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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post \\ 

PAMS, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1985 



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mse Approves MX, 217-210, 
pleting a Reagan Victory 


» t 


The Associated Press 

UNGTON — The House 

- sanative. gave final con- 

- \1 approval Thursday to 
se of $1 _5 billion to build 
nissUes. The 217-210 vote 

- up the first uugor legisla- 
xy for President Ronald 
n his second term. 

. the last hurdle blocking 
on of the 21 missiles, 
rote represented only a 
JtfromTuesday’s 219-213 
m [be MX, but was just as 
7 divisive. Voting for the 
Twrsday were 156 Repnb- 
' td 61 Democrats; voting 
iverc 23 Republicans and 
oocrais. Sixjztembexs did 

- Leagan, in New York, 
those who voted for the 
.nd said he “will not soon 
ose who chose the road of 
courage and vision.” He 
k vote “essential to our 
and our future." 

- -- congressional leaders al- 
tfae president’s triumph to 
.. se, skiDful lobbying effort 
ins success in linking ap- 
' . f the MX to prospects for 
dable arms control accord 
Soviet Union. 

.'ate Thursday authorized 
. . of the 10- warhead inter- 


continental missiles; the vote Tues- 
day approved their construction. 
The Senate approved construction 
of the missiles in two 55-45 votes 
last week. 

In the final minutes of Thurs- 
day's three-hour debate, Represen- 
tative Edward J. Mar key. Demo- 
crat of Massachusetts, referred to a 
photograph showing “a beautiful 
scene of MX missiles streaking to- 
ward the Earth.” 

“When some people see this, 
they see a demonstration of re- 
solve," he said. “When I see it, I see 
the end of the world.” 

But Representative Norman D. 
Dicks, Democrat of Washington, 
said Mr. Reagan had kept his word 
to become deeply involved in arms 
control efforts. He said Congress 
should help the administration 
with its military modernization 
program. 

The MX debate, said Represen- 
tative Vic Fazio, a California Dem- 
ocrat, divided the House “as no 
issue has in the last decade.” 

■ ‘AO-Out 9 Lobbying Effort 

Earlier. Margaret Shapiro of The 
Washington Post reported: 

The House speaker, Thomas P. 
O'Neill Jr. of Massachusetts, said 
the Democratic leadership had 
made an “all-out attempt*’ 


• • r >.- 


%e Says U.S, Policy 
; Deterrence Unaltered 


’•‘j.— - 2 


Roam 

... _ DON — President Ronald 
s top arms control aide as- 
_ jtrppeans on Thursday that 
'Vestem strategic concepts 
lay in force for a long time 
* UA space-based defense 
verebmlL 

EL Nitze, special adviser on 
gpriauons, said the West's 

talks are private, but 
of words is loud. Page 3. 

threatening a massive nu- 
■ spouse in the event of a 
~ mack would continue “for 
years." 

the United States 
dying to negotiate 
in nuclear weapons, be 





’ . erh diplomats said Mr. 
as dying to defuse a grow- 
ite in Western Europe over 
nvolved in Mr. Reagan's 
*c Defense Initiative, aj 
oti-missile shield i 
fu “star wars ” 
^pace-defense plan, still in 
research phase, is wholly 
*au with the North Atlantic 
^Organization’s deterrence 
he said. 

isiveiiuclear weapons. ”and 
frat of massive destructive 
von they embody," would 


Paul H. Nitze 

remain the key element erf deter- 
rence for the foreseeable future. 

Mr. Nitze set no limit for reli- 
ance on nuclear arms but said the 
deterrence policy would continue 
in the near term'and the early and 
intermediate stages of a possible 
space defense system. 

“This situation unavoidably will 
obtain for many, many years," he 
said. Experts say the space-defense 
system could take decades to build. 

The veteran negotiator spoke on 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Wednesday to reverse Tuesday's 
House vote. 

He said the attempt focused on 
convincing some moderate and 
conservative Democrats who sup- 
ported the missile to switch posi- 
tions^ because of the high cost of 
building the MX and of hardening 
the silos in which the missiles wifi 
be deployed. 

But administration o fficials and 
MX supporters also lobbied heavi- 
ly Wednesday in hopes of holding 
their winning margin in the House. 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, telephoned Republican and 
Democratic legislators who had 
supported the MX to thank them 
and encourage them to vote for the 

missile again 

House Republican leaders con- 
tacted some Republicans who vot- 
ed against the missil e to try to 
change their votes. The 24 Republi- 
cans who voted against the MX 
Tuesday represented a larger num- 
ber in opposition than in any previ- 
ous vote cm the missile. 

Congress approved an initial 
batch erf 21 MX missiles two years 
ago. 

MX opponents remain optimis- 
tic on the chances of blocking the 
MX the next time it conies to Con- 
gress; this will be for authorization 
of the 48 missil es Mr. Reagan has 
requested in his 1986 budgeL 

■ Panel Votes to Drop C-17 

Bill Keller of The New York 
Times reported from Washington: 

A key Senate subcommittee has 
voted to halt funds for the S40- 
billion C-17 transport plane pro- 
gram if Congress decides to cut 
deeply into President Reagan's mil- 
itary budgeL 

The 5-4 vote at a closed meeting 
of the Armed Services subcommit- 
tee on sea power and force projec- 
tion late Monday was the first sig- 
nificant vote in Congress this year 
against a major weapons system. 

The subcommittee vote caught 
the air force and the manufacturer, 
McDonnell Douglas Cap., by sur- 
prise and opened a fierce lobbying 
effort to reverse the decision when 
the full Armed Sendees Committee 
takes up the issue next week. 

The subcommittee vote, which 
would deny money for full-scale 
development of the C-17, came as 
the paneT was drafting a military 
budget that would give the Penta- 
gon only enough of a- budget in- 
crease in the 1986 fiscal year to 
allow for inflation. 

The panel also drafted two other 
versions of its budget, both includ- 
ing money for the C-17. in case 
Congress decideed to allow the 
Pentagon a more generous growth 
rate. 

According to a committee aide 
who was present for the vote, the 
subcommittee chose to give up the 
C-17 because it was a program 
scheduled to grow rapidly in the 
next few years and because it had 
an alternative in the existing C-5 
transport plane. 


Dollar After the Fall: 

The Analysts Predict 
A Period of Stability 

By Bob Hagerty 

umational Herald Tribu 


the 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Economists 
have been predicting the immi- 
nent decline of the dollar for 
years. At last, foreign exchange 
traders seem to agree. 

The dollar was little change 
Thursday. But the nervous sia- 

1NEWS ANALYSIS 

bility came after an unusually 
swift fall over the past month, 
amid signs that the U.S. econo- 
my was slowing and worries 
over the health of the U.S. 
banking system. 

That decline has brought the 
dollar down about 10 percent 
against the Deutsche m a r k , to 
3.1210 DM at Thursday’s close 
in New York from the 13-year 
high of 3.4780 DM reached in 
late February. 

The dollar’s decline has been 
even sharper against the pound, 
which had risen to SI -2275 at 
the dose Thursday in New 
York from a low of about S1.04 
a month ago. The Japanese yen 
has gained about 4 percent and 
the French (rime 9 percent 

Even so, the dollar remains 
relatively high. A year ago. it 
stood at 2.60 marks, and most 
economists said it was grossly 
overvalued. 

Few analysts predict that the 
dollar will continue to fall so 
precipitately as it has in recent 
days. The general feeling is that 
the U.S. currency will be stable 
or slightly up in next few days 
in reaction to the recent phmge. 

Investors with big dollar 
holdings “are not panic-strick- 
en yet,” said David Morrison, 
chief international economist at 
the London stockbrokerage of 
Simon & Coates. “They’re not 
diving for the door as if it were a 
banana republic currency." 


and 


Looking further ahead, 
question is so complex 
economists have been wrong so 
often that they hesitate to imW» 
firm predictions. But Mr. Mor- 
rison and many others say the 
dollar has probably passed its 
peak. 

One reason to expea a weak- 
er dollar is that the currency’s 
five-year surge has begun to 
draw howls of pain from UJS. 
industry and agriculture, whose 
products are bong priced out of 
foreign markets. 

The US. Commerce Depart- 
ment reported Thursday that 
the country's merchandise 
trade deficit widened in Febru- 
ary to a seasonally adjusted 
$11.45 billion bom S 10.29 bil- 
lion in January. Commerce Sec- 
retary Malcolm Baldrige pre- 
dicted that the strong dollar 
would lead to even bigger defi- 
cits in the months ahead. 

Such a dismal trading perfor- 
mance is prompting U.S. com- 
panies and farmers to demand 
government action to midge the 
dollar down. 

Eastman Kodak Co. estimat- 
ed Thursday that over the past 
four years its earnings have 
been reduced $500 milli on be- 
cause of the dollar’s rise as for- 
eign-currency profits have de- 
clined in dollar terms. Adding 
in indirect effects, such as the 
loss of sales to foreign competi- 
tors, the company said its earn- 
ings have been cut by as much 
as SI billion. 

“Americans now understand 
that they have an international 
trading sectm.” said Mr. Morri- 
son of Simon & Coates. 

The dollar is also suffering 
because of signs that the U.S. 
economy is slowing, making the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


EC Agrees on Entry 
Of Spain and Portugal 


By Steven Dryden 

Inte rnatio nal Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The foreign min- 
isters of the 10 European CommU' 
oily nations reached an accord 
Thursday night on terms of entry 
for Spain and were near final agree- 
meat with Spain and Portugal. 

Foreign Minis ter Roland Dumas 
of France, whose objections last 
week blocked agreement on en- 
largement, said the EC ministers’ 
agreement was likely to be accept- 
ed by Spain and Portugal. 

He said all sides had made con- 
cessions in order to reach the settle- 
menu 

“Our troubles and our difficul- 
ties are over,” Mr. Dumas said. 

Other EC officials predicted that 
the remaining min or obstacles 
would be resolved and an agree- 
ment reached within hoars. 

“The problems are becoming wa- 
fer-thin," one said. 

After the foreign ministers com- 
pleted the details of their terms of 
entry, EC officials began meeting 
separately with negotiators for 
Spain and PortugaL 

If the terms are acceptable, the 
accord was to be completed in a full 
meeting of the foreign ministers. 
Such an agreement would probably 
ensure the entry of Spain and Por- 
tugal by the January 1986 target 
date, EC officials said Thursday. 

Jacques Delors, president of the 
European Commission, said he ex- 
the issue to be settled Thurs- 
ly night. 

“I believe we are dose to an 
agreement," he said. “There is good 
will on both rides.” 

The 10 EC members agreed earli- 
er Thursday on the major points of 
the package of conditions to offer 
Spam, which included three areas 
of negotiation. 

The three areas are the terms 
under which the large Spanish fish- 
ing fleet will enter EC waters, a 
timetable for the introduction of 


pleted by the end of March to allow 
the parUaments of member states 
to ratify the agreement by Jan. 1. 

Among the final points still un- 
der discussion late Thursday nighi 
was the size of the rebate Portugal 
would receive on the value-added 
tax contributions it makes to the 
EC treasury. 

Commission officials propose 
that Portugal receive rebates on its 
VAT contributions for seven years 
to compensate for its economically 
disadvantaged position. Payments 
to Portugal could total 1— bUUon 
European Currency Units (S800 
million), officials said. 

■ Farm Freeze Rejected 
In Beam, Agriculture Minister 
jgnaz Kiechle insisted Thursday 
that he would not accept EC Com- 
mission proposals to freeze farm 
prices. He said he was defending 
Spanish agricultural products into ^ esl Gcrotany’s national interest, 
community markets,and ibcrrisWf^ **^ e D ° l any more 

'sacrifices." Mr. Kiechle said at a 
news conference. He said Chancel- 



Jacques Delors 


of Spanish work^s To jtiSsmi _ 
other members of me community. 

French reservations Iasi week on 
two aspects of a package offered to 
Spain by Italy’s foreign minister, 
Gtiilio Andreotti, the chairman of 
the ministers’ meeting, held up an 
accord. 

But the French objections were 
resolved Thursday morning in a 
meeting between Mr. Andreotti. 
Mr. Dumas and Foreign Minis ter 
Fernando Moran of Spain, EC offi- 
cials said. 

[Diplomats told Reuters that 
France had obtained minor conces- 
sions but nothing of substance on 
its demands last week concerning 
Spanish wine and fishing rights.] 

Mr. Andreotti pushed the mini* , 
ters to conclude the enlargement 
negotiators before the start of an 
EC summit meeting Friday to 
avoid entangling the heads of state 
in the details of the talks. 

EC officials believe the enlarge- 
ment negotiations must be com- 


lor Helmut Kohl had backed his 
views ou EC farm prices for the 
year beginning April 1. 

Agriculture ministers are due to 
resume price talks in Luxembourg 
cm Monday after three days of ne- 
gotiations in Brussels this week. 

Britain's farm minister, Michael 
Joplin g, blamed the lack of head- 
way on Mr. Kiechle's refusal to 
accept price cuts in the key cereal 
seaor. 

“Then Mr. Jopling will have to 
wait until August," Mr. Kiechle 
said. But be added that he regarded 
vetoing the proposals as a last re- 
sort and hoped to find new possi- 
bilities for compromise. 

Mr. Kiechle said he “categorical- 
ly rejected" a further cut this year 
in EC compensation to West Ger- 
man farmers for currency fluctua- 
tions. and said production cuts to 
fight surpluses must be linked to 
future price rises for the farm prod- 
ucts involved. 


Aquino Witnesses Gone; 
Apathy on Trial Grows 


.S. to Boycott Elbe Ceremony 


r By James Markham 

' New York Timet Service 

•DNN — The U.S. government has decided to 
yMt an anniversary gathering on the Elbe River 

* month of Soviet and American veterans of 
Id War II becaose of the killing of a U.S. Army 
win East Germany. 

-cconfiug to American diplomats, there will be 
-'rffidal U.S, representative and no .American 
■ guard at the ceremonies April 25 in East 
may to mark the 40th anniversary of the 
up between the Red Army and American 
a on the Elbe. 

ana- annv and Stale Department officials ac- 
*bdged Wednesday that Major Arthur D. 
- tobofl Jr., who was killed Sunday in East 
n&ny, had been photographing the inside of a 
ft military building through a window in an 
^ that had been officially off limits to Ameri- 

• until last month. 

taording to US. sources the building was a 


tank shed belonging to a regiment of the 2d Soviet 
Guards Army quartered near LudwigsIusL 

But the officials maintained, as has the United 
States since the incident occurred, that the shoot- 
ing of Major Nicholson was totally unjustified. 

Before the shooting there had been plans to send 
diplomats and a unit from the U.S. military liaison 
mission at Potsdam in East Germany to the cere- 
monies at Torgau on the Elbe. Major Nicholson, 
who was killed by a Russian sentry near Ludwigs- 
lust, was a member of the liaison mission. 

“It’s not really the time to be celebrating the 
friendship between (he two armed forces,” said a 
U.S. official, who added that it had been decided 
that socializing with Soviet officers in Potsdam 
would be ended. 

The Soviet Union intends to send a group of 
veterans to the ceremonies ai Torgau, the site of 
the Elbe linkup, and East Germany is expected to 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Service 

MANILA — When it began a 
month ago, the court case against 
the chief of staff erf the Philippine 
armed forces and 25 other men in 
the assassination or Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr. was hailed here as “the 
trial of the century." But today the 
trial is the subject of widespread 
cynicism, even apathy, among Fili- 
pinos. 

Witnesses regarded as vital to the 
prosecution have vanished. The 
soldiers charged in the purported 
military plot are being kepi not in 
jail, but in more spacious and com- 
fortable special barracks. 

One of the two men that a citi- 
zens' panel concluded last year was 
a possible g unman in the assassina- 
tion, Sergeant Filomeno Miranda, 
was married this month in festivi- 
ties replete with a roast calf on a 
spit, all while in custody. 

The armed forces' chief. General 
Fabian C. Ver, a cousin and close 
friend of President Ferdinand E 
Marcos, is out on bail. In recent 
weeks, he has been feted or dinners 
and other public ceremonies 
around Manila. Late last month 
Mr. Marcos surprised many Filipi- 
nos and foreign diplomats when he 
declared that if General Ver was 
acquitted he would be allowed to 
reassume command of the military. 

In a recent editorial, Veritas, a 
respected opposition weekly, said: 

“The general perception, held 
rightly or wrongly by (he FQipmo 
citizenry, is that the trial seems 
headed toward a mass acquittal erf 


the accused. So what is the use in 
getting all worked tip about it?" 

Agapito Aquino, younger broth- 
er of the asassinated opposition 
leader, said, “People lost faith in 
this court after they refused to pot 
the accused in jail and Marcos gave 
the signal that be would reinstate 
Ver." 

The absence of crucial witnesses 
has led to repeated delays. It has 
also prompted expressions erf con- 
fidence from defense lawyers. An- 
tonio P. Coronet. General Ver’s at- 
torney, said recently that his job 
might be quite easy.' 

“After all," Mr. Coronel said, “if 
you have no evidence to defend 
against, then there's no need to 
prove your innocence." 

A nationwide search was ordered 
Monday to find six missing wit- 
nesses. Three were private security 
guards at Manila International Air- 
port on Aug. 21, 1983. when Mr. 
Aquino was shot to death on his 
return from three years of self-exile 
in the United States. 

The others were an airline 
ground engineer, a cargo loader 
and a neighbor of Rolando Gal- 
maru the man who was shot to 
death by soldiers on the tarmac 
immediately after Mr. Aquino was 
killed. The government said that 
Mr. Galman was a gunman with 
Communist links and that he had 
murdered die opposition leader. 

The 25 soldiers and one civilian 
accused of having taken part in the 
conspiracy are now being charged 
with two counts of murder, one for 





Roberta Masibay, 16, a witness at the trial of the chief of 
the Philippine armed forces and 25 other men for the 
murder of Mr. Aquino, tearfully denied Thursday that she 
had been bribed to change testimony implicating the men. 


Mr. Aquino and one for Mr. Gal- 
man. 

AB six witnesses testified before 
the citizens’ panel whose report last 
October was the basis of the court 


charges. The government said 
Tuesday that it had found one of 
the missing six, Rizbonric SicaL 
Mr. Galman was believed to have 
(Continued tm Page 2, CoL 4) 


mey Reagan: Filling the White House Vacuum as Staff Shifts 


Bernard Weinraub 

York Times Service 

. ^UNGTON — After While 
dinners now. while cof- 
. lag served. Nancy Reagan 
ttientfy white her husband 
i questions from reporters 
. g nearby. At a signal, the 
* rf her eyes, a staff member 
o the president's side and 
him back »o the dinner, 
kg beside her husband at 
4 outside the White House, 
sagm dutches his hand as 
. »come pouring forth from 
. s. Inevitably, she gives a 
senile tug to his arm. The 
. « shrugs and moves on. 

. week Mr. Reagan noted 
■ ae glee that women among 
anm at his televised news 
pee were wearing red — 
’eagan's favorite color, 
gred has proved to be a way 
n B Mr. Reagan's attention, 
we laughs at the red busi- 
n it’s an indication erf bow 
y people are taking Nancy's 
a former White House 
d. 


utiiders all this may seem cials, Mrs. 
,But it underscores both 


administration and her concerns 
about how her husband is per- 
ceived. These and other incidents 
reflect the dual nature of Mis. Rea- 
gan's role in the administration, a 
role that combines what her friends 
call a powerful protective streak for 
her husband and ha awn contribu- 
tion to the day-to-day workings of 
the administration. 

"She's the president’s best 
friend, his closest confidante and 
his most trusted adviser." said 
Nancv Reynolds, a Washington 
lobbyist who is a close family 
friend. "Since the re-election she's 
more relaxed and more confident 
than I’ve ever seen her." 

Several factors have emerged in 
recent months to provide Mrs. Rea- 
gan with new; influence, a White 
House aide said. Perhaps more im- 
portant. she has altered the image 
from the early days of the first 
Reagan administration that por- 
trayed her as a woman whose inter- 
ests appeared to focus a great deal 
on designer clothes, expensive chi- 
na and wealthy friends. 

According to White House offi- 
h Reagan's influence is 



French Smith, who is returning to 
California, as is William P. dark, 
the former interior secretary. 

“Her anchors are gone.” a for- 
mer White House official said. 

“Reagan will rely more and more 
on her as the second term pro- 
gresses." said another former 
White House official “He won’t 
have the old-timers with him." 

.Although Mrs. Reagan rarely in- 
volves herself in specific policy is- 
sues, her influence is now centered 
on what one official termed “per- 
sonnel and tone and how people 
see the president” 

Even such a close friend as Mr. 


A White House official said Mrs. 
Reagan was also concerned about 
Nancy Reagan napping daring Mr. Reagan's unsuccessful potential embarrassment to the 
quest for the R^S&can Residential nomtation in 1976. 

of the U.S. ambassador to Austria, 

chad K. Deaver, the deputy White relations job, often spoke with Mrs. Helene von Damm. a long-time 
House chief Of staff, who has over- Reagan inree or four times a dav. Reagan aide. 


signed as labor secretary after a 
New York judge refused to dismiss 
a conspiracy case against him. In 
fact, it was an open secret in the 
White House that she wanted Mr. 
Donovan to depart after Mr. Rea- 
gan's rejection. 

According to friends, Mrs. Rea- 
gan has struggled hard to remove 
the gilded image that marked her 
early years in the White House and, 
the friends say, deeply upset her. 
Sbeila Tate, bo- former press secre- 
tary, says that as eariy as 1980 Mrs. 
Reag a n insisted to aides that she 
wanted to get involved in drug 
abuse programs but was uncertain 

Deaver irritated her recently when to ^ ' L 
newspaper reports disclosed that “We kept saying the issue is a 
he had purchased a BMW automo- drag, depressing, but she persist- 
bile at a discount price while on ed,” said Miss Tate, who added 
official business in West Germany, that the delay in shaping Mrs. Rea- 
gan's role was partly the remit of 
the shooting of Reagan in 1981 and 
his convalescence. 


INSIDE 

■ Charter 77, the Czechoslovak 

rights group, has survived for 
eight years despite heavy odds 
against it. Page 2. 

■ A Senate panel barred the di- 
version of foreign aid money to 
Nicaraguan contras. Page 3. 

■ European ready-to-wear col- 

lections had high points but no 
startling surprises. Page 5. 

WEEKEND 

■ Oscar nominees for best ac- 
tor and actress analyze the roles 
that pm than in the running for 
tbe Academy Award. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ A group led by T. Boone Pick- 
ens, a Texas oilman, said it may 
seek control of Unocal Carp., 
the big oil company. Page 1 1. 


partly the result oT the vacuum cre- 


relations job, often spoke with Mis. 

Reagan three or four times a day. 

seen the president's schedule often Meanwhile, Edwin Meese3d, the Further, Mrs. Reagan was dc- 
wj n »r shifts, especially the under Mrs. Reagan's guidance. Mr. presidential counselor, has become scribed by one official as relieved 

enmina departure in May of Mi- Deaver, who is living for a public attorney general, replacing William when Raymond J. Donovan re- 


Mrs. Reagan's involvement in 
drug rehabilitation programs 
among the young was one of the 
reasons cited by Richard Wirthlin, 
the White House pollster, for a 20- 
point increase in her approval rat- 
ing. which climbed to 82 percent in 
a recent poll of 1,500 people. 


Hungary Leader Re-Elected 

Aeence France- Presse 

BUDAPEST — Hungary's 
Communist Party leader, Janos 
Kadar, was re-elected Thursday to 
the post he has held since 1956. He 
took the title of general secretary, 
however; previously he was known 
as party first secretary. 


Air Force 
Suspends GE 
From U.S. 
Arms Deals 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The .Air 
Force announced Thursday that it 
has temporarily suspended the 
General Electric Co. from obtain- 
ing any new contracts with the De- 
partment of Defense. 

“This suspension is based upon 
the indictment returned by a feder- 
al grand jury in the U.S. District 
Court for the Eastern District of 
Pennsylvania on Tuesday” Air 
Force Secretary Verne Oit an- 
nounced. 

The grand jury indicted GE on 
charges that it falsified claims mid 
lied about work done on a nuclear- 
warhead system, thus defrauding 
the government of $800,000. GE 
denied any wrongdoing. 

Meanwhile. letters released 
Thursday showed that Mr. Orr had 
asked chief executives of United 
Technologies Coro, and General 
Electric, two of the largest U.S. 
defense contractors, to refund vol- 
untarily $206 mini on of “unreason- 
able profits." 

The letters, dated March 15. said 
Pentagon auditors determined the 
companies “realized profits that 
were significantly in excess of those 
negotiated by the government” in 
providing spare parts for jet en- 
gines between 1978 and 19S3. 

According to Mr. Orr, the audi- 
tors calculated that the Pratt & 
Whitney division of United Tech- 
nologies was paid $38 milli on in 
excess profits, while General Elec- 
tric was paid $168 million in excess 
profits. 

“Our initial review indicates that 
the inspector-general's findings are 
substantially correct," Mr. Orr 
wrote. “Basal upon the circum- 
stances surrounding the execution 
of these procurements, it is appro- 
priate that I take the exceptional 
action of requesting a voluntary 
refund under fixed-price contracts. 

“This request does not in any 
way waive any legal rights for re- 
covery that the government may 
have under tbe contracts associated 
with these unreasonable profits." 

According to a summary of the 
inspeaor-general's audit report, 
the excess profits were paid to both 
companies in pan because inflation 
rates were much lower than origi- 
nally anticipated in 1982 and 1983. 
The auditors reported GE received 
“higher than negotiated profits 
whenever deliveries were made 
ahead of schedule” and because the 
negotiated rates for overhead ex- 
penses were significantly higher 
than the actual rates." 

At Pratt & Whitney, the auditors 
reported that the firm had benefit- 
ed from “changes in accounting for 
labor standards and alleged defec- 
tive pricing,” 

Spokesmen for United Technol- 
ogies and General Electric declined 
to comment. 






jrsHi-s -sti 2 *t**n* “JfJ55?ssilsif?l5Etsi*K:!?s::Ks:5!i mi 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HFIRATJI TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1985 


Charter 77: la Pain but Alive 


I*- 


Czechoslovak Dissident Group Survives Against the Odds 


By Bradley Graham 


PRAGUE —In (he Soviet bloc, 
Osechosiovalda's Charter 77 is an 
example of survival against the 
odds. 

Eastern Europe's oldest dissi- 
dent group, marking its eighth an- 
niversary, recently issued a lengthy 
restatement of principles, in pan to 
remind the world that it still exists 
and in part to clarify for supporters 
what toe movement stands for. 

Charter 77s field of comment 
has broadened since its founding in 
1977 in defense of human rights. Is 
recent years, it has produced re- 
ports on such diverse topics as pol- 
lution, rock music and drugs. Its 
aim, supporters say, is to offer 
Czechoslovaks an alternative voice 
to their (Vtn rn i n nist gove rnment 

A lengthy appeal recently issued 
by the charter movement called for 
the dissolution of NATO and the 
Warsaw Pact and the creation of an 
association of “free and autono- 


writer and one of those present at 
die clandestine film showing. “But 
the only dialogue we've had has 
been with the stare security ser- 
vice.” 

For all the international atten- 
tion that Charier 77 has generated, 
it has made little measurable im- 
pact inside Czechoslovakia. 


They’ve been more 
effective in making 
their point to the 
outside world than to 
their fellow citizens.’ 


“They've been more effective in 


making their point to the outside 
world than to their fellow arizens," 


nywig* 1 Fiirapaan nations. “Perhaps 

such an ideal seems a dream, the 


such an ideal seems a dream." the 
17-page document, said. “Yet we 
arc convinced that it represents the 
will of most Europeans/ 1 
Going up against one of the ster- 
nest regimes in the Communist 
world has been a painful experi- 
ence for many signets of the char- 
ter. Many have bem or are still 


onea, for participating in the move- 
ment. 

Most of the supporters have en- 
dured a variety of forms of harass- 
ment, from loss of jobs to perma- 
nent police surveillance to 
exclusion of their children from 
universities. 

On March 11, police in Prague 
raided an apartment -where 48 per- 
sons, many of them supporters of 
Charter 77. were viewing newsreels 
of the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of 
Czechoslovakia. Ah were detained, 
some for as long as two days, then 
released. 

“We offered dialogue to the stare 
at the be ginning , without fflnsions, 
of course,” said Eva Kanturkova, a 


world than to their fellow otaeus, 
a Western diplomat in Prague ob- 
served. 

In contrast, the Polish Commit- 
tee for Social Self-Defense, known 
as KOR, which formed about the 
game rinw , laid an ^dura ti o nal and 
organizational network that facili- 
tated the rise in 1980 of the inde- 
pendent Solidarity union move- 
ment. KOR eventually dissolved 
and some of its members served as 
elected representatives of Solidari- 
ty or senior advisers to it. 

Dissent in Czechoslovakia was 
□ever reinforced, as it was in Po- 
land, by strong independent pro- 
test movements among workers 


sued in January. “Charter 77 has 
no members, only signatories. It is 
not something one can join or 
leave, only sign. 

“It does not intend to enunciate 
its own programs of political or 
societal changes or reforms. Its 
goal is the rehabilitation of people 
as the true subjects of history. 

“What a person can gain is the 
feeling of being liberated, the feel- 
ing of bong true to himsdf, the 
feeling of being publicly responsi- 
ble agai n, the feeling of having left 
the forum of general indifference 
and of not participating, with his 
silence, in matters that are evident- 
ly immoral” 

Charter 77 is represented by 
three spokesmen who change from 
year to year. Their names are at- 
tached to the documents released 
irregularly in the group's name. 
The three used to be chosen to 
reflect the major factions — ex- 
Communists, Roman Catholics 
and non-Cammunist int ellectuals 
This year, all have leftist back- 
grounds. 

How are subjects chosen for 
charter reports? “There is no bu- 
reaucratic approach," explained 
Jin Dienstbier, a spokesmen for the 


and. students or by the Roman 
Catholic Cfoirrh, which is tightly 


Catholic Church, which is tightly 
controlled by the Prague govern- 
ment. “Charter has remained a an- 
gle stream of overt dissent rather 
than one of several mutually rein- 
forcing currents," said H. Gordon 
Skilling, a Canadian professor, in a 
1981 study. 

Charter 77 insists that it does not 
aim to be a mass movement. Sup- 
porters number about 1,200, and 
the group has been gahring only 
several dozen new ones per year. 

“It is not an organization nor a 
basis for opposition activities,” 
said an anniversary statement is- 


2,000 Rioters Dispersed in Khartoum 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Police 
and soldiers fired tear gas to dis- 
perse more than 2,000 rioters 
Thursday in renewed demonstra- 
tions against the government trig- 
gered mqm price increases, dip- 
lomats said. 

One witness, who declined to be 


identified, said at least three per- 
sons were lolled. The report was 
not confirmed, however. 

Police killed at least two persons 
Wednesday and arrested about 
1,200 during rioting that broke out 
hours after President Gaafar Ni- 
mdri left Sudan for the United 
States, where he is scheduled to 


Iraq Bombs 6 More Cities, 
Presses Iran for Settlement 


By Judith Miller 

New York Times Sendee 

BAGHDAD — The Iraqi gov- 
ernment announced Thursday that 
it had attacked six dries in central 
and western Iran and a “very large 
naval target” in the northern part 
of the Gulf. 

A statement issued by the offi- 
cial Iranian Republic News Agency 
said 36 people had bom killed and 
250 wounded in the latest day of 
Iraqi attacks. 


halt to the fighting should be total. 
Iraqi officials said they were un- 
willing to accept a partial cease-fire 
that would create a lull in the fight- 
ing during which Iran could rebuild 
its forces and launch another off en- 


Arab and Western diplomats 


said the Iraqi raids were aimed ai 
continuing the pressure on Iran to 


continuing the pressure on Iran to 
accept a comprehensive peace set- 
tlement to end the 54-month con- 
flict 


Iran on Wednesday sought the 
assistance of Secretary-General Ja- 
vier Pfcrez de CuHlar of the United 
Nations in persuading Iraq to ac- 
cept a moratorium on attacks cm 
dries like that he helped arrange in 
June. 


But Iraq has been adamant that a 


sive. 

This theme was underlined re- 
peatedly Thursday by the Iraqi 
state-controlled press. Baghdad 
newspapers quoted Yassin Ramo- 
Han, first deputy prime minister 
and commander of die 630,000- 
strong Popular Army, as saying 
that Iraq's aimed forces would con- 
tinue its buildup of troops and 
weaponry and its raids against Ira- 
nian dries unless Tehran respond- 
ed to its peace appeals. 

For its part, the Iranian press 
warned Gulf states that their more 
open support recently far Iraq 
placed than in jeopardy. The En- 
glish-language Tehran Times an- 
gled out Kuwait, accusing the 
neighboring Gulf state of having 
permitted Iraq to use Bubiyan Is- 
land off its coast for mDitajy action 
a gains t Iran. 


fire with tear gas, dispersing the 
group several hundred yards from 
the embassy gates. 

The Associated Press reported 
that an official at the embassy, con- 
tacted by telephone from Cairo, 
said police fired tear gas to break 
up a crowd of 75 to 100 people 
advancing .toward the embassy. Af- 
ter the noting Wednesday, Suda- 
nese authorities sent extra police 
and paratroopers to the embassy. 

Sources in contact with Khar- 
toum hospitals said at least six and 
possibly as many as 18 rioters were 
killed and an undetermined num- 
ber wounded Wednesday by police. 

A police brigadier, Mohammed 
Abdul-Jabir, said 1,200 arrests 
were made Wednesday. 

The government said late Thurs- 
day that it had srt up special courts 
to try rioters and that more than 
300 had been sentenced since die 

night, The^temCTtfram^^ 

rarity Department, reported by the 
official press agency, SUN A, did 
not say what die sentences were. 

“A large number of saboteurs 
have been arrested and will under- 
go trials," the statement said. 

( UPI ; AP, Reuters) 


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WORLD BIHEEsT Mi * " irl * in 


Goetz Pleads Not Guilty in Shoofgf 

NEW YORK (AP) —Bernhard H. Goetz pleaded not gubvlD 




to charges stemming from his shooting of raw youths on 
subway train. His lawyer was granted 45 days to prepare a 5 
quash the indictment. 

Mr. Goeu’s appearance in Criminal Court in Manhattan came 
after his indictment on four counts of attempted murder by the s 
grand jury to investigate the Dec. 22 shootings. The fast n^. 
indicted Mr. Goetz, 37, only on chains rebtira to weapons pm 
He did not testify before either panel but two rathe four victims* 
before the second. 

Judge Stephen Crane kept Mr. Goetz’s bail at S5.0Q0, tom 
prosecutor's request that it be raised to $20,000. In pleading for fl 
bail Barry Sloinick. Mr. Goetz's lawyer, said his cheat had, *£ 
natdy. the best-known face in the cranny. He couldn't flee," 


«j«4 Mg 




. . 




Danish Workers Blockade Folkett 


----- 

. .... ....tiMrts 


COPENHAGEN (Reuters) — Danish workers blocked mat \ 
here Thursday and blockaded the parlia men t, the FoQcetiag, to t 
government plans to impose a settlement in a strike and k> 


involving 300.000 private-sector employees. 

Prime Minster roul SchlQter had to have a police escort to gn g 
the blockade, which delayed a parliamentary debate on the sen} 
terms for more than as hour. Justice Minister Erik Nitm-Hanseoj 
away from the Folketing by demonstrators, said later on Danktt 
“This is an attack on democracy." J 

Police later broke up the crowd of demonstrators, which somer 


: rr-se ' 


Karen Nicholson, Major Nicholson’s widow, after a service in Berlin for bn 1 husband. 


iWM 


group. “Someone usually cranes up 
with an interesting idea. But thars 


U.S. Will Boycott Ceremony on Elbe 


said numbered up to 2,000. Two arrests were made, police safe 
government said Wednesday that it bad agreed with the opp» 
Radical Party or ‘ 


Radical Party on a two-year package foe private and puu» 
employees and that the strikers would be ordered bade to war 
dispute began Sunday. >} 


with an interesting idea. But thars 
not enough. 

“You need a group of people to 
do the research. For instance, for 
five years we tried to prepare a 
document on ecology but weren’t 
wtisfo-d We finally published one 
Last year that was written by a com- 
mission of government specialists 
who couldn’t get their study pub- 
lished officially." 

The example highlighted the 
bdp that Charter 77 sometimes re- 
ceives from es tablishment insiders. 
Charter provides them with an out- 
let for information that a Commu- 
nist censor has blocked. Another 
such case involved a report on 
health care drafted by doctors 
working in medical institutions. 

“We are not so totally discon- 
nected from society as is sometimes 
thought," Mr. Dienstbier said. 


(Continued from Page 1 ) 

send Comromrist veterans of the 
anti-Nazi underground resistance 
movement as welL 


According to diplomats, UJl, 
British and French military com- 
manders in West Germany met 
Tuesday to discuss possible retalia- 
tory measures against Soviet liai- 
son missions that patrol in West 
Ge rman y One possible measure 
discussed, according to a source, 
was a sharp restriction on the 
movements of the Soviet <«»w« 
“fora limited period of time." 


rammed head-on by an East Ger- 
man truck. Under a 1947 agree- 
ment, Britain and France also nave 
liaison missions based at Potsdam. 

An American diplomat said that 
the Allies were reluctant, however, 
to take retaliatory steps that might 
ultimately undermine a valuable 
jntfpigpii r^ gatlw ri n E institution. 


French militar y officers were re- 
ported to be incensed at Major 
Nicholson's killing since they were 
said to have obtained assurances 
from Soviet officers about the safe- 
ty of Allied patrols after a French 
observer was killed a year ago when 


■ Attache’s Trip Canceled 

The New York Tones reported 
earlier from Washington : 

The White House disclosed 
Wednesday that, to show irritation 
over the incident, the senior Soviet 
military attache in Washing ton, 
Rear Admiral Ivan P. Sakulin, who 
had been on a guided tour of the 
West Coast with other attaches, 
bad been told by the State Depart- 
ment to return immediately to 
Washington. 


“We consider it inappropriate 
for the naval attachi to be on such 
a tour in light of the fatal shoot- 
ing," a State Department spokes- 
man said. “We also wanted to have 
the opportunity to protest the 
shooting in the strongest possible 
lerms to the naval attache in Wash- 
ington.” 

Oleg M. Sokolov, the No. 2 offi- 
cial in the Soviet Embassy, was 
seen later at the State Department 
on his way to meet with Richard R. 
Burt, assistant secretary of state for 
European affairs. 

Lany Speafces, the White House 
spokesman, said various steps were 
under consideration because of the 
shooting, but White House and 
State Department officials stud 
there was no thought at the mo- 
ment of curbing any negotiations in 
progress. 


have a medical checkup and, on 
Monday, meet with President Ron- 
ald Reagan. He arrived in Wash- 
ington on Wednesday night 
United Press International re- 
ported that witnesses said students 
and workers looted shops, set fires 
and stoned cars before tnnring to- 
ward the U.S. Embassy, a heavily 
f ratified building in the center city 
across from the main campus of the 
University of Khartoum. 


President of Singapore Resigns 
Amid Treatment for Alcoholism 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — President 
Devan Nair resigned Thursday 
because of alcoholism. Prime 
Minister Lee Kuan Yew said. 
Mr. Lee told Parliament that 
Mr. Nair, 61, was in a hospital 
where he was being treated for 
mental disorders caused by ex- 
cessive drinking. 


Riot police and soldiers opened 
e with tear gas, dispersing the 


Singapore’s president per- 
forms only a ceremonial rede as 
head of state. Under the consti- 
tution a new president is to be 
elected by BaifiamenL 

Mr. Nair, a former trade 
union chief, was taken on 
March 16 to a hospital in Singa- 
pore from Kuching, capital of 
the eastern Malaysian state of 
Sarawak, where he was on a 


private visit. He was initially 
diagnosed as having serious liv- 
er failure. 

Mr. Lee. a longtime associate 
of Mr. Nair, said doctors later 
concluded that the president 
was in “ an acute confusio nal 
state due to alcohol superim- 
posed on a long-standing condi- 
tion caused by alcohol depen- 
dency." 

“The president's mental state 
at present fluctuates between 
lucidity and mild confusion, 
and disorientation," Mr. Lee 
told Parliament. 

Mr. Nair said in a tetter to 
Mr. Lee that he was only a' 
“moderate social drinker" when 
he was elected president in Oc- 
tober 1981 for a foar-year term, 
Mr. Lee said. 


Dollar Has Passed Its Peak , 


Traders, Economists Believe 


(Continued from Page I) 


country a less attractive place to 
park money. Last week, the U.S. 
government estimated that the 
gross national product in the Gist 
quarter of 1985 was growing at an 
annual rate of 2.1 percent, about 
half the level expected. 

The run on savings banks in 
Ohio revived fears that the U.S. 
banking system was shaky, hurting 
the country's image as a safe haven 
for investors. 

Thai image has also been dented 
by news that die United States re- 
cently became a net debtor for the 
first time since 1914. In other 
words, Americans owe foreigners 


more money than foreigners owe 
them. 

This landmark had been kmg ex- 
pected, but it served to underscore 


that huge U.S. trade and budget 
deficits leave the country depen- 


defidts leave the country depen- 
dent on an ever-growing flow of 
investments from abroad. Should 
foreigners lose confidence in the 
United States, those investments 
could be attracted only by pushing 
US. interest rates up sharply, blud- 
geoning the economy. 

Economists can stiD find strong 
counter arguments to support the 
dollar. 


lie Thursday, Lebanon's chief UN 
representative, Rashid Fakhury, 
said his government did not feel the 
force needed a wider role. 


The UN Security Council is ex- 
pected to renew the force's man- 


Trial Stirs 


Little Hope 


(Continued from Page 1) 


been set up by the military as part 
of the conspiracy and the court is 
expected to question Mr. Steal 
about Mi. Gaunan’s contacts, if 


l’s contacts, if 


any, with senior military officers. 
So far, no significant new evi 


So far, no significant new evi- 
dence has been presented to the 
court. The hearings have consisted 
mainly of testimony similar to rf»n 

gTts H months of deliberations 
by the same witnesses. Given the 
reluctance of some of those wit- 
nesses to crane forward, the special 
three-judge court has less evidence 
before it than was received by the 
citizens’ paneL 

The panel was set up to conduct 
an independent inquiry into the 
Aquino assassination, but it was 
not a court and its findings did not 
carry the force of law. 

The three judges hearing the case 
now are all Marcos appointees. 

“Presumably, Marcos has more 
control over this court than he did 
over the citizens’ board," a diplo- 
mat said. “The government is send- 
ing signals as to what it wants to 
happen. But just what effect that 
will have is uncertain." 


“The market is over-discounting 
the bad news at the moment," said 
Robert Schwab, head of portfolio 
management at Fuji International 
Finance Ltd, a London unit of 
Japan’s Fuji Bank. He predicted 
that the dollar would be stable to 
slightly stranger over the next cou- 
ple of weeks as the market recog- 
nized that “it has overreacted on 
Ohio.” 

The supply of dollars outside the 
United States has shrunk consider- 
ably over the past few years, largely 
because U.S. banks reduced their 
international lending. Meanwhile, 
debtors still need to buy doflarsiio 
repay their debts. 

U.S. interest rates remain higher 
than those in most other major in- 
dustrial countries, apart from Brit- 
ain. The United Stales is still con- 
sidered a safe haven and it offers a 
wider range of short-term invest- 
ment opportunities than do other 
countries. 


Many economists also believe 
that the recent estimate of the gross 
national product understated U.S. 
economic growth and that the com- 
ing months mil show a modest re- 
bound. 

Rainer Siegelkow, an economist 
at Westdeotsche Landesbank, pre- 
dicted that such a rebound would 
help support the dollar over the 
next six months or so. That, he said, 
should give the United States time 
to begin reducing its budget deficit 
and thus lessen the chance that the 
dollar will eventually come crash- 
ing down. 


dale before it expires April 19. 

In Beirut, a group that has 
claimed the deaths of two British 
diplomats in Greece and India last 
year said it was responsible fra the 
latest in the two-week series of kid- 
nappings, the abduction Monday 
of Alec Collett of the UN Relief 
and Works Agency fra Palestine 
Refugees. 

In a statement, the Revolution- 
ary Organization of Socialist Mos- 
lems accused Mr. Collett, who is 
British, of being a spy. 

Nine foreigners have disap- 
peared in Lebanon in the past two 
weeks. On Wednesday, a Briton, 
Geoffrey Nash, was released un- 
harmed near his home in west Bei- 
rut. 

After the Collett kidnapping, his 
agency told expatriate staff mem- 
bers to leave the country. 

In other developments, wire ser- 
vices reported that fighting broke 
out in the northern port of Tripoli 
Thursday, jeopardizing the eight- 
month-old Syrian-mediated peace 
treaty between rival Moslem militia 
groups. There were also reports of 
renewed dashes between the Leba- 
nese Army and Christian militia 
forces near Sidon, in southern Leb- 
anon. 

Police in Tripoli 65 miles (105 
kilometers) north of Beirut, said 
two militiamen were killed and 
three wounded in fighting that 
broke oat early Thursday. No civil- 
ian casualties were reported. 

Militias of the Moslem funda- 


from the Syrian-backed Arab 
Democratic Party fought fra sever- 
al months last summer, until Syria 
mediated a peace treaty that was 
signed in Damascus. 

(AP, UPI, Reuters) 


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• 5 Rue Daunou. PARIS 

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Craxi Warns of New Terrorist Thr 


ROME (UPI) — Prime Minister Benin© Craxi of Italy wanted 
day of a new wave of terrorism a day after suspected Red 
guerrillas kilted a prominent economist. 

Ezio Tarantdli, who advocated curbs on Italian workers’ aut 
wage hikes, was shot down at the University of Roracby two yarn " 
“The Red Brigades have killed again, with the same technique 
same macabre ritual as usual," Mr. Craxi said after a Cabinet. ■ 
meeting. “This strategy is aimed at mobilizing opinion sgan 
economic policy of the government. It emerges dearly that Hot ■ 
Brigades’ intention to strike at certain labor ration aides, whu 
hold guilty of complicity in what they consider an anti-water j ■ 
meet policy." 


lyj V> ( 

limkrupt 



. ^-***» . 


Honduran Crisis Sparks Coup Run 


***** 


TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (UPI) — Honduran military anti 
it an elite armv unit on alert Thursday, and the government cal . 


UN to Pull 
Unessential 
Lebanon Staff 


put an elite army unit on alert Thursday, and the government cal 

^The army's Cobra battalion surrounded the’supteme Court a 
National Congress, whose leader challenged the authority of Pr 
Roberto Snazo Cdrdova by calling for the expulsion of the chief j 
The crisis flared when a faction of Mr. Snazo Cordova's Libera 
called Thursday for the removal of Supreme Court Chief Justice 1 
Arita PaJomo, asserting he was behind a scheme to accuse the Car 
president. Efrain Bugirou. of a plot to destabilize the govemmea 


.-.-.I 

* *.!«"*.' iNt 


For the Record 


Con^nledby Oar Stiff From Dispatcher 

BEIRUT— The United Nations 
has ordered its agencies in Lebanon 
to withdraw unessmtial employees 
because of a series of kidnappings 
of foreigners. But a UN spokes- 
man, Louay Djoundi, said Thurs- 
day that there was no plan to evac- 
uate all foreign workers. 

A UN spokesman in New York, 
Joe Sills, said Wednesday that all 
UN agencies in Lebanon had been 
asked to determine which staff 
members were not absolutely es- 
sential 

Earlier this month, 36 Britons 
and Americans who worked for the 
UN peacekeeping force in southern 
Lebanon were withdrawn from the 
country. 

At the United Nations in New 
York, Lebanon requested that the 
peacekeeping force remain in 
southern Lebanon fra six more 
months without any change in its 
mandate. 

In a letter to Seaetary&eoeral 
Javier Pfcrez de Cufeflar, made pub- 
lic Thursday, Lebanon's chief UN 


President Nkobe Ceansesou of Romania said Wednesday tl— •, 
Warsaw Pact countries had worked out differences on the future le ^ 
their alliance's 30-year treaty and agreed to extend it when rt expir 
14, according to a statement from the official Agerpres news * - 
received Thursday in Vienna. 0 

Egypt’s foreign minister, Esmat Abdel Megind, met Thursday ii 
with Ptiahn Ben Etissu, chairman of the Israeli parliament's con .V.- ;. s * 
for foreign affairs and defense. 

A form of proportional representation will be introduced m F fc y r 
legislative elections next year. Prime Minister Laurent Fate 
Thursday at a closed meeting of Socialist members of the N 
Assembly in Rennes, accordingto a party spokeswoman. Mr. Fah 
the plan would be announced Wednesday. (I 

A Colombian airplane cradled Thursday in the country’s q . 
mountains, killing all 40 persons aboard, officials said.'Thqf 
Airlines plane was on a domestic flight 
Peru has (hopped charges against 17 peasants accused of ltillir ' 
Peruvian journalists in an Andean village two yean ago, the a 
general's office said Wednesday. It said insufficient evidence hi" ' 
presented during the six-month trial 
A federal judge in Texas reduced on Thursday the sentence d 
who helped two Salvadoran refugees enter the country illegally. H 
lowered the sentence of Jade Elder, 41, from a year in prison to 1 - “ 
in a halfway house. 


Nitze Says Nuclear Policy ' Held St 
On Deterrence Unaltered 



(Continued from Page 1) 
aims control objectives to the Lon- 
don-based International Institute 
for Strategic Studies two weeks af- 
ter Britain’s foreign secretary, & 
Geoffrey Howe, voiced serious 
public doubts about the system. 

Sr Geoffrey questioned if the 
system, to destroy missiles with la- 
sers and other devices, would un- 
dercut the deterrence idea. West 
Germany and France have aired 
simflar doubts. Washington has of- 
fered 18 allies a share in research. 

Some NATO governments have 

Reagan and other U.S. 
that the spacc-defense system even- 
tually could make rnidear weapons 
obsolete. They fear U.S. interest in 
defending Western Europe may 
wane if this happened. 

Mr. Nitze said deterrence could 
still be the basis for a U^. -Soviet 
strategic relationship if it became 
possible to deny an attacker the 
gains expected. 


that “we are allies, not vas * - - 
the United States." . • 

General James Abrah; 
who heads the U.S. spare-;' 
project and briefed Bond 
rians on the proposal Wed; ~ 
told a West Goman inte- :■ 
that “If Bonn does not want '":.. 
part we can naturally see it f'-,.. 
by our own efforts." •_ 

In Brussels, the EuropeaP: ; 
missio^ rerideni, Jacqtas^ :- T: 

pean Community set aside f-_~-_ 
take part in the space-defer , 
gram, but the idea immedial- — 


funding fra tl:: 


space weapons researc; •_ 
scorned by Denmark and 1 v 
and officials from other cd- 
vcticed surprise at the propc ; ^ . 

Mr. Deters said at anews ^ , 
ence he would propose at a 7 
meeting of EC leaden Frid;^ 
ihe 10-nation group doubk. _ 
search budget to fund partic. 
in the research. , . _ 

Foreign Minister Uffe U ‘ 
marm- Jensen of Denmat T;; 
quoted by a spokesman as .. . 
“Deters must have pit hi. 
mixed up. April Fools’ Dijj- _ 
till Monday. ; ; 

The Danish pariiameot _ : * 
Tuesday to take no part n - V. ‘ 
weapons research, only hmi {j •: 
Mr. Weinberger formally-;.' 1 
the NATO allies plus JapaU ■" 
tralia and Israel to particip .; • 

Irish officials also ng«?v; 
involvement, rcaffinningj! 
land, the onW non-NATQ||fc, 
behoved the EC shou& B|^||l 
with security and dcfmse 


■ West Germans Indignant 
West German politicians ex- 
pressed indignation Thursday 
about a 60-day limit placed by the 
United States on its diet to alKes 
to show an interest in taking pan in 
President Reagan’s space-defense 
program, Reuters reported from 


Volker Ruche, foreign affairs 
spokesman of the governing Chris- 
tian Democrats, said Lite time limit 
specified by the U.S. defense secre- 
tary, Caspar W. Weinberger, 
“might almost be seen as black- 
mail* 1 

Senior aides to Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl were quoted as saying 
the 60-day deadline, white expires 
in late May, was “completely unac- 
ceptable." 

Government sources said 
Wednesday that Boon would sim- 
ply ignore Mr. Weinberger and 
take up the issue with Mr. Reagan 
personally. 

The opposition Social Demo- 
cratic Partyalso criticized the Unit- 
ed States. The party leads, Hans- 
Jochen Vogel said that Mr. Kohl 
should make dear to Washington 







*-!•* 
-in that wan 


WHAT WOOD LIFE BE LIKE 
WITHOUT rr? 

WBkjqnd 

EACH FRIDAY IN THE HT 


■ Weinberger ‘Satisfied’^ 

Defense Secretary Weinb \i / 

“very satisfied" with the W, * 
ropean defense ministers’ e'5k- ( 
meat of reseatdi for the sp ‘ y M \ 
lease program and hope* ' 
governments mil particip ■ , 
reedy in the program this y- 
cording to an interview pu 
Thursday in Paris, The Ass. ^ - 
Press reported. .\ 7-,, v r . 

“The Europeans unam?, ' - 
supported cor research ^ 

and they welcomed caff taV r »>. T » 
to participate in the 
thefr fields of expertise, Mr >,*is x 
berger told the Paris newsp’ ‘ -\u . j** 

Monde. “I very mote W u 'i 
will, submit hods for the V # 
research contrac ts wm te_y 
company our program this v 


















J»j 

c s v, iu l S. Senate Panel Bars 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29* 1985 


Page 3 


;3‘- - • 


verting Foreign Aid 
> Nicaraguan Rebels 


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iy Susan F. Rasky 
Mnr >bnfc Timex Jemer 

iHINGTON — ? The Senate 
. i Relations Committee, in a 
s move, Las voted to prohib- 
se of any foreign-aid money 
rebels fighting the Nicara- 
3venuocnL 

i n 9-to-S vote occurred on an 
nli,,.; meat to a S12.&-biIlion for- 
V d bin that the committee de- 
, Wednesday night. 

amendment was proposed 
: itor Oaibome Pell, a Demo- 
^ Rhode Island, who said it 
not prevent the adminisira- 
m asking Congress for $14 
. . in coven aid to the rebels. 
ioney, if approved, would be 
■Jed through the Central In- 
ice Agency and not through 
.te Department's foreign aid 

r concern was that the ad- 
-ation might try to use for- 
d funds to get around the 


existing prohibition on aid to the 
contras,” said Senator Pell, the 
ranking Democrat on the foreign 
relations panel 

Since Congress cut off American 
covert aid to the rebels last year, 
administration officials have ac- 
knowledged that some foreign aid 
to Honduras and H Salvador has 
bean used to help the rebels. Is 
recent discussions about possible 
alternatives to renewed covert aid, 
administration officials have said 
they were considering rfiannrfmg 
money through third countries. 

The amendment approved 
Wednesday would prevent the 
United States from entering into 
“any agreement or undemanding 
either fo rmal or informal" under 
which a recipient of U.S. military 
or economic assistance provides 
aid to the Nicaraguan rebels. 

All of the Democrats on the 
committee voted in favor of the 
amen dmen t , and all of the Republi- 



Public Aspect of Private Talks 

Arms Negotiations Are Confidential, but PR War Isn’t 




Vi 


i -w : ; 

* » 1 (■. 


fk - • • . 


mzil Says Old Regime 
sarly Bankrupt Nation 


llotulnrjii t risj. 


a . 

• !*-*-- ■ . 
t'*'. * j 


United Press International 

.) PAULO — Brazil’s new 
' V-i government said Thursday 
‘r.-je outgoing military regime 
country virtually bankrupt 
statement coincided with an 
ncemem that President-dect 
ado Neves was battling a 
'ij-ijJ ,'perairvc infection. Doctors 
might not be able to take 
- . for as long as 90 days, 
•eminent ministers reporting 
* 'e President Jbs6 Sarney said 
iad found that the outgoing 
.. ty government of JoSo Bap- 
■ *igueiredo had left the nation 
. 'iin the ltd. 

dth Minister Waldir Pires 


“The inheritance of the new gov- 
enunent is so tragic that acting 
President Sarney will have to lay it 
squarely before the nation,” said 
Senates' Fernando Hennque Car- 
doso. a leader in the legislature 
Finance Minister Francisco 
DameQes said that because of the 
administration's austerity pledge, 
some government programs would 
have to be cut to make up for the 
shortages. 

Brazil is pledged to austerity in 


Senator CLaiborne Pefl 

cans voted against it with the ex- 
ception of Charles McC. Mathias 
Jr. of Maryland. 

[In an action aimed mostly at 
China, the committee voted, 13 to 
3, to bar aid for family planning 
programs to any country that per- 
mits infanticide or coerced abor- 
tion, The Associated Press report- 
ed. The vote came on an 
amendment to the aid bill by Sena- 
tor Jesse Heims, a Republican of 
North Carolina. 

[The coamriUee adopted another 
amendment by Senator Nancy 
Kasscbaum, Republican of Kan- 
sas, blocking funds for “any pro- 
gram for population planning” in 
China. Chinese government rules 
that limit families to o ne child re- 
portedly have led to cases of baby 
girls bong killed by parents who 
had hoped for a boy.] 

The vote on aid to the Nicara- 
guan rebels occurred after a 
lengthy debate and followed defeat 
of a broader amendment proposed 
by Senator Christopher Dodd, a 
Democrat of Connecticut, which 
would have prohibited foreign aid 
to any country that was providing 
aid to the rebels. 

Senator Pefl acknowledged that 
Us amendment could not prevent 

the ariiri i nj g l ra tion front eeAinp to 


K»rih. h’f , , 


^ tresr*. ? . 


agreements made with (he Intema- 
tionalM^Ftmd.mexchmtge 

for continued loans to help with its rSSrtm-nt 

"a 1 ?;,! 

Vi" —issxbsku: 

r -bfllioD deficit in the health had developed an infection smee adxmmslrab011 ' 

undergoing surgery for a third time 
on Tuesday, but that tests showed 
the problem was “being con- 
trolled." 


* '*4 

; W * » • ;- . . 

* 1«** .» .j -, v 


' -ystem, artificially prq'ccting 
nly $134 miDion. 

1 an aide to Agriculture Min- 
*edro Simon said that only 
* njv. trillion was budgeted for the 
am program, against a $2.1- 
. requirement Mr. Simon 
; d that lost farm aid could 
' “serial conflict" bom hungry 
its. 


■ US. May Petition OAS 
The United States said it will ask 
the Organization of American 
States to find a “satisfactory reso- 




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rpt* w . 

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vs- % , 

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.Unit’s Chief Gets 
?ar Jail Sentence 

~ Reuters 

3St A.U, West Germany —The 
of a West German amstruc- 
iqaipmeni company vriiose 
ue fed to the coon ti^s largest 
ng crisis of the 1980s was 
. here Thursday for ax years 
ine mouths. 

land Spkia, 43, fonner chief 


Mr. Neves, 75, spoke with his lution of the Nicaragjoaa problem" 
wife Thursday, ate solid food and if the Cantadora countnes fail to 
walked a few steps in his hospital 
room. But doctors cautioned that 
he was not out of danger. ■ 

Mr. Neves fdl ill on the eve of his 
inauguration, which was scheduled 
for March 15. missing the ceremo- 
ny that was to make Mm Brazil's 
first civilian president in more than 
20 years. 

“Sarney is acting president in 
fact as well as in name,” S3id Sena- 
tor Cardoso. “He must and wfll 
make the decisions the nation 
needs and he will have ample politi- Contadora process, 
cal support" rales, the NV 


produce a peaceful settlement, 
United Press International report- 
ed bom Washington. 

U.S. Ambassador J. William 
Middendorf 2d said Wednesday in 
an OAS permanent council meet- 
ing, “In the final instance, the OAS 
has a responsibility to assure peace 
in Nicaragua,” since in 1979 it 
, withdrew snpport from the Somoza 
government 

But several Latin American 
countries reiterated snpport for the 
. Edgard Par- 
ambassador, 


>b Krchett 

International £fenld Tribute 

PARIS — As the UA-Soviet 

arms-coutrol talks got under way in 
Geneva this month, the public 
promptly got a taste of the rhetori- 
cal posturing that will accompany 
the secret bargaining over weap- 
ons. 

An example surfaced Wednes- 
day when the Soviet delegation 
called in reporters to challenge a 
news article that had appeared in 
the International Herald Tribune 
on Wednesday. 

The article, written by United 
Press International, said the negoti- 
ators bad discussed space- based 
anti-missile systems Tuesday in 
what was described as the first sub- 
stantive round of the talks. But (be 
Soviet spokesman mricti-H that the 
talks concerned ways to avoid mili- 
tarizing space, rather than defen- 
sive missiles. 

When a U.S. official who had 
briefed reporters about Tuesday’s 
talks was asked about bis earlier 
comments, he denied that the UPI 
stray reflected bis original state- 
ment. 

His comment, however, must be 
interpreted in the light of the diplo- 
matic ground-rales that impose 
confidentiality on the talks. The 
U.S. official, who reporters insist 
mentioned the space defeases in his 
briefing, apparently was obliged to 
backtrack rather than acknowledge 
that he had slightly violated the 
confidentiality rale- 

The seeming attempt to present 
publicly the U.S. point of view on 
the talks was countered by the So- 
viet reiteration of its own interpre- 
tation — a skirmish in public diplo- 
inacy that is Kkdy to be the start of 
verbal dancing on the head of a pin. 

Any breakthrough in negotia- 
tions is likely to be kept secret 
while negotiators try to condnde 
an agreement Meanwhile, state- 
marts end even artful leaks are 
usually related to political position- 
ing, not to the substance of the 

fa tire 

For example, tight secrecy was 
maintained in 1982 durum the 
probing between U.S. and Soviet 
negotiators in Geneva about inter- 
mediate-range nuclear weapons. 
The so-called “walk in the woods" 
occurred during those talks, when 
the chief delegate of each side 
agreed privately on a formula to 
put to then- govemmentSL The sub- 
stance of the proposal was leaked 


Some analysts, however, said said: “Had the United States kept 
Mr. Sarney might face stxoim oppo- out of the region, we would have 
rition from the left. Unlike Mr. been able to reach an understand- 
tive officer of the Wibau AG Neves, who consistently opposed ing with our neighbors a long time 
of the now- bankrupt EBH the mflitary regime, Mr. Sarney ago.” 

ng AG, was found guBty of backed the generals when they took . The ambassadors from Hondu- 
mting malpractice, credit office in 1964 and moved to the ras, H Salvador and Guatemala 
and breach of trust. opposition only last year. : supported the U.S. position. 


U.S., Soviet Discuss 
Mid-Range Weapons 

The Associated Press 

GENEVA — In the longest ses- 
sion yet, U.S. and Soviet arms-con- 
trol negotiators met for nearly four 
bans Thursday to discuss medi- 
um-range nuclear weapons for the 
first time in 16 months. 

The session, between teams 
headed by Maynard W. Glitman 
and Alexei A Obukhov, was the 
third and final meeting this week 
by the subsidiary groups at the Ge- 
neva talks. It lasted three hours and 
45 minutes, at the Soviet mission. 


h.o - Niirlfari^y Held Stock in Companies Working for CIA 


(hi I h it 


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« — . , , | r: Howard Kura 

! jf ill l \iii Waihiii’sji Pan Sflnff 

tSHINGTON — WflKam J. 
, v, director of (he Central Intd- 
x Agency, owned stock in 
d companies that had con- 
. . , * with the agency before he 

fished a blind trust in late 
according to CIA documents, 
e Centralintdligenoe Agency 
meats were released to the pri- 
Ccnier for National Security 
es in response to a repest 
r the federal Freedom of In- 
J ation Act, wMch makes many 
mment documents available 
. obfic scrutiny, 
me of the conqjames' con- 
i were fra seem operations 
Jthere were uoclassifwd. CXA 
‘ ■fils refused to identify any of 
potracts fra security reasons, 
is not known whether Mr. Ca- 
tiD owns stock in companies 
add CIA contracts because all 
nandal transactions are now 
led by the administrator of his 
' i .trust, and its contents cannot 
wfepubEc. 

tti Volz, a CIA spokeswoman, 
Mr. Casey had ured an da bo- 
screening arranganeni “pre- 
f to avraa any possible suffies* 
of coafUct of interest" She 
' the arrangement is still used 
toWings oat have not been 
din Mr. Casey's trust 
ider the arrangement she said, 
waseys lop deities determine 
her a CIA mailer might pose a 
\ - *t with Mr. Casey’s homin; 

Kh cases, the officials notify 



“whether to dispose of the holding 
or make it subject to the screening 
arrangement" 

Mr. Casey set up the blind trust 
in October 1983 after members of 
Congress criticized his stock trad- 


■L 


William J. Casey 
Mr. Casey, who has the option of 

selling his stock or disqualifying 
himself from the issue. 

Mr. Casey described the proce- 
dure in a May 19S2 memo to his 
staff that was among the docu- 
ments mode public. He said that in 
cases where as “holdings involve 
companies doing business with the 
agency,” he would decide on an 
mvestment-by-investment basis 


. setting up the trust, Mr. Casey 
did not include 34,755 shares be 
owns in Capita] Cities Communi- 
cations Inc, (he amgtomerate that 
has proposed a $3 ^-billion take- 
over of American Broadcasting 
Companies Inc. 

Hie CIA said Mr. Casey was 
following rules of lire Office of 
Ckwcnxmean Ethics that do not alr 
low an official to include in a blind 
trust a block of stock that makes 
more than 20 percent of his 
ings, as Mr. Casey’s Capital Cities 
stock (fid. A CIA statement said 
that Mr. Casey notified 
about ins retention of the 
The CIA said it was “a matter of 
indifference" to Mr. Casey whether 
that stock was in his blind trust and 
that he has asked Ms attorney to 
explore whether it could be placed 
in the trust- 


Hie agency documents show that 
CIA officials frequently discussed 
Mr. Casey’s finances in internal 
memos before he created the trust. 
Many of the memos involve up- 
dates on Mr. Casey's holdings. 

On July 22, 1982, for exam 
CIA officials were told that J 
Casey had bought stock in 10 com- 
panies, including Delia Airlines 
and General Motors, and sold his 


bought stock in Abbott Laborato- 
ries and sold shares in IBM Crap. 

Another memo, to the QA gen- 
eral counsel, Stanley Sporian, was 
entitled, “Casey 02 Sales and 
Agency Reports Relevant to 02." 
It contained “a summary of Mr. 
Mr. Carey’s oil stock transactions 
from mid- 1 980 to the present.” 

"dearly, an enormous amount 
of government time was spent ca- 
tering to Mr. Casey's desire to con- 
tinue buying and sefling stock, 
said Morton H. Halperin, director 
of the nonprofit National Security 
Center, winch is affiliated with the 
American Civil liberties Union. 



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in Western capitals only after an 
apparent Soviet disavowal. 

Bui the battle for public opinion 
in the media is ever present as the 
private talks continue. This week's 
incident highlighted a fundamental 
difference between the two sides — 
their clash of views about how the 
subsidiary talks on space weapons 
should be approached. 

In the Soviet view, the Geneva 
talks are designed to prevent what 
Soviet spokesmen call an arms race 
in space — a phrase referring to the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Reagan administration’s program 
of research into defensive arms in 
space capable of intercepting Sovi- 
et missiles, which is popularly 
known as “star wars." 

President Ronald Reagan has 
said that this research program will 
not be impeded by the Geneva 
talks. 

In the UiL view, the Geneva 
talks are a forum to persuade Sovi- 
et officials to discuss bow such de- 
fensive missiles, if they prove feasi- 
ble, might be phased into sendee to 
enhance international stability. 

The two governments, anxious to 
resume the Geneva talks, apparent- 
ly have agreed to disagree on this 
point. Bm the difference is the cen- 
terpiece of the propaganda war 
about space defenses as each side 
seeks international support for its 
position. 

The quarrel over space weapons 
is a major stumbling block in (he 
negotiations, which cover, in addi- 
tion to space defenses, interconti- 


nental missiles and intermediate- 
range nuclear weapons. In agreeing 
to the three-tier talks, the Soviet 
Union said that no result could 
emerge, from any of the subsidiary- 
talks unless agreement is reached 
on all three levels. 

Many diplomats expect the Scwi 
et Union at some point to demand 
a moratorium on the research and 
development of space- based weap- 
ons as a condition for continuing 
the talks. 

UA officials, anticipating that 
move, have insisted repeatedly that 
the United States intends to contin- 
ue its research on space-based de- 
fenses. Thus, any such Soviet move 
would appear to be an attempt to 

The^eagan adminis tration con- 
tends that a moratorium on space- 
weapon research would leave the 
West behind the Soviet Union in 
this Geld and could not be verified. 

Soviet propaganda and diploma- 
cy are trying to mobilise public 
opinion in Europe and elsewhere to 
press the Reagan administration to 
slow its military programs, con- 
tending that h would improve the 
climate for the Geneva talks 

Despite the news blackout in Ge- 
neva, comments and leaks about 
the substance of the talks have al- 
ready started emerging elsewhere. 

Fra example, the chief Soviet ne- 
gotiator, Victor P. Karpov, recently 
said on Soviet television that Ui>. 
research on space defenses was un- 
dermining the Geneva talks. 

The U.S. secretary of state, 
George P. Shultz, then protested 
against what he described as a 
breach of confidentiality. 


F.H. Bartholomew, 86, Dies; 
Reporter, Executive at UPI 


New fork Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Frank H. Bar- 
tholomew, 86, chairman emeritus 
of the news agency United Press 
International died of cancer Tues- 
day at bis borne in Sonoma, Cali- 
fornia. 

Mr. Bartholomew joined the for- 
mer United Press as a reporter in 
Portland, Oregon, in 1921 and re- 
tired in 1972 as chairman of the 
board of what had become United 
Press International after a merger 
with the International News Ser- 
vice. He was an award-winning war 
correspondent as weD as a news 
executive at the agency. 

He became president of United 
Press in I9S5 after serving as a 
correspondent in the Pacific in 
World War H, the Chinese dvfl 
war, the Korean War and the early 
fighting in Indochina. Mr. Barthol- 
omew oversaw the merger with the 


International News Service in 1958 
and was elected chairman of the 
agency in 1962. 

Mr. Bartholomew combined a 
talent for both reporting the news 
and directing the news-gathering 
operation. He was drawn to the 
scene of action as a reporter even 
after becoming an executive. He 
was named a vice president 1938 
and became first vice president in 
1954. 

But in the intervening yean he 
traveled as a correspondent to the 
several Pacific fronts in World War 
IL covering developments in New 
Guinea, (he Aleutians, Okinawa 
and the Philippines. He was the 
United Press correspondent at the 
Japanese surrender aboard the 
USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay in 
1945, at the atomic bomb tests on 
Bikini in 1946 and at the fall of 

Shanghai tO the Cfl rnmimis ts in 

1949. 


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view on 

sect, lawn and mounters. Garage, 
eefer. USS320JXKX Net. No other 
fees or taxes. Greets NS5AG, P.a 
Box 37. CH-2500 Biel 4 


lTHTAHNG VIEW of Monaco, 
52 14 m. comer studio, new budding, 
sunny aS day. Garage, storage, ten- 
n, haatod swinvninQ pool, aodrans 
playground, 24 hour doorman, tele/ 
security system. Write; Ltmgevm, 74, 
Bd dTteie, 052, Monte GariaTel: [Wj 
257213 


MONACO. Perthouse 300 sqm. Yacht 
23 m. + Rob. P3] 895295J 


■ PARIS A SUBURBS 


. BCCBYKSNAL PANORAMA 

• ON 7W SBNE VAUEY 
VS-Yveines on N13, 60 bn. Pwis 

• LARGE ENGUSH RESDBIGE 
Ah CHARACTH, 1200 sqj*. an 3 
W eb, 20 roams of which 4 
RECEPTIONS, Low XB wood wl 
panelSna, on 7 ha endosed uncSwted 
oorfc. oaddodc. ifuUki, wood 

• iCgSBbSe 266 90 75 
r 91 rue du FG. ST-HCNORE 
75008 PARIS TELEX 642-066 F 


■ SAINT-MAUR (94) 

• B Ian East Pais, RB] 

- Quiet, on Mome Ever. 

S1UNHNG PROPBOY: 

400 sore Bring spool, fccreldar's flat), 
tel 850 sqju. laid or 1/50 sqju 
. Price ra/OOiOO a FS^SOfm. 

Tel ( 1 ) 824 48 82. 


16TH TROCADSO 


3 rooms. High aott freestone wing 
beautiful rec e pt i oaupper floor, eleva 


tar, bokony, sua 85 iqjm. F1/50^XH. 
Veit Mon. Apnl 1, noon / 4 pm. 

6 rue Eugene Delacroix, Paris 14. 


PARS 17TH, near Metro La Fburcfte. 

tm house, 50 


for sek, renovated stone 
sqjtk, smal private garden, vwfl 
‘ kitdien & bathroom vrith 
1 \ Tet Mt 3878105 
1)50 14 94. Atfred Gat. 
CH-3020 Berne. 



BOULOGNE 

16th floor, mag«freirtp«nth ma e,oriB- 
ind 2/3 room, about 80 sua, terrace, 
unsalable view. 225 64 54. 


6TH. 25 RUE DAUPHINE 


2 rooms, o^oom forte^ cc fa . : 


38 SOM. 

Vait Saturday 30di - ZOO pm.- SjOOpm. 


ST GSIMAINDESPRE5. Rue de Seine, 
iwfriy tap floor 2/3raonx FTOOjOOD. 
T* 281 36 58 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PAJWS A SUBURBS 


HEART OF ST GERMAIN det «S 

IIS sqjR. ’ jpu l iL ient, 3 bedrexxm, 
bgh p»fcg, enormo u s ~ 

Iriua 13ri> mute. Pne* 

Donawy jl] 624 93 33 


NOIRE DAM£ Oupfex 2-raop, chars, 
bears, terrace, vwr today IjurJ t 
pa 8 . me fVedertc Scutav Paris 5th 
or 766 12 b e ve l in gs . 


EUlariiONAL beween Lance ft 
Notre Dame, 220 iqa on 3 floors, 
cSredfy an Sane + right to bee 
hatfgrfMfag. Tek326 98 66 


PORTUGAL 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA'S FEW 
SUPER PORT 


prims 85 mts on 13,171 sqa n «A 
nus 21 swer opmtmenti above & 78 in 
se por rite hnayy condo- Jin frontline 


main piers. Top investmentfl 45% 
furry now before next price-rim! 
Contact deadly dwe ta per s. 


PUBtTO PUNTA PORTALS, SJL 
Director Gomerrid 
• C/ Marino 101, Fortdb Nous 
Mofloraa, Spam or Tbt 68686 OUJU L 


MARBBIA Hill CLUB 

A SUFOS FEW VUA 
OF CLASSICAL SPANISH DESIGN 
bu 8 r around a ceatrof open patio, spa- 
cious acconanodobon mdudes 5 Ded- 
roana with marble bat hr oarm ervnfo 


noble floors throughout and exteceiva 
■nlaK&aped 


terraces. Sm ■ 


large swimrong , 

fcxited in the most 

tween MerbeBa and PUerto Bonus, aid 
has a maenfraent sea view. 

PRICE UK£35O,000 
A foCy dri Jed b rochure sh ows tha and 
other p’estijjiotBprcpflrtteSB avakble 


upon request e efowd^ front 


MVBTJ 

Avcnida Eaedo Soriono, 32 
Marbela. Spda Teh 34 ($2) 776250 


MAIIQRCA - PORMB4TOR 
PCIUWSA 
Luxurious comemd fonnhorae, bocuti- 


fd settna cn 11 ha land, .2 rera^tei 


m oms, dining room, 4 double 
roams, 3 baHvaams, swimming pool, 2 
garages. 1 m3e from seashore. 
SFZ73£00 

C Friessler, Londritrasse 84 
3047 Breragarten, Bern 


Teh 31/23 09 75 or 61 35 38 


MB40RCA 

Beodvfront chalets ft apartments 


Cota Fared, the lest pmatfiie of the 
from booth, ten- 


Motfitontmean. 50 m. 

no, golf ft dl facSties 
neighborhood. 

P rices; Chalets 108 sqm. 

Duple* 74 i 
NOVUMiSbRSJL 


the 


MADRID tab (II 2709004/5, 
43978 AJULA E 


Tiz 


TtflNKMG ABOUT RBRBNG m 

Span? SphnSd idea ifyou m head- 
ing for MarbeQo - Costa del Sail 
Contact im We buy, saL rant, con- 
struct, viDas and opcrtnwrti, beodv 
sde, in the mourtnini and on Ihe golf . 

We m rather sure to have gat what 
you are looking far and if not W 1 


produce it for you! PROM0TUR - 
Apcrtado 118, Matbala Spam. Tbu 
WWfl^piUR E The BKTProperly 


TEE OFF FROM YOUR FRONT - or 
kitch e n door? in Guadakrino Golf 
Marbda we have for rent ar sole, 
vila. m im upcirabty nice fiats, town - ft 
Denthauses wHi ocean view, nicesur- 

M li«jujuelLnm«T pu|i|uIb 

<k ffPemanofTOk reiKiBfn 

crtund.Twppdy bma th e way Guo - 
•or-fcte. \mannmt 

_ - Apartodo 118 - Mar- 

befla - Spain. Tiu 77610 OTUR E"The 
Propery People". 


I baths, 
efinmg- 

„ I kitchen,' 

. Tel, pod, d _ 

garden, 5400 sam. Peaceful hoS- 
aay/retiremMi vSa with spedoedar 
p onora u i k. view. USS1104XXL Con- 
tact; EAGASA. Gran Via 57. 28013 
Mad rid WPt-11 2483411. 


MALLORCA 32,000 SOM. prime 
kmd m eaduM Comp de Mar with 
rnqgnifi cp* tea views. Approved for 
u on s tr mJ i un of 2 houses 350 fruit 
trees OGve move. Abundant vwter 
on properly. >165 JOO. Mr. Samper, 
Joan Mira ll5, Prima de Mafcxaj, 

Spoilt. Tet 28a47tt 

COSTA Da SOL FBU A 3be droom 
flm USWMXXLTel 52/520772 Write 
Houston, Apia. 34, NerjajMA). SP. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


C05TA BRAVA. Urge htefci ham. 

few of 


lira to quiet benches. 18(7 view i 


Mediterranean. Privacy. Fumafied to 
nduoes ca. 4 bed- 


USA stondonft, 
reams. 3188 


raomt. 3188 stun. land. L5S9840Q. 
Write; Jemer, Apartodo 111, Gonv 

Aa, Afcncria, Span. 


COSTA BLANCA, JAYIA, Span 
K^i doss 2 -bedroom seafront town- 
hausa ($24000) ft 1-bedroam n»- 
sanettes (SI 2 ^ 00 L garden ft terrace. 
P re m opoi m s Goto, Cc0e 
18/Gatode" 


20 HOUSES, 2 bedroonB. 2 bath- 

r e cun , lounge. kiKhen. On the beach 


near Mcjarcsr, Gala Banco, ready 
rr«L ft- 


for occupancy . Write to SegarrtL j. 
asrdo Soriano 60, Marfaefa, Spate 


MARBEtlA: Hgh doss apartments 
_m Puerto Baas, sSfferenl sizes 
■SAP. Cede Recpidtos 11-Jc, 28001 
Madrid. Tet 


SWITZERLAND 


ZURICH 
SWITZERLAND 


Only 30 nin away from ZuridvJOatan 
Airport, we can otter you a choice of 
roam epartnafs which am cut- 
».xSng bam m quality and ia ardiieo 
rural dmign. Indoor twinning pool, ffc. 
i*s, restaurant + room service. 


fly far the ckmat ap artm ei tf prated to 
the meteopob of Zurich math sales per- 
ron to foreigners B offer! Ihe posseii- 
tiea of either on ideal vocation resi- 
dence ar cm attractive investment for 
anyone who eppreoctes the charm and 
1 of a deSghtfril environment 
easy reach of Zuridk 


Up to 85% of the purthcae price can be 

fiocnced on very ecsy terms. So ' 


contact us_ Your copirofour 34 page 


brochure aweits you. Sadi at 
nrfy a this wil not repeat 


RE5DGKZA AG 


a^NtOl Zuridi, TModcer^SO^ 


Tek (01)221 33 95 Tfa 813 376 EES I 


SWITZERLAND 


FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APARTMB4T 
OR A HOUSE? 

• TO SOTE IN SWITZHUAND? 

• TO INVEST IN SWITZERLAND 


CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF EXPSD- 
ENCE W BLBD1NG AND SUMG 
FME SWISS SEAL ESTATE 


SODIMSA. 

P.O. Bax 62. 

1884 VBan, Switzerland. 
Tlxi 456213 GESE CH 


DAVOS-PLAT7 

Our bed offer in Davasr exclusive 
apartment wkh large Irving roam, fire- 
place ft grAery, wood cowed wok, in 
rnioU vda now under ra c on d ru c tron. 


2 bedrooms, one bathroom, ana show 

I, overlooking 


er best location. 


tarns. 116 Sq m, + 10 sun. covered 
terrace. Pricer SF998JXXL Free for sale 


to foreigners. 

Mortages at low Swiss interest rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 


YOUR PARTNER M EUROPE 
Derfstr., OL-8872 Weasen 
Tefc O+J 8-431778. 

The 876062 HME CH 


SUNNY SOUOBM SWITZERLAND 

LAGO MAG6K3RE 

In best locrforL we offer several new 
a ucx t iu et its ft houses m Ms beautiful 
Swris no in ASGONA and PORTO 
RONCO,e«: apartment, 133 s qjL + 
terrace, mtefoonng lake ft moextexm, 
150 m to the lake, Id <waGty,minnng 
pool, garage. Price 51768,000. 

free tar sab to fmeigter s . 
Mortgages at low Swiss te w ed rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD. 

YOUR MUDI« W EUROPE 


Via G. Cotton 1 CH6900 LUGANO 
Tefc QV91 -54291 


1-542913 

Tbc 73612 HOME CH. 


SWirZRLAND 
Mwafious Resort of 


Crans-Montana 

Sfc 


on Big i bed Europecn nountaet 
course, far sale a p artments 2 to 6 
roans. 


From Swiss Francs 2064X10, 50% mort- 
gage amiable at ffl4% interest. 


far 


iSA. 


GcL Bcniamia Constant 1 
1003 - lauKnne - Switzerland 
Tab (021)20 70 11 Tbt 25873 AWL CH. 


CORAL GAB1& MIAML 5UPBB 

o p ortme nt , 2 large bertooms. 2 
□cans, convenuya. xesgsnno area, 
averiodong golf ckib. 1525 sqh. ex- 
daring large baloany. Reaso contact 
USA Ml 305661 5u9 or Switzerland 
031/44 34 57. 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In fllQ 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


By PHoimk Gall your toed IHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed of the cost immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hours. 

Cosh The basic rate is $9.80 per line per day + toed taxes. There are 
25 letters, sigpis and spaces in the first line aid 36 in the following lines. 
Minimum space is 2 lines. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner's CJub, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access and Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMBUCA 


Paris: (For classified onlyh 
747-46-00. 


EUROPE 


A ms terdam: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361 -8397/360-2421 . 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01} 329440. 
Frankfurt: (069} 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. . 
Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London: (01) 836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /455-3306. 
Milan: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03)845545. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Tel Avhn 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


Buenos Aires: 41 40 31 

(Dept. 312) 

Guayaquil: 431 943/431 
Lima: 417 852 
Farwonq . 64-4372 
San Jose: 22-1055 
Santiagoi-69 61 555 
Sao Paulo: 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 246303. 
Jordan: 25214. 
Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 34 00 44. 
Qakr 416535. 

Sau<£ Arabia: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 
UJLE.: Dubai 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNITBD STATES 


Bangkok: 3904)6-57. 
Hong Kong: 5-420906. 
Manila: 81707 49. 
Seoul: 725 87 73. 
Singapore: 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


AUSTRALIA 


New York: (212) 752-3890. 
West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 


Sydney: 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWrraERLAM) 


GSTA AD 

A ana n o E&nme opportuaiy 

SGHONRIED 

only a few mnriK from lovtfy Gstaod. 
A p artments at pries 


tower th an Gflo ai 
70%-WTBttST5%% 


AYA&ABIE fOR FOtBGNEBS. 
GLOBE PLAN LA. 

Avo Man Bep»2l 
CH-I005 LauKinu, Swtewfand. 
Tefc (21)22 35 12. Tbc fcl85MBJS CH. 
‘ ' a 1970 


CHOOSE 

SWnZBLAND 

We have far fareignark A very big 
choice of beautiful APARTMENTS/ 
VILLAS / CHA105 ia the whob 
mgioa of lake Geneva, Montrero ft al 
EdiioM mauatcin resort*. Very teasorv 
d but aho the best end man 
Price From about USS40J300. 
s <a 6M%. Ptecssi vi st rear 
ffantMnwv moke a dtodaa. 
H.5BOU3 SA. 


Taw Grise 6 , 0+1007 Lounane. 
Tefc 21/25 26 11 Tlx 2K2J8 SEBO CH 


VALAIS / SWITZHUAM) 


CRAMS MONTANA 
THYON, 1ES COHONS 
ST. LUC VAL u*AM«vrais 
Flats cmddiakb 25 to! 50 nun,. Ito5 
rooms. GrecSk 60%. tataretf rate 675%. 
Duration 15 years. Owners bureau. 
Direct sde. 

VAL PROMOTION SA 
10 Avo. du Midi, O+1R50 San, 
Tefc 41-27-23 34 95 


APARTMENTS - CHALETS 

AvaHable far PunfaaM by 
BkuafaMMfn. 

Prices from SFTzJdIXL Mcrtgogm at 
6 M% interest. Write; 

6L06E PLAN SJk. 

Av. Man-Papas 24 
0+1005 Lausam. 5wrJjoriand 
Tefc (021)22 35 12. Tbu251 85 MEUS CH. 

_ . • — 1970 


SWnZERLAM): We are seftng 2 very 
exdusnm homes within 30 emutescr 
downtown Zundu These homes wB 


be 200 sain. each,, overlooking _ 
lake. Priced at i&WOJOO each. 


Mortgages from 5KK fa 60% of 
purrhaw p 


i price. SeniangS n 
mentis avafaUe. For further b 


informa- 


tion phase write: Box 2125, LH.T„ 
FriedndWr, “ 


.15, 6000 Frcnfcfurt/ Main 


Linafluaus Office in Geneva's 
right bark beautiful location an top 
floor orariocHng aty with view on 
Alps ft Jura mountains. Near irtemo- 
fiond orgmizationi. Eec dfa nt bvesfc 
men). Space 223 sq.ni, park*»g lots 
ovaUife in bo a men t Pnane, telex, 
facsimile. For further i nf o nn ahen cad 
022/4541 3& 


CORAL GABIES. MIAMI. SUPBB 

p pq rtmenj. 2 largo bedrooms, 2 


baths, convertible. RewJenttol oroa, 
overiat^ang gofl didi. 1525 *qA ex- 
ducting large Dafcony. Phase ateacf: 
USA 001 305661 5629 or Switzarlaad 
031/44 34 57. 


VBBH SKIING AREA. 60 sqm. flat 

in luxurious blade, fafly funaned with 
fatting mcqn ie. Swiss raortoa ro ovri- 

Me ' ndfcLSfaS'aOt? 


USA GENERAL 


980 ACRE RANCH 
GEORGIA, UJSJL 

Two hoars drive south of Atlanta Inti 


Airport. Slow roKng land. Fenced pa»; 
tore, crop and tunner " 


r land; cattle cmd 

hone foatrin. Banch has ouhtancting 


natural beauty four jokes provid e pfan- 
rater. Cdretoken honio, oguip' 


lyaf witer. 

inert fod, new tended hone bare and 
tnxnig area. Price indudn d frxm 
e gu i pm wd , 1 50 head of erttie, 18 r ege- 
tered qwrter hones and more. 
Abundont gone deer, turkey ft quaft 
$1,18^000 US. Cadi eNy 
Write or cal: UNG HOWONKSTON 
3650 HcAenAem load, K.W^ 


Phone: [404) 


Geerala 3t 
04] 262 - 


3540 


CAUFORMA-GamraeiDd ft pereo ge 
Banna 6 


p ropertie s near Santo 
Western White House. 


b. Only 2 hn. 
front LA. UVE OAK EAl.lV, 3575 
, Bax 4 IT, Santa Vhez.CA 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


A WK3UE OPPORTUNITY TOM 
ACQUME A MAGMfKBfT HOUSE 
A A MANHATTAN APAKTMBfTl 


A lunifioas 6 year aid bride vda ei 
meticuloin mown awfilion an the 
StanAxd/Gracnwich barrier in Con- 
necticut USA cn seduded 19 endawd 
acre* set in a private 61 acre parti ia 
ana of the finest raridertid cveaL Cus- 
tom fa world famous celebrity, a 
pqUU fateioudy decorated vflacoat- 
prfaig 7 baboons, 8 to etvsuta bdh- 
roopis, exquisite detq^ ft e w ept wu l 
space fa en tor to i ni n g with richly 
adorned 10 ft. high orings • with crys- 
tal dmndetier, ilkepkw. tad Imd 
parquet floor, imprerave ietported Jtafc 


m marble povwler room with hand 
imU) bom 


carved mmbla basin and WC. Punsih- 
ing supplied by America's Fkwst menu- 
fadurer. Prove toss fa guest suites an 

Se^vSi'Spfa^nd^S^ setarium 
with automatic shades ovorloaking 
heated swimming pod in magnificent 
rraturdgardam&woadandwnhvHnd- 
big straam ft smal pond. Latest techno 
logied burgkr darm/fim ft smoke de- 
tecton, hewy du ty teleph one fan with 
■tvbdlr tearooms, 11 zone hooting ft air 
contition in g system, cent al vocumn 
deaning, lerge storage workroom, r»- 
mote asrtroC altadwd 4H ccr gaug e 


with fa own 500-gdlon gas station, 
bonefcmado autamefe gotes lead to this 
6,000 rv ft. boon sdycted in toaedble 
privacy yet cdy 8 ninutes drive from 
town with ctirect trams to midManhat- 
hn, 46 minutes away. 


This property md udes a 17t h floor ma- 
rtian »'irl coop upotmenl ei Monhot- 
tan welh 24-tow 

ble bei^oom &1 , 

with dinette ft a terrace __ 
most presti gious Ea st gl h SL ft 5mton 
Haoe. The upriknel is modemfy fur- 
nished ft an be pwdawd separately. 


Teh Londoa fa. 


or eveningi 8 - 11. 581 
581 28fl 


-10 


Or write Bax 40664, LH.T, 63 long 
Acre, London WH 9JH 


NYC 


43-Story CONDO 

Dag Hammttskjold Tower 

240 EAST 47lh ST. 

1 Block To Untied Notions 
-SP6CTAOULAR- 

1, 2, 3, ft 4 Bedroom Apmtments 
Inneitirte Oocupcmcy 
New Fid Service BUkfcra With 
S wi mm ing Pod, Hecdh Gib and 
Howeheffimg Services Avoiable 
RB^lAL APAETMSVT5 
ARE ALSO AVMABLE 
For Wo CoB 212-759-8844 
Sat, 5un 11-4- Mm to Fri ?-5 


NEWLY njRMSHB) PBVA-TBUtE 
Mocfijon Avenue ft 62nd Street, lorge 
studio fuiy staffed Gty eroded win- 
dows fa quiet, parquet floors, 3 wdk- 
in dosets, tfrerang roam with buftei 
cabinets. Lehoped (fimng vridi enmer 
window, newly decorated kitchen ft 
both, hcu se fcceprq service. 5185J0Q 
or cash S55D irnnhly mamten ui iC B , 
55% tax d ed uctable, h e n e dfa e ocas- 


pohey subied to bored approval. 
ftnapab only cal 201 766/171. 


MAMMTTAN4UTT0N R. VQ1A 

12 grooous rooms in white glove 
buflamg. Fift floor with unobstructed 
East Ever view*. Wdodbarino fire- 

uoitBCi cdmdoil #u muon, 
Afym Os l i l Lt i r (212) 9803019 
Qylivmg, fat (212T 4208*88 


HONXVIIU.NY t 

«l nrie. 28 min. Iran NYC 

mnod IC-12. Gradous homes ft coop 
mrt m erti Wrisa fa brochure. Deed 

Red Estate, 120 Kraft Aw-Bronwae. 

NY 10708. (91.4 3378Mb. Wb me 
refacitftcn spedofa te . 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ISA RESIDENTIAL 


LA XX1A CAUFORNUL bsmnous 
modern estate overtadon g flu fad 


k. wdh pad. tenets cow? ft maw 

s^iayrn 


. . & Correct egerts 

AC Bottom or Us Teacher, a'a 
Mdcusadr ft Assoc., 1291 Owe 
Jain, CA 92037. Tefc (6191 454 


Lo 


NEW YORK; LMCOtN CTCBL 
Aeraa from the Met. 1 bedroom 
onto. cWusm, 25ih floor, new Bdtiv 
oup (Germori fatdwn, mognAotrt 
souh view. $a5jOOO. laid operate, 
free ei 6 months. Tefc 212-570 (001. 


MANHATTAN. Gatside, kwy. spec 
M oto r view, bedroom, IK bofa, L- 
foped tivisg-jEsEog. tafcssiy, secun- 
iy, garage, tends S265JS8. Owner. 
frnmtO. Itt 45 92 


BAIflOl A hBV CANAAN ConnMA- 
cut Executive type homes fa red ft 
sale. Pleasant N.Y. Gty mfamfa. 
Fiench 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
ft INDUSTRIAL 


CAlffORMA WOE VMEYARD wtih 

winery site. 500 acre prenum vorieid 


years ima Total ow acres Mtand. 
One new of frontage on major Ccfif. 
highway fa winery. Winery permtis 
aotanecL Joirt vertwe or ide. Cur- 
rent monoamnunt avdkibfa. Owner 
H. Schwalx, 9056 Santo Moricn Btvd, 
las Aredes.CA 90069, 


WEST INDIES 


CHARMING FURNBHH) HOUSE oi 

Soady Lone Gaff Cbune wift swim- 
mtog pod. large gaden, 3 bed ma n s . 
3 bants. stafTbedroom/batfa, ivtng- 
dning roam, lutdien, laundy. price 
S275M0. Tefc London 01-938 2480 


REAL ESTATE 
TIMESHARING 


NEW ZEA1AM), luxury seff eortamd 

frti iahed 2 -room a paU nm*. prime 
fishing, gaffing, tourist location 
Tempo, faff freehold tMaai perpetuity 
covering 6 worths per year time- 
share. Mmg rirms to wer 500 
rasorts worldwide USJSO^IOO. lb NZ 
3302 Attertiort Aspmw. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES MARMA. New pafouse 

frjffy furnished ot gdf cwne on Bvi- 
ere, 800 m. beodl 360° panoramic 
view sea ft Ester*), lorge winning 
pool, 2 bedrooms, Icrgx kitchen, Inge 
Irving room, atiroa- bolh roum . 2 
WG. 4 bdeonies terrace cn roof 
exceOert entertaining orea with bar ft 
txefa ec u e. Avertable 12 wads from 
10th May 1985. Told USS1000QL fa 
duda nxnd once Vf My. Tefc Owner 
(93) 49 50 07 before noon or after 6 
pjg. daffy 


ST. JEAN CAP IBOUkT. between ffae 
ft Monaco. Magaficed view aw- 
loaiang horbaron 3 troped oats. B 
bedrooms, 4 baths. Extra large Evfag, 
dnfog room, modem kiKhen, terrace 
ft swnuneng pod. Mad awrtaUe. 
-- ■■ <*rtd ussizooa August 


USSlSiXX). Contact Jacques Fronmu, 
10019 USA. fflg 


250 w. 54 St NYC 
586-2607. 


BETWEEN CANNES A ST TROKZ. 
lovely house overlooking breathtak- 
ing sea view, 10 min. wait to sea 
Sv™ lining, 3 bedrooms, 2 bdhs, 
modem Utawn, fcxge terrace ft gar- 
den -June 15 to Sen. 15. Direct from 
owner. Ccfl (94) 4/16 22. 9revnoon 
or evniyngs. 


VAR. SUPBOLY RE5TORH) and 
equipp ed fanfo m e. Sl eep s 10. Her» 
ed pod, hard tends court. 1 hour 
Noe airport Avdfabfa fat fortnights 
Apri and SnpNniiber, first in May, dl 
fate Tel 1X0761-62311 


LUXURY PROVENCAiE fanfouse 
near Nee. 3 double bedraanq, bod- 


ed pool, faw._ fay.-y, Septem- 


ber from £875 to £1^75 per 
London 221 7S0 front 10&A 


BETWS4 PA 8 B ft DEAUV0IC. fain- 
ote for r ent 2 wnda or 
5 bedrooms, log^r^ fa 

^oSirmWsSi^'CT 57 94 42.' 
AUTHOR'S SPAOOU5 BEAMS) vfl- 

. Id*, Pams. 

'week. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


OUTSTANDING REGB4CY country 


house set fa 17 acres of private 

Am dtabte arcs 4-6 


tide grounds, 
weeks from nu 
absence. Large 

rooms. 6 beds, 3 

great rauif art . S 

tween London ft 
hours button from Yi 


during owners 


O'" 

nndway be- 
'i fnadi 2 
An did 

. visiting fagfaKl York 25 
WmUv rartd E 1>00 fadudm 
h o usrfc s eper /cook, domestic help, 
chauffeur ft um of Volvo or. Enqui- 


Phfip Bean, S dtewfo HidL 
Tefc Yorkshire [HoMlerq 


Yorkshire. Tefc 
301 99. The 527067. 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE AFASTMBCrS. 

Krtfdibriclge/Oiekea. Ow 100 
fufly serviced studes, 1 ft 2 bedroom 


a pwlmert s. All modem 
Murium sti 


stay 22 days. Prices from 
Cl 45 per week. Derae atatod lor- 
rame Toong. NGH Apartments, Nefl 


Gwynn Home, Stoone Ave, London 
SW1 T«fc¥S? 1 105. Th 29SBT 


7G. 


CB4TRAL LONDON - Executive ser- 
vice tmu rti ra nts in new buddings, 
fanedied end fu&y 
mad service (Man. 


ffirou^h Fi^CdfaTV. Phonefor bro- 


1 1342 or write Presaign- 




SL. London 1 


EXECUTIVE sune MAYMK. Luxu- 
ry furnished apotmerts, nevriy decx> 
rotecL (ufa serviced secretcrid/ tufa 
foakfiev £450/£5ob per week. 3 
months to 2 yean. Mountourron Men- 
Ltd. London 01 491 2626 
I8S. 


UJXUKY FULLY RMMSHB) new flat. 
1 bed, reception, btehen & bathroanv 
cpnt kxxwxv. Interior dssgned. Ex- 
csflert access Wert &d and Gty. 

El 75 per week, kiducf * 

London 01-221 0749 ar 


KM A BUTOtOFF- A large selection 
trf propwiies in SL Johns Wood. 
Be^nts Tv. V, Swiss Cottage, Hamp- 
stead & envrrons. 6 months +. Tel 
01-586 7561. Tlx 883168 ACO G 


MARY POTTS mid Jtartnm for 
goad qudtiy fomifod flats ft houses 
to rertfa aertrd London areas. Spe- 
dedsfr in Uteia mangemert ft sdes. 
01-493 2020L Ik ALD2&7994. 


JOWI BOCH has 20 years experience 

fa Rertdk. Long or short tenancies. 

Central ft suburbexi London ft Aber- 
deen. Brcb & Co. 01 -499-8802. 


LONDON. Far the bast funishad flats 

end houses. Coras* the SpeddetiE 
PhjB gs. Lewis. Tefc London 


Tefax 27846 tSSBX G. 


OBNnrSAL London. Luwry, furnished 

flab. Amoral Utdiera. £290/weefc 

4 or £175/vMfc - ste 

2204 cr 01-486 341 


2 Tefc 


fOR FUflNEHB) IETTQ4G5 Bi S.W. 

Umdai, Surrey ft Berkfoe. Contact 
MAYS, Oxsfsott (037 284) 3811 UK. 
Telest 9955112. 


SUNHEY UX Superior quatity houses 

to let Henheim properties, Wood- 
Lane. fed* 


A 8 GE RJ8M5HED 18th ortixy res- 

denceby the Qy of London to let for 
2 years. Enquiries to Tet London (Dl) 
2v 7006 (evemngt) 


GB9E 8 CO. Excellent Selection of 


Houses ft Flab fa rental in North, 
Tefc 01 


Nortiwesi & Centred London, tefc I 
AS 8611. 


ANSCOMK ft RMGIAND wdh of- 
fices fa Sf Johns Wood ft Kensington 
offer the bed service fa nadenid 
letting Tdfc 722 7101 jQlUX 


MAYFAIR SUPERBLY FURNEHED 2- 

bedropm apartment. C2S0 weeUy. 


LONDON HAMPSTEAD _ 

room ffat. £220 weefc 01-904 


five 


HOLLAND 


PETER BUM MAKELAASDU 
Isifl Houvfag S ervice R wi tids 
AmtertfateTeli W0-7M022, 


HEAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSHB CHORE BlV. 
Mbw reotote. Vdem astr !74 
m&mttrdnaz 


UJXUBOUS HNMSHB STUDIO 
oportmert . 1st floor of ca rrot faces*, 
open fee. baft. S360 mdicfag 
GWJ_ fefacaton Mmen RYlS 
313W4747a 


MONACO 


MONTECAXULFarrartorfae.hra*- 
ry 3«aam flat wtih poafc lam cocrt 
& sauna. UfcpS) 5& 


PAKIS AREA FURNISHED 


LUXURY AT EUOGCTPtKER Try ffa 


Blirytto- 
lad oport ie e n a near the 6Bd Tow- 


er. From «ae wedc upwards, hrty 
aawpped siueSas to 5 roona, vrth or 
“mot hotel Ccosod: RA- 
TOIH. 14 ree ste Tbitere, 75015 
tariktefc STS 62 20. Tic 2C&11 f. 


74 CHAMFSaYSSS 8ft 

Sftxtig^or 3raem o pcrtiaraL 


LE CUUUD6E 359 67 97. 


ST CLOUD 

nm e t fa hoae. mxotbL 3 I 

g^SS!%So 


MONTUGLON E&v access Etoft^gor- 

geout fantisfad At. indoor pool, 5 


4 baths, finest exretivwg. 


1-2 yr. lease; lefenraces & security 

i 53600/morth. Tefc 3-416 

Qumpo 312-44T-9209. 


SHORT RBOAL M PARS: state* 

and 2 roams, b e oulJirt y de ax i Jtel . 
Cortadt Soteegie. 6 ave De feat , 
75006 Peris Teh P)3S9 99 50 


BEAL FOR SHORT TBWSAY.Poris 

rtmfioe 8.2 itrans. decorated. Contact 

Sorafinfc B0 rue IkxvwsUe, Pars 7th. 
Tefc (1)544 39 4g 




Idfcfan, shower WC pat ... — 
F2500 + F200forges. Tefc 20611 44 
or 544 04 04. 


(OAR ETOBE, H#i dma biftting, 150 


MONTPARNASSE, 2 ROOMS, 


chain. S^ht May - pa. HfldD + 


charges. Tdr 335 48 25. 


SHORT IBM in Latin Quarter. 
No agents. Tefc 329 38 81 


TOU1AC Large 2 rooms, 
F1000 net. Tefc720 9495 


13THTGUIAC 

term. 


short 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


UMVBSITE 


luxurious 


garage, FlftOXL Tefc 563 68 


[71) ST GBMAM W IAYE. Via, 

dcn. 


u *°°s. 2i Srs- , £ 

Agence do Chateau - 

451 65 31. 


ST CLOUD. Nea-i _ 

menf, 4 bedrooms, short terra, 
executive. Avoiable faxra ifcdely. 
17220. Cogfc 60B 57 27. 


144faEOUSE AUTEUR. Stixtio, balcony 
tail 
33 


SPAIN 


IBIZA 

HUTOP HNCA. fantastic sea view, 
seduded location, iw Itsuft 10 afas 
Goff ttocn liaq, 5 rains ifoerto Ibrza, 5 


b e d room s . 4 bofta. big pool, efe gtrag 
woman. Far rent May 1 - 03 15 $700- 


1100 weekly minimum 3 we e ks. Crrt 
Aueuia {535ffl 3148 or Ports 256 0255 ar 
Bax 1981Hafal Ttfatite, 92521 Nart- 
ly Cede*, France. EventuaBy fa sale. 


SUCCEED IN IHE SIM 

Refafad safe; freehold bouiiqite Prime 
beach pautioa in Monar, Alaeria, 
Span, lodes dothing, feather accesso- 
nes, Uadero Porcoan. quaEty gffts. 


Price «33QjOOD fesrtas. Apatoda 17. 
Garruaw, Afam 


, Afaeetfa. Spain. 


MAJBBZA 

Oasis Oub between Marbela Oubft 
Puerto Bows. Exdusira private dub, 


beadv pod. 2 bedroonv 2 bathroom 
house, maid service, private anden. 
Avtrtable fay & August No arafren. 


Avirtoble fay ft 

$3500 US per manthTBax 1986, Hecdd 
Tribune, *Sll Neufiy Codex, France 


POIBICA. MAIICMCA. Charmfag 

Wx-y vSu, ' ' ' 


, lovely view on meutatea 

ft sea beaotffd terrace ft gadea 
pod, 15 mins, sea Lam wing + 
dining, largo modern kitchen, 4 dou- 
ble b edrooms, baths, beta nvtrtoUe. 
To rart by month faw/July/AugusL 
Puri* 260 60 18 a Box 1967, Herald 

Tribune. 92521 Nealy Cedex, Franca 



HIECT ROM OWNER, vBa fa rent 

fa Benidann beach, Apm, 


. . , May, fate 
Contact Mariano Ffarez, Ave- Brad 
4AA 28020 Madrid. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SWITZERLAND 


swnzBtuto 

to mo 




25 antes off hfaway « Ciwumahd 
F175& eca 


per luatihi 

— notoaduded 

Afl.Obcr«4er 

Knbweg 14, 6300 utg 


wfloge sn: 

afro 


ZURICH, EOT AKA {DOUS) 
SdeeeSd view, apatmecr in gorgoora 
vita T bedroom 25 sp.ni., drmsng 
room 13 sqa. racrble baft, wmg/dtv 
teg 56 sam. dries* fafthen 16 sqnv, 
high ct&fa, rievatar from gtngi. 
an SF3 JM/marth. 

Tri Zurich 2S2 U 46 ar 55 09 89. 


oty-cdunirysEH 
■ aftfonU furmfli 
SF4^D0. O* 


favriy aid ml 2 boewnfri fomfod 
apartments. Sflj600 - 


BN - JULY/ AUGUST, lovely 1 -bed- 

room upann e rt , fanng/draig room. 


USA 


MANHATTAN- Modern rtudo o wrfc 


Untied Nraxme.- ... 
Itidhen ft baft. Tel: 




REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


BOOM WITH FAMB.Y or smert apan- 
erart wtih txca eonc) use of ktiawn. 


M fictf chart MBS oaeve n i ert ty hy 
coted room & bath fa any 4 to 6 
vmefc period b et ween June and Sep- 


tember, deem, safte swToaxJmgs es- 
ohon A tic 


seetUL Drtotied riamctioii 
sure prompt reply. UffiMAN. 2100 
So. Odkxi tone, far Lauderdale, 
Hondo 3331 6. 


WOUCH) SABBATICAL HOUSWG fa 
fate: Home ar tp c x lrae ni to aeconc 
m od u le 2 adufa 3 drtdren in ex- 
change fa our 5 bedroom home near 
Barton; Ji^jTfa. 1985. Jon D. 


Sdmeidw; 710 South St, Neediaq, 
MA 02192 USA 617-44742515 


LUXURY HOME- 3 bedroom. 2 betfa 
staffed ot ~Casa cte Canpo”, Daiirx- 
can Repufafc. fj ehonge tar June ao- 
aananodubon Lug ano, De canber 
London. Telex LISA 3727 S29 or P.O, 
Bat 644 Winter fak, FL 32789. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


LANGUAGE SCHOOL <Hb U & 
part Mite Epflteh ft Germqn mqtfar 


tongvetettdte«,Mirthav*EECpeB- 
MR or voted working pepm fate 


5? 


12 80 So For Lenguth 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 


ALWAYS 
drtdrras 
branches . . . 
brio waridMdi. Cal Stoone Bareau, 

!SAS.BaSB8a& 


ALWAYS AVAOABU LONDON arty 
bsteynndin ft Irt cfa» date nwte. 

SmRiMi, London 730 8122 > 
5142, Lcencto emotortTwrrr agency 


INGUSH NUMB ft MoCter t Hript 
free now Noth Aowcy. 53 ‘Perth 
Rood. How, UK- Tefc flw3) 29044, I S 


AUTOMOBILES 


NEW MERCH3E5 190E 


tight bond drive. Optical mdudei 
Power tteemg, dr co n d te o wr^ , rise- 
Inc sunroof, attomakc efaane wtn- 


Tefc (0110-1811 55. Tbc 2fg44 
AUTO CBfTSt FSBBM 


; reratsw by 

Wedfawii JZ ft, Raltew f— . 


1929 ROUS ROYOE Pbonwce 2 wti h 

Ho 1 


with i 


adty tuned dnaii ft modfied break- 
ing to the ipeediettiiora of me 
owner Cqptdn Mol ' " 

Senoudyfa sale at 
the evening: York 




Ufa 
55528 or 


UfXURIOUS BMW 1985 735i, two 


months okij B00 « tics only, wtih 


computer, 
leather upl 


Pens 39611 


blue metoBc pant, 
y, sun roof, ft more. 

us&ooo. 


TOR SAlfc PORSCHE Targa 911 1975. 
Perfeo eo^fau fatodi, bage hdhw 
Antwerp Bel- 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC RBir A CAR. Prestige oars 

with phone: Boh Spirit; Maudes. 

Jaguar. BMW, fcnouanei. snafl cat. 


46V nine Chorron, 75008 Pans. IA 
72030.40. Telex 6X797 F CHAROC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SCHOLAR ft WffE wish to swop their 
gp u rt ura it on Amsteidom canal with 
yam 2raam flat. New Ytxk Gty rtnT- 
fag Sept 1985 - go to 2 yea*. CcM 
Holcnd H 20-224494 Sondoy/i 


EXCHANGE 1 BEDROOM Manhattan 
fltti June-Sear fa sanM in franco 
&arejjgr372_ CPW. NVC 10025 


SEBC STUCK) PARS end Api. 2/3 
matiht. About F3 .500/ month. (UK) 
44481 47377 office houn. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 



B4GUSH SPEAKMGsdenri watfed. 
Tefc 77D-3HJ6, or prsfesnay visit us ei 
person of h xx trime, PARFUMBU^ 3, 
rue du Hctifcr. fail 9, Jtetra Opera. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AM OBC AH PHD MALE 44 interested 

in fiving ft working in West Europe. 
Strata psyfobaaAbutiwftfimn- 
rid bacfc g ro u ncL WbI consider efter- 
nctiive portion. fWSp levinthd, 5S22 
Bfancs Awl. Waodtond Kft, CA 
91367 USA 


AUSTRIAN COOK 20, 5 years experi- 
ence, reeks job in hotel a restauront. 
«. Gzek. DonouBdteigenrtr. 30 / 4 / 
17, A-l 200 Vienna. 

PHBHJLYBRWGUALFrenchAtrari- 
can vara hum anities ft fee arte 


JONDON, YOUNG MAN, ll. pri- 
vrie modd, toofag fa trade wgert- 
fr. Tefc 01^85 9^ 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


JUHBUE SEBCS fa AhBOCAN 
NvrmXVt raws fa PAJB& 


Engfah,. 


Dutch or German 
of french re- 
quired, Engfish forttiand. Binguaf 
leasts. Wrtie ar phone: 138 Avenue 
Victor Hugo; 7511ft fat*. France. Tefc 
727 61 


MTL CONSULTANTS, ABOflKTS 



i P^Tefe^ Send CV, ph oto to 


. Herald Tribune, 92521 
Neufty Cedex. France 


HT CnCULATKM DBVUtTMfiVT b 


Jooidng for tiemparary Lffitguol Eng- 
kf # (MHQDt HD- 


Ssh/French secretary, 
mediately. Phone Mrs Rabonaf Paris 
747 12 65 exfc 4302 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


GR - THE CRBME DE IA Q»tt tem- 
porary help people raonxl 
Erigfidi mother tongue 
fa«75B 8230. 


HOWTO IMPORT AHMOKAN 
CAR MHO THE USA. 

This doamieor exptora ftrty whnt one 
must do to bring a car tire the US. 
safely and le^.%. it mdudei new ft 
ued fawpean arto prices, buying tipi, 
DOT ft EPA cawenmn addresses, cus- 
tom deoronca ft shipping pracefau 
as waB as legri points. Because or the 
strong dollar, you can save np to 
USSISJOOO when buyfafl a Meroedu, or 
BMW in Europe ft m^afrng ti to the 
Sues. To recwve ftn man u al, send 
USS1 85D fodd US51 JOfa postojul fa 
PJ_ SdmKfo POetfadi 3131 
7000 Stuttgart 1, West Germany 


Owwg^H. 


GmbK Ttek 

Picti-up ufl over Europe *ro/rt>dqps. 
TRANSCAI 20 me Le Sueur, 75116 
Paris. Tefc 5000304 Nice: 8&9533. 

Antererpt 2339981 Cames 3943 44 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EXCAUBUK 

AUTOMOHUB 
are ampletely hand-butir in Anmrica 
— ‘ ' xhjtJtoo for 

HwEurepft- 


Oriy 44 af the 250 unir production < 
1985 are bang ofloentad to the Europ 
on and Midtfle Emt mcrlcA 


New for 1985 (fa fume only) is a 

Genera Motor* 57 fare M) on- 


spocial 

one producing 300 HP. in ti* natural 
ram ar 435 HP. whai a m ereharged. 
Prices USS6ft<X)0 -R5JOOO (FOB factory) 
on equipment, 
xaxnnctieiy 8 week* from 
_ dtocotion lasts, fa more 
utiormotian contact the role and exciu- 
•ve ftrtribukMti 

EXCAU8UR MOTOR CAR 
asnauTORS 

fate Priara, Are de la CMa 
Mente Qmfa Menace 

Tefc 33 - 93 - 25 63 91 
Telenc 469870 SACS 
Offices now aka in UX ft S w itar lgnd 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
BUY-8ACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


WHIR FDR HB CATALOG OR 
| NS BUY-BACK FOU» TO: ■ 


pan 


fa 


SHVSHXt SA, Choussee de Wavre 
465, 1040 Broach, Belgfan. 
Pbgne: (02)6499062. Telex. 63290 


AX HS CARS: MOORS, Rob 
Brwra, Audi Volvo, Porsche, BMW. 
We tap a (urge stodiaf brand new 

‘id* 

We aisp tote* core of the s£p^ 


DXX. 1 


Ik Belgium 82209 EUKOAU fl, tk 
UJSXW95689 via US. NV Euro Au- 
to'i kitemational. Koningia Astridaan 
47, 9990 ‘ 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

thi Motana shoaub* 


Tax free IHD. M aodrimMag WOO 
Sa ft iketift tnteBneti fa NMMftabt 
■hpari fra* nock. 


EPA 4 DOT ce rt ifi cation ft (hpPV by 
fete****. 


omor rom source 


Tnram l#w>t to i Mrf 

It HawadreHBJfndon NW2 7RL 
Ttl 01208 ON?. 

Tries 895403 TKAS G. 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, IXOTK CABS 

FROM STOCK 


fa IMMBUnFrMwf) 


teUAA. 

RUTEMC 

Taranpr, 

WGerm., Iri 
Information , 


VMtt. & Fra nkfurt, 
s, Iri (069332351, tiv 41t 
ton eefy by pte e ne cr W 


559 


LML SA 

oFfiOAi KXis ucra 

DEALER FOR BEURUM 

TAX HIS CARS 


ROLLS ROYCE BWT1EY 
RANGE and LANDROVBt 

r. de MtDDBflOURG 7482 


1170 Bnirtels 
TEL 2-473 33 92 
TlX: 2S4S9 


10 YEARS 

We Deffver Care to (he Werid 


TRANSCO 


Keeping a caraati rtodt of more 4ion 
300 brand new cars, 

^faneea SA ^’hfarSEa^ 


2030 Artiwenx l#»L 
HS240. iSSrhtANS B 


Tel 323/542 62 40. 


"TAX 


NEW 198S 

■PC, BMW, PORSCHE. 
ROUS ROYCE. FHfatAH. 
V.W. / AUDI 


' WDfRHD. Eora/USi 
Immedfate / T 
GiT. VCHtOE L . 

Tel: iMden 1011 493 4218. 
Tbc 299824 RANKOO Gv 


TAX FIB AUTO SALES 
Order your Eurapecn - US - end UK 


Ca rental, u ninfaed mileage. 
Leasing new ca 1 to 6 months. 
Trims IIOOSTX Tel: 651 434X 
Penan, 2 Ave fate de fair* dead 
Pate 75016. 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.C.T. 

Al tncta, dl models, braid new 
Kxerloon I, 3506 Anhrarp. Betaum 
Trt3/231 :&00.1fa354iPHGWTB 
Said (35 fa catofog 


fa Otied DeBraiy 
rawwt 

3B0 SE, SB. 500 SE, SB. 


ranbet fT^° ^ 500 ^ 


OteM ft Twtea 
GmbH 


BodiumerStt 103, 4350 bcUnghauen 

■BMHMHMM82993/AHS D 


Tel 02361/ 7004 Txt 


- 280 Si US _ 

■ 930 TURBO Bod&Bbdi USPftOOO 
■911 CARRBMfed/BtodUSSTOXiO 
RBMEX GeftH, 

GeitSniptr 100, D-4330 Moefam 
Tefc Rm434099. TlxJ56U88. 


EXPBRBKB) CAR TRADBS for 
Mercedes, BMW, Porsche, offer M 
service m^ort / export US DOT ft 
SPA fa tourist ft dealer. Otsawride 
Duetsri- 
211 - 


Motors, T e r rteege n s tr . 1 4 D 
dorf W. Ge neeny. T efc (0) 
434644. Trie* 8S87374. 


TRANSIT CAR BBOUM. Any new ft , . 
md tars, (tends 911 Tme ffr 
Peal White, USJ1QJS00. BMW 635 
C5. 79, silver. Pondies 

928 S from B0 + 81. Tefc 
323/6587228. The 33699 SRWATB 


TRANSMUNDI BBOUM, 21 Gntel- 
seboaiL 8-2241 ZotrwL Antwerp. Tefc 
03v384]ilL54 Tbr 32302 Tronun 8. in 
stode Mercedes, BMW, ASQ 


NEW PEUGQ0Y. Laid Rover, Range 


Rover. Toyota,' 4*4, tropiaJ specs. 
Zoreebaai V 


Britos, Zareebaan 18, Maorisas. 
brotfe, Holo n d RB3l)445<yl tx 4 7082 


500 58, CHAMPAGNE WITH add 
upholstery, IHD, fotiy loaded, Othr- 
erf mflrago only, offers tiwited. Tefc 
fadaid 01-642 0879 onyttine. 


1985 BMW 3251, factory US specs. 

fifty boded. Cafl W. Ger- 


btsdllSW.'warwiMvu.-MH «v,m 

rarer W 695601 702 or 38 63 63 


BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 
VEHICLES 


READY TO UVE W Pais, enx* every. 

- - Aftstrol 33 ft 


where, owner Ills 1 
Motor Safer Bafar 37. t 
Tefc 307 55 90. TOans-tpra / * 


Pais. 


ACrnS'S 60 ft yadtf Caines fa sefe 
£50 JXXX Tefc 01 -402 8304 


LEGAL SERVICES 


IMMGRAT1QN ft BU5MBS VISAS 

TO USA Rkhad Sv Goldstein. Esq. 
wil be oyoloble fa can su tt u t ia e m 


London from April 1 to 7. Cdl in 
13784&lo 


London 01-3718291 or write or telex 
63 Wol St. NYC 10005. Tefc 212-925- 
B5B0- Totem 661199. 


LEGALSStVirw - 




UX Uvmt - torew- 

EMBLSFBh®*! 

Twtrj* rap: 


„ ?l *i anr» 




FORSAUAWaRk 

VIDid * 


VWDWSAJIWnCft 

ferJXeiERSsF- 


AmesiCM Bkei. fa fes ortra 

- limrnoaal / CYHRK 
Tefa- * 3»2 PRC Qf 


ANTIQUES 


P0ftSAU,1 - ?ihftl8fteatiBtyi 

msst&ffsSh 


93400 StOven, 
Sun.Mrellafadpie. 


S3SRVICES 


YOUNG IADY 

PA'faMipreter ft Tamm Grid 

PASS 562 QSt7 


PAM — U«H3 AMSIWpfti 
I DUHBfflOPWHBtm 
INTBt NATKJNAL UD tM 

■MMsranMMMwd 





** PARK 553 62 62 

FOR A REAL VJJ. YOUNG D ' 

Oetingurihed. Begont. Mubting 




ktrtkNMftll 


V9 LADY GUBE 


Ybung, educated, etegaet ft efte 

MUiniOtt 


* PARIS 527 01 93 

YOUNG LADY TRRMGUALVI 


YOUNG aEGANT LA 

MuMsiftind PA fate 525 I' 


TOKYO 442 39 71 

EUROPCAN YOUNG PA tA 


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'Vernation?! Herald Ti 
‘JUS — From Milm 
ton and Paris, the European 
/-l o- wear collections have 
‘heir high points butnostar- 
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V PARIS FASHION 

Ay shearling added on out- 
< sy note. Coats, with a lot of 
Vquarter lengths, were more 
. irtant than dresses. Al- 
%gb Yves Saint Laurent 
^Ved tninia, the look was gen- 
>y long, with big shoulders 
A wide lapels framing tiny 

, 5. 

’■^splaying the female body, 
rj t recently glorified by Azze- 
> Alala, was another major 
i, with sculptured garments 
swing every curve. The retuin 
,« shape made all these col- 
ons strongly European, and 
u away the shapeless, lay- 
n. look of the Japanese. 

:plor was another important 
. fin i, with the palette switeb- 
, to purple ana fuchsias and 
from the bright primaries 
'Sst season. 

'"1 terms of talents, both 
yni Versace and Giorgio Ar- 
■jCi lead the Milan fashion 
: while in Paris, there was a 
ing of the cards. Full focus 
tyon Claude Montana and 
**t-Paul Gaultier. 

' v'jmaruicl Ungaro, Valentino 
; « Kar l Lagerfeld for Chanel 
'.' vexed professional collec- 
w .-Vs, as safe as money in the 
't Thierry Mugler fared bet- 
£$han usual Retiflers said that 
^as inmed out his production 
,^-oIems. Saint Laurent was still 
r r y body's favorite designer 
.mailers were divided. Some 
, it Others found it repeti- 
‘p'« and too rnmj i on the safe 

was a good season for knits, 
■■■ i Gaultier’s tapestry sweaters 
^Oing up everywhere and influ- 

. He floral effects combined 
.ieTl paideys made for a roman- 
.'nostalgic look. 

. -Jany collections suffered 
excessive staging. In an ef- 
to be different, designers 
- ‘.t fallen into more and more 
‘-^jiplicaied ways of showing 
clothes. The result was of- 
r.Z jo their disadvantage. The' 

. ^ one who did not fall into 

A .f . > - 



OorfieCerl 

Operetta look by Renzo and a tight-fitting dress by Alala. 


Lhis trap was outsider Alala, who 
showed in his showroom without 
music or props of any kind. 

Kenzo is the most poetic of 
Paris designers and seems to be 
perpetually living in a child’s 
world. His whimsical collection 
included Bavarian folklore, Pe- 
ruvian peasants and a good dose 
of fairy-tale characters, includ- 
ing Snow White. The podium 
was filled with sleighs, mastiffs 
on leash and page boys courting 
beautiful damse ls under showers 
of confetti. 

The Bavarian Operetta look 
included white peasant skirts 
over colorful petticoats and dec- 
orated with multicolored rows of 
ribbons. Flat peasant boots were 
edged with fur, heads were 
wrapped around in big mohair 
scarves and Russian blouses 
were tucked into baggy muzhik 
pants. 

As usual the look was utterly 
cheerful because of Kenzo’s riot 
of colors, with reds and yellows 
and hot pinks all thrown in to- 
gether. When Kenzo showed 
miniskirts, which he did quite 
often, he had them over blue or 
red legs. The look was not only 
young but virtually junior. 

Knits, always a strong point 
here, had the ethnic beauty and 
coloration of South American 
Andes peasants. Serapes, in con- 
trasting patterns, were thrown 
over the shoulders. The fairy-tale 


part of this show had page boys 
in bright floral velvets and prin- 
cesses in crinkly taffetas. 

At Alaia's, the stray once 
again was the bodv. This design- 
er, who can be held responsible 
for the curves’ revival went rate 
notch further with clothes that 
fitted like a second skin. Al- 
though Alala is an outsider — he 
does not show with the rest of 
Paris designers — he is consid- 
ered cure of Paris’s most influen- 
tial d esigners , an accomplished 
technician and a peerless tailor. 

He even made ski pants sexy, 
with intricate back seams outlin- 
ing the derriere. This he had al- 
ready done on sexy tittle skirts 
that have been heavily copied. 
The contrast between these fig- 
ure-moulding slti pants and 
bulky white alpaca sweaters 
made the models look even more 
vulnerable. Another interesting 
group was all the tailored jack- 
ets, including a gray one. over 
ski-pants, which was like rein- 
venting the pant-suit. 

Other high points included tai- 
lored coats unmatche d in Paris, 
interesting shearling with doud- 
partems over them and revers- 
ible mink coals. Abfia, who in the 
past has designed costumes for 
the Crazy Horse Saloon, also 
showed suk jersey dresses so re- 
vealing that even the models 
seemed embarrassed to parade 
them. 


Seoul Hands 
Boat, Crew 
And Bodies 
To Chinese 


Untied Press International 

KUNSAN, South Korea — Two 
crew in embers cried and begged for 
their lives Thursday as South Ko- 
rea returned a Chinese torpedo 
boat and its crew a week after a 
mutiny caused the vessel to drift 
Into South Korean waters. 

Hie radio operator, Du Xinli, 20. 
and the navigator, Wang Zbon- 
groag, 19, were handed over to Chi- 
nese authorities along with coffins 
containing the bodies of six. other 
crewmen who died during the muti- 
ny. Also transferred were nine sail- 
ors from the torpedo boat who sur- 
vived the mutiny unhurt and 
another two who were injured. 

The two mutineers were con- 
fined in a cabin of the torpedo boat 
as the vessel was towed by a de- 
stroyer to the t ransf er point, in the 
Yellow Sea, 155 miles (250 kilome- 
ters) off tire Korean coast. Later. 
Korean officials said, tire two shed 
tears when they learned that they 
were being returned. 

“They begged for life, in tears," 
during the 12-hour journey by de- 
stroyer to the meeting point, an 
official said. 

The Beijing Foreign Ministry 
confirmed that China bad received 
the boat and all crew members. The 
two nations do not have diplomatic 
ties. 

The message thanked South Ko- 
reans for “their assistance." but 
gave no details on the fate of two 
mutineers. 

The ship was returning home last 
week from a naval exercise when 
two of its crew mutinied and the 
vessel ran out fuel, drifting into 
South Korean territorial waters. It 
was spotted by a South Korean 
fishing boat and was towed to a 
small island luff Friday, 

South Korean officials said that 
Mr. Da and Mr. Wang, armed with 
automatic rifles, fired at their supe- 
riors on tire bridge after being disci- 
plined. 

The two could not be treated as 
defectors because they mutinied 
out of personal nonpolitieal griev- 
ances, South Korean officials said. 

The Chinese expressed their 
gratitude by presenting 25 bottles 
of Chinese liquor. 15 cases of beer, 
30 cases of wine, and 30 cartons of 
cigarettes. 


South Africa : Adrift in a Sea of Violence 


By Alan Cowell 

Hew York Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
wheel it almost seemed, had come 
full circle. On the 25th anniversary 
of the Sharpeville massacre of 
I960, the police guns blazed again, 
this time m Langa township, near 
Uitenhage, just back from South 
Africa's southern coastline. At least 
19 blacks died and 35 were hospi- 
talized. 

The temptation among commen- 
tators was to say things had not 
c h anged over the 25years. But this 
time there was a difference. 

At the time of the Sharpeville 
killings in 1960, when 69 blacks 
were killed by the police, the white- 
led nation, steered then by Hendrik 
Verwoerd, seemed encased and 
protected in an ideology not ques- 
tioned by its architects, sure of the 
course Afrikanerdotn was taking 
After the kHKngy at Sharpeville, 
and a sweeping crackdown on dis- 
sent. there came what many schol- 
ars regard as 16 years of black ac- 

r cscence in lire townships, before 
Soweto uprisings of 1976. 

Last Thursday, however, 25 
years to the day idler Sharpeville, 


Von Weizgacker to Visit U.S. 

Reuters 

BONN — President Richard von 
Weizs&cker of West Germany vrifl 
visit Washington ne*t week for 
talks with President Ronald Rea- 
gan and U.S. senators, his office 
announced. 


Secret Toy Case 
IhsdesmV.Ko 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Charges that a 
senior British civil servant 
breached the Official Secrets 
Act were dropped Thursday af- 
ter a court was told that the 
documents Alan Lowther 
leaked to a fellow employee 
dealt with toy typewriters. 

Outside the Old BaGey crimi- 
nal court, Mr. Lowther, 44, an 
executive officer in tire, Home 
Office, called the mo- "a dis- 
graceful waste of public mon- 
ey,” The prosecutor offered no 
evidence, acknowledging that 
the two pages of a confidential 
report on work given to prison- 
ers were of little value and that 
the other employee was familiar 
with their contents. 

Mr. Lowther said Ire hoped 
tire case would be tire death 
knell for tire 1911 act's Section 
2, which forbids any govern- 
ment employee from disclosing 
information to anyone unau- 
thorized to receive it Critics say 
tire section is far too broad. 

Six weeks ago, Clive Printing, 
a senior official at the Defense 
Ministry, was cleared of Section 
2 charges after admitting that 
he gave an opposition lawmak- 
er confidential but not classi- 
fied documents about the sink- 
ing of the Argentine cruiser 
General Belgrano during tire 
Falklands war. 


there was a shift if not in tactics, 
then in mood. 

“For tire first lime I can remem- 
ber," a Western diplomat said on 
the day of the shootings, “there is 
do blueprint" to define the govern- 
ment’s view of the future. 

Compared with I960, (he white 
authorities seemed adrift, reliant as 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ever on force but unable to provide 
any other answer to the questions 
spawned by their own troubled ra- 
cial history. 

Apartheid's provisions for the 
black majority — that none would 
ever be permanent residents of 
white South Africa, but rather 
would be citizens of tribal home- 
lands — have been abandoned. But 
in their place, the authorities have 
not found a new formula lo cope 
with a growing black population. 
Instead of leading, the government 
increasingly seems to be reacting to 
pressures created by others. 

The killings left the white au- 
thorities embattled and defensive, 
evidently determined not to lose 
face and refusing even to acknowl- 
edge that the cause of violence 
might lie beyond the “agitators'’ 
and “In umidnm rs" the government 
blames for unrest. 

Young blacks responded to the 
killings by creating a kind of anar- 
chy in neighboring Kwanobuble 
township, slaughtering in vengea- 
nce fellow blacks considered 
stooges, forcing government ser- 
vants, including black policemen, 
to flee, effectively breaking down 
the icons of stale power in a chal- 
lenge that the government could 
meet only by further force. 

South Africa's president, Pieter 
W. Botha, faces a plethora of prob- 
lems. The economy is in deep crisis. 


His plans for limited change — a 
departure from traditional apart- 
heid designed to secure continued 
white hegemony — have won scant 
credibility among nonwhites. 

But if there is a single, burning 
issue confronting the authorities it 
is the growing lawlessness in the 
nation's black townships. 

In many such places these days 
the symbols of the government writ 
— black-led community councils, 
liquor outlets owned by local au- 
thorities and the homes of black 
government officials — have been 
razed by crowds. Those emblems 


have been replaced by armed p<>- 
lice, an implicit acknowledgment 
that the government’s writ in such 
places runs only because the whiQf- 
autborities maintain massive supe- 
riority in firepower over a largely 
unarmed black population. - ■ 
Mr. Botha says that no one wig 
stop him from keeping law and. 
order. Liberal commentators assert , 
that bis methods only lead to fur- 
ther alienation among blacks; 
whose demands for demoaacy out- 
strip the government's ambiguous 
offer of citizenship, political and 
land rights to “qualified" blacks. - 




School Bus Crash 
In South Africa 
Kills 41 Students 

United Press International 

JOHANNESBURG — Forty- 
one high school pupils died and 28 
were injured when a school bus 
went out of control and plunged 
into a lake, police said. 

lieutenant Pierre Louw said 39 
children drowned intide the bus 
and two died later in a hospital He 
said 28 children were still hospital- 
ized. some in critical condition. . 

The accident occurred Wednes- 
day afternoon as the bus passed the 
West dene Dam, about three miles 
(five kflometersj from the center of 
Johannesburg. 

A witness said it appeared that a 
tire burst, sending the bus swerving 
into another vehicle, smashing 
through a fence and plun ging into 
the lake. 



c >° 


CHRISTIAN OIORSOUUWS 

30. ° ver '' jeMC cI%pTc r iy«^'-' 
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SC/ 

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rown Boveri drive and control systems 
>ok after the world’s biggest water pipeline projects 
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p supply more than 
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a * \? pump drives, alt supplied 
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t** ■ 

1985 another double pipe- 
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^ "0000 m 3 of drinking water 
\ 37 day from the Shu'aiba 
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** , a to the holy city of Makkah 
■r.itoTaif. 

>^this project Brown Boveri 
supplying the entire electri- 
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ft is the biggest single order ever 
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In committing their worldwide 
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5478S4 I 


Competent - Dependable - Worldwide 


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BROWN BOVERI 


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international 



Eribunc, 


With The New York Time* and TV Wnixin^loa Part 


Iraq Breaks Its Word 


What is Iraq’s word worth? It is bound by 
the Geneva protocol prohibiting the use of 
poisonous gases in war, yet a group of Iranian 
soldiers is under treatment in European hospi- 
tals for the effects of mustard g ag From »hi< 
and other evidence, U.S. officials conclude 
that Iraq is once again using chemical weap- 
ons, in violation of the treaty it signed in 1931. 

When Iran complained of chemical attacks 
a year ago, a United Nations team detected 
mustard gas and the nerve gas Tabun on the 
battlefield. Evidently the use of these outlawed 
weapons had been long premeditated. Under 
the guise of making pesticides, Iraq construct- 
ed plants for producing toxic gases and im- 
ported chemicals from America and Europe. 

“Justly condemned by the general opinion 
of the civilized world" is the Geneva treaty’s 
description of chemical warfare. The United 
States condemned Iraq's use of the poison in 


March 1984, and restricted the sale of the 
precursor chemicals, as did Europe and Japan. 
But one dose of the world's obloquy was not 
enough. Iraq has now invited another. 

Both Iraq and Iran have committed many 
brutalities during four and a half years at war. 
But brutalities are seldom decisive; their only 
certain effect is that one leads to another. The 
two countries are now bombarding each oth- 
er’s dues. Why amid this barbarism worry 
about chemical weapons? Because any sustain- 
able limit on the barbarism of war is worth 
keeping. Having tasted chemical weapons in 
World War I, Europe kept them unused in 
stockpiles throughout World War H Chemical 
weapons can be contained, provided that they 
□ever begin to become commonplace and that 
those who unleash them are forced to count 
the world’s abhorrence in the price of their use. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Latin Nonproliferation 


■Argentina and Brazil are holding talks to 
open their nuclear facilities to reciprocal visits. 
The missions would be an important contribu- 
tion to peace and to the control of nuclear 
weapons in the Western Hemisphere. 

Both countries have the capability to build 
nuclear weapons. There have been occasions 
over the years when each has seemed to be 
moving in that direction. Both have always 
denied it, asserting that they wanted nuclear 
power only for peaceful purposes. But because 
of a long rivalry between them, evidence of 
nuclear progress in either country has been 
grounds for anxiety in the other. Under the 
military government that collapsed In 1983, 
Argentina had been showing signs of moving 
purposefully toward a bomb. Both countries 
have declined to sign the Nuclear Nonprolifer- 
ation Treaty, in protest against provisions that 
they consider discriminatory, and both have 
bear carrying on nuclear work at sites that are 
not subject to international inspection under 
the treaty's safeguard system. 

That is why it is significant that the initiative 
has come from Argentina and that the visits 
would specifically include all of their nuclear 
sites without exception. Both governments em- 
phasize that the visits would not replace other 
regional commitments, or the mare formal 
safeguards that already apply to some sites in 
each country. This agreement holds great 


promise for reassuring each government of the 
other’s intentions. Perhaps it will not be limit- 
ed to those two. The journal Nucleonics Week, 
which first reported these negotiations, says 
that Uruguay is also ready to join. 

These talks would have beat highly unlikely 
under Argentina's previous government. They 
are one of the many benefits that an elected 
president. Rail] Alfonsin, is bringing to his 
country — and not to his country alone. Pro- 
gress toward the agreement has been delayed 
by the transition in Brazil but there both the 
last government and the newly elected one 
have been firmly in favor of the idea. 

It is a delicate business to fit together the 
network of treaties and understandings that 
try to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. 
As long as a few countries have the bomb and 
most do not, a kind of inequality is inevitably 
built into the general treaties. That inequality, 
reserving the weapons for the few, offends a 
number of governments, including some that 
have no intention of building them. Where 
those governments decline to join the nonpro- 
liferation treaty, regional agreements can com- 
plement it and support its purpose most use- 
fully. When Argentina and Brazil start sending 
their specialists to take a look at each other's 
nuclear plants, they will strengthen their own 
security, their neighbors’ and everybody else’s. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Try a 'Share Economy’ 


These are the best of economic times for 
most Americans. But what of the eight million 
who, despite the boom, r emain unemployed? 

Policy-makers accept 7-percent unemploy- 
ment as an unavoidable cost of stable prices. 
They fear that a concerted effort to reduce 
joblessness would trigger another round of 
inflation and recession. But in what may be the 
most important contribution to economic 
thought since the general theory of John May- 
nard Keynes, Martin Writzman, an economist 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
suggests an elegant way to break the link 
between employment and the business cycle. 

He set out his plan in October in a readable 
little book, called “The Share Economy," that 
continues to stir restless interest. The core of 
his idea resembles profit-sharing: Grange the 
system of fixed wages to one in which workers’ 
incomes are determined by company perfor- 
mance. Almost everyone would benefit 
• Most workers are paid according to con- 
tract so many hours times the hourly rate. If 
the cost of extra hours is less than the extra 
revenues the work would yield, the employer 
hires more people. If workers insist on higher 
Wages or if sales fall they get laid off. 

■ But suppose that labor, instead of negotiat- 
ing for so many dollars an hour, negotiated for 
a' share of company revenues. And suppose 
that the agreement left the employer free to 
hire as many more workers as he wanted. 
Attitudes toward hiring would be transformed. 

. - Imagine that General Motors, for instance, 
agreed in such negotiations to pay its workers 
70 percent of revenues. Since it would keep 30 
pfcrcenl GM would want to keep hiring as long 
as the extra workers made a contribution to 
revenues. Those already employed would in 
effect pay part of any new workers’ wages. 

- If there were then a recession, GM would 
have a strong incentive to avoid layoffs. Reve- 
nues would fall but pay would remain a fixed 
percentage of revenue, so the company would 
g-iin nothing by idling productive workers. 

That sounds great for GM and the workers 
who would otherwise be unemployed, but 
what about the rest of GM"s workers, whose 
income would fluctuate according to company 
revenue and new hiring? Why should they buy 
the Weitzman idea? One reason is that the pay 
loss, averaged out among a whole work force. 


would be small Another is job security. Most 
people who work for a living should be willing 
to take a temporary pay cut to keep fellow 
workers on the job during a recession. 

In good times, if GM hired so many people 
that wages dropped substantially, the union 
would be Free to bargain for a larger share of 
the profits, just as it is free now to bargain for 
higher wages. And if most companies switched 
to the Weitzman share agreement, the wide- 
spread competition for workers would ensure 
that no company could long get away with 
sub-par compensation. “The share economy" 
would superficially resemble the full-employ- 
ment economy of World War IL when employ- 
era had to scavenge for workers — with one big 
difference. In a war economy the pressure of 
labor shortages brings higher wages and, ulti- 
mately, inflation. In the share economy, em- 
ployers would always want more employees 
but they would not have to pay inflationary 
wages to get them. The link between high 
employment and inflation would be broken. 

There is another set of virtues in the idea. 
Government policy-makers would no longer 
have to accept low growth to avert inflation. 
Inflation could never become locked into high- 
er wages, so it would not feed on itself through 
workers’ expectations of more inflation. 

Could a share economy work? It does. Pay 
in Japan is in part determined by sales. No 
other economy has so successfully maintained 
high employment with low inflation. 

There may be undiscovered flaws in Mr. 
Weitzman's proposition. But if the share eco- 
nomy delivered, think of the triumph. All the 
efficiency of competition would be retained: 
Corporate performance would still be reward- 
ed or punished in the market. The distribution 
of income would not be greatly altered. But 
prosperity would no longer depend on the 
misery of the unemployed. 

The share economy deserves attention and 
debate. The idea needs testing for analytic 
errors, and practical examination to see how 
business and labor might be encouraged to try 
it and learn how to manage the transition. 

Ideas that promise so much usually suc- 
cumb to general skepticism. But this is no 
crackpot scheme — not as long as society 
rewards work and so many people need it 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR MARCH 29 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Roosevelt Addresses Egyptians 
CAIRO — Mr. Roosevelt delivered an address 
at tbe Egyptian University [on March 28]. 
After a reference to the president of the univer- 
sity, Prince Fouad. of whom he spoke in terms 
of the highest praise, he said that the university 
bolds untold possibilities for the good of the 
country. Wisdom and sincerity, financial and 
education management, and above all charac- 
ter, are more important than mental subtility. 
No pmn is educated by a curriculum. Are the 
people ready, Mr. Roosevelt asked, for self- 
government with a paper constitution? Self- 
government is not a matter of a decade or two, 
but of generations. Every man must fight for 
himself and remember tbe Arab proverb, 
“God is patient if man knows bow to wait." 


1935: Murder TriaL, Guernsey Style 
GUERNSEY — This island is having its first 
murder trial in 82 years and the inhabitants are 
discussing it to the exclusion of all else. The 
defendant is Mrs. Gertrude de la Mare, who is 
charged with the murder of her employer, a 76- 
year-old farmer. Guernsey legal procedure is 
filled with picturesque customs dating back to 
Norman times. A case is tried before a bailiff, 
whose function corresponds to that of an Eng- 
lish judge. The decision is given by twelve 
jurats. The honor of serving as a" jural is 
eagerly sought by every islander. One extraor- 
dinary feature is that the jurats may not retire 
behind dosed doors, but must conduct their 
deliberations in public. Each jurat must speak 
up and give his view of tbe case. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairma n 1953-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


iUP M. FOISIE 
LTER WELLS 
BERT K. McCABE 
4UELABT 
RLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubtaker 

Executive Editor BQNDY 

EiSiar ALAIN LECOUR 

Drpun Editor RICHA RD H- MORGAN 

Deputy Editor sltfdAN W. CO NAWAY. 


dSSefSr 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Direair of -Adrerttiutg 

national Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue CJarka-^C^iiik, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Pans. 

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I 


South Africa: What Means to a Fair End? 


W ASHINGTON —To think seriously about 
South Africa's racial dilemma is, for me at 
least, to make a series of false starts to nowhere. 

The premise is easy enough: that it is wrong 
for the white minority, whose antecedents are 
European, to rule the black majority , whose roots 
are African; that it is particularly wrong that 
the minority should govern so ruthlessly without 
any semblance of the consent of the governed; 
that it is unacceptable in a world daiming to 
be civilized that any people should be denied 
the fundamental rights of citizenship in the land 
of their birth and heritage. 

But since to expect the white Afrikaners to 
relinquish their awesome power to the black 
aborigines is no more realistic than expecting 
while Americans to hand control of America to 
the American In dians, the question is: How can 
this f undame ntal injustice be remedied? 

Two groups of optimists think they know. 
The rosy-eyed optimists are convinced that the 
white minority government can, by the prospect 
of some combination of economic pressure and 
international embarrassment, be nudged in the 
direction of radial justice. 

These idealists indude Randall Robinson, 
bead of the Free South African Movement that is 
leading the daily pickets at the South African 
Embassy in Washington, and Chester Crocker, 
architect and defender of the U.S. policy of 
“constructive engagement" Admittedly, the two 
would find little on which they could agree. But 
the fact is that both believe that the U.S. govern- 
ment, through a proper use of its diplomatic and 
economic influence, could move South Africa 
toward an acceptable solution. The key differ- 
ence between them is that Mr. Crocker would use 
the carrot of warm relations, and Mr. Robinson 
the stick of economic sanction. 

The bloody-eyed optimists would support Mr. 
Robinson, not because they believe his approach 
would work directly but because they are per- 
suaded that all-out economic sanctions would 
hasten the day of all-out civil war, which blacks, 
by reason of their superior numbers, would win. 

I find it hard to follow either scenario to a 
reasonable outcome. The ruling whites obviously 
value American investment and American good- 


By W illiam Raspberry 

will — but surely not more than they value 
political and economic control of the land they 
have ruled for about as loan as whites have ruled 
America. In other words, whether in response to 
Mr. Crocker’s carrot or Mr. Robinson's stick, the 
South African whites can be expected to do little 
more than put a prettier face on apartheid. 

As for the path of all-out war, it is bard to see 
how the blacks could win. If the Pretoria govern- 
ment is willing have automatic weapons fired 
into crowds of black mourners, knowing that the 
eyes of those whose goodwill they covet are 
watching, what would they stop at if their very 
survival was at stake? Is it really credible that the 
most sophisticated mili tary establishment on the 
continent would balk at carpet-bombing the 
black townships if it came to that? 

Perhaps tbe most seductive aspect of tbe vari- 
ous disinvestment proposals is the fact that white 
South Africans seem to react positively to them 


and black South Africans seem to encourage 
them. Both responses may be misleading. What 
the black majority seems to favor, and what the 
white minority seems to react to, is the threat of 
disinvestment. As with the blackmailer who 
threatens to reveal some dark secret, the threat is 
effective: tbe actual delivery is worthless. 

I have heard the boldness of Mack South 
Africans who insist t h at while the economic rum 
that disinvestment and severing of relations with 
the Western world could bring would hurt them, 
it would hurt the whites more. Blades are used to 
suffering, they say. But it occurs to me that the 
effect of disinvestment could be achieved by 
b lacks themselves, simply by voluntarily giving 
up the jobs that disinvestment would elnmnate. 
I find it instructive that no cal] for a general work 
stoppage has ever had modi success there. 

It is perfectly obvious what is wrong in South 
Africa. It is equally obvious what a just outcome 
would look like, what I find impossible to see is: 
How do you get from here to mere? 

The Washington Past. 



IBM Will Stay Put and Keep Practicing Equality 


A RMONK, New Yolk — The 
debate over whether American 
companies should do business in 
South Africa has taken on new ur- 
gency. This is fueled by South Afri- 
ca's continued resistance to all but 
the most limited reforms of apart- 
heid and the continued suffering of 
blacks and other non whites. 

Some individuals say that Ameri- 
can firms in South Africa must now 
oppose apartheid more directly and 
publicly; others are pressing them 
to withdraw fully. As a result, the 
Internationa] Business Machines 
Corporation has again re-examined 
its practice of doing business in 
South Africa. We have concluded 
that we should remain there. 

Like most American firms in 
South Africa, IBM practices non- 
discrimination and gives equal pay 
for equal work. IBM South Africa 
continues to increase its employ- 
ment of blacks, including managers, 
and blades work in all major areas 
— sales, service, etc. — in a non- 
segregated environment 
IBM. complying fully with U-S. 
export regulations, does not sell its 
products to the police, prisons, mili- 
tary, national-security agencies and 
the department that administers the 
passbook system for blacks. 


By John F. Akers 

The writer is president and chief executive officer of IBM. 


We work to improve black educa- 
tion. Our largest project contributes 
video recorders and lessons, and 
workbooks in science and math, to 
35 high schools in Soweto and three 
blade readier- tr aining colleges. 

For some critics, however, the 
conduct of American companies in 
South Africa is not the issue. They 
argue that only a small percentage 
of nonwhites have jobs with Ameri- 
can firms, and that whatever bene- 
fits those nonwhites receive cannot 
outweigh the need to take a symbol- 
ic stand against racism by with- 
drawing completely. 

I believe that people who hold 
this view tend to overestimate the 
economic and political impact that 
such action would have on the gov- 
emmenL Moreover, they often un- 
derestimate how economic activity 
can generate social change. 

Business people are not social re- 
formers in disguise; but economic 
activity does have profound social 
effects, direct and indirect, that en- 
hance the climate for change. 

For example, any business com- 
munity needs well educated em- 


ployees, and all businesses want the 
largest number of customers possi- 
ble. Both considerations give busi- 
ness a strong interest in opposing 
government policies that limit hu- 
man potential and restrict freedom. 

It is no accident that pressure 
against apartheid in Sooth Africa's 
white community often comes from 
the white business community. 

Do American companies really 
rhatiwige discrimination head-on? 

Here is what Jack F. Clarke, manag- 
ing director of IBM Smith Africa, , 
himself a South African, recently 
said in a speech these: "The laws 
affecting the right of a person to 
sell his labor must be abolished 
... Laws which force a person 
working in a first World environ- 
ment at tbe office to return to the 
deprivations of a Third World di- 
mate at night must be changed." ^ vwejct 

Mr. Clarke also called for “bring- : 
ing blacks into the constitutional 
framework." He spoke not as apo- 
litical activist but as a businessman 
who knows that opportunities for 
growth are limited by laws that de- 
prive people of basic rights. He is 


thus a powerful voice for change — 
but not if he is not there. 

EBM could depart with vay little 
financial sacrifice. IBM South Afri- 
ca generates less than 1 percent of 
IBM's worldwide revenues. But we 
believe the right thing to do is to 
remain and redouble our efforts to 
advance social equality. IBM urges 
other companies to do the same — 
many already are. Pressure on 
apartheid will be increased by more 
corporate involvement, not less. 

All companies doing , business- in 
South Africa should honor tbe prin- 
ciples set forth and recently ampli- 
fied by the Reverend Lean Sullivan 
of .Philadelphia calling for buriness 
actively to wosk f or change: (My a 
truly international corporate effort 
can make a difference. 

Corporations have* choice. We 
can view South. Africa as a tragedy, 
wadi our hands of it and wan foe 
the erosion that may or may not 
coaiK.regardksstrfwhalwedOl'Ch' 

a model for * 

which black, white, Asian and col- 
oretT might some day enjoy peace 
and freedom. This may be an im- 
possible dream, but I am not ready 
to give up on iL 

TJie New York Tones. 


'Let’s Have 
ASumHjit t 
— Please’ 

By William S afire 

r* AN DIEGO — In a startling flip- 

President George Bush to ite lam 
Kremlin fimendwiiha “C? 

talion to Mikhail Gorbachev to a get 

1SSS35K&SS- 

SSXSZZJSEgSt' 

lead tbe world to unrealistic expecta- 
tions. Forget afl previous disparage- 
ment of phony “atmospherics. 

To underscore his earcraess for 'a 
handshake conference. Mr. Reagan 
made public his invitation to thejomt 
global photo opportunity. First Sec- 
retary Gorbachev said nothmg- 
Turning the other ch eck, the re- 
buffed presxdmt told a press confer- 
ence that protocol called tor the next 
summit meeting to take place in the 
United States, and again put o n the 
public pressure. More silence from 
tbe Soviet Union's cagey new leader. 

This week Mr. Reagan fairly got 
down on his knees. Admitting that 
“there have been no s i gn als" of ac- 
ceptance. he pleaded through report- 
ers with the bard-to-get Russian. The 
date “depends on Gorbachev . 

when it could be convenient for him. 

Why, Mr. Gorbachev would not 
even have to make a special trip. In ti. 
times past,” offered the prendan.-** 
raffing to a supine fallback position, 

“the head of state of the Soviet Union 

has come to the opening of the Unit- 
ed Nations. If that is convenient for 
him, I certainly wouldn't see any rea- 
son why that wouldn’t be for us." In 
other words, if Mr. Gorbachev will 
not come to Washington on a state 
visit, Mr. Reagan is hoping to be 
squeezed ~n«n the Soviet leader's busy 
schedule at the United Nations in 
New York this fall perhaps between 
the Caban and Nicaraguan leaders. 

Why all this uncharacteristic beg- 
ging for the pleasure of another su- 
perpower's company? Mr. Reagan's 

X to hold hands has fed to a sig- 
inl weakening of his position 
on Russian violations rtf past arms 
agreements: What used to be. bis 
painted objections to the placement 
of battfe-management radar and the 
encryption rtf missile telemetry that 
mocks the ABM treaty has, over-., 
night, become mere “language prob- f. 
Lems between our two countries." 

The killing of a US. army major, 
coldly justified by the Kr emlin in its 
jet-shootdown mode, does not coed 
the suitor's ardor for a summit ses- 
sion. Tt would make me mac anx- 
ious logo to one," Mr. Reqgan said. 

Mr. Reagan is not the first leader 
to adopt the notion that basic differ- 
ences m interests could be overcome 
by the warmth of human understand- 
ing. When Winston Churchill first 
f or a “parley ai the summit" in 
ISO, be HittiwTtwI * {Beets 


dy contested by hordes of 
.experts ana affidafe drawn up in 
yast, cumbrous anay." John Kenne- 
dy in 1959, brforehe learned better, 
won tbe hearts of die hopeful by 
saying, “R is far better that we meet 
atthe summit than at the brink." 

celebrate the 40th annm ra a - 


N 


A Case for 'Iron Fist’ : Israel Is Entitled to Security 

EW YORK — Israel’s “iron 


fist" policy in southern Leba- 
non — responding to terrorist attacks 
against its military personnel with 
Large-scale shelling, mass arrests and 
the rating of bouses — is arousing 
considerable moral indignation in 
America and Western Europe, even 
among Israel’s friends. Since Israeli 
military sources have suggested that 
the “iron fist" may soon look like a 
“velvet glove” compared to what is in 
store if terrorism in and from Leba- 
non continues or heightens, a second 
look at what is actually happening cm 
the ground would seem in order. 

Israel has a dual goal in Lebanon: 
to withdraw its military in an orderly 
fashion (although it does not intend 
to have the pace of the pullback dic- 
tated by terror) and to secure its 
northern border. This second con- 
cern — to protect the Galilee region, 
home to 10 percent of the country’s 
3 ulation, from Katyusha rocket al- 
and other shelling from Leba- 
non — was the principal aim of the 
Israeli invasion in 1982. 

In the three years since. Jerusalem 
has abandoned the political aspira- 
tion that attended that undertaking: 
the installation of a “friendly,’ pro- 
Western government in BeiruL That, 
it seems, was simply not to be. Israel 
is now focused on far more limited 
security-related concerns. Because of 
this, the “iron fist" policy has over- 
whelming public support in Israel 
It should not be hard to under- 


By Eric M. Breindel 


stand tbe wish to be free from tbe 
danger of constant shelling. How, af- 
ter all, would Americans want Wash- 
ington to respond if the northern tier 
of their country, from Buffalo to Se- 
attle, was subjected to persistent 
rocket attacks from bases in Canada? 
If diplomatic remonstrations with 


100 men were taken 
dotting — from one small village, 
all and their “repression” is abating. Shiite groups throughout the re- : 
Americans, in particular, should un- giou now stage some .70 attacks in 
derstand that the fury of dm Leba- week an the withdrawing Isadfe - 


ry Of Yalta, oar palpitating shetpas 
shook! ¥ecaH certain summit lessons: 
- • The meeting should be for the 
sake a& the subject, not vice versa. 
ia Tlnngr£fce treaties with regards to 
•fishmg rights ...” offers Mr. Rea- 


well beyond ample 


ncse Shiites 
resentment 
What if things get worse in south-, 
era Lebanon? In the 1970s, when d- 
Fatah prevailed and rocket fire from 


The search for poUtkaL accommodation is over; 
the goal today is simply freedom from assault. 


Ottawa and the Canadian provincial 
governments proved fruitless, surely 
Americans would wish the U.S. mili- 
tary to take whatever steps necessary 
to render the endangered cities, ana 
the lives of the people who dwell in 
them, free from fear and violence. 

Israel’s critics have noted with iro- 
ny that Israeli soldiers are bong at- 
tacked by Shiites — the very people 
who so warmly welcomed them on 
their arrival in 1981 What does this 
signify? True, the Israelis are now less 
popular than they were among cer- 
tain radicalized factions of southern 
Lebanese. People everywhere tend to 
resent living under alien rule. But the 
lerrorism on the rise now may have at 
least as much to do with Lebanese 
domestic politics, Libyan aid and 
Khomeini ideological inspiration as 
with the Israeli occupation. 

The Israelis are withdrawing, after 


its bases caused the people of Galilee 
to spend ranch time in underground 
shelters, it was not uncommon to 
hear militar y officials, tnclnHmg the 
late Defease Minister Moshe Dayan, 
speak of the possibility — - if all else 
failed — of rendering “Fatahland" 
uninhab itable. Sinrilariy drastic no- 
tions are a g ain heard among TVadin 
in government and the military 
Critics ask what could justify such 
extreme measures. Last week a sui- 
cide car-bomb assault killed 12 Israe- 
li soldiers and wounded 14 others. 
Israelis responded with an attack 
against tbe Suite village of Zrariyah 
— not, it was emphasized, in reprisal 
but because intelligence had estab- 
lished that the town had became a 
terrorist base. Vast quantities of arms 
and ammunition were recovered . >10 
less than 34 Shiite guerrillas were 
Iritlad in the gun battle and more than 


kibe “iron fisT approach a mood 
or even tactical wra^ His difficult 
to im ag in e bow the; aspiration .to 
withdraw an occupying army peace- , 
fully, or to. cxqoy asecure Croatia; 
can be deemed iffegitimate. .. 

Straightforward gmmmirfnwit* 
— warnings, if you will — have been 
issued .from Jerusalem time and 
again, making dear to the Lebanese 
that Israel now wants nothing more 
than security in the north. The search 
for political accommodation is over; 
the goal today is simply freedom 
from assault. Must Israel once a g ain 
be judged by a moral standard so 
uniquely harsh that it does not even 
include the right of self-defense? 

The writer is adjunct professor of 
international relations at Georgetown 
University. .He contributed Ms com- 
ment to The New York Tqnes. 


Letters intended far publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and ■ 
an subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited man us c rip ts 


. . . these could be 
osably by a summit” 
sort of treaty-entreating makes the 
■ • president a diplomatic meruficanL 
. • An unstructured get-together 
nourishes the w rongheaded notion 
that the real differences between the 
two powers are rooted only in rnimry . 
derstandmgx The red trouble is not 
lack of communication, it is the Sovi- 
et desire to dominate. f - 

• Only negotiations beforehand 
can prevent ' i mssnYe* “When a chief 
of state or head of government makes 
afuntiile,”wroteDtanAcheson,“the 
goal line is open b ehind him." 

• The side that presses for a meet- 
ing weakens its position. When Presi- 
dent Nixon mined Haiphong harbor 
before the. 1972 s ummi t conference, 
he showed his willingness toforgo tbe 
routing in Moscow; the Russians 
showed that they wanted detente 
more, and Mr. Nixon went m with 

tbe psychological upper hand Later, 'Utri 
during Watergate, it was Mr. Nixon ’ 
who needed summit rafts , and the 
advantage was with -de Soviets. The 
side that shows it wants the meeting 
more suffers tor its political needs. 

At fids moment rt is Mr. Gorba- 
chw, not Mr. Reagan, who needs 
added legitimacy. The U.S. leader, by 
c^Bg^wameetirttanywherie.any- 
tnuc, daneatB his office and under- 
cul& his negotiating position. 

'• The New York Times. . 


'Star Wars’ Together 

Regarding the opinion column “The 
Strategic Concept Behind U.S. Aims 
in Geneva ” (March I5i: 

Paul H. Nitze says that “the U.S. 
objective for the next decade is a 
radical reduction in the power of ex- 
isting and planned offensive nuclear 
arms." This radical reduction is to 
be sought while the United States 
is engaged in research on space weap- 
ons that are capable of destroying 
nuclear missiles in flight. 

If, during the next decade, the Rus- 
sians have reason to believe that the 
United Slates is forging ahead to- 
ward its goal of placing defensive 
weapons in space, how can they be 
expected to agree to a reduction in 
offensive weapons? They will have to 
prepare for the worst: a unilateral 
breakthrough by the United Stales. 
Mr. Nitze does not discuss this perti. 

If ii is inie that the United States 
would like to have a radical reduction 
in offensive weapons, the way to get 
it is to invite the Soviet Union to 
participate in U.S. research on defen- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


sive weapons. The Russians would be 
expected to accord the same right to 
U.S. researchers. The British and the 
French might be brought in on the 
same terms. A joint international 
effort of this kind would assemble 
a richer combination of brains and 
experience than any angle nation 
could. And all parties could rest 
assured that no one would be gaining 
a unilateral advantage. 

Without such an invitation, few 
will believe (and certainly not the 
Russians) that the United States has 
no sinister objective in hastening its 
“star wars 1 " research. 

JJ». MORRAY. 

Eguiiles. France. 

Outbid the Crooks 

The United States has invested 
much money and effort in combating 
drug production in South America 
and Mexico. Could it not use the 
money to buy the crops from the 
peasants, offering higher prices than 
the drug dealers and then simply de- 
stroying the crops? Why wait until 


processing has converted low-cost 
raw matoial into high-cost finish ed 
products and enormous amnnnLs of 
cash are involved? At least this solu- 
tion would raise the standard rtf liv- 
ing of ^tin American farmers, at 
present in dire need of aid. Some may 
question the act of a government ptxr- 
ahasing a crop and then destroying it, 
but has not the same government 
paid fanners not to plant? 

FRANCISCO OLIVARES. 

Bern. 

About Mozambique 

Regarding the report “Mozam- 
bique s Struggle: Now It's for Surviv- 
al A (Feb. 12) by Glam FraikeL 
About 20,000 Portuguese stayed 
on in Mozambique. The new authori- 
ties did not alfew the others to take 
away much of value; secority mea- 
sures during departure were strict 
I am among those who kept work- 
ing in Mozambique, gam] 
pragmatism would one day prevail. I 
would like to stress the importance to 
die economy of the presence of the 


above-mentioned 20,000 Portuguese. 
Mozambican authorities and flic pco- 
ple are so aware of tins that we Portu- 
guese are tnated there as natkmak. 

A. DIAS da CUNHAi 
Lisbon. 

The nmoit reads in many passages 
like a handout of Mozambique's 
Marxist government Mr. Frenkel 
claims that there were only 12 umvw- 
sity graduates when the Portngnese 
left in 1975. The first university was 
opened in Lonrcngo Marques, as Ma- 
puto was then known, in 1964, and in 
1972 there were 2,140 students. 

GILBERT V_D. AUE. 


America dates back just a few hon- 
££ a r ye 2 I ? T » faraway society that 
has lived isolated much of the time. 
He mamtams that there are no Eu- 
ropean national heroes in the 38th or 

_iwn centimes comparable to Wash- • 
mgoo, J^asonmid Lincoln. Whal 
Disradi, Talleyrand;* 

Mewenui* Bamank. 



Europe and America 

Regarding ’"Oardying the Europe- 
an View of America” (instgfrts, Feb. 

IS) by Peter J. Parish: ; 

The writeris 'disappointed that Eu- ' 
ropeans knew sp. UtiJe of American 

but Americans tajpw^ ^even 
t their European forerun- 
ners. European civilization 
across 2^X)0 dramatic years, whereas 


vnroRiNOBErnLL ■ 

* Athene 

Kennedy’s Politeness 

« rl > ** opinion wham 

hfe. Satire claims that the CuhaU 

“^^osis jras caused by John 
^^Vsprtiteness to Nikita Khrit 

GtpliaaCd are 50 . siffr that the i Ufit 

^toatiarkthe^ to a S5^ 

• ^^^CBSOSHAW, 




B 










S *29,1985 


RmllQCTrtirane . 

WEEKEND 


Page 7 



. • *. 








Equality 


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taging a Political Message 


by Rosette C Lamont 

■', ■y EW YORK — The speedy 
- I Broadway demise earlier tins sea- 
■ %| son of the American adaptation 
N of “Accidental Death of an Anar- 
Dario Fo’s improvisational political 
an on the brutal police defenestration 
. aspect in a terrorist bombing in Milan, 
to the larger question of the precarious 
.. i of politics and drama, 
spite its success in Italy, where Fo’s 
: ran for two years, and its enthusiastic 
don in London and Paris, it appears 
the New Yoric failure of the play that 
s are easier to translate than their, ech- 
d the mind Bottled for export, some 
yncratic rixcn tn stances may travel as 
.» as the regional wines of Europe, 
e we in America too far removed in 
• and spirit from the violent, grotesque 
exice sketched by the Italian dramatist 
iat he calls “a farce of powers Do we 
didacticism even when it masquerades 
r conunedia deJTarte downing? Do we 
t that a serious message may put on an 
' disposition? Or have we become alto- 
sr nnreceptive to plays with a political 


’ tcrc are those who believe that Amen- 
. political theater is a thing of the past, 
s are “the fervent years” of the Group 
‘ iter. Who are the heirs today of Clifford 
, s, Elmer Rice, Robert Sherwood, Paul 



• Steinbeck's 

latized, and Marc BHtzstein’s proletar- 
' agitprop musical drama, “The Cradle 
' Roekrwas performed despite a barrage 
" roduction btms. 

•« political complexities of the postwar 
s gave birth to their own brand of re- 
'israte, politically committed dramatur- 
' 'The afterglow of this awareness can be 
,-cted in the plays of Arthur Miller, for 
aple. In “The Crucible.” his most explic- 
mmentary an the McCarthy era. Miller 
-ted the ways in which the social fabric of 


a country can be unraveled by ideological 
hysteria. 

One feature is common to self -declared 
political plays: In them propa ganda an d 
literature are inextricably mixed. Such plays 
may indeed be on the wane in the U. S. 
theater today, but that doesn’t mean that 
politics has disappeared from the theater. 
There is a land of theater where politics still 
{days an essential part, although it is embed- 
ded below the surface — or is implicit in the 
cultural or social commentary of the plays. 
Much of what we take for granted about our 
culture, we have learned, is imbued with 
political assumptions and values. As Rich- 
ard Gilman writes in his introduction to 
“New Plays USA 2”: “Political . . . to do 
with the organization of life, the cnrmrmnni 
area of values.” In plays which suggest a 
political vision in this indirect way, the mes- 
sage is no longer is the text, but in the 
subtext 

One of the great modem masters of the 
dramatized subtext is Anton Chekhov, the 
creator of the non-event tragicomedy, a 
gone winch foreshadowed our mid-century 
metaphysical forces. In Chekhov’s mood 
plays action is replaced by rippling under- 
currents and the key episodes ofthe protago- 
nists’ fives occur somewhere offstage. 

Chekhov grew up with the conviction that 
the way to freedom lay in “squeezing the 
slave out of oneself, drop by drop.” But he 
never belonged to a political party, nor re- 
vealed radical leanings. He thought of him- 
self as a chronicler of society, bat refused to 
draw ideological conclusions. By now, from 
the distance of time, it has become dear that 
his plays portray more than the stasis of 
individual characters — that they evoke, 
through those characters, a condition of the 
larger society — the inertia that pervaded 
Russia under the rigid autocracy of Alexan- 
der IH when censorship squelched civic ini- 
tiative and life become hopelessly stagnant 
Watching “The Cherry Orchard^ or ‘‘’Three 
Sisters” requires of the audience a new way 
of listening. In these dramas, there Is power- 
fill political consciousness, but the full 


meaning emerges only after one has read or 
sees the plays. 

The same can be said of a contemporary 
playwright who has often erroneously been 
called apolitical, Samuel Beckett In man y of 
his plays, the political significance, indeed, 
has to be inferred from the overt content. 
But in others, it is more evident. For exam- 
ple, in his short one-act play “Catastrophe,” 
written for the Czechoslovak dissident writer 
Vaclav Havel when the latter was held in jail, 
we are shown P (the Protagonist) standing 
mute and motionless upon a cube while the 
Female Assistant of the Director is prep 
ing him for her boss’s approval. While the 
latter paces nervously, afraid of missing “the 
caucus.” the young woman proceeds to re- 
move P’s cap, robe, and to roll up his trou- 
sers until his moulting head, gmariafi»H 
frame and twisted, gnarled hands are re- 
vealed. But, when aQ is set, something utterly 
unexpected takes place. Slowly, P raises his 
bent head and peerc out with a steady gaze. 
By this single gesture, be conveys man’s 
irreducible spirit, the triumph of the individ- 
ual conscience over a tyrannical regime that 
would crush it if it could. 

One of the dictionary definitions of catas- 
trophe is “an event ove rturnin g the order or 
system of things.” Beckett suggests in mini- 
malist term? that the individual can and 
must struggle against the boundless cruelty 
of ideological tyranny. Although nothing in 
the text tells ns so, the ima ge on the stage 
sends a clear si g nal, one that transcends 
language. 


HE political substratum in non-pro- 


fTIHEpt 

■ pagam 
J- cipher 



ario Fo. 


UdtrHoAon 


cGstic plays can be easier to de- 
cipher with the passage of time. From 
the perspective of a few decades, we can see 
the plight of Willy Leman in “Death of a 
Salesman” as revealing the conditions of this 
America . — its ruthlessness, its merciless 
individualism, its lade of humane values. As 
we get closer to our own time, and the 
political structures in which we live become 
less clear, the larger patterns can become 
obscured by the particular drama enacted 
before us. Bat that is the effort required by 
many recent plays, as contemporary Ameri- 
can writers, particularly those who belong to 
the post-Vietnam War generation, have be- 
gun to acquire mastery of the subtext and the 
subliminal message. 

In the works of many younger dramatists, 
America is portrayed as a strange country, 
mad and violent, greedy for material gains, 
and metaphysically blind. In Sam Shepard’s 
“True West,” Austin, the Abel turned Gain 
by his wicked brother’s disquieting, destruc- 
tive presence, proc e eds to strangle that 
brother with the cord of a ripped-oui tele- 
phone. Their mother, who has just returned 
to chaos from a jaunt to Alaska, comments 
wryly as she watches the scene: “You’ll have 
to stop fighting in the house- . . You’ve got 
the whole outdoors to fight in.” 

The “whole outdoors” is the vast conti- 
nent of America. In Shepard’s plays it ac- 
quires mythic proportions. Once these open 
spaces were traversed by explorers, pioneers, 
prospectors, and settled by ranchers and 
farmers. Now, these noble American icons 
have been replaced by pitiful caricatures: 
ne’er-do-wdls, small-time thieves, impover- 
ished cowboys. Adventure, glamour, money 
have moved from the land to the corporate 
offices and Hollywood studios. Because 
there is nothing concrete to grapple with any 
longer, Shepard’s protagonists — brothers 
(“True West”), brother/sister lovers (“Fool 
for Love”) — duel with one another. 

May’s question to Eddie in “Fool for 
Love” hangs in the air, unanswered yet preg- 
nant with the deepest meaning: “Why is 
everything a big contest for you?” It is the 
question American playwrights are asking of 
America, and the contest becomes a meta- 
phor of the American condition — the poli- 
tics independent of parties of elections. 

The contest is one of the prevailing images 
on the American stage. It Iks to do with the 
“American dream” of success. Tragicomical 
in John Guare’s “House of Bine Leaves,” 

Continued on page 9 | 


Analyzing the Roles 
That Vie for Oscars 


By AJjean Harmetz 


I OS ANGELES — What kinds of per- 
formances win Oscar nominations? 
Is the film, the role, or the acting 
most important? Do the actors and 
actresses fed passionately about the charac- 
ters they portrayed? Arid do they secretly 
expect nominations? 

When the envelopes were tom open at the 
Academy Award ceremonies Monday night, 
the choices ranged from depictions of Wolf- 
gang Amadeus Mozart to a reporter for The 
New York Times, from a rich Bostonian lady 
to three women struggling to keep their 
farms. During the weeks before the Oscar 
ceremonies, all five of the women nominated 
For best actress — Sally Field, who won, 
Judy Davis, Jessica Lange, Sissy Spacek and 
Vanessa Redgrave — and /our of the men 
nominated for best actor — F. Murray Abra- 
ham, the winner, Jeff Bridges, Tom Hulce 
and Sam Waterston — shared their ft 
about the characters and movies for 
they were nominated. Albert Finney, who 
was unreachable, is quoted from an inter- 
view he gave the author in Cuernavaca. Mex- 
ico, in the summer of 1983 when he was 
filming “Under the Volcano.” 

Safly field (for her role as Edna Spalding, 
a farmer's widow in “Places in the Heart.”): 

“In my case, it wasn't just Edna. The 
script of ‘Places is the Heart’ is so well done 
that it brings more attention to the role. 
Edna is such a complex character that she 
gives the actor a lot to do. Edna has to step 
outside her own limitations to conquer the 
Thing s that happen to her. 

“Without wanting to sound overly mod- 
est, I thinlr the winning is getting the nomi- 
nation. I said the same thing when I won 
with Norma Rae, who. like Edna, had to 
adjust to changing circumstances. When it 
gets down to five actors, it’s the role that 
wins the award. Put Sissy Spacek or Jessica 
T jng e in the role of Edna Spaulding, and 
they’d' have gotten nominations. However 
wonderful Jessica was in ‘Country,’ that role 
would have been good to another actress 
too” 

Sissy Spacek (for her role as Mae Garvey, 
a strong farm woman who must fight a flood 
in “The River”): 

“At one time in my life I would have 
thought Mae Gamy was very conventional 
and unli berated in her role of wife, mother, 
center of the family. As a child. 1 would 
always talk about ‘My Career.’ My mother 
would say, ‘I’ve had a career,’ and I'd think. 
‘Oh, mother, having a family isn’t a career.’ I 
spent my first six years trying to kiss my 
elbow because some relative had told me 
that if I kissed my elbow Td turn into a boy. I 
had to wear jeans with elastic instead of 
zippers because I was a girL I couldn’t take 
my shirt off because I was a gjrL 
“1 always thought of my father, who’s a 
very strong man, as a Rock of Gibraltar. 
Four years ago my mother died and every- 
one realized she was the strength in the 
family. Not until I lost my mother and had a 
child did I understand the postion in life that 
women hold. My mother cued the day after I 
found out I was pregnant 1 had always been 
the child. Six months before. I would have 
felt, ‘What? Me have a baby? But 1 felt 
totally prepared. It was like a relay race — 
passing a baton. 1 think of my grandmother, 
my great grandmother, my daughter, my 
inddaughters. Mae Garvey was a very 
silent, loving woman who didn’t need to take 
credit for being strong. That’s why the role 
so attracted me.” 

F. Murray Abraham (for his role as Salieri, 
the envious court composer in “Amadeus”): 

“There are certain areas I won't psychoan- 
alyze. Part of acting is a mystery. Examining 
it is treading on forbidden territory. You 
know how much in demand this rede was. 
The director Milos Forman saw 1.000 peo- 
ple. I read once and I got it It was a 


phenomenon and I didn’t have a chance 
against the stars who wanted the role, and I 
got it because Milos wanted someone who 
would be identified with Salieri and not with 
any previous roles. 

“Milos has a voracious appetite for life 
and he shakes a film like a bulL He can’t 
abide an unreal moment. He’ll cut you cold 
and make you start again. That was a god- 
send to me. Milos has an eye you can trust 
and that allows you to relax. If you don’t 
trust your director, you direct yourself and 
your performance is self -conscious." 

Tom Hulce (for his role as Mozart in 
“Amadeus”): 

“For starters, it’s a fabulously written 
character. Peter Shaffer gave flesh-and- 
blood life to someone we only know as a 
deified, angelic creature of exquisite music. 
The particular challenge to me was to lake as 
many risks as 1 could imagine and not shy 
away from the controversial aspect of Mo- 
zart’s life. The fact that my performance was 
critically controversial can be attributed to 
the risks I took. Some of the negative critical 
reaction made me angry because it was as 
though the critics were seeing me in “ Animal 
House.” They didn't understand there was a 
choice being made. It would have beat easier 
to play something as literate as Peter’s script 
with an English accent and to present a 
much more conventional picture of an artist. 
It's wonderful to have made the dangerous 
choice rather than the safe choice and to be 
rewarded.” 

Judy Davis (for her role as Adela Quested, 
a young English girl forever changed by 
India in “A Passage to India”): 

“I don't know wnat on earth makes Amer- 
icans no minate performances. 1 was sur- 
prised by my nomination. I wouldn’t have 
thought my character was in enough of the 
film to be no mina ted Pe ggy Ashcroft, Victor 
Banerjee and James Fox get major scenes 
where they are set up. My character is not 
even in much of the early part of the movie. 
It sounds like we all should say why we 
should win the Oscar. Vanessa Redgrave is 
one of my favorite people, and I could find a 
better reason for bier to win than for me.” 

Vanessa Redgrave (for her role as Olive 
Chancellor, the repressed spinster feminist 
at the heart of “The Bostonians”): 

“1 feel that all I've done is play the lady 
Henry James wrote about, a lady who really 
existed. My own bluestocking spinster great 
cousin was one of the first women under- 
graduates admitted to college in London. 
Girls of a certain background were treated 
with contempt if they tried to do anything 
with their lives except marry for the right 
amount of money. Socially, there were enor- 
mous pressures to give in. They were proud 
women who were ridiculed, who were living 
in a milieu that treated them with scorn. 
Henry James wrote with an intense attrac- 
tion and intense revulsion toward all (hose 
women. I don't share James's cynicism about 
those women, but none of us tried to change 
what James wrote. The one really basic dan- 
ger for all of us actors is to try to make the 
characters we play as we would like them to 
be and not as they really are. Every woman 
would like to be courageous and not to be 
jealous or have ignoble petty feelings, but 
James traces in Olive the pettiness afi of us 
would like to avoid portraying and I try 
scrupulously to show characters in all their 
unlikable moments.” 

Albert Finney (for his role as Geoffrey 
Firnrin, a former British consul whose drink- 
ing is now his only vocation in “Under the 
Volcano”): 

“Whenever I read a script I like, I think it 
wall be so easy. It never is. He was a man who 
was suddenly very drunk, like someone un- 
der sodium pentothol and it had to be done 
straight, soggy straight with no dramatics. It 
was a very elusive thing to catch. And I’ve 
never been as witty as Geoffrey Fi rnrin or as 
capable of feeling deep pain. I fed shallow 
next to him. In order to be a character who 



Tom Hulce. 


fedad Open, Conwin frt 



Sissy Spacek in “ The River. '■ 





Sam Waterston. 


feds a deep emotion about an actress one’s 
just met, one must go into the memory vault 
and mix in a sad memory from erne’s own 
life. You pull out that little drawer labeled 
‘Broken Heart DP and it floods your system 
like Proust's dipping the madelone. 

“1 don’t regard that as a trick. As an actor,, 
you use anything you can. When I was doing' 
Hamlet at the National Theater in 1975, my 
father died after the second preview. The 
next night all that stuff about Hamlet’s far 
ther became, for two previews, impossible to 
say without weeping. After that, one started: 
— as an actor — to use iL” 

Sam Waterston (for his role as The New'. 

Continued on page 9 




•L 


rench Revival for Thermal Purgatory 



ARIS — The French like to sit in 
yj water and to saB across it- They are 
not keen cm drinking it, possibly 
“ because for so long water was asso- 
Wl with penitential cures at spas, “a re- 
tool for purgatory,” as Madame de S4vi- 
5 wrote from Vichy. 

Rk cures have became less drastic in the 
1 50 years and, since World War II iher- 

Mary Blume 

ibsme, as the French call it, has steadily 
ogressed, with the number of curistes al- 
ast doubling in the last 10 years. 

.The spur has been the French S4cnnt6 
dale, or national health system, which 
imburses recognized cures on the basis of a 
aple letter from the curiste's physician. 
Recent increases wmb that some curistes 


will be reimbursed not only Tor the cost of 
tiie cure but also for most of their travel and 
hotel expenses. Since French companies usu- 
ally consider cures as side leave, an employee 
can still take die five- week summer holiday 
as well “Of coarse very few people stoq? to 
such behavior,” says a representative of the 
Sy dicat National des Etab K ssements Ther- 
maux. Of course. 

Until recently applications had to be sent 
to the Steuriti Sociale by April 1 and so 
there was a flurry of activity and advertising 
from competing spas in February and 
March. Even without the deadline, this is 
still the time when interest in watering places 
is at its height: Many arejost reopening after 
the winter hiatus and those few people who 
want to finagle a free p re- vacation in order 
to get in form for the real summer vacation 
go shopping for the right place. 


The Institm Franqais d ’Architecture held 
an exhibition on French watering places, 
which has just dosed, and a few weeks ago 
there was a display at a huge exhibition 
center at which various spas did their best to 
attract the general public with brochures, 
audiovisuals and a computer that recom- 
mended a spa when informed of the subject’s 
means, maladies, favorite sports and pre- 
ferred scenery. The event was not attended 
by the Syndicat National des Etablissements 
Tbennanx. “Oor interests are medical,” said 
a representative. “We don’t care about peo- 
ple who are planning their vac a tions.” 

France has more than 100 watering places 
which divide among th*»m most human ail- 
meats. While s pefr old-fashioned afflictions 
as gout are rarely mentioned these days, go- 
ahead spas now include treatment for the 
diseases at modern life. Divonne-les-Bains 



fid* 19th-century lithograph of equipment at Aix-les Bains. 


offers a view of tranquil Switzerland and 
treats insomnia, anxiety and overwork, while 
Ussat-les-Bains has a climate and vegetation 
that are described as sedative and now spe- 
cializes in le stress as well as asthenia and 
gynecology. 

The handsome exhibition mounted by the 
Institm Francis d ’.Architecture included a 
study of spa iconography and a historical 
rfcsumfc of architectural styles (including 
neo-Byzantine and neo-Egyptian) right to 
today. Missing in the chronological survey 
was World War II, when the French govern- 
ment took a four-year cure at Vichy. 

nr ~J~ ICHY is the grandest of afl, with 12 
\j natural springs and cures for the Ever 
V and kidneys. Alphabetically, French 
watering places range from Aix-en-Provence 
(rheumatism, veins) to Vittel (liver, nutri- 
tion. kidneys). There is also the redundant 
Bains-les- Bains (heart) and little Merkwiller- 
Pechelbronn, near the German border, 
whose chief distraction is its oil museum. 

Lamartine is said to have written part of 
Ms mournful poem “Le Lac” while gwring 
from his window at Aix-les-Bains (rheuma- 
tism), a watering place also visited by Balzac. 
J. P. Morgan ana Veriaine. 

There is no French watering place with the 
beauty or literary associations of Bath in 
England. This may be because French spas 
are connected with a strictly administered 
medical cure and despite the luxury, life 
there was often deadly dull. 

“AD watering places are the same — bars 
that dispense water, bathtubs, eternal ball- 
rooms," Flaubert wrote, a statement corrob- 
orated in “Maigret & Vichy,” where Georges 
Stm enon writes, “They could have sworn 
they’d been in Vichy all eternity, while in 
fact it was only their fifth day.” 

These days there is an urgent attempt to 
brighten up spa life and to attract more 
visitors fin 1984 there were 600,000 curistes). 
Vittel now emphasizes nombermaj attrac- 
tions such as riding and jogging and tennis, 
while the Club Mediterranfe has set up its 



■ft 


Caricature by Gustave Dork for a book on spas in the Pyrenees. 


own pleasure domes in Vittel and has added 
to its usual round of distractions a health 
program called passeport pour la forme. The 
casino with adjoining theater is a classic 
diversion, and since World War n, some 
spas have gone in for music festivals, among 
them Aix-en-Provence; Divonne and Evian. 

If the baleful craze for clean living that has 
struck France has helped revitalize old wa- 
tering places, it has been more useful in 
promoting newer cures, such as thalassother- 
apy, which is based on sea, rather than 
spring, water cures and offers two advan- 
tages: a seaside setting and the fact that the 
health-giving waters need not be drunk. 

Thalassotherapy tends to be aimed at such 
modern ailments as le stress and to offer as 
diversions courses in computer science 


which might attract the diligent rising execu j 
live. A main part of the cure is seawater 
baths, to which seaweed is often added, 
giving the mixture the color and odor of a 
tubful of commercial travelers' dirty socks.' 

While old-style watering places used to 
offer punishing cures redeemed by eight- 
course meals and lavish entertammehis, tha4 
lassotherapy emphasizes relaxation and star- 
vation. Not every seawater cute includes a 
strict diet, but the better ones do, the finest 
and most fashionable being Quiberon, in 
Brittany, where the Hotel Diet&ique lives up 
to its name with elegantly presented meals 
that add up to only 800 calories a day. 

“It’s really not very much,” one steady 
customer rays. “Just enough to keep us from 
eating each other.” ■ 






iAS/aSKS -Sf J8TWW1* l"l 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2985 




TRAVEL 


,«T l’»F 


New Stars in Michelin’s Sky 


The Bly in the U.S. Wine Boom 5, l ^ 1 " 


P ARIS — The spring crop of new Michdin one-star restau- 
rants — the dry gamed 12 — offers no stunning surprises, 
but there is no doubt that non-French restaurants axe finally 
getting some establishment recognition and that the French 
are increasingly attracted to restaurants devoted almost exclusively 
to fish and shellfish. 

Gastronozmcally, the most interesting and noteworthy of the new 
stars fits into neither category. It is Manoir de Pans, the 17th 
Ammdissement sister restaurant of the La Ferme Saint-Simon, a 
restaurant in the 7th Ammdissement of which I've never been 
terribly fond. 

But the food at Manoir de Paris is wonderful and although one 
might at this stage call it a junior Jamin (the chef, Philippe Groult, 
was Joel Robuchon’s assistant for 10 years) there are plenty of light. 


Patricia Wells 


- — f t — — -- — — - — — — a vi imiumi, a super- 

simple grilled daurade served with an oursin (sea urchin) «n«» 
alongside, and a little casserole of scallops, w3d plewoue mushrooms 

anti HinoniKtinK in a ni<»1.hnM« J 1 _ T_. ■_ e 


and langoustines in a snail-batter sauce, a rich and lovely marriage erf 
land ana sea. There is also a wonderful salt-cod dish that unfortu- 


Iand and sea. There is also a wonderful salt-cod dish that unfortu- 
nately, was maned by the overpowering cubes of green pepper that 
are part of the garnish. 

The wine list is quite good, and one won't be disappointed with 


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Michdot’s 1980 Meursault Changes, honestly priced at 220 francs 
(about 522). 

Desserts show less promise. There is a rather “artisanal" gcae&u 
operd that is pretty but rather bland, and a terrible ndUefeiuBe, or 
puff pastry, filled with a dull chocolate cream and diaries that 
sparked unpleasant childhood memories of industrial, chocolate- 
covered cherries. 


by Frank J. Priai 


N EW YORK — A few years back, 
serious observers of the U. S. cul- 
tural scene hailed what they per- 
ceived as a new social phenome- 
non: the widespread acceptance of wine as a 
part of the way of life America, we were 


pact said, “you find that table wine actually 
lost nine iramon gallons last year (1983) and 
16 million gallons since 1980 ." 

Based on these figures, and chi interviews 
with wine-industry leaders and restaura- 
teurs, I would venture to say that die reports 
Of U. S. wine acculturation were not only 


told, was becoming a wiae-drinking nation. 

Those were heady days. Between 1960 ami 
1980, the consumption of table wine — the 
kind usually drunk with meals — increased 
more than sixfold. Between 1975 and 1983. 
the golden years of the wine boom, total 
wine consumption in the United States went 
from 36S naltion gallons to 529 trillion gal- 
lons. New wineries seemed to open every 
other day, wine dubs proliferated, and wine 
books tumbled off the presses. 

Then, suddenly, the euphoria was gone. 
Wine consumption continued to increase, 
but the rate slowed to a snail's pace. Two 
recessions, in 1980 and 1981 and '82, lode 
their toll; so did a heightened concern over 
health, fitness and driving while intoxicated. 

But these were not the only reasons for the 
tapering o B erf the wise boom. More impor- 
tant, perhaps, was whai appears now to have 
been a basic misunderstanding of the wine 
market. Wine drinking in the traditional 
way, with meals, was a p par e n tly not what it 
was all about in the first place. A lot of the 
wine involved — and this is still the case — 
can be considered wine only by a genuine 
effort of the wifi. The fact is that serious, 
traditional wine d rinking — anrf by that I 
mean good red wine — has been on the 
decline in this country for at least five years, 
and this in spite of tumbling prices both for 
domestic wines and and imports. 

Fine table wines, wines with elegance and 
breeding and complexity, are almost always 
red. As with great mnac or literature, it takes 
effort and patience to learn to app recia te 
them. But even ample red wines are more of 
a challenge than similar whites. They have 
body and tannin, and they are probably dry. 
which means not sweet. In other words, they, 
too, take a little getting used to. 

In its annnal American Wine Market Re- 
view and Forecast for 1984, Impact, a wine 
and spirits industry newsletter, expressed it 
succinctly: “The numbers from 1983,”' it 
reported, “once more refuted the claims that 
an increasingly sophisticated American 
wine-consuming public would soon turn 
back to red table wise.” If white wine was 
excluded from the table-wine category, fin- 


al u. S. wine acculturation were not only 
premature, ihev were mostly groundless. I 
would suggest further that the united Stales 


heavy decor, but there is a warming fireplace, and the service is 
attractive and extremely professional 

Those familiar with Robuchon’s cooking will recognize it immedi- 
ately: the same simplified but elegant presentation, the same sprin- 
kling of truffles over just about everything, the same tiny cubes of 
vegetable, even many frankly derivative dishes. The two chefs share 
many of the same suppliers, so chances are the ingredients that go 
into your meal at the Manoir will be about the finest to be found. 
Jamin it’s not • — many of the flavors are undeveloped and show a 
lack of sophistication — but it will be interesting to follow Groult’s 
development 

Some of the best dishes to sample here include the queues de 
crema tes en marmiire safran&e, prepared with fresh, not frozen, little 
shrimp bathed in a delicate sauce barely hinting of saffron - a super- 

Ctmnla rmllAil iratv .1 __ / t »_\ __ 


JL known place of its kind in Paris. Of course its popularity is no 
accident. Tan Di&h is conveniently situated in the 7th Anoadissc- 
meat, the welcome there could not be wanner, and the fresh, original, 
bright cuisine serves as a perfect foil to the daily French diet, what’s 
mare. Tan Dinh is open on Saturday night, when the city’s choke of 
restaurants is slim indeed. 

There’s almost no need to recommend specific dishes, for the 
convivial Robert Viflan will lead you through the menu, composing a 
meal that not only suits the palate of each diner, but the size of their 
appetites as welL The restaurant is justifiably renowned for its wine 
list (the list of Bordeaux, especially Pomerols, is extensive), and there 
is a very drinkable selection of less expensive wines, many priced at 
around 75 francs a bottle. 

A recent dinner there was memorably satisfying, highlighted by 
the original ravioli filled with snippets of smooth-flavored smoked 
gpose breast, a great pasta dish peppawi with a spicy shrimp sauce, 
and a superb assortment of fried spring rolls. Cnftieau Magence, a 
distinctive white Graves, is a perfect match for this lovely food. 
Viflan notes that the menu will soon undergo some changes, offering 
several new creations. 


A MONG the city’s new starred fish restaurants are Vifiars Palace 
/\ (8 Rue Descartes, Paris 5), La CagomDe (89 Roe Daguerre, 
-ZTJIl. P aris 14) and Gotanard, the grandfather of the three Gon- 
mard, just off Place de la Madeleine, is one of those large, old- 
fashioned spots — there is no doubt that you’re in a French 
restaurant with a capital F — that appeals to traditionalists. The 
decor is a tat frumpy and worn, but service is superbly professional 
and the fish delightfully fresh. 

Current offerings worth, trying include the perfectly ample grilled 
turbotin (which ought to be preceded by a platter of first-of-the- 
season asparagus saved with a commendable hoflandaise), and the 
langoustines an four, sweet and fresh and served in generous portions. 
To accompany the meal there is an old standby, Ladoucette’s 
Pouifly-Fiimfi, priced at 150 francs. 


Manoir de Paris, 6 Rue Pierre-Demours. Paris 17; let 572.25.25. 
Closed Saturday, Sunday, and July 5 to Aug. 5. Credit cards: American 
Express, Diners Club, Visa. A menu at 255 francs, not including wine or 
service. A la carte, about 350 francs a person, including wine and 
service 

Tan Dinh, 60 Rue de VemeuU, Paris 7; tel: 544.04.84. Closed 
Sunday and Aug 15 to Sept 1. No credit cards. From 200 to 300 francs 
a person (depending upon choice of wine), including wine and service 
Goumara, 17 Rue Duphot, Paris 1; tel: 260.36.07. Closed Sunday. 
Credit cards: American Express, Diners Chib, Eurocard, Visa. Fran 
250 to 350 francs a person, including wine and service ■ 


would suggest further that the United Stales 
has never beat and is not now a wine- 
drinking nation and that the jury is still out 
on whether it ever will be. 

One of the first signs that gave credence to 
the idea of transformation into a country of 
wine drinkers was the dramatic switch from 
dessert wine to table wine in the 1960s and 
70s. Domestic sherry and port, which had 
once been the staples of the American wine 
market, dropped off the charts, as they say, 
during the years when wine was becoming 
fashionable with the middle class. 

The inevitable conclusion? America had 
switched to table wines. But what do we 
mean by table wine? Basically, it is still wine 
— not bubbiv or fortified with additional 
alcohol. It has 12 percent alcohol by volume, 
more or less, and meant to be consumed with 
food If we were consuming it all with food, 
the wine-drinlring-nation theory might Stand 
up. But most of the table wine is while, and 
white wine in the United States is more a 
liquor substitute than a companion to food. 

U- S. consumption of white wine is three 
times that of red, and anyone who has been 
around people who drink wine knows that 
the most white wine is drunk as an aperitif. 


wines were made and about IBS ad]} 
gallons of white. In a 1980 survey. 8$ , 

of the French people polled said theyY 
f erred red wine with their meals and only 
percent opted for while. ’ 

Robert Mondavi, Cafiteaa 
blames the wine industry for mining a* 
cans away from red wine, "In the pw# . 

said recently, M we all made our red 
big, too strong to go with food" As a ra . 
Mondavi contends, Americans turned 
lighter whites and roses. He believes that 
industry is now on die right track an, - 
producing lighter, more ekgam reds that - 
appeal to the American taste. 

Surprisingly, most serious wtne 
are unaware erf just bow unimportant 
wines are in the American wine scene <*i 
it hard to believe that most U.S, wine dtt 
ers have not the slightest interest in red*. 
— or any serious table wine; that they 
their wine sweet and cold, regardlescf 
color, and that in many cases, u never oa 
to them to combine wine with their mca 




a* 

■ fWM . W 


■unte um 




One dissenter, and a powerful one, is 
R&J. Gallo Winery in Modesto, Calilor 
Gallo Chabtis Blanc is the largest-sd 
white wine in the United Stales, and 0 
Hearty Bureundy is the largest-selling 
wine. “We find that our wines arc drunJ 
aperitifs and then carried over to the dit - 
table,” a Gallo spokesman said. 


-■*■**• 


m 


I NDUSTRY leaders persist in the theory 
that while wine is a prdimmaiy to the 
m.tin bout, a kind of peats asmormn that 


m.tin bout. a kind of pons asmorwn that 


intelligent drinkers will cross one day to the 
world of sophisticated red-wine drinking. 
Perhaps, but when does the 


begin? In 1970, again using Impact figures, 
Americans drank just ova half a gallon of 


wine pa adult, and all but a glass or two of it 
was red. Five years lata, red wine still held 
44 percent of the table-wine market, to 32 
percent for white. But that was the last time 
they saw each other. By 1983, 61 percent of 
the wine Americans drank was white. 

In France and Italy, the figures are less 
dramatic but reversed nonetheless. In Italy 


Even so, the long-awaited crossover to 
wine remains as much a symbol as it 
hoped-for reality. It symbolizes the sw 
from wine as a social drink to wine as aj 
erf meals. And. as Impact’s figures shot \ 
just hasn't happened. 

Just as we have misconstrued the role 
white wine in thinking of it as a table w 
we have also misinterpreted the rok of. 
so-called “pop” wines in our culture. Is . 
really wine drinking? Pop wine products 
mostly cold, alcoholic drinks that use win 
a base, and they are usually faddish, set 




enormous quantities for a few years and t 
sinking back into obscurity. 

In a sense, the American love affair v 
white wine and the popularity of pop w - 
are the same thing , Americans like t 
drinks cold, simple and sweet. And even 
so-called dry whites almost always ht\ 


Sw 

Sd 


tiu 


lation wines amounted to about 145 million 
gallons of red and just under 79 million 
gallons of white, fit France the same year 
some 269 million gallons of appellation red 


so-called dry whites almost always h*\ - 
touch of sugar. “Americans," said A1 
Lichine, “are bom with refrigerators in t 
mouths." 


- w*m 


C I0S.S The Sew York Time* 


APRIL CALENDAR 


*4«*j 

ass 




VIENNA Konzerthaiis(td: 72 111 1). 
CONCERTS— April 13and 14: Vien- 
na PhiUuumomker, Andie Previn con- 
ductor, Arturo Benedetti-Micfadan- 
gdi piano (Mozart, Haydn). 

Apnl 23 : Hagen Quartet, Alfred Prim 
clarinette (Dvorak, Mozart). 

April 16: ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
Michael Giden conductor (Bach, Ja- 
nac ek). 

RECITALS — April 17: Haydn Trio, 
Thomas RieU viola (Beethoven, Mo- 
zart). 


April 21: Margaret Price soprano. 
; Norman Sheilerpiano (BrahmsL Rach- 


; N orman Sheilerpiano (Brahms, Rach- 
maninov). 

April 29: Oleg Maisenberg piano 
(Chopin, Debussy). 

•MusOcverein (teL 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS— April 7 and 8: Vienna 
Sympbomker, Leopold Hager conduc- 
tor (Bedboven, Mozart). 


BRUSSELS. Optra National (tel: 
2I7Ja.ll). 

OPERA— April 13, 19.21: “Tristan 
und Isolde” (Wagner). 

• Palais des Beaux Aits(td: 51 1 29.95). 
CONCERTS — April 5: RTBF New 
Symphony O r ches tr a. Alfred Walter 
amanctor (Martin). 

April 18: National Belgian Orchestra, 
Mend! Rodan conductor, Emil Gui- 
leles piano (Stravinsky, Tchaikovsky). 
April 24: Belgian National Orchestra. 
Mends Rodan conductor. Mstislav 
Rostropovitch, cello (Berlioz, Schu- 
mann). 

GHENT, Royal Opera (ted: 252425). 
OPERA — April 5, 7, 10. 13: “D Bar- 
biere di Sivigha" (Rossini). 

UEGE. Theatre Royal (tel: 23.59.10). 
OPERA — April ll 14. 18, 20: “Le 
Nozzedi Figaro” (Mozart). 


April 23: Scottish National Orchestra. 
Neeme Jarvi conductor, Birsdi Finnila 


JeemeJarvi conductor, Birgit Finnila 
soprano (Beethoven, Dvorak). 


April 2S: City of London Surfoma. 
Christopher Warren-Green conduc- 


Chnstopber Warren-Green conduc- 
tor/ violin. Crucian Steele- Perkins 
trumpet (Bach. Vivaldi). 


trumpet (Bach. Vivaldi). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 


speare Company — April 11-20: 

“Hamlet” (Shakespeare). 

April 25-May 1: “Richard IIL” 
•Hayward Gallery (td: 928.57.08) 


EXHIBITIONS— To April 21: “Re- 
noir,” “John Walker: Paintings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series.” 
•London Coliseum (td: 836.01.11). 
OPERA— April 2, 6, 10. 12, 18: “Fido- 
Ho" (Beethoven). 

April 4. 11. 13, 17. 19. 23, 26: “The 
Bartered Bride" (Smetana). 


phony Orchestra, Jorma Panula con- 
ductor (Maglec, Mozart). 

April 11: Helsinki Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Eri Kins conductor, Karl Leis- 
ter clarinet. (Mahler, Mozart). 

April 17 and 18: Helsinki PhiJQiarmon- 
ic Orchestra, Umberto Benederti MB- 
chdangeli conductor. Pascal Devoyon 
piano (Beethoven, Schubert). 

April 24: Radio Symphony Orchestra, 
Leif Segerstam conductor. Heinrich 
Schiff cello (Tchaikovsky). 

April 25: Helsinki Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Okko Kamu conductor, 
Emanuel Ax piano (Beethoven). 


RECITALS— Aprfl.9: Janne Marttila 
violin (Brahms, Mozart). . 

April 16: Andrei Gavrilov piano (Cho- 
pin)- 


ENGLAND 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


RECITALS— April I land 22: Daniel 
Barenboim piano (Beethoven). 

April 15: Isaac Stem violin. 

•ThHtre des Champs Elystes (tel: 
723.47.77). 

CONCERTS — New Philharmonic 
Orches tra — April 5: Peter Schneider 
conductor (Strauss). 

April 12: Emil Tchakarov conductor, 
Natalia Gutman Ceflo (Berlioz, Schu- 
mann) 

Orcbotre National de France —April 
3: Esa Pekka Salonen condnctor.Sal- 
•vatorc Accardo violin (Reger, Stravin- 
sky). 

April 10 and 11: KuttSanderiing con- 
ductor. Stephen Bishop-Kovaccvich 
piano (Brahms, Tchaikovsky). 
•Theatre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.19.83). 

BALLET — Maurice Bqart 20th Cen- 
tury Ballet — April 3-7. 9-1 1, 13. 14: 
“Notre Faust" (Bach). 

April 17-21.23-28: “Le Conconrs." 


Vladimir Ddman conductor (I 


RECITAL— April 10: Paul Tort- • 
cello, Maria de la Pan piano (E . ■. 
Tortelier). 

GENOA. Teatro Marghcrita t 
58.93.29). 

OPERA — April 2,4, 9, 11, 14: “A V 
(Verdi). 

April 26 and 28: “Andrea Cbfr- 
(Giordano). . J - 

TURIN. Royal Kdacefrd: 839.88 
EXHIKTHON— ToMay 21- “q 
ly LifeinRajasthanScenThrouj - 
man Miniature Paintings Iron 
XVII to XDC Centuries." 

•Teatro Regio(td: 54^0.00) ■ 

OPERA— April 2. 4, 9. 11, 14. If - 
"TaneredP* (Rosssini). 

April 19-21, 23, 24, 27, 28; “The , - 
rered Bride" (Smetana). 




JAPAN 


April 18: Warsaw Bomns Consort, 
Mardn Szczydnslri conductor (Polish 


Mardn Szczydndri conductor (Polish 

Bwnim nw mnw) 

April 19: ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
Michael Giden conductor, Gabrida 
Benadcova-Cap soprano (Beethoven). 
April 20 and 21: Vienna PhOhannoa- 
Dccr, Andrt Previn conductor (Debus- 
sy, Ravd) Sl Louis SynqiluHiy Or- 
aiestra, Leonard siatirm conductor, 
Emanuel Ax piano (Bernstein, Mo- 
zart). 

•Staatsoper (teL 53240). 

BALLET — April 3: “Swan Lake" 


(Narcyev.Tdi 
April 8 and 13: 


“The STeqjmg Beauty” 


an Without a 


1 and 4: “The Worn- 
flow” (R. Strauss), 
taifai" (Wagner). 


BOGIUM 


ALDEBURGH, Snape Mailings Con- 
cert Hall (teL 35431 
CONCERTS — Brtnen-Pears Orches- 
tra — April 5: Philip Ledger oondnetor 

April 8: Tamas Vasary conductor- 
/piano. Heather Harper soprano (Bee- 
thoven, Mozan). 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican Art Gallery — To April 8: 
“Munch and the Workers,” “T radition 
and Renewal: Contemporary Art in 
the German Democratic Republic.” 
To April 14: “Mahler, Vienna.” 
Barbican Hall — London Symphony 
Orchestra — April 3: Claudio Abbado 
conductor (Debussy, Mahler). 

April 4 and 8: Peter Schkkde conduc- 
tor (Bach). 

Apnl 25: Jane doverconductor, Imo- 
gen Cooper piano (Beethoven. Mo- 
zart) 

April 2: London Concert Orchestra, 


EVIAN INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL 


GERMANY 


In its 10th year, this Freochfestival will 
ronfrom April 4-13. Itfeatures iheltd- 
Jowing events: 


TOKYO, Azabn Museum ( 
582.14.10) 


ITS — April 4and5: Euncqje- 
an Chamber Orchestra, Paavo Berg- 
luod conductor. Barbara Hendricb 
soprano (Banok, Haydn, Mozart). 
April 6: French Youth Orchestra, Em- 
manuel Krrvine conductor, Olivier 
Chariier violin (Schubert, Webern). 
April 7: Orchestre des Pays de Savoie, 
Kenneth Gilbert conductor (Bach). 
April 8: Tahch Quartet (Beethoven. 
Janaeek). 

April 9: French Youth Orchestra, Em- 
manuel JCrivine conductor, Claudio 
Arrau piano (Beethoven. Berikxz). 
April 10 and 11: Pc£sh Chamber Pbfl- 
harmomc, Wqdech Raj ski conductor. 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

BALLET— April 9 and 29: “Coppfr- 
lia”(DeEbes). 

April 1 1: “Las Hermanns" (MacMB- 
lan, Martin). 

OPERA— April 1, 12, 15, 28: “Fide- 
Ko” (Beethoven). 

Aprfl2: “LaBofeme" (Puccini). 

April 5, 8, 14: “Siegfried" (Wagner). 
April 16 and 19: “The Flying Dutch- 
man" (Wagner). 

April 18 and 22: “Ariadne anf Naxos" 
(Strauss). 


To April 28: “Masterpieces of UV_ 
EPamtiire.” 


•Japan Folk Craft Museum ' 
467.45^7). 

EXHIBITION— To June23: “C ' . 
of North Eastern Districts," 
•Okura Shukokan Museum ( . 
583.07.81). : : 

EXHIBITION — To April 21: V 
Itoyama Taikan: A Modem Japa 
Style Painter." 

•Yamatane Museum (td: 669. 40. r 
EXHIBITION —To May 10: : 

temporary Japanese Painting." / 


* .i ti 


• :m j-.? 

• . ni 


Mstislav Rosfropovich ceDo (Haydn, 
Stravinsky. Tchmkovdcy). 


ANTWERP, EHsabethzaal (td: 237. 


Adey conductor, Craig 
Shqppaidpiano (Ravd, Rossini). 
April 6: London Concert Orchestra, 
Robert Ziegler conductor. Axur 
Mackay soprano (Bach. Handel). 


22.47). 

CONCERT — 


CONCERT — April 23: Belgian Na- 
tional Orchestra. Mendi Rodan con- 
ductor, Mstislav RostropcmLch cello 
(Beethoven. Haydn). 

• Royal Flemish Opera (tel: 
233.6cL85). 

OPERA— April 5, 6, 12, 14: "Parsifal" 
(Wagner). 


April 13: Polish Chamber Philhar- 
monic, Wqjtiech Rqski conductor. 
Paul Badura Skoda piano (Mozart). 



Claudio Arrau. 


April 9: New Symphony Orchestra, 
VdemTansky conductor (J. Strauss). 


April 13: English Chamber Orchestra, 
Yehudi Mennhin conductor, Jos6- 
Luls Garda violin (Bach). 

April 15: Royal PfaBharxoonkiOrdiesr 
tra, Peter Gdlhora conductor, Marga- 
ret Bruce piano (Brahms, Mozart). 


•Royal Opera (tel: 240.10.661 
BALLET — April 1: “Fndmd" (Fo- 
kme, Stravinsky), “Return to the 
Strange Land" (KyliAn, Janacek), 
“New Ballet Iw Michael Grader" 
(Cordcr, Profokrev). 

April 30: “The Sleeping Beauty" (Pe- 
ri pa , Tchaikovsky). 

OTERA— Amfll6,9, 12, 15, 17,20: 
, “Don Carlo" (Verdi). 

April 13. 16, 19,23.26: “Ludadi Lam- 
mennoor" (Donizetti). 


SOUTH TYROL 


•Tare GaUny (td: 821.13.131 
EXHIBITIONS — TO April 14: “St 
Ives 1939-64." 

To Jane 2: “The Political Paintings of 
Meriyn Evans ( 19 10-1973). 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS— To April 14: “MI- 


DOLOMfTIS ■ ITALY 


PARIS. American Church (tel: 
705.07.99). 

RECITAL — Anil 21 : Laura na Mit- 
chcimore piano (Badi. Scariaiti)- 
• Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277.12J31 ■ 

EXHIBITION —To April 27: “Archi- 
tectural Trends." 

To May 10: “Image and Science." 

•La Maison de Sciences de 1 "Homme 


CONCERTS — Berlin Radio Sym- 
phony Orchestra — April 1: Rkxardo 
OrnUy conductor, Vladimir Ashken- 
azy piano (Bartok, Bruckner). 

April 7 and 8: Mstislav Rostropovich 
conductor (Beethoven). 

Berlin Symphony Orchestra— April 4 
and 5: Hans HUsdorf conductor 
(Bach). 

April 6: Borislav Ivanov conductor 
(Beethoven, Dvorak). 

ApriI27: Ernst Mflrzendorfer conduc- 
tor (Mozart, PonlencX 
April 28: Berlin Stumo (Mr, Eddy 
Rhein condnctor (Brahms). 
HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
35.1555). 

BALLET —April 4, 6. 7. 9: “Giselle" 




MONTE-CARLO, Centre de Con ' ■ — ■' 
ftd: 50.76JS4). 

CONCERT — Mont^Cado 
monic Orchestra — April 14: L 
rence Foster conductor, Danid Ba 
boim piano (Tchaikovsky). . i 
April 17: Jean-Ffene Wallez oorafi}-* 
tor. HerveBDIaol piano (Brahms, U 

KE&TAL— April 9: Fredbrika ‘ v - 
Stade mezzo-soprano, Lanrana R. r ■ 
chelmore piano (Mahkr, Ravd). 
•Chapelie de la Visitation (;-.., 
S0.76i4). ‘-- , - 


- art 
" -“tyw 
,' r : Va-'xt 


Kteto 

urA 

tim 


(te a 




-• • ' '-L.» 


The south of South Tyrol 

offers to you spring in ail its beauty. 

And In the new price catalogue, the * 
’85 holiday adviser, 
with 120 multico 
loured and plea 
sant pages, innu 
merable opportu 
nities for merry 
holidays, and 
many intere 
sting special 
offers as well. 

Please ask 
immediate 
ly for 
sending 
you 
gratui- 
tously 
the '86 fioii 
day adviser 


Constantinople: watercolours by 
Amadeo, Count Preriosi (1816-1882). 


•Wigmore Hall (td: 93521.41) 
CONCERTS — April I: Su 


Stanford 


String Quartet (Beethoven, Schubert). 
Aprill 3: New Chamber Orchestra of 


Stockholm, Iona Brown conductor 


EXHIBITION — April 15-27: “Mi- 
chael O’Dwyer,” photographs. 

• Librairie-galerie dn Jour (td: 233. 
43.40). 

EXHIbi l iON — To April 20: “Jean- 
Midhd Pradhomme." 

•Musted’Art et Essai (td: 26039261 
EXHIBITION —To April 22: “Od£ 
kmRcdoo-" 

•Mtuee de la Publicity (td: 246. 
13.09). 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: 
“French Film Posters.” 

•Mus&e du Grand Palais (tel: 


OPERA — April 4: "The Barber of 
Seville" (Rossini). 

April IS: “Tsar und 25mmennan” 
(Lortzing). 

April 23 flnd27: “Don Carios" (Verdi). 
April 28: “Othello" (Verdi). 
MUNICH, Gdrtneiplatz State The- 


50.76^4). 

CONCERT— April 5: Quatuor .. 

Nova (Haydn). , 

•Opera House (td: 50.76^4). T .- 
London Festival BaBet — April 6 -.', - i 


• --V-t 

t JC-r-. v 


•M 90 




I Umr 


“Etudes" (Lander. 
April7:“LaSylphi' 


& 

I' vtm i 


■ter (tel: 201.67.67). 
BAI1ET— April H 


BALLET— April 10 and 12: “Coppfi- 
lia” (Delibes). 

OPERA — April 2: “Don Giovanni" 
(Mozart). 


•Theatre Princesse Grace (t 
50.76^4). 

RECITALS — April 6: Henri; ' 


Gartner piano (Debussy. HaydnL . - • i-. 
April 13: JanuszMoaaidn bass, 
eeue Dedieu- Vidal piano (Chp|'^ 


m 


April 4: “DieZauberflOie" (Mozart). 
April 29: “Le Nozze di Figaro” (Mo- 
zart). 

OPERETTA — April 8. 14. 24, 26: 


Schubert). 


am MVMM 

<Jw 

« s «4».4Sl 
rfte m m 



April 27: BrodsicySaingQuartet(Bee- 
tho ven, Menddssohn). 
RECITALS— April 4: Marc Ponthos 
piano (Brahms Chopin). 

April 10: George Malcolm harpsi- 
chord (Bach). 

April 14: Sylvia lindcastrand sopra- 
no, Geoffrey Parsons piano (Liszt, Si* 
bdius). 

April 26: John Mills. Raymond Buricy 
guitar (Ravd, Vivaldi). 

April 28: Maggie Cole harpsichord. 
Nogel North tale (Bach). 

NORWICH, Theatre Royal (tel: 
28205). 

OPERA —April 2 and 6: “The Barber 
of Seville" (Rossini). 

April 3: “The Marriage of Figaro” 
(Mozart). 

April 4: “King Priam” (Tippett). 


261.54.10V. 

EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: 

“Edouard Pignon.” 

To April 22: “Impressionism and the 
French Countryside." 


Lake"(Ti 
April 6: 1 
sky). 


tolze, Tchaikov- 


•Mu^edu Louvre (tel: 260.3926). 
EXHIBITIONS— To April 15: “H 


EXHIBITIONS —To April 15: “Ho- 
bdnai the Louvre.” 


To May 6: “French Engraven from the 
XVlfl Century." 


Mnstedu Poit Palais (tel: 742.03.47). 
EXHIBITION — April 5- June 30: 
“James Tissot: 1836-1902." 


ATHENS, Center for Folk An and 
Tradition (tri; 324 J9 .87V 
EXHIBITION —To May: “Folk Art 
and ^ Tradition of Thrace. 


STOCKHOLM, Concert Hall 
22.18.00V 

CONCERTS — Stockholm PhiB J’ 
momc Otdiestra — April 11: P* ■ 
Betgluqk conductor, Salvatore : . 
carao violin (Schubert, Sibdias). ■ 
April 24 ana 25: Silvio Varviso c 
ductor. Hdena DOse soprano. Sy 

Lindensuand alto (Verdi). 

AprDIO: Stockholm ChamberOrd . 
tra, Iona Brawn conductor (fir,, - 
Tchaikovsky). •. 


<«ii ! 


? r Jr‘ 




1MK3 


•Mnsee Rodin (td: 705.01.34). 
EXHIBITION— To April 15: “Rob- 
ert Jacobsen." 

•Optra (id: 74157.50). 

OPERA — April 2, 4. 5. 8. 11, 18, 22: 
“Wa 2 zcck"(Bcrg). 


April 17, 20, 23, 30: Akcste (Ghick). 
•Salle Gaveau(tel: 563_2030), 
RECITAL — April 18: Anne Queffe- 
lec piano (Bach, Mozart). 

•Salle Pleyel (563.07.961. 


April 11: “Vassi- 

lis Kypraios." 

•Nees Morphea Gallery (tel: 
361.61.65). 

EXHIBITION —To April 20: “Pan- 
ayiotisTetsu.” 

•OraGaBey (tel: 323.06.98). 
EXHIBITION — To April 16: 
“ChissaVoudourogloti.” 


UMTID STATU 




TOURIST1K KOMITEE 
RATHAUS, 1-39040 AUER 
Tel. 0471/80231 


HELSINKI. Finlandia Hall (tel: 


40241). 

CONCERTS —April 3: Radio Syro- 


•StdleHwd (563.07.961. 
CONCERTS — April 17-19: Or- 
chestra de Paris, Danid Barenboim 
conductor, Itzhak Perlman violin 
(Bach, Beethoven). 

April 26: OTChestre National de 
France, Colin Davis conductor (Berii- 
oz). 


ITALY 


NEW YORK. Guggenhdm Muse •• , 
(td: 36035.00). ; \t’ 

EJGIIBrnON — ToAptflZL “Fr • , 
ken thaler on Paper A Retrospect : . 
1950-84.” , ' ■ 

•Metropolitan Museum of Art (■ - 
535.77. fo). 

EXHIBITIONS— To April 14: “V 


k • t .-tjv 


• i i ■ 




BOLOGNA, Teatro Craminalc (id: 
22-29.99). 

CONCEITS — April Hand 12: Or- 
chestra < Coro dd Teatro Conumak, 


TaScpL l: “Mm and the Horst." v.' 
•Museum of Modern 




EXHIBITONS— ToMay 14: “He 1 ^ 
.Matisse." 

To June 4: “Henri Rousseau." ^ 


r 1 V J»iU*tfli 

;-v 

-■****>■ 











S. Wi 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1985 


Page 9 


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by Roger Coffis 

r t HAT do Swissair, Amsterdam's 
k /Scbipfaoi Airport, Inter-Con ti- 
\I nestal hotels and Avis car rental 
Y have in common? They are all 
.No- 1 favorites by frequent travelers, 
ling to the results of a survey an- 
ed this week by the International Air- 
assengers Assodatioo (1APA). Inter- 
Ly, the top three choices in each 
Vy are replicated in a similar survey 
1 out in 1984 by a British magazine, 

xs Traveller. 

■ survey reflects the view of 9,000 IAPA 
ersHvmg outride the North American 
cnt who returned questionnaires in a 
postal poll 

isair was voted most preferred airline 
■■ percent of respondents, followed by 
tnsa (27.5), Singapore Airlines (2 6.4), 


rasa (273), Singapore Airlines (26 
i Airways (2L8XKLM (20.4) and Ca- 
lcific (162). Although most countries, 
s Germany and Britain, ranked Swis- 
oond behind thrix national carriers, a 
ty in France (56.6 percent) ranked it 
ihead of Air France. Swissair scored 


ihead of Air France Swissair scored 
. l as haying the best service both on the 
i and in the cabin. 

iphol emerges as most popular airport 
aereent) followed by Singapore (14.5) 
' urich (95% The favorite hold chains 
ter-Continental (16.7 percent), Hyatt 
Hilton (12 J) and SSberaton (10 J). Avis 
r added the car rental agency with best 
l service (42.4 percent) with Hertz 
~ second, way ahead of all others. 

i parallel survey among 10,000 IAPA 
-.ers in North America, Swissair was 
: ated the favorite international airline, 
• - gh the question was biased towards 
.5 carriers. The top three domestic 
. S are American (49.4 percent). Delta 
.. 'and United (41.7). However, there are 
■ erable differences in re^onal prefer- 
For example, in Dallas-Fmt worth, 
‘-can. Airiines scared 61J1 percent, in 
a, Delia scored 85.6 percent and in 
. ' { 0 , United came top with 58.6 percent 
* votes. 

-phol was named the favorite intema- 
airport, the top three domestic U. S. 
is being Tampa, Atlanta and Dallas- 
/orthTln the United States. Hertz led 
y a few percentage points and Hyatt 
id as the most popular hotel chain, 
"■"■“reasons for choosing one airline over 
x depend to some extent upon die 
m of the Sight, but convenience of 
lie is a major deciding factor in every 
«Jot surprisingly, frequency of flights 
-3-time performance are rated hitter 
» of up to two hoars, whereas quality 
gbt service and food are more impor- 
r the long-haul passenger. Past experi- 
oth an airline u another k^ factor, 
at flier programs count far more for 
. lvdcr in the United States than in 
parts of the world. Over half of the 

- 'espondents say they fly one airline in 
mce to another because they belong to 
pent flier program. Sixty percent say 
widd fly at less convement times in . 
tocoRea their mileage points. 

of the most striking results of the 
. is the ambivalent attitude toward 
Jalion in the United States. It seems 
.e jury is still out on the question of 
t or not unbridled competition in the 
industry benefits the traveler. This is 

- -tilted by differences in attitude be- 
t U. S. respondents and those in neigh- 

Canada and Mexico, 
example, only 35.2 percent of U. S. 
dents believe that air travel has im- 
1 as a result of deregulation (432 in 
while 492 percent say it has deterio- 
'30.8 in 1981). On the other hand, in 
a and Mexico, 512 percent thought it 
nproved (44.8 in 1981) and only 30 
it that it had deteriorated (24.6 in 
Examples of advantages and disad- 
ses of deregulation are perceived as 
fares (U. S.: 64.9 percent, Canada and 
o: 712) versus fewer flights and worse 
des (U. S.: 53.7 percent, Canada and 
o: 39.4). •‘More confusion” was cited 
. uiy 50 percent of the two samples, 
u this seems to indicate is that lower 
more popular routes into the major 
l hubs have made a greater impression 
n-U. S. residents who are not so ex- 


taging 


and tragic in Beth Henley’s “Miss 
acker Contest,” it reaches archetypal 
itfons in David Mamet's “Glengarry 


rtiM* 


, Rea in pungent lacker-room dialect, 
4"s play revolves around the “board” 
*1 estate office. Every salesman’s hope 
ied to the possibility of getting to the 
r " tile namw on the board in order to 
to being fed the best “leads” for the 
3b. 

s, long ago, the business deal was an 
tore, it took talent, flair, a kind of sixth 
Now it has been reduced to wheeling 
eating, to crooked nnsrepresentatioa. 
. afy way a man like SbeDey Levine can 
e is by stealing from his office the file 
ds in order to sell it to one of the 
sitors. He will be found out Like 
Loman be is a has-been. Only some 
_ men can stiQ stay in the swim, men 
ichard Roma who do not believe in “an 
morality.” and pretend that they 
ce each day “without fear.” The com- 
/eoess hoe is a struggle for sheer sur- 
— a struggle against becoming a fail- 
id therefore a nonpersan. 

OR the average person this- fearless, 
empty existence is an impossibility. 
Those who have had a glimpse of the 
of emptiness yawning under the var- 
I surface of our consumer societ y ma y 
opted to tnnifg the final old, grand 
A calling it quits. Such is the decision 
i at by the naiighigr in Marsha Nor- 
jf* “ 'Night, Mother." 

rough Miss Norman aims at universal- 
e way in winch despair is presented as 
v terent part of ordinariness gives the 
is particular American flavor. The ba- 
nuture of the living room and bright 
surfaces of the kitchen in which 
of the action takes place hardly seem 
, . iht setting for metaphysical anqmsh, 
ti, morethan the daughter's epilepsy, 
separation from a husband she loved 
e his lack of character and morals, 
wen than her disappointment with her 


Continued from page 7 

only son, a drug user, it is this dreary assort- 
ment of cleansers, soaps, paper towels, cans 
and garbage bags, that generates its own 
kind of hell 

The red and gold Chinese restaurant and 
dreary real estate office of “Glengarry Glen 
Ross,” the bare, almost unfurnished mold 
room in“Fool few Love,” the motdish living 
room and kitchen of “'Night, Mother” 
speak of a world offstage, the vast spaces of 
an invisible society numbed by materialism, 
the receding myth of success, md a complete 
lack of spiritual dimensi on. Although the 
texts of these plays are in no sense political, 
the accurate picture depicted on the stage 
conveys a message that becomes clearer with 
rime, ty burying the political in the subtext, 
our contemporary dramatists instruct ns 
without preaching, provoke us to thought 
and awareness by means of laughter and 
tears. * 

C 1985 The W«* York Tima 

Rosette C Lamoru is a professor of compar- 
ative literature at Queens College and at the 
Graduate Caiier of the Citv University of New 
York. 


TRAVEL ' 

Bahia: Brazil With an African Soul 


posed to the sharp increases in fares and 
reduced sc hedul es on shorter, less-u-avded 
domestic routes within the United Rtaw a 
major flaw of this kind of quantitative sur- 
vey is that forced-choice questions do not 
evoke consumer motivations. However, dis- 
enchantment and confusion about deregula- 
tion could stem from breakdowns in agree- 
ments between carriers, whereby tickets are 
hono red and baggage is automatically trans- 
ferred between competitors* flights, this was 
the case last July when American Airlines 
aided its agreement with Continental Per- 
haps some kind of self -regulatory mecha- 
nism needs to replace the now defunct CAB 
in protecting consumer interests. 

According to Hans Krakaner, senior vice 
president of IAPA the lesson to learn from 
the U. S. experience is bow not to go about 
deregulation in other parts of the world. 
“Since 1977, we have cautioned against such 
an abrupt move to deregulation. What we 
advocate is a gradual liberalization of fares 
and free entry of new carriers into air 
routes.” Krakauer says that IAPA is prepar- 
ing a survey among its British members to 
explore the effects of the recent deregulation 
experiment in Britain, a project it hopes will 
enhance its credibility with its members, 
airlines and government agencies. IAPA is 
currently cooperating with the Afaoports de 
Paris in a survey of 6,000 of its members to 
find out what f a cilities would be needed for a 
business center on the Heathrow pattern. 
Surveys like these are one way for members 
to articulate tbetr needs and are good public 
relations if they are conducted properly. 

IAPA as an unabashedly profit-making 
organization is possibly unique as a consum- 
er adovacy group. It claims to have more 


Swissair, Avis, 
Sdriphol among 
the favorites 


than 100,000 members throughout the world 
and makes its money by subscriptions linked 
to travel-related insurance schemes. It has 
picked up some flack because of this, but 
there seems to be no reason why the profit 
motive is necessarily inimical to effective 
. consumer representation. Members are of- 
fered a free- luggage retrieval service, lounges 
at a few airports, discounts on holds, car 
rentals and other travel services. They also 
get help with individual complaints. Accord- 
ing to IAPA most of its members are fre- 
quent travders with high incomes, dustcred 
in the 35-55 age bracket and either individ- 
ual entrepreneurs or executives working in a 
small corporate enviro nment. 

According to Krakauer, IAPA is closely 
involved with several airline safety issues in 
the North America, such as life-vest specifi- 
cations, smoke detectors, flammability stan- 
dards for-materials, as well as the treatment 
of children and handicapped passengers. 

In Europe, the association is discussing 
the problem of denied boarding compensa- 
tion (bumping) with several airiines under 
the auspices of the Air Transport Committee 
of the International Chamber of Commerce: 

But a major ambition of IAPA is to be- 
come a recognized negotiating partner with 
the International Air Travel Association 
(IATAX IAPA Krakauer contends, is the 
only international organization with a broad 
enough consumer constituency to match that 
of LATA for commercial carriers. “We want 
to have a voice in some of the basic princi- 
ples of tariff setting.” he says. 

Krakauer has high hopes for a meeting he 
will attend in Geneva on April 10, to which 
LATA has invited, at which seven organiza- 
tions representing airline passengers' inter- 
ests are to deride the broad issues of Europe- 
an air transport for further discussion. 

However, some insiders are skeptical that 
this meeting will prove to be much more than 
a public relations exercise cm the part of 
IATA and its member airiines, who need to 
be seen to be sympathetic to passengers’ 
views. And little chance is seen that any 
consumer group wiO have a real part to play 
in the core issues such as deregulation. ■ 


fepoque, R 
the sugar. 


by Maiiise Simons 

B AHIA Brazil — She sits radiant cm 
a bluff by the sea. painted in. pastel 
colors, dressed in white lace, hold- 
ing fruit, spices and lean children. 
Kipling called her “the hearth of all that 
flaming energy when Brazil was being born.” 
If Br awl has a mother, Bahia is her •name 
Situated on the edge of the New World, on 
a wide-mouthed bay full of .history and 
myths, Bahia is the place where immigrants, 
traders, dreams ana capital entered Brazil 
Gold and diamonds, dyewoods and -driiw 
were dispatched from here for Portugal. 

The slave fleet that crossed the Atlantic 
for three centuries — from the mid-l6th to 
the mid- 1 9th — often dropped anchors here. 
In the early days of Brazil's epic settlement, 
soldiers, missionaries, prospectors and cattle 
fanners used Bahia as a staging point for 
their treks into the interior. 

Such was Bahia’s power that it was not 
only the capital of Brazil for two centuries 
but also the religious, political and economic 
center of the Smith Atlantic. Its archbishop 
ruled over the African bishoprics of Angola 
and Sao TomA A grand lady of the Mile 
fepoque, Bahia grew fat on slave labor and 
the sugar, tobacco and cacao of the lush 
coastal lands. 

Today the city — officially Salvador but 
commonly called Bahia, which is also the 
name of the state — is only Brazil's fifth 
largest. But more than any other city, it 
shows why Brazil is so different from the rest 
of South America. It fits into neither Spanish 
America nor Anglo America. Though Bahia 
has Iberia’s face and America’s body, its soul 
is African. 

On arrival, one immediately loses a sense 
of place. It is of little help to know one is 
midway along Brazil's 4,600-mfle coastline. 
The beaches, the year-round tepid water and 
lush nature feel familiar enough. A traveler 
in the New World who seeks the reassuring 
image* of old finds them quickly: The crum- 
bling mansions and co unting houses of the 
planters and traders still dominate the cen t e r 
of town. The Roman Catholic Church, a 
beneficiary of the planters’ «»rnmg l «5 built 
monasteries, convents and places of worship 
that rank among the finest of Iberian colo- 
nial architecture. 

But life all around those walls, the music, 
the gait, the smells and the markets, the 
worship and the street vendors, has stayed 
much closer to what the slaves brought. 
Perhaps there is no other city in ibis hemi- 
sphere so halfway I -a tin halfway African, 
where this blend has forged such an exuber- 
ant place. Havana has become more sober, 

I New Orleans far less African. Haiti is more 
African and more homogeneously black, but 
! Port-au-Prince never gained the prosperity 
to exhibit its culture so ostentatiously. 

Bahia has mixed the strands of its white, 
Amerindian and black population so thor- 
oughly, its people say it created a new race. 
Known as Bahia white or Bahia black, de- 
pending on one’s view, this h uman blend has 
created its own food, its own religion and a 
lingua franca, none of which is quite 
matched in the rest of Brazil 
To visit Bahia’s collection of overlapping 
wonders takes several days. Many spots are 
handsome, some quaint or gorgeous. Even 
the large poor neighborhoods have a sense of 
style. Instead of the deluge of cement that 
covers so much of the urban Third World, 
Bahia's modest homes are made of red-col- 
ored earth and painted in pastel tones. 


B UT for those of ns who come from 
high-strung. First World schedules, it 
takes a tittle longer to enter the Ba- 
hian state of mind. If Brazilians have a knack 
for taking life in stride, Baianos are altogeth- 
er and fully laid back, the nonchalant ene- 
mies of flap. The mind seems permitted to 
roam freely, without having to squeeze into 
extended focus. There is a great calm, that 
property of people not connected to clocks. 
Baianos break appointment s without qualm. 
No one explains or apologizes. In lieu of a 
sense of time, however, a stranger is offered 
esteem, friendliness and bemused tolerance 
for one’s un-Bahian ways. 

Nomatler if a guide does not show up, one 
can do Bahia alone: From the flat waterfront 





Street scene. 



Analyzing Oscar Roles 


York Tunes reporter Sydney Schanberg in 
“The Kilting Helds”): 

“Why has anybody nominated me for an 
Oscar? I don’t know. I think the first criteri- 
on why people get nominated is that the 
movies they play their characters in are 
good. After that, I gness it helps if it’s a big 
part I would have thought the things that 
are' special about this man I play would have 
argued against a nomination. Ires presented 
in an unvarnished way. Usually « , nrii«ne» 
response to a character comes out of real 
sympathy for the guy. We didn't court sym- 
pathy, didn’t ffwJte nfm cuter or npfr nrm 

get cozy with the audience. That’s an oppor- 
ttmtyyou don't get very often in big pits in 
movies because sympathy has to go to the 
leading character. Bat if there’s a noble end 
to acting, it's where people get a chance to 
lode at themselves as they are to themselves. 

“I spent an intense three days with Sydney 
> Scbanberg over a period of a few weeks. It 
made the preparation of the part, easier, 
made it easier to nail down the roedfics of 
the character. But it was hard for aim. There 
was no fencing around or feeling each other 
out. He poured himself out. It’s a tremen- 
dous act of trust to put your life story in 
someone’s hands.” 

Jessica Lange (for her role as Jewell Ivy, a 


farmer’s wife faced with the forced foreclo- 
sure of her family farm in “Country”): 

“It’s hard fra- me to separate the playing of 
the char a cter from the malting of the fflmj 
because it’s my film. It sprang out of the 
knowledge I bad of what was going on in 
rural America, and I co-produced it_ I think 
we made a good, small, honest film — not 
sentimental not romanticized. With my hap- 
piness over being nominated, there’s disap- 
pointment that my nominatioo was the only 
nomination we got. I have to separate myself 
from what Hollywood calls success and 
think of success on a more intimate IeveL 
‘Country’ has been used for organizing farm- 
ers and educating them to the fact that they 
are not isolated cases. I’ve gotten letters from 
fanners who said they hadn’t been to a 
movie in 15 or 25 years before ‘Country’ and 
that (hey had stood up at the end and 
cheered. 

“The pan of Jewell Ivy was more familiar 
to me than any other part I've played. I drew 
from all my aunts in rural Minnesota. I 
wanted to convey the tremendous strength 
and tenacity of these women in balance with 
a heartbreaking vulnerability. Jewell Ivy is 
not the type of character you can embellish 
and make bigger than fife.1 tried to keep my 
performance absolutely honest, even though 
that was not the most showy acting choice.” 


POONESBURY 

'TODAY I Wi<£ 
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THE FNE MINUTES 
SOH&tftERE.'' 


S7W6,IS7AY ■ 
HQMEANP/mr 
THE HOUSE." 





Tin Now Ytafc foau 

area and its string of forts, one is hoisted in 
gjant public elevators — encased in huge 
concrete towers — to the upper city. Here 
the finest museums anti colonial buildings 
are in the historic part of town, within a few 
blocks. By one local count, more than. 20,000 
structures predate the mid-I8th century. 

Being fond of the past, Bahia has muse- 
ums of all sorts. There are museums for 
postcards, for coins, for maritime maps and 
instruments. The most impressive ones, in- 
cluding ibe Museum of Sacred Art, have 
enough silver, sculptures, jewelry, furniture 
and paintings to dazzle students of colonial 
or religious art. 

I, rather liked the tiny, misnamed Museo 
da Cidade. or Q'ty Museum, once a private 
home; now full of the charm of mismatched 
and transplanted objects. It overlooks Pillo- 
ry Place (Largo do Pelourinho). the spot 
where slaves were punished until well into 
the 19th century. A first room, darkened with 
thick curtains, seemed like a haunted private 
theater. Large life-size mannequins woe 
covered with, faded costumes and talismans 
of Candombte, the spiritist religion brought, 
from Africa by the slaves. Up the narrow 
staircase there was a display of mementos 
and Victoriana, bequeathed by a prominent 
family. Peering at the satin sachets, silver 
finery and love notes, one fell almost indis- 
creet. Then, unexpectedly, another room of- 
fered an exhibition of African, gypsy and 
Hindu headdresses entitled “Thirty ways to 
tie die turban.” Each style had a name, and 
so one encountered, all tied in knots, Auda- 
cious and Bizarre, Jovial and Triumphant. 

A few hundred yards up a climbing, nar- 
row street is the former medical school 
which seemed to have even more spirits and 
ghosts per square inch than most places in 
town. Its past ivory-colored grandeur is still 


learned men. Along its garden paths, kept 
moist and moldy by the thick canopy of 
trees, one expected poets to be making notes 
about the passage of time. 

In one recently restored wing is the coun- 
try’s new and only Afro-Brazman Museum. 
A modest though fascinating exhibition 
traces Candombl& objects, fetishes, masks 
and ceramics to their places of origin in the 
countries now known as Benin, Zaire and 
Angola. In its last room on huge wooden 
panels are the much extolled earrings of 
Candombl£ gods by the contemporary 
sculptor Canrbt 

There is also a museum of med icine and 
an exhibition of Brazilian archaeology, 
spread out through the former hospital wing. 
On this surprising tour, during a moment of 
deep concentration among the Amerindian 
axes and funeral vases. I heard cheerful pi- 
ano music coming in. It turned out that a 
ballet group had also taken up residence in a 
former hospital ward. 

Outside, along the cobblestone streets and 
squares, tantamount to a large outdoor mu- 
seum, a visitor with a taste for Baroque wiD 
find that the style reached heights never 
dreamed of along the Mediterranean. 

Craftsmen here had more rosewood to 
work with, gold was cheaper and imagina- 
tion less bound by conventional forms. 
Church walls and altars contain pink clouds, 
tropical birds, mulatto faces, male and fe- 
male figures that are far from demure. The 
Church of Sio Francisco de Assis has a 
plethora of gflded cherubs and curlicues. 
Next door, the Church of the Third Order of 
S3o Francisco has one of the city’s most 
masterful and ornate Baroque facades. In- 
side the church, the life-sized statnes of 
saints reputedly led a double life: Smugglers, 
so the story goes, used to hide jewelry and 
other pieces of contraband under the saints’ 
doth robes. The city has dose to 130 
churches; it is a difficult task to see them alL 


M ORE numerous but less conspicu- 
ous are the places of worship of 
Candombld, Bahia’s own wncretic 
religion, long persecuted and now fully ac- 
cepted and even attended by the bourgeoisie: 
It was during the long periods when the 
African gods and spirits were outlawed that 
the slaves camouflaged them with names and 
properties of Catholic saints. AD came to 
coexist in a new pantheon and, detached 
from West Africa, rites evolved with a life of 
their own. 

With two religions, if not practiced at least 
known by everyone. Bahia is the dty that 
most merrily celebrates feast days of spirits 
and saints. The calendar bulges with events; 
the list indudes the crossing of the Bay of All 


Saints (Jan. 1) by a magnificent, festooned 
fishing fleet carrying images of Christ. On 
the Day of lemanji, the sea goddess (Feb. 2). 
thousands of people wade into the water, 
offering her perfume and white flowers. 

On a recent night. Jorge Amado. Brazil's 
best-selling novelist, who lives in and loves 
Bahia with passion, had arranged for me to 
attend a private Candomblt ceremony. It 
was the feast day of St Barbara, or rather 
Iansd, her Candombld counterpart. Celebra- 
tions were going on when 1 visited the village 
of Bate Fofiia, just outside of town. Here, in 
a Candombld compound, the moon bounced 
off the whitewashed temple, the little out- 
buildings and the low white palisades built 
around half a dozen sacred trees. Inside the 
temple, the altar looked white, gold and 
Catholic, but the language of the inscriptions 
was Yoruba. 

What followed, after men and women in . 
Sunday finery embraced and sat at opposite - 
ends of the nave, was hard for a nomnitiate ; 
to appreciate fully. An outsider’s perception . 
was of a dozen women, dressed in the most* 
impeccably ironed and starched white lace; 
robes and kerchiefs, all of them carrying > 
different amulets. They shuffled, danced,; 
turned, moaned, shrieked and spun. Men! 
beat on a cluster of drums that had a variety’ 
of registers worthy of a church organ. * ; 

All but one of the women went into a. 
trance, (bar bodies shaking as though swept * 
by a Eve current. Accomplished initiates, ' 
they moved their arms onto their backs and 
spread their feet, seeking stability. The spirit 
would pass, the dancers went on. 

Four hours later, with the aging dancers 
still going strong, the community was served * 
dinner in the main house of the compound. , 


I S it the exuberance of nature, fueled by > 
three cultures, that has made the, 
Baianos Brazil’s great orators — jug- 
glers and gymnasts of the spoken word? 1 
Their favorite pastime is to sit and weave, 
stories, night after night, eating heavily,' 
drinking local firewaters or bitter cordials to ‘ 
dissolve the solid fare. And at the slightest . 
excuse, Baianos burst into public speech, as ' 
baroque as the flourishes of their churches ’ 
and with an almost oracular ring. 

A friend traveling to Rio de Janeiro re- . 
cently recalled sitting next to a Baiano who ‘ 
was making his maiden flight. As the voyage 
neared its end, the hostess delivered the: 
usual courtesies over the sound system , 1 
thanking the passengers. The Baiano rose to 
his feeL “On the contrary,” he began, “it is 
we the passengers, who must thank you,” 
and he wockesd his way through a long list of 
merits of the crew. After several minutes, tbe 
Brazilians, a good-natured and tolerant 
kind, cheered toe man. ■ 

C J98S The JVew York Tunes 


Continued from page 7 

Jeff Bridges (for his role as an alien ex- 
plorer from a distant planet in “Stannan”): 

“When 1 first got tbe part I thought that 
the sky was the limit. Unit 1 could go any- 
where with the character. But the line I had 
to walk became thinner and thinner. 2 had to 
be as consistent as possible in order not to 
rip the fabric of tbe love story. 

“How do you create an alien? I thought 
about some of the crazy people I’ve known 
who I thought might be alien. I observed my 
three-and-a-half-month old daughters be- 
cause 1 wanted to have their innocence, the 


way kids make a mistake without knowing 
it's a mistake. I worked with a friend who’s a 
dancer with isolating parts of my body and - 
moving just one at a time. It was almost as 
though Starman was seated in the head and 
riding the body, giving each limb an assign- . 
mem. 

“The character is a device to look at our- , 
selves in a fresh way. I share with Starman 
the belief that we shortchange the positive 
ride of ourselves — our capacity to love." ■ ; 

© 1985 The Nev York Times 


■ ADVERTISEMENT. « 


“ MAKE MINE A LARGE ONE." 

BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HAPPIER TIMES. 
WHO WOULD have thought a new play on botany would prove a 
source of constant hilarity throughout the evening? But despite the 
lethargy the topic instantly induced in one at school, such a subject is 
keeping audiences rolling throughout Europe. 

ON TOUR 

PART OF ITS immense charm is that “Make mine a large one” has 
such a wide appeal. (Though one must confess that those with a more 
cultured taste will probably find it wittier than those who labour 
under the misconception that Shakespeare's ‘Taming of the Shrew’ 
is a course in animal husbandry.) The plot has an international 
flavour. The main personalities are drawn from ula> 

countries as diverse as Morocco, Saxony and Indo- Sto a 

China and feature such characters as Coriander, Ifi fijB-itg 

Angelica, Orris and Juniper. Although at first sight 
such a mixture might appear a little uncomfortable, 
it is the skill with which they have been seamlessly jfM l lb 

blended that guarantees the end result. W * 

I Taise my glass to the creators of the production. 

Bombay Gin. It is indeed their unique distillation 
that keeps one amused. nummu 

And I for one shall oft return to my favourite bar iBIiSj 

to watch it run and run — into my glass. 



lull 55S345iSiS5i C/EIWSS? 


f 




Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 1 


Unocal 

VOL Hfab 

34294 50% 

Low 

48 

iMf 

4H 

dno 

+2 

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■H-T-re-tyre 

27*6 

27% 

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GTE 

1583* 41ft 

39% 

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13488 60% 

59 

59 

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11109 37% 

37% 

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10549 54% 

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54V 

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AT&T 

10203 21% 

21ft 

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Dtams 

10064 19% 

18% 

19 

— ft 

IBM 

9924 127% 

24% 

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41ft 

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Jrnn» OU4 *0£A0 S963 1 AttLOf + 0J6 

Utfl 15Ui 1SLH 151.06 15245 + IA9 

Canto 5UJ1 51142 31009 ST2M— Oil 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

iMusrlois 

Tran*®. 

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Finance 


HIM Low CtaM CVtMF 
10447 103.58 101*8 + 045 
12007 119*6 119 A* +004 
9743 96.93 94.93 — 0.12 
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107 JO 19743 19743 +BJM 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Ullitihn 

Industrials 


Close cum 

7204 — 002 

£941 +0.W 

7547 —0.15 


NYSE Diaries 


dost Pttt. 


Advanced 
Declined 
UnManaed 
Total Issues 
New Ktohs 
New Laws 
WWmtte up 
Vatunwdown 


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March 27. 
March 24. 
March 25. 
March 22. 
March 21 . 


Mr Sales 
1745*7 <37,282 
171 JO* 4*14*3 
1B443I 49034 
190482 4*7274 
208.105 <56436 


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up to the closing on Wail Street and 
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weivMevp 

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207 

259 

308 

225 

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Dow Off in Mixed N.Y. Session 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New Yoirfc 
Stock Exchange made a mixed showing Thurs- 
day after an early rally faded. 

But analysts noted that the late selling was 
concentrated in a few big-name stocks. Groups 
like food and utility issues remained strong. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, up 
more than 6 points in the early going, was down 
420 at 1,260.71 by the dose. Gainers, however, 
outnumbered losers by more than 4 to 3. 

Volume came to 99.78 million shares, down 
from 101.04 mfllion Thursday. The exchange’s 
composite index edged up .05 to 103.98. 

Stocks bad the credit markets working in 
their favor, with interest rates down considera- 
bly for both Treasury bills and bonds. However, 
the rally in stocks that began on Wednesday 
faltered as the session progressed. 

Analysts said investing institutions were ap- 
parently intent on selling some blue-chip issues 
as they prepare their portfolios for first-quarter 
reports. 

The day began with what was billed as the 
first visit ever to the NYSE trading floor by an 
American president in office. President Ronald 
Reagan called for support for his budget plan, 
and then rang the bell sounding the start of 

T rading 

Dow Jones's average of 15 utilities climbed 
1.49 to 15185, its hignist close in more than 19 
years. 

In the food and soft-drink group, new 52- 
week highs were recorded by such issues as 
Borden, up 1 W at 7194; Quaker Oats, up at 44; 
Dart A: Kraft, up 1 at 94; Pepsico, up 1 at 54%, 
and Coca-Cola, up % at 69%. 


M-l Falk $500 Million 


The Associated Prea 

NEW YORK — The basic U.S. money sup- 
ply fell $500 milli on in mid-March, the Federal 
Reserve said Thursday. 

The basic supply, called M-l. dropped to a 
seasonally adjusted $570.1 billion in the week 
ended March 18 from S570.6 billion the previ- 
ous week, the central bank said. 

M-l is a measure of money supply growth 
that includes currency in circulation, travelers 
checks and checking deposits at financial insti- 
tutions. 


Some brokers said strength in these groups 
might reflea c on c ern over a slowing economy, 
since food and utility stocks are regarded as 
“defensive’' issues that stand to suffer relatively 
little impact from down cycles in business activ- 
ity. 

Others argued, however, that enthusiasm for 
the utilities betokened expectations of further 
declines in interest rates, which might benefit 
the market as a whole. 

Unocal led the active list, up 2 at 49ft. An 
investment group headed by T. Boone Pickens, 
chairman of Mesa Petroleum, increased its 
stake in the company to 13.6 percent with the 
purchase of a large block of shares Wednesday. 

The group, which had previously declared it 
was buying the stock strictly for investment 
purposes, said Thursday that it was considering 
seeking to gain control of the company or to 
restructure iL 


12Montti 
HIM Low Stock 


SB. Close 

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37ft 37ft 37V— ft 
9ft 9V 9V— ft 
20V 27V 28ft + ft 
13V 13ft 13ft + ft 
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19ft 18ft 1BV + ft 
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72 72ft 71 V 72ft + V 
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26ft 20ft CotoPol 
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10Z107 107 107 —ft 
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137 107 
247 114 
140 119 
232 94 


177 

204 

71 

1040 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sis. Clas* 

Dlv. YUL PE UOsHlah Law Quot- Ch'oe 


8 

15 

47 2f 14 
34b 1.1 12 
24) U I 
AB 3.0 < 
240 74 7 


17ft 11 CdoipSc 
46ft 19% CPtvsn 
30% 19% CotiAss 
23ft Uft Conalr 
2a 19ft CnnNG 
17% 10% Conroe 
31% 23% Cora Ed _ 
a 35 CanEpf 445 113 
44% 38 CanEPf 540 114 
38V 265k CotlsFd 1A4 34 11 
54ft 50% ConFpf 334a 63 

36 20ft CnSFrtS UM 33 11 

45% 31 CnsNG 232 5.1 9 
11 4ft CansPw 6 

26 13 CnPpfA 4.16 173 
28ft 13ft CnPpfB 430 173 
45ft 23ft CnPpfD 7A5 173 
46ft 25% GftPpfE 732 184 
46ft 25 CnPpfG 736 ISO 
25% lift CnPprV 4A0 184 
21% 9% CnPnrU 140 183 
22% 10ft CnPprT 178 183 
45% 25% CnPpfH 748 183 
23% lift CnPprR 400 1B4 
23ft 10% CnPprP 3f8 183 
22% 10ft CnPpfN 145 183 
15ft 7ft CnPnrMUD 17 j 
14ft 7 CnPnrL 233 184 
24ft 11 OlPprS 442 184 
IS .. 7ft. CnPprK 243 17.1 

43 23ft CntlCo 240 84 7 
im'a 4% Coni il I 
4ft V Cantll rt 
40ft 12 Cntillpf 
4ft % CtllHdn 
9% 4ft Cat Info 
24 18 Control 

39ft 24% CtDPta 
33% 23% Conwd 
3ft 1 vICoafcU 

34ft 25% Caapr 

37% 30 Coop I pf ISO 84 

27 11V Coop Lb 43a 3 3 

20% T2% CaarTr 40 11 8 
24% 12ft Coopvts A0 14 18 
21ft 11V Copwld A4 34 
27ft 19ft Cpwldpf 248 114 
27V 17ft Cardura 44 3J 17 
15ft 10% Caretn 
40 30 CarnGs 

45 22% Gor&Jk 

64ft 40V CoxCm 

9ft 4ft Craig 

37 32 Crone 

78ft 38ft CrayRs 
27 ft I£ft CrockN 
22 15ft CrckN pf 118 113 
23ft 19ft CrmpK 130 S3 9 
52% 34V CrwnCk II 

42V 27V CrwZof TOO 24 16 
51ft 43 CrZof pf 443 93 

45 SO CrZel pfC4J0 70 
« 19ft Cut bra 40 24 7 
33% 12ft Culhiate 37 

B8ft 6116 CumEn 230 30 4 
10% Bft Currtnc l.lOall.l 
40ft 30ft CUliW 130 3J 10 
52ft 27ft CvctoPS 1.10 23 10 


151 15ft 
312 21 
40 29% 
27 22% 
13 24ft 
80 13ft 
2095 31% 
450y 41 
Bx 43ft 
ms 38 
2 53% 
312 30ft 
464 44ft 
3568 6% 

53* 21 
60* 25V 
800* 42ft 
29S* 43 
300* 63 
26 23% 
31 a 
54 20V 
1002 4216 
48 21ft 
46 21ft 
40 20V 
12 Mft 
7 13ft 


23 21ft 
49. 14V 
1222 39V 


14% 15 + ft 
20 30 — V 

29% 27% + V 
22V 22V 
24ft 24ft — ft 
13 12ft 
31ft 31% + ft 

41 41 +1 

Oft 43%+ ft 
37V 37V + V 
52V 52V + V 
X 30 — ft 
45V 45% 

4% 4%+ ft 
24 24 

25V 25V 
41V 42ft +1 

42 43 —V 

43 43 +1 

2JV 23V + ft 
19ft 19V 

2B 20%+ % 
42V 43V +IV 
21V 21ft + % 
20V 21V + % 
20ft 20%+ ft 
14V 14V 

13 13V + V 
21ft 21V + V 

14 14V + ft 


244 

430 




1.72 74 8 
72 2A 37 
l.W 37 11 


27 44V 
725 IM 


7% 
518 22% 


4159 XV 
10 29V 


54 1% 

L52 53 U 2S3B 29V 


81 33V 
44 14% 


17 19V 
1104 22ft 


56 43 12 
1JB 34 15 
U» 23 
44 4 19 


20 12V, 
30 72 
374 24ft 


121 13V 
<55 35ft 


17U 44 
1634 41ft 


140b 44 11 
22 
U 


11 

6 

548 

29 


9 

33% 

57 

25V 


39 19 


2M 

2121 

77 

58 

41 


21M 

53% 

42ft 

49V 


768 28ft 
199 74% 


9% 

34% 


70 50V 


8% 

2% 2% — V 
44 V 44V + % 
1 1 - ft 

7% 7V 

i£SS+v 

28ft 21ft- ft 
32% 33 
Uft Mft— V 
19ft 19ft— V 
22 32% 

12V 12% 

21% 21%— ft 
25% 25V— % 
UM 13ft— ft 
35 35%+ ft 

43 43V + % 

59V 60 — V 
8% 8% 

33% 33%— ft 
44V A4ft + % 
25% 25% 

19 19 

21 21ft— ft 

S2% 33 V + % 
41V 41% + ft 
49% 49V + M 
44ft 64% — V 
X 28ft + V 

74 74ft + ft 
9% 9%+M 
34V 34V — V 
50V 50ft + ft 


aft 

18V 

30% 

8ft 

15 

93% 

78 

25ft 

12V 

18% 

39% 

Uft 

56ft 

33ft 

33% 

23V 

47V 

8V 

34ft 

XV, 

37% 

16M 

72ft 

61% 

59V 

40 

25 

2*16 

35% 

25V 

24ft 

27ft 

Z7V 

31ft 

31ft 

lift 

» 

15V 

28% 

22% 

38% 

» 

125% 

81ft 

42 

816 

16M 

30ft 

21V 

55 

37 

<2Vi 

33ft 

51% 

Mft 

23ft 

19 

49% 

54% 

34V 

44V 

32% 

129 

77 

72V 

25% 

34 

73 

14V 

58V 

Uft 

2SV 


UV Dallas 
9V DamanC 
2ift DanaCp 
5% Dandtr 

Bft Denial 
70V DartKr 

39Vk DataGn 

13ft Dntpnt 

8% DtaDsa 
12ft Davco 
26ft DavtHd 

11% DavtPL 

45V DPLpf 
21ft DeanFs 
24V Deere 
17ft DalmP 
27 DHtaAr 
4V4 Deltona 
17V DlxCh s 
T7V DenMfs 
26V DeSata 
lift Doted 
59 DetEPf 
47ft DetEpf 
46 DetEpI 
45ft DetEPf 
19% DE PIF 

20 DEPTH 
19% DEpfO 
19 DEpfP 
19V DEPfB 
19% DEpfO 
19ft DC pfM 
24V DEprL 
24ft DEpfK 
13V DtrtEpr 
17V Dexter 

9% DIGIor 
21V UiGlODt 
16V OtomB 
34% DtoShpf 
44 D leads 
77V Digital 

45V Dfanev 

30 DEI 
3% Dlvrsln 
6% oantea 

21 DanRn 
16 Donald 
34% Donley 
23V Dorsey 
31% Davor 
25V DOwCh 
35V DawJn 

10% Drava 
U5V Drew 
1«V DrsxB 
23V Dreyfus 

43V duPont 

30% duPntpf 
39 duPntpf 
22V DukeP 
97 Duke pf 
64 DukCPf 
59ft Dukepf 
21% Duke Of 
W Duke of 
51V Dun Bed 
lift OwLt 
43ft DtMPf 
Bft DycoPt 

17ft DvnAm 


40 34 
20 13 
1J0 67 


,18b 14 
454 44 


re is 

44 14 
44 If 
240 124 
748 148 
48 14 
140 33 
142 8.1 
40 1J 


12 121 
9 9? 

18 2089 
7 176 


32 23 

ire so 

1 A0 42 
148 104 
932 134 
741 111 
745 IU 
736 125 
275 114 
124 111 
113 134 
112 134 
ITS 110 
340 113 
142 134 
440 117 
4.12 114 
240 124 
40 14 
44 45 
225 8.1 
17* 93 
4-00 104 
LOO If 


37 

2 

218 

14 

30 

8 


.12 

172 9A 
44 34 
1.16 11 
ire am 

42 23 
140 63 
70 13 
50 19 
40 19 
200 10.9 
J58a 1.1 
100 18 
ISO 10A 
4-50 104 

248 77 
675 U 
870 I1A 
840 111 

249 115 
185 Ilf 

ire 25 

206 134 
740 124 
40 4 3 
30 4 


9 134 20% 20ft 20ft- % 
53 X- UV 11% I1V+ ft 

0 SOI 28ft 27V 27ft— ft 
45 45 7% 7% 7%+ft 

480 12ft 12 12% + ft 

10 633 94ft 99% 94 +1 

13 1704 46V 44% 45V +lft 
590 18V IBM 18M— ft 

11% Uft lift— ft 
18% 18V 18ft + ft 

38% X 3SVk 

15% 15ft 15ft 

100* 53ft Sift 53ft— ft 
15 399 30 »V 29ft— ft 
30 779 30ft 30ft 30ft- M 
9 1474 23ft 23% 23% 

7 1545 46% 45V 45ft + M 
17 4 5% 5% + % 

14 254 31% 31V 31ft— ft 

11 108 24 23V 24 + % 

9 W 34 33ft 33ft— V 

7 1876 U 15V 15ft 

450Z 71 69ft 49ft— lft 
400z 58ft 58ft 58ft— 1 
3Wta 57ft 54V 57ft +1W 
lOOz 57V 57V 57V— ft 
3 23% 23% 23% . 

” 24% Mft 24V— % 
MM 22ft 23V 
23% 23% 23%+ M 
23ft 23 X + V 
25% 25ft 25% „ 

2SV 25% »%— M 
29V 29V 29V— V 
30% 30M 30%— ft 
2 17% 17% 17% + V 

11 109 22V 22 22 

34 14V 14V 1416 

10 27% 27% 27% + % 

1110062 19% 18V If — M 

200 37% 37M 37M 

12 458 5ZV 50V 51ft + V 

13 3880 104% 103% 104 +% 

40 tf5 79 77% 77V— 1% 

' 41V 40V 41V + V 
4 5% 5% 

fft 9V ?V 
28% 2B% 20%+ ft 

17% 17% 17ft 

55V 54% 54% + % 

26% M 24 - V 

35ft 35ft Kft 

29V 2BV 2BV— M 

45V 44% 45 + V 

12% Uft 12V + ft 

30% 30U 20% 

18ft IBV 18% + ft 

12 87 46ft 45ft 44 — V 

9 2277 52% 51ft 51ft— % 
7 33V 33U 33V+ ft 
V 44 44 44 +ft 

8 12*1 32V 32% 32% — ft 

1 134 134 134 +5 

MSOz 74 76 76 +lft 

WZ 68 68 48 + ft 

5 25ft 25% 25ft 
23 32V 33V 32V 
t 830 72V 71V 77V +.% 

7 305 14 15% 15% 

780* 56V 51V 54V +.16 

0 19 13 12% 12% + ft 

2 5 24% 24% 24% 


4 7 

4 181 
1124 
■ 328 
8 22 
U 421 
13 M 
13 331 
10 2495 
X 435 
112 
15 720 


40 24ft EGG 

17ft 17 EQKn 

A0 14 20 

471 

2 

37ft 3*46 
17V 17V 

31% 21% 5 Sysf 

JO 17 14 

793 

2936 28% 

28V 20 

EaafeP 

144 44 8 

41 

22% 22 

19% 12 

Casco 

A4 2J 

Ml 

19 10% 


a% + % 


4V 

216 

lft 

ISV 

17% 

18ft 


3ft EetfAlr 
1% BALWtO 
% EALwtA 
4% ElAIrpf 
<V EAlrptB 
9V EAlrefC 


4359 

254 

125 


31 15ft 
110 17 


20% 21ft EastGF 

18% 12ft eastuti 
78 40ft ElKod 
40ft 37V Eaten 
30% 30ft Etniin 
32% 20ft Eckerd 
39V 3lft EdlsBr 
18% 13 EDO 
3416 19 Edward 
23ft 19ft EPGdPf 3J5 104 
29ft 25ft EPGnf 175 1X2 
28ft 23% EPGpr 
14% 9ft EfTOTO 
Bft Elaur 
2% ElecAs 
4% EMM 

7% EMMpf 140 94 
IS ElCtSP S 48 5 


140 £4 
154 106 

area 47 
ire 24 
re so 

144 84 
140 54 
44 14 
40 24 


14% 

7V 

BV 

10ft 

28% 


re u 


« UV 
31 591 22*6 
6 88 18ft 

12 4445 4BV 
4 130 51% 
12 344 2716 
12 584 29V 
10 31 

12 145 MV 
20 440 31% 
5 
3 
1 
15 


4ft 6ft 6ft— ft 
3 2% 2^-ft 

14V 15 — V 
16% 16% — V 
lift 18% + ft 
22V 22ft— W 

Wft !£8— w 

0% *7%— ft 
50ft 50ft— ft 
24V 27 
» 29 — ft 

32 lift 31% + % 
15V U + % 
30ft 30ft — ft 


23% 
28% 
reft 
89 14% 
30 10% 
- 4ft 
8% 
10V 


re 5A 


18 HV Etata 
Uft 5% EMelnt 
78V JBM EmraEt 240 34 
Mft 5ft Em Rod 441 69 
20ft UV EmrvA JO XI 
33V 24ft Emhart 140b *3 
113 98ft Emhtpf 2.10 2.1 
20% 14% EmaDs 144 94 
5 3% enwnf 47 94 


0 

r 274 
a 

a 37 25V 
17 X 14% 
137 I". 

14 480 71ft 
17 91 13% 

9 1504 18% 
9 530 Mft 
1 102 

7 43 19% 

ire* 4% 


22% 22%+ ft 
28% 25% — V 
27ft 27ft — M 
14% Mft + ft 
19% W%+% 
4% 4ft + ft 
Oft Bft— ft 
10V 10V + V 
34% 25% + ft 
. 14V 14V 
4% 8% 6% 

71ft 71% 

13% 13** 

15V 14 —ft 
27V 20ft + V 
102 102 +2% 
Wft 19ft— V 
4ft 4ft + ft 



12 Month 
HIM LOW 


Ik CIOM 

Oft. Ytd. PE IMHigb Low Qlto. Ch'oe 




4 Eraopt JO 10-5 . XMx 4% *V 4% 

7 Emopf J1 H-5 MOO* 8 8 8 — ft 

;* Muc 213 % + 

32V 22ft EiMCp 21 24 17 W X 29ft 29% 

38% UV EitisStf 56 14 U 3 Mft 34M 34ft— ft 

29% 17% E march 140 £7 17 UK 38ft 23V X — % 

*8 31ft Enecnpf AMellA 4000* 5*ft 54ft 54% + ft 
107 91% Entcn pflireallA S U0V fflHV 100% + 16 

M 1% Enwce 25 184 2ft 2V ZV 

31% 9ft Entera 407 10 WV 

30 U% EatxE n 1AILO 49 17%. Wft 17 

21% U EMexIn lJO 74 8 M Uft 17ft U — ft 

28ft Uft Eeufxs U 81 25ft 25% ZSft 

8ft 3 EftAnk a 4M 8% 4ft— ft 

17V lift Eomfcof are mj s Uft u% io%+ v 

4i% ssn Era Has ire aa 4 22a m am 39% + % 

14% 9ft Eaottcn 42 14 ■ re U lift 12 + V 

14% 1% Erxxrra JO U H » tB l»Q + ft 

2T5 12ft EsaBsn 44 25 11 141 18ft 17% 17%+ ft 

MjmeanC 40OX2 12 4t 32M 21% 21V— M 
3T« 20ft Estrtne 72 35 W W 22ft 21% 21ft— % 

30V 20 Ethyl 1.12 34 11 H7 37V 34% 37ft + V 

7% 1*6 wiEvaoP 135 2% 3V 2V 

9ft 2ft vf Evan Pf SI MU 3ft 3V+ ft 

41V re ExCeto 140 4J 9 62 35ft 35ft 3S«k + ft 

UV 13ft Exnlsr 146a 114 MU 15ft U + ft 

S0% 37% Exxon 340 44 7 SIM SOM 49V 49*6— V 


11 6b FH tad 

2 





*7% 42ft FMC 220 £5 92 

383 


r*i 


22V 17*6 FPL Go 140 C 3 

9 

U33 

21 

22ft 

22V + V 

13*6 9% FabCSr 30 2A 16 

n 



lift 

14% 9% Facet 

38% 15ft Fatrebd 40 63 


12 

438 

13ft 

13% 

Uft— ft 
14V— V 

39*6 33% Fefcrcef 3140 93 


ISO* 

38ft 

38 

36V— ft 

16V 9ft Ffrirtd .18 U 

9 

122 

13V 

MV-' T 1 

13ft— V 

24V Hfb FomDIe 

25 

109 

2tft 


21%+ V 

19ft 14*6 FOnstef AO 24 

12 

2 

UV 


15V 

32V 23 FrWSfF 

4 

27 

25V 


2SV+ V 

28V 14% Fandl 48 <& 

• 

566 

Wft 

19 

19ft 

13 8% FarDra JO 14 17 

61 

TOV 

10% 

10V + % 

7 4% Feden 

8 

710 

6 

5% 

5% + V 

Z7% 29*6 FedICo L64 44 

7 

340 

34ft 

33% 

33%— ft 

45% 27V FedExa 

27 

1374 

36% 


35V— % 

48ft 34 FdHuiot 


43 

34ft 

t-j 

34 — V 

39 29ft FdMoa 152 43 

10 

39 

SV 


35ft + V 

Wft 10ft FMNM 46 14 


1WS 


I 

16 —ft 

27 16% FedPSf JO 37 

4 

42 

19 

ft r 

19 + V 

23 U FedRR LU (7 M 

26 

2tft 

21V 

21ft 

19% 13% FOSaal 40 <9 12 

72 

Mft 

Uft 

16%+ V 

57V 42% FedD5l 2At <3 

■ 

494 

56% 

56 

56ft— ft 

30V 22V Farro U0 <6 

10 

6b 

re 

29*6 

25% + ft 

37 25V Ftoat 240 65 

10 

42 

31*6 

31 

31 — V 

17V 4 FlnCnA 451 


MH 

7 

6% 

7 + ft 

47V 14V FtaCput 673e2U 


24 

32 

31V 

31% — ft 

7V 2ft FnSBar 

Wft M Ftresn 40 « 

f 

92 

1170 

4V 

tov 

4 

nv 

4V+ ft 
ISV— ft 

28% 19 FtAIUn 142 37 

8 

41 

21 


27%+ V 

35 21V FBhSVS 140 £1 

8 

633 

32 

t it’j 

31*6 

35 25ft FBkFta 1JO 35 

12 

106 

35 


34V— V 

71ft 34*6 FBost 1J0 14 

11 

•6 

Nft 

r r yj 

48ft 

27 18% FffCbJc I J2 60 

18 

*98 

22% 

L > 

22 — % 

20 13V PtOTex 140 94 

7 

750 

14% 

M 

14%+ V 

BV 40 FIBTx Pf £1 IeK5 


S 

42 

47 

42 — ft 


10 

71 

10 

10 

W 

20% 10V FFcdAz ,15e 4 

4 

TO 

18% 

U 

18V 

48V 30V Flmste 2J4 54 

8 

1278 

46ft 

48 

46%+ V 

30V 31 Flats pf £37 BJ 


84 

28ft 

28ft 

28% + % 

Uft 7V FtMba 34 25 

9 

449 

9% 

9% 

9V 

50% 31V FNStS 248 £4 

7 

45 

49ft 

49 

4*U 


107% 90ft FHStban42e11J 
7% ift FstPo 8 

30V 20’A FstPopf 242 94 

31% Zlft FtUnRI 1.92 62 15 

22% 14V FIVaSk 44 3f 9 

2tVk M FlWbC 120 44 8 
53 45ft FWUcpf 425 124 
54V 3DV Flschb 140 24 34 
lift S’- FhhFd J35e J 
34V 20V FltFnG*U2 4.1 8 
28V Mft Fleet En 24 L7 S 
39ft 22V Flerana 
23V. 23V FUxlV 
UV 10V Flexlpf 
37ft 19ft FlfatSf 
31V lift FknfPt 
40 39% FklEC 

25% UV FioPra 
19 11% FtaSU 

TV 3>6 RwGen 
21 lift Flawri 
23V Mft Fluor 
35*4 43% FoateC 
51% » ForUM 
12% 10V FtDear 
47ft 48 
15V 10 

UV 4% FOxSIP 

35ft 25% Faxbra 

11% 4% FMOG 

25% Uft FratMc 
34% 20% Frtotm 
20V 19 Fruehfs 
32ft 25 Fruhfpf 240 
34% X Fmua A0 


22 15 
40 24 15 
141 129 
20 4 17 

U 

.Ua 4 12 
IU U f 
40 24 U 


73 

93 

43* 

120 

319 

3 

240 

10 


40 22 10 908 
40 22 1074 

220 4.1 11 3*8 

240 44 3 4901 

___ 126 IU 

FIHawd 144 24 15 

FOStlNh 44 il 14 

46 72 II 

IM 44 74 

238*25.1 
40 34 IS 

40 22 15 

40 24 5 

74 

12 9 


50 HOft UBft IBZft + V 
191 7 8% 6ft + M 

S3 20% 27V X + M 
124 31ft 31 31 — ft 

2S9 22ft 71% 21%+ V 
12 2U6 2M6 24V 
100* 49ft 49ft 49ft— ft 
345 37% 37V 37V— M 
10% 10% Mft 
32ft 32M 32ft— V 
21ft 21 31 — V 

39ft 30% 39V— V 
a 32% 32%+ V 
12ft 12V 12ft + ft 
31% 31% 31% + ft 
_ 27ft 36% 27 + % 
10 38% 30% 389* + M 
683 25ft 25ft 25ft + V 
55 17V. 17 17 

89 5 49* 4% 

908 ISV 17% 18 
18% 1f*e Uft 
54V 54 54 

43% 42V 43% + % 
11% Uft 11% 

64% 83V 44 
Mft 13% 14 + ft 
9ft 9% 9% 

24V 36 3* — V 

9% fft 9ft— V 
20ft 19% 19V— ft 
27ft 27V 27ft— V 
23% 23ft 23ft + V 
24V 24% 28%— ft 
32% 32*6 33% 


.15e 5 12 210 
130 aj 6 

ire 34 14 ICS 
12 1141 
LOO U 11 465 
125 
7 


348 77 
250 7.1 
200 73 
2A8 113 


31% 15ft GAP 
39ft 20V GAFpf 
37ft 25V GATX 
34% Wft GCA 
77V 48% GEICO 
50ft 4 GEO 
13% 5V GFCP 
44ft 35% GTE 
39ft 31V GTE Pf 
26% 22V GTE pf 
UV 19% GTE pf 
10 4% GolHou 

581* 36 Gonett 
25% 18% Gap5tr 
30% 10% Goarht 
19ft 13% GataD 
Mft 9% Gem! 1C 
Uft 10 Gemlll 
41% 30V GnCarn 
17ft 14% GAInv . . . 

46V 29V GnBcsh LOO 25 
34V 16V GCtam* 40 14 11 
21 12ft GnDofS 
84 44 GtlDra 

65V 48V GcnEI 
62 45% GnFdS 

7 5V QGthn 
14% 8% GHosts 
17% 8% GnHous 
27V Uft Gainst 


30V 30 V 30% + ft 
38V 37V 37V— ft 
33% 33% 33% 

26V 25% 25%+ ft 
78 75V 75V— V 

4% 4V 4V— ft 
7 8% 7 + ft 


I 
6 
7 

ire 

141 24 21 1143 
JO 22 15 284 
A0 3J 16 351 
-56 2-9 16 


715*34 41ft 39% 39% — IV 


35% 35% 35%—% 
2SV 25ft 2SV+ V 
21% 21% 21%— V 
5% 5» 5ft 
58% 57% 57%— lft 
22% 22V 22%— V 
10% W% 10% + V 
I77x 19% 19M Wft + V 
122 10ft 10% 10%— M 
11% 11 V 11% + M 
43ft 41V 42 +% 

16% 16% 16% + V 
40% 40V 40%+ V 
32% 32% 32M+ V 
13% Uft 13V + % 
74% 73ft 73%—% 
60% 59 39 — 1 

250 4.1 10 12*9 62ft 48V 60% —1 
400 92 93 6ft 4% 6ft 

re 2A 3 £20 12% 12% 12% + ft 

24 23 32 8 10% 10ft 10ft— % 

JO 29 T7 1306 18% 17ft T7ft— % 

40% 45ft GnMHrs 224 34 M 1772 59% 58% 59 — V 

85 81 GMal £00r 64 5 4944 74% 73% 73V— % 


104 

150b 18 U1 1833 
1436 9.7 53 

m 
us 
14 531 
140 1A 9 590 
220 17 1213*88 


72 a OMEl) .IB* J 
40 33V GMotpf 375 104 

52ft 44% GMOtpf £00 9J 


.14 


LM 


23 21 
6 

2J 21 


9V 3%GNC 
UV 7V GPU 
75V 44V GenRe 
12% 5 GnRefr 6 

53% 39% GnSlenl 140 4.1 12 
12 WOTFlBf L2S 11.9 
8ft 5V Gansco M 

2BV 13% GnRod .10 4 2* 

23% IS Gantt O 13)0 
22% Uft Gstpf 148 80 
34 24 Gen Pie 1.1B 37 14 

27% U Go Poe 40 34 a 

20V ZZ% GaPwpf 344 129 
30 25ft GaPwpf 376 U.1 
21 17V GaPwnf 2.56 124 

21V 17 GaPwpf 252 12A 
25ft 21V GaPwpf 275 117 
Mft 52 GaPwpf 740 124 
30% 20ft GerbPe 1.16 39 12 
Uft 12 Garbs S .12 4 14 

I2M Bft GtentP 

11 5V GtorFn 

27 16V G iff Hit I 

59V «% Glllatta 
17V lift G leosC 
9V 4% GtoWM 


532 

6 

4 

20* 

301 

532 

115 

564 


5 

-52 It 19 
240 4A 11 


26 

12 % 

4% 

28V 


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Bft .GMNug 
IV GMNwt 

11 GWWF 

36V 24% Gdrk* 
29ft X Gaodvr 
19 13V GordnJ 

32V If Gould 
44ft 36ft Grace 


46 


82V 61ft 0ft + % 
37% 37V 37%+ V 
SOft S0V 50ft 
7M 4% 4%— V 
UV 12 12 — V 

73 72V 72V + % 

10% 10ft 10% + % 
44% 43% 43V— 114 
400* 10V Mft 10ft— V 

389 5V 5ft 5V+ V 

127 17 16% 16% — ft 

188 21ft 21V 21V— V 
3 20% 20% 30% + % 
466 31% 31V 31%+% 
140* 22% 21% 22M + % 
11 26V 26ft 26% + V 
482 2S% 2B% 28%+ ft 
19 20% 20 20% + ft 

1 20V 20V 20V + ft 
53 24ft Mft 24ft + V 
SHSz 61 60 61 — lft 

601 30ft 29V 29% 

349 19ft 19 19M ’ 

21 UV 11 UV 
706- 10% 10ft 10% 

297 24% 24% 24ft— % 
642 59V 58% 59 — M 
111 12V 12 12 — % 

783 ift 4% 4% 

38 20% 20% 20V— M 

976 Uft UV IM 


65 3 2% 2% 

re 7 7 784 28% X 28M 

1J6 5A 12 67 39ft 39 29ft— M 

140 U 7 1454 27V 26V 26% 

52 33 9 41 lft MU Uft— M 

48 14) 57 821 23V 22% 22% + M 

240 *4 10 2095 41% 40ft 41 + % 

69 47 Grabiar 174 24 T3 100 63% 63 43ft 
15% BM GtAFst 'A0 2798T715 Mft 15 + ft 
18 Uft GtAtPc a 735 17% 17% 17% + V 

45V 27ft GtLfcln 140 24 11 55 41% 41ft 41ft— V 

21ft 15ft GNIm 145#104 7 3 18ft 18ft 18ft + ft 

43V 31 GtNNk 162 *3 I - - — - — 

47ft 51ft GtNNkpf 495 94 7 


28ft Uft GlWFln 
19% 9ft GWHsp 
UM 11 V GMP 
29ft 18% Greyfi 
£V 2V G ruler 
13% Bft GrawGS 
1Z% 6V GnibET 

30 2iv Gramn _ 

34ft 24ft orumpf 240 11L7 
Bft 4V Granted .16 29 


772 

183 


48 

90 

£75 


27% re Gullfrd 

35 25% GifWst 

66 54ft GtfWpf £75 94 5 

24V lift GuHRs 23 14 IS 

Uft 10 GtfSTUt 144 114 6 1516 
Mft Gtfsu pf 5 jm lx. am 
30 24 GltSU pr 345 134 U 

33V 27 GlfSU pr 4.43 134 25 

m 12% GAero 4% II 17 94 

19% 14 Gulten 40 17 U 36 


35V 34% 35V + M 
53V 53 53 

27 26V 24%— ft 

M% 14% 14% + M 
15% 15% 15V 
77V 27% 27% 

5ft 5V 5%— M 
13V UM 13V 
12% 12% 12V + V 
27 2flt 26%+ M 
26ft 24% 2SM 
5% 5ft 5ft— M 
24 8 78 24% 24 24V + % 

24 11 3803 34% 34% 34%— M 
62 61 61 —2 
Uft 15% UV* 
lift 13% 13% — ft 
38 38 38 

2#V 28ft 20% 

32V 32 32 

13% Uft U%+ ft 
16V Uft 16ft— ft 


33 10 
41 

172 109 8 
170 47 11 I960 
12 410 
re 27 17 re 
70 3 15 208 

170 37 7 369 
5 
55 


,+mm 


■t 


800 % PROFITS and ’'POWER ELITISTS? 


h * 


LordTennyson’sdassic lines ...•‘Ring outtheoU.ringin the new.ring out thaty* 
ring in the true", have relevancy even in milieu's as nonpoetic as Wall Street, in $ 
summer of t98Z while theDow wasdroopingunderflOO. wredeSed prevailing opink* 
predicting that the "DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000 BEFORE HITTWC 750‘. 

On August 9, 1982. BARRON’S, in mirroring the malaise on the "Street", mused 
The market seems to be saying it’s seen the future and it doesn’t work". . 

The rest is history; the Bull rampaged. Joseph GranviBe. who had in T9£ 
envisioned the DOW collapsing "under 650“. was among the prophets of doom wfc - 
hid behind STAR WAR semantics to justify their myopia. Now that the DOW h* . 
slipped from the 1300 level, the "Crowd" is cringing, mesmerized by pariahs 
despair, the samespecies. who at $800 an ounze, urged investors to hoard preckx 
metals, antique Chinese commodes and other collectibles, awaiting a fisc 
Apocalypse. The United States has not united: Visigoths have not stormed theCra 
Horse Saloon in Paris; Blue Birds still fly over the white cliffs of Dover. 

Our forthcoming letter discusses why the DJI may catapult over 2.000, why ft 
“Power Elite" relishes downside spasms; corrections that enable them tobuyirr 
weakness, ultimately selling into strength, defying the manic-depressive behaviorr 
most investors and their guru's. 

As a piece de resistance, C.G.R. focuses upon two, low-priced, emorgir 
equities, with the dynamics to mature into prominence, as did a recent 
recommended junior oil and gas stock that gushed from $2 to$16. before a 4-1 sp 1 
as the result of the company discovering a major field in Texas. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to. or telephone: 


* 


Niffti 

jn f rt O hi HP®* 


■t ifrr U*d 







CAPITAL 

GAINS 



G.V.C. Capital Venture Consultants 
Amsterdam B.V. 

KatverstraatH2 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netheriandt 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex: 18536 


2K 


.= . m i 

*8.5* 


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Past petfonnancc docs not guarartoo luture resufl- 


12 Month 
Utah Low 


Stock 


SM. Cbu 

Dlv. Via. PE lOOsHiafl Low Quof. Ch'oe 


8 864 


23ft 11% HmFSD .. . 

9% 7 HtneG pf 1.10 142 77 

35 rev Hmjflto re J 44 1026 

14% 8V HmjfFn A0 29 5 14 

40V 43% Hondo JSa 3 M 5*2 

44% 44% Munwell 1.90 33 11 3501 

35ft 20 HoavrU 174 37 13 230* 

24% 19ft HraiBn 1.12 67 8 59 

24 20 HraBfl of 2.96*11 A X 


10 3% Horizon 

48% 34ft HaSPCa 50 
30% 22 Hafolln 140 
37ft 21% HouabM 94 
19% 13% HouFab AB 
37% 24 Heuafnf 125 


IJ M 3094 

93 13 17 

U M 53 

24 11 88 

9 Mil 


77% 61 HalMpf 625 83 32 

23% 18% Haulfld 2A8 114 6 7*1 


Sift 39% HouNG 
19 8 HouOR 

23V 13% HawfCP 
25% 20ft Hubbrd 
13% 9% Huffy 
21% 12ft HuahTl 
25 17V MootiSa 

33 21% Human 

27ft 17ft Hurt Ml 
41% 23% HuftEF 
25% IBV Hvdral 


2.12 42 12 4134 
2746247 129 

AO 22 2* 31 

228 84 12 
M 11 9 
AB 33 783 

22 13 • 10 

48 23 14 3204 
JO 19 14 24 

SS 23 18 939 
200 84 9 17 


23ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
7% 7% 7%— ft 
26% 25% 38 — ft 
14% 13% 13% — ft 
54% 55*4 55*4— ft 
59% 57ft 57*4 — ft 
34 V 33ft 34M+1MI 
24V 23% 33H— % 
25ft 25% 25ft + V 
5 5 5 

48% 48% 44%+ ft 
27% 27% 27% 

36% 38 36V + ft 

18ft 18 18%+H 

36V 34 34ft + ft 
75V 71 75 

23% 23 V 23% + ft 
51ft 49V SOft +1ft 
8% 8ft Bft + ft 
_ Mft 18% 18ft+ ft 
40 26V 28 26 —M 

43 T3ft 12% 12% 

14% MV 14% + V 
18ft 18% 18% — V 
29V 20% 29 + ft 
26 26 34 + V 

37% 37 37ft + ft 
25 24% 25 + % 


35% 21ft ICIrtok LM 44 II 
19% 18% I CM n 


!? * ~ is: of 


30 22ft 1CN pf 270 93 

17V 14 INAIfl 192 120 

25% 23 lPTbnn 

20 14% IRT Pr* U0 

41% 3% ITT Co 170 

44% 40 ITTpfK 470 

65 44ft ITT pfO £70 

49ft 42ft ITT Of I 

23 15V IU iltt 

40% » iduhoP 

23ft Uft I daalS 

25 17% UlPowr 244 104 

19 14ft llPawpf 213 12J 

35 27V HPowpf 4.12 114 

32ft 25 HPowpf 3JS 127 

SZV 4B% IIFowPf £75 1L1 

37 28% llPawpf 4A7 124 

33ft 25ft HPowpf 470 12 3 

34V 21V ITW* 74 19 M 


02 7 

8A 31 

4J0 7.1 7 

ire 7.1 48 

378 10 ~ 


32% 32 32V + ft 

17ft 17V 17ft + ft 
UV MH 11 — % 
28ft 20% 28ft 
14V 14 14 - ft 

‘ i— M 


m* 

35% 34% 3«* + V 


s £ft&:& 


39V 27% lrrpChm 76a 24 
9ft 5% ImpICp 
M% 8% INCO re IJ 
55% 45 indlMpf 778 114 
<1% 49 IncOM pf 776 122 
17% M ImflMpf 215 127 
18V 14% IndMpf 233 129 
28% 23% IndlMpf 373 124 
20% 17ft ImUGs* 148 72 
15 5ft fltoxcn .14 19 
24V 12V IRtmtc 
SOft 39ft InoerR 270 £7 17 
37ft 27% InaRpf 235 77 
15ft 10% InarTcc J4 42 20 
an* 19% IntdSN 70 21 
48ft 38% IMdSfpf 473 117 
21% M Insltao 170b £1 M 
11% 3% mopRs 


43 63 43 

241 17 14% 16%—% 

• 138 40% 40% 40% + % 
21 14 13% 13%+ % 

4 4793 3(% 24% 34% 

650* 18 17V 17V— % 

500* 35 35 35 + % 

100: 31% 31% 31% + M 
50 S3 X X + V 
2030* 34 35ft 35ft— % 
1 32% 32*6 32V + V 
238 34V 33 V 34V + % 


9 1273 37% 37V 37%—% 
12 306 8% 8% ■% + ft 

5685 13% 13 13V + V 

5®Z 53 53 53 — % 

10* » 59 59 — ft 

1 17 17 17 — M 

2 17% 17% 17% — ft 

3 2BV 28 28 — V 

4 25 25% 2Sft 2S%— ft 

1419 7% 7% 7% 

22 54 18 17% 17% 

450 45ft 44% 45V + ft 


8 

T7 

74 

3 

113 

12D3 


24V 11% HtfgRsc 6 144 

30% 19 JntgRpf 373 127 10 

37ft 25V IntoRpf 425 127 6 


13V 7V IntRFn 
19 15% Itrasa 

45V 55 Interco 
140 120 Inters* 

15% 9ft Infrftt 
53% 41 Intrlk 
14% 0% I turned 
24ft 14% IntAto 
138V 99 IBM 
24ft 15V IntCtrl 
29ft 22% IntFtav 
UV 5M IntHorv 
7ft 2% IntHrwf 
50 23ft IntHofC 
42 20% IriYHpfA 

34% 17% IntHpfD 
43% 32% IntMtn 
29% 23 Inf MU It 
57% 44 Inf Poor 2A0 
17% 9V IntRc* 


30 

64 

464 


31 30V 31 + ft 

12ft 12V 12ft— ft 
23ft 23ft 23% + ft 
43% 43% 4J%+ ft 
19% 19% 19% 

5% 5 S%+ ft 

16V 14 16V + ft 

24 23% 23%+ ft 

31 30% 31 + ft 

12% 12% n%— ft 

10ft Mft Uft + ft 
42ft 62ft 42%+ % 
2 135 125 135 
787 10% TOH 10% 

87 50% 50% 30%+ V 

409 9% 9% 9% 

71 17 9 29 19ft 19% 19% + M 

*A0 £5 12 9904 127% 126% 126% 

JO 1 J 9 34 20% 20% 20% + M 

1.12 33 IS 630 28ft 21 20%+V 

3044 10V 9% 10ft + V 

371 4% 6% 6% — ft 

10 4SV 48 48V + V 

7 38 36ft 38 +2 

244 31V 30*6 31V + % 

2M 44 12 1242 41% 40% 41 — % 

ire 43 9 11 28 27% 27%— ft 

44 26 1198 <9% 49ft 49ft— M 
14 111 13V 12% 12%— ft 


US 

2.10O1 1A 
378 44 12 
775 57 
M £4 4 
1*0 £1 8 


,£L. .2?* fntNIHl M 47 9 4057 54% 51% 5Zft + % 
183ft 128 Inftit ptJULS) £8 27 185 100 180 -Oft 

99 MV IntMtpfHBJO 104 204 97V 97V 97V 

27 fntobGn 178 24 » 243 — “ "" 

17V TO I lit Bohr 52 

20 15% IntsfPw 140 94 1 TO* 

19% 14V lowoEl 140 WJ 6 69 

KM 21ft lowllG 2J4 95 7 T61 

31% 25 lOWaRl 3J3B f-9 * 21 

38 I pa Ico 374 £9 0 BOO 

13% *** IpeoCp 34 IS 11 33 

15 23ft IrwBkl 14* 54 7 191 

54 42% IrvBkpf £150102 230 


38V 38 38% + % 

16 15V 15V— % 

I9M 19ft 19% + ft 
18% Uft 18% + M 
20% 28% 28% + % 
31% 31ft 31ft— V 
34V 33% 34 + U 

12V 11% 12M + ft 
34% 34% 34%+ ft 
50ft 50% 50% + ft 


30V 20 JWT* 

1.12 34 

13 

340 

28% 28V 


34ft 23ft J River 

56 13 

8 

602 

2SV 24% 



24% 13ft Jamswy 

.12 5 

10 

258 

22ft- 22V 

22ft- 


14V 10% JaunF 

1A46T14 


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12% 12ft 

12V - 


43 26% JeffPle 

ire 34 


29 

40ft 40ft 



29ft 24ft JerCPf 

<00 14J 


20l 

2BV 28V 

38V- 


17ft 54 V JerCpf 

946 144 


130* 

68ft 67 

67 — ft 

58 46ft JerCpf 

£12 K1 


80, 



56ft 45ft JerCpf 

748 134 


J03 

56ft 56% 

Sift +1 


£18 113 


2 

16 16 


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rn _?% Jewtar 


19 

4 

7% 7% 

7% 


H 


6% 4V HRT 
27% 19% HallFB 
44 26V HaJbtn 

lft % Hallwd 
10ft S% Halwdpf 
36% 25V HamPs 
13% lift HanJS 
W% 15% Hard I 
SSVi 25% Handim 
15ft HandH 
23ft 16V Hama 
£3% 23% HgrBrJ 
30ft lev. Harlnds 
12% 7% Harntsh 

33ft Mft HrpRw 
35 22% Harris 

1W8 lo% HarGrn 
X* 19 Harsco 

33% Z3Vi Harfmx 
14V 13% Hattfle 


13% 8 Haves* 

34% 23ft Hazhrtn 
Uft 9 HazLob 
13% 9% Hocks 
33ft 13V HWMM 
27 14% Hal lain 

25 15% Hollis 

49 32 Heinz 

30 12% HcfnaC 

25% M HeftnP 
6V 3% Ham Co 
12% 11% Heminc 
37V 27» Horcuf* 

24V 15% Herirc 
» 19% HerltCpflJO 

17 Mft HerSpfn 
42 28ft Hereby 
12% 5V Hesston 
Mft 9 Heetn pf 
44V 31 ft HcwiPk 
30 18% HOxcef 

19V 12 HlSbeor 
13 BM HlVolf 
26% 17ft Hllflbrt 
*3% 45ft Hilton 
44ft 31 Hlloeto 
52% 3SV Holiday 
81ft 52% HothrS 
27«k 12 HemcO 




50 

5V 

5V 

5V 


140 43 


831 

32ft 

23 

23ft 


140 64 

11 

1705 

31 

30V 

30V- 

% 

48 £4 

16 

1491 

1% 

IV 

IV— ft 

36 55 


268 

9V 

7ft 

9% 

- V 


s 

611 

32% 

31ft 

31V— V 

1A7M14 


49 

13% 

13V 

13% 


144a 94 


35 

19% 

19% 

19% + V 


IS 

191 

47% 

4716 

47% + ft 

M 34 

19 

114 

20ft 

19% 

19*4+ ft 

AO 11 

26 

W 

18% 

14% 

18% 


ire n 

13 

JH 

49% 

Nft 

48%+ ft 

46 14 

20 

299 

30% 

29ft 

30b + ft 


» 

427 

11% 

UV 

10ft- 

-% 

re 27 

13 

9 

29V 

29% 

29%- 

-% 

48 3.1 

12 

isss 

28% 

2J*6 

28 



8 

124 

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36*6+ V 

ire 47 

11 

24 

27% 

27 

Z7 - 

ft 

IJ8 If 

10 

489 

33 

32ft 

32ft— % 

ire ns 

10 

5 

15% 

15% 

ISV— V 

1J4 84 

9 

170 

2BV 

rev 

20% - 

% 


reo 14 7 A 
J* 1A 15 16 

32 37 17 16 

re 2J 97 
re U 37 1163 
AS) 24 10 190 
_J4 1.7 12 50 

1 A0 33 13 992 
IS 44 
34 1A 28 1008 
12 

JOe 7J 43 
140 45 9 394 
TSe J 37 147 
£2 13 

420 

2A 12 


1X0 


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M 

JO 

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170 

ree 

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30 
2 

4 16 4941 
13 IS 
2.9 24 
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22 13 
30 14 
7 II 
IJ 14 

U U 
31 


11% Uft UV 
38ft 24 V 24ft + ft 
ISV 10ft 10% + V 
12ft 12V 12% + M 
UV 14% M% 

17% 18% 17 + V 
22ft 21ft 21%— 1ft 
49 48 4SH+ % 

M% 14V 14% 

3<% 24ft 24ft — % 
S% Sft 5%— V 
12 12 12 
33% 22ft 32%+ ft 
24V 24ft 24M— M 
28% 38% 2BV— V 
14ft 14% 14% + ft 
199 42ft 41ft 41ft— V 


7ft 7% 7ft + V 
MV UV 11% 

34% 34 34 — V 

24V 26 24 - ft 

17% 17V 17V 

Uft lift 11%+ V 

25% 24ft 24ft— % 
40% 40ft 40ft + % 
33% 33ft 33ft— ft 
522 51V 51ft 51ft— ft 
29 77ft 77 77V 

847 17% 17ft 17ft + V 


10 

114 

798 

517 

US 


41ft 38 Jctaun 
44V 37ft JohnCn 
29% 21% Jaraen 
24% 15% JostoriE 
27ft 21% JovMh 


1J0 2J 15 4851 41 48ft -iSV— ft 

146a 4J 9 1615 42 40% 41ft— 9* 

170 34 M 7 26% 24ft 24% + % 

40 3A 14 109 23ft 23 33ft + ft 

1A0 SJ 14 133 25V 25 25V+V 


Mft 7% PCD l re 2A 9 183 Ift 8V Oft 
17 9% KLMi U 2035 17 14% 16% 

3*% 33 KMI pf 4J0 127 1 37ft 37ft 37ft 

41ft »% Kmart 174 3J 9 2304 33% 33 33% — % 

40ft 28 KN ElNI IAS 3J II 130 39% 38ft 3? + % 

19ft 12*6 KafjrAI 50 4A ~ T - 

»% 14% KatoCa 70 14 

30% 15V KatC pf 147 IA 

,16ft ■% Kmeb A0 4.1 
101% 87 Kaneb Pfl3J4ai4j 

rev Mv KctvPL are iiu s 

S4% Mft KCSou 170 27 11 
19M 12ft lUnGE 2J4 12A 4 
re% 28% KanPLf 236 BA 7 
71 17V KaPLDf 223 117 

*5 18 Katyin 

115 49 Katypf 

20 10% KaufBr 

Uft 12% Koufpf 
•8 48 Koufpf 

50V 28V Keflaoa 
34% 23 Keltwd 
4% 1 Kenal 
29V 19% Kanml 
24ft 23% KyUlll 
14% 10% KerrGI 
34V 26V KerrMc 
27% 16ft KevBk 
5% 2ft KavCon 
19% 14 Kenlrtf AKl 27 18 
38% 2tft Kktoe 14 u f 

>4 63% Kid DrB <00 57 

84 « KldpfC <00 57 

SS 2S? 273 44 10 2*29 

36% Mft KnoblRd 76 11 17 832 

25 P? 5° BBr ** 66 

Wft UV Kolmar 72 IJ 14 233 

2V >7ft Kasan 70 <2 » 99 

14 12% Karra n 171 

40% 29ft Kroger 200 57 11 485 

!L 40, 27 13 34 

gft 44% KvecerB 431 J 24 *4 

23V 13 Knar 40 <3 * 84 


1A4 IJ 
AO 14 6 
L30 97 
675 104 
ire 34 IS 
ire 34 7 


40 

2X4 


1.10 

ire 


£7 14 

37 * 
34 34 

m a 


448 13% 13% 13V + ft 
MB lift 15% UM + % 
7 MV 14M 16V 
4M 10 9% 9ft— M 

280* 88 88 88 
317 23ft 22% 23 +ft 
88 51V 50% 51 
19ft 19 If 
35V 34V 35ft + % 
SOft 19ft 19ft— M 
31 38V 37 — % 

97 97 97 — ft 

16% 16ft MH + V 
14% 16% 16%— % 
80% 80% 80% 

49ft 49ft 49ft— V 
32ft 31% 31ft— % 
IV 1ft Ift— M 
Sl% 21ft 21%— ft 
23ft 25% 25% 

11% Uft 11% 

31V 30% 31ft + ft 
36V 25ft Uft— ft 
3 2ft 3 + ft 
18% 18 18 + V 

34% 34% 34%— ft 
80ft Mft B0U— ft 
80ft Mft 80ft— ft 
49 48ft 41ft— ft 
34ft 36ft 34ft 

27W 2M re%— % 
w 16% I6%— V 
IM* 18% lift + ft 
U% 13% 13% 

40 39ft 48 
23% 23V 23%+ ft 
47 46 46 —1 

Mft 18% 18% — % 


342 

3B6 

5 

178 

2 

119 

4 

1 

313 

79 

129 

3 

144 

u 

546 

50 

19 

299 

139 

1 

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UMBtoit 
wan Law 


Slack 


S% 

Dlv. Vkt PE MteHlahLow 


17% II* LTV 
>1 MV LTV Of 
69 50ft LTV Pf 
18V 13 LTV pf 
IT 10% L Quint 
39% 15% LOCUM 

12% 7 LfHaroe 

311* » Lafropl 244 MA 
Mft 9V Lemur* re 28 4 

4ft 1% LamSa* 200 

Mft Mft Lowtlni J4 <3 11 

25V 13ft LearPt 70 14 11 

20% 20% LMTPRf 147 U1 
52% 37ft LearSa 140 17 9 
20% 14 LaaRtri* A-' 27 15 
35% Mft LlwvTr 1J0 44 13 
37% 21ft LeeEnt 
ISV 9 LtoMm 
21 15ft LaaPlat 
4V Sft LebVBl 
37 25 LVIn Pf 

15% 13% Lehmn IM12 
15ft 9% Lamar re U 21 

21% Mft LeucNt * 3 

2SS S,. » 

sm Sm Loff. 

7Tft 65 LQFpf 
BV 21% UofvCp 
79ft 53 Lilly 
40% MV Limited 
~ 26V UncNtl 

Ut£n 

S3S 

Loews s 170 

LoaJcon re 

Lorn Fin 1.16 34 12 


Sft 
3S II 

33ft 19 

Mft 14V LomMJj 


M 

47 

20V 

20ft 

20 % 


2% 2V LamMwt 
27% 17% LnStar 1J0 £6 
S3 44 LoneS Pf £37 11 J 

’ 3% LILCo 

Mft LILofE 
23V LILofK 
8ft LILPfX 
9 LILpfW 
9% LILPfV 
24V UV UL PflJ 
19ft 8% LILpfT 
S5V 27V LILofS 
15% 6 LILPfP 

17ft 7 LILpfO 

27ft 17 LonaO* 

33V lift Loral 
15 10% LoGenl _ . 

38 22V La Land 170 29 II 1810 

25*i 17 La ROC 40b 39 17 545 
32ft 20% LaPLPf <80 MJ 25 

23V 16% LoPLpf 114 134 27 

21V 22% LouvGs 2A4 84 7 534 



471 32% 31ft 
43 39 38% 

M 48V 45% 

7 74 74 

. 15 32Vk 31% J 

370 <1 11 1329 77% 78ft 7 

32 4 25 428 31% 38 t 

144 45 12 503 41% 41V 4 

234a M2 2 22 22 2 

270 2J M *40 68% 41ft 4 ~ 

A0* U 9 4445 49% MU 4 

40 24 11 471 31% 30ft 3 

5 1328 43% 42% 4 

A 20 54 31V 34 3 

■ a 

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59 

2 3250 

loot 22 22 

120* 41 41 

25 16% 14% i w 

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B 
II 
31 
9 

15 

4 

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14 18 565 
J5 <5 9 22 


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aeralb3Egribunt; 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U,S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 10 


AY f MARCH 29, 1985 


** 


Page 11 




TECHWOiOGY 

r^s Artificial 'Lung’ 
ters Nitrogen From Air 

By JOHN HOLUSHA 

New York Tima Service 

EW YORK — The air we breathe is largely useless. 
Seventy-eight percent of the mixture of gases we know 
as air consists of nitrogen, with essential oxygen mak- 
ing up only about 21 percent and various compounds 
^pe elements, such as carbon dioxide and argon, atyrn i^p' ng 

>i we breathe, we bring these gases into contact with a 
meable membrane, which is the Hning of our lungs. The 


d cells. 


the more abundant nitrogen is, for the most 
and exhaled. 

Co. has recently developed a device that r i s es a 
artificial lung to sepa- 
rogen from oxygen for 
xial use. It has no 
parts, but can, in ef- 
a 95 percent pure ni- 
jatofastrcamof corn- 
- air. Dow says this is 
t industrial use of the 
me technique for air 

on, although it has 

. ed in other applications, such as removing carbon dioxide 

ft liana. 

tandard means of splitting air into its constituent parts is 
ic, or requiring very low temperatures. The air is com- 
and cooled until liquefied and then allowed to. warm 


Nitrogen has 
important uses 
in the food 
industry. 


CAPITAL 

OWNS 

WttCARCH 



V. **' 

— CJAT. f. . 


m. 


# r 


The resulting products are 
, r . -red by pipeline to nearby users, nr by insulated tanlrar tn 
r ■‘■'sunt locations. 

ber method, called inert gas generation, simply consumes 
. xygen in an airstream by bunting a fuel, but the output is 
/-'..mated by combustion byproducts. 

itkOGHN has a variety of applications in the chamiaai 
md metal-processing industries. It also has important 
ises in the food industry where, by displacing oxygen, it 
long the shelf Hfe of packaged foods such as coffee and 
itips. It can also be used as & protective atmosphere in 
rtmg and storing fresh produce such as apples and pears, 
■vers, extending the storage life of apples by up to nine 

of the Dow device is a hollow fiber finer than a 
lair. The fiber is made of a polyolefinic plastic material, 
because it pennits the passage of oxygen, water vapor and 
iicudde at several times the rate of nitrogen. Polyolefinic 
hat the material involves a combination of olefins, or 
ited open-chain hydrocarbons. Almost 10,000 stiles 
! kilometers) of this fiber is packed into a tube that is four 
2 meters) long and about 10 inches in diameter. The large 
of fibers presents a very large surface to the incoming air, 
.enneation can take place. 'Die hollow cores of the fibers 
reded to a waste pipe. 

anpressed to 75 pounds (34 kilograms) to 90 pounds per 
ich — standard in most plants — is both the raw material 
driving force of the system. The air Is fed into a 
ed tube naming down the middle of the module and 
uniformly to the bundle of fibers. 

, ixygen, water vapor and whatever carbon dioxide is 
pmneate the fibers, while the nitrogen is swept past by 
she of incoming air. The oxygen-enriched airstream exits 
Caps on- each end rtf’ the unit, while the nitrogen is taken 
i a connection on the side. 

aid the units were capable of producing nitrogen of 95 to 
mt parity, although the output decreases as the purity 
lent increases. “Ninety-five percent purity is the most 
(Conthmed on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


i r 


■ _ fe jp 
ft 71 i 


-> 


. 4 

*'4 


Lots intorbank rates on March 28, excluding fees, 
w®* for Amsterdam, Brussels. Frankfurt, Mian, Pam. New York rates at 


5J. Yen 
133315 *1 »L55i 
2X34 MT 
11X11 • 1.2345 ■ 
33458 31X48 
75530 733 

344 25X00 
X5975W7J8* 

95J5 

1346" 

13954 180809 
341 2500? 


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1515 

4318 

17X895 • 

3697* 

0.1743 

- 

5412* 

ass 

7695 

20.1098 

659 

XM1* 

17313 

— 

3.11RS 

3337 

- 

3274- 

156 X 

8657 ■ 

6973 • 

1328 

— — 

3339 

117183 

2(45X93 

43243 

TUB 

149175 

244U0 

639 JO 

21025 

— 

54875 

31309 

— — 

13275 

IB) 

935 

17954) 

3335 

6X15 

WO 

11445 


— 

476Uk 

27036 

15.18* 

38375 

3M31 

KU9 

2438 

1X88 ’ 

7134 

399.11* 

24495 

33192 

8438 ■ 

27495* 

0.1321 

7497* 

61125* 

67175 

03845 

23341 

68245 

1.432.12 

von* 

449512 

&I87327 

088336 

107997 937941 1.94614 

Dollar Values 

34705 

417919 


U.S. Gap 
On Trade 
Worsens 

Exports Suffer 
Steep Decline 

The Associated Pros 

Washington — The us. 
trade deficit widened to SI 14 bil- 
lion in February, the worst showing 
since September, as exports suf- 
fered their steepest decline in sevea 
years, the government reported 
Thursday. 

The Commerce Department said 
last month's deficit was 11 3 per- 
cent higher than the 5103-billion 
deficit recorded in January, and 
was the biggest monthly imbalance 
since an 5113-billion deficit last 
September. 

The deterioration in February 
resulted from an 8-perceoi drop in 
export sales, the largest monthly 
decline since a 103-percent fall in 
January 1978. 

Last year, the United States had 
a record 51233-billion merchan- 
dise trade defidL Commerce Secre- 
tary Malcolm Baldrige has predict- 
ed the deficit this year will climb to 
5140 billion. 

The country's poor trading per- 
formance has been blamed in part 
on the high value of the dollar, 
which makes UK goods more ex- 
pensive and harder to sell overseas 
while increasing Americans* appe- 
tite for cheaper imports. 

Commenting on the worsening 
figures, Mr. Baldrige noted that for 
the first two months of the year fee 
deficit was running at an annual 
rate of SI 30 billion, worse than last 
year’s 51233-bdlUon imbalance. 

“U.S. exporters continue to 
struggle with the handicaps im- 
posed by the strong dollar, slower 
growth abroad and by foreign im- 
port barriers,” Mr, Baldrige said. 

“Further increases in imports 
and higher trade deficits lie ahead," 
he added, noting that even with the 
dedines in recent days, the dollar is 
still valued 22 percent above its 
December leveL 

As usual the United Slates sus- 
tained its largest trade deficit with 
Japan. This was 542 billion, 152 
percent above the S3.7-biIlion im- 
balance in January. The defiat 
with Canada was 51.8 billion; with 
Taiwan, Sl.l billion; and with 
Western Europe, SI. 9 trillion. 

The department said overall im- 
ports dropped 13 percent in Feb- 
ruary, falling to 5293 billion com- 
pared with 529.7 billion in January. 
The drop came from an 11.8-per- 
cent decline in petroleum imports, 
which in turn offset increases in 
imports of Japanese cars, clothing, 
and motor vehicle and tractor 
parts. Imports of cars from Japan 
rose 47 percent in February to a 
total of SI 36 billion. 

The February decline in exports 
reflected decreases in sales of vari- 
ous manufactured goods and agri- 
cultural commodities. 

Sales of aircraft, electrical ma- 
chinery, office equipment, automo- 
biles and fertilizers were all down 
from then January levels, the de- 
partment reported. UK sales of 
manufactured goods totaled 512 
billion in February, down 9.9 per- 
cent from the January level 


Sheraton Gains a Foothold in China 

Prestige Hotel 
Turns to U.S. 


Management 

By John F. Bums 

New York Timer Service 

BEIJING — John Kapioltas 
smiled when someone suggested 
Sheraton Corp.’s entry into the 
hotel business in China, was Iflrw 
the cavahy riding in. 

“1 wouldn’t say we see it quite 

tike that,” the Chair man of the . 

hotel chain said recently, refer- 
ring to his company’s contract, 
signed March IS, to take over 
management of the Great Wall 
Hotel 

The $75-mflHan luxury hotel is 
a prestige project owned jointly 
by a UK company, E-S Pacific 
Development & Construction 
Co., ana the Chinese state tourist 
monopoly, China International 
Travel Service. It represents the 
largest single investment involv- 
ing UK interests since Deng 
Xiaoping reopened China to for- 
eign equity holdings six years 
ago. 

Mr. Kapioltas, 57, was here to 
sign the ma nagem ent contract 
that gave the nTKJwned Shera- 
ton Corp. its first foothold in a 
communist country. With : 
sentatives of the owners Ic 
on, he was reluctant to say what 
many people in Beijing have 
known for scone time: tnat the 
hotel badly needed an injection 
oT professional management of 
the kind that a large UK hotel 
chain could provide. 



1 . *» I ■ * . 1 

i wit nun mmuxona 

Guards posted outside the Great Wall HoteL 


For months before the Shera- 
ton agreement, there was talk 
that afi was not well at the Great 
Wall, the 22-story tower of shim- 
mering gray steel that stands 
over the flat brown landscape of 
Beijing. The hold, which opened 
in December 1983, has been 
troubled by thin patronage at its 
10 restaurants and lounges, low 
room occupancy outside the 
tourist season and difficulty in 
main taming four-star standards 
among its 1,700 Chinese employ- 
ees. 

Spokesmen far the hold’s U.S. 


co-owner, E-S Pacific, have an- 
swered published reports that 
the hotel was in financial trouble 
by insisting that, its finances were 
sound. But diplomats here say 
negotiations last year with the 
London-based bank syndicate 
that put together the original 
loan package led to a “stretching 
out" of the repayment terms, and 
that at least one participant. Al- 
lied Bank International, balked 
at the new terms. 

The Great Wall has come to 
symbolize Mr. Deng’s controver- 
(Contipned oo Page 13, CoL 2) 


Pickens Group 
Says Next Target 
May Be Unocal 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — An investor 
group led by T. Boone Pickens, a 
Texas oilman, said Thursday that it 
was considering seeking to yin 
control or restructure Unocal 
Corp., an international oil compa- 
ny with annual sales of SI 1.5 bil- 
lion. 

In the past, the Pickens group 
had said only that it had been buy- 
ing stock in Unocal for investment 
purposes. 

Thursday's disclosure came a 
day after the group, known as Mesa 
Partners U, said it had bought 6.7 
million shares or Unocal stock for 
$321.6 million, in creasing its hold- 
ings in the Los Angeles-based com- 
pany to 133 percent of its stock. 

Unocal, the most active slock on 
the New York Stock Exchange on 
Thursday Tor a second straight day. 
closed at 549.625 per share, up 52 

Mesa Partners 11 now has spent 
51.05 billion to buy 23.7 million of 
Unocal's 173.7 million common 
shares outstanding. 

Mr. Pickens is chairman of Mesa 
Petroleum Co., which has head- 
quarters in Amarillo, Texas, and 
which holds a 90-percent interest in 
the investment partnership. 

In the past, Mr. Pickens has 
launched takeover fights against 
Goes Service Co., Gnu Corp. and 
Phillips Petroleum Co. 

Although he has not succeeded 


in those bids. Mr. Pickens and his 
partners have earned hundreds of 
millions of dollars by either selling 
their stock back at a profit or by 
being outbid by other suitors. 

The Pickens group said Thurs- 
day that it was seeking a two- 
month postponement of Unocal’s 
annual shareholders* meeting, 
which is scheduled for April 29, so 
directors and shareholders can 
evaluate any plan the partnership 
□tight submit. 

Although no plan was disclosed, 
the Pickens group said it could of- 
fer to buy a controlling interest of 
the company. Other alternatives, it 
said, would be a company program 
to repurchase Unocal stock from 
shareholders or the sale or distribu- 
tion of Unocal's assets. 

The group also said that if share- 
holders agreed to adjourn the meet- 
ing until June 28, it might put for- 
ward its own candidates for the 
Unocal board. 

Barry Lane, a Unocal spokes- 
man. declined comment on the an- 
nouncement 

Earlier this week, however, Fred 
Hartley, chairman of Unocal at- 
tacked corporate raiders in general. 

“We must eliminate the legal fic- 
tions, tax code twists, the easy 
money, and (he speculative mania 
that's making it so simple to de- 
stroy productive companies, H Mr. 
Hartley said. 


France Said to Seek Trade-Money Tie in Talks 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France has threatened 
to block negotiations on trade lib- 
eralization that have been sought 
by the Reagan administration, un- 
less the talks are accompanied by a 
commitment from major industri- 
alized countries to reform the 
world, monetary system, French 
and UK officials said Thunday. 

Reagan administration officials 
in Washington, speaking on the 
condition that they not be identi- 
fied, rejected linking trade and 
monetary reform. 

France and the European Com- 
munity Commission want mone- 
tary reform placed high on the 
agenda at the annual summit meet- 
ing of major industrialized democ- 
racies, in Bonn on May 2-4. The 
leaders of the United States. 
Frances West Germany, Japan, 
Britain, Italy, Canada and the EC 
Commission will attend. 

“We might be willing to talk 
about monetary issues at Bonn, but 
there can be no question of mone- 
tary reform, as toe French are de- 
scribing it, being tied to the trade 
round,” a U.S. official said 
“What’s more, it’s not a question of 
whether we have the round, but 
who wiQ be there, considering (the 
impact of] our huge trade denaL.’ 

The Reagan administration has 
repeatedly called for a round of 
trade talks in 1986 and has urged 


that participating governments fo- 
cus on reducing barriers in services, 
high technology and agriculture. 

The foreign ministers of the 10 
EC countries meeting in Brussels 
on March 19 endorsed the talks, 
which would be held under the aus- 
pices of the Genera] Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. They stopped 
short of agreeing on a date. 

Jacques Attali, representing 
President Francois Mitterrand dur- 
ing recent summit preparatory 
meetings in West Germany, said 
France would not agree to a date 
for the trade talks until there afro 
was agreement to discuss monetary 


reform, according to officials who 
attended the meetings. It was the 
toughest such statement to date by 
a European official 

Under EC roles, which require 
unanimous approval for trade ne- 
gotiations, France can block the 
community from agreeing to start- 
ing the talks. 

In tones that a participant de- 
scribed as “strident and tough,” 
Mr. Attali said trade and monetary 
reform were linked and that pro- 
gress on resolving the issues should 
proceed concurrently. 

He proposed that the summit 
leaders in Bonn not only endorse 


monetary reform, but that an inter- 
national conference on monetary 
reform be held in Paris neat year, 
with the International Monetary 
Fund handling the preparations. 

He reportedly said that a major 
goal was strengthening die wond 
monetary system and stabilizing 
currency values. And he reportedly 
said that the preparations for the 
conference should be based cm a 
study on the monetary system to be 
presented in Bonn. That study had 
been ordered at the summit in Wil- 
liamsburg. Virginia, in 1 983. 

Mr. Attali was not immediately 
available Thursday for comment. 


U.JL Bank Cuts 
Its Base Rate 

Agence France- Prase 

LONDON — National 
Westminster Bank PLC re- 
duced its base rate on Thursday 
from 133 percent to 13 percent 

It is the bank's second reduc- 
tion of the base rate within a 
week and was prompted by the 
rise of the pound on foreign 
exchanges. 

The base rate determines 
what interest (he bank charges 
to borrowers and pays to depos- 
itors. All other rates are scaled 
up from this rata 


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” Senate Presses Reagan 
To Curb Japan Imports 


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Japan 

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***■ CoamerttianlL, CrSan Ly> 
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and Ivrsov Ne*i Vorfc Cnmw cunan' eontroo. 
All WlCM M VJM own*- 
Sonnet.- fteutors. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
passed a resolution Thursday urg- 
ing President Ronald Reagan to 
retaliate against Japanese ' 
unless Tokyo gives UK . 
greater access to its markets. 

“Our patience is exhausted," 
Senator David Boren, Democrat of 
Oklahoma, declared before the 
Senate approved the nonbindmg 
resolution on a 92-0 vote. He called 
Japan’s $37-MHon surplus in trade 
with the United Stales in 1984 “an 
intolerable situation.” 

The Senate’s vote came cm the 
beds of an announcement by Japa- 
nese officials that they would in- 
crease their nation’s auto exports to 
the United States in the year start- 
ing Monday by 25 percent, to 23 
million vehicles. 

A White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said Mr. Rea ga n 
was “extremely disappointed” by 
the Japanese announcement. Mar- 
lin Fxtzwater. another spokesman, 
added, “Our position remains that 
we want more access to other [Jap- 
anese] markets.” 

The Senate action also followed 
a C o mmerce Department report 
that showed that the United States 
suffered an SI 1.4-billion foreign- 
trade deficit last month. As usual 
the largest deficit was with Japan. 

The resolution came as negotia- 
tors neared a deadline for decisions 
that could determine if Japan will 
open its market to perhaps S2 bil- 
lion in American tdeconummica- 
tioDS equipment 

It urged Mr. Reagan to obtain 
more markets to offset the estimat- 
ed S4 billion in additional amo 
sales, or retaliate with tariffs and 
quotas. Mr. Reagan could do so 
under the International Trade Act 
of 1974. 

Lionel Ulmer, chief UK negoti- 
ator in the tdeoomxnumcations 
talks with Japan now underway in 
Washington, told a House pa&tt he 
would be “less than candid if I 


suggested to you that success is 
assured by Apia l. r 

On Monday, the Japanese will 
set regulations for equipment that 
may be sold to Nippon Telephone 
& Telegraph, a government mo- 
nopoly that is bong transformed 
into a private corporation. 

Mr. Ulmer, undersecretary of 
Commerce for international trade, 

told the idwnnmumieari nrw sub- 
committee of the House Energy 
and Commerce Committee that, 
even if U K objectives in the talks 
were achieved, there could be no 
assurance the Japanese would im- 
plement them. 

Mr. Ulmer said he was uncon- 
vinced that retaliatory action was 
needed but said measures such as 
the Senate resolution 
Senator John Danfi 
can of Missouri, and Mr. 
were “useful” to impress on the 
Japanese that Congress is upset at 
the trade gap. 

Senators warned that unless Ja- 
pan responds favorably, stronger 
measures wiL soon appear on the 
Senate floor. 

In Tokyo, the Japanese govern- 
ment turned aside harsh criticism 
from the UK Congress and Rea- 
gan administration and fo rmally 
a p p roved on Thursday the raising 
of its voluntary auto-export quota 
to the United States. 

The minister of international 
trade and indnsuy. Keijiro Murata, 
saw! at a news conference that the 
decision was intended to foster 
good relations with the United 
Stares by providing for “modera- 
tion” in growth of auto exports. 
These have been restricted far the 
last four years voluntarily. 

The current quota, which expires 
on Sunday, is 1.85 million cars a 
year. 

Japan *21 continue to wort, to 
reduce its mounting trade surplus 
with the United States, Mr. Murata 
Tokyo mil continue efforts 
the Japanese market, he add- 



For the man with exceptional goals, 
anew dimension in banking services. 


TV hat 

fvmen 


makes Trade Develot 


elop- 
ement Bank exceptional? To 
start with, there is -our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well. For example, 
trade ana. export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
your needs, wherever you do 
business. Reason: We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 89 offices in 39 
countries, to bring you a whole 
new dimension in banking ser- 
vices. 

While we move fast in serv- 
ing our clients, we’re distinctly 
traditionalist in our basic poli- 
cies. At the heart of our business 
is the maintenance of a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 
portfolio of assets is also well- 
diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
servative ratio of capital to 
deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity- sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
with us soon. 

TDB banks in Geneva, London , Paris. 
Luxembourg, Cbiasso , Mon ft Carlo, 
Nassau, Zurich. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 62.8 billion and shareholders' 
equity of US$ 44 billion. 



Ttade Development Bank 


Shorn) at left, the bead office 
of Trade Development Bank. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 





f 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29 , 1985 


Thursdays 


I n Month sja. npff 

! High Low Stock Qhr.YM.Pg 1009 HMf LOW Quot.Orae 


12 Month 
HtehLow Stock 


IHMlLawOlXHr.Ol'Bf iHWiLaw Stock 


Ont I i2MPdtn 
» Low Owrf cn'og ! HtehLow Wc*, 


Ste. Gob* 

CHv VW. PE MBtHIBULwOWt-ng 


17 Month 
HMALW* 


ms a 


38% 3IM Norton IN +7 12 86 35% 35 35* + % 

XZVH im Nanst 1J0 U 14 n 2Mb 26 26V* — % 

51% ant Nova 29% TJ 13 1772 28 37 27*— « 

m. 26 Nucor JO 12 11 38 3£* 34* 34* — * 

Pft 3 NutrtS -OBI 304 3* M »+% 

83V. 58% NYNEX 640 +0 8 78A »% TO* 79V. _ 


Closing 


Tobias include the nationwide Prices 
up to the ciosinp on WaH Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
H Krh Low Slack 


Sts. class 

Dht.Yld.PE IQOlHiah LcwQuffl.Ol'pc 


(Continued from Page 10) 


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63 51 

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47 41 

62* 409k 
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NAFCO I JO SO 
NBD 240 4.1 
NBI 

NCH J2 35 
NCNB TJ2 34 
NCR s J38 3.1 
NLInd 20 1 3 
NUI 232 47 
NVF 

NWA M 22 
NMncB 248 45 
NOlCD L20 5LD 
Nashua 

NatCan 1J0 24 
Nicnvs M 24 
NatDlst 220 7.1 ; 
NatEdu 

NatFGS L8B 7J 
NQTGyO 200 44 
NtHom 

Nil 25 2 

NMedE 52 12 
NMlneS 

NIPrest 120 34 
NISemi 

NtSvdn 120 34 

N Stand AO ZB 

Korean 48a +3 
NcvPw 276 94 
Nevppf 140 112 
NOVP Pf 123 114 
NOVSvL 40 42 
N Eng El 340 92 
NEnPpf 276 112 
NJR9C 204 72 
NYSEG 244 102 
NYSP4A 3210122 
NYSBf 212 12T 
NYSpfD 3.75 132 
Nowell 20 30 
Nowhal 44 14 
NCWfUf <70*300 
NwtllRt 480 72 
Nownit 120 23 ; 
M llDO rt 

NlaMP 200 114 
NiaMpf 340 126 
NIOMOt 320 132 
NiaMpf 4.10 127 
NlaMaf 485 133 
NlagSh 1X3024 
Nlcofot .12 2 : 

NICOR 304 100 
NoMAf .12 2 : 

NarfkSo 340 S3 
Narlln 

NorsJr 240 6.1 
Nontr pf +72rl+0 
Nertok os 2 
NACoal LOO 12 
NAPtlll 1O0 24 
NEurO 1440 94 
NoestUt 128 102 
NlndPS 126 124 
NIPS of 427O104 
NoStPw 324 74 
NSPwpf 340 114 
NSPpf 4.16 10 2 
NSPwpf 724 112 
NSPwpf 700 114 
NorTof JO 
Nfhaafa 

Norms 120 22 ' 
NwCP Of 542012J 
Nwtlnd 248 SO 
NwSfW 


20 19% 
58% 58* 
14% 14% 

21 20* 

37 36% 
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11* 11% 

41% 41% 
59% 59 
34 23* 

26* 25* 
419b 41* 
14% 13% 
32% 30% 
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27% 27 
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28* 27% 
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10 * 10 % 
26% 25* 
11 % 11 
29% 29% 
14% 14% 
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: 14* 13% 
16* 16* 
10* 10% 
39* 38* 

26 24 
25* 25% 
23% 23 
24* 24* 
17% 17% 
28% 28% 
I69h 16% 
46% 46% 
15% 7516 
9% 9th 

43% 43% 
2% 2 
13% 17% 

27 27 

27* 27* 
32* 32* 
36% 36% 
15% 15% 
14% 14* 
30% 30% 
15% 15* 
64% 64% 
15% 15% 
39% 39% 
47% 47 
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52% 52* 
39 38% 

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44 44 

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45 

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PPG 120 42 
PSA 20 15 
PSA CW 150 10J 
PacAS 154 12.1 
PocGE 1X2 100 
PaCLtg 322 7 J 
PcLum 120 42 
PocRes JKr 2 
PacstspfMffl 115 
PacSd 20 27 
PacTsto 172 8.1 
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Pociicp 232 as 
Podfpf 407 122 
PalaWb 20 12 
PalnWpfUS 73 
PalmBe 1J0 3.1 
PanASk JO IS 
PaaAm 
PanA wt 

Pondckn 30 12 
PcnfiEC IM 62 
PaniPr 

Pan ft 20 42 

Pardvn 

ParkEs 

PorfcDrt .16 22 
ParkH 1.12 35 
ParkPn 22 25 
PnfPtrl 

PoyNP 20 42 
POVCstl .16 2 

Paahdv 20 25 
Parao 
Pan Con 

Panntr 2X6 52 
Pa PL 256 97 
PaPLpf 420 125 
PnPLpf 450 13J0 
PaPLdpf322 128 
PaPLcfprZXO 123 
PaPLdPf025 125 
PaPLdPf275 13JJ 
PaPLpf 924 11 J 
PaPLPrilJO 120 
PaPLsr 870 130 
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PaopEn 120 72 
PPpBoy AO 1.1 
PepsiCo 128 XI 
P*rk El 56 23 
Prmlon 126*14.4 
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Pelrta 120 4L2 


12 787 31% 
9 763 37% 
342 34 
1013 19* 
42 129b 

7 910 17% 

12 211 43% 

13 56 25* 

8 7% 

15 17% 
II 44 14* 

8 1411 70% 

1 10 % 

8 274 27% 

33 32% 
a 844 39% 
36 31* 

14 Ml 39* 

9 31 28 

2460 4* 

M 2% 

16 41 T7% 

W 3992 39 

17 906 S 

14 255 17% 
28 878 14 
11 44 15 

471 6* 

10 604 32* 
31 265 18% 

13 110 2% 

11 M0 12* 
II 1599 20% 

98 \ 

11 384 51 

I 3327 479h 
I 692 26% 
30z 34 
35 

7 26* 
32 23% 
17 25% 
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lOOl B4 

120z 92 

270102 67* 

12 35 39% 

2B 23* 

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2410534 54* 

14 260 25 

7 269 8% 

14 165 18% 
14 125 24 


30%+ % 
37%— % 
23*— * 

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17*— * 
43%+ * 
25* + % 

7*— % 
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14% — % 
70* + * 
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38% — % 
77* — % 
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84 —1% 
92 +1* 
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53%+ % 
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23*— * 


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PTrtJtv 1JXM205 
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PMhiO 

Photo nr SJO uu 
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PooaPd 20 34 35 
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Portrof 550 69 
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PaGnf 1150 114 
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POrGpf 422 134 
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PatEJpt 244 19 
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PSInpf 1JB 149 
PSInpf 7.15 164 
PSInpf 852 164 
PSInpf 8X8 165 
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PSwEG 272 95 7 
PSEGpf 140 112 
PSEGPf 4.18 122 
PSEGpf X0S 122 
PSEGpf 117 115 
PSEGpf 620 124 
PSEGpf 243 113 
PSEG pfHE ill 
PSEGpf 7J0 112 
PSEGpf 942 124 
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PuaMo .16 14 8 
PR Cera 5 

PueetP 1X6 124 9 
PullaHcn .12 X 25 
Purotot 156 54 12 
Pyro 7 


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138 U% 
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3612 4316 
3133 30% 
179 48* 
2641 38% 
1414 ISH 
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UK 30% 
aoz 32% 
ISO* 61 
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300* 67 
230* 56 
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ST 32% 

2 32% 
82 33 
1161 28% 

2 85* 
200z 42 
112 22 % 
30 37* 

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227 22% 
36619 55* . 
13 13* 

10 40* 
1348 20* 

10 18% 
460 7% 

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28* + % 


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50*— 1* 
4% 

TO* + * 
10 %+ % 
14% — % 
13% — % 
10 % — % 
11% 

25*+ * 
27%+ % 
12% — % 
34 +1 
39% — % 
17% — % 
54% 

19* 

Wl%+ % 
64 +Hk 
76* 

J*+ » 
10 * 

7% 

14*— th 
16%+ * 
23%+ * 
0% — % 


29 5* *5 *2 *%_* |i% 43% turtCo 2X0 46 11 .SZtS^iSSSi* 

* 11 ii 55 **TTzt SHnJWSgiS** 

2.2X10 SJ&aTaKS. 

\sl ig ? 2 zzTgx j# m 1 2 szBhzz 

I4M X5 6 402 Xffl 29% 29% —1 21% 16% SYBrwl 1J8 SjJ 11 194 }*** g* g 4 * ™ 

U 2 IS a 26 * 36 * am- * »4 a% stmo i uo ?x n a a » 

"v sssssss* » uii.™ sas*;. 

w a* S* s nm xi u is itf am am 


n% 7% Rn4H 40 4j a Tit « jv «■+>■ 

27% M% mwntpfxil MU 3» X X ** 
16* 9% RBRSf UhHJ X A a% U 13 — % 

IT* 9 tecnEe n Tin TJ* 13% 13%— * 

12% 8 Raima X 1* 1+ 334 tob 1* £»— * 

18* 7% Rata 39 6 m •% fJJ 

!% % Rkftrf 52 % % %— % 

x 7s Raunc jo n u ttt » am am— % 

6 % a* ftepAb- )1 319 4 % 4 6 — % 

2 1 % AtpAwl 139 1 % T% 1 % 

25% 9% RaoGVB J6 27 10 M 21% 21 21%. 

45* B% RenNY U6 O 7 X 41% 41% 4i% + % 

51% 52 MY P<A 645*1%] 45 55* 55 56 — * 

34% 21% RanSk 164 u i 42 xra 29% 29%— 1 

at* art Renakptzja is a 36 * 36 * am— * 

W% 06* RMHWodrXMax X *4*93*94* 

X 2 u 22 a* 2 B* X 38 *+ * 
JO U n 1517 24 * 31 % 24 % 

75 13% 12 12* 

IX* 52 f2 2519 X?% 36* J*%+ * 

JU 32 II M 19% 19% 19%— % 

M 15 9 lit T3% 13% H* 

UQ f2 I 2036 85H >4% M*- * 

+10 XX 4 49* 49% 49%—% 

7 rant torn n«%—% 

IJ0 32 6 3H a* X 36* +1* 
12* <2 to 431 31* 38% 30%— H 
IJ8 MX a 17* 17% 17% — % 
JO UP W 31* 31 31 

II T] 5 4% 5 + % 

i.n ax * 22 xm am am— % 

wo 4.1 X 143 at* XJk 39*- % 
1* IS 21* 21* 21* 

zx idt 6 aa 28% x ao* 

244 7j f m 34* 34 a* + % 

120 2X IB 1693 X* 38% 38%— % 

200 U 9 93 61% *1 61 — % 

» 30 51% 50% 51% + * 
J0eU32 a 5 Sa% 22 % 22 %+* 
JOSe 3 X 774 24 21* 23%— * 

M *4 M 1C 10% J0% 18% 

63 2% 2* 2%+* 

M +0 W 56 U* 15% 15% + % 

1.12 11 U 60 29* 29% 29%— % 

JO JIM 3711 9* 1% 9% + * 

227* u 5 as 56% 55* 55% + % 
II 245 14% 14% 14*+% 
J4 UI7 M 46% 46% 46%— % 
IS 86 22% 21* 21*— * 
X6U8 » 17* 17 17% + % 

UO 45 13 4 22% 27* 22* 

60 25 9 M>2 24% 24* 34V. — % 

60 2J14 nn%x%2i%+% 

5 1 14% M% 14% 


31% W% SfrfMin 
19% 14% sonoRt 

m 3 % svousn 


46 X If* tt%+ % 
« U% U* *4% + % 
n % s% s% ♦ % 


S% » uatotte jo X 
9% M* IMteff 40U 
37% 18% IMbM IjM +T 
33% n« UKLOOf uo u 
X a UOOOH M0 18 
n% a uwwna u u 


Sict §*«%«%-* ^ ^ *5? ,J0 K 8 

u BS m I* m- * 34 34* 5«nCn A* IX w ?i *?% 7% 


3* M* IMM 
37% 18% UnfkPd 


ri’l 

fcilr 1 


T « 49% 41% + * <1 23% USUPf 1 

* »*TB iom+1% *% m wm** i 


•% O* UOM UM4MU 4 

B% X* more. 2X2 Ml t AM 





^ S%^KSRSijJ 

x +* 18% 15% UtPLM 2J4 OJ 


IPI 



35 


S 


44 28% OuakOs 1X4 21 73 435 44% 43* 44 + * 

33* 15 QuokSO 20 3X 27 309 21% 21% ZI*— * 

11% 6% Ouanax 34 28 8* 8% 8%—* 

34* 23 Qvestar 160 +7 9 1055 34* 33 34 +1 

25* 14 QkRefl X4a 12 19 68 23% 33 X* + * 


17% 6* 
43% X* 
35 X 
97* 71 
31* 24% 
35* 29* 
9* 6* 
4* 3 
18 12* 
11 * 6 * 
42% 25 
8* SVk < 
21* 16% 
9* 3% 
66 47% i 

17% 8% . 

48* 34* : 


8* 8th 
41% 40* 
: IS 34 
94* 93* 
31% 30% 
34% 34% 
7% 7 
4% 4 
15 14% 

10 9* 

42* 41* 
7% TH 
18* 18* 
4* 4% 
58% 57* 
13% 13* 
45* 44* 


8*+ Vk 
41 + % 

34 — % 
94* +1% 
30%+ * 
34% 

7 — % 
4%+ % 
14% 

9%+ U 
41%+ * 

m— % 

ii*— * 
4*— % 
57% + % 
12* 

44% 


U.S. Futures March 2S 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open High Low Close Chs. 


Season Season 
HKltl Low 


Open Htoh Low Close Che. 


ORANGE JUICE (HYCE) 
l&ooaib*^ cents per lb. 


Season Season 
Hleh Low 


Open High Law dose Che. 


WHEAT (CBT1 

SON bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
4J5 3X2% May 3X8 358* 

320 3X4* Jut 334% 3X5* 

3X6% 3X6 SOP 3X4% 3X4% 

368% 3X6 DOC 145 3X5 

3X4% 360% MOT 329 350% 

482 367 MOV 

Est.Salee Prev. Sales U9S 
Prey. Dav Open Int 3+416 upsbs 


111400 

15100 

Mav 

163X0 

18485 

15500 

Jul 

16240 

18200 

157X5 


142X0 

mao 

15700 

Nov 

16050 

18000 

15600 


16100 

177 JO 

156X0 

Mar 


1 6250 

16000 

May 
Jul . 


Est. Sates 300 Prav. Sates 

Pray. Day Open Int. +443 up ■ 


X260 X070 Jwl 

Est Sales 2X29 Prev. Sates 1253 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 11X08 up MS 


FRENCH FRANC (I MM3 

i!srrrr^iss o !.o«> ™ 

JIM30 J®500 5«P -104141 +£ 

-0967D J0M70 Dec .11085 +35 

Est Sales 1 Prev. Sales 333 
Prev. Day Open laL 171 up 250 


IS* 357% -an* 
3X3 3X4% —an* 

3X2% 3X3% — J1 


363* 344% — JO* 
349 349* —J30* 

346% — JQ% 


COPPER CCOMEX) 
25200 IbaL- cents per lb. 


CORN (CRT) 

52H bu mini mum- dollars per butorel 
3X0 269* May 279 220 

3X1 273 Jul 2X9* 220 

3X1% 266% Sap 270* 2X1 

2.95 260* DOC 265 265% 


2.95 260* Dec 265 265% 

310 269* Mar 2X4 274* 

3X1* 274* MOV 2X9* 220% 

224 221 Jul 222* 223* 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 17460 
Prav.DayOpenlnt.KMM up 1.170 
SOYBEANS ICBTJ 
SAX) bu minimum- dal lore per bushel 


2X8* 2X9* +20* 
278* 2S0 
270 271 

264% 265* +20* 
2X3 2X3* +20* 

279* 220 % +20* 
221% 223* +50* 


6340 

62X5 

Apt 

61X5 

61X0 

61X5 

61.55 

— xo 




61AS 

A? A* 

61X0 


—.15 

B8XS 

9700 

Jul 

6250 

62X5 

tavi 

6365 

—05 

82.10 

57J0 

S*f> 

6365 

63X0 

62J5 

63J0 

+.15 

8+25 

B+20 

5850 
59 JO 

Ok 

Jan 

63X5 

6185 

6325 

41X5 

63X5 

7400 

61.10 


6+53 

6500 

4+55 

6445 

+.15 



JUI 

65X0 

65X0 

6500 

4540 

+20 

7050 

78X0 

65X0 

63X0 

6400 

65X0 

Sop 

DM 

Jan 

6550 

6620 

6550 

6SXS 

6670 

<6X5 

+XS 

+J0 

+J0 


GERMAN MARK tIMM) 

I per mark- 1 paint equals 802001 
I J733 .2KB Jon X234 2238 2201 2223 49 

2M5 2930 Sen 224* 2MB 2232 3253 49 

J610 2F71 Dec X295 2295 J275 2291 +9 

2251 Mar 3339 +9 

Est. Sates 30048 Prev.Sales 39204 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 51X33 0(11X53 


250 4J II 445 
» 2i 
J0 UQ E 
JW X 29 25 

278eK4 87 

31 UU H 
73 164 

40 U 23 99 

UO +9 10 1057 
J2 IX 12 125 
1X2 El 7 14 

ixo iix n 
n 

.16 4 14 412 

453# 7J 300 
2.10 82 t 397 
AM HI 133 
SO 1 
56 L5 16 2HB 
l« l2d 17 
1J0 38 10 4887 
140 46 $5 3 

X0 U 47 t 
U0 84 7 M 
1X4 67 3 

1X8 126 4 


150 123 7 

zm 13 i an 
ui un KM 
1-2D II t 5053 
.12 LI W S4M 
24 26 12 347 

10 m 

1.12 3J 9 1952 
52 36 10 32 

LSI 32 14 IS 
42 1.1 7 241 
L46 124 9 

2.10 l+O 38 
2.10 14J 42 

At ZD J 145 


20 ii 9 ns 

14 22 

40 U 15 50 

U0 3.9 S 470 

UO 26 IS 942 6 

1X6 5.1 V 3716 

UM*8X 12 
1X2 46 7 779 2m 
34 14 

40 LI 17 494 35 

22 59 26 228 12% 
60 26 7 63 23% 

21W 24 10 145 59* 
2.12* SJ S 2439 36% 
50 31 6 09 26* 

52 21 12 395 33 

7 S3 6% 
42 M 3 

1D.I 8 319 

11 13 1547 33 

72 K1 57% 
11 15 66 

X 10 252 35* 
112 Q 29* 
34 21 121 14% 
22 20 366 

44 10 2636 

IX 15 39 

13 12 508 


46*— * 
10 % 

27 + % 

17*— * 
17 + * 
1*%+ % 
8*+ * 
1% 

31* + % 
32*— * 
30 + * 
21* + * 
10* 

5%— % 
26 %+ * 
52* 

23* 


X 13 2576 
10 10 145 
86 25 

114 68 

•m 10 17 
22 11 5 

42 1 102 
222 23 94 

12 8 3918 
7 4747 
7 26 


2X3 62 10 333 


Esi. Sates 5500 Prev.Sales 11X94 
Prev. Day Open Int. 81.9T3 up 245 



.12 2 2D 172 

20 22 4 1521 
J3 5 14 754 
16 239 
12M 72 9 168 


5J0 « I 
5 UH 6 
128 84 8 1473 
52 33 53 127 
25 179 
1X2 32 10 7805 
152 44 8 3 

124 50 10 299 
160 22 15 3303 
20 19 16 477 
54 V II 551 
22 24 9 443 
3X0 54 I ins 
220 AO I 996 
9 49 


51LVRR CCOMEX) 

SON tray atr cents per troy az. 


7X7 

£70* 

May +06% 

7X9 

5L80* 

Jul 

+15% 

756 

542 

Aw 

+18 

671 

581 

Sap 

+12 

648 

583% 

Nov 

+13 

6X9 

5X4% 

Jan 

6X3 

7+2 

606% 

Mar 

+34% 

7X9 

+15 

May 

Jul 

+40 

+46 


Est. Sales Prev.Sales 2JJ75 

Prev. Day Open ML 64536 up 183 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 
m Ians- dollars per ton 
205L0O 12950 May 13640 139.10 


604 607* —JO* 

613 616* —am 

614% 611 — O0% 

608 612% +00% 
609* 613* +O0* 
620* 624% 

6X1% 635 
6X9% 643 . 

646 649 


fiXLD 

5570 

Apr 

6600 

6600 

6560 

45+2 

iSS 

15110 

5530 

Mav 

6610 

6695 

655 5 

<620 

14610 

5620 

Jul 

6720 

6790 

6650 

6715 

—32 

11830 

5730 

Sop 

6790 

6875 

6770 

6825 

— 14 

12300 

5900 

Dec 

7020 

7055 

6940 

7N.1 

— 32 
—44 

12150 

11930 

10480 

5950 

6070 

6210 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

7300 

7353 

7300 

706X 

7200 

7314 

9450 

6350 

Jul 

7410 

7410 

7410 

744X 

— +7 

9400 

6410 

Sep 

7540 

7560 

75*0 

758X 

—44 

7990 

6670 


7810 

7B&5 

7810 

7802 

— 4J 

7610 

7410 

Jon 

7890 

7890 

7992 

7874 



SWISS FRANC (IMM) 
i lperfTano-1 point eauatsSOOOOi 

4900 X439 Jim 5118 X823 2784 2817 +32 

ASM Sep . J858 .3860 J82D J655 +32 

4360 2531 Dec 2880 2905 2890 2900 +30 

2945 XS35 Mar jwa 2940 2940 2940 +U 

Est. Sales 24017 Prev.Sales 20566 
Prev. Day Onen Int. 22.146 off 1458 



37* +1% 
23*+ % 
36*— % 
30V. 

n*+ * 
is* + % 
19%+ * 

w%+ % 
8*— % 
12*— * 
33% ; 

*JVj+ * 
31% — * | 
10 *— % 
2B*+ * 
5*% — % 
36*+ % ! 
14% — * I 
41% + % I 
39 — % 
11 * + * 
15 — * ! 
15 — % 
23%+ * ; 

4%— % 

am— * 
is% + % 

25 + * 

25%+ % 
49* +1 
34* 

102 *- * 
27* + % 
13*— % 

35 + * 
12* 

22*—* 

59% 

36 + % 
25*—% , 
32*+ % 1 

6* 

14*— % ! 
15*—% , 
32* + * : 
57% 

65 — % i 
34* 

29*+ * . 
14*+ % ! 
11*+ M 
63 + % 
56% +1 
34*— * 
«*+!% 
T7%— % 
24%+ * 
37*+ % 
21%—% 
27% 

45*+ % 
37% 

7* 

3S%— % 
24 

40* + * 
35* . 

2*- % 


. __ Varan 1 2 *' -mT 

44*— 1 4Mk 30% Utttan 26 Jtt M tokfi 

55* K* 9% Vans 40 34 U V IS ml 

H*+ % 35% 17% Veen 40 32 U 177 30* in? 


A* 3% 
im «* 

4J* 25% 
75% 46% 

m on 

un 33% 

61% MV 

UW M* 
30* II* 
<1* 27 
» SI 


40 32 13 177 30* 

32 3* 3* 

*w 

? jo iu i£% in* 5* 

74* BW «0k M* ST 

M 38 30* n* 

it a am am 

320 14 11 94 78 77 


t* 3 13* 13% U*+ i % 

L92 32 14 1730 0% 59* » *-H 15% 5* 

x* li is if» am am am 

• ~ — ■ ■ n 30% im 

T - J 6* aZ 

2fm 4 Tf 167 45% 44* 44*— 1 46% 30% 

“ K 55 5K* 2 55 >S 

!3 K.! S SSS'* 

'S.’3a ™ 8 8 hIS + ^ ss 
jg Sn » .T — T+ i 85 S« 

14 34% » 33*+ * »* It* 

13 3 15 IS 15 fi** S 

« W ? *S S K^ # S*-% r^ iwi 

TO OQ 250 3M%M% + % I W 

■* 1-5 U 41* 3K 49* a 31 WICDR SJO M 7 * O* 9* w 

TstubZESSo 40 U ” ^ »%mii 

79% + % W* *% wwnec 494 m W 9* * 

33 ♦ * 47% 31 WroHWrt 28 4 23 Mtf 44* 43* to 

12%+% 104 IB MMnst I Wt Wi# 

M% Ml 38% Waton 28 U 19 3» 53* S* H 

35%+% 23H 15* WkHftktUS IK 32* 31% S 

» — * se* 33* Wales# as ix m an 34* m * 

SStJ? 37 m WPOtUm 1 A0 4.1 7 SB 34 3M 3 

7% VUttJef 128 IM JOi 9 f « 
2v% WodJPf lS U 1 /55b to* to 

, IT* Wornce jj 61 II M 81% 3 

.1. ... I 5% l> WmCm 4082 27* u* 3 

30* 38* WOfnrL 148 XI U 3JtS 39* 38* 3 

, W* M* WOShGs 126 7* t 120 29 TtH M 

V* + % I am 19% WMIMM ui 4j i m 27 am 5 

a** . _ I 26% 16 WUWT 248 02 8 W0 Wnml 
«%+ % I Stt 27* Waste 40 12 W Wi 94 90*3 

4*% t.W I 3Mb 19* WUfeJn X» LS 11 222 34* 31 S' 

13* 8* WBvOaa X0 34 IB 1 9*9%, 

^ „ 12% 4 Wean (I 38 Wt W* tt 

**+ % 23* 13% WeOOO X0e U 13 594 31* 38* A 

K*+ Vk 38b 29% WefSM A XO LI U IN 38 37* 31 

37 — % 55* 30% WMs P 340 44 ■ 304 5<U 53* 3 

M% + % 38* 22% W#IPM 340 VU 12 45 3k* ** £ 

14V. + % 17* »* Wendy s XI U W 1372 17% ** » 

1*b WesICs M II 12 22 31 Mb 31 

. . 34 WPanPpMXO 1LS 42% to m a 

ra* +1_ I 46% 34% WktPtP 3X0 6X M H+ W* 38* » 

6% 2% WhARL 2014 6 5% 4 

»» V* VWAIrwf 109 1% IV. 1 

u%— w ii* 8* wAtrpf un nx 14 im im n 

A*+ % 19% 8* WAIT Of 2X4 1U 42 is* It* H 

S*- % H% 4 WCNA 1257 4% 6* 4 

36% 5% Iranian 5M 8% B% | 

IT + % 64% 24% WhUnnf 3 8 8 3 

_. 9% 2% WMJptS 15 4 1*1 

15% 4%WnUPtE 30 7% 6% f 

»J4 + H 30 5% WUTlPfA 9 1% fit f 

24* + 32% 19% WstaEs UN 34 16 5473 30* 29* S 

41 31* Westvc IQ U I 44 77% 37* n 

14% — J* 34 25 Wevern 1 2D 4X 1914865 38% 27* 27 


^4 U#* 


,P Vnll 


192 62 11 7145 

^ ° ,3 nio 

AO 3X SB 1149 

3$ £ 34 2^ 

120 62 9 5931 

mu u so 

» ,J f 8S 

.18 U 10 4357 
.40 IX II II 
asa 9.1 7 2576 

12D 3Lf U 4813 
2J8 42 S 

140 15 2 

46 47 

4.15 115 2 

23 71 

1X4 34 15 492 
48b4.1 9 3 

40 12 6 74 

40 3X M 95 
.90 SX 136 
2272 
418 

IM UU 3746 
16 47 

1X6 II 14 718 
1400 25 n 32 
1X2 32 7 19 

U 40 
152 132 5 4663 
172 142 25 

3X5 14X 128 

147 UJ 34 
4X8 143 16 

2X6 142 6 

2X1 T34 14 

27 193 
48b 12 12 29 


IN 23 13 347 


IU9I104 200 

AO Zi 10 ?» 

185 

294 

44 AX I 

33 3100 
X4 LI 14 314 
71 10M 
3X5 152 112 

225 94 151 

144 SJ 11 2694 


2.160 AM 10 974 


150 104 19 

13 SS 
120 SJ 10 AS 
40 IX 11 558 
41 

IN AX 16 
120 1U 31 

104 SO 9 736 
153*144 M7 

XX 9J 9 
4 U 
40 20 14 54 

1JD0 34 9 2 

44 2X16 XM 
451 92 11 30 

.16 15 17 15 

J50 32 46 

.10b S 26 493 
1.10 85 52 

300 75 9 455 


22 14 11 217 


n 42 f 11 
20 22 9 1131 
25 15 I 109 


30* +1% 
27%+ % 
IK* + % 

IT* 17* +% 
32* 32* 

27* 31* + * 

3% 3% 

44* 45%+ % 
to* 49%+ % 
39% 39% +1% 
9* 9*+ * 
36* 36*+ * 
33% 22% + Vk 
37 37 — % 

16* 16%+ M 
14* + % 
20%— * 
17* 

10 * +1 
» + * 
53*+ % 
16* 16*— * 
«* 48*+ % 
SB* 50*— % 
35* 35*— * 
MU 19 + % 
18% 11* 

25% 25H— * 
26 26% + * 
24 H* + * 
2W »% 

16* 14% — % 
16* 16* + % 
30* 31% +1 
36* 37* +1% 
to* 43 +* 

107 107%—* 

1544 JJ46 
I* 1*— % 
9%— 1* 
7 

30% + U 
30% + % 

KVk 

W%— % 
S3*— * 
29 + * 

If* + % 
12* 

54*+ * 
43* 

22% + * 
10 — % 
24 + * 

12 + * 
34* + * 
34* + * 
17b + * 
X — Vk 
17*— h 
41%—% 
34% 

27 — * 
5W+ % 
20 + % 
29*— % 
4Uk— W 
5* 

6 * + % 
13* + * 
21* + * 
13 + * 
37%+ * 
21* 

16 *+ % 
31 — * 
30% — * 


m as* im 5 

382 34* M it, 

l 3 * t 1 !’ 

» ai% am jSL 

40*2 27* to%3 


r‘ l%N» 
t. a 

me 

■ i 


L„, Tf**** 




34 25 wevern 1X0 4X 1816865 28% 27* » 

44* 34*WeVTM 220 7.1 86 N* 39 IE, 

51* 43* weyrpr 4J0 *J 5 to% 48* 4T 

33* 11% WMIPtt II 12% 12% r.: 

41 21 WPUPfB _10Z 36% 20k » . 

38 20 wtiPitnf »a Wt 

69% 38% WMrfpf UI 44 f to 61 % to «. 

' ” “ 19 Ml I 

120 27* 36% I 


r_s;x*gairn*%; % 

/'A.-.v m* 

- V 


36 34% WIW1C 

29* 17* WhHebl 


’+■ -Mi- 


25% M% Wbmak JO 25 10 302 34* 23* *- 
12% 6* Wtebhft 4X 91 10% 18% R 

14% 8 cnifntn 


n m wti 
n im n% r 


31% 22* wmam in 4X 7 2*13 am 2toh 21-- 


4% 2 WUmEI 
9* 6% wttahrO .10 L4 M 
38 33* WfnDtx 148 Alt 13 

20% 7* Wbmba .10e A 15 
UPb 5% VWnaer 18 

7% 3* WtnterJ 
33* 25* WIscEP 2X8 70 8 
S0% 6Mb WISE pf AN 114 
71% 59% WISE pf 7X5 1U0 
32* 23* WtacPL 164 83 9 
33* 24* WhcPS 2X6 72 8 
40% 27* W11CB 18 U I 


267 4% 3% < 

26 7% 7* : 

68 34* 36* > 4 

966 im 18 V _ v 
32 •% A* i-lftil 

10 4* 4% 

377 33* 31* ar . 
3Bl 78* 71* h 
1001 70* 70* It . I 
Ul 32* 31 t IP 
an 31* 11% 3; 4 [1 
129 34% 34* 2 * 


Slwmttm 


9% WMvrW J4 22 34 157 11* 11* 1 

ia* weedPt jo u is 6it ai am a 


18* WeedPt Jo 32 15 
41% 29% WMWffl 1 20 +4 9 
Al 42% Wotwpf 3X0 3J 
8* 2% WTHAT 


A 33 22% 2 

9 41% 41 4. 

5 91* 58* 5 4 
i7 3* 3% 


tof u w w rf wo mi 
<, „wnX Marti 


45* WrWV U0a 10 11 IN 61* 0% *- 




6* 3% wantzr 
H Iff* wvteLb 
23* 16* Wynns 


X3 2J 10 174 12% 12* r 
JO 18 8 221 21b 21% 2 


46* 33* Xerox 3X0 72 17 MM 67*. 42% A 

51* 45* Xerox Pf 5AS 102 582 50b 50 9.. 

39 19 XTRA 44 U 10 134 27Tb 36* 2 ~ 

30 24 ZataCs 1X2 48 ■ 18 27* 77* X ' 

34* 13* ZDPOto 24 52 17 697 14 Vb Ok \ 

SI 30 Zavn J0b X 14 135 56* 55* 5 

31b 18% ZeottTvE ,! 

21% M* Zeros II U8 1*% 19* 1* 

31* 21% ZurmM 1X2 46 » IN 2Rk 28% 8- 


.- .rvMMrad frl 

- 

•o. Mam 


31* 21% ZuraM LSI 44 10 IN 28* 




31 UAL xse 14 1 1054 46% 45* to + * 
24* UAL Pf 2J0 74 274 31* 31* 31%+* 

7% UCCEL IB 63 13* 13* 13*— M 

16% UGI 104 82 11 87 23* 32% 23*—% 

3 UNCRes 1096 9* 9% 9%—% 

10 URS JOO 17 16 76 1Mb WA: 10% + % 

17* USFGs 120 7.1 3N 786 31* 31 31 

22% USGs 1JB 5>I 6 239 33* 32% 32*— * 

13% UnIFfSt XD 1.1 M 17 11% 17* 17*— * 

75 UnINV 12Se 40 9 30 97% 96% 94* + * 

38% UComPs 144 429983 34* 34 34—* 

3Z* UnCarh 140 90 8 813 38 36* 37* + * 

4* UnlonC 10 5* 5* 5* 

12 UnSec 1X2 10.1 4 1116 17% 16% 17 + % 

X) Unfit pf XE! IXO 78z 37 27 37 


NYSE ffighs-Lows 


NEW HIGHS IN 


- • Mill 

fc! - *-**Jjf 

■v»im mm- 


fCl 

34* + * 

s=& 


30% UCamps 144 42 
32* UnCarb 140 M 
4* UnlonC 
12 UnSec 1X2 111 
X) Unfit pf 150 IXO 
27% UnEIPf 454 1X2 
34% UnElpfMAOO 111 
48% UEIPfL 800 U0 
18% UnEIPf 208 124 
13% UnElpi 2.13 125 
45 UnB Pf 744 122 
69 UEI PfH BOO 111 


AhmanHF AUeoPw 
AmStnrepfB Anheuserfl 
BectanDtcfc BeUCdaa 
BrtsfMven BWvn UGa* 
CenLoEtec Cent Sava 


atrchPCkwl CoastolCP 
CocaCota Cmnw Call 


AmBrdSiTpf Amt. 
AnHensrot ApP- 
BlocraftLe RflR . 
Camp Soup cent 
ChrteCrft On - 
OxnttCapfA On 




2D0z 34* 34* 34* +1* 
19 30* 30% 30% + * 
500* 61% 41% 41% + % 
39 23* 23% 23* + % 
4 17 17 17 — % 

210Z 58* 58* 58* + * 
50QZ 61 59% 61 +1* 


74% — * 
27*+* 
32 +% 
15* 15* 

19* 19* 


S£S*±S 


82 UnPcpi 7X5 65 
9* Unlrayl .18 1.1 11 
53% Unryl p( uo 11X 
3* Unitor 66 

10* UnBrnd 16 

9* UBrdpl 


120 UI11R1 47% 67* .47% 


21 107 HM 104 — * 
3970 14% 16% 16* 

1010* 68% 68% 68% 

20 4* 4* 4* 

72 13% If* 12*— * 
93 13* 13% U* 


19650 13438 Jul 14430 14500 

183.00 13700 Aug 167.10 16720 

17950 14000 SOP 169X0 15050 

180J0 14250 Oct 15300 15300 

18400 14750 Dec 15750 15800 

ION 14900 Jan 160N 16000 

m.5® 15400 Mar 

Eat. Sales Prev.Sales 11X83 

Prev. Day Open int. 44401 off 370 
SOYBEAN OILCCm 


137 JO 13840 -JO 
MIN 16450 —50 

14460 14750 —50 

149X0 14900 —JO 
15150 15250 -JO 
156X0 15750 —50 

159X0 15950 -100 
16450 -150 


Eat Sales 26000 Prev. Sales 27500 
Prev. Day Open I nt 74049 up 1.139 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 tray az^ 


Industrie 


2250 May 2920 30X0 

22X0 Jul 28.10 2950 

2250 Aup 7730 UM 

3495 2250 Sep 2447 34X0 

J40O 2190 Oct 2SJO 25.90 

2550 2190 Dec 3485 25110 

25X5 2X60 Jan 2450 2400 

2420 3450 MOT 2440 2450 

Ext. Sales Prev.Sales 13240 

Prev. Dav Open Rif. 44255 of! 1521 
OATS(CBT) 

5JM0 bo minimum- dollar* per bushel 
Ul 157% Mav 159% IJO* 

1X8% M3 Ju) 156% 156* 

1X9 150 Sep 153* 153* 

122% 154 Dec 156% 154% 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales M2 

Prev. Day Open Int. 3X95 up 10 


3958 3009 +JM 
28.10 2852 —21 

27.15 2752 — 

34 75 — JB 

2550 25X5 +.10 

2475 25JJ7 +30 

3450 2458 +55 

3440 3450 +.10 



27U8 27750 
280X0 28220 
28450 28820 
29420 29450 
30120 


11620 11320 11420 
11520 11320 11350 
11220 11320 113.10 



37 37%—* 

S £%tE 

79* 19% + * 

X2 22 9 443 13 W* 13%— % 
1X0 56 I 1525 61* 61% 61%—* 
120 M I 994 47* 44* 40*—* 
9 49 15* 15% 15% 

22 32 10 192 M* 14* 16*—% 
J94 36 11 521 39 31* 38* 

IJM XI 11 34 33* 32* 32*— * 

1X0Q12D 11 H 9% W 

-72 X4 47 3* X* J%+ % 

Xfi 42 10 2 18% 18% 18% — * 

24 AS 10 24 11* 11% 11* + % 

1.14 32 13 3320 31% 30* 31 — % 

1X0 62 10 145 17% 17* T7* + % 


2Kb UCbTTV .M A 70 480 39% 38% 39% + * 
23% UnEnre 268 82 36 3458 30* 30 30* + * 


22% UnEnre 268 82 
22* 9 Ulllum 220 12X 
28* 19 UIKupf 3X7 Ul 

16% 11 Utltupf 220 MX 

3Mk 30% UlllUPf 600 U0 

14% 10 UlllUPf 1X0 MX 2 mk 12* 12* + * 

33* 14% Unltlnd 54 22 12 SB 30% 19* 20 — * 

37* 35% UJerBk 156 44 I *4 35% 35% 35* 

»4Vb 9* UTdMM 7 73 13* 13* 13*—% 

2% UPtcMn 1 15 2* 2* 2* + % 

22 UsalrG .12 A 7 2517 33* 33* 33Tb + * 

5% USKom 198 7% 6* 7% + * 

29% USLeas 20 ZI 9 18 39* 39 39 — M 

23 USShoe JU 32 73 340 XI 29» 30* +t* 

22 USSIeel IJM 17 W 2510 27* 26* 36*— % 

.4«4 USSMaf 494e 96 130 53* 52 52*+* 

115* USStlpr 12X5 92 ■ 130 129 129*+% 

22* USSttPt 235 BJ 334 38 27% 27% — * 

31* USTofc 1X2 46 13 1184 37 36% 37 + * 

55+i USWost 5X3 75 8 916 75 76* M* 

5* UStcfcn 29 7 11* 11* If* + * 

29% UnTcbs 1J0 36 8 3649 42 61 41% +* 

2tF% UTctipf 7JS 7J> 177 37 36% 34*+ * 

17* UntTU 1X2 SJ ■ 3SH 21* 21* 31* 

21% unrrapf 150 sx 11 36% 26* »*— % 


2458 30* 30 30*+ * 

41 M* 16 M* + * 

31 36% 36% 26*+ * 

1300Z 15% 15 15 — * 


Crown Crk 

Danetey 

PPL Gras 

GenCorp 

Nenbey 

IntrpuoGp 

Levttz 

Merck Co 

NUI Cn 

Poc Lshtp 

PeaetCa 

PubSvcCal 

Rich vlck 

SmlthBeck 

SouttwniCo 

Textron 

TrttonEnsv 

UtoehnCa 

WitsncasS 


Cidbro 
Duke Am’ 
FstUnREs 
Gen Pood 
Idaho Pw 
loatcaEiTt 
LnmNMNia 
MldCOR 
Nat Can 
PadflCOrp 
PoriGen El 
PabSvcEC 
Rural Dutch 
Smucfeen 
SoaNEnsTl 
TextnXOapf 
UfUlevr NV 
USLIFECP 
WosteMot 


Confidtan 
DortKrafl Delr 
OukePpMA Bate. 
PtaProoress Gete 
OerberPrds QMS 
Int North 
JerCf 36af 
Monel w> 

MMyiPwLi 
NYSIaEG 
Pupercrtt 
Patoai Bloc 
QunherOats Ral 
SanDteGas Sou • 
Sonat 
swestPSvc 
Textn Itoof 
UMWaters 
warnrCom 
wrlstev 


’-•% « mm 


wmtft mi « 

-*m**m" 

■■ .-fi| 

• . 5d?P«W' 


• v irk«;« 


1 26* 26* 24%+ % 

2 13* 13* 13*+* 


123X0 125X0 +250 
13260 13560 +100 
13830 140X0 +260 
14060 14230 +2X0 
MAN 14830 +360 
15030 15150 +330 
13330 15530 +230 


US 52 1A 
IJM 49 
UO 32 0 
60 2X 11 
130 22 10 


134 IJ 15 128 
1346 

60 5 1145 


38*+ M 
11 *— * 
62* 

27*+ % 
45 +* 
21 *— * 
3 + % 
70% + * 


AMCAlnt 

SMMatr 


Anneal ik 
T exCOmBn 


FedtHmeLflPf Mol 
TBwtoMfo 


r -p.#tort* 
'.'H eywi 



The Daily Source I 
International Invest 


^ 4-' :^* il 


177 37 36% 36*+ * 

2SH 21* 31* 21* 

11 36% 26* »*— % 


UWRt 1X0 65 12 2*1 19* 19 


11330 11330 11260 -J5 


157%. Ui* —32% 
165 165 -JO* 

162 162 — 32* 

165 155% —31% 


OO LD CCOMEX) 

HO troy a*- del tars per troy ee, 

514J0 21260 Apr 32130 339X0 33150 

327JM 29230 May 

51030 28730 Jun 33130 331X0 337X0 

485JM 29130 Aug 33730 31750 33330 

49130 29730 Oct 34130 341X0 344JM 

I 48950 30150 DOC 34M0 31480 34400 


COTTON 2 (NYCS) 
aunoibkr cents perl* 

79X0 6136 May 6734 

7935 6335 Jut 6555 64.17 

77 JO 6463 OCt AM MM 

7330 6461 DOC 6Sto 65X2 

76X5 65.90 Mar 6AX5 6635 

mra 6441 Mav A7X5 6760 

mss 6450 Jul 

Est. Sales Z1N Pivv.Scriss UH 
Prev. Day Oosn Int 18633 up *4 


6499 <7.18 +.13 

6350 6400 +61 

6U0 6S51 +X1 

6520 *561 +33 

6A75 6473 +27 

6735 67 JO +30 

67X0 +X0 


London Metals 
Uarda 28 


London Commodities 


March 28 


Paris Commodities 
March 28 


Cash Prices Mard 


SEL 


h/ 


Livestock 


49630 37470 Apr 

435X0 32050 Jtm 36560 36560 26540 

42860 33130 Alta 37150 37130 37150 

395X0 33530 Oct 37UB 37*00 STUB 

31130 3030 DOC 38550 BUD 38850 

Est sales 50300 Prev. Sates 55436 

Prev. Day Open inL124J7S off£M5 


CATTLE (CME) . 

40300 lbs.- cents pot lb. 

6930 6155 Apr 63X0 6460 

4950 6460 Jim 6730 67X7 

67 57 6115 Auk 6650 6467 

4490 *160 Oct 6405 *430 

6725 6360 DeC 6525 6535 

6765 6425 Feb 65X5 65X5 

67J7 6400 APT 

Est. Sales 13332 Prev. Sola 19515 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 63354 off 512 
FEEDER CATTLE (CM3) 


Financial 


HEATING OIL (NYME) 
toiMOoaF ante per gal 
8325 6585 Apr SUM BUS 

8260 A4JM Mav 7490 77X0 

7860 6250 Jun 7X7S 7460 

7430 6425 Jul 7260 73X0 

74.W 6425 Aim 7330 73X0 

7460 70X5 Sep 

Jtol 7481 7490 


80.18 1058 — 1X2 

7590 76JJ —52 
7358 7435 +31 

7140 73.10 +35 

7330 73X0 +.14 

74J0 +X7 

76X0 7<X> 


US T. RILLS (IMM) 

Si million- ptsaf INpcL 


Free. Day Owen ini. 18X90 up Ml 


9141 

87.14 

Jun 

91.15 

91 J7 

91.13 

9JJ1 

+09 

91X3 

86X4 

Sep 

9063 

9084 

9+63 

»+79 

+09 

90X0 

85X7 

DK 

90X1 

9044 

9001 

9042 

+07 

9055 

8+60 

Mar 

9001 

9+15 

9001 

9+15 

+07 

90X7 

8701 

Jun 

89X4 

89X5 

09X4 

89X6 

+06 

9000 

8953 

1+00 

8905 

Sop 

DK 

89X2 

89X7 

09X2 

89X8 

8941 

+05 

+26 

Est. Safes 

Prev. Sales 15,173 





CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
UNO bbL- denars per bU. 


*4.000 1 bo.- Cents per Qx 

74X0 6470 APT 6930 6925 

72X5 44.95 MOV 7020 TON 

73X0 6460 Alto 71.15 71.32 

73JOO 6730 S#P 7500 7030 

7132 67.10 Oct 7035 TOAS 

7120 6935 NOV 7130 ri35 

Eet. Sates 1618 Prev. Sates 1.967 
Prev. Dav Open int. 10506 off IN 
HOGS (CME) 


300001b *.- onus per lb. 

45X0 

45X8 

4505 

4+15 

—J7 




5100 

51.10 

5047 

90M 

—56 


4+95 

Jul 

5350 

SXD 

5110 


— JO 




5250 

5165 

52.72 

52X5 

—35 



OCt 

49.10 

49.10 

4+55 


—30 



+955 

49X0 

4940 


— JO 


4625 

Feb 

+9X0 

49X5 

49X0 



47X5 

4550 

AW 

<705 

47X0 

4705 

47X0 

+55 

4905 

+700 

Jun 

4800 

4+N 





Est. Sates 6X13 Prev.Sales 10635 
Prev. Dav Open ini. 26501 up 367 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 

Wsm lbs.- chits per lb. 
hm 61.15 Mav 7430 7420 

8267 6Z15 Jul 74X0 7467 

0065 *020 Aug 72X5 73JM 

76X0 63.15 Feb 7550 75X5 

7560 6400 Mar 7430 7465 

7560 7068 MDY 

7^.89 7090 JUI 

Eel. Sales 4573 Prev.Sales 8.10 
Prev. Dav Open Int 12X34 UP 393 


Prev. Dav Open Int 39597 oHZii 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

XI 00300 prln-ptsl32ndsaf IM pel 
83-3 70-9 Jun 7M 79-2 

81-13 75-18 Sep 77-16 78-9 

80-22 73-13 Dec 

- ms 75-14 Mar 

7t~24 74-30 Jun 

Est. 5a tea Prev.Sales «tb 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4VX96 up 497 
ITS TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 pet-SlOOJOOrta 8. 32nd»af IN pci) 
77-15 57-20 Jun 68-15 4+9 

76-2 57-10 Sep 67-21 68-12 

76-5 57-0 Dec 46-29 67-19 

72-30 57-2 MOT 66-6 6+27 

70-16 56-29 Jun 65-24 *4-9 

70-3 56-29 Sep 6M 65-24 

4+26 56-25 Dec 6+29 65-7 

69-12 56-27 Mar 6+17 44-24 

69-2 63-12 Jun 64 6+13 

68-26 63-4 Sep 63-13 6+2 

48-8 63-24 Dec 

Est. Sates Prev.SateSl32X74 

Prev. Dav Open lnlX24J83 off 2327 
GNMA (CBT) 

SIOOOM prln-pts S.32ndsot INpet 


7U 78X7 
77-16 78-1 
77-11 
76-34 
7+8 


3+28 

24X8 

May 

2955 

24X0 


2954 

34.10 

Jut 

2957 

34X5 


2950 

2440 

Sep 

2950 

2445 

Oct 

7950 

3440 


2950 

2190 

DK 

3900 

3445 


2946 

2650 

Feb 

2945 

24X2 

Mar 

37X0 

34X3 

May 

26X0 

24X0 

Jun 

Est. Sates 

Prev.! 


2830 28X6 
27X6 27X3 
Z7J5 27X0 
27J9 2745 

2735 2730 
27 JO 27 JO 
27X0 27X0 
27X5 27X0 


27X7 2825 
27J8 27 JH 
27X7 27 M 

27X2 2739 
2735 27X4 

27 JO 27 JO 
27 JO 27 JO 
27X5 27 JD 

27 JO 
27 JO 
27 JO 
27 JO 
27 J8 
27 JO 


Close Previous 

BM Ask. Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Starline per metric ton 
Moot BUH 889J0 88400 toQI 

forward 919JM 91 9 JO 916JM 917JJ0 

COPPER CATHODES [HM Grade) 

Stalina per metric to* 

SPOt 1.149J10 1.150X0 1,151X0 1.15200 

forward 1,169 JO 1,1 70 JO 1J71J0 1,172X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Shtodard) 

Stei due per metric Ion 
Spot - 1,14730 1.1503 1,15400 1,157X0 

forward 1.16X00 1,165X0 1,772X0 1.174X0 

i r*n 

sterdne per aefrtc tea 

spot 29ZJ0 29250 29150 293J0 

forward 30200 30250 30L50 382X0 

NICKEL 1 

Sterttog per metric tea 


I forward 4X29.00 
SILVER 


4390X0 4,265X0 4375X0 
4X34X0 4X05X0 4X10X0 


Prev. Day Open Int. 43J32 ua4N 


Spot 51350 53450 54100 c*cnn 

forward 5S3JD 553X0 S«5n 564X0 

TIN (Standard) 
starling per metric ton 

SPOt 9X00X0 9J35X0 9A6X0 9J40X0 

forward 9A40X0 9JS8X0 9J5AX0 9J4OX0 

ZINC 

Sterling per rotate ton 
spat 755X0 736X0 774X0 779X0 

forward 71550 716X0 734X0 735X0 

Jourar.-AP. 


4S-U 0 
67-19 68-3 
6+28 67-10 
6+6 6+19 

65-23 6+30 
65-1 65-12 

6+26 6+27 
6+12 44-13 
63-30 63-30 
63-13 43-17 
434 


Stock Indexes 


69-71 

*9-4 

57-17 

Jun 

See 

6+16 

68-30 68-16 

68-36 

68-4 

+5 

+5 

68-13 

5+4 

DK 

67-10 

67-17 67-10 

67-16 

+5 

60 

50-20 

Mar 



66-31 

+6 

674 

67-3 

58-25 

46 

Jun 

See 

66-11 

66-17 *6-11 

66-16 

66-2 

+6 

+7 


Est. Sates Prev.Sales 173 

Prev. Day Onen Int. 4X54 uc83 


COFFEE CINYCSCE) 

37 JOOIbs.- cents per lb. 

152X0 122X1 May 143X0 14140 


14930 121X0 Jul 142.75 143X5 

147 JO 127X0 sea MZ30 143X0 

14+55 129X5 Dec 14136 143X0 

14350 12850 Mar 1405 T41JS 

140X0 131X0 MOV MOJO 141X0 

139X5 13SJD Jul 14050 14850 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 2395 

Prev. Dav Open int. 13X96 uaS2 
SUCARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

1 12JH0 lbs." cents oer I el 
10J0 182 May 3X0 192 

9.95 4X1 Jul 4X7 +10 

9.75 4X2 Sea 4X1 +21 

9XS U0 Oct U3 436 

7X5 +17 JCm 4X0 +SD 

9X3 5X6 Mar 5X8 5X9 

7.15 553 MOV SJO 552 

6X9 5X0 Jul 5X5 5X5 

E&LSateo 13,100 Prev.SalM 10J50 
Prev. Dav Open int. 84.195 uo2X29 

COCOA (HYCSCE1 
10 metrle fans- 5 m r ten 

2570 1998 Mav 7440 2463 

3400 1998 JUI 2260 2270 

2415 1987 Sep 2225 3368 

2337 1945 Dec 2174 2181 

1190 1955 Mar 2160 2175 

7130 I960 MOV 

2035 - 19M Jul 

Est. Soles Prev. Salei 4XOI 

Prcv.Dov Open Int. 27X60 up 546 


M2X0 142J5 
14 775 142X9 
142X0 142X0 
141X0 142X5 
160X5 142X0 
140X0 141X5 
14058 1402 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

11 million- pta of 100 pci 
91X8 05X3 MOT 91.15 912 

9120 8+30 Jim 9034 9059 

90X0 05X0 Sep 89X0 89X1 

m? 8SX4 Dee 89X0 89X0 


SJO 1X0 
195 177 

4X1 +11 

4X0 4X4 

480 4X3 

5X8 5.10 

£35 £35 

5X7 5J9 


2425 2453 

22M ai® 
2115 2231 

21M 3174 

2160 2170 

2170 
2170 


90.17 SSX4 Dee 09X0 89X0 

89X8 8+56 Mar 

89X6 1+0 Jun 

8852 87 J* Sep 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales 395 

Prev, Day Open Int 6,939 off 67 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Si mlllkm-atkef INpcL 
90X8 82X9 Jun 89X6 90.19 

90X3 1453 SCP 89X1 8953 

89X7 04X0 Dec 88X1 19X6 

89X8 B6.W Mar 8859 88X5 

89.15 86X3 Jun 8834 8851 

8884 • 87X6 Sep 88X0 88X0 

89X7 17X8 Dec BkXO 88X0 

Est Sales Prey.Sata 41X51 

prev. Dav Open Int. WXB oft *53 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

1 pto pound- 1 aoW equate NOW 
1X350 1X235 Jun 1X17S 1X250 

1X200 Sep 1X140 1X1 90 
1X300 DM 1X140 1X190 
1X300 1X680 Mar 12000 1X210 

Est. Sales 1UN Prev.Sofee 13X29 
Prev.Day Open Int. 2+845 uaB62 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
SMrdir- ipotereauaiasoxooi 
XB3S X0S4 Jun X277 2384 

jsm XH25 Sep X260 X2M 

XS66 XQ0» Dec J250 2350 

XS04 .6981 Mar 


91.15 91X3 
10X4 9055 

89X9 89 JO 
89X0 89X2 
89-10 


5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cants 

109-10 15+10 Jun 183X5 18+20 

I92JD 160X0 Sep 18+90 187X5 

19+40 17520 Dec 19080 19080 

192X0 190.H) MOT 192X0 192X0 

Est. Sales 53X77 Prev. Sates S7J2S 
Prev. Day Open Int. 56X83 up 1X07 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

2555.53 168.10 ter 193.10 N4X0 

219X0 173X0 Jim 198X0 199 JO 

21230 115.75 SOP 203X0 203X0 

210X0 209 JO Dee 

Est Sains Prev. Sales 4X77 

Prev. Day Open Inf. +752 up 49 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
pointe and cents 

110X0 90X0 Jun M6J0 107.15 

111JV 91J5 Sep TOBJO 109 JO 

1I17S W1XD Dec 111X0 11L15 

11X15 112X0 Mar 11125 11125 

Est. Sales 11X97 Prev.SalM 12X39 
Prev. Day Open Int. 10X19 up 510 


11250 182X0 
ttfiH 18+25 
10X0 18955 
192X0 192X5 


U.S- Agency Rules 
In Steel Dumping 


Htob Lew BM Aik Bid Aik 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric Ian 
Mav 114X0 112X0 112X0 11260 113X0 113X0 
Aug 11+00 1 1520 115X0 115X0 116X0 117X0 
OO 121X0 119X0 T19J0 119X0 120X0 121X0 
Dec 126X0 136X0 125X0 T26X0 12+20 127X0 
Mar 141X0 137X0 138X0 13+20 140X61 mm 
Mar 146X0 144X0 143X0 14120 14250 14SX0 
Aug 151X0 150X0 MOXO 14?X0 149X0 151X0 
Volume: ZM2 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per met ric fon 
Mar 2X35 1.985 2X04 2X35 1X93 1X96 

May 2X64 2X05 2X32 2X33 2X35 2X36 

Jhr 2X22 1.990 1,992 1.993 1X97 1X98 

Sep 1.990 1548 1X67 1.969 1.966 1.967 

D«C 1X15 1X91 1J92 1X95 1X95 1X96 

Mar 1,905 1X85 1X85 1X87 1X85 1X90 

May 1XN 1X88 1X85 1X88 1XBS 1X95 

Volume: 4,951 lots of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Staling per metric ten 
Mar 2200 2.143 2,163 ZT70 2,147 2,160 

May 2240 2.1B0 2306 2370 2300 2M* 

Jlv 2J79 Z226 2251 2253 2J42 22*4 

Sep 2323 2260 2290 2293 2274 2375 

NOV 2X40 22H0 2X12 2X15 Z2BH 2290 

Jao 2X15 2270 2287 2X90 2375 2X80 

Mar 2X70 2360 Z255 2X0 1341 2X48 

Volume: 1449 lots ai 5 tens. 

GASOIL 

UJ. dollars per metric tea 
Mar 244X0 242X0 244X0 244X5 243J0 343J0 

Aot 23+00 232J0 234X5 21100 23250 234X0 

May 233X0 229X0 231X5 231 JO 229.75 230X0 

J«n 224X5 225X5 226X0 226X5 22+XO 22650 

JlT 22+50 22SJ0 225J0 ZUX0 Z25XS 226X0 

AW 227X0 227X3 228X0 23 2M 227.60 230X0 

SOP N.T. N.T. 228X0 235X0 227X0 233X0 

OCt N.T. N.T. 228X0 238X0 226X0 236X0 

NOV N.T. N.T. 228X0 24 1JH 225X0 238X0 

Volume: 1J76 lots of IN tans. 

Sources: teuton and London Petroleum Ex- 
change 190X0777. 


Htob Law BM Aik Clide 

SUGAR 

Frencta fraora per metric ten 
May IXN 1X60 1X66 1X70 — 28 

AW 1J39 1JU 7321 7325 —Zi 

Oct 1J76 1X65 1X57 1X45 — 33 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1X15 1^135 —30 

Mar 1535 U20 1X19 1530 — » 

May LS70 IJ70 1570 1585 —30 

Est. val.-. 1X00 lots of 50 tans. Prev. actual 
sates: 1X70 lots. Open Interest; 3X430 
COCOA 

Freacb francs per IN kg 
Mar 2X55 2X45 2X00 Z4N —55 

May 2X60 2X35 2X39 2X40 +4 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2X00 — +10 

Seo 2X80 2X80 2X60 2X00 — 10 

Dec 2,195 2.179 7.170 1175 —5 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2.S3B — Unctl. 


Commodity and Unit f's »,» . 

Coffee 4 Santos. U — •• 

Prlntclatti 44730 31 %,nl— OjB 

Steel billets IPHtl, ton fi3X‘' C.V" • 

Iron 3 Fdrv. PhOa. ten 3]XS 

Steel scrap No 1 favy Pitt. - JJto \.. 

Lead Soot, <b — — Jf-3 A? 

COPP-r elect, lb - *■ 

Tin (Straits). lb-—- ««--.• 

Zinc. E. St. L. Baste, lb V ^ 

PaUadlunuoz — Ifl - * - * 

SJtvsr N.Y.OZ — *■>.._ 

SourauAP. " i l v ' r . » ; * 


Asian Commoditi »*.'? 


March 28 !; 


May N.T. N.T. 2,125 — Unclk 

Est. wl; 95 lets of 10 Ions. Prev. actual 
sates: 136 lots. Open interest: 893 
COFFEE 

French francs per HO kg 
Mm* NLT. N.T. 2556 2517 + 17 

Mav 2555 2550 2551 2565 — 14 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2590 2530 —15 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2567 2587 —12 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2562 24M —3 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2535 2580 —10 

Mar 2520 2520 2515 2535 —3 

Esc val.: 4 toil of 5 tans. Prev. actual sales: 
21 lots. Open interest: 10 
Source: Bourse Ou Comm e rce. 


MONO-KONG GOLD FUTURES * - . 


mot- nS n.t. moo moo jt 
A of _ 329X0 329X0 BU0TO»B h ; . 

Mav . N.T. N.T. mxo 52x0 •_ 

Jun _ 331X0 331.00 m» 334X0 31 
AW- N.T. N.T. 338X0 340X0 34 ;; 

OCt _ N.T. N.T. 342X0 SUM X4 ; 1 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 34+00 350X0 34 .’ 

Feb - N.T. N.T. 354X0 3S+M 35 * .. 

Volume; 25 totsaf IN 0+ 

SINGAPORE GOLD FU TURKS J .. 
U+l per agaai 4 ■ A** 








Dividends March 28 


Per Amt Pay Rsc 
USUAL 


AM IS. S. 

Jun 334X0 33110 

TUm N.T, N.T. 

volume: 102 lots of lNo+ 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mataystai cents per kite 


A- 

i. 


192X5 193X0 
19750 197X0 

2aiN mis 

206X5 


KHXO 10+15 
U+U 108X0 
1MX0 11OL40 
113X5 11250 


The Assoaaud Pros 
WASHINGTON ~ Steel pipe 
and tube products imported from 
Spain and Argentina for oil-driDing 
projects have been sold in die Unit- 
ed States at unfairly low market 
values, the Commerce Department 
ruled Wednesday. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

March 28 



Jl M 44 

.15 4-30 +9 

X3 5-27 +22 


S .12 5-10 +19 
JO +24 +1fl 

a 30 s-is +1 

Q J7 M +8 

S XI +14 5-17 

O 35 5-T +15 

O X*- +10 +10 


BM AIR 

Art 204X0 20+50 

May 2D7XS 207 JO 

&= SS » 

aup 211x0 21 

Sop 21350 21 

Vrtunie: 72 tot+ 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Slneapere cants eer Wte 


A-Amnml; MMo n OUy; Otoaertertv; S-SemL 
Annual. 


“■ 9 , * 
I .?i. . ’ 


rcjumei 

--r '.folio needs! 
:n> u&.etooai 
: *t».v frjwe tfiej 

!’lV(>«045n)« 
.vpii tiesipftei 
tuvgrtfft 
'■-untie*. **1 

■ ".■I. .muwve'cj 
' 'HOfOous fi 
; '■rirttiwe him# 
"^tjhtSlocft( 
' -rj^irtrvr hj 
pm 


His s 


5W« CkBkUtt | Pofs+ajf 
Prfai M Her Jm Jk M MmrJeaeJiy 


Commodify Indexes 


89JM 90.12 
89X9 8957 


Si S3 

88.19 18X4 
88X0 8&04 


Ckse 

Moody's 95950 f 

Reuters ■ 1«937^0 

D J. Futures 123.91 

Com. Research Bureau- 2+4^0 
Moody's : ba» 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 1& 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 
96630 f 
1,953.90 
123.91 
24470 


The U.S. International Trade 
Commission must now decide 
whether to impose ano-dumping 
duties. The commission will exam- 
ine whether imports of ihe product, 
known as u ml-country tubular 
goods," are substantially injuring 
the U.S. market. 


— t% ]/k uu 
UI tl DR - - UU £*14 9/16 tVU 

T» 7* 9 111k - V7i 1 T* 

ns j% 3 % 7 * w. i mm it m 

1R I5/U2<b. 41b Bb 4* S% Rb » 

ie vw »» 2 * m 9» ns - 9 

no im % 17/uiin i» m 13% wt 

NS l/U 3/16 * — — - _ 


DM Fntnres Options 

March 28 


BM Art 

RS51Apl« 174.00 17S.* 
RSS 1 Mnv- 180X0 180J0 

RS5 2 Art „ 17+50 17&9 


jST- 


RSS 3 Art— 172J0 17X® 
RSS 4 Art— 167 JO WJO 
RSS S Art — .16250 16450 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Mekmloi rteertteMr 25 n« 

BM A*k 

Art 1X50 W 

Mav ixsa IXTO 

Jun 130 1X40 

Jly 1X70 JXig 

Auo I XU 1X00 

Sap LED 30 

Nov ... 1X40 1X80 

Jan Uto 130 

Mm- 1X30 1X8) 

Vrtufm: 0 loll of 7S funs 
Source: fteutrrs. 


9L Gmm MM*1S0I)I works cate pe mrt 


TaWatmtonc UUH 
Total cafl am taLTZUH 
TaHHl VUbmt wu 
TaM pal am UL wan 
ladoi: 

tfakrfUk uwTTSXB OaaaUSJi-iLU 
Score*: C&OE. 


SMkb Coto-SeMe Itett-Seitte 

Prka Jub Sep Dae Jan Sop Doc 

10 2X7 256 - Ut 053 Oxs 

3T 1J1 133 269 0J2 SJi 03 

32 L12 1X0 220 0.9! 13 — 

33 672 1X9 Ul L4S 1X5 - 

34 0X3 ON U) 215 — — 

35 025 149 — 2.95 107 — 


1.1965 1X180 
1.1920 1X135 
1.1920 1X130 
1X000 1X130 


Market Guide 


J250 XZ79 
•7230 X2S8 
X220 X3S0 
7244 


CBT: CMcaeo Baafd of Trad* 

CME! Chicago Marantlte Ezchonaa 

IMM: international Monitory Morkot 

Of Oileaae M ar eaw Hle Exchango 
NYCSCE: Now York cocoa. Swor, Cotfrn fixchanM 

MYCR: Now York Gotten Emhgnao 

COMSX: Commodity Exonnao. Now York 

NYME: Now York Morcontlte ExcfkrtM 

KCBT: KanwH aty Bawd of Trad* 

NYFE: now York Futures Exchange 


The Commerce Department in- j 

ves ligation began after several I U- 
American steel companies filed a I 
petition in June 1984 over imports 
of the products, which are used 
underground and in the water to 
drill for oil. Commerce withheld 
ruling on a case involving similar 
products imported from Mexico. Ii 
said a decision was expected by the 0 n*v*oe 
end of May. &>*».- * 


btfmotedloMmLWI 

Cam; wml WL 7X>6 bpm ML 3U*7 
itete : Wtet woL+7]5opw ml lajri 
Source! CME. 


16+ -7 


" ' r 1 ft? \#m 


-i-f Q 

■* .v.vi 


-Vlfc*iXfc 


U A Treasury Bill Bates 
March 28 


BP Wins Indonesia Ca 


Offer BU TteM YteM 
3*nonra 838 886 Ui lil 

6-monlh (49 147 1% 9X7 

Oiwyaar 846 164 9X» 9X4 

Seun»: SMunan BnHmrs 


Japan Prices Rise in Year 

Reusers 

TOKYO — Producer prices in 
Japan fell 0.1 percent in the second 
10 days of March from the previous 
10-day level, and rose 1 percent 
from a year earlier, the Bank of 
Japan said Thursday. 


iRrsrtw 

JAKARTA — British PC 
Co. PLC has won an IL 
contract to provide Bw£S 
state oO company, Ptrtana ^ i 
refinery consultancysa| ; 
dustry sources said Thutg , f 
value of the coniract; Ww^ , 
dosed.' ' ito 


morn 

' i 

’ V. if f 



















aNESS ROUNDUP 


iio Thrift Is Reopei 
er Misconduct Qa 


r ' 


the Associated Prat 

. [NNATI — As concerned 
s waited in line Thursday, 
dators reopened a savings 
. that had tarn dosed after 
■Ml oncormorcaf itsoffi- 
aDy withdrew thdr money 
; nm on deposits, 
itors who bad ordered 
Savings & Loan Co. 
ednesday proceeded with 
of the institution's boohs 
. Thomas Baltics, Ohio’s 

‘ aty superintendent of sav- 
1 loans, said Oakmont 
%t money demand* 
allowed to remain opea 


* . 


* ■^'*1 W- 

* -. • 


jitial Insurance 
>s Not to Go Public 

w York Tima Senior 

YORK. — Prudential In- 
Jo. of America, the biggest 
tier, has decided against 
' 2 to public ownerstup. a 
ther insurers have, also 
sidermg. Prudential is a 
isnrance company, mean- 
s oo capital stock and is 
3d controlled fay po&cy- 
wfao receive dividends 
dio earnings, 
we had a group studying 
'ould convert and whether 
y Robert A. Beck, chair- 
chief executive of the in- 
1 Wednesday. “As a result 
studies we have decided 
noceed at this dm* with 
(ami na tion of demutliali- 
Prudentml is based in 
New Jersey. 


Tbc action was the lastest chap- 
ter m a public crisis for manysav- 
tugs and loans in Ohio that began 

rowed $670 million from a Florida 

KT dealCT *“ «"a-S 

TTie Home Slate run forced the 
gaonnau-based thrift to close 
March 9, and Governor Richard F 
Cdesre dosed 69 other privately 
insured Ohio savings and loans six 
days later. 

State officials on Wednesday Dut 
Oakmont under the control of a 
stare conservator, saying at least 
one officer of the ihnft iaay have 
dosed, a personal account during 
the cnas two weeks ago. A state 

or 5f 13 had prohibited 
such withdrawals. 

Mr Batties declined to identify 
or officers allegedly in- 

Tbestaie and federal bank ex- 
ammers’ findings will be turned 
tw to die Ohio attorney general 
and to Lawrence Kane, a siate- 
aRpointed special prosecutor who 
is mvestigatmg the Hwne State col- 
lapse, Mr. Batties said. 

officials have said the 
closed thrifts cannot nopea for full 
seroce, other than deposits and 
5750-per-month maximum with- 
“^wals by depositors, unless the 
timfts can obtain federal insur- 
ance, convince the state they can 
qualify for it or are taken owsr by a 
federally insured bank. 

. *y “ft Thursday, 26 of the 
dosed thrifts had fully reopened 
under those requirements. 


Peat Am Crews 
Return to Work 

Uni ted Proa International 

NEW YORK — Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways’ 5 800 
ground workers began return- 
ing to work Thursday after a 
monthlong strike. 

Pan Am approved a three- 
year contract with the Trans- 
port Workers Union Wednes- 
day, and members were «nt 
nuugrams calling them back to 
work. The union struck Feb. 28 
The tentative settlement was 
reach e d S aturda y. 

Striking mechanics, baggage 
hanttiers and flight dispatchers 
wted 3,583 to 2,193 fbrthe new 
™»^year contract, which in- 
cludes a 20-percent wage in- 
crease and a cash bonus. The 
workers two years ago had giv- 
ai the financially troubled air- 
luie a 14-percent wage conces- 
sion. 


INTENTIONAL HERALD TRIBU NE, FRIDAY. MAKPR , 98s 

business people 

Bank of Boston Discloses 
More Errors in Reporting 

f rtntr+i/jL .4 L. /L». c*- cr f n. 


Compiled by Our Staff Front Dispmdta 

~ Bank of Boston 

t-fcrp. failed to report another SI 10 
muuon in international cash trans- 
actions of more than 510.000, Wfl- 
“*® L Brown, the company’s 
“airman, told the annual n yyono 
Thursday. 

Mr. Brown said the bank holding 
“inpanyon Wednesday filed 1,200 
r^orts with the federal govern- 
ment on the transactions. 


First 

the 

pleaded 


bonal unreported transactions are 
found they would be 

t National Bank of Boston, 
company’s major unit, 
■ . sr-Jtyto a felony charge in 

February that it had failed tore- 
pon 51.22 billion of international 
cash transactions. 

. In the aftermath of that scandal, 
banks across the United States 
have been re-ex aminin g rh^ pro- 
cedure. On Wednesday, Irving 
TiustCo. and Manufacturers Han- 


— « iLUU 

Boston $ international banking 
subsidiary in Miami. Eight-tan? 
dred transactions, nearly fco mfl. 
“ 0I V’ were foreign-exchange trans- 
actions with Canadian banks 
dating from July 1980. 

. Mr. Brown said an internal re- 
view was continuing and if addi- 

& Remains in Trouble 

ROME — Zjmmri Caded 1“* year $500 milHon 

»W<»1 ItaBafdoma^n^ ^ 


——»««*** --- WUUXUiJf, living 

He said about $73 million of the Manufacturers Han- 

amonnt represents 59 bank- to- ^^T^Co-sajddieyhadvitrfat- 
haut transactions between the can- ? ■ r - ?’ r 31 ^ Secrecy Act by 

tial bank of Haiti and BaSTof h ""“ ’ 


stay thu it tJSfflum wo,lld 


hawng failed to rroort to federal 
authorities hundreds of milHnng of 
dollars in cash transactions. 

Irving said it had failed to report 
1,659 transactions with 38 foiSm 
banks, totaling 5292 million. Man- 
ufacturers Hanover said it had 
™f. to ffle required reports on 
LWO mtematronal transactions in- 
volving 5140 million. 

Rith banks said they now have 

filed the necessary reports, and that 
the errors were oversights and did 
not result from any attempt by or- 
ganized crime to disguise the ori- 
gins of cash acquired from illicit 
sources. 


Swiss Brokers 
Join Japanese 
In New Firm 

By Lynne Cuiry 

International Herald Tribune 

„ LONDON — Tradition Service 
Holding SA, a Lausanne-based 
subsidiary of Compamue Finan- 

ciere et de Crtdit SA, aSwiss finan- 

cia] group that provides money 
brolung and specialized banking 
services, and Nagoya Tansbi Co„ a 
Japanese money-broking firm, 
have agreed to establish a joint ven- 
ture in TH r, ”‘ 

Called 


-Jtan Tradition Cd. the 

new organization will act as an in- 
ternational foreign-e xchange and 
deposit broker in Tokyo. 

Tsutomu Tsumiyama, currently 
president of Nagoya Tansbi Co. 
wiD be the new company's presi- 
dent. 


troubled 

ance gr 

lux AB 

Thursday that it has^shSl^roO Analysts said the vi 

of its 18,800 jobs over the next aUz f^ 10 smc toough involving large si 

three years. J 05 ^ n «n fusions from the age of 50 instead peared to be adSnSti 

JfsSafSt !Si*3a‘ s 

managing direcior, said suSSjta ^ PercCTt 


1 i : 


« ± 




; y f Lnng’ 

: ers Air 

t iaaed from Page 11) 
al," said Stephni G. 
- naiketing managers for 
-uanbranes depar tmen t 
, in contrast can 


Analysts said the violations, 
n,.«K —living tage am^ ap- 
* ---- - — administrative errors 
rather than deliberate attempts to 
evade the law. 

The secrecy act requires banks to 
report to the Treasury Department 
any cash transactions of 510,000 or 
to 011 *; Jhe intent is to help authori- 
ties fight illicit drug trafficking bv 
U M frtog it difficult for criminals to 
«My«i huge amounts of small-de- 
nomination bills- (Reuters, NYT) 


Nagoya Tanshi will have a two- 
thirds stake in the company and 
Tradition will hold the remaining 
one-third. Nagoya Tanshi win e£ 
tablish a wholly owned subsidiary 
with capital of 50 million yen 
($200,000) to which it will transfer 
the business of its foreign depart- 
ment. Nagoya will then sell 33 per- 
cent of its shares in the new subsid- 
laiy to Tradition Service Holding. 

Britain Sets Up Panel 
For Investor Protection 

Britain's Department of Trade 
and Industry has appointed Mark 
Weinberg, chairman of Hambro 
ufe, the largest British unit-linked 
life insurance company, to head a 
new watchdog group for investor 
protection. 


Mr. Weinberg was named chair , 
man Thursday cf the new Market- 
ing of Investments Board, which 
will cover the regulations of such 
investments as life insurance and 
unit trusts. The creation of the 
group was proposed by Trade and 
Industry Secretary Norman Tebbit 
in a white paper in January. 

Mr. Weinberg will continue as 
chairman of Hambro Life, which 
was acquired by BAT Industries 
PLC in Februaiy. 

Credi tans tail- Bankverem, Aus- 
tria’s biggest bank, is setting up a 
subsidiajy in Glasgow, CA Indus- 
trial Finance Ltd, mainly to fi- 
nance capital-equipment purchases 
by small and midsir ed companies. 

The state-controlled bank 
named James Hamilton managing 
director of CA Industria l, 
has authorized capital of £2 million 
($2.5 minion). He previously was 
managing director of Grindlays In- 
dustrial Finance, a unit of tirind- 
lays Holdings PLC, recently ac- 
quired by Australia & New 
Zealand Banking Group Ltd 


Page 13 


Taipei. Mr, Dorn was previously 
basal in Frankfurt as assistant vice 
president in the bank’s internation- 
al division. 

C Mhan k has appointed Phillip B. 
Lassiter divirion head for East 
Aria, responsible for overall man. 
agenuni of Citibank’s corporate 
banking activities in the Philip- 
pines, Taiwan, Hong Kong and 
China. Mr. Lassiter, now located in 
Manila, succeeds James J. Collins, 
who has become Japan division 
bead and country corporate officer. 

P M a ririp iua National Bm* has 
nam ed Jim Hildebrand chief exec- 
utive officer of its London mer- 
chant bank, which is expected to 
open this summer. Mr. Hildebrand 
was previously managing director 
of Continental Elinas Ltd, the 
merchant bank bought by Fust In- 
terstate. 


“ U1V 

Dresdner Bank AG of Frankfurt 
has appointed Hans Jfligen Dora 
representative of its new office in 


Options 


Urine IbS/k.). 


| (Vox 

Mgy 

** 

Not 

1 

jocuza 

. 


1 m 


250M750 


1 ™ 

WWUO 

aooazso 



730- 90) 

1550 1750 

TIMXxn 


450 450 

1IJW37S 

mtata 

1 SO 

30ft 5(0 

WtljCO 

1575-1775 

1 


635-173 

tmuTs 


GaU 3R00.3ZrJD 

ValanWkkeWcM&A. 

UWU Mom-Mmc 
12tl Genera l. Sw tocri Mri 
Trt. S1C25T - Telex 2S 365 


STOCK 

DeVoe-Holbem 
International bv 
City-Cock 
International nv 


BID 

USS 

5% 

234 


ASK 

U5S 

6% 

336 


Quotes as of: March 28, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
win be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 
10I7BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firconl 


Sheraton Gains a Foothold in China 


■v*» 


: 9.99 percent parity, bnt 
’ _ utiyes argue that this lev- 
. ‘ ty is not needed in many 

. ste onstream is enriched 

26 percent to 27 percent 

duch can be applied in 
- v •' as of a plant or simply 
■o the atmosphere, 
cu.ts are not entirdy sure 
.. . ; mokcuks pass through 
■ 7 « faster than others, 
Reynolds, the chief re- 
*- .in the project, said Mo- 
V * or weight cannot «- 
^.phenomenon, since 
- ^ a molecular weight of 
ales the membrane used 
■ trator several times faster 
3gen, whose molecular 
- lA - 

Jdule in the Dow system, 

.CAmnnmr mTI. 


r t i 


■The Dir 
biteraass; 


. ice 300 standard cubic 

X an hour, and the 
tookedupinparal- 
m uce as much gas as a user 
z standard system con- 
" » modules that can pro- 
- J standard cubic feet of 
,n hour on a continuous 



(Continued from Page 11) 
aal “open-door policy, adopted in 
1979, which eudedlUSist 2lf-ref£ 
ance m favor of impor ting technol- 
ogy, capital and Western expertise. 

The 1,007-room hotd was the 
urst U.S. investment to be agreed 
upon after Beijing began looking 
for partners in “jamt ventures,** as 
they call the policy of marrying 
Chinese and foreign ownership. 
Despite Chinese efforts to lure U.S. 
businesses, only about 30 joint en- 
terprises have been undertaken, 
with a total capitalization of be- 
tween $100 nriffion and $150 mfl- 
hon. More than half that is repre- 
sented by the Great Wall HoteL 

Chinese officials say that the new 
pobrics have attracted $8 billion in 
foreign capita] in more than 2^00 
agreements. But Western embas- 
sies say the Chinese count indudes 

trading am tracts ami other ar- 
rangements that dp not Involve an 
equity holding here. By these esti- 
mates, the true figure is probably 
less than $1 billion, pan of the 
money coming from Chinese entre- 
preneurs in Hcmg Kong and the 
United States. 

To draw more investment, Mr. 
Deng and his colleagues owi-tikir Jt 
crucial that projects like the Great 
Wall Hold be seen as efficient and 
profitable. The symbolic value of 
the hotd was underlined last April 
when President Ronald Reagan 
hdd a banquet there, serving gov- 


ernment leaders American turkey 
and California champngn* 

Because of the need to show that 
the hotd was first of all a Chinese 
venture. China International Trav- 
el Service, which holds a control- 


ling interest of 51 percent, has in- 
sisted on having the management 
under its direct controL The UiL 
investors, led by GB. Sung, a 
Shanghai-born industrialist with 
headquarters in San Francisco, had 
wanted a major U.S. hotd eh*in 
involved, but settled far a compro- 
mise under winch the general man. 
Beer's position went to an Ameri- 
can of Chinese origin, Peter Sun. 

After a year, Mr. Sun wanted to 
leave the Great Wall Meanwhile, 
faced with the accumulating prob- 
lems, the Chinese had begun to 
listen more sympathetically to the 
arguments of thdr U.S. partners. A 
call was placed to Sheraton head- 
quarters in Boston, and Mr. Ka~ 
pioltas dispatched two top execu- 
tives to negotiate with E-S Pacific, 
the business set up by Mr. Sung 
and his investment partner, Mac- 
Donald G. Becket, a Los Angeles 
architect and devdoper. 

For Sheraton, the stakes in the 
new venture arc high. The chain 
will be paid an undisclosed fee or a 
percentage of revenue to operate 
the hotel — a payment that pre- 
sumably takes into account some 

CXncnSIW inlriil nuniiiu, 


be spent to link the hotd to the 
Sheraton's reservations network. In 
addition, Sheraton has just spent 
$1 m illio n on a promotion cam- 
prngn advotising the renamed 
Great WaB Sheraton Hotel Beijing 
m major UJS. newspapers. 

The ads were not mined at Chi- 
nese travelers: The daily room rate, 
5125 for a double, is more than half 
Qiinas average annual income. 
Moreover, doormen in braided uni- 
ronns discourage all but official 
Chinese from even entering the 
building. Bnt Mr. Kapidtasis en- 
awraged by the rapid growth in the 
numbers of foreign tourists and 
businessmen, two million last year, 
a 32-percent increase over 1983.* 
“We expect to make the hotd a 
financial success for the investors." 
he said. 

An air of caution affects the at- 
mosphere in which joint ventures 
wtfk. The Chinese have mandated 
that the faoteTs 70 foreign staff be I 
wthdrawn as soon as possible, and 
Mr. Kapioltas said the Stanton 
hopes to have the hotd run entirely 
by local people in three to five 
years. 

As a policy matter, the Chinese 
also seek the early departure of 
|omt venture partners. Under all 
such contracts, the foreign equity 
holding disappears after an agreed- 
upon period, usually 7 to 20 years. 

Ih the Great Wall's case, the Chi- 
nese insisted on a relativdy quick 
transition. 




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what your portfolio needs in today's market 

We think the U.S. economy is right for stocks, but * 
oniy a select few have the potential to outperform /Mfc~ 
any possible market adjustments. 

We believe investors must segment the universe of companies into 
mose that do well despite the past strength of the dollar and those 
that are modestly to significantly impacted by the dollar's strength 

At Bache Securities, we've selected eight U.S. stocks that we think 
will do just that, and we'd like to tell you about them. 

If you are an ambitious investor who is interested in taking a 
cautious and selective investment stance , send for our latest Action 
Alert entitled. Eight Stocks. " It will give you our insights into the 
stocks which we believe have high earnings growth potential no 
matter how the market performs. 

For your free copy, call or contact the Bache Securities office nearest 
you. 

LorK $on: 5 Burtington Gardens, England WfX IL£. Tel: 439-4191 Telex: 263779 
New York: TOO Gold Street. Special and International Accounts, U.SA 10292 Tel- 791-4425 
Zurich: Wasserwerkstrasse 10, Switzerland. 8035, Tel: 361-4422 Telex: 81336 
Singapore: Wing On Life Building, 150 Cedi St, Republic of Singapore, 0106 Tel: 224-6122 
Hong Kong: Shell House, 24-28 Queens Road Central, 9th Floor, Tel: 852-5-229051 
Tetex:HX 62201 

Please send me your latest Action Alert entitled "Eight Stocks" 


i*« * - 



Name 


Address 


Telephone 


Bache Securities Inc. 


i ‘ T 


International offices. - Amsterdam, Athens, Brussels, Buenos Aires, Chiasso . Cologne T n uxx+ trferf 
Own* Hamburg, Hong Kong, London. Lugano. Luxembourg. Madrid. Monte Curb. Montevideo. Munich? New 
Jbri. Paris, Rotterdam. St. Croix, SL Thomas. San Juan. Singapore . Stuttgart. Tokyo and Zurich. Also affiliates in 
Melbourne and Sydney. 


SILVER SPUR 
SILVER SPIRIT 

Paris delivery tax free 
F.F. 786000 & 682000 


ROLLS 


m 



FRANCO BRITANNIC 

25, rue P.-V. Couturier. 92300 Levallois 
Tel. : (01) 757.50.80, Telex 620420 

JAGUAR - ROVER - RANGE ROVER 


EHTE NAZIONALE PER L’ENERGIA ELEITRIGA (ENEL) 

VA% 1971/1986 European Cnrwsncy 
Unite 60,000,000 Gua^teedBc^ 

CmTaK 7 5JS00.000 have been 
™ !Sy VLWS 14 1985 “ Pmacc d a Not "y Public Cor redemption 

^ ™^OUSLY REDEEMED, 

6921 up to 22316 IneL 

They are redeemable, coupon doe May 1, 1906 attached m from May 1. 1965. 
Amount mumortized: European Currency Units 5,000.000. 

OntstewBog drawn Bonds: 

1404U. 1411 ind. 1661 2385 ^toS87ineL 

4898 and 4899 5062 to 5064 incL 

5344m 5339 to 5341 incL 

5**4to 5356 md. 5358 5483 

19390 to 19392 ind. 33985 

Luxembourg, March 29. 1985. 

THE FISCAL AGENT 

kredeetbank 

&A. LUXEMBOURGEOISE 



Fuji unlocks 
new opportunities. 

You need Fuji Bank, one of Japan’s largest 

CW^ SfS? 32 dties in 21 to help you anywhere, any time 

Our over U.S. $110 billion in assets enable us to finance virtually any project 

And our experienced international staff can provide you with a wide 
range of financial services and information. 

For a head start in international business, start with Fuji Bank. 

We’ll open up considerable possibilities. 

0 FUJI BANK 

owsM.Nitwork Tokyo. Japan 

LOfldOrt, DfllMidort Frankfurt, Zurich. ■Luxmiboura Paris. MwtrM . 

Atlanta, Miami, Toronto, Mexico City, Sio Pauto uaanie. San Franctoco. 

WWtarE. Haller & Comtuny. Waiter E. Heiier Overseas Cotporeiion 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1985 


Thursday^ 

AVffiX 

Closing 


Tobies induce the nationwide prices 

op to the dosing on won Street 

and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

Via Vie Associated Press 


i? Month 5b. One 

HfthLOw Stuck Dfa. YM. PE KBsHiBh lew Oust. an» 


G Month sts. 

HMh LOW Stack D»v. VKL PE IM»HtflhLOW 


MOW „ 
LOW Slack 


pH via. PE TO Hi oil Low Pud Ch 




UU 5 711*1 

n no wt 

70 Ift 
TS 5 3ftt 
AS T ift 
30 14 30* 

is n 

10 31 TIM 

>7 s art* 
777 w* 
10 ift 
15 117 1710 


21ft 21ft 

Mft 186* + ft 

11% 11*— ft 
vex JTVi— n 
6% i'i * ’ft 
2* PMO ft 

Pi r% 

Tift lift + ft 
hi’- toft 
14 Uft + ft 
Aft 4'-— ft 
i7 im + ft 


ift 
UH 
8% 
f 

ttt 
2ft 
12ft 
2ft 
lift 
2ft 
lift 
7ft 
tft 
21ft 
a 

17 
144 23ft 
Aft 3ft 
1ft 10ft 


3% ift 
71* Tft 
m ns 

14ft lift 

17ft 1! 

IK tft 
II fk 
Wr 4ft 
25ft » 

tft Tft 

27ft WH 
ift 5ft 
Ift 5 
Aft 2V> 
Ift 1ft 
IN, T3ft 
lift Ift 
13ft ift L 
U 10ft (j 
14ft » L 
35ft 13ft L 


10ft Sft 
15ft 12 
II Oft 
27 lift 
Tft 1ft 
31 12ft 
34V. 22ft 
lift 27ft 
21ft 14ft 
9ft 5ft 
19ft 10ft 
9ft ift 
lift 7ft 
5ft 2ft 
17ft 3ft 
2ft ft 
•ft Aft 
5 Tft 
15ft 9ft 
Aft 2ft 
13ft Aft 
34ft 25ft 
aft n* 
10ft 2ft 
17ft lift 
4ft 1ft 
■ft 3ft 
lift I 
13ft Aft 
lift 28ft 
Oft 29 
21ft lift 
10 7ft 


119 
AA 
5 
21 
2 
50 
21 
AS 31ft 
301 10ft 
2ft 
lift 


21 

aft 

33 

33 

32 

32ft 

20ft 

30ft 

Bft 

Bft 

12 

lift 

Ift 

Bft 

141% 

15V, 

2ft 

Tft 

Aft 

Aft 

1ft 

1ft 

5ft 

5ft 


2ft— ft 

lift + ft 


3ft 3ft 3W + ft 
15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 
am ion ion— ft 
38ft 3TA 38ft + ft 

39 an* a? 

19ft 19 19ft + V 

8ft Bft 8ft + ft 


; ioB ■ 

MAftMAft— 3 

Aft 

66% 

6ft + 4% 

3ft 

2ft 

3ft 

12ft 

121% 

12ft 

a 

2ft 

nr_«. 

21* 

21% 

Ti— 1% 

3Bft 

37ft 38 +1 

l Tft 

9ft 

Tft 

20ft 

204% 2K%+ ft 

2 

1ft 

2 

91% 

9ft 

Tft 

Bft 

Bft 

Oft 

i 12ft 

1211% 

12ft + ft 

JVi 

3ft 

3ft— 1% 

: m 

1 

1ft + ft 

7ft 

7ft 

Tft— ft 

m% 

101% 

10ft 

5 

5 

5 4 ft 

Tft 

2 

2 — V% 

7Vh 

Tft 

71% + ft 

in 

11% 

1ft— ft 

25ft 

23V. 

255%+ ft 

32ft 

32ft 

32ft 

3 

3 

3 



M 

40)30 9 
JO i U 

JVt *2 12 
59 A3 1A 
L2D* 4.1 10 
52 13 17 
35* S3 4 
32 24 19 

uo no ■ 


19 Ift 
M 13ft 
•zsx uft 
52 Tft 
3 lift 
A* 15ft 
At ]9ft 
in ova 
5A 5ft 
12 12ft 
9 13ft 
U 1ft 
59 Mft 
TO 2ft 
43 lift 
57 lift 
teat 3zft 
2 31 % 

19 9ft 
909 ISft 


1ft Ift 

18ft 1M + ft 
15ft 15ft + ft 
19ft 19ft 
42ft 42Vb— ft 
5 5 — ft 

13 13ft 
Uft 139* + ft 
1 I 

10ft 10ft + ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
lift lift + ft 
lift lift + ft 
23ft 33ft— V. 
2ft 3ft + ft 
9ft Tft A- ft 
10 H 


24ft lift 
22ft 141% 
12 ' 4 
- lift Aft 
204% lift 
17ft Tft 
7ft 3ft 
7Vi 3ft 
I 5ft 
7ft 5ft 
JAVr 21ft 
10ft ift 
11 Tft 


OEA 

Ookwd Mb 

OdatAa 

Otters* 

O naiad M 
Obtent M 
OOWtp 
OPtrm n 
DrkitHA .15 
OrMHB JO 
OSuUwn J2 
OrfrOF jBX 
OnrkH TO 


i 22*4 22ft + ft 
19ft 19ft 4- ft 
> Sft+ ft 
1 0 10ft — ft 
19ft 19ft 
155% lift + ft 
Aft dft+ ft 
Aft Aft— ft 
Aft Aft + ft 
7ft Tft— ft 
35ft 35ft— ft 
9 9 

9ft 9ft 


17ft 

lift Jadvn 

_50b 14 

9 

9 

Mft 

14ft 

14ft— ft 

94% 

5ft Jacobs 



52 

Aft 

ift 

Cft + ft 

5ft 

3H Jot Am 


A 

AS 

Zft 

Tft 

2ft 

Bft 

4ft JeTTOn 

jrn 6.1 

16 

A 

B 

0 

B 

61% 

2ft John Pd 



51 

41% 

4 

4 — 1% 

Uft 

7ft JotmAm 

JO 2.9 

IA 

65 

ion 

10ft 

10ft 

lift 

31% Jotuilnd 


4 

78 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft + ft 

7ft 

4 JmpJkn 


5 

Ml 

4ft 

4ft 

41% + ft 


lift COH 9 

9 CHB JOb 13138 

5 CMI Cp 
2V. CMXCp 

13ft CRS 34 20 17 

9ft CmsNJ 16 

4ft CogtaA 4 

W Cal RE 150 9S 9 
lift Chimin M Z9 33 
4ft Colton n 
ft Colin wt 


1 lift 

20 15M 
18 Oft 
1A 2ft 

2 17 

27 13ft 

3 8 

115 12ft 

21 am 

39 4ft 

AS ft 


lift lift 
15ft 15ft 
Oft Oft— ft 
2ft 29* + ft 
lift 17 + ft 
13 13 + V* 

5 5 + ft 

12ft 12ft + ft 
20ft 20ft— ft 
Aft 4ft— ft 
ft ft+ ft 


Ift FPA 73 

lift Fublnd JO 23 7 
2 FnlrmC 
5ft Fldoto 

9ft FlConn 100a 94 7 
IMA FfF5Ln 400 20 7 
11 PWVmB JO AO lo 
lift FlschP 4M 54 10 
7ft PltcOe 4 

22ft FftGEPf 440 142 
Oft FlonEn 

24ft FloRcfc JO 14 11 
22ft Fluke 1381 5.1 11 
Aft Food ml 11 

7V. FooteM 

4ft FttllllG 21 

AOft FordCn 0440* 

15 PoretCA .15 J134 


13 lift 11 
18 17ft 17ft 

2 3ft 3ft 
93 ift ift 
12 10ft 10ft 

5 29ft 2F» 
99 12ft lift 

3 12ft 12ft 
41 Ift Oft 
i 24ft 24ft 

52 9ft 8ft 
157 43ft 42ft 
101 24ft lift 
i 11 II 

4 9ft 8ft 

14A Oft Oft 
SAW 98 96 Va 

10 21ft 21ft 


n -» 

17ft 

3ft + ft 
ift— ft 
10ft + ft 
*U- ft 
lift— ft 
12ft + ft 
8ft— ft 
2fli + ft 
Oft— ft 
426% +11% 
24ft + ft 
11 + ft 
9ft+ ft 
Bft + ft 
94ft— ft 
21ft + ft 


3ft 1ft 
15ft 10 
lift 9ft 
17ft 10U 
9ft 516 
1714 0 

15 5 

Ift 114 
Bft 7ft 
4ft Tft 
4ft 3ft 
5ft 3ft 
ift 3 
Sft 3ft 
3ft 2ft 
15 Ift 
15ft Bft 
27ft 21 


KdpOfcC 
KovCp TO 
KoarNn JO 
Kefchra 381 
KavCo to 
K orn TO 
KtvCa 
KavCawt 
KtvCa un 
KMdawt 
Kltem 
Klnark 
Kirby 
KltMte 
KJoflrVs 42r 
Knoao 
Knoa 

KogarC 232 . 


102 2ft 
34 15 
3 12ft 
40 17V, 

3 714 

505 ro« 

42 Aft 
141 1ft 
241 I 
31 Aft 

4 Aft 
22 Aft 

302 3ft 
TO 5 
19 2ft 
44 13ft 
51 13ft 
100 2AVl 


2ft 2ft 
Uft Uft— ft 
12ft 12ft 
16ft 1716 + ft 
Tft 7ft 
Tft 9ft— ft 
Aft ift- ft 
1ft 1ft + ft 
7ft 0 + Hi 
4ft Aft 
Aft Aft + ft 
Aft Aft 
3ft 3ft 
Aft 5 
2ft 2ft 
1314 13ft— ft 
13 13V. + ft 

245% Sift 


13 10U 

n ift 

KH% Bft 
10ft Ift 
Uft 8 
34 281% 

32ft 24ft 
27 21ft 
21ft 17ft 
19ft Uft 
219* 17 
22ft 171% 
91* 7ft 
20 1514 

1014 13ft 
17ft I3T4 
17ft lift 
24ft 14ft 
43ft 34 
64ft 53ft 
45„ 35ft 
14% ft 
39ft 2 m 
8ft 5ft 
9ft 3ft 
23ft 15ft 
14ft 7ft 
5ft 2ft 
Uft 7ft 


PGEB4A 

PGEolC 

PGElrfO 

PGEnfE 

PGEolC 

PGEolF 

PGEDfZ 

PGEofY 

PGEpftV 

PGEpfV 

PCEofT 

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PCErfH 

PGEofR : 

PGEpfP : 

PGEptO 

PGEoiK . 

POTm 

PocUpf ■ 

PacLTol I 

Padfpt ! 

Pag* a 

Pancp 

Pantasr 

PoraPk 

Parkdi 

Paftch 

Po y Fo h 

pec nr 


40 t.l 21 
22 
8 

40a 27 9 
20 
31 

SU 73 32 


12ft Uft 
10ft Mft 
10ft nm 
10ft Uft 
10ft Uft 
33ft 33ft 
31ft 31ft 
26%. 26ft 
21 . 21 
19ft 19ft 
21ft 2!ft 
21ft 21ft 
9ft 9ft 
19ft 19ft 
Uft lift 
16ft lift 
Uft lift 
22 21ft 
VC. 391- 
«2ft a 
41V. 4154 
ft ft 
371% 3616 
7ft 71% 
Ift 8ft 
22 21ft 
•ft I 
Aft Aft 
lift Uft 


12 ft 

Uft— M 
10ft + ft 
HH»+ ft 
1 0Vi+ ft 
331% + ft 
31ft + ft 
2 AM 
21 
19ft 

21ft— ft 
21ft + ft 
9ft + ft 
19ft + ft 
1A*% 

Uft— ft 
lAtt 

21ft + ft 
38ft— 2ft 
42ft 

4, t£+».' 
34ft + ft 
7ft 
■ft 
21 ft 

Bft+ ft 
Aft— ft 
lift 


Bft 

Aft SFM 


II 

a 


71% 

7ft + 6% 

F% 

71% SFM pfA 


AM 

7*% 

r.. 

Tft + n 

5ft 

3ft SMD 



38 

31% 

31% 

36* + ft 

13'm 

7 5089 


27 

1 

91% 

9V* 

Tft- 1% 

ton 

7ft Sowm 

JOr 24 


2 

76% 

76* 

7ft 

31% 

4% SCnrlo 



to 

Ift 

in 

in— n 

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jn ti j 


■ 

74% 

Tft 

7V» 

Bn 

7ft 5000 Ft 

IjOO ha 


4 

M 

H* 

m+ n 

eon 

47*6 S DCO Of 

934 125 


tote 70ft 

77ft 

an+ift 

41 

49 SDgapt 

7 JO 12J 


2000* 51ft 

58ft 

an 

301% 

21 V, 30000* 

445 12J 


M 

3*6% 351% 366% +1 

60 

334% sanJW 

2.90 ST 

9 

3 

55ft 

SS 

55V. + 1% 

36 

ZJI% Sancfot* 

M SB 

It 

3 

Jfl* 

26ft 36ft— «% 

51% 

35% Sonmrk 

-CM 94 

11 

3S 

4» 

Aft 

4V»+ 1% 

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44% SouadA 

.20 X0 

t 

215 

Aft 

4ft 

46%+ 6% 

10ft 

9ft Sound P« UI 12J0 


331 

10 

Tft 

10 

5ft 

3ft SdPtrn 



21 

46% 

4*1 

46% + V% 

22ft 

151% Sdwte 

56 19 

10 

14 

191% 

lTft 

196%— ft 

ift School P 


a 

7 

2ft 

3ft 

2ft + n 

MV> 

104% samab 

41 1! 

17 

5 

13*% 

Uft 

Uft— ft 

Bft 

3«% Sclirtst 

.10 1J 


64 

5ft 

5V* 

56% 

35 

23 SdLH 


12 

65 

271* 26ft 

27 ft + n 

IS 

11 ScurRn 



12 

156% 

15ft 

is** + n 

11% Sflflporf 


IA 

5 

11% 

1ft 

Ift 

15ft 

10ft SvcCap 

.14* 1.1 

I 

55 

14 

136% 

14+6% 

A ft 

2% 5*tsFra 



3 

36% 

3ft 

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94% 

4% SalsDU 



57 

1ft 

IV. 

16% + ft 

Oft 

31% Salas 


4 

IS 

7 

7 

7 + ft 

4ft 

3ft SalhiAs 


13 

34 

4ft 

466 

4ft + ft 

54% 

2ft Somtcb 



5 

46% 

4V. 

4ft 

151% 

lift Srvisco 

44 X9 

21 

3 

Uft 

lift 

lift 

% 

7ft 9*rvu 


73 

A 

*n 

Oft 

tft— ft 

51% Sorwotr 

421 75 

7 

39 

Oft 

Tft 

8+6% 

18ft 

■n Salon i 

.12 7 

12 

9 

171% 

17 

17 — n 

Uft 

Bft SbaorS 

150a BJ 

A 

3 

un 

tin 

lift 

Tft 

ft Sharon 



21S 

l 

ft 

ft— 1% 

14ft 

r.% Shaawl 

.Mb U 

65 

150 

Uft 

UV* 

136% + ft 

15ft 

ton Sfarcn 

40 24 

It 

3 

146* 

14ft 

146%— ft 

7ft 

5ft sifeo 

JO 35 24 

2 

Aft 

Aft 

46% — ft 

15 

0 SikOSAi 

50 14 

13 

59 

131% 

un 

ui%+ *% 

44% 

3ft Sllvrcst 


17 

31% 

3ft 

31% + 1% 

5ft 

21% SteiCOS 



3 

3ft 

36% 

sft+ n 

lift 

10ft SmihA 

M 11 


2 

isn 

isn 

un + V* 

15ft 

12ft 5iivdar 

250 1X4 

14 

54 

14ft 

146% 

14ft + ft 

84% 

2ft 

5ft Sailiran 
S SoTn 


IA 

m 

2 

Tt Tt ir*[ 

lift 

11% SaatCaa 

JO* 44 


3 

10ft 

106% 

10ft + V* 

ia 

7ft 5CEd Of 

156 1TJ 


5 

Tft 

Tft 

96%+ U 

10V% 

7ft SCEOPt 

151 114 


1 

fn 

n% 

tft 

iiH 

8VS SCEdpf 

1.19 115 


U 

10H 

wv% 

io6%+ n 

44 

33 SCEdOt 

458 94 


150r 431% 

431% 

43ft— ft 

&£ 

1051% SCEdpf 

145 UJ 


10 

13 

U 

U + ft 

27ft SCEdPl 

1J0 34 


1 

381% 

an 

30ft + 6% 

T1U. 

lift SC Ed pf 

2J0 114 


5 

19ft 

19ft 

196% 

am 

16 SCEdpf 

251 UJ 


14 

19ft 

196% 

196%+ ft 

A* 

S3v% SCEdPt 

7JB 125 


134 

67 

*26% 616% —16% 

15ft 

ift 5prfcmn 



258 

in 

766 

81% + ft 

s 

ift Sprkof 

150 12J 


15* 

8ft 

an 

81% 

84% Spcfrot 

59 4 

14 

142 

15ft 

isn 

Uft— n 

AM 

31% SpadOP 



13 

At* 

i 

Aft + Vi 

IS 

84% Sponcar 

J* 13 TO 

3 

106% 

ion 

106% 

ton 

11% Sondthn 



196 

11 

ion 

tot* + n 

24% 

in Sonar wt 



410 

2ft 

26% 

29%+ ft 

Sft 

34% sarowt 



3 

51% 

5V% 

5ft 

9ft 

44% StHavn 

50 1.1 

50 

30 

7ft 

7 

7 — ft 

2ft 

11% StHavwt 



15 

2ft 

2ft 

9U 

23ft 

un srdPrd 

50 34 

4 

11 

226% 221% 

22ft— ft 

as 

53ft StOShr 


11 

21 

71 

71 

71 

B Stanwd 



4 

8H 

n% 

66% + ft 

20ft 

114% SfarrtH 


22 

29 

17ft 

176% 

179k— M 

Uft 

ift State* 



It 

961 

Tft 

964 + ft 

a 

nu Slot* of 

24S UJ 


1 

231% 

22VS 

221%+ ft 

21 

14n Stepan 

40 34 

12 

S 

196% 

196% 

1964 + ft 

3ft 

14% SterfEl 


15 

IT 

2ft 

2ft 

76% 

23 

7 StiiExt 


10 

19 

196% 

»ft 

196%+ ft 

9 

54% SterISff 

.13a 15 a 

45 

7 

ift 

46%+ 1% 

4 

1ft Sfrutw 



2 

2V% 

36% 

2ft 

Oft 

516 SumJlE 


12» 

AM 

4 

Aft + ft 

15 

111% SumtEoflJO 113 


1 

131% 

un un— n 

un 

5 Sun3l.fi 



35 

sv. 

sn 

5V% 

174% 

Un Sanjr 

40 29 

13 

41 

lift 

lift 

W4 + 6* 

»ft 

liU. SuorFd 
n Super* 

44b 14 

12 

138 

149 

T- 

** 

» 


41% 2ft 
AU 3 
241% M% 
ft ft 
lift lift 
lift m 
21 l«ft 
2ft 1ft 
3ft Ift 
Mft im 
22ft 10ft 
Ift Aft 
I9W 14ft 
13ft Tft 
Uft 5ft 
Uft 9ft 


Ultfcspf 75 5.7 
Uptown Ji* 45 
UAIrPQ MU 4 
UPaodA ji UB 

U FootfS » 

UUMd 454 50 IS 
USACwt 

Untwv •oil! 14 

UnRUB Mm ±3 
UnvCm 14 

umvlft 24 

uavPat 


12 Ift . 

29* n u 

3M ft 

H IKU. 

3 11* 

Urt 


AMEX Higb-Lows 


AMCEnln 

arzFsttcp 

GftnOHB 

KeytrComwt 

Midland Co 

spndfliPwt 


ArrawAuto 
rtc Tramp 


MW HI OHS 33 

BotarPtmrm BmmFor 0 C* 
DtamndBam OrMvHari OE 
HotmPranwt iRTCarvn Im 
LaarPiPar LthWiPri Me 
Scurry Rn SCE 1 3M la 
IMHtlPwt WhcoPOi 


CSFB 


Credit Suisse First Boston 
CHANGE OF TELEPHONE NUMBER 


Effective 31st March, 1985 

the telephone number of Credit Suisse First Boston Limited and 
CSFB Investment Management Limited changes to 

01-6343000 

Our address and telex number remain the same. 

22 Bishopsgate, 

London EC2N 4BQ 

Telex: 892131 

Direct telephone numbers of our trading departments remain unchanged. 


Over-the-Counter 


March 28 


NASDAQ Nolfonal Market Prices 


5am In Hal 

100s HUh Law IP-M-Ofo* 


sates in Nat 

MBs HU* Law SPM-OTg* 










& 


Subscribe to the IHT at special mtroductoiy rates for new 
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BNP INTERBOND FUND 

DIVIDEND PAYMENT NOTICE (COUPON N° 1) 

As at 15 April coupon V 1 detached from shares of "BMP INTER BOND 
FUND", will be payable at lhe counters of BNP (LUXEMBOURG) S.A. 

Price: U.S. 94.00 per share net 
Shareholders may u*e the proceeds for winvesiment until June 14. 1985. 
without payment of the subscription commission and the entrance (be 
referred to in the prospectus. 

Reinvestment will be made at rite net asset value price following the trade 
dated. The funds needed to round up to one additional share, may be 
inverted at lhe same conditions. 


BAMQUE NAHONALE DE PARIS (LUXEMBOURG) SjV. 
(Depository Bank of BNP LNTERBOND FUND) 

Financial Agent 


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i Oreo Mi 
OrttoCe 
I Orton R 
Oihmn 
, ottrrp 
OvrExo 
, OaWM 
Oxoco 


30 

274 


AO U 


104 1% H* l% + % 
S 3% 39* 3% 
g 2% 2% 2H— U 
27 3% 3 3 — % 

415 IM 13% U% + V* 
21 3% 2% 2%— % 
1240 39% 39V.— V 

350519* 519* 514* +U 
5 34% 31 34 — % 

22234% 35 34V* +1U 

3 211* 20% 21V + 9* 
467 14 15V 14 + U 

74 4% 4U 6VS+ V 
414 3% 2% 3 

S 17% U% MVS— % 
42 40% Alb +19* 

25 18U 10% 10% 

138 4% 6% 6% + V 
36 94* *% *94 
34 5% 5 S — V 
12* 179* 17V 179* + % 
Bins II 18V + vs 
48530 29 29%+U 

813% 13U 13%+ U 
5149* MU MU 
344 4% 3% 4 — % 


Sales hi Hot Mesle ^ 

ites mm Low J pal Ores no* mm low ipjlcjv 

gwtm 48723% 22% 8% + % Smith F 

ArnM* 0* 3% 3V 39*— % Sodatv 1J4 44 

Outage 49 109* mu MU— 9* SectvSv 

Quetra 743012% n% 11% + u sntMcti 

_ SottwA 

R | Soneatn AB T-5 

J SanocP du 

18110 99* 99*— U SanrFd .15* 5 

Si 29 9 19% 19 1*% + % SaMlcO U3 *J 

44 U 4417 169* MV 5aHou> 

30013% 12% 129*—% SltadRi 2 U 
84*14 12% 12V— IV Soutrst U0 3J 

l > t • +% Sovran .10 14 
IN tt S 5 — % Sovran 148 43 
1*7 3*1* 34% 24%— % SocMIc 


RAX ‘ 

RU CP 

RPMs 

RadSys 

RodtnT 

Radian 

menu 1 

Rotra- s 

Ra riii e *. 

Ravmds 

Royen 


Rs cot n 
RsdknL 44 


MathBx 
MatricS 
Max era 
Maxwm 
May Pi 

MoySoa .10a 4 
MavnCH 

McCrm JO 24 

McFod 

McFort 

4 


PLM 

PNC 

PobglB 

Poecar 

CT -. - r~.l 
TULTM 

PcGaR 

PocTal 

PcrCoPtl 

Pontch 

PancMx 


.13 

Z32 


PorTcii 

Porlsan 

PorkOtl 


PafnlM 

Pafiex 


Madcrst 

Medici 

Madpls 

Meodts 


Mentro 
MarcBs 1.92 
Mwm 148 
rNY MM 
MrchCo 
MorchN U0 
MerSv 
MTdBc 
Mrdflpf 
MerfBa 
MeryGs 
MAYLd t 


Patrtof 

PautHr 

Poulpt 

Paxhxi 

PnvN 

Payctix 

Pay co* 

PoofcHC 

PowrlH 

PeorMf 

PewOM 


130 24 


140b 59 
SO A3 


.13 14 


40 34 


230 44 


40 27 


7%— % 


IS 


Mrtrfin 

MetAirs 

MotrPn 40b 47 


% ns- 16 

23^ a 


IwnSoU 160 *J 


4% 4%-% 

^s&siSiKr 1 

1112 H B 
m 0% 7% t 


Million 

Mllllpr 

MinHcr 

Mlostor 

Mtscher 

Moosfc 

MoMCA 

MoWCB 

MOCON 

Modhw 

Maledr 

MoMx 

ManCa 


J* U 
t 


JBRast 
Jodwot 
JockUO 

20 

JamWtr 43* 23 
JaffBWt 140 42 
JeflNLs 44 17 
2d 


.12 4 


Jerico 
Jtfy » 
JhrunE 
JanlcM 
Janal A 


Juno 

Justins 


13320 1*% 1*9* + 1* 

237 49* 4% 4% — % 
283716 37 37%+ U 

1B2DV. 20 30 

50 18V 179* 10U + U 
19 30V 379* 20U+ % 
146 2* 3*9* 24 +19* 

I* 20V 199* 1*9*— % 
101 ■% 79* 0% + U 
189* 109*— % 

u u 

59* 59*—% 
A* 4U 
4 At + % 
% 9 — % 
29% 30 


MonfQ 

MonAnt 

Momnt 

ManuC 

MooraP 

Mor Flo 

Mar Ka 

MCSB 

Morrsn 


J3 

140 


U0 


1.1 


1 J 

20 


Id 

1J 


43 
JO 15 
s\ 

.13e 14 
48 IS 


Moslrwe 34b 24 
MotCJb 30 U 
Mueller 7 JO 73 
Muttoke 
Mumnd 
Mylans 


41219 
12* % 
30 59* 
** 4% 
30 4% 

in tu 

18130 


. 3% 3 3%— 9* 

13539% 39 JOU 
3*5 39* 3% 3% 

AIM 26V 24 24 +1% 

10 16V MV 169* + % 

wrr* 

c m vis m 
*7 5% 5% S%- V 
126 46% 45% 44 + V 

110 8 7% « — V 

TSSK & 284* 

’SiS 

171 9 I * +% 
1213 14% 12% 139*— % 
17 30% 30 V 30 V 
425% 25% 25% 

*179* 17% 17% 

9 139* 13V J3U 
0 1*% 19 19% + % 

Ml*% » 17% + % 

542 6% 5% 4 + % 

5 09* 13 139* + U 

1171594 IS 15 
5222V 21 V 22 — % 
61 22 21% 22 + U 

U 1144519* 50% 519*+ U 
3311 20V 17% 20 +9* 


2 5% 6% 6% + % 

5647V 49 47% + 

3 *U *U *U 

3*947 45V 45V— 1% 

+* *% *9* 9% 

30 24 239* 239*— V 

249 13V 129* 13 + V 

865 13% 13% 13%+ V 

312 4% 4 4% + % 

8* 7V 7% — 

647 15V II 

20 17 U% 16% 

20 12% 12 12%+ % 
IB 17V MU 17% + 9* 
3 20% 20% 20% 

25 SV 5U 5V 
24 49* JU 4U 

313 8% 7% 8U + 9* 

2434 32% 32% 

IB IBM 18% 18% + % 
3 10% W% 10% 

10 17% 17% 179* — 9* 
21 229* 2296 229* 

311 IT 11 
706 18 17 10 +1 

540 12% 12 12% + 9* 

14625 249* 25 + U 

32 SJ 112% 12% 12% — V 
Jet 3 413 0% 39* 0% 

TJX) 4.1 4 47 48% 48%— 7 

PenaEn 230 7.5 *7 2*% 29 2*U + U 

Pentor J4 2J 25 29 3% 29 +% 

Penwer 3* 129* nu 12V— u 

Poop ex 343 *9* *W 9U 

PeopBs J2 00 41796 17% 17% „ 

PeopRt 1*1 % % K+% 

Percept 51 3 796 79*— % 

ge raA _ 7213% 13 13 

Perecp* «io% w io%— u 

Petme L12 18 4*2*% 29V 29V 

Phrmct 344 11V IM* 11U + U 

Phrwixt 34*% *9* *%+% 

Phrmwt 4 8% 09* 8% 

PSFS 3*4 Mb M* *% — % 

PbllC I 4«r 29 7462 17 14% 149* — 9* 

PhnxA/n 27 2% 2% 2%- % 

PhotoC S 407 7% 7 7 +9* 

PlcSav 54122% 229* 22% 

PteCate 40 23 403 229* 229* 22%—% 

PlonGS JO 14 2419V 10U 19V 

PtonHI 32 20 17931V 30V 309*— % 

PtanSt# .12 14 2 8 0 8 

PbxtfrC 94 34 429% 20% 2B%— % 

Planum M 11 *309* 30V 30V 

Po+aOc 11318% 9%111%+U 

PtCYMd 177027V 26V 27 +9* 

Proex A 22% 22 22% — % 

PpwAI 21 2% 29* 2% 

Powrtc 107 18 17% 17% — U 

PrecCst .12 4 34 34% 34 34V 

PidRsfc J2 2J 8299* 299* 29% 

PrPdLa 23 4 59* 594 — V 

PrstnCP 40 11 2 M M M + % 

Prawov 113 AS 1 3 — U 

Priam 219 5V 5% 5%— % 

PrtcCms 83129* 12 12% 

PrfcCoS 124 549* 54 54V — U 

Prhy© .14 24 189 4% 4 4% + % 

Prtroru 16715% 159* 15% 

ProdOp .14 15 24 4% 4% 49* 

Profits 40 14 2 119* IT9* 119* 

ProoSvs 21 5% 59* S%+% 

PrcoCp .15 4 204296 42V 4296+ 96 

Proora _ 130 5V 5% 5%— % 

ProcITr 120 04 184 14U 14V 14V— U 
ProtCps 42 24 71 22% 2TV 22V + V 

Pro) col 31 2% 29* 29*— % 

Pruvln 22 14V 14% M% 

PrvLfA 248O10 7*7 M% M%— % 

PtCNC 140 84 33 21 20% 21 +% 

PuSdBc U2 M 2230% X 30 — % 
Puilmn 1002 7 5% 7 

PurtBn 40 1J A 27V 22 22V— V 


NCACP 

NMS 

Napeol 40 17 


40 U 418% 18% 18% 


Naoas 

NastiFn 

NBnTex 

NCtyBn 

•may 


9to 4J 
JU LI 

IM U 


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KalFvSA 44 
Kamo UO 
Keocap 
KyCnLf SO 
Kewax 

K*wi»S I 44 
KayTm 
Khnbal J4 
KJmOrk 
KMeold 
KIndars 
vIKPSS 
Kretttr 
Xrey 
Kiwi 
Kutcke 
KustEI 


U 

34 


U 

14 


U 


KLAl *] lot* U MU 

KMWSV 53 13V 13V IM 

KTran 15 5U 5 5U + tt 

KVPtw nun su— % 

Kaman M 20 1A 28V 20U 20% + U 

Korctir 34179* 7714 17V— % 

Itoler JOr 34 100 14V 13V 14% + 

2 ’ft 9 »-v 

47 % % % — J 

237 34% 32% 36 + % 

55 509* 50V 50%+ % 
110 49* 4% 49*+ % 
2248V 40 40 —U 

68 *% 4% 49t+ % 
IU% 12% 12% 

S3 * 8V 89* 

26 32 32 32 

4 6 » » 

6 79* 79* 796—% 
06 4 *38 169* 16 16U + % 

1 1% 1% 19t 

in i* n 

J5J 518 8 7%791 + U 

42 20 1513 159* 15% 15V + U 
.15 J 661 1*9* 11% 19% + % 
127 7V Ttt 79*+ 9k 


NfCtyPf 130 84 
NCmBc 40 10 
NtCPtrs 3D 13 
NDutp 44 44 
NHanl s 

NHtthC 47b 14 

NtLumb 

NMicra 

NitPann U» 34 

&3X 

ras- 

HalsnT 
Natsan 
NwkSec 
NetwkS 
NtwtEt 
Neutnis 
N Brans 
NEBu* 

NHmpB 


40 2A 


LDBrnk 
UN 
LSI Lee 
LTX 
LePatos 
LaZBy 140 
LuddSt 
LodFrn .13J J 
Lnknw .16 1.1 
LamRs 

U 


23 


LadBF 

LdmkS 

LoraCo 

L onger 

Larsen 

Lawens 

LeeOto 


*6 0% 0% 89*— % 
440139b W* 13V — tt 
327131* 13 13V— V 

31 1* lltt 18V — 1* 
3914V 14V 14V + M 

S 41% 41V 41V 
21V 38% 28%—% 
16* 15% 15% 15% + U 
41* 149* 14V 149* + % 
7*10% *% *%— 9* 
5*4 15 14V 15 + % 


MJNats 1.12b 43 

NYAIrt 

NYAwt 

NwOrv 1.10 LI 

2£SL* M * 

NIColo t 
NIckOG 

NlkaB 40 44 
42T LI 
t 

46 34 
44 14 
.12a 4 


Nardsi 


dir .1 


40 34 LU6 MV M UU + U 
28* 8% 7% *% + % 
42 14 314* 4* 4* 

49* 34 S M* 69* 69* 

44 14 15 35% 34V 34V— 1 

48 U 11 »U 2* 2 TV 

4* 5V 5% S%— % 


Homan 

NoANaf 

NAItlnS 
NGarGe 1J4 74 
HoFrkB 100*13 
NastSv 
NoMr 

NwNG 144 XI 
NwttHl 1J* 26 
HwNLs 40 23 
MwstPS XI 0 95 
Nonas* .U XI 


132 7% 69* 7% + % 
6*1 5% 5U 59t— lb 
1 15 U 15 — U I 
2313V 13V 13V — V 
T7524 21% 23V. — % 

21 20% 20V 20% — tt 

314 14 14 +% 

17639V 39V* 39% 
4745V 45V 45V 
18 23V 23 23 

284 16% 16V U% + % 
206 10 % 10 % 10 %+ % 
10 6 6 6 

1 26V 269* 259* — U 

34 * 5% 5%+ U 

*65 4% 3% 4%— % 
130 X 30 —96 
1 12% 12% 12% + 9* 
24 3% 39* 3V— % 
20 5% S% SU 
W 5% 5% 5% 

22 ■ 79* 79*— V 

30* S 7 71*— tt 

86 1% Mb 8% + % 
81425% 25V 25V— V i 

11 Stt 5 5%+%! 

127% 27% 27%+ % | 
716 8% 8% SV 

2 33% 32111 32% —1 
120 21V 21% 21% + % ; 

**3<V 23V 23V— % 
63 5% 5 5 „ 

ZAO % V V +% 

10 18 1796 11 + U 

14422V 22V 32V 
405 6% 6% 6tt— % 

S* ** ^+%I 

276 * H tt 
ID 7% 7% 7%— V 
7 Stt 5% 5?k— % 
3*921% 20 2C%+1 

235 31V 37V 38 
19 40% 40V 40U + % 
1 D 9 6 tt 6 6 tt 
33 10 9% 9%— % 

37 7% 6% 7 +% 

5 25% 25% 25% 

1631% MV 30V 
214 0% BV 8% + 9* 

31 6% 616 69* 

621 18% T7% 179* + % 

75 52V S2 SZtt + % 
57335V 35% Stt + 9* 

22 22% 22 22% + % 

16 69* 69* 6tt + % 


OM5s 1393 lltt 11% 119*+% 

Quadra 1021 6% 6 6 +% 

QixzJcCs 41 23 19 U 13 13 

OuaiSy 7S 2% 2 2 

Ontmxs 10149* 14V 14tt+% 


Retecl 
toCvEI 
Rauls s 
RHIub 


RntCntr 

RpAuto 


SSSf 

■mcjtb ri 

ReutrH 

RavarA 

Renan 

ReVRey 


RtlUlm 

RkftEI 

RJtzva 

Rival 


ftabNue 

RobYsn 

Rocfcor 

RdnvH 

RkMtC 


Rouse* 

RoweFr 

Ssr 

RvonF* 


1J0 LI ... 

3* 4% 4% 4%+ V 
ZX 3 2496 24% 24V + % 
14 US 10 17V 17V— % 

51*96 1*V 199*— U 
» 6% 6% 6% — % 
XI 10 31 31 31 — It 

1663 9% 94* 99b— % 
1 8 MU 14 14 — % 

JO XI 160 6tt fl* 69* . 

d* 3 310 13 R|* !2%— V 

S3 74* 7% 7% — % 

1 5 5 5 — % 

46118% 77V 17V— % 
44 LI IR *% 9V 9VS— U 
^ „ 258X5% 14% 15 + % 

32a 23 1 12 12 12 + % 

77 29* 2U TV 

3 MV 15V 15V — tt 
•Ue Id 11013% 12V 12%+ % 
die 4 4425% 2A* 21% 

144 120 1 12 12 12 + tt 

. „ 17 6 Stt 5V— % 

1J4 34 5137% 36V 36V— % 

34 23 77*119* lltt 119* + 9* 
211 10 17% 17% 

126V 26V 26V— U 
170 2% 2tt 29* 

SO A1 1144 T5tt 15% I5tt + 9b 

L00 34 *65 29 28 2S + V 

t U 7% 7% 7% — % 

J* S 10 UV n 13U 
11712% 129* 12% 
4391W* ITU 1*U 
3*4 S3 3 10% 10% 10% 

48 M 11 U9b 111* 119* 

Jfti 1J 1123 22 23 +% 

32a 1.1 A 36V 25V 24V 
40 29 2Z1 20% 21 + % 

ldO ZB 77 39% 3* 39 — % 

.120 1J 30 *9* Mb *%— % 
31 2% 2% 2% 

34 <% 5% At + % 
5* *% *U Ftt— % 
3 4% 4% 4% 

12717 169* 17 + U 


SpertID 

Spire 

StprSrs 

SWIM JO XI 
Igagy. U» 37 
Staodun 

Stan has L2D u 
SMSIB IM X0 
StataG JA U 


32 XI 
J5 44 


StamrL 

StewStv 

Slwlnt 

StewSn 

5HM 

SWsYla 

StoCkSy 

Stratus 

StrwCx 

StrYtar 

StuartH 

Subaru 

SiAAIrt 

SubrB 


.16 13 


30b 13 

SS L3 
141 L3 
JJ5 U 
1J2 LI 


SufflON 

SumtBs 96 44 
Sum BA 230 43 
SumtHl JJ*e 9 
Svncst 

Sunair 34 L3 


140 36 
.16 3 


SuniLI 

Smart 

supRte 


SupfEq 

Sykes 

SynMi 

SrmtoT 

Syneur 


Syntrex 


.13 14 



SaMSy .n 14 

SovnF 140c 4.1 
SvBkPS 44 23 
ScanOp 
SCanTr 

Stfwror 32 X2 
SchlmA 40 23 
Sdmed 

SS?. 3 44 
!»• ■ 
asr 


Seoltnc 
ScNtBkl L10 7J 
SeCWI L2D 4J 
SocAR* .10b 4 
1.12 SJ 

SeCTao 

SEEQ 

Sanrioi 

Srvmcrt - ^ 

landra ^ 
SevOafc .16 LI' 
.... __ 48 14 

Shwmts 140 S3 
Shelby s .16 J 
Shsldle 

Stowi .is j 
ShenSos 

Shpemt .ifla 20 

SisinCs 

Silicon 

Silicons 

SlIfcVtH 

SHtotx 

Slttac 

StmAlr 

Sbnpln JO xi 

Sippln 

Staler 

Skipper di S 

SloanTc 

SmlthL 


43 SU 8 I +U 
2014V 14% MU 
438 12V 12% 12% — % 
141 T8V 18 18% + % 

134 10 *9* 99* 

514% 14% 14% 
217% 17% 17% 

532 32 32 — V 

18*321% 21% 219*+ % 
31136V 35% 36%+ % 
61*66 UU Mtt 
SO 129* 12% R% 

767 60% SO 60V +2 
220 4 3% 3%— % 

21 *9* *% 996+ 66 
■ 866 Stt 8% 

« % % %+tt 

61x7% 7V 79* +V 
29 3*% 39% 3*%— V 
62 299* 29% 29% 

122 9tt ttt ttt— % 
21*T3Vfc 12% 12% 
57*10% 10 10% 

4318% 17% 17%— 9* 
10 7V 7V 7V + V 
3* 6% fib 6% + % 
4 6 6-6 

4 49* 49* 4V— tt 
1511V 11V lltt— V 
152 54* 5% 59* + % 
1ST79V 17% 17%— 9* 
94 89* 89* 8% 

*21 6% 4% 6%— tt 
17 69* 69* 69* + tt 
13 ISU ISU 15U + tt 
28 X 30 36 —1 

316% U 16 
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5S2* k -sr* 

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103 Btt I SU— % 

^ S5 z 7 * 2^-* 

445 12V 12% 129* +U 
17* M 35V 35V+ U 
35 17 10% 1BV+ U 

27 15 14% 14% 

46230% 29V 30 + % 

210 31% 379* 31% 
*317% 77% T7*b+ % 
28129* 12% 12% 

503 28% 279* 21 
S3 15 Mtt 14V 
8 5 5 5 + % 

3 7 7 7 + U 

187 I 7% 7%— 9* 
41612% 11% 11%—!% 
*16% 16% 76% 

252 20U 19V 20 + U 

M 7% 79* 7tt— U 
1211 11 II 

>1 15V 15% 15V 
24515% 14% 15%+ W 
33 189* 18V 10% 

1311% 11U lltt— U 
22 7tt 7 7 + % 

479 3% 39* 39* 


Sim 

Svstfn 

Syslrtta 

SysJCn 

Systmt 


20 79* 7% 79*— % 
US40U 39tt 40 
48614 13% 14 +4* 

23 79* 7% 7% 

471 14% 149* 149*— tt 
4 26% 26% 26% +2% 
1747 46U 47 + tt 

146 IM* 16 16% 

10 16 159* 16 + tt 

46 51* 51* 59* + % 
12 289* 20% 20% 
425% 2S% 25%—% 
151 7% 7% 79* 
23239V 311* 39tt— % 
14 IV 19* 19* + % 

53 8% 79* B%+ I* 
1 14% 14% 14% + 9* 
1*5189* IS 15% + % 
14X7% 79* 79* 

25 2% 2tt 29*— 1* 

14 151* 149* 15 — V 
IBS 109* 109* 10% + I* 

8 6% 6% «% + tt 
102 2766 26V 271* + tt 
40217% 169* 1496 + % 
SB 5% SV 59*+ V* 
4251* 251* 251* + % 

24 321* 52 52 

50 6% 6 6 

12 6% 6V 6V 

200 4 » H 

15 U 149* 15 +1* 

5231* 27V 23V— V 

108 SV 3% 3tt— % 

5 6% 6% 6% + 9* 

1 Uh 13V 13V 

2810 *% 9V+M 

7131 MV 15% JSV + % 

6 52 51% 52 + V 

527% 27V 271* 

4 3% 3V 3%+ % 
6d33Vz 137% 133 

25 5 5 5 

472 469* 45% 46% + tt 
59 99* 9% 99* — % 
R % 416 M 
3*SV 20 209*+ 9* 

1 47 47 47 

617 109* 10V 101* „ 

42 IV Ttt 146— K. 
55 59* 59* 59t+ V 
1 9U 91* Ttt— tt 
647 BV 0 Ola— % 
10 38% 30% 38% 

ID 179* 1716 1796 + % 

34 4% 3% 3%— % 

P 75T* 

221 Stt 3 3tt + % 

12 12V 11% I2V + 4* 

35 4% 3% 4% + tt 

481 11% I0V 119* + V 

151 4 3% 3%— % 

24 MU 1596 15V— % 
24219* »U 219*+ U 
157 5% 5V 5V 

ltn 9% 91* 9% 

32 A** a, i~" 

11 19% I9tt T9%+ V 


TBC 
TCACb 
TSCInc 
TSI 
TSR 
TocVTv 
Ta 


Tdi 

TcCom 
Total 
TtanA 
TAP9UB 
Totem 
Tetecrd 
TrtaDiCt 
TOMd 
Tatab* 

Tetxan 
Tameo 
TmpiE 
Temont 
TarmDf 
Teadata 
Texon 
Texine 
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ThotM 
ThdN 8 
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ThouT > 

3Com 

Tlorco 

TtmpE.0 

TmtFTb 

Ttarary 

Tofu s 

TotadTr 1J0 SO 
TofTrpf 2J0 9 A 
TbPCvA 
TotiSVS 
TroLAp 

TrurrtJ 124 64 

Trmnt 

Trtadsv 

TrtMIc 

TrftCm 

Trton JJ9 Id 
Tn»jo ao 15 
TBkGo UJ0 3d 
TraNY* 120 42 
Tuck Dr 
TwnCtv 
Tytan 

TyeonF JO 2 


22 Id 


die 


92 42 
t 


15 


128 IS 


U 


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USUCe 

USPRI 


23602X5 


521% 71V 21% 

210 10 10 — % 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


T he*ostbea^u'^ artn,ertS 

MONTE CARLO 

are sold through 

aged* 

(J. de BeeT ’. Pr ? c l d ^ nc esse Charlotte 

T«. (93) 5°.e6-00 w ^ prindpafity a Monaco ot 
B«iusi«B^^ BNAT1 0N AL REAL^ 

S 0 W F S 2 ^“ UP °l reqUe5 



loafing Rate Notes March 28 




Cera m H im SU Askd 


Dollar 


Ski 

HP 

f&T 

gmf t 

KB, 

mrtpif? 

Wfl/M 

mi) 

3 ? 

"tohoNivi 

■Mm 

M 

M 

HP 

IBWrtMl 

SS 

SS** 

0 torn *7/91 


BO 

«» 


CaaeenNes BM AtM 
Jtt »4 WJJ 99.91 
IV 17+ 1802218032 


jmgw 

hnia 

Jmmew* 

22 ?** 

5 s 

SSium 


■1«» 

H.M 

Nvn 

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W M008UBJ8 
«* JM 951(490* 
BL W IldWJI 
8*. 315 HJ0WO38 

n h nojoun 

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9Tl/*>* 19X3 VMS 
9V 2M 49.IJWJS 
1Mb 2M 9I2S 10025 
946 M W-O 7977 
4% *4 5820 V35 
9V 138 9L33 IL47 
9% J1-5 100200039 
9 25-7 9935 4935 

916 304 1004010040 
«% 39+ Hums 
101* 3M atuowuq 

1% 154 99J7 9927 
m* 304 10U3M73 

n* n-7 wijnwue 
11 1+4 wiismn 

tv 39+ 10A15M2S 
£> JM W0J9I0IIU 
9% 68 1084110051 
V 12+ 1BU7TM47 

tv 34 raooauojo 

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OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your own vacation land on the fabulous Lake of the O&rfcs in Central 
KfeoutL Right in the heartland of America. Auray from dttieL noise, 
pollution Bid the rat-race of the workaday world. 

Forbes Inc., pubteheis of Forbes Magazine, through its subskfiarp. 
Sangre de Crislo Ranches Enc. is offering the opportunity of a Wetime for 
you to acquire one or more acres of our choice Missouri lakeland 
There’s no better time than right now to find out if Forbes Lake of the 
Charles is the place for you. Al our homesites. tnehiding lake front and take 
view, wffl be a rrummum see of one acre— ranging to over three acres. 
Cash prices Sari at S6.000. One or more acres of this incredibly beautiful 
lakeland can be yours lor the modest payment of $60 per month, with 
easy cmfit toms available. 

For complete information, tnduefing pictures, maps and full details 
on our Eberal money-back and exchange privileges, please write to: 
Forbes Europe Inc.. Dept. H. P.0 Box 86. London SW1 1 3LJT England. 

Otuam me Prooerv Report requrea by Federal law and read ■ betore 
s^raifl anything Mo Federal agency has fudged the menis or value, if any. 
d to*, property Equal Cterrt are! itasns Opportunoy 


= TALI VERDE 

AT THE BILTMORL Phoenix, 
Arizona, U.SJV. 

Sumpfuoosiy eiegred 3 bedroom luxury 
home on rite grounds of The Biitmore. 
lots of omar l il ies ind. cull rat u t win- 
dows, gorgeous pool, fash brekfiaping. 
$415,000. 

Gill AAary Helen McGinn 

{602) 949*8000 or 1-8004433-1131 

TOM JACKSON 
A ASSOCIATES, INC 

6808 E. Camdbaek RiL, 
SooHwfcdv Arizona 85251. 



Non Dollar 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm in Texas 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management. 


Please note specific interest 
in request to 


Am 97 

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Sources Cr*ttTSuBs4-Flrsl Beaton Ltd. 
Lend# t 


HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS* 

David Oonosky. CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dates, Texas 75201 
21 4/748WJ Tetex 732459 

The Offcfcg Fok* *r teas Real Eso&l 
tertnen m Sorvtce ram Giutae J Efc*. 


ENGLAND - CENTRAL 
WARWKXSHKE 

In the Cstufa of John P. Sherida n . 
Prime location conveniant far ad porta 
of toe UX 14 ndra international Air- 
port and Station. Well placed far Mo- 


CLAVBDON HAIL ESTATE 

Choice period country residence of 
apod chcem end draraber in first dou 
order. Pufly modombed. Central heat- 
tog. 4 Rne Rec e ption Room*. Excellent 
Kitchen. Bracddast and UtSty Rooms. 6 
ChofTning Bodnoom*. 3 Bathroom*. (2 
fine suites). Garaging. TrocGHonai Oirt- 
buBdmgs. Stable/ Courtyard wfto 9 
loose bora*. Tennis Court. Poddodc. 
4M ACBB. 

Also nearby FARM. 92 Acres of Level 
Pasture load with gcrilop/lancftng strip 
and Mo d er n M u lt i Sip 


B uittey. Abo nearby 6 Aa* PS* 

dock. Aucrioa 24 Aprfl. 

Ds k iisd particulars from 
Qiariee 8. PMBpe Auctioneers. 

48 Street, Henley ^ A rden. 
Weta MliB nn di B95 5AM. 

TeL {05642] 433 T/ 4632. 


Purchase or lease of a 

FIVE STAR 
GRAND-HOTEL 

(rraody for c on Hiu t tfon) 

in Switzerland 

Approved project on best lo- 
cation in famous resort and 
convention spot. Hotel with 
fall year operation, located 
close to the world famous 
mountain and ski area. Acqui- 
sition through owner. 

For fiiO daferib please consult 
PUBUCITAS 
under cipher 05 - 1 15 , 067 , 
CH 4010 Basel. 


IN VALENCIA : 


1 TC SMIOSH CAURXMA 
FLORAZAR 2 

Boh on Die t uodi o f QAI Bf * n tt» «wy 
hea rt «>Ftfw -ORAN GE B*4~ ro w chpire of 
1+ beebeom flea i.J pp/foee 1 ^ -- 
AS w*i bage tenom and panoraoc +ew. 
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■etw pita taflotae 3 mm* 
autv 3 w+mraiv pooh. 2 eyiertt courn, fn»» 
ion, gfm. sauna »ooe4 dufa. 

ROBAZaBS behg so date to rhn co—tadd 
enrofailBk has aeeos 10 reftaims, 
ba+v dsBOihaquei, hc vs Hd and yaefotaV 
d*n on c e lsi r h oMg rsjpelievpis cap. 
W u p”— 1 Col (omstnitteid or- 

B “ T ^Mras ftcm.Ui. $14^XXL 

Ready for occupation. 

For imdxrt ux/ ufcrknth corr&xf 
falcate date prim btOf; 
BeORMATICM: HOCAZAR SXL 
BOX 72 -TRj p«6) U203ia 
TBSfc 61092 RZIE 
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Japan Steel Capital Spending 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The combined capi- 
tal spending of Japan's six maj or 
steelmakers is. expected to fall 1.4 
percent to 51 1.80 billion yen (about 
$2 billion) in the fiscal year that 
ends March 31, 1986, from an ex- 
pected 51930 bflHon yen in the 
current fiscal year, company 
spokesmen 'said Thursday. The fis- 
cal 1984-85 figure is down 29 5 per- 
cent from a year earttex, they said. 


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1 7% 7% 7% — % 

4324 23% 23% — tt 


XpMC 

raw 

xutax 


454 4% 4tt 4tt— % 
613 ■% SV 8V— % 
208312% 11% 11V— % 


YlawFi 

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914 3% 3 3% + % 

120 1% IV ltt— % 


China Sees Trade 
Risingby 5.3% 

Return 

BEUING — China’s expects a 
53-percent rise in its foreign trade 
this year to 1263 billion yuan 
(S453 billion), SongPing, the plan- 
ning minis ter, said Thursday. 

He told the National People’s 
Congress that the government aims 
to boost exports. 

Foreign trade last year rose 20 
percent to 120.1 billion yuan, but 
the year ended with a 4-billion 
yuan deficit, according to state sta- 
tistical bureau figures. 


-ADVERTISEMENT- 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quot atio ns Supplied by Funds Listed 
28 March 1985 

^ yfrig Mwitw woteWwBreiutantatfflteFuttrtitetedwtntWit 

racraNon of mm hind* w hora quotas ora based on Issue prices, n, foUawfna 

.■ fM 5«me inmacti *7Euu2£EUnEfc nJe iht: 

M) -dally; [w>-wwklv.- (b) -W-moatbly; Ir)-ragulo rt y; (l)-irrayu tarty. 

AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

tw) AMW Trust. XA * 151X6 SffiKfcSHSE 0 

BANK JULIUS BAER BCaLltL -<w) Pol ~ ' 

5F 915X0 — (wt Dollar Lons Term. 

SF 1188X0 — (w) Japanese Yen. 


— Id ) Baerbond. 

— tril C nnhnr .. _ _ _ 

— Cd 1 Eeu fcoe r America 51106X0 — jwj Pound SlVrlina . 

— <2 Em/taoer Europe 5F 1 199X0 — iwl Deutsche Mark . 

— d ) Eeulcaer Pacific. SF 1168JU —Iwl Dutch Florin I 


—3 9.94 
-S10XB 
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_ | . .. -Zi an 

<d ) Grubar. — — SF Ituaxo — <wl Swiss « 9 32 

SF16SUO* 


— (dVStackbor. 


— fdlcSFFund. 


— Id ) Crossbow Fund- 
—Id J ITF Fund N-V— 
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— Id] Aslan Growth I 

— tw> Dlvertiond 

— fw> FiF— America, 
-jw) FiF— Eiireae— 
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ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
SF2SX6 PB 05571, The HaaM («0t 46N70 
SF 11X7 -td > Sever BetroutagmU 

- 5,357 PARtCBAS— GROUP 

— Id 1 Cortexa mterinttanal. — 
. 31X15 — (w)OBU-DM__ 

SF 83X5 — iwl OBUGESTION 
318X7 —(Mr) OBLI-DOLLAR 

31X57 — Iwl DfiU-YEN 

3 15X9 — (w) OBLI-GULOEN 
387X5 — Id ) PAROIL-FUND. 


532X0 


— (d tndooua /Multibands A „ .. 

— <d 1 irKfbsuez Multfbands B. — _ 5 14X83 —ft 1 PARINTER FUND 
BSITANNIA^OB 271, St. HeUer. Jersey -<«>>PAA US Treasury I 

. 50X44- ROYAL & OF CANAD/LPOB246GUERN5EY 



—iw) BriLOoilar Income 

— (w> BritXMcwxJuOurr 

1 Brit. tntlX Manoaxartf _ 
1 Brit IntUManaaPortf— 
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I Brll-Go/d Fund—. 

> OrttManau. Currency 

1 Brit. Japan Dir Perf.Fd. 
» BrtUersey Gilt Fond — 
I Bnt WnrlO Leta. Fund— 
— (d i Brit World Tedm. Fond. 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— (w> Capital Inti Fund 

— tw) Capital Italia SA 


— Crt 1 


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. nXM 'Hwl RSC Far EarttPocHle Fd 510X8* 

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51X40 SL90 Otter 5X21 

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— Id) 
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S^ NS 5i' N TERNATI0NAL LTD. 

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— ivrt SHB Inti Growth Fund 31970 

■ua 94 - SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

« * •— SF SB7 JO 

DM1U34 


SF 10X50 "—td 1 ArnwrlCD-Vatar, 


Bond Va Wr Swl , . . . 

Brew valor remark DM 104.73 — * D-Mark Band Selection 

BoSvSSuStollarLJ S 11004 -«3 Dpi tar Band Selecti on 3120X9 

Bond Valor Vm Yen10485X0 Ftarin Bond Selection — FLlISJO 

Convert Valor Swf SF10XW Intervojpr--— SFS875 

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5F F 1W^ ^2 Z^l&ZSS.- S SF^LW 


! ammtadntFiint) VlMXO 1 UMwsoi Fwni 

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UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 


I) Europo-Valor. 

1 J Pacific — Valor - 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

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— (d)AmcoUj.Sh.. 
SPJWS0 —Id) Band- Invest. 

Sc rel « “"IS j Pa* 1 ® SwteS, 

SF 17275 — fd j Japan- Invest - 


ISF41X0 
SF 67X01 
SF 134X0 
SF 984X0 

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— (d)Saftt South Afr.Sh. 
dm 24J0 — (*> Sima (nock price), 

DM 8*82 UNION INVESTMENT Frankiurt 

Dunni Hrepttt 4 Uayd Georue, Bnnaels Z/diuldfc2S£ RK&?8 

-/m DSH Commodity Pool- 3 30077 — — fi } H? gW H.10 

—fin) Currency & Gold Pool 5 189X6 — — W J UnJrdfc__ — DM 77X0 


— (ml Wtajv LHe Fut Peal— 3414J0 — 
— (m) Trans World Put. FoaC 397976 — 


Other Funds 


F+C MGMT.LTD. 1NV. ADVISERS 
I, Lourroce Poanty Hill. EC4. " 

— <vr) FAC Atlantic 


—Iwl F+C European. 
— Iw) F4COrten)ol_ 


— 39.93 
5 2573 


FIDELITY POB 476. Hamilton Bermuda 
—wtl American Valuta Oo n aao it — S8LSD 
— (m) AmerVOtawsCunuFref — 5101.14 

— Id) Flde/nvAmer.Areats 365X4 

— Id ) FhJeDtv Australia Fund. — _ 58X3 


W) Acf lbonta i Investments Fund. 3 201X8 

wi Aeilv—t Intt 11077 

ml AIIV4 i.trt 3X80 

,w) Aouita international Fund_ 5 112X4 
r I Arab Blmw I C 3 848X2 

(b)Arlone 31X99X3 

tw) Truitcnr tnn Fd. IAEIF) 5 1070 

Iwl BNP Intartond Fund 399.11* 

nr) Bands>)ex-)ssue Pr.. SF 135.65 

.ml Canada GhHMortapBe Fd 3 8X0 

Id ) Capital Preserv. Fd. lirtt 1113T 

3 IJ2 

59X1 

« J CJ Jt Jtawn Fund. l ia_23 

_m) Qevetand Offxhprn Fd. 52X8773 

iw) Coiumota securttles FL 114X6 

b 1 COMETE 394X62 

w> Convert Ftl. Inn A Certs. s»xi 


31X14 Jyl Cttjctaal Fund 


—Id ) FJdWIlv Ofaeoverr Fund 

3 d FtailtyDlr.Svu1.Tr 1 12X02 

d ) Fidelity For Eoff Fimd___ 32025 

d ) Fidelity liin/Pupa sslsi 

— id) FWrtlty Orient Fwid S2ixo 

— (d)Fjdemy Frontier Fund 51274 

lid 1 ra^inv sSaSSfeZ- *sSS te! SfiRS^ ^ iSri B *2* 

—Id > Fidelity World Fund 53045 

FORBES PO BOK7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Apent 01-8393013 

— Iwl Gold Income S 7.99* 

<wl Gold Appreciation _______ 34X2 

Iw) Donor income (841 

— (m) Strategic Tmfc«. sill 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— (wj East Investment Fund S 36X80 

— (w) Scottish World Fund. 


w> D.GX. 
d ) D. Witter Whf Wide ivf TcL_ 
b I Drakkar Invest .Fund N.V_ 

d ) Dreyfus Fund inti 

w) Dreyfus Inter continent ■ 
w) The EstoCltahmeot Trust. 

Id ) Europe Obnuatfons^rata 
Kwl First EtreV Fundta 
«b I Fifty Stars Ltd. J 
l(iv) Finsbury Group ■ 

(*) Fonseiex issue PrJ 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. jd J Govremm. 5ro. Fund*, 
- - - - (d 1 Frankf-Trust f 



SF 7690 
32265 

„ _ 382X7 

PB 119, SI Peter Part. Guernsuv, 0481-23715 Id J Fnmkf-Trusl Ittlerabw — DM4131 

(m) FuturGAM SLA 5114X1 («d HorasmonnHIdos. N.V 5108.11 

112537 ImI MeeHn B.eule 3105X2 

5 13*51- (») Horizon Fund 3 1.10235 

S 10232 tb I ILA Inti Goto Bond S9XO 

. *3 12X6 (d 1 inlerfund SA 51257 

SF 7778 tit i n urm artta t F»nrt . 3324X2 

1 10378 (d) intormWnoMut. Fd. CfB - — 536970 

1103X4 Fund Ltd 57J4 

103X0 p lr ) mn Securities Fund i &XS 

311574* Id 1 Investn DWS _. DM 43X5 

132^0 (r I Invest Atwntloues. jJS 

510753 {r > ItaHortune Inn Fund SA _S 11.12 


lm)GAM Arwrraoe Inc 

Iw) GAMortca Inc 

jw) GAM 8aram liic— . 
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GAM Frane-vnL 


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I w) GAM Norm America lnc_ 
iw) GAM N. America Unit Trust. 
Iw) GAM Pacific Inc 


Iwi GAM Start. & l ntt unu Trust 

(ml GAM Systems Inc.. 

Iw) GAM Worldwide Inc 

(ml GAM Tytiw SA OOH A 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) LM. 

— (w) Berry Poc. Fd. Lkt- 3970 

— <d l e.T. Applied Science— 3 1554- 

— fd ) G.T. Aston H.K. CwtluPd— 5123T 

— Iw) G.T. Asia Fond S3J9* 

— W 1 G-T. Austtaflo Fund, 321X9- 

— <d)&T. Europe Fund, 1954 

— <») G.T. Euro. Small Coe. Fund S1Q50 

—Id ) G.T. Dollar Fund_ 51L55 

—ld)O.T. Bona Fund 3973 

— 10 1 O-T. Otabdl 7«jmwv Fd 3127) 

— Id I G-T. Honshu Pathfinder* - s 2476 

— (d ) G.T. investment Fund___ 31750 
— (d 1 B.T. Japan Small COLFund^ 34229* 

— Id ) G.T. Tachnoteny Fund 327X9 

—« ) G.7. 5outo Chtaa Fun d S1L05* 
EBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY) LTD. 

M Sao« SLSt, Helle£.-tB3M6331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

»(d) (imm eta S9X2 Otter 19J18 

MUttC aP.: Bid — — 31072 Otter 310547 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

— f d 7 Stiart Term 'A' lAccum) SL4602 

— (d) snort Term 'A* (Dbfr) 11X103 

— U) Short Term'B 1 (Accunt) 3 VI 123 

— (d ) Short Term V (Dtstrl 5 08488 

— <w) Long Term 321J6 

JAROINE FLEMING. POB 70 GPO HO Kg 

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—lb J J.F South East Asia 529.95 Iw) 

— »b ) J.F Japan Teehnoteav Y 23*20 (d 

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LLOYDS BANK INTLPOB438. Geneva 11 

lart Dollar. 5 1 05. 10 jgj 


5133x5* I w> Jaoan Selection Fund. 

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lm) jeffer Ptns. IntL Ltd 5 

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‘wIKMmmrt Bens. Jap. Fd 571X3 

d ) Lelcom Fund. 51,16177 

w? Lyverope Cap Hold _ 3 16978 

(d ) Uauibaer 5 1X85X0 

|W) Ltovds InH. Smaller Cne 5 >274 

w> Luxfund— — - 172TB 

m) iMaanafund mu 5 19774 

d ) Medtotanum Set. Fd 5 1353 


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Renta Fund — __ 
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SCi/Tech. 5A Ltreemboure_ 59X1 
State St. Bank Emily HtlssNV 5972 
StrotaBY investment Fund_ 51974 
Syntax Llrt -feuw »!' 5 750 


Techno Growth Fund.. 
Tom Poc. Held. (Sea). 
Tokyo Poc. Hold. N.V.- 
Transnacffle Fund. 

TurnuahEB Fund 

Tweedy Browne fiv, 

UNI Bond Fund 

UNI Coo Hal Fund. 


SF 91X5 
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5 139X6- 
187X3 
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5 2067X1 
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DM 7650 
5933X8 

S 105211 

United Cob. Invt. Fund Ltd. 5170 

® Worldwide Securities S/5 3%. 54280 
Worldwide Special S/62%. 5157354 

DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs; FL — Dutch Florin: LF — 
y wonteSEJ Frt*2“J * p — Swl« Francs; a — asked; +— OHer Prfc*s;b — bW 
change P/v 510 to 51 per unit,- Njl— Not AvaltaMo; 6LC.— NatContmunicaMd.-a— 
New; S - suspended; S/5 - Stock SoUt; * — Ex-CMvUend: — 

Grass Performance Index Febj • — Rcdcmm- Price- e»Coupm; m — Formertv 
Worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 — Offer Price hid. 31b ardllta charge; ++— Sally Mode 
Price as on Amsterdam Stack ExdKmue 









X 


; Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MARCH 29, 1985 


** 


* • 


\ 



PEANUTS 


ACROSS 

1 Did (he huckle- 
buck 

7 At the nadir 

13 Diacritical 
mark 

14 Shows 

16 One of 
Webster’s 
replies to 
Hayne 

17 Old hand 

18 He, objectively 

19 This makes 
paints 

21 Explorer 
Johnson 

22 Satanic 

24 Approaches 

25 Ui Hander foe: 
1899-1902 

26 Plexuses 

28 Mapabbr. 

29 Kin of an 
ophicleide 

30 Of perfect 
happiness 

32 Sans twioklers 

34 German river 

36 Artist-author 
Silverstein 

37 Laden 

41 Army engineer 
corpsman 

45 Audibly 

46 Kind of sister 
or story 

48 Combine 

49 Sugar unit 

•V jVeir York 


50 Mexican 
commeal 
mush 

52 Trendy set 

53S.E.C. 

member 

54 Deviation from 
the rule 

56 French 
business abbr. 

57 Brilliant bird 

59 Pragmatic 

person 

61 Disintegrate: 
Brit. 

62 Enters the 

. service 

63 Annalists' 
items 

64 Fries quickly 

DOWN 

1 Inferred 

2 Nudist 

3 Basketball 
toum. tetters 

4 Football foul 

5 Remove to a 
distance, in 
law 

6 NickCarter's 

" Key" 

7 Young hares 

8 Oasts 

9 Katarina . 

. figure skater 

10 Chemical 
suffix 

11 Marley's 
partner 


Times, edited bn- Eugene MaleJtu. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



WoF OPPORTUNITIES FOR tfXJNS SO-GETTERS LIKE TOU, 

Mitchell., if rouft move to the bis coy .’ 1 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
I s Oy Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words- 


Thai's for us! 


But you 
promised! 


ESTAC ! 


n 


m 

□ 

u 


TAGEA 







DWEAMO 


zn 

□ 


u 



BRYCAB 


r n ^ 

r-^ i 



THE MOST 
EFFICIENT 
WATERPOWER 
IN THE WORLD. 

Mow arrange the circled leiters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested b>- the above cartoon. 


r HERE ..A 

LETTER FROM 
YOUR BROTHER 
SPIKE... 



1 PEAR SNOOPY DELL, OUR 
CACTU 5 CLUB HAP ITS 


FIRST WWCE LAST NIGHT" 
■& 



* ACTUALLY THE PANCIN 6 
IaJASNT AS MUCH FUN A 5 1 
THOUGHT IT WOULPBE..." 




BOOKS 


BLOND IE 


12 Prickly plants 

13 Stick together 
15 Deadfalls 

20 On which 
nelsons occur 
23 In a queue 
25 Whence a 
reliever comes 
27 Played the 
paraclete 
29 Carplike fish 
31 Recent: Comb, 
form 

33 Gift-openers’ 
sounds 

35 Touches up a 
Rembrandt 

37 Golf-ball 
ingredient 
from the bully 
tree 

38 Howl 

39 Nicholas H’s 
surname 

40 Condemn 

42 Exact 

43 Solipsists 

44 Adjusts an 
alarm clock 

47 Sounds 
raucously 

50 " of robins 

51 “Maria 

1933 song 

54 Opposed, in the 
backwoods 

55 Asian border 
river 

58 Soul, to Simone 
60 Kindled 



ANDY CAPP 








THAT'U. BE 
THECVW^EH? 
HEHJHEH! 
HEH'HEHf 
HEH- 


a 




J lY> BATHER BE LAUGHED 
ATK3R hOTWCKUNG HIM 
THAN BE UNABLE ID LAUGH 



WIZARD of ID 


Print answer here: f J I I j 1 


resi>irday - , Apswer WhaI lh? p ,n ow ngnr m the kids’ room 
looked like— "BED-LAM” 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

BruueLi 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Com Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Prank turf 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Ln Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prague 

Rcyklavlk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


Ankara 

Beirut 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

Tel AvW 

OCEANIA 


HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

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F 



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ASIA 



HIGH 
C 
34 


AFRICA 

Algiers 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


F 

c 

F 


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2i 

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48 

2 

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79 

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17 54 II S? r 


LATIN AMERICA 

3! 


Buenos Aires 
Umo 

Mexico Cllv 
Rio de Janeiro 
Sea Paula 


77 >6 01 
34 75 IS AJ 
28 83 10 M 
79 £4 18 M 


— — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 



Anchorage 

4 


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14 

fr 

Atlanta 

24 

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€1 

Boston 

18 

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PC 

Chicago 

18 

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a 

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26 

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Mouitan 

20 

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lm Angeles 

20 

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PC 


Auckland 

Svdnev 


7? M 

34 75 17 *3 


Miami 
Minima Pdiil 
Montreal 
Nassau 
New York 
San F i- on cisco 
Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


el 


29 S3 19 66 tr 

5 41 2 36 Sw 

13 55 -5 23 

14 75 le «l 

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9 40 J 17 


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24 75 10 SO 


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ci-eiaudv; to-iogg/. tr-toir n-na.i; o-overcasi- oc-ourtl. cloudy, r-roin 
sh-snowers. st-slpr m, 

FRIDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Rough FRANKFURT: Cloudy Temp 

n j 146— 341. LONDON: Ojcrcasl Toma 9 — 3 143 — 37) MADRID: Fair 

Tftnp IS — S 150 — 411, NEW YORK' Fair Tama. 10 — 10 iM — 50) PARIS: 
Cloud r Temp II — JI57— 171. ROME: Overcast Temn 12 — 13 *SJ — 10;. TEL 
AVIV: Pair Tamo 22— to 172 — tu ZURICH: Fair Temn i — I 1*3— ill 
BANGKOK; Foggy. Temp 35-21 195 — 311. HONG KONG: Cteudr Temp 

J4 2n 175 — 69) MANILA: Fair Ttmo 15 — 2* *95 — 75 j SEOUL: Fair. Temp 

9 — 7 {*8 — J6i. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp 30 — 2S 106 — 771 
TOKYO Fogg. Temp. 12 — 6 ■ 54 — AJ; 



REX MORGAN 


LITERARY CRITICISM: Essays on 
Literature. American Writers. En- 
glish Writers. 1484 pp. 

LITERARY CRITICISM: French 
Writers. Other European Writers. 
Die Prefaces to the New York Edi- 
tion. 1408 pp. 

By Henry James. Edited by Leon Edel and 
Mark Wilson. $27.50 each. The Library of 
America, 14 East 60th Street, New York, 
N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakucani 

I N die right hands, Henry James believed, 
literary criticism could be a “supremely 
beneficent" art, but it demanded a rare “dus- 
ter of qualities" — curiosity and patience and 
“perception at the pitch of passion and expres- 
sion.” As he saw it, the critic should be “the 
real helper of the artist, a torch-bearing outrid- 
er. the interpreter, the brother." a kind of 
delicate tuning fork, keyed to pick up nuances 
of both beauty and craft 
Now, thanks to these two superb volumes, 
contemporary readers are afforded the oppor- 
tunity to assess James’s critical oeuvre — and 
the simple, sensuous pleasure of reading the 
master’s improvisations on literature, Ameri- 
can, English and European. The books have 
been published, with scrupulous attention to 
detail, by the Library of America — a brave, 
new enterprise, dedicated to issuing the works 
of prominent American writers in an authori- 
tative form; and they contain a comprehensive 
collection of James's literary criticism, plus the 
1 8 prefaces he wrote for the New York edition. 
More than a third of the pieces have never 
appeared in book form before. 

In these essays, James illuminated his own 
writing process and the ideals he cherished as a 
novelist: his love of exactitude; bis conviction 
that a story should be coherent in form, as 
organic as a living creature; his passionate 
belief that novels, like old-fashioned paintings, 
should try to represent life. As a critic, howev- 
er, he tried never to impose his values upon the 
works of others; and he wrote, with admiration 
and perception, about talents as dissimilar as 
Dickens, Trollope, Hawthorne, Howells and 
Flaubert. He could delight equally, say, in 
Stevenson's “Treasure Island,” with its “mirac- 

Solotion to Previous Puzzle 

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□S3 QOH I 

□Daonmnaaaaaaa 

BBHaa aaan □□□□ 


LEANTlEVILlELLA 


Coincidences and buried doubloons,” 
111 Sic more “homely and prosaic" virtues 
of poetic ‘‘WDhdm Master." % 

Jams Vthmui an t catholicity of taste reflect- 
ed not Only hie Aon n resergnir of svmnathv for 



P9- 

... the 

“most magteticent form of art,” and that its 
magic derived, from its elasticity, its radical 
freedom from definition. “The house of no- 
tion,” he wrote, has “not one window, but a 
million,’ and “she only obligation, to which in 
advance we may bold a novel, without incur- 
ring the accusation of being arbitrary, is that it 
be interesting.” 

What James would not tolerate was the 
vulgar, the egotistical and the bogus; and when . 1 
he suspected that a writer was not making tiff? 
most of his gifts, be could be sharply dismis- 
sive. Reviewing Walt Whitmans “Drum 
Taps," he wrote; “to adopted as a 

national poet, it is not enough” “to discharge 

theimdi, — ‘~ J — ‘ — 

into the) 

“Les Fleurs du I 

dicrqusly puerile view” erf — for Mm, evil 
“H egrnu outside and not and consists 
primarily of a great deal of brid landscape arid 
unclean furniture.” 

Far the most part, though, James was less 
in terra ted in passing judgment on a given text 
than in using it to shed Brin on an author's 
overall achievement He bettered that a novel 
reflected “the quality of the mind, of the pro- 
ducer.” and he felt that critics had a responsi- 
bility to interpret a writer’s inner Hfe and 
public personality. As a result, his essays are 
filled with wonderful cameos — character 
sketches almost as vivid as those found in his 
novels. Kipling, for instance, emerges as a 
cheeky youth who “rushes about malting peo- 
ple jump with the deep sounds, the sportive 
exaggerations of tones that issue from its painif 
ed lips,” and Turgenev, as a “storyteller who 
has taken notes" U sur le vif” 

The transactions between life and an contin- 
ually fascinated James, and this 
impulse led him, in these essays, to: 
the husbanding of material and talent and" the 
consequences of environment, social and fa- 
milial, upon a writer’s sensibility. 

In Ms book-length essay on Hawthorne, 
James spent a lot of time marveling tu how 
devoid this author’s life was of “social acci- 
dents” and “literary incident." He discussed 
the narrowness of Hawthorne’s life, spent 
nearly entirely in small New England towns; 
tire unsophisticated appeal of bis work, and the 
ways in which his innocent, yet self-conscious, 
temperament typified the native genius. It is 
almost as though James — like the hero of 
‘The folly Comer” — were meditating upon a 
possible alter-ego, what he might have been 
had he stayed home and never gone to Europe. 

In fact the character of James so permeates 
these essays that the reader is left with an 
insistent after-i 

man His presence is there in the 
style and the elaborate, supple prose. And it is 
there, too. in certain recurrent themes — the 
preoccupation with the United States and Eu- 
rope, with women as heroines, and with what 
James called the “modem condition-” 


I'VE GOT TO GET BACK 


TO GREET SOME NEW ARRIVING GUESTS 
CARL l SHOW CLAUDIA AROUND ! IF SHE 
NEE SOMETHING OTHER THAN BOOZE 
TELL HER ABOUT THE PCWDER ROOM 




WHAT DID 
HE MEAN By 
POWOEG 
JZOOMT 


THE PCWDER ROOM IS THE 
FIRST DOOR ON THE RIGHT, AT 
THE HEAD OF THE STAIRS l GO 
ON UP AND LOOK IN / YOUIX 
FIND THE POWDER THERE / USE 
WHATEVER YOU NEED/ 



QQQQO □□□□ 


R IMfif 

3/29/85 


Michiko Kakutari is on the staff of The New 
York Tunes. 


BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


.scratch 

.SCRATCH 

S Scratch 



?-rg a?M [WR- 


IT'S OKAV,dON... 
I’VE SUBPOEP THE CHAIR. 
IT'S SAFE TO SIT IN NOW 



! 19?5 VKVIM? F 


By Alan Truscort 

A lmost an experts would 

open four spades with the 
hand shown, prompted by the 
favorable vulnerablilily. This 
happened to be the wrong mo- 
men t for such action. The limit 
for East-West is about one 
club, and North-South are 
headed for defeat in four 
spades doubled. The only 
question appears to be the size 
of the penally. 

At double-dummy the de- 
fense can take six incks. West 
must underlead his chib ace, 
allowing East to win and shift 
to a bon. This removes the 
bean ace from the dummy be- 
fore South can develop a dia- 
mond trick; and he must lose 
two tricks in each major suit 
and one in each minor. 

Down two seems a likely re 


.suit, and would be the outcome., 
if West leads, for example, the 
chib ace. One declarer did bet- 
ter, for he received the lead of a 
small trump. This destroyed 
East's jack, and when South 
won he led his singleton dia- 
mond. West put up the ace and 
shifted to dubs. The declarer 
was able to discard a heart los- 
er on the diamond king. He . 
lost a trick in each suit for 
down one, and thought he had 
done well 

Italy’s great Giorgio Bella- 
donna as South also received 
the helpful trump lead and also 
led his' singleton diamond at 
the second nick. But when 
West put up the ace, he shifted 
to the three of hearts. He was 
discomfited and South was as- 
tonished to find that dummy’s- 
seven hdd the trick. It was 
then an easy matter to discard 


the dub -queen on fheriigmonri 
king, return to the dosed band 
with a dub ruff and drive out 
the ace. 

The defense took a heart 
trick eventually, but Befiadona 
had ten tricks for a score of 
590. 

NORTH 

PAT 

- <MCJ7«543 
*5433 

WEST BASKO) 

MM: 

4“ A.10 11,111,1 »Q»J 

* A 8 7 # * K J 18 8 

SOUTH 

+ KQ108754 

00/98 

<■9 

* Q 

East and Wee wan wfaanbte. 
The bidding: 

East Sooth Wart North 
Pass 4* DM Pan 


Wan lad the spade two. 


■A 


lAnswers tomorrow) 


World Stock Markete 

Y'ia Agence France-Presse March 28 

Uourift price i ui local anencies anlea <i ikenuse indicated. 


Amsterdam 


ABN 

acf HoMine 

Aegon 

AICZO 

Amid 

AMEV 

A Dom Rubber 
Amro Sons 
BVG 

Buetirmonn T 

Coland Hldg 

Elsevier-NDU 

Fokker 

G>5l Brocades 

Heineken 

Hoogovnns 

KLM 

Naaroen 

Nat Nedder 

Nedllovd 

Oce Vander G 

Pokhoed 

Philips 

Pobeeo 
Rodamca 
Pallncc 
Sorenio 
Povai Dutch 
Unilever 
Von Omrneren 
VMP Srork 
VNU 


Ctose Priv. 
404 JO550 
]»7 107.50 
106JO 105 

H0.30 109J0 
215 21470 
215.70 315 

n ilk * in 

74.20 75.10 

215 217 

00 8750 

JS 3550 
114 JO 11250 
104 40 104.30 
185.33 195 

1S5J0 1 57 JO 
5050 5900 

SB.VO 54 JO 
47.60 47 70 

70.20 70 
IBS 5X1 18350 

312 313 

71 50 64 JO 

59.10 60.90 
74.40 7490 

138.20 138.70 

67.20 67 60 

a.n 44 

19640 177 

340 341 

31 JO XL2D 
152 1*300 
210 211 


Brawwh 


flrtoed 
Bekaart 
Cocker II I 
Coueoa 
EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevoerr 

HoOaken 

Inter com 

Kreolerbank 

Peirollna 

5oc Generate 

Safina 

Soivav 

Traction Elcc 

UCB 

Unerg 

viailleMonlogne 


1805 1770 
5940 5930 
266 263 

3330 3425 
3090 JOflO 
3200 3255 
1955 1980 
3900 J900 

5780 5760 
22C5 7185 
0200 9390 
6770 6760 
1970 2000 
7560 TsCO 
44C0 4430 

4125 4105 
5230 5140 
1700 1700 

63&0 635(1 


Kail -t- Sail 
Karsiodl 
Kauftial 
K kJcckncr H-D 
Kloecknrr Werke 
Krupa Stahl 
Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmann 
Moral igeseiisc ha tr 
Muench Rueck 
Prnnsoa 
Ruelgers -Werke 
BWE 
Schcrlng 
Siemens 
Thyssen 
Varta 
Veba 
VEW 


Close Prev 

250 252-50 
nuo 311 
218 220 
249.50 251 

6950 ra.ni 
10*50 :ro 
4I1J0 41450 
19150 192 

15050 153 

16050 159.10 
250 257 

1155 US0 
274 27050 
32550 32S 

15450 IS3J0 
44750 44350 

524 53650 

9SJ0 98 
178 18250 
17850 177.70 
12250 1 77 TA 


Valkiwagenwerk. 70050 190 

Commerzbank Index : 118150 
Previous : T 18120 


Hong Kong 


Bk Easr Asia 
Cneuna Kong 
Cnino Light 
Cross Harbor . 
Hang Seng Bank 
HK Eiecme 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Telephone 
HK Whan 
Hutch Yinampoa 
Jardine Math 
Jar dine Sac 

Nr» warla 
5ha<v Brothers 
SHK Proas 
Sime Daror 
Stalu. 

5wlre Pacll’c A 
Wheeraek A 
v/heeicck Mor 
Winsor 
world in* i 


71.70 25 

1350 1050 
14,48 14.10 
«.«0 750 

47 4*50 
7.15 7.15 

31 3150 
4.775 430 

940 ejs 
70 71 

5-*0 5.35 

19.90 1140 
9 9 

950 9 JO 

6 401 

34)75 3.075 
9 mu 
650 6J5 

^150 15C 

Tro 7jo 

Susa. — 

1JC 4 t5 

1.74 ITS 


Current Stack Index : 225453 
Previous : 22SS.93 


Frankfurt 


AEG- Tele i union 10700 10760 


Allianz vers 
Bosl 
Barer 
Baver.Hvaa 
Baror Ver Bank 
BMW 

CoimncriiHinl 

Cantlgumml 

Daimler-Benz 

C-eausM 

Deutsche Bcacoc* 

Ceuische Bank 

Zirettm or Bank 

DUB-Schvlt 

GHH 

Hocntie# 

Moecnst 

Haesch 

Hotzmonn 

Horien 


1038 K7T7 
19750 1*7 40 
20750 307 40 
33750 330 

328 326 

380 37350 
16400 165 

134 40 137.70 
Ml 66550 

358.10 360.20 
161 161 

432.20 43670 

167.10 185.10 
710 212-TC 

15450 15550 
472 472 

201 40 200 10 
107 10660 
393 389 

165 IC 


Hang Seng index : 1252.90 
Previous : 115062 


1 4ohannc<ibnrc j 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Gold 
Barlows 

Blrrwr 
Bu'lels 
De Beers 
Oriel on *e in 
Eicnds 
OFS* 

Harmon r 
Hivcia Slcol 
Kloof 
Nedbank 
Pros Slovn 
Pusalot 
5A Brews 
St Helena 
Sasol 

West Holding 


0 cocock 
Bareevs 
Bass 

BA.T. 

Bcearam 
BICC 
BL 

Bum Circle 
BQC Grouo 
Bools 

Bonater Indus 
BP 

Brit Home 5t 
Brit Telecom 
Bril Aerosaace 
BTB 
Hurman 
Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Czm 
Coats Pawns 
Commercial u 
Cans Gold 
Court aulds 

Daiaerr 
Do Beers « 

Distillers 
□ riewnlein 
Flsons 
Free Si Gea 
GEC 
CUN 
Glaxo c 
Grand Met 
Guinness 
Gus 
Hanson 
Hawker 
iCt 
Imtrs 
Jaguar 
Lloyds Bank 
Lonrno 
Lucas 

Marks and So 
Mldicnd Bank 
hoi west Bank 
p end a 

Pliklnglan 

Piesse* 

Pacoi Eleel 
Pandlonicln 
Ronk 
Peea Inti 

Peurers 

Parol DulehC 45 37/64 


Claw Pre* 

153 
587 
539 
326 
373 
251 


41 
520 
293 
174 

252 

541 

272 

144 

415 

*94 

207 

515 

157 

196 

152 

206 

531 

144 

4BB 

517 

204 

*27--« 

320 

I27L, 

188 

224 


205 
534 
145 
488 
500 
286 
S27 
318 
5771 -j 
188 

_ 225 

II 3*6411 13/64 

278 283 


247 

804 

212 

417 

774 

1B7 

300 

534 

171 

233 

145 

329 

627 

351 

286 

196 

214 


249 

799 

213 
417 
771 
188 
2*7 
537 
170 
268 
'» 
32* 
629 
340 
2*6 
198 

214 


M2 

361 

45=*s 

669 


RTS 442 

Sccicni 863 

Sainsbun* 306 

Shell 703 

STC. 202 

SIC chartered 4S7 

~aie ana Lsie <30 

Tesca 2*5 

ham EMI 399 

• i aroua 2*4 

Tratalger Hse 337 

THF 144 

Ultramar ' 218 

un.Iever c :23/64 125/32 
Un,iea Biscuits 18t 181 

Vickers 253 256 

W.3eee 1*4 U) 

•V Holdings SJ»-*5 SU’i 

IS'*, 

749 


730 733 

7/45 24S: 

■6TN 16553 
ICdS 1040 
1657 1650 

8000 7925 
1003 970 

£350 527S 
1600 T585 
3150 3100 
2975 2»H 
400 39£ 

7750 ~JU 

90S 90S 

5900 S«S0 . -- 

1780 1750 [War Loan 3' st 
6*3 A70 ’*oo!«qrth 
3225 rSO ' 

573 Mfl 


604 



Oo*e 

Pr»v 

Flraloer 

S3JC 

SZ25 

Generali 

42610 41590 

IFI 

8010 

8IW0 

Italcemenll 


llalmubillarl 

69290 69850 

Medlaoanca 

82500 83930 

Montedison 

1500 

1500 

Olivetti 

6331 


Pirelli 

2100 


RA5 

64900 65800 

Rinas cento 

66250 

667 


1990 


Snio 

7B2A 

2813 

Slonda 

12130 


5 lei 

2*55 

2505 

M1B Current Index : 1193 


[Previous : 1207 



11 11 

Air Ltauide 

040 

838 I 

A IS thorn ATI. 

W7.2 0 307 X 


1205 

1217 


614 

609 

BIC 

531 

533 


621 

610 


7J45 

2370 

Cerrefaur 

2000 

1990 


1195 

1195 

Call meg 

281 

201 JO 

Dumez 

el5 


Ell-Aqu.laiiw< 

235J0 Z35J0 




Gen Eaux 

659 

617 

Hochetle 

1532 

1E40 

i metal 

111 

112 

LOtprof: Can 

479 

*T5 

Legrand 

2060 

2120 

I'Orral 

2492 

2480 



1850 

Mlchetln 

935 

936 

mm Prnnor 

100 

98.40 

Moot Hennessv 

1B»1 









715 

720 

Pernod Rlc 

703 

607 

Petroies iHei 

286 26150 


285 

B..1I 

Poclain 

50 

CcjI 

Prlnlomui 

W ' ^ ]| 

Rod lateen n 

275.10 274.90 

Rcdouie 



Routael UdOf 

1723 

1773 


1000 

1875 

Sour .Perrier 

517 

523 


2536 

2555 

Thomson CSF 

533 

550 

Valeo 

227 


Aeefl Index : 20558 


PrevkHis : 20193 



CAC Index : 21180 


j Previous : 719.46 



11 SteZapore II 




Cold Storage 

281 





FraserNeerve 

SSS 

5 JO 

Haw Par 



incncape 



Keoewi Shin 



AAal Bonking 

6 

S.90 


»J0 


OUB 


X76 






I .Vi 


1,!9 


51 Trading 

•ij? 

4J? 


482 

4 JO 

OUB Index : 4li.lt 



Previous : 41289 



II Ncarikbelia li 


Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 

Swedish Match 
Volvo 


205 

220 

340 


Affaersvaerlden Index : 38850 
Previous : 38720 


%'Aagy 


AC I 

AN! 

ANZ 
BHP 
8 oral 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Calm 

Comalca 

CRA 

CSR 

Dun Wo 

Elders Jxl 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Oakbrldge 

Prko 

Poseidon 

RGC 

Santos 


202 

295 

455 

598 

326 

312 

300 

366 

270 

604 

286 

207 

316 

170 

240 

302 

182 

79 

402 

370 

4T0 

61* 

186 

28 

98 

364 

:MJL 


Tohyo 


wu — U . E - T - 30 ,n * r * : 978.10 
SSM 6ia Pr '»»d* ; 


Milan 


London 


A A Care 
Allicd-L«cr: 
4ngig *"•■ 3 -jiJ 


Bcr.cg Cckin 

I Cen-raie 

! C'aarv;ie!i 

Trefl itai 


513 J17 , 

173 I Farm, Iona 

Hi 187 1 F'3t 


16680 17000 
3630 3721 
BU3S S395 
2280 2100 
HDD 11315 , 
^35 2985 


AGA 

Alla Laval 

Asea 

Aura 

Alias Caoca 

Bolldew 

Electreiu* 

Erlcsvm 

Esscite 

Hanoeisaanken 
Pharmacia 
Scab- Scan In 


NO 
190 

”5 

175 
ICS 
775 
328 
ru 

N.O 

IS' t«9 
503 7C* 

430 N.O. 


Ahgl 

466 

466 

Asahl Chetn 

077 

B75 

Asohl Glau 

910 

902 

Bank at Tokyo 

mo 

850 

Bridges tone 

540 

530 

Canon 

1370 

1390 

CUah 

359 

365 

Dai Nippon Print 

1050 

1040 

Oaiwa House 

565 

571 

Full Bonk 

1610 

1640 

Full Pnofo 

1730 

1740 

Fuilltu 

1160 

1170 

Hitachi 

849 

HO 

Honda 

1420 

1420 

Jaoan Air Lines 

6400 

6400 

Kallrrw 

273 

272 

Kansal Power 

1450 

1430 

Kawasaki Steel 

147 

147 

Kirin Brewery 

615 

595 

Kama Isu ltd 

-STB 

472 

Kuaota 

327 

325 

Matsu Elec inds 

1590 

1990 

Maisu Elec Works 

775 

785 

MitsuDishi Bank 

1610 

I6IC 

Mitstjwsni ertem 

450 

450 



Cl«e 

Pr*r. 

Mllsuhlshl Elec 

376 

400 

. Ml nuolsni Heavy 

275 


Mitsubishi Cora 



Mitsui and co 

343 


Mllsukashl 



Mitsumi 

971 


NEC 



NGK Insulators 

900 


NikkoSeC 

801 


Nippon steel 



Nippon Yusen 

240 


Nissan 



Nomura Sec 



Otvrnous 

1180 


Pioneer 



Ricoh 

8«7 


Sharp 



Sony 



Sumitomo Bank 



Sumitomo Charm 



Sumitomo Metal 



Talsei Coro 



TaHfta Marine 


467 

Takeda Clwrn 



Tdk 

5690 


Tollln 



Tokyo Elec Power 

1750 

1730 

Tokyo Marine 



Tor ay ind 

46? 


Toshiba 



Toyota 



YomaidH Sec 

822 

828 

NIUmi/Dj. index 

1248*42 1 

Previous : 1255BJQ 



New index : 1004JE 



Previous : loom 



li II 

Adia 

2720 

2750 

Bonk Lew 

3570 


Brawn Boverl 

1635 


Clbo Getar 

2890 

2900 

Credit Suisse 



Eleetrowart 

2885 

2900 

Georg Fischer 

740 

750 

Intordlseount 

1920 

1955 

Jacob Socfiard 

6350 

6400 

Jet moil 

1920 

1940 

Landis Gvr 

1690 

1690 




Oerltkan-B 

1480 


Radw Baby 

8725 

8775 

Sand 02 

7600 


Schindler 

4100 


Sulrer 

365 

368 




Swissair 



Swiss Reinsurance 

7700 


Swiss Voiksbor* 



Union Bank 


3685 

Winterthur 



Zurich Ins 

20750 21000 

SBC loan ; 43UO 



Previous : 43U0 






available. 4d: ex-dividend. | 


IBM Introduces S>-stem 
To Back Up Gjmputers 

Urn led Press Intemai:uKa/ 

RYE BROOK. New York — International 
Business Machines Corp. unveiled Thursday a 
back-up computer system deigned to provide 
uninterrupted service to on-line terminal users 
in banking, retailing, manufacturing and other 
industries. 

The IBM System-SS duplicates system hard- 
ware components, including processor, memory 
and controller, and takes over automatically if a 
component fails. The system continues to oper- 
ate and to process on-line transactions. 


Taroate Stack 28 \ 


Canadian, sfixfa via AP 


inoABttPrai 

47380 AgnkO E 
7200 AOrO IndA 
38460 AH Eiwrav 
1700 Alto NOt 
lino Also Cent 
2*59 AJooma St 
BUI AnK«n 
7800 A tca I f 
91 425 BP Canada 
20474 Bank SC 
17835* Bank N S 
3900 Barr lek a 
7HU Baton A f 
27281 Bonamo R 
7150 Bralorr® 
1200 Bramdlaa 
32$ Brenda M 
4879 BCFP 
81070 BC Res 
14570 BC Phone 
7250 Bnrawk 
1550 Budd Can 
#450 CAE 
2O0CCL A 
222DQ CDtStb Bf 
16125 Cod Fry 
11350 C NOT West 
400 C Pacfcrs 
7B350 Can Trust 
900 C Tung 
48236 Cl BkCom 
6400 Cdn Nat Ras 
73226 CTireAl 
54H?CUtllB 
ssocaro 
1903 CflontTC 
66S Celtm 175 p 
450 C Dfsttl A 
322W CDMb B I 
mm ctl sank 
300 Canveiitrs 
OQOCamveSt A 
oeoocosefca R 

4120 Conran A 
ISOOCrawm 
88300 Czar Ra 
716a Doan Dov 
IHJODoonA 
44128 Denison A a 
03828 Daman Bf 
1500 Prvloufi 
23771 Olcknsn At 
6200 DkknStB 

1538 Damon A 
39240 Ddolca A 
1427 Du Peril A 
44«DvlexA ^ 
6575 Elcfnam X 
U07S Earl tv Svr 
230 FCA InH 
1600 C Falcon C 
2*180 FKnbrOee 
1820 Fardv R« 
19S1 Fed Ind A 
200 Fed Plan 
7450 FCHv Fin 
lOOFruahaut 
25DOGenals A 
3735 Geae Camp 
28345 Geocrude 
4420 Slprol tar 
22370 Golden** f 
100 Good veer 
4 Graft G 
500 Grandma 
500 GL Forex! 

ID Gt Pacific 
729 Orevhnd 
4507 H Group A 
12900 Hrdlna A f 

S3oo Hawker 

OT3 Hay »D 
7404 H Bov Co 
40915 iretasco 
lOOOIndal - 
12a i nans 
24270 inland Gas 
66800 InH Thom 
503650 Inter Pipe 
8300 Jannock 
iroOKwn KgHa 
450 Kerr Add 
11481 Laban- 
71047 Loc Mrwix 
2000 LOnt cent 
15000 Locane 


High Low Clara Otoe 
555k. 55W 55t. + V4 
SIM IM 16M+ U 
UM 6W 496 
K21V3 2M 2114 4- 1 
JHH 141b I4«b— W 
5211b 2QA Z1tb+9fe 
521*. 2116 214k 4- Vk 
S19 184k 19 4-16 

sm flu 8%+ v, 
531 29 ffltt+B 

S5U 546 SVw— lb 
S12H 121b 1216 
147 143 144 — I 

515M 1516 1SU— 16 
450 435 440 +5 

SS 490 493 —5 

*1766 17J6 TO 
. *10 9%. W6+ Vb 

S9U 9 9 — Vk 

244 234 342 +4 

*2116 2116 21lb+Vb 
*1416 I5U lM+ 9k 
524 23U . 2316 

5171b 17 171b— U 

*2716 27lb 2716 + U 
54 4 6 

516 1556 1596— V» 
S2S16 74*. 25 +W 
*29U 29*. 2W6+U 
53396 3216 334k+h 
914 U 14 
529 Vi 2916 2916 

279b J7V3 271b— Yi 
5896 Sib 51k— Vk 
Sim 17 17 

*1Pk 11 111k +46 

57 49k Mb— 16 

517 17 17 

54 5 4 

*4 .4 4 

SltSWi 10 ffl 

I» « » 

MW 716 8Vb+ 16 

285 275 285 +5 

111 1016 n + 16 

5171b 171b 17Vb 
m 144 170 +13 

445 420 440 +15 

425, 42D 425 440 

S11J. HU llVk+M 
5114k IDVj 1146+ Vb 
57 7 7 

*4Jb 516 416+ V6 

S6ta 4Vk 4<b + 16 
215 215 215 

S27W 27 . 27 — Vk 
5141b MV6 161k + Vk 
53916 VPh 3m— U 
SSVb BV6 8W— U 

S71k 7U 71k 

Sim 199k 199b— Vk 
51891 15U laib+lb 
100 90U TOO + 3 

395 295 295 +5 

5221k 22 22Vb+ Ik 

52116 214k 2116— 16 
*1216 12lb l» 

524 74 34 

52716 2716 27V. + U 
*1016 1096 1016+ Vk 
m 248 270 +2 

SO*. 996 94b 

5716 7 7 

S42W 42W CV5+ V5 
331 31 31—1 

44 *4 44 

sam am em 
530 30 30 

524 25W 2546— H 

57W 71b 71b 

125 120 125 +5 

S201i 201b 2096+ 16 

!['$ Hi* l,V!i 

5J6U Wk lib- a 
520 279b 2746— 14 

*« 13 13 ■ + 35 

5151k 1596 156 
SJ4J6 IS* 16 

1371b 3716 37U— U 
SllVk 11 11 + u, 

117 in in -s 

5149* 16 16Vb 
*23 V. 23 23 

S32Va 31 3116+44 

*1176 1146 11%+ lb 
513V6 046 1316+ Pi 


. 212 LL Loc 

nULoWowCo 
2D0MDSHA. ■ 
105100 M1CC 
17586 MaanHX 
imiMeriandE 
45755 MalaonAI 
llOMobODB 
4289 Murphy 
TOO Nabltcn L 
40824 NarandO - 
*3204 N green 
1 22297 MveAltAf 
12237 NawscoW 
37V4S NlfWst ip A 
7142 Oak wood 
nraoshawffAf 
12200 Pamour 
53034 PanCanP • 
11400 PBtnMna 
3*00 Phanlx Oil 
2428 Pine Point 
lOOOPiaraGOa 
9Q44T Placer 
12085 Prmfga 
8500 Que Stare a 
3280 Ray rack f 
15313 Redpath 
St2T27 Rd 5l«ntix A 
49525 RraServi . 

. 3077 Revn pm A 
1947 Roger* A 
5X0 Roman . 

250 Rottxrran 
44715 Sceptre 
10775 Scans f ' 
23408 Stars Con 
409540 5MJ Can 

21931 Stwrrnt 
SH Sigma 
ISO Slater Bf 
7000 Souttim 
730 St-Brodcxt 
25922SMCOA 
28000 SaTptra 

50 Steep R 

34350 Sydney o 
4400Talcorp 

18700 Tara 
1294 Teck Cota 
54447 TeckBf - 
20WSTex Can 
4400 Tltom N A 
27621 Tor Dm Bk 
2000 Tumor Bf 
2-371 TrwderaAf . 
3500 Trn* Ml 

MUBTrCaaPL 
30978 Trlmoc 
"gTrtracA. 
23050 TurtMf 
293UnCarbld 
8899 U Enlprlse 
3400 u Kena 
2814 U SIMM ’ ' 
15450 VersHAf ’ 
1700 Vestaran 

4500Wefcfivod 
47500 Westm In 
14300 Weston 
14964 Wooded A 
9975 Yk“ 


T&-- 

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men Lew Cleae C3^e 

. 134 34 34 —1 

51716 IM6 17 — 16 
5189k 189k 1BH+ 16 
214 205 212 +7 

SBlb 2SU 2SVb+ 16 
430 415 425 +15 

SIM 18 ‘ 16 — » 
5181 b 181% 18M+.M 
S22W 2116 22 +1 
528 28 24 + U 

51514 111b 181b— U 
5181b 18 - 1416+ I 
5846 416 6Vb 

*24 Vk 2316 24 + 16 

54 50 JB 

*716 7 7tb+lb 

«4 2316 9®?6— : Vb 

571b 716 716+ U 

*31 - 301b 30n+ lb 

518 1716 -18 + W 

528 28 28 

117 1T7 117 

*2516 2SVb 25J6 — lb 
*20 lFK lA>+ 16 
815 390 405 . +15 
*8Vb BV6 816 
512 lllb 1VW . 
SEIlb » 2116-116 

270 .288 368 —.1 

IM 125 125 . 

S94b 916 916— Vs 

Sim - KM 10U+ W 
*41 lb 41 41 - 

•8J6 Mb 8V6+ 16 
S^U 21* 2214 + 16 
571b 716 71b 
5Hlb 281k 2Mb + Ik 
57Vb 4VB 816+ lb 
5816 BVb 816+ W 
SlWb KM 10Vb+U 
*5816 SB 58—16 
51216 .1216. IZS6 . 

&^lt 

270 270" 378 +3 
34 23 - 23 

108 102 108 +8 
5219b 2116 219k— 16 
Snik 114k im+4* 
sunk lUk 1216+ 16 
*3516 3316 34U+1V6 
5S7U ST 571b— 16 
SIM 1Mb T9 — Vk 

sim m -mb- 96 

*23 - 221k 271k + V9 
*716 716 716+ V* 

820 4W 410 —31 
•*25Vb 2416 2416—9% 
*2416 239%.- 2316 +Jb 
430 415 420 —15 

S279b 2716 2716+16 
59 57 99 +-3 

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sink mu ii*+ 
51116 .11 ITVk— 

115 no no - 

571% 7 71b 

S1H6 119k 1716 • 

518 . 15U 16+16 




SIM 12V6 
513 • 1216 


Total sales 20431X819 shores 


TSE 308 Index: 




240140 


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14728 CanBatfi 
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Total Sales 44)1140 Warn. 

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irdinak’ Coleman Has Gotten Hying Start on Baseball's (lass of ’85 


. '•«**«* 7fm«Sarvtor 
EfERSBURG, Florida — 
incc Coleman: He is 23 
L he is a switch-bitting out- 
jBd he can fly- Two years 
led ihe South Atlantic 
: hv hitting -350; be broke 
Sessional baseball record 
og 145 bases, and be did it 

- though he missed 31 games 
.immy. 

year, be moved up to the 

- fcvd of the minor leagues 
,e 101 bases, breaking the 
I'd Association record set 

as by Tim Raines. 

. ’t break it, fie shattered h, 
wes. 

; Vince Cokman is one step 

. . Tin fame anf f fortune. He 
here in the sunshine at A1 
' in the red-trimmed 
• of the Sl Loris CarcBnals, 

; knocking at the door. But, 
c a of the 300 or so other 
: ^appln^forjobsintbelag 
he is knocking at the door 
. 'bouse: in left Odd, Lonnie 
'.'a center, Willie McGee; in 
[ ; -'4 Oark. 

lidn’t have an outfield Hke 


VANTAGE POINT/ Joseph Durso 


Expos, and 22-year-old Sbawon 
Dunston of Brooklyn battling 39- 
year-old Larry Bowa for shortstop 
on the Chicago Cubs. 

Stars are also arriving from the 
Olympic Games, where ha^hatl 
was a demonstration sport. Two of 
the best are Cory Snyder, a 6-foot- 
5-inch (1.95-meter) second base- 
man for the Cleveland Indians who 
hit 73 home runs in three years at 
Brigham Young, and Oddibe Mc- 
Dowell, an outfielder for the Texas 
Rangers who hit .407 at Arizona 
State. Neither has played one in. 


“Gtrihen,” says T-aRmre^ “has a 
c han ce to be anything from gpod to 
great. He has good defensive ac- 
tions, a good stroke, good instincts 
for die game. We haw a good 
shortstop in Scott Fletcher. Bui Oz- 
zie’s a left-handed Utter, and he’s 
been handling himself welL We fig- 
ure we gave San Diego a 20-game 
winner, and this kid was an impor- 
tant part of the trade.” 


tan oat in the big leagues last year, 
be hit a triple and two singles in his 
first three times at bat. He is a 6-3 
left-hander who spent the season 
shuttling between Chicago and 
Denver. But no more. He hit J12at 
Denver, was nam ed rookie of the 
year in the American Association 
and now has a shot at the same title 
in the Ameri can 

NEW YORK YANKEES 
Scott Bradley comes from Essex 
Fells, New Jersey, was an all-Amer- 
ica at the University of North Car- 
olina and can play anywhere: 
catcher, outfielder, third and 


young 
I think 


levd, he never believes he’s beaten. 
I don't relish putting any 
in a backup role, but ! 
can handle it.” 

Christensen figures to make the 
Mets as the fourth or fifth outfield- 
er, and as a frequent right-handed 
pinch-hitter. At California State, 
be hit 23 home runs as 3 junior, 
tying the school record set by Tim 
Wallach, now with the Expos. 

He made his major league debut 
last September as a pinch-hitter for 
Darryl Strawberry, which should 
earn him a spot in a trivia quiz 
someday. He walked. A few day 


agent market because they thought 
Simmons could replace him 
He is a switch-hitler with power 
and a good arm. At Evansville in 
the American Association, he bat- 
ted 301 with 22 home runs and 41 
doubles. In tune g ames with the 
Tigers in September, he hit .433 
and passed the audition. 

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS 
Jose Gonzalez was like Guillen, 
stuck behind a star shortstop, in 
this case Ozzie Smith of the Cardi- 
nals. But Gonzalez was liberated 
last winter when the Cardi nal s sent 
him to the Giants as part of the 


, _ . . , uiuu c aw someoay. tie walked. A few days — ; — , — , 

? * f ^ icy a ^ gi rt e d hitter. And he will prob- later, he gpt his first hit: a double ransom for Jack Clark. 


fling of pro ball; neither figures to 
see the big leagues soon. 


shapes and from half a dozen coun- 
tries, more of them come with col- 
lege degrees these days, same of 
them even come with agents »nd 
reputations, and all of them <«wim» 
with hope. Mrdfccy Mantle remem- 
bers that be came to the Yankees in 

1951 with one pair of blue dark? 

‘ ays Wbitey Herzog, the and a straw nr j te a sf 
. ■ of the Cardinals, ^oto- The word these days in the train- 

. - mid start in center and jug camps in Florida and Arizona 
"i he the National League’s - 
;' f the year.” 

wi& decide Coleman's 
.enact two weeks as spring 
■ winds down and the 650 
‘ r»the 26 teams in die major 
-.■ue filled. Rookies, the boys 
wiQnrobablyfiU 50 or so 
-ibs. The 250 other rookies 
~ d back to tbe minors. Some 
: -Tace again soon when injn- 
- slumps prompt the call for 
.anents. And, if he is not 
' in Sl Louis flying for the 

. inebodty needed a 
\;r fielder’ 
r :aan would T>e 
x>kie of die 


disdple of Lins Aparido, his man- ably stick with the Yankees in all 
ager on the Venezuelan national four roles because his credentials 
just before he signed axe impeccable: hat ting champion 
T with the Padres at the age of 17. In (J35), rookie of tbe year and most 

S55£RS.-*£fl=! SSSSaSi 

tour seasons m the minors, he has iww vnsr mftc 

averaged 308. He has never seen «„ . .r" 1 !?, v_ 

Chicago, but he wffl. H ^ t ^$L? iy ' 

son says, nodding toward John 
Before anybody got Daryl Bos- Christensen. “He’shit 300 ai every 


off Steve Carlton, which isn't too 
shabby, either. 

DETROIT TIGERS 
It’s not easy to make a team that 
won the Work! Series, but 2 1 -year- 
old Nelson Simmons will do it as a 
reserve left fielder behind Larry 
Herndon and as a designated hit- 
ter. In fact, the Tigers did not pur- 
sue Rupperi Jones into the free 


He is a switch-hitter who batted 
379 at Louisville last summer, and 
a shortstop with good range. He is 
getting every chance to replace 
Johnnie LeMaster. the right-year 
veteran who is a good fielder' but 
weak hitter (317) and chronic com- 
plainer. 

MONTREAL EXPOS 
When the Expos traded Gary 
Carter to the Mets, they got four 


young .players in return and filled 
three positions at once: catcher, 
shortstop and center field. The man 
in center is 23-year-old Henn Win- 
n i ngham . a left-handed hitter with 
a distinction: He was drafted by 
the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1979. the 
Milwaukee Brewers in 1980, the 
Expos later in 1980 and the Mets, 
who finally signed him. io 1981. 

He does not hit borne runs, but 
he hits a lot of other fringe He 
ended last season at Tidewater at 
381, then averaged .407 in Septem- 
ber for the Mets. 

Joe Hesketb is a left-handed 
pitcher who also owns a distinc- 
tion: After one season in the mi- 
nors in 198Q, he underwent elbow 
surgery and did not appear in a 
game again for 684 days. But he has 
never had a losing record in pro 
ball, and be went 12-3 last year at 
Indianapolis before getting the call 
to Montreal 

CHICAGO CUBS 

Shawon Dunston was bom in 


Brooklyn 22 years ago and wowed 
them at Thomas Jefferson High, 
where be hit 25 home runs. In June 
1982. the Cubs bad tbe right to 
make the first pick in the amateur 
draft, skipped Dwight Gooden and 
took Shawon Dunston. The Mets 
later conceded that, if Gooden had 
been taken, they would have 
switched to Dunston. 

Manager Jim Frey has been giv- 
ing Dunkon every' chance to re- 
place Larry Bowa, who suspects the 
deck is stacked in Duuston's favor. 
But the Cubs wonder why Dun- 
stem's 300 batting average in the 
lower minors plunged to 333 at 
Triple- A last summer, and why he 
made 58 errors. They also have 
Dave Owen, Tom Vetyzer and 
Chris Sprier as experienced backup 
infielders. 

“I want to be a star” Dunston 
says, sounding the theme for all 
1985's rookies. “But, if I’m not 
.ready, 1 don’t want to embarrass 
myself in front of 50,000 fans.” 


1 gays manager 
-ij Herzog. 

a, Vincent Maurice Colo- 


of *85, the scouts, 
-■s and other baseball peo- 
is fikdy to indude these 
Jnewos: 

GmSen at shortstop and 
ston in center fidd for the 
—•White Sox; Scott 
leof four positions,] 
ne catcher, for the New 
■nltees; John Christensen 
TK.4 outfielder on the New 


is that 1985 looks tike a modest 
year for rookies. No Dwight Goo- 
den, with Us 276 strikeouts last 
year. No Cal Ripken Jr n who was 
rookie of the year in 1982 and most 
valuable player in 1983. 

For Vince Coleman, the road to 
the big leagues has climbed almost 
straight op. At Florida A&M, he 
majored in physical education and 
stole a record total of 65 bases in 
1981. Then he went to Johnson 
City in the Rookie League, where 
be hit 350 and stole 43 bases; then 
to Macon in the South Atlantic 
League, where be won the batting 
(350) and base-stealing (145) titles. 
After that, he was vaulted from 
Class A baseball to Class AAA at 
Louisville and, although he stole 
101 bases, he saw his batting aver- 
age slide by 93 points. 

"He made too big a jump last 
year, from A-ball to triple A” Her- 
zog says. “If we leave here injury- 
free, he'll open at Louisville. If 
somebody needed a center fielda, 
he’d be the rookie of the year. Ihe 
best tiling I heard cama from 
George KisseO, 40 years a Cardi- 
nal He says tins kid is the best 
rookie he's ever seen.” 

CHICAGO WHITE SOX 

Tony LaRussa sits on a chair 
outside the White Sax dugout in 
Sarasota, Florida, and compiles 
lineups for several days. Ihe white 
Sox may have more good rookies 
fr«n any other team mis year. 

LaRussa considers the fact that 
the White Sox plunged from first 
place to fifth, then traded LaMarr 


f and-CalvinSchiraldias- Hoyt-to the San Diego Phdres for 
stinting pitcher; Nelson four players: Tim Lollar and B31 
Long, both pitchers; Luis Salazar, 
third base and the oot- 


s as the chief backup in left 
’ tbe Detroit Tigers; Jose 
z at shortstop on the San 
co Giants; Herat Win- 
i in center field and Joe 
pitching for the Montreal 


who plays 
fidd, and his countryman and dose 
friend from Venezuela, a 21 -year- 
old rookie shortstop named Ozzie 
Guillen. 



UCLA, Indiana Gain the Final 
Of NIT Basketball Tourney 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Brad Wright 
scored 23 prims and keyed an 11-2 
surge that broke open the game in 
the final five minutes as UCLA's 
basketball team beat Louisville. 75- 
66, Wednesday night in the semifi- 
nals of the 48th National Invitation 
Tournament 

Tbe Bruins earned a berth in 
Friday night's championship 
at Madison Square Garden against 
Indiana, which earlier Wednesday 
evening beat Tennessee. 74-67. as 
Uwe Blab scored 24 points and 
Steve Alford got 23. 

UCLA led, 36-33, at intermis- 
sion and six times held nine-point 
leads before Louisville pulled even 
behind a run led by BiDy Thomp- 
son, who scored 16 prints. Thomp- 
son scored four straight points as 
the Cardinals made it 56-56 with 
5:30 left in the game. 

Then, in the last five minutes, 
Wright tori: charge, scoring six 
prints during the streak that gave 
UCLA a 67-58 lead with 1 :06 left 
T thought the difference in the 


seemed about to do the same 
against Indiana by rallying from a 
13-potm deficit early is the second 
half to take the lead midway 
through the period. But Indiana 
held off that furious charge with 
some dutch play by Blab and Al- 
ford. 

“Alford and Blab are the of- 
fense,” said Indiana's coach. Bob- 
by Knight. “If they’re off, we’re in 
trouble.” 

Knight also said this was per- 
haps one of the least-utlented 
teams he’s had at Indiana. 

“We're not a good team, but op- 
ponents will come at us as if we 
were in the top echelon,” Knight 
able 


_ _ o Indi- 

said. “We can blow leads— tonight ana a 68-65 cushion. Blab then 


its in the first half as Indiana 
a 40-30 lead at intermission. 
But Tennessee’s Tony While stared 
14 of his 22 points in the second 
half to rally ms team. The Volun- 
teers finally took the lead at 57-56 
with 9:54 left following a 9-0 streak 
keyed bv their sharp-shooting 
guard. 

There were four lead changes 
and two ties before the Hoosiers 
went ahead for good, at 66-64, on a 
basket by reserve Dan Dakich with 
4:49 left. 

White made a foul shot with 2:36 
remaining to bring Tennessee with- 
in a print before Blab sank two free 
throws with 1:52 left, giv 


we did. 

“We have a tendency to let ofF 
with the lead — that happened to- 
night — but we were lucky enough 
to turn it back on.” said Blab. 

The 7-foot-2 Blab scored 14 


blocked a shot by Michael Brooks 
with 28 seconds left and Indiana 
bolding a 68-67 lead. 

Then Alford took charge at the 
foul line, scoring five of 
last six points. 


Flyers 9 Streak Ends at 11 

game was Brad Wright,” said Lou- A tt 1C* A • n 1 

sffiff ffl&J5?fe 1 2S A* Hawks Score 4 m 3d 


Hu AaociDMrf ftw* 

and a teammate 


LoaisriDe^s BQly Thompson had to Ignore hands of Craig Jackson, right, 
in UCLA’s 75-66 semifinal victory. Indiana advanced by defeating Tennessee, 74-67. 


(110-meter) Wright 
10 of 1 1 shots, got 12 rebounds and 
blocked four shots. 

The first half was closely played, 
with UCLA bolding the biggest 
lead, of five prints. 

hfifid_Mignel scored 20 prints 
for UCLA, getting seven on foul 
shots in the final minute. The Bru- 
ins. 20-11 have won 11 of their last 
12 games. 

Tennessee, which was making a 
habit of thrilling comeback vic- 
tories in tbe NIT tournament. 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dapeidta 
CHICAGO — The Chicago 
Black Hawks brought the Philadel- 
phia Flyers back to earth Wednes- 
day nigbL 

The Flyers came into Chicago^ 
Stadium riding a heady 1 1-game 
winning streak, the fifth-lcmgest in 
NHL history, during which the 
rookie-laden team fluted with the 
league lead, briefly overtaking the 
defending Stanley Cup champion 
Edmonton Oilers. 


COREBOARD 


Basketball 


Hockey 


Standings 


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* 20 27 21 2»— ft 

. *4 23 34 25-114 

■«.«22, TOnay 4-1355 W; J.A»a- 
•H 22 . RoWnaon M2 MB M. R»- 
tetaofoii 53 (RdMmmi 101. PMto- 

- • (mjwmom mi. asms: 
'» ttaMraon S), PMtooaMMa 2* 


National Hockey League Standings 

VfALUS CONFER HNCE 
Patrick OtvUiM 

W L T Ptl GP GA 
x-PtilluMpNO 44 20 7 103 331 234 
k-Vtoshlnafon 43 33 * *5 302 225 

X-N.Y. IStondK* 3* 31 5 43 331 3*3 

N.Y. Ranaon 24 41 10 54 201 324 

Plttabunrfi 24 45 5 51 3SB 354 

Hem iewrt 30 45 9 4* 34S 314 

Adam UvislM 

N-Qin<WC 37 27 9 43 303 255 

X-Monlraot 34 27 11 43 277 247 

K-Saffato 34 24 14 42 271 223 

KhBMton 33 32 9 75 274 243 

Hortfora 27 34 9 43 251 302 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Ohrtsion 

*-St Loots 34 34 12 40 275 243 

x-Oltcnoo 34 3* 5 71 »1 Bt 

x-Oofrotr 25 39 II 41 2*3 347 

x-MfnMsata 24 40 12 « 2S3 304 

Toronfo 20 47 4 * 235 323 

SwyttK D WM w 

y-EOmonton 47 17 10 »4 344 344 

X-Wtantoes 43 27 7 91 339 314 

x-Colsarv 39 37 9 «7 343 3M 

x-Los AiwNof 32 30 13 77 334 304 

Vancouver 24 44 4 54 271 386 

{y-ctincned dlvMon IttteJ 
(x-dlncned ntovoff bertti] 

WIDKBMrs RESULTS 
CMtsrr 8 3 1-4 

LOS Anaete s 1 1 4— 1 

Kromm 0301, Covoinm (5L Bernan C3I. 

Seers (34); Mokasak (41, Diem <441. Sftetx 
an aeai: Caleery (on JanecvW 71-12-10—33; 

L> Angeles (on Edwards) M -4-34. 


8 2 1—3 
3 3 8—4 

Lsmleux ( 38 ), Lamooreux 3 ( 8 ), Young 
( 38 ); Adams ( 11 ), Htodins (U), Brtdomai 
( 21 ). Skats as Maf: New Jersey (on Henan) 
17 - 13 - 71 — 35 ; Pmskumh (on Rasdil 134 - 4 — 
25 . 

ILY. Ra nge r s 1 1 8-3 

BafWe 1 4 V-* 

Rvff (10), KMsisr 2 (l«) ; Wtanwr (6). Povb- 
tlen (13). Skats ae sea): N.Y. Rangers (on 
Sauva) 444-17; BoHalo tan Vonblesbreuckl 
11 -4-14—31. 

8 1 1-3 
8 1 4—5 

Seeord ( 13 ). T_Mumjy ( 35 ). LudiOc (IT), 
Larmar ( 44 ). Ganfewr (M); Prapp 3 ( 41 ). 
Skats an oaai: PtiltodetoNo (on Bannarmon, 
SieoradansM) 1 V 9 - 17 — 31 ; cmeana (an Und- 
beran) 1 M 4 -U- 3 B. 

stuxrii 1 0 1-3 

Taranto 1 1 3—4 

Gavin ( 12 ) .valve ( 34 ), Anderson 126 ). Dar- 
1090 ( 34 ); Mullen ( 34 ), Wilson U). Skats aa 
god: St. Louis (an BemftarcB] 5 - 17 - 14 — 32 ; 
Toronto (an MmenJ lMM-JB. 

1 1 1-3 
• 0 )— I 

Dinaen ( 23 ). Tureeon ( 29 ), Fronds ( 23 ); 
Gwtsftsan 03 ). spots aa paert: Hertford (on 
j 0 MS) 444 -> l 9 ;Washlnatan(anUwtllH 4 - 


X I w 
18 1-3 

Hawarctadc (49), Small (31), Bosdanan 
(31), NfU (9), MocLaon (39); Lantblar (SL 
Tontl OSLMcNab (21LSbats sa ooaJ: WlnnJ- 
peo («* Bradawl 14-8-18—32; Vancaaver (aa 
Hayward) 10-T1-11 — 32. 


Transition 


BASEBALL w 

Americas Le v o va 

TORONTO— opHoned Jotm CarulH and 
CNJn MeLnueMln, pIKhers. to la Syracuse of 


CINCINNATI — Sent Skeator Barnes. Tam 
Runnel t* Wade Rawdan, and Paul OTMNL 
loHeWsrs; TerrvMcGrKtcxrtcher; Scoff Ter- 
ry, rttcMT, aatf KM DanleU. ouffMifer. Io 
Bwlrml n ar Waauc train InaeomoUm tor reos- 
ilgnmenL 

HOUSTON— OaUonsd GJenn Davis, nrst 
ttcooman. to Twsm at fha IWfc Coast 


IDAHO STATE— Announced Ifw raslono- 
tton at MBce OMv.assWanf football ceodi, to 
taka a similar poNHan wHB tka Untvanttv M 
Tuba. 

INDIANA STATE- Named Jerry Bevceat- 
sbtanf football cooeH 

MICHIGAN TECH— Named Tam Donna 
looRxdf co odi 

PITTSBURGH— Armeunead Ihe rsslono- 
Hon of Judy Sower, women's basketball coo- 
dv 

TENNESSEE— Announced me raslanMbxi 
of Lorry MaradA axsbtaM fooiban cooefuto 

(Ok* a alnril or position at Artuna Slate. 


at xf : 

I. 34 34 38 3P-9S 

; „N3-42LBIrd4-llS'732f DOwWns 
1*. Rldwraim5-21 3^ 
jfe Batten S3 (McHMe 14), New 
- tennamx 38). AHtsb: Boston 27 
RtLtiew Jersey 21 OB d iardson 

*3 34 38 «-« 

XX XI 39 30— 99 

fa*4*34. atm io-is M31; Ket- 
*. 1*. FlemJna 7-71 3-3 14. Ita- 

. * B *oS4 (Levlnastanf). IndanaSO 
L Aunts: AfMMa 3D (Rivers 12). 
(Kefleea Si. 

x* xe 33 w-qn 

_ 38 M 14 3S— 727 

f" M «. Thomas 4-14 S-4 22; 
»L Sameaon 11-22 4-4 34. 
"tefMSS (OMhiwea 111, Detran 
^UI.AMhh: fttuttaa 33 (Lucas 

* (Thomas in. 


onmame&t 

hmisumu 

(Af New York) 
Te nn o me 47 
-ow**nw m 


BASKETBALL 

doeiMH Assodotien 

PHOENIX— pnestf woltor OovB. BuorU 
on me tnlurv list 

POOT BALL 


Exhibition Baseball 


INDIANAPOLIS — Traded Marti Herr- 
man. Quarterback, to San DMaelar a lutwm 
draff dwKt. 

VMM SMtt Football League 
LOS aNGELES R e M an ed Erie Tnomp- 
tM, nuuW rtwct Placed Trov West safety, 
on me Mtiirad raserve llsr. 

HOCKEY 

Melleu ef Hockey League 
BOSTO N R eac h ed 0 contract aoraement 
wftn MUcMel Thetven, detenseman. ler ttie 


COLLROS 
AUBURN— Announced Mat Sonny Senm. 
batfwttMtl ajocfwhwwtthdwin hla rtwnfr- 
IhA. 

AUSTIN PEA Y Ite W red Luke KeHV.I»- 


WEDNHSOAY^ RESULTS 
ptiitadeWMifa 4. St Louis 1 
ICensas CHy 4. Atlanta 2 
Montreal % Texas 3 
Taranto X dnctanaM 2 
Boston 8. CMcaaa wtdta Sax 7 
Houston 3, Loo Aneafes 1 
OtfcDOo Cubs 14 San Franddco 2 
Sen Diego 1. Seattle 1 
GoHtomH A Oakiand 8 

MllwautM 7. Cleveland 6. IS Innings 
Pittaburon A Detroit 3 
Bafttmore 2. N.Y. Yankees 1 
MlnneeDta A N.Y. Meta 8 


Soccer 


Colorado— N omad oihw Lucas ad 
*i.^ LBoan Bsotttont tootaoJl coodes 

hhIiUxik gncalmtPOsUlMi mhh te—n— at 
Ihe Cnnoaion FootbaH Uawta 
FURMAH-wcmed Georoe Estes totfcof- 

^GeORGlA TECH-NOmed Chta Wisdom 

iwiiM taA cooch. 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 


Betalum X Greece 0 



French first division 
A unmtBeslto l 


Lakers Make 
Sonics Bluer 

The Associated Pros 

SEATTLE — Kareem Abdul- 
Jabbar and Byron Scoit each 
scored 21 points Wednesday night 
as the Los Angeles Lakers routed 
the Seattle SuperSonics, 122-97. 
The Lakers had beaten the Super- 
Sorics only once in four previous 
games this season, but since center 

?qgAFoqjs 

Jack Skma was injured Seattle has 
lost four of five games, and only 
one of those losses has been by 
fewer than 15 points. 

Los Angeles, which had a 10- 
game winning streak ended Tries- 
day night in Portland, led all the 
way in this one-sided contest, as ax 
Lakers scored in doable figures. 

In' other games it was Atlanta 
125. Indiana 99; Boston 105, New 
Jersey 95; Philadelphia 1 IS, Wash- 
ington. 97; Detroit 127, Houston 
110: San Antonio 121, Golden 
State 120 and Utah 116, Dallas 
101. 

Early in the second quarter, the 
Somes made their only serious run, 
dosing to 42-36 as they outsoored 
the Lakers, 11-2, with Tern Cham- 
bers and Cory Blackwell each get- 
tha four prints. 

But the Lakers blitzed the Son- 
ics, 20-9, over the final 6 JO of ihe 
second quarter to post a 62-45 half- 
time lead. During that rally, Scott 
scored right of the 16 points he got 
toe first half. 

Seattle’s coach. Lenny WSkens, 
said the Lakers “took advantage of 
our young players.” 

■ 2 More Arrested at Tulane 

Two more Tulane University 
basketball players were arrested 
Wednesday in' connection with a 
print-shaving scandal that has 
shocked the university, and the 
New Orleans district attorney, 
Hany Connick, said it was “quite 
posable” there would be other ar- 
rests, The New York Times report- 
ed from New Orleans. 

John W illiams, the team's star 
senior center who was a likely first- 
round choice in the professional 
draft, was arrested Tuesday night 
and accused of shaving prints to 
affect the otneome of two Tulane 
basketball games last month. 
Wednesday morning, two other 
players, David Dominique, 19, a 
sqtoomnre from New Iberia, Loui- 
siana. and Bobby Thompson, 21, a 

senior from New Orleans, surren- 
dered to authorities. ^ They also were 
booked on violations of Louisiana 
sports bribery laws. 



Fefix Magath scored against Malta as West Germany won a World Cup qualifier, 6-0, in 
Saarbruecken. Wednesday night in Glasgow, Wales beat Scotland, 1-0, in a major upset 


But after the Black Hawks put an 
end to the streak with a 5-2 victory. 
Philadelphia's coach, Mike 

NHL FOCUS 

Keenan, said the loss might be a 
necessary “touch of reality ” 

“We’re not over confident and 
we’re not cocky at all, but this re- 
minds you how vulnerable you 
are;” said Keenan. “Yon would like 
to keep a streak like this going, but 
a touch of reality going into ihe 
playoffs may be better for us. 

“We had the effort,” Keenan 
said. “But it was just a matter of 
Ch i ca go having a good game a n d 
an inspired game.” 

In other games it was Buffalo 3, 
New York Rangers 2; Hartford 3, 
Washington 1; Pittsburgh 4, New 
Jersey 3; Toronto 4, Sl Louis 2; 
Winnipeg 5, Vancouver 3 and Cal- 
gary 4, Los Angeles 2. 

Steve LudzDe jammed in a re- 
bound at 7:34 of the final period, 
then the Black Hawks got two in- 
surance goals 28 seconds apart. 

Ludzik, playing on the Black 
Hawks’ fourth line, scored the 
game-winning goal after Rick Pat- 
erson’s 10-foot wrist shot was 
kicked out by the Flyers' netmind- 
er, Pelle Lindbergh. 

Ludzik, standing just outside the 
crease, got the rebound and beat 
Lindbergh on the stick side for his 
11th goal this season. It came less 
thaw a minu te after Philadelphia’s 
Brian Propp had made it 2-2. 

Propp’s goal, his 41st of (he sea- 
son and second of tbe game, sent 
Chicago's goalie, Murray Banner- 
man slumping to the Ice with a 
cramped leg muscle. Warren Skor- 
odenski replaced Bannerman and 
teammates Steve Lanner and Billy 
Gardner provided some breathing 
room when they tallied at 16:30 
and 16:58, respectively. (UPI, AP) 


Some Choice Comments on Some Choice Events 


By Scott Ostler 

Lea Angela Times Service , 

LOS ANGELES —News item: Defensive 
end Jack Youngblood of the Rams rejects 
doctors’ recommendation that he undergo 
back surgery before playing football again. 

Comment: Fortunately it is only Jack’s 
spine, not something serious like a finger or 
appendix. 

Actually, Youngblood sought a second 
opinion, and will undergo treatment recom- 
mended by noted orthopedic specialist Matt 
bfiDea. 

The MUIen treatment consists of putting 
whatever body part hurts you into a carpen- 
ter’s vise and yanking it around until it feds 
better. 

Caution, for yon kids at home: This treat- 
ment is not recommended for eye injuries. 

O 

News item: After a disappointing *84 sea- 
son. Cedi Cooper, the Milwaukee Brewers’ 
first baseman, joins the non-talkers. He won’t 
talk to die press this season, in order to avoid 
that “distraction.” 

Comment: This vrin free Cooper to do the 
important things ballplayers do to get ready 
to play, such as play cards, open mail, play 
loud music on load-music players, chew to- 
bacco, spit tobacco juice on the floor, and 
change shoes. 


Good lock, Cec. If not talking to the media 
improves your performance, let me know. I 
might try it myself next season. 

□ 

News item: Tire Los Angeles Lakers’ Mi- 
chael Cooper injured on dance floor, out for 
season. 

Comment: If you missed this item, it is 
became it is just bring reported now. Cooper 
was among the celeb raters at a 40 th birthday 
party for his coach, Pat Riley, at a swank, 
nightclub. 

Somehow, Cooper stumbled and fell to the 
dance floor, clutching his right knee. Riley 
and the team doctor, Steve Lombardo, 
rushed to Cooper’s tide. Lombardo instantly 
diagnosed a serious knee injury. 


two 

co-conspirator Lombardo and boogied 
across the dance floor. 

□ 

News item: David Bey, in a press confer- 
ence after losing to Lany Holmes, claims he 
was weakened by a cold. 

Comment: A weak alibi, al best Once 
again the sport of boring is embarrassed by 
its failure to install an efficient system erf 
prefight examination and certification of ex- 
cuses and alibis. 

Fighters should be required to fiD out a 
: form, something like this: “Check any 


and all of the fofl owing items that apply to 
your present condition: overtrained, under- 
txained, detached retina, detached spatula, 
sore hand, dislocated spleen, malaria, dan- 
druff ” 

Too many fighters are stepping into the 
ring poorly prepared for post-fight alibi- mak- 
ing, and lfs tune for reform. 

□ 

News item: U.S. Football League atten- 
dance down. 

Comment: It is time for the USFL to make 
the switch to indoor football. That would cut 
overhead, since the game would be seven- 
man football, and cheerieading squads could 
be cut ’in half. Moving indoors would also 
boost scoring, since tbe field would be 40 
yards long. 

Also, with a Plexiglass wall around the 
field, there would be no running out of 
bounds to avoid tackles. 

Sure it sounds Hke a radical move, but look 
what switching to a smaller, indoor format 
did for the popularity of such sports as soccer 
and bonding. 

□ 

News item: The National Football League 
announces that it wil) experiment with use of 
TV instant replays to aid officials. 

Comment: Leave ii to tire NFL to pounce 
on a great, new idea. 







wsiWJB wi 



Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 198S 


OBSERVER 


Onsets of Jogging Envy Actor Ken ' A ^ Qear *“8 

Himmen * - 7 • IBBH frliTL I couMn'i connect 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I suffer long 
bouts or envy. The latest set in 
a few months ago when somebody 
said Cary Grant bad just bad his 
80 th birthday, or was about to have 
his 80th birthday, or whatever — I 
forget — but it had to do with Cary 
Grant being in the vicinity of 80/ 
I immediately collapsed into 
envy, which is nasty stuff. It not 
only makes you unhappy with 
yourself, it makes you angry at the 
object of your envy, who is proba- 
cy a perfectly decent perm as I 
assume Cary Grant is. 

Nevertheless, the news about his 
octogenarianism instantly threw 
me into a fit of sour envy. What 
right did Cary Grant have to look 
better at 80 than I had az 30? 

I have had trouble all my life 
with Cary Grant At 18 1 wanted to 
know why Cary Grant was entitled 
to a dimpled smile while 1 had to 
put up with a cowlick and ears like 

antenna rticfyts 

And now here was this cup of 
gall about Cary Grant at 80. All 
right. Cary Grant. I said to myself. 
I’ve had enough of your superior- 
ity. And I began a long-term pro- 
gram that would eventually make 
me look as good at 60 as Cary 
Grant had looked at 80. 


Thus the following week found 
me joining the neighbors who trot 
around and around and around the 
block at dawn, an hour I have al- 
ways considered fit only for fixing 
squads and snoring. 

On the third morning during the 
10th circuit of the block, my Cary 
Grant envy ceased abruptly. “Be 
honest," I urged myself. *You can 
roll out at dawn for the rest of your 
life and still not look as good at 60 
as Cary Grant does at SO — am I 

rightr 

I had to agree that I was, but next 
morning I rolled out again anyhow. 
Why? I had moved into another 
form of envy. This was inspired by 
the extraordinary number of trot- 
ters who wore headsets linked to 
cassette players. 

What were these people listening 
to? I could imagine. Some, I fig- 
ured, were gulping down entire 
courses in music appreciation: Vi- 
valdi’s greatest hits, Wagner's Ni- 
behmgenlied digested for joggers. 
Others, no doubt, were taking 


taped IBM, Du Pout or General 
Motors. 

I envied these people for their 
efficient use of time. I had always 
wanted to run IBM — I don't know 
why, except that I'd always liked 
the idea of being introduced as “the 
man who runs IBM," so I could 
then say, “And would you believe I 
can't tell a transistor from a trans- 
vestite?" 

This particular envy prompted 
me to mm out at dawn for another 
wok. Now L too, had a headset 
clamped to my ears. In one ear I 
listened to “Mendelssohn for Be- 
ginners,’’ in the other a condensa- 
tion of the best-selling “Creative 
Accounting and Plea-Bargaining 
Your Way to the Top." 

That was not all. In my hand I 
carried a portable telephone, ready 
to do business in an instant. My 
family said, “What business? 
Who’s up at dawn except joggers 
and policemen finishing the grave- 
yard shift?” 1 pointed out that at 
dawn the London gold market had 
already been open for hours. 

□ 

“But you're a complete idiot 
about markets of all kinds,” said a 
family member who prides herself 
on candor. Her observation was 
responsible for my next onset of 
envy, since it started me reading the 
Wail Street news to leant about 
markets. 

My idea, you see, was to surprise 
her by coming back one dawn to 
announce that Fd phoned Loudon 
and bought a quart or two of gold 
while jogging past Swenson's news- 
stand. 

Well, of course, in the Wall 
Street news I learned about the 
people who raided the Phillips Pe- 
troleum Co. 

Talk about envy! “Why are these 
people entitled to make milli ons 
raiding Phillips Petroleum when I 
don’t even know what Phillips Pe- 
troleum is?” I cried. 

If I had known, S140 milli on 
could have been mine instead of 
these other two fellows’. But what 
would I do with $140 milli on? Buy 
a two-bedroom apartment with a 
window in Manhattan, of come. 
That would still leave a little. Sever- 
al milli on possibly. Might be 
enough to get me outfitted by Cary 
Grant’s taflor. 

Nete York Times Service 


By Christine Chapman 

T OKYO — Tm an actor’s 
actor, not a star. I’m not like 
John Wayne or Toshiro Mifune," 
said Ken Ogata, who at 47 is 
much admired in Japan as a film, 
stage and television actor. He 
should sotm become known to 
Western audiences for his role as 
Yukio Mishima in a U.S. film 
about the celebrated novelist who 
committed ritual suidde in Tokyo 
in 1970. 

“Mishima," which will pre- 
miere at (he Cannes International 
Film Festival in May, will add a 
new dimensi on to Ogata’s gallery 
of virile characters — the strong, 
usually silent type who says more 
through action than through 
words. 

“In film I have to have a tight, 
clear image, a control of the per- 
son Tm playing. Otherwise, 1 be- 
come invisible." Ogata said, add- 
ing, “Films capture the spirit. On 
the stage I have to push myself, 
my spirit, onto the audience.” 

A stage actor since his appren- 
tice days in 1958 with Smnkoku 
Geld, a troupe born of the trend 
toward realistic drama, Ogata has 
worked in film as well throughout 
his career. 

He stayed with Shinkoku Geki 
for 10 years, being trained by 
Ryu taro Tatsumi and Shogo Stn- 
mada, who he said gave mm his 
“backbone as an actor.” He 
played a boxer in a I960 movie, 
but his first popular break did not 
come until 1965. Then, on NHK, 
the national television network, 
he played the title role in a histori- 
cal drama about Hideyoshi, the 
Iate-I6th-cratuiy mfiitaiy ruler of 
Japan. 

Daring the past 10 years Ogata 
has acquired a reputation in mov- 
ies as the most versatile of all 
Japanese actors,” said Donald Ri- 
chie. a Western authority on Jap- 
anese cinema. Ogata is the only 
man to have won the Japanese 
Academy Award for best actor 
twice: in 1978 for “KichuDni" or 
“A Brute of a Man," and ih 1983 
for his role as a farmer who aban- 
dons his aged mother on a moun- 
tain in “The Ballad of Nar- 
ayama,” which won the Palme 
d'Or at Cannes that year. 

Ogata is a talented, imagina tive 
performer with “an extraordinary 
co mmand of technique,” Richie 
said. The actor’s naturalistic style 
closely reflects the Japanese idea 




Ogata in the role of Yukio Mishima. 


of what a certain type of man 
must be like: the superstitious 
fanner bowing to the customs of 
his village, a common gangster in 
“Vengeance is Mine," a tyranni- 
cal, womanizing husband in pre- 
war Japan in the recent “Kai 
and now a famous novelist ob- 
sessed with the idea of a spectacu- 
lar death. 

To play or act naturally is the 
most difficult thing to do," Ogata 
said during a long interview in a 
coffee shop across from the NHK 
studios, where he was making a 
prison film, playing what he 
called a “Steve McQueen- type." 
“Being an actor is not to express 
one's thought in words but rath- 
er in action. There are so many 
things I can tell in movement but 
not in words." 

Personable and entertaining, 
Ogata is aware erf the impact of 
restrained, and comic, gestures. 
He uses pauses often to heighten 
effect His eyes are his strongest 
instr umen t of expression. He has 
an athletic body, the muscles de- 
liberately weli-devdoped for tire 
Mishima role. To prepare to be 
Mishima, who transformed his 


slender physique into a nmsratfar 
one when he was 30, Ogata under- 
went a body-bufldmg program. 

“When I saw the rushes,” 
Ogaia said, grinning, “I was sur- 
prised that I had a beautiful body. 
I didn’t look Hke myself. But the 
most difficult thing to create s 
something in the head, not the 
physical. ‘What is he thinking?’ 
was the problem.” 

Ogaia decided: “He was think- 
ing how to die beautifully.” 

Playing Mishima was grueling, 
he said. “It pul grey in my hair 
and hurt my eyesight. After trying 
the suidde scene for 20 times," he 
said, demonstrating with a gri- 
mace, “all of a sudden 1 couldn't 
read the papers. I put every possi- 
ble strength into tins film, every- 
thing I learned in acting." 

He tells with relish erf being 
offered the pan by the American 
director Paul Schrader. At first, 
he said, Schrader looked for a 
Mishima lode-alike. He talked to 
50 actors. 

“I was number 5 1," Ogata add- 
ed wryly. 

“When they announced the 


film, ! couldn't connect myself 
with it Look at my face,” he in- 
sisted, twisting it with his hands. 
“I don’t look like Mishima. When 
Paul called roe, we talked for one 
hour. Usually if s 10 minutes with 
a director, I read the scenario 
three times before I made up my 
mindL l was touched, Ifs the most 
beautiful I have ever seen." 

The script by Paul Schrader 
mid his brother Leonard is com- 
posed of episodes from Mishina's 
life and from his novels. It depicts 
him as a man who tried to make 
his life and death an art form. 
Since the novels tend to be auto- 
biographical, contriving his life 
into a drama was the natural pro- 
gression for Mishima. 

In a biography, The Life and 
Death of Yukio Mishima," Henry 
Scon Stokes, comparing the Japa- 
nese novelist to Andrfc Gide. 
wrote that, for both, it was “im- 
possible perhaps to put a distance 
between themselves and their 
work.” Scon Stokes, who knew 
Mishima during ihc last few years 
of his life, said he “endlessly re- 
hearsed his own death" in his 
novels and in two films in which 
his character committed hara- 
karL 

A devotee of the bloody samu- 
rai ethic, a rightist who harangued 
Japan about its indifference to the 
imperial system, Mishima had 
crossed the line between fiction 
and reality. At age 45 be disem- 
boweled himself Before members 
of his private army who then, on 
his orders, decapitated him. 
Many Japanese, including Eisaktt 
Sato, then prime minister, called 
him mad; many still do. 

Ogata said Schrader chose him 
for the part because he, Ogata, 
had “a writer’s eyes and could 
create lunacy, kyoki .” 

“Bat my Mishima is not crazy” 
he added. “He was a seeker of 
beauty, in bis literature and in his 
daily life. That's how I played 

him" 

His performance does not sug- 
gest the writer's homosexuality, 
Ogata said. “1 myself don’t act as 
a homosexual The novels touch 
on it subtly." The script drama- 
tizes erotic scenes from the novels 
in which both men and women 
appear. 

Schrader says “Mishima” is an 
American film despite its Japa- 
nese cast and lines, which will 
require English subtitles. Ogata is 



Ogata: “Actor's actor. 

nor sure “This film is certainly 
American-made, but as long as 
I'm in it, it’s a Japanese ‘Mi- 
shima.’ For example. Paul insist- 
ed 1 use more hand movement. I 
said, ’No, I won’t do «C He insist- 
ed, I resisted. It's an international 
film." 

The film may not be released in 
Japan. Not only is Mishima not a 
hero to the average Japanese, but, 
trying to protect her husband's 
reputation. Yoko Mishima, disap- 
proves of the script, though she 
agreed to the project at first. Fur- 
ther, the extreme right may object 
to the portrayal of Mishima's fa- 
naticism 

One indication that there is in 
fact pressure from somewhere is 
that the film was not nominated 
for entry in the first Tokyo Inter- 
national Film Festival, sdieduled 
for May 31 through June 9. 

Warner Brothers will release 
the film in the United States and 
Europe during the summer and 
fall according to FUmlink. but 
Toho-Towa, which owns the dis- 
tribution rights in Japan, remains 
undecided. 

Ogata said he believed the Jap- 
anese opposition would end after 
Cannes. He plans to attend the 
festival with Schrader. 

Ogata sees Mishima as “a seek- 
er of beauty," and himself as a 
good actor. “A good actor has the 
heart of a child.” he said. “He has 
eyes that can see what beauty is.” 


Christine Chapman is a Tokyo- 
based writer who specializes in cul- 
tural matters. 


people ! 0 

UcmardoSttyCrfL 

Funded for Los jhM 

Arnutod Hammer, the .* 

isx, has put up SI maWE 
lish a research center at then- X* 
stiy of California in Lot A r t 
that wiQ specialize in ti* I l 

Leonardo da Vinci. *\ [ • * 

ter undoubtedly wiS ta&t l f ,»l I i » 
the pre-enm*era center f«tv I ip 
do studies in the United M’J’I 
throughout the world," $3 ‘ 
man of Occidental Petti.. 

Corp. said, adding that head “ 

vide scholars access to 3fe| 
do drawings and nanosajpg 
private coHectwns. 


Jonathan Yardky of dfcl 
ington Post compikda^B 
10 books be believes coctfi ' 
the most to American com ' . 
list, published in America! s 
rage magazine, did nolimS/'/ 
Bible, dictionaries. vcxtixxS 
dren's books or anytirinjfffi 
eign writer, YanttcyYiap,' 
order of publication: "Wsffe 
Htnrv David Tborean; 

Grass," Walt Whitman; % 
Dick, or Street Life in Net* 
Horatio Alger, The Adveni- 
Huckleberry Finn." tVtop 
“The Boston Cooking^ 
Cookbook," Fume Fxreat 
Theory of the Leisure ClasC. 
stein Vebien; “The Scads <rf 
Folk," by W.E.B. Du Bqj 
Our Tune," Ernest Heath 
“How to Win Friends . - 
race People." Dale Caiaegi 
“The Common Sense Book a 
and Child Core." by Dr.M . 
Spodc. Yardley, who recrit 
Pulitzer Prize for doting . 
criticism in 1981. said: 
idea what son of nation we. - 
be had they never beat puli ’ 
Yardley said only four of 
books has any genuine litem ' 

it—' “Walden.* “Leaves otf- 
“Huckleberry Finn" and " 
Time." but 'said the 
“helped shaped that vagwtf- * 
lessly fascinating creature 
the American character." v* 

f.-P— 

□ 

Several thousand icrq r .-- 
chanting fans greeted nxtytf 
chad Jackson Thursday j 
dame Tussaud’s wax min 
the unveiling of a wax figur 
pop star. Meanwhile, wi 
dread year of 1984 now ate 
George OrweTs statue tit 
removed and is being shq ' 
the museum's reserve ccto 
southwest England. 


fli 1 



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REAL ESTATE 
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HOUIGATE 1M PARS old house with 
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REAL ESTATE REAL ESTAT 

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TAX SERVICES 

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COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 

OUtSKHOS OF PARIS. PANTO, fart 
warehouse about 1000 sqm. Metro, 
circular rood. A4 highway. 260 89 5£ 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

EARN 25% - 35%. Invest fa 90 . 2701 
day negeftafafa COtnmerad paper 
notes. Write AOed IM, POtT®.| 
Hrtrisopburg, Vrginia ^01. U&A. 


mnsanr— or bwess 

92200 PWJy. Tefc 111 747 51 48. 

PrailJ GERMANV 

sqm. on 3/50 sqm. W PossMty to CONVm YOiaU^. $ now & invest 
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ANJOU great Britain 

ewe^reqwr.— r,» 

Ttswwmhr 

SECSCUSS 


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! • CAP INllrii. bonoriaws fa the beam ' ■ 
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x 30ft, fcxge kitchen 18R - ■ 
rape. 9? year Uoee. OJ - 
everenas London 580 4M1, .. 
493 9W1. 

UTT1£ VBACEREOBICY.* • 
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Q BtL Jean Meanaz. 4703, weekdays 499 9WTr 





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lain, surface, refined decoration. 
1 ha part let Paris 296 95 52 


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[Utq 0250 SOU fer ^ 

UWOONL IMR OMR-' - 
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IRSIOIIC MANSION Hre ' - 
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■ ssisacB&a SIS 


dbiBBW.'. 



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PAGE 4 
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more HOUDAY ft T1AVR ADS 
PUASE TORN TO 
PAGE IW 

TO THE WEEKEM) SECTION 


Am. E. Zola, 1 A3 rarer . .; 
kitchen, fridgr Tit 577 73^ 

gheatbrita 
BBi PLAZA HOTBt^‘1 . 

■* 


SI 000 denooenriiore. No maxunum. 
Foreign oKhaue MrvtOfi ovofiobfe. 
Cash America mmend Center, P-Q- 
Ba> 1987, Knemwe, a 32742 USA . 
Telex: 803848 STEED OSS. 

UNQUE CHANCE For ponidpariore , 
fanewtighfawlftxhianandciQaBo- 
ryfitMforwrtnan&mea Partly ready . 



peny. Mate oners upher i 

119, PuUatoh Q+7001 OWE 




PV Anatordoin/TidemaWrBai 86, 
3022 SM Rotterdam 


Worldwide Areruss Centert horseback nekna, rafS^SS pr^I 

isSL sstSS zasjB&tHsi 

Tefc 47 04. Thi 642504. rentresinPbns&FreivLifiuiam 


mites. Hght from Pin 



horsebadt ndfaa, raffing end private 
visits to vtneyarfr cheese form s , mon- 
uments and eraft workshops. We oho 
omj ptwtde private guides, ihavf- 


VAN CLEEF & ARPEI >1 

— woiu.n kamhi s jew e.i.s ah,'' — | 
EXCM MVK JK\VKl> A W A K 11 * ' 


75Q08- Tefc 35947 04. Thu 642504. rentAfaftAft Frond. ftriire. Q± 

YOUR OfflGE TO PARS: TSEK. ^ P««het^ 6 to Frim- 
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errands, mOm. kve 24H/day. 285 42 82, tic 641055 PU0U 

TeL PM 1 6 OT 9595. Ji2 ?uni 


LONDON 

lift NEW flOMI MKEi E, 
TEL.: Ol-tOl Um Ol’KN "A 1 » »** 



f marine nar Ol forint. 73 rue de PEvanvile 75018 Paris. 




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