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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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ZURICH, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


t v.» 

■ % I 


Kohl Urges Allies 
Fo Develop Joint 
Star Wars’ Policy 


i»;ci 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Part Service 

BONN — Chancdlor Helmut 
“7 ;- S -oh] of West Germany urged the 
. -o aropean allies of the United 
' ' " .-. ates on Wednesday to devde^j a 
~ ''Vint approach to President Ronald J“V Iac *f r 
‘ - Strategic Defense Initia- backlothe 

i ve so that they might mfhience 
..... ' ture decisions on its posable de- 

'v^T l ’0 J ^“ effort to rcccmdle differ- 
^ .-ices across Western Europe, as 
:;.dl as in iris own 


•'V>. 


.‘T.^i^xul the program, 

. ..7 : du h was essential to leave open 

. iy conurntment to bojld a space- 
y y -?vViased missile defense system to 
" l !e ;.Vihance projects for eany agree- 
" - Veits at the Gtaieva asms talks 

. tat would involve deep cots in 
-.. - rategic and medhnn-raiige nucle- 
“ weapons. 

- - j/f ftiii. Mr. Kohl stressed that if the Ge- 

- ^ 7 l ‘- ;, ^va negotiations succeeded in 
. r ating mastic bilateral cots in of- 

- * t^iavenodear arms, the 

- •* s ^. space-based systems 


ceed with a $26-b0Bon research 
program into space-based defense 
over the next five years has evoked 
mixed emotions in Europe. 

While acknowledging that the 
“star wars” project was probably a 
key factor m bringing Moscow 
atm; talks, the Europe- 
an allies fear that the program 
might develop such momentum 
that anti-missile technology could 
be deployed that would undercut 
Western deterrent strategy. 

Allied leaders have largely sup- 
ported U.S. research to counter the 
Soviet Union’s space-defense ex- 
periments but they also have 
warned that an uncontrolled spiral 
in offensive and defensive weapons 
systems could jeopardize the North 
Atlantic IVcaty Organization's co- 
hesion as well as their own national 
interests. 

Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher. echoing reservations 
voiced by bis British counterpart. 
Sir Geoffrey Howe last week, 
warned Monday that die U.S. and 



Peres Eases Opposition 
To U.S. -Arab Peace Talks 


the belligerence of Syria, Iran and 
Libya, be said, “Inis is a more 
moderate bloc” 

Mr. Mubarak and King Hussein 
of Jordan visited the Iraqi leader, 
Saddam Hussein, on Monday, dur- 
ing one of tbe fiercest battles erf the 
four-and-a-half-year war between 
Iran and Iraq. 

Foreign Minister Yitzhak Sha- 
mir of Israel, leadiy of the rightist 
Likud bloc, said the three leaders’ 

direct bearing on theprospects for 
peace in the Middle East. “Only 


fa to n AIwrtta i — tab to 

President Reagan draws a smOe to show his happiness with the Senate’s MX nrissOe vote. 


| Senate’s Vote on MX: More a Display 

n’sQout 



,*r *jj- jmin dc to advocate that theEuro- 
’""ici -cans develop a joint position and 
f -iat il»»y hring this to bear with our 
: ‘ Ct^merican allies.” 

.‘ W'nsj .The UJS. determination to pro- 


lowed to endanger the highly moral 
goal” of deterrence, Mr. Genscher 
said. “Every new development 
must therefore be examined to see 

(CouthHKd on Page 2, CoL 1) 


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■ .* ■» NT 


Reagan Chooses Brock 
As Secretary of Labor 


The Associated Bros 

• . -'^WASHINGTON — Presidcni 
~ •wM Reagan said Wednesday 
T nonrinate waiiam R 


^the 


IMnniVi 



lus sperial trade lepresenifr- 
_i^e, to repike Raymond J. Dono- 
•^\ 3 jn as secretary of labor. 

P resident Reagan called Mr. 
: rnxjock^onr tap choke from a blue- 
■ it r Aon hst of candidates” for the 
_! tl'jsL Th£ nomination requires Seo- 
. . 7e confirmation. 


ffn«H Tjm«» a, Kirkland, the AFL- 
CIO president, to inform him. 

While acknowledging that there 
bad been “some very difficult 
times” between the a dm i n is tra tion 
and organized labor, Mr. Brock de- 
scribed Mr. Kirkland as “an old 
friend” and predicted that they 
would be able to work together. 

Mr. Kiridand said: “The AFL- 

ao welcomes the nomination of 
KB Brock to be secretary of labor. 
We have worked with him in many 
areas over theyears. While ^ we have 


By Hedrick Smith 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The latest 
round of the seemingly endless 
American political cnnfrrmtaftonc 
over the MX missile kindled little 
pablic controversy in the United 

MVSAMH • 


the Reagan administration 
wanted to impress a wider audience 
in tbe Soviet Union and Western 


* vMr. Donovan, who Bad been on j ^ 

WMiiKifetodiainHnni^jand “ , £ hi"^mcd 

, jx«y Md tnmddu^ ioiptri look fomard , 

- jday after a New Yodt Supreme ■ — L -_ 


new arid constructive relationship 
with the Labor Department.” 

Asked about mending relations 
with American labor unions, few of 
which supported Mr. Reagan’s re- 
election hid, Mr. Brock said: “We 
had some very difficult times. We 
have a lot of communicating to 
do." 

Mr. Brock said his top priority 
would be creating as many new 
President Reagan, referring to jobs as possible, 
f nnor f^fatywis thq< hit u dmnris - I don t .even know what the 

W has bad with organized la- budget of the department is. I have 

a lot to learn,” he added. 


_ wit judge refused to overturn tbe 
^r&tmenl and ordered him to 
V •• Knd triaL 

y/'- Mr. Brock, adted Wednesday 
■ -out reports that he had been re- 
. -riant to take the new post, re- 
^^jnded: “You just can’t bdieve 
, - .’aythmg you read, can you?” He 
. -Hal the post “a ehallmg e that is 
possible to resist." 


j Tuesdays solid 55-to45 
vote in favor of the intercontinental 
midear missile probably has more 
significance for the public diplo- 
macy surrounding the arms talks in 
Geneva than as a demonstration of 
Pr esident Ronald Reagan’s legjsla- 
tive influence on othw issues a of 
Senate confidence in the missile 1 
itself. 

Id his final appeal for support, 
tbcSenate majority leader, Robert 
J. Dole; Republican of Kansas, 
conceded that the MX, which 
stands for missile experimental, 
“may not be a perfect weapon sys- 
tem,” but he sard voting for it “will 
make the job easier” for American 
aims negotiators. 

A defeat Tuesday, after earlier 
congressional votes in favor of 
farm credit legislation that Presi- 
dent Reagan had opposed, would 
probably have raised some talk 
abort his “lame dock” difficulty in 
con trolling Senate Republicans. 

In tbe short ran, the ease with 
which the president and the Senate 


Republican leadership withstood 
eight Republican drfections and 

rolled Up a ™>h1e marg in of v)C-* 
tory, after a tight 49-to-4S vote for 
the MX last June, gave the admin- 
istration a psychological edge for a 
seennti Senate vote on Wednesday 
and two MX missile votes in the 
House of Representatives next 
week. 

But Alan Ganstou, the Senate 
D emocrati c whip, contended that 
this victory would have little spill- 
over effect on forthcoming battles 
over Mr. Reagan’s military budget 
for next year or his desire to over- 
haul the tax system. Senior White 
House officials agreed with that 
assessment 

“Each of these battles has to be 
fought pretty much on its own,” 

Panel Recommends 
House Reject MX Funds 

The Associated Press 

• WASHINGTON The House 
A p prop ria tions Committee voted 
Wednesday to recommend a halt to 
more spending on the MX ndssDe. 
The28-to-26 vote sets the stage for 
a lengthy battle next week on the 
House floor. 

The House is to vote first on 
authorizing and then appropriating 
$li Whoa in this fiscal year to 
budd 21 of the 10-warhead inter- 
continental misriks. The Senate, 
which authorized tbe funds on 
Tuesday, was expected to vote its 
1 a second time on Wednes- 
ay. 


said one presidential adviser. 
“You’ve gpt to start over again with 
each issue, putting together your 


Specifically, Democrats like Sam 
Nunn of Georgia and Albert Gore 
Jr. of Tennessee, who backed Mr. 
Reagan on Tuesday in voting to 
authorize 21 MX missHe* for this 
year, warned that they would op- 
pose his pending request for 48 
more MX missiles in the 1986 bud- 
get Republicans like Daniel J. Ev- 
ans of Washington and Charles 
McC. Mathias Jr. of Maryland 
have issued similar though less pre- 
cise w arning s. 

“I think it is enormously impor- 
tant, in the fiscal year 1986 ^Der- 
ations on tbe budget and the MX, 
that we look at dramatically slow- 
ing down the production Dire,’' Mr. 
Nunn declared in Monday’s de- 
bate. “I can say without any doubt 
that 1 win not vote for 48. 1 will not 
vote for any number approaching 


Reuters 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shhnoa Peres of Israel has 
dropped his opposition to prelimi- 
nary Mi d dle East peace talks be- 
tween tbe United States and an 
Arab delegation that would ex- 
dude Israel, his spokesman said 
Wednesday. 

The spokesman, Baruch As- 
kerov, said that Mr. Peres would 
approve of such a meeting on the 
condition iM direct Axab-IsraeSi 
talks followed. 

Israel and the United States ini- 
tially rejected a proposal last 
mouth by President Hosni Mu- 
barak off Egypt that the Reagan 
administration fiftgnri**** with a 
ft mhuam-Palcsriman delegation. 

“The idea of a preliminary meet- 
ing is not our fust dunce,” Mr. 

Askerov said. “We prefer direct ne- 
gotiations. but we can accept the 
principle of it if it is linked to a 
meeting with Israel.” 

The statement was the strongest 
signal yet that Israel would support 
Mr. Mubarak’s peace efforts. 

The U.S. State Department said 
Monday i i was considering the pos- 
sibility of talking with a Jordaman- 
- Palestinian team without the Pal- 
estine Liberation Or ganizati on if 
that led to direct talks with Israel 

An official source said that Israel brndo-lrith basuthe 
might accept Pales t i nian s hi tbe 'Tuesday that Iran sent 30,000 to 

50,000 soldiers and poorly trained 
“volunteers” across the border and 
that most of them were killed, 
wounded or captured in an Iraqi 
counterattack 

“I don’t think the Iranians know 
how many people they have lost,” a 


talks with Israel can have meaning 
for the peace process,” he said. 

.■ Qadhafi Cautions Arabs 

Colonel Moamer Qadhafi of 
Libya was quoted Wednesday as 
threatening a “terrorist” campaign 
against pro- American Arab states, 
and wishing he could behead their 
leaders one by one, The Associated 
Press reported from Beirut. 

The Libyan leader was quoted as 
saying that if Arab rulers friendly 
to the United States did not reject 
UB. control, he would “deter such 
weakness.” 


U.S. Analysts Say Iran 
Suffered Major Defeat 


By Bernard Gwcrtzman 

New i’offc Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Iran ap- 
pears to have suffered a crushing 
defeat in a weeklong offensive 
aimed at ending its m&tary stale- 
mate with Iraq, senior Reagan ad- 
ministration officials say. 

In their assessment of the fight- 
ing in southeastern Iraq, along the 
le officials said 


Jordanian delegation if they were 
not known members of the PLO. 


“We make a point of saying . 

said : 


no 

PLO. bnt we have never said no 
Palestinians,” one source said. “We 
don’t want to dose off any oppor- 
tunities but we Biro don’t want to 
talk out lend about sensitive sub- 
jects.” 

Israel and tbe United States re- 
ject contact with the PLO until it 
renounces violence and recognizes 
Israel’s right to exist. 

Mr. Pere s’s aides said ihai such 
objections still held but that he did 
not want to reject the idea of a 


Report Sees 
Sabotage in 

nor want to reject me toea oi a Tji i t 1 

prdimmaiy session if it could bring nh fipfll I i ^K 


ties to vote on the MX missiles, one 
now and another probably in mid- 
summer, some Democrats and 
moderate Republicans saw an op- 
portunity to straddle both sides of 
the issue by voting with the admin- 
istration now and against it later. 

But the White House, operating 
like a winning college basketball 
coach who builds up the reputation 
of less powerful opponents, played 
up Turaday’s vote m advance as a 
tight “make-or-break” battle, in an 
apparent effort to brighten the dra- 

(Cootinned on Page 2, CoL 3) 


The newspaper Ha'aretz said 
that Mr. Peres had told Washing- 
ton he consented to snch a meeting 
and was awaiting Jordan's re- 
sponse. Jordan mwsts that the 
PLO, which it has recognized as the 
sole legitimate representative of the 
Palestinians, must lie included m 
any negotiations. 

■ Peres Welcomes Arab Talks 

Mr. Peres welcomed talks this 
week in Baghdad among the lead- 
ers of what he called the “more 
moderate” Arab bloc of Egypt, Jor- 
dan and Iraq, United Press Inter- 
national reported from Jerusalem. 

“I hope that not only will such a 
bloc be established, but that it will 


Compiled bf On Staff From Dispatches 

DANBURY, Connecticut — 
The rhaTT man of Union Carbide 
Corp., Warren M. Anderson, said 
Wednesday that sabotage could 
□ot be ruled oat in the huge gas 
leak at the company’s plant in Bho- 
pal, India, that killed more than 
2,000 people in December. 

Announcing tbe findings of the 
company’s investigation into die 
tragedy, he said it was unUkdy that 
the primary cause of the leak — 
water introduced into a storage 
tank containing a dangerous chem- 
ical — was an accident 

Mr. Anderson said the amount 
of water in the tank, estimated at 


senior official said, “but it is in the 
u»pc of thousands, we think.” 

Administration officials said 
they based thdr assessment on sev- 
eral factors', intelligence gathered 
by Western countries, presumably 
through various electronic means: 
reports from Western observers, in- 
cluding journalists, who visited the 
battle area in recent days; dose 
analysis of statements made by 
Iraq and Iran, and information 
gleaned by U.S. and other Western 
diplomats in Baghdad and by 
Western diplomats in Tehran, 
where there is no U.S. mission. 

As recently as Monday, U.S. of- 
ficials were saying that the fighting 
was indecisive, but on Tuesday, se- 
nior officials were firm in asserting 
that they had no doubt that the 
Iraqis had decisively defeated the 
Iranians in the latest conflict 

In what adminis tration officials 
regard as a desperation move, the 
Iranians also launched a few Sovi- 
et-made surface-to-surface missiles 
against Baghdad, the Iraqi capital, 
and at least two were believed to 
have exploded in the city. The mis- 
siles, known as Scuds, date from 
the 1950s. They are cumbersome 
battlefield weapons fired from a 
tractor-like vehicle and are very in- 
accurate at the 150-mile distance 
from Iran’s frontier to Baghdad. 

The missile has been supplied to 
Warsaw Pact nations and to Egypt, 
Syria, Libya and Iraq. It can carry 
both nuclear and conventional 
warheads, but the Soviet Union is 
not known to have ever allowed its 
nndear weapons out of its control. 

UB. intelligence officials assume 
that Libya sold the misales to Iran, 
one official said. 

“The question we’re all looking 
at,” one senior official said, “is 
whether the size of the defeat will 
finally convince Khomeini to end 


also basicalty^^nn Egypt’s po- ab< J lt ^ 240 gallons (about 450 tbe war.” He added that there had 
Ucy m the direction of peace, Mr. to 900 literal. “wSd have taken 15 bee 


Peres said on television Tuesday. 
As compared with what he called 


f&r, said of Mr. Brock: “Anyone 
Qlpo’s spent four years in inlenu- 
val trade negotiations can negp- 
^.^ctc ahnost anything.” 

.Even before Mr. Reagan an- 
ffneed the decision, Mr. Brock 




«<M t 


lU-lfe! 






; -j 


^ Dollar Falls in Europe 
As Price of Gold Rises 

. The Associated Press 

LONDON — The U.S. dol- 
fin«h*d lower Wednesday 
most major currencies 
a volatile bout ot trading 
o London, while gold prices 
i “ ^ swung widely but finUhed high- 

''Uttin Europe. 

i-f*. / In Zurich, bullion soared to 
"VG49_50 a troy ounce at nnd- 
i^V'aeciioa, then reversed course to 
: rinse at $320.50 compared with 
J-i: a dosing price of $317 JO on 
■ ,‘Ibesday^Details, Page 11. 




The nomination of die fanner 
Tennessee senator is expected to 
win quick Senate confirmation. 

Mr. Brock, 54, heir to the Brock 
candy manufacturing fortune, first 
came to Wasbhigton politics in 
1962, when he was elected to Con- 
gress from Chattanooga, Tennes- 
see. He was the first Republican to 
represent that city in the Hoase in 
42years. 

Mr. Brock served four teams in 
tbe House and was elected to the 
U5. Senate in 1970. He was only 
the second Republican elected to 
the Senate from Tennessee by pop- 
ular vote. 

He was defeated far re-election 
six years later by James Sasser, a 

Democratic lawyer frtHn Nashville. 

‘ Mr. Brock then became chair- 
man of the Republican National 
Committee, a pofitkmbehdd until 
Mr. Reagan, chose Imn for the trade 

job. 


Belgian Lower House Backs Missile Deployment 


United Press Imenutmal 
BRUSSELS — The Belgian gov- 
ernment won a iMtafidenee motion 
in the lower house of parihunent chi 
W ednesday, surmounting opposi- 
tion criticism of its dedsksi to per- 
mit die installation of U.S- cruise 
missiles in Belgium. 

The 212r member Chamber of 
Representatives voted shortly be- 
fore dawn at the end of a 15-hour 
debate, endorsing the coalition 
cabinet with a 116 to 93 vote. One; 
member and two were 

absent, 


of bellicose men,” Prime 
Wdfried Martens told the dumber 
in a final plea. “It was a difficult 


decision, but it was essential for the 
frftiannr and for OUT COOntiy.” 

Mr. Martens heads a four-party, 
center-tidi coalition. Belgium is 
the fonrth^ West European country, 
after ft pmin, West Germany and 
Italy, to deploy U.S. missiles. Tbe 
Netheriands has said that it will 
make a final decision on deploy- 
ment on Nov. 1. 

Belgium is s cheduled to deploy 
48 cruise w««nes under a 1979 
agreement among the 16 North At- 

states. arrived 

at die Florennes air farce base on' 
Friday, just one day after the gov- 
ernment agreed to accept rbww 

Mr. Martens argued that the 
NATO decision to deploy a total of 


to 900 liters), “would have taken 
to 20 minutes to get there.” 

But he added that even if sabo- 
tage bad occurred, a runaway 
chemi cal reaction could have been 
controlled had .not the plant man- 
agement deliberately ignored stan- 
dard safely and operating proce- 
dures. 

Mr. Anderson said the plant was 
in »» cb a state that it sh oul d not 
have been operating Dec. 3 when 
41 tons of deadly methyl isocya- 
nate gas leaked from the tank md 
spread over BhopaL 
The leak also injured 200,000 
people. 

Mr. Anderson blamed the 
plant’s operators for the leak. 

SSx members of Union Carbide, 
Ltd, India, who worked at the 

now had more than 400 55-20 mis- given away jnnstiiction over a seo- crimhial m * B " 

ales aimed at Western Europe, tion of theFloiennes base, 40 miles t Un ion r^bide is bemn sued for 
each with three warheads, while the ^ kilom^) aomh of &ussds. taSnnection 

-2 and cruise missiles so The area where the missiles are 


572 Pershing-2 and cruise missiles 
in Western Europe could be re- 
versed if an agreement was readied 
during UB.-Soviet talks cm inter- 
mediate-range unclear weapons in 
Geneva. “Our decision, to deploy 
has no aggressive nature,” he said 

Foreign Minister Leo Unde- 
mans said earlier that -smaller 
NATO countries would have un- 
dercut their jnftngnce in tbe alli- 
ance if they had refused to take 
part in the deployment. 

He said that the Soviet Union 
now had more than 400 SS-20 mis- 


Westem strategists generally do 
not coant French and British mis- 
siles aimed at the Soviet Union 
when calculating the balance erf nu- 
clear forces, although Moscow in- 
sists they be included. 

Tbe sharpest attacks in the de- 
bate Wednesday came from flic op- 
position Socialist Party. Louis Tob- 
back, the floor leader of the 
Socialists’ Flemish facticHJ, charged 
tb»t tbe government bad “acted as 
a vassal of the United States.” 

He said tbe cabinet had even 
jurisdiction over a sec- 



by NATO carry a to- 
109 warheads. 


stored is being manned by UB. 
Army personnel 




•il * 


■* 


^The Longest Tunnel in the World 

.^Japanese Engineering Feat b Called a e White Elephant’ 




JfNO' 


By Clyde Haberman 

;• New York Tunes Service 

“ (i : rOSHIOKA, Japan — Modi of Satoshi Maruya- 
?s fife is spent oeueath die floor of the railing 
i.^. agara Strait 

<*• 5y vocation, Mr Maruyama is a civil engineer, but 
* M ter w a ie r n»w«ri man ” describes Ms occupa t i o n 






.*»**- - 


■**. 


V-rc accurately these days. He talks with i 
:- c ' fc about the 33.5-mfle (54 Iritomeiet) Srikan Tun- 

h ‘ j eftnn^fmg tlm mum Japanese island of Honriin to 

, ryettow-draped northern »ri«nd of Hokkaido, 
v V' t is, by far, tbe world’s longest, and it Was Mr. 

. • mum. .a*. ...J i A mwuIcnI fJw rilfnM 


lK** a 




- ;'-;4e ooiter a week ago when laborers . 

V W8& a layer of soft black dirt to join tunnd . 

- "ions that had been dug bran both ends. The nd. “The Tsugaru Strait has been a 


that will use H, Japan National Railways. “White 
ele phant” has become a favorite newspaper teem. 

when work began is 1964, Japan’s economy was 
leapfrogging ahead and anything seemed possible. 
Now, for the national railroad, almost everything 
seems implaufibk. 

Party plans called for high-speed “ballet trains” to 
ran on timnd tracks, creating a direct route from 
Tokyo to Sapporo, the capital of Hokkaido. For 
sparsely populated, somewhat neglected Hokk a id o, 
tte psychological benefits were almost as important as 

the economic. 

“We’ve been forced into isolation in terms of educa- 
tion, culture and economy.” said Hiroshi Kawata, 
president of the rhamb w of Cnmmem and Industry 
in Hakodate, the largest Hokkaido city near the tan- 

wall 


.-it* 


S; * 


WO 1, 


'tes sent up a chorus of “Banzai!” 

» l was so excited, ] couldn’t sleep weD the 
* . * .we,” Mr. Maruyama said. “I really felt that we 
‘ ^waphshed something." 

' -> „- : is footings were shared by thousands ofc oH e ^u es 


mg us from the rest of the country, 
through the wan.” 


tunnd 


more 




i'-V 




•si 






they bad to return to a doubt-ndden reality: 
s’f that they have spent the last 21 years J 
■' .« the Tsngaru Strait, what will become 

*'■' ’j' * Ink: the Seikan Tunnd.. 

ViVunder, it also serves as . 

overruns, construction delays and grandiose 

** '' ^uandafiy, it has proved to be a disaster for the 
,y ’ey that built it, the Japan Railways Construction 
• -|c Corporation, and /or tbe bureaucratic cousin 


than 16 hours, induding a frair-and-a-half-hour ferry 
trip araoss the strait to Hakodate from Aomori, on 
Honshu. ^ That is, 4f the feny is nmning. Rough weath- 
er forces shutdowns an average of 80 days a year, the 
operators not being eager for a repetition of a 1954 
ofum acddeaiin which more than 1,100 people drowned. 

The bullet train was seen as an obvious solution. 



_ j of poor management. 

The timnri gridg, the railroad loses money at the 
rate of $1 nnHkm every hour, and the completed 

(Contained on Page 4, CoL 7) 



Workers at tbe center of Seikan Tamel, which 
will consect the Japanese islands of Honshu 
ami Hokkaido by ra!L Tbe tunnel under the 
Tsngaru Strait Is the world’s longest 


with the leak. 

The company report mD to be 
given to the UB. Environmental 
Protection Agency and to state 
agencies investigating safety at 
Union Carbide’s Institute, West 
Virginia, plaiU- 

The agency and Congress have 
been critical of Union Carbide’s 
record-keeping on the release of 
less dangerous gas at its Institute 
plant, especially after people in a 
shopping center were overcome by 
fumes from another planL 

Mr. Anderson said India’s Cen- 
tral Bureau of Investigation and 
the state of Madhya Pradesh in 
which Bhopal is looted wiD issue 
their own reports. 

(Reuters, AP) 


been no sign from Tehran that the 
I ranian leader. Ayatollah RuhoDah 
Khomeini, was ready to seek a ne- 
gotiated peace. 

U.S. analysts say the Iranians, 
who lad been building up for the 
offensive for months, attacked 
through tbe Huwaizah marshes. 
The thrust of tbe assault came from 
the east of A1 Amarah and A1 Qur- 
nah, towns an the Tigris River 
north of Basra. The Basra to Bagh- 
dad highway, a militarily signifi- 
cant nortlhsouth road, also goes 
through those towns. 

U.S. officials say the Iranian 
Army intended to cut the road and 
isolate Basra to the south. That 
would have beat a major victory 
for the Iranians, who apparently 
hoped it would break the Iraqi re- 
solve and lead to the resignation of 
President Hussein. Iran 

has marie his r emo val a condition 
of ending the war. 

In the initial phase of the latest 
attack, Mardi 1 1 to 14, the Iranians 
were believed to have fought their 
way to the eastern banks of the 
Tigris, and in some places actually 
crossed it and set up positions at 
tbe road. 

U.S. analysts said the Iraqis, who 
had been expecting tbe attaik, had 
buflt up a wdl-en trenched defense 
with artillery and tanks and used 
Soviet-made helicopter gunsbips 
and fighter planes effectively. 

Another official said the battle 
“was a classic example" of a wdl- 
trained and well-supplied army 
prevailing over thousands of infan- 
try troops lacking artillery and air 
support. He said the Iraqi defense 
was patterned on Soviet tactics, 

(Continued on Plage 2, CoL 5) 


INSIDE 

■ President Alfousin of Argentina urged nonintervention by all 

outride powers in Central America. Page 3. 

■ The CIA has proposed a law that would make il a crime for 

government employees to disclose national secrets. Page 4. 

■ Pravda reminded Soviet officials, workers and managers of the need 

for discipline. Page 5. 

■NATO envoys said a Reagan-Gorbachev meeting was likely in 
Helsinki in August 


■ Rain In EOiopia has raised hopes for some relief of the drought 

there. . . . Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Legfrlatioa was signed to allow 69 dosed Ohio savings and loan 

associations to reopen. Page 11. 

■ A new space race is evolving for the lucrative “made-in -space" 

market. Page 11. 


iv*- 


** > 


. «« 


** 




; rrairs , isi 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 



Significance of MX Vote 

o 

Is limited to Diplomacy 


Helmut Kohl adknowledgiiig applause at party meeting. 


Kohl Urges U.S. Allies 
To Unite on * Star Wars 9 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ma and significance of the victory. 

Privately, however, Donald T. 
Regan, the White House chief of 
staff, was reported to have told 
friends outside of government last 
week that he expected the president 
to win the MX votes in the Senate 
and was frankly hoping fra “a big 
win” to show political muscle to 
members of Congress and also to 
the Russians. 

Moreover, the White House de- 
cision to have Mr. Reagan put his 
personal prestige on the Ime by 
lobbying the Senate on Tuesday 
indicated that his advisers felt vic- 
was in hand. White House 
do not lightly expose Mr. 


superpowers toward hair-trigger 
policies of “prompt launch” under 
attack. They presented its mam 
merit as putting some pressure on 
Soviet negotiators to bargain more 
flexibly. 

Fra just as Western statesmen 

sure of then^^^^leuier, Mik- 
hail S_ Gorbachev, so the White 
House has deliberately cast the cur- 
rent battle over the MX as a test of 
American strength and resolve. 


an 


U.S. Group Starts 
Anti-Deficit Drive 


(Continued from Page I) 
whether it brings ns closer to the 
goal of preventing war." 

Despite official denials of a rift 
between Mr. Kohl and Mr. 
Gcnscher on the potential reper- 
cussions of the space system, the 
chancellor appears to have adopted 
a more optimistic perspective to- 
ward the project. He has endorsed 
research into space-based defense 
bat wants the European allies to 
share in the economic and techno- 
logical spin-offs that emerge from 
the U.S. program, according to his 
aides. 


Top Leather Fashion 

European export prices 



Marie-Martine 


50, Fbg. Saint-Honore. 
Paris 8th. TeL: (1)265.6822. 


Senior chancellery officials said 
that Mr. Kohl's call for a concerted 
European approach toward the 
Strategic Defense Initiative reflect- 
ed his conviction that the allies 
would gain a greater voice in ulti- 
mate decisions on deploying space- 
- based systems if they became ac- 
tively involved in the research 
phase of the project 

West Gorman officials also have 
argued that, sinr*» the Reagan ad- 
ministration appears determined to 

Grammy should srekPecononric 
benefits by proposing its own con- 
tributions to the project. 

Such tasks migh t indude ad- 
vanced research in optic lasers, 
space sensors and other fields that 
would bolster Europe’s high-tech- 
nology industries. 

Mr. Kohl also believes, a senior 
adviser said, that the Geneva talks 
will secure deep cuts in the super- 
powers’ nuclear arsenals only if 
Moscow is prodded toward an 
agreement by the risk that the Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative will yield 
huge technological advantages for 
the West. 

The chancellor appealed 
Wednesday fra both the United 
States and the Soviet Union to 
charms their mutual research ef- 


Reagan to the nsk of a personal 
rebuff if they see any serious risk of 
defeat. 

“AD of this may be show busi- 
ness,” commented Senator Paul S. 
Sarbanes, a Maryland Democrat 
who has opposed the missile. “It 
makes ir look like the president has 
made a big difference/’ 

Few senators, however, disputed 
that heavy personal lobbying for 
the mi-^ by the president and the 
American arms negotiators in Ge- 
neva bdped swing key votes in the 
past week. 

The Pentagon has sought to por- 
tray the multiple-warhead missile, 
the lar ges t land-based missile in the 
U.S. arsenal, as an important coun- 
terweight to Soviet heavy missiles. 

But many of those who voted for 
the MX on Tuesday, like Senator 
Nunn, warned that it was a vulner- 
able missile that would move both 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A group 


Doctor Says Reagan Has 
A Second Hearing Aid 


forts into anti- missil e systems to 
lead to cooperative agreements that 
would strengthen the 1972 Anti- 
Ballistic Missile Treaty and fore- 
stall an arms race in space. 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, who has worn a 
bearing aid in his right ear for the 
last 18 mnnrh^ has begun nsing a 
similar device in his left ear^to 
achieve balance,” the White House 
physician, T. Burton Smith, said 
Wednesday. 

The second hearing aid first be- 
came evident at a White House 
state dinner Tuesday night for 
President Raul Alfondn of Argen- 
tina. It is similar in siyi» and design 
to the sophisticated corrective de- 
vice prescribed for Mr. Rea gan af- 
ter an Aug. 22, 1983, e xamina tion 
in Los Angeles. 


representing 200 of the nations 
largest corporations have krmched 
a millk m-dollar effort to pressure 
Congress and the White House to 
get moving on reducing U.S. bud- 
get deficits. 

“We want our political leaders to 
know there are mflfions of people 
out there who are disturbed about 
these deficits, who want something 
done about it and want it done 
now,” said Robert A. Beck, chair- 
man of the Prudential Insu rance 
Co. of America and chairman of 
the Business Roundtable, com- 
prised of top executives of the na- 
tion’s largest, corporations. 

The member' corporations will 
provide the starting point for the 
campaign. Mr. Beck said Tuesday 
that die gr ou p plans to spend about 
$1 million to spread tl 
through brochures, company . 
cations, speeches awl letters to con 
gressmea. The symbol of the cam- 
paign is an octagonal stop sign with 
a raised hand and the slogan: “Halt 
The Deficit. Write Now 1 . 




ilt-l’em 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Vie tnam Hands Over Remains to U.S 

HANOI (WP) —-Vietnam turned over Wednesday to US ftffirUi. .l j '* 





I f p; | ' 


’■ t’ 


IOI(WP) — Vietnam tuned over Wednesday to U.S. officials ifc* ’ . 
remains of five persons believed to be U.S. servicemen missing in aetki • i 1 1 

during the Vietnam War. : y l 

The remains were handed aver at Hanoi's Gin Lam Airport to a IP 
team led by Colonel Joe Harvey, the head of the Joint Casualty Reoh 
non Center based in Hawaii Tee remains are to be flown to Hawaii fi 

irienrifi carin n. 

There are indications that Vietnam wants to improve ties with tl 
United States and hopes that the 10th anniversary of the C omaa nj 
victory over Smith Vietnam next month wfll mark a new chapter ; 
relations between the two countries. However, a UiS. request to partk 
pate in the excavation of U.S. warplane crash sites in Vietnam has bet 
turned down. Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Tbach said Tuesday. 


Jhtit 


Perle Takes Issue With Britain’s How 


LONDON (AP) — Richard N. Perle, the U.S. assistant sjwwaty { 
defense, has taken sharp issue with a speech by the British Form 
secretary. Sir Geoffrey Howe, that questioned the wisdom of the U- 
Strategic Defense Initiative. 



The offensive was centered between A1 Amarah and Basra. 


anyone who has charted its course.* 

Mr. Perle caustically summed up Sir Geoffrey’s speech Friday to tl 
Royal United Services Institute by saying, “It was a speech that prow 
again an old axiom of geometry, that length is no substitute for depth 
Sr Geoffrey posed 22 questions about President Ronald Reaps 
research program, which seeks to to determine if deployment of a spac 
based military shield against incoming Soviet missiles is possible; 


US. Analysts Say Iran 
Suffered Major Defeat 


Vatican Assails Liberation Theologian 

VATICAN CITY (UPI) — The Vatican accused the Reverend Leona 
do Boff, the Brazilian liberation theologian, on Wednesday of “a pro- 
found misunderstanding" of Catholicism and said that his optima 
“en danger the sound doctrine of the faith.” 

Catriinfl i Joseph Ratzinger, German prefect of the Sacred Congrea 

. • r .< _ *— - _ e aL — <4t'intau i in m 7 I m. 


Tax Leads Israelis 
To Drop Passport 


(Continued from Page 1) 
reihng for weQrentrencbed fire- 
power. 

The Ir anians have not acknowl- 
edged that they suffered any losses, 
!>nd in their commumqu£s they are 
still saying that they are winning. 
Neither Iran nor Iraq releases 
much information about its mili- 
tary operations, and independent 
reports on the battles are not avail- 
able. 

. The Iraqis,, who took foreign 
journalists to the scene of the latest 
fighting, a sser ted that as many as 


100,000 Iranian soldiers were in- 
volved and that about 30,000 were 
killed and the rest wounded. The 
American figures are much more 
conservative. 

■ New Iraqi Attacks 

Iraq launched air raids rat Irani- 


tion for the Doctrine of the Faith, made the charges in an 21-pa; 
“notification” nn i:o,,wr hvtV - Oiiirrh - Chansm and Power " 


on Father Boff s book, “Church: Chansm and Power.' 
Paul II personally approved tire judgment, Cardinal Rs 


Franciscan pnest, wno personauy defended his book at a “brother!; 
meeting with tnc cardinal at the Vatican on Sept. 7. “This is just 
theological pnd moral jud gmen t on the book. No disciplinary action 
involved,” a Vatican spokesman said. 


an dues on Wednesday, The Asso- t _ „ 

dated Press reported. An Iraqi mil- JMeveS HflS ]\eW SllTfferV III Brazil 
itary spokesman, in a statement “ J 

moahored in Nicosia. Cyprus, said 
that Iraq carried out raids on “se- 
lected tar g et s ” in the Iranian does 
of Isfahan, Kermanshah and Bu- 
shire. 


A pence France- Presse 

JERUSALEM — About 3,000 
Israelis resident abroad have for- 
mally renounced their nationality 
to escape the traveler’s tax, the In- 
terior Ministry announced 
Wednesday. 

The travel tax was imposed sev- 
eral months ago as part of an aus- 
terity plan to reshape the Israeli 


Battle Between Army, Militia 
Resumes in South Lebanon 


BRASILIA (AP) — ■ Doctors performed another operation on Pro 
dent-elect Tancredo Neves of Brazil on Wednesday because “his dink 
condition did not change” after emergency abdominal surgery six da 
earlier, the government said. 

A press spokesman said the medical team treating Mr. Neves, 75, ma 
the decision “after new complementary examinations.” Earlier Wednr 
day, the spokesman had described Mr. Neves as being “in a good stale 
general.” . . . ' 

Mr. Neves underwent surgery on Friday for diverticulitis, anintestfr 
ailment, hours before he was to be inaugurated as Brazil's first crviE 
president in more than two decades. Vice President Josfc Samey, who* 
inaugurated, is the acting president. 



For Lite. Acadvntc A W 

may quaWy kx 
BACHELORS MASTER SORpOCTORME 
Send detailed resume 
for ■ free evaluation 
PACIFIC WESTERN UMVERSTTY 
MOD «nn BU bon OU7M36 USA 


economy. An Israeli leaving the 
S150plus 


Train Kills Swedish Jogger 

The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — A young 
woman wearing headphones and a 
portable tape recorder jogged 
across an unguarded railroad cross- 
ing, and was struck and killed by a 
train, police reported Wednesday. 


country must pay a tax of SI! 
a surcharge of 20 percent of - the 
amount of his travel fare and 15 
percent on his foreign currency. K 
Israeli travelers, permitted to 
take out up to $1,000, must also 
pay an additional tax of 20 percent 
an services provided abroad such 
as hotel reservations and car hire 
facilities. 




Reuters 

SIDON, Lebanon — Heavy 
fighting resumed Wednesday be- 
tween the Lebanese Army and 
C hristian militiam en on the out- 


skirts of the southern port ritv of 
three 


A Dozen 



Sidon after efforts to end 
days of clashes failed. 

Security sources said the Chris- 
tian Lebanese Forces militia, winch 
has taken over Sidon’s eastern sub- 
urbs, bad rejected a peace plan, 
brought in reinforcements and 
erected street barricades. 

? A battle erupted just after a 2 
PAL (1200 GMT) deadline for ac- 
cepting the cease-fire plan expired. 

In Beirut, where the cabinet met- 
to discuss the Christian militia re- 
volt against President Amin Ge- 


PStSONALTBES PLUS 
MARY IUMI 
IMTHE WfflCB® SECTION 
OFHBDAVSHT 


mayd, military sources said the 
army was sending reinforcements 
to Sidon. 

The dashes, which began on 
Monday when Christian gunmen 
took over Sidon's eastern suburbs, 
have claimed 10 lives and 47 people 
have been wounded. Red Cross of- 
ficials said. Thousands of Moslems 
fled from the area Tuesday. 

Security sources said that 24 
hours of efforts to restore peace 
failed when the Christian militia 
rejected an army deployment plan 
in the suburbs. Civic leaders and 
Moslem mili tia commanders said 
they still were counting on the 
army to restore wder and to avert a 
broad sectarian conflict. 

In Beirut, Christian rebels led by 
Samir Geagea said they had taken 
“complete control" of the Leba- 
nese Forces in a reshuffle of the 
command structure. 


For die Record 


MBdu3 S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, met Wednesday with Vi 
President Ratil Casuo of Cuba and the two men reaffirmed coopera ti 
between Moscow and Havana, the news agency Tass said. (UI 
The chief executive of the European Community, Jacques Delors 
France, said Wednesday that be expected EC foreign ministers to hold 
unscheduled fifth straight day of talks Thursday in an effort to set 
terms of membership for Spam and Portugal (A 

The c hairm an of the ttmdnnd - Paliflnate state branch of the Ubc 
Free Democratic Party from 1974 to 1981, Hans-Otto Scholl, 51, a 
charged Wednesday with a 2.6-miUion-Deutsche marie (S797 T 500)jewe . 


store robbery in December. Mr. Scholl, held for investigation since Jan- 
tied the 


has denied the charge. (Root 

Six Mexican police officers and a former officer were ordered Tuest— 
to goon trial in the case of Enrique Camarena Salazar, a U.S. drug ag^ 
who was kidnapped and killed. Three of the men were charged w' 5 "'"' 
kidnapping and murder and the other four with drag offenses. (A '-' ■ ■’ 
Norman Snmdera has resigned as chief minister of the Turks 
Caicos Islands following his indictment two weeks ago on drug charge^: ; , r 
the United States, his lawyer said Wednesday in Miami . ,. 

Prime Minister Rgpr Gandhi of India plans to visit troubled Puiy 
state on Saturday, the Press Trust of India said Wednesday, (Reufe., , . .. 
Spring arrived Wednesday al 4: 14 PM. Greenwich Mean Tone. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


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Conflict k AUrPermsive 
% Nicaraguan Daily life 

ffidals Say Struggle Against Rebels 
adennines Economy, Civil liberties 


Page 3 


}!•*«_ t '* J; • • 


By Larry Rohcer 

Sew York Times Service 


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fighting, the increasingly fierce 
? between the Nicaraguan gov- 
. • •oeni and the rebels seeking its 
"throw is the dominant factor in 
•wintry's political and econom- 
'jfe, according to Nicaraguans 
'diplomats hoe. 

■*■*•■. rebels have not been able to 
• - ? s and hold a single Nicaraguan 
‘■'•j. But the bounties economy is 
- jd shape and Sandinist leaders 
■ .f'.ie the guerrillas for thaL They 
r >J;>the rebels' war erf attrition has 
xad the government to take tnea- 
:■ -. . . s restricting dvO liberties in de- 
■ . ■^ ,, e of national security. 

‘ : >.ic restrictions include the renn- 
: _;'.;don of press censorship, which 

« VppUed especially vigorously 
: - i ^-osi the major opposition daily 
‘ ‘“'.ijpaper. La Prensa; the limits 
, ampaigfl activities preceding 
N'rjtl^Ql ydections last November, and 

us is the second of two articles 
Nicaraguan rebels and their 
- •„]>? on the country. 


VS.y -> 

%» ■ • 
»w ■■ 

H i lin. !*»«••■ 


‘ recent orders preventing some 
.'.-r.'sition leaders, such as Arturo 
• : Cniz and Pedro Joaquin Cha- 

: ro, from entering the country, 

wt - . »yond that, the war has taken a 
" - ^tandal human toU According 
: w- -sverameot statistics, more than 
‘ \ '.D people were killed in attacks 

armed counterrevolutionary 
ips” and more than 2.000 
^ . nded fnan 1981 to the end of 

* u - f p rvinju 

Sose figures do not take into 
t ( ; Tcimt casualties among the re- 
and they do not appear to 

- ^.ngnish between casualties 

Dg Nicaraguan Anny oombai- 

- ~ and tbe civilian population. 

the name of tne dead, the 
" ' . ^. ^linist leadership has tailed oa 
opulace to make whatever sac- 
- are necessary to “extermi- 

: : L-i’ the rebels. 

'iveryone to the defense, every- 
> for the war fronts!" is the 
in that appears on walls and 
cards all over Nicaragua, 
ndimst leaders have repeated- 
. ecled negodalions with any of 
' ■'r'cbd groups. When asked this 
• ^ about the prospects for such 

- Vice President Sergio Ra- 

-2 gave a one-word reply: 

’=3er. 

- :: )wever, the Sandimsts have 

talking with Brooklyn Rivera, 

: • -•? - t;of the leaders of the'Miskho 

■ an insm^ncy on the Atlantic 
• "t. Those contacts led to a limit- 

■ -nsoaer exchange last fall and 

continuing in what Western 


diplomats see as an effort to divide 
and weaken the rebel forces. 

The Sandinists have made it 
dear that they see the ultimate so- 
lution to the problem in negotia- 
tions with the United States and 
not in talks with the domestic op- 
position, armed or unarmed. 

President Daniel Ortega Saave- 
dra perhaps expressed the policy 
most bhmtfy during the etert ipp 
campaign last fall when be said, 
“We want to talk with the owner of 
tbe arcus, not the acrobats." 

Among tbe opposition, opinions 
are divided on the effect tbe rebels 
have had on Sanding policy. One 
popular school of thought argues 
that the war has prevented tbe San- 
dirusis from carrying out the radi- 
cal plans they originally had and 
has forced them to present a “plu- 
ralist” image to the rest of the 
world in return for aid. 

“Maybe U.S. support for the 
armed groups has actually helped 
us," said Eduardo Rivas Gastea- 
zero, president of the Democratic 
Coordinator, the mam coalition of 
opposition political and labor 
groups. “We are not in favor of the 
armed struggle, but if it did not 
exist, perhaps the government 
would have already done away with 
the opposition." 

But tbe opposition also believes 
the Sandimsts are using the war 
with the rebels for their own politi- 
cal advantage. The Sandinists, Mr. 
Rivas said. Have seized on the exis- 
tence of the rebels to “discredit and 
intimidate" the legal opposition. 

Thus La Prensa has been dubbed 
La PrenCIA and tbe Roman Cath- 
olic bishops and the Coordinator 
are accused of “playing the CIA’s 
game:" 

Tbe policy of reducing tbe space 
in which the opposition can ma- 
neuver seems to have gained force 
in recent days with the launchingof 
a crusade against Mr. Cruz, the 
former junta member and ambas- 
sador to the United Slates. Mr. 
Cruz, who has emerged as an out- 
spoken critic of the Sandinist gov- 
ernment, was the Coordinator's 
nominee for president in the elec- 
tions last year. 

After signing a declaration in 
San Jos6, Costa Rica, this month 
calling on the Sandinists to agree to 
a “national dialogue" with aO ele- 
ments of the opposition, Mr. Cruz 
was prevented from returning to 
Nicaragua. Mr. Ortega said March 
10 that tbe government now con- 
siders Mr. Cruz to have passed over 
to the counterrevolution. 

To Lino Hemdndez of the Per- 
manent Commission for Human 
Rights, the Sandimsts also have 



AHonsm Asks Restraint in Latin America 


AN* 

meat 


been using the war as a ^pretext” 
for violations of constitutional 
guarantees. But with or without tbe 
rebels and their U.S. support, he 
said, the Sandinists “wul always 
have a motivation" for restricting 
civil liberties. 

Those restrictions, according to 
Mr. HemAndez, indude press cen- 
sorship and limitations on freedom 
of assembly taken in the mnip of 
national security. In addition, he 
said, more than 800 peasants have 
been tried on charg es of aiding or 
collaborating with the rebels by 
“anti-Somoza popular trib unals " 
in which “there are no legal guaran- 
tees.” 

Most Nicaraguan opposition 
leaders and journalists, as well as 
mosr foreign diplomats in Mana- 
gua, tend to agree that the rebd 
threat has stiffened the resolve of 
the Sandinist leaders and made 
them less likely than ever to com- 
promise with their domestic oppo- 
nents. 

The war's effects on the Nicara- 
guan economy may be even more 
far-reaching tnan those in the polit- 
ical sphere. Officially, rebel attacks 
are said to have inflicted about 
S275 million in damage a figure 
that does not take into account the 
shifting of economic resources and 
other indirect consequences of the 
war that are draining tbe economy. 

In their frequent public pro- 
nouncements, Sandinist leaders 
have blamed the rebels for virtually 
all of the country’s economic iHs. 
The rest are attributed to the Rea- 
gan adminis tration’s “blockade” of 
Nicaragua's foreign trade and cred- 
its. 

Although trade between the two 
countries has declined fnan the re- 
cord hirii registered in 1981, the 
United states remains Nicaragua's 
leading trade partner, supplying 
about 20 percent of its imports and 
taking IS percent erf its exports. 


according to U.S. Embassy esti- 
mates. Virtually tbe entire Nicara- 
guan banana crop is sold in the 
United States and large amounts of 
Nicaraguan coffee, cotton, meat 
and shellfish also go to the Ameri- 
can niarkftl 

Opposition economists argne 
that the economic crisis is primarily 
a result of the failure of ihe statist 
policies of the Sandinists and ih^’r 
incompetence as managers. But 
they agree that the war has made 
tbe situation more acute. 

The most severe economic dam- 
age has been to the coffee crop, n ,, , _ t 

which is Nicaragua’s chief foreign- tSOuVUm OOuherS 
exchange earner. Rebel attacks on 

cooperatives and coffee pickers H/ennrtP ^trihdrr* 
during the recent harvest were in- 


‘ By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Rail Alfonsm of Argentina told a 
joint meeting of Congress on 
Wednesday that a solution to the 
conflicts in Central America must 
be based on nonintervention by all 
outside powers and respect by the 
countries of the region for the 
rights of their own people and their 
neighbors. 

In his address, Mr. Alfonsm 
made no mention of U.S. efforts to 
pressure Nicaragua through sup- 
port of the rebels fighting the leftik 
Sandinist government. During wel- 
coming ceremonies for Mr. Afcf on- 
sin at the White House on Tuesday, 
President Ronald Reagan had spo- 
ken of the necessity to curb “The 
Communist tyranny imposed on 
Nicaragua. 7 ’ 

By contrast, Mr. Alfoosin’s re- 
marks Wednesday appeared to 
contain an implied rebuke of what 
many Latin Americans regard as 
excessive U.S. em phasis on military 
solutions in Central America. But 
his words also implied criticism of 
Cuba and the Soviet Union for try- 
ing to sow discord in the region and 
of the Sandimsts fra* faffing to per- 
mit democracy within. Nicaragua. 

Mr. Alfonsm, who became presi- 
dent in 1983 after seven yeans of 
military rule in Argentina, en- 
dorsed the Coniadora negotiations 
on a comprehensive peace agree- 
ment for Central America. 

“My government supports the 


strumeataJ in reducing this year's 
crop, which has been officially esti- 
mated at about 1 10 milli on pounds 
(50 million kilograms) but w hich 
industry sources say may actually 
be as tittle as 80 trillion pounds. 

Other crops grown primarily in 
areas not affected by the fi ghting 
such as cotton, sugar, beans and 
com. also have been affected, al- 
though indirectly. 


. The Associated Press 
LA PAZ — As tanks patrolled 
the streets, soldiers fired shots is 
the air and used tear gas to disperse 
miners and striking workers who 
are trying to topple Bolivia’s presi- 
dent, Heroin Siles 7-tiaro 
The military mobilization oc- 
curred a day after at least 10,000 
miners blocked tbe streets of La 


Paz for seven hours, detonating 
Many young men who ordinarily sticks of dynamite, halting traffic 
would be picking the crops have *nd_forririg businesses to a< 
been drafted into the army and sent 
off to war zones. But according to 
farmers and ranchers, thousands 
more have gone into hiding to 
avoid the draft, adding to the man- 
power problem. 

Industry has been affected, too. 

This month a plywood factory in 
Managua said it was closing be- 
cause it no longer had reliable sup- 
plies of wood, which had been com- 
ing from northern areas where * n. . . p. . . u . . . . 

some of the heaviest fighting has AK ^ fi *"FffStmMi8si5appi 


Jose. 

Tbe strike, now in its 13th day. 
has 1 shut down marry factories and 
mines, intercity transportation, 
long-distance communication and 
public hospitals. Tbe strikers are 
demanding raises and the resigna- 
tion of Mr. SHes Zuazo. who took 
over in October 1982 as the first 
popularly elected president in 18 
years. 


been taking place. 

“It seems as if the contras’ objec- 
tive is to bleed the economy dry," 
said a European diplomat of the 
guerrillas. “And they have been 
very successful at doing thaL" 


The Associated Press 

JACKSON,] 


-Alyce 


j Mississippi- 

Clarke, a Democrat, has become 
the first black woman elected to the 
Mississippi Legislature, winning a 
special ballot Tuesday ni Jacksoa. 


efforts of Coniadora which is the 
appropriate mechanism for finding 
stable solutions Cor the Central 
American countries," he said. The 
search for solutions, be added, 
should be based cm five criteria: 

• “The principle of self-detenni- 
nation as recognized by contempo- 
rary international law freely exer- 
cised through the will of the 
majority." 

• “Tne existence of pluralistic 
democracies throughout the re- 
gion." 

• “The principles of territorial 
integrity and nonintervention 
should be respected and universally 
applied. This means they should 
not be invoked in a one-sided man- 

*i 

OCT. 

•“Specific warranties that the 
countries of the region wfll not 
meddle in the affairs of their neigh- 
bors.”. 

• Eliminati n g “ mili tary mecha- 
nisms" or arms buildups' in coun- 
tries of the area that threaten the 
security of neighboring nations. 

U.S. officials said privately that 
they regarded Mr. AJfonsin’s 
speech as reflecting the attitudes of 
most democratic governments in 
Latin America, and they said it was 
not inconsistent with the Reagan 
administration’s policy toward 
Central America. 

While acknowledging that Mr. 
Alfonsm would not endorse Mr. 
Reagan’s call for supporting the 
Nicaraguan rebels, the officials 
noted that his main points — sup- 
port for the Contadora process, 
democratic pluralism and a halt to 
interference in the hemisphere by 
outside powers — have also been 
advocated frequently by Mr. Rea- 
gan and Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz. 

Mr. Alfonsm also said tfrai the 
problems of Central America and 
tbe wider Latin American region 
stem from “generations of mis- 
rule," political and economic un- 
derdevelopment and the chronic 


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debt problems of countries whose 
economies are based on the pro- 
duction of raw materials. 

He acknowledged that his main 
aim in coming to Washington was 
to seek understanding for Argenti- 
na's snuggle to reduce its annual 
inflation rale of about SOD percent 
and to repay a S48-bQlian foreign 
debt. ■ 

Discontent within Argentina 
over the austerity measures de- 
manded by the International Mon- 
etary Fund has created tensions be- 
tween the Alfonsm government 
and Argentina’s creditors. 


“That is why 1 request a special 
understanding from the senators 
and representatives meeting here 
and from the government of the 
United States," he said. “The prin- 
cipal purpose of mv visit is to em- 
phasize our common interest and 
adherence 10 democracy so that oc- 
casional misunderstandings and 
disagreements will not affect this 
basic facL" 

Only a few dozen erf the 535 
members of Congress attended the 
session in the House of Representa- 
tives chamber. Other seats' were 
taken up by guests. 


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■SSi'aWrS .,^f|gS5??S|3?c , S^S5S?miHlif£;3lf3J:??fmJIS5« 131 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


In Frankfurt 

stay where the business worid stays. 
At the great hotel they know best. 


CIA Proposes a Law to Make 
Disclosing U.S. Secrets a Crime 


HOTEL 

FRANKFURT 

INTERCONTINENTAL 



By Smart Taylor Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —The Central 
Intelligence Agency bas proposed 
to the white House that legislation 
be sought that would make it a 
crime for government employees to 
disclose national secrets without 
authorization, Reagan administra- 
tion officials said. 

The proposed- legislation would 
authorize prosecution of govern- 
ment employees or former employ- 
ees who “wiHfully” disclose “any 
classified information," with cer- 
tain narrow exceptions, to report- 
ers or others outside the govero- 
menL 

The maximum penalty would be 
five years in prison and a $25,000 
fine, the officials said Tuesday. 

Although the Justice Depart- 
ment takes the position that such 
disclosures already violate criminal 
laws barring espionage and theft of 
government property, that inter- 


pretation is m dispute in a pending 
conn case. 

The purpose of the QA proposal 
is apparently to persuade Congress 


Intelligence, the proposal is bong 
reviewed fry the Justice, State. De- 
fense and other departments. No 
decision has been made whether to 


to establish beyond doubt that un- send it to Congress, according to 
authorized disclosures of classified the officials. 


information by government em- 
ployees are crimes. 


Kathy PhersOn. a CIA spokes- 
woman, said the proposal, a copy 


The proposal does not appear to erf which was obtained by The New 
authorize prosecution of journal- York Times, had been de sign a t ed 


ists or others outside the 
meat who publish secrets 


rent- secret by the agency on the ground 
t are that its disclosure while it is still 


disclosed to them. However, it being discussed would be “inap- 


nrighi create a baas for seeking to 
force journalists to disdose their 
sources. 


propriate” and “premature.’' 

George Lauder, chief spokesman 
for the agency, declined to confirm 


The proposal also specifics that a whether the proposal had been 
defendan t could avoid conviction classified or to discoss whether its 


by esta blishing that the infonna- disclosure would be considered a 
lion bad not been obtained through crime under the proposed legisla- 


te defendant’s government ser- 
vice, that it bad already been pit- 


vice, that it had 


Don. 

The proposal for criminal legjs- 




V. Milling 


„/■ M 

U- *9*1 


J. Mi f ft 
r : , V ,M ft 


j -p i 


fished or that it was not “properly lation is one of several steps the 


classified." adminis tration has taken or consid- 

Lnformation is “property dassi- ered to combat disclosures, indud- 
fied," the proposed law stales, if “g a presidential order, late cut 
disclosure Reasonably could be ex- back somewhat, that provided for 


THE ADVANTAGE IS INTERCONTINENTAL 

0 INTER- CONTINENTAL HOTELS 


EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 
NON-RESIDENT1AL 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 

mx fti Uft At tm (Of aanplMQM s toort- 
*r«L lor woriaia profuaoift. 

br te CoWEraia Dtpc*! 


pected to damage the national se- lifelong censorship of petsons who 
^ have held certain official positions 

Sent with the signature of Wil- acd S«aler use of polygraph ma- 


liam J. Casey, director of Central chines, or he detectois, to trace the 
source of disclosures. 


TAIWAN TRIAL — Chen CM- Ji. a reputed gang leader, 
was escorted on Wednesday to tbe Taipei District 
Court, where be faces charges of murdering Henry Lin, 
a Chinese- American journalist, in Daly City, Cafifonua, 
on Oct. 15. Mr. Lin said in court that Vice Admiral 
Wong Shi-Kng, former director of military intelligence, 
ordered the staying, asserting that Mr. Lfti was a spy. 




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For reservations call: London: (01) 491-7181, Paris: (01) 742-07-92. 
Amsterdam: (020) 262021 


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for ADVANCED STUDIES 

CX-J J Pl nf*i«'rnnl “ - » 

ocnooi or rToresuonci rnonogcmgH 
Offica of the Doan, Room HT-1 
lOOGoffiDma, 

Novato, CA 94947. (4151 382-1 60a 


ILS. High Court 
Widens Detention 
Ptnoers of Police 


Most of those measures, like the 


Japanese Tiumel Proves 

sures rather than the journalists -*■ 

«« a A Costly Accomplishment 

TMvfriql mtiner lncr Ti»*^tr fmm Tliriop */ -*■ 


Sftt 

■ . -rf -An* A 


c,, <Usmcl °?“ l r m i SS K l re . ma iJ!; Seflcan Tuand will only expand the - all of them men. supers* 
WASHINGTON The Su- was a enme for officials to give dc fi a - L Cons traction is about a de- haring kept women out — ther 


(Continued from Page 1) 


For thousands of tunnel ha 


preme Court expanded polk* pvw- military secrets to reporters or olh- ^ behind schedule, the S2.S-bil- the added worry of layoffs. M 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


»r ft i . "• «■ _ft j _ . r . * . Lduc uauuu auiumiu un. « 0 .u a vu- 

ere Wednesday to stop and hold a ers without authorization. y ricc * more than three were recruited from (his village ; 

su^ect without arresting him. say- Rqectmg a motion to dimuss a ^e/theorinnal estimate and reg- neighboring towns on Hokkim 

mg there are no absolute time Urn- cnmmal prosecution. Judge Young ^ train semce to Hokkaido. ex~ ' 

its on such detentions. adopted the Justice Departments . n igoo _ sure 

Th. 7 Jl n.Iino orntt-n hv rhirf n.rh umUte l ** 11 * 5 De S m m “ a 3 Ure 


its on snch detentions. adopted the Justice Department's 

The 7-2 ruling written by Chief view that such disdosures violate 


Justice Warren E Burger was an- the general, broadly worded crimi- 
other in the court’s continuing ef- nal laws barring espionage and 


money loser. 


Domestic air travel in Japan bas 
own spectacularly, with iwo- 


The Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of 
Commerce (LC.C.), Paris, the world's most widely used arbitra- 
tion centre is seeking a 

LEGAL COUNSEL 

to join the Court’s Secretariat 


forts to resolve conflicis between theft of government property. of^tfSon passed 

the nghts of utge ns an d police That interpretation has long who travel between Honshu and 
needs to question cnmm al su s- disputed by dvfl libertarians, Hokkaido annually taking planes. 

, D ... journalists and others who say lie railroad estimated this month 

Adopting the K eagan aomnns- Compress intended the estuonase tha* 0 t millinn nassenura a vear 


southern run. The ) 1 are not s 
what they will do in two or ti 
years, when they will have finis 
laying track and electrical lines 


.l*fl €1 4 

- bnili 

i>to# to 

- '--=**1*13 1 pti 

ma fomft 


EUROPEAN FINANCE DIRECTOR 


The new counsel, like the four existing counsel who report to the Coat’s 
Secretary General, will be responsible for the day-today handling of (be 
coses submitted to the Court. He or she will screen requests, communicate 
with parties and their Counsel, pr e s e nt eases to tbe Conn, monitor the 
progress of cases submitted to simtralda anA advise arbitrators and parties 
on Uw Court’s Rules and local procedural law, among other duties. 
Candidates must have a law degree and at least three years experience in a 
domestic lend system as well as in international business law. They must be 
Quart in English and French (written and spoken) and have a good 
knowledge of a third hnpmp-, preferably Arabic. 

Applicants having professional experience in an Arab legal system will be 
favoured. 

The post should be filled by May 20. 

Plaate tend your application and C.V. under confidential cover 
not later than 20 April 1985 to: 

Under of Nreotuial 

In tom ofiond Chamber of Commerce (LCC) 

KsKsi &sn£-"' 

RANGE 


American Fortune 500 Company Is seeking a qualified and 
seasoned Manager for the position of European Finance 
Director. This a highly visible appointment offering consider- 
able exposure to both US and European Management 


That interpretation has long who travel between Honshu and 
been disputed by civil libertarians, Hokkaido annually taking planes. 


Still, even the skeptics marc 
the engineering accomplishmec "' 
Actually, three Srikan tun 


Hi 


Actually, three beikon tun . R #1 

were dug — the just-compli w *ha I M 

main one. which is 35 feel (IQ j][| [ > RJn 


Based in London and reporting to the Vice Presfaient Europe. I marijuaiu. smuggling convictions 3 ^ 0 ^ by an 


“ _ .... ... ■ r -J- UW W WWWiVJWW W WUU1U Uv UuilCU uuuutu 

couri ruluit, that dismissed the j ssue has never been squarely can- kan Tunnel — roughly one-fifth 

i-mnnntinn rnnw-Tinnc .... - 1 J ivbwmj ‘ 


of two North Carolina men be- 
cause they were held in custody for 


and computerised accounting systems 
Countries. 


Lawyers for Sami* 
iso a, a civilian em 


European I 20 mimites without being arrested, naw who is tbe 
In another case, the court al- ___/ . 


e court the volume forecast 15 years ago. 
Loring Mor- Normal train service through the 
tbe tunnel is expected to lose at least 
t in the $36 million a year, and chat is unre- 


Working experience in the Electronics Industry as well as 
Foreign Currency Management are definite advantages. 


Particular preference will be shown to those candidates who 
are between 40 and 45 years of age. CPA or FC A a plus, but a 
seasoned Manager is more beneficial to our needs. 


, : ~r~° ~ T navy wno is me attendant in me $3b million a year, ana tnai is unre- 

case, say he wffl appeal thejudge’s Uted to the §320 million the na- 
lowed continued use of le^al J convi^ at his trial, set to donal railroad will be required to 

begin July 15. He is chained under pay back each yearto the constmc- 
mouidy Urn the Food an^Drag and theft laws with Sion corporation. - 

Administration!* not feqimed to xml ^tcUigence photo- “When we look back now” the 


main one. which is 35 feet (10 {][i l » * * 

tens) wide, and narrower pilot 1 

service tunnels finished earlier. 0 

Of the total length. 14.5 crj Ijriht U1 
run beneath the Tsugaru Si - 
from Yoshioka to Cape Tappi 
Honshu, at depths of up to 328 
beneath the seabed and 787 
beneath the water surface. 


ill’ 


and who with to be considered should send their dotal 
resume/ CV in strict confidence to: 

International Herald Tribune, Box No. 034823 
63 Long Acre, London, WC2 E9JH England 


WHAT WOULD UFE BE UKE 
WtTHOOT rn 
WEEKEND 
EACH FRIDAY IN THE I HI 


begin July 15. He is charged undo* pay back each year to the construe- The world's second-longest 
the espionage and theft laws with uon corporation. net the 13.&- mile-long Daishiir 

, . - giving secret intelligence photo- “When we look back now” the which also is in Japan, does 

ensure the ngections ao uot pro- to a British military maga- newspaper Asahi said months ago begin to approach the SeDc 

duce a slow and painful death. gne. in Storial “we find many length. The only possible rival 

The proposed law is the Gist things to criticize, among them 322-mile tunnel planned to i 
known to have been advanced by a overoptimism about the plan and nect England and France imdci 

. ■ ■ • < n i - *_ it. Slnil nf rw» hut Hnanri^l TV 


hI*M 
. Ur 

i 


r 


322-mile tunnel planned to > 
nect England and France undci 


hieh-level Reagan administration slowness in coping with the chang- Strait of Dover, but financial p 

- I ° : t. lame hn,n K-illat that Miivl 


official. 


ing situation. 


lems have halted that project. 


■ 

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Remuneration will be based on experience and will include such benefits as a 
preferential mortgage scheme, non-contributory pension , BUPA etc. 

Applications, including brief details of career to date, should be sent to: 

P. M. Lefevre, Head of Personnel, Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited, 

23 Great Winchester Street, London EC2P 2AX. 


Practically all your sales are done directly (not through 
agents). So everything depends on you. So we offer you 3 


agents). So everything depends on you. So we offer you 3 
weeks training in the U.b_ and more when yon return to 


weeks training in the U.5_ and mo 
Europe. 

We ask a lot. We give a lot: a motivati 
cost compensation plus legal and exu 


salary, very attractive 
egal advantages. 


Interested ? Please send four candidature and C V. to: 

Vrv CAREERS INTERNATIONAL, 


STMTS 

rttemanorrai 


Avenue Wmsfon-Churchill, 1 1 . 
Botte 30.1 1 80, Brussels. 


INTERNATIONAL 
HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATION 

has a vacancy for a 

PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER 

initially based in Geneva 

Candidates should preferably be in their thirties, with extensive 
experience in advertising and marketing public information mate- 
rial. Journalistic experience with demonstrated writing and editing 
skills requited. Professional fluency in English and French, good 
knowledge of German. 

Net monthly salary approximately U.S. S2^00. — . 

Writ* to: Box D 2138, Herald Tribune, 

92521 Neuilly Cedsx, France. 


THEMTERNATIONAL 

MANAGBt 

A WfflOY GUIDE BY SHBKY BUCHANAN 
WEDNE5CAYINTHEB-TT 


- a variety of special projects such as capacity and strategic marketing studies. 

The preferred candidates, between 24 and 30 years of age. will be University 
graduates or will have an equivalent professional qualification in a financial 
discipline. An MBA degree from a major business school would be considered an 
advantage. 

A quick analytical mind, the willingness to attend to detail, the ability to relate at a 
senior management level, and to work under pressure, are all essential qualities. An 
excellent command of written and spoken English is a basic requirement 

These positions offer the opportunity to gain varied experience and visibility at 
senior levels in the Company. The successful candidates will have the benefit of 
exposure across all management functions in a variety of businesses throughout 
Europe. 

Employment terms and conditions are those appropriate for a major multinational 
company. 

Mease send your application with a current curriculum vitae to either: 

Mr. R.G. Jeffrey 

Grace Industrial Chemicals Inc Mrs. B. Roussouliere 

Avenue Montchoisi 35 Grace Industrial Chemicals Inc 

Case Postale 40. Boulevard Henri Setter 

1001 LAUSANNE - 92150 - SURESNES 

Switzerland France 


LfiTtriftej 


Representative Wanted 


GENERAL MANAGER 
MONACO 


Hooter Dote Canter. Inc. an aotoMlahed and rnopocted luppQor of: >*>; 

• IBM PC and nalnfrano patent and trademark record manager** RV 
lyatem*. 

• WoridMda patent and tradamark (ax payment •trvlcoo, . 


V j fV»WN ■ 
r*4M0 
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• - VS. 


Opportunity to raproonl lull (poctnim ot paunt end trwemwk record m*n*8#n«anliyd» r ’ 
plm Bovswni •wrten In wai wi Eurepo Soil IP eorpprm pMwuvtradwnwk ■Mpamna' - 

and law tirm, - 

Products and mthoi ora wall provan and oocu in anted; compeinMy pneM.oa»r w m * t '. .' 

Nfid taun. . r . 


Our client is a Brussels based worldwide organization, operating a sophisticated telecommunications 
network for processing international banking transactions. Through the implementation of its development 
strategy the company is able to regularly present various new products and services to its clients, particularly 
in the field of terminal systems and software packages. To ensure market success of these new products the 

company is now looking for a 


product manager 

Banking services 


iref-IH121 -m/1) 


WIwm function vriP ba 

■ to assess tne matakiy at business plans mwimsoi product functondity. marvel pne* and devetapment costs. 

" todnvettwpfoiaciioaauccessfajlvTWlgrrwnta^.byflnsw'ngawtalmortieTinqapP'Wch; 

^ lo control aRocation of funds ardexpefidriure. 

•- id ensue on-time ddivaryot all aspfldSOl the mafkawginit 

The suceeufui candWale shouM be ablo to donwRStrate: 

J proven product manaQementei'OanftKe. pieterabty acqwed with a major service company, computer manufacturer or international twrft. 

' a comt wt »er sw >tfior>ieageo<*rtWrertiona' banting- 

c a strong expewnce n software protect control, 

the abH>ty » use En^tShas a working language and fluency n a least one other European language: 
good marketing and communcaKon skds. 
c experience in tinanca! comm 

This cttalKngng function requres a strong, seh- motivated person, able io successtuAjr cVrve several protects through a muibdnns^nai anjani 2 at>on. 
The abAfy lo won* undot prcssre and to smet daadlnes s essential "" 

Remuneration »vU rttleci seniority ana Pvpcnence, with atceSent prospecla for career devetopmeM. 


Recent expansion has caused a Monaco based Manage- 
ment and Financial Services Group (o create tbe new 
position of General Manager, reporting to the Directors. 
The successful applicant would he: 

- Required to reside in Monaco i Accommodation not pro- 
vided). French or other foreign languages a plus hilt not 
required. 

- Applicants musl be fully conversant with : 

■ all corporate, secretarial, accounting and administra- 
tive work In muhi-currenries 

• computer based accounting and administrative systems 

• corporate procedures based on English law 

• Applicants must; 

• he qualified Chartered Accountants with currenl l T K 
practising certificate 

a or Chartered Secretaries 

• have 10 years relevant experience 

• be willing to travel - especially to l Hindoo to .supervise 
our City office and meet with client advisers 

• provide leadership to 10 staff, and have ability to grow 
with this rapidly expanding group . 

Applicants should write, enclosing a Curriculum Vila:, a 
current photograph and stating salary- requirements to: 


and Mini. 

Eason tire* bi 1*9* marfcm. xortwaro and xanrico iiIh and IBM pc family la Pawn* 
■ Cotnmtaalonod aoRwaro and aamca aaloa. 

• Comp*ato aoftware producl and miwco Mna lor paloni and liodamaik 1 up Don 

• AegroMPm load ^anarauon program 


Modilftg European I nU wl w i i lor April ibbs. 

Cantoer Pater j. MeAtaer. Preiidem 
Master Date Canter, Inc. 

20100 Northwestern Highway. Suite 300 a Southfwnj. Ml 48034 
Phone 313-3S2-S8I0 • TLX 23-9670 • Cable- MASTERDATA 


j 

; ! ■**■****■*§ 

: i 

! i 


— MANAGER 

MARKETING EUROPE (South) 

A loading US company In ttw field of airborne navigation, avionic 
andC 1 systems, seeks a Mmager to Join their European Marfc*ti*H 


i f 

.< : t 



Office located m BrusMb. 


Please wme wdh tun career details a> . 

Jerry RUBIN - Personnel Consultant SJL- chjussee de La Huipe 185 ■ 1 f70 Brussels. 
A0 appuatmK. wd be answered. Absolute discretion is guaameoa 


JT 


HAVA5 MONTE-CARI.O N» SOT 

4. Rl'E OES IRIS 
MC 98000 MONACO 


The successful applicant, directly responsible to the Director Interne.. 
tiond, should have a background in the marketing of navigator' 
conrniunicatron or avionic equipments/ systems in the European arac • -.- H — 
ond preference will be given to indmduais with current markefofi,-..* . ' 

experience in Germany, Italy, Spain and Frcnce. He should have tb "'a. 
ability to seek out and to asses mark e ti ng opportunities in ha area e ^ 

operation, to negotiate agreements at the highest levels and to have 
record of converting marketing opportunities to successful busines \ ■ . 

conclusions. * 



; j • mfi- 

\ ! A'r- • 


i 


Sotory h negotiable and benefits vriB be appropriate for such a semt \ 


Screening interviews will be held in i^mdon. a short list of 
candidates will meet all directors In Monaco. 


An attractive package will be paid to the successful appli- 
cant: salary ui\ free and foil Social Security and medical 
cover. 


app oi ntmen t . ‘ 

Candidates wishing to be considered for this posttio* , I 
should send their detailed resumi/ curriculum vitae iil^ 1 
.strict confidence to: * * -r 

Box D-2137, Intemafional Herald Tribune ^ ' s 
92521 Neuilly, Codex Fronce f 


A i 
n 






1 1 rv| 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Page 5 




i-J 






.--3 


Soviet’s Managers, 
orkers, Told of 
iscipline 

isiries. which in the Soviet economy 
act 85 central management for indi- 
vidual production sectors, for try- 
ing to get the maximum possible 
investment and lowest possible 
production targets in the next fi- 
ve-year plan. 

"To successfully meet targets for 
this year and the whole five-year 
plan,” Pravda said, "partv. local 
council, trade union and Commu- 
nist youth organizations need to 
take a new look at the organization 
of Socialist competition.” 

"Socialist competition" is the of- 
ficial term used to encourage fac- 
tories to vie with each other in 
output in the absence of the capi- 
talist profit motive and its conse- 
quences. 

Under ibe terms of an economic 
experiment launched under Andro- 
pov and thought to have Mr. Gor- 
bachev’s personal backing, some 
factories are being allowed more 
autonomy over use of funds. 

This means they can give top 
workers higher bonuses. Also, fac- 
tories that improve production fig- 
ures will be allocated more funds 
while those that do not meet targets 
may find less money at their dis- 
posal 

Pravda compared results at two 
metal plants in the Urals. Despite 
the fact Lhai both had faced power 
cuts and other difficulties cause by 
the cold winter, one had increased 
production by 6.4 percent while the 
other had failed to meet all targets. 

Also singled out for criticism was 
a major timber plant at Usi-flimsk 
in Siberia. Pravda said the plant, 
built to soak up surplus power from 
a vast but underused hydroelectric 
station, had failed to meet targets 
in January and February. 


Rouen 

IOSCOW — Soviet officials, 
and factory managers were 
. to take a new look 
their attitudes to work and to 
for a decisive turn to a 
fey of intensive development, 
in editorial in Pravda, the Com- 
jhist Party newspaper, repeated- 
'erred u> the need for “disci- 
" indicating that the word is 
as firm & slogan under Mik- 
S. Gorbachev, the new leader, 
it was under Yuri V. Andropov. 
^Strengthening of organization. 

fcr and discipline in all spheres 
■production and management." 
V.Wda said, "is of ever-growing 
! importance for the decisive turn oT 
- v r economy on to the path of 
-ensive development." 

Vlr. Gorbachev took power last 
■■Vek on the death of President 
’>*• (ostantin U. Chernenko, whose 
’*■ l ; month rule has been seen widely 
■ - ‘ a stopgap period between his 
^decessor, Andropov, and An- 
? , , . . . : jpov’s protege, Mr. Gorbachev. 

*«•**' »* if 7 P iv,,. Hie Pravda editorial quoted Mr. 

' 1 'tftrbachev’s call for law. order and 
*e ■ i* i or discipline in his first spttsh 

■ * 't'iiHlKf lih P^y l^der. The past winter 
' ’ ''%wed signs of an economic 

wmurn that had to be halted, (he 
. tonal said. 

- Economic figures for the first 
. . ’■> months of this year revealed a 
. . . ious decline in the rate of growth 
Soviet industrial production and 
ior productivity. 

- - - Pravda cited poor planning as an 
tmple of bad labor discipline 
i criticized the energy, transport 
3 metallurgy sectors for failing 
meet many of their planned tar- 

.- S. 

The editorial also attacked min- 


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luminit Seen as Likely 
n August in Helsinki 


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By Don Cook 

La i Angeles Times Service 

3RUSSELS — Senior allied dip- 
flats at the headquarters of the 
rth Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
□ believe that President Ronald 
agan and the Soviet leader, Mik- 
1 S. Gorbachev, are almost cer- 
a to meet in Helsinki around the 
n of AugusL 

fhere is. the diplomats point out, 
eady-made occasion for such a 
jeting— a ceremonial gathering 
mark the 10th anniversary of the 
of the agreements at the 
sJsinki Conference on European 
rurity and Cooperation. 

^inrush officials are said to be 
ful that the heads of the 35 
, , t .. rtt .taiory governments win be pre- 
■ ■' ''* • t for the anniversary. 

T " It really seems now to be only a 
stion of who makes the first 
ve.” a diplomat said. “If Gorba- 
v accepts the Finnish invitation, 
all the East bloc leaders wiQ 
, ow suit, and of course the 
.TO heads of state will also 
ee. If Reagan and the NATO 
emments decide to make it a 
-unit in Helsinki than the Soviet 
c can scarcely stay away." 
lie 10 governments of the Euro- 
m Community informed the 
nish government more than six 
mbs ago that they’ would send 
ir foreign ministers to Helsinki 
the anniversary. But at the last 
sting of NATO foreign minis- 
f. in Brussels in December, this 
ition was modified to keep the 
* open for the heads of govera- 
nt to go. The final communique 
m the December meeting said 
t the NATO governments would 
represented in Helsinki “at an 
injpriate political level." 
tccording to NATO sources, it 
at U.S. insistence that this 
"ding was used. 

iven while the late Soviet leader, 
nsian tin U. Chernenko, was still 
e, the United States wanted to 
p the possibility of a Helsinki 
unit meeting open, a U.S. 
rcesaid. 

Viih the death of Mr. Cher- 
ko and Mr. Reagan's clear uni- 
on to Mr. Gorbachev to visit the 
tted States, the prospects for a 
fcting have changed. Talk of pre- 


conditions and careful preparation 
has subsided 

So far, Mr. Gorbachev has been 
unresponsive. NATO diplomats 
doubt that he is prepared to travel 
to the United States within the next 
six months, but they believe that 
Helsinki would be an attractive al- 
ternative. 

In August 197S, at the Helsinki 
ceremony where the agreements 
were signed. President Gerald R. 
Ford met with the Soviet leader, 
Leonid L Brezhnev, to discuss pre- 
liminary steps in the SALT-2 agree- 
ment on limiting strategic nuclear 
weapons. Mr. Ford and Mr. Brezh- 
nev followed up with a meeting in 
Vladivostok, in the Soviet Pacific, 
a U.S. Official Is Pessimistic 

In Washington, a White House 
official told The Associated Press 
that it would be “pretty safe to rule 
out" a meeting in Helsinki. The 
official speaking on condition he 
not be identified, noted that Mr. 
Reagan has repeatedly accused the 
Russians of violating the Helsinki 
accords and would, therefore, not 
help them celebrate the pact 


Pretoria Builds 
Electrified Wall 

Untied Press International 

CAPE TOWN — South Africa 
has built an experimental electri- 
fied wall along a stretch of its bor- 
der with Zimbabwe, Defense Min- 
ister Magnus Malan has told 
Parliament- 

Officials told the Johannesburg 
Sunday Express newspaper that the 
nine- mile (14-5-kilomeier) hairier 
is meant to stop illegal immigrants 
from entering the country in search 
of weak. The paper said the wall is 
topped with ccals of razor-shaip 
“blade wire” and 1 1 strands of elec- 
trical cable. 

General Malan told Parliament 
on Tuesday that the wall was “an 
integrated experiment with border 
barrier systems" and had cost SI 25 
million. He said warning signs 
would be posted at intervals and 
Lhat farmers had been asked to 
warn employees that the barrier 
would be charged with 20,000 volts. 


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France to Double Nuclear Warheads on Subs 


United Press international 

LONDON — France will more 
than double the number of nuclear 
warheads aboard its submarines 
this year and will have nearly 500 
submarine-based warheads by 
1992, according to Charles Hemu, 
the French defense minis ter. 

There will be 176 warheads in the 
French submarine force by the end 
of this year compared to 80 at the 
end of 1984, Mr. Herau said in an 
interview published Tuesday in 
Jane's Defense Weekly. 

France's sixth nuclear-armed 


submarine, L’lnflexible, will go 
into service this year, he said. I twill 
be equipped with the M-4 missile, 
which carries six warheads, each 
with a yield of six kilotons. One 
kiloton has the explosive force of 
1,000 tons of TNT. 

The other fire submarines also 
will receive M-4 missiles, bringing 
the total number of warheads in 
France's undersea force to “almost 
500 by 1992," Mr. Hemu said. 
French air and ground nuclear 
forces also will be updated, he add- 
ed 


Increased European military 
strength “can only contribute' to 
forging closer contacts among Eu- 
ropeans,” he said 
Mr.-Hernu said trade in military 
equipment between Europe and the 
United States is “very strongly" 
weighted in favor of the United 
States but is becoming less one- 
sided 

Greater “aggressiveness” by 
French executives and the develop- 
ment of unique European weapon- 
ry are helping to balance the equa- 
tion, he said 


Volunteers Discover Real Israel 

Army Work Program Has Attracted 3,600 Foreigners 


By. Thomas L Friedman 

/*?«•■ York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — If the Volun- 
teers, for Israel program had travel 
brochures, they might read "Come 
to Israel meet the people, see the 
land and learn bow to repair the 
engine of a Patton tank or wash 
dishes for 1.000 soldiers." 

Since its inception in early 1983, 
Volunteers for Israel has allowed 
about 3,600 foreigners — most of 
them Americans, 18 to 65 years old 
— to spend a month or more work- 
ing on an Israeli Army base per- 
forming noncombat duties. It is not 
everyone's idea of a vacation, but 
to hear some volunteers tell it, it 
beats seeing Israel from a tour bus. 

Dressed in standard-issue green 
Israeli Army fatigues and armed 
with two pink rubber gloves, Shir- 
ley Benson, a gray-hatred mother 
of three children and grandmother 
of five, interrupts her dishwashing 
efforts in the mess hall at the 
F.mannfll army base to explain 
wfaat she is doing in Israel 

“lama Jewish mother who left 
the kitchens of America for the 
kitchens of Israel" said Mrs. Ben- 
son. a 55-year-old resident of Cali- 
fornia, who forms pan of a battal- 
ion of “Yiddish e Mamas,” as the 
Israeli soldiers call them. 

“America has its Peace Corps," 
she said, “and this is also a kina of 
Peace Corps. We don't teach them 
anything, though. We give of our- 
selves. I don't do it for money. I do 
it for the wonderful feeling' J get 
inside.” 

Mrs. Benson volunteered for a 
mouth with her husband, Ben, who 
is working on the same base, south 
of Tel Aviv, repairing the brake 
linings of Israeli Army jeeps. 


The Volunteers for Israel pro- 
gram was the brainchild of one of 
Israel's most distinguished combat 
officers. Aharon Davidi, a retired 
general who headed the Israeli 
pare troop corps in the 1%7 war. In 
August 1982, at the height of the 
Israeli invasion of Lebanon. Israeli 
industry and agriculture experi- 
enced a critical shortage of man- 
power. resulting in some unpicked 
fruit rotting on the vines. 

General Davidi helped ease the 
crunch by organizing a group of 
volunteers to pay their own way to 
Israel and wore in kibbutzim and 
industries critically short of labor. 
Some of those who took part in the 
emergency labor drive had such a 
good time' that they pressed Gener- 
al Davidi to develop a permanent 
program whereby people of all ages 
could come and donate their labor. 

The volunteers, who have come 
from the United States. France, 
Canada, Britain and South Africa, 
apply through the program's of- 
fices abroad. Those whose applica- 
tions are approved pay about S600 
to cover round-trip airfare and 
some field trips in Israel. To avoid 
questions of dual citizenship, they 
must also sign a release form saying 
they have no intention of serving in 
the actual combat army or of 
pledging allegiance to it. ' 

In return, on arrival at Ben-Gur- 
ion Internationa] Airport they get 
assigned to an army base in Israel 
pTopet, the occupied Golan 
Heights or the occupied West 
Bank. Each volunteer is given an 
Israeli Army uniform, boots, hat. 
field jacket' and socks — all of 
which, except for the socks, must 
be returned at the end of the pro- 
gram. They live four in a room on 


their own floor in a regular aim 1 
barracks, are integrated into ah so- 
cial activities on the base, get all the 
food they can eat and all the He- 
brew and Israeli culture they can 
soak up . 

Kristin Reed of Washington, an 
18-year-old convert to Judaism, 
stood tn the tank shop at the Eman- 
uel base with her arm swallowed up 
in the depths of a tank engine. 

A visitor asked what she was 
working on. 

‘‘It’s a Patton tank." she replied 
with authority, stretching her arm 
deeper into the engine. 

And what was she doing? 

“Right now.” she said. “I'm try- 
ing to put a new screw into a very- 
hard place. Success! I got it!” 

Not all the volunteers are Jews. 
Monty Crisp, a 51-year-old Chris- 
tian fundamentalist from South 
Carolina, came to Israel to work on 
a kibbutz and an archeological dig 
but heard about the volunteers pro- 
gram and signed on. 

”Bein§ in Israel and knowing 
what an integral part of society the 
army is.” he said. “1 wanted to see 
it from the inside." 

Lately- he said, he has worked 
with an Israeli team reconditioning 
a captured Soviet-made tank- Be- 
cause he grew up on a farm and is 
familiar with basic mechanics, he 
said, he was easily absorbed into 
the work crew, despite some lan- 
guage difficulties. 

“We reconditioned the entire 
tank and changed all the pans” he 
said, pointing to the tank, now 
bearing Israeli markings. H I never 
dreamed I would ever be under a 
Russian tank. 1 wish we had one of 
these on the farm. It would be great 
in the rainy season.” 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Year’s First Rain Raises Hopes 
For Relief in Ethiopia Drought 


By Clifford D. May 

Sm Yi*i Times Service 

ADDIS ABABA. Ethiopia — It 
rained here this week. Not much, in 
terms of what is needed, but 
enough to raise hopes in this 
drought-tortured African country 
that the seasonal “short rains" — 
which failed completely last year — 
might have arrived. 

“It’s too early to say for certain." 
said Simon Chater of the Interna- 
tional Livestock Center for Africa, 
an institution that keeps a keen eye 
on the weather. “Bul we’re cau- 
tiously optimistic." 

On Sunday, Martha Kebede and 
her family were having a get-to- 
gether when abruptly, from abnor- 
mally darkened skies, there issued 
sounds to which the ears bad be- 
come unaccustomed. They were ac- 
companied by flashes of the purest 
white light. 

At first, the gathering ignored 
these intrusions, dismissing them 
as empty promises. They continued 
to talk softly, lunching on the sour 
bread known as injerra and sipping 
the sweet honey wine called tejj. 
But then it arrived: a cooling driz- 
zle that evolved into a respectable 
downpour. 

“Oh, this isn't spoiling the party 
at alL" Martha Kebede said. “It’s a 
cause for celebration." 

Soon, almost ah of the 60 mem- 
bers of the Family were sin ging and 
dancing in the rain, the women 
refusing umbrellas, preferring to let 
their white embroidered shawls 
soak up the precipitation, the men 
not minding that their suits were 
growing dark and thirir shoes be- 
coming sloshv. Every clap of thun- 
der brought a burst of applause, as 
though an inspired performance 
was being staged for the entertain-’ 
mem of this audience alone. 

Similar scenes are said to have 
taken place in six of Ethiopia's 14 
regions, where the year's first rains 
were continuing. By Friday, rain is 


predicted to fall in four more re- 
gions. according to the official 
Ethiopian press agency. 

“This kind of steady, soaking 
rain every afternoon is'^ust what is 
needed," Mr. Chater said Tuesday. 
“Much better than torrents. If it 
keeps up. it will do a tremendous 
lot of good." 

If the rains continue, within 
about two weeks many of (he coun- 
try’s farmers should be able to be- 
gin planting crops including com, 
sorghum and teff, the coarse grain 
from which injerra is made. Equally 
important, they will be able to pre- 
pare the land for the “long rains," 
which normally begin around June. 

Much or the country’s pasture 
land should spring back to life, Mr. 
Chatam said, and cattle that might 
have perished may survive and 
even start to give healthy quantities 
of milk again. 

Still, Kurt Jansson. the United 
Nations assistant secretary-general 
for emergency operations in Ethio- 
pia. pointed out that even in the 
best years, the short-rains harvest 
provided only 10 percent to 20 per- 
cent of this country's total produc- 
tion. 

And Ethiopia's total production 
has not been sufficient to meet the 
population’s needs for many years. 
Western environmentalists and 
economists also warn that lack of 
rainfall is only pan of die problem 
in Ethiopia. The country is also 
hungry, they say. as a result of 
environmental abuse and agricul- 
tural policies aimed at providing 
inexpensive food for city dwellers 
and soldiers at the expense of peas- 
ant farmers. 

Then too, welcome as the rains 
are, they are not an entirely un- 
mixed blessing. 

“Some of the airstrips on which 
relief planes are now landing and 
some of the roads over which food 
trucks are now traveling are likely 
to soon become impassable," Mr. 


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Jansson said. “We're going to have 
to move very fast to get the food 
where it’s needed quickly” 

In many of the famine refugee 
camps, the rainfall will also almost 
certainly lead to increased disease 
and discomforL 

“There are people still living in 
holes in the ground covered with 
plastic sheeting." another aid offi- 
cial said. “These could fill up with 
water. And even the tents will re- 
quire drainage. The rain means 
more work, not less." 

Moreover, most of those already 
in the camps no longer have the 
tools, the seed, the draught animals 
or even the strength they would 
need to return to their farms to try 
to take advantage of the short 
rains. 

Nonetheless, gray skies and the 
scent of moist air are clearly cheer- 
ing and encouraging Ethiopians, 
many of whom appear to agree 
with the sentiment expressed by an 
elder at Martha Kebede's party. 

“God has turned his face toward 
us,” he announced as he did a little 
dance on the slippery lawn. 

■ U.S. Senate Approves Aid 

The Senate gave voice vote ap- 
proval on Tuesday to a bill autho- 
rizing S17S million in emergency 
nonfood aid for African countries 
suffering from the drought The 
Associated Press reported from 
Washington. 

The House and Senate are work- 
ing on legislation to proride about 
$700 milli on in food and other aid 
for the stricken African nations, 
compared to the 5185 million 
sought by the White House. 

Tne nonfood aid items approved 
by the Senate include seeds, fertil- 
izer, pesticides, farm implements, 
farm animals, vaccine and veteri- 
nary help, blankets, clothing and 
shelter. 


Wave of Strikes in Italy 
Expected to Slow Travel 

Reuters' 

ROME — A wave of strikes last- 
ing until Tuesday will disrupt air 
and road travel in Italy, radio and 
television reported Wednesday. 
Most of the strikes are to back 
union demands for employers to 
approve wage increases in annual 
contracts due for renewal 

Gasoline station attendants 
throughout the country began a 
48-hour strike Wednesday. An air- 
line pilots’ group announced a 
24-hour stoppage for Monday. 
Journalists, doctors. law court 
workers and other groups also an- 
nounced strike plans. 



bmn 

SPEEDY GERMAN — An experimental high-speed intercity passenger train, com- 
missioned by the West German state rafiroad, leaves die Kropp factory in Essen. The 
locomotive, capable of traveling at 220 miles per hoar, will eater service in the 1990s. 


3 Jailed Dissident Poles 
Reportedly Are Indicted 


Irish Brace for Nazi Criminal’s Return 


Reuters 

DUBLIN — The Irish govern- 
ment is bracing for a storm of pro- 
test over the expected return or 
Pieter Menten, a Nazi war criminal 
due to be released from prison in 
the Netherlands on Friday. 

Menten, 85, who was born in the 
Netherlands, has served two-thirds 
of a 10-year sentence fix massa- 
cring Polish Jews in 1941. He owns 
a country house in southern Ire- 
land 

His lawyer has been quoted in 
the Irish press as saying that Men- 
tal. a millionaire art collector, 
plans to spend his remaining days 
at the 15-room mansion in the Wa- 
terford village of Lembybrian. •- 

Many of Ireland’s' 2,000 Jews 
were outraged and called for Men- 
ten to be barred from entering the 
country. 

Dr. Joseph Briscoe, a leader of 
the Jewish community, said on ra- 
dio Wednesday that all Irish peo- 
ple, not just Jews, were opposed to 
Menten coming back. 

“We are literally horrified " he 
said, “that we would have to live 
under die same sky as somebody as 
evil as this m.m, who has commit- 
ted the most frightful crimes " 

A government spokesman said 
that as a European Community na- 
tional and a resident in Ireland 
since 1964. Menten was entitled to 
come to Ireland. 

Residents of Lembybrian say 
that Menten has never lived perma- 


nently in his mansion but only vis- 
ited it occasionally for holidays. If 
be does return, he is likely to have a 
24-hour police guard. 

An elaborate security system was 
installed in the house' after an 
armed gang tried to bum it down 
five years ago. 

The house, believed to contain 
some of Menien's art treasures, is 
protected by steel shutters, spiked 


railings, bulletproof glass and 
floodlights. 

Menten's Indonesian former 
wife, Meta, who divorced him when 
he was imprisoned but is reported 
to have remained in dose touch, 
has visited the house regularly, ac- 
cording to neighbors. 

Menten suffers from diabetes 
and has been hospitalized from 
time to time throughout his impris- 
onment. 


Bv Michael T. Kaufman 

Sew York Times Stem* 

WARSAW — Indictments have 
been drawn up against three jailed 
Polish dissident leaders, one of 
whom has been on a hunger strike 
for more than a week, according to 
people close to the men. 

The three — Wladyslaw Frasyn- 
iuk, Bogdan Lis and Adam Mich- 
nik — have been held without ac- 
cess to visitors since Feb. 13 for 
purportedly discussing plans for a 
nationwide work stoppage to pro- 
test price increases. They are said 
to face charges of urging public 
unrest. 

According to the sources, the 
lawyers for the three men were 
called in this week to review the 
indictments and the record of the 
interrogation. 

The sources said Tuesday that 
the authorities were seeking a 
speedv one-day trial just before 
Easter, which is April 7 this year, 
and that the three men, all of whom 
received amnesty last year, would 
probably receive prison saliences 
of two to three years. 

The meeting at which the y were 
seized had been convened in 
Gdansk by Lech Walesa, the leader 
of the outlawed Solidarity labor 
movement, but Mr. Walesa was not 
detained. The plans for the work 
stoppage were later abandoned. 

The reported hunger strike was 
begun March 10 by Mr. Lis, who 
was once the second-ranking mem- 
ber of the Solidarity underground. 
There was a report from Solidarity 


sources that he was forcibly fed 0 
Tuesday. 

Some Solidarity sources sav ifc 
any sentences the dissidents tm 
receive might be suspended in c? 
change for assurances of ^ 
havior. Others say the auihoritit 
may once again order an amncsi 
in view oT the growing number c 
political prisoner in detention. 

Members of a Roman Cuthol 
Church committee who vimi 
mutes and aid their families 
there were now 105 political 
taiuees, including some who _ 
refused to take a military loyal 
oath. This figure appears im‘ 
compared with the 652 prisone 
who were released in an amnes 
last summer, but it represents 
sizable increase over the last thn 
months. 

Jacek Kuron. a dissident, sa 
last weekend that the goverante 
appeared to be snipping up arres 
to intimidate people in advance • 
the price increases. Mr. Kuron sa 
that after the trial and convictk 
of four security police officers fi 
the murder of a pro-Solidari 
priest, the government seemed 
be accommodating the security a< 
paratus. 

Jerzy Urban, the guvemme 
spokesman, dismissed suggesihn 
that the government was seeking 
intimidate people. 

“We do not want any politic 
prisoners in Poland at all.” he sa 
Tuesday. “Many of those who a 
now in prison were decisively stri 
ing to be put there." 





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Page 8 


THl'RSDAV, MARCH 21- 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 0m 


Published Willi TW Nn ^ ork Time* And n»r U a*Wn£ton Po“t 


Much Ado About the MX 


The extraordinary thing about the MX de- 
bate is that in the fifth year of an administra- 
tion which won re-election on a platform of 
military strength, the particular weapon most 
symbolic of that quest for strength remains in 
deep political trouble — no matter that it 
cleared one hurdle in the Senate on Tuesday. 
However the votes finally come out, the presi- 
dent's struggle to get them tells a political tale. 

Is there left a legislator who has not received 
a personal MX appeal from President Reagan? 
The scale of his exertion falls somewhere be- 
tween formidable and epic. Perhaps inadver- 
tently, he has set a new standard of presiden- 
tial commitment against which his subsequent 
appeals for this or that are bound to be mea- 
sured. Yet his appeal has been resisted, if not 
altogether rebuffed, not merely by legislators 
of a different, partisan or ideological persua- 
sion but also by defense-minded legislators, 
inducting some in his own party. 

The upshot is that even a victory in the 
current series of votes will have a Pyrrhic 
quality. It cannot possibly produce the success 
at Geneva that many people will have been led 
to expect by the president's dire warnings of 
what a negative vote would bring. His cam- 
paign has taken important swing legislators to 
a point where they may reluctantly support 
MX now, chiefly because of the damage a “no” 
might do to the American position at the 
Geneva talks, but they are darned if they will 
vote for the 45 additional MX missiles needed 
to complete the administration's MX buy. 

Meanwhile, the MX has become a leading 


exhibit in the general indictment holding that 
the administration throws money at military 
problems without knowing what it is doing. 
This indictment, key legislators believe, is 
bound to make its mark cm the administra- 
tion’s defense planning and spending. 

It is unfair to put the entire burden of the 
MX on the Reagan administration. The missile 
was, first, a Ford and Carter project. But Mr. 
Reagan did not merely inherit a debatable 
rniwiif! program; all missile programs are de- 
batable. He added a philosophy — build great 
strength and negotiate from it —that does not 
lend itself easily to the proportion and intelli- 
gence that even many of his supporters feel 
ought to be essential elements in security pol- 
icy. Proportion and intelligence are after all 
the quintessential conservative virtues. The 
MX without “star wars” was one thing; the 
MX with “star wars" is — well, people wan t to 
think about it. The president’s seeming indif- 
ference to a proper connection between de- 
fense and the deficit adds to concern. 

Is there in the Reagan administration an 
awareness of the range end depth of reserva- 
tions it has stirred on security issues, among its 
friends as well as its political adversaries? It 
does not bode well that, regarding the MX, the 
president felt it necessary to launch a Norman- 
dy invasion to capture such a relatively small 
objective. What Mr. Reagan most needs to 
demonstrate, and most of all to the Russians, 
is a command of the American political arena. 
Yet that seems to be where his frailty lies. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Federal Insurance lor All 


“Is my money safe?" That is the question 
aroused in depositors all over the United 
States by Ohio's temporary closing of 71 pri- 
vately insured savings institutions. 

The answer is an unequivocal “yes" for the 
great majority — everyone with deposits up to 
5100,000 in banks covered by federal insur- 
ance. Federally insured accounts are, for all 
practical purposes, backed by the govern- 
ment’s power to create money. But what of the 
minority? What of depositors in the small 
number of h anks that lack federal coverage 
and rely instead on problematical state insur- 
ance? However well managed, those institu- 
tions are vulnerable to the sort of crisis that 
has beset Ohio. And when it explodes, deposi- 
tors must expect to bear the brunt of the shock. 

It would therefore serve both individual 
depositors and the financial system as a whole 
to require federal insurance for all banks. 

Ohio's turmoil began with the failure of the 
Home State Savings Bank on March 9 after it 
had lost millions in the collapse of a securities 
broker in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Once 
Home State went under, depositors at the 
other banks insured by the Ohio Deposit 
Guarantee Fund nervously began withdrawing 
their money. Many, perhaps all of these hanks 
have sufficient assets to cover their liabilities 
to depositors. But none could raise the cash 


overnight, and Governor Richard Celeste 
wisely chose to dose them until confidence in 
the system is restored. But even a happy end- 
ing should serve as a warning. 

Businesses go bankrupt every day. The risk 
of bankruptcy is indispensable to the market's 
efficient allocation of scarce capitaL But banks 
are not like other businesses; if some start to 
fail, confidence in all banks is diminish ed. A 
modem economy cannot operate efficiently 
unless depositors are sure their money is safe. 

Until recently one could plausibly argue 
that private bank insurance was sufficient to 
maintain confidence. But the increasing inte- 
gration of the financial system — the links, for 
example, between a bank in Ohio and a securi- 
ties broker in Florida — puts all financial 
institutions at greater psychological risk. 

In any case, s mall dqx>sitors have no idea of 
how much risk they bear. Indeed, in a system 
in which most banks are federally insured, 
they are easily misled into a«nmiiiy that all 
banks are equally well insured. 

The remedy is for Congress to insist that all. 
banks and thrifts get federal insurance or quit 
the banking business. That alone will not guar- 
antee complete confidence in banking, but it 
would spare other depositors and other states 
from having to repeat Ohio's unhappy ordeaL 
- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


For an East-West Summit Soon 


The momentum of the Soviet bureaucratic 
decision-making process predudes a sudden 
reversal of policy, particularly internationally. 
It is like a large oil tanker— even if the cap tain 
wishes to change course, and this has yet to be 
proven, it takes a long time to turn around. 

It is natural to look for rapid changes in the 
Soviet attitude to nuclear weapons. Here Mr. 
Gorbachev will face formidable difficulties. 
Grigori Romanov has a reputation far being 
the generals’ man and will watch carefully for 
any sign of deviation. The military leadership 
has become very strong and assertive. 

What is needed is a personal meeting be- 
tween Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Reagan to 
allow some empathy to develop between them 
as individuals. President Reagan is going to be 
in Europe for the Bonn economic summit 
between May 2 and 4. A meeting in Vienna 
just prior to the 40th anniversary of V-E Day 
on May 8 would be the appropriate moment to 
start to reorder East-West relations. 

— David Owen, writing in The Observer (London). 


There is a real connection between these two 
aids areas. The most dangerous factor in the 
Gulf war and in Lebanon is the growth of 
Moslem fundamentalism. Since the end of 
World War D, the Middle East has been an 
arena of violence and a source of discord 
among the great powers. Nowa new ingredient 
has been added to this witches’ brew, and no 
one can say how far the poison will spread. 

— Syndicated columnist Drew Middleton. 


The Iraqi declaration that Iranian airspace, 
is now a war zone endangers the lives of 
Japanese and other foreigners staying in Iran. 
In the course of the war, both sides have 
inflicted damage on third countries through 
attacks on tankers, mining of the sea and 
polluting seawater with oil spills to further 
their own aims. This is not fair. It is obvious 
that this war is the height or human fopy. 

— The Daily Yomiuri (Tokyo). 


No Hurry in Southern Africa 


Stirring Up Today's 'Balkans' 


Dwight D. Eisenhower's comment to me in 
1956 that the Middle East was bound to be- 
come the Balkans of the last half of this centu- 
ry has been abundantly supported by the 
events of the past several days. The war be- 
tween Iran and Iraq, for months confined to 
isolated air attacks on shipping, has unexpect- 
edly moved into a high-intensity phase. The 
situation in Lebanon is deteriorating rapidly. 


The situation in both Mozambique and An- 
gola is that neither the government nor the 
rebels seem able to sway the balance in their 
favor unaided, yet neither side is prepared to 
negotiate because each thinks it is on the road 
to victoiy. Apart from a few minor economic 
difficulties. South Africa is not seriously dis- 
advantaged by the chaos that has resulted, and 
is far less dependent on good relations with its 
neighbors than the other way around. Pretoria 
wou Id be glad if peace could be arrived at, bnt 
if not. it can live with the alternative. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich). 


FROM OUR MARCH 21 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: U.S.-Canadian Trade at Issue 
ALBANY, New York — President Taft and 
Earl Grey, governor-general of Canada, sat 
together [on March 19] at a banquet at the 
University Chib. Both made speeches on the 
subject of friendly relations. Earl Grey said: 
“So long as the Stats and Stripes and the 
Union Jack get together there will always be 
fair weather." Mr. Taft, referring to the tariff 
conference which will take place between him- 
self and the Canadian Minister of Finance [on 
March 20]. said that every effort would be put 
forth by the United States to find a means of 
avoiding the creation of a tariff wall between 
America and Canada. He said: “It is to our 
great advantage to be just to Canada, and to 
her advantage to be just to us." 


1935: Dust Storms Pall Middle Weal 
CHICAGO — One of the worst dust storms in 
the history of the Middle West, and the third 
within the week, swept over Kansas and Ne- 
braska [on March 2D], blotting out the sun, 
halting traffic and forcing people to stay in- 
doors. Thousands of tons of dirt in fine parti- 
cles were swept through Lhe air. When the wind 
slackened, this settled to a depth of half an 
inch or more, sifted into houses and shops and 
crunched under fooL Wet sheets packed about 
doors and windows gave but slight protection 
against the infiltration. People in Kansas are 
getting used to going to bed and finding the 
covers weighed down with dirt in the mo rning. 
The condition prevailed from Wyoming and 
the Dakotas to the Texas Panhandle. 


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\yM /> \i& 


To Have Reductions 
In Offensive Missiles 


By Jeremy J. Stone 


W ASHINGTON — The Rea- 
gan administration says it 


W gan administration says it 
wants a “radical reduction” in of- 
fensive nuclear arms during the next 
10 years. Such reductions are in- 
creasingly admitted to be crucial to 
the success of the defensive weap- 
ons that the administration seeks. 
Many observers have concluded 
that talk of radial reductions is just 
talk, unlikely to lead to any actual 
diminishing of nuclear arsenals. 

But the new Soviet leadership 
might be able to force such reduc- 
tions if it played its cards property. 

The Russians dearly see the Rea- 
gan adminis tration's Strategic De- 
fease Initiative as an enormous ob- 
stacle to new agreements. Bui what 
if the Soviift Union decided to try to 
pre-empt and predude “star wars” 
deployment through an agreement 
on reductions of offensive weap- 
ons? For example, the Russians 
might propose a program of con- 
tinuing, progressively deeper cuts in 


Nikolai Chervov of the Soviet gen- 
era! staff. If America proceeds with 
the SDI, he said, the Soviet Union 
win respond by adding new capabil- 
ities to its offensive arsenal. 

Ii is not surprising that a Soviet 
general would think the best re- 
sponse to new American defensive 
measures is more offense to over- 
come them. This has been the tradi- 
tional approach of both superpow- 
ers, and explains why they adopted 
the 1972 ABM treat)'. 

But the “star wars" defense will 
be a long time abuilding, and to 
respond to it with new’ offensive 
weapons the Russians will have to 
come up with new lands of weapons 
and new tactics anyway. So reduc- 
tions of existing offensive systems 
could still be possible. 

Such a strategy is also consistent 
with the Soviet use of arms control 
to moderate U.S.-Soviet relations. 

It is predsdy this “bear hug" ap- 
proach that is often feared by 



Bv COCO m m* cnine tutws (Tamu. DWrUwttd by Cortoonisn & writers Syndicate. 


'W e both believed that we might conclude 

a 50-percent reduction innudear arsenals.’ 


offensive weapons that would con- 
tinue only as long as the United 
States renamed from field-testing 
or deploying defense systems pro- 
hibited by the 1972 treaty banning 
anti-ballistic missile systems. 

A wefl designed program of an- 
nual reductions of 5 pocent in each 
side's inventory of warheads would 
bring substantial reductions in a rel- 
atively short time, and could politi- 


cally tie up “star wars.” This might 
be the Soviet ace in the hole. 

To make such a proposal the Rus- 
sians would have to overcome their 
first instinct, which was outlined in 
Washington recently by General 


American hawks opposing arms 
control on the ground that relax- 
ation of tension will really mean 
relaxation of American vigilance. 
On the other hand, steady reduc- 
tions ewer a long period would be an 
appealing idea, bound to find many 
supporters in the United States, 
making it harder to reject 
There has been considerable sup- 
port in the United States for the 
idea of progressive, steady reduc- 
tions. In 1979 the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee unanim ously 
supported a resolution urging Mos- 
cow and Washington to pursue 
“continuous year-by-year reduc- 


tions in the ceilings and subceilings 
under the [SALT-2] treaty so as to 
take advantage of the treaty already 
negotiated and to begin a sustain- 
able and effective process of reduc- 
tions in strategic arms.” 

At the June 1979 Vienna summit, 
after six months of Pentagon stud- 
fcsofthc proposal. Pre side nt Jimmy 

menu a'jhpercent annual shriiliage 
of SALT-2 limits and sub-limits for 
five years. As Mr. Carter reported 
laier on his conversations with Leo- 
nid Brezhnev, “We both believed 
that we might conclude a 50-perccm 
reduction in midear arsenals on 
both tides even bdow the SALT-2 
levels.” This would suggest that the 
■Pentagon signed off on several 
years of this percentage of ««»nii 
reduction of &ALT-2 limits. 

Sh rinking SALT-2 by 50 percent 
would achieve most of the goals set 
by President Reagan in the 1982 
speech in which be called for, 
among other things, reducing ballis- 
tic missile warheads to about 5,000. 

And re hUp- hie arirnmittr atjon called 

the SALT-2 treaty “fatally flawed," 


the principal flaw now died is the 
treaty’s failure to indude disarma- 


treaty’s Mure to indude disarma- 
menL A proposal to shrink SALT-2 
would repair that failure. 

Moreover, an agreement of this 
kind would be easy to negotiate — it 
only requires agreement on a single 
percentage. Proposing it would give 


die Russians both the moral high 
ground in these negotiations and a 
real prospect of heading off the de- 
fensive arms race that certainly 
worries them. Public opinion in Eu- 
rope and America would surely be 
impressed by such an offer. 

But a successful negotiation 
along these lines would not have to 
be seen as a victoiy for the Rus- 
sians. On the contrary, it would give 
President Reagan an enormous tri- 
umph: He could describe it as just 
what he intended all along — real 
reductions. And he could Keep his 
“star wars” research, provided it 
stays in the laboratories. 

If, after far-reaching reductions, 
the two tides were willing to accept, 
wanted to purchase and could fig- 
ure out how to live with some kind 
of population defense. President 
Reagan could get that, too. 

Finally, for those of us who be- 
lieve that “star wars” puts America 
on absolutely the wrong road for 
national security, there would be 
pre-emptive arms control instead. 
As the idea of building a defense 
gains momentum in America, there 
may be no belter solution for the 
Russians than to bold “star wars” 
hostage with a reduction agreement 
of luwmited duration. 


The writer is director of the Feder- 
ation of American Scientists. He con- 
tributed this to The Washington Post 


Defense Is Only a Vision; Deterrence Is a Reality 


H AMBURG — A European who 
remembers the heated and bit- 
ter debate over whether U.S. Per- 
shing and cruise missiles should be 


By Christoph Bertram 

xble in defensive The spectacle 


if he finds it difficult to follow the 
present American advocacy for stra- 
tegic-missile defense. 

In the debate in Europe, anti-nu- 
clear protesters, the political left and 
many churchmen were claiming that 
deterrence was no longer acceptable 
as the basis for security. It was, they 
said, profoundly immo ral to threaten 
the destruction of another society. As 
we know, their protest did not suc- 
ceed. But now no less a person than 
the president of the United States is 
saying virtually the same thing: 

The human spirit must be capa- 
ble of rising above [deterrence]. 

— March 1983. 

Would it not be far more hu- 
manitarian to say that now we ctm 
defend against a nuclear war by 
destroying missiles instead of 
slaughtering millions <4 people? 

—October 1984. . 

There is a better way of etimi- 
- noting nuclear war than retalia- 
tion with a deadly comterstrike. 

— February 1985. 

What makes these remarks so dis- 
turbing is not that they may or may 
not be correct at some time in the 21 st 
century, but the effect they have now 
in the 1980s and 1990s. 

At this stage nobody knows if there 
ever can be, from a technical point of 
view, a rdiahle defense against ballis- 
tic missiles; most sdennsts doubt it 
And nobody knows all the counter- 
measures that a determined enemy 
might develop. Nor does anyone 
know whether such a system could be 
funded. The price tags currently 
quoted of around $500 billion are as 
speculative as the rest of the exercise. 

On this shaky basis, caution rather 
<Kan enthusiastic advocacy would 
seem the order of the day. One would 
expect a serious research effort to 


systems, coupled with persistent em- 
phasis that, for the foreseeable fu- 
ture, there is no alternative to the 
“balance of terror” as the under- 
pinning of our security. 

Yet we are seeing something very 
different From the highest authority 
of the Western world comes word 
that the dreadful morally repugnant 
days of deterrence through the threat 
of retaliation are numbered and the 
bright new and morally sound alter- 
native of strategic defense is nigh. 

If deterrence were a robust doc- 
trine with strong public support, one 
could dismiss these statements as the 
typical American way of presenting 
Visions as if they were reality. But 
deterrence is far from enjoying popu- 
lar support It has taken a serious 
knocking in recent years. Skepticism, 
doubts and outright rejection have 
grown In all Western societies. 

There are many reasons for this. 


The spectacle of an unrestrained 
aims race has raised fears about 
where all this might end. The dead- 
lock in arms control has disappointed 
many hopes. Military men and civil- 
ian strategists have pretended that 
somehow the waging of nuclear war 
could become a serious military op- 
tion. The peace movements have 
frightened themselves and others 
with the belief that deterrence is driv- 
ing the world to certain disaster. 

The net result is that deterrence 
through the threat of nuclear retalia- 
tion has become a brittle concept — 
not vis-a-vis adversaries but in the 
eyes of our own citizens. And yet to 
date It remains the only concept we 
have for survival in the nuclear age. 

Deterrence has helped to keep the 
peace between East and West for 40 
years. Unless political leaders should 
lose all caution, it is likely to continue 
to do so. To fight a nuclear war may 
well be immoral but to threaten nu- 


clear retaliation in order to prevent 
an atLack is a very different matter. 

And we may have no choice. If past 
experience is any guide, the attempt 
to escape from the midear dilemma 
through strategic defense will end up 
like aUother attempts in history that 
sought to replace offense by defense: 
with a new arms race and, despite 


major efforts, no basic change. 

If the Strategic Defense Initiative 



If the Strategic Defense Initiative 
should escape this fate, it would be 
little short of miraculous — some- 
thing to believe when it happens but 
not to bank on now. 

The difference between those in 
favor and those against the SDI is 
whether, in some distant future, de- 
fenses against ballistic missiles could 
really constrain a determined enemy 
attack. That remains to be seen. In 
the meantime, as Paul Nitze, special 
adviser on arms control to the presi- 
dent and the secretary of state, notes, 
for “at least the next 10 years we will 
continue to base deterrence on the 
ultimate threat of nuclear retaliation. 
We have little choice; today’s tech- 


nology provides no alternative.” 

But the constant attempts from the 
White House to talk strategic de- 
fenses up by talking retaliation down 
will make it increasingly difficult to 
regenerate and maintain public sup- 

C for the West’s nuclear doctrine. 

t if, at the end of all the research, 
a strategic defense, the bright new 
world, fails to materialize and we 
arrive bade where we started — in the 
old, grey world of deterrence? 

Enthusiasm for the SDI is thus an 
example of the familiar human fail- 
ing of constructing the future before 
mastering the present Unless solid 
research results allow for a proper 
examination, it is an example of stra- 
tegic escapism. There is, for a long 
time to cook, no alternative to keep- 
ing the peace by threatening an ene- 
my with nuclear destruction. 

Political leaders, instead of strain- 
ing further an already brittle consen- 
sus in our societies, should seek to 
strengthen it through realism and not 


Bv EWK In AftanblQdtt (Stockholm 1. Distributed by Corfcnnbls & Writers Syndicate. 


Don’t Split 
Europe’s 
Convoy 

By Giles Merritt 

B russels — The commoj 

Market is a joke, as anyone win 


is » 


,te 4 -^ ni . 




*.!- <Mh 


has business in more than (me Eure- 
pean country can confirm. Trucks ar- 
routinely held up at frontiers fo 
hours on end, and often for day. 

Exporting goods to aon-Cammuint 
destinations can be more siraighj 
forward and profitable than com • • r>i * ; t - 
with the bureaucratic demands of Ll 
neighboring EC country. - 

So, ou the face of it the laic* 
moves by France and West German 
to link up with the three Bendu 
countries and form a super-effider 
customs union at the heart of th 
Community might be warmly we 
coined, In fact, it is a devriopmec 
that must be viewed with alarm 
The risk is that the five commit *’ 
now trying to bind themselves togeti - 
er into a new common market «i 
instead destroy the Community erf li 
soon to be 11 In order to slrcamlia ■ 
their customs and immigration pn „ -i « \ \ 
cedures, they may jeopardize * ‘ 

ECs political and economic ties. '' 


-f— 4 

•.-I Arid 

.. .van* i 




■ - 




yi’Lmta., 


The attractions of recreating tfc 
original spirit of the Common Mi 
fcet are understandable. There is 
conviction in Paris and Bonn tin 
something has gone very wrong wit 
the Community launched back i 
1957, and that only the original si 
signatories of the Rome treaty a 
sufficiently “European" to retail 
the EC that (he founding fathers ct 
visaged. (If Italy has been exclude 
from the negotiations now talon 
place in Paris, it is chiefly becau 
President Francois Mitterrand fean 


i ..*# 

■-'lit :st 




--- * « 

Mr* i 


the Italian propensity lor delay.} ,• 
“A strong flavor of the good ol La 


[uiloHwwj 


v. +*0 m 




“A strong flavor of the good ol jiii *** * ^ 

days," was how a senior Belgian Si wrftjg 4 

ure described the atmosphere wfae -■ m *-*** m 

French and West German minute , Swmf 

met Benelux counterparts in Brussc . . .,. 4 ~ s*. ^ 

last month to launch the corapli 

negotiations for dovetailing nation t-wira* m 

procedures. By early next year a inn 

should be able to cross any border : - J *••«■*« 

the new- zone in under 10 minutes. 

The French-Gcrman drive tocof .. . _ . 

the tighter links of the Benelux co ” 

nomic union dates back to last Ju **** *?* * 

and the Kohl-Mitterrand summit wm 

SaarbrOcken. Hard on the heels 

the previous month's Fontainebla t . _ '.a - 

decision by all the EC heads of gO ’f;rjc s < iUL!i!) lt>r l JttSl 
eminent that internal trade libers *" “ 

izations were urgently needed, li r “ 

two leaders evidently concluded th ■ -- 7* 

they could not wait lot Brussel: : ' . ** 

cumbersome diplomatic procedure -,,>«** ** 

The Benelux countries were d- • - 

lighted. They are ardent support* 

of ever closer European Integra tic . -1* 

They have been the Cornmunin . t 

soul and conscience ever since t 

day in September 1944 when the Ik . ■ i mm 

gjan, Netherlands and Luxemboi 

govemments-in-exile met in U jSS- 

don’s Savoy Hotel to agree on a q ' ^ 

toms umon that came into force ft_ " 1 v W ~ •= ; ? 

years later as the ECs precursor. -ww** 

The Benelux union has remain 
kmd of the Community with 
cooperation pacts uniting the tin 
governments. But it is transform 
into something much less desiral 
by the addition of France and Wi 
Germany. It becomes the vehicle 1 
a “two-speed Europe." 

The possibility that the EC m 


' .• •* *> 

x«ti» 


split, with one croup forging abe 
while the other lacs ever farther 1 


while the other lags ever farmer 1 
hind, is an old political bogey. T 
ECs cohesion and its inlernatiot 
dout would be weakened. 

Yet the truth is that synchromzi 
the political stances of the 10 meml 
governments has become prpgn 
sively harder, and most of those gc 
eroments have began to entertain t 
idea of a two-speed Europe even 
they have been careful not to say t 

The code words are “a Enrol 
of variable geometry,” meaning pi 
jects like Airbus that do not preasi J 
minor EC membership, and “a rtJ 
tier Europe" that acknowledges ti* 
some EC countries are richer th 
others even if economic converger; 


etv 


is officially the Community's gdaU 
For more than 25 years tne ethos jjQn tp.. 
Europe has been that convergence 1 ‘U • 


essential to unity. But that roirit . W; 
entiehtened self-sacrifice bv the rit 


enlightened self-sacrifice by 
er EC countries no longer 


Seemingly Seamy and Thus Unseemly 


streagtnen it uurougu realism ana not ct EC countries no longer prevail- ^ 
weaken it through illusions. In the Chancellor Hdmut Kohl made tK^lLulp, 
nuclear age, you play around with plain enough in Dublin last Deces; 
deterrence at your penL ber when he remarked that the EC - 


The writs- is political editor <4 the 


W ASHINGTON — “Unseem- 
ly” is not a word used often 
these days. If it is not illegal gpes 


By William Safire 


these days. If it is not illegal gpes 
the post-post-Watergate morality, 
it is not wrong. To denounce an act 
as “unethical* draws a sntirk. “Im- 
proper” gets a shrug. The weakest 
of these, “unseemly ” carries as lit- 
tle sting as “inappropriate.” 

I animadvert here on what ob- 
servers in Washington have come to 
call with world-weary amusement 
and not the slightest pricking of 
conscience, “the BMW affair.” 

As scandals gp, it is no big deal. 
White House aides, advance men 
and Secret Service agents went to 
West Germany to make arrange- 
ments for President Reagan's trip 
to the Bonn economic summit in 
May. Many of the Americans pro- 
ceeded to make excellent arrange- 
ments for themselves, using diplo- 
matic passports and ibdrReagan 
association to purchase BMW auto- 
mobiles al a 20-pexcent discount 

A few of us — blnenoses, stiffs, 
sensation-seeking ethidsts — think 
it worthy to note the irony in the 
president's men paving the way for 
his economic discussions about the 
overvalued dollar by taking the 
time to ship borne German -made 
cars for personal use in America. 

Some doubt that it is fitting for 
Wbite House aides, whose trans- 
portation toEurqpe was raid by the 
taxes of autoworkers in Detroit, to 
take advantage of that travel to buy 
the products of those who compete 
with American autoworkers. 

A few others lift an eyebrow at 
the propriety erf U.S. government 
officials getting something for 


nothing. In the case of Michael 
Dearer, the presidential aide who 
rose to great heights on the basis of 
his senativity to public opinion, his 
“perk” was a saving of about 58,000 
on a sedan. What did BMW expect 
to receive in return for this largesse? 

Ordinary American tourists and 
tax-harassed executives could ask: 
When these cars are resold in 
America new or used, should this 
discount, available only to some 
special Americans with black diplo- 
matic passports, be reported to the 
IRS as a taxable fringe benefit? 

After Newsweek unveiled the 
deal a Secret Service spokesman 
told Howard Kurtz of The Wash- 
ington Post that none of its agents 
were involved. Said a BMW offi- 
cial asked if the special discount 
would be available if any White 
House officials planned to resell the 
cars, “I'm in the car business. I'm 
not in the morality business.” 

How did President Reagan react 
to the private dealings of advance 
men sent abroad on the public's 
business? His was the classic every- 
body-does-it response: “You’re 
talking about something that has 
gone on for a great many years, that 
exists in oar embassies in ah other 
countries. It’s a standard practice." 

The While House counsel Fred 
Fielding, was called upon to give 
his imprimatur to the car-buying 
scheme. The role of White House 
counsel has degenerated into (I) 
publicly condoning the tawdry ads. 
short of outright graft, of staffers; 


(2) docking embarrassing inquiries; 

(3) writing a new regulation to pre- 
vent others from domgrt again 

True to form, Mr. Fielding put 
out a statement that he found 
“nothing per se illegal or unetitical” 
about the purchases of the nine 
luxury cars ou the Bonn advance. 
Then he distributed a directive for- 
bidding future abuse of the diplo- 
matic passport by advance men. 

The Secret Service spokesman, it 
turns out, had been misinformed; 
some agents did purchase the BMW 
cars. White House aides who drive 
rickety American-made vehicles 
charge that this deal was bruited 
about for months by members erf 
the Secret Service White House de- 
tail- The new secretary of the Trea- 
sury should ask: Granted, such ac- 
ceptance of foreign favors is not 
unlawful but isn't it unseemly for 
these brave men to be touting for- 
eign-car discounts on the ride? 

Ah. there is that word: “unseem- 
ly." When something gives you a 
creepy feeling: when tne president 
of die United States is forced by the 
dictates of personal loyalty to up- 
hold a practice he knows demeans 
his aides and his office; when the 
lawyer on the premises says it was 
okay up till now, but. not to worry, 
it won’t happen again — then we 
have an example of unseemliness. 

People in high places tend to fed 
that an admission of unseemliness 
weakens them. Not so. Mr. Reagan 
would have done better to say: “I 
know if s been done all along, but 
that sort of thing doesn't set right 
with me. I told them to cut it oul" 

The New York Times. 


the International Institute for Strut 
Studies in London. He contributed 
comment to The Washington Post 


plain euougn in Liu mm last ueccx: 
ber when be remarked that the EC ^ 
a convoy that can no longer afford-, 
sail at the speed of the slowest shr-i 
Mr. Kohl and others who belie v 
that the ECs future lies with the IP - 

countries that are the most progr- - 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are sub/ect to editing We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


shre might reflect on the warturjin 
technique of convoying: The bigi^. 
they are, the safer they become. ^ 


they are, the safer they’ become. ^ 

It is in any case impossible to ct. 
the dock bad: to the time when n 
Community was a trading bloc rat] 1 
that the complex political entity s 
today. Bonn and Paris would do h ' 

ter to discuss trade liberalization w 

all of their EC partners. ti.r 

International Herald Tribune. AflJ 


10 nonsl 
Daily nt 
DjiIy-74 
Thu. Fri, 
Daily 74 
Kn. Sat r : 
Hut arid 
Iwavai 
Daily . 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Missiles and Missiles destroying lCBMs, having^ 


Missiles and Missiles destroying lCBMs, having an accu 

cy of 90 meters and a destmeo . 

The editorial “The MX in the Real probability of 99 percent. i. 

World" (March 2) contains two er- The second error is the notion tl , 1 U)I 
rots. The first is Uie notion that the the Soviets have an advantage due- 5r ; 
United States has no missiles match- their ability to knock out a hiri . ' 1 * 


I Xniv no 

Multiple 


ing the capabilities of the Soviet SS- percentage of U.S. ICBMs 
18s and SS-19& The canabilitv of America can knock out of thei 


18s and SS-19& The capability of 
interest here is the ability to destroy 
missile silos, a capability that de- 
pends mainly on accuracy and that 
can be quantified in terms of the “silo 
destruction probability." The U5. 
Minuteman-3 missile with a Mark 

is accuraie^o within^dmeters (720 
feet) mid has a destruction probabili- 
ty of 58 percent against typical silos. 
The Soviet SS-18 (in the 10-warhead 
model) has an accuracy of 260 meters 
and a destruction probability of 56 
percent. The SS-19 is similar. These 
highly accurate Soviet models were 
first deployed in 1982, three years 
after the upgraded model of the Min- 
uuaman-3, and are obviously compa- 
rable to iL The MX, on the other 
hand, will be the first of the true rilo- 


Araerica can knock oul of theirs, 
seen above, tins situation is not < 
to any advantage of Soviet tnisvjL 
technology. It is entirely due to 
fact that the Soviets have placed ■ .-y 


lXiilv?4; 

Nonstop 


IHtel Will IMV WWI1UW ■ S -J* •' • 

percent of their warheads on lai ” . ] \ t 
based ICBMs, while the Uni\ v * \ \ 


based ICBMs, while the Um\ 
States has put only 25 percent 
ICBMs, wisely baring the remain 
on bombers and submarines. So, 
course the Soviets can destroya bi^ 'tljhl 
er percentage of America's ICBMfc *1 
but ICBMs are only pan of the sic^j 

Tl u " iL.* iL. * A iaI Cnt O* 


er percentage of America's ICBMi » 

but ICBMs are only part of the sifrij lU; 

The result is that the total Sot [ V . 
strategic force is actually signifies’ “ - \ 

ly more vulnerable to a U.S. surp 1 


I *ai)y 
Multiple 


attack than the total U.S. force is t 
Soviet attack. MX deployment ' 
make this disparity much greater. 

ART HOBSOT* 
Stockholm 


Daily 

Multi 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Page 9 


SCIENCE 


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' 4 . .Turkish Scientist Suggests Ark Site 

ANKARA (Reuters) — Noah’s ark could not have landed on Mount 
.. Ararat in Turkey, where many have sought its remains, according to a 
.■■report by Yflmaz Guner, a government geologist who analyses forms of 
• • . : landscape. But be did not rule out the possibility of the ark’s having come 
. 'to rest oh Mount Cudi, also in Turkey. 

■ In a paper prepared for a sdenrific convention. Dr. Guner said that the 
Old Testament flood was probably an ocean tidal movement and that 
4yarat, near the Soviet border, was too high to have been reached by it A 
• . possible landing place was Cudi, near the border with Iraq, he said. 

. . He said a boat-shaped rock formation on Ararat was merely a shape 
frequently found in volcanic regions. 

Bees Said to Store Photo-Like Images 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — The ability of honeybees to remember the 
i and p at te rns of flowers seems more sophisticated than scientists 


Learning to Live With the Artificial Heart 


\ Dr. James L. Gould of Princeton, using an experimental device that 
. tad artificial flowers with different patterns, tested honeybees’ abilities to 
, " : .-earn the differences. He concluded, in a report in SdaKX magazine, that 
■ ' he bees can in d eed remember by storing photo-Uke images in their 
\-jrainS. 

■ ' * . There also seem to be prejudices built into honeybees’ recognition 
systems, he said For example, it has also been learned recently that bees 
.-can to prefer the color violet. No one knows exactly why this preference 
r uists, but the bees will learn most quickly to recognize violet-colored 
* ' wurces of food. 

Worid Has 344 A-Plants, Agency Says 

'“ r VIENNA (NYT) — By the end of 1984, the International Atomic 
Energy Agency reports, there were 344 atomic reactors — 33 came online 
’ - - last year — delivering electric power in 26 countries. The agency said 
_ radeai reactors have an accumulated 3,500 years of operating experience 
. ‘with no accident having significant harmful effects on the public.” 

The percentage of U. S. electricity derived from nuclear power, the 
jgpncy reported, was 13.5, roughly equal to the world average. The 

- estimate for the Soviet Union was 9 percent 

• Ha French percentage, 58.7, was highest, followed by Belgium, 50.8 
jercent, and Finland and Sweden, both more than 40 percent Others 

- '.ocluded Switzerland, 36.5; Bulgaria, 28.6; West Germany 23.2; Japan, 

' £9; Hungary. 222; Spain, 19 J; Britain, 17 J; Canada, 11.6; Gzechoslo- 

ralrifl, 8J; and the Netherlands. 5.8. 

Cities Called Mosquito Breeders 

"J '• ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey (AP) — U. S. urban areas have become 

.r .vxime breed in g grounds for mosquitoes, which are attracted by lights and 
_• jools of water. Dr. William R. Horsfall, professor emeritus at the 
. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. has told the American 
. .-'tfosquiio Control Association at its annual meeting. 

One result of the rising urban mosquito population may be an increase 
n cases of mosquito-carried disease, he said “Nationally, the mosquito 
~ jopulaiion is greatly reduced.” he said, but the insect's numbers are on 
. . he rise in metropolitan areas. 

_ . Dr. Horsfall said lights on buddings and the blue street lights popular 
: n most urban centers draw mosquitoes, while sodium vapor street fights 
, .‘ 'with an orange glow are less alluring. In addition, development in aties 

•’ ass upset normal drainage, he said. 

Sevf Coating Sought for Catheters 

~ GAINESVILLE, Florida (UPI) — Infections associated with urinary 
■ atheterizatiotu which about 73 tnillioa people undergo in the United 
. ; 1 tales every year, are believed to contribute to up to 56,000 deaths 
-unuaDy, out a University of Florida engineer is trying to develop a 

• oating to prevent the buildup of crystalline material frequently observed 

• a such infections. 

- Chris Batich, a materials engineer, said the coating would prevent 
aldum oxalate crystals from sticking to the portion of the catheter that 

• aters the bladder and in the interior of the tube. 

' Catheter manufacturers usually apply srhcooe or Teflon coatings to the 
nbes. But Mr. Batich said the coating most be able to flex with the 
nflat/on of the small balloon that locks the catheter in place, and tiny 
racks that attract the crystals often develop on the surface. * 


By Lawrence KL Altman 

jVew York Tima Service 

T UCSON, Arizona — William 
J. Schroeder did not attend his 
son’s wedding Saturday, but he did 
attain a medical milestone. Despite 
extreme physical weakness and 
damage from a severe stroke, he 
reached his 1 12th day on a Jarvik-7 
heart. Thai is how long Dr. Barney 
Gaik, the first human to receive 
the device, lived with it. 

Artificial hearts got two other 
boosts last week, both from the 
Food and Drug Administration, 
The federal agency approved Dr. 
William S. Pierce's plans to use the 
Penn State heart experimentally ai 
the Hershey (Pen nsylv ania) Medi- 
cal Center. And an rDA official on 
a fact-finding visit to the Universi- 
ty of Arizona Medical Center en- 
couraged Dr. Jack G. Copeland to 
seek permission to use artificial 
hearts in the transplant program he 
heads here in Tucson. 

Dr. 'Copeland stirred up a con- 
troversy recently when he per- 
formeda bizarre marathon of oper- 
ations in which he im planred the 
Phoenix heart, an unapproved de- 
vice, in the chest of Thomas 
Creighton in a desperate attempt to 
save the 33-year-old automobile 
mechanic’s life. The implant, ne- 
cessitated by the failure of a human 
heart that Dr. Copeland had trans- 
ited the previous day, was 161- 
by another human-heart 
transplant. 

Despite Mr. Creighton's eventu- 
al death, the sequence of events 
illustrated bow an artificial heart 
could be used as a bridge to buy 
time until a human heart could be 
found. A small but growing num- 
ber of doctors envision the day 
when teus of thousands of heart- 
auack victims, taken to hospitals 
after their hearts stopped or 
developed shock, wffl wind up wit 
the artificial implants. 

Some may speed the rest of their 
lives on the devices. For others, the 
experience, may be temporary — 
just long enough to give their dam- 
aged organs a chance to heal or to 
sustain them until a human trans- 
plant can be found. 

Many of the devices will be total 
artificial beam like the Jarvik-7, 
the Penn State heart or a variation 
of the Phoenix bean. These indude 
right and left ventricles held to- 
gether by materials such as Velcro 
and attached to the recipients' nat- 
ural upper heart chambers. 

But many more are likely to be 
partial hearts designed for short- 
term use and already being tested 
experimentally in several hospitals. 
These machines, called left ventric- 
ular or right ventricular assist de- 
vices, take over the function of the 
left ventricle, the main pumping 
chamber of the heart, or the right 




Natural 
Right Atrium 

Artificial 
Valyas 

Artificial 
Right «, 
Ventricle / 




Aorta 




Pulmonary 

Artery 




Rubber 

Diaphragm 

Air Hosea 



Da NmrVorkThiM 

How Jarvik-7 artificial heart fits into chest 


ventricle, giving the mus- 

cle time to recover. 

Dr. Copeland used the Phoenix 
heart as a temporary measure, al- 
though he said later that be had not 
considered what he would have 
done if, during the time it was sus- 
taining Mr. C reigh ton, the patient 
had had another stroke or other 
medical catastrophe that would 
have made the second transplant 
inadvisable: Dr. Copeland said the 
machine, which was designed for a 
calf, not a human, worked flawless- 
ly until it was removed to give Mr. 
Creighton his fourth heart of the 
week (counting the one be was bom 
with). The surgeon said Mr. 
Creighton's death was not due to 
the artificial heart but to complica- 
tions from bring on a heart-lung 
bypass machin e for more than 10 
hours while Dr. Copeland waited 
for the artificial organ to arrive by 
helicopter. 

Although some legal and ethics 
experts criticized Dr. Copeland's 
action and said the government 


should take steps to prevent further 
such moves. Dr. David W. Johnson 
of the FDA called it “a unique 
emergency.” 

Dr. Johnson, who made his com- 
ments after a five-hour meeting 
with officials and physicians at the 
University of Arizona, said he 
would review the case with his su- 
perion in Washington. “We may 
find that the FDA is part of ihe 
problem," he said. “Maybe we 
should be approaching some situa- 
tions differently than we have.” 

Legal and bureaucratic consider- 
ations aside, such use of the artifi- 
cial heart would give heart trans- 
plant patients the benefit of 
backup technology now available 
to kidney transplant patients. 
When someone awaits a kidney 
transplant or the organ fads after 
suiginy. an individual can be sus- 
tained by dialysis, which usually 
involves a thrice-weekly cleansing 
of the blood. This allows greater 
freedom than that now offered to a 


total artificial heart recipient, who 
must be tethered to a power supply 
white the device is in place. 

Bui 'in bringing natural heart 
transplant procedures within reach 
of more patients, artificial hearts 
can be expected to aggravate an 
already senous shortage of organs. 
Dr. Copeland counted on an infor- 
mal priority system to move Mr. 
Creighton to tne head of the wait- 
ing list for his second human heart 
transplant. It would certainly be 
harder, ethically If not practically, 
to jump an individual ahead of oth- 
ers when artifida] devices were 
keeping more end-stage heart pa- 
tients alive. 

Further, the demand for human 
hearts to transplant is likely to in- 
crease because of the one million or 
so Americans who have undergone 
coronary bypass surgery. Many are 
bound to bet»me transplant candi- 
dates as the veins taken from their 
legs and put in their hearts deterio- 
rate from the inexorable damage of 
atherosclerosis, the underlying 
cause of their heart disease. 

Little wonder that Dr. William 
G DeVries, the surgeon who im- 
planted the Jarvik-7 m Mr. Schroe- 
der and Dr. Dark, believes that 
patients and doctors must consider 
all artificial hearts permanent. 
Even if medical catastrophes that 
could make transplant operations 
inadvisable are avoided, he argues, 
there will still be no assurance that 
a human heart will be available. 


Effectiveness of Heart Drags 

United Press Intemnucnal 

WASHINGTON — Studies 
show that tissue plasminogen acti- 
vator. winch can limit the severity 
of heart attacks, is almost twice as 
effective as streptokinase, a similar 
substance now on the market, ac- 
cording to Dr. Eugene Passamani, 
associate director of the National 
Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. 


Skyrocketing Shuttle Prices Pose Dilemma 


United Press International 

W ASHINGTON — NASA proposes to raise the 
price of a space shuttle night to S87 million 
starting in 1989, but the U. S. Transportation Depart- 
ment wants even higher prices so commercial rockets 
can compete for satellite launching business. 

Therein lies a dilemma. A new report by the Con- 
gressional Budget Office says significantly higher 
prices for a shuttle launch trill divert some of its 
business to the expendable European rocket Ariane 
unless the Arianespace consortium raises its prices. 
But unless the shuttle prices are considerably higher 
than the National Aeronautics and Space Administra- 
tion proposes, companies trying to find business for 
expendable Delta and Atias-Cemaur rockets are not 
likely to succeed, the report said. 

If the price of carrying a satellite aboard the shuttle 
is so high that it makes it cheaper to fly on a Delta or 
Atlas-Centaur, NASA will lose ah but the most spe- 


cialized commercial and foreign satellite business, the 
budget office said. That would mean the cost to 
taxpayers for the remaining shuttle missions would be 
mud) more than it would be if NASA had commercial 
and foreign business to go along with military and 
space-agency missions. 

The price for a shuttle launch is S38 million in 1982 
dollars. Starting next year and running through 1988, 
the price will be S71 million in 1982 dollars, but the 
analysis said that will not cover all costs. 

The NASA administrator, James M. Beggs, said 
President Ronald Reagan directed NASA to produce 
a pricing {dan for “ftfl cost recovery” for shuttle 
operations starting in 1989. Eric Hamishek, deputy 
director of the Congressional Budget Office, told a 
House subcommittee that NASA proposed S87 mil- 
lion a flight for 1989 through 1991. Mr. Hanushek said 
that price — figured on the basis of 1982 dollars — 
called for recovery of average operational costs only. 


SURFACE OF 


massive star n 

ENVELOPE VaPlP ' 


■ 


jjSgpx shock, wave 

Wy FROM COLLAPSED 
' CORE 


June 6, 1983: Star itt galaxy N(i( -1699 
found to have brightened 300 times. 


DIAMETER OF /£ 
OUR SOLAR /M 
SYSTEM tm 





June 14, 1983: Hypothetical shock 
wave, K0 percent of way to surface. 



June 23, 1983: Shock wave reaches 
surface; star at maximum brilliance. 


ORIGINAL 
RADIOS or 
STAI 



Late July 1983: Star, blasted apart by 
the supernova explosion, reaches a 
radius of S billion miles. 


Nanoral OpwlAttwonyOtw nai nn 

SUPERNOVA SEEN — U. S-, Argentine and Chil- 
ean astronomers have reported the tint detailed obser- 
vations of early stages of a supernova, an explosion 
■believed to mark the demise of a giant star. Data from 
the 1983 observations has taken unto now to interpret 


Pan Am Is Flying 
BetweenThese Cities 


wl -li.-.i ■ 

hry- •* 

London to: 


New York 


Washington 

in ■ 

Miami 


. Tampa 


Los Angeles 


San Francisco 


Seattle 

(Ao***”- — r '- 

Berlin 

/ fc# W-" 

Hamburg 

J ijeru 

lfi.fr* ** 

- 

Frankfurt to: 

m* ' : : 

w. - 

New York 

.Jw 

i»T' 

Berlin 

TOTtnirn 

‘ l!1 Munich to: 

New York 

1 Wlr* 

Zurich 

i *v ; * 

i ■*< 

Hamburg to: 


London-USA 

At'-' 

Beilin 

1 


;§■ '> 

AX. 

n'*'" 

' & , . pi . 

.*■ 

S. 

A. ••• 


Nuremburg to: 

Bmssels-USA 

Beilin 


ID nonstop 747's a week 
Daily nonstop 747's 
Daily 747's 

Thu, Fri, Sat, Sun. 747's 
Daily 747's (except Tue & Wed) 
Fri, Sat, Sun, Mon, 747's 
Thu and Sat. Nonstop 747's 
Twice a day 
Daily 

Daily nonstop 747's 
Multiple Daily 

Daily 747's 

Nonstop 747's on Fri, Sat, Sun. 
Daily 

Multiple Daily 


Daily 

Multiple Daily 


Stuttgart to: 

Berlin 
Zurich 
New York 

Berlin to: 

Frankfurt 

Stuttgart 

Hamburg 

Nuremburg 

Zurich 

London 

Brussels 

Zurich to: 

Newark 
Munich 
Stuttgart - 
Beilin 

Paris to: 

New York 
Rome 


Multiple Daily 
Multiple Daily 
Fri, Sat, Sim. 


Multiple Daily 
Multiple Daily 
Multiple Daily 
Multiple Daily 
Multiple Daily 
Twice a day 
Daily 


Nonstop 747's on Fri, Sat, Sun. 
Nonstop 747's on Fri, Sat, Sun. 

Daily 


Daily 747's (except Tue, Wed). 
Wed, Sun. 747's 


Rome to: 

New York 

Daily 747's (except Tue, Wed). 

Paris 

Mon & Thu. 747's 

Brussels to: 

New York 

Daily 

Washington 

Daily 

Miami 

Daily 

West Coast 

Daily (except Tue, Wed). 

Tampa 

Thu, Fri, Sat, Sun. 

Nuremberg 

Daily 

Berlin 

Daily 

Dhahran to: 

New York 

Nonstop 747's on Wed and Sat. 


Pan Am's Flights Beyond 
New York and Miami: 
Newark- Washington Twice Daily 

New York-Miami Twice Daily 

New York - Los Angeles Daily 

Miami - Los Angeles Daily 

Call your Travel Agent or Pan Am for 
more details. . 








Em Am.Ybu Can't Beat The Experience: 









E< 


AH 

An- 

Alt 


At) 

M 

In 


CM 

CM 


■A 

Fto 

F« 

Ota 


IM 

Ln 

Lit 

In 


N« 

OU 


(•I 

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w» 

fin 

Vr» 

v* 

*0 

Xar 


M 


Aal 

Bli 

a® 

J«r 

in 

OC 


Ant 

5*t 


C'j 

tsi 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


VOL Hlua Lew UM OMB 


PnlCo 
ITT Co 
Chryilr 
GMcrt 
Texaco 
Fort IM 

ABriref 

CBS 

Tandy 

RCA 

Am Exp 

Morans 

AmHei 

IBM 

PMPtwtl 


30339 SPA 
18511 3414 
15400 3A 
15140 76% 
14061 35% 
13339 40** 
13103 107 
13053 THU 
12750 33% 
1Z741 43% 
12519 43 
12324 46% 
12138 31% 
HIM 130% 
tarn am 


si 

31% 

33% 

73% 

34% 

4ZK> 

UM 

HU 

32% 

41% 

41% 

45% 

30% 

129 

37% 


52% 42 
33% -41% 

33=23 

106% -4 
105% 4-7% 

3* — % 
4J% +% 
43 +1 

46 

21% 42% 
129% -1% 
30% — % 


Dow Jones Averages 


CNMfl HWi Law Lot t Qua 


Indus. 127U3 1277.39 12S7J4 126524— £85 

Trans 40441 60629 S96JS 599,09 — 421 

Util 14926- 15023 14824 14921 4- 021 

C0m» 51489 51680 50920 51185— IK 


NYSE Index 


Camoaslte 

industrials 

Tranm 

UttHtte 

Finance 


Prsteous 

Tothrr 

MWi 

Low 

OOM 

3 PM. 

(0151 

10Z61 

10351 

10357 

119 JB 

11755 

119 JB 

11983 

9724 

95J6 

97 24 

97 JB 

54.(9 

5181 

5X19 

5XZ7 

WJ7J7 

105.92 

107 J7 

107.22 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages 

Today 


Bands 

Utintlas 

Industrials 


7U3 

' 6857 

7548 


7245 

6943 

7548 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Dsdlnsd 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New H lotis 
New Laws 


708 

1058 

854 

512 

446 

449 

2020 

2019 

41 

64 

10 

11 


OdcH-ot Trading In N.Y. 


March 19 
March 10 
March 15 
March 14 
March 13 


Bay Sates 
212462 521257 
10663 491909 
179217 454498 
179495 403245 
204426 526843 


Inducted In the sales floor** 


•SUM 

14405 

1291 

2426 

1567 

14M 


Wednesday^ 

MSE 

Closing 


Vte.ot3P.M_ 


SMI MM 


nw.3P4f.98L 9570700 , 

Prev cmaoltdated dose 140335400 1 


Tabled iadude the naHoawtde prices 
up to the ckulna on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


□echoed , 
Uncto w sd 
Total (BOB 
New Malts 
Now Laws 


30 

301 

260 


306 

S 

788 

19 

11 


NASDAQ Index 


Week Year 


composite 

Indus! rial* 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tram. 


37685 37833 7H42 
21800 9893 30141 28783 


32847 — 

moo — 

26147 — 
3127 — 

355.1* — 


331.15 36923 
33124 34*89 
26130 TIM* 
2*9.15 2M«3 
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Trading Active on N. Y. Market 


IMud Pros International 

NEW YORK — The stock market was slight- 
ly lower late Wednesday in active trading, as 
investors watched for an attempt to follow 
through on the big increase of the previous 
session. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which 
gained 21.42 Tuesday, was down 0.77 to 
I,270J2 about an hoar before the dosing. The 
average had been down more than 6 points 
before rebounding. 

Declines and advances were nearly even 


Although prices in tables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. close in New York, fir time 
reasons this article Is basal on the market at 3 
PM. 


among the 1,944 issues crossing the New York 
Stock Exchange tape. 

The five-hour Big Board volume amounted to 
about 88 JO milli on shares, compared with 
95.76 million in the corresponding period Tues- 
day. 

Alan Ackerman of Herzfeld & Stern said the 
stock market was likely to “build a base for 
another move upward." 

“The weakness of the dollar gives a favorable 
bias to the outlook for multinational including 
IBM and drug stocks," Mr. Ackerman said. 

He added that some decline in the dollar was 
needed after its recent strength, and if the 
currency swings become more predictable, the 
investment picture will improve. He said the 
currency fluctuations of the last few days repre- 
sented an over-reaction to the problems involv- 
ing some Ohio savings and loans. 


Before the stock market opened, the Com- 
merce Department repotted personal income 
gained 03 percent in February. The January 
figure was revised to show an increase of 0.6 
percent 

The report also showed that personal spend- 
ing was up 0.7 percent in February, slightly kss 
than December and January. The report tended 
to reinforce the perception of analysts in recent 
days that the economy, while healthy, is not 
booming like it did at the beginning of 1984. 

John Burnett of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jetr- 
retie said stocks were reflecting confusion due 
to the volatility of currency and precious metals 
markets. He also said the decline was in reac- 
tion “to the slippage in IBM b eca us e they’re 
throwing in the towel with the PCjr." 

On the floor, Texaco Inc. was near the top of 
the active list at mid-session, down slightly. 
PepsiCo, was up in heavy trading. The company 
denied rumors that it might be acquired by 
Philip Morris. 

Auto issues weakened after several brokerage 
houses lowered gaming s estimates. General 
Motors, Ford and Chiysler were down slightly. 

IBM was off slightly. After the close Tuesday, 
IBM announced it would stop manufacturing 
its IBM PCjr home computer. IBM has had 
problems marketing the machine. 

Apple Computer, traded over the counter, 
was up slightly, and Tandy Corp. was un- 
changed. 

Among other technology stocks. Motorola 
and Digital Equipment were up a bit, while 
National Semiconductor was down slightly. 

Among the energy issues, Exxon and Mobil 
were up slightly. Phillips Petroleum was down. 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Dtv. YkL PE 


Si. 

Mb mgb Low 


Cton 

QuoLOiHe 


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11 

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48% 36% Ct«T#C 210 5J 9 417 38% 37% 37%— % 

11% 7% Corral J07 J M T02 10 9*4 9%— % 

44V* 30% CartPIr ID 19 11 258 41% 40 41% + % 

32% UR* CarfHW 122 4J 52 I486 27 26% 27 + % 

34% IfNtCanWI J2 15 12 440 33% 33 33% +1% 

16% 9% OHCNG 1J9 73 7 « UH 1M UH+M 

18% 9% CasttCk 730 11*5. 10% — % 

32** 15% Csttc Pf 124 243 20% 20% 20%— % 

53** 28*6 CatrpT JO U 5017 30% 2916 30 + % 

27** 16 Cm J6 13 11 173 23 22*6 22*6— % 

94% 62*6 CManw MD 49 1 B1 91*6 90% n%— 1% 

40% 34 Catann* 450 116 2 31** 3B*t 30** + % 

15 7% Cansvn jM J 23 218 ■**■%■% 

41% 32 Cantrt 238 59 9 210 4M6 40 40%—% 


2*% 17 Ctotnn 
23% 17 CanSoW 2JZ 9.1 
25% 16% CanHud 284 1U 
23% 18% CenllLI 232 95 
43 36 CnIUnf 450 10J 


10 206 23% 21 21 — % 

6 1716 32% 22 22% + % 

6 01 24% 24H 24% + % 

8 1068 21*6 22% 23% + % 

10: 42 42 42 +1% 


IB 

U Oil IPS 

1J0 9J 7 335 

17* 

17*6 

17*6 

23% 

17*6 CnLoEl 

156 BJ A 50 

23 

22* 

22* 

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79# CaMPw 

180 1X0 4 167 

10% 

10 

10 

22% 

14 CnSova 

J4 XB IS 2371 

22% 

22 

33 — 1* 

18*6 

109# CVtPS 

150 11.1 5 17 

17(6 

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14(6 

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561 

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10% 

7*6 Cntry Tl 

JO 7J 1 100 


10% 

18(6 

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1«# Canvitt 

280 I2J 9 243 

21 

20*6 

20*6 


15*6 Crt-feed 


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23 — 1% 

24*# 

17 CassAIr 

80 10 34 131 

19* 

194* 

19*6 + % 

26(6 


80 15 2B44 

21(6 

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279# 

19 OimlPf 

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33% 

23% 

23% + (6 

54 

43(6 Chml pf 

480 9J 41 

49*6 

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10% 

8 ChamSp 

80 X6 12 273 

B*6 

8% 

8% 

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1 teChrtc 
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1% vlChrtpf 

71 

2% 

2* 

2% 

10(6 

7 

2% 

2* 

2% 

56(6 

35% Ctaa 

380 78 4 4M7 

51* 

51V# 

51*# — % 

43 

34% Ctew Pf 

525 1X6 10 

46 

41% 

41%— *% 

51 

a CAomd; 

4J3aT12 71 

52% 

53% 

53% — % 

53% 51 ClmaaM 

9J0el78 _ 31 

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53% 

53*#— (6 


21*6 14 Owl Seer 32 3J 8 25 

34% 24% Chamad 152 io 13 19 

4] 23% ChmNY 248 AJ 6 1230 

42% Z3M OlNVpf TAJ 4.9 3 

50% 48 CUNY Of 653al20 469 

56*k 46 ChNVpr 555*112 5 

39% 31% CbtH* 124 35 11 38 

38** 32% CtWSPn 250 *2 10 1614 

48% 29% ChBvrn 140 7J I 2368 


.10# A 7 
J3t 39 91 
AU 1.1 


30 315400 
27 14 172 
22 16 579 


928 144 

a ms 

74 2 A 13 


JO J 


31*6 17% CNWrt 
300 112% CMMIw 
75 53% CtllMlof 

26*6 16% OlIPnT 

15 7% ChkFHlII 

44% 24% OlrtsOr 

12% 5 cnrbfn 
13% M6 diromo 
54 42 Ctirm nf 

36% 20% Chrvslr UM 
63% 34% ClKJOBs 220 
37 21% Church 80 

18% TIM ChTCflwl 
46 35% cm Bad 3.12 72 

15% 8% anOE 2.16 144 

31 24 ClnOPf 4JM 138 

37 26% emept 475 146 

68% SO OdGar 9 JO 145 

68 48 OnGPf 

2f% a cinMff 

36 21*6 ardK 

31 16% Clraty 

zm 13% Oran 
47% Z7% CTUcm _ 

16 68% arto* J* 8.19*104 
99*6 75% aioi MA974al08 

101 97% CncsiftfB9J12e 9.1 

44% 32% atyiav 
68 52 Ctvinpf 280 24 

25% 21*6 Cfylnuf 2J7 114 
11*6 6% OobJr 72 MU 
36*6 23% Clarice 
16 6% aavHm 

22% 17 aval 

20% 13% CJevEI .... 

SB% 46% CtwEI pf 740 1M 
59 47 Civ El of 756 111 

16% 10 devote 80 45 
17% 19% Clvpkpf 223 134 
a 14** avdepf 184 107 . 
34% 22% Clorew 120 35 ll 
21% 14% CfubMn 
31*6 23 OuottP 
19*6 15 ChMt Pf 
21% 12% C#04Wi 
3946 23% Coastal 
42% 24% Cstlpf 
43 24% Crttpf 

66% 53% Cocoa 
19% 9*6 Cotaca 
34 25% Cate inn 


19*6 19 19 — *6 

30% 30% 30%+** 
30% 3746 38 — % 

as ant a + % 

54% 54 54% + 16 

53% 53% 53% + % 
35*6 35*6 35%— % 
32% 32*6 32%+ % 
34% 34 34*6 

4M 17*6 17% 17%— % 
26 153 150 150 —3% 
23 49 *8% 68% —1% 

21 24 ZPk 23% — % 
.0** 8% 8*6 
44% 43% 44%+ H 
11 10% 11 + % 
10*6 10*6 10%— *6 
SOM 4086 49*6-1*6 
34% 33% 33%— 1% 
99 5746 99 +1 

579 36<A 35% 34 
10 18% 18 18% + % 
104 42% 42% 424* + % 
441 15 14% 15 

9ta 29% 29 39 — % 

10QZ 32*6 32*6 32% + *6 


m 


148 

275 


64% 44% + % 
64% 64 64% +1 

23% 23*6 23*6 + % 
30% 30% 30%— % 
28% 27*6 27%— % 
22% 22*6 22%— *6 


226 S3 7 4910 4Z*6 42VE> 42*6- % 


1357 


187 


.lOe £ If 
ua as to 

UK 58 
80 2J 10 
80a U 9 1501 
1.19 U 3 
183 *8 5 

196 45 M 4129 
1114 

128 48 13 47 


78*6 77*6 78*8+1% 
91% 91% 91%— % 
99% 98% 99 — W 
38% 38% 38lu— % 
59 59 59 — % 

25*6 25% 25% 

7% 7% 7% 

30% 29*6 » + % 
13*6 13% 13*6 + % 
20% 19% 19%— % 
19*6 19% W% 

1301 57 55*6 57 +1% 

7I& 57% 57% 57% 

20 13*h 139b 13*6 + Vt 

5 16% 16M 16% 

9 17% 17% 17% + Vk 
878 33% 32*6 33% +1*4 
32 20% 20*6 20*6— % 
236 25% 27% 25*6 — % 
23 11 17*6 17*6 

17*6 17% 17%— % 
39 38% 30*4 — % 

42% 42% 42% 

<2% 42 42 

67 65*6 64*6 +1. 

15% 14% 14%— % 
80% 30% 30%— *6 


12 Month 
High Law Stack 


Dtv. YM. PE 


511 

TMiHWUaw 


Ctoa 

QuaLQl'M 


1J4 58 11 
2D 1J 12 
36 28 U 
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380 108 6 
182 4J 
ISO 127 
200 125 
237 107 




_ 128 
232 108 


24 

80 


8 25 
L9 11 


16 

J7 11 U 
34b 1.1 12 
180 9S 8 
280 97 9 
80 U 6 
280 78 7 


37% 25% CmbEn 
17% 8 COTTKJ13 

a 15% Com Mil 
39*6 9*6 ConMr# 

29% 21% CmwE 
29*6 21% CwE pf 
16*6 13 CWE pf 
17 13% CwE Pi 

22*6 18*6 CwE pf 
2SU 20% CwE Pf 
59 46 CwE pf 

25% 1AU. Cora ES 

90 79*6 CnmESpBJO 118 

32% 20*6 Comsat la 38 11 
34 18% CPSvct 

36% 26 Com pgr 
17*6 11 CoripSc 
46% 33% Cptvsn 
30*6 19% ConAgs 
23% 13% Conalr 
18% 13*6 CormE s 

26 19% CnnNG 
17*6 18*6 Conrac 

31% 23*6 ConsEd 

43 35 Conepf 485 117 

44*6 a ConEpf 3JH 118 
» 26% ConsFd 184 15 11 

36 20% CraFrta 1J0 X2 11 

44% 31 CnsNG 232 58 I 
TIM 4% ConsPw S 

a% 13% CnPpfB 450 178 
46% 23% OtPptD 7 jC 177 
46% 25*6 CnPpfE 772 188 
46% 23 CnPpfG 776 188 
2S% 11% CnPprV <40 19J 
21*6 9% CnP prU 380 165 
22*6 10% CnPprT 378 185 
23% 11% CnPprR 400 185 

24 10% CnPurP 158 192 

23% 10% CnP prN 185 19.1 
15% 7% CnPprM 250 177 
14% 7 OlPprC 223 177 
24% 11 OiPprS 402 198 
15 7% CnPurlC 283 108 

43 23% CnttCo 260 63 7 

MM 4% COfitIH 
4% *6 Contllrt 

48% 12 CrtlllPf 
4% *6 CHIHdn 

9% 4% cm Info 6 

24 18 ContTeC TJ2 7J 9 

39% 24% CtDalo 72 23 41 
40% 33 CnDtpf 450 127 
31% 2346 Canvrt U0 3J II 
3% 1 vtCookU 
34% 26% Coapr 1J3 57 14 
37*6 30 COORI Pf ZV0 98 

27 19% Coop Lb JBe 7 3 

20*6 12*6 CaprTr 80 2J I 
24*6 11% Caapvb 80 18 16 
21% 11% Copwtd 84 XI 
27% 19% Cpwtdpf 286 11J 
27*6 17% Cordura 84 12 17 
15% 10% Cor# In J6 43 12 
40 X ComGs TJ8 35 15 
45 22*6 CorBt It UW 24 

63 40 Cox Cm M J M 

9% 4% Crab) 

37 31*6 Craw 180b 47 II 

78% 38% CravRs 23 

27% 16% CrocfcN 80 18 
22*6 15% CrdkNpf 211 11 J 
23% 19% CrmpK 18 U I 
5T 34*6 CrvmCk 10 

38*6 27*6 CrwZM 180 28 15 
51% 43 CrZrtPf 463 98 
63% 5H CrZe(pfC450 7J 
26% 19 Clllm JO 3L2 6 
33*6 12% Cut Inet ( 35 

88% 61% CumEn 270 10 4 
10*6 8% Currlnc l.Mdil.1 
40% 30% CurfW la 14 10 
52% 27% Cyctm 1.10 27 10 


566 34*6 
332 16 
17 IS 
3237 10*6 
2051 79 
1 28% 
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IS 16 
2 22% 
10 24M 
10QZ 56% 
28 23% 
311 8* 
328 31% 
1581 3146 
2 32% 
257 15% 
8665 21% 
990 28*6 
76 22% 
36 16% 
13 24% 
72 13% 
1361 30% 
1700x41*6 
6 43 
497 37% 
40 31% 
IS® 43 
712 6*6 

2Mb 26% 


34*6 34*6 
15% 15% — % 
17*6 17*6 
10% 10% + % 
20% 28*4 + % 
2816 2896 + *6 

15 15 — % 

16 16 

22 % 22 % — % 
24*6 24*6 
56% 56%—% 
23 23% 

86 86 — 1 % 
31% 31*6+ V6 
30*6 30*6— *6 
32% 32% + Ml 

15 15% — % 
38% 21 — 1% 
28% 28% 

22M 22*6+ % 

16 16% — % 
24% 2«% 

13% 13*6— 16 

39*6 30% 

41% 41% 

36% 37*6— % 
30*6 30*6— *6 
42% 43 + % 

6*6 6*6 
25% 25% -1% 



>+ 16 
i+ M 

14% 14%— % 
12M (246— 16 
20*6 21%+ 16 
13% 13% — % 

41 41 — % 
8% 8M 
2*6 2*6— % 

43 43 +% 

- 1% 1% 

8% 8*6+16 
23% 22*6 
i 33% »*6— M 

29% 29M 
1*6 1*6+ % 
29 29*6+ % 

32*6 32*6— *6 
1446 1446— % 
19 19*6+ % 

22 % 22 * 6 + % 
14 14 + % 

22 22 — *6 
21 3M6 

12% 13 + % 
36*6 36*6—146 

42 42%+ % 

61*6 82*6 + *6 

8% 8% 

33% 34 +46 

8946 6946—1*6 
25*6 25*6 
19 19 

21V6 21*6 
48% 48% 

37% 38*6+1 
49 49% 

61*6 12 +1 
34% 2516 + *6 
25*6 »%— 1 
7216 72*6— % 
9% 9*6— % 
3S 35 — % 
48*6 49 


.Itfa US 
474 47 


JO 18 
74 18 
_74 17 


26% 20% Co! spot 178fa 57 38 2*30 24% 24% 24% + % 


22% 13*6 CoiAfts M 28 
22% 9*6 COIPCHI .16 J IS 
31*6 20*6 CoJPon Ml if f 

13% 39% Cottlnd 2J0 47 ID 

37% 27 Col Gas X18 11J 8 

S3 48*6 CoIGtpf 5.48 117 

55 48 CotGspI SJBtll.l 

27*6 21% CSOpf X45 

108% 98 CSO pl o 1125 (47 
108% 97 CSO Pin 1575 147 
45% 2716 Combln Z16 SI 9 


670 23% 22% 33% + *6 

441 X* 20% 20% — % 

(42 27% 27% mt— % 

427 59% 59V6 59% + % 

809 28% a 28*6— *6 

a 48% 48*6 48% — *6 

60 51 51 51 + *6 

7 27*6 ff 27*4 + % 

400(107% 107% 107% + % 
320x100% 107% 107% 

640 43 42*6 42% + % 


23% 13% DaOas M £8 
18% 9*6 DamanC JO 17 
30*6 21% DmCP 178 47 
8% 5*6 Dancttr 
IS 8% DcxUrt 
93 70% DarfKr 

76 39% DataGn 

25% 13% Datum 
12% 8*6 DtaOn 

18 12% Dayco 
39*6 26% DavtHd _ . 

16% 11*6 DOVtPL 2J00 138 
59*6 45 DPLPf 770 137 
33% 21% DoanP 1 88 16 

34M 24% Dear# Un 37 
22% 17% DelmP 1J2 BA 
47% 27 DcltaAr JO 17 

8% 4*6 Dtltana 
34V6 17% ObcCbS .92 ZB 
28% 17% DtolMfS 170 5.1 
3716 26% DeSafo M0 08 
MM 11% DatEd MB 108 
72% 59 DatEPf 9J2 115 
61% 47% DatEPf 7M 132 
5916 46 D#tE pf 7A5 1X3 
40 45% DatEPf 786 13.1 

25 19%DEpfF 275 118 
26% 30 DEprR 374 1X4 
25% 19% DEpfQ 313 112 
24% I9V> DSttm 2J5 1ZI 
27% 19% DEpfO 340 13J 
27% 19% DE Pf* 342 133 
31% 2416 DEPrt. 480 116 
31% 24% OEpfK 4.12 13a 
107 86 DE ofl 1280 127 

18% 13*6 DatE pr ZM 118 
34 17% Daxtgr Jo 16 

15*6 9*6 DIGtor M AS 

22% 16% DtamS IJt 98 
35% 34% DloShpr 480 108 
59 44 DtebMs 180 18 

125*6 77*6 Digital 
81% 45*6 Disney 
42 X DEI 
6*6 3% Dtvrsln 
16% 6*6 Borneo 
30% 21 DamRs 
21*6 16 Donald 
55 34% DanteV 

37% 23% Doraav 

42% 31% Dover 

33% 23% DOwCh 
51% 35% DowJil 
U% 10% Drava 
23% I5U Drear 

19 14% DrnxB 
49% 23% Drnyfus 

54*6 43% du Pont _ 

34% 30*6 duPntpf Z5S 104 
4416 X duPntpf 4J0 10LS 
31*6 22*4 DukeP 288 79 

77 04 Duka Pf &70 114 

72% 59% Duka of &20 128 
25% 7146 DU kept 2 89 108 
34 28 Du fee pl 385 128 

73 51% DunBrd 188 28 

16*6 11% OmLf ZJfi (34 
14*6 11% Dunpf 1J7 138 
1616 12% DuawK ZlO 113 
25% 22 Duaor Z75 11J 
58% 43% DM Pi 770 1X5 
16% 8% DVCOPI 80 48 
25*6 17% OynAm 70 J 


9 

41 

22 

21*6 21*6— % 

54 

130 

12 

n*6 it*— % 

a 

682 

28(6 

27(6 27*#— % 

44 

108 

2S2 

7% 

11% 

7% 7% 

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10 

174 

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90V» 90% + % 

13 1068 
1156 

49 

19*6 

47% 47%— l*b 
19(6 19% + 16 

12 

97 

114# 

11(6 11(6— V# 

■ 

537 

18% 

17*# !■* + *# 


- — - — 37 38 +*6 

7 186 15% 15*6 15*6 
TOx 58 58 58 —1 

M 62 30*k 30*6 XI6 
29 12S2 31% 31*6 31% 

9 5221 22% 2196 22% + % 
7 2110 46% 45% 46*6— % 
45 6 5*6 6 + 16 

17 TIB 34% 32*. 33% — % 
10 338 26 22 23%— 3 

10 24 37% 34% 36% + % 

7 1769 15*6 15% 1546 + *6 
20* *9 69 M 

an 58*6 56*6 58*6 
sm 56% 56 54 — % 

«b 56% 56*6 56*6 + % 


13 


170 IJ 
2M 6J 


.12 

372 9 J 
.86 XT 
1.16 37 
170 45 
.82 23 
180 67 
7S tJ 

SO XT 
80 48 
380 TL1 
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MIS SJ 


2 23H 23*6 23% 

67 2M6 24% 24% + % 
B 23*6 23% 23% — *fa 
i a IM z» 

181 M6 25 25*6+ % 

AO 25 25*6+ % 

M 29% 29% 29% 

13 .30*6 30% W% 

5 104 104 104 —I 
11 17*6 17*6 17*6 + *6 
(22 22% 22% 22*6— 16 
63 14% 14% 14*6 + % 
(0 6029 18% 17% 18 

33 g% 36% 37 — % 
13 270 52*6 32 52 — *6 

12 «97 103% »T*4 1U256— % 
41 1371 79% 78% 79*6— *6 

41 40*6 <1+16 

S* 5*6 5*6 
9% 8% 8*6— *6 

2B'-> 27*6 38 + *6 

(7 14*6 16*6— 16 

52% 52% 53% 

36% 26*6 24% + % 

.. — 36% 35% 36 — % 

10 3369 29ft 28% 2B%- % 

23 572 4S*6 45 45*6 + *6 

12 % 12*6 12 % 


6 22 

4 74 

3278 
■ 2100 
0 77 

15 1167 
13 9 

13 287 


85 


M 2517 am » 20%- % 


18J6 17*6 18 + % 
47*4 46% «6%— 16 


9 2107 52*6 51% 53% + 16 


10 

9 

8 5447 


W6 33% 33% — *6 
43*6 42% 0*6+ % 
. .. 31% 30% 31% 

4301 75 74 75 

120Z 68% 67% 68%— % 

I 25 75 25 - % 

_ ■£ 3J% 32% 32% - % 

22 899 71% 71% 71*6 + *6 

7 7094 15% 15% 15)6 

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1 15*6 15*6 15% 

l«ta 24% MU 24% 

... 470x 53% 53% 53% +1% 
10 40 12% 13% 12% — 16 

12 T7 24% 24% 24%— % 


40 

17% 

31*6 

78*6 

19*6 

4*6 

316 

1*6 

1311 

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38% 

18% 

70 

60% 

30% 

32% 

39*6 

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23% 

29% 

28% 


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184 43 
M 2 A 


36% EGG 
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21*4 ESysl 
21*6 EogtoP 

12 Eases 
3% East Air 
1*6 EALwtO 

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4% ElAIrpf 

6*6 E Air DIB 
9% EAlrptC 
31*6 EaffGF 1J0 SJ 
12% EartUti 
40% EsKed 
37*6 Eaton 
20% Etfiim 
20*6 Eekerd 
32% EdlaBr 

13 EDO 

19 Edward, 

19*6 EPOctof 335 104 
25% EP&Pf 173 1X2 
2316 EPGor 


M 2U X 
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9 224 24% 
148 MM 
B76 516 
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95 15 
5 14*6 
31 340 32*6 
6 100 18% 
13 9790 4916 
7 8194 53*6 
13 448x27*6 
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10 104 33*6 
13 444 '• 


1.94 WJ 
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88 12 
184 X4 
MO 48 
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80 2J 21 300 31% 


14 . 


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47 37*6 


37*6 37% — M 
17% 1716— % 
2716 20 +% 
2**6 3416— % 
18*6 18*6 
5*6 5*6 
2% 2*6 
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13% 18*6 + % 
14*4 14% + % 
14*6 14*6— % 
32% 2216+ % 
18 18 — % 
47% 48 - *6 
52*6 5316—3*6 
34*6 27%+ % 
27*6 28*1+ *c 
32*6 31 + % 

15% 15%+ *6 
30*6 31%+ % 
22 % 22 %+ % 
28% 281a + % 
27% 27*6 


llMcnm 
KMbLow Stock 


Din YllS. PEJtafMM* 


Oom 
Qua Cute 


14*6 

14*6 

7*6 

8% 

28% 

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17*6 

78% 

14% 

20% 

32*4 

20)6 

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33 

29% 

103 

58 

107 

316 

31*6 

20 

31*6 

38% 

6% 

1716 

41% 

M6 

14% 

2216 

24% 

31 r 


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9% errors 
1% eicor 
2*6 EtecAs 
4% EMM _ 75 

15 Elenas 81 J 29 
IKS Elgin JO SJ 17 
M 6 Etodfrt 

58% EmrsEI 280 38 14 
5*6 EmRod 94t 78 17 


SO 39 10 
L40B&0 9 
176 98 7 
87 M 
81 1X9 


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J4 M 14 


S3 


7*6 

9% 

14 

41*6 

14*4 

5J 


11*6 EntYA 
34% E cohort 
W% EapDs 
3% Entppf 
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22*6 East CP 
18% EnlsBu 
17% Eanril L40 JL5 IS 
97 erachpfi(L32 HU 
51% Ensch pf 6JSalM 
91*6 Enxch pflMSplU 
1% Ensrc* 25 

9% Emm 

14% EntxE n 187**03 
14 Enfwcia 130 78 8 
23% Eo u ltat U0 45 15 
3 Eaulmk 
11% EamlCPt X31 1X7 
28% EalRas 1J2 AS A 
9% E quite n .12 18 8 
8% ErbmnJ JO 
12*6 EasBsn At 
15% EnaxC JW 
20% EsSrtea J2 

20 Etttvl 112 
1*6 vIEvsnP 
2% vl Evonpf 
4% vfEvnpfB 
30 ExCeta lio aa 9 
13% Exceter 1 J6alZO 
37% Exxon 140 85 7 


2A 17 

14 11 
>14 13 

15 TO 
38 11 


3M 18% 14% 14)6— % 
4 10*6 10*6 Km— % 
53 4*6 4*6 4*6— *6 

IS 7% 7% 7% + % 
91 35 24% 25 +*6 

4 un MM 14% — % 
Ml 416 6*6 4*6—% 
642 72*4 72 72*6 + % 

os u 13 % ia%— % 

984 17% 17 17%+ % 

2S1 38*6 28 28%+ % 

3* 19*6 1196 19% 

TJOr 4% 446 4% + % 
K»t 8% tm 8%— % 
4*3 % 16— 

471 29% 28% 29 +% 

8 34% 34% 34*6+ *6 
1837 29*6 29% 2916— 16 
15330x102)6 102 Ktt 
OOOz 54% 54*6 54% 

65 100% 99% 99% 

74 2*6 2% 2*6 + % 

m ifffe ta% io%—% 

115 18 17*6 17%—% 

297 18 17*6 18 + % 

31 atVk 37% 3U6— % 
294 6% 6% 6*6— % 

3 M% 14*6 16% + *6 
136 3B%38%38%— % 
14 1M 1% 12 + % 

3 12% 12*6 12*6— *6 
18% 17% 18 — % 
21% 23)6 Zm— % 
31*6 30% 20%— *6 
37% 37% 37%— *6 
W6 2*6 216 

316 3% 3% + % 

4% 4*6 4*6 

3» 36 36*6+ % 

15% 15% 15% 

49% 49% 49% + *6 


IS 

22 

114 

87 

403 

13 

6 

476 

10 

8062 


JO 


25 

4 SO 
65 B 1W 
28 18 171 
8 73 

L64 47 7 117 

26 2900 
L52 43 ID 20 

.16 18 2773 

70 15 7 169 
18 UD 22 
80 SO 12 177 
240 44 T 339 
UO 46 10 153 

2 M 65 ID 22 


.as 

80 IM 


11 6*6 FHInd 2 20 

67*6 43*6 PMC 230 Xi 50 991 
83% 52% PMC Pf ZZ 11 1 

22*6 17% FPL GO 188 87 9 98T 

13% 9% FnbChr 38 Z4 14 13 

M% 9% Facet 49 

am 15% FateChd 80 4J 126 

39% 33% Falrcpf 160 9-5 23 

16*6 9*6 Falrfd .18 13 10 
24% Tim FomDl s 
32% 25 FrWrtF 
28*6 u% Farah 
13 8% FayDra 

7 4% Fatten 

37% 29% FtdKo 

45% 27*6 RkJExp 

39 29% FdMoa 

19% 10% F#dNM 
27 16*6 F«dPB3 

23 16 Fad Rtf 

19% 13% FdSgnl 
57*6 42% FedDSI 
30*4 22*6 Fora 
37 25% Fldcst 

10% 4 FInCpA 

5% 3% FinCPPf 

47% 14*6 FblCPPf 6730203 
7% 2% FnSBar 
19% 15*6 FI irate 80 44 9 

28% 19 FIAIIlD 182 X7 8 

57V, SOU. FtAtl pf 630*118 

35 21*6 FBKSVS M0 43 8 

33 25% FBkFta 130 17 11 

71% 34% FBoaf 130 18 11 

27 18% FstCMc 132 59 19 

87% 70 FCM PfB OJSelLl 

20 13*6 FTBTOX 130 &? 7 

5516 40 FIBTxpf 6.1101X9 

51 38% FlBTx pf S34el2J 

21 9% FtQtV 7 

20% 10*6 PFedAz .15# 8 6 

48*6 30*6 Flntrta 234 S.1 7 

3016 21 FlnWpf 237 84 

11% 7*6 FIMbs 34 13 10 

50% 31% FKStB 288 60 7 

7% 4% Fat Pa B 

30*6 2016 FstPapf 2JO. 93 
31% 21% FtllnRI 132 XI 15 
22% 14*6 FtVaBk 
28% 16 FtWbC 
54*4 30*6 FfcKhtJ 

12 8% FbhFd 

34*6 20*6 FirFflG* 132 43 
28*4 14% FM«lEn 36 hi 
38% 22*6 Flemng 
33*6 21*4 FtexIV 
13*6 1016 Ftexlpf 
37% 19% FthttSl 
31*6 13% Float PI 
« 29*6 FkrEC 

25% 18% Fla Pro 
30 11% Fla5H 

8 3% FlwGm 

21 11% Flewr* 

22% 14% Fluor 
SS 43% PaatoC 

*» » ESC*** 

10% FTDmb- 


4201 

8 

72 

48 

397 

363 

17 
575 
T70 
158 
324 

56 

468 

9 

10 

35 

158 

531 

30 

193 

18 

no 

78 

sa 

113 


114 

37 

S 


48 FIHowd M4 Z5 16 
10 FartWh M 38 14 


11*6 6% FoxSfP 
35% 25% Fcwbro 
11% 6% FMOG 
25% 13% FrptMc 
34% 20% Frtgfrn 
28*4 19 FruoM 1 
32% 25 Fnrfrfpf ZOO 
36% 20 Fuqua A0 


84 48 . 

130 43 8 
180 16 26 
85# J 

8 

_ 9 2074 
JB 14 14 189 
80 25 14 79 

Ml 1X6 15 

30 A 18 73 

14 109 

.16a A 12 20 

Z16 98 9 1386 
-40 X4 13 34 

151 

JH X2 IB 143 
AO 73 m? 

330 4.1 11 40 

ZOO 47 313214 

1-36 IM 33 

... m 

.... 372 

88 49 11 13 

UM 48 74 IB 
2 306 23 8 409 

80 X0 15 1689 
XI 16 914 
28 5 466 
7.1 6 

13 9 280 


9% 9% 

cr% 40% 

76% 76*4 
21*4 21% 
11*4 11*4 
13% 13% 
17*6 17% 
38% 37*6 

14% 14% 

21% 31% 
33% 23*6 
20 19*6 

10% 10% 
5*4 5% 
35 34*6 

34*6 34% 

35% 35% 

16% U% 
19% 19% 
21*6 31 
16% M 
55*6 54% 
26*4 26*6 
30% 30% 
6% 6% 
5% 5*6 
34 33 

3% 3% 
18% IS 
27% 27% 
56% 56% 
32*6 32% 
32*4 32% 
66*6 46% 
23 22% 

78 77% 

15*6 14% 
44 44 

42 42 

10*4 10% 
18% 17*4 
46*6 45% 
28 27% 

10% 10% 
41 47% 

7*4 7% 
29% 28% 
31% 31*6 
21% 21 
25% 36% 
39 38% 

10 % 10*6 
31% 31% 
23 21*4 

37*4 36% 
31% 31*4 
12% 12% 
32% 32% 


9% 

41 + % 

716% 4VA 
31% 

11% 

13% 

17% 

38 

i«%— % 
21%— % 
21*4+ *4 
19*6— *6 
TO%— % 
5%— % 
34% 

34%+ VS 
35%+ % 
16*6— % 
19*4— % 
21%+ % 
16 

54%—% 
26*6— % 
30% — % 
f% + % 
5(6— % 
33%— % 
344— % 
18% . 
27%+ % 
54% + *6 
32% + % 
32% — % 
66(6— % 
22% — % 
78 + % 
1444— *6 
44 — % 

47 
10*6 
18 

45*4- % 
27% — *6 
10%— *6 

48 + % 
7*6— % 

29 

31%+% 
21% + % 
26%+% 

10% 

31*6+ % 
22 —1 
37*4—% 
31% 


-60 

M 



31% 15% OAF .15b J 13 337 
39% 20% GAFpf 130 XT 3 

37% 25% GAT X 130 X7 14 374 
47% 33% GATXpf 2J0 XI 2 


34% 19% GCA 
76% 48% GEICO 


180 


_ 4 GEO 
13% 5*6 GF Q> 

44% 35% GTE 
26% 22% GTEpf 
21% 19*4 GTE of 
10 4% Gattfau 

58 34*4 Gamtt 

25*4 10% GapStr 
30% 10% G«artit 
19 13% Gal co 

10% 9% Gam IlC 
11% 10 GomlM 
41% 30% GnCnrp 
17% 14% GAJnv 
46% 29*6 GuBotl 180 
34% 16*6 GCtems -40 


33% 16*6 GCnpfs 
21 12% GnDota 

84 . 44 GnDvn 

65% 48*6 GonEI 
62 45% GnFeta 

7 5*6 GGtttn 

14*4 ffMCHorts 
18% 8% GnHoas 
27*6 15% Gninrt 
60 

85 


12 2798 
U 11 598 
118 
3 

100 73 8 4959 

280 78 2 

288 1U 12 

10 

1-<S 26 20 1103 
JO 23 16 494 
AO 33 13 187 
-M ID 15 53 

110 

JMb &7 197 

MOb 33122 1671 
MSB 9J 93 
' 15 8 107 
13 11 121 


31% 30% 
30*6 38% 
33% 32*6 
41 41 

26% 25% 
77% 74% 
5% 5*4 
7% 7 
43*6 43 
25*6 25*6 
21% 71% 
5% 5*6 
58% 56% 
23 22*6 

10% 10% 
18% 18% 
10*6 10 % 
11 % 11 


30% — *6 
3S% + *6 
32*6—% 
41 -2 
25*6— *6 
7411—1*4 

5*6 

7% + % 
43 — % 


At U 


21 

18 70 

180 M 9 1383 
230 15 12 4719 
ISO 48 70 *41 
80a 9.1 48 

32 184 
34 22 33 28 

JO 39 17 523 
45% GnMUta 234 XT 14 513 
61 GMol SJJOr 68 515157 


72 33 GMEn JOB J 767 

40 33*6 GMol pf X75 98 3 

51*4 44% GMOtPf 580 97 26 

7*6 3% GNC .16 23 22 212 
13% 7% GPU 6 211 

75*6 46*6 GcnRa L56 Z1 21 661 

TZ% 5 GnRafr S 09 

53% 39*6 GnStanl 180 X9 12 985 

12% 10 GTFIpf IJO 118 430i 

8% 516 G#nsco U 60 

7S*6 1316 GfiRod JO 8 24 126 

21% 15 Ganitp 180 268 

36 24 GanPtS 1.18 XS 15 634 

27*6 18 Go Poe 80 U 23 3460 


37% 33 GaPcpf 224 6 A 

38% 22% GaPwpf X44 138 

30 25% GaPwpf 336 1X2 

21, 17% GaPwpf 236 138 

31% 17 GaPwpf 152 113 

63 51% GaPwpf 772 1X8 

30% 20% GarbPs 1.1* X9 11 

23% 12 GorbSs .13 3 M 

12% 8% Glontp 
11 5*6 GlbrFn 

V 16*6 GWHIH 
59% 43*4 GiltettB 
17% 11% GlaasC 
9*6 4% GlobtM 


J3 20 20 
280 4-4 11 


4 

14 

330 

2 

T 

I340Z 

384 

575 

36 


17% 16% 
3996 3914 
33% 33% 
32% 32 
16 15% 

73% 72*6 
62% 62 
<144 61*6 

6*4 6% 
12*6 12% 
11% 18*6 
17*4 16*6 
57% 56*6 
76% 73% 
63% 63% 
39 38)6 

5Z% 51% 

7% 7% 
11% 11*4 
73% 72*4 
10 % 10 
47% 46% 

11 % n% 

S% 5*6 
1644 16*6 
21 % 21 % 
34% 3346 
22% 27% 
35% 35% 
27% 26% 
28% 28% 
19*6 19*6 
20% 20% 
61% 68% 
29*6 29*6 
19% 19% 
1146 11*6 
10 946 

25*6 ZSVi 


34 53 652 

17*6 GlabMpfXSO 1*3 62 

8% GMNuo 50 2340 

609 

30 3 7 897 

136 SA 13 Ml 
M0 60 7 1870 
JZ XI 9 78 

-68 28 58 660 

Z80 fef 10 385 

47 Grabigr 13* X8 13 149 

8% GIAFrt A0 19 B 107 

— — — io 1292 

180 XS 10 5 

185*10.1 7 15 

1-52 43 7 566 
J 

10 


18*4 134# 


31% 

5*4+ % 
57%+ % 
23 
10% 

1844 

10(6 — % 
11 — % 
•sm— *4 
16% 

39% + % 
33%— (6 
3Z% + % 
15*6— % 
71 + *6 

67*6— % 
<146+44 
6*4 

1216— % 
10*6—44 
17%+ % 
57 

73% —3*6 
63*4— % 
38*6—1*6 
51*4 
7*6 

11*#— % 
73% + *6 
10 - % 
46% 

11*6 

5*6 

16% 

21% — % 
33*6— *6 
22*6— % 
35% + % 
36% + % 
3Sfi— % 
19*6— % 
20% — % 
60%+ % 
29%— *6 
1916— *6 
1146 

10+16 
25)6— % 
59 — *6 
13*6 


1*6 GWNWT 
11 GkfWF 
24*6 Gdrlcfl ' 
Goodyr 
13*6 GortkiJ 
19 GCUM 
36% Grace 


18 13% GtAIPe 

45% 27% GtLkln 

21% 15% GNIm 

43% 31 GtNNk 

67% 51% GtNNk at 435 *7 

28% 16% GtWFtn JS X6 


19*6 9% GWHsp 41 22 

16% 11% GMP 133 108 8 17 

39% 18*4 Gr#Yh 130 O II 736 

44% 37% Grayll pf 435 10 l 7 1Kb 
6% 3*6 G roller 12 2177 

13% 8% GrowGs 80 X2 17 135 

114) 6*6 Onto El 80 J 13 452 

30 21*4 Gnnm 180 48 7 433 

36% 24% Grumpf 280 1DJ 2 
B% 4% Grunts! .16 17 182 

27*4 20 Guilfnl 88 18 * 88 

35 25% GtfWlf JO Z7 11 2270 

24U, 11% GuirRs X4 13 JS"* 

30 16% GuffRpf UD U 3 

14% 10 GHStUI Ml 111 6 1107 

X 34 GHSU Of 3JS 1X4 15 

33% 27 GHSlt PT 488 1X7 W 

20% 13% GAera Me 48 18 300 

19% 14 Guitar 80 Xi 13 77 


20% 30% 
11*6 10*6 
3% » 
27*6 2M6 
30 29 

26% 26*4 
16)6 16*# 
23*h 23 
41 40*4 

61% 61% 
14 13*6 

17 16% 

«% 40% 
18% 17*6 
33fk 3316 
54% 54% 
24*6 24% 
14*6 14Vi 
15*6 15*6 
38 37% 

44% 44% 
5% 4% 
13*6 13% 
10% 10*6 
26 25% 

26% 26 
6*4 6 
24% 24*6 
33 31*6 

15% 15 
20 % 20 % 
13% 13*4 
28% 28*4 
32% 31% 
14% U 
16% 16% 


20%+ % 
11% + 44 
3%+ ** 
27*4+1 
29 — 14 
36%— % 
16*6— V) 
23% — 16 
40%—% 
61*6 

13*4— % 
17 + *6 

am— (6 
18%+ *4 
33% + 16 
54%+ *6 
34*6 
14*6 
15*6 

27*4+16 
44% +116 
5*#+ % 
T3%— % 
10% + % 
2516—1% 
28 -% 
6 - *4 
24% — (6 
32*4+1% 
15% + % 
20% + % 
13% + % 
28*4+16 
32%+ % 
u% 

16%— M 


6*6 

27% 


1% 

10% 

R 

SS 

20% 

« 

33% 

35 

18*6 

28*6 

33% 

U% 

23*6 

13% 

34% 

13% 

13% 

23% 

S' 

49 

30 

25% 

4)6 

12% 


416 HRT 
19% HdlFB 
2616 Hawn 
*6 Mallwd 
5*6 Hahnfpf 
3516 HamPs 
11% HanJS 
15*4 HanJI 
25*4 Handhn 
15% HandH 
1<« HOftM 
23% HarorJ 
WA Har Intis 
7*k Kanilrti 
U% HrpRw 
22*6 Harris 
10*4 HarGrn 
W Harscxi 
23% Hortmx 
13% Hafts# 
15*4 HawEla 

8 HOVHA 
23% Hazlefn 

9 Hoi Lob 
9*4 Macks 

13% HcdoM 

14% Hallnm 
15% HrtUO 
32 Halnz 
12*6 HalnaC 
18 HelmP 
3% Hanes 
11% Heminc 


IJO 68 
IJO 55 
80 58 
J6 6.1 


M7U1.1 
1840 OA 
1.12 X2 
M 44 
A0 XI 
180 20 
Jd XS 


JO 28 
JB XI 


89 

ns 

11 1768 
547 
50 

8 145 
87 
« 

M 79 
19 240 
26 Z7 
13 223 
28 <18 
30 285 


13 


MB 67 
UB 48 
IJO 114 
184 XI 
JO# U 
J6 IJ 
J2 X9 
JB 24 
40 14 
88b 18 
36 IJ 
M0 13 


13 654 
8 123 


46 18 
50c IS 


658 
46 
S3 
81 
50 
30 1991 
10 03 

13 10 

13 721 

14 18 

as 6io 
6 
1 


JW 5% 
25*6 «*> 
30% 20% 
1% 1% 
9*6 9% 
29% 39% 
13*4 13% 
19*6 19*4 
52 50% 

20% 19*6 
19*4 11*6 
51% 49% 
29% 29 
11*6 11% 
am 30% 
29% 28% 

16% M16 
27% Z7% 
32*4 31% 
16 15*6 

20% 2M 
11*4 11% 
24% 24(6 
11% 10*6 
12*4 12% 
171# 16*6 
17V. 16*6 
23% 23% 
48% 48 
14*6 14*# 

21% ZU4 
5% 5% 
11% 11% 


5% 

25%—% 

30*4—16 

1% 

9% — % 
39%- % 
13%+ % 
19%-% 
50% —1*6 
19)4— » 
15%— *6 
49*6—116 
29*6- % 
1I%— % 
30*4 

21% - % 
16*4 

Z7%— % 
32%+ *4 
16 

20%- *4 
11%— % 
24%+ % 
11 + % 
12%— % 
17 — 1% 
16%— % 
23% — % 
48%— 16 
14** + % 
21*4+ % 
5% 

11% 


n Month 
Hfe* Low stock 


Mv. Yld. PE 


Sv 

IBfcHbBLew 


oust ora 


••as 


Har cun MO 48 
HarflC JBe J 
Heme Pf IJO SA 
Harahv MO 34 



MO 48 11 732 


10 

9 

226 

. 7 283 

38 \x mm 

3 
103 
II 
7 
11 

64 569 
■ 81 
2218 
6 1026 


I 1C tads 
i I CM n 
I ICN 

i ICN Pf 270 97 
INAte 1.92 118 
iPTImn 

i IRTPrt 140 83 
, ITT Co 180 ” 

ITT pf J 480 67 
ITT PfK 480 65 
t ITT pfO 500 8J 
ITTpfN 235 5.1 
i ITT pfl 450 7J 
i IU Inf 1J0 78 
i IdOtaP 3J8 U 
i IcJaalB 

i ItlPawr 244 108 
i llPawpf 204 120 
■ llPawpf Z3S 1Z2 
IIPOwpl 461a118 
i ITW* 44 U 14 
, impawn 86# 24 0 
i ImplCP 12 

i INCO JO IJ 
I IndIMPf 848 1X4 
lixflMPf ZI5 128 
i IndIMPf 225 138 
< IndIMPf 275 112 
i I rail Get UB 7.1 6 
: Intxco .14 28 
Intmtc 23 

i insarR 160 54 17 
InaRpf 285 7 A 
, IngrTec J4 4J 21 
i InldSIf JO 23 
i inldStpf 475 10J 
Insllcn 180b SJ 10 
InspRs 

UdaRsc 6 

InlaR uf 383 1X8 
IntgR Pf 4JS 138 
imRFn US 

I IcpS# XIOallJ 
Inter co U8 49 12 
Inter pf 775 57 
Inttfrt 40 55 6 
Intifk 340 5.1 1 
Intmed 
IntAtu 72 
IBM 440 
IntCIri JO .. .. 

IntFlav 1.13 41 14 
IntHarv 
i IntHrwt 
InfH pfC 
rnttiPfA 
InIHpfD 
IntMln 240 
Inf Mult 176 


32% 3216 32% — 16 
17V, 16% 16%— % 
11 Tim 10*6— *4 
27% 27*6 27*6 
16% MV6 1616 + % 
25*fe 25 25% — % 

19% 1916 19%— % 
34% 31*6 33% +1% 
40 40 60 +1 

4216 59 62 +3 

59% 59 59 + % 

44 42% 44 +1% 

62 61% 41% +1 

17% 17 17% + 16 

39% 39*6 19*6— % 
14 13% 13*6— V6 

24*# 24% 34*#+ 16 
iOOZ 17 17 17 

lOOz 1916 1916 19% 

20 41% 41% 41%— % 
158 33% 32 33 +1% 

1152 39% 35% 35% + % 

102 t% 8% 8% 

1623 13)6 13 13% — % 

soar 64% 64*6 64*6—2% 
2 16*6 16*6 16*6 
17% 1716 17V,— 16 
24% 24% 24% 

26*6 36% 26% 

7% 6% 7% + % 
19 18% 18*6— V) 

47% 46*6 46*6—1 
31*6 31*6 31*6 
Ux 12*6 12% 12*6+16 


M 

200 

27 

430 

361 


12 


649 

23)6 

22% 

■ 

43* 

43* 

394 

19* 

19 

1X5 

5% 

5% 

67 

16* 

16*6 

15 

23*6 

33% 

24 

31 

30% 

74 

13% 

12% 

60 

18% 

18 

270 

63 

62% 


33 
XI 9 


17% 916 

#%3£ 

3EZ 

S K 

19% 14% 

ssr* 

31% 25 
33*6 36 
13% 9% 
35 m 
54 42*6 


19 — % 
5% — % 
16*6—% 
23%— % 
30% 

12% — % 
1816 + % 
^ __ ... 42%— % 

181 136 135*6 >55% + *t 

9S0 « 10% 11 + % 

24 51 50% 50% 

262 10*6 9% 10%— % 

. 23 19 11*6 18% 

34 1211168 130% 129 129*#— 1% 
M 10 18 22 21*6 21*6— 

103Bx 27% 27 ~ 

1971 9% 9% 

158 30V, 29*. 

SJ 12 667 

._ x 6J 9 95 

mtPaar Z48 4J 26 2379 .'50% 
citrac# 18 337 1516 M’ . . ._ .. 

rasas 8 

ffliSi .. M'S | 



4116 40% <1 +% 

.28% 28% ■%+%. 

49% — M 
1416— *6 


nfuUGp 188 29 12 
iitBafcr 

IntrtPw IJO 107 8 
InPwpf 138 117 
Iowa 19 1J0 104 8 

InwllG 274 97 7 
tawlllpt 3J1 IM 
lawaRs X08 WL1 7 
I pa loo X04 92 8 
IPCOCP J4 28 11 
IrvBJcs 1J6 SJ 7 
irvEUtpf 5.156107 


50 16% 16% 16%— 14 


47 18*6 18% 18% + % 


1001 19% 19% 19% + 

S JSSSSSlt -16 

^S%3%S%i: 

627 32% 32% 32% + % 


30*6 20 
34% 23% 
24% 13% 
14*6 10% 
43 25% 

58 46% 

*8% 90 
92)6 7816 
16% 12*6 
916 5% 
4016 28 
46*6 37% 
29% 21% 
26% 151* 
37% 21*6 


JWTs 

J River 

Jarrwwy 

JapnF 

JeffPH 

JerCpf 

JarCpf 

J arc pi 

JarCpf 

Jewier 

JohnJn 

JohnCn 

Jnroan 

Joanns 

JpyMIg 


3J 13 

2L2 


M 


L12 

46 

.18 J 
144B11J 
M2 37 6 
X12 144 ■ 
tun 1X1 
1180 1X8 
Z1B 137 

20 

1J0 XO 15 
186a 44 9 
180 3S 18 
JO 13 1C 
140 54 14 


273 29 
1012 26 
117 21*6 
171 12% 
429 40% 
20z 56% 
200* H% 
ISOs 86 
38 16 
3 7% 

8970 40% 
305 40)6 
6 25% 
246 341* 
185 25% 


20% 20% 

25% 25*6 + % 
21 21*6+ 14 

11% 12% + % 
40% 40%+ *6 
56% 54% — % 
N 96 — % 
86 86 -1 
M M 
7% 7% + % 
39*6 40%+ % 
K% 40%+ % 
25)6 25%+ M 
2J% 2416 
2M 25*6 — % 


10% 

17 

3F% 

41% 

40% 

19% 

227# 

28*6 

16% 

21% 

20 

54% 

14% 

18% 


JO 


4J0 

184 


U7 

40 


22% 

21 

45 

115 

20 

18% 

49% 

34*6 

4% 

29% 

26% 

M*6 

3416 

27*6 

5*fc 


36*6 
51% 
» ■ 
28% 
29*6 
2316 

KM 

16 

40% 

23% 

67% 

23(6 


7% KDI 
9% KLMs 
33 KM I Pf 
24*6 Kmart 
28 KN Ena 
12*6 KalsrAJ 
14% KalsCe 
1516 KaiCpf 
.8% KOMb 
14% KCtyPL Z36 
15% KCPL pf 233 
36% KCSOU 180 
10V) KC5a Pf 180 
IM KanGE ZM 
28% KonPU 2JM 
W KaPLpf 272 
1716 KaPL Pf 273 
U JCatyln 
«9 KatYPl 
10*6 K outer 
12% KaufPf 
2816 Kellogg 
22 KallHKf 

I Kanot 
19% Kenmt 
20*# KyUtIP 

II KarrGt ... 
26)6 KerrMC l.W 
16% PtrvBk ’ 
.2% KavCon 
14 Kmlnt 

asm Kkkla 

39*# KlmbCS 222 
22% KrohtRd 76 
17*6 KUBOT 3J0 
16)6 Kolmar J2 
17% Kopara 80 
96*6 KopprpfiaOO 
IB ) Karaan 
29% Kronor XOO 
IT Kutitms 40 
44% Kvocers 041 
13 Kysor JO 


M |? 

11J 

"4 


u 

84 

XI 

18J 5 
129 
38 M 
U 

1X6 6 
89 7 
115 
11J 


146 

1J8 

176 

1J0 


IJ 

34 6 
9.1 

X6 15 
X7 7 


80 

344 


1J0 


X6 17 
97 8 
19 

37 35 
49 ■ 


1-20 


I 26 18 
30 9 
AS 10 
37 U 
87774 
18 16 
47 M 
10.1 


58 11 
XS 14 
J 37 
48 6 


80 8% 816 8% + % 

1433 16*6 16*# 16*#— % 

2 37% 37% 37% 

*674 14% 3366 33%+ % 

14 39 38*6 38*6 

227 14 13*6 IK— % 

ISO J6% 15% 14 
1 16 . 16 16+16 
370 9*6 9% 9*6+% 

937 71% 21% 21*6 + % 

2 18 18 18 — *6 

142 4916 4016 4916+1 

141QZ 12% 12 12 — % 

940 10% 1B% lff)6+ % 

106 33% 3316 3316— 16 

15 3016 2D 3016 

■ 20 19% 20 + % 

968 39% 38% 39%+ % 

7 101% 100 10B1A +8 
21 16*6 16% 16*6 + % 
6 K% 16% 16W— 16 

SS) 49*6 49 49% + *# 

41 32% 32V# 32% + *# 

20 116 116 1% 

50 22% 22% 22% 

148 2516 25 25% 

43 11*# 18* 1>*#+ *fc 

1507 30% 29* » 

537 26% 25*6 21% + % 

13 2*6 2*6 2*6 

82 18*# 1816 1816— V# 

225 MV. 33% Mis + 4# 

250 48% 48% 48%— % 

1417* 75% 3416 35)6 + % 

340 28 27% 27%+ 16 

17% 17% 17*#+ % 

19 18% 18*6— % 

99% 98% 99% — % 

13% 1316 13% + % 

«£* 2L 23? + * 

2D b 2316 23% 

48% 4816 48*# + % 

20 19*6 19% 


103 


4 

83 

365 

70 

115 

25 


2816 22% 
15% 7*# 

17% 12% 
4% 2 
18% 8 
17*6 8% 

25% 14 
31 1816 

1816 13 
17 IBM 
2M# 

12% 7*6 
31% 23% 
18% 12*fc 
4% 1*6 
14% 10% 
3516 13% 
38*6 30% 
53% 171*2 
30% 14 
35*6 24% 
33*6 21% 

1516 V 

37 35 

16 19% 

15% 9% 
24% 19% 

38 30 

36% 33 
DA 25*6 
50% 40% 
79% 65 
31*6 21% 
79% 53 
<0)6 15% 
45% 26% 
22% 18% 
80 57% 

25% 16*6 
53% 30% 
43% 25% 
46 33% 

34% 18 
JJV# 19 
»% 16% 

2% 2% 
27*6 17% 
53 <4 

B% 3*6 
47V, 31% 
49 23*6 

flffll 8% 
30% 9 
20% 9% 
24% 11% 
S* 8% 
57 27% 
15% 6 
17% 7 
55 34 

27% 17 
31% 18% 
15 10% 
38 22% 

25% 17 


ZB4eMJ 9 


19 
17 

383 

9 

13 

8397 

3 

54 

1235 

ISO 

» 

84 

3 

33 

BO 

417 

700 

41 

190 

03 

238 

Ml 

165 

39 

73 

3 

557 

39 

20 
3 

334 

1038 


LN Ha 
LFE 

LLERy ?7?rCTS 
LLCCP 
LLCpf 
LTV 

LTVA -43t XS 
LTV Pf X06 114 
LTV pi US U 
Latent 15 

LoetOs IJO 7J0 7 
Lafarge JO Z6 
Lnfrgpf 2J4 9J 
Lamaur 34 14 5 

Lomses Ihi 

Lawtlns J6 4J is 
Lear PI JB 9 13 
LoarPpf 2J7 11 J 
LearSo 1J0 38 9 
LeaRnt » AO XI >4 
LswrTr 1J0 X5 ' 
LcaEnt J2 24 
L4WMCB JO 1A 
LaoPtat At 25 
LehVoi 
LVlnpf 

Lehmn lJBelU 

Lannor jo IJ 19 
LaueKts 4 

LeucdPf XOO X3 
LavISt MS 58 27 
Lav Hi 73 1.9 9 
LOF 1J2 IS 8 141 
LOFpf <75 6 A 35 

LtatyCP 72 23 17 139 
Lilly X2D 62 11 1363 
Limited <32 J U 1325 
LlnCNft 184 64 12 6SD 
Ltncftt X24018J 27 

Uttan 2J0 XO 10 742 

Litton pf 380 9 J 1 

Lttckhd 80a IJ 9 4597 

Locttte JO 25 12 71 

LWMtl un 5 

Loglcon JO 8 2fl 
LwnFln 1.H 4J 11 
LontMts IB 

LomMwr 

LnStor IJO W 5 
LoneSpf 5J7 1!J 
LlLCa 2 

LILpfJ 
LIL PfK 
ULofX 
LILpfW 
LILPfV 
LILpfU 
LILpfT 
LILRfS 
LILpfP 
LILPfO 

UtnoDr 1JI 2 A U 
LonoOwf 

Loral 88 18 17 
LoGafH J5 X5 9 
La Land 180 30 10 
LCrPtte J0b 38 17 


1310 

70 

845 

95 


100 

11 

766 

4002 

TOQz 

15 

101 

15 

38 

II 

2 

6 

6 

291 

17 

aa 

19 

438 

601 


26% 26 
14% 14% 
16% 16% 
3U 3% 
9% 9% 
11% 9% 

15% ISM 
22*6 22 % 
15% 15 
11*6 11% 
3416 34(6 
7% 7*k 

34% 26% 
17% 17% 
4% 3% 
13% 13% 
23% 22*# 
2516 24% 
41 47% 

18 % n % 

33% 32% 
35)6 33 
14% 14 
19% IBM 
3% 3 
31 31 

16% 14% 
12*6 12 % 
2116 21% 
33 32 

32% 31*# 
38% 38*6 
48% 4616 
74 74 

31*6 3)% 
77% 76% 
37% 36% 
43% 42% 
22 21% 
6716 66*6 
2316 23V. 
48% 46% 
31*6 30% 
43*6 42% 
3316 32% 
29 20% 

» 27% 

2H 2% 
22*6 22% 
48 47% 

6% 6% 
41 41 

41 41 

1716 1716 
17% 1716 
m# >7% 
20% 20% 
16% 16% 
51% 51% 
12% 13 
14% 14% 
53% 52% 
27 26% 

30% 39% 
1216 12% 
33% 31 
»* 31 


26%+ % 
14%— % 
M% + % 
316 

9%— 16 
1816 

MW— 1*6 
27% — % 
1516 + % 
ll%+ % 
2416+ M 

-2?— * 
3gh— % 

1 Z3f 1 

16 

13V) + % 

55=2 

ist-* 

33 -% 
35% +2% 
W +16 
19 + % 

3% 

&— 

21%—% 

32 

§5+* 

44%+% 

31*4 + % 
»%— (# 
37 +% 

4216 + 16 
21*6+16 
67 +% 

m— 16 
<7%— % 
31*4+116 
43% + % 
33* + % 
2tH# — % 
23*6— 16 
2*fc— % 
22% 

48 + % 
6*6+ % 
41 

41 - % 

1716— )6 

28 + * 

16% 

51% 

19% 

MW+ % 

snt+% 

27 + % 

S? 6 - J? 

2%- % 

33 + % 
JIM— % 


Protect Your Short-Term 
Gains With^ Ihe Long-Tbrm 
Security Of Gold. 


The spectacular rise of the dollar and 
of many paper investments has brought 
substantial profits. The wisest investors 
now convert port of their gains into 


Krugerrands. 

Why? 


coins. The most widely circulated - and 
widely recognized -gold coins in the^ wodd. 
And because they contain 1 oz. 1/2 ox, 
1/4 oz and 1/10 oz of pure gold - with just 
a touch of hardening alloy - you can be 
rnr foiin that in the long run, they wiB 
secure the value erf your investment profits. 

Ask your bank or broker today or 
write foryourfreecoRy of the “European 
Guide to Gold and Krugerrands" to: 
International Gold Corporation 
Coin Division - 1, rue de la Rdtisserie - 
CH - 1204 Geneva - Switzerland. 


: “T 

. M.I eOdt rii 



KRUGERRAND 
Money you can trust 


Please note that International Gold Corpora tion 
docs not provide «bayin£ or odllng service. 


13 Month 
HfBhLaw Stock 


Div. Yld. PE 


Sb. 

lOUHttOLow 


0«tOf» 


32% 2M LOPLPf 
2316 16% LOPLPf 
28)6 22% LouvGs 
49*6 36 Lnwrts 
20 16)6 Lomus 

25% 18*6 Lubrrl 
32 23*4 Luovss 

3BV, 15% LudcyS 
M JOT# LuMne 


480 15.1 
X16 Mj0 
284 88 7 
4J 6 
V2 16 
SJ H 
1.9 19 
X0 10 
313 184 


280 

J2 

1.16 

54 

1.16 


4 

9 

a 

29 

547 

655 

246 

214 

SO 


32V# 31% 
22*6 22% 
27*6 27% 
46 45*6 

2Mh 26% 
21% 21% 
28% 28 
19*# 19% 
15 14% 


311k— K 
22%-R 
37*6 + M 
46 + V 
24%— *1 
21% + V 
28)6— K 
19V, 

14)4— V 


-- v.ih it 


M 


^ pm 

.. . 


23% 13% 
51 36)6 

26% 16% 
14% 7% 
42 34 

14% 916 
12)6 9 
16% 10 
5(6 2% 
25*6 17% 

26 17% 

58% 36% 
53% 38% 
19*4 11% 
39*6 24 
29% 3% 
23% 12% 
21)6 13% 
24% 10% 
41% 2Z% 
SO# 41 
57 40 

11% 5% 
2Kb 18)6 
33 21 

4% 3 

2% 1b 

3SU, 19*6 
51% 40*6 
60 20% 
12% 91b 
18*6 14% 
86% 58% 
67% am 
54% 38% 
■3 55 

13% 8% 
33% 22% 
1316 716 
20 15% 

3*6 2 
27% 20% 
11% 9% 
80% 51*6 
14 6% 

10% 416 
32% 16% 
15% 9% 
49% 3016 
49% 36)6 
32% 35% 
23 20% 

31% 23% 
12 416 

10% 6% 
42*# 40*6 
84% 47% 
44% 31% 
4H6 34 
36)6 19% 
4516 32*6 
15% 10 
6% 3% 
27*6 19*6 
41% 27% 
24% 12% 
34% 21% 
51% 33% 

27 229# 
45% 30*6 
64*6 4016 
100% 7816 
68*6 40*6 
36% 22 

3% 3 

22 13% 


J4 


U 19 1699 
IJ 26 5843 

14 6 

15 10 
IJ 15 
1) 35 
38 


’5 

•99 

18 

175 

34 

218 


MACOM 
MCA 81 

MCorp 180 

MDC J2 

MEi JO 

MOMGr 84 
MGMGTPU4 ... 
mgmuq J0e IJ 24 
MGMuwf 

MGMHO 80aZ7 M 
MBLtO J8f 
Maanll UK) 18 16 .. 

Macv 1.16 2J 11 1381 
Mod Rea 40 

MooiCI U» 2J 6 229 
MotArt ULOOc 39 

Manilla J0b2J 6 594 
ManhNt J2 18 19 266 
ManrCs .16 J 22 391 
MfrHan X2B 88 5 7133 
MftrHof 6J3TIZ5 W 
MfrHuf 5J2B1X1 382 

vlMante 3 938 

viMntepf 18 

MAPCO 1J0 3J 8 544 
Momlz 12 

Morcda 119 

Mor Mid M0 O I IU 
MorMpf SJOaWJ _ 30 
Morion 82 J 37 48 

MortcC JS X3 134 
Morkpf L20 XI 6 
Mcnrkrf SA J It 249 
MrjftM X40 18 39 973 
MgrtM 1J4 17 1587 

MrtMpf 487a 6J 338 
MaryK .13 1.1 15 *« 
J6 IJ 15 787 
JO 18 15 7 

IJO 98 12 57 


18% 17% IS +V 
53% 49% 51 W. +3 _ 
22 21*6 21*6— V 

13% 12*6 13 +M: 
40% 40% 40% — * 
1416 14 M% + U 
11% 11% 114#— V . 
12% 11% 11%— 4- - 
24* 2% 2Kr— V 
22 21% 21%- V 
18*6 18% 11% 

5816 56 56 -Or 

4716 46*6 444) — V - 
13% 13% 13*k+M 
36% 35% 36 + V ' 
3% 3% K6 + V . 


14 12% tflk— V 

21 1916 afl%+19 . 

22% 31% 211#— V- 
37% 36*6 37%— I . 
5216 52% 52%— I 
49% 48*6 49 
7% 7% 7Vi — 1 
23 22% 22%— » 

31% 31 31 — 

3% 3% 3% 



Masco 

MessMr 


xa las 

U2 1X0 
J3r J 12 


M0*#rF 
JJasCP 
Maine 
MatsuB 
Mattel 
Matte wt 

Mottlpf X50 82 
Maxatn 


MavDs L72 38 10 2550 
Mavta 280a 54 10 306 
McDrpf 230 SJ) AS 
McDrpf 280 1X3 2 

McDerl 1J0 67 17 2061 
McOrlwt 
McDtd. JO 
McDals J2 
McDnO 184 
McGEd 100 
McGrH 180 
Mclnta 
McKass 280 
McLarat 
McLaawt 
McNeil JO 
Mood 1J0 
Mesrux J4 
Madtm J6 
Mai tan 240 .. 

Melton Pf ZJ0 jos 
Mattel) 184 23 12 


6 

22 19 84 

18 14 2670 
28 9 2109 
4J 66 2383 
XI 14 1373 

58 12 233 
9 BS 
180 

33 7 1 

Xi ■ 1148 

g'S m 

58. 9 3854 
844 


43-1 


Merest 1 JO XI 10 24 

Monde • 320 XI 15 3037 

Menttti 1J0 18 15 150 

MarLvn JO 28 30 5751 


s 


■* 5% 

516 2V> 
55 44% 

57% 45% 
3% 2% 
16% 1316 
7% 4% 
49 3316 

14% 9)6 
25% 17% 
28% 22 
17% 11% 


31*6 23*6 
21% 6% 
20*6 15 
lHk 4 
319# 23V# 
4 % 

9*6 5% 

29% 16)6 
15 8% 

21% 149# 
51 40% 

31% 26 
28% 16% 
18% 149# 
9(6 6*6 

52% 34*6 
25% 18% 
28*6 ZJ% 
49% 28% 
SO# 75)6 
42% 36% 
30% 18% 
21 12 
31% 31% 
44)6 3916 
25% 15% 
2J% 15 
43 27% 

30% 22% 
23*6 18*t 
13% 11 
11% 3% 


Manor 
M»sa Pi 

M#saR 1J0# SJ. 

Mascd) JBelXl 7 71 

Mestefc 1 

MIC PIG 788 1X5 40d 

MIEpfl 8.13 15J SB 
MaxFd .17a 68 38 

MdiER 138 U IO 10 

MtcWbS J6 S 33 2 

MUdccn X36 5.1 9 663 

MldSUt 1J> 1X4 5 3537 

MktRra 1J0 58 16 

MWE 288 9J 10 92 

MlttnR 80 25 14 22 

MMM U 42 11 1473 

Mte PL 276 X9 8 2B2 

Mbnlns cm 

MoPSv IJSb 68 7 9 

Mrtte 343 

Mobil Z20 7J 9 3994 

teMoUH 31 

ModCPt 12 48 

MotaK 80 18 11 994 

MobHX 334 

Monrch JB XI 25 43 

Moran# 2J0 58 8 2327 

MntDU 156 BJ I 33 

MonPw XOO 9.1 11 354 

MonSt UOStOJ 94 
MONY JO SJ 8 230 
MooraC 3J0 18 12 275 
MoraM 1JM X5 13 43 

MorMPf X50 98 32 

Mergns 120 48 812324 
Moranpf 7J7a 9J 66 
MorKnd 18 U t 12 
Monas JO un ss 
MttORtV 1.71a 88 11 124 
Mortons 84 2J 13 384 
Metrics 84 L9 10 7369 
Munfrd , 54>U 13 SBi 
Munsng 398 I 

MurahC 188 38 16 53 

MurpO «S M It 32 
MurrvO 1J0 58 IO 14 
MutOm 18681 IJ 18 
MvarLn 35 


55% 54% 

9*6 9% ... - 

15% 14% 14% + ) 

87% 82% 83 
63 43% 4ffl%- J 

49% 43*6 489#- ) 

74% 72% 72H— 11 
11% 11% 11%—* 

30% 389# 29%— 1 
12% 12% 12V#— V 
11% 18*6 M*6 . 

2(6 2% 2Vk— ) 

27 26% 3*%— * 

11% 11 H 
43% 629# 63V#— 

IM 13% 13(6 + ) 

9% H# 9% 

30% 30V# 30% + > . 

14 13*4 13*6—} 

4SV, 44% 45 — } 

41(6 47% 470—1 
28V# 27% 27% - I 
21% 21% 21% 

27% 26% 269#—} 

7** 7*# m- 
»% 9% 9)6-1 
60(6 59 5W6-I 

769# 75% 76 +H 
43*fc 42*6 43. — 1 
65 44(6 

33 32% 

44*6 43% 

16 IN# 14 
5% 5% M . - 

269# 269# W# + 

36 35% 3M— 

30% 20 IM— 

31% 30% Mb— 

49*6 49% 49*— 

22 23 35+{ 

1^6101% IMh + i 

£ ££=N -• 

29* 299# 299# " 

7% 7 7 

» ** » 
i 53 53 SJ +1V. 

L 54 54 54 +V* ,. 

2*6 2% 1% / 
1fl» !» W . .( * • 
6% 69# «*+( 

4716 46(6 44%— *. 

13% 13% 13(6 
18 179# IZ* ~r }' . 

37*# 24% 5%+ \ 

M% 1J*V §*—* 

84% S3 — 

31)6 31 



K Aim 



y ' f w. 


% rz' % 

•v » 4 a 

IM HI 
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M 

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31 


l: ir \ jlue* 


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■*- **6f 

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4JMB. *4M% 


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.SIRI’l 


iav#— i, 
311#— 1. '■ 

7%— ( te. 




16* 14» 

67* 4W ‘ 5T 

206 .29 39 

32(6 21* M 
17% T7% 17% + 1 
9% » 

52)6 52 

23(6 22* ZM 
26*6 24% «% 
46% 45* " 


Hates 


3S% 38% 38%- * 
21% 21 21%— 
20 W# » +! 
30% W) »%— 
3316 32% n , 
24 23% 2« + 

19* H* IM + . ■ 

s 

ij* m S)- 

4% 4 4 — 


- ?? ■*»* 
■31 fu , - 




22% 16 
60* 39*# 
24 14% 

22% 17% 
39*6 23 
30% 20% 

17 10% 
34%25£ 

46V# 31% 
SB*# 38% 
38*# 21 
299# 20 
41(6 30*6 
72% 54 
18% 11% 
29*6 22*6 
19(6 16)6 
20 11*6 
39% 18V# 
224# 19% 
65(6 27 
4% 2% 
33% 23% 

29% 17% 
11% 6% 
29 21U 

16*6 9% 
29*6 21% 
13 10 

2 9V, 21*6 
14** 11% 

18 14% 

20)# 19 
17% 14% 
12M 8% 
29% 28% 
28 21% 
26% 20*6 
23% 14*6 
32 24 

70 55% 
25% 19*6 
18% 13% 
38 24 

19 13(6 

47 W*6 

15% 11% 


HAFCO 

NBD 

NBI 

NCH 

NCNB 

NCR a 

NL tnd 

NUI 

NVF 

NWA 

N abacS 

Not CD 

Nashua 

Nat Can 

N Can pi 

NfCnvs 

NteDM 

NDtrtw 

NatEdu 

NatFGs 

NPGPt 

NatGva 

NIHoili 

Nil 

NModS 
N Mines 
NtFnrt 
NtSuml 
NtSvdn 

Narco n 
N«Pw 
Newppf 
NevPpf 
NoVPBf 
NavPpf 
NavSvL 

NBiUd 

NEnPpf 

njrk 

NYSEG 

NY5pt 

NYSpf 

NVSpfA 

NYSpI 

NYSpIO 

Newell 

Newhte 

Nawhii 


IJO xe ia 

U 61 7 

n X4 14 
133 U f 
88 03 • 
JO IJ 
232 6J V 


JO 12 17 
Z68 44 12 
130 £1 12 
6 

IJO 28 10 
1J0 28 
J( U IS 
120 78 20 
UB 9J 

11 

6J 7 


1 JS 


X30 103 
XOO 4J 


JS 

52 


J 20 
1.9 14 


1J0 


XB 12 
13 

1J0 13 13 
Ate AA 6 
234 * 3 9 
IJO 1L5 
1J4 10J 
U8 113 
1JS 118 
JO XB 7 
M0 98 4 
176 1TJ 
104 U 10 
384 TU 6 
X75 133 
■JS 1U 
X01811J 
XI2 123 
X75 1X3 
JO 17 11 
84 18 29 

XTSXn.l 


17 20V, 
16 57% 
969 14% 
32 21*6 
294 35% 
2064 30 
907 11*6 

1 34(6 

.425 1 

1341 41% 

622 51% 
1412 34% 
34 27*# 
1554 41% 

2 73% 

SS 

132 29% 
2 IB* 
42 12% 

73 28% 
1 22(6 
370 42% 
152 3% 

201 29% 
1747 27*# 

4 10% 
40 26% 

4953 11% 
260 30 

wr it 

49 »% 
5Mb 14(6 
SSh 16*6 
29% 20V# 

5 16% 
31 W*6 

185 38* 
4 23% 
9 25% 
3083 2216 
1802 28(6 
10 * 66 
200 25% 

19 17% 
2 28% 

IM 18% 

20 46V, 
20 15% 


20 3J}6 + 
57*# S7%+, 




n% ae-u ^ ii 
21% 

M, + 

48% 41V# 

57% 57* + 

23% 23%-’ 

27 27 — 

n% 73% +1’ 

»% M* + 

12(6 12% + 

21 as — 

22(6 22)6 
42% 42*+: 

3 3% + 

Wh 2B6-1 
27 27%—* 

10% JO* - 
21% 24V#— 

10% 

5% 

u% j§+ 

Ufb 1J% + -. 

10 % 10%-— 
a** a»- 

22% 23%-. 

25% 25% 

22 22 % 

28% 2H« 

66 44 

25 25% + ' 

1716 1716— 

vm m%+'. 




*««■ r% 




(Continued on Page 12) 



fi 









tatistics Index 

. . v _„ex ortcn Wfl EantfmM raoorts P.n 
• SO amex MainylowiP.iz Frtnfl rata nates p.is 
V-wySE prices Wo Gold markets P.n 

• m’iSE BtstW/IMto P.I2 Infer as) rotas P.ll 
*CanO«on Stocks P.15 Market summary P.10 

' C u rrency rotes P.M Ootwns P.15 

• 'tommeWlei P.U OTCHoek P.14 

InMtfwds p.M Ottwr markets P.16 

THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Hemlh^SSnbuttc 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


US. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 




^ SL ' ■; 
R & ; 4 



WALL STREET WATCH 


With Dollar Up, Analysts 
• ’ Look to the Service Sector 


l 1 *- =:• V " ' ^ 

s' . * 4 ; i:r Vi- ^ ARis — 

1 • .\ 7 to go OU 

,S v • • ■ -v * Hv I - can’t be 

1 Li 1 n 1 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

— With the dollar acting so unstable that it is liable 

out and shoot somebody, investors in U.S. Stocks 
be blamed for trying to find cover. Bat where to 
Greg A. Smith, director of research at Prudential - 
<. Badhe, has summed up the problem: 

, “If the dollar decknes sharply,” be noted, “investors in the 
, stock market could lose valuation as bond and other interest rates 
/j react to the dollar’s weakness. 

“If the dollar remains near current levels or moves higher, 
' V profits could easily be flat for the year,” he added, “which would 
suggest that even with a better valuation, the stock market is very 
near fairly valued based on. _ 


Investors know the 
U.S. economy has 
moved to a service 
orientation.’ 



* 


* w 


* - our expectations that stocks 
would sell at between 11 and 

' V 12 times earnings this year.” 

. 1 r’c,' With the strong dollar un- 
’ : ' dercutting corporate profits so 

,' v v ; severely, Mr. Smith said inves- 
7 tors must now “segment the 
universe of companies” on 

:-' \.vr Wall Street between service- “ * 

* .‘ r: --V type, which are relatively unaffected by currency movements, and 
... l f;'< those in the manufacturing sector that are affected. 

~ ‘The stock market as it is presently constructed really doesn’t 

"'-V; line up with the strength of the U.S. economy, which, as most 
investors know, has been moving toward a service orientation for 
some time,” he continued. “We have a service economy «nri a 
manufacturing stock market” 

Fred FraenkeL, chief investment strategist at the firm, elaborat- 
ed that this “bodes very poorly” for most stock-market indexes, 
because “in general, large capitalization companies are more 
negatively impacted by the dollar's strength than many wmll 
K. K 1 , V DD 1 1 - pubHc or privately traded companies.” 

v v Only about one- third of market capitalization is in service- 

V . v '.jv vn; - related stocks, while two- thirds of Standard & Poor’s 500 equities 

■ *•'“ **L. is still related to goods production, he painted oat 
. . A - . Taking all this into account, Prodential-Bache has been adding 

T-., stocks in the service sector to its “ultra-focus list” most recently 
- Shoney’s and Jaguar. Meanwhile, all technology stocks have been 
— -* removed from the list Mr. Smith explained: Tt reflects that the 
- part of the economy represented by manufacturing has really not 
felt the recovery that the economists have been saying exists.” 

; : Where the dollar will head and its effect on wj Street is 
' - 7 “plaguing investors at home and abroad,” echoes Thom R. 

• 7 i Brown, dhainram of the investment poficyjxmnrittee at Butcher 
- - & Singer. 

V However, he added: “The current dollar problem will be in 
..good part alleviated and investor psychology wQl improve dra- 
_ maticafly if Washington produces positive action towards ieduc- 
:ing the. deficit.” 

Decisive action here, he predicted, will produce “a powerful 
. upsurge” that could carry the Dow average “well above the 1,500 
• leveL” 

; Stocks among the Dow industrials that Butcher & Singer 
thinks would advance “30 percent or better from current levels, 

: given restoration of investor confidence,” are Alcoa, DuPont, 
IBM, Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing, U.S. Steel, AT&T, 

~ Goodyear, International Paper and Owens-lBinois. 

“Stop worrying about higher interest rates,” he added. Tt is 
simply not in the cards as long as tike dollar stays strong.” 

The dollar’s latest gyrations are providing new diaUenge to 
’ what Robert G. Heisterberg calls “world-class investing.” He is 
research director at Alliance Capital Management, which handles 
more than $20 billion, making it Wall Street’s largest investment 
r manager outside the money-market funds. 

“■ Criticizing U.S. institutional investors for being “uninterested 
■ and underinvested” in other countries' markets, he said it is 
essential now in analyzing companies to evaluate their prospects 
(Continued on Page 15, GoL 8 ) 



Europe and U.S. Race to Commercialize Space 


By John W. Anderson 

New York Tima Service 

HOUSTON — Mention the “space race” 
and most people still think of a battle for 
military supremacy between the Soviet 
Union and the United States. 

But a new space race has developed, the 
spoils of which am not political but econom- 
ic. It is the push to command the lion's share 
of private rockets and communications satel- 
lites; to make pharmaceuticals, semiconduc- 
tors, and other delicate products in a totally 
controlled environment. 

At stake is more than $52 billion in annwat 
revenues by the end of the century, according 
to Center for Space Policy, a Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, research investment firm. 
Preliminary results show that the United 
States is running behind the competition. 

“We are moving slow as turtles compared 
to the Europeans," warned Christopher Pod- 
siadly, director of the Science Research Lab- 


oratory at Minnesota Mining & Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

- The problem is not lack of scientific acu- 
men. but cash. By starting to “privatize” 
space activities — for example, by selling to 
the private sector rights to rockets originally 
built for and owned by the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan has put UB. companies 
in a dilemma. 

For although U-S. concerns have been ov- 
en a shot at a potentially mammoth market, 
they are pitied against European concerns 
that are subsidized by their governments. If 
this situation continues, UA companies say 
they will fall permanently behind in all as- 
pects of the commercialization or space. 

. Transpace Carriers Inc, a 17-employee 
company in Green belt, Maryland, is experi- 
encing such problems in its attempts to tarn 
its newly acquired rights to launch a Della 
rocket into a thriving business. 


The company was started in 1982 by a 
group of NASA technicians who wanted to 
capitalize on the government’s decision to 
allow private companies to launch rockets. 
McDoimdl Douglas Corp., the manufacturer 
of the Delta rocket used in more than 160 
government-run launches of satellites and 
scientific experiments, has agreed to build it 
for Transpace. 

Transpace has yet to take physical owner- 
ship of a rocket, but has spent $9.5 million 
setting up shop and trying to dram up inter- 
est from telecommunications companies and 
anyone else who might eventually launch 
satellites. 

The company was prepared for UA com- 
petition. For example. General Dynasties 
Corp. now holds ownership rights to the 
Atlas Centaur rocket and plans to launch it 
itself. And the government-owned space 
shuttle has been launching communications 
(Continued on Page 13, Col 3) — 


New Law Allows 
Thrift Units in 
Ohio to Reopen 


By Gary KJort 

New York Times Sercice 

COLUMBUS. Ohio— The Ohio 
Legislature approved emergency 
legislation Wednesday allowing 69 
dosed savings and loan associa- 
tions to open and eve depositors 
5750 per month until state officials 
permit the institutions to resume 
normal operations. 

Governor Richard F. Celeste 
quickly signed the legislation and 
later met privately with about 120 
executives of closed savings and 
loans. After the meeting, Thomas 
Batties of the stale Commerce De- 
partment's savings and loan divi- 
sion said that the first institution 
might reopen Thursday. 

“We are protecting $4 billion, 
the savings of 500,000 Ohioans," 
Mr. Celeste said in a statement pre- 
pared for the signing. 

The measure approved would al- 
low an institution to reopen as soon 
as it applies for federal deposit in- 
surance and stale banking officials 
determine that it is in strong 
enough financial shape to qualify 
for the insurance. 

The impact of the crisis spread to 
international financial markets 
Tuesday and was blamed for a rise 
of about $36 an ounce in the price 
of gold and a sharp decline for the 
dollar. 

Although investors in Europe 
may have reacted in an exaggerated 
fashion, analysts said, the Ohio 
troubles were one more indication 


that the American banking system 
is far more unstable than it used to; 
be. 7 

After two days of legislative del 
bate and partisan politics, the Re- 
publican-dominated Senate voted 
unanimously early Wednesday to 
approve a House' measure passed 
several hours earlier. 

The measure would allow all in- 
stitutions to open almost immedi- 
ately on a limited basis no the 
500,000 depositors affected by the 
closings could withdraw up to $750 
a month to meet necessities. 

Mr. Celeste ordered closed 70 
state-charted but privately insured 
thrift institutions Iasi Friday after 
mounting concerns over the Ohio 
Deposit Guarantee Fund triggered, 
a multimillion-dollar customer run 
on deposits at several of the institu- 
tions. 

The run was touched off by the 
collapse earlier this month of 
Home State Savings Bank in Cin- 
cinnati after it was disclosed that it 
may have lost $100 million in the 
collapse of a Florida securities 
company. 

Over the weekend, state and 
Federal officials decided that fed- 
eral deposit insurance was the only 
way to restore enough public confi- 
dence in the institutions to allow 
them to reopen. 

One association reopened Mon- 
day as a member of the Federal' 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 


*-■ I. 


Dollar Falls Again in Europe; GATT Says World Trade Rose in 9 84 
Gold Rises in Wild Trading 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The VS, dollar 
finished lower Wednesday against 
most major currencies after a vola- 
tile bout of trading in London, 
while gold prices swung widely but 
finished higher in Europe. 

Dealers were reluctant -to fore- 
cast whether the dollar’s slide this 
week in foreign-exchange trading 
heralded a sustained turnaround. 

Stephen Crook e, an exchange 
dealer with Irving Trust, described 
the trading as “violent, volatile, 
nervous,” and said the British 
pound looked especially strong, 
buoyed by Tuesday’s unveiling of a 
1985-86 budget. 

The pound strengthened to 


$1.1750 during trading in London, 
but fell back in late trading to close 
at $1.1515. It dosed at $1.1365 late 
Tuesday. 

Is Tokyo, the dollar dosed at 
256.90 Japanese yen, down from 
259 JO yen Tuesday. 

Other late rates in Europe, com- 
pared with Tuesday’s late levels, 
included: 3262 Deoistih marks, 
down from 3273: 2.7515 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.78 15, and 9.99 
French francs, down from 10.059. 

Gold opened in London at a bid 
of $33750 an ounce; and dosed at 
$324,00 a troy ounce, op $725 
from Tuesdays dose of $316.75. In 
Zurich, gold dosed at $323, up 
from $31850 on Tuesday. 


Compiled by Our St/tf From Dopoiches 

GENEVA — The volume of 
global trade increased 9 percent in 
1984, fueled by the U.S. economic 
recovery that also posed an “in- 
creasing threat to International 
trade relations,” the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trades 
said Wednesday. 

The value of world trade, down 2 
percent in 1983, rase 6 J percent to 
$1.95 trillion, GATT said in its first 
estimate of international commerce 
in 1984. It was the first significant 
growth since 1979 and put the val- 
, ue dose to the 1980 record of $1.99 
trillion. 

U.S. imports accounted far more 
than half of the increase, the study 
said. The trade expansion was 
dominated by exchange among 
North America, Western Europe 
and Japan. 


The study called the U.S. share 
“disproportionately large” and 
said it contributed to the record 
deficit in Washington's interna- 
tional accounts. GATT also said 
the increase could endanger inter- 
national trade relations by adding 
to protectionist pressures in the 
United States. 

The difference between the value 
and volume figures resulted from 
the rising dollar, which made the 
value of man y countries’ exports 
decline when expressed in the U.S. 
currency. 

The study said that trade ten- 
sions “are at least as Strang as dur- 
ing the recess on years.” It noted 
that the U.S. recovery had not ex- 
tended to aQ sectors of the econo- 
my, leading to growing demands 
for protection from U.S. basic in- 


dustries, which are especially 
threatened by imports. 

The strong dollar and a record 
increase in the U.S. trade deficit 
“are posing an increasing threat to 
international trade relations by 
adding to protectionist pressures.” 

The GATT study said it was “a 
misunderstanding” that import re- 
strictions could reduce the trade 
deficit and expand employment in 
the long term. 

Trade tensions also resulted 
from “the weak growth and further 
increase in unemployment” in 
Western Europe, which had kept 
alive protectionist sentiment there, 
the study said 

The study said that Japan “re- 
sponded more strongly than West- 
ern Europe to the stimulus from the 
United States," with exports in- 
creasing 16 percent (AP, Reuters) 


U.K. Banks Cut 
Their Base Rate 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s four 
major clearing banks Wednes- 
day cut their base rate to 13‘? 
percent from 14 percent follow- 
ing the British budgeL statement 
Tuesday discouraging a sharp, 
reduction in interest rates. 

Barclays Bank PLC was the 
first to act followed by Mid- 
land Bank PLC, National West- 
minster Bank PLC and LLoyds 
Bank PLC. The base rate is the 
rate on which banks determine 
interest charged to borrowers 
and paid to depositors. 

Base rates were raised to 14 
percent from 1 2 percent Jan, 28, 
having already been increased 
twice in that month to defend 
the pound 


Currency Rates 


Lota interbank rates on March 20, excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
PM 


] Schulz Steers Porsche 
Toward New Expansion 


it; - s. 


n 

s: 


■» - 



* 

C 

DM. 

f r. 

1U, 

SUr. 

BJ=. 

tF. Yen 

.fftonwn 

16845 

4JD9 

11187* 

3587* 

0.178 

— 

541- 

13385*14X75* 

■ nmati(a) 

4571 J 

75JB 

20.1095 

68728 

1175* 

178133 

. . 

2382 2158 * 

> ron4durt 

Tlpftl 

3JW 

— 

3168* 

1577 x 

8887* 

4776 • 

11875* 1772* 

. Man CM 

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17478 

11X305 

287268 

4823 

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’ [atm 

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63X00 

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~ — 

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\ mYafft(c) 

— 

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34905 

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27715 25770 

‘art* 

9.W 

11.419 

3.0589 

— — 

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27)4 

1571B* 

34355 3JU5* 

-l*TO 

356.90 

297.15 

7M9 

2584 

IMS' 

7004 

39384* 

9378 

urteh 

Z7ST5 

3,1571 

MJ7 • 

27-59* 

0.1329 

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<805 • 

18725* 

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13295 

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4X55S7 

1583 171366 

- ;_SOB 

0.770309 

0JU439 

116483 

9-69239 

280663 

35767 

637573 

24601 349538 

, <i 



Dollar Values 






Per 

s 


Par 

I 

Ptr 

Corr “ eT 

USJ 

EqrtV. 

CWT “ W Uil E«fe. ° rrWKV UA. 




V - 

U 


-W9 

■n# 

■m 

'w 

.m 


Australians 

Austrian ichHIing 
MV*M fin. (rone 
Canadians 
DanUti krone 


Greek drachma 

Hob# Kangs 


1X225 

JZ» 

VM 

1.3728 

nju 

sat 

14000 

77045 


OH Irish* 

000>2 Israeli shekel 
OHM KmoWrtw 
OJOI2 Motor. rtHftt 
01073 Her*, 

00544 PM. i 

(urns* Pert, i 

0277 St 


L0524 OS442 Smwnl 1251 

81 MO 05285 S.Afrka>araiKl IM1 

QJUB 00012 S. Korean won 832X8 

2556 00054 5mkl peseta UOiH 

M2 0.1075 SumLkfSM MO 

1031 0*253 Tatums »■* 

inn 00350 Thai baht 27JTC5 

34095 02723 IULE.iflrtHn) 34725 


; .n*rtkt:i.nsi inni 

11 ) Commercks franc (h) Amounts needed to buy one wood (cj Amounts needed to bur one dollar (•) 
- ilttialioou) Units 0( LOU |Vl Urttuat IMOa 
Qj not quoted; SLA.: not awUohta. 

' wees.- Banco* ou Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commerdole ItaUana (Milan); Chemical 
■ t-m* (Hew York).- Banaue Rationale de Porte (Parts); IMP (SDR); Bona ue An* to et 
. HmaVonete trinvasllesemenl (dinar, rival, dirham). Other data tram Ronton end Ap. 


By Warren Gedcr 

International Herald Tribune 

STUTTGART — How many 
high-performance Porsche sports 
care will be sold this year is a rela- 
tively simple calculation for Peter 
W. Schulz, the American chairman 
of the West German automaker. 

“What our sates volume wfl) be is 
amply a question erf how many cars 
we can build,” said Mb. Schulz, 55, 
who became Porsche AG's chair- 
man in 1981 as an outrider to both 
the family-owned company and to 
the business of selling cars. 

World demand for Porsches. 
whose prices range from 34,650 
Deutsche marks ($9,307) for the 
924 model to 114,000 DM for the 
911, has never been stronger, he 


Interest Rates 


- Wocnrrency Deposits 


March 20 


win French 

Donor D-Mark Franc Storm* Franc ECU 5 DR 
> Ih -K M S« SWk -5* !3Vi - 134U lOW - H» 10 • IMk W 

, 9 . 9th 5ft -6 na 1316-13* loot- 10 «. 10 - 10W IK 

l‘>- ?h. • 9H. 5 hk - 6 h SVt - 5 V. 13Vh - 13H ID*.- 11th IBh-lOW M 

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»hh- 10*616 • 64U 5W - 59k nth - 12W 12 -1216 10H.-1IM Wfc 

■ •' ** apeneetue n Martian* dorxrstix at a mutton mtntmom tofeauhratant). 

-- were: Attraan Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FPU Uords Ban t (ecu); Reuters 
' \9R). 


«an Dollar Rates 


Into. 

R* Id 
' no: Reuters. 


2(006. 

»-9th 


JmM. 


Dto. .»0 


Math 20 


1B9U-11 


>0 

4 

Hi 



7 Money Rates 


Britan 




- - 


; . Ited Statics 

CIbm 

pra*. 

Oast Prey, 





count Rote 

8 

8 

Bank Base Rato 

ire u 





i fonn Funds 

8 M/16 

Coll Men** 

1415 14 

i * 

> 

i ' 


" ito Roto 

lOVi 

ire 

9 May Treasury BUi 

131213/16 





- Loan Rato 

9IM9* 

9HfW 

jtfnwitti mfrbann 

13 13 3/16 

A 


w 


i ■ • m - Pooer. 38-179 days 

NA 

887 

Japan 


«n - 

- 



‘ .Onto Treasury Bills 

846 

153 


i’l •* 


I- 


’! Treasury Bills 

850 

197 

Discount Roto 

5 5 

“ 

•4 

— 


(3859 days 

MS 

133 

call Money 

MS 6 7/16 


- 

■« ; 

- 

■.* 1889 dovt 

850 

154 

60 -day inMnwnk 

6W 6V2 

it* v 


• -a 


< st CcnnanY 

.Aon) Rate 
; 'Wbm Role 

4JB 

580 

580 

j Gold Prices 



r ■ *' 


• . ’**onih Intortunk 

115 

625 



> • 




. **« Interbank 

135 

145 

AM. 

pjyl am 


% 


— . 

-* '.*Hi IntortoMk 

655 

645 

Hans Kano 33780 

34550 + 4270 

'4, 

to 






Uflwmtows “AB 

- +3075 







Pari* M25 *W 3&aa 

3237V + 1459 

■p * 

5 

A 

r> 


Rat* 

• • Ntonoy 

„ ; "onto inieriMAk 
. *. " >nh » intorttorfc 
'■ lOh iniertMMk 

ion ire 

Ml S/S 10* 
10 M/1510 M/15 

Hi 11/16 10W 

WVj 10 #/U 

2^ 33950 33380 4 450 

U-don 33375 32480 + 775 

•M* Yort - 32140 - 1570 

Official fixings tor uwtoa Pori* and Unusn- 
DouroLOoeidito and dostaa prtew lor Hons km 
nnft T.frtrti. xm Yort Comas currant cnarroCL 

V ■ 




% Beaten, Commenbant Crititi Lv- 

AU prices in UJ5 vet naxs. 






, * t-mui Ban*. Bant of Tokn. 


Source: Renter , 1 



Thai was the message that Mr. 
Sdmtz planned to convey Thurs- 
day at Porsche’s first public share- 
holders meeting. Last April, the 
company offered the public 30 per- 
cent of its capital in the form of 
□on-voting preference shares. 

“There could be anywhere be- 
tween 400 and 1,000 shareholders 
at Thursday’s meeting, there's just 
no way for us to know,” Mr. Sdmtz 
said. 

Since the initial listing on the 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange at 780 
DM a share, Porsche shares have 
surged steadily to more than 1,300 
DM this week. On Wednesday, 
Porsche’s shares closed at 1,293 
DM. down 27 DM. 

For Ferry Porsche, 75, board 

chair man and son of the company 
founder, luring Mr. Scfautz from 
Klockner-Humboldt-Deutz AG 
appears to have paid off in no small 
terms. 

Ashead of the diesel-engine divi- 
sion far. the Cologne-based engi- 
neering group, Mr. Schutz bad 
been involved in the sale of truck 
motors to the United States. 

Mr. Porsche saw in the American 

engineer a rrmnagrr who could 

bring an informed view about con- 
sumer expectations in the VS. 
market and who also could estab- 
lish a team-oriented approach to 
running a small, but rapidly ex- 
panding car company. 

Since Mr. Sdmtz assumed chair- 
man’s duties, Porsche’s profit has 
soared more than ninefold to 92.4 
million DM in the last fiscal year, 
ended July 31, from 10 million in 
1980-81 when earnings had been 
flat 

Sales, ind tiding revenue from 
Porsche’s spare parts, repairs and 
research activities, have more than 
doubled over the corresponding pe- 


riod, to 2.49 billion DM last year 
from 1.17 billion DM in 1980-81 
The number of Porsches sold in the 
United States increased to 21,000 
in fiscal 1984 from 7,800 in 1980- 
81. 

L ike other Ger man automakers, 
Porsche lost revenue during the 
metalworkers’ strike in May and 
June. But sales in the first half of 
the current fiscal year climbed to 
IJ5 billion DM from 1.275 billion 
DM a year earlier. 

An auto industry analyst at 
Frankfurt bank said that much of 
the sales increase's value could be 
traced to the appreciating dollar 
because 47 percent of Porsche's 
cars are sold m the United States. 

“The value of the cars bang sold 
is increasing at a faster rate than 
the number of cars being marketed, 
bm, nonetheless, both volume and 
value axe increasing steadily,’’ the 
analyst said. “Dollar dependency is 
certainly a risk for Porsche. 

“If the dollar drops a hit below 3 
DM, we foresee 1985 profit about 
even with last year,” the analyst 
said. “If the dollar stays as high as 
it is or goes a bit Jugher, then profit 
per-share could, comb from 110 
DM to 140-145 DM.” 

The analyst said a trend toward 
purchasing high-value sports cars 
m the United States would likely 
continue through 1$T7 and, despite 
stiff price competition from Japa- 
nese companies like Mazda and 
Datstm. “Porsche’s reputation far 
quality may justify the price differ- 
eonaT in customers’ eyes. 

Porach^sworit force of 7,000 has 
beet hard-pressed to keep pace 



(Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) 



mas 

The "SUR-MESURE" 

• in Reody-to-Wear 
Men's famous artisanal 
handmade clothes 

TORREGIANI 
Designmr for man 
38. Ri» fonpif*', 75006 PAHS 
TeL- 7 * 2176 . 17 . 


This annourwment appears as a matter of rerand only 



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Nippon Credit international (HK) Ltd. Nippon European Bank SA - LTC8 Graup Nomura International Limited Norddeutsche Landesbank Gtrozentrale 
OsterreichischeLanderbank Pierson. Hearing a Piereon N.V. PK Christiania Bank (UK) Ltd. Postipankki PnvatbankenA/S 

Rabobank Nederland Satomon Brothers international Limited Sanwa international limited 

Sxiete Generate AJsariennede Banque. Luxembourg Sparekassen SOS Sumtomo Finance International Sumitomo Trust International Limited 
SvenskaHandetebanken Group The Taijc Kobe Sank (Luxembourg] SA Tokai International Umrted Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities! Limited 
Union rteBarv^Prabeset Frankses -UBAF. Westdeutsche Landesbank Orozemraie Wood Gundy Inc. 'femakhi International (Europe) Limited 


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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

IBM to Stop Making 
PCjr Home Computer 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Page 13 


COMPANY NOTES 


By Andrew Pollack 

Afar VorA Tines Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Intoua- 
. oaal Business Machines Corp. has 
xided to cease production next 
rath of its PCjr borne computer, 

■ machine that never quite caught 
a in the marketplace. 

: IBM said Tuesday that it was 
■king the action because invoi- 
ces were sufficient to meet future 
;mond. The company said it 
ould continue to market the re- 
; mining computers and to suppon 

* product by providing software, 

1 wrc parts ana optional hardware 
, tachments. 

• Nevertheless, the surprise an- 
xmcemeni in effect signals the 


market, especially because that 
market includes schools, 

“1 can’t imagine they would give 
uj) that low end of the market, 1 ’ 
said Epl Juliussen, chairman of 
Future Computing Inc., a Dallas 
market researcher, which estimates 
that IBM sold 275.000 PQr’s in 
1984. “From a strategic point of 
view they ought to have something 
to take its place." 

Many analysts expect IBM to 


.3d continue to Market the re- 

■ mining computers and to suppon or ^ ’ 

■sgsrSzta ESSES 

tachments. sor. The price erf the original PC is 

■ Nevertheless, the surprise an- also expected to be cul 

xmcement in effect signals the _ „ . „ . 

id of the PCjr, a product that once ,.^ e cancellation of the PCjr m- 

! as expected to establish the same “P* 65 even broader re- 

miinance for IBM in the home ahgnmeni .°* product line 
arket that its initial PC estab- "“P 11 “ 111 store - However, the 
died in the office market. reM L spokesman indicated that a 

IBM thus becomes the latest ca- S^fiSS^S' 45,101 
-laity of the disappointing market » be introduced soon. 

home computers. Many other Norman DeWitt, director of the 
nnpanies, including Texas Instru- personal-computer industry service 
tents Inc. and Coleco Industries *°f E^tiKjuest, a market researcher, 

. kx, liave withdrawn from the mar- sa *d he thinks that IBM made its 
■t after failures. ■ decision because it was not making 

Commodore International Ltd. *e PQr when 

.« seen its sales and earnings " *e pnee re- 

ununei and Apple Computer Inc. 

centiy announced that it would ^ ^Qr would be 

ose its factories for a week be- ^ n t™ 1 * 

mse of bulging inventories. wbc f c ^P? 1 * n J? e competed di- 

■ “The home market didn t ex- _ , r? , , . . , 

ind to the degree IBM and many 

.jservers thought h would," said suit, tottoduced mkte 1983.it did 
lhn Q. Pope, a spokesman for “{«■* the market until early 
1M in BocaRaton, Florida, where 1984, imsmg the L 1983 Christmas 

m personal-computer operations ! ^^T^lfe wasn t 
.* based. “But that doesn't mean cukd fonts keyboard. wh^e ruh- 

* home market doesn’t exist" hen2 ^ J £V S C ^ W1D S 

IBM did not say whether it *»® 1 EL*"??"* ^ 
■wild abandon the home market P^ced the keyboard with a more 
M it conventional one. 


personal -computer industry service 
for Daiaquest, a market researcher, 
said he thinks that IBM marfe its 
decision because it was not mairirig 


mse of bulging inventories. 

“The home market didn’t ex- 
md to the degree IBM and many 
.Kervers thought h would." said 
ihn Q. Pope, a spokesman for 
1M in Boca Raton, Florida, where 
' £ personal-computer operations 
x based. “But that doesn't mean 
« home market doesn’t exist" 


Wang Considers 
Reorganization, 
Some Layoffs 

Los Angeles Tima Service 

BOSTON — The president 
of Wang Laboratories inc„ the 
computer company, said the 
company may reorganize in an 
effort to recover from its cur- 
rent earnings slump and may 
have to lay off some of its 
31,000 workers. 

John F. C unningham also 
said Tuesday that its rival. In- 
ternational Business Machines 
Corp- is partly to blame for a 
sales slowdown that has hit 
Wang as wdJ as such competi- 
tors as Digital Equipment 
Corp. and Data General Corp. 

He said that IBM, by promis- 
ing that it wiQ soon offer prod- 
ucts more advanced than those 
currently cm the market, has 
caused customers to delay 
product purchases. 

Mr. Cunningham, at a press 
conference, also discussed 
, Wang's announcement March. 
12 that its earnings for the three 
months ending March 30 would 
be 30 percent to 40 percent be- 
low those of a year earlier. 

He said this was caused by an 
industrywide sales slowdown, 
the strength of the U.S. dollar 
and problems in Wang’s perfor- 
mance, including delays in the 
shipping of new products and 
customer service that he said 
must be improved. But, he said, 
the slump has created a sense of 
urgency and thus has given 
Wang a “major opportunity" to 
reorganize and mm a staff that 
has grown too large. 


Lockheed Plans $10-BiUion Expansion 

a. pounced Monday that it plans to Marketing costs will rise S25 nui- 

stall from 400 to as many The ambitious expansion plan buy ABC had their debt placed oq lion to about 5320 million and the 
as 3,000 scientists, engineers and reflects Lockheed’s surging profits, a credit-watch list by Standard & company plans a £100-mil!ion 

Iecnmrann< Mr T? irh cqiH whi^h Iimm rat In unti jvT Pnnr^c T Am »n*r . ■ • a- _ 


By Ralph Vartadebian 

Los Angela Tima Service 


LOS ANGELES — Lockheed technicians, Mr. Rich said. which have set records in each of 

Corp. has disclosed a strategic plan The expansion win make the the last three years. The company 
to spend 510 billion over the next center what is believed to be the earned a record $344 million in 


decade on research and plant con- world's largest private aerospace 1984, up 31 percent from 1983, and 
s miction, concentrated on its Cali- research center, complete with su- posted a 5218-billion order back- 
fornia aerospace facilities. personic wind tunnels, a computer- log, equal to three years of work. 

The plan, described by Ben Rich, >zed weapons simulator, radar 
president of Lockheed' Advanced ranges, material laboratories and 
Aeronautics Corp., in a recent in- acoustics chambers, he said, 
lerview and confirmed with other At the same time, Lockheed wfll 
Lockheed officials, includes a sig- continue to reduce its operations at 
nificant expansion of the compa- neighboring Burbank, transferring 
ny’s Kelly Johnson Research Cen- increasing amounts of engineering 
ter. about 45 miles (70 kilometers) to the new center and production to 
northeast of Los Angeles. its assembly plants in Palmdale; 

Lockheed will bund up to five about 35 miles north of downtown 
new technical facilities there and Los Angeles, Mr. Rich said. 

Investors Plan Takeover of Storer 


which have set records in each of PoorisCorp. (51 f3-mlUibn) capital spending 

the last three years. The company American Telephone & Tele- program in Britain, 
earned a record $344 million in graph Ca said it began beaming International Telephone £ Tele- 
1984, up 31 percent from 1 983, and high-speed, digital data and video- graph Cbm. said its Danish affili- 
posted a 5218-billion order back- teleconferencing signals via satel- at c. Christian Rowing AS. was 
log, equal lo three years of work. Kte to France over its International awarded a contract by Air Canada 
Lockheed’s commitment in re- Accanet Reserved 1.5 Service. The to supply a new data wmmunica- 
search and capital spending also service _ operates at a speed of 1,544 tioas network for the airline’s reser- 
raises the ante among aerospace megabits of information a second, va lions and check-in systems. The 


tioas network for the airline’s reser- 
vations and check-in systems. The 


companies seeking the next genera- providing voice, data, full-color contract's value was not disclosed, 
tion _ of ^military programs, which and fuU-motion video services. iwdomMnt of 


BankAmerica Corp. had the rat- 
ings on its senior debt changed by 


uou oi muitaiy programs, wmen iuu-iuuuuu viucw services. Develnnnwnt Corn of 

will be fewer aof n5e hotly con- . BmftAn*rica Cy. had the rat- SJS\aM 

tested - ^ bl ch f n f d , b y the delivery of a software package 

Air Force and Navy orders dur- ®*“dard & Pan- s Corp. to A -pi us l0 ^ ^ pf Apple Com- 

ing the rest of Lhis century are not ^^-nmu^m subordmai- ^ ^ M admosh personal 
expected to be enough to support debt to A from A-plus, and on computer will be delayed two 
the U.S. aircraft industry. **■ prefereed stock to A-mmus from The announcenim is a 

... . « setback for Apple in its battle with 

r 1 Bayer AG, the West German in,™,;™*! MvImm 


.Vnt York Times Service 

NEW YORK — A group of in- 
vestors has announced that it wants 
to gain control of Storer Communi- 
cations Corp. and then liquidate 
the Miami-based broadcasting and 
cable-television concern. 

The Committee for Full Value of 
Storer Communications Inc. said 
Tuesday that it would elect a slate 
of directors at the May 7 annual 
meeting and then “sell ah Storer’s 
assets and distribute the net pro- 
ceeds to the company’s stockhold- 
ers." 

The committee was formed by 
Coniston Partners, an investor 
group led by Paul Tierney, Keith R. 
Gollust and Augustus K_ Oliver 
that has bought major slakes in 
Cyclops Corp. of Pittsburgh and 
Sooner Federal Savings & Loan 
Association in Tulsa, O klahoma. 

The committee controls 867,400 
Storer shares, or about 5_29 percent 
of the shares outstanding 

Wall Street is keenly aware of the 
premium that broadcasting stocks 


can command. On the New York 
Stock Exchange on Tuesday, 
Storer's shares rose $5.75, to 
$70,125, on a volume of more than 
900,000 shares. 

John Bonner, manager of corpo- 
rate relations at Storer, said the 
company would not comment until 
it had studied the committee’s fil- 
ing made Tuesday with the Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission. 

Mr. Tierney said: “Our invest- 
ment philosophy is to try to find 
companies that are undervalued." 

Storer has posted a Loss in each 
of the last two years, primarily be- 
cause of the cost of expanding its , 
cable- television operation. Last 
year, the company had a loss of 
$16.7 million on revenues of S536.8 j 

The company has shed sane of 
its troubled cable systems, and ana- 
lysts are optimistic. Peter Appert of 
Cyrus J. Lawrence Inc. forecasts 
earnings of 65 cents a share this 
year and $1.55 a share in 1986. 


Japan Securities 
Set for Records 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan's major se- 
curities bouses are expecting re- 
cord current profits m the first 
half-year ending March 31, ac- 
cording to spokesmen. 

I Nomura Securities Co. pre- 
dicts a record first-half profit of 
nearly ]00 billion yen (5385 
million) against a record 74.7 
billion yen in the like period last 
year. Daiwa Securities Co. has 
revised its current profit fore- 
cast to a record 65 billion yen 
from -the earlier predicted 62 
billion yen and the previous re- 
cord 48.83 billion yen a year 
earlier. 

Equity trading volume on the 
Tokyo stock exchange rose 20 
percent Io46i33miinon shares 
m October to February, from 
38,676 million in the like period 
last year, the stock exchange I 
said. 


h Ik's Macintosh personal 

? fT T, A : plt ^ an r d . Qa computer will be delayed two 

its preferred stock to A-mmus from announced is a 

i» setback for Apple in its battle with 

Bayer AG, the West German International Business Machines 

“ ncer ?5 s “ d 11 J 185 Corp. in the office computer mar- 
raised, the bonus paid to its workers b el / * 

on 1984 results to 60 percent of , , 

average monthly pay from 42 per- C ^ or c a 0 d ? 

cent Tor 1983. A Spokesman said a £ reed “.^PP 1 ? ^ 

there is no official Sk between the ®^on of computer disk drives to 


higher bonus and any planned in- 
crease in the 1984 dividend from 
the 7 Deutsche marks ($118) paid 
for 1983, but said the bonus is 


Daewoo Telecom Co. of South Ko- 
rea. Deliveries wfll be made over 12 
mouths starting next month. 

Sun Hung Kai Finance Ca had 


widely regarded as an indirect divi- trading in its shares suspended on 
dt-nri indicator. the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 

Denison Mines Ud. of r a naHn An exchange spokesman said trad- 
said Clifford Frame was replaced “8 wiH not resume before Friday, 
as president by the vice chairman, company is expected to an- 
Edward McConkey. The company nounce “ accord to sell its banking 
did not elaborate. subsidiary to Arab Banking Corp. 


did not elaborate. subsidiary to Arab Banking Corp. 

General Motors Kenya Ltd. in ^ Sun Hung Kai chairman. Fung 
which the Kenyan government has ^ Hey, for 360 million Hong 
a 51-percent stake, said it plans to dollars ($46.2 million). 


produce a four-door sedan named 
“Uhuru" at its Nairobi assembly 
plant The first of a planned 2,000 
cars a year is expected to be com- 
pleted in a few months. 

HJ. Heinz Co, the US. food 
concern, expects to report higher 
earnings and revenues in the fiscal 
year ending in April, despite pre- 
dictions of lower profit ma rg ins for 


mpletely or whether it was plan- 
. ng a new product. Some analysts 
id it would be inconceivable for 
)M to desen the lower-priced 


IBM shares dosed at 5130.875 
Tuesday on the New Yak Stock. 
Exchange, up 52-50 from Monday. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
20 March 1985 

t The not aucl vain qmftrt ions shown below are suiwnetf hr Ola Funds Uttetf uri ft Me 
exception of some funds whose quotes ore based on issue prices. The following 
morainal symbols indicate frequency of quotations supplied I or the IHT: 

W) -daily; (w> - weekly; (b) - U-mantblr; (r) - reguterty; CD -brnmlarly. 

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I 

Raceby Europe and U.S. to Commercialize Space Heats Up 

(Continued from Page 11) to NASA, each launched five of the Douglas is the leader in researching the product on 3 test mamifactur- with crystal growth and film pro- 

in r 1 tJbllivoo coni nh>lPiM«/«aiil!^<lT ny>Ar1iiAl«nn Sow Z^A. .Zll I .L. .1 _■ J ~ • .1 . A. * 


satellites for commercial customers 
for about 519 mflhoa a launch. 

' But none of the U-S. rocket 
launchers had counted on the entry 
of Arianespace. a private French 
company whose largest stockhold- 
er is the French government It 
holds ownership rights to the 
Ariane rocket, which was devel- 
oped by the European Space Agen- 
cy, a council of 1 1 European coun- 


10 commercial satellites sent into pharmaceutical production in mg unit it will send up on the shut- rv^rfn. 
space in the Iasi 14 months. space. The company has a partner- tie this month. If the experiment is ber. Y 
But NASA bad planned to raise ship agreement with Ortho Phar- successful, McDonnell Douglas where 
its price for launching a private maceuticals to separate hormones will send a 15- ton prototype pro- its Eui 
satellite on the shuttle to about S27 from complex protein solutions us- dnetion plant into space in Novem- caUy, 
million this fall, in order to make ing a process known as electropho- ber. It expects that it could get space 
.commercial users bear more of the resis. Food and Drue Administration an- exneri 


S on the shuttle last Novem- 
et 3M's experiments are no- 


spacecraft’s costs. Now NASA is This involve 
not sure it could make the increase particles from a 
suc * t * mg an electric: 

“Ariane will soon have a cost The process wo 


sis. Food and Drag Administration ap- 

This involves separating tiny proval of the product as early as 


1988. 

oped by the European Space Agen- su ^ . mg an electrical charge to them. There do not appear to be Enro- Podsiadly conceded, 

cry, a council of 1 1 European coun- “Ariane will soon have a cost The process works better in space pean competitors wailing in the There is poetic iustiee in thi* in 
tries that supervises all major space advantage of up to S5 million on because materials are more easily wings. “The fact that we don’t have that the European Space Aphtcv 
projects in Europe. Arianespace al- taunches *. Ch^cr Lee di- separated in the absence of graviiy. any competition isn’t a bad fed- that is giving theU S. P rocket com- 
ready operates three Ariane rock- ^ we wouldSS^l nnr neither company wfll “8." says James Rose electropho- panies such trouble is the same 

ets, and is expected to have a fourth u . , we los f 811 08r divulge what product they plan to nas project manager at McDon- agency that, a decade aeo devel- 

rouiy for kunching next year. ndlDM ^ 

Arianespace .currently charges ' SffLSSlJS oeU .Douglas wid « willbe a cure Mr. Podsiadly ai 3M, by con- the request of the United States. 


oer. Yet JM s ex penmen is are no- 
where near as ambitious as those of 
its European competitors — ironi- 
cally, in labs on the same U.S. 
space shuttle. “We are doin£ our 
experiments in small canisters 
while they are doing things that 
take up the whole shuttle,” Mr. 
Podsiadly conceded. 

There is poetic justice in this, in 


Tetefouaktiebobget LM. Erics- 
son, the Swedish maker of tele- 
phone switching systems, plans to 
raise its U.S. capital expoiditure 
slightly in 1985 to approximately 
$20 million. Much of the expendi- 
ture will be investment in software 
and marketing toward its Axe tele- 
communications system, the com- 
pany said. 


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ready operates three Ariane rock- 
ets, and is expected to have a fourth 
ready for launching next year. 

Arianespace currently charges 
between 524 million and S26 mil- 
lion for every communications sat- 
ellite it sends into orbit, and al- 
ready has sent up five satellites. 

Transpace, on the other hand, 
has yet to find a customer. It claims 
that it costs about 537 million to 
send satellites into orbit aboard a 
Delta rocket, and that it would 
charge 542 million a launch. Arian- 
espace would not divulge its own 
cost estimates, but Transpace says 
(hat the French company’s costs 
are much higher than its own. The 
reason for the difference in prices, 
Transpace insists, is that Ariane- 


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P -^ SematreJTwn^th^. for T ^ e comply wfll by irast, feels the competition shaiply. This laboratory became the first 

lo make matters worse, the Eu- t o produced liters (1J7 quarts) of His company beganaperimeniing Spacelab. 


ropean Space Agency may bufld its 
own shuttle. In January. European 
ministers met in Rome and ap- 
proved the Ariane 5, a rocket sys- : 
tem that could launch a small, 
manned shuttle known as the Her- 
mes. Research and development 
costs for the Ariane 5 are expected 
to exceed 523 billion. 

"France has a political position 
to develop an indroendent manned 
capability," said Frederic d’Allest, 
chairman of Arianespace. His col- 
league, Mr. Heydon. added: "We 


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—Hd) ConcMtra DM MBS — Id ) Unltonds 

— t Id i inn Rentenfond DMBAte —id > unirak 


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F8C MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISEK (r ) Area Finance I.F IWJ2 

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— Iw) FAC European *97? (w) BNP inferbond Fund — *9879* 

— Iw) FAC Oriental *2SJ1 |w) Bandsefoa-lwue Pr — - SF 0485 

fidelity FOB *70. Momltion Bermuda iff*. 1 *i?S 

-In,) Amorteon voluo* Common- *8*30 }i! SSSfi! E”ES ,rw * ,Bn Vi’S 

-imlAmer values Cum.Prof — 1101.16 

=ldiESS!!RSS^flS¥Sid— 8 1 »^Hs 

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Fdl Id I Dravtu* Fund Inn 

—Id ) Fidelity World Fimd 1303 }„,» n~v«.ia intaramtlnent 


SF 167 JP —id I Japorv-lrwMt 

— Id ) Soffl South Ah - . Sh. 3F SfiTiS'i 

W ng -td) Sima (stack Price) SF2IMJD 

SF 00 UNION INVESTMENT FrankhlTT . 

— <d | Unlronta DM41.70 

DM MBS -id) Unltonds DMZI.70 

DMB6A* — |d) Unirak ; DM77.95 

iMs Other Funds 


not recover full costs. , 

“We entered this business rely- 
ing on the belief that we would 
operate in a free- market economy," 


tition at NASA which should make 
them more efficient." 

Competition among LLS. and 
European drag and electronic corn- 


said Tony Savoca, president of P 3 * 1 *?* l0 . capitalize on the low- 


Transpace. “But the Ariane is sub- gravity, high-purity manufacturing 
sidized. If we don’t get their price conditions in space promises to be 
levels near full cost recovery, we are 35 intense as that now occurring I 
going out of business." among the rocket-launch concerns. 

Transpace filed a complaint of The pure, microgravity environ- | 
unfair competition in the United meat of space allows special phar- 
S tales last year, claiming Ariane- maceuticals, crystals, and metal al- 
space charged U.S. customer less loys to be made which cannot be 
thtm it did Europeans. A decision is reproduced on Earth. Eric Meger. 
expected by July. vice-president at Center for Space 


FORBES PO 0887 GRAND CAYMAN 
UmDon A9*rt OVMMOV) 


— (w, Gokt in 

~l»] GoW Aupradotton — 

— J*l Dollar Incomo 

—On) Slrateaic Trodtop— 
GEFINOR FUNDS. 

~ j*l EaN invmdnwnt Put 
-Jwt Scottish world Fund 
tJwi State St. Amertam_ 


~ (w) Droyfux Intercontlncnt 
N Iw) Tho Establishment Trual. 
(0 1 Eutom ObUoatKms 
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. SBA5 (W FliuOurv CfW» 

* l.ll Iw) Fans»l«x Issue Pr 
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, (w) Formula Sehctton 

Id I Fonditulla — ----- 

Id I Oovornm. Soc. Fund* 

S 148.18 (d j Frank! -Trust Intarzins 
Iw) Haunmwm HWoa H.V 
■nop. Iw) Kestio Funds. 


nans 

1 1,11214 
*8573 
*3285 
*177 
LF 627* 
S 72961.19 


Meanwhile, both sides remain Policy, estimates that this will gen- 
intractable. “Our prices are consid- crate a 525-billion annual business 
ered on a case-by-case basis to by the year 2000. 
compete with the export market," For now, no European company 
insisted Douglas Heydon, the has put any money of its own into 
French company’s executive vice this research. Funding is provided 
president But Mi. Savoca coun- entirely by various governments, 
icred: “We want to compete with But the expectation is that private 
Ariane on a world market, but you European companies such as West 
have to first get rid of their subsi- Germany’s Messerschmitt-Bdl- 
dy." kow-Blohm will turn the research 

Even NASA feds threatened by into commercially viable products. 
Arianespace. The Ariane and the In the United sates, by contrast. 


Wfe hear they now pay 
ljOOQOOO dollars for a superstar 
to seflaproduct 

Here’s the oriy salesman \ve need. 


OMLGuhLLM.LenAacntAl-491423B , w j Hounmono HMu* 

gUMUL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. Jw{ HSiS/SKt 
ffl.m, SI prtw Port. Guornsov. Mlj2Q5. r 

sins !dlfcfcffi!dsK. 

* I33AB- Iwi imwnwfjet Pond 


battle to win customers. According way from the sutl 


: pay ns ow 
McDonne 


ImlGAM ArMtroae Inc 
GAMortcd Inc— 

•I GAM Boston l ik 
*) GAM Ermltooe 
w)GAM Fronc-vol__ 

■d ) gam internaltaMl I 

;•*) gam North America tnc 
:*) GAM n. Amerto 

•S Gam Foci He me 

,wi Gam sten 8 inti Unit Trust 
Jl gam SMems inc._ 

•1GAM Wortdwldo tnc 

to! GAM Twit* Sa Class A 
iT. MANAGEMENT (UK1 Ltd. 
-twl Berry Poc 

“to>G.T.AnoHf 


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S UM IrmCurrwTCv Fund Ud 

SF96JB trl inn Sjcurlltes Fund 
s 10178 td ) invasta DW3 
*10271 »r)imn*l 
lDl.lOp lr ) Itoltof . 

*113,15 Iwl Janan Sctortkm Fjmd 
12200 p (wl Japan Pacific Fund 
iw*" iw) Jaffw Pfns. IntL Lid 
siu&m Ktehtwort Bmsan ln« Fd 

I w) Ktetewurt Bens. Jap. 

(d ) LMcom Fund — 

(wl Loverwa Cap Hold 
*9-73 (d 1 Llqulbocr 
- '5-*$* iwl Ltovtto tniL Smalter 


rtdlG.T.AseanH.ICGwrh.Fll — S1271" {wl Luxfund 


-<*! G .T. Asta Fund 

■J55S-T- *>*woito Fund 
-fd I G.T. Eutom Fund— 

G.T. Euro, small Ca*. Fund 


rtfl)G.T. pallor Fund 

-fa I G.T. Band Fund— . — 

-fd ) G.T. Global Tertintev Fa 
-J J J G.T. Hamlte palltflnder 
-fd 1 G.T. tnma s twwn t Fund— — 
■fd J G.T Jaoon SaiaH Co^und 
2 G.T. TBc h nato av Fund 
tdlG-T. South China Fund 
BC TRUST CaiJERSEVi LTD. 
^ Seale Sf-SL Hrtler i0534-3633I 
HADED CURRENCY FUND. 

■WJint: Bid *9.52 Otter _ 

KWCoa: bM *10.11 Offer— 

ITERNATiONAL income FUN 


S7M 

SMS 

DM4477 
*6.94 
110.92 
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_ *2143 
- *7177 
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STUB 
*19774 
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. *104* 


« - *-*- 1 s M5* ml Mounoiund N.V. 

*2043* ui Madlolamim SoL F 
*9.17 b ) Meteors. 

&1&Q& Wl HAAX * IVAO 

*1632 d) Nlkko Growth PacLaasFd *1107439 

*9JS wl Nippon Fund — _ — — — *J»45* 

I iua wl Novotec Invcstnwnl Fund — _*£{£■ 
*2678 w) NJLM.F. 

*17-2 ml MSP WL , . 

I4Z08* w) PANCURRI Inc.-* 

*28.17 r ) Farton Sw. R Es* Garnwa 
I3M- r ) Prnmol Value Fund N.V — * 1 

BC TRUST CO(JE RSEYl Lta 5,1 PSCfTRSKHTv 

«SoateS , »Sl. HMIeriOS3634ni "} KhSm Wl F 

Radeo CURRENCY FUND. ..... 2 | 

■W ine.: Bid *9.52 Offer 19J15 “ 

JdJQtAtBid llfl.1T Offer JMW33 )? 

it-ERNATtONAL INCOME FUND 12 

iS } Short Term wiAccuml. — S1J *H m Reserve 
« I Short Term 'A'fDlstr] S1JM? [£ sSSral Portfolta 

!5 } fliSi id sa t nw Hnbowp 

it B lDlcfTl (w Srale SL 8«m EouiyjWM 

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CD) J.F iHimn Tnirf Y 4977 (W T>dV)0 GrOWTft Furo . “.ffs! 

lb i j.f South East Asia—— *29.92 (w ToKvo POfc HoW. JSNti)— — * 101^ 

iw {gut 

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!* { Ctess B - Ui — S10W? (S UNI Bend Fund- 

•*> ) CIom C ■ Jooon *7299 uni Capital Fund. „ * 105211 

fUFLEX LIMITED £2 S?^£ UM 

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sasaRa===si.%’ 

wl Dutch Florin .FL9.916S { fl t l SSJw^Ssli^iMe* S/S a ui sSSfl 

-'SwteFrbnc SF 9.9194 » ^ 

K — Deutsche Mark: SF — Belolum Froncs; FL — Djrtrtj — ma 

wmbouro Francs; SF - Swiss Francs; o-rgBlMb + — OHW Wd 

«w p/v *10 lo *7 per unit; KA - Npl Avqllgfate;^— NotOemmwitagted.Q 
w. 5 — suspended; S/S — Slock Spill; 1 — Ex-CUvRtend, • — ex-icts. — 
PtfrlwnSSflptos Fatu • - RodenwiPrlce- es-jCwwLJ* -vg" ™”? 
ridwkte Fund LW: ® —Oiler price incL 3% preUm. charue, ++-^doiiv sncL 
as w on Amsterdam Slock Exchan b* 


CaMHUNAUTE EUROPEENNE DU GHARfifiN ET DE L'ACIER • CXQi 

Empruiu de F.Fr. J50 000 000 
Obligations 1414 % - 1980-1986 

U COMMUNAUT£ EUROPCENNE DU CHARfiON ET DE 
L’ACLEK (CXCLA) a decide de pmceder au rembouxseniem antidpe de la 
totalis de Tempi-unt au prtx de 100^ majort des ini&rla courui, 
coofonneflwnt aur conditkias ifemisaion de Pemprufli. 

Lea 30 000 obligations de F.Fr. 5 000 seroal rmboursables & partir 
du 22 avril 1065. date a laqueile elles cease ran! de porter int£ret ao prix de 


FJ*r. 5 062,60 soil FJr. 5 025 pour le principal « F.Fr. 37.60 repriseo- 
lanl 19 jours d’inlerfts courua depuis le 3 anil 1985. 

Lea obligations devrom Ptre prfseoioe* au rembouisemeoL coupons au 
3 avril 1986 anaches. 

Le remboursement des obligaiions se ten au* guidiets des banques 
suivantes : 

DRESDNER BANK AKTIENCESELLSCHAFT. Francfon/Maim BAN- 
QUE BRUXELLES LAMBERT S.A- Braselle*; BANQUE PARIBAS. 
Paris; CREDIT LYONNAIS. Pans: SOClET£ GEnERALE, Paris; S.G. 
WARBURG CTCO™ LTD.. Londws; CREDIT LYONNAIS. L aixembomg. 

L’ Agent Financier 

CREDIT LYONNAIS - LUXEMBOURG 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on March 18, 1985: U.S. $139.42. 
Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Infanw a tion: Pierson, H e id rin g & Pierson N.V., 

Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


Whenyou make agreat 



have to make a great fuss. 



,-■*! is mi* & nnwnttmss 12 1 




Over-the-CouBter March 20 

NASDAQ Notional Market prices 


Sam id Nat 

lMs Histi low 3 P.M.arve 


DBA 



4314W 

14 

14 

DC NY 

■USe 63 

39 MW 

63W 62W— ft 

DEP 



19 9W 

9 

9 — ft 

DL Rn 



1S312W 

12ft 

12ft— ft 

ON A PI 



IS 4tt 

«ft 

6U 

DolrMJ 

t 


6S10ft 

9ft 

Oft— ft 

DohivSy 



1635 31 W 

30ft 

31ft +1 

DoknF 



1B92S?* 

38ft 

2BW— ft 

DmnBta 



124 5ft 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

DortGp 

.13 

.1 

1 94 

94 

94 —8 

Datcrd 

M 

1.1 

94222 ft 

21ft 

21ft— ft 

DtalO 



8012ft 

«ft 

12W— ft 

DtSwtch 



170 6 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

Dalmor 



5 B 

8 

a 

Dotpwr 



14 4ft 

Aft 

4ft + ft 

Dalscp 



11 16 

16 

16 —1 

DlQSltl 



33 4 

3ft 

3ft 

Datum 



177 8 

7ft 

7ft— W 

DovlXW 

.l«e 1.1 

18 17ft 

16ft 

17 — W 

Daman 



M 6ft 

6W 

4VS— W 

Drt»Sft 

-ZB* 1.1 

71 18W 

18ft 

law + w 

DeeJsD 



890 16W 

16ft 

16ft 

DeklbA 

■72 

3j0 

96 24ft 

23ft 

23ft + ft 


2J0 A6 16648m 47Vi <Tfi 
7 Sft IVEi 1 ft 

6 7*4 7*. 7ft- 

.100 1 J 10 6 ft 6 

9 2 ft 2 V= 2 W- 

«llft 1 IU I 1 H- 
6 71 - 7 % 7 * 
TDDa 28 iZa 35 M - 

.30 15 OSS SC 54 


BHDO 220 45 

BFiCm 

3GS 

BlW CD .100 1 J 
BPISv 

BRCom 

OalrdC 

BakrFn IDOa 28 


BatdU 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Hwwo 

91 4 V> 

4 

4 —ft 

HvDrUC 

221 lift 

11 

l» - 

HyftM 

M 5 ft 

5 

5 — ft 

Mypatwc 

60 6 W 

4 ft 

*ft 


Sam la Net 

190s Higb LOW IPJM.a’oe 


latoww JO ts 

I mm** 


.10 

IJ 

JU 

3 A 


1 ST S .1 

.we is 


208 U 
JMe J 


OCC Tc 
OakHDl 


65 + ' 4 . 

31 l l + W 


mci 7350 vv. m av>— ft 

MIW M 4 Vs iVi «w 

MPSIS 42 6W 6ft m 

MTS S M 13 3 JJ 1» J* + W 

MTV 1041 21% 21 214% 


■JO 1.0 


Let's drink to what you don't know about Spanish food. 


with every region contributing its own special (fishes, rabbit, chicken, partridge and pigeon. roast baby lamb, accompanied ideally with Rioja wine, write about, a toast in Spanish sherry, brandy or wine. 




440MB 

‘ KHVMi U. 

ii **• 


Spain. Everything under the sun. .: r 




-V:. i*l 

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U.S. Futures March 20 


Sm*« Season 
Htah Low 


OMt HHdl Low CtRH Oft 


Man Sanson 
Mot) Um 


Open Htah Law ri*^ On, 


9HEAT (CBT> . . . 

lbs U» «w 34 m 34» 343 % 345 % ISS 

iw ia« Jrt xas a* 34i uavs — 4m 

tOM 33k San 343 334% 331 331% —35 

J43V1 IM ft* X4» 3*U 341 341te -JB 

34QV* Mar X4B —32 

Itt.Sotes , J*nrv-Sof“ J4W 

w.DcyOpaRlnt 33911 off«? 


Metals 



».B 8673 Jun 8730 to. 13 8740 K.18 

5« S74B Sap B7J3 8733 1733 87.97 

8731 Dec 8733 8733 8743 *748 

EsLSelM Ptsv. Sales 3*316 

Prev. Day Onen lnt.ui.763 offIMOS 

BRITISH POUND (IMJHJ 
Spy Pound- 1 poMeouabSOBDOl 
*3350 ■“"> USQ Vl« 1 .1975 1.1340 

i-jgoo 370 , - 1M0 i-raa ujis 

Hgg l-Wg OK 1.1350 1.1«0 1.1300 LJ320 

13875 Utsao Mar l ifes 

Sst. Sates 17 MS Prev.Sete* 23.130 
Prev. Dor Onen l». 20301 offjjl] 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMMJ 
spardir- i point equate town 
■ 4835 4054 Jun 4345 4943 4927 4335 

458S JD25 Sea 4240 4340 4ZU 4214 

4«6 JTW, Dec 4239 409 J2C0 J20I 

jg" ““l JTO J* 3 ■ 721J JW 

B**- Soles 2,829 Prev. Sales 4J57 
Prev. Dor Onen lid. maao eHiOH 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Suerfranc-l point eque is soooooi 

•US £25 Jun * 1004 0 .1 01 50 JJ9950 ,10050 

•1222 ■£$* 301 09775 09775 099,0 09940 
49470 49670 Dec 49900 

^.Soles 52 Pnnr5alee 134 
Prev. Day Onen lot. 514 off 2.158 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S Per mark- 1 petal gguclsgLOOOl 

Jun 4087 Jl» J073 J082 

■*“ 33$ Sw 3120 -313* 41«3 Jill 

J*JS Dee J157 J157 JUS J147 

4251 4040 Mar Jits 

E3t5aje* XLZX Prev. Sa lee 46463 
Prev. Day Open Int 4&850 OHA214 

JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 
teer yen- 1 pome equate 50400001 
»«g i SSI 4CQyzi JCJ948 403905 403714 

&E5 -SSES ^■££J2°SEF 0 S2£ixbk4 

004350 403905 Dec 404020 40402$ JM39fSJ»40G2 

EeL Bales i«A» PimJbSEbSb J, 0WFi,J,0 «* a 
Prev.Dov Open Int. T7J89 off 72 

SWISS FRANC I IMM) 

5 per franc 1 point equals sajxoi 
jno JO? Jun M56 JW Mas MS 

4®5 400 sen 4700 3725 4475 4M4 

4340 4531 Dec 4742 4742 4745 4729 

Mar 4805 4835 tr >5 4790 
geLSotes 25.199 Prev. 5c 1^374^0 
Prev. Day Open Int 23455 of!7JS2 


ICI Is to Use New Euronote Option 


By Bob Hagcrty 

International Herald Tribute 

LONDON — Imperial Chemi- 
cal Industries PLC said Wednesday 
that it was leaping into a financing 
opportunity opened by the British 
government in Tuesday’s budget 
speech. 

The British chemical giant chose 
Citicorp lnlrmarional Bank Ltd. to 
arrange an unusually flexible pack- 
age under which ICI can borrow up 
10 MOO million (about £340 nfl- 
lion) by selling Euronotes denomi- 
nated in dollars or pounds, or 
bankers’ acceptances in dollars, 
pounds or Deutsche marks. 

The pound-denominated Euron- 
ote option was added only after 
Nigel Lawson, chancellor of the 
exchequer, announced late Tues- 
day that the government plans to 
eliminate restrictions an sales of 
one- to Gve-year bonds by British 
corporations. The new option less- 
ens British companies' traditional 
reliance on overdraft or medium- 
term loans horn banks and lets 
them borrow from a wider pool of 
investors. 


Euronotes are a booming type of 
short-term securities, akin to U.S. 
commercial paper, that are traded 
among banks, corporate treasures 
and other institutional investors. 
Bankers’ acceptances are negotia- 
ble debt instruments often used to 
finance foreign trade: 

Citicorp will arrange “tender 
panels” of banks standing ready to 
bid competitively to buy notes or 
ac ce ptan ces IQ issues under the 
package. Backing up the package is 
a revolving line of bank credit that 
ICI could tap if marke t conditions 
did not favor the sale of notes or 
acceptances. 

Alan Clements, ICTs finan ce di- 
rector, sad the company lined up 
the package because it provides the 
flexibility to borrow in several dif- 
ferent forms at short notice. 

Part of the proceeds will help 
finance ICTs recent $7S0-mUlion 
purchase of rhemiral operations 
from Beatrice Cos. The proceeds 
also could be used for smaller ac- 
quisitions that ICI is considering, 
Mr. Clements said. 


IQ wanted the option to sell 
acceptances largely because West 
German regulations do not allow 
the sale of mark-denominated Eur- 
onotes, The company might use the 
acceptances to cover foreign-ex- 
change risks rather than hedging 
itself in the traditional way by buy- 
ing or selling in the forward mar- 
ket, Mr. Clements said 

The package illustrates how top- 
rated corporations often can bor- 
row more cheaply through securi- 
ties than through bank credits. Mr. 
dements noted that ICI has a tra- 
ditional revolving medium-term 
credit facility through which it can 
borrow dohais at about 025 to 
0275 percentage point over the six- 
month London interbank offered 
rate, or Libor, which currently 
stands just below 10 percent. 

Under the new package, he pre- 
dicted. IQ would be able to ski 
notes paying interest about equal 
to Libor. If it decides to tap the 
package’s standby credit, ICI 
would pay about 0.125 point over 
Libor. 



Livestock 


ATTLE (CMB) 

UDOtoS-- cants pot tb. 

69 JO 6155 Apr AOS 6245 6142 624 0 

6940 4440 Jun 65 40 6555 6S0S 6540 

6747 63.15 Aub 6545 6540 6440 6547 

45.90 4140 Oct 63.10 6340 4X00 6327 

6745 6X60 Doc 6447 6440 6442 6X47 

67X5 6425 Fab 6425 600 6453 6440 

6757 6640 Apt 66,10 

St. sates 14447 Prev. Sates 17244 
rw. Day Open Int 61427 off 715 
EEDER CATTLE (CME1 
ux» Its.- cants par lb. 

7475 6575 Mar 6770 6770 6645 6637 

7420 4670 Apr 6770 6775 677D 6742 

7275 6495 May 6X45 6X50 6745 68.15 

7U0 4640 Aim 6982 WAS 6945 6975 

7300 67JJ0 Sap 6040 6920 6945 69.15 

7232 67.10 oa 6945 4905 6675 6847 

7120 4045 Nov 4953 6957 6955 6957 

at Sola US37 Prav. Sates 1561 
rev. Day Open int. 10457 off 309 
OSS (CM!) 

U80 Ifaar cents par lb. 

5445 * 4445 Aar 4555 4570 4X12 45-55 

5X40 4840 Jim 5065 5 DlB5 5035 5040 

5X77 48.93 Jul S170 5X00 5155 51-97 

5437 4750 Auo 5165 5170 5127 5X47 

5173 4X00 OU 47 43 4770 4740 47-45 

JOBS 46J0 Doc 4825 4B25 4X00 48.10 

49.70 4625 Fab 4840 4840 4825 4820 

4775 4X56 Apt 4677 6677 45.95 4575 

4808 47J30 Jun 47.95 4775 47.95 4775 

st Salas 5709 Prav. Sales 7266 
rev. Day Open InL 25763 off47i 
ORK BELLIES (CME) 

LSODIHk-cantipor lb. 

8120 60.10 Mar 7185 7412 7320 7X65 

COO 4X15 MOV 7180 7400 7320 7365 

8247 6X15 Jul 7X20 7155 7225 7X32 

8065 4020 AUO 7125 7125 7075 7TL90 

7X15 4X15 Fab 7120 7X00 7100 7175 

7340 4420 Mar 7073 

TOAJ 7040 May 7120 

7070 7070 JUl 71JB 

it Sales 1930 Prev.Sabt 1780 
rw. Day Open InL 1X248 off 12 


WFIE C (MYCSCE) 

MOO Ibdj- ends par lb. 

15X70 12X50 Mar 14X48 14X65 

BXOO 12X01 Mar 14X71 14445 

14920 121.00 Jul 14X73 14445 

4750 127.00 S«> 14275 14340 

4X25 12925 Dec 14250 14250 

4220 12X30 Mar 

4000 13X00 MOV 

3925 13X50 JUl 

sl. Sales 7250 Prev. Sales 2416 
rev. Day open Inf. 1X406 off 72 
JOAKWORLD 11 IHYCSCE) 

2000 OIL- cents per lb. 

10JD X82 May 179 402 

925 4411 Jul 417 421 

975 422 SOP *30 434 

1JB 440 Oct 450 454 

77J 487 Jan 500 soo 

9 J3 5J2 MOT 343 347 

7.15 558 May X6« 571 

669 5JO JkK SJ0 572 

a. Sales 7J5D Prev. Sales 9005 
fw.Dav Onen im, 78035 up 163 
DCOA (NYCSCE) 

1 mafrl C tans- S par ton 
2570 1998 Mov 2425 3638 

3400 1998 Jul 2235 2245 

7*15 no sap 2197 2212 


14X25 14X30 
1«X» 14X89 
14370 143JH 
14X73 14X10 
14X20 14243 
141 JO 

140.13 

139.13 


371 X94 

4.13 4.17 

430 434 

446 408 

477 497 

X40 544 

S67 547 

5JB 571 


2390 3435 
2210 2240 
2118 2211 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

51 rmiUerv-pteof 100 net. 





9141 

■7.14 Jun 9U0 

9090 




9183 

8684 Sap 9079 

9042 

9028 

9041 



8587 Dec 9002 

9Q.11 



i3 

9055 

8640 Mar 8987 

8989 

8973 

■947 

9027 

8781 Jun 89 J4 

8949 

89.54 

8949 


9000 

*880 Sap 8940 

B9J0 




89 J3 

B9JJ5 Doc 5974 

8984 

8944 

89J4 

+.18 

Est Sates 



Prav. Dav Opan lot. 40417 oH 1401 




U Y*L TREASURY 1CBT1 





SlflOMOprln- Mx« 32nd»afl»pcf 





7D-2S Mar 798 

79-8 




82-3 

704 Jun 78-10 

78-10 

77-29 

7+4 

+12 


75-18 Sap 77-12 
75-18 Doc 7+17 
75-14 Mar 

77-13 

77-6 

77-11 

+12 


78-23 

7+17 


+12 

7M4 

74-30 Jun 



75-18 

+12 

: Es7. Sate, Prev. Sain 1X406 

Prev. Day Opan InL 50890 offl.193 


US TREASURY RONDS (CRT! 





<8 pct-S10(U)OQ-pta&32nctaaf 100 pet) 




77-15 

77-15 

57-27 Mar 69-12 

69-13 

694 

69-3 

+• 

57-20 Jun 60-16 

68-16 

68-1 

68-13 

+16 

76-2 

57-18 Sep 67-19 

67-20 

6+17 

<7-18 

+15 


57-8 Dae 66-30 

6+30 


+15 

7X00 

57-2 Mar 6+6 

6+7 

sz 

6+4 


70-16 

56-39 Jun 65-19 

65-21 

65-20 

708 

56-29 Sap 65-3 

65-7 

6430 

65-5 

+13 

69-26 

56-25 Dae 6426 
56-27 Allar 6+14 

6+27 

6+18 

6+24 

+11 

69-12 

6+16 

6+7 

6+13 

-HI 

69-2 

63-12 Jun 




+11 

60-26 

6+4 Sap 63-25 

63-30 

63-21 

63-26 

+10 

EsL Sates 

Prev.5atoal45463 



Prev. Day Opan Int821874 up317 




GNMA (CRT) 





SV0U»0p«in-pls 8>32ndsof 100 Pd 



— 13 

70-17 

57-5 Mar 69-12 

69-15 

68-38 

6+28 


57-17 Jun 68-19 

68-19 

s# 

6+16 

+6 

694 

59-13 SOP <7-25 

67-25 

67-22 

3 


59-4 Dec 



a 

68 

SB-20 Mar 



6+12 

+6 

67 -B 

58-25 Jun 



SB 

+6 

678 

65 SOP 



44 

Est Sate* 

Prev.Satos 

460 




Prev. Day Opan Hit 4822 UP 28 





CERT. DEPOSIT UMNU 
f) minion- pte of KM pet 





9180 

BSL63 Mar 9140 

9145 

9095 

9145 

+40 

9170 

8580 Jun 8946 

90.14 

8946 

90.13 

+49 

9040 

8540 Sep 8980 

8940 

HM 

8949 

+38 

90.17 

8584 Dec 8S94 

18.95 

8090 

8949 

+40 

8988 

B6J6 Mar MOO 


5840 

U77 

+47 

8946 

0643 Jun 



88J8 

+41 

8848 

8746 _3ep 



8835 

+40 

EsL Sates 

Prev. Sates 

470 




Prev. Day Open int. 7734 off 30 





EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllltaf*«teof 100 Pet 





9088 

8249 Jun 8948 

8920 

8948 

8949 

+45 

9003 

S4J3 Sap 8846 

19.11 

8842 

8949 

+49 


BOO DOC 8844 

8*71 

5844 

1849 

+49 

8948 

*6-10 Mar 88.15 

8841 

8R.15 

8840 

+49 



Porsche Steered Toward Expansion 


(Continued from Page 11) 
its own importing operation, 
Porsche Cars North America. 

Foreign orders keep the compa- 
ny's factory operations at full ca- 
pacity and buffet it from West Ger- 
many’s emission-control debate, 
which has depressed the order 
books of the automakers such as 
Bayerische Motoren Wetke AG 
that rely more heavily on the do- 
mestic marke t 

A bigger concern for Porsche is 
whether West Germany will offi- 
cially call for a speed limi t on the 
country’s autobahns. 

Mr. Schutz said that Porsche re- 
cently has moved to overeome-the 
bottlenecks in its paint shops ihpt 
have caused delays of as much as a 
year in delivery of some model* 


He said that by employing a 
third work shift and accelerating a 
100-million DM expansion of paint 
shop facilities and other assembly 
plants, Porsche would likely to 
meet its production goal of 50,000 
automobiles. 

“If we reach that target — and if 
the U.S. dollar doesn’t fluctuate 
more than 10-15 potent, well get 
pretty dose to 4 billion DM in 
sales, compared with 15 billion in 
the previous year,” be said. 

“When you consider that much 
of our costs are fixed, due to the 
high engineering content of our 
cars, a sizeable jump in sales to 4 
billion DMisgomgtohaveapreLty 
favorable effect on our earnings,” 
Mr. Schulz said. 

Mr. Schutz fled Nazi Germany 


with his family in 1939, became a 
U.S. citizen, and returned to Ger- 
many in April 1978, where he had 
to relearn his mother tongue. 

His major contribution to 
Porsche, he believes, has been em- 
phasizing a stronger “consumer- 
oriented’’ approach. 

The attitude prevailing here 
when I arrived was that Porsches 
had become too expensive,” be 
said. “I found out that this was not 
the problem, but that the product 
was not good enough in terms of 
meeting customer expectations.” 

As an example of Porsche’s U.S. 
sales problems at the decade’s out- 
set, he died the 924 model, which 
“used an Audi engine and was not 
being accepted as ‘true Porsche.’ " 


AnatystsUke 
Service Sector 

(Continued from Page 11) 
in light of imeniational competi- 
tion. 

“Continued strength of the dol- 
lar," he further observed, “win 
open IfJS. markets increasingly to 
foreign companies, making them 
more attractive to American inves- 
tors." 

Mr. Hdsterbeig, just returned to 
New York from Australia, de- 
scribed the investment community 
there as “favorable” toward Wail 
Street and impressed with the Unit- 
ed States' resurgence as “the domi- 
nant 'economic engine after suffer- 
ing through a long period of low 
growth and high inflation.” 

They were very’ curious about 
the business incentives that helped 
us do it," he said. 

The Robeco group, largest mutu- 
al fund outside the Untied States 
including SlJ billion in holdings 
invested on Wall Street, was more 
concerned a year ago than ii is now 
about the dollar dropping, accord- 
ing to Wim pykema, manager of 
currency and cash for the Rotter- 
dam-based firm. 

He said that 12 months ago Ro- 
beco was “almost fully hedged,” 
then started buying back dollars 
throughout the rest of 1984. “The 
dollar is an overvalued currency, 
but it may stay that way for some 
time,” he added. 

Hans van Derkqogh, a manag er 
in the U.S. equities department, 
said Robeco remained “positive" 
towards Wall Street and expected 
“follow through” after the surge in 
prices earlier this year. 

Breda Cummins, portfolio man- 
ager at Irish Life in Dublin, Ire- 
land’s largest life assurance compa- 
ny, commented that the dollar's 
high valuation has probably caused 
Europeans to cash in Wall Street 
investments. 

She predicted “1,350 is about as 
high as I think the U.S. mar ket is 
gong this year, with 1,170-1.200 
the floor, put there by companies 
buying back their own stock.” 


Over-the-Counter 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prl 


(Indaxas compiled Nsrttv beta 
SR COMP. INDEX (CMB) 
points and cants 

189.10 156.10 Jim 18X95 11415 

. 19270 16000 Sap 18775 18730 

19640 17570 DOC 19030 19030 

Est Solas Prav.SalM 7X181 

Prav. Dav Opan int. 51794 otf 143 
VALUE LINE (team 
polnti and amts 

20680 168.10 Mar 19485 19485 

21980 17X00 Jun 20080 20080 

21X30 18575 SOP 30635 20473 

EsLSdlas Prav. Sates 7434 

Prav. Day Open InL 7J79 aff2S7 
NYSE COIMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
points and cents 

11QJU 9000 Jun 106J5 107JJO 

11170 9L35 SOP 1B87S 10875 

11375 10170 Doc 11U» 11180 

EsLSatem Praw.SoM 19785 

Prav. Dav Opan int. 4819 aff4T7 


18X15 U29S 
18530 18635 
190.10 190.10 


19X50 19235 
19770 19070 
30170 20680 


IQ5J0 M630 
10770 10X30 
118.15 11850 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's N.A. f 

Reuters 1,991.00 

DJ. Futures NA 

Com. Research Bureau. NA. 

Moody'S : base 700 : Dec Z7. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones: base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


t Guide 


Previous 
95X00 f 
Z01340 
I24JI5 
24120 


PA+ W 
5—14 
25 

a + (a 

111 k— v. 

IW* + 14 
IM* 

159k + U 
14H 
4 

361* 34k 

21 21 — 1m 

59* 59*— I* 
369k 24V, — v, 
Ulk 131k + li 
41k 79b— 14* 
129* 13 +9* 
9V*. 9V, — U> 
131k 14 
H h—Jk 
IS* 161*— 9* 
49* 41k 

30 + Vk 

21* + Vi. 
24 Vi — 1b 

109k— V* 
189*— « 

6Vk— 9k 

11* 

51k— V. 
101k + 9* 
l«i— V. 
219* 

7U- V6 
7V. -*■ V* 



Asian Commodities 

March 20 


London Commodities 

March 20 


HM Low Bid Aik BUI Ask 

SUGAR 

sterene per nsetrfc toe 
Mov 11640 11X00 11X20 11X60 1U40 11X60 
AIM 12170 11880 11870 11830 12C40 12080 
Oct 12670 12X20 12330 1ZJ80 12570 12S80 
DOC 13X00 12X00 12980 13180 13140 13X00 
Mar 14530 14X40 14X80 14400 14340 14530 
Mar 15170 14820 14800 14830 15040 15830 
ABO 15570 155JJ0 15430 15680 15530 15680 
Volume: 1734 lots of 50 tens. 

COCOA 

Sterling par metric toa 
Alar 2,130 XI 03 XII! XU3 2796 X1M 
May X1S3 1118 XI 27 X128 XI 17 X1T8 
Jly 2.106 2877 2882 2883 2884 2885 
Sap 2874 XU5 2852 2854 3W x»5 
Doc 1765 1750 7754 1.955 ITS! 17S2 
Mar 1752 1,940 1,944 1748 1743 1746 
May 1.943 1743 1,944 1745 1735 1740 
Velum#: 4J33 loti of 10 tom. 

COFFEE 

StarffaM par rnatrlc ten 

Mar 2886 2870 2772 2775 X»0 2795 
May 2827 X300 2807 2JT2 XOT 2834 
Jly 2865 2830 2856 X357 2853 2856 
Sen 2408 X366 2896 2898 2J90 2895 
NOV 2415 2871 2400 2409 2400 2402 
Jan 2876 2850 2870 2873 2860 2865 
Mar 2840 2815 2840 2850 2825 1340 
Volume: 8814 lots of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

U7. dollari per matrlctoa 
Mot 23775 23675 23630 23780 23530 236JU 
API 22970 22730 77# IW 77 ATS 22300 774 T# 
Stay 22X25 22685 727 JX) 22775 22450 2475 
Jun 22X75 22X75 22480 22475 22X25 ZZXSO 
JVy XI 4.75 23485 32485 23430 7X185 71X50 
AM 77474 33475 22485 22980 22080 22X00 
SOP N.T. N.T. 22600 23X00 22600 227J» 
M N.T. N.T. 225JB 236JJ0 22180 23DJJ0 
Nta N.T. N.T. 22580 24380 221 JR) 23080 
Volume: 2867 tats of 100 tens. 

Saunas: Btufwro ana London Petroleum Ex* 
atanga loasoHl. 


London Metals 

March 20 


ALUMINUM 

mS 0 "" P " r "^S? 80 W80 96480 96580 
fa r word 97880 97980 99680 99780 

COPP ER C ATHOP gS (HJgta Grade) 

l^JO 1^80 

forward 183850 183980 1749 JO 1750JD. 


Cash Prices March 20 


forward 

COPPER 

Sterfkwe 


NICKEL 
Sterfins p 


171800 171 9 JO 
183850 183980 
C ATHOD ES (Stand 

^TmLOO 182680 
174080 184380 

sr metric tan 

HHt fi 7 «* 4 WI 

31X50 21480 

■metric tee 
4J35JJ6 654580 
6JI580 457080 < 


183X00 17J7JJ8 
185X80 185580 


yun 
21X50 31X80 


Commodity POP Uott 

COfteo 4 Sentos. to 

Prfntdoth 64/M 38 Ik, yd _ 

State I Wltete (Pttu.tan 

Iron 2 Fdry. Pteta, tor 

Steal scrap No i hvy pm. _ 

Lead Spot lb 

Copper eteci^ U) 

Tin (Straits), lb 

Zinc. E. SL l_ Bates, lb 

PaikKSuni,QX - 

Silver N.Tw at 

Source: AP. 


Dividends March 


TmnwMterd) 
Sterling per metric ton 
fpot 989000 9.9 

forward 981880 98 

ZINC 

Sterling par metric toe. 
HWt 775JB 7 


U^. Treasmy Bfll Bates 

March 19 



Commodities 

March 20 


m ^ w ias 

W IS If 

N.T. N.T. 1J91 1403 

N.T. N.T. 1440 1455 

1700 late of 50 ions, Prav. actuar 
late. Ooan mterwJ; 2X236 


■"ataanciPH'iMM 

* 24M 2854 2880 2419 +36 

V 3400 S5 2JS0 2885 +45 

2820 2830 2JiS — +40 

1 2825 2825 3J05 2830 +25 

' 2820 2810 S7W 281 5 +19 

* N.T. N.T. X1W — +20 

2 _ ILT. N.T. 2.185 - +20 

i ^ 300 tat* at 10 tom. Prav. actual 
» 2J0 lots. 0 pm bmrasl: 909 

•oilraacf par inks 
\ N.T. N.T. 2590 2415 (inch. 

" MIS 2480 2410 2*18 - 21 

N.T. N.T. 24W 2410 — X 
I , 24« 2499 X4« 17)0 

J N.T. N.T. 2480 1710 —20 

. M N.T. 2485 - —25 

, 2450 3 41 7 2435 2470 —25 

* totsw stem. Prav.octuol sates: 

. . ite-Ouanlntarast: 156 

ra: Boors* A/ Co mtmrtx. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 19 


Hrta OSRBl „ , PteUxte 

PiK* Ate *ter Jte* Jly Apt liter Jo** JN 
m-.-- - 1/16 — — - 

155 - - - - l/tSUtt-- 

uc s m — n l/is 1 * p te 

T*5 an Utt 16 ltn UJ6 II 11/16 J5n» 

In m m w n 1* lyitite 2 

175 5 *H HU *V* 1* K. 3* » 

MO 20* 30* M M »««*» 

* * » » « 

te 1H6 h 1* - - - 20tt - 

® S SSS 

Mo; 

Mp 17640 Low 12347 Clew 17453 + IN 
Starve: CBOE. 


Cbesebroagh Completes 
Stauffer^ Tender Offer 

Reuters 

GREENWICH, Connection — 
Chesebrougb-Pond’s Inc. said 
Wednesday that it has successfully 
completed its $1 -25-bzIIiozi tender 
offer for Stauffer Chemical Co. 

A Cheseb rough spokesman said 
the merger with Stauffer would be 
“formalized within a few weeks." It 
will require loans of about $1-24 
billion, increasing total debt-capi- 
talization for the new entity to 
more than 70 percent. 


Otter Bid YMd YMW 

IS 19 IB U1 

190 980 9J6 940 

9.18 970 RIM 1087 


Catapaay 

Par 

Aart 

Pay 

ROC 

INCREASED 



Fifth Third Bacrp 

8 

40 

+15 

+29 

teausaaf Faeries 

.12 

7-1 

+7. 

INITIAL 




VMS Shrt-Trm Inc 

0 

30 

+15 

+29 

STOCK 




I KcvtiominN 

a. 

25% 

+31 

+9 

I USUAL 




Fad Paper Board Co 

Q 

.17 

*■15 

+29 

Manuloc. Manavar 
Mott's Super Mrkts 

g 

SO 

ss 

+25 

6-3 

+3 

+13 

Ohio Art Co 

Q 

46 

+8 

+18 

Pav 'N Pole Sirs Inc 

Q 

.15 

+24 

+4 

Stared Medical 5 vs 

8 

.12 

+15 

+31 

Stanavtlnc 

as* 

+25 

+5 

UPlotai Co 

a 

44 

+1 

+8 

1 A-APouaL- A+MoMhhrj 4+Oaartafty; S-Sarel- 

I Source: uPl. 






Source: Solomon Bnttars 




DM Futures Options 

March 19 

W Gtnnoi MoMSSO marts anil vb not 


I 


Strike CaHt+cHte PataMtte 

Price Jn Sa Kc te te Qk 
29 X34 289 — 13 IS - 

38 1J8 X16 - DJ5 U2 - 

31 1.10 149 210 188 170 — 

32 U1 U5 US LB US - 

33 045 187 148 2JB 283 — 

36 086 US - 2.94 — - 

flatAaoMMal voLMSG 
Ctefc: Men. voL 59] ape» lot 4395 
Pats: Mon.voL27apaabI.X141 

Source: CMB. 


Pan Am Set to Resume 
Some HightsmU-S. 

Reuters 

NEW YORK. — Pan Am Coip. 
said Wednesday that it plans to 
resume transcontinental service 
Friday with daily nonstop fli ghts 
between New York and Los Ange- 
les and Miami and Los Angeles. 

The company said it was able 


resume the 


Union, because of back-ttyworit 
agreements between Pan Am and 
its {slots and flight engineers. 


Britoil Is to Buy 
U.S. Oil Assets 

Return 

LONDON — Britoil PLC said 
Wednesday that it is buying U.S. 
oil and gas assets from Freepcrt- 
McMoran Inc. of New York for 
$73 J million (about £65 millio n). 
The cad wiU crane from internally 
generated funds. 

As part of the transaction, the 
British concern is awprtng 516 
billion cubic feet (15 billion cubic 
meters) of proven gas reserves in 
Montana, Colorado and Texas, 
winch are expected to produce 9 
millioo cubic feet daily. Also in- 
cluded in the accord is 150,000 bar- 
rels of recoverable oil and conden- 
sate, 

Britoil is also acquiring from 
Freeport a 25-percent interest in 
1.8 million acres (728,744 hectares) 
of U-S. exploration land, a 25-per- 
cent stake in two gas-processing 
plants in Oklahoma and Colorado, 
and a 4-Dercent boldios in a Texas 


\'- i * 1 »] MT> 























































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


1 

2 

3 

4 


6 

ft 

7 

ft 

ft 


to 

14 





10 






11 

IT 




18 






1 

to 

20 







| 

21 


22 



23 



u 

24 





25 

20 

27 



I 

28 




a 


33 




1 

34 



R 

36 



X 



1 

37 




38 



1 

40 



41 



■ 

42 



u 

43 

44 





■ 

4ft 



■ 

4ft 



47 


48 



1 

40 



SO 

81 

H 





i 

S3 




57 


L_ 


■ 

1— 


a 





M 

: 1 



l*T 



f 


1 

82 

ra 


r - 


84 





■ 

U 


10 fit III 113 


PEANUTS 



It5 A MEP1CAL FACT 
THAT BREOTN6 THROUGH 
'(DUR MOUTH CAN 
CHAN6E YOUR FACE... 




■v n 



BOOKS 


ALLOWING FDRTV RUNS 
IN THE FR5T INNINS 
CAN CHANGE \OUR 
WHOLE BOPYi 




BLONDIE 


WHSOE'S 

1 QAD ?r« 


ACROSS 

IDA’S aide 
5 Radarscope 


It Area over an 
eye or eyes 
14 Chopped 


15 “And Unis 

shall ye 

Exod. 

18 Papal court 

17 Categorize 

19 Swan genus 

20 Jehu 

21 Diamond birds 

23 Asian holiday 

24 Behalf 

25 Pleases a 
glutton 

28 In medias 

29 Part of a Jack- 
in-the-green 

33 Good motor 
sound 

34 By way of 

35 Teach, e.g. 

36 Haifa 
Broadwaytide 

37 Comes 
tumbling down 

39 Flax fibers 

40 Soprano 
Farrell 

42 Suffix for Arab 
or Serb 

43 Excellent 

44 Kind of heat 

45 Med.-test 
reading 

46“ of God.” 

stage hit 

47 Mom's and 
Dad's moms 


49 Its cap. is 
Tallahassee 
58 Wild duck 
S3 Rap sessions? 

57 Lily from 
Africa 

58 Christmas- 
song creature 

69 Incision 

61 “Paradise 
Lost” figure 

62 Foil's kin 

63 Their teeth are 
scarce 

64 Cleans a 
meerschaum 

65 Millstone 

support 


a/ai /as 
22 Medical comb, 
form 

24 Oyster 
catchers 

25 People of 
intelligence 

26 Partner of 
visual 

27 Sing lustily 

28 Sunder 
39 “Cry, the 

Beloved 

Country*' 
author . 



Alexander; 

*7 REALi-V/r- 


WHERE WERE WE A H 
• — i WALR HOUR AGO? 


(UA/1N6 

I DINNER 


*JWB_UTWsN?f,ri LOST /W/ HEAD 


h-} P 

I 


THE MATTER OF WALES: 

Epic Views of a Small Country 

By Jan Aforra. 442 pp. Illustrated. $ 22.50. 
Oxford, 200 Madison Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

I T is just over 700 years since the English 
completed the conquest of Wales that had 
bees begun by tbe Normans. In 1282, the 
Welsh leader Llywdyn the Last was defeated 


in battle and subsequently killed in an am- 
bush; in 1284, all Welshmen were formally 
declared streets of the English crown, and the 
son and heir of Edward I was born at Caernar- 
fon Castle and presented to the assembled 
Welsh chief tains — if legend is to be believed 
— as “a native-boni Prince of Wales who 
spoke not a word oT English." 

After some sporadic rebellions, resistance 
died down; then, at the beginning of the 15th 
century, the Welsh landowner Owen Glendow- 
er rose in revolt and united almost all his 
countrymen behind him in a war of indepen- 
dence. For a few brief years, Wales was a state 
as never before or since — for Glendcrwcr, 
holding court with his chancellor and his con- 
stitutional lawyers and his Great Seal, sending 
out emissaries to France and Spain, was laying 
claim to a throne that had never really existed. 
As Jan Morris says, the miniature realm he 
established on the fringe of Europe was a 
visionary concept, sustained by visionary 
means. “It was like a fictional kingdom of 


BEETLE BAILEY 


think/ 

think/ 


THERE MUST BE 
SOMETHING IN THE 
— REALM OF fOOt? 
J X HAVEN'T 
,T\ PONE YET 


FINE 

COOKING? 


m means a 31 Redeem 

aondbirds meerschaum oneself 

a holiday 65 Millstone 32 English writer- 

ilf support critic: 1817-78 

s®s a 34 Director 

on DOWN Stroheim 

vssssr 5“— 

fgg? si£S e .g. add*," Verdi 

*T 4 5SE« 

J y 5L SHewrmf^ 41 Bald nestlings 

h.e.g. “Western 43 — 

d way tide a "Waiting for 45 Last 

rtingdown 

. . 8 Guides from Poland 

g DrArtb S^mfbr 

Jlent ingredient 

of heat 19 Chick’s pad 51 Auk genus 

.-test Ji^d’s retatlve S2 End dTdoth 

“W 12 County ta Neb. S3 Contain 

-of God, 13 of the 54 Ape 

?hit Roses 55 Deadlocked 

‘"sand 18 Pindaric 56 Source; origin 

s moms pieces 58 Ebro estuary 

© Neui York Tones, edited by Eugene Malesba. 




ANDY CAPP 


THE TIME IT 
TAKES NOU, 
► TO WALK “< 
HOME FROM 
THE PUB-/ 


X FEEL 90 LISTLESS 
THESE tysNS—zMEBBE 
I SKXILD GET SOME 
PEP PIUS FBOWTHE 
DOCTOR 


ALL THEY DID FOR HIM 
LAST TIME IA»S MAK E 
-7 HIM DRINK FASTER « 


* — X 

wpuLDNnr 

. BOTHER- , 




1 County i 
I oft) 


WIZARD of ID 


13 of the 

Roses 
18 Pindaric 
pieces 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




m 
i nap 
l&u? 


( lf?WW*TZ? 
m m&A 
£Z \ mHWAMl' 


r an -i 





□ D 


CWwe 


REX MORGAN 


i ||! ! l 

ill imil 


I HAVE THESE \J 
FRIENDS IN SAN ft 
DIEGO' THEY M 
INVITED A\E TO 1 
A PARTY TONIGHT'] 
WANT TO COME J 
fgrr ALONG 1 ? r^M 


SURE— PROVIDING T/A NOT 
OUT TOO LATE.' I HAVE A 
SALES APPOINTMENT EARLY 
to IN THE. MORNING-, CARL/ r- 


ITS THE KIND OF PARTY WHERE 
NOBOCY MISSES YOU IF YOU WANT 
_ TO LEAVE AT NINE O'CLOCK f g 
X THERELL BE A LOT OF PEOPLE M 
:-■■■■ GOING IN AND OUT." tol 


SOUNDS 
LIKE THE 
KIND OF 
PARTY J 
LIKE' j 


& 


ifwotev 

lEceSS&W 

Ks-ar 




'CAN W CHEER MEllP.flAB* l THINK 
I 60T7HE BLUES IN THE NIGHT.* 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
v toy Henri Arnold and Bob Lea 


Unscramble these low Jumbles, f-* 
one letter to each square, to form ° g 
tour ordinary words. 


GARFIELR VOJ HAVE THE \ 
HAWAIIAN CAT FLU. YOU'RE ' 
GOING TO HAVE TO UE AROUNPj 
ALL WEEK i -n \ 

C»vrn: 


ANP YOU MOST 
SfiWINSIPC , 


WHAT?/; 


1 FOR THE FIRST 
T1MEJN MU LIFE. 
I GOTTA GET OUT/ 


MYKOS 


SCERS 




OTMP»Vf& 



BHEWJH 


i «lW»ilnltoH Emu wm 


RAFIAS 


SIEMUS 


THAT ITON JVASi 
THINKS ITS NEVER 
AMISS TO POTHVS. 


Wdd Stock Markete 


Via Agence France-Presse March 20 

Gating price* in local aurmdes unless otherwise auSc tU ed. 


Flat 

Ftastder 
GMMrafl 
1 Ft 

IMoerrmnti 

iMmoMHarl 

Motlfeffisonca 

Montadbon 

cwv«m 


Cmm Prev. 
Pharmacia 311 312 

Saab-Sconla ■CO 430 

Sondvik as *W 

Skansha NjQ. 9* 

SKF 214 214 

SMtftehMatctl 227 23D 

Volvo NA 317 


AflaamaerMw Index : 3f7Jl 
Prsvtart : 377JB 


Now arrange the ended letters To 
torm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer here: 


ABN 

ACFHoVhW 


Yesterdays 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: BURST INEPT DOOMED POMADE 
Answer. What a rail guy Is— A DUPE THAT’S A DOPE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Brussels 

Bocimrosl 

Budapest 


Costo DtIM 


ErUnboreb 

FtarMOR 

F mnfc t w i 

Oeneva 

HsWokl 

Moitbol 

Las Palmas 


LOW 
C F 

9 <8 d 

0 B » 
W SO d 
6 a r 
3 37 d 

3 34 o 
-1 SO sw 

2 34 r 

4 a sh 

1 34 O 

R 4 d 

1 34 cl 
-4 21 di 
■2 as Cl 

1 34 d 
-5 23 d 
-5 33 B 

5 41 ah 
14 41 d 
9 48 r 

-3 27 cl 

2 36 d 
-1 X <r 
■1 30 Cl 
-a 18 fr 


Baton* 
••dine 
Ho*w Kona 
Manna 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

— — — — no 

13 SS 2 36 fr 

20 48 15 S9 D 

33 91 35 77 fr 

24 79 14 41 a 

15 5V 4 43 e 

8 44 4 43 r 

— — — — no 

17 <3 16 61 0 

11 52 5 41 a 


AKZO 

AHold 

AMEV 

Alton Rub 
Amrabank 
BVG 

BuThm ann T 
Cakmd HUa 
- Eisrrier 
FotUcar 

GUI Brocades 
■ ■ — ■ — ■ — 
nwwjwwm 

H oaaqvw H 
NaanXn 
KXJVU 
Nat. Nr<Mar 
Neddtovd 
Oar Vender C 
PaklW4d 
Philips 


Clese Am. 

Horten 174 171 

Kail + Salz 339 34050 

Karstodt 214 21250 

KauHjot 23433050 

KlaccknarhW 263 264 

iOCHK*nsrWertas 75 TIM 

KrupB Stahl 94 91 

Linde . 41830 418 

Lufthansa 19850 28050 

MAN 153 15450 

Mannesmonn 147 jbo U3 

MefaiftmMrscnaff 274 242 

MuandiRnertc 1120 1150 

Praussaa 382 33 

RuehMTO-Wer*e 3485D 347 

RWE 1SJ 15030 

Sdierine 45345&50 

Stamens 553 552 

TtlV BSH 103.20 10450 

Varta 115 185 

Vega 18480 18480 

VEW 12213U0 


Anew Am Gold WU H7M 

Bttocock 144 145 

Barcknn 513 572 

Bass 539 53V 

BAT. 353 340 

Pee chai n 345 343 

nice 350 331 

BL 43 44 

Blue Circle 5X3 515 

BOC Group 299 202 

Boots 175 174 

Q owt ita r Indus 299 24(2 

BP 553 534 

Brit Home St m 270 

Bril Telecom 134 134)6 


Rfrtascente 

SIP 

sola 


Sy4mmy 


M» CMTOOt UK 
Pravtaas : 1196 


Brtt Aerasnac* 391 390 

BTR 707 724 

Burrmh 204 210 

Catrie Wlnetea 547 545 

Cadbury Scftw 144 144 

Otssrfesr ijKTis 3SS • 200 

Cod* Patuns 144 146 

Commercial u 199 m 

Cons Gold 521 509 

CourtauMs Mf 154 

S Datadv 900 500 

iBMTIi 487 418 

union sol 305 

DrtafonMn 52444 S2M 

FSoni 324 313 

FraeStGod S3S VM/j 

Cec 198 198 

GKN 338 344 

iJS5 f Md 

” s 

Hanson 219 223 

Hawker 423 427 

IC1 777 781 

Imos 193 181 

Jaguar 330 342 

Uovds Bank 549 547 

Lonrho 171 110 

Lwcas 288 384 

Mortis and So 149 149 

MhfkBid Bank 337 132 

NatWW Stalk 634 414 

F end O 340 358 

PllUngtan 303 30S 

Ptaamy 300 1M . 

Racal Elect 214 214 

RdxMonleln 5101 Vj s97Vj i 
R ank 358 358 ' 

Reed Inti 590 594 

Reuters 374 375 

RoydOufetiC <79/32 47h 

RTZ 442 4S7 

Soatdil TO 90S 

Salmburv 302 JD2 

ire 1 % m 

Std Chartered 447 462 

Tate and L vfa 440 m 

TOSCO 344 237 

Thom EMI 414 412 

TJ.sroap 238 246 

TKMIaarHM 350 349 

THF 154 194 

Ultramar 220 Z1B 

Unilever £ 1214 m£ 

United Biscuits 185 IN 

Vlcker* 248 265 

WJTeen S39M 939ft 

WJtaWtoos 931ft 931 

WW Loan 3ft I 35ft 35 

Wootwortti 480 407 


Vdkswaaemwrlt 205 20450 


COOHnerzbaafe index : WT759 
Previous : U17.lt 


R o d a mco 

RaHnco 


AFRICA 


Aleters 11 55 10 SO st 

Cairo 38 87 M 57 lr 

CtHTtet 14 41 12 54 fr 

Carobiaaca 18 64 12 54 r 

Horen » 68 17 43 r 

Loan 30 84 25 77 d 

Nairobi 29 84 18 44 r 

Teals 18 64 9 48 Ir 


Royal D&iteft 
UnJ lever 
Vw Ommer 
VMF-Stark 
VNU 

AiHMan index: 21 

Previous: 20540 

Seurce: Reuters. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Artaed 

Bekaml 

Cocksrlll 


Osla 

Paris 

Praaoe 

RtvUnik 

ROOM 

StaCUMhH 

Strasbaaro 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

ante 


Buenos Aim 22 72 W 58 fr 

Lima — — — — no 

MMatClhr 28 82 It 92 tr 

Wo de Janeiro 24 79 71 70 d 

Saopanlo — — — — no 


EBES 

GB-Inro-BM 

GBL 


NORTH AMERICA 


• 2 28 cl 

-2 28 fr 
4 29 If 

1 34 d 

1 34 a 

• 9 U If 


Anchorage 

Attmta 


MIDDLE 


Detroit 
Hong lain 


Ankara 

Behai 

WWW 

Tel Avtv 


4 29 3 37 e 

20 48 14 57 tr 

21 70 3 37 d 

If 59 9 48 Ir 

20 68 IS 5V fr 


Las Angela! 

Miami 

Mtanea*ns 


OCEANIA 


20 68 16 61 fr 

Sydney 25 77 21 70 el 

d-etoudy; tcMoggy; ir -fair: Mull; 
dauav; r-rabi; sh-stuweroj iw-snow; 


Hew York 
Saaprandsco 
Seattle 
Toronto 
WOdUMfM 
no-not available. 
SMtofrnv. 


I 34 -4 
18 64 -3 
9 48 -1 
9 66 -1 

14 57 -2 

8 44 -2 
27 81 16 
20 68 15 

22 72 8 

24 75 14 

9 48 -2 
5 41 .12 

25' 77 16 
11 52 1 

15 59 i 
W 50 5 

7 45 *6 
14 61 I 
o-avercrat; 1 


Hoboken 

Intercom 

Kredtattunk 

Petroflno 

SoCGonofale 

Safina 

Soim 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VHriita Montoane 



ZlJd 31 A0 
U 12M 
13J0 1340 
9J£ 9 JO 

4S35 44 

7J5 7JB 

3175 32 

440 4575 
*30 BIS 
46 65 

520 5.15 
1BJD 18JD 
855 840 


930 9 J0 

550 £75' 

8.15 1M 

850 850 

635 6 

un us 

2040 2DJ0 

7.15 7.15 


4175 *20 
1J70 IAS 


I index: UCL56 
1 <30097 


current Stack loan i 13BSJ1 

rmtaniUOH 


AEG-Ttmrunkm 

Allianz Vert 


Bavto* 

BawJtvpa 

Baver.Ver.Bank 


THURSDA-rs FORECAST — CHANNEL; Rough. FRANKFURT: Oaudr. 

Temp. 5 — 1 141 —34). LONDON ! Rain. T«m 4 1 (39 — 30). MADRID; Shew- 

ers. Tema.4— -3 tii— set »n>vAsr-tMr Tmma 7— ntM—rrt eeeii; 

aviv: ^i y eloudv. Terrm. 21 — 151.. 


W3L Trjna 4 2 M3— 287. NEW TORN; Pair. Tend 7— a {45— 327. PARIS.' 

5SS> Tjgnft *r-'2 t43-2B1.ROMBiShowera.T4mA 12-6 154—431. TEL 
AVIV: Partly doudy. Tamo. 21 — is (70—591. ZURIOI: Cloudy. Temo. 3—0 
BANGKOK: Foggy. ' Toma, 35-25 (95-77). KONG KONG: Fair. 
J*™- *-'7 (68-43). MANILA: FaW- T«na 34 -25 (93 - 771. SEOUL: 

SS%= T S3S T ”“ m ~ m - 


Commenbank 

CanHgunwnl 

Oalmler-Benz 

Deausso 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
OiatttsrSank 

DUB-Schult 

GHH 


1107011150 
104 1027 
21820 21150 
220 224 

315 330 

327 320 

391.50 395 


171 JO 16880 

141 jo wm 

697 697 

360 355 
164 165 

Mil m»' 

215 215 

1S3J0 ISTjSO 
47*50 475 

21*50 2MJB) 
112113J0 
397 395 , 


Hoesch 

Holzmom 


A 60 

Anglo Amerlcnn 

Anglo Am QoM. 

Sarfows 

Biyvaar 

BufWs 

Oe Been 

Driefaniein 

Elands 

GF5A 

Harmony 

hHvnid Steal 

Kloof 

Nedbanh 

pres Stem 

Ruse tot 

SA Brows 

St Helena 

Sasal 

West Ho UI no 


700 675 

DIB 2300 
169(10 17000 
1025 990 

1625 1629 
7475 7400 
925 900 

5025 4975 
1510 1460 

MS 

400 400 


7g0 7225 

970 975 


5J00 539) 
1580 1540 
<30 610 
3250 3250 


Air Uaakte 

iS'SSS^i 

gugco.ro • 

sa ar 

Corretour 

s&r 

Oumez 

ENAauHalne 

Europe! 

Gen Eaux 


ACI 
AN I 
ANZ 
BHP 
Borol 

Bougainville 

Brambto* 

Cstas 

ComalcD 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

EMMS lid 

Hooker 

Maoolkjn 

M1M 



roroal 

Matra 

Mlcbeiln 

MMPermar 

MeetHannesev 

Moulinex 

Nord-Eat 


Previous; 

Source: R 


Pernod Me. 
Patrales (fsel 
Peugeot 
Patton 


Rodlatechn 
Rsdoute 
Roussel Udaf. 


SourJ’errler 
TO Iemeg m., 
Thomson CSP 
Vdfto 


Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
1 Canon 
Citah 

Dal Nippon Prinl 
□ahnraHousa 
Full Bank 
Pull Photo 
Frtllsu 
HltocM 


Aaes index : 2KL23 
previous: SSLW 
CAC index : 3SU8 
Prtvtoes : 289J8 


coustoragg 

DBS 

F raserNeOve 

how Par 

Inchcage 

KetwilSMF 

Mai nanklna 

OCBC- 

OUB 

Sen* Shipyard 
Slme Darby 
SStaamMP 
SI Trading 
(JOB 


1.72 1J3 
167 N.T. 
425 *20 
825 140 

238 2*1 

242 M 
IJ3 135 
815 815 
9A5 9AS 
N.T. 180 
136 135 

2JD3 IDS 
1.19 130 < 
846 846 
*58 *54 


Moan Air Unes 
Kallma 

I Kansol Power 
Kawasaki steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu lid 
Kubota 

; Matsu Elecinds 
Matsu Elec works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 




to f 
otoxet' 


ing the red dregpn (hat survive from arnkmiiy 
to decorate a million bear coasters and ash- 
trays). A chapter on Welsh culture takes in 
tombstone carvings- and nicknames (Dai Dug 
(he bus conductor. Hmjyn Kremlin the wdw 
known Communist); it quotes a description of 
Welsh choral singing written by GiraWus Cam- 
brenas (“Gerald (m Wdshman’') in the I2ih 
century that is still applicable today; it points 
out that Welsh inventions indude fawn »enn^ 
and the sign for equality in mathematics. 

Mortis is mil afraid to generalize (with many 
shadings and qualifications) about the Welsh 
national character — about the taste for brava- 
do and “picaresque effrontery" for instance, 
or the streak of headstrong eccentricity she 
aptly describes as ""fizz." She reminds us 
some of the ways in which the Welsh are a 
“famously lusty people,” a spotting people 
(though she goes wrong over lire name of the 
most celebrated of modem Welsh boxen, 
Tommy Farr), a hospitable people, a soldiering 
people (and at one extreme — Henry Morgan 
the pirate, H. M. Stanley the explorer — a 
people who have produced their fair share of 
buccaneers). 

If Welsh culture is distinctive, it is also 
many-layered. At the heart of it are tbe Welsh- 


la" 


;l .m 


.. -» <*** 


i -i IN* 


•=»--** raw 


Welsh, the “Cymiy Cymraeg” — 
about 500.000 of them, only about a fifth of tire 
total populathHi, forming “a secret inner 
world, within the half-private world that is 
Wales as a whole.” Morris knows enough 
Welsh, it seems, to be privy to the language 
mysteries, and she writes feelingly about such 
features of its literature as the qtigraaimanc 
“englyn,” a kind of closdy woven welsh haiku 

Wdshness is much more than a maun of 
language, however. It constitutes a spectrum, 
thinning out (but taking a lone time to disap- 
pear) the more the Welsh yield to the cultural 
pressures of the Fnriieh. Morris shows keen 
jnsjghi into the problems of the half-accnhur- 
aiea — of someone tike Dylan Thomas, for 
example; she also casts a glance over the count- 
less Welsh who have made good in England 
and in the world at large, very much including 
the United States. 

Contacts between Wales and America .osten- 
sibly go back to Prince Madoc, who is sup- 
posed to have voyaged across the Atlantic m 
the 12th century. A plaque near Llandudno 
calmly announces “Prince Madoc sailed from 
here to Mobile, Alabama, "though for clastic 
simplicity the plaque in the village of Llanfair 
Cdriog commemorating a president who liked 
to claim that his father was born within sught of 
Snowdon is even wore impressive: "To the 
Memory of a Great Welshman, Thomas Jeffer- 
son." 

Morris's account of the industrialization of . 
South Wales gives rather less scope for pictur- 
esque effects than the rest of tire book, but 
within the limits of her space she does justice to 
the long tradition of Welsh radicalism, from 
the insurrections of the early 19th century to. 
Aneurin Bevan. the Labor Cabinet minister. 
That tradition is far from dead — the South 
Wales coalfield was the last to concede defeat 
in the recent British miners' strike — but 
within the past generation or so, as Morris 
shows, the leadership of resistance to the En- 
glish in general has passed from the Left to the' 
Welsh nationalists. 

The nationalists' most notable recent vic- 
tory, brought about by the threat of a hunger' 
strike from their leader, Gwynfor Evans, in' 
1981. was to obtain an all-Welsh television 
chann el Whether the movement has a serious ' 
long-term political future remains to be seen,', 
but for the time being Owen Glendower un- 
doubtedly lives on. i 


romance. 

Melting back into the mists, liable to be 
confused in legend with King Arthur, Glen- 
dower has remained the foremost Welsh na- 
tional hem "He is the Welshncss in all Welsh- 
men,” Mortis writes, "the spirit of their 
ori g ins" and each chapter of "The Matter of 
Wales" is introduced by a -tittle tableau, a 
reminder of what m ig ht nave been — the ideal 
Wales that Glendower contemplated from his 
throne, and that still lives on as a shared 
tradition and a communal memory. 

Morris is half-Welsh, and her “epic views of 
a small country" are in part the expression of 
an outside observer's curiosity, in part the 


product of a deep personal commitment Ei- 
ther way, “The Matter of Wales" ranks among 
her best books. It moves easily from briDiant 
cameo to panoramic survey; it conveys a con- 
stant humorous delight in unexpected quirks 
and accomplishments; the writing sparkles, 
but seldom at the expense of exactitude. 

On the contrary, one of the most impressive 
aspects of the book is the enormous amount of 
information Morris manages to jrack in — 


information about the religious history and 
economic development of Wales, the land- 


economic development of Wales, the land- 
scape and dimale, the flora and fauna (includ- 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


bod 03 aaao aaaa 
□Goran anan □□□a 
BEEnn aaoia Eaaa 
EHDQE0I33CH3 QCIEB 
QCiaa 00(333(3 
EG3E3H 00030 
ECHO 0330 □□□□□ 
BGESD000 QEI3I3ECK3 
Emma aaaa bqqe 
B aoaa naaooo 

GD0E0Q 0003 
□ODD □□□0030003 
EBEH 033D 03EO3 
QDED 3333 130030 
0D0D 0333 30300 


ming a secret inner f . - < .«k |)T 

,p(>K f ^ HKIft 


i*. jtiilOU* - 

-jft » l 


irretei 


: Vytefem* It 


ieto IViVini \\ HCTi 


John Grass is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


tT, t.iih’rf U*$|i 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tmseott 


O N the diagramed deal 
North and South reached 


sion, but there was another 
chance, as South proceeded to 
demonstrate. 


ax dubs with the hdp of some 
artificial teds. 


Two spades was a transfer to 
dubs, and four diamonds and 
four spades asked about 
North’s high cards, when 
South settled in six dubs, he 
knew that his partner hdd 
both major-suit aces and (he 
dub king but lacked the club 
queen. 

The contract might seem to 
depend on an even spade divi- 


He won the opening heart 
lead with the king and played 
three rounds of trumps. East 
won and returned a diamond. 
This was most unlikely to be a 
lead from the king, so South 
won with the ace, led to the 
heart ace and ruffed a heart. 


- NORTH <D) 
4AQ54 
O A832 

isr 

111 lh" s 


When he then led his re- 
maining trumps West could 
not stand the pressure: He had 
to surrender either his dia- 
mond king or bis guard in 
spades and the slam was made. 


W WT X3A& I 

HI S?-. 

OK 10 88 3 111,1111 

SOUTH* QM 

6X12 

* 57 
0 AS 

♦ A87654 

Bodi uMh were vulnerable. 

tNMn g; 


ABOARD! 



Wait lad the bout qaeia. 


Out I 

Mitsubishi Etac 400 

Mitsubishi H«W 273 

MIMibtohl Corp 520 

Mitsui and co 339 

MfiwtaaM 421 

Mitsumi N_Q_ 

NEC HAS 

NGK Insulator* IffcfiO 

NlkkoSoc BOO 

Nippon Stool 155 

Nippon Yuson 245 

Ntaai 641 

Nomura Sec 1250 

Olvmwn 1260 

PtOMOT 2858 

RlCotl 925 

Sharp 1050 

Sony *m 

Sumitomo Bank 1796 

Sumitomo Chem 216 

Sumitomo Metal 155 

TOM Coro NjQ. 

TabhO Marino 467 

Tafceda Chem 025 

Td* 60H 

Toil Ift 434 

Tokyo Elec. Power 16BD 
Tokyo Marino an 

Toray Ind 445 

Toshiba 418 

Toyota 1350 

YamatahlSec 80S 


Canadian stacks da AP 


Nte* Law OWN CM* 


Nfldnf/DJ. index : 11541 M 
Previous : 12A77J* 

New HMtox : vmJB 
Previous : 14NUI 


Zuri«fa 


Bonk Leu 

Brown Boyer! 
ttta Gclav 
OraUit Sulsae 


£ s 

««8 ms 

B51 B79 

512 511 

1480 1460 

341 334 

1050 1040 
575 560 
1630 1630 
1850 1838 
1330 1330 
M ES9 
1440 14M 
ST>m 5900 
270 Z76 

14TD 1350 
149 146 

565 565 

456 448 
324 324 

1610 1M 
810 eoo 
1580 1S7B 1 
439 438 


Etaetrawatt 

Geors Plsdwr 

(nterdlscount 

Jacob Snchard 

J «IM0K 

Landis Gyr 

Norte 

OefllkamB 

RoctwBabv 

sandoz 

Schindler 

Saber 

SBC 

Swtasalr 

Swiss Retosurance 
Swtn VoUubank 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ins 


2730 2740 
3575 3573 
1640 1600 
2950 3000 
2445 2435 

2860 mu 

760 770 

1950 1938 
6460 6(75 
3000 IM0 
1730 1720 
6500 6520 
1500 1505 

ms TOSB 
mm 0050 

4050 3950 
385 380 

374 36* 

1155 1137 
9650 9675 
1405 1480 
3600 3675 
■4300 4320 
20900 20750 


700 Alta Nat 
300 Algo Cent 
1736 Atoarrw St 
100 Andre WAf 
130 Arucen 
loraoAtcoif 
2W0 BP Cmada 
17035 Bank BC 
31881 Bonk N 5 
81290 Barridk O 
300 Baton At 
57296 Bonanza R 
4400BrolDrna 
10300 Bramalea 
530 Brenda M 
3986 BCFP 
40272 BC Res 
9210 BC Phone 
17D0 Brunsnk 

4CCLA 
fflSSSlCad Frv 

2100 C Nor West 
5»C Pockra 
4WJ Cm Trust 
500 C Tung 
100 CGE 

63306 Cl Bk Cot • 

5200 Cdn Nat Res 
5»74CTIneA< 
1292 C UNI B 

1000 Cara 
1651 Catonese 
300 Celan 17SP 
3(00 C DiUb A 
4100 CDlstbBf 
3MCTL Bank 
i™ Conyentrs 
200 Con west A 
SOOCoeekaR 
400Canron A 
73MCnownx 
11400 Czar Res 
56261 Doan Dev 
600 0ootiA 
•444 Denbon An 
7*364 DtaVtonBf 
9300 Dev^tcon 
40000 Dkkran A f 
M9Q Die* ran B 
1939 Daman A 


HJjOi Low Close Choc 
015ft 15ft 15ft— Vi 


>22 21ft 22 4- 1 

Mlft 21 21ft + ft 
SHft 24ft 24ft + ft 
*19 19 19 — ft 

Mfc 8ft 8ft + ft 
S27V. 26ft 27ft +1 ft 
55ft 5ft 5ft 
*13ft 12ft U 
158 146 154 +13 

SISft 15ft 15V1I 
410 403 405 +5 

SS 490 495 +5 

817ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
59 9 9 — ft 

510 9ft 10 + Vi 

249 216 248 + 3 

571ft 2tft 21ft 

sr & jr +,B 

517ft 17J4 17ft + ft 
*Z7ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
JW Oft 6V. + ft 
*Uft 16 16ft + U, 
523V. 23ft 23V.+ ft 
S29U 29V. 29 U, 

533 33 33 + ft 

14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 


529ft 29ft 29ft 


“SSgJSSl 

1286 DvtOx A 
3550 Etctham X 
SOOEmco 
T77D00 Eauffv Svr 
4225 C Falcon C 
9506 Flcnbrdgo 
2700 Fed IndA 
1100 Fed p|qn 
UOOFOtyRn 
750 Fraser 
2634Gere09A 
2390 Geac Come 
1 13054 Geocrode 
i 23500 Gibrattcr 
66975 GoWcorpf 
200 Goodyear 
SSOfl Grandma 
SDOGLFarwl 
200 Gt PocHIc 
MGreytmd 
300 H Group A 
3*61 HrdingAf 
2l$0 Hawker 
17W Hares d 
2*20 H Bay Co 
32156 Imaea 
650 indal 
75S Inland Gas 
13700 Inti Them 
3069 intpr Pipe 
100 1 voce B 
2800 jannodc 

71520 Korn Kgtla 
380 Kehwv H 
1242 Karr Add 
7800 Loboti 
99209 Lac Mnrhs 
4525 LOnt Com 
iBlDOLacona 

1971 LL Lac 
4150 LObtoW Co 
1000 MOS HA 


SBC Index : <3730 


M.O.: not auofedf n*: met 
avaltobtei xd: ex-dJvkJand. 


OUB lodex : 4&5T 
ProytoU : 423JM 


F.T.M Index : 140130 
Prevtous : ms* 


CemueU to Stock index : 9B2JB 
Pnevloas : 973J8 


AA Corn 
AliJed-Lyons 


I Banco Comm 
Central* 

Oaohotele 

SI 2ft silft Cred liat 
17B 178 Farm Rot la 


17400 17610 
374J 3592 
8250 7930 

.n*8 2 i» 

11750 11800 


Alfa Laval 

Area 

A«ra 

AHaeCaan 

Bouden 

EtaetroluK 

Ericsson 

Eseette 

Handel soon ken 


3*0 N.T. 
191 191 

362 360 

NJQ. m. 
108 107 

2« 205 

3» 324 

280 277 

365 3 66 

170 1«. 


Ok Tedi Mine To Reopen 

Reuter* 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — Pa- 
pua New Guinea announced Wednesday that one' 
of the world’s richest gold and copper projects 
would reopen, a month after it was closed by the 
government because of a dispute with its foreign 
partners. 

Prime Minister Michael Somare said the $1.1- 
biUion Ok Tedi project would formally reopen at 

Xil i r.o . r . 


midnight Wednesday following an agreement with 
the Amoican, Australian and West German part- 
ners. Papua New Guinea had accused them of 
failing to comply with an agreement to build a 
copper mine and other facilities. 


» 26 26 —3 

S8ft Bft 8ft— ft 
817 1611 T6tk— ft 

S12 lift lift- ft 
57ft 6ft 7ft + ft 
*T7ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
■6ft 6H 6ft— ft 
16ft 6ft 6ft + ft 
510ft 10ft IDft+ft 
S6ft 5ft 5ft 
■8 8 8 

279 276 279 + 3 

SIDft 10ft 10ft 
38 18 18 

60 152 155—1 

405 +78 

420 420 420 

51 3ft 13 13ft+ ft 

813ft 12ft 12ft+» 
S7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
5ft 5fc+ ft 
_ 5ft Sft+ ft 
225 220 220 — 5 

527ft 26ft 27 — ft 


527ft 26ft 27 —ft 
S*ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
839ft 38ft 39ft + ft 
58ft ,8ft 81k + ft 
518ft 10ft 18ft 
17ft l 7ft + » 
117ft 17 17ft + ft 
m 94ft 96 +lft 
MVJ 22ft 22ft + ft 
522 21U 22 +% 

513ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
5171* 17ft 17ft 
527ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
*11 10ft 11 + ft 
270 258 2?0 +12 

5Wft fft 10ft +1 
*7ft 6ft 7ft + ft 
141 41 41 — ft 

74 70 70 

89ft B*ft— 3 
aw 30 + 1 

26 26 + ft 

*7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
12* 122 123 +2 

SBft aft 20ft + ft 
534 ft 23ft 26 — ft 
117ft 17 17ft + ft 
*27ft J7ft 27ft 
513ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
Il6ft 16ft 16ft + ft 
58ft 8ft 84* 

SUM 35ft 36ft + ft 
522ft 22ft 22ft + ft 
511ft 10ft lift + Ui 
IT? 110 119 +15. 

S38ft j* .a — 1 
>17. lift 17 + I 
toft »ft 23ft— ft 
ta* 3ft a +m* 
silft 11 11 -ft 

512ft lift 13ft + I 
533 32 32ft + S 

518ft 18ft 18ft + ft 
■ 16ft I6ft 16ft— ft 


66880 Melon H X 
6048Mortand E 

AlMMshunAf 

4S0 Mahan B ... 

ion Murptiv 820ft aft soft ■■Sr 
38110 Nabisco L S26ft Mft 26ft- J ■«- ■ 

97701 NorandQ *19 18 H»+l 

11786 Nor can S1«ft 14 l4ft+ 8s,. 

95709 NvaAltAf S68k 6ft jft 

7800 Nawsca W *23 22ft25+ft-- 

2vmsNUWnaoA. 57 s» 55 —f 

5S7490okwaod 56ft 6ft .»+* '■ 

3300 OstKmo A ( «4ft 24ft 24*-.g^ 

37-150 Pomour 56ft . 5ft S8.+1V 

I97D0 PonCan P S29Vi 29V, »ft+ p . ; . 
7701 Pombina Sink 18 Wft+* 

4050 Phonlx Oil S7ft 7 7ft +1 

200 Pint Point Sffl a 2| + y*. 

, 4450Ptac»GOo 118 110 710 T.Pk> 

161800 Pftcor 124ft 23ft 24ft +18^ 

299Pravtao S19ft 19ft 19ft +J| 

23825 Quo Store O 460 410 460 +« 

1000 Rom Pet 55ft 5ft 5ft 

232500 Hayrack / 5 » 8 8ft + II 

16006 RMtoant Clift lift lift ’»«+». 

77206RdStOflhsA S24ft 24ft 2*»— \ 

1000 RclChtwW SIS 14ft 13 + 

WA®! Ktirevf 219 200 210 — ‘ 

1533# RevnPraA la ia 125 — 

TOO ROOT'S A 19ft 9ft 9ft ■ rre. 

5150 Roman 812 lift B +? % ' 

400 Rotlunan S41ft 41ft 41ft +1 

lOOOScoatr* S6ft .6 Oft -J - 

10300 Scott* I S2!ft 21ft 

6754 Soar* Con S7U 7ft 7* + J . 

31221 ShoU Con *2436 24ft 24ft+J'*.‘^ 

SS540 StHMTttt S6ft 6ft 6ft + 1 ' 

I M3 Stoma so Ift 9 +B 

ioo Slater B I Sin* in* in»+! 

insouthm (Soft 5*ft 

MOStBTOdcrt *12ft. nft 12ft + } 

39H0StotcaA S21K 21ft 2lft+3 . 

lOOOSulotro 305 305 3K +?. 

3CTSteooR ' 285 280 2« + ( 

lOSuncorar C24ft aft 34ft— 

i 7000 S vdrwty Q 27 25ft ft — ? 

12050 Tatars 85 H M +5 

275 Tara 809ft 19(6 W6+*-. 

3375 Tack Cur A Silft. lift }lft + ’ 

67889 Teck B f 112ft lift 12ft + 

^SSBSTpcCoft SJSft 31ft 

5*55 Thom N A 557 56ft 57 . + 

BO* 5 Tor Dm BK 819ft l«k Eft+f - 

£7053 T orator Bf *30 19ft a. * I 

1271 TraaorsAI S22ft 23ft 22ft--J'-. 

64STrnsMt S7V. 716 7ft+l 

ISEfflTrlnWv Ros 440 440 448 1 

19963 TmAI to UA 534ft 24ft Mft+^ v _ 

35537 TrC Of! PL 523ft 23ft 21ft +\"S. 

4728— Trimac re an 

MM Trim A I *37 26ft 27 

5700 Turbo f 57 55 55-. 

270 Uni corn A ( S7ft 7ft .Srr, 

50WynCttrtMd 112ft rift Uft + , 1 . 

30543 UEntorlM Silft lift ISrr, '*- 

19450 UKona 5(1 ft •. 

500 U Sisco* 102 102 lffl 

SIBOVeriflAt 87(6 7Vk »«■ 

“VBtfgren 511H 11» lift I., 

wahnvad 5)6 16 14 v i . 

Wrttorto 18ft 18ft 18ft t H+lL 

Wwtmto 1141* 14 lfi*+ ‘0, 

WntQn 535ft ra W6 

WoocWA 512V. 12ft 2V. 

YkBMr SI 3ft 13ft 13ft +2 ’u. 

Total satas 1*956341 ahorn 

Oau Prevft 

■0 ind**: 2431 J 0 tsn 


*35(6 24ft 34ft 1 
425 4 ", 425 +» 


SUft 15ft 15ft A*. 
S16U 16ft 16ft— B' 
*»ft aft 20ft -^r 
*261* 26 Ui 26ft— J 
■19 18 llft+1 

514ft 14 l4ft+fts. 


fsf- 


7ft+L 

£ at 


400 Vastoren 
miMMwl 
2l00vre*Norto 
12335 WM min 
950 WHM 
UMWoodyrdA 
3600 Vk Bter 


rr» 

lift lift I. , 

lift lift S+iL I. . 

14 14ft + ‘Dai{ » 

Bio ® . l<h tittit!u S 

ms 13ft +2 1 ' t ** 


TSEM index: 


Mttnflrafafl March b\ 


S 23U- ft 
a +2ft 
1 11 - ft 


24850 Bonk Mont 
7100 CotlBoIti 
5549 Dorn Tx( A 
1417 MfttTrsf 
17S71 NOTSk Ctto 
4500 Powor Cora 
3500RoiiandA 
12H RaHondB 
12538 Royal Bank 
30000 RovTratco 
555St9tnbrgA 


MW1 LowCtoieOt ■> 
1»<6 25ft Mft 
■IB I7ft 18 + 

HI* lift lift + . 

SMI* 14 |4M»— 

II 7ft I7H 178. 

17718 27(4 fflS + 8. • 
*23 22ft 22'V— v v 
SHft 22ft 22ft- N" I 
*2*ft 2W* 2f« 

119ft 198* 19*4 + 

S33ft m* ul* + 




■"iwj 


Total Satas 3.10&22* sharM. 

CteM IWd< 

iMtustrtols Index; Dl-M 110 


H-, It . e 


- *'•*•■•** 


cy 


- +i 

" ■■*.*»* 6. 


■-»**«»* (h' 







ly 


ENTERNATIQWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


Page 17* 


SPORTS 


ndiana, UCLA Advance in NIT Tourney 




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I •CUkI - 


t/prMrf Press International 

fEWYORK — The regular sea* 
, may have been disappointing 
. both the Indiana and UCLA 
tetbflD teams, but both seem 
v rained to make up for it in the 
■ ional Invitation Tournament, 
or the second game in a row, 
Hoosiers and Bruins were big 
aers as Indiana crushed Rich* 
-id, 75-53, and UCLA routed 
1 iraska, 82-63, in second-round 
.on Tuesday night, 
idiana, a 13-13 team during the 
alar season, had opened the 
■ney last. week with a 79-57 
.ibtog of Butler. UCLA, 16-12 
.ire the start of the NIT, had 
shed Montana, 78-47, in the 
ling round. 

- . heir runaway victories Tuesday 
: Indiana and UCLA into Sat- 
,ay night’s quarterfinals. Also 
ancing were Vmania with a 68- 
.triiunjjto ova Sl Joseph’s of 
; nsylvania, Marquette with a 56- 


S4 squeaker over Cincinnati and 
Fresno Stale by defeating New 
Mexico, 66-55. 

In second-round games Wednes- 
day night. Southwestern Louisiana 
was to play at Tennessee, South 
Florida at Louisville and Tennes- 
see-Chattanooga at Lamar. 

In Bloomington, Indiana, Uwe 
Blab scored 17 points as the Hoo- 
siers, taking control with 12-3 
spurts early in each half, rolled past 
Richmond. 

The smaller Spiders trailed by 
nine points at halftime and closed 
within seven before Indiana's sec- 
ond-hall streak pm the game out of 
reach. 

Indiana outrebounded Rich- 
mond 39-25 overall, and the Hoo 
sier passers — led by Slew Robin- 
son and Dan Dakich with seven 
assists apiece — set up 22 baskets 
for their teammates, compared 
with only eight assists for the Spi- 
ders. 




"W^sn we get our center re- well enough to have a chance to 
bounding, it’s a very big plus for win. 

us," said Indiana assistant coach “Early in the game we were a 
Jim Crews, speaking in place of little stagnant and they jumped out 
Coach Bob Knight, who has re- to a big lead" — 15-7 with 12:20 
fused to answer reporters’ post- remaining. “We went to the man- 
game questions once early in the to-man defense to get our feet mov- 
season. ing in the hopes we could do some- 

Richmond Coach Dick Tarrant thing on offense.” 
said Hab“was too much for us. We K^y Trotter and Mandy John- 

just couldn l mateh up to that. Blab son scored 12 points apiece to key 
played quite well. Marquette’s victory in Cincinnati. 

InLos Angelo. Reggie Miller The score was tie! seven limes in 

*"f l S ^ xooad half- the Iasi lime at 52 

pace UCLA over Nebraska. The with 2:46 remaining. 

lead at the mtmSom Nebraska ^ ul J he _^ V , a f r ’ 0IS 



Hess Slalom Victor 


never seriously threatened there- , -. . - . . 

IS# 


Marquette center Walter Down- 
ing put the Warriors ahead to stay, 

54-52, by sinking a six-foot jump p,.?#* 


as 21 points. 

“It was a great team effort," said 


Reeder and Michael Sims each hit a ij 
free throw in the final 33 seconds to I 


the winSngc the Waniois thdr 56-54 vio 
“I told my leam ‘Just take me back lor ^' . . . . 

to the Apple.’ I would love to go " dunk we missed the front aid 



mk « - 

Hr-. 

t«w .*r-' 

a* 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

^-Yankee Pepitone Arrested in N.Y 

JEW YORK fUPI) — Former 
‘ :.v York Yankee Joe Pepitone 
arrested late Monday in. 

'oklyn and was charged Tuesday 
.i criminal possession of con- 
led substances (heroin, cocaine 
' { Quaaludes) and criminal pos- 
ion of a handgun. 

> ■, car m which Pepitone, 44, and 
..... other men were riding was 
roped by police for allegedly run- 

- z a red lighL A search turned up 
U.jOO cash, a loaded H caliber 

..-ringer pistol under the front 
: j, drug paraphernalia and the 
■"-codes, according to a police 

- kesman. Also arrested were 
jmas Carbone, the car’s owner, 

Robert Oates, both of Brook- 


. 'aiitoae, a slugging outHelder- 
: - 1 baseman for the Yankees dur- 
^ a flamboyant 12-year major- 
: jue career that ended in 1973, 
■■ i unable to make the $15,000 
~1 set at his arraignment and 
-nt Tuesday night in jail The 
./ je men are to appear at a hear- 
Friday in Brooklyn Criminal 
: art. Each faces a prison teen of 
years to life if convicted- 


to the Apple.’ I would love to go J ^unk we missed the front aid 
back to Madison Square Garden of nine one-and-ones, but we |? 
and show the people back there the played pretty good when we had to, 
real Bruins." and we made the baskets when we 

In Charlottesville, Virginia, Jim had tp," said Rick Mqerus, the 


Mfller, Tim Mnllen and Olden Po- Marquette Coach, 
lynice led a second-half Virginia Scott Barnes scored 19 points 
surge that bdped the Cavaliers de- and Mitch Arnold added 16 as 
feat Sl Joseph’s. Polynice paced Fresno State beat New Mexico, 
the winner with 15 points, wiffle The game, in Fresno, California, 
Miller added 14 and Mullen 12; the was halted by a bench-clearing 
trio accounted for 29 of the Cava- brawl late in the second half; the 
tiers' 34 points in the second half. 


brawl late in the second half; the 
mdee resulted in the ejections of 


“As usual, we had our normal New Mexico's Johnny Brown and 
dry spells out there tonight on of- Fresno's Brian Sal one. Brown, who 



fense," said Virginia Coach Terry came into the 


averaging 19 


Th« Aaoaond Pna 



Holland. “But we played defense points, scored 12 before departing. Erika Hess in Utah: *lt was good to have experience today.’ 

Infielder Lyons Keeps Up Red Sox Rookie Tradition 


The Associated Press 

PARK CITY. Utah — Erika 
Hess of Switzerland got the belter 
of a course that dumped most of 
ha competition and went on to win 
a women’s World Cup slalom ski 
race on Tuesday. 

Hess, a two-time overall cup 
champion and the career slalom 
victory leader with 16. won by attri- 
tion. She completed the second run 

WORLD CUP SUING 

in 40.18 seconds for an aggregate 
time of 1:1730. and then watched 
as American Tamara McKinney 
and first-run leader Paoleua Ma- 
goni of Italy both fell. 

“It was good to have experience 
today," said Hess. 23. “The course 
was so steep, you had to know that 
you were going too fast, so you had 
to watch your line and round off 
the turns." 

McKinney, who could have 
wrapped up the slalom title by 
placing second, was doing well 
when she hooked a tip only three 
ga tes from the finish. “I made some 
mistakes at the top and knew 1 had 
some time to make up," she said. "I 
just skied loo straight." 

Magoni, who carried a .64-sec- 
ond edge into the second leg. 
slipped six gates into the run and 
was eliminated. 

Petrine Pden or France, second 
to Hess in career slalom victories 
with 15, posted a 4024 on the sec- 
ond leg to take second in l:\7.42. 
Italy’s Maria Rosa Quario, second 
after the opening run, finished 
40.42/1:17.49 for third place. 

Despite dropping to third. 
Quario was happy with her second 



CtmpiM by Our Staff From Dispaid\& 

WINTER HAVEN, Florida — 
Can the Red Sox luck out with a 
rookie infield er for the third time in 
five years? Steve Lyons hopes so, 
and he continues to impress Bos- 
ton's new manager, John McNa- 

SPRING TRAINING NOTES 

mara. “He looks like an athlete, a 


si milar situation in 1980, when be the intensity," he said after pitch- pared for their first spring-training ^ 

was forced to keep rookie infidder ing one inning in Oakland’s 6-5 meeting. And then, for the next Waterville VallCT New Hamo- 
r»l**nn Hnffmnn Sa AM Ratah vintrtrv mior .I.™ u .L_. ,u 7 . erviuc Valley, New Mamp- 


Glenn Hoffman. So did Ralph 
Houk in 1982. when Wade Boggs 
earned a job as the team's 2Slh 
player in spring training. 

Hoffman became the regular 
third baseman to his first year; he 
moved to shortstop in 1981 and 
held the job until a knee injury late 


victory over the San Diego Padres, three hours, they refuted those shire) on Saturday.' 

It was overwhelming. Its easier to daims. “You always downplay a -x* m very pleased, because usu- 
111311 a game like this before you play." ally by tSEftoe^S 
dreg high. Cheaper, too. said Clint Hurdle, the Mets’ reserve tired and don't ski welL But after 


dreg high Cheaper, too. said Clint Hurdle, the Mets’ reserve 

_ □ ' catcher, “just to case you lose: It 

The proceedings began with gets a lot more important when you 


said Cunt Hurdle, the Mets’ reserve tired and don't ski welL But after 
catcher, 'just to case you lose: It the world championships’ 1 — in 


The proceedings began with gets a lot more important when you which she failed to win a medal — 
New York's Mets and Yankees win.” If that's the case, consider the “I worked very hard to make my- 
feigntog apathy — just another day 8-2 result a notable achievement self strong for the end of the sea- 


Peptone m Brooklyn Tuesday. 


m 

mr a 


BRIIM.i 


i. *** 

* >. * •• ■ 


-0 *4^ 

*- 

g wsqfsA- 

-i-,i tj ( 


1 ' 


UCfc* • . 


^aJanabe to Defend WBC Title May 9 

TOKYO (UPI) — World Boxing Council junior bantamweight cham- 
' o Jiro Watanabe will defaid his title against Julio Soto Solano of the 
V uninwam Republic here May 9, the Japan Boxing Commisrion an- 
. kneed Wednesday. 

^ Watanabe, 23-1 with 16 knockouts, will be malting his second defense 
/ the title he won from Fayao Pooltarat of Thailand last July. Solano, 
,‘tked fourth by the WBC is 37-4*2 with 21 knockouts. 

- rent Sutter, Gilbert Lost to Islanders 

JNIONDALE, New York (AP) — Center Brent Sutter, the New York 
-tnders’ second leading scorer, will be sidelined for three to four weeks 
h a right shoulder separation, the National Hockey League team 
loonced Tuesday. Injured Saturday in a game against Was hing ton, the 
t-team all-star had 42 goals and 101 points in 70 games. 

^slander left wing Greg Gilbert underwent knee sugay Tuesday and 
, '“I be lost to the team for the rest of the season. Gilbert had 13 goals and 
• points to 58 games this year. 


starters com- 


player who wfll do the job wherever ia 1983. Boggs, who had a good-tot, anhe office, they were sayingTues- for the Mets and a meaningless loss son.” 

you put him,” McNamara says, S*" 5 * *** ^ “ dtey pro- for the Yankees. Only 14 of the 59 starters com 

“He's definitely going to figure to gjf lS 

tsasas,- SsweSs Cavaliers Humble lfae 76ers, 116-89 

play otha mfield and outfield poa- J25 n0 ^ 7 

dons, turned m another ou island- r~'r?T 
ing performance Tuesday iu Bos- bfatlmnoal < ^, lh f J® b ^ >“■ 
ton’s 5-3 loss to Minnesota. He had . As long as Wade Boggs is play* 


The Associated Press 


out Moses, but they beat New Jer- Poquette scored 15 points in the 


RICHFIELD, Ohio After sey without Moses,” said the veter- first half as Cleveland 

r t. • t fin f Aminp^ u Wn%io tniMAil it halftima 4^ififiinna 0 


two Si won3woxu» «3e tog third base to Boston. 1 never seven seasons of playing for teams an forward. “We’ve turned it halftime advantage Roy Hinson, 
three bases and savetTstariinE will’’ Lyons said. “I just have to that failed to _ make the playoffs, wound. vnjhj game-high 21 points, then 


three bases and saved starting 
pitcher Dennis Boyd with two brD- 


hope to make the dub as a utility Ben Poquette derives pleasure from It was the ninth victory to the a( f^ quarter to 


piicacr Lrauuiixiya wim iwu oru- --r- - -- — * » - -- -.j — , ~r- . — — « 

liani diving pickups on sharp player and then be ready whenever- beating a top team man important last 12 outings for Cleveland, pusn me Lavs lean to /tt-oo. 

ground balls all of which is foro- Fm needed." . late-season game. which leads Atlanta by ]& games The 76erc, whose worst previous 

mg management to re-evaluate his O r "it feels good when you beat the for the eighth and final playoff spot loss this season had been by 19 

admitted bid to win a utility job. Mike Norris has two strikes vni wimc to the Eastern Conference. For the points, committed 23 turnovers 

General Manager Lou Gorman against him, but he isn't out yet. KHA FUUJ& Cavahere, who recently won at and hit only 40 pertan from the 

says that if Lyons can't break into The Oakland A’s right-hander ufir_jjpper.edielon of the National Bas- Phfladdjjhia for the first time since field “We woe runmng a lot of 
the starting luieuD he'd be better derwent sureerv on his Ditchina ketball Association.” Poouette said 1976, it is the first time since the makeshift stuff, said Julius Br- 


ing management to re-evaluate his O ■ ^^^neejtgooo^n^^roi^ai^tnt 

admitted bid to win n utility job. Mike Norris has two strikes NR A PYITIR 

General Manager Lou Gorman against him, but he isn’t out yet itDAJUUja 

says that if Lyons can't break into The Oakland A’s right-hander ufltuJipper.echelon of the National Bas- 
the starting lineup he’d be better derwent surgery on his pitching ketball Association," Poquette said 


off playing regularly to the high shoulder in August 1983 and subse- after be had 19 points and 13 re- 1974-75 season that they have beat- rag, who collected 16 points to 
minors again. But McNamara quently was basted for cocaine pos- bounds to help the Cleveland Ov- en the 76ers three straight tunes. share the losers scoring honors 


minors again. But McNamara quently was busted for cocaine pos- bounds to help the Gevdand Cav- enine/i 
sounds as if there might be dis- session, but Tuesday to Phoenix, aliers hand die Philadelphia 76en Elsewl 
agreement “I’m to favor of taking Arizona, he was back on the their worst loss of the season. 116- Chicago 


the best 25 players north when we mound. Malting his first appear- 89, here 
break camp," he said. “And if Ly- ance against major-league hitting Poaot 
ems is one of the top 25, I’d like to in more than 18 months, Norris that the 


- 89, here Tuesday night 


Elsewhere it was Houston 106, ^ m 

ticago 100; Milwaukee 130, New doi well organized offensively.’ 


ons is one of the top 25, I'd like to 
have him on the balldub.” 
Manager Don Zimmer faced a 


uette said it didn’t matter 89; Atlanta 103, Wi 


said he was “ecstatic." 


ses Malone, 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


SECOND AEGKMMt REOKMUL AMU. 

noum SEMFMui nut fouw 


REGIONAL REGIONAL SECOND 
FtNAL SEUrtNAL BOUND 


“You bad to be out there to feel with a sprained ankle. “It was with- 


World Cup Skiing 

WOMEN'S SLALOM 
tAi pork C«v, UMhl 
1. Erffco Hass. SwIlartawl, 1:17J0. 

X Perrin* Pelon. Franca. i:T7Xl 
X Morta Rosa Quarto, Httv. 1:17AV. 


night Jersey ! 1 1; Dallas 96, San Antonio M I don't remember us handling 

it didn't matter 89; Atlanta 103, Washington 97; the ball any poorer than we did 
yed without Mo- the Los Angeles Lakers 130, Phoe- tonight," Coach Billy Cunningham 
sat out the game nix 1 12, and Portland 143, Detroit said, “it was not what I would 
Jdc. “It was with- 123. consider a real Rood effort." 


consider a real good effort.” 


pleted both runs (the first with 48 ^ 
gates, the second with 50). opening. ! 
the way for second-scaled skierv to ‘ 
score points. 

The victory was tile first of a 
disappointing season for Hess. but', 
it lifted her past McKinney into ' 
first place in the slalom standings ■- 
with 87 points. 

McKinney remained at 82. and > 
Pden (80) bolted into third and-* 
Quario improved to 75. AH have a \ 
chance at the title, which will be , - 
decided in Friday’s final women's , 
slalom of the season at Heavenly V 
Valley. California. ’ ‘ 

Flyers Take 
8th Straight 

The AssMtateJ Pnw 

PITTSBURGH — The Philadel- 
phia Flyers and Pittsburgh Pen- - 
gums are in different kinds of bat- 
tles for National Hockey League. . 
playoff spots. The Fiver* are trying ' 
to strengthen their hold on first * 
place in the Patrick Division while-; 
the Penguins are struggling for the:^ 
last post-season slot. * 

Ilkka Sinisaio, Ron Sutler and I 
Murray Craven scored third-period - 
goals as Philadelphia strengthened , 

l\HLFOq?S 

its grip with a 5-3 victory over Pius- - 
burgh here Tuesday night it was a 
the eighth straight triumph for the 1 
Flyers, who now lead second-place ' 
Washington by eight points. 

Elsewhere it was the New York ; 
Islanders 3, Lets Angeles 2. and 
Washington 4, New Jersey 1 . 

“1 feel very positive about our » 
peaking now” said Flyer Coach , 
Mike Keenan. “The team is matur- - 
tog, growing stronger and that’s t 
something you’re looking for, espe-' • 
ciaUy at this time of the year.” , 

The Penguins seem beaded in the 
opposite direction. After beating ’ 
the Rangers on Saturday, they have 
lost two straight and are five points *■ 
behind fourth-place New- YorL 

On Tuesday, they lost after tak- 
ing a 2-0 lead in the opening five - 
minutes. “It's getting to be old. 
hat," said Coach Bob Berry, “I 
thought we put ourselves in a posi- 
tion where we could have won. but 
it’s the same old stuff. We find 
ways to lose hockey games. It’s as 
simple as that,” 

Sinisaio tied the game at 3-3 
when he blasted a 45-foot slapshot 
over goalie Denis Herron’s left 
shoulder at 3:24 of the final period. 
Suiter got his second tally of the 
game at 7:40 and Craven,’ assisted 
by Dave Poulin, scored into an 
empty net with 24 seconds left and 
the Flyers short-handed. 

Pittsburgh’s early lead came on 
Kevin McCarthy’s goal 1:42 into 
the game and Mario Lemieux's 
36th of the year, on a breakaway at 
4:55. Sutler and Ed Hospodar 
brought the Flyers even to the mid- 
dle period before Pittsburgh’s Arto 
Javanainen made it 3-2 by beating 
Pelle Lindbogh at 1 1:55.' 


Hockey 


NHL S tandings 


WALKS CONFERENCE 
Patrick DhrMM 


JJSi'iiSL 

Imp 

ilMB 

MUhCft 

iiLW ~ : 

hflUMOg ■ 


N.cfeAKJn. ■; 

_ - 

talLM 


A Mataoreata Ttalkg, Poland, 1:1X32. 


W 

’ L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

5. Ido Ladstaetier, Austria 1:19^2. 

x-Phlladelphla 

45 

19 

7 

97 

312 

223 

6. Carlmie Schmldhauser, Switzerland. 

x-Washlnuton 

41 

21 

9 

91 

289 

215 

:19A7. 

x-NY [slanders 

39 

29 

5 

81 

320 

279 

7. Maria Eppie, West Germany. 1:1978. 

NY Rangers 

23 

37 

10 

54 

245 

303 

B. Monica Aeltae, Sweden, 1 130.11. 

Pmsburah 

33 

«2 

5 

51 

344 

336 

9. Eva Twardofcens. UJ- 1:21-85. 

New Jersey 

20 

42 

9 

49 

217 

304 

ia Traudl Haegher. West Germany. 1:2209. 

Adams DteWaii 



11. Anlo Zavodiov, Yuaosiavta, 1:2259. 

x-Quriwc 

35 

24 

9 

79 

293 

249 

12 Amy Uvron, U-S- 1:2299. 

x -Montreal 

34 

25 

11 

79 

245 

23S 

12 Heidi Bowes. UJL. 1:354)2. 

x-Butfalo 

32 

23 

14 

78 

2® 

204 

14. Heftfl DaMgren. U4L 1:27 SL 

Boston 

32 

30 

8 

72 

244 

249 

WOMEN'S OVERALL STANDINGS 

Harttard 

93 

38 

9 

55 

240 

294 


• . . • 

' Duka 73 r 

mm»i’wtrhig»Tfi 

. — ^ L 

w . 1 


— Hbubca ^ 


NATIONAL 

CHAMPIONSHIP 





-I limtera 

■■ 

HintUO 

US' 



J S.MJ1-W 

■MOSS 

ill - 

_ 


M7. 

•WHS 

» 

ML SO 

^ DwpX 


1 ' 

^ CMtoUTodtTO 


assr 


rssr 


O*W0i1MkM-7 


tional Basketball Association Standings 


lASTEKN CON FB HENCE 
AflonUe DMbIm 

W L Pet. CB 

J® M 14 JH - 

st 17 jso a 

34 31 JOO 3D 

;*»Y 34 3S 493 20V) 

‘ T W| n « 33 31 

CeMral DMftan 

"WiVw 44 20 JQi — 

4t 34 33 JOT » 

* 33 34 478 


Portland 

Ptmnbi 

5oattl» 

i A- ciiPMM* 

GotdMi Slot* 


33 34 sn \m 
31 38 AN m, 
» 39 424 21 

34 44 JM 27 
19 49 J79 31 


jtand 


“ na 7t AO 412 20 

» 42 J91 3tva 
10 20 41 JW 28 

WCSTEftM CONFBRINCE 
MKTWMt DMsIafi 

* 43 35 432 - 

48 28 M 3 

' 39 31 £57 S 

RTanl “ 34 34 484 W 

33 14 47B t»l 
*alV 25 43 JA8 18 

Padflc btvMaa 

Lnk «v 10 18 .734 - 


(x-cHndwd PtovaH bertn) 

(y^llndhad dhfWan mwi 

TUESOA1TS RESULTS 
PMfadalNila 24 21 21 23- » 

Cleveland 29 23 24 38-114 

Hinson 4-11 9-12 2L P0no9«0 M3 W 19} 
BorWey 44 1-» 14, Ervin# 5-1044 14» Tonoy 5- 
143-411 RNbowads: PhUadrtpWa52tBor1iiw, 
Hava 8)i Chrvohnd 59 (PooMlta 13). As- 

iB»: PMtadaWila M (Toner. Threott 5); 
Clovatand 28 IBaotty 111. 

Sent Antonio 94 V W 22— 0 

Dallas » 99 94 17-94 

vlneoni 9-14 17-30 as. Dovfs 7-it 3-3 17; Gor- 
Wln 9-17 4-5 22. Mltdwll 10-14 1-2 21. R«OBOd»: 
Sop Antonio 51 ttaimora 9): Dallas 51 (Vlrv- 
ctnf 18). Asstfs: Son Anfonlo 30 (Moore 9); 
Dalle* 27 IDovl* 9). 


NOW JortOT 99 34 90 94-111 

MUwaskoo 32 31 » 38-10 

. Cunmlnat 1D-T5 AS 34, Mokuki Ml 2.3 18; 

8-12 44 2H. Wlllonu Ml 4-1828. DOw- 
klns 8-14 34 19. Rkftardson B-19 3-3 19. 8o- 
baands: New Jersey S3 (Dawkins 10); MIL 
waukne 48 (Mofceakl 9). Assists: New Jersey 
24 (Ransav. Cook 41; Milwaukee 32 (Prassev 
8). 

WaMUnefna 19 27 22 29— 97 

Atuoto 98 39 19 24— 182 


NTT Tournament 

SECOND ROUND 
Ttttday's RmmNs 
I ndtona 7S, Rlefimeod S3 
Virginia 48. SI. Joseph's 41 
.Moraueffe 54, OndonaH 54 
Fresno St. 44. New Mexico 55 
UCLA 82. Nebraska 43 

We dnesda y* Came* 

South Florida IB-11, ftl Louisville, 17-14; 
Souituvostera Louislana. ]7-lXQlTsnnes3ee, 
19-14; Tena-Chalftmaega. 23-7, of Lamar. 20 - 


wuidns ii-if 10-11 33. Johnson 6-14 M 18; 
Robinson 9-34 68 34, Malone W-23 4-7 24, BaF 
torn 5-« a-2 iu. Bradley W « in. Rebooads: 
WaNUrtOtonn (Rsbbwan 111; Ai1onto54 »WU- 
lis 13). Aaddi; Wathlnatan as [Bradley 4); 
AHonla 29 (Johnson 8). 

cucaaa it u 28 38— no 

Msmstoa Van 32—184 

Sampson W-71 66 34, Otalumn 12-20 M 24; 
Jordan 11-22 9-UJ 31, Dalhnr 1524 M 30L Re> 
baantft: Chfcoso £2 (OUhoan, Johnson 81; 
HwMonS4 (Oleluwan 21) JlssisM: OiKago23 
(Jordan 7); HouNon 31 I Halil ns 
LA. Laker* 39 29 27 35—138 

PMenfal 31 X 94 25— ru 

AbduKlabbar 12-1724 24, Johnson 610 12-12 
2t; Adams 9-14 1-1 19, Lucas 7-13 3-4 17. Re- 
bounds: Los Ansoies 47 (AMuf-Jobbor *J; 
Phoenix 44 (Luceal2).Ai»JsJs: Los Angelo* 37 
Uolwson )B|; Phoenix 32 (Humphries, Ho Hon 
7). 

Oetratt 33 a 93 35—723 

MriMnd 34 M 34 39-H3 

M-Thompaon 1M04-4 30. Vondeweghe 12-20 
4-4 28; Thomas 13-21 m 29, udmbeer 11 - 21 M 
2a. Rebounds: Delrall 49 (Lolmbeer 15); Port- 
land j3(AA.Themgson tl I. Assists: Detraff 39 
(Thomas IS); Portland 41 (Drexler 10). 


1. Mlcheta Flofail. Switzerland. 259 points. 

2. Brtaene OorttL Switzer land, 217. 

3. Mario WHilier, Sw I tzerhxM. 197. 

4. Oloa Chorvatova CzedioslovaUi], 174. 

5. Marina KlehL west Germany, 144. 

6. Hess. 15B. 

7. Ettsabeth KJ renter. Austria, 154. 

' 8. Tamara MeUnney. UA, 139. 

9. Blanca Fernandez Ochoa, Spain. 108. 

10. Eaals. 104. 

European Soccer 

CUP WINNERS' CUP 
(dtn-tarfieal*. Second Leal 
Roma t. Bayern Munich 2 ; Bayern Munich 
advances on anareaate. e-L 
Dynamo Moscow 1. Larisa 0; Dynamo Mos- 
cow advances on aadraoate. 1-8. 

CHAMPIONS' CUP 
(Owlerflocds, Second Leal 
Sparta Prague 1. Juvenhis 0; Jtrventu* otf- 
vanoos an aaareoate. 3-1. 

Dnepr oneprapohwsk L Bordeaux i. Ap- 
arasate, 2-2. Bordeaux advances oa penolttes, 
!M. 

UEFA CUP 

(Q u arts' fl nah. Second Loot 
Dynamo Minsk l.Zelleznlcnrl ; ZeileznJatr- 
advonam on aaoreoato, 3-1. 

VMeMon L Mcmdiester United 0 (extra 
lime). Aporeaote, t-i; VMeolon advances on 
penalties, u 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Arsenal 1, Ipswich 1 
Wattand % Luton D 

PUNCH FIRST DIVISION 
Sfrasboura I, Rouen 1 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
America* League 

BALTIMORE— Announced that Jerry 
Johnson, John Hoover# Jerry Augustine «id 
Jew Brito, pitchers; Louts Rasodo. catcher, 
ondJoffSdweter.sscondboee mar uieBrad es - 

M noted jor ra-aostenmoat. 

FOOTBALL 

United States Foottxdl League 
JACKSONVILLE— Announced the retire- 
mart ri Archie tSriffln, running boek- 


I Exhibition BasebaD 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

jc-SL Louis 33 26 11 77 266 253 

x-Chkogo 34 33 5 73 279 275 

Minnesota 23 37 12 a 242 2S7 

Detroit 22 38 11 55 272 324 

Toronto 18 44 7 43 219 388 

Iinyfhe Dhrtrioe 

x-Edmomon <5 17 9 99 3S2 254 

x -Winnipeg 39 27 7 85 323 385 

s -Coloary 34 26 9 81 324 ZM 

x-Los Angeles 32 27 13 77 313 292 

Vancouver 32 41 8 52 2S3 344 

(x-dlndwd Playoff berth) 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
New Jane* • s 1—1 

wusntaotoo 2 2 B— 4 

Gushsfsson (9), Gartner (44), Murphy (12). 
Carpenter (491; Boone (21). Shots on pool: 
New jersey (on Jansen) 662—21 ; Washing- 
ton ton Law) 168-12—34. 

PhiiadeMia 0 2 3-4 

PHtSbarah 2 18-3 

Ron 5utter 2 (14), Hospodar (3), Sinisaio 
(321. Craven (94); McCarthy (9). Lemteux 
(SSL Javanainen (4). shots ao goal; Philadel- 
phia (on Herron) 9-15-19—41; Pitteaurah 
(UiKtaorgh) 12-10-10— 31 
Los Anoetes 9 1 1-2 

N.Y. Wndm • 1 1-3 

Flatter (18), Tonelll (39), a Sutter (U); 
wiiaams (Sl. Nlchelte (45). Shots on goal; Lot 
Anofite* (on HradW) 10-15-14-41.- N.Y. Is- 
landers (on Janacyfe) 12-5-13—30. 



RawvfrllMed Plrets hUmKXCMJ 1 

After being dumped by defenseman Joe GreBa in Tuesday 
night’s first period, Washington’s Bob Carpenter slid info : 
Ron Low — and the New Jersey goalie opted for an ira- * 
mediate and sustained counterattack. Low received a pair of 7 
penalties in the fracas, and the Capitals converted than into ’ 
the first two of four power-play goals in a 4-1 NHL victory. ; 

Football : 


United States Football League Leaders 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Lewis. MEMP 


Offense 



Roller. JACK 


Yards Rush 

Pass 

Bledsoe, ORL 

Tampa Bay 

1454 

434 

1020 

Carthon, NJ 

New Jersey 

1300 

7« 

558 

FluHe. NJ 

Baltimore 

1483 

530 

943 


Birmingham 

1446 

617 

849 


Memphis 

1241 

471 

578 

Travilllan, TB 

Jacksonville 

1)18 

341 

757 

Smith. BIRM 

Orlando 

707 

322 

385 

Flfzkoe. BALT 


Defease 



Alexis. JACK 

Tampa Boy 

1110 

340 

770 

Keel JACK 

Baltimore 

1112 

429 

483 

Moser, MEMP 

Birmingham 

1221 

539 

482 


Memphis 

1233 

479 

751 


New Jersey 

1310 

414 

494 

Andrusvstnr, TB 

Jacksonville 

1490 

4M 

876 

Cater, ORL 

Orlando 

1594 

933 

441 

MUIIor. MEMP 


Quart trhadci 



Stricter. JACK 


Tuesday's Results 
GrtrirmoH & St. Lsub 2 
Atlanta 3, tfcun 2 
Houston 14, Detroit 3 
Nsw York Mets A New York Yankees 3 
rtdkxteiphia % Chicago White 56* 2 
Toronto 4 Pltttburah 1 
LOS Angeles i Baltimore 1 
Kansas a tv L Montreal 2 
Mhawsata 5. Boston 3 
Col Horn (o e, Chicago Cuba d 
son PnwcrtW & Seattle 3 
Oakland 4, San Dfggo 5 
Mllwaukse 7, Cleveland 5 


Lewis. MEMP 
Stoudt, BIRM 
Fusina BALT 
Reavf^TB 
Luther. JACK 
Flufla, HJ 
Btlua, JACK 
CoMorn. OftL 


ATT COM YDS 
81 40 7M 
lit 42 90S 
IU 75 911 
121 <7 814 
45 25 282 
9« « 828 
64 34 290 
101 49 483 


HIEMP 28 233 13 43 3 

JACK 60 229 18 *9 1 

. ORL 55 225 4.1 15 1 

, NJ 41 205 ID 551 1 

4J 19 T72 9.1 25 3 

Receivers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
M. TB 23 332 144 32 4 

IIRM 18 343 II? S3 s 

BALT IB 240 133 22 0 

JACK II 217 111 32 2 

iCK 17 144 as 38 0 

MEMP 14 327 30A 571 3 

N<r , YDS AVG TB )» LG 
rgtnr, TB 12 52B 460 1 2 59 

IRL 24 1834 413 ) 4 57 

HEMP 21 902 428 4 4 53 

JACK 14 4TB 424 J 3 51 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Rvshors 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
Anderson. TB 75 423 « sat 6 

Walker, NJ 45 33B 5J Mr 3 

Brvanl, BALT 48 304 4J 35 2 

Willlarra, MEMP <0 J47 A2 37 0 



Offense 

Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Houston 

1009 

144 

1443 

OaMpnd 

1443 

534 

934 

Denver 

1445 

419 

824 

Portland 

1308 

454 

452 

Arizona 

1243 

432 

831 

Los Angeles 

1242 

S3 

489 

San Antonio 

800 

3m 

498 

Arizona 

Defense 

1033 

433 

480 

Portland 

1190 

498 

m 

Las Angeles 

1335 

445 

890 

Oakland 

135? 

322 

1030 


Houston 

1371 

411 940 

San Antonio 

I37B 

419 759 

Denver 

1571 

<47 1124 


Quarterback, 

• 

ATT COM 

YDS TD INT 

Kelly. HOU 

184 115 1473 1J s : 

Hebert. OAK 

III : 

55 9J2 10 4 . 

Williams. AR1Z 

ns : 

73 859 J 5 *. 

YOuno. LA 

1D2 . 

53 000 3 5 

Woodwcrd, PORT 90 . 

C MS 2 4 

Evans. DEN 

140 , 

41 865 4 10 

NeulteheL SA 

J9 ; 

salt 


Rustier, 

» 


ATT VD5 

AVG LG TD 

Jordan. PORT 

58 

335 DA at 3 •' 

Johnson, DEN 

37 

298 7.8 39 4 

Beattav. oak 

32 

314 W 57 l •' 

YOU1W, LA , 

34 

163 68 22 2 . 

Gray, LA 

40 

156 19 341 1 -. 

Brawn. ARlZ 

27 

146 5-t 38 3 *. 

Lena. ARIZ 

42 

145 15 17 3 J 

GWhori, DEN 

25 

142 17 15 0 • 

Williams, OAK 

38 

.128 34 15 0 . 


Receivers 



NO YD5 

AVG LG TD J 

Johnson. HOU 

39 

373 129 S?1 a .■ 

Verdin, HOU 

It 

364 14 1 74 4 . 

Carter. OAK 

18 

3M 2U 50t 3 

Harris, DEN 

18 

310 11.7 391 t •' 

Townsetu LA 

16 

3411 213 Ml 3 - 

Uhvit, DEN 

15 

215 143 77 1 ' 


Talley. DAK 
Gossen, PORT 
Partridge. LA 
WOlteHL HOU 


Pmitm 

NO YDS A VC TB 120 LG 
20 KJ5 41 8 2 7 54 
IS 414 40.9 2 3 JO 

18 755 4B.1 1 5 53 

18 719 39 V J 2 55 









•sr/ranrs ■=..«« MfminimiiiizmtanisstfssTtsft ist 





Page 18 


INTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Watchins Gorbachev Trappers ding to Endangered Calling Hefner Admiis ga-oke 

O n„ C TV7«m IT— g iwwr.U.T'Vkl 1 ' n ^ 


W ASHINGTON —Hie Soviet 
Watchers of Washington met 


YV Watchers of Washington met 
last week k the “Darkness at Noon 
Russian Tea Room” to be briefed 
on Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorba- 
chev's rise to the top of the 
U.S.S.R. 

Professor Nicholai Dubo- 
kowsty, one of the leading FCrem- 
linologists in this country, gave us 
the word. “Gorbachev may be 
around for at 


m 



least 30 years, so 
you have to 
watch him very 
closely." 

“What should 
we watch for?" 

“Since he is 
only 54 years old 
you should 
watch the way 
he stands when n„ nfcmr , M 

he's on the top VOttowM 

of Lenin's Tomb. Remember, he is 
the first Soviet leader in 10 years 
who can watch a parade without a 
Politburo member on each side 
bolding onto his arms so he won't 
fail down. This has its good and 
bad implications. The fact that he 
can stand on his own feet makes 
Gorbachev dangerous. At the same 
time we can expect more credibility 
from the Kremlin on their leader’s 
health. Now when they announce 
be has a bad cold, we can all ass- 
sume be does have a bad cold.” 

“Why is Gorbachev getting such 
a good press?” 

“Because he speaks English and 
wears nice suits. One of the reasons 
Americans never trusted the Soviet 
leaders in the past was that they 
dressed so tacky. How could you 
discuss ways of avoiding World 
War m with people who wore bag- 
gy pants and white socks? Gorba- 
chev is a new breed of Russian. His 
suit coat fits, and his choice of 
shirts and ties is impeccable. He’s 
the type of person you're not 
ashamed to be photographed with 
at a s ummi t conference." 


“Does the fact that he's a snappy 
dresser mean he's a more formida- 
ble adversary?" 

“He could gp other way. Khru- 
shchev almost brought us to mide- 
ar destruction by hammering his 
shoe on the podium at the United 
Nations. Gorbachev would never 
do this because he’s afraid it would 
ruin his shine. But you still have to 
watch him very carefully. The fact 
that he doesn’t drool all over the 
medals on his chest could be to 

NATO's disadvantage. With the 
others you knew they weren't going 
to be around very long, so the West 
was wining to put op with their 
peccadillos for a year or two. With 
Gorbachev it wiD be at least three 
decades before he winds up in the 
Kremlin Wall." 

“Do you think he will flaun t the 
fact that he is only 54 years old in 
Reagan’s face?" 

“He has already, in a hand-deliv- 
ered letter to President Reagan. 


By Christopher- S. Wren 

New York Times Service 


Philip Husky with marten peits from bis trapline. 


p AE, Northwest Territories— 
JV PiuUiD Husky, a Donib In- 


Gorbachev started by addressing it 
’Dear Unde Ronnie.’ That threw 


United Prats International 

WASHINGTON —The Wilder- 
ness Society, celebrating its 50tb 
anniversary, has unveiled what is 
believed to be the only permanent 
exhibition of the landscape photo- 
graphs of Ansel Adams, who do- 
nated 75 photographs to the society 
shortly before his death last year at 
age Si 


the president for a loop. He doesn't 
even like his grandchildren to call 
him Grandpa." 

□ 

“Vice President George Bush 
watched Gorbachev all during 
Chernenko’s funeral. What was his 
impression of the man?" 

“As you know, Mr. Bush has 
become an expert at watching Sovi- 
et leaders at Moscow funerals. He 
came back quite impressed Mr. 
Bush thinks Gorbachev has the po- 
tential to become the first Soviet 
yuppie premier. The leader seems 
to enjoy the good things in life, and 
one of his priorities is to provide 
more of the same for his people. 
The vice president believes if we 
can get Gorbachev to import more 
Pemer and buy more BMWs with 
stereo tape decks in them, the Sovi- 
ets wQl lose their appetite for world 
conquest." 

“What about Mrs. Gorbachev? 
Should we spend much rime watch- 
ing her?" 

“You have no choice. The press 
is now referring to her as another 
Jackie Kennedy. Mrs. Gorbachev 
could be a big help to the Soviet 
leader when be travels around the 
world. The thing to watch is his 
first trip to France. If he pulls a 
John Kennedy and says, 1 am the 
man who accompanied Raisa Gor- 
bachev to Paris,* and it gets a big 
hand, we're in a lot more trouble 
than most people drink. " 


JV Phillip Husky, a Dogrib In- 
dian, brought six marten peits 
into the Rae Cafe and laid them 
out carefully on the worn yellow 
linoleum floor. He wanted 50 Ca- 
nadian dollars apiece for them. 

Amie Stetnwand, who owns 
the Rae Cafe and adjoining gro- 
cery store and pool hall had got- 
ten up on the right side of the bed 
that morning, he said later, so he 
paid out 300 Canadian dollars 
(about 5220) without haggling. 
He planned to send the marten 
pelts to the fur auction in Van- 
couver. 

Husky was heading back to his 
trapline, a wide circuit of traps 
laid out in the snow of the scrub 
forests 80 miles (130 kilometers) 
to the north, after he loaded his 
snowmobile with groceries and 
gasoline. 

“I got a cabin," Husky ex- 
plained. His En glish is limited. “I 
go out tomorrow. One of my boys 
will come with me." 

When a visitor asked what be 
would do if Ik could not trap. 
Husky, who has lived on a trap- 
line for 45 of Iris 61 years, looked 
bewildered. 

“This town is about as poor as 
you’re going to get.” Stein wand 
explained later. There's no em- 
ployment here. About 90 percent 
live off the land." 


OVxsopher £ WfWTh, Nh tort Times 




A day after Hugh Hefner's 
spokesman denied that the chair- 
man of Playboy Enterprises bad 
bad a stroke, Hefner said he had 
recovered from a nrild stroke and 
blamed the ailment on stress 
caused by a book by the film direc- 
tor Peter Bogdanovich about the 
murdered Playmate Dorothy Stntf- 
ten. T suffered a stroke two weeks 
ago," Hefner, 59. said in a state- 
ment issued by the Playboy spokes- 
man, Don Rogers. Stratum's hus- 
band, Pad Snider, (rilled himself 
and his 20-year-old wife in 1980 
after reading, her memoir about her 
affair with Bogdanovich. Last year 
Bogdanovich published a book 
about Scranen, “The Killing of the 
Unicorn," which Rogers said con- 
tained veiled statements blaming 
Hefner for her death. Bogdanovich 
said after Hefner’s statement was 
released: “Confronting Hugh Hef- 


in New York until 1981. Then, in . 
line with Picasso's wishes, the 
painting was tuned over to fl* 


Prado museum in Madrid after 3* M 

death of Franco and fee return of » L 1 1 jUliCS 
democracy to Spain. ^ r"** 


Patricia Hansen, wife of the 
Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Rich- v 

ante, has given birth in New Yortltt v 
to a baby girl, Theodora Rupee) 1 


•d i<> 


-> 

*** 


Richards. Hansen, & model defcv- 


ered the 7-pound. 15-ounce baby! 
by natural childbirth with - Ridh- T 1 i ‘ 
arris, 41, assisting. It was the finr* 


.4 1 1 art 


arcs, tu&iMuig. u was me lujt ' 

child for Hansen. Richards has two 
children, Marion and Angela, by 
his f earner wife, Anita PaDesfag, 

□ 


ner with the reality of his life, and 
in particular what he and his maga- 
zine do to women, apparently is 
something he can't face." 


If the Dogrib Indians could not 
trap, he said, “you'd make vege- 
tables out of them. It's the only 
thing they know how to do, and 
they're good at it." 

In the Northwest Territories, a 
wilderness area more than one- 
third the size of the United States, 
people fear that efforts by conser- 
vationist groups to halt the fur 
trade will undermine their tradi- 
tional way of life and bring prob- 
lems ranging from economic 
hardship to a rise in frustration 
and alcoholism. 


around. They don't know any 
other way of life.” • 

Canada claims to be the 
world’s largest producer of high- 
quality furs. Its fur industry has 
been estimated at $450 million a 
year or more. This dependence on 
wildlife has created a euphemistic 
vocabulary in which animals are 
“renewable resources" that are 


harvested" for food and profit 
About 80,000 to 100,000 Cana- 
dians live by trapping and hunt- 
ing. Many are Dene or Inuit as 
Canada's Indians and Eskimos 
call themselves. They are espe- 
cially vulnerable to a fur boycott 
because they often have no other 
source of income. 

Two-thirds of the population 
of the Northwest Territories, 
about 33,000 people, live off the 
land, said Nellie Coumoyea, min- 
ister of renewable resources in the 
capital Yellowknife. 

The fears of the trappers were 
touched off by the success of con- 
servationist groups such as 
Greenpeace in stopping the blud- 
geoning of baby seals. Although 
the campaign centered on New- 
foundland. it all but wiped out 
Canada’s sealing industry, which 


The prospect has sent a collec- 


tive shudder through Rae, a pre- 
dominantly Doerib community 


dominantly Dogrib community 
on the Great Slave Lake. It sur- 
vives on government handouts, 
seasonal firefighting, hunting and 
trapping. 

“I don't want to even lalk 
about it," said Joe Rabesca, chief 
of the Dogrib band at Rae. 
“There’s just too many people 
and not enough work to go 


exported more than $2J£ million 
worth of sealskins a year. 

Total annual income from seal- 
ing in the northern arctic commu- 
nity of Resolute reportedly fed 
from 54,000 Canadian dollars to 
1,000 dollars in 1983. 

In the Northwest Territories, 
people from the sooth who want 
to holt hunting and crapping are 
perceived as affluent dry dwellers 
with no comprehension of the 
age-old relationship between ani- 
mal harvest and harvester. 

T think that they forget that 
we exist as people on the other 
side," said Nelson Green, an inu- 
vialuil from Paula tuck on Cana- 
da's northern coast. “We have to 
feed our families, but we've al- 
ways been in tone with the land, 
so we know what can be taken.” 

The trappers say they waste 
almost npthm g of the animate be- 
cause the meat is eaten by their 
families or sled dogs. 

“What most people don’t un- 
derstand is that most of the ani- 
mals taken for fur are also used 
for food," said Jim Bourque, a 
former trapper who is now depu- 
ty minister of renewable re- 
sources in the Northwest Territo- 


ries. “There’d be very little 
reduction" in the number of ani- 
mals killed even if there were no 
market for the fur, he said. 

Canadian provinces have start- 
ed trying to defuse the controver- 
sy over traps that critics say are 
crueL British Columbia banned 
most uses of leghoid traps. Ontar- 
io may follow smL * 

But trappers in the Northwest 
Territories have balked at switch- 
ing to off-set traps, which kill an 
animal instantly in mousetrap 
fashion. They claim that such 
traps are hard to set and imprac- 
tical because they freeze to the 
animal in winter. 

The Dene and Inuit formed an 
alliance with indigenous people 
in Alaska and Greenland last 
year to defend the harvesting of 
wildlife. But the coalition. Indige- 
nous Survival International has 
had little impact because trappers 
and hunters are unused to pre- 
senting their case in public 

“They don’t understand, they 
don't have the money, they don't 
know how to defend themselves," 
said Coumoyea. “They don't 
even understand why they should 
defend themselves." 


With a stirring rendition of the 
Mass in B minor, Leipzig has 
launched its bicentennial tribute to 
Johann Sebastian Bach at the 
Gothic church where he served 
more than 20 years as can tor . Hans 
Joachim Rofagch, musical director 
of St Thomas Lutheran Church, 
directed the two-hour perfor- 
mance. About 1,600 Bach lovers 
crowded into the church for the 
evening performance by a 50-mem- 
ber orchestra, the 88-member St 
Thomas boys choir and . four East 
Goman soloists, including the ten- 
or Peter Schreier. 


Delegates headed for U. N. Se- 
irity Council debates reportedly 
d by are- 


cunty Louncu debates reportedly 
will soon be confronted by a re- 
minder of the horrors of war. a 
tapestry of Picasso's “Guernica." 


Sources said the tapestry, owned by 
the late Neboo A Rockefeller ana 


the late Nelson A Rockefefler and 
woven under Picasso's supervision, 
would be loaned or donated to the 
United Nations by Margaretta 
(Happy) Rockefeller, widow of the 
former U.S. vice president The 
tapestry hung in the executive man- 
sion in Albany while Rockefeller 
was governor of New York. The 
1937 painting itself, a protest 
against the bombing of the Basque 
town of Guernica during the Span- 
ish GvO War, was on extended 
loan to the Museum of Modem Art 


Arnaod de Borchgrave, the fa 
met foreign correspondent whoco 
wrote “Trie Spike.” a novel aboo 
Soviet influence on the U. S. me 
dia. has been named editor in chfe 
of The Washington Times, takin 
over editorial control from Salt 
Hemps tone, who had been execs 
tive editor for less than a year 
Hemps tone who took over las 
July when James Whelan was dc 
missed as editor and publisher c. 
The Times, will continue to write ■ 
twice-weekly column. Dc Borcf 
grave, 58, already a member of Th- 
Times's editorial advisory bout 
said he was Bret approached abot 
three weeks ago by Colond Bo F 
Pak, president of News Wort 
Communications Ino, which owe 
T he Times and is in turn owned b 
interests connected with the Rem . 
end Sim Myung Mom's Unifier 
tion Church. De Borchgrave sad 
Pak offered him the job of pnbliri 
er, which he refused. Last weekem 
he said. Pak offered the job of ed 
tor in chief , which he accepted. D *. 
Borchgrave. who left Newswee 
magazine in 1980 after an editor’ 
dispute, has helped operate a new . 
letter called Early Warning, whir’ 
he said is read by 23 heads of star 
and 16 directors of national intdl 
gence agencies. He is also a scum 
associate at the Georgetown Un " 
versify Center for Strategic and h ; 
temational Studies. 


China’s Ministry of Culture . • 
organizing a retrospective exhib . 
tion on Yves Saint Laurent May 
through July 14, with about 21- 
designs from 1958 to 1985, at tL 
Museum of Fine Arts of Beijin !. 
the designer announced in Pans. 


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Jamba, the mrade bean sawn in the 
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