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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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PARIS, SATUKDAY-SUTVDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


S. Beats a Path to a Fugitive 

&May Have Proof of Va&(Miruption in Arms Industry 






ly Wayne Biddle 

V«‘ York Tima Service 

: ,ENS — For more than a 
iteady stream of U.S. inves- 
has sought audience with 
■ otis TaJris Veliotis. Al- 
, he was first viewed with 
an, many visitors to his vfi- 
jkah, this city’s richest sub- 
now come to believe that 



he holds evidence of vast corrup- 
tion in the U.S. anus industry. 

indications are that this may not 
be idle muring Although Mr. Ve- 

liOQS, 58, a former manager of the 
Electric Boat Division oT General 
Dynamics Corp. lives with the taint 
of having fled to his native Greece 
just before a 1983 U.S. indictment 
on kickback char ge s he possesses 
voluminous private records from 


on Pliers Deal: 

(But Read the Small Print) 



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By Fred Hiatr 
| and Rick Atkinson 

- Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — In June, 
tr a government engineer 
bed a Senate subcommittee 
' the Boeing Military Air- 
ite. £.ie Co. was planning to 
-go the air force $748 for a 
of duckbill pliers, Boeing 
“• ■- ted their price to $90. 

- : seemed like another victory 
ic Pentagon’s war on exor- 

: - at prices for spare parts, as 
ing also reduced the prices 
■ iiout 50 other tools included 
• ie same contract 
--•^ut, according to documents 
v .lined recently, Boeing also 
- .. ed a new charge onto that 
■- .. xact: $95,307 for “support 
pment management 4 Re- 
the total price of the pliers 
other tools went from the 
inal $557,500 to exactly 
1300. 

■ Dealing with these contracts 
-re squeezing a balloon; you 
,c ■- xza it in one place and it 

- s out in another,” Senator 
jfcs E Grassley. Republi- 

— of Iowa, said Thursday. He 
complained about the pli- 
'-when they cost $748. 

. he pliers in question, used 

spnirmg engines on KC-135 
planes, are made by 
Inc. of MeadviDe, 
jnsytvama. They are stan- 
.d duckbill pliers in every 
f except for a small notch on 

• end, an air force parts num- 
i*n the jride.aod a “black 

ie protective finish.” 
ZTTmpal Chanhan, the engi- 
- who testified before Sena- 
” Grassley’s Judiciary sub-' 
unittee on administrative 
' rice and procedure in June, 

• he found similar pliers at a 
Jware store for $7.61. 

- The question comes to 
.. d, ‘Can common hardware 

e pliers be used?*” the air 
— *e wrote to the senator in 

- “The answer is that com- 

-i pliers could probably be 
. Mile to wort” 

: i ; 'm in its unsigned explana- 
.. memo, the air force said 
nary pliers would not be the 
1 tool for the task of posi- 

- ing a small pin in the jet 
he. 


-'**«■*' ' •- 


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v..»- - 


“Anyone who has tried to 
perform minor maintenance on 
their car or kitchen sink knows 
that lack of the proper tool can 
make a simple task almost im- 
possible,” the air force said. 

Boeing originally proposed 
charging $5,096 for two pliers 
in 1983. That price indnded 
$305 for the two pliers and 
Boeing’s surcharge for buying 
them, pins $4,791 for what the 
air force called additional 
“management support tasks 
and profit.” 

Air force price analysts con- 
cluded that the price was too 
high and negotiated with 
Boeing for almost six months. 
On March 2, the air force 
signed a contract that included 
$1,496 for the two pliers, “a 70- 
percent reduction,” the air force 
noted in its memo to Senator 
Grassley. 

Al though Boeing only acted 

as mid dleman in buying the pli- 
ers, it said: “Suppliers most be 
identified, contracts written, 
schedules monitored to ensure 
timely delivery, hardware test- 
ed, specifications checked, re- 
cords maintained, drawings- 
specification packages 
prepared and delivered, ana so 
on.*’ 

By the time Mr. Chauhan tes- 
tified, air force officials had be- 
come “sensitive to the line item 
price integrity requirement,” 
the air force said. 

“There was an appearance of 
overpricing,” the air force^sajd. 
“However,, that 
now being 

In fact, the appearance was 
corrected twice, according to 
defense officials. Boeing 
knocked the price down to $90 
and added thie $95,307 manage- 
ment charge in July, then re- 
duced the price to $80 in Octo- 
ber, simultaneously increasing 
the management charge to 
$143,000. The total contract 
price: a familiar $557,500. 

The Boeing contract also in- 
cludes $30,648 for “proposal 
preparation.” That paid for 
1,286 computer-generated 
pages of background material, 
according to an official, or an 
average of 23 pages for each line 
item, including the two pliers. 


his decade in the top erheinn of 
General Dynamics, the largest UJS. 
weapons bidder. 

After months of congressional 
hearings and Justice Department 
scrutiny, his status as a fugitive has 
become secondary to his curator- 
ship of these documents, which in- 
dude extensive recordings of his 
business phone calls. Investigators 
have found the cache to be an al- 
most bottomless source of informa- 
tion about reportedly fraudulent 
activity at General Dynamics and 
the Pentagon. 

In three days of interviews at his 
home, Mr. Veliotis presented stark 
personal contrasts. He is an aristo- 
cratic and broadly educated profes- 
sional, with an engin e e ring degree 
from Greece’s Royal Naval Acade- 

eral Dynamics shipbuilding work 
to obtain higher government subsi- 
dies. 

“1 took the company line,” he 
said of his involvement in this and 
other schemes. For his own part, he 
said he blamed personal ambition, 
arms industry norms and his being 
“maybe a little crazy.” 

General Dynamics offi cials have 
continually rturinfafriBri ihar the 
Veliotis allegations are false and 
self-serving. But as investigators 
from the U.S. government and the 
press have gradually obtained inde- 
pendent confirmation of some of 
his charges, the company has be- 
come more defensive. 

Of the records that Mr. Veliotis 
keeps in an Athens bank vault, the 
telephone tapes have proved the 
most dramatic, if not yet the most 
damaging to General Dynamics. 
Mr. Veliotis said he had given 90 
percent of his surreptitious record- 
ings to the Justice Department and 
60 percent to a reporter far The 
- Washington Post who is writing a 
book about the company. 

He said he had kept about five 
hours of taped business conversa- 
tions that be feels are severely dam- 
aging to top General Dynamics ex- 
ecutives and government officials. 
He trill release these tapes, he said, 
if the Justice Department “doesn't 
play it straight” 

His lawyers have also been in- 
structed, he added, to release them 
upon his death. He said three at- 
tempts have been made to kill him 
sincdhta&^t^^ • 

i&h Ekah residence was built with 
security in mind — it has bullet- 
proof windows and extensive alarm 
systems, and is just down the hill 
from the home of Constantine Car- 
amanlis, a family friend and former 
president of Greece. 

For a year. Justice Department 
investigators have made repeated 
visits to Athens to question Mr. 
Veliotis and decipher his tapes. 
Early on. the department granted 
Him immunity c harges in a 
single area — possibly fraudulent 
filing of daims to recover huge cost 
overruns on navy submarine con- 
tracts in the 1970s. As manager of 
Bee trie Boat in Groton, Connecti- 
cut, from 1977 to 1981, he played a 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 6) 



Reagan Asserts 

It Is 'High Ti 

To Hold Su 


Mill 


It 


Riot police in NIort, France, dodging liquid manure sprayed Friday by farmers protesting 
the proposed entry of Spain and Portugal in the European Commimity and a plan to freeze 
EC farm prices. Foreign Minister Feroando Morin of Spain as he Mmwmfwi Friday in 
Bnissels mat Madrid would pursue the stalled negotiations to rater the EC by January. 

EC’s Entry Talks for Spain 9 Portugal 
Fall Short Over Issues of Fishing, Wine 


By Steven 
- . . fmenvafonaLi 

BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity foreign ministers came 
dose hut failed to reach agreement 
on the toms of EC membership for 
Spain and Portugal in a fiv^day 
negotiating session, officials said 
Friday. 

The mmistexs will return to Brus- 
sels next week to try to complete 
the negotiations before the start of 
an EC summit meeting Friday. 

An agreement next week would 
still provide time for the parlia- 
ments of the 10 EC member na- 
tions and Spain and Portugal to 
ratify an accord to enlarge the EC 
by Jan. 1, the target date for the 
entry of Madrid and Lisbon. 

After the end of the ministers’ 
talks late Thursday night. Foreign 


a Walden Pond: Debate on Visitors Ruffles Calm 






i.u» * i 




■ Margot Homblower 

Washington Pest Service 
-^'fCORD, Massachusetts — 
early afternoon near spring, 
jst famous pond in America 
■rs the dark, snow-tipped 
~ dong its perimeter. Lavender 
soften the sky. A fisherman 
i line off his canoe, but the 
. e not biting. 

pile the outward serenity, all 
' quiet at Walden Pond, the 
. of the 19th-century phfloso- 
lemy David Tboreau. 

140 years since he built his 

- can cabin there to live in soli- 

- ad contemplate nature, the 
• c (25.1-hectare) pond and 

ndmg woods have become 
f the most popular tourist 
•in New En gland, attracting 
0 visitors a year. 

^summer days, as many as 
.swimmers and sunbathers 
v»* its tiny beach. Radios and 
varties shatter the peace. The 
*^tian is trampled and the 
hordine eroded. 

, .Vis is a desecration of an 
1 h jn n shrine,” said Mary Sher- 
^78, a retired naturalist who is 
f Walden Forever Wild. The 
js pushing a bill in the Mas- 
. etts le gislature to declare 
i v ? * slate sanctuary, 

' - 'ting and restoring the 



Two Massachusetts officials stand near a dismantled dock at' WaMen Pond. 


i #■' 

S’"- -M 
r •- 

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mb 20 miles (32 kilometers) north- 
east of Boston. It is remembered as 
an intellectual mecca in the mid- 
1800s when Emerson, Thorean, 
Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Al- 
cott family lived here. 

Thoreau moved to the pond a 
natural and forested cofldi- f w yean after graduating from 
known to Ralph Waldo Em- Harvard He lived there for two 
. »md Henry David Tboreau.” years, cultivating his bean Grid and 
7 ue Senate committee voted writing the thoughtful, tmeonven- 
j^aday to study the bill further donal and idealistic journals that 


Kit 





ate officials and local resi- 
v o pposed it in a hearing. It is 
. line chanty, of passage this 
ut proponents vow to fight 

Idea Food has become like 
Island, grossly overcrowded 
..sused,” said Kelly McOin- 
• acutive director of Environ- 
Lobby, a nonprofit group. 
Bvironmental activists con- 
it is politically impracti- 
swimming at one of the 
bathing areas unless the 
alternatives, 
which fadmtes 350 
woods around the deep, 
* ism this affluent sub- 


later evolved into “Walden; or. 
Life in the Woods,” “Civil Disobe- 
dience” and other works. 


“Hundreds of years ago the Indi- 
ans swam there,” he said. “Emer- 
son and Thorean swam there. It's 
on fy fair that people continue to 
mire advantage of thi 
natural resource.” 

Besides, he added, *T used to 
take my own kids ont there.” 

Under public pressure, the state 
has undertaken a SlJ2-ntiHion res- 
toration program at the park, 
which has been declared a National 
Historic Monument by the U.S. 
Department of the Interior. 

A badly eroded section of beach 
has been closed and replanted. 


“What would Henry have 

the'i^Ssd tree toots teC 
feet of sod has washed into the 
this wonderful pond, leaving deep gnlbes along the 
shore. 

“People come here from Japan, 
Poland, Ireland,” he said. 


Minister Ghrho Andreotti of Itafy, 
the, chairman of the meeting, said 
rf 1 ' the negotiations' with Spaitfi 
“We had almost brought things to a 
conclusion.” 

Spain, he said, “had accepted the 
package I drew up," but some of 
the terms were unacceptable to 
France. 

Mr. Andreotti said two issues on 
which France was unable to 
were the number of Spanish . 
vessels that would be allowed into 
EC waters during a transitional pe- 
riod, and the amount of Spanish 
wine produced from 1980 to 1983 
that could be sold on community 
markets 

While France was widely blamed 
for the failure to reach an accord, 
many EC officials said that the res- 
ervations of several other member 
states also had blocked an agree- 
ment with Spain. They said also 
that Portuguese negotiators had 
not been satisfied with the EC 
terms. 

Leo Tin demans, the Belgian for- 
eign minister, said that Mr. An- 
dreotti told the negotiators Thurs- 
day night that Italy might postpone 
next week’s summit meeting if an 
agreement were not reached before 
then. ' 

However, EC officials said at a 
briefing Friday they were confident 
that Mr. Andreotti would be able 
to conclude an agreement before 
the summit marring 

Italy has the authority to order a 
postponement because it holds the 
rotating presidency of the EC’s 
governing Council of Ministers. 

Foreign Minister Fernando 
Marin af Spain said the differ- 
ences remaining between the com- 
munity and Spain were “tiny.” He 
pledged that his country would 
“continue serenely and without any 
resentment” to work for an accord. 

[Mr. Morin warned Friday after 
returning to Madrid, however, that 
an agreement on Spam’s entry 
would not be reached unless 
France abandoned its “exaggerated 
position,” United Press Interna- 
tional reported. 

[He said that, just as the 10 EC 
members appeared to have reached 
a common position on Spain, “sud- 
denly raised its demands and raised 
them above what they knew voy 
well would be acceptably to 


the other nations of the communi- 
ty. Average EC unemployment is at 
aTecoid 12 percent 

EC officials said that French ne- 
gotiators feared a strong political 
reaction from their wine makers if 
they allowed Spain to be exempted 
from EC quotas, as Madrid has 
demanded. 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON - President 
Ronald Reagan hns emp hasized his 
desire to meet the Soviet leader, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, saying it is 
“high time” that the United States 
and the Soviet Union hold a sum- 
mit meeting in an effort to improve 
relations. 

Mr. Reagan, speaking at a na- 
tionally televised news conference 
Thursday night, brushed aside the 
notion that be was “being re- 
buffed" because be had not yet 
received a response to an invitation 
to Mr. Gorbachev to come to the 
United States. 

“There are a number of things, 
bilateral situations between our 
two countries, other things to talk 
about, that we’re negotiating or 
mllcrng to each other on a ministeri- 
al level," Mr. Reagan said. “And 
that some of those could probably 
be further advanced if we met at a 
summit." 

Asked about the prospects of 
having a summit meeting soon, Mr. 
Reagan replied, “Well I have to 
think that they should be good." 

“1 think it’s high time that we did 
this." the president said. 

In Moscow, the Politburo met 
Thursday for the first time since 
Mr. Gorbachev's election and later 
reported it had agreed that the So- 
viet Union was “ready to return to 
the experience of ditente of the 
70s." 

Mr. Reagan, in response to an- 
other question, linked the possible 
success of current arms negotia- 
tions in Geneva with the House of 
Representatives vote next week on 
funds for 21 additional MX mis- 
siles. 

“Now is the testing time,” said 
Mr. Reagan. He said it was “the 
tradition of bipartisan unity on na- 
tional defense that brought the So- 
viets back to Geneva and unless 
that tradition is maintained next 
week in the House there is little 
prospect for success at Geneva.” 

On Wednesday, the House Ap- 
propriations Committee delivered 
- a setback to the administration and 
voted. 28-26, against a resolution to 
release $1 J billion to buy the mis- 
siles. White House aides expect a 
dose vote next week. 

The invitation to the Soviet lead- 
er was said to have been delivered 
by Vice President George Bush af- 
ter the funeral of Konstantin U. 




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v- • 

s§S§® 

sate*. 



Helen Sitzman, a Sooth African opposition party leader, 
speaking with youths who witnessed the police shootings. 

Investigation Is Ordered 
In South Africa Shooting 


Mr. Sherwood told the commit- 
tee that “city mobs" have so pollut- 
ed the pond that “on a warn sum- 

mer day you can see human feces iemi 
floating. State officials contended The 
that the pond is unusually clean. 


The drive to conclude an agree- 
ment cm schedule has been jpven 
urgency by the concern of some 
officials that there would be reper- 
cussions to the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization if Spam's EC 
■ship were delayed. 
Spanish government of 


T.OCfll residents nre divided 


Spanish go 

Prime Minister Felipe Gonzfilez is 
to hold a public referendum by 



tion for years as a cam. 

■James Gutensohn, commissioner 
of the stale Department of Envi- 
ronmental Management, which 
oversees Walden Pond, told the 
Senate committee Wednesday that 
when Emerson's descendants con- 
veyed Walden to the state in 1922, Few are more distressed by th 
the deed specified that h was for erosion than Raymond Faucher, a 
D ubhc “bathing, boating, fishing forester who supervises day-to-day 
and picnicking/ * mana ge men t of the park. 


remaining hathluyufi is bring cov- 
ered wilh talar shingles. 

The 1.7-mile perimeter of the 
lake, where tho u s an d? of feet have 
trampled the earth into a barren 
pathway, is to be shored op with 
rocks and landscmnog. 

Few are more distressed by the 


there’s a halo over this place,” and 
that he would “hate to see it tamed 
into a sanctuary." 

However, Thomas W. Blandmg, 
in a letter released by the commit- 
tee, deplored the “uncaring 
crowds” and advocated a swim- 
ming ban, adding “Henry Tho- 
rean. the great American prophet 
of preservation, is a prophet with- 
out honor in his own country.” 


. symbolic Section by tl 
EC could add to'pubhc opposition 
to participation in NATO. 

The enlar g em ent nreotiatic 


negotiations 
have centered on three main areas: 
the Lams muter w hich the huge 
Spanish fisting fleet win enterEC 
waters; a timetable for the mire- 
stricted introduction of Spanish ag- 
ricoltural products into community 
markets; and the rights of workers 
from Spain and Portugal to jobs in 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
Smith African government ordered 
Friday a judicial inquiry into the 

kitting by police of 18 blacks 

Thursday near the southern auto- 
motive center of Uitenhage in east- 
on Cape Province . 

The deaths have elidted an out- 
cry among church and opposition 
groups in South Africa, who have 
accused the police of either falsify- 
ing their version of the killings or 
using improper tactics to cape with 
a crowd of blacks. Reaction outside 
South Africa to the killings was 
sharply critical. 

In the incident, a police patrol 
opened Are with automatic rifles 
and shotguns on a black crowd 
walking to a funeraL The initial 
death toll was put Thursday at 17, 
but it rose to 18 after an unidenti- 
fied woman died in hospital Thurs- 
day night* Up to 37 mote people 
are believed to be in hospitals. 

“Thane are all the dements of 
panic" by the police, Helm Suz- 


man, a white opposition legislator, 
said after speaking with black sur- 


vivors of the incident. Mrs. Suzman 
has been a leading campaigner 
against South African race laws, 
known as apartheid. 

In defense of the police action. 
Louis Le Grange, minister of law 
and order, said that the crowd had 
attacked the police with stones, 
sticks and gasoline bombs. But 
Mrs. Suzman said that there was no 
evidence of such incendiary devices 
among the crowd. 

The Reverend Beyers Naude, 
secretary-general of the South Afri- 
can Council of Churches, said that, 
judging from reports of the killing 
he had received, the council “can- 
not accept the official version of 
events and the reasons given by the 
authorities.” 

The judicial inquiry ordered by 
the government will comprise only 
one person. Justice Donald Kanne- 
leyer, who will take depositions 
Monday. 

Witnesses, who declined to be 
identified, said Thursday that the 
police opened fire without provo- 
cation on a peaceful procession and 
called in nelicopier-bome rein- 

(Conrimted on Page 2, Col 7) 


Chernenko in Moscow on March 
13. Mr. Reagan noted Thursday 
night that Mr. Gorbachevjvho as- 
sumed his post after Mr. Chernen- 
ko's death March 10, had been in 
office only “a few days." 

Discussing the arms ialk> m Ge- 
neva, Mr. Reagan expressed opti- 
mism that there would be an agree- 
ment “We're hopeful that for the 
first time we really have an oppor- 
tunity to get a reduction of mis- 
siles,” he said. 

Discussing a range of foreign po- 
licy issues, Mr. Reagan nude these 
other points: 

• Describing the fighting in Leb- 
anon as “a tragedy." he said that he 
did not believe that an kraeli lank 
had deliberately Tired or. a CBS 
News camera crew in southern 
Lebanon on Thursday, killing two 
men and wounding a third. Mr. 
Reagan added that, while be did 
not have all the details, it obviously 
was difficult for Israeli soldiers to 
tell who was a civilian and who was 

(Continued on Page 3, Col. 3) 


Gorbachev Calls 
For Missile Halt 

The .lutvuut'J Press 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, 
urged NATO on Friday to halt 
Pershing-2 and cruise' missile 
deployments in Europe to pave 
the way for agreement at the 
Geneva arms talks. In return, 
he said the Kremlin could 
freeze Soviet countermeasures. 

The report by the official So- 
viet press agency Tass on Mr. 
Gorbachev's remarks to a dele- 
gation of visiting Socialists con- 
tained his most detailed com- 
ments on arms control since he 
became Communist Party gen- 
eral secretary March II. 

Mr. Gorbachev told the So- 
cialists, “We are convinced mat 
the termination of new Ameri- 
can missde deployments in Eu- 
rope with a simultaneous end in 
the buildup of Soviet counter- 
measures would be most helpful 
to solving the entire complex of 
questions under discussion in 
Geneva." He did not specify the 
countermeasures to which he 
referred. 


Frenchman 
Is Abducted 
In Beirut; 

2 Missing 

Heuicrs 

BEIRUT — A French vice con- 
sul was abducted and another 
French diplomat and his daughter 
disappeared Friday in West Beirut. 
A caller said the Islamic Jihad had 
seized all three. 

The vice consul Marcel Fon- 
taine, was kidnapped by gunmen 
within sight of Lhe French Embas- 
sy. In addition, the embassy said 
that an attache. Marcel Canon, 
and his daughter, Danielle Perez, 
were missing 

Callers saving they repre^nted 
the Islamic Jihad also claimed re- 
sponsibility for the kidnapping of 
two Britons and an American jour- 
nalist lost week m West Beirut. 

A caller said Islamic Jihad was 
holding the Britons, Geoffrey Na*h 
and Brian Levick. and the Ameri- 
can, Terry A. Anderson, in a cam- 
paign to rid Beirut of foreign spies. 

Mr. Nash, who was abducted 
March 14, is a metallurgist who 
works for the Lebanese govern- 
ment. Mr. Levick. kidnapped a day 
after Mr. Nash, is a businessman, 
and Mr. Anderson, who was seized 

(Continued on Page 2, Col. 3) 


INSIDE 

■The health of .Americans is 
improving, the government 
said, but experts found disqui- 
eting exceptions. Page 3. 

■ Most voters in Bangladesh 

basked President Hussain Mo- 
hammed ErshadL official fig- 
ures showed. Page?. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ U.S. consumer pices rose 0J 
percent in February. Page 9. 

in New 
Page 9. 


■ The dollar firmed 
York trading Friday. 

ARTS/LEISURE 


■ The New Paris Biennale 
opens in a splendidly refur- 
bished former slaughterhouse 
at La ViUeiie. Page 6. 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUNPAY, BIARCH 23-24, 1985 


Peres Defends Action 
Of Israelis Who Killed 
Newsmen in Lebanon 




By Edward Walsh armed guerrillas were killed or in- 

P<a ' Serwte * jured as a result of the tank fire. 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- A military spokesman in Tel 

Aviv said Friday that a preliminaiy 


day that the two memberc of a CBS investigad 
camma crew who were killed by the «nnk « 
Israeli tank fire in southern Leba- with resu 
non on Thursday were fired on be- would be ' 
cmae they “took positions in the theinddo 
midst of a group of armed men who Israel R 

were engaged in active hostility” had accepi 
against the Israeli military. <$ theme 

In a message to Edward Joyce, investigati 
president of CBS News in New routine rr 
York, Mr. Peres expressed “deep In raids 
sorrow at the tragic death of two nese villa 
newsmen,” but maintained that the Thursday, 
tank crew that fired at the men “did persons tl 
not deviate from the strict orders Moslem g 
concerning the protection of inno- seven othe 
cent bystanders.” CBS newsi 

Mr. Peres added: “I reiterate Is- The ne* 



investigation had determined that 
the tank crew “acted in accordance 
with regulations” and that there 
would be “no special inquiry” into 
the incident as demanded by CBS. 

Israel Radio said that Mr. Peres 
had accepted the military’s version 
<4 the incident and ruled out any 
investigation other than the army's 
routine review of the action. 

In raids on four southern Leba- 
nese villages east erf Sidon on 
Thursday, Israeli soldiers killed 21 

persons they described as Shiite ^ _ _ 

Moslem guerrillas and wounded _~“ n 

seven others, in addition to the two Villagers in Hn mnm Tahta, Lebanon, carried the bodies of victims of Thursday's Israeli attack there to a cemetery Friday. 


CBS newsmen. 

The newsmen were believed to 


WORLDBRIEFS— ^ 1 

U.S. Makes New Propel jj 

*“*■ ** 

African governments m discussions this week were, but a 

and in SeTbTO. He dedmedto 

senior Unofficial who be Ktermw_ ^ Africa . { 

might lead to high-lewd talks involving the U 

^ :: 

.... 

canySgout a United Nations peace fonnula m South-West Atnca, ^ 
known as Namibia. £* 

Writers Assert Turkey Uses Torture 

ISTANBUL (AP) — Two playwrights, Arthur % 

States and Harold Pmtcr of Britain, ended ^ 

of the human rights situation in Turkey and denounced what they calico ^ 

“gross violations of human spirit through physical ‘ ^.i, ;« V 


.is y- ■■■. 

sit- ' - ■ 

iji£. 

'it. --W 

??F jf*- ’ 


’.IV* 

it -r 


rad’s longstanding and unqualified be the first killed by Israeli fire in JfV/m/tfmi/Tyi 
commitment to freedom of the the Lebanese conflitt. A # OflLf IfflLfi i 

press and totally reject any sugges- Meanwhile, the Israeli Army 

tion that the incident was anything crackdown against the Shiite guer- (Continued from Page I) 
but a derivative of the tragic situa- riQas continued Friday with the M V lg u The Assndated Press 
tion in Lebanon and the cucum- srarch of kdvtfM bSSirf^Biri^ 
stances under which we are forced about five miles (8 kilometers) A Western diplomat said Friday 
to cany out our duty to protect the south of T)re. that he formation that the 


which Riyadh would get Mirage 
planes for ofl.” 

He sa id that Islamic Jihad h«d 


lives of oar soldiers.' 


Timor Gdksd, 


lives of oar soldiers. Timor Gflksd, spokesman for 

[CBS rejected Mr. Peres’s de- the United Nations Interim Forc e al 
fense of the Israeli tank crew, Reu- in Lebanon, known as UNIFIL, r^. hs 
ters reported from New York said one civilian was killed and He said that 


A Western diplomat said Friday seized them to show its rejection of 
that he had information that the France’s relations with an “axis” of 
three were bring held in Hennel, a moderate Arab nations made up of 
town at the northern tip of the Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and 


The second caller’s statement did newspapers 100 meters (330 feet) 
not carry the usual hallmarks of from toe French Embassy corn- 
previous Islamic Jihad comm uni- pound. 

qufcs telephoned to news agency The owner of the shop said that 
offices in Beirut- two neatly dressed, dean-shaven 

Major Giovanni Sctnrru, an Ital- young men with pistols took Mr. 


Frenchman Abducted in Beirut ; 2 Others Missing *SkfiZS&3 

7 ° and Mr. Hntexfa member of PEN, coododed a visit to smvty conditions 


prin [yjf. mUGT, a iiiUiUA*L ^ 

nd caller’s statement did newspapers 100 meters (330 feet) ^ difficulties nf joumafets. writers and acadcnnoans under rmruai 
the usual hallmarks of from toe French Embassy com- rule Marti*? law is in force in 23 of Turkey's 67 provinces, maun mg 


offices in Beirut 
Major Giovanni Sdrirru, an Ital- 


iey m eas 
it Hennel 


was controlled 


“but is disappointed that you chose of CBS, and the decision to make it 
to ignore the testimony of eyewit- public, underscored Israeli sensi- 
ness journalists on the scene.’"J tiviry to the increasingly adverse 
ThcnvftTj*an«P*mninv«*«nf publicity snrrounding what has 


have linked with Islamic Jihad. 
Naming the three French etti- 


The two Lebanese employees at p ubi l 
CBS, Tewfik Ghazawu a camera- 
man, and Bahije Metni, a sound- “**® 


publicity surrounding what has 
been called in the Israeli press as 
Israel's “iron fist** policy in south- 


man. were reportedly in an auto- 6111 Lebanon, 
mobile when it was hit by tank fire ..^ OK * ®“ t te 

near the village of Kfar Milflc. The Moslem guerrillas that have result- 
driver of the car was injured in the oi in nmnmxis Israeli casualties. 


France and Sand! Arabia under Carton or his daughter. 


Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and ian Army Haison officer with UN Fontaine out of the shop and into a NEW DELHI (UPQ —Police looking for the kffiere daSpvKX offiMl 

Egypt. troops in Lebanon, was also in- car. raided several homes Friday and de m ined three Afghans beueved to na~ 

“Everything win return to nor- volved in an incident with gunmen “I was just giving Mr. Fontaine i in ire to guerrillas fighting Soviet troths in Af ghanistan , according to 

mal” when France stops support- Friday in West Beirut. his change when I felt a pistol in my report by the Press Trust of India news agency. _ 

mg Iraq in its war with Iran, the A UN source said Major Schirru back, and I was shoved into the Sources quoted in the report said that in addition to the raids, the 
caller said. and a Greek colleague were or- back of the shop," the shopkeeper authorities searched people at the airport, at train stations and in vehicles 

But another caller to news agen- deredout of a car by four men with said. “Two men with pistols pushed leaving the city. The opoatioos were part of a search fra - twopcrsomwtio 

des, who also said he spoke for automatic rifles on a seafront bou- Mr. Fontaine into a car waiting OT Thursday shot Valentin Hritrkienko, 48, near the Soviet Embassy, 
Islamic Jihad, claimed responsibil- ievard, but neither was hurt or ab- outside with another man and left, wenked in tlte econ<OTk section. . , 

ity for the kidnapping of Mr. Fon- ducted. It took less than a minute , just a Three young Afghan men with possible links to ann- Soviet guerrillas in 

min e only and dianot mention Mr. Mr. Fontaine, 43, was seized by few seconds. Mr. Fontaine said Af ghanistan were detained and many others questioned about the killin g. 


the city of Istanbul and the capital of Ankara. Hg; 

Arrests Reported in Russian’s Killing | 

NEW DELHI (UPI) — PoSce looking fee the kfflers of a Sovirt V i 

raided several homes Friday and detained three Afghans believed to ha "• 

i m ire to guerrillas figh ting Soviet troops in Af g h ani stan, according to a 
report by the PressTrust of India news agency. ? i V > re- 

sources quoted in the report said that in addition to the raids, the — ; - 
authorities searched people at the airport, at train stations and m vehicles z- 

leaving the city. The operations were part of a search for twopersons who v-rv-j: 


ducted. It took Ii 

Mr. Fontaine, 43, was seized by few seco 
two gunm en a s be was buying nothing-* 1 


inddcnL the Israeli military has retaliated 

[President RomJd R ragM . a! a 
press conference TTuSda, in guerriila strongholds. 

Washington, called the crew mem- ■ Eariy Pcflont Is Seen 
bo’s deaths a tragffty, Umted Rcportsin^saidFri 
Press kuernationa] report^, die Sunny’s troops wifi o 
sure^lfais was not a deliberate kffl- didr withdrawal from s 
mg, he said.] f^hnnnn in Mnv four mnn 


Unrest Reflects Kenya’s Insecurity Doctors Say 

By Sheila Rule and withdrew scholarships from leftist pamphlets were circulated xfTWl I JXM)T)S 

New York Tunes Service five others. on the campus and Mr. Moi ao- 1 

NAIROBI — Recent unrest 


Reports in Israel said Friday that 


and withdrew scholarships from leftist pamphlets were circulated 
five others. on the campus and Mr. Moi ao- 


the tunny’s troops win complete SaLSffiSSKteS ^cd the ondcr. 


The government told all students cased some students of bowing to fVT • _7 

to resume classes, but the students “imported ideologies.” Yy P 

defied the order. The pro- Western goveramem's 

Students demonstrated in cen- swift reaction to the latest unrest Compiled by Oir Staff Fmm Dapatdus 

tral Nairobi, ostensibly over the was viewed by Kenyans and for- FRANKFURT — Doctors in 
way the authorities were handling eigners as evidence that the at- ^est Germany and Rrfgnmi who 
their grants. Bui some chose to use templed coup has not been forgot- mating I ranian cams tries from 

the demonstration as a platform for ten and that this country, long ^ Gulf war said Friday that their 
a political statement, saying public- viewed as a model of prosperity were ^ victims of mus- 

ly that they were Marxists and de- and political stability on a conti- g gQ 


their withdrawal from southern ffluruinated theuneasiness that the students demonstrated in cen- swift reaction to 


veramems 
test unrest 


IUV4A wiimuawfll MVUl UUiUU L J1 1 , . .til f >1 kJURitua uuuuiuuoiwu XU WVU — 

Lebanon in May, four months ear- B ° VCn ^?f! U stlU tral Nairobi, ostensibly over the v«s viewed by Kenyans and for- 


I rtil fll 1 1 AM* m |V|AT. XvUX iiwniin^ VmU ■ « ■ 

Journalists who were in the same lier than previously planned. The 311 attempt 

sreawerequotedassayingthatthe AssodatedftSr^S^ l .° °?& tow Preadcnt Damel 
camera crew members and other The reports in Israeli newspapers Arap M0L 
joumalists with them were dearly came as Israel faced growing pres- After a week of disturbances last 
identifiable and that the Israeli- sure to speed up its puDout because month, in which at least one stu- 
tank, stationed about 500 yards of increasing attacks on Israeli sol- dent was killed, the government 
(457 meters) away, appeared to fire diets. dosed Kenya’s main university 

at them deliberately. The Jerusalem Post reported that campus indefinitely, arrested sever- 

in a statement issued Thursday the Israeli cabinet is scheduled to &1 students and ordered others to 
night, the Israeli military command approve the start of the third and return home and report to their 
said that the tank had fired on final stage of the evacuation by local authorities. 

“armed men who were taking firing April 15 and the last soldier wiB Students at the University of 


fying the authorities to detain 

them. 

Although the authorities did not 
specify the reasons for the action 


nent seen from outside as one of 
turmoil, has yet to regain full self- 
confidence. 


Th^ young Airiian men with possible Kriks to anti-Soviet gnerriEtesm ; 

Afghanistan were detained and many others questioned about the killing, ^ 
a spokesman for Afghan refugees was quoted as raying. The rookesman . 
noted that Mr, Khitrichenko’s assass i n a tion coincided with a day known l 
to refugees as Afghanistan Solidarity Day. 

Neves Recovering; Party Asks Delay , 

BRASILIA (AP) — The political party of Tancredo Neves asked • 
Brazil’s Congress on Friday for an extension of the d e a dl i n e for the 

swearingmof the president-elect, who had surgery on the day he was to £ - 

have been inaugurated. The request did not require formal approval by .> 
the Congress. -f' 

Surgeons said Friday that Mr. Neves, 75, was doing “very wefl” afterjj* 
an intestinal operation Wednesday, his second in less than a week. Ther jj 
said he should be able to leave the hospital by the end of the month. Th | 
first operation was March 15. ' / 

Vice Preadcnt Jos5 Samcy, 54, has been serving as acting preside g ; 
The Tinprml constitut ional deadline for Mr. Neves’s swearing-in is Mo a 
day, hairing extamating d rcumstances. In a letter delivered Friday 
Congress, me BrmdUan Democratic Movement called Mr. Neves’s si F. 


S-f-^4 ■■ 


■: 

- 


“The dinkal picture shows dear ‘ ^ 

evidence <rf iqjury inflicted by mus- 
tard eas,” said Dr. Max voo Klar- T "-l. n »>» i- W7 I. 


The attempted coup was the first thebar Rj ffsaSk Irish, Rr hish Worldng on Ulster Plan 


“armed men who were taking firing April 15 and the last soldier wiB Studen ts at the University of 
positions.” and that from the dis- leave Lebanon by the first week of Nairobi’s College of Architecture 

lance involved “it appeared that May. and Engineering and the College of 

the CBS crewmen were among the The Ha’aretz newspaper also Humanities and Social Sciences 
armed men in the village.” said that the evacuation will be boycotted Haw* after university 

There have been no reports that over by mid-May. officials expelled three students 


taken against the eight University ® noe Kenya became independent ^ Munich. A 
of Nairobi students, a statement “? ic wzs ,ed b y «pw-rankmg Belgium, said three 
rmm Ur Mni'c nffir*- cun tai^r air force personnel who accused ih n .h« ( ?»rnr 


Students at the University of from Mr. Moi’s office said later 


rital in Ghent, 
I ranian s oldie r s 


V'-. 


officials expelled three students August 


that the youths had been involved M*. Moi’s administration of cor- 
in “activities similar to those which “J inefficiency and was 

led to the disturbances ofl 982," a j»PPprted by students. The irtel- 
reference to the attempted coup in 1™ brought with it hour* of wide- 
August of that year. At that time. SP**" 1 looLn g m Nairobi. 


ioduding breathiiig 


LONDON (AP) — Prime Minister Garret FitzGerald of Ireland s» * 4 ^. 
Friday that Britain and Ireland vac working toward “a new basis" f; ‘/r 
solving the conflict in Nortiieni Ireland. 

In a speech prepared for delivery to a journalists’ banquet in Londc £ 


responding to treatment. 

Mustard gas was wide 
World War I, but it has 


rarities and skin leaons, but were Mr. FitzGerald spoke of a “novd political strncturtfM’ar Ulster thi ^ 

i Tii in rlmo twatnvmf i i •. ■_ _ v* ^ <■- — — m -~-v — * ,J — - " 


. world give expresaon to the Rranan Catholic minority’s 
ua y m ty. “An effort is now bring made to approach die pro 


ticalideot 
a on a ne 


1 ? ccn basis,” Mr. FitzGerald said. “not one involving victory of ooe side ov 


The govercment blamed . stu- banned by the Geneva conventions ^ odw, tint rather.requiiirre die accommodation of both identities 
dents for much of the banditry, on warfare. an eonal footine.” ‘ 


Herato^ESribune 

LET THE TRIB BE YOUR GUIDE. 


amis lor tnuen oi me uanaury. cm waiiare. an equal footing.” ' 

Afterward, the university was Iran, which accused Iraq of using Siortly before the speech, Britain^ forrign secretary. Sir Geaffiti* 

dosed for a year and four students poison gas against its troops in Howe, and Iidand’s foreign mmister, Peter Bany.hdd talks in Dublin Qn ^i 
were convicted of sedition. southern Iraq this month, on i new mnHin imH » joint omnmnniqiife ipoke of “the firm commit- 

Western mid Kenyan pohtiral Thursday sent 33 wramded people ment of both governments to thesearch for a constructive way forward^* ■*. 
experts say that, just as Mr. Moi s to Western Europe for treatment 

crackdown on opposition that pre- Iraq has denied using chemical |T n -tl»nRp<«nnl ' -1 

ceded tbe unsuccessful coup proba weapons. A United Nations inqui- IWUlCllcwru * * 

bly contributed to the rebellion in ty last year found evidence of their j. Da^d Doorindfi, a former financier, pleaded guilty in U.S. District • 
1982, the government's moves to use. ... . CbiirtinSanDiego tofourfdxmydiargesmCheoollapseofhisJ.David«fc 

sran the recent protest may further In fighting Friday, Iraq said its Co. investment company, which prosecutors say att ra cted S2Q0 mShott , 
inflame the students emotions. warplanes hit a large ship m fee from 1979 to 1984. He races up to 20 years in prison. (LAT) ' 



stem the recent protest may further 
inflame the students’ emotions. 


inflame the students’ emotions. warplanes hit a large ship in the 
With a population growing at a Gulf and attacked three Iranian 


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witn a population growing at a trait and attacked tnree Iranian ^ Franrisam Fatten in the United States win off® sanctuary & ■ 
rate of more than 4 percent a year dries. Confirmation of the .Iraqi tmm Fl Salvador and Guatemala *i Franrijcm mnummiries f % 

and banted available land. Kenya attack on shipping was not mime- scveQ ^ miKriic order announced Friday. (UP* ’’1 

<an expat to face continuing fnc- diately available. Two male Japanese tenophffiacs have died of AIDS, die first kaodja. '■ 

nous and uneasiness, these sources Iran said that rhe I rams had suf- j »i •_ , .uri-TrL jl. _ . , . 


tions and uneasiness, these sources ban said that thelraqis had suf- deaths mJapanfromthed 
say. feredheavy casualties m a ground w the AsamShimbun- T 

In the recent week of unrest, one attack- Iraq did not mention were thoudtt responsible, 
youth died from injuries received ground fighting, but said its war* g 

when riot police broke up a meet- planes had been active on most 

ing of several thousand students at fronts. q 1 i f * 

tbe university’s athletic grounds. The Iranians said that Iraqi war- /llTI 


i Shimbtm. Tranrfuaons of nqpcnted ccmtammated blood 
t responsible. (Reuters) 


Police say they took action only planes flew over Tehran white Ha- 
after the students disobeyed an or- sbemi Rafsanjam. the speaker erf 


to disperse and became violent, the M 41 is, or parliament, was lead- 7 T * aunaatn a. Kflmpt 

the students maintain ed that ing Friday pray ers at Tehran Uni- foice aignts, Mr. Lc Grange has oowunmc sanctions. 


South Africa Orders Inquiry 

(Continued froa Page 1) Snidath S. Ranqihal, called for 


the police Bad started the distur- verdty. Tbe planes did not attack, stttmgly disputed their assertions. Mr. Ramphai said the 49-natipn 
• 1CC . Addressing tbe crowd, Mr. Raf- killmg, according to the Cammonwealtb should take a kdd 

Hr Moi has suaKsted that for- sanjani said Iran would soon fire South African Institute of Race in c ampaignin g for sdective cay 
ias iSd teenmvolved. In a another missile at Baghdad. Iran Rations, was the worst angjein- nonuc sanctions on tbe basis of 
Jiff fvhfld re- says it has fired seSndssiks adentsmcetheSharpewIleajassa- mternatranal coosqjsos. r 
«d a^nessaa from O^oslo- into Baghdad; Iraq has accused of Xtech 21, 196oTm which 69 “Merdy a demonstration of seri- 

sabotS^T^tg of explo- Mad^inahaflofpd^gun- «sn«s about sanctions could hOp 

closine of the univeratv’s mSn wms at the times some of the mis- firt .TfcelHimhage deaths came on to mduce a mcre senous approKh 
doing ot the university s mam ^ m rqxjr4cd to ^ ^ tl»25th.anniven^ofSharpeyilkL «> chanae in South AftiSC” Mr. 

1 Lnuncdmdy conv-ludcd 6* SSt , Wktepred CoDdemufi™ “Wl fmm i. 


baoce. Ad&essiiig the crowd, Mr. Raf- 

Mr. Moi has suggested that for- sa“J“n said Iran would soon fire 
eigners had been involved. In a another mtssfle at Baghdad. Iran 
recent speech, he said be had re- says it tas fired several msaks 
ceived a message from Czecboslo- mto Baghdad, Iraq has accmed 
vak university students protesting saboteurs of carrying out esplo- 
the closing of the university’s main was at the mnes some rf the^ms- 


campus. 

“1 immediately concluded that 
the students who sparked off trou- 
ble here were their agents,” be said. 
“It was their godfather protesting. 
These troublemakers at our univer- 
sity have been sold, body and 
soul” 


CHURCH SERVICES 


(Reuters, AP) 


14 Dead in China 
After dan Fight 


•„ South Africa withdrew from 

Foto^ reaction to the kfflings Cranmonweakh in 1961 been* ^fr ?*§ 


AMBBCANCATnS!flNPABS.23Ave. Vn tl 

Gccrga-V. 75006 Pom. The V«y h». “J™ “ 11 

Jeaws R. Lee, Own. Metre-. GoorgoN or of 1983, a basketball bdo 
Abito-Mereeou. Sunday: 9 a.ra, 1 1 am. the Lu family was 
Church school end nwwry 11 ojn. Wook- ^ frgm [heir Village in 
days: 12 noon. Tel.: 720.1 7.91 - ■ 


The Associated Press secretary, Sr Geoffrey Howe, con- 

BEUING — A dan fig ht that donned “this indefensible action 
began over a missing basketball led by tbe South African police.” . 
to the beating deaths of 14 people Secretary of State George F. 
from a rival village md death sen- Shultz of the United Stales rallwt 
tences for seven killers, the Peasant the shootings “a deplorable tactic.” 


washar*, Reuters reported.,^ .. membere objected to its racial pdB f-fc 
The British government- ex- des. -r* - 

Passed concern at the “tnmc and Prime Mm&ter' Okrf Palme of "W 
mmecessary deaths.” The Toiegn Sweden said the shooting was “tm- 1 

secretary. Sir Geoffrey Howe, con- for tunate shameful an3 despica- V- 
demned “this Indefensible action hie” and “the logical n 

ftV Cntlfh AfrlMn nrtfena - - » - _ . «i ni* ’! . 


Daily rqxated Friday. “I am not prepared ins 

The report said that in the spring try to defend it, he said, 
of 1983, a basketball belonging to President Ronald Reagi 


of- a fundamentally evil system.” 

France condemned what it de- 
scribed as “the increase in brutal 
repression” in South Africa. 

West Germany voiced its “grave 
concern,” and the Foreim Ministry 


>aH belonging to Preset Ronald Reagan said at jn Borin said that tenSitm m *juui 
the Lu family was acddentaUv tak- a ijaess conference Thursday rn^it Africa could only be ehmmaiedbv 
en from tirar village in China’s that whflethe deaths y^etragic, ending apartheid and rivmnbladM 
Guangxi Z hu a n g autonomous re- There has been mcrcaang violence political and .wi»i jj^ 6 


CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rim du 
Vnvx-Colan&ior, 75006 Pork. Metro St.- 
Strfpice. Sunday wor ship in Entfoh 9»45 
ojh.. Rev. A. Sanmenelio. Tel.s 607.67.02. 

PARS SUBURBS 

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, RooitMal- 
moaon. EngDih ipeaking. aR d en om in o- 


gion by ntembas of a rival village there is an dement in Sooth 
after a county-sponsored game. Africa that does not want a peace- 


Tbe Lu elm retaliated by tatrhig ful settlement, that wants violence 
a bicycle, and 14 of the neighbors ™ the streets^” 


ana mere is an etement m Sooth . Seoetarv-GenendJ^r rj.,.. 
Africa that does not want a jxace- de Gnfflv crfSeUnitodNaS? 

ful settianenL that wants MnWo i— unu ®® Nations, 


who came to reclaim it were seized. 


tbenreeta” oommemoration Thins- 


bound and marched to a mountain Unity demanded United Nations SouA. Africa, so kwo a? 
slope where membere of tbe Lu against the South African maioritv mk 


rion», BihiTSudy: ftd&wonfce: 1CM5. 56 rian stoned and dubbed them to government, and thesecretar^gen- 


Am Bom-Rosin. Tet.: 749 . 1339 . 

MONTE CARLO 

MONTE CARLO, fort. FeBowdiip, 9 ruo L 
Notari. Sunday BSde hr. (all ogat] 9,45 aja 
Wonhip 11 & 6 pjn. Td.. 255151 . 

EUROPE 

UOTAMAN-UNVEKSAUST. «ordap end 
activities in Europe. Contact EUU, Steve 


death, the newspaper said. 


era! of tbe British Commonwealth, 


iMjonty was deprived of hta 
nghts and kept out of die nati 
mainstream. ■■ 


EC Entry Talks for Spain, Portugal FaU Shari 




ssasaasss- iMaasaas- 


Dw±. sonng>Mcrt 20, 1271 nc Hv^onl T?w which Sponirii fishing boats would tins year, aBowing the EC toptnsoe 
Netherlands. TeL- (+33} (0) 2152 55073. enter Irish waters — was resolved new prog r ams. that had bt rn icoo- 
before tbe talks ended, Mr. An- artfired w the deficit. 


STOCKHOLM 


enter Irish waters — was resolved new pn 
before tbe talks ended. Mr. An- arefized 
dreotti said. Spam warned a five- 


imjmanub. church war oty center, year waiting period, while Ireland 
Svrioyum demanded a 10- year exduaon, fol- 
TeL: (08) 316051, 151225. hv the- mutual Intmrfnrtirm 


f also agreea mat an increase 
revenues would take-effect 


HITHIHIOl a 1VJM1 uumivu, iw _ C__* . • J T,- ■ , 

lowed by the gradual introduction and Portagal 

m am 9 - DC COIDC UlP.ffitlF.I 


Signature — 

(necessary for cord purchase^ 


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23-3-85 


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Ho Elfeobelh HERWOOD 
181 Are. Ch.-de-C suBe. 
92521 NeniDy Cedes, Franee. 
TeLs 747.12.65. 


IUW6U uib fii au u w uuiuuuuivu Imnnm. *- — - 

of Spanish vessds. become members. 

Mr. Afldreotti said the twcoun- Mr. Andreotti said the nattMtis 

tries agreed to 10-year OLdu skm had made. progress on a 
■period, followed by unrestricted devdopmeuc aidpn»ram for die' 
access fra Spanish boats. poorest; regions of Italy, G reece 

The ministers also agreed on a and J 7 aace,'&k diey difl not agr et 
plan to fund their 1985 budget defi- on the p ro pjpggd fnwftig lew* rif 
cit, estimated at mrae than 32 M- $4.76 huhrinfor' theprogrintn.' 


^Mbre than 100,000 fanneo W 

S blocked J 

«*ys, brader points, and 

to protest the EC Comm/ , 
saris plans to freeze 1985-86 la! 

Unki 


was senonsfv 




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Page 3 



^ 3 jy 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SIENDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


Arndts H, 


' ZONKING AND DRIVING — Ed Foreman, a policeman in Midwest City, Oklaho- 
displays, a bumpe r stick er that a jm^e can order a driver to (dace on his vehicle to 

-T,, ,''V a conviction for driving ffMc intoxicated nr drivin g irmk »r rtw> infTnpnrp nt alr^nl, 

hamper sticker asks otner motorists to report any erratic driving to the police. 




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*;■ Jtains of Industry: 

V- Tliey Overpaid? 

lanes for American business 
idves have more than tri- 
in a decade, according to 
. Patton, chairman of the 

r--. Mmtial nmrnniwi nn on ffl- 

legislation during the 
-- " rm ad mini st r ation In an aiti- 
tr the Harvard Business Re- 
- ’ adapted far The Washing- 
‘-.rflost, Mr. Patton writes that 
r - " the 124-percent inflation 
^ jetween 1973 and 1983 been 
factor, the median pay 
. ' . : 00,000 for heads of big com- 
• „'. :: es would have risen to 
~ ',000. But instead it “tops SI 
- on a year far many large 

IrWu British W nrkinn*’T' hes T. . 

. . ? -f. Patton says he is not talk- 

.iboul the leaders who saved 


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• '» TsJer and turned Kresge into 
rarl, who are “worth mil- 
■ -'-C But most chief executives 

— administrators, and short- 

- Mcmss at that, he says. 

. ' 7 r. Patton blames their “exor- 
: it salarjes”-on compensation . 
*ys. which are undertaken 
ompanies to determine the 
7 ■ for various executive func- 
~ z ‘\ - Also responsible, he said, 

• ’ ecruiters who get a percent- 
if the new executive s pay — 
i above the company aver- 
necessi taring raises all 
nd to avoid morale prob- 
the growing prmrice of 

- executives appointing each 
- r to their boards of directors, 

" h “smacks of coziness," and 
•• fading of the tradition of 

- png leaders up through the 
.--“s. 


report any 

Mr. Patton, a retired director 
of McKinsey & Co., an interna- 
tional management consulting 
firm, says, “Many of the best-run 
companies train their own execu- 
tives and do not rely on recruit- 
ers, while others do not permit 
their chief executives to sit on 
other boards." 


Short Takes 

The Pennsylvania legislat u re, 
which inadvertently passed a law 
last year p e r m it tin g un taxed, un- 
regulated gambling in bars, has 
repealed it. Now tavern owners 
are clamoring for the legalization 
of video poker games, which 
have long led an illicit existence. 

The U.S. Army used mules 
during World War Q to carry 
supplies through the jungles erf 1 
the Philippines, the mountains of 
Italy and the Burma Read, but 
phased out the animals in the 
1950s. Now, coinciding with the 
re-establishment of the 10th 
Mountain Division, the . army is 
studying the feasibility of bring- 
ing mules back for use over 
rough . or. .mountainous tenpin 
where it Is impractical to to use 
motor vehicles. 

Legislation to permit the mint- 
ing of the first American legal- 
tender gold can in half a centu- 
ry, to compete on world markets 
with South Africa’s Krugerrand, 
has been introduced by Senators 
Robert J. Dole of Kansas, leader 
of the Republican majority, and 
Alan Cranston of California, as- 
sistant leader of the Democratic 
minority. Mr. Cranston said the 
coin would offer investors and 
collectors “a free choice between 


a symbol of Liberty and a sym- 
bol of race hatred. I have no 
doubt which they will choose.” 

Hie Middle West 
As a Shifting Ideal 

For Americans, the Middle 
West is the traditional source of 
the country’s food and values, 
less a specific place than an idea 
that conjures up images of farms, 
small towns and friendly people, 
notes James R. Sbortridge, a pro- 
fessor of geography at the Uni- 
versity of Kansas. And as the 
reality of these images moves far- 
ther west, he says, so do ideas of 
where this region is. 

Since the turn of the century 
the Midwest usually has been de- 
scribed as the 12 states from 
Ohio west through Kansas and 
noth to the Canadian border. 
But, according to a survey by Mr. 
Sbortridge, the Middle West to- 
day is a much smaller region that 
for most people includes only 
Iowa, Nebrarica, Missouri, Kan- 
sas and South Dakota, though 
the fringes shift according to in- 
dividual opinions. 

Industrial centers like Detroit 
and Cleveland no longer fit the 
perception of the peaceful, 
friendly agricultural heartland, 
and Chicago, once its capital is 
no longer considered so by a ma- 
jority of the 1,941 students 
polled in 32 states. Mr. Sbor- 
tridge concluded that the indus- 
trial stales east of the 
once considered part of the 
die West are now “a region in 
need of a name." 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


fa* «k* 

J. • Jr. 

r ih *'* 
wi ftfewy* 




Reagan Seeks 
Compromise 
With Senate 
On Budget 

By Gerald M. Boyd 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has expressed wiB- 
in guess to discuss a co mpr omise 
with Senate Republican leaders on 
his 1985 budget, but he has rqected 
any reduction in his proposal for 
military spending. 

JMr. Reman and Senate Repub- 
licans met Friday but were unable 
to resolve the question of miKtaiy 
spending. United Press Interna- 
tional reported. It said agreement 
was reached to ferns a smaller 
“working group" for further talks.] 

“We recognize that others may 
have other ideas," Mr. Reagan said 
at a news conference Thursday. 
“But now they’ve got something 
that we can sit down and. talk 
abooL” 

At an earlier meeting between 
senior Senate Republicans and 
White House aides, Pete V. Dome- 
niri of New Mexico, the Budget 
Committee chairman, warned that 
the committee’s package was “the 
best you’re gang to get." Thai 
package reduces Mr. Reagan’s re- 
quested military appropriation by 
$12 billion. 

In discussing the budget, Mr. 
t appeared to begin on a 
itory note, but his 


U.S. Report Finds Americans ’Health Is Improving 


The Assodaed Press 

WASHINGTON. — The health of Ameri- 
cans continues to improve by almost every 
measure, the government reported Friday. 
But health professionals say there are some 
disquieting exceptions to the trend. 

The Department of Health and Human 
Services, in an annual report on the health of 
the American people, said that both men and 
women are living longer, healthier lives. 

Infant mortality . continues to de cline, 
though at a slower pace. Life expectancy is 
up. Deaths from heart attack and strokes arc 
declining And people are chang in g their liv- 
ing habits in ways that should bring improve- 
ment and longer Ihes. 

“Progress is the won! that best defines and 
describes the health status of the American 
people," said Margaret M. Heckler, secretary 
of health and hmw*n services, in her intro- 
duction to the report. 

“There are, of course, lags and aberra- 
tions,” she said. “We certainly cannot rest cm 
our laurels." 

But, Mrs. Heckler continued, “It is dear 
from the baric health yardsticks that the 
United States is moving in the right direc- 
tion.” 

At a press conference Friday, Mrs. Heckler 
said the “dramatic and ran tinning " improve- 
ment in life expectancy was largely due to the 
major drops in deaths from bean attack and 
stroke. 

The 188-page report noted: 

• A child bom today can expect to live 74.7 
years, based on the 1983 data analyzed. This 


is more than a third longer than the 47 J years 
of a person born at the turn of the century 
and a full year’s increase since 1980. For 
newborn girls, life expectancy is 78.3 years; 
for boys. 71J3 years. 

• While whites still can expect to live long- 
er than blades, the racial gap is narrowing as 
blacks live longer. The racial difference 
dropped from 8.4 years in 1950 to 5.6 years in 
1983. 

• Americans who reached their 65th birth- 
day in 1983 could expect to live another 16.8 
years. In 1970, that figure was 15.2 years. 

• Infant mortality dropped to 10.9 deaths 
pa 1,000 live births in 1983, a decline from 
11.2 in 1982 and from 16.1 in 1975. 

• Deaths from heart disease declined 26 
percent between 1970 and 1983. when statis- 
tics are adjusted for age, and stroke deaths 
dropped 48 percent during the same period. 

• More people see doctors — 74 5 percent 
within the last year, compared with 66 per- 
cent in 1964. The increase has come primarily 
among lower-income groups. 

But the report also contained some disqui- 
eting statistics. For example, while cigarette 
smoking has declined among American men 
to the pant that the number of ex-smokers is 
beginning to rival the number of current 
smokers, the same is not true for women. 

The study said that 34.8 percent of Ameri- 
can men smoke, c ompar ed with 52.1 percent 
in 1 965. But 31.8 percent have quit, compared 
to 20J percent m 1965. 

Among women, however, the percentage 
now smoking has dropped only to 29.5 per- 


cent in 1983 from 34.2 percent in 1965. .And 
the report blamed most of die problem on an 
increase in smoking among women aged 20 to 
24. In that age group, the study said, smoking 
increased from 32.7 percent in 1980 to 36.1 
percent in 1983. 

At the same time, the report noted the 
death rate from lung cancer among women is 
climbing. In 1981 , die report said, lung cancer 
deaths among women surpassed deaths from 
breast cancer for one age group and matched 
it in another age group. In general the num- 
ber of cancer deaths among both sexes has 
stayed fairly constant for 30 years. 

Another troubling statistic in the report is 
the infant mortality rate, which continued to 
drop, but at a far more gradual rate than in 
past years. 

The decline of 0.3 deaths pa 1,000 births 
between 1982 and 1983 compares with a 
decline of 0.7 deaths in each of the preceding 
two years; 0.5 deaths in the year before that; 
and 0.7 in the previous year. 

In addition, while the infant mortality rate 
among whites is 10.3 deaths pa 1,000 births, 
the rale among blacks remains almost dou- 
ble. at 20, the report noted 

Even with the overall decline to 10.9 deaths 
pa 1,000 births, the United States has only a 
mediocre rating worldwide based on 1981 
figures. Of 25 nations listed in the report, the 
United States ranks 15th in infant mortality, 
according to the report. The infant mortality 
rate in Sweden is 7.0 deaths per 1,000; in 
Japan. 7.1; in Finland 7.6; in Norway. 8.1; 
and in the Netherlands, 8.2. 


tore . 

stiffened as he was asked' about Riry Fv/wyge/r 
specific areas erf possible compro- Uoo 

raise with Senate Republicans. 


U.S. Schedules Congress Gets Data on Soviet Missile 

Details on New Mobile SS-24 Were Released for MX Debate 


hi Honduras 

reduction, in his mil- 


— 'INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 

Ninth Africa Order 




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EUROPEAN FINANCE DIRECTOR 

.terican Fortune 500 Company is seeking a qualified and sea- 
led Manager for the position of European Finance Director. 


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o wish to be eonsfcfenMf should tend OuardeUdlod resume/ CVm 
let confidence to: 

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63 Long Acre, London, WC2 E9JH England 


SOLICITOR/ATTORNEY 

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Reagan Urges 
Soviet Talks 


At one 
jeered the 
tee’s 
hay 

“Any farther cuts are actually 
going to run the risk of lowering 
our capability of preserving nation- 
al security," Mr. Reagan said. 

The president complained that 
members of Congress who advocat- 
ed reduced military spending were 
attempting to use the money for 
domestic programs, and he said 
this was not acceptable to him. 

Mr. Reagan also said he would 
not tiy to punish any of the 22 
Republican senators up for re-elec- 
tion in 1986 if they did not support 
his budget proposals, as he had 
been reported to be planning todo. 

The president said the “llih 
Commandment" of his party was: 
“Thou shalt not speak ill of another 
Republican." 

On another domestic policy mat- 
ter, Mr. Reagan said he would not 
support the extension of a special 
unemployment-benefit program 
due to enure at the end of this 
month. Under the program, the 
long-term unemployed have been 
able to receive aid beyond the cus- 
tomary six-month limit. Adminis- 
tration officials have argued that it 
was no longer needed because of a 
robust economic climate. 

“Now we have about 30(1000 
people going back to work every 
month in new jobs," Mr. Reagan 
said. 

On the budget, Mr. Reagan 
would not endorse a call for a one- 

year eliminat ion of the C05H>Miv- 

ing increase for Social Security re- 
cipients, a plan backed by Senate 
Republicans. He also rejected a tax 
increase, a possibility raised by 
some Democrats as a means of re- 
ducing the deficit 

The president repeated his f re- 
fluent contention that Soda! Secu- 
rity was not related to the budget 
because it is paid for from a sepa- 
rate fund. 


% Walter Pincus 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Rcagm 
administration has given Congress 
an illustration and new informa- 
tion about the Soviet Union’s new 
mobile 10-warhead intercontinen- 
tal missile, the SS-24. 


By Michael Wdsskopf 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
militar y is planning next month to 
hold its largest exercise ever in 
Honduras, sending more than 
6,600 troops lopractice an amphib- 
ious landing with support from at- 
tack helicopters and guided missile 
ships. Pentagon officials have an- 
nounced. 

The exercise, called Univosal 
Trek '85, is to kit for two weeks. It 
would be the fifth major maneuver 
by the two nations since 1983. 

Another maneuver. Big Pine 3, a 
three-month mission in which 
tanks woe sent to Honduras for 
the first time and as many as 4,500 
troops were deployed at its peak, 
mil still be operating in another 
part of the country when Universal 
Trek '85 begins nearby on the 
northern coast April 23. 

The exercises coincide with an 
administration push in Congress 
for release of $14 millio n in aid to 
the rebels who oppose the leftist 
regime in nrighbormg Nicaragua. 

Honduras agreed to the maneu- 
vers depute reports that some of its 
military officers have been eager to 
scale back the U.S. military pres- 
ence unless Washington promises 
more aid and a security pact 

Universal Trek ’85 is to involve 
an amphibious landing far from the 
Nicaraguan border on the coast 
near Puerto Castilla, sending 750 
marines ashore as Cobra attack he- 
licopters and drips provide cover, 
according to officials. 

An air assault task force from the 
101st Airborne Division is to join 
the marines ashore, the officials 
said. In all 3,000 UJS. troops are to 
participate in the landing, arpport- . « P^vipus jiusuw 
ed offshore by a g3S mvestigauon of the submanne 
3 - - - daims ended m 1981 without pros- 

ecution. Mr. Veliotis said Electric 


pear externally identical to stan- 
dard Soviet freight tr ains ” 

The Soviet Union has also devel- 
oped and is deploying a second new 
mobile missile, the SS-25, which 
has a single warhead and is trans- 
ported on trucks. 

Some arms control experts say 


The was released as part of That the SS-25 is potentially more 
the administration’s effort to unsettling than the SS-24. 


votes for additional funding for the 
1 0-warhead MX missfle that Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan wants to 
buOd. 

Senator James A. McClure, Re- 
publican of Idaho, used the new 
Hnta and a Pentagon illustration of 
the SS-24 during a speech or the 
Senate Dow in support of the MX 
missile earlier this week. The Sen- 
ate lata 

21 of the MX missiles. 

The drawing was made from in- 
telligence photographs of SS-24, 
windi will not be operational until 
next year. 

• Senator McClure said that rail- 
road cars attached to the missil e 
launcher would house additional 
missiles, support equipment, secu- 
rity forces and command and con- 
trol facilities. 

• “These trains are deceptively 
concealed," he said, “so, as to ap- 


John D. Stembruner, director of 
the Brookings Institution's nation- 
al security program and a forma 
Pentagon consultant, said Moscow 
had so far "made it easy for us" to 
keep track of SS-25s by construct- 
ing unique garages for them. 

But, be said, the deployment of 
the SS-25 is disturbing because the 
Reagan administration “does not 
appear to be making any efforts to 
control it by arms control arrange- 
ments." 

“If they decide to go to conceal- 
ment,” he said, “it would begin a 
very unfavorable competition be- 
cause we don’t have the land and 
the population control they have to 
permit those activities." 

The SS-25 “is nearing operation- 
al capability" in two missile fidds, 
according to the new version of 
“Soviet Military PoWa," the Pen- 
tagon’s annual survey of Moscow’s 


military forces. The volume is 
scheduled to be released next 
month. 

Mr. Stembruner said Thursday 
that administration officials have 
yet to reach agreement on what 
negotiating position to take on the 
two new Soviet mobile missiles at 
the Geneva talks. 

The Soviet Union has informed 
the United States that the SS-24 is 
the one new missile permitted un- 
da terns of the unratified SALT-2 
treaty. 

It has also said the SS-25 is a 
permitted modification of their 
older SS-13 missile. 

Up to now, the administration 
has described the SS-25 as being in 
violation of provisions of the 1979 
strategic arms limitation agreement 
because it is significantly different 
from the SS-13. 

A Pentagon official said Thurs- 
day that beyond protesting the SS- 
25, “there is no consensus within 
the government about what the So- 
viets should do with it." 

Mr. Stembruner and other intel- 
ligence experts said that it would be 
easia to keep track of the SS-24 on 
its railroad launcher once it became 
operational than the smaller, road- 
mobile SS-25. 


U.S. Seeks Greek % Evidence on Arms Industry 


(Continued from Page 1> 
part in defending the claims. Now 
he is playing a central role in assert- 
ing they are bogus. 

He said he believes the docu- 
ments must inevitably lead toward 
indictments of current General Dy- 
namics officials. 

A previous Justice 


He did not directly deqy that mat- 
ey changed hands in some; form, 
but asserted he had bon “double- 
crossed." 

In the. months to come, Mr. Ve- 


liotis said he would be willing to 
-testify before congressional com- 
mittees or for the Justice Depart- 
ment, if procedures that would pro- 
tea his freedom could be arranged. 


cruiser, destroyer and frigate. 

The exercise is scheduled for 
April 12-27 and is to involve 1,000 
soldiers, 2^00 marines, 3,250 navy 


t- 


(Contmued from Page 1} 
a soldier, since the Lebanese 
ers were dressed in civilian doi 

• He voiced surprise that 
Geoffrey Howe, the British foreign 
secretary, had raised questions in a 
recent speech about American re- 
search plans aimed at developing a 
space-based missile defense. Mr. 
Reagan said he knew the strategic 
defense initiative, popularly known 
as “star wars,” Had the endorse- 
ment of Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher. 

• Saying that the United Stares 
had not been idle in efforts to work 
out further accords in the Middle 
East, he praised efforts by Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and 
King Hussein of Jordan to start a 
new round of peace negotiations 
aimed at addressing the problems 
erf the Palestinians. Mr. Reagan 
said the United States would do 
“whatever we could to bring the 
waning parties together.” 

He said that be was willing to 
meet with a group of Palestinians 
and Jordanians to discuss peace, 
but “at the moment" not with the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
because “we have not had any 
statement from them that tbqy rec- 
ognize Israel or the United Nations 
resolutions" that rail for the return 
of Israeti-cxxnpied territory in ex- 
change for recognition of the right 
of all states in the area to exist 
within secure borders. 

• On the kiflmg g Thursday of at 
least 18 blacks in South Africa, Ml 
R eagan appeared to blame both 
sides. He termed the violence “trag- 
ic," but said it was “ significant" 
that sane of the security forces 
“enforcing the law. and using the 
guns were also blade — black po- 
Hoemen." To assort “that the vio- 
lence was coming totally from the 
law-and-order side ignores the fact 
that there was rioting gong on on 
behalf of others there." Mr. Reagan 
said. He added that die South Afri- 
can apartheid system was “repug- 
nant." 

■ Discussing world trade, he said 
that when he attends the economic 
meeting of Western leaders in 
Bonn in May, he plans to propose 
“another round of trade negotia- 
tions to further get us back to com- 
pletely free trade.” 


Some supporters of the freeze 
note that Social Security financing 

is related to overall federal spend- G f iso, the official 
, ing and argue that the freeze is 
needed for fairness. 

On taxes, Mr. Reagan said that 
“we’re nowhere near” the point of 
considering increases becanse'Con- 


ing cuts 
dent’s budget _ 
to Congress last month calls for 
about $47 bOhon in cuts. 

Mr. Reagan’s comments on taxes 
appeared slightly less adamant 
than his previous s tatements. In the 
past, for example, he has said that 
the only way taxes would be raised 
would be ova his “dead body.” 


■ Soviet Bloc Deliveries 
Soviet bloc nrilhary deliveries to 
Nicaragua reached 18,000 metric 
tons in 1984, helping that country 
„ i u *’■ estab- 

S. re- 



Soviet Union has provided more 
militar y assistance to Cuba and 
Nicaragua ova the past five years 
than the United States has sent to 
the rest of Latin America. 


Reagan Says Focus on Peace 
Predudes VisUtoNaadCamp 

Lot Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President Ronald Reagan says he decided not 
to visit the site of a Nazi concentration camp (hiring his trip to Europe 
next month because he wants to focus on peace rather than the past 

Speaking at his press conference Thursday, Mr. Reagan also said 
that he bdieved that West Germany's present sense of guilt for the 
Iritling it of million's of Jews in World war H, had “been imposed upon 
them, and I just think it’s unnecessary." 

Mr. Reagan will be in Europe for ceremonies to mark the 40th 
anniversary of the war’s end,, and some Jewish groups "had suggested 
that be visit the concentration camp at Dachan, north of Munich. 

Mr. Reagan said he felt strongly that “we should observe this day as 
the day when 40 years ago peace began,” rather than by reviving 
memories of the war. 

He said that he had discussed the visit with the West German 
chancellor, Helmut Kohl who, he said, Telt the same way; that we 
could observe this as the begriming of peace and friendship between 
us.” 

K lheyhaveafeding > aguiltfediog that's been imposed upon them, 
and I just think it's unnecessary, Mr. Reagan said of the West 
Germans. “I think they should be recqgnized for the democracy that 
theyVe created and the democratic vpnndples they now espouse." 

m an fl’riHi*, Mr. Reagan fflggasten that among tile German pnpmla- 

t ion, there were “very few mwe that remember even the war, and 
certainly none of them who were adults and partidpatingmanyway." 
In fact, however, many Nazi war veterans are still alive. Mr. Kohl was 
15 when the war ended. 

{The chief West German government spokesman, Peter Boemsdi, 
praised President Reagan’s comments Friday, criling them “the 
words of a friend," The Associated Press reported from Bonn. 

[“We were pleased,” Mr. Boemscfa said, ‘‘we have repeatedly said 
that the anniversary of the German capitulation must not remind ns 
only of the honor and the crimes of the past. It should also be a 
reminder of what we have achieved in the past 40 years."] 

Mr. Reagan is scheduled to mark May 8, or V-E Day, the 40th 
anniversaiy of the official end of the war m Europe, with a speech to 
the European Parliament in Strasbourg. He is also scheduled to visit 
Spain and Portugal while in Europe. 


Boat had been able to overwhelm 
government lawyers in that case by 
responding to their subpoenas for 
company records with vast 
amounts of technical paperwork, 
much of it irrelevant. He also main- 
tained that the company had ob- 
tained from a Justice Department 
Lawyer a copy of the prosecutor’s 
bria. 

He said he was interested neither 
“bringing down General Dy- 
namics,” nor in returning to (he 
United States to re claim about $9 
mffliem in personal assets frozen by 
the courts. He said he hoped his 
allegations would lead to reform in 
Pentagon weapons procurement, a 
process he described as being 
plagued by abuse. 

• There appear to be two dear tar- 
gets of ms elaborate ballet with 
U.S. investigators: Hyman G. 
Rickover, the retired admiral who 
was a key figure in the navy's nucle- 
ar sub marin e program, and David 
S. Lewis, chairman and chief exec- 
utive of General Dynamics. Both 
are repeatedly the subjects of deep 
expressions of contempt from the 
forma shipyard manager. 

Mr. Veliotis described repeated 
ffiflsbw: with the admiral ova how 
to buOd submarines. These was 
also the matter of what he de- 
scribed as both a long-tom pattern 
of corporate gift-giving to Admiral 
Rickover, as well as pandering to 
the admiral's personal whims 
ing sea trials: Supported partly by 
documents provided by Mr. Velio- 
lis, a House committee has already 
verified one instance in which jew- 
elry was purchasedbyGoieral Dy- 
namics for the admiral's wife. . 

Admiral Rickover has acknowl- 
edged receiving such rifts, but 
maintained that they had no effect 
on Ins relationship with the con- 
tractor. 

Mr. Vdiotis’s disdain for Mr. 
Lewis is based partly on a belief 
that the General Dynamics chair- 
man quashed his hopes to rise to 
the top of the corporation. 

Not smpriangy, the subject of 
his U.S. indictment is one of the 
few issues on which Mr. Ydiotis 
commented only sparingly. Ac- 
cused of receiving $1 3 ntmjon in 
kickbacks from a subcontractor 
while managing. General Dynam- 
ics' Quincy, Massachusetts, ship- 
yard in the early 1970s, Mr. Veliotis 
staunchly maintained that he made 
no personal gain in such a scheme. 



y:.y ■ ■ 


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Table dock “Colemna Buigtfri”, solid silver. 


BVLCARI 

10 VIA DEI CONDOTT1 ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE • NEW YORK 
SO. RUE DU RHONE 1204 GENEVE 
AVENUE DES BEAUX-ARTS • MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA.ATHENeE • PARIS 






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Page 4 


SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


Jleralb 


CVTERNATIOrVAL 



SltibuM Moscow’s Al^an Line May Be Hardening 


PnNithrd Whh TV Sew York Times *nd 7V VasUnglOQ Port 


Deadlock in the Gulf 


When the price of oU soared in the 1970s, 
one great question was the use to which the oil- 
exporting countries would put their new 


wealth. Iraq and Iran have used it topursnefor 
tensely bloody 


four and a half years an wmw 
war. For some time the war has been dead- 
locked along a line very dose to the prewar 
boundary. Periodically one side or the other 
attempts to break the deadlock, and the level 
of fighting suddenly rises. 

That is happening ag^m this month, but this 
attempt differs from most of its predecessors. 
This time, in violation of an agreement worked 
out last June by the United Nations, both sides 
are going after civilian targets. Neither has 
sufficient air power to tti wV * ? a decisive differ- 
ence in the militar y balance. Both have appar- 
ently decided to use their planes instead to 
increase the sense of war-weariness and fear 
among civilians in the hope of generating pres- 
sure for a negotiated settlement- A series of 
explosions in Baghdad suggests that Iran may 
be using missile against its enemy's capital. 

Neither side seems likely to win a conven- 
tional military victory. Both are better 
equipped for defense than for offensive opera- 
tions, which is why the casualties have been 
so high. Both sides, but particularly the Irani- 
ans with their much larger numbers, have 
retied heavily on tactics reminiscent of World 


War I, with massed infantry attacks into fire 
from entr enched machine guns. 

The United Stales and the Soviet Union 
came some time ago to a tacit agreement that 
Iraq canno t be allowed to lose. Each super- 
power has its obvious reasons for wishing to 
avoid the surge of aggressive Moslem funda- 
mentalism that would surely follow an Iranian 
triumph. Iran has been trying to buy weapon* 
from every possible source from South Ameri- 
ca to North Korea, but the superpowers have 
been at worh to hold down the flow. They have 
succeeded — so far — in preventing Iran from 
breaking the deadlock, but not in ending the 
fi g htin g . As long as it continues, a break- 
through by one side or the other remains 
possible. That was what the Iranian offensive 
this week was attempting — with very Ugh 
losses but, apparently, little success. 

The sticking point remains Ayatollah Kho- 
meini's insistence that any settlement requires 
the overthrow of President Saddam Hussein. 
There recently have been signals suggesting 
that at least some Iranians are ready to retreat 
from that condition, although, tike all tignak 
from Iran, they are anything but dear. For the 
rest of the world a stalemate remains the best 
military outcome, since that alone seems bkely 
to lead to serious peace negotiations. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Chore for Mexico 


The United States is rightly alarmed by 
evidence that drug traffickers are c orruptin g 
Mexico's law enfo rcement- Why are Mexican 
officials SO reluctant to riiaxe that alarm ? 

A decade ago Mexico was the main source 
of marijuana and heroin consumed in the 
United States. Commendably, it responded to 
US. pressure and help with an effective crop- 
eradication program. By 1981 Mcrico’s share 
of marijuana shi pments to the United Stales 
had fallen to 4 percent. Its heroin share was 
down to 33 percent by 1983. But now Mexico’s 
marijuana shipments have rebounded to 24 
percent, while heroin shipments have crept 
bade up to 37 parent. The reversal coincides 
with disturbing signs of official indifference. 

Last November Mexican authorities seized 
1500 tons of marijuana produced on a farm 
employing 6,000 peasants. How could that 
immense business operate without official 
complicity? This month the authorities were 
suspiciously stow to investigate the murder of 
a U.S. drug enforcement agent. Under heavy 
pressure from Washington they finally arrest- 
ed several police officers. “It’s hard to tell the 
good guys from the bad guys here," reported 
one U.S. agent "They all cany badges.'’ 

What can the United States do? Same in 
Washington are enragpd to the point of de- 


Good Talks in Quebec 


. When the president of the United States and 
the' Canadian prime minister can agree,' they 
-usually 'have~the satisfaction of having done 
something legible for a lot of people. A 
boring serenity along a border, leaving coun- 
tries’ energies free for more productive pre- 
occupations, is the reward of good diplomacy. 
The Quebec conversations tins week between 
Ronald Reagan and Brian Mulroney were 
warm and at least modestly productive. 

The agreement on arid rain is likely to prove 
more useful than it might look at first glance. 
A lot of Canadians have needled Mr. Mul- 
roney for settling for a mere study. True, it is 
unfair that the wind blows smoke mostly from 
the United States to Canada and not vice 
versa. But the United States has reduced emis- 
sions of sulfur dioxide, the most threatening of 
the pollutants, by a third since the mid-1970s. 
Canadians, meanwhile, have done very little to 
control their own prolific sources of arid rain. 
Canada would be in a stronger position to call 
for further action in the United States if' it 
began to tighten up the loose controls on its 
own power plants and, especially, its smelters. 
Mr. Mulroney understands this point With a 
little luck, the joint study will lead to a joint 


commitment to improve the protection of both 
countries’ lakes, forests and people. 

The most sensitive subject in the Quebec 
conversations was defense, and Canada's fears 
— exacerbated by a careless remark by Secre- 
tary of Defense Caspar Weinberger — of bring 
overrun by UJL strategic planners. 

But the more important subject was trade 
and money. Here the president and the prime 
minister did less than they might have done. 
Earlier the two countries were talking about a 
free trade zone between them. But in Quebec 
nobody seemed anxious to pursue such a radi- 
cal thought. Instead they proposed stQl anoth- 
er joint effort, this one to reduce tariffs and 
other trade barriers. This joint effort seems 
likely to produce less than il promises. 

The reality is that under Mr. Mulroney 
Canada is again opening its economy to the 
foreign investment that it needs. And under 
Mr. Reagan the United States is becoming 
more dependent on Canadian energy — elec- 
tricity in the East, natural gas in the West 
These bonds of mutual advantage and depen- 
dence created the cordial atmosphere in which 
the two men met on Sunday and Monday. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Drug Runners Stop at the Rank 


It has become increasingly evident that 
banks and other financial houses often are 
unwitting, and sometimes writing, handmaid- 
ens of drug smugglers. They “launder” huge 
amounts of dirty money by passing it through 
clean hands, thus untiring illicit drug-trade 
profits look legitimate. Low enforcement offi- 
cials recently said they believe that $1.2 billion 
transferred through the Bank of Boston was 


tied to drug trafficking. The bank was fined 
5500,000 for failing to report the transactions. 

Prosecutors want tougher laws to help them 
crack down on money laundering. Illegal U.S. 
drag trafficking is estimated to generate as 
much as 580 billion in cash a year. If bankers 
don't cooperate better with law enforcement in 
following the Mafia’s money flow, they may 
fall under some tough new laws, which they 
will entirely deserve. 

— The Commercial Appeal (Memphis). 


FROM OUR MARCH 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: HalpinWiddereMiistDBann 
NEW YORK — The Chicago ordinance which 
deprives women of long hatpins, their most 
cherished weapon of defense, became law [on 
March 21] amid a tempest of hissing from the 
fair sex which crowded the galleries of the 
Chicago City HalL By a vote of 68 to 2, the 
Council, after considering the proposed ordi- 
nance for a month, decreed: “No person while 
in a public street or public elevator or other 
public place shall wear any hatpin the exposed 
point of which shall protrude more than one 
half of an inch beyond the hat in, upon or 
through which such pin is worn.” After the 
ordinance passed, many women indignantly 
proclaimed their intention of carrying a long 
hatpin in their hands as a weapon. The ordi- 
nance has aroused widespread interest. 


1935: Travel to the Moon and Back? 
PARIS — Scientists have proved wrong so 
often as to what might be posable or impossi- 
ble in the future that one hesitates to pro- 
nounce on the possibility of transport between 
the earth and the moon. The problem is engag- 
ing the attention of engineering and aeronauti- 
cal, experts. Granted that the problems of pro- 
pulsion will be solved and that somebody will 
get to the moon eventually, the question of 
getting bade remains. Given a sufficient sup- 
ply of rockets, it is conceivable that the “moon 
Oyer” will have enough propulsive power for 
the return journey. But what if he misses the 
earth? He would then be travelling in space 
forever. The first moon “tripper” would have 
to be endowed either with a rare degree of 
foolhardiness, or super-human intrepidity. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Quantum 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

OhChainaen 


PHiUP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
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SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PubBsher 

Ejuatbe Edittf RENfiBONDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR AtnxuXc Pubiisker 

Deputy Editor RICH ARD H_ MORGAN Associate Pub&dter 

Dmay Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director , 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director < 


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Inleraational Herald Tribune. 181 Avooue Charicuk-GanBe, 92200 NeuDy^tsr-Sri&e, 
cc747-I ” "** ' 


France. Telephone 747-1265. Tdoc 612718 (Herald), Cables Herald Paris. 
Dinaeur de lapabBcation: Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24*34 Hermessy RtL, Hoag Kong TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
ManagfngDSr. UK: Robin MacKkhan, 63 Lang Am. London WO. TeL 836-4802. Telex 262009. 
SA. au capital de 1JOOLOOO F. RCS Namerrt B 732021126. Commission Paiiudn No. 61337. 
US. subscription: S284 yearly. Second-doss postage paid at Long Island City, N. Y. II 101. 
0 1983. fiMememanaf Herald Tribune AH rights resented 




W ashington — The experts 

in Washington are not sure ex- 
actly what General Secretary Mikhail 
Goroachev had is mind when he told 
Pakistan’s President 25a otHaq at 
the Chernen ko funeral that contin- 
ued collaboration with the rebels 
in Afghanistan would affect Soviet- 
Pakistam relations in “the most nega- 
tive way.” But when the Soviet agen- 

S < Tass is at pains to report such 
unt language. American authorities 


By Philip Geyelin 


The evidence is in the way the 
Soviet “press has 
aceuptoa 


take the matter seriously. 


manning an end to help from the World Bank 
and the Inter-American Development Bank, 
which last year lent Mexico more than $800 
nriflion. But that would further limit Wasting- 
ton’s influence and penalize U.S. businesses in 


Mexico. Besides, the Mexicans have a point 

nth the 


when they say that the problem begins wit 
demand for drugs in the United States. 

But in their terms it is risky to dismiss the 
issue so casually. Colombia, Pakistan, Thai- 
land and Malaysia once considered drug pro- 


duction for export a relatively harmless activi- 
ty; ah now find thei 


[ themselves having to cope with 
large and growing addict populations. The 
Mexican economy is already infected, as Mexi- 
co's drug traffickers have invested their mil- 
lions in real estate and other leg itimate busi- 
nesses. Unchecked, their bribing and bullying 
of officials is sure to continue. 

Does a country so dependent on U.S. tour- 
ists really want a reputation for addiction, 
corruption and violence? Is its legitimate eco- 
nomy so weak that it must settle for an econo- 
my rooted in crime? Why does a government 
properly proud of its standing in the hemi- 
sphere let itself be poshed around by thugs? 

Pride should dictate Mexico's cooperation 
with drug enforcement So should self-interest 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


One theory is that Mr. Gorbachev 
was cunying favor with his military 
as part of the process of consolidat- 
ing power. The military’s frustrations 
with an ugly struggle that has lasted 
longer for tire Soviets than World 
War n are predictably acute. 

But that theory makes sense only if 
Mr. Gorbachev means business — 
more resources allocated to the Af- 
war effort, stepped up cross- 
“hot pursuir of Afghan re- 
bels into Pakistan at the expense of 
Pakistani civilians, or subtler, subver- 
sive pressures on Pakistan. Whatever 
the case, the conclusion here is that 
Afghanistan is increasingly a high- 
priority Soviet concern. 

And that makes Afghanistan - — 
and Pakistan — an in cre asing con- 
cern for U.S. policymakers as wdL 
Washington is a heavy supplier of 
military aid to the Ha gov ernment, 
by way of stiffening its resolve as a 
co-conspirator in the CIA’s “covert” 
supply of arms to A fghan rebels. So 
Soviet efforts to intimidate the Paki- 
stanis are at odds with U-S. policy. 

The conflict of U-S.-Soviet inter- 
ests is compounded by the U.S. Con- 
. is even more eager than 
. administration, and a lot 
more erolicit, in its dedication to the 
cause of the Afghan “freedom fight- 
ers.” By doubling the administra- 
tion's SlOO-nriffion request for akl to 
the rebels and passing a resolution 
for more effective U.S. support. Con- 
gress has made Pakistan all the more 
uncomfortable with its role as the 
overland route for aid to the rebels. 

Not that the Soviets would not be 
admfwiTchfng Pakistan in any case. 
Most of the costs of the war to the 
Soviets are obvious: the casualties, 
the weapons destroyed, the strain on 
Soviet resources, the open-endedness 
of il all. But one cost has gone largely 
unnoted, except by U.S. authorities 
who monitor such matters: the de- 
moralizing effect the war is be ginnin g 
to have on the Soviet public. 


growing man-on-the-strtet awareness 
that mudh more than a modest peace- 
keeping mission is involved, with the 
Afghan government’s army doing the 
fighting. The word is getting around 
that there is a war on. 

The public is still not being told 
anything remotely dose to the facts. 
Officially there is no hint that more 
than 100,000 Soviet troops, with jet 
aircraft, heavy armor. heQcoptexs and 
sophisticated weaponry, have been 
actively engaged m an mcondusve 
combat role against Afghan guerril- 
las with about as much success as the 
United Stares adueved over arry com- 
parable 416-year stretch in Vietnam. 

But increasingly, over the past 
year, the Soviet press's war coverage 
nag fhanpnri from articles on weap- 
ons-cleamng contests and daily life m 
the fidd bakery to celebrations of 
heroes and gaerifi r r increasing 
analogies to the Great Patriotic War 
(World War II). “They are playing it 
recently much more as a long and 
glorious struggle against the Af] 


stan counterrevolution,** says one 
US. government analyst 
The reason is that even in a dosed 
society, the wounds of war — or more 
precisely, the wounded — can no 
longer be concealed or explained 
away. So great are their numbers, and 
so obvious their public presence, that 
the Soviet news managers have -been 
obliged, in their own erode way, to 
develop a new public relations ap- 
proach. The new line attempts to 
sanctify the war heroes and put as 
fine a patriotic gloss as posable on 
the Afghanistan war effort 
With increasing frequency, Soviet 
newspaper readers are bong treated 
to stirring vignettes about Soviet sol- 
diers grievously maimed in perfor- 
mances of great gallantry. The ac- 
counts have simple one-word head- 
ings: “Courage,*' “Fidelity,” “Duty." 
The language is almost childishly ro- 
mantic; U S. analysts have taken to 
referring to them os “The Adventures 
of Ivan in Afghanistan.” They are 
taken as significant evidence that the 
Soviets think they have a public- 


long and opinion problcn 
A fghani- The efforts to 


iblem with the war. 


rmtiimirg the home- 


front effects are considerable. Sol- 
diers rotated home from Afghani- 
stan. I am told, are posted in remote 
and underpopulated pans of lire 
country, away from cities where they 
would conw into contact with the 
most sophisticated segment of soci- 
ety. The kffled-in-action are taken 
note of publicly with no reference to 
Afghanistan: "So-and-so died fulfill- 
ing his international duty for social- 
ism.” The next of kin must sign an 
oath, under penalties, not to disclose 
that the relative died in Afghanistan. 

But the demobilized amputees and 
paraplegics, appearing in growing 
numbers, cannot escape notice. 

That would be reason enough to 
present them in positive, patriotic 
terms. But the accompanying effort 
to identify them with the veterans of 
the Great Patriotic War suggests 
something else: a way of preparing 
Soviet opinion for a protracted Soviet 
engagement in Af ghanistan . 

Whatever Mr. Gorbachev has in 
store Tor President Z ia , the new line 
for domestic consumption, says one 
authority, is “not exactly an indica- 
tion that they are thmlring about 
leaving any time soon." 

Washington Pan Writers Group. 





Yes , the Import Surcharge Is a Dangerous Idea 


W ASHINGTON — In their frustration over 
the swollen U.S. trade deficit, Washington 
officials in and out of Congress have been in- 
dulging in an unprecedented outburst of “bash- 
ing” Japan, which has an embarrassingly large 
trade surplus with the test of the world. The 
reaction borders on hysteria. It focuses at the 
moment qn the possibility of a 20-percent air- 
charge on imports, touted as the most menacing 
weapon with Much to confront Japan. 

In an econometric model exercise financed by 
Motorola, Nobel laureate Lawrence Klein of the 
Wharton School of Finance has estimated, with- 


By Hobart Bowen 


out advocating a surcharge, that in its first year it 
would raise from S35 billion to 559 Whon in 


revenue. It is thus being billed as a magic answer 
to America's economic problems: At one stroke 
it would bring down the trade and budget deficits 
and also curb the rise of the dollar. (On the latter 
point you can get as many points of view as the. 
number of economists you assemble.) 

But a surcharge is a very bad idea, a erode 
blunderbuss designed to punish Japan for failing 
to buy more imported goods, especially manu- 
factured goods, from the rest of the world. 

“I think it’s a rotten idea,” admits Senator 
Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat who has been 
trying to get his constituents' prime beef into 
Japan. “But it may help our export industries.” 

Harvey Bale, erf the Office erf the UJS. Trade 
Representative, which exposes a surcharge, said 
at a Washington think-tank seminar that foreign- 
ers would regard it “as a confession erf .our 
inability to get the budget deficit under control, 
and the dollar therefore would take a tremendous 
plunge.” And the surcharge would attack nation- 
al pride in Europe and Canada. Td give them 
about a week to retaliate," Mr. Bale said. 


But an import surcharge may nonetheless be 
triggered by one of two events: a Japanese failure 
by April 1 “todo the minimum required" to open 
their markets, as promised, to more telecom- 
munications and high-tech equipment from 
America; or failure of the European Community 
countries to agree to a new multilateral round of 
trade negotiations that President Reagan wants 
endorsed at the May economic summit in Bonn 
of leading industrialized countries. 

Reagan officials may not be unhappy to see 
senators and congressmen popping off against 
Japan. Whatever brings Japan to the negotiating 
table, they privately say, is worth doing. 

The betting in the best-informed quarters is 
that the Japanese, having taken careful sound- 
ings of the hostile mood on both tides of the aisle 
in both houses of Congress, will soon make the 
concrete announcement on telecommunications 
and high-tech equipment imports necessary to 
defuse the import surcharge surge.” 

Actually, Japan has come a long way from the 
dosed nation of the hundred years preceding 
World War 13, and it rarely gets credit for the 
degree to which it has opened its markets. In part 
that is due to the Japanese insistence on an 
internal consensus when striking out in a new 
direction. The process is daw. and Westerners 
often have less patience than Orientals. 

A veteran economist and former diplomat, 
Saburo Okiia, made dear in a conversation with 
Washington Post journalists last week that the 
American message is getting through. But he 
warns that results are not going to look dramatic 

“We know dial a conceptual change is neces- 


sary. there is need for a transition,” Mr. Okita 
said. “It is not a question of unfairness but 
slowness. There is a historical difference that 
must be borne in mind. We have had to push 
exports for the past century.” 

Such appeals for patience fall on deaf ears in 
Washington. Supported by the AFL-CIO, which 
deplores a steadily declining membership, some 
congressmen are losing their sense of prwortion. 

Senator John Heinz, a Pennsylvania Republi- 
can, said recently that rising Japanese exports 
“make people mad.” If imcnaflenged, be said, 
“something sudden, dramatic and unstoppable 
will take place. So don’t retaliate against the 
world, retaliate against Japan. They deserve it!” 

In fact the Japanese trade surplus has many 
causes; banieis to imports of manufactured 
goods, while significant, are only one ekmenL A 
major problem is the excessively high level of the 
dollar, which makes Japanese goods cheaper and 


American goods more expensive in world mar- 
ts that Ja 


kets. Another problem is hat Japan makes high- 
quality goods and knows bow to market than. 

Furthermore, one reason for the unemploy- 
ment in the United States that the AFL-CIO 
reflexively blames on Japanese competition is the 
fact that many corporations have shut down 
operations in America and moved them abroad. 
In part this has been a response to some onions 
pricing themselves out of the market 
An intelligent response to the international 
reorganization of markets, especially for high- 
tech goods, would be “a large-scale investment in 
upgrading the U.S. work force," a Brookings 
Institution report says. The resort to protection- 
ism through unport surcharges, quotas or other 
devices is not the smart approach. 

The Washington Post. 


Will Mitterrand Transform de Gaulle’s Republic ? 

P ARIS — Francois 
means to leave his 


on 


Mitterrand 
mark 

nse pul 

have been launched under his presi- 
dency, each erf them expressions of 
his personal taste. He risks, however, 
leaving a larger, immaterial monu- 
ment because of what he does or does 
not do to alter the political character 
erf the Fifth Republic. 

His material monuments, if they 
are completed, mil be three. 

A new opera house at the Place de 
la Bastille in Paris will allow the exist- 
ing Palais Gamier, marvelous but im- 
practical product of the Second Em- 
pire, to become a theater of ballet. 

The Louvre museum is to expand 


By W illiam P faff 


themselves felt in France’s history. 

A profound and romantic wish to 
democratize and distribute all i 
to let every man rule 
in France crashed again and 
against an equally strong wish to 


have order, form, rationality, author- 
te Fifth 


ity and decision. The Fifth Repub- 
lic's constitution created a kind of 
elected absolutism, by which for sev- 
en years a president with vast powers 
consults but is not ruled by Pariia- 
menL Each year sees his conduct im- 
by regional or 
, and each five years by 
a parliamentary election. 

This constitution has since 1958 


try. It will given 
ground facilities crowned by the fam- 
ous (some say infamous) glass pyr- 
amid by LM. Pei, to be erected over a 
new entrance in the central court. 

Finally, at the skyscraper business 
center called La Dfrfense, just to the 
west erf ihe.city, a building m the form 
of an arch — two great towers with a 
bridge — will complete the noble 
perspective that now sweeps from the 
Louvre and the small Arc de Tri- 
omphe in the Carrousel garden, past 
the Place de la Concorde, up die 
Qiamps-Elysees to the neat Arc de 
Triomphe and on to La Defense. 

Mr. Mitterrand’s predecessors, Va- 
lery Giscard (TEstamg and Georges 
Pompidou, left museums —an as yet 
unfinished museum of 19th century 
art in Giscanfs case, and the enor- 
mously popular museum of modem 
art that bears the Pompidou name. 

Charles de Gaulle left no monu- 
ment, and instructed that none be 
biulL No doubt that was pride, im- 


gjven France an enviable ^ability 

itiaJ 


and continuity of direction. Essent 
to that stability has been the electoral 
method, that of winner-take-alL as in 
Britain and the United States. 

it is this which now is in question. 
Local elections just concluded have 
shown the governing Socialist Party 
of Mr. Mitterrand somewhat im- 


of Parliament. The chance of the So-, 
dalists attracting allies able to make 
up a majority would be very poor. 

If the voting method were changed, 
however, to one of proportional rep- 
resentation — the system used under 
the Fourth Republic — the outlook 
would be transformed. The National 
Front would become a substantial 
force in the National Assembly. The 
conventional right would probably 
split between those willing to collab- 
orate with the extreme right, tolerat- 
ing its hostility to immigrants and 
vituperative language, and those who 
would refuse to do so and would be 
prepared to work with the Socialists 
in a center-left coalition. 

This obviously must seem to Mr. 


Mitterrand, as politician, the brighter 
prospect. It is by no means certain, 
however, that it is the choice he will 
make. He has in his career acquired 
the reputation of an opportunist It is 
not perhaps, the reputation he wish- 
es to carry into the history texts. 

The French, more than most peo- 
ple, are aware of their past and cele- 
brate their great men, among whom 
they count Napolton Bonaparte. Not 
because he was a conqueror. His con- 
quests were gone before be was. The 
second Napolfon to rule France, 
Louis Napoldon, offered this expla- 
nation of the success of the first “He 
gave the people what they wanted, as 
well as what they ought to have." The 
second phrase evokes a memorial 
more substantial than monuments. 

© /98J William Pfaff. 


Narcotics 
TheBan f 1 ’* 
Is at Horn ^ 


By Flora Lewis 

P ARIS — The laws of supply 
demand assert themsefve- 
ways that are not always benaf. 
The proof is the drug traffic, 
world's prime example of a 
suuined. savage capitalism. 

The focus is on suppliers and 
murderous rangs. especially iu k 
co and Colombia, The fact is- 
their mnltibiUion-dollar bus 
flourishes because of demand fa 
United States. Officials say dun 
tary radar in sou than California ' 
istera “swarms, like clouds of - 
flies" of small planes coming in: 
the sea, doubtless delivering dm 
A participant in the Geneva^ 
talks dies a Pentagon observe 
not altogether & joke, that noa 
what kind of strategic dcftl ' 
America nay achieve, the easiest 
to deliver a nuclear weapon tc ■ 

United States would be to smug - 

in in a bale of marijuana. 

The politics of drugs have bet 
high politics. Jeane Kirkpatrick 



h-.* 



UA representative at the United -. 7 
tions, has blamed Cuba and Na 
gua for promoting drug trade . 
secret weapon in their fight ag 
the United States. That may or 
not be the case; no dear end 
has been produced. But an extra ' 
nary, audacious interview given- 
major Colombian dealer indjt' 
that whatever revolutionaries ' - 
think about using the traffic for 
own purposes, drug entreprtc ." 
find it useful to encourage the 
order that the rebels spread 
The interview was made by a S * 
ish crew in the Colombian jungle, ’ 
later shown on Colombian tdevt - 
according to a Washington Post ' - 
respondent. It showed Carlos Le - 
Rivas, wanted but never cat 
sounding off at his ease. 

It is only since May, when-’ 
Colombian president declared a . ^ 
of siege after the assassination o 
justice minister, that people like - 
Lehder even bother to hide. Be . 
he lived on a grand estate, bti'.. 
discotheque, published a newsp . 
and founded a political group c. 
the National Latin Civic Moved 
While Mr. Lehder admits adm ' 
Hitler, for television he affect/ 
more popular anti -authority pot; 
view. “Cocaine and marijuana - 7 ‘ 
become an arm of struggle ag 
American imperialism," he said, 
have the same responsibility in tit" 
he who takes up a rifle, he who p 
coca, he who goes to the public i - 
and denounces imperialism.” - - 
Soon afterward there was a * ' - 
onstration by a crowd estimate '■ 
50,000 in Bogota on behalf oL 
guenilla movement M-19. Only - 
year die long-sputtering rebeQiu.: 
Colombia seemed to be petering 
A provisional cease-fire was si- 
with the government and neg 
tions were planned on some o 
revolutionaries' social demands. 
M-19 has now broken off the ta 
It called the demonstration, v 
was peaceful, to show that it can 
rally support. One banner refk: 
guerrilla aims: “With the pe 
with arms, to power.” Another 
doser to Mr. Lehder’s requirem 
“No to extradition," it said, roea 
extradition of arrested drug de 
to be tried in the United States. 

Riot police watched passive} 
guerrilla leaders arrived by bus 
descended to harangue the cn 
The government's attempt to 1 
the drug empires has apparently i 
ea the bosses to a new alliana 
well as producing embarrassing 
deuce of how far the gangs have 
etrated the legal establishment 
In February a plane of the nati 
Colombian airline was found tql 
brought more than a ton of cocair 
Miami. Last year officials on the : 
erf the presidential palace in Bo 
and a Colombian diplomat in Sj 
were charged with trying to smu 
cocaine in a diplomatic pouch. 


I’rrihNMl !»’ I 


Ikvrkimgmi 






tN>1 


wk* 1 




.. 3 

, -- =t 


In his television performance 
i nave 


Lehder said: “We 


point of no return. Lara Bou 
Tambs and B&ancur united to t 
spire against the interests of 
country. Lara Bonilla was exea 
by the people." Rodrigo Lara Boi 
was the justice minister who 
murdered last year. Lewis A. Ta 
is the U.S. ambassador. Belisario 
tancor is the president of Colons 

This is the real Amer 
menace to vital U.5. interests, ! 
motive is not co mmunism: it is m 
bucks, pure capitalism. The out 
fective way to deal with it has to i 
invoke the laws of the market . 

When demand dries up, so <: 
supply. The source of the dire*, 
inside U.S. society: the people 
buy drugs and keep the fortune-h , 
era happy. It is not only ilhgf. 
flock to this market, it is unpatnr 
President Reagan should make c 
to the country that standing ta| 
the opposite of high. 

The New York Tones. 


Mm*** 


LETTERS TO THE ED ITOR 


proved over its recent electoral per- 
formam 


formances, and still i 
party in the country, but with practi- 
cally no prospect of winning, by it- 
self, the parliamentary election that 
will take place a year from now. 

On the other hand, a new party 
of the extreme right, the National 
Front, has confirmed its ability to 
draw about a tenth of the national 
vote — 8.69 percent, to be exact, 
down from 10.95 patent in Europe- 
an Parliament elections a year ago. 
The other parties of the conservative 
opposition together attracted just un- 
der half of the March 10 vote. 

The National Front's score is ap- 


perious pride. His monument was the terminally 
France liberated and restored, a sys- Party now obt 


prottimaJely the levd of support that 
' i Communist 


sys- 


tem of government bestowed upon.it 
that has constructively reconciled 


the terminally ill French 1 
Party now obtains. 

It is apparent that if substantially 
this same distribution of votes were 


the authoritarian and revolutionary to occur next year, the major parties 
impulses that have repeatedly made erf the opposition could take control 


Africa 'Dismtegratmg 3 ’ ? 

“The progressive disintegration of 
Africa, a generation after indepen- 
dence, is a global distress.” So wrote 
Flora Lewis in^MobDizing Youth to 
Lend Africa a Hand" (March 19). 
This kind of nonsense coming from a 
normally well informed and sympa- 
thetic writer is typical of the distress- 
ful exaggeration about Africa’s con- 
dition that appears in Western media, 
possibly due to the media's failure to 
report the positive as well as the nega- 
tive sides of the African condition. 

In what way, may one ask, is Africa 
disintegrating? True, the economic 
distress in many African countries is 
acute, but what is different about 
that? The economic decline in the 
developed countries has, relatively, 
been greater than that in Africa; the 
difference is that they have more fat 
to five off. The economic situation in 
Latin American countries like Argen- 
tina, Brazil and Mexico is worse than 


in any of the major African countries. 
Why do we not hear of Latin America 
being in a state of disintegration? 
There are violent situations in 


are violent situations in a 
few African countries, but they are 
no worse than in Southeast Asia and 
certainly not as bad os in the Middle 
East. Established political systems 
survive and function in every African 


should realize that Iran’s many 
complex problems are not likel; 
disappear. Should he return home 
will see for himself that the fulur 


the Islamic Republic is as uncer 
as most observes believe it to be 


MEHRDAD KHONSAR 
Londot 


country — one might almost wish v ■ u- J /■*— .«nmr 
that this were not so. But it is encour- 111 Bffd COfflpRUy 

Regarding the report “ Dutch, R* 
ing to U.S. fears. Act Against C 


aging to see that more have moved 
toward greater liberalization than to- 
ward greater authoritarianism in the 
past five orjtix years. 

So^ “disintegration"? Not in the Af- 
rica with which 1 am familiar 

COLIN LEGUM. 

Editor, Third World Reports. 

London. 


Iran "ConsoUdatmg” ? 

Iranians like Hass&n Alizadch — — 
who deplores “consolidation" erf the 
regime m Iran/Iefter*. March 2) — 


mg 

Pornography" (March 20): 

The little “Lolita" is promnfl 
mm tinned in this article about de 
cable chiM pornography. As I b 
most realize, this is a cheap pc 
arism by purveyors of^ what Vlaoi 
Nabokov, considered to be ® 
strews. Child pornography sj« 
not even be thought d in connect 
with the novd “Lotiw-" 

DIMITRI NABOKOV 

Montreox, Switzerland 










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■Ashad Says 
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PVTERISATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUBDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


Page 5 


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The Aaodnied Press 

; AKA, Bangladesh — Prea- 
riussazn Mohammed Ewhmi 
; ■ ngSadesh rimmed Friday the 
.rttf 94 percent of the voters 
' dferendum on his continued 
. ry rule. 

-position politicians de- 
ed die poB as a fraud and a 

'* pard at a polling station was 
' in one of several bombing 
‘ ' aits anxmd Dhaka, the capi- 
*•. even otbex persons were hurt 
.'. •ice said they arrested four 
/■os in connexion with the 
ings. 

'' ier bombing incidents were 
ted in the dries of Chittagong, 
V . pur, Pabna and Sirajganj, but 
, ••. were no reports of injuries. 

3 \jording to official figures. 72 
." ‘at of those eligible voted in 
. ' ferendum. 

■ official count in 86 percent 
;-e voting districts indicated 
Jeneral Ersbad received the 

• wal of almost 28 million vot- 

* ' r 94 perccnL There were al- 
V muHoa votes against Gen- 
..' Ershad’s policies, official 

-s showed. 

" neral Erahad called the refer- 
! ji earlier this year after be 
,~‘ r ded parliamentary elections 
'j- iad been scheduled for April 
' -iponents of the government 
' id to participate m the dets 
• 'unless General Enhad turned 
*-r over to a caretaker govern- 

- before the election. 

'' z opposition, called for a boy- 
; rf the referendum, a general 
” o on election day, and vowed 

- ntinne its push for an end to 
- -iry rale. 

; -rind Khan Menon, a spokes- 

Thnrsday°^S^Mre^^^um 
: i farce. He clahned no more 
:r S percent of the 48 milli on 
' 4e voters participated, and 
"'his alliance knew“the auto- 
: rulers would announce' the 
- -s using preplanned statistics." 
-■neral Ershad, who took power 
-soup three years ago, said he 
-ow willing to discuss the tran- 
~ • to civilian rule with the oppo- 



Moscow Notebook: Recalling Brezhnev and His ' Coachman 9 


Ferdinand E. Marcos ad- 
dressing the cadets Friday. 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Tima Same 
MOSCOW — He is said in Moscow 
gossip to have started his career as Leo- 
nid L Brezhnev's chauffeur, and during 
his brief tenure as the leader of the Soviet 
Union some people referred to him dis- 
missmgly as “the coachman," 

At his funeral last week, aQ eyes were 
on his forceful, younger successor, Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev. 54, r unning the cere- 
mony briskly thremgh its familiar steps. 

Now, a week after bis burial in Red 
Square, Konstantin U. Chernenko is al- 
ready fatting quickly from memory here. 
The forlorn impression he leaves behind 
is of a small 73-year-old man t viably sick 
and i n a deq u a t e to the job, appointed for 
political reasons by men more powerful 
that* he, run through the p»w s of leader- 
ship even when he seemed too weak to 
stand up on. bis own and buried hurriedly 
when he died so thqj his colleagues could 
get on with their business. 

Mr. Chernenko rose through Commu- 
nist Party ranks primarily on the basis of 
his dose friendship with Brezhnev, and 
when be was appointed to the Politburo 
in 1978,. the move was seen in large part 
as the gesture of one pal to another in an 
administration accustomed to cronyism. 

By the time he became tbe Soviet 
Union's supreme leader in February 
1984, 15 months after Brezhnev’s 


he was already weak and spoke haltingly 
and there was no evidence from the out- 
side that he had any real friends in the 
Politburo. 

IBs appointment seemed clearly to be 
a hard-nosed co mpromi se among com- 
peting Kremlin factions, and as his 
- health quickly deteriorated, Soviet offi- 
cials discussed his illness more openly 
and with less sense of decorum than they 
had with previous leaden. 

To show that he was alive during his 
long absences from public view, Mr. 
Chernenko was given whar seemed in- 
sultingly insignificant statements to sign, 
addressed to a Canadian schoolgirl or a 
group of Western churchmen. 

In his last days, when be was roused 
from his sickbed to take part m brief, 
heavily edited television appearances, he 
stumbled, mumbled and nodded compla- 
cently as another official waved and 
grinned at him as if to a small child 

Last week, Mr. Chernenko’s humanity 
s uddenl y, and disturbingly, flooded back 
onto Soviet television screens in the last 
moments of a funeral that had been car- 
ried oat with a remarkable sense of im- 
personality. 

As his Politburo colleagues stood stiff- 
ly at the graveside, Mr. Chernenko's wid- 
ow, Anna, bent over his open coffin, and 
for one long the Soviet Union 


watched as she kissed him, embraced him 

For that erne miniu&^he maitff of 
Kremlin politics seemed to pause as its 
transitional leader-of-convenience was 
buried. 

□ 

So many l«>ifag Kremlin officials 
have died over the list few years and so 
many rumors of death have kept Moscow 
on the edge of its seat that when Mr. 


For that one minute, the 
march of Kremlin politics 
seemed to pause as its 
transitional leader-of- 
convenience was buried. 


Chernenko’s funeral finally came, it set 
off another round of nervous tremors. 

Two days after his burial March 13. the 
city suddenly was abuzz with word that 
the defease minister. Marshal Sergei L. 
Sokolov, might have died. Marshal Soko- 
lov, 73, had been appointed only three 
months before, ‘when Dmitri F. Ustinov 
died at the age of 76. 


Marshal Sokolov had been absent 
from the lineup of Soviet leaders atop 
Lenin's mausoleum during the funeral, 
and people with video tape machines 
hurriedly wound them back and forth to 
see if the defense minister had been pre- 
sent the day before as Mr. Chernenko's 
lying-in-state. He had. 

Soviet officialdom showed nnnqial 
sensitivity to the Sokolov rumor. The 
official press agency Tass took the irregu- 
lar step of publishing a brief note on the 
coating visit of the Czechoslovak defense 
minister, Milan Vadavik. and pointing 
out that Marshal Sokolov would be his 
host. 


The Soviet propaganda apparatus re- 
acted with practiced speed to Mr. Cher- 
nenko's death. On the day of the an- 
nouncement, roadside poster displays 
featuring his portrait and sayings were 
removed. 

Somewhere in Moscow, no one seems 
to know just where. Mr. Chernenko had 
an official residence. Some time soon, as 
with Brezhnev and his successor, Yuri V. 
Andropov, a plaque bearing his portrait 
in bas-relief likely win be put up on the 
residence wall and someone will be as- 
signed to make sure fresh flowers always 
rest on a little shelf below it 


Not long ago. a Moscow office worker 
says she was suddenly, and inexplicably, 
overcome by a feeling of affection for 
Brezhnev. Although he had been the So- 
viet leader for 18 years, Brezhnev had 
never impressed his personality very 
strongly on his countrymen. 

"Lord knows why 1 did it," she said, 
"but after work I went out and bought 
some flowers, wrapped them up in news- 
paper, and headed for the street where he 

lived. 

“There were already some tulips up 
there.' 1 she said. “I had carnations. I 
quickly put them on the shelf and hurried 
to the curb to hail a taxi." 

Then the woman realized that a man 
was standing quietly behind her and that 
he had been watching her aQ along. Soon 
an official-looking car pulled up to the 
curb and the man stepped forward to 
open the door for her. Very politely, rite 
said, the man escorted her home, asking 
questions all the while. 

“He must have thought I was some son 
of dissident,” she said. “He asked me why 
1 had brought flowers to Mr. Brezhnev's 
plaque. 

“1 told him 1 wasn't sure myself, but 
that 1 thought Mr. Brezhnev deserved to 
be remembered," the woman said “And 
he said to me. ‘You know that nobody 
remembers our leaders after they are 
gone.’ ” 


Greek Town In Cyprus Grows Silent Under Tu rks 

• mnnsntum. of J m. 


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; v* «n. riit. i 


~ twice postponed the parha- 
''ary elections before he can- 
the April 6 vote and called the 
mdnm. No new date has been 

- jt the elections. 

' or to the referendum. General 
id put two opposition leaders, 
m Khalida Tia and H&sma 
’ % in custody, and most other 

- «itian leaders went under- 
-ad. 


Opposition of 
Backing Rebels 

Reuters 

BAGUIO, Philippines — Ptea- 
deat Ferdinand E. Marcos said Fri- 
day there had been a perceptible 
increase in fywnmimfot insurgency 
and accused opposition politicians 
of attempting to use tins activity to 
Earn power. 

Mr. Marcos, who withdrew from 
public view for several weeks in 
November and had not left Manila 
since September, was visiting the 
northern Pbflippnies town of Ba- 
guio. 

He said that for the first time 
“opposition parties are sup port in g 
the legalization of tbe Communist 
Party and have adopted tbe princi- 
ples of Co m m u nism in their plat- 
form which they would nnplMnwit 
if elected into office.” 

He described as “innocent, na- 
ive, foolish” what he said were op- 
position attempts to nse Coamm- 

Mr. i&trcos, 67, whose health 
has been a cause of concern, at- 
tended graduation ceremonies for 
cadets of the PhQqnnne Military 
Academy. He kxticed fitter than at 
any time since November and 
spoke for nearly an hoar. Chiefs of 
most diplomatic missions based in 
Manila attended the ceremonies, 
which were also televised. 


* * 

. TV r • • 


By Henry Kamm 

. New York Tima Service 

RIZOKARPASSO, Cyprus — 
Seven Greek Cypriot mm sat cm 
the porch cf die coffeehouse in this 
once-Gitek town near tbe tip of ihe 
country’s northeastern peninsula. 

They drank no coffee and hardly 
moke. They looked glumly across 
the alent street toward the deserted 
Greek Orthodox church 

It was a typical Grade village 
coffeehouse scene; but without the 
n«am1 iwimiifinn The men said it 
was lit* thfe every day, and had 
been so fi or 10 yean. 

*T do nothing,” said the youn- 
gest, aged 47. The others ranged in 
age from their 60s through their 
late 70s. Asked whether be had 
fields to weak in this Mlly region of 
tobacco, fruits and vegetables, the 
youngest replied: “I did. Now I 
have not.” 

' The others nodded to indicate 
that he spoke for aH They occa- 
sionally and suspiciously wed the 
T urkish Cypriot official who had 
accom panie d a reporter on a lour 

of the northern part of this island. 

“Please don't print my name," 
whispered the youngest when the 
official's bade was turned. 

The seven were pan of a group of 
773 Greek Cypriots who are all that 
remain of tbe Grades who stayed in 
tbe north after the Turkish invasion 
in 1974. After the invasion there 


was a de facto ethnic partition, with 
the Greek nugarity gathering in tbe 
south and the Turks in tbe north. 

Fewer than 100 Turks remain 
among the Greeks in tbe south. The 
S33 Greek Cypriots in Rizokar- 
passo make it the largest Greek 
community in tbe north. Until 
1974. Rizokarpasso was a Greek 
town of 3,500 people. 

Some Greeks stayed in Rizokar- 
passo and in mm» email pr commu- 
nities of tbe Karpas Peninsula be- 
cause the war spared this remote 
region. But most left in the ex- 
change of populations that fol- 
lowed The rest say they hope that 
they can save their property for the 
day the Cyprus division is solved. 
Abandoned property is taken by 
the authorities. 

On an island where even the sim- 
plest human problem is tainted 
with the antagonisms of co mm unal 
politics, the “enclaved Greeks,” as 
they are called, are minor pawns 
for both sides. 

The Turkish Cypriots, eager to 
dear out aQ Grades, make hfe as 
unpleasant as possible without ac- 
tually driving people out. The 
Greek Cypriots in the south see 
those stiQ in the north as represent- 
ing a eon tinning Greek presence 
that sustains damns oo behalf of 
the 165.000 Greek Cypriots dis- 
placed by the war. About 35,000 
Tbzks lost their homes. 


To keep the remaining Greeks in 
the Karpas Peninsular, the Grade 
Cypriots provide the basic necessi- 
ties of life that the Turks deny 
them. 

Tbe Turkish authorities prevent 
the Greeks from working their 
fields by declaring the land to be in 
off-limits “ mainu y areas.” The 
stagnant economy predudes other 
employment mid Innits tbe Greek 
Cypriots to producing what they 
can grow in their kitchen garden*: 
As gard ening is considered wom- 
en’s work, this leaves the men little 
to do except visit the coffeehouse. 

The Greek Cypriot government 


provides weekly shipments of food, 
clothing and medicine, which are 
delivered by trucks of the United 
Nations peacekeeping forces. The 
government also pays a monthly 
cash allowance of 32 Cyprus 
pounds ($48) for the first person in 
each famil y and 16 pounds for each 
additional member. 

Police permission is needed to 
travel outside the village. Weeklong 
family visits to tbe south are ar- 
ranged through the United Na- 
tions. but Greeks from the south 
cannot visit their relatives. 

‘They live on their own land like 
foreigners,” said Mr. Ioannides. 


C H A N N E L 


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P. Kr. 1,500 ISO 

F.M. 1.120 560 ’ 

FT. 1,000 300 | 

D.M 412 206 ‘ 

r 4i ; 

Dx. 12.400 6.200 ‘ 

LM. 104 52 

Lire 2m0QQ 106.000 ' 

L Fr. 7.300 3,850 ' 

FL 480 228 

N-Kt. 1.160 go' 

Qc 11.200 5.800 


The rest ef Europe. Noilb Afncn, fonnar French 
Africa, U.SJL French PolrnFiBia. Middle Eng: 

I $1 2341 I4fll 7 

Beet at AfQ£a.Caoad&. Latin. Amsiies. GoS SBSU, 

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money artier to the IHT). . 

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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAT, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


ARTS / LEISURE 


Paris Biennale Shows Off Villette Hall 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 


’P AR1S — The New Paris Bien- 
'Xnale is something of an event, 
-not least because it is in the splea- 
-ilidly refurbished ox-shed of the 
Tormer slaughterhouse at La VU- 
Heiie, next to the f mure Museum of 
-Science and Technology. The 
building, which covers more than 
-two hectares (five acres), was com- 
pleted in 1867 by Jules de Merindol 
in a style akin to that of Victor 
Ballard’s Les Halles, the former 
■market in the center of Paris. De 
-MSiindoI's structure has been 
'turned into an aerial glass buflidng 
with a broad, wing-Uke roof and 
-endowed with sophisticated equip- 
ment that allows it to accommo- 
date a broad range of events. It is 
clearly one of the most successful 
-achievements of its land in recent 
■- d e cade s 

>, The biennale — this is the 13 th 


category of official manifestat ions 
that are created and kept going by 
public funding. This implies that it 
does not depend on public taste 
and does not have to appeal to any 
particular audience: What it does 
need is the approval of its peers. As 
such it leads an autonomous life, 
sustained by its symbiotic link with 
the other big international shows, 
on the Comment at least, and with 
the stale of the art market in gener- 
al. As a result it is governed by a 
consensus of the art world and can- 
not be expected to do much more 
than acknowledge the primacy of 
trends or of individual artists in the 
mmmmi'a) dicuits and in the oth- 
er shows. 

Another result is that there is a 
certain sameness in the an we are 
likely to see in Venice. Kassel or 
Pans. What differences exist are 


due to the perspective given by lo- 
sre will be o 


Its budget has been increased ten- 
fold from the last exhibition, to 10 
million francs (about SI minion), it 
has found a permanent and inde- 
pendent base at La Villette and the 
"directors have decided to abolish 
n the age limit: Until now it was open 
_ody to artists under 35. AH this 
Implies a new concept, and shows 
the determination of the French 
nfficiaTg nmning such cultural ven- 
tures to consolidate the position of 
Paris on the international art scene, 


& position that has been questioned 
in recent years. One official recent- 
ly declared that the biennale should 
strive to become the French coun- 
terpart of the Documenta exhibi- 
tions in Kassel West Germany — 
an ambitious goal. 

It should be borne in mind that 
the biennale belongs to a peculiar 


cation: there wul be more French 
artists in Paris, though not as many 
as some officials of the Culture 
Ministry would like. 

In former years participants 
were selected by national commit- 
tees and presented under national 
labels. This year the selection was 
entrusted to a commission m ad e up 
of a West German, an Italian, an 
American and two French mem- 
bers, and the participant's nation- 
ality is state d only in the c ata l o g. 
This arrangement a nd the small 
number of people on the commis- 
sion give the snow greater coher- 
ence. 

The exhibition is divided into 
three sections — visual arts, sound 
and architecture. The visual art sec- 
tion occupies the largest part of the 
big structure, and a number of 
works were especially designed to 
CD the tremendous space of the 


central nave. The En glish artists 
Gilbert and George, for instance, 
are represented by a photomontage 
panel (“Death After life”) 4.84 by 
11.11 meters (527 by 1111 yards). 
Daniel Burcn of France construct- 
ed an inverted pyramid is striped 
doth that, at 12 by 17 meters, pret- 
ty well fills up the center of the 
budding. Roberto Malta of Chile 
sent a continuous sequence of can- 
vases 19 meters long, referring to a 
tale by the Colombian poet Jorge 
Zalamea. 

As might be expected, the exhibi- 
tion stresses the return to figurative 
ait that characterizes the French 
“Figuration Libre” (for example, 
Hfcrvfc di Rosa), the German 
“Wilde MalereT (Georg Baselitz), 
the Italian “T ransavanguardia” 
(Sandro Chia) the American Neo- 
Expressionists (Julian Schnabel) 
and graffiti artists (Keith Haring is 
scheduled to paint the inside of the 
Porte de Pantin M£tro station). 

In all these areas the production 
is uneven. There is much that is 
silly, gratuitously loud-mouthed 
and pomtiess to tile limit of tedium. 
But there are also a number of 
works that are outstandingly inter- 
esting. Susan Rothenberg of the 
United States has a strong painting 
of rather ghostly ships on a bladr 
ground; Anselm Kiefer of West 
Germany effectively uses black and 
brown and thick texture (paint 
mixed with straw and stripes of 
wood) in extremely large canvases 
full of symbolic implications. 

Enzo Cucchi of Italy has a large 
assemblage of driftwood and scrap 
metal that is monumental and rath- 
er more engaging than the rest of 
his work shown here. Christian 
Boltanslti of France is showing a 
delicioasly immaterial piece, a little 


shadow theater that rian re* on the 
four walls of the room. 

With the bi ennal e now open to 
artists over 35, hs organizers have 
decided, setting aside restrictive 
considerations of mere fashion, to 
honor a number of artists who are 
still active in their 80s and 90s. 
Most were chosen because they 
kept working in a figurative vein 
when this was anathema. Their 
dean is the Polish painter and writ- 
er Joseph Czapski, 90. He is closely 
followed by Jean Heiion of France 
and Evert Londquist of Sweden, 
both 82. Henri Mkhanx. the Bel- 
gian artist who died last year in 
Paris at 85. is represented by about 
30 works done in Iris last two years. 

The generation in between is rep- 
resented by such artists as Gabnel 
Stupica, Pierre Bettencourt, Leon 
Golub. Antoni Topics and Co Wcs- 

terik. 

The biennale’s sound section 


hie Beddey, Takis, Zev, and Bill 
Fontana. A Luciano Beck) opera, 
several rock concerts and two 
darvif» evenings will be held in the 
2,000-seal concert area at the north 
end of the biriTdmg. The architec- 
tural section of the show opens 
April 1. 

“NouveUe Biennale de Pans,” 
Grande Halle, Parc de la Villette, 
Porte de Pantin, through May 21. 

■ Ero 85: Good Taste 

The exhibits at Ero 85, Paris's 
third atmnal exhibit of erotica, 

r ange from photos and pain tings to 
costumes and a variation on tradi- 
tional French pastries. United 
Press International reports. The 
French are flocking for a peek, 
through Sunday. 

“This year there is less Moulin 
Rouge and more Louvre,” said the 



Rome: 



•Coro* 




And the City’s 'PopoHno 


R c 


By Edith Schloss 

International Herald Tnburte 

OME — After the turbulence 
. . .. and experimentation in art 
before and after World War I. a 
relatively stable period set in dur- 
ing the 1920s. 

One of the most incisive and cap- 
tivating of the new realists in Italy 
was Antonio Donghi. who pain- 
stakingly observed sis friends and 
neighbors. Over his Roman river- 
scapes there are no bright blue Ital- 
ian skies, nor is sun tight immerfi- 
aidy welcome in his sparse, dusky 
interiors. The washerwoman, the 
seamstress next door, the young 
girls at their outings on the Tiber, 
tradespeople are contem$>lated 


brides, the cabaret museum j 
downs, painted in uudrans 
poses, look at tire viewer sensB 
but also with pride and sweets 
Neither pretentious nor too hii' 
they are reasonably cootemT 
then, work and lot Donghi, t 
kept his private life to himself, 
pressed the feelings Of others v 

in vuAftivM m 



, .» -,«* m 

W Wt# 

■yirXi 


y,m 


evenly, not in a fleeting moment of 
ir Eves ' 


Sculpture by Julian Opie goes up at Paris Biennale. 


publicity director. Catherine. Dc- 
boisfroget. “Perhaps next year we 

J’TT 1 Z — V.-I> _ 1!aaL 


will bring back a link of the popa- 


lar burlesque style. But it i; 
nitely not pornography.” 

Nevertheless, gig gles abound ai 
the pastry shop, where a sales deck 
said customers had been eager to 
buy pastel-colored almond-paste 
cakes formed into lips, hearts and, 
er, other shapes. The shop also 
turns out mane-to-order cakes. 

Visitors to Ero 85 must be at 
least 18, but, despite the presence 
of graphic “objets d’art” by some 


of the 300 exhibitors, Philippe Ren- 
aud, the fine -art and antique dealer 
who organized this year’s convec- 
tion, sard bad taste, obscenity and 
pornography were screened out 
There is an exhibit of Man Ray 
photographs, a 16th-century tapes- 
try and an exhibit of sexy costumes 
and dothes. 

There are photos of ladies in lin- 
gerie, sflhn ukie images of naked 
female forms, magazines. 50-year- 
old fashion drawings, antique post- 
cards and even a “cuvte ero done” 
bottle. 


— red wine at 20 francs a 


their lives but al their most com- 
plete and best, in repose and integ- 
rity. 

Donghi was born in Rome in 
1897. the son of a doth merchant 
His parents separated and he was 
put in a children’s home. After 
studying at the academies of Rome 
and Florence, he participated in the 
exhibitions of the new realists in 
Italy, and in 1927 took part in a 
show at the Carnegie Institute in 
Pittsburgh. 

For anyone who has been in 
Rome and gotten acquainted with 
the Pqpolma, the people of the 
streets, with their roughness, wis- 
dom and cool fatalism, not only 
Caravaggio's canvases of mythical 
and religious events but also 
Donghi's people at tire opposite 
side of the spectrum must have a 
special meaning. 

The young women . sitting sagdy 
in bedrooms and not in studios, tire 


tine and darkjpwd colors. 
Some of the oils of the last ye 
rather fussy and of obsesriredei 
hardly seem to be from Us ha 
But most give us a wonderful v 
of a fine realist and Us 
“Antonio. Donghi, .. . 
from 1922 to 1961," Palazzo R 
chi. Piazza Pantaleo, through 4 


, wi %. MM 
«. 1! 


Mugler Hi 


Ernesto Tatafiore, inspired 
itiyNeat 


his native city, is a witty 
tan who uses the devices of 


be paints the volcano and ita ] 
streams in flat smouldering 
against glum, guunetal-gnyri 
adding floating letters or sentei 
as a whimsical touch. The 
are by no means naive, but qS 
wry and knowing. Despite ' 
tongue-in-check attitude, the 1. 
sions to the platitudes of histai- 
data and figures, there is soured, 
truly charming and serious k 
Tatafiore’s jolly and sinister v 
nelligen 


opposite are an intelligent appranatiar -. 
X have a the world he has to five with. - 


Ernesto Tatc^iort,” Gallerh 1. 


Ponte, Via S. 
April 21. 


ignazio 6, thn 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


mope 




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Next progra ms: 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


Page 7 


ARTS /LEISURE 


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s fybree Corots in a Row, Including a Gem From the Early 1860s, Surface at Drouot 


'nieraaaonal Herald Tribune 

R1S — France is an astonish- 
i treasure bouse of unrccord- 
irks of art. Many surface at 
. ;• m, where they are sol d in the 

tUREN MELIKIAN 

\cy style that ch a r ac t e rizes 
of French auctioneering. 

■ - Tuesday, at a sale conducted 
• . iviane Jutheau-Paugam, three 
' is in a row tuned up. Oneis a 
Vom the early 1860s. By then. 


the French master had developed a away in a comer at the right, intro- 
style that indudes ah the ingredi- during a spotof color and shifting 


ents of the Impressionist move- 
ment that was to blossom 10 years 
later — with one exception. His 
palette is darker, mostly in brown- 
ish and blackish greens. Otherwise, 
the view of a thatched farmhouse in 
Normandy, with trees blocking out 
the horizon and a stretch of grass in 
the foreground, has the typical 
sketchy touch later adopted by Mo- 
net and his fellow Impressionists. 
Three small figures, a man and two 
women picnicking, are tucked 


the focus of the picture away from 
the center, which was a revolution- 
ary idea ai the time. 

The picture has an impeccable 
provenance. It was formerly in the 
collection of the descendants of the 
Monsieur Briand whose house at 
Vimoutiers appears in the view, 
and it has been reproduced in the 
second supplement by AncLrfc 
SchoeDer and Jean Dieterle to the 
standard work on the artist, 
“L’oeuvre de Corot” by A Robam. 


Its minute size, 24 5 by 35 centime- 
ters, could have hampered it. In- 
tense competition from the trade 
sent it shooting up to 730,000 
francs (about 573,000), paid by 
Richard Green of Lon< 


log reproduction. Hence the low 
price, 160.000 francs. 

The third Corot, with the same 
provenance as the other two, al- 
most looked like a poster for a 
beginner’s course in the artist’s 


The next Corot was a view of a work. A duster of trees overhangs a 
wood near Vimoutiers. The study wide expanse of water — the River 
of sunlight falling through a vault Vire, in Normandy — with two 
of foliage to a muddy lane is en- punts by the river bank. A Norman 
c h a nting . But time has not been village appears in the dicinnre as a 



. . hardly 

work can be seen even m the cam- banal, one of ibe two figures in the 


Merry Mugler Retains Wit and Fun but Fits In Better Now 


hands om e jacket Worn with big 
sombrero hats and bell-bottom 


By Hebe Dorsey 

.. International Herald Tribune 

VR1S — Almost everyone panto, this first group had a definite the business asm the past and as a 
■■■ ved Thierry Mugler's coHec- South American gaucho look. totally French fashion house,” 


ques Lenoir and Gaby Aghion, and 
hope that they will continue to run 


winch does not mean that ev- 
ie is going to buy it Burton 
.. ' - ky, president of Saks Fifth AV- 
I' said: “It’s not for us, but we 
“ . ' .yed the show” 

-• anting right after a Japanese 
.'..'-.■dose, Mugler’s collection 
- 7" ‘sday night was like cham- 


Paiskys in sharp primary colors 
were seen on silk jersey, vmet and 
craw fake furs and worn by an odd 
medley of models, including the 
transvestite Terry Toye. Tight vel- 
vet pants under bright satin shirts 



were an evolution from Mugler’s 
last coDection, where Ik introduced 
the ski-pants that are now so large- 
ly copied. The abundance of color 
had a cheery effect. In addition to 
primary colors, Mugler showed 
low-key shades such as burgundy, 
purple and olive green. 

A genuinely talented designer, 
Mugler has had an uneven career, 
with a series of hits and misses. But 
this collection, which was serious 

with Op Art jerseys, psycho- soa’s and sbould attract more buy- 


: y PAMS FASHIONS 

*. Jte, fun and witty and very Pari- 
-Vv It also included good dothes, 
■■ ' bly coats in lengths from threc- 
- -^.ler to the floor. Mugler’s pea 
.■ ••.■7 st and blouson, with double 
of silver buttons, was memo- 






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prints, bell-bottbm 
iskzrts worn with 
x, and risqufe, Brigitte Bardot- 
: bosoms popping out of long, 
y vamp sheaths whose skirts 
: cut all the way to the crotch, 
body-conscious Mugler had all 
lotnes strongly ho gging the 
and showed more than his 
dure of soy, saucy dresses: 
. _ this time he fits in the overall 
rion picture as wefl. Nutty ao- 
ories, such as giant Afro wigs, 
'"UO br-Hc shaped Hire television 
mu and ornate masks, were all 
e for fun. 

he opening, with black condu- 
u«. velvet suits, had one of 
2* deft favorite tricks — 
d in with color that 
red at die flick of a zipper. 

’* ,ri '•jackets, when an the pleats, four 
‘"‘boat and two in back, were 
ted up, one was left with a 
— pdy, figure-conscious and quite 


Arr- 


ets.. 

to his Business manager Michel 
Douard, totaled S4 millio n last 
year. 25 percent in the United 
States. Douard added that since the 
majority of shares in Mugler were 
sold to Umberto Ginochietti, an 
Italian manufactnrer, in 1981, busi- 
ness had grown 70 percent a year. 

The talk at Chlot on Friday 
monring was about the house being 
sold last week to the British compa- 
ny Alfred Druhill Ltd. Tony 
Greener, manag in g director of 
D imhill, who was seeing the collec- 
tion far the first time , said that the 
company started in the pipe busi- 
ness, had diversified and now owns 
a prosperous menswear and fra- 
grances business. It bought Chlo6 
to add a women’s line, he sad. 

“We felt that Chlofc has a very 
fine reputation. We left the man- 
agement to its original owners, Jac- 


Greener said. 

_ The figures at Chlo6 are impres- 
sive. Greener said sales in fashion 
and fragrances totaled weD over 
S100 milium in 1984, 40 percent of 
it in ready-to-wear. But anm the 
departure of Karl Lagerfeld, who 
made Chios’s reputation as the 
boose designer, the ready-to-wear 
figures have been dropping, 
Greener said. 

The coDection has been turned 
over to several low-key designers, 
including Guy Paulin, sportswear, 
Philippe Guibourg6, evening; Peter 
O’Brien, who was already in charge 
of licensing; and the Italian Lu- 
ciano Soprani. Add to that Aghion, 
who Hkcs to keep a vary dose eye 
on the designing studio, and you 
end up with a lot of cooks in this 

kitchen 

But this seemed to please the 
new manager, who said D imhill 
would rather promote the name of 
fThWi than tha t of a particular de- 
signer. The company may have a 
hard time, as the collection was 
flat, anonymous and terribly un- 
even. Tbe beginning, though better 
than last time, added up to no-risk, 
commercial sportswear. The eve- 
ning wear dragged on and an, soon 
crossing the hne between the safe 
side and dowdiness. 

Nothing ever chang es much at 
Jean^-Lonis Scherrer’s, but he is a 
reliable designer whose clothes 
have an exquisite, well-groomed, 
Parisian chir. This season, his fa- 
vorite inspiration was the colorful 
paisley shawls worn by coquettes 
under Napoleon IE, an item large- 
ly used in interior decoration. 



ChifatM 


Thierry Mover’s Op-Art evocations of the 1960s. 


Schemer opened with very pretty 
long dresses in paisley prints 
topped by long, matching knitted 
jackets. He also shewed long pais- 
ley silk sweaters edged with knit 
over long tweed skirts, and com- 
bined paisley with velvet, jersey 

and li gh t flannels 

The skinny dress under a shorter. 


flared coat was a recurrent theme. 
In a season when black is not beau- 
tiful. Schemer showed too many 
little black dresses followed by 
panne velvet and gold lante. Acces- 
sories in this reassuring collection 
included turbans, miles of crystal 
jewelry, and big shawls thrown 
over the shoulder. 


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Detail of dragon embroidery on a bine velvet canopy made in the late Ming Dynasty (c. 1621-1644), on show at Spink & Son. 

inaugural Show at Nahiiin and Beetles Sets High Standard 


WBVERSITY 

DEGREE 


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KyX z By Max Wykcs-Joyoe 

— — ^ International Herald Tribune 

JNDON — Until last fall Peter 
— 'Nahum was a director and 
d of the British Paintings De- 
triment at Sotheby’s. Chns Bcc- 
a medical practitioner, part 
comedy duo, “Beetles and 
i,” and a dealer in 19th- 
watenxtiOTS. Nahum and 
gone into partnersltip 
Sl James’s gallery in 
,the inaugural exhibition is of 
Discoveries." 
are setting themselves an 
standard. The 
incudes a tine Pre-Raphad- 
hndreape, “Fairiigfrt Downs — 
m the Sea,” by William 
Hunt (1827-1910); a ma- 
landscape, “View from 
Road," by Edward 


“Departure Platform: Victoria Sta- fourth, Leopold Flotek, was bora 
tion/’ by James Tissot( 1836-1902); *» D '*— *- kj- « j- 



m 

Pdand and trained as a painter in 
Canada and London after reading 
classics in Montreal. Working in cm 
on canvas, he seems the most ac- 
complished of the four. 

Of the 10 “grand masters" of 
Brazilian abstraction, four were 
bom in Japan — among them, the 
best, Tikashi Fnkusnima, who 
bases his large paintings on the 
movements and colors of the sea- 
sons; and the self-taught Tonne 

O btain* 

The B nmKan- ham artists in- 
clude die fine sculptor Servulo Es- 
meraldo. This is an altogether im- 
pressive introduction to Britain of 
these artists. 

“Abstraction x 4," Canada Heme 
Cultural Center Gallery, 

SW1; u Modem Bt 
” Brazilian Center, 15 

ri«. Rossetti's celebrated ^ ™ 


and an abstract painting by tiki 
artist-potter WSfiam State Murray 
(1881-1962). 

“New Discoveries — A Celebra- 
tion of British and European Paint- 
ing cf the 19th and 20th Century,” 
Peter Nahum and Chris Beetles, 5 
Ryder Street, Sl James's, SW1, 
through March 30. 

□ 


often in his shadow, and, from 
1867, when they quarreled, had to 
contend with Whistler’s bitter en- 
mity. 

Garton and Cooke, in collabora- 
tion with the Dutch deala Th. 
Lamentins, are showing 100 etch- 
ings and drypoints by Haden that 
display the mil range of Ins sMls- 
Thrs is all the more surprising since 
he was not trained as a professional 


characteristics Hall most values in 
his sculpture — “stillness, light- 
ness, tension, ascent, enclosure.” 

"Nigel Hall — Recent Sculpture,” 
Juda Rowan Gallery, 11 Tottenham 
Mews, off Tottenham Street, Wl, 
through April 27. 

□ 

In the Nahum and Beetles inau- 
gural exhibition, William Staite 


artist but as a surgeon; in ins early Murray is represented by “Action 
years he exhibited at the Royal and Inaction one of a group of six 
Academy under the name FL Dean. 


are nignngnted in “Abstraction x 
4” at the Canada House Cultural 
Center Gallery and in “Modem 
Brazilian Abstraction” at the Bra- 
zilian Cen ter, under the auspices of 
the Brazilian Embassy. 

Of the four Canadians, three 
disd- 


Diis show ranges over many years 
an “Mytton 


812-1888); a chalk drawing 
I'an nil painting of two of Dante plined maime r: Joseph 

nalaVvntAA fVwJi Hv birth unH Am 


>i-\'jmnenf — “Aspecta Medusa’ 
— ■ '*^.d “Jane Moms as Beatrice"; a 
* ;^ 5 jile and untypical painting of 
.'-’■^ ■'ng) “David — oh! that I had the 
- tigs of a dove” tiy Lord Leighton 

.„’C-<‘v3<M896); a graphic portrayal of 


t raining , lives and works in Toron- 
to; Harold Feist, Texan-bom and 
American-trained, also lives in To- 
ronto; and Douglas Haynes, bom 
in Canada, t rained in me Nether- 
lands, now lives in Edmonton. The 





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April Z 

U 

Chinese scholars have for many 
centuries done their artists a disser- 
vice by dioriiaring all WOtks except 
paintings, sculptures, ceramics and 
braizes as “mmar arts.” Two years 
ago tbe Oriental Department of 
Spink mounted a collection of the 
“minor arts." Now, in “The Minor 
Arts of China H," they have on 
show 239 works, many of museum 
quality. 

The show is divided into 10 sec- 
tions, notable among which are 35 

Miiimnk and 78 tarrile s. Among the 
enamels are 18th-century incense 
burners — one in the form of a 
kylin, a mythical nrinew animal. 


of Ms best work, from 
HalT (1859), a country house 
where be often stayed for the salm- 
on fishing, to a drypomt of the 
River Test at Longpansh in Hamp- 
shire, “The Little Longiarish” 
all the drills he 
in the intervening decades. 

“Sir Francis Seymour Haden,” 
Garton & Cooke, 9 Lancashire 
Court, New Bond Street , Wl, 
through Aprils 

□ 

Nigel Hall is a British sculp un- 
fast achieving an international rep- 
utation, showing with Maeght in 
Paris and Zurich, Kasahara in Osa- 
ka, Nkhnn nra in Tokyo, Lfipke in 
Frankfurt and Rechmau in Co- 
logne. His “Recent Sculptures” at 
the Juda Rowan Gallery are made 
of printed ai nm n m m tubes and 
panels and are made to be hung on 
walls, but have to be carefully and 
modestly lighted to throw minus- 
cule shadows that bring out the 


abstract “Space Tune Studies” he 
painted in 1936. Tbe exhibition on 
Murray in Reran 138 of the Vic- 
toria and Albert Museum shows 
him in a much more familiar gmae, 
that of an mflnmrifll artist-potter 
of the 1920s and 1930s. The show 
consists of 34 of his major ceramic 
sculptures, many in the form of 
bowls, vases ami covered jars; and 
a small group of works by his chief 
students — Sam Hafle, Robert 
Washington and Henry Ham- 
mond. 

His early ceramics often betray 
his dose association with the Vorn- 
dsts; ins lata work is dose in feel- 
ing to the Oriental, for he had 
learned to bold the decorator’s 
brush to maximum effect from the 
Japanese ceramist Shoji Hamada, 
and was greatly influenced by his 
friend Arthur Waley’s study “Zen 
Buddhism and its Relation to Art” 
(1922). 

^William Staite Murray," Vic- 
toria & Albert Museum, Roam 138, 
Cromwell Road, SW7, through April 
28. 


Dinosaur of 'Baby’ No Cutie 

gourd-form Pekin enamel -vase of J %/ 

George Loomis (WniianiKatt) and 


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1736-1795. 

Anxmg the textiles — a Spink 
dalization not only in the Oriental 
Department — are a late Ming (c. 
1621-1644) blue velvet canopy, em- 
broidered with dragons charing 
peads and clouds, apparently com- 
posed of yardage ongnially intend- 
ed for a conn robe; and a group of 
18th-century brocade robes, al- 
tered for the Tibetan market. 

“The Minor Am of China JJ," 
Spink & Son Lhnitai 5/7 King 
Street,- Sl James's , SW1, through 
April 3. 

□ 

Sr Frauds Seymour Haden in 
Ms lifetime (181S-1910) suffered a 
considerable eclipse in Ms reputa- 
tion a$ a major printmako, and as 
a prime factor in the Etching 
Movement, because he was Whis- 
tler's brother in-law and worked 


By Vincent Canby 

New York. Times Serrice 

N EW YORK — The top of any 
list of beloved, cuddly crea- 
tures would probably be occupied 

by puppies, kittens, gerbils, rabbits 
and maybe newly hatched chicks 
once their sticky fuzz has dried to 

MOVIE MARQUEE 


downy-yellow softness. The bot- 
tom of the list? Baby garter snakes, 
tadpoles (which can’t be easily cud- 
dled anyway) and, Fm afraid, the 

man-made, 10-foot-long, baby disdain that is not inappropriate, 
brontosaurus, or “hatchling,” that the film waT shot mostly 


his wife, Susan (Sean Young), a 
research sdentist, locddng for dino- 
saurs deep in the bosh. 

George and Susan find a daddy 
and a mommy brontosaurus and 
their baby, “Baby.!* With the help 
of some “good” natives, George 
and Susan fight to save Baby from 
“bad” natives, one of whom seems 
to have been modeled vagudy on 
Idi Amin, and fromtwo unscrupu- 
lous white men, borrowed from ±e 
dumbest of the old “Tarzan” mov- 
ies. Patrick McGoohan plays tbe 
nastier white man with an elevated 


is the centerpiece of the newianta- 
.sy-adventure film “Baby Se- 
cret of the Lost Legend.” 

The film is a sort of stunted 
“young-adult" movie about the ad- 
ventures in stOl-Daikest Africa of 


on location, in the Ivory Coast, 
none of it, with the exception of the 
opening sequence, looks especially 
authentic, and, worse, none of it is 
mind-expandmg. as good fantasy 
should be. 


punts wears a bright red bonnet. 
Small as ii is, the Mob of color 
makes the scene more alive. It sold 
for 720,000 francs. 

In a mix that would be incon- 
ceivable in London or New York, 
the sale included a group of sketch- 
es by Sonia Delaunay. Although 
ultimately intended for figurative 
purposes, these were essentially 


i is an extraordinary story, as 
told in the sale catalog by the ex- 
pert for the sale. Jean-Pierre Ca- 
maid. 

In 1923. he relates, Sonia De- 
launay did about 50 drawings for 
“simultaneous fabrics." The phrase 
in Freud makes no more sense 
than it does in English: it would 
seem to mean essentially that the 
fabrics were made “en suite,” or in 
a ret, as cabinetmakers say. De- 
launay did them fra a French com- 
pany in Lyon. Ha contribution 
was purely pictorial, but It gave ha 
the idea of producing fabrics. A 
year later, she opened a workshop 
and started turning out fabrics 
woven to ha designs for private 
patrons as well as theatrical and 
ballet productions. In May 1924, 
when a “Bal des Pages" was held 
fra the benefit of forma Russian 
court officers, she contributed cos- 
tumes on the theme “La Mode & 
venir” (the fashion to be). Men clad 
in geometrical costumes on rigid 
frames pranced around to specially 
composed music, characterized by 
Camard as "insolite” (unaccus- 
tomed or weird). Women dressed in 
designed to look like 
“colored rhythms” were also fea- 
tured. A poem by the now-forgot- 
ten Joseph DeUeD was recited dur- 
ing intermission. 

The designs were then shelved, to 
be retrieved 60 years lata by Ca- 
maixL Some are working drawings 
of documentary interest; others, 
done in gouache, are of greater sig- 
nificance to modem art Seeing 
them at the sale preview was like 
bong invited to watch a creative 
process 60 years ago. The feeling 
worked wonders as the auction 
proceeded. 

A geometrical construction of 
semicircles and spheres done in 
wash heightened with gouache, 
which without CamaitTs due rare 
would hardly guess to be a sketch 
for a costume, whizzed to 72,000 
francs. It is signed and dated 1924. 
Eventually, no doubt, it will be seen 


in a museum. Another purely ab- 
stract sketch, less rigidly geometri- 
cal and dating from 19x2, went tin 
to 115.000 francs. 

More surprisingly, a purely doc- 
umentary Soma Delaunay sketch 
showing women dancing in avant- 
garde costumes, done for a Dada 
show organized by Tristan Tzara, 
brought 61,000 francs. 

While these were tbe most signif- 
icant discoveries in the first halfof 
the week at Drouot, they were by 
no means the only ones, dot, com- 
mercially sp eaking , the most lucra- 
tive. The top prize — a steep 
780,000 francs paid by an unidenti- 
fied foreign buyer — went to a 
landscape by Fnts Thaulow. 

Born in Christiania — now Oslo 
— in 1847, this pointer had an 
unconventional career that resulted 
in the most academic type of paint- 
ing. He was trained at the School of 
Fine Arts in Christiania and at the 
Copenhagen Academy. Weaiying 
of his stultifying surroundings, he 
left for Karlsruhe, Germany, and 
lata to France, where he spent 
most of tbe rest of his life, except 
far numerous trips to Germany, 
where his work was immensel y 
popular. He had a studio in Dieppe 
for many years and from there 
journeyed through the French 
provinces. The painting offered at 
Drouot was obviously done in 
France, possibly in one of the east- 
ern pons of Normandy. The houses 
walls. 


rice of 
sale 


other, resulting 

780.000 francs. With 
chaw of 10.55$ percent (below 

20.000 francs, different percent- 
ages apply), this is dose to £80.000. 
which compares favorably with the 
tom! of £$1,000 paid in June at 
Christie’s for a comparable land- 
scape that was in a much brighter 
color scheme and thus more sal- 
able. 

■ Baudelaire Book Sold 

A first edition of “Les Fleurs du 
mal” by Charles Baudelaire fetched 
1 J million francs (about 5130.000) 
at a sale of 19th-century books 
Wednesday by the auction house 
Ada Picard Taj an. Reuters report- 
ed from Paris. 

The slim red volume of poetry, 
dedicated on the flyleaf to the 
painter Eugfene Delacroix, a close 
friend of Baudelaire, was bought 
by Pierre Bftts. a Parisian dealer. 
Experts at the sole said the 1857 
dedication probably increased the 
value of the book tenfold. 

The sale of 108 books belonging 
to Jacques Guerin, u private collec- 
tor. raised more than 12 million 
francs. 


ole brick 


the steep 


with purp) 

tiled roofs with a gentle 
curve at the bottom, are ol 
with loving care. The expanse of a 
widening river sending bock reflec- 
tions of a wintry sky as the breeze 
blows ripples on its surface ex- 
presses a genuinely poetic fee] for 
the French countryside. In the dis- 
tance, mauvisb trees crowning a 
low MIL It would be a truly sensi- 
tive picture if it did not have a 
photographic quality that brings it 
within inches of kitsch. 

Thaulow is much sought-after in 
northern Europe these days. The 
picture, beautifully reproduced on 
the catalog cover of Hervfc Pou- 
lain’s sale, had been under cata- 
loged by the expert, Andri 
SchoeDer, who has a large file on 
the artist. The title he gave it, “La 
Riviere"; the medium, identified in 
three words; and the dimensions, 
60 by 73 centimeters, made up the 
entry. Dealers from all ova Europe 
hoped to make a killing; instead, 
they bid vehemently against each 



BUCCELLATI 


4 Place Venddme 
Paris I er Tel. 260.12.12 


KWERNATIONAL ART 


».i i 1 1 




NEW YORK /PAHS 


ZABRISKIE 

TIMOTHY 

WOODMAN 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

PETER BRIGGS 

37 rue Qutncampoix, Paris 


MAASTRICHT 


ANTIQUAIRS 
INTERNATIONAL 
& 


P I C T U R A 
FINE ART FAIR 



E U R O H A L 


M A A S T R 


C H T N L 


23-31 MARCH 1985 

UnCMMIU l«2 HRS. si KttAlMMI H*S. 


PARIS 

r= WALLY HNDLAY =1 

Galleries Intemafional 

now yarlc - Chicago * palm beach 
bevedy htfb - park 


EXHIBITION 

F. GALL 

» ■ 

GANTNER - BOURRHl 
HAMBOURG - BOUDET 
MICH&-HENRY - SEBIRE 


Impressionists and 
post impressionists 

2 Ave. Matignon - Paris 8th 

T*i 223 . 7074 . mpodoy (fan. irfcfay 
IO ojh. la 1 tun. - 2 i 30 to 7 pj*. 


Hotel George V - 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

•m. en. Milan m>i p^-ua t* * *■.; 
M* 7 ■»>.-< pm. 


ZURICH 


GALERIE 

BRUNO MEISSNER 


k 

ui 

a 

Ui 

z 

I- 

U1 

m 

5 


wv 


Wa n ti ng to buy 
Groat Painting! 
Old Masters, 
Impressionists 

for instance 
G. Courbet 
C. Pissarro 

Galerte Bruno Meissner 
Bahnhotetra*»14 
CH-8001 Zurich 
Telephone (01) Z11 90 00 


AIHRMS 


VA5SIU LAMBIINOS 

Recent paintings 

ZYGOS GALLERY 

(Behind National Gaflety) 

MARCH 19- APRIL 4 , 1985 
lOa.ai.-2 p.m. and 6-10 p.m. 
Sundays 1 1 aun. - 2 p.m. 

33, lofontos 

Athens 116 34— GREECE 


350 

reasons 
to -visit 
LE LOUVRE 
DES 
ANTIQUAIRES 

250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SUNDAY 
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

2 , PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
75001 PARIS -TEL ( 1)297 27 00 

Now Exhibition : 
T1HEURES : OBJETS DART 
de rAntjquM au XIX* alicle 


27 man - 4 mat 1985 


Klapheck 


Galerie Maeght Lelong 

13, me de Tehfran, 75008 Paris 


27 man - 4 mai 1985 


Dibbets 


Galerie Maeght Lelong 

14, me de Tfh&sn, 75008 Paris 


FELIX VERCEL 

presents 

TAURELLE 

« danse at paysage » 
march 20 - aprtl 10 


• AVENUE HATIONON 
PARIS 8 * 25 & 25.19 


DENISE RENl 


196 Bivd. St.-Germain, 7th. 222.77.57 

NARAHA 

Sculptures 

First Exhibition in France 


-GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


.6, Rue Jean-Mermoz. 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82^44 , 


— EXHIBITION FROM — i 

Matisse to Warhol 

1905-1982 

held tHl end April at 

Galerie 1900-2000 

8 Rue Bonaparte 75006 PARIS 
.325.84.20. 


"ART ^ 

EXHTOmONS” j 
"ANTIQUES* J 
"AUCTION I 

<2 A I pc« ! 

appear on Saturday 








TRIBUNE, SATUROAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Om HI oh Law Loot On 


Indus 127292 1277.39 126120 126795— 077 

Trans 57187 HUS 9H91 57488- 421 

UMI 149 J 6 15024 14828 U9 J* + OH 

Comp 51346 5UJ4 S0OS7 91141— l.M 


composite 

Industrials 

Transit 

utilities 

Finance 


Hfeb Ltd CJom arat 

10408 10351 iqlas —OSD 

m2 11907 1W.W-JS 

7743 77 JI3 7703—03 
5444 505 508 +M0 
IffW 10747 10747-044 


NYSE Diaries 


N 

Rrida>s 

IS 

I 


( 

Closing 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Pec B ned 
VnCTlnind 
Toma imm 
Mow Mm 
Now Lews 
Velum, up 
Volume down 


3* 250 

323 ass 

2 » »1 

79* 777 

at at 

13 14 

2JULU0 

XU0J70 


ComMoltc 

tnowtrlDH 

Finance 

Irauroftce 

UNI Md 

Bonus 

TnmA 


WHO 
t Cnf* AM 
1—017 173.77 
1-028 M* 
) 4-014 33035 
I 4-003 31087 
f —OB5 35M7 
I 4-041 250.74 
1—037 25591 


□oh Pm. 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uncnensed 
Total issues 
New High* 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume down 


688 833 

815 in 

SOS 486 

3008 2012 

as a 

15 7 

39429400 


Bar Soles "SHTJ 

March 21 308.103 45*281 2JM 

March 3D 319.111 4803J2 ..{JJ 

March 17 211812 5U2S7 U9B 

March IB 1K463 491909 5298 

Mordi IS I79JT7 454298 3421 

-included in me sales fhrun» 


VM at 4 P 14 H.SMM 

Pm.8PJW.voL 9593UM 

Prtv coauBdotcd dot* lliMMM 


S3 "ffi 
It % 

2325 4 » 

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1311 39k 
1231 13* 
TISS WH 
HB7 10b 
1047 3M 
849 7 

748 14* 
885 m 
878 M 


n 

K 

410 — ft 

a=S 

2£ ** 

aEs 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Tables inefade tht nationwide prices 
up to the amine on wall sireer and 
do not reflect late trodos elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


industrials 

Tram. 

UtfiBm 

Finance 


hIop Law Oese CVw 
200J6 197.32 177J3 —039 
15X15 153.M 15X71 -041 
79 J1 7945 77 J3 +007 
2077 2059 3040 — 007 
179.92 17844 179.04—021 



AMEX Stock Index 


N.Y. Stocks Off in Dull Session 


RMenfli 
HtBhLow Stack 


a**, yh.pi: not km low duatavi 



y. 




■zu 


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XV. 194k 
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42ft 241, 

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United Press International 

NEW YORK — The stock market wound up 
a lackluster session with a small loss Friday, 
despite a new report showing inflation re- 
mained moderate. 

Except for some excitement in a handful of 
stocks rumored to be takeover candidates, trad- 
ing was dull “It seemed like merger mania," 
said Peter Ftuniss of Sfaearson I-chman, 

He said institutional investors were in the 
background and traders were dominant as ru- 
mors flowed back and forth on several issues. 

The Dow Jones industrial average lost 0.77 to 
1,267.45. For the week, the Dow jumped 20.10. 

The New York Stock Exchange index shed 
020 to 103.65 and the price of an average share 
decreased 6 cents. Standard Sc Poor's 500-stock 
index fell OJI to 179.04. Declines topped ad- 
vances by an 8-7 ratio among the 1,999 issues 
traded at the dosing. 

Big Board volume totaled 9925 minion 
shares, up from 95.93 milli on traded Thursday. 

Before the stock market opened, the Labor 
Department reported Consumer Prices in- 
creased 0 J percent in February, keeping the 
inflation rale in the 3.5-percent range. 

The report an inflation followed by one day 
the government estimate that the economy was 
growing at a 2.1 -percent rate in the first quarter 
of 1985. 

Chester Pado of A.C. Securities, Los Angeles, 
said the market seemed to be in a “backing and 
GUing mode" after rebounding from the 1240 
area. 

He expects a renewed attack on the 1,300 
level possibly by the end of next week although 


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there could be another testing process at the 
1,280 area first 


Eldon Grimm, of Birr Wilson Co., said the 
market was “just drifting, everyone's saying the 
only game in town is these takeover deals.” 

“The market is idling me you have two tiers, 
with one consisting of blue chips and special 
situations including takeovers," said Ralph 
Acampora of Kidder. Peabody. He said the 
other part of the stock market was the second- 
ary stocks, which have not done wdL 

“Taken together," he said, “the market is at 
best neutral to weak." He expects any rally 
attempt to be “temporary and non-sus tamable” 
unless the market can show better volume on 
the upside and better breadth." 

ITT Coro, was the most active NYSE-listed 
issue, up 1* to 3514. The heavy trading came on 
new rumors that Minneapolis investor Irwin 
Jacobs wants to see a spin-off of assets such as 
Sheraton Hotels and Hartford Insurance. 

Northeast Utilities was second, unchanged at 
14ft. 

Texas Oil & Gas followed, unchanged at 17. 

Forstmann Little & Co. announced plans for 
a leveraged buyout of McGraw- Edison Co. for 
559 a share in cash. McGraw- Edison spurted 11 
to 551*. 

Crown ZeDerbach Corp., in which Sr James 
Goldsmith has acquired a stake, gained 4 to 
42ft. 

Snap On Tools Carp, dipped 3ft to 34%. The 
company said it expected record sales in the 
quarter ended March 30 but earnings could be 
lower. 


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ADRIAN ZECHA LINKS 
A LUXURY CHAIN 


MAKING DEALS WHILE 
BREAKING BREAD 


\ drian Zecha looks out of 
: 1 place at New York's May- 

{ air Regent Hotel For one 

* ' ■ - g, he's wearing a fisherman's 
■ ; ater. At this bastion of con- 

• ; ative elegance, in a cozy sa- 
- room where tea and finger 

r ■ c iwiches are served every af- 
.oon at four o’clock, Zecha 
' -;s to be the only man not 
; ring a proper coat and tie. For 
Lather thing, he's East In dian 
.:d while the Mayfair Regent 
’• ‘/have its share of Chinese and 
. ‘anese guests, not a lot of Fast 
■ vans pass through the hotel's 

■ jiving door. Yet Zecha seems 
:■ jit home in this Victorian-style 
!. : ira that one might imagine it to 
J Mis own living room. 

;i ' .1 a sense, it is exactly that 
^ e ^ Adrian Zecha is, at 52, a globe- 
~.;'.ting veteran deal maker. 

: i len years ago he engineered 
:• : he Mayfair the sort of quiet 
] • that has become his trade- 
• .-He. At a time when the city's 
L : ; "els were still feeling the pinch 
times, Zecha put together 
roup of investors and ap- 
: ached Bill Zeckendorf, Jr., the 

- ..eloper who himself had" 
rght the old Mayfair House 

years before. Zeckendorf had 
■' Vailed Sirio Maccioni at the 
; ‘el's elegant Le Cirque restau- . 
:: : among other things, and put 

■ : stately old 200-room hotel on 
=■ ■; long road back to respect- 

. :ity. But there was still so far 
- ;o, and Zeckendorf had other 
< ‘ to fry. Fbr $14.5 million, he 
; ; . '1, the hotel could be had. 

!. problem was, Zecha and his 

- - i tners, Hotel Managers Bob 


Burns and Georg Rafael, had only 
$15 million they could squeeze 
from their Hong Kong-based Re- 
gent International Hotels, a pri- 
vate company specializing in ho- 
tel management and acquisition. 
Hurriedly, 'they put together a 
$1 million nonrefundable down 
payment. Then Zecha went look- 
ing through his mental list of 
names. By the time he was 
through, he had recruited a group 
of Chicago businessmen— led by 
Mortgage Banker Norman Peri- 
mutter — to ante up 75% of the 
price, while he and his partners 
contributed the balance. 

To an outsider, that might have 
seemed a dubious proposition. All 
that effort for a quarter of the 
pie? But it was just the sort of 
proposition Zecha, Burns and 
Rafael liked. Now they could fol- 
low their usual game plan, with 
Zecha as the front man wheeling 
off to make another deal Bums 
and Rafael stepping in with hotel 
expertise to oversee the day-to- 
day operation and the backers 
watching their investments ap- 
preciate with little or no effort 
on their part — a strategy of man- 
agement rather than ownership. 

Says Zecha: ‘The guy who owns 
a hotel has two choices. He can 
run it himself and become a pro- 
prietor-owner. But if he . is an in- 
vestor in a property company, he 
does not want to, because run- 
ning a hotel is a very specialized 
business, full of daily management 
problems. In the U.& the name of 
the game in property ownership is 
riot return on investment but real 
estate appreciation." ' 


Zecha continues to hold a place 
as one of five directors on the 
Regent's international board. But 
the truth is that he sort of floats 
off on his own these days, serving 
as chairman of a publicly traded, 
energy-related trading company 
he founded in Hong Kong, put- 
ting a Regent hotel deal together 
in San Francisco, talking with 
bankers in Bangkok about an- 
other Regent hotel there, and in 
general tending to his various in- 
terests like some private practi- , 
tioner of shuttle diplomacy. 

The most recent example of 
Zecha s deal making involves the 


Park from a Saudi Arabian group 
for 45 million pounds. Just six 
months later, though, the hotel 
was sold again: this time by the 
Regent group to the Sultan of 
Brunei for an undisclosed sum. 
"We couldn't resist his offer," says 
Zecha. Once again, the Regent 
group retained a management 
position. From now until the turn 
of the century, it will work for the 
sultan to help assure the hotel's 
greater success. Already the sul- 
tan has tossed out Regent s own 
renovation budget of six million 
pounds — which in the main would 
have paid for air-conditioning to 


- - •• O-MS? 




.. . . ... ._ ; 

• * > l “» ** "i ‘ 


Adrian Zecha puts together big-money backers for luxury hotels. 


venerable Dorchester in London. 
Just last July Zecha and the Re- 
gent team,, bankrolled by Dallas 
Developer Bill Criswell and San 
Francisco Venture Capitalist Isaac 
Stein, swept in to buy the old 
350-room hotel overlooking Hyde 


be installed in the tradition-bound 
hotel — and suggested instead that 
Regent spend 22 million pounds 
putting in every luxury from new 
bathrooms with sunken tubs and 
separate shower stalls to a health 
Please turn page 


I n the beginning, there was 
breakfast. The original New 
Yorkers — good Dutch bur- 
ghers and enterprising English 
traders — would never have 
dreamed of starting a day s work 
without a hearty breakfast. 

In more recent times conve- 
nience foods and long commutes 
pushed real breakfasts right out 
of many people’s lives. Fortu- 
nately for egg-starved executives, 
muffin ma verts and other aspiring 
sybarites of the early morning, in 
the late 1960s two pioneers of 
the palate created something that 
was destined to revolutionize the 
way New Yorkers do business: 
the power breakfast 
The power breakfast was born 
amid the plush banquettes of Le 
Restaurant, the dining room at 
the Regency Hotel Gerald “Jerry" 
Tsai, Jr., a go-go portfolio man- 
ager based in Boston, was the 
proud father. Larry Tisch, who 
owns the Regency along with his 
brother Bob, was the attending 
physician. At first it was just Jerry 
and Larry, talking stocks over 
Danish and coffee in the hotel 
dining room whenever Jerry, who 
was busy starting his Manhattan 
Fund, came into town. But power 
hitters like Leon Hess of Hess 
Oil, Colt Industries' David Mar- 
golis and Developer Lewis Rudin 
soon joined in. As the crowds 
grew, so did the menu, and by 
the mid-1970s the limos were 
huddled three-deep along Sixty- 
first Street. Inside, deal makers 
from the worlds of politics, in- 
vestment banking and real estate 
broke brioches together, while 


the hired guns of the corporate 
takeover game made mental 
notes on who was breakfasting 
with whom. 

Still the undisputed leader in 
terms of Manhattan heavy hit- 
ters, the Regency has become a 
kind of Elaine's for businessmen — 
a place to be seen rather than a 
place to talk. And like its late- 
night counterpart, the Regency is 
never going to be famous for its 
fine food. Keeping in mind, then, 
that the whole point of a power 
breakfast is the jump it gives you 
on the rest of your day, what is a 
discriminating (and deal-hungry) . 
executive to do? Here arc a pair 
of places — one new. one recently 
renovated — that offer a chance 
to combine early morning busi- 
ness and gustatory pleasure 
without having to worry about 
what everyone else in the room 
is saying. 

At Le Regence. the restaurant 
at the Hotel Plaza Alheneo, Dec- 
orator Valerian Rybar used well- 
spaced tables, Wedgwood -blue 
walls, Haviland-Limoges china 
and vaulted ceilings playfully 
festooned with trornpe I’oeil 
clouds to create an aiiy, pleasant 
setting for morning tete-a-tetes. 

Though the carpeting is only 
temporary (the real rugs are still 
in the Orient) and the three crys- 
tal chandeliers have just been in- 
stalled, Chef Daniel Boulud seems 
to have the breakfast well in 
hand. The grapefruit is suffi- 
ciently cold and astringent to 
dear the most jaded palate. The 
espresso is respectably bitter, but 
Please turn page 


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: : doaSiatettevride sash-like ribbon effect serves to join radi floral wreafo to symmetacaSy placed smaller 
‘ ‘ bouquets erf flowers and fruits. The weavers' art has achieved its pixuiade with this example. 

; ■ ANTIQUE AND EXEMPLARY CARPETS AND TAPESTRIES 

An Appointment Is Suggested Smm KT v i.. in Dallas: 


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A 'Dealer tolerated in this Art Form to America 


in New York: 

15 East 57th Street pi 

5th floor r j 

New York, New York 10022 \9 
(212)759-3715 


Wvian Watson, Inc. 
590 Dallas Design Center 
1025 Stemmons Freeway 
Dallas, Texas 75207 
(214)651-0211 



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PARIS \LW \ORK 



ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


advertisement 


; g - c ., r ; 

t||- 


CALENDAR 


MARCH 

2 A The March of Dimes holds 
its tenth annual Cosmetics 
Industry Beauty Ball tonight in 
the Grand Ballroom of the New 
York Hilton HoteL Joseph Schri- 
ver, vice president of Bamberger’s, 
will serve as chairman, and the 
honorees will be Toni Hopkins, 
vice president of Neiman-Marcus, 
Margaret Sharkey-Kelly, a con- 
sultant for Cosmair, and S. James 
Spitz, president of International 
Flavors & Fragrances. Cocktails 
are at 7:00 pjn., followed by an 
8:00 dinner. Tickets for the black- 
tie gala are $300. Avenue of the 
Americas at 53rd Street. For in- 
formation, call (212) 922-1460. 

APRIL 

2 The Martha Graham Dance 
Company will give a special 
performance this evening at the 
New York State Theater. Four 
ballets will be presented, includ- 
ing Stravinsky’s 'The Rites of 
Spring." The 7:00 pjn. perform- 
ance will be followed by a black- 
tie dinner-dance on the prome- 
nade. Among the celebrity hosts 
are Elizabeth Taylor, Polly Bergen 
and Andy Warhol; Nancy Reagan 
is honorary chairman. Tickets are 
$250. Lincoln Center. For infor- 
mation, call (212) 838-5886. 

3 Christie s will hold 10:00 ajn. 

and 2:00 p.m. sales of 
watches, clocks and scientific in- 
struments. On April 17: silver and 
Russian objects. On April 19, in 
London: Andrea Mantegna’s Ado- 
ration of the Magi is up for auc- 
tion. On April 20: English furni- 
ture. On April 23 and 24: jewelry. 
502 Park Avenue. For informa- 
tion. call (212) 546-1120. 

Phillips will host an 11:00 am. sale 
of books and prints. On April 10: 
decorative arts. On April 17: a 2:00 
pm. sale of 20th-century paint- 
ings and a 6.-00 pm. sale of 20th- 
century decorative arts. On April 
24: Americana at 11:00 am. and 
silver at 2.-00 pm. On April 30: 
jewelry. 406 East 79th Street For 
information, call (212) 570-4830. 

4 Sotheby’s will host 10:15 am. 

and 2:00 p.m. sales of 
watches, docks and scientific in- 
struments. On April 10: Japanese 
art On April 17: Chinese art and 
furniture. On April 22: jewelry. 
On April 24, at 2:00 pmj the pri- 
vate library of the late Paul 
Francis Webster. On April 26: En- 
glish and continental silver. 1 334 
York Avenue. For information, 
call (212) 606-7000. 

5 The Jewish National Fund 
hosts a dinner-dance tonight 
at the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Cock- 
tails are at 6:00 pm., dinner is at 
7:00. Tickets are $300. Park Ave- 
nue at 42nd Street For informa- 
tion, call (212) 879-9300, ext 225. 

8 The Merce Cunningham 
Dance Foundation will hold 
its third annual "Arts Salute” gala 
in the Rainbow Room at Rocke- 
feller Center. Cocktails will be at 
7.-00 pjn, dinner at 8.-00. Tickets 
are $300. 30 Rockefeller Plaza. For 
information, call (21 2) 935-1840. 

9 The Paul Taylor Dance Com- 
pany will give a benefit per- 
formance on its opening night at 
City Center. Selections of Taylor's 
work from the past 30 years, in- 
cluding "Aureole," "Lost, Found 
and Lost” and "Esplanade," will 
be performed at 7:00 pm. A black- 
tie buffet dinner and party will 
follow. Hosts include Jerome 
Robbins, Martha Graham. Merce 
Cunningham and Robert Joffrey. 
Tickets are $150. 55th Street be- 
tween Avenue of the Americas 
and Seventh Avenue. For infor- 
mation, call (212) 966-6959. 

The Drawing Center will host its 
third annual spring benefit to 
celebrate its exhibit "Drawings 
from Venice: Masterpieces from 
the Museo Correr.” The show will 
feature 128 works from the col- 
lection of the municipal museum 
in Venice, including drawings by 
Durer, Tiepolo and Canaletto. The 
6:00 pm. cocktail preview will be 


followed by an 8:00 candlelight 
dinner at the Leo Castelli Gallery. 
The Hon. Giulio C. di Lorenzo, 
Consul General of Italy, will serve 
as honorary chairman. Tickets 
are $250. 137 Greene Street. For 
information, call (212) 982-5266. 

T A The Asia Society will host 
X\J its annual awards dinner 
tonight at the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel Thornton F. Bradshaw. RCA 
chairman and chief executive of- 
ficer, will chair this black-tie af- 
fair. The cocktail reception will 
begin at 630 pm. in the Astor 
Salon, followed by dinner in the 
Grand Ballroom at 730. Tickets 
are $500. Park Avenue at 50th 
Street For information, call (212) 
288-6400. ext 269. 

T Q A black-tie dinner-dance 
lO preview for the sale of the 
late Florence J. Gould's estate 
takes place this evening at Sothe- 
by’s. Tickets are $350 to $1,000; 
proceeds will benefit the Ameri- 
can Hospital of Paris. For infor- 
mation, call (212) 838-0157. The 
estate, which comprises more 
than 200 impressionist, Postim- 
pressionist and old master paint- 
ings, will be up for auction at 
7:00 pm. April 24 by ticket only 
and on April 25 at 10:15 am. and 
2:00 pm. 1334 York Avenue. For 
information, call (212) 606-7176. 


O / Magdeleine and Jean- 
Baptiste Chaumet will 
host champagne receptions to- 
night and tomorrow from 4:00 to 
8:00 pm. to introduce “Les Pierres 
d’Or.'' a collection of gold jewelry 
reminiscent of French 17th- and 
18th-century designs. By invita- 
tion only. 48 East 57th Street. For 
information, call (212) 683-4855. 


A /T The Committee of French- 
£ O American Wives will host 
the 42nd annual Bal des Berceaux 
in the Grand Ballroom of the 
Plaza HoteL Mrs. Jean Lanier and 
Mrs. Michael Somnolet cochair 
this black-tie benefit, which is 
under the patronage of French 
Ambassador Emmanuel de Mar- 
gerie. Tickets are $200 and $250. 
Fifth Avenue at 59th Street For 
information, call (212) 541-5812. 

O /A The Kips Bay Boys’ Club's 
annual show house, dec- 
orated by New York’s top interior 
designers, will be on view to the 
public from May 1 through May 
19. This year the Curzon House 
has been chosen. Tonight, from 
6:00 to 8:00 pm., there will be an 
opening night cocktail party at 
the Metropolitan Club. Tickets 
are $100. One East 60th Street 
The show house will be open 
Mondays through Saturdays from 
11:00 am. to 430 pm.; Sundays 
from noon to 430 pm.; Thursday 
nights till 730 pm. Tickets are 
$10. Four East 62nd Street For 
information, call (212) 893-8600. 

The Skowhegan School of Paint- 
ing and Sculpture will host its 
39th anniversary awards dinner 
in the Grand Ballroom of the 
Plaza HoteL A cocktail reception 
at 7:00 pm. will be followed by 
dinner at 8:00. Tickets are $300 
and $500. Fifth Avenue at 59th 
Street For information, call (212) 
755-1190. 


*1 Q Easter is the theme of the 
_L y Russian Nobility Associa- 
tion's annual dinner-dance in the 
Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf- 
Astoria HoteL A cocktail recep- 
tion at 730 pm. precedes dinner 
at 830. Tickets are $100. Park 
Avenue at 50th Street For infor- 
mation, call (914) 937-5661. 


STYLE 

Continued front opening page 


club and swimming pooL 
This is the sort of deal making 
that has made Regent Interna- 
tional Hotels, at 15 years old, one 
of the hottest hotel chains of its 
kind in the world. Others — Hilton, 
Hyatt, Marriott Holiday Inn — are 
huge by comparison to the Re- 
gent's far-flung, 13-hotel fiefdom. 
But Regent has never gone em- 
pire building. From the start, the 
plan has been to go up against a 
select few international hotel 
companies catering exclusively to 
the luxury market— the Toronto- 
based Four Seasons and the 
Hong Kong-based Mandarin and 
Peninsula — and to do it as the 
Regent did with both the Mayfair 
and the Dorchester, by having 
other investors put up the cash 
and by supplying the manage- 
ment expertise that makes the 
equation work. The profits may 
not seem as glamorous at first, 
but Zecha now can point with 
pride to the numbers that count* 
"On a capitalization of $13 mil- 
lion ten years ago,” he says, "we 
have put together a total property 
portfolio in excess of $1 billion,” 
much of which the Regent part- 
ners simply manage — but some 
of which they own in part 
Until its purchase of the Dor- 
chester, the Regent group had 
stayed away from Europe. It had 
its 600-room flagship Regent Ho- 
tel in Hong Kong — in the black 
after just four years — and it had 
branched out to Manila and Ku- 
ala Lumpur, to Sydney and Mel- 
bourne, to Fiji and Auckland. 
Meanwhile, it had accumulated 
American Regents in Chicago, 
New York, Washington, D.C, and 
Albuquerque. Now the Regent 
group seems poised to enter the 
European market. Emboldened 
by the Dorchester sale. Regent is 
scouting even now in Germany 
and Switzerland. 

I t would be charming to imag- 
ine that Adrian Zecha had 
come this far from humble 
be gin nings as a fisherman's son 
on the beaches of Ball In fact, 
his family traces its rise to 
Zecha’s great-great-grandfather, 
a Czech sculptor who fled to 
Holland after being involved in 
one of the periodic uprisings 
against the Austro-Hungarian 


Empire, and from there went to 
the East Indies. 

By the time Adrian was born in 
1933, the family had grown weal- 
thy on its vast tea and rubber 
plantations. In 1948, when Adrian 
could qualify for a student visa, 
he followed his brothers to the 
U.S., quickly learning enough En- 
glish to attend Dickinson College, 
where he got a premed degree. 
His father wanted Adrian to be- 
come a doctor, but he had other 
ideas. In 1953 he graduated from 
Columbia with a master's degree 
in political science. 

‘1 already knew that I wanted 
my own publishing business," re- 
calls Zecha, "so I joined Time to 
get experience." After a brief stint 
as a journalist, he switched to 
the business side, eventually ris- 
ing to be Asian operations mana- 
ger before he left in 1960 to found 
Asia Magazine, a slick Sunday 
supplement designed to fit neatly 
inside the English-language news- 
papers of each Asian capitaL To- 
day Asia Magazine is an immense 
success (circulation: 370,000). 

The traveling that Zecha did as 
he set up and ran his magazine 
stood him in good stead when 
two old friends asked him to join 
them at Regent They made a 
formidable team: Bums and 
Rafael with their hotel experience 
gathered from posts all over Eu- 
rope and beyond, and Zecha with 
his countless wealthy contacts in 
the region. 

Although Zecha is still involved 
with the Regent chain, he now 
spends most of his time on the 
company he formed four years 
ago in Hong Kong. Its three lines 
of business — China trading, oil 
field service and building vessels 
of all kinds for oil exploration 
and drilling — remain small and 
personal. 'T really do not Uke to 
work in a corporate structure,” 
says Zecha. "My theory is that if 
you run a business with ten peo- 
ple, you are a psychiatrist with 
ten patients." So his main love 
and expertise remain the same. 
"All deal makers." he muses, “are 
solo players, and you have to be 
a lone wolf to survive. The pen- 
alty, by definition, is that you are 
sometimes a very lonely person." 

— Jay Palmer 


FOOD 

Continued from opening page 


the caf£ au lait, served in a 
double-sized mug with a choice 
of four kinds of sugar, is a real 
treat Breakfast at Le Regence 
offers light but not Spartan fare — 
a sensible strategy for diners who 
will probably do business at 
lunch and dinner as well. No 
eggs Benedict or lumberjack 
specials here, though the waffles — 
crisp outside, fluffy inside, with 
lashings of maple syrup on the 
side — and moist-but-not-greasy 
sausage are certainly a tempta- 
tion to overindulgence. 

Miraculously, the scrambled 
eggs come properly soft without 
even having to ask. Though we 
opted for York ham, more adven- 
turous diners can have their eggs 
with Swiss dried beef, kippered 
herring or asparagus. 

The ladies who lunch have al- 
ready made Le Regence a regular 
part of their circuit Jacqueline 
Onassis and Jihan Sadat have 
been seen in the restaurant, as 
have hotel guests like Prince 
Albert and Princess Caroline. At 
least for a little while, though, 
breakfast remains uncrowded 
and discreet With its only notice- 
able flaw being tea served in bags 
rather than loose, and with Super- 
agent Mort Janklow already a 


reg ular (he lives across the street), 
the question may soon be: Will 
success spoil Le Regence? 

Le Regence, 37 East Sixty-fourth 
Street Telephone: (212) 606-4648. 
All major credit cards accepted. 

The Cafe Pierre is altogether a 
more hard-boiled experience. 
From seven o'clock on, the gray 
and gilt dining room of the Hotel 
Pierre is filled with the throaty, 
masculine sound of deal makers 
at work. This is an international 
crowd: among the diners are 
bankers from Britain discussing 
the fate of Hong Kong merchant 
houses after the Chinese take 
over the colony. The ubiquitous 
Valerian Rybar has done his work 
well, opening up the windows 
along Sixty-first Street and filling 
the place with enough etched 
mirrors and sconces to satisfy the 
vainest CEO's need for flattering 
light The mirrors, hung at eye 
level also make it easy to scan 
the room without having to turn 
the head. But despite the plethora 
of porticos and other neoclassical 
objets dart adorning the walls, 
and in firm defiance of the 
trompe l’oeal sky dotting the walls 
and ceiling (a Rybar signature?), 
the ambiance at the Cafe Pierre 
is exactly what Charles Pierre 







Le R'egence offers elegant breakfasts in a regal setting. 


TALK 


F rank Lloyd, founder of 
Marlborough Gallery, has 
quietly reemerged in New 
Tbrk after a period of abstinence 
following the famous Rothko af- 
fair. Lloyd is in fact a man of 
many countries. He maintains 
houses in London, Paris and the 
Caribbean and is about to add a 
new place on East Seventieth 
Street now under renovation by 
Valerian Rybar and Jean-Fran^ois 

Daigre Of note for Japan- 

ophiles is the battle between Pan 
Am and JAL for hegemony over 
trading routes to the East. Pan 
Am long dominated the market 
with its nonstop 747 SP service 
until JAL counterattacked last 
year. JAL has put its money at 
the doorstep of the shrine called 
Japanese home cooking and com- 
fort. Thirty-two comely JAL flight 
attendants serve sushi and hot 
towels, compared to the normal 
crew of 16 stewardesses working 

double shifts on Pan Am The 

battle of the Eastern skies has 
not deterred Akio Morita, director 
of Pan Am and chairman of 
Sony. He keeps up a regular 
transpacific schedule, sipping 
green tea in the front row single 
seat while catching up on office 
work through his Sony Walkman. 
Mr. M’s regular visits to the 
United States attract unusual at- 
tention from the American busi- 
ness press, wiiich rates him and 
Sony's products much higher 
than their share of the electronics 
market would warrant. In Japan, 
electronics giants like Panasonic 
(Matsushita) command a far 
greater share of public mind and 
money, and Mr. Morita is fighting 
to keep ahead of his bigger and 
stronger rivals. . . . The new In- 
dian government has been trying 
to sabotage the plan for a big 
India promotion in the States 


this fall. The exposition road 
show was designed to include 
participation of major retailers 
like Bloomingdale's as well as a 
host of designers like Faloma 
Picasso and cultural institutions 
including the Cooper-Hewitt 
Museum. After Bloomingdale's 
buyers jumped the next plane 
home during the recent turmoils 
in India, it became apparent that 
plans might have to change. Both 
sides have been trying to piece' 
together the promotion after a 
hiatus following formation of the 
new government. . . . Meanwhile, 
the ubiquitous Marvin Traub and 
his minions are scouting the Pret 
in Milano to sign up resources 
for Bloomingdale’s annual coun- 
try promotion. Last year’s Japan 
effort was not a notable success, 
dwarfed by the French pageant 
preceding it Getting back to the 
basics of European fashion and 
design may signal a mature mid- 
dle age for trendy Bloomingdale's. 
. . . From Fifty-seventh Street 
comes word that Dimhifl Tailors, 
favorite custom tailors of New 
York CEOs, Is in the process of 




- — o: Marvin 

'^\Traub 


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would have wished for the hotel? 
he founded over 50 years _ ag * 

The ^ell-upholstered diners 

astride well-upholstered chairs 

make the room seem Uke part ot 
a very select private club. 

. If only the renovation had in- 
cluded polishing the service as 
well as the space. Perhaps the 
waiter's seeming neglect is irir 
tended to allow one time to study 
the Pierre’s new "alternative > 
menu. Designed for calorie-count- 
ing and sodium-shunning dim?n>. 
the alternative breakfast offe :rs 
fruit and cereal with skim milk, 
bran-carrot muffins and decaf- 
feinated coffee. "Our clientele are 
fairly conservative,’* says Restau- 
rant Manager Peter Hinzmann. 
'They don't want wild innovations 
at breakfast." What they do want, 
presumably, is delicious food and 
properly prepared drinks. And 
that is exactly what they geu 

The basket of pastries, all evi- 
dently baked on the premises, is 
impossible to resist. The crois- 
sants are flaky on the outside yet - 
slightly moist inside, the brioches jt- 
are excellent, and the bran muf- 
fins have at least as much flavor 
as fiber. As at Le Regence, tea is 
served in bags, but real tea is 
gladly brought on request. Un- 
strained fruit . juices and sliced , 
fresh fruit that, rarity of rarities, 
hasn’t yet started to go soft or 
turn color make saving room for 
themain course a difficult but 
delicious duty. The scrambled 
eggs are soft, adorned with both : 
strip and Canadian bacon, and - 
the smoked Scotch salmon is 
succulent without being fleshy. 

The gemutlich atmosphere, 
large tables and comfortable 
chairs all make getting down t a,i£, 
b usiness easy. Judging from the 
body, language and the prospec- 
tuses chi the tables, a lot of work 
is being completed before many . 
people even get out of bed. If Le ..." 
Regence might also double nicely 
as a place to breakfast with an ' 
out-of-town lover and the Cafe.; 
Pierre as . a place to meet a rich 
uncle from St. Louis, both are - 
eminently enjoyable spots for male- ; 

OrfelM^^l^th Avenue ; 
at Sixty-first Street telephone: . 
(212) 940-8185. AU major credit • 
cards accepted. .. 

: . — DlDl Guttenplan • 

• > •; /• ‘ ‘ ■ 

being sokL Owner Leon Block and 
his brother have been negotiating * 
with a major merchandiser who _ 
fancies the name as a means of & 
ballooning the business. Bringing : 
Dunhfll to the middle market will .; 
mean using the name on ties,.; 
accessories and apparel in order ; 
to move the xnerciuuidise nation- 
ally through department stores./ 
What about the other. DuhhiH of; 
pipe and leather fame, on Fifth' 
Avenue? The name has been the 
subject of litigation. . . Food 1 
news from the West Coast in- 
volves a popular favorite called 
Max's. Bistro fare at. Morton's- 
and Spago has now been one- 
upped by Alsatian Chef Max 
Dautriangle^whQ reigned at David: 
Murdock's Regency Club before ,■* 
opening his own'place. Murdock *T 
. is spending more time in New ’ 
York at his Fifth Avenue maison- 
ette, taking a personal hand in. - 
■ the operations of recently ac - 
quired Camion M3k. Starting with 
a modest purchase of Stair & * 
Co.,- Murdock has moved on to ' 
more serious matters by. acquir- 
ing a controlling interest in the- 
international leasing company 
FlexKVan- ’... i The mighty dollar. 
appears to be tickling the Reach’ 
of many New Yorkers. 
One recent, , skftmy issue of The 
New pricer included four differ-; 
erit • ads. for Francophiles:- the : 
French Travel .Newsletter', laL 
Fiance en Cassettes; the Paris??' 
Newsletter; and Barges and Bal-' 
loons On and GVer the Canals ot 
France. Oddly enough, none of 
these outfits resides in New York^ 
of Parfs. The first, comes from' 
th at mtematlon ai crossroads' 
Charlottesville, Virginia. The sec- 
ond hails Erom country music 
capital Nashville, Tennessee, and 
the third from Newport, Rhode 
blapd. Finally,., the Barges and?* 
Batons advertisement comes 
. compliments of Horizon Cruises 
' j® 3 Uev *ne^ Illipois. Merer ■■ 

Middle America* ' • * 

~—A. de Comtade ' 


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Index 


8 .. 

a p.UI Earnings reports P.12, 
iflgwtPJO FOno rate m*a P.13 
I p. a GoWmartets ' ft 9 
Ham p .10 interoi run p. 9 
Kk, P.14 AAorfcot tummarv P- 1 
m P. * OnUas P.12 

, p,19 OTC Stock P.12 

P,T9 Other market* P.U 


2imlb^^Sribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 

Report, Page 8 


RDAY-SUTVDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


** 


Page 9 


ECONOMIC SCENE 

rforing Ways to Bring 
3 Dollar Down Softly 


r 


Stanford professor 
advocates a 
w tr i n m v ir ate” of 
key central banks. 


much i if it W a$ yo^ 


By LEONARD SILK 

Sw York Times Service 

EW YORK — The French Prime Minister, Laurent 
Fabius, calls a “smooth decline” in the dollar crucial to 
his own country and the rest erf Europe. The West 
German Finance Minister, Gerhard Stoltenberg, look- 
rad Europe, warns that the debt problems of the develop- 
n tries would deteriorate rapidly if current levels of the 
ind United Stales interest rales continue. And, in Wash- 
Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 3d says he wants “to 
x>k" at ways of remodeling the. world’s currency markets. 
, he is concerned about the overvalued dollar and. the 
rly currency markets. 

iow can a soft landing for the dollar be engineered and the 
lonetaxy system stabilized? Oneway, much favored by the 

bus, would be for the 

States to put its fiscal 
i order, their argument 
educing the big budget 
would promote lower 
rates and bring down 
high dollar exchange 
"hose taking this posi- 
ntend that the United 
s drawing capital from 
of the world, curbing international growth and aggravat- 
anploymcnL 

n the existing disagreements between the White House 
lgrcssional Democrats, and the president’s determination 

x from^rau^at 1 action will be ta^'oa^^bud^ 
nt to reduce real interest rates and correct the dollars 

linnYm. 

overvaluation of the dollar currently is estimated at 40 to 
eat against the European curr e ncies and about 25 percent 
the Japanese yen. Some economists even believe that, if 
Ited States were, in the c u rr en t world environment, to 
ite the budget deficit, this would in fact strengths the 
not weaken it, by increasing foreign confidence in this 
f and sustaining the capital flow to the United States. 

OTHER approach to bringing about a soft landing for the 
dollar and a mote stable and lasting balance among 
currencies stresses doser monetary cooperation among 
dial banks of the leading industrial coon tries, 
aid L McKinnon of Stanford University, a leading mone- 
pert, suggests that a “triumvirate” should be formed by the 
States Federal Reserve System, the Bank of Japan and the 
toman Bundesbank to create a new monetary order that 
be less rigid than the old Brctton Woods fixed-rate system 
s chaotic than the present floating-rate nonsystem, 
new monetary order would have four essential elements: 
ie central banks would set explicit target zones for the yen- 
and maik-dollar exchange rates. The dollar might be 
d, for example, to stay within a range of 2.10 and 230 
he marks, and within 200 to 220 yen. The aim would be to 
equilibrium among price levels in the three countries, and 
: a greater degree of balance to the trade among them, 
te central banks would undertake a commitment to adjust 
lomestic monetary policies to achieve those target zones, 
the dollar-exchange rate was above its target zone, the Fed 
expand the money supply and reduce Interest rates, while 
mdefihflnk and tiie Bank of Japan would symmetrically 
ct If the dollar fdl below its target zone, the Fed would 
ct money while the others expanded. 
iere would be rules set for derisive intervention in the 
=y markets to correct “disorderly conditions.” The central 
would agree on the degree to which they would sterilize or 
rihzc changes in the monetary base resulting from such 
ntions. This could exert a powerful effect on domestic 
t rates. 

ie triumvirate would manage the growth of money for the 
(Continued on Page 13, Col 4) 


Currency Rates 


Lota Interbank rote* on March 22, educing fees. 

: fcringi for Amsterdam, Brussab, Frankfurt, Mkn, Pore. Now York rata at 


% 

C 

DM. 

FF. 

ILL. 

QMr. 

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112J0* 

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1UQ 74933 04112 

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3J21 

93325 

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3441 

MSS 27155 25545 

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11.547 


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rdtani 1,055 
rtancUMn 2230 
Im He. franc 6500 
tftea! UTS 

ttknm runs 


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3.13057 9S7W7 \miB 

Dollar Values 
* 


35382 UUM5 2*551 


iKMfl 


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I29N Kmritl Onor 
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UQM 04454 MMKl 2244 
1 19 JO 0525 LAMcasrand 19047 
0309 00012 LKHWM 95290 

2 .5525 00053 Sta.MMta USOO 

9225 0.1093 S— U lW i *23 

U304 09252 Taiwan t 39X5 

17000 004 TMNH 27395 

14097 02721 UJLK.4MMM 1(73 


sdtd to twv one dollar 1*1 


nuirtabi 

nM franc M Anwont*ata8iiStol>w«*P«»»( W Amo 
(x) unHi of moo rv) umts or mooo 
«4*d; KJU naf avaUoMa. _ _ „ 

tawwt du Benelux {Brussels}: Banco Commercials ttaHana (MH mtit Barque 
de Paris ( Paris}; IMF tSDRIi Boneue Ante et Internationale trinvaettamenl 
M dkhamj. Other data tram (Motors andAP. 


Interest Rates 


smrency Deposits 


March 22 


D-Mark Franc Sferkao Prw «U SDK 
• IK JH..5K Sh - M 13* ■ 13* 10fc-l» 10 Mi - W* M 
-to SM •!«. Jh - IM 13B1-13*. 10W- 10W. 10M.-10M. to 

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cab* to Interbank dnxani of SI mflWOrt minimum (oreautvalanH. 

towon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. PFJ! Ueyds Barit (ECU); Reuters 


Dollar Rates 


tiers 


Him. 
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Inm. 

9 K. -99V 


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March 22 


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oney Rates 

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^^STi4^ York Com« cantrad. 

Alt Brices In WW PV *»“*. 

Source; Reuter* 


Dollar Is 
Firmer in 
Quiet Day 

Gold, After Rise, 

Finishes Lower 

The Assacuued Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned firmer in quiet trading Fri- 
day after four days of often-violent 
swings that ioweredits value by 4.7 
percent 

Gold prices fell, but still wound 
up the week with substantial gains. 
Republic National Bank in New 
York said bullion was bid at $316 a 
troy ounce as of 4 PJM. EST, off SI 
from the t»i<*- bid T hursday but up 
52] _50 from the end of the previous 
week. 

Following a volatile week in 
winch markets were buffeted by the 
" closure of 70 savings and loans in 
Ohio and signs of unexpected 
weakness in the U.S. economy, cur- 
rency traders who had been selling 
dollars bought some bade Friday to 
reduce their exposure to new 
riuxks over the weekend and to 
cash in on eariier gains, said Moiy 
Ogata, senior vice president and 
treasurer of Union Bank in Los 
Angeles. 

“Some good profit-taking took 
place, especially against the pound 
in Europe," he added. 

The pound, which. ended last 
week in London at SL0860, had 
shot up to SI-189 Thursday, but 
dipped to $1.1720 on Friday. Later 
in New York, the pound dipped 
further, to SI.I735 against $1.1875 
Thursday. 

“The main concern of the market 
is the total viability or health of the 
U.S. financial market or economy," 
Mr. Ogata said. 

In Tokyo, where markets re- 
opened after a holiday Thursday, 
the dollar edged up to 254.90 Japa- 
nese yen from 254.10 Thursday in 
the United States. By the end of the 
trading day in New York, the dol- 
lar had climbed to 255.45 yen. 

Late dollar rates in Europe, com- 
pared with Thursday’s late prices, 
included 3.21 Deutsche marks, 
down from £261; 9.818 Hatch 
francs, down from 9.985; 2.7235 
Swiss francs, up from 2.72; 3.628 
guilders, down from 3.684; and 
2,043.50 lire, down from 2,074.00. 

Dollar rales in New York as of 4 
PAL EST, conmared with late rates 
Thursday, included: 3.2210 DM, 
up from 3J20S; 2.7155 Swiss francs, 
down from 2.7250; and 9.8325 
French francs, up from 9.817S. 

Precious metals markets also 
were calm Friday after a week of 
hectic trading in which the price of 
bullion briefly shot as high as 
19 an ounce. 

In Europe, gold fdl $4.50 in Lon- 
don to a late hid of $317 an ounce, 
and in Zurich, gold slid S5J0 to 
dose at $315 an ounce. 



Ill* N*w York Tntflc 

Bernard Tse and his wife, Grace, in the production unit for the WY-50 video te rminal. 

Hardware Can Be Profitable Too: 
Another Silicon VaUey Success Story 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

SAN JOSE, California — Low-key and unabra- 
sive, Bernard K. Tse does not fit the mold of the 
brash and flamboyant entrepreneurs who capture 
the headlines here. And his business — computer 
terminals — lacks the glamour of some high-tech 
fields such as microchips and biotechnology. ' 

But his success is as dramatic as those of his 
Silicon Valley neighbors. Virtually overnight, 
Wyse Technology, a company founded by Mr. Tse 
and his wife, Grace, bom Asian immigrants, has 
become the world's leading producer of computer 
terminals outside the major computer companies 
themselves. 

Sales for the fiscal year, which closes at the end 
of this month, are expected to exceed $75 million, 
quadruple the S18 imlHnn of the previous year, 
which in turn was quadruple the $4 3 million of the 
year before that 

Earning s are expected to exceed $6 million, or 
$1.05 a share, triple the level of a year ago. The 
company stock, first issued last October at $7 a 


share, is now trading at about 51 1 in the over-the- 
counter market. 

“They are far and away, at this point in time, the 
class of that marketplace," said Joel M. Hausman, 
an analyst with Robertson, Colman & Stephens in 
San Francisco. 

But having risen rapidly from its start in 1981, 
Wyse now ..faces an even greater challenge — 
staying on top. That is not easy in the terminal 
business, winch one Wyse director termed a "slip- 
pery pole." The technology is well understood, 
there is Hide brand loyalty and what counts most is 
low-cost manufacturing. 

Indeed, Wyse quickly dethroned Televideo Sys- 
tems In&, a former Silicon Valley high-flier that is 
now facing hard times. Tdevidoo, founded in the 
proverbial garage by Philip K. Hwang, another 
Asian i mm igr an t, bad, in its heyday, done in some 
other companies. But it now ranks third, behind 
Wyse and Applied Digital Data Systems, a unit of 
NCRCorp. 

“What they’ve done to Televideo, there’s a 
chance someone else mil do to them," said Mi- 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


U.S. Prices Up 
0.3% for Month; 
Orders Off 0.2% 


McGraw-Edison Agrees to Buyout 


The Associated Press 

ROLLING MEADOWS, Illi- 
nois — McGraw-Edison Co. and 
Forsimann Little & Co. said Friday 
they have agreed in principle for 
Foratmann to acquire McGraw- 
Edison in a leveraged buyout val- 
ued at $13 bQHon. 

Jim Novy, a McGraw-Edison 
spokesman, sad the price was $59 
per share in cash. Forstmann plans 
to invest about $300 million of its 
capital in the transaction, the com- 
pany said, adding that the balance 
of the purchase price would come 
from bank loans. 

After the announcement, 


McGrow’s stock surged $1 1 Friday 
on the New York Stock Exchange, 
to close at $5530 a share. 

McGraw-Edison, based in this 
Chicago suburb, makes and sup- 
plies electrical products and related 
services designed for various indus- 
trial, utility, commercial and auto- 
motive applications. The company 
earned- $10.8 million in 1984 on 
sales of $1.7 billion, down from net 
income of $33.4 million on sales of 
S1.4 trillion in 1983. 

The New York-based Forsl- 
maon is a private investment firm 
that specializes in acquiring com- 
panies through management* 


buyouts. McGraw-Edison said its 
senior management wottid be of- 
fered an equity participation in the 
acquiring company. 

Completion of the transaction is 
subject to a definitive merger 
agreement, approval of McGraw- 
EcBson's stockholders and comple- 
tion of the bank-financing arrange- 
ments as well as the fulfillment of 
other customary conditions. 

As of March 15, about 16J545 
milli on shares of McGraw-Edison 
common stock were outstanding 
and 41 1,000 were issuable upon the 
exercise of outstanding employee 
stock options. 


By Jane Seabcrry 

il'astnngtcn Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — Boosted by 
the sharpest food-price rise in six 
months, U.S. consumer prices rose 
0.3 percent in February, a rate 
slightly higher than the previous 
month but still considered moder- 
ate. 

The February increase in the 
consumer price index followed a 
CL2- percent rise in January, the La- 
bor Department reported Friday. 

Although food prices rose 0.5 
percent last month, motor fuels 
prices dropped 2.6 percent. Gaso- 
line prices are now 17.1 percent 
below their peak level reached in 
March 1981. 

The February increase leaves in- 
nation for the last 12 months at a 
3.5-percent rate, below the 4-per- 
cent pace for 1984. 

Thursday’s government "flash" 
estimate of the gross national prod- 
uct included its own price figure 
that threw an inflation scare Into 
world money markets fora time. It 
estimated that the broadly based 
implicit price deflator, which ap- 
plies to consumers, businesses and 
wholesalers, is gaining at a rate of 
5.4percent this quarter. 

Trial rate would be nearly twice 
the rate in the fourth quarter. But 
•when technical factors were consid- 
ered. the underlying rate appeared 
to be less than 4 percent, about the 
came as charted by the consumer 
price index report Friday. 

Meanwhile, in a separate report, 
the Commerce Department said 
Friday that new factory orders for 
durable goods dropped 02 percent 
in February after an increase of 32 
percent in January. 

However, most of the decline 
was accounted for by a 48.5-per- 
cent drop in orders for defense cap- 
ital goods, generally a volatile sta- 
tistic. New orders for capital goods 
excluding defense, considered a 
gauge of future plant and equip- 
ment expenditures, increased 29.6 
percent in February following a 
13.1 percent decline the previous 
month, the department said. 

Ibis gauge had been weak for 
most of the last eight mouths, sug- 
gesting that business investment 
would drop sharply. Economists 
said Friday that the rebound pro- 
vides hope of increased business 
expansion. 

Without the defense component, 
new factory orders for durable 
goods overall rose 4.7 percent in 
February. 

At the White House, spokesman 
Larry S peakes welcomed the con- 
sumer numbers, saying that “infla- 


tion at the consumer level remains 
wefi contained." 

The consumer price report came 
just a day after another govern- 
ment report showing that a surge of 
imports is displacing domestic pro- 
duction and keeping growth at a 
low 2.1 -percent rate in the first 
quarter. 

The slow growth of the economy 
and the increase in imports, while 
upsetting to domestic manufactur- 
ers, are two of the major reasons for 
the moderate inflation picture, 
economists said. 

The slower growth prevents the 
creation of shortages and bottle- 
necks in production that often lead 
to price hikes. In addition, the in- 
flux of imports that ore cheaper 
than domestic goods not only di- 
rectly keeps prices low but encour- 
ages price competition with U.S. 
businesses. 

However, some economists 
warned that the prices of services 
are increasing Taster than that of 
goods and because the UJS. econo- 
my is becoming more services-pri- 
ented the depressed goods prices 
may not keep overall prices low. 


Japan’s Exports 
Slowedby6.3% 
In Latest Month 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The Japanese 
economy is expanding steadily 
although exports, a major fac- 
tor in recent economic growth, 
have slowed recently, the Eco- 
nomic Planning Agency said 
Friday in a monthly report 

By volume, customs cleared 
exports fdl 6 J percent in Feb- 
nuuy from January when they 
rose 3.4 percent, the report said. 
It attributed the decline to de- 
clines in shipments to the Unit- 
ed States and to Southeast Asia. 

Plant and equipment invest- 
ment in the fiscal year ending 
March 31 is estimated to have 
risen 15 percent from the previ- 
ous year, and is forecast to rise 
5.2 percent in the coming year, 
it said. 

The report said personal con- 
sumption has shown signs of 
moderate growth since January 
1985 after eariier sluggishness.' 

It said there are signs of re- 
covery in housing starts and 
both consumer and wholesale 
prices are stable. 


Bundesbank Warns of a Sluggish First Quarter 


of goods and services, grew 16 per- 
cent last year. 

“We don’t think we’ve left the 
growth path. On the contrary, we 
can be quite optimistic that well 
have around 3-percent growth for 
the year, particularly in light of 
continuously strong exports, in- 
creasing capital investment at 
home and the settlement erf major 
wage rounds to go into effect this 
year,” the spokesman said. 
Commerzbank AG, West Ger- 
_ __ many’s third largest commercial 

yearMriter.howewx , the first qnar- ^ ^ evSf Weaker prog- 

ter will show real [inflation-adjust- nosis for the first quarter — fore- 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank,- West Germany’s central 
bank, does not rule out a stagnant 
first quarter for the economy, a 
Bundesbank spokesman said Fri- 
day. 

fc Due to severe weather, we can- 
not deny the possibility erf a stag- 
nant first quarter if we compare the 
first three months of this year to the 
last three of 1984," the spokesman 
said. “Compared with the result a 


ed] growth," he added. 

In the fourth quarter last year, 
West Germany’s economy grew 1 5 
t from the preceding quarter, 
quarter growth had beat 2 
percent 

While acknowledging that the 
economy may show no growth in 
the current quarter, the Bundes- 
bank still believes that growth for 
the year wOl be in the 23- to 3- 
percent range projected earlier by 
the Economics Ministry, the 
spokesman emphasized Hie gross 


it decline in the 
GNP from the preceding quarter. 

In March, Commerzbank revised 
downward its projection for GNP 
growth to a 25- to 28-percent 
range from its projection in Janu- 
ary of a 28- to 3-percent rise. 

The revision reflects, in part, 
problems in the construction in- 
dustry, which is struggling with ma- 
jor over-capacity, and a sharp de- 
cline in domestic orders for the 
automobile industry because of the 


sumers have been hesitant to buy 
cars until they know for certain 
bow a proposed tax-incentive pro- 
gram for buyers of cars with cata- 
lytic converters would work. The 
program would have to be ap- 
proved by the European Commu- 
nity. 

Karl Heinrich Oppenl£nder, 
president of IFO-Institute fur 
Wirtschaftsforscbung, a 
West German economic-: 
institute based in Munich, said that 
a decline in GNP in the first quar- 
ter was possible, but he noted that 
IFO has yet to make a formal as- 
sessment 

Of greater concern to IFO, which 
is sticking to its projection of 2- to 
25-pesceoi growth for this year, is 
that the institute’s "business . cH- 
prate index" fell sharply in Febru- 
ary, to 90 base points from 92 in 
January after a fairly constant rise 
during the previous seven months. 

The index, based cm a monthly 
survey of 10,000 to 15,000 compa- 
nies in manufacturing, construc- 
tion and retailing, measures man- 


ihe 


agers’ outlook for growth in 
coming six months. 

“If we were really experiencing a- 
strong, sustained recovery, we 
should not see this index fall.” Mr. 
Oppenlfinder said- “You can’t 
blame the drop on the weather, 
because the index lakes into ac- 
count seasonal factors." 

Mr. Oppenlander said a 2i -per- 
cent rise in GNP this year would 
have no appreciable effect on re- 
ducing unemployment. The Eco- 
nomics Ministry contends that 
such a growth rate will leave 
100,000 fewer workers unemployed 
by year end compared with 

ber 1984. 


Convertfund International SJV. 

SodM Anonym* (ThmsHsumant 
Luxembourg, 37, nw Notm-Dom* 

B.C Luxembourg B 8.129 

Notice is hereby «iven to holdexs of class "A" shares of Gonvenfund 
International SA. that on or after March 29th, 1985, payment of a dividend 
of USS 0250 (50 cents) per share will be made against surrender of coupon 
No. 16 with one of the following paying agents: 

— Kredietbank N.V. Bnunels. 

— Krediexbank S-A. LuxembonrrroiM, Luxembourg. 

— Banca Nwriooale del Lavoro, Rome. 

— Crtdtl Commercial de France, Paris. 

— Weetdentsehe landeabank^Cfroacn brale. Dowel do rL 

— Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York - Corporate 
Trust Office, New York. 

As result of the distribution the net asset value of "A" shares will reflea 
■ the decreased proportion of the fund's net assets allocable to "A" shares as 
described in the oUering prospectus. 

Convertfund International 5.A. 


national product, which measures European- wide emission-control 
the total value of a nation’s output debate: Some West German con- 



fTheValue Line provides 

OBJECTIVE 
EVALUATIONS of 
AMERICAN STOCKS 

The Value Line Investment Survey continually reports on 
more than 1700 American stocks. It provides a vast amount 
of statistical history and forecasts, all of which are reduced 
by Value Line's computer-based programs to two simple, 
easy-to-apply indices: (1) The rank for Timeliness (Relative 
Price Performance of the stock in the Next 12 Months} and {2} 
the rating for Safety (Price Stability of the stock plus financial 
strength of the company)- 

An introductory subscription brings you ail the full-page 
reports to be issued in the next 12 weeks on the more than 
1700 American stocks and 93 industries regularly monitored 
by The Value line Investment Survey— for just $65, about 
half the regular rate. You may take advantage of this offer if 
you have not had a subscription to Value Line in the past two 

years. Send payment along with name and address together 
with tills ad to Dept 313L0* 

THE VALUE LINE 

71 1 Third Avwkm. Horn York. N.Y. 10017. U^A. 

FMmmm fa load ornmotim fBrtfeb » fMijMa S*ta.fr1BS, JMZNt 
J . ~ IcrWon— do* Jggwlto: WwUg, jjfJ *lw 

. «*» Ji Mni WlUil. l*w> dm Whw 78007 ton* fM- BSMBUSH. 

Distributed by KLM Royal Dutch Alrtnes PubMcoBon Distribution Sonrioe — 


rm RESERVE 

iNSUflED DEPOSITS TRUST 


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An Account for the Cautious tmestor 
to Protect and Increase C api tal 


US. Dolor Denamincftsd 
Insured by US- Govt. Entities 
important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Ride 
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800% PROFITS - FACT OR FANTASY? 

Economists who belittle the American dream are oblivious to the North American quest for 
achievement In its relentless pursuit of ultimate excellence, the United States has been 
described as a daring experiment, one generation ahead of everybody else, the last word in 
modernity, thefuture that works, the next century. Even the inroads of Japan will not permanently 
fracture America's vision of fulfilment 

The convulsions of Vietnam set back, but did not negate, America's “rendezvous with 
destiny”. Americans are emerging from the self-incriminating lyrics of the 1960's, students have 
abandoned the “gospel” according to Bob Dylan, and are studying again, trying to blend 
materialism with non-dogmatic morality. 

We are not advocating a return to “Great Gatsby” class distinctions orthe capitalism mocked 
by Sinclair Lewis, but rather an enlightened fisqaflsm, combining Yankee thrift with creative 
avariciousness. 

In January 1982, our editors, mirroring the new mood in America, wrote... ”We are adamant in 
predicting a massive bull market, repeating our thesis that the DOW NOW 790. WILL TOUCH, 
1,000, BEFORE HfTTING 750, THAT BY 1983, 100,000,000 SHARE TRADING DAYS WILL BE 
ROUTINE ON THE N.Y.S.E., FOR THE LEAST EXPENSIVE COMMODITIES IN THE WORLD ARE 
BONA-FIDE U.SA EQUITIES, MOST OF WHICH ARE TRADING FAR BELOW REPLACEMENT 
VALUE OR FUTURE EARNING POWER DOOMSDAY THINKING IS A HARBINGER OF BETTER 
TIMES, FOR EVERY BULL MARKET IS SPAWNED DURING THE NADIR OF SOUR ECONOMIC 
NEWS’. Our prophecies eventuated. Once again thecontrarian triumphed. And now? We believe 
the DOW will catapult over 1 500. 

C.G.R.'$ current letter reviews four “Big Board” corporations that may be ingested by 
predators. In addition, we focus upon a low-priced stock with the potential to emulate a recently 
recommended “special situation” that spiralled 800% before a 4-1 stock spirt 

For your complimentary copy, please write to or telephone: 



CAPITAL 

GAINS 

RESEARCH 


FRS. Financial Planning Services bv 
KalvarstraatT12, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) -27 51 81 
Telex 18536 


H 

I 

t 


Name: 


Address: 

1 

_ _ 1 


i 

Phone: 





Past performance does not guarantee future results 


L 









ismssis"3^3is?mnm5ES5!f5?mmmf5Si isi 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATBBDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


friday^ 




(losing 


Tobies Include tin aotloawide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do net reflect late trades elsewhere. 



m 




Ea 

Li_9 

U3 

4J04 

1L2 


M 

14 

17 

ZOO 

54 

7 



12 



21 

160 

<6 

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32 

25 

33 

1J0 

35 

9 

1J2 

95 

1 

7.15 

124 


1H 

114 



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nvi— w 
13A+ * 


U 28% QuokO* 1JS4 21 n m 43U 42% 42* — * 
9B 90% QuaOpf 954 102 Hz 93 93 93 —1 

2m 15 QuaKSO rn 17 26 125V 22ft 21 21ft— ft 

lift Ok Qvanw 35 39 MS 8ft Bft+ft 

34ft 21 Questar 140 iO 9 296 32ft 32 32ft— ft 

25ft U QfcRM Mi 1.1 18 103 23V 33ft 33ft— ft 


* 


rm 


rrwn 


Friday^ 



\i i »;i 


Dosing 


Tobies Include the natfonwlde prices . 
up to the closing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Pros 


tft+ ft 
30U— ft 
30ft + ft 
30 — ft 
Z> + ft 
10ft + ft 
5ft + ft 
*fc— ft 
ttft + ft 
■ft- ft 
37 + ft 
23ft- ft 
27ft + ft 
30ft 

17ft- ft 
10ft + ft 
WH— ft 
11 
Oft 

13ft + U 
23 —ft 
39ft + ft 
30ft— ft 
ft 


35ft 20ft SVtiriuM XC 73 S 33ft 20ft 33ft + ft 

Uft m SntnCs _ XI B Oft EM Oft + ft 

»ft 37ft SHOCK Iff UH K S|P 57ft- ft 

30ft 2» Swot JO U» 27* MS 31ft J4ft + Hr 





m a at 

1M XI 34 
ZOO 1X4 3 
UP M3 
4H UL2 
1J0 Ul 
M 23 
32 A 
1JA 44 


£ 1 

UO 

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33ft 21ft 
15ft 5ft 
23ft U 
5ft 3ft ' 
2Bft MW 
AW 2ft 
44ft 20ft ' 
13ft 9ft 
25ft 17ft' 
,*ft 3ft 
Mft Sft 
43ft 25ft ' 
44ft 92ft 1 
Oft Sift ’ 
34 14ft ’ 
41W 2 7 ' 

71 30 ’ 


in u ■ 

244 142 


M A 11 
40 24 M 
40 10 13 


31ft 31ft 
9ft Sft 
2114 20ft 
2ft 2ft 
2«i4 am 

m m 

32ft 31ft 
12 Uft 

20 mw 


3lft + ft 
Sft + ft 
21ft + ft 
3M— ft 


UDolLA 
42 U0 19 
7J2 123 
745 Bfl 
US» 7.1 14 
15 

2J0 24 11 


HU Mtt 
42U 4TW 
43ft 42U 


204+ ft 
31ft— ft 
Tift + ft 
19ft— ft 
4 + ft 

lOU+ft 
42 — ft 
42W+ ft 
42 


39ft 3IW Jfft 
J7W 74ft 77ft + ft 


HU 

14 

9 

12 

7 

3J 

9 

22 34 

34 

15 

44 

9 

3J 



49ft 20 
34ft 24ft 
15ft 7ft 
23U 14U 
lift 3 
14 10 

32ft 17ft 
35ft 22U 
19ft 13ft 
56ft 45 
94 75 

41U 30ft 
SPK 22* 
7ft 4ft 
Mft 12 


UAL 
UAL pi 
UCCEL 

um 

UNCRat 

UR3 

USFGs 

use* 

UniFrst 

Unllvr 

UnlNV 

U Comps 

Uncarb 

UnbnC 

UnElec 


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240 74 443 

19 43 

244 04 11 197 
240 

40b 34 14 30 

220 74395 555 
140 44 7 504 
.50 LI 14 15 

149*34 9 1 

3450 4.1 9 152 
144 44 9 575 
340 9.1 8 I5TI 

L72 HU A 1407 


44W 43ft 
31 30ft 
U Uft 
23ft 2ZV 
Oft 9ft 
lift lift 
31ft 31ft 
34ft 34ft 
Mft 15ft 
54 54 

94 94ft 
34ft 33ft 
STM 34M 
Sft Sft 
Mft MU 


44ft— ft 
30ft + ft 
14 + ft 

23 
9ft 
lift 
31ft 
34U 

Mft + ft 
58 +lft 
94ft— 1 
33ft— ft 
33% +1 
5ft 
MU 


Softs ftaure* araeneMctat. Yearly mom and tows reflect 
ft* prwfaus52 weeks mo* fits currant week, but not Dw lotost 
trading day. WImtc ir soltt or stock OMdoiMiaaMuntlna la 35 
nsrani or mors has boon paid. Um years Mefc-toer rones and 
dividend ors shown far Rw new stock onhr. UatattaBierwtae 
noted, roles of dyfdendi art annual dMwrMmenM based oa 
ttw latm dadorntkn. 
a — dtokftnd atao extrateUl 
b—amuot rate at drvfdendpfiM nock dhrtdencL/l 
c — IbniMattoadlvtdiMi/l 
dd— caNedJI 
d — mw yearly tow4i 

• — Addend dsdarsd or paid In pracedlm 12 manlTis/l 
■— dividend InCmodton funds, soMedto 15% naanrasMtonco 
lax. ■ 

I— dhridand doctarad after saU+up or stack dMdsrnL 
l— dividend poM this year, omtttsa deferred, or no odtan 
taken of latast dMdbnd aidftfpa. 

k— dlvMsmt declared or paid tots year, an acc w nrtattvc 
tons with dl vtdsnds In arrsars. 

n— now barn In the pad 52 weeks.'nwMoMaw range baetae 
wM the start of trecHna. 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E— prie s e a m ln es ratio. 

r— dividend dsdarsd or paid In preesdkn 12 month*. alas 
stock dtvMmd 

i— stock ram. Dividend begtai with date AT epltt. 
sis— softs. 

t— dividend poMUi stock In prccsdlna 13 mantas. isMm aftd 
cash value on ex-dividend or ex-dMrkxitton dale, 
u— new yearly Men. 
v—iradinetaKed- 

vl— ki ban kr uptcy or race! verstilp or beino reorpa nH ed an- 
der the BankruKcv Act. or seairtTtesoseiKned by such com- 
panies. 

wd— when distributed, 
wl— when Issued, 
ww — wdh warrants. 

*— ex-dvUend or ex-rWdi. 
xdls — ex-distribution, 
xw— without warrants. 

V—ex-<flvtdend mi iotas Wi fulL 
ytd— VftkL 
x— sales In MIL 


48ft 33ft Xerox 340 74 17 MS7 43ft 42* 41 

Sift 4Sft Xerox Pi 545 1U W4 41ft 4 lft «%' 

29 19 XTRA 44 25 9 35 Mb 25ft 2S» 


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30 24 SEaleCp IB 47 S 19 27% 27* Z» 

Mft Uft Xowato J4 44 18 M Uft Hft ». 

■ 30 Zayre 40b 3 u ra BV, B » 

31ft MU Zooms 7 4» 21U 21ft 

21ft Mb Zorns II M 19ft lift 19V- 

31ft 21ft Zurnln L32 44 M 225 30% 27% M 


NYSE Highs-Lm 


TiHmA 

H Wi Low Stock 


DW. Ytd. PE IOBiKWiLow UuotOrtlf 


19ft 
1SU 
1 2ft 
10 3 

Mft 53% 
7ft ft 
17ft lift 

su eu 

1*M lift 
- 3U 1ft 
4 3M 
10% 3 

Uft 9 
14ft Alb 
3ft ft 
2ft ft 
tft 3U 
lift AU 
12ft 9 
24 10 

UU 6% 
lift 81% 
3ft 1 


YVr 


17ft 9 
2U ft 
5U 2% 
7ft 4ft 
49ft 32ft 
22ft 13ft 






111 0U 
44 14ft 
9 AU 
36 2U 
1 23 
4 30 
3181 UU 
14 2 

39 21ft 

33 7% 
3 12 

3 4 

3 U 
23 14M 
W 3ft 
3 11M 

34 22ft 

41 2% 

3 35ft 
1 SOU 
12 Oft 

N V 

18 SU 


7ft 8ft— ft 
Mft 14ft + U 
Aft Aft— U 
2ft 2ft 

37ft 37ft 
10ft 10ft— ft 
2 2 

20ft 21ft + ft 
7ft Tft— U 
lift lift— ft 
3ft 4 + ft 

.ft ft +Jk 
lift 13ft— ft 
3ft 3ft 
lift 11% 

22ft 22ft + ft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
35ft 35U — U 
SOU SOU— ft 
m Oft— ft 
8ft 8ft— U 

SU su— u 


M » 

it! 

lift lift 


Mft Uft 
Sft 8 
■ft 9U 
21ft 21ft 

StaSS 

18U 18ft 

1»1« 

15ft Uft 

2u£u 

341b 34ft 
9ft Oft 
Sft 5U 
2ft ZU 
2% 2ft 
Oft H 
80 S3ft 
Mft 17 
29U 29% 


71b 

4ft FOPOEV 


n 

130 

5% 

5 

5U + % 

12 % 

7ft PortSyi 


76 

33 

11 

10 ft 

Hft— U 

17% 

12 PUtflPr 


U 

32 

Uft 

Uft 

Uft— ft 

37 

17ft PwwerT 

.14b 

5 56 

1 

29U 

2 fft 

3fU— ft 

7ft 

5% PratrO* 



25 

Aft 

AU 

ilb— % 

24V 

IStaPTatn. 

.92 

a y 

g 

22 ft 

22 ft 

22 ft + ft 

■V 

6 % Prattltd 

.12 

i 

7ft 

Tft 

Tft— U 

lft 

% PrwBiRa 



37 

1 % 

1 

lft + % 

Ota 

6 % PrasRB 

J8 

95 * 



91b 

9U + % 

8 

3ft Preeld 


15 

25 

3ft 

Sft 

Sft— % 

21 

Uft PrpCTe 

152 

75 n 

78 

20 ft 20% 20ft+% 

27ft 

11 % PntvEn 

a 04 

74 7 

3 

27% 

27% 

27% 1 

19 

MW PptPfC 

234 117 

M 

18% 

lift lift— ft 

33 

25ft Pst PTC 

4J7 Ul 

9 

31ft 

31ft 

31ft 

Oft 

4ft PuntoO 



7 

Sft 

Sft 

Sft 


s T5 

Mft 22 
12ft Oft 
19ft UU 
ltta TO* 
Mft 7ft 
■ft Aft 
7 Sft 
MU Sft 
4 2ft 
UU 9W 
37ft 2H% 
8 ft 3% 


TotfPte M 
TWPtwt 

TalPtpr 2JS 114 
TrasLx Mr J 


n uft uft 
in iu iK 

7 MU MU 
7 10% HM W 
54 T7ft Mft 
3 M M 

w ru 9ft « 

1 7 7 

1 5ft 5ft 
53 Sft 5% 

H 1ft 2ft 
MS UU Uft 
5 27* 2® 

27 5 4ft 


TmsTec 48 32 
Tranm 40 V 


TrlSM 400 
TrtaCp 49t 
THHtno 
Trtdex 
TUbMox 
TUHex 44 
TomrC 120 
Tyler wt 


32 Aft Aft AU— % 
U 4ft 4U 4U+U 

n m m » 

30 191b Uft Uft— ft 
17 IMl 131b Uft 

« » M Oft— % 

31 Uft Uft UU 

177 47ft 4AW 47U + U 
132 I 7ft 7ft— ft 

33 4ft 4ft 4ft 

S "R”*"* 

U 24U 204 Mft + ft 
9 30U 20ft 20ft+ ft 
99 4ft M 3ft— ft 

S 4U 4% 4U+ ft 
34 33ft 33ft 
2 33ft 32ft 33% + ft 
14 7 Cft flb 

38 Uft Uft lift . 
88 mb 20ft SOU— ft 


3ft 3 
MfttOfc 

Uft UU 
Mb Mft 
10ft Uft 
4S 41 
M 2 
1ft 1ft 
13ft 12ft 
Mft MU 


17% 17ft 
Uft Mft 
Uft Oft 
7ft 7U 
14% Uft 


Ml 109ft 107% 109ft +2U 
878 Aft Aft Aft— U 

T9 31% 3% 3W 
57 lift HU 11%+ % 
1 Sft 5% 5ft +> 
14 2ft 2U 2ft +ft 
121 2% 2ft 2ft— U 

132 Mft 3Aft SAW + ft 

33 Oft 9ft 9ft 

7 21% 21 21 — ft 

441 2 1ft 3 

. M 2ft 2ft 2ft— U 
19 9ft 9% Oft 

« 8ft Sft 8%+U 
U 12ft 12% Uft + % 
617 Jib 3 Jft + ft 

345 I 1 1 

Tl 81b 8U lib— V% 

33 10% 10ft 10ft— ft 
1 Tft 7U 7ft + ft 

48 1% 1U 1U 

14 2AU Mft 36ft— U 

13 33% 33 33% + M 

a 3ft m 3ft 



18 

■40b 3J 9 
.10 4 17 


291 42 12 
29 82 18 
IJDe A2 ID 
J2 12 16 
25.52 4 
22 IS ao 
120 11.1 0 


U BU 
2 12ft 
214 17% 

S 

27 18ft 
314 15U 
57 19ft 
732 43 
M 5ft 
as uft 
n 13% 

40 1 

ri mo 
4 2ft 
*2 lift 

n mh 

TOte 32ft 
A Sft 
17 TO 
35 f% 


au 

12ft— ft 
1714+ U 

Mft+ft 
Uft— % 
19% — U 
41U— 1% 
5 — Mi 
U —ft 
13% + U 
ft— IE 
HU 
2ft 

UU— ft 
M 

32ft + ft 
Sft 

0ft+ U 

9lb— U 


24% 16% 
22U 141% 
12 4 

16% Aft 
18ft 9ft 
20ft 18ft 
T7U 9ft 
7U 3ft 
8 5% 

7ft 5ft 
3ft 1 
36% 21ft 
»W AU 
11 7ft 


OEA 

Oofcwd Mb 
OdOtAn 
Odets ■ 

OtlATt 24 
Otkjlnd 40 
Ofsfens 24 

fXXclm 

OrlolHA .U 
OrtolH O 20 
Ormiind 
OSuUvn 32 
OxfrdF 42t 
QmrUi 20 


M 23% 
12 21 
87 8 

46 11% 

3 14 

2 19ft 
17 IS 

7 AU 

3 AW 
13 7U 
13 lft 

9 34% 

301 a 


22V 22V— ft 
20ft 20ft— M 
7ft 7ft— U 
10ft Hft— ft 
M U — ft 
19ft 19ft 
Mft MU— U 
Aft 6U 
Aft Aft— M 
7 7U 
lft 1ft 
36% 36ft + lb 
Oft Oft— u 
9 9U+ U 


17ft 11% Jocfyn 50b 34 9 3 Mft Mft Mft 

9ft 5% Jacobs U AU AU 6% + U 

5ft 2ft JetAm 5 119 » 2% 2%— ft 

2ft ft JetA wt 3 ft ft % 

8U m Jetran 49tA.1 16 4 8.7U8+U 

4U 2ft JahnRd 53 4ft Jft 4 + ft 

UU 7% JahnAm JO 24 16 a 10ft ipu 10U 

7% 4U JiDPJkn 5 42 4% 4 4 — % 

31V 31ft Jvpftsr < 4 31ft 31ft 31ft 


13 8% AU AU + U 

5 ”3 ^5 ^ 

49t &.1 16 4 8.7U8+U 

53 4ft 3ft 4 + ft 


19 

lift 

15ft 

9 

9V 

5 

4V 

2% 

19% 

13ft 

19W 

9% 

13% 

ID 

26 

Hft 

6% 

5 

1ft 

ft 

15V 

9% 

22% 


24 

18% 

■12 


SU. 

2% 

lift 

5U 

4J% 

36 

7W 

3% 

20ft 

15ft 

7ta 

4 

1ft 

ft 


12ft 8% 
22ft Mft 

rift su 

30 10ft 

13ft 11 
17ft 12ft 
U 7% 
lift 8% 
42ft 24ft 
30% 22% 
13% Aft 
10 7ft 
Oft 4U 
IK 68 
22ft 15 

22ft 15 
24U lift 
2% V 
43ft 29 
■ 4ft 
36 14 

10% 7W 
Ota S 
lift Tft 
20ft 12 
14ft Oft 
7ft 4U 
19ft 10W 


FPA 

Fablnd 40 : 

FittOtt 

PIPZLn 40b: 
FWrmB 40 i 
HsetlP 4» i 

Han En 
FHRck JO 
Pluke 148! 
Food an 
FooteM 
FthUIG 

FordCn pAJMs 
Fame A .U 
ForstCB 49 
FanoiL 
Fatent 

Fronii 140o : 
FrdHiv 
Free El 

Piftdrn 28b : 
FrtftEn 
Frkm JO i 
Frisch ■ 32 ■ 
FmlHd 

FrtAwt .171 ! 
PurVTtn 


A UK 

91 17ft 
84 Aft 

2 29ft 
40 13% 
10 12ft 

so aft 
2 » 
183 43ft 
S4 27ft 
12 10ft 

1 Oft 
19 Fft 

400i 98 

10 21ft 

2 21ft 
148 Uft 
782 1ft 

15 40 

3 AU 
78 24ft 

11 IU 

312 9% 

12 H 
35 20ft 

385 Hft 
22 AU 

92 17% 


lift lift 
17ft 17ft 
Aft Aft— ft 
29V 29ft 
13 13 — ft 

12ft Uft 
BM Bft + ft 
SW BU— lb 
42V 42ft + Mr 

8 % 27ft +1U 
ft 10V— % 
8ft BV— ft 
Oft 8ft- ft 
97 97% +1% 

21ft 21ft + ft 
3Tft 21ft— ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
IU 1%— ft 
40 40 

6 A — ft 
33% 23% — 1 
Sft 8% 

8% BU— % 
U II 
Mft 20U— ft 

AU 4% 

17ft 17ft 


lift 3ft GNCEn 

lift 3% OlEXPt 4 

Jft 4ft GRJ 

5 2% GTl 31 

Hft *ft QataxC 7 

3U 1% GalxyO 44 

33 24ft Qann UO 4.1 » 

UU 8ft Ganji 


48 4% 4ft 4U+ U 

4 77 9ft 9% Oft— ft 

3 Sft Sft 5ft 

31 189 3* 3V 3V— ft 

7 34 lift lift lift + ft. 

44 298 Jft 2% 2ft+ ft 

9 7 27% 3m 29ft— ft 

147 10 9U 9ft + ft 


iy ^ 



13 10ft 
12% 8ft 
11 8 % 
10ft Oft 
row su 
10 % 8 
34 , 28ft 
32ft 2AV 
27 71ft 
21ft 17ft 
19U 15ft 
Wft 17 
22% 17ft 
Oft Tft 

20 151b 

1SU Uft 

17 raw 
lAft Uft 
18% 14ft 
17% 13ft 
19ft 15 
9% Tft 
S4M Mft 
39W 21% 
43% 34 




IV + % 
2ft— U 
5ft 

32 + % 
13W 

lift— ft 
Uft— U 
lift— % 

2Sft+ ft 
5W 

2Sft + % 
AU— % 
7% + % 

2% 

2% 

37ft— 1% 
15V— ft 
13 + ft 
12 - ft 
13ft 

30 — ft 
Oft— ft 


39% 28ft 
Oft Sft 
23ft 15ft 
17% Sft 
Sft 2ft 
11 BU 
85% 321b 
23% 15ft 
2ft 1ft 
34ft 26 

32W 23 
Mft lDft 

lift tft 
4ft 3 U 
lft K 
10U Aft 
13 7W 
18ft 12% 
2ft lft 
10U 3% 
8 2U 
10W 5 

8ft Aft 
Uft 11 
71% 37 
13V Aft 
20% 13ft 

Zfi 

2ft 


U 12ft 

3 11% 
1 Mft 

4 10% 
22 

i ro 

24 Jlft 
.42 31% 
U8 26ft 

11 21% 
W 191b 
30 20ft 

13 21ft 
A 9ft 
46 19ft 

5 Uft 

25 16ft 
13 U 

1 17ft 
40 1AV 

1 nu 

43 9 

56 23ft 
10x 34ft 
10Z 40ft 

2 71V 
144 Oft 

3 5 
n iau 

J 

32 18ft 
V lft 
75 35% 


35 US 
99 25ft 
4 UU 

31 lift 
874 4 

54 ft 

s a 

a ^ 

01 4U 
1 3ft 
U 6ft 

1 Sft 
A UU 

2 7DW 
240 9ft 

99 17ft 

a i8ft 

3 2ft 
1 23% 


17% 12% + % 
11% lift— ft 
10ft Wft 
1BU 10% 

10% 10% + u 

M 10 — % 
33ft 33ft + M 
31 31 —ft 

to 26ft + % 
21 % 21 % — % 
19% 19% + % 
20ft 30ft 
21% 21ft + U 
9ft 9ft + % 
19% Wft+ U 
lift Mft— % 
14% Mft + % 
U 14 
17U I7U— % 
16ft 15ft + U 
18% UU 
8% 8* 
a 2s%+ % 

34V 36V— ft 
40V 40V +1% 

81ft 8^-U 

» 38 —ft 

7% Tft— % 
21ft 21ft + % 
9U 9V+ % 
4ft Aft— % 
H MM + U 
43% 83% — 1b 
U 10ft + U 
lft lft— % 
35ft 35ft— ft 

iTv raft 

lft lft— % 
a 25ft + ft 
n% rau 
n n — % 

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7% 7% 

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Mft Mft 
lft 2 

4 4 + U 

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5ft 5ft— % 
H% 13% + % 
7DU 70U— U 
8ft 0 —ft 
17V 17ft 
Mft Mft 
TV Tft— % 
23% 21% 


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fa?js 

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Verlt 14 

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vertpia JO ti 
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vamn 

vtaucriG Jf U 1] 
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vwcCp JO 4J 11 


as io% 

M 31% 

a a, 

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5 31b 

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221 11% 
1* 4ft 
20 7V 
2 Mb 
1 83U 
5 0ft 
32 Mft 
■ 3 10U 


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M LI 12 


18 

14 

7 

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80 


57 7% 7% 7ft 
* 10V MV lffft— % 
♦49 7 8ft Aft— % 
.27 10W HU 10ft— U 

In 18% II 71 — ft 

2 .7% 7% 7% + % 
43 UU Uft 13%+ % 

3 Sft Sft 3ft— U 
» 2ft 2% 2ft 

TI3 19W 19ft 19ft 
M 51ft 58% Slft+JU 
81 4W 4% 4ft+% 
54 Mft Mft Mft 
HStaTTO 184 184 -8 
» 3 2ft 3 + % 
.37 0 2Mb 20ft— ft 


W 9ft 9% 9% + H 
34 lft 9% Oft 


1* U 
4 

J9I 58 50 


34 fft 9% Oft 

236 3ft 3ft 3ft+ ft 

17 6 5% 8 + ft 

.10 23ft 33ft 23ft + % 
144 Mft H% 10ft 
43 7% 8ft 7 

87 a Wft 19% 

M4 4 3ft 3ft— % 
1.2% 2U 3U+ U 


The Daily 

Source far • 
Inteznationa^ 
Investors. 


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lift 84M «8ft lift 
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SINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


Page 11 


•rm ■ 


i' 1 * I *«..*» 
-s -. **> 

l "1 u_ 


r 

i r>esky Is Said to Hold 
v 7-to-8% Stake in CBS 


J* t. : T * 

^ - 
O *■* '* 

s r f < ; t 

til? i 

fc S 5 ' 

■» 

* E 35. * 
ite§- ‘ 

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• 

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i* « ^ : ' 

T* I'M -.• 

r •»" ^ * 

Eis??., 


»**«**» .- 
>«W Wwn,, 


■. A WE— Mffa, „ M 


j ; !y Isidore Barmash 

, 1 ’ .Vrw York Tunis Service 


c a l l ." CBS alsosaid Thursday that 
there was no basis to rumors that a 
leveraged buyout Iw a management 


;,g to reliable financial 

r 

•nkesman for Mr. Boesky de- 
'io comment on the reported 
lions. A CBS spokesman 
ye’re nm aware of any stock 
alfluon greater than 5. per- 


■■ i« ^ '•- l \ - • 

; - 0;yssenPayout 


CBS stock closed Friday at 
$108.50 on fee New York Stock 
Exchange, np S2.B75, down 6Z5 
cents, bn volume of 153,300 shares. 
CBS has about 29.7 millio n com- 
mon shares outstanding, 

Mr. Boesky 5 s investment, on 
which sources said a filing is ex- 
pected shortly with the Securities 
and Exchange Commission, would 
increase the intensity of merger in- 
terest and speculation in the enter- 
tainment and media fields. 

Early this week, American 
Broadcasting Cos. agreed to be ao- 

v„ n _■ 


fi p « , , j quired by Capital Cities Communi- 

Jfe nemsratea cations, Inc. and, on Wednesday, 


* - ; JlSBURG, West Genna- 
t - Thyssen AG will pay a 
Send in the fiscal year end- 
j ;i ':pL 30, 1985 after omitting 
-V-iyout for two years, the 
i jgjna board chairman, Dir 
■ jpethmazm said Friday. 


Rupert Murdoch, the Austr alian 
publisher who owns the New York 
Post and other newspapers, an- 
nounced that be was acquiring a 
50-percent interest in 20tb-Cenxuxy 
Fox Film Corp. 

According to reports, Mr. 
Boesky has recently disposed of a 
number of holdings in his compa- 
ny’s portfolio to raise money for 


*'* - " ' J ke period a year ago, but 
• «.* • V. • ve no profit figure or year- 
'*" v7 ~ - . comparison. Domestic 

^ t . rfol mrvfi f in IQQVOA ' 


**►- m ne a. 

*4 UWa »■ #1 t- r ^tT'Wr J ft 


’ 3 net profit in 1983-84 to- 
I87j4 million DM ($58 
at current rates) and 
■ :r.^ u ' ; cl group sales, 32 billion 

m j l 

— ^ c. Spethmann said that 
- — group monthly sales av- 
; > . ;iJ T^Sd 2.7 bQHon Deutscbe- 

: * i 1 * i £ 's in the first half, up 6 
li-j-'t 41 ' !ait from a year earlier. He 
’• * .. ilthe company also plans a 

" “ ! 'al increase as soon as pos- 

to improve its capital ra- 

'»ut he did not eLaborate. 


SEC on Thursday, Mr. Boesky sold 
1 million common shares of South- 
land Financial Corp. for $28.75 per 
share and 185,000 shares of ABC 

Mr. Boesky also disclosed that 
between Feb. 19 and March 14, be 
purchased approximately 2.4 mil- 
lion shares of Stauffer Chemical 
Co. for prices ranging from $27 to 
$27.85 a share. 

PaKburg Plans Hold Project 

Ratten 

HONG KONG — Pah burg In- 
vestments Ltd. will invest 300 mil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars ($38 mil- 
lion) in a Hong Kong hotel project, 
its chairman said Friday. 


Attendants 
At Pan Am 
End Strike 

Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — More than 
two dozen flight attendants 
broke ranks Fnday with strik- 
ing ground crew workers and 
reported to work at Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways, lifting the 
airline’s hopes of restoring 
more flights to service. 

Members of the Independent 
Union of Flight Attendants re- 
ported for flights from New 
York cm the first full day that 
tested whether they would com- 
ply with their union’s call for 
them to return to work, a Pan 
Am spokesman said. The air- 
line, which usually has 390 daily 
flights, had 157 flights Thurs- 
day, he said. 

The onion previously direct- 
ed its 5,000 Fan Am attendants 
to honor picket lines set up Feb. 
28 by the Transport Workers 
Union, representing 5,800 me- 
chanics and other ground crew 
workers. It reversed the order 
this wed: as a “show of faith" in 
its own contract negotiations 
with the airline. 

Officials refused to comment 
on contract talks with the atten- 
dants union, whose contract ex- 
pired- Jan. 1. The attendants 
had set an April I s trike dead- 
line. Pilots and flight engineers 
have been working since shortly 
after the transportation Welk- 
ers’ strike began. 

The attendants have also 
warned they will strike if the 
airline refuses to rehire more 
than 150 attendants fired for 
refusing to work during the 
transportation workers’ strike. 

Contract talks between the 
transportation woikera and Pan ' 
Am continued. 


Burroughs, Under SEC Order, Restates Earnings 


By Nathaniel C Nash profits by overstating the value of the eommissia 

New York rones Scnice its obsolete computer inventories. SJL Shad, has 

WASHINGTON — Continuing ‘This is a case of a company not Mr. Shad caJ 
its efforts to restrain aggressive ac- making the hard judgments on the nanrial fraud” 
counting practices, the Securities value of its inventories," said Bruce they do not all 
and Exchange Commission said it Hiler, assistant director in the com- of fraud. The 
has charged Burroughs Corp. with mission's enforcement division. fact, is an SEC 
overstating its e a r nin gs from Sep- In responding to the rfiyr ge^ the seeding, the mi 
tember 1981 to September 1982 by company said, “In choosing settle- mission brings, 
more than $60 million. meat ova- litigation. Burroughs carries odiher 

The nation's No. 3 computer concluded that its stockholders penalties. justs 
maker on Thursday signed a con- would be ill served by the company just earnings an 
sent order, without admitting or incurring litigation expense and a teraa ^ controls. 


profits by overstating the value of the commission’s chairman, John that Burroughs did not adjust for 
its obsolete computer inventories. SJL Shad, has promised to pursue, the lower value of the inventory 
"This is a case erf - a company not Mr. Shad calls these actions “fi- until it took a $154 million write- 
making the hard judgments on the nanrial fraud" cases even though off at the end of 1981 
value of its inventories," said Brace they do not all involve accusations "They should have been rating 
Hiler, assistant director in the com- of fraud. The Burroughs case, in the write-downs on a quarterly ba- 
mission’s enforcement division. fact, is an SEC administrative pro- sis." Mr. Hiler said. "And that 


denying the charges, and agreed to 
restate its earnings for 1981 and 
1982 and to have its independent 
auditor conduct an internal review 
of the company’s current inven- 
tory-valuation process. 

The commission contended that 
the company had overstated its 


concluded that its stockholders penalties, just agreement to ad- assessment of the company's fman- 
would be ill served by the company just earnings and institute more in- dal condition." 
incurring litigation expense and a tema * 0011 trct - As a result of the proceeding, 

diversion of management resources The commission’s complaint Burroughs agreed to reduce eam- 
simply to adjudicate matters now agains t Burroughs focuses on its ings for the mini and fourth quar- 
several years old." method of vahiating computer in- ters of 198 


method of vahiating computer in- ters of 1981 and the first 


The commission’s case against ventory during the recession days quarters of 1982 by a total of S61.4 
Burroughs is significant, not only . of 1981 and 1982. The commission million, while adding $61.4 million 
because it is against a major indus- charges that muc h of the compa- in profits to its previously reported 
trial corporation but also because it n/s computer equipment had be- $87.3 minion loss in the I9S2 
is the land of enforcement case that come obsolete during that time, but fourth quarter. 


Paribas Sells Stake 
In Hong Kong Finn 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Banque 
Paribas has sold all its 25.5- 
percent stake in Sun Hung Kai 
& Co. to Heeyun Co. at a price 
of 1.60 Hong Kong dollars (21 
U.S. cents) a share, according to 
a joint statement by the French 
bank and SHK on Friday. 

Heeyun is a private company 
associated with the chairman of 
SHK, Fung King Hey. Mr. 
Fung, who owns a 28. 8-percent 
stake in SHK. is obliged under 
the Hong Kong code on take- 
overs and mergers to make an 
unconditional general offer to 
acquire the remaining fully paid 
shares at 1.60 dollars each. 


Ericsson Affiliate to Sell 
Gear to British Telecom 


By Bob Hagexty 

International Herod Tribune 

LONDON — A local affiliate of 
Sweden's Tdefon AB LM. Erics- 
son has won a hotly contested or- 
der to supply digital local tele- 
phone exchanges to British 
Telecommunications PLC, the 
Bririch telephone compan y said 
Friday. 

But Britain's Office of Triecont 
muni cations said late Friday that it 
would investigate the planned pur- 


ture of NV Philips and American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

A British Telecom spokesman 
said all three bidders offered 
roughly similar performance, but 
that Thom Ericsson came up with 


COMPANY NOTES 

Aberdare Cables Africa Ltd. will Barbados, for a 403-square- mile 
M. UlCAAIUI acquire the shareholding of Scot- (1,000 square-kilometer) area off 

T . . .... tish Cables Ltd. and pass a 69- the northeast coast, according to 

IT™ ky. a percent block of shares to a new the prime minister of Barbados, 


“the best commensal package" and cer, Arthur V. Toupin, 63, said he 
OTomiswi the ffiirhest delivery. WOQ Jd be taking early retirement 


company held by ASEA Electric Bernard St. John. 

South Africa Ltd. and Philips Elec- Grown ZeDerbach Corp. “will 
tronics Hol ding s (Pty.) Ltd-, the continue on an independent 
companies said. course" in the face of a potential 

BankAmerica Corp.'s vice chair- bid for a takeover of the company 
man and senior administrative offi- by Sir James Goldsmith, according 


While all threebidders promised to later this year, “fuffiffing a long- manufacturer had started 
manufacture the equipment m Bat- stan<Eng intention.” The San Fran- with “a relatively slow start" 
!>■* 811 cisco-based bank holding company General Motors Corp. said i 

«tabhshed plmil aiScunihrape^ ^ announced a management realign- recalling 1,000 workers to asse 


Barbados, for a 403-square-mile Mesa Petroleum Co. has filed a 
(1,000 square-kilometer) area off lawsuit in San Francisco against 
the northeast coast according to the Unocal Corp. and its chairman, 
the prime minister of Barbados, Fred L. Hanley, contending that 
Bernard St John. Unocal had used “coercion and in- 

Crqwn ZeDerbach Corp. “will limidation" against Security Pacif- 
continue on an independent ic National Bank in an attempt to 
course” in the face of a potential interfere with business arrange- 
bid for a takeover of the company men is between Mesa and the h-infc 

Mr. Cream said the re.tn and natv-r "7“®*“*“ Ta . ,e * PLC. 


retirement Mr. Creson said the pulp and paper “V r yC 
« a long- manufacturer had sorted "$85 tSSrfSr”! 

San Fran- with “a relatively slow start" 

5 company General Motors Corp. said it was Hunl ii^™£~'l a . su i> s “ Uar * ° 
m realign- recalling 1,000 workers to assembly Omii cSEl 1 Resources 

me nnniMl lin« .v. m Lilias. 


chase. The new regulatory agency “pressed steennakmg city m the ment, but no successor was named, lines next week, reducing the num- 
rited complaints from members of BeB Adantic CorpL has asked the ber of workers on indefinite layoffs 

Parliament who fear the purchase , ? utun J“: us. Justice Department tortcom- to 21,000. The company said it is 

would reduce orders for purely had dumnatedthTO other bidders; mend a court ruling that would scheduling overtime at seven car 
British equipment Vm“ Fr ance, Siemens allow it to enter the software buri- and three truck plants. 

The contract valued at as much w “ l Ga ™5 1 ?, ness. Bell Atlantic said it proposed Gerrard & National PLC the 

as £100 millio n (about $110 uril- letepnones & Cables P LCof to provide software and other oper- British discount house, and the 

lion), went to Thom Ericsson Tele- “ntuut which w as off ering ITT ational support systems to tmanlli- stockbrokers James Cape! & Co. 

communications LtdL, owned 49 s S y stem . . teamMogy. ated providers of exchange tde- said they had decided not to pro- 
percent by Ericsson ahd 51 percent sc “ > °8 communications services. ceed with plans announced in Oc- 


W _ . . _ _ _ mn rna m M- ■ n «<vi uw mavu mv uu v« TTUiaUd UU IIUIUIIIUV Ukrt/J 

Last autumn, Bnttffli Tdaotn us. Justice Dqpartment to iecom- to 21,000. The company said it 
£ lddm: mend a court ruling that would scheduling overtime at seven car 
CTT Alcaid of France, Semens allow it to enter the software bus- and three truck plants. 

. Germany _and Stan- ness. Bdl Atlantic said it oroDoscd Gerrard & National PLC. i 


ana tnree truck plants. 

Gerrard & National PLC the 
British discount house, and the 



*-*» * ■■! wt TAMM ^ fjn _ " • ■ — r * — w •“»*» UUU UVVIUMi UVL LU UtV 

percent by Ericsson ahd 51 percwit T^e competition was strong communications services. ceed with plans announced in Oc- 

by Thom EMI PLC, a British dec- because Britain is one of the Castle & Cooke Inc. said it tober for a jam company which 

tronics company. Tborn Ericsson’s . * ew inoustnal countnK, signed a letter of intent with certain would lave applied to become a 

AXE exchange woo over equip- ff 311 * ro ™ “ c Uni red. States, that of its private unsecured lenders market maker in the restructured 
ment offered by Northern Tdecom exdiangp tednuHogy from that would provide for a moratori- British government bond mar ker. 

foragn su^iuers. . , um on debt payments until the Honda Motor Co. said its wholly 

i . tto s-s 


lUd provii 

debt pa 


Slowdown lfl Pf in TT S merger mtoFlexi-VanCofp. France SA, wiU btald^ aSSmillion- 

CUUffUUWU liiru OdlCO 111 \J «sy Co. bM Gene^ecmc Co. of CWf Ofl PLC the British com- franc (about $4-mfflion) factory on 
n ^ ! . -m Britain, both of whrdi make Sys- pany, has signed a $30-million 20- the outskirts of Orifcans to make 

Called Cyclical by an Analyst ££ bwn mown, mum aim. 

* * • billion a ye» to upgrade its net- 

By Carla La2zareschi January sales, although just half work, wanted a second technology 1 

Los Angeles Tima Service of the recMiot December pace, were as a backup to System X. So far, Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 


Called Cyclical by an Analyst 


Volkswagen has agreed with the 
Chinese government to invest $42 
million to expand their joint auto- 
mobile factory in Shanghai 


Gold Options (prim taS/oi.). 


32o usm5oo aaaua 

333 am kuo lAsiins tuojujp 
30 US- OS 12SUSO) WC03203 

350 am <9 xuo-iuo luauoo 

340 1JB- 300 A» a» 133S-1CS 

370 ATS- 6Ji iQP&rap 

Gott 31UO-3U0> 

Vaican White Weld SJk. 

I. QmI *i MaM-Hanc 
Ull Cnm 1, Sw ta tfkwi 
TcL 3I«ZS1 - Tdn 21305 


By Carla Lazzareschi January sales, although just half work, wanted a second technology 
Los Angeles Times Service of the red-hot December pace, were as a backup to System X. So far, 
ANAHEIM, California — The still substantially ahead of those of System X has been troubled by 
W5 from the per sonal computer January 1984, he said, and better technical delays and has failed to 


ri 


news from the personal computer January 1984, he said, and better technical delays ana has failed to 
front appears beset as the than any month of 1984 except win major overseas orders. I 

industry is with layoffs and prod- November and December. Thom Ericsson is scheduled to 

act' suspensions. Bat at least one Although Mr. Juliussen provided begin delivering 100,000 exchange : 
is advising retailers in the no sales figures, his analysis was hnesin 198fi's second half and con- , 
riy new and highly seasonal largely supported by data collected tinue with 300,000 to 500,000 lines 
industry to look beyond the head- hy InfoCbrp, a computer-research in 1987. 
lines. firm in Northern California's Soi- 
l’s the growth rale that’s slow- con Valley. According to InfoCorp, TTirr/fs flrvm* 

mg. The market isn't shrinking; it’s 344.000 personal computers were 1,U V W 

growing," Egfl Juliussen, rjiarrman sold in December, more than twice a • » jr n t g 

of Future Coaqrating Co., the Dal- tire 167,000 units sold in January. la PpUJCSCl 

Iasrbased D re¥arch..finn. told . a In March 1984, the earliest month The Associated Press 

skeptical audience of personal- for which InfoCorp has data, jost - rnniMB]1 n nw At i««ct 
computer merchants at &e Com- 129,000 units were sold. Ohio - At^ 

pater Dealers' Exposition in Ana- Mr. Juliussen’s argument was f limited ^^ness for a second 
Km on WaT-Irt bow mppgdmritemlhed.y^Mi- ftSSSSKS^TSS 
today than it was a year ago. chad Shabazran, prcsidait of do- ^ 


Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings (Seaboard) N.V. 


The Annual Report as of 31st December, 1984 has been 
published and may be obtained from: 


Ohio Thrifts Open; 


Tnsr-haseri ^ npyardh firm ... inld m In March 1984, the earliest monih 
"skeptical audience of personal- fur which. InfoCorp has d a t a, just 


computer merchants at the Com- 129,000 units were sold, 
pater Dealers' Exposition in Ana- Mr. Juliussen’s argument was 


the state Commerce Department I 


Mr. Juliussen’s analysis Dies in opaations for Computer- Kenneth Cot, that they 

the face of conventional wisdom Land, the largest retail franchiser doscd ^ , ^,1, . 

that the market for small-business m United States. ^Ve are lions are put into effeo. 
and home computers is again on stronger ntw than we were last ymr A spokesman said 


and home computers is again on 
the downside of its roller coaster 
ride of the past few years. 

The conventional wisdom was 


the downside of its roiQeranster at tins tin*,- Mr. fflabazian said 

-ride of the past few years. And tiiat s a surprise we had not ^ withdrawals ody, adding that 

The conventional wisdom was C0unled they opened after representatives 

supported by this week’s an- . According to Future Comput- / r0 m the Federal Reserve certified 
nouncement that International I 0 ®’ 5 analysis, retailers, particularly that they had sufficient capital to 
Business Machines Corp. wQI sus- inexpenenced, independent opera- meet customer d emands. 
pend production of its PCjr and tOTS » ^ bearing the brunt of the Meanwhile, the office of Gover- 
earfier news of a weddong maim- sales problems. And it is these pco- nor Richard F. Celeste announced 
facturing furlough at Apple. Com- the analysis holds, who are Friday that Thomas Batties, super- 
puter Inc. Iikdy to blame their troubles on an intendent of the state’s Division of 

But Mr. Juliussen contended industry slowdown rather lhan on Savings and Loan Associations, 
that retailers should not necessarily increasingly fierce competition. had been replaced by Robert B. 
conc l ude that the pe rsonal compm- “It’s a period of competitive tur- McAlister and that Mr. Batties 
ear market is suffering. The current bulence, but not a shrinking mar- would return to a job as legal coun- 
slowdown, he said, is typical of the ket," said Bill Ablondi, a Future sd to the division. No reason was 


Pierson, Hakfring & Pierson NX 
Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam 

National Westminster Bank PLC 
Stock Office Services, 

3rdFloor 

20 Old Broad Street 
London EC2N1EJ • 

UM. Rothschild & Sons Limited 
New Court, St Swtthin's Lane, 

London EC4P4DU 

LEuropienne de Banque 

21 Rue LafRtte, Paris 9 

IHnkaus & Burkhardt 

K&ningsaliee 21-23 
D 4000, DOssetdorf 1 


SaL Oppmihelm jr. A Oe. 

Unter Sachsen hausen 4, D 5000, KOtn 1 

Banque Paribas Belgique SJt 
Boulevard Emile Jacqmain 162, 

B 1000. Bruxelles 

Banque Parfoae 
3 Rue d'Antirt, Peris 2 

Banque Paribas (Luxembourg) SJL 
10a Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 

Merrill Lynch international & Co. 
all European Offices 

Rothschild Australia Limited 
Royal Exchange Building 
56 Pitt Street Sydney N.S.W. 2000 


Computing vice president 


given for the move. 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS YOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


F or IRA investors seeking the 
assurance of a fixed rate, we 
suggest a bank? 

For those investors more 
concerned with how high the 
rate of return is, than with how 
fixed, we suggest another route. 
The Oppenheimer Special Fund. 

Because over its Life, the 
Special Fund has the best perfor- 
mance “record of all 361 mutual 


had been able to 


Fund IRA since the Funds 
inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $104,570*** as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21 .5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 


.funds that have been in existence higher return is pref- 


that long— an astonishing total 
return of MOW 


erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 


[~ToM.' Tucker Smith wvw 1 

I Oppenheimer &Ca. 62^ -64 Cannon Sr. London EC4N 6 AE England I 

I Telephone 01-236 6578 1 

J Piease me an IRA application and i Special Fund pTcwpcctua with more complete informa- 1 
i don. includlngjJIcbargwjuidexpenies. HI read it otreriilfy before I Invesr or seod money j 

! D1U Kke to open w IRA. CUB like to twitch my IRA- . 



© 1985 Oppenheimer Investor Services, Inc. 'Bank IRA's ore insured and generally have lined interest 
rates, whereas ihf Furid - * w ossm value flnauaies and maybe subjea ra toss. "March IS, 1973-Oeceraber 
il. I ipn»-r Analytical Services. Inc. "‘Aasuminga SlQOO lovestrococ on March 15. 1973 Unceodon 

of fund) amJS2jM0 annual invesnnenaon fas business day of each year [hereafter with all dividends ted ’ 
distributions reinvested. Past performance Is nocan indication of future rewhs- In the period shewn, 
stock prices fluctuated severely and were generally higher at the end than at the beginning. 


INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES FUND S.A. 

SOCliTt ANONYME - LUXEMBOURG 


CONVOCATION OF THE ORDINARY 
AND EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 
OF SHAREHOLDERS 


Notice is hereby given that the annual general meeting of Shareholders will be held 
at the head office of the Corporation, 14, Rue Aldringen, Luxembourg Qty, at 3 p.m., 
on April 4th. 1985, with the following agenda: 

1) To hear and accept the reports of 

а) the Directors, 

б) the Statutory Auditor, 

2) To approve the balance sheet and the profit and loss account for the fiscal year 
ended December 31, 1984; 

3) To discharge the Directors and the auditor in respect of the performance of 
their duties; 

4) To elect Directors and Statutory Auditor in accordance with the articles of 
incorporation; 

5) Miscellaneous. 

Resolutions to be taken at this ordinary general meeting of Shareholders are not 
subject to quorum requirements. 

Furthermore, notice is hereby given that ordinary general meeting as above, will 
immediately be followed by an extraordinary general meeting of Shareholders at the 
same place of meeting for the purposes of considering and, if deemed fit, of approving 
the following agenda: 

— Adjustment of the articles 3-21-23-24 of the articles of incorporation to the law 
of August 25th, 1983. 

The articles of by-laws subject to the above adjustment are available also in 
their new text with the registered office of the Company (14, Rue Aldringen, 
Luxembourg) and with the secondary office in Italy (177 Via Toledo, Naples). 

Shareholders are informed that the above resolution may be taken at the 
extraordinary general meeting only if 50% of the shares outstanding are represented in 
person or by proxy and must be approved by at least two thirds of shares represented. 

in die event that such quorum condition is not fulfilled, a second meeting, not 
subject to such quorum requirements, will be called through publication of additional 
notices and will take place after the delays required by kw. 

In order to be authorized to vote both the above meetings bearer shareholders must 
deposit their shares 5 clear days before the meetings at the registered office of the Funds 
or at one of the following Banks: 

—BANCO DI NAPOLI, VIA TOLEDO 177, NAPOLI (ITALY); 

— BANQUE GENERATE DU LUXEMBOURG, 

14, RUE ALDRINGEN, LUXEMBOURG. 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 








international 


m 




M 


Season Season 

Htoh Low 


Open Ktefi Low Clou CDs. 


Grains 



Season 
! High 

Smsoii 

LOW 

Open 

Htab 

Lew 

CM* 

CM. 

ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 




-*3S 


15140 

May 16490 

16490 

16340 

16145 

18485 

15590 

Jul 16*75 

1*490 

16440 

16470 

—JO 


157.75 

Sop 16 US 

164/5 

16495 

16415 

—JO 

18140 

15740 

Nev 16340 

1*340 

16325 

16110 

—70 

18040 

15640 

Jan 1*340 

16370 

16370 

16X10 

+45 


15630 

Mar 



16X50 

—45 

16X50 

16090 

MOV 



HX5S 

— 45 


Jut 



16X50 


Est. Sales 200 Prev.SaEe* 

346 




Prav. Day Open InL *7*5 otflVB 





Over-the-counter 


March 22 


nasoao Nattonol Marfcvt Prices 


Metals 





f ft 


Industrials 


Mum im 

MU HM LOW JPJK.CVM 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CAKE) 

4BL8S&I lb*r- cents per lb. 

*940 6155 Apr 62/0 6X10 

»50 iUt Jan 6590 66.15 

67/7 6X15 Aua 45/5 6572 

6590 6U0 Oct 6L60 (US 

6745 6X60 DOC 6/55 45.10 

6X45 6125 Fob *535 4540 

6757. 6640 Apr 6600 66 lOO 

Est Sales 1,279 Prev.Sales 12689 
Prav. Day Open Int 61473 up 531 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
41000 lbs,- conts P(r lb. 

7130 6670 APT *755 4X20 

-7273 6195 May 4065 *9.15 

7X70 4660 Auo TOjOO 7070 

7X00 6760 Sep 4965 70.10 

72J2 67.18 Oct 69.15 6955 

7X20 69 JI5 NOV *955 7065 

Ext. Sales 1218 Prev.Sales U20 
Prov. Day Open InL 105X2 up 64 
HOGS (CMC) 

30400 lbs,- cents per lb. 

5145 4135 Apr 4550 4597 

5X40 4140 Jun 5050 5065 

5577 48.95 Jul 5190 5205 

513 7 47.50 Aua 51 JO 51 JO 

-5175 4500 oct 47 JJ mm 

som 4630 Dec 4100 4150 

49 JO 4125 Feb 4835 4150 

4735 4530 Apr 46J0 4600 

4100 47J00 Jun 4100 4860 

Est Sales 7/40 Prev.Sales 1693 
Prev. Day Open let 34777 off 283 
PORK BELLIES (CASE) 


Financial 


CRUDE OILflfYME) 
1400 bbL-dalleis per bbL 
3078 2478 Mav 

2843 

2X67 

2820 

2874 

— vTO 

2X55 

2(79 

Jun 

77 J5 

27 JB 

27/0 

7761 

— 75 

2974 

2410 

Jut 

2745 

2749 

2770 

2777 

—.13 

2947 

2475 

Aua 

2740 

2775 

27.10 

27.15 

— ,13 

29.50 ■ 

2448 

Sep 

27.15 

2770 

2744 

2744 

—41 

2X50 

24/5 

Oct 

2770 

2779 

2770 

2779 

+.19 

3 SJffl 

2440 

Nov 

27.10 

2779 

Z743 

2779 

+49 

2940 

2X90 

Dec 

27.15 

2779 

27.15 

2779 

-M4 

EsL Sales Prav.Stdm U45S 

Prev. Day Open Int. *1911 off 1*89 





Stock Indexes 


3X000 lbs.- cents per H* 

ST-20 60.10 Mar 7X75 7100 

826$ 61.15 May 7X72 7110 

8247 6X15 Jul 7342 7X80 

8065 mm Aua 7135 71J5 

75.15 6X15 Feb 7X15 7245 

7X40 6100 Mar 

m m tom Mav 

7090 19SS Jut 

EstSalu 3333 Prev.Sales 2/83 
Prev. Day Open Int 11939 off 307 


S COFFEE CCNYCSCE) 















14545 14580 

14440 






14520 14550 






14475 14450 

14X50 

14477 





14375 14373 

14X00 


+7* 



Mar 

14240 14290 

14240 






» 




+43- 



Jul 






feet. Sales 

2700 Prev.Satas 2780 




prtv.Day Open Int. 11306 u»68 





SUOARWORLD.il (HYCSGEJ 


¥ '. 











441 

443 

371 





Jul 

421 

422 

410 

414 

— 45 




427 

431 

425 

431 

—45 




452 

452 

442 

445 

—47 


497 


593 

543 

541 

497 

—40 




548 

548 


541 

—47 




572 

573 

563 

564 

—44 


543 

Jul 

572 

592 

5J6 

590 

—44 


54*3 

•rav.Satas 4427 




Prev. Day Open InL 80755 up928 





COCOA (NY CSCE] 















21*0 

3421 






Jul 

2207 

2341 





1987 

Sop 

2190 

2238 

2164 


■H25 


1945 


2 m 


21 Of 




1955 

Mur 







1940 








1980 

Jul 







Prev.. 

ale* 49*7 




- Prev. Day Open InL 26J00 oH*4 






SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 
points and cent* 

189.10 156.10 Jun 18X40 18X50 

19270 16090 Sep 187 JO 187 JO 

19640 T75J0 Dec 19050 T9OS0 

191X5 190.10 Mar 

Est Sales 5X346 Prev. Sates 73977 
Prav. Day Open InL 53X20 up 2990 
VALUE LINE (KCBTI 
points and cents 

20*90 16110 Mar 19190 19390 

21960 17X00 Jun 199.10 19945 

21XS8 18575 S*P 2D3JB 20120 

21090 20950 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 5556 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7J07 off 221 
NYSE CO MP- I NDEX (NYFE1 
points and cents 

11000 9090 Jim 10660 10670 

111.90 91 J5 Sep 10870 10170 

11375 10170 Dk 11090 11090 

10.10 11X30 MOT 11390 11290 

EstScrtes 10729 Prev.Sales M902 
Prev. Day Open Int 9406 ao8Z7 


18195 18240 
18550 18590 
19045 189.10 
19240 


19245 19X85 
19790 19090 
20X10 20X10 
20110 


10570 10100 
10790 10X00 
11090 11055 
11290 11X10 


Commodity Indexes 


Est. Sales - Prev.Sales 163 
Prev. Day Open lot. -4.764.oK2S . 


CENT. DEPOSIT (I MM) 

SI mliHac+ptsoflOOPCt 
9170 0563 Mar 9150 9170 

9170 8570 - Jun- 9071 9075 

9060 8590 Sop 8953 8953 

90.17 8134 Dec 8997 8997 

8978 8656 Mar 

1946 8143 Jon 

8852 8796 Sep 

Eat Sales 441 Prev.Sales 515 
Prev. Day Open int. 7993 off 11 


91.12 91.15 
MM 9098 
■950 MM 
■997 8995 


Close 

***"'*V« 964J0f 

Tenters 1.96X50 

DJ. Futures 12X00 

Com. Research Bureau. 24X90 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 
960201 
1,98X70 
123.1© • 
24X40 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

ItmlUtaoptsotlOOPcL 

9088 8249 Jun §952 8967 

5SSJ3 0453 S*P 8975 *975 

8997 8490 DK 0893 8895 

8948 HID MOT «8« 8845 

■9.15 8173 Jun £.17 £17 

8894 87J0B Sep 8X00 £01 

8977 8771 DM 8791 «741 

E»t Sates 34,101 F^TV.SoIm 46J19 
Prev. Day Open InL 9123V off 97* 


■946 8968 
8996 89J» 
8167 8868 
8142 8899 
88.17 88.16 
8890 S7.95 
■791 8776 


m 


Yf 


m 


T*z" 




Paris Commodities 

March 22 


Asian Commodities 

March 22 


London Commodities 

March 22 


Cash Prices March 


Hlgb Lew Bid AlX ChUe 

SUDAN 

Freed francs per metric ton 
MOV' 1726 1711 1711 1715 —10 

AU0 1786 1766 1767 1738 —13 

Oct 142* 1410 1411 1413 —11 

Dec 1485 1485 1460 W -20 

Mor 1586 1570 1571 1573 —13 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1415 1535 — U 

Eat. voi.: 1900 lot* of 50 tans. Prev. actual 
soles: X165 lots. Open Interest: 23917 


Mar 

2750 

2745 

2700 

2740 

—35 

MOV 

xass 

2725 

2725 

2728 

— 18 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2770 

— 


Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2780 

— 10 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

X1B9 

xiyo 

— 20 


N.T. 

14 T. 

X165 

X190 

— 20 



• 

X160 

XVN 

—20 




iu tons. Prev. actual 




■rest: 976 


COFFEE 





French franc* per leo kg 



Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2550 

2610 

Unch. 


2600 

2600 

2600 

2605 


JIV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2630 

2645 

Until. 


2690 

2690 

2670 

2685 

Unch. 


2700 

2700 

2675 

2695 

+ 15 


N.T. 

N.T. 

2635 

2660 

+ 15 


N.T. 

N.T. 



+ 8 



28 lota. Onen Interest: 1*9 



Source: 

Bourse do Commerce. 




S&P 100 Index Options 

March 22 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 


ILLS par ounce 






Prav. 




Htoh 

Lew 

Settle 

Settle 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

31640 

31490 

Api 

31*40 

31540 

31640 

31500 

Jun— 

32140 

32140 

32140 

31950 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

32640 

32550 

volume: 134 lets at 100 ex. 



KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 



Maimtan cent* per kilo 




Close 

Preview 


Bid 

Ask 

BM 

Ask 


19675 

19475 

19340 

19440 

May 

19140 

198/0 

19*40 

19650 

Jun ■ ■ 

19840 

20040 

19750 

19950 

JlY 

19940 

20140 

19940 

20040 


20X50 

30450 

20240 

203,09 


20540 

20640 

20440 

20500 

vaumc:49lotv 




SINGAPORE RUBBER 



Stopapore cents par Mia 




Close 

Praviepf 


BM 

Ask 

BM 

Ask 

RSS1 API- 

16840 

168J0 

16475 

16775 

RSSl MOV. 

17140 

17173 

17040 

17050 

RSS 2 Apt — 

167 JO 

16850 

16640 

16790 

RS53 Apt — 

16550 

16650 

1*440 

16590 

RSS 4 Apl _ 

1*050 

16X50 

15940 

16140 

RSS 5 Apt 

155/0 

15750 

15440 

i<*nn 

KUALA LUMPUR PAUM OIL 


Malavslen ringgits per 25 tens 



High Lour Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

S ter lin g per m e tr i c ten 
May 11540 11X20 11390 11490 
ADO 12028 11790 11X«J 11990 
OCI 12590 12240 12140 12190 
Dec 12940 12940 12990 13190 
Mar 14590 14390 14X80 14470 
May 15090 U&0S 14790 14990 
ADO N.T. N.T. 15390 1 6590 
Volume: 817 lets of 50 tans. 
CTfflA 

Stertiee per metric tan 
Mar 2960 2935 2940 2960 
Mar 2970 2937 2955 24S7 
Jhr 2924 2907 2920 2921 
UP 2905 1987 2902 2904 
Dec 1922 1911 1,920 1922 
Mar 1915 1900 1912 1917 
May N.T. NX 1900 1915 
Volume: 4782 lots of 18 tens. 
COFFEE _ 

Sterling per metric lee 
Mar 2752 2731 2742 2745 
Mar 2792 2760 2786 2707 
JlY 2733 2J02 272* 2730 
Sep 2770 2J43 X-T45 "VIM 
NOV 2789 2357 2771 2783 
Jan 2960 2740 2740 27M 
MW ofia* t|Ht ->,nn 2940 
Volume: 3773 tots of 5 tans. 
GASOIL _ 

us. Milan pw metric lea 


11490 11590 
1209012070 
12590 12570 
13190 13270 
1459014570 
15090 15040 
15570156/0 


Commodity and unit 

Coffee* SantaxBa — 

Prlntetotn 64/3038 lb, yd . 
Steel billets iPltt.l.tan— 
lrwi2FWy.PNkLtefi — 
Steel scrap No I hvy Pitt. 

.Lead Spot, H> — 

Co nn er elect, to- ■ ■ 

Tin («nrit*),lto_-. 

Zbic. E. St. L. Basts, lb _ 

Palladium, ox 

Silver N.T.R 

Source: AP. 


2948 2949 
2958 2960 
2911 2915 
1992 1995 
1915 1916 
1910 1912 
1907 1.908 


Dividends March 


9JM 2726 
2760 2761 
2799 2902 
2736 2740 
2751 2754 
2730 2735 
2900 2910 


Cent eany 

Per 

Ant 

Pay 

Roc 

INCREASED 



FlltertefcCo 

Q 

.15 

5-15 

5-1 


STOCK 



- 

Friedman Indus 


5* 

5-10 

*6 



Volume: 0 lots of 25 Ions. 
Source: R e uters, 




Company 

Earnings 


Revenue end profits, m millions, 
ore in bed currencies unless 
otherwise indicated 




-UM*-- 


Australia 


DM Futures Options 

March 22 

if . Gaum Mat •VSB36 marts mb otr mil 


London Metals 

March 22 


China Sets Law 

For Foreigners 


9 Months 



Starting nw metric ton 
assert 93190 93200 

forward 96X00 16X80 95X00 


US. Treasury BHI Rates 

March 22 


COPPE R CATHOPES WW Grade} 

Stertlea per metric ton . 

spat 199350 1,19490 1.17290 

forward 171490 171490 U9L50 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard} 
Starling par metric ton 
Spot 170090 170590 1,18X50 

forward 171290 171590 1.19500 

LEAD 

StarliM per mtlric 8 m 
sear 30290 30X00 30] 90 

terword 91190 31190 30990 

NICKEL 

SterRpg par metric ton 

foot X4M90 4,9 3 ) 0 ° 443590 . 

forward 493090 453540 446590 < 


BEUING — China has passed a 
law on economic contracts with 
foreigners that is to take effect July 
1, a senior Chinese parliamentary 
official said Friday. 

The law allows partners in a con- 
tract to decide which country’s law 


Canada 

Hudson's Bay 


to apply in the case of disputes, 
Yang Jiangyun, senior legal official 


otter BM Yield Yield 
3-montti XJO 848 890 U1 

►month 899 U7 943 f94 

One year 998 996 999 938 

Source: Sofamontbvtbsrs 


forward 493090 4JQ590 446590 

SILVER 

Pence per tray ounce 
WO* 5379Q 53890 5*40 

forward 55&90 55790 55390 

TIN (Standard) 

Stefflne per metric too 


Yang Jiafl$yun, senior legal official 
to the National People’s Congress, 
said. 

But jam-venture contracts, co- 
operative management of enter- 
prises, and prospecting and devel- 
opment of natural resources would 
be sutg'ect only to Chinese law, he 
said. 


forward 9/6000 946540 944190 945090 

ZVHC 

Sterling per metric tea 
£Mt 76640 76840 76040 76290 

tarwara 74640 74740 73750 73890 

Sower: AP. 


Switzerland 

Sandoz 



K*WEIAWV4DRDCN 
EURGBOMJS 
R&COW.GBVRTZ 
EACH MOt'Crtl'W THE HT 




HE I Mo 
hmo Am 
Modi CO 74 1.1 
Habers 


M » » 

% S* k 

U 151* 15* 
5Vi SM SVt 
35* 358* 351* 
31*6 



1916 1946 + 1% 
6* Ok—Vk 
48* a 6 — V6 
371* *71* + 1b 
1916 TO* 

19 19 

378* 30 
211* 2316 + 16 
EH* BM— 16 
■ 8 


616 616+ I* 
616 616— 16 


291* 298*— W 
1816 18)6 


»* 

JB 17 KSBill 

" m 

f 

M 34 _tal2ta 

m 




ertjW &!& 


»A6i *** 


** m- 


n 

29 916 916 
13*1 7V. m, 
371916 Mk 
CM «ta 
321* 221* 
1916 Itt* 

2 * si 

^16 

_>M6 Mb 


51 47*6 4*V> 

im m 

3074416 44K 

1316 13 
1316 13 
KM MM 
7 29* 

271*16 toy, 
SZ201A 2016 
131316 1296 
4U201* 29 
17929 II 
79 416 
94 BH 
48 56k 
449 1166 
KH 166 
177 316 
VMM 
320 21 

31 516 5 

3H* xm 

2m 291* 
Sta 516 




* • 






•i 


[ 


u nv 

■M 

88b + V* 


2U415M 

UV* 

14V* +1 


731 14V. 

UM 

139k— Vb 


69 20 

19M 

19V4 


MMK 

131* 

14 —V* 

2.9 

39 413* 

41*4 

4114 


334 22V: 

20V» 

2216+18* 

J 

89 1638 

168b 

168b— 16 

1.1 

1081416 

14 

14—16 


1112 um 

10 

Wb + Vfc 

17 

21 M 

M 

U — 16 

46 

9 IS 

Ml* 

148* 

39 

191 16 

ISfh 

1516 


3 I 

786 

786 

U 

155 sn* 

SO 

SOW 

17 

* 63* 

68* 

686 

15 

31 371* 

368* 

378*— *6 

14 

43914 

Bib 

2916— Mi 


S66 M 

5M 

Sto-kb 


55 M 

U 

14—1* 

34 

83 98b 
397 3 

% 

916 

79b— 16 


as m 

2H 

28b 


134 30 

1916 

1916— 16 

29 

3415V, 

1486 

i486— W 

36 

244 

43 

43 

/ 

6720 

1986 

198* 

J 

744 

44 

44 4>V6 


45 68b 

61k 

68b + tb 

26 

28 IS 

14V, 

1416 

U 

1309 13% 

ISM 

158* + K 

79 

2814 27 

2186 

9*Rr— Vb 

2531V 

31V* 

31Vb 

29 

3 5V. 

58* 

SW4-W 


■u U 

*■■+*1. ta 


4 Arrested in Belgian Protest 

The Anocioied Press 

FLORENNES, Belgium — Four 
people were arrested Friday after 
they climbed a radio aerial across 
from an air base here and unfurled 


ment of U.S. ennse missucS, 

police reported. 




























































































iy ^ l&is* 


y,- 

ef a >■ 

l V u * ■ 

T; v ^ „■ ‘ 

r • '* « -t! 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKPAY SUNDAY, MARCH 23-34, 1985 


Page 13 


ge* - .. ; - 
r : . 


ss of Gas Contract Underscores Soft Landing Silicon Valley Firm Finds Hardware Is Profitable 

Vllllierahllltv lTI or FOT tho DoUctT . , ( Confinoed h 010 ^“8* *) used to eater data into, and read tors. The result has been red ink Wyse has also had some quality 

A TT «*/ ° f lUllUt J 1H 1 11U11IH chad Muiphy, editor of the Cali- data out of them. Unlike personal and management defections --and and customer-service problems 

(Continued from Page 9) to™ 3 Technology Stock Letter, computers, terminals cannot run a lack of attention to its tenmnaJ that contributed to its loss of its 

{“JJ"*® been an un- pendent Norway has become on its industrial world as a whole, aimi™ who does not recommend Wyse programs on thdr own. business. major customer, Alpha Micros**- 

usual case, However. nr.rrnltxrm w-tnr .t mhiM*. iu stock. International Business Maehmee Telnnrim oaw Vv«p a moiM- t«nc inimiw . ilirinnn nT Qio. 




I •: : 


' . Bamaby J. Fcder Sleipner may 

. 'twYcricrtmaScrrite usual case, ho we 

! ) — When the British gov- ™r <* **“ 
; said last month that it W?®* 

* *to British Gas Corp.’s pro- the doUar-priced 
. -agreement to buy 530 bil- “an 30 percent. 
t th of natural gas from Nor- “'f* 1 

•j 'ieipner Field m the North 8°P“ transaction 

S 'myrt«»L {JTl&J’ET 

- ««nul du^gbu. 

“ , devd °p "■ St SI*, 

- fSiJS J3LSSS5 pensive andless 

■ ,) percent of the mvestment 

t have gone to Norwegian jmu ^ 

v lion aimpanies, contrac- rmaUy.Bntisb 
■ d offshore-service rompa- na J?X y ' 


The rise of the dollar during the 
n e gotiations had driven the cost of 
the dollar-prioed contract np more 
than 30 percent. Although the nat- 


penderit Norway has become <m its industrial world as a whole aiming does not recommend Wyse programs on thdr own. business, 

petroleum sector. at stabilizing thdr common price sto r- International Business Machines Televideo gave Wyse a tremen- 

Injust a decade, oil and natural- l^farthelongrumlnanmcnas- Moreover. Wyse has grown so Corp. and Digital Equipment dous void to play into," said Fre- 

gas production has climbed from ingly interdependent world, Mr faf by gaining market share in ter- Corp., the two largest computer deric H. Cohen, an analyst with 

less than I percent to more than 18 McKinnon maintains, monetary ““ak- But to sustain its growth, it companies, are also the largest ter- UF. RoihschDci, Untcrbog, Tow- 


tnan mi percent. Although the nat- percent of Norway’s total domestic policy should be geared not to one b starring to diversify btyomi the minal manufacturers. Wyse is be- bin. 
ural gas might well have been a output — more than trrole the cmmtrv hut tn »n terminal marker, which is growing lieved to be ihe new largest, mak- * 


“Tr a ouiput — more than triple the country but to aH 
evenattherngho- share petroleum has in Britain’s It is not necessai 


Wyse is also 


xt - was deuwed In economy. jusi managing monetary growth But “ new areas, starting wide variety of computers, though 

the ljws. mat nse gave Bntam indeed, oil and natural gas now will be enough to keen exchange wth personal computers, are more not those of IBM. its major cus- 
i account for more than 30 percent rales stable. prictssteadyaSd “fc. , . . tomera are Tandy Corp ? which 

Bntam s decision also reflected a of Norway’s exports and more than world economic growth continums StflL Wyse s success is beyond uses the Wyse terminals mils Mod- 

spate of reant domesbc natural 20 percent of its lax revenues. — monetarism has had no rach fW* expectations, in- d 16 multi-user computer, and Al- 

^s diswvoies m its own waters Direct employment m the indm- ironclad results — m mangnt^ dudmg its own backers. tos Computer Systems, which pro- 

that made aopner look more ex- try remains small, but it is vital to desirability of cooperariwaction , “** ^ Tse *** ^ ™*- wded * e iaaae V for w yse to start, 


stable, prices steady and 


tos Computer Systems, which pro- only toother 
vided the money for Wyse to start, market the : 


wiD avoid direct competitimi 
s retail market and will sell 
o other companies, which will 


penave and less essential to meet- the health of some major dries, among the mao- central banks and ^ 10 fonn a company ever since and now owns 30 percent of it. 

TflO 11*2 flfllTIfQl 0QC TTMVifi flfl fhd Mrln . . . L . . w . . 3. ' ' 1 «L«nr mat a« »h« IT n .f TIC /Va tL. — 


Wyse has also had some quality 
and customer-service problems 
that contributed to its loss of its- 
major customer, Alpha Microsys- 
tems, to Ampex. a division of Sig- 
nal Cos. “We found that Wyse was 
not tenibly responsive to us," said 
Marcia A. Cook, mgmw y of pe- 
ripheral products at Alpha Micro- 
systems. Another factor was Am- 
pex’s lower price. 

Another uncertainty stems from 
the entry into the multi-user micro- 
computer market qjf IBM, with its 
PC-AT, and American Telephone 
& Telegraph Co„ with its upcoming 
7300. This might result in overall 


^“turalgasneedsintheearly 

/fsasst 1 ^ ^ a 

patently gave moeasmg weight as dnstries and suSdize emph 

-Ieipner Field was the Iinch- STfSinSili^ fr^Nor^v ET ,Btlia,l } flV6 hdped 1 
a^lan to keep 1Mb ZUtZlgGL^E& Mts u^toyment rate 
j industry busy umfl the rar owned gas cox^any toLal indns- M 

* -.ro0 on and natural gas pro- nial markets from the resource-ridi Fortunately for Norwa 

i -oorthem Norway got under nationalized coal industry thus re- rebuff came at tun 

i : ±e 1990s. during Britain's long-iemj energy ll *** numero ^ * 

i*i however, the plan is in independence. men t prospects m sight. 


Meanwhile, oil revenues have al- the provmaah greater guidance to th^met at ±e Umveraty of IUi- One reason for the success, of was talking to Businessland, a corn- 


market the machine under their growth of the multi-user market, 
own name. One source said Wyse but could hurt Wyse’s customers. It 


lowed the govemmait to spend the markets. nris m the earty 1970s. Mr. Tse. 36, Wyse is its low-cost manufacturing puter store chain that wants to 

=3 makers ap- heavily to rapport muJitiondta- Central bank cooperation would P^ dent and chief executive at in Taiwan, a man of soaring hub market its own private-label com- 

ng weight as dnstries and subridize employment certainly need the support of na- Wyse, camc to the United States for terminals and their cousins, puters. 

« UBtteo1 to* 1 programs that have helped Norway tional govemmeoti It would have firom "“S Kon fi 10 altend colIe g c Wact “ d televisions. The company is also broadening 

pm Norway hold its unemployment rate aiiust to be accompanied, to the extent T 9 ! ^ ved * doctoral donee in “We live in the land of displays," its market m terminals. It has cn- 
by the state- over 3 percent. possible, by budget and fiscal pedi- eagmeermg. Mrs. Tse, 33, said Charles T. Comiso, vice presi- tered the market for terminals com- 

> steal Indus- Fortunately for Norway the des designed to reinforce nations’ **° “ vice president for engineer- dent of marketing. While many ter- patible with Digital Equipment 


is not dear yet whether Wyse can 
get any of the terminal business for 
the IBM and AT&T machines 


er 3 percent. posable, by budget and fiscal poll- i jj, 

g~«ggSi?JfS: 

tad numeroDs oto devdop- gro^h. Ilw ould^o ry d re trad e ^^ n ^g 1 a £ ^ sdc « m 


The company is also broadening « 11f T , 

its market in terminals. It has cn- rOrd Motor Introduces 
wred the market for terminals com- t*i . o . j ■ r 


saia uktrs l. i_amiso, vice pres- lerea ice maixci ior lerminais com- ■ r 

dent of marketing. While many ter- patible with Digital Equipment o£a&H 111 MTOp€ 


however, the plan is in independence. 

A XT™..™.. L,, : j . 


s and Norway has received Given thwa- arcumstance, lew rtime Minister Kaare Wiiioch rr* T ^ 

irpest reminder yet of its Norwegians bdieve that deferring “ d government officials voiced - ™ 

oddest as a nation with vast Sleipner devdopment is hkdy to tbeir disappointment that the „ 

expensive — petroleiim re- affect the negotiations for which transaction had fallen through, as 


Prime Minister Kaare WDloch 


[market 
ig the d 


After college, Mr. Tse worked ai factoring, and some erf its own de- 


ment of both industrial and devd- RCA Laboratories mi video dis- sign, there. The vertical integration 


minal companies buy terminals or machines, and is looking at ex- 
subassemblies from the Far Fast, pan ding to telecommunications 
Wyse actually does its own manu- terminals and color graphics tenni- 
some of its own de» oals. 

: vertical integration Mr. Tse said Wyse is close to 


affect the negotiations for which transaction naa taiien unougn, as thae are^no magic cures RCA and then in the termina] divi- The company also introduced million to $20 m i lli on, is with anti-skid brakes, independent sus- 

Norway is now preparing over the 38 r* 31 ^*9“* . Um ’ for the debt, monetanrand trade s* 011 Hewleu-Packard Co. When some sex appeal into an industry Northern Telecom Inc. pension and electronically oon- 

sale of 1.2 trillion cubic meters (42 a disorders threatanng North and it came time to form a buriness, that was thought not to have any. But Wyse’s competition is trolled shock absorbers, 

trillion cubic feci) of Trail natural £ <a * r t °P 1 ® South. But the broad directions of t^mnals were the obvious choice. Instead of the usual boxlike tenm- mounting a counterattack in the To be built at Ford's Fordwerke 


plays and then for Zen tec, a ternti- speeds up product design ami low- landing some big new contracts. 


faDm through, as Monetary cooperation is no 
iw*™* thaTEm- cure-all: there are no magic cures 


nal maker. Mrs. Tse worked at 
RCA and then in the te rminal divi- 


ers costs, mfidals say. 


United Press International 

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. 
said Friday it has unveQed in Eu- 
rope a four-door hixuxy sedan that 
could be imported to" the United 
Slates by next spring. The car, the 


Sources say one of than, worth S10 Scorpio, includes such features as 


the first time that a project sale of 12 trillion cubic meters (42 
n discontinued because the trillion cubic feet) of Trail natural 
; couldn’t be sold," said gas — six times the Sleipner total 


9ft » 
*-*. m 


\ x for petroleum. 

< was an important part of Germany. 

: ; ning curve for the Norwe- However, Sleipner did under- 
. jbBc,” said Nils Gulnes, se- score the vulnerability of North Sea 
e president and head of the producers to price competition 
*■ trtment at Den Norske Crc- from the Organization of Petro- 


gas — six times the Sleipner 

ioedland, Norway's deputy — to a consortium of European 
r for petroleum. utilities headed by Ruhrgas of West 


— ■ — — - - disorders threateaina North and 11 10 a ouaness. 

South. ButttTHdffin . of wwe the obriqns dmice. 

52 lmnEd 10 ^ constructive solutions are emerg- Two oAer Zentec officials. Law- 


f Europe^ “oa alternative.” ^ uuw ‘ vc ^ 

[gasofWKt “We began pressuring the o0 — £ 

did ^ SBSWffSSST 1 " Brha.GDrinae.ses 15% 

if North Sea Thus, when the Sleipner an- Reuters 

ompetition nouncement came, h was already LONDON — Britain's gross do 


it came time to iorm a Dusmess, mat was mougnt not to nave any. But Wyse s competition is 
te rminal s were the obvious choice. In stea d of the usual boxlike ternd- mounting a counterattack in die 
Two other Zen tec officials. Law- nals, Wyse produced sleek ones main terminal area. This week. Te- 
rence D. Lummis and Garwing with a v-shaped profile. levideo introduced a new terminal 

Wu, were also involved in starting The company also got a break at roughly the anw price, $700, as 
the company and are now vice when Televideo made a disastrous Wyse’s main product, the WY-50, 
presidents. foray into the personal computer but with extra features. And Qumc, 

Computer terminals, also known market. Tdevideo entered the mar- a division of ITT Corp., recently 


‘ ; Norway’s largest commer- leum Exporting Countries in the oil 

oL *Tt was something we market and a variety of producers, 
£ -• iceded to control optimism especially the Soviet Union and AI- 
i irkets win always want our geria, in the natural-gas market. 


Moreover, it highlighted how de- 


Petro- dear that the initial slack would be mestic 


LONDON — Britain's gross do- as video display te rminals, are ket late, and was not experienced in introduced a te rminal ce lling for 


taken up by pushing forward the adjusted 13 percent cm the average 
second phase of the Gullfaks. ad- basis in the fourth quarter after a 
field development, originally revised 1 -percent increase in the 
scheduled for the middle of (he third, according to Central Statisti- 


cal Office figures released Friday. 


rose a seasonally hooked up to larger computers, and retail sales, having sold to distribu- 
ent cm the average 


the Audi 5000, priced at $24,565 
and $17,710 respectively. The rear- 
wbed-drive Scorpio will be sold for 
between $20,000 and $25,000. Ford 
said. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


SERVICES 

TOKYO MS 2741. Tounog & (hop- 
pain nmdai. inrcrpnMo, otc. 


HONO KONG K~ 143HU Young 














































































































1 5] »S»UH35ll£IliS52S!imSIE»fi»2£a slU£ 




Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


ACROSS 

1 Fellow 
STeutomcgod 
10 Of a region 
15Sonof Issacbar 

18 Complete: 
Comb- form 

19 Heath 

29 Punish 

21 Canzone 

22 Plant of the 
legume family 

23 Baseball 
brothers 

24AstatP0f 

Mexico 

25 Brooder 


ACROSS 


50" in thy 

scutcheon 


ACROSS 
84 Sequence of 


Putting People on the Map by robert h. wolfe 


PEANUTS 


ji « la j7 is »» 


i in in 1 1 in —in in ii 


Cervantes 

52 Medical suffix 

53 Brooks and 
Ferrer 

54 Michigan 


28 Actor on a New 
York river? 

' 29 Ayr negative 
30 Dreyfus-trial 
* subject 
■ 31 Serried 
' 32 Ouphe 

- 34 Snuggeries 

- 35 Task 

' 37 Hamlets 


40 Barracks big- 
wigs 

- 43 Cabal 

44 Cries of 
surprise 

v 47 A leap, in 
fencing 

- 48 Borders 

' 49 Shoot the 
breeze 


54 Michigan 
actor? 

57 He schooled 
Samuel 

58 Ed or Leon 
00 Period from 

B.C.toTV 
61 Queen of 

fiction 
82 Red dye 
84 Reproach 
88 Election group 

67 Outcome 

68 Homophone 
fora libation 

69 A result of 
oebulization 

70 Swathe 

73 Paradisiacal 
Jeannie? 

77 mountain 

(leopard) 

78 A hit song in 
1943 

79 N.Y. city 

80 Her 

81 Dead duck 

82 Sequential 
notes 

83 Sydney is its 
cap. 


stages 

85 Awaited 
judgment 

86 Imam’s world- 
88 Ahead of, on 

the briny 


» l M FRACTIONS MY 
UNDERLINING... > 


90 Liberal group 

91 Ace 

92 Former 
Yankee 
slugger 

94 Penitence 

98 Spanish 
nobleman 

100 Ohio 

politician? 

105 Venerable 


1«0 l« 142 



'IF E EVER Write N 
SOMETHING WORTH 

t UNDERLINING, |*n n 

Vj5E Ready ! j 


Sv,.^ < “*1* 

Have 


BLONDEE 


ISNT CSOQ I 
i-A BUS J 
9MR.V ’ 
WONOEBRX- 


VeS, 0UT I HEAR 1 HEAU-Y 
HE HAS 

PPOBUBMS J If 

AT HOME J 


HfS Wire POMP ■ 
DOZENS or OLD 
l_C we L E TTB B S i 


_ THAT L- 
NO/ * HE M 

K I Htfwseus 




j ii 


106 Give oxygen to 

107 Unique 

108 April 13, e.g. 

109 Psyche part 

110 One of the 
Antilles 


fflx_ 


111 Puerto 

112 Where sudd 
grows 

113 Emulated 
Edwin Moses 

114 He wrote **I 
Can't Sleep": 
1936 

115 Tearful 
llOBranchia 


aOQLAUUf ) 

! \ «■ 

iLOVINSIOU- 



dkr ( 
V. :»* 01 


n Mi 
; *MMK 

... *m 

**'** ***** 


BEETLE BAILEY 


X WANT WOO 
NOME PROMPTLY 
AT FIVE/ / 


I'LL TRY, BUT THE * 
BATTERY IN MY l 

Watch went pead l 

LAST NISH T 5 i 


x hear ticking/ call 

THE BOMB SQUAD/ 


r W 4* 

*HT 


A 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 Outline 

2 Credit 

3 Gobel’s wife 

4 Cloth patterns 

5 Boia and bolo 

6 Acrylic fabrics 

7 A lord in 'The 
Winter's Tale" 

8 above 

(better than) 

9 La Salle 
contemporary 

18 Bottom line 

11 Cleaves 

12 Irregular 

13 Kind of phobia 

14 Inclined 

15 Hibernian 
L actor? 


16 Concert halls 

17 Note 

20 Blanched 

27 Addicts 

28 Make the copy 

right 

33 Wimbledon 
rout 

35 Slack part of a 
sail 

36 Small shark 

38 Friend of 
Triijan and 
Tacitus 

39 Part of a 
hippocerf 

40 Russell role 

41 Co-inventor of 
cordite 


42 British 
actress? 

43 Nol 

(drop a suit) 

44 A loser to 
Franklin 

45 one (golf 

thrills) 

46 Booths 

50 Monad 

51 Vomer, e.g. 

54 Certain cars 

55 Sphere 

56 Cartographer’s 
abbr. 

58 On the 
Andaman 

59 One-millionth 
of a meter 


© New York Timet, edited by Eugene Moksha, 


DOWN 


DOWN 


03 "Monty 
Python’s Life 


72 Cowboy’s pal 

73 Adriatic port’ 


64 Theodosia 
Goodman 


74 Select group, 
with "the" 


65 Alex Karras, 
once 


87 Famed chair 
designer 
69 Boundary 

71 To 

(exactly) 


75 Always 

76 "Where 

Eagles " 

Mac Lean 

77 Comforter's 
activity 

81 “ to the 

Chureh..." 
84 Just fair 


DOWN 
85 Obviate 

87 Kind of maniac 

88 Crests 

89 An incendiary 

OOPunta k 

city In Chile 


DOWN 


B2 Common code 
93 Salt's "Haiti” 


95 They’re found 
in circles 

96 Fishhook 
attachment 


97 Lincoln’s 
inadequate 
cousin 

98Energumen 
99 Kafka charac- 
ter 

101 Oboist’s 
purchase 

102 Granger's 
quarters 

163 Award for TV 
commercials 

104 Places 


ANDYCAPP 


V/ POOR OLD ACWS BEEN 
BURGLED AND IOST -< 
ALL HER SWINGS - 


M 


BtTStLlY REALLY, 
KEEF1NSXXJR r- 
>- CASH IN 
THE HOUSE \ 
THESE D°YS ) 


1 SORRY, PS3CY. IN 
NOTONlYSiLU^ rr 


IMPOSSIBLE! 


■ - v ir* a 

t, h'***.*, 
*x40Vi6 

• -..<**«« 

.«•* 4 

..■ A** . 

•- «*M 

...r M Ml 


INSIDE, OUTSIDE 

By Herman Wouk. 644 pp. $19.95. 

Little, Brown & Co, 34 Beacon Street, 

Boston, Mass. 02106. 

Reviewed by Ross Thomas 

TT aH begins rn the White House Executive Office 
I Building during that terrible Watergate summer 
of 1973. There, lodged in one of those big high- 
ceihnged rooms without anything pressing to do, 
Israel David Goodkind, a 5S-year-ofd corporate tax 
■attorney, life-long Democrat, fanner gag writer, and 
■now a neglected special assistant to the president — 
yes, that president — starts writing his memoirs 
about growing up Jewish in America. 

What Herman Wouk has tried to do, in the words 
of his hero, L David Goodkind, is write “a kaddish 
for my father . . . start to finish; but in counter- 
point it is also a torch song for the *305, a sentimen- 
tal But Band number that no one has ever heard till 


BOOKS 


professors, who are writing novels about Jewish 
college professors. It is a strict literary convention of 
the genre, like 14 lines of sonnet form." 


By the time he comes to this conclusion. Good- 
kina is not only a high-priced tax lawyer, who does 


. UU". 

Wouk succeeds wonderfully well, even brilliantly 
■i in parts, and his very, very long novel — ifyoudotft 
-■■ , mmd frequent helpings ctf sentimentality — is often 
fascinating, frequently funny and sometimes quite 
ir proving. also suspect it of being a prescription 
written to cure “Portnoy’s Complaint ... • . 

y . ..In one of his frequent ruminative passages, our 
hero, L David Goodkind (with a long I), decided 
that “All American Jewish novelists are coDege 
professors, and they all write about Jewish college 


kind is not only a high-priced tax lawyer, who does 
battle for utilities against the Internal Revenue 
Service, but he also negotiates the occasional pub- 
lishing and Hollywood deal for his old Columbia 
University classmate, Peter Quat, who earns a spec- 
tacular living by writing savage novels about being 
Jewish in America. 

But to Goodkind, growing up Jewish in America 
was a wild, wonderful and esoteric adventure. For 
there are two Americas: the one inhabited by your 
Jewish family and friends — the Inade — with its 
own customs and language, and that other America 
— the Outside — which is pagan, suspect and 

fascinating 

Goodkind grows up in the southeast Bronx, the 
son of Russian immigrants. His father eventually 
establishes a commercial laundry with two dead- 
weight partners who ding to him like leeches for the 
rest of his life. Goodkind ’s mother is. of coarse, 
outspoken, aggressive, warm, headstrong and al- 
most overpowering. She is also unusually well 
drawn as is Goodkmd^ra a quiet, thoughtful man 
with an exceptional mind. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 




□□□no □□□□□ aaaaaa □□□□ 

□□□□□ □□□□a aaaaaa □dhb 

aaaaaoaaaaaaaauujaijatsua 
□□a UL3LJU □□□□□ □uuoa 

□□□□ □□□□□ BiiuuLJ amauciu 
□odd □□□□ auaeiB 
□UUI'JUHQQBaHHUUUUUUUaQO 
□□□□bd □□□□□ □□□□□ non 
□□□□□ □□□□□ «□□□□ BHOG 
□□□□ guqqg idumuu □□□□□ 
ljguu aaaaa □□□□□□ 

□JDLlGUGyUkiUUUJUUlLlLlGJUyU 
L1JUQUU □□□□□ □□□□ 

UUUUU GUUUL1 UULIUIJ LlldUU 

aaaa uanau aauaa nauuu 
buu uuuon nyiiun uLioiuun 
□□□□□□□□□□□aaaaaaaaooD 
BBDaa □□□□ aaaa 
anuauu auauu anaaa jquu 
□ aoao aoaaa aaaa odd 
□□ uauGQuaauuuBuaauaauau 
aaua □□□□□□ aaaaa □□□□□ 
aaua tjuuauu aaaaa uuugg 


Goodkind himself grows up smart, skipping 
grades, going to summer camp, and eventually get- 
ting admitted to Columbia — with the aid of one of 
his father's gentile friends — where he discovers he 

talen t far writin g After g raduati on, this talent 

helps land him a job with Henry Goldhandler, who 
runs a gag factory that supplies scripts for half-hour 
radio comedy shows. 

Until now, Goodkind’s sex life has been virtually 
nonexistent But then he meets the Broadway show- 
girl, Bobbie Webb, and an obviously doomed love 
affair begins. 

Wouk shifts us almost effortlessly back and forth 
between New York in the 70s and ’30s and Wash- 
ington in 1973. In the fall of that year, Goodkind’s 
aged mother becomes ill in Israel Watergate has 
also heated up again and the vice president is about 
to resign because of excessive greed. Goodkind flies 
off to Israel, finds his mother somewhat recovered, 
and then goes calling on Gtdda Meir. whom he had 
escorted on U. S. fund-raising tours while he was 
counselor to the United Jewish Appeal 

It is here, I think, that Wouk’s novel suffers from 
a mild case of Lanny Budd Blight, but he quickly 
cures it with only a minimum dose of mekxirama 
and the Israelis, with a hand from Goodkind, go on 
to win their Yom Kippur War. There is also a gem of 
a scene between the disint egrating chief executive 
and Goodkind at Camp David. Wouk artfully 
catches the president's bewilderment and portrays 
him with understanding and compassion, if not 
sympathy. 

Flashing back to the 70s agam, Goldhandler, the 
gag writer, dies and Goodkind returns to Columbia 
to take his law degree. His romance with the beauti- 
ful Bobbie Webb also dies, only to flicker into life 
again and then blaze up to a point where he asks this 
complete Outsider; to marry him. 

As for the ’30s, Wouk has succeeded in writing it 
a torch song, if of a distinctly Manhattan variety. 
He is even more successful at the kaddish that is said 
for the father of I. David Goodkind. 

As for Goodkind himself, he changes over the 
years. Never a true hedonist or unbeliever, he grows 
a lot more devout, a little stuffier, somewhat more 




F? * 

''*«» 0L 


WIZARD of ID 




3b: 


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Aboard 


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REX MORGAN 


IS CLAUDIA TRIP TO THE WEST 
IN TOWN, COAST, WILL PROBAB 
BRADY? J BE GONE ABOUT A 
WEEK l jams 


NO? SHE'S ON A 1 WHY DONT YOU 


WHY DONT YOU )/ YOUR GOOD THELMA FEEIS THE NEl 

COME OVER TO H WIFE WILL TO DO THIS, TO MAKE S 

THE HOUSE TONIGHT BEGIN TO THINK $ YOU TEMPORARY BACH EL-' 1 * 

andtake potluck JrvE become a j are occupied and * 

» WITH US? r * REGULAR " ACCOUNTED FORf. 

BOAgp6g.> ? [ ~ • 




pyOLEY 


GARFIELD 


YOU LOOK MUCH ES6TTER THIS / WHAT WOULP \{ JOSTSOME 
MORNING. WOO MOST BE OVER WOO LIKE FOR > JOlCEANp 
THE HAWAIIAN CAT FLU VBREAKFAST ? JS A DANISH r 


»I DOUBT THAT> 
EVER HAP IT^ 


AND A ROAST PI Qi f 
ANP SIX PlNEAPPlXS,m : ^ 
AND A POUND OF . * 

T MACAPAMIA NUTS/: 


generous, and a trifle compJacenL In other words, 
he grows both up and older and, as he does, he 
remembers. And I must add that be remembers 
wonderfully well. 




- 1 •• 


Ross Thomas, author of " Briarpatch, ” wrote this 
review for The Washington Past 


3SM PAYfS 


-»-* sics hw 


- . . 8 5 : 

W * “ I'-. 


W)rid Stodk Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse March 22 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


(Meemorfl 

ItDlmobllkirl 

MMUobonco 

MonMIson 

Olivetti 

PlrXU 

HAS 

Rlnascanto 

SIP 

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Slanda 

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CMH Prt*. 

SMedWiMafcti 219 33* MKmi&MiI Heavy 

VWvo 230 251 Mitsubishi Carp 

AffOmwwMoB Index : 2tl30 MtSkSTl” 
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Muds22\ 


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Karstodt 2T221L30 

Kmrfhof 222 223 

KtosckiwrH-O 2OT 2&OSO 
KfOSCknar Werko 74JO 75.10 
Krnpp Staiil 105 N 

Lind. _413 416 

Lufthansa 19&50 lfflJD 

MAN 156 155 

Mannesmann . 1 C 6 J 0 14&50 
MetallaaMtlscbatt 268 272 

MuaKiLRlWCk 1165 1US 
Praunn 278 3B3 

RuotMrs-WnVa 335 337 

NWE 1 57 15530 

setwrtna 456J0 4S5J0 

SMfflons 542 5S&80 

Tlwsaon 105.10 10M0 

varto 187 187.90 

votn mso 1 SSJS 

VEW 123-50 12350 


MIB Current index : 1222 
341 I Previous : 1217 
MS 

245 
43 
520 


VoJkSwaoonwerfc 20450 206 


Cammanbank Index : U22A0 
Previous : 1,227.31 


Bk East Asia 

73M 

2130 


1340 

Sfi 

China Light 

14.10 

Craw Harbor 

9JS 

9J0 


47 

4W5 

HK Electric 

7J5 

725 

HK Holds 

3230 

3125 



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HK Whorl 

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6.10 

610 

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SHIC Props 

LW 

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430 


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21.40 

2131) 


7.15 

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Wlnsor 

420 

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Previous : U*7J3 

U 6049 





mi 

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720 

710 ! 


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AnaloAmCold 
Ba rton* 

Biyvoor 
Buffvls 
Oe Baers 
DrielOnhiln 
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GF3A 
Harmony 
Hlveld Stool 
Kloof 

351 342 I Ntdbonk 

333 334 [ Pmsievn 

Rush kit 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Saaal 

weatHehflne 


2370 2300 | 3M Chartered 
14900 16500 I Tate and Lyt* 


10QS 1000 
1475 1450 
■ 7700 7400 
*50 947 

5130 3075 
ISSO 1510 
3000 3000 
3000 2960 
395 393 

7473 7300 
9S0 940 

5800 5600 
1460 U-S 
43® 623 

3175 3150 
580 380 

6000 6175 


Composite Stack Indue: 997 JB 
Previous sM440 


147 
337 

424 A1M _ 

ti l w«u 

301 

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214 
Wi 
355 
574 . 

371 Bouctmd 
V32 (CDMSnroBe 
447 I DBS 

FrasarMovo 
Haw Par 

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KoapelStdp 
Mol BanMno 
OCBC 
OUB 

SembShlarard _ 
5 trrw» Oprtrr 
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St T rod! na 
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Mitsumi 

NEC 

NCK Insulators 

NjkfeoSac- 

Neuan steel 

Nippon Yusen 

Nissan 

Nomura Sec 

Olympus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo CtMTl 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tabai Core 
Tabha Marine 
Tafceda Chem 
Tdk 
Tallin 

Tokyo Elec. P ower 

Tokyo Marina 

Toruy Ind 

Toshiba 

Toyota 

YamatdilSec 


1000 1790 1 
213 214 

156 155 | 

212 NAl 
452 467 

880 823 

6020 4080 
430 434 

S74® 14SSS 
882 893 

449 445 

411 <10 

1330 1350 
>14 805 


NBEkel/ELJ. index : 1Z542L40 
Prevloes :12J4tj7 
New .Index : 1004J6 
Previous ; ueSAS 


Zurich 


146 148 

£45 267 

62 0 US 
US 525 
£34 234 
343 243 
1J4 U4 
6 6JS 
925 940 
178 340 
123 124 

1.97 1,90 
1.16 l.W 


AlflO 
Bank Leu 
Brawn Boveri 

Etoctrowatt 
Geora Fischer 
Intent! soount 
JocoU Suctwrd 
Jet mall 

Landl* Gvr 

Neeffe 

OerUkan-B 

Roche Babv 

Sandax 

ScMnaier 

Sulzer 

SBC 

Swtsselr 


2770 2710 
3610 3563 
1450 1645 

2m 2980 
2443 2440 
2*75 2843 
m 752 
1940 1950 
4425 4440 
1980 2010 
1725 1730 
6570 6520 
1460 1495 
8900 8950 
8040 8075 
4050 3950 
382 311 

380 377 

1170 1140 


Swiss Ralnmirance 9625 9700 

swjavonuxmk mbs mbs 

Union Bank 3715 3490 

Winterthur CM) 43©S 

Zurich Ins 21300 Zi ISO 


SBC index : 0930 
Previtti : 43U0 


N -Q" «M Quoted; NA; not 
ovotlBWe; xa: exMivuiend. 


Phillips Sued Oyer Plan 


OUB Index : 41727 
Previn bs ; niii 


SMckbatai 


'tm 


AGA 

Alta Lorel 

acoo 

Astro 

Attn* Cooao 

Datum 

CWctroka 

Ertcsun 

Enelte 

Handetstanken 

Ptnrmocfa 

Scxib-Scanki 

Sandvlk 

Skarraka 

SKF 


383 390 
187 190 

345 346 

340 340 
107 109 
220 29 

338 323 

273 278 

370 369 

148 149 

207 SOS 
<20 NA 

40a 400 

nso'asD 

209 212 


United Pros Inunatfonal 

NEW YORK — A Phillips Petroleum Co. 
shareholder who wrote options on his stock has 
filed suit seeking to enjoin Phillips from com- 
pleting a debt-swap plan it announced early in 
March to halt a takeover bid by Carl C. Icahn. 

The suit, filed Thursday in Delaware State 
Court, also names as defendants the American 
Stock Exchange and Options Clearing Corp. 

The plaintiff, Fred Lowenschufs, says he 
owns PmQips shares and has written several 
hundred “put” options on Phillips common 
Mock before the mite for Phillips' recapitaliza- 
tion plan was announced. 


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lapitals’ Carpenter 
^irst U.S. Player to 
xoore 50 NHL Goals 


- (^ace to play, and if after college 
* iNTREAL — The flowering they re still a free agent, iheyTl try 
^ b Carpra ter — the “Can't- to find a minor-league tam and 
~ ’Kid” — reached full bloom work their way up.” 

■day night when be became The Capitals took Cai 
rst ILS.-bom player to score the firsthand of the 1 
als m a National Hockey draft, picking the Pcabod 

M season. chusetts. hiiH srhnnl chk 


Jen ter in 

i ** • • Kusma national noacey draft, picking the Peabody! Mass* 

I ;je season. chusetts, MgE school student third 

i . ■penter whipped a wnst shot overall. At the time, he was the 
I \ = ___ highest U.S.-bom player ever se- 

> ■' — NHL FOCUS lected, was labeled a can’t-miss 

— - _^ N>, ^ n ?^h,. a |,- I5 '^ 4 i L 0f i^ ie sec " 111 1“ ^ threc J^T seasons, 

i-ssattsaa 

- - V 3 2 / ■* 'heat ^ Washington Capt- ^ a full-fledged star 

* Carpenter said he never set 50 as 
: - a taigetbefore the season, but that 

1. MMdpta *, N.Y. wtai he had 46 with 12 games left 

V ■ e£Ki& 3E& s^r 50 ”- 

- fe«S-£sK -MLTyftVK 

I 016,111 10 an my teammateC he 

said. “They kidded me all the time 
JS Amencans conmg m and and kept me loose. 

^ 6‘ s<> _ we ?? being able to play “Pwrlinlnpir-Jillv th*n>’c HA bhv 


r NHL FOCUS 

Montreal's fallen goal tender, 
*< Penney, at 15:24 of the sec- 


** A] t. . . 

* N'ii'jic- 



in Uk season, he s 
Knd Quebec 5, N.Y. Islanders a j xyat 

,|g!S£«t3E£ dsrFS 

1 vnth thegameafittle bit moi^ said. “They kidded 
L Amraans conmg m and and keptme loose. 

- 1 Jj®”* “Psychologically 

. -W. saidCarpeattt.“Kidsm V ou dS tirnkSb 


4 ! ! 


■*><3311 


m**- 


SrZrffi “Psychologically, there’s no way 
*ay, saidCupoittf. ^idsm you nm ’t thmlr about if, 1 guess 

? £^ mta8bSCb0dWOnt when you by not to think abowU, 

‘S*T«4 to a* a StftwS 
; right passes or the right plays.” 

•*sffr Mike Gartner, who has scored 45 

playing alongside Carpenter 
.* . this season, was overjoyed for his 

BF‘ - - t 4 • \vV teammate. 

“Pm reallyprond oF him,” 
KJfe.,.-. ' Gartner said. “He’s had a tough 

Krw^ja fl|HL|lH5S' time the last few years with aB the 

mW' S. pressure he had coming into the 
'"'Hj. a- league. 

“He’s only 21 years old and 1 
[ ‘ r 1 HHL'.xBi give him all the credit in the 

A third-period goal by Guy Car- 
- 1 ' . bonneau proved to be the winner in 
SSx-v the contesL 

Carbonneau flicked a backhand 
" : t .\ pass from the left-wing boards that 
deflected off defenseman Scott Ste- 
veas' stick and over the Moulder of 
Washington’ goaltender. Pat Rig- 
gin, at 14:18 at the third period to 
Bob Carpenter break a 2-2 tie. 


‘SCOREBOARD 


tf'v v* * 

i 

ypt# ■/«* 


— Hocke; 
v ,,-L StandmgH 


Basketball 


NBA Standings 


v. .WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DtvtVon 

.. - ‘ W L T Pt* GF GA 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AltaMIC DtvNlM 

W L Pet. GB 


**■ .-.•oitietoMo 

44 

19 

7 

99 

320 

7 Z 7 

x-Bastan 

55 14 

J 97 

— 

'Hlnofsm 

41 32 

9 

91 

291 

218 

xrPMIadoMila 

51 18 

331 

4 

-^JNonders 

38 

3 D 

5 

81 

321 

284 

Washington 

35 ^ 

-507 

20 

il'iraeni 

23 

38 

10 

54 

269 

311 

Now Jorsav 

35 35 

J 00 

20 V 4 


23 

a 

5 

51 

244 

334 

now York 

23 44 

jm 

32 

— — 

jarmrr 

28 

43 

9 

49 

219 

307 


Control Division 



v Adam DMsiOR 




x-Mlisraukoa 

48 21 

AM 

— 

* >*c 

34 

24 

9 

81 

298 

250 

Outran 

37 32 

536 

11 

>4 too! 

35 

25 

11 

81 

268 

237 

CMcaoo 

33 37 

.471 

15 % 

1 * ,-jlo 

32 

24 

14 

78 

259 

211 

1 

I 

u 

28 41 

.404 

20 

4;, . 

32 

30 

9 

73 

267 

250 

Atlanta 

27 42 

J 91 

21 

■« ra 

24 

38 

9 

57 

243 

298 

Indiana 

20 49 

J 90 

28 




U‘ \/..i i- : V 

.-,r ■ ■ 


ifVB CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
UkR' Narrit DMA* 

*£= mils 33 27 13 71 3W 257 

— -fee 34 34 5 73 283 281 

ota 33 38 13 » 244 2»2 

23 38 11 57 280 332 

IS <7 7 43 223 SIS 

*; Smyttt Dlvldoa 

.‘A.' 'Vwtton 4* 17 9 101 358 251 

;V :-iJeeo 40 27 7 87 328 307 

•■;arv 37 28 9 83 333 278 

kngtfu 32 28 13 . 77 319 380 

•'■-Y*jwr 24 41 8 5* 2*1 370 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DMstoe 


% • ..»W 

! f^kvnw.T 

\ ‘ 'f'w*r (SOI, 

p iston (on 



Kit: 


netted pkivotf berth. 

> THURSDAY’S RESULTS jpeUndwil PtcYoH berth. 

Man B 3 8—2 v-cilnched division title. 

,ial 2 B 1—3 THURSDAY’S RESULTS 

i av 09 ),TUrcDtta «), Carbonneau ( 28 ): ParttaMl 14 » 12 Jf-W 

■Her ( 50 ). Gorttwr ( 4 S). SUM* on goal: PboeM* n n 38 «- 1 M 

Man (an Pemev) 7 - 7 - 4 - 18 ; Montreal Mocv 10-19 « 24 . Humohrlas 7-18 54 19 ; 
KKn) 144 ^— 29 . Dnwler 11-20 44 24 , Vandeweohe 8-15 74 24 . 

j. a a i « i R aB a emlr: Portland 50 ( Drexler 121 . Ptwanix 

1 • • 8— 1 57 (Jones 12 ). Assists; Portland 21 (Colter Ti, 
our ( 19 ); Simmer ( 34 ). Skoh on mol: Ptwenls 3 * (Hufnphrtoi 8 >. 

1 «- w-«#. TrtDudca 12-19 ^2 24 Lalmbaer 9-17 2-2 » 

Lons 8-14 3-4 20; 5tiart 11-045-8 29. Floyd 7-14 8- 
M 10 22. Rebaaadt: Detroit 42 (Lalmbecr 15). 

J’** GflWm State 50 (StitHfi 9 ). Assists: Oetnon 30 


s-Oenver 
Houshm 
Dellas 
San Antonio 

Utah 

Kansas City 

v- 4 — A. Lakers 
Portland 
phoenix 
Seattle 
LA. Clippers 
GoMen Slate 


44 25 438 — 

40 28 488 m 

39 31 JS 7 516 
35 3 « 493 10 

33 37 471 UMi 

26 43 .377 It 

POCMC Division 

50 18 .735 — 

33 37 471 18 

32 38 457 19 

so 39 435 am 

» « J52 Mb 

19 51 .271 32 



Memphis St., Oklahoma 
Squeeze Out Victories 
In NCAA Tournament 


Die Aaedotod Ptw 


Patrick Ewing all but blocked the basket in Mocking shot by Greg WDKams of Loyola. 
Ewing also provided 21 points and 14 rebounds in Georgetown’s 65-53 victory Tbusday. 


t United Press Imenumcmal 

DALLAS — If the NCAA lour- 
1 [lament’s Midwest Regional semifi- 
nals were any indication of the 
closeness of the competition, then 
the regional final Saturday between 
Memphis State and Oklahoma 
should be declared unsafe for the 
faint of heart. 

* Wayman Tisdale and Andre 
Turner, two very likely heroes, put 
Oklahoma and Memphis State into 
the final with last-second shots in 
their Thursday night. 

Tisdale provided the game-win- 
ner far the Sooners in an 86-84 
overtime victory over Louisiana 
Tech, and Turner did the same for 
the Tims just as regulation ended 
in a 59-57 thriller against Boston 
College. 

The Tigers and Sooners face 
each, other Saturday afternoon with 
a trip to the tournament's final four 
ai stake. 

In the East Regional at Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, Georgetown 
defeated Loyola of Illinois, 65-53, 
and Georgia Tech beat IlKnois, 61- 
53. The Hpyas and Yellow Jackets 
meet Saturday in the East final 
Tisdale sank a six-foot (one-me- 
ter) jump shot with three seconds 
remaining in overtime to bring 
O klahoma its victory. 

“A lot of guys didn't have the 
point total they want, so they want 
to play five more minutes. I think 
Wayman was one of those. He 
wanted a few more shots,” said the 
Sooners' coach, Billy Tubbs. 

Tisdale, a 6-foot-9 junior who 
played the final nine minutes with 
four fouls, scored eight of his 23 
points in overtime. 

Louisiana Tech overcame a four- 
point deficit in overtime to tie the 
score with 18 seconds left on two 
free throws by Robert Godboh. 

Oklahoma worked for the final 
shot, with Louisiana Tech trying its 
best to deny Tisdale the bail 



David Johnson took the ball away from Willie Bland of 
Louisiana Tech during the 86-84 triumph by Oklahoma. 


Wintering on Lake Warms Young Man’s Heart 


The Associated Press 

MILWAUKEE — For seven long weeks, 
Tom Nutt spent his mornings and evenings 
contemplating the shimmeri ng lights of the 
distant Lake Superior shore, the biting wind 
and a hole in the ice. 


Meals were fresh trout and splake, when be 
could catch them. At other times it was frozen 
meat and his mother's homemade bread and 
home-canned vegetables. 

“Simplicity has always been the form at 
my life. I grew up that way," he said. "The 


_ JNutt HvedJn a six-foot XI S3 centimeters)., shack is a mat life because you landof revert 
by right-foot ice f shing shade, 2¥i miles (four back. You just get caught up in surviving, 
kilometers) from land. It started as a publiri- You fed healthy. You sleep so wdL You 


ty stunt to promote off-season recreation in 
northern Wisconsin’s Bayfield County, but it 
turned into something special, something 
personal, for the 26-year-old. 

“At night there’s a quietness," he said. 
“You watch the tights kind of shimmer from 
Ashland and Washburn. Yon just fed you're 
secluded from the wodd. One thing is the 
wind. There's always a wind out there. The 
wind just always seems to bite yon, whether 
if s 30 bdow (minus 34 degrees centigrade) or 
20 above." 

He drove across the ice to work each day, 
but at night, Nutt lived simply. No radio or 
phone. An oil heater kept the wind-driven 
chill at bay. 


wake up excited to see if you can catch a fish 
before wort" 

The day began at 5:30, fishing with shiner 
minnows through the ice. 

"The sunrise has a new meaning when 
there’s nothing to block iL I see it break the 
horizon and I see it silhouetted against the 
lighthouse," he said. 

“I think aim out there I think about where 
I want to be and what I will be con tent with. I 
flunk a lot about being married and having a 
happy relationship,’' said Nntt, who is en- 
gaged to be married in June. 

The quiet, restful nights were not as com- 
mon when Nutt first took up residence in the 
shack. Subzero temperatures and wind would 


cause pressure ridges in the ice, some heaved 
as high as six feet, to nimble and groan. 

"One night when the pressure ridge 
cracked it was like a little earthquake," be 
recalled. “It woke ok out of a dead sleep at 4 
Ail and I was just land of shaking." 

The first weekend in March, a storm hit. 

“The wind was 80 or 90 miles per hour,' T 
was out there shoveling and it knocked me 
down three or four times,” he said. 

The next Monday morning, the four-wheel 
pickup Nutt uses to commute to his shack got 
stuck in a drift. 

“It look an hour and 10 minutes to walk off 
the lake. If s a long way out there, especially 
when you're bucking a 30 mph wind," he 
said. 

He stayed until March 15, when Wisconsin 
law requires aD shades be off the ice. 

"Everything went fine," he said. “Tm glad 
and Pm sad all in one. I don’t know if m ever 
have the opportunity to do something 13m 
that again. But realistically. I'm glad to be 
back home. I'm enjoying the oomf on of being 
able to turn on the shower and get hot water.” 


But with three players surround- 
ing, him, Tisdale got the ball just 
outside the lane, turned and tossed 
up a soft left-handed shot. 

“It seems like it took forever on 
the rim,” said Tisdale, an all-Amer- 
ica. “I just wanted to turn and 
shoot it as soft as I could. I wasn't 
trying to run off as much time as I 
did." 

Turner's jumper came after Bos- 
ton College had tried to run as 
much ume off the game dock as it 
could. 

With the score tied at 57, the 
Eagles held the ball for tire final 
two minutes and called lime out 
with 14 seconds remaining to play. 
However, Vincent Askew stole the 
ball from Roger McCready after 
the ensuing inbotmds pass, with 10 
seconds left, and fed Turner. 
Turner moved left before betting 
the buzzer with his winning shot 

“That last situation was Just one 
of those things," said Boston Col- 
lege’s coach, Gary Williams. “We 
lost the ball, but it still took a great 
shot to beat us." 

Memphis State owned a 12rpoini 
lead midway through the second 
half, but the Eagles scored 12 
points in a row. 

Two free throws by McCready 
with 4:37 left made it 57-57. The 
contest’s next points came on 
Tomer’s game- winning shot. 

Memphis State forged its 12- 
point laid thanks to a career-high 
23 points from 7-foot sophomore 
William Bedford. 


Lee did not score a point in the 
first half and finished with just 
eight. 

At Providence. Patrick Ewing 
provided 16 of his 21 points in the 
second half and grabbed 14 re- 
bounds in Georgetown's triumph. 
He also served notice to the rest of 
college basketball. 

“Fm not ready to go home yet.” 
Ewing said. 

Andre Moore had 19 points for 
Loyola. Alfrcdrick Hughes, averag- 
ing 27 a game and a double-figure 
scorer for 94 straight games, was 
held to eight points on four-of-13 

shooting. 

“It was a great season." Moore 
said. “It’s too bad it had to end 
losing." 

Hughes, a senior forward, picked 
up three personal fouls early in the 
first half and sat out the last 10:02. 
Yet, the Ramblers gave the Horn 
trouble and led at halftime, 28-26. 

Georgetown, the Big East Con- 
ference tournament champion, still 
trailed, 38-36, early in tire second 
half as Hughes found the range for 
two baskets. Bui Georgetown went 
on a 8-0 nm, with Ewing contribut- 
ing six points, and had a 44-3$ 
advantage with 13: 17 to play. 

Georgetown then held Loyola at 
bay as Ewin£ continued to be a 
force on the inside and the Hoyas 
spread spread out their offense, 
taking only the easy shots. 

Georgia Tech was led by Mark 

Price, who scored 20 points on 


Bedford lode up the scoring "in«>f-I2 shooting, 
slack from another all-America, Any time you have a player who 
Keith Lee, who picked up Ms third can shoot from the outside like 
foul five minutes into the game and that, be can really hurt you," said 
sat out the remainder of the first Illinois’ coach, Lou Henson. “I 
half. think Mark Price was the key.” 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


SeavertoGet 
New Record 


Ru^jy World Championship Planned sa^H^T-to™ 

PARIS (UPI) — The rugby union’s International Board voted tmani- Seaver, the three-time Cy Young 
mously Friday to organize a 16-nation world championship in 1987 and Award winner who already is a 
agreed in principle that South Africa would participate. familiar entry in major league base- 

The event would be called an “international tournament” rather than a ball's record bodes, will merit a 
world cup and would indude the right member nations of the Interna - new line April 9 when the Chicago 
tionfll Board and eiriit other countries selected by the haani The British- White Sox’s pitcher makes Ms 15lh 
dominated board began meetings Tuesday to discuss a proposal by opening-day start 
Australia ami New Zealand to organize a world cup of rugby. “He was our winningest pitcher 

The board agreed in principle to allow Smith Africa to participate even last year and nobody threw more 
though most nations have joined an internati onal sports boycott to effectively,” said Tony JjRussa, 
protest South Africa’s apartheid policy. However, South Africa adds one Chicago’s manager. "Plus, he’s 
of the world’s strongest national rugby teams and has two representatives throwing free and easy this spring." 
on the Internati onal Board, rugby’s unofficial wodd governing body. Seaver, 40, the right-hander who 


■# • • • 
Jd - 

I:**’ 

*9-- " 

si---' 4 - 

ip v 


Mfi.GllitalMI; DJSuttar (U).Sbotxon 
JuoMc (on 5 m HID 14 - 154 - 35 ; Now 
MSovtonvl Mr9-2L 
mwr 8 8 0-3 

boot o i i-a 

(251, LanJMor Ml. Lomov 09); Mr 
1 -.PicMta (17). Shall on tool: Vancou- 
' I Rttcn) 17-4-7—30; New Jenav (m 
rt KT7-18— 35. 

■wart 8 3 1-4 

Mb 4 1 8—8 

uttar OS), Karr 152). Smith (14). Pram 
MM 2 (27), Zonal 05), Cravan (25); 
Mnan2 no.Grasetmar (15).0atwrm 
liaa pool: Hew Yor* (on UntodOoroti) 
-35; pbUodoJatila (an Hanlon) 15-12- 


Baseball 


THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
VL Manama 2 
a Cun 11. Oakland 10 
wo 7, C lava land &, 13 1 mines 
4m 11. San Francis c o 5 
nka laSoaMoO 


(Thomas 19). Golden State 25 (Short 7). 


NCAA Tournament 

SEMIFINALS 
Thursday's Results 
Goorsla Tech 41. Illinois 53 
Georgetown 45, Loyola III. S3 
Ofcamatonship 
Saturday. March S3 

Georgetown. 3J-Z ml Georgia Tech. 27-7. 
Southeast Regional 
ChBo u No ns hlp 
Sunday. March 24 

North Carolina or Auburn vs. Maryland or 
VI Oonova. 

Midwest Regional 

T hu r sd ay** RasuBs 
Oklahoma 84, . Louisiana Teen 84 OT 
Menwhls St. 59, Boston College 57 


Stounday. March 23 
OkU4wnOr 31-5. vs. Memphis St, 30-3. 

West Regional 
Championship 
Sunday. March 24 

N. Carolina SL or Alabama vs. SL John's or 
Kentucky. 


Transition 


on the Internati onal Board, rugby’s unofficial wodd gov erning body. Seaver, 40, the right-hander who 

nuiie fais American leag ue debut 

Ashe, StoDe, Jones in Hall of Fame 

NEW YORK <AP) —Arthur Ashe of (he United States, Fred StoDe of * 

Australia and Ann Haydoa Jones of Britain were selected Thursday as le 8 eil “\7 
the 1985 inductees into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. son. Both Mtntdred 14 openos. 

Ashe, a native of Richmond, Virginia, was the first black man to win a rr 1 - 

U.S. Open, in 1968. After Ms playing career was cut short by a heart m 

attack, newas named UA Davis Cop team captain in 1980. STifSS!^ rf5S5lI2 

Stoile won the U.S. National Championship in 1966, the French Open JJffi 12 ^ ^ ^ greeted 

in 1965 and 16 men’s doubles and mixed doubles titles in Grand Slam 15 011 °p en ™S 

tournaments. Jones, who won the women's singles at Wimbledon in 1969, ■ Playoff Expansion Sought 
is chairman of the Women's Professional Tennis Council and generally Major lratrne baseball’s team 


Suns Trounce Trail Blazers, 
Bringing Gloom to Ramsay 


seaver, me uuee-iune ty Young The Associated Pnss 

SrSTm^or^b^ , Arizona -Th^ 


NBA FOCUS 

rookie Jay Humphries had 1 1 of Ms 
19 in the pivotal fourth period as 
the Phoenix Suns beat Portland, 
114-104, Thursday night. 

The victory moved Phoenix (32- 
38) to within a game of the second- 
place Trail Blazers (33-37) in the 
National Basketball Association’s 
Pacific Division standings. Detroit 
defeated Golden State, 122-113, in 
the only other game Thursday 
night 



Jack Ramsay 


■AND— Optioned Stove KMer end 


pHcmrs, Id molr mlnor-toosut comptax for 
reasolBfimont. 

CHICAGO— Sant Lorry Rothschild, JotVMTV 


HULtitfleMm,toTacn>naDfttioPadf- Abr** and Scott Holman. pKrtors. Darrin 
t Leooua. Sant Stan Javier, outfielder. Jockson. oaMl^tlef. and Tito Wannltmd Tom' 
b* catcher, and TUn PvxnarskLTtilrd woods, WWders.toltialriT»lrior-lea*MlCOnt- 


ls chairman of the Women s Professional Tennis Council and generally Major league baseball's team Ramsay, whose team had a three- there is not a 

recognized as a major force in the administration of the women’s tennis, owners proposed Thursday that tire game winning streak “We that can’t beat 

five-game league playoffs be ex- just played three excellent games at Behind by7i 

Giants TrrarJp Off Wnnlfnllr tn Ollpns panned to seven games beginning home with good defense and re- ters, Phoemx ti 

tjrttUllfe irdUC WUUllOilk W 4-nters ^ se&son ^ a!jjlxd ll £ 1 jw£ bounding. Hoe, we had 15 turn- Many’s three-D 


’ TWto thalT mtoorJoaout cocnplax tor pun ter rocsttwnwnt. TI ... nO n,, , jui-H . 

■ nmtnt PHILADELPHIA— Sant Randy Sal ova InurSday lOT a third-. 

INTO— Oottomd Stan CJarko, anchor. outflaMcr. to Iholr mlnor-leoawa comolax tar Woolfolk had his W 

rmmtoormrt. for 92 yards, and tost 

National LM9U8 BASKETBALL i non in 

-NTA— Optianad MtouH Sooa. Infloid- Itattomri BaskMbaH AaodaNea rusher m Ivo/anu IS 

ttfunond of tho tntomotlaiwl Loaoufc bOSTOH— ReodKMtod Codrfc mojcwriL 

rtvQorv.StwaZiom and David Cknr. forward. Plocad MX. Carr, ouardtorwanl do 


Football 


L Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T Pet. PF PA 
fc** (ham 3 1 0 JSD 129 97 

• 3 10 JS 0 84 70 

3 10 ,750 117 88 

fW 2 2 0 J 00 IDO 101 

**"• 2 3 0 AM 123 153 

' n 1 2 I J 7 S 79 49 

0 5 0 JM 75 154 

,■ WEJFTERN CONFERENCE 

<00 1 JM 0 112 85 
2 1 1 A 2 S 97 105 

2 2 0 -500 77 47 

• ; 2 2 0 J 80 94 107 

" * 2 2 0 J 00 . 41 4 S 

T-'J «*•* 1 3 0 350 105 90 

I V 1 3 0 150 44 103 


for 92 yards, and test his job to Jo 
Hu * — i Association rusher in 1982 and 1983. 

BOSTON— ReadhMtod Codrtc MUWBlL 

tarwORL Ploead MX.Corr.auar«Morwtinl,oo 

Mood-Alti 

FOOTBALL 

UMted State* FootbaH Leasae .... , 

LOS ANGELES— (ndofimtotv suspended United Press international 

Duane Gunn, receiver, tor dtedoHnary r» TPfcTPP Arivonn Members of 

Adlvdtad Gary Lowed, wide rtalvar. lfiMTa, AlUtm— MemDa^CH 

college Arizona State University^ basiball 

Arizona state— R etained Mine Mam. team have been given a connover- 

ToM Freeman and Don BoccNaBt(s)aiif tool- ci»l iwyvt-al iwfng drag to mCrfiflSe 
ball cooches. Non>*d Jim Codetta KJrk Doll. . Lsminac hv 

TMintv vauafan, am Youn*. Pai Hendofson performance despite waojinj by 


uvv^uuiib piujum va* 

Giants Trade Off Woolfolk to Oilers 

NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Giants traded running back A ssociation for an answer by next 
Butch Woolfolk, their top pick in the 1982 draft, to the Houston Oilers week, United Press International 
Thursday far a third-round draft pick this April reported from Clearwater, Florida. 

Wo6Ifo“ ' ' - - - - ■ - * * ’ 


reported from Clearwater, Florida. 

Woolfolk had Ms worst professional season last year, carrying 40 times The Play as A ssociation indicat- 
for 92 yards, and lost his job to Joe Morris, He was the Giants’ leading edit might agree to the change on a 
msherm 1982 and 1983. one-year trial baas. 


home with good defense and re- 
bounding. Hoc, we had IS turn- 
overs by halftime. 

“We shoot 20 percent from the 


reax enaeo. we mat can t treat you. 
radian games at Behind by 75-74 after three quar- 

defense and re- ters, Phoemx tied the score at 77 on 
we had 15 turn- Mac/s three-point play with 11:26 
left. 


second span. Thai gave the Suns 
the lead for good, at 82-77, with 
10:18 toga 

Ten points from Humphries and 
seven from Macy made it 108-93 
with 2:48 left, ensuring a victory 
that ended Phoenix’s four-game 
losing streak. 

“It was a win we had to have if 
we’re going to slay in this race." 
said the Suns' coach, John Mac- 
Leod. “Macy and Humphries gave 
us a good solid game ” 

■ Clippers Reportedly at Fault 
Executives of the Los Angeles 
Clippers, who hare complained 
that information concerning Mar- 
ques Johnson's drug history was 
withheld by the Milwaukee Bucks, 
needed only to follow leame proce- 
dure, The Los Angeles Tunes re- 
ported Friday. 

The NBA’s standard procedure 
f to the allows a team involved in trade 
dont, negotiations to check a player’s file 
league to find mil, among other things, if 
that player has received treatment 
: qnar- a t a drug rehabilitation center, the 
1 77 on newpaper reported. 

1 11:26 a team only needs permission 
from tire other team involved to 


Mike Sanders, playing for only gam access to the information. 


floor in the first quarter. If sincred- the second time since a laiee injury Had the Clippers exercised that 
ible! We massed six easy layups is November, then got a lay-is and option, sources told the Times, they 
eariy. I don’t have an answer. But I a free throw sandwiched around would have known that Johnson 
can tell you this," Ramsay added. Michael Holton’s jumper in a 44- had been hospitalized at Sl Mary’s 


Mood- Altering Drug Given Arizona State Athletes 


United Press international drazine derivative marketed under not to be identi fi ed. “You can get h Gough said he prescribes the 

TEMPE, Arizona— Members of the name Nardil, is generally riven if you ask for it— and even if yon drug to help athletes fight depres- 
Arizona State University’s baseball as a last resort to people suffering don't. But no earn ever told ns ii was sion. He added that Nardil is “a 


Rehabilitation Center in Minne- 
apolis in 1983. 

A J J “Sure, I would have told them 

1 fn l/)r/)(7 they could check it out with the 

LI/# UC/l'vu league,” James F. Fitzgerald, the 

Bucks’ president at the time of the 
years. We have complete trust in trade,' said from his Palm Springs 


his methods." 


severe neurotic depression. 

It is bring prescribed for Arizona 


dangerous or that.il conld kill you. shortcut” to: 
“The doctor never told me any- better about 


l Nardil is “a 
the athlete fed 
and to be able 


home. “They didn’t ask me. 1 be- 


Tortiff*Y Voufltm. Bill Youn* Pot HtMtonafl 
end Rorailo Jonas anlotant lealbcdl COOdKt. 


the manufacturer and many doo- 


coLeA TE-No^ ^ttartwteandArt tors that it is dangerous; according 

tomort insist on ■ mmoii coocnos. _________ r . nr , rrl 

COLORADO STATE— Anaou need ttiot Sorv tO a HCW^VapeT I^OTL 


Bnxk, who said he is aware of lieve I dealt straight up with the 
the potential dangers of the drag, dippers. That avenue (the NBA 
said that at one tmre he was bring procedure) was available to them, 
counseled by Gough for depression Urey just had to look." 


who formerly worked as director of 
mental health for Student Health 


nyuHridi assistant tootoan condi. rtslonod The Arizona RfflU 
toiai«o*i n,ttor,,osn,on,rtS,nf1,or *L Nam * t * nlavers as savinH uu 

(Wm LAV assistant coach. _ 

DELAWARE STATe— Ftfsd Joe Doan Do« Whined the dlUg OCHllu 


The Arizona Republic quoted Services at the university, the re- week as a 


Gough, who works two days a nf his athletes had used NardiL 


were not port said. 


Arizona 


Mite 34, Otiendo 3L OT 


*oeljIwarestatS— F tfod joe Doan do< warned the ^drng could have senous use or me drug does not 

vldsML monV haskuthall coach, and Sianlay rffaets and, under certmn con- ranfic-10 CoofereQCe rules. 

mcsomh. _ q>Qd !r ffititms, be fatal “Ii*s been around here la 

Jt bw>«toe« coach. The drug, pbenzine sulfate, a by- years," said one player, who 


itatnc consultant for But, he said, he thought they bad 
'S sports program, bear told of the potential dangers, 
all players currently “Flayers and coaches are very 

mo WtA tV<l4 Ua Lap 1 . - ’.l oL> /Ias.aUU 


and was prescribed Nardfl. He said Alan Rothenberg, president of 
he used it until a couple of years the Clippers, said, “Why should we 
ago, adding that at least one of the ask (to check the files) when they 


Use of the drug does not violate said two baseball players currently “Players and coaches are very 
Pacific- 10 Conference rules. are using the drug, and that he has happy with the work Gough's 
“It’s been around here lor a few suggested it to ax others. He did done,” Brock said. “He’s bet at very 
years," said one player, who asked not identify the players. helpful for tire past six or seven 


assistant coaches is using the drug, tril us there's no problem with 
Brock said he does not think use Marques and drugs? I thought he 
of tire drag by athletes and coaches (Fitzgerald) was an honorable man. 
is a problem and added that its use I had no reason to believe MDwau- 
is not confined to the baseball kee was lying u> me. So, why ask 
team. He would not elaborate. the league?” 












Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 23-24, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


High Interest , High Risk 



W ASHINGTON —The recent 
savings and loan scandal in 
Ohio has shaken the banking in' 
dustiy very badly. What happened 
was, the Home State Savings Bank 
had invested its depositors' money 
in a Florida company that special- 
ized in dealing in government secu- 
rities. The company was shut down 
by the Securities and Exchange 
Commission after it couldn’t ac- 
count for milli ons of dollars of 
bonds it claimed 

to have on hand. 

When word got 
back to Ohio 
that Home State 
was stuck with 
bad paper, the 
good citizens of 
Cincinnati de- 
cided it might be 
prudent to take 

their money out n , , 

of the bank Bucfawakl 

while there was some still left. 

Unfortunately, everyone got the 
idea at the same rime, and panic set 
in. not only for Home State cus- 
tomers but for other banking insti- 
tutions in Ohio. The governor had 
□o choice but to declare a long 
bank holiday to cool down all the 
people who were screaming for 
their savings. 

i asked a former Ohio banker 
(not from Home Slate) who also 
got burned how something like this 
could take place. 

“We mane a mistake. It could 
have happened to anybody.” 

' “That’s what the people of Ohio 
are afraid of," I said, “why would a 
bank risk so much money with a 
small Florida securities company?” 

"You should have seen their of- 
fices in Florida. Eveiy dealer had a 
suite overlooking the ocean.” 

“You mean yon invested your 
depositors’ money in a firm be- 
cause you were impressed with 
their offices?" 

“Of course not. I didn't give 


them any funds until the officers 
took me for a ride on their 70-fooL 
yacht. HI say this, people in Flori- 
da really knowhow to live." 

“Hold it,” I said. “Bankers don’t 
risk their customers' savings in a 
company just because it owns a 
yacht.” 

“It wasn't only the yacht. They 
also paid more interest than other 
firms in the bond business. The 
competition for deposits is fierce 
these days, and if we can offer just 
a quarter of a percent more to the 
public, we can put the guy across 
the street out of business. People 
don’t understand that we can't let 
their money sit in our vaults. If we 
offer them a higher rate of interest, 
then we have to get a higher rate of 
interest for oarselves. That’s why 
we went to Florida. They were able 
to pay us more, and at the same 
time it was safe because they were 


backing our deposits with govern- 
rities. Is that 


mem securities. Is that a sure thing, 
or isn’t it?" 


“Probably, except many of the 
securities didn't exist-" 


“Now you’re getting into techni- 
calities." 

a 

“Why didn't you ask to see the 
bonds?” 

“We did. Do you think we’re 
from Missouri?” 

“And what happened?” 

“They showed them to us and 
then put them back in the safe." 

“Didn't it occur to you that they 
might have been showing the same 
collateral to different customers 
over over again?” 

“Frankly, it never crossed our 
minds. This one gny had a home 
you wouldn’t believe, with a tennis 


court, Olympic-size pool and race- 
horses. Nobot 


Brighton Hotel to Be Rebuilt 

Reuters 

■ BRIGHTON, England — The 
120-year-old Grand Hotel, severely 
■ damaged in the Irish Republican 
Army bomb attack on Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher and her 
'cabinet in October, will be rebuilt 
at a cost of £8 million (about $9.5 

■ millio n) and scheduled to reopen in 
August, according to its managing 
! director. Smart Reed. 


lobody lives like that un- 
less they’re honest” 

“In retrospect wouldn’t your 
bank have been better off if you 
had talfgn the bonds back to Ohio 

instead of leaving them in Miami? " 

“I couldn’t have done that If I 
had asked for the securities I would 
have hurt their feelings, and they 
would have told me to invest my 
money somewhere else.” 

“Perhaps that would have been 
the best thing that could have hap- 

l't 


ave tossed all your depositors' 
Okefenokee 


money into 
Swamp.” 

“Yeah, but at the same time I 
would never have gotten such a 
good interest rate for them either.” 


A Real Model for King Arthur 


Study of Manuscripts Links Him to f Riothamus / a 'High King 9 of the Britons 


By John Noble Wilford 

New York Times Semce 

A British scholar has uncov- 
ered evidence that he says 
establishes the identity of the 
man who. may have been the 
model for Arthur, the once and 
future king of legend. The real 
Arthur, according to the findings, 
was probably a fifth-century 
“high king” of the Britons called 
Riothamus. 

In a detailed analysis of the few 
written accounts of the time, the 
scholar, Geoffrey Ashe, a histori- 
an who specializes in Arthurian 
legend and who has worked 
closely with archaeologists, found 
a striking coincidence between 
Arthur’s supposed exploits in 
Caul and the documented - expe- 
dition of Riothamus, who is 
known to have led an army of 
Britons in a struggle to expel the 
barbarian Goths from the pro- 
Roman region of Burgundy. He 
advanced into Burgundy, was be- 
trayed by an associate, fought 
bravely but was defeated and dis- 
appeared from history in about 
470. 

Further research gave Ashe 
reason to suspect that Arthur and 
Riothamus were one and the 
same: He and Lion Fleuriot, a 
Celtic scholar at the Sorbonne in 
Paris, working independently, 
discovered that “Riothamus” was 



not a name but a title, meaning 
“high king.” Since history records 
no other name for the kmg, Ashe 
derided, after years of what is 
called manuscript archaeology, 
that he bad probably “found” the 
man who was Arthur. 

In “The Discovery of King Ar- 
thur,” published recently in asso- 
ciation with Debrett’s Peerage, 
Ashe wrote: “In the High King 
called Riothamus we have, at last, 
a documented person as the start- 
ing point of the legend. He is the 
only such person on record who 
does anything Arthurian. Or to 
put it more precisely, he is the 
only one to whom any large pan 
of the story can be related.” 

The finding is not likely to di- 
minish the Arthur of medieval 
romances, which are glorious fic- 
tions about a magic sword and 
the prophetic Merlin, gallant 
knights of the Round Table and 
ramcln L, the adulterous love be- 
tween Lancelot and Guinevere, 
Galahad’s quest for the Holy 
Grail, and the king's defeat and 
disappearance to Avalon. This 
Arthur, though he never lived, is 
immortal 

But Ashe’s conclusions are cer- 
tain to stir controversy among the 
scholars who have sought to es- 
tablish the historical baas, if any, 
for the legend. Some scholars 
doubt that there was a real Ar- 
thur. Others believe he was a gen- 
eral, not a king, who fought the 
invading Saxons and was given 
heroic stature in Welsh and Bre- 
ton folklore Still others question 
whether he extended his military 



(Men'i Ufarary, MondieHar 

Miniature (c. 1240) depicting crowning of King Arthur. 


British history that united legend 
because so little about it is 
known. 

When Rome withdrew its le- 
sions early in the fifth century, 
: Britons, a Critic people, dmn- 


reach to the Continent. 

Norris J. Lacy, president of the 
International Arthurian Society 
and a scholar of medieval French 
literature at the University of 
Kansas, called Ashe’s study “the 
most complete and best-re- 


searched” attempt so far to iden- 
al Arthur. 


Bryan Wtinon 

Drawing of Cadbury Hill, 
possible site of Camriot 


tify the real. 

“Many people are still viewing 
it with some reserve," Lacy add- 
ed, “but the arguments are rda- 
tivriy convincing and Ashe is 
making some converts.” 

The hypothesis is likely to give 
added impetus to archaeologists 
di g gin g fen traces of fortresses, 
villas and other artifacts from the 
time of Arthur, a chaotic time in 


nerable to attack. To shore up 
defenses, an ambitious noble- 
man, Vertigem, brought in the 
Angles and Saxons, mercenaries 
who then turned on their employ- 
ers. The Anglo-Saxon takeover 
was forestalled by an army of 
Britons led by. a king — either 
Arthur or someone like him. 

Since there are no contempo- 
rary accounts, the legend of Ar- 
thur grew mainly out of Welsh 
stories passed on from generation 
to generation. In about 1 135, 
Geoffrey of Monmouth embel- 
lished the stories in writing a 
“history” of the British kings. 
This became the primary source 
of medieval tales celebrating Ar- 
thur's reign and his presumed 
battles in GauL 

In the 1960s, archaeologists in 
Somerset uncovered the state re- 
mains of a fortress at Cadbury 
HDL one supposed ate of Camc- 
Iol Pottery found there was iden- 
tified as being . similar to known 
fifth-century pottery. Leslie Al- 
cock, professor of archaeology at 


the University of Glasgow and 
leader of the excavation, said the 
ramparts and architecture of the 
fortress suggested a grandeur be- 
fitting a king — not a castle in the 
medieval sense of the Arthurian 
legends, but perhaps more than 


the headquarters of a military 
inlander. Ah 


commander. Alcock has re- 
frained from making a judgment 
on the reality of Arthur. 

John Kenfidd, an archaeolo- 
gist at Rutgers University in New 
Jersey, wlQ resume excavation 
this summer on a Roman-style 
villa near Avebury in Wiltshire. 
The villa is near the reputed she 
of the Battle of Badon, where 
Arthur is supposed to have de- 
feated tire Saxons. 


Nothing dug up there so Tar 
points to Arthur, Kenfidd em- 
phasized, but pottery places the 
time of the villa in the late fifth 
century. He said the villa could 
provide clues to life at the time 
Britain was passing from Roman 
to Saxon hands. 


Ashe said he hoped archaeolo- 
gists would dig around the area 
where Riothamus fought the 
Goths in France. Finding some 
British weapons from Arthurian 
times, he said, would reinforce his 
thesis. 


PEOPLE 



Kids Pick Karate Kid 


Forget about asking for the enve- 
lopes Monday at the Academy 
Awards ceremony; young Ameri- 
can moviegoers have deaded that 
“The Karate Kid” was the best 
movie of 1984 and that Eddie Mur- 
phy and SaBy field were the best 
actor and actress. More dun 5.000 
students, age H lo 14. selected tire 
winners of the Son of Oscar 
Awards, sponsored by Junior Scho- 
lastic magazine. Murphy was 
picked for his performance in 
“Beverly Hills Cop," which came in 
second in tire best-picture category. 
Field was chosen for “Places in the 
Heart,” for which she is also a con- 
tender in the grcwn-ww' Oscars. 
Ralph Macduo of “The Karate 
Kid” drew the second largest num- 
ber of votes for best actor, Bffl 
Murray came in third. Daryl Han- 
nah of Splash" placed second as 
best actress. . . . Vanessa Red- 
grave, nominated for a best-actress 
Oscar for “Tie Bostonians," will 
miss the award ceremony because 
of the funeral of her father. Sir 
Michael Redgrave, who died 


ingtoa on their way home f ra - 
wait to Australia, a spokesman 
die British Embassy said in w* 
region. He said their two » 
Prince WBEam and Prince 



would reman in Britain. Dal i 

S in 1 nt * 


once changed planes in Los A?' 
les; beyond that, she has never 
ited tire United States. Tto 
man said the couple had 


|t’ w 


ited the 'United States. . Thespoi jf j { | ^ ^ 


in Sin 
to k 


lurni nuu uk wupie nao acccn 
an invitation from President# 
rid Reagan and his wife. Nan* i * 
have ditmcr.at the White Hm ‘*«| I 
Nov, 9. The next day they i * 

the National Gallery's “Tnsj* 
Houses of Britain," of which t 
arc patrons. 


i*v r.s 


Thursday. The actress also an- 
nounced d 


that sire plans to appeal a 

federal court ruling that upheld the 
Boston Symphony's right to cancel 
an appearance by her following 
complaints about her political acti- 
vities. . . . Peter Bogdanovich, 
angry at alterations that Universal 
Studios made in his movie “Mask,” 
has failed in an attempt to block 
U.S. nationwide release of the 
film. Bogdanovich asked Superior 
Court Judge John Ode in Los An- 
geles to issue a preliminary injunc- 
tion preventing the film's release so 
he could reinsen scenes and music 
removed by the studio. Cole, how- 
ever, ruled that Bogdadnovich's 
contract with Universal was ambig- 
uous and did not specify an abso- 
lute right to final musical and the- 
atrical cut oT the movie. Last month 
Bogdanovich filed a multimillion- 
dollar suit against Universal and 
the producer, Martin Starger, 
cl aimin g that 10 minutes of Bruce 
Springsteen music was replaced 
with Bob Seger music— the studio 
claims contract difficulties with 
CBS Records — and that scenes 
were cut without his permission. 

□ 


Piymptoo. Massachusetts, wo 

be happy to be home to a yt 
commissioned by Adolf Hfflecj 
the vessel touched off a stir inn 
by Plymouth and raav never n? 
Massachusetts at alt Chute 
Sanderson of Kingston, « 
bought the Ostwind last week 
SI, wants to display the boat i 
military and maritime museutr 
is developing in Plymptoo, ini 
from Plymouth. But his assod 
Richard Swete, said the yacht 
in such disrepair that it might 
be worth transporting from Jj 
sonville, Florida. The vessel 
commissioned in 1939 by Hide 
promote Nazi supremacyin ntc 
according to Horace Glass, » 
sold it to Sanderson. Initial rep 
that Sanderson planned to nc 
the yacht near Plymouth Rr 
where the Pilgrims landed in. If 
set off an uproar. Sanderson r 
that he never planned to keep 
ship in Plymouth and that “it pu 
was my intention to emphasize! 
ier's connection with the Ostwir 
Selectmen in Plymptoo say t 
would welcome the ship. 


Friends of Rose Kennedy, 94^ 
she has made an “almost min 
Ions" recovery from a stroke 
had last spring, which kept 
from spending the whiter in FT 
da for the fust time in 20 Years 


say 


Princes Charles and his wife, Di- 
ana, wffl visit Washington in No- 
vember to attend a British an exhi- 
bition and dine at the White House. 
The royal couple will be in Wash- 


President Ronald ' 

will nominate the 

pioneer Martha Graham, 90, i 
member of the National Counci * 
the Arts. If confirmed by the 5 
ate as expected, she will succeed 
conductor Erich Leundorf, sen 
tire remainder of a term that 
expire next year. 


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Tel: CH 58431778. 

Hx 876062 HOME CH. 


CAPK CAW CAPRI CAPRI CAUL 

For sdk centrd beautiful potBratec 
top floor ap artment, newly furnnhed. 


otatade. Or. Mario fenron . Vkt Ce r- 
cdaN.lCoorilldyTd 081 78379547 


MArcMteandPoiKhvCan 


CO-IMPORT/ EXPORT 

World Wide Tox-Ftm CftfS From Europe 


FramBfllm 


200 Spedd Can in Stock- bmesBafa Delivery. 
Two Hoar Showroom - Unique In E u rope. 


280$E/L Porsche 911 5C, Targa, Porsche 928/5 out. or not. 

P 930 TuRfa, P 944, P 924 out or nor, 1900, 190 E, 300 TDT. 

600 MnteW 280^ SE 3. £L 190 2, 3, eta. 

One of fl>e greatest Mercedes wd Porsche ears specfefati. for 
Importing European cars m the U&A. _Spedd cewfihens far 
in Mra/ f i i m nffaai ns to Amoricon name, for DOT (about 


tranrfbnnatioro to Amorieon nonra, far DOT (about U J. 

St. Tiuhl ei , s fa enw e g 298,Ha «i e W -Z»id > B e l gl wn , Europe. 


About 40 ml from Brussels Airpert Zoventem. 

Teiesci 39^876 (BBseni). 

Phones 011/27-0-64- 27 J3.91 « 27^4.66 -27.28.32. — I 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 

Apartment tn porit palace, 5th floor, 
1 be dr oom. Inina, bdfrroom. W.C, 
kitchen, front S rear bakones. 


cellar & parking. 


kifarmatione Mhs H. Sdhleditar, 
. Tel. 02845 18221, 

(Rhein burg. Wed GerttwiyJ 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


85 SOJ4. + 60 sqm. terraae, luxuri- 
oudy equipped cm finfehi n as. Last 
floor, sun, 3 ml F1750JX. 5uido 
200 pm -5pm, 14 rueJowenef.l' 


ear PLACE DES VOSGES. 2 room. 
<4 comforts beams F295DOO: 2745958 


SARDINIA 


SARDINIA PORTO CERVO / Casta 
5mer(4dq, large, fuiy funded <qn1- 
menr2 terrooss overlooking old port 
US$270,00Q. Henrich, P:OJBw 144C, 
NAIROBI. Kenya 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 

h the bay of Pbfcno, 5 mins. Pakna, 15 


mim. airport, 664 berths 8 to 38 melerv, 

‘ liKSvrduof 


2 far ip to 60 meters each. 

TV/mara/wolef /phone a 

Professorial port management co. Ful 
marine servioesc tower, rocKa^ rip, trov* 
eLfiff, repar, feel station, ei & outdoor 
witaer iKeduouds, U-ground oor- park. 
Lodtora. Canroknicntary service & lei- 
sure focgtien mednaL oonlan 
ping, astering, flntftffoirment. 
terns Wwty, Commercial area can- 
prisas 85 urMs on 13,171 sqm in aL 
Plus 21 super apartments above & 78 in 
separate unjry condo - oil in front Kne 
dong mein piers. Top investments 498 
saUTHuny now before next priceriwl 
Gankct efredty developers: 


PUHHO PUNTA PORTALS, SJV. 
Deecta Comerdd 
C/ Manno 101, Portal Nous 
Mkrto, Spain or Tlx 68686 CAUU E. 


SWITZERLAND 


ZURICH 

SWITZERLAND 


Only 30 ntia away from ZtsidMOaien 
Airport, we can offer 


IK room 


turd 


you a choice of 
which ore out- 
and in architec- 

-I- roan swvke. 


By far Ihe dosest apartment prafed to 
the metropoSs of Zurich with safes per- 
mits to foewonen. It ofrers the possibi- 
tiei of either cm ideal _ vacant rati, 
deuce or an attractive mvessment far 
anyone who approoatos Ihe chornt aid 
1 of a delightful environment 
easy reach of Zurich. 


Up to 85K of the purchase price am be 
financed on very easy terms. So pieose 
contact us-Your copy of aur 34 page 
brochure awtaii you. Such an 
nity as tftis wfl not repeat ^ 


REODBUZA AG 
04-8001 Zurich, Tahsdker 50, 
Teli (01J221 33 « The 813 376 EBICH 


LAKEGB4EVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 


vfllh mogtifice n t 

Geneva aid mountain. 


Montreux, VBen, Verbiar, Les Dtadr- 
si cTOk roar Grind, Ley- 


ots, Chotaou , 

tin. EsceOert Opperi u n Oitas Ear 


Prices feom SF1 23000. 

MXWereri. 


Av Mon bpas 24, 

Oil [OM Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tel, fflj 22 35 11 The 251 85 MBJS 
Snce 1970 


SWTTZBLAND 

r arofeewn con buy a STUDIO 
APARTMENT a OW£T an LAKE 


GENEVA - MONTKUX or m these 
world fanout reurOt OW B- 
MGNTANA, IB WABHfflS, 
RBSL VaiAJK, JURA, etc from 
$F1 iAjOOO. Mortgages 60% a 
twx fSrS. 
IEVACSJL 


52 rue de Mombrifart, CH-1202 
41-22/34 15 40 


GHMEVATefc 

Tefac 22030 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In the c hanti n g mountain resort of 

LEYSIN:' 


RESIDENCE LES FRENES 

Overlooking a spfemfid Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 nsn. from Monfreux end loke 

Geneva by cor. 

- you con own quofey r r° | l* nr * t 
with indoor swimnung pad end 
fitness fbriStios in an ided 
enyeorenert far fan Old sports 

■ nnanangjjrww 5F. rales 
up ID 8DX mortguges. 

Please owtach 

Residence fa s frowe s. 1854 Leyrin 
SWITZBOAMl 

Teh (025) 34 11 55 Tbo Atoka 25629 CH 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWITZBOAND 

LAGO MAGGIORE 

In best looOiarL rm offer several new 
opatlmenb & houses in this beautiful 
Swiss craa in ASCONA end PORTO 
BONGO, emi apartment, 133 sqm + 
terrace, oywtooong lake_& mountains, 
(wanning 


150mtothek]l(£ ! 1stauaEi ly. iteimni 

poo ‘ , iSX 

rtw tor saio ro toreignen 
Atortgages at tow Swis interest rates. 

EMBA1MOME LTD. 

YOUR PARTNBt IN EUROK 


Via G. Cotton 1 CH-6900 LUGANO 
CH/91-542913 


Tefc 1 

The 73612 HOME CH 


lAKEGBCVAMSAIMontrauLLau- 

sonna} + oB famous mourftm re- 


sorts. Foreigners con buy: APART- 
AAHVTS/CHALETS/VUiAS. Prices 


from about I 


t US&WjXKi. Mortgages eff 
6W% interact. Contad H. RESOLD 

Td 21/25 Oil 


SA, Tnr Grise 6. CH-1 007 Lousenne. 
" 1. Tlx 24298 SBOCH 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SANTA BARBARA CAUF. USA 

Showass e in March 1984 taue of 

ArdvtedintJ Digest, this Venetian 

Gotac estate designed by renowned 

architect Addfaan Mtgner is one of 

Ihe great residences In America. Fd- 
oce-tte gates open to nrorly 13 acres 
of fermd gartou whh anaxfng 
fcxrotans and barand bdketaxfe 

SL? 

rooms, «mooi nqyt catmKra axtngs, 
caved wooden doors, enormous 

roans (5ving room dona nmesures 

1,429 *aM- This home is cxr architee- 
tural wonder, a Hoarst Castle in much 


barter Ksta drion more manopaable 

l For tartiiir 


safe. Price US$15 taffion. 

mformaTion contact WBatn Capp c/o 
Alexandra Bdto Seal &Wn, 1101 
Coent VOage Rd, Sarto Bar faara , 

Cafif. 931WU5A Tefc 805*59-3378. 
805-969-6895. 


USA-LOS ANGSfiS, CAUF. Braati 

condonwsura sec»4y brdcfcgj. 
SwilchboanJ, vdri porting. 1 bed- 
room on ocean d uff $2 15,000. 3 bed- 
room on Wfohira 5399,000. EBen-Tsh, 
John Doudos Co. Td 213^206651. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


VffiMNA*S HOUSING AGOKY. 
0222-527964, Hodasy, Graben 31. 
Rental: deluxe flats & houses. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


VAIL SUPB0H.Y RB5TORB> trod 
eouipped fatehous*. Sleeps 10. Hea- 
ad pod, hard, tennis court. 1 hour 
hfcee airport. Awridde lest fartnightf 
Aprfl and September: first in May, al 
June. Ttd UKVit-disil 


NORTH BRITTANY, Mothora house 

an estofa. Sea view on all tides. 6 
bedrooms. Juw/Jdy & Sept. Tefc (3] 
976 2379 from 1 pm. on. 


NEAR STE MAXIME VBa with 
view on mo, 6 beds. June. Tefc 
03 12 v W1 96 93 41 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON HAMPSTEAD luxury live 

-9042700 


room flat. £220 week. 01-904 1 


HOLLAND 


Renthouse International 


020448751 (4 tries) 

Nedefhww 19-21, Amsferdant 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

ITALY 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VQA8RO 

Luxury opai 1 mart house with facahed 
flats, amiable for I weekend more 

ntonro 6794325. 6793450. 

Write: Via del Velabro 16, 

00186 fame. 

km 

SHORT TOM in Latin Quarter. 

Mo agents. Tefc 329 36 83. 

fUTEAUX: 32 son, 2 room flat + 
hupetenaee. fWw. 1*4354 25 06 

SPAIN 

ROM 

K5HXNnALAREA 

Lovely apotmerts by day, by week or 
by month. Direct ftixxro. Aumomous 
heating. Bar. Besftwnxit. Gcxage. 

24 hour service. 

RBBUNCE CORTINA D’AMPBZO 

(39-6) 3387012 - 3387015 


USA 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

HHH 

74 CHAMI5-ELYSEE5 8th 

Stiida, 2 or 3room aparttnent 
One month or more 

LE CLAMDGE 359 67 97. 



REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 





employment 


IOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDER 

“INTERNATIONAL POSmONS- 
MGE3 


EXECUTIVE 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


DYNAMIC SALS DIRECTOR to sat 
no European dstribution of uprtnprlae* 
electronc gadgets. Reid experience 
requred- Sind of, photo, refer enoe s 
& salary requirements la D. Marino, 
65 Ave de Comes, 06160 Juan les 
Pen, France. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


DYNAMIC MANAGBI. bottonOme 
with UJS. cantpo- 
ny, seeks hew chalenge, senior man- 
agerant potitioiv prenrafatv with US 
corporation or mtT consulting firm. 
Extensive experience m sales, fattiness 
crfcnirmtrcrtcn. audit, perfectly triSn- 
and, EngSsh/Frencn/German, MA 
Bcanontia from Swiss Busmen School. 
Box 1944, Herald Tribune, 92521 
Neufly Cedex, France 


EXEamVE. SfflO SUfTAMf portion 
with transportation company. Fxtov 


ft *ransportctfiofi company, btev- 
I Error shippng & internatiand for- 
rdra as wd as cortdner leasmg 


warding 

experience worldwide. Fluent 
languages. Profit minded, good argo- 
ncuer & ad u mMar. Phase phone 
London: 373 2286 or telex 881 32 71 
quoting reference U4 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBmON EXECUTIVES 

AM thyourh 


“1 j n ee nine 

k,0»htrnnMme/Henidflt- 

burtm, wMmnwwweiBBW 


ef a mdboa mdei iwrlti- 
■rife meet of whom ant m 
fat ii i e and induthy. wX 
road it Juot fefex w IFtwk 


61359QM ere lOeurZ, eo- 


«* (Park 
am* an- 

am Mer you 

zzrysrszz'tsi 

ado h US. $9.80 or load 


otftMhnf per Bno. You mutt 
Madmcamploto and verifr 


IMPORT/EXPORT 


WANT CONTAMR LOADS -Rossig- 

■ me **-- ■ - - Slf^w. 

IIRAAr 

Tbe: 

Apache. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WEEK 

APRIL 1st, 


in 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


• A Shr k Bern taM CMm 
B ecomes A Medfa Gireit 
Overnight By Acquiring ABC 

• Spoott- The DdW Srope 
6*tas To The SAL Crick. 

• Mafau A CMBy Re ee p fl a n hr Tto 


• fad. puflooiu Fhcmc's -Vote hr 


NOW ON SALE 
AT ALL WTHNATTONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Dduei rentat Vderiusstr. 174 
Anwerdora. 090431234 or i 


PETR MUM MAKSAARDU 
Ml Ifauefcm 5ervke R enfah 
A msl sir d am. lets 020-768022, 


COMPUTE PORTRAITS 


T-SHm FOTQS 
NOW M PULL COLOR 
on oB-ctai busais that eon eara you 
WTO - Sltom^ Nsu 

system from $10000 - $30,000. 
Mma Dept. Ml^ft«S3il70340, 

6000 Franfcfurt/W. Garrinny. 

Tefc 059747808 Tin 412713 KmA 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SAVE 50% ON ART 


regular prices. Adtfiliond tfecourt 


& 100 t&oom of lesser arttik. 
Showroom: 

DXH. Decor totar- Na tional 
id FU 24 rue Godot de Mouray, 
750W PAHS - Opera tfcfact 


Phone 265J9J7. Motor oretfit cords, 
ice tat 


literature & price fat an request 


MONEY TREES? 


YES) Invest in one of America s most 
exciting technaiocKd Ueakthraugre in 
a bifcto dolor uSSy. MOO nut trees 

planted & addtiond 20^00 to be ptont- 

ed soon. High amud eantogs stand 

BROKB^^kSSK^MVITai. 
Material awriable in EnaWi. Frendi, 
Genrexv Arabic. Box 1^8, Herald 
Tribune, 92521 


Neufy Cedexj Fnra. 


CAYMAN ISLANDS 

lecxfing Irteraotiond FtoanddCenfar 
NO DUT1B - NO. TAXES 
Financid property iriv eilmert s from 
returns. 


Pleose redy far u rfo nnotiott . 
3N Sj 


HORIZON S JL P.O. Bax 221 
CH-I2TT Geneva SwBuriand 


fSENCH Cornpony of perfume*, eat 

de tofette & nwrrotia. a looking for 
ogentt et the UiAi lAnewa 
Experience in mass Atrouior & reF- 
eranees essential. Own brand tone & 
pockopng pocsfole in addiion to the 
large range of porfunros & faeet wo. 
tors existing ofceady. Send CV to Pot- 

ridt Duhamel EFM, 123 IGno Hen- 
ry's Rood. londqn*NW3 UX. by 
whom lebctoa vm be mcoe. 


BUSMBSMB4. MEVIDUA15 and 


aticn conccntad. Do you hove ex- 

laround? We centum 


cen ach laying oroundT We con turn 
your excess cew into .red asiels. Foe 
rnorged- Write Afied Ltd PQB 422, 
HQnSodxmVu- 22801, USA. ■ 


V YOUR COMPANY reeds ospitd to 

expend and * eriereried [ in public 

financing - Irodng under Ynneemr 

Slack Excherm tontact hdfie h- 
vesbmenh. TOTT Aftto Pha, W hi- 
terock. ELU V4A 5J1 Grata 


STOCK-LOTS, Import/Exporr textile 

fabrics, ready, pttxtictt^industnaj, 
eoraumer products etc. Gahar Inti 
av^ P.oiox 64. 2380 AB ZgETBk 
WGUDE/HoBand. Tefc 31.171530)2. 
71x30269 hL 


PANAMA UBS1A. CORPORATIONS 

from USS400 mdWfef^w- Td 
^4CL Telex: 62S3S2 ISLAND 
fAUK). 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


HAVE US DOLLARS to exchraige far 

Swi» Francs or If oti u n Lira. G» 361 
6500 Zurich. 


WORKMG PARTNER WANTS on 

cruising hold boaLTd Pans 382 6902. 

BUSINESS SERVICES 


HIT 

BEAUTIFUL. PEOPLE 

UMJMITB) MC 

U5A. A WORLDWIDE 


A complete soad & business service 
p o vtang a unique ooUedian of 
taertod, verarie & nMnpta 
inefividuab far a9 accations. 

212-765-7793 

212-755-7794 

330 W. 56th St. N.Y.C 10019 


Service RepreseMrtives 
edWorldvride. 


Needed 1 


MTEBNA310NAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 

UK companies front 175 LOALfanrena 
& td maior off-shore c en ters. Fid ad- 
mmatrotion, n uu enee services, pcxuen 

of attorney, registered offices, accoun- 

tancy, oonfidenbrt bonk acsouna 
apaied. corifidertid telephone, telex, 
fax & maing saw 

EJLS. United 

43 Cantina Street, Uverapd, L8 7NN. 
Tefc 051 7W 148a Hx 6&613 HJSSBL 
Pax: 051 709 5757 
Assoaatad Offices Wuldwide. 


KOUMMMUCABEPenMd SetWK. 
Mdce "s&sfing down' in Suatzeriaido 
home to home affair. Fiats, schools, 
cars, permits. B. Kouffiar-AtoCabe. 

PierreriroOT 46, 1020 RenmnAw 

sanne. Td 021 /& 82 18. Tlx 25074. 


TAX SERVICES 


UK CHARTERED Accountants provid- 

ing US federal tax s ervices. Lovett 
VWfajmson & Co. Tefc (0/0/3) 39330 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


EARN 25% - 35%, hv« In 90 - 270 
duy negotiable e n tnmetod peper 
notes, write ASed LfrL, 908 422, 
H c m sonburg. VjjWH 2H01 (UA 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Your bed buy. 

fine d anends in any price nrtgt 
et lowest wholesale pias 
(Sract from Antwerp 
carter of the diamond world. 
Ful guamtee. 

For free pice Esf write 


PaGaanstragt62^B-2DlB Aghwwp 


^ - Tefc (32 31 234 07 51 

Tbb 71779 fyl b. At the Direnand Qub. 
Heart of Antwerp Desmond mdusry 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


AMERICAN ENGITOl seeks' position 
in North Africa, Middle East, ar Far 
Eos* {ten years experience m these 
toartiofi^ as Coneatf Manager, Pro- 
ject Ma i wger, or Construction Man- 
aaer.Wrile Rddi Schaffne rlfrl . Boot 
1066, Beaumont, Texas 77706, or 
phone USA 409753-2068. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


A CAKBl OPPORTUNITY n Europe 
with major Amoriccm nauranoe com- 
peny. Ful co rn pony benefits ounfamt- 
ed uname. Must be American fi 

censed. P lease send resume to. 

Metrapafiton Insurance Camptmy, 
Kettungdr. 4 \ 6270 kktemOberrod. 
W.Gerracny. 


AUDmON French/ Engish, Shake- 
[.Paris 255 45 55. 


speorp, prafessionds. I 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


MEXICO CITY. Swiss tody, 34, movmg 
la Mexico with tourncCst husband in 

summer, seeks employment, possibly 

part-time. Former tawnationd news 
agency correspondent, now free- 
loncn. 5poc4a Engfish/ French/ ftafan/ 
Spanish. Would consider PJL/U.M 
bodes/ather mteresbna vmrit Reply 
Bax 195a Herald Tnbira, VS2) 
Nengy Cedex. France 


APPLICANT SEBOS 

requiring fluent French & _ . 

oeSent secretarial ddh. & traveL Ap-| 
picant has 1 year of handson busi- 
n«s experience, o BA «t Frendi 4 1| 
year study abroad expariwice. WI1- 
to relocate. K. Bowen. P.O. Bax! 
40729. htaonapofa, IN -46040 


I USA. 


AMBDCAN WOMAN, 6yeari ti nan- 
ad sales/corparate banking experi- 
ence, Ivy League MBA in finance 


seeks career xi Europe. Wbridm 
of French. A. Johnson. S2 
Ave, NYC 10030. 212- 


281-4495. 


YOUNG AMBBCAN MAN 26, 

in France 10 yean experience 
fluent in Bcfian seeks J " _ 


. __ _ - ... . inar ... 
vaTvee to traveL Tdi [7^ 32 10 99 
franco. 


PROfBSONAL CAPABLE, eduoai- 
oj. traveled Am erican to dy warts 
sirion in Bens as J rt i t knl or gel fix — , 
far exeaitive man/waman. Curry. 
Tat 813/837-8266 USA 


YOUNG MAN from PhAppmes, reeks' 

house work, ipoaVx EngBsh. some 
Spanah. References. PtxisSOd 4656 l 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Ail PAIR to core for newborn rnfmi, 

Sorting July. Prefer serious minded, 
experienced lady, nvnimwn oge 18. 
Own room & oar. Smofl town 2 hours 

from NY. Ody Engbh nofaen. $400 

per month. Send letter of introduction 
to Nefaen, Bor 302, Bradefidd, CT 
06804 USA 


FOR PARS A SOUTH OF FRANOt 

Franco American fomfly seeks quaS- 
fred loving ixmy to core far 2 grh 5 
&3 + new bofay due Aug. Write with 
references to Box 1739, Herald Tri- 

bune. 92521 Neufly Grig, ftpnre 



AU PAIR WANTED- Care 2 ddefcro, 

NYC area prracto home, rehrenots. 
Or. K Heluk, 246 Hicktfy St, 
Westwood. Ni 07675 USA 


AU PAIR far 1 year old on awitry 
farm. Nanvnahar, driving bceroo. Dr. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


MATURE CpOTE. OB / SURER, 

«efe housekeeper seek position In Ere 


don pduti tousehdd a fcmtry wdtt. 

nefie efnoent 


& service, 

_ ter 30 years written 

referencos in the USA, and Europe. 


AI.WAY5 AVAILABLE - AU PAIRS. 

n&all 


dddrons navty, mum'i hdpent & 
branches Of 1st dass Ive-in domestic 
help warfaride. CaB Soane Bureau, 
London 730 B1 22/5142 Q4 hours) U- 
CEMPAGY. Tte 89SQ67felOAhg G. 


MAHUGDCOUPUwith hotd&cofer- 
■ng dplamas seeks ful time 
(preferady in HeBmfl. Speak 

Butch. French. German. Wntu 

P082H46. 1000 HE Amsferdon. Hd- 
kind. 


ALWAYS A VAAABIE LONDON ady 

oabynMidm& 1 h doss ddhr mdek 
We Bureau, London 730 8122 / 
5142. Lanced employment agency 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


B4GUSH NANNK5 & Mother s Helps 

free now. Nash Agen cy, 5 3 Church 
Rood, Howe, ULTeL 10273] 290*4/5 


YOUNG HIENCH WOMAN, 34, 
some English, seeks au pair nb UA. 
Pans S&B? 98 


YOUNG MAN sods dike or house 
work. Reference available. Td Paris 
222 56 27. 


SEEK PART TIME OEANMG jab {of- 

roraoons). Tefc 504 51 20 fans 


SG9C PART TIME OEATOW or bdiy- 

tining pb. Tdi 738 66 87 Paris 


OUUHVHlR very good references. 

Gajdo, 17 run Dora, Paris Bth. 


FRENCH LADY endlere cook, house- 

keeping. Para 272 6329 from B txn. 

SEK HOUSE 

in exchange for room. Pans 


AUTOMOBILES 



BRAND NEW 1985. Mercedes 380 

SE, dl options, catayst. Offers to AA 
BarthdTSdtaalgaM 33. D-BT37 Berg 
l.Tefcffi8l51-510M.Tlxi52 77 59. 


U5. - MBfCBXS BB4Z 240 D, 1982. 
DOT/ffA, S13J000 defivered in New 
York. POrii 524 94 85 or 306 59 94 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAfiC RENT A CAR. Prestige cm 
with phone: liofc Spirt. Mereedes, 


Jaguar, BMW, Esnouanes, smdl can. 
~ man, 75008 


46 r Pierre Oforran, 75008 ftms. Tefc 

Telex 630797 FCHAFLOC 


720 JO. <0. Telex < 


AUSTHA A EAST EUROPE USS1S0Q 

per day. AuSohava, fianzanbruedtr 
enslr. t A-1Q20 Vienna. Tefc 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR B-rrO THE IL5JL 
This document expkens fufy what one 
must do to bring a car into the US. 
safely and fegaty. R indudei new & 
reed fenreroan wto prient buying tfos. 
□OI & cPA avnernan ackfrmei, cut 
tom dear once & shppmg proceckxes 
as wel re legal pouits. Berause of the 
strong rtoBar, you can sore up to 
USS fo^XU wmn buying a Mercedes, or 
BMW m Europe & sn p oil ii i g it to the 
States. To receive this mcmuol, send 
USS18J0 (add USS1 JO far padage) to 
P.L achmidt, Posifodijiar 
7000 Stirttgart 1, West Germany 


CAR SHVPMG 1 SERVICES 
A» spede fan d German ear fan w dei 
we are .your best connection far Euro- 


pean peLup. soa/cirfreigte,' us cus- 
toms, breicfing, Cameroon DOT / EPA 
m New Yorfo Houston, Las Angole*. 


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PAGE 13 ' 
FOR MORE 
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