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•‘Global N< 

Edited 

„ '-Muted Smul - 

■w.- pari*. London, Zurit 
'si ‘iong Kongi Singapore, 

'ie Hag ue and Maiseule 

M DATA a W6A* ON PAGE 16 


11 era lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Published With Hie New York Times and Hie Washington Post 


tribune 


M,759 


* * 


PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


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S.- Japan Trade Rift Widens 

yo’s Decision to Raise Auto Exports Incenses Senators 


r Peter T. Kilbom 

,*» York Times Service 

HINGTON —After years 
•ctm g and posturing by the 
States over the spread of 
■■ e goods in the U.S. market 
- lade of access by the Unit- 
■ s to the Japanese market, 

' ~~ CTS ANALYSIS ~ 

■■Nations between the two 
\ js appear to be at boding 

>t formally approved Hiurs- 
increase in its voluntary 
' auto exports to the United 
3 24J percent for tb e year 
on Monday. The current 
''i.'- 1.85 miHion cars a year. 

i Japanese hoped that (Ms 
’• efuse some of tbe acrimony 

• ide. They woe under no 
; meat to impose any Hunt 
•• eed, die Reagan adminis- 
. earlier this month said it 
; iot pressure Japan for an 
•not the controls. 

ringress saw no concession 
n*s move. Moreover, the 

• e fated to deal with the 



John C Danforth 


th Africa 
isMeetmgs 
Opposition 
^ causations 


principal U.S. objection to then- 
trade policies: their reluctance to 
open Japanese markets to US. 
goods in the way that the United 
States is open to Japanese prod- 
ucts. 

The Senate wasted no time in 
passing a unanimous resolution 
Thursday accusing Japan of unfair 
practices. It was a stunning com- 
ment on a dose political ally, say- 
ing in effect that Congress has had 
enough of Japan’s trade potidss. 

Tbe anti-Japanese rhetoric in 
Washington is more extreme than 
in any previous trade dispute with 
Japan. Congress has “nm out of 
patience,** said Senator Bob Pack- 
wood, the Oregon Republican who 
is chairman of the Senate Finance 
Committee. He said the Japanese 
“have dallied and stalled and lied 
to us." 

“It is very acute, more acute," a 
Japanese diplomat in Washington, 
Hidehiro Konno, said of the new 
tension over trade. 

What infuriates Congress is the 
fact that Japan’s commercial suc- 
cesses have begun to undermine the 
broad U.S. economy — not just 
Detroit and the steel industry but 
the young high-technology indus- 
tries as wdL 

The U.S. trade deficit with Japan 
— the excess of imports of such 
Japanese products as autos, ma- 


fy Alan Cowell 

' ew York Tones Service 

tNNESBURG — South 
* authorities, facing a crias 
st in the nation's black 
x, temporarily outlawed 
ty meetings by the United 
_ iticFrout and 28 other op- 
. (Hgamzafions in the East- 
''t region and near Johan- 

United Democratic Front is chincr ? ***» recorders over 


govern- 

rlinmen- 



exports of American-made goods 
to Japan —jumped to $36.8 Whan 
last year from $21.7 billion in 1983. 
That accounted for almost a third 
of the entire U.S. trade deficit last 
year. ' 

Japan appears insensitive to U.S. 
concern, as is demonstrated by its 
decision on car shipments. 

“I think if s outrageous and ab- 
solutely dumb in this atmosphere," 
Jack Albertiue, president of the 


^..regarded as tbe 
vfflmdpal, nonpar 
taient. South African com- 
! the ban was almost 
i the fronfs status 
Sty among opponents 
'rule. ■ 

Beyers Naude, 

^ecretttyof the South Afri- 

- ndl of Churches, termed 

- "an act of desperation on 
. jf the government to stem 

rf liberation." 
m cm meetings, which rep- 
i tightening of a wide- 
.'Smpdown on dissent, is to 
■; a effect for three months. 

'• on, Louis LeGnuige, min- 
bw and order, banned ef- 
] persuade penile to stay 

ZtSS&FgSi Master of the 

• two days, threatening an 

fromgatherings organized SC316 

Jnitea Democratic Front, ° 


American Business Conference, a 
Washington-based association tbar 
is committed to free trade, said of 
the Japanese derision 

What has been most grating is 
Japan’s refusal to return the presi- 
dent's favor of not pressing for a 
renewal of automobile quotas. 

An opportunity to let the quotas 
expire has arisen with b ilatera l ne- 
gotiations over access to tbe Japa- 
nese market for US. telephone and 
telecommunications hardware. Af- 
ter months of tall-a and with a 
deadline on Sunday, however, the 
Commerce Department delegation 
reports that the Japanese refuse to 
discuss much more than general- 
ities. 

Significantly, the sponsor of 
Thursday’ s Senate resolution was a 
moderate Republican, John C 
Danforth of Missouri. He, like oth- 
er prominent Republ ic an senators 
such as John H. Chafee of Rhode 
Island and Mr. Packwood, are lib- 
erals on trade. But they see the 
American experience in trade with 
Japan as a one-way street 
“There is a growing sense that no 
matter what is negotiated, the re- 
sults are going to be efurive,” Mr. 
Danforth said. “One way or anoth- 
er. the Japanese win. They always 
rind a way to maximize their ex- 
ports and nrniffnizff their imports." 

“What is free trade?" asked Wi- 
liam K. Krist, a lobbyist for the 
electronics industry and a former 
deputy U.S. trade representative in 
the Reagan adm i n is t r a ti on “is it 
free trade for one country to be 
open and for another country to 
say if s open but isn’t?” 

Nevertheless, Mr. Krist and oth- 
er trade experts here concede that 
Japan is only part of the canse of 
the widening US. deficit in foreign 
trade. 

“The trade imbalance is due to 
many factors,” said Yuji Breda, a 
counselor for economic affairs at 
the Japanese Embassy in Washing- 
ton. He cited the dollar’s value and 
the fast pace of the U-S. economic 
recovery, which provided a hoge 
market for other countries. Japan, 
he added, is the biggest importer of 
U.S. goods after fimada 
Whatever the flaws of the Ameri- 
can economy, the Senate’s 92-0 ac- 
tion Thursday suggests that the 
United States means to press for 
trade concessions of a sort that Ja- 
panhas refused to make in tbepnsi. 

Steps to ease restrictions will be 
introduced on April 9, it was 
announced in Tokyo. Page 1L 



The Portuguese finance minister, F rafini Lopes, left, with 
tbe Spanish and Italian foreign mmisters, Fernando Morin 


Rw AoocuMd Pima 


and Gioiio Andreotti, and commission president Jacques 
Delors, after Spain and Portugal agreed to join the EC 


Sa/tzetaJds Elected Greek President on Narrow Vote 


By Henry Kamm 

New York Times Service 

ATHENS — Supreme Court 
Justice Christos -Sartzetakis, the 
candidate of the governing Social- 
ist Party, was elected president of 
Greece on Friday with tbe mim- 
mum number of required votes in a 
special session of Parliam ent 

The narrow margin made the re- 
sult less than a triumph for the 
g ov e rnm ent of Prime Minister An- 
dreas Papandreou. The opposition 
leader, Constantine Mhiotafcis, an- 
nounced that his New Democracy 
Party did not recognize the election 
because one vote was invalid. 

Mr. Sartzetakis, 56, was elected 
to take the place of Constantine 
CamnanHs, 78, who had been pres- 
ident for five years and had served 
as prime minister for 14 years. 

Mr. Papandreou set off a politi- 
cal crisis on March 9 when — to tbe 
surprise of Mr. raramanKs and 
most of the rest of Greece — Jie 
proposed the candidacy of Justice 
Sartzetakis to the Socialist Central 
Committee and parliamentary cau- 
cus. 

The derisive ballot Friday 
cast by the acting president, is 



was 

annis 


Christos Sartzetakis 

Akvras. The opposition challenged 
this as.unconshtutimjal, but the So- 
cialist majority voted last week that 
Mr. Yanms could vote while serv- 
ing as interim chief of state. 

Mr. Mifsotakis said be would not 
attend the new president’s inaugu- 


ration Saturday and would have no 
contact with hrm 

Parliament voted in a tumult of 
angry recriminations, hanging of 
desk tops and constant ringing of 
the speaker's bell for silence. New 
Democracy deputies objected to 
the ballot papers, which virtually 
precluded the secret voting that the 
constitution calls for. 

The ballots for Justice Sartze ta- 
bs, the sole candidate, were blue. 
White ballots indicated a blank 
vote. Since the deputies at dose to 
each other, no one could put his 
ballot in its envelope with the cer- 
tainty that his neighbors did not 
know how he was voting. 

“It is unacceptable at this great 
hour, when we are called an to 
make such great dwarifms that the 
voting be secret,” said Mr. Papan- 
dreou in reply to Mr. Mitsotalris’s 
challenge. Secret voting for presi- 
dent is specified in the 1975 consti- 
tution. 

. - Mr. Papandreou issued a state- 
ment praising the election as a 
“great victory for democracy” 

Despite the colored ballots, po- 
ll deal analysts believed that one or 
two of the Socialist deputies man- 


aged to circumvent strict party dis- 
cipline and withhold positive votes. 

The count was 180 votes for the 
candidate, five ballots invalid and 
one blank. Tbe 1 12 New Democra- 
cy members refused to participate. 
Of the 188 other deputies, the 12 
Communist members and 5 leftist 
independents were considered sure 
votes far Justice Sartzetakis. Ibis 
suggests that only 163 of the 16S 
Socialists supported the candidate. 

Two earlier rounds of balloting 
since March 17 ended inconclusive- 
ly when Justice Sartzetakis fdl 
short of the 200 voles required in 
the initial rounds. If he had not 
obtained 180 votes Friday, Parlia- 
ment would have been automati- 
cally dissolved and general elec- 
tions called for May. Parliament’s 
term expires in October, 

Mr. Caramanlis’s removal has 
deeply upset the moderale-to-con- 
servative sector of the electorate 
and worried Greece’s allies in the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion and the European Cominuni- • 
ty. They considered the former 
president the most effective re- 
straint on the leftist Mr. Papan- 
dreon’s tendency to distance 
Greece from its Western allies. 


EC Hails 
Entry of 
2 Nations 

Spam, Portugal 
Agree to Terms, 
End 8-Year Talks 

By Steven I. Drvden 

International HeraU Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Spain and Portu- 
gal accepted terms of entry to the 
European Community early Fri- 
day, right years after applying for 
membership. 

Community leaders immediately 
opened a summit meeting and be- 
gan discusring the remaining ob- 
stacle to the accord, a veto threat 
by Greece. 

The agreement, which will ex- 
pand the EC to 12 members, was 

In Spain and Portugal there is a 
sense of history in the making 
and the end to isolation. Page 2. 

hailed by the Italian foreign minis- 
ter. Giulio Andreotti, as proof that 
the community is a "living reality 
with a future." 

Mr. Andreotti. who chaire d the 
ministers’ meeting, said the agree- 
ment was particularly important 
because continued difficulties 
“might have created an image of 
weakness and crisis in the commu- 
nity.” 

The agreement came after sever- 
al last-minute negotiating sessions 
dealt with, among other issues, the 
terms under which Spain's huge 
fishing fleet would enter communi- 
ty waters, theintroduction of Span- 
ish agricultural products in EC 
markets and tbe rights of Spanish 
and Portuguese woikeis to jobs in 
other community nations. 

The accord allowed the two-day 
summit by £C heads of state and 
government to go ahead as planned 
Friday afternoon. 

Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dreou immediately reiterated 
Greece's threat to veto the agree- 
ment if it did not receive enough 
X ihe 


Marc Chagall, 
97, Is Dead; 


Front, 

■ by the Azanian Students 
dun, the Black Students 
at and' the Congress of 
focan Students were also 
L Thebans represent virtu- 
taket prohibition on gatb- 
^here thc authorities are 
becriticized. 

t flared, meanwhile, in dis- 
«rts of tbe nation, with 
tttamen reporting vdri- 
M hi Alexandra, close to 

■to?* 5 • WeaI * y nortitcrn 

ten in Grtof^ein^in 
*o Cape, which is in the 
> part of the country and 
oafocus of recent unrest 
.-rackdown followed by 

the ki l li n g by police erf 
Jasons near the southern 
Jucnhage, an act that has 

the confrontation be- 
; government and its op- 

dkaal inquiry Friday into 
ft a white police officer 
■among those who opened 
sstimoay that contradict- 
.»tnjt presented in Fariia- 
Vfr. LcGrangp on the day 
AKiog. 


The Associated Press 

ST.-PAUL-DE-VENCE. France 
— Mate Chagall, 97, one of the 
century's major artists, collapsed 
and died at his home here Thursday 
night in southern France. 

“He died naturally as a man 
worn out,” said Jean-Louis Prat, a 
friend of ChapalL Mr. Prat said he 
visited tbe artist earlier in the week 
and found him working in his stu- 
dio. “He had stopped painting sev- 
eral months ago, but be continued 
to work on drawings and also wa- 
tered ors.” 

A Sense of Fantasy 
And landmark Images 

By John Russell 

Ate*- York Times Service 

NEW YORK. — During the sec- 
ond half of this century, Chagall 
bad arrived at something close to 
ubiquity with his images that had 
an almost universal potency. He 
was a master erf large-scale com- 
missions that have left s permanent 
mark on the cities in which they 
were located. 

The first thing seen when one 



Shultz Says U.S. Would Meet Halfway 
With Russians at Geneva Arms Talks 


SStt? - >■ -s? IE “ ltata 


ft. AaoaoStd Pnoj/1077 

Marc Chagall at bis home in the south of France. 


®ned with stones, sticks 
®e bombs had attacked a 
patrol in a single 
fifci forcing police to open 

taed on Page 2, CoL 7) 


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are the huge 
morals that be made for the Metro- 
politan Opera in 1965. 

His “Four Seasons” mosaic far 
the First National Bank in Chica- 
go, his mosaics and tapestries for 
the Knesset in Jerusa l e m , his ceil- 
ing painting for the Paris Opera, 
the museum of his biblical paint- 
ings that bears his name in Nice, his 

stained-glass windows for United 
Nations headquarters in New 
York, the cathedrals of Metz and of 
Reims in France, the Fraumflnster 
in Zurich and the Hadassah He- 
brew University in Jerusalem — all 
these have been granted landmark 
status. 

To th<™ must be added the 
paintings that can be found in al- 
most every museum in the devel- 
oped world, the private commis- 
sions, the graphic works that he 
produced by the hundreds, the 
stage designs and the book illustra- 
tions that he never failed to pro- 
duce on demand. 

He had an enormous constituen- 
cy — one that overran all bound- 
aries of age, creed, social status or 
place of origin. Though he was not 
without his detractors, Chagall’s 
sense of fantasy, his gorgeous col- 


ors and his gift for an immediatel y 
accessible poignancy won admirers 
wherever his work was shown. 

His uncoiiventiona] world was a 
brightly colored melange of ani- 
mals, flowers, people, embracing 
lovers, birds and fish playing musi- 
cal instruments, nymphs, satyrs, 
winged female figures, Jewish and 
Christian symbols, vignettes of 
clustered roofs and violins with an- 
gel's wings. These objects rarely if 
ever bore their naniral hues; cows 
were likely to be blue, horses green, 
people red. 

Inis fantasy universe, sometimes 
poignantly sad but more often 
laughingly joyous, was childlike in 
its apparent simpleness yet strange- 
ly sophisticated in its perceptivo- 


fhagall expressed his antic ima- 
ginings in oils, pas ids, watercolors, 
gouaches, lithographs, etchings, 
murals, glass, clay and stone. *T 
work in whatever medium likes me 
at the moment,’' he once said. 

Marc Chagall was bom Mpyshe 
Shagal on July 7, 1887, in VHdsk. 
Russia. Vitebsk bad a large and 
self-contained Jewish population, 
which, alike in refigious, social and 
cultural terns, was a people set 


Religions festivals, fasts and 
etary rales were strictly observed. 
In their dress Jews within the pale 
were unmistakable. Nor were they 
allowed to travel without a permit. 

It was from this nrilien, at once 
isolated and intensely alive, that 
Marc Chagall drew not only his 
awareness of the injustices and in- 
equalities of human life but a vast 
repertory of symbol and allusion, 
ritual and wxy humor, aspiration 
and irrepressible feeling. By the 
time he got to St. Petersburg as an 
artstndouin 1906 he had the sub- 
ject matter of a lifetime at his fin- 
gas’ ends, and he was to be sus- 
tained by it ■ 

To get to Stl Petersburg at aii was 
difficult, in that no Jew from the 
pale was allowed to settle there 
unless be was registered as a do- 
mestic servant. Luckily for Chagall, 
there was in Sl Petersburg a mon- 
eyed Jewish community that did a 
great deal for the cultural life of the 
dty. Not only did a member of this 
enlightened gro up pretend to the 
authorities that CbagaH was in his 
service as a footman, but it was 
thanks to another Jewish patron, 

(Ontimed on Page 6. Cot 1) 


By Bernard Gwcnzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz has declared 
that the United States is ready to 
meet the Soviet Union halfway in 
finding “a mutually acceptable ap- 
proach” to the arms issues under 
negotia ti on in Geneva. 

In his first speech on arms con- 
trol since the Geneva talks resumed 
two weeks ago, Mr. Shultz said 
Thursday in Austin, Tern, that the 
United States would be flexible in 
the negotiations and prepared for 
“trade-offs” in reducing strategic 
nudear missiles and bombers. 

But he offered no change in the 
administration’s dete rminati on to 
proceed with research into strategic 
defenses despite Soviet insistence 
that there can be no progress in 
nudear aims reduction until curbs 
in the defensive program are agreed 
upon. 

Meanwhile, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the new Soviet leader, said in 
a letter to a group of West Germans 
that U.S. statements on the Geneva 
negotiations “cannot but pat one 
cm guard." 

In the letter, published by Tass, 
he wrote: “Already now, with the 
talks started, one gets the impres- 
sion from statements by high-rank- 
ing representatives of the UKA. 
that Lbesy need talks as a screen for 
carry ing through their military pro- 


Mr. Gorbachev’s statements re- 
flected several recent such accusa- 
tions by the Russians, but it was the 
first time they were made by tbe 
Soviet leader. Western diplomats 
viewed the letter as part of an effort 
by Moscow to attack West Europe- 
an support in the Geneva talks. 

In his speech Mr. Shultz did not 
mention the ItiBmg by a Soviet sol- 
dier of an U.S. Army major in East 
Germany on Sunday. Because of 
the killing, the U.S. government 
has decided to boycott an anniver- 
sary gathering on the Elbe River 
next month erf Soviet and Ameri- 
can veterans of Worid War IL 

Asserting rhat the administra- 
tion is hoping to work out a “transi- 
tion” penod with tbe Russians for 
reducing offensive weapons and in- 
stalling defensive ones, if they 
prove feasible, Mr. Shultz said that 
so far “the Soviets have not accept- 
ed tbe idea of a cooperative transi- 
tion.” 

“At this point the Soviets still are 
seeking to undermine our domestic 
and allied support for the Strategic 
Defense Initiative research, while 
they proceed with their own ef- 
forts, he said in his speech to tbe 


Council on Foreign Relations. Tbe 
Russians, he said, “are lough - 
minded realists, however ” 

Mr. Shultz continued: “As our 
research proceeds, and both na- 
tions thus gain a better sense of the 
future prospects, the Soviets should 
see the advantages of agreed 
ground rules to insure that any 
phasing in of defensive systems wifi 
be orderly, predictable and stabiliz- 
ing.” 

It would be in neither side's in- 
terest, he said, to have an “uncon- 
strained” development of new 
weapons. 

Mr. Shultz said again that Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan had directed 
that research into strategic defense 
comply with the existing anti-bal- 
listic missile treaty and that any 
decision to deploy new defensive 
systems not in compliance with 
that treaty be negotiated with the 
Soviet Union. 

In Washington, meanwhile, 
three Soviet military attach were 
summoned to tbe Defense Depart- 
ment on Thursday to receive 
tests about tbe slaying of “ ‘ 

Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. 

“We continue to believe it was an 
outrageous, unnecessary and total- 
ly uncalled for act," a Stale Depart- 
ment spokesman said “We nope 
the new Soviet leadership will seize deploying further missiles in Eu- 
this opportunity for constructive rope m return for a halt in Soviet 
action that wilf prevent such ac- countermeasures, 
tions in tbe future. On strategic weapons, Mr. 

Referring to a Tass dispatch that Shultz said that the United Slates 
blamed tbe major for the incident, remained ready “to explore trade- 
the spokesman said: “Appropriate offs between areas of U5. and So- 
expressions of regret are much viet advantage.” 


more helpful than tendentious and 
distorted press releases.’' 

In his speech, Mr. Shultz said 
that “the president has instructed 
our negotiator to bargain seriously 
and vigorously.’' 

He said: “We will judge the re- 
sults by the strictest of standards — 
whether they would maHi tai n the 
security of die United States and 
our allies, insure deterrence, en- 
hance strategic stability and reduce 
the risk of war. 

“We are prepared to be flexible, 
however, about ways to achieve our 
objectives. We will meet the Soviet 
Union halfway in finding a mutual- 
ly acceptable approach." 

In the negotiations on medium- 
range missiles, Mr. Shultz said, the 
American proposals made in 1983, 
just before the Russians suspended 
talks, “provide a framework for a 
fair agreement,” 

Under those proposals, the Unit- 
ed States would agree on equal lev- 
els of warheads in such missiles, 
but would not deploy as many in 
Europe as ihe Soviet Union would 
be permitted in Europe and Asia. A 
balance in Europe would thereby 
be assured, but the Russians would 
be allowed additional missiles in 
Asia. 

Tbe Iasi public Soviet position 
called on the United States to cease 


aid from a program to assist 
community’s underdeveloped re- 
gions. 

However, Greek officials said 
■ Friday that Mr. Papandreou had 
informed the summit meeting that 
he would accept a “political state- 
ment" of support for his demand 
that Greece receive $2 billion as its 
part of the disputed aid program. 

“Greece wants a political com- 
mitment,” said Loucas Panousses, 
spokesman for the Greek delega- 
tion. 

Diplomats told Reuters that Mr. 
Papandreou’s statement meant be 
would not exercise his veto threat 
immediately if (he EC summit 
meeting issued the statement be 
wanted. 

Another EC official, however, 
said that Mr. Papandreou did not 
have the power to block the imme- 
diate drafting of the treaty of acces- 
sion. but could refuse to sign it 
when it is prepared, probably by 
June, thus blocking the ratification 
process. 

Foreign mmisters met Friday 
evening to discuss the aid program 
and were to report later to the com- 
munity leaders. 

The commission has proposed a 
7-billion ECU ($5- billion) program 
to aid the poorer areas of Greece, 
Italy and France. Greece has said 
the sum is not large enough, while 
Britain and West Germany have 
said it is too much. 

At an EC summit in Dublin last 
December, Mr. Papandreou had 
said that unless the aid were ap- 
proved at tbe Brussels summit con- 
ference, Greece would veto ihe 


Community officials can 
drafting the treaty of memt 
lor Spain and Portugal without 
Greek agreement to the 
mem. Bui Greece must sign 
accord before the ratification pro- 
cess begins in community parlia- 
ments, community' officials said. 

The community is expected to 
finish drawing up the treaty by the 
end of May. giving parliaments 
seven months to rarity enlargement 
before the Jan. 1 target date for 
entry of the two countries. 

The EC leaders began their 
meeting Friday with a discussion of 
the economic situation in the com- 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Europe Sturts Summer Time on Sunday 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Clocks will be tinned ahead early 
Sunday in Western and Eastern Europe as most 
European nations switch to summer time. The 
Soviet Union will change Monday and the United 
States and Canada at the end of April. 

The legal moment of change Sunday is 2 AJU 
European time, or 1 AJML Greenwich Mean Time. 

Tins will ppt continental Europe two hours 
ahead of GMT and Britain and Ireland one hour 
a he a d . In Europe, only Iceland does not change 
time. 

The United States and Canada mm docks 
ahead an hour for daylight saving time Be ginning 
April 28. 

In Australia, the country's three time zones will 
fall back an hour on Sunday with the approach of 
winter south erf the equator. 

Far Eastern countries and most tropical and 
equatorial nations do not use daylight saving time. 


Clocks remain on standard time in most of Asia, 
Africa and Latin America. 

The return to winter time occurs Sept. 29, when 
docks are put back an hour, except for Britain. 
Ireland, the United States and Canada, which go 
back Ocl 27, and the Soviet Union, which reverts 
Oo. 1. 

There is a small European Association Against 
Summer Time movement whose French chapter 

e i a protest outside the European Parliament 
quarters in Strasbourg. It maintains that tbe 
government claim to save the equivalent of 300,000 
tons of oil each year, 1 j percent of consumption, is 

greatly exaggerated. 

And a Socialist member of the French Nati onal 
Assembly, Jean-Michel Boucheron, manmal^c that 
daylight saving time upsets fanners still in the field 
when it is time to winch evening television and 
office workers whose lunch hour ends at solar 
noon. 






tun v .*iMe9rvf»issrs2$nNamiii»mvm3»«m9ms» i«m 




Page 2 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD A Y-SUNDAV t MARCH 30-31, 1985 



For Spain and Portugal, WORLD BRIEFS 


TV* VnA Lnlqfinnict Poet WARSAW (UPI1 — General Wpjciecli Janudski, tbe fcy 
JL O JuflU liSOIdmilHB L JL del threatened Friday to use “tough measures against diasklaais c 

porters of the outlawed Solidarity union unless they halted their 
■d,, T/w%, &<«■• For Scam. the second lareest n&- tion to the country s Communist system.. 

tiongrShjcallymW^TOEu- In an address to a imeetmg of the Wish ComnnuustW 
nf hkfnrv rope anathe fifth largest in popula- Jaruadsfa said that bis government had not rebnquabsd as j 
■ *J ADI S?""’'u.rf nSCaf Son! the issue is almost of a seeking reconciliation with cnucs of the regime. Btuifowpijj 

psychological nature, having to do good will conti nue to be tmdtrotimatcd. *t wll not bejSfe 
nomst past that ted been lot be* ^hmi^as ranch as anything tough measures prescribed by the law." he added, 
hmd mid expectations forafiiture wrttt pnoe as muen as anymmg ^ bv ^ underground Solidariw n 

ol moderngy were telt mlbenaon » fo. neneral public euthusi- for demonstrations an Monday to protest a second round of fe 

asm over dcrouySf to ignore increases of 12 to 13 percent These increases, it is estimated, *2 
the economic impact of member- 10 percent me in the cost of living. 

^isnoSZthaxrtedcd- * 

SSAUSBSU 7 Die in Renewed Lebanon Fight/ 

Lisbon marks arauestone for both ■■ > ■■ BEIRUT (AP) — Rival mili tiamen exchanged sniper Ore m i 

societies. _ NEWS ANALYSIS Friday and there were artfllery battles around the somhahg 

Prim e Minister Fefipe Gonzakz — Sidon, but a cease-fire halted fighting beroeen Moslem affi 

spoke of “a historic st^fotward" wjll benefit — although not some northern city of Tripoli. , . . 0L- 

and said that Spam now had ro sectors such as dairy fanning— but Police said seven persons had been tailed and more thaajr 
prepare itsdf to face “the dial- ixuiusuy win take a considerable wounded in the three cities. The state radio said President M§ 
leag es of m od ernity ." ksodL was intervening to halt the fighting in Sidon. which IsiaeffB 

Returning from Brussels after ^ ^ as the EC negpti- army evacuated Feb. 16. 1® 

the final agreement early Fnday ^ ^ The Israeli military command in Tel Aviv said four erf its « 

morning over the emry tenn* For- njentatora have made much of the wounded Friday by a rocket fixed at their position u Lake Qa 
ogn Minister Fetnado MOrtn amplified scenario of southern Lebanon. It also said that Israeli troops bBedihreegu 

saidt “Spam biiot- where ungtn- three isolated centuries. This centu- an overnight dash on the Litani River, tod’s front hue in th 
in rhn ft Ur Spain stood cm the siddines of 

Troops Patrol Khartoum After IJi 

that “international complexes that KHARTOUM. Sudan (UN) — Mice and sohfewput 

we have endured" could now cease, ^dtk image of rSSlato deserted strais of 
In Madrid and Lisbon, “entering ^ proua isolation- ^ three days of anu-Kivamnent and ■ 

Europe” was perceived as a mix of guch nsvcholosical trails lav wcrc htcreased. The official Sudan News Agency reported ih 

a coming of age and a graduation dose to tG^rfa^ba pariiamni- five persons S^kw*tetum to wd 

ceremonv. or. more precisely. as an i«ni rivhstr hw WntnAerisv nn iiv Sudsii s union leaders appealed to people .wo 


Jaruzel&ki Warns of Tough Mease 


By Tom Bums ForSpa 

Washington Past Server bon gCMT 

MADRID— A sense of history 
in the making, relief over an isda- , . 

Moist pastmat had been left be* 
hind and expectations for a future ^’ nn P 11 ® 
of moderniiy were felt in Iberia on . 

Friday as the doors of the Europe- 
an Cbmmtmity were finaBv opened ®r mow J 
io&axnandP«aigaL ' 

There is no doubt that iheded- ™FJ“J 
skrn made by the community to 
extend membership to Madrid ami Spainanu 
Lisbon maxis a milestone for both ■■ 
societies. NE 1 

P r i me Minisier Fefipe Gonzakz — 
spoke of "a historic step forward” ^ 
and said tto Span now had ro 
prepare itsdf i© face "the dial- , 

leages of modernity. knock. 

Retaming from Brussels after inre ctn 
the final agreement early Fittav cnl 

morning over the entry toms, For- 
agn Minister Fernando Morin nhvimslv 
said: “Spain is now where it right- 


For Spain, the second largest na- 
tion geographically in Western Eu* 


COPENHAGEN PROTEST— About 100,000 Danish 
workers demonstrated Friday In front of the partiaraent 
btrikfing, protesting government plans to impose a set- 
tlement in a strike and lockout Involving 300,000 em- 


HeratiQCSribune 

- - t- r— ----f-*- 

Reaching More 
Than a Third of a 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 


ployees in private business and industry. Schools were 
dosed, hospital patients sent home and post, bus and 
plane schedules were (fisropted by wildcat strikes. Hie 
proposed settlement ended five months of negotiations. 

Iberians Accept EC’s Terms 


rnB membership in the EC, Mr. 
Morin said, signaled the end of “a 
hfctnrie frustration" and meant 
that “international complexes rimf 
we have endured” could now cease. 

In Madrid and ttomn, “entering 
Europe” was perceived as a mix of 
a coining of age and a graduation 


(Continued from Page 1) 
rounity, in particular the unem- 
plpyment rate; which is at a record 
12 percent. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain, caflmg jobless- 
ness a “blot cm Europe,” said com- 
munity businesses could grow and 
produce jobs only if they were freed 
from excessive government regula- 
tions, British officials said. She 
called cm the community to study 
the possibility of reducing business 
regulations by one tirird. 

Mis. Thatcher also em pharived 
the need to try to avoid Strang 


finally deemed worthy to join a 
fluctuation of the exchange rate of open only to tire 

Tfae ftortM^saH^Sdt^ 

creases in European interest rates, oped and with fewer expectations 
The EC fonrirnmnnsrets con- than Sjnm, it wasmorc odiously a 
I .L. . case of economic survival. The 


ceremonv or moreprecisetv as an dfhat* w«iwoisw nn ik. Sudan s union readers appeared io pcopic io muni io wo 

SjtSSIttSS and “guard Aeir property —d that of ihafemptoygg ^um 

finally deemed worthy to join a » boost Mr. Morin's confidence , 


5*?pSS?d PortngnenTneg^ wiB now Mpoot its poor relation, 
tiators. At a press conference later, Portugal's prime minis ter. Mano 
the S pamrsh foreign minister, Fer- Soares, a Socialist who staked his 
nandn Mr mVn said he was “tre- political career on jcHning the EC, 
mendously satisfied” with the ac- said Friday in a radio interview; 
cord. “Within fire years. Portugal will be 

The agreement put an end to the a completely different country — 
“inferiority complex of S pain in and certainly a much better one for 
international affairs,” he said. all Portuguese.” 


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“ .VpfLrfMV Snfft SSSofhr PoSce and army units remained on duty guarding the US. E 

mrfOlataScnotnoteitaS securio&ce Oso patrolted other pne of the opitol. 
bracing the wider cause of Spain, 

par liament and joined the wo Jewish Film Expo Is Bombed in 

end the breach and belong to Eu- PARIS (UPI)— A bomb exploded Friday during a Jewish G 

I0 2®*. , . at a theater in central Paris, injuring 20 persons, the police s 

Membership the EC is a said that no one claimed responsibility for the explosion and ti 
mighty challenge tire Sj»nish state festival organizers had not received any threats, 
faces to break out of isolationism The bomb exploded during a showing at the International 
said the parliamentary spokesman Jcwish Films of “EidunannTMan of the Third Reich," made b 
for the Basque nationalists. In the German director Erwin Loser. 

same vein, his Catalan nationalist police said the bomb had been placed under a scat in the be 
colleague said Spain would find m basement theater, near the city's Jewish quarter, and that 
Europe “the ancient origins of a was destroyed. Officials said that most of the injured received h 
European Spain. J 

If isolationism is one theme, the 

Reagan Names Civilian Space Pi' 

ground there is the all-important WASHINGTON (UPI) — President Ronald Reagan name* 
issue of a democratic Spain as part commission Friday to develop civilian goals for space, an 
of Europe and acting as a fully defended his plans for a space-based missile defense as a * 
supportive member of the North “mankind ease away from the nuclear parapet” 

Atlantic Treaty Or ganizat ion. The commission, to be headed by Thomas 0. Rune, a fora 



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EC membership is seen as the of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, v 
natural consequence of Spain's Jcane J. Kirkpatrick, the outgoing United Nations dd egai 
post-Franco move to become a rep- Annstrong, the first man on the moon, and Kathryn D. Suffiv 
icsentative democracy. American woman to walk in space. Mr. Reagan called on t 

Spain was denied entry into the “devise an aggressive rivilianspace agenda to carry American 
EC during Franco's rule, and ac- century." 
ceptance is viewed as approval on 

the democratic process that Spain _ __ _ _ 

has undergone in the last decade. Duarte PlaUS tO KeSURie Peace . 

bership firms up Spain’s ties with • SAN SALVADOR (UPI) — President Jos6 Napole6n l 
NATO. Friday that he would resume peace talks with the leftist reb 

Mr. Gonzttez argued against to overthrow his government rraudless of the . 

NATO membership rnl982 when national elections Sunday. He declined to fix a date for the i 

he was opposition leader. M*- Duarte made his statement in the face of stepped-) 

„ . . . . activity and a rebd threat of sabotage that has reduced highw a 

He has isnree come motmd w ^ eastem provinces, anned farces were placed on nun-. 
favoring NMD members^but Thursday night, with 10,000 troops deployed around the a , 

says he intends to htmm an dector- ^ 

al campaign p W^that the issue An increase in terrorism and the possibility of arigWstma .* 

ranammgmNATOwillbepuUoa new legislative assembly has thrown the future of thepeacea v .^. 
rdcrenanm. rebels into doubt The talks were indefinitely suspended in ' 

EC membership is seen by West- but Mr. Duarte told a news conference he was ready to “open 
em diplomats in Madrid, as well as dialogue.” The dialogue will continue after the election: 
by senior officials in Spain’s gov- adding: “I am going to re-establish the process in the search 
eminent, as being of pome impor- 
tance in Mr. Gonzalez's plan to • 

gain endorsement for NATO. for the ReCOIu 
Mr. Gonz&kz rntend$ to link the 

aitianra*. which most Spaniards op- . A Conservative Party bill to abolish the Greater London • ■ 
pose, with the EC, winch virtually six other big city authorities, all controlled by Britain’s oppa 
all Spaniards welcome. Parly, completed its passage through the House of Connnor 

But membership will have its ® vote of 325-170. 

Qjstk F Tfe Rnmaman National Assembly re-elected on Frid 

. Ceaugescai, the Communist Party chief since 1965, as i 

Spamm maustiy has grown m a Romania by a vote of 369 to 0. He was first elected preride: 
hothouse ch protectionism that has (AP) 


; iemazninguiNATOwillbeputtoa 
referendmn. 

EC membership is seen by West- 


allowed it to become, for example, A Vienna court wntrereH nine Pakistanis to prison teems ’ 
a major ca r exp orter. But EC mem- up to 13 years for plotting to murder Pakistan's ambassado 
bership means the addition of a and to kidnap other diplomats to press for the release cl ■ 
common external tariff that, over a Pakistan. 


transition period, wQl 
into Spain's customs 


Entry also means the introduo- 
ion of European fiscal measures. 


Correction 



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tion of European fiscal measures. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency said tits 
notably the value-added tax, end- report, in the March 27 edition of the International Herald 1 
ing the edge enjoyed by Spanish incorrect in saying that the organization had tdd its expad 
products. leave Lebanon. An official saidihe agency had told only its* 

Economists in Madrid estimate to Ie ave the country. The error was repeai«l in the edition o 

that the doable effect of common — - — — 

tariff s and European fiscal prac- 

of Spanish industry in half- South Africa Bans Meed. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

CHURCH SERVICES fire hi self-defense after ordering 
" the crowd to disperse. 

AMERICAN CATHh55l IN PARS, 23 Avo. 

Gaorga-V. 75008 Pork. Th. Vary Rav. °Y black activists and Witnesses. 
Jamas R. Uo, Dtorv AVshxn Gaerg»-V or who S3V that the Crowd WHS 8 
MnwAkramr. Sunday; 9 ruiu. It ojb. peacrfuf pTOCeSSUMl OU its Way toa 

funeral, and that the police opoud 


nuns 

AMSUCAN CATHBKAL IN PARS, 23 Ava. 
Gwrgt-V, 75008 Pork. Th» Vary Rav. 
Jamas R. Lao, Doan. Malror Gaorga-V or 
Alma- M arcuou. Sunday: 9 curu, 1 1 aju. 


people from 60G chum 
ty, student and trade u 
It was formed in An 
oppose a new coostitu 
persons of Indian and . 
descent limited partiaiy 
reseutation, but ou 
black majority of 23 njl) 
South Africa^ tradida.hs. 


CBffltAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rue du *“& 

VieuR-Gofenbiar, 75006 fcrk Motro Si.- Warrant Officer Jacobus Wouter 

Pena toidthe inquiry lint hehad 
~ seen no evidence of gasoline bombs 

PAiusaamas being thrown at the police and had 

EMMANUa BAPTIST CHURCH, RoulMoJ- n ? t ““ **“. ,eader Of dtt CTOWd 

mobon. EngSdi Rpoddne. ofl danommo- wielding a brick, as Mr. Le Grange 
Kbto riudy , y ■^wibip.j ouj. 56 had said. The discrepancies seem 

Ru. BanMde* Tel., 749.is.29. certain, opposition analysts said, to 

Europe be seized upon by the government's 

UMrAHAMNVBBAUsr, worship and adversaries to discredit the entire 

acdvitiM in Europe. Cortod EUU, Sieve police flCCOUnt of CVetltS. ST* tL 

Dick, Serlngrtroof 20, 1 271 NC Huizen, The . , DenaocnitJC FlOTl »y 

NetiwriandL TeLr (+3ij (0) 2152 55073. latest move against political mined to peaceful cha 

ob«va * °PP° nenls follows the arrest on mally shims violence. 

CHURCH OF ORBST-Meeteim in BtAh tTCSSOa ChOTgCS Of 16 leading mOH- B 

Sunday ewsningi at 6 pj^, 26 me de io b®® °f the Uiuted Democratic ■ U5. Orutizes m 
TWj FronL The authorities on Friday The U.S. State Depa 


fire without provocation or warn- S® 0 " 1 A* 04 * 5 tr *® ,n ®nr 1 v • 
inp A rodepman lot B ■*' ’ 

Warrant Officer Jacobus Wouter ^^cnL wouWtato t f 
Pentz told the inquiry that hehad 4e fn 

SSB3 from organi 
bemg thrown at the pohee and had pih,ed“ opposition to 
“ l “ *!“ I f der . ? crowd lh . 

wielding a brick, as Mr. Le Grange p^-.u 
had said. The discrtp^ies seem Tire i^MKC, activi 

ffiEraa -- 9 pp*k» -- 


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P 0 * * •«. FronL The authorities on Friday The U.S. State Depa 

“tMiyZOas tite date for the stan cized the Sou* Afnff ■ 

above. m their trial, which is expected to ine, “measures aimed 

jiQQQjoijyi last at least 18 months. By invoking l^uimatc and pcacefii ' , 

immanub. church near &y center, security legislation, the authorities to apartheid are WX c 

Msmiy dtrnbanisttovahip. Sunday n 4XL have ruled out bail for the defen- finding a solution to t 

Teb p») 316051, 151225. dants, meaning that many of them mqor problem,** Unit 

\~Z ' ~ 1 win have been detained by up to fernatioMl rqwted f 


To place an adeertuement 
in dot section 
please ctmtoctr 
Ms Elisabeth HER WOOD 
181 Awl. Ch.-deXrauIle, 
92S21 NcmUy Cedes, France. 
TeLr 747.1IL6S. 


two years before the court pro- 
nounces a verdict on them. 

A spokesman for the United 
Democratic Front described the 
ban as “a declaration of a regional 
state of emergency.” The front 
claims a following of 1.5 milli ng 


Edward Dragm • 
partment s p ok esman , i. 
measure apptfued 10 . 
tent with a sou* Am 
meot “offer of estabte 
loguc with blade letdo.' 













,? r AMERICAN TOPICS 


'ichanan Expanding 


g White House Turf 

wick X Buchanan, a for- 

" ' i 


tordWL Nixon and Gerald 
Ford, is enlarging his do 
after returning last month 
; he White House as director 
fl i m i m nf n "*i fln * - The Wash- 
aa post says he will take 
r the office of public liaison 
•n its director. Faith Ryan 
ittlesey, {eaves next month 
a second tour as t 


,1 [ . 

‘ to Switzerland 

‘‘•Vhe Post says Mr. B uchanan , 



me 


Tn 

t 

ft c 

•iw ■ 


I 


*i:n 


■i Khj. 


■Win 


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„ N'T 

Patrick J. Buchanan 

adding the liaison office to 
‘JiJjH functions, prevailed over 
. ward X Sonins, a White 
-• disc political assistant. ft says 
. •' ;> Buchanan also stands a 
chance of taking ova the 
- --of-tovm press operation 
••• m Michad K- Deaver, Presi- 
“■'it Ronald Reagan’s deputy 
: "t >ef of staff, teams to join a 
die relations company in 
~:jy. 

Rnrihaman, 46, daring his 
• i ade away from the White 
' - use, wrote a syndicated col- 
m in what The Post calls 
ke-no-prisoners prose.** It 
iji; beat peculated that his 
^tfrontaticaial style has put 
- m bite into Mr. Reagan’s 
~ ;. > 10 ™: — taunting lax-minded 
-r agressmen to ‘’make my 
V” for example, or compar- 
the Nicaraguan rebels to the 
" . :.;s. Founding Fathers. 

Well, no, says one old Wash- 
hand: “More likely is 
Reagan, with the election 
. Cl of the way, hired a speech- 
iter who would write the 
. . ... ngs Reagan wanted to say.” 

■ iMli-tn W . . _ 


B.I 


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si tew «• y 

1 a, 

ir-*- 

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hurt< Pi. 


*** *- 


-.^lort Takes 

Swry ADo, 34, a worker 
.'*0 was fatally crashed by a 
jot at Diecast Cap. in Mtch- 
. -jflmJWy, was, according to 
. ’i U 5- government and the 
. boric Industries Association 
America, “the first docti- 
»led case of a robot-rdated 
ality in the United States” A 
alar death at a Ford plant in 
drigan in 1979 was caused by 
r tatrated maduncay. The ro- 
a ui.i! i'^assodatioi says a robot 
. . ^programmed to do many 
• • ..figs; an automated! machine 
. . 'dannsoae'basidfuxtetion. 


The College Republican Na- 
tional Committee Fund 1 
baited distribution of a poster 
urging private help for Nica._ 
gnan rebels with the title “Save 
the ‘Contras’ ” and the slogan, 
“Only S3 cents a day wffl sup- 
port a Nicaraguan freedom 
fighter.” A spokesman said the 
mailings were stopped out of 
concern that they could damage 
President Reagan’s ch-ipr^ for 
winning congressional approval 
for 514 million in aid to the 
rebels. 

Despite the current farm cri- 
sis, Wayne Rasmussen, the U.S. 
Agriculture Department’s his- 
torian for the past 40 years, pre- 
dicts that the family farm win 
survive. Big companies have 
found fanning a relatively poor 
investment, he said, and “for 
the next SO years we will have a 
system pretty much of the kind 
that we have now as far as fam- 
ily farming is concerned.” Mr. 
Rasmussen did not dispute 
however, a five-year-old depart- 
mental prediction that the IS 
miHi on farms in 1980 probably 
will drop to 1.8 nuOion by the 
year 2000. 

Three years ago the Sflver- 
dome at Pontiac, Michigan, 
played host to the National 
Football League's Super BowL 
This winter, snow and ice col- 
lapsed the inflatable fabric 
roof. Anew roof costing 58 mil- 
lion, with a heating system that 
instantly melts snow and sleet, 
is to be installed. 


Exeidng Alternative 


To Kiddie TV Found 

A Brooklyn kindergarten 
teacher named Edith Newman, 
in a tetter to The New York 
Times, has taken issue with pro- 
posals to expand children’s tele- 
vision programs to include art, 
science and drama. 

She writes, “Our society’s 
lOdren, passively glued to the 
television screen, already lose 
emt on something far more pre- 
cious than Tow-cost supple- 
mental education;’ they nave 
little opportunity to develop 
their own creative, exploratory 
power. 

“Parents and educators,” she 
continues, “should be encour- 
aged to turn off the television, 
providing instead a baric toy, 
like a large set of plain wooden 
budding blocks, phis small hu- 
man and animal figures. With 
such 9 toy, children can leant to 
master their environment in a 
deeply satisfying, intellectually 
active manner. This authentic, 
first-hand, confidence-building 
experience is called play.” 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


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w tin- II 


S. Rights Panel Rejects 
Comparable Worth 9 Pay 


By Robert Pear 

Ate* York TimaSenice 
ASH1NGTON — - A new re- 
irmn the U& Commisrioa an 


< • 


4 
*r* 




if/i 


men and women should re- 
the same pay for peifonnmg 
Wit jobs of “comparable 

ic 232-page study called (he 
eptof ccanparable worth “pro- 
dwajjd irretrievably fiawed.” 
Hera policy of comparable 

- h, enqrfoyers assess the intrin- 
ri»of mfierem jobs by mca- 

- >g such factors as the knowl- 
Trialls and effort required of 
-Joyces, their degree of respon- 
<ty and their working condi- 

Gvil Rights Commission 
that such evaluations were “in- 
subjective" and “cannot 
^tho oastence of sex-based 
^wtrimination." It said there 

- gjoToafly certain” way of 
priihg the value of two jobs. 

- «roovtr. it said, the disparity 
*8® for men and women was, 
part, a result of factors 
f - umb discrimination. These 
liXvasaid, include differences 
- • to® “educational 

I / l !i ‘ 1 * m { ’' Mi. or women who anticipate 

V raring and child-rearing 

^uons in the family”; the 

" ftor tendency of women to 


Removes 5 Justices; 



Republicans 
Would Freeze 
Arms Budget, 
Poll Finds 


By Helen Dewar 

WaiMngton Post Senior 

WASHINGTON — House Re- 
publicans have irutiewiarf in a sur- 
vey that they would vote to freeze 
military spending and Social Secu- 
rity benefits as part of a compre- 
hensive U.S. budget freeze for nact 
year. 

The results erf the survey, con- 
ducted by the House Republican 
leadership and reflecting the views 
of about two-thirds of House Re- 
publicans, could strengthen the 
hand of Senate Republicans as they 
tiy to negotiate a budget agreement 
with the White House. 

_ Sharp cuts in the administra- 
tion's military buildup and dam- 
nation of next year's cost-of-living 
increases for toe program of dis- 
ability payments and retirement 


its are opposed by President 
Ronald Reagan^ But they are key 


that the Senate Budget Committee 
approved this month. 

Senate negotiators met Thursday 
with David A Stockman, director 
of the Office of Management nnd 
Budget, and were to meet Friday 
with White House nffiduk in an 
apparent escalation of efforts to 
reach agreement on deficit reduc- 


Space Litter Making Life Hazardous for Orbiting Visitors 


By Thomas O’Toole 

Washington Post Serna 

. WASHINGTON; -When the space buttle Challenger 
retained to Earth with a cracked windshield in June 1983, 
en gineers assumed the culprit was a nucrometeorite — a 
stray piece of cosmic dust that could have hit the wind- 
shield at 44,000 miles (71,600 kilometers) an hoar. 

But after examining the fracture pattern and trace 
elements in the crack, scientists concluded that whatever 
Challenger ran mm was man-made. 

The case erf Challenges windshield Qlastrates a serious 
concern among people who put spacecraft into orbit. So 
much debris httezs the space lanes that it poses a major 
collision hazard. 

Experts suspect that space collirions have destroyed at 
least two satellites — one American and one Soviet — and 
possibly a second American craft, all of which had been in 
good condition. 

The world can expect a major cdtirion in Earth orbit 
every 15 years, according to Donald J. Kessler, a specialist 
in orbital debris at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. 
Texas. 

“If tiie debris keens accumulating 1 the chances of colli- 
sion are greater,’’ Mr. Kessler said Thursday. “We might 
get to where we see a collision that breaks op an operating 
satellite once every 10 years." 

Some 5,400 objects the sine erf a baseball or larger, each 
circling Earth at 17,500 miles an hour, are now being 
tracked in space. Only 200 to 300 are operating satellites. 
The others are old rockets, payloads, shrouds, fuel ^r »fc r? 
or reran ants of previous explosions and collirions. 

A more serious threat are objects the size of golf balls 
estimated to number 40,000 rased on counts by earth- 
bound telescopes. 

Even the third category of space garbage — tiny orbit- 
ing flakes, estimated to number in the bflHons — are 
potentially hazardous. They are the prime suspect in the 
case of the shuttle windshield. 

The windshield crack was the first proof engineers had 


that space debris was a growing problem. A more convinc- 
ing case came when a later astronaut crew returned to 
Earth with pans of the Solar Maximum satellite they 
repaired in orbit last April Mr. Kessler and his ream 
found 160 small craters in the layered plastic insulation. 

“Most of the holes we found in die plastic had been put 
there by man-made objects, either particles of paint or nny 
pieces of metal that had punemred the plastic at anywhere 
from 15,000 to 18,000 miles an hour. Mr. Kessler said. 

“The number erf man-made craters was two to five times 

The most dangerous highways in 
space are those over the poles, used 
frequently by weather satellites. 

what we would expect from meteorite hits,” he added. 

Mr. Kesslex said much of the space debris my from 
satellite explosions. Eight)' objects have exploded in space 
ance June29, 1961, when the second-stage rocket of a Air 
Force payload blew up into 261 tradeable fragments, 199 
of which still drdc Earth. 

In addition, the second-stage ga g fne $ of nine U.S. Delta 
rockets have exploded, scattering more than 1,400 frag- 
ments into orbits that most still follow. 

Most space explosions have been of Soviet origin, 
i n d n d ing 19 explosions during tens of anti-satelHte warn, 
ons. These tests have produced almost 1,000 pieces of 
debris. 

Between 1975 and 1983, the Russians deliberately de- 
stroyed 1 1 electronic surveillance leaving behind 

almost 600 “large” fragments. 

At least two catastrophic collisions have occurred in 
Earth’s orbit in the last 10 years. A U.S. balloon satellite 


when it failed in 1982, 
suggested a sideswiping 


— — 4 • uiuuiv 

named PAGE05 pot into orbit in 1966 to make a geodetic 
survey erf Earth broke up for no apparent reason in 1975. to them or a crew 


The sun’s strong ultraviolet light was a suspect, but careful 
analysis ruled that out. The prime suspects are any of the 
1.2 billion metal needles pm into orbit by the Air race in 
1962 and 1963 to see if radar signals could be bounced off 
th e n? . 

The needles were supposed to be released as single 
objects but entered orbit in clumps. They are in orbit at 
approximately the same altitude and inclina tion (88 de- 
grees) to the equator as the destroyed PAGEOS satellite. 

A second collision apparently took place on July 24, 
1981, when the Soviet satellite Cosmos 1275 broke up — 
an event seen on the radar screens of the North American 
Air Defense Command. 

A U.S. satellite named Landsat 4 was in the same 
“Bermuda Triangle" of 
leaving fragments in its v 
collision. 

The most 

near the poles. Most weather and reconnaissance satellites 
and some scientific satellites are put into polar orbits so 
they will travel over every spot on the globe every two 
weeks or so. Not only do these orbits converge on single 
points above the poles, but they contain a substantial 
share of Earth’s satellite traffic and hence much of the 
debris from space collisions. 

“The colHrions and explosions have unfortunately tak- 
en place at fairly high altitudes, which means that most of 
the leftover debris wfll stay in orbit instead of coming 
down and burning up in Earth’s atmosphere," Mr. Kessler 
said. 

He is concerned that a collision could befall the occu- 
pants of the space shuttle or the permanent space station 
to be put into orbit in 1993. 

“I worry about the space station because it’s going to be 
so big, 10 times the size of the shuttle,” Mr. Kessler said. 
“But the shuttle worries me, too. We warn our shuttle 
astronauts on space walking missions now that a dropped 
wrench or even a dropped pencil could spell catastrophe 
w following tin 


ag them in 


tions. Negotiators said progress 
was being made. 

Senate Republican leaden are 


leave and re-enter the job market,” 
and the "occupational segregation" 
of women in lower-paying jobs. 

The report, the government's 
most detailed study of the compa- 
rable worth idea, said there were 
already adequate remedies for pay 
discrimination, in the Equal Pay 
Act of 1963 and the Civil Rights 
Act of 1964. The commission re- 
port recommended “uncompro- 
mising enforcement” of the 1963 
law. which requires equal pay for 
equal work. 

But, it said, 3 policy of compara- 
ble worth would require “a radical 
reordering of our economic sys- 
tem.” 

The report is being sent this week 
to the eight members erf the com- 
mission, who will vote on the find- 
ings and recommendations at their 
meeting April II. The report is con- 
sistent with the views expressed by 
a majority of commissioners in- 
cluding the chairman. Clarence M. 
Pendleton Jr. 

Philip L Sparks, a spokesman 
for the American Federation of 
State, County and Municipal Em- 
ployees. sharply criticized the re- 
port 

“This is a reversal of a long- 
standing policy to put the federal 
government on the side of employ- 
ees in pay discrimination cases,” he 
said. 


ite House but have indicated 
that they may move on their own If 
an agreanent appears impossMe. 

Results of the survey of House 
Republicans, a copy of which was 
obtained by The Washington Post, 
showed a consensus for an across- 
the-board freeze with additional 
domestic program cuts, generally 
in line with those preposed by the 
Senate budget panel 
More preferred this approach to 
Mr. Reagan’s proposal for a freeze 
in overall spending with differing 
cuts in specific programs. 

Of all domestic spending cuts 
fisted as options, only Mr. Rea- 
gan’s proposal foe a 5-percent pay 
cut for federal wmiera failed to 
gain support from a majority of 
House Republicans. It was op- 
posed by 53 percent The proposal' 
also was rejected by the Senate 
panel 

A summary of the results indi- 
cated that 62 percent of Hoase Re- 
publicans favored a freez e on So- 
cial Security benefits as part of a 
'ensive freeze, 
in four of House Republi- 
cans responding said they favored a 
freeze in nhhtary spending author- 
ityaspartof a comprehensive bud- 
get freeze. The figure dropped to 61 
percent for anything approaching a 
military spending freeze without 
comparable domestic cuts. 

Reagan Seeks Poficy Shift 
President Ronald Reagan, pro- 
claiming the “age of the entrepre- 
neur,” said Thursday Hot his ad- 
ministration sought a radical shift 
in government policy marked by 
tax simplification and reduced gov- 
ernment spending, The New York 
Times reported from New York. 

“We nave lived through (he age 
of big industry and the age of the 
giant corporation, but I behevc that 
this is the age of the entrepreneur, 
the age erf lie individual,” Mr. Rea- 
gan told students on the St John's 
University campus in Queens, New 
York. He also visited the New York 

Stock Exchange- 


Deputy Chief 
Is Appointed 
In Hungary 

By Robert Gillette 

Los Angeles Times Service 

BUDAPEST — The Hungarian 
Communist Party, in an apparent 
effort to ensure an orderly succes- 
sion of power, has named a deputy 
for die first time to Janos Radar. 
72, who has ruled Eastern Europe’s 
most prosperous nation since 1 956. 

Karoly Nemeth, 62, a member of 
the Politburo and an associate of 
Mr. Radar since the 1950s, was 
named deputy general secretary 
Thursday at the end of a four-day 
party congress. As expected, the 
congress ratified Mr. Radar's con- 
tinned leadership and set policy 
guidelines fra Hungary’s develop- 
ment aver the next five years. 

Voting tmanimonsly, in keeping 
with the Soviet style of Communist 
Party meetings, the session's 1,016 
delegates reaffirmed Hungary’s 
commitment to liberalizing eco- 
nomic reforms that have given the 
nation's farms and factories wide 
scope to manage themselves and 
allowed small private enterprises to 
flourish.- 1 • 

“The byword is contimrity,’’ a 
Western diplomat said, in summing 
up the 23th party congress. 

Mr. Kadar appeared vigorous 
and relatively healthy, and diplo- 
matic observers said he has shown 
no indication of stepping down in 
the near future. However, he has 
been expected to begin delegating 
some of his responsibilities, partly 
to ease his workload and also to 
ensure the eventual transfer of 
power to a trusted ally who would 
continue his economic policies. 

Mr. Nemeth moved into the par- 
ty’s Central Gmmmteem 1956, the 
same year the Soviet Army crashed 
a nationwide anti-Communist in- 
surrection and installed Mr. Kadar 
as party leader in place of Imre 



East-West Talks Skirt Arms Control 

Allies Gain Confidence at European Security Conference 


Karoly Nemeth 


Nagy, whom the Russians execut- 
ed. 

After a period of harsh repres- 
sion, Mr. Kadar gradually won 
public confidence and respect by 
loosening ideological controls and 
moving away from a highly central- 
ized, Soviet-style economy to one 
that has brought Hungary a mark- 
edly improved standard of living. 

Mr. Nemeth has served as head 
of the parly's agriculture commit- 
tee. its economic policy committee 
and, most recently, as headiof party 
organization and personnel. While 
thoe was no direct indication that 
he is to be groomed as Mr. Kadafs 
successor, analysts said that bis ap- 
pointment as deputy appeared to 
put him in an advantageous posi- 
tion. 

During the dosing session, three 
members of the party's 13-man rat- 
ing Politburo were removed: Va- 
leria Brake, 65, a hard-liner, Miha- 
ly Korean, an armed forces expert, 
and Lajo5 Mehes, a trade union 
functionary. 

Three others were added: Karoly 
Grosz, 55, who is thought to have 
reservations about the country’s 
economic direction, Csaba Ha- 
mori, leader of the youth organiza- 
tion, and Istvan Szabo, who heads 
the main farmers’ organization. 


Panel Disputes Its Own 'Contra’ Vote 


By John Vinocur 

New York Tima Serna 

STOCKHOLM — The East- 
West conference on security in Eu- 
rope is now at its midpoint, with 
many of the Western allies believ- 
ing they may achieve some impor- 
tant goals by the time the meetings 
conclude in 1986. 

The West considers that it has 
overcome its initial concern about 
the talks. When the conference be- 
gan in January 1984, the allies 
feared that the Soviet Union would 
use it in its rampmg n against de- 
ployment erf new American medi- 
um-range nuclear missiles, Per- 
shing 2 and cruise missiles, in 
Western Europe. 

It was a time when the Geneva 
arms talks were broken off, and 
Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro- 
myko was asserting at the opening 
session here that “the present U.S. 
administration is thmlting of war 
and acting accordingly.” 

Bat the meetings, grouping 35 
nations under the offioal name of 
Conference on Confidence and Se- 
curity-Building Measures and Dis- 
armament in Europe, have not 
mined into a sounding board for 
the anns-control issues that the 
Western allies insist are not part of 
the conference mandate 

Now, with arms control talks re- 
sumed in Gmeva, the sessions here 
have settled into their own-rhythm. 
According to Jean-Rerre Ritter, 
the Swiss delegate, the conference 
has no particular dynamics of its 
own, but generally reflects the evo- 
lution of East-West relations. 

In this context. Western dele- 
gates have reported serious conver- 
sations with their counterparts 
from the Warsaw Pact over the last 
few months, and now see the 
tafin that discussions on 
conference document could begin 
in thefafi. 

“You just don’t hear the Soviets 
going on about Pershings and 
cruises here anymore, and that is 


Leader Calk Alert ga£ 


H* Associated Press 

8GUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
l£??? tnre ^stalled five new 
gpcC oart justices Friday over 
“Wans of President Roberto 
? Ctedova. He called the *o- 
Jnariaacal coup" and placed 
• forces on alert 
- R Snazo had said he would 
TPWxnt the installation of 
Selected fltegdly in open vio- 
■ of the constitution. 

« that was no show of force or 
when the justices were 
''“lftd* National Assembly. 

’■ ^jS-aocr session that ended 
'Friday, the 82-maober legis- 
to remove the justices 

corruption. Alter the 

ara, Mr.Suazo-said on televi- 
tnat the situation amounts to 
■tows of the cr- 

and “a technical corn ” 

spokesrnra raid the 
fl forces commaada; General 
* L6p« Rctcs, flias instruct- 
“tots to be maintained an 


%hotu the country 


The high court is appointed by 
ibe legislature but has had the pres- 
ident’s complete backing and is 
known to include friends of his. 

The constitution says magis- 
trates may not be removed; sus- 
pended or transferred from their 
posts after being elected hy the leg- 
fd a run ? to four-year terms. 

Mr. Suazo ordered police to 
guard the Supreme Court building 
Friday after an emergency meeting 
with the military high command 
and his cabinet. It apparently was a 
move to keep the new justices from 
entering the building; 

The confrontation appears to re- 
sult from a recent falling-out be- 
tween Mr. Suazo and the legisla- 
ture's president, Efrain Bu Giron. 

Mr. Bu Girdn appointed the In- 
itiative oaod to investigate the jus- 
tices alter Mr. Suazo refused to 
back Mr. Bu Girin’s candidacy for 
president in the November elec- 
tions. Mr. Suazo is barred by law 
from sedan* re-election. 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Leaders of 
ibe Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee disagree strongly about 
whether their vote to prombit the 
use of U.S. foreign aid to rebels in 
Nicaragua actually bars such aid. 

The committee chairman, Rich- 
ard G. Lugar, Republican of Indi- 
ana, and Senator Claiborne Pefl, 
Democrat of Rhode Island, the 
committee’s ranking minority 
member, could not even agree 
Thursday on which of two versions 
of an aid amendment had been 
adopted bjr the oonwinet Wednes- 
day when it approved a SZ2LS-bS- 
hon aid bill fra fiscal 1986. 

At issue is whether the amend- 
ment, adopted by a 9-8 vote, pro- 
hibits agreements (hat would en- 
able other countries receiving U.S. 
aid to give some of it to the guerril- 
las fighting Nicaragua's leftist gov- 
ernment. 

There have been unconfirmed re- 
thai some aid provided to 
and B Salvador has 
been diverted to the rebels. 

The amendment is unfikriy to 
survive in the foil Senate, sources 
said, because Mr. Lugar wifi ex- 
plain thai there was serious dis- 
agreement about what amendment 
was adopted. 

The confusion about what hap- 


pened Wednesday night began af- 
ter the committee, on a tie vote, 
failed to adopt an amendment pro- 
Senator Christopher J. 
of Connecticut. 

tied thai^aid funds ¥ra*fiscan9&S 
may not be used, directly or indi- 
rectly. to support “mffitary or para- 
nrifilary operations in Nicaragua 
by any group, organization, move- 
ment or individual" 

However, Republican members 
were unanimous in opposing Mr. 
Dodd’s second paragraph, which 
said no funds could go to any other 
country that provided support to 
such operations in Nicaragua. 

According to the stenographic 
record, Mr. PeU said he wanted to 
offer an Amendment “that might 
meet some of the objections be- 
cause it is virtually the same as the 
Dodd amendment except that it 
does not prohibit the giving of aid 
to third co u ntries that might in 
their wisdom, or lack of wisdom, 
want to assist the contras," or re- 
bds. 

Mr. Dodd asked, “As I under- 
stand it, what my cofleagne is doing 
is just taking out [the second para- 
erauhl of mv amendment?” 

Mr. PeU replied, “That is essen- 
tially what it does.” 

Later however, Mr. FeQ said his 
amendment was not a truncated 
version of the Dodd proposal but 


consisted of different language. It 
stated that aid funds cannot be 
used "directly or indirectly" to hdp 
“any person or group engaging in 


an inaugency or other act 
lion” against the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment. Bat it also added: 

“The United States shall make. 
no agreement and shall enter into 
no tmderstandmg, either formal or 
informal, under which a recipient 
of U.& economic or mililaiy assis- 
tance or a purchaser of American 
military equipment shall provide 
assistance of any land to persons or 
groups engaging in an insurgency 
or other act of rebellion against the 
government erf Nicaragua.” 


delegate. “In some ways, 
seriousness has replaced propagan- 
da. - 

The Stockholm meetings are part 
of the consultative process that has 
grown out of the 1975 Helsinki 
agreements. While the Soviet 
Union has focused on broad, de- 
clarative proposals involving the 
renunciation of force, the West has 
concentrated on what it describes 
as practical mffitaiy and political 
measures that would lower the risk 
of war. 

The relative optimism among 
Western delegates relates to the 
fact that acceptance by the Soviet 
Union of any of the Western pro- 
posals on bringing greater trans- 
parency to military procedures in 
Europe would represent a net gain 
to the Atlantic alliance. With the 


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Warsaw Pact’s advantages in con- 
ventional forces, any new controls 
augmenting those already present' 
in the Helsinki accord are consid- 
ered advantageous by the North 
Atlantic Treaty Otgamzation. 

Tbe first important development 
for the conference, signaling the 
possible shape of an agreement, 
was President Ronald Reagan’s 
speech in Dublin last June in which 
he expressed a U.S. willingness to 
affirm the principle of nonuse of 
force. Until then, the West had said 
that such an affirmation would be 
redundant in the sense that it was 
already included in the United Na- 
tions darter and in NATO decla- 
rations. 

Moreover, some Weston dele- 
gates feared that the discussion of 
nonuse of force would open up 
what they consider other irrelevant 
issues bong pressed hy the Soviet 
Union, such as renunciation of a 
first nuclear strike and of first use 
of chemical weapons. 

President Reagan's speech of- 
fered a means for the conference to 
move forward. The West now has 
made it dear that it would discuss 
language that would affirm the 
principle of renunciation of force, 

but without specific relations hip to 
nuclear or chemical weapons. 

The Western countries also have 
laid out proposals in six areas in- 
volving the exchange of nrilitaiy 
information, annual forecasts of 
military activities, notification of 


mflitaiy activities outside garri- 
sons. observation of maneuvers, 
verification of compliance through 
inspection and establishment of 
hot-line co mmunica tions links. 
The most striking proposal in- 
volves 45 days' notification for any 
out-of-garrison activity involving 

6.000 men, for the mobilization of 

25.000 reservists and regular 
troops, or fra any amphibious ac- 
tivity with 3,000 combat troops. 

The current arrangements, called 
fra in the 1975 Helsinki accord, 
specify 21 days’ notice and 25,000 
men. The change, 


according to 

Western officials, corresponds to 
the realities of Warsaw Pad exer- 
cise patterns and would hamper the 
possibility of intimidation moves 
or surprise attack. 

The proposals also go beyond 
the Helsinki provisions m guaran- 
teeing the presence of observers at 
all exercises. The present agree- 
ment allows the country holding 
the maneuvers to decide whether it 
will invite observers. 

James E Goodin, the U.S. dele- 
gate, acknowledged that inspection 
and verification would be areas 
where it would be difficult to get 
Soviet agreement, and a Soviet mfl- 
itaiy delegate, General Valentin 
Tataroikov, already has ruled out 
the liketibood of Soviet acceptance. 
In torn, the Russians have called 
for a ceiling of 40,000 men on ma- 
neuvers, evidently aimed at NA- 
TO’s large-scale autumn exercises. 



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Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


limlb 


INTERNATIONAL 


PiAliArd WlihlViVii }«i Ti me>u) Tir TaAi^Mii Pu4 


Srlb lint Reagan Gets His America Moving Again 

Tbr Wa*in£lofl Pu* O V-' V-' 


The Lost White Tribe 


Television coverage of South Africa's agony 
has made the principal actors, white, black and 
brown, comprehensible. It has underlined the 
message of prior press reports: the bafflement 
of a lost white tribe that cannot understand 
why Americans are so aroused. South Africa's 
leaders deserve a hearing, and an answer. 

Look at our country, pleads the Afrikaners’ 

president. P.W. Botha, It has problems, but a 
prosperous white minority has spread econom- 
ic benefits to 21 million blacks, the healthiest 
and best paid in all Africa. Why kill this goose? 

Racial injustice exists, he concedes. "Ur- 
ban" blacks deserve some political rights, and 
further "reforms” are needed in the apartheid 
system that treats the majority of blacks as 
citizens not of Smith Africa but of tribal 
"homelands." Just give us time, he asks. 

Yet Mr. Botha's nationalist regime cannot 
say bow much tune because it does not say and 
probably no longer knows where it is gfugg it 
deals politically only with blacks who accept 
the apartheid framework or wQ] not press too 
vigorously against it. It deals no less harshly 
than it did a generation ago with blacks who 
ask to be consulted before their fate is decided. 
It muzzles them. It bans them. It shoots them. 

Mr. Botha grieves for the victims, vows 10 
uphold law and order and blames radicals for 
provoking bloodshed. But that will no longer 
do, precisely because South Africa’s black ma- 
jority is better fed and increasingly better led. 
It is learning that its labor is vital to the whites' 
vaunted prosperity and that every promise of 
reforms reeks of paternalism. 


Nor can the killings of unarmed demonstra- 
tors and the other outrages of institutional 
racism be mitigated by pointing to raisgovem- 
ment in black-run African nations. President 
Botha is the first to ask ibat Afrikaners be 
judged for what they' ore — a proud, devour 
people of European origin whose forebears 
settled ia South Africa before the .American 
Revolution. Their claim to a common kinship 
with the West is what sharpens the very con- 
demnation that Mr. Botha deplores. 

Racism is not unique to South Africa, and 
no Western society is without sin. But. after 
every allowance is made, South Africa remains 
the only country claiming Western values 
whose political system dishonors them and 
whose government stands forthrightly on the 
side of racist repression. Betraying the reli- 
gious tenets underlying Western culture, it has 
made race the touchstone of political rights. 
And even now its leaden seek not to unite with 
the black majority but to expel it from South 
Africa to the specious tribal homelands. 

How Americans might best help rescue this 
"Western” outpost from calamity is a hard 
question. But judging the essence of South 
Africa's present system Is not hard. Secretary 
of Slate George Shultz used the right words the 
other day in reacting to the Uitenhage killings. 
They are repugnant, and the system that pro- 
duced them is eviL With a forbearing president 
in the White House, the prodigal white tribe 
has had every chance to make its case to 
Americans. It needs now to listen. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Geneva + MX = ? 


The choice before the House of Representa- 
tives in conadering the MX missile was posed 
in terms that many congressmen wished to 
revise or escape. But they could not avoid the 
terms — up or down, no conditions attached 
— and they made a dose but sound decision in 
boosting the second batch of 21 MX missiles 
over ttKnr fourth and last parliamentary hurdle 
of this session. Cut now to Geneva. 

There is widespread agreement that on its 
merits the MX would have crashed. Its fate 
was bound to pivot on the perceived probable 
effect of approval or rejection on the recently 
resumed arms control talks in Geneva. The 
Reagan administration acknowledged as much 
by bringing back the chief of its Geneva nego- 
tiating team for eleventh-hour lobbying, while 
the secretary of defense toured in Europe. 

The issue admitted of different and equally 
conscientious answers, and certainly it became 
extremely politicized. For a swing bloc of 
legislators, most of them Democrats, the ad- 
ministration's insistence on needing MX to 
strengthen the president's Geneva hand, or at 
least prevent the w eakening of his hand, added 
a painful extra burden. This group favors the 
idea of effective aims control as a tool of 
security but harbors strong misgivings about 


Mr. Reagan’s commitment to it These legisla- 
tors had to face the possibility that by voting 
for the fflissflg they would help him to avoid 
serious negotiations and that in any event they 
would pay politically for their vote. With no 
little courage, they took the risk. Les Asp in. 
the Wisconsin Democrat who chairs the House 
Armed Services Committee, was their leader. 

' Asa practical matter, it will take some time 
at Geneva for President Reagan to learn 
whether his MX victory was worth the tremen- 
dous struggle be waged to win it, and for those 
who supported him to learn whether they were 
wise to do so. We think, nonetheless, that a 
conscientious Congress could not possibly 
have cut off the president in these early-Gene- 
va, early-Gorbachev circumstances. 

There is a residual doubt about Mr. Rea- 
gan's approach to arms control — and a great 
deal more than a residual doubt about the 
Kremlin's. But there is also a residual aware- 
ness that the position of strength Mr. Reagan 
has built (with help from his predecessors and. 
in the MX vote, from some of his political 
rivals) and the image of strength he has fash- 
ioned for himself give the United States some 
special opportunities now at Geneva 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Mejico Si, Argentina No 


Mexico gets consistent and steadfast sup- 
port from the International Monetary Fund. 
Argentina does not. Mexico has just reached 
agreement with the IMF on the next stage of 
economic adjustment to manage its foreign 
debts. But IMF loans have now ceased to flow 
to Argentina until at least the middle of the 


year, when resumption will be contingent on 
better progress by the government in bruudne 


better progress by the government in bringing 
the couniiy’s accounts into balance. 

Mexico has put itself through a time of 
severe austerity that is beginning to produce 
hopeful results. The country is moving back 
toward normal financial relations with the rest 
of the world, and the economy is beginning to 
grow vigorously again. But Argentina has nev- 
er quite come to terms with the need to bring 
its accounts into better balance. One reliable 
indicator of the slippage is its annual inflation 
rate, now around 800 percent and rising. 

The difference between the performance of 
the two countries has less to do with technical 
economics than with their politics. Mexico is 
under a strong and self-confident government 
Argentina is led by a promising but sometimes 


Other Opinion 


Papandreon vs. Enlargement t** * lwle teaches the absurdity of 

* ™ nreachinp union whm unify nf wiirii is «■> 


The admission of Spain and Portugal is 
necessary to fulfill the pob'iical purpose of the 
Community, which is the stability of Europe. 
The difficulty has been the threat of Andreas 
Papandreou's government to block enlarge- 
ment unless he gets special funding for 
Greece’s Mediterranean agricultural products. 
The best way to avoid a threat of blackmail is 
to give advance notice that it win not be paid. 


preaching union when unity of spirit is so 
elusive. No member state would allow itself to 


elusive. No member slate would aDow itself to 
be overridden on a matter of essential national 
interest. There is general agreement that once 
enlargement is settled, there must in practice 
be more majority voting to assist the flow of 
business, but there is no sense in pretending 
that the national veto of last resort could lose 
its place in Community arrangements. 

— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR MARCH 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Asquitii Attacks Lords’ Power 
LONDON — In a crowded House of Com- 
mons, the Prime Minister introduced [on 
March 29] the Government’s veto scheme with 
regard to the House of Lords. Mr. Asquith 
proposed "that this House wiD immediately 
resolve itself into a committee to consider the 
relations between the two houses of Parlia- 
ment and the extent of the duration of Parlia- 
ment ... We should have, and should contin- 
ue to have, in this country two legislative 
Chambers. We desire to see maintained in all 
its integrity the predominance of this House in 
legislation, while the House of Lords can exer- 
cise the useful functions of consultation and 


IE- IUMIM — - - - — - — - 

revision and of delay consistent with the pre- 
dominance of the House of Commons. 


1935: Berlin Admits Holding Jacob 

BERLIN — The German government official- 
ly admitted [on March 29] that Berthold Jacob, 
the Jewish journalist of Strasbourg alleged by 
the Swiss government to have been kidnaped 
over the Swiss frontier near BaseL has been 
arrested by German authorities and is being 
held in Bolin for trial for military espionage. 
This is the first admission of Jacob’s arrest by 
the German secret police, although the capture 
was effected three weeks ago. The communi- 
que states that Jacob, whose real name is 
claimed to be Solomon, was arrested while 
attempting to cross into German territory with 
a false passport. The Basel police, however, 
claim that Jacob was kidnaped by men in a 
motorcar as part of a six-month plot. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman J9$S-I«82 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WTLLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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BnBFRT K McCABE Cleauft' Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Auceuue PuNuher 

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il, S, subscription: S2S4 Yearly Secondfjass 

v 1985, International Hen 


N EW YORK — The least com- 
plicated explanation for Ron- 


uncertain administration that is trying to pull 
together a deeply divided people. There are not 
many countries in which the various classes 
and interests have fought as vehemently, or as 
destructively, over the past generation for their 
respective shares of the national income. La- 
bor. industry and Argentina's swollen military 
establishment have all been dangerously suc- 
cessful in pressing their claims over the years, 
with the result that all of those claims add up 
to substantially more than the country pro- 
duces. Inflation is the classic resulL 
It is the government's job to work out the 
compromises that will allow the country to live 
within its means. President Raiil Alfoasm evi- 
dently feels that for political reasons, be can- 
not safely go much further to reduce incomes 
and consumption. But the IMF is telling him 
that he must go a lot further. The Argentines 
argue that conventional methods of reducing 
inflation are very hard on the poor. The answer 
is that the rest of the country' — the middle 
class, business and especially the military — 
can properly be asked to share the costs. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


aid Reagan's continued mastery of 
Congress and his opponents comes 
from a veteran ana senior federal 
civil servant who wishes to remain 
anonymous. He offers it not to dis- 
parage the president but in grudg- 
ing admiration of his ability to take 
and hold the offensive as few presi- 
dents have done for so long. 

Call it a "one arm, two ana" 
approach: The president lets it be 
known that be intends to ask for 
both your arms. The demands are 
leaked. Budget Director David 
Stockman, without confirming the 
leaks, sees do reason why govern- 
ment should subsidize both arms. 
White House spokesmen play coy. 

Liberals ana moderates are ap- 
palled. Interest groups mobilize. 
Conservatives rally to the presi- 
dent's Arms Reform Plan. 

The White House agrees to nego- 
tiate. And in the end, when Mr. 
Reagan decides that he will take 
only one arm, opponents sigh with 
relief and hail the compromise as a 
victory for moderation. 

Alan J. Abramson, who helped to 
prepare a study of the president’s 
governing techniques for "The Rea- 
gan Record," an Urban Institute 
report, said that the "most difficult 
question we wrestled with and were 
not able to resolve” was whether the 
president has succeeded through 
compromise. (The Urban Institute 
is a bipartisan organization that in- 
cludes Reagan conservatives, liber- 
als, educators, corporate heads and 
former cabinet officials.) 

"You could say be compromises 
in the end, but it' often takes him a 
very long time,” said Mr. Abram- 
son, "and it may be more sensible to 
say that by aslung for a great deal 
and waiting, he gets much more 
than anyone expected him to geL" 

Once again this year Mr. Reagan 
has sent a budget to Congress rail- 
ing for draconian cuts in domestic 
programs and for higher military 
spending. Democrats (and a Tew 
Republicans) are recoiling at the 
domestic cuts. Republicans (and 
many Democrats) are mortified by 
the size of the deficits. Both sides 
have solemnly pronounced the plan 
"dead on arrival” and declared that 
they will write their own budget 

But in die weeks of ha ggling and 
handwringing that are ahead, the 
White House mil hold its ground, 
Mr. Reagan's “dead” budget will 
quietly return to life and in the end 
the president will probably gel 
much of what he wanted. 

Thus Mr. Reagan's STSO-bQlion 
tax cut and his $1 J- trillion military 
buildup remain largely intact de- 
spite agreement among most econo- 
mists and key presidential advisers 
that those two policies have been 
responsible for most of the deficiL 

According to the Urban Institute. 
Mr. Reagan has won more than half 
the domestic budget cuts he has 
sought since 198 1 and is likely to do 
as well or better this year. 

Social Security and its cost-of- 
living allowances, which were 
thought to have been untouchable, 
have been touched. Like many of 
the working poor in previous Rea- 
gan years, family farmers now face 
the loss of federal protection from 
the wintry risks of the free market. 

Programs (o help provide health 
care for the middle-income aged 
and college educations for the chil- 
dren of middle-income families are 
now in doubL And such agencies as 
the Occupational Health and Safety 
Administration, the Legal Services 
Corporation and the Small Business 
Administration, which have been at 
the core of activist government, are 
dearly not long for this world. 

On other fronts. Mr. Reagan’s 


By Saul Friedman 

This is the first of two articles* 


popularity remains high despite a 
policy failure in Lebanon and the 
loss of nearly 300 American lives. 

The peace movement seems to be 
in a remission based on the hopes 
for the Geneva arms talks. U.S. aid 
to El Salvador continues. The presi- 
dent frankly acknowledges his in- 
tention to remove the Sandinist 
government in Nicaragua; one way 
or another, despite heavy congres- 
sional opposition. Unsupported 
"contras” continue fighting there. 

Through research for “star wars," 
the president has won permission to 
expand the arms race to space. New 
Trident submarines, aircraft carri- 
ers, battleships, Pershing-2, cruise 
and other missies enter the arsenal 
— along with the B-l bomber and 
the MX, which were thought to have 
been killed by past Congresses. 

John L. Palmer and Isabel V. 
Sawhill wrote in the Urban Insti- 


tute’s report that Mr. Reagan's “re- 
jection of the moderate-io-jiberal 
consensus*’ [ h«t had dominated 
both Republican and Democratic 
administrations for 40 years, “his 
vision of a better America based on 
less government and more individ- 
ual enterprise and his efforts to 
translate this vision into a new 
agenda for the nation have been 
both distinctive and controversial. 
Not since 1932 has there been such 
a redirection of public purposes.” 

Thomas Mann, executive director 
of the American Political Science 
Association, has said: “What Rea- 
gan demonstrated is that under the 
right conditions . . . you can make 
America get moving again," 

The experts argue whether Mr. 
Reagan has really moved the nation 
away from the Roosevelt New Deal 
or merely curbed the excesses of 
such successors as the Great Soci- 



ety. The Urban Institute scholars 
are not sure bow radical Mr. Rea- 
gan’s redirection will turn out to be. 
fietn o c rat s tend to believe that Mr. 
Reagan’s changes will not last much 
beyond bis presidency or the next 
deep recession- Yet it is dear that he 
ti ps c hw nfifl d the terms of debate 
and with it the national a ge nda. 

In tire budget battles, no one pro- 
poses adding new social programs: 
the diOTuagiVwi is over which to cue 
md by how mncli- There is no more 
talk of making absolute cots in Pen- 
tagon spending; the argument is 
over how much to raise it. The fear 
of new Vietnams and the anger of a 
few years ago at covert CIA actions 
faded as Americans cheered the 
Grenada invasion or shrugged at 
U.S. military ventures in Latin 
America and the Middle East 

While the scholars and political 
experts search, for the tactical se- 
crets of Reagan successes, it should 
not be overlooked that his greatest 
source of power is his continued 
popularity. For most politically ac- 
tive Americans, men and women 
with educations, homes and rela- 
tively secure jobs in white-collar in- 
dustries, the Reagan programs ap- 
pear to be working. Studies by the 
Urban Institute and the Congres- 
sional Budget Office find that the 
affluent have grown more affluent 
while the poor grew poorer. 


Only a few years ago, such schol- 
rs as James MacGregor Burns and 


ars as James MacGregor Buns and 
political operatives like Lloyd Cut- 
ler, the fanner Carter White House 
counsel, were convinced that the 
presidency had become paralyzed. 


The writer, an associate professor qf 
journalism at GobmOa Umrersiiy. cap- 
ered die White House for 19 yean. He 
contributed das comment to Neysday. 


Thatcher Coaches Post-Imperial Gusto 


L ONDON — A paradox of mod- 
r era politics is that some of the 


1 era politics is that some of the 
most effective leaders lead while 


By George F. Will 


looking backward. Churchill was a 
19th century romantic. De Gaulle, 
entrusted with authorship of the 
Fifth Republic, had bis gaze fixed 
on the sweep of past grandeur. 
When Ronald Reagan said “Ameri- 
ca is back,” he was saying that 
greatness is traditional Prune Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher brings a 
retrospective cast of mind to an ag- 
gressive attempt to shape the future. 

Asked in an interview at 10 
Downing Sum whether Britain can 
have a commercial future as bright 
as its commercial past, Mrs. 
Thatcher reacted in the vigorous 
maimer characteristic of the very 
faithful when confronted by un- 
comprehending agnosticism. Her 
answer contained about 2 percent 
economics, 2 percent sociology and 
96 percent nationalism. 

The question: Is not your prob- 
lem more complicated than the one 
Mr. Reagan saw for himself? Cam- 
paigning in the late 1970s, he said 
that Americans are instinctive capi- 
talists. bursting with entrepreneur- 
ial creativity, healthy people ready 
to remake the world if only govern- 
ment would get out of their way. 
But the British are not that way. 

Her terse roily: "They were.” 

Her expanded reply, delivered 
with quiet vehemence as she edged 
forward in her chain “Most of the 
major industrial inventions were 
ours. The steam engine, Brunei’s 
bridges, the spinning jenny, Ark- 
wright and so on, you name iL" 

With her fust word, "most,” she 
was gilding the lily a biL But gilding 
lilies in ways that stir confidence is 
an act of leadership. 

Sbe continued to the effect that 


Britain has been more creative more 
recently than all the talk about "the 
British disease” would suggest Brit- 
ain created radar, the jet engine, 
vertical- takeoff aircraft, peoidfim. 

But wfaat happened to that vigor? 
She says there has been failure, es- 
pecially in universities, to adapt to 
Britain's role after empire. The uni- 
versities were fine at producing co- 
lonial administrators but have never 
adapted to the need to train people 
for trade and industry. This reflects 


logy and economics. Mis. Thatcher 
has said: “Some reverend and right 
reverend prelates have been heard 
in the land. 1 make no complaint 
about that After all, it wouldn't be 
spring, would it, without the voice 
of die occasional cuckoo?” 

A few years ago protesters were 
gathered at a ban as Mrs. Thatcher 
arrived to give a speech. A television 
reporter asked her reaction to the 
protest. At first she seemed puzzled. 


Then sbe said "Oh. you mean this. 
Why should I care? These people 


Why should 
don’t belong 


Entrepreneurs didn’t 
have Oxford accents. 


a "baric snobbery ” the prejudice 
"that trade and industiy aren't' 
quite the thing as professions.” 

About that snobbery, die says 
idly, "We are getting rid of it” One 
way she tries to do that is by evok- 
ing memories of Britain's proud 


achievements and by laying waste; 
rhetorically, to what she sees as 


rhetorically, to what she sees as 
institutionalized snobbery. 

Oxford, proving that acade m ic 
folly knows no nationality, recently 
voted against giving Mrs. Thatcher 
what it has given other recent prime 
ministers — an honorary degree. In 
a speech last weekend she noted 
that many of Britain’s best entre- 
preneurs came from modest back- 
grounds, "didn't speak with Oxford 
accents” and "hadn't got what peo- 
ple call the zight connections.” 
What critics "can’t stomach is that 
wealth creators have a tendency to 
acquire wealth in the process of cre- 
ating it for others.” 

Various bishops are muting theo- 


I thank God they don't” . 

Her success derives in part from a 
second paradox: Democracy is gov- 
ernment by consent, but oneway to 
get consent from a majority is to be 
seen to care Side for consensus; It 
has made her a success — soon, an 
unprecedented success. 

A constant complaint about de- 
mocracy is that doctoral cycles 
overrun the cydes of problems. By 
the time a government formulates 
and begins implementing policies, 
the pendular movement of opinion 
rearranges the governmental furni- 
ture, and the policies do not have 
time to-be tested. In 1979 Mis. 
Thatcher said she would need two 
full terms — 10 years — to change 
Britain’s course, which meant com- 
bating snobbery and making otter 
altitudinal changes. She may get 
more than 10 years. 

In May 1987 she will break As- 
quith’s record (1908-1916) for the 
longest consecutive residence inNa 
10. In 1 987 or 1988 die may became 
Britain's Franklin Roosevelt, the 
only leader since the early emer- 
gence of democracy — since, say, 
the 1832 Reform Act in Britain — 
to win three consecutive elections. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


The Message to Washington Was to Drop Nimeiri 


L ONDON — The American sice 
/ president. George Bush, must 
have come away from his March 5-7 
visit to Sudan with few doubts about 
the widespread unpopularity of Pres- 
ident Gaafar Nimein. who arrived in 
the United States on Wednesday to 
seek more military and economic aid 
as wdl as for a medical checkup. 

Mr. Bush had extensive consulta- 
tions in Khartoum with both sup- 
porters and opponents of the Nimeiri 
regime. Some of the more sensitive 
meetings took place with Chester A 
Crocker, the U.S. assistant secretary 
of state for .African affairs. 

.Among those who presented their 
views were a delegation of Southern 
Sudanese leaders ineluding a Sudan- 
ese vice president. General Joseph 
Lagu. and a senior minister. Abel 
Alierr the recently freed claimant to 
the leadership of the powerful Ansari 
Moslem secL Sayed Sadeq el-Mahdi. 
and a group or prominent Sudanese 
professionals and academics who 
asked to remain anonymous. 

Mr. Bush's biggest" surprise must 
have been the memorandum p resen l- 


By Colin Legnxn 


ed by Vice President Lagu. who was 
the military leader of the An vanya 


the military leader of the Anyanya 
movement during die South’s 14-year 
war of resistance that began in 1958. 
He has been the major Southern prop 
of the Nimeiri regime, but his memo- 
randum is remarkably critical. 

General Lagu cited cultural and 
racial factors to explain the periodic 
eruption of violence in Sudan’s 
North-South relations. For the first 
time he publicly criticized the intro- 
duction of Islamic law. which he said 
put Southerners “effectively in the 
position of second-class citizens.” 

He bluntly warned: “Certainly this 
is not acceptable to them, neither can 
they accept the position of a minority 
people, knowing that they are one- 
ihird of the population ... To them 
the leadership in the North is not 
serious about the unity of the country 
so long os {it introduces] issues that 
lend to complicate matters.” 

No less suprising was Genera) La- 
gu’s rebuttal or his own president's 
campaign to persuade Washington 
that the present insurrection in the 
South is Communist-led. 

‘'Southerners, in generaL" he said. 


“are not Communists, and commu- 
nism is little known among them. 
Those in the leadership of the current 
rebellion have all worked with me in 
various capacities, including their 
leader, John Garang. It was on my 
persona] recommendation that he 
was selected and sent for a company 
commanders’ course in one of the 
United Stales military academies.’’ 

General Lagu added that if the 
Southern movement now "appears to 
be Communist,” this could te a way 
of getting "the aid they badly need to 
promote tbeir struggle.” 

In another memorandum present- 
ed to Mr. Bush. Sayed Sadeq el-Mah- 
di said there is a widespread belief 
among Sudanese that the regime has 
failed the country. He proposed "an 
alliance of political parties, trade 
unions, the Southern movement and 
the armed forces to take power dar- 
ing a provisional period of redemp- 
tion.” This transition period would 
pave the way for the establishment of 
a democratic government 

While reassuring Mr. Bush as to 
the respect in which the United States 
is held by the Sudanese, be said that 


professors, lawyers and doctors. They 
are mostly Moslems or secularists liv- 
ing in the North. They maintained 
that the Nimeiri regime is at war “not 
only in the Southern provinces but 
throughout the nation.* 

They, too, called on Washington to 
freeze wwmmip. and military aid un- 
til human rights are respected, de- 
mocracy is restored and the war in 
the Sooth is ended. They said they 
would have preferred to sign their 
memorandum, but "for reasons that 
are undoubtedly dear to you, we 
mus t remain anonymous.” 

The view in Cairo rtf the situation 
in Sudan is gloomy. President Hosni 
Mubarak's advisers believe that Gen- 
eral Nimeiri is unlikely to survive for 
too much longer, and they are con- 
cerned about who might follow him. 


What to Do? 
Disinvest ; 
In Racism 


By Anthony Lewis 


OSTON — Events m South Afrt- 

BcTcorfronl .WKnffll. msmu- 

- ...kiir tnk novate, with bora 




apartheid and need onlv be gBKU 

Swaged. They have shown. wiL,- 
SSTthat they accept no change m 
the system of white supremacy. 

The most iimnediate drogsanv 
be economic. The toned States is 
now South Africa’s Urgttt trading 
partner, supplying nearly J) percent 
Sits imports. American investment 
there exceeds $10 billion. The ques- 
tion, an old one made more urgenu i* 
whether Americans should continue 
to do business in a country' gripped 
by a policy of state racism. 

American companies, challenged 
on the issue in recent years, have 
come ro argue that they do more good 
for the abused msgoriry bv staying in 
South Africa. They ate the Sullivan 
principles, accepted by some U.a. 
firms, which call for desegregation of 
work places and other steps toward 
just treatment of black employees. 
That argument was ably restated by 
the prudent of IBM, John F. Akers, 
in an article on this page yesterday. 

“We can do business in a way that f 
provides a model,” Mr. Akas con- 
chided, “for a society m winch blade, 
white, Asian and ‘colored’ might 
someday enjov peace and freedom.” 
That was ifiMSs choice, rather than to 
"wash our hands of !l” 

No doubt IBM is a model employ- 
er. But Mr. .Akers is quite unrealistic 
in his view of apartheid — and of 
what his or other American compa- 
nies can do about iL 

A business can order its own prac- 
tices in a way, promoting 


Mack employees, etfamnatmg segre- 
caied lunchrooms and the like. In 


Egypt regards good relations with Su- 
dan as vital to its security. The two 
countries have a mutual defense 
agreement Perhaps even more im- 
portant is Egypt's reliance on satis- 
factory division, of the N3e waters. 
The need for water demands a sym- 
pathetic attitude from the Southern 
Sudanese; in particular. 

President Mubarak recently re- 
tailed tim 300 Egyptian troops be bad 
sent to Khartoum to help protea 
President Nimeiri from an alb yd 
threat by Libya. Hie hopes that mis 
will be a signal to the Southerners 
that the Egyptians are not involved in 

BuHVfrV hlnbmak is opposed to 
political or .military interference in 
Sudan. His concern is to ensme that 
the successor regime will be sympa- 
thetic to Egyptian interests. 

International Herald Tribune. 


That is the point missed by Mr. 
Akers. IBM and other American 
compa n ies do a relatively small part 
of their business in Smith Africa, bnt 
their presence is an immensely im- 
portant symbol to South Afri can* it 

Western world — a sensenFlegi rima- ^ 
cy — for which they hunger. 

For IBM and others to leave would 
not be “to wash, our hands of it,” it 
would be a powerful statement of the 
limits of American toleration for in- 
stitutionalized racism. And I think it 
wiu happen if things go on as they are 
m Sou th Africa, no matter what the 
companies say now. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO TEE EDITOR 


Impressions of Sudan 


U.S. support for the present regime 
has alienated the Sudanese people. 


has alienated the Sudanese people. 
He argued that humanitarian roief 
should continue but that develop- 


ment and military aid should be given 
oofy to a regime based on tbe rule of 
law. a political solution for the prob- 
lem of ihe South, sound economic 
policies and democratic govemmenL 
The anonymous delegation of 
“concerned Sudanese professionals 
and academics.” who presented their 
memorandum to Mr. Crocker, de- 
clared that Mr. Bush's visit “co- 
incides with a most crucial phase of 
political developments in Sudan, and 
u therefore arouses tbe deep anxiety 
of most segments of our society.” 

They blamed the economic and po- 
litical crisis on IS years of misman- 
agement, poor planning, comiption 
and political despotism. They alleged 
that General Nimeiri imposed Islam- 
ic law as a means of muzzling dissenL 
Those subscribing to this memo- 
randum include former diplomats 
and senior civil servants, university 


Regarding U U.S. Food Aid Is Free, 
but Costs a Lot ” (Feb 4): 

I have traveled extensively in Su- 
dan for the past several months and 
seen thousands of refugees. The peo- 
ple can indeed eat wheat, com and 
powdered milk when available. There 
is certainly drinkable water to mix 
with powdered milk. As for "primi- 
tive” roads, I have traveled by truck 
on a two- lane hard-surfaced road 
from Khartoum to Port Sudan via 


Kas&ala, a town on the Ethiopian 
border where I visited two refugee 
camps. The scenes of human misery 
might be out of Dante’s “Inferno.” 

MARY NAKAMURA. 

Khartoum. 


out justice. They have already started 
to do so in the South, biting the back 
of the hand that they have been 
shown lor more than a decade. 

Already before Islamic law’s appli- 
cation to the penal code (which, by. 
tbe way, does allow for appeal, how- 
ever hopeless such pleas may be in 
Sudan now), Khartoum was the saf- 
est erty in Africa due pre-onmaatly 
to the nature of the Sudanese, who 
are peace-loving and uniquely gener- 
ous and sincere. Thievery, however, 
had grown common, in certain (usual- 
ly privileged) parts of town. In its 
ruthless fashion, Is lamic law nipped 

fhic tit rhA Klf/I* 1 hnkifa afiumia - - -* m 


dam for Islamic law itself, but rather 

G ^? ral misuse of it 

Like all laws discovered by man, Is- 
lamic law cannot live without justice, 
and that is what Sudan ' now lads 
most sorely — next to food. 

RALWl W. SCHLISLES; Jt 
New York. 


^Regarding “Palestinians, Others ” 
March 26) from Rita Horn- 


ruthless fashion. Is lamic law nipped . now the American Embassy 

this in the bud; but its abusive appii- 111 she wants she can 

cation in pursuit of consolidating ^ p t>acK to Bucharest and still find a 
President Nimeixi’s power has since coonl P r .w™ch is called Romania and 


The Sudanese are a moderate, 
cool-tempered people — up to a 
point: but when someone ruling them 
removes himself so far from their 
reality that he can discourse with Sufi 
mystics into the night while people 
across the Nile in Qmdurman are 
starving to death, do not expect sha- 
mans to seize the day. The people 
themselves will be the ones to mete 


- rresment JNimem s power has <inn» 
turned the st omachs of Sudanese. 
There should be no Western dis- 


Leners attended far publication 
should be addressed “Letters foput 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and futt ad- 
dress. loiters should be brief and . 
are subject fa editing. We cannot 
be responsible far- the return o f 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


country ^wtneb is called Romania and 
But, as Mohammad Taibush had 

is do 100^ a coun- 
tO'caUed Palestine andttePalestm- 

ian natitm and culture ate both in tir^ - 
course of disappearing. Iff-’ 

is^ssarjssss'- 

no^ht to anyone to destroy iifrom 
memory. 

AMIN BOUAZXZ. 

•Paris. 


-V . 






V :i j 

-v 




pHud lunchrooms and the like. In 
those respects American companies 
can set an example for others in 
South Africa. To the extent that the 
Sullivan principles have encouraged 
such behavior — and many US. 
companies in South Africa in tact do 
not comply with them — the princi- 
ples have been a good thing. 

The gains are of very modest di- . 
mension. The American companies J 
that substantially comply with the* 
Sullivan principles have, altogether, 
about 22,000 blade employees. That 
is in a country with a blade popula- 
tion of more than 22 million. 

Bat whatever American companies 
may accomplish on matters like fac- 
tory segregation, their chance of be- 
ing effective is infinitesimal when 
they move on to politics. That is. 
when they challenge — as Mr. Akers 
and others say they will — apart- 
heid’s premise that blacks have no 
political rights in South Africa. 

As Mr. Aiere wrote hirasdf. “Busi- 
ness people are not social reformers 
in disguise.” The notion that P.W. 
Botha will be moved by their political 
exhortations is, frankly, laughable. 

What does move the Pretoria gov- 
enunentisnosccreLltistheihreatof 
disinvestment, of American compa- 
nies pulling out. In words and in 
laws, officials have made obvious 
their fear of tire American disinvest- 
ment campaign. Its significance has 
also been acknowledged by business. 

. Chi March 14. the major business 
associations of South Africa called on 
tire government to make reforms, 
“Visible progress on this road,” theyr., 
said, wotud have a positive effect "on ' 
overseas opinion and especially on 
the current disinvestment debate in 
the United States.” The American 
Chamber of Commerce in Sooth Af- 
rica has also urged reform with an eye 
to heading off disinvestment. ' 

Over the years that disinvestment 
has been domed, I haw found it a 
difficu lt question with fair arguments 
on both sides. But the relentless re- 
fusal rtf the government to admit the 
political existence of its black people, 
or. their equal humanity, has oy now 
tipped the balance. It is time to stop 
lending that system, by our presence. 


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international herald tribune, saturday-sunday, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Page 5 


In p^aris: 'Wozzeck’ Through a New Lens 


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By David Stevens 

/rternatiopal HmU TWww 

AIUS — One of the Fans Op- 
1^*5 great moments was toe 
3 production of Alban Bcrgfc 
. not**," under the joint artistic 
tosbip of Pfcn* Boulez, ten- 
ds Barrault and Andrt Masson. 
'■■ Wt in the cenvesmy year of the 
. nposer’s birth, his first opera, is 
ion the Paris stage, with undi- 

ushed power bat seen through a 
‘fcrentlens. 

Whereas the earlier production 
■red dose to a literal reading of 

• text and the early- l 9tb-centuty, 
* DMural, semi-mflitaiy atmo- 

«re of Georg BOchner’s dramat- 
■ ' pigmen t, this new production — 

• i teun from the Deutsche Staat- 
perin East Berlin, where it was 

. ' a recently staged — views the 
rk more from the era of the com- 
' jct, a century later, in a grim, 
Mrressively collapsing urban 
dscape devoid of any sign of 
are. 

n Hans-Dietcr SduaTs sets, the 
i tain goes up on a concrete wall 
reed by uaiap ed cubicles and 
\ tpw siairwdls. As scene follows 
-'oe. the wall sh'des apart to reveal 

srest of vertiginously tilting sky- 
‘ apers, reminiscent of one of 
. tad Fdninger's visions. As the 
.* i approaches, the stage is littered 

• h corpses not accounted for by 
‘.jtejcL 

jhe sets are complemented by 
» costumes of Marie-Louise 
'undt, all in dusty, anonymous 
'iy except for the startling white- 
* b of Marie's dress and the cheap 
. tz of the revetes* garb in the 
er-ganlen and tavern scenes. 

- In place of the dehumanizing life 
~ 'casern and ytaJl town, thee is 
T . “casemizing” of daily city life. 

- place of tie disastrous effect of 
: utal and manic authority on one 

- piused individual, there is the 
; jtoahzed social destructiveness 
> capitalism and the industrial 

rohitiou. If this does not always 
' comfortably with the literal text, 
jtEast Bofin production includes 
'^dramaturgy* by Sgrid Neef, a 
realized subtext that sees the 
'una as a metaphor for urban 



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A scene from Act 3 in the Paris Optra’s new production of Berg’s “Wozzeck- 


.Ja her staging, Ruth Berghaus 


(who in the 1970s was director of 
Bertolt Brecht’s Berliner Ensemble 
and is the widow of the composer 
Paul Dessau) takes some not very 
convincing liberties with the book 
and perforating tradition. 

Wozzeck is far less submissive 
than usual toward his tormentors; 
even in the first scene, while shav- 
ing the moralizing Captain, be 
wields his razor with the mmnw of 
a Sweeney Todd and behaves with 
unmistakable defiance. On the oth- 
er hand, in the beer-garden scene, 
at which Wozzeck sees Marie and 
the Drum Major dancing, Wozzeck 
stoically suffers a bizarre, transves- 
tite hiunfliation. 

The piercing orchestral crescen- 
do on a single note that follows the 
stabbing of Marie and pushes the 
psychological tension to an almost 


unbearable point, is here marie to 
coincide with the stabbing, effec- 
tive on a primary level but trivializ- 
ing to a powerfully employed musi- 
cal device. And the eerie music for 
the open field of the second scene, 
and for the sounds of nature that so 
frighten the Captain and Doctor in 
the next to last scene, is under- 
mined precisely by the absence of 
nature. 

Although the three acts of the 
opera are self-contained musical 
entities, the work in this production 
is being played straight through 
without an intermission. The gain 
is enormous. “Wozzeck” lasts bare- 

§ ’ an hour and a half, shorter than 
trauss’ one-ad “Ednra,” and it is 
propelled forward so feverishly by 
the Expressionist intensity of 
Berg’s music that a pause for reflec- 


irtist Hopes to Save Zanzibar's Stone Town 


The Assoaeud Press 

/ANZI&AR. Tanzania — With 
-/a series of oil paintings and 
ner colors, John Baptist de Silva 
ipes to drawing the world’s atten- 
arto the beauty and the sad de- 
ne of Zanzibar’s old Stone Town, 
Arabian Nights maze of narrow, 
'streets. 

48, hopes to arrange 
ions abroad of works depici- 
r the district's unusual architec- 


ture, a Mend of Middle Eastern, 
European and Indian design 

A 1983 United Nations study 
called the former slave- trading cen- 
ter an important pan of the world’s 
heritage that is seriously threat- 
ened. Few of the stone and lime 
structures have beta maintained 
since a leftist revolution in 1964 
toppled die Arab sultanate that 
ruled the island of Zanzibar. 


Twice a year, rains drench the 
Stone Town, rotting the mangrove 
poles that support roofs and weak- 
ening the day, stone and fime walls 
of the buddings, some of which 
date from the early 1700s. 

Overseas interest in renovation 
has begun to be expressed. In Janu- 
ary, for instance, Nonray agreed to 
fund two- thirds of a $750,000 pro- 
ject to rehabilitate a three-story 
building. 


□on or refreshment seems beside 
thepoinL 

Christoph yon Dohnauyfs long 
familiarity with this music in the 
opera house and recording studio 
told in the sureness and apparent 
ease of bis conducting, as well as in 
the rich-toned and confident play- 
ing of the Paris orchestra. It was a 
musical performance in which 
Berg’s lyricism counted for as much 
as the hysterical outbursts. 

In the title role the French ban- 
tone Peter Gottlieb was vocally 
powerful but somewhat monochro- 
matic, dramatically suggesting a 
controlled anger rather than tor- 
mented confusion, whDeAnja Silja, 
despite familiar vocal stridency in 
moments of stress, was convincing 
in putting over Marie's sexna&ty 
ana wide emotional swings. 

The veteran tenor Ragnar Ul- 
f ung and the bass Gunther Missea- 
bardt turned in marvelously lunatic 
caricature sketches as the Captain, 
and the Doctor, and others in the 
uniformly solid cast included Allen 
Cazhcart as the Drum Major (who 
swaggered convincingly despite the 
plainness of his uniform), James 
Hoback as Andres, John Fryatt as 
the fool, and Anna Ringart as Mar- 
greL 

Further performances of " Woz- 
zeck" at the Paris Opera aresched ■ 
tried for April 2, 4, X 4 //. 18 and 


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)efiant Shippers Undercut Iraq’s War Strategy 


By Jonathan C Randal 

Was&ixfpon Past Service 
KUWAIT — ■ The Gulf conflict 
tm im sign of ending after four 
<1 a half years, despite reported 
tempts at peace negotiations, 
igdy because neither Iraq nor 
wv can stop the other from ex- 
vtiog oil to pay for the fighting. 
Hut remains the lesson of the 
■ tanker war” that Baghdad 
anchfld ayear ago hoping to force 
v*atolhen^otiatingtable.Fnis- 
s*ed, Iraq has tried to achieve its 
ril by stepping up air raids 
.pinM cniSan targets, and Iran 
fiRtaiutedinltind. 

A Jew ago, Iraqi warplanes be- 
. n-finog Exooct missiles at ship- 
's ™n a 50»mDe (81-k0ome- 
pavae around the main Iranian 
3 bdHty ai Khara Island. Iraq 
fa warned that snip within 50 
?toofKharg would be liable to 
VnA sea attack. 

lA* tanker attacks increased 
ftjpriog, it was suggested that 
- Mwpowere would intervene to 

war rather than risk having 
Mafcting spread and cause ml 
tog to rise. 

Iraq’s plans to cripple Iran 
totbwwted by nuuket forces 
“K supriang accommodation 
the dangers of 



“It’s bard to believe that millions 
of dollars worth of investment and 
the lives of seamen aboard tankers 
and other ships plying the Gulf are 
at risk,” a Western diplomat said. 
“But frankly, it's become a bore, a 
case of another day, another ship 
attacked. No one seems to care.” 

In a period of prolonged oil ghil, 
Iran discovered that tanker owners 
were prepared to risk sailing to and 
from Kharg Island for a price. 

Several weeks passed with no 
Iraqi attacks on tankers, which had 
proved less effective than originally 


-ADVERTISEMENT- 



"POSH" VERSUS "GOSH" 

.+ 

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TRIBUNE. 

&* 1 . — The origin of the acronym POSH is widely known. 
.Coined by the Victorians from the initials of the phrase 
Port Ota. Starboard Home ’ it got its present m ean i n g from 
'gefact that these were the cooler and more comfortable — 
more select— sides of the ship on which to travel 
and from India. 

r-. However I have long felt there was something amiss 
*«b this sentiment. 

seemed to me that no true Victorian gentleman or 
“wy would ever feel entirely at home aboard a ship that 
®“*y served port as a refreshment. Especially when that 
som was bound for the land of quinine and tonic water, 
backing my hunch. I have spent many years research- 
■ intensely into that era. 

I tot now pleased to be able to publish the results of 
gay enquiries. 

Staee 1 apparent that shortly after the discovery of Bombay, 
fVMf was superseded by 'GOSH, as in ‘Gosh. I could do 
,s«h a drink!’ or 'Gosh ! That’s smooth !* 

I should make clear that the BOMBAY I am 
to is, of course, the CZV, 

« is a particularly fine gin with a deli- 
te bouquet that is imparted by the 
“ttanicals* used in its. manufacture. 

“, c * a hned. it is indeed BOMBA Y 
_ * v * unique distillation that keeps one 

anujsaj - 

that may explain the origin of 
It stands for v 'Gm Out, Starry-eyed 

Dr. Hilary Snell h* me.. 

Theodolite College, Oxford. 



Th» Nm York Timei 

thought because crude oQ does not 
ignite eaaly. 

Ecologists, who had feared wide- 
spread damage from crude (til re- 
leased from sunken tankers, began 
to relax. So far, only one tanker has 
been sunk and tt was transporting 
refined products, which evaporate 
more easily than crude. 

But with soaring insurance rates 
and salary premiums payable for 
every day shippers spent in the 
Gulf, Iran began granting big dis- 
counts to owners risking the Kharg 
Island run. That trade continues. 

By November, Iran also had be- 
gun operating an oil shuttle with 
chartered medium-sized tankers 
between Kharg and Srri Island, 
which is inside the Gulf but much 
closer to the Strut of Hormuz and 
well within air cover from the Irani- 
an air base at Bandar Abbas. 

Two giant tankers anchored at 
an old oh terminal at Srri act as 
storage reservoirs. Customers send 
their own supertankers there to 
load crude at a small er markup that 
reflects reduced time spent m the 


war zone and thus reduced insur- 
ance. 

Specialists estimate that Iran 
earns SI0 billion to 515 billion an- 
nually from oil. The variation re- 
flects the specialists’ difficulty in 
evaluating the importance of spot 
sales and complicated baiter deals. 

Iraqhad little choice but to build 
new pipelines. Although Iraq has 
said it invaded Iran in 1980 in order 
to regain control of the Shatt-al- 
Arab waterway, one of Iraq's goals 
is believed to nave been the capture 
of Iran's oil fields. Iraq failed, and 
in the early days of the war, Iran 
destroyed Iraq’s terminal facilities 
at Faw at the head of the Gulf. 

Iraq has increased the capacity 
of its pipeline through Turkey to 
the Mediterranean to 900,000 bar- 
rels per day and reportedly is con- 
sidering a second pipeline that 
could cany 700,000 barrels per 
day. 

Iraq’s annual oil revenues have 
been estimated at 59 5 biQkm. In 
addition to the oil exported by the 
pipeline, 100,000 bands a day of 
refined products are trucked to 
Turkey and to the Jordanian port 
of Aqaba, which has access to the 
Red Sea. 

■ Overall Cease-Fire Rejected 

The speaker of Iran’s parliament 
said Friday that Iran would not 
accept an overall cease-fire, but 
was willisg to reach a partial truce 
to spare civilian targets, United 
Press International reported from 
Baghdad, erring a Tehran Radio 
report 

“The Islamic republic will not 
agree to a cease-fire m the war- 
fronts,” said Hashemi Rafsaiq'ani, 
speaker of tbe Iranian Majlis. “Iran 
is ready to accept a cease-fire in- 
volving attacks an cd tankers, pas- 
senger planes and civilian area.” 


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PRIZE 
SCHEDULE 



Part-Maori in New Zealand 
Named as Governor General 


. These are the figures. 
Where else are the chances 
this good? They are almost \ in 2. 
Being a state lottery, the Sueddeutsche 
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with large prize money. Besides the Jack- 
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half the ticket numbers are drawn for prize 
money. 

tf coupon is missing, write for information. 

E. Gehle 

Boppstr. 20-24 
D-6500 Mainz, 
W-Gervnany 



The Associated Press 

WELLINGTON. New Zealand 
— In a break with tradition. Prime 
Minister David Lange announced 
Friday that Archbishop Paul 
Reeves, the part-Maori primate of 
the Anglican Church, would be 
New Zealand’s govtrnor gerund 
Archbishop Reeves, 53, is the 
first person descended from the 
original Polynesian inhabitants to 
be appointed to tbe post, which, 
although the highest constitutional 
office in the nation, is mainly cere- 
monial. He is also the first Angli- 
can archbishop to hold the office. 

Archbishop Reeves is a contro- 
versial figure because of his outspo- 


ken views on social and political 
issues. He is opposed to unclear 
proliferation, an issue which has 
brought Mr. Lange into conflict 
with the United States because of 
his ban on visits by US. nud ear- 
powered or armed warships. 

“The office of governor general 
is an app ro pri ate expression of his 
calling as a Christian minister,” 
Mr. Lange said. Archbishop 
Reeves Tias worked for a just and 
humane society in New Zealand." 

Tbe opposition leader, Jim 
McLsy, said he bad reservations 
3bom the appointment because of 
the archbishop's controversial po- 
litical views. 


I’ll join the lottery 


For aif classes of the 77. Sueddeutsche Klassenlotterie, 
Starting May 1 1, 1985 through November 2, 1985 

Please fill in number of tickets you want to order. 



Start of next Lottery 

1985 



E. Gehle 

Boppstr. 20-24 

D-6500 Mainz, W- Germany 



DM or US$* or £* 


1/1 ticket 747.00 • 229.85 • 210.45 


1/2 ticket 387 JOO • 119.10 • 109.05 


1/4 ticket 207.00 • 63.70 • 58.35 


*US S and £ prices are subject to rate of exchange. 

Prices cover all 6 classes and include airmail postage and 
winning list charges. No additional charges. 

Rate of exchange; March 19B5 


[ Please write In 

German □ English □ 

77/82 

Mr.a Mrs.D MissQ Please orlnt in 

First Name 

• | ' Mock tetters. 

Last Name 

1 I ' 1 • 1 1 1 • ' 1 , | 

_LJ i i_. ^ 1 . . 




Street 


j , 

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- 

P.O.Box 

■4-j 

L-jJ-J 


City 


-4-4-4 

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LLLj 

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VALID ONLY WHBtE LEGAL ‘HOT AVAILABLE TO RE5H)GMT5 OF 5IHGWOItE‘*| 


t 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SL'NDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


e* 

Ca 

“ * 


ABTS/ LEISURE 


Marc Chagall Dies at Age 97 a Sampling of Chagall’s Images 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Max Vinaver, that Chagall was able 
in 191 1 to go 10 study in Paris. 

. Meanwhile, Chagall enrolled, in 
1906 in the Imperial School for the 
Protection of New Art in St. Peters- 
burg. 

In developing his abrupt, fore- 
shortened, wpsy-mrvyfccm of nar- 
rative art, Chagall owed modi to 
the example not oily of other 
painters but of Meyerhold, Ev- 
remov and other progressive the- 
ater directors. Himself destined to 
do much of his best work for the 
stage. Chagall grew up with theater 
ah around him. (Even bis future 
wife; Bella Rosenfdd, was attend- 
ing lectures by Konstantin Stanis- 
lavsky when lie first met her.) 

By 1910 Chagall, at 22, had two 
paintings in an exhibition at the 
offices of Apollon, a leading art 
magazine in St. Petersburg. But, 
fundamentally, he was ready 'to 
take on a new challeng e, ana he 
persuaded his patron to stake hwn 
to a first visit to Paris, where he 
arrived in 1911. 


Chagatf jjj pgjjj had an almost 
instant success. Mating his exotic 


and deeply felt subject matter with 
the new modes of pictorial struc- 
ture that he learned in Paris (above 
aQ from Robert Delaunay), he gave 
his autobiographical fantasies the 
status of epic. Paintings tike “1 and 
the Village” of 1911. now in the 
Museum of Modem Art in New 
York, had an imaginative power, a 
compos tionai virtuosity and a firm 
basis in fact that caused wide- 
spread enthusiasm. 

By the summer of 1914, no more 
than seven years after his first ar- 
rival in SL Petersburg as an un- 
known student, Chagall had paint- 
ed many of the pictures by which 
he is now best known, and had 
shown iham in Paris, Berlin and 
Moscow. 


AUCTION SALES 


- FONTAINEBLEAU - 

5, Rue Royate, Piece du Chateau 
Auction Sale 
Sunday March, 31 it at 2 pjn. 
Mainly XVlilHi Century 
furniture and objets d'Art 
MODERN AND 
OLD MASTER PAfriTlNGS 

M* Osenat 

Auctioneer 

Td.: 422.27.62 


In June 1914 he went back from 
Berlin to his native Vitebsk, where 
his fiancee, Bella Rosenfdd, was 
waiting for him Caug ht in Russia 
by the outbreak of World War I, he 
had no choice bat to stay indefi- 
nitely. He and Bella were married 
in 1915, thereby setting the seal on 
what was already a love affair of 
legendary stature. Their daughter 
Ida was bom in 1916. 

The printer welcomed the Bol- 
shevik Revolution in 1917, not only 
because it made him, as a Jew, a full 
citizen but also because it recog- 
nized him as an artist. Indeed, he 
was made commissar for art in Vi- 
tebsk, where he busily went about 
trying to make the average man 
into a painter. 


Affronted finally by the official 
ant-garde — Kandinsky, Rod- 


avant-garde — Kandinsky, Rod- 
chenko and Malevich — that 
placed him in the poorly paid 
“third class” of artists, Chagall left 
the Soviet Union in 1922 for Berlin 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

DENISE RENl 


1 96 Blvd. St. -Germain, 7th. 222.77.57 


Sculptures 

First Exhibition in France 


rALBUE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


.6, Rue Jearv-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS . TeL: 359.82.44 , 


BERGGRUEN & CIE 


70 Rue de PUniversitfc, Paris (7 e ). 
Tel: 222.02.12. . 


CUBIST PRINTS 


Until April 30 


-GALERIE DINA VIERNY - 

36 Roe Jacob - 75006 PARIS - 260.23.18 


Andre BAUCHAJNT - Camille BOMBOIS 

Paintings 


Henri MATISSE - Raoul DUFY 

Drawings 


MARCH 1985. 


VIRTCURML 


centre (fart plastique contemporain 


BURRI 


Oeuvres 7964-1984 


DUMITRESCO 

Peinfures -sculptures. 7977-7984 


S. Delaunay, Dumitresco, Gilioii, Le Parc, Malta, 
Meurice, Penalba, Rougemont, Schoffer, Valmier. 
Tapis d'artistes 


HUNDERTWASSER 

Estampes 


9, civ. merfignorr pans 8 - 299.16.16 

# du mardi ctu sameeS de 
10h30d 19 h 15. 


- IJE CENTRE INTERNATIONAL ■ 

D'ART CONTEMPORAIN 

27; Rue Tone, 7501 2 Pam 
T«t.: 307 68 58 
pr ese nts its own collections 

LE SALON DES NATIONS & 

LE SALON DE IA PHOTOGRAPHS 
NTERNA7I0NALE 

from April 3 lo 12; April 16 lo 2% 
April 26 to May 4- June 4 to 14 
June 16 to 24. 

French and Foreign Plastic artists and 
Photographers. (Manly American, 
Yugoslavian, Swiss and French) 

— daily from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. ■ 


ZURICH 


GALERIE 

BRUNO MEISSNER 




Wanting t»buy 

Great Paintings 
Old Masters, 
Impressionists 


w 


for instance 
G. Courbet 
C-Picsarro 


O Galerie Bruno Meissner 
^ Bahnhofstrasse 14 
5 CH- 8001 Zurich 
Telephone 101) 2119000 


FEUX VERCEL 

presents 


TAURELLE 


■ « danse et paysage » 
march 20 - april 10 


"ART 

EXHIBITIONS” 


9 AVENUE MATIGNON 
PARIS 8* 25&25.19 


appear 
on Saturday 


and Paris. Among the paintings he 
left behind were “Over the Town” 
and “The Wedding.” 

Chagall, at 36, was welcomed as 
an idol by the Surrealists, who saw 
their art's characteristics heralded 
in such prewar paintings as “Paris 
Through the Window” and in the 
artist's double-headed men, in his 
dream imagery and in the way be 
juxtaposed animals and men. 
“With Chagall alone, the metaphor 
made its triumphant return into 
modem painting.” said Andre Bre- 
ton, the Surrealist theoretician. 

In a strange act of obeisance, the 
Surrealists Max Ernst, Paul Board 
and Gala (who became Salvador 
Dali's wife) implored Chagall to 
avow Surrealism. “I want an art of 
the earth,” he replied in refusing 
the homage, “and not merely an art 
of the head.” 




£71 




BUCCELLATI 


4 Place Vendome 
Paris 1" Tei. 260.12.12 


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But the paintings he produced — 
“Bride and Groom with Eiffel 


Tower,” for instance — were de- 
nounced by most critics as traves- 
ties of bis once combative gifts. 
From this obloquy he was rescued 
by his etchings. 

Ambroise Vollard, the Paris art 
dealer, commissioned the painter 
to illustrate Gogol's “Dead Souls.” 
For the task, he was obliged to 
learn the art of etching, at which he 
proved enormously adept. The 
whimsy of his illustrations was a 
great success and led to a commis- 
sion to do La Fontaine's “Fables.” 





. < 



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“La Peintre an grand soled” (The Painter in Bright Sunlight), 1979. 


Self-portrait, 1913. 




'* -Tdr.Jti 


His folksy modem icons brought 
out the subtleties of the 17th-centu- 
ry tales and underlined their Orien- 
tal origins. Again Chagall scored a 
triumph. 

His next co mmissio n was the Bi- 
ble, for which he did 10S plates 
between 1931 and 19S6, when the 
edition was published. These are 
remarkable for their humanity and 
Tor their precise detail. 

When the Germans overran 
France in 194041, the artist was 
brought to the United States by the 
Emergency Rescue Committee. He 
was in New York for seven years, 
for most of them living in an apart- 
ment off Fifth Avenue. 

Chagall was a slow workman. *T 
could do 10 p ainting s a day, like 
some of the otters, if I wanted to,” 
he said. “But there’s more to it than 
that. A true work of art is a self- 
contained world, and the world 
wasn’t made in a day ” 

In 1944 Chagall's personal life 
was virtually shattered by the death 
of his wife, who was his mentor and 
his guide, and for nine months he 
refused to paint. 

“All dressed in white or all in 
black, she has long floated across 
my canvases, guiding my art,” he 
said at the time. *T finish neither 
painting nor engraving without 
asking her *yes or no.’ " 

When the painter returned to 
France four years later, it was with 
Virginia Haggard MacNeil, by 
whom he hada son, David. Mrs. 
MacNeil, a Briton, left him after a 
while for an older man, a buffeting 
to Chagall's ego that he took in 
injured silence. But be soon met 
Valentine Brodsky, a divorced Rus- 
i si an, who became his second wife. 

In his studio were racks of can- 
vases, art books strewn about, un- 
cleaned palettes, photos of relatives 
and portcaids pinned on the wafl. 
A samovar bubbled and a phono- 
graph gave out classical music as he 
tofled. II was his private world. 

From it came such paintings as 
“The Lovers of Veneer a boy and a 
girl tenderly embracing, with 
Vence in the background. 

Chagall gave off an air of meek- 
ness, which concealed a hardhead- 
ed shrewdness about his own worth 
in the marketplace. 

In his last years, increasing ce- 
lebrity attached to Chagall. The 
Mus4e National d’Art Modeme in 
Paris opened a room devoted to his 
work. He was awarded the Interna- 
tional Prize for Engraving at the 
Venice Biennale. 

His work in glass, which he 
learned to stain in his 60s, oat- 
shines his paintings in the opinion 
of many cntics. 

In one of his last thrusts in this 
direction, he designed a triptych of 
Old Testament (hemes for the three 
huge Gobelins tapestries for the 
Knesset, the Israeh parliament 

With this work, as with his other 
art, Chagall considered himself a 
rugged individual, serene in the be- 
lief that his creations would outlive 
their critics. 

“If I create with my heart, almost 
all my intentions remain,” he as- 
serted. “If it is with my head, al- 
most nothing. An artist must not 
fear to be himself, to express only 
himself. If he is absolutely and en- 
tirely sincere, what he says and 
does will be acceptable to otters.” 


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*Le musiden” (The Musician), 1922. 


“Vue de Vitebsk” (View of Vitebsk)” 1909. 


“Crescent Couple,” detail, 1951. 


Impressionist Sales Make It Gear; The Well Is Running Dry 


International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Sotheby’s worst 
/ sales ever of Inroressiomst and 


sales ever of Impressionist and 
Modem Masters took place Tues- 
day and Wednesday in an atmo- 
sphere of dismay. Even the high 
percentage of works that bad to be 
bought in for failing to reach tte 
vendors' minimum price — 29 lots 
of a total of 61 on Tuesday — does 
not describe the extent of the fail- 


Not that Sotheby’s stands alone 


log says. In this case, Monet's 
memory must have betrayed him, 
or perhaps he never bothered to 
finish the wort The hazy blur is 
almost indistinct to tte eye and 
excessively thin in coloring. The 
hammer went down at £46.200, 
leaving it unsold far below the low 
estimate of £550,000. 

Alfred Sisley's oeuvre was illus- 
trated by a late landscape of 1892 
that does not add much to his glam- 
our. It is an oversized, sketchy pic- 


SOUREN MfJIKIA N 


mre postcard of the bridge at 
Mom, an old town on the Seine. 


in this respect Christie’s auction 
earlier Tuesday was almost nonex- 
istent Its -most salient feature was 

work by Thto van Rysselberghe. a 
hanger-on of the Impressionist 
school who had neither an original 
vision nor any striking gifts as a 
draftsman or colorist. A landscape 
by him zoomed to an improbable 
£86,400 (S106JJ00), a idling illus- 
tration of the thirst for the vanish- 
ing art of Impressionism. 

But it took Sotheby's evening 
session Tuesday to underscore the 
depleted state of the market There 
were so few Impressionists that the 
title of the catalog, “Impressionist 
and Modem Pain ti n g s and Sculp- 
ture,” seemed to defer to tradition 
more than to reality. 

Monet was represented first by a 
shapdess landscape done in pastel, 
an uncharacteristic mwlnwn for the 
artist. The landscape was probably 
done around 1868, four years be- 
fore tte word “Impressionism" was 
coined and the corresponding 
movement actually emerged. At 
£45,100, it can be considered to 
have been very well sold, even if 
that price is below the inflated esti- 
mate of £49,500 to £60500. 

A second Monet was more Mo- 
net-like and truly Impressionistic, 
or, to be accurate, Neo-Impression- 
ist. Dated 1903, tte view of Water- 
loo Bridge and the Thames just 
misses bong a very beautiful pic- 
ture. As tte Sotheby's experts note 
in tte catalog, it was painted, like 
otters in tte same series, from Mo- 
net's room on the fifth floor of the 
Savoy Hotel “Many of tte pictures 
were finished at Givemy from 
studies and from memory and were 
completed in April 1904," the caia- 


Moret, an old town on the Seine. 
Apart from its being featured in 
Francois Danlte's catalogue raison - 
ni of Sisley's work, its merits are 
few. At £151,800, Sisley's postcard 
did not do badly. 

The Renoir pieces in tte sale 
were like caricatures of bis work; 
looking at them, no one would sus- 
pect that he ever mattered. The 
portrait of a buxom girl, Made- 
leine, with a rose in her hair and a 
bovine smile intended to be allur- 
ing, is so thinly painted that tte 
grain of the canvas shows through. 
Its vendor made a killing at 
£268,400. but this work will hardly 
enhance Renoil's narne. 

Add two late Pissarros — one of 
women by a riverside after a swim, 
which wept for £101,200, the other 
a view of the statue of Henri IV and 
tte Pont Neuf in Paris, unsold at 
£130,000 — and that was it for 
Impressionists. 

The lesson seems obvious: In the 
Impressionist field, winch not long 
ago led the glamorous sales, sup- 
plies are running out. With Soth- 
eby’s and Christie's trying to pul 
together sales in London and New 
York, the resources simply are not 
there. 

In addition, French auctioneers 
are making a comeback. The more 


known as a Pointillist, master; the 
landscape that Loudmer had, dated 
1886, has a composition that cranes 
dose to some of Van Gogh's land- 
scapes. Even at the record price of 
just over 22 million francs, “La 
Ligne de I’ouest 4 la Sortie de Par- 
is” was a bargain for its Swiss buy- 
er. 

Loudmer also sold a great Corot 
of die 1840s, a landscape with three 
children, for more than 35 million 
francs. It might have gone for even 
more in New York — American 
collectors are more susceptible to 
Corot’s restrained romantic vein 
than are their European counter- 
parts — but hardly in London. 

More surprising than Sotheby's 
and Christies poor showing in Im- 
pressionist art was the unimpres- 
sive sampling of 20th-century mas- 
ters, which are still available in 
large numbers. A couple of ridicu- 
lous Chagalls — “Le Pom Neuf,” 


terizes so much of the artist's work. 
It carried an estimate of £900,000 
to £1.2 million. Bidding proceeded 
slowly, in the gloomy atmorahere 
of an auction that is failing. As the 
hammer went down at £790,000 — 
£839,000 with the sale charge — 
one had a feeling that tte auction- 
eer had let it go as soon as the 
reserve had been reached. 

Could things have gone better? 
Almost certainly not. Even Soth- 
eby’s. with its efficient, probably 
oversophisucated selling tech- 
nique, and its powerful propagan- 
da machinery, cannot transform 
dogs into masterpieces. The end of 
a cycle of abundance is in sight, not 
just far Impressionists but for ma- 
jor 20th-century masters. 

■ Record Photo Price 


■$104500, was given Wednesdar 
Sotheby’s in New York by 1 


Sotheby’s in New York by 1 
cohn Forbes Jr. for a pictun 
Abraham Lincoln and his son ’ 
signed by Lincoln. The New ^ 
Tones reported. 

The six-inch (15-centimeter) 
photograph was made by And 
Berger at Matthew Brady's pbo 
raphy studio in Washington 
Feb. 9, 1864. It- was among 
autographs and manuscripts 
by Hsk O. Sang of Chicago. 




8* 


The highest price ever paid for a 
photograph sold at auction. 


■ ‘GtesKey’SoH / 

The final 214-page signed t / 
script of “The Glass Key” by 1 
American writer Dashidl fi 
mett was sdd Wednesday at O 
tie’s to Minerva Rare Books ... 
£18360, more than four times 
estimate. The Associated Pres: 
ported from London. 


dated 1953, and “Le VMagois," 
dated 1973. bought in at £175,000 
and £135,000, respectively — were 
unworthy of Sotheby’s standards. 
Several Utrillos were no better. 

This problem, tte presence of 
bad paintings that looked too much 
like the unsalable leftovers of a 
dealer's stock, was compounded by 
tte inclusion of paintings with ex- 
aggerated reserves. This can work 
in a good context, but they become 
self-defeating in an unglamorous 
one. A typical example was a large 
Cubist still life, done by Picasso m 
about 1915-1916, which has been 
reproduced many times. U was 
bought in at £1.1 million — one of 
two Picassos unsold. It was clear 
that, there were genuine bids at 
dose to £900,000; the painting sim- 
ply was not attractive enough to 
se& beyond that limit. 

The Picasso was followed by a 
pleasing but unimportant Braque 
still life that failed to sell, a Sevenni 
reproduced in the catalog but with- 
drawn from the sale — which al- 
ways leaves an unpleasant impres- 
sion — and then a big portrait by 
Egon Schiele, dated 1917. This, an 
important piece within the Austri- 
an master’s oeuvre, was by far tte 
most important painting offered 
this week in London. The sitter was 
Karl Griinwald, a textile manufac- 
ture, art collector and dealer who 
supported Schiele. The portrait has 
that sinister edge to it that charac- 


dynamic groups, such as Guy 
Loudmer and the Ader-Picard-Ta- 


Londmer and the Ader-Picard-Ta- 
jan team, are staging sales that look 
increasingly respectable. They 
manage to get very good prices, as 
more than one dealer could be 
overheard to remark at the Soth- 
eby’s and Christie's sales. 

Only last week, on March 22, at 
DronoL Loudmer sold a hastily 
sketched Vuillard interior scene, 
dated 1910. for more than 35 mil- 
lion francs ($368,400). In the same 
sale, a world record was established 
for Charles Angrand, who is mostly 


Richard Gere’s 'King Dadd 


C APSULE reviews of filnc re- 
cently released in tte United 


V_/ cently released in the United 
States: 

“ *Kmg David,' about the warrior 
king who made Israel a nation, is 
not a good film," says Vincent Can- 
by of The New York Times. “As 
biblical epics go, it's a tiny bit more 
lively than George Stevens's 


bits of history, extraordinarily 
told, thanks to Bere&Ford and 
writers.” . 


“It’s a shock to find NeQ Sm 
name attached to something 



l y. unfunny as The S 

go's Wire,’ " says Janet Maslr 
the New York Times. “Sim 
new romantic comedy is goofl^ 
couple of mild chorales at-g 
none of them revolving arouira 
young couple at the heart -.of 
story.” 

Directed by Hal Ashby, tte | 
stars Michael O’Keefe as Dr 

Palmer, a baseball star, and Re 
ca de Momay as Debby Hustc 
rock singer. Oflce Debby and 
ryl have passed beyond their a 
ing to begin a marriage, the 
concentrates on proUans of c 
ntitment in a dual-career rclat 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


‘Greatest Story Ever Told,’ but, as 
good, old-fashioned, corn bah en- 
tertainment, it doesn't even at- 
tempt to compete with anything as 
riotously gansh as Cedi B. De 
MQle's classic. The Ten Com- 
mandments.’ ” 


Directed by Bruce Beresford, 
iling David” is done straight and 


“King David” is done straight and 
chronologically, foDowing the ex- 
ploits of David (Richard Gere); his 
problems with Saul (Edward 
Woodward), once his father-in-law 
and IsraeTs ting, but primarily Da- 
vid’s jealous, vengeful pursuer; Da- 
vid's wrvra and nis honor-destroy- 
ing yearning for Bathsheba (AKce 
Krige); and the matter of David's 
son Absalom. 

Shefla Benson of the Los Angeles 
Times disagrees with Can by, say- 
ing: “All these are extraordinary 


pt< 


takes Debby out of the 

cure and shifts tte focus to Du - .. 
teammates and manager (R*, ; v ; 
Quaid, Cleavani Derricks ^ '\.- 
Martin Ritt), with whom he h ; . •: [ 
much better rapport than i .. 

wife. v 

□ ’« 

“Desperately Seeking S» „ 
directed by Susan Seidaman^- 
fable that involves, among 
unlikely things and people, a? 
of stolen earrings that once>; 

longed to Ndferuti; a gangster : ; 

in Atlantic Gty; an earnest^ 


DOONESBURY 


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'TAB HARD QUESTION: 
HAVE I BEEN SLUMMING?* 


■ ' Jr-.-r*- 

. . . . * 

zis and hot tubs and who sta.:- . »< t -v3r 

his own cheery television com.' \ «. • " 

dais; a professional hit nan;-: • • * 

neaa; and mistaken identity-; ‘ •••»».' - gi ’ 

film’s stars are Rosanna Arqw.;- * V '?tJ - 

and the rock singer Madonna^ ■ * 

“Sdddman's principal talfi£-S . M * 

forlningingcockeyedchartctfi;.. . . 

life with great good humor aiv' . v '• , v * • -.fskv. 

p qiyfryfnginnj and she’s 8S Wt. L . • 

abraitlifeinthenewbohetn»^. ' - , 
the new suburbia,” says Vjks , 

Canby of The New York 
“‘Desperately Seeking Susa: ». • ^ 

full of funny, sharply observer , •. . 

tails.” . i 


rim M 






m MVMI 







BERMUDA 



A SPECIAL ECONOMIC REPORT 


SATURJDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


>r Tourists, It’s 
3auty vs. Beastly 
Ise in the Dollar 


**<£**■?& 





>^ai Herald "f r iS 

&rd An.i]\i\--. 

cia]< 

■VmftTcna . 

al Busin (as (>jr 

torch, 

r 19*21. 2'v< 


FI ta Howard Rose 
AiLTON — Benunda the 
Vis now Bermuda the a- 

he Bermudian dollar hdd 
itb (be U.S. currency, the 
se of the dollar has made 
bbeau and Europe more 
i to vaca tioners than Ber- 
onerican tourists, who ao- 
r about 90 percent of via- 
, are balancin g the island’s 
(gainst its high prices, 
on Minister Irving Fear- 
i, “Our tourism industry is 
We have too few visitors 
• too few dollars. That is it 
iheU2* 

* jmber of visitors has fallen 
from a peak of more than 
in 1980 to fewer than 
last year. Government 
far tourist tax revenue 
U. inasmuch as 10 percent off 
it 12 months as the dec fine 
d. 

on has kept Bermuda pros- 
ioce the last century. The 
* lar, spent freely. has given 
British colony one erf the 
per-capita incomes in the 
* .lore than 517,800. 

:.y,« in 198V84 brought 
* v ^hdu into an economy with 
-million gross domestic 
Nearly 10 percent of the 
mlarion of 57,000 work in 
id guest houses, with thou- 
ure depending for their liv- 
tourists eating in restau- 
drinking in bars and 

*r 

is tourism and travel taxes 
dgeted to bring in more 
I million in 1984-’85, with 
; duties accounting for 
SO million more. A former 
□muster, Jim Woobidge, 
i that Bermuda, which spe- 
n high-cost ccanfort for the 
■not for people earning less 
tflOO a year. 

15. recession plus the rise 


in the dollar’s value hit Bermuda 
hard. The fall in tourism has affect- 
ed both residential hotels and the 
cruise ships that stop in Urn superb 
natural harbor at Hanuhon, the 
capital city. ■ 

Mr. Peatman, who replaced Mr. 
Woolridge last autumn, has 
switched the island's formerly re- 
laxed advertising style to hard' sdL 
He has launched a p ro g r am to 
make Bermudians more aware of 
the importance of tourism 
more responsive to the needs of 
tourists. He recently anthnri 7H 
$1,155 million for television adver- 
tising aimed at Bermuda’s tradi- 
tionally strong marfret in the U.S. 
Northeast. 

David Anfossi, ah accountant 
and a former chairman of the influ- 
ential International Business Asso- 
ciation, also died a drop in the 
number of business visitors. “There 
is a noticeable trend toward doing 
business over the cheaper tele- 
phone, Letec or fa csimil e equip- 
ment, rather than staying hererbe 
said. 

The holds are worried by the 
tourist economy’s performance and 
are holding down rates for the com- 
ing season — rates that were raised 
automatically by up to 10 percent 

in past years. 

The president erf the Hotel Asso- 
ciation, Chris Szembeck, said: 
“We’ve reached a level dial’s being 
resisted by the consume and we 
can’t increase our prices Eke we’ve 
done in the past It’s all about per- 
ception of value for money.” 

The holds Mr. Szembeck over- 
sees, the 1,000-bed Pembroke Prin- 
cess and the 1,500- bed Southamp- 
ton Princess, are holding rates at 
last year’s level, between $52 and 
$145 per person per night in a dou- 
ble room, far the majority of cus- 
tomers. 

The 900-bed Sonesta Beach has 
spent $1 million on upgrading but 
is raising prices just 35 percent. 
(Continued on Next Page) 


K 

W/M* i 



A Prosperous Economy 
Is Moving to Diversify 

By Mark MacNamara The health of the economy depends 60 percent of the imports and 90 

HAMILTON Bermuda has ^ image of a stable, conserve- percent of die tourists. In addition, 

one of the highest standards of Kv- biraoaJ country untouched by the international business sector of 
ine in the world and “owr- F.™ commotion, money laun- Bermuda’s economy gets much of 


the international business sector of 

ine in the world and virtual “over- V*- 0 ™ Kramoucm. money laun- Bermuda’s economy gets much of 

employment,” yet it is taking steps lI i P«*nce.af 

to expand its <^amylway from m some of the Caribbean na- offshore US. insurance companies, 
dollar-dependent and labor-inten- l “ e , sowh - . , Bui the most significant connec- 

sive tounsm, the basis of its nrm- t T ennuda s cconom y J“* always non between Bermuda and the 
peniy h«d a strong service sector, ever United Stares may be that Bennu- 

Tbe annual per-capita income in ^<*™<kwwhen,besHfes! build- da’s currency is "tied to the U.S. 
this country af57j00Q people, of m £, ships fresh vegc- dollar. In 1970, when it was pushed 

whom 60 percent are black! is table ? 10 Ncw * oik, Piracy out of the “sterling area.” Bermuda 
SI 7,800. puffingit in the worid’s ^ u ° s g* 05 . to Conf^cracy turned to the United Slates. The 
top uTlNearlyx) percent of house- Jurmg the^nmean Ovil War arrangement has been satisfactoiy 
holders own iheirhom«; the gov- a . profi h the late 19th in that U5. tourists can use their 

eminent target is for 60-percem 9 “^ ^ Prmcm Louise, the doUars interchangeably with Ber- 
ownership in the next few years. f °TJ da ¥ hr fJ rf < ^ en Victona mwhafl dollars, and the highly val- 
Seveotypercem of households have “J ^ ^i of *=^ i3 ?S5i®J[ cnior ' d ° Uar bnn 8 s & relatively 

a car. there is a television set in 96 ^ “J* 1 bestowd upon cheaps imports, particularly petro- 

percitofthemSda^togna- Bf^ittca^asafashiormbte leum. 

Shine in 78 percent. Inflation is vrml ? reson for *e nch and fam- But the mb is that lately, the 
miming ai 4 6protayw ^ Lato. the U.S. middle classes strong dollar has badly hurt Ber- 
Tbe “overemployment" means muda’s tourism industry. Compet- 

there is a labor force of some Since World War H, the island’s mg destinations in Canada, Mexi- 
32,000 to fiB about 36000 vacan- t 01 ® 51 industry has been its main- the Bahamas and even Europe 
ties. Pvpatnat^t make up 25 per- sta y» and in all but two years, 1981 have diverted significa n t numbers 
cent of the work force, mcluding ^ 1 ^84* the number of tourists of tourists. In 1984, tourism sank 
people in the lesser-paying soviet arrivin g each year has increased. 6-8 percent. Since the peak year in 
fobs. In recent years; the presence Repeat business runs as high as 35 1980. tourism has fallen 15 percenL 
nf fo reigner s Wnm . M percent. Bomuda’s stratqy has Moreover, Bermuda does not enjoy 

issue in the largely black Progres- 1x01 10 retain its reputation as a tbesame U.S. tax-exempt status for 
sive Labor Parry, the opposition pkce.lhat caters to quality, not business conventions as do Mexico 
party quantity. It also seeks to create a end f^narfi although negotiations 

The 'surprising thing about this S m “mely European atmosphere »« under way to change that. 
SI-biffion economy, growing at an with no mminaers of America's The problem of the US. dollar is 

»nnnni rat£ of aj^t 2 percent, is Subiubai1 fast-food culture. compounded by a 7-percent cap set 

that it performs so consistently and “The market we’ve aimed at,” 00 interest rales by the goveru- 

profrtably, particularly when the said Sir David Gibbons, former a , result, Bermudian 

country must import almost $365 prime minister and finance minis- 01081 rnves t a good deal of 




during the A m e ric a n Civil War arrangement has been satisfactory 
turned a profit. In the late 1 9th in ib»f U5. tourists can use their 


1 

¥- 

1| 

m 

Waa 

lit 

S'! 

"AC 

i 

X'-'rV, > 

* 

- iV.;T 

'*■■■ ■ 



hnwdaNMftnoi 




Family racariooers enjoy the snrf, left; the Bank of Bermuda in Hamilton, right 


Decline 


winter resort for the rich and fam- But the nib is that lately, the 
0115 . Lata:, the U.S. middle classes strong dollar has badly hurt Ber- 
followed. muda’s tourism industry. Compel- 

Since World War U, the island’s ing destmations in Canada, Maxi- 
tourist industry has been its main- co, the B ahamas and even Europe 
stay, and in all but two years, 1981 have diverted significant numbers 
and 1984, die number of tourists cf tourists. In 1984, tourism sank 
arriving each year has increased. 6.8 percenL Since the peak year in 


By Chris Morrison 

HAMILTON — The halcyon 
days of fast and uninterrupted 
growth in the offshore insurance 
business in Bermuda are over. The 
island tax haven, the largest off- 
shore iTwnrflpff- Toratirm m the 
world, has seen major cutbacks in 
the business, and more operations 
may leave. 

It was far different in the 1970s, 
when major multinational corpora- 
tions, particularly from North 
America, famed their own “cap- 


tive” insurance companies in order 
to retain, and hopefully maVw a 
profit on, the insurance premiums 
generated hy their own risks. They 
located these in advantageous tax 
environments like Bermuda. 

The idea grew rapidly and, aided 
by U5. tax requirements, a market 
soon developed for the captives to 
underwrite nonparent risks from 
unrelated third parties. They did 
this largely through reinsurance, a 
process that enables large commer- 
cial risks to be laid off! or appor- 


tioned, and spread across a number 
of participants. 

With its good financial infra- 
structure, light regulatory require- 
ments and accommodating tax en- 
vironment, Bermuda was a magnet 
for both captives and professional 
reinsurance companies and bro- 
kers, which were attracted by the 
increasing amount of business that 
was generated. 

But the last few years have seen 
insurance rates fall throughout the 
(Continued on Next Page) 


summers uoia, a oennudian u- nircoHioranewi-aaujac — out oy juu U wiu uuy 

queur. Because everything must be large they have sufficient dis~ Mow 7 percent and allow the gov- 
imported the cost of living is high posable income to travel and take a W propose a floating rate, 

and although Bermudians pay only modest vacation. As a matter of The drop in tourism, along with 
a 4-percent hospital levy, paid fart, with our stable exchange rates, slower than anticipated growth 
quarterly by employers, and no in- we benefit from a U5. recession rates in other sectors of the econo- 
"come tax, all imported items bear because people give op their Euro- my, notably in construction, could 

heaw mietranc dntiw pean trip ann COffiC here.’’ combine to nr/vfnee a deficit in rka 


heavy customs duties. 

The island has the ultimate ser 


combine to produce a deficit in the 


Besides the United States, fier- balance of payments by the end of 


lack of government interference, the United States, which supplies (Cootinued on Next Page) 


4 " - .» " ! 




SUCCESSFUL 

INVESTMENT 




iiii^ 

IV 




The Port Royal Golf Course at Southampton Paris. 


Island of Records, Especially for Golf 

LTCW — In many Bermuda Introductions are required at Mid Ocean and hotel course, the Princess, is the 





xr-jfr* 


lion — In many wiws, Bermuda 
land of records, with the most 
tod most police per capita in the 
and the most golf courses. 


^ ana the most golf courses. 

M06l>Cjr' seven courses, pins an 18-hole 

L-V J \ bcio 8 readied for opening in St 

’ ,Vr ' w s this summer and a good mne-hole 
. U' course at Horcrms. Three of 

men & en— Port Royal, Castle Harbour and 

»an— -are chanqaonshqs courses, and 
L'*.' of the seven are open to the public. 


Introductkms are required at Mid Ocean and 
RidddTs Bay. 

Princess is the shortest of the courses — 
2,454 meters (2,678 yards) for par 54 — while 
Ocean View is a nme-hoie, par-35 course. 

Fees range frtxn $10 for nine or 18 holes at 
Ocean View to $18 for non-guests at the 
Bdmotnl and a top-rate $30 at Castle Har- 
bour. House guests at Belmont and Castle 
Harbour get cheaper rates and some of the 
other courses offer cut-price deals. The other 


hotel course; the Princess, is the samf price 
for residents and non-guests. 

Only the Bdmonx and Mid Ocean offer 
caddies but carts and part or whole sets of 
dabs are available for hire at most courses. 
Each course has a poo to give lessons for an 
average erf $15 per half hour. 

Part Royal, Princess, Riddeffs Bay and 
Mid Ocean are by the sea and aD offer spec- 
tacular views. 

— HOWARD ROSE 


iear Issues Complicate Relations With U.S. 


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T J i . 'T’L' 1 1: 1?. 



TON — Bermuda’s rda- 
hh the United States is 
ly remora fish that ana- 
to the whale. Although 
aa self-governing British 
itb a British legal system 

island’s economic wdl- 
; military significance are 
edy to the Umied States. 
Sh this relationship is well 
by most Bermudians, 
torn of the opposition, 
*sslve Labor Party, have 
ft recently on two issues: 
lotion that the United 
tconfingenqy plans to de- 
auejear depth charges to 
® time of international 
the foci Utar Washington 
Go (m hs 99-year lease of 
.*» station ai Su David’s, 
P. serves as the country’s 
»»t. Thfr United States 
9°Srid and spends about 
30 a year mam taming it 
expires in 2040. ' 


The United States operates a sec- 
ond military base, an intelligence- 
gathering station at Southampton, 
equipped with special acoustical 
sensors to trade Soviet s ubmarin es. 
There is also a tracking station of 
the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration and an 
acoustical research laboraimy. 

Bermuda’s strategic importance 
oomes bom its location 570 miles 
(912 kilometers) off North Candi- 
na’s Cape Hatteras. Although it 
would be of tittle consequence in a 
nuclear war, it serves as a perma- 
nent aircraft carrier in peace tim e, 
allowing U.S. Navy aircraft to 
monitor Soviet submarines and 
other vessds. 

The issue of nuclear weapons has 
become sensitive since last May, 
whm a Pershmg-2 missile fired m 
Florida veered off course and 

crashed IS) miles southwest of Ber^ 

oanda. The issue came up again la« 
October and in January, when sto- 
ries in the British press alleged that 


the United States'had contingency 
plans to use Bermuda as a forward 
base for its airborne relay stations 
in the event of nuclear war. 

Bermuda's prime minister, John 
W;D. Swan, wrote a letter to the 
U.S. State Department, asking for 
an explanation of the allegations. 
In its reply, the dep ar tm ent would 
neither confirm nor deny the truth 
of the stories but Mr- Swan was 

assured that no deployments would 
be made without permission, from 
proper authorities. 

“Yes, I was satisfied with the 
response,” the prime minister said-' 
**T yin in affiance man and Rmrni. 
da must stand with those that it 
depends upon and with those soci- 
eties it is allied with.” 

Although the issues of nndear 
weapons and rent-free use of the 
naval base are largely partisan, Ber- 
muda's negative response in No- 
vember 1983 to President Ronald 
Reagan’s Caribbean Basin Initia- 


tive was not partisan. Negotiations 
collapsed because of a condition 
that allowed UJS. officials, from 
such agencies as the Justice De- 
partment, the Treasury or even the 
Drag Enforcement Agency, to sob- . 
poena Bermudian dozens in Ber- 
muda. 

This was considered a threat to 
sovereignty and Bermudians 
locked with some disdain at coun- 
tries m the region that agreed to it. 
Mr. Swan commented. “Don’t cut 
off our ankles and expea us to 
walk around and support you." 

. Some U.SL officials "fbmt pri- 
vately that the condition «rr>o»m*d 
to an “embarrassing invasion of , 
arabority,” and that there is no I 
need for such an agreement. In i 
fact, die Bermudian government I 
has cooperated in the prosecution I 
and conviction of several people 1 
sought by the United States. Afro, J 

(Cautioned <m Page 9) L 


professionals world wide and offices in London, investments. This single-minded policy lies at 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL H1F.BA 1J) TRIBUNE, SATURP AY-Si"NDAY , MARCH 30-3 1, 1985 




A SPECIAL BEPORT ON BERMUDA 


Small) Conservative Financial System 
Resists Increase in International Banking 



• LA 

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• -vf 


JL 

1 



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riH* 


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, ... -x-r : r-r:' ! jr, • - 


HAMILTON — The financial 
system that serves Bermuda’s do 
mestic and offshore companies is 
made up of three government-li- 
censed banks, a tiny stock ex- 
change —for trading m local com- 
panies only — a fully automated 
private commodities exchange and 
a sophisticated communications 
network. The entire system is a 
miniaturized version of the New 
York and London models, vet de- 
signed to Bermuda standards: It is 
high-technology, capital-intensive 
with mmhniim labor and space re- 
quirements. 

Three banks, with total capital 
and reserves of just over S4 billion, 
may seem a small number to serve a 
whole country, as tvdJ as nearly 
6,000 offshore companies. Bat, be- 
sides the small population, nearly 


p A person who arrives at the teller’s window with 
a suitcase fall of cash is not welcome. We’ve tried 
to get that word around, and in the process, 
we’ve turned away a lot of people.’ 


gathers roughly 25 percent from 
overseas and 75 percau locally. Al- 


half of the offshore businesses are rectory, listed under a representing 
personal holding companies. There company. 


are about 1.13 
companies. 


Bermudian 


Bermuda has not opened itself 
up to international banking, in con- 


Of the 5,412 foreign companies trast to the Cayman Islands or the 
exempt from Bermudian participa- Bahamas, partly for protectionist 
don requirements, only 193 own reasons and partly because Bennu- 


space and have staffs in Bermuda, da is intent on project! 
The remainder are often not much vative financial image, 
more than names in a building di- “A person who an 


A Prosperous Economy 

-r -mm • f-v • • a cess, we've aimed away a lot of 

Is Moving to Diversify 

^ Caymans.*’ There have been re- 

(Continued From Previous Page) Authority on mutual funds. The 0 f flight capital and drug 
eminent spending, a freeze on the gHd el tn es, drawn up last summer, money going into the Caymans, 
creation of newcivil service jobs ^ lc *?i “ “Experience has shown/* said Sir 

and delays in capital projects, in- custodians lor fund, assets and pro- David Gibbons, former prime nnn- 
eludine a nlanncd snrais stadium Vld ® * or appointment of local i*-. ^ finance minister, “that in 


“A person who arrives at the 
teller’s window with a suitcase full 
of cash,” said one Bermuda banker. 


referring to money laundering, “is 
not welcome. We've tried to get 


and delays in capital projects, in- 
cluding a planned sports stadium. 

In his 1985-86 budget statement, 
Mr. James acknowledged that “our 
main problem in recent years has 
been a propensity to live beyond 
our means; the result has been an 
unwarranted increase in local costs, 
a deterioration in the balance of 
payments, and two successive bud- 
get deficits.*’ 

Perhaps the greatest danger to 
Bermuda's economy is that the cost 
of doing hncinggg might increase 
and consequently discourage the 
growth of the international busi- 
ness sector. Because of growing 


ister and finap«» minister, “that in 


registrars and transfer agents. Nev- other offshore banking centers, 
ertheless, because of strong local ^ been embarrassing in- 
opposition, the Monetary Author- stances when even someofthelaig- 


lty is revising its original proposal. 

As for political stability, the 
United Bermuda Party has ruled 


cst h anks have been accused of ma- 
nipulating trades or exchange rates 


United Bermuda farty nas ruled jq ^ to take profits into a tax-free 
the country ever since a tw-party j^isdictiom We considered licens- 
system was adopted m 1963. The W the world’s eight largest banks, 
Progresave Labor Party cropos- but after some debate we derided 
uqn, which is largely black, has insurance was a sounder financial 
failed to break the UBPs gnp on business than hanking . Also, re- 


power mainly because it has not member, we have limited land area 
been able to attract any of the ^ a housing crisis. Banking 


concern over the environment, po- 

litical apprehension about b ringing within their own party. In practice, 
m formers and a nSES 


white m i d dle class. Une critic said: would involve bringing in a large 
“They’ve made the serious mistake nuniber pro f^Ss: money 
of paying lip service to integration traderSj investment people and 


housing shortage, the government 
has sought to push international 
activity in the economy. 

The government’s overall strate- 
gy is to expand the economy in 
industries that are less labor-inten- 
sive than tourism. There has been a 
moratorium on building hotels 
since 1970. The idea is to attract 
wealthy offshore businesses look- 
ing for sophisticated communica- 
tions and automated services, as 
well as certain tax and regulatory 
advantages. 

However, some members of the 
international butiness community 
in Bermuda have expressed fears 


gone out and worked very, very 


those involved in exchange rates, as 
well as administration people.” 
Although there are only three 


hard to create a biracial party and operating banks, there are at least 


government. 


20 foreign hanks with Bermuda- 


Neverthdess, Bermuda is a hire* based operations. Foreign basks 
rial country, which, although in indude Morgan Guaranty Finance 
many respects a model of racerela- Ltd.. Lombard Odier Ltd and Eu- 


many respects a model of race rela- 
tions, still exhibits tension. Tradi- 
tional sources of friction remain: 


Ltd., Lombard Odier Ltd. and Eu- 
ropean American Finance Ltd. Un- 
der Bermuda law, these foreign 


the majority of the country’s wealth com panies are prohibited from 
and power is still held by whites, conventi onal banking, and, as a re- 


and a growing minority of blacks suit, they co nfine their activities 
favor independence and fear that largely to underwriting securities 


white foreigners will take away and participating in syndicated 


jobs, housing and lanri. 

Colonel Gavin Shorto, a Bermu- 
da R egim ent commander, qnnmgri 
up the Bemmdian character: “Ber- 


about protectionism and increasing mudians are hardy and deter- 
business costs. The issue has come mined, and above aQ, prag m atic. 


loans. 

Of the three licensed Bermudian 
banks, two, the Bank of N.T. But- 
terfield and the Bank of Bermuda, 
do about a third of their bus ness 


up within the last six months, part- 
ly because of new guidelines pro- 
posed by the Bermudian Monetary 


mined, and above aQ, pragmatic, outside the country, through sub- 
Thcy’re tike cals. There's some- sidiaries in other hanking centos. 


thing timeless about their ability to As for profits, the Bank of Bennu- 


adapt and survive.” 


da. the country’s largest bank. 


oversea s and 75 percoii locally. Al- 
most 80 percent of domestic profits 
come from the “exempt” compa- 
nies, mostly captives and other in- 
surance companies. Capital and re- 
serves of Bermuda's three banks 
total about S4.6 billion. The third 
bank is the Bermuda Provident 
Bank. 

Besides the three banks. Bermu- 
da's financial structure includes la- 
tex, a private company that opened 
in October 1984 and is the world's 
first fully automated real-time 
commodities exchange. The system 
operates by inviting competing 
marketmakers topost bid ana offer 
prices in gold, silver, U.S. Treasury 
bonds and freight. 

“When fully operational.” said 
David M. Thompson, general man- 
ager of Intex, “we expea to do 
some 70,000 trades an hour, and we 
w31 be open 24 hours a day to 
service Asian clients. The Chicago 
Board of Trade sells about 500,000 
trades in a day. 

“We derided on Bermuda,” Mr. 
Thompson said, “largely because 
there were no other exchanges here 
And because of its co nu n un icatioBs 
capability. This is also becoming a 

major business center not just 

for fngnranec i xw n p»niVjs That the 
Jardine Matheson conglomerate 
has moved its whole base of opera* 
tions from Hong Kong to Bermuda 
is just one indication.” 

Intex is one of only three compa- 
nies that have been permitted to do 
business in Bermuda by an act of 
the TVrnrndian Parliament. The 
company’s revenues are taxed at a 
rate of 5 percent and the govern- 
ment hopes that the potential tax 
from Intex will reach 5450,000 a 
year. 

But latex’s importance goes be- 
yond its ability to attract capital to 
Bermuda. “Intex increases the vol- 
ume of communications," said 
Donald P. Lines, chief general 
manager of the Bank of Bermuda. 
“The greater the volume, the 
cheaper the mrit cost of communi- 
cations and the more attractive we 
ivmmg as a finanrial center.” 

Last year. Cable and Wireless, a 
British company with a contract to 
provide all of Bermuda’s external 
communications, installed a satel- 
lite system that will make it possi- 
ble for Bermudian businesses to 
farm out labor-intensive white-col- 
lar processing work. Banks and in- 
surance companies, for example, 
will be able electronically to trans- 
mit clerical work to wherever it can 
be done most inexpensively. The 
hope is ihai this capability will al- 
low Bermuda to keep its compara- 
tive advantage as a specialized fi- 
nancial center. 

— MARK MacNAMARA 






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Offices of two banks in HamUton. 


f Offshore’ With a Difference: Bermuda 
Neither Tax Free Nor 'Caribbean Haven 


-J=C- 

tiis 


‘-f- 


HAMILTOX — Bermuda is of- 
ten thought of as a tax haven for 
offshore business because there is 
so corporate income tax and be- 
cause of laws regarding confidenti- 
ality. The government is trying to 
change that imagf- 

“lt*s the idea of a Tax haven in 
the Caribbean' that the govern- 
ment is trying to change." said 
Robert Baker, rhnirman of the 
Chamber of Co mme rce's interna- 
tional companies division. “This is 
really a very proper little place, 
even stuffy." 

Bermuda is also not tax free, al- 
though the word “tax” is carefully 
avoided. The country earns a sig- 
nificant percentage of izs total 
earnings from corporate fees, 
stamp and fnvioT r re duties and hos- 
pital levies, which are contributions 
that citizens pay for health care. 

Thought lias also been given to 
an employment levy in an effort to 
get additional revenue from off- 
shore business to offset the down- 
turn in Bermuda’s tourism indus- 
try. 

The tourism industry has been 
hurt during the last three years by a 
strong U.S. dollar, which has made 
Bermuda a modi less competitive 
tourist destination than Mexico, 
Canada and some parts of Europe. 
The Bermuda dollar is pegged to 
the UJ5. dollar. 

“The reason why so many com- 
panies have come to Bermuda over 
the years," said Mr. Baker, who is 
also president of the Hudson Insur- 
ance Co, “is not so much for tax 
advantages but for ease of forma- 
tion and less onerous regulatory 
rules." 

Although about 55 percent of 
Bermuda’s foreign-exchange earn- 
ings comes from tourism, nearly 30 
percent, or 19 percent of gross do- 
mestic product, comes from the 
proceeds of international business. 
And the gap is narrowing. 


In the meantime, Bermuda’s in- 
ternational business sector has 
grown substantially. The number 
of international companies regis- 
tered in Bermuda has increased 
from 5.000 in 1980 to almost 6,000 


it is much cheaper to open a com- 
pany than here, is going after vol- 
ume. 

“But one of the trade-offs is that 
their computer services are virtual- 
ly nonexistent We're aiming at the 


The reason why so many companies have 
oome to Bermuda over the years is not so 
much for tax advantages but for ease of 
formation and less onerous regulatory 
rules.’ 


in 1985. Fifteen years ago, there 
were fewer than 800 foreign com- 
panies. 

Although the iTHCTn«ri»nal busi- 
ness sector has been growing, the 
rate of growth has dropped in the 
last three years. 

In 1984, only one firm was added 
to the roster of companies. In addi- 
tion. the volume of local expendi- 
ture by foreign companies has not 
recovered from the sharp drop in 
1982-83. Part of the reason is that 
offshore companies have become 


increasingly sensitive to the high 
cost of dome business in Bermuda. 


cost of doing business in Bermuda. 
“Bermuda must be very careful not 
to price itself out of the market." 
one insurance executive said. 

As with its tourism industry. 
Bermuda has cultivated the image 
of an international business center 
more concerned with quality than 
quantity. 

“Whether in tourism or in inter- 
national bus in e ss .” said Sir David 
Gibbons, former prime minister 
and finance minister, “we cannot 
cater to volume. The Caymans, 
which has 15,000 companies, three 
times as many as we do, and where 


richer companies, the ones that re- 
quire sophisticated communica- 
tions and processing services.” 

Another reason Bermuda is 
building up its international busi- 
ness sector is that it is sot labor- 
intensive and thus is one area in 
which this small economy can ac- 
commodate growth and upward 
mobility without increasing the 
strain on social services and hous- 
ing. 

Also, because more education is 
needed to wok in foreign rampa- 
nies, as opposed to the tourism in- 
dustry, Bermudians are encouraged 
to improve their skills. 

internati onal business in Bermu- 
da is divided into two parts: the 
professional services provided to 
international companies by bank- 
ers, lawyers, accountants and local 
management consultants, and the 
offshore activities of international 
companies themselves, which in- 
dude exempt companies and part- 
nerships. and permit companies. 
Exempt companies can do only off- 
shore business; permit companies 
are incorporated in Bermuda and, 
with a license from the Finance 


Ministry, can do business in ., 

country. 

Exempt co mp a n ies are exey 
not from taxes but from the j 
eminent requirement that at U ' 

60 percent of a local company 
owned by Bermudians. 

There are 5,412 exempt com 1 
tries in Bermuda: 1,176 insure 
companies, 556 commercial u 
ing companies. 773 shipping V ' 
panies and 2,907 other firms (m ‘ ' 
ly personal investment compani- : 

Insurance companies from- 
United States, attracted by Bet*' 
da’s less regulated business e - 
ronment, have become the bag 
growth area in the country’s m 1 
national business nonfolia ; 

Since the late 1960s, the nun - 
of insurance con$anies has -*• 
creased tenfold. 

Faced in the United Stales * 
certain reserve requirements,':' 
signed risk plans, guaranty fit - 
for insolvency and rigorous Js-- * 
nal Revenue Service scrutiny, L 
insurance companies sprangup 
Bermuda during the nud-1970sr 

It was also during the early It 
that medical malpractice and pr 
uct liability premiums increu 
sharply in toe United Sttr. . . 

sureXSnLdves _~ 

surance companies, called captv- . 

These captive companies, SC: - , 
times derisivdy referred to as 
nocent capacity” within the ia . . 
try because of their ini.-, 
wiffingmess to underwrite unw. . 
ed risks, number about 65 U "- 
percent of 1,176 insurance con : , 
nies in Bermuda. . 7mm m 7 

However, during the lasu“ 
months, captives have fatten -', 
hard times. A soft market, bad - 
ing and high interest rates, wi 
encouraged cash-flow unden 

ing, have contributed toapurg 

a few less profitable operation! . 

— MARK MacNAM/* 1 


v .- t 


: WS 




\±Xr'- 

t>'*> * fl 


: : - ■ 

-hi* 




. ’ jin 

Hill 
I 

> ' -<iMf i* 


Offshore Insurance Business 


'"VIIUIUTVKS 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
world, and markets such as Bermu- 
da have suffered badly. 

The image of the market has also 


been hurt because of the wett-pub- 
hdzed scandals at Uoy id’s of Loo- 


hazed scandals at Lloyd's of Loo- 
dan. Allegations love been made 
that well over 5100 million was 
improperly diverted by some 
Lloyd’s underwriters, with same of 
the money ending up in offshore 
locations like Bermuda. 

The shakeout in wold insurance 
markets has hit the estimated 51.5- 
bfflion Bermuda insurance busi- 
ness particularly hard. 

Two UK ral companies. Exxon 
and Chevron, have stopped their 
captive insurance subsidiaries. An- 
con and Insco. from writing unre- 
lated third-party risks. Another oil 
giant. Humps Petroleum, earlier 
withdrew its captive, Walton Insur- 
ance, after major losses. 

The cotbadts also include a 
number of medium-size concerns. 
The latest to go is Mentor Insur- 
ance, the captive of New Orleans- 


based Ocean Drilling and Explora- 
tion. 

But Bermuda’s problems do not 
stop at the underwriting leveL In 
particular, the attitude of the UiL 
Internal Revenue Service over the 
taxation of captives is canting in- 
creasing concern in many corpora- 
tions. 

The U.S. authorities are current- 
ly waging an aggressive campaign 
against the tax position of offshore 
captive insurance (xmpames, argu- 
ing, for instance, in a case involving 
MobD CXI, that captives are an In- 
credible tax-avoidance mecha- 
nism.’’ 

Captive managers are having to 
confront an increasingly uncom- 
promudiig stance by the U.S. gov- 
ernment, which suggests that when 
a company boys insurance from an 
insurer it owns, then there is no 
transfer of financial uncertainty 
outside the “economic family” of 
the corporation. Hence, a number 
of important tax deductions should 
not be made. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPA Y-SIJIVDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


jconomic Concerns 
threaten Harmony 
„ etween Races 


Page 9 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON BERMUDA 


MILTON — Racial friction 
rmudfi is more a result of 
mic issues, such as the cost of 
and the lack of housing, than 
al ones, although black anger 
lly exists. 

prime mhuster, John WJX 
is W** - , as are the ministers 
nice, education, ocanmunky 
literal affairs, hmumg as d 


However, leaders of the quality uneven. 


In an effort to ease the housing 
crisis, the Government Housing 
Corporation has begun building 
new developments. The hope is 
that middle- and upper-nnddle- 
dass families will move into the 
newer and more expensive develop- 
ments, leaving their old honvy for 
die less advantaged. But labor costs 
are high , productivity low and 


W m 


save Labor Party, die large- 
k opposition party, are voio- 
creaang resentment at die 
i of while foreigners, partio- 
professiouals, who hold 


A new one-bedroom apartment 
costs about $100,000, with a mort- 
gage of $800 a month. 

Moreover, 20-year mortgage 
money is hard to come by 


jobs and boy land in interest rales are capped at 7 



An Electronic Link in NATO’s Defenses 


tingency plans since the mid-1970s 
to deploy giant nuclear depth 


By Richard M- Wdntraub don and other installations linked military installations prepared by tingency plans since the mid-1970s 
w a c rrrM/'rmxr *° modem dec ironic warfare, the the Congressional Research Service to deploy giant nuclear depth 

• _ U V a ° nt : naw continues to operate a small for the Senate Foreign Relations charges to C ana d a, led and. Puerto 

£r.Ei«,ir doorstep of reading slatioQ co^i dered ^ Commiuee: Rko and Bermuda. 

U S.- European runs by smaller The facilities “monitor various ^ The weaprms. known as W7 


envoys that provisioned an 


The facilities “monitor various 
ocean phenomena, such as cur- 


The weapons, known as B-57 
bombs, have the power of 10,000 


“It's minor compared to what it rents, and operate acoustic hydro- tons of TNT. 

S to ns«l to be in terms of numbers,” phones planted offshore as pan of venaons of the classified 

fensesof^NtSh^S^^ 531(1 one f® 1 *- “But de- a continuing navy program de- re ^ rt *** leaked l0 ^ press in 

^oxiNortn Atlantic ireuy stipyers making their way to the signed to provide more detailed m- several weeks ago. it 


fe : idmds' beaches, 
golf courses and yacht basms are 
air, naval and communications fa- Azores.” 


", . . , , . » [Mediterranean] apart from a bat- formation on the factors that com- 

", v,„^ cfies ’ rie group must refuel and they can prise the ocean environment and 
f D °^~-.^r ns r just make it from Bermuda to the affect the transmission of sound in 


ah ties that allow the United States 
to survey a wide are of the Atlantic 


The air facilities in Bermuda 


seawater. 
This pa 


in a continuing cat-and-mouse pans-Atlantic ttgfate * 

game with Soviet submarines, ao- » j 

252* >£ 


serve a similar refueling role for server tdxmliiaxy tongue twisters to 


one longtime ob- 


touched off a furor. 

Ultimately, the reports prompt- 
ed a State Department spokesman 
to say that it is “strict NATO and 


United Suites policy never to con- 

ms-Atlantic flights. ” remark: “You can bet he’s not talk- firm or deny the auihoitidiy of any 

Less widely discussed are the ar- tog about monitoring porpoises.” alleged U.S. or NATO classified 
ities of two other installations on The vast array of underwater lis- documents, but he added mat no 


firm or deny the authenticity of any 
alleged US. or NATO classified 


srmn-M fcTnfca.- Ti n m-iuo iwu umo insmiianom OP juc vml uiwjt u uuuciwaio iu- — — 77 , — , — 7 — 7 — -.7- 

iSSuf Bennuda s the islands: a National Aeronautics taring devices, combined with sat- weapons would be deployed with- 






of blacks here like the 
wng around the track, 
ring cared for,” said 


raies are capped at / per- 
cent. The three local banks ti^d to 
invest as much money as possible 
outside the country. 

In addition, crime in the Mack 


oa industrial umon, an am- concern: Burglary and purse- 
organization for most of the snatching have mcr«iw»rf tyt fh» f « tf 


T 1 al Simmons, president of the community has become a major 

" da Industrial Union, an um- concern: Burglary and purse- 

organization for most of the snatching have mer»iw»rf m thr f a tf 
~''v, in the island group. two years, prostitution is on the rise 

ft a ft- ft , * . . _ . »v s assumption is that the and the use of dings among young 

#1111 i viD run indefinitely ” people is widespread 

' • 1 Jr 1 | f |H|e 1959, when Beonuda b&- Since 1980, reported crime is up 
• . , x HfloEcyof de segreg atio n, black almost 20 percent; convictions are 

y M • | • I 1 ias flared half a dozen times, up 5D percent, 

lifl \ * I I* | I fc 1 1 . \rk fc Trxwttly in 1981, during agen- A Royal Commission survey 

" * 1 ‘ M ,{}] Ujkefcfflowing the breakdown done last autumn on drug abuse 

Jjstract negotiations be tw ee n among Bermuda college s tudents 
wanment and a hospital 1 * ‘ ‘ 


two years, prostitution is on the rise ,\/)/||*/» fj ft 

and the use of drugs among young w/ f J- 

people is widespread ** 

Since 1980, reported crime is up By Roger Scocton 

almost 20 percent; convictions are HAMILTON what *, Mr. Down said Land prices have 

i m 50 percent. HAMILTON — What does an quadnnjed A third of an acre. docfcy ? rd *“4 removcd lts 

A Commission survey acut f y ^^onmem-consaous ffi^SuId haw Sst abSS 
done bKitumn on ^.000 inl975,Tn^f^ 

among Bennuda college students “ything from S100,000 to 

showed that the useoQeran vras a ° dlcss iff 0 20 square imles (51.7 ji^oQQ. ^ ^P 5 call 


Explffling Bemnda’s coves by sailboat 


Affluence Hampers 
Search for Housing 

By Roger Scorton setting for $250,000 to $350,000. 


c ur rent qlratAoie mte a kouuuhi nuinuumu I.WIWWVU 

rwraTinr, r . tt e xt t and Space Adminisirarion tracking eliites and anti-submarine air and 
AirSfoS 5 .TKiSLy Fij?S “Hi what the navy callTiS surface vessels, have become the 

Saint David? Sii? oceanographic research facilities, first line of defense in modern na- 

- - - s “land, the U^. The NASA station initially was val warfare and many experts be- 


Njiw'b 1 ne station imoafly was vai wan arc ana many experts oe- 

airerafiTh?TyShpSp^^wf placed on Bermuda reportedly to lieve it is facifilies such as these that 
SmSv^hiSSSf ““a** launches from Cape Ca- give strategically placed islands 
SSffJrSEKELS such as Bermuda tbar greatest val- 


routes for the Soviet Union’s . ^ juncuon is un- last resort Since it would disrupt, it 

Northern Fleet. , . 11 “ 8150 facilities such as these not destroy, the highly sensitive un- 

Tbe anti-submarine so aadrons Thc L role °* oceanographic that have led observers to discount denvatcr listening devices that are 
of P-3Cs oDcrate from Kmdlrv nn ««»rcfa faciLties was described as the importance of recent reports at the core of NATO's own defense 


md out the “prior agreement of the 
[Ik host government.” 

na- British officials simply refuse to 
be- discuss the issue but other knowl- 
hft edgeable observers note that a 
ads weapon like the B-57 is unlikely 
ever to be used except perhaps as a 
last resort since it would disrupt, if 
ese not destroy, the highly sensitive un- 


cf p-3Cs ooerate from Kmdlpv on taounes was described as the importance of recent reports 

foiorlSSSSwS Mtow“»npm™u.s. 0 «rse« that a^Um.alSu^lm had »n- 

from their regular bases on the 
mainland. 

While Britain dosed its Bermuda IVir/ilriov* Tacm/vo C* /vmnli/tni , A TT 


A ».** t r i*4»' 






w 


& 


y 




;-r - a **?^** rl 


•e were incidents of harass- 
af tourists and Bermuda’s 
ranber regiment was called 


more than double that among - 

American students. whdi to house it? 

Sir John Sharp, minister of labor , ^ lo fc “ e ? te 

d home affairs, said that “75 per- ^ re* 1 ® 6 sae of the 

nt of the crimes committed £Se **** 30 

- Hmo.r.11^ » “>.*> atber. 


square kilometers) of land on 
vmich to house it? 


sz’GmSszrjSi 
fr<jm S100 - 000 to 


Nuclear Issues Complicate U.S. Relations 


..though no shots were fired, cent of the crimes committed 
. 7, Bntish troops were Gown are drug-related.” 
judl disturbances flowing Austin Thomas, termer “a 
- Tging of two blacks, one of ow” mimgfer of education in 
had been convicted of mar- opposition, party, believes tha 
-the governor, Sr John Shar- country’s mnienal wealth is c 


And obstruction axis, be aid, 

8 reimmg at $110 to $150 a It is the Umted States that h 


and home affairs, said that “75 


square foot The real-estate indus- 


don still has responsibility for the (Gootinned From Page 7) 
islands’ defense and foreign policy Bermudian banks take pride in 
and British ships and aircraft call their “clean” reputation, 
there repulady, according to the The notion of sovereignty is 
British Embassy in Washington. closely linlr«vl to that of indepen- 
It is the Umted States mat has dence among a growing number of 
continued to develop nriOtaxy facO- black Bermudians. The prime min- 


Austin Thomas, a former “shad- 
ow” minister of education in the 


bases here, then we would like to 
negotiate a lease for those bases. 


Progressive Labor Party, believes That’s the arrangement the UJS. 
that independence is inevitable and has in many other places, but we 


that the advantages would be sub- cannot negotiate until we are inde- 
stantiaL pendent" 

, , However, polls taken through 

“One of the problems we have the years show that almost 95 per- 
had in the tourism business is being cent of the white population is 
unable to negotiate lower air-fare against independence and only 
rates with U.S. carriers,” Mr. about 20 percent of the island's 
Thomas said. “That must be done total population favors the idea, 
in London through BOAC [British Those opposed argue that the 
Airways], which has little interest country possesses neither the bu- 
rn helping tourists come to Bennu- reaucracv nor the government ex- 
da. Also, if we are so important to pertise to govern itself 
U.S. security that they keep two —MARK MacNAMARA 


Jaasa aia 

KKUSMSM! STrtBTSK 


ply for B e rm u dian s. His own cam- sannel and their dependents are are living in a period," be said re- 
pmy*s finance subsidiary will lend counted among the islands' 57,000 cently, “in which TWmnH^nc are 

nn -n - - - fUnn. f IfVt AAA J 5* a. A A « nM 1 • .> • Mm 


country’s material wealth is caus- 
ing a situation wmflar to the one in 


real estate — affordable, that 


^ a MHU1UM1 MliiUfU LU U1C UUC Ui TtArmi .Jin 

c the countiy, whose popula- many middle-class suburbs in Eo- 


.50 percent black, has come a rope and North America, 
ly ntm the ugly days in the • The stale of tb 
50s, when, on one occasion, developed that peo 
. sy Adams, the blade prime accustomed to nvi 
r of Barbados, was not al- means,” he said. 

'nto a whites-only Bermudi- “Bui the pike th 

L not only a matter < 

n Smith, a former member three jobs to affor 
' ament wno recently joined a ries,itisthatparen 
'oupof dissidents within the to supervise their 
.' ave Labor Party, criticized we’re seeing is a bi 
idnaons of a 1984 study black family.” 
sioned by the government According to c 


auj uuutwxuu »UUU 1 U 2 > UI CU- Tl;, ■ 4 . -# n _ ... ■■ 

pe and North America. Tins is not tosaythat Bennndi- 

^ThestaleoftS^omyisso are poor One trf tteprmcqial 

reasons that Bermuda has a horn- 
msprobtaBl iilkmomms 
ans.-hesdi aflWe of .B pople, who OT no 

... loo^r content to hve m the house- ( 


more treqnenuy open to negotia- ties. 


bdieve that mdependence is the 
natoraj next step in the country’s 


tion than at any time in the past. In addition to the naval air sla- political evolution. 


holds where they were bom. This 
financial, independence, coupled 


n Smith, a former member three jobs to afford all tb£e luxn- 
smem^iOTtlyjmnrfa ries,itkt^panat5ffl^athome 

^houSronteXnJb 

ave Labor Party, criticized we re seeing is a breakdown of the , , , , i V , 

'dnacj.s of a 1984 study blKtfamfly." 

aoned by the govonment According to one govenunent uvctju 

me perceptions about the offidal, tasked not to be identi- 

■of life, because It threw Bed, “crime is a big problem. But JTSSm^Z'SSS 
and whites together and the wont of it is that whites thmk ^ws, which ^o^tSsca?^ 

‘id: “The condusions would in fact, (here^^me bSs'who SSoa^e^^That tteo^ 

blacks a pp rove of 

be fact is that althou^^ According to the 1984 study, 

more wealthy than ever be- -most Bermudians are satisfied , - 

dam wodtink harder, those with their lives, their wo* and S^ ffratd COmp * aUOn for 

.wendarcnormaldiigil. p^pats for the fnrnrt fiistgainst this backgraund that 

ink the anger is more dan- ^The mmonty of Bermudians f „ 
now than it has ever been.” who have what has been labeled a 
irea in which blacks fed the ‘syndrome of discootmf ” have 
k^nch is in the toimsm more than one source of unhappi- poni^freai^^ 
r. As intense competition ness. .. 

er business travders and Mr. Smith, who is black, believes nnn _iw!^fLc <,« «rirt Th<*v 

fon» down hotel ra^ that black Bermodians are “getting cannmb^Svdopcd p 

a tresses, who are mostly °^le said: “The real appeal of this 1 ._i .r .. » 


-jw end are nor making iL 
ink the anger is more dan- 
aow than it has ever been.” 


mqm warworn, wtat w housed on the island in 
a breakdown of the SSrfpSf- 

ro rvrv> ™8 81006 8041 boosted the ovexaD } 

Accon&ig to one govomnent demand for new homes. 

i^ci^^^^nroblem 6 ^ Restrictions on car ownership 

*“ve not helped the ritnS 


trd traffic growth. That this ot^ec- [ 
tive has been achieved is of little 


that the one-car coc-home rule has 
also stiffened competition for 
bousing. 

It is against this background that 
foreigners, or non-Bermudians, as 
the local population refers to them, 
find themselves negotiating their 
purchases of real estate. 

The ground rules for sales to 



shrinks for maids, busboys 
d tresses, who are mostly 




he average wage in Bennu- island is that it is a nice and friend- 537000 or 


30 a week, yet rents, even in 
nent-spoosored housing 
, start at about $500 a 


ly place. Once people lose that 
quality, no one is gang to be able 
to tram them to get it bade.” 

—MARK MacNAMARA 



COMWBUTORS 

IK MacNAMARA is a Miami-based journalist who writes 
the Cnibbean and Latin America. 

JUS MORRISON is the editor of Re Report, a fortnightly 
kterfrom London that covers reinsurance. 

It^PARD ROSE is a business reporter fen The Royal Gazette in 
■Wa. 

pan SCOTTON is a senior business reporter for The Royal 
Bermuda. 

VHARD M. WHNTRAUB is depnly foreign etfitor of The 
a£ngtou Post. 


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condominiums and apartments 
av ailab le tO non-B ermndiam will 1 

seU for about $250,000. 

Finally, government permission 
is required for any sale to a foreign I 
national. Tins screening process, 
which is begun by applying 
through a local law ran and sub- I 
nutting personal and bank refer- 
ences, takes between four to six 
months and leads to the buyers | 
payment of a one- time govenunent 
fee equivalent to 10 percent of the 
final purchase price. 

The outlays do not stop there. | 
Legal fees on the purchases of a $1- 
miflm n piece of real estate will . 
range from $12,000 to $15,000, of ( 
which 60 percent is stamp duly — 
half a percent on the first $100,000 
and 1 percent thereafter. And an- 
nual land tax starts at 65 percent j 
of the mrnml rental value on I 
houses and 15 percent on condo- ) 

minimus. 

F inancing by one of the three I 
local banks is available — for a j 
price: The island’s biggest bank, the ( 
Bank of Bennuda, for example, will 
lend up to $250,000, bnt only for a 
period of five years- 
But the overriding problem for 
many non-Bermnuans buying 
property is not so ranch financial as j 
finding the real estate in the first 
place. Of the approximately 22^)00 
homes here, an estimated 200 
houses have an annual rental value 
qualifying them far sale to foreign- 
ers. 

Of those 200. according to a rtal- 
estale salesman, Andrew Down, 
fewer than 20 are currently an the j 
market. And their average price 1 
tag, he says, is about $1 nmEon. 

“That kind of money will buy a 
three-bedroom, three-bath boose j 
with a fined kitchen and garage on 
possibly a quarter to a thud of an 
acre of land, which will not neces- 
sarily have a water view,” said Mr. 
Down, who works far one of the 
biggest companies in Che business j 
and is head of the Bennuda Cham- 
ber of Commerce's real-csmtc divi- 
sion. 

Mr. Down said that Bermuda’s 
real -estate market is worth 575 mil- 
lionto S 200 milBan is annual sales. 

Prices have risen dramatically. 
Houses that were going for $95,000 
to S120£00 a decade ago arc now 




Private 

Independent and International 

We nfier highly >op’nis‘ic< 2 ted PRIVATE banking IncilHies including 
Imaneiai planning, ,?ssel management, and comprehensive personal and 
corporate trustee services. Our global investment management 
approach, backed by advanced communications and related svstems, 
enables us tv provide INTERNATIONAL investment portfolio 
man age me nt and custodian services on an advisory or fully discretionary 
basis to our customers, which include private individuals, multi-national 
corporations, pension funds, mutual funds, and unit trusts. 

Wearean INDEPENDENT bank established m Bermuda in 188T 
The Bank is largely Bermudian owned with no dominant shareholder 
or group influencing our policies and sound judgment This is 
particularly important in the evaluation of business and investment 
opportunities during times of uncertainty. 

the Bank of Bermuda is 
INTERNATIONAL in character ottering 
comprehensive financial serv ices 
worldwide from Bermuda and through 
subsidiaries in New York, Hong Kong, and 
Guernsey. Channel islands with 
representation in London. 

these characteristics, with an 
t-mphasGon global asset management and 
negligible international loan exposure, 
place The Bank ot Bermuda Group in a 
unique position to provide specialized 
assistance to sophisticated private 
investor-- and multi-national corporations. 

The Bank of Bennuda Limited 








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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


•%e 


NYSE Most Actives 


Unocal 

v<+ HI** 

21+15 soft 

Low 

49% 

La* Ctaro 

50% +ft 

SOME* 


23% 

24 + b 

ITTO, 

19547 3* 

34% 

am +i 

CSX 

15314 23b 

22% 

23b + ft 

Gan El 

14281 59ft 

58% 

-59ft' 

AT&T 

MM7 Uft 

Ub 

ZIft + ft 

Tannco 

1 IT m 

42ft 

42% — b 

5aumCo 

Ki.iiV ■ 

IfUr 

30 +b 

PhilPet 

10883 38b 

37% 

37*6 —ft 

DiamS 

10407 19% 

Uft 

19% +% 

GMat 

10074 73b 

72ft 

im —i 

Texaco 

9232 36ft 

35 

34% +1 

Sperry 

803 53% 

51ft 

52% +1% 

HalmP 

8808 24% 

24 

34% + ft 

FordM 

8231 43% 

42b 

42ft — 1 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own HM Uw Lai Own 


liMM 1362X7 RIUS 135575 HUJt + +87 

Tram stub u*xt sm.ii ran* + *5 

urn vsiM utn isi.n inn + 0d< 

comp stm san sows sura + au 


NYSE Index 


Composlt* 

i ndustr ial* 

Trangp. 

utmibK 

Finance 


hibr low etas* am 
nu+o kudo hum +oxa 
120.18 71937 120.18 +0J2 
9735 9674 9735 +17* 
5110 5+72 5110 +0X2 
10735 107.19 10735 +02 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

munis* 

Industrials 


7231 

«37 

7535 


am 
+027 
+ Mi 

+m 


NYSE Diaries 


Advoneod 

1037 

911 

Decflnod 

517 

430 

Undxmoed 

446 

444 


1998 

2005 


98 


New Low* 

5 



<7740X00 


Volume down 

24X51770 

mm 


Odd-Lot -Trad I ng In N.Y. -) 


March 28 
March 27 
March 26 
March 25 
March 22 


■Inefudad hi the solas Bowes 


Bur Sato 
174365 446371 
17430 427282 
17130* 461383 
184X11 496*34 
198382 4*7274 


•sun 

1309 

1.175 

953 

3.116 

1014 


Fridajs 


N*SE 


Closing 


Vd.ot4P.M_ 


tSTJSUM | 

PfTV.4PJA.VBL tfJXSX I 

Pnwra wd WtfetfOctc UUdLfM I 


J 


Tables (ncfade the nationwide once* 
ur to the dosing on Wot! Street mi 
go not reflect late traces elsewhere. 

Via The Asyacicicd Prai 


AMEX Diaries 


□ 


Advanmd 

pocrawa 


Total I m ho 


vafoBWuR 

WHOrtftdB*" 


Oh* 

Prer. 

305 

308 

234 

307 

a 

30 

717 

713 

Jt 

a 

7 

+J4LIR 

IJ4I730 

5 


NASDAQ index 


COAHlIlt 

Industrials 

Finance 


unarm 

Bonn 

TnauB. 


Ctu* Orta 
ThX *■ IM 
297 JJ + J« 
wu > +104 
+205 
36929 +W 
anra-a.]* 

25534 +0.H 


Watt 1W 


778.91 7*7* 

Itn 

2039 SOLO* 
35720 7»19 


Standard & Poor's Index 


industrial* 


HM Law Ctesa cum 
201 30 «.« 7n.tr * 134 
154*3 157*1 15430 + ZAC 
■02* TO.fJ lfL3+ +M* 
20X1 2051 3030 —Ml 

UK34 17934 l«U* +1.12 


AMEX Sales 


dPX+VQtOONI 
Pm. 4 PM- vohpn* 
Pnv.an.nMM 


I 12 JM 00 


AMEX MOSt Aether 


SAT 

mroA 

CMM 


38644 an. 
AMS SO 
4415 } 

saoe* *633 n 

oomaR SU 2iA 
MaOcn S* UH 
OffCdB itto it 
wirfti< I V* tft 
NYTWft 064 411b 
frairt A IBB 10 
AtfnK 956 IH 
HouQT m M 
HBShri M SO 

T«»jur . oo to % 
DetafW *5 Uft 


.55 

un 

? 

% 


«■ 

+i - 


n 

l n 


$ K 

S"* 

jft 

BO * ' 

ft * 
IS 9. 

& *t 



U 


trs" ... 

■ ■ 


| AMEX Stock index 




in 


little 


MM 

22931 


7*7*9 


Cm* 

22939 


?! 


*c' l .- 1 


UManHi 
High Low Stock 


Sis. Cbm 

div. ympe mosHiBhLowaootam 


38 


23ft Wft AAR 
21b W* AGS 
WVb IH AMCA 
1796 1396 AMP 
4316 liU. AMR 
2095 1846 AMR pf 2.18 107 
*ft 27% ANRpf 237 112 


23 14 
9 


92 
102 
5 

30 27 38 717 
10 6343 
13 
4 


2.12 112 

40 

2JOO 37 
J2 13 11 


13 

620 

354 


1SK 18ft 10% + b 
1254 12b 1246 + K 
lift 1896 1016— 1% 
17b 16% 17b + U 
43 4096 42 +1 

20ft 2096 2096— ft 
24ft 2496 2496 + ft 
19ft 19ft 19ft 
996 9ft 9ft 
506 5396 5396+ ft 
1796 1796 1796 


25 19 ANRpf 
14ft Bft APL 
67ft 4696 ASA 

27 16 AVX .... 

5746 3696 AMLab I US 23 14 1396 Oft 5296 51 + ft 

2596 1+Mi Actcwdo U4 JJ9 It 26 22ft 22ft 23ft 

22 12ft AantC M 23 38 15ft 14ft 15ft + 96 

32b 3U 11 21 996 9U 9ft 

2.1IC123 93 16ft 14ft 16ft 

S U 7 9 lift lift IHft 4- V6 

31t 7J 18 42 lift 1096 lift + ft 

14 2273 33ft 33 3396 + 96 

.12 13 4S 9ft 9ft 9ft 

12 T1 12ft TT*6 1196+ ft 

234 63 39 2471 40ft 40ft 4096 

5331107 20 Sift 54ft 54ft— ft 

UO 34 19 3371 34 3296 33ft +1 

21 11 2ft 296 2ft 

170 25 11 " 

M 29 11 

21 


10ft BU AotmE 
1796 U Ada Ex 

20 lift AdmMl 
T9U Bft AdvSvs 
41ft 2SV6 AMO 
12ft *ft Adwst 
14ft ffft Aarflex 
42ft 271A AntnLf 
59% SZft A6fLPt 
32ft 15ft Ahmns 
4ft 2ft AJJeen 
51 38ft AlrPrd 
2*96 13 AlrbFrt 

2 1 AlMaas 

32 26ft AlaP PtA 372 73 j 0 
7ft 6 AlaP dot J7 120 
73ft 61ft AlaP pf 900 125 

102 BSft AlaPpf 11O0 lU 

48ft 37 AlaP pi B.1A 120 

1396 11 AioaKS 
1996 9ft AbkAlr 
16ft 10ft AQirfOS 
31ft 22ft AMra 
35ft 23ft Alcan 

3SV6 27ft AlcoSM 

32 17 AJexAbl 1O0 

24ft 2096 Alexdr 


72 7.1 12 
.14 7 9 

78 20 U 19 
76 U 13 -348 
170 47 10 3597 
170 35 12 379 
37 

19 


*7ft 65ft AltoCp 2J06T 20 31 
25+ 23 AfBCppf 286 T77 
28ft 18ft Ale | id 1U0 52 
94ft 81 Alai pfCllTS 127 
31 24ft AllaPw 270 B7 9 
22 15ft AlftnC Mb 3J 13 


549X 4096 48ft 4896 + 96 
153 21 20ft 20ft— ft 
120 1ft 1ft 1ft— ft 
12 38» 30ft 33ft— ft 
17 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
60501 72 72 72 

W0* 99ft 99ft 99ft 
13110Z 69 45 65 

37 13 1296 13 

19ft 19ft 19ft+ ft 
lift 1*96 14ft 
30ft 30 3096 + 96 

25ft 2596 25ft+ ft 
34ft 3496 34ft + U 
31ft 3096 31 — ft 

23 22ft 22ft— 9k 
78ft 71ft 7Bft+ 96 
25ft 25ft 25ft 
2696 26ft 2696+ ft 
92ft 92ft 92ft— ft 
31 3046 31 + 96 

19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 


1293 

SB 

8 

3 

195 

3 


324 


«96 28ft AlldCps L80 40 8 2931 38ft 37ft 3794+ ft 


42ft 53ft AhtCopf 674 109 
109ft 99 AldCO aflZOO 1U 
107ft 100ft AMCpf 127»*1X0 
21ft 1196 AfldPd 
59ft 38 AIMStr 
12ft 5ft AlltsCh 
36 24 AJhsCpf 

27 20 ALLTL 

25ft 20ft AlphPT 
4196 30ft Alcoa 
Oft 15ft Amax _ 

42ft 32ft Amoocpf 100 
33ft 22ft AiRHes 1.10 
2ft 1U AmAsr 
1996 15ft ABakr 


2.12 17 9 439 


707 

*59 

2 


15 


70 5296 A Brand 190 56 10 

27ft 2446 ABrd Pi 275 103 
70ft 53 ABrdpf 167 3J 

IIS 54ft ABdCSt UO ^ .. 

26ft 19ft ABIdM 76 13 13 

2SK 19ft ABusPr M 2J 15 

55ft 40ft AmCan 290 15 11 

2496 21ft AClXlPf 270 117 
m m ACan pf 1173 127 
W 16ft ACaaBd 270 1U 
33ft 25ft ACopCv 65M7U 
lift 6ft ACantC 12 

S&ft 43ft ACran 170 17 12 3904 

29ft 18ft ADT 72 19 26 119 


34 61ft 61ft 6196+ ft 
5 104ft 106ft T06ft+ ft 
26 103 umnaib 
19 22ft 22ft 2296 
57ft 56ft 57ft 
946 7ft 7 796— ft 

37 32 31ft 31ft + ft 

WO 26ft 26 26ft + ft 

5 2296 2Zft 22ft— ft 

3496 34 34ft + ft 

1896 1796 US + ft 

>496 34ft 3446 + ft 

31ft 31 31ft + ft 

2 196 2 + ft 

lift 1896 18ft 
£996 6896 6996+ ft 

2696 26ft 2696— ft 

_ 70ft 70 70 — ft 

L5 16 3518 »* lltSft 10* +1ft 
11 2596 25ft 2596 
1 2596 25ft 25ft 
340 S3 SH 53 + ft 

374 23ft 2396 23ft— ft 

3 tfiSft K«ft 708ft + ft 

126 Uft 1896 18ft + ft 

39 30ft 38% 30ft 
29 9 8ft 896 

51ft 5096 5196 +1V6 
2396 2396 2396 + ft 


174 67 9 
-BOB 14 13 
1J0 15 II 
TO 1.1 
17 

15 16 2110 
354 
8 HI 


29ft 29 
1196 lift 1196+ ft 
5496 5496 54ft + ft 

fflft 62 62ft +2ft 


** ** ss+s 


lift lift .... . _ 

10 ft 10 ft 10 ft + ft 


21ft Uft AElPw 2260105 8 3948 21ft 21ft 21ft + ft 

44ft 25 Am Exp ITS 11 IS 4779X 4196 41U 4196+ ft 

30 14 A Fanil Mb 24 12 226 27 2596 27 + ft 

3096 1946 AGnCP 170 14 9 1238 

12ft 6 A Gal wf 398 

57 5196 AGnJ PtA &2BB117 21 

B3ft 5896 AGnl pfB 570a 77 85 

67 4496 AGh Ipf 375 S3 41 

62 40ft AGnpfD 2 j64 4U 191 

3246 2596 AHvlf IM U t 3 

13ft 7ft AHalSi 5 „ . ... r .... . 

42ft 4696 AHOOM 270 4J U 1769 62ft 61ft 6216+ ft 

38 26ft AH0SP LU 3J 11 <2*4 37ft 3696 37 + 96 

84ft 6296 Amrtch 670 80 8 599 82ft 8196 8216 + 96 

78 S3 AlnGra U4 A U 282 7396 7396 7396 + 96 

38ft 18ft AMI 31 27 U 4938 2596 34ft 2Sft +!ft 

596 3ft AmMot 81 1966 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

6S 2746 AN Kiss 222 14 12 378 <5 6496 6494— ft 

43ft 34ft APmfc) 74122 4 5348 35 3396 34 

1396 546 A5LFla 4 ® Aft 696 6ft 

18ft 12ft ASLFlpf2J9 160 133 1396 1396 13ft 

16 10 ASMp OO 60 14 49 1396 U 1396—96 

3596 2296 AmSfd 170 12 12 252 30ft 30ft 30ft + ft 

56ft 26ft AmStar 74 12 9 AM 54 53ft 53ft— ft 

4494 46V6 AStrptA 4J8 17 387 *5 65 65 

5496 51 AStrnfB <00 127 11 5494 54ft 5496 + ft 

£5 1714134 21ft 21ft 21ft + ft 


22ft 14ft AT&T 120 


37ft 30ft AT&T pf 164 100 
38 31ft AT&Tpf 174 102 
26 1396 AWatrs 

63 35 AWafpf 173 22 

12 10 AWatpf ITS 117 

23ft 20ft Am Hall 278 11.3 
lift 496 ATrSc 
7916 5*ft ATrUn 
33 26ft Amiran 170 SO 
35ft 17 AiiimOs 30 7 
9696 60 Amaspf 572 57 
29ft 21V!l Anwtak JO 10 14 
2896 18ft Amfac 
16ft 194 Anrtnc 4 

38ft 26ft AMPl 31 23 17 
24 Uft AmpCD 00 11 W 
21ft 1294 Am raps 
28ft 19 AmStti 170 
39ft 25ft AimM UO 
4ft 196 Anacmp 
30ft 19ft Anatoes 

lift Anchor 178 
2(ft AnClay 1J2 
9ft AndrOr 20 

® 16ft AflPPlJc J6 
5394 AnlWU 200 
44 AhhWPf 3M’ <3 
1396 Anlxtr J 14 II 




Ift— ft 

3716 37 3796+ 16 

_.. 3ft 396 3ft 
1« ?6ft 2M6 2M6+96 

10 
23 


1494 


13ft Antn 9O0C 
aftAnthwB 04 j 14 
15ft Wft Anttiny 740 17 4 
9ft AnodM 30 27 U 
ft ApchPwt 
15ft ApdiPun200alU 
53ft ApPwpf &U 124 
SO ApPwpf 770 123 
2716 ApPwpf +18 112 


26^ ApPwpf 300.127 


2394 22ft 2396 + 96 
40ft 40ft 4016 + ft 
lift lift lift + ft 
20 1916 28 + ft 

10ft 7996 79ft— ft 
5716 5696 57 — ft 
Uft 15ft Uft 
1516 15ft 15ft 
14ft Uft 1416+ 16 
1216 12 12 — 96 

lift lift 1194— M 
1ft . 116 116 
U 17ft 17ft— 16 
: 45ft 45ft 65ft + ft 
: 40 <0 40 +116 

3194 3116 3194— M 
2^ 29V» + m 

i ApUTta 1.121 37 14 91 2894 3M6 28ft 

8 AppIMs 263 71 1316 12ft Uft— ft 

1516 ArcftDn ,14b 3 U 3H9 2116 20ft 2116 + 14 

Uft ArlzPS 260 117 7 2M0 22ft 2216 2216+ ft 

AriPpf 1051*117 1130*91 fl 0 

AHPpf 378 121 37 2816 27ft 21 +96 

. AriPpf 1070 11.1 4B770* » 94 96.. 42 . 

■ft Arrnco 2978 n ■ 89k + ft 

18 Artncpf 210 11.1 17 1916 19 19 —ft 

15ft ArmsRb 78 23 t 106 2116 Wk 2M— ft 

. 22*6 ArmWIn U0 26 9 647 OT6 Mft Mb+1 

8 ft 19 AroCp U0 09 8 8 »k 3094 Bft + ft 

ft Uft ATOWt JO U I SO 1596 IH4 1M6 

25ft 16 Artro J2 7 66 25 24ft 2M6 + ft 

^6 14 Arvbll 70 37 ■ » 2B6 m 2H6+ ft 

33ft 1796 AsarcO 959 2696 25ft 2H4 + ft 

31ft 209* AsMOII 170 57 329 2916 2*16 2916+ ft 

4216 33ft ANllOpf 478 107 » 

29ft 3116 AshlOpf 306 10.1 23 39ft 89 3916 

61ft 4516 AldDO ZAO 47 W 130 ftft »ft 9BV6+ft 

25ft lift AtMana 170 7.9 9 11 20ft 2096 2M6— 16 

Kft 19ft AtCvEI 278 107 8 155 24ft 34ft Mk+ 16 

4096 AH Rich 370 62 22 4510 .4916 _4(ft 4H4 +_ft 




34794284 AtlRcpf 370 J 
31 32ft AtlRcpf 275 1U 
125 97 AtlRcpf 270 27 

20 1116 AtlOKP 

339* IHft AuaaT 70 
441* 29ft AulaOt 72 
2 ft Uft AVEMC 70 
39ft 23 Awry AO 
41 27 AVTWt M 

2596 1916 Avan 270 
36ft U Avdkt 


1 328ft 32894 32M— 196 
SlOOy 3116 Uft Uft— ft 
4 TI7 1141611616— ft 
7 Uft Uft 14ft— ft 
283 2416 M Uft + ft 
722 43ft 42ft 4396 + ft 
25 24ft 24ft 2496 + ft 
. . 280 33ft 32ft 33ft +1 

17 U 1382 3216 31ft 3216 + ft 
97 9 1941 20ft 2096 20ft— ft 
12 8 2294 2216 22ft— ft 


1J 18 
17 19 
27 U 
17 U 


78 U 
70 1J 
72 57 
76 17 


UB 

JO 


10ft 

3ft 


47ft 

41 


U 1016 BMC 
Bft 18ft Holmes 
23ft 15 Bkrlntt 
24ft 1896 Da Mar 
2ft ft vIBaWU 
p 3 BMU Pf 

so 28ft nmicp 

23ft lift BallvNtf 
4W6 30ft BattGE 77 

S’SS 

846 BncCtrn JSU 57 
3Vi StniTBx 
3«ft Bandeo U0 2.1 
29 BkBOl 270 5J 
25K BkHY 274 57 
2646 15ft Bn Was 170 U 
20*6 1416 BnkAm 
5 1ft 40 BkArn Pf 5.19B1U 
16ft lilt BkAfflBf 278 
Sift 23ft BkARty Zffl 77 
66 3794 BankTr 2J0 4J 

24ft 1916 BKTrpf 270 107 
» ws Bsrajar J13« 7 
3H4 19 Bard 74 17 
Uft 18 BarnGP 70 16 
50 32ft Harriot 
33*6 19ft Barvwr 
1396 896 BAS IX 
2896 17ft BauKfi 
1896 lift BnxtTr 
25ft 17ft Bov Fin 
3146 1994 BavStG 
3894 2094 Boartno 170 37 
3316 24ft flOCfCD 170 67 
4896 3094 fiKtnD UO 1A 
lift 494 Botarr 
10ft 9ft Bafcar Bf L7D 167 
1816 Wft BOkfriH M 3.1 
30ft 2196 aWHwt 76 27 
30 21U BolHWDf A7 27 

R»6 66 BOllAH <70 U 
2916 22ft BCE o 2J8 
2716 1946 BNIInd U 

3J96 27V6 Nlhl 270 77 
S 2594 BatoAH 70 17 
29ft 2046 Bamb 170 37 
37ft 23 BenfCp U00 57 
38 32. Banal pf AM 127 

20ft 17 Banefpf 270 127 


38 130 
12 27 

16 1043 
16 U 
157 


12 290 
275 
11 72 

7 1268 


176 27 
70 25 

.12b U 
J8 U 
77 23 
JOa 7 
240 ”■ 


10 88 

7 ■ 

361 

13 23 

5 140 

6 137 

9 45 

11 3613 
211 
67 

11 87 

7 3295 

426 
17 72 

12 1027 

9 3 

9 522 

14 260 
12 116 

15 2361 

75 29M 
48 3 

9 21 

11 217 
9 1343 

16 506 
127 
U 

7 1 
9 217 

6 

8 773 


i 07 


a 


74 U 

70 02 


314 BangtB 
7ft Bergen 
3ft Barker 
lOft BaafPd 

1416 BethStl ... 

5794 3714 BtftlStPtSTO 1U 
28*6 IBft BethStpfWO 11 J 
36ft 21 Bewetiv 72 U 
24ft 1«4 BIpThr 70 06 
14*6 Uft BtoCfln 
2M 1716 BtadtO 
3816 20 BUHP 
40 UK BtalrJn 
51ft 37 BtekHR 240 47 
66ft 36 Boama 170 23 
44ft 37ft BobeC 170 Sfl 
57 46 BebKCRfSTO 93 

r lSft BOttBer .W 7 
52 BaKMrt 072 37 
306 16ft BoraVWr 72 44 
Oft 4ft Bernina 
30*6 25 BMEd 034 U 
75ft 63 BcaEpf OB8 113 
18ft 9 BME nr 1.17 114 


74 27 
172 67 
76 25 


12 II 

8 4072 

22 43 

11 SO 

9 394 
12QZ 
21(1* 

24 455 
14 12 

29 79 

13 508 
1753 

a 

U 

18 523 

16 975 
1354 

11 3047 
8 8 

17 18 
13 382 

I 3025 
17 425 
7 

29 22 

10 337 
9 957 
W 
8 510 


15 


Uft 1216 
3014 29*6 
Uft 1696 
231* 32ft 
196 1ft 
5ft 5ft 
47ft 4*ft 
Uft 14ft 
Wft Wft 
41 40ft 
43 43 

27ft 27ft 
Oft 9, 
346 3ft 
57ft 5646 
4596 4496 
38ft 31*6 
2594 23ft 
18ft 18ft 
43ft 43ft 
15ft 15*6 
31ft 3096 
6396 63ft 
23ft 23ft 
11 W96 

2996 29ft 
2216 2216 
50 49ft 
2346 23ft 
lift 1144 

26 25 

15K Uft 
2196 2196 
31 30ft 
34ft 3396 
30ft 29ft 
499* 48ft 
5ft 596 
1096 Uft 
121b 12ft 
28 27ft 
28 27ft 
B3ft BZft 
29ft ana 
22ft 22ft 
3596 35 
54*6 53ft 
28ft 28ft 
37 Uft 
31 35 

20 Wft 
516 596 
2216 22ft 
596 5ft 
12*6 11th 
18 17ft 
4216 Eft 
Zlft 71 
32ft 32 
22ft 22ft 
16 Uft 
22 2196 
29M 29ft 
22ft 2146 
51ft 50ft 
4U6 42ft 
3896 38 
54ft 504 
2696 26 
72ft 71ft 
ZHh 20*6 
<94 494 
39 311* 

75ft 75ft 
Wft Oft 


12ft + ft 
301* + ft 
Mh + ft 
23» + ft 

S£ + * 

47ft + 96 
14ft— ft 
109*— 1b 
fl + 1* 

f*?ft 

Wit + *6 

2396+16 
1896— ft 
43ft + ft 
15*6— ft 
3096+ ft 
<396+ ft 
33ft— ft 
10ft— ft 
2016— lb 
2216 

SO +96 
23ft + ft 
12 

26 +9b 

£i + * 

33ft— ft 
29ft— ft 
49ft +1*6 

5ft + 1* 
10 ft 
12ft 

21 +M 
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Stocks Stage Broad Advance 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices' on the New York 
Stock Exchange made a broad advance Friday 
in response to encouraging news on the eco- 
nomic outlook. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrial 
stocks rose 6.07 to 1,266.78, cutting its loss for 
the week to 0.67 points. 

Volume reached 101.35 minion shares, 
against 99.78 milli on Thursday. 

Before the opened, the government 

reported that the index of leading economic 
indicators rose 0.7 percent in February. The 
increase in the index, which is designed to 
detect future economic trends, was larger than 
had been envisioned in most advance estimates 
on Wall Street 

In addition, market-watchers said, it ap- 
peared to be just about where investors wanted 
a to be — nather high enough to raise fears of 
upward pressure on interest rales, nor low 
enough to aggravate worries about a slowing in 
the pace of business activity. 

To give the market another boast, there was 
the Federal Reserve's report late Thursday of a 
5500 -nnHi on decline in M-l, the narrowest mea- 
sure of the U.S. money supply, for the week 
ended Match 18. Interest rates fell in the credit 
markets as that news came out. 

With all that, however, analysts said investing 
institutions still seemed to be intent on s etting 
some blue-chip issues before making their re- 
ports for the first quarter. 

In the auto g r o up , for example, General Mo- 
tors dropped % to 73 and Ford Motor 1 to 42%. 
The companies are faced with the prospect of 


stepped-up competition from Japanese manu- 
facturers, who plan to increase shipments of 
cars to this country with the expiration this 
weekend of voluntary import quotas. 

Sea-Land tumbled 4ft to I9 J i after the com- 
pany projected sharply lower first-quarter caro- 
mgi Among other companies in me comainer- 
slupping business, shares of American 
President dropped 4ft to 34, and Sea Containers 
Ltd. lost 1% to 37ft. 

In the plus column, Mohasco picked up 2 to 
31ft. A Miami investment firm proposed to 
acquire the company for S32 a share. 

Unocal rose ft to 50ft and led the active Hst 
on volume of more than 11 million shares. The 
stock climbed 2ft points Thursday, when an 
investment group headed by T. Boone Pickens, 
chairman of Mesa Petroleum, said it was con- 
sidering seeking to gain control of the company 


or to restructure il 


In the daily tally cm the Big Board, about two 
issues rose m price for every one that lost 
groun d. The exchange's c ompo site common- 
stock index gained .62 to 104.60. 

Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those stocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 
totaled 121.91 million shares. 


Standard & Poor’s index of 400 industrials 
rose 1.24 to 201.67, and SAP's 500-stock com- 
posite index was up 1.12 at 180.66. 

The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 
the-counter market added 1.03 to 279.20. At the 
American Stock Exchange, the market value 
index dosed at 229.59, up 1.49. 


12 Mourn 

Hint] LOW Stock 


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71% 
36 V» 

. *' A 
t IK. 
41% 

W% 
Ml 
22ft 
24 ft 
3m 
38n 

7 Vt 


Uft 

41% 

5076 


17ft Cmnn L40 O* 
m Cum 
9ft Cnrtra 

14% EntxEn 1778117 
16 Entneta Ut 7J 
15ft ««k» 

3 EauiiM. 
lift EtMkp Z31 14.1 
28ft Eaffla L77 *3 
9ft Emdiea J2 17 
8% t> W ! 30 23 
UH EraBsn ra 25 
15% EbkC JOU 07 
201b Edrtai 37 21 
30 EM 1.0 28 
1% vievaaP’ 

76 vfEnixiaf 
4ft viEvnofB 
30 BxCHa 148 +s 
37% Cxxatl ira +1 


t> vua 

35 >44 
342 


• IIS 

15 5 

63 


* 99 

■ 47 

17 417 
11 221 
n u 

II 181 
II 138 
146 
48 
1 

9 377 

7 son 


ran ran 

2% TJ, 
lift 10*6 

lift wn 

U * Uft 

35% 3ft 

an * 

16% M<* 
nr- 3i% 

ran r? 
un m 

17% 57ft 
31% 31% 
23 31ft 

ran ran 
2% 2ft 
3ft 3ft 
A* n 

35% 35ft 

50% 4*ft 


28H+ % 

Vb 

lift +m 
17 

nm+ n 

35ft— % 


IM 

ran + % 

13 

ran— % 

17%+ 'A 

31% 

33 +1*6 
37% + 16 
an 

J%+ ft 

<%+ n 


soft + % 


11 6% 
<7% 47ft 
22 17% 

13% 9*6 
14% 9ft 
20% lift 
3916 33% 
U% 9% 
34% ten 
19*6 14% 

ran 33 
ran w% 

U Oft 
7 4b 
37% 39*6 

45% Z7H 

39 39ft 

19% 10% 
27 16% 

33 16 

19% 13% 

57% 43ft 

ran ran 

37 35% 

17% 4 
S% 3ft 
ran 14% 

7% 2ft 
19% U 
TO 12% 
35 21’+ 

15 25ft 
71ft 3Ab 
37 18% 

20 13% 

ran « 

21 9ft 
2046 10% 

ran son 

30% 21 
1H6 7ft 
50% 31% 
7% 4ft 
30U 30% 
31ft 21ft 

22% 14% 

28V* 16 
S 45% 
54% 30% 
lift 8ft 

34% 20ft 

28% Uft 

39ft 22ft 

33% 23% 

13ft 10% 

37ft 19ft 

3116 1416 

40 39% 

25ft m* 
19 11% 

7*6 316 
21 lift 
22% 14ft 

ra% 43% 

51% 33 

12% ton 
ran ra 

15ft 10 

lift 4% 

3Sft 25% 

11% 6H 

25% 13ft 

34% 20ft 
28% 19 
32ft 25 
36% 20 


PM IM 3 

PMC 230 15 51 
FPL GP Ut AO 10 
Fcacw JS 14 16 
Foenf 

FOircad 70 U 
Fdtrcpf U0 11LO 
Fclrfd J8 L3 9 
Farads 25 

hxaW ra 19 12 
FrywsiP 4 

FnuB Jl +6 9 
FsyOro JD 19 17 
FuM 8 

PhdKs 174 13 7 
FttJHXD 27 

FdMn 152 47 W 
PadNM .16 10 
FmdPBa 30 23 6 
FbdRlI L44 <5 14 
FdSonl 70 +9 12 
FbdDSt 240 +3 8 
Ferro 130 47 U 
Fklcd 200 +5 W 
FfelCpA J» 

Fiacnpf ra 11J 
FbiCopf +73*215 
FoSBar 

Flrestn 70 +4 9 
FtAfll 9 

FBfcSr» 17 U I 
FBkFlo 120 15 K 
FBosf 130 17 II 
FsfCWc 132 42 U 
FtBThx 130 87 7 
FtBTxof 8.1WHJ 
FlCIty W 

FFedAX .15* 7 6 
Fllrttta 234 57 I 
Flntstpf 237 63 
RJUUs 34 14 9 
PNSffi 270 59 7 
FslPO ■ 

FstPopf 162 fX 
FlUnRJ 133 42 IS 
FtVoBk 14 U 9 
FtWitee 130 45 B 
FWbCPf 425 115 
Ftachb LOO 27 36 
FlshFd JBa J 
FltFoGa 133 +1 ■ 
PlwtEn 36 13 8 
Ftanmn 78 22 15 
FlaxIV 70 u 15 
Find Of 171 137 
FBvtST JO 7 17 
Float Pf 15 

FloEC ,16a A 12 
FkiPra 116 14 to 
FteStl 40 27 13 
FIwGrn 

Flown 70 12 U 
Fluor 70 £1 
FoofvC 220 +1 11 
FordM 270 +7 3 
FIDcar 136 U7 
FIHowd 174 27 15 
FasfWTt 74 21 14 
FaxStP JO 77 10 
Foxbro 174 35 78 
FMOG 23893+7 
FnMMC 70 35 W 
FrHtm 70 22 15 

Fruebfs 70 27 5 
FruMpf 270 7.1 
Fuaua 70 13 9 


46 9% 9.1 

445 43ft 13 
5837 21% 22% 

• 11% ll’i 
7 Uft 13% 
763 16ft 16 
25 34ft 36 
246 W 13% 
W3 21% 21’- 

23 IM 15ft 

II 27 25% 

96 19% 19 

Mi nm low 
40 s% s% 
98 34% m, 
2642 3m 35ft 
2ft 3Sft 34% 
109 16% 16 
W7 TO 18% 
166 32 21% 

II M% 16% 
428 54V* 55% 
1U 28b 25% 

24 31 30% 

2675 7% rt 

13 Sft Sft 
00 3H6 ran 
141 4ft 416 
TTOx lt% U 
250 im 18% 
409 33% 31% 
11 34% 34ft 
5I7x 6IU 68 
25*0 32 31 

14% 14ft 
42 43 

10 f% 
uft im 
4 7ft 44% 
28ft 28ft 
1016 9% 
49% 4f% 
7 6% 

28ft ra 

31ft 31 
21% 21% 
_ 26% 26ft 
2001 SO 50 
60 37ft 36*6 
53 10% 10ft 
130 32ft 31ft 
1254x21- 2046 
180 39ft 39ft 
232 33ft 32% 
2 12ft 12% 
328 32ft 31ft 
43 27 36% 

49 39 38% 

1579 2 Sft 2Sft 
0 17 17 

2U 4% 4% 

241 18ft 18 
1620 U% M% 
159 54 54 

S229 43% 42% 

20 11% n% 

446 <4 63% 

133 Wft 13% 

n m 9% 

IS! 26ft 25*4 
162 9% 9% 

2499 20% 2016 
59 27ft 27% 
684 23% 23ft 
64 28% 2m 
223 3316 32ft 


9ft 

43b— % 
Uft+ft 
11% 

13%+ V6 
1616— ft 
38 — ft 
U + ft 
21ft + % 
Uft— ft 
27 +m 
TOM 

10ft— ft 


1494 

IS 

22 

78 

533 

21 

476 

45 

H9 

87 

64 

74 

20 


Mft+% 
35%+% 
34%— ft 
16% + % 
19 

22 +16 

U% 

Sft— ft 
24% + % 
30ft— ft 
6ft— n 
Sft— ft 
31b— % 
4% 

lift + n 
1 9ft 

32ft + % 

34ft— n 

68% + ft 

zrn— % 

14% + % 

ra 

18 

18%+ lb 
47ft + % 
21ft— % 
Iflll + % 
48ft— % 
7 + Vb 


31ft + 16 
21ft— «6 
26*6+16 
50 + ft 

37%— ft 

10ft 

32 —16 
21 + ft 
39% 

3316+ % 
12*6— ft 
31ft + ft 
27 

39+16 
25% + % 
17 

4%— ft 
Wft+ ft 
18% + % 
54 

ran— *6 
u% 

41%— ft 
14% + % 
9% — % 
2616+ ft 
9%+ ft 
20ft + % 
Z7*6— ft 
23%— % 
28b— % 
3216— % 


31% 15)6 
3916 20% 
37ft 25% 
34% 19ft 
77% 48*6 
10ft 4 
13*6 5% 
4416 35% 
26*6 22% 

VSfc 

58*6 36 
25% Uft 
30% 18% 
19ft 13% 
1016 9ft 
lift 10 
43ft 30% 
17ft 14% 
46% 29% 
34% 16% 
33ft 16*8 

2i ran 

84 44 

65% 48% 
62ft 45*6 
7 5% 

14% 8% 

T7I6 Bft 

27% ran 

60% 45ft 
05 61 

n 33 
40 33% 

52ft 44ft 
9% 3ft 
13b 7% 
75% 46% 
12ft 5 
53ft 39% 
12 9% 

■ft 5% 
2B% 1396 
23*6 IS 
36 34 

27% 18 
3716 33 
28% 22ft 
30 25ft 
2516 21% 
63 51U 

30ft 20ft 
23ft 12 
Uft Bft 
11 5% 

27 16% 

59% 42% 
17*6 lift 
9% 4*6 
26 17% 

12% BM 
6% 1% 
28% 1! 
36% 34% 
29M 23 
19 13% 

32b 19 
44H 36ft 
59 47 

1516 BH 
18 1ZM 
45% 27ft 
2116 15ft 
43% 31 
28ft Uft 
19% 9ft 
uft rib 
29M 18% 
44ft 37ft 
616 8*6 
Uft Sft 
12 % 6 % 
30 Zl% 
2616 34ft 
Bft 4% 
27% 20 
35 25ft 
24% lift 
50 Wft 
MW 10 
50*6 39 
30 24 

33% 27 
20ft 12*6 
19% U 


GAP 

GAFpf 

£1* 

GFCfl 

GTE 


5 39 
D 33% 
S66 26% 


GTE pf 270 80 
GTE pt 2X8 1LS 


GalHau 

Ganett 

GaoStr 

GmrM 

Gda 

GetnllC 

Gamut 


.15a J 12 262 31 
U0 li 
1J0 16 14 

170 L4 II 272 75 
<9 4ft 
4 7 

378 73 7 5078 40% 
1 25 
1438 21% 


1X8*20 


■SB 22 .. 
ra * 17 
76 29 W 


10 

845 


5% 

a 


104 22*6 
511 11 


30% 31 +% 
38b 38% + ft 
33% 33ft— ft 
25% 26ft + % 
74 74 —lb 

4% 4ft + ft 
6ft 6ft— ft 
39ft 40% + % 
25 25 — % 
21ft 21ft— ft 
5% 5% + % 
55ft 56% —1% 
22% 2216+ ft 


511 19% 
146 10ft 


10ft 11 + ft 


153 lift 


40 A 

90 32ft 
1 32 


GnCOfP 170b *135 434 42% 
GAUM 173a 97 15 16ft 

Go Bah 170 * 0 
GOnms ra 13 11 
GCnpfs X6 lx 
GnDats 14 <61 14b 

GnOvn 170 IX 9 639 73ft 

2JD U 13 14281 59% 

150 +1 10 B» 61ft 

TOO 9X 170 6% 

70 * 3 52 12% 

34 23 33 21 HJft 

JO * i<s ifisa rm 

GnMIU* £24 37 14 12H 59ft 

GMat 570r <9 510071 73% 

CM Ed ,18a J 731 eft 

GMat pf ITS 99 27 38 

GMatpf 570 97 3 50ft 

GNC .16 23 31 25 7 

GPU. 6 1781 ran 

Ganna 176 2.1 21 307 73% 

GMtpfr 5 

GnStanI 170 +2 11 

GTF1 pf 175 UX 


Gait El 

GftFdi 

GOmn 

GHOSTS 

GnHous 

Gainst 


22 10ft 
643 43% 
508 11 
13 3BS 5% 
J 25 462 17 
61 21ft 


GnRod .10 
GwuTfl 170 
GanPtl l.U * 15 496 32ft 
GaPOC 70 U 23 2419 22% 


1 35ft 
W 26% 
21 29ft 

2 24% 
BQz 60ft 


GaPCPf 124 . 

GaPwpf 3X4 127 
GaPWPf 376 13.1 
GaPwpf 275 UJ 

GaPwpf 732 1 27 ^ . 

GarbPi l.U 37 12 40Z aoft 
GaiDSl .12 A M 353 19b 
GkrntP 75 lift 

GtbrPn . 5 13TO Wft 

GIHHni 72 £1 19 
Glllatta 2X0 4X 11 


137 M% 
722 59ft 
70 12ft 
677 4% 

43 20% 
542 lift 
52 3 

749 29ft 


GloMM 34 * 

GlobMPfXJD 177 

owHw « 

GWMwl 

GWWF 30 3 0 ___ 

Gdrhdl 176 57 12 7U 29ft 

Gaodyr 140 U 7 60M 2716 

GordnJ JZ 3.1 9 35 16% 

Gould 70 37 57 444 23 

Graca 270 +7 W 545 Aft 

Grainor 17 il Q in 42ft 

GtAFat X0 25 9 2272 16b 

GtATPc „ 0 397 10 

GULkla 170 2x 11 <7 4116 

GNIrn ITSaiai 7 15 18ft 

GtNNk 172 <J ■ 508 3616 

GtWFhi 78 U 10 U0S 27ft 

GWUP 42 319 15b 

BMP 172 101 8 13 16 

Grayfl 130 +4 11 597 Z7H 

Grarh Pf +75 117 life 43b 
QtuJJer 12 IIS 5b 

GrtmGs 7 U 17 79 13b 

a rub El ra J IS 743 12% 

Grumn 170 U 7 442 26ft 

arumef 270 1U 1 26*6 

Cranial .U 20 57 5% 

GylSfnJ il U I 17 24% 

emm jo *.ii 2351 34% 

GutfR* 27 13 06 16b 

GvHRbt UO +7 4 son 

GHSfUf L64 11J 6 2414 Wft. 

GHSUpf 4X4*135 “ “ 

OHSUPT 375 1* 

GttlURT 4X0 1* 


60 40 

1 

11 32% 


19% 19%' 

10% 10% 
lift 11b— ft 
41% 47% — b 
16% 14H— b 
am 41 +% 

32ft 32% 

32 32 +M 

13% 14% + % 
73 73 —ft 

58ft 5916 
60% <116+ % 
6% Mb— ft 
12ft 12%+ ft 
Wft Wft+ % 
Wft 17 — ft 
57ft 58ft— ft 
72% 72ft— 1 
filM <2 +16 
37ft 38 +ft 
SOM 5016+ ft 
6*6 7 +16 
lift 12 
73 73% +1 

10ft 10ft— ft 
42ft 43ft— % 
11 11 + ft 

5% 94k— ft 
16% 16ft + b 
20ft 21 — % 
31*6 32%+% 
22 22%+ 1b 

35% 35ft 
36*6 36% 

28% 38% + ft 
24ft 24ft 
«Jft 60ft— 1 
29ft 30%+ ft 
18ft lift— b 
1116 11ft+ b 
1016 10% 

34ft 34ft 
5B% 58ft— ft 
12ft 12)6 + ft 
4% 4ft 
20ft 29%+ ft 
lib 11% . 

2ft 3 +16 

2B 29ft +1% 
28ft 29ft + % 
26ft 2716 + 16 
16b 16% + b 
22% 22% — ft 
Aft 41ft + ft 
— % 
14ft 16% +1b 
17% 15 + ft 
A Aft 
18ft «%— ft 
34ft 3616 + ft 
26% 27 +16 
14% 15b + ft 
15% 16 + b 

27ft 27ft— ft 
43b 43b— % 
5% 3b— ft 
13 1316— Mi 

lift .1216— ft 
36 26 — ft 

2616 36ft 
516 5%+ b 
34% 36*6 + % 
33% 34b— ft 
W U — ft 
20ft 20ft 
Uft U + ft 
ra ra- +1 


182 43ft 40% 42% 


GAoro JO* 57 17 144 13% 
Gufton ra 27 13 48 16b 


32 32b + b 

Uft 13ft + b 
WM Wft 


6% 4% 
27ft 19% 
44 26% 

1ft % 
10*6 5% 

36ft 25% 
Uft lift 
19% 15% 
ran 23% 
aow isn 

2 Jft 16% 
53% 23ft 
30ft 16b 
12% 7% 
3316 1416 
35 22% 

18% 10% 
25% 19 
39ft 23ft 
16b Uft 

2 8% 15% 
13ft 8 
34% 23% 
13ft 9 
13% 9ft 
23ft Ub 
27 14*6 

35 15ft 

ra 32 
X 12% 

25% 18 
6b 3% 
37% 27% 
34% 15ft 

29 19% 

17 1A6 

42M 2SM 
12% <b 
44b 31M 

30 18% 
19b 12 
13 Bft 
26% 17ft 
63% 45ft 
44% 31 
52% 35b 
Sift Sft 
271b 12 

2H6 n% 
9ft 7 
X 2016 
16% 8% 
60b 43% 
<6% 46% 

ssn 20 
26*6 IPV6 
26 20 
M 3*6 
48% wn 
30% 22 


HRT 

HoilFB 170 +3 
Mtribfn 170 58 
HallWd 71 U 
Halwdof 76 58 
HomP8 

HanJS 1X701)7 
HorUI 1740 »J 
Hondim LU * 
HandH M U 
Hama XO 2.1 
HorBrJ 170 11 
Hartads J6 L8 
Hand* 

HrpRw 70 17 
Harm 78 3.1 
HarGr n 

Hcnco 1J8 +7 
Hartmx W* * 
HaUSa 170 UJ 
HawElS 1X4 77 
HayasA JOa 17 
HcnJafn 76 U 
HazLaP J2 u 
Hacks JS 12 
HedoM JO U 
Haumn X» * 
Hallia J6 * 
Heinz 1X0 * 
HMlftC 

HelmP 74 * 
HamCa 

Horeufa 1X0 48 
Home ■ .75o .j 
HorltC0fl.W S3 
HorSPf n 

Keniry Ira 13 
lli wfwi 

KowtPk 33 a 
He* col XO 27 
HBhaer ra 28 
HlVott M 1J 
HIM] rtf S4 £2 
Hilton 170 28 
Hitachi J3e .7 
Holiday 170 18 
Hours US 17 
HocnaD 
HmFSD 

HnwGpf l.W 1+7 
Hrnatka JO 7 
HmsTFn XO 28 
Honda Tie j 
Hanwell 180 37 
HaovrtJ 174 X0 
Him Bn 1.12 +b 
H rzBn pf Z9601L6 
HartBon 

HawCo XII 17 
Hotel in 2xo u 


MO 5% 
467 33% 

11 745 30% 
17 W » 

0 9% 

0 145 31ft 
49 13ft 
U 1*% 
15 332 48*6 

19 133 20 

27 19 19b 

U 257 48% 

20 139 30ft 

29 367 11 
13 5 29% 

12 242 38% 

8 649 IB 

11 SU 27ft 
TO 232 33% 
TO 34 13% 

9 VB 21% 

7 190 11% 
IS 43 27 
17 107 10ft 

211 12ft 

38 5B1 Wft 

10 471 17% 

12 TOS 22% 

13 2511 49 

15 52 15 

29 8800 14% 

60 5% 

9 2060 33 
37 02 24ft 

20 21% 
657 17% 

12 547 42 

W 7M 
U 301 34% 
U 28 24% 
24 10 17b 

9 253 12% 

13 123* 34% 

14 U20 £M 

11 915 33ft 
14 324 51*6 

13 104 77M 
31 227 17ft 

8 1384 27 
215 7ft 

« 1731 2*% 
4 57 14 

ID 367 55% 
Jl 1100 J8M 
U 2368 35 
8 119 23% 
35 25ft 
75 5 

14 1237 4<*6 

13 77 28ft 


M Sft + ft 

23*6 23ft + % 
30b 30% + % 
1b 1ft + % 
9ft 9M— ft 
30% 31%— Ml 
Ub Uft 
19% Wft 
47% 47ft— % 
Wft 19% + % 
18% 19 +ft 
47ft 48b— ft 
29ft 30%+ % 

ion w*ii 

29*6 29%+ b 
27ft 38%+ b 
16% II +lft 
27 2716 + 16 

32V, 33ft + ft 
15ft 15ft 
SWb 21 +* 
ion lift— % 
26*6 24% 
ion ion— b 
ran tan+n 
16% Wft + ft 
T7% 17*6 + ft 
21% 22% + % 
40 4B%- b 

14% 15 +M 
24 24% + M 

5% 5K+ M 
33% 27% + b 
23% 23ft— ft 
28ft 20*6— ft 
16% 17 + b 
41ft 43 + n 

7ft 7% 

33% 34 
26 26% + b 

17% 17b 
lift 12%+ ft 
24 24ft— M 

60ft 62ft +2 
32% 3316— ft 
51ft 51*6+ ft 
7716 77V, + b 
17% T7V6— ft 
22% 29 + M 
7% 7ft— b 
26ft 26% + ft 
Uft Uft— u 
54% 54V,— 1b 
57% 57% 

34ft 34% + ft 
2316 3Jft— 16 
2516 25ft 
5 5 

46% 4416— ft 
27% 21% + ft 


u Moron 
HtaWLOW 


Slack 


Uv CMO^ 

Dta. vid- PE lOOsHtan Uw. Quel Cn p* 


2716 21% 
19% Oft 
37ft 24 
3WS 36 
77ft 61 
Uft 10b 
54% m 
TO ■ 
33b 13ft 

26% ran 

Uft 9ft 
21ft 13% 
35 17b 

33 31% 

3716 17% 

AH 339b 

25ft 11% 


HauahM 

HeuPoa 

HOMlitf 

HOtaTM 

tiatafhf 

Haul op 

HouNG 

HouOP 

HOwfCp 


Hvffy 

HlMhTI 

Huatise 

Human 

HantMf 

Hume* 

Hvdral 


.96 2A 
AO 23 
1.75 47 
2X0 4X 
+35 03 
M IM 
'2.12 +4 
37*4 23 . 7 

ra u 
£21 07 
ra li 

X8 32 
33 13 
M U 
JO L9 
7D 23 
£00 7 A 


14 27 

11 45 

a WH 
2 
5 

6 1511 

11 1780 

72 

a* a 

12 34 

a 47 

995 

* 2 
14*1713 
U < 
U 365 
9 72 


34ft 21b 
11% U 
36% 3Mb 
M 94 
75% 75 
33% 33% 
son at* 
•% m 
n% nn 
26 26 
13% 17% 
Uft Uft 
lift 18ft 
3fft 36ft 
21 25% 

37ft 36ft 
96% 35% 


960b + ft 
54 + % 
IS 

33ft + ft 
4Mb -2ft 
Ma+ ft 
U%+ % 
26 

11 + ft 
Uft + ft 


30ft + ft 
25*6— U 
36H— ft 
21% +1% 


25% 21% 
19% 16% 
lift 5% 

ao an 

17b w 

35% a 

20 14ft 
Aft 20% 
46ft 40 
65 4U6 

dm a 
ran «3)6 
u 15% 
40% 30ft 
339b Uft 
X 17% 

ia un 
» un 
35 27b 

32ft 35 
SZb 48ft 
37 38% 

36b Ub 
3*b 27% 
9ft Sft 
Uft 8% 
56ft 45 

losn «in 

17*6 W 
11% Wft 

25% ran 

15 s n 
2*b im 
son am 
37ft 27% 

15% 10% 

3M6 19% 

ran am 

21% 14 
11% 3% 
26b 11% 
30% 19 
54b 43 
37ft 25b 
13b 7b 

19 15% 
65b 55 

UO iso 
15% 9W 
53% A 
16% Fb 
■24% 14*6 
130b 99 
24% 15b 

29ft 22% 

11b 5% 
7% 3% 
SO 23% 
43 20% 

34% 17*6 
43*6 32% 
29% 23 
57% 46 
17% 9b 
54% 32% 
IBS 121 
38*6 27 
1Tb TO 
30 15% 

20 16% 

19ft Ub 
29b 31% 
20b 17 
Uft 25 
34b 26 
13ft 9*6 
35 23% 

54 raft 


1J0 47 II 


lCUtdl 
iCMn 
ICN 

I CNP? 230 M 
IHAIn 182 118 
IPTImn 373 

IRTPr* U0 12 7 3 

ITTCA LOO 27 131*547 


630 

71 

441 

4 


77 

7.1 

U 


ITTpfK +00 
ITT 5J» 

ITT PIN £35 
ITT Oh +50 
tU inf 1 JO 
IdanoP 3JS 
■doom 
IHPOwr £64 TO5 
IIPOWM 274 118 
■IPflwpf £U 117 
HPowpf +12 IV 
llPawpf 170 TV 
llPswpf 535 117 
IIPUWDf 4X7 OX 
ITWl Ai 18 14 


74*23 


impChm 
ImotCo 
INCO JO 18 
indiMpf 778 115 
lndlMpf1270 122 
IndtMD? £15 12X 
IndMpf £25 138 
IndHSM 178 7J < 
maxes .14 1.9 
loftttTC 22 

InaarR 3X0 53 17 
InoRpf £35 7J 
InarTac M 43 20 
mush ra ii 
inkisrpf +75 lai 
I ml lea 170b 5.1 10 
InapR* 

liwpRac < 

InlgRpf 973 12X 
IntaRpf +58*157 
IntaRpf +25 UJ 
inlRPn IU 

nos* £isaiix 
Intorca 371 48 12 
Inforpf 735 53 
irorm X0 
Intrlk £60 


32b 32 33b + ft 

17% 17b 17% +% 
111% Wft 11 
Uft am 28% 

Mb 1< !<%+% 

25% Uft 25 — % 
19% 19% 10% 

96 94ft 95%+) 
63% <3% 49% 

S*V» 59ft sm 
46% 46% 46% + % 
64 0 64 +1 

... 17 16ft 17 +ft 
179 41% 41 41b + ft 

■6 U Uft U + % 
< 1174 35% 34% 25% + ft 
130Z 17% 17% 17% + ft 

raozw w TO + ft 
I Ota 35% 35% 35% + % 
2Sta 32b ra 32% + % 
182 52% 53% ran + % 
3001 36 3* 36 + % 

126 34b 34 94%— % 


17 

1 

2 

17 

20 


I 52U 37% 36% 36ft— ft 

Q Id Cft 8ft ■% + % 

2279 Uft I JM Uft + ft 
177501 S3 SH. 52%- % 
life 98 98 90 —lb 

1 17 17 17 

328 17% 17% 17% + % 

6 34 25% 25% 25% + % 

332 7% 7b 7b— % 

99 18% 17% 17% 

490 46 45b 44 + ft 

5 31 »% raw— % 

7 12% 12% 12% 

995 34% Ub Uft+ b 
0 44 43% 44 + ft 

31 Wft 19% 19H— % 
44+ 5% 5% 5b— % 

IM 16b 16% 16%—% 
20 24 23% 34 + % 

2 43ft 43b 43ft— % 

73 3i am son— n 
im lift 12% tan— % 

35 Wft W% Uft 
268 <2ft <2% 67% + % 

3 135 135 US 

£5 < 1330 11% 10% 10%+ % 
5.1 I ra 51 51 51 + % 


5» 10 fb ra + b 
IntAUl 32 33 9 29 19% »% 19% + % 

IBM 4X0 25 12 6948 137% 125% m%+b 

IntCtrl jo IX W 43 20*8 20% 20% + ft 

luTFtav 1.12 19 tS 804 26% 2IW 28% 

inJHtnv 3+76 10% 10% Mb + b 

InfHrwt TV* 6% 6% 6ft + ft 

InfHpfC 11 48% 41b Mb 

mmpfA s an a a 

InfHpfD 227 32% 31% 32b +1 

IntMln 2X0 +3 U 694 41% A 41% + % 

intMutf V6 +J 9 17 2m 27% 21 + % 

+i 2* 767 ran +9% 49*6 + % 

17 213 14 12% 13%+ % 

V 9 3564 52% 50% 53% 

55 U 189 176 TOD 
23 13 217 40 39% 39% +1% 

93 15% 15% 15% + ft 

62 19% lift 19% 

20* 19% 19% 19b— % 

8 60 10% Uft lift 

7 278 29% 29 29% + ft 

7410tte 28% 20 20 + % 

1 54 Uft 31 % 31% + % 

_ • 177 34% 31% 34b + b 
J4 £8 11 48 12b 13 12% 

7 284 34b 33ft 33ft— % 

135 50b 58 50b— % 


IntPopr 2X0 
Inf Ret 
inmrta 3X8 
IntNt pCJHUD 
intpbCo 178 
InfBokr 

IntafPw 180 . 

inPwpf £28 IV 
lowed 180 10 l 3 
lowtlO £74 9J 
lewllluf £31 IU 
lowoR* 370 93 
I pahs 174 58 
IpcoCp 
irvBk* 186 57 
IrvBkpf XUalOJ 


8 


30ft 

34% 

24% 

14*6 

43 

29K 

53 

56% 

16% 

9b 

AM 

46b 

29% 

26% 

27% 


U JWT 3 
33% JRJvar 
13% Jammy 
10ft JawiF 
2+ft JaffPlx 
24% JarCpf 
46% JarCpf ' 
47 JarCpf 
12ft JarCpf 
5% Jawlcr 
a johnJn 
37% JahnCn 
Uft Joroon 
15ft Jca toni 
Uft JoyMfa 


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M 23 1 
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1X4*1TX 
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+00 135 
8.12-1+0 
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70 U M 
1X0 55 14 


04 

234 

19 
341 
441 

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20 
u 

7483 

1168 

1 

195 

1801 


28% am 

25ft 24ft 
22% 22b 
12% Ub 
40% 40b 

* L 

S% 55% 
14 W 
7ft 7ft 
42% A 
42% AM 
26ft 26ft 
34 23% 

2Sft 25% 


28ft— % 
25*6+ b 
22ft— % 

Uft+ % 

40% + ft 

a .+ % 

a +% 

55% 

16 

7ft + % 
A +lb 
42% +1 


2M4+M 


24 . 

25%+ ft 


10% 

17 

39ft 

AM 

40% 

19% 

49 

70ft 

22ft 

20ft 

16% 

23% 

Wft 

54% 

19% 

35ft 

45 

a 


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9ft KUWs . 11 

33 KMI pf +50 127 
26ft Kmart u U f 
a KN Ena 1X8 32 10 
12ft KaDrAj ra +3 
45 KalAlpf +12 
52 KafMM 435 
Wft KabCa JO 
15b KalCPf L37 
8** Kcnab XO 
Mb KCtvPL £36 
74b KCPLpf £20 124 
36% KC50U 1JOO £0 11 
12% KanGE £36 12X < 
28% KanPU 286 IX 7 
10 Kalvla 


130 

997 

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2838 

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47 

97 


10ft KaufBr XO 2X < 


8% 8% »ft + % 

17 Wft 17 + ft 
37ft 37ft 37ft + % 
33ft 33ft 33ft + b 
39% 0 39%+ % 

790 Mb Uft Mb + % 
1 51 51 51+1 

10 0 0+1 
64* 16b 15ft 16 
9» 14 W 14 + % 
347. W 9% W + % 
5 1538 24 22ft 24 +1 
J 77ft 77ft 77ft f- % 
a 51 50ft A 
465 19% 18% TO 
449 35% 35% 3Sb + % 
274 37b Mb 37 
44 16ft 16ft 16ft + % 


50b 28b Kid lose 
34% 32 KallMl 

1J4 3J 15 

273 

49% 

49b 

49% ■ 

b 

1JB 37 7 

a 

32% 

u% 

32% ■ 

% 

4ft 1 Kami 


44 

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1ft 

1ft 


29% 19% Kannri 

70 £4 17 

m 

22b 

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Uft 20% KyUtll 

2X4 M 9 

157 

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25% 

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32 

11% 

11% 

UH— ft 

24% 18% KarGpf 

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8 

19 

lift 

19 


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1.10 £4 25 

319 

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27*6 16% KayBk 

MO 57 8 

14 

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u 

36ft 


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9 

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18 

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417 

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ra 17 16 

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16 12ft Korea Ii 
40ft 29ft Kroaar £00 57 11 
23ft 11 KUMms AO 16 U 
Olb Mb Kyaoraa 73* 3 X 
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13 Kyior 


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im Uft 18ft + 4+ 


am 
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31 

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inn 


35ft 

37ft 

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53ft 

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70% 

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79% 

40b 

45% 

22ft 


53% 

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46 
U 

33ft 

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S3 

Bft 

30% 

45% 

47 

20ft 

20% 

20% 

24b 

19% 

15% 

17% 

37% 

Ub 

15 

a 

25ft 

32% 

23b 

20b 

49ft 

a 

25% 

32 

»b 

w 


22ft LN Ho 
7ft LPE 
Uft LLERy 
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8 LLCnf 
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U LTVA 
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7 LoSorso 
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20% LaraPpf 
37% Laarsa - 
97 LaarS pf 
M LaaRMa 
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2t vs LaaCnt 

9 LaaMa 
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9ft Lwmor 
im loucNti 
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50 Lowed pf 
23 LovtSt 
35ft Lavttz 
40% LOF 
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53 UIIV 
15b UnUfad 
26b UficNH 
TBft UncPI 
60ft LIHan 
30ft Lacfchd 
29b Loefifh 
33% Loawat 

10 Loo Icon 
19 Lam F in 
16b LamMts 
2b LamMwl 
17ft USlor 
46 LanaS of 

3ft LILCo 
14 ULPfB 
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23ft LILpfK 
B% ULpfX 
9 LILpfW 
9% LILPfV 
11b LILPfU 
8ft ULPfT 
< LILpfP 
7 LI L rao 
17 LonaDi 
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10% LoGanl 
22b La Land 
17 La Poe 
28% LaPLpf 
16ft LaPLpf 
22% LouwGi 

M Lewits 
16b Lawn 
18*6 mom 
23ft Lubrns 
15ft Luck VS 
10% Lukens 


274O10J 9 
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rat 23 
3JJ6 1X2 
335 U 
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V0 7J 7 
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£44 10X 

34 M ia 
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J8I 17 II 
£87 137 
1J0 37 9 
£25 1.9 
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82 £5 .14 
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17 

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100 

110 

5150 

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251 

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11 


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14K 14ft 14ft + b 
16% 15ft 14% + b 
2% Jft Z%— % 
11% Wft 11 —ft 
10H W% T0%— % 
14 16 16 + b 

23% 22ft 23% + ft 
59% 59 59% + % 

16 15% 15%+ % 

11% lib lift 
23ft 23% 2J%— b 
7ft 7 7 —ft 

23% 33% 23% 
lift 11% lift— b 
4 3*4 3*4— b 

13% Uft Uft— b 

a me a + ft 

24 23ft 26 +ft 

ra% 47*6 ra — b 
118 110 1W +1% 
60 20 m* 19ft 
136 ran 33% 22% — b 
15 36ft 26ft 36% + b 
54 Uft 14*6 Wft 

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30ft 30b SOW— 1ft 
52 53 52 

32% 32% 32%+ W 
38% 38% 3t%— % 
200 45ft 44ft 45ft+% 
TO9 74 . 73% 74 
40 32 31% 31 %— b 

847 77% 77% 77ft + % 
443 38b 37% Mb— % 
740 41% A AM + b 
13 21% UH 21H— ft 
73+ 68ft 68% 68% 

MW 49% 40% 4m— ft 
74 31 30% 31 + b 

911 43% 43% 43ft + b 
a 34ft 34% 34% + b 
207 Uft 31ft Uft— % 
ira a 24% an + % 
257 2ft 2ft 2ft— % 

20 22 Ub un— % 

31 46% 45ft 46% — ft 
120 fb 5b <ft 
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100X 40% 40% 40% 

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29 17ft Wft 17 + % 
22 17% 17 17 

20% 20ft 30% 

W 15ft Uft 
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Mb M Ub + b 
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17 

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313 

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270 

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360 

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28% Uft 28% + ft 
46 45ft 45%—% 
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15ft 15b 15b— b 


M 


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UJAY-SUflPAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 

f 

S ECONOMIC sca« 

igan’s Mixed Signals 
^Deficit Compromise 

Bj LEONARD SH£ . 

New York Time* Service 

■ - EW YORK — Shortly before last November’s elec- 
tion, President Ronald Reag a n said the federal deficit 
« was “shrinking” and would amount to jmt $1 72 billion 
4 in the current fiscal year. But the 
. dmate is that the deficit *31 amount to £22223 billion . 
3 n higher than the last jjre-election estimate, 
own optimistic assumptions about continuing eco nomic 
.m 1986 and the willingness of Congress to give the 
' t the budget cuts be wants, the administration is now 
lat the deficit will be ~ 


Heralh^SiL^ribunc. 

BU SINESS / FINANCE 


tO$180bfllionmthe ~ — 

ir 1986. It now seems wimmtf milHan r 

wever, that Congress c . - c • J 
accept the president's 50031 oeCOTlty 

oils, what’s left 
to compromise on? 

-cable reality? - — 

earns. He has started to signal his willingness to start the 
trocess of compiomismg. Bat compromise on what? At a 
: i meeting with Senate Republicans last week, the prcsi- 
m ,jcd his unwillingness to cut his miKtary budget and «»iri 
;ed freezing Social Security. 

president keeps both military spending and Social 
•immune from further trims, there win be precious little 
- nosmse about. Social Security, military spending and 
* on the debt constitute three-fourths of the budget. 

. cine listens carefully to the signals being emitted by the 
; ouse, there appeals to be greater wiQhigness to trim both 
' and Social Security outlays. 

is news conference last week, Mr. Reagan, when acWd 
ther he was ready to reduce Social Security, went through 


■- tfer to COLA sin my statements during the campaign,” 
. cost-af-Kving adjustments. 

" . he-made his seeningty unequivocal defense of Social 
; pending during the campaign, to protect the benefits 
hose now reoeivmg or eventually to reoeive them, he was, 
"answering what I thought were some demagogic false- 
- faa* I had some kind of a secret yen to destroy Social 
» " He added, "I didn’t mean it, but it was interpreted as 
that" 

t the point where it sounded as though he were saying 
would be wiBmg to see the cost-of-living increase sus- 
for a year, as some congressmen have proposed, the 
t again drew bade, saying that “we’re wasting a lot of 
ring about it," because “Social Security is running on a 
md it is totally funded by a tax that can only be used for 
pose." He continued: “So, when we’re talking about 
jcuriry, we’re not talking about the deficit at alL" 
resident is incorrect about that, but no one he listens to 
ireotly told him or convinced him that Social Security is 
he unified federal budget. Surpluses or deficits in the 
ecurity trust fund are indeed included in the unified 
\ reduction in the Social Security surplus does reduce the 
sderal deficit. 

jr. Reagan obviously does not want to take the lead in 
5 Social Security, an issue that has hurt him, or alarmed 
dealer in the past, although he appears willing to go along 
Suspension of the Social Security cost-of-living adjust- 
Congress win take the initiative. However, politicals 
tactions in November 1986 will not be eager to touch 
jcurity unless the president, who cannot run again, gives 
cter coverage. 

litaiy spending, Mr. Reagan seems determined to give as 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


Currency Rates 


Lote Interbank rata on March 79. exdudmg fees, 
mgs for Amsterdam. Broads. Frankfurt, Milan, fora. Now York rata at 


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■. ** 

Jardines 
Writes Off 
Ship Fleet 

Firm Posts Loss 
Of $118 Million 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Jardine 
Matheson Holdings, the big Hong 
Kong trading company, said Fri- 
day that it had taken a writedown- 
in 1984 of SS4 mQHan Hong Kong 
dollars ($71 million) for its ship- 
ping assets and will withdraw from 
shipowmng. 

The writedown, the teegestOHij- 
ponenl c£ a total 873-nnlEonrdoIlaT 
extraordinary charge against 1984 
eaxsiraS' resulted in a loss for- 1984 
of 918 ntiQum dollais, compared 
with net income of 351 millioii dol- 
lars a year earlier, the company 

Simon Keswick, rhmVn uiTi, said 
the charge also included 159 mil- 
lion dollars for a writedown of UB. 
property holdings and 108 milBnn 
for the company’s share of 1984 

Co. Janfines owns 3 5^ percent of 
Hcar^ccmg Land, the cctoqi’s laig- 
estproperty company. 

The company also reported ex- 
change-translation lo sse s of 125 
million dollars for overseas assets 
and hahifities, reflecting the Hong 
Kong dollar’s appreciation against 
the British pound, the Australian 
dollar and toe yen in 1984. 

Excluding the extraordinary 
charges, Janfines earned 80 mOlioii 
dollars, down 42 percent from 139 
million in 1983, tire company re- 
ported. 

Mr. Keswick said the move out 
of shipping would take three years 
and would also affect vessels relat- 
ed to its offshore oil-service busi- 
ness. “We've now come to the con- 
dusion that the market has got 
considerably worse and it’s a lousy 
business to be in," he said. “It is 
capital intensive and we can foresee 
no early end to conditions of over- 
supply ” • 

Jardines now owns 20 ships, 
down from a peak of 35 in the early 
1980s. Eight of them are in the spot 
market and the others are under 
long-term charter. 

Jardines, founded 1 52 years ago, 
is one of the colony's Iwrirng shro- 


U.S. Stocks 

Report, Page 10 

Page 11 



ComputervisioiifftWBttiedtoa 
Sharp Drop lofts Stock Price 

Monthly K.Y.SX. chteoladottM • ohm 


:>VV : 


Leading Index 
Of U.S. Economy 
Rises by 0.7% 




The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
government's main economic forc- 


ed last July may have ended in 
February. 

“When the March numbers 


rusting gauge rose a healthy 0.7 (measuring business activity) start 
percent in February, the Com- mfpm g <nn, T think w. htb gtyi n g te 
merce Ocpaitroent said Friday, see some major strength across the 
leading administration officials board,” he said “We won’t get a 
and some private forecasters to nm-away |wwi, but we are going 
predict an upturn in economic afr to see renewed strength.” 

!Mty in the months ahead to otter good, news, thegovm. 

The February gain in rite Index ment reported Friday that sales of 
of Leading Indicators followed an tingle - family homes one 6.2 per- 
even stronger January increase of cent in February following a 03- 
13 percent, the bi gge st rise in al- percent decline in J anuar y, The in- 
most two years. crease, the biggest since last 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm September, put sales at a seasonally 
Baldrige said the new report of- adjusted annual rate of 638,000 in 
fered encouragement that current February, 
dower growth “will be foflowed by ti, c department said the gain in 

better performances in the period die leading index last month came 

ahead . (mm in fill, nt (Iw Tfl mil!. 


Da Mm Yori TV) 


James R. Berrett, Compotervisiofi’s chief, fit front of computer-generated ship design. 

Computervision Gambles Its Future 

Onetime Pacesetter Scrambles to Regain Lost Prestige 


In other goods news, the govern- 
ment reported Friday that sales of 
single-family homes rose 62 per- 
cent in February following a 03- 
percent decline in January. The in- 
crease, the biggest since last 
September, put sales at a seasonally 
adjusted animal rate of 638,000 in 
February. 


. By Eric N. Berg 

New Teric Timer Sender 

BEDFORD, Massachusetts — TiW a politician ■ 
on the campaign trail, James R. Berrett was on the 
atomy last month In a one-week tour through 
Europe, the chief executive of Computervakn 
Cop. gave five speeches, sat down with reporters 
and auesmen in Benin and France, **** with top 
French government nffirial« and logged close to 
1,000 mug. 

Mr. Berrett was at it again, trying to sell an idea 
that he has bet his company mi and that he has 
touted worldwide. It is that all aspects of factory 
production — from design to assanbly to quality 
control — can be automated by Computcrriaon in 
a system linked by several computers made by 
different co mpanies, 

The system is one of the newest applications of 
CAD/CAM, the co mpu te rized design and manu- 
facturing process that to ok designers and engi- 
neers by strain when Cbmputcxvision pioneered it 
in the 1970s. In essence^ the new application allows 
engineers to design and build ever ything from hair 
dryers to lawnmowcrs with a computer mat creates 
blueprints on a -screen and that can also drive 

machine tnnk 

So far, however, there have been more skeptics 


than buyers for Mr. Berretf s system. Many cus- 
tomers have spumed it, fearing ms disparate com- 
puters will not work together. Instead, they have 
flocked to systems made by IBM, Intergraph and 
Applicon — based cm a single computer line. If 
Mr. Berrett cannot reverse that shnation soon, 
Computervisian could lose the chance to re-estab- 
HA hsdf as die pacesetter in CAD/CAM, and the 

company dm* ama nnra a pinq i t» r c<yild Iff 

also-ran. 

. “Ibe question in everyone’s mind is tins: Is Mr. 
Bcrretfs strategy ever gomg to happen, and if so, 
when?” said Joseph B. Greescm, a former top 
marketing executive at Computervision and now 
president of his own CAM company. “How long 
wiQ it be before the new products replace revenue 
from the old? And can they afford to wait?” 

The situation has grown so serious, in fact, that 
Computervuiou announced two weeks ago that it 


buyers for Mr. Berrett’s 
rs have spurned it, fearing 


uower growtn ~wui be renewed by The dqMrtment said the gain in 
better performances in the period ^ leading index last month came 
... ... „ . from strength in five erf the 10 indi- 

Mr.Baldrigesaidhewas“pank> caiors awSable when the report 
ulariy encouraged” by a 48-percent was compiled. 


to expand output in coding ffXSgSESSSlK 

r^ST3tf?BS!S 

formatiOTof new businesses imd 

sSS^BS^said increases ^ “ 

in the leading index of 03 percmia «™8«divaies. 
month would be consistent with tire , The biMea negative factor was a 
administration’s forecast of 4-ner- m »e length of the average 
cent economic growth this year. w*™*. Analysts have said they 
The index has increased only 03 ^ dedme stemmed from 

percent on average in each of the ifusuaUy severe weather during 
last six months. die month that forced plant dos- 

Lany Speakes, the While House mg s. They pre diood the length of 
spokesman, noted that “some cur- W ®*week would nse again m 


would hardy earn a profit in the current quarter. 
For the company that was once CAD/CAM’s 
undisputed leader, the announcement was a shock. 
On wan Street, which had grown accustomed to' 
meteoric rises in Computervisum’s earnings, the 
company's stock went mto a taflspin. 
Computervision has been No. 1 in the, total 
(Coafisoed on Page D. CoL 2) 


rent economic statistics a 

moderation of business activity,” 
but added that “the leading indica- 


March and would be a big positive 
factor in next month’s index. 

The four other negative influ- 


tors show a path of continuing ences were manufacturers’ new or- 
growth in the months ahead. With ders for consumer goods, weekly 


Japan Sets Date for Trade Measures 


the coming of spring the indicators unemployment claims, a change in 
signal renewed optimism.” he the pnee of sensitive raw materi al s 

The gnv gnmen t Tas i mwif jpmyj and the number ofbuSdingpennils 
3 pretiminary estimate of economic issued. 

growth of only 2.1 percent for the The chang es left the index at 
first three months of this year. 1673 percent of its 1967 base, com- 
Many leading forecasters had been pared with an index of 166.4 in 
expecting hiraer growth and imme- Januaiy. The change in the Januaiy 
diately aitaned the “flash” pregee- index was originally reported at 1.7 
tiou as bemg-unrealisticBlly low. 

Michad Evans, head of Evans 
Economics, a private forecasting 
firm, said the two month- to-month 


Agaiee France-Presse 


The United Stales has been i 


ping and trading companies. Its to growing anger in the United 
fortunes have suffered in recent States, will announce measures 


TOKYO — Japan, in response wider access for its products in 


four. 

The state minister m charge with 
external trade, Torino Komoto, 


Congress, stemming mainly from 
Japan’s trade surplus, 
ta .Reagam Rrm on Opposition 


eflating property markeL 
Since his arrival in 1983 1 


■ Since his arrival in 1983 as chair- Friday. 

man of both Jargneand Hong- Mr. Nakasone did not give spe- 


uicaudj uouc, luauiu thnt IV . rl-l.nt T7nn.li* T> -~ ' 

plans to discuss progress in the four ™ 8t ”® sukalR o“*j d Rc ^^ t5t ?T 
. mounting pressure to reudiate 


The White House said Triday^^ that 

- ■ - - - • * the slowdown inactivity that start- 


percent but was revised to 13 per- 
cent in Friday’s report 
In December, the leading index 
fell 0.5 p er cent, its fourth 
since last June, when it dropped 03 
percent. 


kong Land, Mr. Keswick has un- 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


Mexico Signs 
Debt Agreement 

Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Mexican of- 
fkaals and more than 600 repre- 
sentatives of creditor banks 
signed on Friday a 523.6-bHKon 
debt agreement, the first por- 
tion of the largest Latin Ameri- 
can debt restructuring ever. 

Jesfts S0va Herzog, Mexico’s 
finance minister, said the ago- 
ing “marks a fundamental step 
in the cubniiuuion of our com- 
bined efforts to address Merir 
go’s debt problems and to per- 
mit Mexico’s early return to 
voluntary financial markets.” 

The agreement covered $25.6 


anese government sources said. 


cific indications as to what the 
package would contain. 

His announcement came a day 
after the US. Senate passed a reso- 
lution calling on President Ronald 
Reagan to retaliate against what it 
said were unfair Japanese trade 
practices. 


mounting pressure to reudiate 
against Japan unless Tokyo opens 


DoUar Continues Its Slide 

The Associated Press selling dollars because of worries 

NEW YORK — The dollar turn- over the soundness of the finaurial 
Wed to its lowest levels since mid- system in the United States, follow- 


Kaneko, to pay partte^ attention press upon the Japanese its desire December Friday, extending a do- ing a highly poblirized closing of 70 
to Uiy demands. Ibe European to open Japan’s markets to U3. choc that has dragged it down Ohio savings and loans earlier in 
Community and the Association of competition, the White House nearly 10 percent from the record the month. 

South-East Asian Natrons have mobsman, Larry Speakes, told heights of late February. In Tokyo, the dollar fell to 

also cnQcrzeo Japan over its trade The A s soc iat ed Press. Gold nrices rose as the dollar 250.750 Jaoanese vea from 253375 


In addition, they raid, Mr. Nila- its markets for American products, 
sone has ordered the chief of the Bat ria Reagan aHmm?<fw »tinn i< 
Economic Planning Agency, Ippei using “the strongest terms" to im- 


be Associated Press. 

Mr. Speakes* comment came af- 


In Tokyo, the doQar fell to 


That resolution, passed on a 92-0 Mr. Speakes* commt 

vote, after Japan announced ^ government sources said ter the Senate appron 
that it would nrise its. car exports ^ r - Nakasone wanted a formal nanbinding measure 
next year by about 25 percent over package of measures prepared be- . Reagan to strike bade 


Gold prices rose as the dollar 250.750 Japanese yea from 253375 
fell Republic National Bank in yen Thursday. 


quotas that’ expire on Sunday. fore a two-day mee ting of Western and quotas if Japan does not lower Thursday. 

On Friday Mr. Nakasone told of the Orpmzation of trade barriers to UB. products, 

the budget committee in the upper Dev ^ 

house of the Diet, Japan’s partia- °Pg cn t startin g Affifl U. prared good m the House, said the 

ment, that the US. rSutiOT rt T «wn» said he feared that moority leader, Robert H. hfichd. 
fleeted a “grave atmuion.” He liter ^™?j£PZL a ‘ aasa ‘ 


mmistere of the Organization d trade barriers to UB. products. 


approved, 92-0. a New York said , gold bullion was Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
asure urging Mr. bid at $32930 a troy ounce as of 4 compared with late Thursday- 
e back with tariffs PAL, up $230 from the late bid 3.093 Deutsche marks, down from 


Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment starting April U. 


The measure’s 
peared good in the 


A major winner as a result of toe from 16495; 9.427 Fre 
dollar’s slide has been the British down from 93; and 1,: 


3.1195; 162 Swiss francs, down 
from 16495; 9.427 French francs, 
down from 93; and 1,97930 Ital- 


potmd, which rose to 51-236 in ian lire, down from 1391.75. 


set the date for the announcement 
of the trade measures. 

“We will do our utmost for the 


minority leader, Robert H. KfiAd. London from 51 228 hteThnrsday. Dollar rates in New Yoric as of 4 

pm would fa ce more cotrosm “Wve got to move ahead, Mr. Law in New Yoric, the pound shot p^L, compared with rates Thnrs- 
there of its mqxjrt pWKses. Michel sard, a dding t hat tough up to $12450 from $12275 late £feyT Sdal7 3.06 DM, do^ 


Michel said, adding that tough 


hadatradesur- . mrasurra would proiqtt the entoas- Thursday. 


”“We~wfll do our utmost for the phis of ahnost $37 binkm with the 
time bring to weak out a solution, United Stto ^ amp^ with 
acceptable to botii sides, through" a suiphis of $21.7 bfflionm 1983. 


syinTWtyoto" 
?ng that toenati 


to “Start cn mmimirat- 
natives arc restless." 


from 3.121; 238 Swiss francs. 


Curmcy dealers in ’the United down from 234; and 935 French 
States and Europe said traders arc francs, down from 935. 


our talks” with toe United States m 
four sectors, he said. 


A former ambassador to the 
United States, Yoshio Okawara, 


taring from August 1982 
through December 1984 and is 
toe first portion of a $48.7-b3- 
fion restructuring agreeme n t. 
The agreement also coves a S5- 
billion medium-term loan 
signed in March 1983. Mexico 
is the first Latin American 
debtor country to achieve long- 
term restructuringon part of its 
debt, which at $973 trillion is 
the second largest in Latin 
American after Brazil, which 
owes $100 bflKorL 


RESERVE 

INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RBINDEP 

Afl Accounf fty the Couhoui bivestor 
to Protect and Increase Capital 


US. DoBar D on or in atad 
Insured by US. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Adv an tages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confident**/ 


CHEMICAL BANK. New York 
Cistodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 


RE5 IN DEP 

Case Postage 93 

121 1 Geneva 25. Switzerland 

Please sand prospectus and 
aco o w w application ta 


Address. 


These are tdeconmuimcations, said at a press conference Friday 
electronics, forest products and tlutttherewasa“vetyhi^iteyd'’cA 
medical goods ana instruments. anti-Japanese sentiment m tbe U3. 

Reagan Extends High-Tech Ban 

The Associated Press th«ity created by the enjiratioa of 1 

WASHINGTON — . President the Export Administration Act of | 
Ronald Reagan has extended for 1979. Such declarations are good ! 
another year the national emergen-, only for a year unless extended. 


cy that he declared last year to 
permit restrictions an the export of 
bigh-i£dmology goods.. 

Mr. Reagan declared the erner- 


The a dministra tion argues that 
the emergency declaration is need- 
ed to guard against high- technol- 
ogy equipment and date making 


gency last year to fill a gap in an- their way to the Soviet Union. 


OPPENHE1MER 
OFFERS YOUR I RA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


F or IRA investors seeking the 
assurance of a fixed rate, we 


«** makes* warm 9* USA. 


The Value Line brings you 

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The Value Lina Investment Survey'covers more th&n 
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THE VALUE LINE 

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toymarahi load correnan (SritWi fi5&Ffraneh frfltO 9«ta MBS, DM20OT and 
raouatafraintonnatsen*hoii!dbadrKSedtt>: Value Una. An.: Ataondrata 
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Dmtoulrnd by Kill Pay* I Dutch katana PabBeation Distribution Santa . 
HoBsnd. Mow 4 to « voak* tor OaOmry A 


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Because over its life, the 
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So if you had been able to 
put $2,000 a year into a Special 
Fund IRA since the Fund's 
inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $10^570*^ as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21.5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 

30/3/85 


l Oppenheimer & Cr*. 62-64 Qinnuh Sr. London EC4N 6AE England 
I Telephone 01-2 36 6578 

I Plea*e*eodroeanIRA application and a Special Fund praspectwwithntorccotnplcieinfornia- 
( dofu Including all charset and expense*, rfl read ir carefully before 1 invest or send memn 
□Fd Hite to open ah IRA. DrdJfkero switch my IRA 




© 19® Oppenheimer Investor Services, Inc. “Bank IB/Vs arc insured and generally have fixed interest 
rales, whereas the Fonft net assd value fluctuates and may he subject to lo». "March 15. 1973- December 
31. 1984, Lipper Ana lyrical Services, Inc. ’ “Assuming a SIXMOinuefli in ent on March IS 1973 (inception 
of fund} and S^OOO annual investments un bn r business day of each war thereafter with all dividends and 
dbrrtbuttons re in ves te d. Past performance is not an indication of future results. In rhe period shown, 
stock price* .fluctuated severely and Were generally higher at the end than at the beginning 













.2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


Friday^ 






Tobies incttKt* tl»* natfonwlda prices 
up hi the dosing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect kite trades elsewhere. 


f 





1 

530 

4% 

.4% 

4ft 



900c 

: 10 

10 

TO • 



01 

IBM 

TOM 

10ft 



1 

MM 

MM 

14% 



2 

12ft 

12% 

izvk 



14 

10 

13 

n 



22 

W% 

18* 

18* 



7 

ii* 

nft 

nu 

1U 

a 

382 

25* 

25* 

29% 

fj 

7 

2247 

27% 

27* 

27% 

TU 


1 

12ft 

UM 

12ft 

1X2 


ION 

34 

34 

31 

1X7 


1000c 

TO* 

39% 

39% 

1X3 


20ftt 

43 

41 

43 - 

1X5 


45 

17% 

17% 

17% 

123 


SOU 

55* 

54% 

55* 

123 


4 

19* 

TOM 

19* 



ST 

3* 

Mk 

SK- 

IJ 

■ 

94 

10* 

10* 

ID* 

111 

5 

10 

t2 

an 

7% 

MM 

A 

7M- 

un 

J 

25 

U2 

ISM 

M% 

lift 

53 

T2 

75 

24ft 

34 

34ft 


7 

1937 

8* 

7ft 

■ • 


44ft am Quoted s 1J4 27 13 1209 4» 44. 45* +t* 

22* IS OuakSO JO M 27 242 22H 21* 22ft + % 

nts 4% Qinmx b u 9ft «% 9% +1 

3444 23 Quostur MO 47 9 23B 34 3344 34 

3944 14 QMMI 740 18 W 123 23% 23 22ft— H 


fif. 


HwiM 




Jl* 27 
JO 14 

un xa 

JO 7 
JO 41 
JO 24 Cl 
XS) 78 
M2 102 6 
11J0 11-3 
160 12.1 
4J0 1X1 
472 1X4 
UA 4J 12 
2.74 7J f 
4J0 107 
4 M 100 
M U 17 
100 57 7 
U 

SH A 73 
JUB 47 12 
72 15 23 
140 U f 
100 9.6 a 
7.15 1X1 
110 115 
MO 1X5 I 
184 14.1 
7.15 14J 
9J4 163 
832 165 


1M+ 16 

101k + 16 




MB 

u 

9 3348 

-12 

u 

19 4142 

J6 

2j a 

3X7 



U 

n 

U2 

XI 

9 

334 

J2 

is n 

58 

L52 

17 

14 

1* 

Jl 

u 

7 

1143 

U4 1X4 


TO 

IM UO 


35 

XTO MJ 


47 

JB 

2J 

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%C 

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u 

9 1144 



M 

29 

JO 

u 

u 

4S 

7J0 

18 

a 

90 

uo 

IP 15 3107 

1J4 

52 

9 2435 

ixt 

4J 

7 

443 

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1.1 

17 

47 

54 

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XS TO 3202 

ML 

14 

7 

190 

200 

3J 

TO 

209 

U7«SJ 

5 

2041 

JO 

XI 

4 

SB 

uo 

58 


5 

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33 


3 

n 

24 

a 

IM 


t4ft W% 

u is* 

3M 2Zlb 
57ft 9 7 

am am 

141k UK 

im n* 
calk <336 
571k J7* 

as sen 

41 40 

IT* 

244k 


34Vj + K 

34* + 4k 


-w 


Indays 

AMEX 


dosing 


Tables fndode flw nation wide prices 
up fa tbe dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect We trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associate d Plress 


2716 274k 
716 716 
CM M 
IM 33 

34U 2JH 

34 34 

4M 40 16 
34 24 

3Clk 24* 
314k 32 
M 15 
Mb 7 
SO SO 
234b am 

nft tstk 

IM 151k 
74N 744k 
271k 2716 
22 221k 

15* 1A 
1946 3T16 


7 




21 15 1171 
40 M 404 
27 11 226 

25 S 925 
544 • 1730 
37 • 723 
46 
109 






37 

43 n 
67 
37 
77 

SJ 

■7 
XI 

27 11 777 
27 TO 426 
86 15 147 
IB 
1095 
1Z1 
IN 
49 
1355 
65 
47 
CIO 
146 
60S 
1261 
494 


T2*- 
6146 
4716 
154k 
1416 

am 

32* 

to 

316 316‘ 

mb mk 
mb 1116 

3116 3116 
MM 1446- 






ins 

4216 4216 4216 
274h 27 271k 

4516 4416 45 

21ft 21 Nib 

ms a 

72 704k 711k 

20 im 20 
171k 1616 1616 
51k 51k Mk 
31 am 304k 
331k 3316 33Vk 
71k 71k 71k 


13 847 iltt 41 4116 + % 

44 U 8 164 3316 3»k 33 — U. 

in u mas ax m «— k 

imow» 3s* Memos wtt 4k 

nm *m am *m+ m 

JO 37 51 387 T2* tlft m 
XU U S TON Mk 3SN + 16 
UO S3 St fffi 3M 25 **+l 

172 45 ■ MO 336k US 336k + 16 

U6 47 • taas 3*ik 33% aavk-f * 

233 M S M W* 33ft 34* + * 

■ J8bX9 V 237 am 2716 27** * v. 

in it * m tun line -m 

US 2 Ilk |%— % 

.HUM 4642 IM U6T7 — Ik 
JO 77 U 17 3316 S 22-16 

152 M 7 sen am 224k 28 + 36 

a m » » 

W «UM 4Mb— 16 

W 42 4 IM 4Mk 4m— lb 

m u 2 40t* an 40ik +i 

47 U4 9% fft 9M + Ik 
4.15 1X6 i am ac*h am— o 

n ws 23k. a a* + % 

M* 14 IS 40b 32 34ft 3Mb— (6 

MB 47 9 D IHi IM MS— M 

4 U i » MK UM UN 

jo v u m am am am + % 

70 <7 362 on 1716 1M4M 

TA4 TON t* 9% — H 

IB ib m M— 3, 

Ut 1J 17 SO 56 Ok 56 43)6 
757 17 J mtffl «3»+2t* 
17 JS 171k. 16)6 IT* * ft 
1 76 18 IS Nt Wi « 4m 4 * 
UOo 35 n aas Sift 50% 51ft + * 
UI 177 Sg 35* 3516 3M6 4 ft 
11 a IM » 1M + 6 

m 717 s tm ph m im t n 

M1711U 2* 26 35)6 S6+ 16 

pfXTSKJ « am 25*6. 2H6— kk 

pi X47 U4 ii a** 2416 am— s 
ritsiu « am am 30ik4- K 
VllHIU 717 17 17 4 * 

Bf 271 1X6 4 m U6 1M 

27 13P lUb 31V* m* Ik 
J»un M 371k 37ft 37ft— M 
UO U n 3TO «ft 43 43*6410 

1UDK1 ao 182*1071610716 4 Vh 

J Un M IM1A1M 

U7 nk 1* Hb4*k 

an n m m*h 
jo as z Oh n Mk— Ik 
s m m am no * 
j« u u » am ao no * 

74 ZZtl MK 12Vk 12* + V* 

•zb is* s wukMt 

275 fj SCI 24 336k 30 4 % 

i jo si n no am an am 
272 iu i mwt lPlk— Ik 
MO* 12 > U &H6 13*k 12Vk— Ik 
X14b Ifll 1U a Bk 541k 55V* 4 Ik 
XS7 60 40 64 OK M 4 Ik 

za » an zm 33* »+ m 

s as n m m— v> 

HU2 MX 28c Mk TSVk 9516 

250 105 3 Slk 3Mk ZHb— th 

n 72 Ok I2M I2lk 4 Vk 

uo uh nankao*k3ovk4i6 

JO 17 n 734 106 34 34*6 4 Ik 

WIA 129 IM lMlM4tk 

pf 200 47 U 30 » 30 

Pf UO 118 1 17)6 1716 1716 

200 49 9 732 4m 46 4116 4 16 

xxmuj >u am an* am 

250 M * 37 2M6 Z7 

i a A » w 

jo as is n as im m*— k 

1J» 3J 9 «P 2P)k TPU. 2116— Ik 
J4 20 « -Of 4m 4116 4116— Ik 
55* 98 11 32 MAM 

JC 25 17 SPx 4ft M6 41*4 Vk 
5016 791 14 13V. 131b 4M 

.Hb j as 379 am are. 2U6— ** 
l.W 15 M n Uh 12*— Ik 
300 70 U 328 39 28 Milt 

52 2J II 1570 2» 21)6 21* 

08 47 9 IS 1Mb IMk M*4 16 
JO 27 9 9*3 36 306 35*— I* 

75 25 t 52 3*6 30 30— Ik 




39 II* 1IV6 II* * * 




1C 


Mk. IM 
SI* 381* 
30*k U 
54 37* 

am m* 

17* V* 

IT m 

=m is* 

am am 

SM 30* 

38* S* 


38* 25* 
17* m 
at ic* 

43 94 

mk am 

11* 88b 

ft ft 

is* IU w. 
im m w, 
11* 4 
116 m 


21* VP Car* 
S* Voien 
U VBUfM 

m Votary Ut 
17* Veaors 
TA Vorco 
5* Vorco mt 
30* Vartan 
9* VWB 

1*6 VtKS 

3* VtWO 
m VorfSo 
25 VS Viacom 
M* VoCPpf 
tf* VaElBf 
IMk V6tP*f 
51* VafiPpf 
IlhVMni 
27 vonwd 
A VutcnM 


3J4 1 M 
02 37 7 


o iiz 
JO 14 U 
jo u n 


UOatXO 
J2 IjO 18 
884 1X1 
160 10J 
975 123 
7J5 1X2 


15 

200 16 11 


m 32* 
971 ** 

40 22* 
13 2* 

11 3 «* 
U 2* 
18 7* 

919 329k 

39 11* 

59 28* 
5 3* 

38a MI6 
289 41* 
128* 73 
HUH 
Mill 
2BHk 61* 
112 19* 
7 48 
29 77* 


31 H 32*4 * 
9* 9*4 bk 
21 * 22 * 4 * 
2«6 2 * 

2o* 20*4 * 
2M 2*4* 
7Vk 7* 

31* 321k 4 * 
ii* im 

19* 20*— * 
3* 3* 

9* M 4* 
J> «*— 1* 
73 73 — * 

SI IT 
79 79 4 * 

Cl *1 41 

1* 19*— * 

39* 48 4 * 

77 77 —Ik 


21 Wican 230 

34V) WCCtRpf 450 
21* Vftxftvl M 
uik kvaacM jo 

«6 WtfttOC 
31 ¥MiMfT 78 
as* Woiom j* 
im WbHllaolJO 
23* WotCSv js 
3a kvatuin 1 jb 
29* WoUJ*f 1J0 
17* Vttarwa M 
17 WraDn 


14* vwohGt uc 


141 27VS 
m 43 
141 33* 
33 19 
75 9* 

1517 45* 
217 60* 
318 32 
221 34 
441 34 
1 45 
295 21* 
1259 27 
■31 39* 
43 28 


2Mb 27*4 16 
43 43 — m 

31* 33*4* 
18* 11*4 VS 


4Ak 44*4 * 
S3* 54*4* 
21 * 21 *— * 
33Vk 33*— * 
33* 33*— * 
45 45 — * 

2116 21* 4 * 

am 27 4 * 

39* 39*4* 
19* 30 4 16 


rWU 


2J4 

M 

X* IM 

2J4 

u 

184 

TJ 

L4I 

43 

Ji 

V 

JD 

XS 

1J0 

AS 

xao 

3J 


Trading Is Halted 
la Bombay Stocks 


43* 43* 43* 
9* 9* 9* 

32 30* 32 
38* 37* am 
15* 15* 15* 
19* 19* 19* 

33 31 33 

14* 




JSm U 7 An 
2J0 7J 153 
79 2N 
2JB4 8J 11 M 


JOB 36 U 
270 77384 
168 XI 4 
JO U 14 
315« XT 10 
141 U f 
360 19 > 


Xlm 

J 

19 

2J0 

7J 

• 



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180 

45 

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4J0 

25 


450 

XI 


142 

17 

M 

JOm 

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12 

UO 

SJ 


UO 

47 

U 



M 



13 


-M J 70 
26 UP 
100 122 3 
X97 1X1 
220 U2 

AES 149 
UO 145 
JC U 12 
XL J 29 
154 LA I 








tto 


BOMBAY — The Finance Ministry halted 
trading for 24 hours Friday at the Bombay 
Stock Exchange, India's largest, to head off a 
payments crisis set off by a buying spree, the 
exchange's executive director said. 

The official, NIK. fytayya, said the govern- 
ment wanted to avert a possible crisis in which 
speculators might fail to pay for their shares. 
“Our prime concern is to protect genuine inves- 
tors," he said. 

Mr. Mayya said the exchange would open for 
one hour a day be ginning Monday. It usually 
stays open for three hows. He said curbs on 
trading would remain until the situation re- 
turned to normal. 

Early this week, the exchange prohibited 
trading on the seven most popular forward 
shares. 

Mr. Mayya said provisions to promote in- 
vestment, including tax relief, in India’s budget 
this month had set off a buying spree and had 
resulted in sharp rises in prices at the Exchange. 

The Economic Times index has risen 29 
paints to 3552 since the budget was announced 
on March 16. 

Brokers said commodity traders who usually 
had little interest in shares had joined in the 
buying spree. 

Tbe most sought-after shares included those 
of textiles, fertilizers, steel and p harmanaitiraiK 
AH had received a liberal tax package, brokers 
said. 









12 Month 

Hfgh Low Stock 




7* I* 
14* BK 
21 * 12 
5* 2* 
71* 58 
C 2* 
14* SVk 
18* N6 


3* S 
3* l* 
20* 15* 
24* 15 
«* 4* 
44* 26 Vk 
9* C 
13* 5* 

ID* OT6 
5 2 

92* 45* 
B* M6 
4 2 

9 5)k 

19 T* 
1* * 
34 28* 

ank n 

18* 9Vk 
14* 4Vk 
BK 4* 
7* 4 
44* 30* 
34* 12 * 
9 5* 

9 5* 

12* 7* 
B 4 
79* 12* 
18* 12* 
ZTh * 
10 3 

44* 53* 
7* * 

17* 11* 
8* 4* 
14* 71* 
4M* 3 
3* 1* 
C 316 
j mo 3 
IS* 9 
14* 6* 

3* * 

2* Ik 
9* 3* 
7* 516 
11 * 4* 

12* m 
at 10* 
11* CM 
II* Mk 
3* 1 


19* 18* FurVttn 


15 42 17* 17* 17*+ * 


1C* B* Unwi 
13* 416 UmdrE 
U n* Lurie 
14* 10 Lydalk 
35* 13* LynCSy 
10* 8* LvnchC 


Jl S 27 
19 

Jll 3J 9 

JO 1 J 14 
JO XI 9 


71 ISM 15* Uftk+1 
W 12* 12* 13* 

43 12* 11* 1216 + 16 
T 14 - 13* 14 + * 
42 30 29* 29*— * 

3x 9* 9* 9* + M 


CM CM 
9* V* 
Mb CM 
15* 15M 


1* 

IM 

M 
9* 4M 
12* 5* 
2H6 12* 
2* * 
3* 2* 
M 
5* 
IM 
* 


ftS 1 * 


* * 
MM 14* 
44k 416 
151k 14* 
3* 3tk 
3* 3M 


« ft 

7* 416 
49* 32* 
22* 13* 


4* 2* 
39* 22 VS 
3M 1* 
5* 3M 
13H 7* 
17M 7M 
P* 7V6 
616 2* 
7H 44b 
4* 2M 
Mb 4 
14* Kl* 
9Vk 4* 
416 1* 
2216 11* 
8* 2* 
ZVj * 
3D 35 
SDK 34* 
2BM 19 
HRJi IT 
12* 9* 
24 19M 

17* 74 
17M 14M 
IM * 
If* 10 
19M 10* 
39* ZZM 
19* 7116 
IBM 9M 
4* 216 
19 12 

30* 21 * 
15* 11U 
3ZM 2ZK 
34* 23* 
4 316 

3 2* 

34* T9* 


S 4* 
3416 24 
TJM 72* 
t 5* 
CM C 
14* 14 
3 2* 

CM 6* 
8M M6 
14 ISM 


12* HM 

3M 2* 

M * 

48* 40 


BN 7* 

% 3 

24* 24M 
ii* n 
l* l* 
29ft 29* 
* * 
a 30 
15 15 

14* 15* 

ZJ IBM 


Im 

25M+ M 
5*—* 
4N + * 
34M— M 
12*+ M 

SJ"* 

T4N+* 

ZB— M 
CM 

SM+ U 
ON 

4*+ * 
5M+ M 
UM 

XM+ * 
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4*+ * 
CM + * 
SM+ M 
1* 

24M— * 
11 — ft 
1*— N 
29*— * 
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JO 

15 

16* + M 

21 + * 



JO 4 S 
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15 
14 

181 U I 

6560154 3 

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10 

JO 1J ■ 


.728 2D 20 
18 

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JO 23 51 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


IICSS ROUNDUP 


Page 13 


tig I* lialuti 

uiluiv SttH»k> 


Us Refuse 
Rescue 
* an Fund 

Reuters 

K _ Swiss banJdng au- 
jected an Friday a last- 
quest from a Swiss-Ita- 
rty hind to stop anxious 
Tom withdrawing their 
i prevent the company 
'liquidated. 

gramme. a fund with 
Gan assets based in the 
Swiss town of Lugano, 
problems since Italy’s 
narkei began sliding in 
1980s. Its assets feu 20 
value in the latest fin a n- 


„ t »iss Federal Banking 
? * at had twice protected 
- am runs by shareholders 
V -< ictober, while the Italian 
■ ‘ d riw tgd a new law de- 
. • dp it. 

iay, however, the ccan- 
■> .! id it tamed down a re- 
“ extend an injunction, 
, ; expire on Sunday, that 

* i - ated individual share- 
" '^in getting refunds. Earii- 
'•', 1 th, a banking commis- 
*/J ial said the decision 
-‘ * • c liquidation almost cer- 


'Telewriter’ Introduced by Olivetti 
In Bid to Conquer European Market 


iteenct Fiance-Prate 

BERLIN — Olivetti SpA. at- 
tempting to convince 4 milli on sec- 
retaries in Europe, introduced on 
Friday a “telewriter” on Friday in 
what the company said is a move 
ahead of Japanese and U.S. manu- 
facturers. 

The new machine, to be market- 
ed as an electronic video typewrit- 
er, offers the familiarity of a type- 
writer and the performance of a 
personal computer, according to 
viuorio Levi, an Olivetti vice presi- 
dent. 

The new equipment can process 
words, stock data, be connected to 
other information-technology 
equipment and can be ran on soft- 
ware, the company said. 

Olivetti said it hopes vo win con- 
trol of 40 percent of the European 
market, with about 400,000 ma- 
chines valued at $1 billion, by the 
end of 1986. This is equivalent to 


Olivetti’s current share of the mar- 
ket for electronic typewriters. 

Olivetti said the telewriter offers 
up to 40 percent more productivity 
than a traditional machine, repre- 
senting one hour's work per day. 

Mr. Levi said the machine would 
be priced at between S1.6S0 and 
$3,000, about 40 percent than a 
personal computer. He said a secre- 
tary could be trained to use the 
equipment in less than three hoars, 
compared with the two weeks he 
said is required to learn how to use 
an information- technology system. 

Olivetti is Europe’s biggest sell- 
ing manufacturer of electronic 
typewriters, with 7,500 employees 
turning out a million machines a 
year worth 5500 million. 

Mr. Leri also announced that an 
apeement with the French firm CI- 
T/AIcatd to build a typewriter fac- 
tory in France had been delayed 
because of the French company's 


COMPANY NOTES 


V’ 


r> been stretching Swiss 
« says the investors may 
tied refunds if there are 
: , res to save a fund,” a 
» spokesman said. 
v d was founded by an 
oder, Orazio Bagnasco. 


Great Western Sonar Ca’s law- 
yers have won bankruptcy court __ 

From Mazda 


-■ i 


Chemical Bank, Mitsui Bank 
Ltd. and Turkish interests plan to 
create a bank in Istanbul next 
month, Mitsui said. Chemical will 
have a 45-percenf interest in the 
bank, Mitsui a 25-percent stake 
and the Turkish groups the remain- 
der. . 

Entrad Corp, of Australia said it 
has increased its offer for Tootal 
Group PLC, a British textile cotn- 

pany. to 715 pence (86 cents) for 

■ “."V each ordinary share, up from 70 factory at Tacoma, Washington, hi 

; Lint JLLUall pence. Tootal urged shareholders July, Kawasaki and GE are to form 

~ ' ’ • to reject the bid for Entrad, which a joint production and sales com- 

V J * #a Bnv now holds 7.10 percent of TootaTs 

■- ' ‘ 1 1 . 118 UJ 1>UY ordinary share capital. 

"■ " Ericsson Information Systems 

AB, a subsidiary of Tdefon AB LM 


“very strong misgivings” about the 
size of the market. 

Mr. Levi, turning to cooperation 
between Olivetti and American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co„ said 
that the trade balance between the 
groups was “widely” in Olivetti’s 
favor. 

He said Olivetti will sell nearly 
$300 million worth of microcom- 
puters to AT&T this year and will 
buy $70 million worth of minicom- 
puters from the UJL company. 

Thailand Buys 2 Airbases 

Reuters 

PARIS — Airbus Indus t rie said 
Friday that Thailand's domestic 
airline, Thar Airways Co, had or- 
dered two Airbus aircraft from the 
European consortium. Airbus said 
the contract, inclu ding spare parts, 
would be worth more than $125 

nrillip TT 


US. Refects 
LoanRequest 


mini on, and are negotiating to sell 
six other plants ana two subsidiar- 
ies. Great Western is owned by 
Herbert Hunt and Nelson Bunker 
Hunt, the Dallas financiers. 

Kawasaki Steel Corp. said it has 
rimed an agreement with General 
Electric Co. to take over a steel rape 


; Ssy Loans 

‘ pgdes Tuna Service 

r* 1 SGELES — Charles 
V) was removed as the 
4 ind chief executive of 
Corp. of America last 
; trying to buy FCA’s 
‘ * of troubled loans, ac- 
«»jus successor, William I. 
«* . 

pp, who now runs his. 
— ngeles-based financial- 
tn, Trafalgar Holdings 
. jrimg with other un- 
-stors, Mr. Popqoy said 

' tpp declined to com- 

ROB IT 

the value of the erffer is 
it would have to be 
because FCA had prob- 

“tes valued at more than 

5 of Sept. 30, according 
■Trith die Securities and 

'’I jvnnnron n 

' haded $593 million in 
- st 60 days delinquent 
. ' trillion owned through 
„ '• However, it is bdieved 
* ak value of those loans 
T ' , -lantiaHy reduced when 
. : 1 iy releases its financial 
-for 1984. 

- the loans arc in trou- 
app apparently believes 
a s valuable if they can be 
- * investors. One source 
•U ■ negotiations said Mr. 

■ us to buy the loans at 
’• 11 »e their new. marited- 


Ericsson. has introduced a portable 
persona] conmuter costing 35,000 
krone ($3,870) that it says is as 
powerful as conventional desktop 
machines 

Far East.Consartuim Ltd. has is- 
sued 37.6 milli on new shares of 1 
Hong Kong dollar (12.8 cents) each 
to companies controlled by its 

chair man, DcaCGH Qtitl, anH trig 

family. The shares are part of a 
move to capitaiiw 37.6 million dol- 
lars in loans from the Chin famil y 

Flat SpA and Nanjing Associat- 
ed Automobile Manufacturing 
Corp., a Chinese company, have 
signed a contract worth about SI 
billion yuan (S353 million) to build 
an auto plant in the eastern city of 
Nanjing, the Xinhua news agency 
said. The plant should produce 
100.000 vehicles annually within 
six years. 

General Dynamics Corp: said it 
has split off part of its Convair 
division to create a unit to coordi- 
jmc space - oriented and Strategic 
programs. About one-third of San 
Diego-based Convair’s 12,300 
workers were shifted to the new 
division. 


pany. Kawasaki Thermal Systems 
Inc, which will take over the Taco- 
ma factory. 

K mart Corp. has completed its 
acquisition ctf Pay Less Drag Stores 
Northwest Inc. through a takeover 
of a Pay Less subsidiary. K mart 
said it owned about 92 percent of 
Pay Less common stock when its 
tender offer at $27 a share expired 
last month. 

Nissan Motor Co. and Yue 
Loong Motor Co. have reached a 
preliminary agreement under 
which Nissan wifi take a 25-perceni 
interest in Yue Loong. Under the 
arrangement, Nissan will invest 
$25 million to $37.5 milli on in Yue 
Loong. which makes Nissans in 
Taiwan, Yue Loong said. 

Philips NV has been fined 25.000 
Deutsche marks ($8,010) by the 
West German cartel office for hav- 
ing concealed a majority interest in 
Loewe Opta GmbH, a television 
and lighting company, when it 
sought to merge with Grundig AG 
in January 1984. 

Storer Commtmicatioos Inc.’s 
chairman, Peter Storer, said the 
board of directors wiD vigorously 
fight a takeover attempt by a New 
Jersey group, Coniston Partners, 
that said it wants to liquidate the 
broadcasting company. 


United Press Imematicnai 

DETROIT — Mazda Motor 
Corp. says it may be forced to delay 
construction of an assembly plant 
near Detroit because its request for 
a $20-m3Hon U.S. loan has been 
turned down. 

Samuel Pierce Jr, US. secretary 
of housing and urban development, 
Thursday said the Japanese auto- 
maker only would be eligible "for 
$23 million of the $20 million it 
had naked for in economic-devel- 
opment loans 

Mazda said Wednesday that 
“sufficient grant money" was criti- 
cal to the project Earlier, it said it 
needed a minimum of $63 million 
in federal funding. 

Bill Ott, a Mazda spokesman, 
said the project is “now entirely up 
in the air and could be delayed 
indefinitely." 

Mazda said it needs the loans to 
begin construction of the $45(kml- 
Iion plant which is expected to 
create 4,000 jobs. The plant had 
been scheduled to begin producing 
240,000 cars a year in 1987. 

Doug Ross, director of the Mich- 
igan’s Department of Commerce, 
said the state, wifi try to find other 
money to help Mazda. 

“We’re committed to a course of 
making sure Mazda builds its 
plants here,” Mr. Ross said. 


Computervision Chief 
Gambles Finn’s Future 


i * 


._ 6 


joy said it remains un- 
ci Mr. Knapp wants to 
just part of the trou- 
ortfolio. 

■ Holdings has written 
d letters, the executive 
t of which was reviewed 
ward of directors this 
re listening," Mr. Pope- 


!t* - 


* ! 


is 


.*& r. 


& 


•- a 

** 

4 

i 

i 




ines 
Mis Loss 

■ aed from Page II) 

vigorous revamping of 

- * mics and has split Land 
-> te and accountable ho- 

■ ty and trading opera- 

wick said that, for tax 
dines would not be sim- 
vided. But, hesaid, “We 
Srivriy streamlining it 

* S towards greater func- 
ttganenu Ibis entails 

* tight control over ex- 
1 capital expenditure, 

* if assets which are un- 
Qr unrdated to our core 

* and antveruQfi all our 
do stand-alcmebusiness 
Wegated operational re- 

, tttionofaboktingcom- 
nnnda last year because 
oties over Hong Kong’s 
- not affected Jardines 
■th China, he said, 
rick also denied market 
it his family might sdJ 
( of its interest in Sardine 
The family has not dis- 

- «ze of its holdings. 

1 Jardines said Friday 
, Jd not recommend any 

- Klends for 1984 beyond 
payment of 10 cents a 

s market reaction to the 
did. 

. nth. as analyst at W.l. 
& Co., said the market 
ated the results. “People 
iwc to see a turnaround 

■ but tte extent of that 
; ! wiQ depend on interest 
, *chan« rates,* he said. 

ales, who follows the 
•; « H <»rc Govext (Far 


‘ (Coa tinned from Page II) 

CAD/CAM market for years, but 
its share has been slipping. In 1980, 
according to Merrill Lynch & Co„ 
it hdd 32 percent of the market, but 
that fdl to 23 percent last year. In 
1985. Merrill estimated, IBM will 
knock it out of the top. 

Mr. Berrett, 45, has not wavered 
from his belief in his integrated 
system, but analysts and buyers are 
questioning his strategy. Compu- 
tervision’s continued stronghold in 
the $23 billion CAD/CAM mar- 
ket, they say, is anything but sure. 

“What they’ve got is a hodge- 
podge; it hasn’t been integrated 
well at all.” said Kenneth C Bou- 
rne, a GAD/CAM specialist for a 
major aerospace company and an 
early user of computer-aided de- 
sign and manufacturing. 

“Basically, they had a system 
that had a very complicated arefai- 


the company's success. And, criti- 
cally, he started integrating com- 
puters made by other companies 
into Computervision’s system. 
That decision reversed a longstand- 
ing company policy to seD only 
Computervision products, which 
had left the company scrambling 
when competitors came out with 
more powerful compmeis. 

Mr. Berrett insists that the new 
integrated conmuter system will set 
the standard for factory automa- 
tion. It consists of desktop engi- 
neering “work stations." minicom- 
puters and a mainframe, all linked 
to enable companies to automate 
their whole process flow. It in- 
cludes three computers of varying 
sizes, and allows customers a 
choice of machines. The buyer can 
use a CDS 3000 made by Sun Mi- 
crosystems Inc, a CDS 4000 made 
by Computervision and a CDS 
5000, Much 'is an IBM 4300. Or, 
instead of the CDS 4000. a VAX 


lecture, very complicated coonec- instead of the i 
tions,” added Ronald J. Bien- made by Digital Equipment can be 


kowski, manager of computer 
services for en gin eers at the Ameri- 
can Motors Corp., which recently 
awarded a three-year $26 million 
CAD/CAM contract to IBM. 

On Wall Street, too, the criticism 
has been mounting since the com- 
pany began shipping its new sys- 
tem in bulk last November. Said 
Bob Grandhi a technology analyst 
at E.F. Hutton & Co.: “U doesn’t 
take much wisdom to conclude that 
ComputervisiaQ is slipping.” 

Since taking over Tn years ago. 
Mr. Berrett biggest push has been 
to try to return Computervision to 
the top of the important so-called 
“ mechani cal CAD" market In that 
segment, computers are used to de- 
sign product components ranging 
from auto parts to airplane wings. 

Toward that end, Mr. Berrett has 
spent millions to boost the power 
of the company’s main computer 
— to enable it to process 32 bits of 
information, np from 16 — so that 
it can compete with rival machines. 
He has expanded the company's 
vast library of manufacturing soft- 
ware. making software crucial to 


used, and in place of the CDS 3000, 
a Lambda, made by a Hillsboro, 
California, concern called Meth- 
cus-CV Inc. can be used. 

The company insists its use of 
several different computers is a 
stren g th , not a drawback: It says H 
thus avoids becoming too depen- 
dent on any tingle company in such 
a volatile market and gives compa- 
nies the best available technology. 


Compromises 
On the Deficit 

(Continued from Page 11) 
Btile ground as possible, and pref- 
erably none at all He is requesting 
that budget authority for the mili- 
tary grow by 10 patent in 1986 and 
41 percent over the next three 
years, rising to $41 1 billion in 1988 
from $293 billion in 1985. After 
correction for inflation, this would 
mean an estimated 6-percent in- 
crease in 1986. 8 percent in 1987 
and 9 percent in 1988. 

However, Donald T. Regan, Mr. 
Reagan’s While House chief of 
staff, has been allowed to say that 
the administration might be witling 
to compromise with the Senate Re- 
publicans to curtail the growth of 
military spending. Mr. Regan, the 
former Treasury Secretary, did not 
say how much of a further cut there 
would be, and it is of imenst that 
he, rather than Defense Secretary 
Caspar W. Weinberger, made the 
offer. 

Mr. Regan said the White House 
did not want to deal with the over- 
all rate of increase in mililary 
spending- Presumably, that is now 
too gross. Rather, said Mr. Regan, 
“if there are methods by which we 
can achieve savings, either through 
elimination of waste, or by stretch- 
ing out a few things that are not 
necessary to our strategic or con- 
ventional weapons systems, per- 
haps we can cut back on spending." 

It is conceivable that, when the 
compromise over military and so- 
cial composition is ova, the presi- 
dent could wind up with close to 
ihe S50 billiofl in cuts he is seeking, 
although many legislators now be- 
lieve the end resnlt is marc Kkdy to 
be about S30 billion. Thai would 
leave the deficit at about $200 bil- 
lion in 1986. 


the market view is that 
• - ddressed itself to the 
, ud is applying stria sor- 
.•/ rooming us core activi- 


Options 


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Tci 310251 - T** 3*305 


IVORY COAST 


MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS, CONSTRUCTION 
POSTS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


THE NATIONAL OFFICE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
informs with deep regret the potential tenderra interested in the. 
international tender NBR 3290/84/ ONT/ DFB/M/03 1 published 
in FRATERNrrE MATIN. INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRI- 
BUNE. jEUNE AFR1QUE. FINANCIAL TIMES and LE MONDE, 
on the first week of March, that this tender must be considered as 
null and void. 

Further information will be given later. 

The NATIONAL OFFICE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS apolo- 
gizes for such a mishap. 

Director 

NATIONAL OFFICE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
BJL.AKA 


Banks in Ireland 
AgreetoHdp 
Insurance firm 

Reuters 

DUBLIN — The Irish cen- 
tral bank will provide funds, in 
conjunction with other banks, 
to rescue Insurance Corp. of 
Ireland, the Connery’s finance 
minister, Alan Dukes, sad Fri- 


_ in parliament dur- 
ing a debate on the government 
takeover the corporation 
from Allied Irish Banks, Mr. 
Dukes said Ireland’s treasury 
wonld not be involved in saving 
the company. 

The corporation’s total losses 
have been estimated by the gov- 
ernment at being between £50 
million and £120 million 
pounds ($42 ntiffion atui $100 
million). 

Mr. Dukes told said the cen- 
tral bank’s contribution wonld 
come from internal reserves. 


Pan Am Cuts U.S. Fares 
To Regain Business 


The Aesodazed Press 

NEW YORK — Pan American 
World Airways has slashed its 
transcontinental and New York-to- 
Mianu fares following the settle- 
ment of a strike by its ground work- 
ers. 

Several rival carriers on those 
routes said tbev would match, or 
nearly match, the new fares, which 
are effective immediately and ap- 
ply to travel completed by June 1. 

The new one-way fare between 
New York and Miami is $99 Mon- 
day through Thursday, and $109 
Friday through Sunday, Pan Am 
said Thursday. The fare had been 
S129 midweek and $139 on week- 
ends. 

The airline's one-way fare be- 
tween New York or Miami and Los 
Angeles, is $129 Monday through 
Thursday and $159 Friday through 
Sunday. The fares also would apply 
to New York-to-San Francisco 


travel when that service resumes 
Monday, Pan Am said. 

The only restriction on the new 
fares is that the tickets must be 
purchased through travel agents. 

Pan An’s action had been antici- 
pated. The airline was expected to 
cut fares tmee the strike was over in 
order to rebuild domestic passen- 
ger traffic. The walkout by the 
Transport Workers Union began 
Feb. 28 and ended Wednesday. 

In Miami, an Eastern Airlines 
spokesman, Mark Wegel, said 
Eastern would match Pan Ant’s 
new transcontinental and New 
York-to- Miami fares. 

United Airlines and American 
Airlines said they would come dose 
to matching Pan. Am’s transconti- 
nental fares. They said they would 
offer $129 one-way fares Monday 
through Thursday and $169 fares 
Friday through Monday, be ginning 
April 7. 


Exxon Closes 

Aruba Refinery 

The Associated Press 

ORANJESTAD, Aruba — 
Exxon Oil Corp- dosed its 60- 
year-old refinery cm Aruba on 
Thursday, as government offi- 
cials continued the search for 
buyers of what had been the 
Caribbean island’s major em- 
ployer. 

Although Thursday was the 
last regular workday, Exxon 
wiU delay dismantling the refin- 
ery to give govenuneni officials 
until June to find 3 buyer. 

Exxon announced last year it 
would close the refinery, which 
employed 1300 Arubans and 
produced 300,000 barrels of oil 
drily, after Venezuela told Ex- 
xon it would have to pay the 
world-market price for the 
crude oil Venezuela had been 
providing at a low price. Vene- 
zuela is just sooth of the island. 
Exxon said loss of (he cheaper 
oil made operations too costly. 


| Floating Rate Notes 


March 29 


Dollar 


imow/MbL 

ABMtrVhfS 

MOMifumri 

AfffedlrtshC 

MMirtafcPwvl 

Arab aicaCerp nw 1 

AfloniieraiintHMl 

5ca Caaim. ItaLW 

WNsLumfl 

Banco I» Rnmon 

BcoMSOTtoJM.fi 

Banco PWoB 
Bank 0< Amedeo 77 
BkMG»H»n*V 
BkOfGreneoW 
BkOMrotmtoff 
Bk Of Irate* 72 
61 Montreal fO 
BkOf MontrealM 
BkOfMMtraelfl 
BkOf Nnw YorilN 
Bk Of Novo Scotia MM 
Bt Of Nava Scnttato 
Bk Of Tokyo 93 
BkOtTakvaK 
SkOfTofcYoD 
Bk Of Tokyo Itsetm 
Bk 01 Tokyo dodB/91 
Bk America 94 
Trust 00 

rnwN 

Trust 94 

Bo Arab* El tnvetom 

BBL*S 

BBL99 

BqlBdasuezlf 
B* Mason 99 
BUEI9 
BFCEI7 
BFCEodM 
BFCEtanOS 
BFCE99 
BNPfS 
BMP (7 
BMP 45/18 
BMP 14/94 
BMP 99 

BNP 94 
BMP 05 

Bo Ptrlbas pern 

Bk Worm 19/94 
Bam errs Owns 9S 
Bardavt Os«ai 90 
BartfcnvOSMnm 
Borders 0*ec» Of 
CtoB Beta per* 
■OteBdoff/M 
Kino BM 00 
Bergen Bcnk 89 
Bergan Bank Oct 88/91 
KlnoBotoWfM 
Kino BOlB 99AM 
Cm 96 
Ccc* US 

CNCA9MS 
CUT 90 
CWT91 


Tie it. 
9*4 134 

r 9 


9ft 44 


9Ki 

9W 

TV, 

9* 

A 

9* 


Coupon Next BU AttZl 
99k W4 to A* 999* 
HP 174 1802210032 
9to >7 1000210012 
Oil. 204 9S1/494W 
Oft 1*9 99AJ 9*75 
9V, JUS 19JB10O* 
9* 44 1600510015 

KJti 264 108.15)0025 

9)1/474 to JO 9990 
9*4 294 99.13 99.25 
UM 205 W3 10025 
9% 94 99 J2 9922 
fib U4 9820 98JS 
9I329U7 

uunau* 

_ . 99 jo ioaz 
_ 204 MO53M061 
8 to 2*4 UB2318EJ3 
TO» 204 1004210071 
n 154 9920 99 JO 
W* 354 1004310073 
9H. 11-7 MB43H073 
11 344 lOOBStOUJO 

294 M015KH2S 
297 10OHI882B 
: 100*8100* 
A4 1003710647 
3-6 10005106.15 
IV4 9944 99J4 
254 1005310063 

1M 100181003 

2M 9940 ltO» 
... I7-e 1006010076 
11H 114 UUOnOH 
fn, 15-7 lOOOQ&id 
Wki 21-9 MQ78HQJ8 
r* 3M iotnuoo.13 
99k 29-7 ICOBraaU 
1M 304 HUMUS 
9to 2» 1000916019 
KBk 13-9 1002810038 

IHk 99J5 ttt 
89k 364 {000710017 
99k tM 10O57WL67 
9% 54 9947 99 J7 
1030 M 10OC10UJ 
MK 44 10126101,15 
91b 22-7 1000510015 
- 9923 9943 

HU0T14 1007710087 
♦to M H0fl6VB.lt 
Hk 30-7 WOBHEffl 
174 1004210072 
X79k T-S 1005010044 
10k. 44 T00tri0022 
9% 04 WUJ1Q03J 
KJW n4 106X210052 
(4k 384 10000)0010 
tok J1-5 16019)6025 

I* U4 loouiauo 

9V. 9-7 ItOTOIBOa 
IHb 114 HO. 151 0025 
91b 04 1002610080 
9W. 15-5 99J0 99J6 
9* 74 100*5 HH45 

Ulk 2*4 1C025VBJS 
«P» 8-5 10B.UM023 


r/MaS. 


CMWMMOto VA AsU 


aoces 

CT&c fWktrl 96 
CftcW 

CortoRS&H-to 
Che* Manhattan 93 
One If 
OtoflBaalBkM 
OtenlaKWklylK 
cxrisHaotoBkfi 
□trlsttantoM 
Citicorp tWUrl nuo.199* 
□HcorpSOPf 9* 

CHI Oct 98 9* 

OKcoraM 

atlcav-UntUfed OMP 
Citicorp 97 


Cnwnr uiui ik Nw 19 
Conan UrONant realtor! 
CCF 84/98 
CCF90AS 
CCF9«M 
CCF 97 
CEPME 87/92 
CEP MEM 
Credit DIMM 
erase Fonder 8U9J 
Credit For 
Cr Lvon93/9f 
CradttLymaMD 
Credit Lyonais 90/97 
crtdnLyoaooisSsrM 
CredK Lvoondi 91/95 
Credtt Lyomab deeff 
Credit Lyornots lan97/9i 
Credit LyO*te»tao92fl» 
CremMaHatnlll 
Credit Nattond 90/9* 
Credit Md boat 00 
CredltonstaBW 
CrecffOTsfnfl 9* 

Del Idil Kama N 
OenAeQJieto 
Den Norekeaovta 
Den Mora* decto 
Deomort Ioa8a/«0 
Denmark od*/to 
DeuinukO* 

Denmark pera 
Die Brel Oesl 93/9* 
DrtnJnerBanfc93 
DrMdoorBenk89 
Dtesdner Book 92 
EttHtBto Mucha- If 
EOF 99 
EOF 95 
EDF97 

Iabw” 

£AB9C 
EEC 8*™ 

Exterior lot] 9* 
Ferrovte99 
FlnnWi Paper 95 
First Btatan Inc 91 /M 
Rnd Bonk Systems N 
First ChkDOo 97 
First Oifeioe 9* 
Fteraty Texas 95 
First M rte ma tafS 
Fuii 91/98 


tolk. 244 9945 9994 
9U 44 9095 99.18 
iik u-7 lausmu 
?v. 99«99J2 

ML U-7 99.93 T002D 
9% 54 9942 10002 
9* Z7-12 I0O5DOU3 
9to 84 99A0 99.15 

n. tw wumoojs 
wo u msneats 

91% 84 99 JO 99.15 
9*k 194 9941 9921 
Ilk 304 9921 99J0 
tok tJ4 W.W18123 
B9k 154 99.59 10050 
81k 3M 9926 99J0 
9)h TVS 99J5 UKU5 
Wto 2M 100U10023 
KPk 114 9989 16065 
99k 2*4 100351(045 
124094 NXU21B072 
to k 2M lOMKOOtt 
99k 224 9972 9952 
ntk 124 1007610060 
10 *4 MU21KL42 

n 274 108JMJSB.lt 
12 94 U0.1TK027 

44k 1-7 9928 9966 
1R* 114 100431 0053 
1W. 04 100.1710030 
n 94 160*010071 
99k M 1004110150 
Wk 29-5 1007010060 
9tk 274 1007010028 
9 18*7 luaoemiB 

m 144 1005710067 
* 187 WO 151 0025 

1M 11-9 1005916086 
95S 204 9925 9965 
9. 11-7 1003810040 

99k 274 WQJ7IBQ.T7 
10 k U-5 100.010023 
1000 94 160331 0041 

916 04 9935 10O5D 
194 9955 U05B 
9K 4-7 18O2S10O35 
n% U4 W0X716OS7 
W 1H 10OBTKU3 
«fc M ibubwou 
B ta 29-7 toil » J1 
life 194 MOI6TB086 
9% 285 9932 10002 
16 274 M026MBJ6 

99k W4 99 J5 10016 
1000 274 WU6KD36 
9tt 124 108.1010020 
WK 124 9927 9917 
WJ0 V) 9997 10007 
99k 17-4 99JS 9925 
IB 26-9 IKLlOltfiflO 
9X 87 WL16100.il 

m. 214 9927 10067 
lOK 304 1602510035 
9958 *923 
Fib 2M 9925 9940 
9% 04 9960 99.10 
74 9921 99 Ji 
214 10O151BL25 
224 WJOfkJB 
84 9962 9922 
15-7 9925 MOOS 


M 

99k 

n 

« 


CoaPteMaxt BM Altai 


Genffno«*W/97 
Cenmunat 92/94 
SZBI9 

SI” 

CZBoon 

CZB9* 

Cfreto 

GrtodtaysTS 

Orfadlaym** 

Great WtotenFta 94 
Creal tVestern 95 


91k 

9Vk 

9K 


pm ; 

HmSornuoipcsp 
Hlmne Amnri cane 95 
MvaroQoebecW 
Hvttn Quebec 85 
Ic Industries 91 
MdenestaWm 
IBJS5 
iBJnovtt 
intend M/99 
lr*iM97 
Rex lie text H 
INI 65 

Italy (Rtovbllc) 99 
Clh*iS7 
itafy 19/W 

JJ>. Maroon ttf79.5/U-2 

KOPfettn 

KOP IBOV92 

KentSroOy 65 

Ktatanart Bemoa 91 

Kirineart Beeson 98 

KeroaDevBktf 

Korea Bkaohw 88 

Unaeato 

Ltayd*93 

Lloyds 92 

LteRtSO* 

LTCB lu» 

LTCB95 
LTCBIUOB9 
LTCB 8* 

LTCB 92 
Motroski 94/99 
NuamalS 
Malaysia aorl9/92 
MoMysio dec89.^2 
Malavsta 18/n 
Man HOT O/Jeai 94 
MonHan OVUvl 98 
Marine MkSand 94 
Marine MMtaod 69 
MMtandM 


MeBgaBkM. 


Midland V 
MU8andf2 
MMIOMto 


MltHlFlnf* 

Morgan Crenton 94 
fdoriBaaeOen 96/93 
MongaoeDcnto 
Nat Bk DefreHft 
NMCOmSdlARdltaW 
Matl Westmlntl 

Natl twestmta M 

MMitoestmlnM 

Matt Wesfirdn 92 

NatlWostaitaBerp 

MesfeOySM 

McwZetdandl? 

Mae Zealand Steel 92 
Nlnaon Credit Bk 98 
Ntaaon Credit Bk 65 
Mtaaon Credit Bk 88 
Morale infFta 91 
OKB 68 
OLB94 


284 ntMHOiO 
22-7 >08.151 0025 
134 >002718033 
. 114 100751 OUB 
169. W-5 98J6 9968 
9* k 294 1008010070 
tok 274 10U61DL10 
JDK. 30-9 100*210652 
18 >4 1000910019 
MM 04 9653 9813 
99, *4 97.12597425 
Wk 274 Moamo 
99k 26-5 9U9 MJ6 
111k 2*4 9945 9925 
9tk 22-7 1 00041 OOM 
1006316013 
9«k 15-7 9925 10025 
« M 1600510026 
U 54 ’OOflObU 
im 204 m«iouD 
» 149 10001)08.11 

ION 204 99 J7 9927 
9th W-7 99X7 9927 
in* EM 9925 10025 
10N *4 1002210622 

10W 2» UD.151MU5 
915/194 99.95 10005 
/ 5 WL76100JA 

l» 14 100.12101122 

lift 94 IIL1DH120 
ion 2S9 mum:* 
91*- 20-5 ML17MU7 
IM 27-9 1002810620 
H 54 99A IDOjOO 
12 94 9925 10925 

H IM to Jt 9958 
W9k 304 1085810068 
98k 44 WL60HD2I 

in* U4 WAneou 
91* 227 9950 18040 
KM U4 lOOflOUd 

10 114 1805010060 

Nk 174 1003310043 
W 514 100801 DOTS 
98k 144 9912 9952 
■ ■ 9921 9923 

12 94 1001810025 

ID 54 180.1010025 

Wlk 244 108.141 DU* 
91k 314 1805010010 
9*k 84 99J00 99.U 
89k 94 100.1810028 

ft* 184 NOdflDaii 
Ft* 194 995810000 
91k 314 1803810068 
• 207 100.1810021 

9tk 2*4 msioo*5 
9ft 74 1806510075 

11 304 1182610016 

m 49 1001710627 

Htt 44 10625100*5 
t. 11-7 HO10HO25 
H% 114 >0080(0875 
99k 194 1802010035 
91* 286 99J| 9928 
9N 214 9920 9920 
9N 18-7 1004710052 
91k 274 1OB0RM 
119k 164 10057)0052 
10ft 25-4 10205182.15 
ON 13-5 100571 0U7 
to. 274 1002010938 
lift 94 1002210042 
F* 2*4 16O2&10C3B 
9ft m 1001310023 
91* 284 9955 Md 
tok 164 1OQ04JOOU 
Nik 94 9925 10025 
Wh 2M 1002810038 
BBk 284 1806818055 


mw/Mat. 

OLB 95/99 
Offshore Wring *1 
DMMier* Mining 14 
Pimn 91/98 
PttOTkm 99/91 
Quetesmift 
Rente 91 

Rea Bk Dal las 97 
RaralBk Scotland I6ri8 
Sal tamo 91/93 
SmrelnLFInn 
SmmdMAOM 
Stoma lot Fin 92 
samdlnowttn Fine 


Scotland IM FkiW 

security Pacffle 97 
SNCFM 
SEAT 90/93 
iF-E.09 
SP£.tl 

Seclete Generate fO/tS 
Soctete Generate H) 
lecteto Generate Mar *8 
Socfeto Generate navto 
Sodete General 97 
5NCB91 

Scatai IKtaadMn) 9S19J 
UnodomOf 5haln93 
Saokiff 

Stand 0101198 
Stand CPori *4 
Stand Chart 91 
Stand CrtrtfltefO 
Stand Chart aero 
State BkOtlndta 17 
Semttano Trust 92/98 

Sweden ft 

Sweden 98/05 
Sweden 69/94/99 
Sweden 93/03 


CoaoteiMajd Bid Ariel 

11% 114 UO20UO10 
«% 44 1102910029 
91* 2H 10024100J* 
W* 270 9SflO toflO 
04. 194 UXU510080 
101* 9-5 MOflliaU* 
Wk m 18031100*8 
9V» 28-5 «8J0 99JH 
8% 1*4 1008210052 
Vft « mUBHUB 
9ft 2*9 UOjOODU 
fit 39-7 TQOIIKH20 
9% IM 9928 9*50 
119k 154 9925 J0Q50 
9% 214 9916 79 .13 
181k 34-9 1003110048 
9% 224 9925 9925 
Ilk 304 99.91 10028 
9% 1*4 MLIDHUI 
9ft 34 9950 M0.M 
IM 9925 10025 


Taiyo Kobe 92/01 
Tokuabi 92/94 
Takai Aslo LMM/99 
ToremoDorointanTJ 
Tana Trust 12/99 
TV094/D* 

UatanBkMgn*ay9f 
UnllM D/Seas Bk 69 
Mem Faroe 97 
WBHoms+Glynsfl 
world Barit u 
YakahamaTl/M 
Zentrateaparkasse 91 


IHk 4-9 KS25I0US 
lift 9-5 1001519025 
10M. 94 10040)0050 
WL 74 WQ3S100AS 
mu 164 108X0106,10 

wft 204 muoinajo 

HUB 274 100221(042 
Kttk 304 100821 0022 
♦ft 204 IDOJBIOOIO 

10ft 284 1O0XK&4O 
MJk 117 lOBSSalflS 

C 3% SWS 

tok 134 M0.aDI0D.ll 
tok 2*4 KRJDDbJ 
1% IB7 9923 9928 
9ft 28-5 99J7P942 
Wb 304 1001810071 
9ft 9-7 10012)0017 
Nft 105 U036100M 
10ft 109 1002810040 


tok IM 1008010050 
9ft U4 IDOSnOOiO 
to* 164 MOJBMUO 
10 9 4 9880 9025 

9% 214 9800 99 m 
9ft 284 9925 10025 
»ft 04 9*43 9953 

lift wo lousuajs 

U9 31-5 9820 9850 
lift 24 1001210022 
»ft 15-7 10O58MO65 


Non Dollar 


tawar/MpL 
Anz 97 

Bk Montreal 94 
BkTekyalV98 
Bqlndaauarfl 
atlcorp »9/91 
CoraondatedaoJd 
CEPME 96 
Crerflt Fonder 99 
Credit National 91/95 
Denmark 93/98 
LlJ.99 

KtaodPaiBdlotamN 
UoytteH 
MMteblO 
5NCF 90/91 
YerkWire 91/94 


CoaponMezf BM Aritd 
Mft 14-5 MOI5NB2S 
Uft 274 1001010020 
Wft 71-5 99 JO bid 
Uft 71-5 100 1010020 
Uft 154 9928 *920 
Wft 54 9U0 99.16 
13ft 714 1002510025 
INk J4 to JI WJ8 
Oft 108 >002710033 
Uft 764 10055100*5 
13ft 154 toJH 9955 
Wft 104 9940 9950 
W* 3*4 9955 10085 
Wft 74 9955 M045 
12ft 244 1003210012 
Uft 274 1953 10003 


Source ; Croat Suh 
London 


frst Boston Lta. 





LET THE TRIB BE YOUR GUIDE. 



lilt GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVEL & 

ENTERTAINMENT: 

EUROPE. 

There's never been 
a guide quite like it 
Trib business readers aU 
across Europe shared 
their mast treasured 
travel secrets with 
joumafist Peter Graham. 

The results a book for 
business travelers with 
contributions from business travelers. 

•Turn an ordinary btshess trip into a pleasant, more 
efficient journey Guide cavers Amsterdam, Brussels, 
Copenhagen, DQsseldorf, Frankfurt, Geneva, London, 
Lyon, Milan, Munich, Bars, Stockholm, Zurich. Over 
200 fad-fiDed pages, this hardcoNer edftion is a great gift 
idea for colleagues, business contacts, or yourself. 

Seven subdivisions for each aty include: 1. Base city 
overview with vital irrfbrmcrtion. 2. Hotels, w9h emphasis 
on business services. 3. Restaurants, for on- and off-duty 
pleasure: 4. After-hours suggestions. 5. Diversions, from 
grend opera to joggpng. 6. Shopping. 7. Vvfeekencfing 
ideas. 

Rave reviews from the travel industry experts: 

"Where to stay dne and revel in Erope_ a handy 
comparion ? 

lrovef and Leisure, American Express. 
Zja good deal of inf or mation in compact, easily 
assr n fatedformT 

S ig n a t u re, Diners Oub international 
4 Fbter Graham and IHT have produced a smaf 
masterpiece." Executive Travel 



FOOD LOVER’S 
GUIDE TO MRIS. 

As restaurant critic 
for the Trib, Pbfrida Walls 
has explored the 
treasures of food 
shopping and eating in 
Pars, from the bistros, 
cafes, cheese shops and 
outdoor markets, to the 
dassic feasts. 

The gastronomic 
delights of tons are 
varied, historic; abundant - and too delicious to be left 
to chance. Food loved* uncovers the many delights to 
be found ail over this extraordinary dly, and takes an 
up-to-date look at some of tons' internationally known 
restaurents. 

Wfefis indudes criticd commentary, anecdotes, 
history, local lore - as as basic fads like business 
hours and nearest metro station. To recreate the taste 
of France at home, 50 recipes are included, gleaned 
from the notebooks of Parisian chefs. 

Paperback, over 300 pages featuring a French/ 
English food glossary and 140 evocative photographs. 

"Bound for France ? Don't go without tofrido WeSss 
Food Lover's Guide to for#* 

Houston Chronicle 

"VfeSsspiBsIhe beans here~ No serious hedonist 
should go to Paris without 'tC 

Gae/ Greene, New \brk Magazine 
^ Sustroted four through, one of the great food 
cities of the wo rid." 

Ptwladelphki Daily News 


International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 
181, avenue Charles-de-Gaufie; 

92521 NeuSy Cedeoc France. 


Pteass check method at payment: 

□ Enclosed s my payment (Payment can be mode in any 

convertible European currency afcunenT exchange rafes). 

□ ESSSSw* 


I | Please charge to my 


Please send me: 

copies of lKT. GUIDE TO BUSINESS 
TRAVEL & ENTERTAINMENT: EUROPE 
at US$16 each, plus postage: 

add $1-50 each in Europe, $4 each outside Europe. 

copies of FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO PARIS 
at US$11.95 each, ph» postage: 

add $150 each in Europe, $4 each outside Europe. 


credtt card. 


a 


Name- 


N°_ 


Exp. date- 


Ad dress_ 


Signature 

(necessary for card purchase^ 


Cfty/CodoCcxjnfry_ 


30-3-65 


*1 '2 










IP SfcXSS IS I* l m I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY* MARCH 30-31, 1985 


U.S. Futures Man* 29 


Jkumi Swion 

Wan um 


Omu Htoti Low Cto* 0» 


amen Season 
Ulan Law 


Omu High Low Oe»* Dig. 


o rahov juice CNYcej 

15XM lm.- cento par to. 

151-DO May 16165 MUD 
153JB0 Jul 16160 16&25 
157.75 SOU 142X0 16120 


ML20 U140 +.2$ 

1020 16250 +3 

162JG 1(2.10 +J0 


Over-tfae-Counter 


March 29 


NASDAQ Notional Morket Priors 


Grains 


wheat CCBt) 

SMOtwmMnKm-donannerbusM 

ISZVt May 157* *57% 

3.90 124* Jut m 327 

Wfifr *26 Sen &3» 127 


uuo Jan isljs UOJS 

15620 MOT MI.15 161.15 
16000 May 

All 

Eft Safes 250 Prw.sofeo 167 
prew.Ca* Oonalnt 6236 off 107 


1(075 16090 +.15 

16L15 Ml 20 +20 

KUO +J3 
16120 +25 



163% 326 Dm 324% *47* 

xmv> uan Mar 150% U3 


174% um Mar *5010 

4X8 *47 May 

Eft Safes Prow. Sales 

Prov. Day Open Int. 34254 un3 


*55 *56% -21 

134% 326% +22 

*33* *S +23% 
*44* *47% +23 

*50 352 +22* 

X4t +21% 


CORN (CBT) 

SXXbu minimum* cut kv* per buM 
*30 229* May 200* 322 


*31 *73 Jill 200% 341* 

*21% *66% Sen 221% *72* 

*95 *60* Dec 246 *00 

3.10 249* Mar 174% 374% 


321* 274* May 200* 24Z* 

20< *01 Jut *03* 325 

Est. Sales Ptcy.SoHb 21472 

Prev. Day Open IM.124X42 unlMS 


221* +21% 
* 01 % + 21 % 
272* +21* 
267* +22% 
276* +22% 
Z4Z* +22* 
223 +21* 


SOT BE AN scam 
6XWbu minimum- drtlor * per b us hel 
757 STD* May 629% 6.10% 



. 759 
756 
671 

648 
679 
7 JO. 

779 

649 

Est. Salas 


320* Jul 619% 619* 
542 Aub 630% UK 
521 Sen 614 614 

523% Nov 616 616 

£54% Jan 626 626 

606% Mar 637 427 

615 MOT 645 (45 

6M Jul 

Frcv. Sales 21.109 


605% —21* 
614% —22* 
616 -JD2 
AM* —22* 
612* —21% 
622% —22 
(24% —20% 
643% +20% 
649% +20% 


Prav. Dav open Inr. (6100 un564 


SOYBEAN MEALtCBTl 
100 torts- dollars per Ian 
moo 129-50 May 13600 139.10 


19640 134JB Jul 14520 1456D 

18020 13720 Aua MOW 148X0 

179.50 14020 Sen 15040 15040 

18040 14350 Oct 15420 15420 

18420 14740 Dec 15820 15820 

1(320 14920 Jan 14043 14*80 

20440 15420 MO- 7(420 M450 

ear. solas Prey. Soles KOZl 

Prev. Day Open int. 44,927 up326 
SOYBEAN OIL <CBT) 

60000 lbs- dal tanner 100 lbs. 

3039 2220 May 30.15 3040 

3040 2270 Jul 2640 2675 

2720 2250 Alia 2745 2720 

2695 2240 Sep 2665 2680 

2620 2290 Oct 2525 2525 

2540 2*90 DSC 2525 25.10 

2525 2340 Jan 2420 2420 

2620 2440 Mar 2440 2440 

May 2440 2440 
Est. Sales Prav. Salas t*U4 

Pm. Day Open lot. 47.180 up32S 
OATS (CBT1 

5200 bu mlnlimuR- dollars per bushel 
121 U7% May 147* 128* 

170% 123 Jul 144 US* 

179 140 Sep 141* 142 

142% 144 Dec 144% 148 

Est.sales Prev. Sales 3 (7 

Prev. Day Open InL 3424 up 29 


13740 13610 —20 

14320 1(118 —40 

14690 14770 —JO 
14920 14920 —70 

15320 15*20 —20 

15650 15720 —40 

15920 15920 —20 

1(420 144X0 — 20 



industrials 


3020 3022 +43 

2640 2845 +73 

2745 2720 +.14 

2440 2675 +.10 

2541 2520 +25 

3420 3423 —6* 

2425 2457 —.11 

2440 3443 —.17 
3440 2440 


147* 147* —20% 
144 144% -20% 

141* 141* —20* 
144* 144% —21 


Livestock 


COTTON 2 CNYCEJ 
50200 Knr cents per Ih. 

22 SS Mov 8763 6775 6726 (740 

25 S5 i uI «-15 4640 (£92 (645 

7720 (442 Oct «<K MM 4SJC (575 

7320 (441 Dec «« (579 «a 

«75 4570 Mar (625 6625 6685 64X5 

7020 (6 41 May (7J3 

™ XS *6» an 

Est Sales 2200 Prev. Sates 1223 

Pm. Day Open Int. 1IJQ3 up 190 


CATTLE (CMEl 
40/xUibsr cents per to. 

6920 4125 Apr 6 155 6 £45 

4920 4440 Jim U3S 6745 

4747 (3.15 AUO (630 4470 

4590 4140 Oct 44.15 4470 

6725 6320 Dec 65.10 6542 

6745 (475 Feb 6545 (525 

6727 6609 Apr 

Ell. Sales 20239 Prev. Sales 12712 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 63216 off 38 


6527 .+20 
4770 +23 

6617 —28 

64.12 +25 

6£20 —22 
6525 —.10 

6675 — 132 


Financial 


HEATING OILOfYMEJ 
42400 pal- cantsner gal 

8375 6525 Apr 7920 IU0 7925 K2Q 

D40 6*20 SSy 7S20 7190 75« SjS 

7820 6150 Jim 7150 7375 7260 7290 

7600 6563 JW 7245 7325 7225 7220 

7-4-10 (865 Aug 72M 7328 7220 7250 

7440 7073 Sep 7*20 7*20 7145 7350 

Etf- Sates Prev. 5a las 9735 

Pm. Dew Open Int 17.901 off 289 



FEEDER CATTLE (CMEl 
4*200 tos^cems per Rx 
7420 6670 Apr 6927 6940 

7275 6*95 May (975 7070 

7170 6660 AUO 7125 7145 

7320 6720 Sap 7025 7025 

7232 (7.10 Oct 7070 7040 

7120 6925 Nav 7125 7120 

Est. Sales 1418 Prnte Sates 122? 
Pm. Day Onen Int. HU24 up 18 
HOGSCCMEJ 
30200 Ibs^ cents per lb. 

5445 MTi Apr 4525 ah 

£540 4840 Jun 5078 5025 

BJ7 46*5 Jul 5235 5347 

5637 47iffl Aug 522S 5250 

5175 4520 Oct 4690 4090 

5025 4630 Dec 4940 4945 

5000 4625 FeB 4940 4925 

4725 45.50 Apr 4720 4720 

4925 4720 Jun 

Est. Sales 10470 Prev. Salas 6344 
Pm. Day Open Int. 26281 off 420 


(925 

69-50 —75 

7125 — £2 
7040 -Jffl 

7Q.7Q -rjjD 

7095 —25 


CRUDE OIL. (NY ME] 

1200 bM.- dollars per ML 

3078 2428 May 3615 3869 

29155 2420 Jon 2773 2724 

29.54 2610 Jul 3742 2779 

2927 2*25 Am 2725 2745 

29 JO 2608 Sep 2748 2749 

2940 2645 Oct 27.15 27.15 

2920 2 440 Nov 2725 2740 

2940 2370 Dk 2735 2740 

Est. Salas Prgv.Saies 10,172 

Prav. Day Opaa Int. *4.165 up 433 


2609 2629 +JD4 
2747 2762 —M 
2729 2742 —M 
2725 2725 —.14 

2720 2721 —.11 

27.15 27.15 —25 

27 JO 2740 —.10 

2725 2740 


4685 -s30 

4947 -J8 

5127 —40 

5147 —48 

4630 —25 

4690 -45 

4940 —20 

4660 —70 


Stock Indexes 


PORK BE LUES (CMEl 
36000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

82JH5 6L15 May 7340 7X85 

8247 62.15 Jut 7622 76-W 

IMS 4020 Aua T2W 7265 

7620 63.15 Feb 7540 7600 

7540 6600 Mar 7525 7525 

7540 7BA 0 MOV 7520 7S20 

7608 mra JUI 

Esl. Sales 6077 Prev. Sales 6372 
Prev. DaV Open I nE 12213 up 09 


7UQ — 148 
7247 —145 
70.90 —145 
7547 —3* 

7520 
7S25 
75.10 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE1 
37400 lbs- cents per lb. 

15200 12201 May 14200 14650 

149-20 m.m Ml 14600 U60T 

14740 12700 Sep 14225 14340 

14655 12925 Dec 14200 U29S 

14340 12B40 Mar 1*240 14240 

MUM 131 M May 

14040 13540 Jul 

EsL Sales XI 10 Prev. Sales 3221 
Prev. Dew Open Int. 124*9 off 3*7 
5UOARWORLD II (NYCSCE) 

1 11000 Ibsr cents per to. 
mss 340 May ua 320 

945 193 Jul 601 606 

9.75 407 SeP 615 620 

9J)5 *20 Oct 627 631 

773 600 Jan 445 665 

923 548 Mar £13 5.17 

7.15 525 May 528 529 

649 547 Jul 549 £49 

Est. Sales OB Prev. Sates 1X753 
Prev. Day Open Int 86553 up 158 


141 JO 14643 
T4L90 14604 
1*1 JO 14348 
14140 14270 
14250 14250 
14175 
1*025 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMS) 
points and cents 

189.10 15610 Jun 18325 18345 

19270 uaoa s*p iuxa vaao 

19640 17570 Dec 190.15 190.15 

i92jo isaw Mar 

Est. Sales 46720 Prev. Sates 5X436 
Pm.Day open int 37J43 up 760 
VALUB UKEOCCBTJ 
pa bits and cents 

20680 16110 Mar 19140 19440 

71940 17100 Jon 19845 199.15 

21220 1*575 Sep 20220 20X10 

2104'i 20940 DK 

Esl. Sates Pm. Sales 5201 

Prev. Dev Open ML A95i up 204 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFEJ 
points and cents 

110JB m00 Jun 10640 18670 

111.90 9125 SeP 10845 10X75 

11X79 10120 Dk 11049 11070 

11X25 11100 Mar I12J0 11280 

Est.sales Prev. Sates 12473 

Pm.Day Open InL 9258 off 461 


12* T2»— % 

14% U* + * 

4% 4% 

IT* 17%+ * 

12 % 12 % 
u m*« 

33* 33 *— * 

14% 17%+ % 

)8% It* + * 

1 1 — * 

7% J%+ % 

7 % 8 , 

36 M —inf GX3 
U* 14 — % GTS 
15% !!%- Hj CrOfll 
23* 23% — % 

13 U 
2% 3H— % 

31 38 — % 

11 13% — % 

33* 33*+ % 

12 13 — % 

8 I — % 

3«* 29%+ M 
m 3* 

2f% 3146- M 
10 10% 

9* V* 

33 23 +3 

7 7 + * 

7% i* + % 

13 13 — % 

27% SB + % 

13% W%— u % 

1% 1%-fc 
8 * 8 % + % 

3% 3% + % 

W% 10% — % 

25* 25*— % 

7H 9 +1% 

II UN- % 

6 * 6 * 

01* as* 
m 7% + % 

C* 4% 

4% 9 
7*6 7*— *6 
T7V» 17% 

4% 4M+% 

19* iy% 

9% 9% 

9% 9*1+1% 

3% 3% + % 

■% 8% 

11% 11% 


£» wS 

<tfr 

UN 


32 £-* 


7 7 — % 
27% 23% 

14% 15% + % 
21V. 22V. + * 

17 17% 

a 2214+ * 
14* 36*— * 
4* 4* 

5% S%— K 

IS* 25* + % 
17* 33 + * 

13* 12* 

5* 5* 

18 48% + % 
4% 4V»— % 

8 8 — % 
8* •%— M 
«* 16% 

4 4% 

5* 15*+ * 
9 20* + b 

4% (%— % 
9 9* + % 

11* S3 — * 
3% 3% 

Sri 5*— % 
9* 23*—% 
1 % 21 * 

* 14* 

9* 20* +1 
3% 13% — Ik 
3* 23*— b 
4* 4* 

1 11% + % 
5* 25*- * 
9* 19% 

Z* 22*+ % 
I* 8* + % 

4 34 + % 



18245 18X35 
18X15 186J5 
18940 19020 
19340 


19X20 19653 
197.90 19945 
20X30 30X10 
30740 


10X00 10X65 
10020 10X75 
11025 1I0JS 
112J0 11X95 


182 345 

349 600 

600 610 
431 423 

465 465 

£05 506 

525 S2S 
£49 £49 



Commodity Indexes 



COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tone- Suer tan 

257D 1998 May 2444 2488 

2400 1 998 Jul 2250 22(5 

2415 1987 Sep 2221 2240 

2337 1945 OK 21® 2185 








X. 





Close 

Moody's. 960.10 f 

Reuters 1.92530 

DJ. Futures 124.25 

Com. Research Bureau- 24640 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep- 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
95940 1 
1,937.60 
123.91 
244.40 


1955 Mar 2180 2180 
I960 May 


2442 2469 
2346 2251 

2212 2220 
2150 2154 

2145 ZI50 
2150 
2150 


Pm. Day Open InL 27407 up47 




Paris Commodities 

March 29 


Asian Commodities 

March 29 


London Commodities 

March 29 


Cash Prices March 29 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
USA per ounce 

Close Prev km 

Htah Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 
Apl _ N.T. N.T. XH JO 33X00 328X0 330.00 
May . NX N.T. moo 335X0 33000 332JQ 
Jun „ 337 JO 337 JO 335X0 337 ja 33100 33600 
aub _ N.T. N.T. 34000 342JU 33X00 34000 
OCt _ 34600 34600 345JJ0 34700 34200 344.00 
OK _ N.T. N.T. 351 JO 35X00 34*jja 35X00 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 357J0 359J0 35600 35X00 
Volume: 24 lots of 100 ox 


Clegg 

NM Low Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Stgrflng per metric toa 
May 11X20 112J0 112J0 11X00 
An 11X60 115J0 11X20 11660 
Oct 12QJQ 11180 11860 11X80 
DK 12560 T2S60 12460 12580 
Mar 13060 136J0 13680 137 JO 
May 14X00 14X00 142J0 14260 
Aug N.T. N.T. 147 JO 14860 
Volume: 2637 lets of 50 tans. 


Prev (CBS 
BM Ask 


11260 11260 
11560 1T£60 
11920 11960 
125J0 T26J0 
138J0 13820 
14X00 14X20 
14X00 14940 


CaaunadlfY and Uatl 

Coffee 4 Santos. Bi 

Printclatti 64/S 30 %, yd - 

Steel billets (Pitt.), ton 

Iron 2 Fdry. PhlkL. ton — 
Steel scrap No 1 l»vy Pitt , 
Lead soot, lb 



M 

36 

.9*0 46 

m 

64 

£1 

t 

260 

£1 

370 

>6 

A6 

2.9 

260 

56 

60 

16 

M 

46 


,K , »,‘*W ttXYB 

. I V » ft 


s: » 

18* 17* 


Copper elect- lb . 

Tin (Straits), lb 

One. E. St L. Baste lb . 
Pa[iacfom,« - 

Silver N.Y-OZ 

Source: AP. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U 44 Per ounce 


. , tfWj Law Settle Settle 

API N.T. N.T. 33170 3X00 

Jun 33X00 334.00 336J0 336X0 

*V? ; sJJHs- ff- T - 34160 33940 

Volume: 3 lots oflOO at 



KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian ants per kilo 
dose 

Bid Ask 

API Ml-50 20150 

MOV 20600 20450 

Jun 20600 207.00 

JIV 20a00 310 JO 

Aug 210J0 211 J0 

Sen 21140 21X50 


volume: (8 lots. 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
20600 20450 

20745 30750 

20940 21X00 
210 JO 212.00 
2I1J0 21X00 

21X50 31540 


I S&P 100 Index Options 

March 29 


SINGAPORE 
51 oospore cw 


RUBBER 
*s oer kJk» 


SWto CnlteLnP PeteUMI 

Price M May Jose Jlr M Mar j» Jiy 

is — 23 — — - int - — 

ua-mi - - i/i4 lm -a * 

148 12* EM - - 1/14 3/16 7/14 U/14 

170 7* 9* 11 ID JU um Ik n» 

in » » n - 1 57163504 a n 

m is/*! 4b 6 n 5k 

« 9ii ik n n m n m - 

m lm % m «n - - - _ 

ns 1/14 3/14 11/14 - - - - - 


RSS 1 Airi — 
R5S1 Mav- 
R55 2 Aul _ 
RSS 3 Art _ 
RSS 4 API — 
RSS 5 Art — 


BM Ask 

17175 T7175 

17775 178J0 

17350 17X50 

17040 17150 

16550 1(750 

14040 16250 


Previous 
BM Ask 
17600 17X00 

ISO JO 18050 
17450 17540 

17250 17350 

1(740 1(940 

16250 16450 


TaaiesiveiuM MUM 
ToW Call open M. 7(1604 
ToM nut volume &2nl 
Total put oeen an. uxfz! 
lade*: 

HWl 17115 Low into O0K 17114+ 0J4 
Source: CBOE * 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malawi on rlnaalts per 25 tens 
Close 

Art 1% 

May 1430 1480 

Jun 1480 1448 

Jiy 1470 1410 

AUO 1460 1400 

3eo 1450 Ijm 

Nov 1440 1JB0 

Jan- LM> 1480 

Mar 1430 1480 

Volume: 0 lots of 25 tens. 
Source: Reuters. 


COCOA 

Sterling per metric tea 
Mar 2JOS 1J90 Em. — 2604 2X35 

May 2X37 2X17 2X28 2X29 2X32 2X33 

Jlr 1 49* 1X79 I4M 14W 1X92 1X93 

S*P 1.964 1J4I 1449 1450 1.9*7 1.969 

DK 1X98 1J84 1X82 1X87 1X92 1X95 

Mar 1X85 1X79 1JS0 1X82 1X15 1X87 

May 1XV0 1X90 1X80 1483 1X85 1X88 

Volume: 2565 Ms of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

SlerBM per metric too 
Mar 2.135 2.120 EXP. — 2143 2170 

May 2185 2165 2166 2170 2406 2410 

Jiy 2426 2402 2412 2415 2251 2253 

S«P 2452 2437 2239 2442 2490 2493 

Nav 2475 2454 2461 2246 2312 2315 

Job 2440 2440 2441 2445 2487 2490 

Mar 2340 2400 2300 2310 2495 2360 

Volume: 2X98 lots at Stans. 

GASOIL 

i UA dollars per metric ten 
MW" 24650 24X25 —346X0 24600 24625 

Art 23650 2] .75 23145 232X0 23445 235X0 
May 231X0 0945 22945 22950 Z3145 231J0 
Jim 226X0 22600 22625 22650 7% Of? 97(75 
Jiy ZMX0 0345 0345 224X0 22550 226J0 
Abb 224X0 22400 225X0 2Z745 228X0 23200 
Sep N.T. N.T. 22600 22000 ram 

OCt N.T. N.T. 222X0 232J0 220X0 238X0 
Nav N.T. N.T. 320X0 232X0 22&JH 241X0 
Volume: 1X9} tots of 100 tons. 

Sources : Otutfrs and Land <an Petroleum Ex- 
change (oasoHi. 




DM Futures Options 

March 29 

W. Gvrattrt-IZim marts a* psr rak 




2 * 

14 

3* 

7 — * 
9* +1 

3*— % 
4% + * 
29 + % 

9* 

15* 

10* + % 
14*+ % 
9*- % 
9 *— % 
16 —1 
17% 

4*—* 
7 — * 
24* + H 
W* 

14% 

17*+ U 
CM— % 
6 % — % 
31 — * 
31 +1 

9* +■% 
* 


Strike GoHeScWe PeteSeltle 

Prise Jee Sep Me Jen Sep Dec 

30 107 1*5 — W W U4 

31 3.19 277 149 041 048 065 

32 153 2-14 245 ft® 1X1 — 

33 0.97 144 111 M0 167 — 

34 0(3 1.18 140 M3 — — 

35 037 065 — 267 275 — 


Estimated total voL 10048 
Calls: Thors. raL 5545 apm InL 35458 
Pots : Thort v*L U64 apta InL 174ft 
Source: CME. 


MCA Acts to Bar 
Takeover Bids 


Previous 
BM Ask 
1X50 1X00 

UW 1X70 
1480 1X40 

1470 1X10 

1440 1X00 

1450 1490 

1440 1480 

>440 1480 

1430 1480 


U.S. Treasury Bill Rates 

March 29 




London Metals 
March 29 


COMPANY 

EARNINGS 


Revenue! and profits, in millions, 
are in local currencies unless . 
otherwise indicated 


Las Angela Tuna Sarin 

LOS ANGELES — MCA Inc. is 
king shareholders to approve a 
oad range ot anti-takeover mea- 


sures including a 50- percent in- 
crease in the number or authorized 


Hong Kong 


Offer Ud Y(ew YWd 
3-mootn 821 £19 £49 U6 

(•month 869 867 9.10 869 

Cl* veer B.7B 8.7* 953 jjg 

Source: Solomon Drainers 


Dividends March 29 


Per Amt Pay r m 
USUAL 


9 -IS 5-,'S +30 

o 68 s-l 616 

D J* 615 M 

O X? S- 22 4-32 

O .16 619 44 

0 65 616 64 

O 03 5-1 610 

g 45 54 623 

Q .M 10-10 9-30 

a X3 5-15 615 

Q XS 6-14 5-24 



Oosa Previous 

BM Aik BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
SterOno per metric toa 
sunt 881X0 890X0 88850 88950 

torword 917X0 '918X0 919X0 91950 
COPPER CATHODES (Hlgll Grade) 

S tertian per metric too 
SOQt 1.145. Si 1.161* 1.149X0 1.15000 

forward 1.165X0 1,166X0 1,169X0 1,170X0 
COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Starling pgr metric ten 
spot 1.13760 1.139X0 1.147X0 1,150X0 

l ur wara 1,155X0 1.160X0 1.163X0 1.165X0 
LEAD 

Sterling oar metric tan 
sod 297X0 298X0 J9260 29X50 

forward J0£5D 306X0 302X0 30150 
NICKEL 

Steril no per metric ton 
soot 449X00 4400X0 4460X0 4490X0 

forward 4432X0 4433X0 4420X0 4434X0 

SILVER 

Panee per troy bmcb 

Spot 53150 53660 53150 53650 

forworn 65360 55650 55250 553X0 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling p«r rooMc ton 
SPOl 9630X0 9635X0 9630X0 9635X0 

forward 7*30 JO 7635X0 9640X0 9650X0 
ZINC 

StOiilBB par metric ten 
SMI 78060 78X00 755X0 75660 

forward 73000 731X0 71550 716X0 

Source: ap. 


JardiiM Moth. Hdgs 

Yaar 1984 1983 

Revalue 8X80. 10X40. 

Profits (OJ918JJ 351 J) 

a: lost 


Singapore 

Utd Overseas Bank 


Profits 

Per Share. 


Sweden 


Volvo 


crease in the number of authorized 
shares and the power to issue pre- 
ferred stock. 

If shareholders agree to increase 
the number of authorized common 
shares to 1 50 million, the entertain- 
ment conglomerate would have the 
ability to issue twice as many 
shares as a corporate raider could 
currently buy. Only 48.8 million 
MCA shares were outstanding as of 
Jan. 31. The company is also asking 
shareholders for the authority to 
issue up to 25 million shares of 
preferred stock, and to gram the 
board the power to determine the 
terms and conditions, such as con- 
vertibility. 

“These are ‘shark repdlants,' 
pure and ample,” one industry ex- 
ecutive said. “No defense is insur- 
mountable. [but] they're insulating 
themselves very well" 


Profits — 
Per Share- 


United States 


Strike at Finns" liquor Shops 


Alex. & Alex. Svc 

4th Ouar. 1985 

Revenue 14&X 

Net Lass — — 67-5 


net IncMes Mbs of a* 7 million tram 
discontinued oneraltuns- 


Reusers 

HELSINKI — Sales workers m 
the F innish state liquor monopoly, 
Alko, went on strike Friday, shut- 
dog all the country’s retail outlets 
for lard liquor, onion officials said. 


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PA 


ACROSS 
1 Shade trees 
5 Colony oaths 
wing 

10 Deceived 
15 Kick 
19 Celt 
28 Debate 
21 Incensed 
22 — breve 
23 AWN 
25 EFT 

27 Places where 
brine Is 
evaporated 

28 Amusing 

30 Microphone 
'inventor 

31 Hannah , 

Van Buren’s 
bride 

32 Certain spoons 

33 Signs loved by 
angels 

34 A Burmese 
group 

37 Dalis of opera 

38 Adjective for 
Everest 

42 Stravinsky and 
Sikorsky 

43 ERG 

46 Dep. 

47 Henri .Rennet 

al. 

48 Auto part 

49 Household god 


ACROSS 

56 Dusty or Home 
Run 

52 Period 
53TAU 

57 River into the 
Bay of Biscay 

58 Became 
insufficient 

60 Titles for 
Fatima's 
descendants 
SI Cultivated 

62 Promote 

63 Plant’s tiny 
opening 

64 Kidney bean 

65 Scrutinize 

67 Chief Justice: 
1874-68 

68 Pilots' unusual 

landing s 
71 Jack the 
nipper 
72ERS 

74 Sryronhero 

75 Erstwhile 
money in 
Madras 


ACROSS 

80 ETC. 

84 Postpone 

85 Dutch province 

88 Ariz. Indians 

89 Ecclesiastical 
headwear 


Crosswordese hy peter g. snow 


90 Sashes for 
Pitti-Sing 

91 Conclusion 
92Culloden — 

Scotland 
93 Frozen 
desserts 


1 

2 

3 

4 

is” 




S“ 




57” 





96 Former Red 
Sox ace 


97 Grounds 
101 OCA 
103 ORT 

105 Platform’s 
platform 

106 Bore 

107 DeSoto 
contemporary 


34 

35 

36 

33” 



47“ 



5” 



56 




108 Sybarite's 
delight 


76 A follower 

77 Apiece 

78 Beatles' meter 
maid 

79 Anchorwoman 
Walker of 
Boston 


109 Trampled 
HOPairs 

111 Photographers' 
developers 


112 job (this 

puzzle) 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 Roe 

2 “Granada” 
songwriter 

3 Corn product 

4 Glides 
5N.H.L.team 
6 Christopher 

and Perdval 


16 Agricultural 
town in 
Alberta 

17 strut, on a 

plane 


40 Cordwood 
measure 


7 Moslem 
officials 

8 River in W 

Europe 

9 Yenta, e.g. 
10 Fail to follow 

orders 


18 Relative of a 
loch 

24 City lights 
26 “Is thy servant 


11 Eurasian 
range 

12 Lose strength 

13 Japanese 
outcast 

14 Fanlt 

15 Dismiss 


TT Kings «- 13 

29 Randle 

32 Ria 

33 Bake, as eggs 

34 Ralph of 
baseball's Hall 
of Fame 

35 Israeli coin 

36 AES 

37 Ria 
39ULU 


41 Marked a 
weight 
deduction 

43 Use muscle 
power 

44 Extreme 

45 Rob Roy's 
refusals 

48 Rebelled 

50 Scald 
vegetables or 
almonds 

51 Trunk ina 
trunk 

53 Ibsen play 

54 “So be 

with Caesar”: 

Shak. 

55 Gush 



DOWN 


56 Horologe 
59 March name 
61 Serin 

63 Surfeits 

64 Herd of seals 


65 Palatinate, to 
a Berliner 

66 “Sesame 
Street” 
character 

67 Harmartan, 
e.g. 

68 Bold women 

69 Horner or 
Peter 


70 Fourth-day 
creations 

72 Chains 

73 Miles and 
Vague 

78 Goes over 
again 

80 A flavoring or 
medicine 

81 Drugs 

82 Trollope’s 

Phineas 

83 Elided 

84 Christian 
creations 


.86 Hit a high 
curve at 
Wimbledon 


95 Minder- 

binder of 
"Cat cM2” 


I trim 


87 Explorer 


Tasman 

mufti 

9 

89 Mushrooms 
. resembling 

97 Recipe abbr.' 

98 Where 

ii 

sponges 

Kerman is 

ii .— i 

iz 3 

91 Scandinavian 

99 Ovid 

X 9 

M 

bay 

100 Eject 


92 Brawl 


a* 

93 Defeat 

102 Share 


94 Reputation 

104 Stir 



ANDY CAPP 


m 

** fr 
-at*, 

- 


COP WORLD: Inside an American 
Police Force 

By James McClure. 343 pp. $16.95. 
Pantheon, 201 East 50th Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by John Gross 

J AMES McCLURE is best known for a series of 
detective stories set in his native South Africa — 
he began his career as a crime reporter in Natal, 
though he now makes his borne in England- Five 
years ago he ventured into nonfiction with the 
portrait of a police precinct in Liverpool, “Spike 
Island.” A fine piece of reportage, it met with 
considerable success, and trim the encouragement 
of his publishers he set out to write a parallel study 
of police work in the United States. 

No easy task to arrange, particularly since he 
insisted an the same terms of reference that he had 
been granted in Liverpool — unrestricted access, 
free use of his tape recorder, enough time to go 
beyond first impressions, and the right to prepare a 
manuscript that would not be subject to editorial 
interference. A succession of metropolitan police 
departments turned down his request — some 
pleading pressure of work, others with the lofty 
response, ^We do not cooperate with publications 


that have a profit motive'' — and the United States 
embassy in London ran into similar difficulties 
when it agreed to help him: but finally he struck 
lucky with San Diqgo. 

Once in California he was assigned to the Central 
Division of the San Diego force. Central is the 
smallest division in the city (only 30 out of a total of 
392 square miles), but its officers have to cope with 
more than a quarter of the San Diego crime work- 
load, and it offered McClure a rich array of excite- 
ments. 

There was gang warfare in the barrio, a Kn Klux 
Kian rally, the policing of “The Flowerbed” (a 


haunt of gays patrolled by a plainclothes squad 
‘ • fellow officers — cop humor — as 


known to their : 

the Pink Berets). A policewoman in Vice found 
hezself arresting her old sociology professor. 

Central Division also furnished a steady supply 
of those lesser miseries and disturbances that make 
up the staple of the crime statistics in almost every 
big city. As McClure describes a drunk bring hauled 
off to “Detox”, — the detoxification unit — for the 
umpteenth time, or a habitual minor offender drift- 
ing through his hopeless rounds, we seem to be in 
the archetypal city of W. H. Auden’s poem, “where 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle ■ 




the lately are battered like pebbles into fortuitous 
shapes.” 

Yet if “Cop World” often deals with depressing 
material, it seldom makes depressing reading. In 
part this is thanks to the sympathy with which 
McClure draws out the men and women he talks to, 
and the skill with which be weaves together a lively 
narrative. In part it reflects (he relatively benign 
atmosphere that prevails in the San Diego Police 
Department — or SO his account suggests. 

Certainly the department is a special kind of 
place. Since 1974, and mac particularly since an 
enlightened chief. William Kolender, took over two 
years later, it has committed itself to a succession of 
sweeping reforms, acronymically summed up as 
COP — the Community Oriented Policing program. 
There have been changes in uniform, fa- instance 
(no insignia apart from badges, no more helmets 
under ordinary drcnmstances) as part of an effort 
to modify what McClure calls “that basic policing 
archetype, Macho Man.” Ethnic minorities and 
women are better represented in the force than they 
were, officers are expected to be more knowledge- 
able about the beats they patrol, any member of the 
public who shows interest can get a place in a police 
car as a “ride-along.” 

Is it all a Httie tooliberal to be true? There are 
times, just occasionally, when you wonder whether 
you aren’t being given a slightly sanitized version of 
the normal state of affairs, whether people didn't 
tend to be on better behavior than usual when 
McClure was around. But these really are no more 
than momentary doubts. McClure’s testimony car- 
ries conviction, and so does by far the greater pan of 
the testimony be has collected from the men and 
women in the San Diego force. 

Their conversations with him touch on their per- 
sonal ambitions, their families, the satisfaction they 
get from their work, the divided feelings to which it 
frequently gives rise. Blacks, Hispamcs and women 
officers are forthcoming about the obstacles they 
have encountered. 

As McClure points out, in comparison with the 
Liverpudlian comments he recorded in “Spike Is- 
land,* tire language used by the San Diego officers is 
lacking in color, and partly because of tins “Cop 
World” has Less humor in h as wdL Bat in other 
tit fully measures up to the standards of the 
book. 





MM Ml 


- S-*. - - 




■ _CPV. ft* 


t * 




vx 


REX MORGAN 




IT WAS A WONDERFUL! 
DINNER AND A WONDERFUL | 
EVENING / THANKS SO 
MUCH 



NEXT TIME I HOPE 
THAT CLAUDIA CAN 
BE WITH ycXJ.BRADV- 


ITS FABULOUS*-—. 



EBOARD 


Nd.krti 

Mi \ M 4 Qifey 


«■***■: 


GARFIELD 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York Times. 



* 1.-4 




•"**'*»«! JntUM 


**-**' mu* 


* We TQL1)>a.Mars*r£t... twenny cents 
AN HOUR A&ZXX/S ,a 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 


LOW 
C P 


Barest one 


d 
fr 
d 
d 

J 41 th 
2 36 sw 


30 


Coda Del sal 
Dublin 


4 39 

5 41 


32 


5 41 
1 34 


Milan 

Macaw 

Munich 

NIC* 

OHO 

Pari* 

PlWN 

RovWavU 


Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Wanaw 

Zorich 


M1QM 

e f 

17 <3 5 41 

7 45 3 37 
IB M 14 57 

14 *1 5 41 

B 44 0 32 

4 42 -1 
B 44 

7 45 

8 it -1 30 
3 37 -3 

19 44 
13 55 
7 4S 0 
>1 52 
7 45 

7 45 -4 
1 34 -3 27 

15 59 5 41 

24 IS 14 41 
17 63 S 44 

9 4B 4 

13 55 
15 50 

3 37 1 34 

9 48 -I SO 

14 41 7 45 

9 48 -9 14 

8 44 2 34 

4 43 -2 2B 

-7 19-10 14 
17 63 5 41 

-1 30 -4 21 

8 44 -1 30 
11 53 2 34 

9 48 1 34 

5 41 -1 30 
8 44 -2 


ASIA 


Beflins 
Haag Kona 
Manna 
Now DaM 


Shamtu* 


27 sw 
d 


TWpaJ 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 


39 


Aialan 

Cairo 

Capa Town 

CmaManca 

Horan 

Law* 

Nairobi 

Tool* 


HIGH 

LOW 

c 

F 

C 

F 

35 

95 

25 

77 

9 

48 

1 

34 

19 

44 

15 

59 

X 

84 

24 

75 

32 

90 

22 

72 

6 

43 

2 

36 

10 

50 

5 

41 

33 

91 

25 

77 

15 

59 

13 

55 

13 

55 

7 

45 

16 

41 

9 

48 

24 

K 

12 

54 

34 

93 

17 

63 

19 

66 

9 

48 

22 

73 

n 

52 

30 

86 

28 

82 

28 

82 

14 

57 

14 

57 

8 

46 


•4 35 
0 32 


LATIN AMERICA 


Booms Alma 
Lima 

Mexico Cttr 
Modi Janatro 
SaoPaalo 


23 73 15 59 
25 73 19 U 

24 79 10 50 

29 B4 


— — — — na 


NORTH AMERICA 


Cn lease 


28 d 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Balrut 
Damaged* 
Jannalcai 
TOt Awl* 


16 61 -1 30 

21 70 16 61 
25 77 9 41 

17 63 10 50 
21 70 15 59 


OCEANIA 


Antfhmd 

Sydnav 


20 68 12 54 
26 70 16 61 


Detroit 

Ma n da te 

Houston 

Lai Aavalac 

Miami 

MlaiKOPOlfs 

Montreal 

Motto* 

Mew York 
San Fraadico 
Stoma 
Tomato 

w**Wn*t*fl 


2 

34 

■ 11 

12 

K 

26 

79 

U 

59 

PC 

16 

61 

11 

52 

Cl 

8 

44 

5 

41 

cl 

1 

34 

• 2 

28 

sw 

12 

54 

9 

48 

St 

29 

84 

20 

48 

PC 

29 

84 

20 

68 

PC 

20 

65 

9 

48 

fr 

27 

81 

19 

64 

fr 

3 

37 

-1 

30 

a 

II 

52 

1 

34 

r 

25 

77 

IS 

44 

4 

23 

73 

14 

57 

pe 

16 

41 

4 

43 

lr 

11 

52 

2 

36 

PC 

15 

59 

5 

41 

d 

26 

79 

13 

55 

d 


d-daudv: fo-togqy; fr-Kjlr; h-hall; na-nat available; o-avercast; pc-parMv 
cloudy. r-raln; sb-stowers; nv-sngw; st-swrmv, 




Wjrld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse March 29 

Closing prices in local currmdei unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aeoan 

AKZO 

AhoW 

AMEV 

A "Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
'BVG 

Buahrmann T 

Corand Hide 

Elseviar-NDU 

FaXJiar 

GM Brocade* 

Holnakan 

I to ooovet u 

KLM 

N aarden 

NatNadder 

NadUayd 

OCflVonderG* 

Pafchoed 

Philips 

RnSwtco 

Rodamca 

Rallnco 

Rorenta 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

VonOmmeran 

VMF stark 

VNU 


40X50 

197 


Z145B ! 

212-50 ZS5 
R 20 i 


zu 

*7 
34 JO 


312 


13750 13 
6670 6 


151-30 

207 


Pravtaat : 2MLM 


Aided 

Bekaan 

Cackarni 

Coheea 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaart 

Hoboken 

Intercom 
Kredlett»nk 
Petrofl na 

Sue Gencralc 
Soft no 

Solvay 

Traction E lac 

UCB 

Unerg 

VWlla Momoane 



Carrent Slack Index ; 225X44 
Prevkhn : 2254J53 


AEG-Triefuni«i 10X50 107 J 


Allianz Vars 
Beat 
Bayer 
BavarHvM. 

Bayer.VerJaank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Canttsumml 
Oahnler-Beiu 
Deoussa 
Deutsche Babcock 1*150 161 

Deutsche Bank 436.10 43X30 
Dmdnar Baft 

DUB-Sdtutt 


1035 li 
19X20 197-40 
205^0 207 JO 
329 33750 

£ 

16470 16450 
13X70 13440 
654 441 

359 35X10 


GHH 
Hochrtai 
Ho*h*f 
Hoasch 
Hetzmam 
Horten 
Kail + SaU 


189 107.10 
21X20 2W 
154 TS450 
474 473 

19950 201.40 
10450 107 

391 393 

170 IBS 
247.10 250 


1 Close 

•rev. 

1 Korstodt 

21X50 211JD 


217 

218 . 

KtocdcnerH-O 

250 2050 


49 

1950 

1 Kruno Stahl 

10X3010650 




193 19150 

i MAH 1|L 

154 15050 
MOJO 16050 

talhmeltschaft 24X50 

250 


1M0 

1155 


272 

274 

: RiNtoersWarice 

33032550 
15350 15450 

Sdwrlnt 

445 44750 

Siemens 

52050 


Thvssen 

97 JO 

9X70| 

vorta 

180 

176 

Veba 

178 17850 



Volkawogenwetfc 

199 20050 

Prevtan'l'iinJI 



II 11 

Bk East Asia 

2150 

21 JO 

Cheung Kong 

14 

1350 

China Light 

1450 

1440 

Cress Harbor 

10 


Hong Sang Bank 
HK Electric 

47 JS 
7J0 

47 

7.15 


JOLTS 



445 

4775 

l HK Shanghai 

850 

640 

HK Telephone 

71 

70 

HK Wharf 

540 

540 

Hutch Whampoa 

2D40 

19 JO 

Jardlne Mam 




9 JO 


Slew World 



Shaw Brothers 

X10 

XU75 


9J5 


Slme Darby 

445 

450 

Status 

150 

150 

Swim Pacific A 

23 


Whotrtock A 

7JS 


Wttaa>Jocfc Mar 

Sun. 


Wlnsor 



World Int'l 

1J9 

1.74 

Ham Seng Index : 
Pmvkuts: 13SXH 

138254 


1 


I 


AECI 

760 

730 


2550 

2465 

Anglo Am Gold 

I7M> 

6700 

Barlows 

1052 

1045 

Blwoor 

1700 

1657 


BlM 

ew 

De Beers 

1010 

im 


5375 

5350 

e«msa 

1610 

1400 

CF3A 

3275 

3150 

Harmony 

3025 

2973 

HSvrid Steel 

395 

400 

KlOOf 

7850 

7750 


920 

935 


6000 

5900 

Rusplat 

IQS 

1710 


450 

440 

5t Helena 

ISO 

19K 


560 

570 

West Holding 

4700 

tssa 

Composite Stack UOtx: 183X5* j 
Previous : 182450 

| IflNlI— | 


AACorp 
AlHvd-Lvuna 
Anglo Am Gold 
Babcock 


SI 314 
173 
591 
152 


513 

173 

516 

153 


Barclays 


BJLT. 

D aach o m 

BICC 

BL 

Blue arete 
BOC Group 


502 

537 


Bawater Indus 
BP 

Brtl Home St 
Brit Telecom 
Brtt Aerospace 
Btr 

Burmati 
Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Con* 
Coats Patens 
Commercial U 
Cans Gold 
CourtouM* 
Datoety 
DeBoers* 

O Millers 
DiiefonMn 
Flsons - 
Free St Ged 

GEC 

GKN 

dense 1 

Grand Met 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hnson 

Hawker 

1CI 


345 

251 

41 

518 

201 

170 

250 

541 

269 

141 


691 

207 

505 

154 

194 

152 

204 


141 

485 

530 

212 


184 

224 


Jaguar ' 

Lloyds Bank 


280 

248 

807 

211 

409 

742 

183 

296 


Lucas 
Mark* and Sp 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 

PareJO 

PUUngtan 

PlesMy 

Rood Elect 


177 

271 

144 

322 

419 

364 

285 

192 

212 


Rank 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 


340 


351 


RTZ 

Scotch! 

Salnsburv 


310 

704 

in 

454 


244 

401 


142 144 


181 


181 

247 

S2SVi XUlib 
35ft 
779 769 



Oem Pmv. 

Generali 

42550 426M 

IFI 

•>>] 

8010 

itahsemenH 

80500 *1710 

iralmablUorl 

69510 69290 

AAnflabanca 

81900 82900 

Montedison 

1500 

1500 

Olivetti 

429S 

6131 ! 

Plmfti 

2160 

7180 

RAS 

<3890 64900 , 

Rlnascente 

667 66250 

SIP 

1990 

1990 

Snto 

2760 

2826 

Stando 

12110 ran 

t s»» 

. 2433 

2455 

7 MlBCemot index :mr 


5 | Pmvtous: mi 



111 ***** II 




0 Airuqulde 


640 1 

* Alsthom AM. 

3D2 387 JD 1 

? av Dassault 

1200 

1205 

I Banco lire 

616 

614 

BIC 

516 

511 

Bouyaues 

B5M-GD 

637 

2340 

6Z1 

2345 

Carrefour 

20» 

2000 

OobMed 

1174 

1195 

Coflresa 

27950 

281 

Dunn 

604 

615 

EHnAauitaing 

23X80 23550 

Europe 1 


931 

Gen eaux 

633 

459 


1845 

IKS 

I metal 

10950 

111 

LafaraeCap 

476 

479 

Legrand 

2045 

2060 

rortal 

2475 

2492 

Matra 

I860 

1070 

Michel In 

900 

935 

MMPenmr 

IN 

roa 

Moat Hcmessv 


1891 

Moulinex 

10X50 

109 




Ocddenlole 

707 

715 


698 

703 

Petrales CfseJ 


244 

Peugeot 

Padaln 

283 

smi 

283 

50 

Prtntemps 

223 

225 

Kodtoteenn 

27950 275.10 

Redoutc 


1290 

Roussel Uctaf 


1723 

Skis Rossfanol 

1565 

18*0 

Sour.Perrter 

497 

517 



* 

Tlioms«HsC5F 

530 

Vatea 

225 

227 

1 Asefl Index :24SJ9 


Previous : 24351 
cac Index : 211 Je 
Previous : yn j» 



11 gnfrpre |[J 


149 

146 

Cow STorcK 

241 

141, 

DB5 

630 

6J0 


3J0 

UV 

Haw Par 

2J3 

2J5 

Inchcape 

244 

244 

Kenpal Ship 

1JS. 

04 


&9S 

4 

OC8C 

9 JO 

9J0 

OUB 

350 

lift 


1J9 

1J» 

Shne Derby 

152 

l.« 


tis 

1.19 

Si Trading 

4J0 

432 

(JOB 

434 

452 

I OUB index : «mjb 


| Pnrvtoes : 416.14 



li StoddMriH ii 


Credltoi 

Fgrntltalia 

Flat 

Braider 


16950 14408 
3553 3430 
7300 no 


moo 11110 

2875 2935 
53 5X50 


SandvHc 

Skartsfca 

SKF 

SwedWiMatch 

Volvo 


Close Pm*. 
N.Q. 380 
89 90 

205 206. 

217 220 

235 240 


Affoemvaoriden Index : 387.71 
Pmvteas : 38SJ98 




AC I 
ANi 
AKZ 
BHP 
Bond 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Coles 

Comal co 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Eldars Ixl 

Hooker 

Mooehao 

MIM 

Mver 

OoJdtrfdoe 

Poke 

PaseUwt 

RGC 

Sonias 

Sleigh 
■So u th land 
woodslda 


294 

455 

592 

315 

212 

392 

080 

270 

612 

289 

209 

314 

147 

245 

308 

183 

78 

414 

380 

495 

tee 

180 

28 

101 

342 


AH Ordinaries Index :829J0 

previous ttasee 

Source: Haulers. 




Asotrl Ghent 


Boik of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 


469 

466 

868 

*77 

895 

910 

822 

845 

545 

540 

1340 

1370 

340 

359 

1040 

USB 

560 

3*5 

1640 

1610 

1730 

1730 

1130 

1160 

827 

8*9 

1380 

1420 

6588 

6400 

289 

273 

1478 

1458 

152 

149 

610 

615 

47E 

470 

340 

327 

1520 

1590 

767 

775 

1610 

1610 

444 

450 


[ Oh* 

Pftv. 

Mitsubishi Elec 

400 

396 

MHsubMir Heavy 

275 

275 

Mitsubishi Corp 

531 

548 

Mitsui and cn 

342 

343 

MltsuJcastil 

425 

424 

Mitsumi 

NA 

971 

NEC 

1080 

1110 

NGK insulators 

900 

900 

Nik kb Sec 

78* 

101 

Nippon Steel 

141 

157 

Nippon Yusen 

237 

240 

Nissan 

657 

659 

Nomura Sec 

1220 

1250 


1200 

1110 

Pioneer 

2610 

2650 

Rknti 

885 

897 

Sharp 

987 

992 

Sony 

4330 

4460 

Sumitomo Bank 

1770 

1770 

Sumitomo Cham 

217 

218 

Sumitomo Moral 

15* 

IS! 

Toiiel Coro 

211 


Tgfsfio Marine 

475 

493 

Takeda Chora 

864 

880 

Tdk 

5480 

5*90 

Tellln 

4*0 

451 

Tokyo Elec. Power 

1790 

1750 

Tokyo Marine 

591 

90S 

Turov Ind 



Toshiba 

411 

411 

Toyota 

1290 


Yamal dil Sec 

*10 

822 

MDUcM/DJ. I«dex 

1251X76 

Previous : 1 KMJ 2 



Now index : 99936 



Previous : 1981*2 



[I Mri. 11 

Adki 

2710 


Bank Leu 

3570 

3570 

Brown Baverl 



SSflSS, 

2850 

2890 

Eleetravratt 

2810 


Georg Fhcher 

no 

74(1 

uiferdiscBuat 



Jacob Suchant 

6350 


Jet moll 

1880 


Landis Gyr 

1685 


Nestle 



OtrilkixvB 

1470 

1488 

RfflChwBoby 

8675 

8725 

Sanaox 



Schindler 

482$ 



365 





Swtss-alr 

1115 

1135 

Swiss Reinnirance 

9850 


Stubs Volksbank 

1420 


Union Bonk 

3660 

3680 

Winterthur 



Zurich ins 

20700 

10750 

SBC Index : 42966 



Prevtous ; 431 Je 



N.G.: not emoted,- 



avaiiawe; xo: ex-dlvldend. 


Continued World Growth Forecast 


AGA 

AIMLovol 


Astra 

Altos Cooca 

Bottom 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
E suite 

HandeUbankan 

Pharmada 

Saab-Scania 


NJ2. — 

!?1 in 

356 355 

370 375 
W4 IDS 
NO. 325 
318 32D 

295 293 

390 NjO. 
140 161 

205 203 

KQ. 430 


Renters 


KIEL, West Germany — The world economy 
will continue to grow this year and next but at a 


A Kid statement said a group of economists and 

industrialists from around the world agreed at a 
forum this week that “world growth can be expect- 
ed to weaken in 1985-86, but with no tendency 
towards recession.” it said. 

The weakening of recovery would be most 
marked in the United Slates where a period of 
normalization would begin after a phase of power- 
ful growth, the group agreed. 


March 29 


Qxnat&im. stocks ria AP 


2590 AMI Prce 
30000 Ack lends 
,18600 Arnica E 
196751 Alt Energy 
273 Alia Mat 
200 Akiu Cent 
10576 Akmma Si 
fSesAndrsWAf 
3116 Argent 
iw Asbestos 
5294 AtCO I f 
72330 BP Cmtado 
24444 Bank BC 

9*390 Bank N 5 

900 Baton A f 
12533 Bonanza R 
17817 Bralome _ 

ISO Bromalsa 517*17* 
BOO Brenda M 
7849 BCFP 


92710 BC RSS 
BC Phone 


157241 

15254 tmmswfc 
.2600 Budd Con 
16400 CAE 
217CCLA 

O7150 COlStb B I 

1500 Cad Frv 
17160 c NOT west 
^CPaekm 
2978 Can Trust 
100CGE 

61323 CTlraAl 


JJWi Low Clam Chpt 
SS5W. 55 55V, 

S16W 14 Vi 14W— M 
Sl«b 144b 1«4+ Y> 
521 V5 2«4 21V, 

S14Vb MVb 14Vb 
S21Vi 21 Vi 21Vi 
S21W 7IH 21 Mr— V, 
T25 25 25 + to 

11914 19 19 

57 7 7 

B8M S Vi 8V1+ vs 
532% 30Vi 314b -H4k 
55*. 5VS 5H 

S12M 12V4 12V* — 14 
147 143 147 + I 

S15Vb 15Vb 15W— M 
440. 435 435 —5 

5514 5 5V. +30 

179W- V4 
19* 916 9* 

19 84b 9 

255 241 251 +9 

«ltb 2Ufb 21M+ 1% 
517 14W 17 + 4b 

5339b 23Vj BV 
5|7Vb n 17 — Vi 

12744 2744 2TH+ lb 


5421 Lobatt 

42392 Loc Marts 
1250 LOirt Cain 
11700 Lacana 
500 LL Lac 
9050 LaMOW.CO 
300 MICC _ 
12313 Melon HX . 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* SATURDAY -SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


tigers 
iking to 
tde for 
unidt 


td Press International 

BEACH. Florida — The 
es Dodgers and Plritodd- 
flies have discussed a 
ar trade that would bring 
1 nal League's seven-rime 
id champion. Mike 
! o the Dodges for pitcher 
h and as many as four 
.yen, an official of the 
^ aid Thursday. 

trial, who disclosed the 
. 'as 081 the condition his 
: be used, said the Phillies 
lsking for relief patch ex 
r. denfuer, catcher lack 
- ist baseman SSd Bream 
■ ly regarded mmor4eagne 
. Ralph Bryant. 

■il would bring to an end 
ns' six-month search far 
The transaction 
i hinges on the powerful 
uxn the Dodgers want to 
-x~ 

. 23, hit 300 at San Anlo- 

Texas League with 31 
"-S^d 86 RBI in 115 games 
us fourth season in pro- 
^NasebalL 

Oodger players admitted 
.1 'lebont me negotiations. 

^ tigers’ vice president, A1 
. said Thursday that no 

Aftt min 
rvtf nave not even 
' , j^ridt at any time." Baton 
; y Campanis told the 
, ' udcaster, Ross Pewter, 
- * “••^ttsweseworiringona 

S- one mirarie deal we've 



Who’s This Great Pitcher the Mets Found in Tibet? 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The se cret cannot be 
kept much longer. Questions axe being 
asked, and sooner rather than later the 
New YoA Mels’ management — and 
Sports Illnstraled magazine — will have to 
produce a statement 

Just who is Hayden (Sidd) Finch? Who 
is this guy who can throw a fast ball at 168 
mBes p70 kflometers) per hour; who, the 
scouting reports rave, “Could be the phe- 
nom of all-time?” 

This week’s issue of Sports Illustrated, 


One due: The Hayden Finch Story Is Letter Perfect 


Schaefer, manager of the Mets* Class AAA 
team at Tidewater, Virginia. 

“Unbelievable!” it says. “You got to see 
this.” The evaluation rates Finch's fast ball 
velocity, and control, at “9.” The highest 
possible rating allowed in the system is “8.” 

The magazine story is decorated with 
photos of add, wearing one shoe, throwing 
at some soda bottles on a beach. There is 
talking to the Mels’ pitching m»ph . 


Mike Schmidt 


dated April 1, details the legend of Sidd Md Stottlemyre. There is -Sid d 
Finch, written by George Plimpton. J -* * 

“I never dreamed a baseball could be 
thrown that fast,” the story quotes John 
Christensen, a prospect in the Mets* orga- 
nization, after faring Finch in a secret, 
canvas-covered batting cage at the team's 
spring training complex in St. Petersburg, 

Florida. “As for hitting the tiring, frankly. I 
just don’t tiririk it’s humanly possible.” 

Look at the copy of the scouting report, 
dated July 28, 1984, and signed by Bob 


and other 

in to watch this 6-fooM (1 -93-metcr), 28- 
year-old right-hander. - 
It’s almost too much to believe, a 14- 
page story aboot a guy raised in an orphan- 
age in En gland, who was a dropout from 
Harvard University, who fives bis own 
strange life-style and has never played an 
o r g an rrad gam* of h flflehafl — but learned 
how to throw the perfect patch while in the 
mountains of Tibet. 


The clue to the story is contained in an 
introductory paragraph. 

“He's a pitcher, pan yogi and part re- 
dose. Impressively liberated from our opu- 
lent life-style, Sidd’s d e ciding about yoga 
— and his future in baseball- " 

The first letter in the first few words, 
when strong together, read. 

“H-a-p-p-y a-p-r-i-1 f-oo+s d-a-y.” 

“I publish 550 stories a year” said 
Sports niustrated’s managing editor, Mark 
Mnlvpy. “So mud) of what we do has to do 
with thing s Bke drags, salaries and now, 
point-shaving, things we have to do. Bat 
for once, 1 wanted to have fun.” 

Mnlvqy said he and Plimpton had dis- 
cussed some sort of April roofs piece a 
while ago. 

“We thought about a compilation of 
pranks puHed over the years,” Plimpton 
told the Los Angeles Herald-Exammer. 


“Bor we couldn't come up with enough of 
those storks. 

“Then we decided I would write my own. 
I’ve never bad so much fun in my life 
writing a story," said Plimpton, who also 
has written first-person pieces about play- 
ing quarterback for professional football's 
Detroit Lions, boxing with Archie Moore 
and playiqg goalie in a hockey game with 
the Boston Bruins. 

The Mets knew in advance the stoty was 
coming. The magazine had set up the pic- 
tures about two weeks ago and had told the 
team what it wanted to da 

Not everyone has figured out that Hay- 
den Finch is a hoax. 

“The phone has been ringing off the 
hook all day,” the Mets’ publicity director. 
Jay Hoiwitz, said from St. Petersburg. “A 
radio station called from Chicago and 
asked if Finch could really throw a fast ball 
at 168 mph. I told them, ‘and you should 


see his slider. He throws it at 120 mph.' ” 

The newspaper in St. Petersburg sent 
two reporters to the Mets’ camp Thursday 
morning to look for Finch and, when the 
prank was revealed, telephoned its con- 
gratulations to Sports Illustrated. 

“What really makes the story is the pic- 
tures,” Mulvoy said. Those shots of 
“Finch” really feature a friend of Lane 
Stewart, the Sports Illustrated photogra- 
pher who took the pictures for the story. 
The picture of “Finch" riding a camel was 
taken two years ago when Stewart and his 
friend were on vacation. 

Mulvoy said he did not even know the 
name of the man pictured as Finch. “He's a 
schoolteacher in Chicago, and we had to 
promise him a copy of the swimsuit issue 
for him to go along with it” 

“I think most of our readers will say, Ti’s 
a great piece of fiction* and will realize it 
was done because this was our April Fool's 
issue.” Mulvoy said. “I hope some readers 
don’t think this somehow damag es our 
credibility.” 


Bruins’ Best Tops 
Oilers’, Kurri’s 70th 


The Associated Press 

BOSTON — To beat the best, 
the Boston Bnrins knew they had to 
{day their best But it helped that 
the Edmonton Qflcxs didn’t play 
hke the team with the best record in 
the National Hockey League. 

“They bring the best out of you. 

NHL FOCUS 


aseballif wepuHit< , 
’’“-'-Nsaid. “IPs way difficult 
-ae land of tiring we’re 
. ■ i xn.” 

have tried desper- 
for a third baseman 
r . t> seasons. Pedro Guer- 
1 atural outfielder who 
I *■ rd most of last season 
1, l inked there a gain this 
M. i made it dear he prefers 
Mil 

Rea team-leading 22 er- 
V ‘asca, wbOe Schmidt, 35, 
~e National League Gold 
’ * '-ard for fielding nine 
Schmidt would 
to move Guer- 
. 0 the outfield, with pow- 
positions. 

L 


title in the 18 years of the franchise. 

Edmonton set a blistering pace 
eariy in its contest and went ahead, 
1-0, on Jari Raufs 70th goal of the 
season 5:49 into the game. He 
joined teammate Wayne Gretzky 
and the Bnrins* framer star, Plm 
Esposito, as the only TO^oal scor- 
ers in NHL histoty. Rum is the 
first right wing to reach that levcL 
But starting at 14:32 of the first 
period, the Bruins reded off three 
goals in 4: 1 1. Dave Rod started the 
rally with a god on a power play 
and Louis Sl«gh*r ana Rick Mid- 
dleton completed it 
“We were ready for the first 14 
minutes and then they took the 
game away from us," ssud Gretzky, 



They’re such a good team,” said 
Boston's coach, Harry Sndm. 

“If you’re not going to have a 
good game, you’re going to get 
blown oat,” said the Brains' goaue, 

Doug Keans, who is 7-1 in fis last 
eight games. “They can score 10 

goals very easfly.” w , f 

1 don’t think we played very who tied Ins own NHL record with 
well,” said Edmonton’s coach, his 125th assist, on Kurd* s goal 

Glen Sather. “We made a couple of 

dumb mistakes in onr own end and, 
all of a sodden, we're down 3-1.” 

Boston, which was 1-4-1 in its 
previous six games, ended up beat- 
ing the OSers, who woe 2-0-1 in 
their last three games, 6-3 Thurs- 
day night 

In other games it was Philadel- 
phia 3, Detroit 1; New Jersey 3, 

Washington 2; Montreal 5, St. 

Lotus 1 and Quebec 4, the New 


Sather mid trie team’s attitude 
has Amwd since it won the Stan- 
ley Cup last season. 

“Last year, we had a very hungry 
hockey dub,” he said, “inis year 
it’s not quite as hungry as it was. 

“IPs going to take an awful lot of 
commi tment and dedication and 
coccoitraiicn in order to get the 
same type of effort” 

“They’re tough to defense.” Sn- 
dea said of the Oilers, who lead tile 



Tulane Case Has 
Coaches Concerned 


York Islanders 2 The Flyers’ vie- NHL with 371 goals. “Fortunately, 
tory clinched the Patrick Division they give you plenty of chances to 
championship, fhrir eighth division score;” 


ImnAhud has bterraionN 

Murray Bannerman stopped Brian Propp and the Flyers Wethiesday night in Qiicago, but 
Flyers rebounded Thursday night to beat Red Win^ and win die Patrick Division tide. 


The Associated Press 

LEXINGTON, Kentucky — 
College basketball coaches, gath- 
ered here for the annual meeting of 
the NCAA Coaches Association, 
spent most of Thursday miking 
about tire alleged point-shaving 
scandie that has rocked Tulane 
University in New Orleans. Some 
said they are considering asking for 
$50 to $100 monthly stipends for 
student-athletes to help in*r« avoid 

hemg hired min gamhhng sch emes 

Jack Hartman, the Kansas coach 
who is president of the NCAA 
Coaches Association, said the orga- 
nization “supports programs to ag- 
gressively solve problems dealing 
with ethics, drugs and gambling.” 

“Onr position is that it is critical 
to provide support to the student- 
athlete to protect the credibility of 
the sport, Ha rtman said. ,s We 
need to recognize the probl ems and 
the dangers. Only having money 
for basic needs” makes the athletes 
“vulnerable.” 

Other coaches agreed it was 
nearly impossible to detect when 
students are bring asked to partici- 
pate in paint-shaving schemes. 

Jim Harriet of Pcppejdine was 
just one of many coacmes who ex- 
pressed “shock, dismay and con- 
cern" about the Tulane case. 

“What can we as ooaches do? We 


Basketball 


Rupp ’s Monument Also Indicative of Basketball’s IBs 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
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Washington Past Service 

LEXINGTON, Kentucky— Rnpp Area, 
szteof the finals of the NCAA tournament, is 
a basketball palace like no other. It seats 
23,000 and, from sane angles, resembles an 
enormous warehouse painted in the shade of 
brown favored by the man for whom it is 
named. 

I love the place; I also hate it 

The rapture for Rnpp is because it cele- 
brates a game that, when played properly, 
edipses all others. No other team game 
requires quite the combination of grace and 
force as basketball, or so much imagination 
soqmddy. 

what is wicked about Rnpp Arena is that 
it stands as a symbol of something wonder- 
fully pure being poisoned, for when you walk 
in you walk away from just abait everything 

ngavjmrYt wjtfi hi g her education . 

Kentucky basketball and Adolph Rnpp 
are among the enduring myths in the Umwd 
States. They remind ns, as the NCAA tour- 
nament concludes here this weekend, of what 


Forprasme Hits Bd-tiftmg tightest, listen 
to this from the University of Kentucky's 
school paper about a new coach: 

i f ace tire handicap that all new 


VANTAGE POINT/ Ken Denlinger 


coaches must face — the critical eye of the 
students, alumni and fans who are skeptical 
to a high degree. He will realize that unless he 
makes good, he nms an excellent chance of 

^Aren't iese kids being a bit tough on the 
poor feBow who replaces the schoors present 
coach, Joe B. Hall? 

Nope. That wasn’t current commentary. 

It wasn’t even the prevailing mood when 
Hall assumed control from Rupp 13 years 
ago. 

This was tiie worrisome welcome Rnpp 
got in 1 930. Kentucky alrrady was crazy over 
hoops, and fretted thal this unheralded high 
school coach, energetic as he seemed, 
couldn't fill the gigantic new gym that seated 
2 ^ 00 . 

Kentucky always seems a bounce pass or 
so ahead of the pack. It has won more games 
than any other school, 1,378, built larger 
arenas sooner and has been more spectacu- 
larly corrupt. 

Before practice Thursday, Vfflanova's 
players were in awe of the mystique and 
mqesty of Memorial Coliseum, of the four 


NCAA title bamuxs, of offices the size of 
tennis courts, of the 13.000 seats. 

VUlanova’s new fieldbouse will not be as 
large as Memorial Cdisann. 

It’s Kentucky's throwaway gym. 

When young coaches from around the 
United Stales talk tactics, they often are 
surprised that they think so similariy, that 
thar pet plays are so alike. Then it comes to 
them: somewhere in fife was an association 
with a man who learned his basketball from 
Rupp. 

In 41 years, Rnpp won 875 games. Proba- 
bly. more area t players left Kentucky than 
stayed at an but a few other schools. 

“Your picture would be on a calendar in 
every small-town grocery store in the stale,” 
said Bob TaBeat, who played for Kentucky 
but left during the 1967 season after an 
argument with Rupp. “If a player just 
walked into e bar, someone would be on the 
phone with coach Rnpp, saying: 'Should we 
get rid of Mm?* 

“He could be so foray, and cutting. I bad 
a class that caused me to be late for Monday 
practices. The place would be locked, and 


when I pulled at the doors, he'd stop every- 
thing and say. 

“ Hade, Galileo is here. Someone please the 
let him in.’ ” 

The players who gave Rupp his greatest 
joy, the “fabulous five," also brought on his 
deepest sorrow. Arrogantly, Rupp said in the 
midst of point-shaving arrests elsewhere in 
1951 that his guys “couldn’t be touched" by 
gamblers “with a 10-foot pole." 

Some could. 

“He had retired the jerseys of the starters,” 
wrote a longtime assistant, Harry Lancaster. 

“He just as quickly unretired them. There 
was tius great big picture of them hanging in 
the ccfisaun.lt was there one night. The next 
morning it was gone. 

“It was another 20 years before be even 
acknowledged that the fabulous five’ had 
ever existed, the scandal had hurt him so 
badly” 

The NCAA also accrued Kentucky sup- 
porters of paying players several times dur- 
ing that period, the late 1940s and early 
1950s, and canceled the 1952 season. 

Two decades later, Kentucky has become 
more, well, professional than ever. Dozens of 
others have tagged along. At its pinnacle of 
popularity, college basketball may also be at 
its most vulnerable. 


cant 

lock tnem up,' 

“Of my five starters, only one 
has both parents at home, the) 1 are 
extremely poor, very susceptible 
and grossly naive.” Hanrick said. 
“We're pining young men against 
street-smart adults. It's just no con- 
test” 

“Tire fans are going to be sad 
about it Basketball is soaring in 
popularity and, even if there is no 
substance to the point-shaving 
charges, we know that something is 
basically wrong.” said Norm Sloan, 
the coach at Florida. 

“We do the same tiring every- 
body else does. We tell our players 
about drags, cheating on exams 
and gambling,” he said. “Honestly, 
I don’t know how much of it they 
hear. Some of them might be ap- 
proached and never recognize it.* 
■ 5th Tulane Student Arrested 

A fifth Tulane University stu- 
dent was arrested Thursday in con- 
nection with allegations of pram- 
shaving by members of the school's 
basketball team. The New York 
Tunes reported from New Orleans. 

The arrest took place shortly af- 
ter two players testified before a 
grandjury that began hearing the 
case Thursday morning. 

The student, Mark Howard 
Olensky. 21. of Fair Lawn. New 
Jersey, was booked on two counts 
of bribery of sports participants, 
two counts of conspiracy to com- 
mit bribery of sports participants 
and cue count of conspiracy to dis- 
tribute cocaine, according to a 
spokesman for the district attor- 
ney. Olensky is not a player. 
Among those testifying before 
‘ jury in connection with 
the basketball case were two play- 
ers who have been granted immuni- 
ty from prosecution. Clyde Eads 
from Tampa. Florida, and Jon 
Johnson from Columbus, Georgia, 
both starting senior forwards. 

Harry Comricky the New Orleans 
district attorney who initiated the 
investigation, said that “as a by- 
product of this investigation” he 
had “reason to believe there may be 
some violations of National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association recruit' 
mg rules." 

He said later he had discussed 
the possible violations with an 
NCAA, official and with Eamnn M. 
Kdhr, Tulane’s president 

The team's coach, Ned Fowler, 
and an assistant coach, Kirk Saul- 
ney, appeared at the courthouse 
Thursday, but their testimony was 
postponed. Most of the basketball 
team, excluding the three players 
who were arrested, appeared at the 
courthouse in connection, with the 
investigation but did not testify. 


Transition 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Irwin Leads Tournament Flayers Golf 

PONTE VEDRA, Florida (UPI) — Hale Irwin, pushing 40 and not 
playing well since a last-round 79 cost him a third U S. Open gcrif title last 
summer, shot a five-nnder-par 67 Thursday fra the first round lead in the 
Tournament Players Championship. 

Tt wasn’t just that last round at the Open flat messed up my game," 
said Irwin, who has played in only five previous tournaments this year 
and missed the cat in three. *T had a nagging groin injury, was concerned 
about my father (who died eight days after the Open ended), and was 
involved in some new business interest s . 

That’s all behind me now," Irwin said after a 30-foot birdie drip on 
the final bole gave him a one-shot lead over Larry Rinker, Bernhard 
T .anger , Morris Hatahky and DA. Weibxzng. 

fA champion Lee Treviso was three under after seven holes, but a 


RASRRALL 


*.IA— Son* stu a town, Tonv 
toCMkM tmd O.W. Smite, Ptti*- 
Idtecatcter; Dmmiwnite,atit- 
•m Carrasco ana Mam Mclo- 
Tan. to ttalr minor 4caeu* 
nw No niwn L 


OAKLAND— Sort Jasm RlUfc Pffcter. to To- 
come at teo Pactte Coast Ute*. 

TEXAS— Oatlonad Clan Cook, Jaw Guz- 
man.OweynaHntrv.Al Lodwwta on d RIefcv 
WrWNpteMHrttStova Buoctete J*« KUfltei 
and Onto Tabor, tefteftten, and Dovo Stock- 
NULauHteMBr, toOkfcAomo dry at te* Amor- 
Icon AwodaNon. 



Te nnis 




NDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(At Mite) 
QUARTERFINALS 
LCuchoslovifldo (2)>tet.Vlto> 
S. Ml, 6-2. 7-4 (7-5), 
Ya- B itedo n m.teLJoHaSoOrt. 
M 

•fc.SwftMrfand.dtf. Tim Wind- 
CWL *4.4-4. 


CINCINNATI— SontJtff Rtt0tH.PIMW.to 
ftetr mi n or N ow camatax for raaBlan- 

NRWYORK— teNtewd EdOtelnfcPlWwr. 
to TKtowater of Hit international Loaoua. 

PHILADELPHIA- IW l im N Ed Olwtofe 
oteter, to tet Nm York Mote. 

FOOTBALL 

N tfW o tt F f tn oM Laooao 

ATLANTA— ABnouocad teat Fulton KlW- 
UmtaiL imtbo ckt r. haf boon teOPHailxtd 
wttti a Iwort toftetian conH»«cflted fcv ohop- 
monla. 


id’s friendly international soccer match 
’ in Glasgow instead of London 


Soccer 


Exhibition Baseball 


ILD CUP QUALIFY! NO 



• dtooc lroa4;Qotor4; Jordon2; 

temxOBmrn. im: April 
Jordon. 

Non WtOmpl o 
. ndontlfa I 

. 4HW tndoreste TMUonda; 
otodtth a 

•, teK won* »■ Bonoiadah v*. 

1 BonaladtNi v*. Indon— laj 

, - lodmhvt. Tuonans; April LI A- 
. «fti: April 9 , India vaTMiom.- 
ta vt. BanotadMh. 


THURSDAY’S RESULTS 

SL Louts 7 . Mofteta) (ss) 4 
N.Y. Mats 7 . Cincinnati 0 
LM ADfltM a Boston (SS) 4 
-Qitcooo WWto SOX L plftebufoli 0 
Damn V. Houston 4 
Kansas dtv 1 Z PUtadrttete 11 
ABoots A Mlnntsota 1 
BaHlmara 14 . Tanas 9 
Boston u>) 1 Toronto 2 
Oqktonif e. CMcaoe Ci 4 » 5 
CgWornfa 8 . O m a t o n d 2 
Stott la 9. rtltomafctt 1 
K.Y. YanfcMS < Mantnal i rttenjiwi 

San Dteao R San Fnmdseo7.SlnnfciOS (M^ 

wtedsl 


NASL, Down to 2 dabs. Is Disbanded 

NEW YORK (UPI) — The North American Soccer League — which 
once had 24 prof esaooal teams playing in the United States and Canada 
— was disbanded Thursday with early two dubs left in its ranks. 

The league’s acting president, Cfiwe Toys, said the outdoor league was 
suspending operations fra 1985 and hoped to reorganize to play again in 
the summer of 1986. The league dwindled to nine teams last year and 
finally only the Toronto Blizrard and Minnesota Strikers were left. 

Soccer Match Is Moved to Glasgow 

LONDON (UPI) - 
with Scotland on May 25 
because the g o v er nm ent /ears “disorder” in the English capital fallowing 
recent soccer riots, the Football Association announced Friday. 

The government's sprats minister, Ned Marfariane, requested in a 
letter to the association itm* the annual mmrf i, dne to place on a 

holiday weekend, be switched to another date, said the association’s 
secretary, Ted Choker. He said “the wonting of Mr.^ Macfadane’s letter 
was such that we could not ignore it” 

Crcker and other officials from the FA and the Football League are to 
m«Ki Prime Minister M ar g a ret Thatcher next Monday to discuss the 
rioting at matches involving the London dnhs and Mfflwafl. 

Chargers Kick Muncie Off Team 

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The owner of the profession al football San 
Diego Onagers, Alex S^anos, who has been (fisturbed by reprais that 



Legendary Driver Moss 
Returns to Auto Racing 


OategdoMteB 

Lee Trevino reacted qmckfy when his birdie putt on third 
g^een of Tournament Players Championship failed to falL 

Chuck Muncie faQed provisions of his drug rehabilitation program, said 
Thursday he has kicked the running back off the (earn. 

“Chuck. Mancie has been an outstanding football player for the 
Chargers, but we don’t believe it is in our best interest for Chuck to 
continue as a member of our organization," Spanos said in a statement 
read by the Chargers' spokeswoman. Fat Rogers. 

Spanos acted after learning from National Football League officials 
that Monde had not satisfactorily complied with a league-ordered drug 
therapy program. The San Diego Union newspaper reported Thursday. 

Muncie, a fonner all-pro and the Charges’ leading rush® each season 
from 1980 IO 1983, was suspended last November by the league’s 
commuaop^ FeteRozelle.RozcIkrnledMimdBmdig'weTOpI^mthe 
NFL until he successfully completed a drag rehabilitation program. 


The Associated Press 
RIVERSIDE, California — En- 
gland’s legendary Stirling Moss re- 
turns to serious auto racing Satur- 
day when he competes in the 
inaug ural United States Endurance 
Cup race at Riverside International 
Raceway. 

Moss wifi be teamed with anotb- 

Irdandfin a Porsche 944.^ 

It was in 1962 at Goodwood, 
England, thal Moss’s Fomrala One 
racing career was brought to an end 
in a High-speed crash into an em- 
bankment. 

Moss was driving a Lotus For- 
mula One car which, in those earli- 
er days of racing, was not equipped 
with seat belts. His 140-mile (225- 
kfiomeier) pet hour accident left 
him unconscious for a month, para- 
lyzed fra six months and without 
the ultimate concentration needed 
fra racing for two to three years. 

By thattime, according to Moss, 
The cars were so much faster.” 

Since that time, Moss, now 55, 
has confined trimsdf to some tour- 
ing car and vintage car racing. Ire- 
land, his racing partner for tins 
weekend, is anotho- former Formu- 
la One ace who. Moss said, “used 
his powers of persnaaoa” to talk 
him out of retirement, 

Ireland and Moss have raced 
against each other many times, but 
together only once before. In the 
1962 edition of the 12 Homs of 
Sebring. the two drove a North 
American Racing Team-sponsored 
Ferrari Testa Rossa, leading the 
race until they were disqualified for 
a pit infraction. 


This weekend's event will be half 
as long. And the cars will be a bh 
slower, as welL The USEC is a 
series for cars in “showroom stock” 
condition, that is without any mod- 
ifications other than for safety. 


Natt,EngUsh 
Strike Again 

The Associated Pros 

DENVER — Calvin Natt and 
Alex English, who have averaged 
60 points between them against 
Kansas City this season, each 
scared 32 Thursday night as the 
Denver Nuggets won thar 19th 
straight game at home, a 133-1 IS 
triumph over the Kings. 

The Nuggets also got 21 points 
and 10 rebounds from center 
'Wayne Cooper in building their 
record to 47-26, five games better 

NBA FOCUS 

than idle Houston in the National 
Basketball Association's Midwest 
Division. Kansas CSiy lost its sec- 
ond straight- 

The Kings trailed all but 
dosed to 107-101 cm Mark Olbexd- 
ing’s three-point play with 6:22 
left. Thai English got back-to-back 
baskets and the Nuggets bttilt their 
lead to 116- IQS. 

In other games it was Cleveland 
122, Chicago 114; Milwaukee 121, 
New York 116 and the Los Angeles. 
Clippers 116, Phoenix 110. 



I lul S553SiW3S5A2i8!B353?H*Setfcfitf S£5i3^ 31 S!S^ 6! Si'" 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 30-31, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Get Computers to Hate Ferretin g O ut Waste at th e Pentagon Bitz Prize: Vargos Lbs 

I r v Franris X. C.lin« i ~~~l more" informants who find sanctuary in the _ _ . .. ^ . . 


W/ASHINGTON —The boom 
VV in home computers hasn't ma- 
terialized, and one of the United 
States's most glamorous industries 
is running out of steam. There is a 
lot of Ccger-pointing as to who is 
responsible. The retailers biamc the 
manufacturers for 'advertising 
products that do not exist. The 
manufacturers fault their sales 
forces for f ailing to move the ma- 
chines out of the warehouse. The 
salespeople blame the market re- 
search depart- 
ments for pre- 
dicting everyone 
in America was 
dying for a home 
computer, and 
the market re- 
search people 
say the public 
lied to them 

Applegate, a 

market research- p , . .. 

er, showed me a BadnraM 
printout of the survey his firm had 
taken 12 months ago. 

“We asked 50,000 people if they 
would buy a home computer in the 



next year and 49,910 said they 
would. Then we asked than why 
and 67 percent said to balance their 
checkbooks, and 38 percent said so 
their kids could someday go to the 
moon. 

“On the baas of these figures we 
predicted that there would soon be 
a computer in every home. When 
our forecasts proved too optimistic 
we decided to find out why. 

“We discovered some interesting 
things. For example, we found the 
people who couldn’t balance their 
checkbooks were too stupid to 
learn how to use a computer to do it 
f or them. 

“And it turned out the ones who 
said they were gong to get them for 
their Idas decided to use the money 
to buy a video recording machine 
for themselves instead.” 


“Too bad they didn’t say that the 
first time around.” 

“We also discovered that con- 
sumers who had owned a machine 
were telling everyone computers 
were not “user friendly.' When we 
asked exactly what they meant b; 
that, they said every time they did 
their taxes on one it resolved dis- 
putes in favor of the IRS. They fell 
since they owned the computer, the 
least it could do was be on their 
side.” 

“Didn’t they feel a computer’s 


graphics capability made it a valu- 
able tool in the home?” 

“We asked people about that 
and they said for the fust week they 
enjoyed cutting up a pie into equal 
stores, but by the second week the 
thrill was gone. As for charts —it’s 
amazing how little they mean to 
most households. I interviewed one 
man who kept putting them up in 
the kitchen to illustrate his wife’s 
productivity, or lack of it, and she 
sued him and his computer for 
mental cruelty.’’ 

□ 

I asked Applegate if he thought 
the home market for computers 
had been saturated. 

“It has until we come up with 
new uses for them. We must prove 
to the consumer that a computer 
can do the job easier than he can. 
For instance, one father we talked 
to said he would buy a computer if 
it had the ability to call every house 
in the neighborhood on Friday 
night and locale his high scbool-age 
daughter when she was supposed to 
be home. Another person said she 
would buy a computer if it Were 
programmed to answer aQ ‘junk 
telephone calls’ and short-circuit 
the machines making them. 

“ Another person said he wanted 
a computer that could cripple the 
department store computer that 
was dunning him. The biggest rea- 
son people want computers now is 
to incapacitate and till other com- 
puters that are threatening people’s 
lives. I have recommended that 
home computer companies in their 
new advertising campaigns stress 
the ‘hate* factor that people fed for 
the big machines If we can per- 
suade Americans they need com- 
puters in the home to defend them- 
selves against corporate computers, 
we’ll be back in business." 


By Francis X. Clines 

A Tar York Tuna Service 

W ASHINGTON — One of the paradox- 
es of politics in the U.S. capital is that 
an overpriced government coffeepot is just as 
likely to to stir controversy and catch the 
public’s eye as is the MX missile, the Hydra- 
tike issue that just endured yet another vote in 
its seemingly endless series of congressional 
tests. 

As sure as there will be more votes on the 

seven -story-high intercontinental rocket, op- 
ponents of soaring military budgets and 
waste will be searching for something as no- 
torious as last year’s 57,622 1 0-cup airplane 
coffee-maker on a Pentagon cargo plane or 
another 59,609 Air Force wrench or a 5436 
Navy hammer. 

Dina Rasor is one such citizen-ferret. As 
the head of an unusual private organization, 
the Project on Military Procurement, she re- 
searches and publicizes military budget 
abuses from a cottage-tike office more suit- 
able to potting geraniums. 

Her research focuses on the kind of gritty 
infor matio n about waste that can break 
through the government’s public relations 
and awaken taxpayers. Most notorious was 
her disclosure last year, along with Represen- 
tative Barbara Boxer, Democrat of Califor- 
nia, of that coffee-maker aboard the C-5A 
cargo plane. In the view of critics, ibal hem 
set new standards for self-parody at the Pen- 
tagon. More substantial have beat disclo- 
sures of critical problems with major weap- 
ons, such as the M-l Abrams battle tank; 
more embarrassing was a private computer 
printout mapping the lobbying wiles of a 
military contractor. 

In a city where m fnnmtinn is the single 
most valued commodity, Rasor, 28, is in 
effect a sly commodity broker, serving as a 
discreet conduit of information to the public 
from disgruntled and anxious workers in the 
Pentagon who use her to ease their con- 
sciences and maintain their anonymity. Her 
information brokerage is growing, with three 



Hm Nnf Tort T- 


Dina Rasor: Gtxzen-fene£ 

others assisting her now in a task that she did 
alone four years ago, “fencing” sensitive date 
to trusted journalists. 

The Project on Military Procurement, fi- 
nanced by 5200,000 a year in foundation 
grants, inandes Paul Hoveo, a one-time Viet- 
nam helicopter pilot, and his former partner 
in military consulting, Joseph R_ Bunnece, as 
well as Donna Martin, a former television 
journalist. 

“The waste is still there.” Rasor said with 
the confidence of a detective who knows how 
to stake out the capital's sluiceways. "They’re 
just becoming more clever now in covering 
their tracks.” 

She talks of her “mderground" in the city 
— a carefully protected group of “100 or 


more" informants who find sanctuary in the 

confide in a score or so aFretired military 
workers, who then transfer documentation to 
Rasor’s office. While “whistle blowers” occa- 
sionally go public in Washington. Rasor ad- 
vises ram mai it is often tow agwiiymg .inri 
more valuable to remain convert. "No press 
release is worth somebody's career.” she said. 

The project obtains more than enough raw 
information about mundane waste without 
having to deal in classified secrets. “If we 
did” reveal classified information, Rasor 
said, “the Pentagon would try to use that to 
discredit us inside the building. They can’t, 
and it’s worked pretty well for us." 

As a result of reaching within an adminis- 
tration that has approached apoplexy at 
times over unauthorized disclosures and has 
gone so far as to consider lie-detector tests for 
the president’s highest advisers as a serious 
antidote, Rasor has tales of great satisfaction 
to teO. Some of her sources, she says, quietly 
attend hurried Pentagon strategy sessions de- 
signed to counter ha* project's latest disclo- 
sures. 

“TbeyTl call me and say, ‘Here's what 
they’re gong to say and here’s the documents 
to refute it,” she said. “A guy who does that 
has a lot of guts. Part of it is just patriotism. 
With 15 years on the job. they wouldn’t risk 
the grief unless they' cared about defense. 
There’s a lot of guys just sitting there not 
wanting to go outside the system.” 

Since her start as a lone researcher with a 
skeptical taxpayers’ group, she remains es- 
sentially a crafty ant working a mountain. 
She doubts that the government would ever 
marshal the strength to investigate itself with 
the zeal that outsiders can bring to the task. 

“Right now they kill the messenger,” she 
said. “The money is the corrupting influence. 
You’re judged in the bureaucracy by the size 
of your badger and whether you can win a 
political barite, not whether the things you're 
buying with that budget can actually defeat 
an enemy.” 


taSaT’ 0 ■ 130-Year-Old Tent Show, One of Last in U. S., Is Closed 

s research revealed 7 J 7 


Applegate's research revealed 
that one of the reasons home com- 
puter sales had fallen off was that 
they had no sex appeal. Women 
hated the look of them in the room. 
So after a month, the majority of 
machines wound up in a closet, 
usually covered with someone's 
Nehru jacket. 

“How do you propose to get 
women to accept a computer in the 
home?” I asked. 


“By getting Geraldine Ferraro to 
do a TV commercial saying it’s the 
only thing that keeps her family 
together” 


The Associated Pros 

D avenport, iowa —a fed- 
eral bankruptcy court has 
rung down the final curtain on the 
"Toby and Suzie Show,” one of the 
last traveling tent theaters in the 
United States. 

A judge declared the show and 
its owner, James Davis, to be bank- 
rupt, bringing to an end tins rem- 
nant of a 130-year-old folk theater 
tradition. The bankruptcy ended a 
long struggle to keep the show, 
based in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, on 


the road in small towns in Iowa, 
Missouri and Illinois. 

Davis has been associated with 
the show for 30 years, right as a 
member of the troupe and the rest 
as owner. He walked out the court 
saying he had “virtually nothing 
left but what I am wearing.” 

His five trucks and trailers, and 
the show’s tents, a folding chair 
and other theatrical gear, will be 
sold to pay creditors. 

“Well, it’s over and that part of 
my life is behind me,” Dans said. 
“Odd, isn’t it? In just five minutes. 


they can end what lasted far 130 
years. Five w"rmt« That’s how 
long it takes to dispose of a farm, 
someone’s business, someone's 
life:” 

Davis said the show opened its 
first season in Quincy, TTImois, 130 
years ago, as one of more than 400 
“Toby” shows that brought folksy 
humor and simple melodramas to 
the rural crossroads of the United 
States in the latter half of the 1 9th 
century. 

In addition to owning the show, 
Davis portrayed tire leading char- 


acter, Tobias T. (Toby) Tolliver, a 
big, redheaded rube who always 
nwnngftri to OUtfOX city stickers. 

Davis is hoping to keep the char- 
acter Toby alive with a one-man 
show he will stage in the only piece 

keepTtfie 1939 FortTthat has trans- 
ported the show’s equipment for 
more than 40 years. 

Davis, who said he knew how to 
play 30 instruments, hopes to con- 
tinue performing at shopping 
malls, fairs and city paries. 


The Peruvian writer Mario Var- 
gas Uosa has been awarded the 
first Riu Puis Hemingway Award, 
the world’s top-paying literary 
prize for a novel, for “The War of 
the End of the World,” about revo- 
lutionary fanaticism in 19th-centu- 
ry Brazil. Accepting the 550,000 
prize at the Hotel Riiz in Paris, 
Vargas Uosa commented on his 
refusal two years ago to become 
prime minister of Peru; M ! thought 
I could do more useful work for the 
country bv writing instead.” The 
award, which is to be given annual- 
ly, is funded by the Sultan of Bru- 
nei. Sir Muda Hassaml BoikiaL 
The presentation dinner, attended 
by Hemingway's sons Jade and 
Patrick and his granddaughters 
Margaux and Marie!, was given at 
the Riiz, whose Egyptian-born 
owner, Mohammed at-Fiyed, is a 
co-founder of the prize. The awards 
are intended to promote literary 
excellence and to celebrate Ernest 
Hemingway's associations with the 
Riiz. 

□ 

West Germany has awarded the 
Grand Gross of Merit, cue of its 
highest orders, to Simon Wle-. 
senthal, 76, head of the Jewish Doc- 
umentation Center in Vienna. It 
was the first West German medal 
presented to Wkscnthal for his 
work in tracking down Nazi war 
criminals and helping Jewish fam- 
ilies find friends and relatives lost 
in Hitler's campaign to exterminate 
Jews. West Germany’s ambassador 
to Austria, Hans Heinrich Noebd, 
presented the medal to Wiesenthal’ 
at tire embassy in Vienna. . . . 
John Jay McOoy, high commis- 
sioner in U. S.-occupied Germany 
from 1949 to 1952, has been named 
an honorary citizen of West Berlin, 
tire city’s highest honor, for his con- 
tribution to Balm's reconstruction 
after World War II. Gty officials 
are to give McCoy the award Tues- 
day at his 90th birthday party in 
Washington. 

□ 

Chetta the chimpanzee, who ap- 
peared in more than 100 movies 
and was most famous as the side- 
kick of Johnny Weissmuller's Tar- 
zan, has retired at the age of 50. 
“We're both retired,” Chelta’s 
owner and trainer, Ton) Gamy, 
78, said Thursday in Newbury 
Park, California, “we’re not going 
to do any more movies, just going 
to kick back and enjoy ourselves. 


Gentry said if the lt>o.p 
chimp could just get a star « 
lywood’s Walk of Fame, it \ 
be ihe crowning glor\ of q 
career. “I got a lot of' spouse 
that,” he said. "I might get on- 
but 1 don't care, as long as C 
gets in." Gentry has trained . 
50 chimps, but onlv three, he 
were really special to him: 
who served three Tarzans — 
mu Brix, Weissmuller and F 
Cntbbe — and Dorothy Lanx 
the 1936 not-so-dassic “1 
Princess”: Jiggs 2d. who star 
several Tarzan movies and i 
up in the Baltimore Zoo; 
Chetta, whom Gcntrv bougj 
5300 on the old Santa' Monic 
in the laic 1940s. "Sure tu rat 
to be a dandy.” Gentry saic 
dump’s name is often missf 
usually as Cheetah or Chreta. 
uy saul. but C-h-c-t-t-a is “ih 
I've always spelled it." 

□ 

South African censors 
bans on books by three pror 
black writers Friday. Amo 
publications listed as "no 
undesirable" by the Dircctoj 
Publications was “Call Me 
Man” by MtutmeU Matsbol 
Son of the Soil” by Wilson ' 
and “The Soweto 1 Love” by 
Sepunb. 

□ 

One of France's most p 
television news comment 
Christine Ockrrnf. rcsignec 
the state-nm Aniennc-2 u> 
Friday because of a disagn 
with its director. It was tfa 
resignation by a senior staff 
ber of the station in 24 hour: 
rent said conditions create* 
reorganization of the news < 
meat and appointment 
nounced Thursday by the r 
mg director, Jean- Claude H 
made it impossible for her b 
out her duties satisfactorily 
rent edited and read the 30- 
news broadcast at the peak \ 
time of 8 P. M. Her estimate 
ence of eight million view 
exceeded those of the news 
of the other two statc-ru 
works. TF-1 and FR-3. Earl 
bert du Roy, news chief, q 
what he termed personal r 
and Robert Gupatre, the 
editor, said he was taking e 
tircment. Chapa ue is repo 
have disagreed with policy c 
made by Hfcberli. 


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'67 to eighteen glorious yearn, 
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Thcnk you my low 

far being such a GEM. 

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