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INTERNATIONAL 






Published With Hie New York Tunes and The Washington Post- / 

** PAMS, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 : -*T^ 


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By John M. Berry 

"• i * Washington Post Service 

VASHIN GTON — The U.S. 
.. <aomy is growing at an annual 
of only 2.1 percent in the cur- 
' . t quarter, primarily because a 
- : v surge in imported goods is 
dmg down demand for produc- 
a of domestic products, the 
/[amerce Department estimated 
ursday. 

vvjfce slow rate of growth in the 

- ss national product, which znea- 

- . es the nation’s total output of 
> . .ids and services, is only about 

\,'.S as large as had been expected 
V most forecasters. It is also down 
m a revised 43-percent growth 
. e for the fourth quarter of 1984. 
e fourth quarter rate was esti- 
_ .vied earlier at 4.9 percent. 

The report pushed the dollar 
uply lower in hectic trading in 
^ ,;rope. In later New York trading, 
. ! British pound surged to SI. 1875 

- .'m Sl.147 Wednesday while the 
... utsebe mark rose to 3305 from 
J , 54. [Page U.J 

. ■ The Commerce Department fig- 
7 e — the stnaBed “flash” esti- 
. ite erf the GNP — is based on 
_ xmrplete data and projections. 
’-Vie estimate is subject to substan- 
..7 .il revision as more complete data 
7- come available. 

Meanwhile, inflation as mea- 
red by the GNP implicit price 
7 flator has risen from a 2.8-per- 
lt pace in the fourth quarter to 
estimated 5.4-percent rate this 

- arter, the department said. Much 

- the higher rate was due to a 
: ange in the composition of out- 

■r* »Vt, including a large rise in energy 
. rdiases, rather than a direct m- 

- ase in prices. 

A separate price index that is not 
- :'ected by changes in output rose 
an estimated 4.1-percent rate, up 


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■jrjs European Community ministers spent a fifth day debat- 
7tg the entry of Spain and Portugal, Lorenzo N ataK , left, 
ommissioner in charge of enlargement, sprite with Jac- 
’. ues Delors, president of the EC ConraussiorL Page Z 


VC Agrees to Require 
" J . jOW-PoUution Autos 




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Wiled by Our Staff Front Dispatches 

-'BRUSSELS — Environment 
V .tusters of ihe European Commu- ■ 
y agreed Thursday on the 
^,«ed, compulsory introduction 
low-pollution cars throughout 
' > 10-nation grouping. 

_ . lt Jnder the agreement worked out 
' * \ an all-night session after months 
’^negotiations, tough European 
odards for exhaust emissions 
1 cow into force by 1989 for big 
s, 1993 for medium-sized cars, 

1 1994 for the smallest cars. 

Ihe ministers were unable, how- 
' r, to agree on the specific stan- 
. ds of pollution control that the 
-os would have to meet by the 
'* ecd dates. They said these 
be determined later. 

' '* hiring the session, it was also 
•. ’ red that lead-free gasoline must 
st sale throughout the commu- 
' by 1989. Ministers approved 
ited tax incentives to encourage 
twists to buy low-pollution 
■; s wdiich are likely to be more 
v. 7 dian current models. 

. wticipams in the negotiations 
'sd the program a breakthrough 
- be fight against acid rain and 
’ i pollution that threatens Ear 
■ s’s forests and lakes, 
fficial West German reports 
-. . : found that at least half of all 

• » in the country have been daro- 

i by pollution, 

’ aal«y Qimon Davis, the EC 
Qhssioner for the environment, 
that the ministers had reached 

• • important agreement that 

• . id bring, about a substantial re- 
n’ ion in atmospheric pollution 

• motor vehicles." 

^.fowever, the European Envi- 

* wnt Bureau, an umbrella orga- 
- uwi of ocolc®eal groups, said 

agreement was too late ami too 
A spokesman said it meant 
sit by 1990, only 5 percent of the 
f lOn roads within the EC would 
w-polluuon auios. 


The compromise agreement 
means that EC automobue compa- 
nies will have to fit two-liter (122 
cubic-inch) models with three-way 
catalytic conveners, the only tech- 
nology available for meeting EC 
anti-pollution standards by 1989. 
But ministers derided that a choice 
of technologie& should be available 
for smaller cars, which have to 
comply with emission standards hi 
a later date. 

For example, Fond of Europe in 
Britain is developing a “lean bum” 
engine that would eventually satis- 
fy anti-pollution controls. 

Technical details of common 
emission standards will have to be 
decided before the end of June this 
year, the ministers agreed. 

Ihe first cars to fall within the 
scope erf the new regulations win be 
new models introduced in 1988 and 
equipped with engines larger than 
two liters. 

New models with mediunhsize 
engines — from 1.4 Hters to 2 titers 
— will have to meet the pollution- 
control standards starting with the 
1991 model year. New modds with 
Winn engines — less than 1.4 Hters 
— must meet an initial standard in 
1990 and a stricter standard by a 
date to be decided later. 

New cars in existing modds 
must meet the following timetable 
for pollution controls: for those 
with large engines, slartmgui 1989; 
medium-size engines in 1993; and 
small engines in 1991. 

Ministers also allowed West 
Germany to grant fiscal incentives 
to buyers of “dean” cars, but the 
incentives must be significantly less 
than the additional costs involved 
in equipping a Car to meet the new 
European standards. 

The EC Commission has to de- 
cide by April 4 on British and 
French complaints that these in- 
centives infringe community com- 
petition rules. (Reuters, AP) 


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from 3.6 percent in the previous 
three months. 

If the first quarter estimate were 
to bold, it would mean that the 
economy has grown at an average 
annual rate of 2.7 percent over the 
last nine months. According to 
most economists, that pace is not 
enough to reduce the nation's civil- 
ian unemployment rate, which 
stood at 73 percent in February. 

[White. House officials said the 
economy is “on a path of steady 
growth with low inflation” despite 
the apparent slowdown in the cur- 
rent quarter, Reuters reported from 
Washington.) 

Most forecasters have been ex- 
pecting real GNP to rise at about a 
33-percent pace during this year, 
although some have warned that 
variations in foreign trade could 
affect the quarter- to-quarter rates 
of increase. 

David B arson, an economist 
with Wharton Econometric Fore- 
casting Associates, said the report 
probably ggriflls that the economy 
is in a “growth recession” with ris- 
ing unemployment occurring soon- 
er than had been expected. 

But he predicted that the econo- 
my will show renewed strength in 
the final three months of the year, 
assuming that the Federal Reserve 
Board loosens its restraints on the 
money supply. 

“Growth wiB rebound because 
the Fed wil] have to respond to 
prevent a growth recession from 
becoming a real recession,” Mr. 
BersonsaRL 

, The department also reported 
Thursday that corporate profits 
rose at a 3.8-percent annual rate in 
the fourth quarter after falling at a 
2.8-percent rate in the third. After- 
tax profits rose at a 0.4-percent 
pace after falling at a 5.7-percent 
rate in the previous three mouths. 



Police Kill 17 

As Blacks March 
In South Africa 


Viktor P. Karpov, chief Soviet negotiator in Geneva, de- 
clining to talk to journalists Thursday. UJS. and Soviet 


negotiators agreed Thursday to divide into three working 
groups, on strategic, intermediate and space-based arms. 


Politburo Endorses a Return to Detente 


By Seth Mydans 

Afar York Times Service 

MOSCOW — The ruling Polit- 
buro met Thursday for its first reg- 
ular session since Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev was named Soviet leader 
last week, and declared its readi- 
ness for improved relations with 
the West 

A report on the meeting earned 
by the nffirial news agency, Tass, 
said the Soviet Union was ready to 
follow the line of detente as it was 
practiced in the 1970s. The phrase 
echoed the policy stated by Mr. 
Gorbachev in a speech made when 
he took power 10 days earlier. 

“The experience of dfctente of the 
70s has proved that relations with 
capitalist countries can also devel- 
op wdl in the spirit of peaceful 
coexistence and cooperation,” the 
report said. “The Soviet Union is 
ready to follow this line.” 

It also said that the first priority 
in U3.-Soviet relations would be to 
reach an accord on arms control, 
and it declared that the Soviet side 
would work to reach an agreement 
in the talks under way in Geneva. 

Tass said the Politburo approved 
the “vast work” done by one of its 
members, Vladimir V. Shcher- 
bitsky, during his recent visit to the 
United States. It did not mention 
Mr. Shcberbifcsky’s talks with Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan or the possi- 


bility of a U.S.-Soviet summit 
meeting, which Mr. Reagan has 
suggested. 

pn Geneva, U3. and Soviet 
arms control negotiators agreed 
Thursday to divide into working 
groups on strategic, intermediate 

Weston public opinion may be 
die key to which side will win at 
the Geneva arms talks. Page 2. 

and space-based weapons next 
week for the first time since .the 
talks began March 12. wire services 

reported.} 

The Tass report avoided the 
harsh criticisms of the American 
approach to the talks that has been 
prevalent in the Soviet press in re- 
cent days. 

The Politburo's reference to di- 
ten te and the decade when UJ5.- 
Soviet cooperation reached its high 
point indicated to diplomats in 
Moscow that Mr. Gorbachev’s ad- 
ministration would seek an im- 
proved atmosphere with Washing- 
ton. 

The report's only critical words 
were directed at domestic prob- 
lems. Here, the Tass report stressed 
an intensification and acceleration 
of economic development and 
called for a strengthening of disci- 
pline and a straggle against “sbowi- 
ness and irresponsibility.” 


These also were themes raised in 
Mr. Gorbachev's acceptance 
speech and repeated since then in 
editorials in the nation's major 
newspapers. 


ptugn for discipline ana efficiency 
carried out bv Mr. Gorbachevs 
mentor, Yuri V. Andropov. Among 
many Russians, an immediate 
question about Mr. Gorbachev’s 
new administration is whether he 
will return to the strict measures of 
Mr. Andropov's campaign. 

But Western and Soviet analysts 
in Moscow cautioned that any 
plans Mr. Gorbachev may have for 
economic reform face opposition 
from the established bureaucracy 
and will take time to carry out 

The Politburo noted the impor- 
tance of meetings that Mr. Gorba- 
chev and oihCT Politburo members 
had with visiting dignitaries last 
week, but it did not mention that 
these officials had come to Moscow 
for the funeral of Mr. Gorbachev’s 
predecessor, Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko. 

It was not the first time Mr. Gor- 
bachev had presided over the Polit- 
buro. Official statements have 
shown that he chaired meetings 
while Mr. Chernenko was tick or" 
away from Moscow. 

The report’s failure to mention 
Mr. Chernenko’s name was a fur- 


ther signal that Mr. Gorbachev’s 
regime intends to dissociate itself 
from that of his predecessor. 

A similar report on the first Po- 
litburo meeting after Mr. Chernen- 
ko's accession to power 13 months 
ago mentioned the name of his pre- 
decessor. Mr. Andropov. 

In a separate report, Tass said 
the U.S. ambassador to Moscow, 
Arthur A Hartman, met Thursday 
with Foreign Minister Andrei A. 
Gromyko and talked about the Ge- 
neva negotiations and other bilat- 
eral subjects. The U-S. Embassy 
confirmed the meeting had taken 
place, but declined to disclose de- 
tails. 

■ Group Talks Start Tuesday 
The agreement in Geneva to be- 
gin discussions on three categories 
of weapons was reached at the 
fourth working session since U3.- 
Soviet disarmament talks resumed, 
Agence France-Presse reported 
from Geneva. 

The delegations apparently 
failed to decide earlier to split the 
talks on long-range weapons, medi- 
um-range weapons and space 
weapons because of disagreement 
over bow closely linked the three 
should be, Weston sources said. 

The first session of talks by the 
three negotiating groups is sebed- 
(Cominiied on Page 2, CbL 7) 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Police 
shot and killed at least 17 blacks 
and wounded 19 others near the 
southern costal town of Uitenbage 
on Thursday on the 25th anniversa- 
ry of the Shaipeville massacre of 
1960. 

The police opened fire with ri- 
fles, pistols and shotguns as a 
crowd of more than 3,000 people 
marched from ihdr black township 
toward a white suburb of Uiten- 
hage, near Port Elizabeth, the gov- 
ernment said. 

The shooting occurred as blacks 
across South Africa commemorat- 
ed the Shaipeville massacre anni- 
versary in which the 69 blacks were 
shot and killed in the bloodiest 
clash in years of protests against 
white-minority rule. 

In the ratial unrest over the past 
13 months, more than 240 people 
have died. 

Louis Le Grange, minister or law 
and order, told Parliament in Cape 
Town that the crowd, ignoring or- 
ders to disperse, advanced on a 
group of 19 policemen. 

“The police -were suddenly sur- 
-rounded and pelted with stones, 
slicks and other missiles, including 
petrol bombs,” Mr. Le Grange 
said. 

The commanding officer, he 
said, fired a warning shot into the 
ground. When that had no effect, 
Mr. Le Grange said, police opened 
fire. 

Mr. Le Grange said that six of 
the 17 blacks died in hospitals. The 
government said at least 19 other 
blacks were wounded. Mr. Le 
Grange said that the police had 
fired six rifle shots, 27 shotgun car- 
tridges and 10 pistol shots. 

A police spokesman. Major 
Steve van Rooyena, said the situa- 
tion outride the Uitenhage was 
“tense but under control” by mid- 
day. Uitenhage is an automobile 
manufacturing center. 

Major van Rooyena said he did 
not know what' prompted the 
march, but said that it may have 
been linked to the Sharpeville anni- 
versary. 

The Port Elizabeth Evening Post 
quoted an unidentified witness as 
saying, “Police suddenly opened 
fire. We deny we stoned them." 


The Post quoted another wit- 
ness, Miriam Mdingi. who works in 
a butcher shop, as saving. “I stood 
in the doorway of ihe butchery and 
saw people lying in the street.’ Peo- 
ple were screaming and running. A 
woman came crying to me and said 
her son and daughter were dead.” 

Mono Badela. a black journalist 
for City Press, a Johannesburg 
Sunday newspaper that is read 
chiefly by blacks, visited the scene 
soon after the shooting. He said in 
a telephone interview that a fire 
truck washed the victims’ blood off 
the sLreet. 

Mr. Badela said that witnesses 
told him the crowd was trying to 
march through town to another 
black township, Kwanobuhle. to 
the funeral of three blacks killed ir. 
rioting lost week. The people did 
not know that the funeral had been 
banned by a magistrate several 
hours earlier, he said. 

He said the owner of a shop 50 
yards (45 meters) from the shoot- 
ings told him that police, in ar- 
mored vehicles, ordered the march- 
(Continued on Page 2. CoL 7) 


Tangle of Events Drove Senator to Drop MX Opposition 


By Dan Baiz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — On Feb. 
27, Paul G Wamke, director of 
the Arms Control and Disarma- 
ment Agency in the Carter ad- 
ministration, called on Senator 
Arlen Specter, Republican of 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Wamke urged the first- 
term senator to stand firm in his 
oppotition to the MX missile. Bui 
what be told Mr. Specter back- 
fired. 

Mr. Wamke told Mr. Specter 
that the MX was a bad weapon 
and’ worth building only to bar- 
gain away. He told Mr. Specter 
about the cancellation of the B-l 
bomber daring the Carter admin- 
istration. 

Mr. Wamke said he bad re- 
ceived word erf President Jimmy 
Carter’s decision only 15 minutes 
before it was announced. He was 
disappointed because he had 
wanted to get something in return 
from the Soviet Union m the stra- 
tegic arms talks. 

When Mr. Wamke expressed 
that disapp ointmen t to his Soviet 
counterpart, the Soviet negotiator 
had the same reaction. He had 
wanted to get some credit bade 
home for forcing the United 
Slates to yield cm the new long- 
range bomber. 

About 5 P31 cm Tuesday, be- 
fore tbe Senate’s first 55-to-45 



Senator Aden Specter 

vote in favor of the intercontinen- 
tal nuclear missile, not even the 
Reagan administration, which 
was lobbying for the MX, was 
certain what Mr. Specter would 
da 

“How are you gang to vote?” 
the senator was asked. 

“I’m going to vote for it,” he 
replied. It was what Mr. Wamke 
hart told him that mflnftnceri his 
decision, he added. 

The senator concluded that the 
United States should try to get 
something for the MX rather than 
unilate rally cripple the program. 

The episode with Mr. Wamke 
was just one of the unexpected 
twists on the road that earned Mr. 


Specter from his vote against the 
missile last year to his decision to 
support President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s MX request on Tuesday. 

Mr. Specter made up his mind 
less than two hoots before the 
vote, he said, and in the end, the 
ament arms talks in Geneva 
proved critical, just as the Reagan 
administration had calculated 
when it decided to schedule the 
first MX vote of 1985 a week after 
tbe resumption of those talks. 

But to get there, Mr. Specter 
endured months of lobbying from 
the White House and a campaign 
by MX opponents in Pennsylva- 
nia. After Mr. SpecLer voted 
against the missile last year. De- 
fense Secretary Caspar W. Wein- 
berger called to say the adminis- 
tration had new information that 
might persuade Mr. Specter to 
support the missile. After that, 
the senator opened his door to all 
callers. 

He went through briefings 
from Defense Department and 
National Security Council offi- 
cials, read technical documents, 
went to the White House for a 
session with the pres dent, took 
phone calls from here and abroad 
from supporters of the adminis- 
tration, and was pressed by a co- 
ordinated, grass roots campaign 
of letters and meetings and phone 
calls from anti-nuclear activists at 
home. 


All the months of work by the 
administration almost went for 
naught when Paul \fichd, Mr. 
Specter’s administrative assistant, 
gpt a phone call last week from 
Mitch Daniels, a new member of 
the White House political opera- 
tion. 

Mr. Daniels was calling to pass 
on a message: When the While 
House staff sat down to allocate 
Mr. Reagan's time in helping vul- 
nerable Republican senators in 
fund-raising and other campaign- 
ing, friends would come firat 

The message was somewhat 
oblique, but later in the week it 
confronted Mr. Specter head-on 
when The New York Times pub- 
lished. a stray saying the White 
House was pressuring Republican 
senators on the MX and threaten- 
ing retaliation. 

At a meeting Friday in Phila- 
delphia with a coalition of MX 
activists, Mr. Specter denounced 
White House aides and said be 
was so mad he had to “go to the 
steam room to cool off.” 

But other forces were pushing 
Mr. Specter to support the admin- 
istration. 

Around Thanksgiving 1983, he 
had gone to Europe to study the 
nuclear issue. In Geneva, U3. 
arms negotiators arranged a 
meeting for him and Senator Carl 
Levin, Democrat of Michigan, 


with Viktor P. Karpov, now the 
chief Soviet arms negotiator. 

Tbe meeting was long and diffi- 
cult. At one point, according to a 
Specter aide, Mr. Karpov blew 
up. 

“If I lived in Pennsylvania, I 
wouldn’t vole for you,” he told 
Mr. Specter. 

“If you lived in Pennsylvania, 
at least you could vote,” Mr. 
Specter shot back. 

Back in Pennsylvania, the pres- 
sure was mounting. Mr. Specter 
went home for a series of town 
meetings last week. Tuesday 
morning, Mr. Specter’s Philadel- 
phia office recorded 468 calls op- 
posing the MX and 65 supporting 
it. 

The previous day, the chid 
White House lobbyist. Max Frie- 
dersdorf, had tried to reach tbe 
senator, Mr. Specter was in Penn- 
sylvania, so the White House aide 
passed a message through Paul 
Michel. There wifl be no retalia- 
tion, he said Vote on the merits of 
the issue, not on your reaction to 
the stories about the threats. 

Mr. Specter finally decided 
about 3:30 PAL on Tuesday to 
vote for the missile. 

“So that there will be no doubt 
about my motivation on my 
vote,” he said in a prepared state- 
ment, “I shall not have President 
Reagan come to Pennsylvania or 
elsewhere to help me raise cam- 
paign funds.” 


Soviet Embassy Aide Is Slain in India 

Motive for the Killing Is Ihiknmm After Gunman Escapes 

By San joy Haacika employee in the mission's econom- Thursday that h was “giving the 

Ne* York Tuna Service ic division. highest priori ty and importance to 

NEW DELHI A Soviet Em- The shooting follows the disap- ensure the security of Soviet per- 

bassy official was shot to death pearance Sunday of lgor Guera, a sonnel in the country.” 

Thuredav in New Delhi by an un- third secretary m ihe Soviet Em- The killing Thursday was the 


INSIDE 


By San joy Haarika 

New York Times Sendee 

NEW DELHI — A Soviet Em- 
bassy nffirial was shot to death 
Thursday in New Delhi by an un- 
identified gunman, five days after 

the disappearance of another Rus- 
sian Hi plnmaf- 

The official, Valentin Khitrit- 
chenko, was hit by at least four 
bullets fired from close range by 
the g unman, who sat behind an 
accomplice on a motorcycle, police 
said. Both men on the motorcycle 
escaped. 

The shooting occurred just after 
noon, about 200 yards (183 meters) 
from the gales of the Soviet Embas- 
sy. 

Police said that the assailant, us- 
ing a semiautomatic weapon, start- 
ed shooting from behind the car in 
which Mr. Khitritdienko and his 
wife were being driven. His wife 
mid the driver suffered minor inju- 
rieS- 

Mr. Kiumtcbenks, 48, was an 


employee in the mission’s econom- 
ic division. 

The shooting follows the disap- 
pearance Sunday of Igor Guera, a 
third secretary in the Soviet Em- 
bassy's cultural office. Mr. Guera 
did not return from his usual morn- 
ing walk, and his rfwafl p ftarancft 
has prompted an extensive search. 

There has been speculation that 
be defected, or was kidnapped or 
killed. Western diplomats and In- 
dian officials say they know noth- 
ing of a defection. 

The police commissioner in New 
Delhi, Stoxyakant Jog, said Mr. 
Khitritchcnko's killing and Mr, 
Gu era’s disappearance may be 
“links of the game drain. ” 

It is unclear if the incidents will 
damage the dose relations between 
India and the Soviet Union. Mos- 
cow is India’s hugest military sup- 
plier and has many industrial and 
scientific agreements with New 
Delhi. 

The Indian government said 


fourth attack on a diplomat in In- 
dia in three years. None of the 
attackers have been caught. 

In 1982, the Kuwaiti first secre- 
tary, Mustafa al-Marzook, was 
shot to death by two assailants. The 
□ext year, the Jordanian ambassa- 
dor was dot and wounded by a 
gunman. Both shootings took place 
in New Delhi, 

In November, the deputy British 
high commissioner, Percy Norris, 
was assassinated as he was driven 
to his office in Bombay. A group 
calling itself die Revolutionary Or- 
ganization of Socialist Moslems 
elainw»<i responsibility. 

“1 hope that the police will find 
the culprits,” a spokesman for the 
Soviet Embassy said. He added 
that Mr. Khiiritdie&ko had been 
based at New Delhi for two years. 


■The United Slates appealed 
to Iran to accept negotiations 
with Iraq. Page 2. 

■ Union Carbide’s credibility 
may depend on the answers to 
important questions relating to 
tbe gas leak in Bhopal Page 4. 

■ Japanese designers in Paris, 

show their fall-winter collec- 
tions, a mish-mash of somber, 
black clothes. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ James A. Baber 3d. the U.S. 

Treasury secretary, may exam- 
ine ways to remodel world cur- 
rency markets . Page 11. 

■ Century Savings Bank, one of 

the dosed Ohio savings and 
loan associations, reopened 
Thursday. Page II. 

WEEKEND 

■ Marguerite Duras has seen 

her name converted into an ad- 
jective after 40 years as & femme 
dekttm. Page 7. 



Sir Michael R 
actor, died at 


grave, the 
. Page 5. 


Israelis Raid 
Villages East 
OfSidorifKiU 
21 Guerrillas 

By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Scn icc 

ANQUON. Lebanon — Israeli 
troops, backed by helicopters and 
tanka, moved out of the zone they 
occupy in south Lebanon on 
Thursday, took over at least three 
villages east of Sidon and killed 21 
guerrillas, according to an Israeli 
Army spokesman. 

Lebanese military sources said 
nine villages were “raided on the 
fringes of Christian-controlled ter- 
ritory about seven miles (11 kilo- 
meters) east of the port city. 

Israeli Army officials said that 
they have no information on other 
villages that Lebanese reports said 
were raided. 

In raids similar to those conduct- 
ed earlier this month in predomi- 
nantly Shiite Moslem villages tar- 
geted as guerrilla strongholds, the 
Israeli troops dynamited houses, 
rounded up young men for interro- 
gation and sent hundreds of refu- 
gees fleeing toward Sidon. 

Israeli forces withdrew from Si- 
don last month. 

Lebanese civilians said as they 
headed toward Sidon through An- 
quon, a mostly Moslem villaj^jusi 
west of one of the raided villages, 
Homine, that the Christian-Mos- 
lem village of Jbaa and the predom- 
inantly Moslem village of Kf ar Mi- 
tik had also been reoccupied by the 
Israelis. 

During Thursday’s raids, the Is- 
raelis moved farther from their 
front line than at in any time in 
four weeks. 

The raids follow a monthlong 
crackdown on Shiite towns and vil- 
lages in south Lebanon to stem 
guerrilla attacks on Israeli troops 
positioned near the Lit am River, 
the area to which they withdrew in 
the first phase of their pullback on 
Feb. 16. 

Lebanese officials in Sidon said 
they feared the Israeli thrust to- 
ward the city was a precursor to a 
wider sweep intended to isolate 
Shiite guerrillas in the Sidon area 
and contain them far from the Is- 
raeli front line. 

“They have reoenrpied the whole 
area they left,” said Amin Bizri. a 
member of the Lebanese parlia- 
ment from Sidon. 

Despite fears that the Israeli 
Army could reach Sidon. there was 
no indication that the operation 
was any more ambitious than the 
land of hit-and-run attacks the Is- 
raelis have conducted recently on 
other villages outside of their area 
of control, most recently in Zrar- 
iyeh 10 days ago. Thirty -four peo- 
ple were killed in that operation. 

There also appeared to be no link 
between Thursday's raids and the 
intermittent battles over the past 
four days involving the Christian 
militia and Moslem guerrillas sup- 
ported by units of tbe regular Leba- 
nese Army. 

Timor Goksel, spokesman for 
the United Nations peacekeeping 
force in south Lebanon, said that a 
small Israeli Army force had en- 
tered the village of Srifa in the zone 
controlled by the Furnish UN con- 
tingent and rounded up about 100 
men for interrogation. 

■ 2 Journalists Killed 
CBS News called Thursday for 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israel to investigate the killings of 
two of the network's free-lance 
Lebanese journalists, Reuters re- 
ported from New York. 

Witnesses said Tewfik Ghazawi, 
a ca m eraman, and Bahije Menu, a 
soundman, were killed when an Is- 
raeli tank shelled a group of jour- 
nalists in southern Lebanon. 


JS' 





iwrawra mm? m?mHimiii5E5mKsffHHHV5K 121 




Page 2 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


Western Public Opinion May Be the Key to Success in Geneva 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Leslie R Gdb 

Nm York Tima Server 

WASHINGTON —As the Reagan ad- 
ministration and the Soviet Union gear 19 
their strategies for the current aims control 
negotiations, the bargaining goes weO bc- 


est- 


cal arenas of the United States and 
era Europe. 

"This is going to be fought oat in West- 
ern newspapers and legislative bodies.” 
yairi a U.S. administration official. “It will 
not be settled by the fence of logic and 

reason in Geneva." 

As U.S. officials and foreign diplomats 
see it, the key to success wiH be which adc 
is able to convince Western public opinion 
that the other is not negotiating seriously. 
If Washington wins, Moscow may have to 
come around. If not. President Ronald 
Reagan will find himse lf trapped either 
into making concessions or looking like the 
obstacle to peace. 

As of Tuesday, the Senate was willing to 
give Mr. Reagan the benefit of the doubt in 
ns 5545 vote in favor of a second batch of 
21 MX missies, the new 10- warhead 


ICBMs bong deployed in Minnteman si- 
los. 

On Wednesday, the lower house of the 
Belgian Parliament, the Chamber of Rep- 
resentatives, showed some skepticism of 
Soviet motives when it authorized the gov- 
ernment to deploy 16 new American medi- 
um-range cruise missiles on Belgian soil 
Moscow's reaction was predictably swift 
andjxmdemnatory. 

I be essence of U.S. strategy, as recently 
outlined by Robert C McFarlane, the na- 
tional security adviser, is to be flexible on 
strategic and medium-range weapons and 
to stress the futuristic nature of space- 
based defeases. In other words, get rid of 
existing threats now and worry about fu- 
ture problems later. 

The Soviet Union, on the other hand, 
faces what officials on both sides judge as 
the more difficult task of convincing the 
public and leaders that such defenses are 
dangerous and most be blocked now, as 
part of any agreement to reduce offensive 
weapons. Right or wrong, experts on both 
sides see this as a sophisticated argument 
that will be hard to sell publicly. 


The virtually unanimous assessment of 
foreign and U.S. experts is that Moscow 
has lost the first round. The British and 
West Germans have announced their sup- 
port for Mr. Reagan's plans for a space- 
based defense system — as long as Moscow 
is unable to show how restrictions on re- 


cess and he 
Soviet Union 

part* 

Whatever 
months, U.S. 


ted accusations that the 
violated existing aims 


if not for the administration's insistence «t 
‘star wars.' 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


search can be monitored, and as long as 
future deployments of defensive systems 
are made the subject of negotiations. 


The Soviet Union came bade to the point 

, Viktor 


last weekend. The So>net negotiator, 

P. Karpov, said on television that the Unit- 
ed States was br eaking an accord to stop 
the arms race in space along with limning 
strategic and medium-range nuclear fences. 
Hiis Imkage had been agreed to by Secre- 
tary of State George P. Shultz and Andrei 
A. Gromyko, the Soviet foreign minister. 

Mr. Karpov’s complaint was repeated 
the next day in Pravda, the Communist 


in the next few 
icials do not expect Mos- 
cow to abandon its criticism of the space- 
based defense plans. 

The Americans believe that if the Soviet 
Union’s effort fails, it win switch Us em- 
phasis from space weapons to the issue of 
medium-range forces, the issue of concern 
to Western Europe. 

By this analysis, the Soviet strategy 
would then be to offer a deal that it bdieves 
the Western Europeans cannot refuse, and 
then use them to press the United Staus to 
make concessions on strategic 
and on the proposed space-based defense 


They have to find a way to do it that 
[their best offers 


does not oblige them to put 
on offensive weapons on the table,” Mr. 
Hardtdc added. Their problem is that 
they don't want to pay a lot on offense to 
get the United Stales to foxgo defense, and 
they don’t warn to be forced to engage in 
aO-out competition on defense.” 

He said that Moscow is unlikdy to walk 

out of the talks again, as it did in December 

1983. In retrospect, Soviet officials them- 
selves felt that the walkout strengthened 
Mr. Reagan’s hand. 


Church Reinstates Foe of Apartheid;#’^ 

JOHANNESBURG (NYT) — The Reverend Allan Boesak i 


jutiATitHcaouiwtxNiij— ineirevereuaAuanuoesik.preai ' 1 .,1 
of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches and a prominent feeopi t yli? 
white South African authorities, was reinstated as nnnistcr of his wi*** - 



turn after church driers dismissed reports that be had ^ 
J in an adulterous tdat«— **" ^ 


Mr. Boesak, classified in South Africa as a person of mixed n 

descent, had dmed having an extramarital affair with Oi Scou, a ^ ' 

church worker, but had acknowledged a “relationship*’ with her. c 



provide evidence of adultery. 


bugged 


purporting 


weapons Meanwhile, the Americans expect to U.S. Urged to Keep Ties to Morocco 

I defense play a strong hand. On defense, this means w a cmwrrmv n iph — T he T intad States should u. 

idinsthe 


system, popularly known as "star wars.' 
sable Sovn 


Mr. Shultz said Sunday that the Soviet 
charges belied its expressions of serious- 


Sovict approach was suggest- 
ed by Arnold L Hordick, former head of 
Soviet intelligence for the CIA. 

The key issue is whether the Russians 
will be smarter and bolder than in die 
past," he said. “They have to make serious 
enough offers on offensive forces to con- 
vince people that a deal would be possible 


^ : Russians not to worry now. 

strategic mrssOes and bombers, it calls 
for saying that any one of several paths to 
deep reductions would be acceptable, withr 
out specifying U.S. concessions. On medi- 
um-range forces, it will mean raterating 
the offer for equality of missiles in Europe, 
with Moscow allowed to deploy additional 
otissfies facing Asia. 


Fleeing Foreigners Say Iran Offers 
Plenty of Goods to Those Who Pay 


The Associated Press 

rs who fled Tehran after Iraqi threats to dose 
1 suffers no lack of food, medicine or dothes 


VIENNA — Ford] 

Iranian airspace say ] 
for those who can pay. 

“We were surprised how easy and how simple and how relatively 
d life was," said Margarite Rejtoe, who flew home from the 
capital Tuesday on an Austrian Airlines special flight for the 
evacuees. 

Western airlines brought hundreds of foreigners out of Iran this 
week after Iraq threatened to shoot down commercial airliners in 
Iranian airspace. 

“You can buy everything on the black market,” said Mis. Rqtoe, 
the wife of an Austrian trade representative. 

Ulrich BOnner, an employee of a West Goman company bufldmg a 
battery factory, said: “Sometimes there’s a brief shortage of nulk , 
sometimes sugar, but meat and all the other daily necessities are 
available." 


There is plenty of gasoline, according to Claus Daubert, a West 
German. “Streets are full of 


automobile traffic,” he said. 

Helmut Paher, manag er of an Austrian company, told of Iraqi air 
raids on Tehran. 

“There is no civil defense in the ordinary sense of the tom," he said. 
They can only switch off lights. There are areas, but they are 
sometimes sounded only after the detonation. There are hardly any 
air-raid shelters." 


U.S. Urges Iran to Accept Settlement With Iraq 


WASHINGTON (UPI) —The United States should continue ft, . 
with Morocco and its aid to the kingdom despite Morocco’s treat) 
union wiih Libya, a senior Stare Department official testified Thane 
“We strongly disagree with Morocco over the alliance and contina 
feel its gives respectability to the Libyan leadership that is uncalled 
and myustifiedr die official, Richard W. Murphy, told the Set 
Foreign Relations subcommittee on the Middle East “Morocco did • 
for its awn reasons” 

America's political and military relationship with Morocco, wt 
provides facilities for port visits by U.S. Navy daps and transit tight 
U.S. Air Force planes, justifies continued economic aid to thckm yt 
according to Mr. Murphy, who is assistant secretary of state-fa. - 
Middle East The seven-month union between Morocco ami Libya 
not adversely affected US. relations with Morocco, he said. 





By Bernard Gwcrc zman 

jtfin* York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States has appealed to Iran to ac- 
knowledge that a military victory 
cannot be achieved in the f oar-ana-' 
a-half-year war and to accept a 
negotiated settlement 
- The appeal came Wednesday af- 
ter what U.S. officials have charac- 
terized as an Iranian defeat in a 
weeklong offensive. 

Administration officials conced- 
ed that the chances of Iran’s yield- 
ing to U.S. and other international 
pleas wax: minimal, but a senior 
official said, “We have to keep try- 
ing and hoping that the sheer num- 
bers of Iranians killed on the bat- 
tlefield will persuade Khomeini to 
try another tack." 

Iraq has repeatedly agreed to ac- 
cept a UN cease-fire and negotia- 
tion, but the Ayatollah Ruhollah 
Khomeini of Iran has refused to do 
so until President Saddam Hussein 


of Iraq resigns and Iraq agrees 10 
pay reparations. 

Partly because of Iran’s refusal 
to negotiate unconditionally, the 
United Stales has been publicly 
sympathetic to Iraq and critical of 
Iran, even while officially profess- 
ing neutrality in the war. 

Edward P. Djerejian, a State De- 
partment spokesman, confirmed 
that the administration believed 


that Iraq had dealt Iran a defeat 
“While! 


there is still the possibili- 
of further actum which could 
the situation," he said, “it 
appears that the Iraqis have blunt- 
ed and to a large extent rolled back 
the latest Iranian offensive." 

He said that accurate casualty 
figures on both rides “win probably 
never be known, but apparently are 
large, and once a gain remind us of 
the terrible cost of this tragic war." 

“We continue to betieve that 
there can be no military resolution 
of the conflict and call upon Iran to 


join Iraq in the many 

international calls fra a cease-fire 
and negotiated settlement,” Mr. 
Djerejian sakL, 

He added that the United Stales 
was particularly concerned about 
preventing Iran from getting new 
arms because of Tehran s refusal to 
agree to negotiations. 

“We are making substantial ef- 
forts to diminish the Qow of anus 
to Iran from free world sources as a 
means to induce Iran to end the 
- fighting," he said. 

In other developments: 


fra an end to more than two weeks 
of attacks on civilian centers, say- 
ing Iran had been forced to retati- 
are by Baghdad. (Ratten) 


Irish Bar Return of Ex-Nazi Official 


• Iraq on Thursday warned resi- 
dents of the southern Iranian city 
of Ahwaz on the Kanm River to 
leave this week or face Iraqi air 
raids or missil e attacks. (Reuters) 


• Tire United Nations secretary- 
general, Javier Pfaez de CuiDar, 
has found some “common ground" 
between Iran and Iraq in ins effort 
to scale down the fighting in the 
Golf war, his spokesman said 
Thursday. Tire UN chief executive 
began the fourth straight day of his 
latest mediation meeting represen- 
tatives of Egypt and Iran and had 
meetings scheduled with Iraqi offi- 
cials. ff/PjT) 


• President Rajiv Gandhi of In- 


lajtv uat 

dia has urged Iraq to declare a 


DUBLIN (UPI) — The Irish 
government said Thursday that it 
would ban Pieter Menten, a Nazi _ 
war criminal, from returning to bis 
country house in southern Ireland 
after his scheduled release Friday 
from prison in the Neth e rlan d s. 

The decision to ban Menten, 85, 
was made at a meeting of Prime. 
Minis ter Gamt FitzGerald and his . 
cabinet, a government spokesman 
said. The ban followed growing 
con tr oversy over whether Mental, 
a Dutch millionaire, should be al- . 
lowed to return to his house in the * 
Waterford village of Lanbybrian. 

Protests against Men ten’s in 


• Ayatollah Khomeini has a g ain 
pledged that Iran will continue the 
Gulf war until Mr. H ussein is re- 
moved. In a message on the Iranian 
New Year Thursday, he also called 


three-month unilateral cease-fire in 
its war with Iran, diplomatic 
sources said Thursday. The appeal 
was made in a message delivered to 
Mr. Hussein by two senior Indian 
officials who arrived Wednesday at 
the start of a new nonaligned peace 
mission, they said. (Ratters) 


tended return were led by Ireland’s 
e owed there 


Jewish community. He 
between 1964 and bis arrest and 
Conviction for war crimes against 
Jews by a Dutch court in 1979. 



•-s*** * 

: 

•. t, x Jsa Bm 
, - ^ Wat m 


: 


*-.**8* m 

■v* flB 


Pieter Menten 


France to Introduce Election Chang 


Lufthansa’s service starts long 
before your first cocktail. 




Lufthansa 


EC Extends 


PARIS (AFP) — The French government has derided to intro r 
limited proportional representation for the 1986 general elections, fl- 
ing strong protests from the conservative opposition parties. 

Prime Minister Laurent Fabius announced the dearion Wedue v . 
night in a televised interview. The neo-GanHist Rally fra the RepubT . 


■y 

I'Ulv wj 


Entry Talks 
Into 5th Day 


and liberal Umoa for French Democracy parties accused the Sod 
to win the 1986 National Assembly election 




government of trying 
“cheating." 

Recent public opinion polls and local elections held this month 1 
the Socialists losing strength. Proportional representation, rather tbs' 
present majority-vote system, could splinter the opposition bbc 
prevent it from winning an overall majority in 1986. 


By Steven J. Dry den 

International Herald Tribune 


UNESCO Members Seek Budget Gq 


BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity foreign ministers conduct- 
ed a fifth day of almost nonstop 
negotiations Thursday with Spain 
and Portugal on terms of EC mem- 
bership for the two nations, and 
they appeared to headed for a sixth 
day of talks. 

EC officials said that although 
there had been progress on some 
important issues. Doth sides ap- 
peared to be holding out for maxi- 
mum advantage. 

“There are some people who 
think we are dose" to agreemmt 
“due to exhaustion,” a community 
official said. 

Spain's foreign minister, Fernan- 
do Morin, said he was optimistic 
an agreement could be readied by 
Friday. 

Foreign Minister Giulio An- 
dreotti of Italy, the chairman of the 
ministers' meeting , met with Span- 
ish and Portuguese negotiators all 
night Wednesday to assemble the 
two countries' positions for presen- 
tation to the 10 EC member states. 

After the beginning of talks 
Thursday afternoon, community 
offi cials said that- disagreements 
with Spain and Portugal remained 
in the three main areas of negotia- 
tions — the entry of Spanish fish- 
ing boats into community waters, 
the integration of Spanish agricul- 
tural products into the community 
and the rights <rf Iberian workers to 
jobs in other EC nations. 

Mr. Andreotti had extended the 
foreign ministers meeting, which 
usually lasts for two days, to four 


GENEVA (Reuters) — Twelve major contributors to UNESCO; 
lieve the Paris-based UN organization may not survive unless it- 
spending soon, delegates from the countries concerned said Thurrf 
They said foreign ministry officials from the mainly Western cout 
derided at talks here Wednesday nig ht to press UNESCO's director 
eraL Amadou Mahtar M’Bow, for a detailed list of the organmd. 


w ntatJ 

programs for the next two years. The talks were attended by 

~ ‘ France, Itaiv. Imran. the Netherlands, a 


Belgium, Britain, Canada, France, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, 

' e United States, which has obs 


Switzerland, West Germany and the 

status at UNESCO since it withdrew last year. 


'.fr\i>-l'Ailt>l 


For the Record 


About 300 mXtuy police stunned a SSo Paulo prison Thursday tc 
rioting by more than 3,000 inmates. Nine inmates died before caln.' _ 
restored, and at least 17 persons were hurt. ( ■ •_ 

The government of Prime Minister Andreas Pkpmdreou of G~‘ 
announced Thursday that technical expats Would exa m in e the dc • . . 
headouarters of the opposition New Democracy Party after, it ; - 
complained that its telephones were being tapped. 

The 13th launch of an Ariaoe rocket from the French space cm ; . 
Kourou. French Guiana, has beat scheduled fra April 24, m anrissLr ... 
place a U.S. and a French ' satellite in orbit, Arianespace, the Earc: 
space consortium, announced Thursday. (r. . 



■**M\ 




South African Police Kill I 


(Continued from Page 1) . 
era to turn back, and that stoning 
and shooting broke oul 
In Sharpevflle and other black 
townships on Thursday, youths 
boycotted school and stoned police 
and passing cats. Police used tear 


gas to disperse crowds of young 
ora of 


blacks. There were no reports 
casualties in SharpcviHc, 50 miles 
(80 kilometers) south of Johaxmea- 


blacks and wounding 178. Ad* ,: - 
said later that 52 of those kflla -; .-. 
been shot in the back. The sw- 
ings made ShaipeviHe a symt-': . 
-the black rights movement 

■ Shultz Deplores Shootii ^' 
Gerage P. Shultz, the 
taiy of state, deplored the 4 
shooting, saying, “there’s no 
fra it,” United Press Internal- *’ 
reported from Wi 


Trites driving through the com- 
munity were stoned. Reporters 
d**u jje d 


Testifying before a 
D minifies, Mr. Shut a was • 


were 


days and then to five in an attempt 
1 on the 


to achieve a breakthrough 
enlargement issue. 

(Mr. Andreotti warned the EC 

summit conferenoe^pl^S 511 fra 
next week if the two sides Tailed to 
agree on final terms for 
and Portuguese entry, 
told Reuters in Brussels.] 

Community officials believe that 
the negotiations must be completed 
this week in order to allow time for 
ratification of the two countries' 
membership by EC parliaments be- 
fore Jan. 1, the target entry date. 

The officials said that some dis- 
agreements over how to integrate 
the huge Spanish fishing fleet into 


to enter the 
community, but were allowed to 
make brief tours. 

- On March 21, 1960, several thou- 
sand blacks gathered at the Sharpe- 
vide police station to protest laws 
requiring them to cany passes 
proving they had the right to be m 
urban townships outside of black 
tribal homelands. 

Accounts still differ on whether 


committee, 

about reports of the killing 
called the South African ap® 
system “totally repugnant ti 
the president and the admit 
non / 5 



the protesters provoked police. Po- 
lice fire on the crowd, killing 69 


■ Appeal for Embargo 
The African National Coo 
the main guerrilla group fit 
white rule in South Africa 
Thursday’s killing s undertint 
need for economic sane 
against Pretoria, Reuters rq 
from I jioilni, Zam bia. 


In jak 

a sU| 

that is ma 


n mo 

'^Uiriows cm 


Politburo Endorses Detente 



* BOB 


resolved during the week of 1 

But they said that the progress 
had created fears among Portu- 
guese negotiators that the EC- 
-Spanish agreement would result in 
more Spanish fishermen entering 
Portuguese waters and harming 
Lisbon’s fishing industry. These 
fears led to Portuguese demands 
for increased protection for their 
fishermen. 

One particularly difficult fishing 
problem that remained to be re- 
solved Thursday evening was the 
timetable under which Spanish 
boats would begin operating in 
Irish waters. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
uled for Tuesday. It was not known 
if the groups would meet at the 
same time and in the same place. 

The United States has said that it 
wants the talks carried out on a 
categoiy-by-category basis, with 
progress in one area not necessarily 
implying progress in another. 

The Soviet Union has demanded 
that discussions on all three types 
of arms be link ed and that any 
advances in one area be part of 
overall progress on the entire qws- 
tion of arms reduction. 

The decision to divide into three 
groups was announced by the U.S. 
delegation, beaded by Max M. 
Kamjpelman, after a two-hour 


Earlier. Mr. Karpov sai 
question of logistics for the 
ing groups was “not a pro! 
Asked how the negotiation? 

proceeding, he said simply. “ 
talking." 

Before the round of talks ' 
day began, Mr. Karpov was 
to comment on the U.S. ! 
vote tins week approving p> 
tion of MX missiles. Tass ha 
critical of the Reagan admi 
tioo’s support for the MX. B 
Karpov replied: 

“That’s US. internal aft 
discuss my affairs with the c 
tion of the United States.” 



/ f 



beaded by Viktor P. Karpov. 


Details of the arms talks 1 
ing withheld, under an agF 
between the two delegations 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


Page 3 


K^'-tega Trips 

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; r -» - 4 ' By Larry Rofatcr 

’ "‘“.x-. A r tfH» ybrfe TTmer Sffwcr 
v MANAGUA — No sooner had 
• i r d Ortega Saavedra finished 

^I'rnT' ding funaal services for Kon- 
r * IN 1 * 1 , in U. Chemenko in Moscow 
. . l 'J^weck than the Nicaraguan 
' ^ ^ teit was back on an airplane. 
- ^{.-instead of heading home, he 
- ^ ‘ - J T Winging his way to Brasilia for 

• ^‘nauguration of Brazil's new 
; .''-f C^an government and the start of 
/ -V V ; oddong vist. 

Ortega’s current Brazilian 
" ! is bis second trip to South 
' ."*• '-: ;r . rica this month and, Hke the 
V v„;*l it involves far more than a 
" ‘ \ exercise in diplomatic proto- 
- L;. ^lis sadden burst of globertrci- 
7 diplomats here say, is part of a 



’79 Klan Shootings Come Down to 'Last Chance’ Suit 


By Bill Paterson 3°^ U.S. District Court things are dean Nazis and Klans- area newspapers as “family people, 

u; r »^‘^Tw/ a r ~ rr ? ce u ^ * 0 ^ )ert Meririge Jr. said men, calm and unhurried, taking hard workers and churchgoers who 

WINSTON-SALEM, North he expected opening arguments to their weapons from the trunk of a love America" while the slain Cbm- 

On the first day of his begin early next week. bine sedan; gunshots, confusion munists were viewed as leftist radi- 

thnd trial, Roland Wayne Woods, The trial promises to be more and panic; bloody bodies on the cals who “in a sense got what was 
x ^ ea ^ er ^ American than a rerun of the two earlier ground, and one widow proclaim- c omin g them.’’ 

Nan Party, wops an olive-colored cases. Ibis time the families of the mg over her dead husband, “Long The Greensboro Civil Righ ts 


third trial, Roland Wayne Woods, The trial promises to be more 
a former leader of the American than a rerun of the two earlier 


wan rany, wore an olive-colored cases. Tins trrne the families of the mg over her dead husband, “Long The Greensboro Civil Rights 
T-shirt that said, “Eat Lead, You dead have hired their own lawyers, live the Communist Partv. Long Fund, a coalition of religious and 

I^HKvRwt” inwcho^t^rr- r»,hi; n _>n t;.» th. j •* - - _-i ■ i , . . 


Lousy Red.” investigators, public opinion poll 

On the second day, his T-shirt and' even a public relations firm 
said, “Lee Surrendered. I didn’t,” a The plaintiffs argue that tins tri- 
reference to the Confederate Crvi] al, which is expected to take 
War general, Robert E Lee. months, will answer questions 
“I don't surrender,” he said out- about government complicity that 
side the courtroom. ‘The more they they say were ignored or burned in 
try me, the meaner I get” earlier trials. Among th em were the 


live the working class.” civil rights groups, has mounted a rally. 

No police appear until later. campaign to shape opinion using An internal police review con- 
Mr. Woods admits that he fired statistics on growing Klan violence eluded that Mr. Dawson had mis- 
his .12-gauge shotgun at demon- and information packets that par- led police officers about the siart- 


Nazi and Klan members in the 
weeks before Nov. 3. 

Mr. Dawson. 66, a carpenter and 
former FBI informant, said that at 
another meeting he urged Klans- 
men to disrupt tin; “Death to the 
Klan” march to avenge Communist 
taunting of {Clansmen at a previous 

An internal police review con- 


Mr. Woods is one of six Nazis following: four of them.” Alterations about Mvmmnii 

and Ku Klux Klan members who • Did a federal undercover agent Mr. Woods considers himself complicity center on Edward W 

iMVP. rVJ'll srmvittM? 1na/*d Kir nil Wf OC Q nrAitnootorVl «unJ fVa nfhoa ■ '■ a.J F J .... ! 


have been acquitted twice by all- act as a provocateur? 


white juries for their role in a Nov. • Did a police informer lead the to be heroes of their race. Carolyn 
3, 1979, dash with demonstrators attack on demonstrators? Strohman. a mage coumronicarions 

at a “Death to the Klan” rally in * Did Greensboro police deHb- professor at Howard University in 
Greensboro. Five members of the erately stay away from the confron- Washington, D.C, has analyzed 
C ommun ist Workers Party died of ration, knowing that rival groups 1,500 newspaper stores about the 
gunshot wounds; 11 members or were armed and spoiling for a inddent and has concluded that 


stralors but says that he was pro- tray the victims as talented young ing time and site of the march and 

. voked. family people who gave up promis- the expected point of confirm tn- 

tnqf say were ignored or buried in “They fired al me, and I Fired ing careers to work as union orga- non. Officers have testified that 
earlier trials. Among them were the back,” be said. “The state said I hit nizers in Nonh Carolina- they stayed away from the starting 

fo ^ of * enL " . . , . , Allegations about government point because they wanted io keep 

Mr Woods ^ considers himself complicity center on Edward W. a low profile, 

and the other Nans and Klansmen Dawson, a police informer, and “I don’t see what we’re here for,” 

to be heroes of their race. Carolyn Bernard Butko vich, an agent with Mr. Dawson sard of the current 

Strohman, a mass communications the U.S. Bureau or Alcohol, Tobac- triaL “They’re asking $48 million, 

professor at Howard University in co and Firearms, who had infiltrat- I’ve got about 48 cents to my name. 


and the other Nteis and Klansmen Dawson, a police informer, and 
to be heroes of their race. Carolyn Bernard Butko vich. an agent with 


sympathizers were injured. 

In 1980, the six men were acquit- 


fight? 

• Did local and federal law en- 


L h (k V ' <. to drum up support for the 

il liar if 4*111 rn V * -* proposal he first made public 

i4 ... 1 r.\.\ a <,flst month. 

plan was announced j'ust 

Uh. . . . •- • . U 11. rtrlHH 1>f< 7 m UMiMN. 


n» •i-r i i in,ii r ted of murder and rioting charges • forcemeat officers cover up critical 

Daniel Ortega Saavedra kissed a girt as lie arrived in Brazil “^“April 1984ihc six and .three evidaicc in the case? 

^ utonaa - other men were acquitted on feder- Television cameras recorded 

al diarges that they violated the events that Saturday mornin g five 
jovernment from Western Europe they add- As a result of Mr. Orte- ovO rights of the victims. an da half years ago. 

T * “ ga’s efforts, a diplomat said, there O® March 11, Mr. Woods re- 


to oe neroes oi tneir race, uaroiyn Bernard Butkorich, an agent with Mr. Dawson said of the current 
Strohman, a mass communications U^. Bureau or Alcohol, Tobac- triaL “They’re asking $48 million, 
professor at Howard University in co and Firearms, who had infiltrat- I’ve got about 48 cents to my name. 
Washington, D.C, has analyzed ^ ^ Woods’ Nazi chapter in the They know that. I don’t have anv- 
1,500 newspaper stores about the summer of 1979. and on the ab- tiling to lose.” 

incident and has concluded that sence of police when the shootings I : 

others may believe that as well. occurred. 

She said the Nazis and Klans- Mr. Dawson and Mr. Butkovich 
men were most often portrayed in attended pl anning sessions with 


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jat plan was anrnmKyd just government from Western Europe 
ieMr. Ortega lrft for Montevi- or elsewhere in Latin America at- 
tar the inauguration of Uru- tended the ceremonies. 

’s first civilian president in 12 “It was a disaster, of course,” 
l The plan contained a prom- said a Eurc^iean diplomaL “The 
j tend borne 10 0 FVihan mili - Danish cultural minister and the 
advisers onl of the 786 he says Swedish immigration minister are 
n Nicaragua, and it mrfndwf a not exactly top-notch.” 
atorium on purchases by Nica- The diplomats suggested that the 

[a of what were called new Sandinists saw an opportunity to 
iis systems” and an invitation recover lost ground when President 
.delegation from the U.S. Con- Ronald Reagan and other senior 
^ to ms p prt N iraraguan milt - administration ofDdals recently 
bites. . • expressed harsh criticism of Nica- 

faryid that t thn ngli diplomats ragua. 

Hr. Ortega’s high -prnfilr per- “The Sandinista credo has al- 
Idiplomacy has another otgeo- ways been that you use any plat- 
[Like the peace plan itself, they form offered to you,” said a Euro- 


ycqid that, though, 
jfr. Ortega’s higb-p 


Videotapes show about 70 dem- 
mstratora, most of them black, 
gathering beside a public bousing 
project with “Death to the Klan” 
placards as a caravan of Nazis and 
Klansmen slowly drive into the 
area. There are shouts and sounds 
to sticks tutting against cars. Sever- 
al cars and vans stop. 

The tapes blur hoe, but several 


iWlike the peace plan they form off era 

■W-his trawls are intended to peandiplon 
1 1 what in recent months has platform, th 
I Jared to be an eroskm in sup- The prin 
V (for the ip Lann Nicaraguan 

rica and Western Europe. appears tot 
Pjg jptnnmw attribute that Qpsitm Mr. OrU$ 


Nicaraguan diplomatic offensive 
appears to be Latin America. 

Mr. Ortega himself has indicated 


is now a “Greek chorus” ratting on turned to court in a 548-mIHioa onstrators, most of t hem Mnrtr 
course,” the United States to resume mtirs civil suit that families of the dead gathering beade a public hmirfng 
t- “The with Nicaragua in Manzanillo, their “last chance for justice.” project with “Death to the Klan” 
and the Mexico. Washington broke off The suit was filed against 6 1 defen- placards as a caravan of Nazis and 
ster are those talks in Januaiy on the dams, mdudmg the Federal Bu- Klansmen slowly drive into the 
ground that Manag ua was not ne- reau of Investigation, the Greens- area- There are shouts and sounds 
thatthe gotiating seriously. boro police and other government to sticks hitting against cats. Sever- 

mity to _ t 0 Rebels Is RaelcpH agencies. al cars and vans stop. 

Dozen, of notKl writers, phDos- ^ occupied Ihe Sn< n* Mptt blur hae, bo. several 

recently °phers and artists from nine Euro- 

)fNica - U.S. Court Bars Removal of Bullet 

jTpiat From the Chest of Robbery Suspect 

a Euro- Tress reported from Paris. J r 

over the la a paid advertisement in New York Tma S*™** nations must be made “on a case- 

Thursday’s issue, of the newspaper WASHINGTON — The Su- by-case approach, in which the in- 

’ of the Le Monde, the group said it consid- preme Court has ruled, 9-0, that the dividual’s interests in privacy and 
ffensive ered aid “to all sectors of the oppo- constitution bars the forced remov- security are weighed against sod- 
^ sition indispensable so that Njcara- al of a bullet from the chest of an ety*s interests in conducting the 
guana can defeat the dictatorship armc d robbery suspect in Rich- procedure.” 


intended to pean diplomat “And the bigger the —f 11 f P“ d advertisement in 
months has platform, the more yon uselL” Thunday s issue, of the newspaper 

skminsup- The principal otgective of the Le Monde, the group said i 


guana can defeat the dictatorship 


main goals of his °I a totalitarian party and finally m<md, Virginia. 




1J 

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and Iran. Official pres- Venezuela, Colombia and P anama’ tiieir political future. 


mond, Virginia. In this case, the court said, two 

Prosecutors wanted to match the lower U.S. courts were correc t in 
bullet with the gun of the intended forbidding the operation. Accord- 
robbery victim, who defended him- ing to medical testimony, h would 
sdf by shooting his assailant in the require general anesthesia and 


:^5on the domestic poetical op- 
- - 'Indian and the Roman Cathode 
idt are also died, 
recording, to diplomats, the 


chest. The alleged assailant fled could take up to two and a half 
and was captured 20 minutes later, hours. 


are aimed at drawing up a peace Die statement was signed by, “T* anegm assailant neo cou 
treaty to be signed by five Spanish- among others, Eugfene Ionesco, the “prarol 20 mnutwlaia-. hoi 

speaking nadoi in ihe region. dramitist, BenumtHenri Uvy, the ««n Wednesday “ . n0 

Diplomats say that shoring up philosopher, and Simon _ Wie- 


The court Wednesday set no Justice Brennan said that under 
hard-and-fast rule for deciding the circumstances the operation 
when the state may remove evi- would violate the suspect's “right 
dence from a suspect’s body to be secure in his person guaran- 
agarnst his wilL Writing for the teed by the Fourth Amendment” 


turnout tar Mr. Ortega’s own ties with the rest of Latin America senthaL who i heads a research cen- 
guration as preadent in Janu- would also keep open indirect tor in Austria on Jews persecuted 
;■ ■ ikrted the Nicaraguan govern- charm ds with the United States at by Nazis. 


' v - ^ikrted the Nicaraguan govern- charm ds with the United States at 
to its decline in international a time when direct contacts are 


difficult. Mr. Ortega’s 


A .. . _ court, Assodaie Justice Wiliam J. Die Fourth Amendment prohibits 

werc ' Brennan Jr. said that such determi- unreasonable search and seizure. 


£$CO Mi’inhiT^Seel 


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■ Ithough the Sandinis ts report- Secretary of State George P. 

had tried hard to encourage this month was first sngges 
U countries to send high-rank- Nicaragua through such chi 
Metegations, the response was they said. 

.-1 Fidd Castro's presence was W inning support for Mr. 


with uando Axrabal, the dramatist; 
bultz Jean-Fran^is Revd, the French 





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this month was first suggested by writer, Vladimir Bukovsky, the So- 
Nicaragua through such channels, viet dissident writer; Winston 


ey said. ChurdtiH, a member of the British 

W inning support for Mr. One- Parliament; and Lord Chalfont, a 

: i _i i i . - i- — - 


■ -Jy publicized, but diplomats ga’s peace plan also helps to main- former high British Foreign Minis- 
.irjt out that no head of state or tain pressure on the United States, try official 


xmiuvran ijnKsivnim^ to lerronsm 

-Officer Says Exiles Paid for Archbishop’s Assassination 


By Don Obercforfer 

Washington PaU Service 

.... aSHINGTON — Die 1980 
mation of El Salvador’s Ro- 
( ^ v 2uh6Bc archbishop was car- 
“ot by former Nicaraguan na- 
' guardsmen directed by a 
d who later became chief of 
~\_gencefor the “contra” rebds, 
■ ;ner Salvadoran security offi- 
lid Thursday. 

1 ‘-^jouel Roberto Santivanez, 
vas head of El Salvador's cen- 
— — Udh'^nce agency in 1978-79, 
4 a news conference here that 


Beers cooperated in creation of vided the money to pay the kilim;, 
rightist death squads. Die Assod- and was passed along inside El Sal- 
a tod Press reported. vador by Roberto Q Anbmsson, a 

[Colonel Lau has also been former mqor in the security service 
linked by Honduran military offi- who has since become a political 
dais to political killings in Hondur leader of H Salvador’s far right, 
ras. His whereabouts are not The kilting was planned in Gua- 
known.] re main acccnrding to Colonel Santi- 

Cdonel Santivanez gave inter- vanez, and carried out by two for- 
views to several news organizations mer national guardsmen from 


* . #. . 1) .II.viW Ricardo Lau had been The Salvadoran government, 

rtfff A fn< *H1 * (MllT l $120 I 000 by wealthy Salva- curing him of making the si 
® exiles in connection with meats, dismissed him last yeai 


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,' tobop Oscar Amulfo Rome- its consul in New Orleans. 

' . ssassmation. Eta said the pay- The news conference Thursday 
was made March 27, 1980, was ^xmsored by afUmmakerwho 
after the biting . is releasing a documentary on Cd- 

it Jos6 Napolebn Duarte one! Santivanez. 
e government is investi- According to Colonel S anti- 
archbishop’s killing vanez, the decision to kill the arch- 


„ ;pirid the government is investi- 
* ” • , g the archbishop’s killing. 


itintro 


tid Thursday. and about two dozen members of Nicaragua and “a Salvadoran Na- 

r 1oaeI Roberto Santivanez, Congress a year ago on his knowl- tional Guard team.” 
vas head of El Salvador's cen- ?dg e d^h-squad activity in H Colonel Santivanez said several 
■'ltdh’gence agency in 1978-79, Salvador, but at the tma masted sources indicated that Cdond Lan 
it a news conference here that that ms name not be used. played “a key role” in training the 

ibd Ricardo Lau had been The Salvadoran government, ac- death squads and was pud for 
‘$120,000 by wealthy Salva- curing him of making the state- planning Archbishop Romero’s as- 
a exiles in connection with ments, dismissed him last year as sassinationr 
aisbop Oscar Amulfo Rome- its consul in New Orleans. After the formation in Angost 

. ssassmation. He said the pay- The news conference Thursday 1981 of the Democratic Front of 

. was made March 27, 1980, was sponsored by a filmmaker who Nicaragua, the umbrella group for 
days after the kfihng. is releasing a documentary on Col- the fight against the Sandinists, 

ridmt Josi Napolebn Duarte one! Santivanez. Colonel Lau saved as its first chief 

vaid the government is investi- According to Colonel Sand- of intelligence, 
g the archbishop’s killing vanez, the decision to kill the arch- He was forced out of this pori- 

jloud Santivanez also said bishop was made by Miami-based non about a year lata, reportedly 
senior Salvadoran military of- Salvadoran businessmen, who pro- on CIA instructions. 

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Page 4f 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


WORLDWIDE 

KVTERTAIIVMEVr 



Unanswered Questions on Bhopal May Be Crudeti to Carbide ’s Credibility 


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By Thomas J. Lueck 

New York Tunes Service 

DANBURY, Connection — At 
a news conference Wednesday to' 
issue a report on what happened in 
the poison-gas accident last De- 
cember in Bhopal India, senior of- 
ficials of Union Carbide Corp. pro- 
vided derailed information on 
operations at the plant bat were 
unable to answer some of the most 
important questions about the 
cause of the disaster. 

Their lack of precise answers to 
crucial questions, inrfntKng who 
was to blame for the accident, re- 
flects the company’s frustrating 
predicament as it attempts to deal 
with history’s worst industrial acci- 
dent, in which more rhan 2,000 
people were lolled Dec. 3 and tens 
of thousands of others injured. 

Among the unanswered ques- 
tions are these: 


• Why were Carbide's safety of- 
ficials in the United States unaware 
that severe violations of safety pro- 
cedures had occurred in Bhopal be- 
fore the accident? 

• If one of the major contribu- 
tors to the accident was a large 


trained by Carbide to operate the bide and other multi nationals as 
technologically complex pesticide the tragedy in Bhopal prompts 
facility and had employment cut- them and foreign governments to 
bads and other cost-cutting mea- re-examine the way business is era- 
sures that the company has ac- ducted by companies from indus- 
knowledged lessened safety at the trial nations in the developing na- 
Bhopal plant? rions and elsewhere. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


The company sai d Wednesday it c omp any said U was ham- 


tad provided initial mining for pmd in ta investigation by die 

plant managers as wdl as training Indian government, which has 

volume of water the plant’s manuals an3 procedures but it did withheld important documents, 
methyl isocyanate storage rant as not say how or whether the Dan- personnel and equipment from be- 
the company said it had concluded, bury headquarters determined if m 8 inspected by_ its headquarters 
bow dief it get there? those procedures were followed. officials. But the mam my of a ma- 

• Why was a refrigeration unit, While it is uncertain whether multinational corpo ration s re- 

deagned to cool methyl isocyanate these questions will have any direct a? overseas company in 

bi& tank and reduce the severity bearing on the company's liability w hich it is the majority owner 
of an accident, turned off at the ' m the case, they may prove crucial seemed to portra y^ a corporation 
time of the accident? And had any to its credibility as a leading mold- n ,°* m full control of tnepeople and 
of Carbide’s U.S. employees ad- national corporation. the operations supposedly accooni- 

vised the managers of the Bhopal The company's maim: problem a * 3 *5, to lL , M 
plant to shuHtoff? Wednesday Wed tol be one of r 1 * 59 


sopieand 

account- 


vised the managers of the Bhopal 
plant to shut it off? 

• Had the managers and workers 
at the plant been sufficiently 


important 


7~*nrb rzrs 

; that question may have JJ? J 31 * 0 * ““P®? 0 ? ^ ^ .? 
ramifications for Car- Danbury,^ Mr. Anderson said. 



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“Yon can’t be there day in and day Warren M. Anderson, chairman of Union Carbide Corp., looks on as Ron Van My» 
out, week in and uotk ooiT None- who headed the company’s investigation of the Bhopal disaster, uses a diagram to expb 
ihdess, he said, “the appropriate how water that entered a chemical tank may have caused the escape of methyl isocyana? 
people" at Carbide “sbonld have 

known” that the Bhopal plant was _ T « TT « 

S^^S^ contravration mdian Aide Says U.S. firm Has TNoDefena 

brok^afthTBhoo^Si?*^ ^ Yor* Tuna Sendee the company’s subsidiary. Union and other matters, ptaang 

mwen at the Bhopal plant, he CarbideWui UcL headquarters in a position ic 

a . . m iiuii , T ih*. ^ a ^ sei “ or ®? v " “How can Union Carbide dis- aware of prcArfems and to cm 

It ga cammon num ag mumt the- extent official said Thursday that own [xs cwn subsidiarYT’ said HJL them in a timely way. 

fridui was prepared to prove te a minister of state for The issue of responsibility is « 

525E?S ^■ S ' U law and j Slice. He said Union Car- sidered crucial because of the 

dlI T ct rcs P° ns ‘^5 r -A bide' had “no defense in this case.” sources at the disposal of Ui 
^V^«Pil1 k J ,tltSpcSt,adc Some Indira officials have said Carbide and its subsidiaiy to 
P ^ flI m B °° pa ^ 351 ycar ' the government would be able to for damages. According to iis l 

of noi^nfiti; nSiior •uihciriiarin: The official said India would re- produce documents rad other evi- annual report. Union Carbide 
raises onfstim^abont whai the Lfnion Carbide's condusioa in deuce that Union Carbide head- dia Ltd. had assets of about 

Union Carbide corporate manag- a re P° rt leased Wednesday that quarters and its Indian subsidiaiy million, whereas its parent coo 


Indian Aide Says U.S. Firm Has f No Defend 


iV»' Yarfc Tima Service 


’s subsidiary. Union and other matters, placing 


.: VP a 

f. -ji 

. t 

v m 

*Tm»sA m 
6 


headquarters in a position ic 


MCUrnCTUT * r _- uuumc UIUU uu. « “ t^v.uwu iv. 

N ' “How can Union Carbide dis- aware of problems rad to cot 


ermnent erffid^raid Thursday that ^ a £ w ES*rSwL 

^ P hTrt?TT 0 - pf 'r e vri® Bharadwa, minister of state for The issue of responsibility is « 

e professional U.S. court that the Union Carbide ^ wand jStice. He said Union Car- sidered crucial because of the 


. rd I 


rZe , law and justice, ne saia union v_ar- srocrca crucuu orcausc ot toe 
Corp. bore direct re^onsiWiw for ydehad “no deifense in this rase." sources at the disposal of Ui 


the toxic ps wax at its pesnaoe Indian officials have said Carbide and its subsidiaiy to 

am m Bhopal fast year. goveramsot would be able to for damages. According to its l 

The official said India would re- produce documents rad other evi- annual report. Union Carbide . 
rt Union Carbide's conclusion in deuce that Union Carbide head- dia Ltd. had assets of about 


leak at its pesticide 
if fast year. 


question; 

Carbide 


- ~M «** ] 

. »;«- 4RC 

u. 'a» >i ■£} 1 


ers may 


dn die chemical accident was caused were in constant communication ny in Danbury, Connecticut, 

- - " IU - solely by errors and violations by over budgets, safety procedures assets of about SI0 billion. 


that may arise in other operations. 

If Carbide is successful in this 
approach could lead other multi- 
nationals to use the same tactic, in 
effect, disowning troubled opera- 
tions in other countries. Such a 
tactic must surely give foreign 
countries pause in considering 


Voting Is light on Bangladeshi’s Rule 


The Associated Press 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Elec 


whether to accept new operations tion officials supervising a referen- 
of multinationals or even to contin- dum on the rule of President Mo- 


ue to permit existing ones. 


hammed Hussain Ershad reported 


Whatever is ultimately deuar- a sparse turnout at the nation’s 
mined to be the cause of the acd- heavily guarded polling places 


dent — and however the blame is Thursday. 

j? -ii . a_ _ /“■ 


divided — the Carbide officials Opposition leaders, who termed 


said the questions it has raised the referendum a farce, had urged a 
about safety procedures and over- boycott of the referendum rad a 
sight erf foreign operations would general strike. They are seeking an 
not be easily resolved. end to Genral Ershad "s martial law 


rad a transition to democratic rule 
under a caretaker government 

A victory for General Ershad, 
55, who came to power in a blood- 
less coup three years ago, was con- 
sidered a foregone conclusion. He 
has been quoted as saying that he 
would consider a favorable vote of 
more than 50 percent a vote of 
confidence. Full returns were not 
expected until Friday. 

Officials said that a bomb ex- 


end to Genral Ershad "s martial law ploded in the central Modhubagh 
1 neighborhood of Dhaka a half hour 


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before the polls opened, killing a 
man. Two other persons were in- 
jured. An Indian was arrested 
Wednesday for throwing a home- 
made bomb into the municipal of- 
fices in Dhaka. There were no inju- 
ries. 

General Ershad said Tuesday, Mohammed Hussain Ers 1 
“This referendum is not to estab- 
lish me in power, but to establish The effect of the call for ag 
peace, discipline, order and pave ^ ^ uncertain be. 

tbe way for general elections. General Ershad declared the . 

Officials said they expected a holiday, closing offices and ; 
turnout of 45 percent to 65 percent nesses. There was little traffic 
of the 48 million eligible voters, but The general has postponed 
many observers predicted that it tiotu three times since Novr 
would be far less because of voter 1983 because of opposition 
apathy, no contests, and the oppo mauds he lift martial law b 
neats* call for a boycott. parliamentary elections. 


The effect of the call for ag . 
al strike was uncertain bo.; 
General Ershad declared the i_ 
holiday, closing offices and .' 


turns three times since Novtr 
1983 because of oppesitiot; 
mands he lift martial law b" ; 
parliamentary elections. 


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Terrace views fading casino and sea. Contemporary furnish- 
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Beige marble floors throughout. Decor in white/ pale grey/ muted 
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Bank references and deposit required. Foreign currencies on 
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Photographs or video tape available. 


in bodkeourrtry small village. House, new condition, 200 sq.r\'l 
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Writ* to Box D 2140, Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuifly Codex, France. 


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r <m 

Authorities in Poland 
enew U.S. Criticism 

( hme as Bilateral Relatiom 
ere Slowing Signs of Improvement 


INTERNATIONAL HER AID TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


Page 5 


By Bradley 

Washington P*. 


5 i ili.st t . 

•‘“V'*! it* 

*h4i fiai, , * 


Fit 


Graham 

'ashingan 'Pm Smite 

i/ARSAW — The PoBsh an- 
ities have severely criticized the 
led States, jast as relations were 
to improve. 

leader. Genera] Wqj- 
Jamzdsfct, last week accused 
administration of re- 
on pledges to restore Po- 
ifeas in U5. wa- 
ts for the Polish 
. and exchange pn>- 
f or scientists. 

, u e government spokesman, 
^t-v urban, elaborated, on the 


■'"•■L'si ry 

i ' ^-plaints. 


■ . | - a Ul d UWUVi u*j 

r Inil N., *\ s, at least in some areas, a 
* \h flawed by real derisio ns , ai 

* ’lifs are often at odds wit 

» i 


umum. ui * 

if % _ inve a new en 


*■** r* oThe US. government’s declarer 
‘“s of a desire to improve rela- 
some areas, are not 
and the 
with the 

ds," he said. 

..tefan Olszowsld, the foreign 
■" jster, said U.S. policy toward 
- md was “a game of appear- 
• \>s." 

i a speech to the Polish paiha- 
.'it, the Sqm, he criticized Wash- 
- on far rejecting a Polish appeal 
~\ talks mi bilateral issues and 
-- iplained that Washington had 
- '.otly given Poland an “ultima- 
i** to accept a new U.S. ambas- 
-•-.''ar to Warsaw or face a further 
moratian m relations. The post 
been vacant since February 
3 because of Poland’s refusal to 
a new envoy. 

verbal assaults follow 
a U.S. military 
on spying charges. 
: episode drew countocharges 
i the Reagan administration 
Polish police had mistreated 
attache. Colonel Frederick 
Vat, and Ms wife. It prompted the 
feed Stales to expel a Polish flril- 



itaiy attache from Washington and 
to postpone indefinitely a planned 
resumption of scientific ex change 

Why the Poles chose to expel 
Colonel Myer, making a major is- 
sue out of an incident that govern- 
ments normally hanrffp discreetly, 
perplexed some Western and Po- 
lish specialists on international re- 
lations. 

One theory is that the police ac- 
tion and recent angry speeches 
serve to accommodate orthodox el- 
ements in the leadership and secu- 
rity services who resented the trial 
of four secret police officers, con- 
victed in February in the murder of 
pro-Soiuiarity priest, the Reverend 
Jerzy Popieluszko.- 

Others see the foreign policy 
moves as part of a general pattern 
of panicky behavior exhibited late- 
ly by the Jamzdski government. 
Worried about worker unrest over 
price increases for food and fuel, 
the authorities have stepped up the 
arrest of opposition activists and 
aggravated tensions with the Ro- 
man Catholic Church. 

Although these actions preceded 
the change of leadership in the 
Kremlin, some Western diplomats 
suspect that the Jaruzelsld govern- 
ment is also nervous about what 
new demands Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, may mate 
on Warsaw. 

To the astonishment of U.S. offi- 
cials, the Polish Foreign Ministry 
summoned the U.S. charge d’af- 
faires a week after the expulsion of 
the military attache to deliver a 
plea for new financial credits. 

Poland is faring interest pay- 
ments of $2.7 billion this year on its 
Western debt In view of Warsaw’s 
request, to which Washington has 
not yet formally replied, Poland’s 



". ✓ >. \ 

Cnmc m Pr*a 

Stefan Olszowski 

statements have been all the more 
confounding. 

Possibly seeking to pull back 
from last week's anti-American 
statements, Mr. Urban, the govern- 
ment spokesman, said Tuesday 
that Poland was “not attacking the 
United Stales" but “simply reply- 
ing to attacks on Poland” by such 
officials as the U.S. representative 
to the United Nations Human 
Rights Committee in Geneva. 

Affirming Poland’s interest in 
economic cooperation with the 
United States. Mr. Urban said: 
“We expect the United States to 
stop its attacks on us, then argu- 
ments from our side trill cease im- 
mediately since they will no longer 
be necessary.” 

■ Priests Attacked in Press 

Polish state-run newspapers 
Thursday accused Roman Catholic 
priests of having a hand in almost 
every political (ianopjf t prtinn in 
the country, abusing their faith and 
patriotic feelings. United Press In- 
ternationa] reported. 

The attacks nme 24 hours after 
underground Solidarity leaders 
called for workers to protest new 
price increases and thnqte n ed the 
government with a general strike 
unless their demands for corre- 
sponding wage increases were met- 


$ tS. House Unit Bans Military Aid 
^ntil Jordan Opens Talks With Israel 






i 

w- 

■u* 


By Joanne Omang 

Wadmpon Post Service 
WASHINGTON — A House 
^committee, ignoring 
mmctTBfinn veto threats, 
jsd to ban mqor military sales to 
dan until King Hussein’s nation 
■' '--'mlw to recognize Israel and 
in direct peace negotiations. 

■ . mother subcommittee, acting 
bout any administration re- 
at, authorized S5 million in aid 
aon-Communist groups in Cam- 
Vietnamese oc- 


aN E w r 

ir.'V ' 

f-V * ‘H- 


iia fighting the Vietnamese oc- 
. nation, the first time funds have 
earmarked for that conflict 
Tie two votes were further evi- 
ct that Congress is asserting it- 
. this session in fc 
• .ters, and appeared to i 
- - _^"major legislative battles. 

•’ ' ” hey came as the Stale Depart- 

%“ *1*11 III E l \ tf lf announced that Secretary of 

* »" r r 111 jt George P. Shultz would visil 

el on May 10 in what was de- 

l ^ Mr - — -“^'bed as a tribute to victims of the 

^cnT.AUAl ibolocaust in World Warn. 
lAVErl Iwniw ^though the announcement 


r > 

•# * **' 

* VW- 

tku* *■:*>*> 



. . _.*rl that the trip was “not related” 
If TA tt WfTN CHAW^he Middle East peace process, 
. .-rim will take place while Con- 
RCI BllrDittr ' from Scm^ ^ ^ debating aid to all the Mid- 

.. Eastern countries and as the 
^.ninis tration considers further 
^'.itaiy sales to Arab nations. 

"7 'resident Ronald Reagan last 
' ’ r threatened to veto stopgap 
tiding legislation that contained 
.. . strict! on cm Jordanian rid iden- 
**^'1 to the one passed Wednesday 
ap.- » ;e£ '* , '".he House Foreign Affairs sub- 
^ mittee on Europe and the Mid- 
East. At that time, Confess 
ded, turning it into a nonbind- 
secse-of -Congress resolution. 

\ knowledgeable administratiem 


Taber al-Masri 


offirial called this year's provision 
“a killer amendment” that would 
again lead Mr. Reagan to veto the 
foreign aid bill. 

Jordan's foreign minister, Taher 
al-Masri, visited Mr. Shultz for 
more than an hour Wednesday and 
was told “well fight this every step 
of the way,” the official said. 

Pro-Israd Democrats pushed the 
provision through over tJ 
non of the subcommittee 
man. Lee H. Hamilton, Democrat 
of In diana, and after meeting with 
Mr. Masri to hear his objections. 

Mr. Hamilton argued that the 
peace process was “alive but at a 
very delicate stage” in Hussein’s 
hands and that the amendment 


“would have the effect of damagin g 
Ms credibility” in resisting Syrian 
demands. 

The Democrats, led by Repre- 
sentative Lawrence J. Smith, Dem- 
ocrat of Florida, said the vote was 
necessary to make sure that both 
Jordan and the Reagan administra- 
tion understood Congress’ continu- 
ing commitment to peace between 
Jordan and IsraeL 

“It indicates that we continue to 
be very upret that we cannot get the 
two countries together ” Mr. Smith 
said 

The measure also praises Hus- 
sein for his recent efforts toward 
peace. 

Democrats supporting the mea- 
sure insisted that the vote, coupled 
with a separate amendment that 
increased economic aid to Jordan 
by $10 million, added up to encour- 
agement for Jordan. 

The $5 million approved by the 
House Foreign Affairs subcommit- 
tee on Asian and Pacific Affairs for 
non-Commumsts lighting the Viet- 
namese in Cambodia is to be fun- 
through Thailand, as part of 
a Sl-5-biHioo package for the re- 
gjon. 

Representative Stephen J. So- 
larz. a Democrat of New York who 
is the subc ommi ttee chairman and 
sponsor (tf the Cambodia measure, 
raid he was responding to a public 
request last month from the Associ- 
ation of Southeast Asian Nations 
for hdp “to compel the Vietnamese 
to come to the negotiating table.” 

Representative Jim Leach, a Re- 
publican of Iowa, opposed the 
measure, calling it “something un- 
precedented: interventionism with 
mu executive sanction." 


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British Actor, 
Sir Michael 
Redgrave, 

Is Dead at 77 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Sir Michael Red- 
grave, 77, the British film and stage 
actor and patriarch of the Red- 
grave acting family, died Thursday. 
He had been suffering from Parkin- 
son’s disease for 12 years. 

Sir Michael, one of the most ac- 
complished actors of a generation 
that includes Sr Laurence Olivier 
and Sr John Gielgud, starred in 
dozens of plays and movies. 

Illness bad kept turn off the stage 
since the 1970s, but in T983 he 
published his autobiography, “In 
My Mind's Eye.” 

The child of two adore, George 
EHworthy Redgrave and Margaret 
Scudamore, he was the father of 
Vanessa and Lynn Redgrave, both 
actresses, as well as son Corin, who 
was an actor before going into poli- ■ 
tics. 

Boro Michael Scudamore Red- 
grave in Bristol, he made Ms first 
stage appearance as a babe in arms 
in Melbourne. 

Sir Michael's film career ranged 
from Alfred Hitchcock’s “The 

Lady Vanishes" in the riassic thrill . 

er “Dead of Night.” 

“The Go-Between” and “Nicho- 
las and Alexandra” marked the end 
ctf his film career with the onset of 
Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative 
disorder characterized by tremors 
and muscular rigidity. 

His stage work inc luded many 
Shakespearean triumphs, while his 
Vanya in Chekhov's “Uncle 
Vanya” and Solness in Ibsen’s 
“The Master BuDder” in the 1960s 
were regarded as the definitive in- 
terpretations. 

He served in the navy during 
World War H, but not before he 
faced, as he put it, “my 20 minutes 
in politics.” He became known, 
briefly, as “Red Redgrave” in 1941 
for endorsing an anti-war. Commu- 
nist-front organization. He was 
banned by the British Broadcasting 
Corp. until Prime Minister Win- 
ston Churchill opposed the ban. 

He was knighted by Queen Eliza- 
beth H in 1959. 


Japanese Look: A Somber Mish-Mash 


By Hebe Dorsey 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — This is going to be a 
bad seajwn for Japanese design- 

toially out of sync with what is 
going on in fashion today. 

As the fall-winter collections 
opened in Paris this week, one 
thing is dear. The so-called Japa- 

PARIS FASHIONS 

nese look is out, swept away by a 
heavy tide of pretty European 
clothes. 

Two years ago, Japanese de- 
signers descended on the runways 
of Paris, creating an enormous 
impact with raw, savage dothes 
cut with an unbridled hand. 
Mostly don e in blade and navy, 
these dothes made no concession 
to Western beauty standards, but 
they had a violence, a brutal vital- 
ity that was both fascinating and 
disturbing. 

After a couple of seasons it was 
asked if the Japanese had any- 
where to go from there. The an- 
swer is no, for they have lost Ihwr 
early impact without acquiring 
the delicate polish of European 
collections. 

While the sew fashions are all 
about shape and color and are 
romantic, reflecting European 
culture, the Japanese are strand- 
ed. In an effort to catch up, they 
have tried to copy a number of 
European designers, but this of- 
ten proved worse. One of the rea- 
sons is that Japanese designers 
have little sense of humor, and 
this runs opposite the witty col- 
lections seen in Milan and espe- 
cially London. 

Fortunately, the new Japanese 
collections were shown to soft 
music — there were even tangos 
instead of wild jungle noises — 
and on fresh attractive women, 
instead of on the sexually ambig- 
uous nwtrfg of the past 

Hairdos were still weird, with a 
stringy, drowned look alternating 
with a stiff sted-woo) effect 
Headgear included rice-paddy 
peasant coifs and black leather, 
and high-tech coils looped 
around and around. But the 


make-up. soft except for strong 
eyebrows, was a far cry from the 
brutal war paint that was shown 
in thepasL 

Junko Shimada’s collection, 

shown Wednesday, was a mish- 
mash of Andre Courreges, 
Claude Montana. Jeau-Paul 
Gaultier and Azzedine Alala. 

The early suits, which were 
desperately trying to be sexy, had 
all the wrong proportions, with 
too much shoulder and too little 
skirt But Shimada was trying. 
There was a lot more color ‘than 
usual, bunny-like hats and even 
gloves. As for the house public 
relations agent she was wearing a 
navy Chanel-like dress and 
pearls. 

Junko Koshino was another 
flop with an overdose of fake furs 
in violent colors shown over long 
knit dresses. This collection owed 
a lot to Gaultier and Pierre Car- 
din while the overly fitted leather 
suits were copies of Alala. But 
midway through, it became strict- 
ly Japanese again, with many ver- 
sions of the kimono. 

Even Comme des Garcons, 
whose designer Rri Kawakubo is 
considered one of the best was 
uncomfortable with the human 
body. Her collection, in which 
she tried to combine both fitted 
and baggy, was neither here nor 
there. 

Her version of the fitted silhou- 
ette poncicfi-H of elongated T- 
shirts topped by baggy jackets 
and velvet coats. Long skirts 
worn over black hose and flat 
shoes dominated. The general re- 
sult was messy. 

Neither did Yohji Yamamoto 
manage to save the day, although 
he stands the best chance of sur- 
viving. His coflection was Gaul- 
tier revisited, and Gaultier him- 
self has been helping himself 
liberally to London street fash- 
ion. 

When Yamamoto opened with 
two black outfits in an almost 
pitch black room, one feared the 
worst. However, things bright- 
ened up considerably with a lot of 
color. A pink-and-salmon outfit 
toward the end was also soft and 



OoWGact 

Junko Shimada's fur-trimmed dress and hooded coat. 


lender, and the navy-and-white 
group came closest to the Europe- 
an line of thinking 
The sharply cut tails were 
straight British dandies while the 
long, floating suits, worn with 
cane and gloves, were Edwardian 
England. Yamamoto, who knows 
how to cut a coat, had quite a few 
nice ones, which were the best 
part of this collection. 


The trouble with the Japanese 
picture has nothing to do with 
talent. It has to do with the fact 
that many of the designers are 
backed by big fabric or ready-to- 
wear manufacturers who' use 
them for publicity reasons. The 
best one can say is that this is a 
very young group or designers 
who are still Having serious grow- 
ing pains. 




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Page 6 


Herald 


iTIONAL 


(tribune 


Published Wgtfai The iVgw Yprfc Thaw upd The Washington Port 


Slowly in the Middle East 


In (be high-stakes diplomacy of the Middle 
East, the hardest thing is to stand alert while 
doing nothing. Fora change, the United States 
is doing that very wefl. 

There has been considerable commotion in 
Egypt, Jordan and the Palestine liberation 
Organization in recent weeks signaling interest 
in a new approach, to Israel. It turns on a 
proposal, already fudged, to create some kind 
of Palestinian entity in the West Bank and 
Gaza, vaguely linked to Jordan and vaguely at 
peace with Israel. It has come with warnings 
from King Hussein that this is the Arabs’ last 
best offer, America’s “last chance" to force 
Israel to accept. Or else what will happen? 

What wffl happen is that Israel wul in any 
case keep withdrawing from Lebanon and re- 
trenching to repair its economy. Egypt and 
Jordan win keep contending that they have 
done their best to qualify for more American 
aid. And the battered PLO will keep looking to 
deal itself back into the affairs of the region. 

This is not the last chance to bring these 
exhausted belligerents toward a recognition of 
realities. The most important reality is that the 
Arabs will finally have to negotiate with Israel, 
not America. Thai is best emphasized by hold- 
ing U.S. mediators willin g but not too ready. 

Overeagpmess is an old American vice in 
the Middle East It was understandable as long 
as the U.S. commitment to Israel strained 
relations with all Arabs and interfered with 
the oil trade. Trying to ride two ponies in 
opposite directions, Americans thought it best 
to keep cracking diplomatic whips. 

As Egypt’s President Anwar Sadat became 


die first to realize, however, there is a better 
way to qualify for American aid and protec- 
tion: accept Israel It was surely easier for him 
to trade peace for the empty Sinai than it will 
be For King Hussein to bargain for a strategic 
enclave inhabited by a million Palestinians. 
Bat now that the PLO has beat defanged and 
Israel is losing the taste for absorbing so many 
Arabs; time can be a pacifying force: 

Then what of those promising Arab declara- 
tions? They imply acceptance of the Reagan 
plan for a West Bank entity linked to Jordan. 
Yet Yasser Arafat faded to sell even that 
ambiguity to his PLO, and still talks of an 
unattainable independent state. By Egypt’s 
reading. King Hussein implies he is ready to 
negotiate with Israel hut the king and his 
Saudi friends show a discouraging preference 
for bargaining only with the United States. 

So President Reagan properly refuses to 
pretend that a deal is at hand. He knows that 
Arabs and Israelis have ample grounds, mostly 
economic, for wanting to impress him with 
their conciliation. If King Hussein has really 
regained the right to negotiate for West Bank 
Palestinians, let the Arab League ratify ids 
approach. If President Hosni Mubarak in- 
tends to gjve new life to the Camp David 
peace; let him prove it Any genuine approach 
to Israel can only reinforce the healthy prag- 
matism of Prime Minister S himo n Peres. 

When truly ready for American mediation, 
die parties will have no trouble reaching the 
White House. When that moment comes it will 
be not a last chance for peace but a first 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Bach for Then and Now 


Johann Sebastian Bach, bran 300 years ago, 
is as near as your stereo set his face on T-shirts 
and coffee mugs, his music more widely heard 
than ever. Yet he is also as distant as the 
century in which he was bom. 

A while back the flamboyant organist Virgil 
Fox was giving one of his popular concerts fra 
people who bad come to music primarily 
through rock roll Those things tended to be 
spirited celebrations of Bach — the late Mr. 
Fox was one of his most ebullient interpreters 
— calling for a certain amount of audience 
participation. After a couple of bouncy fugues, 
Mr. Fox changed gears. His next selection, be 
•Announced, would be an organ prehide to a 
cantata entitled “Behold, I S tand With One 
foot in the Grave." The audience reaction was 
; i second of sQence followed by a ripple erf 
' nervous laughter. It was a reminder of the 
distance that separates us from the time and 
place in which Bach lived. A choral work 
'fthose sentiments must have seemed quite nat- 
ural to congregations in the early 18th century 
'causes uq w i pn«Ht in the late 20th. 


J Last Sunday a series of long lost Bach organ 
compositions, recently discovered in a Yale 


University library, was performed in a special 
Concert at Yale University- They were preludes 


to hymns, and there was in them, Lon Tuck 
wrote in a review in The Post, “that over- 
whelming sense of majesty, of s omething 
mightier than one’s own self, that is the essence 
of Bach’s organ music at its greatest." Soon 
they will probably be played not only on 
church organs but on stereo sets — sometimes 
listened to and sometimes serving as back- 
ground for conversations on the benefits of- 
racquetbaQ and the prices of Italian wines. 

How would Bach have reacted? Well we 
would not be surprised if be walked into the 
room, sat down and started listening intently 
to see whether the organist was getting it right. 
For while it is true that he was a religious man 
in a religious age, he was also an extraordinari- 
ly dedicated and hard- wo rking musician — a 
perfectionist both as performer and composer, 
a serious student of the works of his contempo- 
raries and of those who had gone before him. 

Much of his music was religious, but much 
was also secular. Not afl of it was appreciated 
in his time, and some was called old-fashioned. 
Some sounds to us today as If it came from the 
future rather than the past So Bach is, at least 
to some extent, a figure of our time also, and 
one to celebrate in this tercentenary week. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Awaiting Recovery in Brasilia 


» There is a firm tone about the policy state- 

■ meat from the sickbed of Tancredo Neves, the 
first civilian president-elect of Brazil for 21 

. years. We should be as concerned as the BrazB- 

■ Dm man in the street at the precarious state of 
his health. The IMF has been told that the new 
government will pay the interest on the 5102- 
billion foreign debt, probably accept new stria 
. conditions and not propose any form of dis- 
guised moratorium. As things stand, only the 


n ular ‘Tancredo" is likely to get away with 
t is hard to see the vice president, Jos 6 


it It is hard to see the vice president, Jos 6 
Sarney, a late convert to civilian democracy, 
managing to keep the lid on. We need good 
hews from that hospital in Brasilia. 

• — The Daily Telegraph (London). 


vigor and some continuing influence; then the 
equation might be slightly different. But most 
Washington observers now see the time scale 
as short and contracting. The portents for the 
eoonomy are ominous enough: a surging dollar 
edging swiftly back in the face of mountainous 
debts and mountainous imports. A definitive 
reverse here will not be recoverable. 

You should never write Mr. Reagan off. He 
is a formidable politician. But luck and touch 
have combined to build reputation. Because of 
his age and circumstances, he has always been 
hugely vulnerable to that luck running out. A 
vacuum of power [is] growing nearer. 

— The Guardian ( London ij. 


Children Keep Baring Children 


Toward f a Vacuum, of Power’ 


The old man can still do it in a crisis. Take 
The most unpropitious of circumstances: A 
Senate in open budgetary revolt, palpably hos- 
tile to more defense spending; a missile utterly 
discredited as anything but a symbol; long 
awaited resumption of arms control talks. Yet 
-flie president of the United States, urgently 
'musding, earnestly lobbying, can produce a 
surprisingly decisive vote in his favor, using 
the hoariest argument in the bode deny this 
year’s MXs and it will be a signal of weakness 
as we sit down to talks with the Russians. 

But, curiously, the question is not how the 
venerable magician pulled it off, but how 
many more times he can manage it. If he were 
‘younger, likely to end bis spell in office with 


American teen-agers get mixed messages 
about sex. Television, movies and magazines 
portray it as titillating or romantic, but the 
traumatic consequences are ignored. Some 
parents, educators, and policymakers rely on 
punitive measures and extolling the virtues of 
abstinence, but America is the only developed 
country where teen-age pregnancy has in- 
creased in recent years. Ambivalent, if not 
puritan dal, attitudes about sex education and 
contraception prevent teen-agars from pre- 
venting pregnancy. Countries with effective 
sex education programs have the lowest rates 
of teen-age pregnancy, abortion and child- 
bearing. American teen-agers need hdp bat 
too often get hypocrisy. Unless mistaken as- 
sumptions are challenged and policies revised, 
America’s children will keep bearing children. 

— The Boston Globe. 


FROM OUR MARCH 22 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


' j.910: What U.S. Policy in Nicaragua? 

' NEW YORK — Little desire is shown for 

- extended intervention by the United States in 
Nicaraguan waters. The Philadelphia Inquirer 

. says: “The purpose of General Aurdio Estra- 

- da's movement, to rid the country of an op- 
pressive ruler, has been accomplished, and 
> with that accomplishment the reason fra giv- 
' ing that movement support, namely, that the 
■ removal of Jose Santos Zdaya last December 
* was demanded by the Nicaraguan people, has 
1 been eliminated. The order of the day is Hands 

Off!" The Utica Press adds: “It is not likely 
'that if the United States restores peace it mil 

• be upon terms dictated by General Estrada. 
'President Jose Madriz [Zdaya’ s successor 

* whom the United States does not recognize}, 

- may prove Estrada’s better and give Nicaragua 
'the government it needs to prosper." 


1935: America Reiterates NemraKty 
WASHINGTON — The State Department 
gmphflstged again [on March 21] that the Unit- 
ed States was following a neutral policy in 
regard to Gramany, but outsiders are now 
expecting that this attitude will become more 
difficult to maintain in view of the French and 
Italian protests. The Far Eastern situation has 
become a factor in the question. Officials ques- 
tion whether the League of Natrons will con- 
tinue to support Washington’s policy of non- 
recognition of Mancbukuo unless the United 
States joins the protest against Berlin’s actions 
in violation of the Versailles Treaty [of 1919]. 
They see in France's refusal to recognize the 
legality of Germany's position a parallel with 
America’s Far Eastern policy: “Non-recogm- 
tion of rights or territories gained by force in 
violation of treaty obligations." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Ouarmm 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen. 


PHIUPM.FOISCE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PM trier 
Executive Editor 
Editor 
Deport Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate Editor 


Deputy PubBsher 
Assoanie PabGsker 
Astcckar PubBshet 


Director of Gradation 
neaertfAdimstogSate 

International Herald Tribune; 181 Aveaue Charies-de-Gaulle. 92300 Neuflly-snr-Sdne, ^ 

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© 1955. International HawdTnhune. All rights reserved. {■£££■ 




fkiday, march 22 . 1985 


Democracy for Latin America 
Is Scarcely a Reagan Concern 






W ASHINGTON — Against 
major obstacles, democracy 


W major obstacles, democracy 
has indeol spreading in Latin 
America — but largely despite the 
Reagan administration. 

The administration’s campaign to 
identify with the spread of democra- 
cy masks the extent to which it gives 
top priority to a shortsighted, nega- 
tivistic anti-communism in I ^ rin 
America. By putting El Salvador un- 
der the same democratic tent as Ar- 
gentina. or suggesting that the tent 
is spreading over both Brazil, and 
Guatemala, the Reagan administra- 
tion seeks to justify support fra 
regimes whose principal virtue is 
virulent anti-communism. 

Support for democracy in Latin 
America, even rhetorically, has not 
always been so important to this 
gdromicTrarinn Mr. Reagan cany r to 
power convinced that Soviet and 
Cuban erpanrinniCTn was the threat 
pnd that the anti-communism of the 
militar y regimes then predominant 
was the way to counter it. 

In the new administration's view, 
President Carter’s advocacy of hu- 
man rights alienated authoritarian 
regimes disposed to be friendly to 
the United States. The Reagan ad- 
ministration would deal wxthhmnan 
rights abases of anti-communist dic- 
tators through “quiet diplomacy." 

Mr. Reagan quickly sect retired 
General Vernon Walters, UN Am- 
bassador Jeane Kirkpatrick and 
high-ranking military officers to 
show his goodwill toward the dicta- 
torial r egim es of Ar gentina, Brazil, 
Chile and Uruguay. Similar emis- 
saries went to Central America. 

The concerted effort to befriend 
military dictatorships was a losing 
proposition almost from the start 
In tiie Reagan administration's first 
year the world recession hit Latin 
America, where it was magnified by 
heavy indebtedness into the worst 
economic crisis in 50 years. As a 
result erf both their demonstrated 
incapacity to manage that crisis and 
their accumulated abuses of h itman 
rights. Latin military regimes lost 
popular support even among their 
most conservative backers. 

Six of South America’s 10 princi- 
pal countries now have civilian gov- 
ernments that came to power in 
open ejections. This is two more — 
with the addition of Bolivia and 
Argentina — than when Mr. Reagan 
was first inaugurated in 1981. More- 
over. Brazil and Uruguay have re- 
cently chosen civilian presidents in 
electoral processes that were flawed 
but that point toward the return of 
full democracy. Despite Reagan ad- 
ministration efforts to put geostra- 
tegic stability above political senti- 
ment. military regimes have been 
falling like dominoes. Only Chile 


By Peter D. Bell 


and Paraguay still buck the tide. 

If Washington hastened Argenti- 
na’s return to democracy, it md so 
unwittingly. The junta had deluded 
itself into believing that Ui-Aigpi- 
tine cooperation a the coven war 
against the Sandimsts. and overall 
ILS. friendliness, meant that the ad- 
ministration would be neutral in ihe 
wax against the British. That miscal- 
culation abetted the junta's reckless 
decision to invade the Falkland*, 
which led to its coDapse. 

In Brazil the military had already 
launched a gradual liberalization ci 
political life in the late 1970s. The 
economic crisis increased popular 
pressure fra accelerating the time- 
table for full democracy. 

In Uruguay increasing popular 
pressure forced the mDrtary regime 
to permit presidential elections. 

Chile could be the real test of the 
Reagan aHmimu rarinn's commit- 
ment to democracy in the Western 

Hemisphere. Augnsto Pinochet runs 
a brutal dictatorship. Senior State 
Department officials have suggested 
that the political polarization result- 
ing from government repression and 
leftist terro rism could make Chile 
“another Nicaragua." 

Chile has the highest debt per 
capitainSonth America. If tbe Rea- 


gan administration applied the Har- 
kin Amendmen t, which instructs 
US. directors of multilateral banks 
to vote against loans to gross viola- 
tors of human rights. General Pino- 
chet would soon fed the pinch. 

Secretary of State George Shultz 
said in recent testimony before the 
Senate: “The furore of democracy is 
precisely what is at stake in Central 
America. If we abandon those seek- 
ing democracy, the extremists will 
gain and the forces of moderation 
and decency will be victims." 

But, with the exception of Costa 
Rica, the Central American coun- 
tries Lack the baric underpinnings erf 


W / 




rfsr 


rm 


I’tir 


stable democracy. They lade the tra- 
dition of tolerance for opposing 


dition of tolerance for opposing 
views; their militaries disregard con- 
stituted civilian authorities; their 
economics arc so poor and inequita- 
ble that they impede the formation 
of truly naoooaf communities. 

By contrast, especially in the 
more devdoped countries of South 
America, restoration and mainte- 
nance of full democracy are genuine 
possibilities. It remains to be seen 
whether the Reagan administration 
will give a hdp ing hand. 


The writer, a senior associate of die 
Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace, is a former president of the Inter- 
American Foundation. He contributed 
tins comment to die Las Angeles Times. 


'There he goes ogam . 9 


To Help Democracy, Lighten the Latin Debt Load 


N EW YORK — Third World debt poses a 
potentially greater threar to US. interests 


IN potentially greater threat to US. interests 
than the Central American crisis. Latin America, 


By Sally Shelton-Colby 


which takes almost a quarter of U.S. exports, 
owes some 5350 billion to foreign banks, what is 


owes some S350 billion to foreign banks. What is 
more, the region's inabilxty to service its debt and 
poll out of recession has produced political vio- 
lence in Brazil, the D om i nican Republic and 
Peru, among other countries. 

The link between economics and politics is 
clear. North Americans cannot expat Latin 
America's much heralded progress toward de- 
mocracy — or its economic and political cooper- 
ation with the United States — to continue with- 
out solid and more rapid economic recovery. 

How strong is the recovery? The patient is out 
of the emergency room but still in intensive card 
On the bright ride, 1984 saw an average in- 
crease of 2.6 percent in the debtors’ gross domes- 
tic products — aB too slight, but welcome after 
the steep declines of recent years. In addition, the 
current account deficit in Latin America's bal- 
ance of payments fell dramatically as export 
surpluses and foreign exchange reserves grew — 
in some countries, at least Indebtedness, while 
still growing, slowed for the first time in yearn. 
On the negative ride, vigorous population 


bearably high and infla tion is soaring. Capital 
transfers of principle and interest out of Latin 
America far exceeded the net inflow of new loans 
and investments, leaving virtually no money for 


badly needed new productive capacity. 

For some three yean now tbe International 


For some three yean now tbe International 
Monetary Fund, the banks and the U.S. govern- 
ment have been pressing for significant reforms. 


Yet only very limited structural adjustment has 
occurred. Mexico and Venezuela, two of the 
largest debtors, remain overwhelmingly depen- 


dent on erne commodify, oil, for their foreign 
exchange income. Both have allowed agriculture 
to stagnate and are now lane net food importers. 
Triple-dipt inflation has become a plague in 
Brazil, Argentina »nri Bolivia and traditional 
efforts to reduce it have been a total failure. 

Public-sector deficits hare been reduced some- 
what, although more through cats in social pro- 
grams and food subsidies th»n by glwniiijiting of 
inefficient government-owned enterprises. Those 
debtor nations that bare achieved trade surpluses 
must thank the strong U.S. economy and their 
good access to world markets — bom of which 
are open to question in the future; 

Beyond this, the improvement has beat un- 
even: relatively strong in the larger, newly nidus- 


growth undermined what economic growth there 
was, reducing GDP per capita to roe levels of 


was. reducing GDP per capita to the levels of 
almost a decade ago. Unemployment stays tm- 


tr ialmng countries like Venezuela, Brazil am 
Argentina, but virtually nonexistent for tb 
smaller debtors like Peru, Chile and Panama. 

What is to be done? Bankers, corporate offi 
cers and government leaders in both the Uniro 
States and Latin America must work together t - 
fashion a more comprehensive solution. 

The debtor countries must carry out real strut 
, tural reforms, however high the political cost - •• 
adjusting their exchange rates, increasing domes 
tic savings and allowing creditors to convert th 
debt owed to them into equity ownership. An 
the debtors’ state-owned enterprises must sta . 
competing with the private sector. 

For its part. Washington should take steps t . 
further open U.S. markets and proride incentive . 
for investment in trade. The IMF mav have to b 
more flexible, especially toward s mall er debtor. 
Banks must continue to do their part, reschedn . 
ing tbe debt, decreasing fees ana investing nr 
money wherever adjustment occurs. 

The needed adjustments trill be politically ni 
pleasant for all concerned, but the alternative i 
worse. No one involved can afford to watc 
continued economic weakness in Latin Americ 
lead to erosion of democratic systems. 


The writer is a vice president for eeonamit 
Bankas Trust. She contributed this comma 


of Bankers Trust. She contributt 
to The New York Times. 


Parity lor the Parties Under Reagan? It Has Already Happened 


W ASHINGTON — About one 
American in fire — roughly 35 


VV American in fire — roughly 35 
million adults — has switched party 
affiliation in the last fire years, with 
the Democrats the big losers. 

The question that has been asked 
so often since Ronald Reagan be- 
came president — Is party realign- 
ment taking place? — is out of date. 
Realignment has already occurred. 
Republicans now equal or almost 
equal Democrats in numbers. Only a 
few years ago, and for perhaps two 
decades before that, they lagged be- 
hind by about a 3-10-2 ratio. 

The appropriate questions today 
are why such broad change has oc- 
curred. and whether it may be blunt- 
ed or reversed by the time of the 
congressional elections in 1986 or the 
presidential race two years later. 

A Washington Post-ABC News 
poll conducted in February found 
little basis for some of the more wide- 
spread explanations of realign menu 
such as the perception that the Dem- 
ocratic Party has become too liberal, 
that men and women have been mov- 
ing in sharply different directions 
or that Mr. Reagan has exerted enor- 
mous personal magnetism 

These ideas seem to account for a 
little of the change. But the main 
factor seems to be that Republicans 
are regarded as better able to handle 


By Barry Sussman 


the economy and as more efficient 
managers of govemmenL 

Generally speaking h is not dis- 
tinctions between Democratic or Re- 
publican policies that hare caused 
realignment Many people who are 
switching parties probably are not 
aware of such distinctions; they do 
not follow public events very much. 

Fewer than half of those inter- 
viewed knew that the Republicans 
control the Senate or that toe Demo- 
crats have a majority in the House. 
Only one in four could answer both 


already begun. Comparisons between 
the February poll and one taken in 
January show a dedine for the Re- 
publicans and a gain for the Demo- 
crats. In January, Republicans and 
independents leaning toward them 
outnumbered Democrats and Demo- 
cratic leaners. In the new survey the 
Democrats have a 6-point lead. But 


thdess seem quite accurate in that 
they are typical of what many polls at 
the time found. Thus, what was a 
Democratic lead of 57-36 in 1980 has 
now been reduced to one of 50-44. 

Not all the movement has been 
away from the Democrats; among 


as Republicans five years ago not 
themselves as Democrats. 

There is a political gap betwea .. 
sexes, to be sure. When all races ; 
included, men divide 48 percent v 
publican and 45 percent Democ ;■ 
m the new survey. Women are i 


percent Democratic and 41 pa 
Republican. But the reason tot 


poll findings do bounce around some 
from month to month, and the drop 


people who say they were Republi- 
cans fire years ago, v percent now see 
themselves as Democrats. But that 
trend is dwarfed by the drift away. Of 
those who say they were Democrats 
in 1980, 18 percent now list them- 
selves as Republicans. 

Since tbe Democratic pool was so 
much bigger to begin with, tbe result 
is a net gain of about 14 million 
people for the Republicans and a loss 
of 12 million for the Democrats. 

The poll shows white men switch- 
ing to the Republicans only slightly 
more than white women, nve years 
ago, 43 percent of white men were 

S cans; today 53 percent are — 
increase; Twenty-four per- 
wfahe men who used to be 
Democrats hare switched parties. 
But that shift is only slightly larger 
' than the change among white women. 
As for the supposed “gender gap” 


questions. And party-switchers did 
even worse than the rest of the popu- 
lation on this elementary tesi- 

What seems to be happening is that 
the switchers are looking at roe par- 
ties and saying, “Which of you has 
done more for me lately?" the con- 
clusion for most is that the Republi- 
cans under Mr. Reagan hare, try cre- 
ating a healthy economy. 

Thar is good news for the Republi- 
cans today, but it also makes realign- 
ment fragile: If the economy takes a 
downturn, or if people perceive it to 
be in trouble, there could be a rever- 
sal Thai occurred in 1982, after 
sharp gains by tbe Republicans were 
erodedduring the recession. 

It is possible that a turnaround has 


from month to month, and the drop 
could be a momentary blip. 

The poll asked L506 people what 
their affiliation is today and what it 
was five years ago. People wbo said 
they are independents were asked 
whether they lean more to the Demo- 
crats or tbe Republicans. 

In 1980, according to their own 
recollection, 36 percent were Repub- 
licans or independents who leaned 
Republican. Today 44 percent come 
oat on the Republican ride. 

In 1980, 57 percent were Demo- 
crats or leaned Democratic. Now that 
figure is 50 percent 
That leaves 7 percent who were 
“pore" independents in 1980, a 
grouping that, according to the poll, 
is now at 6 perce n t 
While tbe figures for party affili- 
ation in 1980 are subject to the vaga- 
ries of people’s memories, they nerer- 


Republican. But the reason lot 
gap is not the recent party-jonq' 
almost all of which has benefitec 
Republicans. The reason is m 
meat by men and women in oppi 
directions during Che 1970s. J 
The sharpest new shifts towan 
Republicans come from a block 
has the potential to make rea' 


s benefitec 

ison is ml • m • • 

“Tie m the 


meat lasting; younger voters anc-- •> J; ( 


under Mr. Reagan, the new poll 
that 9 percent of men and 9 percent 
of women who thought of themselves 


so-called baby-boomers born 

and shorty after World War IL '« ■- 
quite a thud of the people surw. . 
were between the ages of 18 anc. . 
Five years ago 35 percent thougL - v ’ 
themselves as Republicans, 54 ^ : 
cent as Democrats. Today they a- 7 . 
a virtual tie: 47 percent Republi : 

48 percent Democratic. 

Among those aged 31 to 44, 
Democrats had a lead of 60-33. __ 
years ago. Now here, too, the '. / 
almost a tie: 44 percent say thq-.: ' 
Republicans. 48 percent Democ_^ 

By contrast, people 45 and c .~' 
show hardly any change at afl. .'/j 
The Washington Post. ■. . .|' 


t -* -Nf 

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vpr 


When Professional Diplomats Give Up 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nightmare in Abeyance 


W ASHINGTON — I was as- 
tounded the other dav when 


YY tounded the other day when 
a senior State Department official 
confided to me that he was thinking 
about resigning- As he put it, “I 
may turn in ray badge." _ 

This officials temptation to re- 
sign reflects widespread demoral- 
ization of professional diplomats 
under tbe Reagan administration. 
In the long run this could badly 
undermine U.S. foreign policy. 

The problem is not simply that 
more and more key positions in 
Washington and abroad are going 
to political appointees. What is 
worse is that so many of these ap- 
pointees are inesroerienced ama- 
teurs with no qualificati on s, except 
perhaps that they donated to Mr. 
Reagan’s re-election campaign. 

In an ala rming number ofrases, 
moreover, the appointees are right- 
wing extremists guided by ideology, 
who have little of the flexibility 
needed to deal with complicated 
and often delicate tasks. 

Political appointments are not 
wrong as a matter of principle. It is 
healthy to inject fresh blood into 
the system, which might otherwise 
be lot to entrenched and unimagi- 
native bureaucrats. 

Outriders like former Senator 
Mike Mansfield, in Tokyo, and Ar- 
thur Bums, who is soon to leave 
Boon, have been outstanding. So 
were Averell Harriman and David 
Bruce, neither of them profession- 
als when they started. 

But their contributions have been 


By Stanley Karnow 


offset by tbe behavior of novices 
like Evan Galbraith in France and 
Richard Walker in South Korea. 

Mr. Walker recently accused 
American civil rights activists of 
“provoking" the South Korean po- 
lice into nranTi smiling Kim Dae 
Jung, the South Korean dissident, 
triton he returned to Seoul. 

Mr. Walker owes bis job to Sena- 
tor Jesse Helms. Along with other 
ambassadors, Mr. Walker and Mr. 
Galbraith issued a statement last 
fall endorsing Mr. Heims, who was 
then running for re-election. 

Mr. Galbraith has been some- 
thing of a loose cannon in Paris. 
Not only has he openly criticized 
the French government without 
clearing his remarks with Washing- 
ton, he has also attacked the State 
Department, saving that it “needs 
to be vigorously harnessed." His 
comments have been so outrageous 
that even Secretary of State George 
Shultz, who usually avoids intramu- 
ral controversies, saw fit to admon- 
ish him publicly. “Somebody ought 
to tie his tongue for Mm,” said Mr. 
Shultz of Mr. Galbraith. 

The trouble with having these 


is compounded because the State 
Department cannot easily disavow 
an envoy, even when he blunders, 
without raising questions about 
his or her credibility. 

A more serious difficulty, at tbe 
higher echelons of the poucymak- 
ing machinery in Washington, is the 
interference of the ultra-conserva- 
tives, who are stming with consid- 
erable success to influence the U.S. 
approach to the world. 

They are exerting a good deal of 
pressure inside the State Depart- 
ment to improve America’s ties 
with Taiwan. That would hurt the 
U.S. relationship with China. 


They have been working to tor- 
pedo O.S. efforts to encourage the 
withdrawal of Caban troops from 


Angola on tbe grounds that quiet 
U.S. negotiations with the left-wing 


Angolan re gim e are heretical. 

They are lobbying strenuously 
for a more belligerent line toward 
the Sanduust government in Nica- 
ragua. Judging from Mr. Reagan’s 
recent warnings to the Sandimsts, 
they are making headway. 

AH this damp ens the enthusiasm 
of career diplomats who believe for- 


Prince Sadrudddn Aga Khan has 
got Ins message right but his facts 
wrong in “Meanwhile, Proliferation 
Approaches" (March 12). 

He writes that “probably at least a 
dozen countries ... are building un- 
pretentious little bombs." The non- 
nuclear-weapons countries of West- 
ern and Eastern Europe and North 
America, as well as Japan and Aus- 
tralia, have renounced the bomb and 
put their entire nuclear industries 
under international inspection. But 
Prince Sadruddin implies that the 
countries making “little bombs" axe 
chiefly in the Third World. 

To make an atomic bomb a coun- 
try must have a reprocessing plant. to 
recover plutonium from spent fuel or 
an enrichment plant to make highly 
enriched uranium. To do so legally 
the plani must not be under inter- 


ous countries by the mid-1970s •’■r 
not materialized. Where Prince - V . _ 
druddin is absolutely right is du> 
may not be able to stem the --' 
indefinitely unless the nudear-w - . . 
ons countries stop setting the*'. 
posable example, exhorting othe ... 

“do as I say, not as 1 do." '. . 

DA.V. F1SCHE ■ : ■ L 
Cambridge, Englac . . 


in# 

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" •" ’Jim 
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•"ViV'iJt 
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J- ’ ' v ■■ 


Freedom for Nicaragu 


Frederic Mortem is eloquent t . , 
Is 47 Years Since the Ansch... 


national safeguards. Outside the in- 
>nh, the 


dustrial No 


only countries 


that have such plants are Argentina, 
Brazil, South Africa, Israel, India and 
Pakistan. Brazil's plant is under 
IAEA safeguards; the others are not 

Only tme of these countries. Israel, 
is generally believed to have “bombs 
in the basement" ready for use if its 
survival is threatened. South Africa 
may have some (or others may wish 
others to believe that it could have 
some). It is very doubtful whether 
Argentina, India or Pakistan have 
any atomic bombs or are making any. 

The remarkable fact is that despite 
the inexorable spread of nuclear tech- 
nology there has been so little prolif- 
eration. President Kennedy’s 1963 
nightmare of 15 to 25 nudear-weap- 


dgn policy ought to be based on 
reality rather than ideology. Many 


outspoken ambassadors is that they 
confuse tbe aoveroments to which 


confuse tbe governments to which 
they are accredited. On seraal oc- 
casions tbe French have had to 
check with Washington to find out 
whether Mr. Galbraith mirrored 
the official U.S. view. The problem 


reality rather than ideology. Many 
are thinking of quitting. 

The fault lies with President Rea- 
gan himself , who seems to be un- 
aware of the extent to which his 
sectarian aides are hobbling Ameri- 
can diplomacy for the sake of pro- 
moting thm own illusory doctrines. 

Tribune and Register Syndicate. 


(March Ilf His account onm.' 
and his family made their way 
Nazi-controlled Austria to the 
dona of America is moving. It i 
bad that this stirring article falls . 
liberal prattle about the Reagar - . 
ministration's role in Nicaragua - .. 

It is obvioody written by s ran ' 
who still believes that commurn.' 1 , 
the full flowering of popular dis .. 
tent and revolution. In fad the 
Curtain is imposed by a small c . 
of radicals. Once it is dosed, a c 
try is lost to democracy and frea . 

Communist dictatorships . 
proven rather unshakable, v : / 
right-wing dictatorships, odiou 
they may be, come and go in 
America, some even ending u , - 
democracies. Most Americans -, 
quite pleased to finally have a p 
dent who is willing to sand u, ' 
global communist expansion. - 
Mr, Morton should be hapF ; • 
give the people of Nicaragua 
same chance that his family $ - 
1940: the right to be free. - 
ALVARO MARTOJEZ-FONK 
HongKtf'-' 


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.. '^taidi 22, 1985 


HcraU>^SSribttttt 

WEEKEND 


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Page 7 


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VI 



if -ITvA’Id 


iach’s Turbulent Serenity 


by Joseph McLeUan 


--»■ WASHINGTON — Yesterday the 
world celebrated the 300(h birth- 
IvV day of Johann Sebastian Bach, so 
A T T much of whose music breathes an 
1 1 of unearthly peace: Listen to his “Sheep 
Wy Safely Graze,” for example, or the Air 
his third Suite for Orchestra, and you 
yit think that bis life was one or the purest 
m and serenity — at least as much seren- 
; as an overworked father of 20 children 
bid expect. 

‘Consider, then, a less celebrated Bach an- 
.versary (the 268th) that comes up near the 
‘ ti of the yean Nov. 6 is the day in 1717 


m 


ments to his satisfaction. His pupil J. P. 
Kirn burger said Bach would not tolerate 
being told that something was “impossible"; 
he “used to say, ‘It must be possible to do 
everything.’ ” Along with his perfectionism, 
he had a choleric disposition, and he lacked 


\ »jVv tL f d of the yean Nov. 6 is 

^ ' m jSSk i Uen he was thrown in jafl. 

. *■ v " iv v®ach was imprisoned and kept there until 

k. _ ' 'x. 2, according to a Weimar court record, 

Vause he wanted a new job. Orphaned at 

‘ and self-supporting by Lhe time he was 1 8, 

*■" 5 spent a large pprt of his life hunting for 

” T :y ^^ter jobs. He was turned down much more 

* ■ . . ten than he was hired, and in late 1717 he 

uned that you do not quit the service of an 
J» r;» ■ . Th-century German nobleman until said 

.bleman is ready to let you go. 

All the evidence indicates that his family 
e was harmonious. The Bachs were musi- 
. ms for seven generations, and Johann Se- 
lf |/1 / T itian. in the fifth generation, raised a fine 
hbp for the late 18th century. He used to 
M \ast that he could recruit an orchestra and 
_ orus in his own home. 

' • ' v^But he was also a' sort of public servant — 

--usic then was largely a function of church 
’* ‘ : state — and his work was less harmom- 

,'~ :r is than his (hardly abundant) free time. 
. ~~l '■ ich’s public life is well documented in 
’lf-‘ s 4in records, church and school reports, 

. ders. bills and receipts, memoirs of ao- 
.... . . 1 '-•-‘laintances and ihe archives of several city 

... ^-'■jvemments. From these old records, the 
*’ --.e o/ Bach appears almost as turbulent and 
as those of Mozart and Beethoven. 
Bach had to wait until long after the cen- 
:: "r -nnial of his birth for his genius to be 
‘ cognized outside a small circle of oonnois- 
• " ..nrs. which included Mozart and Beetho- 
’ ‘ ~~jl Mozart made string transcriptions from 
■ Tveral sections of “The Art of me Fugue," 
imposed preludes for them and wrote to Ids 
’ 1 - -’ rther that he had found music from which 

; could learn something. Beethoven first 
•• .:hieved wide recognition as a piano virtoo- 
•.•■v playing “The Well-Tempered Clavier" 
~ ad at the end of his life, Bach was the only 
- rear predecessor Beethoven had for some of 
■*. ..e ideas in his late quartets. But otherwise, 

. .-ach’smusic was hardly known for nearly 80 
— ars after his death. 

Recognition came finally in 1829, when 
'. ..tenddssohn revived the “St. Matthew Pas- 
on" in Leipzig, where Bach had worked for 

te last 27 years of his life. Since then, there 

ave been no limits to Bach's reputation: his 
tflueace can be seen in the work of every 
1 I Ion composer from Oippm to Bartok, and 

MU> 1 1 til) ill >s probably stronger today than at any’ 
, { f ne in the past 


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the ability to suffer fools gladly. 

For mud) of his adult life, Bach was sur- 
rounded by people whom he must have con- 
sidered fools. He had to work with than and, 
worse, be had to work for than, to accept 
their judgments and satisfy their musical 
tastes. Sometimes he simply refused to do so. 
He was a firm believer in rules: rules of art 
and rules of life. He was also fully aware of 
his own worth. When the rules were not 
properly observed or the value of his art not 
properly recognized — particularly when he 
thought his rights were being violated or the 
quality of his work was being undermined — 
be was always ready to fight. 

This pattern was established eariy. In Arn- 
stadt, where he got his first job as an organist 
when he was 18, he had a public brawl (in 
which he drew his sword) with a bassoonist. 
The town's consistory advised him that he 
must learn to “live among imperfections." 

Many of the documents of his life (more 
than half his surviving letters, for example) 
deal with controversies, usually between 
Bach and the bureaucrats of church and 


state. One reason may be that documents 
tend to be generated when there is conflict, 
while happy times go undocumented. 

Another reason is that he was often em- 
broiled in disputes. He fought with the sub- 
deacon of St Thomas Church in Leipzig 
over who should choose the hymns to be 
sung before and after the sermon, tradition- 
ally the cantor’s righL He fought with the 
authorities at the university in Leipzig over 
who should conduct Sunday services there, 
compose new music and collect the fees for 
this work — again traditionally his preroga- 
tive. He fought with the town council over 
the number oF musicians made available for 
services. He auditioned candidates for his 
choir school, pronounced them unfi t and 
saw them appointed despite his objections. 
And Bach was not the first choice for the 
Leipzig cantor’s job; he got it only because 
Georg Philipp Telemann and Christoph 
Graupner turned it down. Available docu- 
ments show that Bach's clavier may have 
been well tempered, but he was not. 

But today the names of his Leipzig con- 
temporaries are remembered, if at all, only 
because of their connection with Bach. So 
are the names of various members of the 
□obiHty who lorded it over him 

To those who know the circumstances, the 

Continued on page 9 


A Vintage Year for Duras 


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According to ms son Cad Philipp 
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Bach. An anonymous drawing of the 1730s. 


Hade in the Film Cutting Room 


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by Walter Kerr 

IT HW YORK — I am not in the 
‘|V | habit of applauding the opening 
: i ^ credits of any film, but I almost 
...L T had to be farably restrained from 
st such madness as I watched the opening 
•rxdits of “A Passage to India" go by. What 
. is the reason for my elation, considering 
’ • - at I hadn't as yet seen a foot of the film? 
.. mple. For the first time in my experience, 
meone had cook right out and told me 
M) made the picture. 

, . But did! need to be told? We go into the 
_ eater dead certain that David Lean made 
T. i Passage to India." Lean is a director. He 
\ reels motion pictures. He is, in my less 
an tentative opinion, the best British film 
' rector still active, and be may be the best 

■ irish film director ever. Line up “Brief 
Kounter" and “Great Expectations” and 

^ ^reaking the Sound Barrier” and “The 
I— — r j)i] idgc on the River Kwai" and “Lawrence 

1 f ) j fii f- 4 Aratoa" and maybe a few more, and you'll 
» . U bit of head-scratching to come up with 

-e man's match. 

7 - So, then, we expect the film’s opening 
. edits to reach a riimw with the customary 
Erected by David Lean.” But — and this is 
Kre the hurrahs are due — it doesn’t say 
at The full statement reads: 

“Directed and edited by David Lean.” 
Now this may seem a pretty simple stale- 
st But it constitutes, I do assure yon, a 

■ 'olationary moment in filmmaking. It has 
. '5ned what a man must be prepared to do 

, . _-j.if :! must succeed in doing — if he is to be 

1 - '' Sided nowadays as the true maker of a 

. n. 

?f course, it’s been a commonplace since 
: dawn of D.W. Griffith that film is a 
- Ector’s medium. That's been drilled into 
until we’re ready to spout oil and help 
re the energy problem, and, so far as it 
% it makes a certain obvious sense. Him 
't a writer’s medium, that’s for sure. Half 
thing s that a skilled writer has learned to 
with words are now taken care of, more 
. :vemcatiy and more appropriately, by the 

Kra and its pretty pictures. 

- lad film isn t an actor's medium, either, 
to we’ve always been told. Whatever an 
* x may have been trained to do on the 
(A here he has no responsibility for sus- 
■flttg the film’s tension over long stretches 
hue, no responsibility for the picture's 
tall shape. He steps before a lens, records 

■' ake" of several seconds or — if it doesn't 
' him too much — several minutes, then 
i into a handy corner and reads his news- 
~ tr or plays cards until the crew is ready 
.’him to shoot another small piece of film, 
'himself becomes a piece, or a series of 
1 • . tmnected pieces, that- will be put into 

. « later on. But he has nothing to do with 
1 essential task, with the piecmfrtogedwr 


P ARIS —In some 40 years as a femme 
de lettres. Marguerite Duras has 
achieved a rare immortality: She has 
become an adjective. What Duras- 
sien means depends on which side you are 
on. She arouses fascination, irritation, adula- 
tion, boredom — sometimes all at once. Her 
prose is diffi cult, spare, obsessive, easy 
enough to parody and very hard to imitate. 
She makes bad habits such as one-word 
sentences work. Always. And in both subject 
matter and in her actual phrasing, she re- 
peats herself, often. 

“Robbe-Grillet said, 'She repeats. She 
says again things that she has already said,’ ” 
Duras remarked in the theater whoe she is 

Mary Blume 

directing a revised version of her play, “La 
Musica." 

“He confuses things, Robbe-Grillet. He 
thinks that to repeat means to say the same 
thing. But if you say things in another way, 
they are new. He didn’t say that malicious- 
ly,” she added. “Easily perhaps, but not 
maliciously." 

“La Mnsica," which opened in Paris this 
week and which Duras also refers to as 
“Musica Musica” and “Musica IL" began in 
1966 as a one-act play for British television 
in which a just-divorced young couple meet 
at a hotel in Evreux for the last time. A new 
act has them talking in the hotel room with- 
out stop until dawn. “1 make them talk for 
hours and hours," Duras has said. “Just for 
the sake of talking." 

Hours of talk is definitely Durassien and, 
especially in her films, it drives some people 
mad (her film “Le Camion” was a mono- 
logue by Duras with an occasional reverse 
shot of Gerard Depardieu). It is a peculiarly 
French phenomenon for respected writers — 
Cocteau, Malraux, Robbe-Grillet — to di- 
rect films, but none has been as unremitting 
as Duras. 

With over a dozen films to her credit, she 
is an active and often innovative filmmaker. 
Cahiers de Cinema devoted a special issue to 
her in 1980 in which she gave a very funny 
account of filmiiig with Godard and quali- 
fied her film, “Aurelia Steiner,” as one of the 
most important pictures ever made. 

Her pictures are so static and un visual, 
says one French critic, that one suspects that 
she makes films in order to destroy the 
cinema. It isn't a medium she seems to love: 
In yet another book of homage she is quoted 
as saying, “I make films to fill my time. If I 
had ihe strength to do nothing, I would do 
nothing." 

Talking in the theater after a rehearsal of 
“La Musica,” she says she makes films be- 
tween books in order to keep writing. To 
write, she has said, is to be unable not to 
write. She is extremely productive and even a 
severe bout of alcoholism did not stop her 
from writing: “When I am writing I am not 
dying." ‘ 

Next month she will come out with a book 
of four pieces about the Occupation (she 
lived that, as she does now, cm Rue Saint- 
Benoit in Saint-Germ ain-des-Pr6s, and 
saved the life of a fellow Resistance member 
called “Moriand,” real name Francois Mit- 
terrand). 

The publication of the new book will mark 
the end of a most remarkable Duras season 
in which, in addition to “Musica" and a film, 
“Les Enfants," she came out with a novel, 
“L'Amant,” (The Lover), which became a 
best seller even before Duras talked about it 
on France’s best television program, Ber- 
nard Pivot’s “Apostrophes,” and which went 
on to win the prestigious G on court literary 
prize. 

“L’Amam" has sold extremely wdl and 
will be published in English this summer. It 
is set in Indochina, a French colony when 
Duras was bom than In 1914. Ha widowed 
mother (ha father had been a math teacber) 
taught at a mixed-race school, a Hern«mrng 
position for a Frenchwoman at the time, and 
scrabbled hard to raise ha daughter and two 
sons. 

“L’Amant” re-explores the period Duras 
described in “Un Barrage Centre le Padfi- 



'-' v 


David Lean, on location for “A Passage to India. 


itself. No, it’s the director who masterminds 
the operation from first to last: dictating 
what the audience w£Q see from shot to shot; 
organizing the separate shots into a coher- 
ent, varied, fixating whole. 


W " EVE been told all this and we’ve 
been believing it Some among us— 
the auteur theorists notably — have 
gone so far as to suppose that a given direc- 
tor’s imagination is indelibly stamped on 
each frame of film, malting each frame in- 
stantly recognizable as his and malting him, 
as a consequence, the film’s sole begetter. 
Hurrah for him, and when did that last 
happen? This little dream-scheme we’ve 


been outlining may be valid enough as the- 
ory, might even be desirable in practice: But 
the fact in case you didn’t catch an long ago, 
is that it doesn’t work or at least hasn't ever 
really worked in the Hollywood we know 
and love. If it worked, we could settle fa- the 
simple credit “Directed by David Lean” or 
“Directed by H. D’Abbaaie D’Anast” and 
let it go at thaL Dare we do so? Not on your 
life. Our vision of the director’s place in the 
scheme erf things bears very little relation to 
his actual clout, or lack of it To us he may be 
top dog. Behind the scenes he can be small 
potatoes indeed, once his shooting is done. 
There are mightier men than he about, just 

Continued on page 8 




-y assy ' A ill"' 1 T 




Marguerite Duras. 




' ■ . . ■ . .. .. 



Marguerite Duras at 18. 

que” (1950), but she says that while ha 
family was still alive she wrote around, rath- 
er than about, them. If some of the material 
in the new book is familiar, the story is noL 
“The story of my life does not exist," 
Duras writes in “L’AmanL" "It does not 
exist. There is never a center. No road, no 
line." A critic in Le Monde crossly noted, 
“Duras says the story of my life does not 
exist This is clearly untrue. She never stops 
telling it to us.” 


T HE three Donnadieu children (she 
became Duras when she became a 
writer) grew up like proud and unduly 
savages. At the age of 15 Vi Marguerite takes 
ha first lover, a Chinese 12 years ha senior, 
takes him for ha own pleasure, which is 
immense, and for his fortune, which is con- 
siderable. The affair ends a year and a half 
lata, when the giri (the book is written in the 
first and thud persons) leaves for France. 
“The book doesn’t really end," Duras says. 
“At its close it is just beginning. ‘L’Amant’ is 
like a book that is opening, a possibility. 
That’s why people threw themselves on iL r ’ 
“L’AmanL" is indeed an extraordinary 
book. Durassien but totally accessible. It was 
written mostly at Neauphle-le-Chfiteau, a 
village near Paris whose other distinguished 
residents include Deanna. Durbin and, until 
be returned in triumph to Iran, Ayatollah 
Ruhollah Khomeini, while Duras can labor 
over a short text for a year, she breezed 
through “L’Amant" in three months. 

“Sometimes I worked ten hours a day. But 
without fatigue. People have asked me why 
it’s such a success and I dunk it is because I 
found a great happiness in writing iL a great 
happiness that is transmitted to the reader. 

“Thai’s a new phenomenon in French 
book-selling, because to be serious you had 
to bore people. I didn’t do it purposely, but 
the book doesn’t bore. 

“It is a difficult book but 1 think people 





j ‘ - 




HMm BaotMfBV 


understand that I didn't make it difficult on 
purpose." 

With the publication of “L’Amanu" pho- 
tographs of the young Duras were given to 
the press: a most arresting face, quite lovdy 
and untrustworthy, with me impenitent eyes 
of a child guerrilla or a subway pickpocket. 
“L’Amanr was first intended as a collection 
of old pictures, rather than a novel, but it 
became centered on a photograph that was 
never taken, what Duras calls the absolute 
photograph: Marguerite, aged 15’4, stands 
on a ferry ova the Mekong River wearing, a 
man’s pink fedora with a black hatband, a 
pale silk dress so worn it is nearly transpar- 
enu and gold dancing shoes. On the river 
bank a young Chinese watches ha from his 
long, black, chauffeur-driven car. 

He is the lover but there are other, implied 
desires — for the girl's schoolmate, Hilene 
Lagonelle, and above all for ha two broth- 
ers: the sweet, slow younga one whose body 
resembles that of ha lover, and the danger- 
ous and bad older brother who robs her in 
Paris during the Occupation when ba hus- 
band is in a German camp and who reminds 
ha of the Robert Mitchum character in 
“The Night of the Hunter," a film that 
makes one faint with horror, she says. She 
has seen it four times. 

One senses that what pleases ba most in 
“L'Amant” is ha liberation in having talked 
freely about ha family without naming cul- 
prits. “There are no villains," she says. "Ev- 
eryone is innocent, even my older brother.” 

Because “L’Amant" began as a photo al- 
bum. Duras says she said to herself that she 
would pay less attention to her writing than 
usual. From this she accidentally developed 
a style she calls ecriture courante , a cursive 
style that she describes as “writing aban- 
doned to itself, left to itself. I sometimes had 
the feeling that the writing was going faster 
than I was." 

D URAS is a small terrier of a woman. 
Although she feels that critics ig- 
nored ha ova the last 10 years, she 
has staunch admirers, and Paul Websta and 
Nicholas Powell, in their recent book “Sl- 
Gomain-des-Prfis," call ha the queen of the 
quarta. She talks much as she writes: the 
pauses, the repetitions, the sudden rhythms 
all demand attention. They are the verbal 
equivalent of the Ancient Marina's grasp. 
There are lots of stories, some perhaps true, 
about Duras groupies; one feels she does not 
discourage them. 

“My readers, who were already fanatical 
about me, were cross about the Prix Gon- 
coun," she says. “They said they are taking 
you away from us, you belonged only to us.” 

She belongs to no one and still considers 
herself a Creole, a French woman born out- 
side France. “All my books come from thaL” 
she says. “I am very glad to be bom else- 
where/’ 

Of ha books she prefers “Le Ravissement 
de Lai V. Stein" (1964) and “Le Vice-Con- 
sul" (1965). “I am very happy when I read 
“Lol V. Stein’ but the strongest and most 
violent jpy is ‘Le Vice-Consul.’ I think there 
aren't many books like it in our century. I’m 
□ol being pretentious. I have a certain idea 
of myself,” she adds, smiling. “One can call 
it pretentious. I don’t care. It’s what I think:" 

A forma member of the French Commy- 
nist Party, she is no longer politically active 
and no longer claims an interest in feminism 
(“I discussed it politely in newspapers for 
years but in fact I never gave it a thought"). 
After neglect and alcoholism (ha cure, typi- 
cally was documented in a book try an 'ad- 
mirer) she is on top right now and enjoying 
iL She was quite pleased to tell the aston- 
ished Pivot on television that Sartre was not 
a writer and did not know what writing is! 

“Sartre,” she says in the theater after tfie 
rehearsal, “is one reason why the French are 
mentally and politically retarded. He consid- 
ered himself the interpreter of Marxism. You 
know how in religion you haven’t the right to 
go directly to Goa, you must go by way o£a 
saint? Well Sartre and Sartnsm woe the 
great intercessors of Marxism. No, he wasift 
a writer. He wasn’L” 

With a grin thaL despite ha years and 
distinctions can only be called cheeky, she 
adds that suddenly she finds it easier to tab 
frankly — about ha family, about the Resis- 
tance, about Sartre. “It’s all the same to rfie 
now, I couldn't care less. Getting old has ivs 
good points, too, I assure you. You’ll see.” ■ 









IKEHnKtfHHKKK 121 





Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22.1985 


TRAVEL 


Lost on the Trail of George Sand and Chopin 


by Anne Sinclair Mehdevi 


V ALLDEMOSA, Majorca — There have been a number of 
celebrated writers in history whose books drift into oblivion 
while their lives capture the imagination of posterity. A 
foremost example is George Sand: Her works constitute a 
Homeric catalog and in the nnd-19tn century die was the best known 
woman writer in Europe 


Who reads “Indiana" or “Spiridkm” today, except students of 
French literature? Yet approximately 300,000 people annually come 
here to the Charterhouse of Valldemosa for a look at the two “cells" 
where Sand, her two children and Frtdriic Chopin presumably 
stayed in the winter of 1838-39. 

The word “presumably" is used advisedly. There is no indisput- 
able record as to which of the 12 cells the famous lovers occupied. 


Sand mentions only one cell in her bode “A Winter in Majorca,” first 
published in 1842. The term “cell" is also misleading. The Carthu- 
sian monks who lived in the Charterhouse enjoyed spacious three- 
room cells, each with a large garden and a stunning view. When they 
were evicted by an anti-derical government in 1835, private families 
bought up the apaitmaits. After Sand and her group left, all the cdl 
owners denied that la francesa bad lived in theirs. 

George Sand had a frightening and unfavorable i mpr e ssi on 
on the locals, going around in trousers with a agar in her month, but 
the real reason no owner wanted to admit that this eccentric 
household had stayed in his or her cell was Chopin's consumption, a 
disease believed to be virulently contagious and of which the Major- 
cans were deathly afraid. It was the castom to bom every piece of 
furniture and any linen that a consumptive had touebed. 

In 1929 Edouard Ganche. president of the Chopin Society of 
Paris, came to Majorca to do a little detective work, and arrived at 
the conclusion that Cell No. 4 was the one. It happened that this cdl 
was for sale and Ganche urged the heirs of Sand’s banker to buy it 
and set up a museum. But someone beat them to the punch and it 




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also had its backers and its proofs. 

* Until 1956, when an uneasy truce was mad*, there was consider- 
able squabbling between the owners of the two cells. Now, a single 
ticket (225 pesetas, or about $1.20) covers both cells and the visitor 


can choose. The yearly take, a gross in the trillions of pesetas, is 
divided. 

Though the mystery of which cell has not been solved to every- 
one's satisfaction, it has at least been laid to resL But there is the 
second mystery. Which piano? F»rh cdl displays “Chopin's piano." 
In this case, however, the solution is dearer. 

The piano Chapin got from the firm of Heyd arrived in Palma in 
late November 1838. Customs of ficials wanted 500 francs in gold 
before they would release it. This amount — almost half the value of 
the piano — was rductandy paid, and letters written by both Sand 
and Chopin announce that it arrived in perfect condition. Chopin set 
to work, completing the set of 24 Preludes and working on the C- 
sbarp-atinor Scherzo and the C-minor Polonaise, among others. 

But his sickness worsened. In early March 1839, they set sail 
without the piano. The custo m s people had wanted annrhw 500 
francs in gohi for an export permit, so it was left behind with Sand’s 
banker, who was asked to seQ it and forward the money. No one in 
Palma would buy it because it was believed to be contaminated, so 
the banker's wife, who did not share the local fears, asked her 
husband to boy it far her. It has remained with die banker's heirs for 
almost ISO years and is on display in Cdl 4. 

And what about the piano m Cdl 2? It is thought to be the one 
referred to as le pauvre piano majorquin, die one used by Chopin 
before his Pleyd came. 

In hex book about Majorca, Sand took a jaundiced view of the 
inhab i tant * She called them monkeys, ba rhatjan^ amt thieves and 

S hasized their “shameless dishonesty and gross greed." Today, in 
tirtn to pesetas harvested through tourism to the reiiq there are 
peripheral sources of income. Chartered around the Charterhouse are 
souvenir shops, restaurants^ postcard displays as well as book kiosks 
where hundreds of copies of Sand's book, translated into four 
langnages, are on sale. This must be sweet revenge. ■ 



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Film 


Continued from page 7 


- , * Vi 

waiting to pounce and to make minQesteai — or i 


meringue — out ^ any man's picture. 

I must give you an example because none of us likes brim 1 
disillusioned or having his most cherished notions challenged--''" 
particularly when the notions are logical eriough. A fdvyeais agnl . ■' 
became interested in the iflm work of actor-director John CroQtwefl . 1 

Would you, by any chance, recognize his name right off? 

My interest stemmed From the fact that I” was working on a tbcc^ ' 
about Bette Davis's career, and enjoying myself ttrormously, but] 
couldn’t fw the life of me remanba' the name of the man wnotnade - -• 

.i «* .L.. nrnmin * tUr “Of Tfunwn Rniut«M n >1 ■ 


r ut 


ieJ 


soaring 






t -#■ t- r-r 

mm 


i j ru i mi | How IAAW V* r — “ffllv 

the film that made the woman a star. “Of Human Bondage,” that is 

- Ca T vnatttor tin Tnhn C * mmufft fha 


Uic null UiaLllMUb Utw avium* MIOL Q , -• 

to say. So I looked the matter np. John Cromw^ directed the fih^ . 
which 1 think we may call a milestone. ,• 

Him I thought If he could make one that good, mightn't he havt; - 
another of some quality along the fine? T was stunned to-' 
discover that — as one of the first stage recruits brought 10 Ihc Wcs^ 
Coast for talking pictures — he’d done, right off, three erf ray favodk ■ ‘ 

films of the early \30s: William PowriTs “Street of Chance," the JU ”... 
Skdly-Nancv Carroll "Dance of life" (called "Bnriesque” in - 
theater), and the best fihn version of “Tom Sawyer” I’ve yet sea 
Productions tumbled out of him over the years, more than 50 oi • ' 
than. There were film versions of well-known stage plays: “Tht .. 
Silver Cord," “The Enchanted Cottage,” "Abe Lincoln in Illinois ‘ 

. . . . n U/,.1 TNI - 


m 


tAIVVI WAtoy * O * ton, 

And the exaberant Ronald Colman-Donglas Fairbanks Jr. “Priioea 
of Zenda" carried his name , as did another 20 films thereafter. 

You’d probably assume that a man of 50 films and mohipk' 
successes would be relatively untouchable. But while I was askuri. 


successes would be rdauvdy untouchable. But while I was asloqg, 
questions here and there about that glossy, mocking bit of derringt: ■■ 
do, “Zenda," I came upon some odd bits of information. It seenu • 
tha t Cromwell made the picture, all right — until it was finished - 
Then the front office derided that it didn't care much for the ’ 
rfimsnrif. sequence in which Ronald Colman and Madeleine Canpfl 
sacrifice their romantic grand passion for the regal duties the lad) , 
has inherited. George Cukor, it seems, was brought in to redo the . ' . 
sequence: After which the front office derided it wasn't quite * 
sansfied with the whole of the long, crackling duel between Coumn ' 
and Fairbanks. Victor Fleming was called in to improve that. 


ant 

the 






however, to see how Cromwell could safely be called the worift .. -• 
regisseur, its auteur, its daddy. What happened probably didnV 
bother him much. He was no doubt a realist who’d been this waj 
before. But how are all the rest of us to speak of it, to think of it?, 

We can search for exceptions to this filmmaking by committee ', 
but the directors who run the show, and no nonsense, are rare. ' , , 

But attend. The executives who so love to “improve” on » : ■ 
director’s work by trimming here and padding there and calling h, - 
troubleshooters to devise new transitions do not, in the end, tend, .t ’ 
the ftiwi themselves. The film, along with instructions for fixing if- - 
goes down to a lab, where a lone little man with a scissors sit. - 
writing. Depending upon the size of the operation, there maybe 
considerable crew similarly equipped and similarly waiting. Thes-r. 
are the editors, die cutters, the often genuinely bright people wfr.-: - 
must rip out of the film what they’ve been told to rip out and thec : :- 
after the film has been treated thus roughly, turn around and make i- 
all smooth again. 

At the very least it seems to me, the editor's credit should h- '• 
rescued from its place near the bottom of the list an area we may ca. 
Oblivion. And 1 don’t mean the editor should be riven a mere aaK-fii : 
leg up, nudged one inch higher in the Pantheon of creative peopl - 
who do things. The best he ever gets now is fourth or fifth spo. - 
somenbere after the principal (Aotographcr and two or three sacec : 
writers. Second position is where he bdongs, and no lower, if we’irr 
still going to hold him to also-ran status. - . I*. 1 


i : ;« 

,: wri 

- ' -k 

t 

. \ ithl 


But we may hope for more. I think Lean is trying to accomplish 
two things with that new double credit It's not vanity. If he’d meiet • - 
wished to add to his own glory, his credit could have read “Written ■ 


modation, award-winning 
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and Directed by David Lean,” since he did do the adaptation of Ek:-'- 
Forster’s nova. as he readies deep downward to pu^: 

another craft up onto Olympus, he certainly isn't making himse * :: 
more important He’s making the editor more important He ; lz: 
setting a nice little precedent, since sooner or later the editor will L“-r- 
somebody else. I tbmk he’s after fairness, and wants us to undents*: . 


where and by whom the west gets done. 

I also think he’s saying that whenever one man can do both job . .. 
for God’s sake let him. h. ... 


e 1985 The New York Tones 


WEEKEND 


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Page 9 i 




FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


Trans- Atlantic Air Fares 
And the Soaring Dollar 


by Paul Grimes 


N EW YORK — As Donald L 
Pevsner sees it, Americans are be- 
ing discriminated against by the 
prices they most pay to fly round- 
up to Europe. The crux of his argument, as 
Contained in a complaint to the U. S. De- 
partment of Transportation, is the dol- 
lar prices that Americans pay are up to 80.2 
percent more than what Europeans pay in 
local currencies for trans-Atlantic round- 
trips that begin abroad. 

For example, when he filed his complaint 
last month, a first-class round-trip ticket 
from New York to Brussels cost $3,060, but 
the same ticket originating in Brussels cost 
only 107,560 Belgian francs, then the equiva- 
lent of $1,698. 

So Pevsner, a Miami lawyer and consumer 
advocate, wants the Transportation Depart- 
ment to compel member »iHin« of the Inter- 
national Air Transport Association (LATA) 
to stop pricing round-trips at twice the one- 
way fare from the originating country. In- 
stead, he would have Diem add the sum of 
the outbound fare, in the currency of the 
originating country, to the sum of the in- 
bound fare, in the currency of the country 
where that leg begins. He says this would 
assure “that similarly si tuated passengers 
■ ray identical fares when the two one-way 
- legs are added together.” 

Pevsner’s assault on IATA stems from its 
refusal, when the dollar is strong, to raise 
local-currency fares for international travel 
that begins abroad. He says this has created 
“a prima fade system of egregious discrimi- 
nation” against U. S. travelers. 

However, many travelers have found ways 
to ease the problem. One is not to buy a 
round-trip ticket, but to apply a modifica- 
tion of the formula that Pevsner proposes for 
IATA. You would buy two one-way tickets, 
paying for the outgoing trip at the dollar 
price and for the return at the dollar equiva- 
lent of the local-currency pace in the coun- 
try where that leg will originate This is 
perfectly legal and can be done by a travel 
agent through an airline computer system. 
The only restriction is that the two tickets 
not bear consecutive numbers; in other 
words, your agent would issue a ticket to 
some other traveler on the same airline in 
between issuing your two one-ways. 
Pevsner, however, objects to this practice, 
\ which is called “double-ticketing,” and is 
' widely used by major corporations for their 
international travelers. Gting his New York- 
Brussels example, he says “double-ticketing” 
would reduce the overcharge on the round 


$450 and Rome for S569. The ads never 
name the airlines; sometimes passengqis are 
told the name when they pay for their tick- 
ets, sometimes not until a week before depar- 
ture, because not until then will the agency 
know on which airline it has seats. Once you 
buy such a ticket, penalties can be stiff if you 
cancel — up to 100 percent. 

Where do such tickets come from? No 
agent would speak for attribution, but some 
are known to come from barter houses 
through which airlines trade free tickets for 
advertising. Others come from high-volume 
travel agencies and wholesalers who lower 


Discrepancies, 
and how to make 
the most of them 


trip from $1,362 to $681, but the total would 
still be 40.1 percent more than a passenger 
starting from Brussels would have to pay. 

Such realities of the international air busi- 
ness may seem to have more meaning for the 
j business traveler. Vacationers, unlike most 

business travelers, can make reservations 
i and pay for tickers far in advance, making 

them eligible for excursion round-trip fares 
that sharply undercut the normal IATA 
j economy-class rates. For midsummer , Trans 

i World Airlin es, for example, is selling mid- 

week round-trip travel from New York to 
London far $614 (compared with $378 this 
winter), provided you buy your ticket at least 
' . 21 days before departure and stay away from 

? 7 to 1*80 days. Tne unrestricted New York- 

I i , London fare projected for midsummer is 
f $676 each way, although there will be a 

| 5 standby one-way fare of $239 for seats still 

{ \ unsold on the day of departure. 

* For almost every bargain fare for Ameri- 

• cans, however, there is an even better bar- 

< gain for Europeans — at least as long as the 

I dollar remains strong. The airlines in the 

y 1 United States don't luce to talk about such 
; 1 discrepancies, but last summer, for example, 

a vacationer from Spain could fly to New 
t Yak and back by scheduled flight for the 

equivalent in pesetas of only $250. Residents 
of the United States are normally precluded 
from such bargains because of the IATA 
policy that a round-trip ticket must be paid 
“ for in the currency of the country where 

l travel originates. 

- Under heavy competition, however, the 

, policy is gradually crumbling. Newspaper 

travel sections are carrying more and more 
advertisements from travel agencies 
offering discounted tickets. Many ads are for 
charter flights, but some axe for seats on 
scheduled flights at prices well below those 
' approved by IATA, such as round trips from 

k New York to London for S358, Paris for 


prices by sacrificing part of their sales com- 
missions. Still others come from wholesalers 
in London, where discounting is rampant. 

Some round-the-world tickets, usually in- 
volving Asian-based airlines, come from 
Bangkok, and are sold for $500 or so below 
the normal IATA economy fare of $1,999 for 
travel originating in the United States. 
“Bangkok is a very peculiar market,” said 
Mahendrasinhi Chudasama, Air India's 
public relations mawiappr for North America. 
^Everything there is discounted. Everything 
there is negotiated between the parties in- 
volved.” 

If you buy a discounted ticket, it does not 
matter where it was validated — New York, 
London, Bangkok or wherever. But be sure 
that it states not what you paid for it, but an 
lATA-approved price, in dollars. 

Is it legal? From your standpoint, yes. In 
the Uni tad States it is technically illegal to 
sell an international air ticket for less than 
the established price, but according to Wally 
Stef any, a spokesman for the Department of 
Transportation, “The law does not apply to 
consumers.” An official of the department’s 
general counsel's office said, “Any way a 
consumer can get a lower air fare, by beg- 
ging, borrowing or stealing — I shouldn’t say 
stealing — is O.K. with us.” 

Officials of the Transportation Depart- 
ment, which assumed many of the con aimer 
functions of the now-defunct Civil Aeronau- 
tics Board, openly concede that they have 
little intention of trying to police interna- 
tional discounting. One said, A It’s a situation 
we typically have not paid much attention 
to. The only thing we are upholding is the 
integrity of the international tariff system, 
but frankly, the United States has been Dy- 
ing to get lower fares. So we have a technical 
violation that does not conflict with our 
polity, and we treat it as such.” 

At IATA headquarters in Montreal, Jose- 
phine Reach, an information officer, said; 
“We are aware that discounting exists but 
there isn’t much we can do about it. We 
don’t police it anymore. We have no jurisdic- 
tion. We used to have a compliance bureau, 
but no more.” 

While aiming at maximum revenue, many 
major trans-Atlantic airlines are involved in 
some sort of quiet discounting in an effort to 
keep business away from low-price earners 
and especially from charters. About one- 
third of the 5.6 million Americans who went 
to Europe last year are believed to have 
flown charter, a figure that disturbs the 
scheduled services. 

Last summer saw the default of three 
major organizers of charter flights and of 
one sizable airline that flew them. In all these 
cases, however, there was at least some ad- 
vance indication of instability, a point that 
makes it essential to ask your travel agent 
about the record of any charter you consider 
taking. On the other baud, most charters go 
smoothly, and it is hard to beat such round- 
trip prices advertised for tins summer from 
New York as 5404 to Amsterdam, $438 to 
London, $ 458 to Paris and $520 to Rome. 
Some prices may drop as departures near, 
but as experience has shown, the cheapest 
charter operator is not always the best. ■ 

® 1985 The New York Times 

Roger Collis’s column will resume next week. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Bach’s Birthday 


Continued from page 7 


dedication of the “Brandenburg” Concertos 
makes particularly discouraging reading. It 
is written in the obsequious style commonly 
adopted for addressing potentates at that 
rime Bach recalls having played for the 
margrave and noticing that he “took some 
pleasure in the small talent for music that 
Heaven has given me." 

Then be offers the concertos, “very hum- 
bly” be gging the margrave “not to judge 
their imperfections rigorously by the fine 
and delicate taste in musical matters which 
all the world knows yon possess." It appears 
that Bach was exploring the possibilities of a 
job. No job was forthcoming, and the mar- 
grave apparently never bothered to have a 
performance of the concertos. 

I T is currently fashionable (and, on the 
whole, a commendable fashion) to play 
his music on 18th-century rather than 
modem instruments with the pitch lowered 
about a half-tone. 

' But Bach's music can be performed effec- 
tively on instruments he never imagined. It 
has been arranged for Moog synthesizer, for 
the scat chorus of the Swingle Singers, fra 
brass quintets and jazz ensembles, even for 
the humble harmonica, and it has retained 
its power. Leopold Stokowski arranged some 
of his organ music for a post- Rimsky-Korsa- 
kov orchestra with strange and wonderful 
results. Ferruccio Busoni transcribed his or- 
gan music for piano, adding even more virtu- 
oso flourishes. Bach’s harpsichord music has 
even taken on a new life, and revealed un- 
guessed dimensions, on that strangest of all 
instruments, the Glenn Gould piano with 
fhum obbligato. 

^ The first one to transcribe Bach’s music 
into new forms was, of course, Johann Se- 
bastian Bach. He was a frequent self-plagia- 
rist — partly because of deadline pressures, 
but also because he was constantly trying to 
find better embodiments Tor some of his 
musical ideas. A list and summary discus- 


sion of his self-borrowings would fill a book 
— and has. In “Bach the Borrower,” Nor- 
man CarreO uses nearly 400 pages to trace, 
for example, the transformation of the Over- 
ture to Suite No. 4 for Orchestra into the 
choral introduction of a Christmas cantata. 

Fra about half a century, since Wanda 
Landowska brought the harpsichord back to 
life, there has been a controversy about 
whether performances of Bach on the piano 
should be allowed. One short answer is that, 
whether or not this is good for Bach, it is 
certainly good fra pianists. Another is that 


Bach’s music should be played on any instru- 
ment that can handle tne notes. 

But there remains the stubborn fact that 
pianos, modem orchestras and jazz combos 
produce a kind of sound that Bach did not 
envision when he wrote the music. The pi- 
ano, for example, has capacities for crescen- 
' dos and sustained tones that were not avail- 
able on the harpsichord, and when these are 
used the music is changed. It is not true, 
however, that Bach never saw or played a 
piano. In his later years, he actually advised 
the organ builder Gottfried SQbennann on 
the design and construction of pianos. He 
even sola pianos for him; at least one bill of 
sale still exists. 

But in general, it is iHuminatmg to be able 
to hear Bach’s music the way Bach himself 
heard iL The sonatas and partiias for unac- 
companied violin, for example, become 
something quite different when they are 
played on a Baroque violin — less b rillian t in 
tone, less difficult in passages requiring more 
than one note at a time, and more purely 
musicaL 

Similarly, the 20th-century voice (particu- 
larly an operatically trained voice) is quite 
different from what was heard in the St. 
Thomas Church in the 1720s — more indis- 
criminate in the use of vibrato, for one thing 
And in Bach’s church the soprano and alto 
parts were sung by boys, not women. 

In his lifetime, Bach was most respected as 


a performer on the organ — like Mozart, he 
wrote music somewhat more elaborate and 
demanding than most people wanted A for- 
mer s tud e n t, Johann Adolph Scheibe, wrote 
an anonymous article in 1737 (probably re- 
flecting fairly common opinions) that 
praised him as a performer and condemned 
him as a compose r. “One is amazed at his 
ability.” he said, “and one can hardly con- 
ceive how it is possible for him to achieve 
such agility, with his fingers and with his 
feet, in the crossings, extensions, and ex- 
treme jumps that he manages, without mix- 
ing in a single wrong tone ” But Bach's 
compositions, he said, were “turgid” and 
lacked “the natural element”; he “darkened" 
his music’s beauty “by an excess of art" 

Part of this critique is an index of chang- 
ing tastes. During his lifetime, the Baroque 
style gradually went out of fashion, but Bach 
continued to work in a polyphonic style. 
Meanwhile, some composers were concen- 
trating on a tingle melody with accompani- 
ment; others (pointing toward Mozart and 
Beethoven) were beginning to find new 
depth in harmonic sequences, concentrating 
on music as a series of chordal structures. 

Bach wrote this kind of music once or 
twice, and he trained his sons to use these 
styles in the next generation. But, conscious- 
ly or not, he chose to be the culmination of 
the Baroque rather than the groundbreaker 
for new styles. 

Chances are that he did not think of his 
music as a historical phenomenon; be pro- 
duced music as needed (for teaching, for a 
religious service, a conceit, a royal birthday), 
the way a carpenter produces shelves and 
cabinets. Composing for posterity was not 
yet fashionable and he probably did not 
raped his unpublished compositions (prac- 
tically all his works) to survive him. He was 
nevertheless his own severest critic, much 
tougher than posterity. ■ 

® 1985 The Washington Parr 


Visiting Pozzuoli’s Sulfurous Crater 


by Michele McCormick 


N APLES — Franco Bruno is an 
easy man to find- Every day he is 
at Solfatara, the fuming crater in 
the center of Pozzuch, where he 
works as a guide. “I don’t care to take a day 
off,” he says. “I like it here. I would rather be 
here than to be at my house." 

Bruno’s real preference for the steamy 
crater may seem surprising, but then bis 
current house isn't really home. He was one 
of 40.000 residents evacuated two years ago 
when significant earth tremors began to oc- 
cur in the area daily, and he hasn't been 
really happy since be moved from PozzuolL 
“It's nice here,” he says, gesturing to the 
broad outdoors. He sniffs the sulfurous air. 
“It’s healthy.” 

Bruno is just one in a long line of It al ia n s 
and visitors who praise the healthful benefits 
of the crater. The Romans built a spa within 
the crater where they could sit in natural 
steamy baths and breathe the fumes that are 
said to give relief from ailments including 
asthma, arthritis, rheumatism and bronchi- 
tis. The crumbling front of the ancient spa 
has been restored, and in season modern-day 
visitors wait in line to step inside one of two 
tiny cavelike rooms where the temperatures 
are high and the fumes thick. 

It is Vesuvius which has brought fame and 
infamy to Naples. But these days it is Solfa- 
tara, named for the prevalent sulfuric rock 
and fumes, that is the more interesting. 

Just a few miles north of Naples, the crater 
of Solfatara is the predominant feature of an 
area long known as the “flaming fields” fra 
its unusual properties. Reservoirs of magma 
within the earth are responsible for the natu- 
ral hot baths in places as far apart as the 
suburb of Agnano and the island of Ischia 
Most of the time the volcanic material mani- 
fests its presence benignly through vents of 
steam in unexpected places, or the much- 
appreciated hot baths. But at times the activ- 
ity takes another form. The hot material 
compresses or expands very gradually, caus- 
ing the land above to rise or fall measurably. 
The phenomenon is known as bradyseism, 
from the Greek word meaning slow. 

Residents of the area take bradyseism in 
stride. After all the listing of truly cataclys- 
mic events in the area is short. There was an 
eruption at nearby Avemo some 3,500 years 
ago. Solfatara itself, about 5,000 years old, 
last erupted in 1198. An eruption which 
formed a new mountain, Monte Nuovo, took 
place in 1538. And that’s about iL The local 
folks have so long viewed the crater at Solfa- 
tara as benign that the town has built up to 
the very edge. 

But complacency most recently ended in 
October 1982, when Pozzuoli was shocked 
by an earth tremor that measured 4 2 on the 
Richter scale. Not serious enough to do 
severe damage it nonetheless caused irrepa- 
rable structural weaknesses in the oldest 
buildings- For nearly two years the ground 
slowly rose and the tremors continued, weak 
but many times a day. No single tremor 
inflicted terrible damage, but Pozzuoli was 
gradually crumbling under the constant 
stress. Thousands were evacuated or moved 
away of their own accord as the bradyseism 
continued. Others, loath to leave the area 
that had been their family’s home for genera- 
tions, spent the days in their apartments, but 
slept outside in tents at nighL 

T HE bradyseism did not slow the flow 
of tourists to Solfatara. In fact there 
were more viators, for now scientists 
came daily to measure temperatures, and 
local people stopped in to see how things 
looked. Over the centuries buildings have 
covered up and blocked what natural vents 
may have existed in PozzuolL But in the 
crater one can plainly see the evidence of the 
massive force that is seeking release. 

Bruno’s tour begins with a little demon- 
stration. “Listen please,” he instructs visitors 
in English. I talian or German. Then he picks 
up a rock and heaves it onto the sandy 
ground some feet away. The result is a drum- 
uke boom. Bruno notes the startled looks 
with pleasure. “The crust here is only about 
five meters thick.” he announces. 

Two kilometers (1.2 miles) in circumfer- 
ence, the crater at Solfatara is wider than 
Vesuvius, but not as deep. Solfatara bottoms 
out flatly, and is edged with greenery includ- 
ing briar and sweet-smelling laureL 
But the vegetation dies away near the hot 
center of the crater. Here the earth is a sandy 
base of aluminum silicate and the steamy 
fumoroles lie in all directions. Bruno points 


out the various “mouths” that can be seen, 
and heard, for some gurgle distinctly. 

Then he points to the ground. A thin 
yellow line marks the silicate like a faint scar. 
Bruno sticks a metal prod into the line, and 
when he withdraws it steam rushes ouu 
, Bruno’s route through the crater is rarely 
precisely the same. In a few weeks the tiny 
yellow line be just pierced will be a crack, 
then a fissure. It will no longer be safe to 
walk that way. Metal fences are set up on 
moveable concrete slabs, and new wooden 
fences sprout each week around the open, 
growing cauldrons of steam. 

At one side of the crater is a small old 
building which was once used by scientists 
studying the crater. Bruno used to take his 
tourist groups around (hat building and 
show them a place where the sand bubbled 
as if boiling. Then he would ask them to wait 
for three minutes while he boiled an egg in 
the hot sand. But that area is now closed, 
unsafe because of the steam geysers that 
have opened there. 

So Bruno does a trick with a torch instead. 
He asks a lady to stand in an area where 
steam is rising from the ground. Then he 
lights his newspaper torch and waves it at the 
ground in a broad circle around her. Sudden- 
ly the flow of steam increases and the wom- 
an, engulfed, disappears almost completely 
from view. The amount of steam that flows is 
the same, Bruno explains, but the smoke 
particles have somehow allowed us to see it 
better. In the same way, he adds, steam is 
more viable on a humid day. 

Across the crater's sandy expanse and into 
the trees on the other side another surprise 
awaits — a camping ground. Few Italians 
sleep in Solfatara, but every summer the 
rampin g ground is filled with tourists from 
other nations who feel no concern. Even 
during the time of the most active brady- 
seism, when tremors were frequent, tourists 
stayed at the camping ground. 

Once, when Bruno had just finished grad- 
ing a group and had taken them into the uttle 
souvenir stand by the camping ground, a 
tremor suddenly struck. ^What’s this?” ex- 
claimed one woman as the shop manager 
urged everyone to remain calm. “This is a 
liule too timely. Is this supposed to persuade 
me to buy something?" 

For the time bong, the tremors in Pozzuo- 
li have come to a halL The town remains 
half -empty, scaffolding everywhere to shore 
up weakened buildings. But the ground has 
slopped rising An ancient Greek temple 
near Pazzuoli’s marketplace which had risen 
more than two meters out of the water over a 
two year period has now dropped back a 
millim eter or two. 

A calm has descended on the district, just 
as has happened in the past But those who 
visit Solfatara know that the calm down in 
the town may be deceptive. Bruno, for one, is 
glad the scientists still come each day to take 
their readings. “When the temperature starts 
rising Hffiin, then the crater could erupt,” he 
says. “It could erupt but 1 don’t think 
it will erupt soon.'' 

Solfatara crater in Pozzuoli is open daily. 
Admission is l,70Q lire. The guide fee for a 
group of four is J 0.000 lire. ■ 


Part of the Roman spa, inside the crater. 


■ ADVERTISEMENT. ■ 


' “ MAKE MINE A LARGE ONE . 


BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HAPPIER TIMES. 

WHO WOULD have thought a new play on botany would prove a 
source of constant hilarity throughout the evening? But despite the 
lethargy the topic instantly induced in one at school, such a subject is 
keeping audiences rolling throughout Europe. 

ON TOUR 

PART OF ITS immense charm is that “Make mine -a large one” has 
such a wide appeaL (Though one must confess that those with a more 
cultured taste will probably find it wittier than those who labour 
under the misconception that Shakespeare's ‘Taming of theShrew' 
is a course in animal husbandry.) The plot has an international 
flavour. The main personalities are drawn from 
countries as diverse as Morocco, Saxony and Indo- 
China and feature such characters as Coriander, 

Angelica, Orris and Juniper. Although at first sight 
such a mixture might appear a little uncomfortable, 
it is the skill with which they have been s eamlessly 
blended that guarantees the end result. 

I raise my glass to the creators of the production, 

Bombay Gin. It is indeed their unique distillation 
that keeps one amused. 

And I for one shall oft. return to my favourite bar 
to watch it run and run— into my glass. 


} 







Page 10 


UVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


TRAVEL 


The Hollywood Restaurant Game: 
Stars, Moguls, Deals — and Food 


by Robot Lindsey 


I OS ANGELES — Louis B. Mayer, who 
ruled MGM for decades like a feu- 
dal autocrat, once decreed that 
J chicken soup and m&tzohs should 
always be served in the studio’s commissary, 
partly to remind his fellow filmmakers of 
their humble beginnings. Both items are still 
on the mean at MGM, but today’s moguls 
often opt for fancier fare and surroundings. 

In the movie business, restaurants are 
where deals are made, stars are bom and 
relationships are formal People here like to 
say that the motion picture industry is a 
“business of relationships'’ — between 
agents and actors, writers and directors, pro- 
ducers and studio chiefs. Often, the relation- 
ships are developed over lunch or dinner on 
an expense account. 

Restaurants rise and fall in popularity in 
Los Angeles as capriciously as the tastes of 
American moviegoers, although, on average, 
they probably have more staying power than 
studio heads themselves. 

Among the current favorites are The Ivy, 
Morton’s, Spago, La Serre, Michael’s, 
Trumps, Orlando Orsinfs, E Giordano’s and 
Jimmy’s. In addition, there are perhaps a 
dozen or more perennials that continue to 
attract Hollywood people, such as the Bistro, 
L’Orangerie, Le Sl Germain, Scandia, Ma 
Maison, La Scala, the Beverly Hills Hotel's 
ever-popular Polo Lounge and, for the older 
generation, Ghasen's. 

Just because a place is popular with Holly- 
wood people, don’t expect especially good 
service or food, even if a meal costs about 
S50 a person for food and wine, the average 
at the most popular places. “Actors are pret- 
ty informal ana most aren’t that sophisticat- 
ed,” said Irving Lazar, the agent “They can 
eat but they can’t dine.” 

You may have some luck and have a 
memorable dinner in one of Hollywood’s 
favored dining spots. But among the criteria 
that determine their popularity, food probar 
bly ranks below ambience, status appal and 
popularity with peers. 

Several thing* make dining at an upscale 
restaurant different in Los Angeles than at 
comparable places in New York, London 
and many other dries. 

Few, if any, people take a taxi or walk to a 
restaurant for dinner. The sprawling urban 

SEE Sincefew restaurantsliave conve- 
nient public parking lots, this means custom- 
ers must hand over their cars to valet parking 
attendants. Until recently, parking was a 
free service, with tipping left to the discre- 
tion of the individual diner. Recently, how- 
ever, even the fanciest restaurants have be- 
gun posting s mall signs demanding a 
minimum of $2 for valet parking. Some din- 
os try to beat the system by parking on a 
side street and walking to the restaurant, but 
attendants consider that bad form and some 
gaze idly at the intruders as they enter the 
restaurant. 

In some dries, dining tends to begin an 


evening of entertainment that might indude 
the theater, ballet or a movie. Here, dining 
out often is the evening’s entertainment. 
Partly because people spend so much time 
on the freeways getting from one place to 
another, a leisurely dinner is all they have 
time for. For the same reason — or because 
an actor may face an early call on the set the 
following day —people in Los Angeles dine 
earlier than those in other major dues, often 
meeting at 7 or 7:30 PAL " 

Compared with similarly priced restau- 
rants in New York or London, dining is 
more informal here. A few places, notably 
L’Ermitage, a generally well-regarded 
French restaurant on La Genoa Boulevard, 
have the kind of starched stiffness often 
encountered in New York or Paris, bat more 
often guests are greeted by stndeats of the 
Calif ornia Cool School of Culinary Style: 
“Hi, my name’s John, and HI be serving you 
tonight,” followed, a few minutes after your 
meal arrives, with, “Hi, everything all right?” 

It is unusual for new customers to tip a 
maitre d’hote! But regular customers at 
prestige restaurants often tip him whether he 
provides a service or not. This is done to 
insure that the customer will be recognized 
on his next visit, for in the insecure enter- 
tainment world, where fame and fortune is 
often transient, being welcomed by name at 
one of the city’s better restaurants ranks 
high. 


Despite a studied nonchalance when a 
Paul Newman or a Barbra Streisand, the 


Paul Newman or a Barbra Streisand, the 
president of Paramount or Fox. arrives for 
dinner, restaurant employees officiously ca- 
ter to celebrity and power. As a stranger, you 
may be required to wait virile more familiar 
faces get preferential treatment or you may 
be rusnea oot before you have finished your 
meal to make room for some one else, as 
happened recently to a foursome of nozuno- 
vie people at Morton’s. Stars — not those in 
the Guide Michelin, but in the celluloid 
heart of Hollywood — are what gives a place 
here status and attract other customers. 


R ECENTLY, the thrones at major stu- 
dios here have been vacated so often 
that it has seemed that same of those 
wind machine the studios use to whip up 
summer storms on a sound stage had gotten 
loose and were running amok. Restaurant 
owners, maitres cFhfitel and waiters may 
gossip about the executive changes, but they 
say they don’t downgrade their treatment of 
the departed. 

At La Serre. 12969 Ventura Boulevard 
(818-990-0500), a respected French restau- 
rant in the San Fernando Valley popular 
with people from Warner Brothers, Colum- 
bia and others at the nearby Burbank stu- 
dios, more than 200 shiny brass name 
plaques are kept ready to be placed an tables 
reserved by rqpilars. 


I F you can’t go to dinner with a movie 
star or a mogul, having an expensive car 
might help. Californians, as has been 
often reported, take then automobiles seri- 
ously. This seems to be especially true of the 
valet parking attendants at many of tins 
community’s better known restaurants: 
They park the most expensive automobiles 
ea ch rugbt in front of their restaurants, lined 
up like a used-car distress sale by the very 
rich. Cars of lower status are driven to more 


remote parking lots. 
Most of the film o 


Most of the film colony’s serious dining is 
done in Beverly Hills and other affluent 
communities. 

The Polo Lounge at the Beverly (fills 
Hotel, 9641 Sunset Boulevard (213-276- 
2251). has long been a center of Hollywood 
deal making, especially in late afternoon and 
at breakfast. Le Dome, 8720 Sunset Boule- 
vard (213-659-6919), and The Palm, 9001 
Santa Monica Boulevard (213-550-881 1), are 
favorites among people who work in the 


gasped audibly recently when asked if a 
plate was removed from the inventory when 
a mogul felL In Hollywood, a king deposed 
by one studio may soon show op on the 
throne of another. ■ 


C 1985 The New York Tina 


Where there is smoke 
there is^jASafire. 


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recorded music business headquartered 
along Sunset Boulevard. 

Chasen’s, 9039 Beverly Boulevard (213- 
271-2168), is a favorite of the generation of 
actors, writers, directors and producers who 
worked here in the 1940s ana 1950s. It has 
enjoyed a rebirth of sorts since the election 
of Ronald Reagan, who says it is his favorite. 

No rules seem to govern which restaurants 
achieve acceptability and status in Holly- 
wood, or guarantee that they will hold on to 
it. Hating well-connected investors, among 
them several agents and Steven Spielberg, 
the director of helped Mortal's get 

established a few years ago, but a famous 
name does not guarantee success. 

A few years ago, Ma Maison. 8368 Mel- 
rose Avenue (213-655-1991), which has the 
unusual affectation of refusing to Bst its 
telephone number in a public directory, 
reigned near the top of Hollywood’s favored 
restaurants. The popularity apparently de- 
rived from two sources: an innovative menu 
prepared by Wolfgang Puck, then its chef, 
and an aggressive campaign of promotion by 
its owner, Patrick TeoauL that w*tw*h aim^H 
at convincing the industry it was the “in” 
place to be. But Ma Maison never recovered 
its special cachet after Puck left to open 
Spago. 

Spago, 8595 West Sunset Boulevard (213- 
652-4025), meanwhile, is perennially crowd- 
ed with stars such as Jemmy Carson, Andy 
Williams and Dudley Moore and lesser ac- 
tors and ranks with Morton’s and The Ivy as 
one of the entertainment industry’s three 
currently favorite riming spots. Some fans 
argue that Puck at his own restaurant doesn't 
always live up to his earlier promise as a 
superstar of California cuisine. But it’s fre- 
quently impossible to book a table there if 
die staff doesn’t recognize your name. 


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Los Angeles Hotels, Old and New 

I OS ANG ELES — After Nefl Simon The Beverly Wilshire (213-275-4282) to-stern restoration. Although not new 
moved from New York to Califor- charges $ 1 75 for a double and it, too, is much has lots of charm; $125 for two. 
nia a few years ago, he looked for a in demand. The Beverly Hilton (213-274- A few blocks away, the Westin Boom/ 
West Coast analome to the Plaza. 7772) doesn’t offer charm, but the ture (800-228-3000) is a la n d m arie with I 


I OS ANGELES — After Ndl Simon 
moved from New York to Califor- 
nia a few years ago, he looked for a 
West Coast analogue to the Plaza, 
the Manhattan hotel in which he set his 
successful play, “Plaza Suite." 

His choice was the Beverly Hills Hotel, 
which became the backdrop for “California 
Suite,” in which one act centers on the anxi- 
eties of a Hollywood star on Academy 
Award night 

On Monday, life; as it does annually, will 
imitate art as dozens of film stars and other 
Oscar nominees gather nervously at hotels in 
Beveriy (fills and Los Angeles, waiting for 
limousines to carry them to the Dorothy 
Chandler Pavilion in downtown Los Angeles 
— and to triumph or disappointment After- 
ward, hundreds of them will gather at the 
Beveriy Hilton Hotel for the annual Gover- 
nor’s Ball of the Academy of Motion Pic- 
tures Arts and Sciences. 

For palm trees, movie stars and a chance 
to sample some of old Hollywood, the Bever- 
ly HiDs Hotel, a Spanish-style pink palace 
with 325 rooms and bungalows on a land- 
scaped knoll over locking Sunset Boulevard, 
is & kind of life-size diorama of the entertain- 


The Beverly Wilshire (213-275-4282) 
charges S 1 75 for a double and it, too, is much 
in de mand. The Beveriy Hilton (213-274- 
7772) doesn’t offer much charm, but the 
rooms are spacious. Rates are $145 to S155. 

Many of the best hotels are concentrated 
in three areas: Beverly Hills and West Los 
Angeles; downtown Los Angeles, which has 
had a surge of construction lately, and a strip 
of high-rise hotels built in the last five years 
near Los Angeles International Airport. 


Many people in the entertainment buri- 
ss bypass the Beveriy Hills Hotel and the 


ness bypass the Beveriy Hills Hotel and the 
Beveriy Wilshire for the secluded Hotel Bel- 
Air (213-472-1211) close to Sunset Boule- 
vard at the edge of the Bel Air residential 
community. Remodeled and expanded be- 
fore the Olympics, the Bel-Air is a romantic 
place shrouded by giant oak trees, syca- 
mores, bougainvillea and other plants and its 
restaurant is first rate. Rates for two people 
are $150 to $250. 

Partly to accommodate last summer’s 
Olympic visitors, hundreds of new hotel 
rooms have opened in Los Angeles during 


to-stem restoration. Although not new, '. 
■has lots of charm; $125 for two. 

A few blocks away, the Westin Bonave 
ture (800-228-3000) is a landmark with fj . 
glass-sheathed towers, efficient, busy ar. 
popular. Rates for a double: $135 to S15T „ 
Across from the Bouaven cure is the Shei " 
ton Grande (800-32S-3S35), which boast! 
being the only hotel in North America will - * 
butler on every floor. It is modem-Iookii " 
efficient, but small enough not to overwhd " 
guests. Doubles start at $150. 

Le Mondrian (800-321-4S64) is a sew-' 
month-old hotel with 188 rooms on the Se •" 


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set Strip in West Hollywood. Decorated wi-' 
artworks and with a rood restaurant. Doul 


artworks and with agood restaurant. Doul 
rooms $95 to $120; suites $155 to 5295. 

Also opened in West Hollywood in Ji r 
under the same ownership as Le Mondrit ; 


Le Bel Age (80M21-6351) has the ambus 
of a small European luxury hotd. Rates fa 


the last year. 

The Westwood Marquis (213^208-8765), 
near the UCLA campus and the village of 
Westwood, offers large, richly furnished 
suites for $140 to $170 a night. 

The architecturally stunning, 24-story 
Sheraton Premiere (800-3250-3535) is conve- 
niently situated for visitors who have work 
to do in the San Fernando Valley. A double 
room is $145 to $200. 

In Century City, at the edge of Beveriy 
Hills, the Westin-operated Century Plaza 
Hotel (800-22S-3000), where President Ron- 
ald Reagan stays when he is in town, is 
impersonal but efficient. In December, a 30- 
story, 322-room tower was added. A double ' 
runs $155 to $195. 

Downtown, the 62-year-old BQtmore Ho- 
tel (213-624-1011) on Pershing Square, is 
being upgraded a gain after an g^rl ier stem- 


ment world ar work and play the year 
around. Less than a mile away, some of the 
same ingredients can be found at lower rates 
at the Chateau Mannont. BuOt on the lines 
of a Norman chateau, the Mannont has been 
attracting Hollywood people for decades. 

For more elegance than the Beverly Hills 
Hotel, greater accessibility to shops and res- 
taurants as well as a chance to spot an 
occasional film star, the Beveriy Wilshire 
Hotel offers a bit of Enropean charm. A 
double room at the Beverly Hills Hotel (213- 
276-225 1) costs $155 to $215 when yon can 
gel one. At Lbe Chateau Mannont (213-656- 
1010), rates run from $80 for a double to 
$350 for suites; it is often booked months 
ahead by people in the record business. 


of a small European luxury hotel Rates fa 
large double room, $165 to $205; oae- a - ' 
two-bedroom suites, $185 to $375. 

The Holiday Ion organization opened b 
of the first of a new line of hotels aimed at 
upscale clientele last September near r 
airport Rooms at the Holiday Inn Crow 
Plaza are larger and the lobby and od— ■ 
public facilities are more spacious and mi > 
elegantly furnished than (nose of the sttv. 
dard Holiday Inn. The level of service see.-, 
much the same. Doubles $69 to $89. -t 

One of the grandest new hotels in years " 
the Southern California coast opened 1' 
year in Orange County, about 80 minutes : 
car from downtown Los Angeles. The Sre , . 


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Carlton (714-240-2000) is lavishly decora.: 
with marble, crystal chandeliers and otb. 
features that bdp explain why it cost aim - 
$90 million. Rates range from $150 fo- - 
room with a view of a courtyard to $275 ■ 
rooms fronting an the ocean. 

— ROBERT UNDS J 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 




VIENNA, Koozerthausitd: 72.12.11). 
CONCERTS — March 24: Arnold 


doctor (Beethoven, Haydn). 

March 28: Helsinki Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Jan Krenz conductor. Trija 
HakkOa piano (Mozart, Ravd). 


•Center for Folk An and Tradition 


(tel: 32439.87). 

EXHIBITION —To May: “Folk Ait 

and Tradition of Thrace. 


CONCERTS — March 24: Arnold 
Schdabere Choir, Nikolaus Harnon- 
court conductor (Bach). 

March 28: Vienna Syraphoniker, 
Horst Stein conductor Elisabeth 
Leonskaja piano (Cherubim. Debus- 

SeCTTALS — March 25: Yo Yo Ma 


•KourdGallery(tel: 361 JU3). 
EXHIBITION— ToMarch30: “Folk 
Art byTheofOos.” 

•Medusa Gallery (tel: 724.4532). 
EXHIBITION —To April 1 l:“Vassi- 
lisKypraios.” 


violin (Bach). 

March 27: Ernst Kovacic violin 


March 27: Ernst Kovacic violin 
(Bach). 

•VoDaoperQeh 53240). 
OPERETTA— March 25: “The Land 
of Smiles” (Lehir). 


BELGIUM 


PARIS, Centre Georges Ponqiidou 
(tei: 277.1233). 

BODBITION —To April 8: “Klaus 
Rinke." 

•Mus£e d’Art Modern e (tel: 
723.6137). 

EXHIBITION— ToMarchSl: “Gus- 
tav Mahler.’’ 

•Music de la Pubhcith (tel: 246. 
I3JJ9). 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: 
“French Film Posters.” 


March 24: “The fierry Widow” 
bar). 

•Matsuoka Museum of An ' 
4370737). 

EXHIBITION— To March3 1 : “K- 
terpieces of Japanese Paintings 
Old Potteries.” 



I’urrriu-v Rate* 



AMSTERDAM, Concertgebouw 


7133.4^ 

CONCERT— March 29: Geoige > 
tenon darinei. Ronald BrantigatT 
anof Prokofiev). 

•Rijksmuseum Vincent Van O 
(teh 76.48.81). 

exhibition — ToApniis: “i> • 

Identity.'’ 


DUBLIN, National Conccn Hall (td: 
71.18m 

CONCERTS— March 24: RTE Con- 
cert Orchestra. Gareth Hudson con- 
ductor. 


■ ; • 

- «ue 

MS 


ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera 


or SPECIAL INTEREST 


(td: 233.6635). 

OPERETTA — March 24: “Grflfin 
Marita” (Kalman). 

BRUSSELS, Palais des Beaux Arts 
(td: 5113935). 

CONCERTS — Belgian National Or- 
chestra — March 24: Mario Venzago 
coodnctor, Walter BocydkmscU rinc ttc 


NAPLES — The Museo di Capodimonte, in a former royal palace, is 
sponsoring an exhibition of more than 300 panning* to celebrate 


sponsoring an exhibition of more than 300 paintings to celebrate 
Naples Golden age of art. “The 17th Century Ci vilisa tion in Naples” 
includes works by Caravaggio, Caracdolo, de Riberas, Dcmemciima 


Also on display are sculptures, marbles and furniture. 
For further information td: 741.08.81. 


March 28: John Carrie conductor 
(Rich). 

GHENT, Royal Opera (tel: 252425). 
OPERA — Marcn 23: “The Rakes 
Progress” (Stravinsky). 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican Art Gallery — To April 14: 
“Mahler, Vienna.”- 
Barbican Hall — London Symphony 
Orchestra — March 23: Barry Tuck- 
1 well cfwidnrmr , Nina MEDtina piano 
(Mozart, Tchaikovsky). 

March 28: Claudio Abbado condue- 
i tot, Bruno Caoiin/ Antonio Balistapi- 
I ano (Berio. Mahler), 

1 Barbican Theatre — March 23: Royal 
Shakespeare Company, “Comedy of 


•Muste du Grand Palais (tel: 
261.54.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: 
“Edouard Pignon.” 

To ^)ril 22: “Iumressioxusm « nd the 
French Countryride.” 

•Mnseedu Louvre (ud: 2603926). 
EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: “Ho- 
bdn at the Louvre.” 

To May 6: “French Engraveiafrom the 
XVHI Century.” 


March 29: RTE Symphony Orchestra, 
Bryden Thomson conductor. 
RECITAL— March 25: Zdma Bod- 
zin piano (Badd. 

•Oriel GaUery(tel: 73.64.10). 
EXHIBITION —To March 30: “Ex- 
hibition of Paintings by leading living 
huh Artists.” 

• Projec ts Art Cm tre (id: 713327). 
EXHIBITION —To April 3: “Recea 
Works by Thomas Malfan." 


•Muste Rodin (teL- 705.0134). 
EXHIBITION —To April 15: “Rob- 
ert Jacobsen.” 

•Salle Pleyd (563X1736). 

CONCERT — March 27: Orchesrre 
National de France, Roberto Abbado 
conductor, Yo Yo Ma cdk» (Brahms, 
Dvorak). 

•Theitre du Rond-Toint (tel: 
256.70.80). 

CONCERT— March 24: Oinkadela 
Have Quartet (Beethoven, Profokiev). 
•TneStre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.1933). 

OPERA — March 25-Aprfl 9: “Ario- 
dante" (Handel). 


EDINBURGH, National GaUcay 

- * r 

EXHIBrnON — To April 28: * * 
Face of Nature: Landscape dran, : 
from the permarvTiT collection.’’ % 
•Usher lull (td: 228.1135). ' 

CONCERT— Maich29: Scottish _ 
tional Orchestra. NcemeJarvicoa^ 
tra, Alfred Brendd piano (Beetiir 
R. Strauss). ^ 

GLASGOW. City Hall ( 
55239.61). 

CONCERT — March 31: Sco s 
Chamber Orchestra, Raymond ^ 
paid conductor (Bach). f*- 

•7heatreRpyHl (let- 331. 1234). v 
(»ERA— March 23: The Batb v ‘ 
Seville” (Rossfati). . v 


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Error s (Shakespeare). 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734^052). 


EXHIBITION— ToMarchSl: “Cha- 
gafl." 

•Royal Opera (td: 240.10.fiQ, 
BALLET — March 23: “The Sleeping 

March25 and 28: “BdSeflinperiar 


VMliY 


Hates 


GERMANY 


| (Balanchine. Petipa), “Different 
1 Drummer" (MacMillan, Webern - 


Drummer" (MacMillan, Webern - 
/Shoenberg), “Facade” (Ashton, Wal- 
ton). 

March 27 and 30: “Manorf (MacMil- 
lan, Massenet). 

March 29: “Firebird" fFdtine. Stra- 
vinsky), “Return to the strange Land” 
(Kyiian, JanacekV TNew Ballet by Mi- 
chad Corder" (Order, Profokiev). 
•Tate Gallery 821. 13. 13). 

EXHIBITIONS — To March 31: 
“WiDiamJames Muller "“John Walk- 
er Prints 1976- 1984." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tei: 


Zauberfl3te” (Mo- 


589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS —To April 14: “Mi- 


o’ Rooker (1743-1801) 


To June 9: “The People ana Places of 
Constantinople: watercolours by 
Amadeo. Count Prezioti (18 1 6- 1882). 


COLOGNE. Oper der Stadt 
(td:2125.81L 

OPERA — March 23 and 29: “Ma- 
dame Butterfly” (Puccini). 

March 24: "Die ZauberfKUe” (Mo- 
zart). 

March 28 and 31: “Le Nozze di Fi- 
garo” (Mozart). 

FRANKFURT, Alte Oper Frankfurt 
(tel: 134.04.00). 

CONCERTS — March 28 and 29: 
Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orches- 
tra, Eliahu Inbal conductor (Mahler). 
RECITALS— March 24: Yehudi Me- 
nohmviotinfBach). 

March 31: (Madia Arrau piano (Bee- 
thoven. Schumann). 

•Cafe Theater riel: 77.74.66). 
THEATER — Through March: “The 
Mousetrap" (Christie). 


GENOA, Teatro Marguerite (td: 
585329). 

OPERA— Mardi 29 and 31: “Aida” 
(Verdi). 

MILAN. Padiglione tTArte Contem- 
ppraoea(td: 78.4638). 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 28 : “Aim 
and Tobia Scarpa: architects and de- 
signers," “The Imaginary and the 
Real: Paolo De Poh. Candidi Flar, 
ToniZucdwri.” 

ROME, Accadrmin Naaomledi San- 
ta Cecilia (td: 679.03 39). 
CONCERTS — Orches ti c ddl'Acca- 
demia Nazionale de Santa — 
March 24*26: Eugen Jodrnm conduc- 
tor. Gerhard Hetzel violin (Beetho- 
ven). 

March 31: Georges PrStrc conductor 
(Berlioz). 


MADRID. Bibiioteca Nackmalv . 
435.40.03V . l«ri 

EXHIBITION — Through Mt 1 
“FrandaPfcabuL” 

•Fundacidn Juan March 1 • 


435.42.40). 

REOTALS — March 25: Urnsi 

lom piano (Chopin). . 

Man* 27: Victor Martin violin. N 

de MacedoocDo, Genovese ^ v 

ano(HandeIV 


sssr 

-I*. Hto'-i 

■h • 

’ ' ‘-.to .tit* -i 




TURIN, Royal Palace(id: 83938.02). 
EXHIBITION —To May 22: “Gwrt- 
ly Life Rajasthan Seen Throughlndian 
Mhaature Paintings from the XVII to 
XIX Centuries." 


"Jean Arp.” _ uj 

•Palados de Vclizquez y de O . 
rid: 274.77.75). „ ■.'! 

EXHIBmON — Through 
“Arte Povera, 12 Italian Artists. \ 
•Teatro Real (td: 24838.75V " - 

CONCERTS — March 27: Of®, 

deC&mara Eoropca, Paavo Bergf^i 
conductor (Bartok, Haydn). ^ 

Maidi28and29i OrouestayCwt 
donates dc Esnaxuu Mignd A w 


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•Teatro Regio (td: 54,80.00). 
OPERA — March 26. 28. 31: “Tan- 
credi” (Rossini). 


UNTraD STATES 






JAPAN 


NEW YORK. Guggenheim M d 
ToAnriJ 14; ' 


JSjFXP* Gol ° Museum (tel: 
703.06.61) ' 

EXfflBrnON —To March 31: “Ka- 
tana CoUetion." 




dinsky in Paris: 1934-1944. ■ 

To April 21: “Frankcn thaler on P^, 
A Retrospective, 1950-84," 1 

■Metropotiun Museum of Art 1 






4674l27L OUCCrafl Museom < lel: 


HELSINKI, Finlandia Hall (tel: 


40241). 

CONCERTS — March 25: Vienna 
PhDhannoniker. Loan Msazd con- 


ATHENS, Athens An Gallery (td: 
7213938V 

EXHIBITION — ToMarch30:“KIir- 


467.4527). x 

EXHIBrnON — ToMarch24: “Ainu 
Craft" 

45330^ Wa Kenn,in Hali ( tel: 
OPERETTA ■— March 23; “Die Fie- 
dennaus** f Strauss). 



EXHQffnONS — To April 14: ‘ 

•Museum of Modern > 
(ieL708>t.00). ■ * 

EXHIBITIONS— To May 14: t 
Matisse." » *■ 

To June 4^ “Henri Rousseau." •. 


• ** - 








Index 


■arm P-M EomlnK resorts' P.14 
Mois/»wPJ4 Fima rote nates P.13 
■ prion PJ2 Cold marten P.il 
uHflMPi- interea rates p.n 
,«rti P.18 Market swumanr p.n 
rates p.u Opnm P.M 

glM p.m OTC stock P.U 
p.M ottwr markats p.u 


Rendh«a&&*§?ribune 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report; M-l, Page 12 


***» #v 




:IDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


** 


Page 11 


TECHNOLOGY 


.«*«**» 


ompanies Move to Add 
apacity to the Telephone 


la... 



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By ANDREW POLLACK 

Wen 1 VarA Times Service 


” people. So far, however, telephone lines more closely 
mble dirt roads than highways: Designed to carry voice 
. versations in an era when computers did not exist, the lines 
: : become a bottleneck to the smooth flow of dam and video 
■ B®- 

ideed, the need to transmit data at speeds higher than 
'phone wires can handle is one reason many large corporations 
.bypassing local phone companies and building their own 
emission facilities. 

% low, however, phone lines are in for a vast improvement in the 
ij amt of information they can cany. Devices are being devd- 
i Id that will attach to each end of a phone line and allow it to 


two telephone calls at 
same time — and reams of 
... a as welL The devices 
> - -tld speed the development 
Y. ome information services. 
" ht now. when people are 
•r .-'ig home computers to re- 
>’« information from a data 
- 1 ■ 'j ;or to read electronic clas- 
ads, others in the house 


Technology is 
finally catching 
up to the common 
telephone line. 


DATE lit >OK 

I-* t-. jj, s 

;v» i: 

V - . 

• ■! ‘ ■ ■ 

■rttS*. • • • 

- 

?; ■. 


: >. . hot make or receive phone calls. With the new devices, they 
, ■ dd be able to. Two people talking on a phone line would also 
r ible to show each other diagrams. 

''-.veil for those who do not use computers, the new systems 
. , V ’ dd prove beneficial because two people in the house could 
; -x calls at the same time. The only way to do that now is to 
. -sr two separate lines from the telephone company. 

‘ : Numerous companies are at work: cm such systems, and Pacific 
, • announced such a system last week. It plans to test it by 
. ' idding an information service in conjunction with' Apple 
" *- 1 oputer Inc. 

, ” ; --';ut others seem ahead of Pacific Bell. Researchers at the 

- ;versity of California at Berkeley developed such a device 
-'. jxal years ago. Bell Laboratories is close to malting semican- 
• tor chips for the system, and is trying to recruit Intel Corp. as 

alternate supplier. GTE Corp. and others are also well ad- 
v . t^ced. So are chip makers, such as Advanced Micro Devices and 

- ■ V; -ional Semiconductor Corp. 

- ^ HE new tr ansmissi on capabilities are part of a bold plan 

- for the world telecommunications system of the future. 

- - The future system, known as integrated services digital 

- - ‘work, or ISDN, aims to turn the telephone system into a Mgh- 

■ ; Vid multimedia channel for voice, data, imaga^ facsimile 
. .jsmission and video. 

. . he °ew devices that would be put at the end of the line would 
Capable of performing rapid calculations on the incoming 
. ~. *aL to try to reconstruct what the original signal looked like. A 
' or boost in transmission speed will come from changing the 
. -lent method of analog transmission to digital transmission. 

. “~o send data over telephone lines today, digital pulses used by 

■ ip liters are converted into tones using devices known as 
■ ; Terns. The most sophisticated modems generally available can 

jsnrit 9,600 hits of information a second; the modems general- 
~ ficwdable by personal computer users can do only 300 or 1 ,200 
; ' ■ • a second, equivalent to 30 or 120 letters a second. 

_ .~lut ISDN would transmit data in digital form directly, doing 
r iy with modems. Planners say the copper phone lines will be 

".to cany 144,000 bits per second of data, 15 times as much as 

now be done with modems. The capacity would be divided 
two channels of 64,000 bits a second, and one of 16,000 bitsa 
■nd. The two larger channels could transmit high-speed data, 
"■ lice conversation, or a crude video image, as in a picture 
shone. The other could be used for several streams of data. 


Currency Rates 


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Late interbank rotes on March 22, exdwfing fees, 
aal fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 


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12927 Kuwaiti dhtar 
UK Matov.rlMeU 
0.1044 Harw. krone 
08544 Pen. pen 
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07(07 03012 S. Konan ma 054J0 

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921 11005 Sawd. kroon 9215 

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17930 DiOSB TkalbeM 27345 

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*» dr Paris ( Parts! t IMP (SDR); Somw Arobe vt intemotianoie trimesttmment 
iraLdbton). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 






oemrency Deposits 


March 21 








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•• Morgan Goocanty (dollar, DM, SF, Pound, FF); uovds San* (ECU).- Reuters 




n Dollar Rates 


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March 21 
1 year 


U.S. May 
Examine 
Currency 


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one Pm. 


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Interested 
InMomeyReform 


By Peter T. Kilbom 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — In the Rea- 
gan administration's strongest in- 
dication of concern to date over the 
behavior .of the dollar. Treasury 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d has 
expressed interest in examining 
ways to remodel the world's cur- 
rency markets. 

Mr. Baker also said he had been 
watching the crisis involving sav- 
ings and loan associations in Ohio 
that precipitated the sharp fall of 
the dollar Monday and Tuesday, 
and was keeping in touch with Paul 
A. Voider, chairman of the Feder- 
al Reserve Board, and Edwin J. 
Gray, chairman of the Federal 
Home Loan Bank Board. 

In an interview Wednesday, Mr. 
Baker declined to discuss details of 
what he called his first legislative 


priority, amplifying the U. S. tax 
system. He said that there would be 
changes in the plan the Treasury 
proposed last November but that 
he hoped to offer a new proposal 
on schedule late next mouth. 

“We know there are some provi- 
sions that simply have to be 
changed from the Treasury propos- 
al, either for capital formation rea-' 
sons or for some other reasons,” 
said Mr. Baker, who six weeks ago 
changed jobs with Donald T. Re- 
gan, now President Ronald Rea- 
gan's chief of staff. 

Mr. Baker stressed that the ad- 
ministration was not committed to 
tightening controls over the curren- 
cy markets, that it was not consid- 
ering any specific monetary plan 
and that it opposed anything as 
ambitious as the Bretton Woods 
system of fixed exchange rates 

“The interest is solely and exclu- 
sively whether or not there is a 
better way,” he said. “Stability in 
those markets is a goal that every- 
one agrees is salutary. 

“You have a dollar, at least until 
recently, that has been going out of 
sight in relation to other curren- 
cies,” he added. T think we wDl 
want to take a look at that and see 
if there’s some way to improve it to 
achieve more stability.” 


m 


its Returns Outstrip 
Competitors’ ... 


Return w average total 
assets in percent 

y 

L Bankers Trust 

r 0 . 7 % 

I\/a 

0.6 

-/ sf 

0.5 

/ Money Center 

# Saaks average 

.04 

"TO 'BO *81 ’82 'S 3 

■84 

Source: Montgomery Securities j 


Charles S. Sanford Jr., president of Bankers Trust. 


Th> Now Tori Tm 


A New Visionary in U.S. Banking 


By Robert A. Bennett 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — For two decades, Walter B. 
Wriston rattled the financial world by pushing 
banks into an ever wider range of new businesses. 
He was banking's recognized visionary leader and 
his retirement last year from Citicorp left a void. 

But a new visionary appears to be emerging: 
Charles S. Sanford Jr„ president of Bankers Trust 
Co., the United States' eightb-largest bank holding 
company. Only 48, and not yet the chief executive 
of his bank, Mr. Sanford is nevertheless picking up 
where Mr. Wriston left off by pushing banks m a 
new direction. 

Or, more precisely, be is leading Bankas Trust 
in a radically new direction — and its booming 
profits are making everyone else take notice. Last 
year, Bankers Trust earned S16J20 for every $100 
of equity, higher than any of the nation's 14 other 
largest bank holding companies, and a level rarely 
reached by major banks. It ranked third in return 
on assets, the other chief measure of bank profit- 
ability. 

Bankers Trust has concluded that only one or 
two of the largest institutions — Citicorp or Bank 
of America — can do what Mr. Wriston preached: 
provide a full range of banking services profitably. 
The rest have to abandon this goal as Bankas 
Trust did in 1978, and exploit narrower niches in 
the financial world. Most bankers have come to 
agree with this conclusion, but only a few have 
acted boldly on it. 

The essence of Bankers Trust's niche is the 
creation of a hybrid institution that combines 


commercial and investment banking, and does 
away with consumer services. A key part of the 
strategy is to convert all the bank's corporate loans 
into the equivalent of interest-bearing bonds that 
can be sold to investors. 

Loan selling generates a growing share of the 
bank's net income, which was $306.8 minion in 
1984. It also provides the bank with an immediate 
replacement of the cash that has been lent, rather 
than having to wait years until a loan is repaid. 
And selling the loans means that Bankers Trust 
does not have to keep capital on hand to back 
them, a relief at a time when federal regulators are 
raising capital requirements for banks because erf a 
rash of loan defaults. 

There are pails, of course. Corporate depositors 
are quick to switch their money to other hanks at 
the first sign of trouble and that makes over- 
dependence on corporate money potentially dan- 
gerous. Consumer lending is a difficult business, 
but a lucrative one these days, and Bankers Trust is 
losing out on those riches. Still, Mr. Sanford, two 
years into his presidency, is w inning applause for 
his daring. 

“If he carries this strategy off completely, he's 
going to change the way banking is done, said 
Lawrence W. Cohn, first vice president of Dean 
Witter Reynolds Inc. 

Like Mr. Wriston in his ability to articulate Ms 
concepts and publicly fight for them, Mr. Sanford 
has become the spokesman for a commercial 
bank's right to get fully into the securities business, 
despite the Glass-Steagafl Act of 1 933, which sepa- 
(Cootmued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Dollar Drops 
After Low U.S. 
Growth Report 


77ir Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
sharply Thursday as markets were 
surprised by U.S. government esti- 
mates of slowing economic growth 
and rising inflation in the United 
Stales. 

Gold, which soared earlier in the 
week, also hea d ed lower in volatile 
trading. Republic National RanV in 
New York said gold bullion was 
bid at $314 a troy ounce as of 4 
PAL, down S7 from the late bid 
Wednesday. 

The dollar’s most dramatic de- 


whkh surged to as high as 51.1900 
in London cm Thursday, its highest 
level since Dec. 17. 1984. It had 
been quoted at 51.1475 the day 
before and has recovered from a 
record low of $1.0395 during trad- 
ing on Feb. 26. 

In lata New York trading, the 
pound was quoted at $1.1875, up 4 
cents from $1,147 late Wednesday. 

According to the Federal Re- 
serve Board s index that measures 
the dollar against the currencies of 
10 other industrial nations, the cur- 
rency has fallen 4.7 percent this 
week and is down 6.4 percent since 
peaking on Feb. 25. 

The major factor in Thursday’s 
.slide was an estimate by the Com- 
merce Department that the U.S. 
economy is expanding at an annual 
rate of 11 percent in the yet-to-be- 
compleied first quarter, against 4.3 
percent in the final three months of 
last year. 

At the same time a broad mea- 
sure of inflation was reported to be 
rising at a 5.4-jperceni annual dip, 
the steepest climb in almost three 
years. 

The figure for the gross na tional 
product, the value of the goods and 
services produced in the economy, 
“was Iowa than the most pessimis- 
tic estimates,” while the rise in in- 
flation was unexpectedly high, said 
Trevor Woodland, national sales 
manager for foreign exchange at 
Harris Trust & Savings Bank in 
CMcago. 

As a result, the dollar, which had 
climbed in early European trading 
following last-minute projections 
that GNP growth would be on the 


order of 4 percent, promptly 
plunged. 

A Fed report late in the day of a 
S2-1 -billion decline in the nation's 
basic money supply in the week 
ended March 11 had little impact 
on currency markets. 

“GNP was such a surprise and 
had such an effect on (be dollar 
that anything else would be an anti- 
climax,'' said David Wilson, a for- 
eign currency analyst at the Bank 
of Montreal 

In hectic trading in London, the 
pound surged to S 1.189 late Thurs- 
day. It had been quoted at SI.1515 
the day before. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late Wednesday: 
3.261 Deutsche marks, down from 
3262; 17200 Swiss francs, down 
from 17515; 9.985 French francs, . 
down from 9.990; 3.6840 Dutch 
guilders, down from 3.6865, and 
2,074 Italian lire, up from 1069. . 

Dollar rates in New York follow- 
ing release of the money supply 
figures, compared with late rata; 
Wednesday, included; 3-205 DM, 
down from 3264; 1725 Swiss 
francs, down from 1758; 9.8175 
French francs, down from 9.980. 


Accord Is Set 
On EC Currency 

Reuters 

PARIS — European Com- 
munity finance ministers will 
announce an accord early next 
month that “will constitute a 
modest stage in the develop- 
ment of theEuropean Currency 
Unit," Michel Camdessus gov- 
ernor of the Bank of France, 
said Thursday. 

“A thaw has taken place dur- 
ing the last few weeks," he said, 
referring to negotiations since 
the ministers* failure to agree on 
a package of improvements in 
the workings of the European 
Monetary System in December. 

EC finance ministers are to 
hold a summit meeting in Paler- 
mo. Sicily, on April 1 3 and 14 to 
finalize the pact, already ap- 
proved by EC central banks. 


Some Ohio Thrills Open 
As Fraud Probe Widens 


United Press Imemanonal 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Some of 
the 70 state-chartered savings and 
loans institutions closed by Ohio's 
governor last Friday began reopai- 
ing Thursday without the long lines 
that officials feared would signal 
renewed runs on deposits. 

“They seem to be doing fine," 
said Brian Usher, press secretary to 
Governor Richard F. Celeste, re- 
ferring to the opening of a Century 
Savings Bank of Cincinnati branch 
in suburban Columbus. 

Otha offices opened in Cincui- 
nati, Toledo and Newark, and offi- 
cials estimated a total of 15 would 
be open by day’s end. 

“There were more deposits than 
withdrawals," said Mr. Usher. That 
also seemed to be true in Qncm- 
nati, where two dozen reporters 
outnumbered the few customers 
who showed up. 

An emergency law enacted 
Wednesday allows the closed insti- 
tutions to reopen if they apply for 
federal insurance on deposits, are 
owned or have agreed to merge 
with a company already federally 
insured, or demonstrate to the sat- 
isfaction of the state superinten- 
dent of savings and loans, Thomas 
Baities, that the interests of deposi- 
tors will not be jeopardized. 

In Florida, meanwhile, authori- 


ties said they had charged an ac- 
countant with accepting money 
and making false statements about 
the financial health of a Honda 
securities company whose collapse 
triggered last week's massive runs 
on (Brio's savings and loans. 

The Securities and Exchange 


Commission accused a Miami ac- 
countant, Jose Gomez, a forma 
partner in Alexander Grant & Co., 
of fraud and of taking payments 
last year totaling $125,000 from of- 
ficers of ESM Government Securi- 
ties Inc. Grant, a national account- 
ing firm, was the auditor for ESM. 

The SEC shut the securities firm 
on March 4 after it was determined 
that it could not meet its financial 
obligations. 

Depositors in Home State Sav- 
ings Bank of Cincinnati, which lost 
an estimated $100 million to 5150 
million from the ESM collap 
withdrew about $40 million before 
Governor Celeste dosed all of the 
state-chartered, privately insured 
thrifts in the state. 

Ohio’s attorney general Antho- 
ny Cdebrezze Jr, is expected Fri- 
day to name a special prosecutor to 


any c riminal acts in the 
Home Stale case. The investigation 
could reach into the state Com- 
merce Department, which governs 
savings and loans. 


Bowater Pretax Profit Rose 
29% in ’84 to £35.7 Million 


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AO prlMS in UXS »"■ «»**■ 

Sourer.- Reuters. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Bowater Indus- 
tries PLC said Thursday that pre- 
tax profit in 1984 was £35.7 million 
(about S41 million) compared with 
£27.6 million the previous year, an 
increase of 29 percent. 

Revenue in 1984 rose 17.5 per- 
cent to £1-27 billion, from £1,08 
billion. 

The company said it was aiming 
for a si gnifican t improvement on 
the 10.5-perceni return on assets 
over the next few years. 

The company said that the full 
profit impact of last year's separa- 
tion of Bowater Inc. North Ameri- 
can forest products business will 
not be felt until 1985, since the cash 
from the various transactions was 
only received during the period be- 
tween mid-April and early June 
1984. 

The precise effect cannot be 
quantified, but if the cash had 
come in at the beginning of last 
year and earned interest of, say, 10 
percent, the 1984 pretax result 
would have been about £7 million 
higher. 

The company said the earnings 
were affected by the impact of re- 
capitalization on the interest 
charge, and of redundancy and as- 


tion costs of 
against 1984 


sodated 
£5.9 million 
profits. 

Bowater said the consolidated 
pretax profit bad to indude 100 
percent of the profits of Bowater- 
Scott Corp. subsidiaries in Britain 
and Australia, although only 50 
percent of these profits are actually 
attributable to Bowaler’s interest 
Thus, although total trading 
profits were virtually unchanged 
from 1983, the proportion attribut- 
able to Bowater rose by 16 percent 
Net debt as a proportion of capi- 
tal employed, fell to 19 percent at 
the end of 1984 from 37 percent at 
the end of 1983. 

It said improvement is also evi- 
dent in interest cover. Net interest 
charges in 1983 were covered only 
2.9 times by trading profits, com- 
pared with 4 times m 1984. 

The group is much less capital- 
intensive dun previously, Bowater 
said. Before the demerger, current 
cost assets were turned ova some 
1.5 times annually. In 1984 the rate 
was more than 3 times. 

Capital eroenditure in 1984 to- 
taled £99 mmxoa. A further £13.5 
million was spent on acquisitions, 
while leasing accounted for £21 
million of total capital expenditure. 



For the man with exceptional goals, 
anew dimension in banking sendees. 


W 'hat makes Trade Develop- 
ment Bank exceptional ? 
To start with, there is our 
policy of concentrating on 
things we do unusually well. 
For example, trade and export 
financing, foreign exchange 
and banknotes, money market 
transactions and precious 
metals. 

Equally important, we are ' 
now even better placed to 
serve your needs, wherever 
you do business. Reason : 

We have recently joined 
American Express International 


Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, to 
bring you a whole new dimen- 
sion in banking services. 

While we move fast in 
serving our clients, we’re dis- 
tinctly traditionalist in our 
basic policies. At the heart of 
our business is the maintenance 
of a strong and diversified 
deposit base. Our portfolio of 
assets is also well-aiversified, 
and it is a point of principle 
with us to keep a conservative 
ratio of capital to deposits and 
a high degree of liquidity- 


sensible strategies in these un- 
certain times. 

If TDB sounds like the . 
sort of bank you would 
entrust with your business, 
get in touch with us. 

TDB banks in Geneva. London. 
Paris, Luxembourg, Cbiasso , Monte 
Carlo, Nassau, Zurich. 


TDB is a member of American 
Express Company which has 
assets ofUS$ 62 £ billion and 
shareholders' equity oj 
US$ U billion. 



Hade Development Bank 


Shown ar left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bonk. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 





* -* 






?i'C*5 a VS L 121 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MARCH 22, I9Bo 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


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Closing 



AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most A 




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251 

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NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Cfem Piw. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

UHlMm 

Industrials 


Got* ane 

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49.12 +039 

75.18 +007 


Advanced 
D*0in*d 
J n chanosd 
Total Ismh 
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Now Lows 
Volume up 
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8X2 7W 

700 853 

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2012 2028 

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March 19 211842 511357 14X05 

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S388 


Tables Indodc the nationwide prices 
op tattw closing on Wall Street and 
do BO* reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


industrials 

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Dow Gains 2.98; Volume Is Off 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Stock prices edged np 
Thursday in uncertain trading following reports 
from Washington that the economy grew at an 
unexpectedly weak rate of 2.1 percent during 
the first three months of the year while inflation 
heated up. 

Drug, retail and financial service stocks were 


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42 + ft 
27 

33 — ft 
15ft— ft 
10 % 

20 —ft 
29ft— ft 
22 % 

90 —ft 




, 3J0 7J 
Pf 535 12X 
Pi 6J3*1U 
pt 9-30*17-5 
38 
U 
6X 
5 X 
Til 
25 
43 


B%+ ft 
2ft 
% + 

2ft 

51%+ ft 
41ft + ft 
53ft + ft 
53V.— ft 

lift— ft 
31ft + ft 
37% — ft 
37ft— ft 
54 — ft 
35ft + ft 
3Zft 

34 —ft 
18% +lft 
1*9% — ft 
48ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
Oft— ft 
44ft +1% 
11 

10% + ft 
49ft— ft 
33ft + ft 
53% — ft 
34ft + ft 
1BW + ft 
42%+ ft 

15 

33ft + 91 
44%+ ft 
43 —lft 
46ft 

23 —ft 
31ft + ft 
24ft— 1 
23ft + 9k 
43ft + ft 
91% — Hi 
98 —1 
379k— ft 
59% + ft 
25ft+ft 
7ft- ft 
299k— % 
13ft- ft 
199k 

19ft + ft 
56ft— ft 
54ft— 1 
13ft— ft 
17 +ft 
17 —ft 
34 +ft 
20ft+ ft 

aft- ft 

17ft 

16ft— ft 
389k + ft 
42%+ ft 
42»+ % 
46ft + ft 
14ft + ft 
30ft 

24ft+% 
23%+ ft 
20ft— ft 
27% 

59% + ft 
27% - % 
50ft— % 
27ft— ft 
108ft +1 
43%+ ft 
34ft + ft 
15%+ U 

17% 

10% + ft 
29 +ft 
15ft + ft 

16 + % 
100 

24%+ ft 
57 + ft 

23% + ft 
31ft— ft 
31 + ft 


M-l Falls $2.1 Billion 


service stocks were mostly down. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 
2.98 points to 1,268.22. 

Gainers barely outpaced losers on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Big Board volume totaled 9S.93 million 
shares, against 107.53 million in the previous 
session. 

A slowing economy is both good and bad 
news on Wall Street While it could bring relief 
from high interest rates, it also could reduce 
corporate profits. 

A higher rate of inflation, meanwhile, could 
ignite fears that the Federal Reserve Board 
might tighten its grip on the money supply, 
winch would push interest rates up. 

The stock market is trying to absorb all 
this," said Larry Wachtel of Prudential-Bache 
Securities. 

Richard Schmidt, of Advest, said, Tt hasn't 
been able to sustain much of a direction either 
way." 

He added: "There’s still a lot of negativism 
out there, uncertainty about the economy, the 
dollar, interest rates and such. " 

The Commerce Department said it estimates 
growth in the broadest measure of economic 
health — the gross national product — at its 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The nation's basic money 
supply, known as M-l, fell $2.1 billion in the 
latest week, a larger decline than expected. 

M-l was a seasonally adjusted average of 
SS70.6 bflhon in the week ended March 11, 
compared with a revised $572.7 bflhon the pre- 
vious week. Last week’s figure was originally 
reported as $572.4 Union. 

M-l is a measure of money supply growth 
which includes currency in circulation, travelers 
checks and rhwTring deposits at financial insti- 
tutions. 


22ft EntfCa 32 14 14 
17ft Eiwcb 1X0 55 18 
5m EDXftpf eJS*U* 
91% ElBCtipfllJlVlU 
19k Ensrc* 2* 

9ft Eirtcra 

U% EntsE n 1X7*105 
it Entnin ijo 7X 9 
15ft Eopfx*. IS 

3 Eaulmk 
lift Eamkaf 2X1 U3 
28ft Eaffta* 1X2 4* 6 
9ft Eauftcn .12 U 8 
r?k Efbmnr JO 2* 17 
12% EssSin M 24 II 
15ft ExmxC JQbX* 13 
20ft E srrlfl* 32 U » 
20 EttIVl 1J2 3JJ 11 
1% viEvortP 
2ft utEuanpf 
4ft vlEvnaS 
30 ExC*l0 1X0 45 9 
37ft Exxon 3*1 U 7 


+ 

28 —1 
29ft 

54% + ft 
99ft— % 
2ft— ft 
10ft 

, 17ft + ft 
IHft + ft 
25% 

6ft 

14ft— % 
38ft + % 
12ft + ft 
uv.— ft 
Wft+ ft 
23% 

20 % — % 
37%—% 
2%+ ft 
3ft 

4% + ft 
. 359k— % 
49%+ ft 


35ft 20 
26% l*ft 
ID 3ft 
48% 34ft 
30ft 22 
37ft 21% 
19% 13% 
37% 24 
83% 54ft 
77% 61 
23ft 18% 
S4ft 39% 
19ft 9% 
23ft 13% 
34% 20ft 
13% 9ft 
21% 13ft 
25 17% 

33 21ft 
27ft 17ft 
41ft 239k 
25ft HV. 


3238 59% 58ft 
3131 33ft 32ft 
63 34% 31% 
8k 5ft S 
939 *4% 45ft 
178 27% 279k 
UI2 35ft 35 
140 lift 18 
15*3 37ft 36ft 
4 B3ft 81% 
250 77% 76% 
2454 23 22% 

387 *4 45ft 
■32 11 8ft 

4 17% 17% 
61 26ft 34 
24 13% 13 

295 14% 14% 

5 18ft 18% 
2907 28% Z7ft 

193 25% 25ft 
79* 37ft 34ft 

6 34 23% 


slowest rate since the 1.6 percent pace turned in 
from July through September last year. 

The economy grew 6.8 percent during 1984. 
In addi ti on , a measure ctf prices tied to the 


in anrin i nn , a measure <x prices oea to me 
GNP — the implicit price deflator — is rising at 
an annual rate of 5.4 n er ^ it in the unfinished 
first three months of the year* 

That rate is the fastest since a 5.6 percent 
pace in the second quarter of 1981 
Among actively traded issues, GTE was 
down 1% at 41%. 

CBS, the target of takeover speculation, was 
down ft at 105%. The company issued a state- 
ment Thursday saying it has “no plans in place 
or contemplated for a management group to 
implement a leveraged buyout of the compa- 
ny" 

Upjohn was up 1 at 78%. Sterling Drug rose 
lft to 32ft. Merck rose lft to 103%. 


23%+ ft 
29 + % 
55%— % 
4% + ft 
259b + % 
15ft + % 
216— ft 
1B%— ft 
36%+ ft 
32% — % 
219k— % 
26 — % 
*2%+ % 
34ft— % 
35% —1% 
14% — ft 
17ft + % 
17%—% 
16 

26ft + ft 
51%+ % 
6% 

50 + ft 

15 — % 


27%+ % 


37 %+ % 

W% — ft 

43 + ft 
22 % + 1 % 
SI 

36% 

10ft— % 
28 

!»+ U 

17 + % 

44 +lft 
17%—% 


16 

17 U 14 
J4b 1.1 12 
1X0 9X 8 
2*0 9J 9 
*0 3J) 4 
2*0 7X 7 
.! 6X0 11 
“ 1 4X5 11X 
F 5X0 11X 
1X4 S3 11 
I 1X0 12 11 
232 5* 9 
5 

>pfB 4X0 17X 
1 pfG 736 110 
PTV 4X8 19.1 
*rU 240 192 
PprT 178 19J 
PbtR 4X0 185 
Pprf» 198 193 
PurN 285 19.1 
PprM 2X0 179 
PprL 223 17J 
P prS 4X2 129 
PjxK 2*3 122 
noi 1X0 43 7 


40%+ U 
23% + % 
22H + % 
25 +% 
25 + % 

23% 

41 —1 
179k + ft 
23 + ft 
33 
10 


88 JP 

•ft 4% 
34ft 17% 
28ft 17% 


17ft 

5ft— % 

10 % 

2Dft— ft 

23 

19ft— ft 
21ft + ft 
23ft 


16ft ?lft 
72ft 59 
61ft 47ft 
59% 46 

2ft S* 

28 
34ft 
27ft 
27% 


40 
17ft 
31% 

29% 

19% 

6% 3ft 
3% 1% 
1% ft 
139k 6% 
15ft 6% 
18% 9% 
2Mb 21% 
18ft 12ft 
78 60% 

60% 37% 
30% 20ft 
32% 20% 
39% 32ft 
18ft 13 
34% 19 
33ft 19% 
29ft 25ft 
28ft 23ft 
14% 9ft 
14% 8ft 
7% 2ft 
8ft 4% 
28% 15 
18 11% 
17% 5% 
78% 58ft 
14% 5ft 
20ft 11% 
32% 24ft 
14% 
3% 


M 

12 

20 

207 

30 

37ft 

37% + % 


IX 


43 

17% 

17% 

17%+ ft 

XO 

14 

1444 

28 

Z7% 


in* 

4* 

1 

69 

24 

23ft 

23ft— ft 

M 

2A 


278 

18% 

18ft 

18ft — ft 




725 

6 

Sft 

6 + % 

I 



58 

5 

fi 

fi 





44 

13% 

13 

13%+ ft 




106 

16% 

14% 

15% + ft 




3* 

17 

16% 

17+16 

1X0 

SLB 

31 

337 

77Vi 

22% 


1X4 

107 

6 

192 

18% 

lift 

18ft + ft 

32D0 

1 47 

12 

7404 

68% 

67% 

67% — ft 

1X0 

22 

7 

2063 

53% 

52% 

52ft— lb 

AS 

32 

13 

142 

28 

27% 


1X4 

ax 

12 

828 

271k 

28ft 

28% 

1X0 

47 

HI 

66 

33% 

32% 

32% — % 

24 

IX 

12 

127 

15% 

15% 

15ft 

XO 

25 

22 

486 

32% 

31ft 

32ft + ft 

225 

106 


4 

22% 

27ft 

22% 

325 

132 


1 

28% 

28% 

28% 



14 

10 

27% 

27ft 

27% 



485 

14% 

14 

14 — % 

26 

32 


21 

109k 

10% 

10% + ft 




fl 

4% 

4ft 

4ft 

XO 


76 

TC 

7% 

7% 

7ft+ ft 

J 

28 

123 

24ft 

24ft 

24ft— ft 

XO 

52 

18 

21 

15 

14% 

15 + ft 







Oft— ft 

260 

34 

14 

1019 

73% 

72% 

73ft + ft 



17 

9*5 

14% 

13ft 


XO 

29 

10 

789 

17ft 

17% 

17% 

1*00 

5.1 

1 

162 

28 

27ft 


176 

9X 

7 

m 

19% 

19ft 

19%+ ft 




lOOOx 

4% 

4% 

4%— ft 

XO 

102 


400z 

4% 

4% 

4%— lb 



16% 
14 17ft 
2S 29% 
50 24ft 
29 26% 
80 7ft 
48 18% 
205 47 
29 




-x4 


ft 
ft 
ft 
% 
% 
% 
% 
ft 
ft 
% 

18% 

128H— % 

21% 

27ft + ft 
9%— ft 
4% — ft 
48% — % 
35%_ % 
29% — ft 
41%+ % 
28ft 

49%+ % 
14%+ ft 
44% + ft 
KQ 

9M6— % 
37ft— % 
16% + ft 
% 
ft 
ft 

28% + ft 

"ft- a 
% 
% 
ft 
% 


* 


m 




5% 

2Sft 
55 44ft 
57ft 45ft 
3ft 2ft 
26% 22% 
16ft 12% 
7% 41k 
49 33% 

14% 9% 
25% 17% 
28ft 22 
17ft 


IJO* S3 
•78*11.1 7 


30% 20 
3*ft 23ft 
34% 13ft 
14% 10% 
43 rsv* 
67ft 54% 
58 46ft 
9Bft 90 
92% 78% 
16ft 12% 
f% 5% 
40W 28 
46% 37ft 
29% 21% 
26% 15% 
27% 31% 


13X0 13J 
11X0 12X 
2.18 13X 


13 165 28% 

8 203 26 
10 120 21% 

176 12ft 
6 354 40% 
lOz 45ft 
10z 54% 
1QZ 97ft 
100Z 87 
SB 16 

19 4 2V. 

15 4009 40ft 

9 330 *0% 

18 3 25% 

14 188 24% 
14 331 25% 


28% 28%— ft 
35% 25% 

21 21%+ ft 

11% 12ft 
40 % 

65ft 65ft— % 
56% 54% — % 
97ft 97ft +lft 
87 87 +1 

159k 159k— ft 
7% TV.— ft 
40ft 40% + ft 
40 *0V» 

25% 25%+ % 
23% 24% 

25ft 2$ft— % 


3X0 142 
7X8 14X 
8.12 112 
.178 6 X 
3.1* 122 
1J8 8X 10 
M 3 53 
2X6 11 9 
128 1X4 X 
1X0 5X 
2X8 9J 10 

XO 19 M 
150 4.1 13 
U I 


65 
31% 

2ft 
11% 
zr% 

7ft 
3ft 3% 
27% 77% 
52 52 

53ft S3ft 
2% 2% 
26ft 26 
15% 15% 
6% 69k 
46% 46ft 
13% 13% 
17% 17% 
27% 27ft 
13% 13% 
84% 82% 
31% 

7% 




•.•hism.-'. i » l ^- 


JO 

4J 

2J0 

5J 

256 

■J 

2X0 

93 

IXOalQX 

JO 

BJ 

2X0 

3J 

IX* 

4.1 

250 

«J 

230 

43 

7 Jim 9X 

1X8 

39 

JO 

38 

171* &2 

M 

23 

M 

19 

X4b 23 


JO 

24 

13* 

ax 

1X8 

09 

XV 

4J 

4.12 

83 

493 

83 

30 

13 

IJ7 

ax 

XO 

43 

236 

103 

3X0 


233 

1^| 

1X0 

p o 

1X0 

80 

236 

29* 


232 

113 

223 

I1J 


8ft 8% 
16% lift 
34% 33ft 
38% 38% 
14ft 13% 
50 SO 


16 15% 

16 16 
9% 9% 
22% 21% 
30 30 

18% IS 
49% 49% 
12% 12ft 
18% 18ft 
33ft 33 
20% 20ft 
19% 19% 
39% 39 
100 % 
67 16% 16% 
3 16% 16% 
344 49% 49% 
65 32% 32% 
82 
209 
273 
64 




166 

1X0 4.1 7S5 

1X0 6X IS 2657 
X8 5X 17 750 
X4 A1 32 


5% 5ft 

a 34% 

30% 30 
T% 1% 
9% 9ft 
29% 29% 
13% 13% 

ins mo 

50% 46 
19% W*k 

in 18% 
£0% *8% 
29ft 29ft 
lift 11% 
30ft 30% 
20% 27% 
14% 15ft 
27ft 27ft 
32% 33ft 
15% 15% 
20% 20 ft 
11% lift 
25% 24% 
11 % 11 
12% 12 
17% 16% 
17ft 16% 
2* 23ft 
48ft 48ft 
1«% 14% 
71% 21ft 
Sib 5ft 
33ft 33 
23% 23% 
28% 28 
41ft 40% 
.7ft 7ft 
34% 33% 
27% 26% 
17 Mft 
12% 12 
25% 25 
Wft 50 
34ft 33% 
SBft jS 
79 72% 

1Mb Mb 
22% 21% 
8% 79k 
%% 34% 
U% 13% 
57ft 57 


Sft 

34%—% 
30ft— ft 
1% 

9V. + ft 
®ft— ft 
13%+ ft 
19%+ ft 
48 —3% 
19%— ft 
18% — ft 
48% —1 
29ft + ft 
11%— ft 
30ft + ft 
28 —ft 
15ft— 9k 
Z7ft+ % 
32%+ % 
15%— % 
20% + ft 
11% + % 
2flh+llb 
lift + ft 
■12ft 

16% - V. 

16% 

24 + ft 
48ft— % 
14% + % 
71% 

5% 

33 — ft 
23% 


41ft + % 
7ft— ft 
33%— ft 
26%— % 
17 — ft 

12ft 

25% — ft 
59% + ft 
33ft + % 
50 — ft 
78%— % 
18% — % 
22ft + % 
8 — % 
25 + ft 
13% 

57ft + ft 


1«X 

BJ 

,x T ? 

iSf 

s 

206 
56 42 15 
X0 X 12 
2X7 11J 
1X0 3X 9 
M 22 U 
in 46 n 
32 ax 18 

XO IX 24 
XB 2X 8 


2 26ft 
22 14% 
8 9% 

*21 lift 
10 3% 

538* 10% 
2 49% 
1685 22ft 
57 15ft 
84 IMS 

36 24% 

60 7% 

57 

37 
73 

352 
748 
43 
761 
32 
265 
499 
25x 
X 


19 

1X5 SB 27 
-72 1J 
’■» sx 
4-7S 6* 

32 22 
330 43 
32 X 
1X4 ** 

03 
10 
9.1 

U 

2X 


36ft 

14 — ft 
9%+ ft 
H%— ft 
3% 

10ft— ft 
48%— ft 

ai%— % 

15ft— ft 
11% + ft 
Mb + ft 


13% 

4ft + % 

13% 

22 % — % 
3*%+ ft 
*7%+ ft 
18ft— ft 


|lft— lft 
34% +lft 
14 + ft 


22 22 
47% 44 
33 32 

43ft 42% 
34ft 33% 
29% 28% 
239b 23% 
2ft 3% 
22ft 22% 
48ft 48 
6% 


19% + % 
3ft 

14% + ft 
12ft— % 

8*-* 

asih 

46ft— % 

32%T ft 
74% — % 

37%+ % 
* 

21% 

Uft— ft 
22 — % 
46ft— % 
33% + ft 

43 —ft 


m 






-Mi 1l< 


i»n 


5% 

35ft 23ft 
35% 23ft 
11 ] . 8tM 


2X0 o 6 


39%+ % 
33% 

23% — ft 
48 

6ft + ft 
23 

56ft— lft 

gft+lft 

17% 

17% 

17ft + 14 
20% — ft 
16% + kb 
51% + % 
T2ft+ % 

53% 

26% — % 

33%+ % 
21 —ft 
32%+% 
B%+ % 
27ft + ft 
46% + % 
26% — ft 

21ft 




Wb 34% M I -3 28 1T ?J 1* u% lS% + % 

Sb 16% Motn ,-S ]X 25 '«■» 51% 49% 49%— 1% 

MtBfP 1X0 6* 6 343 22 21% 22 + % 


20% 17ft 
51ft 48% 
1U 105% 
108ft 101ft 
34ft 22 
31ft 2*ft 
14ft 9ft 
34 2S% 

55 42 

60% 45 
26% 18% 
28% 21 
141k 10% 
66ft SI 
63 47ft 
87ft 76 
89% 77 
17% 12% 
61ft Sift 
19% 15 
107 98ft 
21ft 19ft 
8% 7 
36% 26ft 
28 Sft 
19% M 
33% 26ft 
25% 19% 
EJft 6% 
27ft 19ft 
13% 8ft 
MH 6ft 
31% 24 
31ft 18% 
33ft 




















































































































o' 


' v !%. 

" & 1NESS ROUNDUP 

V S if 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 




ecom’s Pretax Profit Up 
1% in Quarter, Net Lower 


4J 

1 1 : - 
i ? ■ ■- 

fit;;; 

.BiT^ 

-r* i* hi 
-«« 

«. 


Reuters 

iN — Telecom 


' •'^^Njrciax profit surged 51.4 
' xarom a year earlier, to £386 
about S42S million) from 
lion, pushing results for 
^ months ended Dec. 31 to 
ion from £717 million. 
^\es rose 111 percent in 
•’ quarter, to £1.94 billion 
y.Ti billion, andllperant, 
^bahon from £5.02 billion, 

• < ne months, the company 

^*et income, reflecting a 
• ‘crease in ta«s from the 
! > . , ier periods, fell 3 potent 
< arta and 43 percent in the 
■- < |mhs, the company said. 

• .. : aiter net feD to £247 mil- 

! £255 ""TKrtn and niae- 

■.-V*iet to £685 million from 
lion, the company sad. 

■. 'ib shares feQ 114 peooe, to 
1 eariy trading cm the Lon- 
- ... ?k Exchange, but recovered 
i 1 !at 13414 pence; np H. 


The company said operating 
earnings for the nine months 
amounted to £1.75 billion and that 
net borrowings fell £380 milli on in 
the period, to £2.83 billion. Spend- 
ing on fixed assets absorbed £127 
biffion, the company said. 

George Jefferson, the company's 
chairman, said operating costs dur- 
ing the period were increased by 
adverse currency movements and 
higher provisions for bad debts and 
other items. But interest costs were 
down si gnifican tly, refla ting the 
company^ new capital structure 
and strong cash flow, be said. 

Mr. Jefferson said results for the 
current quarter remain. satisfactory 

Douglas Hawkins, who follows 
the company for James Cape! & 
Co., said the Telecom results 
should not be seen as a disappoint- 
ment. Mir. Hawkins said he expects 
die company’s program to install 
digital exchanges throughout Brit- 
ain to produce 15-20 percent annu- 
al revenue growth through the sec- 
ond half of the decade. 


Texas Air Plans 
A New Carrier 

Las Angela Times Service 

NEW YORK — Texas Air 
Corp. has announced plans to 
begin an airline based in Los 
Angeles to offer high-frequen- 
cy, low-fare passenger ana car- 
go service in the western United 
States. The carrier. Continental 
West Airlines In cl, will start in 
June, Texas Air said. 

It said the subsidiary would 
have its own manaymgnt iwim 
but be operated under a join i- 
marketing arrangement with an 
existing Texas Air subsidiary. 
Houston-based Continental 
Airlines. Continental West will 
fly six new Boeing 737-300S, the 
statement Wednesday s aid , 

A Continental Airlines 
spokesman said it was too eariy 
to say how many people would 
be hired by the new airline. In- 
dustry sources said h would fly 
between Los Angeles and Las 
Vegas, Reno, Nevada and San 
Francisco. 


BASF Pretax Group Profit 
Rose 50% in ’84, to Record 


LUDWIGSHAFEN, West Ger- 
many — BASF AG reported 
Thursday that pretax world group 
profit rose just over 50 percent in 
1984, to a rec ord 25 1 billion Deut- 
sche marks (S773 million) from 
1.68 bffliofl DM in 1983. and said it 
expected good earnings this year as 
wdL 

The chemical giant said orders 
were higher than a year ago al- 
though the rate of sales growth had 
slackened compared with the ex- 
tremely strong rises in eariy 1984. 
Group sales rose 15.1 pe r cent last 
year, to 40.4 billion DM from 35.1 
billion DM, and parent-company 
sales increased 17 percent to 19.8 
bOlion DM from 16.9 bflban DM, 
BASF said. 

The company mad* no state- 
ment on its dividend. The amount 
will be decided upon at a meeting 
of the supervisory board April 2? 
Each of the three major West Ger- 


V* {-* ;■* 
** 4 * - 

r> “* 


V. 

r 

* 


E t: v 


r : ", t 


3f* • “1 

% « V 


M I*- 

G V 
U V 


± - 

99m 0 *■ 


Inkers Trust: A New Visionary in U.S, Banking 


jotinaed limn Page 11) 
nunerdal and investment 
He -wants the act re- 

;is are symbolic, so you 
’.«reak down that symbolism 
' to change behavior,” Mr. 
. said. For that reason, he 
'X call loans “loans,” or 
.■bonds,” or notes “notes.” 
* than all “IOUa.” That, he 
•I wfll help break down re- 
■>' to his attempts to repeal 


. ' “Joans” and “securities,” 
'{ banks to deal in loans but 
‘jrities. 

ianford, like Mr, Wriston, 
,‘i wait for Congress to act 


“Bankers Trust has dealt with 
Glass-SteagaD by emphasizing the 
areas that are legal, _like loan sales, 
mergers and acq uisitions, financial 
advisory services and underwriting 
securities outside the United 
States,” said George Salem, bank 
stock analyst for Donaldson, Luf- 
kin & Jeanette, the securities firm. 

A handful of other rairm»»Tri»! 
banks also sell off their corporate 
loans, but only as a sideline. For 
Bankers Trust, matching investors 
and b or row e r s, rather than merely 
malring loans m»ri holding them in 
its portfolio, is becoming the core 
of its business. Last year, h sold 
$72 billion of the loans it had made 
to corporate clients, representing 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Q u otat io n s Supplied by Funds Listed 
21 March 1985 




tL MANAGEMENT 
■ ■Mol Trust SA—— 

: JULIUS B AER SCa 

Cm*mr 

Emribaor America __ 


Ltd. 

- SFV15JS 
. SF 119SJ3C 
S 111100 

. sf mini 
. SF 117700 

- SF 108700 
SF 1US00* 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
pb esn, Tb* hood. 4*Mn 

—Id) Bwf B atipal n HiP 1 1 S3L20 

LLOYDS BANK I NT1. POB 4». Gama 1 1 
— Kw) Uoyds i ntn Dollar— SKMJO 
— Hw) Lloyds lid*) Europe — SF11U0 

— Hw) UByds inn Growth SF19U0 

— ftw) Uoyds InTI Income SF 320.00 

— Hw) Lloyds lni*l Pacific — SFM7O0* 


CrantiM Find. 
' UF Fund N.V_ 

IliE INOOSUEZ 
Asian Growth F 
Dhwrhond— 
J=IF— Amorlca- 
Ft F— Europe 



30 percent of its total loan portfo- 
lio. In effect, the bank is taking on 
all the middleman aspects of in- 
vestment banking without giving 
up a commercial bank's ability to 
make huge loans with depositor 
money. 

“I think you can fi qtriH«g« 90 per- 
cent of die loan portfolio;” said Mr. 
Sanford, whose Savannah drawl 
and Southern niceties cnmmrflag e 
bis demanding nature “There is 
very little you can't sell at a price.” 

Mr. Sanford has gotten 
Bankers Trust deeply involved in 

crimmerriiil paper, as an inrentwti- 

ary in placing commercial paper 
with institutional investors. The 
bank’s innovative role in commer- 
cial paper — ■ which are IOU*s is- 
sued by big corporations to raise 
money — has found imitators 

them Citib ank and Morgan Guar- 
anty Trust Ca 

But it was Bankers Trust's lead- 
ership that drew the ire of Wall 
Street The Securities Industry As- 
sociation, in a precedent-setting 
lawsuit has accused the bank of 
violating the federal law that sepa- 
rates c ommer cial and investment 

h anking. 

The new directions at Bankers 
Trust are bringing radical change 
to the bank’s executive ranks. Top 
new. staffers are often investment 
bankers hired from. Wall Street 
brokerage houses and securities 
firms, and the average salary of the 
bank’s 10.400 employees soared to 
$41,760 last year from $33,085 in 
1983-and 519J05 in 1979. 

The Bankas Trust approach 
could misfire. By shedding its retail 


branches, the bank has become de- 
pendent on corporations, govern- 
ments and other Dig institutions for 
its $25.6 billion in deposits. 

Bankers Trust could also suffer 
from its decision to give up con- 
sumer lending and consumer de- 
posits. For the rest of commercial 
banking today, consumer lending, 
at rates of 18 percent or more, has 
become a high-profit business. 

In addition, (he new Bankers 
Trust counts more heavily on the 
profits from its trading operations 
— not only those earned m selling 
loans, but also in trading govem- 
ment securities. These earnings are 
volatile. 

In the fourth quarter of 1984, 
Bankers Trust’s trading profits 
soared to $55 3 million, accounting 
for 55 percent of total pretax net 
In the third quarter, t rading profits 
were $9.2 million, or a bit less than 
10 percent of the total, and in the 
second quarter the bank lost $1.8 
minio n in its bond trading activi- 
ties. 

Finally, the strategy ai Bankers 
Trust, with its $45.2 billion in as- 
sets, focuses heavily on the most 
competitive shoe of the banking 
market — major corporations. 
Thai market has been shrinkin g as 
ttvsf companies have become in- 
creasingly adept at handling their 
finances in-house, without banks. 

West German Stocks CKmb 

.. Raters 

FRANKFURT — Commerz- 
bank AG said Thursday its index 
of 60 leading West German shares 
set a record high at 1,2293. 




Contact S4-64133, 

ASSA SWSS ADVERnSEMIMn, 
PA*. 114, CH-M01 h i ta SwfeaaH 


Gold Options dates la V«U. 



Gob, 3 HU 0. 31300 

VUcvsWUteWeM&A 

L Qaai tm MooMDnc 
nil Gam L Sw tart aal 
TcL 31B251 - Tdac 28315 


STOCK BID ASK 

us* US* 

DeVoe-HoIbem 

In t ernat ional bv 5V4 6% 

City-Clock 

International nv 294 336 

Quotes as oh March 2L, 1965 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without ■ 
obligation. 


Fhsc Commerce S ecu ri t i es bv 
Herengracht 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 




Sanrorql Portfolio. SF 112.10 


Hat* SI. Bonk EouttyHdMMV S9.W 


TocWfo Growtti Fund- 
Tokyo Pac HokL (5oa) 
Tok yo Pac. HaW. tL V.- 

Tr ow oe H l c Fund 

Turauabe Fund —. 








NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 


EXPORT DEVELOPMB1T CORPORATION 

U.S. $100,000,000 
12% % NOTES DUE MAY 15, 1987. 
SERIES MU 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Export Development Corpo- 
ration intends to redeem on May 15, 1985 the 115. *100,000,000 
notes outstanding for the 12% % Series MU Notes doe 1967 at a 
price of 100 % of the principal amount together with interest on 
such principal amount accrued and unpaid to the said date of 
redemption. 

The redemption price on the said Notes shall be payable on 
presentation and surrender thereof with all unmatured coupons at 
any one of the following paying agencies: 

Bank of Montreal, 

9 Queen Victoria Street, 

London EG4N 4XN, England, 

Banqoe Internationale a Luxembourg, 

2 Bonlevard Royale, 

2953 Luxembourg. 

Bank of Nova Scotia, 

66 Boulevard de ITmpiratrice, 
lOOO Bmssela, Bdghim. 

Bank of Montreal, 

37-39 Ulmenstrasse, 

D-6000 Frankfort, W. Germany. 

Ranh of Montreal Trust Company, 

.2 Wall Street, 

New York, 

N.Y. 10005, U.SA. 

NOTES should be surrendered with all coupons appertaining 
thereto maturing after the date fixed for redemption, failing which 
face value of any missing unmatured coupon will be deducted from 
the sum due for paymenL 

Any amount a period of 10 years from May 15, 1985. On and after 
the date fixed for redemption, interest on the notes will cease to 
accrue. 

Dated: March 18, 1985. 

EXPORT PEVBOPflABIT CORPORATION 


man chemical companies made a 7- 
DM payout on 1983 o mingc 
Commercial bank stock analysts 
said they were expected to settle on 
9 DM for 1984. 

BASF is the second of the three 
to report 1984 pretax earnings. 
Hoechst AG said parent-company 
pretax orofit rose 44.7 percent to 
1 33 bOlion DM; no group data was 
available. Bayer AG is expected to 
make its earnings statement in ear- 
ly ApriL 

BASF said its strong 1984 sales 
rise was largely the result of in- 
creases in volume sales, particular- 
ly abroad. It said sales rose in all its 
business sectors by 11 to 20 per- 
cent, with above-average gains in 
insecticides and pesticides, plastics 
and fibers. 

Its North American business was 
particularly aided by the mark’s 
softness against the dollar, the 
company said, though it did not 
quantify the impact of currency 
factors. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Alstbom-Adantique has signed a 
technical and marketing agreement 
with Toshiba C oro, u nder which an 
Alsthom unit SCEML will market 
Toshiba robots and automation 
equipment in France and share 
technical knowledge with Toshiba. 

British Airways has filed a pro- 
posal with the U.S. Transportation 
Department for reduced standby 
fares to go into effect April 1. A 
flight from New York to London 
would be $199. compared with 
$279 a year agp. 

Brown, Boveri & Ge AG says a 
consortium it leads, including 
AEG-Telefunken AG and Siemens 
AG. won a contract worth 69.9 
million Deutsche marks (about 
$21.4 minimi) for an electricity 
supply system in southern West 
Germany for the federal railroad. 

CDF-Otimie, the petrochemicals 
subsidiary of state-owned Char- 
bonnages de France, announced a 
1984 net consolidated loss of 862 
million francs ($86 million at cur- 
rent exchange rates), compared 
with a loss of 2.76 billion francs in 
1983, on net revenue of about 25 
billion francs, against 19.49 billion 
francs in 1983. 

Cr&fit Suisse is negotiating to 
buy Effecienbank -Warburg AG 


for an undisclosed amount. The 
Zurich bank said the talks should 
be completed by the end of May. 
The sale would have to be ap- 
proved by the West German cartel 
office. 

House of Fraser PLCs board 
has declared a special interim divi- 
dend of 3.5 pence a share, confirm- 
ing the intention announced when 
it agreed to terms for purchase of 
its shares by Alfayed Investment & 
Trust (UK) Ltd. 

General Motors Corp. says it will 
offer low-cost financing for some 
of its small models, following the 
lead of Chrysler Cotp. and Ford 
Motor Co. Also, some analysts re- 
duced GM^ first-quarter earnings 
estimates bv as much as $1 a share. 

Jaguar PLC reported an 83- per- 
cent rise in 1984 pretax profit, to 
£913 million ($105 million), from 
£50 million in 1983. 

Komaisu Ltd. has announced 
plans to buy an abandoned factory 
in Chattanooga, Tennessee, for 
$3.5 million and to begin assem- 
bling heavy construction equip- 
ment by next March, in a bid to 
increase its share of the U.S. mar- 
ket. 

MCI Mail, a unit of MCI Tele- 
communications Corp., has ex- 


Page 13 


ponded its international courier 
service to include delivery to Cana- 
da, Mexico, the Caribbean, Puerto 
Rico and Central and South Amer- 
ica. 

National Can Corp. stock owned 
by Victor Posner is to be sold to 
Triangle Industries for nearly $150 
million in cash and Mr, Posner has 
dropped his long-standing attempt 
to take over National Can, the Mi- 
ami businessman said. He added 
that if someone else outbid Trian- 
gle, be retained the right to sell his 
stock to the higher bidder. 

Porsche AG reported revenue for 
the first half of the 1985 fiscal year 
rose 7.4 parent to 1.37 billion DM. 
The managing board chairman, Pe- 
ter Schutz, forecast car production 
to rise about 15 percent this fiscal 
year as daily output is increased to 
meet strong worldwide demand. 

Siemens AG said world group 
revenue rose 39 percent to 22.4 bil- 
lion DM in the first five months of 
fiscal 1985. The management 
board Anirm-ip , Ka rlheinz Kaske , 
said the high growth rate was main- 
ly due to receipts by Siemens' 
Kraft werk Union AG or power sta- 
tion projects. Excluding these, 
group sales rose 9 percent in the 
five months. 




Non Dollar 


IB ffl i M g 




Aw mfliyiroiHe mumg mwil inrJ mm m-rf ■oifrfr jnc c mpra iblc Ayiw 


The Perfect Executive Folder 

Exclusively designed for the tatemational Herald Tribune 

by LeathasnHth of London in superb, fine-grained leather 

The most efficient of all possible solutions for • In center position a 50-sheet blue paper A-4 

or ganizin g the many papers yen need— end collect— -at pad bound in matching Mack leather. Under the pad, 

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business trips. • At right, a space-age thin, solar powered calcu- 

The ideal business gift for an associate, a family Iaior that fits in its own pocket; two pockets for credit 

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Please send me Executive Folders. Price includes gold-blocked 

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Return this order fonn to: Imtids 

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Rease check method of payment: 

□ Enclosed is ny check or money order far $ madetotbeonkr 

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[tiiiVIvi'i 'jj •• i til 
































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Page 14- 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TREBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 




Thursday^ 


N1SE 


Qoang 


Tobies include the nationwide n rices 
up to Hie closing on wall Street 
end do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


ntMcmti 

High Low Start 


Sis. Gase 

Dtv.Yld.Pg IPOs HlBh Low Quotmpe 


(Continued from Page 12) 


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15 PSA JO 15 
13ft PSA dot 190 100 
lift PocAS 13* 1X1 
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30ft PocUa 332 7J 
21ft PcLum 100 47 
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lift POCSCl JO =7 
54 PocTele 540 75 
21 Paelfcs 232 BJ 
Z7VS Poclf pf 4JB7 127 
25 PalnWb JO 16 
281% PdlrtWpf 225 73 
25ft PalmBc 170 ““ 
4 Potato 
lft Pota wt . 

13ft Pandckn 70 
31 PonhEC 230 A7 

3 PwiTPr 
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121% ParfcPn 
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14ft POVINW 
lift PavNP 
13ft PavCsh 
Aft Peolxty 
Ponao 

40ft PenCen 
44ft Putney 
19ft Pa PL _ 

30ft PoPLPt 4J0 123 
30 Pcm.pt X50 133 
20 PoPLdPfSTO i 2 -i 
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25ft PaPLOTrXTS 133 
311% Pen wit 270 57 
20 Pftiwp f 1J0 47 
30ft Pemtzat 270 45 
72 Pam pfB S30 9 A 
9ft PeopEn 170 73 
23ft PSPSOV JO 1.1 
35ft PepsiCo US 37 
17ft Perk El 56 23 
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28 Pefrfe TJO 43 
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14 P of Rapt 157 107 

4 Pfrlnv 130*19.5 
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25 PUIEDf 4J0 143 
40 PtillE pf 730 13.9 
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43 PhllE Pf 735 143 
Aft PhllE Pf T7E 133 

97 Phil of 17.12 743 
51 PhllE Pf 950 143 

44 PhllE Pf 7 JO 140 
401% PhllE pf 775 143 
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28 Phlllnpf 130 13 
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37ft 37 37ft— ft 

23ft 22ft 23ft +lft 
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12ft 1»> 12ft 
17ft lift 171%+ ft 
42ft 42 40ft + ft 
25ft 25% 25ft— ft 
Sft 6% 8* 

17% 17% 17ft— % 

a 15 14ft 14*— % 

9 1289 72% 71% 72* + ft 

8 1212 27 28ft 27+1% 

26 32% 32% 32% — ft 

88 752 38% 37% 38%+ft 

K 31ft 30% 31* + ft 

37ft 37V, 37%— % 

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5 4ft 5 + ft 
16* 18% 16% 

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28 131, 18ft 18% 18ft + * 

13 46 21% 2 2% 

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18 354 19% 19ft 19*— * 

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2601 34ft 34ft 34ft 

14 24* 24 24 

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15 29 23ft 28* 

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I4S50Z 85ft 85ft 85ft 

8 301 lift lift lift 

15 54 M* 35* 35*— 1% 

2310147 52ft 51* 51%— % 

14 589 247k 24ft 24ft— * 

7 274 8ft 8H 8ft 

14 116 18% 18ft 18% — * 

15 2» 35* 34ft 34* + M 

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a 15ft 15* 157k— * 
44 5b 5% 5% + % 

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2350V 51% SO* SO*— 1 
2220 y 62ft 80ft 62ft +1* 
133x 10* 10% 10* + * 
93x 9% 9ft 9ft + % 

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4509 87 65 66 +lft 

20y 55 55 » +1 

180V 55ft 54 55ft +2% 
252 191% 19* 19* + ft 
2352 92% 90% 92* +1ft 
427 23 21ft 23 +1% 

3 54ft 52 54M+4M 

1253 39 38ft 39 — ft 
6767 381% aft 38ft + * 
459 23ft 23* 23* + * 
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a* a a + * 

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134 33ft 32* 33% + ft 
2948 27ft 26% 2 7ft + )% 
100Z 41* 41* 41* + * 
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80 23* 22% 22ft— % 
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15% 15* 15*— * 
22* 22% 22%+ ft 


15 

12 

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31ft 

22ft 

19 

19% 

25% 

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13* 

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108% 

64% 

S7 

63% 

65 

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15 

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108 14J 
7.15 14J 
9J4 165 
4J8 MJ 
596 168 


10* 


19* PS In pf 
6 PSInpt 
Aft PSlnpf 
36% PSlnpf 
49% PSlnpf 
43 PSInof 
46* PSlnpf 
3ft PSVNH 

6 PSNHpI 
6% PNHpfB 
8ft PNHpfC 

7 PNHpfD 

7 PNHpfE 
5* PNHpfF 
7% PNHpfG 

19% PSvNM XB8 115 
20* PSvEG 272 1X2 
10ft PSEGPf 180 11J) 
28% PSEGPf 4.18 1X7 
35ft PSEGPf 52B 1X2 
15 PSEGPf XT7 1Z5 
16% PSEGPf 2J3 125 
96 PSEG PT123S 11.9 
53 PSEG Pf 7 JO 1X4 
55 PSEGPf 508 1X8 
51% PSEGPf 752 1X4 
a PSEGPf 7 JO 12J 
2% Publldc 

8 Pueblo .16 15 
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9* PppetP 1J6 12J 
Wft PulfeHik) .12 
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5ft Pyto 


13* 13ft 13ft 
40% 40 40ft— % 

_ 19* 19% 19* + * 

40z 57ft 57ft 57%—]% 

10 18ft 18* 18% 

392 7ft 7ft 7b 
7401 22 22 22 

lOItte 7% 7 ? 

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50Qz 43% 43Va 43%— * 
ran 57ft 57% 57* + ft 
Me 52 B 62 +1% 
5% 53* S3* 53*— 1 
m 4% 4ft 4%+ft 
270* 10* 9% 9%— 1* 

11 10% 9% 9% — * 


16 

5 

11 

10 

54 

378 

4200 

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13% 17% 12%— ft 
13 12* 12*— ft 

lift 11 11 — * 

lift II lift— % 
25 24* 25 + * 

28% 28% 26* + * 
12* 12% 12* + ft 


J 24 
55 11 
8 


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ID* 43% Oft 43% 

2 17% 17% 17% + ft 

3 19% 19ft 19ft 

20*102* HD* 102* +1* 
£ta At 61 a — lft 
10* 63 63 63 — ft 

MO* 60% 60% 60% + % 
20* 59ft 99ft 59ft— I* 
541 4 3* 3%+ ft 

44 11 10* 10*— * 

7 7* 7ft 7% + ft 

442 14* 14% 14* + % 
252 IS* 15* 15% 

457 24 22* 23% — * 

172 8% 8% 8* 


nz 



Q 



1 

44 

98 

22* 

17% 

34* 

2Sb 

28% QuakOs 1-26 73 13 2819 43* 42% 43b + % 
90% OuaO Pf 906 100 40z 94 94 96 +1% 

15 QuafcSO 00 3J '26 307 21% 2D* 21% + % 

6% Ouanex 36 35 8% 8% 1% 

23 Ooesfar 10040 9 83433 32% 32% + % 

14 QkReil 04a 10 19 66 23* 23% 23% — % 

| 



R 



1 

18% 

4b RBlnd .16 

10 

9 

8% 

8% 

8% 

43b 

29b RCA 106 

X 


43% 


42* 

35 

29 RCA Ft 3J0 

MU 

J7to24% 

33 

33 —1% 

97b 

71 RCA pf 400 

4.1 

21 

97* 

94% 

97%+ % 

31* 

24% RCA pf 202 

6J 

320 

31% 

30% 

31b 

35* 

29* RCA pf 305 

10.1 

215 

34% 

34 

34% 

9* 

6b RLC 08 

X 

9 252 

7% 

7% 

7% — % 

4* 

3 RPC n 


28 

4% 

4 

4% + % 

18 

12b RTE 04 

30 9 75 

14b 

16 

16% — % 

lib 

4b Rodlce 


■ 50 

9* 

9% 

9%— ft 

42W 

25 RatsPur 100 

20 15 475 

42 

41% 

41% 

8% 

Sit Ramad 


52 472 

7 

4* 

6* 

21b 

16% Ranee 04 

44 

9 21 

18% 

18b 

18b— % 

7b 

4% RangrtJ 


409 

4b 

4% 

4Vk — % 

66 

47% Ravcm 04 

J 

17 180 

57b 

55% 

56b -1% 

17% 

8% Ravmk 


7 

12% 

12% 

12% 

48* 

34* Rayfhn 100 

3i 

17 1217 

45% 

44% 

44*— b 

13% 

7% RoadBt 00 

4 , 

31 70 

9b 

9 

9%— % 

23% 

16% Rtf Bat of Xn 

104 10 

20b 

20% 

20%—% 

16* 

9% RltRef 103# 91 

10 11 

l.-M 

13b 

13%+ b 

17b 

9 RecnEq 


13 383 

M 

13* 

13%— Vb 

13b 

B Redmn 00 

30 

18 52 

9 

BH 

9 — % 

id* 



20 8 

f% 

R% 

B%— % 

1% 

% Regal 


78 

1 

% 

% 

39 

23 RetaiC 00 

X' 

ID 39 

38% 

37% 

37% — % 

6% 

3b RepAIr 


11 288 

4% 

5% 

A 

2 

1% RepAwl 


18 

1% 

1% 

1* 

25% 

9% RraGyp 06 

24 11 158 

23* 

93% 

23*— % 

12* 



3 

12 

12 

12 

45b 

31% RepNY 104 

31 

8 30 

42% 

43% 

42%— % 

26% 

20* RNYPfC X12 12i 

10 

74* 

24* 

24* 

58% 

52 RNY pfA 605el1J 

S3 

54% 

95% 

56 + % 

34% 

21% RepBk 104 

.V 

7 360 

32% 

32% 

32b— % 


14% RshCot 33 

li 

22 661 

30* 

» 

20 - b 

32% 

22% Revco 00 

30 12 1259 

24% 

33* 

24% + % 

14% 

9* v| Rover 


4 

T? 

12 

12 +% 

40% 

29 % Revlon 104 

50 12 3413 

36* 

35% 

36%+ % 

20 

11* Rexnrtf 04 

X. 

9 205 

12% 

19* 

12%+ % 

S5% 

52% Reyn In 300 

41 

8 1643 

85% 

Ub 

15% + % 

49% 

46 Reylnpf 110 

Si 

2 

48% 

60% 

48% 

110% 100% Rnrlnpf 


10 108% 108% 108%+ % 

41b 

26 Rev MM 100 

U 

6 347 

34% K* 

35*— % 

30% 

24b RchVcfc 108 

9 532 

29% 

29% 29%+ b 

34% 

17* RieaefT 100 

Kl 

30 

18% 18b 

18b— % 

33% 

17% RJtoAM 00 

Tj 

19 379 

31% 

31 

31ft— % 

7% 



14 98 

5% 

5* 

S* 

34% 

27b RobStrw 1.12 

30 

0 47 

33% 

33b 

33%+ % 


12 Month 

HKm LOW Stock 


Sb. One 

Dir. VHPE UXUHtgh LOwQnet OTae 


I JO 


Rodcwf 

RklnfPf 


4.1 a 
15 

220 109 6 
2J4 72 9 
100 23 10 
155 XI 
ZOO 32 9 
9 

JO* I J 32 
05# 2 29 
M 4.1 17 


VS 

M3 


34% 24 Rarer 
14% 8% Rowan 
35ft 41* Ratio 
22 11* Rovlnfs 

50 32% Rufcrmd 

28 13 RusBn 

50 15% RU5TO0 

28% 17% Rvantf 
aft 19 Rvuer » 
28* 12ft Ryland 
18* 8ft Rvnwrs 


J4 3J 11 
1.12 3J M 
JS JIM 
2J7e S3 S 

II 

34 IJ 17 
10 

.76 45 8 
UN 45 14 
JO X3 9 
JO Z9 14 
5 


141 39ft 39* 39* + '« 
19 IWB 21* + * 
5*4 20% 20% 38* + % 
281 J3* 33% 33* 

991 35% 35% 35% 

i ia m t» —6ft 
23S 62 61% 61* 

a% a a — * 
22 % a* 22 % 

33% 21% 23 +1% 
11% 10% lib 
2% 2* 2*— % 
17% 16% 17 + * 
29* 29ft 29% — ft 
8% lft 0%-* 
3288 S*% 54% «ft+ ft 
a 14% 14% 14* 

18* 47% 47 47* 

41 23* 23* 22% — * 
41 17 16% lib— % 

n m* 2m 239* 

311 a 25% 25* 

562 21% TO 20*— ft 
IS 15 14% 14% + % 


12 Month 
High Lew 


sack Dtv Yki PE lOMHiafa Ian QpotOrg* 


54ft 


749 

a 

52 

B 

sa 


50% 

12* 

30 

a 

23 

18* 

10 

n 

33 ft 
34* 

35% 

21ft 

10% 

10% 

aft 

53% 

23* 

>0% 

a 

25% 

30% 

a* 

17* 

19% 

11% 

9% 

23% 

41ft 


SSftSCM 
7% SLInds 
19ft SPSToe 

15 Sabina 


100 42 
20b XO 
JO 30 

M 3 

16 Sobnfty X78el6J 
11% SfsdBS a IJ 14 159 
73 204 


13 164 
9 H 
13 103 

124 


5% Stud Sc 
Ik SfttSwt 
28% SatKInt 

»b Sofewy 

2S% Saga 
14 SKJOLP 
9 SPoul 
3% vIScfent 

32* SaUeM 


JD IJ 22 229 
1J0 43 10 2799 
52 17 13 MJ 
10 U 7 14 

100 110 77 

171 

.16 J 14 7S7 


49* SahMpt 4X0e 7J 


207 


47% <7% 47*— % 
10% W* 10*— b 

27 a a 

14% 14ft 14ft— % 
T7V» 16% 16ft— ft 
16ft 16% 16ft 
8* lft B*+ * 
lft lft lft 
3D» 29* X — % 
32% aft 32%+ % 
30* 29* 30* + ft 

a 20% 20* 

10* 10ft W* 

4% 4% 4%+ * 
27ft 26% Z7ft + % 
52* £2 52 — * 


17% SDIeGs 

210 

90 

8 

494 

93b 

27% 

23b 

+ 

% 

6* SJuanB 

87) 

90 

n 

143 

8% 

8* 

Bft 

+ 


31 Sandr, 

06 

10 

16 

1149 

37% 

36% 

36% 

— 

% 


104 

XI 

13 

394 

26b 

23b 

26 

— • 

% 


100 

30 

11 

1476 

n 

96* 

ZTVi 

+ 

* 

[ .;4.. r ■ 

100 

40 

15 

18 

30% 

301k 

30% 

+ 

% 

13* SauiRE 

00 

1.1 

46 

22 

18 

17* 

18 

+ 


14% 50VE1P 

160 

80 


18 

18% 

18% 

18% 



9% SflVEpf 

108 

110 


2 

11 

11 

11 




XM 90 


13* 

32% 

60ft 

39* 

16* 

43* 

45 

13% 

15% 

15ft 

27ft 

Sft 

43ft 

aft 


4* Savin 
17% SCANA _ 

33 SchrPla IJ8 40 
aft SCMlmt) 1J0 3J 
7* SdAfl .12 XI 
H=* Scoalnd 36 2J 
40% ScolFat 

a* scottp 

11% See ttys 
20ft Scovlll 
iflft SaoCnt . _ 

Oft ScaCtPf 1J6 126 
12ft SeoCpfBXlO 13J 
12 SroC PtC ZlO 115 


1.12 XI 
-52 3J 
1J2 17 
J2 LI 


■ 284 
11 497 
9 53T7 
X 37 4 
11 77 

ra a 

9 704 
II W5 
14 II 
7 89 
23 


32% 

65ft 

37% 

1(0* 

a* 

22 


14% SecLdn 

2 % seoco 

X 

12ft Saoguf 
19* 5ea!Afa* 


10 


S cot JO 20 


JO IJ 
100 18 
-52 3 

1-75 SO 


Soars pf 854e BJ 
secPccs 


20* 

25% 

81ft 

39* 

30* 

35* 

8* 

18% 

18% 

37 

59* 

38* 

a% 

IB 

aft 

Oft 

58* 

41% 

38* 

19ft 

29ft 

aft 

21* 

28% 

49ft 

20% 

lift 

34% 

19ft 

a 

39% 

36ft 

aft 

a 

MM 

a 

8* 

a 

aft 

15% 

73ft 

aft 

a 

17% 

27% 


JO 1.1 
J2 S3 
M IS 
100 14 
Z17* 60 
00 30 
02 20 


JO 4.1 


19* 500 1 Pw 
37ft seorteG 
29ft Soars 
97 

19 

u* Seta Li 
23ft SvcCps 
11% Shaklce 
70% fitawfn 
32% Sheno 
28ft shefrr 
17* SholGlO 
23% Shrwin 
4ft Shoetwn 
12 Showtot ... 

12* SlorPoc X80 100 
24ft Signal 100 10 
48* stgnlpf 4.12 7.1 
a singer .10 0 

a* Slnsrpt 300 II J 
12* Skyline Jfl 14 
9* Smimin 
50 SfhkS 
36% Smuckr 
aft Snapon 
27 Soixrt 
12* SonvCo 
22* SooLln 

27* SourcC 

18 SrcCppf 2J0 1X4 
23 Sojerfn 246 90 
39% Soudwn 100 20 
a SoetSk 120 40 
5ft SoetPS 1.657224 
17* SColEs 204 64 
U% SouTTtCO 102 100 
25ft SofnGE 206 7 S 
27* SHCTI X72 7.1 
aft SoNEpf X82 100 
a% Softy pf 240 100 
a SounCo 1J2 64 
a Soutlnd 100 XI 
11* SoRtrr .12 J 
6* Soum rk 00 20 
48 Somk of 7.12el4L4 
14* SwAIrl .13 J 
Ijft SwtFor 

10% SvrtGaa 

55 SwBH! 

19* SvrEnr 

17 SwiPS 
lift Spartan 

18 SoectP 


_ X8 
200 47 
.96 lj 
1.16 30 
705 4J> 
.lSe J 
100 50 
130 17 


V 

7 379 
127 

10 9S3 

16 74 

74 83 

8 77 

17 1924 

9 42S2 

a 

1771 

2 

17 161 
X 150 
a ri4 

10 333 

5 1847 

7 85 

11 453 
7 115 

14 ID 
7 658 

13 3886 
23 

11 865 
7 

a 127 

20 MO 
TO 1911 

15 a 

13 157 

7 237 

m air 

10 ITS 

41 

7 

M 12 

11 32 

8 287 

a 3i 

7 2995 

6 2716 

7 40 

9 733 

6 

2 


8% lft Sft + * 
22* 22% S3* + % 
48 39% 39*—% 

39% 33% 38*— % 
11* lift lift— * 
27% 27% 27ft— % 
80 £0 80 
35% 35ft 35%+ ft 
14% 14% 14* 

41ft 41% 41ft + * 
39* 38* 39 
11* 11* 11% 

15ft 15* 15ft + ft 
15ft 15b 15ft + ft 
24* 24% 34*+ b 
4* 4% 4*— ft 
41% 41 41 — * 

18% 18* 18*— ft 
24 * 23* a* + 1k 
24ft 25* a — ft 
55% 54* 55ft +1 
35% 34% 34*+ ft 
102% 702% 102% 

28% 27* 27*— % 
14* 14* 14* + ft 
S 34% 34*+ * 
14 II* 13*—* 

a* a* a*— * 

59% 97% S9ft+ ft 
35% 35 35% + * 

25* 36% 28* + Vk 
32ft 31% 32ft+ ft 
6* 6* 8* 

14* 14% Mb— ft 
15* 15* 15* 

33% 32% 33ft + ft 
57* 57 57* 

34* 35* 15% + % 
29* 29* 29ft 
14ft 14* 14* 

11% 11 11b + b 

60* 59ft 59% — % 
58 &B4 55* 

38% 38% 38ft— ft 


37ft 37% 37ft 

18 18% +b 


104 XI 
5J0 7 S 
SI IS 
108 90 
S3 X3 


10 1190 
19 2499 
4 365 
40 

14 260 
18 TZ1 
9 174 

a 1 a? 
12 524 
a 889 
S3 56 
24 129 


18b _ 

23* 9 23* + * 

34* 36% 36% 

a* a a — ft 

27* 27% 27% — ft 
45% 45ft 45ft— * 
■ 27ft 31 + * 

7ft 7% 7% 

23* 23ft 23*+ b 
ltb 19ft 19ft— ft 
a 33* a + ft 
38* 37* M* + ft 
35* 35 35* + * 

a a a 

24% 24 26* + ft 

32% 32ft 32%— ft 
15* 74% 75% + % 
7% 7* 7* 

49ft 49ft 49ft- ft 
a% 23% 23%— ft 
15% 15 15ft 
15% 15ft IS* 

74% 73% 74* + * 
a 27% a + * 

a 20 % a + ft 
16ft M 16 
19% 19 19 — % 


UeS. Futures Mar* 21 


Season Season 

Htah low 


OP«n HKlh Low Close Qtg. 


Grains 


WHEAT {CETl 

5000 bu minimum- dolkm per bushel 
405 132% May 146 149% 

190 306* Jul 303ft 134* 

376ft 306 Sep 302* 303* 

163% 308 Dec 3J3 X43 

174ft 140ft Mar 3M 3J8* 

402 198 May 3J8 3JB 

Est. Sales Prov. Safes 15007 

Prev.DoyOneninl. 31170 up 999 


3J5ft 

302 

301* 

142 




303* 

301ft —00* 
142* +00* 
348* +00* 


CORN (CBT) 

iooo bu minimum- dollar* par bwhef 
300 2J9* May 277b 178* 

131 173 Jul 279 200* 

301% 2-66% Sep 270% 372% 

X9S IN* Dec 184* 186* 

110 Z49* Mar 273% 275* 

301* 274* MOV XM 202 

Jul 282 204 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 27738 

Prev. Day Ooen lnt.T77J20 up 58032 
SOYBEANS (CRT) 

5000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
7S7 570 * May 600 ill* 

Jul 6.1? 401% 

Aug 621 604 

Sep 6.14ft 6.1 B 

Now 6.16% 600 

Jan 627 600 

Mar 607 437 

May 

J -- Prav. Sales 28086 

Prev. Day Open InL 6X041 off 818 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTJ 
IN fans- dollars per ton 
20500 12930 May 14000 14100 


278ft 

278ft 

270 

263% 

172* 

278% 

281% 


278 +01* 


279ft 

271 


_.ft 

+jn 


272% — 05 

279* —00ft 
202% 


7.99 

706 

677 


_B1 
503% 
*79 5.74% 

7-62 606% 

7.79 115 

Est. Soles 


603ft 

4,13ft 

616 

610 

412* 

600% 

60S 


604% +01% 
614ft +011 


16 

616% +00% 
610% +01 
613* +JR* 
623% 

60S +37* 

6J2 +01 


19650 13470 

18000 11700 

179.50 MOM 
10030 M2JD 
18400 147.50 

16X00 14900 

20650 15400 

Est Soles 


JUl 14500 14730 
AUg 14830 15000 
Sep 15130 15330 
Oct 15*30 15430 
Dec 15730 15900 
Jan 16100 16130 
Mar 164X0 16600 
Prev. Sato 1*783 


Hgg 

148.10 

15030 

mm 

15730 

16000 

16300 


73930 +100 
145.90 +170 


+100 

15100 4X50 


15X50 +100 


16000 +100 
18600 +330 


Prev. Day Ooen Inf. 42303 off 1040 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 
60000 R»- donors per 100 

tbs. 





30.W 

2280 

May 

2905 

2905 


2803 

—06 




2X35 



—44 

27 JO 

2200 

Aug 

2700 

2705 

2X80 

3405 

—05 

2495 

23M 


24J0 

2X73 

3600 

2405 

—20 

2X00 

Oet 

2500 

2590 

2550 

2590 

—15 

2540 

2X90 

Dec 

2520 

2535 

IS! 

2603 

—07 

25 25 

2300 

2400 

JOT 

Mar 

2500 

2515 

2605 

2L4S 

—16 

—33 

Ebi. Sates _ 

Prev. Sates 12041 





Prev. DavOsen Inf. 47788 off 1*3 


OATS (CBT) 

‘nln 


5000 bu minimum- dal tori per bushel 
131 107% May 171 173% 

Jul 109% 109% 
Sep 1J4 104 

Dec 107% 107% 
Prev.Salas 540 


1.7B% 1J3 

179 100 

102% 1 04 
Esl. Sales 


170* 

137* 

131% 

106% 


171 +00* 

10B +00* 

103% 

106* +00* 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 3001 anil 


.Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEl 


40000 Ibx- cents per Rx 

as 

6205 

6200 

4X57 

+■57 



Jun 

6597 

4540 

4590 

+00 

6707 

4X15 

Aug 

6530 

65J5 

4530 

4500 


4500 

#100 

Oct 

6335 

4JJB 

6335 

6257 

+JB 



DOC 

4600 


4640 



6705 

6605 

Feb 

6100 

6500 

4500 

6500 

+00 

6707. 

-6600 

Apr. 




4X00 —10 


Est. Sales 12334 Prev. Sales 1X874 
Prav. Dav Open ini. 60042 off 985 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44000 lbs.- cents par lb. 

7620 8670 Apr 6730 8605 

7X75 6435 MOV 6605 6685 

7X70 4640 Aug 6905 7X02 

7300 6700 S*P 6900 6930 

7X32 67.10 Oct *697 6900 

7X20 6905 Nov »J5 6973 

Est. Sales 1,194 Prev. Sales 1,169 
Prav. Day Open Ini. HMa6 vpt 
HOGS (CME) 

30000 (os.- cents per ib. 


6730 

6U0 

*905 

6975 

6697 

6973 


6705 
8875 
6977 
89 JO 
89.12 
6907 


+J3 

+00 

+72 

+75 

+75 

+70 


5605 

4405 

Apt 

4530 

4570 

4527 

4540 

—IS 

55*0 

4840 

Jun 

5CL55 

5QJQ 

5035 

50J2 

—08 

5577 

48.95 

Jul 

SL95 

5X00 

5U0 

51J2 

—25 

5X37 

4700 


5105 

51 JS 

5105 

5100 

—07 

51 JS 

4500 

Oct 

47 JD 

4730 

4700 

4705 

—JO 

mac 

4600 

Dec 


4&J0 

4700 

4705 


4930 

4605 

Fob 

4860 

4803 

4802 

+03 

4705 

4800 

47 JM 

Apr 

Jun 

4705 

4705 

6705 

4580 

4705 

—05 


Est. Sales 6186 Prev. Sates 4,970 
Prev. Day Open inf. 25060 oKTIO 


PORK BELU ES (CMS) 
38000 lbs.- cents per lb. 


8100 

60.10 

Mar 7190 7190 

7190 

7X90 

+05 

8X00 

61.15 

Mav 73 

55 7X55 

7X30 

7X62 

—03 

8X47 

4X15 

Jul 7) 

30 7X30 

7X30 

7X30 

—02 

fffMT 

6000 


IS 7805 

3008 

7105 

+.15 

73.15 

7X40 

7040 

7090 

8X15 

4X80 

7060 

7090 

Fefc 7100 7225 
Mar 

May 

Jul. . 

7100 

7Z15 

7100 

7180 

7X10 

+00 

+05 

400 

+00 


E91. Sales 1745 Prav. Sale, 3326 
Prev. Day Open inr. 1X146 off 102 


Food 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37300 R*~ cents per I b. 

15X00 12201 MOV 14450 14&00 


12100 Jul 14570 14570 
127X0 Sep 14470 14470 
12X25 Dec 14149 14149 
12830 Mar 


iaj» May 
13530 Jul 


14970 
14750 
14025 
14270 
14000 

13975 

E*t. Sales 2000 Prev. Sales 1,104 

Prev. Day Open inf. 1X238 offi66 

SUGAR WORLD II (NYCSCE1 

1120001 b*.- cents per lb. 

7000 3J2 May XW 403 

9.95 401 Jul 470 472 

975 472 Se« 427 427 

905 640 OCf <J9 433 

7J5 687 Jan 

903 502 Mar 505 530 

7.15 5J» May 571 574 

609 5J3 Jul 574 694 

Est Safes 380 Prev. Sales 7223 

Prev, Day Open Inf. 79027 upij?2 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric fern- Seer fan 
2570 1998 MOV 

1998 Jul 
1917 Sea 
1945 Dec 

1955 AUr 

1960 May 
1980 Jul 

Prev.ScMs 7, 


18450 14545 

14530 14570 

14615 14617 

14X49 14149 
14X40 
14175 
13931 


+138 

+102 

+107 

+108 

—.10 

+1.12 

+08 


XM 400 
617 619 

632 6a 
649 433 

. 303 

5J4 5.48 

539 5J0 

334 574 


+06 

+02 

+02 

+04 

+JE 


+03 

+03 


24M 

2415 

2337 

3145 

2130 

ms 

Est. Sam 


Prev. Day Open Int. 28.902 off 



Season Season 
Hiatt Low 


Oven High Law Ctoae CDs. 


ORANGE JUICE (NY CE) 

I5000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

18500 15100 May 16500 16500 18X85 18400 

Jul 18670 16600 164J5 16680 
Sep 16500 14500 16673 18673 

NOV 183-40 

Jan 16X00 15X00 16X85 18305 
Mar 18470 16470 16605 16335 
May 18355 

Juf 14X55 

Est Sales 400 Prev. Sales 353 

Prev. Day Open Int 6J43 up 101 


18405 15500 

18200 157.75 

18100 15700 

18000 15600 

17750 15630 

16X50 16000 


^2 


—75 

—75 


“etuis 


COPPER (COMEXI 
25000 (bar cents per ib. 


9300 

4X60 

55J0 

6X25 

Mar 

AST 

6100 

6105 

6105 

4105 

+05 

9X50 

5600 

May 

6180 

A9m 

6105 

6105 

+80 

8805 

5700 

Jut 

4X35 

6X70 

6200 

6X35 

+J5 

8X10 

57 JO 

Sep 

6X90 

6305 

6225 

5270 

+J5 

8X09 

8X00 

5BJ0 

9980 

Dec 

Jan 

4300 

6305 

6330 

6300 

6X45 

+80 

8000 

59M 

Mar 

6485 

A 460 

6X80 

6165 

+J» 

7400 6L10 MOV 4X40 4480 

7480 . 6100 Jul 

70.90 6X30 Sep 

71130 6600 Dec 

6530 6500 Jan 

Elf-Sale, 7000 Prev. Sale, 11056 

6480 

6X15 

4485 

4515 

4590 

4515 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 

+05 


Prev. Day Open MX 83098 off 59 


SILVER (COMEX7 


5000 tray az.- cento per trov a*. 
16200 340 Mar 6330 

44X0 


6310 

+53 

5810 

151X0 

5570 

5S30 

Apr 

May 

42X0 

4510 

42X0 

4320 

6365 

+40 

+50 

14610 

5620 

Jul 

4300 

6600 

6300 

64X2 

+40 

11830 

5730 


6450 

4870 

6450 

4570 

+40 

12300 

5900 

Dec 

4600 

6870 

6600 

67X9 

+X7 

12150 

•9950 


4440 

6700 

6660 

6908 


11930 



4850 

7040 

6850 

49X9 

+48 

10480 

<210 


7100 

7120 

7100 

7065 

+45 

9450 

6350 

Jul 

7272 

7773 

7250 

7200 

+X4 

9400 

6410 


7290 

7480 

72X0 

73X0 

+43 

7650 

6670 


759.1 

759.1 

739.1 

7550 

4X0 

Jan 




7627 

+40 


Est. Sales 36000 Prev.Sales 43018 
Prav. Day open ML 76770 oft 1078 


269 JO — 1J0 


PLATINUM (NYME7 
50 tray ab- dollars per fray ae. 

28200 2*000 Mar 

44750 23*00 Aar 26750 27400 28570 26950 —2.10 

44950 2*100 Jul 27490 27900 27150 27400 — 110 

79X00 25000 Oct 2310O 2BS5C 27900 28100 -Z10 

27X50 24000 Jon 28800 28950 28750 28750 —110 

30050 27950 APT 29570 —3.10 

Est. Salas 2J46 Prev.Sales 6587 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 16901 off 113 


PALLADIUM (HVME) 

IN fray OZ- dollar, per az 

16X50 10500 Mo* HON 11000 11000 110.10 

- Jun 11X00 11400 11150 11260 
Sep HITS 11X50 11X9 111J5 


15950 
14173 
14IJ0 
12750 
Est. Salt 


10S50 

10650 Mar ... .... 
415 Prev. Sale, 1022 


Dec 11X00 11220 11X00 11060 

iiu» 11 x 00 a 100 11 x 10 — ,40 


Prav. Day Open Int. 6828 eft 80 


GOLD (COMEXI 

321 00 

31X00 W30 Jun moo 32900 

«50O »10O Aug m50 33350 

49300 297JX1 Oct 33100 «**» 

D%c 3ST - S0 ^^<50 
M6J0 Fib 34300 34800 

31470 Apr -inm mm 

433-70 32050 Jun BUD TBI ^1 

gwo aiN Aug 36700 3*700 

39X70 33500 Oct 37350 37600 

38600 34200 Dec 3BTJ0 38370 

».Sam 55000 Prev.Sales S3628 
Prav. Day Open ML14X878 arfXM9 


31SN 317.10 
31750 
32370 319.90 
32000 32230 

SfS SIS 

5fl0O 33X00 
33450 33760 

34200 S4S »i 


355.10 
3£0O 36150 
37X50 368.10 
3817D 37400 


—7.10 
—7 JO 
-750 
—7 JO 
—700 
—800 


Financial 


US T. eiLLS tIMM) 
a million- pi, of IN pet. 

9101 87.14 Jun 9007 9097 

mm St 14 91131 7X51 

9090 85J7 Dec 9073 9074 

90^ B6£0 Mar 

2-21 mjt 
9000 ffl0O Sep 

8953 8905 Dec 

Esf.salu 15JW Prev. Sale* uj49 
Prev. Day Open Int. 40089 us 472 


9097 

9030 

90.17 


89J4 


9096 

9050 

9X18 

8994 

89J6 


89 J3 


+08 

+09 

+08 

+07 

+07 

+08 

+09 


»&T»^?lNpct 

si 

g-13 Dec 

BW 75-14 AtaT 765 78-W 

7V-26 74-30 Jun 7571 7+3 

Est.Saha Prev.Sales BJ20 


78-5 

77-13 


765 

75-a 


78-12 

77-19 

76-H 

76-70 

75-26 


+9 

-222 

+6 


Prev. Day Ooen hit. 49938 off 452 


US TREASURY BONDS (CUT] 


(8uc«loaooi>p»s*9tadspflNpd^ ^ 


Jun 


77-15 57-20 

7+2 57-10 see 

7+3 57-8 Dee 

72-30 57-2 

7D-16 5+29 

n ks 

89-13 5+37 Mar 

69-2 63-12 Jun 

60-20 63+ Sep 

Est. Saiga P rav. Soiosl 19 J59 

Prev. Day Open 1nl02II07S oft 1,09* 


88-14 

67.28 67-28 67-28 
8+30 67-8 6+21 

Mar 8+10 6+17 86 
Jun 65-14 8+30 4+14 
6+30 6+15 6+30 


Dec 6+18 6+2 


68-21 

67-38 

£7-2 

6+13 

65-27 

6+11 

6+29 

6+17 


6+28 


GNMA (CBT) 

aHuw ptIispnx aaTWs of iNper 

89-27 57-17 Jun 88-17 8+31 

89-4 59-13 Sep 67-25 67-27 

6+13 5+4 Dee 57-5 57-5 

68 5+20 Mar 

67-8 5+35 Jun 

67-3 85 Sep 

ESI. Sales Prev.Sales 331 

Prev. Day Open Inf. +7W off 133 


6+14 8+17 
67-2] 67-23 
67-1 67-1 

6+13 
6+38 
6+12 


+1 

+1 

+1 

-415 

+1 

+1 


CERT. DEPOSIT fIMM) 
Rmllllen-pbpf IWpc# 

9X70 8X61 Mar 9LI0 91.13 

8SJ0 Jun 9034 9X27 
8500 See 89 Jl 8903 
8U4 Dec 89.11 89-24 
86J6 Mar B8JB BUS 
»6J3 Jun 88J2 8X74 
87-86 Sep B&51 8852 
Esf.loto 58? Prav. Sc lea 824 

Prev. Day Oran int. 7.M4 affix 


9120 
9X60 
9X17 
B9J8 
89 J6 


9105 a.is 
tan 9xi8 

»J1 8958 

89.11 89.16 

8878 3836 
B8J2 8804 
3851 8843 


+.10 

+05 

+09 

+07 

+09 

+06 

+06 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
a (nilitan-ptsof 1 00 net. 

90N 8X49 Jun 0902 8902 

9033 8403 Sep 8953 8953 

8907 5400 Dec 8801 8850 

S9J8 36,10 Mar BUO 8857 

19.15 8173 Jun 8803 88-33 

N54 B708 Sep 38N 

87 JB Dec 8708 8708 
Est. Sale, *3.914 Prev.Sales 45.152 
Prev. Day Open irt. 97JT5 off 4048 


8901 9976 
8953 89.17 

8828 8X77 

0050 8X48 
8X27 BBSS 
8X08 8X04 

8708 8706 


+07 

+08 

+08 

+08 

+07 

+07 

+08 


Season Season 
High Lew 


Open High Law dose Che. 


BRITISH POUND OMMJ 
5 per pound- 1 paint eauaUSOON! 
1J350 10235 Jun 1.1470 1.1830 

1+450 10200 Sen 1.1300 1.1785 

1.2710 1 0200 DSC 1.MS0 1.1775 

1.1400 10680 Mar 

Est. Sates 2X760 Prev.Sales 11, as 
Prev. Day Open Int 21J74 up 573 


1-1470 1.1745 
1.W70 1.1705 
1.14S0 1.1705 
1.1325 


+405 

+390 

+385 


CANADIAN DOLLAR OMMI 
S per dir - 1 point equals 100001 
-7m JW4 Jun J252 J283 

-7585 -7023 Sep J345 JOT 

-7366 -7006 Dec J 2 S 0 J2S5 

J5D4 0981 Mar 

Est. Sales 3014 Prev.Sales 31279 
Prev. Day Open ML 10J19 up 41 9 


J2S2 J279 
-7245 J260 
-7250 .7346 
•72a 


FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

8 per franc- 1 do I til envoi, 5X00001 
.11020 09410 Jun .10100 .10140 

.10430 09*80 Sep 

09670 09670 Dec 

Est. Sales 1*0 Prev.Sales 65 
Prev. Oay Open ln>. 513 ottl 


.10100 .10140 
.10100 
.10060 


+90 

+160 

+160 


GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S per m arfc- 1 pol n t rauaJs 880001 
0733 -2905 Jun J1Q0 J155 

0545 ^ Sep 0132 0184 

-3610 J971 Dec 0200 0211 

0251 JD40 Mar 

EASale, 41055 Prev.Sales 30027 
Prav. Day Open Int. 49001 up *51 


Oft 

55* 

34% 

22 

20% 

63* 

50% 

17% 

17 

30* 

35% 

10% 

a 

4* 

2D* 

17A 

a* 

X 

36 

45% 

39% 

53ft 

a* 

12 % 

73 % 

21ft 

a* 

n 

33b 

a 

16b 

59 % 

1ZZ 

49ft 

15% 

34% 


21% 

15* 

59* 

38* 


3J% Sperry 
30% sorbs, 
SM SaoarD 
37% 5 o p m e 
17* swev 
16% StbPot 
13 SMso- 
50* StOind 
39ft SMOOh 
6% StPocCs 
lift aundn 
19ft SfanWfc 
23% Ste w r ett 
S* SlbMSe 
15* SfbbfOl 
2ft Stsego 
14* SttTt ni 
F% SV1B9 
23b SfenDo 
lTi StetrnJ 
25H SlbWm 

3Z% smnsw 
25 SfoneC 
32* SMasm 

ISft SBrEa 
2 vISterT 
31* srerar 
19* siriMta 
141k SfrtdRf 
3* SuavSh 
a* sunaks 
24* suoot 
6* 5IMEI 
■OHSmCs 
90* SunCpf 
34% SvOttstr 
7% SunMn 
23% SoorVX 
19* SoPMW 
16 % Srbran 
10* StrmsCP 
37* Syntax 
2S% Svscu 


103 30 
102 4 A 
XM U 
I0O 19 
JO *0 
St Z7 
J2 23 
3J9 U 
ZOO 6J0 


S3 U 

m as 

IN Z» 
130000 
IJ4 53 
.12 30 
J4 40 
76 X9 
TJ6 10 
130 73 
100 50 
100 3J 
00 23 
100 23 
104 87 


1113226 

« an 

» 

U 1035 
U 4BS 
11 114 

U 60S 
0 1540 
0 1534 
9 256 


JO S 
SO 43 


130 19 

At L4 


2J0 43 
2JS 23 
XM 4S 


00 23 
AS IJ 
108 50 


132 33 
36 XI 


JO 294 
M 19< 

II 1 

a 

106 

TS 

11 19> 

10 41 

14 IAS 
It *4« 
16 1* 
s a 

10 483 
U 402 

578 

5537 

n 

n m 
s 

» an 

M 7 
637 

11 473 

2 

13 10T 
33 651 
11 463 
U 046 

n 192 
20 1 

14 1417 

15 125 


56% 52 53tt +1% 
M% 33H 3«* +1% 
37 as* 0 b- % 
54* S2ft 34ft +1% 
20% w* aob + % 
19 * »ft T9*— ft 
16* M% 14*— ft 
62* a 62*— % 

47% 46% 47 + ft 

16ft 15ft 14ft + ft 
15% U% 15% + % 
27% 27% 27% — b 
34 34 3* —ft 

18% 10 H — % 
27% 27ft 27*+ b 
2% 5ft 3ft- ft 
■art » w — % 
11 % 10 % 11 

33ft R 32% +1% 
17b 164k 18* 

29 28ft 28ft 
4Ts 42% 42% 

27b 36% 24% — ft 
45% 45 <Sb + * 
21* 21% 21% 

Ti 3* 2%-» % 
75 72% 71* + * 

28ft 19* 19* 

16'8 15% 10* + ft 
5% 5ft 5% 

31* 30* 30*— 
n% ia-- 33 % 

7% 7 7* + 

50 48% 49ft— ft 

107. a W% 102%— % 
44 45ft 45ft— ft 

•*«***. 

a* Mb aft— b 

36ft 36ft 36ft— ft 
19 % my 19 % 

ITfc 13* 13b + b 
58 % 57b 57%— ft 
33ft 33% 33*— * 


12 Month 
WiLaw SfOOi 


DM YM. pg MOkHlgh Law Cunt. Pipe 


41% 35ft 
Mft 24 
n% 7 % 
T5ft lift 
36* 17 
81% 58ft 
10* 3% 
TO 53V, 
16* Mft 
19* 13* 

73% 46ft 

36ft 33V. 

15ft lift 
60* 51 Vb 
5* 2% 
302%T47b 
22* 13% 


J7e 0 
Z20 IS 


TDK 
TECO 
TGiF 
TNP 105 IS 

TR E 100 40 

TRW 300 XB 

TocBoot 

TaWDrd U2 IS 
TaJtcv 05# J 
TdieypfUO 50 
Tombrd X20 40 
Tandy 


39% 25% 
44* 32% 
102 17% 

79 65 

35* 71b 
20ft 9ft 


4 ift a% 


47 % 35 

35% 26% 
35b 25 
149% 105% 
3ft 1 
27% 16ft 
39 28* 

2S% 20* 
7% 7 
43% a* 
V% 5% 
26 13* 

<3* 28b 

18ft Uft 

26% 13ft 

22ft 11% 

20% 17% 

10% ift 
10ft I 
52ft 33* 
23* 12 
SI 34% 
59% 47% 

39% 28* 

a ii* 

18* Uft 
27% 24* 
27ft 22 
25* 20 
II* 251k 
17ft 13b 
17b 13% 

65% 26ft 

40ft ISft 

44ft 19% 

17% fft 
4* 1 

22 10b 

35* 23* 
35ft 18% 
13* 7ft 

Uft lift 

25 16% 


X T6* 
12ft 10* 
53% 37ft 
64 45* 

25* 19% 
OH 6% 
96* N 
92* 77 
24* 20 
Uft 6% 

36* a 

37ft 24% 
20ft 9ft 

a* 22 % 

45ft 25% 

19* 


5 

22ft 12ft 

a* 20 * 

42ft 24% 

6ft 4 
9* Sft 

a 13* 
aft 11 * 

13b Bft 
31* 29* 
20ft 10* 

5 3% 

35% 27% 


IN IJ 

Tslcsm 

Trldve 

Trtrele 02 L5 
Telex 

Temp In 04 IS 
TarmcD X92 70 
Tracer UN 1X1 
Tencor 7J0 9-5 
Terdyn 

Teura JO 12 
TeserM XM 80 
Texas 100 80 
TXABC LS2 4 A 
TexOn 106 40 
TxEstS 120 70 
Texlnd 00b XB 
TexMst 2N 10 
Texlnt 

TexOGs M XI 
TxPoc JO IJ 
TexUHl XS2 9J 

Texfl in 

Textron IN 43 

Ttaack 

IftmE 

ThmBts 104 3J 
Thoraln 05b +2 
ThtnMed Jfl 20 
Thrifty 00 20 
Tlcwtr SO XI 
TlgerM 
Tftrf pf 

Time XN 10 
TMipix 

TlmeM 136 20 
Tbntam 100a 30 
TtxOhp XJ7 16 
Tokhrns 

TWedls 202 U0 
TMEd pf 3J2 U0 
TaJEdPf 3JS 14J 
TolEdPf 3J7 142 
TcHEdPf 438 143 
TolEdpf 206 140 
TaiEdpf 231 U0 
Tento JO 3 
Tool Rat JSb 10 
Trchm, IN 20 
ToraCa JO 17 

Tojai 

Towle 

TayRUS 

Troeor 34 XT 
TWA 

TWA Pi 235 160 
TWA PfB 125 90 
Trgnm 104 SJ 
Tran Inc 232 110 
TARltV 100# 03 
Trwucp Xlib is 
Tmscpf 307 60 
Tran Ex X20 *J 
Tronscn 

TrG Pf 1032 WU 
TrGPpf 604 9J 
TrGP pf 200 100 

Tnsoh 

Tranwy IN 53 
TrnwM JO 13 
TwfdwtA 
Twfdpf 200 60 
Trawler 204 60 
THCan 3S3eU3 
TrlCnpf 250 93 
TriSoMl 

Trial nd JO U 
TrtoPc IN U 
Tribune 04 20 
Trtcntr _55eKL5 
Trtco .16 Z6 
Trlnty 00 30 
TrltEng .11% 0 
TrltE of X10 80 
HksEP IN 23 
T|0UM 02 X 6 
TwInDs -80 40 
TyeoLb 00 20 
Tyler 35 24 


n to era. 47 ft 47 *+ b 
8 2661 29* » 2Jb + * 
n 447 11 10ft 10% + * 
8 49 15ft 15ft 15*— % 

15 87 23% 23ft 23% — V# 

n 232 79 78* 78ft + ft 

46 4% 4ft 4% 

14 373 48% (6 67% +1* 

U 36 15b 15 15%+ ft 

X 18 17ft 17*— ft 

U 61 69 46ft 69 + % 

13 6200 33 33 33 + ft 

U 77 ISft 15ft 15ft 

I 539 60 * 59 59 — % 

8 58 3% 3H 3*+ % 

10 467 252*248*251 —3% 
30 1491 21 20ft 20ft 

U 3U 42ft 41ft 41ft + ft 

I 444 34ft 34 34ft + % 

W 2154 40% 40* 40* 

5 99 99 99 

» 78 78 78 

13 530 24ft 23ft 23*— ft 
a 327 12ft Uft 12ft— b 
10 25* 25% 25%— ft 
34 2905 3S 34ft 34ft 

ft 


I 564 Sift 34ft 34ft— ft 
6 1119 36 3Sft 36 + b 

8 355 aft 31% a%— ft 

14 17 28% a* 23% 

5 374 112*110*110*— ft 

99 ze 2% 2% 

10 6976 17ft 17 17 — ft 

78 34 32* 32* 32* , 

6 2908 77 ft* 26ft + % 

45 3* Sft 3* 

13 2233 42 41* 41% 

35 9 lft Sft— % 

a 65 22* 22% 22%— % 

15 80 37* 36* 37 — b 

9 15 lift 16% lift + % 
C 161 14% M 14% 

15 ift a* 20 -ft a* + % 

346 lift 17% 17* + * 
516 9ft 9% 9b 
183 9ft 9% 9%— % 
U 4067 53 50ft Sft +1% 
17 508 77* l*% T7ft+ % 

14 9B4 49* 48H 49 

TO 204 SOft 50* 50b 

7 228 36ft 35ft lift + ft 

ID 73 18% 18* 18% — W 

5 304 18ft 18* 18* 

3 25ft 25% 25% 

IB 26 25* 26 + % 

U 24* 34* Mft — ft 

1 30% 30% 30% + « 

12 17 16* 16ft— % 

12 16* 15ft 16* + ft 

24 34 57% 57 371k + ft 

11 35 36* 35* 35ft— ft 

U 313 42* 41* 42 + * 

9 369x 15 14* 14* 

360 2 1* 1ft— ft 

40 11* Wft 107k— % 

24 4155 30% X 30b + Vk 

14 277 31* 30* 30*— * 

12* 12% 12% 

13% 13* 13ft 

24% 23ft 23* + ft 

28ft 28ft 28*— ft 

19b 19 19% + ft 

17% 12ft 12% 

54b 55 Bft + % 

65 63% 65 +1% 

a 22ft 22ft— * 

.. 10H 10ft ?M— ft 

1401 95% 95% 95% 

ICS 92 92 92 

2 25ft 23ft 23% 

13 3S 12ft 12b Uft— % 

» 4 34ft 34ft 34ft 

11 786 34ft 34b 34ft + ft 

69 17% 17b 17*— b 

2 30% 30% 30ft 

10 1441 42* 41b 42% +1* 

250 24* 24% 34ft + % 

26ft 26% 26* + ft 

5% 5ft 5ft 

aft a 20* +i% 

29% 29% 29% 

42ft 41ft 42% + ft 

5b 4ft 5b+ % 

4* 6ft 6ft— ft 

14ft 13* 13*— ft 


74 2429 
92 


11 1183 
13 

> 5 

II 1551 

a 

163 
5 111 


6 a 

16 142 

9 7 

17 455 
10 130 
16 60 

95 

23 468 

a 


20ft 19ft 19ft— ft 
12% 12%— 


__ U 12ft 12ft— ft 
9 268 36b 36 36b + Ml 

17 679 20* 20* 20*— ft 
9 122 16% 16% 16%— ft 
* a? 36% 36 36 + ft 

Rft 31 31*— ft 


162 


U 


0099 0139 
0122 0168 
0187 0302 


+57 

+57 

+55 

+54 


JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

ottiODoacoi 


yen - 1 point emioia 

004450 003826 Jun 003922001974 

004150 003870 See NIBS 004010 
004350 003905 Dec 004040 004050 

Est. Sales 16093 Prav. Sales 15J16 

Prev. Day Open Int. 18031 up 1042 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

XPer franc- 1 point equals JCLOOn 
J900 0439 Jun 0664 0725 

JfW 04» Sep 0745 077S 

"SI ES® JB15 -* 15 

- W .1 5 -3835 Mar 

Esl. Sales 30486 Prev. Sales 21031 
Prev. Day (Men int 2X107 offiso 


0663 0707 
0722 0746 
0795 0795 


+62 

+60 

+64 

+60 


Industrials 


LUMBER ((ME) 

130N0 bd H.-8PCT 1N0 ML ft 


22S0Q 124.18 

23050 131J0 

197.50 139,30 

184.10 148-40 

18700 14700 

19500 15300 

164J0 15550 

Est. Sates 1466 Prev.Sales X3S0 
Prav. Day Open Mt. 8085 up 405 


May 12X10 ISON 126JQ 12900 
Jul 13700 13X80 13470 13700 
Sep 14300 14400 13900 14300 
NOV 14400 14400 14100 14400 
Jan 15000 15000 14X00 149,50 
Mar 15300 15400 15X00 15X70 
May 15X60 15660 15500 15720 


+1J0 

+100 

+160 

+100 

+100 

+J0 

+J0 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 
5XM0 lira* cents per lb 


79 JD 

6306 

MOV 

as as 

<785 



7905 

£305 

Jul 

6180 


—82 


4X62 

Oct 

6X48 4588 

6588 



7X00 

4X41 


4550 4589 

6535 



7675 

7000 

7005 

4550 

4481 

4X50 

Mar 

May 

Jul 

6X55 8605 

66-50 

<450 

6699 

6782 

—04 

—03 

Est.sates _iooo 

Prey. Sale* 5000 




HEATING OIL(NYME) 
42000 gal- cents per ga I 
8275 6S0S Apr 

8XS3 6400 May 

7X40 6X50 Jun 

7X10 6505 Jul 

7ia 6X25 Aug 

7300 7X25 Sep 

7X50 7X80 Dec 

Est. sates Prev. 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1X292 


P 83 

7365 7365 
7100 7300 

7X50 7X24 

7X00 7X90 


- 9397 
UP 462 


81 -S 8176 
74J0 7623 
7165 7304 

7105 7200 

7X50 7324 

7200 7190 
7X15 


+107 

+200 

+103 

+1JS 

+1J4 

+170 

+1JO 


55KE5 qftiCNYME) 

1000 bt>L- dollar. 


5SS 


29.55 

29S4 

79.57 
2900 
29 JO 
3900 
29-50 
2900 
2M6 

Est. Sales w 

Prav. Dav Open int 47600 off 545 


2X40 


iperm. 

Mey 

28.10 

2801 

2703 


Jun 

Z7JS 

2704 

27 JB 

2736 

Jill 

27.15 

2735 

2608 

2784 

Aug 

2691 

2705 

2601 

2708 

Sep 

2600 

2708 

2603 

2705 

Oct 

7700 

27.10 

2700 

27.10 

Nov 

5& 50 

27.10 

2690 

2700 

Dec 

27.15 

27.15 

27.15 

27.15 

JOT 

Prev. Scrim 15)8? 


27.15 

27.15 


+N 

+03 

+J3 

+J9 

+64 

+29 

+J0 

+25 


+25 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cent, 

189.10 156.10 Jun 1830$ 18400 

19X70 16004 SOP 1B6N 18300 

JTSTQ D#C WuS iJlJO 

19105. 19a 1 a Mar 

E,f. Soles 40J64 Prev.Sales 64077 
Prav.DayQeenlnL 57.130 off 864 
VALU E UNE(KCBT) 
pamt, and cents 

2HN 168.10 Mar 19X25 19X45 

m3S anX0 

3232 §5P 304 » 70430 

21000 20900 Dec 

Est Sales Prev.Sales C /411 

Prev. Day Open Int. 70a oh si 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
polntsondcents 

fifSS 2?" ^ un ,0 M0 10705 

11100 9105 Sep 10X30 10960 

11375 10120 OK lloS 73 S 

jaLSole, 1L33S Prav. Sole, V yty. 
Prev. Day Open int, BJ79 oft 40 


18X60 18300 
186.15 18X75 
1H.10 190.15 
19X55 


1«N 19145 
19825 19805 
20400 


-JO 


HILOS 10605 
100.10 10860 
11060 1)065 
11110 1I2JQ 


+.10 

+.10 

+.10 

+.J0 


Commodity indexes 


AAoodv^s. 


Reuters. 


DJ. Futures. 


oosb 

M(L50r 

1,98370 

123.10 

243J0 


Com. Research Bureau. 

MoodYs : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 

0 - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 1GG ; Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
96160 f 
1,991 JM 
123JJ3 
24370 


Market Guide 


CBT: 

CME: 


Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEXI 
NT ME: 
KCBT: 
NYFE: 




i M er e ratn# Exchange 

New York Cocoa, sugar, Cette# Eiarat 
New Yer* Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Excnarm New Tort 
New Yura Mercantile bdnn 
Kgaoi Ctfy Board at Trade 

New York Futures E x awngg 


M* 

15% 

23% 

34ft 

11% 

14 

32* 

35% 

43 

19ft 

95ft 

41* 

JB* 

7ft 

14ft 


a UAL 
34% UAL Pf 
7ft UCCEL 
16% UGI 
19ft UGI Pf 
3 UNCRes 
10 UH5 
17% USFGS 
22ft USG, 

40% USGpf 
13ft UnlFtgt 
75 UnlNV 
30ft U Camp, 104 
32* VnCarb 360 


JSe X7 7 
260 70 

19 

204 A? II 
275 11 J 


3284 45ft 64ft 44ft— ft 


60b X4 16 
X20 70395 
168 40 7 
100 2 S 
SO 1.1 14 
115* XB » 
40 f 
W » 


33 

35% 

36 

30ft 

34ft 

17ft 

a 

a* 

58% 

111 * 

lift 

70 

4ft 

19ft 

Ub 

40 

aft 

22b 


4ft UnlonC 
12 UnElec 1J2 106 6 
a UnEI pf 3JD 1X1 
25% UnEI pf XN 125 
M% UnElpf 400 136 
27% UnEI pf 406 1X7 
24% UnEI PtM40O 1X3 
18% UnElpf 258 12J 
13ft UnElpf 2JJ 1ZS 
45 UnElpf 764 1X1 
49 UEIPfH IN 1X4 
Mb UnPoc IN 30 U 
82 UnPcpf 70S 60 
9* Unlmvl .18 1Z 10 
53% Unryfpf ON 110 
3b UnltDr 44 

10* UnBmd 14 

9% UBrdpf 

2Bft ll Chi TV .14 6 68 

22% UnEnrg 268 XI 


5HJ 


27 

1211 


Uft 


Uft 10 


41ft 

37% 

14% 

3 

38ft 

fft 

42% 


Ulllum 
UIQupf 
Ulliupf 
uiihipf 
Ulliupf 

Mft Unttlnd 

34V, unltim 
25% UJerBk 
9* UMMM 
2ft UPkMn 
22 UrolrG 
5% USHom 
29ft USLea 


ZOO 1X1 3 
357 1X1 
Z20 UJ 
4N 1X2 
150 150 
06 24 13 
S3 6 X 
IJt 14 I 
7 
1 

.12 J 7 


N 20 9 299 


179 a 30% 30% 

70 13* 13% 13*— ft 

ui a 22 % a + ft 

rate 23ft 73 23ft + ft 
465 9ft 9b 9* 

42 lift lift lib + ft 

1007 a% aft 3 m + * 

323 34% 34 34ft + b 

1 61* 41b 41b— b 

T25 18% lift 18% — % 
57 96 95% 95* +1 

35% 34 34 — 1 

37% 36 36ft— % 

5* 5% 5* 

14% ICft Uft 
Itte 24% 26% 26% 

2Qz a a a 

Ittz 33ft 33ft 33ft 
atte 33% 33b Mb— * 
15 30ft 30 30% + ft 

a5 23% 23% 23% 

12 17ft 17 17 

660z 57 54% 56* +1% 

180Z 60 59% 59% 

1373 48* 47% 48 

10 107% 104 107* + * 
1Z74 15H 15 lift— ft 

Sfa « 69 68+1 

17 4% 4% 4ft— ft 

142 13ft 13b 13% + ft 

13 lift 13b 13% — % 

106 an. a* 38*— * 

143 30* 30* 30* + ft 
72 16ft 16% 16% 

W 26b 26% 26* + ft 
lOIte W 15 15 — ft 

11 26ft 26ft 26ft— * 
37 12% 12% 12ft 

236 27% 21 21% + ft 

13 3Bft a* 38b— b 
34 35% 35ft 35* + ft 
225 13% 13% 13ft— ft 

2 2ft 2% 2% 

903 34* 34b 34ft+ ft 

an 7* 7ve 7ft 

40* 39% 39% — % 


33 73 

a 22 

58ft 499k 
149% IIS* 
30 32% 

Nft 31* 
74ft 55* 
45 39ft 
39* 38ft 
Uft 17ft 
17% 12 
Sft 22 
32* Ub 
37* W* 
,21ft 15b 
58 X 
a% 4j 
«n 2m 

9%. fft 
2$ft 30ft 
25 a* 
25ft aft 
a* 17% 
18ft 15ft 


USShoe 06 30 
USSted IN X7 
VSStlef 49* »J 
USStlpr12J5 9.9 
USSUpf Z2S XI 
U&Teb 1J2 40 
USWM i3i 70 


II 330 
10 2J9I 
3D 
204 
470 


UnTchi 1JQ 15 

UTche *" 


13 1048 


pf Z5S 70 

Uni Tel 1.92 80 
UWRJ IN 76 
Uniirae JO 0 
unlm M> x* 
UtifvFd 106 XO 

unxeof IN O 

Unocal IN 3.1 
UPteiHi 2J* Z3 
US LIFE 10* X4 
LteJfeFd 10*0190 
UtoPL 2J2 I0J 
UtPLP t 7N 110 
UTPXPf Z« «0 
UtPLpf 23* IX* 

UtPtPf 20* 1!J 


. 70* 
I 7H4 
368 

9 10B7 

10 49 

16 326 

13 2S5 

17 X 
9 22 * 

13 33ft 
1« 493 
13 401 
X 

9 54* 
4 

a 

A3 

13 


Xft 3M 38% - » 
37% a* a + ft 

32% 57ft aft— ft 
19ft 121ft IX* . 
X 37% 27ft + ft 
X aft 37* +1 
74 75% 75ft 

40ft 39ft 40 — ft 
35ft 34% 35b— b 
27* 3 22* 

17ft 17 17b + b 

26ft 2tb 31ft— ft 
17ft 17 17b 

34ft 31b X*- * 

ssft aft aw + ft 

4m 47b 47b— ft 
78ft 771k 70ft +1 

40b 39ft 40% + ft 
9% 9% 9% 

22% 22% 22% + b 
341k 34% 34% + ft 
36ft 361, Uft 
19ft 19* 19* 

17% 17ft 17ft + ft 



a 3i*»— * 
Sft Ift 

30% a 
3ft 3% + ft 
3«% 3*ft 
3ft 3ft— % 
71k 71S 
XW. 33*— 1% 
lift lift 
19% X — » 
3% 3* 

ISft 10ft— * 
43 43* + ft 

72 72 +1 

■0b 80* +1% 
42 42% 

25* 35ft 
39ft 39ft + ft 
75b 75ft +1H 


W 


a 

49 

35b 

25b 

10* 

47% 

Mft 

a% 

38% 

37 


86 7 


JO 33 
N 

IJ 18 


10 17 
42 7 
30 

40 11 


19ft 

28b 


52% 


12* 

12% 

23ft 

a* 

55* 

9b 

17ft 

a 

44% 

Tift 

6% 

lft 

lib 

1918 

lift 

114 

36ft 

44% 

9% 

15% 


40 13 

az a 

XS 8 

XM 120 I 
00 10 17 
06 10 11 
00 XI If) 


X 

32ft 

41 

II 


aft 


a wicor xx 

36% Woteftpf XN 106 
31ft Woctnrs .92 30 11 
14% Mfocfcht 
4b Wainoc 
31 WaiMrr 08 
38% waigrn 08 
15% WkHRiglJO 
25* WalCSv J5 
a wqltJm 1J0 
39% WalTJpf 100 
17* womco N 
17 ivraCm 
28* WarnrX IN 
U* WoshG , 10* 

15% WshNat IN 

16 viteiwin " 

27* worn 
19* WatkJn 
8* WayGa, 

4 weenu 

13% WetjgO 
29ft WetaMlc 
30ft wetftF 
22% WrtFM 

9* wendys 
Ub WestCfl 

36% VYsiPtP 

9ft WslOTs 104 
3ft WnAIrL 
* WtAIrvi 
8b WAIrpf XN 1X7 
8* WAIr pf X14 110 
4 WCNA 

85 WPoc: * 

5* WUnton 

24ft WnUnof 

2b WnUpfS 
4ft WbUpIE 
x wun Pf 
5% WUn pfA 
19* VMgE, IN 30 10 
31* Weave 103 15 8 
a Weyerh 1-30 *0 19 
34* Weyrpf XBO 70 
43% Weyrpr 400 90 


rat 

177 

1715 

at 

ia 

198 


30a 10 13 
JO 10 U 
2JQ X5 8 
200 1X7 11 
21 U 11 
J4 XI t2 
80S 50 11 


14 34% 9% 34* + '* 
4Qz 42% *2% 42% —1 
U4 33b X 33b— % 
19 Uft Uft— ft 
9* 9W W* 

45% 45 45* + % 

52* 51* 52% +1% 

21 »% a ♦ ft 

35ft 31 35%+ ft 

33% 33 33%+% 

45 44% 44% + * 

a a% 21 %— % 

26% 25ft 26% + * 
X 37% 37ft 
19* 19% 19lk— 
27% 27% 271,— ft 
20b 20% 20b 
SO* 4>* 50ft +1% 
34ft »% 24%— % 
9* 9* 9* 

10* Uft 10* + % 
20* 20ft 20% 

a 37 % a + * 

S3* SJVk 5JW— % 
34% XU 26b— % 
17 1«% 14* 

20% 20* 20ft 

a 34ft x + ft 
n +% 
5* Sft 5% 

1% 1ft 1% + ft 

17ft 17 17ft— b 

18% ft* 18% 

_ 4% 5% 4% +1 

3 114%ll4bl14%+ ft 
704 8% «b 8% + ft 

1 27% 27% 77% — % 
83 J* 3% 3% 

47 7 4* 4ft— ft 

I 28% 38% 28%— % 
9 Sb 8b 8b 

2062 30% XU 30% + % 

ID 07* 37% 37ft— ft 

1351 28* a* 28b— % 

58 60* 39* « — ft 

87 48% 4b 48b— ft 


4 

95 

2350 

1523 

106 

51 

289 

151? 

S 

1 

95 

144 

93 

107 

54 

2273 

12 

101 


37 1L 

314 
143 


35 

51 

3752 


Company Earnings 


Revenue and profits. In millions, ore in local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


Britain 


EUCC 


year net also excludes Bain ot 
5135 mttlion. Full name el 
company It Great Atlantic 
and Pec Hie Tea 


Year IfM 1933 

Revenue Z09X 1J00. 

Praia, Net 900 8X0 

Par Shore 0.192 0.178 


Bowater Ind. 


Year 1984 1983 

Revenue— 1J70. 1080- 

P relax Net - 35.7 770 

Per Share _ 0J4e 0067 


British Telecom. 


Humana 

2nd Gear. 1905 1984 

Revenue — 7100 *47J 

He I Inc. 5106 4701 

Per Shorn — 052 X47 

IP Half 1185 Ml 

Revenue 1070. 1 070- 

Net Inc. 10506 95.92 

Per Shura 107 0.96 

Betn tlx-mentn nets In- 
dude BoHa of S3 million from 

satot. 


1985 1964 

1.940. 1J30- 


2550 


3rd Guar. 

Revenue 

Prato, Net— 3840 
Per Shore— 0039 
9 Months 1185 

Revenue 5620. 5060. 

Pretax Net 1070. 7170 

Per Shore — XII — 


1984 


Britoi 


2nd Quar. 
Revenue— 

Net Inc. 

Per Share — 
1st Half 
Revenue — 
Net Inc. — - 
Per Shore — 


Jim Walter 

1985 1984 

5240 50X5 

1608 11J4 

049 002 

1985 1984 

’« 

1.93 105 


Year 

Revenue. 

Pretax Net— 688.1 


Per Store— 0X82 00846 


Canada 


Lang {stand Light. 

YOBT 1984 Iff* 

Revenue— 1.97X 1.790. 

Nel Inc 34006 287.16 

Per Shore 309 200 


££ Year 


Dorns Pet. Canada 


1984 1*83 

188.7 1330 

3X4 7.1 

Per Stare — 007 ON 


Year 

Revenue 

Profit 


May Dept Stores 

4diO ear. 19MS t 


Seagram 

Year 1904 1983 

Revenue— 2020. 2661 

Profit 38X6 317.5 

Per Store — 405 303 

Resu/fs tn U 0 L dollars. 



U20. 1630. 

-1100 1004 

205 232 

1985 1984 

6J60. 6.190. 

2141 1870 

406 432 


Per thane rntutts rastoted 
(or J-for-2 spUt In Oct. 


United States 


Amer. Mecficd 

d Quc 


1985 IfM 

Revenue *69.1 6145 

Net me 430 14J 

Per Share — 051 X19 

let Half 1185 IfM 

Revenue— 106X 1000. 

Met Inc- 85J 510 

Per Store — 102 062 

1984 year nel Includes 
c Horae of SUL 1 million. 


HHsfaury 

3rd Guar. 1185 
Revenue— _ 

Nel Inc. 

Per Stare — 

9 Months 
Revenue- 

Net Inc 

Per Share — 



Ex-Cefl-O 


1 st Quor. 

Revenue — 

Net Inc 801 1001 

Per Shore — 008 


I9M 1986 

269J 26X2 


OJA 


A A P 


Widces 

4th Quor. 1981 19M 

Revenue — 7394 73IU 

Net Inc 302 (alOJ4 

Oper Store— 023 — 

Year 1985 1*M 

Revenue— 3030. 2070, 

Net inc 9J2 90 

Doer Share— 007 X66 

a: lass. 19BS nets exclude 
aalns of S271 J m illion In 
hoarier and of S379S million 
In year. 


1985 1984 

uia uia 


806 

003 

IfM 


Revenue. 

Oner Net — ill 

Oper Share— 002 

Year ins 

Revenue— 5070. 

Oper Net — 500 

Oper Stare— 105 

Nets exclude tax credits of 
543 million vs sss million m 
warrant ond of S30 million vs 
5163 million In years. 7905 


West Germany 


BASF 


31J 

004 


Year f«M mi 

Revenue. — 4QJ00. 35.no. 
Pretax Nel— 202X 1J8X 


Boyar. Vereinsbk 

Year IfM 1983 

Profit 12X9 12X6 


13 Month _ 
HtahL— Stock 


Oh.TM.Mm 


Xft 

4T 


40% 

34% 

e% 

39% 

3SVk 

m. 

Uft 

a% 

Sb 


11% WIMPH 
26 WPtiaM 
X WlPflpt 
94% WWrM 200 43 


MftWBRC IN « 
34% WMTCPfCIN 70 


17% V kfaBeW 
Uft WMW N 
*% wiemn 
I Wllfrdn 
33* Wimowi IN 
3 WIMiEl 

4 % wnihro 

25* wtaoix 
7U voanta 
Sft Winner 
3* winter J 
25b WISCCP 208 70 
5fV> WUd 70S IU 





i»5. 

4« 

% a 

2, 7» 

pa 

» 


tom 6 4 S. 


03 316 10 
M 23 I 




44b 33b Xerex IN 4.* 17 ai3 
Sift 65b Xerox pf i*5 tl.l 7 
39 19 XTRA 04 3j 9 307 




34% 2Sft» 


7, *! 

■z u X 

„ I> - ! 


X 34 ZftleCe 103 41 I 53 

23% 19b ZolepiA N 9J I 
26% Uft ZBDOtO 04 60 16 385 

56 X Zovre ACU J U *84 

21b Uft ZeMlfcC 7 406 

21ft 14ft Zero * 18 40 

aft 31% Zurnln 103 4J 10 236 


27* 37V, n 

T* a* m 

13* Uft re 
55% 55 S 

a *» 

JKJ 4 191 
*7% 2Tft 271 


-A 


Europe’s Econon 
Is in Good Shape 
New Report Says 


Realm 


WASHINGTON — Pessimism in B 
over tang-term economic stagnation is ec 
ated and Europe is in good shape, accord] ■ 
a U.S. study published Thursday'. 

“There is no reason to believe Europ ‘ 7 
throw away her future," the private Hi 
Institute concluded after a year-long ieve ’ : t 
tion. 

Presenting the study, entitled t 'Earop< ; 
the World." Alexander M. Haig, a former. ' 
tary of state, said many of the European dt 
raaes faced deep-rooted domestic difficu ' ' 
However, “the wdls of European vii * 
energy and innovation have not run d 
would be a serious — and possibly iraj ■ , 
Uundcr to condude otherwise." 

The Hudson study was assisted by an » 
ry committee composed of Mr. Haig and 
eminent officials, businessmen and in idle * . 
on both sides of the Atlantic. 

“The Hudson Institute was coneerncc ; ■ 
visions of a permanent decline of Europe - 
becoming conventional wisdom," said the . : 
tute’s president, Thomas BelL 
“Ccmmentaiors were missing many aj • •* 
European industrial adjustment and exog ' . 
ing tensions within the Atlantic Alliance.' . ' , 
Mr. Haig said the European Economic • 
m unity could look forward to 15 yean of 1 
able demographic developments that i 
help to reduce unenqsloymeni and increas ; 
ductivity. 

The report said Western European cou " 
should experience long-term economic g - . 
rates of between 2 and 3 percent. - 


* » 4 .-a. 

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M M <Al 





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t 

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3 : 

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n 




TIk International HeraldTribiine. \ • 
Bringing the World’s Most / '* 
Important News to the World’s .f ' 
Most Important Audience. 


i . 
tr, 


London Commodities 

March 21 


Prev tan 
Bid Ask 


Oet 


Jly 

Sep 


MOT 


HJgfl LOW BU AN 

SUGAR 
Stall no eer metric foe 

115J0 11300 11480 11500 11300 11X60 
12000 11800 12000 12000 11400 11800 
12S0O T230O 12SJJ0 12S0D 12X60 12300 
DOC N.T. N.T. 13100 13200 12900 13100 
Mar 74JL2? 16300 145JX3 76X35 74X80 74400 
May 15000 16X60 15000 15060 16800 148J0 
Aw N.T. N.T. 155J0 15460 15460 15600 
Volume: 1,Tft let, of X terra 
COCOA 

SterBaa ear metric tea 
Mar X1S 2042 2068 2069 XI 11 XI 13 

MOV XM8 2053 20SB 2060 X1Z7 113 

2097 2010 20)1 2015 20*2 2083 
2057 1J92 1.992 1.995 2052 2056 
10*4 1011 1015 1014 1056 1055 
1.923 1,910 1010 1.912 1046 1,948 
1019 1007 1007 1008 1044 1045 
Volume: 5^27 kdsof 10 Ions. 

COFFEE 

SterHaa per metric lea 

Mar 2090 2022 2025 2026 2073 2075 

MOV 2032 X2S2 2^0 2061 2007 2012 

JTT 2075 2098 2099 3002 2054 2057 

Sep 2J1B 2034 2036 2040 2096 2098 

Nov 2J22 2069 2051 20S4 2 ASX 2J09 

J an 20*5 2025 ZJX 2035 2070 2073 

MOT 2030 X293 2000 2010 2040 20SQ 

volume: 4J26 lots ot 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

U A. dellan; ear metric fan 
MOT 237N 23S0S Z3AJ5 237 N 23600 237JXJ 
229X0 225-50 22X75 22900 228XC 22X75 
22705 22400 22700 22705 22700 22705 
MW 22073 MK 7+1 50 22400 Yft -r* 
mm 221 man mx -run* 22X50 
22400 22+50 22200 2»_00 22405 229 JO 
N.T. N.T. 224N 23000 22400 23200 
N.T. N.T. 23400 23200 22£0O 23407 
NO* N.T. N.T. 22400 23175 mm 24200 
Volume: 1848 lots ot IN tons. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
change (gasoil I. 


API 

May 

Jen 

Jfy 


Sop 

Od 


DM Futures Options 

March 21 

WLlacrinanMBt-tZSflBnak&aBhnroafc 


Strike Cois-Some 
Price Jea see Me 

a X64 j,m - 

30 IJ5 U - 

31 104 UI UB 

32 082 105 IN 

3) 051 UI IX 

36 029 US - 


poisoeme 
ift See Dec 
008 052 

o5o ax 


a 1.15 

1J2 


15 “ 


Ekflraeted feM vei KJS3 

Wed. VOL 8099 open tat 34196 
Put, : wea. ret 2503 QPea let 16.U1 
Source: CME. 


CBS Denies Bt^ out Planned 


Reuters 


NEW YORK — CBS Inc. does 
not plan, nor has it contemplated, a 
leveraged buyout by a management 
group, the company said Thursday, 
responding to printed reports. 


Asian Commodities 

March 21 


HOKG+CONGGOLD FUTURES 

Clece Previous 
HWl Lew BM AN Bid Art 
Nor _ N.T. N.T. 31000 31200 331M 335N 
AM — 32X00 32X00 310X0 31200 33600 33600 
May _ JLT. N.T. 31300 31500 33600 338N 
Jun — JLT. N.T. 31600 31800 34400 34600 

g: 

- N.T. N.T. 33000 33200 35400 35600 
Fete _ 338N 33800 _3370O 33900 359N 36100 
Volume: 16 tah of IN era 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U-SJ perooace 


HWl low Settle settle 
N.T. N.T. 31600 33800 

32SN 31500 31500 J2B0O 

319N 31900 31900 31X50 

N.T. N.T. 32530 337JD 


Volume: 279 tots of 100 oz. 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

Mataystofi crate per kite 
cion 

bu Ask 
19300 19400 
19600 19630 

197 JO 199 JO 
199 JD 30000 
30200 Tnmn 
20600 X5N 



Volume: 41 lets. 


Previous 
BM Art 
192x0 19300 

19SJ0 19700 

197 JO 19EJ0 
19800 19900 

20200 20300 

20400 20500 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore rente per Mlo 
Oara 

Bid Art 
RSSlApf— 166J5 16705 

RS5 1 May. 17000 17X50 

RSS2AM- 16600 16700 

«5S3AM— 16*00 16500 

RSS4 Apf,- 19100 16100 

RSS5AM— 15400 15600 


Previous 
BM Art 

16800 16805 

17X05 17X50 

166J0 167.50 

16430 16630 

159 JO 16100 
15430 15630 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MaleyrtBi rtaggfte per 25 tons 

BM Art 

Apl 10SO U« 

MOV 1070 10» 

Jun 1060 1020 

Jhr 1050 1010 

AUg 1060 1000 

Sep UK 1090 

Nov 1020 UBS 

Jon — 1020 1080 

MOT 1010 1070 


Previous 
BM 


Volume; D tote of 25 torn. 
Source; Rothes. 


1090 

1080 

1070 

1060 

1050 

1040 

1030 

1030 

1020 


1040 

U» 

1020 

1010 

1000 

1090 

1080 

1080 

1070 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 21 


SMB CNN-Led 
Pita AN May jsn Jly 
» - — — - 
us m- - - 

DS 8* 9ft II* u 
T7S 6% rn 7* 9% 

IS Aft k E 


A - 


PeftLest 

AM May job# Jly 
vuk t, « 
ft VM 11714 nn* 

ft I Ift 1* 

lft 277111ft 1U 
» Sft - 
9ft 9tt — — 

- l] n* - 


TrtdcrttolMe hub 
TW ta cell Been h i. 5K8ii 
Trtfleet i bNiu i psx 
Trti eel ogto int nues 


HK8I76.« Ua 17565 Ctat 17S46 UB* 
Source: CBOe, 


Paris Commodities 

March 21 


Art Ch-ge 


High Lew b^t 

SUGAR 
FreocB Irena per metric tea 
May 1040 1015 1023 1025 —8 

Aug 1A05 1075 1082 1085 —8 

Oct 1065 1020 1.422 1X27 — 1) 

Dec N.T. NLT. l^BO 1JDO —30 

Mar 1015 IJBO 1J56 1090 —6 

May 1(04 1026 1028 1045 —12 

Esr. voL: Zooo tots of 50 rorra Prev. actual 
sales: X22I tats. Open Interest: 23072 


COCOA 

French francs per 7M kg 
Mar NT, N.T. 2035 2055 —45 

May X40* 2040 2043 2066 —37 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2080 — —35 

Sep N-T. N.T. 2075 2020 —30 

Dec 2005 XI9S 2.190 yrn _)o 

Mar N.T. N.T. — X2T0 —IB 

Mav N.T. N.T. — 2000 —5 

'2& : ^ WN «* 16 Ions. Prev. ocfuol 
sales: 1U Ml*. Open Interest: *66 


COFFEE 

French franc, per 709 Kg 
Mar 2080 X580 9m _ 3 q 

•I IS “ 

H.Y. NX U60 X7M — 30 

™ nx *« z{| 

en. voL: 28 tof, of 5 lens, Prav, actual sates; 
17 late. Ooen Interest: 144 
Source; Bourse du Commerce. 


May 

JIV 

Sea 

Nov 

Jan 


London Metals 
March 21 


Prev leu, 
BM As 


BM 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric too 
■pot . 92000 92100 96600 94700 

toward 95200 95100 97100 97900 


COPPER CATHODES {High Grade) 

Sterling per metric roa 

spot j 1,17200 1.17300 101800 101900 

forward 1,19450 1,19500 103X50 1,23900 

COPPER CATHODES (SHtotardl 
Staling per metric tea 
seal 
forward 


1.18200 1,18X50 102400 102600 
1,19500 1.19700 100)00 106X00 


LEAD 

SterliBg oet metric tan 

Spot 30101) 302.00 30400 30500 

forward 309 JO 31 OW 31X50 T140Q 


NICKEL 

sierltaa oar metric tea 

soot A43SuOO 4^4500 453500 4^4500 

toward 446500 407000 6J6S0O 4J7O0O 


SILVER 

Peace per trav aaace 

spat 53400 S3UX SO 00 55200 

55300 55500 57000 57X00 


toward 


TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ton 

003500 904000 909000 9.90000 
904500 905000 901000 9,91500 

ZINC 
Sterling 
—1 

forward 
Source: AP. 


' metric ton 

76000 74200 77500 77700 
73708 73000 7S2JQ 75300 


Cash Prices Mud 


io 4ft?; 


Commodify and Ueit 
Coftee 4 sonftra 1 


Prlnfctott) 64/30 38 %,vd— 068'^_ 

Steer billets (FllU.ten 67100 


Iran 2 Fdrv. Ptilla. too 
Steal scrap No 1 hvy PUL - 
LeadSPOLib . 


Copper elect, lb . 
Tin (Straits). 16 . 


Zinc. E.SLL. Basra lb. 

Paltodluriboz _ 

Silver N.YwOZ 

Source: AP. 



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Central Peonsves 
General Host Cera 
Mov Dept Stores 
NYNEX Carp 
Spectra Indus Inc 


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American Inti Grn 

Automatic Switch 

Bonaar Hvdift-Elec 
Banks ol MhLAmer. 
Bank of Virginia 
Bell Industries 

Bln Its Monutot 

Dlxloa Inc 
Daw aiemlcal Co 
FaJrcniM indue 
Hartford Nafi Cora 

Heritage Bancorp 

Hughes SuppIv 
MMIanttc Banks Inc 
MortBOM Grwtti Inv. 

Nall Service Indus 

Savannah El a Pwr 
Servfee Cerp inH 
Stacker & Yale 
Slone & Webster 
Texas OU-AG Caro 
Trinity Indus Inc 

united Came Tele. 

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>ver-the-Couiiter 


March 21 


NASDAQ Nethmol Market Prices 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 



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32 


• 4531296 11VS 1IVS— 94 

(Queued on Pag? 16) 


The editors of 
the International 
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22-1& 


m m m mz m 


s m m m m m m 













































































IOTERiNATIOJXAL 


TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


Thursdays 

AMEX 


KW Lew Steel 


Tobies Include tbe nationwide prices 
up to ttae dosing an WaU street 
and do not reflect (ate trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


--«««¥ 


5 


'l&Si. 


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If 11% coi s 
15% 9 CHB 
9W 5 CM I Cp 
4% 2ft CMXCP 
19ft 1M CRS 
19% 9ft CO«SMJ 
Oft 4% CaaHA 
13ft 10 Cal RE 


* ”B 

1 JB 10.1 ■ 


114 12% 12ft 12ft 


An International Conference 
Organized By 

Plant Location International 
In Cooperation With 
The International Herald Tribune 


Orer-the-Counter 


NASDAQ National Market Pit 



THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE 
AND INCENTIVES IN EUROPE 


April 25-26, 1985, Brussels 

The conference will provide senior executives with an in-depth analysis of the current 
and future investment climate and the incentives offered in sixteen 
European countries. Question and answer periods wiU follow each session. 


Thursday, April 25, 1985 


Norway: Mr. V. Hveding, Chairman, Christiania Bank Oslo, 
former Minister of Enas'. 

Denmark: Mr. M. Ostcrgaard, Managing Director, Industrial 
Development Council of North Jutland. 

Belgian: Baron A Rekaert, President, Bdcaert N.V. 

The Netherlands: Mtr. AA^M. van Agt, Qmmisaoocr 
of the Queen, Governor ofN. Brabant Province; former 
Prime Minister. 

Guest luncheon speaker: Prof. Dr. P. Mathqsen, 

Director General of The EC Regional Policies. 


Austria: Mr. G. L Gain, General Manager, ICD, former General 
Manager. General Motors Vienna. 

Switzerland: Mr. Carl Meyer, Vice-President Finance, 

Swiss Asuag-SSIH. 

Sweden: Mr. FC Lewenhaupt, The Wyatt 
Company AB. 

Luxemb ou rg: Mr. Z. Magnus, General Manager, 

Kredielbank, Luxembourg. 


by Minister of Brussels, Mr. P. Hatty. 


Friday, April 26, 1985 


France: Mr. J. Paul Home, Senior Economist. Smith Barney, 
Harris Upham &Go. 

West Germany: Mr. B. Layton, fanner President, Ford Europe. 
Portugal: Mr. E. Lopez, Minister of Finance. 

Spam: Don Letxi Bendbas, General Assistant Director 
erf Economic Hanning, Ministry of Economics. 

Guest hmcheon speaker Mr. W. Martens. Prime Minister 
nf Bel gium. 


Italy: Dr. Gianni Varasi, President erf the Federation of 
tbe Chemical Industry, Italy. 

Greece: Mr. S. Papaefstathicu, Deputy Governor, Heflarique 
Industrial Development Bank. 

United Kingdom: Sr Edwin Nixon, President. IBM (UJC). 
Ireland: Mr. L P. Doyle, General Manager, Allied Irish 
Banks Limited Europe. 


22-3-85 




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19 17 17 

IMS 17ft lift 
1 i 6 
220 34% 34ft 
5951ft 30ft 
2525ft 21ft 
fl lift 13ft 
90 a 7ft 
1513 12ft 
22 9ft 9ft 
3014ft 13ft 
«4 ft ft 
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030 39ft 
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17 +ft 
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8 + ft 
12ft— ft 
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Reuters 

WASHINGTON - p 
tional Association of Sec 
Dealers Inc. and the CT 
Board (rf Trade said they 
introduce two products. 

NASDAQ said Wedn» , 
would offer a NaSDAQ-JOC 
option and the Chicago boa 
offer NASDAQ- 100 mtot: 

It said the NASDAQ* I® , 
was comprised (rf the IW 

nn n financ ial Securities 0 
NASDAQ national market s ■ 

It raid it expects the Set . 
and Exchange Commission ' 
rider the NASDAQ- HW 


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,S- •’» * ; 

liT a ju. 

•• n ^ 

REAL ESTATE 


, . ; for sao: 


•' • MONACO 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


TQ^^^SHAKE J West German Bank Plans New Unit 


(Continued From Back Page) 




MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUP® PORT 

hfte boy of Mmo. 5 mots. PWmcL 15 
mpert. 664 berths 6 to 38 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


ST. MORITZ - MADULAiN 

Aportma im 54 sqjn. up to 90 tom,, 
gsnercKsJy designed m the Enaidin 
gyfe t fop qorfry + bult-in Man. 
rawo. sauna. indoor swamra pool 
Baoodful jumwr&TOE. sfcuncL lonanto 
St, Moritz. Pricei in to 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




NEWYOBC 
CSdRAl WUBt WEST 
Apartment, fan floor irmnfieenJ * 

kGBta DE 

31 RUE JEAN MBUftOZ 
7*620 L*ETANG LA VUE 
FRANCE (3) 95* 04 47 


PARIS AK£A FUBNJSHED 


74 CHAMPS-EYSHS 8th 

Ruffe Tt v Jw* op a rtme d. 
One monh or more. 

IE OABDCE 359 67 97. 



By Brenda Hagerry 

Insenumonal Herald Tribune 
LONDON — Industriekr edit- 
bank AG-Deutsche Industriebank 
plans to open its first branch out- 
side West Germany early next 
month in Luxembourg,. 

IKB, which has head offices in 
Dflsseldorf and BgHm and special- 
izes in credit for industrial custom- 
ers, particularly medium-sized 
businesses, said Bode Demisch and 
Alfons Schmid, directors of the 
bank’s subsidiary company in Lux- 
embourg, will hod the new Lux- 
embourg branch. 

Mr. Demisch said the new 
branch's main activities would be 
foreign-exchange doling m addi- 
tion to some loan business. 

Yasuda Trust & Banking Co. has 
set up a unit in Zurich, Yasuda 
Trust Finance (Switzerland) Ltd. 
PARIS area UNFURNISHED [The new unit is headed by Yoshiaki 
Takanashi, who previously was in 
NHALLY ON GARDEN **** bank’s Tokyo head office. 
Receptor 4 3 baton. acRoi Amax Europe has appointed 
FI 2 JOOO. let 563 66 3f Hany ConolJy senior vice presi- 
dent, finance and administration. 
He formerly was vice president, fi- 
nance and control, for the Climax 
Molybdenum division in Golden, 
Colorado. In his new post, Mr. 


Con oily is based in Anm Europe’s 
head office in Paris. Amax Inc., the 
U^.-based parent, is a natural re- 
sources and minerals development 
concern. 

TEC Europe Co_, London, has 
named Kutsunori Kaio managi n g 
director, succeeding Shiririri Suga, 
who has returned to Japan, where 
he will have responsibility for a 


manager of TECs Asian, Oceanic 
and Middle East division. TEC is a 
Japanese maker of a range of elec- 
tronic equipment for the retail 
trade, including electronic cash 
registers, scales and scanning sys- 
tems. 

Fuji Int H TO t jmwl T M h] 

London has named Robert Schwob 
deputy general manager and head 
of portfolio management He joins 
the bank, the mtenutional invest- 
ment banking arm of Fuji Bank 
Ltd. of Tokyo, from LR Roth- 
schild, Unterberg, Towbin Interna- 
tional Asset Management, where 
he was joint managing director. 

E*F. Hutton & Co. (London) said 
John Gallagher has joined its ranks 
as first vice president and interna- 
tional sales managfr for fixed-in- 


come products from Morgan Stan- 
ley International in London. F.F . 
Hutton is a New York-based in- 
vestment banking and brokerage 
concern. 

Gdtex Petroleum Corp. of the 
United States has "=m"V John 
Landds vice president of regional 
operations. Mr. Landds, who con- 
tinues as chairman of Caltex Aus- 
tralia, will be succeed e d as chief 
executive of the Australian unit by 
John McPfaail, formerly deputy 
managing director. 

Banca Commerdale Italians said 
Anthony Solomon, former presi- 
dent of the Federal Reserve Bank 
of New York, has become an advis- 
er to its management board. 

NJW. RodscbOd & Sons Ltd. has 
named Charles Alexander. Peter 
Freeman and Kate Mortimer to its 
main board. Ms. Mortimer is the 
first woman to be appointed to the 
London-based merchant bank’s 
board. 

Midland Bank International erf 
London has named Lord Selsdan 
to the new post of group adviser, 
public finance. He continues as the 
bank’s group adviser, European 
Community affairs. Adrian Robin- 
son has been appointed corporate 


Page I 


Japan Appointee 
Turns Down Post 

Los Angela Times Service 

TOKYO — Norishige Ha- 
segawa, chairman of Sumitomo 
Chemical Co. and a vice chair man 
of Kddanren, the federation of 
economic organizations, said 
Wednesday that a private business 
leader picked to become a vice 


verted tram public to semipnvate 
ownership on April 1 refused to 
take the job because of intervention 
from “political circles." 

Yuzuiu Abe, president of Nis- 
shin Steel Gx, had been recom- 
mended for the NTT post by Ket- 
danren, and accepted last 
Saturday. But he said Tuesday that 
be was rejecting the offer, citing 
“uncertainties about health." 

The company's present vice pres- 
ident, Yasusada Kitahara, is 
known to have close ties to former 
Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka 

finance director with responsibility 
for aerospace, succeeding .Anthony 
Cooper, who has been named assis- 
tant general manager at Midland 
Bank International. 



BKSUSH/fTAUAN port-time public 

relation* amiable n Mian. San* 
Inas wftig to trawL Write to Inti 
Herald Tribune, Bou 200. Tam 5. S. 
Fefcs Sear ate 20007 My. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


AUTOMOBILES 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/ Interpreter & Tourwm Gud* 

PARIS 562 0587 


YOUNG REGANT 

laden awdabie as your PA‘» 

H. Kong 3-7242425(2) 


r* -■ 

itesJ -.J 
■!** ■ - 

C . 

'■ *•- 


i it g e r w— 

ita" ■- * •• ■ 

£*** 

■- - 

«-,.*> ■ 
** rY ■ • -*- 

xrsc^r 

SL*sr-. 


BOU-FOCH 
I lourii, perfect axxfitoti, 300 
. 5 bodroone, 5 baths, 2 mods' 
. Perfectly justified high price. 
-ASSY 562 1 6 40 - EXT 3*7 


5 .VENUE GEORGE V 

A-HSRE, IUXE, faring SOt 
-— icticft 1 bedroom. FI/llM)0 
'[AMT-POSE 563 11 U 


ARCHITECT SBLL5 

sjphb HOUSBOAT 
.:»» Y 1980; . 120 sq/m, fireplace, fcm- 

taong Bait de Bodognn. 

JOOflOa Tel 602 38 90 


iONCEAU SUPBIB 

ctatettf far reception s. 9 room 
done, 3 mads rooms, no wwi 
-NNT-FIBSE 563 11 88 


By far the doted tentmeii preied to 
the metropaGs of Zuridi with sates per- 
mits to foremen. It offers the posobC- 
twt of dAur on ided vacation resi- 
dence or an attractive investment for 
reiyone udw appredetot the dnin and 
cfueol of a deSghlftd anv it onment 
within easy teach of ZwkJl 

Up to 85% af the purchase price am be 
fintwed an vety easy tern*. So please 
contact us— Your copy of our 34 page 
hrocWe awcat$ you. Such on opporto- 
nity at Ihit wil not repeal itself. 

RBDBBA AC 
04-6001 Zurich, Tdadnr 50, 
Tel: (01)221 33 95 U» 813 376 RE9D4 



L AKE LUG ANO 

lc aoertmerts in a tape 
ul pak(l7PQQ s^n^with syriro- 


ming pad, privela nrama tmdnivate 
beoch. 1st quafcy.Aptrtnerti 80 sqjn. 
up to 190 sqjn. + terraces 24-47 
sqjn P Has: SF453^00 - SH.123^00 
on The Residenzo Kvalago in the South 
area af the Let* offers upti t m et di 
from 57 sqjn. to 130 sqjn, overlooking 
the U» aid the mountains. Meet; 
SF21QA50-5F 485,450. Free for sale to 
foreigners. Mort g agee a* low Swiss 
taleieel rates. 

EMERALD - HOME LTD. 


retort tna an 5w Northeast Coast d 
the United Stoles. 

FOB MVBTMB4T 6 USE 
CnS or mai inquiries to: 

Lena Rubenstein 

INTERNATIONAL 

82 Park PL, E Htm^ton NT 11937 

(516) 324-6200 


980 ACRE RANCH 
GEORGIA, U.5.A. 

Two hours drive sooth of Altata Inti 
Airport. Slow refag (and. Fenced pat 
Hire, crop cnfhmMr lamb coMe and 
hone faddist. Rands has outstanding 
natural beattonlbur fakes provide plen- 
ty of water; Cbrefcfcen home, equip- 
ment shed, iw*»sldl horse bam and 
toning area. Price indudes al farm 
equipment. ISO head of adtle, T8 rois- 
tered qumtar hones ad more. 
Atxjndnsl game: dear, twtay & qaaA 
$1,110000 If A Cash arty 
Write or a* KMG HOYMNGfON 
3650 Habershtee Road, N.W., . 
AH mrta Oeoraia 30305 
Pham: (4041 362 - 3540 



SPAIN 

d-taf * - 

' New taairy house, fcicenoo- 
183 sqm, 3 Bedrooms, 3 baths, 

, -• «oam with diimey, dhn^- 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 

DO YOU WBH- 

• TO BUY AN 'APARTMENT 
OR A HOUSE? 

• TO RETIRE IN SWITZERIAMX 
‘ TO BMV5T IN SWITZERLAND? 


SODIMSA. 

PXX Bax 62. 

1884 VBon, Swritauiand. 
The 4562ft GBE CH 


SWITZMttAID: Were*sdSng2very 
Bxdusree homes withm 30 nvnutes « 
downtown Zurich. These homes wi 

Mortgages from 516% far 60% of 


Mableheod Neck 
Manadwuns 

ELEGANT MARBLEHEAD 
NECK ESTATE 

Marblehead Neck, Massadwselts 


m Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 
bi rKmr 

INTERNATIONAL HOA1D TRIBUNE 

■ Phone: Cdfl your local IHT representative with your text You 
I be informed of the cost imm e di at el y, and once prepayment is 
xfeyour ad wiH appear witfvn 48 hours. 

■ft The base rate is S9.80 per be per day + kxd taxes. There ore 

fat«, ii^ and spoaesmtlw firs* knettod 36 in the fofcwring fern. 

ainum tpoce k 2 lines. No abbreviations aecep au i 

•6 Ccevku Amaricon Express, Diner's dub. Emocnrd, Master 

fa. Access and Visa 


hcadoffke 


ils {For dasdfied orfyk 

.74746410. 

'ii* . EUROPE 

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, V^ - "* 361 -8397/360-2421. 

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. Ptahagan; (01) 329440. 

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tararas 29-58-94. 

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■ Avhn 03-C5 559. 

• ta««! Contact Ffwidwt 

UWTH) STATES 

^■TvTerft, pl2J 75243890. 

If Corah (41 5) 362-8339. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bogota: 212-9608 
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(Dapt.312) 

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Umax 417852 
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Scevt i ag o: 69 61 555 
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MIDDLE EAST 

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Kawata 5614485. 
Lebanon: 34 00 44. 
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PAR EAST 

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Hong Konra 5-420906. 
MiraBa: 81707 49. 
Seaub 725 87 73. 
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Talwara 75244 25/9. 
Tokyo: fW-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

sy*-r.«9»». 
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tt* Priced at u»«aora SOTHBY'S 

Mortgages from 516% far 60% of aWI * 

INIBtNATIONAL REALTY 

tion please write: fl y 212 5, IKT 101 Newbur y St, aadc^fi^ 02116 
FriecfiSwr. l*6000Finakfijrt/ Mom Teteptene; 617/5366632 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 




PEANUTS 



OOPS! 50RKV, MA'AM... 


I WAS PREAM1NG 
THAT I WAS WIPE 
AWAKE.. ^ 


THAT SHOOU7 COUNT 
FOR 50METHLN6. 
SHOULPN'T IT? 


BOOKS 


W TM 


,«1L 


(\ /rr& 


BLONDIE 

| DON'T POOtSET 


DON'T R30SET ) f BE 
"THE R GUT </ OVER 

ON TV TONIGHT jl ACT 6 


NO, GOME TO 
\fM HOUSE / r 


r-* t SAID H 
MY HOUSE/ 


I WS AT vour) 

LOUSE LAST—' 


LOUISE BOGAN: A Portrait 

By Elizabeth Frank. 460 pp. 

Illustrated. 524.95. 

Knopf, 201 East 50th Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

L OUISE Bogan, who died in 1970, disap- 
t proved of the sdf-dramatizing confession- 
al poetry that she saw conriDg into vogue in her 


HOUSE LAST 
time i V 





f, f HOW'S THE Y NOT NEARLY 
5 RGHT?rA AS GOOD _ 


AS OURS 


last years. Not only was she naturally redeem; 
she also believed thal the true poet “represses 
the outrig ht narrative of his lire.” Instead of 
exploiting his personal history, be uses his an 
to set it at a distance; subjective feeling is 

recast as seemingly objective myth. And this 
was an ideal that she did her best to live up to 
in her own work. She had set down her experi- 
ence, she once wrote, “in the closest d etail. But 
the rough and vulgar facts are not there." 

To reconstruct such a Kfe is a difficult task. 
It rails for exceptional empathy and insight, 
and for the ability to set imaginative work in its 
biographical context without reducing it to 
mere documentation. Fortunately, Elizabeth 
Frank, who teaches at Bard College, has risen 
admirably to the challenge- Her book is a 
of its Had , find one that does full justice 
to a remarkable woman. 

What were the “rough and vulgar facts" that 
are the biographer’s business, if not the poet's? 
The most devastating of them were beyond 
doubt the events of Louise Bogan’s childhood. 
sh« was born of Irish slock in Maine in 1897 
and grew up in a successor* of rooming houses 
and temporary homes. Her parents were ill- 
matched; there were fearsome quarrels, and 
her mother not only had a long series ofloyers, 
but — impelled by who knows what twisted 
motives ■ — took her small daughter along with 
her to her trysts. Louise loved her and felt an 
urge to protect her, but she also suffered per- 
manent damage. Fes' much of her life, she was 
to be racked by rage and jealousy, to alternate 
between tenderness »nd sudden spasms of cru- 
elty. 

Yet the sources of her strength showed 
themselves in childhood as wdL Early on — 

she may have been as young as 8 at the time — 
the sight of a vase in which someone had 
placed a bunch of marigolds gave her an over- 
whelming sense of illumination. She under- 
stood the impulse of pleasure that lay behind 
the wav the Dowers were arranged. “And I 


) s 


ACROSS 


1 Bombay 
bigwig 

5 Mud follower 
9 Something to 
flick 

12 Ignore 

13 Imogen's 
Fidelein 
"Cymbefine" 

15 She, in Sonora 

16 War 

(famed race 

- home) 

17 “Lost Hori- 

* zun” director 

18 Pherkad is one 

19 Optical toy 

22 Stanford White 
extension 

23 Distaff 

- busybody 

24 O’Hara’s Joey 
27 Break bread 
JS Leaked almost 

imperceptibly 

32 Step 

(hurry) 

34 Red or Dead 
38 Spanish 
. satirist: 

180837 

38 24-sided figure 

42 Thermoplastic 

43 W.W. II zone 

44 Poetic times 

45 Disclose 

48 Cato's “It is” 

50 Actor Billy 

» W illiams 

51 Quartet from 
: Mississippi 


53 Spy job 

55 Like serpen- 
tine writing 

62 Transported 
emo tionally 

63“...akiss 

through ”■ 

Hugo 

64 Jean or Walter 

65 “Ship” 
follower 

66 Stripper, 
possibly 

67 Part of 
HOMES 

68 Thriller prop 

69 bitsy 

70 Start of a Stein 
line 


20 Hopped-up 
drink 

21 Stone tablet - 

24 Crocks 

25 Lend 

(listen) 

20 Kin of a metre 


BEETLE BAILEY 


28 Duffer’s 
device 

30 Babbled 

31 Worker 
33 Mockery; 

caricature 
35 Borden 
weapon 

37 Faulkner hero 


VMA TARS 
YOU PO\H& 
N<2W? j 


INVENTING 
SOMETHING 
TO HELP 
MANK/NP 


WHAT 
IS IT? 


DON'T you know 
ANYTHING ABOUT 
.INVENTING THINGS 

^ -2 


you PON*r know what 

YOU'VE INVENTED TILL 
A YOU IHVEMT it/ 


38“ of robins 


1 Gambol 

2 Oriental nurse 

3 Judicial 
number 

4 Make amends 

5 Recoil 

6“Merry”ina 

game name 

7 Under the 
“affluence of 
incohol” 

8 Writer Bret et 
al. 

9 Lowest female 
voice 

10 Word before 
stick or happy 

11 Loser to a 
tortoise 

14 Rhone feeder 

15 Shenanigan 


40 A daughter of 
Zeus 

41 Inn 

46 Religious 
retreat 

47 One of 13 at the 
Vatican 

49 Boy or bit . 

52 All tuckered 
out 

54 Stud or draw 

55 Blow cue’s own 
born 

56 Punchbowl site 


ANDYCAPP 


rt: 


2 



m 


<3o~ (theref<s 

S-RlGHT-r- 

(BEHINOV 

SnsUI you- r 


57 Bedtime-story 
word 

58Shakesaleg 

59“QuoVadis?” 

character 

60 Rainbow 
flower 

61 Aigonquian 
language 



TWTADhWVS 
> MAKES HIM T* 

HESITATE-) 





BEFORE tC GOGS 

[ AHEAD, ANYW4Y 




knew the flowers —their striped anj I* 

dqtaocc — forever and for iD time, fonjl 

and back. They were mine, as ihmgb Ifi 

invented them. ' " • t 

In other weffds. she h»d grasped thepossik ^ 

sties (rf an. ae went on to start writing pom' . 

and by her mid-teens it was becomitsd* - 
that she had found her vocation. Saba • * 
knack for drawing, too, and sheidolizedhen : ' M 

teacher until the fata! afternoon wfcoi &. . : ,l * 1 

caught sight of her “with* greasy paptfW. _* 4,1 

one hand and a half-eaten doughnut toT.' ■■ ■ ■* 

other.” Her romantic ideal had been beta* - 1 

and “with perfect mthtossness I njeSs ’ . ■ r -- 1 J 

ttiteriy." . -i * 

After a year at Boston University, 
dropped out in order to get married, bat ' 
spite of having a daughter to whom she i ' 
mained closely attached, she was soon Mod > ■ < 

with her husband. By 1919, she was Kvbfc'; ■ v ’ 
hersdf in Greenwich Village and emb mii#^ . 
a love affair with a young mshmaa who wt 
had a mission to call attention tothentafr 
the poor by shoplifthm and dm testifying'' - T] 

court to their plight He waseventuaDy ca . -ijih 

□titled to an asytan. bid malirions go® f iflf * * * 

about dm episode kept cropping up for yqJ(D * v 
and adding to her sense of vufombtKty wht 1 r m ^ • 

ever it did. • 11 . ' ■ t«l 


k -, = i #!■*» < 0 > 

** *«m 

* ' 








e poor by sboplifting and then testifying^ rfl 

urt to their jrnghL He was eventually cot _ . -iiil S PR 

itted to an attorn, but malirioos go* .flf 
out the t^tisode kept cropping up for y^J[U> v 
d adding to her sense of vulnerability wht L r y'V * 

Htf second marriage, tote writer Rayxna'.f'i] 1 ( * I rum 

olden, lasted much longer than her first, EM 1 
was increasingly p mu a n at ed by firiitsV’ ^ ^4 

Libursts of jealousy, and HoMen’s^vod 
her couldn't make up for — indeed, tend 1 * ’ 

underline — the roaiive weakness of ! ■ 


WIZARD of ID 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


OBmckwcx- mo-m& 
FC^THeVVIEflTHeR- 


© Neva York Time*, edited by Eugene Mdteska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE " 


CLEAR 

AtiOCCQL 

TCNlGHT 




mHM&MTEDRJURKY 



REX MORGAN 


□Boa anaao aaaa 
□nau aaano □□□□ 
□nsQaamans ansa 
BGQQHQni annanQS 
□da ansaa 
OCDQ3 urns ataana 
□□□□ □□□ anaaDa 
DEH oaaanaa asa 
onatiaa □□□ naaa 

□Eaca aas □□□□□ 
Banina aan 
□□annaa aanaaaa 
□nao oaaanaaaaa 
bddd cnaaan aaaa 
□bob ganas □□□□ 


Holden, lasted modi longer than her fira, 1 
it was increasingly punctuated by fightsV' 
outbursts of jealousy, and Holden's tend 

to her couldirt make im for— indeed, tend 
to underline — the raative weakness of 
nersonaliiy. Within a few years, she w» sho 
mg distinct signs of paraimia, and in the et .-- - 
1930s she spent two spdh in the hospital um. : 
psychiatric care. - 

She emerged from the second erf than a go’-. 
deal mellower, and “as cured as she was e 
likdy to be.’’ But griefs and afflictions w 

always liable to flare up again. 'When i - v 
visited Ireland in 1936, for instance, she i ' ■ 
seized with a sense of horror; it never seen' ^ 
have occurred to her, as FKwtheth Bade a’, 
that the conspiratorial faces she thought- 
saw on every ade^ were ghosts from her mothC^ 
dominated jpasL 

Painlul though her life often was; it is na’ 
less gloomy to read about than a bore outb ' 
nueht suggest. It was lightened by friendsh.^- 
with suen notable figures as Margaret Me ' 
(who wrote a poem about her) and Edna - 
Wilson (who set her off on a long and ' - 
gmshed career as a reviewer); by her fat T 
cheerful affair with Theodore Roetbke, 
years her junior, and by the tot# humor. 
such things as her account of James Tbnrt - 
who met her at a party and told her foey on) -- 
to see more of each outer. “He has a glass e • ’■ 
poor dear. Anyone who falls for me ts sure 
have something missing.” 

Above aH of course, there is the poet- 
which Frank analyzes at length, and with b ; • 
sideraWe slriH When rite compares h to that- . 
George Herbert or Gerard Manley Hopkj , 
she claims far too much for it But at its best ^ 
such poems as “Hypocrite Swift” or “Song " . 
the Last Act,” it bars the impress of a for ., 
dable personality, who has now been a' . . 
memorated in a biography of the caliber 
deserves. 


TS, 




>.™*e**# 


mm 

_ «• I 

--- j i n Mm t 

i «w»H 


-* ■ « A# 

mI 11 


-«> v m 

V *; r 


John Gross is on the staff of The New Y 
Times. 


HOW LONG 
WILL YOU BE 
ON THE ROAD 
THIS TRIP, ^ 
, CLAUDIA? N 


I'M NOT GURE — AT 
LEAST A WEEK/ 


I LL HAVE TO BE IN SEATTLE 
FOR THREE DAYS— AND t VE 
NEVER MADE A CONNECTION 
3 THERE' DO YOU KNOW ANY- 
'■M one I CAN CALL*? r~^ 


[ YEAH, A FELLOW 
BY THE NAME OF 
I ERNIEf I'LL GIVE 
► you HIS PHONE 
NUMBER WHEN WE 
GET ON THE PLANE' 
HIS STUFF IS -d 
— 7 THE BEST' E 


BRIDGE 


I 


9"J. 


S OME ap 
sint comb 
to be quite 
viewed in a 




GARFIELD 


My Mo w wants to use the none now.so i'll 

' HASnAC^ItXI BACK. MAY8E (N A GCXlPlAHOJRS/ 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


GARF1ELP, I KNOW WOO ARE 
SUFFERING FROM THE HAWAIIAN 
CAT FU), ROT WOU LOOK RIP1CULOUS 
POM& THAT HULA PANCE^w-^^ 


WATCH MV HANPS 
. CAREFULLY. JON , 


EVERV MOVEMENT, 
HAS A MEANING/ jJ 


Unacramble these four Jumbles. [ No 
one letter to each squaie, to form 1 hurry, 
four ordinary words. I driver 


RYRUH 


RIBBE 


J?M P54VT5 



^qnkt 


©1885 United tan SyndeM.M. 


Bv Alan Tmscoct make his contract? Lead to- my. An additional conssi- 

1 ward the king? Or lead toward, alicm is that a dnb lead tb_'. 

S OME apparently simple the jade? king is more liable to leat 

suit comomations turn out One conaderation involves heavy defeat 
to be quite complex when the possibility that others wiQ The same dub play, leu! ' 
viewed in a specific setting, play six diamonds. In view of from the dummy, has con .* 
Consider, for example, the that leading to the dub king ecable merit if South is i.’ . 
dub suit in the diagram. wOl not do ns any good, irte- modest three no-trump an' 
If South needs a trick in a spective of the poation of the looking for a useful ovotrT ' 
burry he must lead to the king. ace. But lode at it from the nckib : : 

If he wants his best shot at an point of view of trying to make *K«ai 

eventual trick he must lead the contract. *q «74 

from dummy toward the jade If West has the queen and .*XT 4 S 

And if he can persuade the East the ace, all is lost If West west bastl 

opponents to lead the suit for has the ace and East the queen, £?/“*** $mii : 

fnm he will have a sure trick, both plays will succeed in 0 »s iiiIhii bis -i 

The deciaon was difficult on practice, for East would have * ill ; *AQf 

the diagramed deal from adu- to inspired to put np an im- soett (D) 

plicate game. Stropose that guarded queen if we lead from ‘ vax* - IB 

South is in a peculiar five no- the dummy. UAXiwa " 

trump contract after bis part- If both honors are with * J1 — 

ner used a natural four no- West, we should lead from the Both non vrinuftb. 

trump to invite a slam. dosed hand. If with East, we wfcr- 

The opening lead is the should lead from dummy. But J. 

spade queen and he decides to since West has spades East is \ « * NX *** 

win. How should be go about more likely to have dabs. So 6 n. t. Tom ^ 

trying to score a dub trick to we should lead from the dumt ww* m nw tpte» wm. 


■■■-. Ivt 

***** 

'■ -i 

■'* 1 4m* 


♦ AQf 
SOUTH (D) 

♦ A7I I 

VAXT • 1 

OAKJU 3 


•• 1 1 w«4 

. iT. l 2 T 


aboard 

Hll-krlluJl 


a N.T. Pi 
S« Pi 
5 N.T. Pi 

WMMl 


JKT. prfeanliall 

toqoMo. 


LOMBAG 


HURSTH 


THOSE RATS WERE 
LESS HUSTLE 
AN C7 MORE THIS. 


\V>rkl Stock Markete 


Via Agence Fmnc&Presse March 21 

dosing prices in local amendet a n l e st otherwise indicated. 


G«nanill 

IP! 

itaKetnanH 

IMimUilarl 

Medlotoonco 

Mort*dl»or 

OllwTtl 

Pfralll 

RA5 


, SaalKScmia 
Santfvfk 


SKF 

SwtabhMotch 


HO. 430 WoadaldC 90 H 

400 410 Wormom 371 374 

72J0 M Q 

313 zu All OrdtnniM Intfn :M3JMI 
224 227 Pr«Vl«B» aB278 

251 cco. Sourat: Reuters. 


March 21 


Gntathai stoda tin AP 


Aftaanvoorhtan index : 3M70 
! Preview : 37730 


Now strange the Girded letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


'Yesterday's 


Print answer here: [ 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles; SMOKY CRESS SAFARI MISUSE 


ABN 

ACPHouioe 


Answer. That Don Juan thinks It's never amiss to do 
this— KISS A MISS 


WEATHER 


EUROPE HIGH LOW 

C F C F 

Ahwrvc If 66 n 35 d 

Amsterdam I « -2 28 fr 

ARmUS 17 53 SO 41 O 

Barcelona 13 55 4 39 d 

Bal ar ado 13 55 1 34 o 

Berlin V 48 2 36 d 

entSHls I 45 -3 38 d 

IDdusrKt 4 39 2 36 a 

Budapest 12 54 2 36 d 

Caeantom 2 36 0 32 r 

Costa Dal Sal 23 73 li 52 d 


Bangkok 
Bdllna 
Nona Korn 
Manna 
Now DOM 


M 57 -1 30 
H 64 15 59 
32 90 24 75 
32 90 14 57 
U 57 5 41 

* 48 5 41 


17 53 14 57 
9 48 5 41 


Dublin 

Edinburgh 


Helsinki 
Istanbul 
Las Palmas 
Lisboa 


Oslo 2 

Paris 4 

proeoa ■ 

Reykjavik 6 

Rama 16 

SlOdUralm 0 

Strastearg 8 

Venice 10 

Vienna 6 

Warsaw 5 

Zurich 2 

MIDDLE EAST 


4 39 0 U r 

5 41 .2 28 a 

14 57 52 41 a 

B 45 -2 28 d 

6 43 -5 23 r 

1 34 -1 30 O 

8 48 3 37 d 

21 M 16 51 d 

17 63 13 53 O 

3 41 0 32 IW 

16 61 S 46 d 

6 43 4 39 r 

6 43 . 7 19 fr 

4 39 -11 12 d 

9 48 b 46 r 

2 36 0 32 SW 

4 39 0 32 O 

■ 46 -1 30 a 

6 43 3 37 o 

16 61 7 45 O 

0 32 0 32 0 

0 46 - 3 27 d 

10 50 5 41 a 

6 43 I 34 O 

5 41 2 36 a 

2 36 - 8 II a 


AFRICA 


AXZO 

AhoM 

AMEV 

A"Oam Rubbor 
Arrtro Bank 

SVG 

BuehrmonnT 

Coland Hlda 

Ell«vkr.NDU 

Fokkar 

GUI Brocades 

Halnakan 

Hoogovens 

KLM 

Noardm 

Nat Nedder 

NocBtavu 

Ocs vandar G 

Paktioeo 

phlllM 

Robeco 

Radnmco 

Rollnca 

Raranto 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

Van Ofn merer 

VMF Shirk 

VNU 


Algiers 

Calm 

Can Town 


14 41 8 46 

22 72 12 54 

24 75 « 55 
19 66 U 56 

25 77 18 64 


ANP.CBS General fodax 


Pmvlaas : 2B53B 


cwsa Free. 

Horten T7> 174 B« *« >c k 

Kan + Sob: 259 JO 2W gordovs 

Korstodt 21230 214 

Kmrfhot 223 224 g-A-T- 

Kicecknw H-O 24A50 263 

Kloeefcijar Wwlea 75.10 75 |ICC 

KrucoShdil - 9* 96 

Unde 416 418J0 gA* Si?* 

Lufthonsa I9SJ0I9SJD BOC Group 

MAN 155 153 Boots. . 

Monrwsmami 16450 147 JO Bweater Indus 
MetalloeMUschatt Z72 TJA BP 

SftESi“ bhitSS^ 

Mwtawvwerks 337 34BS0 BrH Aemsooce 
RWE 15150 153 

scnarlno <5520 453 

5 lemons Z6JB SS3 <***>, WfrjKpee 

Thvssen 10C40 70320 Cadbury Sgw 

Varte 1B7J0 IBS 

Vtba 18550 1B4B0 CoatsPatori|S 

VEW 12120 122 Cornrnerclol U 

VoDcsMoganwark 2U6JOSOO 

Cammerzbank Index : U29JB Dalgetv 

Pravieas ; 141751 De Beers* 

■ — . Dtslirters 

1 Orietetrteln 

Bk Easl Asia 2150 2150 ES?** 0- 

CheunaKang 1340 13 SSh 

China Uoht 1350 1350 , 

Cross Harbor 9 JO 955 gSd Met 
Hang Seng Bank 4575 45JS 

HK Electric 7JS 7XS 

HK Hotels 33L25 31 JJ Sif-- 

HK Land 450 450 

UK UhiimIwiI liC IW » ™""*T 




< Bank LOU 
I Brawn Baverl 


ObaGeiBY 
Credit Suisse 
Electrowatt 


SB MIB . C urrent index : OT7 
g Preetoas : 13BI 

3*5 


Commerzbank Index : U39J 
Prrrten : ijn7je 


Bk East Asia 2150 2150 

Chewto Kang 7350 13 

China Light 1350 1350 

Crass Harbor 9J0 955 

HanaSenaBank 4875 4575 

HK Electric 77S 755 

HK Hotels 3375 3175 | 

HK Land 450 450 

HK Shanghai 555 B30 

HK Teteahane 69 66 

HK Wtlorl 570 570 


855 870 

69 66 

570 570 


27 B1 17 63 
17 63 7 45 


LATIN AMERICA 


Beta** Aires 13 55 8 46 a 

Lima — no 

Mextca City 28 82 8 46 PC 

Me de Janeiro 29 84 24 75 tr 

500 Paalo — — — — na 


NORTH AMERICA 


Aakara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Td Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

Sydney 


8 46 2 36 o 

19 66 13 55 fr 

18 64 -1 38 fr 

16 61 6 43 0 

ai 70 8 46 fr 


Doran 

Honolulu 

Houston 

LdSAdMltS 

Miami 

MtewepeUs 

Moatrmt 


21 70 13 55 


27 81 2D 68 d 


ckdaudy; to-fooay; fr-falr; fHwli ; 
cloudy; r-raui; sh-snwrers; bmhw. 


H*wY*ric 
SaeFrtmdscs 
Seattle 
Torwifa 
WasbinatM 
no-not ovellobte; 
st^lormy. 


1 34 -4 
13 55 9 

8 46 -2 
B 46 -2 
17 63 -3 
6 43 -7 
27 81 20 

19 66 B 

20 68 11 
25 77 19 
13 SS -2 

I 41 -4 
34 75 15 
91 48 0 
15 59 8 

ID 50 4 

6 43 -4 

11 52 4 
B-overcost: 


25 d 
48 r 
21 fr 
» IT 

27 fr 
19 fr 
68 PC 
46 PC 
52 pc 

66 PC 

28 fr 
35 fr 
W fr 
32 fr 
48 PC 
39 r 
25 fr 
3» d 
nc-portlv 


ArtKd 
Bekaort 
Cocker 111 
Cobeoo 
EBES 

GB-IWW-BM 
G8L 
Gevoert 
Hoboken 
inte r com 
Kredletbank 
Pofroflng 
Sac Generate 
Safina 
: Sotvav 
Tractlai Elec 
i UCB 
Unerg 

VIdlle MontoDne 


ai 

S 


nn nnm uu ui ii,- m , 

Hutch Whampoa 1944) 1S.BO k 

Jardlne Mdti 9 855 

JanJhw Sec 9 AS 970 

New World 6.10 570 

Show Brothers X15 115 BSgJM** 

SHK Props. 173 850 SKfSS.'SSS. 

Slim Darby 6J0 05 Bonk 

Stelux 1^5 170 

Swire PactflcA 2150 2070 SSUS® 1 

WhedockA 
Whee Jock Mar 

wiraar 
Works Inn 


3 to V9 Ak-Uauide 

256 2W 

548 £53 S^cnlre 

273 273 

04 Vj 134 KESP 

383 >91 1 

692. 707 

205 SM 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


*%*#* 


Page 19 1 


SPORTS 


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f Wind That Blows Giants No Good Can Not Be Blamed on Breezy Candlestick Park 


New York Times Service 


VANTAGE POINT/ Dove Anderson 

“I have no resentment; I hope they do well,” Robinson Jose,” the Giants' president has sai 


ora. Yes, the Mew York area, where the lo 
Polo Grounds once stood- That's where the 


The last time the Giants won the division pennant was 


U?*r w k® 8 **^ ut I honestly don’t see them movin g past problem. We 

Omsty anybody." stadium that 


, . . Polo Grounds once stood- That’s where the Giants created 1971; the last time the Giants won the National League 

ints prcadcnthassaii Financing is the big so much of their tradition that is now so tarnished. That’s pennant was 1962; the last time the Giants won the World 
would need S50 milli on for a baseball-only where the Giants wrote so much of their history that is Series was 1954 

aul 41 - - -- AC AAA 40 AAA 1 _ I II, ■ " 


ten la *£■ jo to jm ^Mgcr. Tun Dawpon. fl* 
year the new owner changed the design of the Giants “new names m the Giants camp are two left-handed 


■^ate wanderer. With her diamonds in a hock shop, the as Bay Area people say, from Candlestick PaittcK 
■'jer of the National League is now a bag lady. winds. 

' en the baseball seas on beg ins, the Chants will be San Jose emerged recently as a possible new home for 
, to improve on their worst record, 66-96, m more the Giants after their owner, Bob Lurie, put the franchise 


develops, we’ve go; a deal. 

a... :r .1 j t 


; ‘ Division for the first time. As with way tram in champion 49ers, not the baseball Giants. franchise. Moving toWashington would so 

S.'.'j training, mere is optimism hen^but Frank Robin- When no such buyer materialized, line took the Gi- dans in the nation's capital for two or three 
' * : Viowacoaca wrth tiu Baltimore Qnolra after having ants off the market. And now they appear to be on the way nearby Baltimore Orioles -would Irnrii atten 
. -\;.;<bscfaarged as the Giants’ manager last season, re- 10 San Jose. Another possibility has been whispered 


a realist. 


> San Jose. Another 

“I’m exploring the entire p eninsula, which includes San, hiring the C 


Unra^real-estate mfrepraeur, weretosdl thedubto. “It looks, Rigney said, “just like the Baltimore On- some baseball people sav. is the departure of some of their 
the group there, led by Tal Snath, that is hoping to obtain oles." older scouts. But the most familiar cratch is Candlestick 

an existing major-league team or be awarded an expansion Rigney had been an infielder on the 1951 team that Park itself. Rigney doesn't buy that. He remembered 
franchise. Movmg to Washington would sooth the i pditi- worked the ’Tittle Miracle of Coogan’s Bluff," and later Willie Mays hitting 52 homers in 1965 and Willie McCo- 
oansm the nation s capital for t wo o r three years, but the in San Francisco he had two terms as the Giants' manager, vey hitting 45 in 1969. 

nearby Baltimore Orioles would limit at tend ance. Now he’s in the O akland A’s front office. “It isn’t any colder or any windier there now than jt was 

Another possibility has been whispered: New Jersey “Nobody realizes anymore," Rigney said the other dav, then," Rignev said. “The difference is that there isn’t 
luring the Giants to a new Meadowlands baseball stadi- “what it is to be a Giant-" ’ anybody like 'Mays and McCovey there now." 




Tennessee Teams, 
ouisville Triumph 




'■*' The Associated Pros 

•- . •/Vvmessee puDed off a thriUm, 
: !badc victory in the last 1 
ds of a second-round gam 


their senior guard, Gerald WiDrins, 
scored at the buzzer to tie the score 
at 77. 

Wilkins, younger brother of the 


Girardelli Wins His 10th Race, 
World Cup’s Overall Ski Title 


c r.; : <-.iesday night and joined Tea- professional basketball Atlanta 
"T ", 1 -^VChattanooga and Louisville Hawks* star, Dommiqoe WiDrins, 
~ ^ rvancmg to the cpiarterfinals erf played 44 minutes and led all scor- 
. . ;■ % -JaticHial Invitation Touma- ers with 27 points. 

. : " ' ■ Manuel Forrest scored three bas- 

^ th Te nn cesee edging South- kets as LouisviDe got the first 14 




Louisiana, 73-72; Tenncs- points of the secreid half of its 
' ^.hattanooga taking an 85-84 garm* to beat South Florida. 

' Z: >’aoc victory at Lamar and _ Louisville led by just 34-31, but 

Forrest started the gamo-breaking 
NTT FOCUS nra with a jumper froa! the base- 

- line. Louisville held a commanding 

s beating South Florida, 48-31 advantage by the time Mike 
: quarterfinal field for this Abram scored the last basket of the 


,'f ■^5'vOle beatin 
, the quarter 
7 : * : ?jaid was set 
r •• opting badeet! 


lfidd for this Abram scored the last basket < 
for the eight streak with 15:10 r emaining . 


rtWrtr 


#?iV- 

Xi -m ; 


my*. 

jj?? 

ItH’ *»' p' 


- pong bawetbaU teams. The victory in LouisviDe im- 

“ ' t>3xrday, Virginia anil play at proved the Cardinals’ record to 18- 
. * ~ -lessee and Frefflio State at 16 and guaranteed tlmt they will 
■ "• ;• A Sunday, Marquette will be have a warning season for the 41st 
' ~c;diana and Tennessco-Chatta- consecutive year. 

; >" e.-i wiD play at Lomsvflle. The Forrest led the Cardinals with 21 
■ ynals and finals will be-played points. 

' : 'C\ m York on Marrh Ti and * . 


N 


;i ‘ Vew York on March 27 and LodsviD 

~ ^ 29. . credited th 

• -4 ;ny Whites four pomts m the defeasi ve S 
. - 19 seconds, two coming on a _ 

: -throws with four seconds left Rra/fi-vm 


Louisville's coach, Denny Crum, 
credited the victory to a change of 


away from South Florida’s Charlie 
Bradley in the second half. Bradley 




~'5^ its SSSaHSESS&fi «L 

- : ^behind victory over South- . . vT“ 

-x- «m Louisiana. switched defenses and put a 

c - Volunteers were losing by little pressure on Bradley and took 
.• ■•"•i with 19 seconds to play when him out of the offense." Cram said. 
• r-’ e, a sophomore, a»red to South Florida’s coach, Lee Rose, 
' : it a three-point g>nv- Ten- ^ ^ generally agreed, although 

* caDed a time-out and came it was “difficult to analyze exactly 

- with White deliberately foul- * e total turnaround at the start of 
he Chuns’ guard, George A L * e second half " 


ItatacMNi 

Marc Girarddfi sped past a gate on a swift second run that won the slalom competition at 
Park City, Utah. It was his 10th World Cup victory this season, his sixth in slalom racing. 


The Associated Press 

PARK CITY. Utah — Marc 
Girardelli of Luxembourg, the 
World Cup overall title already in 
his pocket, tinned in a blistering 
second run to win Wednesday’s 
men’s slalom race for his 10th vic- 
tory in a brilliant season. 

The 21-year-old native of Aus- 
tria, second after the fast run, 
docked 55.14 seconds in the after- 
noon heat for an aggregate time of 
l minute, 47.24 seconds. 

GirardeDfs sixth slalom triumph 
of the season was assured when 
Italy’s Oswald Totsch, the first-run 
leader, caught an edge and slipped 
about halfway down the steep, icy 
course. It was the second time in as 
many days that an Italian led after 
the first run, only to fall on the 
second. The same fate befell Pao- 
letta Magoni daring (he women's 
slalom Tuesday. 

And, just as in the women's race, 
the mountain proved too much for 
most of the field. Only 27 of 69 
racers finished the first heat and 10 
more fell in the afternoon. 

Girardelli, already the winner of 
the slalom and giant slalom season 
trophies, clinched the overall title 
when defending overall diampion 
Pirmin Zurbriggpn missed a g^te in 
the first run. Zurbriggen trailed 
Girardelli, 262 points to 233, when 
the competition began and needed 
to finish at least 1 lth in this slalom 

10 r emain mathematically in the 
title chase. But Zurbriggen hooked 
a gate midway tbzoughnis run. 


“1 am disappointed because I 
was in the right rhythm for this 
race," Zurbriggen said. “1 could 
have been in the top three. I was 
sure I could have 52 seconds this 
run" — which would have placed 
him third after the morning compe- 
tition — “but I passed my inside ski 
out of the gate. 

“Girardelli is a very good winner 
for the World Cup'" Zurbriggen 
added. “He is the best winnerbe- 
cause he won slalom and giant sla- 
lom and had good dow nhill re- 
sults.” 

Girardelli knew he had the title 
in hand when hr stepped into the 
starting gate for the second run. 
But, he said, he still was deter- 
mined to win the race. 

u rm glad I won today because 
the people are so wonderful here," 
he said of the estimated crowd of 
10.000. “They go with every racer, 
not just the Americans. 

“1 knew that three racers before 
me didn't finish the second ran and 
I knew it was a very difficult 
course," he added. “But after the 
first few gates, I frit a good rhythm 
and I attacked all the way.” 

Veteran Klaus Heidegger, who 
paid his own way to the United 
States so he could prove he de- 
served a place on the Austrian 
team, almost made the gamble pay 
off. He finished in 1:48.95, which 
would have been good enough for 
second, but the race jury later de- 
termined that he had missed a gale 
and disqualified him 


With that, Yugoslavia's Rok Pe- 
trovic, until now more adept in the 
giant slalom, claimed second in 
1:49.38. Paul Froaunelt of Liech- 
tenstein, whose second run also 
was scrutinized by the jury, was 
awarded third. He was timed in 
1 :50.40, 3. 16 seconds behind Girar-' 
ddlL 

Ivano Edalini gave Italy some 
consolation by taking fourth in 
1:50.83 and Didier Bouvet of 
France was another 22 back in 
fifth. 

Among the first -run leaders who 
fell during the afternoon were Aus- 
tria’s Thomas Stan gassmg er. third 
in the morning, and Sweden's Inge- 
mar Stenmark. who was fifth. U 
was another disappointment for 
Stenmark. 29. the World Cup i«: 
cord-holder with 79 victories but 
none this season. 

Park City is home for the UiL 
Ski Team and the experience of 
skiing on the slick mountainside 
paid off with the best UJS. point 
total this season. 

Tiger Shaw of Stowe, Vermont, 
claimed seventh place and nine 
World Cup points with a lime of 
1:52.87. Dan Stripp of Old Forge, 
New York, was eighth; John Bux- 
man of Vafl, Colorado, was 10th: 
Felix McGrath of Norwich, Ver- 
mont, was 13th; Sandy Williams of 
Rochester, New York, was 14th 
and Cory Carison of Minnetonka, 
Minnesota, was 15th. 


BKIIHrl 


ft** 

SHWlilw*. 

;.'***- - 

'Ate fhtter.tv- >• 

tmi *** 

V-*' •; 

(ft to'.i'f •: ^ 

to: -• ^ 

-r - •• »■ 
A*l .. . 

« w , ’ . 

t-JM? A' * •* 
iV %- - 


|W‘.Vv 
A* &\*r 
i* 




mooes missed his free throw, 
Tennessee’s guard, Fred Jen- 

.raced down the court to score 

. . ... 15-footer from the left That 
. \.Tt tlje score 72-71 with 10 sec- 
: “ 'te’go; Tmnes&tegot fhd'baD 
• - - whoa the Cajuns couldn’t get 
„ “ibounds, and Southwestern 
r ;i si ana's forward, Randal 
"-h, fouled White. That set up 
■ ' - /inning free throws. 

• ; 7 lies Hunter scored on a base- 
' * • " irive with nine seconds left in 
;ime to give Tcanessecs-Chatta- 
’‘a a heart-stopping victoiy 
Lamar. 

_ "« Moccarins, who trailed by 
• r .,, i points with 1:19 left in regu- 
1 a, forced the overtime when 


Bird Scores ' Only 9 13 Points for Celtics 9 But His Deft Passing Puts the Bucks to Flight 


TheAssoc ^ t, . J, ! T ” “Some nights you have the op- Cleveland 108; Kansas.Oty 118,. 

In case anyone was beginning to portunity to shoot the ball, some Philadelphia 117 In overtime; 
think Lany Bird had to score 40 nights you don’t," said Bird, who Washington 105, New York 102; 
points for Boston to win, the Cdt- had scored a dub record 60 points San Antonio 106, Chicago 98; Seat- 


points for Boston to win, the Cdt- had scored a dub record 60 points 
ics* superstar has scotched the no- eight days before. “I don’t think I 
tion before it could take root have to take a certain number of 


San Antonio 106, Chica, 
tie 123, Golden State l 


NBA FOCUS 

Kevin McHak, whokd all scor- 


es 121, Utah 110. 

Bird, who had scored 206 points shots. I just lake what I can get." Bird said'fie could have created 

as the Celtics won their five previ- Dennis Johnson, who made only more shots foe himsdf. But, he 


^ « ers with 28 points, gave Boston a . ™ UUL P m * 

PSLH* 105-103 lead wth 1 :<M left when he n»gM, the first contest he missed 


stole the ball for a 


p. Paul 
.waukee 


as u>e uancs won imar nve previ- Dennis jonnson, wno mane omy more snots tor himseu. But, he n T-Liru, ’ ley, stud Ritma must wait a week lDe hoard member, Damd Ne- 

^.rhacmcany.-WhyshoddJ ^SonS. teswdlmgmtofiEg.xu.a.Mde. ^ser. aM.ltofay in Madiyn. 


fug the rest of the srasrat. United aiing last September’s six-player Officials of the Clippers said 
Press International reported trade that sent Manques Johnson to they were told of Johnson’s drag 
Wednesday from Seattle. the Los Angeles Clippers, hid the history only then. Alan Rothen- 

Sikma did not play Wednesday fact that Johnson had undergone berg, the team president, said he 
night, the first contest he missed treatment in a drag rehabilitation hadn’t decided u legal action wifl 
this season. center in 1983, the Los Angeles be taken against the Bucks. 

JSXrii&t&zn 

far cnWlina m iTi» fin am- tn aiKciH* viaser. said Ttiesdav in Madison. ^ a season high 32 points 


The iwwn spokesman. Ride Mox- Times reported Wednesday. 
n. said Mima must wait a week ’ nie member, Danid Ne- 


night’s contest with the Milwaukee faDaway shot with four seconds left when I 
Bucks, took only nine shots and to beak a tie at 105. That gave Bird 


scored 32, 60, 31, 35 ■ SOona’s Season Over 


UM swelling iu uicuiixa wsuosuc. 

then suigoy wffl be performed. Wisconsin, that the Bodes “tried to 


scored 13 points, his second-lowest Boston its first victory over the and 48 in his last five games. “What Jade SQcma, center of the Super- * Bitcks Admit Deception 


total this season But he added 11 Bucks in three tries this season. 1 do right now is not going to be Sonics, must uni 


rebounds and 10 assists as Boston 
won. 107-105. 


SCOREBOARD 

Basketball 



h Sonal Basketball Association Standings 


In other games, h was Denver good enou^i for everybody after repair an figured 
123, Indiana 119; New Jersey 128, the week. I had," he said. which wdl prevent him from 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


;o surgoy to 
t ring finger, 


_ D . . . .. y. hide" that Johnson had been hospi- Iu that game, the Jazz center, 

■ ducks AHem Deception talked in Minneapolis in July 1983. Mark Eaton, blocked six shots to 
A member of the Milwaukee Johnson’s stay at Sl Mary’s was give him 396 for the season, three 
Bucks’ board of directors has con- first made public in a Los Angeles more than the single-season NBA 
finned that the dub, when negoti- Times story on Feb. 9. record set by Elmore Smith in 19741 


V EASTERN CONFERENCE 
4 AHORlIC DtvMon 

W L Pci. GB 

v * 55 14 J77 — 

-P^ odlPhla 51 IS .73? 4 

- fW an 35 M 3X7 M 

laney 35 35 MO ZWi 

4 23 H .333 33 

Central DMsfofl 

" ^ ,-v toukwi 48 21 IM — 

* at x jot nn» 

•••• 90 23 37 An 

- • V kwl 28 O -404 20 

’ "L'j, * 37 41 JH 21 

. • \ JO 20 4? JW 38 

■ . WESTERN CONFERENCE 

- T '■ MMmit DMslon 


r 

‘ 


44 

25 

■638 

_ 


.! • “ on 

40 

28 

ja 

3ta 

•<* vi e 


T *■ . * ;. 

39 

31 

557 

5W> 

■ : 


■'■-jv Monk) 

as 

38 

A93 

10 

w. * 


.•» - ' 

33 

37 

An 

liui 



1 ' •*_ OCttV 

28 43 

Fodffc Dtvtoloa 

577 

» 



’ '' ’• Utan 

50 

IB 

.735 

— 



- r ;.v 

33 

38 

-471 

17Vi 



llx 

31 

38 

A49 

19W. 



T.’ir-^ • 

30 

39 

A3S 

2DWl 

T 

A 


‘"l-i TImwi 

25 

48 

•352 

26ta 

* ‘ 

CD, 'MM*.-’ 

- 

: ■ State 19 

'■ . n*)« PtavoH barm) 

;„r •f' 1 'totrad dhrlalon Mile) 

50 

3» 

31VS 


- . WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 

IT - M H 11 3F-WS 

■ ’ » S3 at 3i — w 

, *n(« 11-15 4-10 21 Parbli 5-14 8-8 l«<Alnoo 
11-344^26. Pr#S5«y 7-1 4 
!%’ *•**«■*; MIhwauk#* S3 (Moncrlaf 81: 

•r* ■ ;.*« (Ptttui 1H. Assists: MltwaukM 24 
.to 71/ Boston 29 (Bird in. 

• 'tolt n It 31 3t-lB» 

;,» WM IS M 27 *-«5 

" !» H 24. Robinson 10-2* 44 34, 

■ /.. '4UMTM033 ; Kino 13-23 M334,Qrr 6-71- 

tos : Now York 32 IOn-11); Wastv 
:. B IRoWniom8i.A»*l8l»;N«*Yorfc37 
.wn/wtahhHrtwizriOusWlinamsB). 

"!p- .tod is n » 38-UB 

’ to * r XI 31 34 33— BI 

M31 DowWa*7-UM«; 
-«5^at Turpin 7-12 MIS, nrtw i niH i 
t ,ana S* IPnwHi 8); New Jermr 58 
-•* **«»« W). Anbrts: Clovptond 50 IBoo- 

■ t ■ M * Mr Now Jaw 35 (Rarwov t>. 

■ ■ ' *C»y 35 at 2» 31 18-118 

■' * **too 38 31 » 38 8— 117 

' ' ' . toon VMS 54 38. Drew 1M4 M 22i 
,’34UlMaaa,B < rtlt»t-14A4'M.Rfr 
,l! Kwipa* atv 49 (Ttarp* 191; Pin to- 
.'WlflDrlitoiBJ.Aiil*!*: KMaCItv 
*w VK PMUiMia » tawohs TO. 

31 31 91 38-121 
1 32 V SI 33—118 

m * .■yWT7.1B»,EwU*h 12*3424; Kt»- 
.>■<» US 28, Fleming 11-17 W 2S. R»- 
' ^Denver 52 (Natl 11); IndloiwSStKel- 
JI. Aatah: Denver 33 (Lever 8J; 

. ,* ® (Wlilami. Ftemfna ti. 

■» II S3 38 33- » 

34 28 18 

1 ■■ :*Ut34S5-831 > GeiVn8-U34lt; Jor- 
: •, [0 18-B 3E WeetrUge J-U W 21 Re- 
P8a»eo 42 {G re enwood 9}; Son Ante- 
■ iMUthdi 12], Aaibn: ouarao 27 
- .'« * •): Son Antonio at (Moore *». 

*We 35 St 37 28— Iff 

37 38 37 D—U3 
^ nrieklW7443l.Bria«wskll»-l5M 

rt T2-55 1W\ 1*, Janntsn UVS'S- 
to: Oohto State 54 U«bn*ort9i; Seat- 
i jV-tefcowjW l«. Aafttu Golden 5to» 
^ - r ti; SotHtio 34 IBHckowsU W. 


Utah 38 » 18 35-118 

LA. Clippert 39 >1 It 33—131 

Johnson 13-1*4-732. Nixon 10-22 <5021, Smith 
8-175421; Grlftnti 1434 3432, Boltov 9-15 2-2 
20. Rehooeds: Utah 58 (Eaton 10); LA. C11p> 
PW840 (DaiwMioiLWotton 12). Astlsts: UMi 
28 (Green t); LA. Clippers 25 (Nixon IV. 

NTT Tournament 

SECOND ROUND 
Wednesdays ResnNi 
Louisville 68. South F tori da 61 
Tomessee 73. Southwostarn Louisiana 72 
Tn/Onttonooon IS. Ltuiwr «. OT 
QUARTERFINALS 
Satortayt Games 
Vlrslnla. 17-15. a Tennessee, 38-18. 

Fresno 5L 23-8, at UCLA. 18-12. 

Saodays Games 

Marquette, 38-10. at Indiana. 17-13. 
Tn.-Chattenaaga, 24-7. a LoutevfTte. 18-18. 


World Cop Skiing 

MEN'S SLALOM 
(At Pork atv, Utah) 

I. Marc Gtrordelll. Luxembourg. 1 minute. 

47,34 seconds. 

3. Rok PetravtQ Yugoslavia l:4Mt. 

X Paul FrommelL Uechtensieln. 1:5080. 

4. Ivano EdatlnL Itatv, liSQJKL 

5. Dldtor Bouvet, France. 1:51.05. 

A. Pater Peoanoalov, BulgorM. 1JL49. 

7. Tiger Show. Ui, 1^117. 

B. Dan Stripp. US. 1 152L5L 

9. Frank Woemdt, West Germany, litK 
TO. John Buxmon. US. 1i54J». 

11. Alex GtoroL Italy. 1:B32. 

12. Anton Steiner, Austria i:5&37. 

13. Felix McGrath. Norwich, VL TJS7.lt. 

14. SondV wnitoms, Ui 1:57 JO. 

15. Cory Cartoon. U-S- ^STAS. 

MBITS OVERALL 5TAMDIMGS 
1. x-CJrardolIL 252 points. 

Z Pirmtn Zurariooea Swlhartond, 233. 

3. Andreas Wenzel. Lle ch tonstola, 17X 

4. Peter Muller, Switzerland, 1SS. 

5. Franc He Inzer, Switzerland. 137. 

4. Inoomar Stsnmaric. Sweden. 135 
7. Thomas BOrater, SwUnriand, 131- 

5. Hoimut HMetner. Austria, 114 
t. Peter Wtnufaereer, Austria UL 

10. Bo Ian KriznL Yuonslavta 1DL 
(tie) Daniel Mahrer, Switzerland, 101. 
(fie) MoriuM WMmolw. West Germany. 
Ml. 

lx<llncMd Htle) 

European Soccer 

CUP WINNER'S CUP 
(OwirttrflBsto, Second U») 

Rapid & Dynamo Dresden 8; RaMd ad- 
vances on aggregate, 5-1 

Fortuno SlttanlW Everfon 2; Evertan ad- 

veetees on uuureuate. S-0 

CHAMPlom CUP 
(QgaatorflnaK, second L88) 
Liverpool 4, Austria Vienna l; Ltogrpooi 
advances « OBErtWrtfc 5^. _ 

panothJnaltae 3. GolhenDuni 3; PWWBdn- 
□ileus advances on aggregata 3-1 
UEFA CUP 

(Qoart n lto ets. Second Me) 
CMoBnel.inhnnaxtofialc2i Intoradvatees 
en snregatto *1. 

Real Madrid 4 Tothmtiam Hotspur 0; Reed 
Madrid advances an aoorevate, t-ft 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dhrtstea 



W L 

T 

Pts 

GF (5A 

x-PMlaM Pitta 

i 45 

19 

7 

97 

312 

221 

x4MBMngtan 

41 

21 

9 

91 

219 

Z15 

x-fLY. isknttart 38 

29 

5 

81 

320 

279 

N.Y. Rangers 

29 

37 

10 

56 

265 

303 

Pittsburgh 

23 

42 

5 

51 

WA 

338 

New Jersey 

20 

42 

9 

49 

237 

304 


Adorns Dfytslan 



x-Ouebec 

35 

28 

9 

79 

293 

249 

^Montreal 

34 

25 

11 

79 

285 

235 

x -Buffalo 

32 

24 

14 

71 

259 

211 

Boston 

32 

30 

0 

72 

268 

249 

| I... 41,,. 

• UN IliHM 

24 

38 

9 

57 

243 

298 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Norris Division 




X-St LZXJiS 

33 

27 

11 

77 

268 

2S8 

xOtlcago 

34 

34 

5 

73 

283 

281 

Minnesota 

23 

38 

» 

51 

244 

292 

Detroit 

23 

38 

11 

57 

280 

332 

Toronto 

IS 

47 

7 

43 

223 

315 

SaiyttM DMetaa 




x-Edinutiton 

48 

17 

9 

101 

358 

2SB 

x-WInnieea 

40 

27 

7 

B 

338 

VS 

x-COtoarV 

37 

28 

9 

83 

333 

271 

x-Los Araetos 

32 

28 

13 

77 

319 

300 

Vancouver 

23 

41 

a 

54 

258 

381 


(x-dlnched PtavoH berth) 

. WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 
Un Angeles 8 3 4-8 

Detroit I 4 3-8 

Foster 2 (15), Ogrodnidt (52), Duguav (34), 
Klsla (18L Lnlsede (71. Monno Ml. Dianne 
(44) ; Anderson (1 ), Williams (tiJRwtt 08), D. 


Smltti (211, l .edeuceur (3). Hakanssan (11). 
■bats oa goal: Los AngMes (on Slefonl 18-13- 
13—35; Detroit (on Eliot) 54-7-2L 
SL Louis • 1 1— a 

Hartford 1 2 8-3 

Robertson (Ml. NeufMd 1351. Fenton (6); 
Ramoge (7), Mullen 135). Shots oa gacd: St 
Louie (an Weeks) B-t3-13-32; Hartford (an 
Milled) 11-17-8— 84. 

Mhueeota 8 8 3—3 

Wlufpee fl 3 3-8 

Babvcti (11), MocLson (28), Small 3 (30). 
Wilson (8); ArcMbakl (1), Graham (t].Sha(s 
no aatd: Minnesota (on Hayward) 13-7-4 — 36; 
Winnipeg (an MotonsanJ 1VI3S--3T. 
Vancouver 2 8 3-8 

Buffalo „ a T l— 4 

SundWrwn IS). Skrlko (20), Gradtn (22), 
Smvt (24), Petti (5); Cvr (21). RuH(t), Per- 
reault 2 (27). Shots en goat: Vancouver (on 1 
.Sami 184-10-24; Buffalo [on Bradeur) 13- 
0-10—36. 

Chicago 1 1 3—4 

Edmonton 2 2 3—8 

Anderson 3 (48). Coffey (28), Karri (88). 
HiKtdv (8); Savant (37). Lanrwr (43). Okzyfc 
(18). Lystofc (IS). Shots oa goal: Chicago (an 
Fuhr] 10-9-15—34; Edmonton (on Skora- 
denskl) 18-12-10-32.- 

TDroefo 1 I 8-4 

Oatavy 4 1 2-7 

Nilsson (33), Otto (3), wnson (22), Outna 
(18), Loots 2 (34). Berexan (1); Andorsui (21), 
Volvo (32), Banning m,Derkw>(23).Shottea 
goal; Taranto (an Lamella) 8-14-10—30; Cal- 
gary (an Bernhardt] 20-04-38. 



V - uu., 

- ^ 



Transition 


CLEVELAND— Acoutred Keith CraeL 
plteher, from Kansas City torn minor leawe 
player to be named later or cash consider- 
ations. 

NEW YORK— Sent ParflAHomlrana Kellv 
Faulk, Bert Bradley. Marie Sflvo and Kevin 
Hickey, pitchers; Bobby Johnson and Mike 
O'Benrv.cotchers.ond Juan Bonilla. Infielder, 
to their minor league complex tor rooatlgn- 
menL 

TORONTO— Sent tMkc Sharpened, Indetd- 
er; Jeff Herron. Jeff Dgwnilstmd Dave 5tm- 
house. eatchers; Luis Aaulno and Rich Car- 
hied) off chert, and Kush BeaudiamA 
autflekiar. to Iturir minor leaoue complex tor 
raaes l gnment. 

Mdfoaol Loom 

NEW YORK— Sant Randv Myers and Jeff 
Bettendorf, pitchers; BUly Bwm and LM 
Dykstra outflekters. and Kevin MHeheJl and 
Dave Cochrane, Infid den, to their minor- 
league base for reassignment NWF84 Drag 
Payttetc assistant pitching coach. 

PHILADELPHI A Assigned Mike Mod- 
dux, Rodgers Cole, Jay Davisson, Rk* Sur- 
txrff and Artura Gonzalez, Pltctwrs; Hill No- 
horodny. catcher; Chris James, outfielder, 
and Ken Jackson. Wwriston, to ttwkr minor 
league complex tar weslgniiwtf. 

SAN FRANCtSCD— Sent Jeff ConwltCoUn 
ward, Mark Colveri, Kallgv Downs and Moris 
Grant, pitchers; Mutt Notes, catcher, and 
Randy Kiitdwr, outfielder, to their minor 
league comrtsx for raasstonmariL Released 
Roy Howell, Inflgtder. 

BASKETBALL 

• Nottonai MHttan Au w c tattoo 

CLEVELAND Named TMxtsr R.Trotton 
president of CC M anaoement Co. vtucta man- 
ogee the loom ondthe Richfield Cnttseum. 

PHOENIX W «ed Uwy Nonce, forward. 


on the intorad reserve list. Activated Mike 
Sanders, forward. 

FOOTBALL 

KnUnddl Fnet ta id Lnaoaa 
1MDIANAPOUS— Added Orlando Lowery, 
linebacker, and Oeo Simmons, tight end, to 
the raater. 

United states Feothad Lsagoa 
SAN ANTONI O— Fired Tom Rasshy. offen- 
sive ruOftBiwtor. 

HOCKEY 

Motional Hockey Leaoue 
Detroit— S ent Rick Znmbo.defensaman. 
to Advmdocfc of the American Hocfcev 
Leaoue. 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA — Announced the restoration of 
Judy Lr Whiter, women's basketball coach. 

AUSTIN STATE— Anraunced that Don WIL 
he tin, woman* basketball conch, has been 
relieved ofhimoHesond has b t i tn ai s i gned to 

other retPOAttonrths. 


Exhibition Baseball 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Los Angeles 4, anctanotl 2 
PMkxWphto fc N.Y. Mets 5 
Montreal X Baltimore 0 
Detroit 11. Pittsburgh 5 
Boston 4, SL Louis 1 
Atlanta !b Kansas env i 
Houston (ss) 8, Minnesota 3 
CMcago White Sax 2, Toronto 1 
CMcogo Cubs », Milwaukee 8 
Son Frondsoo 1L CaDtamia 2 
San.Dlaao 8, Saame 3 
Oeuetand 4. Ooktond 2 
Houston (si) 4, N.Y. Yankees I 
(NOTE: (te) slgaiSes oallt-Mvad). 


Fn g faJi and Hon^rian players had head-to-head confron- 
tation daring a European Oianipioa’s Cap quarterfinal 
Wednesday. United, one of the most famous teams in 
Europe, was beaten by littJe-known Videoton, 54 on penal- 
ties, after the teams tied, 1-1, in Szekesfehervar, Hungary. 

Jets 9 Record 40th Victory 
Makes Coach a Believer 


Los Angeles Times Service 
Hie Winnipeg Jets have con- 
vinced all the other teams in the 
National Hodcey League that they 
are a legitimate contender. Now, 
they’ve also made a believer out of 
tiwr coach, Barry Lang. 

After the Jets trounced the Min- 
nesota North Stans, 5-2, Wednes- 
day night at Winnipeg for their 
dub-record 40th victory. Long ad- 
mitted as much. 

“Moat of what this team has 
done has surprised me,” he said. 
“But the way they have played late- 
ly has made a believer of me.” 

Doug Smail scored twice to lead 
the Jets to their dub-record seventh 
consecutive victoiy and enabled 
them to retain a four-point lead 
over Calgary in the battle for sec- 
ond place in the Smythe Dryisoa. 

.The Jets, after a scoreless first 


period, broke the game open with 
three goals in the second period. 
After the North Stars closed to 3-2 
with goals nine seconds apart eariy 
in the third period, Ron Wilson 
scored and S mail pot the contest 
out of reach with his 30th goal 

NHL FOCUS 

“We have been playing sound 
hodcey lately" Long said. “And 
(Brian) Hayward has given us out- 

jfln prifng gftnlfflndrnfr 

In the seven-game winning 
streak the Jets have outscored then- 
opponents by 36*15. 

In other games it was Calgary 7, 
Toronto 4; Detroit 8, Los Angdcs 
6; Vancouver 5, Buffalo 4; Edmon- 
ton 6, Chicago 4, and Hartford 3, 
St Louis 1 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Rome Soccer Fans Stab Two Germans 

ROME (AP) — Italian soccer fans, angered by their team’s loss, 
attacked a group of West Germans with dubs and knives Wednesday, 
stabbing two and injuring at least four others, police said. 

Officials said fans of Roma, which was beaten, 2-1, by Bayern of 
Munich in the quarterfinals of the European Cup Winner’s Cup tourna- 
ment, struck without provocation outside the Olympic Stadium. MIchd 
Schandern, 22, and Walther Marschoer, 50, were stabbed in the chest and 
back and were hospitalized, police said. Berinald Rinner, 26, was hospi- 
talized with head and face injuries. 

At least two Romans were injured in the melee and hospitalized. Police 
lata said they had arrested two of the suspected assailants, identified as. 
Antoodk) Morroni, 19, and Fabio Mari, 23. 

Gene Iba Hired to Coach at Houston 

WACO. Texas (UPI) — Gene Iba, a member of a prominent basketball 
family who led tiny Houston Baptist University to three straight 20- 
victory seasons, was hired Wednesday as coach of Baylor University’s 
troubled basketball program. 

He signed a four-year contract, the terms of which were not disclosed. 
He succeeds Jim Haller, who resigned Feb. 22 after disclosing that he had 
given a player a S 172.50 university check to be used for a car payment. 

Iba, 43, had a 128-96 record at Houston Baptist, his first head coaching 
job. His unde. Hank Iba, coached for many years at Oklahoma State and 
was the third-winningest coach in college basketball history with a 655- 
316 record; be also coached the U.S. Olympic teams in 1964, 196S and 
1972. Gene Iba’s father, Clarence, coached 11 seasons at Tulsa, and his 
cousin, Moe Iba, has been at Nebraska for 14 years. 

Gerets Has FIFA Suspension lifted : 

ZURICH (UPI) — The one-year, worldwide suspension of framer 
Belgian star Eric Gerets has been lifted, the International Soccer Fed era-; 
tion announced Wednesday. Gerets, who last played for AC Milan, 
allegedly was involved in a bribing scandal in Belgium. 

He first was suspended for three years, but that was reduced to a one: 
year ban that was to have ended April 30. ! 

Frazier, 41, Signs to Fight Oeroux, 47 

MONTREAL (AP) — The former world heavyweight boxing champs 
oo, Joe Frazier, who is 41, and a onetime Canadian champion, Robert 
Oeroux, who is 47, signed a contract Wednesday for a light that quickly 
was pul in doubL 

Promoter Regis Lftvesque has promised etch man $160,000 to fight 
June 23 in suburban Laval, and the Quebec Professional Boxing Federa- 
tion has agreed to sanction the bout, provided both men pass a ihdrough 
medical e xaminati on. Bui GiDesNeron, head of the Quebec Sports Safety 
Board, said Wednesday the bout would be illegal because Laval does not 
have an athletic commission to sanction it. 

“The only place it would be legal would be in Montreal or Quebec 
City,” said Neron, “and I don’t think these athletic commissions tfoultj 
give permission for such a fight” 

Grinndl Athlete Seriously Injured 

KJRKSVHUE, Missouri (AP) — Eight members of the Grinned 
College track team wwe injured, one critically, when a van taking them to 
a track meet in Florida ran off a highway in northeast Missouri. 

A spokeswoman at the Univemty of Missouri Hospital and Clinics 
said the condition of Jon Toomsen, 19, of Clear take, Iowa, had 
deteriorated to critical Thursday following surgery and he remained in 
the hospital’s intensive care unit. Six students were reported in satisfac- 
tory condition while the eighth had refused treatment 






S 12 15 Htf WHICH lEIKmKHKS KH ISSSS IS I 




Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1985 


OBSERVER 


people 


A Cnwmg for Oaten Dali, at 80, Is Trying to Be as Outrageou s as Ever ££-.3 

a * Rv F/ksranri SrViniYiflrh^r *** • He announced that he was re* f dmjh u . . 



By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — I had a sodden, 

insensate hankermo in cm m 


1 N insensate hankering to see an 
oaicr. 

I wanted to see men at tail in the 
saddle. 

I wanted to see posses headin’ 
'on off at Eagle Pass. 

I wanted to see strangers walking 
into saloons and inviting the sneers 
of the Dalton gfln g by ordering 
sarsaparilla, which they would pro- 
nounce “sasparetta.” 

1 wanted to see shoot-outs, either 
down at the corral or outside the 
SQver Dollar Cafe. 

I wanted to see the eyes of strong 
men narrow to slits as they studied 
Indian smoke signals that said Cra- 
zy Horse was in a foul mood over in 
the next canyon. 

I wanted to see men who spent 
their whole lives on horseback, ex- 
cept when bedded down with cat- 
tle, but still managed to smell so- 
cially acceptable at the church 
social — I wanted to see those men 
decline to kiss scboolmanns and 
widows before riding off toward 
the sunset 


An outer I needed, but there 
were no oaters, and, no, 1 did not 
want to see a basher. 

I was in no mood to watch robot 
killers who looked like men hurl 
policemen through stone walls, 
crash the heads of beautiful women 
and wipe out 30-ton trucks in head- 
on colhsioiis. 

□ 


By Edward Schumacher 

Nm York Times Senate 


F IGUERAS, Spain — His be- 
loved wife, model and muse. 


An oater — that's what I wanted 
to see. 

But there weren’t any oaters. 
They don't make oaters any more. 

They make weepers. “Go see a 
weeper,” said my movie counselor. 

But I didn’t want to see the best 
mom who ever lived — and still 
looking not a day older than her 22- 
year-old daughter — get aban- 
doned by her rotten husband, take 
to alcohol and contract a terminal 
case of gigolos. 

1 wanted to see an old over-the- 
bill gunfighier ride into town and 
stay just long enough to give a 
rotten husband the thrashing of his 
life. They make screamers, too, but 
I didn’t want to see a screamer. 

So metimes, sure, it’s fun watch- 
ing the village maniac: jiiiwimh to 
the full moon and Halloween, 
sprout tusks from his upper jaw 
and take a chain saw to toe school- 
marm and the widow, but not now. 

I wanted to see a U. S. marshal 
give the Dalton gang until sun- 
down to get out ctf town and take 
their guns with them. I wanted to 
hear the marshal say, “And if 
you’re dunking of coming back 
with chain saws to do up the 
schoolmarm and the widow and 
me, m gjve you a piece of advice: 
When you saw at me, smile.” 


“It doesn’t have to be a basher,” 
my movie counselor said. “Go see a 
spacer." 

Sad advice to give a man who 
craves an oater. I’d rather see a 
basher than a spacer. It’s always so 
boring when the alien born way out 
there in the special-effects galaxy 
starts showing the dumb, greedy, 
violent Earth people how dumb, 
greedy and violent they are. 

But look bow HI- tempered this 

weeper-screamer-basher-spacer 

movie menu can make the gentlest 
erf men. It is a calming oater I need, 
to see. 

I want to hear the wagon master, 
looking out across the prairie; say: 

“Yup, sore looks like it’s a man 
riding this way, but if it’s one of 
them preachy aliens from outer 
space or one of them robots wear- 
ing human hide and Hair he’s made 
a big. mistake, because look over 
there ...” 

Over there I want to see the U. S. 
Cavalry arriving with sand for the 
robot’s gear box but ready to tom 
him over to the immigration people 
for deporting if he turns out to be 
just another knee-jerk liberal alien. 

“Try a teener," I am told. 

I gnnd my molars. I do not want 
to see a teener. I do not want to 
watch incredibly . beautiful adoles- 
cents wrestle with primitive in- 
stincts. I know adolescents are con- 
stantly tormented by the biological 
urge to propagate the species. And, 
of course, adolescents want to es- 


I loved wife, model and muse. 
Gala, is gone. But after five years 
of living in public and 
more than two years of mourning 
in the dark, Salvador Dali, surely 
the greatest showman of 20th- 
century art has derided to talk. 

Dali, by most accounts the 
best-selling artist alive, has been 
the center of a swirl of machina- 
tions to pet at Ids will, of charges 
that he is manipulated by those 
around hhn l and of «tan<iaiQ in- 
volving hundreds of millions of 
dollars worth of forgeries. 

But that is dearly not what 
concerns him. Six months ago, 
after he was severely hurt in a me 
while sleeping in the castle near 
Figueras that belonged to Gala, 






be was shaken out of bis depres- 
sion. Now be wants the world to 
know that Salvador Dali at 80 is 
as mentally sharp, artistically 
rhaiiang in g and personally outra- 


geous as ever. 

“I am not going to die, 
castigate those who envy 


a die, so as to 
envy me,” he 


That's entertainment? True, in 
teeners the adolescents never have 
pimples, but that isn’t enough to 
justify teeners. In oaters, the horses 
never have pimples, either. 

1 want to see a sheriff facing the 
Pecos Kid. Just before he goes for 
his gun, I want to hear the sheriff 
say. “I always knew there was 
some thing unnatur al about a Kid 
with no pimples.” 

But the oater is gone. I hope 
John Wayne didn’t take it with 

him 


New York Times Service 


castigate those who envy me, he 
said, went on to quote the Spanish 
mystic St. John of the Cross: 
“Death, come hidden lest I hear 
you come; the pleasure of dying 
might give me hfe.” 

“The difference between a cra- 
zy paranoid and me,” he said lat- 
er, “is that I am not crazy.” 

It was vintage Dali — almost. 
The trappings have changed. 
Known for a lifestyle as surrealis- 
tic as much of his art, Dali once 
wore ermine caps and carried 
with a silver-handled cane as he 
migrated between suites at the SL 
Regis Hotel in New York and the 
Meurice in Paris to Pnbol Castle 
in his native Catalonia. Now he 
shuffles between his bed and an 
armchair in a mansion, the Tone 
Galatea, in Figueras, his home- 
town. Hxs right hand shakes al- 
most incessantly. He is fed 
through a tube in his nose. 

But if at first his appearance is 
sad, it is, like almost everything 
else in Dali's Hfe and pnmting 
deceiving. Admittedly vain, he 
shuns photographs and has shot 
out his once glamorous entourage 
because, he says, he does not want 
to be seen in this state. Still, the 
burns on his leg from the fire are 
almost totally healed, and his 
doctors say that he is perfectly 




DaK (left) leaving the hospital last October; a sketch of 
Gala (detail) done in 1941; a dapper Dali in late ’30s. 


He announced that he was re- 
naming one of his paintings, the 
1945 “Basket of Bread,” which he 
said he considered one of his most 
profound works, though it has 
been largely ignored by critics, 
The new name, he said in a tvped 
statement, is “Better Death Than 
Dishonor,” the motto of Anne of 
Brittany (1477-1514). The paint- 
ing, which hang s in the museum 
in Figueras, isora basket of bread 
on the edge of a table. It repre- 
sents Dali s transition from pure 
Surrealism to what he called his 
classical stage.' 

As death approaches. Dali said# 
he wants to be remembered as a 
thinker, not as a painter. “Paint- 
ing is an infinitely minute part of 
my personality,' he said. TV 
thoughts he wants remembered 
are his surreal visions erf the uni- 
verse, of dream worlds more tan- 
gibly real than observed nature; 
of his mathematical intuitions. 


Ubby Riddles endured 1 ' 
miles of bboards, sub-zero : 
peratures and screaming 

the Idiiarod Trail Sol Dog 

The 28-ycar-dd musher from* f * 

em Alaska already has plans Kpll * * 

partofherSSO/WOinpriSjS 

— to buy a ticket to Hwafi. ' , 

dies and her 13-dog team cit . tr 
into the finish chute m Nome / - 
ka. Wednesday, after 18 dayo- 1 


a Pa 


>/ * ft* 


Tha Anobatad Press 


does not trust judges, he went on, 
and woald not press charges. “I 
am a painter, not a detective;” As 
to whether the fakes might deval- 
ue his work: "To the contrary. All 
the great painters have been falsi- 
fied.” 


capable of walking and eating 
nor mally but that he is a chronic 
hypochondriac who simply does 
□ot want to. And the piercing, 
slightly crazed eyes remain dear 
and strong. 

His hand became steady when, 
dining the interview, he would 
suddenly be especially interested 
by something. Doctors have dis- 
carded a dia gnosis of P aririnsn n's 
disease. The suggestion is that the 
creator of such paintings as “Illu- 
minated Pleasures,” “Tae Persis- 
tence of Memory” and “The Cru- 
cifixion” can paint a g ain if he 
wants — and he says he does, “as 
soon as I can.” 

Dressed in white twin pants 
and a silk smoking jacket — 
turned inside out — and with his 
famed moustache a little Hmp but 
still curled up, Dali sat in a white- 
dra^ted arm chair The blue-gray 

in a trampe-Toeil of framed rect- 
angles. He was eager to speak. 
“Ask me more," he kept saying. 

He raised the issue of the fake 
Dalis: “No one would worry if I 
were a mediocre painter." But be 


Dali samlariy dismissed re- 
ports that his assistants did much 
of the work during his last two 
years of pain ting. “Let my ene- 
mies devour cadi other,” be said, 
maintaining that the assistants 
did little mote than paint the 
math ematical formulas that ap- 
peared in many of his last oils. 

Most of the forgeries are of 
lithographs. Dali acknowledged 
that Se had signed stacks of blank 
pieces of paper; he said that they 
were to be stored and used far 
limited editions bat that their 
number got out of hand. They 

made it easy to forge lithographs, 

and the editions were hardly lim- 
ited amid a tangle erf often con- 
flicting contracts signed by Dali. 

Some critics hold that Dali de- 
based himself by, in their view, 
grabbing for money and promot- 
ing gimmi cks sum as Salvador 
Dali perfume in bottles he de- 
signed. But DaH, citing his long 


study of alchemy, said: “liking 
money like I like it is nothing less 
than mysticism.” He added, 
“Money is a glory.” 


Money is behind the competi- 
tion by some of Dali’s relatives, 
the Spanish government and the 
r ^ian regional government for 
the 4,000 or so works and manu- 
scripts, thought to be worth many 
y pijiiiyic of dollars, that Dali has 
in his private collection. Dali said 
he would leave the collection to 
Spain and Catalonia. 

In Spanish cultural circles, Dali 
has been, condemned for his rela- 
tionship with Franco. Dali, once 
pan of an extraordinary circle 
that included Picasso, Federico 
Garda Lorca and Luis Bunud, 
fell out with each, though often 
. for personal rather than political 
reasons. He said Picasso was one 
of the few painters he admired, 
and he added, “Picasso loved me 
a lot. Despite his Communist 
ideas, Picasso- is a genius, and so 
amL" 

Dali’s political past is seen to- 
day as an apolitical eccentricity. 
He considers himself a monar- 
chist “Monarchy is the only bio- 
logical, natural system," he said. 
“What would Pans be if there had 
not been Versailles? Sometimes 
there are good kings, sometimes 
there are bad kings, and some- 
times yon have to cat the heads 
off of some. But that’s not impor- 
tant:” 

Turning to art, he said, “Mod- 
em art today is a disaster because 
of an excess of freedom.” 


About the only people dose to 
Dali are Robert Deschames. an 



. . . j -i a» 4 

i 

r ire ** 

- 'A* 

.. A-** 

. . * "*6* « 
itl'* 

*• -4 ***** 


art expert who acts as a part-time 
aide, and Antonio Pitxoti a paint- 
er who lives nearby and visits 
each evening. They nave brought 
an element of calm to Torre Gala- 
tea, which adjoins a museum ded- 
icated to Dali’s work. 


$01)11 


rlirrxD® 


Dali mostly reads and thinks — 
often, he said, about mathematics 
and about Gala. Her image will 
soon be on billboards around the 
country in a government art cam- 
paign to which Dali contributed v 
the rights of six of his works, all of 
her. “I love her ever more,” he. 
said. 

He asked that at least the last 
lines of a two-page summary of 
his life, written for the interview, 
be printed. “I was expelled twice 
from my family,” it reads. “Each 
time I emerged victorious. I was 
expelled twice from the San Fer- 
nando Academy of Art. and both 
times I emerged victorious. I was 
received by two popes, and each 
time I emerged victorious. I was 
expelled two times from the Sur- 
realist group, and each time I 
emerged victorious. An critics 
never will be able to understand 
this enigma, because my life can 
never be explained only by paint- 
ing. Dali, who am I? A hero?" 

And, in pure Dalian fashion, he 
rfi*mflndwi that his visitor re- 
spond, “Yes." 



Jhr 


.i# *4i* !■ 


r.-A V 

• I** m 


Ubby Riddles, (em 


minutes and 17 seconds o : 
trail the fourth-slowest Id, 
run cm record. It was Rid 
third Iditarod. She placed 1I-- 
1980 and 20th in 1981. TV 
trail, winding aver two mov 
ranges, the Yukon River - 
through 27 checkpoints. foDv 
Iditarod Trail — a tum-of-tix 
tury mail and freight ronie tin 
the link between the influx 01 •“ 
ers who crowded the gold-'' 
shores of Nome around 190 - 
the open-water port of Sewai 
□ 


K vl^Wl 

i /i* 

’huH tJm 
• *-r* 

-.4 I 
V? t, 

. ■* * 


GET 


•j a* 




The Writers Guild Wedn.‘‘ 
gave its awards for movie writr 
Woody AAen for “Broadway 
ny Rose" and Bruce Robins* 
“The Killing Fields." 





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agence bo vis. 

BJ>. 63, 06310 BeauEetHWT-Mer. 


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