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' e Global Newspaper 

■ Edited in Paris 
. ^ Printed Simultaneously 
. . ; n Parts. London, ZuricW- 
Hong Kong, Singapore! 
fhe Hague and Marseille 


bJteralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


iTHHt DATA APPEAR ON PAGE U 



. 31,757 


Published With The New York Times and TTie Washington Post 



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ZURICH, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 






ESTABLISHED 1887 


.S. Is Considering 
iplomatic Moves 
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t/nirerf Press International 

tSHINOTON — The United 
. is considering some form of 
Baric retaliation against the 
i Union for shooting to death 
. military officer in East Ger- 
i, the white House said 
tesday. 

e are considering some steps 
ring US-Soviet relations, but 
they’re finalized, I can’t be 
ic/ Larry Speakes. the White 
s spokesman, said. “I can’t 
hem out, but there could be a 
ier of diplomatic-related steps 
mid take.” 

missions on a U.S. response posing sides. Both sides mtr» pjc- 
being held in the State De- tunes, they said, but at the riskof 
lent and the National Securi- bong /forain^ 

The officials said they did not 
know whether the two had driven 
through a restricted area to get to 
the area when: they encountered 
Soviet forces. But they denied that 
they were on either a permanently 
restricted or temporarily restricted 
area at the time of the shooting. 


had ignored warnings and was shot 
while trying to escape. 

The U.S. officials said Major 
Nicholson was shot in the chest 
without warning ami that Sergeant 
S c hatz . who waited in a nearby 
vehicle, was shot at and missed . 

_ The senior adminis tration offi- 
cials said under the rules govering 
the activities of both U.S. military 
observers in East Germany and 
their Soviet counterparts in West 
Germany, wide-ranging surveil- 
lance is permitted, although areas 
designated as restricted areas are 
off-limits to personnel of the qp- 




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unriL 

anwhile, administration offi- 
admitt ed that Major Arthur 
alson was taking photographs 
nvfet nrifttaxy equipment in 
had beat a Soviet restricted 
in East Germany before he 

■ tilled by a Soviet sentiy. 

e senior State Department 
Defense Department officials 
-ated, however, that there was 
. unification for the shooting 
' lay near the East German 
of Ludwigstast, 100 miles 
kilometers) northwest of Ber- 

c officials, speaking on the 
-ition they not be identified by 
" '■*; said M^jor Nicholson was 
de a Soviet mili tary bafiding 
g pbotographs through a win- 
of nnlilaiy equipment 
■ e budding had been desij 
a restricted area by the 
- ary, but that restriction was 
< Feb. 20. they said, and Major 
oUoq and his con^anion, Ser- 
L Jessie G. Schatz, had a right 
photographs of what was 
"e toe building. They stud they 
Vved the Russians had de- 
ed the film. 

le officials said the two Ameri- 
enembers of the military liaison 
ion at Potsdam, East Gmna- 
' were not in a restricted area 
i they conducted the mission, 
:30Q yards from one. They de- 
theAmericans were “qrydng.” 
_a Soviet news agency Tass 

■ Tuesday that the two Amcri- 
had pOKtrated an area that 
been designated restricted by 
soviet mffitaiy. The account 
Major Nicholson opened a 
ow of a budding on a Soviet 
ary installation and taken pic- 

-• of mfltaiy equipment inside, 



House AutEorizes Funds 
For 21 More MX Missiles 


■ UJS. WiQ Continue Talks 

Earlier, Bernard Gwartzman of 
The New Yale Tima reported from 

The United Slates (dans to con- 
tinue negotiations on improving re- 
lations with the Soviet Union de- 
spite the ItiDing of as army major in 
East Germany, administration offi- 
cials said. 

Taking their lead from President 
Ronald Rea ga n , the o fficials said 
Tuesday that the shooting should 
not be allowed to become an obsta- 
cle to progress in the current nego- 
tiations between Moscow and 

W ashington 

On Monday, Mr. Reagan was 
asked if the shooting would lead 
him to drop his effort to arrange an 
early meeting with Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, the new Soviet leader. 
“No,” he replied. “It would make 
me more anxious to go to one.” 

A high-ranking State Depart- 
ment official said Wednesday that 
U.S. policy toward Moscow had 
been set for some rime, aiming to 
alleviate tensions. 

He said he anticipated that once 
the U.S. review of the killing of 
Major Nicholson was over,, the . 
United States would seek redress in 
the m3Uaiy-to-m3itaiy area, such 
as pressing for more dear-cut as- 
surances on the rights of liaison 
mission officers in East and West 
Germany, and some formal action 

(Continued on Page 2, CbL $ 


TEHRAN BOMBED — A ghTs body is removed from the nibble of a bombed b 

after an Iraqi air raid on southern Tehran. On Wednesday, a powerful explosion i 

Baghdad and Iran said that it had fired a groand-lannched missile in retaliation. Page 2. 

West Germany Modifies Its Support 
For U.S. Space Defense Research 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has voted, 219- 
213, to release SI 5 billion to buDd 
21 additional MX missiles. Almost 
one-fourth of the Democrats joined 
most of the Republicans in siding 
with President Ronald Reagan. 

Sixty-one Democrats and 1S8 
Republicans supported the resolu- 
tion Tuesday authorizing release of 
the funds, while 189 
including the entire Democratic 
leadership, anti 24 Republicans 
voted against iL 

The MX, for missile experimen- 
tal, is designed to replace the cur- 
rent generation of intercontinental 
ballistic nrissOes. It was first pro- 
posed in 1972 during the Nixon 
adminis t ration and has been a sub- 
ject of intense congressional scruti- 
ny since 1977, when the Carter ad- 
ministration attempted to 
axxderale development. 

Congress has never blocked the 
nrisale but has often put conditions 
on Us development. 

Reagan needed to win Tuesday’s Of Key Weapon for Administration 

authorization and another vote J r 

Wednesday or Thursday on a fund- By Hedrick Smith 

"™ " ' ’ " New York Timet Service 


gotiator in Geneva. Max M. Kam- 
pelman. 

Mr. Reagan and Mr. Kampd- 
man argued that a defeat of the MX 
would harm the U.S. position at the 
arms talks, a point that apparently 
swayed many lawmakers. 

Representative Les Asp in. Dem- 
ocrat Of Wisconsin and chairman 
of the Armed Services Committee, 
said in the debate: “Why should 
Congress unilaterally remove 
something from the table?” 

“We need to give our negotiators 
something to negotiate with,” he 
said. 

The Democratic leadership, sol- 
idly united against the MX for the 
first time, focused on the budgetary 


impact of the missQe. In the final 
hours before the debate, MX oppo- 
nents said that the money argu- 
ment appeared to be the major fac- 
tor in shoring up votes against iL 

I^presentative Tony Coelho, a 
Californian who is head of the 
Democratic Congressional Cam- 
paign Committee, said before the 
vote that the “fear factor" was per- 
suading many wavering Democrats 
to vote with the president. 

Thai concern was exacerbated 
-this week by reports that the Re- 
publican campaign committee was 
embarking on. a campaign to “soft- 
en up” many Democrats for the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Reagan’s Victory on MX 
Is Setback for Democrats 

Divisions in Party Led to Approval 


By James Markham 

New York Tima Soviet 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
KohFs government clearly indicat- 
ed Wednesday a coding c? its qual- 
ified support for the Reagan ad- 
ministration’s plans for a 
space-based defensive weapons 
system. 

At a background briefing, a se- 
nior government official released a 
position paper that marked a re- 
treat from west Germany’s back- 
ing for the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive. He said that Bonn would not 
feel bound by a 60-day deadline set 
by Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger on whether UA allies 

would 



ioting Erupts in Sudan 
s Nimeiri Goes to U.S. 


•••■•? - 


• \ r • 




npikd ty Oar Staff From Dispatches 

AIRO — Riots broke out 
. nesday in the Sudanese capital 
: 3nrtoum after President Gaa- 
• Nimeiri left on a trip to the 
"led States. 

-"V disturbance was apparently 
^ght on by price increases for 
d and other goods, 
he Cairo correspondent for 
nee France-Presse quoted a 
‘■tern source in Khartoum as 
bg that police killed three per- 
; and wounded several in trying 
'op the disturbance, 
t Washington, a State Depart- 
t spokesman said (hat at least 
■ persons had been killed in the 
" ng. 

; 1 loesses said by phone from 
rtoum that cars had been set 
ae but that police seemed to be 
rolling the riots, which broke 
after President Nimeirei 
Jped subsidies for bread and 
x goods. 

ires were reported in several 
" ^ s of the city, an Hirtine 
. . w in Cairo said that the Air 
- roe office in Khartoum had 
t “sacked.” A diplomat at the 


US. Embassy said ihai the embas- 
sy had “lost a few cars.'' 

The British Br 
ration said in a report from ] 
that demonstrators had shouted 
“Down with the World Bank, down 
with the IMF!” 

“Down with America and impe- 
rialism!” was another chant, ac- 
cording to a diplomat 
Diplomats confirmed a BBC re- 
■ that the riot police had first 
tear gas to prevent the ad- 
vance of the demonstrators and 
then opened fire with rifles and 
small aims when the tear gas failed. 

S udan, hit by a rebellion in the 
south, stricken by drought and bur- 
dened by a refugee influx from 
famine in Ethiopia and Chad, is 
Africa’s largest country and one of 
iispooresL 

President Nimeiri, who came to 
power in a military coup 16 yeans 
ago, imposed Islamic law in 1983 in 
as attempt to impose disciplme 
and raise productivity. 

Major General Nimeiri is ex- 
pected to seek farther economic aid 
in mTl« in Washington with Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and other 
U.S. officials. (Reuters, AFP, UPJ) 


“We don't want to get on the 
wrong horse, if we get on at all,” 
said the official, who has a signifi- 
cant role in fonnolatmg Bonn’s de- 
fense policies. /‘We can't say 
-whether we to going to participate 
in a research concept that we don’t 
even know.” 

The shift came as defense minis- 
ters of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization issued a statement in 
Luxembourg backing ILS. research 
into what has become known as the 
“star wars" program. 

While asserting that there has 
been no change in his government’s 
posture Mr. Kohl has moved away 
from a speech in Munich on Feb. 9 
that guardedly endorsed the re- 
search aspects of the US. program. 

While withholding a final judg- 
ment on the program, Mr. Kohl 
embraced President Ronald Rea- 
gan's rationale for a defensive 
weapons approach and said (hat 
West Germany’s industry conld 
not be left out of such a major 
research effort. Last week, be urged 
the European allies to develop a 

joint approach to the Reagan pro- _ _ 

gram so that they might influence ]n fcuTOVe Trading 
decisions on its possible deploy- r T? 

meat 

The government’s first 
dons over the program were turned 
at March 18 worn Foreign Minister 
Hans-Dietrich Genscher voiced 
concern over a posable erosion of 


■ CasparW. Weinberger 

non was seeking a joint iferJ^re uinq 
endorsing the project at the summit 
meeting of industrial democracies 
that wm be held here in May. 

■ Defense Aides in Accord 

Defense ministers of the Western 
all i a nce on Wednesday urged the 
United States to continue its re- 
search, saying the West’s security 
interests demanded iL The Associ- 
ated Press reported from Luxem- 
bourg. 

Although the Danish defense 
minister joined in the declaration, 
his country’s parliament instructed 
the government Tuesday to refuse 
the UJS. invitation to participate. 

Australian officials said 


Dollar Declines 


Wednesday that their country also 
would refuse to participate. Aus- 
tralia was one of three non-NATO 
countries invited by Mr. Weinber- 
ger to join the program. The others 
were Japan and Israel 
- The ministers also pledged to 
continue the installation of 572 me- 
dium-range nuclear missiles in 
Western Europe unless an arms 
agreement is reached at the Geneva 

talks. 

Lend Carrington, the NATO sec- 
retary-general, disclosed that 134 
cruise and Pe rshing missQes had 
been deployed in Europe, indudhig 
16 in Belgium. 

The ministers welcomed a for- 
mal invitation Tuesday by Mr. 
Weinberger for the alHcs to partici- 
pate in the research on space weap- 
onry. • 

Michael Hesdtine, the British 
defense secretary, said in an inter- 
■' vfeiHhat ryttucaabesure”Eritain 
wfl] join in the UJS. program. 


mg measure. The Republican-led 
Senate approved the funds last 
week by a modi wider margin. 

Representative Edward J. Mar- 
key, Democrat of Massachusetts, a 
leading opponent of the MX, said 
that only three lawmakers would 
have to switch their votes for the 
missile to be defeated. 

“The fight is not over," he said. 

However, MX opponents 
stopped short of predicting that 
they conld reverse Tuesday’s out- 
come, saying that most lawmakers 
have made up their minds on the 
issue and that few were likely to 
change. 

The president praised the vote as 
an “important and unmistakable 
signal of American unity and re- 
solve.” 

He called it “a dear demonstra- 
tion of American strength and de- 
termination” affirming “our com- 
mitment to maintain the modem 
forces necessary for effective deter- 
rence and to do everything posable 
to achieve significant arms reduc- 
tions.' 



NATO's traditional deterrence 
doctrine. 

At Wednesday’s briefing, the se- 
nior official denied that Bonn’s po- 
sition had been infinenend by pres- 
sure exerted on Mr. Kohl when he 
met March 14 in Moscow with the 
new Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev. 

The official stressed that Bonn 
would seek to shape its position 
toward the UJS. space-weapons 
program in concert with other 
Western European nations. He dis- 
missed as “press speculation” re- 
peats that the Reagan admimstra- 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Lower interest 
rates and fears about the stability 
of the UJS. banking system pushed 
the dollar sharply lower Wednes- 
day. 

In London, the British pound 
rose to SI 039; it was quoted at 
S1.IS2 lateTuesday. The dollar was 
also down against most other major 
currencies. 

Currency dealers said the dollar 
continued the decline that began 
Tuesday after US. newspapers re- 
ported that bad real estate and en- 
ergy loans could hurt profits at 
some Texas banks. 

The dollar also reacted to a de- 
cline in interest rates on short-term 
dollar deposits in Europe, thus 
making the dollar less attractive to 
investors. Details, Page 9. 


Sir Geoffrey 
dgn secretary, said March IS that 
there were many unanswered ques- 
tions about the desirability of a 
defensive system in space. 

The defense ministers also were 
given recommendations by Gener- 
al Bernard W. Rogers, the NATO 
commander in Europe, on how to 
implement a 1983 decision to with- 
draw 1,400 nuclear warheads from 
Europe by 1988. They said all 
atomic demolition mines would be 
removed, but no other details of the 
plan were disclosed. 

Mr. Weinberger later went to 
Paris to brief President Francis 
Mitterrand on the proposal to in- 
volve the allies in the research pro- 
gram. 

■ Tafts in Geneva 

U.S. and Soviet negotiators on 
strategic nuclear weapons held 
their fro working session Wednes- 
day, United Press International re- 
peated from Geneva. 

The meeting, held at the U.S. 
delegation bin! ding, lasted two 
hours and 15 minutes. 

The talks are broken down into 
three categories with separate ne- 
gotiating groups on defense and 
space amis, strategic nuclear weap- 
ons and intermediate nuclear 
forces. 

Delegates on the defense and 
space groups held their first work- 
ing meeting Tuesday. 

Before me meeting Wednesday 
on strategic weapons, the chief So- 
viet negotiator, Viktor P. Karpov, 
clearly indicated that be would be 
protestingaboDi approval for a fur- 
ther 21 MX missiles by the United 
States. 


House action occurred after days 

_ , both 

culminated 
Monday when 100 lawmakers were 
driven in military buses to (he 
White House for a personal plea by 
Mr. Reagan and has chief arms ne- 


WASHINGTON — The vote on 
the MX missile was not only a 
crucial victory for President Ron- 
ald Reagan but also a serious set- 
back for the Democratic Party, al- 

NE VS ANALYSIS 

ready riven by splits and internal 
disarray after Mr. Reagan's land- 
slide victory in November. 

The House speaker, Thomas P. 
O’Neill Jr., made Tnesda/s MX 
showdown a “vote of conscience,” 
rather than an issue of party loyal- 
ty, somewhat cushioning the jolt of 
defeat for the House Democratic 
leadership. 

But the leadership had lobbied 
hard to beat the president, and the 
defection of 61, or roughly one- 
fourth, of the House Democrats, 
underscored the speaker’s difficul- 
ty in holding the majority together. 

Both in Tuesday’s vote and in the 
votes last week in the Senate, Mr. 
Reagan would have lost had it not 
been for Democratic defectors. In 
• .i the Senate, the Democratic leader- 


House Democrats like Bill Alex- 
ander of Arkansas, the chief deputy 
whip, conceded that Tuesday’s vote 
not only left Mr. Reagan “king of 
the hill” but also hi g hli ght^ Dem- 
ocratic divisions as the House 
moves toward other key votes on 
the budget and on aid to Nicara- 
guan rebels. 

Mr. Alexander, a previous sup- 

Tuesday, said that hard^Eartoig 
over the MX might leave internal 
“wounds and bruises" because the 
issue had engendered strong emo- 
tions among Democrats. 

“This is a significant split in our 
party,” he said. “It’s the way the 
Democratic Party is. We are a di- 
verse party that divides up on is- 
sues and rarely marches m lock- 
step." 

But other Democrats, even some 
who voted with the president, am- 
tended that this vote was not indic- 
ative of how House Democrats 
would perform on issues like the 
budget and aid to Nicaraguan re- 
bels, or even another vote next 
summer on 48 additional MX mis- 
siles. - . 

Sojm political analysts like Nor- 
man J. Ornston, author of several 
books about Congress, said that 


ship itseir was spliL'The minority 
leader, Robert G Byrd of West 
Virginia, backed the White House, 
and Alan Cranston, the Senate opposition parties were almost al- 
Democratic whip from California, ways split within. Also, be said, the 
helped lead the opposition to the MX issue was. heavily affected by 
MX missile. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


Zhao Says Chinese Economic Reform 
Has Stumbled Over Wages, Spending 


By Jim Mann 

Los Angela Tones Service 

BEUING — China's program to 
reform its economy has run into 
difficulties because of an initial 
binge of ctHxsunmtion, wage raises, 
hank loans ado increases in the 
money supply. Prime Minister 
Zhao Zryang said Wednesday. 

In his animal report to the Na- 
tional People’s Congress, the Chi- 
nese parliament, Mr. Zhao con- 
fessed that he and other Chinese 
leaders “lade experience" in carry- 
ing out economic changes of the 
scope China is now implementing. 
He in d icated that the regime in- 
tends to keep the economy under 
tight control as it proceeds with the 
reform program this year. 

The Chinese prime minister also 
called upon authorities throughout 
China to help “forestall panic buy- 
ing.” Since last October, when the 
regime annwmmH plans to lift 
some price controls, millions of 
Chinese who feared a period of 
inflation have rushed to buy con- 
sumer goods. 

“Our country has a population 
of one billion, organized in more 
than 200 million households,” Mr. 



Zhao Zayang 


Motel People: New Homeless in U.S. West Can’t Afford Regular Housing 




By Mark L Pinsky 

Lot Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Growing numbers of “mold 
. People” who are unable to afford permanent hous- 
og have appeared in several Western states, leading 
touring experts to speak of an emerging class of the 
‘hidden homeless.” 

Estimates of the number of people marooned in 
noids — to find affordable housing or 

“cumulate ihe cash deposits required by landlords 
md utility companies — range up to I million in 
.-ihfomia alone. 

Blasi, a staff attorney for the Legal Aid 
of Los Angeles, says molds with high 
percentages of long-term residents are becoming 
fairly mmnwn throughout tire Western states.” 

He characterizes such complexes as “the suburban 
squivalent of Sod Row hotels." 

_ The U.S- Bureau of the Census has no national 
rgures on motel dwellers, nor does the Department 
.A Housing and Urban Development 

“1 don't believe anyone knows how many there 
ire,” said Art rhnntmn of the bousing cotn- 
nission in Orange County, California. 

One problem with keeping track of the motel 
i Wellers, mid Michael director of the C hri s- 

Xna, CaJjfomia. is*thflf “we don’t count diem as 
tomeless if they have a roof over their heads. 


Brad Paul, a hearing activist in San Francisco and 
board member of the National Coalition for the 
Homeless, estimates that between 250,000 and I 
million Californians are Irvin gin mold rooms. They 
are better off than people living an the street, in cars 
or in shelters, Mr. Paul says, but often jnst marginal- 
ly. 

“They becomeprisoners, in a sense, in these mo- 
lds,” he said. “They are the next group ai risk to 
become homeless in this country. 

Richard and Tina Cisneros, who have lived with 
their three children in a motel room in the Los 
Angeles area since moving three months ago from 
New Mexico, say their goal of finding more suitable 
bousing is as elusive as when they arrived. 

The motd room costs $140 a week. Together they 
bring home $319 weddy from their jobs, and from 
what is left they have to pay for food and clothes, 
gasoline for their car, storage for their furni tu re, 
doctor bills for the children mid medicine far Rich- 
ard, who is an epileptic. What is left, they try to save. 

Tina Cisneros estimates that to escape to an apart- 
ment, they will need about 51,500 in cash — first and 
last months’ rent of perhaps $600, plus deposits for 
security md utilities. 

Not all “mold people” are like the Cisneroses, 
who live in relatively dean and comfortable — if 
cramped — quarters. 

Many survive entirely md permanently on public 
assistance of one land or another. They congregate 


at places Eke the Wishing Well Motd in suburban 
Santa Ana, which was died early this year for 600 
building and fire code violations, including over- 
crowding, insect and rodent infestation, inoperable 
plumbing and hazardous electrical problems. 

“Low income people don’t have much choice,” 
said Ken Dnfer. who has been living at the Wishing 
Well for the past six months. “These places aren’t fit 
to live in.” But many families like his, he noted, even 
with one member working, can never seem to save 
enough cash to move out of the motel and into an 

“The deposit, that’s what’s kilting everybody 
here,” Mr. Dnfer said. 

“It’s a vicious circle," said Eileen S ch w artz , pro- 
gram director of the Traveler's Aid Sodety of Or- 
ange County. “They can’t get oat of it, they’re stuck 
in there.” 

Many of the more desperate motd dwellers are 
paying 70 percent to 80 percent of their take-home 
pay on hooting, frequently for a single room without 
cooking facilities, noted Mr. Elias, of Christian Tem- 
porary Hooting. 

“Going out For prepared food eats up whatever 
income they have left, said Jean Forbaih, director 
of the Share Our Selves program in Orange County. 

Added to the economic pressure of living so close 
to the edge are the difficulties inherent in overcrowd- 
“£■ 

“Several family members living m a stogie room 


leads to problems," said Ron Johnson, president of 
the Family Services Association of Orange County. 
“It may lead to physical abuse of a spouse or 
children, even sexual abuse, with whole families in a 
single bed." 

“There’s a high incidence of neglect,” said Lois 
Wood, supervisor of the Quid Abuse Registry of the 
Orange County Department of Social Services. Of- 
ten, die said, children are left alone without child 
care while a single parent, or both parents, works. 

“The sense of being closed in an each other in a 
motd room,” said Rabbi Steven Reubm of Los 
Angeles, often results in a “depression psychosis." 

In Tustin, California, teachers and health officials 
report increased levels of such health problems as 
head lice, as well as the need for guidance counseling 
among the 60 or so mold children. 

“Motd children are something we talk about 
among ourselves," said a Tustin dementajy school 
teacher who asked that her name not be used. “They 
may move as many as seven times m a given school 
year. That kind of in-and-out life allows for no 
foundation, no basis for learning,” 

Long-term life in a motel creates both a syndrome 
and an insofar subculture of its own, residents and 
commmity workers say. 

Regardless of the weekly rate or state of repair of 
the premises, prcstiteticc, drug-dealing and alcohol- 
ism are often part of the mold milieu. 


Zhao said. “The domestic market, 
consequently, has an enormous ca- 
pacity. If everyone rushed to buy 
the same commodities at the same 
time, no slate reserve, however rich, 
could cope with the situation.” 

The prime minister’s speech, 
broadcast on nationwide television, 
amounted to the first detailed ac- 
count by Chinese authorities of the 
mistakes they have made in their 
efforts to transform China from a 
planned economy to a form of mar- 
ket socialism. 

Mr. Zhao and Deng Xiaoping, 
the paramount Chinese leader, 
“can’t kero their finger on every- 
thing," a Western diplomat said 
after hearing the speech. “They’ve 
been trying to do too much at once, 
and they don't have too much expe- ' 
rience in running a free economy. 
So now they'll ran in for a year.” 

In his speech, Mr. Zhao went 
beyond the descriptions of eco- 
nomic errors and implicitly ac- 
knowledged that the entire lone of 
China’s reform program wiD be 
changed to make it more sedate. 

Last fail, when the economic re- 
forms were first annminrwi L ordi- 
nary Chinese were encouraged to 
spend more money, to wear newer 
and more fashionable clothes and 
to consume more goods. 

On Wednesday, by contrast, a 
chastened Mr. Zhao — wearing a 
Mao jacket instead of the Western 
suit in which he is usually attired — ■ 
admonished the nation to be “mod- 
est and prudent.” 

“Only by adhering to tile policy 
of building up the country through 
thrift and hard work can we gradu- 
ally increase its economic strength 
and create a solid material founda- 


tion for continuously r aising the 
people’s living standards” he de- 
clared. 

The Chinese prime minister 
placed much of the blame for the 
/economic problems on what he 
called “lax control” over bank 
credit and increases in the money 
supply. He said that bank loans 
were up 29 percent last year, and 
that nearly half of this increase was 
in the month of December alone. 

Those remarks provided the first 
official explanation of why the 
presidents of two of China’s most 
important financial institutions, 
the People's Bank of China and the 
Bank of China, have both been 
replaced ova the past month. 

China’s economic reform pro- 

Pany Central Committee last Oc- 
tober, calls for a gradual lifting of 
price controls and a drastic reduc- 
tion in the role of centralized state 
planning. The aim is to increase the 
efficiency of the Chinese economy 
and thus help spur growth and 
modernization. 

Even in the weeks before the re- 
form package was approved, resi- 

( Continued on Plage 2, CoL 7) 


• INSIDE 

■ Amadou M ah tar M’Bow, 

UNESCO’s director-general, is 
faring increasing pressure to re- 
sign. Page 2. 

■ The Senate Foreign Rela- 

tions Committee tentatively 
voted for a partial freeze on 
foreign aid. Page 3. 

■ PresUeBa-deetTancredo Ne- 
ves of Brazil faces a 
recuperative period. 

■ Yves Saint Laurent’s fall- 
winter collection was short and 
simple: a lesson in 
down. 


■ The stakes are too high for 

the EC to allow expansion talks 
to fail Page 6. 

SCIENCE 

■ The first weather satellite was 

launched 25 years ago. and me- 
teorology has not ban the same 
since. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Japan will keep voluntary re- 

strictions oo car exports to the 
United Stales. Page 9. 











1 i 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


j : \ 


Blast Rocks Baghdad; 
Tehran Claims It Fired 


Ground-Based Missile 


CanpUed (w Our Staff From Dispatches 

BAGHDAD — A powerful blast 
rocked Baghdad on Wednesday 
and sent up a cloud of white smoke 
on the city’s western edge shortly 
after Iran said it fired a ground- 
launched missile at the Iraqi capi- 
tal. 

Iran claimed it had fired its sixth 
missile at Baghdad in two weeks. 

Bag h dad residents said a hug* 
explosion occurred at about 1 P.M. 
in a densely populated neighbor- 
hood. Staff members of a hospital 
said they had been alerted to re- 
ceive wounded. There was no offi- 
cial report of casualties or damage 

Iran said the mis si le attack was 
in retaliation for Iraqi rocket 
strikes Tuesday and Wednesday 
against Tehran, which Iran said 
killed 12 people, and against other 
Iranian ones. 

A senior I ranian official, mean- 
while. indicated that the Tehran 
government had doubled its claim 
For reparations from Iraq as a con- 
dition for ending the Gulf war. 

A deputy foreign minister, Ali 
Mohammed Besharad, said in an 
interview with the English-lan- 
guage daily Tehran Tunes that Iran 
would continue the war until its 


Conservative Unit 
Obtains list of 
CBS Shareholders 


New Turk Tima Service 


NEW YORK — CBS Inc. has 
turned over its list of shareholders 
to Fairness in Media, a conserva- 
tive group that hopes to take over 
CBS to end what it contends is the 
network's liberal bias in reporting 
the news. 

CBS relinquished the list Tues- 
day after Fairness in Media, allied 
with the Republican senator Jesse 
Helms of North Carolina, agreed to 
conditions for its use. Earlier this 
month, U.S. District Judge William 
C. Conner told CBS and Fairness 
in Media to find a means by which 
the group could get the list 

Last month CBS filed suit to 
prevent Fairness in Media from se- 
curing the list unless its members 
could give assurances that it would 
not be used for political fund-rais- 


ing. Shortly after CBS filed suit 
Hoover Adams, an ownra of 11 
shares of stock, sued CBS for the 
list on behalf of Fairness in Media. 

By law, shareholders are entitled 
to receive lists of stockholders to 
influence corporate policies, and 
many liberal groups over the years 
have used sum lists to introduce 
resolutions on such issues as minor- 
ity employment environmental 
protection and divestiture of opera- 
tions in South Africa. 


aims were achieved, including pay- 
ment of about $350 billion in repa- 
rations from Iraq. This is about 
twice the amount previously men- 
tioned by Iran. 

Mr. Besharati reiterated that 
Iran, at war with Iraq since Sep- 
tember 1980, continued to insis t on 
the trial and punishment of Presi- 
dent Saddam Hussein of Iraq, as 
well as the repatriation of more 
than 200,000 Iraqi refugees in Iran. 

A military statement said Iran 
would retaliate for Iraq's alleged 
use of chemical weapons. 

Iraq said earlier its planes had 
raided Tehran and the cities of 
Qazvin and Kaahan in northern 
and central Iran. Iran said three 
people were killed when an Iraqi 
plane attacked a Tehran suburb. 

Iran said more than 200 of its 
troops had been affected by mus- 
tard and other gases in recem fight- 
ing in the marshes of southern Iraq. 
Two I ranians wounded by chemi- 
cal weapons died this week in West 
European hospitals. Iran said. 

The national press agency IRNA 
said Iran, starting early Wednes- 
day, shelled six southern Iraqi dries 
in retaliation Tor air attacks on Ira- 
nian cities. 


Street Near White House 


May Be dosed to Traffic 

WASHINGTON — The secre- 
tary of the Treasury. James A. Bak- 
er 3d, has told Congress that Fen- 
nyslvania Avenue in front of the 
White House might be dosed to 
traffic as a security measure. 


The two-block stretch would be 
sealed off under a Secret Service 
proposal that is “still very much in 
the p lanning stage," he told a sub- 
committee Tuesday. The six-lane 
thoroughfare passes about 100 
yards (90 meters) in front of the 
White House. The Treasury over- 
sees the Secret Service, which pro- 
vides security for the prcadent 



I 



It said the fire was aimed at mili- 
tary and industrial installations in 
Basra, A1 Faw, Abol al Khassib. 
Tannnmmah , Si bah and 7iariiyah. 
Initial reports said oil installations 
in Basra, on the Shatt al-Arab wa- 
terway, were ablaze. 

The upsurge in fighting started 
March 4 when Iran said Iraqi war- 
planes hit an unfinishe d nuclear 
plant at the Iranian Gulf port of 
Bushehr and a steel complex near 
Ahwaz. 

Iran's War information Head- 
quarters said in a statement that 
Iran had no wish to turn Baghdad 
into a ruin with missil e strikes and 
that the latest attack was only be- 
cause of the Iraqi ruling party’s 
“hard-headedness/ (AP. Reuters) 


IMMOLATION — The mao on the right poured gaso- 
line on himself and set himself on fire Wednesday in 
front of the South Korean Embassy in Taipei He is in 
stable condition in a hospital. He was protesting SeouTs 
decision to return a Chinese boat and its crew to China. 


MX: New Generation 


Of Strategic Missiles 


New York Tima Service 


WASHINGTON — The MX is 
the latest generation of interconti- 
nental missil e in the U.S. nuclear 
arsenal and represents a consider- 
able technical advance. 

Twenty missies have already 
been purchased for research and 
development, and seven have been 
tested in flight. The air force de- 
scribes the tests as successful 

After research is complete, the 
Reagan a dminis tration plans to de- 
ploy 100 new missiles in silos at 
Warren Air Force Base, which 
stretches across eastern Wyoming 
and western Nebraska. It wants to 
buy 123 more missiles for spares 
and for testing under operational 
conditions. 


Congress already has authorized 
the purchase of 21 combat-ready 
missiles. Delivery of that batch is to 
begin in the spring of 1986. and the 
first set of 1 0 should be operational 
by December 1986. 

Each missile is to be fitted with 
10 warheads, but 12 could be 
mounted without technical diffi- 
culty. Each warhead has an explo- 
sive power equivalent to that of 
300,000 short tons of TNT (272,000 






H'S.-V, 


Keep up with the Joneses. 


When you keep up by phone, you stay close to the people you miss in the States. 
You trade your latest experiences and share your everyday lives. But, best of all. you hold 
on to that special bond that joins you in spite of the distance between you. 




AT&T 


UNESCO Head Under WORLD BRIEFS 


Further Pressure to Quit 


By Stanley Mcisler 

Las Angeles Tima Service 

PARIS — Amadou Mahtar 
M’Bow, the director-general of the 
United Nations Economic, Social 
anH Cultural Organization, is fac- 
ing increasing pressure to resign or, 
at least, reform the agency drasti- 
cally. 

The latest pressures have come 
from a meeting in Geneva of the 
countries that now provide most of 
the a gen try's funds and from a 
change in the attitude of the French 
government toward Mr. M’Bow. 

The second factor may mm out 
to be the more important. Some 
members of the UNESCO staff, 
nervous about their jobs since the 
United States withdrew from the 
agency at the end of last year, be- 
lieve that only Mr. M'Bcw’s resig- 
nation can save UNESCO and that 
only the French government, by 
turning African governments 
against Mr. M’Bow. can fence him 
to quit 

Unless Mr. M’Bow leaves before 
his present term expires at Lhe end 
of 1987, according to this view, 
none of the industrialized countries 
will take seriously any attempt at 
reform of UNESCO. Mr. M’Bow, a 
former Senegalese minister of edu- 
cation, has rejected suggestions 


turn, Britain has formally notified 
Mr. M’Bow that it intends to with- 


Mr. M’Bow that it intends to with- 
draw al the end of this year. 

The Netherlands, West Germa- 
ny, Japan and ram aria have hinted 
that they, too, may gp unless Mr. 
M’Bow cuts ejqjenditures drastical- 
ly, stops running the agency like a 
personal fiefdom, and takes 
UNESCO out of programs that the 
industrialized governments regard 
as beyond the agency’s real prov- 


the scene of last wedft police killings . a, nrotesiers provoked 

inquiry into conflicting versions of whether the proi®** v 

into on crow* m members of 


police into firing on thecrowd- called on members of 

In Cape Town. President Rcdm W. Bothaanw^ ^- 4 ^ 

Parliament not to debate the sbootmg5 debate on 

inquiry was finished. The of the three houses 

£2 miner Tuesday, but Mr. Botha told Mum*"* _ lhot 

n c nrfi M Asians and people ot bu-«« 


ince. The programs most criticized 
are those focusing on disarmament 


that he resign, characterizing the 
rempaipn against him and UNES- 


metric tons). The entire missile 
weighs 96 tons and is 71 feet (21.6 
meters) in length, making h the 
largest in the US. arsenal but 
smaller than some Soviet missiles. 

The MX has a range of 6,675 
miles (10,540 kilometers) and uses 
four rocket stages. 

The advanced guidance system is 
designed to give the warheads such 
accuracy that half of those aimed at 
one site would land in a circle 400 
feet in diameter, with the rest near- 
by. This planned accuracy, coupled 
with the relatively high explosive 
power, makes the MX suitable for 
use against reinforced Soviet mis- 
sile stios or bunkers designed to 
protect Soviet leaders. 

Perhaps the most debated issue 
concerning the MX has been how 
to base it. Plans once called for it to 
move among 23 possible launching 
points, but the Reagan administra- 
tion would put each missile in a 
tingle redesigned silo now occupied 
by an older Mmuteman missile. 

Critics say that under this strate- 
gy Soviet planners could hope to 
destroy the 10 MX warheads by 
attacking each silo with two war- 
heads. 


rempaign agains t hrm and UNES- 
CO as a rampaig n against the 
Third World and blacks. 

At a meeting in Genera last week 
with a representative of the United 
States, offi cials of 11 industrialized 
countries, including France, set 
down a strategy for forcing reforms 
from Mr. M’Bow. These members 
have not been satisfied with his 
promises of reform, and effectively 
issued an ultimatum for him to un- 
dertake serious reform by May or 
face an exodus from the organiza- 
tion. 

Counting the United States, the 
12 countries at the Geneva meeting 
contributed 70 percent of UNES- 
CO's budget last year. Although 
only the united States, which con- 
tributed 25 percent of the budget, 
has withdrawn from the orgamza- 


are those focusing on disarmament 
and on the coverage and distribu- 
tion of foreign news. 

Tim change in the French posi- 
tion hasbeen chronicled carefully 
by the Paris daily newspaper Le 
Monde. In the past, France has 
been a staunch defender both of 
UNESCO, one of the most promi- 
nent of the international organiza- 
tions headquartered in Pans, and 
of Mr. M’Bow, a graduate of the 
French educational system. Only a 
few weeks ago, France pledged a 
grant of an extra $2 million to make 
up for a part of the financial 
loss from the U.S. withdrawal 

But, according to Le Maude’s 
Bernard Brigcukax, who follows 
UNESCO affairs closely, the 
French government has decided 
not to turn over the pledged money 
until Mr. MTkiw demonstrates that 
be is serious about reforms. France 
is not ready to try to force Mr. 
M’Bow into resignation, Mr. Bri- 
gouldx said, .but it is ready to de- 
mand reforms from hini_ 

In a series of articles, Mr. Bri- 
gOuledx said rim* tbe hardening of 
France’s attitude against Mr. 
M’Bow seems to date from the 
transfer a few weeks ago of the 
Latin American specialist Rfgis 
Debray from the staff of President 
Francois Mitterrand to the Council 
ot State, a judicial body. 

Mr. Debray, who was an asso- 
ciate of the late Cuban revohition- 
aiy Ernesto (Che) Guevara as jour- 
nalist and activist in the 1960s, was 
considered a defender of UNESCO 
at the El vsfie Palace and an advo- 
cate of the Third World on many 
issues. 


the matter Tuesday, but Mr. Botha told a jracisu^- - ^ 

or Parliament — for whites, Asians and people ot nw 
debate could inflame tendons in the counuy^ . cascs 50 

A magistrate in Cape Town anti-apartheid 

people, including some of dm nation smjjt dur i ng iSegS 

denes, wh o wer e among r^Sd without 

march to protest the police actum. The defendams Friday. 

hnfl The other defendants were expected to appear Thursday 


ECFamSBiiistersPessiniisticonPact 

BRUSSELS (Renteis) —Farm ministers of the Europ«m Comnnuuw 
looked set Wednesday for one of the kggimA 


looked set Wednesday for one of the longed ana 5 

price reviews on record after making virtually no progress m thar first 

reconvene in Luxembourg on Monday, and plan to stay all 

necessary to reach an accord. . — #i 

At least five ministers said divisions over proposals from thc^eoi^ 
Commission for a virtual price freeze were so deep thqy were uoy* 
pessimistic of even being able to reach agreem ent even at the end ot mis 

special session. . „ . „ . . 

‘There are even greater difficulties than originally envisaged, sardine 
Irish agriculture minister, Austin Deasy. His French counterpart, Micna 
Rocaxd. said there was a lot of hard bargaining still to be done and fie was 
not optimistic about the n*i«nees of agreement next week. 


Thai Troops Clash With Vietnamese f 

ARANYAPRATHET, Thailand (AP) — Thai and Vietnamese forces 

dashed in Thai territray smith of here Wednesday in the latest of a recent 

series erf Hand incursions, Thai military sources said. , . . 

Thai officers an unknown number of Vietnamese troops based m 
Pamiwtia crossed into Kiong Nam Sai village; about 10 miles (15 
kilometers) from A ra ny a prathet, exchanged fire for 20 mi n utes with Thai 
troops and then called for mortar and artillery support. 

lhe officers said one Thai soldier was seriously wounded. The Viet- 
namese withdrew back across Ihe border, they said. 


Lone Hijacker Seizes Lufthansa Jet 

ISTANBUL (AP) — A lone hijacker commandeered a Lufth a nsa 


jetliner Wednesday mi a Munich-Athens fli ght, forced it to land here and 
freed the 141 other passengers aboard, the Turkish state radio reported. 

The radio said the hijacker was holding all nine crew membera as 
hostage but die West German airline's Frankfurt headquarters said he 
had freed six of them. 

Luf thansa nffidak said tbe hijacker demanded to be flown to Libya in 
tbe Bodng-727. Air traffic controllers at Nicosia said he was armed with a 
knife. 


Reagan’s Victory on MX 
Is Setback for Democrats 


(Continued from Page 1) 
the start of the Geneva arms talks 
and the shooting Sunday of an 
American Anny major in East Ger- 
many, so it is not as good a test of 
the potential cohesion of the Dem- 
ocrats as the budget . 

Nonetheless, Mr. Orastein said 
that Tuesday’s vote was a setback 
for Democrats because their party 
“at this point is feeling in more 
disarray than at any other time in 
their modern history because they 
sense their political coalition is 


sipping away from them, or has 
already slipped away." 

In Congress, up-and-coming 
Democrats had Mame d an aging 
leadership for sane of the party’s 
problems and had pushed for new, 
younger leaders to provide more 
cohesion and better direction. But 
even the younger Democratic lead- 
ers, now in their 40s, found that the 
MX issue diyided them philosophi- 
cally and emotionally regardless of 
generation. 

Representative Richard A. Gep- 
hardt of Missouri, the new chair- 
man of the Democratic Caucus, 
was one of the most outspoken op- 
ponents of the MX missile, while 
Representative Les Aspin of Wis- 
consin, who seized the chairman- 
ship of the Aimed Services Com- 
mittee in a significant rebellion in 
December, gave the final flora 
speech in favor of the 21 MX mis- 
siles. 


For the Record 

A British sokfier was Idled Wednesday in a Roman Catholic section of 
Belfast when a bomb exploded in a housing complex, police said. Two | ' 
civilians were slightly him in the explosion, which was attributed to the 
Irish Republican Army. (UP!) 

Hie prime canister of Turkey, Turgnt Ozal, flew to Washington on 
Wednesday to discuss Cyprus and UiL military grants, and to seek an 
amnesty on S3 J bfifian mat Turkey owes the International Monetary 
Fund. Mr. Ozal will meet with President Ronald Reagan, and wifi 
promote Turkish goods in an I I-day tour that will also include New Ymk 
and Chicago f 'UPS, } 

Car bond) explosions in Santiago injured 10 persons and damaged 
offices of the government newspaper La Nari 6 n and of two U.S. banks; 
Gubank and the Republic National Bank. Eight persons were injured in 
the first explosion late Tuesday at the newspaper, and two were hurt in 
the second eariy -Wednesday at tb&bank offices. (DPI) 


Zhao Says Economic Reform 
Has Encountered Difficulties 


Mr. O’Neill, of Massachusetts, 
called Mr. Aspin “a tremendous 
factor" in swinging Democratic 
votes behind the administration 

W^hh^ton! the Democratic wLp. 
said the “Aspin group" of Demo- 
crats set “die high-water mark" for 
what the administration could 
achieve on the MX missile. 

The narrow margin Tuesday, he 
contended, signaled that tlx; presi- 
dent's request for 48 more MX mis- 
siles was “in serious, serious trou- 
ble.’’ 


Before those missies are voted 
on, however. House Democrats 
must heal dmskms reflected in 
charges of “betrayal" and “broken 
commitments” leveled against Mr. 
Aspin by liberals like Representa- 
tives Les AoCran of Oregon, How- 
ard E Wolpe erf Michigan and Ed- 
ward J. Markey of Massachusetts, 
who contend Mr. Aspin had prom- 
ised to oppose the MX missile in 
return for support for the chair- 
manship of the Armed Services 
Committee. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
dents of sane of China’s major 
cities began snapping up ford 
items and some durable goods as a 
hedge against price increases... . . 

In his speech Wednesday, Mr. 
Zhao described in detail how Chi- 
nese enterprises — many of them 
state-owned — also went on a 
splurge al the end Of 1984. 

According to Mr. Zhao, some 
Chinese banks learned last fall that 
the amount of credit available to 
than this year would be based on 
their 1984 year-end figures. There- 
sult, said the prime, minister, was 
that the banks “vied in granting 
loans" to make as many as posable 
before Dec. 31. ■ 

D uring the same p erio d^ he said, 
many Chinese enterprises heard 
that their payroll levels' at the aid 
of 1984 would be used as the base 
figure fra determining payrolls un- 


der the reform program this year. 
As a consequence, the prime minis- 
ter said, they “indiscriminately 
raised wages and handed out bo- 
nuses and allowances.” 


House Backs 


MX Project 


Other Democrats in the House 
contend that going with the presi- 
dent on the MX missile enables 
them to rebut Republican charges 
that Democrats are “soft on de- 
fense" and gives them more free- 
dom to break with the White House 
on future votes, particularly on the 
Pentagon budget. 


(Continued from Page 1 ) . . 
1986 congressional elections by us- 
ing the vote on the MX as an issue. 

The House speaker, Thomas P. 
O'Neill Jr. of Massachusetts, 
blamed tbe “power of the presi- 
dent" fra the leaderahip’s defeat cm 
the MX. 

“There’s about $99 billion out 
there that the president has the 
right to spend" on projects that 
affect lawmakers’ districts, and ad- 


Mr. Zhao said Chinese authori- 
ties have already taken sane mea- 
sures to eod down the economy »* 
and drat. they win take some other 
steps later tins year. 

China plans to raise the interest 
rates an bank deposits as a means 
of making more credit available, 
Mr. Zhao said. It is commonplace 
in China, particularly in the coun- 
tryside, for people to keep their 
savings at home rather than depos- 
iting it in a bank. 

lhe prime minister announced 
that, as had been predicted, a series 
of wage reforms will go into effect 
for mmiops erf Chinese gDv eaunenl 
workers this July in which salary 
levels wifi be finked more closely to 
job performance. ’ 

But once again, he sought to 
da mpen expectations of any far- 
reaching changes, cautioning work- 
ers and intellectuals that “we can- 
not expect too much” in the way of 
wage increases. - ..J 

— L - ■■ < 


U.S. Considers 


BetaUotion 


ministration officials probably - 
made it dear that mi MX vote, 
would be remembered, he sakL- 
Tbc tactic, he said, “is as oktas 
riw hills.” 

Supporters of the highly accu- 
rate, 10 -warhead mi ante argued 
that it was needed to nmfani» 


Top Leather Fashion 

European export prices 


US. nuclear forces and provide a 
show of strength against tire Soviet 
Union. Tbe Russians have de- 
ployed intercontinental ballistic 
missiles snmkr to the MX. 

Opponents argued that the MX r 
to be deployed in old Mmuteman 
missile alas, would be vulnerable, 
that the program was excessively 
costly at $40 billion or more, and 
that the vote would have little ef-. 
feet on the arms talbi because the: 
Russians have made dearthatthrir 
greater concern is Mi. Reagan’s 
proposed Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive research program into a space- 
based defoxse against missiles. - 



(Continued from Page 1) 
by the Soviet Union, such as a 
court-martial of the soldier. 

State Dt^rattnent officials said 
that negotiations in Moscow on . 
putting into effect an upgrading of 
ttpripmeat fra the “hot tine” be- 
twwn Moscow and Wariringtrai 
were proceeding as scheduled. 

They said the two countries have 

tiiscnsred at length putting into ef- 
fecta new cultural, grigntifiy. nnrf 
technical exchange and tbe tmening 
ra consulates in Kiev ami New 
York. 

The Soviet ride has finked agree- 
ment on those two sets of accords^ 

*™the i»aorariontoAercrfIot,the Y- 

soviet anime, of its rights for 00 m- 
“enaal service to the United 

* State?. 

• Soviet Union and the Umi- 
fid States arc also to hold cabinet- 
‘ 2? m Moscow oa May 20 

and 21 oa trade and e conrunif! is- 

s *** qeoi » ! 

A. Q„y 

myto m Vienna on May 15. 


UNIVERSITY 


Marie-Martine 




50, Fbg. Saint-Honor*. 
Paris 8th. Tel: (1)265.68^2; 


BACHELORS. MXSTEra.ORjaOCTOMie 
Send detailed rawmt 

torn bp# •valuation 

»OHC WESTBWUNIVEniTY I 

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H|{> 

N.I.H, v eves Faces a 'Very Long’ Recovery, 
razil’s Economic Goals R eaffir med 


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*•-***•■ 


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~a very mug unre. 

Ie'j ’ i- _ . /. Neves. 75, undo 

” f , ' /surgery Tuesday 

|| *e in his small in 

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. ' piled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

o PAULO — President-elect 
. redo Neves of Brazil was in 
jus and delicate condition'* as 
covered Wednesday from his 
• intestinal operation in 12 
according to a presidential 

■ firwn 

e spokesman, Antonio Britto, 
Mr. Neves’s recovery would 
"a very long tune.*’ 

/. Neves. 75, underwent emer- 
' for a ban- 
in teshne. Mr. 
<v, K f said that doctors had re- 
**>,» d a one-centimeter (0.4- inch) 
rom the intestine and that the 
ing was “successfully con- 
i’* 

*. Neves was to have been 
. i in March 15 as Brazil's first 
' an president after 21 years of 
uy rule. But hoars before his 
juration he was rushed to a 
ial with intestinal problems. 

' oderwent a second operation 
'lays later. 

x President Jos6 Samey visit- 
. 4r. Neves in the hospital 
j lesdsy and said afterwards, 
sniheseriouHiessof theoper- 
he underwent, his condition 
^olmdy normal, and above all 
i , in excellent spirits.” 

UH|.,jture Minister Jos6 Apare- 
'who accompanied Mr. Samey 
' : hospital, said Mi. Neves bad 
'• jp three fingers indicating the 
■ ier of operations he has un- 
' .« ne, paired bis abdomen and 
- .raised a thmnb in a sign that 
<5 in good spirits. (AP, UPI) 

. ' )fic y to Be Continued 

kson Diehl of The Washington 


Monday that he was determined to 
pursue Mr. Neves* economic aus- 
terity policies and that the renego- 
tiation of BraziTs huge foreign debt 
would deride (he fate of the Chilian 
government. 

Despite Mr. Neves’ worsening 
health and the resultant political 
uncertainty in Brazil, Mr. Samey 
said there would be no change in 
the government's determination to 
its term with potentially 


P * . in excellent spirits. 


painful measures against inflatio n 
inflation has reached an annual 
rate of 230 percent 

“there is a limit tiMhe sacrifices 
that can be asked” from Brazil’s 
130 million people. He said credi- 
tors must accept the new govern- 
ment’s need to address urgent so- 
cial problems and the threat they 
posed to its political survival. 

Mr. Neves, elected with Mr. Sar- 
sey Jam 15 by a special electoral 
college, has frequently been de- 
scribed by political leaders as a 
master of politics whose personal 
leadership is essential to maintain- 
ing both the policy and the overall 
cohesion of the broad governing 

alliftnr* 

However, interviews Monday 
and Tuesday with Mr. Sarney, For- 
eign Minister Olavo Setubal and 
Carlos Lemgruber, president of the 
central bank, indicated a sobstan- 


what is staled in the constitution.” 
According to the constitution, Mr. 
Sarney, 54, would be sworn in as 
president and serve a full six-year 
term. 

The new administration plans to 
begin negotiations in April with the 
International Mone tar y Fund, 
which last month suspended its 
economic program with Brazil be- 
cause of a failure to hey eco- 
nomic targets, inHurtinq those for 
the inflation rate. 

Brazil must reach agreement on 
an economic plan with the IMF in 
order to reopen negotiations with 
banks on the rescheduling of a bool 
$50 billion of its $100 billion in 
foreign loans. An interim agree- 
ment wiB lapse May 31. 

Last week, the new administra- 
tion announced measures to con- 
trol inflation, inchidmg a 10-per- 
cent cut in the budgets of 
government agencies, a freeze on 


state 

Mr. Samey, however, stressed 
that Brazil has derided to adopt 


“as our own 
as an imposi- 


bdt- . 
derision" 
tion from abroad. 

While agreeing with IMF offi- 
cials on the need for tough action 
against inflation, be said the gov- 
ernment believed that “we have a 


T Si 


tial consensus among government social debt that is modi huger than 
leaders to carry out Mr. Neves' the foreign debt.” 
austere and relatively conservative 
plans for the economy even in his 
absence. 

The army minister, General Le- 
onidas Fires Gon calves, said that if 
Mr. Neves could not asatmg office. 


E*)-4 V*. 

*>«:v - 

.... 

i.tv** •>. • .- 

ortb« J{. 


“the army will cany out exactly 


“The foreign debt has created 
impassible barrios," Mr. Samey 
said. “There are limits of health, erf 
hunger, of education. They are the 
limits erf survival. If we do not take 
these into consideration, our plan 
will collapse." 



U.S. High Court Limits 
Use of Guns by Police 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court ruled Wednesday that 
the police may not shoot unarmed 
suspects fleeing from crimes when 
there is no apparent threat of harm 
to police officers or others. 

By a 6-3 vote, the court struck 
down a Tennessee law that autho- 
rized the police to shoot at fleeing 
felons, a statute said to be similar 
to those in about half the states. 

The court said the Tennessee law 
was unconstitutional insofar as it 
authorized deadly force against ap- 
parently unarmed, nondangerous 
fleeing suspects. 

“It is not better that all felony 


temUMBd.naiiWBtfaiid 


Goetz Fails to Testify Before Jury, Blames Prosecutor 

Bernhard H. Goetz, center, leaves tire New York District Attorney's office after fading to testify in a 
second grand jury investigation into the December shooting of four youths in a subway. Mr. Goetz 
has confessed to the shooting. The district attorney, Robert M. Morgeathau, later that when it 
was time for Mr. Goetz to testify Tuesday, Mr. Goetz tried to “unreasonably and unfairly limit the 
grand jury’s inquity” by restricting questions. Mr. Goetz blamed prosecutors, saying; “All the DA 
wanted to do was to push and probe in another effort to stack op some more charges against me.” 


I Justice Byron R. White for the 
court. 

“Where the suspect poses no im- 
mediate threat to the officer and ho 
threat to others, the harm resulting 
from failing to apprehend him does 
not justify the use of deadly force 
to do so.” Justice White said. 

The ruling does not prevent the 
police from using deadly force 
when there is “probable cause" to 
believe the suspect is dangerous. 

In such cases, Mr. White contin- 
ued, deadly force is permissible to 
prevent escape “if, where feasible, 
some wanting has been given.” 

The ruling stemmed from the 
shooting Oct. 3, 1974 of a 15-year- 
old suspected burglar in Memphis. 

After years of hearings, the 6th 
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals re- 
vived a lawsuit by the bey’s father 
against Memphis and the police 
officer when it ruled that the law 


allowing such use of deadly force 
was unconstitutional. 

The Supreme Court Wednesday 
upheld this ruling, but the future of 
the suit is uncertain. The Supreme 
Court ordered lower courts to de- 
termine whether the riiy of Mem- 
phis .and its police department 
must pay damages for the death of 
the boy. 

Mr. White was joined in his 
opinion by Justice william J. Bren- 
nan Jr„ Byron R_ White, Thnrgood 
Marshall, Lewis F. Powell Jr. and 
John Paul Stevens. 

in a dissenting opinion. Justice 
Sandra Day O'Connor said the rul- 
created a constitutional right 
a burglary suspect to flee 
unimpeded from a ponce officer 
who has probable cause to arrest, 
who has ordered the suspect to halt 
and who has no means short of 
firing his weapon to prevent es- 
cape.” 

She was joined by Chief Justice 
Warren E Burger and Justice Wil- 
liam HL RdmquisL 

In another case, an evenly divid- 
ed court upheld a ruling (hat forces 
a New York community to provide 
public land for a privately spon- 
sored Christmas Nativity scene 
each year. 

By a 4-4 vote, the justices ruled 
that Scarsdak, New York, must 
permit the placing of a Nativity 
scene in the park m the middle of 
town. 

Such tie votes, however, do not 
set a national precedent because it 
is possible that in some future ras* 
the same issue will be decided by all 
nine justices. 


.... 

k Lus 

■mu*' uk t 
id- %#• ; -.Tti. 


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l 



U.S. Aid Cut Is Voted by Senate Panel 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Paa Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee has 
begun drafting a foreign aid bill by 
voting tentatively for a pi * 


rnnuni!?!* 

• . , Wren explore the remains of the town hall in San Mafias, a village 21 miles (34 

w n. 'i 1 1 > M f * ■ ?Vf 1 I }itr‘ meters ) north of San Salvador. The bunding and three others in San Marias were 
wff* » « i* * i t i « [i,il ~vn up this week by guerrillas in a campaign to disnqrt Salvadoran ghminre Sunday. 


*4*a> —*• .' 

*■ % ■' • ~ 


H 


btitical Foes Drain Duarte’s Powers 

ration Provides Opportunity to Regain Momentum 


Ml *’ 


«!*<' H l> 

i i*roj 


H 


i 


Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Poa Service 

N SALVADOR — Old ad- 
ties on both right and left 
in recent months taken away 
of the momentum that Presi- 
Josfc Napoleod Duarte 
red last year with his election 
he opening of peace talks to 
us country s civil war, accord- 

- > Salvadoran politicians, for- 
diplomats ana other observ- 

5 preadent could win back 
initiative if his moderate 
tian Democratic Party scores 
iset victory in Sunday’s na- 
I legisUtive and munidpal 
3Q&, winch mark the first pop- 
tferendum on Mr. Duarte’s 
feacyr. 

i Christian Democrats are cx- 
i to gain a few seats in the 
iative Assembly. But most ob- 
predicted that a recently 
d coalition of ctmservative 
* would retain control of the 
tUyand of most local govera- 
; in the countryside, 
hoover, some of President 
‘■e's strongest opponents are 
le the arena of electoral poli- 
p , , td will belittle affected by the 

- nation's conservative estab- 
- * at —including the business 

‘unity and influential ele- 
■ in the armed forces — and 
nrist-led guerrilla movement 
tth resisting Mr. Duarte’s ef- 
o achieve a national recondl- 


I 


in rightist political violence, and by 
U JS.-badced efforts to build a more 
professional military. 

Killings by “death squads” have 
continued to decline during Mr. 
Duarte’s term, according to records 
compiled by human rights organi- 
zations, and residents in bleak, bat- 
tle- weary parts of the countryside 
in three strategic provinces said 
that the army has tightened its hold 
in the past year. 

But hopes appear dim for an 
early peace settlement in talks 
opened by President Duarte in Oc- 
tober. 

The armed forces and the rest of 
the conservative establishment re- 
ject the insurgents’ demands for 
constitutional changes that effec- 
tively would grant the rebels a 
share of power. The armed forces 
seem convinced that a military vic- 
tory is possible in the long run, and 
the nation's second-largest party 
has crane out against the peace 
talks altogether. 

The leftist Farabundo Marti Na- 
tional liberation Front shows no 
sign erf substantially softening its 
position in the talks. It remains 
strong in about a quarter of the 
country and stubbornly resists mil- 
itary dirfeat. 

“The exercise of power is wear- 
ing. and the Christian Democrats 
are worn down,” a prominent 
member of the party said privately. 
He offered an illustration of hcrw 
President Duarte is boxed in: 

“If the conservatives remain in 


“This is a serious problem," the 
Christian Democrat said. 

On other fronts, the right has 
slowed investigations of past politi- , 
cal assassinations and of reports of 
two army massacres that allegedly 
took place after the president took 
office on June 1. Conservative par- 
ties will retain control of the na- 
tional attorney general’s office and 
of (he Supreme Court even if the 
Christian Democrats win control 
of the assembly. 

Sunday’s ejections will deter- 
mine the balance of power in the 
assembly and in the nation’s 262 
municipalities. 

The conservative parties current- 
ly hold a 34-seat majority in the 60- 
seat assembly, and have used h to 
stymie President Duarte in a vari- 
ety erf ways. In December, for ex- 


117 mmkm less than the amount 
requested by President Ronald 
Reagan. 

However, the committee stressed 
Tuesday that its $lL8-bQlion over- 
all figure for the 1986 fiscal year, 
approved without dissent, was in- 
tended as a “framework” from 
which to work. Consequentl y, the 
amount could change by the time 
the committee reports a bill to the 
floor. 

The action Tuesday, which fol- 
lows die austerity blueprint laid out 
by the Senate Budget Committee, 
meets the administration's request 
for increasing military and eco- 
nomic aid for Israel to $3 billion 
and fra- Egypt to $23 billion. 

But in all other categories the 
committee voted to freeze spending 
at tins year’s levels or to cut it in 
some cases. 

The administration proposed a 
fiscal 1986 aid package of $15.9 
billion, of which $132 bdHan falls 
within the jurisdiction of the For- 
eign Relations Cammitlee. 

In fixing the amount at 512.8 
billion, the committee followed two 
approaches. In categories where 
the administration asked for in- 
creases over fiscal 1985 appropria- 
tions, the committee froze the 
amounts at this year’s level In cate- 
gories where the administration 
proposed cuts, the committee took 
the lower figures. 


. Only Israel and Egypt were cited 
in Tuesday's action. Tne rest of the 
amount voted by the committee 
was eannaTfraH f or broad catego- 
ries of economic and military assis- 
tance and did not include levels for 
specific countries. 

However, if the committee sticks 
to its $ 12.8-billion figure, there will 
not be enough money for the ad- 
ministration to meet its goal of in- 
creasing aid to several other coon- 
tries. such as Turkey, Morocco and 
Central American nations, that it 
considers priority cases. 

To meet its aid goals for these 
countries, the administration 
would have to ask Congress for 
more money or, f ailing rh»i repro- 
gram available funds by shitting 
money tentatively earmarked for 
some countries to others that it 
considers more important. 

: Because of disputes between the 
House and Senate, Congress has 
not, been able to pass a foreign aid 
itiS for four years. Funding for aid 
programs has been passed in the 
form of continuing resolutions that 
limit Congress's ability to specify 


posed by Representative Slept 
Solarz. Democrat of New Yoi 


>henJ, 
'oric, in 

response to disclosures about the 
activities of a Pakistani who was 
arrested for allegedly attempting to 
smuggle devices useful in making 
nuclear weapons out of the United 
States. 

Mr. Solarz is chairman of the 
House Foreign Affairs subcommit- 
tee on Asian and Pacific affairs, 
which approved the proposal to 
“dose an important loophole” in 
U3. laws aimed at preventing the 
spread of nuclear weapons. 

Under current law, the panel 
said, the United States must sus- 
pend economic and military assis- 
tance to any country that deto- 
nates, transfers or receives 
nuclear explosive device. But the 
penalty does not apply to a country 
that merely acquires nuclear tech- 
nology from the United States in 
violation of American export law. 

The Solarz proposal would not 
be retroactive: It would apply to a 
country that “exports illegally, or 
attempts to export illegally,” an 
“material, equipment or 


where and how funds should be .ogy? to be used in the manufacture 
spent. of a nuclear device. 

■ Nuclear Smuggling Targeted 


Robert Pear of The New York 
Times reported firm Washington: 

Congress look a first step Tues- 
day toward cutting off foreign aid 
for any country that smuggles 

equipment or technology out of the _ _ 

United States for use in mid ear cussion on improving relations be- 
w«ux>ns. tween the two countries three years 

The legislation does not name a after they fought a war over (he 
specific country, bur it was pro- Falkland Islands. 


British-Argentine Meeting 

Reuters 

BONN — British and Argentine 
politicians met in Bonn on 
Wednesday for a confidential dis- 



The Centurion Executive. 18 karat gold. Quartz. 
Water-resistant. With sweep-second hand; day and date. 
An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 


Concord Watch Company SA., 

(»3, rue Centrale, 2S02 Bienne, Switzerland. 

European Watch, Clock and Jewellery Fair Basel 8.5, 
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palace’s operating budget and 
forced Mr. Duarte to scramble for 
funds to pay security guards and 
secreraries. 

The rightist Nationalist Republi- 
can Alliance, known as ARENA, 
and the less extreme National Con- 
ciliation Party, the nation’s second- 
ami third-largest parties respective- 
ly, have formed as electoral coali- 
tion for this race for the first time. 
Together they received 49 percent 
erf the vote in last year's first-round 
presidential election, compared 
with 43 percent for the Christian 
Democrats. 

Most sources doubled that there 


WWdrina^DditiSmo the majority in the assembly, then xwei sources aoamea mar mere 
DiuSZiJ Mteicd paH / - be be major shifts m Sunday's 

_ ^ it. voting. 


fr*> - 











ea 

l have restricted pursuit of 
ricy goals of negotiating an 
»the nve-year-ola war, prose- 
I past human rights violators 
*oflding the economy. 

U A government, which 
hat it is not supporting the 
tan Democrats with covert 
ends as it did last year, ap» 
satisfied that President 
e is hemmed in, according to 
out Salvadoran political ob- 
*- Washington seems to fear 
leftward movebv Mr. Duarte 
atienate the right and upset 
suing political equilibrium, 
aid. 

Duane's accession as El Sal- 
* Gs« directly elected civilian 
eat in 50 years marked an 
tent accomplishment. The 
forces, which helped to steal 
aion from Mm m 1972, now 
as him in part because Ms 
n.led the VJS. Congress to 
. y movase military aid. 
‘tidhion. President Duarte’s 
us been accompanied by a 
l purge of military security 
£ suspected of involvement 


said. But even if the Christian 
Democrats win, he added, “there 
would be another type of problem, 
because then Duane would have 
the power to push forward the dia- 
logue” with the guerrillas and thus 
encourage a backlash within the 
armed forces and the right general- 
ly- 


voting. 

Same signs pointed to a narrow, 
come-from-befaind victory by the 
Christian Democrats. Party 
sources said that recent opinion 
polls showed a ground swell of sup- 
port for the moderates mthecoun- 
tryside. where the conservatives 
previously have dominated. 


.SC/ 

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Page 4 


Herat b 


ESTHWATONAL 


Sribune 


PabWifd With The NfW York lanes and The Washington Pom 


Death at the Barricade 


Contrary to Soviet claims, the sentry who 
killed Major Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. in an 
East German town on Sunday apparently nev- 
er Bred a warning shot Indisputably, he left 
the uniformed American bleeding for 30 infn - 
utes before medical aid arrived Whwi the 1 1 S. 
sergeant cm this legal surveillance team tried to 
a dminis ter first aid, he was ordered away. 

Sunday was a bad day on the forgotten East- 
West barricade. It was also an ominous re- 
minder for Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald 
Reagan that their larger diplomatic purposes 
are always hostage to such bloody blunders. 

The s u perpo w ers owe each other, and the 
world, a better insurance policy against dumb, 
cold-blooded zealotry. The Soviet failure to 
explain, or apologize for, the callous downing 
of a Sooth Korean airliner in 1983 froze a 
budding diplomacy for more than a year. 

Considering the p roximi ty of their armies, 
the Soviet nrwT Amgrirstn romr nandar y in Cen- 
tral Europe have a good record for averting 
trouble. Most Qare-nps have been political. 
Still, when the generals fail, a mechanism is 
needed for prompt explanation, apology and 
reassurance. If relations are healthy, ambassa- 
dors can be trusted with their accounts of such 
events. When suspicions dominate, as now, 
special efforts are necessary. 

The risks are especially acme in Germany 
because confrontations there were once a 
weapon of diplomacy. A 1947 accord assures 
the United States, Britain and France a mili- 
tary outpost with travel rights in East Germa- 


ny. Reciprocally, the Soviet Union maimains 
three military missions in West Germany. Hie 
patrols, in dearly matted vehicles, monitor 
opposing forces to assess tactical capabilities. 

Soviet and East German troops are said to 
have increased their harassment of these sur- 
veillance sorties in recent months. Last year, a 
French officer was killed in a head-on collison 
with an East German army truck Other teams 
observing maneuvers have had their jeeps 
bumped or turne d back with warning shots. 
Chi the claim that it wanted to prevent snoop- 
ing, East Germany closed some of its airspace 
{fairing recent military maneuvers. 

American officials say they don’t under- 
stand these provocations. They think one ex- 
planation may be that the crack Soviet divi- 
rions in East Germany have recently shaken 
off tight political controls. Idle armies can 
grow restless and their acts of harassment can 
become a dangerous sport That is why U.S. 
guidelines forbid the use of force or life-endan- 
gering measures against Soviet teams that en- 
ter any restricted area. A Soviet officer who 
ventured off-bounds in Bavaria last week was 
detained, then escorted bank to Frankfort 

If such a rule applied in East Germany, 
Major Nicholson would be alive. Beyond ex- 
pressing regrets, the new Soviet leadership 
needs to change the rules and attitudes that 
can cause sudi a killing. And the United States 
needs to work with the Russians to reaffirm 
the roles wherever their forces meet 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Gorbachev Style 


President Reagan has spoken hopefully 
about the prospects of an improved relation- 
ship with Moscow — an early summit meeting, 
for instance, and progress in arms redactions 
— now that Mikhail Gorbachev is in power. In 
the new Soviet leadership's own initial signals, 
however, a bit more of a hedge is evidenL 

Take the summit It is a good idea. The 
coincidence of Mr. Reagan’s rejection and 
Mr. Gorbachev’s elevation makes this a rea- 
sonable moment to resume a political ritual 
with its own special combination of opportu- 
nity and risk No major breakthrough could be 
expected, but it would be enough to pursue the 
modest purpose stated by Secretary of State 
George Shultz — “to review the bidding and 
see where we may go from here.” 

Somewhat to the administration’s embar- 
rassment, however, Mr. Gorbachev still has 
not accepted the Reagan invitation. He is 
“studying” it. The pause suggests a certain 
dement of deliberation that was evident in a 
COUple Of Other things fhaf have ha ppen wd in 

the Soviet leader’s first days in power. 

He — who else? — saw to it that a Httle extra 
threat was transmitted to W ashing ton. JDusko 
Doder, chief of The Washington Prist’s Mos- 
cow bureau, has reported that the new Soviet 
leads sternly warned Pakistan to halt its sup- 
port of the Afghan rebels, lest Moscow stir 
dissident tribesmen inride Pakistan. That 


much was expected and had happened before; 
the Pakistanis are standing thar ground. But 
meanwhile, other Soviet sources conveyed to 
Mr. Doder that Moscow might similar ly pro- 
mote des tabilizati on in Pakistan if the United 
States took military action against Nicaragua. 
This hint of linkage came in a form that could 
be, and soon was, officially denied. Is that 
to be the Gorbachev style? 

In a similar ly am hi gum is manner , the Krem- 
lin let loose a propaganda blast, delivered by 
the chief Soviet negotiator, about arms con- 
trol In substance it came down to the familiar 
complaint — winch appears to be true —that 
the United States wants to keep open its de- 
ployment options for a space-based missile 
defense. In form, however, the blast raised the 
question of whether the Soviet negotiator com- 
promised the pledge of confidentiality the two 
rides UxA as they opened talks in Geneva. The 
answer apparently hinges on exactly when the 
Soviet statement was recorded. 

You could call it a small matter, but at this 
point in the U.S.-Soviet proceedings, small 
matters are the subject of much attention. The 
two rides are feeling each other onL The tone is 


being set for a phase of Soviet -American rela- 
tions that both sides realize is exceptionally 


turns dial both sides realize is exceptionally 
important It is a moment for the closest atten- 
tion to “si gnals, " sent and received. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. . 


Sudan: An Act of Decency 


President Gaafar Nimeiri of Sudan wanted 
no publicity for a simple act of decency — 
permitting the United States to airlift 800 
stranded Ethiopian Jews to Israel. He deserves 
much credit for going ahead with the decision, 
but it is appalling that he felt compelled to 
play down so modest a gesture. 

Ethiopia calls its Jews Talashas," a deroga- 
tory word for stranger. For centuries they have 
been ignored or persecuted by a succession of 
Ethiopian rulers. Israel was slow to acknowl- 
edge their plight, buz in 1973 its parliament 
formally recognized their claim to citizenship 
under the Law of the Return. About 15,000 
Ethiopian Jews have immigrated to Israel, and 
perhaps 10,000 remain in ancestral villages. 


caught in the crossfire of civil war. The immi- 
grants include 8,000 wbo escaped through Su- 
dan, where they were Down to Israel via Bel- 
gium on charter planes. When that airlift made 
headlines last year. General Nimeiri suspend- 
ed it to placate Arab radicals. 

Nonetheless, be agreed to an American res- 
cue, on condition that it be kept quiet No 
doubt his need for economic aid, and a 
planned April visit to Washington, played a 
part in his derision. But it also took courage. 

AD the Jews from Sudan now are in a 
country where they will no longer be strangers, 
and there is hope for deliverance of those still 
in Ethiopia. That is what will be remembered. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The Soviet Sentry’s Orders 


Given that only a year or so ago a Soviet 
fighter attacked and shot down a civilian air- 
liner that had accidentally strayed over Soviet 
territory, we cannot be totally surprised by the J 
murder of a UiL officer by a Russian sentry in 
East Germany. Yet this tragic incident like the 
destruction of the airliner, is not part of some 
diabolical scheme to slow up a threatened 
thaw in East-West relations, or to quiet fears 
of Soviet hardliners. The Soviet sentry, like the 
comrade fighter-pilot, had been reared to ac- 
cept that the Soviet Union is the bastion of 


peace constantly under siege by subversive and 
hostile forces, and when in doubt to shoot. 
There was no justification for lolling Major 
Nicholson, and one would like to drink that 
responsible Russians must know it 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


The death of Major Nicholson is shrouded 
in paradox. Even as it presages the need for 
arms limitation agreement it offers grim warn- 
ing of how difficult such guarantees will be to 
verify. For what is Major Nicholson but a 
martyr to the monitoring of an arms accord. 

— The Daily Mail (London). 


THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


Warrior Diplomacy: 
Reagan and the MX 


By James Reston 

W ASHINGTON — In the fight east Prob; 

over the MX missile, finally Reagan adi 
approved Tuesday by a House vote of thepossflril 
219-213, we have seen a perfect ex- The presi 
ample of Ronald Reagan s phfloso- see Mr. Gt 
phy of politics and diplomacy. heeding hi« 

It is based on the old political the- Konstantin 
cay that it is more important to in- chose to fig 
mire fear than confidence. It is essen- Mr.Gorbac 
Hally Machtpolitik or “power waycfdoii 
politics," and ft won — but at a price, power disa 
President Reagan did not convince through the 
members of Congress of the effective- Sir Harril 
ness of the MX as a weapon, but he of diplomat 
scared thera ff they did not give him experience < 
more weapons, he said, he could not prove that s 
negotiate fewer weapons with the successful, j 
Russians at Geneva. And if they did confidence i 
not give him 21 more MXs, they ride, avoids 
would lose jobs in their states and row shon-tr 
districts, ana maybe their seats in The basis 
the next election. Sir Harold 

This is the warrior view of politics influence,”] 
and diplomacy: Don’t deal with the diplomatic ^ 
facts, deal with the votes. Don’t wait drion, calm 
or worry about what is in this new modesty an< 
guy’s mind in Moscow. Just make This isnc 
sure that he knows your mind is made Kampehnai 
np to build more weapons on Earth plomacy ha 
to get less, and more weapons in poEtical pit, 
space whatever the cost It is an in- notexcesriv 
wresting paradox. must go ba 

There is now, we are told, a new with the cm 
“Reagan Doctrine,” under which the The 

United Stales will support any state 
or group fighting for freedom against 
communis t domination anywhere in jji 
the world. It is an extension of the 
Truman Doctrine, and of John F. ' 

Kennedy’s promise to “bear any bur- 
den” in defense of freedom. T> ARIS - 

It is a noble objective, which, as L anniver 
former Secretary of State Alexander that consec 
Haig used to say, might work if we decline, it h 
had the will and a military draft But describe the 
there is no evidence of either. of “Europcs 


race, Probably it will not. but the 
Reagan administration did not give 
thepossfinlift of change a chance. 

The president insists he wants to 
see Mr. Gorbachev. Bui instead of 
heeding his advisers and going to 
Konstantin Chernenko's funeral, he 
chose to fight the MX bank to give 
Mr. Gorbachev a warning. This is his 
way of doing things, a diplomacy of 
power discredited from Maririaveffi 
through the two World Wars. 

Sir Harold Nicolson, in his study 
of diplomacy, has observed that the 
experience of the centuries tended to 
prove that a negotiator, if he is to be 
successful, must be able to gain the 
confidence of the people an the other 
ride, avoi ding all appearance of nar- 
row short-term political advantage. 

The basis of successful negotiation. 
Sir Harold concluded, was “moral 
influence,” founded on se\«n specific 
diplomatic virtues: truthfulness, pre- 
cision, calm, good temper, patience, 
modesty and loyalty. 

This is not a bad definition of Mr. 
Kampehnan's reputation, but his di- 
plomacy has been dragged into the 
political pit, where such qualities are 
uot excessively apparent, and now he 
must go back to Geneva, and deal 
with the consequences of his victory. 

The New York Tima. 



'Don’t you see? We need the talks with the Russians 
as abargcdnxngdupto get Congress to OJLiheMXJ 


Europe : Frustration in a Land In-Between 


P ARIS — On the eve of the 40th 
anniversary of the end of the war 


I anniversary of the ended 1 the war 
that consecrated Europe's historical 
decline, it has become fashionable to 


By Dominique Mots! 


Over the years; diplomatic repre- 
sentatives have gone by many names: 
legates, orators, nuncios, commissars, 
procurators, agents, ambassadors. 
Mr. Reagan has turned them 
propagandists and lobbyists. 

It has been astonishing and a little 
sad to see Max Kampehnan, ordered 
hone from his mission in Geneva to 
reduce missiles, running around Cap- 
itol Hill lobbying for the MX as if he 
were still drumming up votes for his 
dd buddy Hubert Humphrey. 

Thepresident argued that defeat of 
the MX bill would tell Moscow that 
we were an “irresolute and divided 
country." Vice President George 
Bush, following the party line, sug- 
gested that the loss of the 21 missiles 
might mean an irretrievable loss at 
the nuclear arms talks in Geneva. 

Mr. Kampelman, who knows bet- 
ter and has to deal with the conse- 
quences of his lobbying when he re- 
turns to Geneva, could only say that 
defeat of the MX proposition would 
“inevitably delay the negotiations." 

Chances are the MX derision will 
not mean all that much. The Russians 
know, probably better than Ameri- 
cans do, that with or without addi- 
tional missiles the United States has 
enough midear weapons at sea and in 
the air right now to survive an attack 
and still destroy every Soviet dty and 
military base several times over. 

America has a strategy for war. but 
what it does not have is a strategy for 
peace, or the patience to see whether 
the collapse of the old men in the 
Kremlin and the emergence of Mik- 
hail Gorbachev will make a differ- 


describe the prevailing mood as one 
of “Europessmnsm-" Is such a feeling 
justified, or are we instead experienc- 
ing a “technocratic melancholia" 
such as only happy and secure societ- 
ies can afford to indulge in? 

remarkable — at leasfon {he surface 
— how little things have changed. 
The security system built in the late 
1940s and basal on American protec- 
tion and nuclear deterrence has 
worked wdL NATO has emerged vic- 
torious from its latest challeng e, the 
Euromissile crisis, and is about to 
engage in a debate over Ronald Rea- 
gan's Strategic Defense Initiative, a 
challeng e h will also surmount. 

Divisions among the Allies of 1945 
have been more than compensated by 
reconciliation between historical ene- 
mies. The French-German friendship 
has become the linchpin of the Euro- 
pean Community. Democracy has 
been restored through Western Eu- 
rope. The European C ommuni ty, in 
spite of the frustration it generates, is 
still an attractive reality, a dub that 
new members want to join. 


history is catching ,m with them, and 
not for the better. They deeply resent 
a lass of control over their future as 
much as the absence of a common 
quest for collective goals. 

Deprived of a collective ambition 
or a sense of imminent fear that 
would force them to transcend their 
provincialisms, European countries 
set individual goals — as is the privi- 
lege, and the burden, of democracy. 

Europeans also are aware that they 
are largely spectators of their own 


P , UIVIA> LUVU wuuvuauiv 

Europe is at center Stage under an order based on a divided 
onfy as the main stake cf '$$£■ 

East- West competition. 

that have known neither war nor the 


Yet it is with a sense of gloom that 
iropeans look at themselves. From 


Europeans look at themselves. From 
Euroterrorism to Europessmnsm, the 
concept of Europe is associated more 
with negative realities than with posi- 
tive achievements. This is the product 
of complex feelings that cannot be 
attributed solely to high unemploy- 
ment rates, lagging demography, un- 
competitive technology, or a sense of 
cultural stagnation. 

Europeans are tom between the 
regret that history has passed them 
by — that the Zeitgeist is no longer 
alive in Europe — and the fear that 


they have started to question the 
credibility of the U.S. security guar- 
antee. They know that if Europe is 
still at the center of world history, it is 
more as the mam stake of the East- 
West competition than as an inde- 
pendent actor. 

It can only be frustrating for Euro- 
peans to lode at the race being run 
before them by the superpowers. 
They were anxious for the decline of 
U.S. power; now they ponder the 
consequences of America's new 
strength and of the new Soviet leader. 
From “star wars” to the dazzling 
technological exposition in Tsuknba, 
Japan, Europeans are contemplating 
projects deculed over their heads or 
largely out of their reach. Frustrated 
by their limitations in a world that 
seems to freeze their energy and 


The writer, associate director of the 
Institut Franytis des Relations Inter- 
nationales, contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


The Ohio Bank Problems Were Not an Aberration 


W ASHINGTON — Following 
the run on savings- and-loan 


YV the run on savings- and-loan 
institutions in Ohio, some observers 
have gone to great pains to observe 
tfiai, overall, the American financial 
system remains sound and stable. 
Thus, we are reassured, there were 
only 79 failures last year among 


By Hobart Rowen 


Earlier this month. Financial Crap, 
of America, the giant thrift holding 
company based in Los Angeles, had 


teroal controls on problem loans at 
three of the company’s largest banks. 
So it is natural that the government 


to boost the interest rates it pays on wishes to assure citizens rathe overall 
deposits (an effort to regenerate con- soundness of most financial institu- 


15,000 commercial banks. And only 
nine of 3,146 federally insured thrift 
institutions went broke. 

These numbers are accurate but do 
not (ell the whale story. The 79 bank 
failures last year represent the biggest 
number since the Depression. And 
even though only nine thrifts covered 
by the Federal Savings and Loan In- 
surance Coip. failed, 64 others either 
voluntarily or involuntarily .were 
merged out of existence last year. 
Even more institutions — 672 — dis- 
appeared in 1982 and 1983. 


D deuce) after announcing that its 
losses last year would run between 
$550 million and $700 million. 

At almost the ™e moment, one 
of the most respected UJS. banks, 
Texas Commerce Bancshares Lac, 
was embarrassed by a large bad loan 
to a partnership that included one of 
its own directors. BankAmerica had 
to write off a huge loss forbad mort- 

E . Three prestigious Boston 
had to admit to irregularities. 


tions. No one, including this reporter, 
wishes to paint an erveny grim picture 


that might lead to a panic. 
But the average citizen has 


But the average citizen has a right 
to be aroused by the discovery that 
deposits thought to be “insured” or 
“guaranteed” are not always safe. 

Henry Kaufman points out that 
the quality of federal regulation and 
regulators has deteriorated. This has 
happened because financial regula- 
tory agencies “have been relegated to 


Last week. First City Bancorp, of a secondary status,” the result being 
sxas disclosed that federal regula- that the most competent government 


ficy-maJang agencies, or to better- 
paying jobs in the private sector. 

It would be a mistake for officials 
to suggest ihat the Ohio dosings and 
the failure of ESM Government Se- 
curities, the small dealer in Florida 
now accused of fraud, are aberrations 
in an otherwise strong system. The 
public was quick to grasp the signifi- 
cant point: Ibis was out one piece of 
a continuous cycle of events. 

Under deregulation, managers of 
banks and thrift institutions have 
been encouraged to take greater 
risks: They have to, in order to be 
able to pay the higher interest rates 
available in a competitive market. 

When, those Ohio thrifts were 
forced to dose, it dramatically ex- 


Texas disclosed that federal regula- 
tors had declared inadequate the in- 


that the most competent government 
workers either go to more visible po- 


posed die fragility of today’s finan- 
cial structure. And this is not limiti-d 


FROM OUR MARCH 28 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO Fordgfl Poticyi Set YoW Own , JllSt 534 


1910: K^^FarmenQiooee Canada 
LONDON — The tide of emigration to the 
“Golden West” was further evidenced [on 
March 25] when the Canadian Pacific Railway 
steamship Empress of Britain steamed from 
Liverpool for Canada. The vessel carried 1,500 
passengers, the majority being settlers and 
described as the flower of the agricultural 
population. Some had a capital of £500 to 
£ 1 , 000 , and the total capital of the settlers 
on hoard was computed at £55,000. Among 
the emigrants was a party of 200 who are 
taking advantage of the scheme formulated by 
Sir Thomas Shaughnessy, president of the Ca- 
nadian Pacific, which is offering inducements 
to farmers of experience. Fifty out of eighty 
acres of land which the emigrant will take 
over wiD be ready for occupation, having been 
ploughed and put under cultivation. 


1935: Hitler Outlines His Demands 
LONDON — The principal demands made by 
Chancellor Hitler in his recent conversations 
with Sir John Simon, Britain's foreign secre- 
tary, were: Equal strength in the air with 
Britain and France, the level to be governed by 
the strength of the Soviet air force; a fleet of 
400,000 tons which would give Germany a 
four-fifths ratio with Britain, or practically 
double the French strength under the Wash- 
ington Treaty [of 1922]; reunion of East Prus- 
sia with the Reich through the elimination of 
the Polish Conidor, and a declaration that 
existing eastern frontiers are not permanent; 
return to German role of the 3,500,000 Teu- 
tons now in Czechoslovakia; economic union 
(Anschluss) with Austria. Germany will return 
to the League of Nations to sign a general 
settlement on the above basis, and not before. 


B OSTON — Charley doesn’t 
look like the sort of fellow the 


look like the sort of fellow the 
kids would normally bring home 
from college daring spring break. 
Maybe it’s the ballet belt over his 
sleeveless T-shirt that sets him 
apart Maybe it’s the M-16 in his 
hands that seems a bit menacing. 

Bui let us keep an open mind. 


By Ell en Goodman 


ley as a home- team player. Repre- 
sentatives Tun Leach, an Iowa Re- 


This Republican fund-raiser is a 
logical extension erf policy-making 
in the age of Reaganomics. 

After all, this is an era when do- 
mestic poEcy is rapidly becoming a 


publican, and Mel Levine, a 
California Democrat, introduced a 
bill last week to stop this son of 
private military funding, but they 
are just trying to keep an old-fash- 
ioned government monopoly going. 

The rest of us can now enter the 
era of Free Enterprise War. Each 
American citizen can have the won- 
derful importunity of choosing 
sides and sending his non-tax dol- 
lars to whatever armed forces he 
finds cute enough to adopt Like 
the looks of an Afghanistan mul- 
lah? Give him a couple of bucks a 
week. Sick of Marcos? Have an ano- 


Charley is, after all, the campus 
poster boy of the College Republi- 


INTERJVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1938-1082 


can National Fund. He is the new 
star of a fund-raising rampaign to 
encourage college students to adopt 
their very own Nicaraguan rebel 
In a macabre twist on the theme 
of the Save the Children Founda- 
tion, the Fond is telling students 
that for a mere $16 a month, only 
53 cents a day, they can buy one 
“contra" meals and medkrae; may- 
be they wiD even get a letter back 
describing how much better the 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


murder and mayhem are going . 
The poster pitch goes like this: 


The poster pitch goes like this: 
“My name is Charley and I am a 
Nicaraguan Counter-Communist 
A Contra. A Freedom Fighter. 

“I have taken up arms against the 
Soviet Empire and its satellite gov- 
ernment in Nicara gua and 1 need 
your bdp. Last year your Congress 
cut off our funding. . . . Please help 
me and my fellow patriots. We 
haven’t got long." 

It closes with the sort of ecologi- 
cal plea that always attracts the 
young: “Save the Contras.” 

I find this tale of Charley and the 
contras a perfect story for the 



Deputy Publisher 
Associate Publisher 
Associate Pubiafur 


LEE W. HUEBNER, hMbktr 
Exeaane Editor 
Editor 

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France. Telephone: 747-1265. Tele*: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

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U.S. subscription- S284 vearly. Second-class port tree paid at Long Island Cuy , N.Y- 1 1 101. 

t' 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved ICSiSl 


first started catting social pro- 
grams. He maintain ed thm dona- 
tions and charity would take up the 
slack. Individuals would do what 
the government would not. It did 
not happen that way, but every- 
body got the hint. The public sector 
was going to do less, the private 
sector was supposed to do more. 

So we have gone private, at least 
in the sense of service. We have a 
growth industry in private security 
systems, new private jails, a bumper 
crop of private hospitals. 

In New York, where the public 
transit system is creaky and some- 
times spooky, there is now a private 
bus company. In dries where the 
public schools are impoverished, 
many head for private schools. So- 
cial policy has been reduced to a 
basic principle: You can get any- 
thing you are willing to pay for. 

Sooner or later this was bound to 


dal structure. And this is not limitwi 
to those institutions that had private, 
rather than federal, insurance. 

The more than 3,000 federally in- 
sured savings and loan associations 
are abetter risk than private-insured 
institutions because the good faith 
and credit of the U.S. government 
imrfidtly stands behind them. But all 
S&Ls have been weakened by the 
inflated interest-rate structure that 
has sharply cut the value of the out- 
standing mortgages they issued at 
lower rates in years gone by. The true 
net worth of many S&Ls is vastly less 
than stated on the books. 

If S&Ls and other financial institu- 
tions had to value more of their assets 
at what they are really worth, it 
would induce more conservative 
lending practices. 

Government, as Mr. Kaufman sug- 
gests, must develop a credit-rating 
system for all banks, S&Ls, and so 
on, and then make them public. We 
need full disclosure. 


tion for the opposition. If you pre- 
fer Iran and your neighbor ukes 


The Washington Post. 


'Vietnam 
Syndrome’ 
Is Natural 

By Philip Geyelin 

W ASHINGTON -Thn te 
roughly the 10th ammtm 
of the fall of Saigon, the "Vietm 


7 lit fa? l 


r - 1):> -ht MinfcU 






4 . AiVfW#**. 

... '*** * 


hopes, Europeans fear the destruc- 
tion of the order in which they have 
lived crofly for 40 years. 

The present exaggerated fascina- 
tion with the Pacific, which has been 
described by some Europeans as the 
“Mediterranean of the 21st century” 

— a historically absurd comparison 

— is at least as much the product of 
Europessimism as it is an urge and a 
signal for Europe to wake up. 

Dissatisfaction with the order of 
Yalta and the division of Europe is a 
further illustration of the present 
mood. Aware of the artificiality of 
the division of Europe, West Europe- 
ans are confused. Should they pro- 
mote their own comfortable stability 
under an order based on a divided 


of the fall of Saigon, the “Vietm 
syndrome" is much on the 
politicians, scholars and commea 
tors. How serious is it? 

Harper's magazine put the qa 
tion to a panel of historians, mflfr 
analysts, an economist and a novg 
and published the answers in t 
month’s issue. The panelists did i 
agree on much. The collective dft 
nonetheless, left me convinced C • 
somehow we have got it all wtoai 

A syndrome, says Wcbstert, b 
number of svmptotm occurring /' 
gether and characterizing a spee\ 
disease or condition.” Thus v 
catchwords “Vietnam syndics 
convey some disability that is gett 
in the way of orderly, forceful, la 
tional conduct erf national seen 
policy and of a well-defined vie* 
the UJS. role in the world. 

Activist, interventionist geopo! 
dans deplore this condition. T 
hunger for a return to those gj 
days in the 1950s when respou 
allies joined in the concerted com 
ment of world communism. 

But this confuses what is abe 
tional with what is the natural Am 
can condition. The real syndrome 
the sense of something out of keep 
with the national character) was 
heady, bipartisan internationalist 
pulse of immediate postwar yean 

Then, as now, political kac 
talked like world policemen But* 
often tiny talked a better game t 
the public or the Congress or - 
military were ready to puy. 

What is different now was wdl> 
in Harper's by a Yale professor, I 
M. Kennedy. The last quarter ca 
rv, he said, has seen an enanc 
change in Third World attitudes 
ward the United States — arete 
against “overwhelming Amen 
presence.” The European allies 1 ~ 
become stronger, and less willilt 
follow America’s lead; the Russ 
have caught up militarily and 
United Suites is no longer “the d 

ly predominant” superpower. T 

gradual transformations,” he ad^*. 
“would have occurred even if \ . 
nam had never happened.” — 

That the public is more squeai 
— and the military more caution r^- 
about active U.S. engagement arc ‘ 
the world can certainly be credhe'j ' 
part to the Vietnam experience. r 


■* i 
.4 


i 

; p» 


.1 

- v in 


iii-* •« 




:• -~ -dpa fw 


. .j .**. a* * 

j- t*** P-Sl 

4>4 

** 

. , ;-.•*» -4 W 
... - 

to 4 

; x-. 




«*» 




INTERN 


dominated by fear of the future and a 
lack of purpose in the present. They 


when another panelist, Georget 
University’s Edward Luitwak, ax; 


:<s tit 


are increasingly without guilt about 
their colonial past, but also without 


their colonial past, but alk> without 
hope or enthusiasm as to what can be 


that if our country was not trar 
tized by Vietnam, the whole affaT 
El Salvador] would be conch 


ISAM 

vnw . 

.m totoi 


done in the Third World. They do not 
even have the escapist possibility of 
looking for exotic and artificial mod- 
els. whether in Cuba or in Maoist 
China, And the end of ideologies has 
been accompanied not by a return to 
idealism, but by a rise or cymrism. 

Nietzsche said: “To revive the 
past, to generate the future, let that 
be my present.” Prisoners of the past, 
fearful of the future, Europeans nave 
no time to appreciate the present. 


H Salvador] would be conch,-- 
very quickly, he is making less » ~ 
than when he says, “The proble ^ 
that the American people never n; . J . 
saw their country as an imperial) 
er, the United States was not 
signed to manage an empir e.” m 

Peter Marin, the novelist, mad- - - 
key point: “Americans love an it 
of strength.” Mr. Reagan pret- 
“an imago of power while avci ’■* 
those concentrations that might f i ■; 
toa test, which, in my view, is pre^' » 

ly why Americans like him.” 

Thai is also why Americans 1 •• .. 
Harry Truman. Yet Truman prac _j - 
ly turned to the United Nation: ' 
international ratification of aKo ; * 
“police action” rather than put- 
proposition to a divided Congra* 
a “war.” And Truman's military K 

not exactly looking for trouble 
it defined vital U.S. interests in a 
that excluded Korea at least a 



u4T 


* w 


Vi 



II •**■** *» .A# tfc 

- II.. W* --<■***. 

- - ’A 

- •• * JM* v 
<-“*• «WM* 4 

-** f* II 

• •• **■ 


.T.vrtf* *■«** 

l. 

• •-* 


John Foster Dulles, a morafij/Q^ 
anti-communist crusader, was sc- ? , 
tary of slate when Fidel 0*5 
launched his revolution. Yet 
doing far mare to “contain corny 
nism” in El Salvador and Nicar . 

— even after Vietnam — than : --?j, 
Eisenhower admhustranou dk'*o* 
Cuba, which was nothing. , 

John F. Kennedy’s bracing hra.; ~ 
ral rallying cry (to support — 
friend, oppose any foe, etc.) wai 

kif IiiK pool rf\(l . . 


mmM 

' -■.-*- ■**»•** 
a rijuj » 

•• ’ -» to 

tm 

■ ***.'• 

- ^ **r#| 

T* . . 




• »*w rut j*,!*,. 

- -• -<■.• : 4 

•• ’ - >• t: w «c ’ 






matched by his fatal scaling da^Ttnk. A 

open U-S. military support for G 

exiles in the Bay of Pigs. LyOar 


exiles in the Bay of Pigs. Lytes* 
Johnson campaigned for the pi *. 1 
dency in 1964 promising that Av 
can boys would not have to fight 
that Asian boys ought to fight. > 

The point of all tins is not jj,, 
Vietnam has left no scars. But.' 3 'o 
result has been not so much the bOj* 
formation of the collective Amek. 
view of the world as it has bec^s**; 
reinforcement of doubts and tests, 
tions that have historically indy.. 


LONDON 

KLOftAVfA 


m hit 


— as witness the UJS. perform,^ £ 


L nHfornrf’ *^. 1 ^' 


IONQOM 

'CrtoH* faewf itj—to 


right Ujp^UMhe Japanese attack 

The attitudes that have aam. 
for congressional constraints on 
Reagan s policy in Central An»j. 
and Lebanon — and which are 0'C4A/ 
attributed to the “Vietnam 
drome” — are not so differait i,’- * . 
dm attitudes that Lyndon Joh" 7 ?^ 
shrewdly recognized in his ster y „ 
escalation of the U.S. role m. v >' <■' 

nam. What we are witnessing is ■ 


LONDON 

w iscow wm 
m WB-mr* 


lONQOft 

HMmmH 




an aberration but a natural ck 
— not a consequence of the VieHj^r 
failure but the cause. * 

Washington Post Writers Groq -CS 


mill over onto foreign affairs. If 
Congress refused to fund the con- 


Congress refused to fund the con- 
tras, then it was natural to turn to 
the private sector, at least to those 
private citizens who regarded Char- 


fer Iran and your neighbor ukes 
Iraq, why fight about it when each 
can adopt his or her own soldier. 

The beauty of tins free choice- 
ism is that we do not have to hold 
foreign-policy debates, we do not 
have to arrive at any son of consen- 
sus, we do not even have to agree. 
In fact, we do not have to funa any 
government at afl. 

Why, for that matter, stop with 
building private armies? While we 
are at it, let os encourage the Rea- 
gan administration to return the tax 
dollars slated for new weapons sys- 
tems and let private citizens, in all 
their disparate wisdom, take over. 
We could begin by holding a bake 
sale for the MX, I have a swell 
recipe for chocolate-chip cookies. 

H'tivhinghm Past Wrners Group. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Signoret Responds Ethiopia’s Jews 


**mooMv 

W^V**** jfc-T 

7*' : 


Regarding the feature “The Fiction 
Touch of Simone Signora": 

You can guess how surprised I was 
to discover m your issue of March 16 
a news agency article by a writer 
whom I have never met In addition 
to not having talked to me, this per- 
son obviously hasn't read the novel 
she writes about, nor the autobiogra- 
phy she refers to. Her piece about me 
suggests that she simply dipped into 
some French interviews with me 
which she did not understand and so 
she digested them badly. 

SIMONES IGNORE!. 

Paris. 


Ethiopia’s Jews ^ 

Regarding "Jews in Ethiopia: 

Future” (March 1): 

The report says that after HjS}*,,, 
suspended its airlift, “the wait pft ti 
fatal for many." But virtually ^ 
the Jews who died, died en rou., '^» 
Sudan, or immediately on arriva ' >• 

A more serious charge has , 
made: that the Jews, though wjj . 
immediate danger in. their vilL 
were encouraged to leave by the V ^ 
tence of the airlift, and by Fala^Vt^ 
sent from Israel, only to die en rv 
to Sudan. This is difficult to prt •s*T'“ay. 




* U a ICH 


1 U JL* € H 


JOHNGERHAR; ■ 


* 2*? ttcow. 

ton* 


(jf 


J*f**wtm ■ 








BSTERNATIOKAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


Page 5 


s . 

Hkdnt Laurent for FaU: 

S V hort — 



Slack Legs and Ti^tMiniskirts 
Wffer Lesson in Dressing Down 


teliffi 


m n 




By Hcbc Dorsey 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Yves Saint Laurent’s 
1 -winter collection, shown 
• -dnesd&y, was a lesson in 
sssing down. Wide evoy other 
signer in Paris took the de luxe 
' d often over-ornate route, 

- int t anrwit went back to un- 

- rstated chic. These were am- 
. v tmghmnicky and realistic 

ithes. 

v In a season wben skirts took a 
. i drop, to the ankles, the audi- 
ce was in for a surprise — Saint 

, PAfflg FASHION 

. urent showed tight and sexy 
nisldits, some stopping at mid- 
: gh. These bothered even his 
_ .'mest fans, including Catherine 
V^aeuve. 

. Some retailers tended to 
d found the look a bit 
: . leriaDy when U was in black 
' * ' iher. “It’s all right for the-voy 
*; ung,” one of than said, “but I 
' n’t know how it will work, on 
men over 30.” Many wffl end 
asking that the skirts be 
Sgthened. Bnt the designer 
V'x>d by. his guns. “I find man 
h unger and more modem," he 
^ mmented after the show about 
■j fftmis. “Besides, I do have 
me longer darts as well." 
'"Even these barely covered 
.. recaps, but the effect was soft- 
'ed ^ opaque black lags. Cock- 
' "3 outfits bad short, skinny min- 
.■one of them topped by a gold 
ither tunic. Only coats woe 
. • Tg and worn over pants, a trend 

- int Lament started a few sea- 
os ago. 

. ' The dressing-down 
>i through the whole 

- th sporty, bulky sweaters over 
- - sde pants and jumpsuits shown 

•: evening. True, tnn jumpsuits 
are made of velvet and jazzed 
with jewelry, but one lends to 


think of pantsuits as more suited 
- to the gym than the 

The mouse and long skirt was 
a noth e r low-key way of dressing 
for evening. Little black dresses 
were made of humble jersey and 
livened up with glittery accesso- 
ries. indudmg rhhiestone-sprm- 
kled black velvet bertfts. Sporty 
shirts and suede pants were worn 
with floating rose-printed taffeta 
coats. Accessories were sober, 
with flat, pancak;e-iike leather be- 
rets and simple gold jewelry. 

Many of these ample clothes 
came beau rifuDy to Kfein the way 
Saint Laurent Handled his colors. 
He was a master when it came to 
mixing 'such improbables as 
mauve and chocolate, and there 
were . interesting variations on 

similar hm«y 

For a designer who putwomen 
into pants, Saint Lament showed 
a lot less than usual, occasionally 
giving in to the currently f ashion- 
able pants resembling longjohns. 
New,- too, .were pants fimshed 
with a. deep tapered cuff that 
looked Eke the top of a boot 
Unlike other Paris designers. 
Saint Lament did not like flat 
shoes, showing high hods that he - 
was able to balance with mini- 
skins, a feat of sorts. 

The silhouette, which stayed 
dose to what he showed in cou- 
ture three months ago, was short 
and skinny, with square but not 
exaggerated shoulders. The com- 
fortable, double-breasted and of- 
ten hooded coats were the only 
important volumes. in tins other- 
wise skimpy coDection. The plaid 
cotton raincoats were new,- as 
were aS the paisley prints, but 
Saint Laurent was ben when he 
stuck to solid colon. 

The best new dress was cut Eke 
a bathrobe, edged with velvet and 
loosely wrapped. A trio of dresses ' 
was made of paisley sxOcs and 
wean with pointed Chinese hats, 



OttfeCwSp) 

Evening mini and velvet bathrobe dress fay Saint Laurent. 


die only ethnic note in an other- 
wise strictly Parisian collection. 

Jacqueline de Ribes, who as 
Vkomtesrede Ribes cuts asocial 
swath in Paris, is anmng to be 
known as the Mother Courage of 
fashion. In her positioiv&be cer- 
tainly did not need to enter the 
crazy fashion world, which is 
tougher than its frivolous facade 
would indicate. 

Her fashion shows still fed like 
social happenings, but it now 
looks as if me might make i L Her 
presentation in a gold-trimmed 
salon Tuesday was attended by 
an impressive rosier of American 
buyers, who may not buy in vast 

eaoughto be there at aE^Ribes 
has also trimmed her ' prices, 
which -makes her more competi- 
tive. 


She should forget about day- 
time suits, but her evening dress- 
es, especially the long, lean ones 
that look Eke her, were aristocrat- 
ic and quite lovely. A peramiaJ 
on the best-dressed list, Ribes has 
distinct flair and impeccable 
taste. She delivered some of the 
prettiest evening dresses in Paris, 
including one in black velvet with 
two hot pink- roses on the shoul- 
ders. 

Ha nag Mori, whose fashion 
house on Avenue Montaig ne and 
coo tore collections make her part 
of Paris, has bought another bou- 
tique at 62 Faubourg Saint-Hon- 
oti, in what used to be the Roger 
et GaOel locale. 

Ha collection Wednesday was 
on a familiar steady, ladylike 
course with the best dresses turn- 
ing up for evening. 


Key Adviser in Oman Is Linked to CIA 

Western Intelligence Seen as Major Influence in Strategic Gulf State 


New York Times Service 

The following article is based on 
reporting by Judiih Miller and Jeff 
Gath and was written by Mr. Gerth. 

WASHINGTON — Among the 
foreign advisers who have played a 
major role in the Gulf nation of 
Oman is a former senior Central 
Intelligence Agency official who 
heads a U.S. corporation dial man- 
ages the country’s most strategic 
region. 

The corporation, Tetra Tech In- 
ternational, has a contract with the 
government of Oman to manag e 
the development of the Musandam 
Peninsula, which projects into the 
Strait of Hormuz. The stmt sepa- 
rates the area from Iran, and a 
significant amount of oil destined 
for the West passes through it. 

For other Americans, even such 
official visitors as congressional 
staff members, the sensitive Mu- 
sandam region is off-limits, accord- 
ing to two U.S. officials who re- 
cently visited Oman and were not 
allowed to tour the area. 

The parent of Telia Tech Inter- 
national is Tetra Tech, based in 
Pasadena, California. It specializes 
in providing products ana services 
in the field of water and energy 
resources and is a subsidiary of 
Honeywell Inc., a leading U.S. mil- 
itary contractor with headquarters 
in Minneapolis. 

Tetra lech International helps 
m a na ge several key Omani govern- 
ment agencies in addition to Mu- 
sandam province, and the company 
and its parent wc at for both com- 
mercial and government customers 
in several other Middle Factrm 
countries, indu cting Saudi Arabia, 
as well as in the United States. 

The president of Tetra Tech In- 
ternational and the man who 
helped to get its contract in Oman 
is James H. Critchfidd, who, be- 
fore joining the company in 1975, 
had an interest in Oman, working 
for the CIA, both as head of the 
Middle East desk and later as the 
chief intelligence official for ener- 
gy, according to forma intelligence 
officials and pubEc documents. 

Mr. Critchfidd is among about 
20 American, British and Arab ad- 


visers to the country's ruler. Saltan 
Qaboos bin Said. The advisers have 
helped shape the country’s foreign 
and domestic policies and, like Mr. 
Critchfidd. many have intelligence 
backgrounds. 

In an interview at the end of last 
year, Mr. Critchfidd acknowl- 
edged that be is one of the closest 
U.S. advisers to Oman's ruler, and 
he said he no longer had anything 
to do with the CIA. 

Yet, there is a perception in 
Oman that Mr. Critchfidd and oth- 
ers with inudEgence backgrounds 
retain ties to their former employ- 
ers. As a result. Western and 
Omani officials said, the rede of 
Westerners and their operations in 
Oman has become a subject of dis- 
pute. 

Such perceptions are often en- 
hanced by the nature of the DA 
itself, the officials said, in pan be- 
cause the agency Has a variety of 
relationships with outsiders rang- 
ing from contract employees to 
part-time informants to business- 
men and journalists who debrief 
the agency on various matters. 

Hie issue of advisers in Oman 
figures in an investigation by the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion into rmtlinm of dollars in pay- 
ments made by Ashland Oil to se- 
cure business m Oman. 

The investigation is into possible 

violations by Ashland of the For- 
eign Corrupt Practices Act, which 
forbids payments by U.S. compa- 
nies to foreign officials. The recipi- 
ents of smne of die payments, 
Timothy London, a British military 
official, and Yehia Omar, a Libyan 
exile, have both been Omani advis- 
ers, according to official diplomatic 
registers. 

Mr. Land on and Mr. Omar have 
had past deslmgc with the QA, 
according to several Omani offi- 
cials, former U-S. intelligence offi- 
cials, and the Ashland public docu- 
ments, which were submitted to a 
congressional committee and filed 
with the SEC. 

Mr. Landon, who lives in En- 
gland and no longer has an official 
role in Oman, declined a request to 
be interviewed. A spokesman for 



Mr. Omar, who also no longer has 
an official role in Oman, said that 
Mr. Omar would not talk with the 
press. 

The relationships between for- 
eign advisers and Oman blossomed 
soon after the coup in 1970 that 
brought Sultan Qaboos to power, 
according to O mani and Weston 
officials, some of the advisers and 
public documents. 

Since then, the advisers have 
been involved in writing O mani 
laws, establishing diplomatic rela- 
tionships between Oman and its 
neighbors, providing security for 
the nation’s ruler and lobbying for 
Oman in the United States. 

In 1971, Robert B. Anderson, a 
former secretary of the treasury in 
the Eisenhower administration,- be- 
came an unpaid economic adviser 
to the sultan. His job, he said in an 
interview late last year, was “to 
consult tot ways to improve their 
economy" and get Oman “out from 
under the dominance of the Brit- 
ish,” who arrived in the country 
before the U.S. advisers. 

Mr. Anderson said that his 
Omani role was arranged in part by 
Gfaassan Shakir, a Saudi with close 
ties to the United Slates and Mr. 
Anderson. Mr. Shakir also became 
an adviser to the sultan, as did Mr. 
Omar, the Libyan exile, according 
to U.S. intelligence officials and a 
1981 report prepared by Ashland 
Oil lawyers for the company's 
board of directors. The report In- 


vestigated allegations by Ashland 
officials involved in Omani busi- 
ness ventures that payments to Mr. 
Omar and Mr. Landon had violat- 
ed the Foreign Corrupt Practices 
Act; it concluded that the pay- 
ments did not violate the law. 

Mr. Omar and Mr. Shakir lata 
came under criticism from British 
bankers and Omani officials for 
mitliftfut of dollars in commissions 
they made during Oman’s develop- 
ment in the 1970s, according to 
Omani officials and the 1981 Ash- 
land report filed with the SEC. No 
formal charges were ever brought 
against the two men. 

The sultan's new. outside eco- 
nomic advisers also became in- 
volved in foreign affairs. Mr. An- 
derson said be was personally 
responsible for Oman's re-estab- 
lishing diplomatic relations with 
such neighbors as Saudi Arabia. 

In 1971, as a result of Mr. Ander- 
son's dose ties with King Faisal of 
Saudi Arabia, Sultan Qaboos made 
a state visit to Saudi Arabia, lead- 
ing to the establishment of diplo- 
matic relations between the two 
countries, according to Mr. Ander- 
son and IAS. and Omani officials. 

C. Patrick Quinlan, who was 
charge d'affaires and the hig 
ranking State Department 
in the country in the early 1970s. 
said in an interview in 1983 that he 
had raised questions about CIA 
connections to Omani advisers. 
Mr. Quinlan said his protests were 
based on his concern that fc 
policy was being undermined 
back-channel discussions. 

“I discovered that the CIA had 
connections with Robert Anderson 
and Omar," lie said. 

Mr. Quinlan said he recom- 
mended that ties between the CIA 
and the Omani advisers be 
dropped, but soon changed jobs 
ana never heard from the State 
Department. 

State Department officials said 
that they were unable to find the 
relevant documents in response to 
a two-year effort to obtain them 
under the Freedom of Information 
Act. 


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Page 6 


t 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


Stakes for Europe Deemed Too High 
To Permit EC Expansion Talks toFail 


The French 
who interest you 
read Le Point 


They have a high income-, and want to spend it 
(in France and elsewhere) . 


By Don Cook 

Los Angela Tunes Service 
BRUSSELS — Will 150 fishing 
trawlers block Spain’s entry into 
the European Community? 

Probably not, but unless this and 
a handful of other seemingly small 
disputes — over Spanish wine, fruit 
and vegetables — can be resolved 
by the end of this week, then not 
only Spain bnt Portugal as well 


may not make it into the EC by the 
end of this year. 


286,500 copies and more than 2 million 
readers in France, 42,300 copies abroad— 
Every Monday, such is the performance of 
Le Point, this French newsmagazine creat- 
ed in 197% and which lias since made spec- 
tacular progress inside and outside France. 
Two editions (national and international}, 
but above all the most interesting reader- 
ship. Let’s judge- 

Readers of the national edition are ma- 
nagers or executives (56 %) with a high 
pur chasing power (54 % earn more than 
120,000 FF/year); they axe young (42 % are 
under 35) and live in big cities (58 % axe in 
towns of more than 100£00 inhabitants). 

People in charge, male (60%), who are ' 
d efin ed by all surveys as enterprising and 
serious, but also great travellers, sports- 
men, music and cinema lovers- extrovert- 
ed and extravagant. 

All rhis is confirmed by the EBRS and 
the recent survey conducted amongst 
readers of the international edition of 
Le Point . All the moreso in that these 
readers have a still higher income (50% 
Mm more that 25QfiQQ FF/year). 


end of this year. 

The heads of government or the 
10 EC nations are scheduled to 
meet here Friday, as they do three 



NEWS ANALYSIS 


n'mi-s a year. But if it seems that 
they will have to spend their time 
arguing about such questions as 
fish and wine, they might not come 
at all. 

The Italians, who hold the EC 
presidency for the first six months 
of this year, say they are prepared 
to cancel the meeting unless the 
foreign ministers can resolve the 
matter at a special meeting Thurs- 
day. 

Everyone seems to agree that the 
stakes for the future of Europe are 
too high to permit failure. As one 
veteran negotiator here pot it: “It’s 
the way the community always 
works. Sooner or later they get 
down to a deadline when they have 



GhtHo Andreotti 


Abducted Briton, 
Detained 2 Weeks, 
Is Freed in Beirut 


The Associated Press 


Every Monday, 
two editions of Le Point 





The international edition 


The national edition 


(42,300 copies f) (286300 copies*) 

entirely distributed outside Franca distributed only 
Europe, Africa, USA, etc. in metropolitan France 


lopolnl 


'OJD83 


BEIRUT — Geoffrey Nash, a 
British metallur gist who was kid- 
napped in West Beirut on March 
14, has been freed, the British am- 
bassador to Lebanon said Wednes- 
day. Ambassador David Miers said 
he was unable to give any details of 
the release. 

Mr. Nash, 60, was the first of 
nine Westerners to be abducted or 
disappear in recent weeks. Most of 
the kidnappings have occurred in 
West Beirut, the mostly Moslem 
sector of the capital 

His release had been promised in 
an anonymous telephone call to a 
Western news agency in Beirut on 
Tuesday from a previously unheard 
of group, the Khaibar Brigades. 
The caller said the group had kid- 
napped Mr. Nash, another Briton 
and three French diplomats. 

The caller added that “after our 
investigation” it had been derided 
that the two Britons and a French 
woman captive would be released 
“very soon." 


exhausted all the arguments and 
know that they have to agree. Then 
they agree.” 

Negotiations to bring Spain and 
Portugal into the EC have been 
going on for about five years. A 
treaty of roughly 900 pages is in- 
volved, and almost every economic 
problem involving Spain and Por- 
tugal seems to touch a political 
nerve. 

Last week the Italian foreign 
minister, Ginlio Andreotti, sum- 
moned the other foreign ministers 
to Brussels in an effort to resolve 
the impasse. They talked for four 
fuD days and on into a fifth. 

By last Thursday night, after the 
longest foreign ministers’ meeting 
in EC history, Mr. Andreotti 
thought an agreement had been 
reached when suddenly the French 
foreign minister, Roland Dumas, 
said no. The French balked at the 
terms worked out in connection 
with fish. They also said they would 
have to have more protection 
against Spanish fruit and vegeta- 
bles, which they expect to Hood 
into France after Spain joins the 
EC They insisted on a reduction in 
the amount of Spanish wine that 
the EC would be authorized to ao- 
qmre, for distillation, at subsidized 
prices. 

Spain has the largest fishing fleet 
in Europe, with an annual haul of 
about 600,000 tons against 


tern are all protected under an EC 
fishing agreement that divides up 
the areas and sets Ennis on the 
amount of fish that can be titan. 

Thff A g reemenf wHl not aupny imnl 

the year 2002 . 

At issue is the extent to which 
Spain is to be allowed to fish in the 
waters of the other countries. Mr. 
Andreotti had come dose to work- 
ing out a formula under which 
Spam would be kept out of the 
other countries* fishing grounds for 
10 years and then allowed in an a 

restricted basis. France hdd cm fra 

greater restrictions. _ 

So the foreign ministers win be 
back m Brussels on Thursday, with 
the heads of government amimg in 
the foBowing day nnV« no pro- 
■gress can be node on the logjam. 

- a major hem os the Hgayfc of 
the heads of government rs a new 
report on accelerating the move to- 
ward political integration and re- 
ducing internal barriers to trade 
within the community. 

France, West Germany and oth- 
ers of the original six nations of the 
community want to efinwn^t r the 
veto and penmi decisions to be 
made by majority vote. Bnt other 
countries, notably Britain and 
Denmark, are reluctant. 



Hungary Urged to Keej 
Public Opinion in Mind 
Before Raising Prices i 


Rruien Unlike such other Easton 

BUDAPEST — A Hungarian nations such as Poland, the Rw 
trade union leader, Sandor Caspar, garian authorities had enough p ; 
warned Wednesday that public ular support to raise prices with 
opinion should be taken into ac- fear of serious trouble, Wes t 
count more when prices are in- diplomats said. 



Boo TarflnteDi 


arad. Mr. Gasw. 67, sprite in r 

Mr. Gaspar. a member of the ia*ed,craindcnt manner before 
Politburo of the ruling Communist i s Q10 delegates. It was a 
Party, told Hungary's 13th Com - mum** mp tchafl pf j y hy ik» < 

munist Party Congress that the veteran leader, Janos Kadar * ~ 
party most pay more attention to Monday. f 


ar, a member of the 
the ruling Communist 


Gunmen Kill 
Italian Labor 


party mast pay more attention to Monday. ' 

ltS M^^many consumer goods 

and services were raised in January. 2 

The increases were part of a poticy ^ 



of government is a new -*7 • 

accelerating the move to- fjCOHOUllSt 


budget deficit and encourage the 
play of market forces. 

However, with tiring standards 


Delors Foresees 


Agreement Soon 


On EC Expansion 


The Associated Press 


PARIS — Jacques Delors, the 
president of the European Commu- 
nity Commission, says he believes 
that the EC is “on t he brink of an 
agreement” for the entry of Spain 
and Portugal. 

After meeting Tuesday with 
President Francois Mitterrand of 
France, Mr. Delors said an accord 

be Reached Thursday in Brussels 
during the meeting of EC foreign 
ministers, before the summit meet- 
ing Friday and Saturday. 


France's 66,000 tons. In principle, 
Spanish entry would enable Spain 


Spanish entry would enable Spain 
to fish in French. Irish. British, 
Danish, West' German and Italian 
waters, frpm which they are now 
excluded. But in practice, these war 


“This agreement must be 
reached at the levd of foreign min- 
isters," the framer French finance 
minister said. “We must not bur- 
den the European Council with 
questions lit**- fishing quotas or dis- 
tillation of wine. The chiefs of state 
and government most discuss the 
larger questions." 

Mr. Delors said the Conmusskm, 
the EC’s executive body, had pre- 
pared the subjects for discussion at 
the summit talks, mdudmg new 
technologies in Europe and the re- 
lation .between growth and .unem- 
ployment. 


Roam 

ROME —An Italian economist 
who advocated curbs on the system 
of inflation-linked wage rises in It- 
aly was shot to death in Rome on 
Wednesday, and first signs pointed 
to the extreme leftist Red Brigades 
guerrillas as the killers. 

Ezio TarantdU, 43, was getting 
into his car after delivering a lec- 
ture at Rome University when two 
young men approached. One 
sprayed him with about 20 shots 
from a submachine-gun, police 
quoted witnesses as saying. 

Soon afterward, an anonymous 
caller telephoned a private Milan 
radio station to say. “We are from 
the Red Brigades. We claim the 
attack.” 

Mr. TarantdU, who was married 
with one son, was one of Italy's 
Catholic labor experts and was 
dose to the Catholic-controlled 
Confederation of Italian Union 
Workers trade union. 

Apart from holding the chair of 
labor economy at Rome Universi- 
ty, he was an adviser of the union’s 
seoetary-geoeral, Pierre Canutio, 
and president of its Institute of 
Economic Studies of Labor. 

In the 1960s and 1970s he 
worked as a researcher and adviser 
at the Bank of Italy and held sever- 
al university teaching posts in Mi- 
lan. Florence and the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology in the 
United Stales. 


me luuwu wuu pus ui a pvuvj .. m _ . , ^ , - 

of removing subsidies to reduce the Q«w reforms woe bang Jar » s£ * 
budget deficit and encourage the duccc *’ r » L 

play of market forces. 

However, with tiring standards S > ^£ D ^?*!?Jl5. hado ^* 
under pressure, especially for 

young families and pensioners, the Of preside 


l 

n .tJ rt '41 

k . ; tite* 

* >«w i i mwU lMI 


increases caused dissatisfaction. But a reorganization of theca 
“Never again should a price be dl has now put power in the ha 
increased without proper prepare- of the president, a move that apj. 
non.” Mr. Gaspar said. ently strengthens hard-liners. 


7 Spanish Officers Dismissed 
Jn Drive to Demilitarize Polk 


fa# 


tea. TUI 


-W.JT 
-IMS* \}4i 

mMOTHF 


Reuters 

MADRID — The Spanish gov- 
ernment has dismissed seven senior 
police officers to counter unrest 
over a campaign to demilitarize the 
force, Interior Ministry officials 
said Wednesday. 

The officers were all army men 
who opposed plans to convert the 
force of 50,000 into a civilian orga- 
nization. Spain's other major police 
force, the civil guard, is to remain 
under military control 

In another development, a police 
unit of about 300 men was disband- 
ed in the northern city of Lein. 
They men had staged a sit-in this 
month to force the resignation of 
thwr commander, Captain Francis- 
co Javier Alvarez of the army, 
whom they accused of despotic be- 
havior. 


of the Le 6 n affair, accusing hit 
bowing to what amounted to a : 


tiny. 

Colonel Cervera said Mr. I. . - 
rionuevo had made no attorn -• ' 
discipline the newly legalized, ■* 
lice unions that hod branded ; 
army police officers as nrifa* •, 
with bunker mentalities. He . 
Mr. Banionuevo had lost am - 
ity. 

Thc statement said the mim 
was suspending talks with the - 
lice unions umu they agreed to« . 
duct their negotiations man 
discreet and aadplined fashux .... 

The other men dismissed \ .~ 
the garrison chiefs in Lqgp- 
Santander, Badajoz and the Ut . *. 
Islands, a commander in BarceL 
and a captain in Las Palmas. -1 


« ~ risri 

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.* A# 




, -»u *Mk 

■ur«55 & 




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M 

Wr*. MM i 


Mr. Tarantdli stirred controver- 
sy in the Italian union world by 
arguing that the system of automat- 
ic inflation-linked wage increases 
known as the “scala mobile ” must 
be controlled to curb inflation. 


About 355 army officers hold 
top positions in the police force. An 
Interior Ministry statement said 
the government would continue to 
work toward an all-civilian nation- 
al police force, but it made dear at 
the same time that h would not 
tolerate further pressure like the 
Le 6 n sit-in. 




The issue has again become con- 
troversial because the Communists 
are promoting a referendum on 
whether to annul the wage cuts. 


Hie most senior of the dismissed 
officers, the police chief of staff, 
Lieutenant Colonel Darid Cervera, 
had criticized Interior Minister 
Josi Banionuevo for his handling 


Strike Enda at British Pap- 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — The Sun, Brits'!'... 
best-selling newspaper, resu'., ' 
publication Tuesday night aft - 
seven-day strike by print wori ’ 
Publication resumed after man . .* 
ment and union officials agree.', 
review the problem that caused!/ 
walkout, the repeated breakag ~ 
printing plates, according to a 0 - : i 
pany official, who spoke ant 
mously. * ../•-■ 


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#MHI 


Why Avis cars are fester. 

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We hope you’ll never see a long queue 
at an Avis rental desk. Not that we don’t like 
being popular. We do. 

Which is why we’ve introduced ways 
of getting you into your car faster than 
anyone else. 


Our Avis Express Card for instance. 
All those tedious questions you’re usually 
asked are encoded on a magnetic strip. 

When we run it through one of our 
computer terminals your rental agreement 
is printed automatically 


But it’s not just our speed that’s made 
us the largest rental company throughout 
Europe, Africa and the Middle East. (Around 
the world we’re represented in 126 countries 
and more than 1100 airports.) 

We may have the only direct world- 


wide computer link in car 
rental. 

But we also owe a lot 
to those three old-fashi oned 
words. L0.1 

We try harder. [i—==! 






Avis features 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


Page 7 


i'N,,,, 


ilhi 


11 Is— 


SCIENCE 


l H 

\ 1 1 



Suicti CwModmn Nw Yort fm 

EVERGLADES CENSUS — Terns above, are one of many mkffife species bang 
counted in an airborne census in Florida's Everglades, metde possible by small, highl y 
accurate navigation beacons that allow planes to surrey the park in a grid pattern. 
Drawing at right shows how the count is made, with the aid of computer projections. 


N. 



A Head Count 
From Ov er h ea d 

Wmg struts and cross- 
bars form a frame (B> on 
each side of plane, 
wtikcfi flies at 200 feet 
Computer Ihen projects 
total population of ani- 
mals in grid area from 
number counted in 
each frame. 


100 m- 


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D 

! 1 

1 l 

! 1 1 

r “i 

r 

V 




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i 



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i — r ■■ f - i 



- FBohttme 


Ssmpi, strip 


| | Grid square 




IN BRIEF 


Crafts Produce 
Glowing Bacteria 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — By 

Sep-sea bacteria mU> common in- 
testinal bacteria, mating them 
glow in the daric, biologists at 
Agonron Institute in La Jolla, Cali- 
fornia, have devised a tool for 
studying the mechanics of muta- 
tion. 

The researchers reported in the 
journal Science that they had creat- 
ed biolun n ncsceat versons of Es- 
cherichia coli, the more or less 
frftTminsg in testinal gwin fhar is the 
principal organism used for experi- 
ments in genetic engineering. 

The team produced glowing cul- 
tures of £ cm by grafting a set of 
five genes from a luminous species 
of deep-sea bacteria called Vibrio 
fischai Dr. JoAnne Eagebrecht 
said the light-producing genes 
served as a convenient visual probe 


5 Years Ago , TIROS- 1 Ushered in Era of Satellite Weather Forecasting 


By William Harwood 

United Pros International 

• APE CANAVERAL, Flori- 
. da — The United States 
died TIROS-I, its first weath- 
. . ilcflilft 25 years ago this Mon- 
providing the first view of 
" af doud patterns and ushering 
' i era of improved forecasts ana 
national cooperation. 

... the past quarter of a century, 
- Tiles We closed broad gaps m 
‘world's storm sorvoUanee sys- 
and have been credited with 
_ Tg countless lives. 

. 3 cover 

(36,150 kilometers) high are 
" - routine on television. Fore- 
ts me weather satellites to 
; tropical storms with unprece- 
' -sd accuracy, thousands of at- 
oberic and ocean temperature 
ings are made every day and 
— ^tive instruments keep track of 
and rna gyifric activity, ozone 
... 5 , even forest fires. 

" tematioaal cooperation has 
n out of the expanding capa- 
-cs of weather satellites, tren- 
ding ideological boundaries, 
i tnan 1,000 ground stations 
nd the world receive data from 
r. weather satellites, often 
sped with instruments sup- 
- 1 by otbo- nations, and data is 
-y exchanged. 

aB began at 6:40 ABLEST on 
. 1 1, I960, when a three-stage 
-Able rocket carried the ex- 
oeatal Telerison-Infrared Ob- 
rien Satellite into orbit about 


450 miles up. Coding the world at 
more than 17,000 miles an hour, the 
270-pound (122-kilogram), drum- 
shaped satellite was equipped with 
two television cameras that marie 
22,952 still pictures during its 
three-month life. 

One OF the first fuzzy pictures 
received from TIROS-1 the day it 
was launched, a shot showing the 
northeastern United States and 
Canada, with the ice-blocked St. 
Lawrence River, was rushed to 
President Dwight D. Eisenhower., 

Within a few days, TIROS-1 pas- 
tures were being sent to meteorolo- 
gists around the world, recalled 
David Johns on, a member of the 
original TIROS team and later sat- 
ellite program manag er for what 
became the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administr ation 
“We were all going into this as a 


fore,** said Abraham Sdmapf, for- 
mer TIROS program rnaqagfy foi 
RCA Astro Electronics of Prince- 
ton, New Jersey, where the satel- 
lites were built. 

“AD the oceans, for example, the 
remote pans of the northwest and 
northeast of the United States and 
Canada, the African area, parts of 
Asia, never got any kind of foe- 
casts on a timely baas. Today we're 
getting images evoy six hours of 
the whole globe." 

On May 25, 1961, President John 
F. Kennedy asked Congress to au- 
thorize the Commerce Departmait 
to set up an operational weather 
satellite program. 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration and the 
Commerce Department’s National 
Weather Bureau — later part of the 
Environmental Satellite Services 


has no boundaries, and nations 
have learned to cooperate in the 
exchange of data." 

The current satellite fleet in- 
cludes advanced fourth-generation 
TEROS-type spacecraft in low orbit 
around Earth’s poles, and other 
satellites operating 22300 miles 
over the equator, where they orbit 
at the speed the Earth turns, pro- 
viding continuous coverage of the 
Western Hemisphere. 

“The polar-orbiting satellites 
cany French itutrumwiis, English 

instruments, Canadian f wnrnrmi- 

cations hardware," Mr. Sdmapf 
said. The polar orbiters can photo- 
graph the entire planet every 12 
boors, collecting data on a swath 
1,700 miles wide, and relaying up 
to 16,000 readings drily to ground 
stations. 

The coverage includes extreme 


northern and southern latitudes 
that escape the hemispheric views 
of the satellites stationed over the 
equator. In addition, the polar ar- 
biters can capture more 
images from their vantage print 
about 600 miles up. 

Both types of spacecraft cany 
cameras and instruments to study 
solar and magnetic activity and 
gather temperature data. They also 
are able to collect and relay infor- 
mation from buoys, automatic 
weather station;; and other ground 
systems in remote areas. 


you must be doing a great job fore- 
casting. No, we do a great job ob- 
serving. We can make some esti- 
mates of the strength of a hurricane 
from the eyes of the satellite, but if 
you really want to know how strong 
the winds are, fly oat into it” Re- 
connaissance airplanes do just that. 

The TIROS series of polar orbit- 
ing satellites, which cost S55 mil- 
lion each, is now in its fourth gener- 
ation covering the entire planet 

NOAA-9 now is the only fully 
operating member of the polar 
fleet NOAA -8 broke down and is 


research program and we fuSy ex- Administration, or ESSA 
pected there would be several years achieved that milestone in 1966 
of research and development be- with the launch of ESSA-1 and 
fore one would ever consider an ESSA-2, improved versions of 
operational system," Mr. Johnson TIROS, 
said. ‘The impact of being able to NASA and NOAA have 
see storms in areas that were com- lawicW more than 40 weather sat- 
pletely devoid of conventional equipped with ever-more-so- 
weather information was so great pihisticated Wnunems. Accurate 
that this led to a decision to look weather information is also vital to 
and see if it made sense to proceed mifitaiy planners; almost 30 weath- 
witb an operational system.” er satellites have been laimrfwj 
Meteorology has not been the since 1966 in the Defense Meteoro- 
logical Satellite Program. 

“We exchanged weather for a 
long period of time with Chinn 
when China wasn’t even talking to 
this country." Mr. Sdmapf said. 
“For some reason or other, weather 


same since. 


that the satellites for the first time 
opened up a whole new vista of 
areas that were never photo- 
graphed or seen or forecasted be- 


The most obvious benefit of 
weather satellites is their ability to 
monitor and track storms. Hurri- 
cane Iwa, for example, was discov- 
ered in November 1982 by a 
NOAA Geostationary Operational 
Environmental Satellite before it 
readied Hawaii 
But weather satellites are rally 
one tool in an arsenal of forecasting 
aids. Neil Frank, director of the 
National Hurricane Center in Mir 
ami puts the utility of weather sat- 
effites into perspective when it 
la un che d in October by the Euro- comes to forecasting the move- 
pean rocket Ariane, is intended as meats of the giant tropical storms, 
competition for Landsat, NASA’s “The myth says hncaitcp we've 
Earth-resources satellite, and as an got these beautiful observing tools, 
entry into the U. S. market. and particularly weather 


The latest advanced TIROS- type out of control, and NOAA-7 is only 
polar orbiter, called NOAA-9. and partially operating. But the system 
two Soviet satellites carry instru- is able to fulfill the needs of meteo- 
meais dwagnwt to pinpoint shi p? rc&ogists, and three new 
and airplanes in distress. Their are in production, 
ground s t atio ns are in the United The pictures most familiar to 
States, Canada, France, Norway tdevisioa viewers are provided by 
and the Soviet Union. the Geostationary Operational Eo - 


France Unveils Satellite 
For Commercial Images 

United Press I memaitmal 

TOULOUSE, France — France 
has unveiled its 4-billion-franc 
“Spot" Earth observation satellite, 
designed to produce up to 50,000 
custom-ordered high-definition 
pictures a year for oil companies, 
farms and other diems. 

The satellite, scheduled to be 


viroumental Satellites, or GOES. 

, Six operational GOES have been 
launched into stationary orbit 
22300 miles high since 1975. The 
system relies on one GOES sta- 
tioned over the Pacific and one 
over South America. 

The camera system aboard 
GOES-5, which had been stationed 
over South America, broke down 
last year. To take up the slack, 
GOES -6 was moved east to allow 
monitoring of the Atlantic and Ca- 
ribbean for hurricanes. 

Two new GOES satellites will be 
launched next year and NOAA is 
planning an improved version 
called GOES-Next for launch in 
the early 1990s. 


for mapping gene function in the 
hereditary code, or genome, of £ 
coli and other organisms. 

Distant Quasars 
Are Discovered 

PITTSBURGH (UPI) — Astro- 
physicists have discovered two qua- 
sars that may add significant new 
information to the study of the ear- 
ly history of the universe, the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh has an- 
nounced. 

The discoveries by Professor 
Cyril Hazard and a Cambridge 
University professor, Richard Mc- 
Mahon. were announced the same 
day they were reported in the Brit- 
ish journal Nature: 

One of the quasars is the most 
distant object from Earth ever de- 
tected by scientists using optical 
means, said Professor Hazard, who 
discovered quasars — quasi-stdiar 
objects, the brightest objects in the 
universe — in 1963. 

The light from very distant ob- 
jects is in effect a freeze-frame por- 
trait of the universe at various 
times in the history of the cosmos, 
be said. He called the discovery of 
the super-distant quasars a “major 
step forward” in the study of the 
formation of galaxies and the ex- 
pansion of the universe. 

Drugs May Stem 
Stroke Deaths 

WEST HAVEN, Connecticut 
(UP!) — Research is beginning to 
show that drugs prescribed for 
heart disease may stem the rate of 
death from strokes caused by blood 
leaking from weak- walled vessels in 
the brain, according to doctors on a 
panel here at a seminar sponsored 
by MOes Pharmaceuticals. 

The drugs, calcium-channel 
Mockers, do not prevent but 
may cut down on resulting brain 
damage, the doctors said. Such 
leaks, called subarachnoid hemor- 
rhages, cause about 10 percent of 
all strokes, and about 19,000 deaths 
a year in the United States. 

“In all other forms of stroke, the 
incidence is decreasing about 5 per- 
cent per year," said Dr. Neal F. 
Kassel 1, professor of neurosurgery 
at the University of Virginia, Char- 
lottesville. “Not this one." 

Geographic Starts 
Science Quarterly 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Th: 
National Geographic Society has 
started publishing what is planned 
to be a quarterly called National 
Geographic Research: A Scientific 


Journal, at a subscription rate of 
$40 a year. 

The first issue leads off with an 
article on “Late Penman and Trias- 
sic Tetrapods of Southern Brazil" 
The nonprofit society's president, 
Gilbert Grosvenor, noted in his 
column in the National Geograph- 
ic magazine: “Such articles are cer- 
tainly not designed to be armchair 
reading.” 

Still he said at a recent press 
lunch, he thinks circulation might 
far exceed other society officers’ 
estimates of 5,000 to 10 . 000 — esti- 
mates that would still give the jour- 
nal ’a somewhat bigger audience 
than most scientific publications 
have. It would take close to 20,000 
to recoup the expected annual cost 
of about $750,000. The Geogra- 
phic’s circulation is 10.6 million. 

Cave in Negev 
Holds Rich Trove 

JERUSALEM (AP) — A tiny 
cave found in 1983 in the southern 
Negev Desert has yielded thou- 
sands of prehistoric objects, includ- 
ing what is believed to oe the oldest 
fabric ever found, and evidence of a 
9,000-year-old religion, the Israel 
Museum has announced. 

Meir Meir, the museum's vice 
president, called the discovery one 
of the most important in the last 25 
years. The cave is in a desert valley 
west of the Dead Sea called Nahal 
Hemar, “river of asphalt,” near 
what is believed to be the location 
of biblical Sodom, about 50 miles 
(80 kilometers) south of Jerusalem. 

Tamar Noy, a museum curator, 
said most of the objects were prob- 
ably used for religious ceremonies. 
She said that a naplrin-tized cloth 
of woven flax was in a style anthro- 
pologists were familiar with, from 
impressions in andent clay, but 
that oo doth this old had been 
found before. 

Big, Sexless Trout 
Reportedly Bred 

LONDON (AP) — Because 
trout spend so much energy and 

eramenl scientists have bred sex- 
less super-trout for fish farms, ac- 
cording to the Observer. 

Despite gourmet fears that these 
giant rainbow trout would also be 
tasteless, the Ministry of Agricul- 
ture is aiming to produce bigger 
fish by juggling hormones and 
chromosomes to dispense with the 
male, the weekly said It said the 
sexless trout grows at double the 
rate of its conventional cousins, 
reaching 30 pounds (13.5 kilo- 
grams) in four years. 


Americans use planes like Europeans use 

is. Not only because their country is so 

it, but also because their climate is so 
ly competitive. 

They dare not miss out on any business 
portunity. 

Of course getting them to the right place at 
right time presents problems. Planes are 
i taxis. 

So how can an airline effectively connect 
major cities? 


We got around the problem by re-inventing 
the wheel. 

We have created two central hubs whose 
spokes radiate out to directly link over 55 
cities in the US. These hubs are at Datlas/Fort 
Worth and Chicago. 

And now we are adding three more 
spokes to our wheel. From London and Paris 

ArnerfcanAirlines 


you can fly non-stop to Dallas/Fort Worth. 
And from Frankfurt you can fly non-stop to 
both Dallas/Fort Worth and Chicago. 

(The London sendee is already in oper- 
ation. Paris and Frankfurt services begin on 
April 12th.) 

Which means you can get to almost any- 
where your business takes you in America on 
one ticket, with one airline, with just one stop. 

Doesn’t that sound better than flying 
around in circles? 



i 



















f 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


VtaL HIM Law 


Unocal 

McCCfl 

PNPtwd 

CHamS 

T«raa} 

55SL. 

§SE 

IBM 


4 fii 46* 

mm m 

3866 3m 

im 17% 

25V. Uh 
2104 21% 

42ft 39* 
Ttft T7* 
3006 27ft 
12m 125ft 
Sft 8* 
60* 59ft 
43* 41* 
48ft 47ft 

ink sift 


47ft +ft 
44 + ft 

38* —ft 

im +m 
35 

21ft + ft 

42ft -n 

n + M 
29ft — Tft 
124ft -I- ft 
fft +ft 

U + ft 
42ft + ft 
Oft +W 
37ft + ft 


Oow Kftti Law Lot CM 


! Indus W60J4 1Z7DJ7 12BLM OUI + 5.19 

Tran 59532 40X30 592J5 399-53 -l- X® 

UfQ 749 JB 15113 149.52 151 Jt + 1.11 

Coma 510.14 SU40 3BUI S12S7 + 272 


Frwrtoos Tadar 
Htt LOW dSM 3PM. 

Camposlta 1B147 10X02 HUB 1EU0 

¥»lr 'as a 'as 'as 

S as as ,as <« 


Wednesdays 


AMEX Diorfes 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Mast Actives 


20 222 

299 SI 

m ms 

TU 745 

21 15 

II 10 


»Mt Tour 

CloM NM «» MB 


Vft MM lM 


Csmomrta 

inttastrtati 

Rnana 


2H.U 27733 BUS 3M.» 
m« 29544 2WJB0 2B1 J4 


Goang 


““3SH 

= 3SSg 

25349 - 255.10 229JO 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


BAT VO» 4ft Oft 
DoaiuP M ft ft 
CcMie MU lift lift 

nuM «9 lm i9 

OatoM MM P 
ItnFl 1771 Rft J3* 

DUlrds ICS Sft Sft 

hwot im 1 m m 

dfCdB 114* Oft 13ft 

tntBkwi M 1 ft 
tokav Ttn§ Mft » 

Matlbh *7* 17ft U 
71R 954 7ft 4ft 

UOtt feD *a 7ft 7ft 
KpvWI » IM ft 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


a 

Bft 13ft 

» ft IS 

4» 

52 ^ + * . 

9ft Nft 


■iU 


Birrw* 


- la* 

iJiftrr 


rag 


1 Dow Jones Bond Averages f 


Banda 

utintiM 

Induatrteis 


AdvWCM 
Dad food 
undnnBMi 
Total Iwai 
NowHtota 
Maw Law* 


W« BU 

SB 492 


1994 1990 

97 SO 

10 12 


March 27 171 JW 461,853 

March 25 144431 494414 

March 22 lft482 447474 

March 21 20X105 454216 

March 20 219,11* 40UW 

•liWddod In It* mMj flpurw 


min To 
low On* 31 


Tahles indude the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on W au street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Asso ci at ed Press 


MW uw dan 3 PAL 
"xfaatricts 199J7 19150 199.13 29038 

Tran 15225 151 Ji 15143 1520 

UHBtftS 7941 7942 79134 7942 

FkWCt 200 3041 M 3040 

ComuraBu I7U4 17741 17143 17943 


3PJA. wohme 
Prm. 3 PA vatama 
Prov. eora. vototm 


AMEX Stock Index 




P i Ira— Tata 

Mftb Uw Gtao JW 

23440 22371 23M1 Hgj, 


..i "v*w 


12 Month 

HtahLmr Stack 


Dk.YU.PB WOoWahLow OunLOfO* 


AAR 48 24 

ASS 

AMCA 

AMP 40 29 
AMR 

AMRpf 2.18 107 
ANRpf 247 107 
APL 

ASA 280 34 
AVX 42 14 
AtatLcM 140 27 
AceoHWf M ZB 
AcmeC 40 34 
AcnwC 42b 34 
Ada Ex ZTMT2J 
AdmMI 42 14 
AdrSva 4lt 74 
AMD 

Advraf .12 14 



AataLf 244 64 
AatLpf 543*107 
Ahmns UO 07 

AHaan 

AIrPrd 140 24 
AirbPrl 40 29 
AIMoas 

AlaP PtA 343 129 
AloPdpf 47 124 
AtaPpT 940 124 
AtaPpf 944 127 
AlOBKl 92 74 
AbkAIr .14 3 

Albrtos 40 24 
AfMans 36 Z 5 
Alcan 140 45 
AJcoSfd 13) 25 
AtaxAte 140 34 


AfleCp 24*1 27 
Aijiint IM S3 


Atolnt 140 S3 
AtOldPf 2.19 114 
Aialoicius 122 
AlbPw 270 19 
AIVmG Mb 3.1 
AiUCoa 740 44 
AMCPPf 674 109 


AMCppflZOO 114 
AMCnf 124901Z1 
AIMPd 

AJWStr ZT2 17 

AUtaOi 

AtlsC pt 

ALLTL 14* 74 
AtohPr 40a 35 
Alcoa UO 15 
Arrant 40 1.1 
AmHn l.W 24 
AxnAsr 
ABakr 

ABraad 390 54 
ABrd pt 275 104 
ABdcjt 140 15 
ABkUl 46 33 
ABusPr 44 25 
Am Cm 250 55 
A Can Of 240 119 
AConpf 240 65 
ACapBd 240 119 
ACOPCV 65M215 
AContC 

ACvan 190 X* 
ADT 92 44 
AHPw 2460105 
Am Exp 148 10 
AFamll 44b 24 
AGaCP 140 35 
AGnlwt 

AGnlpfA 6480115 
AGnt ptB 59M 74 
AOnpfD 244 64 
AHalsf 

AHamo 250 47 
AHav 1.12 XI 
Amrtch 640 Z1 
AlnGrp M 4 
AIGPPf 545 47 
AMI 72 ZT 
AmMot 

ANtRai 242 34 
A Praaid J4t 19 
ASLFM 

A5LF1 pf Z19 159 
AShlp 40 61 
Am3td 140 54 
AmStor 44 14 
AStrpfA 448 67 
ASh-pfB 640 124 
AT&T 140 55 


9 236 
H 17 
12 263 
ID 3197 

12 707 
2784 

19 35 

38 5 

245 
11 
1 

8 975 

13 208 

7 7m 
221 

2 
179 
45 
V 1066 
143 

3 

9 121 

13 1 

11 1348 

393 

15 3355 

706 
S 114 
10 160 

4 

16 1525 

13 28 

15 4 

11 237 

5 
IS 
35 
22 

12 17 
12 875 
7S 858 

8 5144 
15 9348 42ft 
12 414 25ft 

9 4601 28ft 


18ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
Wft— ft 
77ft + % 
40ft + ft 
28ft + ft 
Kft+ ft 
9ft— ft 
53ft + ft 
T7ft+ ft 

52ft +1 
22 ft— ft 
Uft +ft 
9ft— ft 
1<ft 

17ft + ft 

JSS + 1 

9ft + ft 
lift— ft 
40ft + ft 
54ft— ft 

»*i+ ft 

2ft— ft 

8* + ft. 

3 Oft— ft 
7ft + ft 
73ft 

74ft— ft 


Volume Is Up in Active Trading 


United Press fraenumonal 

NEW YORK — Hk stock-market was gain- 
ing Late Wednesday in moderately active trad- 
ing after investors shrugged off reports that 
first-quarter profits for some companies would 
trail the year-earlier pace. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
AM to 1,264.36 about an hour before the close. 

Advances led dedines by a 9-5 ratio among 


Although prices in tables on these pages are 
vm the 4 PM. dose in New York, for time 


from the 4 PM. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
PM. 


the 1,930 issues crossing the New York Stock 


19ft + ft 
14ft + ft 
30 +« 
2Cft— ft 
34ft + ft 

77ft— ft 

5%+ft 

92 +ft 
30ft + ft 
19ft + ft 
37ft— ft 
6M6— ft 
106ft— ft 


Exchange tape. 

Five-hour volume amounted to about 85.89 
nuElion shares compared with 76.08 million in 
the like period Tuesday. 

Eugene Peroni, of Bateman Bidder, Hill 
Richar ds in Los Angeles described the Dow’s 
jump as a “relief rally." There has been no 
further negative corporate developments and 
many of the stocks that had been oversold were 
finding some support, he said. 

High-tech issues absorbed bad news particu- 
larly well, he said, bouncing back after a batter- 
ing earlier this week. The rally in that group 
“could blossom,” he said. 

The market “had beta crippled by its near- 
sighted vision,” he said, ana preoccupations 
with first-quarter earnings. 

“The market may not get up to a broadly 
sustainable rally tins week,” because of a great 
deal of institutional window dressing, he said. 

Institutions are mainly recycling money al- 


22ft— ft 
57ft— ft 
7ft + ft 
am 

26ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
34ft + ft 
17ft + ft 

TXZ 

raw + ft 
69ft— ft 


S ltlh 
54ft 
15 77ft 
140 57ft 
45 KM 
13 6329 62ft 
11 2577 35ft 
8 8S0 B2ft 
IS 535 77ft 
2 124 
11 2537 2i 
84 674 3ft 
12 11W 65 
4 302 39 
4 303 6ft 
3*5 13ft 

1 * is m 

12 229 31ft 
9 299 54 
121 65 
24 54 

1711984 2H5 
119 35ft 
238 36ft 

5 SSI 


46 + ft 
18ft — ft 
30ft + ft 
8ft 

52ft -Hft 
23ft— 1 
21ft + ft 
43ft+ ft 
26ft + H 
2Sft + ft 


12 Month 
Utah Low Stock 


Dk.YM.PE HM HIM Lop 


AT&T Pi 344 104 
AT&T Pi 334 103 
AWotra 

AmHotl 248 113 
ATrPr 633* 9J 
ATrflc 

ATrUn 65M 04 
Amoron 140 so 
AimaDa 20 4 

Amaapf &X2 57 
Anwtofc JO 10 
AlWjBC 
M1VHC 

AMP S 72 U 

A msjS 140 53 
AimM 140 43 


im+ ft 
54ft + ft 
77ft +lft 
57ft + ft 
I0ft+ ft 


4ft 3ft 
38 21ft 

r % 

20ft 14ft 
36ft 28 
23ft 19ft 


62ft +1 
35ft + ft 
81 ft— ft 
72ft -Hft 
124 +lft 
27ft— ft 


64ft 

38ft -Hft 
6ft + ft 
13ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
30ft— ft 
54 
65 

54 +ft 


26ft 12 
30 22ft 
44 26ft 

40ft 23ft 

40ft 25ft 
16ft 12 
2Zft Uft 
17ft 15ft 
21ft lift 
29ft 23 
50ft 35 


sr* 


soft 44V, 
»ft 12ft 
65ft 47ft 
20ft Uft 
lift 3ft 
15 10ft 


TJ3*6J 8 934 
751 
137 

02 73 24 27 

Z12 84 8 64 

147 107 1 

3J5 123 11 

JO 3 18 36 

06 5J> IS 1 8 
08 24 16 4*1 
00 24 8 1600 
48 14 16 441 
44 ZB 35 208 
JO 47 7 23 

2J6 125 10 

11 63 

04 62 20 377 
140 27 7 1582 
-55 U 18 
540*10 442 

44 57 14 242 
240 44 11 1927 
52 27642 171 
59 

110 Mt 3 


4ft 4ft 
26ft 25ft 
17ft 16ft 
3 2ft 
18V. lift 
37ft 36ft 
23 23 

32ft 32ft 
22ft 21ft 
27ft 27 
42ft 41ft 
35ft 34ft 
35ft 34ft 
14ft 14ft 
17 17 

17ft 1716 
17ft 16ft 
26ft 26ft 
52ft 51ft 
6ft 6ft 


26ft 4- ft 
l7ft+lft 


!7ft+lft 
2ft + ft 
1816 + ft 
37ft + ft 
23 

32ft— ft 
22 + ft 
27ft + ft 
42ft + ft 
35ft +1 
35ft + ft 
14ft + ft 
17 —ft 
17ft— ft 
17 +ft 
26ft + ft 
Hft + ft 
6ft 


14ft 14ft Uft— ft 
59ft 9 59 +1ft 

19ft 19ft WM + ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
lift lift Tift— ft 


tpl|s 


Anchor 148 65 
AnClar 02 33 20 
AndrGr JO O 15 

ZBS i3 22]J 

aSSS P<3 JB O 18 

Off &JJS 

ApchPwt 1 

Wff WB 

ApPWPf 4.18 13J 
ApTOto 1.W 15 16 

ArchDn .14b 3 M 
ATtePS 160 117 7 
ArTPPf 358 123 
AriPpf 1070 114 
ATkBW 40 O 8 
Artda 08 5.1 17 
ft ArthRt 
9 Armen 

18 Armcp* Z» 188 
UftAnnaRb 48 22 8 
22ft Arrow in UO 38 8 

19 ArnQ* 130 33 t 
Uft AnwE JO O 8 
i* Artro J2 3 

14 Arvtoa. JO 45 8 
3*ft ArvlnH 300 43 
17ft Aaoreo 
20ft AaMOfl 140 54 
3» AlMOpr 650 1U 
31ft AMMO at 336 10.1 
45ft AadDG 160 64 9 
73 AsdDpf 473 52 
Uft Athlon* UO U I 
19ft AfCvEl 248 111 8 
40ft AHRlrfr 3J8 6J 22 
32ft AtlRcof 3 JS 9 3 

YrniS&S! 3 *" 

ink AVEMC 40 15 12 
23 Awry 40 17 14 
10 Avtalln .... 8 
27 Avnof JO 14 14 
1916 Avon 230 93 10 
10 A Yd In U 


lft 21ft + ft 

Pr=: 


20 
122 
2138 
ST4 
60 
392 
49 12ft 
3N lift 
17 116 

£ Sft 

& 

130 


mo + ft 

57ft + ft 

J5ft+ ft 
14 +1* 
12ft + I* 
lift + l* 

17ft— ft 
25ft + ft 

ani + ft 




55 

1452 
109 

636 fft 

8 19ft 
7 21ft 

1464 32ft 
V 31V* 
68 16 
« 34ft 
7B 2Dft 
5 48 

1438 36ft 
1W 3»ft 

1 41 
• 39ft 
418 57 
S 91 

9 20ft 
900 - 341* 

2731 49ft 
91 Bx 38 
4 117 
12 15 
184 24 
661 43ft 
1 24ft 
78 35ft 
70 14ft 

1261 31 

1439 20ft 
38 22 ft 


9ft— V* 

Mft+ft 
*2 + ft 

am— m 

lit* 

a* —ft 

r 

25ft + ft 
29ft— V* 
41 

sr* 

*i 

30ft + ft 
24ft + ft 

sr+1* 

116ft— ft 
15 

2Rh— ft 
43ft + ft 
34ft— ft 

Uft? ft 
aoft + ft 


-140a 32 13 
350 19 16 


350 22 16 
2 


lft 7ft 
>« «* 


m 


1J0011J 47 

220 U 18 786 
140 65 9 37 


140 65 9 37 

1J4 44 7 2485 
UO 27 

34 

52 U I 
14 

475 107 7 

5?'i* 

40 
.169 
250 

250 35 12 
140 




ssii 


Uft 12ft 13ft + ft 
18ft 17 . 18 . +1 


44ft 44ft 44ft + 16 
lift Uft Uft+1 
14 14 14 — 16 

211* 21ft 21ft + ft 
6ft 4ft 4ft + 16 
lift + ft 
711*+ ft 
CZft+ ft 

SSiiJ 

37ft— ft 
221*+ ft 
Hft— ft 
23ft— ft 
31ft 
fft + ft 
48ft— ft 
27ft + ft 
32*l + ft 
Uft 

in*+ ft 
am* 

3116+ ft 
22ft+ ft 
90 +ft 
39ft 


jo » 
154 32 11 


un 17 u 
40 U IS 
160 9J 7 
247 112 
110 57 f 
37 J U 
120 M 7 
122 45 W 
52 15 12 
120 77 0 


122 
JO 1J 
76 SJ 11 
440 42 8 
450 1U 
24 5 23 

231 18 9 
18 

102 82 7 
184 11.1 6 
222 93 ■ 
140 82 7 
126 84 6 
4.18 125 
140 133 S 
44 18 16 
128 112 5 


JO U 7 
160 115 9 
70 11 10 
40 11 33 
40 12 
440 9J 
40 48 12 


BMC 48 44 
Berime* 50 17 
BtaUrtl 22 5J 
Balder 26 14 
vIBaldU 

BallCo im 17 
BallYAW 2D 14 


Bourse uo 7J 

BflttPfS 450 W7 
Bncan* 40 

Bncarn J3* SB 

12 . 11 

BkBos 240 .55 


BkBoipISJMU 
BkNC dpC4M1Q7 
BkNY 2J4 53 
Bnfcvta* 1 J 0 12 
BnkAm 152 0.1 
BkAm nf 5L19.UJ 
BkAffiPf 838.11 J 
BkAm ot 240 
BkARtV 240 &£ 
BcnkTr 270 43 
BkTTPf 250 M2 
BOOMT 43* J 
BPS 44 15 
BamGa JO 36 


Bonwt 126 2j 
BarvWr JO 15 


BA51X -12D 14 
Bawd! 75 11 
BaxtTr 23 23 
Bay Fin 2D* 1J 
BaySG 240 82 
Bearma 1J0 10 
B«afCP 1 JO 52 

Bear Pi 328 64 
BoctnD 120 15 
n*|mi- 

Baksr Pf 120 Iff 
BWODH JO U 
J6 2.1 
B«IHwpt 33 25 
BotlAH 640 82 
BCE a sa 
Bflllnd 32 14 
BMOat 100 7J 
MOAH JO 15 
BWlh 140 36 
BnOxpf 444 43 
BanfCp 249 55 
BWWfPf 630 137 
BWMfnT 359 34 
*50125 
BM0fB 23.34 
BoruSn 
BirMy 

B«tPd 24 24 
BafliSH 40 23 
BMMtPfUO 11.9 
BoftiS) pf 250 no 
BM rl* 32 1J 
BluTBr JO 3J 
Btocfln 

BKKkD 64 24 
BKfcHP 172 66 
Blair Jn 56 26 
BttKHR 240 67 
Bootas 149 23 
BsfcoC 120 42 
Bo INC Pf 540 93 
BoltBor .10 4 
Barton 272 32 
BuuWu 22 65 
Bornm 

BosEd 334 85 
Base pf 688 124 
BaoEpr 1.17 116 
BasE pr 146 117 
Banfrn 72 33 
BrlpSI 140 55 
BrtstM 168 33 
BrsfM Of 260 17 


H 140 12ft lift 12M + ft 

11 118 29ft 2916 29ft + ft 

16 018 ltfft 76ft 76ft + ft 

15 72 23 22ft 2Zft + ft 

137 lft lft 1ft 

11 44 47 46M 46ft— ft 

aw wft uft Uft— ft 

11 M lift Wft Uft— ft 

7 606 40ft 40ft 40ft + ft 

2Bx 42 42 42 —1 

9 95 27ft 27ft 2716— ft 
7 10 9 9 9 +16 

755 3ft 316 3ft— ft 

n 6 56ft 56ft Sift 

5 362 441* 43ft 44 + ft 

14 50ft 49ft 49ft— 16 

4 S3 53 H —lft 

6 1M 30ft 3016 38ft— U 

9 54 2S» 2516 2*ft + ft 

11 1221 19 Uft Uft— V6 
24 43ft 43ft 43ft— 16 

- SO 71 71 n +16 

94 15ft 15ft 15ft+ ft 

11 276 30ft 30 30 

7 497k 63ft 62ft 62ft 

1 In 33ft 23 M —ft 

18 5 lift lift lift + 16 

13 816 29ft 29ft 2916 + ft 

9 40 22ft 22ft 2ZVi 

9 438 49ft 49ft 4916— 16 

14 183 2* 23ft ZM 

12 342 12ft 13 Uft + ft 

U 422 25ft 24ft 25 — ft 

76 3K24 16 15ft Uft 

19 754 21ft 2ffft 20ft— ft 

9 22 31ft 30ft 3116 

11 21 33ft 33ft Hft— ft 

9 32CO 30ft 29ft 30ft +11* 

5 a 55ft +Tft 

15 650 4m* 471* 48ft +lft 

189 5ft 516 5ft— ft 

23 Wft W raft + ft 

7 5 T2ft 12ft Uft 

9 340 27 2*16 26ft + ft 

3 26ft 26ft 36ft -H 
I 1359 63ft 821* ttft + ft 
237 2916 soft 29 + ft 

U 11 23ft 33ft 2316+ ft 

8 7513 35ft 35ft 35ft + ft 

72 36 53ft 53ft 53ft— ft 

11 29 38ft 28 28ft— ft 

M Uft 86ft 86ft— ft 

9 109 3*ft 36ft J6ft 

76 31 33ft 33ft— ft 
4QyU2 182 M2 -Hft 
lOftE 2D 20 20 

3* 554 Sft Sft 5ft + 16 

M 47 23 22ft 22ft + ft 
29 113 Ah Sft 51* + ft 

12 415 Uft lift lift— ft 
544 17ft 77ft 1716 + ft 

39 4216 47* 41ft 
36 21ft m 2ffft + ft 
H 474 321* 31V 32 — ft 


380 72 6 
ATS 112 
525 7X4 
655*122 
920*17.4 
22 42 8 
152 55 11 
240 48 6 
137 5.1 
tn»im 
£99.113 
124 32 7* 
ZOO 43 -9 
340 70 8 
15 
61 


Mm A 7 
33* X1 117 
4sr 1.1 



UO 29 1 
u iv 13 

J8 22 76 


16 209 22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 
660 Uft 13ft 13* + ft 

72 940 24ft 23« 34ft + ft 
8 33 2916 29 29ft + ft 

17 276 21ft 21ft 27* + ft 
13 394 51ft SO Aft +1ft 

8 1341 63ft 81ft 61ft + ft 
17 263 3BH 3816 38ft + I* 

2 54 54 54 +M 

29 K? Uft 26 26 
W 598 70ft 69ft ftft+lft 

9 1H6 2Dft 20ft 2Dft— ft 

11 6ft 8ft 6ft 
8 13* 38W 37ft 38ft + ft 
tOQz 74 ft 7416 7414 
4 VM 10 7016 + ft 
32 lZft 12ft 12V, 

8 1776 22ft 21ft 22 — ft 
8 129 29 38ft 29 
17 2731 571* KH 57ft +116 
2 120 120 120 401* 


X12 73 7 
ZU 142 4 
425 UA 
922 144 
22 XI 29 
24 13 H 
JO J 1* 
14 

136 53 7 

8.19*705 

924*104 

121 12 * 
ZOO 35 
2J7 112 
32 93 
l.W 32 W 
14 

UO U I 
Z52 7Z4 6 
740 735 
724 135 
40 42 
223 125 
1J4 T1.0 
UO M 11 
.70# J 10 
UO 34 10 
UO 54 
40 27 9 
400 1J 9 
1.19 24 
1J3 4.1 
196 42 14 


120 48 13 
12*9 52 28 
425 1X1 
44 30 1 
.16 J 16 
140 52 9 
ISO 42 10 
XU 112 8 
345 

525 T4J 
ZT6 £0 9 
1J4 £3 12 W7 
20 12 12 199 
26 ZD U 129 
3 109V 
320 1A3 .7 1986 


41 +ft 
Hft— ft 
23* + ft 
2Sft+ ft 
2716 + ft 
18 

23ft— ft 
23ft + ft 
50ft + ft 
72 
17 

4ft + ft 
10 

22ft + ft 
Wft— ft 
21 

4M6+ 16 


Hft + ft 

Sift— ft 

42ft + ft 
53ft 

53ft— ft 
18ft— ft 
3016+ ft 
37ft 

36ft— ft 
5416+ ft 
52*— ft 


1.98 124 
ZM 124 
1120 112 
040 11 J 
840 1JJ 

Z32 9J 5 
120 34 II 
24 J 25 
40 IJ 11 

? 


31*+ ft 

Mm * +2 

71ft +1* 

23ft 2116— ft 
10* 18ft— ft 

45 45ft + ft 

Wft. 11716— ft 
Wft Wft 
34ft 34ft + ft 
5« 56tk + ft 
36ft 36*+ ft 
78ft 78ft+ 16 
42M 43 + Vk 

15 1516+ ft 

34 34 

85 48 

23 23ft 

mi* mu + * 

25ft 36*+ ft 
23 21 

4B* 43ft + * 
78ft 7816— * 
91* 91*— ft 
36ft 37ft + ft 
79 79 + ft 

£7 57ft + ft 
25ft 25ft + ft 
7ft 716 + ft 
29ft 29*+ ft 
12 121*+ ft 

1K6 1**— * 
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55 S —1 

56 56 —1 
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17* 1716+ ft 
16* 16ft— ft 
33ft 3M— ft 
28 20 —16 
27* 29 +1 
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46 46 +2V* 

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68 89 +lft 

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lift U* J-tfk + * 


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16 STD 22ft 

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29ft — 1ft 
29ft— * 
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29 + ft 

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22ft + ft 
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13ft + ft 
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31*— ft 
66ft + ft 
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52ft + ft 
47ft + ft 
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20 12 52 41 
128 44 8 222 
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20 14 12 184 
24 12 ■ 174 
J4 13 U 1602 
208 13L0 7 9449 
721 138 TODz 
J 14M 23 

U8 3L3 28 976 
732 £1 7 464 
M 73 7 741 


20ft 

Uft 

77ft + ft 
7ft— ft 
12* +1 
93 +Tft 
44ft +7* 
18*— ft 
11*+ ft 
18ft + ft 
3Mh + ft 
15* — ft 
54 —ft 


Z9 1* 723 

5.1 IB 190 

4.1 9 94 

KU 7 748 
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3 711022 
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12 4107 
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31ft + ft 
21*— ft 
33*— * 
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71 +Zft 
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25ft + * 
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25*+ ft 
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22 + ft 

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37* 36* 
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29*+ ft 
34ft + ft 


HtoPLnw Stock 


IKMLM Quota*! 


ready in the market, rather than injecting new 
cash, he said. There is “more of a cash-flow 
nutted to gst over 1300,” Mr. Peroni said, 
predicting an influx of new cash next month. 

Charles Comer of Oppcahehner & Co. said 
the rebound reflected a “very favorable recep- 
tion to treasury refunding ” 

Such stocks as General Electric, IBM and 
General MQls “hdd np pretty wdT in the face 
of bad news, he said. 

“But unless we see the bond market shaping 
up,” Mr. Coiner said, the latest advance “won’t 
go too far.” 

Tim market “may drift a Httk lower.” he said, 
with occasional flasb-in-the-pan rallies.” Per- 
haps six weeks from now, he said, the market 
can look forw ar d to substantial gains. 

F5rmtng c.T riat«H p n no n nr<»rr»»n t< came from 
S PCfr rampani AC ag TR^ >{ ^ yl Mirwiftsn ta fr Jrmwg 
& V fannfflffmfng. ThreC-M said e arnings for 

die first quarter probably win be less dun the 
$1 JO per share reported in the same period of 
1984. 

General Electric was indicted Tuesday on 
four counts of making and presenting false 
claims to the government, and a current and 
framer manager were charged with lying to a 
grand jury. 

The charges could make GE ineligible for 
new government contracts. GE is the nation’s 
fourth-largest defense contractor, and does 
abool $43 billion in business with the Pen tagon 
each year. 

On the flora, Unocal was near the top of the 


17ft Erarrat UO £7 17 
97 EoacftpfHUZ 1X1 
7* Ensrr# 25 

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lift gotten 1J7B1L0 
74 Entwxln 120 73 « 
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3 Eqpbnk 
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38ft EnTR** 122 44 6 
fft EaoRen .12 18 8 
Sft Ertxrmt 2D 2 A 17 
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15ft EsmxC Jt*>17 72 
30ft Eahin# 32 32 10 
30 Elfivt 722 38 71 
7* vfEvooP 
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30 EXC**> IJ 45 f 
73* Excrtsr 1 Stalls 
37* Exxon M U 7 



2 

220 xs a 

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124 48 7 
27 

122 44 10 
.16 18 
20 37 4 
144 62 14 
x SB n 
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120 47 U 
ZOO 44 11 
251 

47*013 


£ 


active list, and higher. A block of 7 million 
shares crossed on the Midwest Stock Exchange 
at 48. T. Boone Pickens was rumored to be the 
buyer. 


30* + ft 

29 to— ft 
23* 

16ft + H 
Sift— * 
lift— ft 
3116 + ft 
4116 

44*+* 
37ft— ft 
3016— ft 
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JO 44 9 
122 37 8 
620*102 
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120 IS n 
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£77aU4 
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20 32 18 
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250 47 3 
136 1L7 
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CAP .15* J 71 582 

6ATX 120 32 M 93 

gsr tp, “° “ * 1*5 

GHCO 1 JO 1J 11 168 
GEO 495 

GFCp 18 

GTE 109 ?J 7 7X75 

GTE pi 100 £0 25 

GTE pf 228 1U 71 

Gaaatt 128 35 21 TOT 

GapSfr 50 22 16 197 

Oftartrt 20 18 16 2072 

G*tea J4 19 M UO 

GwnllC 134 

Oamil I 182 

GnCBrp 150b 16U4 1152 
GAfnv L43* 9J 44 
OnBaft IDO 35 8 19 

GOMPS 20 12 11 347 

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GaOatl 15 539 

Gnovn MO U 9 79 

G*nEI 320 17 1210790 

GnFdi 350 41 10 667 

GGtbn 20a 92 50 

GHojfl 20 14 3 104 
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Gnfrtf JO 23 77 806 
GflMIlb 324 37 M 4773 
GMst £00r £7 5 3694 
CM ED . .18*. 3 72*5 

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GAtoJpf 5J0 9J 4 

CNC .14 33 22 70 

GPU 4 522 

GnRt 156 22 71 668 
GBMfr . 5 95 

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GTFlPf 125 1LI 80DZ 

G*mco 13 570 

GnRad .TO J 26 194 

G«fts>fl UO 40 

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GtfPOC JO 32 32 2270 




30* 30 
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42 <2 

25* Wft 
74 75* 

4ft 4ft 
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411* 41 
25* 25 
21ft 21* 
5ft 56* 


25* +1* 
76 + to 
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22ft 22* 
10ft 10* 
19ft 19 
70ft 10* 
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ioft + to 
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70ft + ft 
11* + ft 

41ft +lft 
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40*— ft 
37*—* 
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lift— ft 
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21* + ft 

26ft— to i 

3W— ft! 
191*+ ft 
20ft 
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38 II 
36ft 94ft 
29ft 23 
69 13* 


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69 47 

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37J* 15ft 
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79* fft 
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29ft IB* 
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** a* 
125 ® 

72* 6* 
38 21* 

361* 34ft 
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46 541* 

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30 , 24 
33* Z7 

20ft 72* 
19* 14 


GtffHtpf 1*4 1X0 70 

GoPwpt Z7t 112 19 

CoPwpf 151 728 > 

GaPWPf 2J2 V2J 2 

GflPWPf ITS 11 J 15 

GoPWPf 722 72J 2Qz 

GarbPa 1.14 98 72 471 
GaftlSO .12 J 14 362 

GlontP 42 

Gan=B 5 7366 

■GOTHm J2 11 98 72 

G0*n« 2J0 44 11 2122 

GlrasC a 

OtoWM 24 £5 493 

GtobMKf £50 772 . 27 

GMNUO 49 40 

CMNwl 119 

OUHfF 30 J 7 VM 

GOrfefi US £3 12 43 

Goodyr UO £0 7 3459 
GordnJ J2 XI 9 9 

Gould Ji XO 57 2565 

Croc* 2J0 6J 10 1338 

Grolnsr 724 2J U T33 

GtAFst J 21 9 59 

GtAfPC 8 73*5 

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GNIm 125*10,7 7 4 

WNSk 122 44 $ 324 
GtKNkpf425 9 B 93 

GIWFJn JB X3 10 1464 

GWHw 41 153 

GMP 122 108 8 14 

GfWVtl 1J0 42 11 987 


GrowG > 20 22 17 94 

GrufcS JO 3 « 409 

Gmmn 1 JO X7 7 9» 

GfWIlPf 2J0 l£7 3 

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GKStUt 1 J4 112 4 6708 
GIBUpr X85 1X4 >5 

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GltSUpf BJO 7X4 30z 

C44TD 2ft £1 17 755 

SuBen J 17 11 6 




Z7* 79* 

44 26to 
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10ft 5* 

26* 25* 

13* lift 
19* 15* 

55ft 25* 

90* 15* 

33ft 16* 

53* 23* 

30ft Uto 
12* 7* 

30ft 74ft 
36 22* 

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33* 23ft 
1616 13* 

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13* 8 
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27 14* 

26 IS* 

49 35 

30 12* 

25* 18 
4(6 3* 

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3716 2716 
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17 16ft 
42 28ft 
12* 516 
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4416 31ft 

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26* 17ft H 
63* 45ft H 
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27* 

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5* 5* 

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32* 3116 
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19* 19* 
49 <7 

20 19* 

19 Wft 
45ft 47ft 
29ft 28* 
11* 11 

StoSS 

16ft 15* 
27* 96ft 

20ft 20* 
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26* 25* 
10ft Wft 
12ft 12* 
17 16* 
17 16* 

23 22* 

48ft 47* 
14* 14* 
94* 23ft 
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42 41* 

7* 7* 
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26ft 2616 

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36* 24* 
60* 60* 
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77* 77* 
17V. 17 
23* 22* 
7* 7* 
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5* 

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116— ft 
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32 +1* 
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19ft 

47*— lft 
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48* +1* 
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28 +ft 
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27*+ * 
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12*— M 
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14ft — ft 
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72*— ft 
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91*— * 

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2614 + to 


W». YM. PE HteHtPDlJm Qu6t-Qrt« I 


2730 38to 3Sft 2Bto— * 
78 8118 2 ft 102ft 102* + * 
H3 2ft 2* FA + ft 

793 Mto W U* 

22 17* 17 17 

70S 78ft 17ft Wft + 1% 

26 36ft 25ft 25ft + ft 

90 6* * 4* + ft 

19 Uft 14* lift— * 
0 39 39 + * 

M a lift lift—* 

179 Uft 12 77ft + ft 

764 17* 17* 17* + * 

73 22 37* 21ft— * 

90 22to 22 22to + ft 

1U 37* 34ft 36ft— ft 
121 2* 3to 2V.— * 

XI 3* 3* 3* 

4 4* 4ft 4ft— * 

174 35ft 36* 35V. — ft 
7 75ft 7 Sft 15ft + ft 
5905 58* SO 50 — * 


16ft 8ft 
60* Oft 


14 un 
54* 56 
59* 38* 


10 Sft 
48* 36* 
30* 22 
37* 21* 
19ft 13ft 


34* 31 
25* 25U 
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62* +1 
77* +1* 
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11*+ * 
73ft + ft 
14*— * 
37ft + * 
13ft 

21* + * 
75ft 

79*—* 

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s*+s 

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21* „ 
76ft— to 
56* 

25ft—* 
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31ft— to 
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18H+ to 
27*— ft 
57 + ft 

31*+ ft 
35 +lft 
61ft + * 
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505— * 
78* + * 
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42ft— to 
40ft— ft 
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lift 

46*— ft 
2Bft+ to 
fft— to 
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27*+ to 
31*+ * 
20* 

9616 

37* 

10ft—* 
32*+ ft 
46ft + ft 
2116+ ft 
39ft +1* 
33*+ * 
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3116+1 
2616+116 
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55ft M 
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23* 18* 
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23ft 13* 
26ft 30ft 
73ft 9* 
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25 1716 

XI 21ft 
27ft 17ft 
47ft 23ft 
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31 27* 

35* 94* 
18 17* 

36* 36 
S3* 53* 
78 75 

73ft 23 
48ft 46* 
BM B 
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96* 26 
13 12* 

14* -14* 
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37* 36* 
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M + ft 
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46*+* 
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36 — ft 
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M>+ * 
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37 +* 

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VflUUB) 

PROPERTY 


Hr KMm 

+iiii i mIM 

ilnmtmd 

MigJi 


35* 21ft 
79ft 76* 
71ft Sft 
28ft 22ft 
17ft u 

25ft 23 
30 14ft 
47* 2DH 
69 44 

66* 40 
65 44ft 
49ft 42ft 
23 IS* 


I Clods 120 4.1 11 459 

icmo n; 

I CM 7377 

ICNpf Z70 92 54 

IMAM 1J2 1U 25 

IPTbnn 719 

1RTPT8 1M 82 7 5 

ITTCP U0 19 13 7294 


32 —ft 
1716 + ft 
1116—* 
28ft 

Uft + ft 
2Sto+ * 


IMPORTED 


23ft Uft 
25 17* 

U 13ft 
35 27ft 
32ft 25 
S2to 48* 
45* 37 
37 78ft 
33ft 25ft 
3516 2116 
39to 27* 
fft S* 

14ft Oft 
1816 14* 
28* 23ft 
28* 17ft 
IS 5ft 
9416 19* 
SOft 35ft 
37ft 27* 
28Vi 19* 
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ZT* 14 
11* 3ft 
26M 11* 
30ft 19 
5416 42 
37ft 2Sto 
UV. 7ft 

19 15* 
65to 55 
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57* 41 
16ft 5* 
94* 14* 
13916 99 
24* IS* 
29ft 22* 
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7ft 2* 

58 23* 

34* 17* 
43* 32* 
29* 21 
57* 46 
17* 9V. 
5Dto 32* 
90* 8216 
171 126 
am 27 

T7to ID 

20 15* 

19* 1416 
2916 21* 
37* 23 
33* 26 
13* 9* 
35 23* 

54 42* 


ITT PfJ AM 64 4 

ITT PMC 420 £5 37 

rrrpfo u» u 4 
ITTpf! 4J0 7.1 2 

lUlltf 120 7.1 a 399 
KW»P 328 XI 8 548 
ida<dB 118 

lUPowr Z54 KJ 6 485 

llPowpf ZM 122 3101 

IIRovrpf A12 1X0 IQ* 

MPowpf X78 1X1 60Qi 

UPwpf £75 11.1 W0 
llPowpf AilaMU 4 

11 P«rM Pl 4A7 114 77001 

IlPDWOf ADO TZ3 2 
ITWt J4 IJ u 123 
impawn J6a Z3 9 2532 
1 mol Co 12 113 

INCO 20 IJ 1405 
l«SMpf 225 1Z9 13 


IMIMPf 3J3 1ZB 
IrxllGs* IJi 72 4 95 

Inaxca .14 ).« 2122 

Infmtc 22 356 

inaarR 2J0 £■ 17 192 

InoRpf Z3S 72 82 

imasti JO u h 

InMStpf ATS 1U 20 

I rail co UObXl 18 784 
InapRa 86 

irriaRsc 4 152 

IrtfuRp* X03 I2J IS 

iRfBRPf 6JB#MJ 1 

fnfBRpf 425 1X8 525 

litfRFn 1U 37 

(to** ZlOalU 45 

inferm XDI 3J 12 248 

intrtat JO £6 4 3716 

Infrtfc Z60 X) I 14 


34*+ ft 
St —ft 
43 

S9to + ft 
43 

_ 17 +* 
40* 39* 4016 + * 
74 13* 13*— ft 

24ft 34ft 24ft + ft 
1716 I486 U* 

34* 34to 3416 + to 
32 31* 3116 + to 

51* 51* 51*— * 
43 42* 42ft— ft 

Uto 36* 36*— W 
32ft 32ft 32ft 
33ft 32* 3Jft + ft 
37* 37* 37* + * 
8* lft 8ft— ft 
73* 17ft U +16 
17ft 1716 77ft + * 
3816 28V6 38to— to 
26* 25ft 25ft— to 
7* 7 7* + ft 

W 17* 13*— * 
45* 44* 44*- — 16 
30ft 30ft 30ft 
2316 23 2M + Ml 
4316 43ft 43ft— ft 
19* 19* 19* + ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
75ft 75* + 16 
23* 23ft— ft 


Ht * 

fMUjr/terwf 




V. > '-.1 \ 

s. .Mi 


EXTREMRY DESIRABLE; 
EXCELLENT Ml YEAR ROUND; 
GRAQOUS LIVING. 


136MD 

KtoftLo* Sack 


Sb. Ora 

U»i Wall Lo» Pact 


4416 4416+ to 
30* Wft + ft 
12* 12ft 
W 1816+ to 
42 62 — ft 

10* VM 

soft soft 

fft fto+ft 

19 19to + * 
725ft |36ft + * 
19* 30*+ ft 
27ft 28* +1ft 
9ft fft + ft 
4* 4ft + ft 
47ft 41 + ft 
29* 30ft +1* 
41ft— ft 
38 — to 
49*+ ft 
12* + to 
52*42* 
90 

183* +13* 
28 +Hh 
Uft 

1916+ ft 
1816 + ft 
28*+ * 
31* + ft 
33*+ * 
12 +ft 
3416+ * 
SDI6—* 


436 

llrtAIn 22 37 9 30 

IBM A40 15 1210977 
IntCM 20 IJ 9 275 

IntPIOV 1.12 4D 15 470 

InfKarv 3IJ! 

IntHrwt 223 

IRlHpfC 11 

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(Continued on P^e 19) 





























>*.* • ,, , 


& » 





is tics Index 



' t prices P.12 BarntoW fewM P.1Q 
; Mgta/lmnP.13 fling ran notec P.11 
prices P- 1 GoM market* P. g 
■ tiw«^sws P.10 interact rotes p, ? 
'. ion stocks P.U Market summary P. B 
‘wsatH p. * QgttaRs P.1Q 

■'isdBKf P.W OTCctack P.1? 

P.M Other mortals P.14 


BcralbSlEsSribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


A¥ t « 


*- 






A-.. 


’«* y * V ... 


? r ^ r: 
• •-*. . . 



WAll STREET WATCH 

•ket Gives Investors 
Back-Off-Buster Message 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

AR1S — Sometimes the stock market gives investors a 
Lauren B ac a l l , over-th e-shoulder, come-hither look. 
Sometimes it gives them a Humphrey Bogart, gfinty- 
eyed, backoff- buster glare, 
efl, not that Bogey ever met a price/ earnings ratio low 
igh for him to want to drink with, oat as the U.S. economy 
ws signs of we a ke n i n g, his type seems to be caffing the shots 
Wall Street 

What the stock market fears now is that corporate profits are 
vg lo be disappointing,” said Suiesh L. Bhirud, chid portfolio 
legist at First Boston. “Aggravating it has been the recent 
mcemcnts of softer eam- 


Mr. Bhirud is 
still bullish 
about stocks in 
the long term 


■i» «•••*. . 


i s by such market leaders as 
ieral Electric and IBM." 
f. et Mr. Bhirud is still bull- 
on stocks in the long term. 

Lsees only a “shallow reao- 
ahead, pushing the Dow 
-age no lower than 1,200 to 

< 0, then the rally resuming 
few months “when it be- 
lts dear the economy is growing at a 2 to 4 percent annual 

"v. 

^rhe good element is that the apparently weakening economy 
jtlinga cap on the lingering inflation rears of investors,** he 
_ “That should bring down interest rates dramatically and 
I the stock market significant appreciation potential” 
it is the same positive point made by A. Gary Shilling, a 
„J tan tin Europe for Alex. Brown & Sons who for months has 
a lonely voice against the consensus by forecasting what he 
; a “confirming recession.” 


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would mean, he explained, that an entire busines s cycle h ad 
' ed without the economy deteriorating into resurgmg infla- 

~ — unlike the last several cycles — and finally investors could 
onvinced that inflation is no longer a significant threat 

• T OT only would this spark the “bond rally of a lifetime,” 
U bat he sees it setting the stage laler on for a booming boil 
1 market in stocks. But the variable in his scenario is how 
» the recession and whether it extends beyond the United 
es. 

\ mild recession would probably mean investors could start 
Jg across the valley by mid-year, with stocks moving up thwi 
atkapation erf better times,” he said. “But if the recession 
ads abroad, as I suspect, it would hit deeper and longer in the 
Then, 1 think it would take unto year-end before people 
Id start looking ahead and begin buying stocks.” 

‘ Idle Mr. Shilling is pleased that he has apparently been right 
U an impending downturn, he warned that a recession could 
due” national economies worldwide. “A lot of countries are 
leveraged with debt — they bet the ranch on inflation 
inning. There’s a lot of downside risk here." 
iwin Wydler, international portfolio strategist at Zurich’s 
ischild Bank, asserted that the impact on U.S. corporate 
mgs of the “grotesquely overvalued dollar” is even more 
if uJ than is generally appreciated, 
t’s making iXS. companies uncompetitive and unprofitable,” 
rid. “IBM, Kodak, they’re all dollar casualties.” 
owever, if the dollar climbs again, he believes the central 
Sin Europe and Japan wQ] be joined by the Federal Reserve 
{Operative “dirty float." The aim of this forceful interven- 
' would be to. bring the. dollar down gradually about 10 
ent»he said. 

Idle Mr. Wydler estimates it would take a 20 percent decline 
ake U.S. companies competitive again with foreign manufac- 
•s, he remains enthusiastic about “individual niche compa- 
that are relatively recession insistent and can escape the 
ts of the overvalued dollar.” 

xks he named are Policy Management Systems, Electro- 
(Continued on Page 13, Col. 5) 


Currency Rates 


] 


Lota interbank rotas on March 27. excluding fees. 
xl faring* for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rotes at 


Dollar 
Drops in 
Europe 

Interest Rates 
Fuel Big Decline 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Lower interest 
rates and fears about the stability 
of the UJS. banking system poshed 
the dollar sharply lower Wednes- 
day. 

Gold rose SS an ounce. 
Currency dealers said the dollar 
continued the dec line rtwu b r gpn 
Tuesday after U.S. newspapers re- 
ported that bad real estate and en- 
ergy loans amid hurt profits at 
some Texas banks. 

The dollar also reacted lo a de- 
cline in interest rates on short-term 
dollar deposits in Europe, thus 
making the dollar less attractive to 
investors. 

The rate on overnight deposits 
fell to 7% percent, against 8H per- 
cent late Tuesday. 

“There’s no real support to the 
dollar at the present time,” a trader 
in London aid. “There’s a pretty 
bearish feeling about the dollar.” 

The dealers said the banking and 
interest rate factors combmecfwith 
a long-expected reaction to the dol- 
lar’s sharp rise in January and Feb- 
ruary and with concern over large 
U.S. trade and balance-of -pay- 
ments deficits. 

On the strength of high British 
interest rates, the British pound 
rose to $1,239 in London. The 
pound was quoted at $ 1,182 late 
Tuesday. 

In Tokyo, the dollar dosed at 

253.975 Japanese yen, down from 

256.975 yen Tuesday. Later, in 
London, the dollar was quoted at 
252.900 yen. 

Other late dollar rates, compared 
with late Tuesday: 3.1490 Deutsche 
marks, down from 32316; 2.6645 
Swiss francs, down from 2.7205; 
9.655 French francs, down from 
9.879; 3.5740 Dutch guilders, down 
from 3.6535, and 2,014.00 Italian 
lire, down from 2,054.50. 

Gold prices rose in reaction to 
the dollar’s decline, bullion dealers 
said. 

. Gold was quoted in London at a . 
late bid price of $33225 a troy 
ounce, up from $324.00 late Tues- 
day. 

In Zurich, the metal rose to 
$330.50, compared with late Tues- 
day's $32225. 

Earlier, in Hong Kong, gold rose 
$1425 to dose at $330.16 hid. 

Silver was quoted m London at a 
late bid of $6,630 a troy ounce, up 
from $6,445 Tuesday. 


Sir Michael Edwardes: Rapid Mover 
Gains Fame as Corporate Doctor 


By Bamaby J. Fierier .. 

New York limes Service 

LONDON — Move quickly. 
That is the first commandment 
according to Sr Michael Ed- 
wardes, Britain’s best-known 
doctor for ailing corporations. 

It is important to act before a 
situation “solidifies around 
you,” he explained in as inter- 
view last month. “You really 
only have a matter of months to 
set the direction.” 

But even for Sir Michael, the 
recent pace has been unusually 
rapid. He had scarcely settled in 
as chairman of International 
Computers Ltd., Britain's largest 
computer maker, when it was 
taken over last summer. . 

Sr Michael was soon appoint- 
ed chairman of Dunlop Holdin gs 
PLC the troubled tire and sport- 
ing goods manufacturer, but by 
early (his month he had received 
a takeover offer from BTR PLC 
a raphfly expanding industrial 


. that was loo good 

to refuse. 

With Dunlop sold, no one ex- 
pects the 54-year-old SrMichad 
to continue nursing the company 
mn^h longer, even though his 
employment contract has more 
than two years to run. 

Speculation is widespread that 
he win soon succeed Ian Mac- 
Gregor as bead of Britain’s 
strike-weakened National Co al 
Board, despite Sir Michael’s 
jKc denial of reports that he 
discussed the job with gov- 
ernment representatives and 
board officials. He has let it be 
known that he would be more 
interested in private-sector em- 
ployment. 

Few analysts expect any carp- 
ing if Sr Mkhad leaves Dunlop 
with a szable golden handshake 



Sir Michael Edwardes 


Tht Now forit Tn>M 


He sacrificed his option to buy 
21 minion Dunlop shares at a 
bargain price, forced BTR lo tri- 
ple its bid and won prase from 
Sir Owen Green, Bin’s chair- 
man, for what he had accom- 
plished. 

“He must have earned the 
shareholders’ gratitude,” said 
Anthony Walker, an analyst for 
the brokerage firm of Savory 
Mffln. 

Like Chrysler Corp.’s Lee A. 
Iacocca in the United States, Sir 
Michael became famoos by sav- 
ing a major auto company. Brit- 
ish Leyland, the state-owned car 
and truck maker, faced collapse 


in tbe late 1970s under the 
weight of poor products, hostile 
unions, discouraged manage- 
ment and maMling politicians. 
His rescue operation at Leyland 
earned him ms knighthood and a 
place in Britain’s corporate lime- 
BghL 

Sir Michael, a South African, 
is so weQ-known in Britain that 
anyone considering offering him 
a job win scarcely need to con- 
sult his rfeamfe. 

Before his five-year Leyland 
stint, which ended with his resig- 
nation in 1982, be tested ms 
management mettle by sorting 
(Contimed on Page 13, CoL 5) 


Japan to Extend 
Auto Quotas at 
Increased Level 


United Pros Imenuuumal 

TOKYO — Japan will maintain 
voluntary restrictions on car ex- 
ports to the United States by limit- 
ing shipments to between 22 miS- 
Ban and 23 nnllion autos, or about 
25 percent more than the current 
year, government sources said 
Wednesday. 

The Ministry of International 
Trade and Industry, which overeces 
Japan’s foreign trade; trill negoti- 
ate with tbe nation’s 1 1 major auto- 
makers on quotas for their ship- 
ments to the United States for toe 
year beginning April l, the sources 
said. 

The outcome of those negotia- 
tions was scheduled to be reported 
Friday. 

According to trade ministry cal- 
culations, Japanese car exports to 
the United States would reach 2.7 
million units in fiscal 1985 without 
any controls. 

The 22- to 23-miUioD ceding set 
by the ministry represents an in- 
crease of about 25 percent, or S3 
billion, over the current year. 

The Japanese automobile indus- 
try, tinder pressure from Washing- 
ton. has exercised voluntary re- 
straints on exports to the United 
Stales since 1981. The cefling for 
tbe year ending March 31 was 1.85 

irtillinm 

Tbe Reagan administration ear- 
lier this month said tbe United 
States would not pressure Japan for 
an extension of the controls. 

Japan's huge trade surplus with 
the United States, amounting to 
$34.7 biDion last year, apparently 
was a factor behind the ministry 


BAT Posts 44% Rise in ’84 Profit to $1.7 hilll™. 


By Bob Hagcity 

* International Hernia Tribune 

LONDON — BAT Industries 
PLC, bolstered by the dollar’s 
strength and the acquisition of a 
big British insurance company, re- 
peated Wednesday a 44-percent 
leap in 1984 pretax profit to £1.41 
billion (about SI .7 Whon). 

But BAT shares slumped 22 
pence to closest 328 pence on the 
London Stock Exchange 


£64 million, mainly reflecting the 
sale of a British grocery chain, com- 
pared with a year-eariier extraordi- 
nary loss of £24 million. 

Earnings per share increased 43 
percent to 5335 pence from 3737 
pence, and the iuQ-year dividend 
rose 25 percent to 10J pence from 
825 pace. Revenue tihnbcd 32 
percent to £1820 billion from 
£13.84 kriBioa. 

The dollar's strength last year 


because Wednesday's plunge in 


ffil 


dollar underlined fears that the to- 
bacco, retailing and paper compa- 
ny win not show currency- transla- 
tion gains in the current year. 

BATs pretax profit was up from 
the year-eariier £979 nrinkm. After 
tax and extraordinary items, net 
rose 62 percent to £848 million 
from £523 million. The 1984 figure 
includes an extraordinary gain of 


; raised the value in pound terms of 
me BATs profit in the United States. 
The company estimated that, with 
unchanged exchange rates, it would 
have shown a pretax profit increase 
of 23 percent 


Another big contributor was Ea- 
gle Star Holdings PLC, an insur- 
ance company acquired early last 
year for £968 nrifflon. The latest 
results do not include Hambro Life 
Assurance PLC, another British in- 


surer, acquired early in 1985 for 
£664 million. 

Eagle Star's insurance opera- 
tions contributed £125 mini on to 
BATs pretax profit. But three- 
quarters of that contribution re- 
flects an accounting rh»ngp that 
bloated Eagle Star’s profit m a de- 
pressed year. 

Eagle Star, changed its account- 
ing poficy so its profit indudes cap- 
ital gains or losses on investments, 
both realized and unrealized, as 
wdl as investment income and in- 
surance results. U.S. insurance 
companies and some other British 
insurers include realized capital 
in their profits, but Eagle Star 
: new ground by bringing in 
unrealized gains, or so-called paper 
profits. 

BAT described the accounting 
change as “a more appropriate 
way” of measuring the retnm on its 


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West Germany Reports Strong Surpluses on Trade 


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aSMfttil 

*rcfal franc (at Amount* medad to buy ona pound (cl Amount* needed*! buy one dal tor( a ] 

SO (xMMts clUON tv) U"*n ol 10A00 
netod; Ka,- noi available. 

Am** Ou Benelux (Bntssets); Ban co commentate ItaJkma (Milan); Omntcat 
ew York); Bonque Nothnot 9 de Peris (Parti); IMF (SOP); Borne Ante ef 
anoto (M west lss n mnt ((Oner, rivet dirham), other ono from Reuters ozxt AP. 


By Warren Gedcr 

International fferaM Tribune 

FRANKFURT— West Germa- 
ny's current account and merchan- 
dise trade account showed unex- 
pectedly strong surpluses in 
February, according to figures re- 
leased Wednesday. 

The surpluses bolstered hopes 
that Boon would exceed the record 
trade surplus for 1984 of 54 fcriHioo 
Deutsche marks ($16.8 bfifion) and 
current account surplus of 17.9 bil- 
lion DM, a near-record. 

The Federal Statistics Office in 
Wksbaden reported that the cur- 
rent account, the broadest measure 
of trade that inchufep merchandise 
and nonmercfaandise items, was a 
provisional, unadjusted 1 S bfllian 
DM in February, compared with a 


January deficit of 800 million DM. 

The merchandise trade surplus 
widened by 81 percat to 4.7 buW 
DM in February from 2.6 billion 
DM in January. 

In February, 1984, the current 
account showed a surplus of 1 bil- 
lion DM and the merchandise 
trade account, a surplus of 4.85 
billioaDM. 

“Canridering that January and 
February are usually weak months 
for trade performance due to cold 
weather, the February results are 
surprisingly good,” said Hans- 
Georg Rapper, senior economist at 
Drcsdner Bank AG. 

“The February figures support 
our projection that the c ur re n t ac- 
count surplus wfll rise to arotm da) 
Union Dm this year and fthat] the 
trade surplus win grow to between 


55 bflhrat and 60 bflhon DM," Mr. 
Knpper said. 

The February trade surplus was 
calculated on the basis of exports 
increasing 1,8 percent from Janu- 
ary to 4186 bmion DM, and im- 
ports falling 33 percent to 38.15 
hjffion DM, the statistics office 
said. 

Wolfgang Bergmann, an econo- 
mist at the Wiesbaden office, said 
seasonally-adj usted figures will 
show “significantly better” results 
in both the trade *nri current ac- 
counts. 

But he cautioned; “While the 
combined January and February 
figures point to higher surpluses in 
Germany’s year-ad trade bal- 
ances, much droends an what hap- 
pens with the dollar.” 


Currency Rates 1 Japan Output Rose 0.7% Last Month 


♦currency Deposits 


Man* 27 


*■ -■ 
T 

I V 


Uatlor D-Mark Franc Storttaa Franc ECU SDR 

%-sw 5*i . sh 5%-fn iK-ra m-iM n -i» i» 

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M-I0W Mb .in 5h -is 1»-lJtt IHI-12 w*. 10% f% 

•fleottf# to tofartan* doec&ira of SJ mJWon minimum fee teufvaUnl). 

Morooo Goarootr (dollar, DM. SF. Pound. FF); Lloyds Bank (ECU); Reuters 


i Dollar Rates 


Man* 27 


r ** 

f » 



*■ Smeo. 

4% MIi-ih 

tauten. 

3a 

9% 

Money Rales 


States 

Ctoca 

Her. 

Roto 

8 

> 

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7% 

tt 

10% 

101* 

oen Rato 

9% 

9% 

aw. 38.17* day* 

845 

875 

rnaainv onto 

US 

U2 

Treasury BJlh 

U0 

177 

lean 

825 

818 

loan 

840 

834 


Rato 

4JM 

800 

t Roto 

535 

530 

T Intarbonk 

4.15 

815 

ntorbonk 

415 

835 

"toreonh 

845 

430 

an Roto 

10% 

10% 

IV 

10U 

KHk 

* itomonk 

«% 

10% 

ntareenk 

up* 

in* 

RtorOHt 

10% 

1017 


(mo*, 
m. -9% 


Britain 

Bank Base Rato 
Call Monev 
ex-day 'treasury Bill 
Sroanffi Interbank 

Japan 

Discount Rote 
Cali Money 
«Ms v Interbank 


Ckne Prsn. 

13% M 
MU W% 
13% 12% 

12 19/32 13% 


5 

Mb 

6 7/14 


5 

Mb 

4% 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s industrial 
production rose 0.7 percent in Feb- 
ruary ova- January, and 5.7 percent 
over February 1984.' the Mimstiy 
of International Tirade and Indus- 
try said Wednesday. 

The preliminary figures reflected 
the first monthly rise in three 
months. But the year-to-year rate 
or increase was the lowest in two 
years, the mimstiy said. 

At the aid of February, the in- 
dustrial index stood at 120.8, from 
a revised figure of 120 in January, 
the ministry said. In January, the 
index was down 02 percent from 
Decembex. The December index 
was down 0.7 percent from Novem- 
ber, when ti was up 03 percent 
from October. 

The February index was up 5.7 
percent from a year earlier, after a 
gain of 8.6 percent in January from 
January 1984. 


According to adjusted figures, 
the February producers’ shipment 
index was down 03 percent to 
1 153, from 1 15.6 in January, The 
January figure was up 0.7 percent 
from December. 

The unatgosted February ship- 
ment index was up 3.6 percent from 
a year earlier, alter a 6.6-percent 
rise in January. 

The adjusted February index of 
producers’ inventories erf finished 
goods rose 1.8 percent to 104, from 
a revised figure of 1022 in January. 

Unadjusted, the February inven- 
tories index was op 93 percent 
from a year earlier. 

(AFP, Reiner, t) 

■ Growth Seen Slowing 

Japan's economy win grow 53 
percent in real terms in the year 
beginning next April 1, down from 
an anticipated 5.8-percent rate in 
the curr ent fiscal year, the Japan 


Economic Research Ceuta- said 
Wednesday in Tokyo. 

Renters quoted the center as pre- 
dicting that domestic consumer 
spending would grow 42 percent in 
1985-1986, up from 2.6 percent in 
1984-1985. 


In January and February thin 
year, the cumulative surplus in the 
current account was 1.1 billion 
DM, up 450 percent from a 200 
minion DM surplns a year earlier. 
The combined trade surplus wid- 
ened 8 percent to 73 When DM 
from 6.8 Itiffiou DM. 

Mr. Knpper said he expects ex- 
ports to cumb 6 percent this year. 

“A slowdown of the US. econo- 
my will not affect West Germany’s 
foreign trade and current account 
surpluses because an expected 
moderate upswing in tbe econo- 
mies of tbe European Community 
— whidi import 5b percent of West 
German exports — can more than 
offset the loss [from the United 
States}.” Mr. Rtqqxx said. 

Separately, the statistics office 
reported Wednesday that die cost 
of living in West Germany in- 
creased a provisional 03 percent in 
March from February, and 23 per- 
cent from a year earlier. 

Karl Otto PBhL the prerident of 
the Bundesbank, said Tuesday that 
a consistently strong dollar “poses 
a danger for price stability ova the 
longer term, and noted that im- 
port prices had jumped 73 percent 
m February from a year-earlier. 


investment in Eagle Star. Without 
the change. BATs pretax return ou 
that investment would have been 
about 6 percent in the first year. 
With the change, the return Is 16 
percenL 

“The insurance industry had a 
poor year,” BAT said, “and had 
Eagle Star been acquired for its 
first-year earnings afone it would 
hare proved a disappointment But 
in the context of long-term strategy 
its performance was encouraging/’ 
That strategy calls for malting fi- 
nancial services one of BATs 
main businesses. 

Brian Gangway, BATs 
chairman and senior finance 
tor, rqected suggestions that the 
accounting change was a way to 
gloss over Eagle Star’s weak perfor- 
mance. He argued that the chang e 
nukes for fuller disclosure of per- 
formance. 

Companies whose reported prof- 
it does not indude unrealized capi- 
tal gains, he said, might be tempted 
to realize profits on investments 
merely to bolster earnings. 

Stripping out the effects of cur- 
rency translations and Eagle Star, 
BAT shows pretax profit growth of 
about 13 percent Analysts noted 
that the improvement came despite 
weakness in retailing. 

“It's a very good performance 
under any circumstances," said 
Nyren Scott-Maiden, chief tobacco 
azu^^attheLoodonsttxikbroker- 
age of de Zoete & Bevan. 

Tobacco results were particular- 
ly strong, though marpm dedined 
in the second naif. FuH-year trad- 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


decision to continue voluntary car 
export curbs, (he sources said. 

Japanese automakers, asserting 
they will preserve “orderly market- 
ing,” have called for the lifting of 
the voluntary limits. 

“It’s nonsense. The matter 
should be left to the discretion of 
automakers,” said Takashi Ishi- 
faara, president of Nissan Motor 
Co. 

Problems are anticipated in ne- 
gotiations between the trade minis- 
try and the auto industry ova quo- 
tas, since individual manufacturers 
are expected to demand that they 
be allowed to cany out their con- 
tracts with U3. makers. 

Mitsubishi Motors Co. said it 
wants to deliver 200,000 cars a year 
to its affiliate. Chrysler Corp„ ac- 
cording to their contract. 

Isuzu Motors Ltd. and Suzuki 
Motor Co. also want to meet their 
contracts, calling for delivery of 
284,000 cars lo General Motors 
Cotp^ which has a stake in the two 
Japanese automakers. 

■ Wanting From U.S. 

The Reagan administration 
warned Japan on Wednesday that 
its decision to impose a new quota 
ou auto exports “is not a substi- 
tute” for opening its own market to 
U.S. products and is not a real 
restraint at att, United Press Inter- 
national reported from Washing- 
ton. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Spealres, said, “It’s the presi- 
dent's position that export re- 
straints are not an acceptable sub- 
stitute for market opening. Export 
restraints are contrary to both the 
spirit and objective of tbe agree- 
ment between the president and tbe 
prime minister." 

Mr. Reagan and Prime Minister 
Yasubiro Nakasonc agreed in early 
January to make “a bold step” to- 
ward opening Japan’s markets to 
U.S. electronics, telecommunica- 
tions, medical and forest products. 

Talks gang on now on those 
four subjects have not produced 
much movement, a senior adminis- 
tration official said 


Israel Refects 
IMF Suggestion 
On Budget Cuts 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON -The Is- 
raeli government has rejected 
an International Monetary 
Fund recommendation that Is- 
rael double a planned budget 
cut of about $1 billion, accord- 
ing to sources here. 

Although an IMF team 
found “encouraging develop- 
ments” in the load economy, 
it expressed concern that any 
gains in controlling inflation 
would prove to be only tempo- 
rary without a deeper budget 
cut 

The IMF visit was for routine 
consultation; Israel has not re- 
quested financial aid from the 
[IMF. But it has asked for $800 
million in emergency aid from 
die United States, on top of 
$2.6 billion in economic and 
military assistance already 
committed for fiscal 1985 and 
$4.05 billion planned for fiscal 
1986. 


Cold Prices 


] 


HOna Kano 
IwtmWWB 

Paris (125 kite* 
Zurich 
undsn 
Nw York 


towim CemmenBonk. Cnfcfff Lv- 
W® Bank. Baas at Tokyo. 


AM. PM. 

32*25 SOSO + 15.15 
33WS - + 

32741 32&5B +1137 

MOW 330150 +400 

329 .W XXLAO + US 

- HA. — 

Official ff lines tor Lo wka i. Parti mb Unan» 
ram, naaotogawlrtailinari oo tor wna Kano 
end rurtefc New York Comax currant 
jut oflen to BBf OUKX - 
gourm: Reuters- 


r i 


Weekly net asset vak/e 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on March 25, 1985: U.S. $139.86. 
Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

tnfpf roa gon: Pierson, IMdHng APfereon IMfc, 

Berengracht 21 4,101 BBS Amstwttam. 


EXECUTIVE HEALTH 
SCREENING 


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Regular screening is your Srst- 
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Cornm watches arc on view at the finest jewellers For the 
address of the One nearest you or for a brochure, write 
or pbone to: France, SA. Michel Niarquin, 177, Bd de 
Creteil, 94100 Saint-Maur. tel. 1/88936.36 - Germany, 
„ H ® n "»4 Helmut Tenet GmbH. Heinrich-Heine- 

Aflee 4, D-4000 DDaseldotf. tel. 021 1320.446 - Great Britain, Saundm 
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w - 




imiSHsHHHSffH 5SH555 I" I 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 198S 


Wednesdays 


KVC M 


dosing 

Tonics Include me natkmwfd* (trices 
' up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


(Continued from Page 8) 

8ft 3 NutrlS m 23 » M M 

82% 9m NYNEX MV U SI227 BMBD 80ft— % 


9% 

ET 

25% 

Oh 

41 

Oh 

42 

Oh 

45 

Oh 

18% 

Oh 

21 


10% 

r£ 

47ft 

Rr 

13% 

Oh 

53 

15 

Oh 

Oh 

VS 

Oh 

16ft 

Ok 

36% 

an 

5% 

On 

14 

On 

26% 

Oh 

16% 

Or 

4% 

On 

16ft 

or 

flft 

on 

6ft 

or 

24 

or 

18% 

OU 

17 

Ov 

13 

Ov 

25% 

Om 




08 

25 

>80 

*2 

-60 

7-5 

1.90 iai 

154 120 

182 

90 

332 

78 

180 

*B 

JBr 

0 

200 118 

60 

28 

582 

88 

60 

30 

282 

*5 

*07 126 

m 

18 

225 

78 

180 

21 

80 

25 

80 

18 

280 

64 



44 28ft QuokOs L24 IS 13 446 4314 42% 4314 +■ 4k 

37% IS OuokSO 00 30 27 B27 22 Zl% 22 +1 

Tift mown 35 28 8% 8ft S%+ % 

34% 23 Questar 180 *0 9 440 33ft 3214 33 + % 

25% 14 QkMI 840 10 W 41 23ft 22ft 33 + 44 


17ft 6% RBI ltd 
43ft 25ft RCA 


.16 10 30 Bft ■ 8ft 

1JM 16 12 3123 41 40ft 40ft + ft 




U.S. Futures March 27 


Season Season 
High LAW 


Open High Law Oasa Oft 


WHEAT4CST) 

ssao Du minimum- dollars per bushel 
405 132ft May 157ft 140 

190 124% Jul 136% 130 

176ft 126 Sep 136 136% 

363ft 136 Dec 365% 147 

174ft 140Vi Mot 151% 152 

402 147 MOV 341 148ft 

Mar 152 3J2 

EsL Sates Prev. Sates 7,188 

Prav. Day Open Int 34128 off 229 
CORN (can 

5000 bo minimum- dollar* per ImM 

130 165% MOV 279% 180 

131 173 Jul 180% 280% 

121ft 166ft Sap 171 272 

155 240% Dec 266 266% 

110 26916 Mar 22416 274ft 

121ft 174% Mar 2J0ft 281 

184 181 JUl 183ft 183ft 

Mar 274 274ft 

Est Sated Prav. Salas 33694 

Prav. Day Open lnt.120716 UP 377 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

1000 bu mlnlmum-dollon par bushal 
7S7 570% May 6.11% 414 

7.99 560% Jul 430 423 

766 582 Aug 420 423% 

671 181 Sop 4V4 415ft 

468 583ft Nov 415ft 418 

479 504ft Jan 425 428 

763 406ft Mor 436ft 438 

779 415 MOV 

Mar 435ft 437ft 
Est. Salas Prev. Sate* 34548 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 64333 off 142 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CRT) 

100 tana- dal Ian pot tan 
70580 12560 May 13840 14000 

19450 13470 Jui 14470 14670 

18080 13780 Aim 14800 14870 

17960 14000 Sep 15060 15180 

10060 14250 OCt 15300 15480 

18480 14760 DOC 15080 15980 

16280 14980 Jan 15030 16160 

20660 15400 MOT 16400 16400 

Ent. Sates Pnm-Salm 12842 

Prow. Day Open Int 44971 up 1081 
SOYBEAN OIL (Cm 

AOOOOibs-danaraparlOOIbs. 

30-99 2280 May 3075 3065 

3030 2270 Ml 2860 2*90 

2780 2260 Auo 2775 2780 

2495 2250 Sep 2670 2682 

26JM 2260 OCt 2580 2370 

2540 2290 Dec 2480 2570 

2523 2160 Jan 2480 2*85 

2*20 2460 Mar 3*60 3460 

Mar 2460 2460 
Est. Sales Prev. Soles 18643 

Prev. Dav Oaan Int. 44476 up 789 
OATS (CBT) 

5800 bu mini mum- dollars per bu*m 
161 167ft MOY 171% 172% 

lJTBft 163 Jul 168% 168% 

179 160 SOP 166 165% 

182ft 164 Dae 167% 167% 

Ed!- Sated Prav.SaJes 200 

Prow. Day opan int 1385 


Livestock 


CATTLE CCME) 

40000 1 bd.- cents per lb. 

5980 6165 Apt 6282 6*20 

6560 6460 JUD 67.02 67.47 

6767 63.13 Aim 6450 4*02 

6550 6160 OCt 64.17 6485 

6785 6160 Dec 65.15 6545 

STM 6*25 Fob 657S *573 

6767 6680 Apt 

Est. Sales 19793 Prav. Sates 3M*3 
Pnv. Dav OP*n int. 63644 op WO 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMD 
44800 Ux^canfs par Rx 
7*20 6470 Aar 6885 *965 

7275 6485 May 7080 7042 

7370 6*60 Aug 7182 7105 

7380 6780 SOP 7075 7LOO 

7282 67.10 Oct 703S 7075 

7370 49JS NOV 7180 7175 

Ell. Safes 1807 Prow. Sated 1790 
Pnv. Day Opoa lot 10666 off 74 
HOOS(CME) 

30800 ms.- cents par lb. 

5*43 4483 APT 4580 4 *25 

5540 4440 Jun S0J7 51A2 

53.72 48.93 Jul 3235 3275 

5*37 4760 Aug 5255 5370 

5175 4580 Oct 4965 4965 

5085 4670 Dec *975 4985 

3080 4*75 Fab 4985 5080 

4775 4570 AW 4780 47.15 

4980 4780 Jun *983 4985 

Eat. Sates 10787 Prev. Sated 9674 
Prev. Dav Open let. 26.134 up344 
PORK BELLIES CCME) 

JA80B lbs.- cants Per lb. 

SUX 61.15 May 7125 7*50 

0267 62.15 Jul 7150 7487 

0065 6020 Aug 72.10 7*42 

7580 6115 FOB 7560 7*20 

75.15 4*00 MAT 7385 7540 

7*80 7040 May 7560 7560 

7138 70.70 JM 7680 7*80 

Est Sates 7676 Pnv. Sates 7827 
Pnv. Dav Opan Int 11831 up 275 


3651* +JOft 
135% — 80ft 
364ft — JXIft 
144% —81 

360ft —80ft 
147 —80ft 
361% 


275ft +81 ft 
ZOO +81% 
271 +81 

265 +81 

173ft +81 

2801* +80% 
283 +81 

174ft 


*80 +80% 
6.17ft +82% 
6.18ft +83 

6.12 +84 

6.13ft +83ft 
634ft +J0Ift 
*35 +84 

683 +83ft 

637ft 


13980 +280 
1 * 5.10 +280 
140.10 4280 
15060 +120 
15330 +220 
15030 +030 
16060 +230 
16680 +080 


2743 — .17 

2670 

256* —as 
2*87 +87 

2*63 +81 

2*50 +J0 

2460 


170% -80% 
167% —80ft 
164% 

167 


087 +35 

6785 +.13 

*660 —as 

**15 —37 

6*2S _jd 
<565 —10 

6785 +.10 


*082 +.12 
*985 +30 

7132 
7070 
7040 

7185 +.10 


4582 —33 

SI. 10 +80 
5265 +.13 

5260 +.18 

4*95 —60 

4965 —80 

4970 +.15 

4673 +.15 

4585 +85 


M80 +133 
7*32 +1.12 
7195 +145 
7570 —OS 
7505 —85 

7530 —40 

75.10 -180 


1 Season Saasoa 




Claaa 


High 

LOW 

Open 

High 

LOW 

am. 

2S35 

I960 

Jul 



2180 

+65 

3138 

2100 

Mar 2159 

3160 

2158 

2159 


Est.Sales 

*657 Prav. Sates 2526 




Prev. Day Open Int 278M up 377 




ORANGE JUICE (NYCE] 

15060 lbi-c«m Par lb. 





18500 

15100 

May 14150 

14200 

14*75 

SOS PI 

+150 

18*85 

15*00 

JUI 14300 

14350 

16150 

16295 

+ l% 

18200 

15785 

Sop 1420B 

14300 

16050 

16275 

18100 

15700 

NOV 14100 

14100 

16100 

14185 

+105 

18000 

15*00 

Jan 14100 

14100 

14100 

14085 

+80 

17750 

15680 

Mar 



16100 

+85 

1625Q 

14U0 

Mav 



14185 




Jul 



16185 



Mar UJ.K 

14185 

14185 

14185 


Ert.Sata 

500 Prav. SateB 

420 




Prev. Doy Open in* *30 off w 





UirfcUV i. ifl 




}t 

m* lift mb 
U% 121k 13% 
54% SW »% 
*jft «% ffi* 

22% 21% 33% 

mit i» 

21% 74% MM 
23% M 27% 

n% im 

34 33ft 
34ft 33 
17 U 
17ft 17% 17» 
<2 41ft 41% 
34ft >4% 34ft 
37% 36% 27% 

5% m m 

30 »»i i*% 

25ft 39% 29ft 
43ft *1% ■O 

SM 5ft 5% 
«% *% *% 
13% 13 13% 

21% 71 21ft 

U «ft 17% 

37% 36M 37% 

ZT% 21% 21% 

16ft MM 

36% 36% 

30% 30% 30% 







Growing with the 
solid-state 
control market 

Ametek‘5 U S. Gauge, Controls 
and Microelectronics Divisions 
provide measurement and 
control capability that‘s inte- 
grated from silicon to systems. 

Write for latest reports to: 




Dept. H, 

410 Pork Avenue, 2!sf Floor, 
New York. NY 10022. 


*i% 
*3ft 
20% 
% I 41% 
1% 70 

ft I 
ft 
ft 

ft 

m 5? 
™ 
S 47% 
,w 54% 
lVt 21% 
3tft 
37 


21% VP Carp 
5% Valara 
14 Voter pf 
2% vatevln 
17ft vanDra 

2% Vorco 

30% Vartan 
5ft vara 
17% vaoco 
3% Vanda 
0% Vests* 
2Sft Vtocem 
54 VoEPpf 
60ft VoEPef , 
*7% VaEPpf 
60ft VBEPAl 
49ft VaEPpf 
51% VaEPpf 
lift VtefMVl 
27 Varnod 
51 VuicnM 


0 191 31ft 
*13 9% 

3f 21% 
30 2% 
7 a 34% 
41 3% 

« «0> 32ft 
15 41 11% 

13 3D 20ft 

13 4 

34 10ft 

10 602 41ft 
IQOx 65ft 

Mm 73ft 
73 

100x M 
XOz 55ft 
25Qr *2 

14 S3 20ft 

15 * 39ft 

11 5 77% 


31% 31ft— ft 
8ft 91*+% 
21 % 21 % — ft 
2ft 2% + ft 
34% 34%— ft 
2 % 2 ft + ft 
Sift 3Zft+lft 
11% 11% 

19ft 30ft + ft 
4 4 + ft 

im* urn 
41 41ft + ft 
65ft *5ft+ ft 

72 73ft +2% 

73 73 

» 00 +1K 

59ft 55ft + ft 

62 a 

20 ft 20 ft 
35% 35% 

77% 77% — % 


44% 

33% Xerox 

300 

70 

17 2004 

43% 43 

43ft 

51% 

45% Xerox Pf 565 1*9 

220 

SM SO 

SO - 

29 

19 XTRA 

84 

26 

9 75 

34% 21 

24ft + 1 


30 34 ZateCA 102 *1 I 10 27% 27% 22% 

33ft 19% ZalaplA 80 13 1 21% 21% 21% 

34% 13% Zapata 84 68 14 *« IM TM 13%+ • 

SB 30 zoyn 60b J >4 415 55% 55% 55ft— 

31% lift ZanME 7 958 21ft 20% 21ft + 

21 ft mm zaui io no m» m* im+ 

31% 21% Zurnln U2 4A W ISO 25 28ft 21ft— 


21ft M 21ft + 
mi Shfc im+ 


19 % »m + 

20ft 31ft- 


m 


NYSE Highs-Lows 


March 27 


■PM .. 

FTliLtl 




280 HL7 
01 12 
64 21 
p(U0 118 
Z 20 *2 
184 


7 71 27% 36% Zn* + ft 

11 1213 33% 32% 33 

136 lift 17ft lift + ft 
494 145 5% 9ft 9ft 

33 1432 43ft Oft 43% — ft 

10 189 53ft 52ft 53% + % 

93 22% 21%. 21% + % 
17 52 35 34ft 34ft— ft 

7 204 33ft 33% 33ft+ ft 

11 187 22 21% 21ft + ft 

U 25ft 25% 25ft + ft 

14 3M6 38% 38ft Mft + % 
I 67 19% 19% 19% + ft. 
• 197 24% 21% 3f% + ft 
0 140 20% 20ft 20% + ft 
H 1416 53% 52ft 52% + % 
11 *4 34ft ZJft 34%—'% 

H II U 9% 10 + % 

52 10% 10% 10ft + % 

13 loa 20% 20ft 20%+ ft 

14 7 37ft 37% 37ft + % 

■ 49 53ft 51ft Sift + ft 

11 161 3*% 31 24ft— ft 

10 1940 17% 17 , 17% + ft 

12 35 21 20% 21 + % 

12Qz 39ft 31ft 38ft + ft 

» U4 31 25 3SH— Jft 

103 H 10% 10ft— ft 

409 « 5ft 4 + ft 

343 1ft 1ft 1ft . 

22 10 17% 10 + ft 

35 19% 10% 19 + ft 

1180 8% * 6ft + ft 

7 I1H 115%11* 

2077 9ft »% JS* . 

3 27% Z7% »%+ ft 

151 4ft 3% 3ft + ft 


Industria 





|,'F 1 1 




f.i! . 1 

| -Ly - ] 

r. ;I f J 







r.;£j 




^ ■r r -f 



Paris Commodities 

Mardt27 


HW LOW BM Ask 

SUSAN 

Froaci fmes pot metrician 
May M10 L2M L294 1096 

Auo 1866 1855 IJ« 1854 

Oct 1MC 1090 1090 1095 

Dec M.T. N.T. 10*5 1665 

Mar LSI L545 1645 1650 

MOV N-T. N.T. 1600 16HJ 

epL yplo 9S0 let* of SO tonx Prev. < 
solas: 685 lots. Open Interest: 2UD9 
COCOA 

ropcii Onaaa ear HO ka 

Mar 2830 2830 — 2055 

May 2840 2815 2835 2837 

-llv N-T. N.T. 2890 . — 

SOP 2080 2880 2870 2800 

Doc 2.178 2.175 1175 2190 

Mar N-T- N-T. 1130 — 

May ItT.Nj. 1125 — 

Est. voL: 60 Ms of 10 tans. Pnv. : 
solas: 0* lots. Opan Intoned: 510 
COFFEE 

Raocta francs per 106 kg 
Allar 2680 2680 — 2600 

May 2690 2671 2645 2677 

Jly N.T. N-T. 2605 — 

Sep 2683 2680 26*5 2673 

Nov N.T. N.T. 26*5 26*5 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2645 2690 

Mar , R.T. N.T. 2612 2655 

Esl. voL: 29 lata ol 5 lor%. Pnv. actual ! 
1 lota. Open I nt e r es t : 178 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


London Commodities 

March 27 


High LOW BM Ask Bid ASk 

SUOAR 

Starting par metric tao 
Alar 71*60 17360 I USD HO m 11480 17+40 
An 12080 11780 11*80 11780 11880 11LB0 
Od 13*20 12060 12080 12180 12280 12380 
DOC 12980 12980 12621 12780 12980 13080 
Mar 14180 14060 14080 14060 14260 14380 
Mery 148JB I4U0 14580 14560 14780 14880 
Aaa 15*00 15480 14960 15180 15268 15480 
Volume: 18M lata of 50 tana. 


H 




Stock Indexes 


(Indexes compiled stnrtty before market dot 
5P C OMP. IND EX CCME} 
polmi and Gsnta 

189.10 156.10 Jun TB280 10385 10165 W3J5 

19270 16080 Sep 18565 137 JO 1SS60 18*65 

»9*40, 17S30 Dec 19965 19065 11965 18980 

Est. Soles Pnv. Sato 57.116 

pnv. Dav Oo«n wt. 5*176 up 304 

VALUE L INE (KCBT) 
pofaifsixidokifi 

»*30 1«.W Mar 19180 19360 19035 19175 

T7380 Jun 19680 1«80 19780 

Esl. Safes P^.5*^*6H> 3,873 30173 

Pnv.Day Onan inL vna upi*5 

NTNB COMP, I NDEX (NYFE> 
po bin and cm tin 

11080 9080 Jun W580 10*90 10580 10*35 

11180 9185 Sop 10785 10885 10785 10150 

1UJS 10180 DOC 10985 111.10 10985 111.10 

11110. 11280 Mar 11115 11115 11115 11115 


11110 11280 Mar 11115 11115 1U.15 11116 

pl-Scto Pnv. Salas 11622 
Prav. Day Opan im. 9809 up«M 


t7rr-errr>K r: t ; ■ r. 


gSBS 






raiftSiil i 


TUI 

. ■ ' ■ < ■ r 



Commodity Indexes 


Gase Previous 

Moody's 9M2)f 96360 f 

Routers 1,95190 1,969.80 

DJ. Futvns NA I235B 

Com. Research Bureau. NA 243J0 

AAoodv's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f • final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 10. 1931. 

Dow Janes : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


CUT: CNcobo Board of Trade 

CMC: CMrage Moraiflfa Ekdnwa 

IMM: International Moncton Market 

Of OiTcaea Mercantile Exchange 
NY CSCE: NOW York Cocoa. Sugar. Cottas Exchang e 

NYCE: Now York Cottan Exehangt 

COMEN: GMnamflty Exdwnpa. Now York 

NY ME: now York Mercantile Exctasa 

KCBT: Kansas City Board of Trade 

NYFE: NSW York Futures Exchange 




Asian Commodities 

March 27 


HONG-KONOOOLD FUTURES 
UASPOroPDCs 

Cte*e Pnv loo* 

Htefc Lwa Bid Ask BU AM 
Mar _ N.T. NT. 32980 33186 3158a 31780 
*N _ 32*80 32*00 £980 33180 31580 31780 
May _ N.T. N.T. SJ280 33*00 31100 32086 
Jwi— N.T. N.T. 33*00 33680 32080 32286 
AUO _ 34186 34180 34086 34380 32580 32780 
Oct_ N.T. N.T. 34*80 34680 33180 333L0B 
g« - N.T. N-T. 34980 15180 33580 33780 
Fata - N.T. N.T. 35580 35780 34180 34380 
Volume: 2* lota o» 100 az. 

SINDAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
uajporooaco 


Htafc LOW 

API 32380 32580 

Jun 33780 32980 

Aug 339 JO 339 JO 

Volume: 314 lots of M0 a*. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
M nfcuskm cowtaPOrfcOo 
Cl » > a 

Bid Ask 

Art 20180 m« 

May 20*50 20780 

Jun 20*00 20980 

jly 20*50 21060 

Aug 209 JO 211 JO 

Sec 21280 21480 

Vohime: 87 lota. 
SIN0APORE RUBBER 


Settle same 
33080 31*70 

T«5JP 32*20 
339 JO 32520 


Previous 
BM Ask 
20080 20180 
20280 20250 

20*25 20580 

20*50 206JO 

20780 20980 
2D980 21180 


Cash Prices March 2T. 


Coouoodlty and UaU Wad l 

Coffee* SantOL-Oi 1611 

Piintctoti *4/30 38 ft, ya — <Ul 
Steel billets (P1tt.),nn__ 47100 * 

iron 2 Pdry.PN tartan — 21380 2» 

Steel scrap No i bvy Pia _ 79-80 too 

Lana Spot. Bj 18-21 1 

Cocoor etad- lb 67-70 7» 

Tki (Slrottsl. Ita 5J17B 6J 

HotE. St. L. Basil. Ita 065-67 

Palladium, oz 110 190 

SOvar N.Y.az *735 

Source: AP. 


Dividends March 2* 


j5®S1 Apt— 17Z50 17*20 

RS5 1 Way. 17750 17*80 

RSS2API_ 17250 17350 

RS5 3 Art _ T7DJ0 17150 
RSS «*Pl_ 16550 1*750 

RSS5 Art— 14050 162J0 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MMarstoi rtflRrtB POT 25 tans 


A* I860 1610 

May 1810 I860 

Jun I860 1810 

JIV IJ70 1800 

Aug 18*0 1890 

Sap 1850 1880 

Nov 1840 1870 

Jan- 1840 i J7B 

Mar. 1830 1870 

Voluma: 0 lots at 25 tans. 

Source: Or ata s. 


17250 17350 

17*50 17*75 
17150 17250 

16950 17050 

16*50 14*50 

15950 74150 


18W 1630 
1830 1830 
1816 1835 
1800 1835 
1890 1830 
1880 1820 
1870 1810 
1870 1810 
1860 1800 




Start tag par metric tea 


forward 91*00 91780 95*00 95*00 

SE^“"™W‘S 0l to , erode) 

inrm pv limit n. vw 

spat L151J30 l.lfiJB 180000 180180 

terward 1.171 JO L173J0 181*00 181960 

COPPER CATHODES (StaadordJ 
Starting per aietaic tan 
tool 185*00 185780 180280 180X00 

forward 1,17100 1,17*00 181*00 1817JOO 

LSAD 

Starilag par metric ton 

mot _ 29150 *550 moo moo 

forward 30150 30X00 31250 31400 

NICKEL 

Starting par metric too 
Si of 487500 fre” *46000 

tonaend *30*00 43KU0 *4RU» 460*06 

SILVER 

Qiaae 

r “»Mi pm MW) UW MI 

wot NA NA 54X00 54500 

forward NA HA. 56250 56*00 

TIN (Standard) 

Starting pa r me tric tap 
SPOl U56J0 956000 660500 981*00 

toward 955600 956000 982*00 681*00 

ZINC 

Starting par metric Ion 
wot 77400 77900 moo 7*300 

f orwar d 73*00 7X100 75500 75600 

Source: AP. 


U5. Treasury Bffl Rates 

March 26 


« YteW YMd 
3+Mon *36 *34 *6* 889 

I6M 1981 I Ml *71 636 960 

120. 11.WL °"" >r ** “ W 

OJU 89.77 I Source: Sakxnon Brothers 


DM Futures Options 

March 27 

KGmmNoridSMowlacinbpcrinark 


£ *» c« i State , Pm+rtfle 

i {5 5 S 066 4 " s® 

30 238 IBS — fin *54 *45 

31 UO 2X 289 *B S3 Sft 

32 1.14 L74 220 *99 130 — 

33 083 181 181 S S - 

34 Ml W 10 S _ - 

35 085 148 — I* 105 — 

Rtametad tstol «oL 1*461 

Source: CME. 


Swiss Bank Seeking 
Japanese Trust Unit 





+ 1 1 1 ■ i tn i i M 


"T, W- rf. Tl 

r#U 



TOKYO— ^ Union Bank of Swit- 
zerland hopes to establish a trust 
bank subsidise in Japan in coop- 
eration with Mitsubishi Trust & 
Banking Coro., a Mitsubishi 
spokesman said Wednesday. 

Japan plans to allow eight for-- 
dgn Wiks to start trust businesses 
there soon. Five UiL banks, Mor- 
gan Guaranty Trust Co. of New 
York, Bankers Trust Co, Gribank, 
Chase M anhattan B ank «nri Chem- 
ical Bank, have expressed interest 
in trust banks in Japan. 


!J Ml t: 1 4 Ti ^ »ii3 

SBIMS 


P i'kTVIi r^i 

















































































JSINESS ROUNDUP 

talf of Ohio Thrift Units Said to Be 



New York Thnea Service 


Kr: * 



v.i <>•. 





■ f ,red to close on March 15 
,; ld qualify for the federal do- 
t insurance that is required to 
me full operations, 
i. McAlister said Tuesday that 
rokerage” center, was being es- 
shed to assist mergers of the 
t units that cannot qualify for 
ral insurance. 

xui 500 pasties interested in 
iring sane of the remaining 
units had called his office, he 


* 


i Florida, the court-appointed 
ver of ESM Government Seca* 
s Inc., whose collapse on 
i 4 led to the dosng of Home 
* Savings Bank of Cincinnati, 


put the company in federal bank- 
ruptcy proceedings, the Associated 
Press reported Tuesday freon Flori- 
da. 

[The receiver, Thomas Tew, says 
be has seized about S30 million in 
ESM assets against about $320 mil- 
lion the firm owes Hotss State, 
other savings and- loans a nd mump, 
ipal investors. He filed a Chapter 7 
petition in West Palm Beach en- 
abling ESMs assets to be liquidat- 
ed and divided among its credi- 
tors.] 

Thus far, 22 of the thrif t units 
dosed in Ohio have obtained ap- 
proval for federal insurance. 

In addition, Mr. McAlister au- 
thorized on Tuesday City Loan A 
Savings Co., with 142,00) deposi- 
tors, to reopen on a full-service 
basis after it received deposit guar- 
antees through hs corporate affih- 
afion with Control Data Carp. 


The remaining thrift units have 
reopened for business to allow lim- 
ited withdrawals of up to 5750 a 
month. 

Except for problem runs at two 
thrift units, which Mr. McAlister 
would not identify, he said “rite 
crisis is over." He added, “Now it’s 
business as normal.” 

The crisis began when Home 
State said it bad lost up to 5150 
milli on stemming from the collapse 

of ESM. 

Coastal Gets Control of ANR 

Reuters 

HOUSTON — Coastal Chip, 
said Wednesday that it has received 
more than 50 percent of American 
Natural Resources Co. common 
stock, m response to its trader offer 
for all shares outstanding at 565 
each. ANR accepted a 52.4-bilKon 
Coastal takeover offer. 


Sun Hung Kai 
Sets Reshuffle 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Sun Hung 
Kai & Co. said Wednesday that 
it will reorganize its board fol- 
lowing its sale of two major 
assets and a decision by its ma- 
jor shareholder, Cie. Fmanri&re 
de Paribas, to sell its 25.5-per- 
crat interest 

The company’s president, 
W iIHam Arthur, said the com- 
pany would reduce its board 
membership to 13 from 17, and 
that the chairman and majority 
bolder, Fung King Hey, would 
name six members. 

Last week. Sun Hung Kai 
sold its banking subsidiary to 
Arab Banking Carp, for 360 
million Hong Kong dollars 
($46.2 million). Earlier this 
month, it sold its stake in HK- 
TVB to local and overseas offi- 
cials for 480 million Hong 
Kong dollars. 


Sears Acts to Acquire Bank, 
Expand Financial Services 


4 EC Countries Allowed 
To Raise Steel Subsidies 


United Press International 

CHICAGO — -Sears. Roebuck & 
Co. confirmed Wednesday that it 
was “probably very dose” to ac- 
quiring a small state bank in South 
Dakota for use in expanding finan- 
da] sendees for its recently an- 
nounced universal credit card. 

“T don’t know whether anything 
is i mmi nent or not, but it’s proba- 
bly very dose,” Sears’s chairman 
Edward R. Telling, told the Chica- 
go Tribune in an interview. 

Sears branched out from hs re- 
tail business into insurance, stock 
brokerage and real estate in 1981. 

A Sears spokesman, Douglas 
Fairweatber, confirmed the basis of 
Mr. Telling’s interview. 

Mr. Telling said only that Sears 
was seeking to acquire a small bank 
in South Dakota for its charter. He 
said the company was not looking 
at acquiring banks in other states. 


Out-of-state bank holding com- 
munes, because of a loophole in the 
Federal Bank Holding Company 
Act, are seeking to acquire state 
banks in South Dakota, where the 
laws would allow them to sell insur- 
ance and offer other services. 

Sears became a bank holding 
company when it purchased 
Greenwood Trust Co. m Delaware 
in January. 

Mr. Fairweather said Sears had 
said then, that Greenwood might 
not be its last purchase of a email 
bank. But he said Mr. Telling’s in- 
terview disclosed for the first time 
that South Dakota was under con- 
sideration. 

Several measures pending before 
Congress would dose the loophole, 
affecting proposed acquisitions of 
South Dakota state banks by Bank 
of America, Citicorp and other ma- 
jor bank holding companies. 


The Associated Prai 

BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity industry ministers reached 
a compromise Wednesday that will 
allow some member states to in- 
crease subsidies to their steel indus- 
try this year. 

The countries chat have asked for 
such authorization are France, Ita- 
ly, Belgium and Luxembourg. 

The authorization is necessary 
under the terms of the EC’s plan to 
return the European steel industry 
to profitability. 

At the same time, the ministers 
reaffirmed their determination to 
stop steel subsidies by Dec. 31. as 
called for by the plan. 

Wednesday’s compromise allow- 
ing the increases in subsidies was 
reached in exchange for a commit- 
ment from the countries involved 
to consider more cuts in production 
capacity. 

The ministers also said the aid 
will be authorized ‘'only for the 


further purposes of a financial re- 
structuring” to reduce a company's 
debt-service burden. 

West Germany in particular had 
argued that any increase in govern- 
ment aid should be linked to capac- 
ity reduction measures. 

But the capacity reduction re- 
quirement was considerably soft- 
ened in the final compromise. It 
was cited as a consideration rather 
than a condition to new aid, an EC 
Commission expen pointed out. 

Italy has requested permission to 
grant new aid this year amounting 
to 2.19 billion European Currency 
Units (51. 51 billion dollars). 
France has sought 1.5 billion 
ECUs, Belgium, 0.18 billion ECUs 
and Luxembourg, 0.21 billion 
ECUs. 

In a related decision, the EC 
ministers agreed to unblock an esti- 
mated 5 billion ECUs in steel sub- 
sidies that have been approved by 
the Commission. 


sieralMOsActs ForStHMIUI Drops Bid for McGraw-Edison I Floating Rate Notes 



dear Way for 
gRestnuSuring 

" Las Angela Times Service 

,. i)S ANGELES — Directors of 
[veil Mills Inc. have cleared the 
'or a mag or restructuring of the 
. ‘jeapolis-based company by 
ang to seQ its fashion division 
5 approving a plan to spin off the 
joup- 

; ie company, which last Jann- 
; iegan exploring the divestiture 
. iose businesses, also has dedd- 
: , 'j sefl its We Axe Sportswear 
►’ i chain in Southern California 
wd it may sell some restaurant 
-itions, including the Good 
'a. 

a result of the restructuring, 
■: . ;>ral Mills said Tuesday it ex- 
’s a 5113.8-million charge 
third-quarter earnings, 
:Tji will result in a loss for the 
" -month period ended Feb. 24. 
..__Tquarter results win be re- 
.•Tjl fin er this week. In the third 
■ xr of fiscal 1984, General 
< ; earned 538.7 million on sales 
. 3 trillion. 

■ uton O. Mayer 3d, an analyst 
New York-based Bear, 
ns A Co., said the third-quar- 
ts is “not particularly signifi- 
The^ ^m^ any^has^enough 

ral Mills stock dosed Tuesday 
'' te New York Stock Exchange 
,_&75 a share, tip 51.75 on a 
ne cf 244*000 shares, 
ken the changes are complet- 
; general Mills will again em- 
uner foods and res- 


which the coopany said 
for 90 percent of fu- 
Salcs and earnings. The rest 

• some from its specialty tctail- 
rjyoop, including Talbot’s, Ed- 

• - -auer and Wallpapers to Go. 


March 27 


■The Associated Press . 

CHICAGO — Forstmmm Little 
& Co. said Wednesday that it is 
dropping its proposed 559-a-sharc, 
or 513 billion, leveraged buyout 
bid of McGraw-Ed&on Co., winch 
is dim luring a higher, “friendly" 
bid from Cooper Industries Inc. 

“The price offered by Cooper 
Industries is well in excess of a 
price for McGraw-Edison which 
would provide us with an accept- 
able return," said Ted Forstmann, 
general partner of the New York- 
based investment firm. 

Cooper, based in Houston, pre- 
viously announced a 565-a-share, 


or $1.4 billion tender offer to ac- 
quire McGraw-Edison of Rolling 
Meadows, fiHndLs. 

Cooper, meanwhile, said Tues- 
day that its chairman, Robert CS- 
rik, and Edward Williams, the 
McGraw-Edison chaw-mar^ were 
holding talks about Coopers 
tender offer, Cooper said 

“They ctaracteiized their discus- 
sions as friendly’ and said they 
hoped the discussions would lead 
to a merger agreement between the 
companies." Cooper’s statement 
said. 

“WflKams said *hgr if satisfac- 
tory merger terms can be agreed 


upon, he intends to recommend to 
the McGraw-Edison board that it 
approve Cooper’s proposed merger 
agreement and endorse Cooper's 
trader offer," it added. 

McGraw-Edison, which has 16.9 
imflirtn common, shares outstand- 
ing, makes industrial and electrical 
equipment 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change Tuesday, McGraw-Edison 
gained 25 cents a share, dosing at 
$63.75. 

Cooper manufactures tools and 
hardware, compression and drilling 
equipment, and electrical and elec- 
tronic equipment 


COMPANY NOTES 


Alcatel Thomson Gigsifoc, a sub- 
sidiary of Tbomson-CSF of 
France, concluded a licensing 
agreement with Minnesota Muting 
A Manufacturing Co, allowing the 
U.S. offico-eqmpment group to use 
Alcatel’s digital optical disk model 

AbAom-Aduthpie, the French 
concern heading a consortium of 
heavy engineering groups, is to seQ 
China 150 electnc rail engines 
worth $250 nalHaa In addition, the 
company said China had ordered 

er statiraudo bc^buflt in Fujian 
province. 

Babcock International PLC, a 
British-based engineering £roup, 
reported an 8-percent drop m pre- 
tax profit in 1984 to £31.6 minion 
(S348 million) on sales up 11 per- 
cent to £1.13 billion. Babcock 
blamed the lower profit-on the Brit- 
ish minm’ strike ' • ■ 

Dataproducts Coqx, the U.S. 
computer-software maker, said it 
expects earnings for the fourth 
quarter ending March 31 to be 


more than 50 percent lower than a 
year earlier an sales about 10 per- 
cent lower. 

DRIHoWngs Ltd. said it sold its 
remaining 4.2-percent stake in De- 
cision Data Computer Coip. of 
Pennsylvania for £4.96 million 
(55 .5 nnDion)- 


five- comp any consortium with 
Rolls-Royce Ltd. of Britain and 
United Technologies Crap, of the 
United States the largest share- 
holders, has agreed to supply its 
new V-2500 engine to three airline 
companies, mcmdrng Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways Inc. 

MCA lot, the US. entertain- 
ment concern, has agreed to ac- 
quire 63 percent of JLLN. Toys 
Ltd. in an exchange of stock wrath 
up to 53SL8 million. If tl« transac- 
tion is concluded, MCA said it will 
mate a tender ofTerfgr the remain- 
ing LJJN. shares; *1514.26 worth 
of stock each. Basedon Tuesday’s 
closing stock prices on the New 
York Stock Exchange, the acquisi- 


tion of the entire company would] 
cost about 565 milli on 

Norcros PLC, a British maker of I 
furniture and pharmaceutical 
products, agreed to buy the rest of 
UBM Group PLC for £1 19 milli on [ 
(S130.9 million).' 

Norsk Hydro AS, the Norwegian 
industrial and energy group, said 
its 1984 post-tax profit was 2.02 
billion kroner, an 87-percent in- 
crease over 1983. Sales rose 21 per- 
cent to 3537 billion kroner. 

Tony Itutetiies Inc, Japan’s 
largest synthetic-fiber maker, has 
reported a 2.8 percent rise in post- 
-tax profit to 16 bfiHcm yen ($623 
million) an sales up 24 percent to 
630 billion yen. in the fiscal year 
ending March 31. 

Valeo, the French vehicle-com- 
ponent maker, plans to increase 
capital by more than 250 million 
francs (5253 million) and is ex- 
pecting a net consolidated loss of 
about 130 million francs in 1984. in 
1983, the company had a net con- 
solidated . profit of 86 million 
francs! 





Manufacturers Hanover 
Trust Company 


is pleased to announce the opening of 
a full service branch in 


Str - ' • 


** * 


am p-* *' 



aam ■ - 


* 

£ 


V-' 



Osaka 


The addition of this branch expands and 
strengthens our worldwide network of over i00 
offices in more than 42 countries. It indicates our 
continued commitment to the international 
corporate and financial communities. A commit- 
ment which provides you access to the global 
expertise, state-of-the-art electronic technology 
and the creative financing solutions needed to 
manage your business. 

Our Osaka branch enables us to provide you 
with a wide range of credit and operating 
services, including medium and short term multi- 
currency financing and complete documentary 
service capability, in addition, we are equipped to 
offer you a full array of electronic banking services. 


To discuss our specialized services in Osaka, contact: 


Masahiro Suzuki 
Branch Manager 

Manufacturers Hanover Thist Company 

Nichimen Building 

2-2, Nakanoshima 2-Chome 

Kita-Ku. Osaka 530 

Japan 


Telephone: 06-229-8281 
Telex: 5224760 MHTCOS I 
Cable: MANTRUST 
Facsimile: 06-229-8286 


to • * 

t, 1 


international Division 


if*'*'' 

: 


MAlffUFACTXJRERS HANOVER 

The Financial Source. 5 ” Worldwide. 



Dollar 


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Arab BkoCorp TOM 
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BFCEI7 
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BNP 87 
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BNP 99 
BNPW 
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BNP 94 
BNPB 

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Dretdner Bonk 89 
Dresdner Bank 9} 
Eldorado Nuclear 89 
EDF99 
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BAB 93 
EAB98 
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Exterior lull 94 
FerravteN 
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First Boston Inc V1/M 
First Bartc Systsins 98 
First Chicago 97 
First CMcaeo 94 
First Cflv Tftos 9S 
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Beaflrance 92/94 
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SZB92 

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IBJI5 
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Ireland 94/99 
Ireland 97 
Mr. Ireland 94 
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CIMIK7 
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JP. Moraan 1997 9SIU -2 
KOP 18092 
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Mangos* Dan 90/91 
Mortgage Dm 92 
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New Zealand 87 
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Nippon Credit Bk 98 
Nippon CraMt Bit 85 
Nlapaa Credit Bk 14 
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Sachte Generate 90 
Soctete Generate Mar M 
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Sweden 91 
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TteOMkl 92794 
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Toronto Domteton 92 
Ten Trusi 92/99 
TVO 94/04 
Union Bk Nereay 99 
United 0/S*aiBkV 
Weds Fargo 97 
WH0aatf+Gtvra91 
World Bank 94 
Yokohama 91/94 
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119b TV4 

99b 44 
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IBM 774 
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nib 9-5 
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119b 154 
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Bk Tokyo 88/91 
Ba IndMaezVl 
OHcarp 89/91 
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CEPME M 
Credit Fonder 99 
Credit NOttanal 11/95 
Denmark 93716 
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SNCF 90/92 
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13ft 274 99X3 H0X3 
UW 2M *9X0 bid 
UN 214 99.99 HU9 
lift 155 99.15 9955 
Uft 54 WBS99JB 
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10W 94 99X0 99X0 
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14ft 24-5 99X0 99X1 
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Source : Croat Suisfe-FJrrt Boston LM, 
Lonoon 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


WfeAiesdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tames include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


BMadfa 

HMLBW Stock 


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mod Inn day. WTitr* a sedlt or stock crlvtosud oraountlns to 25 
paramt or mor* has b**n pakt Hw wars h lan-tow rang* and 
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noted, rates at dMdands or* annual dlstmnamwitt based on 
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a— dlvWsnd also estralsiyi 
b — annual rate at dtvKtondrtus stock dMamUl 
c — Uqutdatino dMdsndJl 
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I— dMdtnd dtdorad after KdlMiP or Hock dtvWand. 

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taken at latest dtvhtond meeting. 

k— dMdtnd defla t ed or paid Kite year, an occamuiaKv* 
issue with dMdands In arrears. 

n— new Issue m lbs past 53 weeks. The high-law rang* boa! ns 
with the start of trading, 
nd— next day delivery. 

P/E — pries e ar n ings ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paid hi pnecedlno 12 months, plus 
stack dividend. 

■—■tack snot. Dividend begins wim date of split 
sis — sates. 

t— dMdmd pakt In stack In pracedlna 12 months. esW matea 
cafli value an ex-dividend or ox-dlihlbuflen data, 
u— new yearly Mah. 
v— Irodbs halted. 

vt— In bankruptcy or i itaver st ilp or being recroanlrftd un- 
der Iho Bani u u p tev Act. or securities assumed by such com- 
ponies. 

wd — when dMr United, 
wl— whan Issued, 
ww— wIWi W urn ei te . 
x— ax-flvktend or ex-rights, 
xtfls — «x -distribution, 
xw— without warrants, 
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COUNTRY 


1 year 6 months 3 months 


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Page 13 


Over-the-Counter 


March 27 


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Sir Michael: Gaining Fame as Corporate Doctor 


(Coo&Hied from Page 9) being regrouped into seven profit LicL which lost money on sales of before moving to Ley land in 1977, 

on problems in varioas divisions The aii at headquarters $18 million in 1966, into a wide- pretax profits rose to about $30 

of Chloride Group, a mnltmarinnii| was soon thick with plans to shift ranging conglomerate with earn- million from 54 million 

battery maker. During 26 years at executives, slash costs, sell subsid- ings last year of $327 million sir Michael attributes pan of his 

the company, he rose from man- >aries and property, decentralize (about £297 million at current 


agement trainee to ehamrmn md and re finan c e , 
chief executive. Sir Michael was able to move so 

He also served on the govern- quickly because he had plotted 
meat’s National Enter prise Board strategy for the prior month with 
from 1975 to 1977. The board. Rohm Biggam and Roger Holmes, 


which has been all but plimTnai«) 
undo 1 Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher’s Conservative govern - 


two executives who had worked 
with him at ICL-Tbe three reviewed 
a major study of Dunlop complei- 


raiesl on sales of S4 bOIion. 

ln acquiring Dunlop. Sir Owen is 
gaining some attractive assets that 
fit welT with his existing businesses. 

Dunlop's woes were rooted in 
the overcapacity that struck Ihe 
world tire industry during the 
1970s following the introduction of 


success to the quality of his team- 
mates. To make sure he has a team 
he trusts, be resorts to extensive 
psychological testing, a practice 
that is rare in Britain. “I started in 
my centre! Africa days," he said 
“The most frequent result of the 
psychological testing and manage- 
ment assessment is promotion or 


meat, intervened in all sorts of situ- ed Iasi year by Price Waterhouse, long-lasting radial (Ires. The com- reshuffling to put managers in dif- 
atioos, bom financing start-ups to When they finally moved in at the parry accumulated $347 nriltioa in ferent jobs,” Sir Michael said At 
corporate bailouts, giving Sir Nfi- conqvany, “it took four working losses in the four years through Ley land, 20 percent of the top 300 
chad extra insight mto the prob- d*ys 10 voify our assumptions, 9 * 1983 and, according to its most executives were soon gone, out 50 
lems of shaky companies. Sir Michael re c alled . recent estimate, lost about 5100 

After leaving Leyland, he wrote TTtis approach is characteristic. miTHm more last year. Dunlop's 
“Bade From Die Brink," a best- The hallrnarirs of Sir Michael's estimated 1984 sales were SI. 8 b£3- 
selling memoir of the period. management style are reorganiza- lion. 

He also, as part-rime diair-man rion and decauralization into prof- Sr Michael had spoken hopeful- 

used Us business and government * l centers. Iy of returning Dunlop to profit- 

contacts to give a boost to Mercury **Hc concentrates on one or two ability this year. However, the plan than traditi onal British managers. 

— — ? - ) » i »* omtoAtr aP fha liiMnaaii ** 1 — al IT P V * « • . J ' 8 1 ¥ 


percent found ; 
cat jobs. 

workers also tend to find Sir 
Michael’s style distinctive. He pre- 
fers to talk more openly — and 
often more bluntly — with them 


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Commumcarions Ltd., a start-up basic aspects of the b usi ne s s," said ind tided the sale of the U.S. tire- He shocked union leaders at Ley- 
tekphone company licensed by the John Egan, an executive who making sub sidiar y to reduce debt, a land by bypassing than to speak 
government to compete with the worked with him at British Ley- divestment BTR has now blocked, directly to employees, 
state-owned British Telecom. land. "He gets fairly clear as to The Dunlop takeover will proto- “One advantage of bang a cob- 
Then, early last year, he moved what he wants to do, describes it bly reinforce Sr Michael's image as trial is that I am not weighed down 
to ICL and plunged into ov erturn?- thoroughly, and then delegates an executive with no ties to any by all that class no nsense, ” Sir Mi- 
ing the division of responsi b iliti e s ruthlessly. " particular company. This image is enaH referring to the ] orig- 

in the compute' company’s board 'Hie takeover hid from BTR understandable but irritating to a standing divisions in British society 
of directors and its strategic plan- raneiged as a surprise hurdle to the man who spent 26 years with ChJo- that foster distance arid alienation 
ning process. restructuring blitzkrieg going on at ride before accepting the Leyland between management and workers. 

& Michael's standing in the Dunlop. It came in late January, challenge. 

Gty of London was demonstrated when the trickiest part of the task Recruited by a Chloride director 

when he indicated Iris interest in — the overhauling of Dunlop’s who met him an a visit to Sooth tyrpv rinnlrtn flflp- 
taking on the repair and rebuilding debt-laden balance sheet — was Africa, Sir Michael, who was 21, Din 8 tFUtuup (_fuer 
of Dunlop after he left ICL. being ne g otiat e d with Dunlop’s sailed to London as a management Is Made Unconditional 
Dunlop's banks insisted that Sir curious bankers and long-suffering trainee for the battery maker in 
Maurice Hodgson, the chairman shareholders. 1951. Rente* 

and the board appoint him as the “In terms of the enormity of the He returned several years later as LONDON — The offer by BTR 

new chief executive, even tho ugh problem, BL was much more diffi- an executive and, in 1963, at the age PLC for the entire share capital of 
they favored another «i*irtirtaf<» cult than Dunlop,” Sir Michael of 33, was asked to move to Sails- Dunlop Holdings PLC has been 
Because Ehmlop was so heavily in- said. “But having a hid at die same bury in British-governed Rhodesia, declared tmconAtional, the com- 
deb ted that it owed its continued time makes the battle very sophisti- now Harare, the capital of Zimba- parties said Wednesday. Accep- 
existenoe to the patience of the cated." bwe, to son out problems in Chlo- tances have been received from 

banks, Sr Maurice eventually sur- hi BTR’s Sr Owen Green, Sr ride's central African operations. Dunlop shareholders in respect of 
rendered after a contest that the Michael found a formidable oppo- . The posting gave Sr Michael ex- more than 50 percent of the ordi- 
British press gleefully called “the nenL Sr Michael, a small, trim and perieace moving in political tarries nary share capital and over 50 per- 
bartle of the knights." intense man with pale blue eyes that proved invaluable during his cent of the preference shares. 

Sir MfchaeTs first day at Dun- mid sandy hair, is better known to Leyland years. He became a Chlo- The Dunlop board has recom- 
lop, Nov. 8, was ni?wk«? by the the average Briton, but Sir Owen ride director by the time he was 39 mended shareholders to accept an 
most dramatic boardroom upheav- has a more devoted following in and was soon promoted to duel increased offer by BTR on the basis 
a] in modern British history: He London. executive after his regrouping of of two new BTR ordinary shares 

immediately ousted 11 of the 13 A former accountant with an eye the Bode battery division sent for every 21 Dunlop ordinary 
members. He also switched trier- fra- companies that can benefit profit* soaring in just 18 months, shares, or 63 pence in cash for each 


chant bankers, stockbrokers and 
accountants. 


from streamlined management and 
tight financial controls, Sr Owen 
Scarcely a week later. Sir Mi- has used afT Tnirifi^T 1 ^ to build the 
chad announced thai Dunlop was former Birmingham Tire & Rubber 


In the six. years he led Chloride Dunlop ordinary share. 


The Back-Off-Buster Message 


■ (Continued from Page 9) 
space Systems, Comp-U-Card In- 
ternational, Helix Technology, 
Molest and, on weakness, CullineL 
Smith Barney has pnblished a 
“reverse recommended list,” com- 
piled by the firm's Edward M. Son- 
deriing. Each issue is rated a sell on 
the basis of fundamental research. 

Exxon tops the list, followed by 
these hospital supply stocks:' Ab- 
bott Labs, American Hospital Sup- 
ply. and Becton Dickinson. 

Hospital management issues are 
also out of favor, notably Hospital 


Coro, of America and National 
Medical Enterprises. 

While Mr. Sonderiing noted that 
Smith B arn ey recommends drug 
stocks such as Marion Laborato- 
ries, Pfizer and Upjohn, they are 
advising clients to switch out of 
American Home Products, Merck, 
Schering-Plough, Syntex and 
Warner Lambert. 

Some other “sells” he highlight- 
ed are CIGNA. Dow Jones and 
Kimberly-Clark, the latter engaged 
in a “diaper war" with Procter & 
Gamble. 


BAT Posts Increase 
Of 44% in Its Profit 

(Continued on Page 9) 
ing profit grew 29 percent to £698 
muhan. 

BAT said it remained the third- 
laraest cigarette maker in the Unit- 
ed States, with steady sales volume. 
In West Germany, BAT’S tobacco 
uztit increased its market share by a 
percentage point to 25 percent. 


Options (prion hi S/QL). 


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8001189 

VSJ975 

320UMD 

360 

580 880 

12504400 

19803280 

VO 

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— — 

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Quotations supplied by Funds Listed 
27 March 1985 

T1»* oat 08881 w4aa«wotattoni shown twhnr ora supplied bv the Funds Ustad wWfc the 
exception at same funds whose doom are band on Issue prices. The failmUn 
manUnol symbols mdlcata fruoaeaev ot quotation sappHM for the IHT: 
tdj -dally; (w)-wmefclr; (M -bt-montUy/ (rj -reentartv; {D-IrTeou tarty. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w> AJ-Mol Trust. S A 


S 15156 OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
* — (w> MuWcurrencY. 


BANK JULIUS BAER LCO.LM. — twi Dollar Medium Term. 

— <d Bocrtxmd SF 91540 — fwi Dollar Lons Tww. _ 

— M > Conbar SF 118850 — [wi Japanese v«n 

— Uf ) Eaulbaer America S 110UB — (v»J Pound SfH*a. 

Clli Men'*— 


.1956 
J 95* 


49. 


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f 



Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 



PEANUTS 


THE MEETING OF THE 
CACTUS CLUB WLL 
COME TO OR PBS. 



FIRST WELL HAVE 
A REPORT FROM OUR 
ENTERTAINMENT 
COMMITTEE 


U)HEE! 




OlsniHMdFwuaSinSaBUncI 




f THANK YOU. \ 
amERTAINMBtT J 
COMMITTEE J 


BOOKS 


THE SOONG DYNASTY 


Nonftl 


By Sterling Seagrave. 532 pp. 
Illustrated 522 . 5(1 
Harper A So 10 East 53 d Street, 
New York N. Y. 10022 . 


who avoided staring straigju m Medn» IE? 
3c*id«dfoftteSo«mmtbeaanworB />■ 

tittn and in the frnaot their dwcasin raat- . , i \*' 
He also searc he s lor Orem as dfey fat* fear'*' 
mirrored is previous histories and • 

oftiwperioaT 


_. 4 


ihxtk 


•**X*Wec j 


BLOND IE 

iwsbA 


(ooea At*moe/n*tMj 

V—f ANY RBOOEFTS ? If 


BE C MET/. 1 ? f-nwns not what, 

| ?*— * J 

^ r' }>-„i i 'll I 


a i 


' Hoi 


ACROSS 


I Fancy’s 
opposite 
5. “Act One" 
subject 
9 Figure of 
speech 

14A“Sakwood” 
actress 

15 This might be 
corny 

16 Great Lakes 
acronym 

17 Protection j Marks 34 carava 

IStoagramfor . SS&tbnan 35Seed’sc 

19 A day's march 2 M^Se 37J^tas 

20 Place to eat, mariner 39Procyoi 

sleep and learn 3 Nothing, in 42 Thomas 

Noya etai. 

24 Rowan 4 October 31 43 It’s now 

25 Jetsam of 1773 alternative Interna 

28 Domestic hot 5 Extend a 48 Perfect 

spot show’s run Edward 

31 Most logical 6 Trans- , 50 W.W. II 

36 Asian salt tree U.S.S.R. range 53Thecle? 
38 Cantabs’ rivals 7 Controlling 55 Report 1 

40 Street show power 56 Soft cla; 

41 Seafarer’s 8 Friendly 57 S um m e 

expression Islands quaffs 

44 Show respect 9 Turnon 58 Marina 

45 Type of (be very 59 Pelagic 

mackerel pleasant) creatur 

40 Specialty of 70 10 He wrote “Our 60 Affluen 

Across Gang" person 

47 Shakespeare 11 Hawaiian 61 Mercyh 

offering thnwh College 

49 A Gardner 12 Melon or 62 Where! 

51 Avila aunt squash aremac 

52Aitcbpreceder 13 German *3 Self 

54 Abbr.on a list donkey 67 Eur. fly 

O Neu) York Times, edited by Eugene Moksha. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


56 Symbol of 
innocence 

64 Aromas 

65 Spydom name 

66 Swerve 
sharply 

68 Slanted 

69 Disastrous 

70 A Fitzgerald 

71 Singer Simon 

72 Marsh growth 

73 Jazz player’s 
phrase 

DOWN 


21 Afriendof 

W inni e 

22 Draft curves? 
25 Items on the 


m 0 





BEETLE BAILEY 


26 Kind Of 
psychology 

27 E.T., e.g. 

29 “Desire Under 
the ” 


CfcRM BEETLE/ 

He roes 

EVERYTHlMS^ 

BACKWARDS/ ? 


LOOK/ 
THOSE ARE, 
HIS SOCKS/ 


WHAT& 

THAT? 


HIS PlMS- 
POH© RM7PLE 


30 Sister’s 
daughter, e.g. 

32 Collars 

33 Upright 

34 Caravansary 

35 Seed’s outer 
coat 

37 Just as 

38Procyon,e.g." 

42 Thomas Gray 
etai. 

43It’snowJ.FJC. 

International 

48 Perfect, in an 
Edwardsfilm 

56 W.W. n area 

53 The clear sky 

55 Report on 

56 Soft clay 

57 Summer 
quaffs 

58 Marina sight 

59 Pelagic 
creature 

60 Affluent 
person 

61 Mercy hurst 
College site 

62 Where herns 
are made 

63 seif 

67 Eur. flyboys 


hi 


ANDY CAP? 


MOW ' 



„.VE*E 9-?] 



NICE 

n ZS£L 


WIZARD of ID 


Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 

f~\ F the three Soong sisters, it is now said in 
v-/ China: "One loved money, one loved 
power, one loved China." The money-lover 
was Aj-ling. who made 1 fortune 25 a specula- 
tor while married to H. H. Kong, the equally 
wealthy financier who served inienmuenuy as 
finance minister of the Chinese Republic. The 
power-lover was May-ling, who married Gen- 
eralissimo Chians Kai-shek and, as the dragon 
lady Madame Q ua ng, helped to sell the United 
States on backing Nationalist China during 
World War IL The China-lover was Gang- 
ling, who married Dr. Sun Yat-sen, the revolu- 
tionary founder erf the Republic of China, and 
who after his death became a vice c h airma n of 
Mao Zedong's People’s Republic of China. 

Of their brother, T. V. Soong, the Harvard- 
educated business tycoon who became Griang 
Kai-shek's prime minister, it is merely said that 
for a time he was the richest man in the world. 

So as far as the influence the Soongs exerted, it 
is not far-fetched of the journalist Sterling 
Seagrave to begin his richly detailed history of 
the family by assorting, “Few families since the 
Borgias nave played such a disturbing role in 

human history.” 

Nor is the statement an exaggeration in 
terms of the family ’s malignancy. The most 
dramatic revelations of “The Soong Dynasty” 
concern Ghfang Kai-shek's involvement with 
the c riminal underground — in particular one 
Big-Eared To, the godfather of Shanghai's no- 
torious Green Gang, who bolstered Chiang’s 
regime through drugs, extortion, and political 
muscle, and exterminated dissenters by the 
tens of thousands. But except for Sun Yat-sen’s 
widow, Cbing-ting, who refused to be drawn 
iigo Chiang Kai-shek’s orbit, every member of 
the family is convincingly painted monstrous 
by Seagrave in one or another special way. 

If Seagrave has any problem, it lies in sus- 
taining the drama of nis revelations. As he 
poults oat in his prologue, writing about the 
Soongs poses “special difficulties" because like 
the Cheshire Cat. they “were visible only when 
they wished to be." Because so much about 
them remains hidden, he has “chosen a way of 
revealing the Soongs that is less subject to 


The resulted tins approach is 0 ^ mccq 

fuL There is a liwfjr portrait of 
father, Charlie Soong, who ran off w the U§ 
od States m 1878 arm got himself tamed:* 
nri&skmaiy by Southern Methodists, fofo 
the charm at the man often outshines 3 
grave’s attempts both to debunk him and n3/ 
nan sinister. On the other hand, the pictum 


Unana tua-s&e): tnai emerges stone that rfr; 
Mnssohm. if not Hitler, as the voy model 0 - 
modern major dictator. And it is backed m 
solid and dramatic evidence of Chungfi^. 
mate a vriv encm with the Green Gang . 

Mon appaffmg of all is Seagram's stub 
Beared Tu Yuch-shcng. who, with twoS 
dates known as Foctananced Huang QUA - 
■and Curio Ch a n g Cfadog-chang (for 
teering in Chinese antiquities), ran the sS 
hai underworld with spectacularly ixaooti' 
bnitafity. This study is nigjhliighiedhy an ft 
view with Big-Eared Tu wrested from him b- ; 
Polish-bom journalist na me d Boca Raff St- 
who published it in her little-noticed 11 
memoir, “Shark’s Fins and 

And this bears upon the major shoctccm . 
of “The Sooqg Dynasty": So much of it . 
pends on previously published books tha 


... :*m 

,. -#*£ anMt' 


. -M t 

L-. * -4 I 


y-» «** 3 
Am l 


• va ' Sr» l 


■■ ml*- «m 


inevitably creates a sense of difa m Dm 
many relations gleaned through the F 
dean of Information Am, there remains a x 
that one has read much of this before 
Of course the point is that Seagrave - 
journalist who grew up in the 1940s on 
Qdxut-Buima border — has put the stay 
gether as it has not been done previously. * 
no doubt it bears repeating and lepcatmt 
pul in the perspective of history what Se» 
regards as the spectacular foBy of the ua 


■- M| 


States for having swallowed what he cbarai 
izes as a fairy tale cooked up by the Soongs. 


- - : -f. 

*! ■ rt -i- M 




mao 

&&mem 
eav 
FthirHU /I 


TH^T 

smree 


mat&AwH fukmr& 
mm t mjvmet 


Solmion to Prevkms Puzzle 



VETERINARY, 




*30 ffl-S. 


REXMORGAN 




|r- 


FRESTON.THI6 IS MY FRIEND 
CLAUDIA, A WOMAN ON HER WAY 
UP IN THE BUSINESS WORLD! SHE 
COMES THROUGH TOWN EVERY/—" 
SO OFTEN AND I WANT HER f™ 
v TO KNOW YOU AND TESS l MM 


HELLO > 
CLAUDIA i 
COME IN, 
DARLING! 


— 1 I WANT YOU TO MEET SOME 
BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE— BUT FIRST YOU’LL 
NEED A DRINK OR ANYTHING ELSE 
r 1 YOUR HEART DESIRES i pm t 


»!AgL6Y 
£ os«fi*kJ 


EGQtDoaa Bmaaona 
Dcamaa aoaDaaa 
□ntaHCJaa □Eaaaoa 
□t an □□□naiaa hqq 
doe □mo naa 
ocdoa iiaa aaaaa 
□Baansa naaaaaa 
□□□ naa 
□DEDsaa □□□□□□□ 
□UQH3 □□□ aaann 
qbd aaa ana 
□dq □□□aaaa aan 
noaciaaa anaaacia 
□EHnnaa □□□□□□□ 
□Bin [DEE tu OBaaaaa 


aes as a Iain tale cooKea im ay tne soongs. 
served by Henry Luce ana his publishings- - 
piie. 

As he sums up T.V.Socfflg’s “operatic « . i . , I 
ship of America" in the 1930s: ’The ScV Ut ( 
family would serve as the courtiers, the h 
maidens, and the compradors. They woul- . 
the terms, cany the moneybags, keep tb 
counting ledgers, and be nspomnble for id 
Eying sfi enemies and viuains. The \5v : 
States's role would be to provide the fund : ' 
return to their money, A m erica n s would 
charge of feeling virtuous." 

SwL the grratest exauanttit of “The S - 
Dynasty” lies in the author’s introductofT - " 
nouncement of what it acoompHsbes: 
book is the first biography of tne whole . 
and the first to examine both their pot - 
contributions and their long-hidden, men . 
isier activities. When all the dan member 
brought together in a single study, it is pos 
roseebowtheyhe^edandhindaedead]i 
in the puh to power, and lo seeinshaip 
their regime's long involvement with tnfcJTi 
pendenee upon the Shanghai gangster tmf 1 

wnrid." 


-- ''***& « 

t*A- 

»m»» 0* 4B 


■tr-Hi m 

-■•wid i«M 

■ 

r «* P«IP« 

: §r 


world." J 

After this, the proof of the pudding ! 
pressingly familiar. By his memod of « 

to look at too much of what we aborty} 
about tbe long and torlous struggle facco 
of 20th-century China. 


Christopher Lehrunm-Houpt is an thei 
The New York Times. 






BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal. 
South reached four 


GARFIELD 


*lM KJT 6CNKA LETTATOUCH HIM UNTIL TA PROMISE 

m td Hrr him cn the knee wrn a hwwer i* 


MIRROR MIRROR ON THE WALL, 
WHO'S THE FAIREST ONE OF ALL? 


THAT SCRAMBLB} WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lm 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one tatter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


PYTEM 


LOBEN 


09 WPWTS 



SHARDS SHARPS 
ON THE FIjOOK^. 


slip 


KJ South reached four 
spades after an auction that 
needs some explanation. 
North passed with a hand that 
many would open and then 
contented himself with a bid of 
one no-trump when his partner 
opened one spade. He could 
afford this seemingly weak ac- 
tion because one no-trump was 
quasi-forcing in the partner- 


South would only pass with 
a sub-minimum opening, in 
which case there would be no 
game. As it was, they reached 
four spades briskly in the face 
of diamond bidding from the 
opposition. 


The routine lead for West 
would be the diamond seven, 
but in bis orrimsatance the 
jack has much to reoomend it 
since declarer is presumably 
short in the suit If the dummy, 
for example, produced Kxx, 
the jack might enable West to 
hold the lead. 

It would seem that South 
must make exactly 10 aides, 
and that was what happened at 
other tables. But here the jack 
lead backfired when South 
won with tbe ace in dummy 
and led the deuce. 

This pul Bast to the test, it 
seemed to him that his partner 
bdd tbe ten and that the play 
of the ace might permit South 
to Tuff and then take a discard 
on the queen. 


So East played low, ! 
produced the ten, and 11 
came home quite easily. 


NORTH (D). J4 

+J»a fl 

9 A3 ,1 

OAQ2 

aiim -Ik 


WEST 
4AM 
9-US4 
OJ87 r 
4K1Q34 


SOUTH 
♦ KQMM3 

OKQJt • 
*M3 . v 
*7 . * 


!*Mdxr*UBi 


Noel* Em 

Past Pm - 14 

1N-T. 3 030 -34 V 

Pass Pus Pm 

West lad thaAamond Jack-.’ 


LERVAM 


DAPARE 


'* WHAT THE 
PILLOW FIGHT IM 
THE KIDS' ROOM 
LOOKED LIKE. 


W>rid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse March 27 

doting prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Print answer here: 


Now arrange the circled I otters to 
fo*m I fie surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Gwwrafl 

iO itotownMin 

ItotmoMBort 

MMHotanCO 

‘Monledlun 

OUvotn 

pirain 

RAS 

Rtocacenie 

SIP 

Sflhs 

Cm* Pm S*ondo 


Yesterday's 


(Answers t o m or row} 

Jumbles HOARD CRAZY TANGLE UTMOST 


ABN 

ACF Hokflna 


Answer What the tired swabbls was looking forward 
to— “SNORE” DUTY 


AKZO 
I AlwM 
AMEV 

< ATUmRubbor 
Aiwa Book 
: BVG 

I BaahrmannT 


MuandUhnck 


WEATHER 


CatandHkta 

EUmlcr-NDU 

Foicfcar 

Gist Breaodas 

HvliwMn 

Hooeovms 

KLM 


EUROPE 


cmSp Dai sd 


RtrtlBvlk 


11 u 7 45 a 

(6 61 1 ® so fir 

U » 7 « A 

7 45 4 37 s 

V) 50 3 37 d 

15 55 4 3* 0 

3 37 1 34 r 

31 W 13 54 d 

6 43 1 34 a 

6 43 -1 30 d 

W U * 43 0 

10 SB 6 43 D 

10 SO - 3 37 a 

1 34 0 33 SW 

w is S 41 a 

22 73 14 57 fe- 
lt 61 10 50 a 

8 46 2 36 Bh 

U St 5 41 cl 

W 54 B 46 r 

3 37 -3 77 Cl 

10 a t s ii 

17 63 9 48 St 

3 37 0 33 o 

7 45 4 43 r 

13 55 4 » e 

-4 25 -I U SW 


Bangkok 
Baaing 
Hons Kami 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

35 *5 Z7 81 ff 

IS 9 2 36 tr 

25 77 X 48 o 

JO W 34 73 d 

3S S5 21 70 0 

8 46 - 3 37 d 

10 SO 7 45 s 

27 84 25 77 o 

a d 17 <3 r 

11 52 5 41 s 


AFRICA 


Not Madder 

NodUoyd 

Qcn Vendor G 

Pokhood 

PMtlPS 

gntooc n 

Rod vmcD 

RfiHnco 

RcKSato 

Raval Dutch 

Unllovnr 

Van Ommorm 

VMP Stark 

VNU 


Crtro 
Capo Tom 
casa t teico 
Harare 


22 72 4 a 

27 81 12 54 

25 77 17 63 
M 9 17 63 

26 79 IS 64 
29 84 27 81 

28 12 16 61 

22 72 9 48 


AMPjCBS qo n o m o Ma : SMS 


ArtMM 

Bokoort 

Cockciill 


LATIN AMERICA 


BaonasAlm 31 3B 11 52 d 

Lima 25 77 19 46 e 

Monica COy 26 79 7 45 d 

Rlade Jtmtfea 21 12 19 66 hr 

son potto — — — — na 


EBES 

GD>lm»«M 

GBL 

Goyeart 

Hoboken 


NORTH AMERICA 


M1DDI 


Tot Aviv 

OCEANIA 


17 

63 

3 

41 

fr 

Aocnoraga 

5 

41 

-A 

21 

fr 

I 





Atlanta 

23 

73 

7 

45 

fr 


so. 

A 




14 


1 

34 

fr 






ChicDpo 

20 

60 

HI 

50 





3? , 



12 

54 


a 

fr 






Detroit 

18 

84 

S 

41 

a 






Hoootais 

27 

81 

71 

70 

DC 

1ST 




HtMIglUO 

36 

79 

19 

66 

Cl 


— 




LosjUisaSai 

t? 

61 

11 

97 


12 

54 

-i 

30 

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Mlaari 

29 

84 

17 

63 

ft- 

19 

66 

13 

36 

fir 

MlimaiHiBi 

n 

52 

6 

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cl 

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na 

Mnatraal 

4 

39 -18 

14 

ri 

24 

75 

ID 

50 

a 

r^assaa 

34 

75 

20 

68 

fr 

32 

90 

11 

53 

fr 

m* York 

19 

M 

4 

39 

fr 






ifnii 

U 

a 

7 

45 

r 






Svsttte 

8 

46 

2 

36 

r 

21 

70 

IS 

39 

a 

Toronto 

9 

48 

• 6 

21 

fr 

23 

73 

19 

66 

a 

woridnotoo 

22 

72 

10 

30 

PC 


Kraaotfianfc 
.Peirnrtna 
SacGanarala 
Safi no 
Salvor 
Troctlci Etac 
UCB 

Unerg 

VMItoMentooM 



2! MIB Onranr in 
£3 prevtaao : mi 


Cmt Pro* Cino Prov 5?”™° 

Kantadt 211 211 S®™ 10 ” ® 32 

Kaumaf m 222 S’ » MIBOsrrmi 

Klonctaor h-O 251 25H50 2*rl: ™ ^ pravtang : n 

KtoacfcaarWOffta 7020 7430 ®*S^ ,ran 2S S9 I = 

KrappSMlI 103 105 g. ,cc 2n 244 I f 

Undo 414JB 417 JJ, Jl I 5 

Lufthansa in 195 £55 £5 SI Afe-Uquue 

MAN 1S3 153 gSL 0 ™* *a SlhSlML 

McavMjmaan 19.10 1625B 5*^. , , IS AV Dassault 

MotaiiaaMbciian 252 25B gnmior Induo M K4 SancSra 

MaondUhnck 1150 1179 ™ g« BIC 

Swot, m M2 inn ^SSSS" 

RWE lQVM icyS Brjt AarospacB 413 398 

SSma BTR «7 704 SS 


CMM Prov. 

43700 
BIOS 
82900 
71800 
«S» 
1508 
4650 
2199 
66070 
66850 
2002 
2BW 
12130 
2455 


CMM Prov. 
SKF _ 201 205 

SvwdtshMaftft 216 216 

Volvo 240 241 


Mmr t vaer W pn lodav : 387 jb 
P rovtous : BUI 




ACI 

AMI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Etorol 

BouoolnvIUn 

BrnmUoa 


201 196 
290 282 
453 451 
602 594 
325 320 
313 200 


C5R 

Ouniop 

evtarthd 

Hooker 
i Moflelkui 
MIM 


s SS, 


OakOrMoo 

Poke 


ThYtaan 101 JO CabJ.Wrel« 5M 5K 

Vorta nug n ip “ftory Sdn* 138 lio 

Vtfaa iSSiM Owtarain* 196 TOO UJiSSJiT 

VEW 122^1^20 1= I^ESic 

Vonowa -™- rt ,982D1 ^ SS'S 5 S“ I/ & g ISSff- 

Cornnanbank ladu : 110X21 courtautds 145 147 rSEi-ror, 

- SSSSb. m a ^ 

\.-m*W-rn 1 MSSu, S * 2 ^ Sm 

» »ua none JT 8 323 

d m ss*"™ ajtgs s» 

' 5-19 OKN 225 228 

law jsa. 


RGC 

Santai 

melon 

Souguaod 

Mtoedddp 

W ar m ol d 

AB OnBnartta Indaa 
Pravkm :81AU 
Sauna: Reuters. 


376 371 

2 n 269 
1 52 

290 2N 
207 284 

314 316 

172 172 

245 240 

300 2*4 

iez 171 
79 77 

400 395 

368 340 

«0 469 

614 600 

189 180 

29 27 

93 100 

360 360 


MHwbtoM Carp 
Mitsui and co 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulator* 

N0cko8ac 

Nippon Stool 

Nippon Yuvan 

Mt—on 

Nomura Sac 

«wnaus 

Planaar 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

5ony 

Sumitomo Bade 
Sum Homo CMm 
SuoiltomoMehri 

toImi Cara 
TatshoMortM 
Takada Chain 
Tdk 
Tallin 

Tokva Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Torav ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
YamalchiSac 


Tw — IH Mark 36 \ 
Canadian stocks via AP 


3900 Merfand E 415 410 4JI 


mWMi/DuL Index : 12S3«tl 
Previous : 12486.15 
New tones: lieu* 
Pnwieuf : tan m 


Hoes Seng ladn : 133042 
Prevtaw : 1344.13 


^ Grand Met 

niS 7 b 

lH 1S8 SSar 
9* SS 

6«J 4 

*£%«**> 

n 3 

"SS 4.W 

wb in 

sesAs Read Id ! 

Reutera 

Rent Dutch C 

r J RTZ 


Si Pernod Me. 

I wsr 

S raa 


Altai 

AsoM Own 
AsaW Class 
Bank of Tokyo 


Roussel Udat 


» a&sssB? 1 




Cdah 

WHSZ?"* 

Rill Bank 
Pull Photo 
Pallfeu 
Hitachi 
Honda 


Bank Lev 

Brawn Boverf 

ObaGakiy 

GredH5iitsM 

EWCtnmnH 

Georg Fischer 

InttnRscounf 

Jacob Suchard 

JalRMlI 

Landis Gyr 

nestle 


2750 2700 
3M0 3620 
1645 1640 
2SSB 2950 
3420 2(35 
2900 2800 
730 750 

1955 1970 


IsT 


366 Aoefi lad es : 285J8 
Pravtom : sosdl 
CAcmaex-.ntM 
312 Piwrfoo* : 2WM 


Baastead 
CM Storage 


d-etooov; fo4acov: irJcdr; tv-ha 11 . - oamrean; pc-aortiy ckwdv: r-nrtn; 
sh-ehawersi sw-snow: M-Oormy. 


nil RSDA1TS FORECAST — CHMINELu Oitopy. FRANKFURT; Showers. 
Tamp. 0 — 3 146 —37). LONDON: Showers. Temp. 7—3 145—37). MADRID: 
Cloudy. Temp. 15—4 159—391. NEW YORK: Fair. Temp. 19—7 (64—45). 
Paris: Pasty dwdv. Temp. 9-6 148-43). ROME: Rainy. Temp, 13-5 


(55— 41), TEL AVIV: Portly clouav._T«na._W — 11^ (86 — 52). ZURICH: Oomg 


wtfh showers. T strip. 8—7 (46 — 36). BANGKOK; Fussy. Temp. 35—27 
(?J - 81). HONG KOW: Oeudy. Tamp. 34-19 (7S-66). MANILA: Pair 
jemp. 33—24 m — tb Seoul: fair. ^ Tama fl— s 146—391. Singapore: 
Slomry. Tsmp.31 — 35 (M— 77), TOKYO: Rolny.Tsmp.7 — 5 (45— 41). 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Anokv AmGoid 
Cerreatstedctadu: 125553 gpriaws 
! Previous ■ zznjw Bhryoor 

1 ...- . , Btafen 

f, „L r „, j | DeBoers 

* 1 dEEIIwl | DrivfwtMn 

AEG-Talefiinlum 107601)050 ecu 1 
AiHanrVers 1037 1054 Hwnmv 

Bari 19740 203 nSZdStael 

BdVSr 20740 213 

Barer.Hvpo. » 349 jggL . t 

Baver.VerBank XK 333 

BMW 37850 381 .S) 

Ccmmorzbank 165 164J0 

CsMtoumnil 132.70 13540 sjS 

DahnierBem 66050 675 oJS *™ 

Deuisdva Babcock ^ui 16? WtotHoWns 

Deutsche Bank 43620 443 composite stock 

S5-W “* PravkWftwS 

DUBkSChutt 21220 21030 _ 

GHH 15550 ID [ ■ — I 

Hochtief 472 472 I Kmato 

HocOtJf 208.10 *37 * ' ^ 

H0«ch 10640 110-10 *&£??■ 

Hobamann 309 393 

Herten 167 166 AnstaAm Gold 

Kail «■ Salx 252J0 255 Babcock 


Allianz Vers 

Bari 

Bevsr 

BaverJfvpo. . 
Bcnnkr.VerBank 
BMW 

Com ine nb taft 

ConHsummi 

DotaderBeni 


Nsdbcaik 
Pres Stem 
Rtnpkrt 
SA Brews 

SIHetem 

SOflM 

West Hokflna 


J 2 S SAMI 

34W 2400 STC 
'?S 2 1 SSS SM Chartered 
}?« IM Tale and Lyle 
165 0 1425 - Teeco 
’S ™» ThornEMI 
WO 965 T.l. group 

SS SS 3 S 2 B *® orH “ 

1585 1530 THF 
3W 3® Ultramar 

7 % 7*5? United 

3 1 kss 
m m saa i>« 

OO 630 WoahMMtn 
325Q 3150 . 


W PnuerNvayff 
302 3n How Par 

703 70S inchcapv 

204 in KtPPriShto 

462 469 Mol Banking 

430 430 OCBC 

245 244 OUB 

403 409 SefflbSNpyard 

226 226 Slme Darby 

337 330 s Steamship 

146 140 st Trading 

215 213 UOB 

125/32 125/32 

i8? i» oub mm: met 

256 » Prevloo* : CI7J8 

543 140 I .... „ 

534)4 532 SWMklM 

3SW 33W. ' . 

* 


rn 57D KT. JO Imknr: I77J9 
6525 6400 Previous : ftUO 


166 140 
240 261 
AID ASS 
US 5. 29 
234 235 



Swiss Voiksbank 
Union Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich ins 


I960 1970 < 
1690 1725 
6470 6530 I 
1430 1439 I 
0779 6925 
772S 7950 
4100 SMI- 

m m 

374 380 

1140 1165 
9650 9650 
1425 1440 
3685 3715 
4300 4335 
71000 71350 


Law Clan Chat 
55 55 — vs 

15H 15*+ v* 
19W 19W+ U> 
Mtt 1510— U. 
2 M 2DW— «k 
21W 2m+ W 

2*16 34 Hr 
18V. 1PL— u 
7W 7W-3W 


Previeas : 4M.H 


NA: not quMed; na: not 
auaHatMe; xd: audlvMsnd. 


244 NA 
1-73 W 
5.90 6 

935 935 
3L7 S 339 
U6 ljr 
U4 1.96 
1.18 1.18 
432 434 
448 446 


Egypt Raises Gas Prices 


Composite stock index : iiiuo 
Prwleuf : 997 JO 


MBms 


□ Banco C«mm 
Centrale 
Osa hotels 
512- Credllal 
174 Farmitaiia 
582 Flot 
144 F Insider 


9 ASM 

Astra 

I AttatCapca 

I I BoUden 

■■ 1 Electrolux 
17000 17200 Ericsson 
3701 3610 Essertv 
8395 82S0 KandiWwnlwn 
2 im TIBB I Pharmacia 
11313 11300 SacdWteortta 
ms sonawik 
S235 52 Sksntka 


307 NQ 

188 lffi 
360 360 
3SS N.Q. 
103 104 

224 222 

319 325 

293 396 

360 363 

169 169 

Nfl! v 5 

N.O. 385 
903 900 


Reuters 

CAIRO — Egypt announced a 25-percent 
rise in the price of top grades of gasoline 
Wednesday, another step m the reduction of 
state subsidies cm basic commodities. 

The move takes the price to 20 piaster a liter 
(76 cents a gallon) starting Monday. 

The government has been cutting subsidies, 
which it said have drained its coffers and en- 
couraged over-consumption. But it is wary of 
triggering riots such as those in 1977 when 
President Anwar Sadat had to back down from 
doubling the price of a one-piaster loaf of 
bread. 


4300 ElcThOm X| 
21075 EouItvSvr 
■aSDFCAfnff 
875C Falcon C 
1315 Flcnbrdooj 
267 Fardy Raft 
lira Fad inaAl 
I OOOFadPtai 
3500FCWVFW 
100 F ru**r | 
1200Fruri»airf 
■lBOBGandlsA ■ 
2200 Gaoc Come 
13600 GMCTudad 
23SDGttraifarl 
27233 GaUcore fl 

SOOGtPacUlc 
|6S0Grevhnd 
Bteo Hrdlno All 
714 Howfcar'ta 
3072 HaynDl 
J<24 H Bay Cal 
35370 imoKaW 


100 Inst Is 

“SBssssr 

2Kom Katla 
7610 Karr Add 
13457 Latah 
40476 Lae Mnrb 
IMLOmOrm 
OtoOLoeam 
5425 LL Lac 
M83 LoblawCa 
53MDSHA 
1 SCO MlCC 
8)00 Melon h x 


0V6 8 V, — w 

27 V, 2M6+1W 
Ml 5% 

Will T » 

142 146 

13U 15V.— n 
415 439 +3 
490 495 +5 

I7H 17»+ M 
aw 91k— 4k 
239 243 +2 

21* 21* 

13W 15*4+ W 
23» 2TK+ W 
171k 1794+14 
27V. 27W- Vi 
t 4 — ft 
16 16 — ft 

m2 mT* 

Uft 14ft 
29ft 29ft— ft 
26ft 32 + 2 
Oft 0ft + *4 
77 77 

11 11 — ft 

7 7ft + ft 
SlTft 17 17 — ft 

Uft 6ft 6ft + ft 
U 6 6 —ft 

110ft 1® 10ft + ft 
771 270 270 

*]7ft 17ft 17ft- ft 
158 155 157 + 4 

420 485 415 +U 

408 380 308. —30 
SIS lift Uft— lft 
Sllft 1IW 11 —1ft 
S7ft 7ft 7ft 
» 5ft £*+»| 

*5> 5ft 5ft+ ft 
27ft 27ft— ft 

16ft 14ft | 

%39Vi 39ft 39ft I 
SSft 8ft 0H+ ft 
I7ft 7 7 +ft 

30 WK 20 +ft| 
517ft 17ft 17ft 
596ft 96ft 96ft + ft I 
290 290 290 - 9 ! 

a a - ^ 

332 23 22 

I12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 1 
£18 18 18 -ft 

334 24 24 

537ft 27ft 27ft 
Slffl* 10ft 10ft— ft 
263 264 265 +3 
Stall 9ft 9ft + ft 
S7ft 694 7ft + ft 
542 41ft 41ft + ft 
*Wft 89ft 89ft— ft 
sal 31 31 + ft 

526ft at 26ft— ft 
121 121 T21 — 1 

S20ft 20ft 20ft— ft 
317ft ]) ))ft+ ft 

317ft lift 17ft + ft 
528ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
512ft 12ft 12ft 
SIM IM 1394— ft 
5Wft 14 16 +ft 

»ft 8ft Mb- ft 
537ft 37ft 37H+ ft 
•" 11 . 11 + ft 

- 106-5 



136200 RaSwvf 
2574 Rovn Pn» A 

I jWgQMre* 

Issssrr 

-37497 Shall Cand 
16537 5»wnmr 
■ SOSkrtM'B^ 
■lMSMdhmi 
p 2 tao stolen A 


SI 4ft 1«* 1 
life A A. 
S32Vr gft 7^ 

Sl^f 

5* & 2^ 

sif» m* jft 1 

430 410 42 

Uft M 
Uft 8ft 

SS ££ ; 

So* 2» ,fc » -V' 
130 135 13 

«<’ 

527 21ft 2.. . 

nSS im i • . 

■Pf'j;. 
s M- 

Illth lift < 

US 3 , 
Sim u» i 

532*. 32ft J 
SUft 30 5 ' 

m ! ' 


W Hm 


> BRIEFS 

N,i i„ 


.« 1 
■'W 1 * 







■SS I 


JPeT* 

SS m If 


--■T* ttom. uh* 
MW. 




uouworitart? 
■|9WWasnnto| 
Iteowntan ■ 

■wtaWoodwdA 
ulllYkBaar I 


*12 W 

sr fid. . 

^ a 
SO 11* 
SIM IM 
13ft fft 
114 Oft . 

it.i 


Total MflM MLUOUOriKMW 


\9»rnfi 
t 9 

' Ant 
4 ■ ■ *- • 4 A,—. 

- * 




T3E3M Indue 


15*460 . 




19343 Bank MOf# 

au _ 

CoitBatt 
2733 DamTxIA 
748 MBIT rri 


T2412 Royal Bank 
I ttfRavTOrtwl 


106 1U 106—5 
516ft 14 14ft+ ft 

523ft 27ft 22ft— ft 


Total Solas W3J44 rinraa. 


High iwC; 

s* tv: 

SlTft 1796 • 

SIM Sir. 

$2514 3ft s' 
519ft )M6 . 




f»r ) 


530ft 29ft 29ft + ft 
Sllft lift lift + ft 
JI2JS 12ft T2VJ+ ft 
513ft 32ft 33ft +11% 
517ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
518ft 18ft 18ft + ft 
230 230 238 — & 

KBft 23 23 — ft 


i ri d wh to te Indus 


I t aiBji yl 


SAW® IN WORDS AND PJCW . - ■ 

DOONESBUOf >.;• 

DA&YlNTHEIHr 


„ £*****» 
hr , 





hr 


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j - 1 * - 



Page 15 




»'* . 
nUj f - 

i 

s toft... a . 

4 - •.,. 

i; -. Si _ 

"•f--**- i.-i 


siadiens, Nordiques Keep Up Pace 

ins and Sabres Defeated in Key Adams Division Games 


• The Assodared Press 

CTREAL — The scramble 
Son in (be Adams Division 
its os the northern front, 
ie French Connection re- 
■ i ahead of the field. Both 
/ ntreal Canariicns and Que- 


caromed a pass off the Bruin cen- 
ter's skate past a helpless Steve 
Penney — scored for Boston. 

Montreal jumped ahead by 3-l» 
one of the goals awning on Tremb- 
lay’s slapshot from just ipswft r cen- 
ter ice. Boston goalie Pete Peelers, 
who hng won only two of his last 11 


NHL FOCUS starts, got & pad on the puck but it 

— — slid past ana into the neL 


*■ $ ■_> .- . _ . 
*fr*fi*M* ' r. 

7e * '*y. .- ; > _ 

■Sfcr- W- 

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. 

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»■ ' . 
« JtA.%.,-*- . 

** ' . 

&>+**=- 

ft" \ * 



xdiques, two of the hottest 
.in the National Hockey 
won Tuesday night to stay 
ied in first place, 
jxeal downed Boston, 5-3, 
•^iebec edged Buffalo, 4-3; 
.£ def eats , the Sabres fdf 
-shits out of first place and 
ins dropped eight points be- 

' /here it was the New York 
s S, Pittsburgh 4; Edmon- 
Jie New York Islanders 5, 
trait 5, Minnesota 1. 
icr Montreal nor Boston 
' particulariy wdl in a game 
■ ig some weird goals. Mario 
-'jy wtiiwi from mid-rink 
ssy Robinson scored cm his 
-am from behind his own 

'weren’t very crisp tonight. 
It cost us a few goals, ” sakl 
' adieu rantem, Bob Gainey, 
asangnasn’t been very 

" Fergus, Geoff CrantnaH 
‘.at T/rneeman — who Was 
' 1 with a goal after Robinson 


Mario Gossefin after a* shramble. 
But refer ee Bryan Lewis disallowed 
the goal, ruling Gates Orlando had 
gloved the puck ahead to Ruff. 

“The pass wasn't directed to 
him, it just touched the top of Or- 
lando’s glove,” said Buffalo's coa- 
ch, Scotty Bowman. 


The Bruins back to tie it 
before JUiden DeBlois 
with the Canadiess shnnh^nAvt 
for the eventual game- winner . 

“Maybe it’s the turn: of year; 
maybe everybody’s a little mentally 
and physically tired," DeBlois said 
in explaining the ragged quality of 
the game. 

"Some people say you can bum 
yourself oat for the playoffs in a 
race like this. They said it about 
Boston last year,” said Montreal’s 
Chris Nilan, who scored a third- 
period insurance goal “I don't 
think so. I think r brer final games 
are important because they'd be a 
sign of how we’re going to nlav in 
the playoffs.” 

In Quebec Gty, the action was 
more impressive. Michel Goulet 
scored his 50th goal and Brent Ash- 
ton got his 30th as the Nordiques 
buSt a 4-1 lead and held on. 

After two quick goals by Mike 
Fo&gno and Uni Housley had 
brought them to within one, the 
Sabres seemed to gel the equalizer 
with only 49 seconds remaining as 



rerange because l made the league 
reverse a decision against us a cou- 
ple of weeks ago." 

At 4:39 of the third period Gou- 
let picked op a loose puck at center 
ice; skated over the Sabre bine tine 
and unleashed a scorcher that beat 
Barrasso high oo the glove side for 
the game-wamcr. Reaching the 50- 
goal plateau for the third straight 
year, Goulet received a prolonged 
standing ovation from thcCbliseels 
15,327 spectators. 

"It really feels good to have the 
fans behind you lie that,” he said. 
“Td tike to continue tike this every 
year — but who knows? • 

“The important thing is that I 
help the team to win. We made a 
few mistairix in die third period, 
but Mario made the key saves earfi- 
or and that kept us in it” 

Nordique Coach Michel Ber- 
geron was impressed by his team’s 
effort “We played with a lot of 
intensity and discipline,” he said 
“They opened up and ««nn back, 
bat we deserved to win." 


Indiana’s Knight Still Casual, Candid, Controversial 



U W ta d fta» Nvn c to c J 

Bobby ‘H yoo win, people seem to care what you do.’ 


By Ira Beckow 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Five college coaches artmded a 
news conference Monday at the Hall of Fame dub 
in Madison Square Garden. Four of them — Loo 
Ca m esecca of SL John's. Don DeVoe of Tennessee, 
Walt Hazzard of UCLA and Bob Dotson, awa^tani 
to Dermy Crum at Louisville — wore sails and ties. 

The fifth wore a green polka-dot shirt open at the 
collar, a tan golf sweater with a “Bogie Busters” 
inscription cat the left breast, and a folded sprats 
magazine in the back pocket of his brown slacks. 

Never mind. Indiana’s Bobby Knigbt has made a 
career of marching to the tootle of his own flute. 

Knight is easily one of the conn try’s most contro- 
versial and volatile basketball coaches on any levd 
and one of the most successful fra winning gar nets 

About tiuTbsl time New York 
Knight coaching — that is, after he had noodled the 
Olympic team to a gold medal in Los Angeles — 
was on film dips during the Purdue g>mu» Feb. 23, 
when he fhmg a chair across the court in a moment 

was flungrarttf the game and the Bi^OConte-- 
ecce suspended him for another. 

New York fens were to see Knigh t in the flesh 
Wednesday night when. Indiana played Tennessee 
in tiie Garden in the semifinals of the National 
invitation Tournament. LoitisviDe was to meet 
UCLA in the second game. 

Camesecca’s i«wn is in the final four of another 
tournament this weekend, one Knigh t knows quite 
well; in 1976 and 1981, his Hoosiers won the NCAA 
tide. This year, with an 18-1 3 record (his worst in 14 
years at Indiana), they weren’t invited to the prima- 
ry postseason tournament and faistpftH accepted a 
bid to the NIT, an admittedly lesser meet 

*Tve always liked the NIT,” said Knight, who 
has won h twice and who remembers following 


what was then the country's major college tourna- 
ment as a teenage - in Ohio . 

Thirty years later, Knight sometimes throws tan- 
trums that would have embarrassed a 15-year-old. 
In fact, they embarrassed a 45-year-old. 

I’m intelligent enough to know what I did was 
dumb,” be said. “Bat it’s the Long story of my 
frustration over the officiating. I was in control, 
though, even if it seemed I wasn’t. The first thing I 
thought of throating was my sport jacket, but I 
didn’t have one on. Then 1 reached into my pocket 
and grabbed my money. But! decided against that. 
So I took the next handy thing , the chair, and 
scooted it across the floor. But 1 made sure I didn’t 
throw it hard enough to hurt anybody." 

Of course, there have been more than one inci- 
dent of odious behavior. WfaHe he coached the U.S. 
team in the 79 Fan Am Games, he was involved in 
an altercation with a Puerto Rican policeman and 
was charged in absentia with aggravated assault. 

And there is his severely abusive i»ngn«y. while 
coaching his players. 

This season has seen odd ponishmcnis meted opt 
during a loting streak. Knight refused to allow two 
players he’d put in his doghouse to ride oo the plane 
and the bus with the othms. And he dismissed Mike 
Giomi for “academic reasons" despite GtomPs hav- 
ing improved on his grades the previous semester. 

“I bold my players to a higher academic standard 
than the NCAA,” he said, “because the NCAA is* 
concealed with players’ being eligible. I'm con- 
cerned with them graduating." 

Asked bow he felt about his volatile huag* , he 
said: “If you win, people seem to care what you da" 

Knight still says what he thinks. The George- 
town-SL Jobs’s game? “Georgetown has the better 
ream, the better intensity, the better players. And 1 
don’t care if Sc. John’s or SL Cecilia’s or Sl Am- 
’ can start five saints 


azers Get Past Lakers in Overtime 


SCOREBOARD 


- -dbyOer Stag Front J Hs pat d t a 
(1AND, Oregon — The 
-i Trail Blazers are finally 
-out grief instead of taking 



* 1 


the National Basketball Associa- Elsewhere il was Milwaukee 107, 
lion’s Pacific Division standings. W ashing ton 96 ; Cleveland 112, 
But with Tuesday night’s 116- New York 98; Dallas 134, Golden 
1 13 overtime victory over the tfivi- State 107; Oiicaga 120, 1***™ 
son champion Los Angeles Lakers, 1 19; Houston 115, Gty 93' 
Portland has won six out of its last New Jersey 109, Atlanta 108; Den- 


Football 


Basketball 


USFL Leaders 


■ASTERN CONFERENCE 


The Road to the N.C.A.A. Championship 


were expected of roruano nas won six out or its last New Jersey 

but then the. seven outings and is solidly in sec- ver 104. Utah 89 and Detroit 119. 
raid place. _ . — 

Furthermore, the Trail Blazers 
have been gwy^fting without their 
Door leader and third-leading scor- 


I first round 


NBA FOCUS 


: as derided for making an 
an trade with Denver and 

- .ting Sam Borne ahead of er, guard Jim Paxson, who injured 

Jordan. Last month, the his finger during a practice March Angeles w hining streak, 
-languished in the middle of II. ■*— ‘ * 


Mil 1 1 <i.i 


^ • • 

if 

*. 

f* 

t .. 




.^ T — •*“ 


v •.«• - 

!*>■> ’ 


Phoenix 93. 

"The Lakers are playing the best 
basketball in the league right now,” 
Portland Coach Jade Ramsay said 
after his team broke a lOgame Los 
:^|ptit 
done tonight with sticky Arfmee 
strong rebounding and hustle." 

“Portland is reaDy craning,” said 
the Laker coach, Pat Riley. “Jack 
las them playing very wdl at just 
the right time: All the criticism they 
took early you can wipe away. This 
chib is putting it together and will 
be a factor in the playoffs.” 

Riley was aHuding to the Blazers’ 
off-season trade of Calvin Natt, 
Lafayette Lever, Wayne Cooper 
and two draft choices to Denver fra 
Kdri Vandeweghe. 

The Trad Blazers, after getting a 
crucial three-point play from 
Vandeweghe to tie the score late in 
regulation, outscored the Lakers, 
10-7, in overtime, with five players 
getting two paints each. 

Los Angeles, which has already 
dinchad the Pacific Division, learn 
the Trad Blazers by 17 games with 
1 1 games left But Gyde Drexler, 
who had 20 points and nine assists, 
said Portland wanted to send a 
message that the playoffs won’t be 
a cakewalk for the Lakers. 

“We figured we’d been playing 
well the last month," he said. “Our 
mentality was to beat them on our 
own court to iproue we had a chance 
in tbe playoffs.” 

Laker guard Byron Scott, who 
led all scorers with 28 points on 12- 
fra-16 shooting, said he wasn’t too 
disappointed tbe team’s winning 
streak stopped. 

“Everything has to crane to an 
end,” he said. “We’re just looking 
to continue to play good ball" 

The Lakers, who lost for only the 
third time in their last 24 games, led 
by 106-103 before Vandeweghe, 
who scored 21 points, hit his three- 
point play with 41 seconds left 
Neither team scared again in re- 
lation. 

One of the keys for Portland was 
bolding aB-tnne NBA scoring lead- 
er Kareem Abdul- Jabbar to 16 
pamtson 6-fra-16 shooting. “It was 
three against one,” forward Mychal 
Thompson said of Portland’s 
ORLEANS (AP) — The star of the Tulane basketball team and swarmmg de fense . Tm sure befelt 
tmfanhy student were arrested Tuesday night, accused of firing be was in a WWF (World Wrestling 




Yards 

Rush 

Pan 

Tamaa Bay 

2101 

692 

1409 

Birmingham 

1746 

737 

1007 

Botthnora 

1737 

616 

1121 

New Jersey 

1632 

921 

711 

Menusils 

1601 

775 

B26 

Jacksonville 

1473 

582 

•91 

Orlando 

1148 

DeienM 

585 

563 

Baltimore 

1390 

569 

541 

Tampa Bay 

1442 

519 

923 

Birmingham 

1475 

535 

140 

Memphis 

1613 

692 

921 

New Jersey 

T7S5 

670 

lie 

Jacksonville 

1931 

■77 

1054 

Ortanda 

1949 

1156 

795 




FOUL 

FOUR 


FOUL 

FOUR 


aiwufaQky 


StfUMGfty 




•T 






r ■ 


; Sir LAs Cay 


1 




UwfeMEMP 
Sfoudt. BUM 
Fustm. BALT 
Raovn, TB 
LuBw, JACK 
Hone, Hi 
Bftfcje. JACK 

Comm orl 


niwimiMii ii 

ATT COM YDS TD 1KT 

in? a urn 

131 77 1070 
140 9} 107? 

IN 07 T224 
Cl 34 416 
110 Sl 773 
M 36 2»0 
101 41 403 




KMtakyM 






:$■ 


Tmsn"’ 


ANuqMnius 


I ojuun 




TB 
WoBw, NJ 
Rosier. JACK . 
Bryant BALT 
UNMORL 
Cflbhs, BIRM 
Wifl kuna. MEMP 
Lavrta, MEMP 
Carthon, NJ 


Trwtinofl, TB 
BALT 

Smith. BIRM 
Atoll. JACK 
Moser . MEMP 
X0*. JACK 
Center, BALT 
Jams. BIRM 
ROXto. JACK 


ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
» 4S1 MT 7 

09 447 £0 0014 

n .a 44 »* 

70 3U AS 35 2 
76 301 0 20 1 
44 255 L? 15 4 
40 347 U 37 0 
30 244 LI 43 3 
S 233 oai 
Ricaim 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 

20 49 1X7 641 S 
22 275 115 22 0 

21 3U17JS2 S 
21 2flU»5l 2 

10 410 211 5? 4 
19 TO 102 as 0 
10 2D HI 27 o 
17 334 10A 53t 1 
17 106 U IS 1 


^ • Atxjqwwrjue 


Ajbqquentue 


'.Jr* 


KC. Stale 00 


• -'F 

•:7 ,T ’ •• 


•.ANi^OM 




i=£ 


Cotw. ORL 
S wider. JACK 
AodnBysnyn. TB 
Milter. MCMP 
PartrldBA NJ 
Lnftcteta, 0ALT 
BIRM 


McFoMmv BIRM 
Joduon. ORL 
Lorn, BALT 
YfilBamv MEMP 
ButNb JACK 
NJ 


Ita i—iUHitad ft— Irtawalcnci 

red from betnd by A^dnl Thompson, Laker Kneem 
hMhr had fee baB dapped away by Bernard Thompson. 
gAbthiJabburtoonly 16 points, Portlfliid won, 11M13. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

me Star Accused in Tix’ Scheme 


P Bi Ti m , ORL 
Harris. BALT 
WtUtarra. MEMP 
Hockatt NJ 
Kama. JACK 
PWFto, NJ 
Camith, BIRM 


NO YDS AVG TB OO LG 
27 1157 419 3 4 57 
If 112 417 3 3 57 
17 720 424 T 4 59 
23 96S4VJ9 4 7SS 
26 1040 40J 3 6 61 
17 670 3RA A 3 49 
23 072 VS I 4 SO 
Pont Monb 
NO YDS AVG FC LG TD 
0 106 03 7 37 B 
1] 155 129 1 71 0 
M 163 1U 1 20 0 
9 90 100 0 a 0 
5 40 10 0 12 0 

IS 71 S3 3 15 0 
KMnlf RMorrars 

NO YDS AVG LG.TD 
19 476 25.1 1W 1 
9 199 211 4t 0 




Transition 


National Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


BASEBALL 


174 22JD 49 0 
127 212 V 0 
KSS21.D28 0 
143EU36 0 
141 20L1 26- 0 


BALTIMORE— Bant BUI Swoooerty, anch- 
or, to Its mlnar-teaoua complex tor recatNon. 


lime players, said Orleans Parish District Attorney Harry Con- there.' 

ad with violations of 1 -rmigana sports bribery laws were John 
^ 24, an aB-Metro Conference senior forward who this season 
I lSjxants, and Gary Kranz, 21. Sought were sophomore guard 
Haaniquc, 19, and senior guard Bobby Thompson, 22, 
efinisfcd the season 15-1? "“** — ti 


(AP.LATl 


in die aflpg r d yframp rxme last nmQth against Southern 1 
i Menqdus Slate; both were plawd hi Tulane. Williams sd 
i,i 6049 loss to Memphis 


e, a game in wirich-Tulane was a 
apoderdog. In the Southern Mississippi game, wot by Tulane, 
played erratically in the firs half and wound up with a 
13 points. Tulane was a 10V:- point favorite . 

ona Slate AJ>. Tamburo Resigns 

. % Arizona (AP) — Arizona State Athletic Director Dick Tam- 
S*d Tuesday night in the wake of news reports that several of 
bTs baseball players had been taking a mood-altering drug 
d by a campus psychiatrist. Tamburo said his decision aid not 
ti toe controversy’, but “was a culmination of things" — includ- 
.- «»’ty President J. Rnssdl Nelson's telling him “it was time for a 

ro, 54, was named AD. in 1980; he had been an as ns ta nt ASU 

- *»ch from 1958-66. Naming Deputy Athletic Director Frank 
«s interim athletic director. Nelson raid the the school's athletic 
at “requires immediate reorganization." 

.1 the past 21 months, Arizona State has been penalized by the 
3 Conference in five roosts. The football and basketball pro- 
*th had loring rec o rds this season and the baseball team is m 
Jl its first losing season in 25 years. 

’s Caps Fined for Loaning Player 

tfORK (AP) —The National Hockey League fined the Warib- 
’ apiak $7,000 Tuesday for illegally loaning coner Mikko Lan- 
i Finnish i««n after signing him rat March 10. LemfiOTn, a 28- 
«wer who had vet to appear in a game vrith the Caps this 

- no was suspended for Wasnington's first playcsf game. 

•* ®. who was with the New Yrak Rangers me jast uiree seasons, 

d as a free agent earlier this month, andjx 
> a to play seven games in Finland through March 21. Theleague 
?lcs prohibit a team from loaning a player to mother team 
putting him o« waivers. 


Golfing Couple 
Aces Same Hole 

The Associated Press 

BECKENHAM, England — 
Ena and John Browribill share 
ora only a marriage. Both are 
insurance brokers, both have 
the same birthday — and both 
scored hoks-in-oneonihe same 
day on the same hole. 

“1 was knocked out,” Brown- 
hOL 43, said Wednesday at the 
Sbortiand5 Golf Club in this 
London suburb. “I can Idl you, 
it cost us a few rounds.” 

Sunday morning, BrownhflL 
the dub treasurer, selected a 7- 
iron for his tee shot on the 1 1th 
bale. “I hit the ball well, and it 
just bounced onto the green and 
straight into the hole," he said. 
“I couldn’t believe it, but it’s a0 
nfKriwl — I wasp laying with a 
lawyer and a justice of the 
peace, so Tve good witnesses.” 

Sunday afternoon. Ins wife 
Fna, 40, used a 7-wood at the 
same facie during a dub tourna- 
ment. “When the ball disap- 
peared rat die green, I thought it 
must have an unusual lie, be- 
cause I couldn't see it," she said. 

A spokesman fra die Guin- 
ness Book of World Records 
said it is investigating to see if 
the double boles- in-one by a 
married couple is unique. 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Offense 

Yards Rush 

Pass 

Houston 

3063 

195 

1568 

Oakland 

1542 

739 

1103 

Denver 

1632 

644 

988 

Portland 

1599 

767 

932 

Arizona 

1567 

593 

974 

Las Angelas 

1466 

611 

555 

Son Antonio 

956 

Defense 

407 

549 

Arizona 

1257 

491 

766 

Portland 

1444 

527 

917 

San Antonio 

1565 

644 

921 

Los Angelas 

1639 

606 

1(03 

Oakland 

1712 

426 

1286 

Denvar 

1727 

552 

1175 

Houstan 

1763 

QuurtarteitH 

522 

1248 


CHICAGO— Waived Mika Squires, ffrs) 
b oa tman. Placed Clltt Snack, pitcher, on the 
21-Oov disabled list. Sant Mark Gilbert, auf- 
ttetder. to Denver c4 the Amsrictn Asscckt- 
Hoa and Kenny Wlinaanhoutflektar, and Ren 
Korkovtcfc catcher. 1o Gians Falls of the New 
YerkrPenn Leesue. 


x-Boston 
x-PhBadeiphlo 
Now Jersey 
Wtzxnineton 
New York 

v-MBwoukoe 
Detroit - 


Ctevetond 

Atlanta 


CINCINNATI— Sen* Fred TeOver, Mike 
Smith, BUhr Howto and Rob Murphy, pitclv 
n to Hs ml nor-teeswe complex for reaeslan- 


W L 
S7 14 
52 19 
36 36 
35 36 
24 49 
Ceetral DhrWM 
52 21 
* 35 33 

35 38 
29 43 
2* 44 
2D S3 


Pet GB 
M3 — 
J32 3 
J00 31ft 
-493 22 
320 34 

JT2 — 
-535 13 
A79 17 
A03 22ft 
J89 23ft 
378 31ft 


stats: Detroit * (Thomas 141; PlwenU 28 
(Adams, Humphries 6). 

Indiana 31 * 32 36—11? 

em cees 29 29 31 31— 138 

Jordan 13-34 13-13 38. WooHcm 14-2234 31; 
SIChHnp 9-14 44 23. KellODO 8-15 5-8 21. Re- 
beuedt: Indtana 42 (Kellooo ID); Chkooosi 


Hockey 


NHL Standings 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick ptataten 


Keflv, HOU 
Hebert, OAK 
WTTHams. AR1Z 
Yesm, LA 
Woodward, PORT 
Ewans, den 
N eohetaeL SA 


ATT COM YDS TD I NT 
315 133 1926 If 6 
135 66 1W1 12 4 
US 17 11112 4 6 
117 61 888 35 

90 42 jU 2 4 
178 83 1069 ’ 5 10 
79 35 436 1 6 


ii lent. 

x- Denver 

46 

26 

SB 




W L 

T 

Pts 

CF 

GA 

HOUSTON— sent Lotty Aekar.Macmv Her- 

x-Houstaa 

41 

29 

JU 

4 

■-Philadelphia 

48 

19 

7 

m 

329 

233 

nandez odd Mark Knudson. pitchers; John 

^-Dallas 

41 

32 

.562 

5W 

x-Waehl noton 

43 

22 

9 

95 

391 

222 

Mtaerack.artcher.and Eric Bulkx*,outftek»- 

San Artonlo 

36 

37 

xn 

10W 

x-N.Y. Islanders 

39 

31 

5 

83 

331 

293 

er.te Tucson of the Pacific Coast League. Sent 

Utah 

35 

38 

An 

11W 

N.Y. Ranoers 

34 

40 

10 

SB 

27V 

325 

Randy Marti and Outlie Karfeld.pltche(ft<D 

Kansas Qtv 

29 

44 

an 

17VS 

Pltteborgh 

23 

45 

5 

51 

254 

Sl 

Its mtoor-toogue complex tor reBselimmsnL 


Pacific otvtstae 



New Jersey 

20 

44 

9 

49 

242 

312 

LOS ANGELES— Optioned Jock Pimple. 

W— A. Lefters 

52 

19 

732 



Adams Division 



catcher, to Atbuauerauo of the Pacific Coast 

Portland 

36 

37 

An 

77 

x -Quebec 

37 

27 

9 

83 

303 

255 

Leooua. 

Phoenix 

32 

40 

MA 

2BW 

■Montreal 

36 

27 

n 

S3 

277 

247 

PHILADELPHIA— Sant Roman Coraball* 

Seattle 

3D 

42 

Alt 

22W 

x -Buffalo 

33 

26 

14 

ID 

258 

220 

Rocky odtareei and Tony Ghstfl, pttchers. 

LA Cl) poors 

25 

48 

-342 

28 

Boston 

33 

22 

9 

75 

276 

263 

and Francisco Melendez, first baseman, to Its 

Golden State 

2D 

52 

an 

32W 

Hartford 

26 

38 

9 

61 

259 

301 


Ptttatwrah Ion Horton] B-MD-25; New York 
(on Herron) 14-77-9—40. 

i a 2—3 
• 3 3-1 

Palement (30), Lsmleux (15), Ashton (30). 
Goulet (50); Tucker (2D), Fo Dane (27),Hous- 
ley (14). Shots oagoed: Buffalo Urn Gonefln) 
44-n—aa; Quebec Con Bamsso) WM— 27. 

1 3 8-3 
3 2 1—5 

Walter (18). Tremblay (27), Robinson (12), 
DeBlois 01). Niton (19); Ferns (29). Court- 
nan (10). Lineman (34). Skate on neat'- Bos- 
ton (an Penney) 5-9-10—24; Montreal (on 
Peeters) 12-1D4-28. 


mi n or l e u a ue complex tor reasstonment. 
Plaead Joe LeMbwra. outftoler.on the 60doy 
emergency dtaobtad (1st. 

BASKETBALL 


t x -cl l ncfied playoff berth! 
(v-ctmehad dtvlstaa title) 


, PORT 
Be nt le y . OAK 
Johnson. DEN 
Brown. ARIZ 
Youno. LA 
Long, ariz 
WTU toms. OAK 
Gray. LA 
Gerhart. DEN 


Johnson. HOU 
Venfin, HOU 
Carter. OAK 
Lewfta DEN 
Morris. DEN 
TownseH. LA 
Rosi. port 
L ockett. PORT 
Banks. OAK 


Tdier. OAK 
Watters. HOU 
daBruna. ARIZ 
Portrldne, LA 
GanetL PORT 
Sneatmcm. DEN 
Harder. SA 


MdMLHOU 
Martin, DEN 
Horrts. ARIZ 
HOB. PORT 
Banks, OAK 


Verdin. HOU 
Fonflmer. OAK 
Harris. ARIZ 
Bentley, OAK 
Jaekeoa PORT 
HDfL PORT 
WIlltomvSA 


ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
58 385 L4 25f 3 
51 362 7.1 57 1 
46 299 6529 4 
43 273 U 44t5 
39 192 63 22 2 
53 176 UH 3 
45 171 U 17 B 
43 164 25 29 1 
25 142 SJ 15 ff 


CHICAGO— RrwJ Rod Thom. peorml maiv 
aasr. Named Jerry Krause aenerel manaser. 
FOOTBALL 


DALLAS— AmeiB 


the retirement at 


Herb Scott, Board. 
LA. RAMS-SIsnt 


I Dieter Brack. Quarter- 


NO YDS AVG LG TD 
29 373 139 521 4 
28 380 H4 74 A 
22 4» 215 5tt 4 
21 279 113 27 1 
21 2221053912 
IS 4S0 3Z2 44t 4 
18 270 150 371 1 
17 206 1U SO 1 
U 292 1U 41 3 


bock, to a tour-veer contract. 

United Hales FaetboN 
ARIZONA— Stoned Kit LnrtinoA detemlvs 
tackle, to a toor-year contract. 

HOCJCNY 

H e W cerf Hacker I ti pn 
BUFFALO— Colled up Gates Ortanda for- 
ward, from Rochester at toe American Hock- 


YDS AVG TB I2D LO 

24 9IO 4U 2 10 56 
31 *57 408 3 356 
15 409 404 1 S 52 

25 1012 405 1 6 53 
18 721 404 2 4 50 
2D 771 385 B 2 5S 
22 777 363 0 2 54 


MONTREA L ne edled Seres Botaeerl, 
rtotrf wine, from Sherbrooke of the AHL. 

HEW JERSEY— R e t u r n ed Gorv McAdam. 
left wtaa. to Maine of the AHL. 

COLLEGE 

AIR FORCE— Announced the restonattoa 
of John Moktefls hockey coach; named 
Coot. Chuck Dench hoc ke y coach. 

CINCINNATI— Homed Tony DeBtasse as- 
sistant football coach. 


Soccer 


VOS AVG FC LG TD 
14 170 12.1 1 79t I 
9 94 1IU I 33 0 

20 TO 95 2 23 0 
9 n 87 3 32 0 
6 « U on i 


NO 


YDS AVG LG TD 
ID 312 3U 94f T 
■ 231 285 57 B 
9 256 28A 76 o 

6 156 264)38 0 

7 164 23L7 44 O' 
4 137 228 34 a 
• 1ST 224 24 8 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
EUROPEAN GROUP 4 
Yugoslavia L Lusembourp 0 
Paints SfoadtesK France 6. Yuaadovio 5. 

Butearta X EaN Germany Z Unemboure B- 
Nem Motctier. April 3. Yueoslavki vs. 

France; April L Butoerla vs. East Germany. 

SOUTH AMERICA. GROUP 3 
Okie Z Urug uay P (at Bto de Janeiro) 

INTERNATIONAL (FRIENOUE51 
Enatond Z Ireland 1 
Romania ft. Patand 0 
Soviet Union Z Austria 0 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Meti 1. Bordeaux I 
Rouen l. Names 0 
RC Pori* A Toulon l 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

28 SB M 37-187 
MftnMoeto* 31 35 35 18— 96 

Cummings M-21 24 2Z Pressev B-15J-721; 
vwniacns 1G20 5-7 37, Malone 10-20 2322. Re- 
bounds: Mlhraukee 62 (Cummlnd? 12); 
WashlnotonS} (Robinson U. AiNto: Milwau- 
kee 19 (Preseor 71; Washington 24 (Gus Wil- 
tons B). 

Near York 34 38 30 34— 98 

C H value d 24 W SB 18— IB 

Free 4-14 7-B1LHubtwrdZ9 8-10 14; Tucker 
E7-Z7 2-2 37, Orr 6-12 3-7 15. RebooBds: New 
York 55 rwuuralO); Oevetond 56 (PoouMte 
9). Asetats: New York 34 (Sporraw 10) ; Cleve- 
tond 27 (Davte B). 

Gorges State SB 28 26 25—1*7 

Delto 22 S3 43 36—131 

Aguirre 18-16 66 27, Bkackmcn M2 10-1034; 
F«uy«9ftDV62),Cannar IMS 1-3 31. Smith M 
M IK RebouadK Golden State 39 (Smith 8); 
DoBae 52 (Perkin*. Brvant Vincent 7). As- 
■tate: Goktea Stale It (FIavd.Canaergl; Dal- 
las SB (Davis, Nlmphbs 7). 

Utah 17 29 21 22— Bf 

Doaver M 25 SB *5— 1*4 

English 10-175-9 25, Natt 9-13 34 Zl; Danttor 
5'13661AW1lkk»B-13D4n6.Rebeaads: Utah 
53 (Eaton 12); Denver 61 (Natt 72). Assists: 
Utah 29 (Stockton 6); Denver 32 (Lever V). 
aty 38 24 34 33- 92 

24 3B SB 29—115 
Samoeen ID-1824 2Z CHajuwon W-14 D-l 2D; 
Thome 8-13 1-2 19, Wooctaon 6-15 %1 14. Re- 
liuundi : Kaosue dry 45 (Thompson 12); 
Hoaston 63 Hienemn 1«>. Asiltos: Kansas 

atr >4 rweodtaBi 4)/ Houston 36 (McCray 12). 
New Jersey 35 25 36 19 W-1B9 

Atlanta 24 21 37 33 32—118 

Rkbardson 13-20 7-9 34. Ransev 5-12 4-5 U; 
WlUdns 16-3*5-937, Carr 7-U V2 15. Rlvsrs44 
H 15. Riheeeds' New Jersey 57 (GadasM 
11); Atianta si (wmuns 91. Assists: Now Jer- 
sey 34 (Ransey »); Attanla 31 (Rivers ?). 
Detroit 22 31 34 32— 119 

Pboeobc 38 25 28 13- 93 

Trlpucka 9-18 7*25. LOOB 9-17 W 2D; Lucas 
6-94-10 16. AdamsM 3-3 13. Rebeoeds: Detroll 
77 (Lai maser 23); Phoenix 40 (Adams 8). As- 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Dlvteten 

Jt-SL LauU 34 27 12 50 273 259 

x-CMcbbo 35 34 5 75 2S6 282 

X -Detroit 25 39 11 61 293 Ml 

x -Minnesota 24 40 13 60 252 3B4 

Toronto 19 47 B 46 231 321 

Saflrtha Dtrtsfaa 

y- Edmonton 47 17 10 184 348 266 

x-Wlimloeg 41 27 7 99 334 311 

x-COtoarv 38 27 9 85 238 284 

x-LOS Angptet 32 29 13 77 322 304 

Vancouver 24 43 8 56 268 381 

(v-citnched iflvteton tttie) 

(x-dlndied atovoff berth) 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
Mtoeerete 1 ■ 6—1 

DettWt 1 B 4-5 

Park (12). Oarodnlck 2 (541. Manna (9k 
Sinter (11); Grrttacn (12). (Bokarev). W59. 
Shots oa goal; Mkpesata ianStaMn) 4-5-6— 
K; Detroit (on Melanson) UMB-15-B. 
F d iH o nte q 2 4 1—7 

N.Y. Istoders 4 i *— 5 

Meseior 2 (221. Cette* 2 (30k Gretzky (671. 
Harter (15); Potvin (15k H enry 12). Tranter 
an. Bosov (56). Tanoill (40). Shots on goat: 
Edmonton (an Hradev) 11-13-11—34; Hew 
York (an FutirJ IM-II — 24. 

P ltteborg h 12 14 

(LY. Rangers 8 2 8-5 

Pavel Idi 2 (12). Greeehner (16k & Patrick 
(UkOsbome (3); Rtastlng (VkLamtoux (37). 
kamoureux (U. Young 137). Shots ee goal: 


Golf 


PGA Leaders 


Exhibition Baseball 


TUESDAY'S RRSULTS 
SL Louis TO. PMtodolPhto 5 
Atlanta 6, Baitlmere 2 
Los Angeles 11. Toronto S 
N.Y. Mats 1, Boston 0 
Ptttoburvb 4. Mktoetata 3 
Chicago White Sax 8. DetroH 3 
Kansas aty Ik Texas 5 
Houston 6 Cincinnati 5 
Oakland 12. Sv Dtago 6 
Cleveland A San Francisco 2 
Milwaukee f. Chicago Cuba 7 
Seattle 4. Coillomla 0 
N.Y. Yankees Z Montreal I 


Leaders on tee Pretesstona! Golfers Assed- 
Ptton tear t hr ough the Lai Vegas laythrttea- 

■d; 

EARNINGS 

l.Curtls Strame S33U46.ZUtftnvWtaik)nB 
JT97J3B. Z Mark O'Meara nfLSBK 4. Craig 
Stadter *1364(26. 5. Fuzzy Zoellar 1126.922. 6, 
Tom WatsmSll? J35.7,Mlka SmlmniZVN.Z 
Fred Couples Si 1149S.9. Calvin Peato$lD7JB5. 
lft Peter Jacobsen 389.200. 

SCORING 

1. Lanny Wadkins. 6921. Z Craig Stadler. 
S9AS. X Don PD0tov.69JZ 4. Larry Mtze.69As: 
Z Tom WOtsoa 69M. ft Corey Pavia, TOOL 7. 
Dan Pool. RLKL ft Ed Flort. 70.1 1.9, Gary Kaai, 
Tftlf. lft Scott Simpson, 7022. 

AVERAfiG DRIVING DISTANCE 
k Greo Narnien. Zlftft Z Fred Cauptes and 
Bill Gkscon. 274.1. 4. Mac CTGrtxtv. 2716. 5, 
Andy Bean. 2714. ft Den Pohl, 272ft 7. Jim 
Dont 2722. ft Clarence Rase. 3693. 9, Greg 
Twtoae. 269.L lft Tam Purtser. 2694L 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1. Calvin Paete, JR Z Tim Norris, 76ft 1 
Tom Kite. J80. 4 Mike Reid end David Ed- 
wards. 257.4 Doug TenelL 246. 7. Hale Irwla 
240. ft jack Reaner. 236. 9. Wayne LevL 234 
lft 3 tied with 219. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
1. Jack Nicktaut 261 1 Dan Port, JSL 1 
Carey Pavte and Brace Ltetzke. 26ft 5, Doug 
TewolL ML ft Scott SI mosaic 234 7. A1 GeJ- 

bergar and Jack Rsnnar.231. AUfca Rrtd. 23ft 
«k 2 tied with 226. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
1. Fuzzv Zoellar, 2741. Z Morris Hatotekv, 
"OB. Z Klfcue Aral. 2726. 4 Latent Wodklns, 
3&D4& Croie Stadler. 2829.6. Rex Cakhrall. 
2B46. 7. Dan Farsmaiu 2R14 ft Robert Luhr 
and Frank Conner, 2821. lft ft Ron stret*, 
2172. 

percentage Or SUB-PAR HOLES 
1, Lanny Wodklns. 26ft Z Craig Sladter. 2 Sft 
1 Tgm watean. 254 ft Gl| Morgan. 23ft ft Fred 

-22>- ft PMIIa Black metr ana Andy 
Bean. 227. ft Greg Norman, 236. ft Futzv 
Zoeitor. . 325. lft Curtis Strange. 224. 


(wocrfrtdge 12). Assists: Indiana 39 (Brown 
51; Chicago 25 (Whatley 9). 


36 S3 35 33 7-413 
Portland 36 39 36 17 »-ll6 

Vandeweghe 6-11 8* 21. M. Thompson M93- 
3 17; Scott T3-16 4-4 2ft JohRton S-16 6-9 2ft 
Rrtounds: Lot AnoetesM I Rombts 13) .-Port- 
land 56 [M.TOampR*i9). Assists: Los Angelas 
39 IE Johnson Ml: Port land 24 (Drexler 91. 











is sw* i* ?i?s;c§* ? r?M?jrw 


? 



Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Serious Talk on the MX J-P-Leand: Truffaut’s 'Antoine’ at 40 Stevie Wonder likes Ba 


W ASHINGTON —The 
meat oa what weapon 



YVtnent oa what weapons the 
United States should bay is no 
longer based on whether they’re 
accessary, or even whether they 
work, but rather how the Soviets 
will behave in Geneva if Congress 
refuses to fund them. The president 
maintains that if Congress doesn’t 
authorize a bil- 
lion and a half 
dollars to con- 
struct 21 new 
MX missiles the 
Russian negotia- 
tors will not get 
involved in seri- 
ous bargaining. 

I decided to 
check out this 
theory with Bli- ^ m aLI 

ni, my Soviet 

diplomatic source in Washington. 

“How serious are your people in 
Geneva?” I asked. 

“Not very serious,” he replied. 
“Why do you ask?” 

“Our president says that you 
won’t become serious until Con- 
gress votes funds for the MX mis- 
sile. Any truth to that?” 

“I don't think it makes any dif- 
ference whether you fund them or 
not I doubt if well get around to 
talking seriously about anything 
until next autumn.” 

“Why then?” 

“Well, the Soviet delegation 
doesn’t have a c-Hanca iq leave the 
motherland very often, and they 
would love to hang around Switzer- 
land for a while. They know if they 
become serious too early they could 
mod up spending next winter in 
Moscow. Our diplomats always 
stay on per diem as long as they 
can." 


“The MX is more than a bargain- 
ing chip," l said. “It’s a symbol of 
the United Stales’s detenmnatkm 
to bang tough and remain strong so 
we can negotiate from strength. 
The MX tells our NATO allies that 
we are behind them, and it is a 
message to the world that this 
country has only one cammander- 
m- rfrief . The MX may be useless as 
a weapon, but at the same time it 
says a lot about what kind of peo- 
ple we are.” 

“Look, if you wish to build more 
NOCs, go right ahead. It's no skin 
off our backs,” Blini said. “What 
do you want our people to do?” 

threaten to walk out of the talks if 
theU. S. Congress votes the money 
for the new ones.” 

“Our negotiators can’t afford to 
do that,” the diplomat said. “If 
they walked out, they would have 
to fly hone immediately and wnn<» 
of them have done then shopping 
yet" 

“How can your people think of 
shopping when both superpowers 
are on the brink?” I said. 

“What you have to understand 
about Soviet delegations is that 
when they go abroad they not only 
shop for themselves, but also for 
their relatives and superiors. If our 
disarmament officials came bade to 
Moscow from Geneva without 
Swiss chocolate and cuckoo clocks, 
their mission would be considered 
a failure. That is why the Russians 
are going to string out the talks as 
long as they can.” 

D 


By Nan Robertson 

New York Times SMh 


N EW YORK — Antoine 
Doind is almost 41 years 


INDoind is almost 41 years 
old. Or, rather, Jean- Pierre Leaud 
is entering middle age. It is diffi- 
cult to separate the two. Antoine 
was the sensitive, rebellious boy 
of 14 immortalized by Francis 
Truffaut in his first semiautobio- 
graphical film, “The 400 Blows,” 
in 1959. liaud played Antoine, 

giving a heartbreaking and mem- 
orable performance. 


“With or without our missile?” 

“No one could care less about 
the MX missile. You keep telling 
the world the only reason you're 
butlding it is so that you will have a 
bargaining chip during the negotia- 
tions. If that’s all there is to the 
MX, why should we take you seri- 
ously 7” 


U. S. Fonding for Arte 

The Associated Pros 
WASHINGTON — The Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts has 
announced 123 grants totaling SIS 
million to underwrite more than 
10,000 events in in 34 states and the 
District of Colombia. 


“It’s hard to believe that after all 
the lobbying President Reagan has 
done, ana aB the arguments he has 
made, the MX is still not a big 
enough weapon system to make 
you people get down to serious 
business." 

“Just because we’re not shaking 
doesn’t mean that were not willing 
to discuss iL Everything is negotia- 
ble in the daytime as long as our 
delegation can eat in one of Gene- 
va’s three-star restaurants at 

nigh t ** 

“There's something wrong with 
all this.” I said. “We are spending 
billions of doQars for new MX 
weapons so you will take us seri- 
ously, and your delegation keeps 
stalling, just so it can gorge itself on 
Swiss cheese.” 

Blini said. “Not to mention real 
cream with their coffee in the 
morning.” 


In four subsequent movies over 
20 years, Truffaut gave audiences 
the unusual experience of watch- 
ing Leaud, as Antoine, grow up. 
fall in love, marry, divorce ana, 
mainly, chase women. In private 
life, the actor has never married, 
but he says, “It's high time I did.” 

Liaud recently made a rare, 
brief visit to New York to honor 
the memory of his friend Truf- 
faut, who died last October at age 
52, and to focus attention on the 
first general re-release in tire 
United States of ‘The 400 
Blows.” It will be followed later 
in the spring by Truffaut’s “Jules 
and Jim.” 

Perched as if ready for flight in 
the French Film Office above 
Fifth Avenue — lie dislikes, and 
seldom gives, interviews — he 
shrugs, waves his arms about, 
clenches his fists, shakes his fore- 
finger, purses Ms lip s, rolls his 
eyes toward heaven. 

He says he is a creature of the 
cinema, and it has been his whole 
life. His mother was an actress; 
his father wrote for films and the 
theater. Their son now has 33 
movie roles behind him and has 
worked with some of Europe’s 
greatest directors in addition to 
Truffaut: Jean- Luc Godard, Ber- 
nardo Bertolucci, Pier Paolo Pa- 
solini, Jean Eustache. & has just 
finished shooting the l atest Go- 
dard movie, “The Detective.” 

Ltand calls Truffaut “my spiri- 




Stevle Wonder’s Academy 


Awards acceptance s p e e ch did not 
go down wefl in South Africa: The 




ringer and songwriter accepted Ms 
Oscar “in the name of Nehon Man- 
dela," the jailed South African 
black nationalist leader. The saw- 
owned South African radio banned 
Wonder’s songs as a result. Won- 
der, who Reared the Oscar for “I 
Just Called to Say 1 Love You" 
from “The Woman is Red,” re- 
sponded; “If my bring banned 
means people wiu be free; ban me 
mega-tunes.” 

□ 

A document rimed by Betsy 
Ross has been withdrawn from a 
Sotheby’s auction in New York af- 
ter the city of Philadelphia said the 
paper was stolen from its fifes. The 


Mays tte country rioger U ^ 
Lynn in “Coatomw’s DjJ ^ 
would attend the 


rTTf* iwnyi 

ago, but Chma suspended w 
turai accord to protest 


turai accord to protest \ 

dedrion to gram asylum to the J/ 1 

use tennis star Hn Na, !}jA 


„ a K< 


document gave the Philadelphia 
seamstress control of her first hus- 
band’s estate after he died without 
a will; it had been expected to fetch 
550,000 to 575,000. The document 
was brought to Philadelphia’s at- 
tention after a photograph of it 
appeared in a Soiheby catalog. 
Ronald R. Donatocci, Phiiadri- 

TOUed^f^documeni returned and 
would go to court for it if neces- 
sary. Betsy Ross made flags in Phil- 
adelphia at the time of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. The popular story 
is that she designed the American 
Hag after being asked by a commit- 
tee headed by George Washington. 
The pre-printed letter of estate ad- 
ministration, dated Jan. 23, 1776. 
bad been scheduled to be auctioned 
along with other items from a col- 
lection of autographs and manu- 
scripts owned by fcfcae O. Sang of 
Chicago. 

□ 


U . 

NBcbarfJacksou did note* 

get star treatment when he n 

m London: Customs oflkath 
him up for 35 minutes udl 

searched Mm, “1 -didst £ 

Jackson said. “Why should D 
there is nothing to find?” He 
London to unveil a figure <* 
self at Madame Tussautfs vt$ 
seum today. 


Hortym K. Vaa/Tha Na- Ycrt Twa* 

Jean-Pi erre L£aod as Antoine Doind in “Tbe 400 Blows,” left^^nd today. 


real father.” In Antoine Doind “1 
found my brother,” he said. It 
was no accident that the director 
dedicated to his protege sm nnff v 
lated film —The Wild Child” — 
in which the teacher learns as 
much as the student. After ending 
the Darnel series in 1979 with 
“Love on the Run,” Truffaut said 
the cha rac ter was “a synthesis of 
two real-life people — Jean- 
Pierre and mysdf . He’s a mix, like 
mayonnaise You can no inngw 
separate the dements.” 

Likft Truffaut, fAanrf had a 
troubled childhood. He was ex- 
pelled from half a dozen boarding 
schools by the age o( 13, he said, 
because “1 couldn't adjust” He 
spent a great deal of Ms time 
*Sm ting and acting out stories for 
my pals in the dormitories.” 

Liaud said that 40 boys had 
already been auditioned when he 
read in a newspaper that Truffaut 


was looking for “a young guy” to 
play the lead in his first feature 
film. He believes ihe director 
chose Mm became of Ms “aggres- 
sive shyness” and “an mtirw de- 
sire to get the rak dot just 
poured out of the s cree n test-” 

He found Truffaut a relaxed 
and sympathetic director who 
“treated children HV<- Tinmen be- 
ings” and the character of Aa- 
tome Darnel with “ imm e ns e ten- 
derness.” A mischievous smile 
lighted up (he actor's face. “In 
school, the teachers were always 
punishing the kids and tiffing ns 
to keep quiet. In the film, the 
adults shut up gnrf I talked That 
was something new and agreeable 
forme.” 

From the immensely appeal- 
ing, unloved boy of “The 400 
Blows,” Antoine Doind grew 

mlflan aduh ley find 

less sympathetic lo many critics 
and film buffs. Truffaut was 


quoted as saying he ended the 
Poind, series because the charac- 
ter stopped maturing: “I can see a 
similarity between Doind and 
Jean-Pierre not wanting to grow 
up, but 1 can’t say I approve.” 


Liaud bridled slightly. With 
eyes cast down, be meticulously 
fined up four packets of sugar on 


a table before him, bringing to 
mind the scene in “The 400 
Blows” where Antoine folds and 
smooths bits of paper while being 
questioned by a psychiatrist. 


' “Francois liked Antoine 
Doind a lot,” he said at lasL“He 


forgave him man y things. It*$ 
true, Antoine kept part of his 
childho od with him. But I think 
he was a sentimentalist- He had 
no social ambitions. He didn't 
want to be famous or successful 
or make a lot of money. His only 
preoccupation in life was to pur- 

‘ i e 1 i « 


The Alexander & Onassbj 
dation announced its 1985 : 
W e dnesday, each worth Sip 
The Athinai prize wfQ go j 
poet and forma Senegalese 
deni Leopold Sengur far “fa ■ 
nuuutarian work and phiJo 




ism as wdlas bis constant act 

for peace and imercultuia 
logue.” The Olympia pria 
awarded to the Netherlands 
Academy of Arts and Sdeno 
to K. K. frsntf of India, sea 
general of the International 
mittee for Irrigation and Dn 
The academy was praised 6 
contribution and safegua 
man’s cultural heritage" bj 
tributing to the publication 
complete works of ErasmtE 


Framji for “Ms activities in 
ing about major changes 


The Chinese Culture Ministry 
censored “Kramer vs. Kramer* 


sue and find love.” 


Private 'London War Museum’ Collection, Building to Be Auctioned in June 


and “The Turning Paint,” two of 
tile movies to be screened in an 
American film festival in April, ac- 
cording to l). S. officials in Beijing. 
Tire officials said a brief bedroom 
scene from “The Turning Point” 
and a sequence iu which Dustin 


planet’s water resources.' - 
Arisxotelis prize went to He' 
Gmdner, founder of the SCK 


dren's Villages oigannatioiyr^N 
foundation was set up in U ' 


Hoffman’s son sees his father's girl- 
friend nude in “Kramer vs. {(ra- 


the greek shipping magnau ' 
tode Onassb in memory of 1 , , r? «- 
Alexander, who was killed at . : J ! ' * * ? 
in a plane accident in 197 
prizes will be awarded later. 


\ I'olic 

Op 

i l ttttfa 


The Associated Press 

ONDON — The London War 


L ONDON — The London War 
/ Museum, a private collection 
of World War II planes, tanks, fire- 
arms, uniforms, relics, treasure 
from the Third Radi and other 
memorabilia, wiE be auctioned off 
this s ummer , according to its own- 
er, Paul Raymond. 


More than 5,000 items, which 
Raymond estimated to be worth £2 
minim (S13 millio n), will be sold 
June 5, less than two years after the 
museum opened in the Whitehall 
Theater near Trafalgar Square. The 
bidding will also be sold. 

Raymond, 59, a leading publisb- 


er of erotic magazines, lost a zoning 
battle last month with tire West- 
minster Gty Council, which object- 
ed to the theater’s transformation 
into an wthihitirtn had 

At the sale, an auctioneer from 
the Phillips auction house wifi 


troops in Italy in 1944. A German 
tank from the Nazi invasion of Po- 


land in 1939 may have to be moved 
to provide seating far bidders. 


the Phillips auction house wu 
stand in a U. S. Army troop carric 
used by General George S. Patton’: 


“There never has been a sale of 
this magnitude on the subject of the 
Second World War,” said Peter 
Johnson of Phillips. 


friend nude in “Kramer vs. Kra- 
mer” were trimmed. Also to be 
shown are “Star Wars," “On Gold- 
en Pond” and “Coalminer’s 
Daughter.” About 20 million tick- 
ets for tire April 1-14 festival will be 
sold at cinemas in five Chinese cit- 
ies, and admission win be the iqni- 
lar price of about 10 cents. The 
officials said Sissy Spacek, who 


President Roushl Resgar 
ored the United States's 33c 
dent. Harry S. Trumao, pre 
the Congressional Gold Mr 


Margaret Truman Daniel, 1 
child. The award was author 
Congress last year on the 
anniversary of Tinman's bb 


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By Plane: Col your local BIT representative with yaw text. 
wiH bn m Bortned of the act mnnecSataly, ond once prepayim 
mode your od w® appear vnltM 48 hours. 

CeW: Hie basic rate is SVaOpw fine per day + loed taw*. The _ 
25 leiten. uflns ond spaces in the fint toe and 36 m the folowmi 
Mwnuw spoa is 2 fines. No obhwc i oAone woe p tesL 
CredR Cards Amerioon Express Drar s Chib, Eurocord, h 
Cord, Access and Vaa 



73001 Peris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


On bedroom 
week-F4JS0. 


. crvcUieper 

10 25. 


LONDON HAMK1EAD toaxy five 
room fl«. £220 week. 01-904 2700 


AGENT IN PARIS 

FHOPC 542 71 99 


contact our barf dstfbufor on 


i would suit Embassy. 

S42 14 46 


htenrfM Herorfd Tribune 
10QI Td Seng CmoomrU Bddi 
34-34 H—ny Read 
HONG KONG 
Tefc HK 5-286725 


Embassy 

• Awe. ae 


Service 


unanaous, omces « gmms; 

nght boi. beomtful location an top 
floor ovoi looting aty with view on | 
Alps & Jura moutttxns. Necr irrtemo- 
honal argaizatiom. C ic o l l e nt ervet- 
mert. _%mas 223 sun, paUng fob 


REAL ESTATE 
TORE4T/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


US NEWS C WORLD RBOti 
ON SALE AT 
BRB4TAPK7S 

37 Av*. dn rOpm Porte 2 


73004 Pari* 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


foamdo. For fixlher nfermotaan i 
022/45 41 3& 


FOR SUMMER ICAR CHARTRES. 

beefy country house, 3 bedrooms, 
hrt? avdtable. drone. FfiOOO/nodK 
MPbriv 878^28 


Wtwn in Romei 
PALAZZO AL VHABRO 
Luxury c^jortment house wdh fumnhed 
Rais, available for 1 woefcand more 


AGB4CE DE L’ETOOf 

REAL STATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


Phan* 4794325; 6793431 
Writ* Via del Veiabro 16. 
001B6 Rome. 


7TH BRETELSL 

Mqde rp , high dost, 35 sXxfio 
+ bdatny. F3640 chor^ bdaded. 
AMI 742 80 S 



MANAGBt SALES KVBOFMB4T, 
15 yean wcridvwde experience, mar- 
tot studies. Industrie! processing rnn- 
sfcuction & momtanonn seeks new 
dxrfbfige. Afi serious offers consid- 
ered for North Africq, Midde & For 
East based openings. Write Box 1974 
Henrfd Tribune, 92521 NauBy Codex, 
Fr ame. 


HSAooma 


LATIN AMERK 


Prwfe: {For dassified otrfyj; 
747-4600. 


HIROK 


AMHBCAN B4Ga« seels poedoo 
in North Africa Middta fast, or Fir 
East (Mi yecn experience m these 
taadion) on Contract Mo n oger, Pro- 
ject Mcrnger, or Constnrann Mm- 
ager. Write Ralph Stbaffine r. Rt 1 , Best 
?£o4 Seaumon^ Texas 777m, or 
phone USA 40»W3-206a 


1STH ETOBE. Oxsneng T -bedroom 

?^i^sr iF4W3 - 


AGM IN PARIS 

PHOHE 542-1 440 


AICOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 


Intemational Business Message Center 


EnpfaH- Paris.- 634 59 45. Rome 
478^20. 


MOVING 


SAMT-AtAUR (941 

£ km East Paris, RSq 
et, an Mams Bver. 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


ALLIED 


VAN IWS WTL 

ova iooo agwts 

IN UiA. - CANADA 
350 WORLD-WIDE 
HtBEHWATB 

PARIS DnbordM totomatfcxMrf 

(01] 343 23 <4 


STUfNNG PROPStTY: 

400 sam. Eying space, lareteter's ffalj, 
an 350 stun, land or 1/50 tun. 
Price 


FRANKFURT sJKJSS 


LE VESMET (78). 

300 tom. l-level home on 1390 Kpa, 
2 hdt aaroge^endcgecl gardea 

COGEDIM 266 36 36 

A1SO DEALS IN OLD STYLE 


bun*, rdnremeieAereAriy 
of fl mOSon readers eerirf 


trife mnrf of whom an in 
fcuri i — and ind u tUy . wdT 


rood ft. JM tafax at (Pewit 
6135951 baton /Dane, m - , 
soring mat w» can Wu you 
bade, amfyevrmeuige wti 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


.BUSINESS SERVICES 


MONEY TREK? 


US. MA RKETING RRM interested in 
buying European goods for mtrfatew 
in US We ere wScapitafced & con 


RBNCH HGH FASHION MOOB. I 
27, PR/PA cxpenencs, Hotory of Art j 
saduate. free to tiwefc bfrgud. 




nmoi ENGBrfn witii mba. 30. 

very successful inti experience, eon 
spec* Enqfis h/Sptresh plus others 
nefcs to tom conoory with mrftino- 
tiorri octrvrties. Bax 1964, Hertrfd Tri- 
bine. 92521 Netdb Cedex, Franca 

BaOtAN G0OIEMAN, 35. Enjjhh- 
/Franm/Dutch law ttbocf trmng, 
eeels position in Wl en riroten ent 
Free nnrnec&rfely, travel. TUI It, 24, 
Qua de lo Loire. 73019 PARIS. 

GENERAL POSTTlONS 
AVAILABLE 


Amelwdox n. 2636-15. 
Athens: 36I-8397/36G242I. 
Bruseeto 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01) 32944ft 
Frunkfcwfc 1069] 72-67-55. 
Laueanne: 29-5B-9A 
listen n- 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
Undent (01)8364802. 
Madrid; 45S2891 745^3306- 
Mien: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03) 8455*5. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Swdwu 0B 7569229. 
TolAvfe; 03455 559. 
Viuraw Contact Frankfort. 


lu e n o e Altwe: 41 403 

Pf*.3\2) 

GuayaguR: 431 943/4 
Un* 417852 
FonanNC 64-4372 
Sun Juuos 22-1055 
Senttoga: 69 61 S5 
Sou Porta: 852 JHfG 


*••• to* 

• -tee r 

-.9 util ' 

’• - 

.v ova®-: 


MIODUKAS 


*346303. 
i 25214. 

S 5614485. 
ns 34 00 4A 
416535. 


•. nJadt 
-• VtV4 * 


-rH»*Hwi4ag| 


Jeddu fe 667-1500. 
IIAfci Dubai 224161 , 


Jutrai jMUIOI , |v 

FARKASrlO K i\\ n»il 



YBI Invest in one of America s most 


feoto for London btsed oaOMm. Tefc 
3 pun, 9 pm. 01-225 0368 (UK) 


bock, aid your mostogo wB 
appear within 49 hoars. Tbe 
rate ft US. $9.80 or toed 
at p rirdmat par fteo. You must 
Made raryrfeta and verifi- 


(069) 250066 

MUNfCH IMS. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON Jim££ 

101) 953 3636 

CAIRO ARM Van Unw ton 

{20-2) 712901 

USA ARM Vrei Lines btfl Carp 
(0101) 312'681-SIOO 



pwe wem ure. Co* our Zunch oftceot! 
01241 98 81,11* 814313 FCZCH, or 
write NCZ Zurich, Katwandftr./Z 
Q44004, Zurich. Swtaertoxi 

JSA FINANCE COMPANY pays 15V 




EXPORT - MPORT 


I PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


RBTAURANT PBCSOMA- Wcflors, 
cryhani, coofc f nMded in St.lam.1 
Hnoun USA. Contw er Ud gourmet 
oncrcfcvrifxwig restaurant se«s puaS- 
fled staff. Kopy vrifh resume, refer- 
ences & photo, Arthany's Idbuiu* 
10 Broadway. St loud MO 63102 


urano STATES 


Bengfeok 39006-57. 
Heaa Kaav5-42D906. 
ManAacBl / 07 49. 
Sueufc T25 87 73. 
Stog^MM: 222-2721 
Ttrfwom 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyor 504-1 925. • 


AUSIKALU. 


r Yorfcx J212) 752-3890. 
tCmh (415)362-8339. 


Syrfcwy: 929 56 39. 
Melieutnet 690 823 


• «?T , a , 

ViTv**- 

“• .--3 1.-- I* , 


We hcmdfo d 


USA FMANCE COMPANY pays 151 
on our c upa d aoDauirf oores in US 
$1000 denonxncrions. No mcBdreun. 
Foreign exchange service o vdfcrfrfe. 
Cab America rviancid Center, P.CX 
Bar 1967, Kearnnee, a 32742 USA 
Telex* Btti848 STEED KISS. 


ikh gd your fronsocBons 

U d. CH-6Q S2 Hooiwa/Of 

Tel 0041 741 /953393Tx 866 m rdndi 



HMOPEAN ORGANOAHGN bared 
m Farit seeb fttirngud tecfwcal 
tronetatcr/erterpreter fiigSsh, French, 


Germai. Write or Phone: AfCMA, 
88. VoJesharbes, 7500B Paris, Tel: | 
S63 62 85. 


EMPLOYMENT 


9TH RESfl)ENT!AL 

in XVtlWi cent. tawnhouse an gardens, 
Irrge firing 4- bedroom, 86 sqja, 
oreerf cham, ewi. ■ ouet. 

uixuSobM-Ytoowm 

Pries R^SOjQOa 563-97-69 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNTnES 


WI7MN SO DATS - OR IBS 
You can have your awn hintlnea 


ONSHORE TAX SHELTERS 

Finn £75 

UK. We of Man, Tttia, Ovmnd hfcnft, 
Puruuu. Liberia & mod dlilu e arses- 


PANAMA IOB0A CORPORATIONS 
from USS400 ovcArfrfe now. Td 





P624] za*a Telex: 6283S2 SUM) 


MARKET RESEARCH7TRANSLAR3R, 
tnt au i u ier. Londcxi 868 6590 eves. 


PCXB4CA MALLORCA Oxtareng 
| ktotry v&a, lovel y view o n m ouAwe 
fawwuf terrace & gardeffc 


HWH SPED 94GUSH torgucqe 

to wont on wd procenar (1 
seried in Cretni, with vredang pr 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


TAX SERVICES 


RE ST lOWS 

Poring Seine and Notre Dame 
ned a tens, 90 sun. 


than moet people oam in a wmek. I 


CmsftH support fodhiei. 
Very strictly confidential 
Free carauitrrficxe 
Roger Griffin IL&, F.CA 
B roch u re; Corpo rate M mwmamt lb 
Western Hoie, VknirwStreet, 
Douglas, tde of Mai 

G. 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS R4TL 


Contemporary renovation. 
Serjyi Koyter 329 > 


Easy. It's not hard at oR when you ovm 
i a Kemo CompuCer P u it nel System. 

A sure winner «w ccmfatnes 3 of to- 
day's hottest trank- video, computers 
end entrait pcJwes- plus the know- 
how and guaran tee s of Tens Irebu- 
mata, insane and Kama. An aO ash 
buneas. Cutamon come to you. No 
seBng. Nosfress. R's not a franchise. AB 
the money ond the profits are 100* 
ycxrs. ided for faniSes. bxfviducfc or 
dmrtaa ownen. Parttirae, fifttinn or 
weehwdr. There's no need to tone 
your present fob. With the Korea system 
you tufa someone's pefure with a T.V. 
camera and mstenoy print it with a 
c omp u t e r. It s so pushbutton amfia, o 
risif can run it But tfiepnofts aren’t lad 
stuff- The Kama system is avcftrfrfe in 
Hack and white or fufl arforris porta- 
ble, sets up m 30 m inu t es or tos, cry- 
time,onyvriiere.Ttoutat«ayourtefn- 
lory. There ora Aocsmfc ef leettim 
wating to be Bed-, plus tremendous 
nxri aider oppfarfiort. System prices 
start at LS^SOto USS2640a 


CAU US FDR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PARIS (31 036 63 11 
LONDON (01) 57166 11 


OONIMEX Coubastars to 300 aties 
worldwide - Air/Sea. Ctrfl Charlie 
281 18 81 Freis (near Opera) Care loo 


VHKAlUFfc Beautiful property, m 
perfetf oontifai, t riple reas pftan, 6 
bedrooms, areoge. etyehrfeers house 
large wooded prek, imid e n fal area, 
cofe & sunny. W excellent fittings. 

Fremont; 500 66 00 

16TH NEW. Tap floor, terrace, pan- 
oron e c view, fivma_ 2 bedrooms, 
equipped kitchen, "bcellert prira. 
One of the lost Viet 2 - 7 pm 14 rue 
Jouvenet 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


sroamiAIN DB PRES. Itae de Seine, 
'^ roonL 


FRENCH PROVINQ5 


VAR WAR BANOOk Benutifaf kxge 


MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUPS PORT 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 
IMUMnSMC 
U4A. 6 WOR1DWR3E 


USA INCOME TAX A0VK2 & to- 
tunw. Fmis bated US OlA 359 63 01 i 


F INAN CIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


& SML OMianH dr QDtiXfL 

pod. 1 5 mm s. soo. L rege 6 vmg + 
(tiring, tope modern khmen, 4 dou- 
ble bedrooms, bcahs, Wp ovrdable. 
To rent hy month Jun*/ toy/ August 
Preis 260 60 IB or Bax 19w, Herdd 
Tr3xme, 92S21 NreJy Cede*. Fremce 

SWITZERLAND 


Preri 260 601 
Trflmne, 92S21 


ti^ipO^QvgLligB ttTR tfio 
tod Mrfioria. Perris 339 83 

PRESS BUREAU CHBF seels 

fene9oml par. FrendiAB 
Krewriedge of prat dynan 


after 1 sew 633 3190 Peris. 
ENGUSHSFEAKMGscrfBsri 


NGUSHSPEAKB4Gs<rfesgiri wanted 
TA77M106,orpreferaBtyriftuiin 
person at fudetifaw. PABFUMS3E, 3l 
me dw Helder, faris 9. Metro Opera. 


A complet e serial & fauenew service 
fxoriefing a reigue collection of 
talented, ve^ft & muNhgud 
indrrrducB for dl oocuiore. 


CAPITAL INVESTORS WANTHJ. 
New USA steel mirerJ nee di np ta 
$5 ndfian toaajuire exi rt ng finuniag 


anauL 

POsmONS WANTED 


. KVOUmONARY 

Fee WarxkxyOierxcois of the finest in 
die mdushy witii m»*ah & cortflko- 
tionc ftood oommirrierf/roatey cxspt 
cations. Gtif. m orufac to rer ready to 
rep ond serfes n do no tf & overseas. 
Dtariutars Wanted 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St. KY.C 10019 
Service Unpresertctivta 


days notice not earfier than 3 years 
from dree of owe at KD% vetim. 
S50^XX) i n crewwrts corwert&le to 
stock re mreurity. tf-TechMetallndus- 


i house, June S 

Tefc 272 78 09 Paris 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


N.Y: 4 bed- 
. Aug: S2400. 


AMSttCAN WOMAN, 6 yeon ftoxv 
ad sales/corporde banking experi- 
ence, Ivy League MSA in fmrewe 
seeks, oner m Europe, Worfena 


trite, 100 Spring Garden Rd, New 
Bern, No. Card™ 28S60 USA Tefc 


» m Europe. Working 
of French. A Johnson, 52 
i Aw. NYC 10030. 212- 



' I 'T-».SR» : «ng| 

... , .fep 

. , u ^ 

. V* 




i te.-rt f 


cuijan: 


Cel VJ. Marketing MOILGARD 
MTBNATIONAL MC 


MTSMATTONAL MC 
12131 532-7431, THEX 314 
fZ49 W. 132 9. Gariana. Otif.1 


mformatiaRr F. Boussk 
non, 75009 fail. Tefc 1 


24 rue Vfo- 
7425950 


ANET REGION (28). fiarisfeng ail, 
10 rooms, + caretaker's house rew 
numerous arfbiiUngs. Pool, 2 ha 
pak crossed by river. Prices 
RLOOO.OCO. Avco 78 79 09, 


CAWB. )50n Cnaitatie, renovated 
house, 3 mono + 3/4 rooms, djpfcx. 
Soamce mica PI 504 61 47. 


bt the bay of Pokna 5 mins, Patna, 15 
mins.arpQrt,664bor1hs8to38meten_ 
2 for up to 60 meters e«h. Indiridud 
TV/rarera/ wafer/ priorw ccnredcre. 
Profesrioc d port immogement oa Fufi 
marin e s ervices: tower, rode, dp, tin*- 
rffff, repair, fuel ttonotv n & outdoor 
waiter hardstonds, Uffound cor- pork, 
todrere. Ox npto nentary service A to- 
sure fddhiet iwfical, rentaa shop- 


Korea. Dept. M35, Pasttodi 170340, 
6000 Frtmkfurt 1 W. Genww. 
Tefc 069 / 747808 H» 412713 ICB4A 


LIQUID GOLD 



INTBMATKMAL COMPANY 
FORMATION 

UK cornparsas frara£75LOM ftm o ra o 
B el ra mor o ff-shor e centers. Fufi ad- 
neiftoiui, nonwee services, peeress 
of atto r ney, regstere d oUk p, accoun- 
tancy, confidenbd Lufc accounts 
op e n e d e n nfidgrterf tefepfune, fete 
«x & mating sarrioL 

EAS- Lteted 


[9171 633-5910- 

HAVE US DOLLARS to exd 
Swiss Francs er bote) Urn. 
6500 Zreurft. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


43 Ccema 5trere, Liverpool, L8 7W . 
Tefc 0S1 7w 1480. Tbt 6361^ BUSSBL 


: 051 709 1480. Th 628613 BUSSSL 
Kofc051 7W5757 , 

Associated Office* Worldwide. 


Londen-London-London 

Old Bond Sheet, W1 


Yay bed buy. 

fine «Ix»jio«ids m cny prire range 
re lowest whotesoie prices 
rired frcBi Antwerp 
centre of the d oro ond world. 
Fufi guarantee. 

For free price id write 
Juadtiai Culdreirteln 



Mr-4495. 

AMERICAN PHD.MAIE 44 retreated 

in living & working in West Europe. 

native position. fttiKp levinthd, 5522 
Bto«Ave. Wbtefcnd HA, O 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


ADTOMOBE 


m^Kfeanfctiwi 
School, Avert EngSsh f G«T»orv. Ex- 
carience in jourfKrftsnv pubfishina 
Sms, scire. Free to travel, good con- 


UHJEDyE SfflS for AMERICAN 
HUMS in PAHS. 

Engish.. Setaien. Otdtft tr Oe man 

sreretanes, knowledge of French re- 
qurad, Engfah shorthand BSngud 
trieristv wit or p hones 138 Avenue 
jteor Hujy», 751 16 Preis, France. Tefc 


autoshepi 


time pb. Peris 


EMPLOYMENT 


1NIBNA1KMAL SIEWABXSS, flu- 
«d ftwdt, fetid, German, good 
yyy tfyo 1 badgrewd in 
feocrtcasi lournafism, video produc- 


Pea t min 
WIBMATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSTOONS 

TUESDAYS 

fe Bn WT Orrerifiid Section. 


TR ANSC 
m 
a 


CANNES/ MCE 
FRANK ROT 
BONN / CaOGffc 
STUTTGART 


JOJOBA 


CAYMAN ISLANDS 


■ MtA tdephone, tete service 
• Secretarial servo, adireretra 


png. catering entertcanraem. Golf & 
terms nearby. Gbramreuai area cao- 
prieu 85 mb on 13,171 sqm m 
Pbx 21 npre anlmmft atxM & 78 m 


TUSCANY 


SSBBfCE MONASTERY 
SANGtSMOfttO 

ffotnantk, k reh recetiy prefect epart- 
ments in a23^00 sqja park ground m 


se parate Gary axido - dl in front Ene 
dong man pin. Tap imastmertll 45% 
sakfiHuny now before next frtcerael 
Contact rfiredty developed: 


the heart afTi 


loamy. Tennis, pool, cent- 
ie. SHJOO^ SllCMOO. 


EfiWtAID HOME UD. 
YOUR PARITQt IN EUROPE 

Derfjtr. 

CH8S72 Weesen SC 
Swirzeriand 
Tefc CH 58-431778 
Th 876062 HOME Ol 


PUBTTO PIMFA POSTA15, SJL 
Dretta G a nieui 
C/Marino 101, fartab Nous 
Motioras. Spain or lb 66686 CAUU E 


SWITZERLAND 


tofoixL the nradn barn prom in the 
vMC VUUIC4BIUII} COBVlGl- 

«i pfwnwewttcdA fool maw- 
uctoria g . Dr. 0. Yremms. Orffanen 
MsVdtf, sfcrfed, "No other dot 
wwd m *• world a arable of re- 
liatmg petraleun breed kforiooret'. 
Afttem Bride provide return on ie- 
i effluent In fntyenr. Ertre auourt 
•turned by 6th yere. ftojertfore show 
mual moeme merecftBr of 33%. 


Leading I n trei eAo i d Finondd Cadre 
NO DUTIES - NO TAXES 

FuKxxari property investments from 

USSdOjfiOO. fc^fi relunB. 

Please reply for m tor mo fott 
HORIZON'SJL P.O. Bore 222 
CH-1211 Genara 12. Smbmhmd 


Secretarial service, ackrirretuftan 
Fo rmati o n, damakrfon and reon- 
ogement-UCtioffdora ajuipu Bes 

safer 


PtitiuadM xd 62 8-2018 Antwerp 
Belgium - Tefc p2 31 234 D7 51 
Tire 71/79 syl b. At theDtaaond Club. 
Heart of Antwerp Oanond industry 


FDR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDER 

“NTBWATKJNAL POSITIONS" 
PAGE 13 


nn lADY. 30, Butinea Sdiool / 


Fmanc*. 5 yores expmnqe borfeng, 
trtl *rad«. s«eta potitian inti ban£ 


CORPCOATE SBYKZS ( UK1LTD 
1/5 OM Bared St London WlX 3TD 


2/S GW Bared St, London Wl 
Tefc 01-493 4244 
7bc 282*7 SCSU3NG 


OFFICE SERVICES 


mamvE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


/firm, id countries, ftjert Erufah- 
/Creman. Box 198(1 Herdd Trtotw* 
92521 NeuBy Cedex. France 



i deleft cantacb AUOBA 
Box 1777, Herald Tribune, 
taffy Crete France. 


SWTTZSLAND 

We ree looking for ssiaus partners 
who are irrferestod in anedmg n a fte 
dt» red estate projesL USRMWQQ. 

brferat B% -I- pretiapatian m fired 
pram, first dare Swire guarantees. 


US. MARKETING EXECUTIVE 


(Cosmetic, Fa sh ion. Gifts) 
sean badgraund, finiSar & weE 


SOEIMSA 
Td-x GESE OH 456213. 


ftrajean batigraund, knSar & erefi 
connected vfth al US Dept- stores, 
ready to open doors for year orenpany 
m the US Bob 1979, Herdd Triune, 
92S21 Neu9y Cate francs 


YOUR UOPffiON OffiQ 

CHBHAM EXECUTIVE CBTOS 
CerarehresiwB range of srevices 
150 Regent Street, London W1. 
Tefc (Q1 J 439 6288 Tte 261426 




AUTO CONVE 


EXEamVSS AVAILABLE 


IMPETUS • ZWCH * 252 76 21. 
Phone / trie* / moBxrc. 


DYNAMIC LADY, GOOD LOOKING, 
Auerrf m sevenrf toig u age i . kx^ ex- 


perience ct (be executive level m the 
field of tourism reel reo nu tic n . etcefc 
fort bwrf e doe erf Brace. Middle 


RUSMS5 SBVKB IN GB4EVA 
secretand semes / trantotev / 
tefephgne / telex / mol twice / 
mexateng / cenpcsty fomaon f 


OFFICES FOR SALE 


AVE MARCEAU - ETOILE 


rtreoH space Navapex, P.O. Bo» 92, 
12llGene»all HMne:22'5744 77 
Tlx: 423 070 




to. 


FRENCHMAN, 23, SSCS 
Monoger of freneh-vyfe 
shop, anywhere Speak, 
'efereflcei Heaie 


FOR MO 
CLASSIFI! 






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