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e Global Newspaper 
'n Edited in Paris 

iV/| v K printed Simultaneously 
"P Ifn Paris, London, Zurich, 
^(Hong Kong, Singapore, 
v he Hague and Marseille 


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INTERNATIONAL 



jHBt DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 1 8 


V 


Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 

ZURICH, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


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/ - - 'ikdbt Ov Siatf From Diqxatha ■ 

• v j v . isHINGTbN — *gi e House 

- ■ a J debate M&n day-era the MX 
- and President Ronald Rea- 
•’ /At his chief anns nffiotialor 

- pilol EGD to argue that the 
: ' nc weapon was crucial to the 

- . - > " tsaf the Geneva talks. 

senate has already voted 
to approve $ 1 J laDion in this 
- year to bu3d 21 of the multi- 

"■ ■'C'jcradc congressmen warn 

anns talks hinge on 


Ml! 


■ad intereontinental missiles. 
J- louse also most vote twice to 
. . the foods, and the fast vote 

'j ' .Kiuled Tuesday. 

'^-'■ 7 *. Reagan called Max M. 
,• . \ -jelman from Geneva last Fri- 




MS 


sue. Mr. Kampehnan, a con- 
. ■s.Sib Democrat, was engaged 
. . ' ? --Jay in a daykrag lobbying cf- 

. - ::sput cd what a White House 
called a “full-court 
. .- . 1*1 '-■•}' on the issue, 

‘ "fe-irer meeting with Thomas P. 
.lr~ : 'i: iD Jr^ a Massachusetts Demo- 
/ vho is q>eaker of die House, 
vith others on Capitol H31, 
-. Campdman joined Mr. Rea- 
1 . ^ v'. ad othff officials at the White 
: ■ :.t. : vt. Later, be was to meet with a 
-*r;: c j of more than 100 House 
' ■ including many oppo- 
-■ v. .of the missile. 

• i;-. ^. . 'er the White Hrase session, 

r. '|iampdman said the MX was 
' . i- T.'d to protect die progress of 
. --T.'.Teiieva n^odations on strate- 
^T : 'tnedimn-range and space- 
, . 1.. weapons. The talks began 

• .T:>a 

operate on the assumption 
. .'^ negotiating with the Soviet 

./r.*Ti is a very serious business, a 
- - /difficult business, and one 
v . ' oot make concessions or pve 
. '■ concerns without getting 

thing in return,” he said 
' -presen tative Janies A. Court- 
_ d emocrat of New Jersey, 
«d &om a meeting with Mr. 
■^ebnan 


•TOP*"***. 


Stage IV. 

BocinwB— 
Rockstdyiw 
DkvWon 

CanosaParfc. 

Calf 

Stage* 

HwcolMlne. 
Magna, man 
St. P«e»Bburg. Ra. 



pWwIsBufld&igthe 
MXMissBe 

Where the jobs and contracts are. 


i\. 


m 


Stage! 

Aerqjet Strategic 
Propulsion Co. 
Sacramento. Calf. 


Stage I — 
Thfofcot 
Brigham City. 
Utah 


•> r 
- 

'*•* mZJin 


Re-oitry System 

Avco 

Wdmtngton. Mass. 

- &ddance and Control 

Rockwell AutoneUcs 
Anaham.CaH. 

Northrop 
San Leandro. CaUt : 

Hooeywofl 

'Oeerwater.Fla 

Assembly and Testtig 

Martin MarMto 

Denver, Cota 

Com ma nd Control and 
Slo Communications 

GTESyhwnfafnc. 

Needham Heqhts. Mass 

Launch «id Eject 


WwttnghouM 
SwmyvaJe. Cahf 

SloModmcatlon 

Boeing 

Seattle, Wash 
Lae Vegas. Nev 



Ths NewYoit Tin 


and epid. 


PIft-e » 


fi - C.c 


Jobs Are Held Out as Lure 
To Foes of MX in House 


r- , 


H 


as 


I* ^ 

• 

» •*- 




Nt-* 


ti.fi* d ic l«vpcd the MX now. 

» i» i said he asked Mr. Kampd- 
NTUkat.^kLI h-aai “Would it end the n^otia* 


i 1 too far, but he fdt 
jt Maid make his job frimji 

•r . - --mfficult and peEhaps would 

on agT Bww»wi long er in order 

'=hicve/’ 

' O’Neill, after his meeting 
Mr. Kawipelmiin , said that the 
£-Mlorhas “ahvays been for the 
imu and “believes n is a bargain- 
vjiip.” 

^ut I just don’t buy his argn- 
be added. “In good con- 
i»» ce 1 cannot vote for that rms- 


wv 


i.'fon 


j •mm-'-r •(,*- 


w'. A 


U 


41, f. 


MW Mt ffSfPlj 

Vi r 

MQV 


grading the House vote, the 
fer said: “It’s dose. Tm sure 
Write House mpredates it’s 
or they wouldnT be taking om 
« stops. It’s doser than you 

^^aeseutative Trent Lott of 
■tfusippi, the a- qpste nf minority 
• 41 tt, agreed that the vote remains 
tf, very dose.” 

; said die admmistratiou had 
i^oved its suroort from the 210 
w-' votes he had counted last 
brn refused to give a specific 
^ber. With two vacandes in the 
member House, 217 votes are 
/wry for a. nmority with all 
-iben voting. Fewer than 20 
>4*jc members are said to remain 
"^xided cm the issue 

i the MX debate opened in the 
*. Representative Samuel S. 
i;T>Jon, Democrat of New York, 
-"‘liasized the administration 
that rejecting the missile 
f 4 ‘^mdainiessagetotheSovi- 
^ ^wfliat as far as the House of 
* 3 ^.ne*entatiyes is ccracemed, it’s 
1 “S to give awtry this missile 
./ [ped to equalize the missiles 
-^ywicts have, without getting a 


-l«V- 


* 


■K. 


Representative Charles E. 

-■'tott, -Democrat of Florida, 
the mi«n» “faulty and vul- 
idtf 1 because it must be sta- 
ri in s3os that are vulnerable 
j^Smiet first strike. 

-r., ‘ W vote on a wasteful pro- 
• he said, “should never be 
hued as anti-American or soft 
tfense." 

<VP1,AP) 

?>■— — - 


ft: 


INSIDE 


j/j i 


ff-L' 




TRAN 





^ The Umtcd States is chang- 
5 rir-traffic procedures to 
-2P «duce ddays. Page Z 

^**4 sdd B members of the 
* Qrinese torpedo boat 
to go home. Page 4. 

®^ESS/ FINANCE 

Ihe doBar rose in calm crad- 
i; m Europe. Page 9. 

Ra v» said a re- 
the world monetary sys- 
. ; i‘ was not a priority. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

governor, Madeleine 
me of two female 
the United States, 
Democrat in a rural, 
state. 


By Hedrick Smith 

New York Tones Service 

WASHINGTON — Represen- 
tative Matthew G. Martinez is a 
third-term Democrat from the in- 
dustrial suburbs northeast of Los 
Angeles. His heavily- Mexican- 
American bine-collar district, hit 
bard by major plant dosings in 
recent years, is aching for new busi- 
ness. 

Like many liberal Democrats, 
the 56-year-old congressman has 
voted against the MX, far missile 
experimental, ever since be came to 
Capitol Hill But with the House 
preparing to vote on it again Tues- 
day and Thursday, he is being 
tempted to switch by arguments 
that MX contracts will mean jobs 
for his district. 

President Ronald Reagan’s main 
arguments for the MX, especially 
with the Senate, revolve around the 
need to show national restrive and 
provide negotiating leverage at the 
arms talfo with the Soviet Union. 
But in the House, where congres- 
sional districts are smaO enough for 
the economic effect of a Pentagon 
program or the influence of major 
contractors to be greater, the jobs 
issue has more appeal. 

“We've had Bethl eh e m Steel, 
Fad, Huffy Bicyde and General 
Motors shut down plants in our 
area and so the general employ- 
ment situation in my district is real- 
ly desperate,” Mr. Martinez said. 

“If there were 10, (XX) jobs for my 
district from MX oontracts, or even 
5,000 jobs,” he went on, “I would 
regard that as positive enough to 
swing my vote Unemployment in 
my district is over 10 percent, and 
when you have that kind of unem- 
ployment rate, 5,000 jobs becomes 
a very lucrative number.” 

He heard the jobs argument 
when, as part of a nine-member 
congressional group, he was invited 
to Vandenberg Air Force Base in 
California for Pentagon briefings 
and a test-firing of the MX on Feb. 
1 . It was pressed on him again by 
G.W. Sargent, of Rockwell Auton- 
etics Division, a major MX con- 
tractor with a plant at Anaheim, 
near Ins district He also hears the 
job pitch bom lobbyists with the 
United Automobile Workers, the 
International Association of Ma- 
chinists and Aerospace Workers, 
and the Shot Metal Workers. 

Representative Meryyn M. Dy- 
mfllly, another potential swing vote 
from a district southeast of Los 

M^contractors, including the 
Northrop Coqx, which employs 
3.700 people in bis district In 1983 
be was me only member of die 

congressional black caucus ever to 
vote for the MX missile, although 
he has since opposed iL 
Ardent backers of the MX sum 
as Representative Samuel S. Strat- 
ton of New York state take the 
House flow to spefl out the eco- 
nomic benefits of the MX program 
to skeptics Mr. Stratton said the 
full program of 100 missiles would 
generate an average of 32,132 jote 
ayear over the next decade in di- 
rect employment and as many as 
95,300 jobs a year, counting the 
spinoff to service industries 
“The record of the number of 
jobs available as a result of MX 
production includes many of the 
very spree states where tbe largest 
number of opponents of MX are 


U.S. Asks 
Statement 
On Arms 

Space Defense 
Support Sought 
For May Summit 

By Don Cook 
LetAngdes Tima Service 
PARIS — The Reagan adminis- 
tration is pressing Us maor allies 
for a. joint declaration of support 
for its Strategic Defense Initiative 
when seven heads of government 
gather in Boon for their annual 
economic summit meeting in May, 
according to European diplomatic 
sources involved m preparations 
for the meeting. 

These sources said the adminis- 
tration would like to have such a 
declaration from the leaders of 
Britain, France, West Germany, It- 
aly, Csn lflda and Japan as a itw»»mg 
of potting further pressure on the 
Soviet Union to get down to 
“meaningful nego tiations" at the 
nuclear mm talks in Geneva. 

In return for such support at tbe 
summit meeting from May 2 to A 
these sources stud. President Ron- 
ald Reagan is ready to pledge a 
policy of research cooperation and 
access to tbe high technology in- 
volved in the multibillian-dollar 
nnssfle-defense program. 

There is a marked reluctance, 
particularly on the part of the 
French, to participate in a joint 
policy declaration. The Europeans 
plan to coordinate their own views 
at a meeting of foreign and defense 
ministers of the Weston European 
Union in Bonn on April 22 and 23. 
Its members are France, Britain, 
West Germany, Italy, tbe Nether- 
lands, Belgium and Luxembourg. 

Mr. Reagan has had q ualified 
public statements of support for 
research on space-based defense 
from Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain, Prime Minister 
Bettino Graxi of Italy and Chancel- 



BUDAPEST CONGRESS — Janos Kadar, tbe leader of the Hungarian Communist 
Party, spoke Monday at the start of tbe party's 13th congress. Page 5. 


Reagan Recasting Federal Judiciary 

Trend Is to Conservative Majority Among U.S. Judges 


By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — An impres- 
sive list of people think William E 
Hdlerstein, a senior attorney at 
New York’s Legal Aid Society, 
should be a federal judge. 

The Harvard Law School gradu- 
ate has the blessing erf both New 
York senators, Alfonse M. D’A- 
mato, a Republican, and Daniel 
Patrick Moynflun, a Democrat. 
Twenty-four former federal prose- 
cutors have endorsed him as “an 
outstandingly able lawyer ” He was 
recommended by a screening p«nri 
beaded by Leonard Garment, a 
lawyer for Attorney General Edwin 
Meese 3d. 

But it is not likely that Mr. Hel- 
lers lein will ever sit on tbe federal 
bench. Critics have persuaded the 
Reagan administration that he is 
too liberal, and administration 
sources say the proposed nomina- 
tion is dead. 

Across tbe nation, senators, gov- 
ernors, county commissioners, law- 


locaied,” Mr. Stratton declared. “I jjettmo uraxi or jialy and chancel- vwc ™-n*#nitnnc w 

cently. Tbe French 


impact of the MX on the success of 
the aims negotiations in Geneva 
will at least consider the conlribu^ 
non of an MX vote on much-need- 
ed jobs." 

Specifically, Mr. Stratton angled 
ant Representative Charles E Ben- 
nett of Florida, a state with major 
MX contractors. Although an ad- 
vocate of large Pentagon budgets, 
Mr. Bennett is a foe of the MX, and 
he todc umbrage at the jobs argu- 
ment. 

Critics have accused the Penta- 
gon of deliberately spreading con-’ 
tracts around the country as an 
inducement far maximum political 
support in Congress, indeed, the 
geographical spread of MX con- 
tracts is a poin t that the adminis- 
tration emphasizes. 

“In aE28 states have apiece of 
the action,” said Captain Rick 
Lehner of the air face’s MX mis- 
sile office. “For the most part, there 
are 10 states which have the bulk of 
the MX contracts. But there are 
hundreds erf subcontractors practi- 
cally everywhere. 

But, so far, Mr. Stratton said that 
has not been enough to ensure 
House approval for the ndssik that 
Mr. Reagan wants to modernize 
the U.S. land-based deterrent and 
match the Soviet mtercantmenial 
ballistic mi sales. 

And Mr. Martinez stiD doubts 
tbe effectiveness of the MX, which 
was originally designed to be a mo- 
bile missile but is now expected to 
be deployed in silos. Besides, tbe 
jobs argument has not panned out 

“Hist the administration was 
talking about 30,000 MX jobs in 
Los Angeles Country, but they fi- 
nally came up with just 1,197 jobs 
in my district,” he sard. “That’s not 
enough to overcome all the argu- 
ments against the missile .” 


have voiced 
mnmumngs ot support, simply ac- 
knowledging that it is prudent to 
undertake research in the field 
' All the Europeans have empha- 
sized that their support for tbe re- 
search program does not extend to 
(Continued mi Page 2, CoL 8 ) 


and conservative activists are en- 
gaged the most sweeping effort in a 
generation to remake the federal 
crurt system. 

Congress handed President Ron- 
ai'Wlea&an this opportunity last 
year -by passing a bankruptcy \jSL 
creating 85 new district and ap- 
peals court judgeships. With nor- 
mal attrition, mis has given Mr. 


Reagan the chance to fill 1 14 va- 
cancies, more than a seventh of the 
court system. 

Mr. Reagan has been usin g these 
lifetime appointments to recast the 
' federal judiciary in a more conser- 
vative mold, largely by naming 
white men who share his views on 
limiting the role erf the courts. By 
the end of his second term, Mr. 

Reagan likely will have named a 

majority of the nation’s 744 federal 
trial and appellate judges. 

The way m which federal judges 
are picked is a curious mixture of 
professionalism and patronage, a 
backstage contest in which outside 
forces can sink a qualified nominee 
almost without warning. 

It is a process in which the 55 
Republican senators have almost 
as much sway as the White Hoose. 
In ideological terms, conservative 
saiators generally are in tune with 
tbe administration. “I want to ap- 
point someone who is at least as 
concerned about victims’ rights as 
criminals’ rights,” said Phil G ramm 
of Texas. 

Moderate Republicans have se- 
cured the appointment of a mimher 
of less conservative judges, but they 
are careful not logo too far. “We’re 
not going to be submitting an ultra- 
liberal who would obviously be 
anathema to the White House," 
Mr. D’Amato said. - - 

Sheldon Goldman, a j udicial ex- 
pert at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst, said Mr. Reagan's 


approach differs sharply from that 
of previous Republican presidents. 

“This a dminis tration is malrfng a 
greater concerted effort to ideologi- 
cally screen the people considered 
for the judiciary than at any time 
since Franklin D. Roosevelt's first 
term," he said. “It is not as impor- 
tant to them to achieve the bless- 
ings of the professional organiza- 
tions on whether they are placing 
the very best minds on the bench.” 

Administration officials say they 
are seeking the brightest and most 
experienced attorneys who share 
the president’s philosophy of judi- 
cial restraint. 

“We’re looking for people who 
view the role of the courts as inter- 
preting the law, not enacting it,” 
said the White House counsel, Fred 
F. Fielding, “There is an imbalance 
in some areas of the federal courts, 
a tendency toward judicial activ- 
ism. We want to have a balance.” 

“Hie president views this not as 
not as a nice reward for 
l-raising prowess, but as some 
of the most important Hecmnn< he 
will make," said James M. Spears, 
acting director of the Justice De- 
partment's Office of Legal Policy. 

Although the lower federal 
courts receive far less attention 
than does die Supreme Court, their 
influence, in some ways, is greater. 
Together, the district and appeals 
courts decide more than 300,000 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


U.S. Major 
Killed by 
A Russian 

American Is Shot 
While onDutr 

wt 

In East Germany 

The Axsoctaed Prm 

HEIDELBERG, West Germany 
— A Soviet guard shot and killed 
an unarmed U.S. Army officer at- 
tached to the UJL military mission 
in East Germany, U3. authorities 
said here Monday. 

The Soviet Embassy in Washing- 
ton charged that he was taking pho- 
tographs of military equipment, 
Bui the U.S. State Department, ap- 
parently rejecting the accusation, 
said, “There can be no excuse from 
the Soviet ride Tor this tragic inci- 
dent." US. officials said that the 
officer was in an unrestricted area 
and that the shooting was unjusti- 
fied. 

The U.S. Army said that the offi- 
cer, Major Arthur D. Nicholson, 
37, was a Russian linguist and it 
acknowledged that the East Ger- 
man military mission to which he 
was assigned was an “intelligence- 
gathering operation." 

The United States and the Soviet 
Union exchanged protests over the 
incident and an investigation was 
under begun. 

Major Nicholson, who was post- 
ed to the U.S. military mission in 
Potsdam in February 1982, was 
killed while on duty Sunday after- 
noon with another officer, “some 
distance from Berlin,” a diplomatic 
source said in Bonn. Tbe other offi- 
cer, who also was unarmed, was 
unhurt, tbe source said. 

Officers at the Potsdam mission 
are allowed to travel around East 
Germany except in restricted areas 
derijgnated by the Russians, such as 
Soviet military installations. 

Tbe U.S. mission was one of 
three set up in Potsdam after World 
War U by the three Western allied 
powers — tbe United States, Brit- 
ain and France — as a liaison with 
the Soviet forces in East Germany. 

At the time the missions were 
established in the late 1940s, East 
Germany was still the Soviet-occu- 
pied zone. 

. Tbe Soviet Union, in turn, set up 
military offices in three West Ger- 
man cities — - Frankfurt, Bimde, 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


Oman Emerges as Firm U.S. Ally in Gulf 


The following article is based an 
reporting by Jeff Gerth and Judith 
Miller and was written by Ms. 
Miller. 

New York Tima Service 
CAIRO — In the six years since 
the Iranian revolution, the strategi- 
cally placed and isolated nation of 
Oman has emerged as Washing- 
ton’s most reliable ally in the Gulf, 
according to Western, Omani and 
other Arab officials. 

This development, the officials 
said, has resulted largely from the 
influence of about 20 U&, British 
and Arab advisers to the country’s 
reclusive and absolute ruler, Sultan 

Qaboos bin Said. 

Hus advisers, many of whom 
have intelligence backgrounds, 
have helped shape Oman’s domes- 
tic and foreign policies, often to the 
benefit of their own country’s inter- 
ests, the officials said. 

The advisers have encouraged 
Sultan Qaboos to give Western 
strategists access to Omani installa- 
tions that other Arab nations, in- 
cluding Saudi Arabia and Egypt, 
have been unwiUing to provide, tbe 
officials said. As a result, they said, 
Oman has become a base far West- 
ern intelligence operations, mili- 
tary maneuvers and logistical prep- 


arations for any defense of the 
Gulf. 

The Reagan administration en- 
gaged Thursday in a rare public 
discussion of Oman’s growing stra- 
tegic value to the United Stans. In 
testimony before a congressional 
subcommittee, Major General Da- 
vid Watts, director of logistics and 


Washington as well as in Britain 
and the Middle East. Among those 
interviewed in Oman late last year 
were some of the sultan’s foreign 
advisers, although several declined 
to speak on the record. 

The sultan, 44, declined a request 
for an interview. Omani and West- 
ern advisers said be spent httic time 


Many Omanis, officials said, favor a 
relationship with the United States to reduce 
British influence in the country. 



security assistance for tbe Central 
Command, said tbe United States 
had nearly finished building and 
modernizing sites in Oman and two 
African nations, Somalia and Ke- 
nya, for use by a rapid de^rfoyment 
face in the event of a crisis in the 
Gulf. 

The new installations would 
“support tactical air operations, 
MAC operations and pre-position- 
ing of an force war readiness mate- 
rial assets,” General Watts said. 
MAC stands for Military Airlift 
Command. 

U.S. and other Western and 
Arab officials discussed develop- 
ments in Oman in interviews m 


last year in Muscat, the capital, and 
administered the country largely 
through his foreign advisers from 
his p*l-*w in Sonia in southern 
Oman. 

O man, the second largest and. 
least populated country in the 
Gulf, controls the 24-mile (39-ld3o- 
meter) Strait of Honnnz, through 
which a significant amount of me 
West’s oil flows. 

Oman agreed to the relationship 
with the United States for a variety 
of reasons, Omani officials said. 
Many Omanis, they said, favored a 
relationship with the United States 
to reduce British influence in the 
country. Modern Oman, they said, 


The Old BaR Game Gets New Pitch in Nicaragua 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Thna Service 

MANAGUA — The nation- 
al baseball stadium here was 
reopened a few weeks ago, after 
a five-year hiatus, newly rebuilt 
and bearing a new name. Tbe 
former Anastasia Somoza Gar- 
da Stadium is now called Rigo- 
berto L 6 pez Perez Stadium, af- 
ter the poet who assassinated 
the founder of the Somcea fam- 
ily dynasty in 1956. 

Virtually every other aspect 
of Nicaragua's favorite sport is 
undergoing a similar transfor- 
mation these days. Although 
fans continue to follow the 
game with the same intensity 

and passion as ever, the Sandm- 
xst leadership is sedring to put 
its own distinctive stamp on 
Nicaraguan baseball. 

A glance at the standings tdk 
some of the stay. With postsear 
sou playoffs due soon, the lead- 
ers m the two divisions of the 
Nicaraguan mmor fcapwy are 
the StadinislPeople’s Army 
Dantos team, named for a guer- 
rilla commander lnBed in the 
fight to overthrow the Somoza 
government, and the Rivas 


“Southern Front” team, whidi 
takes its name from one of the 
Sandm i sts' major victories in 
the uprising. 

It is equally dear that Nica- 
ragua’s leaders are trying to car- 
ry out profound changes in the 
character and function of the 

narimml pi m e, rhangee that are 
in keeping with their stared goal 
of creating “a new Nicaraguan 
man.” 

^We want to rid baseball here 
of hs commercial aspects,” said 
Ottonid ArgOeDo, president erf 

the Nicaraguan Baseball Feder- 
ation. “We are going to contin- 
ue to charge admission, of 
course, but we do not want the 
players to be used merely as the 
objects of investment and spec- 
tacle. 

“We want a more humane 
system that takes into account 
the player’s education, health 
and family and ayes him a 
chance to develop himself as a 
person," added Mr. ArgOdlo, 
who is also mnristo- of aque- 
ducts and canals. 

An example of that policy, 
Mr. Argflclfo said, is the new 
(CoBrinaedon Page 5, Col 1) 



Th. Nm York TnM 

Rafael Obando, a second baseman for tbe Boer team, 
marched with a rifle instead of a bat or glove daring 
parade marking a Sandhrist anniversary in Managua. 


is in large part a creation of tbe 
British, who were the first to sense 
its strategic potential 
The British helped the sultan 
overthrow his father in a coup in 
1970, according to some officials 
involved in its planning, although 
the report has been denied by the 
British government. In the mid- 
1970s, the sultan had British assis- 
tance in quelling an insurgency, 
backed by Southern Yemen, in the 
southern province of Dhofar. 

Omani officials said that Oman 
has been more concerned with 
what it sees as the Soviet threat to 
the Gulf and the Indian Ocean 
than with the Arab-Isradi conflict 
This, Omani officials said, has 
spurred them to seek foreign mili- 
tary support, as has Ayatollah Rn- 
hoflafa Khomeini's staled intention 
to export Islamic revolntioa to oth- 
er countries in the region. 

Since the Iranian revolution in 
1979, some advisers to tbe sultan 
said, both Britain and the United 
States have tried to assume a low 
profile in Oman to avoid, they said, 
creating the kind of foreign pres- 
ence in Oman that ultimately 
proved so destabilizing in Iran. 

Several advisers to the sultan 
noted that the two countries are 
very different. Many Omanis, they 
said, have benefited from the devel- 
opment of tbe country under for- 
eign tutelage, and most are mem- 
bers of a small Moslem sect called 
Ibadhi that lacks the politically 
radical traditicHi of Shiisn, the sect 
of Islam dominant in Iran. Esti- 
mates of Oman’s population range 
from 1 million to 1.8 million. 

Under an agreemoit with the 
United States, Oman provides stag- 
ing points Tor the United States at 
military installations at Masirah Is- 
land, Sib and Thamarit, and on the 

Musandam Peninsula near the . . - - , . - . - . 

Strait of Honnnz, Western officials P^goMMpmg 

said. The installations, they said. a J m P mcnt ’ gliding fud 

could be critical to any defmsetrf ^ P 8 ”** * U-S.-ftaanred 

the Gulf. 

Because only the strait separates 
it from Iran, the Musandam Penin- 
sula has provided a useful listening 
post for monitoring the Iranian 
revolutionary government, accord- 
ing to Western and Arab intdfi- 
geoce sources interviewed in Wash- 
ington and the Middle EasL 
The United States used Oman to 
stage the unsuccessful mission to 
rescue the American hostages in 
Iras in 1980. In December, accord- 
ing to Western and Arab officials 
in Washingto n and the Middle 
East, the United Slates had a team 
of commandos secretly positioned 
in Oman to monitor tbe situation 
during the hijacking of a Kuwaiti 
plane to Tehran m whidi two 
Americans were killed. The 


Omanis have denied the repots. 

“Oman has become what we had 
hoped Egypt might be," a senior 
UJS. military official said recently. 

And a State Department official 
said: “We could never secure the 
lands of access in Saudi Arabia that 
we have negotiated in Oman.” 

The foundation of the UB.- 
Omam relationship is an agree- 
ment signed in June 1980 — after 

tbe fall of the shah erf Iran ami the 

Soviet intervention in Afghanistan 
— - that provides the United States 
with access to Omani installations 
in exchange for a security commit- 
ment from Washington and at least 
$260 million over five years to 
modernize Oman's four military 
bases, according to U.S. officials in 
Washington ana the Middle East. 

General Watts and other U.S. 
and Omani officials said that in the 
last year Oman has permitted U.S. 
P-3 anti-submarine reconnaissance 
planes to operate out of Masirah. 
U.S. officials said some P-3s have 
also operated from Sib. 

The small U.S. Middle East na- 
val fleet and the larger Indian 
Ocean naval contingent are also 
resupplied from Masirah, General 
Watts and other officials said. 

Hie agreement provides the bat- 
tle group with emergency 


Omani storage facilities at the 
bases, U5. officials said. 

The agreement has started a de- 
bate in Oman as wdl as among 
Slate Department and Defense De- 
partment nffirials in Washington. 
In interviews, senior Omani offi- 
cials stressed that the installations 
could not be used against an Irani- 
an threat to tbe Gulf or its shipping 
lanes, but only in the face of a 
direct Soviet threat to Oman. 


lomats who support the U.S.- 
Omani relationship say Oman is a 
priceless staging area whose useful- 
ness has already been proved. 

Oman, they said, has become 
: what a Western official called an 
“invaluable" link in the Ingistinai 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 6) 




WPi'sSa/S -..jf IS s«S5IS 121 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


m 


Lebanon Kidnappings 
Continue as a Briton, 



year- 

Unit* 


Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispazcka 

BEIRUT — Gunmen abducted 
Monday the director of France's 
cultural institute in the northern 
port of Tripoli, and in Beirut a 
British contract worker with the 
United Nations was also reported 
to have been kidnapped. 

In Tripoli, a police source said 
gunmen broke into the home of 
Giles Sidney Peyrofles shortly af- 
ter midnig ht, singled the French- 
man out from his roommates and 
took him away, making him the 
fourth French national kidnapped 
in Lebanon since Friday. 

In Beirut, Alec Collett, a 63- 
r-old Briton working for the 

Jnited Nations Relief and Works 
Agency for Palestinian Refugees, 
was kidnapped near Beirut, a 
spokesman far the agency said in 
Vienna. 

Mr. Collett was identified as a 
semi-retired former director of a 
UN information service in Africa. 
The agency spokesman said that he 
was taken from his car by “uniden- 
tified people” as he and another 
employee of the agency were ap- 
proaching the southern Beirut sub- 
urb of Khalde. 

The spokesman said Mr. Collett, 
a resident of New York City, was 
married to an American. 

In the abduction of the French- 
man, a group identifying itself as 
the Lebanese Armed Revolution- 
ary Factions delivered a handwrit- 
ten message to a foreign news agen- 
cy saying it had “arrested" Mr. 
PeyroUes. 

The group's message said it 
would “not be responsible for guar- 
anteeing^ Mr. Peyrolles’s safety” 
unless France released a jailed 
member of the organization, “our 
comrade Abdel-Qader Saadi," 
within 48 horns. 

The group told the Italian gov- 
ernment to free two other detained 
members, Abdullah al- Manso uri 
and Josephine Abdo, or face simi- 
lar action. 

The group has previously 
claimed responsibility for the kill- 
ing in Paris of the assistant U.S. 
military attach*. Charles R. Ray, 
on Jan. 18, 1982. 

Mr. Peyrofles became the eighth 
fo reigner kidnapped this month in 
a mostly Moslem area of Lebanon. 

The group’s message said it had 
not wanted to act against France or 
Italy “because tbeir conspiratorial 
role agains t our people is limited, 
considering tbeir position toward 
world imper ialism led by the Unit- 
ed States and Zionism." 

However, if France and Italy 
failed to release the three group 
members named, “oar future retali- 
ation will be most severe and will 
bring catastrophe to residents of 
Paris and Rome," the message 
warned. “In addition, we will con- 
sider any Frenchman or Italian, 
wherever he may be, a target for 
os,” it said. 

Mr. Peyrolles’s disappearance 


ear 


coincided with the arrival Sunday 
in Beirut of a French government 
envoy. Maze Bonnefous, to look 
into the kidnapping last week of 
two French diplomats and one em- 
bassy employee. 

Marcd Fontaine, the vice consul 
at the French Embassy, Martel 
Carton, the protocol officer and his 
daughter; DanieQe Perez, a secre- 
tary, were kidnapped Friday in 
Modem West Beirut. Responsibil- 
ity was claimed by a caller to West- 
ern news agencies who said he 
spoke for the Moslem fundamen- 
talis t Tslamip. Jihad group, which 
has been linked by U.S. officials to 
pro-Iranian Suite Moslems of the 
Hezb allah, or Party of God. move- . 
meat. 

Two Britons and an American 
journalist, Terry A. Anderson, were 
kidnapped this month in abduc- 
tions daimari by the Tslnrair Jihad. 

That caller said the release of the 
French citizens depended on “the 
cancellation of a barter deal be- 
tween France and Saudi Arabia un- 
der which Riyadh would get*? 
French Mirage fights 1 planes in ex- 
change for caL 

(UPI, AP, Reuters) 



Ignaz Kiechle, right, the West German agriculture minister, talked Monday at the start of 
a European Community meeting with Ms Italian cocmterpart, Fetipgo Maria PandottL 

U.S. Altering Air-Truffle Procedures to Cut Delays 


By Richard Witkin 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK —The \JS. gov- 
ernment wBl start new air-traffic 
procedures next mouth to help pre- 
veut a repetition of the record flight 
delays of last summer. 

The changes by the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration include alter- 
ations in routes and procedures for 
planes flying to the New York area 
from the Southwest; acceleration 
of a program to resolve bottlenecks 
in the airways as they start to devel- 
op; and the relaxing of restrictions 
on the fore and aft separation of 
planes. 

New schedules for the heavy 
travel season go into effect with 
daylight saving time April 28. 

The airlines say they have no 
intention erf reverting to the exces- 


sive bunching of flights that con- 
tributed to last year's snails. 

Sixty percent of delays are 
caused by bad weather. A delay is 
recorded when a flight is 15 min- 
utes late other taking off or land- 
ing. 

After delays set records last July 
and August, they hit an all- time' 
high in October of 48,898, or 1,600 
a day. Total flights at the nation's 
22 busiest airports averaged about 
24,000 a day. 

The delays prompted pressure 
on the airlines from the FAA to 
spread peak-hour flights at six air- 
pons having the balk of the delays: 
Kennedy, La Guardia and Newark 
in the New York area; O’Hare in 
Chicago; Atlanta; and Stapleton, 
in Denver. 

After the agreement on schedule 
changes went into effect last No- 


vember, the average number of de- 
lays dropped to 863 a day through 
January. 

“I don’t want to getoverenthosi- 
astic,” Donald D. Fngm, adminis- 
trator of the FAA, said. “But we’re 

Mnch^ aFthe* problem last year 
was caused by saturation of single 
sectors of airspace in which planes, 
were bang guided by controllers 
rigidly adhering to a standard of 20 
miles (32 kilometers) or more of 
fore mid aft separation between 
planes. 

To cut delays, the aviation agen- 
cy began usmgan “enroute sparing 
program” in December along the 
East Coast. Controllers identify 
which planes are converging from 
different sectors on a particular 
corridor. By taking account of how 
these planes are progressing right 


then, they can ignore the 20-mzle 
spacings, which the airime s regard 
as wasteful, and smooth traffic 
flow by relaying instructions to 
various planes to speed up or slow 

down. 

Mr. Engen, a former navy pilot 
and retired admiral, said tnai last 
summer, “If a line of squalls was 
predicted for 10 to 11 the next 
morning, instructions would go out' 
the night before to reroute traffic. 

“Sometimes the thiinda r v f n rr i is 
didn’t develop and the airline peo- 
ple would wonder why their guys 
had to go through all this Mickey 
Mouse. Now, with the improved 
flow-control center using enroute 
sparing, new software, and real-' 
tiffli* weather information, we can 
make decisions based on what is 
actually happening." 


U.S. Officer Is Slain in East Germany 


(Continued from Page 1) 
and Baden-Baden — as Hawhus 
with the UiL, British and French 
military. 

Under the agreement, each side 
is allowed to accredit 14 officers 
and enlisted personnel to their mis- 
sion office. As for freedom of trav- 
el, the agreement states: 

“Each member of the missions 
will be given identical travel facili- 
ties to include identical permanent 
passes in the Russian and En g li s h 



territory and roads in both zones, 
accept places of disposition of mili- 
tary units, without escort or super- 
vision. ” 

In Washington, a Soviet Embas- 
sy statement charged that either 
Major Nicholson or his companion 
was wearing a camouflage suit and 
carried a camera used to photo- 


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Soviet statement said that 
the U.S. officers entered the area 
“despite the presence of dearly vis- 
ible warning signs in Russian and 
German.” 

“The officer was caught red- 
handed by a Soviet sentry guarding 
that emnpmeni," the statement 
said. “He did not comply with ins 
orders and, after a warning shot, 
while attempting to escape, be was 
kffled." 

Bernard Kalb, the State Depart- 
ment spokesman, said that under 
an agreement with the Soviet 
Union regarding East Germany, 
“any use of force is unjustified.” 


liaison office was an intel- 
ligence-gathering operation and 
that officers serve there with the 
goal of increasing their knowledge 
about Soviet armed farces. 

According to the Soviet Embassy 
statement, the other UJS. officer, a 
driver, was apprehended with his 
vehicle. “The Soviet side lodged a 
resolute protest in this connection 
and expressed its regret over the 
death of the American militaiy of- 
ficer," the statement said. 

It said that the installation was in 
the Schwerin district, which is, 
about 100 miles (160 kflometera) 
northwest of Berlin and 30 miles 
from the West Goman bonier. 

A Pentagon official said that the 
shooting occurred in or near the 
town of LudwigslusL The official 
said he did not know what East 
German or Soviet installations 
might be in the area, but added: 
“This officer wasn’t! 
he shouldn't have been i 


Retirement Strips 
The British Army 
Of Victoria Cross 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — The Victoria 
Cross, Britain's highest award 
for bravery, was from 

the country's armed forces for 
the first time in 129 years Mou- 


lain Rambahadnr Limbu of 
10th Princess Mary’s Own Gur- 
kha Rifles. 

He was the last serving hold- 
er of the crimson-ribboned 
medal, inscribed “Fear Valor.” 

Captain Limbu, now 45, won 
his VC on Nov. 21, 1965, as a 
lance-corporal serving in Sara- 
wak, Malaysia, against Indone- 
sian irregulars, when he carried 
two wounded men to safety un- 
der machine-gun fire and then 
knocked out an enemy patroL 

Since then, the medal has 
been awarded only four times, 
to two Australians who served 
in Vietnam and posthumously 
to two Britons for bravery in the 
Falkland^. 


EC Envoys 
Open First of 
A Key Series 
Of Meetings 

The Aaodtued Pros 

BRUSSELS — The 10 agricul- 
ture ministers of the European 
Community opened a three-day 
meeting Monday on new farm 
prices, the fint of a series of crucial 
EC discussions this week. 

Industry ministers must decide 
Tuesday whether to extend state 
aid to the sted industry beyond 
Dec. 31, the deadline they set for 
restoring the industry to health. 

Foreign Minister Giulio An- 
dreotti of Italy, who chairs the EC 
Council of Ministers, is to meet 
Wednesday with Finance Minister 
Ernfini Lopes of Portugal to try to 
sort out the last problems erf Ponu- 
gaTs entry into the EC 

Mr. Andreotti is to meet Thurs- 
day with Foreran Minister Fernan- 
do Morfin of Spain, also to solve 
difficulties relating to Spain joining 
the EC, and later in the day will call 
the 10 and the two applicants for 
what is hoped to be the final agree- 
ment on the EC enlargement 

If everything goes as planned, 
EC chiefs of state and government 
win meet Friday and Saturday for 
ihwr regular spring summit confer- 
ence. Kit if enlargement taTVs fail 
Thursday, the conference could be 
postponed. Prime Minister Bettino 
Craxi of Italy said. 

The farm ministers are not ex- 
pected to agree this time, a Europe- 
an Commission spokesman said, 
and will probably have to meet 
again next week, failing to meet the 
April 1 deadline for new farm 
prices. 

The commission has proposed a 
price freeze. Britain, France, the 
Netherlands and Denmark support 
the c o mmi ssion. 

■ Kohl to Press Mitterrand 

West Germany’s chancellor, 
Helmut Kohl, was expected to urge 
France to modify its last-minute 
objections to Spanish and Portu- 
guese entry to the EC in a meeting 
Monday night with President Fran- 
Is Mitterrand, Reuters quoted 
.ilomatic sources as saying. 
French objections to fishing and 
wine clauses blocked agreement cm 
a finely balanced package of entry 
conditions for Spain at an EC for- 
eign ministers' meeting Thursday. 

A West German Foreign Minis- 
try spokesman said Friday that the 
entry talks were beyond the point 
of no return and that the remaining 
minor problems would be resolved 
by Thursday. 

Diplomatic sources said Mr. 
Kohl, whose visit was planned at 
the hut French-West Goman sum- 
mit conference in Paris in Febru- 
ary, would use his dinner meeting 
with Mr. Mitterrand to try to en- 
sure that obstacles to Spanish and 
Portuguese entry are smoothed out 
this week. 

Retired General EMled ■ 
In San Salvador Ambush 

The Associated Press 

SAN SALVADOR — Three 
gunmen have killed retired General 
Jose Alberto Medrano, the long- 
time leader of rightist political par- 
ties and founder of a vigOante 
group, according to witnesses. 

The gunmen fired cm General 
Medrano's car Saturday as it ar- 
rived in front of a San Salvador 
theater, killing him instantly, ac- 

nouo^be identified for fear of re- 
prisals. No group immediately 
claimed responsibility. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Botha Backs Aide in Uitenhage Dead 

UITENHAGE. South Africa (UP!) — President. Pieter W. Both, 
Monday r ei ectr*^ ^ dkm'icni nt r ««» r • o-.... 

law and order. > 


were killed. 


iected calls for the dismissal of Louis Le < 

over his handling erf protests last week in wl 



,_J during a weekend of unrest in nearby townships. 

Mir. Botha said, “ft amazes me that while rioters defy and chalfan. 
laws of the country and try to make South Africa urraovemauT 
where we should stand together to repudiate such action, attacks 
launched on a minister doing his duty. 

India Is ’Concerned’ About Defectic 

NEW DELHI (Combined Dispatches) — The Indian govento 
expressed “serious concern” Monday over the defection of a & 
diplomat based here to the United States. The minister of state 
external affairs. Khursheed Alam Khan, told Parliament that invea 
lions were continuing into “how an official of the Soviet Embassy 
India clandestinely.” 

A spokesman for the Soviet Embassy in New Delhi. Vladina 
Tsatsyn, said that Igor Gezha left behind his diplomatic passport. 
Tsatsyn said Mr. Gezha “couldn't be taken to a point outside l 
without gross violation of the sovereignty of this nation as his Sc 
diplomatic passport and identity card issued by the Indian Foi 
Ministry are currently in the U&S.R. Embassy in New Delhi" 

The U.S. Embassy said in a statement Monday that the defector 
“safe and well in the United States,” but U.S. officials would not say 
Mr. Gezha left New Delhi. He was said to have disappeared while joe 
March 17. The American statement said there was no connection ben 
the defection and the killing last week erf Valentin Khiirichenkt 
unidentified gunmen. fJVIT, l 

U.S. Urged to link Aid to UN Voting 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, the 
representative to the United Nations, said Monday that the admtni 
tion should consider consistent anti-American voting records of 
members when deciding how much foreign aid to provide them. 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick, who has submitted her resignation, said ibis wa 
personal opinion, but that she believed it represented the thinkin 
high-level administration officials. 

She testified before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on 
eign aid that many nations of the United Nations consistently v 
a g ainst issues the United States considered vital 

Danish Government Divided on Stri] 

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) — Denmark’s coalition government is 
over intervening; in an industrial conflict in which 300,000 privates 
workers are striking because of a wage dispute, political analysts 
Monday. 

The effect of the combined strike and lockout, which began Sue 
worsened Monday as workers failed to arrive for shifts after the week 
Food and fuel supplies were disrupted as truck drivers walked 
exports were hit by dock closures, many newspapers failed to apt 
pupils at 30 schools were sent home for lack of heating and 
stoppages cut off smaller islands. 

The dispute is over a union claim for a shorter working week anc 
above the overall 2 percent they say was offered. The government 
hold further talks on the conflict Monday with the opposition Ra 
Party, which wonts an immediate imposed settlement, but pot 
commentators said some government members would prefer to le 
conflict run for a couple of weeks. 

Salvador Cleric Urges Romero Inqui 

SAN SALVADOR (AP) —The leader of the Roman Catholic Q 
in San Salvador, joined by 6,000 people in marking the fifth annivc 
of his predecessor's assassination, has urged the government to reopi 


investigation of the killing. 

During a memorial Mass on Sunday, j 
Damas praised Archbishop Oscar Ammo i 


Archbishop Arturo Rivi 
Romero as a martyr and 
“his death must be clarified and those guilty must be punished" 
Archbishop Romero, an outspoken advocate erf human rights, wai 
and killed March 24, 1980. while saying Mass at a hospital Last 
President Jose Napole6n Duarte promised an investigation. But c 
claim this was sidetracked by the country’s rightist attorney genera 


For the Record 


British printing union leaders met Monday to discuss a dispute tha 
closed the biggest selling daily newspaper, the Sun, since last week. 

Justice Lewis F. Powefl returned to the U.S. Supreme Coer 
Monday after missing more than two months of work after surgery 
cancerous prostate gland. 

Archbishop Join Roach, framer president of the National Cat 
Conference of Bishops, pleaded guilty Monday m Center City, Mini 
ta, to a charge of dnmken driving and was fined 5445. The archbi 
heads the SL Paul-Minneapolis archdiocese. 

Sooth Korea proposed to North Korea on Monday that an ecom 
meeting with be ndd April 18 at the truce village of Panmunjom and 
a meeting of Red Cross officials be held in Seoul from May 14 to 17. t 

The acting chief of the Philippine armed forces, L i e ut e na n t Ga 
Fidel V. Ramos, ordered a nationwide police search Monday fa 
missing prosecution witnesses in the Aquino murder trial I 


Reagan Is Recasting Federal Judiciary in Conservative Mold 


(Continued from Page 1) 
cases a year, only 150 of winch are 
reviewed by the Supreme Court. - 

When it comes to n ami ng district 
court judges, Mr. Reagan often fol- 
lows the long tradition of accepting 
namti riflifig recommended by the 
senators of his party. But, adminis- 
tration sources say, there have been 
a surprising number of unpubli- 
cized cases in which the White 
House has rejected a choice as too 
liberal or unqualified. 

Many senators tty to avoid such 
problems by relying on screening 


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committees to recommend candi- 
dates. But few deny that political 
considerations arc vitaL 

“I don't think you Can eliirnnate 
politics from the selection of 
judges,” said Jonathan C Rose, a 
Washington attorney who once 
beaded the Office of Legal Policy. 
“The question is whether it plays 
an improperly Large role as op- 
posed to the qualifications and 
merits of the candidates.” 

He said “senators sometimes fed 
obligated to reward political asso- 
ciates as opposed to the most dis- 
tinguished lawyer in their state.” 

The While House has a freer 
hand in fining vacancies on the 
appeals courts, which cover several 
states, although senators still posh 
their favorite tgmriiriflips 

The judicial nominating com- 
missions used during Jimmy Car- 
ter's presidency has been scrapped, 
on tne ground that they were too 
slow and inherently political. In 


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their place is a more informal pro- 
cess that generally works hke this: 

Names of candidates are submit- 
ted to the Office of Legal Policy, 
which reviews their work, surveys 
their colleagues and interviews 
leading contenders. After Attorney 
General Meese settles on a candi- 
date, he sends the name to a While 
House selection committee chaired 
Mr. Fielding, and which in- 
odes Mr. Meese, the White House 
chief of staff, Donald T. Regan, 

litical affairs, Edward J. Rollins! 
This committee either endorses the 
finalist or raises objections. 

The canHiHnti* than nmriaq rasan 
FBI background check and is eval- 
uated by the American Bar Associ- 
ation, a lawyers' association. If no 
problems surface, die panel sends 
the candidate's name to Mr. Rea- 
gan. 

In practice, the internal jockey- 
ing can be fierce. A framer White 
House official. Morton C. Black- 
well. said conservatives frequently 
mount campaigns against judicial 
nominees, ana that “the major 
point of contact for these conserva- 
tive groups was Ed Meese when he 
was in the White House.” Mr. 
Mecse’s influence will be equally 
great as attorney general Mr. 
BlackweG said. 

In every administration, accord- 
ing tO Mr. Garment, nominations 

“tend to be driven by the lowest 
common denominator." 

If someone is against a candidate 
and points out a blemish or flaw or 
defect,” be said, “it frequently can 
cany the day." 

Last summer, officials from anti- 
abortion and pun ownership 
groups bitterly criticized the norm- 
nation of Andrew L Frey to the 


There is an 
imbalance in some 
areas of the federal 
courts, a tendency 
toward judicial 
activism. We want to 
have a balance.’ 



Fred F. FieWing 


UNIVERSITY 



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District of Colombia Court of Ap- 
peals after it was disclosed that he 
is a me mb er of the National Abor- 
tion Rights Action League, 
Planned Parenthood and the Na- 
tional Coalition to Ban Hand gun? 
The nomination was withdrawn. 

That dispute may presage a more 
active role for conservative groups. 
Howard Phillips, director of the 
Conservative Caucus, said Mr. 
Reagan “should not appoint any- 
one to the bench who is pro-abor- 
tion” arid that his group has target- 
ed other judicial candidates with 
such views. 

A clear picture of Mr. Reagan’s 
judicial appointments emerges 
from his Gist four years. According 
to a study by Mr. Goldman of the 
University of Massachusetts* one- 
quarter erf those appointees are mil- 
lionaire. Their average age was 50. 
Two- thirds of the appeals court 
nominees had previous judicial ex- 
perience, reflecting the White 
House desire to select people with 
proven track records. 

The figures also show that the 


165 judges Mr. Reagan named in 
his first term include only two 
blacks and 13 women. This is a 
sharp reduction from the 40 wom- 
en and 37 blades munwl to the 
federal bench by Mr. Carter. 

Aides to Mr. Reagan say they 
have had difficulty finding quali- 
fied blacks who share the adminis- 
tration’s philosophy and that few 
senators have sent them black 
nominees. But they also say they 
will not bend their ideological goals 
just to boost tbeir percentage of 
minority appointments. 

However the choices are made, 
there is no question that Mr. Rea- 
gan is living up to his campaign 
pledge to name judges who take a 
conservative view of crime and 
punishment. And that, Mr. Gold- 
man said, is the way the process is 
supposed to work. 

“This administration is further- 
ing its goals," he said. “It may not 
be your goals or my goals, but 
that’s why we have elections. When 
we elect a president, we’re electing 
a judiciary." 


U.S. Seeks 
Declaration 
From Allies 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the deployment of a defensive 
tem in space. 

Moreover, since renewed t 
control tatka opened in Geneva 
weeks ago between the Ui 
States and the Soviet Union 
Geoffrey Howe, the British fen 
secretary, and Foreign Min 
Hans- Dietrich Gcnscta of ' 
Germany have publicly expre 
reservations on the feasibility 
strategic wisdom of the progra 

The Japanese position on a j 
declaration of support for the L 
ed States is not known, but di 
mats here said Japan’s inteses 
technological sharing with 

weigh reluctance for Apolitical 
sons to follow the Reagan adm 
oration's wishes. 

■ NATO Ministers to Mee 

Defense ministers erf the N 
Atlantic Treaty Organization 
try at a two-day nuclear plan 
meeting in Luxembourg on T 
day to find a common stana 
Mr. Reagan’s plan for a sp 
based defense, Reuters report* 

Tbe 14 ministers are likd! 
adopt wording dose to the si 
meat issued by Britain and 
United States in December, w 
endorsed research cm strategic 
fence but said that deplqymen 
space weapons must be a matte 
negotiation with the Soviet Ufl 

The other main feature d 
Luxembourg meeting will be j 
port by General BentardW. 1 
era, NATO supreme allied c 
rnander, on how to implemo 
decision to withdraw 1,400 tac 


modernize the remaining 4,(S 
ffis plan-is adosely r g«nrdaJ 
cret, but officials at NATO w 

quarters aie sure he will not rety 

neutron weapons. 




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Which costs you more? 


No small business owner thinks 
"Can I afford a telephone?” 

He can’t do without one. But on 
the grounds of cost, many firms do 
without a personal computer. Which 
is strange. Because computing is 
not only becoming as natural as 
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How much does each office phone 
cost you a year? The installation, the 
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Buying and operating an IBM 
personal computer system, with the 
basic software you need, probably 
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And after your PC is paid off, your 
phone bill keeps coming. 


Now look at what an IBM PC can 
actually save you. 

Take a common headache, 
inventory control. Our PC XT keeps 
track of 100,000 different items - 
more than you’ll ever want to 
stock. 

It’ll tell you how many of each 
you’ve got, what you paid for them, 
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and how fast they’re moving off 
the shelf. 

Which helps you plan orders, 
monitor cash flow and boost 


profitability, 


Think of tax returns or the \AT. 

One of our PCs can save hours of 
accountants’ time, cut the auditor’s 
bill and give you many relaxed 
evenings at home instead of worried 
nights at the office. 


T. 


* jaiwr..: 


alking of the office - how much 
rent do you pay per square foot? 
£ 20 ? 


A filing cabinet takes up six 
square feet. 

That’s £120 per year. 

The same files on diskettes are 
less than one tenth of that. 


With our new software package, 
DisplayWrite, your IBM PC turns 
into a high-powered writing and 
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Now you’re not only saving 
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It’s how long you can afford to get 
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Find out about Authorised IBM 
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Pick up the good old phone 
now and ring your 

local IBM office. ===F= T = 



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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


Seoul Says 13 in Crew 
Of Chinese Navy Boat 
Want to Return Home 




U.S. Envoy Sees China Committed to Modernization 


By Qyde Haberman 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — The South Korean 
government said Monday that 13 
surviving crew members of a dis- 
abled Chinese torpedo boat now in 
its custody had expressed a desire 
to be sent back home. 

A government statement implied 
that the naval vessel and its crew 
would be returned, but a spokes- 
man said by telephone from Seoul 
that no decision had been 

South Korea also said an investi- 
gation of a shooting incident 
aboard the boat, in which six crew- 
men were killed and two were 
wounded, had revealed no political 
motivation. 

Foreign diplomats in Seoul said 
dmxoglhe weekend that their in- 
formation suggested that a mutiny 
or hostage- taking mig ht have been 
attempted Friday by would-be de- 
fectors while the boat was taking 
part in maneuvers in die Yellow 
Sea. But the South Korean an- 
nouncement Monday said the 
shooting had been started by pro 
sailors with “grievances" against 
senior officers. 


getting that neither wants it to in- 
terfere with warmer dealings. 

Chi Sunday, the possibility that 
some Chinese sailors wished to de- 
fect prompted officials from the 

Taiwan government to seek inter- 
views with crew members. 

Two members of the Taiwanese 
Embassy in Seoul were reported to 
have tried Sunday to meet crewmen 
being held at a Kunsan hotel, bat 
were turned away by the South Ko- 
rean authorities. Taiwan’s ambas- 
sador to Seoul, Hsueh Yu-chi, cut 
short a vacation in Taipei, where he 
said before flying back to South 
Korea that he hoped to interview 
the Chinese sailors. 

The Central News Agency of 
Taiwan said Sunday that one crew- 
man, identified as Gao Zhnnfaig, 
26, bad asked to meet the Taiwan- 
ese ambassador. 

South Korea and Taiwan have 
long been the most anti-Cammu- 
nist countries in Asia. But in the 
last few yeas strains have devel- 
oped as it has become dear that 
South Korea wants to establish 
smoother dealings with Beijing. 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Post Service 
BELTING — China’ s modern- 
ization program is likely to en- 
dure regardless of internal argu- 
ments and eventual leadership 
changes, according to the U.s. 
ambassador to China, Arthur W. 
Hummel Jr. 

Mr. Hummel, who was bom in 
China, said that, given the diffi- 
culty of the task of moderniza- 
tion, “rigs and zags” resulting 
from mistakes and from argu- 
ments over the pace and side ef- 
fects of the economic reforms are 
inevitable. 


But, Mr. Hummel said, the es- 
sential lines of the program will 
continue, “no matter whether the 
present leadership dies tomorrow, 
is replaced, or whatever, because 
there is a very deep conviction 
that China is vay far behind its 
neighbors, that China needs to 
modernize its whole economy and 
also modernize its sodety in some 
ways." 



process are dearly evident at the 
moment in the speeches of certain 
Chinese officials and in the press. 

Official pronouncements on 
the need to counter corruption 
and instill new discipline have 
caused some foreigners to fear 
that the modernization [nogram 
may be sharply slowed, if not re- 
versed. But indicators over this 
past weekend tend to confirm Mr. 
Hummd*s prediction that the re- 
forms WOuld rwi thine. 


On Sunday, the Xinhua news 
agency reported that document 
No. 1 for 1985 of the Communist 
Party’s Central Committee sets 
out 10 measures aimed at encour- 
aging “a TnaA-wwwrwitwt rural 
economy." 

The agency confirmed that 
Guna was going ahead with plans 
disclosed earlier this year to 


Arthur W. Hummel Jr. 


well as with the help of some 
ffli ts frfr managwifll ^Iffpc 

Arguments within Chinese so- 
ciety over the disruptions, appar- 
ent inequities, and illegal finan- 
cial dealings that have 
accompanied the modernization 


There is also a conviction, he 
«a»H that m nriwnwMtinn has tn he 

carried out with the help of for- 
eign ca p ital and technology as 


state purchases of agricultural 
produce. 

- According to Document No. 1, 
the system of re^ponsibifity that 
links income with production 
“win t mchangpd far fl l ftpg 
period to come.” 

Also on Sunday, the People's 
Daily, the nffiria? Communist 


Party newspaper, addressed the 
concerns of some of the critics of 
the modernization program by 
saying that “in the world there is 
nothing that Is perfect" and that 
some problems are unavoidable. 
In its front-page weekly commen- 
tary, the paper said that one 
should not give up the overriding 
advantages of the program just 
because it emailed some disad- 
vantages. 

The People's Daily said that the 
confidence of “some people" in 
the reforms had declined com- 
pared with the last quarter of last 
year. 

But with China’s “open door" 
policy, the paper said, “it is un- 
avoidable that some pernicious 
capitalistic ideas will enter China 
also." 

Mr. Hummel, 64, is the first 
career diplomat to head the UJf. 
mission in ffrina since a US. liai- 
son office was set up in 1973. He 
was bom in China’s Shanxi prov- 
ince, the son of a Congrcgational- 
ist minister and China expert. 

“Some Chinese wonder wheth- 
er they’re going too fast," Mr. 
Hummel said. 


“Some wonder whether the so- 
cial disruptions are more than 
China should have," he added. 
‘’Some ask whether it's a good 


8 Said to Die ; ,, r 
In Baghdad 1(1 r , 

Blast; Iran ‘1“ 


r $ am 

IxtHiiiig 


Claims Attach 


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“There must be arguments 
about how to do it, because there 
is no recognized model for having 
a portion of an economy still un- 
der state control," be continued. 
“And having a general socialist 
system here while (he same time 
releasing the provinces and cities 
to raalci- their own decisions out- 
side the central plan and allowing 
market forces to determine at 
least in part the way prices work. 


BAGHDAD - Alias ^ 
persons were killed Monday 
an explosion destroyed part of 
new apartment building In cq& 
Baghdad, witnesses said 


. .,»* t ¥ 

. . , : 4*i 


Iran said that it fired a pym r 
hunched missile into Baghdad* 
ly Monday in retaliation for Ip 
attacks Sunday on ships using t 
Iranian oil terminal at Kharg 
land. Hours before the Iraqi nc 
on the ships in the Gulf, Iran h 
called a halt to its own attach 
Iraqi civilian areas. 

The explosion in Baghdad t 
strayed a section of the threosu 
residential building and dajaag 
others nearby. Iraq blamed t 
similar explosions mis month 
Iranian agents, but said notM 
about two mhos. No casualty i 
ures have been released for any 
the explosions. 


“It’s a very delicate thing to do 
to ay to reduce the terrible subsi- 
dies thm take up more than 40 
pe rce nt of China’s budget,’’ be 
said 


“There will be zigs and zags," 
he continued. “There will be mis- 
takes, perhaps veiy conspicuous 
ones , that wul caus e the central 
government to pull back; in its 
pace of reform. There will be suc- 
cesses, too, that will cause them to 
move a little faster.” 


. --v» 




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.«■■»** ifcp 
.. -I 

, ■ ** rn* ** 

i * 

UM hhMCH 

. i 


Iraq, meanwhile, said its pis 
raided targets in five Iranian riti 
including Tehran. 


- *- ** 

, . s. ** mi 


, • .if JH to* - 


The statement, issued by the 
minister of culture and informa- 
tion, Lee Won Hong, said that the 
two men had stolen automatic ri- 
fles from a storage area and had 
then broken into the boat's bridge, 
firing upon and killing six senior 
crewmembers. 

Two other sailors were wounded, 
but not seriously, and are hospital- 
ized in the western port of Kunsan. 
Eleven other crew memb ers are in 
South Korean custody at a Kunsan 
hoteL 

According to Mr. Lee, the two 
armed sailors feared reprisals from 
the Chinese authorities and steered 
the boat away from other vessels 
tairing part in the militar y exercise. 
The boat eventually ran out of fuel, 
he said, and drifted into South Ko- 
rean waters, where a fishing boat 
spotted it and escorted it to shore. 

The Seoul government did not 
specifically repeat a protest that it 
made on Saturday in which it asked 
China to apologize because three of 
its navy ships had followed the tor- 
pedo boat into South Korean wa- 
ters. But without mentioning the 
apology, a government spokesman 
in Seoul said that a decision on 
returning the boat and its crew 
would be made “after receiving 
their answer on the violation of 
Korean territorial waters.” 

Grina and Somh Korea have no 
formal relations, and they have 
made contact with one another 
through representatives in Hong 
Kong. Both sides have taken a low- 
key approach to the incident, sug- 


Gandhi Budget Has a Reagan Touch 

Urges Less Regulation, Tax Cuts for Business and the Rich 


By Steven R. Wcisman 

Mew York Times Service 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi, in a notable break 
with past policies, has proposed a 
program to cut taxes for businesses- 
and wealthy individuals and reduce 
government regulation of central 
parts of the economy. 

The prime minis ter’s program 
bears more than a passing resem- 
blance to some of President Ronald 
Reagan’s “supply-side" initiatives. 
Mr. Gandhi seems to have bor- 
rowed a page from Mr. Reagan's 
textbook in an effort to shake up 
the Indian economy. 

The program, introduced in his 
government’s budget last week, has 
drawn praise from several quarters. 


Argentina Seeks UJL Talks 


Reuters 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — Argentina accused Britain 
on Monday of obstructing a negoti- 
ated settlement of the Falklands 
dispute and called for a resumption 
of talks between them. Britain has 
refused to discuss sovereignty over 
the South Atlantic islands, which 
Argentina claims. The two nations 
fought a war over the Falklands in 
1982 after Argentina invaded them. 


including some associated with the 
political opposition. 

B usiness groups and trade asso- 
ciations are hailing it as the most 
important budget proposal in 
years. But others nave attacked the 
bu dge t as “against the common 
man.” 

Perhaps most reminiscent of 
Reaganomics is the basic thgme 
that the proposed changes are 
aimed at increasing savings, invest- 
ment and productivity m a free 
economy. 

Unlike Mr. Reagan’s tax cuts, 
however, Mr. Gandhi's proposed 
tax reductions would affect only a 
small part of the population: por- 
tions of the middle and upper cuss- 
es, who are the only people who 
pay income taxes. 

In fact, there is a debate here, 
similar to the one on Reaganomics, 
over whether the benefits will ex- 
tend to the vast majority of impov- 
erished people in India. “Unless 
the large masses have purchasing 
power, they cannot take advantage 
of these steps,” said AX. Nagar of 
the Delhi Sch ool erf Economics. 

The Gandhi program falls short 
erf an attempt to revamp the econo- 
my, which remains highly regulated 
and heavily taxed. Yet the budget 
offers the dearest indication so far 
of Mr.- Gandhi s’ apparent determi- 


nation to liberalize an economy al- 
most universally described as 
strangled by taxes and government 
regulations. 

The pr o gr am is also armed at 
reducing rampant tax evasion, 
which has been a fact of life in 
India for years. 

“What is important is that the 
government is chang in g direction," 
said a Western economist “It used 
to be that the government had its 
finger in every piece of the pie. 
Now it is stepping back a bit and 
giving the private sector a chance to 
allocate. They’re letting the mar- 
ketplace in a little.” 

Import duties, which were ended 
on computers last November, are 
to be lifted on other electronic 
equipment, too. 

To help dose a budget deficit of 
$3 billion in a budget of $37 billion, 
the government is raising taxes and 
fees on such commodities as im- 
ported petroleum and petroleum 
products, cement, commercial ve- 
hicles and soda water. A proposal 
to increase railroad fares has pro- 
voked protests. 

Some erf the changes Mr. Gandhi 
proposes can be ordered unilateral- 
ly. Most are expected to be enacted 
by the p arliamen t, where Mr. Gan- 
dhTs Congress (I) Party commands 
an 80-pocent majority. . :V * 



Oman Emerges as Firm Ally 
Of U.S. and Britain in Gulf 


•> • V * X 

•fc*. ; 


(Continued from Page 1) 
rhaiTi that supplies militar y equip- 
ment to Afghan rebels. 

O mani and Western officials in- 
terviewed in Muscat denied that 
Omani airstrips were being used to 
ship arms or supplies to Afghan 
guerillas. They also denied other 
reported activities in Oman by 
British and US intelligence agen- 


V.P. Singh 


The changes were put forward by 
V.P. Singh, the finance minister, 
one of a small group of market- 
oriented economic advisers to Mr. 
Gandhi This group began assem- 
bling almost immediately after Mr. 
Gandhi took office last November 
upon the assassination of his moth- 
er, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi 


A minority of U.S. officials in 
both the State and Defense depart- 
ments, as well as U.S. diplomats in 
the Middle East, have questioned 
whether the large investment was 
worth the military use permitted by 
the agreement. 

Some Western officials and dip- 
lomats critical of the relationship 
have argued that Saudi Arabia and 
other Gulf countries including Ku- 
wait, which Favors a more indepen- 
dent foreign policy stance by Gulf 
states, would eventually press 


Economists note that India has 
experienced satisfactory growth 
rates in recent years. The economy 
expanded more than 5 percent last 
year. But some people have ex- 
pressed concern that if there is an 
economic downturn, Mr. Gandhfs 
experimentation with market solu- 
tions could crane to a quick halt. 


United Press International 

AMMAN — King Hussein of 
Jordan and his wife, Quern Noor, 
left Monday for Madrid for a 
three-day state visit at the invita- 
tion of King Juan Carlos and 
Queen Sophia. 


Oman into its military ar- 
rangements withlne West 

There are indications that many 
Omanis, especially among the 
younger and better ed u cated, re- 
sent the influence of the sultan's 
advisers. Some are determined to 
place Omanis in the jobs foreigners 
now hold, according to Omani and 
Western residents of Oman. These 
critics say they are concerned by 
the increasing percentage of 
Oman’s national budget that is be- 
ing spent on the military. 

Oman’s relations with Britain re- 
main strong. About 1,000 British 
mili tary personnel serve on con- 
tract or have been sent on special 
assi gnmen t to Oman to serve m key 
military positions. 

Under Mt»n Qaboos, Oman has 
kmg been the political maverick of 
the region. It was the only Gulf 
nation to endorse the Camp David 
peace accords between Egypt and 
Israel and to refuse to sever diplo- 
matic ties with Cairo after the 
peace treaty was signed in 1979. 

To survive, according to some 
sources, Oman must be seen in the 
rest of the Gulf not as a Western 
surrogate and military staging 
ground but as an independent na- 
tion that -has chosen to ally itself 
with the West out of self-interest.- 


A military spokesman said 
other Iranian cities attacked w 
Hamadan, Isfahan, Kashas r 
Tabriz, and all the Iraqi planes 
the raids returned. He said t' 
Iraq would continue to strike In 
cities until the country’s leaden 
sponded to peace appeals. 

The spokesman said that L 
would retaliate against Iran for' 
ing weapons supplied “by 2a 
servants and Arabs of the tongu 
terms Baghdad uses for Syria t 
Libya. Some diplomats in Baghc. 


. u fua if 

5** * 






said that the Iraqi statement was 
admission that the explosion M ' 


admission that the explosion M 
day had been caused by Iran 
missiles supplied by Syria or Lib 


1.. 

-t-.-rt 1 

•'n*L«** 

^,T4 iMJf 

jtf 


{Iranian radio said Iranian a. 
dais confirmed the Iraqi attack . 
Tehran, The Associated Press . 
ported. The radio, monitored.. 
London, said that two Iraqi 
fired three rockets into a “desi 
area of Tehran.” It added that -. 
Iraqi planes escaped under he 
anti- aircraft fire. Iraqi planes i 
flew over 13 other Iranian til 
the radio said.] 


-t 

(to*)** 

fw 

: . ’** F 

VI. i ' 


Mitterrand Gains Support j|J H;il! ( v *11116 


Reuters 

PARIS — President Frans*: 
Mitterrand is gaining in p^iila- • 
while Raymond Bane, Valdy fr_ 
card d'Estaing and Jacques Qi 
all leading opposition figures, 
growing less popular, accordin . 
a prill published Sunday in: 
newspaper Le Journal du:_ 
manche. 


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When Eliot took over as manager, 
toe Southport office was considered 
exceptional Exceptionally sloppy and 
exceptionally unproductive. 

So one of the first things Eliot did 
was call Team Xerox. 

The Xerox people studied Elioft 


office and came up with a productive 
solution. They chose from a wide 
array of midsized copiers and tailor- 
made each one to fit the needs of each 
department or work group. 

They installed Xerox electronic 
typewriters, with unlimited memory 


and displays that virtually guaranteed 
error-ftee letters and 
reports And they followed 
up by providing him with 
one of the largest and most 
highly trained service organizations 
in the business 


iTeamXerdx 


Now the Southport office is exceptional 
for two other qualities: the most 
dramatic turnaround and the 
award for toe most outstanding 
manager of the yean 
□ CaD your local Rank Xerox office for in- 
formation and product availability 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


Page 5 


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democrats Warn Soviet 
lo Honor Existing Pacts 




Q 


%w Arms Talks Hang mBalancO) 
Congressmen Write to Gorbachev 


w 


.'" By Leslie H. Geib 

' New Yiv* Tima Service 

’■ .\SH3NGTON — A group of 
■rful liberal and centrist Denj- 
•' ; in the House of Representa- 
has sent a private letter to 


this kind of message couTd be dis- 
missed by the Soviets,” said Repre- 
sentative Stephen J. Solan, Demo- 
crat of New York. “But they might 
take the point more seriously when 
it comes from liberal Democrats 


‘ \ ail S. Gorbachev warning that wth a long track rex^ of support 
i .jviet Union most comply with tnr arrne Mntrr '’ ” 


-t 


K*>: 

A ' 1 


ge* a* Firm AIK 

Britain in Ciulf ’ 



tig arms control treaties or 
'the most “serious conse- 
r ts for the future of anus con- 

‘v ' 5 main purpose of the letter, 
-. 'll of its signers said, is to send 
. ; r : sage to the Soviet leader that 
- control advocates as well as 

/ . will insist that existing arm< 
1 be honored before new ones 
' -A : negotiated. 

unusual form of commnni- 
:. i specifically stated that pros- 
■■:v, for a final on space-based 
' : V. lies, widely seen as Moscow's 
goal in the arms control talks 
? 5-neva, “would become much 
. “ V. difficult” without strict treaty 
■“■‘■Sance. 

; V-enty-ihiee representatives 
;-: s l the letter, inducting three 
-ful House members wio will 
»*\. with future arms treaties: 

• ^ B. Fascefl of Florida, chair- 

-v< s ‘if the Foreign Affairs Com- 

- -• ,-^'n Joseph P. Addabbo of New 

- chairman of the Appropria- 
- ' - Committee’s subcommittee 

; "e'ense, and Les Aspin of Wis- 
' chairman of the Armed Ser- 
^ fc v- Committee. 

f_~ 4; letter’s most pennted refer- 
icjras to the radar being built 
trasnoyarsk in central Sibe- 

■ - Dee the ' flrlmfnic fm. 

hese Democrats contend that 

- -.-jJar, when it starts working in 
^ ■ three years, will violate the 
. . treaty an anti-ballistic nris- 
' ~7^r ABMs. 

. . ?ie Krasnoyarsk “problem is 
".? ‘-"solved in a" satisfactory man- 
. - die letter stated, “it ww have 
./; -s consequences for the future 
• aims contra proems,” in- 
-g eroding “substantive and 
support for the ABM trea- 
• ■ if in tne Congress and among 
•- nerican people.” 

- - cities of aims control s ending 


for anns control/ 

Representatives Sol arz, Aspin 
and N orman D. Dicks of Washing- 
ton were the pime movers in writ- 
ing and organizing support for the 
letter, which, they said, was deliv- 
ered to the Soviet Embassy on Fri- 
day. Mr. Aspin and Mr. Dicks also 
have been instrumental in building 
House support for the MX missiles. 

President Ronald Reagan has in' 
asted that his Strategic Defense 
Initiative, the missile defense sys- 
tem popularly known as “star 
wars,* ww not be subject to negoti- 
ated limits. The administration 
says the Krasnoyarsk radar violates 
the ABM treaty because it is not 
located on the periphery of Soviet 
territory, and because it faces out, 
toward whal would be the trajec- 
tory of incoming missiles, rather 
than up. as for the satefiite tracking 
that is permissible under the treaty. 

A recent analysis of this radar by 
British intelligence experts con- 
curred that it was a probable viola- 
tion. But they also observed that 
treaty language cm allowable radars 
for satellite tracking and monitor- 
ing of arms treaties did not make it 
ah open-ttnd-shm case. 

The signers of the letter were: 

Representatives Aspin, Addab- 
bo, Solaiz, Dicks and Fascell, 
Howard L Ber man andMervyn M. 
Dymally of California, Robert 
Garcia, Gary L Ackerman and 
Theodore S. Weiss of New York, 
Thomas M. Foglietta and John P. 
Martha of Pennsylvania, Nicholas 
Mavroules and Barney Frank of 
Massachusetts, Robert G. Torricel- 
li of New Jersey, Howard E. Wdpe 
of Michman, Harry M. Rad of Ne- 
vada. Michael D. Baines of Mary- 
land, Berkley Bedell erf Iowa, Sam- 
uel Gqdenson of Connecticut, 
Edward F. Fdghan of Ohio, Dave 
McCurdy of Oklahoma and Don 
Banker of Washington. 



Soviet Business School Urged 

Article Also Say's Younger Managers Could Aid Economy 


Hungary's Communists Start Congress 


The Associated Press 

BUDAPEST — The Hungarian 
Communist Party began its con- 
gress Monday with its leaders, in 
speeches prepared for the meeting, 
endorsing cautious economic liber- 
alism but condemning domestic 
codes. 

The meeting is the most impor- 
tant policy session for Hungarian 
leaders in five years and the first 
Communist Party congress in East- 
ern Europe since the death March 
10 of the Soviet leader, Konstantin 
U. Chernenko. 

The four-day meeting is to make 
derisions on Hungary’s political, 
social and economic development 
for the next five years. Since the 
early 1970s the counity’s economic 
experiments and relatively tolerant 
political climate have made it 
unique within the Soviet bloc. 

Prepared remarks by Janos Ka- 
dar, the Hungarian Communist 
Party leader, and Andras Gyenes, 
bead of the Central Control Com- 
mission, the party’s disciplinary 




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ie Old Ball Game’s Back, With New Piteh 

„ . (Omtinoed from Page 1) ed to not only' support but to ac- 

centing the frequency of the lively take part in the revolutionary 
; ’ts* appearances. To prolong process. Wnenthe fifth anniversary 
' ’*-$ and avoid aippling arm in- of the founding of the Nicaraguan 


RANK 




I avoid aippling ; 
they are allowed to patch 
/. fixed number of innings per 

- - - Sandimsts also seem io view 
ih as an instrument ftir na- 

integration. A new major 

, team representing the long- 
Atlantic Coast is con- 
; for second place in its divi- 
Two other new teams 
it industrial workers and 
]|itional Union of Agricultural 
1 livestock Workers. 

to Mr. ArgQdlo, the 
it is subsidizing all 10 
'league teams. Sportswrilers 
s has meant higher wages for 


: founding of the Nicaragnan 
People’s Militias was celebrated 
with a mass rally and a parade-in 
Managua late last month, the 


oated the sports pages here for 
days. At the moment, attention has 
shifted to Mr. Martinez’s chances 
erf regaining his spot in the Orioles' 
starting rotation. 

“Just the other week, a scout for 
the Pittsburgh Pirates eame 


marchers urduded ,f patriotic r ball- Ihrougb hoe.” said Edgard Tijer- 
players in mtifanh, carrying rifles ino, sports editor of the Sandioist 



on their shoulders instead of bats. 

. From a strictlypoGtical point.of 
view, basd^l, winch was popular- 
ized by the Ui Marines who occu- 
pied Nicaragua forneaily 20 yeas, 
has “imperialist” connotations. 
That has not prevented (he game 
from acquiring a mass following 
that cuts across ideological lines 



Front’s official newspaper. Barri- 
cade. “He said there were at least 
three players he might beinterested 

in si g nin g .” 

But, added Mr. Tijerino, who de- 
scribed himself as a Detroit Tigers 
fan, “It is our policy not to disclose 
the salary figures in the contracts 
that arts across ideological tines signed by players in the US.” He 
and mcludes many of (he Sanduust said the front “does not want our 
National Liberation Front’s ' top players to be ferial by millionaire 
leaders. contracts that might tempt them to 

“Sometimes we- will talk about leave the country to try and make it 
in return, players are expect- baseball at cabinet meetings, and in the big leagues.” 

every now and then we even play a The byword in Nicaragnan base- 
bit ourselves,” Mr. Aigfleflo said, ball (hese days, then, is self-suffi- 


nfmalft Slaughtered 
□stralian Zoo Attack 

77* Associated Press 

ELAXDE, Australia — Sixty- 
were beaten and 
to death Sunday night by 
at the chfidreo’s section 
Zoo, the police said 
iy. • 

zoo’s director. Robert Bak- 
that most of the animals 
and would cone op to 
consequently were very 
catch.” 


“The biggest fans are Humberto 
Ortega and Sergio Ramirez.” He 
was referring to the defense minis- 
ter and the vice president 
Five Ni 
made it to the 


itiy even has 
stopped importing gloves, balls, 
bats and other equipment from the 
United States and has begun mak- 
icaragnan players have ing its own-ball, the Dan to. 
the U5. major leagues in 


the last 10 years, the most success- 
or footle Baltimore Orioles^ and 
David Green, an outfielder-first 
baseman with the San Francisco 
Giants. 

When the Sl Locus (Cardinals 
traded Mr. Green to the Giants last 
month, analyses erf the deal douti- 


Tbere have been, as might be 


expected, some complaints that the 
Danlo ball is inferior to those once 
imported from the United States. 
But, Mr. Tijerino said, most of the 
protests seem to have come from 
pitchers whose earned run averages 
have risen and hitters whose rat- 
ting averages have dropped since 
the new ball went into play. 


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body, were made available to re- 
porters. 

Mr. Kadar, the initiator of (he 
economic chang es, criticized “un- 
balanced and unhisiorical pieces or 
programs violating our political in- 
terests and moral norms.” 

Mr. Gyenes’s speech said that 
publicity had beat accorded “to 
writings professing anti-Sodahsi 
views and attacking the social sys- 
tem.” He said these phenomena 
“create rightful indignation.” 

Hungarian analysts said Mr. 
Gyenes was alluding to criticism in 
print, movies and broadcasts of 
Hungary’s Stalinist era. Some liber- 
alization in the 1950s allowed op- 
position to grow, culminating m 
1956 in a anti-Communist revolt 
that was crushed by Soviet troops 
and tanks. Mr. Kadaris govern- 
ment was installed a month after 
the revolt 

More of Mr. Radar’s comments 
in his spe ec h dealt with the per- 
ceived need to continue with eco- 
nomic policies diverging from the 
centralist Soviet modcL 

Of the country’s small but vigor- 
ous private sector, he said: ^Ve 
support a better utilization of indi- 
vidual and family labor reserves. 
Small enterprises and economic 
work groups gradually fit into the 
system erf the Socialist economy.” 

Mr. Kadar endorsed existing 
policies of dfxentralization and of 
closing down or drastically re- 
vamping .unprofitable state-run en- 
terprises. 2. 

He restated the role of profit in 
economic planning, saying Hunga- 
ry's system-stakes into consider^ 


alien the active role of the market.” 

Although Hungary’s cautious 
freedoms have resulted in relatively 
cordial relations with the United 
States, it regularly follows Mos- 
cow’s line on East-West issues. 


Poles Banking 
Dollars Before 
Deposit Deadline 

Reusers 

WARSAW — Thousands of 
Poles went to state banks Monday 
to deposit dollars in new accounts 
before a rule-takes effect Saturday 
that forbids paying interest on ille- 
gally acquired money deposited af- 
ter day. 

Newspapers reported that Poles 
had hanked more than $1 billion 
between Jan. 1 and last Thursday 
and said there were still several 
hundred million dollars in private 
hands. 

Dollars have become vital in Po- 
land for buying scarce goods and 
services. The black-market rate for 
the dollar recently rose to about 
700 zlotys, compared with an offi- 
cial rate ofI38. 

To combat the black market, the 
government tins year introduced 
foreign-currency accounts that 
earn interest and can be used for 
travel abroad To attract illegally 
owntjtf dollars, the banks said that 
before March 30, Poles could open 
these accounts without saying 
where' the money came from. 


By Dusko Doder 

Washington Pan Semce 

MOSCOW — A Soviet econo- 
mist long identified with reforms 
ideas has published an article call- 
ing for younger managers and for 
the establishment of a Western- 
style business school to train indus- 
trial leaders. 

The article by Abd Aganbegyan, 
a member of the Soviet Academy of 
Sciences and head of an economics 
institute at Novosibirsk, was pub- 
lished Sunday in the government 
newspaper Izvestia. It appeared to 
signal an effort by the new Soviet 
trader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, to 
invigorate the economy. 

In his article Sunday. Mr. Agan- 
begyan quoted Mr. Gorbachev’s re- 
cent speech demanding an im- 
provement in “the management of 
the economy.” 

Too many industrial enterprises, 
Mr. Aganbegyan said, are run by 
old men lacking basic engineering 

training ami understanding of soci- 
ology. psychology and the latest 
developments in computers and 
automation. 

“We are living in the century erf 
technological revolution,” Mr. 
Aganbegyan said. “We cannot 
think that this should bypass the 
sphere of management.” 

Alluding to tne rigid system of 
centralized planning, he said some 
organizations “try to make deci- 
sions for managers and their enter- 


Although Andropov' initiated 
“experiments*’ in several branches 
of industry, seeking to give manag- 
ers more autonomy ana to reward 
higher productivity. Mr. Aganbe- 
gyan wrote that “there has been no 
breakthrough in productivity.” Mr. 
Gorbachev's immediate predeces- 
sor, Konstantin U. Chernenko, had 
continued Andropov’s policy but 
with far less vigor. 

Mr. Gorbachev said in his only 
eh since he became bead of the 
jmmunist Party that he wanted 


to see a restructuring of "the mate- 
rial and technical base of produc- 
tion” and an improvement in “so- 
cial relations.” 

■ Pravda .Assails Coal Industry 

The Communist Parly newspa- 
per Pravda said Monday that the 
Soviet coal industry was dogged b> 
poor managemenfand inadequate 
equipment. Reuters. 

Consequently, last year the 
equivalent of 10 million ions of fuel 
were lost, the report said. 


What is required, he said, is the 
introduction of management 
courses that would employ such 
■Western techniq ues as computer- 
modeled games. His institute, he 
said, has had some success in offer- 
ing an intensive, three-month 
course for factory leaders. But, he 
said, an overall improvement of the 
management system requires mon- 
ey and time: 

“If foreign business schools 
spend S20,000 to develop the 
cheapest business game, it is clear 
that we wiD have to spend the same 
amount of money as wdL” he said. 
“If the capitalists do not spare 
funds on teaching business people 
active management methods, then 
why should we think we can limit 
ourselves to just leanring” to in- 
dustrial managers. 

Mr. Gorbarihev. like Yuri V. An- 
dropov, his predecessor, has fo- 
cused most of his attention so far 
on Moscow’s internal problems 
and has insisted on greater eco- 
nomic efficiency and social and la- 
bor discipline. 

It is expected that the new Soviet 
leader's drive to modernize the 
economy and revive its growth will 
include a substantial change in per- 
sonnel. It was announced Satuiday 
that the minister of electricity, 
Pyotr S- Neporozhny, 74, has been 
succeeded by Anatoli I. Mayorets, 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Mike and Kate Westbrook: 'Ransacking Rossini’ lor Jazz 


By Michael Zwerin 

fntaTiationnS Herald Tribune 


F | ARIS — Mike Westbrook has 
written iazz music based on the 


-L written jazz music based on the 
works of Garcia Lorca, Brecht, 
Blake, Hesse. Rimbaud and Rossi- 
ni and performed it in Zurich. Lau- 
sanne, Copenhagen. Stockholm, 
Paris, Milan. Rome and London. 
He is preparing a musical theater 
adaptation of D.H. Lawrence’s 
poem “The Ass" to celebrate the 
1 00th anniversary of the author’s 
birth in Nottingham in September. 


His orchestra will be featured at the 
Europa Jazz Festival in Le Mans, 
France, on April 20. 

This most European of Europe- 
an jazzmen admits that “the main 
audience still looks to America for 
its jazz. We can’t argue with that, 
but where does it leave us? It's just 
like Surrealism or something, the 
form do longer belongs to any rare 
place. Jazz has spread throughout 
the world and we rind our inspira- 
tion comes principally from Euro- 
pean poetry and traditions." 


“We” are Westbrook and his 
wife, Kate, who plays tenor horn, 
rings and co-wntes some of the 
material. “We spend most of our 
year touring Europe and after 12 
years of it we can now do most of 
our repertoire in the language of 
the country we are playing in. Gar- 
cia Lorca sounds better in Spanish. 
Brecht is somehow more spontane- 
ous in German." 


“Though I- suppose Europe still 
lust take second place to Ameri- 


European government cuts in 
culture budgets bun adventurous 
music like the Westbrooks’. 


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must take second place to Ameri- 
can jazz.” he said, "sometimes 1 do 
not find the current American mu- 
sic very creative. It’s kind of coast- 
ing, thrown togelher without 
enough rehearsal, people resting on 
their laurels, not struggling as we 
have to here to stay on top of what 
we are doing. Our situation is very 
perilous.” 

Looking at their bodes for the 
rest of Lheyear, he finds that subsi- 
dized official festivals and presen- 
tations are sharply down. “They 
are relying on standard American 
names to draw the crowds,” he said 
while in Paris last week to launch 
lus new album, "On Duke's Birth- 
day” (Hat Hut). “They are not so 
willing to risk the consequences of 
experimentation. Basically, there’s 
a conservative trend.” 

Except for a few piano lessons 
from his grandmother, Westbrook 
is self-taught. He was born in High 
Wycombe in England and grew up 
in Torquay and learned jazz “chro- 
nologically, from Jelly Roll Morton 
to Fats Waller a n d, through my 
father, Duke Ellington/' He 
formed his fust band while in an 
school in Plymouth. In the mid- 
1960s they enjoyed a once- weekly 
residence at Ronnie Scott’s Ola 
Place in London. 

Influenced by Ellington and Gil 
Evans, he augmented his band until 
it became “The Concert Orches- 
tra,” which was ambitious, expen- 
sive and cumbersome, requiring 
large halk and heavy amplification. 

In the early 1970s, just about the 
time Rate joined the band (they 
were married later), Mike's career 
“had come to a hair. Somehow ev- 
erything seemed to fall apart And 
then a door opened.” 

“There was a big movanent to- 
wards community arts in Britain at 
the time,” Kate explained. “It usu- 
ally meant playing in streets or in 
hospitals and prisons and so on. 
This meant we had to be mobile, 
totally acoustic, and we formed a 
four-piece brass band. It was a real 
opportunity to play for the sort of 
people who do not usually come to 
concerts, and wonderful communi- 
cating to people who were so dose- 
up.” 

Kate learned the tenor horn, an 
instrument generally played by la- 
thes in Salvation Army bands, not 
associated with jazz. Westbrook 
began to play tuba and valve trom- 
bone. They looked for new material 
to fit the unit. The Westbrook mu- 
sic to William Blake's poem “Let 
the Slave” has been recorded by the 
ringer Van Morrison (on “A Sense 
of Wonder ” now in the British top 
40) and will be performed by the 


Westbrooks m London on March 
29. 

There are now three baric West- 
brook groups, a sort of “muse for 
all occasions” concept: the trio, “A 
Little Westbrook Music" which 
toured France earlier this month; 
the brass band, now seven pieces: 
and the 1 1 -piece Mike Westbrook 
Orchestra, Westbrook said he was 
“a bit sad to move away from the 

street concept,” but “we began to 
be interested in theater music 
Well be playing the Rossini in 
Queen Elizabeth Hall in June” . 

During a theater festival in Lau- 
sanne, Mike started “ransacking 
Rossini. I suppose you could call it 
jazzing it up.’ It's the sort of thing 
one might imagine as terribly 
corny, but it turned out to be {peat 
fun. It’s just popular musk, after 
aQ. The finafe from 'Wilfiant TdT is 
like one of the greatest pop son& 
ever, with a marvelous progression 
of chords going down in thirds. It’s 
a great bold theme — it could have 
been written yesterday." 

He said he and the groups “never 
consciously built any son of special 


repertoire: we son of just decided 
what to play today. I’ve always had 


what to play today. I've always had 
a great respect for the myth of New 
Orleans tradition, and I suppose h 
was quite natural to go bade to that 
source; we played ‘High Society.*- 
Then we came across some Elizabe- 
than musk and I arranged that 
And on our new album I tried to 
capture the spirit of Duke without 
usmg any of his actual material.” 

He thinb? of his music as jazz, 
“although my definition may be 
broader than others.” 

Kate; “It ought to be about a 
great processor music, not stuck in 
the past." 

Mike: “You can debate this for- 
ever, to very little effect. Bui jazz is 
about individual freedom within a 


collective community. We keep 
craning bade to that” 


Mike Westbrook Brass Band: 7 
Dials. Covent Garden, London, 
March 28 lr Chaucer Theatre, Ald- 
gate, March 29; Reggio Emilia, Ita- 
ly, March 30. Mike Westbrook Or- 


chestra: Europa Jazz Festival, Le 
Mans, April 20. 



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Mike Westbrook; Looking for material to fit the unit. 



1 lie pleasure is back, 


iy 


Finding le Mot Juste/or Spirited Talk About Wine - 


, 7, is! 



By Frank J. Prial 

New York Times Sendee 

F t ARIS — French intellectuals 
are ever convinced that, unlike 
their wine, their langnagg is in a 
state of decline. They blame this rat 

ihftmri riirwig infhignf p of American 

culture — to which they are hope- 
lessly addicted. Enraged by this 
paradox, they revile Americans and 
brand U.S. culture banal. They 
mount campai gns a gains t words 
such as “ferryboat” and “weekend” 
anH indignantly call on the authori- 
ties to uproot signs that say “stop” 
at busy intersections. 

To counteract this linguistic slide 
into the abyss, they write a lot 
about the true French language. 
For example, books in a senes 
called “French Rediscovered” have 
been appearing intermittently for 
several years. The most recent title 
is “The Words of Wine and Drink- 
ing,” by Martine Chatelain-Cour- 
tois. Appearing as it does in. a series 
on saving the French language, the 
books shows, if nothing else, how 
important wine and spirits are to 
the French soul, not to mention its 
liver. 

The book is a compilation of 
French dang , historical words, ar- 
chaic words and technical words, 
an Heating with drinks, drinking 
and drinkers. Sane- of its observa- 
tions shed fight rat France and 
French wine. 

There are some fascinating defi- 
nitions. For exampler chicory has 
been added to Fre nch- coffee from 
time imme morial. But in Paris ar- 


got in the middle of the last centu- 
ry, cfricorie was a synonym for 
drunkenness. Chatelain-Courtois 
found that the derivation was from 
schikkem, the Yiddish word for 
drunkenness. 

“Bar” is almost as common in 
French as in En glish. At one time 
in France it was usually modified 
by “American.” as in bar amiri- 
cam. The French word for a bar is 
eomptoir, which simply means 
counter. But, “The Words of Wine 
and Drinking" traces the word 
from the English “barroom” to the 
Middle English “barre,” which was 
plucked whole from Old French. 

Some phrases are almost poetic. 
Who but the French would call the 


Margaux, whose wine her parents 
— according to her father, son of 
the writer Ernest Hemingway — 
were drinking around the time of 
her conception. But I did not know 
until reading “The Words of Wine" 
that in 16th-century France a mar- 
got was a woman ot easy reputation 
or a female drunk. Apparently, in 
the region around Lyon, margin 
still refers to being drank. 

“Toast” is another word that has 
crossed and recrossed the English 


Channel Originally, according to 
“The Words of Wine,” it was 


French. It was spelled tostee and 
meant a diced of grilled bread. In 
Elizabethan England one put a 
slice of toast in a glass of wine 
being offered to someone to honor 
Him. It became “toast” in England, 
came bade to France in the 18 th 
century as tostee and then became 
toast in the 19th century. This it 
remains on both sides of the chan- 
nel, although French linguists 
would undoubtedly prefer pain 
grim 

“Sponge," or eponge, has about 
the same m eaning in the French 
vernacular as it does in the English. 
To say in either language that 
someone “soaks up wine like a 
sponge” is not hand to decipher. 
The book offers a quote from Gus- 
tave Flaubert, however, that is 
worth repeating. Writing to a 
friend, he said: “I sleep like a rock, 
eat like an ogre and drink like a 
sponge.” How did he -ever -have 
time for “Madame Bovary”? 

One of the more interesting drfi- 


raised punt in the bottom of a rap- 
idly emptying wine bottle the 


idly emptying wine bottle the 
Mount of Despair? On the other 
hand, who but the French could 
come up with “let’s throw a couple 
behind the tie” for “let’s have a 
couple of drinks.” 

Sometimes the book is simply 
wrong. Take the phrase voir des 
elephants roses — “to see pink d6- 
phants.” Chaidain-Courtoiis says it 
used to be “to see pink elephants 
fly,” and traces it to the 1950s and 
the popular Walt Disney film 
“Dumbo.” But there were “pink 
elephant” cocktails in the 1920s, 
just as there woe “pink ladies.” 
The phrase may well go back to the 
first peasants who saw Hannibal's 
elephant-led troops tumbling dawn 
out of the Alps. 

Thonameofthe model Margaux 
Hemingway came from ChiUeau 


nitioos is that of the French wo- 
connaisseur. (The English versif 
“connoisseur.” is Iron the 0 
Frtnch.) Remarkably fora Fren 
writer. Chatelain-Courtois says 
connoisseur that “it has such c 
an ces that it is difficult to tnu 
late." 

“The connoisseur," she writ** 
“doesn't have the scientific knot' 
edge of an enologist, nor even - 
understanding of wines as pro. 
as that of some professionals, su 
as professional fasten and wi, 
stewards. His knowledge is mt 
comparable to the culture of 
honest mod than to the erudition - 
an expert” One wonders what > 
means by “the culture of an hon. 
man.” 

Anyone who doubts the van 
and originality of the French li 
mage should turn to ChateU 
ourtois’s fist of slang terms 
wine (she finds about 110), 
terms for drinking (about 150 yi 
her phrases for overindulge! 
(about 60). Some of the mote j 
ttxresque in this last grou 
“flower-nose.” "cellar frog," 
bag” and “tea seller." 

The Paris intelligentsia need 
Their language Is ftouri 


fill *« 


p<4 

- «*4 m 


Adi 

— tfcrt I 


• • TL* 

■V 

- siont a# ■; 
•*. a **4t 


■z^r. 






i -JMtftj 

»r*# 




lira IP 


pick up from Americans, 
got one or two or more of 
own. 

“Les Mots du Yin et de rivre? 
by Martine Chatdain-Counai 
Volume 10 in the series “Le F| 
<jais Retrouvfc,” published by Bi- 


'Natural’ Drink Trend Aids British Gder 


By R_ W. Apple Jr. 

New York Tima Service 


H ereford, England — The 

quest for lighter, more “natu- 


1 A quest for lighter, more “natu- 
ral" and healthful-seeming bever- 
ages so popular in the United 
States is also bubbling up is the 
deeply established drinking habits 
of the British. The movement is 
particularly effervescent at the 
world’s largest ddermakzng enter- 
prise, H. P. Bulmer LtcL, a 98-year- 
old company that has prospered 
mi ghtily from the recent changes in 
Britons’ HrjnHng habits. 

. Its facilities look like a set for a 
Hitchcock thriller — row after row 
of immense black-and-white oak 
vats towering 30 feet (9 meters) 
above the floor, jammed so closely 
together that the visitor soon loses 
his way in the maze; From its base 
in Hereford, close to the bonder 
between England and Wales, 
Bulmer’ s last year sold half erf the 
total British consumption erf 67 


germing revenue source when he 
saw one, reintroduced a cider duty 
after a respite of 40 years, and 
successive increases have made the 
drink somewhat more costly than 
draft bitter. 


It was William the Conqueror 
who brought cider, along with so 
much else, to Britain. During the 
Hundred Years War it was a wel- 
come substitute fra the wine that 
no longer crossed the Channe l, and 
in the I8lh century it was a favorite 
of aristocrats. Then it fell from 
fashion, and dde r houses by the 
dozens went into bankruptcy. 

As in Normandy, British rider is 
made from all sons of apples, but 
in the Hereford area it is made 
from sharp, tangy little fruits with 

names like Variington MTfl and 

Tom Piitt and Stoke Red. The ap- 
ples are shaken from the trees and 
picked up from the ground by ma- 


admits to having developed for the 
“macho market.” 

Buhner’s sells its product with 
success in Australia. Kenya, even 
Mauritius — but has had no luck 
with the vast U. S. market Imports 
account far most of the commer- 
cially available alcoholic rider in 
the United States, hut they 
amounted to only 319,600 gallons 
last year. That includes the 20,000 
cases of Bulmer's that ended up 
mainly in Boston and San Francis- 
co. 

The problem, said Richard 
Thome of Bulmer’s, is that “Ameri- 
cans think of cider as something 
traditional and nonalcoholic to 
drink at Halloween and Thanksgiv- 
ing.” But the company is not giving 


|i Tonight could L 

thenigl 


: wine-coolers’’ in t£?Stitie^ 


tttiDkm gallops of rider, worth 
about £430 million, twice as much 


chines, ground into pulp and 
pressed. The juice ferments for 
about six to eight weeks. 

Cider comes in many forms: 
strong and not-so-strong, still and 
bubbly, dry and sweet The big sell- 
er is Bulmer’s Strongbow, an as- 
tringent drink with a fragrant taste, 
high in alcohol, which the company 


about £430 million, twice as much 
as a decade ago. 

The British, to be sure, still con- 
some 25 pints of beer for every one 
of rider, but while rider is growing, 
beer is declining especially the tra- 
ditional Britirii tipple, the dark- 
hued brew called ratter. 

No one is quite sure bow to ex- 
plain the evolution of cider from a 
drink favored by West Country 
rustics into a mass-consumption 
product Heavy advertising cer- 
tainly had something to do with it, 
and so did the introduction of rider 


of wine “coolers” in the Stales, 
Thome is trying to promote the 
notion of apple coolers. 

Perhaps the British producer 
ought to take into account the 
American health craze and quote 
the 17th-century diarist John Eve- 
lyn in its advertisements. Gder, he 
wrote, “excites and cleanses the 
stomach, strengthens the digestion 
and infallibly frees the kidneys and 
bladder from breeding the gravel 
stone." 


m 

m 

Spielcasir 

Aachen 


6 Love Letters From Grieg 
To Young Pianist Published 


an draft into more than 85,000 
pubs. 

But G. A. Thomas, a Bulmer’s 
spokesman, said he suspected that 
the most important influence had 
been the growing preference for 
drinks thai are light and “naturaL” 
British rider (not to be confused 
with the alcohol-free American 
product) is simply fermented apple 
juice, without additives. It ranges 
from 3 to 8 percent alcohol less 
I than most wine. 

Gder used to be cheaper than 
beer, but no more. In 1976, Denis 
Healey, then Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, a man who knew a bur- 


B ERGEN, Norway — Six love 
letters from the enm noser P/t- 


D letters from the composer Ed- 
vard Grieg to a young concert pia- 
nist have been published here after 
a dispute that eventually split along 
political lines. 

The letters were written by Grieg 
in 1896, when he was 52 years old 
and had been married for almost 20 
years to the anger Nina Hagenip, 
his cousin. The recipient was Bella 
Edwards, a little-known musician 
believed to have been American or 
Danish. She was 17 or 18 at the 
time. Historians in Bergen, where 
Grieg was bran in 1843, said be was 


well-known as haring an eye for 
pretty women, but the letters to 
Edwards are the first indication 
that he carried on such relation- 
ships after middle age: 

Grieg’s career was at its peak 
when be wrote the letters, pub- 
lished by a library in Bergen. He is 
remembered primarily for the Peer 
Gynt suites — incidental music 
written for Henrik Ibsen’s play — - 
and his romantic piano concerto. 

The library bought the letters 
from a Danish antique collector in 
i960. Grieg’s descendants objected 
to their publication, citing the com- 
poser’s statement in his will that 
the letters should be burned. But a 
majority of members of the board 
of the Bergen library voted in favor 
of publishing. 

The dispute ended earlier this 
month when the main Norw eg ia n 
political parties represented on the 
board voted in favor of the letters' 
publication, with the Christian 
Peoples Party opposing it, 

“How I long for you and how 
happy you make me. It is as though 
every breath I take brings your soul 
closer to mine;" Grieg wrote. 

He is thought to have met Ed- 
wards in Copenhagen, where she 
studied from 1S94 to 1896. He of- 
ten traveled through the Danish 
capital on his way to concert dates 
on the Continent. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


l. „ 

faris Perfection’ at Chanel Gets Lagerfeld a Standing Ovation 




r J By Hebe Dorsey 

'j&nttmaih>na} Herald Tnbme 

®IS — “Paris perfectKKi” is 
Iw^y one California boutique 

K drfmed the Chand collec- 4 . .. . . — - — - — 

ishown Monday morning. ^ 

Bevaybody agreed, and gaw S 1 ?" 101 * 1 <*<*«*■ Lagerfeld 
SLagerfdd wbo designs this ? d k “P tk-pretty.gdd buttons, 
gwa standing ovation. however, and the signature black 
g^with a magic wand, who Asroi and wtete ramda. 

STihe destiny of this hoose mrnate that lues de la Fres- 
Hf i sange — the house modd, who is 

UpAmc PAcnrnN p®* a fortuDC «> wo* only for 

f PARIS FASHION Chsnd — came out in the first 

tjL Lagerfeld was in iota] con- «“ «*■ ”• 

f.* 4 got ^everything ngm . pro- ^ ^ M & - Jc VHaH _ 

aSh« ' “**-“»* sweater andS shoes. It 
|othes, much younger and w fo & wed by ^ ^ o{ 

1 essence of Chanel as a the pretest were att along 
B vl*,* the huesofndmg coats. They were 

made °* ^ odea ' leather, tweed and 
^ cashmere; with matching boater- 

mcked into tfaesjrirts of dressy ew- 
nmg srns. Simple black sweaters 

5 ««»««* aaymetrical ole 
N ldK. and there were a lot of ^ ^ xma!ty re . 

A few seuons ags^ parists boardroom, marie h 

to the ballroom. So did leather, 

f(j including a smoke-gray leather 

,H,Vi rr *T nef suit, its floor-length skirt finished 

■ ttUlg JLAJSL with a back drape. Stunningly 

/ C7 draped black dresses, some embroi- 

/J msn-r/vf 9 deved with gold, owed nothing to 
f i'CyCA Chand and everything to Lager- 

feld. 

'■PSULE reviews of films re- So did the Watteau-inspired 

■ mtly released in the United clothes that he three 

months ago in the couture coilec- 
, i one has sketched the psy- lion and that gave a shot in the arm 
■y of the baby-boomers, or not only to the house ctf Chand but 
— — — — — to the whole couture world. He 

Movie marquee r 

' the comic potential beneath some satin evening outfits in Wat- 
-cutely as Albert Brocks. His teau pastels. 

'-us “Lost in America'* gives There’s a new face in the Dim 
- ipstick of i he mind — it's oot clan: Bernard Arnault was named 
: -io, but the hero’s ego that Ivor’s president last week, while 
1 splattered with pies and Paul Audrain, the former presi- 
'■ »d down the staircases of his dent, was named general manager. 


would have hollered; tins time they Ar^ salt’s construction company, resttucturing of its capitalization crown of Boossac Saint-Frcrcs, is This may wpfain the confusion in 

did not .appear to even notice. FerineL is one of lour new owners that he said would angman the worth 500 nuDion to 1.5 billion trends, with everything from the 

^ Not did they scan to mind that of Boossac Saint-Fiires, Dior's capital by400 million francs (about francs. Arnault said currently popular ski dothes to last 

the ^ouldas woe much wider and parent company; the other three $405 million) and give the four Meanwhile, the Dior ready- to- year's androgynous look There 
the shoes much flatter, and that all are banks. Asked if Dior would go owners the majority of the shares, wear is sluggish at best- The design- were even winter shorts and strong 

the gold chains were replaced by public, Arnault said only that tbc He said they hoped to resume trad- mg is by four young men under the whiffs of Courriges and Cardin, 

multicolored chokers. Lagerfeld Boossac group had suspended trad- mg in October or November. The artistic direction of Marc Bohan, Maybe Dior's managers should 

ing on the Paris Bourse pending a house of Dior, the jewel in the who does the house’s couture line, concentrate on finding just one 


nee-length 


hemline. 


W 7 '* ,IL 


W 


v* v 










^stopped above the knee or at 

^skles, and there were a lot of 
. A few seasons ago, purists 


u itj 

•tting 'Lost 
l America’ 

'^■PSULE reviews of films re- 
. -"sully released in the United 

: .i one has sketched the psy- 


:lOVIE MARQUEE 


.... - the comic potential beneath 
., 'cutely as Albert Brooks. His 
. . 'r.'cis “Lost in America’’ gives 
. ipstick of the mind — it's not 

. but the hero’s that 

Tplattered with pies and 
' '-id down the staircases of his 
jnd,” says Paul Attanasio of 
-• ashrngton Post 

the eve of an expected pro- 
— :.i, an advertising executive, 
- • . 1 Howard — played by 
. -j. who also directed — lies 
^ in bed. He’s climbing the 
- . ate ladder, but he’s in a nil, 
■ sis wife (Julie Hagertyk per- 
. ■ directre in a tog retail store, 

... ie same way. 

/ /ben David gets fired, it’s like 
. "s out for them. Inspired by 
: ~n “Easy Rider,” they decide 
^3 out of society and head 
' the country in search of the 
■' merica. Die easiest of easy 
" thcragh, they buy a Witme* 
complete with microwave 
(with browning c^abifity), 

• icy’re fueled by a $100,000 
' ■ v8 «■” . ' 













OafaM (21 

Lagerfeld’s coat and trousers for Chanel; “French poodle” dress by Tan GhidiceDL 


POONESBURY 

'MAKH26-J0mS 
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2 FOR. TtB FIRSHMB-* 


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CR&50UT tNHB5l££P. 
FROM WHAT JOWeHAS 
TOO MO, I KN0W7H15 
PRQBABW MOANS H&S 
Her* _ 


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woirnimv TO CHANGE ms 
tWteMTDRLC¥VWBZATRSK 
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TAMNSAimANDf&SGEMBUNG 



Interesting things were happen- 
ing outside the Tuderies runways. 
Tan Giudicdli, who sat out the last 
two seasons because of financia l 
mishaps, was bade on tbc scene and 
showing in his apartment on Boule- 
vard Raspail. 

Hating severed the link with his 
former backer, the oil-drilling heir 
Primat SchJumberger, he now has a 
tie-up with Sheikh Mubarak al- Sa- 
bah of KuwaiL It came about by 
ac ci d e nt. Giudicdli said. “His sis- 
ter, Amina, used to buy from my 
boutierae on Rue de Tournoo. One 
day, she asked what happened — 
and decided to put me back in 
business." Since die lived in Lon- 
don, she opened a Giudicdli bou- 
tique Feb. 28 at 12 Beauchamp 
Place. Another is scheduled to open 
soon in New York. 

This is good news, for Giudicdli 
unders tands cocktail and evening 
dresses better than most designers, 
and he has a very witty and Pari- 
sian hand. He will fiu a gap in 
Paris, where evening wear is not so 
easy to find, especially at ready-to- 
wear prices. 

His new collection of 60 models 
included several beauties, includ- 
ing a funny black-and-white one, 
trimmed with white ostrich feath- 
ers, that GhidiceQi called “my 
French poodle." 

AUTHORS WANTED 
BY N.Y. PUBLISHER 

UadnQ Bibndy book pub&tHor mb monu- 
laipM of af type, faron, noo-ficfion, poetry, 
juwMfc. scholarly and retootn woria, etc. New 
authors welcomed. Send for free booklet H3 
Vantage Press. 516 W. 34* Sr, New York, N.Y. 
1000HJ-SA 


New collection 

ESCADX 

at European 
export prices 

Marie-Martine 

8, Roe de Sevres, Paris 6th. 
TeU (1)22218 44. 


KARL LAGERFELD 
Boutique ^ 


173 New Bond Street 
London WI, England 


Rene Lalique in 
London. 

The Galerie Modeme R.Lalique Collection 
at Harvey Nichols 26 March -20 April 

A rare collection of Decorative Glass by Rene 
Lalique (1860—1945), organised by Galerie Modeme, 
the worlds foremost authority on R. Lalique glass, 
~ is now on view at Harvey 
Nichols, one of Londons 
leadingDepartment Stores. 

Galerie Moderne’s 
unique and representative 
collection will be of par- 
ticular value to visitors 
with an interest in 1920s 
Decorative Arts and R. 
Lalique glass; renowned 
for its quality and design 
throughout this exotic era 
to the present day. 

The exhibits, which 
include vases, bowls and 
statuettes in opalescent 
and frosted glass, are being 
offered exclusively 
Grand Nuc.hyRcmr Lalique, through Harvey Nichols 3S 
arm 1920 . important statue part of their French “Parle 

<66awJ.in/n>5fa4giiis&. _ . ,, 

rrangais season. 

The Harvey Nichols “Parle Frangais” season, 
which includes the Galerie Modeme R. Lalique 
Collection, runs from 26 March to 20 April. 


Harvey Nichols, Knightsbridge, London SWl. 


jTorioh 

the 


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TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 




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Page 8 


Jteralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Eribune. 


PubOAed With Tbe >ew York Tunes and TV WA*Wagum Pew. 


Small Beer for Britain 


Britain's latest budget was dismissed by 
many commentators as boring. A week after 
its unveiling, it still does not look tike a 
dramatic contribution toward better eco- 
nomic health in a country dogged by severe 
unemployment, a shaky currency and along 
history of bad labor relations. 

Nigel Lawson, tbe chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, does not aim at any sort of Keynes- 
ian reflation. Extrapolating from his own 
estimates, h is hard to see unemployment 
falling this year from the present three to 
four million, or around 13 percent of the 
labor force. The aim is to reduce the budget 
deficit, instead of pushing it up in Reaganite 
fashion to create more demand and jobs. 
That is not surprising, since Mr. Lawson is 
profoundly un-Keynesian and highly suspi- 
cious of the adventurous course that the 
Reagan administration has taken. The suspi- 
cion is warranted — not because the under- 
lying concept of changing your budget bal- 
ance to balance your economy is wrong, but 
because the Reagan administration seems to 
have dangerously overprescribed a medicine 
that should be used, judiciously. 

There were some mildly useful points in 
the Lawson budget. Reform of National 
Insurance — which taxes employers accord- 
ing to the number erf workers they employ, 
and taxes workers according to their wages 
— may faintly encourage employers to take 
on more lower-paid workers; one hopes it 
will not inspire them to get rid of the higher- 
paid. The intention to draw tbe teeth, at the 
official wage councils — which discourage 
recruitment of the jobless by keeping the 
bottom end of wages up — and the plan to 
increase spending on youth tr aining projects 


accord well with the sensible view that Euro- 
pean governments have to deploy a wide 
range of policies to get people back to work. 

What is disappointing is that Britain has 
not seen fit to follow up last year’s rational- 
ization of corporate tax by an attack on the 
irrationalities in the personal tax system. 
There are only promises of discussion pa- 
pers, which can drag proceedings out be- 
yond the lifetime of the present government. 
As in America, the distortions in the present 
tax system are harmf ul to prosperity. 

For the rest, Britain’s budget is rather 
small beer — almost literally. Some ques- 
tionably large increases in taxes on ciga- 
rettes and dnnk will raise the general price 
level slightly faster than would otherwise 
have been the case, mildly aggrieving the 
modest smokers and drinkers but doing little 
to help the dr unkar ds and the cancer-prone. 

Mr. Lawson’s second budget is intent on 
defeating inflation. Otherwise it is a bit of a 
nonevent. This is probably right for the 
moment, because a new event is about the 
last thing you need when your economy is 
emerging, a little groggy, from a yearlong 
coal strike, confusion in the market for oil 
(one of Britain's major assets) and upsetting 
conditions in the exchange markets. 

A major problem has long been the idea 
that the British budget, which has to coin- 
cide with the vernal equinox, should set the 
scene for the year ahead. Decisions should 
not be made at an arbitrary date. Britain was 
probably right not to chan g e much this Eas- 
ier. What Mr. Lawson has to watch is wheth- 
er, perhaps near the autumn equinox, some 
small chang e; of course is needed. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Midterm Blues in Europe 


AH three of Western Europe’s major govern- 
ments have fallen into one kind or another of a 
midterm slump. Americans might usefully 
keep that in mind, since it is affecting the way 
Europe responds to tbe rest of tbe world. 

French re gional elections have Mimed out 
badly for the governing Socialists and well for 
their conservative opponents. Since the cam- 
paign for next year’s parliamentary elections is 
already under way, the regional returns are 
another warning of trouble ahead for Presi- 
dent Frangois Mitterrand: His own term runs 
mufl 1988, opening the possibility that he may 
find himself trying to govern whh the National 
Assembly in the hands of the opposition. That 
is a familiar drc mnstance in American politics 
but has never happened in France’s Fifth Re- 
public, and the prospect creates great anxiety. 

In West Germany earli er this month, Oskar 
Lafcntame, a radical Social Democrat, led his 
party to triumph in a state election in Saar- 
land. That has no immediate effect on the 
conservative- to-cente coalition in power at 
the federal level, but Mr. Lafantatnes victory 
gives new force to the neutralist attack on 
established West German policy and. signifi- 
cantly increases the strength of the left wing 
within the Social Democratic Party. 

In Britain, Margaret Thatcher’s Conserva- 
tive government remains securely in control 
with its huge parliamentary majority, but it 
has been among recently in opinion polls. If 


national elections foDow their usual rhythm, 
Britain, West Germany and Italy will bold 
elections in 1987. Governing parties in those 
three countries, unlike the French Socialists, 
are not yet dose enough 10 the next vote to 
have to worry about it very urgently, but aO of 
than are now halfway through their terms, 
with less to show than they had hoped. 

The general tendency in European politics is 
neither to the right nor to the left buC as it has 
boon for some years, against the party in pow- 
er. The widespread sense of discontent is gen- 
erated above all else by the very high un- 
employment and the failure of a succession of 
experiments and initiatives to restrain its 
steady rise. The interesting comparison be- 
tween Britain and France suggests that the 
prescriptions of neither right nor left do much 
to cure the kind of unemployment from which 
most of Western Europe now suffers. 

The causes lie deeper than conventional 
policy can reach. Most Europeans seem to be 
committed to social stability to a degree that is 
bad for economic growth. They know it, but 
they are sticking with their choice, however 
much they may comp lain about the ride ef- 
fects. Tbe high unemployment has not led to 
political disruption at collapse, as politicians 
had feared, but it has made European politics 
a cheerless business in which governments now 
find themselves grimly on the defensive. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Botha wm Have to Negotiate 


As still more Sooth African blades fell 
to police bullets over the weekend. President 
Botha told American television that it was all a 
C ommunis t plot, that nobody in the world 
would stop him maintaining law and or da and 
that people who opposed bis government did 
not get shot. Meanwhile, white opposition 
members of Parliament from the Progressive 
Fodextd Party conducted a swift inquiry on 
the spot in the Uitenhage area of the Eastern 
Cape and came away convinced that the police 
hud deliberately fired ball ammunition (as 
distinct from tear gas, plastic ballets or shot) 
into Thursday’s funeral procession although 
they had not been attacked. 

in less than seven months since the new 
constitution came into force, excluding the 
black majority but giving other non-white 
groups a subordinate share in power, more 
than 200 Africans have been killed by police in 
disturbances too numerous to count. If South 
Africa lodes bad after [Uitenhage], it was no 
better before it. for those who wished to see. 

People have been speaking of time running 
oat ever since SharpeviUe, but the direct threat 
to white domination by force is no more real a 


quarter of a century later. All one can say is 
that the African majority is much more impa- 
tient. The president's position is as dear today 
as it was a week, a month or a year ago; He wall 
initiate reform, just you wait and sec, but he 
will not tolerate the unrest which persistently 
proves it to be overdue. The real flaw in 
President Botha’s approach is not so much the 
contradiction between the peacemaker and the 
paranoid policeman as hus deter mina tion to 
impose reform from above rather than negoti- 
ate with those who demand iL 

— The Guardian (Londai). 


Cause for Concern in Greece 


There is genninc cause for concern over 
developments in Greece. By forcing Constan- 
tine f-aramaniis out, Andreas Papandreou h a s 
removed the chief obstacle to his campaign, 
launched in 1981, to get rid of U.S. military 
bases and perhaps quit NATO. It probably 
would be counterproductive for the United 
States to match Mr. Papandreou's provoca- 
tions tit for taL It weald not be wrong to 
remind the Greek government erf the mutual 
benefits to be derived from dose cooperation. 

— The Sacramento (California) Bee. 


FROM OUR MARCH 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Canada Imports British Miners 
MONTREAL — Labor aides are exasperat- 
ed by the announcement that the Dominion 
coal and iron companies have arranged to 
import 1,000 men from England to replace 
union miners who have been on strike in Nova 
Scotia for some time. A number of “strike- 
breakers” have already been imported from 
different parts of the Dominion, and it was 
believed that the mining troubles were over. 
This opinion seems to have been too optimis- 
tic. The trouble arises out of the refusal of 
snployers to recognize the unions because the 
men were affiliated with the United Mine 
Workers of the United States and have taken 
orders from the American executive. This in- 
terference of Americans in Canadian matins 
has robbed the men of public sympathy. 


1935: Poland Adopts a Dictatorship 
PARIS — By tire adoption of the new constitu- 
tional regime [cm March 23k Poland joins the 
list of European countries governed more or 
less dicta tonally. In reality, an authoritarian 
regime is no thing new for Poland. It has exist- 
ed de facto since 1926, when Marshal J6zef 
Pilsudriti. introduced radical reforms which 
practically pul an end to the democratic Con- 
stitution of 1921. Although the Diet and the 
Senate have been retained, their function win 
be advisory. Such an evolution was inevitable 
after the difficulties encountered in the work- 
ing of the earlier Constitution and the success 
of Marshal Hlsudsld is forming a government 
after his coup d’btat in 1926. The failure of the 
democratic experiment is hardly encouraging 
for tbe future of democracy in Europe. 


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JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


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Co-Chairmen 


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CARLGEWIRIZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubbker 

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0 1985, International Herald Tribune. AB rights reserved. 




For an American Approach to Vietnam 


W ASHINGTON — Vietnam's brutal bat ef- 
fective military campaign against the 
Cambodian rebds fighting along the border with 
Thailand may have opened a window of opportu-" 
nity for the United States and the ASEANcoim- 
tries — a chance to settle the tragic conflict in 
Indochina and reduce Soviet influence there. 

The Vietnamese offensive — some 20 rebel 
camps have been destroyed in February and 
March — is part erf a two- track strategy: to 
e limina te any serious resistance to the Vietnam- 
ese occupation of Cambodia, and then bargain 
from a position of strength to settle the conflict 
there on terms favorable to Hanoi. 

Vietnam has in effect created a new set of 
political facts in Cambodia. At the same time, 
however, its own dire economic straits are com- 
pelling it to seek an opening to the West 
How can the West be sure Hanoi wants to 
negotiate? Consider events of recent montfo 
Even as Vietnamese troops were destroying 
the Cambodian rebel bases — those belonging to 
the non -Communist guerrillas ««i the Khmer 
Rouge — and driving some 300,000 refugees 
across the border into Thailand, Hanoi agreed to 
cooperate wi th Washington on recovering Amer- 
icans still rmssmg in action in Vietnam. 

The s up reme irony is that Vietnam Is now 
advocating more American involvement in 
Southeast Asia. The Vietnamese dearly hope to 
curb Chinese influence. They also seem to see 
that Soviet economic aid has not been sufficient 


By Robert A. Manning 


Australian officials have been in an out of Thai- 
land and Vietnam. Last month Prince Sihanouk 


to sustain their country, and they fear the conse- 
quences erf a Grinese-Sovi 


iviet rapprochement. 
What exactly has Vietnam gamed? 

First, the Vietnam-backed government in 
Phnom Penh no longer faces an)' significant 
resistance inside Cambodia. 

Second, much to the chagrin of the ASEAN 
members, Vietnam has called China's bluff. Bei- 
jing, the ream backer of the Khmer Rouge, has 
not launched any significant counteroffensive. 

Third, the refugees driven into Thailand put 
raw .pressure on it to reach a settlemenL 

Au three gains would be useful to Hanoi in 
negotiations over Cambodia. What would be the 
talks’ likely outcome? The key question is wheth- 
er Hand could accept a “Fmlaudizcd" Cambo- 
dia, over which it had less than complete control. 

The new Cambodian government would have 
to be the product of internationally supervised 
elections and would likely be headed, nominally 
at least, by Prince Norodom Sihanouk, former 
head of stale and leader of one of the noo- 
Conamunist rebel factions. It would, however, 
also have to include some wm-Communist rebels 
now fi ghting under Son Sazrn, the former prime 
minister, and even some Khmer Rouge, although 
not their infamous and barbaric leaden. 

There has already been a flurry of diplomatic 
activity. Senior American, Soviet, Chinese and 


appeared in Canberra urging international talks. 

There is as yet tiule to suggest that Vietnam is 
willing to accept less than total domination erf 
Indochina. But Hanoi's desire for Western aid 


and investment gives the United States signifi- 
cant leverage. So far the Reagan administration 
has deferred to China and the ASEAN countries 
on all Questions involving the Cambodian con- 
flict. A bold American initiative could, however, 
do much to encourage Vietnamese flexibility. 

What does America stand to gain? Eventual 
normalization of relations, with a phasing down 
of the Soviet military - presence at Cam Ranh Bay. 

Many in the ASEAN countries would like to 
see Hanoi weaned from the Soviet bloc, Vietnam 
being after all the only likdy counterweight to 
Cbhuse influence in Smith east Asia. This would 
be a serious blow to Moscow and could only 
enhance UJS. security interests in Asia. A settle- 
ment would also eliminate tire possibility that the 
worst of the Khmer Rouge would eventually 
shoot their way back into power in Cambodia. 
The United States would have nothing to lose 


from a diplomatic initiative. It would at the very 


least score 
Vietnam's 


with ASEAN allies and 
ilomatic bluff. 


Mr. 


the 

far East Economic Renew and other publications He 
contributed this comment to The New York Tones. 


For American Military Aid to Khmer Nationalists 


N EW YORK —Cambodia, the 
last country entrapped in the 
TnHnrhina conflict and the one to 
suffer the most, can be rescued from 
its 15-year nightmare and restored 
to peaceful independence by Amer- 
ica working with the Pacific basin 
countries. The rescue operation re- 

. find the 


By Kishore Mahbnbani 

The writer is Singapore's ambassador to the United Nations. 


rescue 

quires that America find the politi- 
cal will to carry it out, and also that 
it provide military support to na- 
tionalist groups led by Prince Noro- 
dom Sihanouk and Son Saim. 

A useful step was the vote last 
Wednesday by the House Foreign 
Affairs Committee’s Subcommittee 
on Asia to allocate S5 milli on to the 
Sihanouk and Son Saxm forces 
fighting the Vietnamese. A third re- 
sistance group, Pol Pot's Khmer 
Rouge, would not get a cent. 

UJS. military support for the na- 
tionalists, accompanied by diplo- 
macy, ought well force tire Soviet 
Union, Qmia and Vie tnam — all 
parties to Cambodia's tragedy — to 
move away from the stalemate- It 
would increase the cost of the Viet- 
namese occupation and ensure that 
if HanoPs forces withdrew, the 
Cambodians would not be left to 
the mercy of the Khmer Rouge, who 
killed millions when they rued. On 
moral grounds the nationalists de- 


serve such support. Failure to act 
would amount to complicity in pro- 
longing Camb odia’s agony. 

U-ST military support would not 
involve sending any militar y per- 


sonnel — only limi ted amounts of 
eriei mat are 


tire materiel mar guemfias require. 

After America left Cambodia in 
1975 there was almost continuous 
warfare between tbe Chinese-sup- 
ported Khmer Rouge and the Sovi- 
et-supported Vietnamese forces. 
This led in January 1979 to the 
occupation of Cambodia. 

Hanoi pretended it invaded to 
rescue Cambodia from the Khmer 
Rouge, but in their place it installed 
ex-Khmer Rouge cadres — a cyni- 
cal act best understood by ima gin- 
ing the allied armies inttaning ex- 
Nazis after freeing Europe trom 
Hitler. Cambodians have no love 
for the Vietnamese, their traditional 
rivals, nor for the Khmer Rouge. 
They cry out for an alternative. 

In recent years, encouraged by 
ASEAN — the Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations, which 
groups Bruno, Indonesia, Malay- 
sia, me Philippines, Singapore and 


Thailand — the natirmatiere have 
gradually emerged as a political 
force. In recognition of their grow- 
ing effectiveness, Vietnam in recent 
months has brutally attacked and 
seized nationalist camps on the 
Thai-Cambodian border. The poor- 
ly supplied nationalists were de- 
fenseless against the overwhelm- 
ingly superior Soviet-supplied 
Vietnamese ranks and artillery. 

Without outside military support, 
including America’s, the national- 
ists will remain defenseless. Thus 
ASEAN has asked the international 
community “to increase support 
and assistance to the Kampuchean 
people in their political and military 
struggle to liberate their homeland 
from foreign occupation" — an ap- 
peal primarily aimed at America. 

Paradoxically. 10 yean after ex- 
pelling UK forces from Vietnam, 
Hanoi has invited the United States 
to return to Indochina and “assume 
a responsible role in contributing to 
the long-term peace and stability in 
Southeast Asa." This opportunity 
should sot be missed. 

Any settkment of the Cambodi- 


an conflict requires reduction of 
tensions between China and Viet- 
nam. America, with its close ties to 
China, can be an honest broker. 

Moreover, America could join Ja- 
pan in offering to assist Vietnam in 


us long-overdue economic develop- 
viin- 


ment once its forces were wit 
drawn from Cambodia. 

In a Cambodian rescue effort, 
the United States would not work 
alone but would be complementing 
the efforts of ASEAN. China, Japan 
and other Pacific basin countries 
to find a solution. 

How would America benefit? 
Resolution of the problem would 
remove the last major focal point of 
superpower conflict in tire basin 
and enable China and Southeast 
Asian countries to accelerate eco- 
nomic development of the basin. 
This would bring immediate re- 
wards to American trade and indus- 


try. In strategic terms, a Vietnam at 


peace would be under less pressure 
to offer bases to the Soviet Union. 

Perhaps the greatest benefit 
of contributing to the successful 
accomplishment of peace in Indo- 
china would be that it might finally 
help bury the painful memories a 
the Vietnam War. 

The New York Tunes. 


Yet Again, 

The Politics^*** 


**#*■> 



01 Terror ti„nt f<w Ki 

" -ilx-rl’r 


By Flora Lewi* 



P ARIS — As Jordan 
talking to Israel with 
participation and Egyptian sump 
murky forces do wnai they c2a 
prevent it. This was to be expected 
Conflict serves many in the Midti 
East. The importance of the fiahti : 
in southern Lebanon is not only ( 
cal. The Shiites who are attadq 
Israeli forces and being subjected ' 
Israel’s “iron fist" in retaliation h& 
introduced a crucial new factor 
complex Middle East politics. Th ' 
enable radical Arabs to boost th • 
armed uprising is possible, to escak 
their campaign against Traitor 
who would dal with Israel, and, a 
haps most important, to heighten t 

pressure of fear on vacillating cost 

vative Arabs who might othcrw 
give Jordan a little passive supper 
This applies particularly to Sai' 
Arabia and the emirates. Tbe Unit 


H 


tt l^tUB 


Mrs** 


, .-«*:'•** ■ 

* Tan 


u 


* 


Irt jfwM** 


States has regularly exaggerated t 

jese weak r 


rok that these weak reeds can play 
advancing American diplomacy. 

Israel helps its worst enemas - 
provoking and prolonging hatred 
Lebanon. The violence secompar 
ing its wise decision to withdraw 
not assure future calm there and ? 
leave a greater menace to Galilee. 

The killing of two CBS tdevisi 
technicians was a grave mistake d 
only exacerbates the situation ai 









r »**■”*«* » 
-'i fa 




time of great ddicacy. Eyewitnes. 
other T‘ 


from 


Western media said 
to be deliberate. Pri-:' 
Imister Shimon Peres should i 
have tried to justify tbe fatal shots 
an accident of war. He should at le 
appoint a commission or inquiry. 1 
The danger, as ever in the MM 
East, is that short-term calculate 
and tactical reflexes will block kx ' 
er-term policy needs. That is e«r V 
what some forces are trying to do ; 

A curious dispute among suppe : 
ers of the Arab cause against Israe 
on example of the political labyrii- * 
ahead and the way it can be expk/ 
ed. The argument is whether A 
Nidal is dead or alive, and whet: v 
Lurien Bitterlin. tire French edita 
a pro-Arab monthly, really talked ' 
him in tbe Syrian-occupied BeT. 
Volley on Feb.' 6 and 7. 

Abu Nidal is a shadowy Paler', 
ian terrorist who claims respond " 1 
ity for “dozens” of assassuatk 1 
according to Mr. Bitterlin. He i'~ J ’ 
reported dead last November. 

Mr. Bitterlin is a GauEist who * 
came passionately pro-Arab re - 
course of supporting the lace Pru- 
dent de Gaulle's decision to negot '- 




TV 


i v ; i l2 1 


. --jn who -k 

. ! .-fifcitf * 


* I 


-*»! 


'Greece First’ Papandreou Provokes a Showdown 


Bitterlin says he met a r: 
who presented himself as Abu N. . 
five years ago in Baghdad, where- : 


S 


AN DIEGO ’— With the resigna- 
tion erf President Constantine 


By L,S. Stavrianos 


CanunanHs on March 20. mfighring 
in Greece. 


turned to out-fighting 
Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou 
precipitated the trouble by suddenly 
withdrawing support for a second 
five-year Caramanlis term. 

A showdown struggle for political 
primacy is now out in tire open. The 
outcome will have far-reaching inter- 
national repercussions- 

It takes 180 votes in the 300-mcm- 
ber pjadiameat to elect a president on 
the third ballot, which is due on 
Wednesday after two inconclusive 
rounds. Mr. Papandreou’s nominee 
— Christos Saitwtakis, a Supreme 
Court judge — is expected to win. 
Mr. Papandreou will then be the un- 
disputed head of Greece until Octo- 
ber, when his four-year teem ends 
and new elections are mandatory. 

If Mr. Sartzctakis fails to win the 
needed 180 votes, the acting presi- 
dent must dissolve Partiamcin and 
bold elections by May 6. 

Whether the next election is in 
May or October, it will be a no-holds- 
barred brawl Mr. Papandreou has 
already called on his followers “to 
take up battle stations.” 

The chief opposition to his Fan- 
Hdlenic Socialist Movement is the 
conservative New Democracy Party 
led by Constantine Mhsotakis. But 
his strongest opponent is Mr. Cara- 
manlis, 78, who has been prime min- 
ister and president for a total of 19 
years. American officialdom and me- 
dia have already taken sides. Mr. 
Caramanlis is touted as a “principled 
conservative* and Mr. Papandreou 


stigmatized as bang “slippery,’’ 
“anti-American" and “demagogic.” 
This is simplistic and mkleaHing 
In a 1979 exchange in Parliament, 
Papandreou, as an opposition 
deputy, asked whether nuclear weap- 
ons were stared at the U.S. bases m 
Greece. Mr. Caramanlis, as prime 
minister, replied that under treaty 
provisions “the facilities do not have 
nuclear weapons, nor may they be 


used for war operations without per 
b Greek era 


mission of the Greek government." It 


was later reported that in secret 
» thegove 


agreements the government had not 
only accepted the stationing of nucle- 
ar weapons but agreed to “exclusive 
U.S. activity” at the HerakCon base, 
where “there will be no Greek au- 
thority, supervision, or presence." 

This episode not only renders sus- 
pect the conventional appraisal of the 
two Greek leaders;, but also suggests 
an explanation for the wideroread 
anti-American sentiment revealed by 
polls recently conducted in Greece. 


gated tbe area after Work! Warn, so 
Greece became “American.” : 

Greek political leaders accepted 

the ^LotaS chessboard. They assumed 
that there was no feasible alternative, 
so a cozy relationship developed be- 
tween Greek politicians serving as 
pawns and the great powers conduct- 
ing their global strategics. 

This comfortable arrangement has 
been challenged by Mr. Papandreou. 
He waned that pawns, by definition, 
are used and then discarded when no 


Ever since their country became 
Greek i 


independent in 1830, Greek political 
leaders have been doing what Mr. 
Caramanlis did in 1979. The reason 
was plain and naked force. 

Sir Edmund Lyons, the British 
namster to Athens, said in 1841: “A 
truly independmt Greece is an absur- 
dity. Greece can be either English or 
Russian, and since she must not be 
Russian, it is necessary that she be 
English.” The British navy dominat- 
ed the eastern Mediterranean in the 
19th century, so Greece did become 
“English." The American fleet donti- 



Br KAL lit The economist (London I. 
Cartoonist* If Wrltwa Syndicate. 


Science Resists the Disease of Secrecy 


W ASHINGTON —It is an old 
story that Russian scientists 
are hobbled by their country’s his- 
toric mania for secrecy, while scien- 
tists in America thrive on free-flow- 
ing information. The new story is 
that each of die national scientific 
enterprises may be adopting some 
of the other’s characteristics, to So- 
viet benefit and American Joss. 

Contrary to the impressions cre- 
ated by same overheated news ac- 
counts, the disease of secrecy has 
not deeply penetrated American 
sc ie nce. The doors of the great ma- 
jority of academic laboratories are 


By Daniel Greenberg 


ing several reported in the latest 
issue of the Bulletin of the Atomic 
Scientists, foreigners were barred 
apparently to preclude difficulties 
with jBpvemment authorities. 

Knowing how science works, the 


literally open, as they always have 
. The same is true of scientific 


been. 

meetings, and the results of re- 
search continue to be published in 
easily accessible journals. But in a 
fashion akin to early scattered out- 
breaks of an oncoming fin epidem- 
ic, the disease of secrecy has caught 
on here and there in the American 
science establishment. 

In recent years there have been at 
least a .seme of publirized episodes 
involving the exclusion of foreign 
scientists from previously open, un- 
classified scientific meetings. In 
some cases (he blame could be 
pinned on government agents who 
intimidated the meeting s organiz- 
ers into bailing noncitizens on the 
grounds that the street matter, al- 
though not secret, was nonetbtjess 
“sensitive." In other cases, ind un- 


reasonably good record against se- 
crecy in fundamental research. The 
same cannot be said of the non- 
sdentist jxriicymakcrs, who chau- 
vinis deafly believe that U-S. science 
is so far ahead of the rest of the 
world that it can afford to pick and 
choose what it will share. 

The result has been a patchwork 
of policies that has arbitrarily 
blocked visits by some foreign sci- 
entists while admitting others. 
Some universities have been out- 
raged by requests to monitor the 
movements of Chinese and Soviet- 
bloc students. At (he insistence of 
the Pentagon, scientific papers have 
been yanked from some meeting 

It most be stressed that, in the 
context of thousands of scientific 
meetings and scores of thousands 
of scientific papers every year, these 
security episodes are rare. Bui the 
chOHng effect warrants attention. 

Science is expensive, financially 
hard-pressed mid dependent on 
government goodwill In several in- 
stances where foreigners have been 


excluded from meetings, the orga- 
nizers’ motive appears to have bom 
to avoid trouble, rather than re-' 
sponsiveness to government edicts. 

Meanwhile, the Soviets are aware 
of Hie scientific price they pay for 
secrecy so obsessive that research- 
ers in adjacent institutes are delib- 
erately kept in ignorance of each 
others work. Ideology and national 
tradition make it difficult for en- 
lightened Soviet research adminis- 
trators to crack that suffocation 
mold. But they are trying. 

While East- West science ex- 
changes flourished under d&ente, 
the Soviets demonstrated a keen 
interest in the managerial tech- 
niques of American science. And 
just recently the Soviets opened 
some of thor major computerized 
data, bases to a Vienna-based think 
tank, the International Institute for 
Applied Systems Analysis, which is 
co-managed by American and Sovi- 
et researchers. The political dynam- 
ics of that derision are unknown, 
but it is a major turnabout from the 
usual Soviet way of doing business. 

The current reality is mat Ameri- 
can science remains largely open 
while Soviet science r emains largely 
closed. It is the respective treads 
that should get attention. 


The writer Is editor and 
cf Science & Government 
independent newsletter. 


an 


1 longmneededl^ ^H£s*aig^mBatstru(Jka 
responsive chord among _a people 
; who suffered so grievously in and 
since World War U, victims of 
successive great-power interventions. 

What has made Mr. Papandreou 
particularly unsettling is that be was 
serious about his “Greece first" rhet- 
oric and that he strove to implement 
h when he became prime minister. In 
doing so he stepped mostly on Amer- 
ican toes. Hence the clashes between 
Washington and Athens when he ad- 
vocated Balkan denuclearization, 
cooling of tbe arms race, downgrad- 
ing of both the NATO and the War- 
saw Pact affiances and focusing of 
Greek defenses against the direct 
Turkish threat in the east rather than 
a gainst Communist states to the 
north, with which Greece has had 
friendly relations. Mr. Papandreou 
now is generally described as “anti- 
American” — a label Americans affix 
to one who puisnes a “Greece first” 
policy matching the “America fust" 
policy of the United States. 

Hus is not to suggest that be is 
blameless for current reasons. He 
was needlessly abrasive when he stat- 
ed that the Korean Airlines plane 
shot down by the Soviets was an a 
CIA spy mission, and then admitted 
he had no proof . He often indulges in 
rhetoric that may be good domestic 
politics but does not help Greek-U^. 
relations. But it would be disingenu- 
ous to pretend that the basic issue 
is mere rhetorical style. 

More fundamentally, it is the in- 
evitable dash between a great power 
viewing all regional conflicts in terms 
of East-West confrontation, and a 
resurgent nationalism in a small pow- 
er rgecting its traditional role as pas- 
sive pawn in great-power stratagems. 


terrorist was. thcn known.ro fc.-- 

Id-. 


. Since, Abu Nidal 
‘ed. to 'Syrian patronage, and the " 
cent interview was. arranged lasts', 
mer in Damascus but without ; ’ 
Syrian intervention, Mr. Bitterly 
sists. He was sure ihe man he sat.*/ 
the Betas was the same person^' 
cause of an unusual scar on the f 
Abu Nidal is quoted denount 
the report of his death as a hoax 





Yasser Arafat to strengthen con 
over the divided PLO. Mr. An 
Arab 


sui 


men, denounced the interview 
“total fabrication” arranged by S 
an secret services to undermine h' ' - 



Western intelligence sources 
there is no evidence that Abu Ni 
has died. The man who gave the in- 
terview said his real name was & ^ 
Khalil el Banna, that he once recat 
a scholarship from the United 
dons Agency for Palestinian Ri- 
gees, and that he had once been£ 
rested and expelled for revolution^ 
activity in Saudi Arabia. * 
He said that Jordan belongs"* 
Palestine and Palestine belongs 




i an* 
-.vi ft 

:i4M 




.-JM« Uk 


ritj- 


ma**- 


-**»■ 


Syria. He gave his aim as the tr 
destruction of Israel and estabt 


Dollar kalfMW 


ment of a revolutionary “peopleV . 
mocracy” in a Syrian-ruled Palest^ - 
But the rial point was threats 
loll any PLO official who deals v* 
Israel, to kill King Hussein and dt^ . 
“reactionary” Arabs and to att., " 
Americans. The purpose was cte . 
to prevent moves toward peace ^ 

limakfanvuii fV. rilii f c M .nl frar nf A " 1 




* 

9 * 

M 


”’*• ■** «» 






MM* 

»«W* 


M 

H 

W 

« 

H 


■» v- 

■ 


. The writer is adjunct professor of 
history at the University of CaBformn 
in San Diego and an author of Grade, 
histories. He contributed this comment 
to the Las Angeles Tones. 


leaders and their representatives. s \ . 

The threats may or may not^ 

Syrian-inspired, but they serve Sy»- 
policy. The speaker may or may ' ** 
have been Abu Nidal, but his 
have the political impact of terrori 
For both Israel and ihe Urn I * 

States, it is important to proceed^ * 1 " 
tiberately, firmly and clearly 
search ol peace negotiations. , 

the effective answer. Staying to E "n 

in f -hnnAn ie n mnntottHS disU. * 1 *" 

**.-1 ,*-•» 


~ «v* : ‘OU* 


im 

k* 


r * , st Rate* 


in Lebanon is a murderous dish 
tian that helps inflate the terroris- 
The New York Times. 




88 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


‘.“in 


More Than Several 


Regarding the report “ Missile , 
nents Protest in Brussels'* (March 
Your report says that “turnout at 
the march was evaluated at several 
thousand.” Even the most conserva- 
tive newspapers in the Netherlands 
estimated that between 130,000 and 
200,000 people took part in the 
March 17 demonstration in Brussels 
against the deployment of American 
cruise and Pershing missiles. 

LOUISE SLATER. 

The Hague. 


Tricky Papandreou 

Regarding the editorial “ The Greeks 
Hate a Point " (March 14): 

The appropriate retort is this: 


and wife of a refugee from Ronu 
(the present U5. Embassy in But 
rest was my husband's family hacjjL ^ 

1 am in the same shoes as Mas u.n,. K 
mad Tarbush — or am 17 Pate ^ 
was never an independent counn • 

Countries that were indcpenc^ 
and are no longer beard of since ^ 
annihilation — such as Estonia ^ u 
Latvia — save to demonstrate ^ *Mtr* 
Tarbush’s faulty reasoning. Agjtat 
for a national identity beyond I 
adequately catered for in Jordan , 

ploy to weaken the Jewish state, v, 

RITA HOROWITV v . 

London, t. 


Mft 4* 

•«» 

“'•to 


***** 

u 




In 


to Gil Ana/s 1? 
it is simply not .ft,. 


and be will keep fooling you. 

HASAN BA&AJL 
Bangkok. 

Palestinians, Others 


Regarding “A Palestinian Answer to a 
fundamental Question" (Match 9): 


As the granddaughter of a refugee 
from the pogroms of Czarist Russia 


three" millioif Palestinians from L 
homes was made good by the 
of Jews from Arab countries. 
Palestinians were eapdkd by * 
force of arms, whereas the Arab J 
were manipulated by Zionist P Kl , 
ganda which mated them to 
Tbe Arab countries have repfiS&iS 
invited the Jews who left ifl the*., 
of the 1948 Palestine war to 

ARNOLD G.RA^\>, 

Lond<» 



W:. 









Vietnam 


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KmllOKEribune. 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 11 


3SDAY, MARCH 26 , 1985 


Page 9 


FUTURES ANO OPTIONS 


aalysts Hunt for Reason 
n* Rise in Silver Prices 




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By EIJ/ABbTH M. FOWLER 

New York Tima Smla 

EW YORK — In the predous-metalfamQy, diver has 
a habit of playing follow the leader to its more expen- 
sive brother, gold. Last week, when sold prices jumped 
sharply in futures trading, silver futures prices also 
C :<ed. For example, the May diver contract on the Comex in 
-:■ Z York jumped SO cents an ounce on Tuesday, to dose at 
4 ‘ -S/15 an ounce. On Wednesday, it rose as high as $6^0 before 
. . ing down as a result of profit-taking. 

- • / •ended thewedc on Friday at $6375 an ounce, still well above 
- -•■■C losing price of SS.75 the previous Friday. That contract has 

■-v'.ed from a high of $15.13 

nnee on Feb. 17, 1983, to 
.. of $5J53 an ounce on 

V ■ -Vi IE 1985. 

. 7? C > te rise in gold and silver 
; r --^/s was att abuted by some 
-./ysts to concern by Euro- 
- . </>. investors about the tem- 

*-^C.iy dosing erf 70 Ohio sav- 
' - ■■*. 7. and loan associations. 
r - * V many analysts were delving for deeper reasons. 

1 ' -I'v ices ror both metals have been very low iardatian to the all- 
'L r - V-: high of more than $50 an ounce for silver and more than 

- ■? *S/' f 01 gold in early 1980/ 

; '-i/lver condnues to be a favored investment for Americans, 
. . " '-r/ rding to Bernard Savaiko, senior analyst at Paine Webber 
; ; J ;^. Thai contrasts with the ceaituries-da popularity of gold 
i>ng Europeans. 

. , : ' r ‘ : ? x. Savaiko thinks there might be more small silver investors 
' " > tose who take delivery and hold onto it — in the market than 
. •'■ - -t before, especially in the cash market. “The public has a love 
. ; i-’r with silver,” he said, caning it the poor man’s insurance 

"■ -i y- 

'^r je stocks hdd in Comex-authorized depositaries dropped 

- ^ . -i 1233 million ounces on Feb. 28, to 1 12J2 million as d last 


Spending 
Hike Seen 
Abroad 


Hi gold and silver 
price rise, Ve got a 
whiff of die panic that 
can happen.’ 


: /.-Iherewasa; 


this month/ 

a home 


Savaiko said, “whidi indicates that silver is 
‘ ■-•*. large industrial usos, I presume, and with large dealers 
■-v/ag delivery to satisfy investor demand.” 


to the dollar, which 
week, in the rise of the 


howdf m u 


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• - S for last week’s price rise, he pci 
’ ■ ■ .•— L weakened at the same time. “La 

- _i. l_ price of gold and silver, we got a whiff of the panic that 
‘ ? r happen,” Mr. Savaiko said. 

think that there is evidence that the sentiment has turned 
v : ost the dollar for the time being,” he added, explaining drat 
. *' “ ' r ioilar “has been overbought by Europeans and was looking 
' _ ' - 1 reason to dedme in price:” 

' ~ - * ; Ir. Sav aiko that *in the current disinflationary 

: - L e markets are likely to settle bade, if fee Ohio banking crisis is 
_ - fved and we don’t see any other or interna tional 

~ t , r — pHcatiOTis over the near tram.” 

/. ; r: ther factors influencing the sflver market, he said, were the 
• “ -'-'»U3. trade deficit and the slowed rate of imaease in the gross 
; ' . Tz oDaL pxoducL 

■ ■ — -onaJd Feinstem, technical analyst Jo* Dean Witter Reynolds 
. ~ in Chicago said: “My bariefeding is that the sflver market is 
’ 7 r -- bullish I don’t think that the Ohio bank rituation had 
7 ^ tiring to do with iL” 

' - ir. Feinstem thinks that there might be other reasons far 

** ~ig silver prices simh as the Comex, the exchange on which gold 
; — ■*' ’■ - silver are traded in New York, raising margm requirements, 
v ■ ' ctive last Wednesday. He said that many holders of short 
. "itions (those who expected prices to drop) had to liquidate 
■ itiom or meet higher margin requir e me nt s. 
r: -Iargm requirements nsnalbf are increased by an c riangt 
• a it foresees sharper price swings. Mr. Feinstem believes that 

V (Continued oa Page 17, CoL 5) 


Write 


US. AffUu 
Expect Increase 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dijpau&a 

WASHINGTON — Foreign af- 
filiates of U3. companies, al- 
though seating lwjr thor ptom 

somewhat, anticipate a 13-percent 
increase in capital spending over 

last year, the government said 
Monday. 

harHevekri off in ] 981^12 and de- 
clined 18 percent in 1983. If the 
1985 spending forecast is realized, 
it would about equal the level of 
guarding in 1980. 

The plans for rntuWwmtinn and 
expansion for both 1984 and 1985 
were revised downward from the 
government's previous survey six 
months earlier, indica ting "the 
b usmen recovery abroad may be 
dower than previously expected,” 
the C omm e rc e Department’s Bu- 
reau of Economic Analysis said. 

The survey is a particularly good 
doe to the sentiment of executives 
overseas, said Ralph Koriow; a de- 
partment specialist. The actual dol- 
lars meet often can chan! 
modi because of foreign 
fliyfirati^w as business plans, he 
indicated. 

“It’s a fairly good estimate in 
terms of assessing whether busi- 
nesses are yiting more optimistic 
or pessimistic,'’ Mr. Kozlow said. 

The latest figure, based on a sur- 
vey taken m December, found for- 
eign affiliates now anticipate 
spending $425 trillion in 1985 com- 
pared with $44 billion in the survey 
Mlrwi six month* emWer. 

Spending in 1984 has now been 
the subject of four semiannual sur- 
veys and each timg the executives 
anticipated gym ding less than be- 
fore. 

Because of the recesaon abroad, 
1983 “was a pretty terrible year so a 
ctmU increase in 1984 is not doing 
much,” Mr. Kozlow said. 

In fact, looking back to both 
1982 and 1983, “You’re not beano- 
ing back afl the way to where 
you’ve been,” even in dollars not 
a*$usted for inflation. 

The latest survey found- 1984 
rapitnl mending now estimated at 
$373 bmion, compared to $40.4 
trillion anticipated eaifier. The low- 
er level would represent a 4-percent 
increase over 1983, the higher level 
a 12-percent increase. 

Because the 1984 base figure was 
revised downward more sharply 
than the 1985 figure, the percent- 
age increase is sharper. 



Mitel teiephrme-swrtdting equipment Inset, Michael CowpLand, chairman. 

Mitel Corp. ’s Difficult Adolescence 


By Ann Duncan 

fmernuiMiaJ Herald Tribune 

KANATA, Ontario —Mitel Corp. was once the 
wunderkmd of the Canadian high-technology in- 
dustry. 

Founded by two British expatriates in an Otta- 
wa basement in 1973, Mitel sailed through tbe 
1970s as if it could do no wrong. 

ga tes and profits for this telecommunications 
man ufacturer — which specializes in telephone 
switching equipment — doubled or tripled every 
year. Its stock price soared, and the company 
expanded into 12 oilier countries. In short, Mitel 
became one of the world’s fastest growing compa- 
nies. 

But during the past few years, Mitd’s sparkle 
hac dimm ed 

The first hint of trouble came in June, 1983, 
when a joint development agreement with Interna- 
tional Businem Machines Corp. was abruptly can- 
celed. Impatient about bfiteTs delays in getting its 


much- vaunted SX-2000 private branch exchange 
to mxrlrgr, IBM turned to one of Mitel’s main US. 
competitors, Rolm Corp. of Santa Clara. Califor- 
nia, and began marrying its computer technology 
with Rahn’s tgl gcnmirmnicarinm equipment. (Last 
fall, IBM and Rolm announced that IBM would 
acquire Rohn.) 

At about tbe same time. Mite] announced its 
first losses. Tbe compmry has had a loss of a total 
of 64.-6 million Canadian dollars (about $50 mil- 
lion at "current exchange rates) during the past 
seven quartos, and investors are anxiously await- 
ing the figures for fiscal 1985, aided Feb. 28. They 
are expected in about a month. 

The bad times have sent Mild stock plummet- 
ing. From high of $41 on the New York Stock 
Exchange and 48375 Canadian dollars on the 
Toronto Stock Exchange in May, 1981, Mitel 
shares leD to a low of $4 in New York and 535 

(Continued oa Page 17, CoL 5) 


Reagan Asserts 
Money Reform 
Not a Priority 


By Hobart Rowen 

Washing ton Pa si Stni ce 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan said Monday that 
tbe rest of the world’s currencies 
would gain against the rtniiar “as 
they improve their economies” and 
that a new review of the interna- 
tional monetary system therefore is 
not a top priority on his agenda. 

Mr: Reagan’s remarks at a White 
House breakfast with a group of 
Washington correspondents was at 
odds with a statement last week by 
his Treasury Secretary, James A. 
Baker 3d. Mr. Baker expressed in- 
terest in examining ways to revamp 
world currency markets but with- 
out tight enin g controls on them. 

In a related development, a Trea- 
sury report to Congress on Monday 
warned that a return to a system of 
managed currency-exchange rates 
could impair the ability of the 
United States and other major na- 
tions to pursue strong economic 
growth with low inflation. 

Mr. Reagan acknowledged that 
some reduction in the dollar’s 
against other currencies 
be beneficial to bO of us, 
because our country has the ability 
to export exooomic trouble as wefl 
as economic recovery. ” 

But he suggested that greater sta- 
bility will be achieved without an 
international monetary ref or m ef- 
fort 

“This has come up before in in- 
ternational meetings," Mr. Reagan 
said. “There are others that look 
back at Bretton Woods and wonder 
should we take another look and 
see that there have been distortions 


or whether something better can be 
worked out,” he said, referring to 
the 1944 monetary conference that 
created the International Monetary 
Fund. 

The President’s comments, to- 

Dottar Up, Gold 
Mixed in Europe 

Umud Pros Inunuuiaaal 

LONDON —The dollar rose 
in calm European trading Mon- 
day. Gold pnees were mixed. 

Traders said there were no 
economic announcements or 
world events to aflect the mar- 
ket in either direction. 

The British pound fefl to 
$1.1715 from $1,172 on Friday. 
In other European trading, the 
dollar rose to 33247 Deutsche 
marks, from 3.2 1, and to 93595 
French francs, from 9.818. 
Gold was quoted in London at 
$314.60 a troy ounce, down 
from S3 15 A0 late Friday. 

with the Treasury report to 
were taken as a response 
to various plans circulating in Eu- 
rope calling for greater currency 
stability. 

For example, Willy de Qcrq, ex- 
ternal affairs commissioner of the 
European Community, suggested 
m Washington last week that world 
leaders consider broadening the 
European Monetaw System, which 
limits the permissible fluctuations 
among Europe's currencies, to the 

dollar and other currencies. 


China Replaces Presidents of 2 Major State Banks 


By Daniel Southerland 

WaMtgttm Poet Service 

BEUING — Within less than a' 
month and without a word of ex- 
planation, China h.Kj replaced the 
presidents of its two leading fman-- 
dal institutions —the Bank, of Chi- 
na and the People’s Bank of China.. 

The Communist Party newroa-7 
pa People’s ’’Daily reported last ‘ 
week that Chen Muhua, the minis - 
ter of .fora^v economic relations 
arid'trade, would leave that job to 
become president of the central 
bank, the People's Bank of China, 
replacing Lit Peijian. Mi. Lu will 
become auditor-general. . 

Eariia this month, it was teamed 
that Jin Deqin bad been fired as 


president of the Bank of China, a 
Itate-nm bank specializing in over- 
seas opera ti ons and foreign-ex- 
change transactions. Mr. Jin was 
replaced by Zhao Bingde. a bank 
. vice-president, who was made act- 
ing president . 

In answer to_a query, a bank 
spokesman said that the change- 
jwa.rtthe Bank of Qnha occurred 
at the end of last memth No an- 
nouncement was made at the time. 

It warns- though the chairman of : 
the Federal Reserve arid the secre- 
tary of commerce in ; lhr United 
States had been replaced; with one 
change meriting only a few fines in 
a newspaper report and the other 
coming without any announcement 
whatsoever. 


It was not dear whether there 
was any relationship between the 
changes at the People's Rank of 
Phirtfl and tbe Bank of Qiina. Bat 
some observers suspect that Mr. Jin 
had become tbe fast high-ranking 
official to run afoul of the rhintse 
government's current anti corrup- 
tion campaign. Tbe bank spokes- 
man said that Mr. Jin had not been 
assigned to another job yet. 

. Foreigners in Beijing have a spe- 
cial interest in Mr. Jin’s case, be- 
cause the Bank of Phi™ has impor- 
tant overseas branches. Mr. Jin was 
respected by many of tbe foreign 
businessmen and bankers working 
hoe. 

After completing an assignment 
as the Bank of China’s director in 


liinrlnn, Mr. Jin returned to China 
three years ago. As president, he 
made the bank a more activist orga- 
nization, involving it more in inter- 
national lending. As one foreign- 
trade specialist put it, he made the 
bank assume a “more aggressive 
posture.” 

“What’s important is that the 
government be able to make 
changes like this without disrupting 
things," said a foreign economist 
who had met Mr. Jin when he was 
bank president. “If they can make 
changes pragmatically, without a 
lot of recriminations, then it would 
be reassuring. It might actually in- 
crease confidence. As the economic 

(Continued ou Page 15, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


] 


Orders Increase 
For U.S. Took 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Orders 
for US, machine tods, a closely 
watched indicator of economic 
health, rose 12 percent in Feb- 
ruary, to $237.6 millioa from 
the revised January figure of 
$2113 mflfion, the National 
Association of Machine Tool 
Builden 

parted January orders at $2l 13 
million. In its monthly report, 
the association said Sunday 
that orders were $202.9 million 
in February of 1984. 

It also rnorted the February 
backlog or unfilled machine 
tod orders at $1.82 billion, up 
4.1 percent. 


Late interbank rates an March 25, adudng *“*• 
irid fixings far Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Mian, Paris. Now York notes at 


The U.S. Budget Deficits: Have the Economists Been Counting Wrong? 


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By Peter T. Kilbom 

New York Tima Savin 

WASHINGTON — Economists 
may have found a due to the nryv 
tay smroundmg what they consid- 
er dm most serious economic diffi- 
culty facing the United States — an 
accumulated federal budget deficit 
approaching $2 trillion. 

The deficits continue to baffle 
such experts, who have warned rtf 

jyn iiinnuignf ICtUiii Of SU£fOC8t£Q£ 

interest rates, high inflation and a 
recession But the sky has yet to 
f an, imd the economy has em- 
barked upon what could be another 
year of growth and relative pros- 
ity. It turns out the experts may 
been counting wrong. 

Robert Brno; a professor at 
NmthwestemUmvexsity in Evans- 
ton, flKnojs, says that in some 
thefi^rreshavebeensomis- 
_ that the red ink may actual- 
have been black and in others, 
the present, even redder than 
die government says it is. 

Bad calculations, Mir. Eisner 
says, can lead to bad policies, such 
as those be blames for the severity 
of tbe recession in 1981 and 1982. 

The work of Mr. Eisner and an 
assistant professor at the Univera- 
w of Illinois in Chicago, Paul J. 
neper; has raised interest among 
economists and public officials 
hoe following pabBcation of an 
article they wrote far the current 
issue of a conservative quarterly, 
TheTubfic Interest 

Mr, Eisner, who is 63, calls him- 
self a “Keynesian libertarian,” 
winch, he says, roughly cha r a ct e r - 
izcsaphfiosajhyrootedinliieNew 
Deal of Frankfin D. Roosevelt and 
leavened with the ideas of Senator 
Gary Hail, die Colorado Democrat 
whose presidential candidacy he 
supported last year. Mr. Eisner’s 
fritting *, however, have im pressed 
eco n om i sts an the right as well as 
the left. 

*Tbat article made me step back 
and have a little less certainty that 
defiats are fl o in g tO lead 10 the 
economic effects I thought, at least 
in the short term,” said Norman J. 
Omstem, economist at the conser- 
vative American Enterprise Insti- 
tute, a research organization here. 

Mr. 


er showing wages, food and other 
forms of c ur r en t spending. 

Mr. Eisner and Mr. Pieper also 
examined the effects of inflation 
and chang in g interest rales. Their 
analysis covers the yean from 1946 
through 1980. 

At the end of 1980, the govern- 
ment reported a national debt of 
$930 WBion. To that figure, the 
authors added federal debts not 
normally reported as part of the 
budget and subtracted loans the 
government had made. 

Then they adjusted the value of 
the securities the government had 
sold to the public. The ravemment 
reports tbe face value of the securi- 
ties. But interest rates woe high in 
1980, so the value of government 
bonds had plunged. 

Next, Mr. Eisner and Mr. Pieper 
added op the government’s finan- 
cial assets — ash, taxes still to be 
received, gold in Fort Knox and 

loans it had extended. 

These assets had a face value, as 
the government reported then, of 
$592 bflHan. But because of the rise 
of the price of gNd in that period, 
their n«n«l m«ifw value was $1 15 
billion higher. 

The economists then subtracted 
tbe market value of tbe assets from 
the market-value debt. With all 
those calculations, they obtained a 


net debt of $447 billion —or half 
the reported national debt. 

From there. Mr. Eisner and Mr. 
Pieper noted the government's tan- 
gible assets. In addition to these, 
assets, the government owns m3- 
fions of acres of land, and in the 
inflation-driven economy of the 
rime, land values soared. 

All those assets plus the financial 
assets, Mr. Eisner and Mr. Pieper 
figured, brought the government’s 
total assets to $1,434 trillion, a sum 
exceeding tbe government’s liabil- 
ities that of 51.154 trillion. The 
US; government, in other words, 
had a net worth of $280 billion. 

' Mr. Eisner and Mr. Pieper 
turned next to the annual federal 
budget and reconciled it with their 
finding? of assets and tiabflities. 
Fran 1947 through 1980, the gov- 
ernment’s reported deficits came to 
$336 bflb'on. But because of tbe 
effect of rising interest rates on the 
government's securities, the market 
value of tbe argnmilaiwl deficits 
was only $222 bflEaa. 

• Then, in translating the figures 
to constant 1972 dollars, (he au- 
thors found that the real, or infla- 
tion-adjusted national debt, had 
actually declined in those years, by 
$231 butian. 

These nnmifll c hang e* jn the na- 
tional debt, with adjustments for 
interest rates and inflation, rather 


than the shortfall the government 
reports in the budget, are a truer 
measure of the d efic i t, Mr. Eisner 
and Mr . Pieper argue. 

In 1980, for example, when the 
budget showed a ddfirit of $61.2 
bStion, the authors showed that in- 
flation reduced real national debt 
by even more than tbe budget defi- 
cit. As a result, they say, the bud- 
get, in a sense, was really in surplus, 

by $7 J billion. 

The new calculations of deficits 


are important, according to Mr. 
Eisner. If the economy’s behavior 
affects tbe government accounts in 

such a way that an apparent budget 
deficit is really a surplus, the econ- 
omy may actually nave entered a 
recession. 

The government is taking more 
money out of the economy in taxes 
than it is putting bade in thro 

federal spending, thus slowing ICC 
economy down. 

Using the conventional measures 


through ready 
ring the Mr. 


of the budget, Mr. E is ne r said the 
Federal Reserve Board believed the 
economy was expanding in 1980- 
The Fed therefore tned to cool 
the economy down by letting inter- 
est rates soar. Mr. Eisner’s and Mr. 
Pieper’s calculations, however, sug- 
gest that the the Fed’s actions only 
worsened a recession that was al- 
at work. 

-. Eisner has not examined the 
government’s accounting in such 
desail for the years since 1980. 


im* 

UteWl/M 
WM TOM 
TOMTO 11 / 1 * 
TQM IBM 


‘ .**■' Anam a r a iw te tefc CrVtfft Ly- 
* LknOs Book. Bonk of Tokyo, 


pm. arm 

31546 31445 + (UP 

31540 — — 1*0 

3IU1 31577 —HO 
3U40 31526 —US 

3ism jiuo — am 
— JIM — MS 
Official fates for iMv 
DaaraboawlnBand dratee i^oratorH»lCM 

<Wd Zurkte Now Ynr* Cornu arm comma. 
All arias In U« 

Sotm; Roofer*. 


Nona Kona 
1 ■— w im 
parts ( 12 S Ula) 
Zflrtdi 
London 
New York 


their examination of the federal ac- 
counts by i nc orpor a ting the gov- 
ernment's assets. The savemmenfs 
books; unlike those of busines s es 
and sophisticated consumers, take 
no account of these. 

In addition, the government, un- 
like business, (toes not beak the 
overafibadget into a capital budget 
and a current budget — one show- 
ing spending for assets and the oth- 


Notice To Commodity Investors: 

PROFESSIONAL 

MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rudolf Wolff has developed considerable 
expertise In money management, and Is 
able to offer proven programs for qualified 
Investors who do not have the time or 
expertise to manage their own investments. 

Minimum Initial Investment SltXMXM- 

Ruflotf WtaWf, ostetMted In 1B66, is 6 member of ttw Norantfa ipoup 01 
companies, b mWnfl and ruouna gtojip with b rwf worth of S2 bIWoa 



If 


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295 Madison Awrue, New YbfK, NY 10017 USA. I 
Phone (2135734440 Tdex ITT 423840 I 

Attn; WJJ/fam Rafter 0 


Please, sand, 
a detailed 
Rudolf Wolff 
Information Kft. 


Name 

Address 


I 
I 

L-_- 


Phteta Tetex ’ 




3/36/85 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS YOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


assurance of a fixed rate, we 
suggest a bank? 

For chose investors more 
concerned with how high the 
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Because over its life, the 
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So if you had been able to 
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inception, your IRA would have 
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The Special Fund provides 
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philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
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p lb M.Tucker Smith 26/3/85 

I Oppenheimer & G»- 62-64 Cannon St. London EC4N 6AE England 
I Telephone 01-236 65 78 

l Ptene send me snlRA application and ■ Special FuwlprcspecnBWKhmoterompteteinfiinna- 
| ritm, iodudingali charges and expenses. Ill rod it carefully before I investor send money. 

| Old like to opes an FRA □lUtifcetoswirchinvIRA- 


Name 


Address 


I Coy 


Son 


J_2V 


Phone 


HE OPPENHEIMER SPECIAL FUND. 


® 1985 Qppcnhehfter Investor Services, In? "Bank IRAs are inured and generally hove l\\ed interest 
rales, whereas ihc Fund's tm assei value fluctuates and may be subject to loss. ••March 15, 1973-Deceinbcr 
31, 1984. Upper Analytical Services, Inc. “‘Assuminga S2J300 investment on March 15, 1973 (inception 
of fund) and $2,000 annual Investments an first business day of eadi year thereafter with all dividends and 
distributions reinvested, fra performance is noran indication of future results. Id the penod shown, 
stock prices fluctuated severely and were generally higher at the end than at the beginning. 


>*.»•*—* 


** 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. MARCH 26, 1985 



Dow J ones Averages 


open Hlsh Low Lost ctn 

Indus 136130 194133 1252J7 1259.94 — 7J1 

Trans 5*422 3*8.10 50730 59100— Ufi 

UHI 14175 MRS 8 MfcU UP.U— ftH> 

Gamp 50935 51171 50577 509.14— 235 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 



NYSE Index 


Prtvfodf Twftnr 
MSB low dan IPX 
Composite 104JI 10158 WUS 10.15 

Industry Is 11934 11939 11*39 1115* 

Train. 77X1 9733 *743 9551 

Utilities S4M $05 SU6 5U7 

Finance 1H7J5 10737 10737 10490 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Mondays 


'L 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 




OecUaea 
Undmoed 
TeW Usees 
Hew KJocs 
Mow Laws 


214 

348 m 

230 235 

m 7*t 

i2 a* 

it u 


Closing 


Cnamsite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

UIHWss 

Beats 

Trcmo. 


S3 = 83S& 
£5 = SftSStiS 

25749 — 3S5J1 23*44 


March 22 
M0retl21 
Men* 20 
March 19 
March U 


‘Included In the sales fisares 


Buy Sales *»*rr 
190402 447474 0014 

200.105 *564*4 1768 

219.116 48UW MS 
212442 51L257 W3M 
1 15463 49340* 5499 


VOL at 3 PJ* ttfHJM 

Prtr.SPJtLvol IMWJM 

PftvcaajoMateddost mjmpn 


Tables tadade the natio n wide prices 
up to the closing qb Watt Street ant 
do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Pins 



AMEX Sales 



3 P.M. volume 

Prev. 3 PJUL vatame 
prev. cans. vW u m e 





■kBbLiM 


Tub 

HUB 

Ute 

QOM 

3PJA 

TtSJS 

23445 

224.91 

mn 




Stocks Slip Modestly on NYSE 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change slipped modestly late Monday as IBM 
announced that it expects lower Gist-quarter 
profits. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fed 
0.77 Friday, was off 5.97 to 1,261.48 at 3 PAL 

Dedincs led advances 982-516 among the 
1,951 issues crossing the NYSE tape. 

Five-hoar Big Board volume amounted to 


Although prices m cables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. dose in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 


^ r r- 






about 62,281,100 shares, compared with 
83.200,000 in die same period Friday. 

On the American Stock Exchange, prices 
were lower in moderate trading. 

After the stock market closed Friday, Inter- 
national Business Marhinas Coip. .mid that net 
income in the first quarter would be less than 
the SI-97 jper share repotted in the Gist quarter 
of 1984. This would be the first drop since the 
end of 1981. 

The company, citing problems with the 
strong U.S. dollar and the costs of introducing 
new products, said it still expects a solid second 
half. 

Charles Jensen of MKI Securities said IBM's 
report “took some people fay surprise.’' 

Negative news from a blue-chip such as IBM 
“permeates throughout the list,” he said. “This 
is a lot of sympathetic idling." 

“Not too long ago emyoue was hoping for a 


83.200,000 in die same period Friday. 

On the American Stock Exchange, prices 


T2 Month 
HUiLow Stock 


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14ft— 14 
15»— M 



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11 

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130 17 7 
Pi 35 13 
330oll 3 
44 54 13 
230 43 II 
42 27433 


56 153* 15ft 
65 2ft 2ft 

38 18* Ute 

65 3614 34 (A 

2 IW 23 
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90 2044 20 

310 261* 26 
390 42V. 41 Hi 
2085 35ft 33ft 
327 349k 34 Vj 
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43 W* 141* 
779 2714 27 
1422 5214 51 H 

39 m m 

1« 49ft 4944 
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3933 33ft 5414 
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3 11* 11* 


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29* 15* 
70* 52 
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4354 107* 104* 105ft— 3* 
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1202 24 23* 23* 

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307 43ft 41* 41*— te 

25 30 19ft 20 
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18 10* lift ra*— * 

100 lift 30* 31*— * 
771 ** 37ft 37*— ft 

20 54* 54te 54* 

350 53 52ft 51 +* 

a 35ft 34ft M*+ Hi 

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MM 34ft 34 34*+ * 

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6 149ft 149 149ft + ft 
4 69 69 49 + ft 

9 Z3ft 23* 33*— te 
22S 9* 8ft 9te+Ite 

116 65ft 44ft 44ft—* 

15 10* 10ft 10ft— Hi 
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2 a 50 50 

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101 78ft 78ft 71*— te 
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533 2Sft 25ft 2Sft— * 
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130 13 12ft 12*— ft 
19 19ft— * 

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14* 14*— ft 
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stronger market with stronger earnings,” he 
said. 

According to Mr. Jensen, financing for the 
braid market is also a concern, with most trad- 
ers wailing on the and “somewhat 

apprehensive” about interest rates. “The mar- 
ket will often flounder and retest its lows after a 
rally, ” Mr. Jensen said. 

Harry Yffleco of Sutro & Co. in Palo Alto, 
California, also said the market’s slide was a 
result of the IBM announcement. “When a 
major c ompany reports disappoi nting earning s, 
it’s certainly going to affect — on a near-tom 
baas — the market as a whole,” he said. 

Characterizing the market as oversold, he 
said it is “still racy much in a position to bounce 
back and cany as to new highs" 

Among Factors that may affect the stock 
market this week is heavy government financ- 
ing. On the other hand, stocks could get a boost 
if President Ronald Reagan and Congress are 
able to co mpr o mi se on reductions in defense 
spending. 

The Treasury Department reported a $20.83- 

bUHon deficit for die federal gov ernme nt in 

February, from S20J8 billion a year earlier. For 
the first five months of fiscal 1985, which began 
Oct. 1., the deficit totaled S99.64 billion, com- 
pared with $89.22 billion for the me period 
last year. 

GJ). Searle & Co. was near the top of the 
active list mid sharply lower. The company, 
which has long beat seeking a buyer far either 
ail or parts of its business, said it would stop the 


13* EbUb 54 16 
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U 4 34ft 34ft 34ft— * 
17 1513 2* 20* 28* — ft 

112 *01 Mgft 102*102*+ * 
4700: SS 54» B +ft 
31 121 2ft 2te 2ft 

94 Wft 10 Wft + te 
■** 17ft T7 17ft— * 

3 72 m 17ft 17ft— ft 

14 44 25ft 25 25 — * 

U3 4* 4 4ft + ft 
12 16ft 14ft 14ft— ft 

4 TO M* 37* 31 — * 

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17 3 12* 12* raw— ft 

11 4f IB 17* IT*—* 

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II 205 34ft 36ft 36*— ft 

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JD 20 15 
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17* 17*— * 

36ft 26ft— ft 
53ft 53ft— ft 
74* 74ft— ft 
22* 23 — ft 
47* 47*— 1 
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17* 17*— ft 
24 34 — lb 

12* 12*— ft 
MM 14ft— ft 
18ft Ute— * 
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25ft 25ft— ft 
35* 35te— 1 
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Dlv. Yld. PE lOQsHloti LowQuot.Ch'De 


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Where Will You Be 
Without Gold If The 
Dollar Drops Again? 

The “almighty dollar" today » 
not quite so almighty. 

Its recent fluctuations on foreign 
exchange markets may be just a 
hiccup. Or the beginning of the 
greenback's long-awaited decline. ~ 
Whichever the case, Krugerrand gold 
bullion coins are your best 
protection against currency 
instability. 

Can you think of a better refuge 
when the dollar is in doubt? 

Ask your bank or broker about 
Krugerrand gold bullion coins. 

International Gold Corporation 
Coin Division - 1, rue de la Rdtisserie 
CH - 1204 Geneva - Switzerland 



m 


±11 








JO *fi 
2jN 11 3 
JOB 1.1 
BOB 57 
tPT 2J9 104 
1D1 450 10J 
P Ul 1J 
Ol 130 lift 
Pf 820 11 J 
pi 7 JO 11J 
of 249 187 
Pf 185 12J 
Pf 1IJ0 T87 
828 11J 
rt 1JI 26 
Lt 206 115 
PfA 2.10 U3 
pf ioa 103 
or PC 2.10 1X4 
pr 271 1X4 
pf 720 1X5 




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17* 14* 
44ft 29* 
34* 14* 
21 12 * 

84 44 

65ft 41* 
62 45* 

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27ft 15* 
40 45* 

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119 21* 21ft 
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S +ft 
7ft + ft 
11 * 

34* 

9*—* 
45ft— * 

im + te 
m 
M 



40 36ft 
17* 17 
Site 21* 
28ft Z1* 

ra* ra 

Mfe 3* 
3ft ite 
1ft » 

14 a* 

18 8* 
18ft 9ft 
29ft 21ft 
lift 12* 
79 40* 

don sm 

30* 20* 
32* 20ft 
39ft 32* 
18* 13 
34ft 19 
23* 19ft 
29ft 2SM 
28* 23* 
14* 9* 
14ft 8* 

7ft 2* 
8* 4* 
38* IS 

15 lift 
18* 5ft 
78* 58* 
14ft 5* 
20* 11* 
32te 24* 
20ft 14ft 

\ 4 te 

32ft 22ft 


20 40V 37* 

. 120 17* 

14 511 Z7ft 
7 3B4 22* 

451 19ft 
3943 8ft 

s % 

171 15ft 
274 17* 
113 18* 
» 301 23ft 

6 373 U* 
U 4769 67* 

7 2121 Oft 

12 192 27* 

12 381 29 
HJ 54 33ft 

13 746 18 

21 211 lift 

7 22ft 

4 a* 
1 27ft 

15 17 14* 

5 10* 

18 4* 

80 299 8 

a 24 94* 

i« a is* 

138 «ft 
.14 589 72* 
17 290 13* 
10 971 T7W 

8 144 27* 

7 12 19* 

70b 5 
T27 

16 96 28* 


36* 37 — * 

a 17ft— * 
27ft + * 
to aote-ff* 
18* 19*+ * 
S* 4te+te 
2* 2ft 4- * 
ft ft 
M* 14*+ * 
18ft 16ft + ft 
17ft lift +1te 
23ft 22*+ ft 
II lift + ft 
66* 66ft— * 
51* Site— K 
V 27 — * 
28* 21 
32ft 33ft— W 
15ft 15*— ft 
» 11 —1 
22ft 22te 
28* 28* + ft 
27* 27te— H 
14ft 14*+ ft 

ra* ra* 

4* 4te— * 
7* 8 + te 
24ft 24* 

15 15 

6* 6ft— ft 
72ft 72ft— * 
13ft 13*—* 
17 17—14 

27ft 27* + ft 

raw rate 

5 5 + ft 

ft + 

au. aw- ft 


8* 4ft 
27* 19* 
44 26ft 
lte * 
IO* 5* 
36* 25* 
13* 11* 
ra* ute 
55* 25* 
30* IS* 
23* Ute 
53* 23* 
30* 18ft 
12ft 7* 
33* 14* 
X 22* 
lift 10* 
28* 19 
33ft 23* 
18ft 13* 
SPA 15* 

is* a 

34te 23* 
Ute 9 
U* 9* 
ZI* 13ft 
27 W* 
a is* 
4v a 

a ia* 

25* 18 
8ft 2* 
12* II* 
37ft 27ft 
34* 15* 
28* If* 
17 16* 

42 28* 
12* Sft 
44ft 31* 

a w* 

19ft 12 

ra m 

26* T7* 
63* 45* 
44* a 
52* 35ft 
Bite 32ft 
27* 12 

a in* 
9* 7H 
X 30* 
16* Sft 
8016 43* 
66* 46* 
3Ste 7B 


5ft + ft 
22ft— 1 
30*+ ft 
1 *+ * 
» + te 
30te+ * 
13ft 
19* 

46* +1* 
19ft 

10*— W 

46*— lft 

raw— ft 

Ute— ft 

aft— ft 
27te— ft 
15*+ ft 
27 —ft 
33*—* 
15* 

20ft— W 

lift— * 

26 + te 
10*— te 
12*+ * 
16*- ft 
16*—* 
21*— W 
48* + te 
Uft+ * 
22 

Sft 

II* 

32*+ * 
24*+ * 
28ft— te 
16*— * 
41*— te 
7te 

32*— te 

27 +* 
17* 

ia —* 

25 — ft 
S*W- te 
Sft— ft 
50ft + ft 
77ft + * 
17* + ft 
22 

7 — * 
25 — te 

rate— w 

55 — * 
SB*— 1* 
34 + ft 


36 

43 

JO 

3 

187 114 

MB 

33 

233 

14 

40 

11 

ISO 

48 

SI 

15 

30 

14 

At 

IS 


25 
21 
U 
127 
17 
55 
256 
22 12* 

§£ 

272 46 

” gft 

Sv, 

■Oft 


a —* 

u* + * 
**-* 

J*- t * 

ZI*— * 
57 — 1* 
15ft—* 
11* 

M — ft 

*=* 

4 

13* + * 
21*— 1ft 
34ft + te 
46ft + ft 
16ft— 1ft 
19* + * 

Stti* 

ra* + * 
3 

14ft— * 

12ft 

m 

45te— te 
74 

a*—* 

38+“ 

44*— * 

22* + * 

«ft— ft 

»H + ft 

23* 

a*+ * 

33 

41 

41 — 1 1* 
16*— te 

w*— * 

17*—* 
20*-* 
16 — * 
flte— * 
ii*- te 

14 —ft 
51ft— l 
25* —lte 
29ft— * 

ra*—* 

S4ft + ft 
20*—* 
rate 

a + * 

27*+ te 

46 

14* 

zite— tt 
*7*- * 
«*+ te 




23* 13* 
SZM 39te 
25* 18* 
14* 7* 
42 34 

14* 9ft 
I2te 9 
18* 10 
5ft Zte 
24* 17te 
36 17* 

a* 36* 
53* 38* 
Wft II* 
39ft 24 
29* 2* 


MACOM 34 
MCA J8 
MCorp W0 , 
MDC J2 
MEI JD 
MOMOT M : 
MGMGr Pt44 : 
MGmim JOe 
MGHUlWt 
mgmhd job : 
MB Ul -7» 
Mocmll UO : 
Mow 1.18 : 
ModRos 
Mosicf uo : 
M0TA8I 18J0C 


HI 19* 19* 
486 a* 49* 
48] 20ft aft 
61 12* 12* 
257 41* 41te 
75 14ft 14 
1 lift lift 
194 12 lift 
3 2k M 
218 22* 22* 
1? io* ra* 
901 S3* 51 
W 44* 44* 

a u ra* 

82 36* a 
43 3* 3* 


19*+ ft 
a*+ite 
20V,— * 
Oft— M 
* 1 *+ * 

38- ^ 
22* + * 
10*+ te 

si —a 
f«4— * 
Oft— te 
38ft 

3*— te 





29* 

12ft 
: 27ft 
33* 

43* 

3* 

29* 

80* 

39* 

18* 

36 
rate 
a 

Wft 

io* raft 
a* a* 
ra* ra* 

sate ink 
25* 25* 
22ft 22M 
65 46, 

17* 1716 
17* 17ft 
48* 46ft 
15ft 15ft 
41ft 
2 * 

17* 

27 
















































































































S s : 

er: 




— 

u u 




u ;•: 


FK : 

5“ 

1p» ; r' •. 

£ s: ‘ 


«K <■*- m . 

1 * l . 

■ 4 * -«* 

s ; L;: .. 


A Blue Chip 

Performance 

in ’84 

• EARNINGS RISE 55% 

• DIVIDEND UP TO DM 9 PER SHARE 


;»k* *•+ 

W* ‘ 

'# ' * • 


In 1984> the VEBA Group’s profit- 
oriented program of streamlining and 
restructuring its activities again pro- 
duced excellent results. Overall the 
year’s net profit rose by 55 % to DM 
575 million on total sales of DM 50 
billion, enabling the company to in- 
crease the dividend by 20% and to 
further strengthen the reserves. 

Moreover, each of the Group’s main 
sectors turned in higher profits. These 
sectors are electricity generating and 
supply, chemicals, petroleum and pe- 
troleum products, trading and transpor- 
tation. 

Electricity - Profits in this key sector 
grew significantly thanks principally to 
high capacity utilization in the field of 
nuclear power generation. 

Chemicals - In recent years, VEBA 
has restructured this sector consider- 
ably; concentrating on specialized pro- 
duction with high profit potential and 
introducing new research programs. 

Petroleum - VEBA continued to 
expand its exploration and production 
of oil and gas, and higher profits reflect 
the shift from, processing activities to 
production 


Trading and Transportation - 

Traditionally profitable, this sector 
again performed well, strengthening its 
integrated service capabilities and tap- 
ping new markets around the world. 

I ti i 1 t rnr 

-Earnings par Share \—A I ■ - — 


9.20 

-DM- 


r 1982~T 

U 

Li 


RsrDVFA 

Outlook- As a result of considerable 
restructuring measures - even in diffi- 
cult years - VEBA has evolved into a 
genuine blue chip company. With each 
major component showing profits, the 
outlook for the broadly based VEBA 
Group is indeed promising. 

To find out more about VEBA, its oper- 
ations and performance, please get in 
touch with VEBA AG, Karl-Amold- 
Platz 3, D-4000 Diisseldorf 30, Federal 
Republic of Germany. 









































f * & i\m i* HmHUi»mKKHKKKmmi m 121 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


•U.S. Futures sbnis 


boon Shw 
HUB LOW 


Om High Uh 0 «M On. 



Brooks Harvey & Co., Inc. is pleased to announce 
its retention by the 


John D. and Catherine T. 


Mac A rthur 
Foundation 


as exclusive representative with respect to the sale of 
two properties located in Palm Beach County, Florida. 


Frenchman’s Creek 


and 


Admiral’s Cove 


Frenchman's Creek contains 1.394 acres, is an approved P. U. D. 
for 6.600 dwelling units, and includes two 18-hole championship 
golf courses and a 163-slip marina. Admiral’s Cove contains 732 
acres, is an approved P. U. D.for 2. 400 dwelling units and includes 
a 57-slip marina. 

The properties will be offered individually to qualified principals 
only. For information concerning offering procedures contact 


BROOKS HARVEY & CO., INC. 


An Affiliate of 

MORGAN STANLEY & CO. 


Incorporated 


1633 Broadway. New York. N. Y. 10019 (212) 703-2500 


NEW YORK. WASHINGTON. D.C. 


John J. Clinch or PaulJ . McAuliffe 


(212) 703-2565 


grange juicmnrew 

'tSMSr Mcnr UUS MUS ML 1 S WX 8 — * 

ias & jss as gs ® 


ua 

sm 

W 

tarn 

Ok 

U 


Season Sconn 
HU) Low 


opmKtah Ur* Om on. 


ma is 7 iu Now uits mss huh 

HUfl uS Jan 1622 S UUS 141 X 0 HUS -MS 


taoxa man Jan uus uus uixo wz 

177 JO ISAM MOT 

UU won Mur WJ) 

wo* "J" TMJS 

EsLSotn 3 S 0 vr+f.sm* _ W 
Prar.DnrOMniiH. AMO OS'S 


MOM — 
MBS -MB 
IMS -AM 



J 671 . 4 f 

xm 

-4 

MU — ) 


CATTLE ICME) 

40 x 00 lbs.- cam* par m. 

40 X 0 4 LS 5 Apr 62511 AIM 

(9 JO- 6+60 Jon 6570 4647 

67 X 7 63.15 AUO <570 6 AM 

6550 £ 1 X 0 Oct OA 5 -4420 

£ 7 X 5 AUO Dac 6*50 AUO 

67 X 5 405 Fab 45 X 8-4570 

6757 - 64 J» APT 

EsLSotas 14 X 77 Prsv- 5 als»jrt^ 
Prty;DovOpon lot 61 MT.UH 7 IS 1 _ 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME 1 
4+000 lbs.- cents Parte. 

700 6470 APT 68 X 0 6 U 5 

7273 6455 MOV AU 6 6820 

7370 6640 Aug 7045 7045 

7 X 00 67 J 00 Sap' 70 X 5 70.10 

7232 67.10 Oct 69 X 5 6750 

7130 055 NOV 7050 7050 

Est.Salm 1 X 99 Pl«v. 5 oIes 1433 
Prtv. DavOpen InL HUMS op 711 


6775 6757 ->« 

6145 61 X 3 —73 

7039 7057 —58 

050 7007 

69 X 0 050 —05 

7035 7037 —SO 


HOGS(CME) 


aoxoo lbs.- cents par lb. 

5+45 

4+35 

Apr 

5540 

4840 

Jim 

5577 

4875 

Jul 

5+37 

4740 

Aug 

SITS 

4500 

Oct 

50 X 5 

4448 

Dtc 

<970 

4445 

Feb 

4745 

4540 

APT 

48 X 0 

47 J 0 O 

Jon 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI mB'ilqn-Ptsaf lOQcct. 
91 X 1 S 7.14 Jun 

* 8 X 7 

91 X 1 

*883 

91 X 8 

9143 



*049 

9052 

*836 

90 S) 

9090 

8577 

Dac 

* 0 X 8 

9818 

*ua 

9817 

mss 

•UB 

Mar 

ME 

89 X 5 

MU 

MW 

9077 



89 X 6 

■975 

8 *X 5 

■974 

98 X 0 

hod 

Sap 

89 X 5 

8 VX 5 

89 X 7 

8*43 

a*xs 

OK 

8*43 

8*43 

MJ 3 

89 X 2 

EsL Salas 


Prav. Saks 9 XW 




E St. Sales 7444 Ptw.SaltS A 157 
Prev. Dav Oean Int 25 X 49 up 672 


4505 4572 —M 
4945 4975 —42 

5170 5175 —45 

5172 5172 +.12 

4170 4047 +77 

4170 49.15 +70 

4010 4970 +75 

■ 46.15 +.13 

4075 4 U 0 +X 8 


Prsv.bavOparHnt. 39591 up 55 


18 YR. TREASURY IC 8 T 1 
» 00 X 00 prln- ptS+ 32 nd»of 100 prf w 
OKI 704 Jun 78-5 78-14 

81-13 75-11 S«P 774 77-29 

80-22 75-13 D 4 C 

IN 75-14 Mar 

79-24 7+00 Jim 

EsLSuta Pro*. Solas 4 J 44 

Prav. Day Open bit 50751 up 474 




78-1 71-15 

774 77-21 

74 - 31 
76-13 

75 - 28 


PORK BELLIES (CMC) 


38000 lbs- cants per lb. 

82 X 0 

61.15 

May 

BU 7 

62.15 

Jul 

8865 

6820 

Aug 

7815 

63.15 

F«b 

73 X 0 

64 X 0 


7840 

7840 

MOV 

. 7890 

7050 

Jul • 


Eat Soles 5797 Prev.SoUj zt 
Prev. Day Opan lift 11774 off 65 


7170 71.95 — 1 J 7 

7225 7232 — 1 X« 
7041 7090 —40 

7200 7+43 +200 
7145 7120 +200 

7 X 60 4200 
7160 7+10 -MAO 


US TREASURY BONDS (COT) 
(fpCf-SlMrOOD-afsASRRHOf IBOpcf) 

77-15 57-20 Jun 484 68-23 

7+3 37-10 Sas 67-10 67-27 


{Indexes compiled shortly before market dose) , ■** * 

SR COMP .INDE X (CMS) : « *•“ ' 

"wno^UAJO Jufl U 3 J 5 18240 111.15 11148 ~J 
19270 16040 SOT 18 SJ 0 USJO 1 S+M 18840 — J 

19640 17170 Dec 189,15 189.15 I 08 JB 18 U 0 — Lv*. ■ ■ - 

Hat Salas Prav. Solas 4 M 82 

Prav. Dav Open inf. 52450 off SB 


77-15 

57-20 

Jun 

7+2 

57-10 

Sop 

7+5 

57-8 

Dac 

7200 

57-2 

Mar 

7 D-H 

56-39 

Jun 

780 

5 + 2 * 

San 

68 GI 

5 + 3 S 

Dac 

69-12 

56-27 

M or 

4 M 

43-12 

Jim 

6+36 

63-4 

Sop 

48-8 

6334 

Dac 


EsL Salas Prev. Salas 7035 

Prav. Day Open lnt 22 SX 51 off 277 


684 68-20 

67-9 67-34 

64-19 67-3 

44 - 1 44-15 

45 - 15 45-39 
84-30 85-14 
6+39 65 

64-20 

4+9 

AMI 

63-23 


VALUE L INE ( KCBT) 

tSST'aa mot ioixo who i*u» i 9 uo — l*-; 

31940 17180 Jim 19740 19770 TWO 196X0 — L* 

31X30 10X71 Sop 201,15 20L15 300.10 300.10 -2^ 

E it. Sales Prev. Soles 1033 f 

Prev. Day Open I nt A941 affMA - 


NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYPE) 
potato and octets 

110X0 *003 Jun lOSIS 106-05 10X25 10540 ' 

Ill JO 91 45 Sap 107 JO W7J0 HJ7X0 107-65 


11375 10140 DSC 109 JO 10970 2094 a W 940 .... . 

lino 11270 Mar U 200 112 X 0 nzoa 112 x 0 ->■>• .. 

Est Salas Prey. Salas 11729 - 

Prev. Da* Open lllL 8 X 92 off 714 - 


COFFEE C(NYC$CEJ ; 5 I 
37X00 cents per lb. + 15:. 

mOO^- 132X1 - Mo* HBL7E- +4*05- 74+75 74AM 

14930 121X0 Jal 145X0 T4AX0 14+90 14559 

147.50 127X0 Sep 14+80 145J0 14+10 14526 

14X75 12935 Dec 144X0 14+5? 14340 14+50 

14230 12X50 Mar 143X0 14150 143X0 143X0 

14000 131X0 May 14250 

13925 135JD Jul 141 25 

Est Sales 1X00 Prev.Satss 2254 
Prev. Day Open Ini 13.111 off 1*5 
sooajwmix uorresew 


HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


112 X 00 lbs.- ceots ear lb. 



1850 

3 X 2 


373 

3,96 

975 

+01 

Jul 

+10 

+14 

975 

+22 

Sap 

+22 

479 

9 X 5 

4 X 0 

Oct 

4 X 0 

+48 

775 

+87 

Jaa 

471 

471 

943 

542 

Mar 

546 

5 X 0 

7.15 

558 

Mar 

560 

5 X 7 

6 X 9 

Est. Solas 

5 X 3 Jul 515 5 X 5 

5 X 55 Prav. Sales 5 X 00 


Prev. Dav Open Ini. 81247 up 493 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 matrtc Hens - 1 par tan 

2570 19*8 MOV 2370 

2400 1*90 Jul 3309 

2415 1987 Sep 2 M 7 

3337 1945 DSC 2123 

2145 1955 Mar 2110 

2130 i 960 May 

3035 I 960 Jtrt ■ 

Est. Sales Prey. Salas 4644 

Prey. Day Open In). 26 X 25 op 17 





141 X 5 

+174 

4 X 8 

374 

-71 

4 X 5 

+13 

—XI 

+22 

440 

-JH 

+38 

4 X 7 

+X 2 

+91 

+99 

+X 2 

545 

5 X 8 

—XI 

560 

5 X 7 

+XI 

58 S 

570 


2365 

3373 

— « 

2198 

2202 

— 33 

21 U 

2178 

—40 

2106 

2106 

—34 

2 T 0 S 

2100 

— 28 


2100 

— 28 


2100 

—08 


QflftYA. (CBT) 

noOuOMprln-pts A 32 nd| of 100 pd 
# 9-27 57-17 Jun 6+8 6+20 

69-4 51-13 Sap 67-18 67-28 

48-13 59 - 4 - Dec 

68 5+30 Mar 

67-8 5+45 JUR 

0-3 65 SfP . 

Est. Sates _ nmr.satm «l 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4771 m»7 


6*4 68-29 

0-18 47-21 

- 6W 


Commodity Indexes 


CERT. DEPOSIT HMM) 
si mHnan-ptsaf MR pet 
9170 8543 Mar 91.10 9L1Q 

91 3D 85J0 Jun 9QJ7 *0.18 

mm 85 X 0 sap nst ifR 

90.17 8526 Doc 89 X 0 89 JJ 

8978 8 A 56 Mar EL 74 0874 

89 X 6 86 X 3 Jim 

, rns . 2 87 X 6 Sap 

Est Safas Prev, Soles 345 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7 X 28 off 65 


9 L 0 S 91.10 
90 X 1 9 X 18 
1929 89 X 4 
89 X 0 89.10 
1 X 65 88 X 0 
1 X 56 
8834 


^* :tt Wfe rnsi 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

>1 mKtkm-Ptsaf nopd. 

90 X 8 8 X 49 Jun 89 X 5 89 X 1 

9033 1+53 SOP 89 X 8 89 .T 7 

■ 9 X 7 > 4 X 0 Doc 8848 8877 

89 X 8 86.18 Mar 8836 8 X 40 

89.15 <673 Jim 8813 88.M 

mm ezxt sop 

8927 8778 DOC 8770 WTO 

Est Solas Prev. Solas 27.153 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 97 X 33 up LI 84 




8948 8978 
8899 89.14 

8840 8873 


MJ 3 8 X 19 
097 
8770 8778 


NYCSCE: 

WYCE: 

COM EX: 

MYMB: 

KCBT: 

HYPE: 


Chlsuaa Board of Trade 
aucooo Mercantile Exchange 
International Monet ar y Marfcot 

Of Chlcaso MercanHIe- Exchange , • 

New York Cocoa. Saaar, Ootfsa Exchange 
Now York Conan Exc fvin oe ' 

Commodity ExctMuwa. Now York' * 

Now York Mercantile Exchange 1 

Kansas City Board at Trade ' 

New York Futures E x c h a n ge i 


. • 

rw-V;-. 


^ * * 


i j 1 1 1 1 uivvre 

iiiuuiiMiin i nmV 

i ibi .Vi' .iii.’iiu'Uil 

Xl iLMli'illlll 

.k^ijeui.:..ai.jk.ijeee 


London Commodities I Asian Commodities 


Man* 25 


Man* 25 


n 


Paris Commodities 

March 25 


0 


Cash Prices 


Min* af* 


illlliaillHlHlllIHIflMfi 
ketitui urfriimn ■ r wngrmA 


I mwtrmA 

twwi ir/»w t wHU ur/rr#^ 


HONO-KONa GOLD FUTURES 
IAS4 per ounce 


SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
Budapest, June 1 3-1 4, 1 985 

The Inferncdiond Herald Tribune conference on " Trade cmd Investment Opportunities in Hungary" 
vriflbe of keen interest to any executive concerned about future economic relation between East and West. 

The conf^rKEprovkles an exfroordirKiryoppcxliffvty hr tnxiness leaders to examine 
howlheHungarit^ government is apfxcrxNngqi^stiorer^domesticorriinterrxriondeconorr^reblions 
and offers Western executives an unusual cxxx&on for cfrect contact with business leaders from Eastern Europe. 
Senior executives wishing to register for the conference shcnMcrimplete and return the coupon bebw. 
JUSE13 JUNE 14 

Keynote Address: TV» Banking System 

Mr. Jozsef Marjai, Deputy Prime Minster Mr. Janos Fekete, First Deputy President, National Bank of 

Hi® Economic Outlook Hungary 

Professor Jozsef Bognar, Oiredor, Institute of Worid Economics Western Banking 4jnd Hungary 

of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Mr. Gabriel Bchler, Vice Presideit end Genera/ Manager, 

Foreign Trade Bank of America N.T^ Vienna 

Mr. Istvan TbrSk. Secretory of Stale for Foreign Trade Industrial Outlook 

The five Year Plan Mr. Ferenc Horvath, Secretary of State for Industry 

Dr. Janos Ho6s, Secretary of State, Natiami Pfannng Board Panel of Kfcjngmn Musfriafisfs 
Afternoon Address Afternoon Address 

Dr. Armand Hammer, Charman and Chief Executive Officer , Professor Richard Portes, Director. Centre far Economic PoScy 

Occidental Petroleum Corporation Research, London 

Inve stm ent Incentives and Tax Free Zones Joint Ventures 

Dr. P&ter Medgyessy, Deputy Minister of Finance Mr. LaszJo Borbeiy, Director General, Department for 

Barter International Monetary Affairs, /Vtoitsfry of Finance 

Mr. S6ndor Demcak. General Manager, Hungarian foreign Panel of Foreign Componies 

Trading Baric Moderator: Mr. Tdmas Beck, President, Hungarian Chamber of 

Commerce 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 

uxx par ounce 



man low bm ask area 

SUGAR 

French tan par matrtc ton 
MOV 1426 1412 1425 1428 +12 

Auo LJW 1 X 68 1780 I 486 +13 

Oct 1 X 25 1 X 15 1 X 16 1 X 20 +5 

DOC N.T. NX 1 X 78 1 X 90 + IB 

Mar 1 X 85 L 575 1776 1 J 85 +5 

May N.T. N.T. 1430 1 X 40 +15 

Est wol j lxso lots of SO tans. Prav. actual 
sales: 1.915 lals. Open Interest: 229*1 
COCOA 

French francs per 188 ta 
Mar N.T. NX 2450 2461 +50 

May 24*0 24 « 2451 2453 +26 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2318 — +40 

Sep 2490 2486 2475 2400 +10 

Dec 2.190 2.190 2.183 2400 Unctv 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2.160 — —5 

May N.T. N.T. £150 — —10 

Est vat; IM lots of 10 Ions. Prav. actual 
■ales: 154 lots. Open Merest: 918 


Cammadnv cutd Unit 
Coffee* Santas, lb 
Prlntdalh 64/30 38 Vs. vd _ 

Staal bJUats IPlttJ. tun 

Iren 4 Fdry. PWta. fan — 
5 tpel yrep^io 1 hvy Pitt - 
Lead Snot. Ih 

Cooper elect, 1 b 

Tin t Strain), tb 

Zhtc. E. St. L_ Basis, lb __ 

Palladium.^ 

Silver N.Y, ox ____ 

source; AP. 


DM Futures Options 

March 25 

w.GcnraiMorMSmmimiBAMrBoit 


COFFEE 

French troacs per ISO ke 
Mre N.T. N.T. 2433 2 X 00 — 17 

May 2 X 20 2 X 10 Z&W 1*27 +20 

Jlv N.T. N.T. USD 2 X 65 +20 

SOP N_T. N.T. 2 X 87 2705 +17 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2 X 85 2715 +10 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2 X 56 — +28 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2 X 45 2 X 65 + 17 

Est. vot: 3 lots of 5 tans. Prev. adual sales: 
12 lots. Open Interest: 165 
Source: Bovnrdu Common*. 


strait 

Price Jun 


•R+sxme , PMHewejj 

S Dec Jen See 

- 838 US - .fc . 


» 246 185 - 830 US 

30 1X4 in — 856 886 

31 LB 6 145 2 X 9 ft» 148 l»^«r 

32 649 L 21 1 X 9 LS 7 LEI — 

33 83 * 888 1 XS 221 . 246 — ' 

31 B 2 J 86 S 1 X 9 3 X 8 — — . 



ENI m efa k nu lseA 7 X 3 i 
Cab: FrLyaL 2 VS*pen 0 ri.XU 8 Z 
Puts : Fd. *M. 1428 eeee tat U.H 6 
Source: CMC. 


London jMetaJs 

March 25 


BM AIM BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 

SterHag per matrtc ten _ 

soot 93 W OTJW 93140 932 X 0 

forward 96 UD 961 X 0 942 X 0 963 X 0 

COPPER CATHODES CHKffl Grade) 

StarOag oar mtMc tw 

spot 1 . 185 X 0 1 . 186 X 0 1 . 193 X 0 1 . 19+50 

lorword 148850 1,207X0 141+m 141+50 


votume: 0 lots of 2S tans. 
Soutat: A niters 


Company 

Earnings 


Rcvgraie and profits, in ireltions, 
are in local currencies unless 
otherwise irxScated 


Argentina is Confident^ 


About Loan DSscossjeigJ 

Return . V? ^ 

VIENNA — The president ■*£; 
Argentina's central bulk has sr. f : 


his country is confident of finals > 

: J. j.l — 


Hong Kong 

Swire Pacific 






hotel cfrttctfy. ‘ '.V- 1 ; 

Ahium HyrtfHctel, l^VT.'-Tc^i^feoai w ti, Sq. 2 
Budapest ]Q5\. TeU (3W}1^835, tefe^22-i)954:,: r r :i ' 


Steffi* 






S&P 100 Index Options 

Msrrii 22 


Y*or 1984 

Revenue — — 12400. 

ProfttS 1450. 

Per Shqre 2 J 12 

South Africa 


SMta 

CBta+m 1 


Pile* 

M 

Mur 

Jam 

Jir 

155 

— 

oi 

— 


NO 





U 5 

m. 

.14 

_ 


no 

71 k 

W. 

WR 

12 

TO 

Jtt 

m 

Tk 

f 

M 

1 9 / 1631 + 

« 

SH 

lU 

7/16 

17/1628 

4 tk 

118 

lk 

lk 

IT/U» 

m 

V\k 

VU 


— 



Murray & Roberts Hdg 

let Half 1985 1984 

Proms 25.16 3833 

Per Shore 076 1X8 


ing new agreements with aefi'-iu 
banks and the Iniematkmal 
tary Fund on a $4J«billion loj^: 
before nrid-year, despite 
problems in meeting IMF perf'rv 
mance targets. 

Dozing the .irinm! meeting of 
Inter-American Development; 
Bank, the president, Alfredo Cc^v 
ceprion said Sunday flight tl^ 
substantial progress was made -. ■■ 
talks last week with banks in N+Vj 


United States 


IctQuar. 

Revenue 

oner Net 
Oper Shore 


Fuller (HLB.) 


IHfntt Mdwtai loots of SL2 minion. 


U.K. Snuff Sales 1% ^ 

Reuters 

LONDON —Snuff sales in B;v? 


3rd Quo*. 

Revenue 

Net Income. 
Per Share 


Tekfroflix 


Dividends March 25 1 1 j«nmt- 

1 1 Per Shore _ 


Cempraiy Per Amt Pay Rec — 

USUAL ^ UU ° r - 

o-, 8 rn +» tejMncwrw 

‘ j: - : Oftar BM VUd YWd I i « P " rShafe - 

s± s s s s is aaasr* § fl a ti 

Ore rent . 9 X 8 . . 9 X 6 . 9 X 9 *78 M-Mewthty; <M2uartartr,- S-Staid- 


Wokbaum 


'illW^SlIltM-JpMr? 




Elizabeth A to Visit Poring > 

AmctFraace-Pmse 

LISBON .— * Queen Eliabdh}^-, ^ 

P Vk ■ __1_ . J..I . J am hamn ft k. 




Dwav fjfh yw f Avffmy.--. 


AmdmL 

Source: UPL 


12? of Britain is scheduled to begin v**, * „ 

JS official Tour-day visit W 

on Tuesday. She Hist visited • j 

^ country 2S years aga Vl’l' ’ 











































<3*^ (y 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


Page 13 


>ver-the-Counter 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


50 
140 

21 

51 

llto 

U 

17 

73ft 

M 

T» 

a 

39ft 

23 

441 

20 * 

7 

713 

IS* 


March 25 


IS Wft 

UK low 

27V. zn 
9 V 
* to 
SVk 4 
2i n 
24* 25 
15* I5H 
4314 43ft 
7ft 7ft 
8 ft T& 
12ft 13H 
■ft Oft 
SU Sto 
u* n* 

7ft 7ft 
Iflft lift 
19» 30 

29 99 • 


19ft It* 

ift 

A A 

22* 22 

5M 4ft 

rat 

Si* 

12* im 
12ft im 
■ft Sft 
22ft 20ft 
4ft 4ft 

m oft 

34 ft 29 ft 
aft 21ft 


Sft— ft 
Sft + K 
' to 
31 + ft 
19 —ft 
Sto + ft 
4ft 
I 3ft 
17 +ft 
.4ft 

IS — ft 

s* 4a 

Uft 

32ft 

Sto— ft 
2ft— to 

TO 

25ft 

lift— ft 
Uft— to 
54 + to 
fto— ft 
17ft 



■ft 
3ft 3ft 
9ft IM 
3 Cto 2 CV> 
7ft 7ft 
72 M Uft 
Sto Sto 
Oft Sft 
7ft 7ft 


eH Inf 

EiLinst 

EIP .12 

EMP 

EMPl 

EZEM 


S 2to 2to 2to+ ft 
2 Sft 5ft Sft— ft 
414 14 14 

45 Sft Sft 3ft— to 
S 7 7 7 

74 9ft * 9to + to 


1221 ft H ft— to 
ran 4 m sis— ft 
1 5ft 5U 5ft— ft 
9 5ft Sft Sft + ft 
10 10ft UK Uft- ft 
UW 31 112 a 27ft 27ft— ft 
-12 L3 9 IDto 9to 9to— ft 
27015ft Uft 15ft— to 
4710ft lOVk 10ft 
IjSS ML2 199 14ft 14ft 14ft— to 
a> 3 a fto 9% 9vi— ft 
... S9 fto fto fto— ft 
72 42 T 17 17 17 + ft 

Jib 3 217M 17to 17to 

40 5ft 5ft Sto— to 
im Sto i svi 4- ft 
17732* 21 to J2* + to 

U5141* Uft 14ft + ft 

SO 4 14ft 14to 14to— ft 

14217 17 17 

11313ft lift 13ft + ft 

240 14 «**"■**-* 

109 Uto ISto 17ft +144 
1210 9* fft 

31 to ft to 
77 Ift Ito M 

4« Sto Sft Sft+ to 

32 Sft 4ft Sft + ft 
257 7ft 7ft 7ft 

1112 Uft TSH Uft- ft 

40 1 9 1 20* 20ft 20 Hi 

OS 14 177 ISto 17 

111 94ft 34 24ft + ft 

4 M 9ft IS 

£* ** •*-* 

33 . l.f SSK2 lift Mto 

IS 17ft 17ft T7ft— ft 

4413to Uft Uto 

24 3ft Jft 3ft 
1330 Mto 2Bto— lto 

1 961 Sft IS* 15ft— to 
70015ft IS IS 
S79 1SH IS* U — ft 
38 53 22S24to 23ft 24 — ft 
2D 24 14 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

«*2 3 T734 33* 31 ft 32ft 4- ft 

10 99 99 99 43 

54 13ft 12* 13 — ft 

11 4ft 4 4ft 

074 15ft Uto U -4-lto 

e - ss ss sua 

a u 

4*027* 27ft 27ft— ft 
« 9121 20ft 20ft- ft 

* 19 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 

■74 U 2I7S5U 5fft SSft— to 
M 23 45 KM Uft mL 

^ StoSJTto** 

Mg 55 M ‘ jfii 4fii~ K 

40 23 57 31* 31K 31ft— ft 

« 23 see =& 

S» “ J sg tft atoi vi 

74? 7ft 7 7ft— to 

12 44 19 25ft 5?* 2S**— to 

tO <0 flu 29ft 29ft 

5 sj urn i 7 to i 7 to + to 

8 13 25 728ft 28ft 20*+ft 

U J Sft 28ft 18ft 
54 150 SO 50 - ft 

3 Sft Sft Sft— ft 
0 U 9225V, 25 25 — ft 

1 4 12 134to Mto 34V* 

„ 21222ft 2? 23ft— ft 

15 13 2191ft 91 31to— to 

1971 14ft 13* Uft— ft 
U Uft 14ft Uft + to 
raw 15 uu Mto+ to 
34 27ft ant 20*— ft 

08 7-5 U 19* 19* 19ft— to 
• 17 2 21ft 31ft 21ft 

1028ft IB 29 

B 17 5523ft zm 22ft— to 

B 47 33Sto 2Bft 28V.+ ft 
B 47 520to 20ft 20ft 

7720V. 30 2Dft— ft 
t 3213 Oft U 4« ft 



5*— ft 
29 ft 
Uft 

is*— to 

is*— u 

fft— to 
34 4-lto 
Uft 
M 

27ft— ft 
Sto + to 


11 v a « mcr* n a aj£i ijci 



Wr i 











■ •» | 

jj itftjigi* 






4 A 





S 


AN 

ESTABLISHED 

COMPETENCE 


harpening future estimations with an 






nor events. 



wii i wli! 


^1* 1 


WisSI 







l-vff 







3 30 



3 % 


1 I] 





I^rr 


yU 

-till 


3 ^ 



is 




Assessing probabilities— the 
challenge facing any good analyst. 

The approaches to making 
optimal decisions are 
many. One is the deti- O* 
sion theory Thomas 
Bayes developed in the 
18th century when he (-y 

recognized the limitations ^ 
of classical statistics. His theory 
starts with known conditions, 
taking into account prior events 
and subjective probabilities. 

Scholars in many disciplines 
are still finding new applications 
for the Bayesian theory of 
probability. 

In investment research at 
Nikko, we consider all the 


.■mr) 




options. Based on our knowl- 
edge of financial markets and 
individual securities, we assess 
the probabilities — for maximizing 
long-run gains or minimizing 
short-term risks— associated with 
different investment opportunities. 

In short, we offer a quality 
and scope of investment research 


that ranks us among the best in 
the Japanese securities industry. 

Nikko research is com- 
plemented by efficient 
yQ\ trading. As an equities 
trader, we are one of the 
largest in Japan. Our 
proven expertise in block 
trading helps professional 
investors buy and sell large 
positions. 

And we are a principal dealer 
in bonds and money market 
instruments, ensuring liquidity 
for international and domestic 
investors. 

Nikko, an established compe- 
tence in investment research and 
brokerage. 








NIKKO 

Nikko Securities 

Shin Tbkyo Building, 3-l # Maruxiouchi 
3-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tbkyo 100, Japan 

. LONDON ZURICH GENEVA FRANKFURT LUXEMBOURG PARIS COPENHAGEN BAHRAIN NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES CHICAGO TORONTO HONGKONG SINGAPORE SYDNEY SEOUL 









































El 


AW 

AM 


Cte 

on 


vt# 

Kn 


lii 

LW 


Me 

ou 


P« 

■u 

U» 

Un 

W*f 

w# 

*0 

rat 


« 


Sfi 


T*t 

OC 


AH 

Sr 


FR 


OH! 
PA 
<W 
J — 
Cv 
H« 
>« 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


Monday^ 


MfEX 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
un to ft* dasins on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades a&mrtiere. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Monte 


Sis. 


Clow 

Hteh Low Stock 

Dlv. YkLPE 

UOaHtob LowOuoL Ofoe 


1 * 1 


3% AOln 

25 

87 

Aft 

5% 

A. +% 

Mft 

8ft ALLob 

JO U 12 

7 

13% 

13% 





21 

20% 

20ft 

20ft 

5% 

2% AM Inti 


779 

4ft 


4% 

78ft 

5B ATTFd 

2L530 7J 

41 

17% 

77 

77% 




1 

3% 

3% 

3%— ft 

14ft 

Bft AcnwU 

31 X* 15 

21 

fft 

9% 

*%— ft 

ISIS 

10ft Action 

28 

4» 

11 

V* 

IBft — ft 

fft 

3U 

3ft Acton 
ft Acte wt 


45 

11 

Aft 

ft 

ft 



» 1% MmRi 

me T5*i aorhi 

2*16 15 Adobe 
8% 4MAMW 
4216 26% AfflPbs 
9% * AItEbp 

TIM 5%AtrCdl 
TOM M ArCalPf 
5 2 Atomco 

92ft 65ft Atmtton 
V 5*0 Aloha 
If 916 Alpha In 
lft % AlteK 
ft ft AltoCWf 
28ft 11 AbaCe 
18ft 9ft Amdahl 
lift *ft Amedeo 
7ft * AmCflp 
Mft 12ft AExpwt 
9 Sft AFrucA 
9 Sft AFrucB 
12ft 7ft AHKhM 
19ft 12ft AMzeA 
lift 12ft AIMS 
2ft < ft AMBkf 
IB 3 AmOtl 

53ft A Puff 


J 20 
15 12 
6 
19 
24 

e 


45 A IS 


a 

JO 14 IS 
JOB 14 

22 


11 

10 

10 

42 U S 
52 35 S 


27 a* 27ft 27% + % 

or mv if —« 

54 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
21 42% 41ft 42ft + ft 

15 6% 6ft 6ft 

106 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
SI 10 fft n 

16 2ft 2ft 2ft 

• 

5 6*6 

48 lift lift lift 

75 It ’£ 

S 22ft— ft 
14ft Mft— ft 
7ft B — * 
7 7 —ft 

29*6 29ft— 1ft 


10 


139 S55 


540 


7ft 

T7ft 

■ft 

Mft 

4ft 

Sft 

6 

3ft 


U 

120 54 15 


46 14 a 

12 


J2 SJ 15 


ft Am Pin v 
lift APnci 
6ft AniRttv 
lift ARmln 
3 AScJfi 
ift Ampal 
3ft Andal 
3 Araucb 
9 Andrta 
ft Apaei wt 
ft vlAnalv 
3ft AroaPf 
5ft Artern 
6ft Armrra 
9 ArrowA 
6ft Asmra 
■ft Astrex 
1 Astro* 

Aohtcrt 

9 Aefrotpf US) 
ft AKsCAl 

4ft AudWr 4So 1.1 22 
. 32ft AufaSw 140a Z3 17 
22ft 13ft Avandl 40 4 9 U 


9ft 

7ft 

lift 

12ft 

lift 

Tift 

3ft 


7 

14 

JO 22 8 
.15 20 


17ft 

2ft 

7ft 


2 7 
97 31ft 

26002 fft 
ZlOOz 7ft 
163 9ft 

4 15ft 

6 15 
172 1ft 
75 4ft 

n 6oft 

60 ft 
1x15ft 

25 6ft 
382 14ft 
20 2ft 
149 Sft 
45 5 

49 3ft 

3 13ft 
2 1ft 

61 1ft 
64 5ft 

2 7ft 

5 6 ft 
12 fft 
37 7ft 
24 lift 

14S 1ft 
1397 ft 
54 fft 
14Z 1ft 

7 4ft 
7* 43ft 

9 T6M 


7ft 7ft— ft 


15ft 15ft— ft 

4 4 

60% 60ft— ft 
ft ft— ft 
15ft 15ft 
6ft Aft 4- ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 


* 2t=2 


Sft 
S 5 
3ft 3ft— ft 
13ft 13ft + ft 
1ft 1ft + ft 
lft 1ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
7 7 — ft 

6ft 6ft 
fft fft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
lift lift— ft 
1ft " 


. It- 

1 1 —ft 

4ft 4ft— ft 
43ft 43ft 
MM 16ft 


B 


Aft 

afft BAT 

J2e 28 

4424 

4% 

4% 

AM 

39% 

22ft BUM 

.19 £ 23 

28 

37% 

37 

37 

Sft 

1% BRT 

f 

A 

2% 

7% 

2* 

5% 

3ft ESN 

22 

111 

4% 

4ft 

4ft 

2ft 

ft BTK 


31 

ft 

ft 

ft 

17ft 

7ft Btecar 

A2 

« 

14% 

13% 

13% 

fft 

7ft BotowS 

3Pnl£ 

8 

9% 

9% 

9% 

Aft 

2% BatyMwt 


M 

3% 

3ft 

3ft 


21 Baa Pd 246*84 
7ft 4% Banstro 

fft 6ft BnfcBSd 50 44 18 

4ft 2ft BamEn 52 

lift 7ft Barmri 40 25 

6ft 4 BarvRG 153 

14ft KM Bern* 40 25 18 
fft 4ft Board ' 

4ft 1ft BeefCh 
22 ft lift BotdBln 140 154 


8ft 2ft Beltran 
50 35 BaiSMA 

50ft 34ft BM5MB 
28ft If 


7 25ft 25ft 2Sft— ft 
2 6ft 6ft 6ft — M 

7 Sft Bft Sft— ft 

6 SM 3ft 3ft— M 

2 Sft 8 I 

S 4ft 6ft 6ft 

2 13ft 13ft Oft— Ml 
19 6ft 6ft 6ft 

IS 2ft 7ft 2ft— ft 

23 12M 12 12 —ft 

V » M M 
40C 19 37ft 37ft 37ft— ft 

JOC 2 37ft 37ft 3716— ft 

L4 14 1448 24 23ft 23ft— ft 


II 


30ft 

12ft 

24 

Mft 

17 

Sft 

Ifft 

19ft 

37ft 

1916 


If 

30ft 

15ft 

37ft 

34 


3M BetttCp 

421102 


1 

4% 

4ft 

4i* 


19 BIcCP 

n 

31 

7 

32 

73ft 

23 

Tfrifc 4* 

ft 

9% BtoV 

AO 

32 

36 

8 

12ft 

13ft 

13W 


19% Blnkiwf 

1J» 

42 

11 

TO 

23ft 

22% 

23 + 

% 

M BtoRB 



21 

1 

Uft 

lfift 

Mft + 

ft 

Mft BtoRA 



27 

IS 

Uft 

16% 

Mft + 

% 

% Blocks 




21 

lft 

1ft 

lft— 

ft 

10 BkMPitA 

4S 

24 

1 

24 

17% 

17ft 

17ft + 

ft 

MM BlauatB 
23ft Botarf* 

40 
J S 

23 

.1 

a 

30 

22 

39 

17% 

37% 

T7ft 

36% 

17% — 
14% — 

ft 

ft 

lift BaWVal 

2 0 



Iff 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft— 

ft 

2ft Bawmr 

12 BowM 

M 

27 

18 

17 

12 

549 

3ft 

1Mb 

3ft 

Mft 

Sft— 

Mft— 

ft 

ft 


140 



X 

25% 

231% 

25ft— 

ft 

11% Brauns 



7 

18 

17% 

12ft 

13ft— 

ft 

22% BrnFA 

48 

74 

10 

5 

31ft 

31ft 

31ft— 

ft 

23% BrnFB 

88 

24 

M 

If 

33% 

33% 

33% — 

% 


12 Month 



8%. 

Claw 

! High Low Stock 

Dtv. YkL PE itnsHtghLowOuoLCiroe 

4 

3ft SrilFof 

40 1U 


A 

Sft 

3% 

lft— ft 

s 

3% Bsddn 



• 

3% 

3% 

3% 

5% 

3% BudOlpf 

JO MJ 


35 

Aft 

Aft 

4%— ft 

34% 

1W Buell 

40 24 

5 

4 

25% 25% 25*— % 

_ 



C 




1 

■Tl 

n% con 


f 

2 

FI 


lift t % 

■ lJj 

f CUB 

JObUUt 

20 

IS3 

1 • 

lift 

mryi 

5 CM] Co 
2% CMXCP 



16 

■ ’ 1 


8*— ft 

■j 



1 

2% 


» 


13% cm 

44 28 

17 

71 

Mft 


Uft— ft 

ifft 

9ft CoesNJ 


u 

3? 

12% 


12% — % 

8% 

4% CaoleA 


5 

12 

Sft 

|l"7 

Sft— ft 

Uft 

to come 

138 102 

> 

107 

12% 

pry 

Uft— ft 

23 

18 ft Cabntn 

40 2J 

23 

98 

28% 

p 1 - ^ 

20*+ ft 

•ft 

4% Cotton n 



78 

AM 

4ft 


lft 

ft coltnwt 



31 

ft 

% 

10ft 

7ft Calprop 

Mt W 

4 

31 

'8ft 

8% 

8%— % 

15ft 


42 Z1 

9 

78 

Ifft 

15 

15% A- % 

3ft 

2 Cntnonl 


S 

2ft 

7% 

2* 

22ft 

13ft CMBTCS 

M 


17 

Uft 

Uft 

Uft— ft 

24 

18ft COnOee 

44 


10 

21% 

71% 

21% 

n 

Aft CarttHf 



108 

fft 

8ft 

9 —ft 

5% 

2ft Cartll 



3 

7% 

2% 

2%— ft 

13 

7% CareB 


15 

11 

11% 

lift 

11% 


S% CareA 

.10e U 

14 

4 

ion 

ton 

Wft— ft 


Sft CareEn 


17 

1 

10 

10 

10 

36 CoroPpf 548 TM 


2SBZ 42 

AIM 

4ift— in 


Sft Cesbtan 

461155 

7 

23 

A* 

4% 

4% 

KT7 1 

15ft CasKAs 

JO 17 

10 

74 


21% 

Zl%— % 


25% Co*Fd 

220o 7J 


AX 30ft 

99% 

30ft + ft 


20% COOMpt 

350 U7 


2Kb 

25% 

24* 

25%+ * 


?% CM3e 

ijeoiu 


13 

13% 

l-^y 

Uft — ft 

12 


16? 

3 

17 

1^' 

17 +% 


30 10 

8 

39 

6ft 


6%— % 

4ft 

' i 


15 

xn 

3ft 

V’ 

3%— ft 

17% 


22 44 

17 

• 

.15 


15 + ft 

40 

\ l J » ,r g 

34 J 

19 

244 

11 


35 — * 

21% 

I ' * aTr^jiH 

1200 60 

10 

9 

1 ,1 

1 fly 

ifft+ n 

44ft 

SCftGMtDnf ATS 


250* 36% 


36% +1% 

23 

fft CWftn a 

.15 4 20 

• 

20 

• T. 

T9%— ft 


lift CltadM 
16% CtfFef 


14 

329 

24% 


24ft + % 


180b 4.1 

8 

26 


24 

sm+ % 


27ft CitFs>pt250 62 


5 

* 

40% 

«%+i 


V i’, »» '• imO 

12% 5J 


n 


38% 

38%—% 



480 25 

10 

3 

IC 

11 

11 — % 


rrrT-^r*^ 

25e u 

11 

18 

31 

r.yi 

41 —1% 



.M 4 

H 

5 


F_1 

26%+ % 

1 » 

3ft Ceenrr 



52 

5 

4% 

4% 

■ 'ir 

6% Coho 

40 22 

9 

5 

9% 

9ft 

9% 

■c ji 

2 CdF wt* 


2 

6% 

•% 

6% 






un 

Mft 






3 

10ft 

TOft 

ion— % 


ft comdrC 



143 

lft 

•1 




104 

Ilf 

7% 

7 

7%+ ft 


6% Compo 



5 

«ft 

■ft 

c% 


7ft QnpCn 


IS 

Ml 

Bft 

Bft 

8% 


5ft OnoFri 


1? 

119 

7% 

7* 

7ft + ft 

22 


50e 17 


1 

1 

Uft 

isn+ ft 

■?LJ 

7% CcnCdF 


5 

42 

kjq 

8ft 

8ft— ft 


6% CenrUv 


8 

12 

r ^ 

18ft 

W%+ ft 


H Cnru-Mm 


7 

264 

Mft 

IS 

16%—®% 

lift 

5ft COPO0 


40 

70 

6% 

6% 

A* + ft 

7ft 




20 

7* 

Sft 

2*— ft 


8ft ConsOG 


A 

87 

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New issue 


These Bonds having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


March 1985 



Toei Company, Ltd. 

Tokyo, Japan 


DM50000000 

3%% Bond Loan with Warrants of 1985/1990 
Unconditionally and irrevocably guaranteed by 

The Sumitomo Bank,- Limited 

Osaka, japan 

Issue price: 

Interest date: March 26 

Repayment: March 26, 1990 

Subscription Right: Each bond in the principal amount of DM 5000.- is provided with one Warrant. 
From April 29, 1905 on 855 Shares of Common Stock of 
Toel Company, Ud. can be subserfoed lor each Warrant 
at a subscription price of V 448 per share. 

Listing: Frankfurt (Main) 


Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 


Nomura International Limited 


Credit Lyonnais 


Daiwa Europe 
Limited 


DG BANK 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 


Genossenschaftliche 
Zentralbank AG - Vienna 


Mitsui Finance 
International Limited 


The Nikko Securities Co., 
(Europe) Ltd. 


Sumitomo Finance 
International 


Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) Limited 


Abu Dhabi 
Investment Company 

Alahli Bank of Kuwait (K-S.CJ 

Al-Mal Group 


Compagnre de Banque 
ct d'lnvestissemcnts, CB1 


Kidder, Peabody International 
Limited 


Nomura Europe GmbH 


CrMR Commercial de France 


Arab Banking Corporation - 
Daus & Co. GmbH 


Dai-lchi Kangyo International 
Limited 


Klein wort, Benson 
Limited 


Norddeutsche Uadeduak 
Girozentrale 


Baden-Wurttembergische Bank 
AkliengeselbdMft 


Daiwa Bank 

(Capital Management) Ltd. 


Kokusai Europe 
Limited 


Osterreichbche Underfunk 
Aktiengesetlscfcaft 


Krediethank N.V. 


SaL Oppenfaehn jr. & de. 


Banca del Gotta rdo 

Banco di Roma per la Svizzera 


Daiwa Europe 
(Deutschland) GmbH 


Deutsche Bank 

AktiHjcKlItduft 


Kuwait Foreign Trading 
Contracting & Investment Co. 
(5.A.K.) 


Orion Royal Bank 
Limited 


Bank fur Gemeiiiwirtschaft 
AktiengeseilKbaft 


Deutsche Girozentrale 
-Deutsche Kommunafbank- 


Kyowa Bank Nederland N. V. 

Landesbank Rherufand- Pfalz 
- Girozentrale - 


Pierson, HekfringA Pierson N.V. 

Postipankki 

Priratbanken A/S 


Bank Gutrwilleiv Kura. 
Bungener (Overseas) 
Limited 


Dominion Securities Pitfietd 
Limited 


Lloyds Bank International 
Limited 


N.M. Rothschild & Sons 

Limited 


Bank Leu International Ltd. 
Bank Mees & Hope NV 


Dresdner Bank 
AkdcngeseirscbaM 


LTCB International 
Limited 


Sanwa International Limited 


Bank of Tokyo International 
limited 


DSL Bank 

Deutsche Sled lungs- and 
Undesrentenbaak 


Manufacturers Hanover 
limited 


J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. 

Limited 


Bank/. VOnfobef A Co. AG 


Effectenbank-Warburg 

AHteogeselfediaA 


Merck, Fincfc & Co. 

B. Metzfer seeL Sobn & Co. 


Smith Barney, 

Harris Upham & Co. 
Incorporated 


Banque Cine rale 
du Luxembourg S. A. 


Robert Fleming & Co. 
Limited 


Mitsubishi Finance International 
Limited 


Sumitomo Trust International 
Limited 


Banque Paribas Capital Markets 


Banque Populaire Suisse S.A. 
Luxembourg 

Bayerische Hypotheken- und 

Wechsel-Bank 

AktiengeseUsctufl 


Girozentrale und Bank der 
flsterrelchischen Spaikassen 
Afct i etige eH techaW 

Goldman Sadis 
International Corp, 


Mitsui Trust Bank 
(Europe) S.A. 


The Taiyo Kobe Bank 
(Luxembourg) S.A. 


Samuel Montagu & Co. 
Limited 


Takugin international Bank 
(Europe) S.A. 


Morgan Guaranty Lid 


Tokai International 
Limited 


Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Georg Hauck & Sohn Bankiers 
KommanditgcscilKhaft auf Aktien 


Nederlandsche 
Middenstandsbank nv 


Trinkaus & BurkWdl 


Hessisdie Landesbank 
- Girozentrale - 


New Japan Securities Europe 
Limited 


. Vereins- und Westbank 
AUngMOschaft . 


Joh. Berenberg, Gossler & Co. 

Bergen Bank A/S 

Berliner Bank 
AkltmgcsellKlMft 

Banfchaus Gebnuder BeUimann 

BHF-BANK (Schweiz) AG 


Hill Samuel & Co. 
Limbed 


The Niltko Securities Co., 
(Deutschland) GmbH ' 


Wako International (Europe) Ltd. 


Industrie bank von lapan 

(Deufsditandi 

AkticngeKlIsc&aft 


Nippon Credit International 
(HKJ LW. 


M.M. Warburg-Bruidonann, 
Wirtz A Co. 


istituto Banca rio 
San Paolo di Torino 


Nippon Kangyo Kakumaru 
(Europe) 

Limited 


Westfalenbank 

AlaieigmHwtaft 


Yamaidii International (Europe) 
limited 




5* 




HWU» Merit 

Dto. YU. PE 

NOtMM 

La* 



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7% KwGavo 

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16 

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15 

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18 

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13% 

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13 — % 

27ft 

21 KaratC 

232 87157 

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l l- 1 

2% 

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75 

2% 

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7% 

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7 

3 

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39% 

23% LakaSR 

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49 

32 

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44 19 9 

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52 


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78 

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48 

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27% 

72% Lsntohe 

11 

35 

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26% +1* 

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A 

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4ft 

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2 

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19 

153 

at 

37% 

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Ji £74 

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13% 

6% LuntfyE 

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16 

13 

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12%—* 

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me Lana 

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M* 

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JO U U 

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10% 

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JO 2.1 9 

73 

Mk 

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m 


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7 

27 

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17 


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1% 

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5% 



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30 

11% 

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11% 


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47 

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21 

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I 1, ill 

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10 

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37 J 16 

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494 

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zn 

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12ft MayEos 

2J0 142 33 
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25 

3 

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3% 

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1 

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11% 

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a 

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22 

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35 

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ft 

un 


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33 

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no 

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30 

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■ 


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24% 

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X UJ 

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14% 


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180 28 W 

ft 49% 49% 

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JOblJ 17 

» 

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780 1 J 17 

59 

14% 

15% 

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4% 



103 

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75 

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44 

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86 

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24 

ft 

ft 

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14 

80 

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5 

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130 

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lift NwpCI 

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13% 

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65 

1% 

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11% 

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7 

51 

10ft 

10% 

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3% 



1 

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19 

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11% 

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13* NoCdOo 


11 

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35 

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32ft 

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11% 

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9% 

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88 

9% 

9% 

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14 

14 

23% 22% 

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22% 

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At 

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20% 

20%—% 

12 

4 odetAn 

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120 

a 

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Mft 

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53 

47 

Wb 

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18% 

9* OftArt 

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17ft 

9* Oisteni 

24 14 14 

17 

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14* 

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7ft 

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52 

4* 

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7ft 

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a 

30 

7ft 

7 

7ft 

■ 

5* OriotHA 

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4 

1% 

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1* 

38% 

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78 

36% 

35% 35%—* 

7% 

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10 

6ft 

6 

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2 

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317 

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Wft tft 
Wft Bft 
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14 26ft 
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27 21ft 


Si 


1166 „ 
Zl% 17 
22ft 77ft 
2D 13% 
17 Uft 
lift 14ft 
17ft 13ft 
Ifft IS 
fft 7ft 
34ft 14ft 

’ft 31 *! 

39ft 38ft 
■ft Sft 
fft 1ft 
16% lft 
Sft 216 
15% 7Y6 
11 Sft 
45M 32ft 
21ft 13ft 
2ft lft 


PGEptA 

PGEpffi 

PGEpfC 

PGEMD 

PGEPfE 

PSEpfC 

POEPfP 

PGEpfZ 

PGEpfY 

POErrfW 

pee prv 

PCBrfT 

PGEpfS 

PGEpfR 

PGEpTO 

PCEpfl- 

PGEPTK 

POEsdi 

PCEPfl 

PGTrn 

PBCUpf 


150 114 
147 113 
145 122 
145 124 
US 124 
UD 124 
454 TX1 
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Ui 12.1 
237 124 
242 123 
254 125 
242 02 
247 124 
240 113 
245 125 
244 124 
242 Oji 
149 713 
144 34 
450 124 




12ft 
lift 

12 Mft 
U lDft 
28 10ft 
36 10ft 
22 31ft 
27 31ft 
15 2CM 
104 21ft 
422 79ft 

71 20ft 
3 21ft 
Ml 19ft 

13 16ft 
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■ 4 16ft 
3 Mft 
6 fft 
131 23% 


12ft 17% + ft 

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IBft 10% — M 
18ft mk + ft 
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26ft 26ft + ft 
21ft 21ft 
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72 

set 

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lift 

lift 

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10 —ft 

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43ft 

41 

a 

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48 

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Ttft TOft TOft- ft 

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10 15 18 + ft 

Mft Mft MH 

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MM Bft 24ft +t 
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90 39ft 29ft ft 
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32ft 23ft 22ft + ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
111. lft lft 
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3ft 3ft 3ft 
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27M 37M 27ft 


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10% 


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7% 

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78 

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17ft SOoap4 

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ran 

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60ft 

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12 

23 

5 


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4%— % 
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AA 

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15 

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7 

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18 

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38 

17ft 

18% 

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4 

11% 

11* 

11% + ft 





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.166 U 63 

4 

ran 

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JB 

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47 

14% 

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Uft + ft 


5* SHco 


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3 

& 

8% 


15 

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M 

14 14 

1 

14% 

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23 

3% 

3ft 

3ft— % 





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At 

32 

12 

14% 

14% 

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33 

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200 U.1 15 

57 

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JO# 84 

2 

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7* SCEdpf 
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L06 

1J0 

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9ft— % 

11% 

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7.T9 

112 

13 

10% 

w% 

tott— % 


73 SCEdpf 

4J8 

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13* 

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145 

IU 

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37ft 

27* SCEdPf 
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a% 

238 

112 

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221 

114 

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7JB 

UD 

38 

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63ft 

83ft— 1* 

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A% Sprionrt 



29 

7% 

7% — ft 

10ft 

6% Sprkpt 

1D0 

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16% 

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J9 

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80 

toft 

15% 

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8% 

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8 

6 

6 + ft 

■ 15 

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J4 

23 20 

40x IB* 

w% io%+ % 


8% Sondten 


188 

St 

8* 

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2 

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283 

1* 

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5ft 

3% Sorowt 



61 

*ft 

5 

5 


4% Slttavn 

DI 

LI 51 

1 

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13% StoPrd 

JO 

35 6 

M2 

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72* 

53* stdahr 


11 

2 

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■ U-J 

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11% StorrTH 


22 

17 

17% 

17* 


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4 

19% 

19% 

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5* 

4% stncop 



17 

5% 

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3% 

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15 

27 

2% 

2* 

2H— ft 

23 

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27 

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9 

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7ft 

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7 —ft 

6 

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Aft 

IS 

11% SumtEPflJO 13J 

2 

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6% SonClY 


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10 

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3 

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r 

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14% 

14%— ft 

2f* 

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130 

49 1? 

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24 

8% 

36% 

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18 

a 

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Mft lift 
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non 

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lift 


26% 

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536 

17ft 

13% 

14 

10 % 

5 

37ft 

6% 

lift 

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10% 

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as 

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11% 

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10 % 

15% 


17% 

34 

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7H 


6ft WTC 
17ft Warner 
MM Woice 
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3ft vnftHA 
63M imw 
17 WRIT 
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3ft wmfro 
13% WtMdPf 
mftbetr 
3M weoco 
lift Wedten 
7 WekSTb 
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2% WMGrd 
16ft WOOD 
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7ft WMBrC 
0% WetDre 
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7% WTHtttln 
Mft WlfWT 
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7ft WtBocO 
19ft W lntln 
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5 

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140 74 15 
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n un im 

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2 7ft 7% 

m w fftiOi ft ' 

28 21ft 32% 

A fft fft 

10 lift lift 
45 MM 
17K 17% 17% 
21 1% 1% 

11 Aft Aft 

AZ Bft Uft 

3 lft fft 
41 lilt Uft 

A 9M fft 
5 Sft 9ft 

S B* 27% 
lft 1ft 
32 12H 12 


7ft— Y 
2M-T 
Uft 

4 


lft 

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31 —I 


fft-1. 

Ilft-l 

A2. 

ift - - 



l» UJS 

Mark I 


Uft 

5% 

5% YankCa 

4 YonMra 

M 

9 

U 1) 

• 

s 

•ft 

Sft 

Aft 

Sft 

6% + 

5% • 

1 



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• -- 

11 

9% Ztmar 

M 

1J . 

21 

•ft 

•ft 

6% + 



I AMEX Higkg-Lom March 2 


lift AM 
12 7M 
20% 5ft 
Mft fft 
IF* 13 
10ft 6% 
T3M fft 
6% 2% 
Aft lft 
22 % TJtk 
sfn n* 
■ Sft 


T Bor 
TEC 
rie 
Tit 

TBbPde 

Tender 

Towy 

Teem 

TctiAm 

TtJrSym 

TochOp 

TecllTP 


Jit 7J U 35 
JOB 9 21 1 

Iff 52* 
45 33 

JO u 12 53 
12 

40 2* 12 23 

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M 29 

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7ft 7 7 

10% MM 10ft 
Aft Aft Aft 
10% 10% TO* 
18% M Uft 
7 7 I 

13ft 13ft 13ft 
3ft 3% 3H 
2ft 3% 2% 
Ifft Iflk Tfft 

st sift aft 


— ft 


— % 
+ % 

— ft 

— ft 
M 


— ft 

— M 

— ft 


figurai ore unoffldaL Yearly Wn and tows reflect 
the previous 52 


_ Meets Pte (he corrunf tmfc but not It* 

latest tradtno day. Wh er e a split er atodt tgvktond 
Qrnouiitins to 25 percent or more hen bun pokL Iw y®or*a 
Wstviow ranee and dividend are *twwn tor the new stock 


only. Unto* omerwt* notea rales at dividends are annual 
dMiwsetnentsI 


bamd an ttw tateet etodarotlon. 

a— dividend also extra (s). 

b— annucA raft afUtektond plus JtedkMvJdend. 

c— IkeridaHna dMdend. 

etd— cafled- 

U— new yoarty tew. 

*— di vktand drciarod or paid In pracedino 12 months, 
p— dMdtnd m Canodlan tand* sublect to 15% non- 
roatdencetoc 

i— dividend dedonjd after «bW-up or mode div idend. 

V— cfhrtdend msM ttui vwir, wiilttiuL ovtcrmt or no odtao 


taken at iotasf dividend meettna. 

' or pafcf IMs veer, an occumulatlve 


h- dividend declared 

tome with (Bvfdcnds k» arrears. „ 
it- new issue in the mP 52 swa in . The hisMow ran * 
bestns with the stort of tradlno. 
r*d — next day del tverv. 


P/g — prtcee u i [J nas i 

ivUend declared or paid In u ra c odk ei 12 months, plus 


stock dhrWeiML 

stock Stun. Dividend begins with date at split. 


I— dividend Paid to stock In pr eceding 12 months. 

ex-dUlilbutlan date. 


cash nhMMftAMMv 
l>— now yearly 


. . _ afyltML. 
tradtoatedteiT 
vt— to bcnfcnnVcv or realveraMp or bring reorganized 
under the Ba nkru ptcy Act, or securities assumed tty such 


wd- whe n distributed, 
wt — when Issued. 


•x-dtvfdendorexrisftfs. 
s— ex^strfttuhon. 

-without wurrontk 
ex -dividend and sates to tutL 
ytd — ytefd. 

‘ InfWtL 


HIM HlOtlS U 


ABIPuPIJ 
Movie lab 
Stmdthftn 


OzFstScP 
NY Times 
Snmatiftwt 


Crownlnd 
PasPLon 
Super Ind 


SCE1 


NSW UMM 11 


Acttonlnd 

iRtffikntwt 


AstrotcBPf 

JetAmertco 


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MonMnd 


FIschrF 


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Mexico Said Readh 
To Sign Debt Pact: 


- H 

-u*h 


'a 


Roden 


’•<1 
•■n-Olt 
, * af 


VIENNA — Mexico should sign the fir - 
phase of a $48*tnlfian debt rcscheduhnz ap 
meat Friday in New York as planned, the he 
of the committee that negotiates on bdialf 7 
Mexico's bank, lenders said Monday. 

William R. Rhodes, a senior vice president* 
Citibank, also said that an announcement so - 
would be made on a 1985 agreement betwe- 
Mexico and the International Monetary Fur 1 
the last stage of a three-year debt rqwymc ' 


_ circles have expressed doubts abc ; 1 1 
Mexico’s abffity to comply with IMF econanV “ 
targets, particularly bringing inflation down : 

35 percent this year. \ 


P9W IS 

Oh Rl 
3 NMtt 


The IMF accord would pave the way * 
Mexico's creditor banks to reschedule area' " ~ 


520 binioa in previously restructured drift C .7 
ofS5 billion 


the balance 1 


billion lent last year. r." 

Mexico said it would prepay 51.2 Wfiori^ 7 ' 
the $5 billion, after delaying a first instajhot ■ ; , 7 
and raising the prepayment anxaot fiwt^,.' 7 ’ 
billion to show good faith. It paid out $ 4 %.“. 
ntiHion late last year and bankers said tt-'V. 
expect the S950 million outstanding to be •' 
paid in soon. v 

Banking sources said they expected' a sofc: . 
cuauly good response to the rescheduling ter 

to sign commitments on Friday. 


BEAR 

STEARNS 


ttos .wirusufK ritHW .enHMtk ,ts .1 matliT vrt nt i«d imty 


1,000,000 Shares of Common Stock 


United Bankers, Inc. 


The sale of these shares was arranged by 


Bear Stearns International Corporation 
London 


a whollyowned subsidiary of 


Bear, Stearns & Co. 


NewVbrk/Atlanirf/lit strin/Chrcaso/Dallas/Los Ang^tVSan Franc md 

Amsterdam/Ci'wv.i/Hong Kung/London/Piiris 


March 1W 


\1l 

Usnm 

•"* 

— it, if W| 

. 

- :^Uu«h« 
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tlfteHf 
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: JifiHf 

J'f'iviiL a 

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'liVkIl 




Small space 
advertising in 
the International 
Herald Tribune 
is less expensive 
than you might 
imagine. 

For price 
details call these 
numbers or 
your nearest 
IHT advertising 

representative. 


l J° r s tate»Rnfl 




M 


aMHK Mb.J 

“‘•■fslMi* teif 

Mrik ll 

v,< Nd 

ft 

N*co 


4m 


Paris: 747.46.00 ^ 
London: 836.4802 •' 
New York: 752389Cy <. 
Frankfurt: 72.67.55.; 
Hong Kong 5.42090f 


Iht 








yire Says Its Earning 
)se 25.3% Last Year 


CVTERNATIOiVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESD AY. IVLARCH 26, 1985 

COMPANY NOUS 



Page 15 


* * 5 £ s 


By Dinah Lee 

vemadonal Herald Tribune 

i NG KONG —Swire Pacific 
' ^ ; ,1 m parent company of Hong 
s Cathay Pacific Airways 
‘ aid Monday that its net prof- 
: ,1984, after taxation 'and mi- 
' TJ interests, rose 25.3 percent 
48 billion Hong Kong dollars 
. x 4 nriffion), from 8372 million 
"'.)inl983. / 

, re has five divisions: aviation 
^ ,btels. property, shipping and 
<■', .re services, and industries 
^ !;;‘ading. 

, company traces its origins to 
' “1 jiding house of Butterfield & 

1 '• which was set np in Shang- 
d in Japan in 1866 and 1867. 

■ 'yarded as one of the most 
-.e of the original “hongs,” or 
concerns, m the region. 

:• ^ company is now pan of the 
*■ i ' Group, based in LnnHnn 
.» company recommended a 
jtividend for the year of 126 
• j , Iper “A” share, compared 
"■ 134 cents in 1983; and of 252 
; iper “B” share, np from 20.8 


increase in net profit from im- 
proved load factors and yields, en- 
hanced by capital profit on equip- 
ment sales and refinancing. 

But both the shipping and prop- 
erty operations continued to suffer 
from a depressed market, despite a 
recent upturn in the local residen- 
tial property market after a slump 
of three years. 

Swire Properties Ltd.’s net profit 
for 1984 was below earlier expecta- 
tions. Mr hliW 


Sfazuid Discusses 

UJL Production 



®3ir £ 



£ £ - jouncing the results, the 


— - 9 — — — yC2T f uut uui 

avia turn, industrial and trading op- 
erations picked up the quite small 
differential there.* 

, Mr. Miles also mentioned Ca- 
thay Parc’s exposure to currency 
fluctuations and the effect on reve- 
nues of the strong U.S. dollar, to 
w Wch the Hong Kong dollar has 
b«n linked since October 1983 
through an arbitrage package with 
note- issuing banks. 

He said tie stren gthening of the 
Hang Kang dollar was "less help- 
far as the year progressed, when 

— — - - - - it - — ■ _ m 


TOKYO — Suzuki Motor 
Co. ^discussing joint produc- 
of comma, i.ial vehicles de- 
sign by Suzuki in Britain with 
Bedford Commercial Vehicles, 
a British division of General 
Motors Com, a Suzuki spokes- 
man said Monday. 

An Japanese newspaper. 
Nippon Kogyo Shimbun, re- 
ported that Suzuki would sign a 

production agreement in 
or July with the aim of 


Bayerischo Vereinsbank 
Says Profit Rose 6% in 1984 


assembly earl 



J early __ 

making IQ.000 vehicles in the 


first year. 

Suzuki said it and Land 
Rover Santana SA started pro- 
duction in Spain tins month of 
off-road vehicles with 1,000-cn- 
mc-centuneter (61-cnhio-inch) 
engines. In Detroit, Automotive 
News reported that GM and 
Suzuki were dwrai-ccw^r a joint- 
production venture in 
with annual capacity of 170,000 
Suzuki cars. 


Reuters 

MUNICH — Bayerisdhe Ver-. 
onsbank AG's group net profit 
rose 6 percent in 1984 to 185.97 
million Deutsche marks ($57.93 
million) from 175.40 uriffion DMin 
1983, Maximilian Hacld, chafrmap 
of the management board, said 
Monday. 

The dividend was unchanged at 
11 DM per share, he said. 

The parent bank's 1984 partial 
operating profit, which excludes 
earnings from .trading on its own- 
account, -declined 43 percent over 
1983 to. 531.7-miIlion DM. 


out 1984, he said. In 1983, the aver- 
age margin was 3 percent. 

•Mr. Hack! said 1984's 
were totally satisfactory even 
though at the operating Ievd 1983 
results could not be quite matched. 

However, bank officials said 
profits picked up strongly in the 
second half of 1984. Atmid-year, 
the partial operating profit was 15 
percent below the mld-1983 level 
because of slack credit demand. 

. Mr Hade] said Bayerische Ver- 

5DCnanlr etill imu i ■ « 


ecwiomy does not deteriorate sig- 
mfioantly. The company posted a 
IJ®tax profit of 322 mdhon rand 
(SI 693 million) in 1984. 

Beecham Group PLC said that it 

R K d accc P lanc ss for 
niV 14 ^* Unibond Hnlriirw 
nXTs ordinary stock. The offer 
w“ °° basis of 45 Beecham 
shares for every 71 Uni- 
bond shares, or 225 pence (52.63) 
per Umbood share. 


share capita] of £50 million (5583 
million). 

Philips NV said it agreed with 
Kyocera Ctnp. to form a joint Jap- 
anese company that will market the 
T *“’ t Sopho-Net system, which 


enables incompatible computer 
Each 


Mr. Hack! said Bayerische ex- 
pects its interest margin to drop 
under pressure this year, but is op- 
timistic that an inaease in business 
volume will offset the decline. 


The average interest margin on 
business in the first two months of 
1985 declined to 2.68 percent from 
an average of 2.75 percent through- 


provisions. 

. While domestic credit risks show 
signs of declining, there seems no 
solution to the international debt 
problem and provisions in this sec- 
tor were increased during 1984 “by 
a not inconsiderable amount,” he 
said. He did not elaborate. 

However, overall, the group 
made published risk provisions of 
416 44 million DM, down. on the 
1983 volume of 50231 million DM. 


— wants to 

set up a trust business subsidiary in 
Japro but has not yet worked out 
details, officials of the bank’s To- 


kyo branch said. They rferifrw^ [q 

Ms that 


comment on reports that Chase will 
set upits subsidiary in cooperation 
with Daiwa Bank Ltd. 


•wan, Michael Miles, nn fed 


matched against their key earning 
e At 


r“**j « uic 

more than one billion 

* '■*-? that he set last July, when 
; tnpany acquired Swire Prop- 

JLtd. 

* ,;i | idded that he saw “generally 
; 1 ■ stable prospects.” 

* * < Miles said details would not 
^ - iirted until' the annual gener- 
ating, at a later dal* 

c ■ iiay Pacific continued to be 
: Kip’s most important source 
une. The airline showed an 


conwiries, the yen, the Australian 
dollar, the Deutsche mark and the 
British pound. 

Mr. MUes also mentioned the 


Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Sets Initial Share Issue 

D 


& 


company’s hopes of becoming 
more involved m China’s offshore 


oil-exploration program. 

“At the moment, Chinese au- 
thorities tend to say that the off- 
shore oQ development will be ban-* 
died by Chinese interests, but my 
impression now is that Hong Kong 
is more and more included in those 
interests,” he said. 


tefos 

TOKYO — Nippon Tetegi 

Telephone Corp. will be « mj? 

ai 780 billion yen (53.053 biffion) 
when it is inaugurated as a private 
company on April ! and ends its 
monop oly of Japan’s public tele- 
communications, a spokesman for 
the state-run corporation said 
Monday. 

The company will initially issue* 
15-6 mill ion shares with a face val- 
ue of 50,000 yen each, the spokes- 
man said. He said the government 
will hold one-third of these shares 


permanently and two-thirds until it 
is authorized to sell them by the 
Diet, the parliament. 

Nippon Telegraph & Tele- 
phone’s articles permit it to issue 
up to 62.4 million shares but it is 
not known when it will issue stock 
after the initial 15.6 mfllinn the 
spokesman said ■ ■ 

Securities industry sources said 
tbe government apparently aims 10 
seO half its total holdings to the 
public over a five-year period, and 
tfa^rest of its disposable portion 


AH proceeds from the sales, 
which would amount to 5300 bil- 
lion yen if the shares were sold at 
face value, will be counted as gov- 
ernment revenue, they w id_ 

The company, now called Nip- 

g on Telegraph & Telephone Public 
°rp., reported turnover of about 
4,500 billion yen in the year ended 
March 31, 1984. 

The government’s privatization 
of the corporation, which has 
320,000 employees, is a cornerstone 
of its deregulation of the public 
idin-OTmmmiairimis market. 


muusu Gets U.S. Base 


CWcorp Remittance Service, a 
subsidiaiy of Citicorp, said it is 
introducing an electronic draft 
payment system called WorWlink, 
which virtually eliminates paper- 
work associated with foreign cur- 
rency drafts. 

Fte SpA’s truck subsidiary, In- 
dustrial Vehicles Coqx, or Iveco, 
will build and equip a factory at 
Nanjing, C hina , to produce under 
licence an initial 50,000 light indus- 
trial vehicles a year, company offi- 
cials said. The value of the con tract 
was put at 5450 million. 

Grand Metropolitan PLC said It 
plans to sell the U-S-based Pinker- 
ton Tobacco Co. because it does 
not fit in with Grandmet’s long- 
term objectives. It also said it was 
seeking to seD Liggett & Meyers 
Ina, another U3L tobacco unit 
PMffiMgEMfl National Bank has 
announced plans to form a new 
merchant bank in Lnndrm subject 
to regulatory approval. The bank, 
to be known as Philadelphia Na- 
tional Ltd, will have authorized 


systems to communicate. 
company win have an equal stake 
in the venture, but financial terms 
were not riven. 

Ranma-Repola OY, a Furnish 
maker of oil-well rigging, has won a 
$4S-mfllion order to hdp Soviet 
yards build two 140-meter (462- 
foot) jack-up rigs, a company offi- 
flal said The rigs arc for use in 
Arctic waters. 

Rkoh Co. has signed an agree- 
ment with American Telephone & 
■Telegraph Co. under which Ricoh 
will become a sales agent in Japan 
far ATfiT^j*enerai-puipose com- 

Saxon Industries Inc, a disiiibo- 
tor of paper products, said a U.S. 
bankruptcy coin in New Yak has 
confirmed its reorganization plans. 
Saxon, which has been operating 


under protection of Chapter II of- 
the Bankruptcy Code since April 
1982. has reached an agreement to 
be acquired by Alco Standard 
Corp. as pan of the plans. ; 

Sana Mead Co. said it will buy* 
35.49 million shar e* qj 223 pe-t 
cent, of Pan-Electric Industries- 
LttL, for 124.23 million Smgaporc. 
dollars (55536 million). The shares 
will be bought from Wesco Nomi- 
nees SDN. 


Toyo Soda Manufacturing Co. 
plans to begin selling aspartame, a * 
low-calorie sweetener, in srane Eu- 
ropean countries in April, the Jtma-' 
nese financial daily Nihon Kazai 
Shimbun said. Toyo Soda will sdl 
the sweetener in countries in which 
G.D. Seadc A Co. does not have 
patent rights, the newspaper said. 

W ashin g t on Post Co. has started 
a tender offer for 1.! m inio n of its 
own class B common shares, at 
5112 each. The company the 
offer, which is not conditioned on 


the receipt of any minimum q urn- 
will expire on April 


Canada Sets Rescue Plan 
For Ailing Alberta Bank 


ber of shares, , Y , U 

12 unless extended, and that with- 
drawal rights will expire on April 8. 


Reiners 

OTTAWA — The Canadian 
government announced a 255-mil- 


Japanese Firm to Drill 
For Oil off Califo rnia 


J^i>tionar j (S I 85.4-niillion)' pro- 

~ J * Canadlftn 


— — j to keep -i^. ■ *m mm 

ial Bank afloat, following 

detenoratioo in its 
VS. loan portfolio. 

Barbara McDougall, minister of 
state for finance, said an infusion 
of capuaJ with repayment provi- 
sions bad been agreed by six Cana- 
dian chartered banks, Canada De- 
posit Insurance Corp., the 
government of Canada and the 
province of Alberta. Canadian 
Commercial Bank is based in Ed- 
monton. 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Idemitsu Oil Devel- 
opment Co. said Monday that it 
bad reached bask agreement with 
Atlantic Richfield Co. to take over 
oil exploration and development 
rights to three zones off Santa Bar- 
bara and Santa Maria. California. 


A spokesman at Idemitsu, a sub- 
sidiary of Idemitsu Kosan Co, said 
it planned to sign a contract with 
Atlantic Richfield in April after 
obtaining the consent erf Japan Na- 
tional Ou Corp, which is expected 
to provide loans for the pregea. 


h: Tjij 


Mideast Market SUi 


: By Susan Chira 

_ ’ 'New York Tima Service 

— ■. With the rash of 

. I Turnon projects in the Middle 
" 3 owed or halted by the de- 
— r-o dl income, the United 
... regained frs position as 

in growth market for heavy 
tent. 

Ltd. plans to take ad- 

2 of that situation, and keep 
h its chief competitor, by 
'g to make construction 
•m^ient at a plant in Tennessee, 
jalsu, the world’s second- 
maker of construction 


r„- „ 

J ent after Cateipfflar Trao- 
«;• jm announced hoe last week 
..had agreed. tq. pay $33 mil- wvexy uymg 10 me 
: its first famay in the Unit- in the 1970s, Mr. 
“es. •" - company con~“^ 

uefiew attlkfoimer'KoeKr- * " ““ 


-n 







m? 


— ■V MM* 11 AA 4 U- 

, , plant m Chattanooga, Ten- 

llV) ^aui^rohedulediobeginbytbe 
AH. v Lilfliof 1986. By 1988, the com- 
. g .»®id, about 250. workers 

. JJjI he. making heavy constmo 

' 1 li,** L’uuqjment, industrial robots, 

- end laser machining de- 
■ Comatsu said it would afro 

- -about 518 million in plant 

• ent ■ • 

- -..having a direct production 

. - .. the United States, we will 
. - _■ to respond more rapidly to 

: .:sds of the market and our 

:ners there,” said : Shoji 
. • a, Komatsu’s 58-yem-old 
•.el, in a recent interview in 
.Jo's Tokyo office, 
nigh the world market for 
. ...--ebon equipment has shrank 
' .. .erceni of its 1979 levd,- Mr. 

” -a said, the United States is 
he few areas where demand 
aring. He estimated that the 
.. » States accounts for about 
- _ mh of the world demand in 

- - . ‘ - ction machinery. 

•A, said Benjamin Mover, an 
-y analyst for Merrill Lynch 
Markets here, the Unithd 

- J. -r is now the world's largest 

.Ction machiner y mar k fit 

■.ler to increase Komatsu’s 
. ' . .hare,” Mr. Moyer said, fc it 
to expand its market in the 


alsu began as a mal-w of 
and firming equipment in 


■ - — — fa wvjmpuivui 

arose to dominate the Jap- 
In the 



onstruction market. 

however. Us future seemed 
1 by a joint venture between 
ishi and Caterpillar, 
hat time, all of Komatsu’s 
ees thought that if we sal 
^d did nothing, Komatsu 


would just disappear,” Mr. 
Nogawa said. “So we did our level 
best." Now, with low labor costs, 
the weak yen and a reputation for 
quality, Komatsu has become a for- 
midable rivaL 

Manufacturing in the United 
States, Mr. Nogawa and industry 
analysts here said, would enable 
Komatsu to lessen its dependence 
on depressed construction-machin- 
ery markets such as the Middle 
East, cement the loyalties of its 
U-S. dealers, avert future protec- 
tionism and shield itself against 
possible currency fluctuations by 
expanding its non-yen investments. 

When Komatsu began aggrps- 
rivdy tr ying to inoeas£its exports 
•fee said, l the 
. , . , cm ‘the fa^- 

est growing overseas markets — :the 
developing economies of the Mid- ' 
die East , and, to a ksser extent. 
South America. 

In recent years, however, that 
effort has been staited by the inter- 
national debt crisis, the faltering 
price of dl and the war between 
Iran and Iraq. 

Mr. Nogawa said a 17-percent 
decline in export sales in 1984 con- 
tributed to Komatsu's 22.6-percent 
drop in net income, to 594 million. 

To help combat that slide, Ko- 
matsu has pursued the United 
Stales m arket much more actively 
in the last few years, banking on the 
expiration of a technical agreement 
that limited its exports to bulldoz- 
ers until 198Z 

With Komatsu able to offer a 
wider range erf construction prod- 
ucts, it was able to persuade mere 
of its 50 dealers to sdl only Ko- 
matsu-made items. Parts and ser- 
vice make up a large part of dealers’ 
businesses, so dealers prefer manu- 
facturers with a full line. 

Komatsu's U3L sales more than 
doubled last year, to 5300 mi nion , 
from 5130 mution in 1983, and ac- 
counted for 10 percent of total 
sales, Mr. Nogawa said. 

Komatsu now has about a 9- 
percent market share of construc- 
tion machinery in the United 
States, Mr. Nogawa said, and the 
company hopes to expand that 
share to 15 parent to 20 percent 
after it begins production in the 
United States. 

Analysts predicted that Komat- 
su's share would grow to about 30 
percent, and he said that the com- 
panies most likely to be hurt by 
Komatsu's expansion would be 
small ones. 


ina Replaces Presidents 
Major State-Run Banks 


t-’Y ipottiumed from Page 9) 
iL* 'Prioress, they’ve got lobe 
- discipline people.” 
v iolation about Mr. Jin’s dis- 
. becomes all (be more inter- 
■ a light or the fact that the 
" government recently in- 
* ‘ *** propaganda drive 
■ . - corruption, indicating that 
> " / targets” should be singled 
. .v .investigation and exposure. 

. . \\ ‘"og coincided roughly with 
rameat meeting at which 

.■ '■ offi cials began mitring of 

•■■'v./d to punish high officials 
!■ jin “unhealthy practices." 

, . M-ibo, the official m chat®; of 
i 1 tnd commission fa guiding 

..-■ v rnmunist Party’s three-year 
.•itioo campaign, said in a 
\ Feb. 28 that, “to check 


goods,” including unjustified bo- 
nuses, and Mr. Jin was said to have 
been generous with bonuses, ao- 
cording to observers of the Bank of 

nhina. 


On March 18, the South China 
Morning Prist in Hong Kong said 
the Bank of China was reported to 
have failed to comply with govern- 
ment directives ordering national 
enterprises to cut back on annual 
bonuses. 


'jr> h y tendencies,, we should 
r 1 ...afine ourselves merely to 


ig flies’.’' 

•: unsubstantiated theories 
about Mr. Jin’s 

they are: 

■ •> : bonus theory. One of the 
i -uihy tendencies” being 
i/ 1 to has been “the indis- 
■«' <e issuance of nioney and 


• The foreign-exchange theory. 
Some argue that Mr. Jin may have 
been made the scapegoat fa a ru- 
mored “serious drop" in China’s 
foreign-exchange reserves, report- 
ed by the government last fall at 
$16.8 billion. But a commercial 
banker said that based on available 
evidence, the Bank of China ap- 
peared to be doing fairly well as far 
as foreign exchange was concerned. 

• The “turf-battle" theory. It is 
conceivable that Mr. Bn’s activism 
nibbed some more conservative 

fTiin«e h anking and f m an rial nffi- 


the wrong way. The banker 
the victim of a 


could have been 
power struggle with the leaders of 
Other financial institutions. 






IS smt I* t«f S*iHIHHIK5HH9aMSIHHKK IS I 


Over-the-Coimter 


March 25 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales in Net 

IBM High Law 3PJW.OTW 


(Continued from Page 

intue ii is ms 

InMobU 383 TO W 

IRIS 57 !?• llV 

■nttSL H ft M 

IntSiilp 10 24% 24% 

IT Coin 33425% 24% 

IntTntol ,20 7% 7 

Inver* Jlie J 11 4% 4 

InvstSL 81 8% 4% 

M MB 12V, 11% 

MJ 160 9 A 54 38% 3B 

923 8 7% 

I 1136% 36% 


Iwosou 140 9A 
ltd 
I told 


13) 

17*i— % 

VA— % 
24% 

24% 

7 — V* 
4 — % 

■m— % 
n% — % 

38%— % 
7% — % 
36%+ % 


mo iv%— % 
6% 6%— % 
4% 7 +% 
37V. 37%— % 
19% 2D% + % 
11% TS% + % 

37% 38 
33% 23% 

19% 19%— % 


"S "S' 


5% 6V, 

6% 6V.— % 

4 6 %— % 

8% B%— V, 
29% 30 + Vi 

18% 1>%— V* 
U 18 — % 
13V. 13%—% 
4% 4%— % 

4 4 — % 

27 27% + % 

17% 17% — % 
13 13 

\ « 
31 32%— 1% 

33% 33% — 2 
50% 50%— % 
4% 4% + % 
39% 40 + % 
6% 4%+ % 
12% 12%— % 
8% 9 — % 
32V. 32% — % 
5% Sft— % 
B% S%— V. 
15% 14%— % 
1% 1% 

7% 7% — % 
15% 15% 

18% 11% 

4% 4% 


M 

48 

AO 

IS 

Ma 41 

44b 1-B 

44 

39 

t 


280 

58 

X70 

8.1 

JSB 

38 

aiaa 

5J 


u 

M 

48 



481 5% 4% 
UK 4,1 40 34% 24 

JIM i 

JO 28 19 25 24% 

J4 U 14748% HV. 

24 7% 4% 
jM 28 5332% 32% 

722 9% 9% 
t 15 14% U 
JO U 325 4% 6 

tn 3 OIMlft 
51 7% 7% 
22 4 4 

19 4% 4% 
12 5% 5% 
818% 18 




f* 


52% 52% 

* 

«*- 

8% 

6%- 

5ft 

4 

left 

14ft 

22% 

23ft 

3% 

3ft 

6% 

6ft- 

14ft 

14%- 

9ft 

9ft 

Uft 

14ft- 

51% 32 

27ft 27ft 

02% 134 

S 

5% 

44 

46%' 

9ft » 

13% 

0% 

4% 

4%' 

28% 20% - 

a 

47 - 

Uft 

HJft- 

ift 

1ft- 

5% 

M 

9% 

9% 

«% 

Sft 

4% 

4% 


im 
.U A 3D 20% 
5 5% 

* “ ik 

1510% 
172122% 
2438 5% 
J2 18 314 

23 8 
5 9% 

JO 8 45 7% 

67815% 
1 153424% 


13%— % 
20 % + % 
4%— % 
■ — % 
7ft— % 
38% — % 
9% 

21 %—% 
5 % + % 
14 — % 

8 

916— V. 
4%— % 
15%— V. 
25ft— N 


ID* art* 


WS 10>- » 
«% n* a 
3* 3% 

2 *U 29% 

» Jft + H 
S 5% 

Hi * + *8 

37% 77%"- % 
3% Ml- % 
11% IK + ft 
U 13ft + ft 

27ft 77**— ft 
20 % 20% — ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
20% 28V. —llv 
39% 39% * ft 
21ft 21ft- ft 
I9W 19ft 

14% 14%— ft 
Oft IB — ft 

5ft 8% 

17ft 17ft + ft 
1ft 5% — J* 
5ft 5ft- ft 
94ft 24ft— Ml 


15ft 15ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
5ft 4ft 4ft 
12% 12 12ft 
54% 53% 54 
4% 5ft 
14 15ft 15ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft 
5ft 5ft 5« 
lift 11% lift 
42U 42 42 

5ft 5ft 5ft 
14ft 14ft 14ft 
21% 21% 


2% 2ft 2% 
14% 14% 14% 
97% 97% 
20ft 28ft 
4ft 4ft 
20% 20% 
11 % 11 % 
5ft 5ft 


39% 39% 
29ft 29% 
9% 9% 
12ft 13% 
9ft 10% 
18 
Sft BU 
9ft 9% 
4ft 4ft 
Sft Sft 
4ft 4% 
11% 

5% 

I7ft 
37 
8ft 
4ft 
Sft 
15 

Uft 
30ft 
17V. 

19ft 
2ft 
3ft 
23ft 


Floating Rate Notes March 25 


Dollar 


4m 


iWu 


RAX 34 10 9ft 9ft— ft 

RLICP M 19 15 19% 19% 1«%— ft 
RPMl M 3J 281 17% 17 17 — % 
RndSys 3313ft Uft 13ft- ft 

RodtnT 293 13 Uft 12ft— ft 

Radian 2 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 


£3 


a % 

12ft Uft 
34ft 34ft 
4% 4ft 
15ft 15% 
30 
30 
17% 
7313 12% 

225 28% 38 
195 
48 
55 
73 
139 
153 

4419ft 
8% 

11 % 

15ft 
14% 

18% 
lift 
7ft 
3ft 
Bft 




« 

1 J7 9 


m 






mm * 


1880 11-4 
9% 48 
9ft 3*7 
9ft 17-6 
Uft W 
10ft 4-9 
9% EMI 
io% iw 
*ft 29-3 
9ft 31-5 
Bft IW HO.' 
9Vi W 99* 
lift IW MJ 
9% 128 1081 
9% 15-5 99* 

9% 74 no: 

Uft 244 
16ft *5 




v*r 


E23E 


•U*’ 




13 

9-4 

U 

M 

10ft 

» 

9ft 

31-5 

9ft 

21-3 

HV 

94 

9ft 

W4 

9ft 

194 

9ft 

31-5 

9 

297 

9ft 

244 

9ft 

7-4 

11 

344 

ioh 

48 

nu 

49 

9. 

1V7 

10ft 114 

9ft 

194 

Ift 

380 

9ft 

11-4 

9ft 

U-7 

9ft 

37-4 

lift 144 

10ft 

254 

rsv 

13-5 

u. 

778 

lift w 

9ft 

244 

Bft 

118 

Vft 

244 

9ft 

144 

10H. 9-5 

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388 


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North 

East South West 

2* 

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2* 

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3* 

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NORTH (D) 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


Page 17 




IN TER NATI ONAL CLASSIFIED After Explosive Growth, Luster Dims at Mitel 


CEAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LEYSIN: 


• bf car. 
n own " 
ntfcar 


Xi: 


■off. afci 

jno of low SF. rotes 
.mortgages, 


‘swthSSm? 


SPAIN 


SUPER PORT 

if of Unto, 5 mins. Pohno, 15 


to 60 meter* each. I 
s/wnfesr/ftew 




i peer, fuel tfation^cnVacfc 
nmmds, Unround car - 1 




-* in pin. Top inverimet 

; KEWS* 

.» O RUNTA PORTALS, 
Director Cmbstckj! 
'tain 101, fortcris Now 



, iifemrtkrol bexbor 
he tow-rife biddings c 
^5 jni style of old AndSb 
,1em croenities as air-co 
**s-' tort tefdwra, bkIubw. 

__i at pnratepam gcnciv i 
I ." finks mK. Pnws 
■" n* ItHava-tSSI 
■' e 370 sqjn. + 

ussi^ooa 

- [AID - HOW 

■ v K NUD1B M EUROPE 
r, CH-W71 Wuean ! 

. A CK5M3177I. 
e 876059 HOME CH 


■ [EAL ESTATE 
;> RENT/SHARE 


3REAT BRITAIN 




etox 27846 BBDEG. 


388 1736. My funtohed 
<1 HAMPSTEAD [inajry 
at £220 week. 01-904 278 


S AREA FURNISHED 


sf-if i 


it Am de i 

. 7S008 Porto 

JUI REAL ESTATE 
GBIT M PARIS 

4I0NE562 78 99 


randS 



lAMPS-EYSSS Mi 

,2 or Jroom apartment 
Jn* month or mom: 
1ARB7GE 359 67 97. 


,th FAJSANDERIE- 

ihert tom, double M 
xn. 17,000; tot 563 68 


•V* • 

■V 

4 It * 
*A« 


one Teh P 35999 50 


544 39 4a 


000. Tefc 720 37 99 


T\* ■ 4 


Nuo«fi 

U' 


1* 

\ a*" 

?UJ 

** 


“IV 

.4* 

1 


a f 

t~ ? 

ii! 

9 ■" 

I fN 



ADC MQNCEAU. 2 
itoriMAS6sa fossa* 

' Oil 267 0335 evenings 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
j . TO RENT/SHARE 

Paris ABRA Frmmauvn 

i IpM ISNA. Umto doobte Mia 2 
vrtl Turwhad, superb 
vow, sumjr. F9J0lb 720 37 99. 

SfWRT TERM to to* Quarter. 
No agena. Tat 32? 38 83. 

SHAKE AMRTMBMT, lO^ATfora- 
boorg-Saml Dens, short term 8245571 2 

“ COUPtEOTCCWTRAL RAT April 1 
- Jine 3DL G A Tet (747831 SO 

RIUY EOUUteSI APARTMENT in 
carter, 'rtteakfy. no anent 57* 14 00 

ST 7t*i4- 3-4 nxML kmuoow, an 
3* gotten Bcraaa. Aor40d.Sz8943 

_ BTH CHAMPS B.Y5S. Beaukfui 5 
rooms, short tena P2O00a 72D W95. 

— TROCADBia LUXURIOUS &(umv 2 

rooms, tanaca. 6475282 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

„ 6th ST PUODE 

a L ttSaBflP a 

^ 16th PORTE ST CLOUD 

% 1 SfcCOKVOmOR, QawoMs. 
nv baipom, fii modani baft, bttban, 

i set&m&zsmt"** 

35 MST EXECUTIVE HOMBFMJMG- 
* fora&iiriubLltente/setosSn 0945 

81 USA 

SARATOGA SNMKM.Y: 4 bari- 

E REAL ESTATE 

WANTED/EXCHANGE 

MR& TBi BWAU7B - Businessman 
\ Awitevitsh to ram 2 bedroom wart- 

E 

■fl fori*. Mia D DmdS-745 1490' 

S EMPLOYMENT 

" EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 

OYNAABC tADr. GOOO LOOMNO. 

* fluant m awd languages, lorn ac- 
partenae ef lfw exaajiira law) ai (he 
° W3 ottoarem and promafian, acel- 

1 tort fawtatoi. rf Ehtopa AW* 

East and Africa, looUng for raw eW- * 
tongiuB opepcteeHy <Mwra foe an - 
use har wtoiivo, quefity of good 
P*^ ond.nagrtiAr. pr^nid to 
travBl, could ba based m Europe or 


AMBRCAN STOCK WaRSUOt 
fonv near Bade, seeks fuO tone tdts 
aaaM to warii with a yocp of 
. * BB * or ^ ro ^ ,s ; 4gglart riwdd poe- _ 

sea sxcdwl braneMngUi W 
gaaga quoEfiatfiaro, gerand adminB- 
totove sHh mdudng typing, and ba 
w> orgonaed and pencnabtei. Srito- 
ry poamansarate with axpartenca.' 
fond CV to Bax 1969, HarMT^UM, 
92521 Nsa3y Coir iuc. Eranca or 
phot* after 4pm, 7^36 03 Pais. V 

MTUAW OfflCE IN RAM 16G, ° 

saato a pKi-teoa rtcapSoerttyefe ^ 
aorfedly hSnguoi EngUt/Irnnch. n 
Mranum 2 yean axpenanat Pteau .. 
■aid your CV. to Bn I960, Harold ' 
Tribune, 92521 NauSb' Codex. Franca S 

MOHSPS>WGUSHbnguagely|pat □ 
to wodk an word proaesor [11X80 n 
seriesj in Gates], wiln worfcuxjpcxjnra, 
Kgh pay, maitoUt imnadtetei^&n- 

too Mr Barbs, Paris 339 83 3d 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

RAMS BASH) Bnteh women, bifingwA 
I2ywn aspaffanea Angk>3dson ac- 
courtteg, imes porWimo mxOUiriug - 
wart Mtoanwa acnuntiiig transfo- 
ian. Bob 1930, Herald Tribma. 92521 
Neuily Cedax, Fronco. 

ARAB LADY 36, Buart Endbh/ 
French, good pmertafon, tour de- 
graes, scab Warming nafoon with 
axKnny. PO BaT 13-5142 
PhuranJ, Beirut. Lebanon. ' 

SWISS IfftBBTTATTVE. EnqEsh, 
French. Gorman,, bate for a tab to — 
Cameroon. Merited with Cameroon 
woman. 8ax 86, 4147 Aesch Jneor 
BawtSwiberlond. Tet 061/78 254. 1 

BRITISH MASTER SBKS emptoyraant Z 
in large yadiL Be-lanker Cgjtcnu ut- ^ 
tody roGahto. Age 51. T*« a789 
25201, (BoganenJ via Faunia & O- 
big. Strcfina 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 

E.LE JfjflB 

with ear, free to start now. £ 

Grib 264 76 24 PAHS h 

IANOUAOE SCHOOL seeb part Erne 

mother-tongue Enffoh 6 German 
teadim. Must have ffiCpasmertar 
vefid woriana pran CdB So For 
lowri Aim W12 80 

WANTS EXPBBH4CH) American 

TER teodian for fauuuuuiuea unrb- & 
tea Moors raqwrad. GaH wmfadayt 9 
to &Zraai 62263 66 „ 




EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WAN. ED 


in gbse ccn of t 
1 Staff d 




Ikanoed. 


AUTOM OBILES 


tod Mu Quince fans 794 70 94. 


fahm 


toother interior. 


AUTO RENTALS 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR SNORING 
sPEdAuns 

FA0S 

CANNES/MCE 
FRANKHJffT 
BOW/COIOGRC 
STUTTGART 
MUNICH 
MEMRHAVB4 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGELES 
MONTSEAL 

aomis 

Lena 9 to us to bring it to you 



AUTOS TAX TREE 


TAKE THE PRORT 

In yoar new &rogan auto purchase 

aim thrirbuic buying prices cwokfcte 
sr your mdmdoal purdwa fortes* 
igiott 

you toice the profit 
wo do the wort 
Worldwide djpmentx to your 
•peanmtion. 

Send rer^goMian ten 

of Ubcbridge 

(IS minuter ham London Airport 
5 Windror Street, Uxbridge. 
Mtodtese*; England UB8 1AR. 

Tefc UK 89571073/72103 
Tbt UK 8813271 GtCOWfi G 

MYCAR 


COOPS ST JAMB 

OmOALAOBir 
OFAMWraB) LTD 
AND IMW NOtafT AMSHCA 

Me you era m Europe, we con offer 
nadorabte songs an brand new US 




an oho ayjpiy right or hA hand 
tox meBMws at tourist prices, 
tea and/ factory built buBet- 
BMWs and the Atom BMW 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

-tax war 

S MBKEX5 BMW PORSCHE. 

S “^V^A^ 

N 

iJj IHD/BHD, Euno/US no. 

S2 Immertcte / Ebriy ddnery. 

G.T. VBflOE ECPORT5 tfb. 

. Tefc London (Oil 493 4218. 

Sj Tbt 299134 UMCCO O. 

pgjgj 




l BOATS A 

RECREATIONAL 
_ VEHICLES 

WaiRAY FAK FWX Cfflh in LLS_5 
extort to OtMier for 1981 ortoter36tt. 

S ^ ffinS" u " d -* k 

i LOW COST FLIGHTS 



TO IMA FROM £119 ms way. 

NATC London 01734 810a 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 



f PENPALS |_ 


SERVICES 

YOUNG BEGANT 5 

lodtes awatobh os your PA's 

H. Kong 3-7242425(2) »* 

Y 

YOUNG LADY = 

PA/Irtefpnter £ Tourism Guide 

PARE 562 0582 I 



lax m 


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ROLLS-ROYCE 

BENTLEY 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHBS 

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MntoiAj of Monaco 
Tet (93/ 50 54 M 
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Offidd Dfced Factory Denier 
n i n li t1 .li ■ J once 1925 


38SOC, BMW, EXOTIC CABS 

FROM STOCK 

for 4MMSXA7F daivery 
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FOB A REAL VJJ>. TOUNOIAW 
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YOUNG LADY TOUNGUALVFPA 


YOUNG REGANT LADY 

NtoMtegwri WL Poric 525 81 01 


(Continued from Page 9) 

dollars in Toronto on Juty 3 \ , 1984. 
Mitel has since been trading 
Around 9.60 Canadian dollars and 
dosed Friday at $6.75 in New 
York, down 12i cents from Thurs- 
day. 

investor confidence was further 
eroded when banks forced a Mild 
CO-founder and il5 chairman Mi. 
chad Cowpland, to seD off most of 
bis Mitel stock after some of his 
other investments had started to 
sour. Mr. Cowpland is a flamboy- 
ant executive whose penchant for 
high living has been much reported 

WHSTBfWB »«» _ TT 

phorw 27 Wt-«Ho r yog &j i% ms- Aco>rdmg to Duncan CampbdL 
Sffr vice preadent for finance 

™ an(J Ju ^*' fiMncial office ^ 

company was hit by the combined 
effects of the global recession, its 
own, too rapid, expansion and a 
year’s delay in getting its SX-2000 
digital switching system on the 
market Its heavy position in its 
____________________ major markets — buyers of smaller 

iMBrnTUNALBEAuimiL tote] telephone switching devices in the 
Sm AcSf* 10 ™ Umted Stales, Canada and Britain 
— meant that future growto would 
come harder. 

Mitel's management could not 
have foreseen the effects of the re- 
cession, but it should have better 
foreseen problems stemming from 

sfffifes ■* -i assSdS! 

Mr. Campbell said during a inter- 
view at Mitel's head office in Kan- 
ata, near Ottawa, in the heart of 


TOKYO 442 39 79 

BfltCMAN YOUNG PA LADY 


PARIS: 520 97 95 

■UNGUAL YOUNG IADY PA 


Mm & woman guW*®, j*cori)y & r*nt- [ 
m aw u*vxx£ 8 am - 12 pm. 


AMS NOTE THS IHON8 AT 0 

757 52 4& Trusted VJ J\ lady, t 


AT ONCE | 






Utoumci/iairopoan) oompaion. I , 


umw wui uwvwwn, m .. ^ — — Tv ° — ,7 , 

fononci Anaftitf 03456^539 1 2000 “were the most foreseeable. 


Tokyo 545 . 2741 . Tourirg & chop. Mr. Campbell said. “That's really 
gEgg&JggjgjJa where we were sericmsly in error/ 
Mitel strongly objected to sng- 
gesticqis that it should never have 
got into the SX-2000 project in the 


Freoto trawL (llfin 44 77 


iog nufifinfluoL Tat 27 04 57U 


urn nunu - i-oiuwu loung » 

tody (Aagn/Watw) Companion survival WAS Wntoftt directly IO the 

» n> ■■ mum n. ■ tv... rs k.r_ 


aiparfc. 7 oTL/nudnighL HTJiovW. 


Aaotart-Tet 8287V32. 


OUNG OCEAMC UDY 01-245 

9002 Utodon/Akporti/Travd 




Tab font 807 84 95. 


famoto/meto oompguan 


indy, Wfagtoi PA. 500 89 72. 


dan/Heafawnf. Tab 244 7571 


ondpanon- 


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UNITH) STATES 

New Yaric (212) 752-3890. 
Wert Coast-- (415) 362-8339. 


s 41 4031 

(Dept. 312] 

Owtyaqui: 431 9437431 
Una: 417 852 
Pmm« 544372 
5aiJMK 22-1055 
l a nW ago . 59 61 555 
SaoPwfoi 852 1893 

MIDPUEAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 
Jeidaa: 25214- 
Kuwait 5514485. 

: 340044. 

R 416535. 
SawfiArahia: 

foddtdn 667-1 S00. 
LLAJEj Dubai 224T61. 

FAR EAST 

Bwi^wfc 39006^7, 
Hong Kaos 5420906. 
ManM 81? 07 49. 
Ssoub 7250773. 
Bmmi 222-2725- 
Tidwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Talcyae 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydnay: 929 56 39. 

: 500 8233- 


spokeswoman, said: “Had the SX- 
2000 been a failure, the company 
wouldn’t have gone under," 

But Donald Gibbs, Mitel's for- 
mer chief operating officer, said: 
“One error very nearly cost us ev- 
erything," in referring to the SX- 
2000. 

“1 think thqr bet the company’s 
existence on the SX-2000, said 
David Dvorchik, an analyst with 
Moss Lawson & Co. of Toronto. 

Mr. Campbell argued that Mitel 
needed the digital technology that 
it developed for the SX-2000 pro- 
ject for other products, such, as the 
recently introduced Generic 1000 
unit, which upgrades and expands 


Silver Prices 
Jump Sharply 

(Continued from Page 9) 

the “dollar could have peaked re- 
cently.” and he says be thinks that 
preceded the rise in the precious 
metal prices last week. 

One unanswered question hang- 
ing over the giver market is the 
large holdings of the Hunt broth- 
ers, the Texans who tried to domi- 
nate the silver market in 1 980 when 
the price rose to the dizzying height 
of more than $50 an ounce. 

Recently, the Hunts have had 
financial problems with their cor- 
porate holdings. Analysts wonder 
whether the Hums have been liqui- 
dating some of their store of silver. 

Another drag on silver prices is 
that production exceeded demand 
worldwide by somq 52 million 
ounces in 1984, according to 
Handy & Harman, the precious 

metals dealer. 


[Gold Options (prices btS/oE.). 


3RTS& GUIDES 


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FOR 077®? f 4 C FUNDS, SB; 
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Quotes as of: March 25, 1985 


LONDON CAB BCORT S oviot 
Tet 370 71 51. 


anaJog-sttitching 
ita! 


early Mitel 
equipment. 

“The strategy to go with a dig 
system was correct," Mr. Campbell 
said. But he added that Mitef was 
ill-equipped to take on a project of 
the sze and complexity of the SX- 
2000. “It is a completely new ball- 
game to be managing a project of 
that magnitude." 

The company recently has made 
some dramatic fhanpm it has cut 
inventories substantially, reduced 
its worldwide work force from a 
high of 6,400 in November, 1983. to 
about 5,000. put some employees 
on a four-day work week, sold a 
plant in South Burlington, Ver- 
mont, and divested itself of a plant 
in Shannon, Ireland. It has also 
begun negotiations with Thomson 
International SA of France to sell 
an unused plant is New Brunswick, 
reduced heavy research and devel- 


cal management shake-up. Twelve cent, to 26335 million dollare from 
senior executives left Mitel in 1983 23439 million doflare a year esrfi- 
and 1984 and two top executives, er. 


well-known specialists in turning 
companies around, were hired. 

Mitd also has signed a distribu- 
tion agreement with RCA Service 
Co„ a unit of RCA Crap, of New 
York, in an effort to get U.S. salts 
of the SX-2000 moving. 

According to some analysts, the 
changes at Mitel seem to be having 
some positive effects. 

In fiscal 1985’s third quarter, the 
company’s loss shrank to 432 mil- 
lion dollars from the year-carlier 
10.05 milli on dollars. Also in the 
quarter, which ended last Nov. 23, 
sales rose 5 percent, to 98D9 mil- 
lion dollars from 93.48 million dol- 
lars. 


Mr. Campbell expressed “cau- 
tious optimism” about Mitel’s fu- 
ture. “we’re going ia the right di- 
rection and we’re starting to gather 
momentum,” he said. 

But many analysts ore not quite 
so enthusiastic. 

Mr. Dvorchik said that while Mi- 
tel had made “a number of positive 
changes’' during the past few years, 
“essentially the jury is still out” 
about whether the company will 
regain its financial health. 

Murray Grossner, an analyst 
with Richardson Greeoshields of 
Canada Ltd. in Toronto, agreed 
that Mitel was “on the road to 


improvement,” but predicted that 
But for fiscal 1985’s first nin e “recovery will take an extended pc- 
months, Mitel reported a net loss of nod of tune.” 
opmeni expenditures and spun off 32.16 million dollars, a sharp wid- “I think that Mitd was out of 
a subsidiary, Trillium Telephone cuing from the 9 2-million -dollar control for a few years,” be said. 
Systems. loss in the Fust nine months of “In a sense, they dug their own 

Mitel also has undergone a radi- fiscal 1984. Sales rose about 12 per- hole." 



The Trustees of Tufts University 
are pleased to announce 
the successful completion of 

THE CAMPAIGN FOR TUFTS 

The Board of Trustees 
and President Jean Mayer 
extend their sincere thanks to 
all alumni, parents and friends 
of the University throughout the world 
for their help 

in raising an unprecedented 

$145,031,901 

in the Campaign. 


Allan D. Callow, M.D. 

Chairman, Board of Trustees 
Roslyn S. Berenberg 
Chairman , Trustee 
Development Committee 
Edward H. Merrin 
Chairman, Alumni Fund & 

Special Gifts 

Jean Mayer, President of Tufts University 
Thomas W. Mnrnane, Vice President, University Development 


Ambassador Malcolm Toon 
Chairman, Campaign for Tufts 
Brace R. Farkas 
Chairman, Major Gifts 
Committee 
Sandra G. Krakoff 
Chairman, Parents' Program 


Fred G. Arragg, M.D. 

F.A.CS. 

Harvey Brooks 
Benjamin Peirce Professor 
of Technology & Public 
Policy, Harvard 
University 

Paid A. Brown, M.D. 
Chairman, Sci/Med 
Advances Cbrp 
Barbara B. Bum 
Director ; International 
Programs, University 
of Massachusetts 
Matthew J. Bums 
President & CEO, 
Automated Assemblies 
Carp. 

John G.L Cabot 
Senior Vice President, 
Cabot Carp. 

Robert S. Cohen 
Professor Of Physics 
and Philosophy, 

Boston Umuersity 


Henry L. Foster, D.V.M. 
President, Charles River 
Breeding Labs., Inc. 
Nathan Ganich er 
President, Oppenheimer 
& Co. 

Nelson S. Gifford 
President, Dermison 

Company 

John J. Heneghan 
McDonald's Corporation 
Weston Howland. Jr. 
President, Blacksione 
Management Corp, 
Kenneth F. Leach 
Vice President, Urban 
Investment & Develop- 
ment Corporation 
Ursula B. Marvin 
Smithsonian Astrophyskal 
Observatory 
Robert P. Mastrovita 
President, Hagkr, 
Mastrotnta & Co., Inc, 
William G. Meserve 


John M. Mu gar 
Belmont, MA 
Thomas O'Brien 
Financial Vice President. 

Harvard University 
Ruth L. Re mis 
Sioampscott, MA 

WtDiazn L. Saltonstall 
SaltonstaH & Co. 

Ira Stepanian 
President, Bank of Boston 
Janies A. Stem 
Lehman Brothers 
Morris Taneribaum 
Executive Vice President, 
A.T.&T. Communica- 
tions, Inc. 
lone D, Vaigus 
Darn, School of Social 
Administration , Temple 
University 

Paul I. Wren 
Honorary Director. 

Bank of Boston 


Partner, Ropes & Gray 

TUFTS UNIVERSITY 
Medford-SonvervxQe • Boston • Grafton 


Talloires 




































































Pagp 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl'NE. TUESDAY. MARCH 26, 1985 


- I 1 I I 1 I 1 I 1" I" Mm lull 


PEANUTS 


iTi 1085 yeM *»vut» Siccxmt vrc I 


123 | 24 125 1 26 


1 37] 1 38 1 39 [40 141 


1*2 I 1*3 I** H5 


1*7 l« t*9 ISQ^Kt 


1 62 163 |B4 IBS 


BLOND IE 

S i NOT TOO WJCH) 
^-7 9M.Trs. X 






a^sCi ^ 


IMHERE.MAAM..I DON^ 
KMOUJ IF t‘M FACING THE 
RI6HT UIW. BUT I'M HERE f 


’ THAT'S AN WWPUL. 
S U7T OF PCO r-S 


TOO MUCH SU6AR 
S IS UNHEALTHY y-- 


* WHO WAS}l THOUSHTSHE 
t THACT ? fA CAME IN WITH 
Z —V vT's-VOU 


•* * J 


ACROSS 

I Aspersion 
5 Road hazard 
)0 P S. group 

13 Melody 

14 Silverheels 
role 

15 Director 
Howard 

16 Stan of an 
anonymous 
quotation 

19 Marine 
hitchhiker 

20 Curvy letters 
22 Quotation: 

Pan II 

27 Singer Paul 

29 Taunt 

30 Assassinate 

31 Bards 
33 Pacify 

35 Make fond 
37 Farm machine 
42 Insect form 

46 Love 

47 Nick Charles's 
dog 

51 Scottish terrier 

53 TV equine 

54 Quotation: 
Partlll 

57 Griddlecake 

58 Writer 
61 End of 

quotation 
66 French island 


67 Competitor 

68 Rambler, e.g. 

69 Draft org. 

70 Platform for 
Plummer 

71 Speedy jets 


1 Mix 

2 Stringed 
instrument 

3 Not cured, as 
ham 

4 Prune, as old 
shrubs 

5 “Athenaeum” 
painter 

6 Alios, 

Calif. 

7 Compass dir. 

8 And so forth: 
Abbr. 

9 Rocky peak 

10 Rainbow 
makers 

11 Throat pan 

12 Author 
Thirkell 

17 Paydirt 

18 Still 

21 Kind of diver 

23 Yellow or • 
Coral 

24 **■ Joey" 

25 Man is one: 
Abbr. 


26 Cordelia's 
father 

27 Mimic 

28 Negative 
prefix 

32 Tin Pan Alley 
gal 

34 Affirmative 
vote 

36 Risqu£ 

38 Fans 

39 Colonnades 

46 Before, to the 
Bard 

41 Comedian 
Skelton 

43 Phrixus's 
transport 

44 By way of 

45 Vessel for 
Ham etai. 

47 Trouble 

48 State of 
equilibrium 

49 Sums up 

50 Tali 

52 Snuggle 

55 Allow 

56 Acad. 

59 Cordage fiber 

60 Summers in 
Sedan 

62 Partsof acen. 

63 Tantrum 

64 Eggs for Cato 

65 Very poor 
magazine 




BEETLE BAILEY 

DON'T THROW THE 
FOOTBALL SO HARt? 
SAR GE, yOLJ'LL J 

BREAK IT/ r QJi 


WOW YOU'VE 

POME IT' J 




-S' : 

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* I 


WO, THE FOOTBALL J 
IS OKAY, I JUST J r-> 
BROKE BEETLE / 07 

[ &CXDP J — ' 


'SH- 



ANDY CAPP 


HOW'S ANON’S 
r COLD, RjOPt— 






FUI.RUBE.I 

-tFLU-A 


WUHDUH Mhw M « mp «p*nLLld 
I Do I BtMM*mrtca&rmtiu1a 


HUSBANDS 
HAVE FLU 

HAVE COLDS, 


/View- York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska . 


DENNIS THE MENACE 






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WIZARD of ID 


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REX MORGAN 


THESE FRIEND5 OF MINE 
i are REAL LAID-BACK PEOPLE f 
j YOU1L LIKE PRESTON AND TESS.' 
THEY KNOW EVERYBODY IN . — - 
I TOWN WHO'S IMPORTANT, 

, CLAUDIA/ 1 ^ 


r DID YOU 
CALL TO TELL 
THEM YOU'RE 
TAKING ME TO 
THEIR PARTYT 


NO NEED ' THEY1L WELCOME 
YOU LIKE AN OLD FRIEND/ FIVE 
MINUTES AFTER YOU'VE MET THEM 
YOU 'LL THINK YOUVE KNOWN 
|M THEM All YOUR LIFE ' ind 


3 

5 K\ W 


AND YOU 
SAY THEY 
DO DEAL, 
RIGHT? 


e/bQj£i 

sounebi 






* KNIQHTS WERE L 0 N 6 ER IN THOSE WfiS/ 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
8 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


:*irf ; 

w* s AX!r4h^:ri4A*^A/{v«<( 

r if~~' flu' -rij-T a-:m- n ! 


*Aa RIGHT/ ANEW 
s WORLD'S RECORD' f ! 




Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square (a form 
lour ordinary words. 


SEMYS 



°o^l 


'■'/■I 


I JW PAVf& 3 Z 6 



books 


DO LORD REMEMBER ME 

By Julius Lester. 210 pp. $13.95. 

Holt Rinehart and Winston, 

521 Fifth Avenue, 

Hew York, N. Y. 10175 . 

Reviewed by Christopher Schemed ng 

J ULIUS LETTER’S “Do Lord Remember 
Me," a novel about a black evangelist and 
his family from slavery to present-day Missis- 
sippi. has the hypnotizing weariness of anrfd 

voice but the touching piquancy of a child 
learning its first words. It is a naggjngly famil- 
iar »aia — a minority struggling against social 
and economic adversity through the ages 
but Lester writes with such a poetic ease, 
evoking a strong emotional response in the 
reader, that the situations seem distinctively 
fresh. . _ _ 

In the opening pages, the Reverend Joshua 
Smith, in ill health, is composing his obituary, 
wracking his brain for details, as if the memo- 
ries fin ding forth would validate all that came 
before. ‘‘Dying wasn’t nothing but going back 
to the be ginning. " he muses, adjusting himself 
to the sensuous tugs of memory, repeating 
about his ancestors to himself as if 
they were mantras. 

Joshua remembers as a child hearing his 
father tell about his great-grandfather. Trem- 
ble Smith, a bouse slave, who informed on 
other slaves planning an uprising and won his 
freedom — a startling bit of inform ation , mor- 
ally horrendous on the surface, which surpris- 
ingly produced a swell of pride in Joshua’s 
father. ( By informing, Tremble saved the inno- 
cent slaves from mmscrimiiiate lynching and 
also blackmailed the slaveowner into giving 
Tremble and his family land and freedom.) 
Joshua’s father was a stumbling-down drunk 
every day of the week except when he awoke on 
Sunday to take the pulpit and dazzle t he co m- 
munity with his hdlfire and brimstone preach- 
ing. When Joshua asked his father why he 
would often laugh aloud in the middle of a 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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■Wist- M •SsSrtSSfgLSE 

SPnlLSd Sccoonuy. 

^J SSSto^ras discriminated against’ 
by other biad« wherever they seUleo. 

-Do Lord Remember Me" is ">«**£* 
entirely of this prickly, ironic 
twist Painful memories and maoents are 
dredged up without judgment bang g* 
tbenTami the emotion and amuetv that 
round them are sometimes left 


the emi ngms movoucui — 

emotions and pent-up rage are effectroslv held 

in check by tiimaiter-of-faci sWDjfte 

Other times, as happens m real life, famdml 
slights (and imagined slights) come to a bead 
mlSTSses. 50 years law; the 
resentments, misunderstandings, and guilt ex- 
plode in paroxysms of emotion. Joshuas care- 
•&ee son, Mine from the Army, suddenly con- 
fronts his father about a time years before 
when Joshua whipped him after a while store 
owner cheated the son out of 50 cents and the 
young man refused to apologize for his mis- 
take.” 

Remembering a separate incident, Joshua, 
feding a flood of shame overtaking him, asks 
his wife Cariotta, “Did you ever forgive me? 
Although they hadn’t spoken for five dead« 
about the tone when the proud husband 
slapped her for taking a domestic job with a. 
white family, Cariotta knows exactly what he s 
mitring about and responds dryly, “I stayed, 
didn't ir 

Part of the reason the novel is so affecting is 
that the cast of characters is not composed of 
the saintly ghosts that haunt other such tales 
but, rather, people so flawed and so adept at 
the art of familial intrigue that the reader can t 
hdp caring about all of them. The delayed 
confrontations, the unresolved emotions, the 
seemingly irrational loyalties are home truths, 
that, juxtaposed with forces out of the charac- 
ters’ control — the racial hatred, social vio- 
lence, and subtle discrimination that push fam- 
ily members to positions of humiliation and 
compromise — combine f or a quietly dignified 
novel that has a knockout emotional punch. 

Christopher Schemering, author of the forth- f. 
coming “Soap Opera Encyclopedia, ” wrote this 
review for The Washingan Post 


By Robert Byrne 

I N the game between Eric 
Lobro n, a 24-year-oid West 
German grandmaster, and 
Hans Ree, a 40-year-old Dutch 
grandmaster, in the Wyk-aan- 
Zee International Tournament, 
White got all that could be 
hoped for out of a pawn sacri- 
fice. Its capture lamed the 
black defenses and Lobron 
.won brilliantly. 

The Schevcningen variation 
of the Sicilian Drfense must be 
regarded as a provocation of 
the Keres attack, 6 P-KN4!?, 
with the object of turning back 
White's thrusts and demon- 
strating instability in the white 
position. 

The point underlying 
8 . . . P-KR4 is that 9 P-N5, N- 
KN5!?; 10 B-K2, P-KN3: 11 
NxN, PxN; 12 BxN. PxB; 13 
QxNP, B-KN2; 14 B-Q2, Q-N3 
yields Black a dynamic coun- 
terattack for the sacrificed 
pawn. 

After 15 R-N3, the position 
was similar to the first world 
championship match game be- 
tween Anatoly Karpov and 
Gary Kasparov in Moscow ex- 
cept that Lobron had omitted 


CHESS 


B-N2 in favor of transfering his 
queen to K2. 

Karpov’s strategy had been 
to advance P-KB4 and P-B5 to 
attack the Hack KP. Lobron' s 
entirely different stafegy was to 
mobilize for pressure on the 
queen file with 16R/3-Q3, hold 
solid in the center with 17 P-B3 
and look, with 18 QB2, for a 
chance to devdop an attack on 
the blade long. 

The purpose of 20 . ..N-Nl 
was to delay Lobibn’s intended 
shift of ins queen bishop to the 
attack with B-K3. But to be 
consistent, Ree should have 
played 2i...BxB despite its 
uniting the white ktngside- 
pawns with 22 PxB. 

Instead, Ree got the agres- 
sive idea of winning the isolat- 
ed White KRP with 21... N- 
N3? which wrongly took this 
piece far bom where it could 
help defend its king. .. 

After 22 B-K3LBxP; 23 Q- 
Nl, Q-K2; 24 B-R7ch, K-Rl; 
25 N-R4L, Ree had his pawn, 
but Lobron already threatened 
the crushing 2fi N-N6ch. 

On 25...Q-N4; 26 Q-N6, 
he could not defend by 
26 . . . N-K4 because of 27 N- 
R5. N-02: 28 Q-B71, KxB: 29 



UMMOK/MMIE. 

PoctUan altar » ... R-Q2 

N-B6ch, K-Rl; 30 Q-N8ch! 
NxQ; 31 N-N6 mate. 

The Dutchman’s 27... R- 
Q2 was quickly dispatdwd by 
28 B-N8!, KxB; 29 NB6ch. Ree 
played 29 . . . K-RJ but gave up __ 
just in time to slop Lobron/ 
from giving 30 Q-R7mate. 

SCUIAN SEFZKSE 


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Now arrange the circled letters to 
lorm t*w surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wbrlcl Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse March 25 

dosing prices ui local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Answer here: 


• (Answers tomorrowl 

I Jumbles HELLO WHINE VELVET GRISLY 
Yesterday s he dj{j atte f putting a lead slug in the 

1 scale— STOLE A WEIGH 


WEATHER 


iH LOW 
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66 

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68 

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C»« Pw 

luarstoai 211.50 313 

Kcwfhaf 222 322 

Ktaackner H-D 251 JO 359 
Kk»cfcner Werke 74 7450 
KTUO0 Stahl 103 105 

Unde 415 413 

Lufthansa 194 19850 , 

MAH 15050 156 } g|“» Circle 

MannESinaim 16450 16650 ' Groud 
AAetalhwsellsctKifl 361 3M 
Muench-Ruedt 1160 116T 
Preussaa 27450 271 

RaetBers-Werke 331 3X 
RWE 15350 15751 

Scherlno 455 45651 

Siemens 53440 Si: 

Thvssen 101 I05.il 

Varta «120 183 

Vrtw 17950 18351 

vew 123 12351 

ValKnwiaetnoerk 30150 2049C 

Cammenbank Index : 1202-20 
Previous: 132U0 


Bk East Asia 

Z2JQ 

22jt0 

Chewito Kona 

13-60 

1X60 

China Udit 

1410 

141(1 

Cross Hvtor 



Hto Sens Bank 

4750 

47 

hk Electric 

730 

7.25 


3250 

3350 


490 

405 

HK Shanghai 

HK Telephone 

840 

7150 

840 


530 

830 

Huldi Whampoa 

20 

2810 

Jardtne Math 



Jordlne Sec 



New World 

64)5 


Shaw Brothers 



SHK Pn»s 


880 

51 mo Darbv 


Stelu* 



Swire Pacific A 

31.90 


Wheelock A 



wtieetoek Mar 



Wlnsar 




1J8 

151 

Hen* Sena index 
Prevlops : 13404* 

134823 


1 Johauuf 

sfcori 

□ 


Sid Chartered 
Tate and Lvle 



OUD 

Senitt Shin yard 
Stmr OeuSnr 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
gos 

OUB Index : 41950 
previous 1 4T757 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The U.S. Supreme Cram 
upheld Monday a ruling that Sterling Dreg Inc, 
maker of Bayer Aspirin and other pam relievers, 
engaged in deceptive advertising. 

After a complaint in 1973 against the compa- 
ny, the Federal Trade Commission ruled that: 
advertisements for Bayer and two other prod- 


c y>\L*v 






































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 



titt* ttt*< %tr 


SPORTS 


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ilkuwva and St, John* s Complete NCAA Final Four 


The Associated Pros 
DENVER — Chris Muffin had 
25 points and forward Walter Ber- 
f added 19 as Sl John's beat 
- forth Carolina State, 69-60, here 
Sunday night in the West Regional 
final of the NCAA basketball tour- 
nament, sending the Redmen to a 
semifinal encounter with top- 
ranked Georgetown. 

The Redmcn’s victory capped a 
successful day for the Big East 
Conference, which wiQ send a re- 
cord three teams to the natfonni 
semifinals in Lexington, Kentucky. 


I V w fc llH *Vl :lt 

E*M* » 




rut- 

Ha AbocWkI nan 

. -.j Camesecca: ‘That’s h, we’re going — we’re going!' 


ViHanova upset North Carolina, 
56-44, for the Southeast Regional 
championship and wil] meet Kletro 
Conference odist Memphis State in 
Saturday’s other semmnaL 

Sl John's, which hit 25 of 31 free 
throws to 18 of 23 for N.C State, 
didn’t pull away tmtD the final two 
minutes. Must's rebound basket 
and two subsequent free throws 
staked the Redmen to a 47-42 ad- 
vantage midway through the sec- 
ond half. With 6:18 left. Muffin 
beat State guard Spud Webb inside 
for a three-paint play. A minute 
later he popped a 15-foot jumper 
over Webb to give Sl John's a com- 
manding 56-48 lead. The Wolfpack 
got no closer than four paints after 

that 

Wolfpack Coach Jim Valvano 
called his defensive strategy a “cal- 
culated risk. That's why Chris is an 
ah-American — he made two great 
plays there." 

Lorenzo Charles, who didn't 
score until late in the first half, led 
North Carolina State (23-10) frith 
15 points. 

It was an emotional victory for 
Coach Lou Camesecca, 60, as Sl 
J ohn's made the final four for the 
first lime since 1952. “It's difficult 
for me to express myself,” he said. 
“When I looked at the cloak and 
saw five seconds left, I thought. 
That’s it, we’re going — we’re go- 
ingP After 1;000 games.... When 
Fm going down into the grave, this 
is the one F1I remember. 

In Bi rmingham, Alabama, V3- 
lanova overcame a cold first half — 
23 percent shooting and a 22-17 
deficit — and Harold Pressley, 


Dwayne McClain and reserve Har- 
old Jensen put the Wildcats in con- 
trol with sot points each during a 
22-7 run eariy in the second half. 
ViHanova shot 16-for-21 (76 per- 
cent) after halftime and limited 
North Carolina to 45 percent for 

the game 

VUlasova, which last appeared 
in the final four in 1971, was led by 
Pressley with IS points, McClain 
and Gary McLain with II each and 


Jensen with 10, all in the second 
half . Brad Daugherty had 17 pants 
for North Carolina, which finish «t 
its season at 274. 

ViHanova trailed, 26-21, early in 
the second half before Ed Pinckney 
started a 1 0-0 spurt with a lay-up. 
After North Carolina cut the lead 
to a point, Jensen fait three jump 
shots and Pressley added two bas- 
kets for a 43-33 lead with 8:13 to 
play. 


Indiana, Louisville Advance 

Compiled by (hr Staff From JDUpmcha 

BLOOMINGTON, Indiana — Steve Alford scored 29 pomis, includ- 
ing 1 1 in two overtime periods here Sunday night, lifting Indiana to a 94- 
82 victory over Marquette in a quarterfinal game of the National 
Invitation Tournament 

Also advancing was Louisville, a 71-66 home-court victor over Temws- 


take on UCLA and Indiana win meet Tennessee. 

A three-point play by Alford with 3:30 left in the second ovotime'gave 
Indiana an 81-76 lead and Marquette, in deqp foul trouble, got no closer 
than three pants thereafter. The Hooisers forced the first overtime whim 
Kreagh Smith tied the score at 68 on two free throws with 22 seconds left 

in regulation. 

The winners' Uwe Blab sunk a free throw 20 seconds from the end of 
the first overtime to knot the score at 76 and set up the deciding extra 
period. Tom Copa led Marquette (20-1 1) with 27 points. 

Mark McSwam and Jeff Hall scored 15 points each as Louisville held 
off 24-8 Tamessce-Chattanooga- Behind a strong fast break and domi- 
nant boardwork, Louisville shot a blistering 71 percent and cruised to a 
35-24 halftime lead. The visitors moved to wiihin 5248 on a 15-foot 
jumper by Gerald Wilkins with 7:58 left to play, but the closest they got 
after that was 65-62 an a basket by Clifford Morgan with 1:11 remaining. 
W ilkins had a game-high 22 points. (UP/, AP) 



Hemmed in by Marik Jackson, left, and harassed by Ron Stewart, North Carofina State's 
Terry Gannon lost the ball during Sunday’s West Regional final, won by St John’s, 69-60. 


Flyers Take NHL Lead on Qub-Record 11th Straight Victory 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


»._■ 


Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 


NBA Standings 


Golden State 


JO Sl 32 32V, 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AUanttc Division 


<:m:ss 


* 

W L 

T 

PH 

GF 

GA 


W 

L Pet 

GB 

.tetoMa 

48 19 

7 

181 

329 

233 

x- Boston 

57 14 

MB 



‘ iwton 

43 22 

9 

95 

301 

222 

x-Pfiltodelaliki 

52 19 

-732 

S 

landers 

39 38 

5 

81 

326 

284 

Washington 

35 35 

JD0 

21» 

— oero 

23 40 

10 

54 

274 

321 

New Janev 

85 34 

An 

22 

• ■ an 

23 44 

5 

51 

250 

344 

New York 

24 47 

JOB 

33. 

' ~tm 

28 46 

9 

at 

243 

311 

Central 'Dtvutaa 



Adams DtviStoa 



r-MIlwoufcm 

50 21 

704 



. -e 

34 27 

9 

81 

299 

352 

Detroit 

37 33 

429 

12V) 

eai 

3S 27 

11 

HI 

272 

244 

auengo 

34 38 

.472 

Iflii 

o 

33 25 

14 

80 

265 

7)< 

Atlanta 

28 43 

M4 

22 


33 81 

9 

75 

273 

2SB 

CiMtea 

28 43 

•3M 

22 

1 

24 38 

9 

41 

250 

301 

Indiana 

20 51 

782 

30 


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' ' T**-" ’ 

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****** 4M*. 

artr hr . 

• r‘- 1 • • 

Jm 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Dtvistoa 

34 27 11 SO 273 W 

35 34 5 75 2U 2B 

24 39 11 S9 288 340 
23 39 13 E W IN 
19 47 8 44 231 321 

Smyth* DtvMon 

*& 17 10 102 341 241 
7 
9 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DtvtNon 



■9 334 311 
«S » 244 
77 322 304 
54 265 374 


* ***» 
U 


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adptaveff harth. 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Oil 1 0 1—3 

J don 3 2 3-7 

- uctMttf (4), Gustolsui (12), Mo- 

- .1), Stevens (2D). Gortiwr (44), Gould 

- wnrtli rant You no (36). HHIIer 12). 
h (30). Shots an Mai: PHtshurah (an 

7^34— U; Wash in gton (on Ford) 9-14- 

• 0 V-l 

I 0 1 w 

l (7). Rotarteon (11); Lemleux (14). 
goal: Quebec (an Weeks) 7-10-14—31: ' 
I (on Seviflnv) 9*4-21. 

HIM 

• 7 1 0-2 

. wt (IS). Middleton (26). Fergus (2B>. 

1; Rsirwev (S), Tucker (19),Cvr (221. 

. goal: Boston (an Boman) WLM— 
oto (on Keane) 54-iM— 20. 

J I I M 

ptala 111—4 

i (2D). KMT (S3). Marsh (23. SMsato 
c inter (19), Flacktiart (8), NaHlind 
^tsqaooal: Montreal (on Llndberoh) 
j, <5. Phlladatahla (on Penney) 10*3— 


■J . I ) 5-4 

i a *-4 

\ ion 3 (251. Oartaga Ofl.Valve (33): 
1 15), Trader (3). Shota an goal : Toronto 
- an) M3-l>— 32; Detroit (an Ben> 
>4-11-20. 

3 1 1—4 

I 1 1—7 

. 2 (in. Bossy (55). F latte V (19). D. 

71; Ruoftulolnen (27), Lorouche (24). 
goal: N.Y. Istandofe (on Hanlon) 14- 
I.Y. Ranaere (on Smilft) 5-11-13-29. 


x-Oenver 

Houston 

Dallas 

Sen Antonio 

Utah 

Kansas CHv 

y-LA. Lakers 

Portland 

Phoenix 

Seattle 

LA. aippere 


45 24 
4D 29 
40 32 

34 37 

35 37 
28 43 

Pacific DMiiee 
a 18 
34 37 
32 39 
•38 41 
. .25 47 


A34 

saa 

556 

An 


* 

5te 
10 

.486 10«b 
34 17 


J43 — 
-479 UM 
AST 2DW 
v423 SM 
MT 28 


Ednbitkm Baseball 


SUNDAYS RESULTS 
Toronto 11, anctonotl 4 
PhltodoWdo A Pittsburgh 2 
Montreal *. Battfmore 6 
St. Louis 4. Detroit 3 
N.Y. Yankees A N.Y. Mets J 
Texas 5, Houston 4 
Kansas CHv 9, Chicago While Sox 4 
Baaon X Minnesota 0 
Los Angeles 9, Atlanta 6 
San Diem A Chicago Cubs 3 
San Francisco la Oakland 10 (tie) 11 Innlnas 
Milwaukee 7, Cleveland 1 
California (set li, Seattle 6 
CatHornta ls»5 1L Foltarton St 2 


Transition 


Football 


BASEBALL 
admUcbr lmour 

OAK LAND— 5ent Ed Myers, pitcher, to Mil- 
waukee to aomotete a trade that senl Don 
Sutton to the ai Sent Steve Onttveras and 
Erie Flunk, pttdiars,' Jose Canesco and Tam 
Romans outfMdere; Chartla O'Brien, catew- 
er.ana Phil siaaben*an, Inftekter.to lie minor- 
league corns lex. 

SEATTLE— Sent Jim Bryant. Jim Lewbh 
RKfc Laecfcen, Jed Murray. Manuel Pena. 
Tom Hauenian end Terry Taylor. Ditchers; 
Tom Tinetev, catcher; Jamie Allen. InflekW. 
and Mickey Branttev. outfielder, to Ite minor- 
league camp lor reasstofimonf. 


SUNDAYS RESULTS 

HMD 29—103 
PUkHMphta 34 11 29 38-121 

Toney 844 12-U 28. Ervlng 11-14 0-122; En- 
glish 1241 2-3 26. issel 4-7 4-4 14. RetoWMk: 
Denver 42 (Cooper 8). Phllodetoftia a (Mo- 
lone 14). Assists: Denver 24 (Lever 5), Phllo- 
detohta 31 (Toney 12L 
Seattle 32 35 22 28- 99 

San Aetonte 33 22 21 18-184 

Gilmore Ml 23 14, Gervfn 4-11 X4 15; Mc- 
Cormick 12-11 5-7 29. Chambers 9-14 B-10 26. 
RMMttmts: Seattle SO (Vranes 13), 5an Anto- 
nte 45 Uonw li). AeeMe: seame 27 rvranes 
8), son Antonio 27 (Moore 7). 

CMcagO 23 28 2* 29— 92 

Utah 24 IS 28 43-118 

Danttay 13-22 M 29, GrTffUh 11-24 23 25; 
Jordon 9-24 8-11 2L Daltov M3 i-l 19. Re- 
bounds: Chicago (Greenwood 10), Ulan St 
(Eaton 181. Assists: Chicago 21 (Jordan 61. 
Utah 34 (tLGraen It). 

Detroit 23 3S 27 35—130 

Lee Angeles » 99 25 45-148 

AbduKtabbar 15-190-2 3X EJohneon 9-13 73 
. BsThamoe 14342-2 30, Lolmfceer 18-188020. 
rehn e n d i : Detroit 471 LQlmbeer 14), Los An- 
oetes a (Rambte 11) Assists: Detroit 32 
(Ttiomasl5). Lae Angeles 44 (E. Jatmcan 19). 


NCAA Tournament 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL 
ChwBgtanHg 
Monte 24 

VDIonava 56. North Carolina 44 
WEST REGIONAL 
OmagloesMp 
March 24 

SL John's 49. N. CoroIIna SL 40 

TOURNAMENT SEMIFINALS 
March 3Q, at LMingtan, Kentucky 
G eorgetown, 34-2, ve. 5L JotuTS. 313 
ViHanova. 21-10. W Memphis 3t„ 313 
TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP 
(April l, at Lexington] 

NIT Tournament 

QUARTERFINALS 
March 24 

Indiana W, Marquette 82. 20T 
LMtsvine 71, TtMChattanooaa 44 
SEMIFINALS 
March 27, at New York 
Indiana 18-13. vs. Tameseea 2M4 
UCLA, 19-12. vs. Louisville, 19-14 
CHAMPIONSHIP 
(March 29, at New York) 


Compiled by Our Staff From TXsptickes 

PHILADELPHIA — Three 
weeks ago, when they were losing 
three straight National Hockey 
, not even the Pfafla- 
themselves would 

NHL FOCUS 

havp dared to think of finishing 
atop the overall league standings. 
But thaf s they are after beating ‘ 


Montreal, 4-3, here Sunday car 
Ekka Smisalo's goal with 38 sec- 
onds remaining to play. The Flyers 
have won a dub-record 1 1 consecu- 
tive games and have 103 points, one 
more than the Edmonton Oilers. 

Elsewhere it was the New York 
Islanders 5, the New York Rangers 
2; Hartford 2, Quebec 1; Boston 4, 
Bufdfalo 3; Washington 1, Pitts- 
burgh 3, and Toronto 5, Detroit 3. 

“We'd certainly Hite to finish at 


the lop." said rookie Coach Mike 
Keenan. “Well make a run for it, 
but we’ll also make judicious use of 
our personnel heading into the 
playoffs." 

Lindsay Carson, Tim Kerr and 
Brad Mareh also scored for the Fly- 
ers, while Mark Hunter, former 
Flyer Ron Flockhart and Mats 
Nashrnd had Montreal's goals. 

Almost nobody had considered 
the Flyers a contender this season. 


It was a time for rebuilding and the 
Flyers brought in Keenan, 35, to do 
thejob. 

. Defenseman Mark Howe, 29, is 
the old man on one of the youngest 
teams ever to challenge for a pro- 
fessional championship. None of 
the other regulars are as old as 27 
and many are just gw ting into (hwr 
20s. 

A few, such as Howe, Sinisalo, 
leading scorer Kerr (53 goals) and 


playmaker Brian Propp have been 
In the NHL several seasons and 
they serve as steadying influences 
on the rest. 

"It was a terrific yin,” said the 
Flyer captain, Dave Poulin. “We 
hadn 't beaten them this year and 
yon don’t want to get swept by 
anyone and then have to meet them 
in the playoffs. For us, someone 
different lias been doing it every 
game.” (AP. LAT) 


Soccer 



Self-Chmtened 76ers Trounce Nuggets 


The ABOd au d Pros 

PHILADELPHIA - For many 
National Basketball Association 
teams, a three-game losng streak is 
no cause for alarm. But when it 
happens to the Philadelphia 76ers, 
it’s rime for a summit meeting. The 
76ers, who virtually fell out of their 


NBA FOCUS 


first-place race with Boston in the 
Atlantic Division because of the 
losing streak, had an air-clearing 
talk among themselves Sunday be- 
fore routing the Denver Nuggets, 
124-103. . 

“We tried to establish a new di- 
rection because we had lost three m 
a row," said Julius Erring, who tut 
11 of 14 shots from the field and 
scored 22 prants. “We talked about 
our pluses and minuses in such a 
way that no one took it the wrong 
way.” 


But despite the triumph and a 
gaudy 52-19 record, the 76ers are 
stiD five games behind the Celtics. 

Guard Andrew Toney paced 
Philadelphia, posting the first “tri- 
ple double” of his four-year career 
with 28 points, 12 assists and II 
rebounds. Moses Malone added 20 
points and 16 rebounds. 

“It was a great effort by every- 
one, particularly by Andrew,” said 
Coach BUly Cunningham. “Our 
guards did a good job today going 
to the boards? 

The 76ers whipped the Nuggets 
in every phase of the game, outre- 
bounding them 58-42, collecting 12 
steals and running at will; 27 Phtiar 
ddphia points came off the fast 
break. 

“We worked extremely hard de- 
fenflvdy " said Cunningham, who 
did not attend the pregame meet- 
ing. 

Toney scored 19 first-half points 


as Philadelphia built a 65-44 lead. 
The bulge reached 29 in the fourth 
quarter, and the 76ers coasted 
Dome. 

Denver has never won at Phila- 
delphia in 12 tries. 

“We were really pathetic." said 
Nugget Coach Doug Moe, who was 
ejected from the game in the third 
quarter with his second te chni cal 
fouL “We weren’t ready. We gave 
no resistance. Philly just walked 
right through us.” 

Elsewhere it was San Antonio 
104, Seattle 99; the Los Angdes 
Lakers 148, Detroit 130, and Utah 
110, Chicago 92 

The 76ere, who recently lost Ma- 
lone for three games because of an 
ankle sprain, got another scare in 
the first period when Charles Bark- 
ley fdl on his left wrisL X-rays 
revealed a bad sprain, but Barkley 
said he would be ready for Wednes- 
day’s game against 


Strange Wins Ins Vegas Golf and $171,000 


L S tanding s 

. EASTERN CONFERENCE 



w 

L 

T 

PA 

PF 

PA 

. nam 

4 

1 

0 

400 

134 

100 

- » 

3 

2 

0 

400 

103 

101 

■ sev 

3 

3 

0 

400 

128 

125 

■■ ■ Jor 

3 

2 

0 

400 

141 

116 

4 lie 

2 

3 

0 

400 

123 

152 

* 

1 

3 

1 

joo 

82 

74 


0 

5 

0 

MO 

75 

154 

- WESTERN CONFERENCE 



5 

O 

0 

1400 

189 

IDS 


3 

1 

1 

708 

128 

124 


3 

2 

0 

400 

104 

80 


2 

2 

0 

400 

M 

107 


2 

2 

a 

ABO 

81 

92 

Vila 

1 

3 

0 

75 0 

44 

103 

. (tat 

1 

4 

D 

TOP 

118 

117 


ST. LOUIS — Waived Gtann Brunvnar. 
catcher, tor the putpom at giving trim htt 
unconditional retaate. Sent MUJ Lavalltera, 
catcher, to Louisville o4 the American As*ocl- 
ottan. Sent Randy Hunt, catcher; Curt Fora 
outftektor. ondTodd Worrell and John Young, 
pitchers, to Its minor le a gu e complex. 

SAN FRAHC l SCO-Stoned Vida Blue, 
pitcher. la a one-vear contract Traded Dusty 
Baker, outfielder, to Oakland for Edmund 
puHuhxb. pihteer. and Dan Winter*, catcher. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Loom 

SAN Dl EGO— Stoned Larry Crawford and 
Johnny Ray Smite, defensive bodes, and 
Chuck Enin, detenitv* and. 

HOCKEY 

N.Y. RANGERS— Recalled Jim WMmer. 
defense manJomord. tram Now Haven at the 
American Hockev League. 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Giion z Malaga 8 
voUadoJM L Barcelona 2 
SevMa 2. Hercules 8 
Santander 1, Mtattco Madrid 2 
Athletic Bilbao 3. Valencia 2 
ZUriMius 1, Real sadedad 2 
EOPOftol 1, Osasuno 0 
Real Madrid & Murcia 0 
EKh* Z Betts 1 

Points Standings: Barcelona 48; Attetlco 
Madrid 48; GJ1an3S; A thistle Bilbao 35; Real 
Madrid 34; Real Eoeiadad. EsaaAot 31; San- 
taster 3f>; Osasuna, Sevilla 29; Valencia, ZO- 
lopco o 28; VtnatolW, Matosa 24; Hercules 
24; Bette 73; Ektee 22; Murcia 18. 


Tht Aaodated Pros 

LAS VEGAS — Curtis St 
idled in a seven-foot putt on the 
90th hole here Sunday to win (he 
Las Vegas Invitational and the 
richest prize on the U.S. golf tour, 
5171,000. Strange’s final-hole bird- 
completed a round of 5-under- 
par 66 and gave him a one-stroke 
victory over Mike Smith. The win- 


ner’s 338 total was 17 shots under 
par on the 7,077-yard Las Vegas 
Country Club course. 

Smith moved into contention 
with birdies on the last four holes, 
finishing 66/339. The 34-year-old 
journeyman collected $102,000 — 
more than he'd won in his entire 
five-season PGA career. 

Mac O’Grady’s 67 pni turn alone 


in third . 

who led through the third and 
fourth rounds of the five-day event, 
faded to a 71 that tied him for 
fourth with Fred Couples (a dosing 
65) at 341. Billy Glassou. in or near, 
the lead throughout the tourna- 
ment, had a string of four mi- 
dround bogeys and finished 
74/345. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Thomas Boswell 


The Rites of Spring Seem to Have Gone AU Wrong 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Seatti American Group 2 
Chile Z Uruguay 0 

Points stmmee: Chiles, Uruguay Z Ecua- 
dor l 

Next Mofckes: Alarcti 31, Ecuador vs. Uru- 
guay; April 7, Uruguay v*. Chile 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
tom 7. Baltimore 3 
31, Memphis 19 
27. Portland 28 
M* 28, Tornoo Boy 24 


Golf 


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^imament Tennis 


WOMEN 
IA1 New York) 

Stngles FtaM 

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CtodentovaUa. M. 7-5. 94. 
Deabies Final 

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The Anccxwd tax 


CELEBRATION — There was jtiafatioo in Bansdona alter the 1 
dty’s soccer ch*, with a 2-1 road victory over Vaiadofid on Su> 
day, won the Spanish danip»arisf«p for the first time since 1974. 


Washington Past Sonias 

WASHINGTON — For traditionalists, 
spring training is becoming almost wtiw>- 

“We used to go to the racetrack after 
practice in my day,” says two-time batting 
chanmion MIdcey Vernon, now an instructor 
for the New Yorir Yankees. “Four of us 
would chip in 50 cents each to go to the S2 
window! Yesterday, I asked a player how he 
did at the track. He said, ‘My horse woo.’ I 
said, ‘How much (fid he pay?* He said, *Na 
coach. 1 didn’t bet on the horse. 1 own it’ " 

On the nearby Yankee practice field an- 
other coach. Roy White, pointed to the com- 
pact, thigh-high nmrftwip beside him in the 
on-dedc rirde, w hi rrin g and awaiting com- 
mands like an electric parody of man's best 
friend. 

“I never thought it would come to this,” 
said White, who played more games in pin- 
stripes than anyone except Mantle, Gehrig, 
Berra and Ruth. “The thing is called a Ponza 
Hammer. They gave it to me to start spring 
training and said, “It can shoot fungos better 
than you can hit than. FEes, grounders, fpul 
pops.’ I said, ‘Yeah, sure.’ 

“One day 1 had a sore shoulder, so I gave 
in and tried it You know, the day of the 
fungo bat may be over.” Will the Ponza 
Hammer make it to Yankee Stadium. “We’re 
not at that stage yet,” While said. “3 hope the 
fans would boo it off the field.” 

'Spring training has been rignificantfy 
transformed In recent years. It hart just that 
players (once they bunked in leaky donns or 
rented furnished garages for th«r families) 
sow own S250,000. condos on the beach. 
Almost everything has been altered. 

In one fundamental sense, baseball hardy 
has (tanged. Pidcoff plays, cutoffs, run- 
downs and double-play pivots are taught and 
practiced as they nave been ancc me first 
Florida training camp opened in Sl Peters- 
burg in. Babe Ruth's time. But step outside 
the white lines and the game can seem unfa- 
miliar. 

Machines and money, modernity and 
medicine, even the martial arts and medita- 
tion, have made the difference. 



Once, pitchers ran sprints until they wept 
Says Gas Hoefling of the Phillies, the game's 
most famous conditioning coach: “Run- 
ning’s a tiring of the past. It doesn’t looses 
you up. It qiu&ly tightens you up. It doesn't 
make you stronger. After a certain point, it’s 
more likely to weaken the bed, knee and 
back. For eight years, Pvt tried to get it out 
of basebalL 


Once, 

istbenics. Now mam 
or aerobic dance, uaseoairs 
player, Mike Schmidt, begins iris 
grappling in the dirt behind the FhOlie ’ 
pen with Hoefling, a 230-pound nmrriat aits 
expert who looks as if he’s trying to bend 
Schmidt's legs back over his bead until they 

Stretching is the most neglected part of 
conditioning^ Hoefling said. “You need 
strength to create motion, but flexibility is 
even more important because it permits mo- 
tion. Ballistic stretching maam forcing mus- 
cles to go further than a man can get meis to 
go by himself. It’s painful and it’s dangerous 
if you don’t know what you're doing.* 

From Honus Wagner through Willie 
Mays, ballplayers “dieted” cm steak and po- 
tatoes and a few beers. Now the fad is scal- 
lops, brown rice and Perrier water. “The idea 
that you need kits of proton, especially in 
beef, for muscle and strength has been dis- 
proven,” says Yankee catcher Butch Wyne- 
gar. “Low fat, high carbohydrate and very 
httieprotem.” WdL Butch, what's for lunch? 
“Pasta but with no meat. I just put lots of 
‘Butter Buds’ cm it” 


electrodes to make Iris leg muscles' serve 
ceQs “fire” to prevent atrophy and expects to 
be back by nndseasoo. 

Once, no ballplayer would (ouch a barbdl. 
Now stars spend the spring debating whether 
to do isometrics or Nautilus, repetitions or 
mass weights. 

The muscle mavens argue. None can prove 
Iris theory and each loves to dwell on the 
injuries of the other’s pupils. Since it’s easier 
to build biceps than brains, almost every 
team is into muscle management, although 
even Hoeffing concedes that “we're in the 1 
Dark Ages of conditioning the human body. 
We all do different things." 

Oner upon a time, you spit on a cut and 
rubbed a bruise. Now if you don’t feel per- 
fect. a battery of trainers, doctors and mas- 
seurs try to decide whether you need diather- 
my, deep heat, whirlpool, ice, massage, 
ultrasound, acupuncture, cortisone or hyp- 
notism. A Yankee trainer is asked if he's 
lacking for any piece of equipment. “No.” 

Once, if you bounced your curve ball in 
the dirt, a coach would growl “Babe Ruth's 
dead — throw strikes.” Now they send you 
to a clean-cut kid with a videotape machine 
who does a slow-motion analysis of your 
mechanics. Past tapes are on file (G 
Brett still is studying 1980 tapes of hi 
wadering how he fit 390). 


Once; if you couldn’t hung tough against 
left-handed pitchers, they questioned your 
manhood. Now they send you to a computer 
wizard who ! — ^ — 


too many 


io tells you you're just swinging at 
first-pitch breaking balls, 
i know what player nas managed to 


knee surgery might be out a year. Now Don 
Mattingly misses two weeks and has no scar 
from arthroscopic surgery. Mattingly pedals 
a fancy Cybex variabk-rcastance stationary 
exercise bicycle m the Yankee camp and 


Once, a pitcher with a ruptured 
tendon might be finished. Now the Balti- 
more Orioles' Mike Flanagan gets a costly 
new cast and leg brace every week, wears 


Want to know what plffyerlu 
get tire ball airborne in the highest percent- 
; of his career at bats against smkerballer 
Qirisenberry? Andre Thornton — nine 
for II. Teams keep or buy such info. How 
can we prepare fora new season if we don’t 
know these things? 

All these newfangled methods go down 
particularly bard in baseball. 

Other sports, blinded by science, infatuat- 
ed with the age. can't wart for the latest 
gizmo, miracle cure, diei or overnight body- 


building regimen- But is baseball, okl hanH^ 
always ask the same questions. 

Who needs to hit a ball harder tiian Timmy 
Foxx or throw one faster than Walter John- 
son? Wind sprints and batting practice were 
good enough for them. Who a doubt that the 
best way to learn to hit. pitch or field was to 
go out and bit, pitch or field until you were 
tired? 

Weightlifting, bah. Aerobic dance, my 
foot. Think Ty Cobb ate carrots? Spit on a 
spike wound, never baby a sprain, keep your 
pitching arm out of a draft and always pound 
that beer. 

Sound like the 19th century? Try 10 years 
ago. In fact, for some extremely successful 
teams, such as the Baltimore Orioles and 
Detroit Tigers, the old ways still are assumed 
to be best. And they could be right. 

“You don’t see top much new machinery 
or weightlifting equipment around here,” 
says Tiger pitcher Jack Mortis. “What I do, I 
go out ana do on my own.” 

“Storing training never changes here,” says 
Oriole pitcher Scott McGregor. “Don’t fix 
wluns opt broke. We’re glad to see other 
teams trying something different every year. 
They just mess themselves up.” 

Says Oriole pitching coach Ray MUler: 
“The Yankees sound like they’re trying to 
play in the NFL Baseball’s not nearly as 
much a sport of muscle as it is a game of 
conditioned reflex and menial alertness. 
We’ve spent oar time working mi baserun- 
ning, signs, relays, cutoffs, bunt plays, bunt 
defenses and all the other boring fundamen- 
tals. Those things never chang e. And we 
think they win more games." 

And down the road? “In all the science- 
fiction movies you see these humanoid ro- 
bots from the future,” Miller says. “Someday 
I figure us coaches wiD just be robots like 
that. They'D put us back in our loeken at 
night, all slumped over. Then, in the morn- 
ing, the manager will just come in, flip a 
switch on our chests and well come to me 

a g ain,” 

Miller watched White aim his fungo gun 
toward the Yankee outfielders. “You think 
somebody’s not working on it?” he said. 







iuil iSUUtUSQBSZZWSSSUmtl&Sii&liSlH SJS*J« din- S.'mxx* 


f 



Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Red Riding Hood Inc, 


W ’ ASHINGTON — Ooccupon 
a time there was a sweet thing 
called Red Riding Hood, who 
owned Little Rod Riding Hood 
Inn, a small company that made 
chDdien’s dresses. One day she was 
walking down Wall Street when she 
met a great big wolf (Amalgamated 
Wolf). 

“Where are you going. Red Rid- 
ing Hood?” the wolf asked. 

“To Grandmother Pizza’s office 
with this new is- 
sue of stock, 
which I hope 
will make her 
wdL” 

The wolf 
thought to him- 
self. “What a 
tasty morseL 1 
could eat 
Grandmother 
Pizza for break- n .. .... , 

fast and Red Bocfawald 

Riding Hood Inc. for lunch.'’ 

The wolf then said. “Where are 
your grandmother’s offices?" 

And Red Riding Hood replied, 
“In the World Trade Center bmld- 



Red Riding Hood was ushered in 
by the secretary. 

“Good morning, Grandmother " 

The wolf did not rcpty. 

“Oh Grandmother, what bigears 
you have." 

*The better to hear all themerger 
rumors on the street,'’ the wolf re- 
plied. 

“Oh, Grandmother, what lag 
eyes you have." 

“The better to read everyone's 
latest financial report" 

“What big hands you've got" 

“The better to grab all your as- 
sets with, my dear." 

“Grandmother, what big teeth 
you haw.” 

“The better to eat yoa with!" 
And with that the wolf sprang out 
of his chaw* and mada a lunge for 
Red Riding Hood, who easily side- 
stepped him and knocked him to 


mg. 


The wolf then said, “Would you 
like to have a hot pretzel from the 
stand over there?" 

“Why not? They are not expect- 
ing me at Grandmother's board 
meeting for a half-hour." 

Whilst Red Riding Hood was 


raring her pretzd and drinking her 
’to the Wo 


soda the wolf sped off to the World 
Trade Center. He dashed into 
Grandmother Pizza’s office and ate 
poor Grandmother up. 

Then he pulled the curtains and 
sat in her leather chair. 


Scala Musicians Accept 
Contract, Call 05 Strike 


The Associated Prat 

MILAN — Orchestra members 
of La Scala opera house have called 
off a strike after reaching agree- 
ment mi a new contract. Toe strike 
forced cancellation of three perfor-. 
mances of Mozart's “The 
Flute” earlier this month. 

The agreement is subject to ap- 
proval % Public Administration 
Minister Remo Gaspari. however, 
and could touch off a dispute be- 
tween Gaspari and La Scala over 
whether state- subsidized theaters 
are subject to rules for public em- 
ployees. 


“What are you doing?" the 
stunned wolf asked. 

Red Riding Hood sat on the 
wolfs stomach and said, “Tm tak- 
ing you over." 

“You can’t take me over," the 
wolf cried “Tm five times bigger 
than you are.” 

“Size means nothing," Red Rid- 
ing Hood said “The only thing that 
counts is how much money 1 can 
raise to get control." 

“Where could you find enough 
dough to buy a great big wolf?" 

“TO make a leveraged buyout. 
I'D cut off your head and sell it to a 
museum, your coat to a furrier and 
your teeth to a keychain company. 
It's all here in the prospectus." 

“The SEC will never let yon do 
iL" 

“They haven’t stopped anyone 
from swallowing anybody else up 
yet,” Red Riding Hood retorted 

“Wait," the wolf said “Why 
can’t we make a friendly take- 
over? Give me a golden parachute 
and ni never try to eat you again." 
□ 


“Sony, but it’s too late," and 
with that Red Riding Hood cut 
open the wolfs stomach and out 
popped her grandmother, who had 
a grin on her face. 

The grandmother said, “It 
worked I knew we could get con- 
trol once he got fat and cocky.” 

Red Riding Hood said, “Where 
do you get that ‘we’ staff, Grand- 
ma? I'm spinning you off to Stan- 
dard .Oil of New Jersey." 


The Brothers Griu 


lllll 


O nce Upon a Time There Were 2 German Linguists Who Thought 
They Would Go Down in History for Their Dictionary 


It was Wilhelm's derision to 
soften the collection of tales with 
the cozy, unce-upoo-a-nme he- 
ed to their enormous popularity. 

Both brothers were politically 
active and as professors at Got- 


By Tyler Marshall 

Los Angda Times Sendee 


XT' ASSET* West Germany — 
JN-Once upon a time, there 


■Once upon a time, 
were two brothers who 
eoflecting fairy tales. Although 
they were great linguists and 
opened new frontiers in the study 
of languages, they would be re- 


most for a collection 
of stories that enchanted children 
the wodd over. 

Unlike the stories that made 
them famous, the tale of Jacob 
and WHheLni Grimm is true. This 
year, the region of central Ger- 
many where they recorded such 
tales as “Snow White,” “Sic 
Beauty" and “Little Red 
Hood" has begun celebrating the 
brothers’ 200th birthdays. 

The tales have stirred contro- 
versy virtually from thear begin- 
nings. Renaissance Europe 
viewed the pre-Grimm versions 
as useless superstition. After 
Wodd War IL the Grimms’ tales 
were banned for almost two years 
in the British zone of occupied 
Germany because of a belief that 
their sometimes gruesome con- 
tents had helped pave the way for 
the German people to accept 
Nazi atrocities. 

The tales were attacked as re- 
actionary by Europe’s New Left 
in the 1960s, and a generation of 
American parents worried that 
they were too violent 

But those reservations have 
done little to blunt the widc- 
popularity of the tales. 
j have been translated in to 70 
lan g na gwi, with each culture hav- 
ing its favorites. 



tinges University, were part of 
the “Gfittingni Seven," 


a group 
of academies expdled from the 
Hanoverian kingdom in 1S33 for 
protesting the monarch's decision 
to suspend the constitution. 

It was a protest a more radical 
professor, named Friederieh Eng- 
els, decided not to make. But 
both Engels and his colleague 
Karl Marx respected the 
Grimms’ political commitment 
and their contributions to the 
German language. Asa result, the 
tales have always enjoyed official 
sanction in the Soviet Union, and 


Moscow plans to publish special 
five eaitii 


Jacob (left) and WQbelm Grimm 


According to Heinz ROQeke, a 
r uppertal Univ 


Wuppertal University professor 
and a respected authority on Ger- 
man folklore, Japanese children 
love the fantasy in the stories. 
Soviet versions invariably con- 
centrate on the coziness of tiny 
houses or little families, while 
Americans tend to accentuate the 
glamour. “Americans inn* the 


a special issue of stamps 
j the stories, the biggest 
exhibitions casi the Grimms as 
key figmra in Germany’s cultural 
and political history. These exhi- 
bitions will emphasize the intel- 
lectual achievements and politi- 
cal commitments of the brothers’ 
most productive years. This de- 
ment, viewed by many Germans 
as far more important than the 
tales, remains largely unknown to 
the rest of the world. 

“The Grimms are known too 
much as simple storytellers,” said 
Klaus Becker, a historian and the 
spokesman for a major exhibit 
planned this summer at the 
Brothers Grimm Museum in Kas- 
sel “Our aim is to show more of 
their role as intellectuals who 
yearned for democracy and Ger- 
man unity during a period of 
French domination-” 

Three exhibitions, including 
one devoted to the illustrations 
drawn by a third Grimm brother, 
Ludwig, are planned for Kassel 
where the brothers lived while 
gathering the tales. Symposiums 
on linguistics and German ety- 
mology are planned for West Ber- 
lin, Marburg and KasseL The 
state of Hesse, where much of the, 
Grimms’ work took place, has 
budgeted 1.5 million Deutsche 


or the big castles.” Rdlleke ! 

Although several cities plan 
festivals this summer with stage 
performances of tire tales, and the 
West German post office has pre- 


marks ^about $470,000) to pro- 


mote the celebrations. German 
dries in Hesse are antetng up an- 
other 400.000 marks. 

For many Germans, the most 
important effort of the brothers’ 


lives was to begin a major dictio- 
nary that (ighr on the devel- 
opment of the German language 
and set a standard internationally 
for Irupnicifc histories. 

■ Wilhelm died in 1859 as work 
cm the letter D was being com- 
pleted. Jacob lived four years 
longer, reaching the letter F. But 
the project survived both world 
wars arid Germany’s division, fir 
naDy being completed in 1960. 

In the Cold War atmosphere erf 
the 1950s, work on the Grimm 
dictionary was a rare point of 
official contact between East and 
West Germany. The two states 
now share the publishing rights. 
A commemorative paperback 
version published last Jail in West 
Germany has gone into its second 
printing. 

Jacob, bom in Hanau Jan. 4, 
2785, was the more ambitious of 
the two. In 1814 he joined the 
Hessian delegation to the Con- 
gress of V ienna, which deter- 
mined the shape of post-Napole- 
onic Europe, but when the task 
proved as boring as it was 
weighty, Jacob amused himself 
by learning seven languages, in- 
cluding Serbian, Russian, Greek 
and Latin. 

WQhehn, bom Feb. 24, 1786, 
13 months after Jacob and the 
second of the six Grimm chil- 
dren. interested hinreelf more in 
the style and aesthetics of his 
work than Jacob, who provided 
the analytical, scientific drive for 
the pair’s wot 


commemorative editions to mark 
tile bicentennial 

Historians sod) as Becker also 
hope to use the celebrations to 
erase some of the myths that have 
grown up around the tales, such 
as the image of the Grimms trav- 
eling through the countryside re- 
cording peasani stories. 

“Most of the stories were relat- 
ed by middle-class friends or 
came via servants or tradesmen 
around the Grimm home in Kas- 
sel” Becker said. 

Rdlleke said 90 parent of the 
tales were contributed by women, 
including Wilhelm’s wife, Don- 
chen. “Old Maria,” a black- 
smith's daughter who was the 
widow of a Hessian mercenary 
killed in the American Revolu- 
tion, related “Little Red Riding 
Hood,” “Sleeping Beauty" and 
“The Valiant Little Tailor." 
“Cinderella” eame from a mid- 
dle-class family in neighboring 
Westphalia. The most prolific 
contributor was Dorothea Vieh- 
mnnn, who delivered 37 mainly 
lesser-known stories to the 
G rimm home in addition to fresh 
vegetables. 

Although the Grimms assem- 
bled the tales while in their 20s, 
their interest in folklore persisted 
through their lives. More than 
1,000 unpublished legends, myths 
and portions of other fairy tales 
gathered by the Grimms are 
stored in the West Berlin Staal- 
sarchiv (State Lflxuy). Although 
most of the material is said to be 
fragmentary and of no great val- 
ue, the bicentennial celebrations 
could awaken new interest in iL 


PEOPLE 



' Bolero 9 Sweeps Razzies 


While waiting for the Academy 
Awards, let's bear it for the bombs: 
John and Bo Derek’s “Bolero" has 
swept the Golden Raspberry 
Awards, known as the Razzies. 
“Bolero," the odds-on favorite, 
won in six of the ten categories, 
from wont picture to worst musical 
score. Bo Dock was named worst 
actress, her husband took worst- 
director and worst-screenplay 
awards and Olivia D'Abo, who ap- 
peared in the film, received the 
worst-new-actress honors. A previ- 
ous Razzic winner, Brooke Shields, 
was named this year’s worst sup- 
porting actor for her mustachioed 
role in the mercifully mostly un- 
seen “Sahara." Lyun-Hofly John- 
son was pegged as the worst sup- 
ag actress for “Where the 
Are *84 “ Sylvester StaHone 


got’ the um male award, worst ac- 
“ Rhinestone.” which also 


tor, for 

was died for worst song, “Drinkm 
Stein,” words and music by Stal- 
lone’s co-star, DoBy Parton. 


Christie Brinkley and Billy Joel 
have been married aboard a private 
yacht on the Hudson River. It was 
the second marriage for both. 
Brinkley, 31, parlayed her appear- 
ances in Spores Illustrated bathing- 
suit issues into a career as a top 
fashion model. Joel 35, is a Gram- 
my-winning singer and songwriter, 
one of whose biggest hits, “Uptown 
Girl," was written for Brinkley. 
They had been engaged since Au- 
gust. After being married by a jus- 
tice of the peace, they and thdr 200 
or so guests sailed to a riverfront 
restaurant 

□ 


won the 1984 Puli cor for 
nonfiction, criticized the u*™, 

by Harvard’s president, Dofc 

Bok, saying that those who do .% 
ittprctive. historical social anglvti * if f 
are in big trouble." Harvard's 
cdogy department has been k 

more toward “quantitative” so3‘ 
ogists, those more oriented in«Z. 

statistical and 

methods, he said. Bok declined, 
comment on the tenure case, bi 
told the Harvard Crimson newspi 
per. “Like all departments, ya 
need a balance of different ax 
poaches lo the discipline. No ob 
is turning tbeir back on the nica 

qualitative approach." 

□ 

- President Rag Atfondn of a 
gentina has been honored by ft 
University of New Mexico for k 
work in restoring his countre j 
democracy after years of nriuta 
rule: Ton Farer. president of jJ 
university, granted Atfonsln i 11 «.• 
honorary doctorate of laws, sayim jj f Lr 
“He has set about the extraori 
nan! 
tog 

with material Hn ^ hiinv i 

resources but with a wretched b 
dition of arbitrary and often a 
thorilative rule." 

□ 



idO/M ana 

Jy difficult task of strengthe . Sfeift 

democratic rule in a count 'iff U / . * * *-*B**^ 

■ immong pwlp f ij il ^ h\in« ’ * 


Nancy Reagan will have an au 
ence with Pope Join Pud Q a 
will visit a drug rehabilitation ct 
ter during a visit to Rome on M 
3-4 during President Ronald Ri 
gan’s visit to Europe, according t 


U. S. Embassy spokesman 
the papal au 


David Bowie delighted 10,000 
rock fans in Birmingham by joining 
Tina Tomer for the finale of her 
British tour in a surprise appear- 
ance. He and Turner sang “To- 
night,” a track they recorded for 
Bowie's recent album of the same 
name, as well as a rock version erf 
the 1960s classic “Let’s Dance" by 
Cure Montez and Bowie’s 1983 
composition also entitled “Let's 
Dance.” 


Rome. Details of 
ence were still bring worked -c 
the spokesman said. Mrs. Reagai . 
to receive an award from fon 
drug addicts at the Italian Cen 
of Solidarity for her efforts to a . 
drug addiction, said Jmm Con' 
vice chairman of the center. R 
gan is scheduled to be in West C 
many for the annual econa. 
summit conference Mav 1-6. 







□ 


Harvard University has denied 
tenure to the Pulitzer Prize- winning 
sociologist Paid E. Starr, who says 
he has accepted a full professorship 
at Princeton University. Starr, 
whose book “The Social Transfor- 
mation of American Medicine” 


Imefeb Marcos* wife of Presk 
Fen&nand E. Marcos of the Phi. 
pines, is in Boston for trea tinea 
glaucoma, Marcos disclosed in 
interview with local reporters in. 
northern city of Baguio. Mrs. N 
cos. 55, left Manila March i; . 
attend the funeral of the So 
leader, Konstantin U Cham 
in Moscow, then wait id the t 
ed States, Marcos said. 


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lb* In? Se n*e tram tm 


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REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LUXURY APARTMENT 


London near pork. Interior decorator 



hotol to view. Write D. Smon, PO Bax 
and Cr phone 


ISTLpndon SW8, 
0lJ35 7711 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CHEAT BRITAIN 


SCOTLAND 
load Hwd Country" 


200 ye* old fis h ermai’s cottage. 
Off*, at “ ‘ “ 


_ Q. Gdfc BrsSey 
(Utq 0250 8?23i for dWak 


GREECE 


luxurious 


AOflA PARASKEVL. super toxui 
offices for Kd*. css oDnaHnning,ieO- 
and Hoar, 3CS s^m. Real borgan Tefe 
7214191 


CARIBBEAN 


CAYMAN BIANDS 


Leatfag Intematiand R nm du l Cantor 
Nto DUTTK - NO TAXB 
finonool property irmstomils liuni 

asS60j500. Hgh 


Please reply for mformatiort 
3N SJl P.CL Bax 222 


HORIZON , 

04-1411 Oeir m 12, Swfawtand 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR LSI BIB. pgnu i wc 

view, 1 7 bra to Cannes, my residen- 
tial, 5 mre beach & part. Largo flow- 
ered terroce. in modem buikniB, dou- 
ble Svinp. 1 bedrooo^ marble 
bathroom. FBSO . QC O . No ao en fa. 
Owner Pmfo 524 57 96 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


in dm hdemtianet HensU Tn- 
banm, wftsrw mne Aran 0 ffcirrf 
at a mSBon readers world- 
wide, most of whom or* m 
busmen and industry, wdl 
read A Just telex us f Path 


613595J'befare IOojil, en~ 


• we tan lelox you 
berk, and your messa g e wH 
wDMii 46 hours. The 


rale m US. $ 9.80 or load 
equivalent per Sne. You must 
Made co mpl e te and verffi- 
atde bXng addma. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WEEK 

APRIL 1st, 


in 


BUSINESS WEEK 


INTERNATIONAL 


• A Shu Is Born: CtmUd Ottos 
Bocomas A MmSoSbrI 
Overnight By Aapi l r h g ABC 

■ Spooldna The DaBar: Europe 
Rmm 1« To The SAL Critic. 

• Britain A CUHy Reception For The 
New Budget 

• tod. Ootioofc frooce't “Vote fop 
RonsM Reagan'. 


NOW ON SALE 

AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 


NEWSSTANDS. 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 


T-SHLKT FOTOS 
NOW tN m COLOR 


a oAccsh buwwss ibat eon eom you 
0/ month. New and toed 


58000 -SIObKV 
t from 111 
a. Ml 


6000fronirfwt/W. QvtKSTf. 
let 06W478DB Tbt 412713 KEMA 


SWITZERLAND 

We ore kMtong for wnous partnen 
who ate mterened in mvedira ma fort 
dais real earn fropo. US52 ajO0,0O0. 
interest 3% + pomqpown in find 
profit fofl dent Svrist guuodees. 


SODIM S.A. 

Tete CESE CH 456213- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUP® PORT 


In the bay of Palma, 5 rim. Palma, 15 
mint, arport, 664 bertht 8 to 30 — 

2 for up to 60 rasters each. 
W/maniAvdar/phane a . . . 
Profeafond part m an agemen t to. FuS 
maim tervicBt: tmtor, redo, top, Irav- 
d-Kft. repair, fuel station, in & outdoor 
winter harrfvtancb, Ugnound ar park, 
Lodgers. Complementary service A lei- 
sure fadltiesi nexfittol. lwrkifia shop- 
prim, al t e ring, enteriainmeiu. Golf & 
terns nearby. Cooxnerad area com- 
criMt 85 units on 13,171 sqjn. in dL 
Plus 27 isasr oparlaenti dx»e A 78 in 
separate luxury condo - afl in front Sne 
dona man pier*. Top rnertmerdtl <S%J 
so&Snuny now before next price rise!* 
Contact dredty devetoperv 


PISQO PUNT A PORTALS, SJL. 
Director Camarad 
C/Morina 101, Porfoh Nous 

MaUarca Spam ar Tfo 6B686 CAUU E 


FLORIDA LAND 


INVESTMB4T 

• Setoo lad tonafogicahr located necr 
Doneywarid / Cfrbmda 

• Option to purchase at wefi below 
ament mate vdoe 

• /defoiand fnatied partner! required 
to pr mletejiwAa e and take ftfe 



lo dew* topers interested bi 
ng mtemahand tourist 

toboebon, hotels, tho ppi twqWBr. 
• Inv es t m e nt tame US$15j®0 to 

fiiSSSriSi 


b wreil m e nt Carp. 

100 N. Bseaytw Hvd 
Suita 1209^M^a 33132 

Tdex: 803ZP BJRO MK 


LIQUID GOLD 

JOJOBA 

Jojoba foe rairade bean grown in the 
UJA hat a natural 0e wan of 1OT - 


200 yttort. UlH: 
he, . _. 

factefog. Dr. D- Vetmana^, _ 
University, rioted, “No other plant 
pwdud « the wand it etqmble of re- 
' J *“ petroleum based lobriosntt", 
_ field* provide retain ea in- 
veetmenf hi fiat year. Entire amount 

amid iname 

to vertom and 


far complete detcrit contact 


RESEAftOi Bee 1777, Herdd TAuat. 
72521 Ncufiy Ceoex. Fraro. 


PANAMA UBRUA, CORPORATIONS 
Fiw.USSW cMjSgbte now, Tel! 
“■20 20240. Tetosa 628352 ISLAND - 
fvmUKl 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OHPSHORETAXSHB.TBIS 

from £75 
UK, We of Mon, Turta, Chanrd tslandi, 
POnarna Ifoerio & mart offshore c 
Canptoto support focOtiet. 

Very rtridty axffidenticl 
Free mrauftofot 
Roger GrSfin L1A, FXlA. 
BrodiwoiCorporm M snqjement Ltd, 

Western Home. Victono Street. 
Dooflias, Ue of Mon. 

Tet: (062 i ] 23303/4. 

Telex (2f3B) GORMAN G. 


MONEY TREES ? 


VES Invert to one of America's most 

plaited & odcEtiond 20^)00lo bo piart- 
ed menu Kgh anud earrings osured 
for m»Y, many wan. 1 
t BiQUiBte Rwnro. 

fowdi, 


Franat 


BUSMSSMBi WDIVRXIALS and 
others m neemed. Do you nave ex- 
cess asdt laying around? We con tun 
your exam coot eta red assets. Fee 
chaged. Write ABed Ltd. POB 422, 
HarSanteaVa 22001. USA. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


Worldwide 
Fran £75 

Mdfag - Telephone - Trie* 

U JC, tde of Mat, Jertey, Guenmy, Gi- 
brofcjr, Panma, Uberio, Luasriwurg, 
Artfflov body made, a speciaL five 
explanatory 


Aston 


ton Company Formations 
Deaf Tl, 0 Vidaria St 
Pougjoi. kk at Man. 

t£« 24 26»1 
Telex 637691 SUVA G 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PE0P1B 

IMJMITB) INC 
U4A 8 WORIDWIDE 


A complete so6d & busmen servxa 
proofing o attoue^edtadon or 
totwitod, vmrtcrife & muMngud 
iixfoiduds for ol tsemsiore. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Si.. N.Y.C 100)9 


Service Bepresetuotrvw 
ed worldwide. 


Needed ' 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTBRNATKMAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 

UKcempoda from £75 LQ6A Ponona 
A (6 mefor off-ihore c enter * . FuB ad- 
minritrtXion nominea servkss, powers 
of attorney, rtmitoved offices, accoun- 
tancy, axdu&ntid bank account! 
opened, confidtntid tetophone, telex, 
fax & malng serrice. 

EBS limited 


43 Cantina Street, InarpaaL LB 7M4. 

Tlx 6S613 BUS5ER. 


Tefc 051 7W 1««. Tlx 

Fac 051 709 5757 
Associated Offices Worldwide. 


London-Londotv-London 

Old Band Street, Wl 

• Ate, tehahane, telex service 

“ Seasfcra sente ac hxri ilmn on 

* Formation, donxafiaiion and man- 
agement - UK & offahom oanpaniet 

safer 


oaapowATE i^jK^ jxnc^tjpl 


2/5 OM Bond St, lot 

Tet 01-493 4244 
The 28247 SCS1DN G 


OFFSHORE SBLVICB 


UX non resident ocn^xxiet vteh 
nominee tfiredon, bearer shares and 

cxmfidenticJ bank accounts- FiAbadMtp 

& Support senicet. Panma S Uberiat 

companies, first rate cpn fida tod 


professional services. 
JACJL 17 WSdegatB St, London 
E17rtLTeb01 377I®<Tlx:fe3?11 G 


INVEST 2 WOKS in Better Health. 
Enter Gordoc Risk Prevm*co & 
Herfsh Recondtioring Program now. 
D egat t -nuitiory peaceful Surrey 
Countryside, highly qaeSfed medcal 
HipervBion. VB Entoo Medad Gvw 
tie, Enton near Godclmte Surrey 
GU8 5AL 45 nrn Lantfon. Ring 
6M2| 8792231 


BU5NSS SOWS W GBCVA 
secretorid ntnte / tramkdioni / 
tel eplwne / tetox I trsA service / 


accounting 7 tu m pony formationi 7 
tforage space. Novapex, P.O. Box 92,1 
121 TGeneva IT. Phone: ZUSU7?. \ 
Tbc42307tL 


BENCH HKH FAJHON MODS, 

77. PR/PA e xp erience, iSfery of Art. 
graduede, free to travel, 
bob For London besed 

3 pin, 9 pm. 01-225 



COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MONACO: 


For ol commercial pnsnses 
pfeosr contact: 

Aram 

ry^Sur. 

26 bit Bid Princene Charlotte, 
MontoCorio, MC 90000 Monaco 
TeL 193) 5W«D, Ux 47M17 MC 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE US DOUARS to exchange for 
Lira Cab 361 


Strict Francs or ItaBon Lira < 
6500 Zurich. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 


IN ZURICH 


FULLY INTEGRATED 

Busipess sarecE 
CLOSE TO FINANCIAL CENTER 
famished Offices / Conference Room 
Telephone / Telex 7 Mdl Services 
Word Pro. 


. „ / Tromta ion 

Cooipofiy Fonucfliofl 
INTHNATIONAL OFFICE 
32 Ramheo, CH-8001 Zuridi 
Tak 01 7 2T4 flfll. Tbc 812656 INCf 
MEMBB WORTOW1DG 
BUStNBS CENTRES 


PARIS 

mar (MAMPS aYSEES 


RENT 

your oma 


wah dl f ac flWei 


YOLIfe FURMSHB OfflCE 
m LOWKM 

• 7 day 24hour occest & aggrphone 


• FJ support senicet XKfa*® 1 
aeot eton a , fete copyiig, etc. 

• Corporate Ifeprasentitoon Service 


• Short or font} term ovcxUifity 

w«ri£w£r ■ - 


Boown Cantae* 

1 1 OTh* Strand London WC2ROAA 
TsL DI 83641918 Tlx, 24973 


YOUR LONDON ORKE 
at the 

CHI5HAM EXECUTIVE CS4TRE 
Canprehwiw range of tervicet 
150 Regent Sheet, London Wl. 
Tet (01) 439 6281 The 261436 


KOUMAB-MeCAS SERVKB. Your 


rriwfcto Swiss hose, darieia/tofo- 
£.7.0. Box 561, Aw 


phene/ tefex/maL . — ™ 

de to Goa 1001 Ixuame, Svntaar- 
lend. 021/3^8218. tbc 25074 MCXOtt 


YOUR OWKS M PAMS: TRfiC 
ANSWB8NG SBMC£. secretary, 
errands^ foe 24H/day. 


IMPETUS • ZURICH * 252 76 21. 
Phone / telex / raaflxw. 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


TAX SERVICES 


USA INCOME TAX ADVICE 6 R* 
hirnL Para based US CPA 359 63 01 


AVE. MARCEAU - ETOILE 

Very h^hdoto Officer 


80 tq a PeriW condition 

SIOOOM 


7«.M00 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


Embassy 

IAM.de 


Service 


75008 Mil 

Tefoi 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1640 


VIEW ON SHNE 


Quo' de Beffimo. bang toodv tet 
flow, 285 rtjo, 4/5 bedraona, perfect 
condition. Modem ‘ arentedure. 
F8, 400^X)0. VJ.GJ: 766 03 26 


AGBICE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

380 26 08 


RUE JACOB. 18th cent. 


house, high 
vino, 3 bed- 


rooms. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


BEST LOOS 
Stone and Nam Dome 
a tene, SO 1 


Contemporary renovation. 
Serge Kayser 329 


PL ETATS UNIS (NEAR) 

Luxurious 135 KjJti. 


perfect mneition. PI, 


AETHUR 562 Ol 69 


FAUBOUtG 
Siikk at 


ST HONOflfoANJOU. 


apartment, M75JD0Q. 
tNTWl«MS 563 17 77 


nuts - HE SAINT, U3UIS. httoriw! 
residence, riew Seme, sun, 190 earn, 
ppolment, roody to move m. J.V. 
Xgctrt 503 03 lff(+ onwwingser* 
vte return 008 osaxecL] 


16TM noCADBta 3 rooms, high 
doss freestone buHng, beautmi re- 


16* mm 

nxnpeuou i, patang, art 503 


MAKIVi _210 Kun. 
‘ <752. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


5TH QUAI ST MICHR. View of Seine 
aid Notre Done. Double living + 1 
betfroo m, charm, 5th floor, no eievo- 
tor. O JBOJOa OTA 222 0819 


ST OBUUMSBmS. Hue deSete 
45 nun. tunny too floor 2/3-rQom. 
FTDOiOOO. Telt 20136 58 


5TH PLACE PANTHEON. ISO tqja, 
double Suing, d ni no, 2 bedroamv fit- 
ted cedar. leL- 763 QQ 79 


16TH Recidantid, txurious 300 sqjst. 


duplex, gardea moWi roonLftorit- 
ing. Fijogooa 1MM0C0M7ZTW6 


BKHWf LAKE 300 tom. tofe 2500 
■txn. gadea 5 bethoom. 503 4752 


SWITZERLAND 


LUXURIOUS OFFICES in Geneva's 


right bant beautiful location an top 
floor ovetootoog rity 


^ uitih view or 

Mps & Jura onamfoa Naar etetito 

tend u t g o ng s e i o rg. Excelent invest- 
ment. SbacBi 223 tqjn, parkuig lots 
waSable in baMmertf. Ptnne, telex. 

facsimile. For further information a* 

022/45 41 38. 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely a c AX tnwts with mogw fi cet it 
views aFUAe Genova and moumm. 


Monirewx, Vilart, Varbier. Les Diobler 
ett, Ototeau cTOex 


netr Grtaad, ley- 

O pp a lu n H ile i For 


sto. Excelent 
Foreig n ere 

faces from SF123/B0. 

Libor al ntortgoget at 6fo% mtatert. 
GiCMEnAN SJL 
Av Man font 24, 
CH-1005 Lawanne, SwnEnriand. 


Tet Pll 22 35 12 Tbc 251 05 MBJS 

LBHnifiiita 


Since 1970 


CHOOSE 

SWnZOLAM) 

We have for foreigmn: A very big 
dicier of beautiful APABTM»iTS/ 
VB1AS / CHAIETS in the vriwto 
region of Lake Geneva Montreux & df 
fanout moutean ntsorti. Very reason- 
ably priced but olio the best ond most 
axaushm. face from about USS40DOO. 
Mortgagee at 6KX Please vat as or 
phone before you at da a deadan. 
KSOOUISA. 


Tour Grise 6, CH-1007 Lautonm. 
i 26 11 Tlx 24290 SfflO CH 


Teh 21 725! 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


•j * 


SWITZERLAND 


u 


SUNNY SOUTHBM SWnZBH 

LAKE LUGANO 


*♦1 


. fl7^)tt) sq.m.) vwth 
nmg pool, private manna aid ( 
beach- 1st qualify. Apartments Bt ■ 
up lo 190 iqjn. + terraces 2- 
sqatL facet: SF453XOO - SH.t 
ar: The Retidenm RSvalago m the 
aea of fee Lake affere apa 
from 57iqjn. to 130 tq.ro. qwL - 

the Ua and fee tnountixnt. 
SP210A50 - SF 485/50. Free for . . 
farejgnort. Mortgagee at tour . 
fatoreef rote*. 


in*- 




W- 


EMERALD - HOME L 


YOUR PAKTNBt M BAD 


VJaGL CaMeri^OMTOpk 


Teh 0691-542913 - 
Tbc 73612 HOME CH 


+:■•*** 


V' 


P ago 17 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 



oison 


International Secretarial Positions 


* him. r.& 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


NBMCH 

PHARMACEUTICAL LABCSATOIY 

bend feroughout the unrid S waO 
brown fc* hi traded leteardi offers a 
pat of 


SECRETARY 

SHORTHAND-TYPIST 


EXPERIENCED 
Bilingual EngBsh-Frendi 

• fomfah mofeer tongue 

• ‘O lewd education mfe mmeznai 2 

of orgavzatian. 
bi wintaii 


y«vl mpmmtLm 
• wife the auaKe of or 


initiative. 

Engfeh & 


The job consists ct sSfferent secretarial 
duties induing fee preparation aid 


folow up of < 


Ml of 

cmI Iranriotens for 

jad «pondble for 

the pntertion of new nndctoa to Can- 
ted Asia. Iron. Tartar, totte X & 
spedana Africa, and who towels 
of hit time. 



Send haidwnttan letter, CV_ 
aid sokvy cksirtd to nm 5030. 
Meda Syria m. 104 roe Seonur, i 
who smB forward 


MULTILINGUAL 


EXECUTIVE 


SECRETARIES 


As pubfafws of EM5 we am ofwoys 
looting for ns of profaaioaak wda a 
feast 5 years expvienot of working 
wife Cfarmw as wel pt McrojngD^ 
redortofmufojd^ffl^paiKasrnte 
caiidatei should be fluent to at leM 2 
languages. Top u wno M e n from 60 
contra aaund the waiid moke use of 
ow terrices when they ore tetexbing 
for ’Executive Mmmml Seo*- 
tertfee' md fanond AeMfontl. Send 


'mnfidentiefly, in Engfeh or French^ CV. 
photo, trfary requ i rement s end private 


Igh on e number under ret SD fo 


c/o ICA. 3 nta d’Havfevflfo, 
75010 farife Frate*. 


MINF6VT for AMERICAN 
-HUMS to PARS. 

EngEsh, _ BriaOfo Dutch or Gennon 
»»p-etaiet, fcnowledga of Freed: m- 
guired, Erwfah shorfeond BEnguol 
tefenh. Write or phones 138 Avenue 
Victor fhjjjo, 75116 Ports, France. Trt: 


BRIH FRANCE 

Hot ina ne Art e opwig t 
for EngEsh mother tongue 

BILINGUAL SECRETARIES 


Temporary and permanent pc **0*1 
avafobfe Co# Pan (11 722 26 « 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SHEAfF® PENS 

MTBMAHQNAL 


EXECUTIVE BILINGUAL 
SKSETARY 


fluent Engfoh aid French onpercrif. 
Good shorthand & typing Very tSversi- 
fied worfo contort with U&4, sent of 
figures nfespensfofe. 

Merroc Gore de PErt 
Send CV, wifoen fetta and trtay de- 
irod to rah 25HTO65. CPA, 3 rue de 
liege, 75009 Paris 


httgrnctfionat Co. teals 
for tn PARS brands (Modrieira) 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY 
(TYPIST, TRANSLATOR) 


wife imwmim 5 years experience hi 

___■ : — gf ffo dis xsy utdurtry. 

mother taygue 


Ffean tend CV, photo + references, 
under n*3603, ta 

ruww ^d«« 
wfl forward. 


SJP. 220, 75063 fartot 
who ' 


Private tottituto 
of kfeta EduooSion 
reeks for fee erection aF its 
Wl Department. 

HUHLEVa 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

fluent fapfish- EogSdi mother feu 


pubEe relations expenenev Send 

'*s£&'a sflgrs&a 

19 rue Won Loo 
75016 Paris 


ADIA 


temporary work 
MIBtNATKMAL I 


'dmimm 

teeks urgently 

BILINGUAL SECHTARY 

Shorthand and word prooeatofl 

saxiMVtti 


PRODBTdt 

SECRETARY 


wa Mog sai 

VSCfPEXT 
1 mother I 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


BOMGUM EXKUT1VE. Secretary & 
petend (fflfaltnt mjuttd for urtl 
organization in Paris, written & SpO- 


pcfeert 

ten letta., .vmih 1 

mate la Box WiS, 

92521 NeuBy Cette France 


ten krttar, resume & tdary require. 

"k HeraW Trfoune, 


MIHDUTiONAL CO. (OPBA) hot 

experi- 


trequreda 

_ w — 1 Gita de 

Trovai should send denjed CV 10 
Bok 1942, Herald Tribune, 92521 
NeuBy Gc6ax, Frcnce 


MTL CONSULTANTS, AKOfTEOS 


teek En gfah moth er- toiyue y oung bi- 
kwxl teuehay, ovaifobfe inuuetti. 
’ toyrork to mudonBefieyue (P2J 




NeinBy Codex. France 


Tribute, 92527 


MIT LAW OFFICE H PAIQS 16th. 


seeks ajmfedtt .bfingud secretary 
Engfah/Frendt. wimm 5 years ex- 
perience. Please u*td your CV. to Bax 


1961, Herald Tribune. 92521 NauDy 
Cetfex, Frota 


, PHABMACSmCAL 
j, seen exacutire seeretory 
June lo December. Britah atiren pref- 

inonncnQi 0000 wtukri ana spatcon 
French, faris 270 72 40 Mre. 2c£to 


SJNLEJLETT reela 
secstTAinr 


rit 23361 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


mndstad 

BRMQUAL AGRiCY Tufiy B3naxd 
758 12 40 TflmP °T?S 


SHCmHAND/TYPISr, experienced 
EngEfe mother fotwe, knowledge 
French, experian BMViitotaxr, au- 
dw, tete prefer jab wife lawyer or 
oatreiwroQiao. Box 1951, Herod Tri- 
bune. 9231 Newfo cite France 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


OK - THE CXB4E DE LA CSB4E tem- 
porary help people recruit biSngud or 
Gtgkrti mother tongue secretories. 


Pant 758 82 30. 


SECRETARIES AVAILS. . 


INVENTIVE, NJHlJGBfT An- 
fluent Frenrti seeks new home - 
1955, Hen4d Tribune. 92S21 
■ Cedax, F rance. 


Junior Level French/English 
Bilingual Secretaries 


The World Bank has vacancies for Junior 
Lews! French/Engfish hifinguaf Secretaries at Us 
headquarters in W eeMeg toe, D-C-, USA 


minimum REQUIREMENTS 1 


1 Three years’ relevant experience ; 

1 Typing skill of 50 »pn in both languages : 
shorthand skill ol SB ferpm desirable : 


• Fluency in En^lsh and French etnotfel; 


i Word procesdng skills h^hiy desirable . 


Salaries are determined by length of experience. . 
Benefits indude 26 days vacation ; home leave 
travel every two years. In addition, medical and E 
Insurance is available on a cost-sharing 
basis ; staff must contribute to the pension plan. 
Relocation to Washington paid on appointment. 
Qualified candidates will be tested and interview : 
locally. 



vb 

M- 


Please send a dcMfod renuu 
dosing date Aprfl 21, 19S5 
quoting Reference 55-FRA-0203 


t. bt E igfob. 



The World Barak 

Bcmiltteuiut Unit 

6 €.«v.dTtea 
75116 Pamela. Fnuac« 


Brush up traming ottorfM 
Tet 265.1663 / 335.1430 


IHT CROflAIXlN DEPABTMB1T it 
kxtfeng for femporary bSngud fog-' 
lah7 French tocretory, avtaokfo re- 

DI >i*n it IAjj P jkjniiJ Ruu 
hibphw, rnynr Rtnma rura 

747 12 uwh 4302 


HUM NEAK 8-EJt G87TU1Y seeks 


ASSISTANT TO CHAIRMAN 

£1 5,000 Sterling PARIS 


We seek ta ti mutual combination of talenu. Fluent fo nscntial and soi; ' 

Becretarial skills ore required. 

More important, however, are the qualities of high inieUigcncr based in f ^ 
education and social poise. The ideal age is 25-35. “ 

A sense of dedication and toui flexibility with regard to frequent international tra *■ 
which will be under firat-clua conditions with til expenses paid, and also to »oi+ _• 
hours, is mandaiory. 

In return we offer unusual variety, challenge and reward, in a non-n»utin«* api**’ 
meat working: for the Chief Executive of a large international organization. 

Interviews will be held in Paris end London. Applications accompanied frpa ^ 
length photograph to ; . 

Box D- 2142 , Intemattoriol Herald Tribune, 

-imst — 181 Ave. Charles-de-Gaulle, 92521 NeuiBy Cedex.ssss ' ", 


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Printed fy gdz In Zurich (Switzerland)