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■‘- ie Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 

fra, Printed Simultaneously 
*' (Jfon Paris, London, Zurich, 

• Hong Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and Marseille 


tTHER DATA APPEAR OH PAGE 12 


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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

* 7 ZURICH, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 


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ESTABUSHED 1887 


ast Jews in Sudan 
j*e flown to Israel 
•a Airlift by U.S. 


-• i Bernard Gwcrtzman 

Hew York Tima Semct 

ASHINGTON — The United 
. s, in a secret operation, has 
jeted the evacuation of virtu- 
- all the Ethiqiian Jews who 
: left in Sudan after an Isradi- 
uiored airlift was halted, ac- 

• og to administration officials. 
: : e operation, completed Satur- 

• .was directed by the Central 
igence Agency and involved 

vtate Department and the U5. 
. "wee, the sources said. In a 
•• -day period, 800 people were 
: 1 by C-130 Hercules trans- 

to Israel, the officials said, 
cause of the amsitivity of the 
. r. ; . the U.S. government would 
'^fidaQy comment. There was 
■ .'■’to official word from IsraeL 
. . cording; to United Press lnter- 
nal. President Ronald Reagan 
; isked about the matter Satur- 


leaving the 800 who have now been 
evacuated by the United States. 

The UJ5. planes that picked up 
the Jews in Sudan were among 
those that were being used to deliv- 
er food to the refugee camps. 

The first day about 200 people 
were flown to Israel, the second day 
461, and by the time the operation 
was concluded, 160 to 200 were 
expected to leave, making a total of 
about 800. The planes reportedly 
used an airstrip near Gedaref, not 
far from a refugee camp. 

To meet Sudanese insistence that 
the refugees not go directly to Isra- 
el. they were given visas with Euro- 
pean destinations. Bui the planes 
apparently Dew directly to Rimon 
Air Force Base, in IsraeL 
The United States decided to un- 
dertake the airlift, sources said, be- 


nal President Ronald Reagan cause no other country acceptable 
: about the matter Satur- to S udan was willing to do so and 

‘-s he and bis wife, Nancy, were because of a desire to aid the Eitrio- 
’ ing children involved in the pian Jews and meet Israel’s request 
•al Olympics for the disabled, for help. The operation was fi- 
jld reporters: “No comment" nanced through CIA money and 
"ormation was gained from refugee funds, which also paid for 
: »1 officials aware of the airlift the food airlift to Sudan. 


. al Olympics for the disabled, 
.'jld reporters: “No comment’' 
■ './ formation was gained from 
'' al officials aware of the airlift 
-spoke on condition that there 
d be no attribution to them or 
r -- . agency. 

V "e operation was first disclosed 
' . / he Los Angeles Times, whose 
J -ter was In Sudan. Because of 
- ./ : uccount, people who might not 
-wise have spoken were wiping 
'■ bride additional information, 
ey said the plan had been 



Death Toll Rises 
As Blacks Gash 
In South Africa 


South African police guarded the roads Sunday in Uftenhage as blacks attended funerals of those killed in Thursday’s dash. 


U.S. Training Anti-Terror Units for Other Nations Zia Opens 

By Joe Pichiralio The counterterrorist assistance United States was providing such clothes and were ordered to stay AT ilHTTIPTlt 

and Edward Codv 1135 11150 indudcd 056 of UA per- sensitive aid or might fed publiriz- away from other U^. military per- * 

wnihmo,™ pan Cow sonne] to advise a foreign govern- mg it could tip off a potential ter- sonnel stationed in Honduras, j-w mr • 
waottk ™ w it c miK ment while an incident is in pro- rorist group. They travded to Honduras aboard nV yw fSTfllTI 

^ In HoX, b . .he 40 men of.a ^gnUr.-mn™*,! aircraft and.re- WOllIUlg 

inp^'inH-termmfii^ fnr foreign For example, during a recent U ^.-trained anri-uaronst squad, caved ldendficaucm papas saying rv q ■ 

SSS^asMtd^^S hostage incidau in Sudan, QA the Urban Operations Command, ihey were cirihan en^ncers. Oil SOV16t 


- .r-uewt, p^^bTnot By Joe Pichiralio The 

■ wise have spoken were wiping and Edwaxd Cody ^ 

' ' ‘ bride additional information. Washington post Service sonnel 

ey said the plan had been WASHINGTON — US. miK- 
> T> , . -_cd out when Vice President iary and CIA personnel are train- S 1 ”- 
. . /-ge Bush met with President ing antj-terronst units for foreign , * >or 
_ ,/ ar Nhneiri of the Sudan this governments as part of the Reagan llos ^ 
*'h. Mr. Nimeiri agreed, as long administration’s stepped-up policy m 


The counterterrorist assistance United States was providing such clothes and were ordered to stay 
has also included use of US. per- sensitive aid or ought feel publiriz- away from other US. nriHiaiy per- 
sonnel to advise a foreign govern- mg it could tip off a potential ter- sonnel stationed in Honduras, 
ment white an incident is in pro- rorist group. They traveled to Honduras aboard 


a recent 


rorist group. They traveled to Honduras aboard 

In Honduras, the 40 men of.a regular commercial aircraft andre- 
u By- mined anti- terrorist squad, coved identification papers saying 


:>'SSUtfSra3nb how.i^ms^cw the Urban Opoations Command; to were dvffian engine**. 

''h. Mr. Nimeiri agreed, as long Administration’s ^epp<^pofey and mflrtaiy pmormel advised l the have at times been portrayed as A govenunmt source sard the 

. « Jews were not evacuated by of combating terrorSmSund the Sudanese, and ndeDigencc picked members of ^regular mtonal sear- structure for the coimtertaromm 

li planes. world, Mcoriinc to US. eovexn- up by US. sateflites was turned nty force caBed the Cobras, mili- ^ tramrng program vaned On some 

" ■dan/whidr has serious eco- ment sources, over to than. The information tary sources said. occasions, the source said, it is a 

■■..^probtatotody®- Tht uupcblimcd program_is dc- SSSSSJS: 


Reuters 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Violence 
broke out again in South Africa 
over the weekend when crowds in 
black townships in the Eastern 
Cape region hacked and burned to 
death at least five persons after the 
police slaying of 19 mourners at a 
funeral march on Thursday. 

Five other blades were killed Sat- 
urday in separate dashes with po- 
lice, officials said. 

In townships near the southern 
automotive center of Uitenhage, 
the focus of the recent unrest, thou- 
sands of blacks massed in the 
streets. Witnesses said that police- 
men ringed the tense areas in ar- 
mored vehicles and that air force 

helicopters flew over the town- 
ships, where several buildings had 
been set ablaze. 

Nearly 250 people across South 
Africa have died in the past year in 
racial conflicts. 

A police spokesman said that on 
Saturday, the 18-year-old son of a 
black community councillor and 
two of his friends were hacked to 
death with spades, sticks, and 
stones in Uitenhage. The bodies 
were then doused with gasoline and 
burned. 

The young men had lied from a 
gasoline-bomb attack on a building 
owned by the councillor, TJ3. Kini- 
innj whose whereabouts were un- 
known. The crowd caught the flee- 
ing young men, the police 
spokesman said. 

Community councillors are of- 
ten viewed by activist blacks as 
surrogates for the white authorities. 


nneibuiR* 

ShjrpevUte 


SOUTH AFRICA 


\e utwt* * 111 " i A 1AV UUUUUUUZApM umgi ran i u ub • 1_ 1 ■ * , - j “ — I r o — — 

d nearly 400.000 refugees signed to increase the ability of powi the location of the abductors, know we have the capability," said 
the famine in Ethiopia, in- ^emments to thwart seizures of wliowerelmkM to secessionist re- a source. “And it might embarrass 


It tells people something if they joint CIA- military operation and in General Mohammed Zia uI-Haq and in recent unrest they have been 
>w we have the capability," said other instances the military does it has told the opening session of the frequent targets for attack . 


: the famine in Ethiopia, in- governments to thwart seizures of ^ were uiulcu u> ic- 

^ig 8^)00 Jews. r Soneges, aiiplane hpaddngs and ^ 111 ** 801,111 °f Sudan. . 

• Nimetn has rdted on U.S. other terrorist incidents with dite U.S. personnel also advised 

-- —ary and economic aid, even squads patterned after a U.S. nrib'- Thailand during an airplane hijack- The counterterrorist training in nam War, have been on the decline m raauoiis wnn me aoviei 

A much of the aid has been tary strike force. ing there. Honduras was carried out by U-S. ova the last decade largely because umon. n - . 

U up until Sudan carries out eco- The training has been conducted It is unclear when the United Anny Special Force posonnd m of reports that the programs were LS®* ,^ e SSnSa Sr 

c changes. in about a dozen countries, indud- States bt^an providmg comnerter- coEaboration with the Central In- not property s^emsed. For exam- S 

' .was announced Saturday that ing Lebanon and Honduras, the rorism training to foreign gramm- teffigence Agency. pie, tbePhoanx pr^ram m Virt- imortforS? Afehan 

Nuneiri is scheduled to come murcessaid. ments. Some sources said the Umt- The tramrng was conducted m nam received considerable enti- 


bds in the south of Sudan. the host country that we are train- 

U.S. personnel also advised ing them." 


Pnn 

.euzab#di Oam 


third man, also with gunshot 
wounds, was found early Sunday. 
The police suspect he was wounded 
in the same incident. 1 

Elsewhere in South .Africa, vio- 
lence was reported in Fori Beaufort 
in the Eastern Cape region, in 
townships near Port Elizabeth, 
dose to Uitenhage, and in town- 
ships around Johannesburg. The 
death toll in the area around Port 
Elizabeth and Uitenhage since 
Thursday stood at 29. 

In Soweto, the country's biggest 
township, near Johannesburg, the 
police said that two hand grenades 
were thrown at the home of the 
mayor, Edward KLunene, but that 
there were no injuries. 

Since last year, the confrontation 
between blacks and the authorities 
has been growing and has tran- 
scended its initial causes, which in- 
duded rent increases and dissatis- 
faction with black education, to 
become a broader challenge to the 
country’s policies of radal separa- 
tion. 

The latest violence began Thurs- 
day when the police in Langa town- 
ship near Uitenhage fired with pis- 
tols, shotguns, ana automatic rifles 


ing there. 


The counterterrorist trainii 
Honduras was carried out by 


alone. oew parhament that Pakistan is Black policemen, too, have come ship near Uitenhage fired with pis- 

' Joint mflitaiy-CIA operations, facm 8 increasing problems with to be regarded as the surrogates of tols, shotguns, and automatic rifles 
which flourished during the Viet- Afghanistan and the prospect of a white officials. Witnesses said the 00 *** crowd of 3,000 blacks in a 
nam War, have been on the decline “ relations with the Soviet homes of 18 black policemen near funeral march. The Uitenhage 


It is undear when the United Army Special Forces personnel in 


in about a dozen countries, indud- States began providmg eounterter- collaboration with the Central In- 


in nam War, have been on the decline decline in relations with the Soviet ho 
3. over the last decade largdy because Union. Ui 

in of reports that the programs were , f^? ncral 23a, the president and ^ 
[n- not properly supervised. For exam- chief martial law administrator of 

t .l fWL-. — 'T • ip.i coin vfttiimav that Polnctan vurniln *n 


-Nuneiri is scheduled to come sources said. 


ments. Some sources said the Unit- 


pie, the Phoenix program in Viet- 


u “P n - Uitenhage had been set ablaze 

General Zia, the president and ^ police fired into the crowd 

chief marhal law administrator, 0 f maamm at the funeral on 
said Saturday that Pakistan would Thursday. 


te United States. He is to see 


“It’s part of a worldwide pro- States h 
am,” said a U.S. govonmep t.offi- “security trail 
iL “It’s been verv suocessfuL” ' «rnmed.tsTor 


t • " 

W-«-- • - - 

/ • ysm 

W — ’ - • 


,, ’ll... s* • n « 


— - “ 

i m 1 

s.- 


Reagan at the White House on grarn,'’s^d aU.S.governraept.o£6- 

' M.' •' dkL ‘Tt’s bem veiy successfiiL" ' 

- was obviously convenient for Information on the program was 
.. ^tiri to win some points’* on the furnished by civilian officials and 
; ipian Jews, an cffirial said. mffitaiy sources in Washington and 


i Washington and 


•-;iitc Department offidals said Honduras who declined tobeiden- secret because individual countries with the prt^ram, the Green Berets manpower for anti-terrorist train- ^ ears - 


conaderable criti- not stop ns suppon ror ute AJgnan The police spokesman said two 
its that thousands of resistance even though Moscow other charred bodies were found on 
l Cong officials and was hinting that this support could the Uixenhage township’s streets on 
vere assassinated, -harm Soviet-Pakistam rdailotts. Saturday. Police- alio* sale ’ two 
Dwartment official Be also announced his chcnce of black youths who attacked a po- 
Army Special Forces Mohamme d Kh an Junqo as Pma- licanan in the black township of 
odea the bulk of the stan s P™ 00 m eight Kwazakele, near the city of Port 


-did not bdieve that Mr. Ni- 
__ ’s visit was conditional on his 
Caution in the airlift. They said 
d been scheduled to visit eaif- 
..,is month, but the date was 
rtk-oned because of Mr. Bush's 
o Sudan. 

Juen the vice president rc- 
-d last weekend, he urged Mr. 
un to approve the plans for 
vacua tion, the sources said. 
Reagan agreed early in the 
'they said. 

er 8,000 Jews had turned up 


might not want it known that the posed as civilians, wore casual fog. 


South Korea Holding 
Chinese Torpedo Boat 

J. 


Saturday’s joint session of the urday. 

Senate and National Assembly was [Authorities in Uitenhage said 
the first meeting of an elected par- Sunday that three more blades died 


Uitenhage had been set ablaze shooting cofodded with the 25th 
since the police fired into the crowd anniversary of the massacre in 
of mourners at the funeral on Sharpeville, when 69 blacks were 
Thursday. by the police. 

The police spokesman said two Initially, the police in Uitenhage 
other charred bodies were found on said that 17 blacks had been killed, 
the U iienhage township’s streets on Two more died later in a haspitaL 
Saturday. Police- alio* said- two The shootings have prompted in- 
black youths who attacked a po- leraanonal outrage and local un- 
liceman in the black township of rest, but President Pieter W, Botha 
Kwazakele, near the dty of Port told an American television inter- 
Ehzabeth, were shot and killed Sat- viewer Friday night that he would 


vacuauan, tne sources sma. g Clyde Haberman other officials, the torpedo boat’s 

™ Tima Service • engines failed during the ntfnL 
S Jews had turned up TOKYO -South Korea is hold- and the vessel drifted foto South 

Suae 8 t0I P ed ° ^ *at Korean waters, whereit fired flares 

^S^ex^mfroS dr&ted infoitewatenwifo six dead fo^t was m distress. ^ 
nia icrap! wnrkwl ouietlv crew members, k21eo m what some The Chinese government became 

Stoln cS Si re P orts described » e mjrdny after aware thal ooe of its boars was 
_ rans Bmrpean Airways, to 


•\ -T-'p /l. v. 

' 

• 4 - 


• u -- 

r • 


' at* 7 nm nffhrm in Jcrad The South Korean govcnrmmt South Korea. China alerted the 

ae are beUeved to be 10.000 turn of the naval vessd and its crew Kong, diplomats said, 
am fo Ethiopia or among the '* a8 ®? on 85 PS 5 ® ^ *. Through U.S. diplomats. South 

refugeoaXy who continue Korea sSt a “ston protesT to 

ke tS^way mto Sudan. porredly held talks OTtheremn of Begfog over the entry ofthree other 
r en reports about the airtift t | ie boat and crewthrou^i ofnaais Chinese military ships foto South 
to annisr in earlv Jannarv. t n a m tt ux m Hong Kong. Korean waters. The three ships ap- 


to appear in eariy January, 
i canceled the operation. 


A South Korean 


Through U.S. diplomats. South 
re ^ Korea sent a “stern protest" to 
, ® Bering ova the entry of three other 

otnaais Chin e se mili tary ships foto South 
Korean waters. The three ships ap- 
ro&t parentiy followed the torpedo boat, 


4 UUJLVlvU Ulw t/Ubi UUVUa , , j . - ■ . ^ mm J -- — ---- - J 

-11,000 Jews were left behind, sighted tbe torpedo boat Fnaay and one was said to be a destrqya. 
nistration officials said Satur- A government statement issued 

at about 200 of them man- £ SS. ErSSrf Saturday afternoon fo Seoul said 

.p leave Sudan on their own, survhSlnd the three ships had returned to ;fo- 






*■ 




INSIDE 

* . 

. , rued bamfits are robbing 
,;<i - sometimes killin g Cambo- 
refugees fo camps along 
:*■ Thai border. Page! 

k retmn of school segrega- 
is threatening racial 
re U5. South. Page 3. 

Ornish strikers halted flights 
^ferries, and the disruption 
jwted to spread. Page 4. 

~*^iaAe Montana and bis file- 
^fskiwear stand oui fo Paris 
collections. Page 5. 

Ftiicia Roberts Harris, the 
I [black woman to serve in 
IfS. cabinet, is dead of ean- 
1-160. PageS. 

IjlNESS/FINANCE 

mi American readied a ten- 
lip agreement with its strik- 
I roimd workers. Page 7. 


the bodies of slain crewmen were 
twlcan to the mainlan d. 


ternational waters afta wa 
and a “show of force" by the 


Korea* 1 Navy and Air Force. The 
Two crew members reportedly nan^ of ^ “show force " ^ 

Sh ° t a not dear, but diplomats said no 

were m a hospital in Kansan, on . , ^ rL 
the YdknrSaB. Ten or 11 other shoU bad been Grrf. 
crewmen were also believed to have China lata acknowled ged mat ^ 
been taken to Kunsan, but thdr its vessels had entered South Kore- 
whereabouts could not be deter- an waters. But it said the ships had . . . .. 

mined. Their boat apparently was done so “inadvertently’’ while 
offshore. searching for the stricken boat and :'%■ v 


fsbore. searching for the stricken boat and 

It was not dear whether any of had turned aramd ona ftcy real- 
e lailtvs sought political asylum led tta enor Bqjmg did not ra- 

SouthKarSToTtSued lobe ^ 
hnnv. demand for an apology. 



liament fo Pakistan since General fo dashes Saturday night with the 
Zia overthrew Prime Minister Zul- police in the nearby black township 


preserve order fo the townships. 

[Mr. Botha said: "We are going 
to keep order fo South .Africa. And 
nobody fo the world is going to 


fo clashes Saturday night with the nobody in the world is going to 
police fo the nearby blade township stop me from keeping order,” Reu- 
fikar AE Bhutto in 1977. The presi- of Kwanobuhk, United Press In- ters reported from New York.] 
dent said martial law would be lift- ternational reported. [He called the funeral march 

ed soon but gave no dale. [A police sp okesman said a riot Communist-inspired. "In South 

“We will face more difficulties," police unit opened fire late Satur- Africa there is a special situation," 
General 25a said about Afghani- jay w h£n j t ^ attacked with fire- be said. “You have a fight between 
stan, where he said Moscow has bombs and rocks. A man and a the superpowers in the world, the 
deployed 150,000 troops to fight woman died lata fo a hospital from United States and the Soviet 
the Moslem rebels. Western diplo- gunshot wounds. The body of a (Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


the Moslem rebels. Western diplo- 
mats say the Soviet Army there 
numbers about 115,000. 

General Zia met Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, the new Sonet leader, in 
Moscow after the funeral of Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko, and General 
23a confirmed Saturday reports 
that Mr. Gorbachev had warned 
him that ties could worsen. 

Pakistan was committed to a 
peaceful solution fo Afghanistan 

talks. General Zia said, addtiig that 
he hoped tbe Soviet Union would 
adopt a conciliatory attitude. 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


House Support for MX 
b Slipping, Backers Say 


By Steven V. Roberts 

New York Tima Service 


the missile said: "There are some 
very ominous signs that give me 


WASHINGTON — As the concern. I think lfs going to lose." 
House prepares to vote Tuesday on He said those signs are growing 


adopt a conciliatory attitude. President Ronald Reagan’s request opposition to the cost of the weap- 
Mr. Junejo, who was railways for 21 new MX missiles, both sides oo. 31 3 time of budget austerity; the 
rpinister fo two previous govern- say the administration’s once-com- united efforts of the House Demo- 
men is, was expected to win the vote fortable margin is slipping. cratic leadership to defeat the 

of confidence in the National As- Opponents of the nugeintocon- weapon; and a backlash among 
sesnbiy that must take place within tmental weapon concede that the Democrats against Republican 
60 days. odds still favor approval, but for plans to spend heavily in an at- 

General Zia said the present the first time supporters of the MX tempt to defeat vulnerable Demo- 

transition from military to civilian are worrying openly that it could be cratic represent lives. Opponents 

rule was the first peaceful atiH or- defen fed. also argue that the heavy, 10-war- 

derly one fo Pakistan, which fo its Representative Les A spin of bead missile is vulnerable to an 
38-year history has had two previ- Wisconsin, a leading Democratic eo ^ n y surprise attack. . 

ous military riders. pro * " ^ " 

Indirectly referring to outlawed the 
opposition parties, he said: “Some Ii 


proponent of the missile, assessed 
the fight as "very, very close." 


Opponents of the missile say 
they can count on a minimum of 


In an interview with The Assocd- 190 Democrats and 19 Republi- 


1*^“ * 


» '* 4 : ' 1 

f **'* „.«»r • 

***** 

: ArA- .... *■ 


lot Murdoch and Marvin 
'may be Hollywood's 
t "Odd Couple.” Page 7. 


ire Girarddli won the 
i World Cup slalom title 
Erika Hess the women’s 
^ Page 13. 

| TOMORROW 

BiL ambassador to China 
internal' arguments and 
H in leadership will not 
phe main lines of China's 
(nizaiion program. 


the sailors sought political asylum 
fo South Korea or wanted to be 
sent home. 

South Korean officials seemed to 
deal cautiously with tbe episode, 
which threatened to undercut re- 
cent attempts by the two countries 
to pursue friendly contacts even 
though they have no diplomatic re- 
lations. 

A statement issued Saturday 
night in Seoul by the minister of 

culture and information, Lee Won 

Hong, did not mention a mutiny or 

any de aths . 

*Ti was determined, based on 
facts so far obtained, that casual- 
ties aboard the Chinese torpedo 
boat were due to a ample scuffle 
among the crewmen and that no 
political reason was involved,” Mr. 
Lee said. 

Officials interviewed by tde- 

a e from Seoul declined to give 
is. But several foreign diplo- 
mats in South Korea described the 
incident as a mutiny that seemed to 
have begun Friday when some Chi- 
nese crew members tried to defect 
to Taiwan. 

No details were available about 
who shot whom or what happened 
after the gunfire ended. 
i But according to Mr. Lee and 


A Chinese torpedo boat that strayed into Sooth Korean 
waters being towed by a Sooth Korean vessd into Konsan. 


Illicit Labs in California Concoct Deadly r Designer Drugs’ 


By Sandra Blakeslec 

New York Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — One or more chem- 
ists working al illicit laboratories in Cali- 
fornia are turning out synthetic versions of 
.heroin and cocame that addicts say are 
inriictingnirchah le from the naturally de- 
rived drugs. 

Although not easy to fabricate, the syn- 
thetic narcotics are legal to possess and 
manufacture. Illegal drugs are defined by 
exact chemical formulas, and the new syn- 
thetics have slightly different formulas. 

Further, the synthetic drugs are stronger 
and potentially more lethal than the nar- 
cotics made from natural sources. 

In the last four years, there have been 90 
confirmed deaths from synthetic heroin, 87 
of them in California, according to Chatm- 
cey Veatch, director of ihe Canfomia De- 
partment of Alcohol and Drug Programs. 
But statistics are limited, he said, describ- 
ing those deaths as "just die tip of the 


Blakcslcc addictive as natural heroin, is so potent, 

hna Service according to drag authorities fo California, 

- One or more chem- ‘bat one chemist working an right-hour 
laboratories fo CaK- day could supply the nation s drift berom 
synthetic vosions of demand. An investment of SL5® could 
hat addicts say are mflhons of dollars m profit, they say. 
n the naturally de- According to Dr. Robot J. Roberto a. 

chief of Cahfomia’s Division of Drugs, 20 
to fabricate, the syn- percent of the heroin used fo the state is 
e@d to possess and synthetic. Users of synthetic cocaine are 
irugs are de fi ned by just beginning to appear for treatment fo 
as, and the new syn- rtfo;™ 

These narcotics are the newest manifefr- 
teStonSeMf ladmofatr^toMidimisMpWaiW 
rnral sources. pro*«n<«of syndic <toBS. Dr. Rober- 
s there iavebem 90 un said. The cbeuustty has been known 
zZEkSR". “ d ■ straightforward. 

according to Chaim- The pain-kQling morphine molecule, for 

f the CaMomfo De- example^can be shaped foto thousands of 
tnd Drug Programs, configurations by tacking on or snipping 
ed, he said, describ- off groups of atoms. Ihe result is stiff 
•just the tip of the basically morphine, but thepoiency, length 
of action, euphoric effects and unucity can 
in. which is just as be different.’ 


Chemists 


enl versions of successful drugs made by drugs, and some people say they seem more 
thdr own firms or competitors. University potent, he said. Other addicts believe the 


research scientists also synthesize mole- syndetic drugs are less adulterated, and 
cules and publish detailedsteps fo sdentif- therefore less dangerous, 
ic literature. Tbe Federal Drug Enforcement Admin- 

Bnt when legitimate drug chemists ere- is nation is trying to catch those who are 
s new compounds, they painstakingly producing the synthetic drugs. A comp re- 
ft them on animals, sometimes for years, hen rive crime bilJ enacted in October al- 
Syntbetic versions of many easy-to- lows tbe government, on an emergency 
dee street drugs, srrih as amphetamines baas, to outlaw a particular ifikai drug 
d Hnllnrinruyns have b ee n available variant fo 30 days. It used to take more 
tee tbe 1970s, Dr. Roberton said. But than a year. 

me.dwmists have begun fabricating new Experts can only guess at how many of 
rcotics. these chemists are operating. Some au* 

The increasing use of cocaine by Amen- thorities, like Dr. Roberton, say that the 


thetic drugs are less adulterated, and 


The synthetic heroin, which is just as 


of our brothers are not here, but we ated Press on Saturday, Thomas P. can s, or 209 votes. Mr. O'Neill told 
have malice towards none." O'Neill Jr„ a Massachusetts Demo- The AP that a recent count by the 

The opposition Movement for crar who is speaker of the House, House leadership found 196 De ra- 
the Restoration of Democracy boy- said opponents of the MX had ocratic votes solidly against the 
called the elections Feb. 25, railing gained ground fo recent days with missile. Because the House has two 
them a fraud to perpetuate mili tary “ones who were wavering." vacancies, 217 represents a major- 

rule. A senior Democrat who backs ity if all members vote. 

Only 15 to 20 members still pro- 

fess genuine indecision, and they 

have been subject to ferocious lob- 

idly 'Designer Drugs’ JSSSsparft 

pkiyed by pharmaamtical . pubfiflffafiTTob^ Otmm^ 

&"^" forihe 

uccessful drugs made by drugs, and some p«x>le say they seem more ^ of ^ « ul ov\e the ad- 

t competitors. Universty Other addicts believe the ministration Friday foriu sum- 

te a!» synthesw mote- drugs are less adulterated, and moned home Max M. Kampeiman. 

detailecLstqxs m saentif- therefore less dangerous. foe chief negotiator atfoeGeneva 

Tbe Federal Drug Enforcement Admin- arms talks, to lobby congressmen 

imate drug chemists ere istration is trying to catch those who are before the vote. Mr. Kampriman. a 

mds, they pa inst a k i n gly producing the synthetic drugs. A comp re- Democrat, had already bam colling 

sals, sometimes for years, benave crime bill enacted in October al- lawmakers by telephone from Eu- 

ions of many easy-to- lows tbe government, on an emergency rope and was credited with swaying 

s, such as amphetamines baas, to outlaw a particular fflkat drug some important votes last week 

is, have fom available variant fo 30 days. It used to take mare when tbe Senate twice voted to 

Dr. Roberton said. But than a year. back the missile, 

vc begun fabricating new Experts can only guess at how many or ^ ^ Kampeiman is to return to 
these chemists are operating. Some au* Geneva^ ’Riesdjw. and his tn pis 

use of cocame by Amen- thorites, like Dr. Roberton, say that the SeSSSetfU Sras'Sto 

led to an increased use of synthetic drugs are the product of one SaPm 

umeracts the irritability mastermind. Others beheve there might be ;L '~j*£? kesmai1 o d he Ar on 
ironic cocaine use. dm or four laboratories making the new ^mpromu* reached 

yee that the problem is ^ last year. S1.5 billion allocated for 

o California but that the Organized crime does not seem to be the purchase of 21 additional mis- 
sprttd is real. involved. Dr. Roberton said. (Confirmed on Pace 2. CoL 7) 


ate new compounds, they painstakingly 
test them on anfoiak, snrnrtimgs for years. 


since tbe 1970s, Dr. Roberton srid. But 
somc cbemist5 have begun fabricating new 
narcotics. 

The increasing use of cocame by Ameri- 


cans, be said, has led to an increased use of synthetic drugs are the product of one 
heroin, which counteracts the irritability mastermind. Others believe there might be 
resulting from chronic cocaine use. three or four laboratories making the new 

The experts agree that the problem is 

largdy confined to California but that the _ Organized crime does not seem to be 
potential for its spread is reaL involved. Dr. Roberton said 










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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 


Raids by Bandits Bring Terror 
To Refugee Camps in Thailand 


By Barbara Crossene 

New York Times Service 

ARANYAERATHET. Tballand 
— Well-armed and organized ban- 
dit gangs from the Cambodian war 
zone are breaking into a lightly 
guarded Cambodian refugee settle- 
ment at night to rob and sometimes 
loll its unarmed inhabitants, ac- 
cording to refugees and interna- 
tional aid officials. - 

In the border area, travelers are 
periodically attacked and refugee 
settlements, including the camp of 
Khao I Dang north of Aranya- 
prathet, have been raided. 

Bat what concerns refugees as 
well as Thai and inter national aid 
workers who administer Khao I 
Dang is the increasing frequency, 
size and violence of the attacks. 

. On March 10, Khao I Dang, a 
thatch and bamboo settlement of 
more than 30,000 people, was at- 
tacked for the fifth time since mid- 
January. This time, residents said 
recently, they were the prey of a 
large Cambodian gang thin, entered 
the camp at about 7:30 P.M. and 
went on a rampage of robbery and 
tenor until 1 A.M. 

For the first time, residents said, 
people who could not meet extor- 
tion demands were lolled- Two 
women and two children, one right 
months old and the other four 
years old, were idiot to death, rela- 



that provides camp security, 
French ai ' 


Kennedy Urges Reward 
For Mengele’s Arrest 


Los Angeles Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Senator Ed- 
ward M. Kennedy, Democrat of 
Massachusetts, has proposed es- 
tablishing a Si-million federal re- 
ward for information leading to the 
arrest of Josef Mengde, the Nazi 

war c riminal believed to be hiding 

in South America. 

In a letter to the Senate and 
House Appropriations Commit- 
tees, Mr. Kennedy and Representa- 
tive Robert J. Mxazek, Democrat of 
New York, who supports the pro- 
posal, said such a reward was ‘'per- 
haps an indispensable element for 
the success of the effort to appre- 
hend Mengde.” 


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fives said, and then were blown 
apart by whai was believed to be a 


“Cambodians are aywi killing 
Cambodians,” said Sou Gaing, the 
neighborhood section leader. 

Refugee leaders and internation- 
al aid workers have relayed their 
fears to foreign embassies that sup- 
port relief work. They have also 
expressed concern to the Bangkok 
office of the United Nations High 
Commissioner for Refugees, which 
is responsible for r unning the 
camp, and to local officers of the 
Thai military-civilian border pairol 


A French aid organization. Doc- 
tors Without Borders, withdrew its 
night staff for a short period. 

Every evening frightened resi- 
dents of the camp, particularly 
those with homes at the edge of the 
settlement, sleep huddled together 
on the ground in the open area 
around the compound's offices, 
hospital and warehouse. 

This place of refuge has become 
a place of terror," a volunteer 
worker said. 

They came down from the 
mountain, more than a hundred of 
them.” said Nan Pkh, 28. describ- 
ing the March 10 attack. “First we 
heard the shooting, then they were 
here, everywhere m our houses.” 

He was squatting by a foxhole as 
he told of the raid, in which his 
mother, Sok Hoeun, and his aster, 
Pich Kola, died. 

He said ins mother and her 
neighbor, Sroy Chhom, had run to 
hide in the foxhole and woe shot 
by bandits “because the women did 


not have 600 baht” (about S21 Jl 
R esidents of the camp say the stan- 
dard bandit “fee” per family is 300 
baht 

Sroy Khoeung, Mrs. Sroy 
Ghhom's husband, said the bandits 
had come to his home three times 
before killing his wife, who had 
nothing left to give them. He said 
he had no money to give the ban- 
dits and fled on the advice of i 
bors, who assumed the im 
would not hurt women. 

His head shaved- in mourning, 
Mr. Sroy sat on his bamboo bed 
over the foxhole. He said the 
camp's security force had ordered 
him to dig the pil in February, 
when he moved from another part 
of the camp to a thatch and bam- 
boo but 

Khao I Dang’s houses offer no 
protection from cross fire between 
bandits and troops. 

The residents of the camp, some 
of whom have been here for four or 
five years and many of whom have 
repeatedly been rejected for reset- 
tlement by Western countries, are 
classified as political refugees who 
will not or cannot return to Cam- 
bodia. 

Their status differs from that of 
the quarter of a min i nn Cambodi- 
ans who woe pushed into Thailand 
by recent Vietnamese attacks on 
rebel bases inside Cambodia. These 
people are expected to return to 
Cambodian territory. 

Khao I Dang is not heavily forti- 
fied. The single, shoulder-high 
barbed-wire fence can be easily 
penetrated, as it is regularly by 
smugglers who supply the camp’s 
black market. 

Residents say that poorly paid 
Thai guards occasionally accept 
money to let the smugglers and 
would-be refugees enter. But resi- 
dents interviewed about the grow- 
ing bandit menace said they did not 
believe the thugs were gaming ac- 
cess the same way. 

Colonel Pradab Sangkaew, the 
Thai camp commander, said that 
the bandits “need only wire cutters 
to get in,” and that the area needed 
stronger defenses against intruders. 

The colonel said the pattern of 
armed robberies indicated that the 
bandits knew when a group of refu- 
gees was about to be moved to a 
resettlement processing center. 


The bandits strike men, appar- 
ently believing that the refugees 
may have some extra money on 
hand for the move. 


Castro Said to Be Vexed by Moscow 


By Dusko Doder 

Washington Post Same 

MOSCOW —A serious strain 
reportedly has developed in So- 
vict-Cuban relations wet what 
President Fidel Castro is said to 
view as Moscow's weak and in- 
decisive response to Reagan ad- 
ministration pressures on Nica- 
ragua. 

Eastern European sources said 
the Cuban leader felt frustrated 
and annoyed by the conciliatory 
approach of Konstantin U. 
Chernenko, the late Soviet pres- 
cient. to the United States. 

Moscow has barely reacted to 
public pronouncements aimed at 
the leftist gov ernm ent in Mana- 
gua, including a comment by 
President Ronald Reagan last 
month that said, in effect, that he 
was seeking to remove the San- 
dinists from office. 

Mr. Castro did not attend Mr. 
Chernenko’s funeral this month, 
presumably to register his dis- 
pleasure with Soviet policy to- 
ward Nicaragua. Mr. Castro also 
did not sign the book of condo- 
lences at me Soviet Embassy in 
Havana. 

The Cuban 1«nfer had attend- 
ed the funerals of Mr. Chernen- 
ko's two predecessors, Yuri V. 
Andropov and Leonid L Brezh- 
nev. Mr. Castro's brother, Raul, 
the vice president and defense 
minister, represented Cuba at 
Mr. Chernenko's funeral. 

Fidel Castro later told a U.S. 
television network that he was 
not unhappy with Moscow and 
that his decision not to attend 
the funeral was not a signal. 

The Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, met last Wednesday 
with Raul Castro for talks. An 
official communique that taiw 
took place in the spirit of “frater- 
nal friendship, cordiality and full 
mutual understanding." 

Sources in Moscow said that 
Fidel Castro became annoyed 
with Mr. Chernenko last March, 
when the Soviet leader refused to 
allow a Soviet naval flotilla to 
approach Nicaraguan waters. 
The flotilla was on its way to 
Nicaragua when a Soviet tanker 
was damaged by a mine at the 
entrance to Nicaragua's Pacific 
harbor of Puerto Sandino. 

According to the sources, Mr. 
Castro was turned down when he 
urged Moscow to have the flotil- 
la proceed to Nicaragua to signal 
Soviet military backing for the 
Sandinist government. 



UMd tan tanrnoMral 

President Fidel Castro, daring talks in 1974 in Havana 
with Leonid I. Brezhnev, then the Soviet Union’s leader. 


In another incident, US. tele- 
vision networks quoted Wash- 


ington sources last fall as repon- 

' - - 


rag that Soviet MiG-21 jet 
fighters were en route to Nicara- 
gua. Bat Moscow seat no such 
jets, limiting its aid to several 
tank* and helicopter g ppyhipq , 

The Russians have been ex- 
tremely reluctant to project their 
power so far away from their 
termory. Instead, they apparent- 
ly have decided to try to relieve 
the U.S. pressure on Managua by 
signaling to the Reagan adminis- 
tration that they can inflict dam- 
age on US. interests closer to 
Soviet borders. 

Reports in well-inf ormed So- 
viet circles have suggested that 
the new Soviet leadership is con- 
sidering unspecified actions 
against Pakistan, an American 
ally, in case of a direct UJS. mili- 
tary move against the SandinisisL- 

This view was reinforced by a 
report of a meeting between Mr. 
Gorbachev and President Mo- 
hammed 23a ul-Haq of Pakistan. 
According to Tass, the official 
news agency, Mr. Gorbachev 
sharply criticized Pakistan for 
supporting “aggressive actions” 
mounted on its territory against 
Afghanistan, a Soviet ally,, and 
warned General Zia that his po- 
licy “cannot but affect in the 
most negative way Soviet-Paki- 
stani relations.” 

There is little doubt that Mos- 
cow would become militarily en- 
gaged if there was a threat to 
Cuba, which is the most impor- 
tant physical and political 


bridgehead for Soviet influence 
in Latin America. 

But in general terms, Moscow 
recognizes that the United States 
is the do minan t power in Latin 


America, just as Washington rec- 
Soviei 


ogmzes Soviet dominance over 
Eastern Europe. 

The Russians also realize that 
any weakening of U.S. political 
and economic influence in the 
region would become an impor- 
tant factor in the global competi- 
tion between the superpowers. 
Anti-Americanism in Latin 
America thus is as important for 
Moscow as anti-Soviet sentiment 
in Eastern Europe is for Wash- 
ington. 

The dispute has surfaced in 
Moscow in an oblique way. The 
latest issue of Kommunist the 
most authoritative theoretical 
journal of the Soviet Communist 
Party, contains an unusually 
warm and laudatory article 
about Ernesto (Che) Guevara. 
The Argentine revolutionary was 
one of Mr. Castro’s top asso- 
ciates and was lolled while trying 
to organize a leftist revolution in 
Bolivia. 

But the Kommunist article de- 
scribed Guevara as a “revolu- 


tionary romantic” and implicit 
‘ "r. Castro 


in it was a message to Mr. 
that ideological consistency and 
revolutionary fervor often are in 
conflict with a state's national 
interests. 

The article was approved for 
publication last month and thus 
presumably reflected the think- 
ing of the Chernenko govern- 
ment 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Israel Agrees to Allow U.S. Broadcast' 

JERUSALEM (API — The Israeli government has at 
Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty to broadcast to t._ 
from a transmitter in Israel. U.S. and Israeli officials said here Sum 
T he officials asked not to be identified. 

The station would use a transmitter planned for the Voice of Amen 
a separate U.S. government radio station, the officials said, and In' - 
Radio would also use the facility to increase its Russan-ianta 
broadcasts for Soviet Jews. 

The Voice of America is an arm of the State Department's {. ■ 


Information 
its commentaries 


Its news i 


tries reflect the official U.S. views. Radio free Eurax-j^ 
Liberty is run by the Board of International Broadcasting, whose xn 
bers are named by the president. 


Sakharov Seeks Treatment for 'Wife 


LONDON (UPI) — Andrei D. Sakharov, the Soviet physicist i 
dissident, has threatened to resign from the Soviet Academy of Sri® 
unless his wife. Yelena G. Bonner, is allowed to travel abroad 
treatment of a heart condition, according to a monitoring group. 

Kcston College, an institution that watches dissident and ndto 
affairs in the Soviet Union and other East bloc countries, aid 
information came from a source in the Soviet Union. 

It said that Mr. Sakharov, a Nobel laureate, made the resign* t 
threat in a letter to the academy from his exile in Gorki, where he was s 
in 1980 after his criticism of Soviet human-rights polities. The acadt 
board is to meet later this month to consider the letter, Kcston Coil 
said. 



50% of Rapes Unreported, U.S. Find 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — About half of the rape victims in. 
United Slates do not report the crime because they view rape i 
“personal matter” or thought “nothing could be done” under the l 
system, according to a Justice Department report released 


the 


Sunday. . _ 

itookjAw^---’'^ 


Bureau of Justice Statistics reported. About half of all victims refuse* 
to the report. 


come forward, according IV/ UJW IV|AMU I 

“Rape victims may also fear to come forward because they believe ^ 
even if their attacker is caught, convicted and sent to prison, the & 
time served is not worth the anguish the judicial process evokes,” said v 
assistant attorney general Lois Herrington. Rapists serve less than i . 
third of the average sentence of 9 to 10 years in prison, governs 
studies have shown. 



Moderates Lead Finnish Communis 


4m* 


HELSINKI (AP) — Moderates in Roland’s Communist Patty fc - 
completed their takeover of the organization or a special one-day t 
grass that was boycotted by the pro-Moscow minority wing. 

* At a meeting Saturday, 236 moderate delegates unanimously re-do 
Arvo Aalto as party chairman and voted in hiSprot4gt,EskoVaiukffij 
as party secretary. The hard-liners could have sent only 119 ddegate ' 
the meeting. 

Mr. Aalto told the congress that the minority had to work within ' 
party or leave it. He said that the party would maintain relations r 
other Communist parties “along traditional lines," adding that the Sc.. 
party had no intention of severing ties with the Finnish majority. 


, , c l '. 

: '.!Vt 
Ai .«* 
(T»0 L 


s 

,7SL 


Genseher Denies Conflict With Kolr 


Analysts See Iraqi Victory in Marshes as Indecisive 


BONN (Reuters) — Hans-Dietrich Genseher, the West German 
eign minister, denied Sunday speculation in the press speculation th. 
differed with Chancellor Helmut Kohl over President Ronald Rea) 
plan for a space-based missile defense system. - 

He said that he agreed with Mr. Kohl that Europeans had to deveM . \\ > ; , 


By Charles Mohr 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Although 


‘ “determine the scale of the war, but 
Iran can determine the length." 


Iraqi territory, the officials said. 


Iraq apparently won the largest 
J of its long war with Iran last 


No analyst professes to see how 
le war, which su 


battle 

week, neither army performed with 
great skill, according to US. ex- 
perts. They said that they did not 
see it as a victory that was likely to 
turn the war completely in Iraq's 
favor. 


An analyst of Middle East mili- 
tary affairs said one of the main 
lessons of the fighting was that 
both sides find it difficult to exploit 
success, to react rapidly to unions 
seen events and to coordinate air- 
power, artillery and ground forces. 
A U.S. official called it “the slow- 
motion war.” 


He said Iraq, which has more 
and better military equipment, can 


the war, which started in Septem- 
ber 1980, can be won in the usual 
sense of the word. 

In the latest round of ground 
combat, a large I ranian force, al- 
ready holding part of the marsh- 
land in southern Iraq, attacked 
westward on the night of March 1 1, 
reaching the Tipis River in a 10- 
mile (16-kilometer) advance, US. 
officials said. The Iranian plan 
seemed to be to take the highway 
that closely parallels the west hank 
of theriverand that connects Bagh- 
dad and the Iraqi city of Basra 
about 45 miles south rtf the battle- 
field. 

In heavy fighting March 17 and 
18, Iraqi forces drove the Iranians 
bade to the marshes, but not off 


casualties of their own. 

In the spring of 1982, roles were 
reversed. At that time, Iran drove 
Iraq from most areas of Iranian 
territory, enveloping and destroy- 
ing several large Iraqi units. But 
then, too, nothing decisive was 
achieved. 

Iraq not only has more planes 
{mil tanks than Iran, it has also 
lately been able to build up stocks 
of items such as spare parts and 
ammunition, the experts said. But 
one US official said that “both 
countries have to live from hand to 
mouth strategically, and it is hard 
to see than advancing very far into 
(he territory rtf the other.” 

Both rides get much of their 
equipment from the Soviet Union, 


and Soviet military advisers are 
serving on both sides. In Iran's 
case, much of the equipment comes 
from Soviet military clients such as 


common approach to the defense program and that success in rcdt 
nuclear weapons at the U.S.-Soviei arms talks in Geneva could rilll’i 1 iT<- 
deployment rtf space systems superfluous. 

Last week, Mr. Genseher said that technological developments 


not be allowed to undermine the West's tested policy rtf nuclear d-' ' ' 

ilofopp 


rence. Commentators took the statement as a signal < 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative. 


f opposition ttf 


North Korea, Syria and Libya, but 
ud the 


the experts said they doubted the 
transfers could take place without 
Soviet approval 

Between the infrequent major 
battles both rides have concentrat- 
ed on small engagements or air at- 
tacks on each other’s oil installa- 
tions or oil tankers in the northern 
Gulf. 

One dement erf successful war 
making seems to be absent: an- 
achievable objective. President 
Saddam Hussein of Iraq began the 
fighting in 1980 to gain control of 
the disputed. Shatt-al-Arab water- 
way leading into the Gulf. Instead, 
Iraq lost its ability to ship oil by 
sea. 


Assad Backs Gemayel Against Revo 


DAMASCUS (Combined Dispatches) — Presidents Hafez Asst 
Syria and Amin Gemayd of Lebanon agreed Saturday that a Chri 
militia revolt caused by Syrian-backed proposals for political chan- 



Lebanon should be resisted. A Syrian spokesman said that the two 
some Lebanese 3 


■ areas with the interna.' 


discussed “the revolt staged in some ] 
undermining national reconciliation." 

Mr. Assad was quoted as saying Syria “cannot ignore or overtook . 
move that wfll serve the interests of Israel and enemies of Lebanon 7 
Syria, or threaten the unity and land erf the Lebanese people."'. 
Gemayd said his government “is commit ted to the Arab option, rccc . 
iation and liberation of Lebanese occupied lands,” according it? 
spokesman. 

In Beirut, Christian and Moslem militiamen fired shells, mortars, 
grenades over the Green Line for nine hours near the Fuad Shehab bi. 
crossing pout, from fate Saturday into Sunday. Only one person'' 
reported wounded, but the dashes were Beirut’s most intense C.\ 
factional fighting killed more than 100 people June 11. (Roam, ; 



Soviet Minister Is Criticized, Retired 


By Serge Schmcmann 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — The Soviet 
Union's veteran minister of electric 
power was retired Saturday, one 
day after an editorial in Pravda 
accused his agency of poor perfor- 
mance. 

The official press agency, Tass, 
said the minister. Pyotr S. Nepor- 
ozhny, 74, was leaving office for 
health reasons. Bui the riming of 
the announcement and the absence 
of tributes usually extended to re- 
tiring officials indicated that he 
had been dismissed. 

It was the first replacement of a 
top nfltinnp i government official 
since the new Soviet leader, Mik- 


hail S. Gorbachev, took office 
March 11. 

In another personnel shift, at the 
regional level Pravda announced 
the replacement of the party leader 
of Kirov province, in northern Eu- 
ropean Russia. The regional leader, 
Ivan P. Bespalov, 69, had con- 
trolled the province since 1971. No 
reason for the shift was green. 

Mr. Neporozhny, a Ukrainian 
engineer, hod directed the 
power industry, a key sector 
of the economy, since 1962. 

He has been replaced by Analoh 
L Mayoress, 55, the minister of the 
electrical equipment industry, 
which manufactures power tur- 
bines and generators. 


The shuffle followed an editorial 
in Pravda accusing the ministry of 
failing to allocate enough power to 
agriculture: 


Death Toll 
Increases in 
South Africa 


For the Record 


\ 


The African and Mauritian Common Organization, which was ere 
25 years ago. disbanded Saturday at a summit meeting in Lon&Toj 



Mr. Bespalov was replaced by 
Vadim V. Bakarin, a Central Com- 
mittee staff official who previously 
served as a party secretary in Ke- 
merovo province of southern Sibe- 
ria. 


The removal of the electric pow- 
er minister came a month after the 
dismissal of the oil minister, Niko- 
lai A. Maltsev. That ministry had 
been criticized for a decline in ofl 
production that began in 1983 and 
that appears to have accelerated 
this year. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

Union. They are both trying to in- 
fluence Africa.”] 

■ Opposition Inquiry 

AlSster Sparks of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Johannes- 
burg; 

Six opposition members of Par- 
liament who conducted their own 
investigation into the shootings 
outride Uitenhage say that their 


findings directly contradict the of- 
or the ' 


exploded a grenade inside a bus in Aldan province 
central Philippines, killing five passengers and wounding lour 
the Philippine News Agency reported Sunday. The agency said 
nist rebels woe believed to have made the attack. ( 

CBS tdevisioa canceled a series of programs on Israd that it w-„ .. 
have broadcast during Easter Week, ana- the killing by an Israeli /«„. 
unit of two Lebanese journalists working for CBS on Thursday. " 
southern Lebanon. President Chaim Herzog of Israel protested^ 
cancellation. 0- ~ ' 

Tens of thousands of Spaniards marched Sunday to an air base use-?,"' * 
American forces at Torrqon, outride Madrid, to demand the withdt 
of U.S. troops and Spam’s pullout from the North Atlantic T? "’- 
Organization. (Rfl-'’ 1 

Britain's 
over Prime 



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BACHELOR S MASTERS dflpOCTORtff 
Send detailed resumA 
for attire evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UMVERSfTY 

14S00 v*«n> Bd Pun Endn CAU7M36 UM 


Soviet Diplomat Flees to U.S. 


The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — A Soviet diplo- 


in lw hjcjml — a soviet diplo- 
mat who disappeared in the Indian 
capital a week ago has been granted 
political asylum in the United 
States, a government spokesman 
said Sunday. 


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Igor Guera, a third secretary in 

sou^faBd^recdved as^um^after 
leaving India, according to an Ex- 
ternal Affairs Ministry spokesman 
who asked not to be identified by 

mmft 

The spokesman said that the So- 
viet ambassador to India, Yassfly 
N. Rykov, informed Romesh 
Bhandari, the Indian foreign secre- 
tary, of the defectum Saturday 

night. 

“The ambassador said the diplo- 
mat was either in the U.S. Embassy 
or had left the country," the 
spokesman said. “The American 
embassy chains d’affaires con- 
firmed the Soviet diplomat left the 
country and sought asylum at a 
point outside India. 

“He was granted asylum in the 
U.S. and he is safe,” the spokesman 
said, adding that he had no other 

jrliiik 

Nikolai M. Fedin, head of the 
Soviet Embassy’s information de- 
partment, when asked about the 
reported defection, said: “1 don't 
know, this is news to me.” 

A spokesman at the UiL Embas- 
sy in New Delhi refused to com- 
mit on the report In Washington, 
Brian Carlson, a State Department 
spokesman, said, “We never com- 
ment one way or another on asy- 
lum.” 


final version of the inririm\t 

The members of Parliament, ail 
aligned with the liberal Progressive 
Federal Party, said that sworn affi- 
davits by blacks who were in the 
crowd indicated that the police had 
opened fire without provocation or 
warning. 

The official police version is that 
the crowd of blacks, armed with 
sticks, stones and gasoline bombs, 
were marching on the white town 
of Uitenhage and that a contingent 
of police who tried u stop them 


opposition Labor Party has gained support and taken a .7 - 
Minister Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative govemmeo-' *7 : 
lowing last week’s budget speech, according to a MORI poll publish ' \ 
Tbe Sunday Times newspaper. : • 


MX Support Slips in House 


find only after being surrounded 
' attacked. 


and 


The legislators said that an ex- 
amination of bloodstains at the 
scene indicated that the crowd was 
about 20 yards (18 meters) away 
when the police opened fire. They 
said there were no signs that the 
marchers had surrounded an ar- 
mored truck that the police were in 
or that incendiary bombs had been 
used. 

“The conclusion must be 
reached that the action was puni- 
tive and not preventative," the leg- 
islators’ spokesman, Errol Moor- 
croft, said in a telephone interview 
Saturday from Uitenhage. 

The Parliament members also 
put some of the blame for the con- 
frontation that led to the shooting 
on administrative bungling. They 
said the funeral procession had 
been banned at Lite last moment, 
but no announcement of the ban 
had been made in the township 
where the crowd began the march. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
sties could be released only if each 
chamber voted twice to do so. If the 
missile survives the first House vote 
on Tuesday, a second is set for 
Thursday. 

With supporters like Mr. Kam- 
pelman to join the fray, toe admin- 
istration is still considered to hold 
toe advantage in the battle for the 
last few swing votes. As Mr. Rea- 
gan noted at his news conference 
Thursday night, “No request by an 
American president far a major 
strategic system deemed vital to toe 
national security has ever been de- 
nied by an American Congress," 

That historical propensity in 
Congress has been bolstered by the 
start of the arms talks in Geneva. 
In meetings with wavering con- 
gressmen in recent days, Mr. Rea- 
gan has woo some of them overby 
stressing the argument that the 


conventional or strategic, nas^ C 
be touched, period” in any I*. ,L~ 
compromise with Senate Rep:. . 
cans, although he left open the . . 
ability of some accomnxxlanc.. - 



‘Don’t believe the 

propaganda that Names 

spending for government lrria 

yond its means,” Mr. Reagan ' 1 ' 


In his weekly radio address. * ' ■ 
bipartisan eft 


fart to rebuild Ai;'' 

ca's defenses only began 


of 


— , while the Soviets » 

ahead with the greatest n uT ,. 
buildup in histoiy, adding < 
tries to thdr empire with tbe e# . _ _ 
a thief plucking apples off a L . 
Mr. Reagan, wbo on ■ 


. Reagan, 
agreed to start negotiations ;• . 
Senate Repahhc&ns on a bt . 
compromise, said, "I'm confi.^ 


country should show a united front 
to toe Soviet 


— .negotiators. 

Democratic leaders adroit that it 
is extremely difficult to withstand 
the influence of the president when 
he plunges into an issue of this sort. 


David Hoffman of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Washington; 

President Reagan said Saturday 
that “vital weapons systems, either 


compromise, sa ... 

that we’re commgcloscr to a r 
mg of the minds. 

He said that he and tbe sen . 
are in agreement tost • 

trolled spending poses a tbre.' . 
our expansion. ” But, he adac 
mart* ckar that in further ft 
tion in defense, vital weapons. 
terns, either conventional or si, • ■ . - 
gjc, must not be touched, 

Mr. Reagan did nW ^ 

military reductions, if ' 

would accept. - . 


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AMERICA N TOPICS 

tomcy in Miami, said the report 
could arouse an “exaggerated 


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Trying to Put a lid 

)d Boom town Woes 

Wyoming and Montana have 
cw laws aimed at nriri gating 
• je effects of mining and drill- 
ig booms and the acaxnpany- 
tg social and economic up- 
heavals. Companies planning 
- irge projects in sparsely popu- 
■ued areas are required to help 
ay for sewer and water sys- 
ans, extra fire and police pred- 
iction, roads and dinks, 
hp Exxon, which plans to begin 
"Ijuildmg a huge gas-treatment 
. lant in Wyoming this summer, 
'-'ill provide the first major test 
.■ ,'f bow well the law works. The 
. ompany has spent millions of 
- oflais to ease the influx of 
.‘ ,000 workers plus their fam- 
\ks, The New York Times re- 
. ‘ orts. People are joking that so 
■' •ir, however, Exjtod has not 
.fovided an artist-in-residence. 

■ Chilton Wtffiamson Jr„ (he 
'•’■fationai Review magazine’s 
ook editor who works from his 
□me in Kemmercr, Wyoming, 
i- 1 ? 5 tb* 1 eve® with the new law, 
r ‘tqlllfs going to be pretty hairy 
us summer." 

T ' : - • “There will be a lot of dnmk- 

• mess and fights in the bars,” 
l;-'e said, “but that’s just some- 
.^ung we go through periodical- 


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. .. bidding America 
/ i Permanent Adieu 

■ While 30 unDion foreigners 
-.ave come to the United States 
nee 1 900, folly 10 million peo- 
ie have left in the same period, 
inn* L ' ^ Population Reference Bu- 
“‘lllSftUau Ino, a private, nonprofit 
. .. ‘search group based in Wash- 
;igton, said the number of pto- 
^ ^ ■& leaving has dimbed from an 

. '■ Tl *>/erage of 66,000 a year in the 
. ’ '^rsthalf of the 196te to 100,000 

: - ~ 150^000 a year todw. Rougb- 
: - ■ half of those are U A ritizens. 
hose numbers do not include 
‘ ' ^ wrists, students and others 
-• . . - aiming to return. 

. ^The rqxMl did not say why 
~ ore Aniricans were emigrat- 
g. It noted thaL the federal 
we mmenr stopped recordin 


. rvemment stopped recording 

f!ttMTirr I It'll ; f .„ ( , jnn^i 0° mugnmts in 1957. 

1 * “*U *nnciDal destinations are Mex- 


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Tmapal destinations are Mex- 
o. West Germany, Canada, 
V.iitam and Japan, in <b«r or- 


rtlw lift 


" ;LS. Wants to Muzzle 
lob Mouthpieces 

' ...“Mob lawyers." the gang- 
:ai “mouthpieces" who peo- 
. led so many 1930s crime mov- 

s, are still around, and now 
ey are on a tentative “hit list” 
President Ronald Reagan's 

- . .ports. 

.. i .. A staff study said a rektivdy 
• _ tall number of “renegade at- 
,-v.nteys" launder money, or- 
jestrate perjured testimony, 
ibe court officials, betray 
.. (vemment informers and even 
. ; _an crimes with their mobster 
jents. The study calls for 
qjped-up use of electronic 
rveiHance and undercover in- 
nsants. 

- The study says that “the 
eswhelnnng mqority of de-. 
' .use counsel, induding those 
jo represent notorious clients, 
nduct themselves in an ethi- 
I manner.” But Albert J. 
rieger, a criminal defense at- 


arouse an 
response.” 


Notes About People 

Former U.S. Representative 
John W. Jeanette Jr„ 38, Dem- 
ocrat. of South Carolina, sen- 
tenced to two years in prison 
and fined $20,000 on bribery 
charges arising from the FBrs 
Abscam investigation, is sdB 
free on appeal His ex-wife Rha 
Jemette, 35, who posed partial- 
ly nude for Playboy and starred 
in a film called “Zombie Island 

Massacre,” is working as an ac- 
tress in New York, spending her 
spare tim* winking on commit- 
tees at Dr. Norman Vincent 
Peale’s Marble Collegiate 
Church and helping out at a 
shelter for the homeless. 

Jane Wyman, who was di- 
vorced from Ronald Reagan in 
1948, gets a bigger paycheck 



Jane Wyman 

than he does. The president's 
salary is $200,000 a year. His 
former wife gets $1.6 million a 
year for her role in television's 
“Falcon Crest,” in which she 
plays the matriarch of a power- 
ful wine-growing family in 
northern California. 


Short Takes 

For some paresis of students 
at a Chicago high school, the 
morning “alarm dock" is a 6 
AM. robot-dialed phone call: 
“Good morning. This is Dr. 
Walter PQditch, principal of 
Morgan Park High School, with 
a recorded wake-up caJL Your 
child has been continually la te 
in coining to school. I will con- 

tjnne to malrft this oqll until the 

problem is solved. Thank you 
for your cooperation." The ear- 
ly icvaBe for 10-o’dock schol- 
ars has been going out since 
September and is credited with 
ting tardiness among the 
schools 2^50 students by more 
than 50 percent. 

PfqrBs Weldon, a Florida 
noise, dubbed her 1980 Pontiac 
Sunbird a “voodoo beast" after 
it had been in 14 wrecks, one 
just after die bought it. She says 
she was not responsible for any 
of the accidents, and stale re- 
cords indicate that she is right 
She turned the car ova- to a 
Fort Lauderdale bar and pa- 
trons can pound the “beast” to 
pieces with a sledgehammer for 
$2 a whack. The proceeds will 
go to a children’s shelter. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


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Nicaragua Says Brazil, 
'cuador Offer Fuel Aid 


4 


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A»V. A-J - 




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By Stephen Kinzer 

Mew York Times Service 
VNAGUA — Brazil and Ec- 
'* . r have offered to hdpNicara- 
resolve its acute shortage of 
ad, according to President 
d Onega Saavedra. 

- . . Onega, who called the short- 
: a truly critical situation, said 
day that be had encountered 
.. I solidarity” for the Sandixiist 
during tus nhuMlay visit to 
'* .L He met there with public 
a and with beads of state 
.red for the installation of Bra- 
->■' rvihan govcxomeiiL 

. said Saturdmr morning on 1 
• tri from Brazil that as a result 
1 1 > Ik |]( l 1 talks there, Brazil and Ecua- 
!»r ion would be expanding their 

* wcial ties with Nicaragua. 

oil has given Nicaragua more 
- ■ 550 mQhOQ in credit the 
. ' nist-Jed revolution in 1979. 

. i of it has beat used to buy 
• ban-made buses. 

■ ‘ t Nicaragua now is mostinta- 
ut Brad's advanced gasohol 
tty. Gasohol, a mixture of 
.’ ne and ethyl alcohol, allows 
-. tts of gasoline to be stretched. 

' . . alcohol can be made from 
. . s corn and sugar cane, among 


Return of School Segregation Threatens Race Progress in South 


By Roy Reed 

Me w York Times Service 

LITTLE ROCK. Arkansas — 
Just as integration here has become 
respectable, the public schools axe 
threatened with bec oming racially 

l a gain 

: movement of whites to the 
suburbs, encouraged by shrewd 
real estate speculators and weak 
political leadership, has left the Lit- 
tle Rode school district with a 4-1 
Wade majority in die elementary 


School enrollment is 70 percent 
black overall, even though a major- 
ity of the dt/s population is white, 
and school omoals predict die 
: schools win be all black in a 

my view, public education in 
this community has readied a crisis 
stage,” Federal District Judge Hen- 
ry Woods wrote in April as he 
signed an order that he and school 
officials hoped would step the re- 
turn to segregation. His order, a 
result of a lawsuit by the Little 
Rock school district, would merge 
that district with two adj oining 
ernes where many of the city’s 
whites have settled in recent years. 
It is being appealed. 

Segregation was the vssae that 
made Little Rock a symbol of the 
school integration fignt in the late 
1950s. it involved federal judges in 
desegregation, the use of federal 
marshals and troops, white resis- 
tance, violence and news pictures 
of black children facing white 
mobs. 

The dty typified what was to 
occur in scores of communities 
around the American South, and 
eventually in the North, as the UJL 
Supreme Court’s 1954 desegrega- 
tion decision led to many 
And today this city, like many oth- 
ers, has once again reached a criti- 
cal point in America’s attempt to 
deaf with the problems of race. 

One of the issues now is renewed 
segregation. The 
widespread in the 
Steve S uitts, director of the 
Southern Regional Council, an At- 
lanta-based private research orga- 
nization, attnbdtes the trend partly 
to the growing urbanization of the 
South and the segregated hooting 
patterns that go with iL 
He also cites continuing recalci- 
trance in the rural sections of the 
Deep South. Recent studies tty his 
organization show that many rural 


principal oQ supplier, with Mexico 
providing most of the rest Venezu- 
ela has all bat aided its shipments, 
citing Nicaragua’s inability to pay 
even a reduced price. 


Bolivian Strikers 
Accept Fourfold 
Increase in Wages 

New York Times Service 

LA PAZ — Bolivian workers 
have voted to accept the govern- 
ments offer to raise the basic rinm- 
mnm wage more than fourfold, 
ending a general strike lasting more 
than two weeks. 

While the increase approved Sat- 
urday will mean more than a 400- 
percent increase in wages for some 
miners, it will translate into only 15 
to 60 percent more for the majority 
of the country’s 1 J million work- 
er*. This is because each industry 
uses a different method to calculate 
the total monthly wage. 

The government agreed to im- 
prove the arrangements to prm 
die miners with basic food needs, 
and to make capital investments in 
the government-owned mines. It 
also agreed to set up a commission 
to study adjusting miners’ wages 
for inflation. 

Miners who began the strike 
March 8 were asking for a wage 
increase of about 500 percent. Last 
year inflation reached 2,700 per- 
cent, and based on the Oat month 
of this year, inflation is now run- 
ning at an annual rate of 50.000 
percent. 

The 16-day strike, the longest 
since President Heroin Sdes Zuazo 
cfa look office in October 1982, cost 
the government more than $140 
milli on in foreign-exchange earn- 

affjtt^mmes, banks^mtPmcst 
small businesses remained dosed. 


**- 

ar y 




. V - 


J aragua is a large producer of 
cane and wants Brazil to oon- 
fotilding several small refiner- 
• Nicai^gaa to convert cane 
ctsinto f mj 

*ragua does not produce pc- 
®o, and gasoline 1$ rationed, 
moment officials say fuel 
^ are one reason for recent 
ks in agricultural and indus- 

hoducuoa. 

; Ortega said that, when he 
.re Brazil, President Le6n 
s Cordero of Ecuador offered 
'd oil to Nicaragua. Mr. Orto- 
id Nicaragua had ayawwA 
. Ecuador’s previous reluctance 
Ppl y the oil was because of 
^pressures.' 

: Soviet Union is Nicaragua's 



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In the fall of 1957, seven of nine black students who integrated Central High School in 
Little Rock, Arkansas, arrived at die school under the protection of nariftnef guardsmen 


areas with heavy black populations 
have virtually abandoned efforts to 
desegregate their schools. White 
students there are growing up in 
private schools, leaving the ptiblic 
schools virtually all black, and with 
diminishing lax revenue to support 

thfrnv -i; j 

Mr. Smtts points out that sur- 
veys show the public schools of 
evoy other region of the United 
States to be less integrated th BTl 
those of tire Sooth. 

He takes no comfort from that, 
though, because the schools of the 
Southern rides are daily becoming 
more like those of tire urban North- 
east. Atlanta public schools, for ex- 
ample, are 91 percent black and 
face tougher problems every year in 
attracting the support of the afflu- 
ent white community. 

The Little Rock school board 
tried to come to grip s with white 
flight in the late 1970s. It opened a 
“magnet school” with an enriched 
curriculum in a blade neighbor- 
hood, and white parents eagerly 
pot their children into it It trans- 
ferred large numbers of blade stu- 
dents out of six virtually all-black 
elementary schools to keep those 
schools well integrated, and thus 
more acceptable to whites. 

Everyone understood ihose were 


measures. Eventual con- 
with the adj oining dis- 
tricts, convening aD of Pulaski 
County into one district, seemed to 
Little Rock officials to be the only 
long-term answer. 

Even though some had anticipat- 
ed it. Judge Woods’s order that 
Little Rock consolidate with the 
districts of North little Rock and 
rural Pulaski County was a politi- 
cal bombshell White parents in the 
two districts outride the pity have 
been meeting for nearly a. year to 
tty to block iL A number of politi- 
rians have vowed to fight iL Little 
Rock's competing dafly newspa- 
pers are split; The Arkansas Ga- 
zette supports it and The Arkansas 
Democrat opposes iL ' 

Thirty years ago school integra- 
tion was widely believed in this 
conservative state to be a Commu- 
nist ploL Sentiment has swung so 
far .the other way that virtually no 
one now will admit publidy to be- 
ing a segregationist. The typical an- 
gry white parent addressing an 
anti-consolidation meeting begins 
by saying, “Tm all for integration, 
bot . . ." 

The main reason people give 
publicly for opposing consolida- 
tion is that it may require busing 
children long distances. Many par- 


ents, blade and white, object to 

that 

Judge Woods said in an inter- 
view that he thought there would 
be less busing than was commonly 
believed. He attributed much of the 
resistance to unacknowledged rac- 
ism. 

“Down deep, many whites don't 
want their lads sitting next to 
blacks," Ire said. “That’s what it 
comes down to.” 

Consolidation is not popular 
among blacks, other, although 
some of the more prominent black 
leaders see it as necessary. Perlesta 
A. Hollingsworth, a former mem- 
ber of the state Supreme Court who 
U one of the black lawyers working 
for consolidation, estimates that as 
many as 60 percent of both blacks 
and whites in the area oppose con- 
solidation. 

He said blacks resented the no- 
tion that they had to go to a white- 
majority school to be successful 
Many also resent having their chil- 
dren bused into white suburbs to 
school he said, and some believe 
blacks have already borne the main 
burden of imring to achieve deseg- 
regation. 

Mr. Hollingsworth takes the 
view that integration is necessary 
for black success, no matter how 


much trouble it is, because black 
children need to learn bow to oper- 
ate in a system with a white major- 
ity- 

“They’re going to always be a 
minority,” he said. “They are going 
to have to learn how to survive in 
that son of environment,” 

There is wide agreement that 
much of Utile Rock s school prob- 
lem can be attributed to two dungs: 
real estate speculators who en- 
riched themselves by encoura g in g 
white flight and shortsighted politi- 
cal and civic leadership over much 
of the last 30 years. 

In the 1950s. Little Rock's whites 
and blacks often lived dose togeth- 
er, as they still do in many «*iaii 
Southern towns. 

In Little Rock today, almost no 
one has neighbors of the other race 
anymore. Most of the whites live in 
the western suburbs, and most of 
the blacks live in the older eastern 
parts of town. Where the two sec- 
tions meet, they are often divided 
by major thoroughfares or rail- 
roads. 

When Litde Rode chose in 1957 
to start desegregation with Central 
High, wind] was in the older, ra- 
cially mixed, working-class pan of 
town, the disastrous consequences 
are well known. President Dwight 
D. Eisenhower finally tailed out 
federal troops and placed the Ar- 
kansas National Guard under fed- 
eral control to patrol Central High 
for a year and protect nine black 
students from harassment and as- 
sault. 

The next year, 1958-59, Little 
Rock’s four high schools were 
closed on an order signed by Gov- 
ernor Orval Fa u bus and endorsed 
a majority of the city’s voters, 
le dty’s 3,400 high school stu- 
dents went to private schools or to 
public schools in other towns, or 
stayed home. 

A group of moderate while wom- 
en led an arduous campaign to re- 
open the schools in 1959, mid tire 
city began the painful process of 
desegregating its entire school sys- 
tem. 

One of tire brighter spots in the 
Little Rode school system today is 
Central High- The school is 57 per- 
cent blade Its racial mix has re- 
mained stable for the last 10 years, 
thanks to heroic efforts and per- 
haps some quiet manipulation of 
enrollment by the school authori- 
ties. 


a 


Central's faculty, equipment, 
students and overall reputation are 
said to be the best of anj high 
school in the city. 

Everett Hawks, the white princi- 
pal. calls Centra] "a model for the 
whole nation." Two of his prede- 
cessors have been black. About 37 
percent of the faculty are black. 
Four assistant principals are black. 
Black and white graduates are reg- 
ularly admitted to Ivy Lea gue col- 
leges. although whites still domi- 
nate the academic life of Central 
and account for most of the enroll- 
ment in honors classes. 


Arkansas links 
Teachers 9 Jobs 
To Skills Test 

The Associated Press 
LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas 
■— Teachers in Arkansas public 
schools have become the first in 
the United Slates to take a test 
of baric sltiDs to determine 
whether they may keep their 
jobs. 

A few stayed away from tire 
testing Saturday, risking disci- 
plinary action or dismissal But 
the state education director, 
Tommy Venters, said a threat- 
ened boycott had had Hide ef- 
fect. 

The Arkansas E d uca t iona l 
Skills Assessment Test was or- 
dered by the Legislature in 
1983. Tne law was enacted at 
the behest of Governor Bill 
Clinton and his wife, Hillary, 
who pressed Tor the develop- 
ment of better education stan- 
dards for Arkansas with a SI 50- 
million increase in sales taxes to 
benefit schools. 

The state will not renew a 
teaching certificate for any 
teacher who does not pass the 
test by June 1987. Teachers 
have five chances to pass and 
can get remedial help. 

The four-hour test includes 
multiple-choice questions, 50 in 
math and 50 in reading, and a 
200-word essay that could be 
cast in such forms as & hater to a 
parent or recommending a pu- 
pil for an award. 


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WiWJTJ 151 


BNTEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 


Greek Judge Again Fails 
To Win Presidency but 
Gains in Second Round 



mRk 


New York Times Service 


ATHENS — Hie Grade Pariia- 
meat has failed for a second time to 
elect the government's candidate as 
president. But it a p pealed that a 
coalition of Socialists and Commu- 
nists would succeed on the final 
ballot this week. 

On Saturday, Christos Sartzeta- 
Ids, 56, the Supreme Court judge 
unexpectedly chosen by Prune 
Minister Andreas Papandreou as 
an alternative to Constantine Cara- 
mantis, got 181 of the 300 votes in 
Parliament. Two hundred votes are 
required for election on the second 
ballot In the third and final vote 
Friday, 180 votes are needed. 

If Mr. Sanzetakis fails to win 
election Friday, Parliament will be 
automatically dissolved and gener- 
al elections will be held May 5. 

Mr. Papaodreou described the 


- result Saturday as u a victory for 
democracy and proof that Sartzeta- 


democracy and proof that Sartzeta- 
‘ kis definitely will be elected presi- 

* dent” 

The development was the most 

* prominent example yet of coopera- 
' tion between the governing Social- 
ists and the pro-Moscow Commu- 
nists. It has already led to 
allegations horn the conservative 
opposition that a leftist popular 
front is developing. 

The expected election next Fri- 
day of the left’s joint candidate as 
president for the next five years 
also appears to signal the political 
eclipse of Mr. Caramanus, who 
served as prime minister and as 
presidait for a total erf 19 years. 

Two weds ago, President Cara- 
manlis resigned and refused to seek 
another term after he was told of 
the Socialists' decision to oppose 
him. He made it clear that he felt 
Prime Minister Papandreou had vi- 


olated a pledge to support his re- 
election. 

The vote Saturday was a relative 
success for the governing Socialists, 
who reacted with applause in Par- 
liament, as it ended indications of a 
small split within the party. On the 
first ballot a week ago, only 178 
deputies voted for Mr. Sartzetakis, 
indicating that two Socialist depu- 
ties disapproved. One other Social- 
ist was absent. The total of 181 
votes Saturday reflected the sup- 
port of all 165 Socialist deputies, all 
12 Communists and 4 of the 11 
independents. 

There was a sharp dispute be- 
tween the government and the con- 
servative opposition before the 
vote because the ballot paper for 
the sole presidential candidate was 
blue while that for a blank vote was 
white. The opposition, which re- 
fused to vote, argued that this was 
the government’s way of nuking 
each deputy’s choice more visible, 
thereby discouraging any Socialist 
from breaking party ranks. 

■ U-S- Military Aid Urged 

The Reagan a dminis tration 
urged Congress on Friday to ap- 
prove its foil 1986 military aid re- 



D anish Strike 
Over Wages 
Halts Flights 
And Ferries 


» 

Italy Awaits Break in Scandak li 


Arrest in U.S. Seen Aiding Inquiry on P-2, Ambrosiano 


MiUiRHIrt J 





The Assoaated Press 

COPENHAGEN — Strikes aad 
lockouts began Sunday throughout 
Denmark in the country’s first ma- 
jor labor conflict in 12 years. The 
dispute over wages and working 
hours involves 320,000 workers. 

Strikes were called from mLd- 
nigbt Saturday after five months of 
negotiations between the Employ- 
ers’ Confederation and the Federa- 
tion of Trade Unions. 

At Copenhagen’s international 
airport Scandinavian Airline Sys- 
tems, or SAS. canceled all flights in 
and out of the country for an indef- 

• — ■ _ j l __ _r i.j. _r 


imte period because of lack of fuel 
supplies, mechanics and baggage 
handlers. 


nded problems at 


A Socialist deputy argues with opposition deputies over the 
color of ballots used in Saturday’s vote for presidency. 


quest for Greece, saying Mr. Pa- 

pan dreou’s government should not 


pan dreou’s government should not 
be allowed to “drive a wedge” be- 
tween the American and Greek 
people. Renters reported from 
Washington. 


Assistant Secretary of State 
Richard R. Bart told a Senate For- 
eign Relations subcommittee that 


the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation and the United States had 


ration and the United States had 
“serious problems” with Mr. Pa- 
pandreou, whom he accused of 

“highly irresponsible rhetoric." 

But Mr. Burt went out of his way 


to emphasize positive aspects of the 
UJ3.-Greek relationship, including 
a five-year agreement to operate 
U.S. bases there that “despite some 
strong points of friction, continues 
to go well in many areas,” 

He also urged the panel not to 
cut or limit aid to Turkey, saying 
security assistance to Ankara, a 
member of NATO, is “as impor- 
tant as the most vital program” in 
the U.S. defense budget. 

A House Foreign Affairs sub- 
committee last week approved all 
but $1.75 minio n of President Ron- 
ald Ronald Reagan’s $501.73 mil- 


lion request for Greece. The redac- 
tion, while small, is significant as a 


non, while small, is significant as a 
symbol of protest against Mr. Pa- 
pandr ecus anti-NATO and an- 
ti-U.5 policies. 

The House subcommittee ap- 
proved $890 million forTtnkey, an 
increase-of $12 million over 1985 
but still a reduction of $49 million 
from President Reagan’s request 

Mr. Burt praised what he called 
Ankara’s return to democratic gov- 
ernment its progress in human 
rights and its participation in talks 
with Athens on resolving the crisis 
over Cyprus. 


U.K. Adopts Rules to Protect Public From AIDS 


By Jo Thomas 

New York Tima Service 

LONDON — New government 
regulations give British magistrates 
broad authority aimed at protect- 
ing the public from AIDS. 

The regulations include the pow- 
er to order a person to be taken to a 
hospital and kept there if the au- 
thorities consider him a risk to oth- 


Local authorities may also pre- 
vent relatives of apersonwhohas 
died of the disorder, acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome, from 
taking possession of the body. 


a last resort Mr. Clarke has resist- 
ed pressure to place AIDS an the 
list of infectious diseases that, 
when diagnosed, require a report 
from a doctor to the public-health 
authorities. 

He said that such a move might 
discourage people from seeking a 
diagn osis 

The new regulations in Britain 
took effect amid growing public 
concern about the spread of AIDS, 


which has now affected 132 people 
in Britain and almost 9,000 people 
in the United States. 


The authorities are required to 
take “all reasonably practical 
steps” to prevent people coming 


near or into contact with the body 
of a person who has died of AIDS. 

Announcing the measures, Ken- 
neth Clarke, minis ter of state at the 
department of health and social se- 
curity, stressed Thursday that the 
new powers would be used only as 


Portuguese Executive Killed 

Reuters 

LISBON — A Portuguese indus- 
trialist, Alexandre Souto, died Sun- 
day after bring shot by gunm en in 
the International Trade Fair build- 
ing in t.i'Ann on Saturday ni ght, 
police said. There wme 10 armed 
men involved in the attack on Mr. 
Souto, whose company was partici- 
pating in a boating and camping 
show. No motive was known. 


But the fear of AIDS goes be- 
yond the numbers. 

Peter TatchdL a former Labor 
Party parliamentary <?nd i da te and 
an activist for civil rights for homo- 
sexuals, said be was attacked by six 
youths as he came out of a subway 
this month 

“We’ve read all about you and 
he gay plague,” shouted one, ac- 
cording to Mr. TatchelL 

You “should be killed before you 
kill us with AIDS,” said another. 

One of the youths drew a knife, 
Mr. Tatchcll said, and they kicked 
and beat him. 


Mr. Tatchefl fled into the traffic 
and escaped on a passing bus. 

The attack on Mr. Tatcbell is an 
extreme example of what many ho- 
mosexuals say has been a wave of 
antipathy against them in recent 
weeks' as concern grows in Britain 


about AIDS. The disorder mostly 
affects male homosexuals. 

“This could be the worst epidem- 
ic rirree the Black Plague,” said 
Joseph Farhry, who recently be- 
came embroiled in controversy af- 
ter he banned homosexuals bom 
the five pubs he owns in Liverpool 
in northwest England. 

Mr. Farley rescinded his ban af- 
ter a doctor assured him that AIDS 
could not be passed through saliva. 
But thepub owner says now that be 
is cntigdering reinstating his ban 

because he is not convinced. 

“People are being beaten up,” 
said T-isa Powers, a worker for Gay 
Switchboard, a telephone advice 
service for homosexuals. ‘Theyare 
being ostracized at wodc.” ' *; ' • 

Last week. Miss Powers said, 
four of the switchboard’s five lines 
broke down just as calls about 
AIDS were .pouring in. Telephone 
company workers at first refused to 
fix the telephones because they 
were afraid of contracting AIDS. 


most erf Sunday. 

Other arrifnfg planned to limit 
international flights and have 
planes carry enough fud for return 
trim. 

Tire strike j<n«l femes on 
passenger, car and freight routes to 
Britain and Norway. 

In the city of Aalborg, 70,000 
people were left without heat as 
workers struck at a power plant 
producing both electricity and 
heat. 

Civil defense units supplied 
blankets and electric radiators to 
the central hospital and to nursing 
h o me s But half of all hospital pa- 
tients had to be evacuated. 

More serious disruptions are ex- 
pected Monday as the effects of the 
strike are expected to spread to 
3,000 shops. 

Prime Minister Pool Sdbluter is 
to resume talks Monday on terms 
of a government-imposed settle- 
ment of the dispute. 

Danes continued to buy gasoline 
Sunday, expecting that halted fud 
deliveries would soon cause service 
stations to run dry. 

Most Danish stores planned to 
open Monday, some with student 
and t em p orary hrip hehfnd their 
counters. 

Many stores said they did not 
know how many of their employees 
would be involved in the strike. 

Slaughterhouses and chicken 
farms also stopped production. But 
truck drivers agreed to transport 
feed. 


By EJ. Dionne 

Sew York Tima Service 

ROME— The arrest this month 
of Francesco Pazienza by U-S. Cus- 
toms Service officials may shed 
light oo in Italy over the 

past five years, including the col- 
lapse of Banco Ambrosiano. 

Mr. Pazieuza, 38, an Italian busi- 
ness consultant, was arrested 
March 4 in New York by customs 
officials, who described him as “It- 
aly’s No. 1 fugitive." 

He is being held on behalf of the 
Italians without bail pending extra- 
dition proceedings, which are ex- 
pected to be completed in about a 
month. 

I talian authorities believe Mr. 

Pazienza can assi s t their Inquiries 
into the 1982 collapse of Banco 
Ambrosiano, the main interest of 
the U-S. investigators, and the 
scandals involving the Propagan- 
da-2 Masonic lodge and its rela- 
tionship to sections of the Italian Francesco Pflrienza 
secret services. 

Mr Pazienza, who has been _ . , 

sought by authorities in Milan nis Fagan, the Customs Soviets 
■ ■ . j; j t t..l. crwv-ial for enforcement, de* 


UT ouuiuaiuw ru iTMiau - — w _ f e 

since he disappeared from Italy in sperialagentforenforccmaiLde- 
Aprfl 1983, is wanted in connection med that my bargain had been 

T. ■ .# r j i etmrl* nntn Mr Pa7i«i7a 


with chare cs of fraud and misap- struck unth Mr. P azienz a. 
nropriation of funds in 1981 and information he had 


proprianon ot rands in 1981 and 1U< 
1 982 stemming from the collapse of us was 
Banco Ambrosiano. He was 
charged after his disappearance. ben, 
When Mr. Pazienza went to the 1 
qistpms offices in New York, he j™ 


us was vague, needed further expla- 
nation aim was general in nature at 
best," Mr. Fagan said. 

He said that at the time of Mr. 


known for his extenave contact* 
the Italian financial and pohu 
worlds. 

He was a dose aide to Gex 
Giuseppe Saniovho, the fan . 
head ot the Italian intelligence [ 
vice. According to an Italian pn 
rocmarv commission, Mr. Pa^ ■ 
was the moving force bchas 
group within the Italian mu 

genee service known as “Super ■ 

The group has been accused 
carrying out illegal activities for 
Italian intelligence service, non 
smuggling. 

Italian courts have also said s' 
Pazienza served as a Honan 
tween “Super S” and the Mafir* 

General Samovito was sal 
quentiy forced to ream after 
name appeared cm the to of m. 
bers of the P-2 lodge. The lod 
membership included many of ' 
ly’s most important public fign .- 

Its members were accused' 
conspiring against the Italian st ’ 
and the discovery of the Jo 
brought down the govenunen . ' 
Prime Minister ArnudoForis .- 

Mr. Pazienza also claims frit 
ship with American officials. 

According to Richard N. Gs 
ner, U.S. ambassador to Italy i , 
1981, Mr. Pazienza apparently - 
templed to serve as a hnkbem 
Italian officials and the incoa , 
Reagan administration after * 



Panenza’s arrest, the Italian “was election of 1980. 


I 1 1X11 II illlllA-J HI t ten 1 law ■ _ . _ _ _ 

did not expect arrest but talks with being considered as ather a defen- During my jast months, as 
officials whohave been seeking in- dantorawimcssmtheU^. rathe bzssadorjwzs Monncd po . 


formation Brora him on the where- Ambrosiano ravesugauon. 


aborts of about 51.4 billion miss- 


ing from Banco Ambrosiano. „ . . . . 

Patrick T. O’Brien, the assistant matters as weU, notaWy the death 


Italian officials want to question 
Mr. Pazienza about many other 


regional commissioner for enforce- of Roberto Cahn, the head of 
*r flu. r'uctnmc s«rvirV« Banco Ambrosiano. Mr. Cam was 


menr at the Customs Service’s New Banco Amoroaano. mt. vram was 
York office, said customs officials found under a London 


had met with Mr. Pazienza in Sep- bridge in 1982, and Mr. Pazienza 
tember 1984 to discuss the Banco' ® London * fcw da >’ s b® 01 ' 


in Washington that Pazieuza 
acting as a go-between, betweer 
new Reagan administration ’ 
the Italian leadership,” Mr. 0 
ner said in a telephone inter 
from his office at Columbia 
School, where he is now a pre 
son 

Michael Ledeen, who serve', 
the State Department under for 
Secretary of State Alexander . 


- H D* 



Amhmsiano case and the oossible Mr- Calvi’s death. the State Department under fa 

launderingoflE missing SSL Mr. CaM had hired Mr. Pa- &o«aiy^State Atasanda 
“Whatwe were trvintt w do is zieuza to help him assemble a Haig and knew Mr. Pazienza, 
JSlTaSSi n group of new investors to gel the hebdieved that MrPaziem; 
much about it as anvbodv ” Mr bank out financial difficulty. ly exaggerated his ties to the 
it as anyooay, Mr. ^ Pazienza, whose brilliance is gan adSnistration to Lncreas 

The delav in arresting Mr. Pa- conceded by his enemies, was influence in Italy. 




Dinosaur Footprints Found 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING — Archaeologists in 
Nei Monggol have found more 
than 1,000 fossilized dinosanr foot- 
prints dating back 130 nriQion 
-years, the official - -Xinhua press 
agency said Sunday.'-Thc prints are 
about 60 centimeters (about 2 Feet) 
long and were left by creatures with 
three- or foor-toed.daws, it said. 


O’Brien said. 

The delay in arresting Mr. Pa- 
zienza, Mr. O’Brien said, was be- 
cause the necessary paperwork was 
incomplete. 

Italian investigators believe that 
Mr. Pazienza knows about loans of 
Banco Ambrosiano funds to bogus 
companies, mostly in Latin Ameri- 
ca, mat left the bank $1.4 billion in 
losses. 

Mr. O’Brien said the U.S. inves- 
tigation focused on the possible 
“laundering” of “several hundred 
milli on dollars.” 

Stuart J. Baskin, one of Mr. Pa- 
zienza’s U.S. atttomeys, said Mr. 
Pazienza had been lured to the cus- 
toms office under the illusion that 
he had beoz granted some form of 

immuni ty. 

Mr. Pazienza was traveling un- 
der a Seychelles passport, and his 
lawyers said he had disguised his 
identity o i “a legitimate 

concern for his security.” 

But both Mr. O’Brien and Dai- 


ly exaggerated his ties to the 1 
gan administration to increast ’ 
influence in Italy. 


Thatcher (Mis Her Giti& 'Cuckoo , 9 
Especially 'Right Reverend Prelates 9 


- m 

•t «VM»«1 


Uruted Pros International 

NEWCASTLE England — Prime Minister Maigaret Thatch 
addresang a Conservative party meeting, called critics of ha ecoua - 
ic policies “cuckoo” and charged them with reinforcing soda! prq _ 
dice against making money. 

“There is a consistent tendency in our society to denigrate f I* 
creators of wealth,” Mrs. Thatcher said here Saturday. “Nowhere - . 
this attitude more marked than in cloister and common room.” '7 

What the critics “can’t stomach is that wealth creators have' 
tendency to acquire wealth in the process of creating it for others,” s~..' 
said. 

Some Church of England leaders have attacked her econooV 
policies as not doing enough to create jobs and alleviate hardship' 

■ “You may have noticed that recently the voices of some revere^ 
and right reverend prelates have been heard in the land,” M = " : 
Thatcher said. “I mak e no complaint about that. After all it would' 
be spring, would it, without the voice of the occasional cuckoo." 


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%Qaude Montana Paints the Slopes 

\ew Collection Puts Elegant Skiwear Into the Streets 


Patricia Roberts Harris, 60, Dies; 
First Black Woman in U.S. Cabinet 


DOONESBURY 



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*r j-. By Hebe Dorsey 

/ntermafonaf HeraU Tribute 

O : Paris — Skiwear for city 
; owls, flared coats over an hour- 
-Mass silhouette and fashion 
»-.-,-eaicd as an art form — these 
; «e a few of the weekend offer- 
•. lgs here in the fall and water 
oflectious. 

Oaee agpm, Qaude Montana, 
. • ' -'Aose wen; now displays a less- 
• ^-more eleganoe, emerged as a 
V:*ris leader. 

. • Hx 5 strong stand far skiwear, 
C ^idch has bap growing since the 


t. Hrnrm^m 


^r'filan collections, could well 
' ~ ■. ; talcft it happen. His junto be- 
• •..ween sfcrwear — aauaijydih«e 
'• - ’ prfcs-sld dothing — and evening 
' war was firm and final. 

« . . He showed striking, boldly 
^V'eomfitric swealeis and ski pants 
1 ;"•■ .Itctnaled wirhlangjohns. These 
: ,Csed to look avant-garie but axe 
* > ow widely accepted. They were 
> ... '•■ roii under big, belted leather 
TwfQj with high collars. 

’ v *?'. The key feature of his sflhou- 
-/'■'ttc was the breaking down of 
- ■ ~toportious with short, three- 

ixiarter »mH f oh- length coats of- 
- m worn in layers. 

; Montana, who used to create a 

superwoman imag e, has consfd- 
.'■• rably softened his work. His 
■•!>: hort, rounded coats would eaa- 

r . •■'**/ fit into a circle and his tight 
. jrscy dresses were kittenish. 

*""f v This showing, he used winter 
. j :diite and neutrals, but he did an 
. - O utstanding job with colors as 
! * That puts him in the same 

., lass as Yves Saint Lament, who 
by far the best colorist in Paris. 
v • -t: “He's never worked on colors 
u ~ v --- vnatmach," Paloma Picasso said 
fiiarf Montana. 

Mixing subtle and strong 
..-.- hades, Montana showed several 
-i- Unusual outfits, including a pale 
’-“.•• : i/istachio three-quarter <»at over 
* jacket of deeper green, purple 



S' ' 

.S' ■ 



Washington Post Service * 

WASHINGTON — Patricia 
Roberts Harris, 60, who as a law- 
yer, diplomat and cabinel secretary 
spent much of her life breaking 
long-standing barriers to black 
women, died of cancer Saturday. 

Mrs. Hams was the first black 
woman in the cabinet, serving as 
secretary of Housing and Urban 
Devdopment and then as secretary 
of Health, Education and Welfare 
during the Carter admmistzatioa. 
She also was the first black woman 
to become an ambassador and to 
become dean of a law school, and 
the first American Wade to serve as 
a delegate to the United Nations. 

Since I9SZ,whensheranunsnc- 
cessfully for mayor cf Washington, 
she had beat a professor at George 
Washington University National 
Law Center. 

Mm. Harris's insistence on excel- 
lence pul her at odds with some 
blacks during the height of the civil 
rights movement in the late 1960$. 
when students at Howard Law 





Patricia Roberts Harris 


the United States for 30 years, died 
Tuesday in New York City from 
complications of a stroke that he 
suffered five weeks ago. 

Mr. de Rivera’s sculptures, bold 
yet delicate curvilinear forms made 
From polished stainless sted or 
bronze, were widely sought. High- 
ly regarded by museums and art 
critics, they are considered to have 
set a standard for conceptual purity 
and craftsmanship. 

■ OAer deaths: 

Leopold Tynnand, 64, a Polish 
editor and novelist who wrote for 
anti-regime newspapers in Poland 
before emigrating to the United 
States in lftffi, Tuesday of a heart 
attack in Rockford, Ulinois- 

Bemard Rofing, 78. a member of 
the Tokyo war crimes tribunal and 
researcher into armed conflicts, 
Saturday of cancer in Groningen, 
the Netherlands. 

Elsa Redcman Kerr, 89, who 
spent 40 years in Lebanon promot- 
ing higher education for women 
and was formerly dean of women ax 


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1969, Mrs. Hams, then the dean. Chaloff and Mr. Sims became S SL. "r iff 0, a „ ^ pT ^~ 



NOT NOW, 

sntotms 

bust. 

i 


student control of the school in 
1969, Mrs. Harris, than the dean, 
maintained an unyielding position. 

She said the law school's purpose 
was to produce “the very finest 


OmrWCwf 

Claude Montana’s sweaters and ski pants. 


hub-fur ( 
apfvudlv 

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•ft mi . nd bright Nue shirt 
-till's ttcri ritin Vr His prettiest group was bright- 
, 1 “olored satin coats. 

Iifn/ir Kari Lagerfeld's collection 

‘ ^ ^TfTllih j^ip prtinb^ tiis nwmy fans wfip 

ad been looking forward to the 
nird edketion under the Lager- 
'.'^dname. 

■ - - -:.v Lagerfeld’s fabrics and work- 
• : lanffliip were not up to par. A 
fiHian t designer who put Cblofc 
.- e. o the map and who is now do- 

- ■: L-ng an excellent job with Chanel 
. ^..-j^Fendi, Lagerfeld is still hav- 
_ . Jag a hard time with his own Hne. 

.-J^ne suspects he is having pro- 
tection problems. 

. . _ His usual luxurious feeling 

• • ' vas nhsang. The daytime dothes 
Tame on too strong and heavy, 

- ..' specially the huge military coats 
." . ver boots. 

. ' . Fortunately, firings turned 


around midway through Lhe 
showing. The Lagerfeld hand be- 
came perceptible again in three 
short, black-silk dresses with 
flattering (UcoUetageL 

But Lagerfeld's passion for 
18th-century furniture got the 
better of him, resulting in velvet 
hats shaped Hke Louis XV aim- 
chairs with Buie blue pillows. 
Dresses were of prints that might 
have covered living room furni- 
ture. Bladc-sQk sheaths were dec- 
orated with gold embroidery, 
shaped like handles of Louis XV 
calnnets. The models stepped 
out of ornate armotres. 

At Jean-Paul Gaultier’s show- 
ing there was another letdown. 

Gaultier is Paris’s new fashion 
guru and the best designer trans- 
lating street fashions, especially 
those of London. He has gained 
considerable acceptance in only 
two years. He is also respected 
because Iris dothes, despite their 
youthful look, are beantifully cot 
and made. 

Gaultier, who used to have the 
wittiest, most unconventional 
shows, went one step too far. He 
let the presentation of his collec- 
tion dominate the clothes. -The 
audience was offered a takeoff of 
Luis Butted’ s film “The Discreet 



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Charm of the Bourgeoisie," with 
maid dusting away and am gfr 
belting it out at the piano while 
the models, reclining on settees, 
looked bored. Boredom was also 
the reaction of the audience, 
which had difficulty studying the 
dothes. 

Too bad. because Gaultier has 
not lost Ms hand. There was an 
evolution of his tapestry swe&t- 
ers. which came in glittery Luxex 
md in diff erent 

Issey Miyake was bom in Hi- 
roshima, trained in Paris, and is 
one of the the most important 
designers in the world. He feds 
that fashion is an art form on a 
‘ par with painting, sculpture and 
arete lecture. His work is in sev- 
eral mnseams, including the Vic- 
toria and Albert in London 
where he lias an exhibition called 
“Bodyworks." 

His collection, dramatically 
presented, had a special flow and 
a stronger Western flavor than 
his last one. It included rustic 
ponchos over long johns, pelican 
coats with deq) raglan sleeves 
and black smoking jackets over 
shrimp-Calored shuts. An out- 
standing /abac designer, Miyake 
showed 40 to 50 new ones, in- 
cluding a shag gy fake fur. 


Vatican Envoy Leaves Malts 

Room 

VALLETTA. Malta — Arch- 
bishop AdnBe SBvestrim, secretary 
of the Vatican Council for PnhHc 
Affairs, said Iris four days of talks 
with the Maltese government in a 
dispute over schools had been in- 
conclusive. 


lawyers," and she would not be first heard them and then by a 
party to diluting that purpose. She second generation of jazz, fans 
later resigned after Hmrg fn g that through a standard instrumental 
the university president, Janies Na- work of the same name. I 

brit, had undercut hear by privately , b* 1053, Mr. Sims joined Stan 
negotiating with the students. Kenton in what many fed was Mr. 
“■ ^ Keaton’s finest baud and then 1 

JJHL (Zoot) Sirnt, 59; formed a quintet with A1 Cohn, a 

Ian CoYAnlmnfet later addition to the Herman band i 

"with - John * ^1 

anger Haley “Zoot" Sims, 59, the jara Mr. Sims made nearly 50 albums ! 
iwhfle saxophonist, durf of mdcct Sabir- under his own name, backed such 


Chaloff and Mr. Sims became Her son, Malcohn, was pres- 
known as the “Four BrothereTthe dcn ^ ^ American Umvraiy 
Herman saxophone seatollt was until he was assassinated in 1984. 
a unit remembered by those who 1 J 



mourns oi me woooy normal Basie and other Wg bands. 

Band and a mnaoan praised by Ins , ^ Viv ‘ *|. 

peers and cntics for his consistent -*L os f ae l r; ei r* . 
virtuosity. Sculptor Worked in Metal 

He was known for his free-flow- NEW YORK (NYT) — Jose de 
ing ventures in traditional 4-4 and Rivera, 80, an artist whose metal 


3-4 meter; for his seemingly effort- sculptures have been displayed in 
less but complex, spontaneous so- nummms and public spaces across 


U.S. Opens 5-Year Drive to Persuade 
Americans to Cooperate With Census 


In Singapore 

our faultless service is only matched 
by our spectacular architecture. 

THE PAVILION 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 
SINGAPORE 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
Census Bureau has begun its most 
intensive public relations campaig n 
to persuade the American people to 
participate in the 1990 census, ac- 
cording to a senior affical of the 
agency. 

One factor contributing to the 
bureau’s decision to undertake the 
five-year publicity drive is the cen- 
sus proteks in Europe that have 
halted the count in theNetheriaods 
and forced a long postponement 
and significant in the cen- 
sus process te WestGennany. 

A second reason for the Census 
Bureau’s concern is that an increas- 
ing number of Americans appear to 
be hesitant about answering sur- 
veys. 

“We are not really concerned 
about a mass refusal to cotmerate 
here in the United States," sted 
WHBam P. Butz, an assistant Cen- 
sus Bureau director. 

“But what the European revolts 


tell us is that a successful census 
requires the cooperation of the peo- 
ple," he added. “AE the technol- 
ogy, all the planning, all the effi- 
ciency doesn’t mean a thing 
.without the cooperation of the 
American people." 

The continued accuracy and 
completoiess of the government’s 
decennial census and its various 
surveys are important because they 
determine how many, congressmen 
■will represent each state and how 
billions of dollars a year in U.S. 
government aid will be-distribated. 
. lhe reasons for the declming 
.participation are not known. Some 
experts believe that part of the an- 
swer may lie in urbanization and 
the increasing difficulty of finding 
individuals. Others contend a 
growing distrust of institutions 
may be a better explanation. 



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MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 


Meralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PuMrtbed VUh The New York Time* ind Tbr Wwfaingtoa Port 


Massacre at Uitenhage 


It has happened so infrequently in America 
that the events re main in the national con- 
science; a scar reminding us forever of a terri- 
ble wound. The Boston Massacre, the Edmnnd 

Pettus Bridge in Selma, Kent State: armed 
men, acting under color of law and order, 
assaulting a crowd of unarmed civilians gath- 
ered to petition or protest. It is not tolerated, 
and when it happens we do not forget 

Twenty-five years ago last Thursday, South 
African police fired into a crowd of blade 
demonstrators gathered at Sharpeville, 70 
. miles (1 10 kilometers) south of Johannesburg; 
. using machine guns, they killed 69. On the very 
; day of that anniversary, South African police 
fired into a crowd of blacks in the industrial 
city of Uitenhage. At least 19 people died, 
although witnesses say the ton was much high- 
er. And more deaths have followed. 

As is usual in these cases, the armed men 
claim to have been threatened and more or less 
forced to fire in self-defense. Blacks at Uiten- 
' hage tell another story. Thousands had. gath- 
ered, they say , to board buses and cats to go to 
the funeral of a black activist killed in a clash 
with police a few days before. The funeral had 
been prohibited by the authorities, who feared 
■ trouble an the anniversary of the Sharpeville 


massacre. The police ordered everyone out of 
the vehicles and then, according to witnesses, 
opened lire with automatic rifles, pistols and 
shotguns at dose range. One man in the crowd 
who rushed for shelter recalls the honor of 
bodies falling and the wounded -lying on the 
ground, “moaning and writhing in agony." 

It is hard for civilized people to imagine 
themsdws firing an automatic weapon into an 
unarmed crowd. It is less troubling if the target 
is a faceless crowd at masse rather than a 
single individual who is staring hard into your 
eyes. It helps if you are with comrades who, by 
joining in, reinforce your self-righteousness. 
And it must be much easier if you are able to 
convince yourself that the people in your gun 
sight are not quite as human as you or your 


grandmother or your children. That is happen- 

" . Africa. 


ing with increasing frequency in South j 
The government may not yet realize it, but 
reaction is certain to grow, not only in foreign 
countries and black enclaves but also among 
South Africa’s own white citizens Tor whom 
this nauseating violence brings home the un- 
speakable reality of apartheid. Apartheid can- 
not be preserwd by machine guns. These 
bloodbaths only hasten the day of reckoning. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Allies Count on Reagan 


At no little political risk, Belgium’s Prime 
Minister Wflfried Martens has wrested parlia- 
mentary approval for the deployment of cruise 
missiles in his country. Narrowly construed. 


made offensive and ab ate the anti-nuclear 
pressures in West Germany. 

Mikhail Gorbachev's predecessors overesti- 


this means that Belgium has complied with a 
NATO decision in 1979 to i " 


i deploy new Ameri- 
can missiles in re^onse to the excessive build- 
up of Soviet SS-20s. But what tipped the bal- 
ance was an act of faith — the belief that 
President Reagan's team has a realistic brief in 
the new arms control talks. If that faith crum- 
bles. so will support for deployment in the 
nervously ambivalent Low Countries. 

Under the NATO plan, Belgium and the 
Netherlands each agreed to accept 48 of 572, 
planned missiles. But the Dutch have hedged, 
deferring their decision until November and 
conditioning deployment on a continued Sovi- 
et buildup. If Belgium contends with an anti- 
nuclear allergy, the Dutch contend with a 
virus. The decision in Brussels will not end 
the wobbling in The Hague, but it is a vital 
precondition. Dutch concurrence would as- 
sure NATO's solidarity, blunt a Soviet diplo- 


mated the potency of Western Europe’s peace 
hen they pulled 


movement and erred again when 
out of the nuclear arms talks in 1983.' They 
failed to block deployment in West Germany, 
Britain and Italy. Belgium's concurrence says a 
lot about Europe's reliance on Mr. Reagan’s 
apparent new interest in arms limita tion. 

The painfnl coaxing of the Europeans de- 
serves not America's contempt but its deepest 
understanding. The Iife-and-death decisions 
affecting their defense and vulnerability are 
made in Washington but they have no vote in 
America’s elections. As the wards of a distant 
superpower, they bear an obligation to support 
its diplomacy. But the obligation that the 
United States owes in return is greater. They 
deserve to be consulted more fuUy than they 
were about the “star wars’’ extravaganza. And 
they have earned a full accounting of the 
diplomacy to halt the aims race. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Time for a PLO Move 


What is notable about the latest round of 
Middle East peace feelers is their lack of dra- 
ma, their procedural quality, the sense they 
convey that, privately at least, the parties un- 
derstand quite well the difficult things they are 
asking each other to do. This is an encouraging 
development in an area too often given to 
impulses and dramatic departures and to alter- 
nating excesses of illusion and despair. 

True, among the Arabs there is a certain 
amount of now-or-never talk, some of it re- 
flecting real impatience and some of it obvi- 
ously designed to break down the Reagan 
administration’s hesitation to get involved pre- 
maturely. At the same time, among the “mod- 
erate” Arabs who have been trooping to Wash- 
ington there is a measure of modesty, too. 
They know that their tender of good faith, the 
veiled peace commitment that the PLCTs 
Yasser Arafat made a mouth ago with Jordan's 
King Hussein, does not meet the American 
requirement for & direct PLO acknowledgment 
of Israel; President Reagan made that dear 
Thursday rnghL They seem prepared, although 
they are not enthusiastic about it. to work a 
while longer to find the formula that will put 
American diplomacy to work on their ride as 
well as on the Israeli ride. 

The moderates have not dropped the famil- 
iar and fundamental demand that the United 


States "deliver" Israel to a settlement They 
have an eye on the Israeli political scene, 
however, and what they see — in the Labor-led 
government now in power — is the faint but 
real prospect of a partner for the Palestinian 
entity they might yet manage to deliver them- 
selves. The gap is still very great The PLO is a 
weak and fragmented organization whose very 
attempt to make itself presentable to the Israe- 
lis could be fatal to it The current Israeli 
government wants the tactical benefits of be- 
ing considered reasonable but is not at all 
eager to bring cm the national convulsion it 
would have to undergo in order to fit itself out 
to deal with Palestinians — particularly when 
so far there are no Palestinians to deal with. 

The way things are at die moment, Jordan 
may try to dig out some Palestinians who are 
representative but not easily identifiable as 
figures of the PLO. But it taka mirrors to find 
such people. It would be far better if the PLO 
prepared itself to accept Israel out in the open. 
The PLO’s argument that its recognition of 
Israel is its ultimate card, one not to be played 
until the last hand, was discredited tang ago. 
The Pales tinians have got to make 1 their move. 
It would be extremely difficult, but it alone 
promises them results. It alone promises a 
serious American helping hand. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


l SharpeviDe, Uitenhage, 


- The tempo of violence in South Africa gath- 
ers pace inexorably. Last week’s killings in the 
Eastern Cape make still more remote the 

* hopes that apartheid can be eased out of exis- 
I trace by political evolution. Distrust between 

the races is greater than at any time since 
. Sharpeville. The hollowness of the promises 
made last September by President Botha at his 
’ installation is now manifest. The new three- 

* chamber constitution — with the blacks be- 
yond the pale — has only heightened conflict 


As the world decides what pressures to apply, 
the truth is that the longer the agony goes on, 
the more calamitous the ending must be. 

— The Observer (London). 


In the years between Sharpeville and Uiten- 
hage the grievances of blade South Africans 
have not changed. What has changed has been 


the pace of violence: Sharpeville was a horrible 
but isolated occurrence followed by a sot of 
police-state quiescence. Today the apartheid 
enforcers can. no longer control the situation. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


FROM OUR MARCH 25 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


-1910: Lava Poors Down Mount Etna 
NAPLES — Telegrams from Catania report 
| that the eruption of Mount Etna is increasing 
‘ in violence and that many new crevices are 

* opening in the rides of the mountain, which 
^ spout out great streams of lava, some of which 

* are flowing rapidly in the direction of that d ty. 
I Bdpasso is all but overwhelmed, and many 
‘fugitives whose homes and properties have 
'been destroyed or menaced are arriving in 

* Catania. Religious processions are being orga- 
> nixed to pray that the disaster may be averted. 

* Four new craters are said to have opened and 
’ are pouring out lava, which is descending in 

* streams and uniting to form a river 6 mitres 
deep and 400 metres across. This formidable 

■ flood of molten rock is pressing onwards at a 
'. rate of at least a mfctre a minute. 


1935: Pope to Warn ol World War 
VATICAN CITY — A solemn warning that 
another war would mean the destruction of 
civilization will be uttered by Pope Pius XI in a 
“Peace Encyclical" which he will address to 
the world on Low Sunday, April 28, when the 
present jnbfiee year doses, it was learned. This 
encyclical is bong described as the most im- 
portant document issued in the present Ponti- 
ficate, which has been noted for many utter- 
ances of great importance. It mil say that the 
time has come for the highest spiritual author- 
ity of the world to emphasize the doty of peace 
toward mankind and to declare that there are 
too many indications of a war in the future, 
which would be more disastrous than the last 
war and which would threaten the return of 
humanity to a state of barbarism. 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Ouamm 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S- PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PubBAcr 

Executive Editor RENfi BONDY Deputy Pubtijher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Assoam Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Depun ■ Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISQNS Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sales 
Internationa I Herald Tribune. IS1 Avenue Charlesde-Gaulle. 92200 Neuilly-sor-Seine, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Heraldl. Cables Herald Paris. 

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t* 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights referred 





How Can We Help? Tell Apartheid’s Cruelty as It Is 


B 


OSTON — How can outriders 


help to stop the oppression and 
a?Thet 


By Anthony Lewis 


killing in South Africa? The question 
is on the American mind, and events 
make it uieenL Once arain last week, 
25 years after Sharpeville, South Af- 
rican police fired their guns into a 


South African situation. ABC News 
Nightline originated in South Africa 
every night for a week. There were 
ton reports, and government 
and opponents were inter- 


The holders of power in South Africa are 
embarrassed and defensive about thexr system. 


crowd of blades. The dead then and 
since are still being counted. 

In thinking about what we can do, 
we must eschew illusions. The United 
States, for one, cannot reorder South 
Africa. On the other hand, America is 
involved there, economically and 
morally, and the involvement brings 
responsibility. Inescapably, what 
America does matters. ‘ 

As it happens, Americans have just 
had an exceptional glimpse of the. 


viewed on the same programs. After a 
tentative first night, the questions be- 
gan to realities that are the bass for 
reflection on the American role. 

The most remarkable thing about 
the programs was a negative. The 
government officials interviewed 
would not talk about the realities of 
the racial system they administer. 
When asked about apartheid they 
spoke of political “structures" or of 
“uplift in the socioeconomic field." It 


was as if they were holding some 
unpleasant object out at arm's length 
and turning their heads away. 

When Foreign Minister R.F. Botha 
was asked about the fact that blacks 
cannot vote, he said that the govern- 
ment was going to “put together 
structures which will allow for partic- 
ipating in detision-malring. Dearion- 
maVmg at all levels, eventually." 

Germ Vfljoen, the minister who 
handles black affairs, was asked 
about “influx control" — the pass 
laws that restrict where blacks can go. 
He said the government was commit- 
ted to “moving away from the nega- 
tive and discriminating aspects of the 
influx control legislation.* 

Does Mr. Viljoen know— does he 
allow hims elf to know — that under 
influx control black men may get 
passes to work in “white areas" hut 
have to live there for years apart from 


Radio Politics: America Is Budding 


M ARRAKESH, Morocco — 
The Voice of America is 
heard every morning in Morocco as 
clearly and regularly as the crowing 
of the roosters at sunrise- “This is 
the news from Washington,” it 
says, as if the Atlas Mountains out- 
side your window were as dose as 
the Blue Ridge of Virginia. 

With a careful touch on the dial, 
you hear the conflicting babble of 
the world: Moscow radio on more 
channels than anybody else, loud 
and accusative; the less frequent 
voices of the West from West Ger- 
many, France and the Netherlands; 
the quiet cadences from Loudon — 
Here is the news, read by so and so, 
in the World Service of the BBC. 

These shortwave stations are in- 
deed a “world service,” neglected 
because they are not heard in their 
own countries, They are bringing 
the news to Africa as never before, 
and reminding at least a remnant of 
leaders and listeners of what is go- 
ing on beyond their borders. 

Charles Z. Wick, director of the 
U.S. Information Agency, was here 
the other day to note the beginning 
of a new Voice of America short- 
wave relay station in Morocco. 
Others are m the process of negotia- 
tion in Israel, and under construc- 
tion in Sri I-imfai and T hailand. 

Agreements have been reached for 
medium-wave transmitters in Costa 
Rica and Belize to extend the reach 
of the VOA into Central America. 

The Voice of America's signal 
comes clear to Morocco but is weak 
in many parts of the Middle East 
and in eastern parts of the Soviet 


By James Reston 


Union, where shortwave radio is 
the maimsource of information.. 

What is .going on now is not only 
an argument about “star wars" but 
a different star war, not about mis- 
siles but about news and ideas car- 
ried by radio into the remotest val- 
leys of the world. The balance of 
radio power between America and 
the Soviet Union is much more fa- 
vorable to Moscow than the bal- 
ance of military power. But the 
Voice of America and its partners. 
Radio Free Europe and Radio lib- 
erty, still do fairly well. 

Broadcasting m 42 
they estimate that they reach 110 
million listeners, many of whom 
never hear the news another way. 

But in this other star war, as 
in the nrilitaiy war, technology 
chan g es the balance, and money 
makes a difference. For example: 


• More than 80 percent of the 
VOA’s 108 transmitters are 15 


years old, and more than 35 percent 

are 30 years old. 

• The VOA broadcasts for 989 
hours a week in 42 languages. Mos- 
cow radio broadcasts 2,175 hours a 
week in 81 languages. 

• The United States ranks fifth 
in hours of broadcasting to Africa, 
fifth in hours to Latin America and 
the Caribbean, sixth in hours to 
Eastern Europe and East Asia. 

This need not be worrying; for if 
you listen to the broadcasts izz Mo- 
rocco from Moscow radio and also 
from the VOA, the BBC and West 


Germany, France and the Nether- 
lands, the contrast between Mos- 
cow's vicious propaganda and the 
West's objective reporting — even 
of news that the Western countries , 
do not like — is startling. 

But there are many areas of Afri- 
ca, Asia and Latin America where 
the reach of Moscow radio is longer 
than the reach of the VOA or the 
BBC Hence Mr. Wide’s travels 
around the world to tty to negotiate 
new shortwave facilities. He wiB 
also be spending the next few 
months appealing to Congress for 
money to extend his reach. 

His main problem is that mod- 
ernization of the VOA cannot be 
done effectively on a yearly basis 
but takes at least a five-year budd- 
ing program, which he estimates at 
a cost or $13 to 51.6 billion. 

On Capitol Hill, where lawmak- 
ers are trying to air the budget 
deficit and are even rejecting Presi- 
dent Ragan's military budget, get- 
ting funds for this other star war 
will not be eaty. But fortunatdy it is 
the main war that we have these 
days. It deserves more attention 


from Congress than it is getting. 

“ “ a the MX 


The Senate approved 
program at a cost of 51-5 billion, 
which is about the suggested cost of 
the VOA over the next five years. 
Maybe this will have more influ- 
ence on the R ussians than five years 
of effective broadcasting by the 
Voice of America. But in Morocco 
and in Geneva, the power of the 
word and the daily sound of Ameri- 
ca’s voice may be more important. 

The New York Times. 


WhUe Britam Muffles a Trusty Voice 


L ONDON — The BBC recently 
/published a document which 


By Jonathan Power 


that Margaret Thatcher is 
working on an urge expressed 
four years ago to turn the corpora- 
tion’s overseas service into a ‘mas- 
sive propaganda campaign of a 
kind we nave never mounted yet” 

At the time she was publicly shot 
down by Gerard Mansell, then 
head of the BBCs External Ser- 
vices, who retorted that “to convert 
what we do into propaganda would 
be utterly counterproductive be- 
cause our stock in trade is the 
truth." But his successors do not 
seem to be prepared to mount the 
same sort of counterattack. 

The new report, written by ajcanl 
review team of the BBC and the 
Foreign Office, makes the BBC 
sound like what its detractors in 
Moscow call it: a tool of govern- 
ment In schoolmasterly tones it re- 
minds the BBC of its duty “to 
broadcast in the national ioteresL" 
And “given that the BBC continues 
to broadcast externally at the re- 
quest of the government, we consid- 
er that the concept of the Foreign 
Office prescribing the parameters 
of the External Services is righL" 

The report dudes the Foreign 
Office for laxity; “We have found 
that the Foreign Office has limited 
its own role. To that extent, there 
have been weaknesses in the re- 
sponsibility for and the account- 
ability of ihe External Services." 

If Washington pontificated this 
way on the role of the Voice of 
America, the British press would 
editorialize on the comparatively 
independent virtues.of the BBC. 


This is going to be grist for the 
mill in Moscow. “How can we call 
independent,” a commentary on 
Moscow radio once said, “a radio 
station whose broadcasting time 
and the langnaw* in which it broad- 
casts are strictly in keeping with 
government injunctions?* 

Radio Moscow has noted rightly 
that the BBC is a potent tool among 
listeners in Third World countries. 
“The corporation has amassed a 
considerable propaganda arsenal 
over the more than 50 years of its 
existence, much greater than other 


centers of 


war. 


Mrs. Thatcher appears to miss 
the lesson of 50 years of history: 
The BBCs reputation was built m 
an age when the British govern- 
ment, while it always hdd the 
BBCs purse, was rather more lais- 
sez-faire in its attitude to string- 
pulling. Political interference and 
finflnMfll stringency risk undoing 
what took decades of careful man- 
agement to achieve. 

The BBC can maintain its effeo 


Moscow, Radio Beijing and a host 
of others. The output of major in- 
ternational broadcasters has ex- 
panded from a total of 2J300 hours 
a week in 1950 to more than 10,000 
in 1984. No longer is the BBC on its 
own, and other stations are often 
much easier on the ear. 

Listeners were prepared to strain 
for the chimes of Big Ben and the 
sonorous tones of BBC news re- 
porting when it was accepted that 
radio listening was full of crackle 
and whistle. But why do it today? 
Or, if the effort is made for 15 
minutes of news, why stay tuned fra: 
the arts and economic programs, 
the literature and science? Listen- 
ers' choice is now suduhat levels of 
static tolerance have dropped. 

According to its own surveys the 
BBC has the largest audience 
international broadcasters 
fy Brazil, Chile, Bangladesh, 


in 


tiveness only if its independence is 
its financia’ 


sources significantly increased. 

Part of the BBCs success was 
that for long it was technically su- 
perior to its rivals. But successive 
efforts to whittle away at its budget 
have meant that it is today less 
audible and broadcasts for fewer 
hours than many rivals. 

The BBC has been overtaken by 
the big spending of the Voice.df 
America, Deutsche Welle. Radio 


Nigeria, Argentina, Greece, Fin- 
land, France and the United States. 
It is second in Pakistan, Indonesia, 
Japan, Peru, Morocco, Thailand 
and Mexico. This does not match 
the BBCs self-image as the world’s 
premier broadcasting organization. 

It is perhaps only a question of 
time before morale widun the cor- 
poration starts to plummet At the 
moment it is surprisingly high. But, 
corne a point the job of nation 
speaking to nation will lose its spir- 
it A relatively objective voice on 
which an important part of the 
Third World and Eastern Europe 
has come to depend will become 
flabby and inconsequential 

International Herald Tribune. 

AH rights reserved 


their wives and families? What does 
he think the “positive" aspects of 
such laws are? Can he imagine the 
humiliati on of living in a single- sex 
hostel of being stopped by police- 
men d emanding to see his pass? 

When Bishop Desmond Tutu 
asked why he could not vote. Foreign 
Minister Botha said that he could — 
in one of the black “homelands" cre- 
ated by the government In recent 
years eight million blacks have been 
stripped of their citizenship and told 


that they are now citizens of a home- 
land. Mr. 


Botha said the government 
hoped to “resolve this problem,'’ too, 
“because we do not want to rob peo- 
ple of their citizenship” 

Such exchanges indicate that the 
holders of power in South Africa are 
embarrassed and defensive about 
their system, at least before an Amer- 
ican audience. They wiD not talk con- 
cretely about the cruelties it actually 
inflicts. And while they speak much 
of change, they do not speak of re- 
pealing even one of the apartheid 
laws that inflict those cruelties. 

The. other thing that the programs 
made dear, if anyone doubted it, is 


that the issue in South Africa is politi- 
Idpow- 


cal power. The whites who hold pow- 
er are unwilling to share it in any 
meaningful degree. The blacks want 
it and are not going to he contented 
with economic advances or the right 
to eat with whites in a restaurant 

Where does ail this point for Amer- 
ican policy? It shows, I think, that we 
should keep the focus on realities in 
South Africa. That is something we 
can da We can avoid playing Pre- 
toria’s game of obfuscation, of end- 
less talk about “reform,” of Aesopian 
abstractions instead of human facts. 

By that test the Reagan adminis- 
tration's policy of “constructive en- 
gagement is a failure. I thought the 
Rragan policy deserved a trial ou thy 
now we can see that it has saved to 
fudge the realities. To the world, and 
to the black majority in South Africa, 
it has looked like complicity with the 
game of obfuscation. And it has 
clouded American ideals. 

When the South African police 
fired into the crowd at Uitenhage last 
week, President Reagan's reaction 
was to defend the police. He said they 
had acted to stop “rioting” — al- 
though Pretoria itself was uncertain 
and worried enough to have a com- 
mission look into the facts. 

Mr. Reagan did not have the sim- 
ple decency to say what his secretary 
of state md — that the shootings - 
showed “how evil and unacceptable" 
apartheid is. UJS. policy must begin 
by making dear that Americans re- 
ject that evil in aD its reality. 

The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed** Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
art subject to editing. We canned 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


A New Part) 
To Watch 
In Portugal 



ByKenPottinger ri^ ( t I V 

TISBON- The Lisbon cafe' ™ 

JU arcuu is puzzled about wbetf.- ? ’ 

the advent of a prcademialist par 1 ' . ; * i* W 


I directions. No one knows. 

The Partido Renovador Democ 
tico (Democratic Renewal fo? 
wants changes that would likely ua 
the present power balance betwc 


-■ , m 

■ , jnw i.4 S 

mm 




LETTER FROM LISBON 


rhe Assembly of the Republic and 
elected head of stale, by bringing b 
French-style executive president 
For the almost 11 -year-old ft*, 
guesc demoaacy, that is a revofatk 
ary suggestion. Despite their irw 
rude, tne existing parties (with i ■ 
posable exception of the Mosoc 
One Communists) staunchly defea 
broad parliamentarianism, const 


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- mum «*i*M 


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> MR 


-*** — 


their supporters to be as loyal 
football fans an' ' 


and clamor for a I •• 
chance "to make the system work 
The presidentialists are a thn 
Their arrival is also a critical cc . 
mentary on the present system. 

The PRD was formal late 1 
month, after a difficult JO-zanr " ; 
long gestation, by an edcctic grout 
business and professional mm, fm 
era and unemployed politicians, " 
event has made fewer ripples d 
predicted, drawing only cautii 
support from expected backers. I 
is probably because of the way it 
been organized and the odd ass - 
meat of characters behind it 
The PRD insists that it is a uniq 
ly national production, inspired 
Portuguese needs and aspirath - 
but Gaullist outlines are chscera 
in the background. And just who _ 
play the central role is an enigma 
The party emerged from a k ’ 
coalition that supported the socc 
ful re-ckction in 1980 of Presic; 
Antdnio Ramalho Eanea. Trading 
the nationwide fund of goodwill 
admiration that General Eari 
honesty and austere provincial 
have won turn, the coalition want ' 
keep the 50-year-old general in p - 
tics after his terra ends in Decern 
The constitution bars him [. ■ 
standing again, but admirers ferv. 
ly hope oe will take the vacant jo. - 
leader of the PRD, endorse a I - 
minded successor as president „ 
force a political realignment, peri : 
even becoming prime minister. , 
General Eanes has few of - 
Gaulle’s traits, but one shared tn 
a lack of taste for politics. Then, 
signs that the PRD may have sen 
ly misjudged his willingness to - 
brace the party as his own. 

But without General Eanes, l 
whose name comes the term “l- * 
ismo” with which the party how 
.stir up national support, the PR - 
bom an orphan with a distinctly - 
certain life expectancy. i 
There is litue doubt that the c , 
try is in crisis— summed up byrf: - 
politician as “pervasive pessimi^ 

“an absence of faith in Portu - .. 
future" — but there is skepti 
about whether the PRD has the t~ 
lion. Most observers place the p 
to the left (rf center, between H 
Socialists of Prime Minister M' ’ _ 
Soares and the Communists of ‘ ‘ 
varo Cunha). But polls indicate tl~ r - ' 
could expect to draw around 25 
cent of the national vote, mainly f- ' 
dissident Socialists and rigbi-af--~ - 
ter Social Democrats, the two pa- 
now in a ruling coalition. 

Its most difficult task is to ft 
presidential candidate. It will pr . 
bly face unyielding opposition ( >. . 
Mr. Soares, who is almost certai- 
be his party’s candidate. . 

At present Mr. Soares has b 
regarded as the likdy winner. Pi t- 
cal sentiment in his favor is grov^^ 
Still, Portugal's most experia 
politician must be aware that 
forces that gather behind him d ^ 1 
□or in praise of his leadership c 
bflities but because civilian all 1 
rives are virtually nonexistent. .. 

Surveying the scene on the 
Portugal’s entry into the Eun» 
Community, an observer can 
the thru: has crane to end the 
Cary’s influence in government. 
Soares remarked recently that ew ' a 
Latin America the figure of the 
cral-p resident is on the wane. ^ 
concern is that unless a break is ir a 
with nxQitary politicians, Portug 
democracy wifi never mature. 

International Herald Tribune-''?^ 


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


No Rest in New Zealand 


1 am a New Zealander 

Europe and a member of a New ! 
land group called Scientists Against 
Nuclear Arms. In the comment I 

have been reading, the only reason 

given for visits % U.S. nuclear- 
armed ships to New Zealand ports 
was to provide rest and recreation for 
the crews. As far as is known public- 

ly, no significant technical or straie- 

pc support was provided during such 

visits, nor was it expected or request- 

ed. So what our government’s ban is 
denying the Americans is the chance 
for their sailors to relax inNew Zea- 

land ports rather than in Hawaii for 
example. This would seem a relative- 

ly minor curtailment of American 
freedom of movement in the Pacific. 


RJL WHITE. 
Zorich. 


exist" on a r.laim that Israel is ' 
oldest of nations.” How can Amt 
accept such a claim when the Isra 

today was founded in 1948 by pa 

whose only connection with tne'.* 
of antiquity was a common relig 
There is no racial continuity, an 

the mtmenmg 2,000 years Jews* 

been citizens of other nations. V 
/one becoming an Amen 

“ s of race or religioa, f 

T .Jy and entirely renm 

and atriure ail and fid 

to any foreign prince, potentate, ; ■_ 
or sovereignty to whom or whicl 

or she has] heretofore been a 

jecL” In implying that Jews areal > 

such a requirement, Mr. Ehan f.; J 
ammuni tion tO anti-Jews (OTOlK . 
ly called “anti-Semites”) who a 

that Jews are not really Amenta' 
MILES copelan- . 
Oxford. Englan ;* 



«•.***;« M, « ww 




■*| r r«*nrv R«tiH 





r •■!** : 
WHIM 

*** ire 


I. i 


Controversy is part of the human 
condition. Could we not look on it 
with some humor— -in the spirit, say, 
of Winston Churchill who found 
himself in 1922 "all at once without 
on office, without a seat, without a 
party and without an appendix"? 

M. de SELYS LONGCHAMPS. 

Seoul 


Marriage in Singapore 

The report “Love’s Labor 


Effort by Singapore w Play Cn,, 
(A forth 7) raises doubts amoflk 


l‘-i 


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**■■* * 

■* ^ 

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Singaporeans about Prune NfiOi, 
Lee Kuan Yew’s qualifieatfaO 

.... , ...... TVa nfi ■ 






Israel, f Oldest of Nations’ 


Regarding the minion column “ Mu- 
barak : A Needed Plunge Into Cold 
Diplomatic Waters " (March 18): 

Abba Ehan bases Israel's “right to 


manage our tax money. The 
for spending on education, to 

ate^lfhe government's Social 
opment unit, which encourages ' . 
rimes among the better-eduC', 
citizens, is sacrilegious and wasit 
SULTANAH MO HAM ED SHAY, 
Manama. Bohnu 


->» fm 
, M 

urn 


'ret-S. 5 3 

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MR 









HralhS^ribune, 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


)NDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 


Page 


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Eurobond Yields 

For Weak Ended March 20 

U-SJ is term. Inti inst 

U^-S Iona term* ind. — 
UAS medium term, Ind. _ 

CaaS medium term 

French Fr. medium term 

Sterling medium term 

Yen medium term. Inti Inst 

Yen Is form. Inti Inst. 

ECU short term 

ECU medium term 

ECU ions term 

EUA long term 


FLx Ig term. Inti Inst. 

FLx medium term ______ 

Cala/tam/ by me Luxemboura Stock Ex- 


1ZA5 % 
1160 % 
1135 % 
1166 % 
11.63 % 
1UM % 
7 JO % 
768 % 
9J» % 
969 % 
9.96 % 
923 % 
1037 % 
1009 % 


Market Turnover 

For Week Ended March 22 

.{Miltons o 1 U£. Dpllanl 

NaHMIar 
total Dollar EuMMMt 
Cede! 1526560 1179040 147460 

Eurodear 2073190 2487460 16S9.90 


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few Eurodollar Calendar 
town Sharply Last Week 

ByGARLGEWlRTZ 

International Herald Tribune 

ARIS — Hie dollar fell from favor last week, chnHding 
between 2 and 8 percent against other major currencies; 
as a result, it lost its preemmratpoffltion in the Eurobond 
"k. market’s new-issue calendar. There were only she new 
. .. : rodollar issues launched last week, compared with 17 in other 
" r >Tencaes — a sharp reversal from the dominant role the dollar 

- v ; played since 1981. In value terms, however, the dollar just 
•— : :ljtaged to keep its lead position: the six issues totaled $1.15 
v - /lion while the 17 others were equal to $985 million 

- ’."'While economists have grown hoarse warning that the dollar is 

iously overvalued and npe 1 

: • - a setback, and central 
. " okers have thrown biHions 

- v . ; dollars into the foreigu- 
- ■ijange market to stem its 

• . 1 ' ’> ^ vance, the dollar was final- 
r ' .r," blocked down by a rela- 
” -“..•"/■■dy jnrimp nrfant accident 
• : r-. . Ohio. 

..'•Relatively unimportant 
V auise the 70 statc-char- 
■- ^ ed savings and loan asso- 
’ - lions that were temporar- 

.* : closed by the governor to 

- ^ It a run liad total assets of 
" • > Z’^oat $53 billion — hardly a 
" v -"nd-boggling number. 

• ” • ^;'But the lines of depositors 
7 - iting to withdraw their 

evoked somber im- 
C s of the bank failures dur- 
-7; the Depression, an event 
• ... ,. Tist people would like to believe could never recur, and relrin- 
.--..,-7x1 doubts about the viability of the banking system that 
. -V;Vfaced when the Third World debt crisis exploded in mid-1 982. 
-.* -j- ljose basic fears had been calmed by the swift official measures 

- - - 7. ten to reduce the danger of a financial catastrophe, but — as 

7 ; Ohio events demonstrated — concern about the banldng 
> -. v - . item continues to lurk just beneath the surface. 

- fJ'Just as the foreign-exchange market was be ginning to regain its 
v • - '1m after the Ohio scare, it was hit again, this time by a stream of 
- . * parently conflicting data coming out of Washhigton. First 

. - 7 ' me news of the “flash” estimate of first-quarter U.S. economic 
•’ >wtb — the first of three official numbers cm the total output of 
r . - ods and services. In a few weeks, as more data becomes 
.. ailable, the flash figure will be revised and only later in the 
amd quarter will a final number be seL 

- 7' TButtneirutial figure was a shocker — estimating the advance at 

7 percent, half the pace set in the previous quarter and well 
. 'low what most analysts had been projecting. The implication 

- such slower growth was that U.S. interest rates would not be 
lug and, more likely, would be easing. That triggered some 
are weakness for the dollar, but set off a rally in the New York 

- ~ . ad market. 

r HAT, too, was short-lived. The next day, W^nington, in 
reporting February’s factory orders for durable goods, 
revised sharply higher the figures for January’s orders to 
- - : . 2 percent from the 1.8 percent initially announced. That revi- 
• m overshadowed February's decline of 02 percent — a figure 
- .any analysts suspect will be revised upward — and fuded 
- . i-ipidons that the “flash” C5NP, estimate paints! an undu^r . 
- . ssimistic picture. 

. . •• JSome analysts, for example, believe the- 11-percent dedine in 
. bruary housing starts, also reported last week, bad more to do 
- lh severe winter weather than a slowing economy. Likewise, the 
. r bruary orders report showed a record 29.6-paxent rise in non- 
. litary orders — not lie stuff for an economic downturn. 

- - As a result, the bond-market rally aborted as traders turned 
- sir attention to the pickup in the rate of inflation that the latest 

S. figures also showed. In addition, analysts fretted that the 
- - :m 0.4-percent rise in fourth-quarter corporate profits, also 
■ Torted last week, would not provide companies with enough 
. xraaUy generated cash and would drive them to seek more 
tside endit — putting upward pressure on interest rates. 

The immediate test for the New York credit market will be this 
*k’s Treasury sale of $16.25 billion worth of four- , seven- and 
-year paper. 

'r Amid all this uncertainty, the Eurobond market turned its 
. Tendon to other cunendes. The British pound was by far the 
: -vorite on the theory that interest rates higher than those 
. - ailable on Deutsche marks, European Currency Units or yen 
- ike the pound a better candidate for revaluation against the 
diar — a theory borne out by developments last week. The 

- . (Continued on Page 9, Col I) 


Last Week’s Markets 

AH figures are as of dasa of trading Friday 


ock Indexes 

feed States 


Money Rates 


LutWk. PravJfVk. K.a>» 
1267.45 1 J4779 +160 




J«l 14926 

Trans. _ 59188 
Pl»__ 17S.T3 
J»5M_ 17984 

SECp__ 10365 


ivsiPnieenmoctuStcariHei. 


14780 +164 
602.19 —127 
17364 +081 
17663 +165 
10265 +1.17 


JE10IL_ 130010 
98720 



120050 —064 
UXA50 —126 


Seng. 126069 123326 +202 


KTTFIi> ! ^ 1 ‘ WDJ - 


1254260 1266803 +050 


Unted States 

UntWk. 

Wttlft. 

Discount rote 

8 

8 

Federal funds rofe_. 

811/16 

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Will Davis, Murdoch Be 
An Odd GouphatFox ? 


Robert Lindsey 

few York Timet Senice 
LOS ANGET.ES — The announcement last week that 


1 



movie industry, like the oil business, can turn up dry boles. 

The announcement an Wednesday inclii^p d an endorsement by 
Mr. Murdoch of Bany Diller, Fox's chairman But it left in doubt 
the effect the purchase might have on the kind of films the studio 
produces. It also raised questions about the future of the former 
Paramount Pictures executive who had been lured to Fox by Mr. 
Davis last September by the promise of a lucrative contract that was 
widely reported to indude part ownership- of Fox. ' 

In June 1981, Mr. Davis purchased Fox, then a publicly held 
company, for more than $722 minion. It was a time of euphoric 
profits for the movie industry, especially Fox, which had distributed 
one of the most profitable movies of all time, “Star Wars.” 

Mr. Davis sold some of the corporation’s properties, recouping 
part of his inyestmeni, but hits — and profits from the film business 
— eluded him 

Fox's last major hit was “Romancing the Stone” more than a year 
ago. 

Since then u has distributed mostly a series of box-office disasters 
such as “Rhinestone,” starring Sylvester Stallone and Dolly Parton, 
“Blame It on Rio,” with Michael raine L and “Unfaithfully Yours,” 
with Dudley Moore and Nastassia Kinski. 

Fox’s television production company, once a major source of 
revenue, also ran into trouble. 

Mr. Davis look the bold stroke of hiring Mr. Diller away from 
Paramount in September. Under Mr. Diller, Paramount had pro- 
duced hits as diverse as “Raiders of the Lost Aik,” “Ordinary 
People,” “48 Hours,” “Flashdance” and “Terms of Endearment” 

But il can take two or three years to get a new movie produced 
and on the screen, and Mh Diller has not had time to put a stamp 
yet on Fox's output. 

Two of the last pictures developed under his guidance at Para- 
mount, ‘Beverly Hills Cop” and ‘^Witness,” have been successful 
But Fox's most recent new film, “Turk 182,” starring Timothy 
Hutton, has proved to be another economic disaster. 

The merger announcement raised several questions: Did Mr. 
Diller know in advance of the agreement between Mr. Davis and 
Mr. Murdoch, and how will it affect his reported equity interest in - 
the company? Will two such strong-willed, independent men as Mr. 
Davis and Mr. Murdoch get along as partners in running the 
company once dominated by one of Hollywood's legendary moguls, 
Darryl F. Zanudc? If they don't get along, win Mr. Murdoch 
eventually buy out his partner? 

Although Mr. Murdoch has a reputation for appointing his own 
people to manage newspapers and magazines that he has acquired, 
he indicated Wednesday he did not plan to replace Mr. Diller, who, 
it has been speculated, bad been given approximately 5 percent of 
the stock in Fox by Mr. Davis. “I look forward to supporting Diller 
and bis executive team.” he said 

If Mr. Diller derides to stay with Fox, his track record at 
Paramount suggests that he may be able to reverse the fortunes of 
Fox and turn out some hits. However, many of the senior aides who 
had worked under him at Paramount and had been responsible on a 
day-to-day basis for film production, executives such as Michael 
Eisner arid Jeff Katzenberg, did not follow him to Fox. 


Mqior Dement* of Rupert Murdoch's Empire 



Th* N*w Yak r«n 

For Mr. Davis, a man who has a reputation for insisting ou 
running things with a tight fist, the derision to accept Mr. Murdoch 
as his partner was apparently a surrender to the financial shoals of 
Hollywood. 

When Mr. Davis purchased the company, it had grown wealthy 
with the profits from “Star Wars” under Damis StanfiD, a Rhodes 
scholar who was more financier than showman. 

The company had its origins in 191 6 under the pioneer filmmaker 
William Fox, who, in 1935, merged his failing company with 20th 
Century Co. founded by Zanuck, who was ousted m a celebrated 
coup by his son, Richard, during the 1960s. 

Mr. Davis replaced Mr. StanilQ with Alan J. Hirschfidd, a 
onetime Wall Street financier and former chief executive of Colum- 
bia Pictures. Before long. Sherry l -anting, the first woman to be 
head of production at a major studio, was also gone. 

Mr. Hirschfidd could not produce a steady diet of hits, nor did 
other executives Mr. Davis brought to the company. Finally, be 
lured Mr. Diller away from Paramount, but it was not enough to 
halt the hemorrhaging of money spent rat producing and promoting 
motion, pictures that failed to nod au dience s. 

Only two weeks ago. Fox announced that it had had to raise $170 
million in additional capital including $50 mStion that it said had 
been pledged by Mr. Davis, to maintain its level of film production. 

It said its bankers had agreed to raise its credit Him* to $400 
million from $396 million ana given it three years of additional time, 
until the middle of 1988, to begin repaying the debt 

Company spokesmen said that the studio had considered other 
means of raising eqtaty, including the disposal of assets or making 
an offering of debt or preferred stock, but there was no hint in this 

(Continued on Page 9, CoL 4) 


Inter-American Bank Gtes Need for Investment 


Heaters 

VIENNA — The.ecanbmy erf 
debt-laden Latin America' still 
shows severe strain and badly 
needs new investment to boost 
growth, despite signs of recovery 
last year, the Inter-American De- 
velopment Bank said Sunday. 

The region, dogged by $360 bil- 
lion. of foreign debt and runaway 
inflation, appeared in 1984 to have 
seen a turnaround of the deep re- 
cession which had plagued it since 
1981, the bank sard is its animal 
report 


But gross domestic prodnet, de- 
spite a rise ‘of 2 percent in 1984, ; 
failed W 'surpass the 1980 lewd. - 
There had also been no rise in liv- 
ing standards; although the recov- 
ery was enough to halt a dedine in 
per capita GDP, the bank said. 
GDP is a measure of goods and 
services produced, rarandrag in- 
come from foreign investments. 

“It is undear at this point wheth- 
er the 1984 recovery halted the 
fonr-year glide in investment in the 
region. It is certain, however, that 
satisfactory rates erf growth wfll not 


be resumed without a resurgence in 
^ihwwtmeol” the n^ort-said. ■■ * 
^ “Tberqiorilobei^iaitedaJthe 
' 26th annual meeting of tire Inter- 
, American Development Bank in 
1 Vienna on Monday, said the bank 
-provided record support to the re- 
gion last year with loans of $3567 
billion. V 

Although GDP returned to 
roughly the 1980 level-m the inter- 
vening years the population had 
grown by ,more than 33 million 
people, the report said. 

It said Latin America recorded a 


ICI Tapping Euronote Market for $400 Million 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Euronote facilities 
con tinued to dominate the interna- 
tional bank-credit market last week 
with Imperial Chemical Industries 
PLC arranging a S400-million fa- 
cility, Marriott Corp. $150 million, 
Soivay ft Ge. $100 imDion, a Swed- 
ish nuclear group $100 mfliion, and 
Micbdin & Oe. $60 millioru 

ICTs package was the most note- 
worthy as it is the first ’to include 
the option to sell one-to-five-year 
notes denominated in British 
pounds. That option is subject to 
parliamentary approval of last 
week’s budget message, which pro- 
posed allowing British companies 
to sell paper with such short matu- 
rities. Previously, five years was the 

mfnimnm maturity. 

The Euronotes can also be de- 
nominated in dollars and will be 
sold through a tender panel which 
would handle both currencies. In 
addition, ICI can request, short- 
term advances from banks in either 
dollars, pounds or Deutsche marks. 

The facility fee is set at a thin 4. 
basis points, or 0.04 percent, for the 
first four years. 6 basis points for 
the next four years and 9 and 10 


basis points in the final two years. 


Backing the operation is a 10- 
year line of credit, whose cost fluc- 
tuates in tine with the amount 


if more than half of the facility is 
drawn from the banks. 


■ OKG, a special-] 
ny operating three 
iplanrs, is seeking $100 
five years. It is paying 
facility fee of 1CT basis points and 
banks' are guaranteed.a maximum 
cants for the first fee cm the notes of 10 bads points 
over Libor. 


SYNDICATED LOANS 


is sashing $100 mil Hon for 
'art at m 11 * l 


os p cants tor tne rust 
10 basis points for up 
[lion ana 1L5 basis 


drawn: 5 basis 
$100 million, 

to $200 millio n 

points for up to $400 million. 

Marriott's fatality runs for seven 
years but begins to amortize after 
the fifth year, reducing the aggre- 
gate amount of notes or drawings 
that can be made to an average life 
erf six years. The company is paying 
an annual underwriting fee of 1k- 
percent and banks agree to take 
any notes' that a tender panel does 
not bid for at a maximum charge of 
20 baas prints over Libor. 

Sofiber Ltd, a Bermuda subsid- 
iary of the Belgian chemical com- 
pany Sotvay. is seeking 5100 mil- 
lion far seven years. It will pay 
banks an attmial fee of 10 basis 
prints and if the tender panel does 
not bid for the paper the banks are 
obliged to take its short-term notes 
for a maximum 20 baas points over 
Libor. This fee rises 5 basis points 


The Michelin subsidiary Miche- 
En Finance Pays-Bas, guaranteed 
by Cie. Finandirc Michelin of 
Switzerland, is seeking $60 million 
for five wars. This isetpec ted to be 
a Merrill Lynch-managed revolv- 
ing underwriting fatality —which 
means that the small “dab” group 
of underwriters backing the futility 
wiD not be asked to bid for the 
short-term notes but canjequest to 
have notes at the price Marill 
Lynch sets. 

This removal of underwriters 


from the bidding process is not 
popular with underwriters, as was 
evidenced again last week by the 
resistance of bankers to the $300- 
mfllion, 10-year facility being ar- 
ranged by France's Crtdit cTEqui- 
pement des Petites et Moyeanes 
Enterprises. In that facility, Bank 
of America (which is arranging, the 
facility) and Lehman Brothers 
share the exclusive right to offer 
short-term dollar notes. The under- 
writing syndicate gets to bid only 
for notes denominated in European 
Currency Units. 

In the near-doimant syndicated 
bank loan sector, Greece is seeking 
an right-year credit of $450 million, 
paying 14-print over Libor for the 
first three years and ft-poinl over 
Libor thereafter. The Greeks, who 
bad hoped to attain a V4-poini mar- 
gin for four years, can request 
drawings in ether dollars, pounds 
or 


U.S. $500,000,000 

Kingdom of Sweden 



Floating Rate Notes Due 2024' 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six month Interest Period from 
25th March 1985 to 25th September 1985 the Notes win 
carry an Interest Rate of 10VW£ per annum and the 
Coupon Amount per U.S. $10,000 wiU be US. $514.31. 
Merrill Lynch International Bank Limited 

Ag«u Bank. 


We proudly 
announce 
the opening of an 
exciting new hotel 
drat rivals your 
favorites in Europe. 

The Century PlazaToujer 

on Los Angeles’ Westside. 

. Please call 
for reservations. 



WESTfN Homs 


Centur^rlaza 

Cable: CENPBLAZA Telex 69S-664 Dept.T 


Pan Am Reaches 
Tentative Pact 
Wilh Workers 


large trade surplus last year, by 

■ importing less - and by increasing 
exports for the first time in three 
years — by 10 percent 

The United Nations Economic 
Commission for Latin America had 
estimated the region’s deficit on 

■ current account was cot from $9 
bflHoninl983 to $3 billion in 1984. 

Interest payments swallowed up 
a high bat dedining portion erf ex- 
port earnings, dropping from 39 
percent in 1982 to 36 percent in 
1983, and 35 percent in 1984, the 
bank said. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Pan American 
World Airways on Saturday 
reached a tentative settlement with 
striking ground workers after a 24- 
day walkout that halted half the 
airline's flights, both sides an- 
nounced. 

The agreement must be submit- 
ted to a ratification vote by 5,800 
members of the Transport Workers 
Union before they can come back 
to work, negotiators said. Details 
of the three-year contract, which is 
retroactive lo Jan. I, were not dis- 
closed pending, the vole. 

The financially troubled airline 
still faces an April 1 strike deadline 
set by its 6,000 flight attendants. 

“Needless to say, 1 am delighted 
that an agreement has been 
reached,” said Robert Brown, the 
federal mediator in the dispute. “I 
want lo compliment both rides on a 
very vigorous bargaining effort” 

Jeff Kriendler, a Pan Am vice 
president said the company pre- 
ferred not to comment until it 
found out whether the three-year 
contract would be ratified. 

Union sources said the tentative 
pact was similar to Pan Am's Iasi 
offer before the strike, with the 
only major change being stronger 
protection against full-time work- 
ers losing thdr jobs to part-time 
employees. Sources said the accord 
would also permit Pan Am to 
stretch out, from fours years to sev- 
en. the time for most new workers 
to reach top salary scale. 

The proposed pact also would 
give the company the right to hire 
part-time employees, lower by 30 
percent starting salaries for future 
employees and drastically reduce 
pension benefits, said the union of- 
ficials. who spoke only on condi- 
tion they not be identified. 

The TWU struck the carrier on 
Feb. 28 after rgecting a company 
offer to raise salaries by 20 percent 
over 36 months, plus an immediate 
$1,200 bonus and a $900 bonus for 
other employees negotiating for 
new work agreements. 

The union, which represents 
5,800 mechanics, baggage handlers 
and flight dispatchers, was asking 
for a “snapback” to the 14-petceni 
wage increase its members agreed 
to forgo in 1982 to assist the amine. 

Earlier, Pan Am pilots had 
agreed to a 32-month contract that 
would gradually restore the sacri- 
ficed wage gains, but a similar 
package was not attractive to the 
TWU. 

In its efforts to save money. Pan 
Am has cm 8,000 jobs over the last 
five years and has asked all of its 
19,000 unionized employees to in- 
crease productivity and agree to 
large redactions m pension and 
health care benefits. 

Pan Am has not made a profit 
since 1980. Its net losses totaled 
$762 million from 1980 through 


1984 and it posted a loss of S207.8 
milli on last year on revenue of 
$3,68 billion. 

The airline's debts have soared 
to $1 billion, forcing it io sell off 
assets, including a hotel chain and 
its headquarters building in New 
York, in which the company now 
leases space. 

Analysts say that many of Pan 
An's problems stem from its heavy 
share of overseas destinations — 8U 
percent of its scheduled flights — 
which have become less profitable 
because of the falling value of other 
currencies against the dollar. 

The strike forced Pan Am to re- 
duce its schedule by half, hitting 
domestic flights particularly hard. 
Previously, it carried 39,000 pas- 
sengers daily on 400 flight* to 89 
cities on six ’continents, and main- 
tained major operations in New 
York, Miami. Houston, Los Ange- 
les, San Francisco and Honolulu. 


All 70 Thrifts 
Reopen in Ohio 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — The Ohio 
Department of Commerce said 
the Federal Home Loan Bank 
Board had approved the limited 
reopening of 67 saving* and 
loan associations shut by the 
state's governor on March 15. 
allowing depositors to make 
withdrawals of up to $750 each. 

A spokesman said three more 
savings and loans opened for 
business without limitations. 
The associations, which were 
open Saturday, were closed by 
Governor Richard F. Celeste 
when a run on Home Slate Sav- 
ings Bank in Cindnnan spread 
to several other state-chartered 
institutions. All had been in- 
sured by a private, state-regu- 
lated fund. 

While the announcement Late 
Friday brought relief to the 
500,000 customers of the thrifts, 
the institutions must still wait 
to see if they qualify for federal 
insurance coverage before they 
can resume full, normal opera- 
tions. To reopen on a full-ser- 
vice basis, the thrift units must 
apply for federal deposit insur- 
ance. State banking officials 
must then determine that the 
thrift unit will meet the require- 
ments for federal insurance. 


Gold Options (ptecata WoeJ. 


Mom Mar 


namn 
MMQJB 
635-835 
30-450 
LSD- 30 




2203450 


16JDWO 

USM50 

KUD123D 

6WR75 

475- 473 


No* 


23503130 

1903263 

lssDiaoa 

T27ST475 

laODTzm 


Get* 31500- 31600 

Vafeas White WcM&A. 

V. Qud *1 VkM-tnmc 
121 1 Genm L Sw Eari— J 
Td.3IUSI - Telex 2S30S 


IMMBSA NACIONAL 
ML HTMLEO SJL 

fENPETROL") 

U.S. S25.000.000 
Floating Rale Notea due 1986 
Notice a hereby pvsn pursuant lo Condi- 
tion 3(6) of lh* Tormt and Condi tore of 
rtw abcJvn mentioned Note the* th® Roto 
of htortst (os Iharoin dnfinad) for tha 
k«Mt Period |oa rtwwn dafviad) from 
25th March, 1985 to 25th September, 
1985 is at the annual rata of lOftA. Tha 
U5. dollar amount to which tha holdan 
of Coupon No. 16 wiH ba anntled on duly 
praaarting tha soma for payment on 2Sth 
September, 1985 wiS be US. 3513472 
sabjed to such amendments thereto (or 
appropriate dtetnoove anongementi bj> 
woy of adjustment] which we mav make, 
without further notice, in the event of an 
extension or shortening of the above- 
mentioned Interest Period. 

EWOKAN-AMBUCAN 
BANC* TRUST COMPANY 
(Principal Papng Agent] 


PROFIT FROM GROWTH 







The general concensus of the 
international investment community is 
that 1985 will see further impressive 
growth in the US economy with the US 
dollar continuing strong against other 
major currencies . 

TYN DALL-GU ARD1 AN 
WALL STREET FUND LIMITED 

invests in a cross section of US investment 
funds managed by some of the most able 
and competent of US money managers. 
These funds and their managers are 
screened by us and a prudently diversified 
portfolio is compiled as to value oriented, 
growth and aggressive funds. 
Minimum subscription is US$5,000 -on 
which an entry fee of five percent (5%) is 
levied. 

You are invited to complete and mail the 
form below. 

— Tyndall-Guardian* _ — ■ 
Management Limited 

PO Box 1 256, Hamilton 5, Bermuda 

□ / enclose $. as a subscription to 


shares of TyndalLGuardian Wall Street Fund 
□ Please forward particulars of 
Tyndall-Guardian Wall Street Fund 


Name.... 

Address. 


IHT’Mai-85 


£ /•- « 














































































-t: . 


New Eurobond Issues 


Amount . 
(millions) ' Aat - 


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R ATING RATE NOTES 

V» National des $300 
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\I«gury 

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■»!‘ ig Kong 

•-'■i rld Bonk ' 

.';rld Bank 

ir- urnnwedth Bank 
.‘Jtiustrafia 

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■y ic Xerox Finance 
■^ithouse Forte 


V,^ sh Columbia 

''tacfan National . 
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‘J'rekassen 

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ujv Zealand Forest 
i'^ juds- 

,;> JITV-UNKH> 

I '-Jot Aviation 
»v dronta Industry 

xljida Motor 

! 

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■ \hibo Ceramics 


libor 100 


Bbor 100 


Kbd 100 


ECU 125 


99J10 Interest wil be pad orthor merehty at Kovor 1 -(north Libor. 
DrquortBrtjr of 0.103 d cWf 34noritti Libor, or seifKanjafly of 
T/ioew 6 -wmUi Libor, at option of iraw. C&lafale eft par 
in 198$. Fcos 0-23%. pBnornintaiorB$10/)00. Pp^abk^fay?. 

9945 Interest win be rhe lower of T03X of 1 -month Ubor. paid 
wwannually, or 6-month Libor plot 3/16%. Radeensilotf 
par m 2000 and coftjtff at par in 1986. Fw 03%. 
PtnorainafaaSlOjXXl Payable May 23. 

9975 Interast pegged to 6-morth bid rate far EurocUkn, u* 
mortHy. NorccRoUe. Fees 030%. 

99^5 Over frflnMrtt Libor. Until 1992, there wffl be a maximum 
coopofi equd to long-term ea^faand indexes plus !«%. 

Coliobto at par m 1992: Fees 03QX- 


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11% 100 97.60 NoncaOable. 

TT% 100% 7775 NonccfobteT 


99.88 NoncaBoble. 

99-63 Noncaflobfa private pfacemant. 
— Noneoitobfe. 


- £50 

£40 
£40 
£50 
ECU 150 


v 30,000 
Au»$4Q 
DK200 
DK250 
1X200 
NZS20 


12 % 100 
10 % 100 
n loo 
11% 100 
9% 99% 


13% 100% 
11% 100 
12% 100 
11% 100 
15% 100 


2000 open 100 


98 Caflcbfa at 101 in 1991. 

98 Noncnflable. 

98 Cottgfato rtf 100% in 1990, 

97.63 Nanariafale. 

99 NoncaJaUe. Purchase fund to produce a fU&yr cn+rotfi 
m. 

98.25 NancaSabto. 

9775 Caflafak ot 101 in 1993. 


100% 9838 

100% .96.83 NanaaRabie. 


'.I'shinpan 


— Noncafloble. 

99.13 Noncafiable. 

— Nonaallable. 

— Redeamabie at par in 1999. 


— Semiarmuafly. CaflaWn at 104 in 198a Conmlfclo at 
1 < 4Q8^D yen per (hare. 

9875 Semiannual eoupcyimdiajted nt 33k Calablocf 103 in 1990. 
Convertible of an expected 5% premium. Twin to be let 
Atoreh 29. 

— SonwartnuaRy. CaUcfate at 104 in 198a Gmertfcla at 
173420 yen per (bare. 

— Each 5,100-nnrfc bond mMiI Marrataxerasabie info shares 
at 70/ yen per share and at 77.94 yen per nxxfc. 


urodollar Calendar Down Sharply 


Interest Rates j American Exchange Options 

Rise Alter I For the Week Ending March 22 , 1985 

3 -Day Decline 

By Michael Quint 

JVw York Times Service 

NEW YORK — In an abrupt 
turnabout, U.S. interest rates rose 
Friday. after dedinmg during the 
previous three days. . 

Rates for short- and long-term 
Treasury issues rose about 0.1 -per- 
centage point in the first few boors 
of trading, then fluctuated in a nar- 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

row range the rest of the day. Six- a*? » in 
; month Treasury bills, for example, * "J 

ended the day at 8.89 percent, up « "S 

from 8.80 percent, with yields for *m 5 r 
notes and bonds rising by similar " ? w \ 

amounts. «S w St “* ,Vl ^ 

Specialists in the Treasuxy mar- ££ 1K * «* 22 

ket attributed much of the decline *2 m s-E 5 ,B u " l ? 

to a desire among government se- m. m i-m m r r 

rarities dealere to see interest rates ^ * ' w r 

at a hitter level before they began £ St j 7 * 

bidding fm $16.23 billion of new mt, ■» su n* *-h?i»u 
nows' and bonds scheduled for sale ** " 2> if £ J3 "“ * 

this week by the Treasury. In the ^ * aW J » { lh r 

last few weeks, mvestor demand » *■« i«- » r 

has been weak, convincing traders w x vu r \ 

and other participants that higher °»5 “ mm! r 'j 

yields are needed to attract boyers. * i-« ™ r r 

In advance of this week's Trea- 
sury auctions, the four-year notes 
to be sold Tuesday were offered on 
a when-issued basis at 11 J7 per- 
cent, tip from 1126, while the sev- 
en-year notes to be sold Wednes- 
day wens offered at 11.84 percent, 
up from 11.72 percent. The 20-year 
Treasury bonds scheduled for sale 
. Thursday were offered at 12. 11 per- , 

’ cent, up from 11.97. ! 

Amid uncertainty about the in- ] 
terest-rate outlook and weak inves- j 
tor demand lor issues due in more 1 
than two years, traders continued [ 
to focus on each new economic 
statistic, even though they ac- , 
knowledge that any single number 
is not critical to the future of inter- 
est rates. 

In trading Friday, the upward t 
revision of January’s durable goods 
data, to a gain of 3 2 percent from 
the previously announced 1 .8-per- 
cent rise, was enough to overshad- 
ow the 07-percent dip in February. 

Even though the monthly dura- 
ble goods report was described by 
one trader as “a notoriously vola- 
tile, unpredictable and worthless 
number,” the report was followed 
by a quick decline in prioes and rise * 
in short- and long-term interest 1 
rates. 


r r 
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Mutual Funds 

ClMlM Prim Moral Zi. 1Tt5 


• Ifjf -I 

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S-* - ,4 


■- (Coafinued from Page 7) 

■ -; kJ rose 82 percent against the 
-;ir compared with gains of 5.6 
,!;ent for the DM and Swiss franc 
!.23 percent for the yen. 

' ’.^hileooupons on Danish kroner 
-'^Canadian, Australian and New 
i'pnd dollar issues are higher 
I, than those offered on pound 
1 ; aments, die economic funda- 
■.jjnls in those countries make a 
compelling case for nsvalua- 

.L 

'? spite the much lower coupon 
.’'■ed on DM paper, Frankfort 
■j '.ers reported a sharp increase 
■ -;>rrign demand last week and a 
. - ig improvement in prices on 
r';eccHidary markeL 
:ie noteworthy development in 
;;-lolIar sector last week- was the 
‘>jen loss of popularity of “mis- 
floating-rate notes, whidi 
j;5de investors with big — albeit 
; ;;silory" — margins due to the 
') that coupons tied to the six- 
--ith interbank rate are set 
,Ythly. 

f-ast week, the historically wide 
y ad between the one-month rate 
which institntimial investors 
';;d bmow to finance their pur- 
and the six-month rate (at 
± the coupons arc set) nar- 
’Dd sharply — to 13/16 pacent- 
.=' point from 1%-points a week 
• • ;» — driving home the realiza- 
that the big pxxafiLs to be mode 

■ .’cl such migmatchmg can easily 

: ;:ppear. 

,‘i addition, Japanese banks 
• ( di traditionally withdraw from 
. market as their March 31 fiscal 
I!:’ draws dose were rumored to 


be out of the market after having 
.been warned by their head offices 
to limit their portfolio of mis- 
matched paper. 

As. a result, FRNs with fixed 
margins' over the interbank rate 
were back in favor. The margin 
assures holders of a profit. In rc- 
tnm, however, it is now the issuers 
who aim to pocket the benefits to 
be derived from.playing the yield 
curve. 

The easiest of the new formulas 
is the one on Caisse Natkmale des 
Tdteommuxricatians. The French 
agency' reserves the right to set the 
interest rate at the one-, three- or 
six-month London interbank of- 
fered rate — obviously whichever is 

for mismatch°^Sr 

funding is least when the coupon Is 
tied to the one-month rate, the 
margin is the highest, %-point, or 
12j basis points, over libor. This 
deceases to 10 baas points over 
the three-month rate and to 1/ 16- 
point over the six-month rate. 

In fact, this option to select be- 
tween time periods was a standard 
feature of traditional syndicated 
bank loans. The only difference 
was that the margin on the bank 
loans remained constant. 

The formula obviously appealed 
to the market as the amount of the 
15-year issue was increased to $300 
million from the $250 million ini- 
tially announced. 

More oompHcaled is the formula 
chosen by End, the Italian state 
electricity agency, on its S300-nril- 
lion of 20-year notes (which inves- 
tors can redeem after 15 years). It 
will set its coupon at either 103 


percent of one-month Libor or 
3/16-poiiU over six-month Libor, 
whichever is the least expensive. 

The 103 percent is a new twist — 
in effect a floating margin which 
narrows as interest rates fall and 
widens as they rise (with Libor at 9 
percent, the coupon would be 9-27 
percent and at 10 percent Libor the 
coupon would be 1030 percent). 
The only problem with the formu- 
la, analysts complain, is that inter- 
est is always paid semi-annually. 

As aresntt, the compound cost to 
investors funding their holdings 
with one-mouth borrowings in- 
creases at a faster dip than the 
floating margin as the coupon risesu 
The crossover occurs if one-month 
Libor hits 15 percent. At that point 
banks paying monthly interest on 
one-month funds would have lost 2 
bass points by the time the semi- 
annual interest income was re- 
ceived. 

In the ECU market, Saini-Go- 
bain issued 5 125 million of undated 
FRNs. The funds wfll be used to 
provide capital for subsidiaries of 
the nationalized company. Interest 
is set at 14 -point over the interbank 
rate, but during the first seven 
years is linn ted to never bring bibb- 
er than 1%-poinls more than the 
yield on long-term ECU bonds as 
calculated by the Luxembourg 
Stock Exchange. 

Hie seven-year duration of this 
rate cap coincides with the period 
during winch (be bonds cannot be * 
called. After seven years, if Saint- 
Gobain dislikes the rale it is pay- 
ing, it can redeem the issue at no 
penalty to itself. 


ME EUROPEAN COMMUNITY 


[ Proposal to End States 9 Veto Power 


g.s:: 

■ m • *i m * 

Mfc >* 


r \ ' 


O.I.IW <* * 

r--' 

a*: 


Wt*. « • 
***■■“■ 


y By Steven J. Dryden 

IntenwtKmU Herald Tribune 

RUSSELS — EC leaders at 
r summit in Brussels next week- 
y wfll be given a special report 
*' anmendiog that they abolish 
" “ 4 is regarded as one of the most 
•' 3os roadblocks to progress in 
^^tt mrminity — the veto right of 
pPibcr states. The prospects for 
ption of die proposal appear 
i. however. 

he reco mmendation has the lm- 
. .rfified backing only of the six 
founders of the cranmuni ty 
' ’ West Germany, France, Italy, 
fnun, theNetiurlands and Lux- 
The four nations that 
jd the EC after it was founded 
3ritain, Ireland, Denmark and 
: . ece — are in varying degrees 
. - itical or ambivalent about lim- 
tlhe veto power, 
he prtmosal endorsed by thesix 




■f r ; ■■■* 


. oos favors the “general princi- 
diat decisions must be taken by 
“Wied ot Simple majority.” It 
.s that “unanimity wtil still be 
- Bred" in a limited number of 
aptumai cases," which are left 
euned, 

r oder current Common Mattel 
sny member country can veto 
?ons of the ECs council of 
isters on grounds of “vital na- 
j '^al interesL" 

, ' a “c rccommendation to change 

■ V*” «y operating role is contained 
. report drawn up by a cranfliit- 
rcnned at the Fontainebleau 
last June to. produce an 


outline for reforming the commu- 
nity’s institutions. 

Many EC officials believe that 
the planned addition of two new 
members next year, Spain and Por- 
tugal, make the adoption of 
streamlined derision-mating rules 
all the more urgent. 

EC Trade Ministers Brick 

Multilateral Trade Talks 

The EC has made a formal 
pledge to hdp launch a new round 
of multilateral trade negotiations, 
but linked their success to efforts to 
halt protectionism and improve the 
world monetary system. 

EC trade ministers issued -the 
declaration last Tuesday, along 
with a call for the new round to be 
opened in Brussels. 

“So it should be called the Brus- 
sels Round,” Following the so- 
called Kennedy Round of trade lib- 
eralization negotiations of 1964-67 
and the Tokyo Round of 1973-79, 
said Francesco Forte, Irak’s minis- 
ter for European affairs. 

The minist ers' declaration added 
momentum to efforts by the Unit- 
ed States apd Japan to launch a 
new round of trade talks. But the 
EC ministers made clear their view 
that new talks alone would not be 
suffitient to strengthen the world 

trading system. 

The minis ters asked for reaffir- 
mation of international commit- 
ments to hah protectionism, relax 
and dismantle trade restrictions 
and pursue recently derided pro- 


grams of the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade. 

In addition, they said, “deter- 
mined concerted action is required 
to improve the functioning of the 
international monetary system and 
the flow of financial and other re- 
sources to developing countries.” 

Mr. Forte emphasized that while 
the community was not setting 
forth ‘‘conditions’’ for the new 
talks, EC interests would have to be 
recognized if they were to take 
place. 

Reflecting the concern of less de- 
veloped countries that the agenda 
may ignore their interests, the min- 
isters said the new talks should be 
held o(iIy if there is an international 
consensus on objectives and partic- 
ipation. 

The community declaration also 
endorsed the inclusion of trade in 
sendees in the new round of talks, 
as has been urged by the United 
States and Japan. 


U.S. Consumer Rotes 

For W— k Ended Mth 22 

Passbook Savinas. 5J0 

Tax Exempt Bonds 

Bond Buyer 20-Bood I nmn. 9jp 

Money Market Fundi 

Donoehurt 7-Day Ayrogn — , &31 

Bonk Money Market Accounts 
Bank Rate Monitor Index BJM 

Homo MuitBMe 

FMLB aweraoa 1147 


New Partners 
AtFoxFUms 

(Continnedfrom Page 7) 
announcement that negotiations 
were being conducted with Mr. 
Murdoch- 

Under the transaction an- 
nounced Wednesday, Mr. Mur- 
doch’s News .Corp. agreed to pur- 
chase 50 percent of TCF Holdings 
Inc, winch owns the 20Lh Century- 
Fox Film Coin., for $162 million. 
Additionally. Mr. Murdoch said 
his company would advance TCF » 
Holdings $88 milli on. 

- Of the $250 million from .Mr. - 
Murdoch's company. Fox said 
about $132 million would be in- 
vested by TCF Holdings in 20th 
Century-Fox. 

“Following the completion of 
these transactions,” the announce- 
ment said, “the equity percentage 
and shareholder debt positions rtf 
the Davis and News interests wfll CWton 
be equal” 

Hidden between the lines of this 
paragraph was the admission that 
something had changed in Holly- 
wood: Marvin Davis, who since 
1 98V had been the only example in 
town of (he old-fashioned movie 
mogul, a man " who owned bis own 
studio, lode, stock and sound stage, 
no longer ruled 20th Century-Fox 
by himself. 

J Consolidated Trading 
I Of AMEX listing 

I Week ended March 22 


Low Last Ghfte 
IR 1? —1ft , 


[n 


Wo ss 

Com Mut SM 


utiaif 14U 1 
DFA Sm 16534 NL 
DFA inf 1MU0 NL 
Doan Witter: 

CWTF l&n NL 
Dwct r B.14 NL 
DtvGt U5I NL 
HIYtd 1X08 11B4 
IndVJ r IDlM NL 
NtIRK TfflS NL 
Option M» NL 
SearTx W2R.NL 
Tax Ex MB 10-29 
USGwt 1U7 NL 
WrtaW 18.15 NL 
Oeiawaiw Group: 
OMC »A 7 10.15 
OKUt 1£57 17D2 
Ootaw 1UB3L74 


Bid AM 
Rove* 7.7a NL 

5 FT EOT M* ia» 

Safaco hair. 

Eault fJV NL 

Gntlh I7J7 NL 

Ina 1X53 NL 

lc HAS NL 

SiPturt inmt: 

Cami 10.13 10.73 

Grwtn list nil 

inco- 9.U *.77 

IAN NL 
SchMW Fundi: 
CalT* *53 NL 

DiMl 5043 NL 

CaoOl 14. VI NL 

Grwln I1W NL 

Incom 1141 NL 

Mil Fd 2251 NL 

MMB 7J| NL 

NYTok HUN NL 

Sourttv Funds: 
Action 765 


Chicago Exchange Options 

For the Week Ending March 22, 1985 


& pdc» calls Puts I Option A i 


Option A prlco i 

Colls 

loon 

a 

2646 

2716 l 

lOBft 

M 

aft 

an 

MOft 

fS 

1716 

20 

KM 

100 

14ft 

n 

lOM 

«a 

lift 

15ft 

Mift 

in 

n 

raft 

QuCB 

IX 

74ft 

*s 

715 

MO 

r 

St 

315 

in 

X 

T 

315 

no 

4616 

r 

215 

in 

14 

a 

2U 

an 

2116 

r 

215 

210 

11 

IR 

215 

230 

a 

15ft 

Ceuno 

a 

i 

116 

l*ft 

TS 

ft 

9-16 

cm 

40 

7 

a 

6*46 

65 

316 

416 

46ft 

n 

46 

2 

Cflfcot 

ao 

r 

4V6 

34ft 

a 

ft 

146 

34ft 

a 

ft 

7-16 

Onm Ed a 

4 

4ft 

29 

a 

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11-16 

C Dote 

a 

r 

6 

X 

a 

4 

r 

a 

35 

1ft 27-14 

a 

« 

Hi 

11-16 


l»ft 

r 


lift 

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7ft 

1 

116 

4ft 

r 


3ft 

F 


r 

r 


r 

ft 

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ift 

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M6 


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3-U 

3ft 

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26. 

22TV1* 

16 

r 

r 

r 

1* 

Ilk 


ft ■ r 
Ift 4ft 
3ft Oft 


IR 1* —1ft 
9ft 10ft +7 
4 4ft 

1 1ft —ft 

2 ». +ft 

7ft 7ft 

3 3ft +ft 
3ft 3ft -ft 
13ft 14ft +ft 
13ft 14ft —ft 


Volume: 45400000 shorn 
Yam- to Data: samwiss 
I mu*s traded In : 90S 
Advpnem: 314 ; dudinH: < 
unchanaed: 154 
New HMis: 51 ; new lows: 


Consolidated Trading 
Of NYSE listing 

Week ended March 22 


Reuters \ 

MANILA — The ceatral bank 
of the Philippines raid it had ap- 
proved the liquidation of Banco 
rihpino, the country’s largest sav- 
ings bank which has been under 
receivership because of insolvency. 
The central bank said Saturday 
that Banco Filipino could not safe- 
ly reopen because its total assets of 
3.909 bUhtm pesos ($21 3.6 ntiUkm) 
are insufficient to meet total liabil- 
ities of 5.159 billion pesos. 


issuaaTrodadkv 

Mftone»»: ubh; 

uneJKowod: §87 
Now Wotl*: M2; 

1985 in dan 

19S4tBdaf»_~~ 
1983 to daw- 


HU Low 
36ft SDft 
115 83 

131 127 
2116 2116 
43ft 39 
39 34ft 
IN) 90 
34ft 32ft 
IS 14ft 
39ft aft 
33ft ttft 
77W 73M 
52ft 48ft 
4Jft 42ft 
5<ft SD 
43ft 40ft 
15ft 14ft 
47ft 45 
5Dft «ft 
43ft 40ft 

: 2345 

; dactlnns-. 933 

now lows: 40 
Velma 


llMW +31 ft 
127ft —ft 
21» +ft 
42ft +4ft 

imS+aoid 
34ft —ft 
16ft —ft 
29ft +1 
TOfc -Htt 
73ft —3ft 
51ft +316 
42ft -ft 

a +]ft 
42ft +!ft 
15 

47ft +7ft 

49ft +ft 
40ft —2ft 



| Coma 37ft 

15-1* 


216 



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NV> 36ft 


IF YOU GET A KICK 
OUT OF SOCCER, READ 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE IHT 




































aSSiTO.'S 12 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 


International Bond Prices - Week of March 21 

Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-623-1277 

Prices may vary according to market conditumH and other factors. 


Mnr Price Mot LBeCurr 


(Continued from Page 8) 






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LFB Luxembourg Franc 
SFR Swiss Franc 
FF FcgrwJi Franc 


,3^$ iy ^ 









































































































































































Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1985 



ACROSS 

1 Easy fly ball 
6 Tiff 
10 Battle 

14 Rub out 

15 A first name in 
whodunits 

16 Midler film, 
with "The" 

17 Carl Lewis is 
one 

18" creature 

was. . 

19 "Belvedere of 
. Sicily*’ 

20 Generous 

22 German dam 

23 Jerk-test joint 

24 Escorts 
26 Clocked, as 
. hair 

30 magna. 

prelate's 
; vestment 

32 Heraldic band 

33 Poufs' kin 
35" What's in 



39 Amble 
41 Edwin Moses 
is one 

43 Show contempt 

44 Unsettled 

46 Zest 

47 Not so many 
49 Until this time 
Si Folly 


54 Pathological 
suffix 

56 With, in Paris 

57 Generous 

63 Mechanical 
repetition 

64 Adriatic wind 

65 Musical-scale 
inventor 

66 Moon crater 

67 Catchall abbr. 

68 Join 

69 Grouse house 

70 Spouse of a 
knight 

71 Pitiless 


1 Pisan's pear 

2 Nuncupative 

3 Covenant 

4 Addict 

5 Wig of yore 
OSound 

Judgment 

7 Screen or 
shield 

8 Choir voices 
OSpodeitem 

10 Generous 

11 Heavy-stroked 
script 

12 Actor from 
Kansas City 

13 "The at 

the spring”: 
Browning 


21 French 

department or 
river 

25 Bandy words 

26 Office bigwig 

27 Algerian 
seaport 

28 Cerulean 

29 Generous 

31 Court starin 

the70‘s 

34 Indonesian 
island group 

36 Actress 
Nazimova 

37 Gist 

38 Petrel's cousin 

40 bien 

42 Free 

45 Plan 

48 Like a water 
shrew's feet 

50 Orange and 
Indian 

51 Rank below 
viscount 

52 Call forth 

53 Huguenots’ 
heads 

55 Cleavable rock 

58 Smallest 
Greek letter 

59 Peewee 

60 Yugoslav hero 

61 Original sin 
site 

62 Sturdy boat 


iVeu' lorA Times, edited by Eugene MaJeska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


‘When a bone rings, it tickles their feet. 
Thats why they fly away " 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
s by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble ihese lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to (ami 
four ordinary words. 


LOHLE 


HINEW 




PEANUTS 
( kind of 


(windy) | (tom/) 


I5NT IT? 


BOOKS 




I 


BLOND IE 


I Hrt/E A BONUS W VOU H DO YOU KNCJWAlr 1 AK/ ^ 
COMING THIS j-f SHOULD GOOD BROKER T SO OKS? 

- — 1 YEAH >zy > WMEST '-, v -1 7 p— IS EW 

I rTr ( Sutton 


BEETLE BAILEY 


LOOK AT THIS.' 


T BALANCED 


TWO PENCILS 


Obi THEIR TIPS! 



ANDY CAPP 


STAFF 

EMWtNCt 



a 



FISH 

w* 

CHIPS 

ITTHT 


• .. > 

' { THANKS, 

. S-RUBEr'. ofc- 


W1ZARD of ID 


g* PIERRE MENDES-FRANCE 

\> y Iif Bv Jean Lacouture. Translated by George 
Holoch. 486 pp. $34.50. 

| Holmes and Meier, 30 Irving Place, 

f New York, N. Y. 10003. 

I vff/ff/ \ Reviewed by Theodore Z el d in 

C(T T OW to make enemies and still be 

H li. towed." that could be the subtitle of 
i his biography of the mast charismatic of mod- 
em French politicians after Charles de Gaulle. 
No one speaks of Georges Pompidou or Fran- 
cois Mitterrand in the tones of mmost religious 
awe that are still used of Pierre Mendfes- 

The reason is not that he was a financial 
whiz-kid. When he was still only 31, in 1 938, he 
was chosen to virtually run the country" s econ- 
omy. In 1943 de Gaulle appointed him his 
minister of finance. But it was not because he 
performed economic mirades that he had his 
extraordinary reputation. It was the sort of 

He was a religious phenomenon, more than 
a p olitician. He was not impressive to lode at, 
short, pale, an eternal five-o’clock shadow. He 
was not particularly charming, except to his 
dose friends: even with them he could be harsh 
and obstinate, lose his temper, drive his audi- 
ence to distraction with bis relentless argu- 
ments: “I Rhall never again," said de Gaulle 
after one mc crrn g with him, “allow anyone to 
speak to me for three hours about economics." 

His passionate conviction that he was right 
was combined with an instinct for unpopular 
causes that he sensed the public secretly ap- 

E ed but dared not adopL Mendfes-France 
courage to the point of being willing to be 
a martyr. His program was austerity, honesty, 
refusal to conmromise, the union of politics 

. and morals. This is not usually the way to 

r-n political office, but it can be to a certain kind of 

L FgiE N peA KE power over public opinion. There was never a 

flo Mendfesisl party, and he was never truly at 

home in any of the parties he supported. His 
legacy is “Mend&ism," which remains a nos- 
JH talgic dream for many French people, the vi- 
V sion of a utopia in which reason triumphs over 
passion. 

1§J1B Yhe contrast with Mitterrand is striking. 

*5*“ Mendis-France recognized that he himself did 

not possess the lobbying skills a conventionally 
successful politician requires. In 1954 he 
brought Mitterrand into Ins government for 
the express purpose of remedying that weak- 




REX MORGAN 


WHEW BEADY BISHOP IS 
INVITED To DINNER AT THE HOME OF 
PROFESSOR WILSON, HIS WIFE CLAUDIA IS 
THE SUBJECT OF CONVERSATION. / 

CLAUDIA WAS SUCH A BRILLIANT T WAS MUCH * 
STUDENT HERE AT THE UNIVERSITY TOO SMART 
THAT I THOUGHT SHE'D STAY ON i TO DO THAT, 
AND TEACH , BRADY THELMA ! s 



AQ YOU KNOW, SHE 
HAS HER MASTER'S 
DEGREE IN BUSINESS ' 
HOPEFUaV, SHE'LL 
GIVE UP HER JOB, SO ^ 
AFTER HER DOCTORATE 
AND GET INTO ACADEMIC 
‘ WORK' i 



□□□□ □□□□ □□□ 
□□no nnnan anna 
cnEsoo son on □□□□ 

bbh daman 
□no □□□ □□□□□□ 

□□DQ □□□ □□□□□ 

nBnrinrnaanmnnoirnm 
□□□□□ E3D£D 13 3 do 
□□1313013 □□□ □□□ 
□□□□□ □□□ 
□□□□□□□□□□□□□ns 
moan aaana □□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
□□□ nama □□□□ 


keyboard: he knows evei\bod> and nay 
thing." 

Mendfes-France was widely r^arded as de 
candidate for the presidenp. and tp 

sawa-SBPSSs 

the most biticr-tasdngpQL 

that was the most powerful medicme. .As oneor 

bis colleagues said, Mendes-France was very 
intelligent, but he lacked common sense. So be 
was. in all prime minister for less than eight 
months, called to office in desperation to do 
the impossible, to cany out the inevitable un- 
popular amputations, and then quickly got nd 
of. 

The politicians feared him as a potential . 
providential m an , to whom France might en- 
trust its destinies. But be won a rare kind of 
admiration outside the narrow circles of parlia- 
ment, a deep devotion, that gives him still _a 
special place in the country's memory. He is 
one of the great noble failures, like the hara- 
kiri heroes the Japanese tike to admire, too 
brave, with ideals too lofty for ordinary people 
to emulate. 

I met Mendes-France only once. It was 
deeply moving. There was an unfathomable 
well of sfwtnws* in him. The way he married 
pessimism with idealism was one of his great Jt 
attractions. He was unprotected by the normal •> 
thick politician's skin: one could almost see ms 
bones through the mantle erf loneliness and 
disa ppointment he wore: he radiated a strange 
combination of_ modesty and strength. 

In only one way can he said to be a prophet 
before his timw He drank milk, not wine. How 
could such a politician hope to succeed in the 
land of burgundy and bordeaux? He would 
have a better chance today. The latest statistics 
say that only a minority of French people still 
regularly drink wine with their meals (46 per- 
cent). Twenty two percent are now teetotallers. 

The publication of this highly intelligent,. 
weU-inionned book is also a sign of changing 


UlUgld|Aljr ill U1C (MUU JCOII L41VUUIU1W u au 

exception. He has not, it is true, written a 
biography in the anglo-saxoa style, he quotes 

frmn ciwtIik rslhpr than from mrffimvi. 






he knows how to make the reader share m 
tension and identify with the tragic elements trf 
the drama. At times, this book reads almre t 
like' a thriller, even (hough we know, almost 
from the beginning, that the victim is doomed 
by his exceptional qualities, and we watch 
bonified as he accumulates different kinds of 
rope to tie round his own neck. 

Theodore Zeldin, author <4 “ France, 1848- 
1945” dr the Oxford History of Modern Europe 
series, wrote this review for The. Washington 
Past: 


MONDAYS, I HATE MONDAYS. IT 
ISEEMS LIKE I JUST GET PONE 
: WITH ONE AND ALONG COMES 
ANOTHER ONE/ VS-0 



nrw pav*& 



y PID YOU KNOW 
YOU'RE CUTE WHEN 
1 YOU'RE ANGRY ? J 


• .■VV.'^rr.yiS 


l'i'1985 United Feafcxe SyiKScaie me 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal, 
North-South readied the 
normal six-heart contract, 
which one would expect to suc- 
ceed. When West leads a dub. 
Sooth should expect a angle- 
ton and reject the finesse. By 
taking the ace and drawing 
trumps, bis dam is safe. 

However, the bidding began 
with a splinter response: three 
spades showed a good heart fit, 
slam interest and at most (me 
spade. The defenders are most 
unlikely to want a lead of the 
splinter suit, so East-West had 
the following agreement: A 
doable of a splinter asks for a 


BRIDGE 


lead of the suit ranking above 
- the splinter suit 

East was therefore able to 
double three spades to request 
a dub lead. So when six hearts, 
was duly readied, everyone at 
the table knew that West 
would lead. 

South now had to decide 
whether West had led a single- 
ton or from three cards. Had 
East doubled with kingjack 
doubfeton? Or with a. void? 
The latter seemed slightly 
more Gkety, so South finessed 
and went down to defeat when 
East won with the king and 
returned the jack far his part- 
ner to ruff. 

It was the double that tipped 
the scale: In the absence to a 


lead-directing indication torn 
East, Sooth would not have 
monad the dob situation. 

j- NORTH 

* * — 

VKII4 
O A 71 
*AQ W 875 
WEST ........ EAST 

| ** 
-.OQ 1 A 843 l,mra OJSS5 

• 3 *KJ 

SOUTH (D) 

♦ AQ3 
OAQ 972 
0 K 

.*>•43 


9 Pub J* 

■m P»w >0 

' Pra 

Weal M tbe dab daw. 


LEWET 


SLIRGY 


WHAT HE DIP 
AFTER PUTTING 
A LEAP SLUG 
IN THE SCALE. 

k — y 

Now arrange ihe circled letters To 
lorm Ifw surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


(Answers tomorrow) 

I Jumbles: HURRY BRIBE GAMBOL THRUSH 
Fridays | Tnose days were less hustle and more this— 

BUSTLE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Aioarve 
Amsterdam 
a mens 
Borcdoiw 
Balerade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

BacMrest 

Budapest 

CwHiImm 

Casta Del Sal 

DuHR 

Edlntaorah 

Florence 

FronKlurt 

Genera 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Los Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Mice 

Oslo 
Paris 
Pro sue 
aevlcjovl* 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH LOW 
C F C P 

19 M 8 46 tr 

8 S6 4 39 r 

IB M 10 » cl 

17 43 7 45 Ir 

11 S3 3 » lr 

10 50 3 34 tr 

8 44 5 41 o 

4 43 1 34 r 

8 44 5 41 r 

3 37 I 34 r 

30 48 10 SO tr 

7 45 0 32 Ir 

4 <3 1 34 d 

13 55 7 4S O 

10 SO 4 39 t 

9 40 0 32 SH 

4 39 -8 18 tr 

7 45 3 36 r 

31 73 17 43 fr 

14 41 7 45 fr 

B 44 4 39 r 

15 59 1 34 tr 

12 54 1 34 tr 

7 45 -4 21 a 

5 44 0 32 O 

14 41 4 43 H 

3 34 0 33 sw 

10 SO 2 34 fr 

S 44 1 34 fr 

1 34 - 4 25 tr 

14 41 6 43 fr 

3 37 -1 10 0 

12 54 4 29 Ml 

11 O 4 43 fa 

4 43 5 41 r 

4 39 1 34 a 

11 52 -1 30 r 


Banana! 
Bell low 

Keaa Kano 

Man Ha 

New Dam 

Seoul 

S hanghai 

Singapore 

Tat pal 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Aleltrs 

Odra 

Cane Town 
Casablanca 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

33 91 25 77 Cl 

ID 50 4 39 r 

19 66 15 S« a 

33 91 25 77 Cl 

29 B4 31 70 fr 

17 63 8 46 d 

14 57 7 45 cf 

31 88 25 77 St 

23 73 17 63 d 


16 61 12 
25 77 13 
21 70 16 
17 63 13 
25 77 18 
30 B6 25 
27 SI 15 
21 70 10 


LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aims 20 66 IS 

Lima 30 B6 25 

Mexico City 29 B4 11 

Rio bo Janeiro 28 82 23 

Sao Paula — 

NORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 

Batrut 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 


B 46 6 43 r 

20 48 14 57 Ml 

IS 44 9 48 fr 

17 43 8 46 0 

23 72 13 55 cl 


AndMCOM 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Odcasa 

Denver 

Detroit 

HaneialB 

Hou st on 

Los Angeles 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

San Praadsco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

Wa sM naton 
uo-tial available. 


4 39 -2 
14 61 I 
3 39 2 

3 37 -4 

19 66 1 

4 39 -2 

27 81 20 
33 73 9 

19 6a 13 
38 82 16 

4 39 -1 
3 37 -2 
25 77 30 

6 43 I 

12 54 7 

8 46 3 

7 45 -2 
6 43 0 

Dovercosl.' 


38 fr 
34 HI 
36 d 
25 Sw 
34 fr 
28 r 
<8 fr 
48 fr 
SS d 
61 PC 
X Cf 
38 PC 

68 fr 
34 r 
45 H> 
34 Hi 
38 Cl 
32 Hi 
DWWrilY 


Auckland 20 68 15 59 sb Tomato 7 45 -7 a ci 

Sydney M 79 20 68 pc Wn H lMPfai 6 43 0 M Hi 

cl -cloudy; fo-foosv; fr-folr; n-toll; jjmoI available: oavercaM: vononty 
cidmIv; r^oin; SWtawers: sw -snow; at -storm y. 

MONDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNE L: C7IOPPV- PR^*lPJ l l|I T; ^P r 1L’LS2f?3y: 
Tnm II — 3t53--371. LONDON: Cloudy. Temow 10 — 7 ISO—m .MAD * ’°- 
ShofMn. TcmSll — 2 154- Ml. NEW YORK: Cloudy. Tenw.8-1 
PARIS: Rain. Temp. 10 — 3 IX — n. f4S 

Aviv Fair Tern a 24 — IJ (7S — 55 ZURICH: Rain. T emp. IB— -1 (so— joi. 
BANGKOK: Showers- Temp. 34 — 27 193—81], HONG KONG: TcmD. 

31 — 16 {70—611. MANILA: Cloudy. Temp. B — 24 I 5E -2Von rri 
Temp, IB— SIM— 411. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Ttmp. 32 — 25 190 — 77! . 
TOKYO: Fair. Team. II— 4fS2— 391. 


The Hialeah Solution USOC Body Seeks Drug Tests at All Major Events 


By Steven Gist 

Nfw York Times Service 

HIALEAH, Florida — It used to 
be that when you went to Miami for 
the winter, friends asked you to bring 
back a crate of grapefruit and a set of 
Mickey Mouse ears. Now they kid- 
dingly ask for a submachine gun and 
a kilo of cocaine. To those who do not 
live here, Miami no longer conjures 
images of sunshine and citrus, dul a 
"Miami Vice" world of street gangs, 
South American intrigue and urban 
unrest 

The picture is as false as most ste- 
reotypes, but as tourism promoters 
know all too well, it's a tough one to 
dispeL Even suburbanites here talk 
feaifully about Miami's mean streets. 

This perception, as much as any- 
thing else, is the reason only about 
10.000 people are going to the races 
at Hialeah Park every day, about half 
as many as a generation ago, and why 
track officials have a bleak forecast 
for the continued operation of the 
country’s prettiest track. Gulfstream 
Park, in the more placid northern 
suburbs, has won the more desirable 
January and February dates because 
it does belter business. Hialeah now 
runs its 50 days in March and April. 

The city of Hialeah is a small rect- 
angle within Miami, and it reflects 
the changing character of the larger 
ciiy. The signs are bilingual, many of 
the bouses are one-story brick dwell- 
ings painted pink or green, and it's 
easier to find Cuban than American 
coffee. 

Residents know the track is a key 
10 their livelihood, and the city of 
Hialeah has been undergoing a con- 
certed renovation effort to make the 
town more appealing. It has worked, 
as those who take the time to look at 
the city can see. but it has been lost 
on the bulk of potential customers. 
To them, the track is in “the bad pan 
of town." 

The track, has two hopes for im- 
proving business — one aimed at 
softening that reaction and the other 


bypassing it. The first is the imminent 
completion of Meirorai! service, with 
high-speed trains whisking customers 
from the security of Lheir condomini- 
um communities to the track. 

Thai, seems unlikely to help. Flo- 
ridians as a breed are drivers, not 
passengers. Hialeah's salvation is not 
going to come from a subway. 

The other plan has real promise. 
Instead of couning reluctant outsid- 
ers, the track is looking at its more 
natural constituency. “We've decided 
that pitching to the people in Palm 
Beach is not the answer." says John 
Brunetti. the track's president. 

That means courting local resi- 
dents and the enormous Hispanic 
community at large, estimated at 
800.000 in the greater Miami area. 
Already, information in the daily 
program is printed in Spanish and 
English. Hialeah is responding to sur- 
veys indicating what these potential 
patrons want. Trifectas and perfectas 
have been added to every race, and 
ihe track is considering further inex- 
pensive exotic bets to lure customers 
away from the jai alai frontons. 

Jockeys will be used more in adver- 
tising, an appropriate move in the 
new marketing plan. Racing is alone 
among major sports in that most of 
its top athletes, the jockeys, are them- 
selves Hispanics. 

It is a refreshing change of attitude 
by Hialeah and BrunettL who only a 
year ago were digging in their heels 
and refusing to change or compro- 
mise. It also may suggest d solution 
for other tracks in trouble. By going 
into its immedjate community, keep- 
ing an open mind and responding to 
what the customers want. Hialeah is 
setting an example that most race- 
tracks could follow. Innovations like 
the Breeders' Cup are good for the 
owners, breeders and horses who 
benefit from further enriching the 
sport's upper echelons. Meanwhile, 
racing and breeding at all other levels 
are declining, and the only way to 
reverse that is to put more people in 
the stands. 


By Michael Goodwin 

New York Tunes Sen-fa? 

NEW YORK — US. Olympic 
officials, concerned by reports of 
drugs being increasingly used in 
sports, want to test U.5. athletes at 
every major competition this sum- 
mer and to continue the testing 
until the 1988 Games. 

Under a plan now being pre- 
pared. an athlete found to nave 
used a drug banned by the Interna- 
tional Olympic Committee would 
be suspended from competition for 
one year following the first offense. 
A second offense would bring a 
four-year suspension, preventing 
the athlete from competing in the 
□ext Olympics. The banned drugs, 
which have about 80 generic names 
and hundreds of brand and street 
names, include narcotics, stimu- 
lants and anabolic steroids. Some, 
such as cocaine, are not permitted 
in any amount; others, such as caf- 
feine. are permitted in certain 
amounts. 

“Wherever the athletes compete, 
they’ll be tapped on the shoulder 
and told it's time for the urine sam- 
ple," said Kenneth Clark, director 
of sports medicine for the UJ3. 
Olympic Committee. He said that 
as many as 1.500 tests could be 
conducted a year, with all athletes 
required to be tested although not 
all would be. The cosL which could 
range from $8 to 5100 for each test, 
depending on (he extent of the 
thoroughness required, would be 
borne by the Olympic committee. 

Dr. Robert Voy. chief medical 
officer for tbe organization, said it 
is proposed to test the top three 
finishers in most events, with other 
athletes selected at random for test- 
ing. “We have to have a method of 
detection that guarantees that the 
athletes are competing to tbe best 
of their ability, not to the best that 
chemistry can buy," Voy said. 

The plan still requires approval 
by the organization's executive 


committee as wdl as by tbe govern- 
ing bodies of the various sports. 

This would be the first tune tests 
carrying penalties have bom con- 
ducted m non-Olympic years and 
in events not directly tied to the 
Olympics. It would be an expanded 
version of a testing program started 
in 1983 after tests at the Pan Amer- 
ican Games in Caracas showed 
some athletes were using bmmwA 
drugs. A UJL weight lifter, Jeff 
Michels, was disqualified after un- 
acceptably high levels of testoster- 
one were found. At least a dozen 
other U.S. athletes left Caracas be- 
fore being tested. 

Subsequently, U.S. Olympic of- 
ficials began testing For drugs on an 
“informal basis, with no punitive 
action taken against athipiw: who 
toted positive. At the national tri- 
als, where U.S. teams for the Olym- 
pics were picked, penalties were 
levied if the drugs were found and 
86 athletes were barred from the 
teams. Tests also were conducted 
during the Olympics at Los Ange- 
les and H athletes, none from the 
U.S M were disqualified by the In- 
ternational Olympic Committee. 

Hie new plan is being developed 
by such officials as Clark, Voy and 
Irving Darcfik, a New Jersey physi- 
cian who is chairman of the USOC 
sports medicine council. The plan 
is to be submitted to the council in 
April, then to the USOC executive 
committee. Approval by both is 
certain, the officials said, though 
details remain to be worked out. 

Approval by the nearly 40 mga- 
dzations that act as governing bod- 
ies of the sports that make up the 
Olympics could require negotia- 
tions about tbe process and penal- 
ties, officials said. Those organiza- 
tions generally have jurisdiction 
over the athletes, except during a 
handful of events such as the Pan 
Am eri can Gaines and the Olym- 
pics, which fall under international 
jurisdiction. 

The U.S. Olympic officials ex- 


pect to get approval from tbe na- 
tional governing bodies for several 
reasons. For one, officials note, 
they could bar an uncooperative 
group's participation in the Olym- 
pics. 

Repre s e ntati ves from two gov- 
erning organizations have offered 
support for the plan. 

think it’s terrific,” said Dave 
Pronty, executive director of the 
American Cycling Federation: 
“Philosophically, it meshes perfect- 
ly with what we want to acconh 
plish." 

ODan Casscfl, executive director 
of Tbe Athletics Congress, the gov- 
erning body for track and. odd, 
said through a spokesman: “We’re 
willing to work with the USOC on 
all drug programs.” 

Generally, the tests would h«giw 
by dividing each urine sample into 
two containers, one marirwi “a” 


and one marked “B." Both would 
be sealed and sent to a laboratory 
at the University of Calif orma-Los 
A n ge l es , the only one in the United 
States and one of the few in tbe 
world equipped to screen mine for 
so many drags and chemicals, offi- 
cials said. The UCLA lab was used 
at Iasi summer’s Games. 

If the first sample tests negative, 
the athlete would be dearwLU it 
tests positivej the “B" sample 
woukl oe used in an appeal and the 
athlete would Ik permitted to be 
present during the tests. 


.If tbe results again are positive, 

the penalty would be levied. If the 

“B” results are negative, the mirid 
results would be discarded and the 
“B” results considered conclusive. 
Thus, both samples would have to 
test positive fra: the athlete to be 
found guilty. 


Hyers Extend Streak to 10 


l*v Angeles Times Service 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey — Dave Poulin scored two 
goals Saturday for the second 
straight game as die Philadelphia 
Flyers beat the fading New Jersey 
Generals, 5-3, to extend their win- 
ning streak to a chib- record-tying 


lead the Washington Capitals by 
aght points with seven games left 
Elsewhere it was Hartford 5, 
Wmnro« 6. Vancouver 
2* «■ Lon“ 4, Minnesota 2 and 
Lajgmy 4, Los Angeles 3. On Fri- 
day it was Buffalo 3, Pittsburgh 1 : 

^to^Kmoii 3 and 
^When the Flyers began dxar 

streak, longest in the league this 

season- tfuwtrm’Wi +k- 


ford 5, 


Poulin’s first goal made the score 
3-3 in the third period. After Ron 

NHL FOCUS . 

Sutter broke the tie with 2:20 left, 
Poulin put a shot into an empty net 
in the final minute. \ 

Tbe streak,, which began March 
5, has virtually assured toe Flyers a 
division title arid given them/ a 
chance to finish wiffithe National 
Hodsey- League’s best overall .re-., 
crad. With 101 pants,, they traiT 
Edmonton by one. for. overall hon- 

ore; in the 


one for overall hon- 

ttrick Division, they 


- . — » “w lodiuu ny • 

Wpoum and the Oilers. by. 2 
Ttaqegames later, the Flyerit lost 
tb«r b«t sojrer.Tmi Kerr, with 51 
goma.gomg.down with a knee inh±fa 
jy- The Caps and Cfflers tomSdk 

point l^ad tor^ 
s last playoff spot. 


IctfX^ 


.4 

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fH t. 


Page ia 


SPORTS 


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r-r Vy -. . 

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8i^"t ,T V ". . 

^***r 

*»*'•’ Mr 


Georgetown, Memphis St in NCAA Semis 


CeKfUal If Ovr Staff From Di^xadm 
EW YORK — Georgetown and 


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' and advanced to the final four of 
■ ;! tfCAA basketball toumamenL 

- ;; -? i Providence, Rhode Island, Georgetown’s 
■-:ick Ewing, the 7-foot (2.13-meter) au-Amer- 

. ' v center, was cat the bench for most of the 
•■' half. But sophomore Reggie W iffiams 
-■ ’ - four dutch free throws and the defending 
Tjpions hdd on for a 60-54 victory over 
s <Vranked Georgia Tech. That gave the 
/•Vm’** die East Regional title and their third 
to the final four in four years. 

‘ ■.toe Hows’ 16tb straight victory j 
' 1 to beccane the first team to repeal as 
- • opal champion since UCLA in 1972-73. 
:- y will meet the winner of Sunday’s West 
tonal final between St John's and North 
alma Slate. 

--- ,.-i the Midwest final, in Dallas, Mem phis 
/•« guard Andre Turner scored four points in 
".final 33 seconds and aH-America Keith Lee 
■■‘"ed 23 paints as the Tigers upset Oklahoma, 
ii. Memphis State, making its first appear- 

• - in the semifinals ante 1973, will meet the 

aer of Sunday's Southeast Regional final 
^ 'Yeea North Carolina and Vffianova. 
nday night. North Carolina beat Auburn, 
$; VUlanova held off Maryland, 46-43; Sl 
; ■■ 3*s defeated Kentucky, 86-70, and North 
. - oBna State beat Alabama, 61-55. 

. I ' i ee got into foul trouble, just as he had in 
. •••. aphis State’s three other games so far during 
.- -v ioomamenL He was called for his first foul 
. - ._«ccrads into the coolest and sat down with 
•• bnrth foul with 1 1:48 left in the second half. 

; -vje came bad; with four minutes to play and 
-'.-a basket and four free throws in the final 90 
mds; Turner meanwhile made a lay-up 
jist the Oklahoma press and then sank two 
.• vJ; throws with 23 seconds toga 
■. - .■. itsoigrtown survived because of the poor 
Siting of Georgia Tech guard Mark Price, 

’ S was a 49 ptreeni shooter during the season 
, ...made only three of 16 shots Saturday. 

■J. T win& who sat out 12 minutes of the second 
**' with four fouls, still led the Hoyas with 14 
yits. Williams and BUI Martin each had 12, 

- : 4e Georgia Tech’s 7-foot John Salley scored 

• the second half and led his team with IS. 
and Bruce Dalrymple each had 13. 

■ -Jeorgia Tech battled to the wire, but Ralph 


Dalton, subbing for Ewing, ard fellow reserve 
Horace Broadnax scored nme points as George- 
town opened a 51-46 lead in the bruising game. 

“I knew they had it under control," Ewing 
said. “I knew Ralph could do iL” With the 
Hoyas ahead, 56-54, Dalton made two free 
throws to ensure victory. 

Georgia Tech's coach, Bobby Cremms, shook 
his head in dismay when he saw Price’s statis- 
tics. “It’s too bad Mark Price had a tough 
shooting day," he said. “We would not be bac 
without Mark Price." 

Memphis State held Oklahoma — at 90.8 
points a game, the highest scoring major college 
team — to its lowest total of the season. The 
Sooners had one last chance after Turner missed 
a free throw with eight seconds to play, but 
Anthony Bowie’s 24-foot shot at the boner hit 
the back of the rim and bounced away. 

Turner, who twice during the tournament 
won games for the Tigers with last-second shots, 
made two free throws with 23 seconds kft to put 
his team ahead by four pants. But with 14 
seconds to go, Oklahoma's Darryl Kennedy 
scored to get the Sooners within a basket 
Turner, a 5-10 junior, then tried to stall away 
the final moments. While trying to reverse direc- 
tion, be let the ball bounce high and appeared to 
carry iL The Oklahoma bench screamed for a 
violation to be called, but no whistles were 
blown. Instead, a foul was «J1cH with 10 sec- 
onds to play, sending Turner to the K«» 

Oklahoma was led by Darryl Kennedy’s 16 
points. Wayznan Tisdale, an all- America, got 
only 11 (he m an ag ed only 10 shots and was 
closely guarded by three players most of the 
contest). 

In Friday night's first West Regional semifi- 
nal, in Denver, the 5-7 Anthony Webb sewed 14 
points and a reserve forward, Bennie Bolton, 
sank two insurance free throws with 33 seconds 
left to help North Carolina State beat Alabama. 

In the nightca p , Chris M nlHn racked np 30 
points as St. John’s polled away from Kentucky . 
Moments after the game, Joe B. Hall nT>nntntr»d 
his retirement after 13 seasons as Kentucky’s 
coach. Hall leaves with a 297-100 reconi; his 
Kentucky team won the national title in 1978. 

In the So ut hea s t Regional, in Btrmtnghirm 
Alabama, Ed Pinckney scored seven points dur- 
ing an 1 1-0 start of the second half mat carried 
VUlanova to victory over Maryland. 




HHf* 


BRIIm.i: 

. * 

i H* • . - • 

Jjw f f-r 

- - 

*fW> »*T> • 

I :K ■ ■■■■ 

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it*- 


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In the second game, Kenny Smith scored 
seven of bis 22 points as North Carolina built a 
15-point first-half lead and Joe Wolf got eight 
down the stretch to help stave off Auburn. 

Sl John’s battled back from a seven-point 
deficit midway through the first half, then con- 
sistently got second and third shots in the sec- 
ond half even though its 7-footer, BUI Wennmg- 
too, was in foul trouble. 

WQlie Glass had three baskets off rebounds 
as the Retimes moved from a 39-38 halftime 
edge to a 57-51 lead with 11 minutes to 
Mullia scored on a feed from Glass and 1 
Jackson sank two free throws as Sl John’s 
padded its margin to eight paints with two 
mmu fwi left. 

North Carolina saw Auburn rally in the sec- 
ond half and five times draw to within three 
pants. But the Tigers were not able to get closer 
until Carey Holland's lay-up with 18 seconds 
left made it 58-56. 

Ho lland was fouled on the play and «ni«H 
the free throw. Chuck Person grabbed the re- 
bound for Auburn but was called for ^walking 
when he fell to the floor. 

Webb and Lorenzo Cha rle s p»rh scored 14 
points and Bolton made two insurance free 
throws as North Carolina State beat Alabama. 
With 33 seconds left, Alabama trailed by 55-53 
and the Wolfback a ebann- to increase 
its lead wben Webb misse d the first of his one- 
and-one free throws. But Bolton, who fmisTwt 
with 11 points, was immediately fouled and 
made bout shots for a 57-53 lead. Seconds later, 
Webb made two free throws. 

VUlanova trailed Maryland by 20-19 at half- 
time, but held the Terrapins scoreless the first 
7:10 of the second half. Harold Pressley scored 
the go-ahead basket-one minute into that half 
and, after Dwight Wilbur made two free throws 
90 seconds laia-, Pinckney scored the next seven 
points as VUlanova snrged to a 30-30 advanta ge. 

Villan ova’s 11-0 run at the start of the last 
half completed a 15-0 streak that included the 
last two baskets of the first half, when Maryland 
was held scoreless for (he final 2: 10. 

Pinckney led the Wildcats with 16 points and 
Dwayne McClain got 14, while Maryland’s 
Adrian Branch led all scorers with 21. But 
Pinckney held Lea Bias, the Atlantic. Coast 
Conference’s player of the year and a second- 
team aH-Amoica, to a season-low eight points 
and five rebounds. (At, UP1) 


GirardeUi and Hess Win Season-Ending Slaloms 


The Aaodaied Pna 

HEAVENLY VALLEY, Cali- 
fornia — Overall champion Marc 
GirardeUi capped a bnffiant sea- 
son here Saturday by winning a 
record-lying seventh World Dip 
slalom ski race by almost two 
seconds. 

On Friday, two-time former 
overall cup champion Erika Hess, 
suffering through something of a 

WORLD CUP SKIING 

down year, finished with a bang 
by winning the final slalom race 
of the season and capturing the 
cup slalom title. 

“Now I have my old feeling 
again," said the winner of 26 
races in the last 4feyears bur only 
two this season. The Swiss ace 
broke through Tuesday by win- 
ning a slalom at Park City, Utah, 
selling the stage for her trtle-win- 


the cup career leader with 79 vic- 
tories, but none this year. 

Third place went to Austrian 
Robert Zofler, whose fine second 
run of 54.81 allowed him to slip 
past teammate Klaus Heidegger 
by .04 seconds. Zoller had a total 
time of 1:50.74. Pinmn Zurbrig- 
gen of Switzerland, the 1984 over- 
all champion anti runner-up to 
GirardeUi this season, rallied 
gamely from eighth place to fin- 
ish fifth in 1:51.11. 

GirardeUi was brilliant in win- 
ning Us seventh slalom of the 
c amp ai g n, tying the single-season 
mark set by Stenmark in 1977. 
With Frommdt waiting below, 
GirardeUi bandied down the 
East Bowl course in 54.08 sec- 


onds — 153 seconds faster than 
Fromm el l 

In the season-ender. GirardeUi 
simply went for iL “If I lead the 
first run, 1 must attack full in the 
second," GirardeUi said. “And if 

1 don’t lead, 1 also have to attack. 

“In slalom I am really faster 
than anybody else," be added. “If 

2 make mistakes, I understand 
why I did not win. If I make no 
mistakes, 1 am sad about myself 
because I know I should be able 
to ski faster." 

It was Girarddli’s Uih tri- 
umph (be also won four glam 
slaloms in capturing the title in 
that discipline), placing him third 
all-time in season victories. Only 


rung victory here. 
GirarddU, 


a 21 -year-old Aus- 
trian native who has sided for 
Luxembourg since he was 1 3. had 
the fastest times in both of Satur- 
day’s heats to post an aggregate 
of 1 min me, 48.66 seconds. 

A distant runner-up was Liech- 
tenstein’s Paul Frommdt, with an 
aggregate of 1:50.40. Frommdt 
had trailed GirardeUi by only 21 
seconds after the morning com- 
petition. but withered under Gir- 
arddlfs second run, which was 
.iy seconds better than any other 
racer. 

But Frommdfs 2Q points for 
finishing second boosted him to 
80 for the season and into second 
place behind GirardeUi on the 
slalom chart. Tn gemgr Stenmark, 
third after the first run, fe& a few 
gates into the afternoon leg ran 
and dropped to third in the sla- 
lom standings with 78 points. It 
was the end of a frustrating cam- 
paign for the 29-year-old Swede. 



Marc GirardeUi: ‘I am really faster than anybody else.* 


Stenmark. with 13 in 1979, and 
Frenchman Jean -Claude Killy, 
with 12 in 1967. won more races 
in a season. 

GirardeUi woundup the season 
with 262 overall points, including 
a maximum 125 in slalom and 
120 in giant slalom. Zurbriggen, 
who missed several races because 
of a midseason knee injury, 
gained 1 1 points to finish at 244. 

In Friday’s race, Hess posted 
the fastest second-run time to 
capture her 17th career slalom 
victory and fourth slalom title 
(she topped that discipline in 
1981. 1982 and 1983). Having 
been fastest in the morning run. 
Hess had to start last in the field 
of 30 in the afternoon. She turned 
in a time of 44.35 seconds for an 
aggregate 1:29.86. 

The victory boosted Hess’s sla- 
lom points for the season to 100, 
seven more than runner-up 
American Tamara McKinney, 
who finished fifth Friday. 

Second to Hess in the race was 
Penine Pelen of France, who was 
timed in 1:30.10; Pekn finished 
third in the slalom standings with 
89 points. Taking third In the 
final slalom of the season was 
Malgoizata Tlalka of Poland in 
1:30.36. Brigitte Gadient of Swit- 
zerland was fourth in 1:31. 10 and 
McKinney, rallying from eighth 
place after the morning competi- 
tion. was fifth in 1:31.41. 

Hess took control with a first 
run of 4552 — .03 seconds faster 
than Italy’s Maria Rosa Quario 
(who started the day ranked third 
on the slalom charts) and .94 
ahead of McKinney. 

The American, winner of the 
slalom title in 1984, held the lead 
after racing 23d in the field, but 
was knocked down in turn by 
Gadient. Tlalka and Pelen. 
Quario took herself out of con- 
tention by falling early in her run. 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Soccer 


NBA Standings 


NCAA Tournament 


Hockey 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


EAST REGIONAL 


Altantlc Dhrisfoo 



Championship 


W L 

Per. 

GB 

Martel 23 

jc-Boetai 

57 14 

jxn 

— 

(At Providence, Rhode Island) 

x- Philadelphia 51 19 

729 

5W 

Georaetown 60, Georgia Tech 54 

Washington 

35 35 

son 

21W 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL 

New Jersey 

25 35 

jfn 

23 

Semiflaofs 

New York 

24 47 

338 

33 

March 22 


Central Dhrtsioe 



(At Birmingham. Ala.) 

x-Mllwaukee 

SO 21 

JIM 

— . . 

VUlanova 4ft Morriam 43 

Detroit 

37 32 

SSL 

12 

North Carolina *2. Auburn 55 

Chicago 

34 37 

sn 

15 . 

ChaaptebsNp 

Atlanta 

25 43 

JU 

22 

Mortih M 

Cleveland 

28 43 

J94 

22 

(At Birmingham) 

Indiana 

20 51 

ja 

38 • 

VT1 Ionova. Z2-1X vs. North Carolina. 774 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


MIDWEST REGIONAL . 


Midwest Dhrtsion 



ChanpteaMp 

x- Denver 

43 25 

LO 

— i 

March 23 

Houston 

40 29 

■SH — 4Va ; 

L - (At DatknJ- 

□alias 

40 32 

-55* 

5 

Metnohls St. ftX Oklahoma 51 

San Antonio 

35 37 

ASL 

II 

WEST REGIONAL 

Utah 

34 37 

An 

im 

Semifinals 

Kansas CHy 

» 43 

J»4 

17V5 

March 22 


Pacific Division 



(At Denver) 

y-t-A. Lakers 

51 IB 

J39 

— 

North Carolina St. 51. Alabama 55 

Portland 

24 37 

AK 

18 

SL John's 8ft Kentucky 70 

Phoenix 

32 39 

A5i 

20 

Championship 

Seattle 

38 40 

AS 

31W 

Martel 24 

LA. Cllapers 

25 47 

J47 

Z7Vi 

(At Denver) 

Golden Slate 

2D 51 

282 

32 

N. Carolina St. 239. vs. St. John's, 3X3 

Cx-ci Inched Playoff berth) 




(yd Inched dtvlstoh title) 



SEMIFINALS ' 


ENGLI5H FIRST DIVISION 
Coventry X Watford 1 
Even on 2. Ananas 0 
loswtcfi 1. Newcastle I 
Leicester t, west Ham 0 
Luton i Queen's Park Roneen 0 
Manchester united < Aston villa 0 
Stoke T. NotlinaMsn Forest 4 
Tottenham S. Southampton ! 

West Bromwich 0. Liverpool 5 
Point* Sfaodiags: Everfon. Tottenham 40; 
Manchester United 54; Arsenal S3; Liverpool 
51; Nottfnoham Forest Southampton JO; 
Sheffield Wednesday 48: Chelsea 43; Leices- 
ter 42; Aston Vttla 40; West Bromwich Albion 
39: Norwich. Newcastle. Queens Pork Rain- 
ers 30; Wof f ord. Sunderland. Coventry 34; 
west Ham 33; Luton 20; Ipswich 27; Slake 14. 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Monaco X Marseille 0 
Brest X Leas 3 
Konev Strasbourg > 

Toulon. 1, Rouen 1 
Bastta Z Tours 2 


Football 


USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Toulouse 1. Lovol 1 
Ulle z Paris RC 1 
Nantes I. Soanu 1 
Paris 5G I. Metz 2 

Points Standees: Boroocux 4S; Nanr»43; 
AuKerre 3ft; Toulon 35: Monaco. Metz 34; 
BresT32; Lens 29; Saehaim, Paris SG. Bastla 
3ft; Ulle. Nancv. Marseille. Laval 25. 

WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Bochum X Karlsruhe 2 
Bonusio M'Gtodbach 7. FC Kaiserslautern 0 
Ham burn 5. E infrachi Brunswick 0 
Waidhof Mannheim a Bavem Munich 0 
Bayer Leverkusen a Borussla Dortmund 1 
Efaitracht Fran Wort 1, Werder Bremen 3 
Stuttoart X Cologne 1 
Fortune Ducneldorf Z Bayer Uerdinaan 3 
chalk* X Armlala BletefeW 0 
Points Standees: Bayern Munich 34; 
Wenter Bremen 32; Borussla M*Glodboch 28; 
Bayer Uerdlneen 27; Hamburg 3ft: Bochum. 
Waidhof Mannheim, Stuttoart 2S. 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Aacott Z Ftoronttno 1 
Atotanto fr Udlnese 1 

Avefllno 0. Nopoll 1 
Como Q. Sampdorta 0 
juvontus X Inter 1 
Lazio 1. Roma 1 
Mllim a Torino 1 
Verona X Cremonese D 


Cleveland 


i Aer Beny of St John’s, left k ept digging for the bal despite die gpngtodtSng tactics of 
^ rtucky’s Winston Bennett (25) and Bret Beaunqx St Join's won the regional semjftial, 85-70. 

JCLA and Tennessee Advance in NIT 


j-i »ad Brooks got 

at All >hi«r B SKi 


V, • 

- Ji 1 

:V •- 


Exl»w 


t: fr- 


IK \ 


United Press I laenuawnaJ 

. —-KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — 
White scored 23 points and 
J Brooks got two baskets in 
, moments of Saturday’s 
Tennessee ad- 
NationaL Invitation 
. . : gnanwat semifinals with a 61- 
- iiciory over Virgin ia. In another 
Irterfinal, in Los Angeles, 
LA beat Fresno State, 53-43. 
Jhe other two berths for 
itfnesday’s semifinals, in New 
-A were to be decided Sunday, 
a Marquette playing at Indiana 
...i Tennessee- Chattanooga at 
wriB* 

- ' kooks’* 20-foot jump shot with 
' 3 to play gjve Tennessee a 53-52 
1 and the Volunteers never 
vin trailed. 

-■ kooks, a Woot-3 (1.90-roeter) 
id who totaled 13 points, made 
Jot from the right comer with 34 
-nidi to go, and he and White 
fr sank technical-foul free 
the last 10 seconds to ice 

.'.>255 y- 

0 /ogpn& kd most of the second 
. f«ud hdd its biggest lead, 35-27, 
“ bcI5G8mark. 

_. Jat Brooks and White brought 
' lessee back in the last 8& mrn- 
l / 1 c.*® rtesm taid^n49-48e(^p 
. . ./jfcfv ti Albany Richardson sank 

/ "W n r Ulro * s to go. 

• . * Cavafiera regained the lead, at 

51, tn Olden mymce‘$ lay-up, 
;Biodks scored with 1:43 re- 
r Bir® and \Wnte twice stole the 
• v im the last 9Q seconds. 

; ^ 6rst of Virginia's two techni- 
tools was called with 10 seconds 
\r- j'*® Ptiymce for slamming the 
■to the court after another foul 
. taa called on him. Brooks’s 
■Unow made it 58-51 
■. . ^Cavafiots? Md Kennedy was 
to for a technical with two set> 

■ ^ Wt when he scored on a slam 
* r bk! hung onto die rim. 

.j* J** throw produced the 

final poinL 

■ , **d Wright scored 16 points 

■ matched bis career-high with 
' c °? aQ( fc as UCLA won for the 

l tune in its last 11 outings. 
J-A nsed a 7-2 run over the last 
' to first half to take 

• * 7 'I8 lead and, sparked by 


W 

the 


land 
half wi 


ahead by 41-24. Then Fresno State 
f 11 


ran off 1 1 straight points to dose to 
43-37 with five minutes to gp. 


But with 2:14 left, Maloncon 
a 14-6 spurt to go scored on a short turnaround 
jumper and Wright’s two subse- 
quent free throws put the Bnnns np 
again by 10. 


Hawks Nip Disgruntled Cavs 


Los Angeles Times Serrice 

RICHFIELD, Ohio — Just 
when it appeared they would be the 
National Basketball Association’s 
Cinderella team tins season, the 
Cleveland Cavaliers have begun 
battling with their ooadL 

After the Cavs’ rebound from a 
2-19 start, it may be premature to 

NBA FOCUS 

concede them a playoff berth. The 
ill and injured Atlanta Hawks out- 
lasted Cleveland, 91-86. in over- 
time here Saturday night. At 28-43, 
both teams are shooting for the last 
Eastern Conference playoff spot 

Elsewhere it was Boston 104, 
Washington 98; Chicago 107, Dal- 
las 97; Kansas City 1 13, New York 
105; Milwaukee 140, Indiana 129; 
Portland 126. the Los Angeles 
Clippers 123. and Golden State 
123. Phoenix 109. On Friday it was 
Boston 129, Cleveland 1 17; Denver 
123. New Jersey 1 1 1; Kansas City 
121, Atlanta 102; Milwaukee 131, 
Philadelphia 112; New York 118. 
Indiana 1 13; Dallas 223, San Anto- 
nio 114; the Los Angeles Lakers 
130, Houston 107, mid Utah 110, 
Seattle 85. 

The Cavaliers, an unhappy 
group after being dismantled by 
Boston, were without one of their 
stars, Phil Hubbard on Saturday. 
But the Hawks had only eight able 
bodies; Missing were Tree RoUira 
and Eddie Johnson (flu), $W Wil- 
liams (intestinal ailment) and Ran- 
dy Wittman (bad knee). 

In Friday’s rout at Boston, 
Cleveland Coach George Kail kept 
talented rookie Mel Turpin on the 
bench. After the game. Kail said 
his guards hadn’t done much to 
stop Boston’s outride aiiact. 

Tuipin, who has upset Karl be- 
cause of his practice babits. and 
guard World B. Free were both 


upset with their coach. “What does 
he want me to do,” Turpin said, 
“break everyone’s legsT Said Free: 
“He told us to sag, to let them have 
the outride shot.” 

Free scored 17 points against At- 
lanta but went 6-for-23 from (he 
field (Cleveland shot only 39 
cent from the floor overall), 
the Cavs could have won in regula- 
tion if Edgar Jones hadn’t missed a 
free throw with 19 seconds left. 


Watson's Lead Cut 
To 1 by Glasson 
In Las Vegas Golf 

The Associated Press 

LAS VEGAS — Tran Watson, 
struggling to a par-71, managed to 
retain a cme-stroke lead over Bffly 
Glasson after Saturday’s fourth 

round of the 90-hole, SI-milKon 
Las Vegas Invitational. It is the 
richest tourney on the PGA tour, 
with a first prize of 5171,000. 

Watson, whose 68 on Friday had 

given him & three-shot advantage, 
was to take a 72-hoJe total of 270 
into Sunday’s final round. Glasson, 
who has hal four operations cm his 
knees, wears braces on both and 
moves with obviens discomfort, 
shot a 69 Saturday to pick np three 
shots on Watson. 

Curtis Strange, with a 66, rad 
Jay Haas (a 67) were at 271 Mike 
Smith, second after three rounds, 
carded a 71 and was at 273 with 
Mac O’Grady, who shot a 65. 

Glasson, 24, who hasn’t finished 
higher than fifth in three years on 
the PGA tout; birdied four of his 
first five holes. Bui then “I think I 
got a little tired," he said. “I wasn’t 
concentrating. There were a couple 
of three-puns, just bran cramps." 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

37 31 31 2f— ID 
33 34 J2 34—123 
B1IW lft-28 J-J3*. McHato lx Johnson I- 

U M IX Ainge 7-10 44 IS; Frat 10-13 74 2X 
Anderson 7-19 2-2 14. RJb ml d l : Cie_«7<WtSf 
7).Bos.45 1 Portah 1 ». Aalfts: Oo.3» IBogtev 
10). Bos. 3ft (Bird 15). 

3» 34 S3 13-111 
23 31 27 24—111 
English 0-ISS-1024, Nan M9S423; Williams 
IMS V2 37. Richardson X3t 2-3 IX Rafeamds: 
Den. 55 (Cooper 14). IU. 51 (Williams in. 
Assists: Don. 25 (Enolbtii). K_l. 29 ( Rcnsrv 
3). 

Kansas City 33 33 M 31—121 

Atlanta 27 M 24 27—112 

Johnson 1*23 54 23. Drew n-T4 2-4 24; Wil- 
kins 10-21 12-1534. Glenn 7-14 44 ILRoiioMtfs: 
K.C. 45 (Thompson 13). AIL 4* (Wilkins. Willis 
7). Assists: K.C 30 (Thous 9). Alt. 19 (Rivers ' 
*). 

Milwaukee 23 35 33 SS— 151 

PWKHtetahlo 30 34 30 21 — 112 

Cummings ft-15 54 21. Hodges 9-20 1-3 29; 
Malm 5-7 13-1422. Cheeks 10-1£ 1-2 21. Tanev 
0-13*4 2L Bctovnds: MIL 45 (Cummings »). 
PNL 12). Assists: MR 28 (Pfesm 7), Phil. 23 
(Richardson 4). 

Mew York S 31 21 33-111 

Indiana flM 31 35-413 

KM0 14-29 13-15 45. Carter 5-14 1-3 17; K *5 
tsgg 7-13 W22. Fleming 5-12*930. Mbauds: 
N.Y. <0 (Boiiey 13), ind. 4V (Kaflow IT). As- 
sists: N.Y.27(Tueker5),lnd.20 (Fleming 4). 
OaBee 24 30 31 S*— TO 

San Antonio 32 B 25 23— 1M 

AauIrF0 11-13 1X15 35. Vincent S-l< U-H 30; 
BuUO-1724 2aGervln 7-14 4421MI(ctiefI8- 
199-2 IX Rebeundt: DoLiS (Vincent 151.XS.44 
(Banks lOLAssMs: DaL27 (Davli 7), XA. J1 
(Moore 10). . 

t-A. Lakers 34 33 S3 34—130 

H 90000 32 2* 24 27 — W 

Abdui-Jabbar 13-1744 30. Scan 9-15 2-2 21; 
McCrav 9-lft >4 2V Sampson S-23 4-11 2SL Rs- 
bounds: ua. 41 (AbduFJabbar, Johnson ft). 
Hou. 54 (Sampson 10). Assists: LJL39 (John- 
son 16). Hou. 2ft (McCrov, Sampson, Uord, 
Lucas 5). 

Utah 2t M SB 30—110 

Seattle 20 21 20 24— IS 

Don tier 11-15 54 27, CrtlttBl ft-17 44 17; 
BrtctcpMJcl ft-21 5^ 21, McCormick 5-12 44 IX 
Reb eu n «N:uiati45(B8flev.DuHoy9),5ea45 
(Brlckawefci tU. Assists: Ufa* 31 (Green 11. 
Sea22 (BrfdcawsU, Henderson, CbacnMn4). 
SATURDAY’S RESULTS 

is M at 24 — ie» 

30 23 3t 27—123 
ShorMX22ft43XFiavdB-U5431; LucosB- 
13 4-4 2X Macs 9-18 BO IX RebeaMts: phx.51 
Uenee 14). GJS. 51 ( Smith. Ateksinos n). As- 
sists: Phx.26 (Humphries ft), GA 21 (Flora 
wDiod, Conner 4). 

2ft SI M 3ft— TO 
35 37 24 2ft— 124 
Van d esesotie 10-20 54 24. Drester 9-156-934; 
Smith 11-15 54 27. Johnson 10-15 3-3 33. Re- 
beands: LA. 35 (Cage. Cotchtnas 5). Pori. 44 
(Bowie ft). Assists: LA.30 (Nixon 111. Port. 34 
(Colter, DaxJor 10). 

laisono 24 31 30 39—123 

Milwaukee * 37 3* 32 41-MO 

Cammlnoa U-U 5431. Pressev 9-13 12-11 30; 
KMtoBB 13-20 94 37. TMtKB M5 53 23. R*- 
teiamti: Ind. 57 (Kellogg 12). MIL 55 (Cixn- 
m toss 101. Asstea: rod 21 [Thamns 71.MIL 34 
(Presaev 71. 

New rerli 29 32 25 15- 1 M 

Kansas CUy 31 If 2ft 27—113 

Thorpe U-205-T0 71, TlJSuS 5- 1510-1022; Klao 
15-2654 37, Orr 5-15 VI IX fiotesads: N-Y.4S 
(wmuns ifl), ICCJ5 (Thorne 17). Assists: M.Y. 

35 (Sparrow ii), K_C 23 (Tbeus 9). 

Chtcaae 30 27 17 11—107 

Mias 17 22 25 33—97 

Johnson 12-13 74 31. WaalriilBO 3-15 S6 23 i 
Aguirre 11-22 10-12 32, Vincent S-15 5-7 21. Re- 
boaads: ail, (Jordon 9), DaL 39 (Perkins B). 
AMWs: Chi. 34 (Jordan W). Dal. 21 (Davis 7). 
Atlanta 15 22 25 1ft 1*- 71 

Cteveteod Z1 19 13 23 S-14 

WHUttfrMX72L Rhmrs4-Uft4 ix Glenn 7- 
792-2 14, Hastfass 4JM 14: Free 5-295917. 
Baaiey 7-14 2-21 a Rebounds: All. 51 (Loving- 
itan 10). Ox 59 (Hinson 12). Atftlsts; AH. 22 
(Rivets 8), tie. 29 (Free 9). 
boston 25 23 30 29—144 

Washington 10 30 M 24—91 

McHme 1M9 7-12 29. Ainge 9-15 M ft; Wil- 
liams 12-25 2-2 27. Reulnsen 8-18 14 17. Re. 
Muodft; BOft.49iBlrai2l.Wosh 71 (Ran in son 
131 Assists: Bov. 25 (Butt 9|. watft 27IGWH- 
llpnis 101. 


(March 3X at Lnlngton. Kentucky) 
Georgetown. 34-X vs. West Qtamotan 
Southeast Champion vs. Memahls St. 31-3 
CHAMPIONSHIP 
(April I, at LdkfagtanJ 

NIT Tournament 

QUARTERFINALS 
March 23 

Tennessee 41. Virginia 54 
UCLA SX Fresno St. 43 

Martel U 

Marquette. 20-in, at Indiana, 17-13 
Tsnn. -Chattanooga- 257. at Louisville, l ft- lft 
SEMIFINALS 
(March JE7. at New York 
CHAMPIONSHIP 
March V. al New York 



W 

L 

T 

PCt. 

PF 

PA 

Birmingham 

3 

1 

0 

JS3 

129 

97 

Memphis 

3 

I 

0 

JS0 

84 

70 

Tempo Bov 

3 

1 

0 

J5D 

117 

88 

New Jersey 

2 

2 

0 

500 

WO 

101 

JocksenvIUe 

2 

3 

0 

.400 

123 

152 

Baltimore 

1 

2 

1 

JOS 

79 

59 

Orlando 

a 

S 

0 

sea 

7S 

154 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Houston 

4 

0 

0 

1.000 

152 

85 

Oakland 

2 

1 

1 

A25 

97 

105 

Arizona 

3 

2 

0 

400 

10* 

■0 

Denver 

2 

2 

D 

500 

95 

107 

Portland 

2 

2 

0 

-500 

51 

65 

San Antonio 

I 

3 

0 

.250 

44 

IIS 


SATURDAY’S RESULT 
Arizona 27. Las A n ae l o s 13 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
ASIAN GROUP VB 
Qatar 7. Lebanon 0 

Points Standings: Iraq % Qatar X Jordon X 
Lebanon X 

Next Matches: Mar. 30. Jordon vs. Iraq; 
Mar. 27. Lebanon vs. Qatar. 

ASIAN GROUP 3-A 
Syria 1, Kuwait 0 

Petal* Standby: Syria X Kuwait X North 
Yemen X 

Next Matches: Mar. 29. North Yemen vs. 
Syria; Apr. 5. Kuwait vs. North Yemen 
ASIAN GROUP 3-B 
Thailand X BangJadesh 0 
Potato standings: Indonesia 4; Thai lore) 7; 
India 0; Bangladesh X 


World Cup Skiing 


Transition 


WOMEN'S Sl.At. O M 
fXl Heavenly Valiev. CaUtomlaj 
1. Erika Hess. Switzerland. I minute. 2945 


'.Y ■IW-H' 


BASEBALL 


CHICAGO— Shmed autfletder-destonated 
hitter Oscar Gamble to o one-year contract. 

CLEVELAND— Sent Cory Snyder, second 
baseman; Andy Altansoa catcher, and John 
Farrell, pitcher, lo their mtaor-taogu# camp 
tar reassignment, 

MILWAUKEE— Ptoced Chuck Porter, 
pitcher, on the emergency 404av (Bscdiled 
list. Added Jamie Nelson, catcher, to the 43- 
mon roster, 

TEXAS— Optioned Billy Taylor and MJtcti 
2woteneky,pttcten.loOk)tetomo City at the 
American Association. Sent Tonv Fasna 
pllteier, to their minor ta g pu s complex tar 
reosslgnmenL 

' FOOTBALL 
Nattanm Football Levon 

ATLANTA— Signed Tommy Norman, wide 


united Slates Football Leogvo 
NEW JERSEY— Released Marcus Hack- 
ott, wide receiver, and Frank Dunoon, tree 
safety. Signed Bill Hid. comertwOuand Tony 
Oifaun. offensive tackle. 

HOCKEY 


N.Y. RANGERS— Recoiled Jim Wlemer, 
defenseman-forward, from New Haven at the 
American Hockey League. 

COLLEGE 

EVANSVI LLE— Named Jim Onews basket- 
ball coetev. 

KANSAS— Nomed Ed BleRk tootball speed, 
strength and conditioning cooctL 

LONG BEACH STATE— Announced the ap- 
potatmont of Lorry Relsbig as assistant toot- 
Bud coach. 

PROVIDENCE— Named Rick Pltfato bas- 
ketball coach. 

SAN DIEGO STATE — Signed basketball 
coach smoker Gaines to three ang-vear con- 
tracts. 

TE NN ESSE E— Announced the resignation 
Of George Cafcgo, assistant football cwd i 


2. Penine Pelen, France. 1:30.1a 

X MalpoRata Tlalka, Potand. 1:3X36. 

X Brioftte Gadient. Switzerland. I^LIX 

3. Tamara McKinney. UJL 1:3IA1. 
x Anni Krttabldder. Austria 1:31X9. 

7. Paotetto MogonL Italy. 1:31JHL 

X Brigitte OerilL Swttrertona 1:31 JO 
9. Vrenl Schneider, Swttzeriona 1:31.99. 
ix Caroline Beer, Austria 1:324*. 

11. TraudI Hoeteier, West Germany. 1 :32AL 
rt Svhrta Eder. Austria 1.3X59. 

IX Zoe Haas, Swllzortokt 1^245. 

lx Catarina Rosen ovist, Sweden, 1 :3ZS7. 
15. Eva Twardbtwns. UX 1:33.00 
FINAL OVERALL STANDINGS 
1. Mlcheta FIoIrI. Swit ze r la nd. 2$9 noin is. 

X OertIL 71X 

X Marla Walllser, Switzerland. 197. 

X Hess and ftterino KtehLWete Germany. 
15X 

ft oi«a chorv ota va Ceechoskwakla 147. 
7. Elisabeth Klrchter, Austria X5ft 
X McKinney. 139. 

9. S e ta wi d er. 112. 

IX Blanca Fernandez Ochoa Spain. 1DX 

FINAL SLALOM STANDINGS 
1. Hess. IDO points. 

X McKinney, 93. 

X Pelen. 39. 

4. Mario Rasa Quarto, Italy, 75. 

X Gadient and Maria Eagle. West Germo- ' 
ny. 57. 

7. Chrtatelle Gulenara. Franca 65. 

X MagonL 54. 

9. Chorvatava 60. 

IX OertIL 5X 




'X& 




MEVS SLALOM 
(Al Hdovml v Vaffey. CoUfomtal 
I.Marc GrronMlb Luxtfnpourv, i mlnule 


Tennis 


MEN 

(Al Rotterdam) 
Qtxnrterflaals 

Tamo* Smta Czeteiostovakla del John So- 
drt UA. 5-1. 50. 

Jakob Hlasefc, Switzerland, del Francesco 
Gonzalez. Paraguay, 5>X ftft 5-4. 

Miroslav Medr, Czechaslavakla del, Boris 
Backer, West Germany. M. 6-2. 

Joaklm Nystram, Sweden def. Pat Cosh, 
Australia 2-4, 4-X 7-ft 

SemHtaals 

Hfaftak det, SmkL 5X 74, 53. 

Medr dot. Nvstrecm, 5a 6-1 

Ftaai 

Medr del HMsak, 5-t S-Z 


WOMEN 
(At N«w York) 
Qaatterttoals 

Ham Mndllkavg (3). Czechaslavakta. deL 
Zina Garrison (7), u A. 5X 54. 

Martina Navratilova (11. US. det. Pom 
Shriw. US. 52. s-l 

Semifinals 

Helena Sunova (St. Czechoslovakia def. 
Kathy Rlnatol. U5. 54. 52. 

Navratilova del. Mandiikova. 7-5. ?-i (9.7). 


Z Paul Frsmmett, Liechtenstein. i^XftX 
X Robert ZaHer, Austria. 1^X7*. 
ft Kkws Hefdeoaer. Austria 1 J07X 
X Plrmln Zurbrlggea SwltzertmL i LS2.12- 
5. Oswald Tatech, Italy. l:5U5L 
7. Peter Papaneetev. Bulgaria 1:5237. 

X Alex GtoroL Italy. 1:5X0, 

9. Daniel MauaeL Franca 1-J259. 

IX Mlehei Vtan. Franca 1-Sft2ft 

IL FI orian Boric West Germany. 1:5553. 

IX Bengt Flaellbera Sweden. 1 dftftl. 

IX Bob Orrnsbv. UA. l:5SJU2. 

1 ft Stefan Plstnr. west Germany, ldl£ 

IX Peter Nam b erger. west Germany. 
1:5X44. 

FINAL OVERALL STANDINGS 
1. GirardeUi. 252 pdtalx 
l Zurhriggen. 24ft 

X Andrsts wenzeL UechtanstefaL 172, 
ft peter Mulier. Swineriand, 15ft 

X Franz Hefaizer, Switzerland, 137. 
ft inDemar Slennterk, Sweden, 135. 

7. Thames Borg tar, Switzerland. 131. 

X Helmut Hdflehner. Austria lift 
9. Peter Wlmsberger, Austria in. 

IX Bui on KrizoL Yugoslavia; DCtaiel 
Mflrtrcr.Swlizeriond. and Markus We smai er, 
West Germany, 181. 

FINAL SLALOM STANDINGS 
I. Girardem, 125 poll dx 
Z From melt, EL 

X ingemor Slsnmark, Sweden, 7X 

4. Andreas Wenzel, Liechtenstein. 75. 

X Paolo De Chlesa I lair. 70. 
ft Baton KrixaL Yugoslavia a. 

7. Janas Nilsson, Sweden, 67. 

L Teisch. 57. 

9. I vo no Edaiini. Italy. S3 
IX Heidegger SI 


NHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GF GA 
x-PhllodetpMa 47 19 7 101 325 210 

x-Waihlngtan 42 22 9 93 294 219 

x-N.Y. Islanders 38 30 5 81 321 284 

N.Y. Rangers 23 39 10 54 272 JM 

Pittsburgh 23 43 S 51 247 339 

New Jersey 30 44 9 49 242 312 

Adams Dfvtstan 

* -Quebec 35 2ft 9 II 298 250 

x -Montreal 35 2ft 11 81 249 240 

x -Buffalo 33 24 14 00 2*2 212 

Boston 32 11 9 73 2ft9 255 

Hartford 25 M 9 « 248 300 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Ofvislos 

«-St. LOUIS 34 27 12 00 273 299 

X -Chicago 35 34 5 75 28ft 282 

x -Detroit 24 38 11 59 285 335 

Minnesota 23 39 12 58 2*6 294 

Toronto 18 47 8 44 235 318 

Smyrna Division 

v- Edmonton 45 17 U 102 351 261 

x-win rupee 41 27 7 89 234 311 

x-Calnary 38 V 9 85 338 384 

x-Los Angeles 32 29 13 77 323 304 

Vancouver 34 42 8 5ft 255 375 

(v-cl Inched division title) 

(x-cllnched piavoft berth) 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
Pittsburgh 1 8 8-1 

Betted* 3 8 ft— 3 

Hamel (17). Perreault (281, Tucker (18); 
Young (35). Shots an goal: Pittsburgh (on 
Barrasso) S-t-2— It. Buffalo lanriomml 174- 
14—39. 

N.Y. Rangers 8 8 3-1 

Detroit 2 7 1— J 

Duguav (35), Yzerman (25). Slttler (10). 
Gallant (4), LoiseUe (8); J. Patrick (I), Lar- 
oucho (23). Samtstram (251. Shed aa seal: 
N.Y. Rangers (an Staton) ftM2— 2ft; Demit 
(an vanbtesbnnidi) 11-10-9 — 3X 
Montreal 0 8 1—1 

Washiiwte* 1 1 6—3 

Taylor (8). Longway (4). Gustotoson 111); 
Waiter (17). Sheheagaai: Alantreal (on Jen- 
een) U-HHF-31.- Washlngtan (an Seetoertl 7- 
104— ZL 

Tomato 8 2 1 8—1 

Edmonton 1 8 2 0-3 

Ybremchuk (1). Andersen (22), Derlaoo 
(24); Krasheinysfci (31 1. Hunter (14), GlBMtV 
(55). Shah on goal : Taranto (on FuJirl 1 2- 11-9- 
2-M; Edmonton in Bemhorm) IHWJ3- 
39. 

Chicago I 8 3-3 

Calgary ft ft V— 1 

Ludzft (10), TjMurray (24), Powaon (91; 
Cavalllnl (4). Shot! on goal: Chicago (on La- 
metta) 9-13-4—25; Calaarv (an Skaradensktl 
12-18-12—34. 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
PhUodelpWa 1 1 3-3 

New Jersey 1 1 1—3 

Slnlsoto (34). Rkh Sutter (5), Paulin 3 (29). 
Ran Sutter (15): Gaone 1221. AdamsdOl.Ma- 
cLean ( 11 ). Shots aa oeat: Ptuiodetmia (on 
Rasch) 14-15-13—42; New Jersey Ion UrfaJ- 
berob) 8-174-24. 

Catea-r I 1 8-4 

Las Angeles S 3 0-3 

Beers (27), Beramn (2L Niuson (34). Bazek 
111); Hardy iM). Sykes 1171. Dionne 145). 
Shots aa goal: Cotoary (an jmcvk) 15-12- 
15—42; Las Angeles (on Lemelln) 10-12-1 1 — 
3X 

Mtanesata 8 1 1—2 

St. Laois 2 1 1—4 

M. Johnson (22), Pettersson (22). Glimour 
mi. Barr (14); Acton (19). Graham (le). 
Shots on goal: Minnesota (on Wamsley) 7-9- 
10-25; St. Louis ion Melodw) 12-IB4-3X 
VoBcaaver 3 1 0-4 

WbttdpsB 2 2 

Turnbull (211. Nlll 18). Babvch (12). Camp- 
bell (II. Hawerchuk 2 (481; Urtan (Ul, Le- 
mav (20).Smvt (2ft). Tanll 135). Shots an goal: 
Vancouver (on Hayward) 2845—3). WlnnF 
peo (on Bradeur) 7-9-12— 28 
Boston 8 1 1-3 

Ha rt f ord 1 1 3-3 

Dinaen (22), Malone (2)), Ferrara 3 U), 
Garina U Nuddieten 25. Shots wgeor. Bosten 
(on Ltof) 7-1*4— 31; Hartford (On PettefS) 13-. 
143—37. 


Exhibition Baseball 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
N.Y. Mots ft Montreal S 

Cincinnati ft Pittsburgh 2 

St. Louis X Khfttts City 3 
Los Anodes X Detroit 7 
Minnesota IX Phliadeiahta 2 
Atlanta 9. Texas 5 
Chicago WMte Sax X Tarania 2 
Boston 9. Houston 2 
San Francisco X San Oleoo 2 
Chicago Cubs & Seattle 1 
California x Cleveland 1 
Oakland IX Milwaukee 9 
N.V, Yankees S, Baltimore 4 




8evtai>-lFi 

Slalom champ Erika Hess. 


SATURDAYS RESULTS 
P hiio oe t phta X Clnetanofi ] 

Houston ft St. Loulft 3 
Bom more 5 . Lee Angdes 1 
Chicago White Sax X Pittsburgh l 
H.Y. Yankees ft Montreal 5 
Minnesota X Boston 3 
Toronto X Detroit 2 
Texas 7, Kansas City 3 
. n.y. Mats 9. Atlanta 8 
Cnicago Cubs ft ColUernia (ss) 4 
Seam* tssi ft San Francises 7 . 10 inrnmn, 
Milwaukee Ik) ft 5an Diego 3 
Cleveland 8. Oakland i 
Coluormo (u) 4 . Fullerton St 1 
Milwaukee i*s> 1? Seattle 9 


Se ' ■ 










.'S :-n K mssit IS I 





Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 25. 1985 


Victor Baneijee: Born to His Roles 


LANGUAGE 


I 


By Nan Robertson 

flew York Tima Service 


N EW YORK— Victor Baner- 
iee, with his dectrifvinc oer- 


iNjee, with his electrifying per- 
formance as Dr. Aziz in David 
Lean's screen adaptation of E. M. 
Forster's “A Passage to India/’ 
has become the first Indian actor 
since Sabu, the “elephant boy," to 
w in world fame in a Hollywood 
movie. It is not at aH likely that he 
win fade away and end, as Sabu 
did, a pauper in his native land. 

Nor will he ever become a 
“brown sahib” in India — the 
term Baneijee uses for “that vast 
number of people the British left 
behind in a no-man's land, com- 
pletely at sea, emulating all the 
habits and customs of the British" 
— including, he added, die habit 
of exploiting his countrymen. 

The Bengali actor, a favorite of 
the Indian filmmaker Satyajit 
Ray, is deeply, irrevocably Indian. 
He feels that the only positive leg- 
acies the British left his nation of 
almost 700 mill inn were the judi- 
ciary system and the railroads. 
Sunny by nature, be says this 
without bitterness. 

He clearly relishes his celebrity 
in his first Western film under a 
British director who is almost an 
icon. He wants to be at the Acade- 
my Awards celebration Monday 
in Los Angeles, though he -is 
crushed that he didn't receive any 
of the film's II Oscar nomina- 
tions. 

In private life, Banerjee has 
never been one of India’s great 
oppressed. He was bom in Calcut- 
ta on Ocl 15, 1946, to immense 
privilege and luxury. He is only 10 
months older than the “Mid- 
night’s Children” whom the su- 
perb Indian novelist S alman 
Rushdie wrote about — those who 
came into the world with India’s 
independence on Aug. 15, 1947. 

Baneijee quotes Rushdie, ap- 
provingly. as saying that such 
films as “Heat and Dust” and the 
rapturously received televiaon se- 
ries “The Jewel in the Crown” 
were not so much about India as 
about Britain’s empire neurosis — 
“the nostalgic twi tching of an am- 
putated limb.” 

He feels that “Passage,” in the 
character of Dr. Aziz, “has por- 
trayed a genuine Indian for the 
first time m a Western film in all 
his facets of character and psy- 
chology.” He added. “Dr. Am 
may be Chaplinesque at the be- 


ginning, but the role is essentially 
sympathetic, not a caricature." 

Toe part was difficult for him. 
Not so Ray’s adaption. “Home 
and the World,” by the Nobel 
laureate Rabindranath Tagore, 
which is scheduled to open in New 
York in early May and has been a 
wnash hit in Britian. 


Art MaHk, the Pakistani- born 
but very British actor who played 
the Indian hero in The Jewel in 
the Crown,” thinks Victor Baner- 
jee was “bom to play Dr. Aziz.” 
But in fact Baneijee’ s life fitted 
him for the role of N ifchil in the 
Ray film: He portrays an intellec- 
tual Hindu Bengali aristocrat, in a 
palace suffocated with late Vic- 
torian objects, who frees his wife 
of 10 years from purdah only to 
see her betray Mm. 

“My family , that interior, were 
exactly like Nikhil’s,” Baneijee 
said in an interview in New Yodt 
during a promotional tour for 
“Passage.” Puffing away on an 
endless tihatn of cigarettes, he de- 
scribed Ms mother’s tum-of-fhe- 
cenmry Calcutta palace, in which 
he grew up and in which he now 
lives — with considerably fewer 
objects — with Ms wife and two 
young daughters. 

There were 40 full-time ser- 
vants, including a washerwoman, 
seven cooks and four guards rotat- 
ing duty at the gate, and a garage 
with six foreign luxury cars. Every 
one of the innumerable rooms was 
stuffed with Victorian furniture, 
bronzes, ivories, crystal chande- 
liers, paintings, sculpture, porce- 
lain vases. Bengal's most famous 
classical musicians came to play 
in private concerts. 

“The floors were so sparkling 
clean yon could eat off them,” 
Baneijee said. “But we only ate 
off silver. Our grapes were import- 
ed from Persia, when my mother 
married, 10 English sergeants 
guarded her gifts of jewelry.” 

She was not in purdah, but in 
his father’s palace on Calcutta’s 
outskirts, in a more conservative 
Hindu family. Women were still 
cloistered; they were behind walls 
even when they went down to the 
Hooghly River to bathe. Victor, 
the male heir — the sole child — 
and as such a possible target for 
abductors, was escorted on walks 
and to school by two bodyguards 
from Afghanistan. 

IBs eyes grew luminous with 
memory, and then he lau ghed. “It 


was a wonderful childhood. They 
spoiled me rotten. ‘Whither is fled 
the visionary dream? 1 "He added, 
“That's from Wordsworth’s *Ode 
cm Immortality/ ” He has a mas- 
ter’s degree in comparative litera- 
ture ana carries Palgrave’s Golden 
Treasury of poetry everywhere. 
When his maternal grandfather 
died without a will in 1960, the 

palace was practically stripped of 
its treasures to pay the inheritance 
taxes. Victor, then 14, saw the 
auctioneers “cart them off by the 
truckload after paying a tenth of 
their value.” 

His father’s family, through 
several generations, was sympa- 
thetic to India's struggle for inde- 
pendence. A great-unde who was 
sent in a deputation to Britain was 
ostracized by the Banerjees for 
even traveling there. Baneajec’s 
■paternal grandfather wore only 
homespun Indian dothes, boy- 
cotting British fabrics, andpublic- 
ly befriended Subash Chandra 
Bose, “the greatest freedom fight- 
er ever,” die actor said. 

Baneijee was educated at an In- 
dian hill-country hoarding school 
run by the Christian Brothers. 
“When I was S, they sensed my 
leaning toward acting and singing, 
and so theyput me on the school 
stage in Tne Pirates of Pen- 
zance.* ” He went on to do other 
light operas, and sang the tenor 
lead in a production of “The De- 
sert Song/ when be was 20. 

After graduation from Jadav- 
pur University in Calcutta, he 
went to work for Reynolds Alumi- 
num and then for a shipping firm. 
His family, landed gentry for gen- 
erations, was horrified to see him 


Dr. Aziz in Britain and in Bombay 
at the commercial film factory 
that is called India's Hoi wood 
In 1989, when Banerjee learned 
through Ray in Calcutta that 
Richard Goodwin, the co-produc- 
er of “Passage," was looking for 
him, Baneijee said, “Forget it 
When Western filmmakers look 
for an Indian they want him to 
play a snake charmer, a chauffeur 
or a peanut vendor.” 

Baneijee said Ray responded, 
“Are you crazy? They’re looking 
for Dr. Aziz in ‘A Passage to In- 
dia.' They’re going to offer Aziz to 

an Indian. If I were ranking the 
film. I'd cast you as Aziz.” 

Grumbling, Banerjee dressed 
himseff and & younger daughter, 
then S, in Indian tunics and loose 
slacks (“I wanted to look like I 
didn’t care a hooL I didn’t want to 
dress dapperty in a suit and tie”) 
and rook her along to an interview 
with the producer. A rambling six- 
hour conversation with Lean fol- 
lowed. Finally, Banerjee recalled, 
be blurted out, “David, if you 
don't mind, am 1 going to play 
Aziz?” 

He said the director replied, 
“Why so tense? Of course, my 


dear man, what do you expect?” 

Warned by the director, “Don’t 
sell yourself cheap," Baneijee said 
be did anyway: T wanted the pan 
so much. It would give me expo- 
sure Td never get in another fflm. 
The salary was the equivalent of 
what f would earn in a year in 
Indian productions. But it was 


less than nearly all the minor En- 
glish roles in the film." 


going “into trade.” Worse yet, he 
left business to become a fufi-time 


left business to become a full-time 
stage actor, and then, in 1977, a 
movie actor. “You’re joining the 
fiJmsT* said his scandalized father. 

Ray chose Baneijee for “The 
Chess Players.” “The Home and 
the World” is Ms third film with 
Ray. He has also starred in two 
Hindi films, appeared in the Ivo- 
ry-Merchant production “Hulla- 
baloo” with Dame Peggy Ashcroft 
(Mrs. Moore in “Passage"). 

“To this day my father cringes 
when he has to teD friends, ‘My 
son’s a movie actor,’" Baneijee 
said. “But then, he always adds, 
‘At least he works for the best — 
Satyajit Ray and David Lean.' My 
mother, however, has become a 
great encourager.” 

Lean searched for the perfect 


glish roles in the film." 

He had started to read “A Pas- 
sage to India" as a college student 
but had. put the book down half- 
way through. “It bored me. I far 
preferred the novels of D ickens 
and Thomas Hardy.” He read and 
studied it again before learning 
the script. “By now my imagina- 
tion was running riot I saw so 
many different depths sad ave- 
nues to explore.” 

Yet, “I found it difficult to 
come to tenns with Aziz. Here was 
a man from a family that could 
affoid to send him to medical 
school, who was obviously educat- 
ed and of enough influence to join 
the government civil service. It 
was absurd to think he would be 
at a total loss as to whatto feed his* 



ENUF on 'Star Wars 


Bv William Safire 


W ashington —Americans 

are a nation of acronynum- 


Ifanuath Jahamsoo/Ovtfhe 


Victor Baneijee; Bengali actor relishes his celebrity. 


F.n glidi friends on a picnic.” 
Finally, T just played the 


on questioning such things, we’d 
still be on location in Bangalore." 
He wound up concentrating on 
Aziz as “a man with a terrific 
range of emotions.” 

He does not Mde Ms profound 
disappointment at not having re- 
ceived an Academy Award nomi- 
nation. “It’s the only film prize I 
really respect, because it is voted 


scripted. If I'd 


by my peers in the industry ” he 
said. “I honestly felt I had a 


chance.” He warns to go to Los 
Angeles anyway for the Oscar 
awards. T was an integral mem- 
ber of the cast I worked jo&y 
hard. I don’t want to be left out at 
their moment of triumph.” 

If he ever does win an Oscar for 
what he considers will be a lesser 
role, Baneijee swore he would “go 
up on that stage and say Thank 
you, David Lean, for ‘A Passage 
to India.’” 


VY are a nation of acnmymsm- 
iacs. A piece in this space a few 
weeks ago, pointing to the presi- 
dent’s unhappiness with the deri- 
sive nickname “Star Wars” and 
asking for suggestions of a new 
name for the global shield he in- 
tends to protect us from incoming 
missiles, elicited 600 responses. 

Many entries from opponents of 
the strategic defense system were 
attacks on the president. The 
“Governmental Inter-Planetary 
Program for Effective Response, 
or GIPPER, was the brainchild of 
Harold Emanuel of Morris Plains, 
New Jersey. Several irate cit izen s 
suggested “Ballistic Offense Neu- 
tralization Zone" or “Bulwark Or- 
der Negating Zealous Offensive” to 
come up with BONZO, the name of 
the chimpanzee in an early Ronald 
Reagan movie. 

I refuse to send these along to the 
White House, and have also cen- 
sored the “Defensive Umbrella," 
DUMB, as well as “Shield to inti- 
mately Provide International De- 
fense, 1, STUPID; and “Wistful At- 
tempts to Circumvent Killing 
Ourselves," or WACKO. Such stri- 
dency stems from the old “Mutual 
Assured Destruction." MAD, and 
triggered the ripostumous “Nucle- 
ar Universal Tactical Systems,” 
NUTS. The derogation most fre- 
quently submitted is PITS, for “Pie 
in the Sky.” 

Most correspondents, like Stuart 
Sbeedy of SJyosset, New Yak, 
stuck to wads formed from ini- 
tials: “Positive Interception of Far- 
Flung Lethal Engines," PIFFLE, 
and “Incoming Missile Barrier Em- 
ploying Concentrated Intense La- 
ser Energy.” or IMBECILE The 
scandal angle can be covered with 
“Strategic Counter Against Mis- 
siles,” SCAM. 

Of the foreign-language acro- 
nyms, I liked “Allied Defense Ini- 
tiative for Outer Space,” or ADI- 
OS, but the other Spanish entry, 
“Militarily Advanced Ceding High 
Overhead,” MACHO, won't fly. 

All right, now, let’s get serious. 
The adminis tration needs a name, 
and its “Strategic Defense initia- 
tive" — SDI, or “Strati efi” — is a 
nonstarter. 

Lots of entries on SANE “ 'Way 
back in 1983,” writes William 
Rusher, publisher of National Re- 
view. “I began trying to get General 


lion, with the acronym SANE]* 
passed the kka along to the Vflj 
House, which apparently vcum 
because they feared confibion 
the ohl Commutes for a Sane 3 
clear Policy. U didn't take befall 
here I am. trying again." 


Im 


Naturally, where there's SAM* - 
there's SAFE "Shield Apiasvf^ 
tal Encounter” and “Shield AoS 
ca From Everything." Those • 
loo hard; Jorio Dauster of Loot ' . 
prefers the plain "Defense m S» 
Against Russian Misaks,” E® 
ARM, and L anting Lament? 
New York offers the simple Tfi 
Altitude Laser Targeting." HAL " 
An acronym that is not already 
word, sent in by three people 3 
pendenthr. is DANA: J Def a , . 
Against Nuclear Attack"; thart 
possibility. 

HOPE springs eternal: f w C 
“Hostile Projectile Elimiuatiotf*^ ' 
“High Orbit Protection Echefar’' 
to “Humanity Offers to Pit* 
Extinction.” 


^,111 W» ** 
,/\ ( rui’U 


Maybe just a name is need 
like “SAM." (No, that’s an aa -. 
nym for "surface-to-air nasale/ 

A wad from tire Greek that m . 
its consideration is areri which i 
the name of the shield, a bras . ■ 
plate, of Zeus and Athena. A hr 
dozen letters came in with ft/ 
Michael Wilson of Hoboko, N' 
York, shapes it into “Atmospbe T 
Engagement and Global Mte' 
gence System” (adding, “alihous 
still like ‘Star Wars’*) and Dr * 
Umebrook of Van Nuys, Calif " ' 
nia. suggests “End Game Iniercr 
Systcm ’ or “American Ear 
Guard in Space.” 

There is one word that pro ' 
keep coming back to: shield. Do. 
realjy need ro file it out with wo 
to make it an acronym? If we hf 
Stealth technology, why not 
technology? I push “global due 
(already the name of an ann' 
exercise of the Strategic Air Cc 
mand) while the presdent ten 
tivety mentions “security duel - 
“Star Wars” is going to be as hr 
for Reagan to shake as “W 
Bank” was for Meoachem Bef 
But if he wants to by, my shield : * 
is all his. Send additional sun * 
tions to the White House dm - 
The motto of my office is “Eve 
body Now Undo Followup' - 
ENUF! •- 


Ne*> York Timex Service 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MOVING . 


SUBSCRIBE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


fo the 

INTERNATIONAL 


ALLIED 


HERALD 


VAN UNES Ml 

ova uooagoiis 

in U5JL - CANADA 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE TO RENT/SHARE 
Paris area furnished paris area unfurnished 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


Man Your OosiMmI Ad Qiriddy and Easily 

fadM 

MTHtNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


TRIBUNE 


AND SAVE. 

At a mw jubsenber ta Aw 
fcrtomariond Harold Trioo*. 
you am mm up Ip half 
the Nwufemd price, dnpendng 
on your country or residence. 


390 WOBXMNIDE 
OB ESTIMATES 

PARK Datbcrda* Intan 
(01) 343 23 64 


CAM CA HB CA HB CAPRI CAPEL 

For solo* control boauTrfiri ponorofme 
tap floor ujMitmenf, newly furnished, 


room, terrace. I 
2 forage tmSxxmTweM e knelt, 2 1 
urt m iai t oft passbie, top terrace 
ovatlab*. Dr. Who Korean, Via C«r- 
ccfohllCoprilfcdy Tel 081/8379547 


framcrjrt 


For dofcxk 

on this spedd baroductary offer, 
write to: 


HT Sntarip0MM Deportment 
III, Amu* Cfcrefai de-Crete, 
92200 NeuMy ta r Some ftwace. 
Or tab Mil 747-07-29 


(06V) 250066 

MUNICH ims. 

(089) 142244 

iondon JfiSz 

{Of) 953 3636 

CAIRO ABM Von Inn tart ! 
(20-2) 712901 

USA AJBad Von Un«« Inf! Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 


ANSGOME 6 RMGLAM) with rf 
ficn n St Johns Wbod & Kotinfllon 
offer ths bop tanka n r es ta rted 
Mk^Tak 722 7101 (01). UK. 


FOR SHORTTERM STAY PARIS: Sin- T4di EGUSEAUTEUL. Studio, btaony I 

^and2rooniLdecorQtodGontod> on gardens. Hgh doss, balk lutehea 

§P?^l^2! , ^ ria ^ 7500flft,ni FriZQO charges ndudad. 503 33 06- 
ToL (1135999 50 1 


YOUNG AMERICAN MAN 26, Swto 

m Franca 10 yoars mptrime* travel, 
Annf m Hsfian mb mtorutina dni- 


PAJUSA SUBURBS 


Embassy 

f Am So 


Service 


75008 fafc 

Tele* 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


IN ASIA AND MGnC 


coitaet our local dblriMlof an 


ta twnaflooct HercM Tribune 
1009 Td ta CammM BaM 
2424 Hmwaev Road 
HONGKONG 


TefcHC 5-286726 


DEMEXPORT 

HUBS • LVON ■ MAR5BUE 
LOU • NICE 

HI waving by sped t£a Iran moor 
ate h Fran to o4 atw n 8w wadd. 
Tal fres from France 16 (Q5J 24 10 82 
FKB ESTIMATES 


AGENT M PARIS 

PHONE 563-1640 


In the bay <t Patna. 5 nws. Palma, 15 
rains, airport, 664 berths Bio 38 meters.. 
2 for up to 60 meters aodt IncSviduai 
IWmvtt/viator/ptom conmdkn. 
Prohusianal part mrwnQimcrt col Ml 
■name Servian.- lower, ratio, dp, trav- 
eW?t. teparr, fue) Man, in 8> outdoor 
winter hordtttuds, U-ground ccr- pert 
Lodm. Gpn E tai M rtory service A lm- 
wra f ocjtie a m etfctj, bor feSng. shop- 
ping entering, MMaanml. Gaff & 
ferns nearby. C m i n ner tin t troacQrrt- 
prises 85 unds aa 13,171 sqja. in aL 
nusZl swjert^jortjnerts tiioveBi78in 
se p im ofe jmury condo - cd m front Kne 
darn main pen. Top hvwrtnwtS 45% 
saMHuny now before nest priaensel 
CarteS (feeeffy dentopert 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy 

«An4i 


DEAL FOB SHORT TERM 5T AY. Paris 
pudbs & 2j roona. decontod. Gmkxt 
SoreSn 80 rut Umenbs, Peris 7th. 
Txk (1) 544 39 4a 


EMPLOYMENT 


Heart m HJon seeb m tor wi i n aded- 
lanang employiaenl in or near uene< 
«a?fnfe to tawut Tet (TP) 32 10 99 


Service 


75001 M 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


WAR PARC MONCEAU. 2 bed- 
rooms, April 1-14. $650. Fteiible Wy 
SAua. Cal 267 0335 evetina 


GENESAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


to walk an »«cd processor 
series) in Cmeff. wim working 


AGB4T IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 


13TH GtACBE. SUNNY STUDIO 
wih smaB Safchen. 5300/ month. April 
1-May 30. Tut 336 57 50. 


2ND- STUDIO- AJoacrfWB,6lh Poor. 

F75/day. Veit today fromrradday on. 
i 47. ree JAbookir. Metro Sente. 


seneq m uwee, w«i warfang pan 
feefa pay. avdidfafe knmecKaiehr.Qin- 
wctAA fate. Pais 339 83 3D. 

AUDmON FreodVEngfaK, Shoke- 
spean-.profassionds.Forii255*555. 


BKUSHL ARABIC HBKH, Hdkn, 

h^hbr eduastod lady, work perrat, 
pood knowledge in avil enpneenng, 
seeks panfion n designing / leanton- 
d work, personal cnaidabt Tol Paris 
5794790. 


By Phono: Cdl your local WT representative with your ton. Yoi 
wfff be informed of the cost rnirnenato^, and once prepaymM.il . 
made your ad vnB appear within 48 hoars. ' ' 

Caet: The basic rote is S9-80 per Sne per day -I- kxd foxes. There or- — 
25 letters, 5»gn» and spoaw in the first En* and 36 in the foflowingSne^r 
Minimiim rpace is 2&iei. No abbreviations u c u sp tai 
CmSt Confer Americcn Express. Omar's CJub, Eurocord, Monai 
Cord, Access and Visa 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMBtiCA 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Paris; {For classified only]: 
747-4600. 


EUROPE 


AGENCE DE L’ETORE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

380 26 08 


IWRO PUNTA FORTAIS, SA 
Director Comerod 
C/Mrrina lOl.Portds Nans 
Mrifaat Span or Tbi 68686 CAUU E 


AT HOME M PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTTMNI5 FOR RBU OR SAIE 

563 25 60 


SHORT TOM in Latin Quarter. 
No agents. Tek 329 38 61 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


FULLY EQUIPPED APARTMENT in 
anter. Weekly, no agent. 574 16QQ 


CHAWS ELYSES- Kgh dan sftxfiq, 
view, IV. Short/long tam. 562 93 32. 


74CHAMP»Y5SS 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


DIVORCE IN 24 HOURS 


GONTRCX Costbusfers to 300 ate 
worldwide ■ Air/Sea 06 Cferfe 
281 T8 81 Aril (near Opera) Car* too i 


SWITZERLAND 


Sute2 orlfooio apar tment. 
One month or an 
U OAICDGE 389 67 97. 


1 6th: PUCE ETAS UMS 


Mutual or contested odmm, low cost. 
Haiti or Domnoon Refwtfic For Hor- 
mteioa tend J&75 (or 24 -pood bootfcr 
/twxftng to Dr. F. Gtrodes, ODA 
1835 IT St MW- Wodvnttei DX1 
20006. OSA Tet 




UWWPY? FAMUY PROBIB4ST 15 
yean as incfividual, marital txtd fcenSy 
ajunelor.ddd -adefesamriherapta. 
Gedemkn. ConfittaUial. Col Paris 

63371189-llaB 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
bate. Park 6345965. fame 
6780320. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH raOVjNCTS 
CANTOS, panoRsnc sea view, roof- 
tap ^3' *P° C8 ' bde- 

pendent itwia 100 sqjn. terrace, 
pod. tennis. Promo fa n 

Moaart Place Motet Ntoe (93) 


Beaunfui duln in lenowtel. “hotel 
partiajtar" idled far ertertc iu inp. Hflh 
pike. Stone hrt 766 33 00 


7TH GREPELLE 

4ih Boor, Sfk tauthean, 160 am. to be 

ratoteacL frits njobffn&S 59 59 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurafet defiwry. 
Write Kaymr. ROB Z B1000 Brute 


CANNES 150 METERS {ROSETTE. 
View Comes hldda. 90 sqjn. doplo. 
F7BOOOO + 60 SQM rntmi 
teben. HSDfm Both remmMcL 
Td; 16 1 5 0*6147. 


20 HOUSB, 2 bedrooms, 2 both- 
rooms, lounge, Ukhan. On the beach 
near Mcjcrcar, Costa Blanca, ready 
to be ocnjxod. Write to Segorra, 
Bkmdo Sanana 60, Mcrbdkt, Spdn 


SUNNY SOUDOM SWTZBBAND 

GOLF HOUSES LUGANO 

5 cou r f ortc U e nice designed hows 
p&bon dsvefapmenfl. At kfj*c loco- 
tan adfeWng me fmoas gaff tab of 
lugau. AI houses wi* private garden 

6 garage. Bed quality inducing fee- 
□bee. My emrpped tothefl etc. That 

STSF495J300 free far seta to 

faroignarx. 

Mortgages at law Site ktorest itoeL 

EMBA1D - HOME LTD. 

YOUR PA2TNB1 M BJROFE 
Via & Uteri 3, OMR» ingn 
Tel: CH-9 1-5429 13 - 
Thu 73612 HOME CH 


air YOUR HOia ML try 0 Ffatotrl 
apanment near the Offal Tower. Line* 


7tb EXCOTIONAL 

Private house with dmroaer. Ivin 

3 badreorn^smJ gar^v F13JQ 


MEXICO OTY. Swiss lady. 34, moving 
ta Mexico uritfi pMmafat hteand m 
summer, seeks emffaymed, possUy 
pan-taw. Farmer international newt 
agency correspondent now froe- 
uno. Spcats Engfeh/French/ltafian/ 
Spanish. Would consider PA/UJM 
botes/otber utarastag. work. Hedy 
Be* 1950. Herald Tnbuna, 9X21 
Nmily Cedtcc. France 


Deal mbs 
MIBMATXMM1 
SECRBARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

fa the HT QateW Stean. 


HT CBH2NAT10N OBtAHTMENT is 
fedtag for temporary bSKwcl Eng- 
fan/ French secretary, avtxktafa xn- 
moefctey. Phone Mrs Babanal Paris 
1 747 12 65 ext 4302 


ury duefiot to Sroom gp u t metto , 
tram one week upwards- FLATOTEL 
14 rue du IMOtej 75015 Pom. Tefc 
57562 2U Tta 2KZ11 F. I 


PLACE ST MIOB. 3-room fi<X, spW 
<Sdvio«c FSOOO. feffy eejuipped Wrfi- 
ea 5th floor, Hr. 6 years lease. Cafl 
329 50 56 between 8 pul 6 10 1 


QUAUHED ROUS4LOYCE dwufleur. 
Autamotilo engineer HPC St 1AM. 46 
yean old. EngKi/French/Hcian, will 
tdm charge dRoBsRayce or Or fleet 
of can private or company. Area: 
South of Frame. Genova Roma Free 
to travel Ear 1956, Herdd Tribune, 
92521 Neufly Ckfex. France 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 
08 -THE CBEMEDE LA CREME tam- 


pans 758 82 30. 


tongue vaetories. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


7TH CHAMPS DE MACS. Apri 1 -I 
Aug. l.Stucio, phone. Tek 71695 1& | 


FAST EXECUTIVE HOMBTORNG- 
Pcxit & suburbs. Retex/sdes 551 09 45 


CANADIAN WOMAN 24. ecW- 
ed. WKfe DtaSs Stela diaDencxng 
emptoyraent. Tefc 2Z7 64 97 PrewT 


LANGUAGE SCHOOL seefa part time 
mother-tongue Bigfah 6 Goman 
teachers. Mud haw EECpanport or 
void untteg popers Cdl So For 
UtogusL ParS 74/12 30 


Anriaten: 2636-15. 
Atfeeaei 36I-8397/36U2421. 
Bramic 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01) 329440. 
Ftefafart: (069) 7267-55. 
lannw 29-58-9A 
Ifebon; 47-27-93/662544. 
London; (01)3364802: 
Madrid: 4&2891/45S3306. 
MRwk (02] 7531445- 
Norwy; (0^845545. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden 06 7569229. 

Tel Avivt 03-455 K9. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


Ruenoa Aiwa: 41 40 31 ■ 

(Dept. 312) 

OoayoquS: 431 943/431 
lfaw.4T7852 
F eme i ta. 64-4372 
SteiJte. 22-1055 
Santtagn 6961 5S 
S«> Pete 852 7893 


MIDOLXEAST 


Bahrain: 246301 
ierdnu 2S21A 
Kewtat: 5614485. 
L ehman : 34 00 44. 
Oakr. 416535. 
SmrdrAtefae 
Jeddah: 667-1930. 
UJULiDtel 224161. 


FAR EAST 

1 


UTOTH) STATES 



International Business Message Center 


WANTS EXPBBKH) Amerioxi 
TEFL teochen for busmessraen, workr 
ingpsxn rented. Col weeUayi 9 
to 62263 66 


New York (212) 752-3890. 
Weal Coast: (41 5] 362-8339. 


AUSTRALIA 


Sydneyr 929 56 39. v/ 

Melbourne: 690 8233. ^ 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


€B€L 


The Architects of Time 



DAVOS-PLATZ 

Our bed offer ki Davou exdusve 
qxatment with large Kvkig room, firo- 
place & gallery, wood covered wofls, in 
mold vnfa now undv rooorairudion. 
2 bedrooms, one bathroom, one dww- 
or, bed faa*te rMcrlooemg raoun- 
tome. 116 sqj n. •¥ 10 sclih. awered 

rerrw*. Pri» SFPSttOOO. Free far srta 
to fareigaan. 

Martages at low Ste fel ermf ram. , 

EMBALD440ME LTD 

YOUR nUOfOUN EUROPE 
Dorfetr^ CH-8872 Wee*en 
Tefc 0666421778. 

Ibc 876062 HIRE CH 


in Sm MoraaHomA HmrMdrS. 
bvnm, wbaremonthematttrd 
of a nuKon readme w orfd- 
ate of whom one fa 
bmlnt mr and mkhthy. 
reed A Mat Mr car [Pam 
613595) before 7C cun, en- 
tej mat we amt iter you 
bat fc rai d yaw menage vnff 
app ear warn i 48houix The 
rale k tlS.S9.80 or fa ad 
equMeel per Bee. You mutt 
fteidi lofeMe and mffi- 
eUmbStngmkkeuL. 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


BUSN3S SBWKCS M GENEVA 
mawtarid service / trandabons / 
/ tefex / mai service / 
occo te i g / oompany formafiara / 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 


MATURE COUPUE. OF / BUTlfS, 
wife howetaepar seek podlfair in firs* 


AUTO CONVERSION | AUTOS TAX IRB^r; 


doesaddt hounhoid or hnury yacht. 
Superior axAura & service, efficient 
haunkeeping. Over 30 years vwiltan 
re fe r e nces ei the USA. and Europe. 
Very reEofcfe cxxl reqxxiiffjle. No bos. 
Rd USA status. Pfegsed»ne 5pm UK 
few, Room 10. 8«2 4&43 


1211 Geneva IT. 
Tba 42307D. 


bfa of Man, Turfa, AnguJb, 

| kb:K\ Punauu, Lfceria and roast other 
offshore arras. 

* Cswfessifed professional 
advice 

* bnaedteE avaflobSty 

* Nominee services 

* Bate Rnplrafions 

* Aceouofato&actimnkbctan 
e kk^tSSha mi & telex 

Finee erannatoqr booklet fanu 
SH£CT COBTOKAIE 

sanncBUD 


SWITZBRAND 

ftjndmers an buy STUDtO APAST- 
/ CHALET, LAKE G04EVA - 
MQNTREUX or ei these wortd famous 
naortsc CRAhSMONTANA, L£S D(AB- 
IB8EI5. VBMS. VULMS. JURA, efc 

Martgoges 60% SI 6 W* Weresr. 

^Ib/acia. 

52 Moribrftrt, CH-12Q2 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


TAX SERVICES 


DOT/ERA CONVBtSXMS to ILS. 
specs. Acc ep tance guaranteed. VIA 
Corp, 62D0 Freeport Cate, BaW- 
moro. MD 21224. Tel: 301-6B86I1, 
The VIA US. Aulas available 

in fe te. Tek 32-5U715Q71. 71c 
82209. 


USA MCOME TAX ADVICE & de- 
tents. Paris based US CPA 359 63 01 


DIAMONDS 




London Snresonthm 
2-5 Old Bond i, London W1 
Tel 01-493 4244, Tlx 28247 SC9DN G 


THIS WEEK 


Your best buy. 

Fine cfcxnonds in any price range 
at lowest whafesale prices 
dred from Antwfep 
earner of the dkenood world. 
Fid guarantee. 

For free price Esi write 


feta Room 10. 0482 42343 

BUUBt VAlfir/ Cook Housekeeper, 
very reEabfa, presenrobfe couple, 
higmy experienoKl in.afl tausetiald 
duties, cepatee or taking oonqiete 
chocae in abtenoe of emnoyen. Free 
nttaTry Safi CoreuScrft/7 Hdi St, 
Akfertaol. Hants UK. Tefc XQSi 
315369 UK Licenced 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


KOUSIOVC 

V.W./ 


TOW 1985 




NEW MERCEDES] 


PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 



FROM STOCK 


AUNAYS AYAEABIE - «1 PARS, 
ctekkens nanmr, mun s neipars & aa 
famebes of 1st dan beta domertic 
help worUjnde. Cdl sioane Bureau, 


London 730 6122/5142(24 houml U- 

CB4PAGY. Tfa 8950670aOATO G. 


far IMM&HAIF defivery 
BBT5HWTQ 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 


RUTE INC. 


Largest Mi av — ai Abtefc ” 

AN?te>. ol mod* broede^ 


I ALWAYS AVA8ABIE LONDON ody 


GBCVA. Tefc 022/341540. 
Telex; 22030 


APRIL 1st, 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


EstnUnhed 1928 

PB g aa n sfrDttf 62, B-2018 Antwerp 
Befckm - Tefcpz ^ 234 07 51 
Tlx: T\779 rjH b-Al the Diamond Oub. 
Heat of Antwerp Diamond industry 


babyntefen & lit das dafly maids. 
Soane Btnou, London 730 B122 / j 
5142. licenced cenploym 


Iperlorei l‘, 2D0S VffwW fefa 

Tek3/23T»«. 


Tek 3/231 ® ® 1% 

Tlx 35546 FHCA ff I, _ * 

Apply far oor colour amog.- -. 
US$5 cah 


APARTM04TS - CHALETS 

AwUfeferhrdmliy 




Prion from 5F/aJoa*Mortgoge* at 
(M% interetf. Wte 
GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av. ManSepos 24 



BUSINESS WEEK 


INTL 

BEAUT1RJL PEOPLE 

IMJMfTO INC 
U5A1 WQHDWIK 


OFFICE SERVICES 


MGUSH NANNS5 & Maher s Hdps 
free now. Nash Agency, 53 Church 
; Rood Have. UK. iSc (02^31 29044/5 


PARIS 

near CHAMPS 


AUTOMOBILES 

1983-BMW74K. 35000 KMS, dart: 


A comple t e torid & twines* service 


CH-10Q5 Loucatm. S wa a rkm d 
: (021)22 35 1Z Tbe25185 MBJS OL 


Tefc (021)22 35 12 7bc251B5 NEl 
eficMMnd Sface 1970 


INTERNATIONAL 


prewiring a unique Coledfoa of 
tataried, veadta & muMbngu^ 
fadSvkbats for eti aeanaa. 
212-765-7793 
211-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service RewssentoteK 
Neerfed Worfawte 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SELFWINDING CHROSIOGRAPH, WATER RESISTANT 

Avoteble in Steel. corcfclrtdtHan o? lleel and !8 IrtgoW Of aU iSktgaW 



't^pSiSS^ 

IvGW BWMMe 

• ^ fo PO 1 * ‘Vote For 


RENT 

YOUR OFFICE 

with di {acflUee 


|CADRlACSEVniE1981, 


options. Best offer over 
Tel Paris B25 67 76. 


ROM STOCK 

Mercedes 500 SEC new, dvk blue 
Meroedes 500 blade 

Mar codes 500 5l/5e JSEC, new 
and mem others ibi 
C acfBaCr Ferrari, Jaguar. Range Rover, 
land Rover, Poncnt, Mer ce des and 
other faadng makev 
Same day registration possafe. 

ocovns 


EUROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 


Call or write for free 

fax iron 


Ssri BTCAJI NL 


Garidoratrasse 36. Qf«H7 Zurich 
Tefc 01/202 76 10. Tefan 815915. 


AUTO RENTALS 


LE SATBUTE, 8 rue Gopemie 
75116 Pmi Tefc (33 1) 72715 59. 
Tdex: (e said 62u 183F. 


NOW ON SALE 


AT ALL NTERNATIONAL 


GBGL 

WHCWlVWffiH 


MEISTER 

Bahnhpfstrqsse 
ZDrich • 


GREAT BRITAIN 

IUXWRT Wttr ffiMSTO MW flat, 
1 bed, reception, kridun S brthroan. 
cptat (oaten. Herfer dedaied. Ex- 
eelent access West End ted Gty. 

ss 


NEWSSTANDS. 


NTONAHONAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 

UKcompcms fcom E r 5(.OM Pbnotea 
& afl rnofor off-shore centers. Fel od- 
wee sfe atien, norili n w services, powers 
of attorney, registered offices, aattm- 
fenqr, conflaenfed bonk acasunis 

. — — — I Hila ntn~l (■Uuoia 

OpBmKL wonoenma >«^pnanM f 
ta & iwjSm servtCB. 

EBJS. limited 

43 Cennino Street, Lwerpoot, LB 7NN. 
Tel IHl m Idnife 6*613 BUSS& 
Feat 051 709 5757 
Atedetad Officei Worldwide. 


YOUR oma N HUBS RKSHT ON 

THE CHAMPS aYSHS 

uxuky sannes omcB 

Telephone answering, Tefex, Fa* 
secretariat, meoteig roam 
AClt tf Oiamtt &*♦» Pwj 8th , 
Tefc 562 66 00. Tfe- 649157F 



10 YEARS 

We De&ver Oars to Iha World 



TRANSCO 


Tel 02341/ 7004 Tx 


AUTO SHIPPING 


OFFSHORE SKV1CES 


TOUR LONDON OFHCS 
at the 

aOSHAM EXECUTIVE CBfTIE 
Comprehensive nan of serums 
150 Regard Street. London Wl. 
Tefc [OlJ 439 6288 Tbt 261426 


LONDON. For the best fcmished fkta 
and houses. Consult the 5aecfefefa 
PWw, Kay and Lewis. Tefc London 
3528111. Tefex 27846 BESIDE G. 


PANAMA! U8B6A. CORPORATIONS 
from US$400 avmto fcfe n ow. Tel 
(06241 20340. Tafe* 628352 ISLAND 
uThnaUKl. 


HAVE US DOUARS to exchcete fw 
Swb Frans or hefian lira. Cal: 361 
6500 Zurich. 


UJC. nan resident anpanies wkh 
nominee efredon, bearer shares and 
canfidembaAoceouqls. Ful back-up 
6 support unices. Ptnxao 6 Ub*,r$n 
coruXte s , First rate c orfidenrial 
prata ai onci imicis. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


; XP-CJL 17 Wdeotas St. Iondon 
! E17TOTH! 01 37?iSl TUr 89391 1 G 


YOUR HEMS OFFICE IN FRANCE 
PARK I6TH 
, Daly office nddi 
Regfarcaon with trade authorities 
DomifflKteri - Trwnaiid secretaryship 
Tefc 651 29 77. TSik 6122S9 F 


HOW TO IMKXT A B1ROKAN 
CAS INTO THE UJA 

This docuroent exjJoira fufly whot con 

must do to bran o n inn the ILS. 
wfejy and fegniy. k includes now & 

ta " c ff ert ? £B A procod urn 

a wed as bgcrf ponds. Because of the 

* 2 % rirfor, ym can save up to 

1^1 feOQQ when bwng o Mercede s , or 
BMW m Europe & uworfen <t to Itw 
Shies. To receive ths monuoL send 

7000 Swsgart 1, West Germty 


I Keeping a constant stock of mare than 
300 brand new an, 

aara wr nw* fT K J r ic oCT COF Qi QQ. 
Trowco SA, 95 Noardetoar, 
2tQ0 Antwerp, BaMum 
Ta(323/542 £2 40. IS 3SM TWNS B 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 


MBCtte 1985. LARGE stock. 
1YA5CO. G8. BAD. CH Col John in 

St&s"™ “ 7 ' ta 


CLASSIFIEDS H, 


VAN CLEEF & ARPEES 


FRATOKflnVMABi-W. Gen 
fesmonn GntoH. Tefc 069 
Bck-gpcg over Europe »m/ 


— MOKl-O I \MI >1 s Ji.tt — 

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LONDON 


l^ANSCAR M rue Le Sueur, 751 Idl 
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Artwras* 333 99 85. Cannes 39 43 44 1 


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TEL: 0 I —4-** 1 l 111,". TELIA: 2o6E(>. 



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