Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats



The Globa] Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hone Kong, Singapore. 

The Hague and Marseille 


INTERNATIONAL 




WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 17 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post, 




ICW 

MSB Din 

U*-> 

Gmndn CSIte gam* »B* 

Qjjnn GID7B _ mm 

fc*SM£ 

.sack 

HI * iifr— tr. 

.115 SkA 


Qm ftJDPBA 

90E»t 

AS** 
bdcKHM-MF-. 
Sou* l 

Simp IHHNou 

Mm ,7Sa 5*. 

SnAwM -220 5* 

Tnvg USD Ob 

IMay Ti«H» 

UAE UDM 

UAM.|b4-(Ua 
TugaAiuB— .HDD. 


No. 31,786 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


Economic Disputes 
Threaten Summit 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Times Service 

BONN — A series of unresolved 
ispuies over economic policy 
tireatens the success of the seven- 
tation Western economic summit 
neeting opening here Thursday de- 
pite months of preparatory talks. 
according to senior officials pre- 
paring the meeting in several capi- 
tals. 

As President Ronald Reagan 
and other Western leaders arrive 
for their 1 1th annual summit meet- 

oTfae summit is forcing Bonn to 
re-examine issues considered 
settled or imsdvable. Page 2. 
«U-S. pressure on Japan to 
stimulate its economy has rekin- 
Ded a policy debate. Page 2. 
■The role of the SS soldiers at 
iitburg remains buried. Plage 5. 

ig, these officials say this year’s 
oiks appear the most difficult and 
/otemially divisive since the Ver- 
-ailles meeting three years ago. 

Thai meeting ended in a public 
quarrel between the Reagan ad- 
ministration and its closest West- 
ern allies over the desirability of 
trading with the East bloc and was 
followed by Washington’s imposi- 
tion of trade sanctions against Eu- 
ropean companies using U.S. tech- 
nology to help the Soviet Union 
build a gas pipeline from Siberia. 

The principal points of disagree- 
ment on economic matters, still un- 
resolved on the eve of the s ummi t 
meeting, are the following: 

• President Francois Mitterrand 
of France; according to dose aides, 
remains determined to stop the 
summit participants from formally 
agreeing to open a new round of 
trade-freeing negotiations next 
year as tike Reagan administration 
and most other participants want, 
in order to combat growing protec- 
tionist pressure. 

• President Mitterrand, these 
sources say, will not agree to a firm 
date for trade talks until the negoti- 
ating agenda has been decided, de- 
veloping countries agree to parti ci- 
ne and the United States gives a 
ler commitment to parallel work 

on stabilizing the dollar and earing 
Third World debt problems. 

• West Germany. Britain and 
Japan remain determined to resist - 
growing pressure from the United 
States, France and Italy to adopt 
more expansionary economic poli- 
cies designed to take up the slack 
left in the world economy as U-S. 
growth slows. 

• European leaders are ready to 
welcome the expected pledge by 
President Reagan to reduce the 
U.S. budget deficit and efforts to 
reduce Japan's high trade surplus- 
es. But they doubt whether either 
country will be able to make much 
headway quickly. 

Some European officials fear 
that failure to resolve these eco- 
nomic disagreements could have 
serious diplomatic repercussions, 
further poisoning the atmosphere 
of the meeting and increasing Mr. 
Reagan’s sense of frustration with 
his allies. 

The senior officials preparing the 
summit meetings have already 
drafted, to a large extent, the two 
communiques that the seven lead- 
ers and tire president of the Euro- 
pean Community Commission 
plan to issue after their talks on 
Saturday, as well as the outline oT a 
special declaration by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl, the meeting's chair- 
man. 

In the draft communique, the 
summit participants have already 
accepted one of President Reagan's 
major economic demands. 

All agree to follow “supply side’’ 
oriented economic policies that, be- 
sides emphasizing the fight against 
inflation, also stress the need to 
p remote faster economic growth by 
freeing up their economies. This 
means reducing red tape stifling 
business, making labor markets 
less rigid and encouraging entre- 
preneurs. 

A second communique drafted 
io mark the 40th anniversary of the 
end of World War H, emphasizes 
the success of postwar cooperation 
between the Western allies and 
supports the Reagan administra- 


tion's opening position in the Ge- 
neva arms {imitation talks with the 
Soviet Union. 

Finally, Chancellor Kohl is ex- 
pected to express the summit na- 
tions’ concern about the Soviet in- 
vasion of Afghanistan and the 
situation in Cambodia in tire sepa- 
rate statement as chairman of the 
meeting. 

In recent weeks, the Reagan ad- 
ministration has made dear that it 
regards tire setting of a firm date 
for opening new trade talks as one 
of its major objectives at the con- 
ference. 

At a meeting of Western finance 
ministers last month sponsored by 
the Organization for Economic Co- 
operation and Development, 
France continued to resist setting a 
firm dale, despite a new U.S. oner 
to hold parallel talks on stabilizing 
currencies as President Mitterrand 
wants. But French officials hinted 
then that France might give ap- 
proval at Bonn. 

However, Mr. Mitterrand re- 
peated his c laim this week that 
France could not accept new trade 
lalfc* without real progress on sta- 
bilizing currency values, since it re- 
gards the overvalued dollar as the 
prime cause of protectionist pres- 
sure in the United States. 




pate 

fuUe 



President Ronald Reagan and fais wife, Nancy, were greeted Wednesday at Bonn's airport 
by Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscber. Behind them was Arthur A Burns, the U.S. 
ambassador, in glasses, and James A Baker 3d, the U-S. treasury secretary. 

Space Arms to Dominate 
Summit Political Talks 


Chancellor Helmut Kohl welcomed Prime Minister Yasu- 
biro Nakasone on Wednesday at die chancellery in Bonn. 


By John Vinocur 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — The dominant politi- 
cal issue for Washington’s allies at 
the Bonn economic meeting is the 
Reagan administration's space 
weapons program. Considerable 
talk, but no endorsement of the 
plan, appears likely. 

Publicly and officially, the Euro- 
pean and Japanese participants in 
the meeting, which opens Thurs- 
day, say they want the United 
States to clarify how they could fit 
into the research aspects of the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, com- 
monly called “star ware." 

But, in fact, none appears to 
have made up its mind about the 
extent it wants to become involved 
as a contractor in developing spa-.e 
weapons under American leader- 
ship. Since the program became an 
issue of public debate this winter, 
the allies have hovered in a zone of 
indecision about the plan, offi 
alternately favorable and critii 
characterizations of the program. 

According to a French official, 
□o summit document is expected to 
deal extensively with space weap- 
ons, and any mention of the U.S. 
program would be in general and 
nonbinding terms. 


Reagan Aides Clash on Speech Draft 


By Lou Cannon 

Woshmpon Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The nation- 
al security adviser, Robert C. 
McFariane, and the White House 
communications director. Patrick 
J. Buchanan, have clashed sharply 
over one of the major speeches 
President Ronald Reagan is to give 
during his European trip, accord- 
ing to administration sources. 

According to the sources, Mr. 
McFariane complained at a senior 
staff meeting Monday that speech 
writers undo- Mr. Buchanan’s di- 
rection had prepared an audience- 
rousing speech more suitable for a 
political campaign for Mr. Rea- 
gan’s appearance before the Euro- 
pean Parliament next Wednesday 
in Strasbourg. 

Mr. McFariane had argued for a 
“presidential-type" policy speech 
that would be nonconfrontationai 
in lone. 

A senior official said Monday 
that Mr. McFariane rewrote two 
earlier drafts over the weekend to 
eliminate some anti-Communist 
rhetoric and produce a more 
“thoughtful and reflective speech" 
on U.S.- Soviet relations. 

An administration official ofteo 
critical of Mr. Buchanan said the 


original speech would have been 
more appropriate for delivery to 
“the American Lemon in Philadel- 
phia" than to the European Parlia- 
ment 

Mr. Buchanan has followed a po- 
licy of not returning reporters' tele- 
phone calls. 

in recent weeks. Mr. McFariane 
reportedly has become steadily 
more critical of Mr. Buchanan and 
the speech writers who report to 
him for positioning Mr. Reagan in 
ways Mr. McFariane considers un- 
necessarily combative and ideolog- 
ical. 

Officials said Mr. McFariane 
and Richard R. Burt, assistant sec- 
retary of state for European affaire, 
have viewed the Strasbourg speech 
as an opportunity for Mr. Reagan 
to give a lofty address on postwar 
Europe, reaffirming the traditional 
goals of the U.S.-European alli- 
ance. 

Instead, they said the speech 
writers prepared a draft that, ac- 
cording to an official was “heavy 
on anU-Commumsm and applause 
lines” and Jacking in more reflec- 
tive themes. 

Mr. McFariane complained and 
the speech was reworked, but a 
second draft did not make the 


changes be had sought Officials 
said Mr. McFariane worked on the 
speech and presented a third draft 
Monday. 

An official said Mr. McFariane 
quietly presented the revised draft 
at the daily senior staff meeting, 
without criticizing Mr. Buchanan's 
previous version. But the official 
said Mr. Buchanan then “goaded" 
Mr. McFariane, saying. “I thought 
we worked all this out with Dick 
Bun" on Friday. 

An official said Mr. McFariane. 
who is usually soft-spoken, became 
furious when Mr. Buchanan per- 
sisted in defending earlier versions 
of the speech and finally said. 
“Speech writers aren’t supposed to 
make policy." 

The white House deputy chief of 
staff. Michael K. Denver, who of- 
ten has been a: odds with Mr. Bu- 
chanan. supported Mr. McFariane. 
sources said. 

Sources said that the dispute was 
left to the White House chief of 
staff, Donald T. Regan, to resolve 
and that the draft Mr. Regan was 
to give the president essentially in- 
corporated Mr. McFarla’ne’s 
changes. Mr. Reagan sometimes 
changes a speech once the final 
staff draft is presented io him 


INSIDE 

■ The House rejected a Repub- 
lican proposal to rerun the dis- 
puted Indiana election. Page 3. 

■ The U.S. Array warned that 

Pershing-2 missiles in West 
Germany were vulnerable to 
terrorists. Page 4. 

fl King Hussein said that efforts 
to revive the Mideast peace pro- 
cess continue. Page 4. 

■ Israels withdrawal from Leb- 

anon reflects a return to nation- 
al values. Prime Minister Shi- 
mon Peres said. Page 4. 

■ May Day protests were 

staged in Poalnd. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/ FINANCE 

■ The main barometer of US. 
economic strength fell 0.2 per- 
cent in March. Page 11. 

TOMORROW 

Europe is going to be crowded 
this year, but there are strate- 
gies and itineraries for savoring 
Die Old World while leaving the 
crow ds behind. In Weekend. 


Spans news Pages 8 and 9. 


Imposed on Nicaragua 


Among participating countries, 
France is now the most actively 
opposed to the program, proposing 
instead to its European partners 
that they begin a common, no nmil - 
itary research effort in the area of 
high technology. 

This program, called Eureka, 
would, in theory, allow Europe to 
make the same technological ad- 
vances it would accomplish if it 
joined the American program as a 
contractor. Another French offi- 
cial describing the French attitude 
toward the summit meeting's stra- 
tegic weapons discussion as a 
“damage control exercise," said 
that while few developments were 
expected from the joint discussions 
..of. eng the leaders, '.be individual 
two-way meetings might be more 
important. 

In a sense, the two-way meel 
fit what some Europeans 
regard as the American approacl 
in dealing with its allies on the 
issue. 

This tactic is described as pro- 
posing two-way cooperation agree- 
ments, but explaining at the same 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


By Lou Cannon 

Washing ton Pat Service 

BONN — President Ronald 
Reagan imposed economic sanc- 
tions against Nicaragua on 
Wednesday, saying that the steps 
woe “in response to the em ergency 
situation created by the Nicara- 
guan government’s aggressive ac- 
tivities in Central America." 

Mr. Reagan placed a total em- 
bargo on trade with the leftist San- 
dinist government, suspended 

Langboroe A Motley resigned 
as assistant secretary of state for 
tnter- American affairs. Page 3. 

landing rights in the United States 
for Nicaraguan planes and ships, 
and anno unced his intention to aid 
a U.S. treaty of friendship, com- 
merce and navigation with Nicara- 
gua. The sanctions become effec- 
tive Tuesday. 

The president’s executive order, 
which does not require congressio- 
nal approval cited “the unusual 
and extraordinary threat to the na- 
tional security and foreign polity of 
the United States." It said the ad- 
ministration was ffcriaring “a na- 
tional emergency to deal with that 
threat" 

[In Washington, Langhorne A 
Motley, outgoing assistant secre- 
tary of state for into - - American af- 
fairs, said, “We have told (he Nica- 
raguans we will lift the sanctions 
that we have announced today if 
they will take concrete steps on a 
dialogic and in other areas of ma- 
jor concern," United Press Interna- 
tional reported.] 

The chief White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speak es, who an- 
nounced the sanctions, said that 
Nicaraguan efforts to “subvert its 
neighbors" and intensify “commu- 
nist totalitarian internal rule" had 
increased since the House last week 
rejected Mr. Reagan’s proposal to 
provide $14 million in “humanitar- 
ian aid” to the anti-Sandinist re- 
bels. 

As examples be cited “new ties" 
between Nicaragua and the Soviet 
Union as a result of President Dan- 
iel Ortega Saavedra's visit to Mos- 
cow, the arrest of seven Nicaraguan 
agents in Honduras and recent de- 
liveries of helicopters and other 
military equipment from the Soviet 
Union and East Germany. 

In announcing the economic 
sanctions, which were urged by 
many members of Congress, Mr. 
Speak es said that Reagan was not 
abandoning his proposals to con- 
tinue aid to the rebels. 

“The president continues to be- 
lieve that direct pressure presents 
the only effective means 


Independent South African Daily Newspaper Folds 


By Alan Cowell 

Sew York Tima Sierviee 

JOHANNESBURG — The Rand Daily 
Mail one of South Africa's leading newspa- 
pers. has folded after 83 years in business. 

Closed by its management because of fi- 
nancial losses, the South African daily pub- 
lished its last edition Tuesday under the 
headline. “The Final Deadline." 

“With the passing of The Mafl, a vigorous 
voice of dissent has been stilled." the editor, 
Rex Gibson, wrote in an editorial rimmed in 
black on the front page of the newspaper. 
“The gap that The Mail will leave is im- 
mense. 

The last edition was filled with memories 
by previous editors, celebrating the newspa- 
per's crusades and triumphs and confronta- 
tions with the white minority authorities. 

But its final hours Monday night, in a 
newsroom Uttered with the paper cups and 
the stale canapes of a baleful wake, there 
seemed more recrimination and bitterness. 

“Something has been taken away frwn the 
overall perspective of the liberal vi$w in 
South Africa.” said Laurence Gandar. a for- 


mer editor who took over the newspaper in 
1957 and made it a major critic or the au- 
thorities. 

He referred to the dosing of the newspa- 
per as “the killing of The Mafl," and, reflect- 
ing a widespread view among journalists that 
bad manag ement was to blame, be said, “I 
believe that in different hands and with dif- 
ferent methods and a different will The Mail 
could have been saved." 

in March. Clive Kinsley, managing direc- 
tor of the South African Associated Newspa- 
pers group, which owns The Mafl, said the 
paper would close because of its “disastrous 
financial performance," with losses equiva- 
lent to $73 mfllion Iasi year. 

The newspaper’s circulation Iasi year was 
estimated at 1 16,000. down from 150,000 in 
the mid- 1970s. Two-thirds of its readership 
was believed to be black and, like other 
newspapers, it printed a special edition for 
blacks. 

A newspaper's business section, called 
Business Day, is to be retained and pub- 
lished as a financial daily. But it is expected 
by many to have only a limited circulation 


and none of the political clout of The Mail. 
Thus, readers in South .Africa’s most popu- 
lous area around Johannesburg will have 
scam choices in the political hue of their 
morning reading. 

The only other English-language morning 
newspaper in the area is The Citizen, which 
was initially created by the government tc 
challenge The Road Daily Mafl and which 
staunchly supports the government. 

Afrikaans-language newspapers, like 
Betfd, are firmly pre^goveramem, and news- 
papers with a predominantly black leader- 
ship. like The Sowetan and City Press, have 
little white following. 

Broadcast new* and commentary on radio 
and television also reflect government think- 
ing. So, while readers of morning newspapers 
like The Cape Times in Cape Town or" the 
black-circulation newspapers in Johannes- 
burg will continue to hear an alternative 
voice, the shaping of opinion by authorities 
in and around Johannesburg will be chal- 
lenged only by Tne Star, an evening newspa- 
per. 

Since the mid-1970s, the South African 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 41 



The fatuil ifea diin g 





1e 




Rand Daily Mail's final edition. 


2 Are Killed 
In Brussels 
Terror Blast 


Steven J. Dry den 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — A van loaded 
with explosives was blown up out- 
side the offices of a Belgian busi- 
ness group Wednesday, lolling two 
firemen and injuring 13 persons, 
police said. 

The attack was claimed by the 
Fighting Communist Cells, the left- 
ist group that has claimed responsi- 
bility for a series of bombings in 
Belgium since October, Belgian of- 
ficials said. It was the first attack 
by the group to cause deaths or 
serious injuries. 

The van exploded shortly after 
midnight on a street behind the 
offices of the Belgian Employers 
Federation, one block from the 
central railroad station. 

Before the explosion, several 
men left leaflets in the area warning 
people to leave because a booby- 
trapped car was parked nearby, po- 
lice said. At the same time, firemen 
who bad received a report that a 
van was on fire on the street arrived 
and approached the vehicle. 

A police officer who had seen the 
leaflets shouted a warning to the 
firemen but the van exploded be- 
fore they could escape. Two fire- 
men were killed and three firemen 
were injured, as were as two securi- 
ty guards and eight persons in near- 
by buildings. 

■ 2 Explosions in Paris 

Explosions damaged the Paris 
offices of two manufacturers con- 
nected with the arms industry 
Tuesday, and the attacks were 
claimed by the leftist terrorist 
group Direct Action, United Press 
international reported. 

Two bombs exploded at offices 
of THecommumcations. Radiofr- 
leciriques et Tdephoniques, a sub- 
sidiary of the Dutch company Phil- 
ips Electronics, which 
manufactures radar units and aeri- 
al photography equipment for 
fighter jets. 

.Another bomb exploded at the 
offices of the Sod fete Anonyme de 
Telecommunications, which builds 
infrared ray units for mig s ile s and 
fighter planes. The caretaker of the 
building was slighUv injured. 


ating Nicaragnan behavior and is 
using the av ailab le to him 

toward that end," Mr. Speakes 
said. 

“He urges all members of the 
Congress to support future re- 
quests for assistance to the Nicara- 
guan democratic resistance. He has 
also made it clear that the embargo 
does not apply to those goods des- 
tined for tne organized democratic 
resistance.” 

Trade between the United States 
and Nicaragua has dgHinaH simp- 
ly t hr oughout the Reagan adminis- 
tration. Presently, Nicaraguan im- 
ports into the United Stales total 
$57 nrillicm annually, compared to 
$263 million during Mr. Reagan’s 
first year in office m 1981. 

According to the Commerce De- 
partment, almost half the U$. im- 

n 

followed in 
by bed and veal shellfish, coffee 
and molasses. US. exports totaled 
$115 million, and the chi ef prod- 
ucts were insecticides, packaging 

materials, soybean Oil and taflra g 

The trade represented 17 percent 
of Nicaragua's exports and 20 per- 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 



Daniel Ortega Saavedra. 


Lebanon Battles Subside 
As Moslems Offer Trace 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — Fighting between 
Christians and Moslems subsided 
in Beirut and southern Lebanon an 
Wednesday after fierce battles 
Tuesday mghL 

Moslem leaders, meanwhile, 
proposed a cease-fire to halt the 
new fighting 

Police said Wednesday that five 
persons had been killed and 18 
wounded in nightlong dashes. The 
casualties had resulted from tank 
cannon fire, rocket-propelled gre- 
nades and heavy nwirihiiie gun fire 
along the Green fine that divides 
Beirut into Modem and Christian 
sectors. 

Hundreds of Beirut residents 
spent the night in basement shel- 
ters on both tides of the three-mile 
(five-kfloroeter) demarcation line, 
as Ghristian and M odem miKtiaa 

battled on despite 15 cease-fire ac- 
cords, police said. Occasional snip- 
er fire kept the five, mqor rood 


Dr ffitt^Srmm awH Shiite 
around Sdonand 



die capital dosed. 

The army command said that its 
troops had been caught frequently 
in the cross fire. It warned that 
orders had been issued to “shoot 
bade and destroy any source of 
fire" on other side of the line. 

Late Ttiesday, Christian defend- 
ers used Israeli-supplied tanks and 
artillery to repulse a Motion attack 
on then mountain redoubt of Kfar 
Faloos in southern Lebanon- 

State radio reported Tuesday 
that the Popular Liberation. Amy 
of leftist and Moslem ndhtias had 
stormed Kfar Faloos. But an Asso- 
ciated Press correspondent found 
the Moslems pinned down at Sal- 
hiye, three miles west of Kfar Fa- 
lous. 

According to telephone reports 
from Sdon, Moslem mfihias were 
regrouping their fighter* on the 
southwestern outskirts of Kfar Fa- 
lous on Wednesday. Bulthdr oam- 
manders said no new push was 
planned into the village. 

Kfar Falous is ax miles west of 
Jezzhte, the largest Christian town 
in southern Lebanon. An estimated 
50.000 refugees have fled to Jezzine 
since Thursday from 24 villages 


overrun 
Moslem 
in the 

The Druze leader, ^Walid Juzrib- 
lat, and his Shiite ally, Nabih Bern, 
made their joint peace proposal 
overnight is anote to the Lebanese 
Army command, rite two leaders, 
said in a statement broadcast by 
Lebanon's state radio. - 

Tbe plan called for 

•The withdrawal of the Israeli- 
sponsored South Ixbanese Army, a 
largely Christian from the 
Jezzine region and the deployment 
of the Syrian-trained 1st Brigade of 
the Lebanese Army in and around 
the town.- : ';z 

• A redeployment of the pro? 
dominantly Moslem. 12th brigade 
of the Lebanese Army on key junc- 
tions along the Beirut-SSdon coast- 
al highway. 

* • The return of all Christian and 
Moslems to the homes they fled 
east of Sidon and in the region 
during the weetiong fighting, along 
with “solid guarantees that their 
safety isnot threatened.":- : 

• A cdnapid i en g ve cease-fire in 
Beirut, where a four-party security 
committee representing the army 
and the principal waning militias 
would oversee the dismantling of 
militia fortifications and the aboli- 
tion of the Green line. 

According to statement, the 
army- commander, General Mkhd 
Aotm, gave- a favorable response. 
HetoJdMr.Jumb&tandMr.Bem. 
however, that tire leaderships of the ' 
Christian PhaUmgist patty and its 
militia, ihe Lebanese Faces,, had 
asked for mere time to stndy the-' 
proposals. ’ 

Several Beirut newspapers said 
Christia n politicians were applying 
pressure on Brigadier General An- 
toine Lahad, commander of the 
1,000-mm South Leb an ese Army, 

to withdraw Ms forces ft nmlemne 

to their base In Maxjayoun, 12 
miles sooth of Jezzine and near the 
Israeli border. 

Police and hospitals said that 75 
people have been killed and 220 
wounded in the Modem offensive, 
which drove the Christians from 
the coastal plain into the Miriiiking 
enclave around Jezzine. 



A woman watches as Christian refugees 
point leading to Israefi-held tenitory 


* ■ 





ic 

£ 

:r 


Vi 

‘ 


i lU H fc i jo. : 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 


* 


U.S. Trade 
Sanctions 
Imposed on 
Nicaragua 

(Continued from Page 1) 
cent of its imports. Although most 
of Nicaragua's major export crops 
— cotton, sugar and coffee — are 
sold elsewhere, the embargo was 
nevertheless expected to have a sig- 
nificant effect on the country’s dis- 
rupted economy, especially by de- 
priving it of dollars tor use in other 
international transact! ons. 

The White House chief of staff, 
Donald T. Regan, was asked on a 
television interview program 
Wednesday morning whether the 
sanctions might backfire because 
Nicaragua would be able to blame 
the United States for its economic 
problems, 

“No, they're already in a mess,” 
Mr. Regan replied, “they owe over 
$5 billion, they have no way of 
paying it. There’s no way they can 
lay that on us” 

Mr. Speakes was asked whether 
the effect of the sanctions would be 
to drive the Sandinists even closer 
to the Soviet Union, 

“It’s difficult to see how we 
could drive Nicaragua any closer,” 
Mr. Speakes said. “For six years, 
they’ve been totally receptive to So- 
viet aid" 

■ Nicaraguan Reaction 
The political coordinator of the 
ruling Sandiuist Float said Tues- 
day that the U.S. economic sanc- 
tions are designed to “conquer us 
by hunger," United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Managua. The 
official. Bayardo Arce, was speak- 
ing in response to reports that the 
sanctions would be imposed 
Mr. Arce said in a nationwide 
television address Tuesday, “They 
wish to conquer us by hunger, to 
put us on our knees with economic 
difficulties, but they will never 
achieve this." 

In Washington, a spokeswoman 
for the Nicaraguan Embassy said, 
“Undoubtedly these sanctions wiD 
have a profound impact primarily 
on the Nicaraguan private sector 
that presently controls 60 percent 
of the economy of the country 
“This new decision of the US. 
administration is consistent with its 
overall strategy that seeks the over- 
throw of the Nicaraguan govern- 
ment," she said 



Bautan 

The Rev. Wilfred Wood 

Anglicans Name 
A Black Bishop 

The Associated Press 

LONDON —The Church of 
En gland nam ed its first black 
bishop Tuesday, Wilfred Wood 
as assistant bidiop of the Lon- 
don suburb of Croydon. 

Father Wood 48, was born in 
Barbados and is at archdeacon 
of Southwark, south London. 
He will be consecrated bishop 
by the archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Robert Runtie, July 25. 

He said there was “nothing 
special” about being the first 
black bishop. “It is unbeliev- 
able that God should call black 
people to be churchwardens or 
priests, but not bishops,” he 
said 


US. House Rejects a New Election in Disputed Race WORLD BRIEFS 

Republicans Plan Walkout* Work on Budget, Other Bilk May Be Slowed Nitze Says Soviet Has Proposed Freeze 

T .. , .... , t.T. .l, .... M > ... . ? . 


By Steven V. Roberts 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — After an angry and par- 
tisan debate, the House of Representatives has 
voted 229-200, to rqect a Republican proposal 
for a special election to decide the hotly deput- 
ed House race in Indiana’s eighth district 

The Republicans decided to walk out of the 
chamber Wednesday when Frank X McGos- 
key was to be sealed 

“Swear in McCloskey and well begone." said 
a spokesman for the Republican leader, Robert 
Michel 

The conflict threatens to disrupt House pro- 
ceedings in coming weeks and could impair 
President Ronald Reagan's efforts to pass a 
budget and other legislative initiatives. Bitter 
Republicans have also vowed to use the issue in 
future campaigns to displace the Democrats as 
the majority party b the House. 

The vote ran largely along party lines, but 19 
Democrats, most of them southern conserva- 
tives, joined a united Republican bloc b favor- 
ing a new election. One of the 19, Romano L. 
Mazzoli of Kentucky, told the House that “the 
race does appear to be tabled” and should be 
re-run. 

A House-supervised recount showed the 
Democratic candidate, Mr. McCloskey, leading 
by a four-vote margin, the closest House race in 
this century. Democratic leaders insist the pro- 
cedures were fair and say they will move 
Wednesday to seat Mr. McCloskey, who was 
fust elected b 1982. 

“Neither Frank McCloskey. nor anybody 
else, should be required to beat a point spread to 
serve b this institution," said Representative 
Richard J. Durbin. Democrat of Illinois. 

Republicans have vowed to disrupt House 
"inns in order to protest the Democrats' 


action. After the vote, they offered a number of 


motions designed to delay the p ro cee d ings and 
tbe Democrats quickly adjourned the House. 

Party leaders concede that Republican delay- 
ing tactics could hinder Mr. Reagan’s legislative 

program, and House leaders have already bad to 
postpone floor action on two major bills, one to 
authorize funds for the State Department and 
the other to provide foreign aid. 

“It concerns me," said Representative Trent 
Lott of Mississippi, the assistant minority lead- 
er. “but 1 had tittle hope of anything construc- 
tive coming out of this House this year anyway." 

Democrats said they regretted the closeness 
of the outcome, but they insisted that if they 
gave b to Republican pressures and called a 
special election, they would be encouraging the 
band of aggressive young conservatives who 
have used the issue as a partisan rallying cry for 
months. 

“You would really be mining the place over 
to government-by-buDying if you did that," said 
Representative Richard A. Gephardt of Mis- 
souri, tbe chairman of the Democratic Party 
Caucus. 

The dispute over the Indiana race has injected 
an unusual level of tension and partisanship 
bto House deliberations since Congress con- 
vened b January and the Democratic majority 
refused to seat Richard D. McIntyre, the Re- 
publican candidate, who ted the race b initial 
returns. 

In dosing Tuesday's debate, Jim Wright of 
Texas, the majority leader, said, “In all my years 
b Congress, I've never seen anything to have 
created such a degree of emotionalism.” 

The Republicans said their rage and frustra- 
tion reflected an accumulation of long-festering 
grievances against the Democratic majority, 
which they accuse of arrogant and high-handed 
behavior. 

“It goes much beyond one seat b Indiana.” 


said Mr. Lott “It goes to the fundamental 
problem about the way the House is run, to the 
Democrats' arrogance of power.” 

Democrats have controlled the House for 
more than 30 years, and many young Republi- 
cans have chafed under the prospect of spend- 
ing their entire careers in the minority. These 
Republicans have argued that the only way for 
tbe Republicans to become a majority is to 
confront the Democrats at every nun ami draw 
dear lines between the parties. 

Republican strategists said the Indiana race 
gave them a good issue to use b future elections 
because it bolstered their argument that it was 
“time for a change" b the House leadership. 

The House speaker. Thomas P- O’Neill Jr„ 
yiirf Democrats were not worried about the 
political risks of seating thdr candidate. In 
recent travels, Mr. O’Neill said, “not one damn 
soul me about the Indiana election.” 

The tortuous history of the Indiana race be- 
gan on dection night, when Mr. McCloskey 
appeared to have won by 72 votes. But a retabu- 
lation moved Mr. McIntyre bto the lead and, 
when a recount by the state confirmed that 
result. Indiana’s secretary of state. Edward Sim- 
cox, certified his fellow Republican as the win- 
ner. 

However, when Mr. McIntyre arrived to take 
his seat at tbe beginning of this Congress b 
January, Democrats argoed that the recount 
procedures used by tbe state had thrown out 
about 5,000 ballots. They voted to seat neither 
candidate and to conduct a recount under the 
auspices of a three-member panel that included 
two Democrats and one Republican. 

The Republicans, who had steadfastly op- 
posed a special election, changed tactics and 
called for one when their candidate slipped 

b ehind 


WASHINGTON (AP) ~ The Soviet Union has proposed a freeze b 
offensive rtudear weapons in an effort to “lode in'* its edge b missiles 
over the United States. Paul H. Nitze. the senior UJS. arms control 
adviser, said Wednesday. 

Mr. Nitze said b a speech that the proposed moratoriums in both long 
and intermediate-range weapons “discredited" and old. “The Soviet 
Union is pleased with the current strategic situation.” he said. “They 
possess substantial advantages b several key measures of strategic 
offensive nuclear power, particularly in prompt coumerforoe capability." 

The speech, before the National Press Qua, revealed some «the give 
and- take in the first round of U-S.-Sovict negotiations in Geneva, whid 
ended last week. At the opening of the talks b March, US. and Sovie 
negotiators adopted a “confidentiality rate,” which, according to 1 
officials, prohibits the negotiators from discussing details of the ia_ 
Mr. Nitze. who advises President Ronald Reagan, a not a member of i 
UJS. delegation. 

Irish Prime Minister Visits Ulster 

LONDONDERRY, Northern Ireland (AP) — Prime Minister Garret j 
FitzGerald of Ireland made a surprise visit here Tuesday to inaugurate an [ 
air link, and hard-line Protestants attacked the trip as an “invasion.” 

“We do not welcome any invasion of our territory bv the prime j 
minister of a hostile foreign country, whatever the pretense He uses," said 
a spokesman for tbe Democratic Unionist Party, led by the Reverend lan 
Paisley. 

Although Mr. FitzGerald has traveled before to other parts of North- 
ern Ireland, it was the fro! time that a leader from the Irish republic bad 
visited Londonderry b 20 years. Police and troops were deployed around 
the airport to protect Mr. FitzGerald, whose plans to inaugurate the 
Dnblin-Londosaderry air link had been kepi secret for security reasons 
No incidents were reported. 

Paris Seeks to Alter Noumea Congress 

PARIS (Reuters) —The French government has approved a draft law! 
that would replace the existing territorial assembly in New Caledonia 


. -■>* 


Hi 


Talks Force Bonn to Debate Role as 'Economic Locomotive’ 


By Leonard Silk 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — The economic summit 
conference beginning here Thurs- 
day is forcing West German policy- 
makers to re-examine issues that 
had been regarded as either settled 
or unsol vable. 

Three interlocked issues — 
growth, international trade and 
monetary policy — are the keys to 
this conference. 

President Ronald Reagan and 
his advisers are pr essing the Euro- 
peans and Japan for faster growth 
and a new round of trade negotia- 
tions. President Francois Mitter- 
rand, however, says France cannot 
accept a new trade round without 


coupling it to revision of the inter- 
national monetary system. 

There is much dissent in West 
Germany on these issues. Some 
Germans are wary of bring forced 
to play the rote of “locomotive” for 
worlds 


economic growth. That wari- 
ness was expressed in an interview 
Friday by Karl Otto Pohl, presi- 
dent of the German central bank. 

But Wilfried Guth, co-chairman 
of the Deutsche Bank, West Ger- 
many’s largest, said b an interview 
Sunday that, in his view, G erman y 
could “do better." He says it is 
possible now to accelerate the Ger- 
man economy’s expansion without 
regenerating inflation. 

West Ge rmans were disturbed 
Monday by the forecast of tbe gov- 


ernment’s council of private econo- 
mists that German economic 
growth would be only 25 percent 
this year, jnst below last year’s 16 
percent, and that unemployment 
would increase to about 10 percent 
from 9.1 percent last year. 

Mr. Guth said he did not consid- 
er President Reagan's effort to get 
tbe West Germans and their Euro- 
pean partners to accelerate growth 
as the same as what he called “the 
primitive locomotive theory" of the 
Carter administration. He defined 
that theory as “Keynesian pump- 
priming.” 

Mr. Guth said that he favored 
measures to attack growth prob- 
lems from the supply side — “by 
doing away with restrictions, doing 


away with impediments to growth 
and getting more flexibility in labor 
markets.” 

But he also saw room for tbe 
Bundesbank, West Germany’s cen- 
tral bank, to pursue a more expan- 
sive monetary policy aimed at 
bringing down interest rates. 

On the issue of international 
monetary revision raised by Presi- 
dent Mitterrand, West German 
leaders are uniformly opposed to 
another Bret ton Woods confer- 
ence, at which fixed exchange rates 
were set However, they say that 
the existing monetary system of 
floating exchange rates can be im- 
proved. 

Economics Minister Martin 
Bangemann said b an interview 


that German experience wi thin the 
European monetary system, which 
has fixed but changeable exchange 
rates, encouraged him to fed that 
the world monetary system could 
be unproved by “introducing more 
stable dements.” 

Mr. Pohl, the central banker, 
says it would be a mistake to try to 
brine the International Monetary 
Fund and tbe World Bank bto 
closer collaboration on lending to 
debtor countries. 

But Mr. Guth, the private bank- 
er, says that while the two institu- 
tions have different roles to per- 
form, the World Bank needs 
stronger leadership and should re- 
late its lending to a nation's overall 
needs. 


A French government representative, Georgina Dufoix, said the 
would be submitted to the National Assembly b early June, after 
New Gafcrffwiinn assembly hod been invited to give its views. 

She said after Tuesdays weekly cabinet meeting that the six-point 
autonomy plan was aimed at enabling the different communities in New 
Caledonia to cooperate in shaping thdr future. She said the Pacific , 
territory would be split along linguistic lines bto four regions, which 
would elect councilors to the new 43-member congress. < 

U.S. Seeks Belter Arms Ties in India 

NEW DELHI (WF) — The U.S. undersecretary of defense for policy, 
Fred C fide, began three days of talks with senior Indian officials 
Wednesday in an attempt to establish a substantive arms sate relationship 
with India b the face of a virtual Soviet monopoly b the field. 

Mr. llde’s visit, which will be followed in a week by a visit here by tbe 
Air Force secretary, Verne Orr, is intended partly to counter Indian 
anxiety over Washington's sale of sophisticated weapons systems to 
Pakistan in a $3.2 billion package. It is also designed to take advantage of 
what the Reagan administration views as an opportunity for better U.S.- 
Indian relations following the dection of Rajiv Gandhi as prime minister, 
diplomatic sources said. 

The sources said that a major policy objective of the U.S. administra- 
tion is to encourage diversification of Indian arms purchases beyond the 
Soviet Union, which has been India's major foreign arms supplier for 
years. 


THE BREAKFAST TIME TOAST 


At 9am each day the board members of James 
Burnough may be found making their toast 

That’s the time when they sample and ’nose the 
previous day’s distillation of Beefeater London Dry. 

They like their toast to be dear, brilliant and subtly 
balanced. With a dry softness that doesn’t overwhelm 
the palate. 

Only then is it allowed to leave the distillery 
bearing the proud name of Beefeater. 

Invariably it meets the required high 
standard. 

Which is undoubtedly what prompts 
them to raise their glasses to the memory 
of their founder Mr. James Burrough. 

\ A man who, just like them, was 

\\ inordinately fussy about his dry toast 




THE GIN OF ENGLAND 


U.S. Push Renews Debate on Japan’s Economy 


By Susan Chira 

New York Tuna Service 

TOKYO — American pressure 
on Japan to stimulate its domestic 
economy, including uigbgs likely 
to be renewed at the Bonn summit 
conference, have rekindled a de- 
bate about Japan’s fundamental 
economic policies. 

Although economists attribute 
Japan’s large and growing trade 
surpluses to tbe strong dollar and 
other macroeconomic factors, U.S. 
officials, such as Secretary of State 
Geoige P. Shultz, have suggested 
that a more expansionary posture 
domestically would help to reverse 
trade and currency imbalances. 

If Japan took steps to stimulate 
its domestic economy, the argu- 
ment runs, consumers would have 
more money to spend on imports 
and corporations would invest 
more money in Japan rather than 
in the United States Treasury bills 
they now favor. Less demand for 
the dollar might also spur its fall 
against the yen, making American 
products less expensive in Japan, 
and Japanese products more ex- 
pensive in tbe United States. 

But demands that the Japanese 
government adopt a Keynesian 
posture and spend more to achieve 


which has pledged to reduce a long- 
term central government debt that 
amounts to half tbe country’s gross 
national product 
Noboni Takeshila, the minister 


benefit from their country's pros- 
perity, and to what extent Japan 
should increase its heavy fiscal bur- 
dens to raise its citizens’ standard 
of living. 


of fi n a n ce, whose department con- **jf g country is saving more 

utils the budget, has said the minis- r f t ^ investing then by Keynes’s 


try will oppose any increase in a 
government debt that swelled to 
$515.9 billion last year. 

Furthermore, a Finance Minis- 
try study issued tins month predict- 
ed that an increase of public invest- 
ment by $12 billion would increase 
imports by only $1.3 trillion. It also 
concluded that a 520-billion tax 
reduction might shave the trade 
surplus with the United States, 
which Japan rats at $33 billion, by 
only about $700 million. 

Nearly every day in recent 
weeks, Mr. Nakasone and a cboms 
of other officials and businessmen 
have spoken out against increasing 
government spending. Instead, Mr. 
Nakasone is expected to propose 
that Japan devise tax incentives 
and ease regulations to encourage 
private sector investment and con- 
sumption. 

But with equal regularity, Mr. 
Nakasocte’s rivals, including politi- 
cians jockeying to succeed him, 
some ministries, and a government 
advisory committee of academics. 



Nakasone and much of his cabinet. 




In Jakarta 

there's a superb hotel 
that is more like a 
luxurious country dub. 

HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
INTER- CONTINENTAL 




T HE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL® 

•^INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS 

Jntan Lapangan Banteng Seta tan, (P.Q Box 32**). 3701QS. Tde\: 44156 
For reservations call: Hong Kong: 5-8440311/3. 

Tokyo: 2150777 Singapore: 220247n. Osaka: 2b4Hh«?. 
or call your nearest inter-Conti non lal -wiles office . 



that Japan change 
sider issuing bonds to finance pub- 
lic works projects. 

An advisory committee headed 
by Saburo Olata, a former foreign 
minister, issued a report that was 
included in Japan's package of 
market-opening measures. The re- 
port proposed that the govemmait 
encourage domestic expansion 
through a variety of measures — 
tax revision, deregulation, a reduc- 
tion in working hours, and in- 


definition, there will bean external 
surplus,” said Herbert Cochran, 
commercial attaebb at the Ameri- 
can Embassy here. “And why do 
people save? Because there are no 
retirement benefits to speak of, no 
help for home financing, educa- 
tion. If the Japanese were to in- 
crease investment by budding more 
homes, roads, improving sewage — 
that would be the big thing.” 

Mr. Cochran’s reasoning is ech- 
oed by such Japanese as Kiicfai 
Miyazawa, an aspirant, for the 
prime minister's post. But such pol- 
icies are not endorsed by Japan’s 
political and business establish- 
ment. 

“We are trying to create small 
government," said Kazoo Nu- 
kazawa, director of the Interna- 
tional Economic Affairs Depart- 
ment of (he Kridanren, Japan’s 
leading business organization. 
“Government is like opium; you 
never quit the habit if you keep 
borrowing from the nation. As long 
as we have a reasonable growth 
rale, we should not surrender our- 
selves to the seductive call of the 
Keynesians." 

Among the economic policies 
under discussion is the country’s 
lax system, which, many aigue, en- 
courages saving at the expense of 
investment 

Tbe system allows only very mi- 
nor deductions for mortgage loans, 
which is the major expense for 
manv Japanese families. It offers 
much less generous depreciation 
schedules and exacts relatively 


save for the future rather than 
spend. 

The Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development 
puts Japan’s savings ratio, wmch is 
the amount saved as a percent of 
disposable personal income, at 
17.5, compared with a ratio of 5.1 
in the United States. 

But while the savings rate is high 
by American standards, Heizo Ta- 
kenaka. a senior economist at the 
Finance Ministry, noted that the 
rate had been dedming, a trend 
that its aging population will accel- 
erate. Increasingly, be said, the el- 
derly will spend the money they 
had saved for retirement. 

Government officials have also 
ruled out lairing monetary mea- 
sures to stimulate Hemund, such as 
cutting tbe official discount rate to 
push interest rates down. Satoshi 
Sunrita, governor of the Bank of 
Japan, aid such action would 
speed the flow of capital to higher- 
interest American investments, fur- 
ther strengthening the strong dollar 
that many believe is at the heart of 
the problem. 


For the Record 

Gary Dotson, who has spent six years in prison for a rape his accuser 
now says never happened, can be released on bond during appeals, the 
Illinois Supreme Court rated Tuesday. His mother said she had arranged 
a $10,000 bank loan to meet (he cash requiranents for $100,000 bond. 

(AP) 

The U.S. sofiritor general, Rex E. Lee, under fire from liberals when he 
took office four years ago and more recently from conservatives saying he 
did not push hard enough for administration views on abortion, school 
prayer, btisjogand civil rights, announced Tuesday that he was resigning 
to enter private practice. ----- - • - JWP) 

Ernst Zundd, 46, a West German convicted of publishing a pamphlet 
that said the Holocaust was a hoax, was ordered deported Monday Iry 
Canadian officials. He had been sentenced to 15 months in jail in March 
for publishing anti-Jewish propaganda. ( Reuters) 

Selective strikes by 600 Swedish customs officers were expected to slop 
air traffic and dose borders to trucks and trains on Thursday. Car 
crossings, domestic rail traffic and other services were expected to 
continue as usual. (AP) 

Two subc om mittees of the US. House of Representatives have ap- 
proved a bill that would ban new loans to and U& investment in South 
Africa unless progress is made toward ending racial segregation there 
The measure now goes to the full Foreign Affairs Committee. (WP) 
Iraqi planes fired ai Exocet nrissOe into a Turkish oil tanker south of 



Correction 

A Washington Post artide in April 24 editions erroneously gave the 
size of Vietnam's recent devaluation of its curren~ f •“ An ~" ,hm 

dollar. The currency is actually being devalued 


Mold. 


ceArms Leads cls Political Issue 



(Cmthmed from Page 1) 

time that nothing could stand in 
the way of private American con- 
tractors’ searing European asso- 
ciates for projects related to the 
space program. 

The West Germans, who have 
spoken more favorably of the re- 
search aspects of the U.S. initiative 
than have tbe French, are expected 
to tell President Reagan (hat thdr 
position is still bang formulated. 
According to a German source. 


creased spending on roads, housing higher corporate taxes than many Chancellor Helmut Kohl will say dedaration refming to 
and other public works. other countries. And in a nation that his government hopes to share offer of narticmkric 

In many ways, the debate touch- that does not offer the extensive a common position with its Euro- pwuwpoui. 


many ways, 

es on critical social questions — to social welfare programs as the 
wbat extent Japan's consumers United States does, most families 


position 

pean partners, but that this is not a 
condition for West German partid- 


The Rand Daily Mail Folds After 83 Years 


(Continued from Page 1) 

authorities have sought to curb 
press freedom and tbe influence of 
The Mail, goingso far as to finance 
the creation of The Citizen, accord- 
ing to clandestine accounts, so as to 
steer English-speaking opinion. 

“What is going to happen,” Mr. 
Gibson, the editor, said as the final 
edition was put together, “is a re- 
striction on the scope erf the news." 

The Mad, be said, had been a 
leader in covering unrest in black 
townships. But with its disappear- 
ance, he said, there will be little 
pressure on other newspapers to 
take its place. 

“The public is going to get less 
news," he said. “Black unrest 


makes every white reader uncom- 
fortable. Whites do not want to 
think that there is a ferment just 
outside their field of vision.” 

The MaiTs dosing was greeted 
with unconcealed glee by tbe au- 
thorities. President Pieter W. Botha 
called for “a new spirit of South 
Africanness” among newspaper 
journalists. 

■ Mine Offices Bombed 

Earlier, Michael Paries of the Los 
Angeles Times reported from Johan- 


■ Both Anglo-American and Ang- 
lo vaal, regarded as among the 


pa lion in the program for space 
weapons. 

Chancellor Kohl was described 
as likely to tdl President Reagan 
that all possibilities for German 
involvement in tbe program were 
being “constructively investigat- 
ed," 

U.S. officials have said that tbe 
summit meeting Mil produce no 
“separate statement” on the Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative, but other 
participants have said there might 
be a vague paragraph and a general 
lie Ameri- 

i offer of participation. 

He added; “ff we don't have an 
SD1 passage, that would mean that 
tbe summit bad been a failure in 
tbe political area" because the sub- 
ject appeared too sensitive or too 
divisive to mention. 

A series of noneconomic issues 


will be raised by the European and 
Japanese leaders. 

In addition to their interest in 
bearing a report from President 
Reagan on the first months of the 
renewed nego t ia ti ons on nuclear 
weapons between the United States 
and the Soviet Union in Geneva, 
the allies are expected to emphasize 
thdr backing far a meeting in the 
fall between Mr. Reagan and the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. 

West Germany, which is particu- 
larly attached to the appearance of 
relaxed relations between the Unit- 
ed States and the Soviet Union, isf 
likely to press for a US. -Soviet 
summit meeting. Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher of Britain, who 
has spent more time with Mr. Gor- 
bachev than the other leaders, was 
also thought likely to urge Presi- 
dent Reagan to go ahead with plans 
for the meeting. 


%■ 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

BAoeiars • masters - doctorate 

Per Work, XcaJr m i r. Ufa rr|iifaiin. 
Send detailed resume 
for fr«« evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 
600 N. Sepulveda B!vd„ 

Las Angeles. California 
90049. Dept. 23. USA. 


The offices of two huge South 
African corporations that had dis- 
missed 17,400 black workers last 
week woe heavily damaged by 
bomb blasts early Tuesday. 

Tbe explosions, the first in cen- 
tral Johannesburg since Septem- 
ber, occurred at the headquarters 
of the Anglo-American Corp. and 
Anglovaal Ltd., two mining and 
industrial companies. 


BaCHELOfl.MASTER.OOCTOflATE 1 

URMAOfCAH Use |M nsl eqenwi 33 [ 
ortf tamxt vh feme No clsses sewn 
9 wi [M» itigafeiet Sretts BoM ipsa ■ 
rout titutnn Sell Head - Sent Resaw 
jgrif fo N. CM EnlHW 

1 lm 213 278 1094 

Uiiisnite Bin 

WM SeeeilyHiDS C# USB W3I? 


ers, had already reached tentative 
agreements with tbe National 
Union of Mineworkers, which has 
100,000 members, on early re-em- 
ployment of (be dismissed workers, 
most of whom have been sent back 
to their rural homes. 

The two buildings were exten- 
sively damaged, as were nearby 
stores and offices. The explosions 
occurred almost simultaneously. 
No casualties were reported, de- 
spite a shower of glass mat covered 
surrounding streets, and a shock 
wave fell almost 10 miles (16 kilo- 
meters) away. 

In Lusaka, Zambia, an officer of 
the outlawed African National 
Congress said that it was likely that 
activists of his group had placed 
the bombs. 

Also Tuesday. 40 union mem- 
bers were arrested on charges of 
holding an illegal galberingouiside 
Johannesburg City Hall. The pro- 
tests occurred at the resumption of 
negotiations between die Metal 
and Allied Workers Union and the 
Steel and Engineering industry 
Federation on wages and a variety 
of grievances. 


Host of Reagans in West Germany 
Says That Hitler Was His Godfather 

BONN (AP) —Baron JOrg Adolf S gimwmd von Holzschuher, who 
owns the 17th-century castle where Presdent Ronald Reagan is 
staying this week, says his godfather was Addf Hitler. 

Baron Holzschuher, owner of Gymnteh Cask, said he was named 
after the Nazi leader and was given a silver dish as a gift from Hitler at 
his christening in a village in northern Bavaria in 1934. Hitter was not 
present at tbe christening and Baron H ol zschuher never saw him, he 
said in a telephone interview Wednesday. Nor, he said, did Hitler ever 
visit the castle, about IS miles (29 kilometers) outside Boon. 

“It's the first I’ve heard of it." the White House deputy press 
secretary. Peter Roussel said. 

Baron Holzschuher said Hitler never had any connection with the 
castle where Mr. Reagan and his wife. Nancy, arrived Wednesday and 
were to spend the next five nights daring the economic summit 
meeting. “Hitler was never in Gyitmich," Baron Holzschuher said. “1 
myself was no NazL Even if I had wanted to, I would not have had the 
chance. 1 wasn't old enough.” 

“There was never a connection between Gymnich castle and the 
Nans." he said. “As Tar as this place is concerned, really, it should not 
be embarrassing to the president of the United States.” 

He said he did not know why Hitter became his godfather, but 
thought that Hiller had many godchildren bom to important German 
officials of the time. Baron Holzschuher's father, Wilhelm, was a Nazi 
party member and governor of two districts in Bavaria, he said. 

Baron Holzschuher was born on March 10. 1934. and christened in 
a Protestant church in the Bavarian village of Anelshofen. 


m 




i 







•' '■ <' s -' 
' r -V0' ■ :• 


'. % - . <g *‘* 


-I# 


BNTER3SATI0NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 


rvlfliLL 


F40X^ 


Page 3 


Animalson Spacelab 
"Tow Scientific Tests 




Oh 




HOUSTON — Scientists aboard 
the space shuttle Challenger got 
one bailey experiment ru nning 
Wednesday, but continued to 
struggle with troubles that included 
free-floating food and feces from 
1 animals on board. 

. Two foul-smefling waves of 
tides floated into the weigh 
'Spacelab mounted in Challengei*® 
cargo bay as an astronaut attempt- 
ed to feed some of the 24 rats and 
two monkeys carried in cages. 

' That came a day after an experi- 
ment that had gone awry sent hu- 
man urine floating through the 
space craft. 

[: Space officials complained that 

t. too much attention had been fo- 


bmk camera was disabled because 
it cobW not be extended through an 
airlock because the airlock door 
ted jammed. The camera was to 
have photographed interstellar 
douds. 

But a medical experiment de- 
to measure 


.mine produced m weightlessness 
. begun operating Wednesday after 
two days ctf problems. The collec- 
tion system had spilled its sample 
into the cabin when the astronauts 
tried to use it 

The animals in Spacelab are in a 
new design of cage that is being 
evaluated' for habitability for 
its when, animal experiments 
; be performed in orbit 
Dr. Thornton ran into trouble 


! 1 cused on sanitary problems when Tuesday when be tried to replace 
1 most of the mission’s sdeodfic ob- vitamin-loaded rat food, which ap- 


jeetives were being 
j‘ George Fschd, dud scientist for 
i Spacdab, the Sl-bUBon Enropean- 
buUt laboratory, gave the missKm a 

1 ' rating of “very high.” 

Mr. FichtI raid Tuesday that sev- 
en of the nine eiqwriments activat- 
ed since themisaon started Man- 
v day were operating. . 

I The crew, which consists of five 
! : scientists plus a nrifitary command- 
{ a and pilot, are working in two 
f shifts to staff theSpacdab 24 hours 
i. a day. The mission commander is 
f .• Colonel Robert F. Overmyerand 
| the pilot is Colonel Frederick IX 
? Gregory, both of the Air Force. 
The scientists are Dr. Noonan E 


patently ted dried out since it was 
put aboard the shuttle 48 hours 


before, the launching Monday. . 
cd a food I 



Senate Votes Prefimniary Approval 
Of Reagan Budget Package, 50-49 


When he opened a food tray, cram- 
bled Arias floated out in a cloud 
into the Spacelab module. 

Later, when he inspected a sus- 
pect monkey-feeding mechanism, 

“There Was mst a flood rtf partially 
ealea crumbs of pellets, bits of fe- 
ces and so forth floating free,** Dr. 

Thornton said. 

Officials said the debris posed no 

danger to heaWL - (UPl AF) Taylor G. Wang, a physicist, hooks up a rarfio In the Spacdab to help activate the laboratory. 


Th* Anoddad fti 


t 


• • • print. 

The Drue Trade: A Windfall for U.S. Government 

w* » whifo nrttino an/1 pHf 


Thagard and Dr. William E 

Seized Property, From Mansions to Rolls Royces, Is New Source of Income 


a physiost, and 


Berg, a chemist 
Mr. Fichtl said the astronants 
were growing electronic crystals 
that cannot be produced m Earth’s 



By Jon Nordhtimer traffickers anesold off to satisfy income tax liens 

f/ew York Tima Service and court judgments. 

MIAMI — Sid Levy came to the auction' “The number of exclusive properties we are 
planning to pay about $750,000 for the nine- 


cooductfid successful tests of flood 
dynamics and had taken pictures of 
dawn light over the plank's poles. 

’’ An experiment with a Freoch- 


Bomb Found Near Btinn 
After Reagan Arrives 


Tht Associated Pros 


m 


BONN — A homemade bomb 
was found Wednesday on the ter- 
race of the German Air and Space 
Travel Association bufl&ig in. sub- 
urban Bad Godcsbtng and defused 
shortly after . President Ronald 
Reagan arrived for the economic 
summit meeting. 

Bad Godesbmg, site of the' 
American Embassy and many dip- 
lomatic residences, is about 16 
mites (26 kilometers) from the 

guest house Mr. Reagan 3* 

> staying. 


bedroom oceanfront horse pot on the block by 
the UJL government. 

But 70 mimites later, as his snakeridn boots 
crunched grains of windswept sand on the tiled 
patio beside the property's 40-foot (IOmeter) 
swimming pod, Mr. Levy heard the federal 
auctioneer complete the countdown on the 
Levy** bid of $919,000. 

At the wd, “Sold!” Mr. Levy’s wife, Sandra, 
relaxed her prayerful hands clenched under her 
dim and embraced her husband. 

“So we’ve bought a drug dealer’s bouse — 
where else but in MSarnTT Mr. Levy, a shopping 
center devdoper, said as applause abated from a 
crowd of unsuccessful bidders surrounding him 
on the patia “I would have never drained 
about mis bade home in Chicago, spending 
$919,000 in an afternoon auction % the ride of 
the ocean." 

Government officials said the home was con- 
fixated when it was demonstrated in corat that 
it had been purchased with money derived from 
drug operations nm by Robert Stating, who is 
saving a 40-year tom in federal prison on a 
marijuana smuggling conviction. 

The federal auction, mice confined to back- 
water militaiy bases and office buildings, has 
moved into uue endhves of wuftionaires' along 
Florida’s Gold Coast as the properties of ding 


asked to handle has mushroomed in recent 
years," said B.C Mahby, regional director of 


r So far we’ve been getting 
competitive market-value 
bids on what we’ve put up.’ 


the disposal division of the General Services 
Administration. 

“But it's fairly easy for os to market them," he 
said. “It attracts a lot more glamorous market 
than selling off a coal gariBratinn plant” 

An auction team from his agency, which man- 
ages fedwal property, is sdling off 10 properties 
on this trip and dans to dispose of 15 more this 
summer, said H. Howard DeVane, a govern- 
ment real estate specialist. There wfll also be 
sales of personal items ranging from jewelry to 
Rolls-Royces, seized from nag or drug dealers. 

“So far we’ve been getting good, competitive 
market-value bids on what wrve put up," Mr. 
DeVane said. 

Real estate agents in the area said the market 


The auctioneers also sold a home in Fort 
Lauderdale for $1 J minion and one in Vero 
Bead) for $1.4 million. 

' “The money isn’t much compared to some of 
the government properties we routinely sell 
off,” said Mm Connolly, the agency’s chief 
national auctioneer. “Just two wears ago I sold 
400 acres (161.9 hectares) at an air force base for 
$45 mfllion in 30 minnies But an auction like 
the one today makes me feel good because we’re 
taking it away from the bad guys.” 

The Golden Beach house, like other property 
auctioned off by Mr. Connolly’s team, was 
seized under a federal racketeering law that 


By Jonathan JFuerbringer 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Repub- 
lican-controlled Senate has nar- 
rowly approved the Whim House 
budget package, giving a symbolic 
victory to President Ronald Rea- 
gan as he left for the economic 
summit meeting in Bonn. 

The package is still open, to 
amendment, and it became dear 
Tuesday that , to win final Senate 
approval it would have to be 
changed agnificanlly. 

Tuesdays Senate vote of 50-49 
climaxed a week of lobbying by the 
ns^ority leader, Robert I. Dole of 
Kansas, who wanted io give the 
compromise budget some momen- 
tum by beginning the debate with a 
yes vote on the package as a whole. 

Two Republicans voted against 
the package while four others voted 
for it after negotiations with Mr. 
Dole. 

“We moved we could keep the 
Republican majority together,” 
Mr. Dole said after the vote. “And 
we consider this to be very impor- 
tant in setting the parameters of 
where we want to go. we want $300 
billion in deficit reduction.” 

Senator Lawton Chiles of Flori- 
da, (he r anking Democrat on the 
Budget Committee, said, “It seems 
to me this is a major vote, a blue- 
print 

The budget plan, which allows 
increases in the militaiy budget 
while cutting and eliminating many 
domestic programs, is intended to 
cut the deficit for $52 billion in 
1986 and by neatly $300 billion 
over three years. The deficit, which 


is now more than $200 billion, 
would be cum around $100 billion 
in 1988, based on the optimistic 
economic projections of the Rea- 
gan administration. 

The next major test for the bud- 
get package is expected to be a vole 
on an amendment to reject a key 
dement, a limit on the cost-of-liv- 
ing increase for Social Security re- 
cipients. 

[Mr. Dole conceded Wednesday 
that be expected the Senate to re- 
move limits on Soda] Security ben- 
efit increases from the compromise 
budget plan. The Associated Press 
reported 

[“Tm a realist; I know we’re go- 
ing to be wounded a few times,” 
Mr. Dote said.] 

To get the votes he needed Tues- 
day, Mr. Dole agreed to some mod- 
est changes in the package, includ- 
ing dropping theproposri to phase 
out the Rural Electrification Ad- 
ministration. This was critical in 
getting the vote of Senator Mark 


Andrews, a North Dakota Republi- 
can and longtime backer of the 
agency, which provides low-cost 
power and telephone service in ru- 
ral areas. 

Senator Lowell p. Wdcker Jr n 
Republican of Connecticut, won 

restoration of Funds for progr ams 
for the handicapped, including 
educational and vocational reha- 
bilitation. 


Mr. Dole has also promised sev- 
eral Republicans that they would 
get to offer amendments them- 
selves to rqect some of the cuts, 
including the one for Social Securi- 
ty. Mr. Dole said Tuesday evening 
that he would probably offer stum 
an amendment in the name of two 
Republicans, Senators Alfoose M. 
D’ Amato of New York ami Paula 
Hawkins of Florida. 

Under the rules for the debate of 
the Budget Resolution in the Sen- 
ate, even if the overall package is 
approved on this first vote, it is still 
open for amendments. 


U.S. Ethics Board 
Reviews Official 


individual is convicted of conspiring to commit 
a number of crimes. 


H Washington Past Service ' 

WASHINGTON — Robert A 
Rowland, bead of the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration, 
owns up to $50,000 in stock io a 
conglomerate that could be directly 
affected by his decision not to 
adopt a federal standard requiring 
dean drinking water and toilet fa- 
cilities for farm workers. 


“It’sagreati 

folks’ attention," Mr. Maltby said fit a tele- 
phone interview from bis Atlanta office. “Not 
ontydotteywindupinjail, but when they get 
out, they don’t have a home to go to." 

A separate division of the General Services 
Administration handles the sales of airplanes, 
cars and boats seized in this way. 

“A lot of the law enforcement agencies con- 
vert this property to their own use to oombat 
other drag traffickers,” Mr. Maltby said. “Why 
send an undercover agent oat in a goverament- 


Mr. Rowland owns $15,000 to 
$50,000 in stock in Tenneco Inn, 
whose agribusiness subsidiary 
owns more than 1 nriflion acres 
(400,000 hectares) of farmland and 


employs thousands of workers in 
Cafifomia and Arizona. 


valiw of the property Mr. Levy bou ght, s ituated issued Foni to- hobnob with cocaine dealers 
in the cxdtutve Golden Beach section above when a Rolls-Royce wffl help him fit into the 
Miami Beach, was about $1 million. seme?" 


His Tenneco stock is among his 
more than SI million in holdings in 
companies potentially affected by 
the agency’s recent decisions. Mr. 
Rowland’s role in decisions affect- 
ing those companies has prompted 
a review this week by the Office of 
Government Ethics. 



A better way 
to invest in U.S. 
Treasury bills. 


Andrated AAA for safety 
by Standard & Poor’s. 


* Capital Preservation Fund International invests 
exclusively in short-term U.S. Treasury Bills, backed by 
the guarantee of the United States Government. 


* It is the only off-shore fund to receive Standard & 
Foor% AAA rating, reflecting “the highest quality with 
unquestioned credit-worthiness.” 

Based in Luxembourg, CPF International offers 
safety privacy and confidentiality Forthe non-US citizen, 
it provides legitimate avoidance of Luxembourg and 
U.S. withholding and estate taxes with additional tax 
advantages in several countries. 

The investment advisor for Capital Preservation 
Fund International is Benham Management Corporation 
of Palo Alto, California, which manages more than 
US$2.5 billion in similar funds in the United States. 


For further information, send for a prospectus. 
All enquiries will receive immediate and discreet 
attention. 


: To: CPH.5 Rue Aid tinge n, Til 8 Luxembourg. Telex: 2987. Tel: 47 56 IX 
; Please send your Prospectus to: 

I M _ WT26 

. Name: ... _ — 


- Address-- 



Country^. 


Capital Pre se rvation Fund Int e r na tional. 


WHOtfTIONS AH ONLY UOIVEO ON THE BAilSOr THE PKMHCTUS. NOT FOI DSTaeUTBN M1M 
VOTED KMCPON « AUSTHAUN BCETTfO KUOM WHOSE BUSINESS WWHVIS THE AOOWSmON, 
DSfOSAI. O* HOUM OF SECUUTKS. WHETHER AS niMOMl M AS ACEfTT 


Motley Leaves 
PostaslLS. 
Latin Adviser 


CooqnJrdby Chr Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Lapgharae 
A. Motley, a central figure in shap- 
ing Reagan adnrixustratian policy 
in Central America, has resigned as 
assistant secretary of state for in- 
ter-American affairs to return to 
the private business. 

President Ronald Reagan nomi- 
nated Elliott Abrams, assistant seo- 
reiwy for human rights and hu- 
manitarian affairs, to replace Mr. 
Motley. 



Albert Maltz, Screenwriter, 


One of Hollywood 10, Dies 


Laaghome A. Modey 


4 k! Officials at several levels said 
Ttiesday that Mr. Motley’s depar- 
ture after two years does not signal 
any policy shirts. Mr. Modey, 47, 
was the architect of the October 
1983 invasion of Grenada and is 
credited with a major rote in nego- 
tiatingwith Congress on policy to- 
ward D Salvador and Nicaragua. 

Mr. Motley said he had tdd Sec- 
retary of State George P. Shultz be 
wanted to leave about four months 
ago “for personal financial rea- 
sons" and dial Mr. Shultz asked 
him to stay through votes in Gon- 
gress Iasi week and until a succes- 
sor could be confirmed. 


that a more conciliatory line would 
be better accepted in Congress. But 
be said he had “no prat disagree- 
ment*’ with those officiate and did 
not blame them for last week’s de- 
feat by two votes in the House of a 
modified administration approach 
io Nicaragua. 


Mr. Motley is known to have 
j dashed vyith hard-liners in the 
%Vhite House- over some of Mr. 
Reagan’s tougher speeches, arguing 


Mr. Motteyj «dio was a land de- 
vdoper in Alaska before he was 
named aT«has<ador to Brazil in 
1981, said he phnnfcd to return to 
Alaska as a businessman. He ac- 
knowledged that “there is talk of 
me running for governo*” but 
would say only that Be intended "to 
play an active yet undetermined 
rate" m Alaskan politics. 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Albert Maltz, 
76, an Academy Award-winning 
screenwriter and one of 10 Holly- 
wood figures imprisoned in 1950 
and blacklisted by die movie indus- 
try for refusing to answer questions 
of the House Committee on Un- 
American Activities, died Friday in 
Los Angeles of complications re- 
sulting from shingles. 

Mr. Maltz went Oscars for two 
- documentaries, “The Defeat of the 
German Armies Near Moscow” in 
1942 and “The House 1 Live In” in 
1945. His most notable pictures 
were "This Gun for Hire r m 1942, 
“Destination Tokyo” in 1944, 
“Aide of the Marines” in 1945, and 
“The Naked City” in 1948. 

■ Other Deaths: 

Sir Max AHken, 75, former own- 
er of Britain’s Express Newspapers 
and a World War n fighter ace, 
Tuesday In London. 

Paul N. Rosenstem-Rodan, 83, a 
Boston University economics pro- 
fessor who was influential in inter- 
national economics and who 


coined the term “underdew 


doped 

natter 


countries,” Sunday in Boston 
a heart attack. 

Cyrus A. Doiph 3d, 78, a retired 
army major general who com- 
manded the fust US. troops to 
enter Paris during World War H, 
Monday in Mathews, Virginia. 

Nak van der Merwe, 64, the 
South African minister of Health 
and Welfare, Friday in Bloemfon- 
tein. 

Irving Peter Pflanm, 79, a 
er, editor and journalism proi essor 
in Chicago, Thursday m J&vea, 
Spain. 


1^00 British Miners Strike 

Reuters 


SOUTH KIRBY, England — 
More than 1,300 miners went an 
strike Tuesday to support four col- 
leagues who were dismissed for ha- 
rassing those who worked through 
the year-long strike that ended in 
March, the National Coal Board 


New York Chy 
Refinancing Debt 
Backed by U.S. 


Mr. Abrams, 37, has been chief 
of die human rights bureau for 
three and a half years, and previ- 
ously headed the office responsible 
for the United Nations and otter 
mtennukmal wgaruzstions. 


New York Thm Sevtee 

NEW YORK -New Yotk Giy 
wifi refinance virtually all of its 
federally guaranteed debt next 
month, bringing to a close a chap* 
to of the municipal fiscal crisis of 
the 1970s, ehy officials announced 
Monday. 

4 Under the plan, $555 million in 
% federally guaranteed debt will be 
Kptaea by, regular aty bonds at 
tower interest rates and payable 
over a longer period. The foderaBy 
wied bonds woe issued at a time 
amen the city was unable to rail 
poods on its own credit because of 

^ shaky finances. .. 

This r efin xn rmo budge! officials 
aid bfeS^wTrStte city’s 
_ coats during the next 
JJto l*ws by 5200 million, thereby 
«eeu« foods for.othtsr pfognans 
«*d for vital.. Mayor Edward L 
Jtoco called a continuation of the 
fo»d ™*a" of htebufe* in re- 

centywra. .. 

Rep^ym^t of tire test of the fed- 
eral loan guarantees would trigger 
a series otchanges under stotclaw, 
including, the expiration of $450 


He was head of the liberal Amer- 
icans for Democratic Action while 
attending Harvard University in 
the late 1960s, but later went to 
weak for conservative Senate Dem- 
ocrats such as die late Henry M. 
Jacbon of Washington and Daniel 
Patrick Moymhan of New York. 

(WP,AP) 




SfogtedimOtids at wholesale price* 
by ord eri n g ffiren from Antwerp. 

the woritTS matt important cut- 

diamond market. Give diamonds 

to the ones you love, buy for 

invest roew. for Jour etyoymem. 

Writt tdnaaUfor free price fist 
Arewue 

JoKhim Goidenstem 
(SaottMexport 

EMUUtedI928 
Mlhnwwi 68, lHOM 

Bebftnk-T«Li Q&5>3M*7J5l 

71779 -ylh. 

at the Diamond Chfo Bldg. 



MARINER SG 



^ ■ * » ■, ’ • 

ft** . . -V.V. . 

S’* - A-.- - 


K'nrrr- ?. ■; 

••• X\ v 


Concord Mariner. For her. 18 karat gold, black chromium 
stainless steel, diamonds. Quartz. Water- resistant. 

An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 


CHAUMET 


IVUUS 12 place VendOme • LONDON 170 t4«vv BoadStmt * 
BRUSSELS 82 avenue Louise * GENEVA 2 roe dUKtvSne • 
NFW VABK aA Fjmt 5Trh biMt 





Recent surveys show that passengers recognize - and appreciate - KLM’s continuous 
search for improvement Test us, try us, fly us. 


The Reliable Airline KL.IWI 









Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, 


Hussein Says Peace Effort Remains Alive 


By Judith Miller 

New York Tunes Service 

AMMAN, Jordan — King Hus- 
sein or Jordan has declared that 
efforts to convene a meeting be- 
tween U.S. officials and a joint Jor- 
danian-Palesiinian delegation were 
continuing. 

He also said that Jordan, the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
and the United States were explor- 
ing suggestions for reviving the 
stalled peace process. 

“As far as Tm concerned, the 
door has not been totally closed,” 
Hussein said 

Hussein gave his assessment in 
an interview Monday evening at 
Nadwa Palace. It was his Hist inter- 
view since Richard W. Murphy, the 
U.S. assistant secretary or state for 
Near Eastern and South Asian af- 
fairs, left Jordan on Saturday. 

He declined to rule out direct 
talks between Israel and a joint 


Jordanjan-Paksiinian delegation, 
provided they involve an interna- 
tional peace conference — a con- 
cept that the United States and 
Israel have opposed. 

‘‘Direct talks will occur when we 
— Jordan and the FLO and other 
parties to the conflict — are en- 
gaged in a peace process that is 
blessed by an international confer- 
ence,” the king said. 

The U.S. State Department said 
that Mr. Murphy’s two- week tour 
of the Middle East had failed to 
produce an agreement that could 
bring about direct talks between 
Israel and Jordan. 

But Hussein said that Mr. Mur- 
phy’s two recent visits to Amman 
had faelued Americans, Jordanians 


and Palestinians to “clarify’' their 
positions and better appreciate 
other parties’ views. 

“We’re still in a give-and-take 
process.’’ the king said 


site the objections of the 
United States and Israel to an in- 
ternational conference on the 
Arab-Israeli conflict, Hussein as- 
serted that such a conference was 
the “most appropriate and credi- 
ble" forum. 

The king said he hoped to per- 
suade Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz of the virtues of such a con- 
ference when Mr. Shultz visits Jor- 
dan in mid-May after a trip to 
IsraeL 

Officials in Washington said that 
Yasser Arafat, chairman of the 
PLO, had ruled out for the moment 
any explicit endorsement of the 
UN Security Council Resolution 
242 unless the PLO was assured 
that it would attend an internation- 
al peace conference as part of a 
Jordanian-Palestmian delegation. 
The resolution calls Tor Israeli 
withdrawal from occupied territo- 



In Singapore 

our faultless service is only matched 
by our spectacular architecture. 

THE PAVILION 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 
SINGAPORE 





THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL® 

•JOINTER- CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

OneCuscaden Road 1024, 7338888. Telex; R537248 
For reservations call: Hong Kang: 5-8440311/3, 

• Tokyo; 2150777, Osaka: 2640666, or call your nearest 
Inter* Continental sales office. 



ties in exchange for peace and rec- 
ognition of its statehood 
“Mr. Arafat was also said to have 
rqected Mr. Murphy’s suggestion, 

presented through Arab intermedi- 
aries, that he draft a list of Palestin- 
ians not well known as PLO mem- 
bers to represent the organization 
in such a joint delegation in talks 
with Washington. 

Hussein declined to comment on 
the substance of bis discussions 
with Mr. Arafat. But other Arab 
officials rejected reports that Mr. 
Arafat was refusing to consider the 
issue of PLO representation at a 
possible meeting with America n s. 

The United States has repeatedly 
refused to recognize or meet offi- 
cially with the PLO unless it explic- 
itly accepts Resolution 242 ana Is- 
rael's right to exist. Israel has ruled 
out talks with PLO officials. 

Hussein reiterated his view that 
the accord that he and Mr. Arafat 
signed on Feb. II, which outlines 
the framework for a joint bid for 
peace, implicitly recognizes the res- 
olution and Israel's right to exist. 
The king, as he has m the past, 
urged the United States to reward 
what be sees as a historic shift in 
PLO policy that has committed the 
organization to a negotiated peace 
with Israel. 



ANNIVERSARY PARADE — Vietnamese troops marched Tuesday in Ho Chi M2nh 
City to commemorate the 10th anniversary of North Vietnam’s takeover of Saigon, as 
the city was known before 1970. In the background is a poster of Ho CM Minb. 


Protesters , 

In 2 Polish 
Cities Back 
Solidarity 

U razed Press Inumatumal 

WARSAW — Riot police used j 
tear gas and batons to break up] 
pro-Solidarity protests on Maj 
Day In the Gdansk seaport and 
thousands staged another pro-l 
union demonstration in Warsaw] 
(hat ended peacefully. 

Sources in Gdanrit said riot 
lice clashed with a group of about 
500 demonstrators chanting “Soli-] 
darity. Solidarity” and fired tear] 
gas and dubbed them with riot I 
sticks when they interrupted an of-j 
fidal May Day parade m the city. I 
Dozens were arrested, the sources': 
said.- i 

In Warsaw more than 10,000 i 
people marched from the church of j 
the pn>-Sofidarity priest, Jozy Fo- [ 
piduszko, who was murdered by : 
secret police in October, toward the y} 
city’s Huta Warszawa sted works / | 
carrying a red and white banners 
saying “Solidarity is alive” and 
chanting “Free political prisoners.” 

The protest ended peacefully af- 
ter a militant Solidarity adviser, Ja- 
cek Karoo, who joined the march- 
ted with riot police and 


Peres Says Israeli Withdrawal Reaffirmed Wallies’ 

* TH» onvtrnmMl tnnlrKnlin 

By Henry Kamm 

Nett York Times Service 


JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres says Israel’s deci- 
sion to withdraw its troops from 
Lebanon three years after the inva- 
sion signaled a return to its “values 
as a nation.” 

“We re-established our national 
consensus on our defense policy," 
the prime minis ter said Tuesday in 
an interview. “I can say it in a few 
wards: Go to war when you don't 
have a choice; make peace when 
you have a choice. 

“We have returned to our values 
as a nation, as a people, a nation 
that has principles,” he continued. 
“This is the most important conse- 
quence of our derision.” 

Mr. Peres's implied criticism erf 
the derision of former Prime Min- 
ister Meaachem Begin’s govern- 
ment to invade Lebanon came after 
he had declined throughout the in- 
terview to discuss the appropriate- 
ness of the action. 

“My job is to worry about the 
future histoiy of Israel," the prime 
minister said. 

Mr. Peres also refused to pass 
judgment on President Ronald 
Reagan's plan to visit a war ceme- 
tery in West Germany whose dead 
include members of the SS, Hitler's 
elite force that played a key role in 
the murder of six million Jews. 


HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 





SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
Budapest, June 1 3-1 4, 1 985 

The international Herald Tribune conference on ‘Trade and Investment Opportunities in Hungary" 
will be of keen interest to any executive concerned about future economic relations between East and West. 

The conference provides an extraordinary opportunity hr business leaders to examine 
how Hie Hungarian government is approaching questions ofdomesticand international economic relations 
and offers Western executives an unusual occasion for direct contact with business leaders from Eastern Europe. 
Senior executives wishing to regsier for the conference should complete and refumffe coupon below. 


JUNE 13 
Keynote Address: 

Mr. Jozsef Marjai, Deputy Prime Minister 

The Economic Outlook 

Professor Jozsef Bognar, Director, Institute of World Economics 
of the Hungcsnan Academy df Sciences 

Foreign Trade 

Mr. btvan Torek, Secretary of Stole tor Foreign Trade 

The Rve Year Plan 

Dr. Janas Haas, Secretary of State. National Ptarvnng Bocrd 

Afternoon Address 

Dr. Armand Hammer, Chdrman and Chief Executive Officer, 
Ocadertid Petroleum Corporation 
Inve s tment Incentives and Tax Free Zones 
Dr. P6ter Medgyessy, Deputy Minister of Finance 

Barter 

Mr. Sondor Demcsak, General Manager. Hungarian Foreign 
Tracing Bank 


JUNE 14 

The Banking System 

Mr. J&xs Fekete, First Deputy President, National Bade of 
Hungary 

Western Banking and Hungary 

Mr. Gabriel Bdhler, Vice President and General Manager, 

Bank of America NT„ Vienna 

Endustrid Oudook 

Mr. Ferenc Horvath, Secretary of Stale for industry 

Pmei of Hungaian Industrialists 
Afternoon Addr e ss 

Professor Richard Porte, Director, Centre far Economic fbfcy 
Resecrch, London 

Joint Ventures 

Mr. Ldszlo BorbeJy, Director General, Department for 
International Monetary Affairs, Ministry of Finance 

Panel of Foreign Companies 

Moderator: Mr. Tamos Beck, President, Hungar ia n Chanber of 
Commerce 


I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


REGISTRATION MORMABON 

The conference vwfi be heldc* the Atrium Hyatt Hotel 
on June 13 and 14. A block of rooms, has been reserved for 
participants at preferential rate. For defcsfe please contact the - 
- hotel dredy. 

Atrium Hya tt Ho tel, Mr. T. Tcffiy, RoosevdtSq. 2. ‘ 
Budapest 1051: TeL (36-1} 187836. Telex, 22- 4954. 

The fee -fix the conference is $955 or the equMfentar- 
a con ve rtib le arrsney. This indudes, dwier June 12, cocfaafe, . 
lunches, doc um an te fon arid simuSanepw Hungaian-Engfeh-- „ / 
FrerefvGemxn translation. Fees art payable in advance of the 
conference and wiB be returned in M for any cancefcfen 
postmarked on or before May 30. CanceBaiiorE after that date 
wffl be charged the fufl fee. 

The conference was orgarxzed in association with 
hterpress in Budapest and G. Arnold Teasing B.V. in Ams teri cm . 

Mafev, The Hungaian airfare, is the official carrier for 
the conference. 


. REGISTRATION FORM 

: Return tor 

In tern a tional Hereto Trfcune, Conference Office, 
181, avenue OwtedtrfSaute, 925ZI Nealy Gxfex, Fme. 
Or telephone: 747 Tm Trfea 613595. 

Pfeate enrol the fofiowng p u to punt for ths 
tarfengnayJo.be held n Budapest. 

□ Check endosed □ Please invoice 


camtittcmm. 


2-5-85 


“A friend is a friend; a mistake is 
a mistake,’’ Mr. Peres said. “When 
a friend makes a mis take, it is still a 
mistak e And a friend is still a 
friend. Mr. Reagan remains a 
friend, but I haven't changed my 
view: I regret this decision. 

The Israeli leader was less chari-' 
table to Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
of West Germany, who invited Mr. 
Reagan to the Bitburg cemetery 
and has rqected appeals to alter the 
program. 


“Krill really committed a very 
grave mistake," Mr. Peres said. 
“He should, as chancellor of Ger- 
many, be the most sensitive person 
when it comes to the depth of the 
moral call of histoiy.” 

In discussing the withdrawal 
from Lebanon, winch is to be com- 
pleted in early June, Mr. Peres 
warned Syria against mkfng mili- 
tary advantage of Israel's pullout 


facing each other far three 
He also said that Israel wouli 
action if Syria tried to incite anti- 
Israeli forces in Lebanon to threat- 
en his country's northern bonier. 

“If Assad gets us into trouble, 
he'll be in trouble,” Mr. Peres said 
of President Hafez al-Assad of Syr- 
ia. He contradicted the view hoe 
that Israel had sent such a warning 
to Syria by using the United States 


17.5., Encouraged by Austerity Plan, 

To Give Israel $1.5 Billion More in Aid 

changes at the urging ri the United 
States. The Reagan administration 
had said it would not grant addi- 
tional aid to Israel until it began a 
substantial austerity program. 

U.S. officials said the adminis- 
tration decided to increase aid to 
Israel after Mr. Feres sent a letter 
last week to Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz ou tlinin g steps to 
improve the economy. 

The $13 billion in supplemental 
aid described Tuesday would be 
divided between the 1985 and 1986 
fiscal years, bringing the total of 
U.S. aid to Israel to $7.1 billion for 
the two years. 


Nr* York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, in response to an 
urgent request from Prune Minis ter 
Shimon Peres, has decided in prin- 
ciple to grant Israel S13 billion 
more in economic aid, U3. offi- 
cials said. 

The officials said that Egypt 
would receive an additional $500 
million in aid and that the decisions 
may be announced formally in a 
couple of days. 

IsraeL which had an annual in- 
flation rate of more than 1,000 per- 
cent in 1984, has made some 


rrom the Bekaa Valley, where Syri- as intermediary. “We don’t feel the 
an and Israeli troops have been need to send a message,” he said. 

“They know." 

Mr. Peres said Israel was ready 
to coexist peacefully with all Leba- 
nese communities, but said that he 
could not appeal to Lebanon’s na- 
tional government far improved re- 
lations. "All Lrfjanoa is made up of 
local forces," he said. “There is no 
national force." 

Israel's hope far peace along the 
border is no longer based on the 
creation of a Lebanese force under 
Israeli control, he said, but on the 
recognition by the various border 
communities that their interests are 
best served try resisting airy at- 
tempts to use their territory for 
anti- Israeli arrinns- 


The government spokesman, 
Jerzy Urban, said that the police 
had detained Mr. Knron aim an- 
other Solidarity activist, 

JaworskL who took part in 
Warsaw protest It was not dear 
whether they would be formally 
arrested and charged. 

Sources in Gdansk said the 
founder of Solidarity, Lech Walesa, 
was surrounded by riot police and 
prevented from joining protest 
marches in the city. Crowds rndud- 
imifnmwvf sriojers cheered Mr. 
as he was escorted home 
with chants of “We are with you 
Lech and we will win,” the sources 


“Israel will defend herself in any 
way that is necessary,” Mr. Peres 
said. “The option to keep Lebanon 
completely free from oar interven- 
tion is vested in their behavior.” 


“It is a shame that we are divided 
so brutally” Ml Walesa said. 

Underground Solidarity called 
for the anti-government demon- 
strations to coincide with official 
May Day cere m onies to demand 
wage comprasation for recently in- 
troduced price increases of 10 to 14 
perc e nt and the release of more 
than 100 political prisoners. 

For the official celebrations, 
Warsaw was festooned with thou- 
sands of red and white national 
flags paired with the Red Flag. 
Workers were taken by bus to the 
city’s central Gizybowski Square to 
hear a 24-gun salute and speech by 
the Polish leader, ■ Gaeral Woj- 
ceich JaruzdskL 


% 


In Moscow, 
Rainy March 
For May Day 

Return 

MOSCOW — Thousands of 
Muscovites carrying banners and 
posters in pouring rain marched 
Wednesday through Red Square 
for the traditional May Day pa- 
rade. 

As the Kremlin chimes struck, 
the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, and the rest of the Politbu- 
ro filed onto the reviewing stand 
above the Lenin Mausoleum. They 
were greeted with loud cheers. 

Not far away, among foreign 
diplomats stood Ronald P. Reagan, 
son of the U3. president, who was 
on his first visit to the Soviet 
Union. He said be was impressed 
by the size or the parade and was 
enjoying his stay. 

Several of the parade posters 
bore anti-American slogans and 
graphics. One said. “The arms race 
unleashed by the U3A. and its 
NATO allies is a threat to Europe- 
an peace.” and showed a map of 
Europe with a U.S. cruise missile 
looming overhead. 

Fewer portraits of Mr. Gorba- 
chev were in evidence than of his 
predecessor, Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko. at last year's parade. A few 
photographs showed him visiting 
factories and workers, and slogans 
proclaimed his drive to revitalize 
the economy. 



Marchers in Red Square hold portraits of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, right, and other leaders. 

Terror Raids on Pershing-2s Feared 


U.S. Carriers to Spend 
Less Time Overseas 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Navy plans to cul the amount of 
time aircraft carriers, the most visi- 
ble sign of American naval power, 
sail in foreign waters in an effort to 
reduce the strain on crews and to 
save money, according to Defense 
Department and congressional of- 
ficials. 

Slumping morale of crews, many 
or whom have been spending 70 
percent of their time away from 
their families, was the main reason 
for the cutback in deployment 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
Army has warned Congress that 
Pershing-2 nuclear missi es in West 
Germany are “extremely vulnera- 
ble” to terrorist attacks and need to 
be fortified. 

For the first time since delivery 
of the medium-range miaules be- 
gan 17 months ago, the army, in a 
letter April 19, asked Congress for 
moaey to begin a four-stage project 
that would eventually secure the 
missiles in concrete sheds bdund 
camouflage fences. 

An army spokesman said Tues- 
day that concern was prompted by 
a security review after a fire in 
January that killed three soldiers in 
a Pershing-2 training exercise near 
HeDbronn. 

“Without this project, security at 


SC/ 

i A N N E L 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

"Europe's Best View" 


PROGRAM THURSDAY 2nd MAY UK TIMES 


J3 35 FAMILY 
M 30 WAYNE & SHUSTER 
'SCO tba:« ? 

15 « S«r TRAKS 

16 M SKY tray l 
IT 30 MR EO 


18 OO THE LUCY SHOW 
IB 30 CHARLIE'5 ANGELS 

19 20 SKYWAYS 

20 ID THE UNTOUCHABLES 

21 OS DAVIS CUP TENNIS 

22 00 SKY TRAX 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION. HATES. MARKETING * 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT THE SALES DEPARTMENT 
SKY CHANNEL. SATELLITE TELEVISION PLC 
TEL: LONDON (01) 636 407? TELEX 266943 


the four Pershing rites in Germany 
will continue to be seriously im- 
paired as the TTirente wjH remain 
extremely vulnerable to terrorist 
action and demonstrator interest 
will remain high,” the army said in 
for the first SUwnllHoo 
on the security project. 

Anny and congressional sources 
stressed Tuesday that the nuclear 
warheads to arm the missOes were 
already stored separately in con- 
crete bunkers. But they said the 
Pershing’s track -like launching 
pads, the missiles themselves and 
their fuel were exposed and would 
be, in the words of the army’s letter, 
“a potentially lucrative target for 
terrorists." 

^In^ i nterview s Tuesday Saiator 

lican wto is cSaiimi^^c^toatc 
Appropriations Subcommittee on 
Military Construction, and Senator 
Jim Sasser of Tennessee, the senior 
Democrat on the subcommittee, 
said they would support the army’s 
request 

While the army has deployed Its 
Pershing missiles at facilities of 
World War Q vintage near West 
German cities, the air force de- 
signed new installations in England 
at more isolated locations for (he 
cruise mieolgi 

On a viat last year to the Camp ■' 
Red Leg Pershing installation, near 
Heflbrorm, the subcommittee staff 
reported watching a hang-gliding 
enthusiast sailing overhead within 
200 yards (180 meters) of the base 
perimeter fence. At the WDcy Bar- 


iorDon 

said Tuesday dial, the army 
[ the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization had Had security inw 
provements in the works far son# 
time bat that they were hindered by 
the location of their bases near 
population centers. 

“Tfwe could have started with a 
blank piece of papa" when die 
Pershings were installed, he said, 
“maybe things would have been 
diffdteaL" - 

Major Maple said that after the 
fire in January, which investigators 
attributed to an accidental bars! cf 
static dcctridty, the army began a 
“very thoroc#”' review of security 
ax all of the Poshing bases. 

He «id the iwwiiirfia fA nr w inwn 
was to remove: the missiles from 
public view. The anny letters said 
the fact dial the missues were visi- 
ble behind rows of cyclone fencing 
and concertina . wire nude the 
weapons vulnerable to small-arms 
Ore and. saved as a rmignw for 
protesters. 

In arepQrtsemTuttdayto Con- 
gress, the anny said it had already 
morod in large semitrailer trucks 
loaded with bridge-brtiJding mate- 
rial and had surrounded the mis- 
siles “to visually Obscure and re- 
duce vulnerability of the nrissQes 
on the sites." 

The report said the next step, for 
which the money' was req 
would be to bmkl protectiv e fi__ 
and concrete security barriers 
four bases in West Germany, to 
racks site near Nea Ulm, the report ’ fully obscure the missiles from 
sard, a popular local walking path public view and protect them from 
adjoined the. base fence. . smaU-aimsTire, - 





ls._- MKOji 




! !NTE H NATIONAL IIKR.4LD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MAY 2. 1985 


PageS 


Role of SS Soldiers at Bitburg 
Lies Buried With Them 

By John TagLiabue "Hie 2d Division fought in Po- slope behind the cemetery's gray 

A’« York Timet S tenia la™ and in the Soviet Union be- memorial, bear the word “HfwT 


By John TagUabue 

A'eu York Timet Sen tec 

BONN — The lush springtime 
grass in the trim cemetery of Bit- 
burg covers a multitude of myster- 
ies. 

Ever since President Ronald 
Reagan said he would lay a wreath 
there next Sunday, attention has 
focused on the identity of the 2.000 
soldiers lying there, including 49 
soldiers of the Waffen SS. the com- 
bat arm of Hitler's elite guard. 

Asked whether the president 


fore being moved to occupied before the name: Hiwi Milan 
France in 1943 to be outfitted and Ivanowiisch. Hiwi Alexander Igna 
brought back to strength. Hotziew and Hiwi Asrntin Buch~ 

By that time, attrition had ex- J£T - 10 n3me a few - 
hausted the reservoir of young pco- Early in the war, when Germa- 
pie for the Waffen SS. once an all- ny's armies fanned out across East- 
volumeer force. More and more ern Europe, local people were con- 
people were drafted, not only in scripted as auxiliaries — 
Germany, but in occupied areas of “HilfswiUigp.” or “Htwis" — Co fOJ 
Eastern Europe. jobs as drivers, laborers and crafts- 

Historians note that the Waffen roen * 


Asked whether the president SS became an international entity. Some were conscripted into 
would add to his visit a stop in the with soldiers from the Netherlands, forces linked to the SS that oversaw 
town of Remagen. where U.S. Scandinavia. France, the Baltic concentration camps, and were 
forces crossed the Rhine in World countries and the Soviet Union. sent to Traw Honilo, near Lublin. 
War II. a West German spokesman A » riorum: ^ Poland, for training, 

said Tuesday there was -no change enri Jf thS^ln. Ilk? £ By 1943, as the extenninationof 

in the program. Galician Division, which consisted 

On Monday, the government’s mainly of Ukrainians. As the war ^ f u f Bee £ e<1, 

princrnal spokesman. Peter Boen- d neeed on. condnmvt shnfflino 10 ““ML 



sch, said Jewish organizations had saw many foreigners scattered .. I r^ ,cr * , wilh tiic r^no^mg of SS 

iroposed a stop in Remagen to among Germans. Graves of SS men mJS? IS i.S’ 

^resistance to the Bitbmg ^SSSSe^K SK ™t^W- 

Di visions of the Waffen SS Dotii^ and Georg Zaske. E^tieb VltoS™ 

ought fiercely in Worid War a A historian at West Genmany’s Jewish organizations in several 
hey also left a trail of atrocities, military archives, in Freiburg. said countries called Tuesday for pro- 


in the program.” 

On Monday, the government’s mainly of Ukrainians. As the war ^ f u f needed, 

principal spokesman. Peter Boen- dragged on, continued shuffling 

isch, said Jewish organizations had saw many foreigners scattered I *}*** Wllh **>* r r ^ fu 3 >,no °V® 
proposed a stop in Remagen to among Germans. Graves of SS men US.S - 

^resistance to the Bitbmg Stpg-gJI.gJg JjK 

f “hi % S^g" rf . S w^UebBit^S ,ero 

fought fiercely in Worid War a A histonan at West Genmany’s Jewish organizations in several 
They also left a trad of atroaues, military arduves. in Frdburg. said countries called Tuesday for pro- 
mdmimE the killing of Jews in the duu. after the Allied binding in ^ demonstrations Sunday at die 
Soviet Union and the massacre of Normandy m June 1944, the 2d cemetery 
other dvilians in places like Boves. Division, with perhaps 12.000 men ( a Brussels, the Union of Euro- 
in northern Italy, Md Oradour-sur- instead of the full complement of pean Jewish Students said it ex- 
Uiane, in central France. 14,000, was ordered north from peeled as many as 500 demons tra- 



: .*! ; iv f: . J:. -. . : ; : ' . ■ : i - 

. : ~ i , ; : ■;> 

f •••. - 

: ' 



5 ;;.; v.. 



SlpgV 

- ' ^ ‘ - '• 

; ; 

m ; 


'-im 


Gtane, in central France. 


Mayor Theo Halle t of Bitburg, a southwest France to help stem the tors from 21 countries to gather at 



town of 12,500 people, has refused Allied advance. Bitburg. 

to discuss the identity of those bur- On the way north, there were In Jerusalem. Kalman Sultanik, 
ied in the cemetery. But at least 200 billings. In Tulle, in the Auvergne vice president of the World Jewish 
soldiers, including 10 of the Waffen mountains. 99 villagers were Congress, said demonstrators 
SS, bear names of possible Slavic hanged: in Oradour-sur-Glane, a would seek to prevent President 
origin. company of the division’s 4tfaRegi- Reagan from entering the site of 

Aiitvu.ah it „ «... — - ment burned and shot the entire the Bereen-Belsen concentration 





-* - ^ m 

y * * j .v—* • ’ 

'vVis-sfr'Jt ■ 


“Mit einem neuen Superlativ 
wartet Canon jetzt auf: Der 
groftte Hersteller von 
Spiegelreflexkameras pra- 
sentiert die Canon MC, 
apostr ophiert als ‘kleinste 
Autofokus Kamera der Welti ” 

‘Color Foto’ in Germany wrote this about the 
latest compact to come out of Canon. 


CAIKH! 


•4 4 

,44C 




Some SS graves at Bitburg bear non-Germanic names. 


* -t 


origin. 

Although it is probably not pos- 


Reagan from entering the site of 
the Bergen-Belsen concentration cerued that the controversy over 


sible to uace iheir actions through- P°P l ^ a ^ 0Q ’ 642 men. women and camp, where more than 50.000 pa- President Reagan’s trip is unleash- 
out the war, a West German group ^dren. in revenge for the killing sons died, if his schedule still called ing anti- Jewish feeling. 
vll*tt QCCPmVllArl »Ka Kac M. of an officer. for a visit to Biiburs. later in the Michael Araon. a leader of Dus- 


that assembled the graves has re- 
vealed that the SS soldiers be- 


f an officer. 

As the Allies broke out of the 


longed to (he 2d SS gSSuR 2d , 

sion and the 10th SS Panzer sion pulled back, with heavy lossw. 

Division. U.S. officials have said 10 « rM *P d “«“• ® 

that two or three soldiers belonged *&"“"■ ^ “» ** *£ , 

to the 1st SS Panzer Division Mtn J c Germany s border 

__ with Luxemboing and Belgium. 

There, in late 1944 and early 1945. 
n* 1 1 . n 11 1 most of the SS soldiers now buried 

Murdoch to Build m Biibu^ died. 

_ fll _ Historians say that the soldiers 

Beilina ( iOmnlex Of the loth Division, which was 


for a visit to Bitburg later in the 
day. 


Michael Amen, a leader of Dus- 
seldorfs Jewish community, said 


Murdoch to Build 
Beijing Complex 

The Aaoaaied Press 

SYDNEY — News Corp.. 
owned by Rupert Murdoch, the 
Australian publisher, will buOd a 
multimfllion-dollar international 
media center and hotel in Beijing, 
the company has announced. 

The announcement Tuesday, 
carried in Mr. Murdoch’s national 
newspaper. The Australian, said 
the development would cost 40 mil- 
lion U.S. dollars, would be com- 
pleted by 1987 and would be a joint 
project with the Chinese govern- 
ment. A 24-story color television 
center for China Central Television 
wfll be pan of the project. 

The complex will have 300 hotel 
rooms for tourists and others and 
100 apartments 10 be rented as of- 
fices and residences, the newspaper 
said, as well as television studios, 
video editing facilities and commu- 
nications equipment for interna- 
tional prim and electronic media. 

DOONESBURY 

ncmtKeeRXSAiR. 1 1 

FozcecmiSFr.iMim MU 

HOU& IMAGE -MAKER MIKE n 

XPEAVBim£A55PTH5 Ur 
t m7HM’Ftm.VS&ON V 
« oFMR.i&mftscm?- / 
UldlN6 £RMM/. 

Mm 


then near Mulhouse, in Alsace, 
must have been remnants separat- 
ed from their division and attached 
to the 2d. 

Among people who saw the Waf- 
fen SS divisions in action in East- 
ern Europe, including Simon Wie- 
sentbal. the Nazi-hunier, the 
non-German soldiers bad a reputa- 
tion for ruthless ness. 

Though some SS soldiers in Bit- 
burg may have been East Europe- 
ans. historians point out that others 
with Slavic-sounding names may 
have been descendants of workers 
who came to Germany in the 19th 
century to work in coal mines and 
steel mills. 

Indeed, some of Bitburg’s dead 
seem not to have been soldiers at 
ail. And there is speculation about 
their origin, their identity, the 
routes they may have taken to 
reach the tiny town, and their activ- 
ities in the war. 

At least five soldiers, buried on a 


SAIPPEMm.MAPRS~ 
TmDSTfiTEMBNrS&f 
HAmzmpz&mrrHOMR. 
tmsmmxx&sAsoELL 
ASTl&R VICTIMS, ttBFBBL 
&£tmwT0&nmA / 
BfliAJCB? fttXMBCF 
r«n simas." ^§F 


H5 FINAL A&MM&fT 

BSHJfipfWf, nsAmi is 
NOW £XP£CJB?TD TURN 
HisflrmnoNTO 
50UCMN6BUSWe95 
FmmsNBN 
P.R.BFM. . 

f _ A 




M.W 

MKSWBURB’ 

0EAVSR... 

\ _ «- 


-CUCK!- 

/ 




m yoiteE 

UP 


Bfmum 

EAfVf! 


siR.mi.you Be 

f&EOTlNGTOMR. 


-imeoMJatBm? 
G&miSOLDtSRS 
HERB VICTIMS or 

-mum 2 


Jewish leaders in Bonn are con- anonymous pamphlets circulated 


recently in the Rhineland city ti 
tied. “Are the Americans Lords in 
Their Own Land?” The implies 
tion, be said, was that “J 
cles" controlled events in the Unit 
ed States. 


Canon/MC 


The Sun also sets. 


I f all you want on your holiday is 
sunshine, you're too easlv satisfit 


M sunshine, you're too easily satisfied. 

You're also fortunate, because the ^ vIrSj 
worid is full of places, some nice and 
some quite nasty, that can give you 
what you seek. 

But what will you do when you’ve MM 
had enough sun? 5 a 

And what will you do when it sets? 

A holiday should be a pleasure at any hour H| 
you favour, under the sun or the stars, in your - 
choice of landscape, whether you’re active or 
sedentary, culture-minded or hedonistic. 

If you agree with us, and want your holiday to 
satisfy all of your senses and sensibilities, read on 
about Spain. 

The mountains or the shore? 

Spain has plenty of both. 

Our mountains, among the highest in Europe, 
offer some of the world’s best and leasl crowded 
skiing. There’s great climbing, too. and every other 
mountain sport in season. 

As for the shore, take your choice of beaches 
from nearly 6,000 Km. of coastline. 

Have a great Spanish holiday at sky level or at 
sea level. 

It’s up (or down) to you. 

What if you sunburn easily? 

Spend pan of each day indoors. 

In shops, for instance, selling choice leather, 
lace, porcelains, antiques and an. 

Or come indoors to see things money 
can’t buy. In the great museums of My* 






< , VI 5 . 

tn.t J /J ffv 1 


m 


m 


up 





Spain are displayed troves of priceless treasures. 

Or stroll in the shade of castles and palaces, 
mosques and alcazars. 

Spain has thousands of ways to tempt you in. 
out of the sun. 

What happens after sunset? 

You understand a people when you understand 
how theyeai. 

Not just the cuisine, but where, how, when and 
with whom it is enjoyed. 

Wc start with "lapas", snacks in amazing 
variety, eaten at stand-up bars at eight or nine 
in the evening. That’s the time to meet us and 
make new friends, in the hours before dinner starts 
at ten or eleven at night. 

Then you can maintain the informal note 
or go to dress-up places serving haute cuisine 
as splendid as an> in Europe. As for us, we Jove 
seafood simply prepared, and even hundreds of 
miles inland you’ll find it fresh daily. Our regional 
dishes arc so varied that you might think they come 
trom many countries and cultures. And our 


regional wines keep them perfect company. 

By the time you've savored the last of your 
Spanish brandy, you will have had a late night. And 
the fun is only starting. 

Enjoy our longest, latest nights. 

At Spanish fiestas, the party seldom stops until 
sunrise. 

And at many, not until two or three sunrises 
have passed. 

No matter when you come to Spain, you will 
find a fiesta somewhere. There are literally 
hundreds throughout the year. Some are simple 
Saints' days in little village squares. But these are 
often wonderful for their intimacy, the welcome 
given to strangers and their sense of natural, 
unplanned gaiety. 

Others are spectacles, elaborately staged and 
ward robed. See processionals, mock battles, floral 
decoration competitions, wine harvests or solemnly 
impressi ve holy days. Or watch the breaking of wild 
horses or the showing of exquisirely trained horses. 
Or see the running of the bulls at the St. Fermin 
fiesta in Pamplona, made famous by Hemingway. 


Speaking of rooms... 

Spain offers every kind of accommodation, 
Lv) from simple country inns to world-class deluxe 
hotels.- - ■ •- • • . - - 

Some of our mdstTBodem hotels are in 
some of our most ancient buildings. Many castles • 
k. and other historic landmarks have been 

converted with ingenuity and elegance, v . 
featuring an and furnishings of their periods, 
intpestingly, even our newest and most . 

® fashionable resort hotels use traditional Spanish 
H architectural themes and decor, so you never 
have that modem sense of deja vu found in the 
5r usual “international” resort. 

We have heard that one young woman, 
asked where she went on f . 
her holiday, replied 
“I don’t know. Wfe 
flew.” Never ' 

“i Spain. ' 










lip 




mm 




iliir 



Even 1 fiesta is a party, and you’re invited to 
them all. 

What's to do at night between fiestas? 

If night clubs, casinos, ballet, opera, jazz, folk 
music, discos, rock music and flamenco dancers 
don't interest you, there really isn’t very much. 

Perhaps people-watching at an outdoor cafe 
while sipping a rare sherry might catch your 
imagination. Or you could just go to your room 
and read a book. 


This long ad is far too short : . 

If you’re interested in visiting Spain, there’s 
much more you’ll want to know. 

Such as details bn your personal interests. . • 
Where you can golf or charter a boat or hunt for " 
game, for example. Or how to follow the route 
of Don Quixote. Or where the Paradoxes, our • 
national tourist inns, are located. 

We have booklets and brochures on practically 
everything. 

Visit your nearest Spanish National Tourist 
Office or mail the coupon below to tefl us what 
you're interested in. 

Whatever it is, you’ll find it in Span, where 
there’s everything under the sun. 

r — — — — — — -I 

Seoretaria General de Turismo . . ■ 

Maria de Molina, SO 1 

28006 Madrid. Spain. 1 

Please tell me where I can fmd everything | 
under the sun. . . - 

Name 

Address : 

City * 

Country 

I am interested in: 


A 


■ Spain. Everythin# under 

■ ■. <■ 1- v-.-.r 

“ " IT' ' “ • 






-■‘•f'.'i't} X .cij -.Nh. ■; 










I 

I 

! 


I 



Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. No < ^ uick Re f orms Are Lihel y A f ter Bonn 


listening 


PoMnhrd ffHli The New York Time* mm) The Wathlajpon Po*4 


The Hungry and the Broke 


East Europe's Warsaw Pact has sworn 
brotherhood Tor another 30 years. The big- 
gest Western countries will do the same this 
week without putting a date on iL In be- 
tween, the nonaligned countries of Asia and 
Africa have celebrated the movement they 
started in Bandung 30 years ago. Their dec- 
laration was reported in small print, but 
parts of it merit dose attention at this week's 
summit of the seven richest nations. 

The Third World has two main problems: 
f amin e and debt. They need to be coped 
with separately. The hungriest require more 
generous and imaginative programs origi- 
nating from the richer countries. There are 
useful new schemes under discussion, in- 
cluding proposals for expanding the World 
Bank's ability to lend on concessional terms, 
and President Framytis Mitterrand's ideas 
for an early information system about ap- 
proaching famines, a better organized trans- 
port system to ship emergency food, and 
more support for indigenous food produc- 
tion in the afflicted areas. 

For many problem countries, however, 
the right approach is not through public aid 
and compassion — pity is a cloying senti- 
ment — but through the market Increasing- 
ly, the big debtors are, or intend to be, 
market-type business centers. The solution 
to their problems is through the private 
capital markeL They have been hamstrung 
in recent years because of high interest rates 
on their massive debt At present about a 
rifth of their sparse savings has to flow out to 
service their debt to the rich countries, in- 
stead of being ploughed back into invest- 
ment at home. With interest rates high and 


Talking Sense in Bonn 


As President Reagan goes to West Germany 
for the annual conference on the world's econ- 
omy. his administration's views seem to be 
changing. In his first term, the United Slates 
did not see the need to pay much attention to 
international trade and growth. It assumed 
that American prosperity would keep rising 
comfortably, th anks to the Reagan tax cuts, 
and would draw the other countries along with 
its own momentum. But now there is a gigantic 
American trade deficit, accompanied by warn- 
ings of an U.S. economic slowdown. 

The United States is becoming more recep- 
tive than at any time in the past four years to 
the idea of working cooperatively with the 
other large industrial democracies — the six 
that will also be represented at Bonn. Earlier 
this month Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
drew the connection between this country's 
internal budget deficit and its unbalanced for- 
eign trade. Then Secretary of the Treasury 
James A. Baker 3d proposed a conference on 
the international monetary system — a subject 
that the United States had been avoiding be- 
cause it did not wish to get drawn into argu- 
ments about the relationship of the budget 
deficit to the sky-high exchange rate of the 
dollar. America now acknowledges that distor- 
tions run from its economy to the economies of 
its major trading partners. 

What are the other industrial countries’ re- 


sponsibilities? Just as the United States has to 
get its trade defiri t under control, Japan has to 
get its trade surplus under control- There, too. 
progress is coming slowly. Europe's growth 
rates depend on exports to the United States. 

As the American economy decelerates, Eu- 
ropeans — and especially the Germans, whose 
economy is the European powerhouse — need 
Lo find other ways to keep their own expansion 
going. Many Europeans understand that they 
are too dependent on a temporary export 
boom across the Atlantic, but have not looked 
for other ways to keep their engines running. 

The past three of these annual s um mi l con- 
ferences have been only modestly useful. They 
all gave great emphasis to the push for lower 
inflation, which was an important contribu- 
tion. They also gave great attention to unem- 
ployment, with very mixed results — lower 
unemployment here since 1982, bnt steadily 
higher unemployment in Europe. These con- 
ferences never got much further into the man- 
agement of the highly complex system of mon- 
ey and trade that the industrial powers share, 
because the Americans were convinced that 
everything was fine and nothing needed to be 
done. Now, among the Americans, second 
thoughts are becoming audible. 

That makes possible at least the be ginnin gs 
of serious conversations at Bonn. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Lebanon: Nation of Mini-States 


With the routing of Maronite Christians 
from their coastal strongholds in southern 
Lebanon, the "can ionization" of that war- 
ravaged country is taking place. Even the fa- 
cade of a viable central government is crum- 
bling, The nation is being carved into religious 
mini-states. Lebanon's fate still depends in 
large measure on its two rival neighbors. Syria 
and IsraeL Since neither has much stomach for 
the actual partition of Lebanon, having been 
burned in trying, they exercise control through 
shifting alliances with factions. 

Israel’s game plan now that it is withdraw- 
ing its army is to count on Christian forces to 
help protect its northern border from shelling 
and guerrilla raids. Syria's position is trickier. 
On the surface, it might seem that President 
Hafez of-Assad would rejoice in (he ascendan- 
cy of fundamentalist Shiites in Lebanese poli- 
tics. They are, after all, influenced by Iran, 
which is supposed to be Syria's ally. But Mr. 
Assad opposes whatever faction seems lo hold 
the upper hand. Furthermore, his flirtation 
with Islamic fundamentalism begins only out- 
side Syria's borders. Inside. Mr. Assad worries 
about the Moslem Brotherhood. 

Israel made the mistake of uniting many 
Moslem groups against it when it invaded 


Lebanon almost three years ago. The southern 
Shiites, for example, were considered friend- 
ties as they burned in resentment toward the 
overbearing presence of Palestinian refugees. 
Now they are the most vociferous foes of 
IsraeL But if more and more Palestinians try to 
return to areas evacuated by Israeli troops, 
friction between these two groups will rise 
again. Likewise, the Druze and Sunni commu- 
nities have their own agendas. 

If the present de facto “cantonization" of 
Lebanon ever reaches the stage where there are 
attempts to legalize it, there will be fresh trem- 
ble. All communal groups have claims against 
one another, all but the Maronites have vowed 
to overcome arrangements which give the 
Christians the presidency, a 6- to- 5 advantage 
in the legislature and the command of the 
army. This may have reflected the demograph- 
ics of 1943, but not today’s demographics. 

A loose confederation of c ommunal states 
hardly reflects the heady dreams that once 
inspired thoughts of Lebanese nationhood. 
But if there is one Lebanese characteristic, it is 
the ability to adapt and, by adapting, to sur- 
vive. For the beleaguered Christians, survival 
in an Islamic world may mean exchanging 
national leadership for an administrative ar- 
rangement offering communal security. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


FROM OUR MAY 2 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Laborers Rally in Hyde Park 
LONDON — A gathering of 25,000 interna- 
tional labor demonstrators marked the May 
Day celebrations in Hyde Park. The demon- 
stration. the “Standard" says, was of a more 
imposing character than has ever been wit- 
nessed in England. Many nations were repre- 
sented. Mr. Victor Grayson made his usual 
violent speech. He said this next summer, 
unless the Government made some move to 
provide for the unemployed, he had deter- 
mined to take the unemployed of London to 
the gates of the House or Commons, it was no 
use talking kindly lo the House of Commons. 
One might as well read the Scriptures to a 
cabhorse. Al the close of proceedings resolu- 
tions were passed of a Socialistic character. 


19S5: Soviet Parade Features Military 
MOSCOW — May Day, which had been ob- 
served in Soviet Russia hitherto as the occa- 
sion of a demonstration against “capitalism 
and imperialism," took the form of one of the 
most formidable military parades witnessed 
since the World War. The troops, with all the 
accoutrements or modem warfare, marched 
flrst, in perfect order and with a martial air 
that Czarist Russia never knew. At the head of 
this army of 30,000 soldiers rode a detachment 
of the motorcycle corps. There followed 300 
tanks and as many armored cars, together with 
an array of military trucks. Overhead flew 750 
planes. The military parade was followed by 
the civilian cortege. Banners and huge por- 
traits of Lenin and Stalin headed every section. 


INTERNA TIOIYAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K_ McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PuNaher 

Examine Editor RENE BONDY Depun, Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

^ ay ^ Wr HICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy &&ur STEPHAN W CONAWAY Director 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAiSONS Director 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Ortaor af Ad*entsng Sales 
Inlentauooal Herald Tnbune. 181 Avenue Charles-de-GaulIe. 92200 Narillv-w-Sane. 

France. Tel: 11)747-1265. Tele*: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 1 SSN:^ 02 WT§ 52 ! 

Director de la pubBcattan: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessy RtL, Hong KontL TeL S-2856HL Taler 61 170 
Managing Dir. U.K.. Rabbi Macjddun 63 Long Acre, Larnkm n y» 7V jig tyr* Trim '*43009 
Gtn Mgr. W. Germany: W. Lnaaba*. Fnedndab. 

U.X suotenpaan. S284 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City N.Y. 1 1 101 
c 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



X 


■^yASHINGTON — There really 


r mystery about the right 
the leaders at the Bonn 


By Hobart Rowen 


abandoning protectionism 
a new global trade round. 


in favor of 


unpredictable, proposals to put a cap on the 
rates payable by these countries on new 
loans makes sense. Sudden rises in market 
rates would be carried forward to future 
years instead of inflicting an immediate new 
burden, as happens at present. 

The major need, however, is to revive 
private direct investment, on an equity basis, 
in the nascent industries of these countries. 
Then, foreign debt obligations mil depend 
on the success of the project rather than on 
the gyrations of the world money markets. 
Fixed debt charges will fall The proposal 
for a World Bank guarantee scheme to pro- 
tect private investment against political and 
commercial risks in indebted nations should 
be acted upon. Such proposals can help, but 
the debt problem is going to be with us long. 

There are only two windows through 
which lasting relief can flow. The industrial- 
ized countries need to ensure a higher 
growth of world trade, so that the indebted 
poor can earn more. And the debtors need to 
reduce their inflationary excesses and pro- 
vide conditions to allow private capital to 
flow into them more safely. 

Economic sanity begins al home. The 
highly indebted countries, instead of reviling 
the IMF for pushing them into unpopular 
austerity programs, should recall that it is 
much easier to deal with poverty and sick- 
ness if they can reduce inflation levels and 
concentrate their public spending on ratio- 
nal economic programs. 

The Bandung countries are right to stress 
their problems. But you cannot help people 
who do not help themselves. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


no 

course for 

economic summit to take: tt has been 
carefully blueprinted by the profes- 
sional. international civil-service 
staffs of the International Monetary- 
Fund here in Washington, and the 
Organization for Economic Coopera- 
tion and Development in Paris. 

It would be a"package deal" — so 
labeled by OECD Secretary General 
Jean -Claude Paye — involving a 
three-way bargain: The United States 


In dramatic terms, a recent IMF 
report showed that for Europe as a 
whole, the jobless rate this year will 
approach 113 percent, or several per- 
centage points above the level before 
the 1980-82 recession began. That is 
nine points higher than in Japan, and 

r . " 


record unemployment in Europe, real 
wages in the past two years have risen 


To Seoul’s 


> 


more than 2 percent annually. On the 
other hand, U-S. wi 


Finally, there is the thorny Ques- 
tion of access to Japan’s markets. 


four points above the level projected 
the Ur 


would sharply cut its budget deficit, 
v reaudi 


ucing interest rates and 
the overvalued dollar 


auemi 


thereby _ 

‘ sd dollar Europe would 
it to stimulate its rale of 
i and shave an appallingly high 
rate of unemployment; ana Japan 
would make a serious effort to import 
industrial products at a level typical 
of a major industrial nation. 

But it is easier for the bureaucrats 
at the OECD and the IMF to lay out 
a wise course of action than it is for 
the politicians who go to summit 
meetings to bile the bullet. Through- 
out the course of the past 10 summit 
sessions (they started in 1975 at Ram- 
botrillei in France), the hope has been 
that a self-imposed and wdl-publi- 
dzed international arm-twisting an 
would make it easier for the politi- 
cians to lake unpopular steps when 
they arrived back home. 

But it has not worked out that way. 
For example, beads of state have re- 
peatedly pledged at summit sessions 
to eschew new protectionist measures 
— even to roll back devices that inter- 
fere with free and open trade. 

Back home, however, the political 
pressures for protection have mount- 
ed as a consequence of recession, and 
protectionist measures have multi- 
plied. The best that can be claimed is 
that protectionist pressures might 
have been even worse in the wake of 
the 1980-82 recession, without the 
pledges made at the summits. 

President Ronald Reagan’s game 

reduce the scandalous American 
budget deficit; there is even a new 
willingness, as evidence grows of a 
siaBmg-out of recovery, to admit that 
a small er deficit is needed to lower 
interest rates and make American 
goods more competitive in world 


for the United States. 

“One of the most disturbing eco- 
nomic developments of the past de- 
cade has been the worsening situa- 
tion in European labor markets, both 
relative to their previous perfor- 
mance, and to conditions in the Unit- 
ed States." the IMF report stated. 

There is little mystery why this is 
happening: Strong labor onions, 
wage indexation and national mini- 
mum wages have helped price Euro- 
pean labor out of the mars cl Despite 


wages and those in 

Japan have responded to the reality 
of recession, boosting productivity. 

But political leaders in Europe, 
while recognizing the problem, have 
found it difficult to produce more 
than temporary refrains. Unemptov- 
t is likely to be a protracted prob- 


memi 


lem for European nations. 
Beyond that, Eu: 


has been 


irope n 

slower than the United States or Ja- 
pan to accept the emergence of new 
high-technology processes, which 
force the displacement of some old- 
line industries. Europe's partners will 
mess for faster action on this front. 
There is also [ess enthusiasm in Eu- 
rope than in America and Japan fra 


Experience has shown that although 
the top Japanese political leadership 
is willing, the Japanese economy it- 
self is slow to adapt lo imports. 
Moreover, neither European nor 
American exporters — with some ex- 
ceptions — have proved to be in the 
same league with the Japanese as in- 
novative marketing men. 

A safe prediction is that a final 
communique in Bonn will agree — in 
principle — with what the IMF and 
OECD civil servants say should be 
done. A genuine conviction may be 
discernible among the politicians that 
progress in all these directions must 
be made. But as measured by actual 
results, progress will be slow. 

The Washington Post. 


Opposition I 1 


By Edward W, Poilras 


Trade Must Take Priority at Summit 


By Jonathan Power 


L ONDON — Protection if it worsens a disease is a 
/ contradiction in terms. Yet, although this must be 
any doctor's diagnosis of what has happened to the 


world's trading system over the last five years with the 
growth of trade 


markets. But Mr. Reagan can only 


pledge an effort at budget control 
He still must make a political deal 
with congressional Democrats to get 
a deficit-reduction package. 

Along with the OECD and IMF 
bureaucrats, the Reagan administra- 
tion believes that critical changes 
must be made in Europe to boost 
economic growth and to lower high 
levels of unemployment. 


Barriers, Western governments are still 
refusing to look the evidence squarely in the face. 

The object of protection — to improve the well-being 
of a beleaguered body, in this case depressed economies 
— has dearly not been saddled. Will the Big Seven have 
the courage to do something about it in Bonn? 

At the IMF-World Bank meeting in Washington two 
weeks ago it was decided to open world trade liberaliza- 
tion negotiations in 1986. The exact date will probably be 
fixed during the Bonn meeting. More important than the 
date, however, is the mandate. 

Quite how bad the situation has become is not widely 
appreciated. Discrimination, to use a word more accurate 
than protectionism, is so rife that it now requires 35 
documents and 360 copies to execute the average transac- 
tion in international trade. A Finnish study of a not 
extreme case found that the documentation costs 
amounted to as much as 5.7 percent of the total value of 
Finnish imports. This is a big slice of profit margins and 
fra many companies, a deterrent to trading. 

in 1980 only 20 percent of manufactured goods con- 
sumed in the united States and the European Communi- 
ty were subject to protectionism. Three years Later, the 
figure had increased to 30 percent 
Protectionism is usually justified by Western potiti- 
ciaiw because it helps relatively poor people in detaining 
industrial areas. Superficially this is convincing. The 
reality is less so. A recent study of the British clothing 
industry found that clothing prices are 20 percent higher 
than they would be without trade restrictions. In low 
quality items, such as jeans, prices are as much as 50 
percent higher and the price of children's wear is raised by 
1 00 percent. A Canadian study found that protectionism 
costs lower income households four times as much as it 
costs wealthier families. More poor people are hurt by 
higher prices than are helped by protected jobs. 


is often a tax on poor people in rich countries transferred 
to the rich in the poor countries. The jibe could more 
appropriately be leveled in the trade arena. While the 


poor m the richer countries pay the penalty of higher 
often those companies (hat 


prices, the beneficiaries are 
are already established in the exporting countries. While 
newcomers find it difficult to enter a restricted market, 
the old-timers can put up their prices. 

As for the poorer workers in the protected industries, 
the benefits are often illusory or insignificant Even in 
industries most exposed to international competition, 
trade flows are usually a fairly minor influence on em- 


S EOUL — President Chun Duo 
Hwaa of South Korea visited the 
White House last week in what was 
described as a cordial meeting that 
fully reaffirmed the security ties be- 
tween the two countries. In fact, it is 
unlikely that these talks penetrated 
bdow the surface or recognized the 
need fra serious readjustments in 
U.S. policy toward South Korea. 

The legislative eke lions held in 
South Korea in February highlighted 
this need. The campaign allowed a 
more open political discussion than 
any in memory. In stumping sessions 
in which all ponies shared the same 
rostrum, opposition speakers reached 
out to an enthusiastic electorate, 
drawing support for the newly 
formed opposition group, the New 
Korea Democratic Party. The ruling 
Democratic Justice Party met an out- 
pouring of dissatisfaction. 

While revealing unhappiness with 
the Chun government, the election 
also was a great affirmation of the 
democratic process. The people 
showed a determination to make vot- 
ing work, and the election gave the 
country a moral boost. 

The Gum government's response 
has been disturbing, however. It 
claims it is seeking dialogue and rec- 
onciliation, but its new appointments 


ployment levels. Moreover, protectionism against exports 
from one country often just encourages other countries 


have increased military influence in 
the cabinet and extended 


which are not restricted to go into the same business. Only 
in textiles has it been possible to make the argument that 
trade barriers protect more than 2 or 3 percent of the jobs. 

Protectionism rives little and takes away a lot. The 
inability of the third World countries to realize their 
potential merely boomerangs into other sectors of the 
world economy. A new study by the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development argnes that 
“had the developing countries been able to achieve in the 
1980s even half the annual average growth rate in export 
earnings they recorded in the 1970s the 1982 debt service 
ratio would have been 4 percentage points lower." The 
OECD concludes that the “self-inflicted effects of the 
protective measures" have cost the industrialized coun- 
tries 3 J percent of their gross domestic producL 

The more uncertain tire world's economic climate the 
more pressure there is to impose increased restrictions. 
But this is taking us all nowhere. The world economy, 
thanks to Man’s innovative capacity, has enormous unre- 
alized potential both in the West and in the Third World. 
Open trade is the best way of maximizing each country's 
contribution. Uncorking international trade rather than 
bottling it up should be the priority in Bonn. 

International Herald Tribune 
All rights reserved 


the degree 
to which Mr. Chun's staff and secret 
police arc involved in political affairs. 

South Korea remains a police 
state. Seoul abounds with uniformed 
and plainclothes police. Strong-arm 
police tactics are used routinely 


against protesting students ana 
, Strict con hols have reduced 


workers.! 
the media to a government-propa- 
ganda tool State control of educa- 
tion is Byzantine in its thoroughness. 
Student and labor protests continue. 

Ami- Americanism, which has a 
long history in South Korea, is a 


growing ingredient in these demon- 
>. South Kore: 


stranons. 


how, early 
agreed to J£ 





HI.R0N8 




Koreans remember 
this century, America 
apan's influence in Korea 
and thus opened the way to a painful 
annexation. They also remember that 
in 1945 the United States was party 
to the derision to divide tire counuy. 
opening the way to war. For the Ko- 
rean people, a homogeneous ethnic 
group that traditionally fears outside 
influences, this sort of thing raises 
doubts about U.S. friendship. 

South Koreans are grateful to the 
United States for defeating the Japa- 
nese and halting Communist aggres- 
sion. Yet they remain suspicious of 
American motives and fear that U.S. 


self-interest may again lead to tire 
undermining of thetr security. 

Nationalism is flourishing In South 
Korea now. and more people com- 
plain that U.S. security interests 



. .. . • . V ‘ 




The German Resisters Should Be Honored, Too 


licy to their disadvantage; that u.S. 
business investments are bad for their 
economy; and that America is merely 
exploiting South Korea in its effort to 
exert influence around the world. 

These are exaggerated accusations, 
but each contains some truth. South 
Koreans suspect that neither the 
United States nor the powers in the 
region care much for their dream of 
reuniting their country. They worry 
that the united Stales prefers to live 
with the status quo than to face the 
costs of ramification. 

To South Koreans, the American 
government also appears to bend 
over backward to put the best inter- 
pretation on tire actions of the Chun 
government Al the same time, our 
diplomats seem to give the most cyni- 
cal interpretations to the actions of 
the democratic opposition. Even Kim 
Dae Jung and Kim Young Sam, who 
have both paid dearly fra their demo- 
cratic convictions, are routinely 
treated with suspicion. 

Many South Koreans have even 
crane to doubt the limited protesta- 
tions that Americans do make about 
human rights abuses. 

It is time for America to reexam- 
ine its policy toward South Korea. 
We should ask whether American, or 


South Korean, security is well served 


by present U.S. policy. 

time for 


W ASHINGTON — When it 
comes to recognizing Germans 


By Francis L. Loewenheim 


who lived during theNazi era, there is 
one group that has every right to be 
honored. It was made up of men and 
women, young and old, Christians 
and unbelievers, who never yielded to 
Hitlerian blandishments, who in 
countless instances suffered unspeak- 
ably and died for those beliefs. 

To anyone familiar with the histo- 
ry of the Nazi years — sadly, that 
does not seem to include many 
around the White House these days 
— the history of the German resis- 
tance is a well-known subject 
Fra years, in the 1930s and early 
1940s, Hitler and company liked to 
make the world believe that the Ger- 
man people were solidly behind 
them. We have long known better. 

The German opposition to Hitler 
began in the days following his take- 
over on Jan. 30, 1933, and continued 
until his “Thousand Year Reich" 
ended 12 years and four months later. 
Its politics were right and left and 
center. Its climactic effort — the fam- 
ous assassination attempt erf July 20, 
194 4 — proved unsuccessful, but the 
incidence of opposition to Hitler and 
National Socialism, the acts of cour- 
age and dissidence were legion. 

Such attitudes and deeds were duly 
noted by the American Embassy in 
Berlin as late as the autumn of 1941. 
As one ranking U.S. diplomat report- 
ed to the State Department on OcL 
14, 1941 (in a telegram not published 
in full until 1982): “The revival of the 
Jewish question bythe required wear- 
ing of the Star of David has met with 
almost universal disapproval by the 
le of Berlin and m some cases 
astonishing manifestations of 
ly with the Jews in public." 
'ears, the Communists — Soviet 


their own. The record shows the resis- 
tance was nothing of the kind. 

There were Social Democrats and 
labor leaders, such as Fritz Leber. 
There were aristocrats and army offi- 
cers, such as Claus Count Scheok von 
Stauf fenberg, who planted the bomb 
in Hitler's headquarters in 1944, and 
others such as Lieutenant General 
Ludwig Beck and Hehnuth James 
Count von Moltke, whom George F. 


In Germany's years of 
shame, the resistance 
set an example of courage 
and humanity. 


they were unable to confront the Jew- 
ish situation head-on. 

The democracies did not help. Ap- 
prised of the opposition’s existence 
and plans for a possible coup against 
Hitler in the summer of 1938, before 
Munich, the British government de- 
liberately turned its head. President 
Roosevelt reacted similarly. 

Some of the resistors survive. One 
of the most notable, the West Ger- 
man diplomat Hans Heinrich Her- 
wanb von ffittenfeld, visited the 


belief that the German people will 
want justice, honesty and truthful- 
ness in the future, as in the pasL 


These are the Germans worthy of 
se, as EBe 


acknowledgment. Fra these, 

Wiesel has rightly said, are “the real 
heroes of Germany.” On May 8, 
these are the Germans that President 
Reagan should remember and honor. 


And it is also tune for us to listen to 
what the Sooth Korean people are 
saying with their ballots — to recog- 
nize their right and ability to enjoy a 
Dree democratic system and lo put 
more weight behind constructive ef- 
forts to bring about true democratic 
reform. This is the rally way to 
achieve security in South 


The writ&, a professor of history at 
Rice University, Houston, contributed 
this comment to The Washington Post. 


The writer, a Methodist missionary 
in South Korea since 1953, is a profes- 
sor at Methodist Theological Seminary 
In Seoul He contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. 


i 




United Stales — including my class- 
room in Houston — in October. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


years 

and East German — liked to daim 
the German resistance to Hitler as 


K erman described later in his mem- 
oirs as “the greatest person, morally 
... that I met on either side of 
the battle lines." 

There were ranking, government 
officials, such as Carl Goerdeler, the 
former lord mayor of Leipzig, Johan- 
nes Popitz, the Prussian secretary of 
the treasury, and Admiral Wilhelm 
Canons. There were noted theolo- 
gians, such as Dietrich Bonboeffer, 
and diplomats, such as Adam von 
Troft zu So Iz and Ulrich von Hassdl, 
and leading historians, such as Ger- 
hard Ritter, whose deeply moving let- 
tere from his Berlin prison in 1944-45 
have recently been published by the 
West German Bunaesarchiv. Before 
and after July 1944, the prisons and 
camps held many such people. The 
executioner claimed thousands more. 

Of course, the resisters remained 
too few. And they were often uncer- 
tain and perhaps inevitably divided 
over tactics and strategy. Tragically. 


1983. It was an unforgettable event. 

As a young diplomat in the Nazi 
embassy in Moscow in early 1939, 
von Herwarth risked his life by dis- 
closing to the late Charles E. Bohlen, 
himself then a young Foreign Service 
officer at the U.S. Embassy, the be- 
ginnings and unfolding of the super- 
secret diplomatic negotiations lead- 
ing to the Nazi-Soviet pact in August, 
1 939. These revelations readied Pres- 
ident Roosevelt and the Department 
of State in a matter of hours. 

In Germany’s years of unspeak- 
able shame, the resistance set an ex- 
ample of courage and humanity at its 
besL In the country’s darkest night, 
they set a standard of honor and 
decency. And they persisted under 
unimaginable circumstances. 

■ As Carl Goerdeler. executed on 
Feb. 2. 1945, put in a secret letter to 
German generals in 1943: “ft is a 
great mistake to assume that the mor- 
al force of the German people is ex- 
hausted; the fact is that it has been 
deliberately weakened. The only 
hope of salvation is to sweep away 
the secrecy and terror, to restore jus- 
tice and decent government and so to 
pave the way for a great moral reviv- 
al We must not be shaken in our 


Turkish Role in Cyprus 


Further to my letter of March 19, 
1985, 1 wish to stress these points: 

In connection with a reference in 
your recent Special Report on Cy- 
prus (Feb. 25), it should be remem- 
bered that property has been seized 
From Greek Cypriot refugees evicted 
by the Turkish army and that the so- 
called government in Turkish-occu- 
pied Cyprus has been declared filial 
and condemned by the United Na- 
tions and the international communi- 
ty at large. The European Communi- 


Talring into account that the last 
intercommunal incident occurred in 
1967, it should be noted that the 
policy of Turkey since 1954 has been 
one of division and creation of fails 
accomplis within the separatist phi- 
losophy of Ankara. The evidence is 
abundant: rejection in 1963 of a revi- 
sion of the Constitution; bombard- 
ment by the Turkish air force of Cyp- 
riot "villages in 1964; withdrawal from 
the government; creation of enclaves; 




*■ V 


invasion and occupation by Turkey 


ty decided recently, through its 


.ommission, that the exports from 
Cyprus to the members of the EC 
should be accompanied by documen- 


tation of the Cyprus government. 

; the Jan. 17 meeting in 


Regarding 
New York between President Spyros 
Kyprianou and the Turkish Cypriot 
leader, Rauf Denktash, I wish to 
stress the goodwill of the government 


of Cyprus to cooperate with the Unit- 
ed Natit 


tattoos secretary-general, and 1 
hope that the Turkish ride 
not continue to create barriers 
to the possibility of success of a 
new high-level me e ti ng . 


since 1974 of 37 percent of the Cy- 
prus territory, recognition by Turkey 
of a separate stale in the occupied 
area, and so forth. 

The future of the people of Cyprus 
os a whole lies in a federation towards 
which the government of Cyprus is 
actively committed. Such a federa- 
tion of an independent, nonaligned, 
territorially integral Cyprus would 
offer Great Cypriots and Turkish 
Cypriots alike the opportunity to live, 
in prosperity and share in the proW. 
gress of a strong, united Republic. 

PETROS MICHA ELIDES. 

Ambassador. 

The Republic of Cyprus Embassy. 

Pans. 


p 

VJ 

r£3 ‘ 


£ 

I 


•--t 

11 


8 

Yt3 




j 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBE NE, THURSDAY. MAY 2, 1985 


SCIENCE 

Volcano Watchers Try to Probe Earth’s Secrets 


**v B 


By Walrer Sullivan 

\'cu- York Tuna Strclcc . r • V . *■ 

N EW YORK — Early one day 
last mouth, right on schedule, 
lava began spurting from a young 
volcanic cone known as Pli’u 0 on 
the east rift zone of Hawaii's Kiiau- 
ea volcano. The 14-houT eruption, 
which sent fountains of fiery lava , 

1,000 feet (300 meters) into .the air, 
was the 3 2d from that site since a 
series of periodic eruptions began 
there in January 1983. 

Probably no volcano on Earth 
erupts so often, and probably no 
other is subjected to such intense 
observation. Among other find- 
ings, the monitoring has showed 
that, with surprising uniformity, it 
gradually swells before each of its 
eruptions, then deflates abruptly as 
lava pours from the outlet 
Kilauea is a laboratory for dues 
to the behavior of volcanoes world- 
wide, and a focal point of efforts Jo ' 
understand the volcanic process 
that boUt the Hawaiian ishmifc and 
which is foohiDg a new submarine 
member of the chain, Lojhi Sea- 
mount, to the southeast. . - 
Hie islands are the offspring of a 
rising fountain of molten rodt deep 
beneath the Pacific Ocean floor. 

For a large part of the past 100 
million years, this fountain has 
erupted periodically onto the sur- 
face and, because the Pacific floor 

has been moving while the plume the rift zones that reach in opposite ejecie 
remained stationary, it has .pro- directions from the island's two ao snail 





i 

/ r • • • I 

f i* W fc n VC . 

* r . / 


m 




ducerf a long string of i s l a n d s . live volcanoes, presenting recur- lowers of women and chili 
They, or their am l tra remnants, rent ducats to the lives and proper- Now Kdanea’s recently 

reach from the currently active vd- tyof the islanders. A 1950 emptiest volcanic cone, Pu’u O. is 
canoes on the Kg Island of Hawaii of Manna Loa, by far the larger of out lava again. Earlier, it 
to the northeast corner of the Parif- ihetwo volcanoes, buried 35 square the RoyaT Gardens sub 


of islands. 


; recur- 
proper- 


anal] Hawaiian army and its fol- 
lowers of women and children. 
Now Kdanea’s recently formed 


ic. But despite years of monitoring miles- (01 square Irflomwn 
of Hawaiian eruptions, the nature an 8 -mile (13-fcflometer) 
of the plume and others like it with- lava fountains, 
in the Earth’s mantle — the inner Last year, a river of h 


wiped out a points out that scientists have not 
and its Id- obtained the sea floor measure- 
hfldren. meats of seismic activity needed to 
atiy formed confirm that and to determine the 
, is pouring structure of the rising plume at 
, it invaded greater depth. 

Gardens subdivision. At Ms disposal are readmes from 

KJOprosoec- 51 seismometers on the island of 


kb. 


# 5 

■ 

“ . -a .• a * 

* A. i“ * ■ 

r ■■ -v ■ 


John Hofmann on Wn O, 
left Hawaii's eruptions are 
caused by molten rock ris- 
ing through the moving Pa- 
cific crust, above. 


After replacing the film, Mr. 
Hofmann and his com panions usu- 
ally fly to Camp Six, on a sharp 
knoll that was reforested after an 
eruption 10 years ago, only to be 
swept by the eruptions of Pu'u O, 


llea (91 square kilometers) under burying 16 homes and 300 prospec- 51 seismometers on the island of 
i 8 -mile (13-kflometer) fine, of rive house lots. The residents were Hawaii and a few on neighboring 
re fountains. evacuated five times. islands. All transmit their readings 

Last year, a river of lava from Dr. Thomas L. Wright, director to the Volcano Observatory by re- 
st volcano moved ominously to- of the Hawaii Volcano Observa- dio or telephone, tot the seism ome- 
ird the city of Hilo and its 35,000 tory, said, however, dial the new lers are not widespread enough to 


area above the central core — re- that volcano moved ominously to- of the Hawaii Volcano Observa- dio or telephone, tot thesasmome- 
mains an enigma. ward the dty of Hilo and its 35,000 tory, said, however, dial the new lers are not widespread enough to 

On ibe island of Hawaii, molten inhabitants. In 1790, KU&uea, ns- lava flows, moving toward the sea, look deeply into the Barth's in tar- 
rock, or magma, bursts forth along ing on the flank of Manna Loar had so far done no property dam- or. 

: • ; aae and had not crossed the bound- Hence there are few dues to the 


m nnn71? - Park, although they reportedly wkhin the 1,600-mile-thick mantle 

tli yi r came within two miles of uoeprevi- that encloses the Earth’s liquid 

— — ously stricken subdivision. core. Still uncertain is how far 

_ 0 _ _ Such eruptions have occuned ev- down such phxmes or “hot spots” 

Gene Promoting Scrames is Isolated ay few weeks with striking regular- originate, why they exist, where 

„ _ 7* ity, the previous (me March 13. they exist and why they seem to 

LOS ANGELES (NYT) — A gene that seems to promote scrapres. Before each eruption the entire voT generate great blobs of magma 
which produces a tangle of protein rods and fSamoxts m the brains of cano inflates, altering the tilt of the rather than a steady flow, 
animals, has been isolated, cloned ami sequfflced, opaiing the way for land as far away as the observatory As a result of a wide range of 
research into what causes tins and other degenerative brain diseases. perched on the rim of the man measurements, however, ranch has 


age and had not crossed the bound- Hence there are few dues to the. 
ary of Hawaii Volcanoes National nature of the plume embedded 


eater depth. ■ swept by the eruptions of Pu'u O, I 

At Ms disposal are readings from stripping its trees of bark and twigs 
' seismometers on the island of to leave a grove of arboreal ghosts, 
awaii and a few on neighboring On the summit, he mounts his 
lands. All transmit their reading electronic measuring device and 
the Volcano Observatory by ra- aims its laser pulses at & succession 
o or telephone, tot the sdsmome- of reflectors in various directions 
rs are not widespread enough to on both sides of the rift. Thar* 
ok deeply into the Barth’s in ten- round-trip travel times are auto- 
matically recorded with sufficient 
Hence there are few dues to the. precision to detect any widening or 


Park, although they reportedly 
came within two miles of me previ- 
ously stricken subdivision. 


_ 0 _ • tti v auen eruptions nave occurred ev- aown suen prames or m 

;-T Gene Promoting Scrames is Isolated ay few weeks with striking regular- Originate, why they exis 

ft „ ^ O r ity, the previous oat March 13. they exist and why they 

v LOS ANGELES (NYT) — A gene that seems to promote scranes, Jlu tiw mthenni. pmmre hint* nt 


The study, reported in the sdentific jouroal Cai, has given impetus to a Kilauea Crater, 14 miles away. The been learned regarding the voica- 
theory that a radically different kind of infectious agait, called a prion, observatory’s tilt meters record the noes themselves. On good flying 
may cause the infection. Thetwark is a collaboration between three teams slow inflation before each eruption, days, until the current eruption, 
of srientists, one beaded by Dr Stantey ftminm of the Uniyaaiy of foIIowed by m abrupt deflation. John P. Hofmann took ofl by hdi- 
Cahforma at San Francisco, another by Dr. Leroy Hood of the Califoona ^ Wright said that, a few hours copra to land at sites along Kilau- 
Institute of Technology, and a third by Dr. Charles Wassmann of the af^ Uie start of the April 24 erop- ea’s east rift zone, ndoading a time- 
Uniyeroiy of Zurich. . don, substantial deflation was al- lapse camera aimed at the 

Most infectious agents msertthor own generic mataial, or DNAmto cvidenL ever-steaming cone of Pu’u O and 

a host cell. The infectious DN A then reproduce itsdf and sends its own to predict ^ eruptions conducting surveys to watch for 

products, which are proteins, into the hosL Pnons seem to be small and probe their origin depend on a spreading of the rift, 
proteins that should not have the ability, like gcnc-carrymg viruses, to tride range of observations, includ- The time-lapse camera is at a site 

reproduce themselves. But in 1982. Dr. Pntsina found prions m the cdls ^ ^ identified & named. Camp Seva. in partisan 

of animals with scrapks arKl has smce advanced tbe ttoory that pnons d^ong of eart^es m a re- ‘ ' 

alone might cause the infection. .. . Mon 25 to 40 miles bekm Hawaii 


land as far away as the observatory As a result of a wide range of 
perched on the rim of the main measurements, however, much has 


clustering of earthquakes in a re- Mr. Hofmann, because seven times 
gion 25 to 40 miles below Hawaii since it was sa up in April 1983 it 




d • j . tt* i m _» _ _i n Dr. Robert Y. Koyanagi, senior re- has been buried by volcanic 

bnonng iieato Ulga JOlOOU rressure search seismolo^st at the observa- “bombs” and debris from the lava 

LONDON (UPI) — Researchers of the University of Helsinki report 

that snoring is often associated with high blood pressnre and angina v ^ berc nnnutes ’ ^ 

^ 6 magma b^an to diverge m tosepa- reght, to make sure a record is ob- 

Tbe team’s stingy of 3^47 men and 3,664 women, reported in Ibe SS? 

Lancet, said the statistical connection between high blood pressure and jvra a^ve volcanoes as well as to miption. A roll of Glm lasts eight 

snoring was significant in both sexes. The link between snoring and u ~ u ™ mo, ^ 1L .. . , 

angina pectoris, piercing anerial chest pain, was significant only in men. Few clues, .however, .are available For much of the ume beewera 

The survey found that 9 percent of the men and 3.6 percent erf tto as to wtoi taqpptaw dc^er down empuons, however, ^e coneis ob- 
women wxre habitual soonxs. Snoring increased sfightly with age among JS 

men but to a more significant extent among womenTlt also appeared to the dow-movmg Pacific plate. Tto ^amalldtrecuons, steam seeps 


men but to a more agnificant extent among women. It also appeared to 
be relaled to body mass — about twice as marry heavy people who 
answered the questionnaire snared. 

Marijuana Use Seen to Damage Fetus 

ANAHEIM, California (AP) — Two studies of drugged rats boost 
evidence that marijuana may damage the human reproductive system, 
perhaps even in rite offspring of pregnant women who smote it, research- 
ers said at a meeting on experimental biology. 

“Smoking marijuana during pregnancy might cause irreversible dam- 
age to those cells in the {ferns] onto which control the female gonads,” 
Amarendhra Kumar of Boston’s Tofts University School rtf Medicine 
said. A Harvard Medical School psychiatrist. Dr. Lester Grinspoon, 
objected that the doses at marijuana given to the rats woe greater than 
the amount stroked by most humans, and that the findings did not 
necessarily apply to people. The researchers agreed- ■ 

Dr. Kumar gave newborn female rats the equivalent of 2 to 20 
marijuana cigarettes’ worth of tetrahydrocaimaMnd, or THC, marijua- 
na's active ingredient, during each of their first five days of life. The rats 
never developed normal female cycles, and at 10 months they had 
abnormally low levels of a chemical that triggers the pituitary gland to 


plate is thought to be a boat 60 from the newly formed volcanic 
miles thick, but Dr. Koyanagi landscape. 


other deformation of the rift zone, 

Sockets for each leg of the mea- j 
surisg device’s bipod are cemented 
into the lava so that on each return 
the tripod can be readily mounted 
in the same location. Once reflect- 
ed laser pulses are detected, the 
instrument runs automatically, 
emitting squeaks, peeps and whis- 
tles that are decoded by computers, 
as it takes and compares about 70 
readings. 

It has been found that, as with 
the tilt observations, the rift ex- 
pands until an eruption occurs and 
that contracts. 

Clustering of shallow earth- 
quakes beneath the east rift zone 
and the coast suggest to Dr. 
Koyanagi that the repeated inva- 
sions of lava are gradually pushing 
that six-mile-wide rim of the island 
‘ toward the sea, motion in the other 
direction bring blocked by the 
mass of the island itself. 

Earthquakes also occur some- 
times under the other islands in the 
chain, including Oahu. There have 
been eruptions there as recently as 
14,000 years ago. although that is- 
land was largely formed by volca- 
nic activity two million to three 
million years earlier. Among fea- 
tures produced by the relatively re- 
cent eruptions were the Diamond 
Head crater, forming a famous 
landmark at the end of Waikiki 
Beach. 


Plan for Bullet-Fast Subway Is Aired 


The Amckaed Press 


cars would go n 


via Dallas, this thing work that this isn’t fittar- 


C AMBREDGE, Massa c husetts 2,450 miles, al 14,000 mph. with ism or some crazy idea,” said Pro- 
— Scientists fired a pinaxme time allowed tor a 17-mile (27-ki3o- - lessor Davidson, who suonsored 


V/ — Scientists fired a pingpong time 
ball through a tube in the bonk erf mete 
an eye — and claimed that the each 
same principle could send a sub- j n 


time allowed for a 17-mile (27-Jdlo- -lessor Davidson, who sponsored 

meter) speedup and slowdown at the conference. 

each end of the nip. While the initial investment to 


an eye — and cla i m e d that the each end of the trip. While the initial investment to 

same principle rould send a sub- in 1978, Mr. Salter mapped out a ^ a vacuum system would be 
way tram from New York to Los rfoha] sub wav system Lb at amid .enormous, maintenance costs 
Angles m about 21 mmoles. cany cars in underground vacuum ** ^ no fuel is re- 

SSISSl tubes fam New Yo* to Europe ?*“> to power the tirns, Mr. 
vi* the Soviet Umoo mjurt 54 


tired to power the trains, Mr. 
liter said m an article. 

Tom Stodkebrand, a engineer for 


help make ovaries produce q_ 

A study by Syed Husain at (be University of North Dakota found that tss ^ 1 ot va< ?5“® ** 
the THC equivalent of as few as 2h marijuana cigarettes a day for 15 days It would bell 

unpaired toe processing of energy-rich sugars in the testicles of yotmg transportation 

SKfunS 

New Insulin Nose Spray Is Tested 


Ma^dnmts Institute of Tech- Tom Stockebnmd, a engineer for 

4 ?^ m ag ne t i ca lly propelled and float Digital Equipment Corp. from Al- 
neos now had the expertise to on electromametcfields. boquerque. New Mexwo, was com- 

^ TbTtomdwoddbclm^witha unsaooedtotwildallJOO toon- 
tem of vacuum tunnels. ‘ 7 ^ s (ration tube of 2 -inch plastic 

“It would be the most advanced P*!**- The pmgpoog ball was 

transportation system in ihe m sequence :as thei fram approaches bundled through ituszng a burst of 
world” said Professor Davidson. » * forward. The nmgnenc helrnm shnt hv n lioht croc atm 


pipes. The pmgpoog nail was 
launched through it using a buret of 
bediam shot by a light gas gun. 


head of MTTs Macro-Engineering Geld, would keep the tarn floating 
Research Group. Wlthm ^ tannei - ^ch m agnet 


BOSTON (AP) — A new method of administering insulin — a nose 
spray used before meals — may largely eliminate the need for insulin 
A injections in severe diabetics, according to a new study. 

■ The study by Boston University Medical Center resoirchers, reported 
in (he New England Journal of bfodicine. was the first kag-tenn project 
investigating response to the method. Eight people used the spray at 
home for three months. “T bis study shows that it can be tolerated, and 
you can achieve the same amount of gjycemic [Mood sugar] control as the 
patient can achieve with injections?’ said one of the researchers, Dr. 
Renate Kimmerte. 

The key to the new technique is an aerosol pump that sprays insulin 
mixed with detergent into Ibe nose. The detergent helps the insulin 
penetrate the membranes in the nose. A drawback to thejrothod was that 
it caused nasal irritation jn some people, and diabetics would still seed 


He demonstrated the concept to ‘ n ? t * se “SJ *** 

experts from the United Stales; Eu- shghtiy during the accderaaon 
rope and Japan attending an inter- P 1185 *- 

national conference on tunnelin g m agnet s lnn ng toe nnm ei woald be 
and underground transportation, of reverse polarity from toeaccder- 

The demonstration, on MTTs aun S IT ? a g ne3s - ^ wuM 

athletic field, took a ample of sec* JP* «f. rathcr 

raids, as a pingpong ball was bur- a ff rac ^ ^ 2 nd slow it down, 
tied through a 950-foot (290-roeter) Cars woald move through unda-- 

plnstic tube. ground tunnels at speeds well 

The idea, using dcctromaguc- above the speed of sound, about 
tism withia a vacuum to prppri an 750 mph al sea level Without air in 
olgect through a rube, was put for- the tunnels, the cars would cemtin- 



SA 




Paris 77, Faubourg St. Honore 

FKOUr- MCrtO -*u«4 - fTVXl - fTLtf'T1~tXht I Hi -MUClIHC-luVll 4 - 1 US UGOJU 

mvmuKio - rvou - mwnn (jomarsgiKc.1 - snctiuwf. - ? now - i#.w - a uco 


“The T70 offers the beginner 
|=jr decision-free photography 

Ik and simple operation ihe 

■ experienced photographer 
has a camera unsurpassed 
in versatility.” 

A quote from ‘SLR Camera’ in the U.K. 




:: 

HH 










UMTBJRWMOOaimER’CB 

EOCUS/Nl 

SOTO’S 

WHOToewE BaBir icv 


ntr u t ura uMB- 


Canon®) 

European camera of the year ’84. 


penetrate the membranes in the nose. A drawback to me .method was that ward by Robert M. Salter, an enjp- ue to coast at a high rate of speed 
it caused nasal irritation in some people, and diabetics would still seed seer for Litton Industries Inc., m . with nothing to slow them down, 
one injection a day to provideinsima wWIe they deep. Insulin cannot be Pacific Palisades, California. “We wanted to show the confer- 

swallowed because it is destroyed by anymes m tbs digestive system. In the 21-minute example, the ence people who go over and see 





White Blood Cells 
Treat Miscarriage 

The Associated Prerx 

I ONDON — Women who have 
* miscarriages each time thw 
get pregnant can be hdped with 
injecticms of their husbtow white 




have reported. 

Professors James Mowbray and. 
Richard Beard of the St Mary's 
Hospital Medical School said they 
achieved a 78-perceni success rate 
in preventing miscarriages during a 
three-year experiment 

They reported in The Lancet that 
22 woinai who had had recurrent 
tiiiscaiTuges ware treated, and 17 
had Borawlprcgnandes. Such mis- 
carriages afflict about one in 400 
women who lack the antibody that 
blocks rejection of the fetus as a 


fM-l 


Mens collection 


A light and airy blouson 

Lanvin has created the most extraordinary blouson 
you can imagine, ideal for a vacation lunch in the sun 
or an informal dinner. 

It is made qf linen, the coolest and most airy natural fiber that 
exists, associated with a knit that gives it body. 

Several models are available with this combination qf materials, 
which ensures even greater cor^/brt and elegance. 

.ds a complement to this marvellously cool blouson, 
we qffer a polo shirt in lisle. For its new collection, Lanvin 
has created dozens of new designs which, in accordance with the 
1985 trend, are mostly in pastel tones. 


LANVIN 


15, rue du Faubourg Saint-Bonore, 75008 Paris - TeL 265J4.40 
2, rue Combo n, 75001 Paris ' 


The London Tara. 

Voted ‘Best Value Hotel’ 
for the 2nd year by readers of 
Executive Travel Magazine 

and Expotel. LOJTO)N 


al ™E 

Eli LONDON 

TARAs^ 

HOTEL 

Seaisdale Race Kenaftgfon. London W 85 SR England 
Tekx 918835. let 01-937 7211 




I 

f 

I 


I 

I 

I 


I 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 

SPORTS 


Tubbs Decisions Page for WBA Heavyweight Title 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BU FFALO, New York — Capi- 
talizing on strong left jabs aiid 
hooks, Tony Tubbs scored a unani- 
mous 15-round decision over Greg 
Page here Monday night to win the 
World Boxing Association heavy- 
weight title. 

Tubbs entered the fight with a 
21-0 record and 15 knockouts. He 
never appeared to hurt Page, but he 
shot down the champion’s boast 
that Tubbs would be knocked out 
wthin four rounds. 

“I knew it was a close fight, I 
tried to pace myself for 15 rounds.'’ 
said Tubbs. 


“The champion wasn't landing 
blows and I did what I had to do to 
win,” Tubbs said. “It was determi- 
nation most of alL” 

One judge bad the fight 147-140, 
another 145-140 and the third 145- 
142 in favor of the Cincinnati fight- 
er. 

Before the fight. Page said that 
since he had beaten Tubbs in eight 

of nine amateur fights, he Would 
knock him out in his first world- 
title defense. “The fight will go be- 
tween one and four rounds,^ Page 
had predicted. “I hate to say this, 
but you'll probably have to cany 
him home.* 


In a somewhat lethargic boat, 
Tubbs landed left jabs and hooks in 
the late going after the fighters 
traded blows in the middle rounds. 
Tubbs reassumed command in the 
14th, and the fighters started the 
15th toe- to- toe in the middle of the 
ring — much to the delight of the 
crowd — before reverting to quick 
jabs and clinches. 

The first round had been a feel- 
ing out process, with Page jabbing 
and the two trading punches. 
Tubbs went down in the second, 
but it was ruled a slip. He came 
back to score with left nooks. 

The fighters spent most of the 
thir d round talking to each other as 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Linguist 


with a technical or scientific background 


Philips, an electronics company 
with a worldwide range of activities, 
is looking for a linguist to fill a 
vacancy in its Central Translation 
Services Department in Eindhoven 
(The Netherlands). 

The functions of this department 
are: 

- To translate written matter of ail 
kinds in a wide variety of fields. 

- To revise and edit texts from the 
linguistic and stylistic viewpoint. 

- To advise other departments on 
questions of language, style and 
terminology. 

- To supply interpreters for 
international conferences. 

The requirements are: 

- Possession of a clear, readable 
English style. 

- A thorough practical knowledge 
of at least German and/or Dutch 
and some years of experience as 
an English translator. Proficiency 
in translating from French and/or 
Spanish desirable. 

- Experience in the electronics or 
light electrical engineering indus- 
tries or a good knowledge of law 
and economics. 

- A background knowledge of, or 
at least a lively interest in, one of 
the physical sciences. 


- Familiarity with terminology work 
and word processing systems will 
also be a recommendation. 

Applicants (age limit 40) should 
have English as their mother 
tongue, have been educated in that 
language, and possess a university 
degree or equivalent qualification. 
Languages other than those listed 
above may be of interest. 

All candidates invited for interview 
will be required to take a written 
test. 

The terms of employment include 
assistance with removal costs and 
help in finding accommodation. 
Eindhoven has a relatively large 
English speaking population and 
there are international school 
facilities offering primary and 
secondary education, as well as an 
International Baccalaureate course 
which qualifies students to enter 
University. 

Applicants should send a full 
curriculum vitae to Mr. P. Hilhorst. 
Philips Personnel Department, 
P.O.Box 21 8, 5600 MD Eindhoven, 
The Netherlands. 

Please state your planned vacation 
period. 


PHILIPS 


they exchanged punches, with a 
Page combination late in the round 

failing to hurt Tubbs. 

Tubbs continued to Land left 
hooks in the fourth. Page's eye ap- 
peared to swell from the frequency 
of the punches. 

Tubbs, seventh-ranked by the 
WBA, earned the title shot March 
15 with a 10-round decision over 
James (Bonecrusher) Smith in Las 
Vegas. 

Page, whose record dropped to 
24-4, won the crown last December 
with an eighth-round knockout of 
Genie Coctzcc in South Africa. 
That victory was somewhat of a 
suprise since be had dropped con- 
secutive bouts to Tun Witherspoon 
and David Bey earlier last year. 

“It's another setback fa- me,” 
Page said of bis first defense. “The 
fight was dose, but I'm not taking 
anything away from Tony.” 

The Don King promotion, 
tabbed “Vindication: Blockbuster 
in Buffalo," turned out to be a 
complete bust for the 26-year-old 


n Sunday night his WBA 
championship bell was stolen from 
his hold room. 

Tubbs, also 26, didn't pet the 
belt, but he got the championship 
with an intelligent fight in which he 
conserved his energy while scoring 
effectively against Page, who often 
moved forward but did not back up 


his agggrcssve stance with aggres- 
sive punching. 

It looked as if Page, who weighed 
a bouncy 239 pounds (108.4 kilo- 
grams), might get back into the 
fight when nc seemed to have the 
best of rounds 11 through 13. 
Tubbs, at 229. seemed to be run- 
ning out of gas- 

But Tubbs was in astral again 
in the 14th, when he landed a hard 
right and several good hooks in the 
fust wiinnte, and dosed the round 
with a hard right and then a left- 
right combination to the bead just 
before the bell 

. At the end of the fight. King 
dimbed into the ring and told one 
of Page’s cornermen, “You blew 
it.” 

The last heavyweight title boot 
held in Buffalo was m 1950 when 
Ezzard diaries retained bis title by 
stopping Freddie Beshore. 

On the imdercard. Hector (Ma- 
cho) Camacho took the vacant 
North American Boxing Federa- 
tion lightweight title with a unani- 
mous 12-round decision over Mexi- 
can lightweight champ Roque 
Montoya. Camacho, who gave up 
the WBC super featherweight title 
io campaign as a lightweight, is 17- 
0 with 16 knockouts. 

Tim Witherspoon knocked 
James Broad out at 2:35 of the 
second round to win the NABF 
heavyweight title. (AP, UP I) 



Qirffcm^ToiyTtafcbs had Greg Page ducking away from a right hand in Monday^ second round. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


We are a well-established company, mark et leader in 
our field, servicing the American Military community 
in West Germany. As a result of further expansion we 
are seeking three experienced, dynamic 

REGIONAL 
SALES MANAGER 

to control and develop outlets in the North Bavaria, 
Pfalz-Eifel and Hessen areas. 

Applicants should have considerable retail sales 
experience and should already have worked at middle 
management level. Talents should include leadership, 
creativity, sound business sense and a working 
knowledge of German. 

These challenging positions carry excellent financial 
compensation including achievement-oriented bonus, 
company car and expenses. 

Please send complete rissumS including references and 
salary history to: 

International Herald Tribune 
Box 2137, Friedrichstr. 15, 

D-6000 Frankfurt/Main. 


Celts 9 76er$, Lakers 2-0 Leaders 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BOSTON — Larry Bird over- 
came bone chips in his right elbow 
to score a playoff career-high 42 
points here Tuesday night, power- 
ing the Boston Celtics past the De- 
troit Pistons 121-114 for a 2-0 lead 


NBA PLAYOFFS 


in their National Basketball Asso- 
ciation playoff quarterfinal Gome 
3 of the best-of-seven series is set 
for Thursday night in Detroit. 

Elsewhere Tuesday, Philadelj 
beat Milwaukee, Denver drut 
Utah and the Los Angeles Lakers 
routed Portland. 

“The worst thing to do is get him 
upset,” said Boston Coach ICG 
Jones of Bird. Bird was decked in 
the third period by Bill Laimbeer 
and suffered a cm on his chin; he 
went on to score 17 points in the 
fourth quarter, including 12 in the 
last 6ft minutes. 

“He’s the best basketball player 
on the planet,” said Detroit's coa- 


ch, Chuck Daly. “He’s as tough as 
anyone in the league. Bird believes 
he can do whatever it takes out 
thereto win.” 

Seeking to become the first team 
to repeat as champions since the 
1968-69 Celtics, Boston took die 
lead for good midway through the 
third quarter with an 11-4 run that 
put it in front, 76-70. 

76ers 112, Bucks 108 

In Milwaukee, Moses Malone 
scored 25 points to help the 76ers to 
a 2-0 lead in their Eastern Confer- 
ence semifinal. Julius Erring 
scored 21 points for the winners, 
while Terry Qmmann hit for 41 
and Sidney Moncrief 20 for Mil- 
waukee. 

“I think we're an experienced 
team and I think you saw it to- 
night,” Philadelphia coach Billy 
Cunningham said. “Some teams 
might have won the first [road] 
gam»». and thought they were fortu- 
nate to split But we know we had 
to capitalize and win two 
and take nothing for grant 


The 76ers hit 90 percent from the 
free- throw tine, where they hit 7 or 
8 in the game's final 1:22. 

Ukm 134, TraO Blazers 118 

In Inglewood, California, Byron 
Scott’s 31 pants led an overpower- 
ing running game and lifted Los 
Angeles to a 2-0 edge m its Western 
Conference semifinal The series 
shifts to Portland for the next two 
games, Game 3 being Friday night. 

Magic Johnson had 19 points. 18 
assists and 9 rebounds for the Lak- 
ers, while James Worthy had 21. 
Portland was led by Kiki Van- 
deweghe's 23 points. 

Nuggets 130. Jazz 113 

In Denver, Lafayette Lever put 
on a sensational show with 19 
points. 18 assists and 16 rebounds 
to lift the Nuggets in the first game 
of a Western Conference semifinal. 
Alex English scored 31 points for 
Denver, and Dan Issel. ending a 
15-year pro career after this season, 
had 24 for the Nuggets. {AP, UP1) 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 




King Saud University 
(Formerly University of Riyadh) 
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 



King Saud University has openings on contract basis for faculty members (Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors) who hold Ph. D. and/or academic titles 
from accredited universities, and also for English language instructors who have at least a bachelor's degree in English as of commencement of the academic year 1985 — 1986 which 
starts on July 27, 1985. 

The 

medical sciences, 
language of instruction is English. 

Interested candidates are kindly requested to send non-returnable copies of their academic diplomas and specialized experience certificates together with their resumes 
(including lists of their publications and references) and written applications indicating the position applied for and the subjects the applicant is qualified to teach, to the Dean of the 
college concerned c/o die P. O. Box number indicated against the designated college. His/Her address should also be indicated so that he/she could be contacted if selected for 
interview. 


i language of instruction is Arabic throughout the University except in the colleges of engineering, science, medicine (in Riyadh and Abha), pharmacy, dentistry, allied 
f computer and information sciences, planning and urban designs and the M. S. program in hospital administration in the college of administrative sciences where the 

ic Pnirliek 


Following is a list of the KSU Colleges and departments : 


COLLEGE 

Arts 

Science 


P. O. BOX 

2456, Riyadh 

2455, Riyadh 


DEPARTMENTS 


Administrative Sciences 2459, Riyadh 


Pharmacy 

Agriculture 

Engineering 

Medicine 

Education 


2457, Riyadh 
2460, Riyadh 

800, Riyadh 

2925, Riyadh 

2458, Riyadh 


1 


Arabic - English - Geography - Mass Communica- 
tions - Social Studies — History- Archaeology & 
Museology. 

Chemistry — Biochemistry — Physics — Astronomy — 
Botany — Zoology — Geology— Mathematics — 
Statistics — Computer Science. 

Law — Business Administration — Public Administra- 
tion — Economics — Accounting - Quantitative 
Methods — Political Science — Hospital Adminis- 
tration. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry - Pharmacology — Phar- 
maceutics — Pharmacognosy — Clinical Pharmacy. 

Animal Production — Soil Sciences — Plant Protec- 
tion — Food Sciences — Agricultural Engineering - 
Plant Production — Agricultural Economics and Rural 
Sociology — Nutrition and Home Economics 
(Females Only). 

Architecture — Civil Engineering — Mechanical 
Engineering — Electrical Engineering — Chemical 
Engineering — Petroleum Engineering — Computer 
Engineering - Nuclear Engineering - Industrial 
Engineering. 

Anatomy - Physiology - Pharmacology - Patho- 
logy — Parasitology — Gynaecology and Obstetrics — 
E. N. T. — Forensic Medicine — Community Medicine 
— Ophthalmology and Eye Surgery — Surgery — 
Medicine — Pediatrics. 

Education — Psychology — Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion — Islamic Studies — Art Education — Physical 
Education — Instructional Media and Educational 
Technology — Special Education (for the handi- 
capped). . 


COLLEGE 

Dentistry 


P.O. BOX 

5967, Riyadh 


Allied Medical Sciences 10219, Riyadh 


Computer & Information 2454, Riyadh 

Sciences 

Planning & Urban Designs 800, Riyadh 

Education at Abha 157, Abha 


Medicine & Medical 
Sciences at Abha 


Agriculture & Veterinary 
Medicine in Qasseem 


641, Abha 


1482, Buraidah 


Business and Economics in 505, Onaizah 
Qasseem 


Noteworthy Benefits : 


DEPARTMENTS 

Operative Dentistry — Oral Diagnosis/Medicine - 
Oral Surgery - Oral Pathology — Oral Radiology - 
Oral Biology — Removable Prosthodontics — Fixed 
Prosthodontics - Endodontics - Periodontics — 
Pedodontics — Orthodontics — Community Dentistry 

- Dental Public Health. 

Clinical Laboratory Sciences - Radiological Sciences 

- Rehabilitation Sciences — Community Health 
Sciences — Biomedical Technology — Dental Health 

- Nursing - Surgical Technology — Medical Assis- 
ting - Anesthesiology — Emergency Medical 
Technology. 

Computer Engineering — Computer Science - Com- 
puter Technology - Information Science. 

Architecture and Building Sciences — Planning — 
Regional Design — Interior Design. 

Education — Curriculum and Instruction — Psycho- 
logy — Instructional Media and Educational Techno- 
logy — Art Education — Physical Education — Bio- 
logy — Chemistry — Physics — Mathematics — 
Geography - History — English. 

Anatomy - Physiology — Family and Community 
Medicine — Biochemistry - Pathology - Micro- 
biology and Parasitology- Pharmacy - Medicine - 
Pediatrics - Surgery - Medical Education. 

Animal Production and Breeding — Crops and Range 
Management — Crop Protection — Veterinary Medi- 
cine — Horticulture and Forestry — Water and Soil — 
Agricultural Engineering — Agricultural Extension 
and Economics. 

Accounting — General Economics — Applied Econo- 
mics — Economic Analysis — Quantitative Methods — 
Finance — Public Administration — Business Adminis- 
tration — Marketing Management — Behavioral 
Psychology — Sociology — Operations Research. 




, s 


Free return air tickets annually for faculty member and family. 
Furnished accommodation or housing and furnishing allowances. 
Monthly transport allowance. 

Relocation allowance. 


■ End-of-service gratuity. 

■ Free medical and dental care covering family. 

■ Contribution by University to tuition fees of non-Arabic-speaking Children. 


F 


r. ■■ 
1' 


h 

% 




///sssssjrsj/JSfjrjrMfj'jrssjrssssssss/s////// / 








- .'li*. , 





9SJR-'* ;• 




v&K- 1 * 1 **. •'• • .-. <. v : -• - 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 


Page 9 



SPOUTS 


Yankees Drop Second Str aigh t Under Martin, 8-4 



Compiled br Our Staff fVom Dupatcha 

ARLINGTON, Texas — Hie 
Yankees may have chang fri man- 
agers, but so far that’s au they’ve 
changed. Billy Martin is finding 
out that some of the problems 

^TUESDAY BASEBALL 

faced by his New York predeces- 
sor, Y ogi Berm, haven’t gone away 
since Martin took over two games 
ago. 

"We're not scoring enough nm&> 
We’re hitting the ban, bat right at 
someone,” said Martin after the 
Yankess absorbed their fifth 
straight defeat, an 8-4 loss to Texas 
here Tuesday. “We are strapped in 
the bullpen,” he said. “I am re- 
stricted about what I can da I can’t 
blame anyone for that It’s not go- 
ing to get any easier.” . 

Eight out of nine batters had at 
least one hit in the Rangers’ bal- 
anced attack. Texas jumped on PM 
' Niekro for five fiht-mmag runs 
and coasted, home from there. Cliff 
Johnson’s two-run double high- 


of the year.. Alf five runs 
after two were out. 

Larry Parrish, who had three 
home runs Monday night, contin- 
ued his torrid hitting with two sin- 
gles; he is lO-far-2Q during the past 
five games. “After Monday aifjhL, I 
was worded about pver-swingmg," 
said.Parrish, who raised his career 
batting average against (he Yan- 
kees to 338. “But I didn’t do too 
ba d" • 1 

Hue Jays 4, A’s 3 
In Oakland, California, Tony 
Fernanda singled home the tie- 
brealdngtiin in the. ninth to help 
Toronto extend its winning streak 
to tix games. With the some tied 3- 
3, pinchhiaer Jeff Burroughs 'dou- 
bted to the wall in left-center. Bur- 
roughs went to third an an infield 
out, and mu: out later Fernandez 
bfooped a tingle to center. 

Twins 11, Tigers 2 
In Detroit, Gary Gaetti drove in 
four runs in a 10-run fourth with a 
single and a double, and Tim Teu- 


fel hit a three-run homer in the 
same frame to spark the Twins to 
their ninth straight triumph. The 
10>run fourth was the biggest in- 
ning against Detroit since Sept 2, 

Orioles 9, White Sox 7 
In Baltimore, Gary Roenk&e hit 
a two-run home run and Rich 
Dauer drove in three runs to pace a 
12-hit attack that sparked the Ori- 
oles. 

Royals 5, Indians I 
la Kansas City, Missouri, Steve 
BalbonTs seccod career grand-slam 
homer capped a five-run thud and 
allowed Bret Sabotages and the 
Royals to coast past Gevdaml 
Rookie starter Jose Roman walked 
four barters in the third before Bal- 
boui cleared the bases with a 400- 
foot shot over the left-field fence. 

Mariners 4, Brewers 2 
In Seattle, left-hander Mark 
Langston scattered right hits over 
his seven innings of work and Alvin 





m runt 



* 5- - 


CaipUed ly Ov Staff firm Dtyatdta 

: BLOOMINGTON, Minnesota 
■ — Darryl Sutter scored 15:41 into 
; overtime here Tuesday night to give 
.'the Chicago Black Hawks a 6-5 
victory over the Minnesota North 
Stars and a 4-2 victory in the Norris 
Divison finds of the National 
Hockey League playoffs. 

It was the third consecutive over- 
time game of the scries, which raid- 
ed as the highest-scoring six-game 

STANLEY CUP FLAYOFFS 

playoff in Stanley Cup history. The 
Black Hawks and North Stars 
scored 62 goals. The old made, 56, 
was set in 1973 by Chicago and 
Montreal 

game, Mmitreal^downed Qaeboto 
, square the Adams Dhison series at 
1 3-3. The deciding game will be 
Thursday night in Montreal. 

When Sutter, the Chicago cap- 
: rain, mw the winning play as it was 
developing, he had a good idea of 
1 what teammate Tom Lyaak would 
; do. He also knew what he himsdf 
; had to do. "I saw Lysiak head into 
the zone, and I knew what he’d do 
i — so I just waited for the pass and 
used [Minnesota defenseman Har- 
old] Snepsts as a screen.” 

Sutter , who had scored the game- 
; winner In Qncagp^s 7-6 overtime 
: victory in Game 4, took rite drop 

C from Lyriak and Masted a 30- 
slapsbot past goalie Don 
Beaupre. 

Earlier in overtime, GMCagO" 

1 ActSura a breakaway and 
fell on Crag Hartsbmg’s shot after 
it hit the right post. 

"You get an awful feehng when 
you start tatting posts in overtime,” 
said Minnesota Coach Gkn Son- 
mar. "But Chicago is a fine team 
and they’re truly deserving win- 
nere." 

Acton had riven Minnesota a 5-4 
lead at 9:41 of the third period with 
a power-play backhander from die 
slot, but Chicago's Troy Murray 
tied it at 15:03 with a 25-foot shot 
off S lever Lama's pass. 

Mi nneso ta defenseman Dave 
Richter made the score 4-3 at 431 
with his third goal of the season 
and Gist playoff goal ever, but 
Murray skated around him and set 
up Curt Fraser’s goal at 6:15 with a 
passthrough the crease 
In the first two periods, the 
teams battled to a 3-3 he with Min- 
>■ ncsota bedding a 23-22 edge in 
* shots. 

"It’s our tnggesl win of the sea- 
son," said Chicago's coach and 
general manager. Bob Polfoxd. 
"Our defense and goalie won it” 
Minnesota goalie Beaupre 
agreed. "Bannoman won the game 
for them. He sure side the wow. 
The saves l made didn’t compare to 
his.” 

“Out of the six games, we out- 
played them in five,” said Minne- 
sota’s general manager, Lou 
Nature. “Bat when you're not des- 
tined to win, you're not destined to 





ThoAw otkktdhwB 

Mike McPhee during a 
f T bot McPhee had the last laugh as 
.playoff series with a 5-2 victory. 


win. And Chicago is an excellent 
team.” 

Chicago will meet Stanley Gap 
champion Edmonton for the 
Campbell Conference title. The 
Oilers swept their series against the 
Winnipeg Jets, 4-0. The Mcnfcrcal- 
Quebec winner will meet the Pfrila- 
ddphia Flyers, who qualified for 
the league semifinals after taking 
their sales from the New York 
Handers, 4-1. 

Casadfens 5, Nordfapes 2 

In Quebec Qty, Ron Flockhart, 
in his first playoff game of the 
season, Ron Flockhart scored one 
goal n nd neste d on a not h er to lead 
Montreal to its vicioiy. 

“It's exciting to score my first 
playoff goal or the year and help 
the team win,” Flockhart said. The 
speedy cento, who replaced for- 
ward Made Hunter, said he owed 
bis success to Coach Jacques Le- 

naaire-JTacqucs bufltn^njy confir 

said. “If s a little bit like a pinch 
fritter or a secret weapon. I did 


pass from Michri 
1 break. 


.a. 


Canadians and Czechs Gain inPrague 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dnpmdta 

PRAGUE — Canada overcame 
the United States, 3-2, and Czecho- 
slovakia scored a stunning 2-1 up- 
set over the Soviet Union in Mon- 
day’s opening medaHound games 
at the world hockey champion- 


resuhs left the 
ship wide open going into W« 
day’s second round, when Canada 
was to play the Soviet Union and 
the United States was to take on 
Czechoslovakia. The towntnanent 
will end Friday, with Canada 
against Czechoslovakia and the 
Russians meeting the Americans. 

The Czechs and Russians went at 


. > 



game 

Union's 42-game, five-year unde- 
fated record in world champion- 
ship ami Olympic play, 

Vladimir Ruzkxa and Dusan 
Pasek scored in the first period for 
Crechoslovakia, whSe Andrei Kho- 
mutov produced the hue Sown 
goal in the third period. 

The Russians nad won 38 and 
tied 4 in world and Olympic play 
since their last loss —to the United 
Staus at the 1 980 Winter Olympics 
Lake Placid, New York. (The 
ilusaans also lostto Team Canada, 
in the Canada Cup last September.) 

The Soviet Union baa breezed 
through ihepreUminary round here 
with a 7-0 record that metaled a 5- 
1 victory ova Czechoslovakia. 


Ruzicka opened the scoring at 
6:10 of tiie first period by shooting 
the puck into an open net after 
goaltender Vladimir Myshkin fell 
down five feet in front of his crease. 
The Czechs broke toward the Sovi- 
et zone on a 3-on-2, and Myshkin 
toppled backwards as Ruzicka 
wound up for a slapshot. 

Pasek made it 2-0 at 11:27. 
Myshkin stopped a shot by Jiri 
Sqta* thwarted Sqba on his own 
rebound and kicked back yet an- 
other. But Pasek, trailing the play, 
finally slid the puck into the goal 

The Czechs' dogged forecbeck- 
inghad neutralizedthc vaunted So- 
viet offense by the game’s midway 
point. The Russians finally scored 
when Khanmtov backhanded a 
shot past Jiri Kralik from the front 
edge of the crease at 5:33 of tin 
final period. That tally was some- 
thing of a fluke, os Czech defender 
Arooid Kadlec lost track of the 
puck near the net; Khomutov 
picked it on, wheeled in front and 
backhanded it in. 

The visitors applied the pressure, 
but the Czechs refused to buckle, 
throwing themselves into poke- 
cheeks and impeding traffic along 
the boards. The winners did not 
allow a tingle shot on goal when 
Myshkin was pulled with 25 sec- 
onds to go. 

The U^. -Canada game was lack- 
luster, never approaching the 
heights of the Czech-Soviet en- 
counter. 


was a 


Davis's first home run of the season 
lifted the Marinas to their second 
straight victory. The loss was Mil- 
waukee’s fifth in a row. 

Angels 3, Red Sox 2 
In Anaheim, Dick Schofield 
drew a bases-loaded walk to force 
home Rod Carew from third with 
two oat iu the 15th, giving Califor- 
nia its sixth straight deriaon. 

Mete 4, Houston 1 
In the National League, in New 
York, Dwight Gooden's four-hitter 
shut down Houston for the Mets. 
Gooden struck out eight and 
walked two in pitching ms second 
complete game of the season. The 
only ran he allowed was a two-out 
first-taring homer to Denny Wan- 
ing. 

GtrtSnflls 6, Dodgers I 

In St. Louis, Lonnie Smith's two- 
nm double with two outs triggered 
a five-run sxlh that helped Joaquin 
Andujar defeat Los Angeles for the 
first tune since 1977. Sl Louis sent 
nine batters to the plate in its big- 
gest kming of the season. 

FWffics 11, Expos 0 
In Philadelphia, Von Hayes 

oqt four hits nnd dam 
Wilson drove in four runs to lead 
the Phillies' rout of Montreal Jeny 
Roosman survived a shaky start to 
pick up his first victory over the 
Expos since opening day in 1978. 

Cribs 3, Giants 1 
In Chicago, Ryne Sandberg de- 
livered a run-scoring doable in the 
third and then scared himsdf on an 
error fry pitcher Bill Laskey to 
spark the Cubs’ 3-1 verdict over 
San Francisco. 

Ptrates 6, Padres 2 
In Pittsburgh, Jason Thompson 
hit a rwo-run borne run and Ride 
Rhoden picked up his first victory 
of the year as the Pirates topped 
San Diego. Rhoden gave up eight 
hits in his five innings. 

Braves 8, Reds 4 
In Gnriunati, Dale Murphy's 


two-run double sparked a five-run 
seventh that lifted Atlanta past the 
Reds. Murphy's two runs batted in 
boosted his April total to 29 in 19 
games, wing the major-league re- 
cord set by Ron Cey, then with the 
Los Angeles Dodgers, in April 
1977. (UPI, AP ) 

Scott Excels 

AsMariners 

WininlOlh 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

SEATTLE — Donnie Scott, 
whose left-handed home run in the 
ninth i nning sent the game into 
extra inning s, hit a two-run homer 
right-handed in 10th to lift Seattle 
to a 9-7 victory over Milwaukee 

MONDAY BASEBALL 

here Monday night. Scott’s fast 
two home runs of the season ended 
an eight-game Mariner losing 
streak. 

Catcher Scott, called up from ibe 
minors last Friday, had been the 
target of the crowd's boos when his 
two consecutive passed balls con- 
tributed to a four-run Milwaukee 
third innin g . 

But the switch hitter led off the 
ninth by connecting off righty Rol- 
lie Fingers and, following Dave 
Henderson's lOth-inning single, 
belted the game- winner off left- 
hander Ray Searage. 

Rangers 7, Yankees 5 

In Arlington, Texas, Larry Par- 
rish's third homer of the night, a 
two-run shot in the eighth, snapped 
a five-game losing streak for Texas 
and spoiled the return of New York 
manager Billy Martin. 

Angels 7, Red Sox 6 

In Anaheim, California, rookie 
left-bander Pat Cements pitched 



tetmwUmad frag Wemwiond 

to naO Milwaukee basenmner Bill Schroeder for the 


Catcher Donnie Scott held his ground 
final out of Monday night's eighth inning. Scott tied the game with a ninth- inning home run 
(hit left-handed) and won it for Seattle in the 10th when he bantered batting right-handed. 


six inning erf one-hit relief and 
Doug Deunoes drove in two runs 
with a double and a home run to 
propel the Angds past Boston. 

Blue Jays 2, A’s 1 
In Oakland, California, George 
Bell had two hits and scored a run. 


and reliever Bill Caudill halted an 
eight-inning rally to preserve To- 
ronto’s victory. 

Royals 3, Indians 2 
In Kansas City, Missouri, Willie 
Wilson bad two singles and a triple 
to pace the Royals' victory. 


PtaB&es 3, Expos 2 
In the National League's only 
game, in Philadelphia, Juan Samu- 
el’s two-out lOth-inning single 
scored Darren Daulton from third 
base to give the Phillies the decision 
over Montreal (UPI. AP) 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Football 


Major League Leaders Monday’s and Tuesday’s Msgor League line Scores NFL Draft 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pet. 

Herr StL 

19 

49 

13 

27 

391 

woutna ran 

» 

55 

9 

21 

382 

MutWtv All 

)9 

71 

17 

27 

310 

Orautafc PH 

15 

40 

S 

IS 

373 

VHavu Phi 

19 

71 

It 

26 

464 

Corcoran Phi 

IB 

44 

6 

IS 

-Ml 

B Russell LA 

14 

n 

6 

1) 

MB 

Dawson Man 

M 

78 

>2 

23 

329 

Crus Htn 

20 

81 

> 

26 

3» 

Vtroll Phi 

17 

54 

■ 

17. 

315 

waHaeb Man 

20 

73 

9 

23 

315 


what I do best — skate and try to 
get open. He trusted me.” 

Flockhart scored the winning 
goal 36 seconds into the second 
period, beating goalie Mario Gos- 
sdin with a wnsx shot to the lower 
left corner. He was set up alone in 
front by a corner pass from Guy 
Carfaouneau. The goal gave Mon- 
treal a 3-1 lead. 

Defenseman Normand Roche- 
fort broagbt Quebec back to within 
one when his backhander from the 
blueline deflected off Montreal's 

^Syj£?ChrisS5SmSed cm 
a power play and Pierre Mondoo 
notched his first goal of the play- 
offs to put the game beyond reach 
by tire end erf the second period. 

Montreal opened the scaring 45 
seconds into the game when Mike 
McPhee deflected a shot by Flock- 
hart. Alain Lemreox evened things 
at 7:51 of the firstperiod, taking a 
Goulet on a2-on- 


Roos: Mure*!*, Atlorrtn, 17; Kommlnsk. AS 

witti T3. - ..: .-Oakland 

Ml: Mvnmv.Aftoitfa.39; G.«Vtbon.P1Ufo- 
dalPtriwtS: C Dautt,San FrondKa.14; Herr, 
5LU>vta.i4; Bnxri&MantrKiM&J. dark, SL 
Uxjta. 1X m Montand. CMcaaa IX 
Wta: Harr, St Louis. 27; MvrrtiY. Atlanta. 

37; Crux. Houston, 2t; V.Hoyef.ftinodcMiia. 

St; Ctorvoy# San Dtopa 24. 

Daobtor. Murvhy. Atlanta. 7; Wntlteh. 

Mwtfrvab 7: Oriamn. Atoatnsat a,- j. Clark. 

SL touH. a; Templeton. Son Dtogo. &. 

Triplet: 11 ora Had udfit 2. 

Hama Rant: Murphy, Atlanta, V; Strowhar- 
rv.Naw York,*; Dawson, MontnaLS; Kaimo- 
dv. San Dimoa.4: Marshall. Lot Angelas, X 
Stolon Samar Colaman. SL Louts. TO La. 

Smith, St. L outs . W; SamutL PfifucMphld. ■; 

Damlaf, Chlcaaa, 7; E. Davis. CtndnnaH. 6s 
Rotnos. MontraaL &. 

PITCHING 

wtaniao Pananta a o (I daslston): it are 
Mod with LOOS. 

StrikMWts: 5oto.Cl«annatt,36; J. DeLeon. 
Pittsburgh. V; VWanzwia. L» Anoetas. 35; 

Gooden. Now York. M; SutcWto. CWcobo. 29. 

Saws: Gassaaa. San Dfeva S; La. Smith. 
aucoaoJ; ReozikXLMontraaL&Oindeiaria. 
pmsburah, a; Suttar, Atlanta, A. 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Now York H2 2S1 HM 13 • 

Texas BMSBinx -7 S I 

GuMrv.MonfofesoaflUarti Wm agar: Ton- 
ana,Hoatati (5). Schmiat (7|, Rozema (91 and 
Stauaht. w— Setimidt. l-i. L-Gotorv.l-a.5y- 
Rmama ti). HRo-tama. Porrlsna (5). Word 

0) . 

aewtond 0W0NM2-C» ! 

Kansas Otv 01# OH MX— 3 » D 

Heatpn. Thompson (U and Banton; Black, 
OuHenberrv IV) and Sundbora.W— Black, 2-1. 
L— Heaton, 1-L Sv— Qutoanhanv OK 

- - - m«a iAM-9 -4 t 
MM BOB tad— I I 0 
Loot, Acker (7). COudtit C83 and Mortfnau 
Krueoer, Atherton (#1, Kaiser (81 and Heath. 
W— UnL 3-1- L—Krueaer. 2-1 Sv— Caudill (5). 
HR— Oakland, ALDavta 19). 

Boston 222 080 8BD— A 7 1 

California 411 MO Bto-? 13 1 

Brawn, Crawford 13), Clear III and God- 
man; Rotnertck, Clements (31. Moore tn and 
Boone, w— Clements. ML L— Crawford, 2-2. 
Sv M oore Ml. HRs— Boston. Guttlorrez til. 
Armas Ml. Easter (3). Ceitfornta, DeCtoees 
M). 

Milwaukee WWM9-IU • 

Seattle M0O22MI3HM4 0 

vuckowlch. Ladd »), Flnoors (71. Saorao* 
in and Schroedsr. CMoore Ml; NLMoara. 
Cetsei [3),stanton 18), vonde Barg (V). Nunn 
(9) and 5atft.w-NunEi.14L L— Somme. 0-1 
HRs— Milwaukee, Schroeder 151. Seattle 
PEradlev (Sl. Cowans (4), Satft 2 (21. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Montreal BIS OM BM 9-2 TS 0 

PhlladetoWa ISO MO ISO 1-3 3 • 

Smith. Rotwrae (V) and Fltzaerotd. Butoro 
19); Dttmr. Hudson 17). Carman ($). Takulv* 

01) and VlralL W— TnkuN«,14. L— Ro berge. 
M- HR— pnnodeiphia. Schmtol (2). 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

H 

H 

Pet 

Franco Cle 

19 

67 

14 

27 

403 

Banrsrd Cle 

17 

so 

9 

18 

340 

Cowans Sea 

19 

75 

13 

27 

340 

Baton CM 

17 

73 

13 

26 

336 

Grid) Cal 

19 

62 

11 

22 

355 

MDavts Oak 

2! 

77 

22 

27 

351 

Wttftaker Dot 

U 

41 

U 

21 

344 

BochteOak 

19 

56 

B 

19 

339 

Puckett 4M» 

20 

91 

10 

30 

330 

Bruoansky Min 

20 

70 

IS 

23 

33 

Wttean Kan 

19 

82 

10 

27 

33 


(UPI, AP) 


“It could have gone either way,” 
said Canadian Coach Doug Car- 
penter. “Both teams were a litie bit 
tired. If s beat a long tourney ” 

Canada, manned by players 
whose toons suffered early efimi- 
natiofl from the National Hockey 
League pla^ffs, tad lost by a goal 
to tfic Ammcansin theprehminary 
round but never trailed Monday. 

John Anderson, Mario Letmeux 
and Doug Lidster scored far Cana- 
da. Tony Granato of the University 
of Wisconsin and Moe Mantha of 
the Pittsburgh Penguins replied for 
the losers. 

Goalie Pat 
stancr far 

Washington Capitals, 
only 33 minutes (*-“ 
in the first round and was i 
as an emagency replacement for 
Rick Wamsley. Steve Weeks of the 
Hartford Whalers had started the 
majority of Canada’s games. 

On Tuesday, Erich Knchnharirt 
and Dieter Hegen scored two goals 
apiece to power West^ Germany toa 
5^4 victory over Rnland in the rele- 
gation playoffs, while Sweden 
coasted to a 7-2 victory over East 
Germany. 

The East Germans cannot efimb 
out oflasi place; with one game left 
they are three points behind West 
Germany. They wiS drop ti» 
B-pool aod be replaced by Poland 
in next year’s cnampionships in 
Moscow. (AP, UPI) 


Rons: MDovta, Oakland, 22; Caw. Can- 
fontfa. 19; Murphy. Oakland, to; Patti*. ColL 
fomfa. 17; Rica. Boston, ta. 

RBI: MOawte.Qak1and.23: Armas, Boston, 
to; Brmwnskv, Miuimuta, 17; DMwwv.Bal- 
tlmnra, 17; Pvdkail. Mhwtsofn. V. 

HU*: Puckett Mlnnasato.30; Cowans, Seat- 
no. 27; Franca. Ctawctond, 27; Hauser, Mta- 
nasetfa 27; ALDawts. Oakland. 37; vvusan, Kan- 
sas atv. 27. 

DouMm: OowttL M ii m Mo r a . t; Leman. De- 
trott.8: Mntttnstv. Now York. 7; Orta. Kansas 
C»y. 7; « an Med wftti s. 

Trtotar.wttaon.KansasCitY.S.-Pettls.Call' 
torn to,2r Trammelt OelraU. S; lore tied urttfr 
2 . 

Home rook MDavte. Oakland. 9; Armas. 
Boston. 4; BraaenSkv. Mkinesata, 6; G-Tho- 
mas, Seattle, C; Pnstov. Seattle. 6. 

Stolen Bow; CoKn* Oakland, 12; Pettit 
CalHarnla. TO; Grtffln. Oakland. 5: Mosehv, 
Toronto. & Sheridan. Kansas CTtv. 5. 
m chino 

Wtentoa Perce ot oat (2 tfKWoari: 11 are 


TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
MlHMSOto MO (taMl MB— 11 13 B 

Detroit M2 BN BOB— 3 13 

Butcher and Solas; Wlicsk, Berensuer (4), 
Bair (4) and Parrish. W— Butcher. 3-L L— 
WHCOX.0-L HR*— Mtonesota, Hrtwk (31. Teu- 
fel til. 


Major Leagne Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Best Division 



W 1 

— 

Pet 

GB 

Toronto 

13 

7 

650 

— 

Bnttf more 

12 

7 

A3? 

to 

Detroit 

11 

7 

AH 

1 

Boston 

9 

n 

A50 

4 

Milwaukee 

B 

ii 

<421 

4to 

Cleveland 

7 

13 

350 

6 

New York 

6 12 

West DtviUoe 

333 

4 

California 

14 

7 

MSf 

— 

Kansas atv 

11 

B 

379 

2 

Minnesota 

11 

9 

-HO 

2tt 

CMcaaa 

9 

8 

SO 

3 

Oakland 

9 

12 

x» 

5 

Seattle 

9 

12 

A3 

5 

Texas 

7 

12 

348 

4 


Chicago IN BIB DBS-7 IS I 

BafHmora BN » IBa-9 12 t 

Baretf star. Ldlar (41. Seaver (71. BJamn 
«) end FUk; Baddlckar, TMarttnex (71. 
Stewart (97 am 1 Dempsey. W— BOdiflCker.3-1. 
L— Baud star, G3. Sv— Stewart 14). HRs— CW- 
oaoa, Salazar (2). Baltimore. G.Roenlcke (3). 
Lrrni (3). 

Ctevetood OBBIDBflBD-1 5 B 

Kansas CitY BOS MB BOX— 5 7 9 

Raman. Eastortv 13) and Banda: Saberho- 
son and Sundben. W— SaDerDaoen. 2rf- L— 
Roman. (M. HR— Kansas City, Balhanl (5). 
NOW Yam B03B0QBW-4 7 3 

Texes - • - MB OB )**—* 11 2 

Ntokra, Cooper (7). Shirley (8) and Wyn*- 
ear; Notes. Harris (51, Rozema (8) and 
SkniDttt. w— Nates. 2-1. L-Nlekra, 3-2. 
Milwaukee IB1 MB MO-2 B 1 

Seattle MB 3» K*-4 II I 

Gibson, Ladd (7) and Moore; Langston, 
Sianian (BI.numi (9) and Scott. Kearney (7). 
w— Langston, 3-2. Lr- Gtbeon, 3-L Sv— Nunez 
14). HR— Seattle, Davis 11). 

Toronto BOB MS *11—4 9 • 

Oakland 201 BOB BIO— 3 t 1 

Cioncv. Lamp («), Acker (9) and Whttt; 
Cadlroll, Conroy (7),T*Uimmn (7), Howell (B) 
and Heath. W — Lamo,2*L— Howell, 0-1. Sv— 
Acker (31. HR— OsUokL Kino man (4). 
Boston MB 10B SB) HO 000 — 2 f 0 

Canton! hi BOB m BIB BOB SOI— 3 9 1 

Hurst, Stanley (B).OIeda 03) and Gadman; 
WHt, Corbett (8). Moore «), album (13) and 
Bo one. w-CUbum. I4L L-Olmta. 2->. HR— 
Boston, Easter (4). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Son Pnndsce IBB Oil BBS— 1 9 3 

Chicago BB3 OBB 01»-d M B 

Laskey. Minton (51. Garrelta (71 and Brsn- 
lv; Trout, Smith 17) and Davis. W—T rout, Li. 
L— Laskey. (ML Sv— Smith (5). 

San Mm BBS Ml BBB-t 9 0 

Pittsburgh MO 003 *M B 1 

Hovt, Booker (7) and Kerned »; Rhoden. 
Holland W and Pena W— Rnodea 1-3. L- 
Hoyt. 24. sv— Holland (2). HR— Pittsburgh, 
Thompson (2). 

Houston IN 000 BOB— 1 4 0 

New York BN BN Ox— 4 7 1 

Niekro. DiPIno (7), Calhoun (B)andAshbv: 
Gooden and Corter. Hurdle (5). W-Gaaden.3- 
i. L — Niekro, l-L HR— Houston. Walling tl). 
Atlanta ON WO 386— B 9 1 

Cincinnati ON BBS 100-4 10 2 

Bedrwlon, Gerber 1 6>,SiTvltti 17}. Sutler (B) 
end Cerane; Tibbs. Willis (7). Franco (SI, 
Price 19) and BllonMla, Von Gordar 171-W— 
Garber, 1-0. L— Tibbs. 0*. 

Montreal BN ON DOB- B 11 1 

PWhuMpWa 402 410 SB*— 11 It 1 

Guinacton, Grapenttiln (4). Burke (71. 
Shines IS> and Fltxaerald. Bursra (51; Kaos- 
man and Oaufton. W — Koosmon. T-I. GuP 

lidwm. >2. 

Lot Aaaeles ON ON 101—1 7 2 

SL Lot’ll BIB BBS BftX — * U A 

Reuse. Castilla (4), Howe (A), DKa (71 and 
5daedk>; Angular and Nieto. W— ArtJulcr^a 
L— Reuss. l-i HR — Lae Angeles. Whittle la 
OK 


The top three tsam-by-team selections la 
TBesdaVs Matloeai Rsottiall Luara oaflege 
draft (fmt number In parentheses tod lento* 
nwod drafted. second number isaver-aU pasV 
Hen la Graft}: 

Atlanta Faicou: BHI Frolic, at, Pitt (1, 21. 
Mike Gam. de. Notre Dame (2, 45). Emils 
Harry, wr. Stantord (4, 19). Bnttato BHU: 
Bruc*5mlth,dB, Virol itfa Tech (LI). Derrick 



NHLPlayoHs 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Montreal 2 9 W 

Quebec 7 I 0—8 

McPhee It ) , Carbanneou (4), Flockhart (1). 
Niton (2). Mandau (1); Lemteux (31, Rsche- 
tort (2), Biots oa goal: Montreal (on Gamtln) 
B-14-5— 37: Quebec (aon Panntv) 9-6-9—24. 
Chlcan 2 119-4 

Minnesota 3 I 2 0— S 

Larmar IS), Softer 2 (7). Lvstok (4). Fraser 
(5),T. Murray (2) ; McKegney (B), Hartobura 
(S).Maruk (4).Rkhtor (1), Acton (4). Shots on 
goal: Chlcaaa tan Beaupre) 12-10-7-9— 37; 
Mlimeeaia (an Bannennan) 1 *-9-11-12— 46. 


DIVISIONAL FINALS 
Adam 

(Series tied. 3-3) 

May 2: Quebec at Montreal 
Patrick 

(Philadelphia def. N.Y. Islanders. 4-11 
Norris 

(Chicago Oaf. Minnesota 4-2J 
Smyth* 

(Edmonton del wtmvtoag. 4-01 

Worid Championships 

MEDAL ROUND 

W L T PIS GF GA 
Canada 1 D D 2 3 2 

CadtastovaUa 1 0 0 2 2 1 

Soviet Union 0 10 0 12 

United Statu BIBO 2 3 

CONSOLATION ROUND 
Sweeten 2 0 0 4 12 4 

Finland - 1 1 0 3 10 7 

W.Gei-mcpiy 1 1 0 2 7 9 

E-Germanv 8 2 0 0 4 13 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 
UbM Round 

Czechoslavolila 2, Soviet Union 1 
Canada X United States 2 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
coasotattoa Rnoad 
Sweden 7. East Germany 2 
West Germany & Finland 4 

WEDNESDAY'S GAMES 
Modal Round 

United Statu v*. Czechoslovakia 
Canada us. Soviet Union 


Bed vrtto urn. 

5trfkeeoto: Morris. Detroit, 34; Boyd. Bos- 
ton. 30: Niekro. New York. 27; Cantons. Bos- 
ton, 75: Alexander, Toronto, 34; Boddkker, San Diego 
Battbnora. Hawaii. Texas. 7a 

Saves: JJftnwfl. Oakland. 4; Caudill, To- 
ronto. ii RtgMttL New York, 5; Hernandez, 

Detroit, 4; NuiteL Seattle, 4; SJtowOrt Boltt- 
mane 4: MpddalL OevUaad, 4. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

w L Pci. 
Chicago B I ifi 

New York It I iO - 

Montreal 12 8 MX) 1 

PMIadelotriO 8 11 A21 4Va 

SL Louis 8 II JO\ iVt 

Pittaburah 4 12 333 4 

West Dtvtehw 


Basketball 


gb NBA Playoffc 


Detroit 



10 9 

11 10 
10 10 
10 ID 
9 10 
7 12 


J24 - 

-H4 - 


A74 

J48 


to 

W 

1 

3 



TUESDAYS RESULTS 

J4 T7 SB JS—T14 
33 27 27 35—121 
Bird 1404 14-1542. Alnge 10-174525,"n»m- 
nivso 4-7 & Trlpucfca 9-14 44 24. Rebounds: 
Detroit 49 (Lbhnbur. Thomas 9), Boston 54 
(MeHafe Bird 101. Aiflris: Detroit 24 Mhorm 
as 15). Boston 29 IDJohAsan 71. 

Utah 39 27 23 34— m 

Denver 36 ST 33. 35-UB 

English 11-21 941 31, issei 11-14 M 24; Dani- 
lov M-14 w 2B. Green B-ll 54 21. RBboands: 
Jaa 49 1 Donttsy, Kelley 9), Nuaaeto43 (Lever 
141. Assists: Jazz 22 [Green 61. Nuggets 33 
(Lew 18). 

PfcBadMnMff 25 29 21 30-112 

Milwaukee 21 22 25 30-IN 

Malone M0W2S,ErvlngB-lS S6 21; Cum- 
mings 14-25 13-16 41# Mencrlef 7-12 SS 2ft. Re- 
bounds: Philadelphia 52 (Barklev 12), Mil- 
waukee (7 C Cummings. Ustef 12). AsstsK; 
Phi lade tebta 21 (Qtorits 9), Milwaukee 32 
tPreascT 16). 

POrtlaad 32 20 33 33-118 

LA. Lakers 29 30 32 33— IN 

Scott 13-17 3-4 31. Worthy 8-15 5* 21; 
VknMwWM UM4 3-4 2X Drexler 8-17 *4 21. 
R ebo u ads; Portland 571 Carr 12). Las Angeles 
S3 (Johnson 9). Assists: Portland 31 tvoten- 
m» 97, Los Anodes 37 (Johnson w. 


CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
EASTERN 
(Boston leads. Ml 
Mew 2; Boston at Del roll 
May 5: Boston at Detroit 
x-mov B: Detroit at Boston 
x-Mav 10; Boston ai Detroit 
x-Moy 13; Detroit at Boston 

(PtaUodetpnia leads. 24) 


Burrouphs, db Memphis stole (1, 14). Mark 
Travnowla, ob Nebraska (2. 29). CMcaaa 
Bean: William Perry, dt damson (1. 22). 
Reggio Phillips, db. Southern Methodist (2, 
4*). James Moness. wr. Texas Christian (3, 
7B). dnctonalt Benaols; Eddie Brawn, wr, 
Miami. Fla. (L 13). Emanuel Kina lb, Ala- . 
bama (1. 2S). Carl Zander, to. Tennessee (2. 

43) . 

OeveHnd Brown: Greg Allen, rb, Florida 
stale C2. 35). Mark Kroroivicz.at. Ohio State (4. 
147). Reginald LUiehome. wr, Elizabeth CMv 
State (7. ITS). Dallas Caeitwvs: Kevin Breaks, 
dL MkMBon (), 17). Jesse Penn, to, Virginia 
Tech H44). Crawford Ker.oa Florida (3.74). ■ 
Denver Brawn! Stave Sewell, rb, Oklahoma * 
(1. 24). Vance Johnson, wr, Arlttna 12, 31). 
Simon Fletcher, (to. Houston (1 54). Detroit 
Ltou: Lomas Brawn, of, Florida (T, 4). Kevin - 
Glover, c Maryland (1 34). James Johnson, 
to. San Dlow State (3, 62). 

Green Bar Packers: Ken Rusttssrs. of. 
Southern CaDfomlo 11, 7). Rich AM ran. oaSan 
Diego State (X 71). Walter Stanley, wr. Mesa 
(4, 90). Houtoa otters; Ray Childress, de, 
Texas AMI (1,3). Rldwrd Johnson, cb. Wis- 
consin Cl HI. Richard bviu de. Sauttwrn 
MlsslsslRPl (2.34). ledtanapolli Colls; Duane 
Sicken, uv Southern California (1, 5). Den 
Andersan.db> Purdue (2,32). Anthony Young, 
db, Temple (3.41). Kansas aty CMata: Ethan 
Horton, rtr. North Carolina (i, 15). Jonathan. 
Hava*, to. Iowa 12. 42). Bob OJdsmwn, oa, - 
Virginia (4, 99). 

Las Angeles RaMera; Jessie Hester, wr, 
Florida (1,23). Tim Moffett, wr, Mississippi (X 
79). Staton Adams, db. East Carolina (L SB). 
Lot Anoetet Roms: Jerry Gray. db. Texas (1, 
ZD. Chuck Scott, wr, Vanderiim 12.50). Dale 
Hatcher, a. ciemsan 1X77). Miami OotPhtas: 
Lorenzo Hampton, rb, Florida (1.27). Genre* 
Little. Of. Iowa (3,451. Alex Mover, lb. North- 
western (3. B3). Mlmasoia VHdm: Chris Do- 
lemon,. lb, Pitt (1, 4], issloc HoH, db, Alcam 
State (2, 30). Kirk Lawdormllk. c Ohio State 
(3.591. 

New England Patriots: Trevor Matlch, c, 
Brigham Yeung <1,281. Garin Verls.de. Stan- 
tord a 481. Jhn Bowman db, Central Micni- 
aan 12, 521. New Orleans Saints: Alvin Toles. 
Fb, TemwsMc (1,2*). Daren Gilbert, of, Fuller- 
ton State a SB). Jar* Del Rla, lb. Southern 
Californio <1481. New York Ofamfs; George 
Mkura,rtt> Kenhidcv (L19). Stacv Rot* non. 
wr. North Dakota State (2, 44). Tyrone Davis, 
db, ciemson (3. 5B). New York Jets: Al Toon, 
wr. Wisconsin (1,10). Lester Lvles.db, Virgin- 
ia 1X40). Donate Elder, db. Memphis State (X 
471. 

PMtadetohlq Coates: Kevin Alien, of, Indi- 
ana (1.9). Randall Cumlnaham.cto.Nevoda- 
LmVmos (2, 37). Greg Naron.bg. North Caro- 
lina (4. 93). PJttsbaroli Staeim: Darryl 51ms, 
de, Wisconsin a 201. Mark Behnlno. at, Ne- 
braska a 47). L Wort Habtov, db. LSU (X 74). 
SL Louis Cardinals; Freddie Joe Nunn. ib. 
Memphis state II. IB). Scott Bwmttd, dr. wts- 
cunsln (2.51 ). Lana Smllh-ot. LSU (X72) . Sew 
Dteao Chargers: Jim Lochev.oa Ohio State. 
I), 12). WOrne Davis, db. Indiana State (1 39). 
Jefferv Dale, db, LSU a SS). 

San Fraactua W»rs; jarry Rica, wr, Missis- 
sippi VaUev State (1, 14). Ricky Moore, rb, 
Alabama (3, 751. Brua Collie, ot. Texas-Ar- 
Ungfan 15, 1401. Seattle SfaWWts; Owen Gilt, 
rb. Iowa (2. S3). Dannv Greene, wr, Washing- 
ton IX SI). Tony Davis, le, Mtsaouri (4. 109). 
Tampa Bay Bacnmean: Ron Holmes, de. 
Wttdihiatan(t.a). Ervin Randle, lb, Baylor (X 

44) . Mike Heaven, db. Illinois f4,92). Wosbjnp. 
ton Redskins: Tory Nlxon.db.5on Diego State 
(X 331. RaPhef Cherry, ofi. Hawaii (5. 1221. 
Dantell Leo. fe. Lamar (4, 143), 

(JSFL Standings 


Mav 5: Milwaukee 01 Philadelphia 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 


x-Mav B: Philadelphia at Milwaukee 


nr 

L 

i 

rer. 

rr 

PA 

x-Moy 10: Milwaukee at PMiadeipMa 

Birmingham 

7 

3 

0 

300 

242 

180 

X-Mav 13: Phltadelpnio ot Milwaukee 

Tomp« BOV 

7 

3 

0 

■TOO 

344 

714 

WESTERN 

New Jersey 

7 

3 

0 

JOO 

251 

213 

(Los Angeles leads. 23) 

Jacksonville 

5 

5 

0 

300 

748 

2S2 

Mav 3: l— A. Lakers at Pori land 

Memphis 

S 

5 

a 

300 

204 

205 

May 5: LA Lakers at Portland 

Baltimore 

4 

5 

i 

•450 

174 

154 

X-MOV 7: Portland at la. Lakers 

Orlando 

2 

B 

0 

300 

161 

169 

x-mov 9; la Lakers at Portland 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


x-Mav il: Portland at LA Lakers 

Houston 

7 

1 

0 

JOO 

314 

227 

(Denver leads, 14) 

Oakland 

4 

3 

1 

MO 

246 

211 

Mav 2; Utah at Denver 

Denver 

6 

4 

0 

m 

244 

199 

May 4: Denver at Utah 

Arizona 

4 

6 

0 

M0 

189 

205 

Mav 5: Denver at Utah 

Son Antonio 

3 

1 

0 

380 

140 

224 

x-Mav 7; Utah at Denver 

Lot Anodes 

3 

7 

a 

300 

165 

244 

x-Mav 9: Denver at Utah 

Portland 

3 

7 

0 

300 

147 

219 

x-Mav 11; Utah at Danve 


Monday's Result 



Ix-tt necessary) 

New Jersey 24, Orlando 7 







Rwfi VfiOer (9) was the first to congratulate Thomas Berth- 

old for scoring die fr-* — 1 =- ^ v e 1 W ™ M 

Cup qualifying rout 


old for scoring the first goal In West Germany's 5-1 World 
" " of Czechoslovakia Tuesday in Prague. 


EUROPEAN GROUP 2 
CachOSlavakta 1. West Germany S 

EUROPEAN GROUP 7 
uuaias X Spain o 

Potato standtags; Wales 6; Scotland. Spam 
4; Iceland x 

Rematetau matebes: May 28, teelend vs. 
Scat kmd: Jons IX Ice lam) vs. Sou In; seta. 10. 
Wales vs.Seottand.-Sept.2S.5oulnvs.lce<<ind. 

ASIAN O ROUP LB 
North Korea ft Japan 0 
Potato staadtm: Japan ft Norm Korea X 
Slnoanore 1. 

Remaining matches: May 13, Singapore vs. 
japan; May 2s. Steoapore vs. Nonh Korea. 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CALI FO UN I A— Placed Gtott ZoM. pitch- 
er. on 15-doy installed list. Recolfed Kirk 
MeCoskUL altcher. from Edmonton otlhBPo- 
ddc Coast i «™ 

KANSAS CITY— Extended the contract at 
Prank White, second baseman, through me 
1981 season. 

NEW YORK— Optioned Juan Bonilla in- 
Beider, m Columbus at tna intenraHenei 
League. Recalled Rex Hooter, inBelder.frem 
Columbus. Released Date Murray, pitcher. 
Activated John Monte fusee. Ditcher, tram the 
disabled list. Signed Wime Honan, coach. 

TORON TO— Designated^ Willi* Alums, firs 
botuman. ter assignment. Activated jim 
Cioncv, pitcher. 

TEXAS— Acquired Jett MuronkO, infleider, 
from Cleveland ts cgmalele on earlier trade: 
osslpnets Moronko to TuBo of the Texas 
League. 


FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
BUFFALO— Traded joe Ferguson, moe- 
lerixxk, to Detroit tar an undisclosed 1984 
draft choice. 

N.Y. GJANTS— Extended the contract of 
Bill PoraKts. head coach 
WASHINGTON— Traded Joe Washington, . 
running back, and lh 1984 first-round draft 
seieaton to Atlanta ter the Falcons' second 
and sixth round selections in 1986- 
TRACK AND FIELD 
THE ATHLETIC CONGRESS-Nomed 
Sle«« Milter, track and Hwd coach at Kansas 
State, head coach olalii leam that will 
comoeteogainst West Germany this summer. 

COLLEGE 

ALABAMA— Named David Hobbs assis- 
tant basketDoll coach 
SOUTHERN OREGON STATE -Named 
Gait Patton women's basketball coach. 










Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


AilRMl 

VoL HM Low u*f 

832M 83b Sflh 63b 

08 

+4% , 

TWA 

20912 15% 

15% 

ISV 

+ v- 

PtlUMr 

19413 84% 

83% 

14 

—lto 

HduNG 

1B8X 50b 

47V 

91b 

-t-11% 

Mobil 

12431 9% 

X 

30% 

+ % 

Reyn m 

13052 7*V 

73 

73V 

—3b 

FordM 

11490 <1 

40b 

40b 

— V 

IBM 

11342 124% 

125% 

125% 

— % 

Texaco 

W548 39% 

39% 

39b 

+ b 

ATiT 

WOT? 21 

20V 

n% 

— % 

CmwE 

9988 20% 

28% 

38% 

— % 

GMof 

9878 47V 

64V 

84% 

— IV 

MMSUI 

0932 13V 

17% 

13b 

+ % 

Unocal 

8714 44% 

44 

44b 

— % 

Qmaed 

B3I5 32% 

32b 

32b 

— % 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open HMk Low 1 Art om- 

. Indus' 1293.11 12&2J1 121947 1M265 — 1*4J 
! Tram B4J3. STMT 54633 STUB— 

1 UHI 1SLO 15409 19US 15101— 8AJ 
| Camp 5009 >M2 380J1 SOU*— «« 


NYSE Index 



won 

Prmrioa 

Low 

CtaX 

Today 

3PJVL 

10431 

10374 

HM.12 

10372 

T1963 

11808 

119.10 

uua 

•043 

9362 

9003 

7X93 

S5J3 

5536 

5533 

5565 

11073 

10963 

11067 

10964 


| Dow Jones Bond Averages 

ftw. IMar 


Bonds 

Utilities 

industrials 


707 
71 J7 
77.90 



Bar Saks *S»n 

misM m 

172090 <14.1 59 0031 

170038 4A56AJ tW 

771682 420733 7697 


Wednesd ays ■ 

MSE 

Closing 


VOiflJ 3 PJA. 


0471003 

Prev.3PJrt.TOL 0320400 

Prev cccsoGdoted clese 1SW3M50 


Tablet include tfte nationwide prices 
up to the daslap oa Wall Street and 
da oof reflect late trades elsewhere. 

i'ia The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives _ 



in 

311 


Utilities 

Banks 

Tromo. 


md Year 

cm* Node M» As* 

2KLS4 MU* 3U7 27974 
29U0 39253 194.72 2*445 
344.7* — 31447 331.90 

Ota — 33143 33471 

Wi 9 — 24941 27140 

207.10 — 24424 25SJ0 

34941 — 2SB52 25419 


VsL 


HIM Low Lett £** 


■AT 

OomtP 

insOv 


ettedo 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


f 

£ PI ■ *%* » TBdOV 

I High Low cm* IP M. 

■ industrials 20041 190-79 199.M 199.19 

I Trent?. 1<947 147.11 140.11 14042 

■ U H«ll*s 0143 81.12 8V44 BL1* 

■ Finance 7142 3U7 2145 21.13 

I comeeslts 14043 17844 17943 179.15 


31003 4 3> 

300 2** A 

3M< n m 

2141 17b 17 

UN Uls Wto 

1442 14V 1419 

fllHoun 1UB I9tfe !tn 

s«ar«t W3i 3a im 



1? Month 
Mlah Low 


Stock Dlv. YKL PE IQOsHMi Low 


ss< 


2m 14 AAR 
19 V 9V ACT 
TBto 9b AMCA 
-21b 13V AMP 
4314 2414 AMR 


21b 10b AMR of 210 1U 

23 19 ANRpf 2.12 104 

I4U B APL 35 

iM 44b ASA 240 44 

27 14b AVX 32 22 12 

14b 14b AZP 272 1U 7 


402413 517 17 174-14 

12 84 13% 13b 13b 4- 14 

43 11 10b 10b 

50 24 55 591 19b 19b I9ta 

9 3501 40b 39b 3914 — b 


13 21V 21b 2114 + b 

201 29b 20b 2M 

38 8b 8 0 — b 

541 50b 49b 50b— b 

179 1 4b 14b Mb— b 

1088x 23b 23b 23b— b 

50 


54 36b AbtLob 140 24 M U80 51 50 30 — 1 

25b 17 AccaWds 44 14 18 109 23b 23 22 — b 

22 12b AanC 40 24 34 IS Mb 14b 

10b 8b AaneE 6H> 37 11 2 0b 8b BV — b 

17b 15 Ado Ex 1.92*114 108 18b Mb 14b 4- b 

20 lib AdmMJ 62 23 6 14 14H 14 14b 

19b 8b AdvSn 4» 54 15 101 9V 9b ?to 

41b 25b AMO 12 5004 2Bb 26b 24b— lb 

12b 4b Advast .12 1-4 1U M n n 

14b Bb AorfltDt II 82 12b 12b 12b + b 

43b 27b AotnU 344 A3 31 2315 «Zb 42b 42b— b 

S V 52V AatLpf 5430104 10 55b 55b S5b 

15b Atom 140 17 13 175 3Zb 32b 3ZV — b 

4b 2b AUaen 21 

51 39b AlrPrd 140 24 11 

24b 13 AlrtiFrt It U It 

2 I AIMoas 23 

12b 24b AlaP PIA342 122 


7b 6 AlaPdpf S3 114 
2b 61b AJcPef 940 124 
MOb BSb AloPpf 1140 107 
79b 43b AlaP p| 944 122 
71 57 AloPpf 8.14 114 

48 56 AlaPpf 828 T2J 

14 11 AkZBSC 5 144 7J 8 

22<A 9b AtskAIr .M 2 8 
17b 10b Albrtes 48 23 18 
51V 22b AKJtsna .7* 25 13 


I » » » 

320 48b 48b 40b— b 
271 18b It ISV— 1A 
75 m ib ib + to 
7 37b 31b 32b 
IB 7b 7b 7b 
300z 72b 72 72b +1 

490x103b IQZb 103b + V 
60l 79 77b 77b— b 

26ttz 89b 89b 49b— Ib 
50x 87b 47b 87b— U 
4 13b 13b 13b— to 
304 20b 20b 20b— to 
71 18b 18to 16b + to 
143 30b 30b 30b + to 


751 


»m» 22V + to 


31b 23b Alcan 120 4 S 12 4553 24% 24b 

34b 77b AlcoSId 140 34 11 121 34 33to 

33 17 AfaxAlx 140 14 

23b 20V AJowJr 19 

8*b 49 AlIpCp 2441 22 24 

16% 23 AlaCOPf 366 102 
23% 10% Alolnt 140 54 
10b 15b Alain Pt 219 112 
94b 81 Alai pfCl)2S 122 
11b 24to AllaPw 220 14 9 
21 15b AltenC 40b II 14 


— to 

+ to 

27b 27b 27b + to 


Prices of N. Y. Stocks Decline 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices were lower late 
Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange, 
and some analysts were predicting a less-than- 
ebullient market for the short term. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was off 
8.06 to 1,250 an hour before the close. Declines 
led advances by a 3-2 ratio. Volume amounted 
to about 81J5 millio n shar es, down from 93 3 
milli on traded in the like period Tuesday. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

The market's attempt — and failure — to 
ffiin significantly last week has thrown cold 
water on stocks, said Chester Pado, of A.C. 
Securities, Los Angeles. 

“When that type of failure occurs, you cannot 


Although prices in tables on these pages 

for t 


an 

from the~4 P.M. dose in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 


4411. 29b AJIdCP 140 44 9 

U, 53% AMCP pf 424 104 

U3to 99 AfdCppfl2ro 107 

T07to 100% AldC pf 1231*114 
3to 13 AlldPd 

19b 39 AlktStr 212 32 8 

17b Sto AllbCh 
J4*t 14 AllsCpf 

27b 20 ALLTL 144 

25b 20% AlphPr 


'SS-S 


39V 39b Alcoa 120 
25V 15b A max jo 
47b 32b Amaxpf 200 
33b 22% Am Ha* 1 .10 
M4 V8b AHMPf 320 
' 7% ib AmAor 
19b 15to ABakr 
70 S3 ABrond 190 
Hto 53 ABrdpf 287 
115 55% A Eldest 140 

»to 19b ABMM 44 _ 

77to 20b ABusPr 44 25 14 
55% 40to Am Can 220 54 IT 
24b 21b A Can pf 280 112 
<8 34 A Can pi 340 42 

19V 14% ACapSd 220 114 
33 2Sb ACanCV 251a 9.1 
11 8b ACentC 
S8to 43b ACvan 
29% 18% ACT 

21b 15W AElPw 
<4% 25 AmEx* 

30 MV AFamll 
33b 19bAGnCp 
13b 8 A Oil wt 

57 Sib AGfll pfA 0609)13 
90 58% AGfll pIB 5.90a 8.9 

71b 44% AGfllPf 325 42 
67 40to AGn PID 284 42 
32*4 25% A Horn 140 34 9 
13K 7b AHalsf 
82b 44% AHama 
30 26to A Hasp 
67b 42% Am rich 
79% 52 AlnGrp 
28% Mb AMI 
5% 3 AmMol 


114 70 77b . 

17 28b 28b 28% + to 
294 24b 34 24b— b 

10 19b 19b 19b + b 
188 92b 92 92 - to 

109 31% 31b 31b — to 
137 19b 19b 19b 
7229 45b 44b 45b + % 
120 44b 44 84b + b 

73 11214112 112 
SO 104 104 104 

27 2Tb 21 21 — % 

493 Sib 55 55—1 

44 7 8% 4b— b 

25 38 29% 79% — to 

39 28% 28b 34% + to 
25 23b 23 23% + to 


40 15 3314 31 30V 30b— to 


575 17b 17b 17% — b 
80 T 34 34 34 — % 

33 22 5594 32b 3TV 31b + b 

18 3 137% 137 T37 

215 2 lb 3 

8 15 Iffto TBto 18V, 

60 9 no 64b Mb Mb + to 
4.1 2 85b 45 85U— 2% 

15 17 1403 100% 100% 100% + to 

34 13 4 25% 25b 25b— b 

11 25% 25b 2Sb— to 

480 54 53b 53b + b 

2 23% 23% 23% — 10 

a 47 44b 44b 

45 1*b 19b 19b + b 

92 40 2714, 27b— b 

II » Ib Ib Ib 
2 90 52b Sib 51% — b 

0 41* 23% 23b 23b— b 
. . I 3243 21% 21b 21b— to 

IX U IS 3713 43to 42 42b— b 

.44b 23 12 194 28% 27% 27% — 1* 

V00 33 10 1802 31% 31b 31b 

38 12b 12U 12b 

54% + b 


1-90 37 
.92 4JJ 

1240105 


85b Z7V ANatRs 222 34 12 


411 54% 54b . 

725 05b 04b IS + % 

2 67 87 87 —1 

1X7 63to 62V 62% + V 

4 30b 30b 30b 

20 9b 9b 9% + b 
190 5.1 12 5277 51b 57% 57b— 1 

1.12 35 9 1992 30% 29% 29b— b 

440 74 8 80 87% 84% 84b— % 

44 4 IB 499 78 73to 73%— ! 

73 32 II 1497 23 22b 23b— 


look for the market to attack the same level for a 
few weeks.” 

He said the market will continue to test the 
l,24G-to-l,250 range for several weeks. 

The immediate picture does not look good, he 
said, adding that “the downside risk is fairly 
minimal" long-term. 


And the potential for an upward swing is 
substantial oe said. 

The market is still confined to its trading 
range, said Joseph Broder, of Stuart, Coleman, 
who believes it will break out of that range on 
the upside. 


Because of a combination of current interest 
rate levels and low inflation, “the odds still 
favor the bull,” be said. 

The disappointing economic reports from the 
government reflect the first quarter, and many 
economists have predicted improvement in the 
second half, be said. 

Arco was near the top of the actives, and 
higher. In other oil stocks, Unocal Exxon, Phil- 
lips and Texaco woe all fractionally higher. 

Philip Morris, also active, was lower. 

Trans World Airlines was off a bit. 

Among technologies, IBM and Digital 
Equipment were slightly lower. Cray Research, 
Control Data, Burroughs and Honeywell were 
up a bit. 

General Motors and Ford woe slightly low- 
er. 

General Dynamics was up sharply. 

American Can was higher after reporting 
first-quarter net of 51.20 a share, up from S1.0J 
a share in the year-earlier quarter. 

And General Foods, after announcing 
fourth -quarter operating net of S2.53 a share, 
up from 5 2-26 a share in the year -earlier quar- 
ter, was off tt to 62tt. It said its first-quarter net, 
however, would likely be below S2.17 a share 
last year. 

On the Am ex, active issues included BAT 
Industries, Dome Petroleum and Instrument 
System Carp. 

A block of 2.64 million shares of BAT crossed 
at 3%. Instrument Systems was unchanged at 
I tt. Horn & Hardart was up tt to 1 Hi 

On pie Big Board, defense issues were gain 
ing. with United Technologies and Lockheed 
higher. 


9b 2% vlEvonpf SS 2% 2V 2% + to 

41V 30 ExCeta 140 44 9 138 34% 35b 35b — VS 

14% 13% Emtir 144*11.4 9 14% 16% 14% — to 

54b 30 Em 340 44 8 43M 52b 57b 51V + % 

II 4% FX Irtd .ISO 54 3 14 9% 9b 9% + b 

47% 44% EMC L3B 14 38 70S «% 4t% 41V— to 
24% 17% FPL G* 158 79 8 3804 24 23% 23% + to 

13% 9b FafcOr 28 24 14 34 10% 18% 10%— to 

14% 9b FgcbI 7 32 12% 12% 12b— b 

20% 151* Fabxhd 50 47 730 17 1« L. 

39% 33b FolTCPt 340 99 IS 37% 37 37 — b 

18*8 9% FatrM .18 U 9 190 13% 13b 13b— to 

34% 10% ForiDI* 23 199 20V 20b 20b— V 

19b 14b Fdatal 40 39 U 35 15V, Ub 15b 

32% 23 FrWltF 5 4 20% 20b 20% 

28% 14% F aratl J0 5.1 7 92 17b 17b 17%— V 

13 8% RJVDtb 2D Z0 16 103 9% 9% 

4% 4% FcOer* 30* 5 I 106 5% 6% 5%— b 

37b 29b FoOlCo 144 5.1 8 Itfl 37 38b 34b 

45% a fosejs, 31 an »% 37 s — b 

39 29b POMao 143 44 10 84 35 34% 35 4- % 

19% 10% F«NM .14 Til 3319 15% 15% 15% 

27 16% FaOPB* JO 44 4 490 17% 17% 17b— % 

23 16 FBtfRIt 144 48 13 27 31% 21 21 to 

19% 13% FOSsni JO U 13 17 18% 18V lib 

MIS <7% FedDSt 254 44 9 4338 59% 58b 58*8— % 

29U 22% Forra 140 44 12 87 28% 24% 24% — b 

37 25% Flora, 200 74 12 11 24% 28 28% + to 

1714 4 FtnCpA JSJ 3138 4 Sto 5b + % 

5b 3% FOlCoof 40 124 1 4V 4V 4%— to 

44b 14% FInCppt 473*224 41 30% 30 38 — b 

7b 2b F rtf Bar 22 4 3% 2% 

20b 14 Flrratn JO U 10 SIM 19% 19 19% + % 

TTU 12b RAMS Jt U 1 IX 2 21b 22% 4- b 

34% 21% FBHSVS 140 AS 8 S74 34b 35% 35V 

35 25to FBkFta 120 14 II 2 33to 33b 33b— b 

71b 35% FBeSt 190 19 10 04 48 87% 67%— % 

27 18% FxtChJe 132 54 27 IS8 24 23% OH- % 

57 4<b FOll a pi 593*114 4 50b 50% 50% — V 

19H 12% FtBTax 1 J3 10.1 9 1500 13b 17V 17% — to 

Sto « FtBT* 0< 4.11*15.1 33 41 «to 40b— % 

21 Bto FtCItv 9 198 9 Bb 9 + b 

23% 10% FFedAx JO* 14 4 424 18b 18 15%— b 

49% JOtt Flntsf* 2J4 49 8 1309 49 48V*48U + b 

31 21 Flittstpl 2J7 79 Ml 30% 30 30 — to 

Mb 7% FtMiss 34 27 I 1» H n M 

19% 16 FINafn n 12 22 18% 18 18% 4- b 

S3 31% FNSTO 298 54 7 159 S3 52b 53% — b 

7% 4b FsfPa 247 7 4% 6to— % 

30to into FstFavf 242 94 82 2 Ito 27% Z7%— % 

31b 23V FtUnRI 192 64 18 43 30 29% 77b 

25% 14% FfVaBJt 44 17 9 203 22% 22b 23% — Ml 

28b 16 FlWbc IJfl 49 I 12 28b .BM 28b— b 
52% 45% FWljCPt 8JS \1H 200x 52 52 52 

54% 30% Fbtftb 1 JO 29 34 14 SV, 35% J5%— to 

11% 8% FsfiFd JSe J 98 10b 10 10 

3 Sto 20% FMFllG 9 U2 19 I 74 34% 34 34% + to 

48 42V, FBF pi 498a 94 50 47% 47% 47% 4- to 

20V 14% Float Ell J8 2JJ 7 1527 19b 18V Mb— % 

39b 22% Fleams 190 18 14 1587 37% 30 38 —1% 

33% 23% FIbxTV 90 2* 14 10 30b 30b 30b 

141 139 
JO 4 U 
14 

-18a 4 13 
216 L2 9 
40 24 II 


30 

18% 

5b 

23 

39 


45 84b 84b 84b— to 

-- - - _ - 450 29% 20b 28V— V, 

UVh 5 ASLFIa 4 143 5b 5b 5% + b 

18b 12% ASLFIpflN 187 495 13b 12% 13b + V 

16 10% ASMS 90 89 9 37 12 11V 11V— b 

35b 22% AmSM M0 SI I W SK 27b 27b— V 

58% 28b AmStar 44 U 9 799 51b 49b 49%— 2b 

88V 48b AS tr PfA 4J8 77 134 82V 59% S9V— 2b 

22b 15 AT&T 170 57 1510102 21 20% 20%—% 

30b 3Dto ATliT Pf 244 97 " ‘ 

27% 13V AVtatra 190 39 


43b 25 APraiU 741 24 3 
SLFIa 


Jib IS ******** 


AWnSpf 1JS 111 
20% 19to Am Hall 240 99 
88% 53% ATrPr 544 U 
11% 4% ATrSC 

80b 58% ATrUn 544 7.1 
43% 18b AmnO s 70 S 
112% 80 Amespf £32 47 
28% 21V Amatak " * ‘ 
28b 18b Arntac 
16 0V Am (ssc 
84to 50% Amoco 370 
33b 28% AMP 72 
24 I2V AnwcB 70 
21V 12% Amrop* 

28b IV AmStti 140 
43b 2HJ. AmsM 140 


. snibSb 


20% 20V 


iSi 10b 10b 4- b 


1 79 79 79 +% 

791 42b 41V 41V— 

90 37 13 + 


21 


5 

49 9 
24 IB 2380 
24 16 m 

5.1 I 
39 14 


9 Iff 

te, 


St?*. 


88V 68V +2% 
29% 30 + b 

12% 12V 

_ 14V 16V— b 

84 27% 27% 27b + b 

408 43 41b 41% — IV 

171 3% 3b 3** 

16 770 18b 18b 18% — to 

85 144 22% 27V 22V + b 

U 19 88 37 38V 36V 

19 14 393 11% II 11 —to 

27 12 55 21 »% 20b— b 

25 11 1400 83b r% 81V— IV 

87 43 58V 58V 58V— V 

20 17 144 14% 13% Mb + V 
7 13 818 13% 12b 12V— 1 

1 37 7 35 12 11V 11V— % 

2J 12 254 12V 12% 12V + to 

508 IV 1% IV— to 


_ 34b 15b Anton* 

30V 19% Anchor 148 
42V 24b AnCtav 173 
12% 9V AnOrGr 70 
23b I8V Angelic J6 
34b S9% AntMus 290 
80 45V Aniwupf 340 

20to 13b Anhrtr J8 
16V 8% Antitan 94 
15% 10% Anttmv 4« 

MV 9% Apocta 70 

2b b ApctiPwt . .., __ 

19% 15b ABCfiPunXlO 107 270 19V 19% 19V + to 

30 28 ApPwpf 390 129 5 29b 29V 29b + V 

39b 17V ApIDto 1.121 15 17 42 37% 32 32— to 

21% 8 AppIMfl 32 13 12% 13 + to 

21V 15V ArchDn ,14b 7 13 2921 2M 19V 19V— b 
30 23 AlIP Pfl58128 33x 20% 28 28 — V 

103 79 AHPPI 10JO W9 610V 98 90 90 + b 

23V 13V ArkBat 40 27 7 38 18% 18b lBtt— b 

34% 18 Arkla 198 59 21 2685 21V 31 TVV + V 

% to ArtnRI a It It 

13% 10% Armada 36 IS 11% 11% n% 

19V 4V Armen 873 7V 7b 7b— b 

29 15b Armcpt 210 117 35 II 17V II + to 

24b lib Arm*Rb 48 25 B 96 19 lfb 19 + to 

38 22% Arm Win 1J0 49544 793 33b 32% 32V— to 

38 29b ArmW pf X75 105 10BX 35V 35V UV +1b 

34b 19 AraCp 170 44 7 7 26% 20 26% + % 

26to 1316 ArowE 70 15 7 113 13% Ub 13V + % 

26V 14 Arlra 72 5 27 isto 25 25 — H 

23% M Arvlns 90 47 7 380 19to 19 19V 

59V 17% Asarca 787 25% 24V 24V— % 

31% 20% AlMOU 140 57 437 31% 30V 30% 

43% 33V AtfitOpI A50 105 1 42V 42% 42V— b 

40 31b A*lO pf 19* too 20 40b 39b 39b— % 

63 45b AsdDG 240 4J 10 488 61b 60 80 —IV 

W0 71 AldDPl 4JS 4.9 7 97V 77b 97b— 3to 

27% 19% AfCvEI 240 97 9 216 28% 26b 26% — M 

59% _40V AHRIdl 4JU 83 3082182 43b 59b 83b +4% 


378b 284 AH Rent 390 .7 

38 AURcpt 378 107 

141 97 AHRcpT 290 19 

20 11% AthnCP 

33V 1SV Auaat 40 
48% 32 AutoDf 43 
5 4% Avalon n 

27b 15% AVEMC 40 
37% 23 A vary 40 
15% 10 Avian n 
41 27 Avrnt 50 

25% 19% Avan 290 
33% IB Avdtri 


. 1 <19 41? 419 +30V^ 

1630x 38% 35 35 -1 , 

31 151 to 141% 15tb +10HJ 
38 13% 13 V* 13% + % 
17 18 314 21% 21 21 — V 

15 18 525 <2b 41b 42 + b 
27 4% 4% «% 

27 M 35 Mb 26% 2tb 
15 14 851 34% 30% 33b— % 

7 21 14 13b 14 + b 

19 13 1867 29V 28b »to— 1% 
95 TO 573 21% 20b 21 — b 

10 24 19b im 19V 


139 Mb 10b 10% + % 
98 31 30 30% — V 

4815 18b 18% 18% — % 
18 22% 22b 22b— % 
238 lb IV lb + b 
88 Sib 51 51 — b 

344 15 14% 14% 

119 10b 10% 13% — % 
413 42% 43% 42%— to 
1101 41fc 41b 41b 
184 30% 30% 30% -f ". 

5 9% Vb 9% 

238 3b 3% J%— b 

16 57b 57 57 — % 

1340 47% 47 47b— 1 

3 51V 51V S1V — b 
880 41b 40V 40V— V 
23 28b 28% 38% + b 


20 10 BMC M 46 

35b 13% Balmc* 50 17 12 

23b IS BkrlnH .92 59 I 

:8V 13% Oah-Jor J6 15 M 

2b % vIBaldU 
57% 29V BallCP ITS 25 72 

29b 11b BartlrMi 70 17 

14% 7% BallyPK 11 

fl'i 30V BalTCE 120 76 0 
4ib 36b Ball PtO 450 IB6 
33b 21 BncOne 1.10 18 10 
10V 0% BncCIrn 52* 14 I 

5% 3% BanTm 

!S 39b Bandao 170 XI 12 
40b 29 BA Bo* 140 5.1 S 

53 43 BkUoi pf 451* 95 

43% 28% BfcNY 294 59 4 

27b 15% BnkVa * 190 37 9 

21 14b BnkAm 152 76 II 1414 20% 20b 20b— to 

52b 40 BkAmpf 5.19*117 SO 46% 46% 40% + to 

16b 11% BkAmpf 280 88 18% 18b 16% — to 

32b 23% BkAAtv 260 77 11 3 31U 31% 31% + b 

45% 37V Brink Tr 2-70 47 7 1734 85 44b 64b— % 

24V 19% BAT r pt 250 107 2 2<H 2*V 24% 

1Tb 7b Banner JO* 7 18 44 lib 11 lib + % 

3ST« 19 Bant 64 15 17 452 30 29% 29V + % 

I*b IB BomGe 90 40 9 17 20% 20 2D — % 

54 33b Bamal 178 25 W 562 53b 53% S3b— % 

36b 22 Barnet wl 22 38b 36b 36b 

33% Ub Banrwr 00 19 M 42 21 2Bb20b— to 

13% 8V BASIX ,12b 19 11 29 Tib 11% T1V— % 

2B% 17b Beutah 78 U 18 563 37% 36V 28b— % 

10% 11% BartTr 77 35 83 2489 15 14V IS 

25b 17% Bov Fin JO 5 41 12 22 22 22 

33 21% BayfllG 200 79 9 21 32% 32b 33V 

38% 29% Baulina 190 XI II 40 32% 31% 31% — to 

31% 34b BcatCa 150 6.1 4 1971 30% 29% 29V— to 

82 Mb B*al of 378 60 1 50 58 56 + % 

15b 12 B*ear 04 3.1 54 493 14% 14 14 — b 

50 30% BactnO 170 25 13 2M 48 47% 47% — to 

9W 4% Baker 111 Sb 5 5 + to 

11 9b Befcar pf 170 166 61 10% 18 10b— % 

17% 17b BaklnH 00 26 10 51 15% 15b 15b— % 

Xb 22b BelHwrt 58 29 9 151 2SV 26% 28% — % 

33 22 BalHwpf 67 20 2 28b 28b 28b— V 

B0 6*b MIAtl 860 76 9 2021 07V 87 87 — b 

30 22% BCE 6 228 285 28% 28% 28V— b 

27% 19% Bolllnd 72 15 14 29 22 21% 7I%— % 

38 27% BaftSeu 250 7J B 3910 37b 36b 36% — b 

55 40% BCMAH 60 16 25 189 51 50% 50% 

41% 33 BantCP 2X0 £2 M 717 39 38b 30b 

38% 30% Boost pi 470 12.1 13 35% 35% 35b + to 

22 17 Banal pf 250 110 710: 22b 22 22 

. 3% BenprB 971 21 233 5 4V 5 

2V A* BeroEn 14 772 21b 23% 23% 

6% 3b Barkov 30 131 5% 5% 5% 

17 10% BestPa 74 IJ 20 494 13V !3b 13% + to 

ii,'* *4 7342 16% 14% tSI 

55% 37% BefltStpfUO 129 21 41% 41b 41V 4- to 

22% 18% BottiSf e(250 129 24 20V 20% 20V 

5ft S* V SI' V 32 19 18 483 33% 32% 32%— b 

90 39 15 397 21% 20% 20»— % 

18b Tito Bleeftn 49 18b 18% 1*% 4- b 

26b 17% BlacJtD 64 37 It 1197 20V 29 30 — b 

Kb 21 BUMP 1.92 67 • 8 30b 30% Xb + % 

« 14% B alrjn 58 26 99 .34 » 1*b 19V 

SJto 17 BlckHR 260 46 IJ — ~ — 

86% 17 Basina 163 27 7 

M% 33b BoUaC 190 47 14 

st 48 BebocpfSJia 90 
29b 15% Ball Bor .10 0 37 

S2_ Bardsn 398 46 9 


8b 4V, Bormna 
39% 7Sto Boa Ed 374 85 8 
77 83 BOSE pf 868 116 

10% 9 BosEpr 1.17 11.1 

12% 10b BoiEpr 108 116 

25b 14% Bowtrn 72 30 8 

JTto 25W Briest 100 £7 11 

58to 43 BrtstM 168 

123 91 BratMpf 290 

3% BrltLnd 20 

21% BrftPt 1630 56 9 

9b BrttTpp 
2b Brack 

15b Brtftwv 19 U S 
20 BkvUG 112 02 7 
23V 19to SkUGpf 207 108 
22% 29 BkUGpf 195 122 
26V 13 BwnSti 70 19 8 
X 22V BronGp 178 5.1 15 

45b 28b BnwiF 1X0 26 15 

23V BPMk 190 39 7 

40% 27V BrSltWS 01 15 15 

19% 13% Bundy 90 45 8 

llto 15b BunfcrH ZI8 117 

21b 14to Burma 13 

29% 23 Burflnd 164 40 72 
58% 35 BrtNth 100 29 7 
7% 8b BWNUPI 55 77 
10b 12V Bumdv 94 6X 14 
65b 4M BurTWl 200 40 11 
20% 12b Buflrln 52 2708 
llto 2b Buftal 
M 4V4 Butnaf 110 246 
24b CBS In 100a 50 12 


40 7 0% 8V— to 

269 3SV X 38to 
1002 75b 75b 75b 
31 10% 10b 10b 
54 12% 12V 12V— b 
398 21V 21 to 21V— to 
.. 146 29% 2Bto 2BU— b 

U 16 3288 57b 57 57to4-to 
17 1 120 120 120 +1 

11 4b 4b 4b 
711 28 27% 30 + % 

1187 17% 17b 17%— b 
338 2% 2% 2to— b 
80 21% 21 21 — b 

258 38% 38 38 — % 

4 22b 27b 22% + to 
9 32V 32b 32b + to 

20 19V 19V MV 4- % 

211 Mb 28 28b 9- b 

238 41 41% 41% — % 

800 33% 32% 32b— V 

31 32b 32% 32% — % 
2 17V 17% 17% + b 

21 IK 18b 18b- b 
155 1S% 18b 18% 





MtoCPCIrt 


.... CPN11 
19% CRIIIWI 
27% 10% CSX 
40V 34 CTS 
12b 7% C3 Inc 
33V 22% Cabot 
14to BV Caesar 
28b 11% CalFod 08 29 
47b 32V CalFdpt 475 100 
23% 13b Cat Dm J5*. u 


190 XI 
72 36 


34U 51V 

1229 7% 7b 7b 

144 14% 13% M — Vi 
1548 59V 59% 5*ft— to 
51 17% 17V 17% + b 
166 3% 3b 3b— to 

34 9to 8V 8*8 — V 

*77 25% 25 25 - b 

26 It 2088 100% 104V T06%— V 
10 28 8% 6% 6b— % 

3001 I0to 10b 10b + b 
7*7 S7% 5BV 50V— % 
30 29% 30 

5V SV Sb— to 
38% 38V 38V— % 
12 10% MV io% 

B=* 


56 10 1816 39% 99b 

160 *5 9 34 21b 21U 

193 20% 20 

2189 23V 231m 

134 31V 32b 

97 9 8V 

01 25V 


1BV 11% Comrnl .12 7 

28 15V CRLkg 00 

9 3% CmaRo .181 

73U 54V Catnsp 250 37 11 
45% 30b CdPacg 100 
Zlb 14V CanPEg 60 
223 Ml CapCtts JO 20 
.25V 13 CgpHdS 78 3J 11 
100% 100b CapH pf 1067*100 
14% 10 Coring a 61 
40V 24% CarfllfD 192 39 10 
25V 15% CaraFI 60 17 10 
20% 19V CarPw 260 96 7 
23% 19% CnrPpf 267 116 
40 35% CarTac 210 57 9 

lib 7% Carrol 97 7 13 

48b 30% caraPIr 19 u i 
a 18V CoriHw 172 46 10 
34b 19% Cartwi SZ 16 12 
16to 9% CcscNG 160 76 8 
16% 9b CatfKk 

29 15V CsffCpf 122 

47b 28% CatraT JO 16 

27V 16 Cm* 76 3J 11 

94% 82% CofORM 460 49 0 

Mb 34 Cefanpf 450 116 

15 7b coney n 94 0 26 

41% 32% CwM 278 55 9 

28% 17 Cmrtaxn 9 

24V 17 CanSaW 202 06 7 

26V 16b ConHud 294 11.1 6 

25 18b ContlLt 272 07 9 

19b 14V CnllPS 100 07 10 

25V 17V CnLxEI 2X8 86 7 

35b 29b CLaElpfAU 129 

11b 7% CoMPw 160 146 S 
24b 14 CnSora 64 15 18 
19 10% CV1PS 170 106 5 

12b 3V Control 
10% 7V CntrtTl 90 76 0 
23b 10V Canwlll 200 120 8 
27b ISM Crt-foed 7D 21 11 
24% 18b Co**Alr 00 21 16 
24V 18% Oimpln 00 16 3 

27% 19 OunlPf 1 JO 48 
54 43V OwnI Pf 400 9J 

io a chcprisp 00 49 n 
4% 1 vlOfftC 

4% lb YlChrtpf 
55V 35% Choja 390 70 5 1 
83 52b amepf 675 116 

48 36% Ch«»* Pt 5JS U7 

58 48 OmSOPf 463*117 

57% 51 Cnasa Pi120BaQ2O 
2m 14% Ctialsaa 72 29 8 


881 

1 


32V— 1 


12% 12 
17b T7to 
45 44V .... 

IS% 10b 18V— % 
13% 13% 13V— b 
. 7tn 20V 20 20 — 

36 4 3% 4 

244 65V 64V 84V— V 
87 4JV 43b 43b— % 
31 MV a» 2CV— V 

333 217 210 210V— IV 
388 34% 23V 23V 

10 W 108 108 
7 11% 11b 11b 

24 34b 34% Mb— V 

92 20% 20b 20V— b 
1574 27V 27 Z7V — % 

11 23% 23b 23b 

35 36% 38b 28V + V 
55 9% 7b 9% 

257 83 42% 42%+ V 

672 28% 30 20 — b 

44 32b 32V 32V— V 

93 18 15b 15% + b 

852 lib 11 11% + V 

3 !0b 20b 2Db 

1873 Stv 31 V 31to— V 

4 23 23 23 

281 92% 90V TOV— lto 

1 39% 39% 39% + b 
136 »V TV 9V + 18 
166 40% 40to 40% 

664 22 21V 21V— V 

1918x23% Zlb 23% — to 
89 25V 25b 25b 
106 25 34% 25 + b 

260 18% 13V 18% 

IX 24V 24 2<b— % 

3 S 34% 34% 

197 9% TV TV 

378 Z4b 34 24 

22 18 17% 17% 

358 3b 3 3b— % 

9B 10b 10b 10% 

IV 19 18b 1? + to 

ISO 23 22b 22V— b 

353 18% IBto 18V + b 
BBS 22% 22 22 — % 

16 34V 24b 24V + to 
33 4TV 49% 49V 
287 8% lto 8% + b 

57 2b 2V 2b 

2 . 2 % 7 % 2 % 

83 53b 51% 51% — V 

2 58b 58 58b +2 

16 45 44V 45 + to 

2 54V 54V 54V + % 
28 54 53% 53%+ U, 

5 18V 1HV 18V — b 


34V 24% Chonwd 162 £2 13 168 29 27V 29 +1% 

43 23b QotiNY 208 66 4 3261 38b 38V 38% + b 

42b 23% QiMV pf 197 4.9 8 38 37% 37% —lb 

SBV 48 QlNYpf 863*119 10 53% 55 55 — V 

39b 31V Otawk 1-24 36 10 M JS% 35% J5%— V 

30% 31b CfomPn 290 59 10 1965 34% 34% 14% — % 


39% 29V Chmrn 200 46 8 
XV 17% CNWst 
200 127 ChlMIW 

MV XJb Oil Ml pt 
XV 14% CHIPnT 
13% TV ChkFull 
49b 34% OtrWCr 

12b a curtain 

13% 9% ammo 

38b 2B» diryslr 190 
47% 3«% Chubb* 2J0 
53b SOV Chubb Pt 425 
17b 11% Church s 04 
48V 3Sb cixieoll 3.12 
15% ?V ChlGE 
88 48 CJnG Pf 

2SV 20 CkwHl 
36 22% ardK 

3i lav aratv 

Mb 16V Circus 

47b Z7% CitloTD 

88 80b cnicpp# 8.19*10.1 

44b 32% CHvInv 

48 52 CtVlnPf 290 36 

25b 21V Ctvlnpt 297 116 

10% 8b debit J2 103 6 
3Zb 23% Clark E 1.10 36 21 
16 6b CtavMtn II 

22V. 17 ClvCIt 1X0 £1 8 

21% 14 CtovEI £52 12.1 8 

80 48b ClvEJPf 700 120 

60 47 ClvEtPf 756 126 

18% 10 Clevpk 60 49 

17b 15% CWpkPt 123 110 

I9V 14V Clvpkcf 164 11J 

38V 22b Ctonm 1J8 40 11 

21V 14V ClubMn .10* J IB 
32Vk 24 duattP 1X0 30 12 
20b 14 Chief pf 1X0 5J 


.10* 0 7 

J3t 41 09 
081 1.1 

173 
19 3 
33 15 
70 

25 15 
6 S 7 
2.16 142 6 
928 137 
-72 33 25 
74 23 14 
XB J 13 
14 
6 


228 SJ 


00 36 14 


147 49% 49% 49b— % 
64M 80b ST 39b— lto 
30% — to 
« Ob S3 53 — b 

89 25% 25% 25% + b 
JW »7b 85V 65V— 1% 


1.19 20 
SJ3 21 
2.98 46 18 


120 


24% 16% Berpwa S3 48 9 3417 20% 20b 20b— % 


21V 12V Ceachm 
53% 23b Coastal 
37b 24V Cstlpf 

30b 24b CBtlpf 

72 V 33b CacaO 

19b T% Col oca 

34 25V Cofamn ... 

XV 20b CalaPOl 1J8B 52 
4Tb » CstgPPt 425 9.9 
nv 14b CoiAlk* 64 32 
23 10 ColFd** .16 J 

31% 20% ColPan 160 50 
89b 39% Co Mind 250 45 
35b 36V Cal Gas 3.18 1)2 
52 45V ColG* Pf 508 11.1 

40b 45% CoIGsPf 5.12 11,1 
108b « CSOpf Dl£2S 147 
108V 97 C50pfnl&25 147 
45V 27V Com tin 216 49 
37b 25V CmhEn 1X4 
17V B ComdlS 20 
20 15% CmnMtl 

J7V gv Camera 
30% Sb CmwE 
18% 13 C*>E or 
17 13V CwE p( 

80 53% CwE pi 

22% 10% CwE pf 
25V 20b CwE pt 
25% 17% CanES 

Hto 20V Comsat 

34 20 CPSVCB 

Mb 26 COmppr 
17V 11 camp SC 
46V M% Cenrsn 
XV 21% CanAa* 


6644 37V 36% 36% — b 
123 17V 17% 17b— b 
139 142V 138V 143 +3 

13 76V 75W 7SV— % 
X 22V 22b 22V + V 

232 8 7% 0 

54 45b 44V 45b + V 
143 I2b 11V 12b + % 
X 10b 1C% IPb— % 
3400 35 34% 34% — % 

455 66V 68 88 — % 

221 58 S7V: 57b 
704 18V 17% !7%— % 

6 <Sto 45b 45b 

275 15V 15b 15V + % 
300z 67V 67V 67V 
294 Zl% 21b 21b— V 
186 33V 32V 32V— to 
1B0 25% 24b 24% — % 
IX 24 Z3V 23V— V 
2516 43V 43 43 — V 

45 80V 79V 80V 
9 4155 37% 38% 38V— % 

7 58V 57V 57V— 3% 
IS* 24% 24V 24% + b 

6X7 6% 7 

270 29b 2S% 79 — % 
49 11% 10% 10% — % 

14 19b 19% 19b— b 
342 20% 20V 20V— to 
I OCC 59V 59V 59% +1V 

20: 59 5? 59 — to 

133 12V 12to 12b— % 

5 17V 17b 17b 

40 16b 18V 16% — % 

468 34% 33% 33%— V 
64 20% XV 20V 

234 30V 29% 29V— b 

25 19% 18V 1BV — V 

245 13b 13b 13b + V 


600 J 12 2792 55V 53b 54b + % 


4.1 17 
33 


5 S 11 
10 9 

20 15 


3X0 106 6 
1X0 11X 
2X0 12.1 
US 120 
237 105 
3X7 116 
Z32 9J 5 
1X0 17 11 
J4 3 25 
60 2.1 9 

7 

a 

HUM 


1 60to 60b 6Dto +3 
13 80 S9V 59V + V 
3497 40% 67b 67b— 1% 
1104 14 13b 13% — V 

109 29% 29b XV 
1513 25b 24% 24V — % 
9ta 43to <3 43 

677 Xb 20% XV— % 
319 20% 20% 20% — % 
433 27% 27% 27% 

1064 56b Ub SSto— % 
515 23% 28% Z8W 
101 49b 49b 4<b— 1 
4 46 48 48 

2tal04 104 104 — V 

2002103 b 103 103b 

131 44% 44% 48% 

425 31b 31% Xb— % 
243 14% Mb 14b— V 
B 18 17% 18 

an Wl 9% 10 + b 
9908 28V 28% 28%—% 
26 16b 15% 16b + % 
15 16b Mb Mb— V 
lOlOOr 87% 67b 87% + V 
X 22% 22% 22% 

3 25b 25b 33b + to 
28 24% 34b 24b— b 
881 331* 32b 32b— % 
127 33V 33b 33b— V 
45 X X TO — b 
2Z1 Mb 14% 18% + % 
773 15% 15V 15% + to 
799 31% 31b 31% — b 


23% 13V Cmrir 
18% 13V Conn E 
27 19b ClVtfiG 

ISb 10% Conroe 
33% 24b ConsEd 


34b IJ 12 
160 9X 9 
200 VX 10 
60 2J 6 
260 70 7 


ConEpf 465 112 
„ ConEpf 5X0 110 

36 20b CnsFrts 1.10 3.9 10 

48b 31 CnsNG 2J2 52 11 

9to 4b CoroPw 15 

76 13 CnPpfA At* 160 

25b 13V CnPpfB 4 JO 153 
45b 23V CflPpfD 705 162 
48b 25% CnPpfE 7J3 172 
48b 73 Cap e«3 736 172 
25% 11b CnPorV 400 I7J 
21% TV CnPprU 360 176 
22% 10 V CnPprT X70 172 
23% 11V CnPprR 4X0 17J 
23b 10% CnPprP 3J0 17J 
27% 10V CnPprN 3J5 181 
15b 7V OlPprM2J0 187 
14b 7 GnPprL 223 132 
Xb 11 CnPprS 4X2 17.5 
IS 7V CnPpTK 203 182 
45b Xb CntiCO 200 8.1 7 

10b 4% Cant I U 
4V % Contllrt 
44% 12 Cntlll pi 
4b % CtllHdn 
?% 4b CntlntB 4 

24 10 ContTdl 

»% 24% cmafa __ 

40b 33 CnDtpf 4JD 112 
33% 23% Canwd 1.10 32 
3b 1 vlCookU 
3<b 28% Coapr 122 5.1 14 
37% X Coop! pf 220 86 
27 12b CoopLb 

20b 12% CoprTr 00 
24% 15 Caapvt* 00 
21b 11% Copwkf 04 36 
27V 19V Cpwtdpf 208 1U 
27% 77b Corduro 
15V 10% Careln 

1 

77% 44b CmrCin 
W 4V Craig 

37 32 CftPia 
Tito 39% CrovRs 
38% 16V CrocfcN ._ 

■a 15to CrckN pf 2.10 116 
Xb 18% CrmpK IX 86 10 


1-72 

22 


11 


W 23b 22V 23b + to 

7 17% 17% 17V— b 

13 20V Xb 20% 

206 13% 13b 13% + V 

8315 32% ZZb 32b— % 

lOQz 41to 41b 41b 

11 43% 43% 43% — b 

45 20to 28% 2Sb + % 

204 44% 44b 44V + to 

*20 6V 8% 8% 
200:26 26 26 + % 
lOr 28to 28b 2fb + to 
4ta44 44 44 

2301 45 45 45 

Mta 45V 45 45 — V 

S 25b 25b 2Sb + V 
20V 2CV, 20b— Vk 

21% 21ta 21% 

21V Xb 22% — b 

2 3 23 23 

22% 23% 22% + V 
15 14% IS + to 

14 13b 14 + to 

23b 23 73 

14V 14% 14% — b 
42% 42%— V 
• *b— % 

z% 2b— to 

1 -? 

7% TV— b 
22V 22% — to 
28% 29b + to 
XV XV 
29V 39V — % 
ito iv + to 

21% 29% — % 
— % 


32 
79 
X 
5 
10 
5 
11 
8 

15 
453 43 
101 IV 
453 2% 

70 48 
T79 lto 

16 7% 

,3 Sto 

10013SV 

^ M r% 


J6 

120 

1X0 

J4 


S,5 


■ «*X 

IJ 3 


57% 34V CrwnCk 
44% 27V CrwZai 1X0 
50% 43 CrZtfpf 463 
l&t> SO CrZel pfC4J0 
2% XV Cuioni JO 
33% 14% Culkwts 
Bb 01% CumEn 220 


92 15% 14% 14% 

238 10% 18V 18V— V 
507 73 m 23V— to 
TO 12to 12V 12V 
19 21b 21% 21b + % 
43 2SV 25 25 —to 

47 12V 12b 12% + % 

36 14 1382 3B% 37% 37%- % 
12 51 45V 44% 44% + % 

S ® “S 'Sim 7 8t“* 

1600 40 10 8* 33b X 33V 

14 1233 6Tb 87b 67V + to 

"*%*&&** 
40 10% 10b 18% + V 


12 M 
26 16 1935 
T6 1*0 

26 V 
38 
U 3 


53b 52V 52V— to 
81% 41U 41%—% 

,4 JES 

13 31 21 21 — % 

37 48% i ’ 

78 19 llto 10V + % 

ss 10% iff% io%— v 

2990 27% 28% 28V— b 
12 7b 7% 7b— b 
87 11 10% 10% 

831 95% 91to 93U _ 

2660 38V 37b X — V 
1374 14% 14V 14b 
42 V% 9% 9% — % 
11 18% 18b 16b 


10% •% Currlnc T.lOollX 
XV 30V Curtw I JO 39 It 

5P8 27b Cydcps uo 2J M 

23b 13% Oolta* 60 12 9 

16 9% DamanC 20 IJ 

30% 21b DanaCe 1JB 46 • 

8b 5% Donahr 19 

15 Sb Daniai ,18b L7 

95V 71b DortKr 424 4J 10 

70 38% DotoGn 11 

25b 12% Detent 

12V Ib DtoDn JO 2.1- 10 

19% 12b Doyco 24 IJ a __ _ 

40V 28% DoytMd 24 26 14 1113 37% 37 37b— % 

17 11% DOTtPL 2X0 122 7 2U 18% 18V 10% 

59% 45 DPLpf 7 JO UJ 410z 58b 58 58 +1 

58b 45 DPLPf 7J7 13J 23ta 38 58 54 + b 

t« 75% DPLpt USD 1X5 14502100% 98% 100% 

38 21b Don Pd J* IJ 17 182 33% 33b 33V + % 

33b 24% Deora 1-00 17 25 3084 27% 27 27 — b 

24% 17% DeJmP 1.92 7 S 9 397 34b 24V 24V — b 

47V 27 DettoAr JO U 7 l«7*41b 40% 40b 

7% 4 V Dottma 14 5V 5% 5% + to 

35b 19 DbrOis X227 16 BS134V14 34% + % 
Xb 17V DwiMt* 1J0 4J 13 77 X 25b 25V 
37% 28% DeSoto 160 46 11 57 35V 34V 34%— to 

17 11% DetEd 160 180 7 1B2D 18% Mb Mb — % 


72% 99 DatEpf 932 113 

82b 47b DttEpf 768 127 

80 48 DetEpf 703 12J 

25 19% OEpfF 275 112 

28V 20b DEprR 3J4 12J 

2596 19% DE PfO 3J3 128 

SSto 1? DEpfP 3.12 127 

24V X DEpfB 27S 11 J 

gb 27 V DEpfO 800 127 

27V lfb OEpWl 101 12X 

31b 24V DEprL 4XS 136 

31% 24b DEpfK 4.12 13.1 

ISb 13V DetEpr 2JS 1Z0 

- - u 


11 


M 74 74 +3% 

3Xz 81% 60b 80% + b 
20ta59% 39b 5Tb— to 
7 28% Mb 24b 
23 25b 25V 25V — V 
28 24% 24% 34V— to 
23 24b 24% 24to + % 
12 34b 34b 34b 
78 26% 28b 28V 
31 XV 26b 28% + V 
6 30% 30% 30% + b 
6 31% llto Jib + to 
5 10% 10% 10% + V 
1Q3 2) b 21 21 — % 

m% i4b in 

27 28% 27 — % 


S , 17% Dexter 

V 9% DIGtar 64 40 56 

28% 21V DKMopf 225 IJ 40 _ 

2% MV DtomS 126 9J 11 3351 19V 10% 19 

38% 34V DtaShpf 4X0 IB6 140 38V 37V 37V 

99 37 Dlafalds 1X0 28 9 921 X XV 30% +1% 

125% 77V Digital 12 484B 99b 96V W%— % 

57b 45V Dfsnov IX 16 49 574 74b 75 75 — 1% 

43V X DEI 200 8J 8 12 41% 41% *1% + % 

8to 3% Dfvrsln 4 23 5% 5% 5% 

14b c% Domoe .12 810 9 0V «% 

30V 21 to DomRa 272 9J ■ 503 30b 30b 30% — to 

21b 18 Donald 68 18 8 92 17b 17b 17b 

57V 35% Donley 1.18 2J 15 866 54b 53% 53V— V 

5* 2JV Darmv U0 U 12 103 28% Z7V 3 — % 

5% J2V Dover J2 23 13 783 XV X X— b 

Bb D5V DowOt 1X0 81 11 2941 Xb 29V 29V— V 

5T% Xb DowJn 78 U X 827 41V 40% 48% — % 

13% 10% Drove JO O 19 llto 11% lib 

23 1SV Drasr JO 39 14 783 20% »b 20b— % 

19V IMS DraxB 2X0 106 2 18% ISb 18% + to 

49% 23% Drsvfu* 60 IJ 12 195 47% 47V 47V + V 

58 43V duPant 3X0 SS 12 57X 55% 54% 54H— % 


36 31 duPrrtPf 050 18X 

4*b 39 duPntpf LSD HU 
BV 22V Duke? 208 76 
127 97 Duftgpf 475 4J 

79 64 Oulcapt STD MX 

73% 59b Duk* pf BX 11 J 
Xb 21% Dufcspt 269 HL2 
34 2B Dukepf 3X5 110 
75b 51V DuoBrd U0 3.1 
18% 11% DwaLt 2X4 IZT 
17b 14 Duo pfA 2.10 1U 
15V 12V Quart 2X0 UJ 
14% 12 Duqpf 2X5 12J 
18V 13 DuqptG 2.10 115 
17. 12b DuqprK 2.M 114 
> 43b Dugpf 7JS 1U 
.. , 8b DreoPt 60 *X 
Xb 17b DmAm 30 M 


68 IJ 19 


9 35b 35% 35VI + to 
23 4* 43% 43V 

8 767 33 32V 22V 

I 136V 134% 134% +1% 
25taM 79 19 

25ta 73 73 73 

11 24% 26b W. 

4 33V 33V 33V + to 
X 1391 72V 70b — 


14% 15% 14 
3530: 17% 17 17V 

ID* 15 19 

100* M 18 
lOta 15b ISb 
1 17 lib 
50ta54to 54 
18 12% 12% 

X Xb X 


n 

15b— to 
17 + to 

3b 

2618 + V 


40 28% EGG 

17V 14V EQKn 

31% 22b E5y*t JO IX M 

XV X EooteP 1X4 47 0 

Xb 12 Era 04 2J 

Bb 3% EostAIr 
3% 1% EAL wtO 

IV b EALwfA 
ItfV 6b EsAJr pt 
19% 8% EAlr pfB 

24b 9V EAJrpfC 
28% 21V EOBtGF IX 56 77 
20% 12b EastUtl 2X6 107 7 


724 38% 35b 34 — % 
14 17 M% 17 
718 27V 27 27b— V 

278 XV 23 22 — to 

MO 19V 19% 19b 
H34 Bb 0% 8b— to 
388 3b 3% 3b 
70 TV lb TV 
54 15b I4V 14V— V 
157 17% 17b 17% + b 
251 23V 23% 22%—% 
332 22% 22 22V + % 

“ 19b 18% 1 — 


78 80V EaKod 320a 50 11 5853 67 83V 64b— 2b 
52 40b EaKod wf 85 44V 42V 42V— 1% 

60V 37V Eaton 100 27 7 939 52% 51% 52b + V 

30% Xb Edllln XB 35 12 1916 25V 25b 23V + b 

37b 20V Eckerd 134 48 11 904 Xb XV XV 

39V 31b EdlsSr 160 40 11 70 E 3*V 38V 

18% 13 EDO 36 IJ 12 37 1SV ISb 15b— to 

34V 19 Edward JS 27 14 370 27V 27% Z7%— V 

23% 19V E PC dpt 275 100 1 22b 23b Zlb 

29% 2Sb EPGpt 279 1U 14 29 X% 20% 

73V 23% EPGpt 1090 20% 20b 28% + V 

K% 9% EITwo 14 X 14V 14b 14V— b 

UV 8b Error 36 36 2 I0V 10b Mb— b 

TV 2% EtocAs 33 4b 4% 4%— % 

TV 40 EMM 448 8 TV 0 

10b TV EMM Pf 1X0 9.9 4 10b 10b 10b 

28% 15 ElcttaS JOB 3 77 11 24V Xb Mb — % 

7b 11V ewn JO 5J 16 2 15V 15 IS — to 

8b 5% Eladnt 27 4V 6V 6V 

75 V SBb EmrsEl 26* JX 13 ISO 89% 80V (0V — b 

15% EnhcEn 1X7*107 143 17V 17 17b 

Entwin in 77 a a lib tt% ib — b 

1.14 47 M X 28% 28% X%— V 

S3 6b 6b 6b 
2 18V 18V 18V + b 
7 293 45 43% 44% +1% 


21V 16 

Xb 16b Eaufxm 
6b 3 Eaulmk 
17V llto Etonkpf 2X1 IU 
48 . an Eat Res 173 U 


14% 9b Eauitcn 
14% 8% ErtPTPTt 

22V 12% EosBsn 
24% 15V Essex C 
31% Wto Esfling 
20b 10 Ethyl* 
TV IV vIEvanP 


9 9 

30 29 14 
04 29 12 
XOb 30 12 
72 X9 9 
J6 23 11 


. 12% 12% 12V — % 
31 11V 11b UV + V 
8 19% IWto 19% — b 
X 23% 22% 23% + % 
153 10% 11% 10% + % 
272 30% 20b 30%+ b 
41 2V 2to 2to— to 


13V 10V Find of 
37b 19b FligtSf 
31V 14b FtaatPt 
<3 29V FtaEC 

37V 18V FtaPro 
18% 11% FksStl 
7b Sto FlwGen 
21 Ub Ftawr* JO. 22 18 
22b 141* FHror 60 U 
57V 4716 FoofoC UD 37 12 
51% 3* FordM 200 66 
12b HT6 FtDear L38 UJ 
67b sob FtHowd 164 IS 15 
15b 10 FaslWIi 04 JJ 13 
11V 8% FBXStP 68 77 ID 

35b 25% Faxtro UM 36 95 
22b 21V FMEPn 
11% 7b FMOG 209*217 


XV 13b FrptMc 60 
34% 21V FrWrn 60 
20V It Frueftf s 60 
3Tb 25 Frvtrfpf 200 
38% 20V Fuqua 00 


27 IS 
20 15 
ZB 5 
70 

IJ 9 


19 12% 12% I2H— W 
318 31% 33b 33b + b 
118 25 XV XV— to 
B 43% <3 43% + % 

2107 Xb 28% 28b 
X 15% 15% 15%— % 
TS7 4% 4% 4V 
110 19 18V 10V— to 

1575 18% 18b 18b— % 
_ 10 58V S4b S6V + V 

311808 41 40b 40b — % 

72 12% 12b 12b— % 
216 64% 64V 64V + to 
216 13% 13% 13V + % 
1*7 9 1% 8% — % 

345 27% 27V 27b— % 
179 27b 22b 22to 
204 9% 9b 


434 20% 2ff% 20% — to 
35 25% 25% 25% 

5« 22 21% 7TV 

85 2714 28% 28% — to 

93 31% 31% 31b + to 


Xb 18% GAP 
37b 25% GAT X 
34% 19b GCA 
77V 48% GEICO 
I0to 4 GEO 
13V 5V GF Cp 
Xb 35% GTE 
28% 22% GTE Pf 
21% 19% GTE Pf 
10 4% GalHou 

62Vj 38V Ganatf 
28% 1BV GocStr 
30% 10% Dearth 
1«% 13% GeJco 
10% 9% GemllC 
11% ID Getnil I 
47% XV GnCorp 
17b 14% GAInv 
46 to 29V GnBcxb 


700 31% 30% 31% + % 
1*6 30>A 30 30% + b 

2U 24% 23V 23% 

90 75% 75 75 

56 4% 4V 4V— % 

43 7% 7% 7b— to 

4447 40b 40 40b— Vi 

1 25% 25% 25% — % 
11 33V, 21% 23b— b 
51 SV Sto Sto— % 
448 STV 57b 57b— lb 
IX 25% 24% X — % 
XI 11% 11% 11b 
40 19 10% 19 + to 

642 10% Wto 10V— to 
JOe 17 KH 11% Ub 11b 

1600 30143 TZB 44b 43 44% +1% 

163*110 30 Mb 16V 14to 

1X0 20 ■ »42to4TV42to + to 


70s 6 11 

IX 4X 14 
12 

1X0 IJ II 


3X8 77 B 
2X0 71 
208 107 

100 26 X 
JO U 17 
00 15 17 
66 29 15 


XV 19V GOnms 00 U to 376 31V 30 30 — 1 

71 12b GfiDat* IS 164 14% 13% 14 — to 

*4 44V CeUvn 1X0 IJ 9 1633 69b 67b 60V 42b 


85% 48V Gan El 
85b 49% GflFds 
7 5V GGtttn 
9% 5% GnHm* 
14% 0V GHrotl 
14% 0% GftHous 
ISb Gnlrat 


220 18 12 4917 59% S*b 5*%— % 
2.50 4X 18 818 63 to 41% *1%— 1%‘ 
60a 9 J 35 6b 8b 4b 

13 54 7b C% 6%— b 

180 13% 13% 13b— b 

1* 9V 9 9 — % 

791 14% 14% 14% + M 

4414 SSto 5Zto 52V— M 


SS 


2 1 

_ _ u 

40% 47% GnMJIbs 2J4 4X 32 
85 81 GAM 5-DOr 76 5 

72 33 GMEn -18* J 

40 Xto GMat pf 375 10X 
52b 44% GMotpt 5X0 9.9 
9 3% GNC .18 20 X 

13% 7% GPU 8 

7»v 48V Gan Re 166 21 21 
5 GnRetr 7 

39% GnSgnl 1X0 8J 11 1401 43% 82 
Kb ID GTFlaf I JO 11.1 
Bb fto Gwraco 11 

28V 13b Gnfiod .10 6 27 

23% IS Gamfo 1X0 
a% 18% OB at 168 8X 
M 24% GanuPt 1.11 JJ 14 
27% 18 GaPoc JO JJ 22 
36 30b GaPc pfC224 80 

XV 22% GaPwpf 304 VIS 

X 25b GaPwpf 376 129 

21 to 17V GaPwpf 268 123 

21V 17 GaPwpf 252 121 

25b Zlto GaPwpf 275 US 

83 51 to GaPwpf 772 12J 

30b 20b GarbPs 1.1* 4X II 

23to 12V G*rttS .12 J 11 


9075 47% 86% 84b— lto 
414 85 63% *J%— V 

1 27% 37% 37% — b 

7 50b 49b 50b + % 

191 6V 6% 6% 

1411 12% 11% 12 + to 

770 74V 73V 73%— to 

112 12% 12b 12b 

_ 1 fl — b 

BOO: 11b 11% ll% 

12) 8% 4b 4b— b 





* Hi there , fella 1 1 Mir your G-shirtF' 


For our 1984 Annual Report, write*. 

Grow Chemical Eimipe N.Y.. Ouiiestr.ut K 
B-2630 .-Vanselaar. Belgium l)ept. Ci 

Grow Group 

Awlgrip Devoe. Ameritone. three of our well-known brand I names. 



35% 21b ICIfldS 1J0 A1 12 1258 32% 31% 31% 

19V 18% ICMP JX IJ 43 17V 17 17 
11% 8 ICN 98 433 10b 9% 9%— b 

X 22b ICN pf 270 *6 11 27b 97b 27b 

17V, 14 INAIn U2 116 23 !*b 18% 16b 

ISb 23 IPTtmn 42 25V Mb 25V + to 

XV 14% I RT P70 160 U 7 8 19% 19b l r 

37V 20% ITTGP 1X0 IX 11 7667 X 13% 33% + % 


JB 

260 


3* 60 


17 

JO J 1 


12b flb GfcmlP 
nb 5V GtbrFn 
27 18% GtffHIll 

82b 42% GlUefta 
17% 11b GtoooC 
8% 3% GtoWM 
25% 17% GtobMpflSO 176 
13b Bb GtdNug 
4 1% GUN wt 

01% 11 GW*TF 
34b 24% Gdrtctl 
29b 23 Goodvr 
19 13V GcrttnJ 

32b 19 Gould 
44to 36to Gruc* 

49 47 Graingr lj* 

17b >b GtARd 
18b 19% GtAtPc 
51 27b Qti-kln 

2Tb 15b GNIrn 
43b 31 GfNNk 
29% 16b GtWFfci 
T7to 11% GMP 
29% 18% Grevh 


83 16V 16b 18% + to 
2S0 21 20V 20% + % 

1 21 21 21 +% 
SM 31b 31 31 — b 

1047 21% 20% 20% — % 
111 25b 35 35b— to 

15 27% 27b 27% + to 

6 29% 29 29b 

51 21% 20to 20%—% 

7 21 2BV 20V — to 

MS 2Sb 25V 2Sto 
29ta82 81 to *2 

155 29% 29b 29V 
1*3 15V 15% 15b 
22 11% II 11 — % 

200 10% 10b 10V— to 

87 24% 24b 24% + to 
54S 61to 60b 60V— 1 
10 13 12% 12V— V 

329 4 3% 4 

47 19V ITto 19b 
SO 11V 11% 11%— to 
90 3 2% 3 

_ _ 1S74 X 29Va 29V + b 

168 5.1 14 UM 31 30% 30V 

160 83 7 1703 26V 25% X + to 

62 30 17 JM 15% 15% 15% — % 

68 3J 56 2149 21V 20to 20% — to 
260 7J 10 33*4 38% Xto 38V + to 
27 12 110 59% 50V SBV — to 
2X S 2140 14% 15% 1* — to 


0 

1X0 1.9 13 
165*107 7 
162 47 9 

J0 3J 9 

1-72 HU 9 
IX 47 11 


44to 37to Grevh Pf 473 11 J 
8b 2V Orel tor 
13% 0b GrawGS JD 27 
12% *v GruhEl xb J 
X 22% Grunui 1X0 13 
28% 24b Grempf 260 119 
Bto 418 enntal .16 IT 
27% X Gutlfrd 6B 10 
39b 25V* GilWst JO 
Xb llto GtilfRs 

30 16b GuHR pt IX 80 
T5to TO GftStOt 164 110 6 
30b 28 GHSUpr SX5 11* 

X 27 GH3U pr 400 12J 
11% 12% GAero 60s 46 24 
19% 14 Gultan JO 36 IJ 
27% 19% HaKFB IX 81 
a XV Halbtn IX 
1% V HOHwd X3 
11% 5V HaMrdpf 66 SI 
Hk 25V HamPi IX 44 9 
13% lib HorUS 10701 IX 
X 15% HanJI 164a *6 
Kto 27to Hondlm 1.12 27 IS 
27V T3V Handl wt 
20% ISb HandH M 36 M 
23b 18V Hama JO 21 27 
25 HarBrJ IX 2-0 14 

31 17b H Wind 9 X 1.9 19 

13V TV HamMl 25 

J3to I4to HtaRw A U 11 
35 22V Harris X 36 11 

1SV 10% HarGrn 7 

30% 19 Harsro IX 47 11 
3J% 23 to Hartmx IX 33 W 
16V 13% Notts* IX 11J 11 
23V 15% HowEI 164 74 10 
13% 8 HoreaA JO* 20 6 

34% 23b Hazlefn 
IM 9 HtttLab 
31 13V HlttlAs 

19V 10% HltUSA 
13% 9% Meara 
21% 13b HecJaM 
27 14% HoHmn 

15% H«Llta 
49 32 Hehn 

B 12V HatneC 
Bto IB MlHmP X IJ X 
6V 3% HemCa 
17% 11% Heminc JOe 74 
37V 27b Hndi IX £X 10 
16b 10U HerttCl 22 

X IX WrtICMUn £0 
T7b 18b HorSatn 14 

42b 28b Hershv IX 36 11 
10b Sto H * *a t on 
13b 9 H#stnpf 


17 18V 16V— to 

51% 50b 51% +1% 
17% 17b 17% + to 
X 3SW SSto— V 
2SV 25b 25b— % 

SS 17% 18% 1*%— % 

334 28b 27V X — to 

80Z 43 43 43 

211 5 4V 5 + % 

58 13b 12% TZ%— to 

253 9V 9b *%— to 

455 24% 25V 26b + to 

25V 2SV 2SV 


14 

215 


1 


14 SV 5b 5b— % 
_ . 32 22V 22V 22V 

24 12 2402 37% 3SV XV— to 
2J 14 2X 17to 14V 18V — % 
7 22V 21V 31V— lb 
1971 14% 14b 14% — % 
31 X Wt Z. 

37 34V 33V 34V + to 

306 IS 14V 14% 

19 M 15% 16 + to 

189 34b Mb Xb— 1% 
5J II 13*1 31b 30b 30b— 1 
69 X 780 1% Ib 1% + % 

80 Ub 10% 11 

TB4 31 38b X%— % 

38 13b 13% 13%—% 
30 19b 19b 1X8 

S 58 49V 49V— b 

25V. 25 25 — % 

X 19% 19% 19b— to 
II 19 19 19 

257 5T V 50b 50b— lto 
W 30V 29b 29%— to 
53B 9V 9% 9% 

X 77b XV 27V +1 
907 25% X 25b— % 
85 15V ISb 15b — to 
913 27b 27b 27% + V* 
73 32b 32b 32b + b 
8 15% 1SV 13% 

135 22b 22 22b 

47 W 9% 10 
101 25 24V 24V 

e wv io% i9% 

572 19% 19b 19% 

36 18% ISb 10% + to 
488 13V 12b 13b + V 
382 Mb lib 14% 

912 19 17% IBM— lb 

.. ._ 141 21% 21V 21% 

30 12 1023 47b 48b 48b— % 
“ 13 M% 14% 14% — to 

63 22b 22 22 — to 

27 6 4 6 

10 12% 12b 12b 
425 32% 33b 32b 
218 16M 15% 15V— to 
2 X S 26 — b 
1B5 14% Mb 16b 
153 40% 39V 39V— V 
22 6V 6V 6V 

i ii* iiv uv— b 


J0 16 14 
J U II 
32 
92 

X 2.1 
X 1J X 
08b 24 12 
36 IJ 12 
IX 


44V STV HewfPk 

32 

7 

14 

4944 

EZ3 

31b 

31% 


X ISto H«xca4 

JO 

30 

14 

92 

ftI 

2SV 

25b 


19% 12 HI9WOT 

SO 

36 

13 

3T4 

21% 

18V 

21% 


1 ' r \W\ ■ r ■ ■ ' 1 1 1 ™ 

.17 

10 

• 

175 

11 

10b 

18% 



X 

23 

13 

191 

w '•.% 

Y \ ^ 

22 


;/ >rW. - Jii'j. --TB 

UO 

26 

15 

3135 


g 

48% 

+1H 

■ BBi m 

631 

16 

11 

44 

fTTj 

P 1 l r 0 

31% 


54% uv HdlkJav 

IX 

16 

13 

712 

1 '• Lj 

f 

53b 



158 18% 17% 18 + to 

313 28% 23* 24% + % 
51 Bto I 8 
891 Xto 23V 23V— % 
23 IM 18b Mb— b 
834 53* 53b 53% + b 


12 HomaD 32 

25V 11% HfflFSD 7 

9b 7 HimG pf 1.10 136 
a 20% Hmstka X J 55 
17% 8V HrttaFn X 26 5 

60b 43% Honda JOe J 10 ..... . ... 

84% 46% Honwell 1.90 30 10 2TB BV 35 55b + b 

35b X Hocvru 14M U 17 195 33 32V 27V 

XV 19b H rzn Bn 1 .12 40 9 32 25% 23b 29% + to 

■■ D HrzBnpf 2J8all6 30 25b 25b 25b 

10 3% Horfaan 130 <V «to 4b— b 

40V Xb HaSPCP X IJ 12 2280 40% 40b 40%— U 

3ST.* 22 Hotel In 2X W U 39 XV 28b 28% + % 

37b 21% HsuOllM J8 26 14 170 34V 36% 34% + V 

19V 13% HouFaa 08 3J 9 238 IS 14% 14V— b 

37% Ub Hamlet US U 8 1984 XV 33% 3Z%— to 

77V 41 HOlnt Pi 83 U 3 74% 74% 74% + b 

25* 18% Houlltd 264 100 6 2889 25% 25V 2Sto + to, 

54b 39% HauNG 2.12 36 18705 SBb 47V SBb +11*4 

8V 8 NduOR 1 -96*71 J 83 9b 9b 9V— lT 

23V 13% Howicp AO 23 21 X 18% 17% IBV + to 

27% 30b Hubbfd 2J9 U 12 X 34V 34b 34b— % 

3% 9% HuHy JO 19 9 ITS 10% 10% 10%— V 

13b HuOflTl 0S 33 1839* U% 15 15b— % 

25 17V Huahsp 32 16 9 M T7b 17% 17V— to 

33 21% Human X 26 IS 1779 27% 27V 27b— V 

27b IBto HuntMf X 71 16 15 25% 25% 25% 

41% 23% HuttEK gO 26 13 2570 33% 32 Kb— lb 

2B% ISV Hydrat 260 70 9 IS 27% 27 27% + to 


63V 40 ITTpttC 400 
81% Xb ITT PfO 5 X 
83 42b ITT PH 4X 

21V 15V IU Ini IX 
43b 30% IdahoP SX 
21% 13b I deal B 
25% 17% ItlPawr 244 11.1 
11 13b UPowpf 104 IU 

lfb 14b llPgwpf 2.1B 126 
19 14b llPuwpf 2.13 11J 

19 15 llPuwpf 3JI 13.1 

35b 27V llPowpf Alt 12.1 
52V 40% llPowpf SJ 5 WJ 
Xto 21V ITW9 M 26 1: 
40V Z7V ImpQim 269* U 
9b 5% ImriCp _ 
tfi* ■% INCO X IJ 
42V 49 IndIMpf 1J6 T2J 
17% 14 IndIMpf 3.15 12J 
10% 14% IndIMpf 235 12 A 
28% 17b ItldlGsa IX TA 
MV 5b Iftoxro .14 26 
25b 13V Infmfc 
X 35b InogrR 
37b 27 V IngRpf 
28% 19% InldStl 
48V 38% InMSf Pf 4H1I7 
21% 14 Irtsllco 16I0I50 10 
10b 3% ImpRs 
24b 11% IntgRsc _ I 
29V 19 IntpRcf 363 116 
HH 42 IntgRpf 869*102 
37b 2Sto IntgRpf 4J5 13J 
13V 7VU ItMFn 

19 15% ItCPSe 
70b 55 Intaxn 

151 to 120 intar pf 
13% 9b Infrto 
53% 41 Intrtk 
14b Bb Intmed 
3<b 14V IntAtu 
138V 99 IBM 
24V 15V IntCtrt 
29b 22% IntFtaw 
11V 5b IntHorv 
7b t% InfHrwt 
SO 23b InTHpfC 
42 20V IntHpfA 

34V 17% IntH pfD 
43V 32% IntMIn 260 
39% 23 IntMutt 1J4 
gV 44 IrrtPapr 140 
17% 9% IntRcs 
54% 32V IntNrth 148 
JS « InffffpUCLSO 60 
41V 27b IntpbOp IX 17 13 
17V 10 IntBofcr 
20b 15to InrstPw UO 90 8 
X 14% tnPwpf 128 IU 

20 14% lOwuEl 1J0 96 0 
30% 21% lowtIG 134 BJ 7 

17 lowfllpf 121 11.1 



80to *0b— Mfc 

lib !■%— % 


41b + b 
X + b 

is:: 

33%-b 
17 —to 
17b— to 
17% IBto + % 
llto llto + b 
x x — b 

STV 57V + % 
32b 32b— % 
35V 38% + to 
... BV 8% + to 
4387 13b 13to 1316— to 

U 27* XV W 

309 7b 4% 7 

4807 28V 25 24b +lb 

403 44V 45V 

JLS* 21V 
7 44b Xto 

IX lfl 17% 

431 5% J% 

19 21b 21% 

22 25V 25V 

10 44b Xb 

43 2Tb 31% . 

70 UV 12% 12% — b 

1100110 58 10% 10V lib 

368 40 12 1494 49b 5b 

7.73 SJ 3 147V IX . 

X SJ 4 KGB 1T% WH 11% + V 

1X5J 7 49 50b 50 » — b 

390 9% 9to *to 

97 06 0 4 10 M 10 

040 35 I211ST7 134% 125b 125%— IU 
30 IJ » * 23 22V 22V— to 

1.12 01 15 502 77V 27b 27b— % 
2200 av Ib 0V + to 

157 s% 5b Sb + to 


+ V 


32 

260 SJ 15 
235 76 
60 13 


to 



49% +1% 




7 

8 

48b 

X 

48V 

3ZV 




97 

2/ 

24b 

27 

47 

11 

ua 


30% 

H 

05 


25 

2/to 

34% 

34% 

09 

a 

1441 

50V 

fito 

fiV 


i/ 

259 

13% 

13% 

13V 

08 

9 

4741 

53% 

50b 

Sib 


13% 9% I 

39% 33% IrvBks 
31b X JWTa 
34b 23b J River 
24% 13b Jomswi 
13V 10% JopnF 
« 26% JoffPii 

88V MV JerCpf 

£ iL JwCgf 

57 45b J*rCpt 

100 90 JerCpf 1360 136 

?S. 78to JorCpf 1160 116 


368 

IX 
1.12 

S 

104*122 
1J2 30 
9J6 136 
860 117 


5 175V 175% J75V ... 
337 40V 39V 40V + % 
X 16% 16 14% 

55 2UV Wb “S— to 
120RI 19% 19% IQb 
W9 19V 19% 19V + % 
77 am 30% 30% 
40Bz2ffV 20V 20V + V 


IowoRb 168 90 B S3 33V 32b 32% + b 

Ipalro 364 BJ 9 120 33V 35% 35V + to 

11 IT 173 II W% U 
5.1 7 341 39% 30b 30b— V 

37 1* B2 30% 30V 30% — V 
23 B Z33 26% 2SV X 
6 IB 220 22V 21V 21V— % 
73B 11% llto 11% 

157 39V 39to 39b— to 
100: 47b 47b 47b 

43Bz SBV 50 50% +lto 

WBta 57 S3 57 

9ta 90b 97 97 

— 500: 95% 95V *5% + to 

M% 12V TerCpt 2.10 112 31 14V 18b 18% 

9% 5% Jewtcr _ 20 ISO 9% 9V 9V + % 

4X6 X JahnJn — — “ 

44V 37b JatmCn ._ 

»% 21% Jorgan IX 36 10 

X% U% Jestans X 13 14 

27b 21V JoyMtg IX 17 14 


IX 26 15 3279 46 42% 42% —1 

164a 47 ■ 392 31% 39b 39% 

11 24V X18 20% + to 
177 XV 23b 24b + b 
199 34% 34V 24% + b 


lWi 

IBto 


X 18 


460 126 
IX 42 


7% KDt 
9% KJJMs 
. 33 KM! pf 
41b 27b Kmart .... _ 

« to 98 KN Ena IX 17 IB 
14% JZV KdfarAl .151 
43 54 KOI57pf 475 0J 

OT4 M% KofaCo X 16 
20V 15V KatC pf 1 J7 17 
14 8% Kanad X 46 

X 14b KCtvPV. 236 112 
31 25 KCPLpf ISO 123 

34V 79 KCPLpf 035 HI 
UV 14V KCPl.pt 230 IU 
20 15b KCPLPf 2J3 IU 

54% 34b KCSau IX 26 
19% 12b KenGE 236 117 
37V Xto KanPLf 268 8.1 
22b IB KoPLof 2J2 105 
45 IB Katvln 
115 X Katypi 
20 10V KauiBr 

Mb 13% Kautaf 
50V 29b Kellogg 
34V 22.. Keltwd 
Sto % Kanaf 
2Bb 19% Kan/ni 
27 20% KyUtll 

MV 10 KerrGI 
24b 17% KerGof 
34b XV Karr Me 
27V 14b K*v8k 
19% 14 Koyslnt 
34V Xb Kidd* 

53% 39% KlrnbC, 

XV 73*. KnohtRd 36 
2M« 17% Koowr 23B 
29V 19V Kolmar 32 


1J6 

lS 

IX 

IX 

tS 

iiS 


75 tb 0V SV 

151 18% 14% 14b 
12 37% 37b 37b 
9 2043 33% 33% 33%_ % 

12 39b 39V 99b + to 

2074 13% 13b 13% — to 

7 54% 54% 54%— % 

382 16 15% 15b + % 

2 15V 15% 15V + b 

394 9 9% 0% — b 

5 774 21 to 20% Zlto— to 

lOQz 31 31 31 

lOOtaX 33b 26 +1% 

4 18b 10b 10b + to 
4 19% 19% 19% — % 
• 74 69 48V 48% + % 

4 1974 17% 17 17to + to 

0 59 38% 34% 34b— to 

4 32 22 

.. 323 35V 34V 35b + to 

16 2 09% 09% 09V + % 

26 5 X 15to 15% 15% 

97 3 15b 15b 15b— to 

36 13 SM 47% 4*b Xb— lto 

29 7 21 31b 31 31 — to 

99 lto 1 Ilk 

37 15 9 22 21% 21V 

9.1 9 45 27 38% XV — Mi 

47 42 10% 10b 10b— to 

93 5 18% 10% 10% 

30 X 10CC 32b 32 32 — % 

« 1 41 24b XV 28b 

ZJ 17 23 17b 17b 17to + b 

36 9 320 33% SIV 33V— % 

40 10 1X1 53V 52b fib— V 
2J 15 1175 3» 32V 32% 
as 52 rn Xto 2Sb 24b + b 
16 16 SO 17b 16% 16V— b 


Xto 17% Kopor* X 46 X 1444 17% 17b 17b— % 


94V KopprpfMX 10.1 
18 12% Korean 

« Xto Kroger 260 40 11 
27 11 KuNmi JB U If 
fib 41b Kvocer JJ* 6 S 
23V 13 KysOT X 07 6 
XU 22% LN Ho 277*105 10 
16V 7% LFE 

'SJ? « LFE Pt JO 46 
17b 12% LLE Ry 2.10*156 
4V 2 LLCCp 
] 2 0 LLCPf 

17V 0% LTV 

»» IBV LTV pt Ut 130 
« Xb LTV Pf STS 93 
Uto 13 LTV dI IX B6 
T7 10b LQuM 70 

2» 14V LOdGs IX 76 4 
«% *% Lotora* 30 26 

31V 73 Lsfrgpl 204 101 
Mto 9to Lomuri 3* 23 13 
4b IV LmnSei 101 

Ub 10V LuwJUrt 96 45 15 
LgqrPf X 1.1 10 
2XA 3M LacrPof 267 117 
5»% 37b LaarSg IX 9.9 V 
LaaRm * 00 2.1 M 


27 

X 

7 

B6 

1 

232 

10 

I 

7303 


S4% Xb LswyTr 
39V 21% LmGnt 
ISto 9 LasMa 
21b 15b LnPW 


3 99V 99V 99V 
U 13b 13% 13b 
923 43b 41% 41% —lb 
~ 28V XV 28b + to 
42 42 42 

17b 14% 14% — b 
24b Xb 28b 
18b 16 16 — to 

10b Mb Mb 
MV 14% 14b— to 
2U Sto 214 + % 
10 IB 10 + to 

9% 9% 9V— Ik 

200 Zlto 22V 27% — % 

3 54 34 54 — 1 

206 14% 14b 14b + to 
712 IM 13% 13% 

27 21% 31% 21V 

4 7% 7% 7% 

1 Xto 24V> 24V + to 
47 UV 9% 10V + % 
10 3H 3% 3% + Ik 
50* 13V 12b 12b— b 
X 10b Wto 10b + b 
31 24% 24% 34% 

ISO 47V 46% 46V— 1 
0 19 18% 19 


160 53 12 2075 29 30b 2S%— % 

.92 20 19 X 38V 30b 38b — to 

x ij a 33 13% ub 13b 

0B 23 9 1UI 2QV 20b 20% + to 


4to 3to LofiVol 
37 33 LVInpf 

isv 13b Lahma 168*116 

15b 9% Lennar X 16 U 
24V TOto LeucNtS 4 

34% 23 Lev 151 IX 50 29 

58% 42V LOF 1-32 36 7 

lfb 4BV LOF pf 47 S 4.9 

3Zto 22b LibtvCp 72 2J 17 

BOV 53 LINK UD 4J 11 

42 15V Limited 32 6 27 

45b Xto UncffU IX 46 12 

23% llto LtacPt 1X01&1 

to 01% utfon UO 36 10 

9to:i0%'Unonpf 260 «7 - .. _ _ 

53b 32% Lockhd 60* IJ 8 3053 47b 44% 48% — b 

42V 30to Locflte « II 11 31 29V 28V 28*— % 

51V 23b Loews! IX 23 13 7202 Xb 43to 43V, -2% 

35 >9% LKBtam X 6 19 X 31% 31b 3Vto — % 

X 19% LomFIn 1.1* 36 13 

25V 14% LomMtS 264 UO 10 

2% 2 LomMwt 
24% 17% LnSfor 1.90 06 4 
92V 00 LaneS pf 0X 07 
S2b 46 LanaS pf 5J7 11.1 
IV 3V LILCo 
X lib LILpfl 


1W 2% 2b 31- to 
6 2415 X M —2 
193 13% 13% 13% 

32 13% 12V 13V— % 
11 20% 20% 20% 

2924 XV 33% 34 + V 

142 XV 43V 43V— % 
0 Xb 49 49 

15 31 31 

1» J7 75 
771 41% 40V 
394 40b 39% 

13 22V 22 
841 48% 47 
73 23 


75b -1% 


14b LILpfE 
43 21b LILpU 

X 23V ULpflC 
20b 0b LILpfX 
30b f LILpfW 
20% WlULBW 
XV 11V LiLufU 
19b BV LJLpfT 
15% 4 ULPfP 
17b 7 LILPfO 
29V 17 LmraOs 14 

33V 22 Loral 08 16 17 
15 10% LcGeni J5 47 10 

3B 22V La Land IX 2J 11 
»V» 17 LoPdc J0b 41 37 
32b 20% LaPLpf 460 I5J 
23% 14% LaPLpf 3.14 144 
39U 23% LotnrGs 204 L5 I 
50 X Lowtos IX O 7 
X 14V Lawns 36 10 IS 
25% 10% Litoral 1.14 56 12 
32 33% mams S6 1.9 10 

20V 15b LucfcvS 1.14 01 10 
14 10b Lufeons 06' 35 10 


979 32% 32% 30%- % 
X 24% 24V 24b + to 
140 2V 2b 2to 
im Zl% 33b 23% + % 
2 94 96 96 +4 

5 «to Xto av * V 

1710 4b 5% 5%- V 
10002 H 21 22 

490s 41 41 41 

101X41% 41V 41% 

42 17V 17 17 —to 

2 17 17 17 — to 

18 17V 17 17 —to 

« 30b 20 20% — % 

3 14b 14V 14V — to 
9 13V 12V 12V— V 

12 15M 14% 15b + V 
2M 27V 24% XV— 1 
152 29% 29b 29b 
7V 11% 11% I1%— % 
740 35% 35% 35% + % 
340 19% 19% 79% — % 
X 31% 31b 31b 
X 22 21% 22 + to 

222 28% 2B% 20%— % 
IU Xto 40% 46% 

311 34% 24b 34b— V 
579 21 20% 20% 

507 28 Mb 22 +1 

9*1 19% W% 19b— % 

4 IM 13% 13% — % 


M 


23b 15b MACOM J4 10 19 I960 11% 17% 17V— % 

55% 30V MCA X 17 X 018 51% 30% 5TU + % 

M% 14% MCorp 100 4J 4 1355 20% 39b 20% 

41% M MCorpf IX 95 5 37b 37 37— b 

14% 7V MDC 32 29 8 34 llto Wto II 

33b X MDU 2J4 77 I 32 33b 33b 33b 

42 34 MEI JB IJ 14 238 37% 37 37% + % 

15V 9to MGMGr 06 36 37 75 MV 14b 14% 

Mto 10 MGMUa JO* IJ 1090 14U IM 13V— % 
5V 2b MGMuwf W »i 1 3to 

27V 17b MGMHo 00a 2J IB 533 27 26% 27 +to 

25% 17b MB Up Tit 37 17% 17% 17%—% 

30 13% Maanll 55 U 16 904 29V X Xto— % 

53% 38b Macy 1.16 26 II 997 45% 44% XV— % 

42 36 Macypf 035 lEl iota <3 42 42 

T9 11% ModRra 47 llto 12 UM 

39% 34 MaotCf IX 26 7 W035V35%35%+% 

29b 2% MBtAst 1868C 730 2% 2b 3% 

23b 12b Manhln j*>2J 01 52 isv ub «b— to 

21% 13% MafiHt 32 17 17 X 18% 18% 18V— V 

25% uto ManrCs .14 Jii 10 22b 22 22% — to 

41V 22b MfrHan 320 U 5 1351 37 X MV— b 

SSto 41 MfrHpf 053*12.1 4 52V 53V 53V 

55to 40 MfrHpf £87*116 153 49b 49b fib— to 

10V sto vIManvt 3 775 5to 5V 5V + V 

72% IBto VIMfTVlpt 107 IBto IBto 18% + to 

33b 21 MAPCO IX 29 I 771 34% 33b 34% +lto 

4V 3 Marat: 91 3% 3% 3V 

2V % Wared* 20 % b % 

35% 19% Mar Mid IX 06 8 » 33% 33% 33V + % 


23 X 
32 30 

7 15 
37 IB 
33 
1.1 15 
16 14 
IJ 14 
90 13 


-54 

300 

1J4 

.13 

64 

JO 

IX 


Mb isto Morions 
12% 9V MarlcC 
87% 60 MarHof 
“ 35V MrOiM 

54% Xto AAartM 

Ub 1% MaryK 

31b 22b (Wasco 

13b 7% ManMr 

20 15b MOiM 

3b 2 MasayF 

27V 2ffV MaaCp 

UV 9to Mcrainc 

00b 51% Matsu E 

14V «b Mental 

10V 4V Motel wt 

32V 10% Mattlpf 150 83 

15b 9to Mom 4 

49b 32V MarD* IX 19 10 

X Uto Maytg 20Oa S3 ID 

31b 25b McOrpf 120 77 

UV 20to McDr Pt 200 11.1 

31b 23b McDfil IX 40 IB 

11% 4% McDr) Wt 

10b 4b McDM JO 26 IB 


IX W6 
132 110 
J3r 0 to 
11 


43% 40V McOnP* X 
Mb 48% McOnD IX 
65 31% MCGEd 260 

«V 3«VMcQm IX 
39% 1X4 Mclntg 
45V 32% McKern 200 
72% 55b MeK pf IX 
ISb 10 McLm 
6b 3% McLeawt 
ZSV 20 McfMI IX 
41V 27b Mead IX 
34V 13iv Mans 34 
34V 24b Metitm 36 
51b 33b Mellon 300 56 
27 23V MXIanpfZX 1BJ 


599 34% 33 33%— 1% 
450 9b 9% 9b 
747 8314 82V STV— to 
231 45V 45 45V— V 

1354 51b SO 50V —lb 
158 TOV Ub 10b 
344 29% 29b 29b— % 
77 13b 12% 13 — to 
30 Wto 19% 19b 
367 2b 2 2 — % 

40 27V 77b 27b + to 
42 UV 11% 11%—' b 
W7 » 58% 58% + b 

409 13b 12b 12% — % 
85 9b BV BV — to 
1 30b 30to 30b + to 
28 13% 13 13 — H 

404 48% 48b 4ffU + V 
103 49b 49 49 — V 

101 28% 28% 28b— b 
* 23% 23b 23% 

423 27% 27V 27V— V 
16 Mk Bb Bb— V 
14 8% 8V BV- % 


10 13 1853 60b 59% 59V— IV 


45b 31% MttvHi IX 
XV 43 Merest IX 
75 v, trerek uo 
68V 40% Mordth IX 
38% 22 MerLvi, X 
3to 2 MraaOf 
22 Uto MmaPt 
15V 77% MeaaR 1. 


2J 9 500 78 74% 75 — b 

II 100 21 85- 88% 44% 

3.1 14 833 40V 45b 4Sb + % 

5 35V IS M — % 

149 XH. 43% 43V 

5 70V 70V 70%— % 

.45 13 11% 11% — % 

132 4 3% 3% 

U XV 27% 77%—% 
600 37% 37b 37b + % 

105 18 T7V 171k 

146 28V 37V 27% + b 

8 17X1 49% 47% % —lto 
IS 78% 28% 34% — to 


53 12 
76 


34 7 
36 8 
U II 
27 


740116 7 


274 


30 13 58* 43% 47b 42b— V 
22 10 133 58% 50% 58% + % 

33 IS 3197 101b V9V 99V— 7 
17 14 304 80% 80 80%—% 

26 21 3198 29% 29 29 — % 

484 2b 3% 2V— b 

4 2 IM 17% 17V 17V— to 
62 * 30b 30% 30% + to 

20 6% 4V 4% 

13% 3% SV— M 
100: 29 29 X —1 

400: 58 58 58 —1 

130: 51^ 58% 58b + b 

113 2% 2% 2% 

4 19b W% 19b— % 
1 ISV 15V 15V 
11 6% AV 4%— % 

1995 51V 48V 51 +9% 

*952 13% 12% 13% + V 
53 18% 18V 18% 

58 29% 28V 29 - V 
11 OV 13b 13b — b 


Bb Sb 
4% 2V Mestefc 
X 31% MtEptC 3J0 130 

57 46 MIEofF 8.13 105 

50V, 40b MtE pfH BJ2 14J 

3V 2b MaxFd 61# 06 

*b 17 MhCn of 265 IU 
18b 12% MctiER IX 96 9 
TV 4% McUbj M .9 X 
52% 33V MMron 268 46 9 
14% 9V MM5UI IX 136 5 
22% 14% MMRnrn ‘ - 
»k 22 MWE 
17b 11% MIHnR 
86 73 MMM 

34% 23% MtnPL 
18% *% MJsnlrrs 
W* 15 8 AdPS« 

2.. 134 *o£SPf 2X 116 

8 '< Mitel prUt ,w 

30^30% + % 

9% 5% MoflCpt 11 tt 4b 6b 6b 

12 T SSSSS *“ M ,a '£ ^ S 

14% MunPw tOO 9.1 11 383 X* 31% 31% * 

IBM 14% MgnU lJOalU 41 17% l»b 171? — % 
8 88 9% 9 9 — % 

13 934 MV 52V S3 + ” 
,]* + b 

1*4 3Sj% 35% 35% + b 


IX 46 13 2305 77 75 75 — _ 

276 8,1 8 IX Mb 33% 33V 

1 J3b 57 7 « ^ ^ =3^:5 

JB U%S 

25* .5% Sb JV 


9% 6V MONY __ 

Mb 34% MoareC 260 
17V 11V MereCwl 
2M* lBHMoreM IX 01 14 
20% 2312 MsrM pt 2JD 89 


115 38% X 

(Continued m Page 12) 


























■'25""!5* SSSSf S' 

■sr. « skt- a- 

w* OTC atK* p.tt 
PM Qttwrmttt*ti p,u 


TOURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 




3T 


XeiaUiSStitnint 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


Page 11- 


WAU. STREET WATCH 

Are the Market Doldrums 
Al Calm Before ike Storm? 

By EDVARD ROHRBACH 

International Herafd Trfoms 

ARI& — Remember when Wall Street used to bc fun2 
Stocks would soar, thea no»divc,'quly to rise again — 
generally i*epmg investors on the edges .of their roller- 
coaster seats. V ou got your money's worth, even if there 
'was precious Httle of it left after allthe wild swings. - 
UntiTMonday of this week when the Dow dropped IS points, 
the average had e frqrtto t through 27 straight trading sessions 
. without moving at least 1 percent im or down from the previous 
day's dose. 

It was the ma^ket’s most lackluster performance in five years. 
It came doseio out-pawning the mooein rettord (going bade to 
1970) whim stocks slept 36 ses- — 


TbeKeveweH 
come oat of this 
period ol dullness 
da tfaenpeide.’ 



sions - without a 1-percent 
- mom, batik in the spring of 

;l9TL-V-3.-; . 

"And as boring as the mar- 
ket has been ba the surface, 
it’s been equally boring under- 
neath,” swliszb Binnyi Jr., 
heaid of equity maiketianaiysis 
at Salotaon. Brothers Inc^ who • 

■'Iwb accurately forecast .the tech offoflow-through that has char- 
acterized Wall Street’s shon-but-sweet advances over the test 
year and a hall. . 

. i. “If there is any real move m stocks'about to take place now," he 
added, “wedoot see anysigns of ii” 

He pointed to the .firm's computer profile of daily activity 
winchshows that even on idativdy strong days since March 20, 
with the Dbw moving 5 to 10 pomtsJMoc trading of 10,000 shares 
or saatt by big institutional investors has' beat weak. Even in 
Monday*ssbarp decline, he said that die reason was not as much 
aggre sanytsefling as it was lack of buyers. 

stock A to buy stock B,”*he ^S^^you arc^^gto have area! 
expansion in tins market, youTL senevidence that new money is 
nwmgm.’* 

What stocks investors areputchasmg also reflects t h^mark etis 

irianraacc issues and nvwfn g m^r of technology.** 

However, John Menddson, head of Dean Witter Reynolds 
Inc.’s market analysis groorp, said he believes that Wall Street is 
about to drake itself out rfthedoldrnms- “ArcioveisuninineiiC 
he said, “you’re just about lookingat it here.** 

E observed that while the Dow has continued to stagnate; 
the New Yarik' Composite and Standard & Poofs 500 



Mf aU-time highs test Thursday, while the number 
of woek^oew highs among stocks on the New York exchange 
was the hugest ia 10 weeks. 

. *Th^ JoScates gathering strength,” he said. “And 1 bdievc 
wel come oat of.tms period of dullness on the upside^. 

Mr. MendHson, who has predicted several major market 
■: dedmes ^md advancesin mcent years, pointed out that so far in 
' .1985* thebtoad market has gone up twice the Dow’s 5-52 percent 
Jain. He ated the New Ycik Ctomposite, up 9S7 this year, and 
fee 5,000E«tock Wflshireindec, up 1039 percent 
As la ooctrpxian, the cumst sentiment he sees prevailing on 
* Waff Street of “extraordinary caiitkxn” is also trulhsb. With the 
's ’ board averages so high and other phases such as low inflation, he 
said, “You’d think investors would be fairly optimistic.” 

... _ — ■ * — “ investment strategist at Morgan 

thing good is braving for stocks 
Tfc -qaotod Mceattd Bealtdk, the 


«♦» 
S:;i 231* + H 

■vsLn. 

5* * 

rt <i 

rtf 4 *-* 

IT IT - W* 
IT IT Jfc 
JO 3B-4— I* 

km 

as ™ 

a s*s 

Ifc a 

la-- 

WB » 

(«Vk IT* — W 
13* IS*- * 

: z j 


famous Spanish bttBfighter called BICordobes. about uninspired 
• CO maa MdoaFagal^CaLI) 


3& 

JM 

* ST 

, If* 

1 s* 

l ST 
. 14* 
. U* 

‘ a2* 

IIP 

* 44* 
42 

« n 

* ^8i 

A an 
«k IS* 
M 1«* 

* 73 

* g* 


£ + 5 


— H 

+ * 

— * 

— U 

— * 

+ * 

— v> 

— * 
— * 
— * 

— * 
+ * 
4> * 

+IW 

+ * 
—1* 

— * 

— H 

— * 
— * 
~ * 

+.* 

-Ik 
4- * 
— * 
— Vk 

— * 
+ * 
- * 
- * 

— * 
— M 
— * 
-M* 
— M 


Currency Rates 


yC , to* interbank rates on April 30/May 1, exdudmg fees. 

Offkxi feangi for Aiwtedam, Bnweh, Frcnkfixt, MSan, Ports. NewYork rates at 
: V>. 7 KM. 


> teMWd «US3 71MB 

. WMiil MMZ It* 

i UateflM • 13» —r 

MDW V .. XT75S0 S4SU0 

HnrYiteU. . MW 


.' Y5047S 31 MS 

. la un 
1 iB«ai ■ ' VMS wws 
ism- uacon unuer 


20,1423 

XMT 

O&W 

11335 

KUO 

(US’ 

isn 


M. B 
NOtAvolMMi 

un IMM* 17MS 
am* u uk IMS' 

IUI73 14SUD 435 

3»Jn 54i» 

MS ZMM 151 
•M AvoUobM 
MM WU4- 7131 
7JM* M3B»* 7JJW 
431H V43M1 15335 

NA . HJO. MOT 


W*. BJF. 


*s. na 


- - 2105 3473* 

AXT* Tlf3** I3»* 
77415 12205 30930 

3172 74L2Q 73SB 

SXQ 24225 2S222 


9429 

4.15$* 1XQ04* 

4SJ032 um WAV 
NA NA 34UM 


Dollar Valuea 


OAM 


UM 
MM 
AM 
050- 
UM 
1173 

• MM9 nriOtBpirtte — 4AM 
UBM O W M Mia *— IK* 
41UW KMKMt 7J0O 


Cnrrwcy 


IAH mt 
•Mil aratf 
asm kmbw 
MM 
MW 


9377 


ter 

DM Bart*. ' UM 

Ml IT inn tl««ii»nn T 12215 
93270 DAMS lAKalWl 13JI1 
■3019 IHQ LMmina U770 
24HS AMS >a.wae UZJI 
MB- Ml SwMLknflo 939 
AS DM51 TWaoM 3M2 
TMM DMM TMW D47S 
MM3 93m ttAJLd Man 3473 


;-;- v vtnvffiM:U3 imbe • • 

- {alCnmnarctallrooCtbS Amount* laaial to boYC«« round {cl Aroowrt»i»«d*dlo buy on# doBart’) 
4>JS AM* W KB W um or UK tri Units of U3M 
.-a-HAMMWiMiNA^nMiMinob* - . 

.. 'i'SMreao: Mhosm dp Imri m CMnm***): Banco eormaarc M M ttoHona tMtkmii Omntcu 
. souk (Mi n* Yortfj flaw MMaaaH te Av* {Pan*}; IMF (SOW: Banmm Ant* 1 
S-siS *****noMaxx* tnanottammi ItBnor, rtyoi, tBrfxanX Otbgrdato from HMMnmdAP. 




i 


Interest Rates 


i|Egrocurrency Deposits 




t . 


;^ 4 siaii Dollar Rates 

i«*. . f i 

bd -•* ; . '•*••* 

RMKX 


iP 



4 mat. 
9-W* 


Bank Soto Rate 
Call Mmy 
*i4bv nraotur* an 
3-mnih Interval* 

t Mt aan n! no* . 
OattMomw 
4Mov Inteteonk 


»*-f* 


U.K. Sets 
Price for 
BAe Stock 

Level Is Higher 
Than Expected 

Bob Hagerry 

Intonations! Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The govenuiMn 
announced Wednesday a higher 
than expected price for its 48-per- 
cent shareholding is British Aero- 
space PLC. 

A! 37S pence ($438) a dure; the 
offer price was just 5 parent below 
Tuesday’s closing price of 395 
pence on the London Stock Ex- 
change. On Wednesday, BAe 
shares slipped 5 pence to dose at 
390, down 42 pence from the high 
readied last month. Some invest- 
ment analysts had expected a dis- 
count of around 10 percent to the 
market price. - 

‘Tt’s very keenly priced," said 
Wyn Ellis, an analyst at the Lou- 


& Co. He warned that a 
market downturn could easily send 
BAe shares below the offer price. 

Because the issue already is un- 
derwritten by five British merchant 
tumfce the government is guaran- 
teed its proceeds of about £360 
million (S442.8 nrilKoa}. Bat a 
plunge in the market price would 
leave underwriters and investors 
with losses on the transaction and 
sour the market's mood ahead of 
further planned sates of state- 
owned companies, notably British 
Airways PLC 

Tim pricing appeared to reflect a 
desire to avoid charges that the 
government was selling state- 
owned assets too cheaply. Such 
charges arose after the government 
sold half of the shares in Britidt 
Telecommunications PLC last No- 
vember. British Telecom shares 
now are trading at about 70 percent 
above the government's sale price. 

The BAe sale, analysts say, is 
extremely unlikely to become a 
rimifar bonanza for investors. 

Applications for toe BAe shares 
are due by 10 AJM. on May 10. 
Buyers wifi be required to pay 200 
pence a share when they apply and 
175 pence on Sept 10. 

Along with the government's 
shares, the offering includes 50 mil- 
tion new shares bang sold by BAe 
to increase its reserves. 

Tbe leading. undawriters to the 
issue, Klein wort, Benson Ltd. and 
Lazard Brothers & Co., said certain 
institutional investors already have 
agreed to buy as much as 100 per- 
cent of the shares on offer. These 
"priority applicants" have at least 
55 parent erf the shares. 

Keith Donaldson, an analyst at 
Phillips & Drew, forecast pretax 
profits of about £150 miHxm this 
year. He called the shares underva- 
lued at the current price. 

Despite his reservations on the 
offer price, Capd’s Mr. EDis said 
“we think the prospects for the 
company on a longer-term view are 
quite good.” 



Bingo players applaud an entertainer at dub ran by Granada Groiq> PLC which is using 
cabaret acts to attract a wider audience and reverse a dedme in tire profitable business. 

Britain’s Bingo. Qubs: P 9 asin Profit 

Big Operators See an Even Rosier F otnre in the Cards 

make the game more tempting by introducing’ 
much bigger cash prizes. 

In most countries, bingo is a nonprofit game run 
for charities. But British law allows operators to 
earn a profit from such items as admission fees, 
food, drinks and low-stakes slot machines, while 
paying out in prizes all the cash staked on bingo. 
The players are mostly poor, ova 40 and female. 


By Bob Hagerty 

Iniemaaonai Hendd Tribune 

LONDON — “Here!" 

Another winner at the Top Rank bingo dub 
rjafmc ^ cmnH nash prize; and once again the 
winner is noi Dot Hajba, a grandmother draped in 
sky-blue polyester. “Fm going to change me pen,” 
she mutim to her husband, Frank, who sileinly 
cradles a bottle of light ale. At the next table, a 
woman resumes her knitting while awaiting the 
next game. 

For several million Britons like the Hajbas, 
bingo is a relatively cheap evening's diversion. For 
a handful of large companies, it is a depressed but 
still very profitable business jproduang estimated 
industrywide revenue of £400 million ($492 mil- 
lion) a year and pretax profit margins of around 20 
percent. Later mis year, the companies hope to 


Many, according to a survey by Trinity and AB 
Saints’ College, would rather be dining out or 
danring , but their husbands rqect such ideas. 

So bingo wins by default. For one thing, social 
convention holds that there are two places where a 
wo man can go alone; church and bingo. 

For another, bingo is neither competitive turn 
stressful. Numbers are called out at random, and 

(Continued on Page 15, CoL t) 


New Statistics 
licate Decline 



In U.S. Economy 


London Gets Rival Currency Options 


By Bob Hageny 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Die Stock Ex- 
change and the London Interna- 
tional Financial Futures Exchange 
are preparing to dug it out with 
rival cmrency-option contracts. 

The Stock Exchange announced 
Wednesday plans to begjn trading 
doDar-pound currency optio ns lai~ 
er f frfe in March, 

said that it would begin trading! 
spnflay contract June 27. 

Currency options, whose use has 
mushroomed in the past few yeare, 
essentially are insurance a g ai ns t 
adverse movement in exchange 
rates. They offer .the right, but not 
the obligation, to buy or sell a cur- 
rency at a given price during a set 
period. 

Many major banks and securities 
firms sell options tailored to a spe- 
cific customer’s needs. Several cx- 
cfaanges trade standardized curren- 
cy options. The most heavily traded 
are those listed on the Phnadelphia 
Stock Exchange, but currency op- 


tions also are traded on exchanges 
in Amsterdam, Montreal, Sydney 
and Vancouver. The Chicago Mer- 
cantile Exchange trades options on 
currency futures. 

The London exchanges have 
been slow to offer currency op- 
tions, even thongh London is wide- 
ly considered the leading center for 
foreign-exchange trading and an 
active over-the-counter market in 
currency options has emerged. 
While rankers long have called for 


ed options in London, many doubt 
that in the long term there win be 
room for more than one exchange 
in the business. 

The Stock Exchange plans to be- 
gin practice trading sessions next 
Tuesday. David Steen, chairman of 
the exchange’s options committee, 
said actual trading would begin 
shortly aftexward- 

Tbe Drat contract covers the 
pound-doUar exchange rate and 
win come in denominations of 
£12^500 ($15375). Mr. Steen said 


that the exchange was Ekety to add 
a doflar-Dectsche mark contract 
within a few weeks and later would 
. consider other possibilities, such as 
contracts covering the rate between 
the dollar and the French or Swiss 
francs. 

The Stock Exchange's currency 
option contract was modeled after 
the pound-doUar option traded on 
toe Philadelphia exchange. Mr. 
Steen-said tost the goal was to 
coordinate operations so that con- 
tracts bought an one exchange 
could be sold on the other, though 
substantial regulatory and techni- 
cal problems would have to be re- 
solved 

Later, he said, a new Hong Kong 
futures exchange would likely pro- 
vide an Asian fink to the Lonaon- 
Philadelphia chain. 

To serve as market makers in 
currency options, tbe Stock Ex- 
change has enlisted units of Smith 
Bros. PLC, a major London securi- 
ties firm; Standard Chartered Bank 

(Continued on Page 13, CoLZ) 


Brazil Takes Tough Stand on Labor’s Demands 


Afr8 29/May 1 


■a/ saw 

Vk. Jte -M 5* - 5* 5 • -SID WW-TZ* »»•»* 9* - fVi V* 

» •» M WW-lOWi 9lh-9lw Sh 

ML -55V -5%. M - SVh. Uv 12 «■ Mlk-MD TVs - TH I ft 

4ML. WS. ,-M. «K -«h Ste -Stt nXn-12*. 10%- I0W 9te - 9 Hi Vh 

£ .:»¥.■ 4 * m -Ml' nr. -aw W»-nik w -»*ii an 

'(I ’ : Sources; Merwm Guaranty IdoUor. DM. SF. Pound. PF); Uurdt Bonk tBCUi; fteuten 


April 30 


m 

wv m& 
n VH 12 l/li 
Wfc JZtt 


5 S 
NA «1/U 
— ffl* 


Gold Prices 




By Juan de Onis 

Los Angela Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — After a 
surprisingly sharp decrease in in- 
flation in April, BrariTs new demo- 
cratic goveiranriit has taken a hard 
tine against a wave of labor strikes 
yiyt jmu n pnnfifl n pw ramnnio iK hv 

crease in the national minimum 
wage. 

The new minimum wage, an- 
nounced Monday night on televi- 
sion, represents toe first big politi- 
cal decision matte by President Jos6 
Saraey, the former vice president, 
who took over as head of BraaTs 
coalition government following the 
death Apm 21 of Tancredo Neves, 
tbe president-elect. 

Mr. Sarney’s dedaon to follow a 
course of austerity and avoid bid- 
ding for populist acclaim rent- 
forced the government’s god of 
seeking to refinance about half of 
Brazil’s SlQO-bflhon foreign debt 
and negotiate a new stabilization 
program with the Intonafianal 
Monetary Fund. 

The Brazilian authorities delib- 
erately avoided the wage po&y 
adopted by Pres dent Ram Alfon- 
sfs of Argmtiaa, who granted Kg 
wage increases without reducing 
budget deficits. As a result, infla- 
tion in Argentina is running at an 
annual rate of ahnost 800 percent 

In Brazil, which is one of the 
-world's 10 largest industrial econo- 
mies and has a population of 1% 
milli on, inflation drove prices up 
227 percent last year. The mffitary- 
backed government of (he framer 
president, Joao Baptists Figaar- 
edo, failed in its effort to reduce 
inflation because it did not cal 


public deficits that built up an in- 
ternal debt of $30 billion. 

Finance Minister Francisco 
Dorn dies pign* to make a major 
policy presentation to the Brarihas 
Congress next week, then go to 
Washington and New York to be- 
gin negotiations with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund and the in* 
lemafional banks that hold Brazil’s 
debt. 

Tbe zuixummn wage, which is ad- 
justed every six months, affects an 
public and private labor contracts 
and more than 30 million organized 
workers. For die past four years, a 
period of deqp economic recession, 
these workers' wages have not kept 
pace with rising pnees. Labor econ- 
omists estimate the dedme in real 
wages at more than 30 percent. 

There was 
on the new 
increase in 
Mr. Neves 
that increased inflation would hai« 
iprsy m rmpa^f nn wqgft earner s than 
cm the nth. 

Mr. Neves died after seven ab- 
dominal operations, the first of 
which was performed March 15, 
only horns before he was to have 
taken the oath of office. The rever- 
sal of Brazil's spiraling inflation 
last month can be attributed to his 
order, issued from his hospital bed, 
to reduce public spending. The cost 
of Bring rose 72 percent in April 
compared with 12.6 percent in 
March. 

The decision to hold the inim- 
nmm wage increase to 106 percent 
of the level of six months ago — 
less than the rate of inflation for 
those six months — reinforces the 
position of Mr. Domdles, who 


pressure 
tfora 

minimum wage, 


held out for ausieri „ „ 
meats fra a larger increase by 
labor minister, Almir Pazzianotto. 

The new minimum wage is 
336,000 cruzeiros a month, or 565 
at toe free rate of conversion. Ac- 
cording to Walter Bareffi, who 
beads an economic study group fi- 
nanced by labor unions, it ‘Ts not 
enough to feed a family of four.” 

The new government, after 21 
years of military-backed authori- 
tarian regimes, is facing a wave of 
strikes, led by automotive workers 
in the state of SSo Paula More 
than 400j000 workers have been 
involved in sit-downs, work stop- 
pages and other forms of pressure 
for wage increases. 

Tbe management group negoti- 
ating contracts in we automotive 
industry has refused to grant a 
wage increase unless the govern- 
ment removes price controls and 
anthoiizes the transfer at higher 
labor costs to the consumer, in the 
form of higher prices. 

In a move to curb inflation, Mr. 
DoroeDes has ordered a price con- 
trol program covering mod con- 
sumer roods, including automo- 
biles. Tbis is described as 
management’s contribution to tbe 
fight a gains t inflation, bn! it is be- 
ing roasted by ®any producers. 

Beating inflation has become tbe 
central concern of the new govern- 
ment. Ibis was tbe line token by 
Mr. Neves, and pledges to cany oat 
his anti-inflation campaign were 
inducted in eulogies at ms ftmeraL 

Mr. Sarney, 54, a framer gover- 
nor of MarashSo state and a sena- 
tor before he became Mr. Neva 1 
running mate, heard not only his 
la bor minis ter but congressi o nal 


leaders argue far a larger wage in- 
crease. They warned of a possible 
"social explosion” if workers are 
not given relief from inflation. 

Tbe decision to provide a token 
increase means an extended period 
of belt-tightening fra workers. But 
the government is promismg to 
continue to reduce budget deficits 
and high interest rates as the best 
way to beat inflation. 

Tbe government also is extend- 
ing more credit to fanners in an 
effort to increase food production, 
and it is planning an emergency 
feeding program for children. 


By Tom ftedbum 

l/tt Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In another 
indication of economic weakness, 
the UJS. government has reported 
that its main economic barometer 
fdl 0.2 percent in March. 

The drop disclosed Tuesday by 
the Commerce Department in the 
index erf leading indicators — to- 
gether with another large merchan- 
dise trade deficit in March — dis- 
appointed administration officials. 

The level of the index *1188 not 
increased during the last 12 months 
and is Klrrfy to remain sluggish un- 
til the dollar falls,” Commerce Sec- 
retary Malcolm Baldrige said. “The 
economy probably wifi strengthen 
during toe current quarter, but do- 
mestic production gains will be 
limited by higher imports and flat 
export sales. ^ 

At tbe same time, the Depart- 
ment of Commerce reported that 
factory orders fe& in March by 0.9 
percent, the second straight month- 
ly decline and the eighth drop in 
factory orders over the past 12 
months. 

“Business is just not very confi- 
dent about the' expansion at this 
point,” said Robert Gough, an 
economist at Data Resources Inc 
in Lexington, Massachusetts. “I 
don’t think the decline in the over- 
all index should be over-in t 
ed, but there are some real ix 
tors of weakness" in tbe economy, 
he said. 

Along with the decline in the 
leading indicators for March, the 
Department of Commerce also re- 
vised downward the gains posted in 
the previous two months; dropping 
tbe February increase from 0.7 per- 
cent to 0.5 percent and the January 
one from 1.5 percent to 1-3 percent. 

t -ifcft Mr. Baldrige, many econo- 
mists have placed much of the 
blame for the economic slowdown 
on the continuing strength of the 
U.S. dollar, which makes it more 
difficult for American business to 
compete against foreignere. 

Despite a modest decline in the 
dollar’s value over the past few 
months, the nation had an SI 1 bd- 
Eon foreign trade deficit in March, 
only a dig^t improvement from the 
$11.4 biffion deficit in February, 
the government announced Tues- 
day. 

“With a more normal perfor- 
mance by the consumer, we can no 
longer hide our hemorrhaging 
trade sector,” said Robert Barbers, 
chief economist at EF. Hutton & 
Co. in New York. “We need a tow- 
er dollar and lower interest rates.” 

In March, imports rose 0.7 per- 
cent despite sharp declines in ship- 
ments erf petroleum and automo- 
biles to the United States. Exports 
rose by 33 percent, reflecting a 
large increase in foreign sales of 
commercial and military aircraft, 
■which tend to run in bursts. 

The trade deficit was a record 
$1233 billion in 1984 and so far 
this year has reached $323 button, 
•■ ^- v y ahead of last year’s pace. 

con tinuing signs of econom- 
ic weakness, which began last sum- 
mer when the pace of growth 
sharply declined, may encourage 
tbe Federal Reserve Board to loos- 


rates to drop in an effort to revive 
the economy’s health. 

The Department of Commerce 
recently reported that economic 
growth in the first quarter, adjusted 
for inflation, was just 13 percent, 
far less than the 4 percent growth 
the Reagan administration is 
counting on to help stabilize the 
budget deficit and prevent unem- 
ployment from rising. 

In the report on leading indica- 
tors, seven of the 10 available sta- 
tistics were down. Only the average 
workweek, building permits and 
initial claims for unemployment in- 
surance : 


Tbe negative influences on the 
March index, in order of impor- 
tance, were from net business for- 
mations, orders for plant and 
equipment, new orders for consum- 
er goods and materials, perfor- 
mance of vendors, sensitive materi- 
als prices, stock values and the 
money supply. 

■ Construction Spending Up 

Overall construction spending 
rase 0.1 percent in March as private 
nonrcsiaential building supped 
*nrmgh to temper a 13-pocent 
gain in residential construction, the 
UJ3. government reported Wednes- 
day, according to The Associated 
Press. 


ing had risen 23 percent in 
ary and 29 percent in January. 


Dollar Stronger; 
CkM Price Down 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Rising interest 
rates in the United States 
pushed the dollar higher 
Wednesday in thin, volatile 
trading. The price of gold fdL 

Currency dealers in London 
said the dollar was bring under- 
pinned by market sentiment 
that there was little chance of 
US. interest rales moving low- 
er. The interest rate on over- 
night dollar deposits in Europe 
increased 16 of a percentage 
point to 8% percent. Trading 
volume was low because most 
European markets were dosed 
for May Day. 

The dollar dosed in Tokyo at 
252475 Japanese yen, up from 
251.425 yen Tuesday. Later, in 
London, the dollar was quoted 
at 252.90 yen. The British 
pound fell to $1323, compared 
with $1,243 late Tuesday. Gold 
was quoted in London at a late 
bid price of $31 130, down from 
5321 flO late Tuesday. 


- 

AM. 

W4 

atm 

tftMKHtt 

mas 

MSJ5 

-M0 

LuMRamre 


Owl 


Paris [BJ Wf) 
znrtcn 

LOOM 1 

at mo 

0HH 

ami 

TH50 

-us 

NO) YWk 

— 

3030 

— in 


. ; Oman Commefsboai. Grimly- 
-'\ -i I WD UerdeBeM. Bam tt iMw 


mecM fedaca kr Landed, Pans nd u» w 
temwanimitnitcMnsMiepttirHaiBKm 

md Zurt*. mh yw* Cnmx «*■« mtracl. 
*11 •rtoi M us* pv own*. 

Bmreri AnAa. 


U 


Markets Closed 


of the May Day holiday, financial markets were dosed 


--and 


is Brussels, Frankfurt. 


ny, fix 
Milan, 


Paris, Singapore, Stockholm 


WORLD-WIDE SERVICE BY 

Jet Aviation - tha international leading organization for business aviation with 
a charter fleet of 45 aircraft and world-wide nine maintenance bases offare you 
complete aircraft manaewnent purchase, sales, financing, insurance, 
operation, crews, refurbishment completion, maintenance and handling 

service of professional perfection. 

Our Afr-lferi serviev 1« svsnabl* to you anHmd-tba-dock: 

1 Seech King Air 200-1 Mitsubishi 2 -SCitation fl- 2 Leatiet 35- 
1 Lfiariet 38-5 Falcon 10 ^ 6 falcon 20-7 falcon 50-7 Guifstream H/H - 
1 DC-9 -1 Boeing 737 -5 Boeing 727 -2 Bo«r>fl 707 -1 DC-8/72. 



Bssal. DuiMWoH. Geneva. KtoMd. Mwuch, Zurich 
Jrtdfth. Riyadh 
Boston, Wtahmgtort. D. C. 


Europe: Zunch (1)814 2003 Tin. 59820 

Midrite East: Riyadh (1(2201866 Tlx. 205 55 J 
North America; Boston (S1712740030 T|«.851 195 


f= CHARTER 

M/Y -AEGEAN CHAILENGE* 

125 Ft 12 persons go anywhere. 
We are doe best in Greek Islands. 

Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 StaSou St, Athens. 

TeL: 3236494. Tbt: 222288. 





Pi 


D 


Carlyle 

lh.nl 


■t Tfitfa StrMt 
NmIMIOCOI 
CubtoTtW Carlyle Haw YWfc 
International TMex 620692 
IMnphOne 212-744-tSOO 

Amwnber of the Slurp CSnwp 
sine* reC7 


D 


j®TAPMAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDII 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OP $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded Hie Mowing 


IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: —24% 

IN 1984: — 34% 

(* of 

APRIL 25. 7985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $85,202.62 

Can or write Royal! Frazier at 
TAPMAN. TrarsQ Analysis and 
Portfolio Management. Inc., 
\Md Street Plaza, New Mxfc, 
New Mint 10005 21 2-269-1 041 
TMsx BM1 667173 UW. 



Breguet : 

Precision mastery since 1775 

Abraham Louis Breguel (1747-1823) 
was one of the most phenomenal watchmakers 
history has ever known. 

His genius was an overriding influence 
no! only on watch-making techniques 
but also on the beauty 
of Ihe finished object. 




remie* 

(y Since 1775 
Available at 

CHAUMET 

jeweler since 1780 

Paris: 12 place'Vendfirae 
London: 178 New Bond Street 
Geneva: 2 rue du Rhone 
Brussels: 82 av. Louise 
New York: 48 Easl 57th Street 










Rage 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2. 1985 



15 PSEGpf 1T7 
46W PSEGpf 
IAW PSEGpf 24} 
51 pace pf wo 
55 PSEGof 760 
Sift PSEGpf 7JB 
SI PSEGpf M 
2ft PvWsfc M 
M PoMo .M 
sft PR Cam . 
9ft PupatP L» 
10ft PHtftHfn .« 
22ft Pvratpi 1-28 
m Pyre 


a nft im 

9JQX 57ft 5* 

4 20ft 28ft 

M 

5ZXb4Aft 65ft 
80001 43ft *3 
290* 81 40 

24 3ft 3ft 
41 lift lift 
51 4ft 4ft 
4*7 14ft M 
M It 1» 
HJ4 UH S4W 
344 8* ■ 


18ft +ft 
** + ft 
20ft 

44ft 4- ft 
45ft— ft 
43ft -« 

41 — ft 
Jft + ft 
111 * 

4ft + ft 
U 
15ft 

24ft— ft 
■ft 


1 



w^rri 


471 
2777 
32 
48 
100 
102 
29 
103 

n 

4747 
1447 
145 42ft 
250* 45ft 
1060 34ft 
4U 
44ft 
J1K> 
10ft 
35 


45* 2BVa QuekOx 194 

25 

12 

4150 

4ZW 42* 

42*^1 

100 

90ft QueOpf 

996 

99 


12S8Z99 

ra* 

90* +1* 

aw 

15 OuokSO 

60 

26 

24 

173 

2TW 

20* 

29*— ft 

lift 

AW Quonex 



34 

227 

Ift 

7ft 

Ift + ft 

34* 

23 Guolar 

160 

SI 

9 

424 

31* 

31ft 

JHk — * 

25* 

14 QkRaU 

94a 19 

IS 

194 

20ft 

20* 

20*— W 


■ 7ft 7ft 
40ft 40ft • 
39 39 

§ft Sft' 

34ft 36ft 
7ft 7ft 
4 4ft 
14* If* 
9ft 9ft 
42 42 - 

7ft 7ft 
3ft Jft 
59ft 40 ft 
44ft 44ft- 

u im 

19ft 19V, 
13ft 13ft 
lift lift- 


35 


aj 


54ft am ' 
25ft 19V. 
Z«* 20ft ' 
20ft 12ft 
31ft 20ft ' 
44ft 24ft 
M 4 
■ft 5ft ' 
21ft 12ft ' 
a* lift ' 
13ft 8ft 1 
40ft 29ft ' 
19 14 ' 

41 27ft ' 
17ft lift ' 


434 ?J 
ISMUS 
2JD 92 
4ft IS 21 

in 17 i 
M UH 
AMU 
90 It 14 
sa 24 
.10b 41 41 
1.10 84 
LOO 7 J TO 
J9 U U 
JO 24 9 
40 35 7 


133 53ft 

its 34H 

■ a** 

14 27 
154 27 
233 43ft 
235 4ft- 
47 4ft 
5 «ft 
49 Zlft 
184 13ft 
344 39ft 
4 T4ft 
4S3 34 

1284 WW 


53ft 59ft— ft 
34ft 34ft— ft 
27ft 27ft 
26ft 27 +1 

34ft 27 
41ft 41ft— 1ft 
Oft 4ft + ft 
4ft «ft + ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
22ft 22ft + ft 
t»% 13ft— ft 
38ft 38ft— ft 
14ft 14ft + ft 
33ft 34 + ft 

14 14 - ft 


GENEVE 


m 


m 




UV-J 


43ft Oft 
36 26ft 
44ft 64ft 
20ft 38ft 
2ft 2ft 
75ft 75ft 
l«ft 18ft 
15 MW 14ft 
SH 5ft 5ft 

a aft a 

25ft 34ft 34ft 
6ft 6ft 4ft 
52ft 


22 

31ft 24ft 
Mft 9ft 
a 22ft 


31 2Sft 
lift 


Pf 360 17 
Pf 250 116 
Pf 2.13 11.0 
Pf 230 115 
Pf 435 123 
1550 14.1 
U42 133 
1-00 4.1 
150 4.1 
1JB 119 
Pf 350 1L0 
P* 450 118 
Pf 444 115 
Pf 736 114 
pf 830 134 
Pf 251a 74 
pf 150 134 
pr 192 115 
pf 1JB0 122 

804 124 
740 111 
127 115 
1400 112 
1400 111 


33ft 

32* 

30 

29ft 

12* 

12W 

94* 

98* 

22 

21* 

19* 

19* 

20 

20 

STW 

51* 

110ft 109* 

104 

105* 

25W 

24M 

29* 

29ft 

14* 

Mft 

20 

30 

32 

21 

32* 

22* 

54* 

54* 

40* 

40ft 

am 

30ft 

a* 

25* 

79 

a 

14* 

14* 

12ft 

ia 

45 

45 

43* 

A2W 

19* 

19* 


61ft 49ft 
55 44ft 
55 43 

57ft 44ft 
3ft 
Oft 


60 

36 

160 

17 

60 

6 

60 

4.1 

68 

36 

1 62 

96 

260 116 

468 13.1 
492 13.1 

1J4 

47 

2.14 

76 

454 106 

94 

16 

360 

56 

69 

9 

260 

56 

92 

22 

160 

17 

260 

96 

2.10 10L7 
160 126 
150 IH 

164 

119 

168 IM 
964 1A5 
LSa 149 
L38 149 
L96 149 


7ft 
18ft 
17ft 
26ft 
lift 

19ft 19ft 
15ft 15ft 

18ft 18ft 
27ft 22 
aft 33ft 

a a 

134 33ft 33ft 33ft 
348 29ft 29ft 29* 
18488 Sft 35ft 37ft 
447 221* 72 22 

37ft 37ft 37ft 
540 16ft 14 Mft 
95 77ft 77ft 27ft 
2232 52ft Sift 53ft 
446 Mft 
25 a 
917 21ft 

19ft 19ft 19ft 
225 7ft 7ft 7ft 
1108 22ft HI* 23ft 
4SCK 7ft 7* 7ft 
2008 7ft 7ft 7ft 

Sgg 

4008 53 57ft 51ft 
^ a 4ft“4ft a 4ft 


49QZ S3 
4008 52 

*00l 

2ft 15U 

I"* 


48 

18ft SAnORt 154 
20ft SPeSoP 1.00 
24ft SoroLea 144 
25ft SpfWei 140 
14ft Soul RE 20 
14ft ScvEIP 140 
9ft SovE pf 108 
4ft Savin 
914 Savin 
17ft 




33* 

a* VF 

17* 

5* Vot 

23* 

M Vat 

4* 

3* Vot 

ana 

19 Vev 

4ft 

2* Var 

44ft 

29ft Vot 

uw 

fft Var 

25ft 

is* vm 

AW 

3W Van 

WJW 

8W Vm 

ASH 

25ft Via 

57 

54 Vat 

7A 

AT* va( 

n 

AT* Vat 

83* 

AOft Vai 

aw 

lift VM 

41* 

27ft Var 

78 

60ft Vuh 



Amiable at laacBog JawoOef* wnrtdwMa 
CbopORi & CM &A. «. iweda Vayrat - GenAva fiZZ 82 17 17 


12ft 
T2ft 
ZJW 12ft 
40 29ft 
57 30ft 
20ft 22ft 
17ft 10ft 
Mft lift 
4J 34 
44ft 34ft 
9ft 
2ft 
ft 


» 

19ft 

law 

51ft 

124ft 

24ft 

40 

9ft 

15ft 


41 14ft 
49ft 34ft 
3444 Mft 
43ft 36ft 
29ft 1744 
25ft Mft 
12ft AW 
Mft 8 
28*2*. 

9 Aft 
MV. 2546 
38ft 7* 
IM Sft 
7ft 3ft 
34H 2SH 
fflft 48ft 
1514 2SW 
34ft 25ft 
40ft 27ft 
14ft 9ft 
27 18ft 
68ft 30ft 
4ft 2ft 
Mft 47 
Aft 3ft 
18 I Oft 

23W 17 


vlWPttptB 
WlllrVrt 200 48 
vnutc IJO U 
wniicptcun 7j 
W&itaM 

WMtWk JO 26 
WfttWl 46 

MIMn 

VnilMm 160 5.1 
WllmEI 

WIMwO .W 10 
WtnDIx 168 46 
Wlnntoo ,10a 9 
Winner 
winters 

WtacEP 268 7J 
WiaEpf 890 116 
WIscPL 264 76 
WtotiPS 2JA 7-S 
WlMO 168 4J 

WotvfW 14 26 

wooctPt JO 36 
WMwftl 290 49 
WHOAT 

Wrtahr IJOo 29 

WUrttxr 

WvleLt) 92 V 
wynm 60 u 


loozaift 
9 984 42ft 
340 26W 
3 41 
11 91 28 

ra 491 an 

3 9ft 

If 19 lift 
4 1259 27ft 
41 4ft 
IS 3 Aft 

13 143 35W 
10 2923 lift 
45 104 7ft 

1 Sft 

2 927x34ft 

SPr 71 

9 227 MU 

I 47 34ft 
9 M4 34ft 

3 2M Mft 

14 11)6 22ft 
9 541 43W 

7 3ft 
IT 293 43ft 
25 4ft 
9 27 lift 

7 4 11 


20ft 20ft 
41ft 41ft 
24ft 26ft- 
41 41 

27ft 37ft 
aw 23ft - 
9W 9ft- 
10* II - 
77ft 27ft- 
4ft 4ft 
Aft 6ft ■ 
34ft JSV* 
lift lllrt- 
7 7ft- 

sn sv» 

33ft 34 
78 78 - 
33ft 33ft- 
33ft 34 
34W Mft 

io io - 
22ft aft 

4tn 4in- 
3ft 3ft- 
41 ft 61ft- 
4ft 6ft 
lift lift ■ 
17ft U 


47V) 33ft Xara 360 66 >9 2881 45ft 45ft 45ft - ft 

52ft 45ft Xerox pf 3.45 106 in 52ft 52ft S2Vj 4- ft 

a 19 XTRA 6426 9 117 25 an 24ft— v. 


a 24 ZoteCD 132 U I 

34ft 13ft Zapata 64 6.1 77 

42ft 32 lavra 60b 7 IS 

3ift 18ft ZanltftE 8 

2IW Mft zaraa 92 19 14 


50 8 20 24ft 26ft 24ft + ft 

4.1 37 242 14ft 13ft 13ft 
7 IS 843 61ft SVft 59ft -1 
8 1D42 20ft 19ft 20 - W 
1.9 14 50 17ft 17ft Wft — ft 


NYSE HighirLo ms 


Over-the-Coimter 


May 1 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sato*" Mat 

108* HI oh LW 3 P.M. area 


160 

56 

60 

59 

t 


.10a 

i 9 


1J 

90c 

19 

160 

14 

65a 


60 

29 

64 

14 

160a 

47 

60 

18 

JO 

49 

60 

46 

192 

« 

t 


160 

14 

-53 

16 

60 

17 

90b 

10 


am 

15ft 
27 
5W 
7ft 

aw 

JH 
6W 
4W 
2ft 

iaw 

15ft 
30 ft 
lift 
I5W 15ft 
15ft Mft 
13ft 13ft 
14 34 

SAW a 
19ft .19ft 
Aft 4ft. 
Jlft 31ft. 
17ft 


iao* Hleh lop SPJACtfge 

in 7W 7ft 7W 
45 Aft 4ft 4ft 
104 Sft 5 5ft— ft 
1411 10ft 1H- ft 
46321ft 21ft aft + ft 
518ft lift 18ft— ft 
55 17ft 14ft 14ft 
U 54 5 Aft 5 
2 2 2 2 


.14 

1J 

.Me 

16 

.14a 

S 

-20 

26 

95a 

4J 

64r 

9 

6* 

19 




MO* HWb Low 3P.M. 01*1* 
J4 5J 9 10W 18ft Wft -f- ft 
.18 12 26515ft 14ft I6W— ft 
810ft RJft Wft— ft 
10 7ft 6ft Aft— ft 
t 57 <W 414 4ft 

4922ft 2314 23ft— ft 


TW — ft 

Sft 

3ft 

Aft— 16 

10 + ft 
ft 

Ift— W 
3ft 

11 + ft 
28V,— ft 
14ft + W 

Ift + 14 
15* 

ion— i% 
is + n 
ion— w 

17ft + ft 

J5ft 


7ft 

Mft 
Sft 
15ft 15ft 
lift 19ft 
Aft Aft 


7ft— W 
25 + ft 

isr" 

MM 

33ft + V> 


soft** Mat 

1WS HWh Low IPJACtft 

38ft 38ft— ft 
27310ft 10 Wft + ft 
Ilia 32ft 33 
US 24 24 — 1 

6 7ft Aft 7ft 
4431ft 21 24 

■44T 39 a 14 13ft 13ft— ft 
25 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
9J7H 37ft 37ft— ft 
3242ft 41H 41ft — ft 
JO 36 5130 29ft 39ft— ft 

94a <7 IB 27ft » 27ft + ft 
90 35 5 Sft 5ft Sft— ft 

719 19 If —a 

1548ft 48 49 —1ft 

6W Aft— ft 
4 3 3 3 — ft 

71217ft 17ft 17ft 
5915ft 15ft 15ft 
543514 35 33 

a 12 ii« lift— ft 

1111ft lift lift— w 
3ft Sft 
Mft 14ft 
14ft 15 + ft 

22W 22ft + ft 
Aft Aft— ft 
19W 19ft + W 
1ft 1ft 
fft 9ft— W 

£ ^ + ft 

15ft ISft— ft 
17ft 27ft— Ift 
8ft Oft + W 
I7ft 27ft— ft 
7W 7W— ft 
I4W 14ft + W 


Sc4a*lp Met 

10«a HIWi Low 3PM.CB-U 


vIKctyJ 

MallYSA 64 IJ 
KaltvS B S2 16 
Kemp IJO 33 
Ken cop 

KvCnU 90 Z9 

Kavax 

Kevfin 

KetmSs 64 35 
KavTra 

KmFn IJO AS 
lOmDol 64 16 
Kincaid 

Kinder* 6* 6 

Kray at 9 
Kruars 32 32 
Kirlcka .16 9 
KuatEI 


W ft + ft 
a 37 - ft 
37 a 
53ft M — W 
5 5 + ft 

48W 40ft 
AW AW— W 
5ft Sft + W 
12W 13ft + ft 
■ 8 - ft 

21 22 +1 
» J9VJ + ft 

aw an— w 

15* 14ft + w 
AW 7 + ft 

Mft 14ft— ft 
T7ft 17ft + ft 
Aft Aft— ft 


r 


7ft — W 
7W + ft, 
Sft— W 

12ft— ^ ' 0X5 
23ft + ft 
Mft + W 
19W— ft 
11 — ft 


in 

lec 

IIS 

ILC 

IMS* 

IPLSV 

ISC 

IVB Ffl 290 6J 
leaf 

IdiaWld JO 35 

imofrri 

loiunax 

irmino 

I munan 

Inocmp 

lodBcp 192 52 
IndSSt 

IndHhfB 65a S 


3V» 3ft— W 
5ft 5ft 
SVi 5V. 

aw m 

23W 23ft + ft 
11k 2 
10 10 
aft 22ft + ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
23 23 

2 2W + W 
Aft 7 — ft 
4H 4ft 
2 2 

5ft 5W — ft 
37 37ft + ft 
25ft 25ft 
10W I Oft— ft 


132* 

31* 

32* 

1 8* 

a 

8* + 

i 7 

A* 

A* 

520ft 

19W 

19* — 

127* 

27* 

27* + 

143* 

43 

43* 

I19W 

Hft 

19W + 

110* 

10* 

10* — 

l Mft 

IAW 

16ft — 

1 5* 

5W 

5W 

1 7W 

7ft 

7ft — 

i a* 

aw 

3W 

1 3ft 

aw 

3* — 

1 Sft 

4* 

5 

119* 

m 

19* + 

2fft 

20 

20 

1* 

* 

* 

! 2ft 

2* 

2ft 

; a* 

7* 

■W + 

4W 

4ft 

4W 

42 

40 

42 +1 

M 

M 

Sft 


2$ft + ft 
7ft + 14 
10ft + W 
7ft— ft 


34 16ft ISft 15ft— ft 

4J3e 76 2A2 62 62 

30 3ft Jft 3ft 

» fft 9ft 9ft — ft 
21513ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
119 6ft 6ft 4ft— ft 
2U61SW Ith lfW 
16 4ft 4ft 6ft— ft 
t 6 1« 10ft Wft + ft 

14032714 24ft 24ft— ft 
, . MS Aft 5 + ft 

.13 .1 195 95 95 —2 

15318ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
219 10W 10ft I94k + ft 
2M <ft 4 4 

34 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

1 3ft Sft Sft— ft 

«S2C 18ft 19 —1 

31 3ft 3W Jft + ft 

196 56 

900 1.1 Sia* 17ft 17ft + * 
71813 Wft 12ft + ft 

•2 K 72*"» 24ft 844k + ft 
98 1J 55! It 15ft 1A + ft 
... .. IBS 1ft >W IK 
164 99 10 lift IM lift + ft 

3 AW Aft AW 
3 1ft 1ft Ift— ft 
■7 4ft 4K 4ft — K 
39A A Sft A + ft 
A Aft Aft Aft 

2 sft m sn 
1 4ft 4ft Aft 
AH* lift lift— 14 

600 3ft 3 ] — ft 

160 36 112 31ft 29ft 29ft —2 

412 12 12 

123 61k 4W Aft 
84 Mh Aft AW 
8324ft 23ft 24ft— ft 
68 4.1 19 9* 9 9ft 

74134 ft 33* 33ft 
265 AW 4 Aft + ft 
94 32 190910ft lift 10ft 

134 5ft 5K 514 + 14 
94 16 24523W 23ft 23ft 4 ft 

190 39 19732ft 22V. 32ft— ft 

196 AJ 2 2D 30 20 

20 19 1217* l«ft ISft— * 

60 26 1615ft 15 15* 

JS 46 5*22* 21* 22* + ft 

90« 16 10713 13* 12* 

.164 16 » 16ft 16 16* + * 

15937,, 36ft 37 
147 rth Ilk 1%k + ft 
57716ft 15* ISft— * 
19TA 15ft 1A 

92 Zl 517 15W Mft 15* 4- ft 
94 19 11220ft 19* 20 

423* 22ft 22ft— * 
7719* 19ft 19ft 
98 13 4039ft 38* a + ft 


* GtoaTr 

* GObrtA 
W GtonFd 


fft fft- ft 

34049* 49ft 49ft— ft 

1213ft 13* 13* — * 
711ft 11* lift +ft 

aw M 10 — K 

'TIE «S6 ^tie 

2ft 2W 2ft 
7ft Aft 7ft + W 
4ft Sft Sft— ft 
5* 5ft 5W + ft 
5* 5* 5* 

15* 15* 15* 

Aft 6* AW + ft 
20W 28* 28*— ft 
15* 15* 15* + * 
24 a 26 — * 
TOft 11 

14 IAW + * 
ft 



19ft + ft 

m- u 

5* 

13ft— * 
4 — * 
13* 

19*— Ift 
4ft 
3ft 

16* + * 
38*— * 
30ft 

29W— W 

B4ft 

15* 

aw 

14 

20 +1 
9*— * 
TOft — ft 
4*— * 
3ft— ft 
24 

27* + * 
5H— ft 
32* + W 
33*— * 
16ft 

20* + ft 
9*— * 
5* + ft 


JBRata .M i.) 

JUG 

JP Ind 

Joduwt i 

Jocfct-ta 

iStZZr M 

JaHrGp 

JaffBaft 160 46 
JattML* 64 16 
3aj5rnrf 60a 2J 
JatMort 

Jartca .12 6 

JHVa 

Jhnane 

JoaicDI t 

Janal A t 

Joaptan 

Juno 

Justin 60 2.1 


14ft + ft 
Sft + * 
17* + * 
Aft 

39*— * 
21ft— I 
17* + ft 
12ft 

39* + * 

24*— ft 
17ft— * 
7ft + ft 

'VTt 

5*— * 
SW + ft 
S* 

fft + ft 
33 — * 
19*— * 


5 LA* 9717* 17* 17*— ft 

KMWSV 211* 11* 11*—* 

KTron IS S S 

KVPhr 4 7W 7* 7* + ft 

Korean 56 2.1 61 27* 77 27* 

KarCflr 49214ft IS* 15*— * 

Kaalar 90 r AJ imisft is* is* — * 

Kovdon 3 8* 8* 8* 

Kornre 1010 3* 2* 2ft — * 

Kaona 90 1.1 »I9 II* 19 +| 


PC 

























































































































"V* - •*«**^- • 


1 ■'. l< -•■. 



IPTrERNATIOlSAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 


Page 13 


A— Vt 
t*~ «4 
- * 
M»— Vi 
h 

*- Vfc 
i» + ft- 
v»— V. 
■tt- * 

.v» 

I 

I — lUi 
M* — Mi 
« 

«tt + v> 
e - ab- 
ate 

)M|— >« 

•It'J —Hi 

M - 
1 ( 4 * + Hi 

tl 


4SV,— Ml 
SUV* * * 
2fl«- Mi 


17Mi —— M» 


nftfcww 

•MOW „ 

hmhC0«(» 

wear 

ttulNaGtta 

pnRwoi 

HnMKor 

KVAPCa 

Mimo/nef 

nzon** 

SMMMSOEi 

THMtMIr 

TWA Ml _ 

VoCMfHW 


C«Mt>nDoto 

RfvwOo^n 

TWMt*M 


N«I 

p.M.cirm 

* 

3? -V 

n ts 

. 

*«M~ te 

S'fc * te- 

T-S' 
ft* tv 

7 + ft , 

Mte-r a - 

,? s ■*■ 5 

*M- te- 


apan Cargo Airline 
To Open II.S. Route 


- By Benny Pagano 

V - Lai Angela Times Service . 

> ^WASHINGTON — Officials of 
Nippon Cargo Airlines haw said 
that the new all-cargo Japanese air- 


sshivufci Shibuya^ vice presi- 
dent of die company’s north 
American rtpersdon, sad the air- 
line plans sol round-trip flights a 
week between die United States 
Japan. Nippon Cargo plans to 
inaugurate service next Wednesday 
with a flight from Tokyo to San 
Ponds co andNcw Yoto John F. 
Kennedy InfrroiffiflMl Airprat 
The inighfr arrangements wen 
oed ou^Maday by V'S. and 


guageof tho overall agreement now 
being worked out. 

Asked whether he expected a 
.longer- tom operating permit to be 
issued, the official sa£l, “Absolute- 
lyT He added, Tw hardly ever 
seen an oceoapdoii that was token 
a way once it was granted.” 

Nippoa Cargo's application to 
mitisteUS. service, filed in Febru- 
ary 1^84, is strongly opposed by 
Flying Tiger Line, the largest 
.'Anwwan cargo carrier between 
tbe-Unhed States and Japan. 

• Hying Tiger officials contend 
that because Nippon Cargo is 
owned primarily by major Japa- 
nese- shippers and freight forward- 
ers, it alk) would receive increasing 


on changes to the k»g-sfand-. 
ing tfla traal ayiatirm agreemen t be- - 
tween the two' nations. A number 
of JmKndmfcots to the. agreemeot 
were expected to beannotmeed by 
the StatcD^aitnienL .... 

- Sources dose to the negations 
said Nippon Cargo has been grant-, 
o&jkn exemption from the pnm- 
,w»s of fakralaviatian law that 
pern the , operating authority of 
<m»sn airbynes i& the United 
States. '. '••'•• 

An officud^of the U.S. Depart- 
rnent.of TrinB^xtttatkm, winch ad- 
^ministers a^ukm law, confirmed 
drat “a tentative understanding mi 
the issues has been reached" con- 
ing Nippon Cargo. The offi- 
dd, Mo a»b: on condition that 
he not be identified, said an exemp- 
tion would be included in final lan~ 


imTi» and other IIS. carriers. 

Flying Tiger holds a 27-jperceat 
share of the trans-Padfic air cargo 
and other U.S. carriers ac- 
count for 13 percent Officials of 
the Los Angdes-based company 
werem Japan cm Tuesday ana an- 
xvafiafate roc comment 

At the direction of President 
Ronald Reagan, the outgoing U.S. 
trade representative, WfiUain E 
Brock, asked, the International 
Trade Ganmissian last December 
tb exajmne trade implications in 
the -U .S.-Japan air cargo market 
Mr.. Brock reportedly favors bdd- 

tioamntil t^cam^ion's^ort 
‘is issued, a move expected by June 
12.- .' 

But Nippon Cargo’s top officials 
have compWcd that their applica- 
tion las been unduly delayed by 
heated debate over unrelated trade 
issues and by die commission’s in- 


GM to Build 
Huge Plant for 
New Auto Line 

Compiled by Our Staff From btyaxha 

DETROIT — General Motors, 
in the first step of what is expected 
to become one of the largest new- 
product programs in the company's 
history, has announced that it will 
spend $750 nrilliOD to build a hugi 
assembly plant in Kansas City, 
Kansas, that will produce a new 
line of mtennediatc-sized cars in 
time for rite 1988 model year. 

The lrighly automated plant, 
covering about 23 millinn square 
feet (about 640,000 square meters), 
is to produce a new midsize car 
code-named the GM-10 model Ex- 
cept for the Saturn project, GM 
highly publicized effort to bofld a 
subcompact cost competitive with 
Japanese models, the $7-bflfion 
GM-10 prqject is tikdy to be the 
company's most important new- 
poxnict pn^ram is me 1980s. 

Flans call for the front-wbed- 
drive GM-10 to replace both the 
front-drive A-body intermediates 
and the dder, rear-drive G-bodk& 
Besides bmlrRng the Kansas City 
plant, to produce up to 270,000 
cars pa year, GM plans to retocil as 
many as four assemb ly plants in the 
United Stales and one in Canada 
for GM-10 production in the late 
1980s, according to reports. 

The Ford Motor Co.’s Canadian 
subsidiary said Tuesday it would 
partially retool an engine plant in 
Windsor, Ontario, winch has been 
malting V-d engines for rear-wheel- 
drive cars. 

GM officials said the company 
has delayed deciding where to 
btnld its Saturn assembly complex, 
a highly sought-after industrial 
project (LAT, NTT) 


SEC Probes Mesa Group 
For Trader Violations 


New York Timet Se r v ic e 

NEW YORK —The Securities 
and Exchange Commission is in- 
vestigating whether an investor 
group headed by T. Boone Pickens, 
chairman of the Mesa Petroleum 
Co, violated federal securities laws 
that govern insider trading, fraud 
and timely disclosure of takeover 
plats, Mesa has said. 

The Pickens group. Mesa Part- 
nets n, is locked in a takeover bat- 
tle with Unocal Coup, for control of 
the Calif ornia oil company. 

A federal judge in Odiforma 


US. Contractor 
Plans Layoffs 

New York Tima Service . 

NEW YORK— General Dy- 
namics Corp. has announced 
tlmi it plans to lay off as many 
as 3,100 waters at its shipyard 
in Quincy, Massachusetts, cit- 
ing a lack of new goysramem 
contracts to build military ves- 


I The layoffs of more than half 
the work force come as the ship- 
yard nears completion of a con- 
tract to build five technological- 
ly sophisticated cargo ships for 
ute UK Navy. Four have been 
finished and the fifth is sched- 
uled for delivery early next 
year. 

“Beyond that, there is no 
backlog of work and there is no 
more work to be done;*’ Robert 
F. Sweeney, a General Dynam- 
ics spokesman, said Tuesday. 
He raid the layoffs “axe pretty 
much definite.” 


said April 25 that Unocal would 
“probably be able to prove at trial” 
that the Kckcns group had violated 
the law in February when it said its 
original bolding of Unocal stock 
was for investment purposes only. 

The commission’s investigation 
could potentially lead to a stiffer 
penalty than would ordinarily be 
the case if violations are found, 
securities lawyers said. That is be- 
cause Mesa Petroleum already is 
under a permanent injunction not 
to violate the commission’s corpo- 
rate disclosure rules. 

Mesa Petroleum consented to 
(he injunction in April 1984 with- 
out admitting or denying commis- 
sion charges of faffing to disclose 
promptly its plans for acquiring 
control of the Gulf Carp. Guff i 
eventually was acquired by the 
Chevron Corp. 

Takeover law experts said that if 
the current investigation results in 
further commission, charges. Mesa 
might be found to have been in 
contempt of cowl One possible 
penalty, they noted, is that the 
Pickens group could be forced to 
sell back to investors the 23.7 mil- 
lion shares of Unocal stock pur- 
chased before the disclosure of its 
intention to seek control of Unocal 

Mesa said Tuesday that the com- 
mission investigation began April 
26. 

■ Rating Favors Pfckeos 

The Delaware Chancery Court 
has ruled in Mr. Pickens's favor,, 
saying that Unocal could not pro- 
ceed with its tender offer to its 
shareholders unless it included the 
shares owned by his investor group, 
The New York Tunes reported 


CBS Takeover Has Makings of Television Drama 


By Donald M. Rochberg 

Th* Associated Press . 

WASHINGTON — Theway' 
Ted Turner teSs die story, when 
CBS executives tatted to him in 
298> abont buying his Turner 
Broadcasti ng System, he rallied, 
“Why djoYiwmt a year and then 
rSlK9yod >, 

Itto<4fbmyearaForMr.Thnwar 
;to get around to trying, end it st31 


now he is m the marketplace with a 
T^^bHKrtr wIfJlyr offer to buy 
ooHtrol ofdje top-rated network. 

- The CBS boacd of directors ro- 
spaoded quickly to the offer from 
the Atlanta-based broadcaster, 
ga ffi n g it, “financtoHy imprudent.” 
If the experts m Wall Street are 


hartal of acquna&twp&ads of 
C^stodE.lneynrtrtevaidiin- 
mervjewof tbedramw fhataffira 
of Senator Jesse Helms, RepuhBr, 
can of North C arol ina , can meant 
a successful campaign to take over 
dm company; ./ 

But Mr. Turner and Senator 
Helms have long records of con- 


Britain’s Output 
From North Sea 


United Press huemaOmaJ 

LONDON — Britain's off 
outputJrom its North Sea wdls 
fell in March for the second 
straight month, economists at 
the Royal Bank of Scotland 
•said rasday. .. 

This decrease in production, 
combined with a stronger 
pound and a drop in the dollar 
ad prices, cat Britain's income 
from North Sea ail by £5 mil- 
lioQ ($6,2 napkin) a day, the 

economists raid- ■ 

Tbe bank’s monthly oil index 
for Match reached a level of 
161 X representing an average 
daily output of 2j66ntiUkm bar- 
ids o f crude. That compared 
with a level of 165.7 for rebru- 

index is based on a lewd 
of 100 for 1980, the year in ; 
which Britain achieved sdf-saf- i 
ftaeocyinoiL . 


founding predictions that they 
would rail short of their goals, u 
the expats were infallible, the un- 
erfbodox broadcaster and his Ca- 
Me New Network would have 
been bankrupt long ago and the 
maverick polr tiaan would not be in 

th f 

Whatever the eventual outcome, 
the CBS siege mixes politics and 
business aha has come about at a 
time wbm the media are under in- 
tenso scrutiny. It also is occurring 
at a time me government is less 
Hedy to intervene to block a take- 
over — friendly or unfriendly. 

The C^S takeover drama has de- 
ments of along-running TV series. 
Most analysts expect it to take at 
least a year until the outcome of the 
takeover bids is known and there 
"OfraU tei wimimf'dtoHn drfTstory 
that are impotable to predict 

“The dung will bait up more 
before this is over,” said Bonnie 
Cook, m analyst with XC Brad- 
ford & Co. of Nashvflk, Tennessee, 
“ff Turner begins to puraue this 
more aggressively and CBS begins 
ro fed threatened, then afl kinds of 
things could happen." 


“There’s several months before 
CBS really has to start sweating,” 
said Edward J. Atorino, an analyst 
with Smith Barney, Harris Upham 
& Co. in New York. He was refer- 
ring to the time it could take before 
Mr. Turner gets the required gov- 
ernment approval to proceed with 
his bid 

The founder of CBS, WIDianx S. 
Paley, speaking out for the first 
time on the takeover bids, said 
Tuesday that any major change at 
CBS would be “a tragedy.” The 83- 
year-old former ebamnan raid he 
snpports present management 

So far, the apparent winners are 
the long-term holders of large 
Modes at CBS stock which has ns- 
en about $30 a share since the take- 
over v«Uc began early this year. 

“They’re all waiting for CBS to 
do something to pay them off,” 
said Mr. Alorina “There's a great 
greed motivation here.” 

For some players, the motive is 
political, a desire to humble what 
Sir. Hahns calls the “dite media,” a 
group the conservative senator says 
is “profoundly wit of sympathy 


with the ideals and goals of the 
American people;” 

Those sentiments were echoed 
last year by Mr. Trnner when he 
told a conservative group that 
“these networks need to begotten 
into the bands of people who care 
about tins country.” 

Allies of Mr. Helms in North 
Carolina formed Fairness In Media 
and announced a campaign to get 
conservatives to boy CBS stock in 
an effort to combat what the grow 
called the network’s “liberal baas.” 
After Mr. Turner made Ms had, 
organizers of Fairness in Media 
said they would urge conservatives 
to bade him. 

Many on Wall Street felt the 
Helms-organized effort was 
doomed from the start They sot 
no chance an ideological canipB&r 
amid raise the 54 buion it migm 
take to puQ off a hostile takeover. 

T don’t think there’s any way on 
God's green earth they’re going to 
be able to form any sort of coalition 
with cash and march in there and 
take over CBS,” said Miss Cook. 

They don’t haw any real finan- 
cial power," she added. “If their 



Senator Jesse Hefans 

goal was to try to scare the media 
into being a little more even-hand- 
ed from what they consider to be a 
HberaTbias, they've- probably ac- 
complished that already." 

When the American Society at 
Newspaper Editors met in Wash- 
ington in April, its members were 
told of a poll by MORI Research 
Inc. of Minneapolis that said three- 
fourths of adults expressed doubts 
about the credibxlity of newspapers 
and television and one-fifth deeply 
distrust (he media. 


London Gets Rival Currency Options 


(Gonthmed from Page 11) 


Many financial institutions a 


The immediate issue for CBS I 
_• was how many people were ready i 

a tfVKr 1 lYYliriYlG to put their trust in the complex , 

offer pot forth by Mr. Turner. ! 
In the financial community, he 
change-traded options to hedge has a reputation as a businessman , 


FLC, and Rudolf Wolff Group P 8 ^ 10 ** waitin & 10 ? cc . wh ^ h against the rides they create for who bought a failing Atlanta tdevi- 
Ltxt, which is owned by Noranda exchange proves most active m cur- themselves in selling taflor-made aoo station for $15 million and in 
Inc. In adefitkm, Mr. Steen said the . , , options to corporations. 15 years built it into a broadcast 

e xc h an ge is talking with about 40 . wnether m me long-team mere itffe also could benefit be- organiza t io n with assets of more 
otefinandal institutions about * both maiiera Lwould <*£££ pl^toSireWrs^ of 5275 mfflion. 

the possibility of dealing in the op- question, said Gary Tatton, a options to nut mT^snalier down Bnt CBS is a multibillion dollar 

treasury manager at Intexmroonai t n iora 


Ltd, whidh is owned by Noranda exenange pnre 
Ixk. In addition, Mr. Steco said the re SS(^ , ? on ?' 
exchange is talking with about 40 . Whether m 
oth« financial institntions about room for be 


IS years built it into a broadcast 


uo nsL 

UFFE is preparing to introduce 
ddlar-pramd currency (muons as 
wdlraoptkaiscn Eurodollar inter- 
est-rate futures. The LIFFE cor- 
rency option would come in de- 
nominations of £2SJX)0, twice as 
big as the Stock Exchange contrast 

Mr; Ste en sa id that he ap- 
proached LIFFE about collaborat- 
ing oil currency options , but was 
rebuffed. Both sides appeared 
Wednesday to be preparing for a 


treasury tnanag gr at international 
Treasury Management, a joint ven- 
ture of Marine Midland Bank and 
Hongkong & S h a ngh ai Banking 
Corp. 


UFFE also could benefit be- organ i za t io n with assets of more 
cause it plans to require buyers of lh ^5275 miT 1 ioii- 
options to put up? smaller down But . CBS , ls 

payment than wta the Stock Ex- option. In 1984, Turner Broad- 
diance. casting had eammgs of S10 miHion 


on revenue of $281.7 ntiffian. CBS 
But the Stock Exchange has an b««( earnings during the same peri- 


Corp. edge in that it already trades op- odofS21Z4milIiQnocrevQcnies(rf 

Some observers said (hat LIFFE tions on various shares and rat the $4.9 biURm. 
was the most Iikdy to succeed bo- FTSE stock index. As a futures Mr. Turner isn’t offering cash to 


cause it has nes 
members. Many 


banks as exchange; UFFE is only now in- the holders of 29.7 millioa shares of 


traducing options. 


CBS stock. 


“We seem to have got there , 
.first," said Mr. Steen, referring to , 
the ptarmed May starting date. J 
“what's their stale of prepared- < 
nesS?" retorted Nick Carew-Hum, 
UFFE*s contract-development 
manager. ] 


This snrauncement appears as z mater at record onfy 




(UNTAINEKVVORLD SERVICES LTD 
HIGH INCOME PLAN 

* 


fj 


A 


ANWMU.Y<MonlWy/sbc nvxtfWy fwms avaltaW®) 

mmom Investment $2730 

ainefwprid^ Services Ltd based In Soomarnpfon 
oou and ooowto o tost doss worid wfcto cortain&r 
na swste* to Ibtf Shipping industiy and spectatoe lrt 
dnQ kwMtoa wtti a High Rwd income w*h wcurBy. 


B Btetib of lh« >fch Income Plan (NOW INCOfiPOftAI- 
f CARWL vom/m cmmB^cornpteteond 
» coupon iodc^F. -Oi kmcmmm at us tom 5-15 yn. 

IT fl fl PWrorafr frn rtrtin bucon^^ kitep- 

LJ U • medtafypkww contact: AO« writer m 
Cortataatwoud SeMcw Lkt 25 Qumto 
LJiJl Tom5oa.Soomomp»onSOi 1BGWGWND 
‘ raw ■ ■ ■ y StXtticraptao.<07P3) 335322- 

' r* .«*r? r -i 

J ^•oMaaridrou tty wtumctolcfti oc your High Rx®d income Ptan. j 

: l I 


US $ 16,000,000 
MIRTICURRENCY FACflJTY 

To assist mthftacquisttion of two 5600 cubic mutruLP.G. carriers 

“Ctaz Nordsee” and "Gaz Pactffc* 

Lead Managed by 

BANQDEWOEMS 


Conanaged by 

Sodete Bancaire Arabe 


Fun«JstMO«toJby 

Banque Worms 
Qbca Commercial de Franca 
SodeteBancareAratw 
Wemationai Banker Incorporated SA (IBf) 
LocaM WematiWial Finance Limited 


* ’ v ^ • ••• . - I 

| W Npr^wotk) { 

L *°« ,,,0 «W3lori .SOf »SC EngltmaJ 


* 


Conran 

Associes. 


by Design. 

O UR Bnaness is providing design and marketing 
Bervices to industry and commerce. 

We tfest fln h ufkfing s (ooIskk and inside) shops, shopping 
centres, offices, rcmaiuanlB *md airports. 

We design products and the packaging that helps io bcQ 
them. Often we do the advertising as wefl. 

We design corporate identity systems and impfement ibem to 
help companies c omimmi cate effectively and efBdoitly with their 

customers and empk^ees. 

Our <s twTf»gi and that of our as TTA < 

3 SUISSES. HABITAT, SPABTY, SEPHORA, FRANCE ARNO. 
HNGOUEV. FOTOFAST, L’OREAL, is founded on the belief that 
good design produces a competitive advantage, improves 
productivity and generates profit. 

If you would like to learn move about our service s and h ow 
we can assist your marlroffrig effort, contact Christopher WEEDEN 
at CONRAN Associes on (1) 544 01 10. Ahereativcny fill in the 
coupon provided and we will send yon oar Utenture. 


CONRAN Assod&i 
52, Bid. du Montparnasse 

75015 PARIS 
TeL (1)544 01 10 
Tefcac 203051 ^ 


4/V 


♦ A’ 


CONRAN ASSOCIES 


Gunpiay 

AAbn 


Swt to f im oe^i i vr VeeAn. finnan Abdqa S3 BM. do UmposiM 75015 bn, 


Notice of Redemption 

Philip Morris International Capital N.V. 

8Vi% Guaranteed Sinking Fund Debentures Due 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the provisions of the Indenture dated as of June 
1, 1971, under which the above designated Debentures were issued. Citibank, NLA. (formerly 
First National City Bank), as Trustee, has selected for redemption through the operation of the 
Sinking Fund, on June l, 1985 (the “redemption date") at 100%of the principal amount thereof 
(the “redemption price”), together with accrued interest to the redemption date, SI, 280,000 
principal amount of said Debentures bearing the following distinctive numbers: 

IlfMO COUPON DEBENTURES BEARING THE PREFIX LETTER M 


44 4087 5445 6S70 8282 8688 9118 
165 4099 5466 6371 8264 8690 9121 
248 4100 6467 6374 8268 8692 9122 
284 4105 5473 8398 8277 8693 9m 

342 4108 5487 6400 8280 8694 9127 

343 4120 5491 6407 8282 8697 9128 
346 4124 5492 6415 8288 8750 9129 
371 4130 5496 6417 8290 8751 9130 
379 4131 5497 6418 8292 8775 9131 
384 4137 5498 6420 8300 8780 9137 

394 4138 5500 6443 8301 8782 9138 

395 4144 5507 6451 8303 8788 9140 
403 4149 5550 6476 8806 8807 9141 
410 4161 5551 7129 8007 8808 9144 
416 4157 5552 7209 8312 8823 9150 
420 4156 5553 7216 8322 8825 9159 
423 4159 5660 7219 8323 8827 9166 
428 4168 5582 7462 8324 8828 9175 
450 4164 5565 7464 8327 8829 9190 
460 4165 5566 7465 6329 8830 9191 
951 4167 5568 7466 8331 8842 9194 
964 4173 5584 7467 8332 8853 9198 

1046 4264 5585 7468 8334 8854 9201 
1172 4804 5569 7475 8342 8856 9202 
1186 4805 5591 7484 8343 8881 9203 
1213 4831 5593 7494 8344 8862 9204 

1455 4833 5596 7518 8346 8863 9206 

1456 484 1 5697 7527 8347 8806 9210 
1537 4844 5599 7528 8349 8887 9212 
1555 4866 5602 7529 8350 8889 9213 

1586 4998 5603 7530 8351 8892 9214 

1587 4999 5606 7531 8352 8896 9216 

1588 5003 5607 7532 8353 88% 9220 
1689 5006 5608 7550 8354 8905 9221 
1594 5014 5610 7551 8355 8924 9223 
1596 6017 5645 7552 8856 6926 9237 
1598 5037 5646 7554 8360 8926 9242 

1624 5043 5671 7559 8363 8929 9243 

1625 5063 5677 7561 8364 8932 9251 
1718 5060 5764 7578 8388 8935 *352 
1729 5068 5809 7578 8369 8937 9266 
1731 6069 5818 7583 8372 8938 9267 
1941 5070 5986 7585 8879 8939 9286 
2178 5076 5986 7588 8 388 MMO 9286 
2187 5087 6064 7592 8390 8941 9288 

2202 5091 0065 7694 8394 8942 9291 

2203 6104 6068 7608 8395 8946 9292 

2204 5105 6089 7809 8401 8957 9297 
2242 5106 6095 7712 8403 8958 9298 
2246 5119 6102 7767 8414 8966 9311 
2249 5121 6105 7768 8420 8970 9312 
•2257 5123 6109 7782 8441 8974 9313 
2262 5124 6116 7783 8463 8975 9319 
2282 5128 6124 7788 8476 8978 9324 
2284 5132 6178 7798 8477 8979 8331 
2288 5136 8187 7805 8478 8982 9338 
2287 5137 6190 7806 8491' 8983 9362 

2290 5136 61% 7807 8497 6999 9356 

2291 5224 6201 7815 8518 9002 9357 

3507 5228 6221 7816 8530 9008 9359 

3508 5230 6223 7817 8590 9016 9369 
8826 5264 6226 7618 6598 9017 9871 
3827 5267 6288 7819 8599 9018 9375 
3831 5274 62S9 8055 8800 9019 9378 
3990 5277 6270 8062 8606 9020 9384 
4042 5281 6271 80TO 8610 9025 9365 
4053 5290 6273 8083 8611 9029 9386 
4055 5306 6275 8084 8630 9032 9S87 
4061 5316 6281 8088 8631 9042 9388 
4085 5388 8284 8069 8632 9045 9389 
4066 5352 6314 8094 8636 9099 9390 

4072 5358 6336 8168 8648 9108 9391 

4073 6364 6337 8216 6666 9105 9393 

4076 5388 6344 8222 8661 9107 SS97 

4077 5390 6345 8227 8662 9109 9401 

4078 5391 6352 8232 8663 9118 9403 

4079 5413 6364 8243 8665 9114 9408 

4080 5418 6366 8256 8666 9116 9408 

4081 5436 6388 8258 8878 9117 9415 

4082 5440 6369 6261 8687 9118 9418 


9419 10132 10536 11226 11798 12357 13169 14133 14530 

9424 10133 10545 11227 11803 12431 13170 14186 14531 

9426 10136 10546 11228 11806 12440 13176 14137 14532 

9434 10137 10554 11229 11808 12441 13177 14 139 14534 

9437 10143 10681 11284 11810 12442 13179 14140 14537 

9451 10188 10584 11235 11811 12445 13187 14141 14589 

9453 10189 10585 11249 11813 12451 13195 14142 14542 

9458 10190 10586 11253 11814 12464 18199 14143 14543 

9460 10192 10587 11256 11821 12458 13203 14146 14544 

9462 10193 10689 11258 11823 12476 13206 14153 14566 

9463 10199 10594 11259 11888 12477 13207 14184 14558 

9468 10213 10595 11266 11829 12478 1S22S 14166 14563 

9483 10218 10597 11267 UB32 12485 13235 14167 14567 

9485 10222 10605 11270 11839 12487 13237 14168 14569 

9496 10228 10620 11289 11844 12489 13239 14182 14576 

9500 10230 10628 11290 11849 12497 13241 14188 14579 

9501 10033 10630 11292 11852 12501 13242 14190 14582 

9503 10234 10797 11346 11859 12503 13244 14197 14598 

9505 10235 10804 11352 11870 12506 13249 14199 14669 

9511 10243 10805 11354 11874 125 II 15265 14207 14670 

9513 10044 10810 11356 11875 12514 13280 14210 14671 

9526 10252 10813 11356 11879 12522 13267 14211 14681 

9527 10253 10816 11357 11880 12525 13270 14212 14689 

9529 10255 10821 113S9 11885 12527 13271 14218 146S2 

1 9539 10266 10839 11360 11886 12528 13272 14222 14693 

9540 10269 10841 11362 11888 12531 13273 14223 14694 

9545 10834 10861 11365 11891.12532 13278 14226 14695 
9561 10335 10862 11367 11693 12534 13281 14227 14696 

9570 10337 10867 11371 11906 12536 13286 14232 14697 

9578 10341 10886 11372 11912 12540 13894 14240 14702 

9579 10348 10888 11373 11920 12544 1329T 14246 14704 

9612 10358 10895 11388 11926 12545 13298 14250 14706 

9616 14)880 10897 13392 11976 12546' 13867 34252 14706 

9626 10366 10898 11393 11998 12550 13868 14258 14714 

9627 10375 10902 11400 12008 12568 13869 14265 14715 

9629 10379 10908 11468 12012 12576 139S4 14266 14717 

9630 10388 10909 11539 12017 12812 1393? 14287 14724 

9722 10390 10922 11540 12018 12613 13945 14268 14761 

9778 10395 10925 11541 12020 12617 13948 14275 14774 

9801 10396 10939 11543 12045 12622 13950 14Z77 14775 

9805* 10401 10940 11552 12047 12623 13964 14313 14782 

9806 10406 10941 11553 12049 12634 13956 14321 14783 

9807 10412 10943 11557 12072 12636 13967 14336 14784 

9612 10413 10944 11577 13074 12638 13960 14340 14787 

9814 10414 10946 11586 12078 12644 13966 14342 14803 

9S15 10416 10947 11596 12108 12645 13977 14343 14828 

9816 10425 10963 11606 12116 12646 13984 14353 14832 

9817 10428 10972 11619 12152 12649 13990 14359 14859 

9819 10433 10985 11620 12103 12650 13991 14386 14869 

9821 10434 10986 11621 12198 12851 13992 14392 14871 

9822 10435 tllll 11623 12200 12652 13993 I440I 14374 

9823 10438 11112 11629 12201 12653 13998 14408 14877 

9830 10439 11115 11659 12213 12660 13999 14409 14889 

9837 10443 11119 11661 32223 12661 14002 14411 14904 

9839 10444 11120 11666 12225 12662 14020 14414 14912 

9842 10445 11121 11675 12236 12663 14021 14417 14918 

9843 10447 11123 11679 12236 12665 14025 14420 14931 

9646 10451 11183 11680 12238 12667 14027 14422 14932 

9861 10452 11134 11681 12239 12868 14028 14431 14933 

9862 10454 11138 11690 12240 12669 14032 14445 14934 

9868 10460 11140 11694 12244 12673 14041 14446 14937 

9869 10469 11143 11701 12245 12675 14047 14448 14939 

9873 10470 11144 11705 12247 12678 14049 14450 14940 

9874 10474 11145 11706 12248 12679 14054 14451 14941 

9875 10476 11162 11707 12253 12688 14056 14453 14942 

9876 10480 11164 11709 12255 12705 14058 14455 14943 

9878 10489 11166 11713 12260 12708 14064 14458 14944 

9889 10490 11167 11725 12262 12721 14068 14461 14945 

9890 10496 11171 11726 12263 12729 14069 14482 14960 

9903 10497 11172 11730 12264 12821 14070 14485 14952 

10057- 10498 11174 11731 12322 12824 14073 14488 14954 

10058 10503 11177 11732 12323 12870 14090 14494 14959 

10059 10504 11182 11734 12325 12871 14091 14502 14960 

100S3 10515 11192 12739 12330 12875 14092 14505 14962 

10064 10580 11193 11751 12334 12876 14100 14507 14964 

10077 10522 11205 11756 12386 12888 14102 14509 14966 

10078 10527 11210 11756 12336 12884 14105 14522 14967 

10093 10526 11211 21793 12389 23163 14114 14524 14S74 

10119 10532 11221 11796 12344 13164 14119 14526 14978 

10127 10534 11225 11797 12353 13167 14126 14527 15000 


The Debentures 
the holder (a) at the 


if led above are to be redeemed for the said Sinking Fund at the option of 
ave and Defiver Wmdown«5th Flow of the Trustee, No. 1 1 1 Wall Street, 


BANQUE WORMS 


Januay, 1985 


in the Borough of Manhattan, The City of New York, or (b) subject to any laws or regulations 
applicable thereto, at the main offices of Citibank, N.A. in Amsterdam. Frank/urt/Mam, London 
(Citibank House), Milan, Paris. Brussels and Citicorp Bank ( Luxembourg )S. A. in Luxembourg. 
Payments at the offices referred to in(b) above will be made by a United States dollar check drawn 
on a bank in New York City or by a transfer to a United States dollar account maintained by the 
payee with a bank in New York City on rhe redemption date, ar the redemption price together 
with accrued interest to the date fixed for redemption. On and after rhe redemption date, interest 
on die said Debentures will cease to accrue, and, upon presentation and surrender of the said 
Debentures with all coupons appertaining thereto maturing after the redemption date, payment 
will be made at the redemption price out of funds to be deposited with the Trustee. 

Coupons due June 1, 1 085 should be detached and presented for payment in the usual manner. 

PHILIP MORRIS INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL N.V. 

By: Citibank, NA. 
as Trustee. 

NOTICE 

Withholding of 20% of gross redemption proceeds of any payment made within the United 
States is required by the Interest and Dividend Compliance Act of 1 983 unless the Paring Agent 
has the correct tax identification number (social security or employer identification number) or 
exemption certificate of the Payee. Please furnish a properly completed Form W-9 or exemption 
certificate or equivalent when presenting your securities. 

Mav 1. 1985 




'Page 14 


G 


Over-the-Counter 


May 1 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 



Safes IP 


Mat 



100 s 

MMl LOW IPJW.Ch'M 

(Continued from Page 12 ) 




26 I 1 W 

1146 

1146 




11 IIM 

1146 

nib— u 




216144 b 

1 TW 

1344 - tb 



34144 b 












6792244 

fa 

23 V.— 16 

MlerD 



106 4 h 

446 

44 % + n 




168 7 

446 

7 + lb 




2 SZ 646 

6 

6 — 4 k 










176 646 

66 k 

646 + V. 




ITS 24 b 

24 b 

24 k + Vi 










482016 

20 

2046 — '4 










192046 

204 n 

2046 



35 

379 32 V. 

324 % 

324 %— 4 % 










526341 b 

3 Mb 

334 *— 4 % 





34 % 





14803746 

36 %a 

37 + tk 




3289 34 V 






1004 74 b 

74 k 

74 k + 1 % 




234 24 

234 b 











551216 

129 b 











19 846 

B 9 b 

046 




21 1346 

1346 

13 W— 16 




65 0 tb 

4 V 6 





3530*6 






23 7 Vt 



~ Mutex 



12334 m 

3316 

334 b 










11 Th 

21 k 

21 k— <% 





1046 

TOtb + 46 




■ 111 

846 

Wb — 1 % 

K!- -Llill 



54 B un 

1946 

1246 



42 

204 314 b 

3046 


MooreF 

1268 

42 

7254 b 

251 b 


Mot-FIo 



3179 k 












82194 k 

194 k 

1946 




377 54 b 

5 

51 % — V. 




3272)6 

124 b 





4915 

1446 





4 22 V] 

221 b 

224 b + 4 b 




722 

22 

22 




1692 54(6 

55 

56 +16 

Mylant 



1398 21 Vb 

21 

21—46 

I 



N 


1 

NBSC 



218 

17 

17 -1 




13 6 U> 

6<A 

646 

■ 



214 546 

54 b 

54 k 


50 

22 

31446 

1446 

1446 




38 12 V. 

12 




1224 

24 


NstiCBk 

54 b 13 

733 

33 

33 




15619 










914 

1346 


'NttCTY 

350 

42 

10664246 

424 b 

424 % 




24 47 V, 






10261 b 

26 lb 





170161 b 

MV. 





Z 211 Vb 





31 2646 

29 V. 





22 54 b 

SV. 

54 b + 46 




83 4 W 






35 »■* 

9 





40 1546 

154 b 

1546 

NtnwdP 







NatrB tv 

N auaia 
Nous wl 

iMtanT 

Nelson 

NWKSfC 

NtwfcSi 

NtwfcEl 

NevNBc 

NBrunS 

NEBus 

NHmpB 

NJNats 

NYAIrt 

NwCtry 

NwtdBk 

Nmol 

NwpPtl 

Nicola 

NICfcOG 

NHceB 

Nobel 

Nodway 

Noland 

Nerdsn 


JO U 


iVi 

«s 

11 m 

7V4 

8 


44* + M 

146 + * 

7 \%— 1 % 

s — * 


S3 IJ 
m 3J 
1 . 13 b aa 


is -m 

130 « 

2 1V6 
84 FVk 
13S 84% 
i» m 

064211% am 21 — * 
10 44h 4th 4th- 4k 

aa sit SNk SV. + 14 

i5M n m 

108 32 am am + » 

• 23 23 23 

142444 2414 MH- 4k 

nm m m 

47 S16A4 HU 1Mb 

411114 10W MW 

J g’ft'&b ,9 m=2 

*18 ft 3 2 ft + * 

U 27251016 ]fl 104b + t% 


Norsk B 
Nmkn 
NoANot 
NAM in 
NCorGs 
NoFrfcB 
NKtHIII 
NWStTl 144 
NestSv 
NoAJr 

NwNG 144 
NwlFtl I M 
NwNLl M 
NwstPS 2.10 
Nerwsa .14 
Wov m l n 
Novor -01 
NovoCp __ 
NoxHI M 
NucMet 
NudPti 
Nucism .12 

Numnu 
Numeric JU 
NutrtF 
NuMadS 
OCGTc 
OokHIII 
OtriRec 


36 24 
44 U 
M 1-1 
.120 J 


144 77 
Ufa 27 


Odlta a 
OffsLoa 
MIMS 
OtitoBc 
OhloCa 
OIIDrls 

CHdFsh 


US 

252 

280 


Mt 14 


JO U 


251 1046 TV* Wl— W 
1 Bt fk Mb— W 
4 23 33 23 — W 

2202046 2046 am + v, 
10241 40*1 «M— 66 

2342W OW 4ZW + 4% 
M7 «W Mb Mb— tb 
4 N N TO 

73 m m Mb— w 
412Mb 27th 24 — W 
4 34 331b 34 

IIW » » 

142Mb 27 27 

WN N n 

1 Mb Mb S!% + 4% 

3731Mb 174b 174b— lb 
2B30W 301b 30th 
21734 33 33 —1 

172316 2314 2314— 14 
14 5W 51b 5W— 14 

14 4 m 
3718Vb 17W 17W— 1b 
73 31b 2ft 3 + Vb 

583471b 47ft 479b + lb 
42 131b 131b 131b + th 
355 514 5 514 

4MH MU 141b— lb 
17 7b 7b 74k — lb 
252714 241b 2714 + lb 
14 7W 714 71b + lb 
21411 10W 10W— 14 

1044 lib lib lib 4- lb 

4 31b 3W ... 

13 21b 21b 21b + lb 

54 21b Zft 21b 

IB Ulb 1414 1414— 14 
91 Mb 21b 21b— 14 

93 4014 39W 4014 + 14 
2441b 4Mb 441b— 1 

2445414 53* 53»— Vb 
192Mb 20 301b— lb 

12 5 4W 5 

110281b 20 38 

IBB 4014 30* 39*— * 
721* 211b 21* 
135191b 181b IB* + * 
42 7 7 7 

SB 2* 3* 2*— ft 
444 15* 14* 15* + lb 
473411b 40 41 — lb 

299 MIA 13 13W— * 

00 17* 17W 17W 
151 Mb 4* 4* 4* 14 

35 MIA 9* 9*—* 

94 4 5* M4 

3214* M 14—14 
3613 12* 12*— * 


BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 


Floating rate note issue of US $250 million 
January 1980/88 


"The rate ni interest applicable lor the three month period beginning 
April 30. 1985 and set by the reference agent is 8%% annually. 


Weekly net asset value 


* i 

V 


^ — -± 


Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 


on April 22, 1985: U.S. $134.25. 


Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


Information: Pierson, HekJringA Pierson N.V., 

Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amst e rdam. 


OMrTP 27* 
OvfExjJ 
OwenM JO 
OMOO 


3531 * 31 * 311 b— ft 
47 12 * 131 b 12 * + 14 

mi* 18 * 1 Mb— * 

193 2 1 W 1 * 


PLM 

PNC 

FBMtB 


.12 

333 


UK A3 
JO 4J1 
.118 15 


,13 1J 


JO 4.1 


PoeFst 
pcGgR 
PMTM 

PoeWB 
PocUSy 
Pocwst 
PoeoPii 
PopeA 
Ponicn 
PmcMx 
Porwsfi 
PorPh* 

PsrTch 

Portion 

PorfcCm 
Parkon 
Par tax 

PotntM 

Potto* 

Poiru 

Patriot 1J0 M 
Patrtpf 220 4.1 
PoufHr 

Paxton M 73 

PavN 

Pavdw 

Pawns 

PMKHC 

PaarIK 

PeerMf 72 54 
PagGfd OU 7 
Ptmlft 140a 34 
PenDcp 200 48 
PanaEn 230 U 
Panto rs 48 27 
Panwsf 
PaopEx 

PaopBs S3 20 

Prat-Rt 

Parcaot 


2 Mb 4lb 4Vb— * 
41157 54* 56*— (4 

2 9* 9* 9* 

Ufa M 1845401b 3W6 40 — * 

111811* 11* 11* + * 

142414 24 24 + 14 

34 1314 13 1314 + A 

24 SW 5W 5*- * 
in n wiA— * 
517* 1714 1714 — * 


9012* Ulb 131b „ 

33 lft 1* I* — ft 


144 4 3* 3*— W 

230 T» 7Vb 716 + Vb 
12419* 19* 19* 
54217* I4W 17 
Bit* 15 15 — 1 

14 12W 12* 17W-* 
134* 34* 34Vb— Mb 
1914* 14* 141b 
10 13 13 13 + * 

143 5* 5 5 

33 414 4 414 + 14 

42 8 B 8 — * 
413014 29 29W— * 

3734* 35* 34 + * 

11919* 19V4 1914— * 
3310* 10* W*— » 
4 18 H IB — V. 

3 2346 23* 23* + * 
112 12 12 

4 14* 14* 1**— * 
421 12* 12* 72* + ft 
10522* 22* 22*— Vb 

2 1314 1314 131A— * 
247 B* B* 8*— * 
15144* 44 44* 

B SB 50 50 — Vb 

141 33* 31 32* +1* 

835* 23 25 — * 

22 1214 12 12 

9* 9* 9* 


W10JJ IS* 


ParsCot 

aua 

ran mv 


1.12 3J 


991 
82 7 
115417 
17 8* 
7 3* 
TM29* 


14 * ■ 

M4 6* 
14* 17 


lb 


Phrmct 

Phrmcta 

Plwtnfct 

Ptirrn wt 

PSF3 

PtHKH 

PtbwAm 

Phyaln 

Picsov 

PlcCofe 

PtenFM 

PlartG s 

PtanHI 

PfontrC 

PtzCSc 

Planum 

PoFOlk 

PIcyiMs 

PuncaF 

R ubric 

PwConv 

PracCat 

PtORtt 

PrprfLo 

Pwl.fl 

PrstnCP 

Preway 


3W 3-4 + * 

465 9W 8W 9W + w 
Mm A 4BB15* 15* 15*—* 
99 8 716 8 + * 

1 4* 4* Mb— * 

JSa J SIS 8* 8* B* 

JDe 3.7 339714* 19* 16 

20 2* a* 2* + 14 

74 43 9 4 6 6 

51125* 24* 24*— W 
JO 23 4220* 20* 2QW + * 

J5B 37 7 T2W 12V4 12*— * 

JO 14 719* 18W IBW— W 

72 2J 1DB1 22W 321h 32W + * 

74 13 829* 29 29* + Vb 

82 5 5 5 

7A321A 31* 32 + * 

71 11 10* 10* + * 

7902616 25* 25V + 14 

4711 10* 11 + * 

35 16 15V 15W + 14 

34 B* 8* 8*— 14 

1225* 25* 2SV 
1431V 30* 31 + * 

52 6 5* 4 

1 25V 25V 25* +1 
41 15W 14* 14*— * 
1480 5* 4* 5* +1 


■10a 2J 

74 3J 


23 


.12 


JO 34 


PrleCms 

PrtcCoi 

PrfnvD 

Plliunx 

Prodtsv 

PtocJOp 

Proflnv 

PnrfHS 

PraoCe 

Praora 


ProtCea 


P ravin 

PrvLfA 

PruOSk 

PubcoC 

PMNC 

PsSdBc 

PotaiF 

Pvtimn 

Purifln 


QMS 5 

Quod ix 

QuakC a 

QuaTSV 

Qntmxi 

Quantm 

Quanta 

QuaatM 

Quintal 

Quixote 

Qualm 


11711* 10* 11* 

251 5W 5* 5*— * 

2011* II* 11* 

43 2 I* 1*— 14 
13315 MW 14*. + 14 
28620 V. 19* 19*— 14 
2 514 514 5V6 — 16 
448 4 3* 3* + M 

1 7* 7* 7*— * 
1610 9* 9*—* 

225311* W* U + * 


RAX 

RJFKi 

HU CP 

RPM* 

itadsya 

RadtnT 

Radian 


JBn S 
36 2 A 
30 33 


•1 9* 9 9 - * 

18 9* 914 9* + <4 

5123* 23* 23*— 14 
1914* 14* 14* + * 
300 9* 9* 9* 

612 12 12 — * 
1 7 7 7 — * 



Rcfoc I 
ftaeyEl JO 11 
Room i Jf 3 
RaMAati 

RoMUi Ottm A 

Reltab 

Repeo 

RpAlita M 4J 
RpHJtti 

ftmhinc J2a U 
RastrSy 

Rautart .15a 1J 
RautrH jib 3 
RovarA 1 M 113 


Roy Roy 


RBHIm 

RkUIEI 

AlHiN 

Rltzys 

Rival 


Roods i uo 


RabMyr 


RMUnd 

RkMIG 

RosbSB 

Rowtcti 

Rouse 

RowaPr 

RovBGa 

RevPIm 

RoyIRs 

Roy [Air 

Rutalnd 

RustPal 

RvonFa 


JO 20 
1JM 14 
.130 U 


BS 7* Mb S* + * 
3942734 34* 34*-* 

»«y> 4V* * 

2123* 23W 33W 
217* 17* T7J4— «, 
229 2D* T9W 38* + * 
72 44b Mb Mb 
2730 39* W4-W 

906 TO 9* 9* 
10211* 10W II* + 14 
537 4* 4* Mb 
2012* 12 12* 

141 Mb 4* Mb— * 

20 4* 4* 4* 

12 6* 5* i* + * 

3 4* 4* 4* 

4 9* 9 9* + * 

48914* If* 14* + 16 

4 11* 1114 1114— Vh 

23 13V 13* 13V 
5817* 12 72* + * 

1572Mb 28* 23*— W 

1112 11* iw — * 

137 7* 7 7 — * 

U 1443Mb 37* 3814 
11 37211* 1114 1114 

1114x8 714 7* 

227 27 27 +14 

4.1 1849* 48 48V— * 

37 2* 2* 2* + * 

5.1 27414 15* 15*— * 

AO 123925* 2<W 2514 + 'A 

413* 13* 13*— * 
1 4W 6* 4* — H 

A 74 M 13* 14 +14 

3511* 71 V 1114— Vh 
1319 19 IP + » 

151 8* BW 8W— * 
SJ 611* 1114 11* + u 

1.1 225 25 25 +1 

71 20 19* 19* 

247 41* 41V 41V— * 
7 9* 9* 9* 

1 2 2 2. 

28 914 9 9V4 

49 4 5* 4 + * 

5 fl* 8* 8* 

21 414 4\h 4W— tb 

11414* M 14* + V 

214 17 16* 17 + V 


Sourrst 

Sovran 


U0 

.» 


SocMtc 

spora 

Sptcdy 

Socmss 

SoacCH 

Ssorm 

SebrtlO 

Saira 


StftfBId 

JO 

13 

1 6 

surety* 

un 

AO 

149254b 

ShtMIc 



*721446 

StdRM 

170 

12 

8354 

Standun 



10 gfc 

stenfdT 



5 ISM 

Stanhos 

uo 

54 

■ } . j 

SUSTB 

U36 

15 

36 5A> 

StataG 

,15b 2A 

60 54b 

SMpar 



11 FA 

Starnrt. 



n or* 

StawStv 



177 UVj 

Stwtrtf 

32 

34 

12146 

Sttfel 



S 64k 

5MY1P 

.16 

1.1 

J 1461 

StackSy 



9 9« 

Stratus 



6901446 

SirwCs 

1.14 

2.1 

4295* 

Stryker 



14 284b 

SUDS 



1 17V. 

SuOoru 

IAI 

U 

T7B3646 

SuOAlri 

J35 

1.1 

2 <Vb 

Subrs 

152 

3J 

423 50**6 

Sudbry 



61 9 

SutfSB 

.12* 

■ A 

95154k 

SumnM 



145 3'A 

SumtOt 

.96 

A 3 

39338*% 

SutniHl 

J9e 

» 

1140118% 

Surest 



473 l*k 

Sunatr 

J4 

U 

72 t 

SanMcd 



13 fjb 

SunSL 

t 


744 54% 

Suawst 

IM 

34 

34146 

SupRte 

.16 

5 

318 UK 

Super El 

1J0t IDA 

aim 

Suprtex 



399 JM 


SABHoa 
SAY Ind 
SCI 59 

SEI 

SFE 

SPOruo 

SRI 

Botacda 

Safeco 

SafHHn 

StJude 

StPaut 

BalCpt 

Sanflar 

SaMco 

SavnF 

SvBkPS 

Scan Oo 

SaalTr 


.13 1J 


.10r 1J 

I 

J« 3J 


1J0 40 


300 


JHr 


Sctwlaa 
SOdtnA 
so Dm 
Scllnca 
SdMIc 
SciSff 
SdSvSv 
sates 
ScrtDH 
SeaGai 
Saanata 
Seal inc 

ScNIBM 1.10 46 
SacNH 120 19 


28 BW ■ IV + * 
7372 II* 11*— * 

251 72* 72W 12W — * 

1517* 17* 7714— * 
54 9* 9* 9* 

1 15 15 15 — 14 

Mint If 19 — * 

56214* MW 1Mb— * 
8137* 37* 37*—* 
12617 16V 16V 

2811* 11* 11* 

«J 115864* 45* 65V— * 
24 3* 3* 3V + * 

3 18 7* 7 7 — * 

14 1* 1* 1* + * 

UDd U 736* 36* 36* 

■84 2J 1930* 30* 30* 

30 9* 9* 504 + W 

1212 12 12 

33 3.1 18 10* TOW 7Mb— * 

416* 14* 1Mb 
JO 23 W17W 17* 17* + * 
22 9 SW SV 
10 5* 5* 5* — * 

67 4* 4* 4W— * 

4 8* BW 8* — * 
216 7 4* 4* + W 

43115* 15* 15V 
239 38 39 +2 
570 9* B* 9 
2430 6% 6* 6* + * 

3 6 6 4 + * 

1376V 14* 15*— * 
3931 30* 3Mb- W 


JO 2.1 







SecSCD 

1.12 

SJ 

3224b 

224b 

224b 



544561b 

534b 

534b —3 

SkToo 



IM 316 

3 

34b 

.16 

1A 







491 34k 

3 





Selbel 

50 

34 

752216 

2166 

22—46 



39 4U 






s n% 

96* 

966— Vb 


25 




Snmlcn 



10 7M 

766 

766 


13 54% 

546 

54b— Vb 

Sensor 

JUS 

3 

2262 75b 

ft 

74b + 16 

40 

34 

21116 

11 « 

in% 

Srvmort 



Z30 lib 

19k 


J 





M 

A 

167713 

171% 




Z 5Vb 

52b 

516 

Svmost 

1.12 

LI 

7253616 

354. 

3616 


66 




Sarvlco 

t 


72046 

2046 

2016 + lb 

42 

2 A 

6523Vb 

73 

234b— lb 

SvcFrct 



402 616 

6 

64% 






SevOok 

.16 

1.1 

45143k 

lllb 

1416 






ShrMed 

40 

IJ 

162 29 

2866 

2 SU— Ik 

2 JS 

25 

Il79fhb 

98 

90 — tb 

Shwmf s 

148 

45 

3103416 

34 

34th 






Shelbvs 

.16 

5 

63166% 

1846 

164b + V. 



116 

1*6 — Vt 

SheWls 



134 179k 

126b 

1216 + 16 

IJ0 

BJ 

12224b 




.15 

3 

513301% 

304b 

3D6b 

1.13 

36 




ShonSos 



7914 

139b 


JO 


22646 



Shpsmt 

-10e 

Zl 

7 «!h 

4X6 

466 — 16 






StamCs 



3 7*b 

7Vi 


A0 

13 

12126 

21 M 

2116— Kt 

StamaR 



5 39k 

39b 





SB Icon 



203 7H 




Silicons 

SlllcVal 

SIIIC7IX 

sntac 
SbnAIr 
51 main 
Slpnln 
StaGo 

Stole r 

SKIpner 
Sky Exp 
SloonTc 
SmlttiL 
SmtthF 
Sodntv 
SodvSw 
Softecfi 
SofhwA 
Sonesta 
SonocP 
SonrFd 
SaMIcG 
SCalWt 


M A 


5111* 10* 11 
20916* 15* 15*— * 
2819* 19 19 — * 

B2 7* 7 7 — * 

9811* IT 11 — * 

4715* 13 15* 

11016* IS* 15* + * 
30 4 4 4 — * 

102 20* 20* 20* 

34 ID* 10* 10* 

59 3* 2* 3* 

379 BW 8 BW + H 
12 3* 3 3 

12 BV aw BW + * 
4243* 42V 43V +7 




109144b 

139b 

13*b 

— 46 



05 766 

69b 

7 

— V% 



113 1366 

139b 

T34b 

— 46 

JO 

IJ 

125 

25 

25 

—in 

1J6b 

2.4 

534616 

«96 

M 


.Mr 

.9 

52174b 

17 

17 

— 46 

157b 

0.2 

44101b 

10 

104b 


130 

7J 

7234b 

23Vb 

234b 




43 54b 

54b 

5Vb 



SthdFn 32 U IB 70V 2BW 28W + * 


624 25 V 24 + * 

Uf 4* 4H 4W— * 
1042* 41V 4» 

45 1 * *— * 

61 SV I* US— * 
513* 13* 13* 

an law n* wn +iw 
105 4 H «v tv— * 
611* 1116 II* + * 

54 aw a* 2 * 

3215* UW 15* + W 
235 8* IV Mb 
4 6 

K* 25 


S3* S3*— * 
Mb «b + V 


5>A 

SV 

6* 


5W— * 

SV 

4«A— * 


4* Mb + V 


y*. f*b— W 
M 14V. 

55 55* + * 

28 28 


4* 4* + * 


9 

15* + * 
3* + W 
20* 


iV 

5* 

9* 

5* 


18V + W 


SunrEQ 

SwwTc 

Sykes 

Svmotn 

SvmOT 

Smear 

SynfaOi 

Svntrcx 

Sraean 

SyAsoc 

Svstln 

Svslntg 

S vatGn 

Syatmt 


3* + * 
12 9 SV BV 

ni^i^ii*** 

h» » aw— * 

11912* II* 12* + M 
65 3* 3V 3* 
30014* U* 14 — * 

223 4 3V 3* 

48 14W UW UW + V 
322V 22* 22W— U 
442 5 4V 4V— * 

12 9V r* na 

236 7 6W 6V— Vi 
134 19W 19 19* + * 


TBC 
TCA Cb 
TSi 
T5Rc 


TocVluj 
TsBkUlk 
Toixtan 
TcCom 
TMCO 
TtonA 
TalPlua 
Trtcrfr 
Tbiocra 
Tafeofct 
Talvkf 
TalOBS 

Taixnn 

temca 

TmplE 
Tcmtex 
Todruu 
Tarmartt 
r era Co 

Termor 

TeRtoltr 
Taxon 
To xlne 

TTtarPr 
TluuhU % 
TlMikf 

TTXlN 5 1JB 
TCBYO » 


28 4* Mb Mb 
425019* 19 IV* 

978 5* 5* 5* 

12 8V IV 6V + * 

13514* 14* MV — * 
34M39W 28* =•*— 1* 
1693 Mb 9 Mb + W 
•91Mb 15* 15V— * 

187 W 15* 16*—* 

76523* JSU 23* + * 



171 ?tk 

Th 

236— 1% 


38015 

14V* 

1446— 4k 

■Ole 

911* 

Ufa 

1096— 16 

20 S46 

5*6 

546 — Ik 


lfl 2H 

24% 

216— 1% 


21 71b 

74b 

71b 


5 3 

3 

2—1% 

St *A 

1531 

21 

21 + 16 

16 4H 

44b 

44b— n 

l 

79 716 

7*m 

736 + V. 


IM 34b 

246 

246— K 


13 1 

1 

1—1% 

359 15 

3471*4% 

164b 

164% 

11210*6 

40*6 

104k 


ThauT* 


TTerco 

ThnbrM 
TlmaEa 
Tiprary 
Tolu a 

Toted Tr uo 

ToiTrpf 2J0 
TrakAu 

Tran Ind 
T ronLo 
Trnsnt 

TrkMSv 
TrUUc 
TribCm 
Trlan 
TnnJo 
TBkGa 


4413V 13* UV 
51 9V ** 9*— * 
640* 40* 40*— * 
48527* 2SW 36* — V 
50 BV Mb BV— H 
13016* MW 16* 

137 8* 8* 8* 

73 9* 9 9* + * 

1 5* SV SV— * 
34P13W T2W 12*— * 
133 V W V 
IBS 14 Ulb 13* 

339* 39* 39* 

531 31 31 —a 

■4 UW IS IS 


TucxDr 
TumCtv 
Tyson F 
USLICa 

un. 

WtrBcp 

Ultrsv 


JB J 
JO 3.9 


20012V 12* 12* + U, 

1020 19* 19* — *1 UBAhk 

5 7W 7* 7* I UBkSB 

414 12 P* 10*— a UBCOI 


Unlbcpr 1J3 WJ 
umn 

UnJfrc » 

Unltnad 

UnFedl 

Unpratl 2JM 4J 
UnPIntr U9t *J 
UnTrSc 2J0 3J 
UACm ■ J6 3 
UBArtz JO 2S 
.Ur IJ 


1J8 4J 


209 V V 
570 21 W 20* 21* +1 
2827 2ft* SOW— * 
5823 22W 22W + * 

78 SOW 30 3ft* + u 

118 «* i a — * 

67U 12W 12*— * 

6 15W 14V 14V— * 
22 9* Mb V* + * 
4411V 11 11W— V 

295 9* BW 9 + V 

64710* 18* 10* 

444 44 44 

16223 22* 22*—* 

843* 43* 43*— * 
212 17* 17 17* + * 

37037 34* 35*— 1* 

2918* 70* 10* + * 
116 14 14 14 . 

19125 34* 34* — * I 


U CorSe 
UCHB 5 II 
UCtvCfr 


UO IS 


UnDam 

MW* 


BCP UO 15 


Un 

uFriarw 

UFiiPd 
UOrd* 
UnNMx 
IMObU 
UPrua 
US Mil 
US . 
US Cap 
US DKm 
US Em- 
us HtB 
US SMI 
US Sew 
USTrfc 
US Tr» 

USlotna 

UTeteJ 

UnToWv 

UaToM 

lIVBBa 

UnvDaw 

UftvPrn 

UirvHB 

UFSBk 

UPRgtll 

UPanP 

Uraacr 

UicoU 

UtohBc 


UB M 

.93 0A 


1J4> ISJ 
JS* 2J 
J4 11 


.oca 3 
.10a J 
U0 9 3 
1J9 4A 
30 .9 


JM 42 
U8 43 


si a* a* 3j7 . ^ 

mi* *'<■*!;** 

31519V 19 19* 

257 tOW 10* W**— ^ 

»10* 10W ffii 
nt, in m 
2 IU* n* Wb 

40 38b 3* 3* +£• 

■waft* fa* at*- v 

13 3U 3 a — * 

41 4* 4* 4* + Ml 

47 4* 4* 4* 

193234* 33* 34 + * 

19 4 3* SV 

0519* 1Mb 19* 
un* 12* 13* 
35530* 9* 30 
19033* 32V 23 + * 

16 5* 5tb 1V> 
1031* 27* 27*— » 
1 11* 11V UW — * 
33941 4Mb 41 + * 

3323* 33* 20*— * 
5330* fa 20 
4571414 U 14 — * 
71 T«* 10* MV— V 
19 5 *V 5 
319* lft* 70V 
94 5 4* 4*— * 

175 5* 4* 5 
2534* fa 34 + * 




9 44k 

41b 

44k + 16 






746 


U 

10*996 







1044 

1096— K 



72 24k 


2Vb— 46 






0k + 4b 



49 796 







1066 + n 



37 596 








124%— Ik 



134 3Vb 

39b 







HVb 

.10 

IJ 

10 896 

046 








JO 

IJ 

■ MVb 

falb 





Km 

14*% 

1496 + 1% 

1J0 

25 

617 35 

341b 

3496 + 46 







A3 

25284b 

fa 

381b +1lb 

rriTfa 




369k 

369*— 1% 



47 6tu 

64% 

6V. — 4k 


JO 

Ll 

6194b 

184b 

mb 


Vedtek 

VWLn 

vwiOm 

VBnzatl 

von era 

War len 

vaarG 

VataBd 

Ventrax 

VtFna 

VerwT 

VOW 

Vtcurp 

metres 

VtadbFr 

Vtratak 


.. . 1J 

JO IJ 
JO 3J 


Ufa 3.9 
JO IJ 


VIxTaOi 

Vltram 

VOdavl 


St* A 
33A IS 
Mr U 


32 6W 4* 4* 

224* 24 31 — * 

210)1* 1IW 11*— * 

35 944 9* 9* 

5 TV 7* 7* + * 

nufciajfci^-^j 

10TB* 18V 1|W 
5B7 4* 4* 4* 

530* 38* 30* 
3815* 15W IS* + W 
714 W W * 


vairC* 

Vnmnf 

VOM* 

vorkic 

VtWN 

WO 40 

NfattPC 

WlbrTal 


M ■* 


4.4 

3 


VNFSLa 

WWSS 

WtkSci 

woimr 

bbbutPP 


l.» u 

JOB 24 


.12 J 
.11 1J 
JO 3J 


J U » FA It* JJJ- f* 
45019V 18* 3J»- f 
H HI IU •* r ™ 
t 6* 6* l! * 
1383Mb 19V 2 "• 

x£*ou m J * * 

■iw. “ K 





"*** * 3! a 

Ufa IV 


S’? 'SS- 

41910* W* 


WriWl 


WMPC2 

wAmOc 

WobfFn 

WalCop 

WbtFSL 

WNUCTC 

WMkT 

WStLta 

IwtTiAa 

WmorC 

Wa tunic 


igtaiu 

J0 MLt 

» U 


.40 14 
-10a J 


VMCOt 

WtOCOm 


Jl 3J 9834* 
« 4W 


WI3* » l» ' 
m ou m m 
3371 b 2 £b w 

43 8 7V 7* 

117* UW t»W 
63 ) 3 * 13 W 
254 12* 11* l»»- - 
38617* I3W 13"-— .-*■ 
13 TV TV TV— ~ 
7 8 7* TV- * 

113* 13U 13* 
5323* 21 » 

8817* l#V 17 — * 

3527 2*V fa* 

• 29V 27* 27*— *b 
9831* 24* fa* ♦ 2 
Mb «n 4*— * 

« r 4* ** 

17 4* 4* 4* 




A3 

9362*46 

fa 








WUIAL 



4S*lt9k 




l 


S 9 










UO 

33 

5544% 

»n 





64 irtfe 





IJ 

71*4* 





1.1 

112 Me 






179 6 

59k 




3J 

191946 

tin 




2J 

14 4Ck 

44% 





1471)1. 





U 

240241k 

fan 



.156 

15 

152 1 


Wi 



U 

Ufa 

324% 





5321046 

91% 

wu + n 




ID 41b 

44k 





530 84% 

79k 


JOdtx 



353131b 

13 

ii 

| 



Y 


I 




393316 

33 

33U 

YkrkFd 

JO 

4.1 

211496 

DM 



*1 


7162Mb 

2616 

244k + 4% 

Zmlds 



7773J9S 

3246 

14 34b 

39k 

SH— «b 




ID 3 

294 

»II« 

in* 

UW— tb 

Dealer 

A0a AS 

2010*6 

1096 

671744 


14 —146 

ZtanUt 

13* 

5 3 

133196 

3596 


696 


ZIM 



3 06 

346 

7i m 

19k 

in + 1* 

Zlvad 



12 5 

5 

2 446 

61b 

446 

Zorefei* 

34 

U 

123 HU 

NI 

6334044 

10 

10—4% 

Zymak 



13 24b 

29k 


2* — * 


3* — * 
5 


2*— * 


^FIoatin^Rat^fotes 


May 1 


1 1 Dollar H 

1 bluer/ Mat. 

Coupon Next Bid Asfed 

Allied InsbVS 

Wh 

IW 

i i ■ ■ 

AHied lr!« 92 

9h 

n-H! 100.1018020 

Aided Irish 07 

9A 

IW 

r ' : 

AOipdlfJilsrpl 

046 

23-5 

tajs V7 30 

Arab Bko Core 19»1 

»k 

IB4 

La.’i 

Atlantic Fm Int iwv 1 


31-5 

Eit'UvKSI 

BcaComm. ital.95 


6-6 

1 ' » II 

Ban Mat Lavcra 91 

To 

3.T0UUS18.U 

Bona Di Room 91 

911/47+ 

9901 7953 

BcoDiSentoSca.91 

r+ 

295 

9U0V9JD 

BrawPIntaB 

IQfc 20-5 

wjstaus 

Bank Of America 97 

946 

M 

WJ0 99JB 

Bk 01 Greece 91/94 

9h 

10/ 

E l 

Bk Of Greece 97 

ft 

m 

||i.i i l|H 

BkOf IretaadS? 

9h 

Ji-i 

B* T * k ■ 

BkOt Irekndf! 

9 

25-7 

■ A I., l. H 

Bi3«onlreol9e 

Vh 

2M 

■l 1 ‘V jj. 1 -1 

Bk Ot Montreal « 

ft 

29-7 

■ “ '7 r - H 

Bk 01 Montreal 91 

r% 

1.11/ 1 ■ 

Bk Of New York *4 

rs 

is-; 

k ‘ i 1 a 

BkOt Nora Seotta 88/93 


21-10 KJQ. 010053 1 

Bk Cl Nava Sco>« 94 


IM 

i -■ ■ i 

Bk Of Tokyo 43 

9% 

fa-toiaunNJS 

BkOt Tokyo C4 


29-7 

1 V LBI 

BkOt Tokyo 87 


73-7 

It 1 a 

Bk Of Tokyo ftbBB/41 

»Vi 

M 

L ; 

BkOt Tokyo dedB.'SIl 

Vb. 

174 

1 00.1110038 1 

Bk AmericsH 

9>b 

2IM 

r" 1,v » - wi 

Banker! Trost 0C 

Vb. 

ll-A 

OJ3LTTBI 

Bankers Trust 94 


256 

1 .'ll 

Banker! Trurtfi 

b 

IM 

1 '/ II 

Ba Arabe El in*es 07/91 

Rle 

3)4 

9SH WH 

BU9S 

n 

17-6 

1006510075 

BWW 

Vh 

IMO UW.W106* 

BW93 

91® 

n-s 

WiBldUH 

Be IndasuerSD 

Vh 

>5-7 

toinlbM I 

Salnfinaezft 

ICh 

21-4 

tt ImTi IrS 

BaDeLlMcnEurB* 

VH 


[irli Ji 

BlcoS7 

Fh 

79-7 

” T ' t ! S 

BIceoctBS 

Vm 

»7 

[• i 

Bice lands 

vn 

2J-7 


Bice 99 

n» 

IM 

‘JT r| 

Bnp« 

rti 

H 


BreiK 

n't 2M 

t?JS told 

Brx.aS.-88 

0% 

31-7 

■00.1010030 

Bn 004,-94 

94% 

IM 

if-rrrTrrfai 

BmjW 


5-6 

99 52 10002 

BiWB" 

wnJM 

usfaioaw 

Bnp Efl/91 

UK 

64 

UIU10136 1 
1 


71601. 


Canada Hud Ud asfcd 


BepM 
BIWOS 

BaPomaseent 
Ba Warms W/94 
Barclay* Osea* « 

Berdan Oiwb W 
Bxxdan Oscaa acm 
BardanOuaaM 
Kingdom Of Mb. pent 
Kingdom Of Be* 19AK 
Kingdom OtBatB.« 

Benton Bank It 
Berean Bank Od 88/91 
KbiBdom Of BMa. Jdn MAM9U 
Kingdom 01 BMaOdW/NWh 


Mb 

Ob 



'To walk fhe streets of Paris — without deadline or curfew — 
stalking everything wonderful to eat 


To get lost and rained on. To find file most 
romantic spot for breakfast and the trustiest 
cheesemonger. To quarrel with butchers and 
descend into the great bakers cellar as he 
pulls the days bread from the oven. To be 
tempted and indulged by the city's most 
brilliant chefs. Its the dream of every one of 
us in love with food. And Patricia Vifells has 
done iL. No serious hedonist should go to 
Paris without it, and reading it at home is a 
tittle closer to actually beffig there? 

- Gael Greene, Ne w j hA Ms g aane 
"-it is impossible to read it and not want to 
be in Paris. Now" 

- Lois Dwan. The Los Angeles Times 

-one of the best guides in English. And, 
mon Dieu, it was done by an American. 
There will be consternation in highjpk 


The "Food Lovers Guide to Paris? by the 
International Herald Tribunes restaurant critic 
Patricia NAfeib, includes lively critical commentary, 
anecdotes, history and local lore. A great gift 
idea. Paperback, aver 300 pages with 140 
evocative photographs. $ 11.95, plus postage: 
add $ 1.50 in Europe and $ 4.00 outside Europe. 


I 


International Herald Tribune Book Division, 

181, avenue Charies-cJe-Gaufle, 92521 Neufly Cedex, France. 

Please send me 

copies of FOOD LOVERS GUIDE TO PARIS/ 


I 


I 


at $ TL95 etsch, plus postage: 
add $ 1.50 each in Europe, S 4 each outside Europe. 
Please check method of payment: 


j | Enclosed is my payment. (Payment can be mode in any 


I 


convertible European currency at current exchange rates) 

□>!— . -K- m •*) 


! charge to my: q 


□ ESS— — 


laces. 


I 


N° 


Exp, date 


Signature 


- Frank PriaL B ig Ne w Yoyfc Times 


I 


PVuwixx t to nt tori ptrebam I 

Name 


J 


Country 


2-5-85 


Cctt* 

CceeBS 
cnaj 90/75 
CnlTO 

cm 91 

ObcQS 

atxnniviv 

□new 

CartarorS+LW 

Choir monhatkMn 
Okbc 09 
Chamlcnl BkM 
CMmlcol IlMdylW 
ChrWkxilo Bk 91 
ChrlsHcnla 94 
CUkorp (WMvJ OU0.I9W 
CUtcorpSam 94 

on oa fait 

Clfl core 94 

cmcore-umoiedoerB 
CllkoreVT 
CooHiwrannkfa 
Commentanh Kov89 
Comm Urn Montreal 91 

co Bans 

CdW95 

CctfeBM 

Cd97 

Cam* S7/92 
Caotneffl 

Cmflt Du NordU/92 
Outfit Fanocr BI/9J 
CrndtlForEiaW 
Cr LvanU/M 
Cradil Lyonnais B7 
CnMW Lyonnais 7B/97 
CmUl Lvormls W/94 
CrnSI Lvoonab 57/94 
CmSl LraonaB<Mc99 
CnH* I Lycnnott lan92/w 
Croat LyamoH lunW/W 
Crtdll National B 
CtnHi Naltonal 96/94 
Crctfi Nahonoiai 
Credita ns talt 9« 

Creditanstalt M 
DalitfaKtxiaMW 
DameOKe + NB 
DcnMorjJtrO* 
DtnNarskel 


9* 

9W 

9V 

9tb 


9W 


9V 


«U 



Denmark B4 

Denmark t 

Die ErstOesi 92/94 
99.94 

OrasdnerBoiikn 

Dresdner Bank 89 

DreMner BaA 92 

Eldar ado Nadear R! 

Edl 79 

Edff5 

Edl 97 

End 01 

Eaton 

Mia 

EeClB/90 

ExtertarinB* 

FetrovieV 

FetTovtoW 

Ftrmhti Faner 9f 

Fim Boston Inc 91/74 

Hm Bank Systems » 

First Obcnso 97 

First CWfcogp 96 

Fkst City Texas 95 

Fbbtlntwitata95 

Full 94/94 

Gendnance B9/92 

Gerttnixice 93/94 

Gib 89 

Gzb92 


n 77-1 UDJ01M.H 
7JB 17-5 9979 99J9 

uoa iu lotjanm 

9* +8 H089UILI9 
9k. A-7 1008110051 
97k 17-4 uoantd 
9W HI Tin. 1910627 
MW +9 MU0ML40 
ws i2J ma'esim 
<w 13-5 lamuxm 

3V5 1000210812 
IM 100.100025 
lie muoMoja 
9-7 IflOJimil 
U-U 1002310031 
IM lOOBUMC 
15-5 9983 9991 

7+ lKUaifafa 

. 34-U IOB.1O10UO 

nv is noiam.ra 

Mb 28-5 9784 9994 
Ub 2-5 9U5 99J0 
!S-7 lStiSlfflUO 
286 99.90 IOUO 
31-7 MLMH830 
M 97.92 I0U2 
77-6 1004310051 
M 1UMU1 
13-5 100.7210062 
IBW 67 I0Q4BM08S 
Itb 5-5 9880 9895 
99b 196 49 J8 9931 
Sbh 31.7 9988 99.90 
9* IM Wl. 15701 JS 
BW 15-7 79.H1 10050 
IV 31-7 79J2 99.72 
9* 77-5 9990 tOU» 
l SW 30-5 UJO. 1010010 
101b 169 HDJB100JB 
9W 260 lOUMOBfa 
9* 9-M lauamojo 
7W 2M 100.15101125 
9. 33-5 9774 9984 

10k. 12-6 1006710077 
W 64 100.1110071 
9* v-o rauaioo.13 
9* 9-10 W0J41 0041 
9V 1-7 99.90 non 
9% 11-10 1004710057 
in* at umai 0050 
7% MO 10053)0043 
9W 9-7 0079100^ 
Mb 29-5 H077U0J7 
Vh 27-4 MO. 151 BUS 
9 18-7 M.16MD26 

9* 1+4 1005718067 
v 18-7 iDtunoon 
1Mb IM 1006410074 
955 2M 99JS 99.95 
«. 11-7 WL21UBJ1 

9W V-t 1802210033 
10k. 1V5 100.1310033 
9h 9-5 lOOIBima 
11-5 9995 100JO 
186 99.95 MOJO 
7-7 U03310U3 

u-io maiaodi 

W4 HUS 18145 
68 MD.U1H22 
261 267 9984 


M 

9»b 

Vh 

0h 


Mb 

0* 

9W 

9h 

9h 


9tb 26101007310085 
9V 265 «980 inn 
10 276 1BU9MU9 

Mb M MLlSnOJO 
ME) 276 1006110071 
9Vj 136 HM.UM024 
99b 13-5 99 J4 9954 

1 QJ0 39 min 0021 

9W 176 99.91 100J1 
246 1803310033 
67 10B.15MO3D 

lit iounaoLi 2 
256 9930 nan 

10h 306 1003510045 
99J2 9972 
Ml 265 99 J« 9930 
9h 115 9925 99J0 
9V 75 9985 9935 
Mb 71-5 M0J4MQ.14 
9 217 93*9600 

66 9974 9984 
15-7 1001510035 
264 HO. 181 BUS 
217 (00.1110035 
115 100.1410024 
IW 100740084 
Wb US VOW IMk 
Mb 295 100JBHB63 
9W 376 180301 OUI 
TOh 36* 1006510085 
BV 16 lOOHNOU 
IIM H-7 9UA 9984 
V* 64 97.12597625 
10h 276 99J5 100.10 
fa 285 MJ0 9480 
9h 361ft 9989 99JV 
9h 317 10DlSinj.n 
980 14 lOOJKlOn 
9Jb 117 9975 10825 

«b in mushuo 
M 56 mnwd 
Wb fa5 nOJODU 
n U9 U02413U4 
Wh 386 106J04100U 
9* HW IBL05100I5 
Ifth 46 1008410044 
10* 23-9 miswus 
m/196 9984 9931 
/ S 10B60H07B 
m ' 76 1001810020 

km is nnnwi.ii 

lOh 256 1005510065 
Mb 305 WUSUH.1S 
IM 276 >002610034 
® 56 9908 Man 

Mb 9- m 9975 Haas 
Mb IM 99.90 lion 
9* 31-10 1004310052 
Mb 64 1DSJ410U4 
9W 1W0 9931 10002 
9W 317 9938 10020 
IBW 145 nonbld 
M 114 10022MOSZ 

9 * 176 inaoioan 

9V 31 -S 10823H852 
Mb M4 9983 9933 
Mb IW 99JJ9923 
9W 610 100.1510030 
M 64 HI0UB3H0.U 
Wh 2M UB2SM035 

W. 315 9935 mas 

BW 55 9900 99.13 
Mb 9-7 100.1410024 
9* 184 lOUCinD 
9* 194 99JI1DU0 
91b JV-5 muoioon 
267 10004180.14 
244 10060)8070 
94b 74 HS.93T0UC 
Mb 11-101006510075 
I Oh 46 1083410844 
»* « 1003510065 

_ 9 11-7 9985 10U9 

Mrtaik Denmark 98« MW IM 10BL05MB85 
MartaaaeBk Danmark 92 Mb 194. 10030MM5 
NOttonatMlastinlnfarOS MO 
Net Bb Outran 94 9h 

NotCorwnSArototaM 9h 

National Westminster 91 9h 
Natt«tsi«*stmtasto'9p 9h 

NaHanalWaslmbalerVf 9V 

National WxrimlnstW 92 9J0 2610 1016719177 

National W fatmtoHr aere MW 13-s 1007910089 


Gjt>96 
Ore 91 
Gftn8avs92 
GrMaviM 
Great Weriwa Ftn 94 
Great Western 95 
Mil Samuel 94 
Hat Samuel Petp97/0 
Hisceno Americano 95 
Hytfcn Quebec 94 
Hydra Quebec 65 
IchkkBtrtasVI 
Indonesia 81/93 
UK 85 
UK noun 
Ireland M/M 
Ireland 97 
Rml Ireland 94 
ikXy ( RcpulKIcl 99 
C IlDtl 87 
Itaty 89/94 

JJ*. Morgan 199798/74 -2 
KntMtt 
Kaaaayei 
Kendra 09 85 
Ktetmnrt Benson 91 . 
KW miort Benson 94 
Korea Dev Bk 19 
Korea Exchange (8 
Lincoln 99 

UordsfJ 
Lloyds 93 
Lloyds 84 
LWJIWB9 
Ltcb8S 
UctohinS* 

LltSM 
Ltcb 93 

Molyasta 94/19 
MdtonlalS 
Makmlaaprtt/92 
Mataysia dad9/93 
MaiovsiaBVn 
Man Han O/Sras 94 
Man Hon { WUv) 94 
Marine MMtand 94 
Marble Midland 99 
Marble MkfcMd 96 
Mel Ian BkM 
MkflardM 


Midland 92 
Midland 91 
Midland 99 
MltulFblM 
Maraan Grarfen 94 


Mb 


smo 99.9a non 

264 99 Jl 9960 
214 9974 99J4 
*7 1HU2UXU2 
274 lOOLOObM 
16H 1082778037 


Neste OrM 
New Zealand 87 
New Zealand Steal 93 
Nippon Cratflt Bk M 
Nippon Credit U 15 
Nlaaan Crertt BkU 
Nordic Int Fin 91 
OfctoBt 
OHlM 
oe>9sm 

Otftinre Mining 91 
ottdwreMImngli 
PtreUl 91/94 
Fkoanfcan 99/91 
Qnwf nikmdM 
Rente 71 

RepBkDoUoiVT 
Royal Bk Scotland 84/94 
Satkmofl/92 
inL Fla II 


& 

B 




Scandbiavton FladecR 
“ Hand lot Fla 93 
Security Pacific 97 
Sndffl 
Seat 90/n 

Sodete Fbi Euraoe en e 89 
SJ=£.91 

Socteta Generale 90/95 
5adateGeneraie9B 
Societe Generale Mar 94 


276 HRJ4WL44 
9-h inunoua 
244 1W.U10U4 
126 UB. 1519025 
204 9935 bM 
M4 1flB0B10B.il 
IBtb 96 9975 I0B23 
MV 58-5 100.1510073 
lOh 265 MUO1B073 
Mb U-IB 700J4100J* 
9W 44 HUM 10024 
9h 267 UUOT0B.il 
UW 276 9925 H025 
9W 194 1HUS10860 
10h *5 1002210032 

Wh Z7-9 1003810048 
9W 5M 9075 9925 
9lb 167 T0O22UO32 
9W 54 100910068 

* 269 moeud 

Kb 39-7 H020H038 
Wi 19-8 9935 10005 
9% lS-tt 9175 ms 
9h 714 9920 99 JO 

uw. 2»6 tounoua 

B* 71-5 9963 9972 
■W 30-7 99.90 10080 

ft. 2*6 nuoaiaon 

9V 34 M35 10015 
Mb 194 9975 10025 
«h 46 MOJSUUS 
IIM 95 lotmutoi 
Wh 169 1004010070 


The Daily 
Source far 
International 
Investors. 






Uaaer/Mat. 


Caiipoa Next M AM 


5odeteG«mrale<NM«i Wu M 
Socteta General 97 HP* *6 

Sued 91 W* 20-1 

Spain (KJaadoni) 92/97 ItBB 276 
5palnD5 Th 2M 

KtogdomOf Spala93 Wh » 
Seam 99 9V 265 

Standard Cbartwad Aug 90 Mb IW 
Standard Ontterad 94 ru 67 
StamtaRia»roradf1 IM 265 
Standard Chartered mark) 10k. 116 
Standard Cborteradotrp TOW 7-J 
Slate Bk 01 IndtaBZ «W 31-5 
SwnltMtw Treat 92/M Kb 126 

Sweden 907BS 
SaadMBflM/99 
Sweden 9V03 
5«MMtinnen> 

Sweden 92/05 
TOIVD Kobe 92A4 
Tokooln 92/94 
TOM Alia Ltd 9069 
Toroma Do mi nion 93 
Tara Trust 92/99 
TH 94/84 

Utrton Bk Norway 99 
United 0/Seas 9k 89 
Weils Fargo 97 
WHHoms + GlvnsV) 


Mb 167 
9W 266 
Mh 35 
9h 9-7 
Bib 205 
TOh 266 
ibv. *• 
Mb 124 
9h 146 
Mb 164 
9h 95 
Mb TH 
9* 264 
9h 165 
IBJb 166 


10030 IB0JI 

uosnoa 

1002210022 

1004110051 
9978 99 JO 
N06IID073 

•935 I0QJB 

wonma 

1002410034 

Honnxuv 

101.161 01 24 
H017UB27 
MSB HUO 

1801518025 

9924 9929 

9924 9929 

munon 

Ida. 1770072 

9945 9fJJ 

loouuaa 

nOSOHUB 

TOO.J9M0J* 


tin ms 

TUB 9950 
9975 10035 
9935 9965 

HU63HQ73 


Issuer/MaL 
World Bank 94 
Yokohama 91/94 

Zentradesaarfcaue 91 


GHMdNakt BW ASM 


OBI Jl-S 9865 99JS 
919 6U U02HQ02B 
9h 167 HUtfUUO 


Non Dollor 


7Mal. 

An 97 

MAtaiiiramM 
nTekraai/M 
BalaaawKfl 
Crncare 89/91 
CWaaHdaVd aald 
CspmeM 
Cred i t Fen c Vr 99 
crawt Mamna) 9t/9S 
D9nmarkra/fl 
1. 1.1. 94 

KMadom B elg i um 94 
UeedsM 
MhdWbTO 
SnctM/T] 

YortJtHr* *7/94 


Ce up a n Next Bkt AsM 
I4W 145 HUfaHOTO 
IJh 714 1ULB1002J 
Iflb 215 9* JO Md 
14h 215 UU1TO0U 
1Mb 15-5 9928 99J8 
W 54 9630 99.70 
13* 214 H02MB4I 
Mh 94 108231003] 

m 1B4 103321006] 
14V 22-5 2SM5SWJS 

a* u-1 uoniaon 

Ok *7 H0.1BUB2I 
UV 245 MM 10004 
IMb 75 tf.M 100.04 
ink 24-7 HB4H0S5I 
Wb 774 KUBSnO.15 


in 

Vi > 


Savm* : CrafU SMtm-Flnl Boston Ltd. 
London 


-ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
29 April 1985 


The attaint valm imranoas s 


idled br na Funds hum wmt ttw 


uunKtoa «< to«8 foods wdasa oaatu an tontad on hne prten. Tfw 9oH»wto« 
imrahml tymbols tadleota trawonev nf quotoflons stvptltd tar Nw IKT: 
ri (w) - we 


(d) -dotty; 


•vMUr; OH-tK-nMxrthhr.' (r) -regutarty; (lj - irravdltartv. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(Mr) Al-Mol Trust AJ 


BANK JULIUS BAER 6 CO. Ud. 
—Id I Boarta ' 

—Id ) Canbar, 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

S 15141 — (w) Multicurrency 

.«*) Donor Medium Tarm. 
— (wj Dollar Lana T 
Japanese Yen 


—<d ) Eantaoer America . 

—Id) EauBtaer Eurooa 

— (d > Eaulboar Pacific— 
—Id ) Grobar. 


— <d 1 Slocfcbar. 


SF 1034/30 


SF 913J0 

3J522S — (•» Pound StarHna 


132552 — twi Doutactw More 
«£ ]S-S — (w) Dutch Florin 
5E !12M9 —to Swtn Frame 



. DM 10.10 


.FL 1ILD9 
. SF 9.90 


BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
— id) Asian Growth f« 
— iwi Dtwartw n d. 


SF 1699 JO* ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

PB *5576 The Ham* 10701 44*436 
— Id | Berar fateeatnaen 1 1 


— <w] FIF— America. 


— <w] FIF— Europe. 
— Iw) Fi r - P od n c. 


. 5 10L37 
SF B2J0 PARISBAS— GROUP 
. S 1137 —Id ) Cartene Inlanwtkwa l 


13340 


—Id junta 


SIMM — IWJOBU-DM 

51570 — Ivr3 QBUGESTIDN 


—id i mdosuas Motitbonai b. 


S 8934 — (wl OBU -DOLLAR 
5 M7J6 — <wl 


BRITANNIAJ*OB 271.SL Naflar, 
— iw) BrttXSoilor Income 
— iw) Brits Manog-CUT 


9wl obli-yen^5 

— iw) OBU-GULDEN. 


J,r! Wa»i —W I PAROIL-FUNO 
— ‘JS -Id ) PARINTER FU! 


, rn»,aiui FUNC 
—id ) PAR US Traosurv 



-id i Brtt. IntU Manaapant siiHO “ 

—id ) Brtf. IntU Ataft 08 J»orrr r 1,17V* ROYAL B. OF CAJUULPOB2MGUERNSET 

-(wl Brtl.Untversal Growth . S0J60 •+(«) RBC Gandhm Fund I 

wl BrILGald Fund,. S0J76 -«w) ROC For EastAPadDc Pd. 

«pn capital 

..... hdl income Fd $»«! 

c 0224 'rtd i RBC MaruCurrencv Fd. I Q.10 

5 1X348 ■+(») RBC North Amer. Fd— — 19J6 
S07BB 


(wl SmAtanaa-Ctimeocv 4 14JJ- -+twt JUC l. 

id 1 Brit Japan Dir Part Fd_ 8LY7I -Wwj RBC kdl income Fit. 


(wl Brit Jersey GIN Fin) 

—id J Bril. Work) Lata. Fund 

I Tech 


—id) Brit World Techn. Fund. 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— iw) Capital ind Fund. 

— <w) Capital Honor 


S KAN D I FOND INTL FUND (466236276) 

—(Milne.: Bkt — . — SkSBOHer 5flJ6 

*34.19 — (wlAcc: Bid Stall Offer I5J8 


*1274 SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTO. 
CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 17 DMnsMni SaJlandar^L37760(a 

—id | Actions 5uHwn . . SF 371 JH —(b) SHBBandFwid_lZ-—J 2179 

—id) Bond Valor Swf SF 1B6S5 — <w) SNB Inti Growth Fund 53034 


/ 

V 


— (dj Bond Volar D-mark. 


— <di Bond Valor US-DOLLAR_5*S iraS *5rt^S5!rtl2S5vJ ,ISSUE 1 

- — Miimiiw — iQ 3 Amen co-vaior 


—id) Band Valor Yon. 


• PRICES) 

v.,1 mim m — *'* * *■— ■■ SF583J25 

—id) Canwert Vator Swf SF 703/5 — {S J D-Mpr kBo«i d56 taction DM US.7! 

—id! Convert Valor US^OOLLAR. * I12J1 “ j5{ SK2SSSK£j“ 

— idlConasac. »=6MU» 

—id ) C5 Fonts llnndi. SF 7330 ~~1°! '.Wgy Rgfa - s rr ■ 

-(d) CS Ponds— Inti — SF 109 JO “55 > 

—id ) CS Money Market Fund__ S 105400 | SKi'SSSCiSSSSS- 


—id ) CS Money Market Fund 

—id j Enerple— Votar 

— (dl Uieec. 


“DM imoe “15 } Swj» F°relw Bond>i 


SF 164JB — W } SMtewalor NtMSeriM- 
— «ftl Utdvaniair 


—id j Europe— Valor. 


— (d) podne— Volar. 


sf 95400 —«o i unrvwrsaf Bond Select. 
SFU175 — 10 I Untvenral Fund 

it Hl-5 Id I Van Haul CalajM 


□IT INVESTMENT FFM 
I) Concentre - 


SF i*enp — 1 Id ) Yon Bond Selection 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 



=asi 


(d ) Inti Rantan ta nd 
Duan Jr Horaltt 4 lUsvd Gear 
imocUv 


DM25.16 


— id) AmcoUtaSh 


I BofKMnvut. 


— |ml DBH Cofnmodttv Pool— 


■ Bra 


DMB6J6 I Fansa SwisaStL 
dl JapuHnvaat 


— (d ) Sant South Air. Sh. 
1 ) Sima I stock price) 



„ ^ S304J3 

ml Currency & Gold Pool S 19926 

— im) Winch. LHeFut Rood _ 559132 ..wioer niincruEUT 

-(m) Trane Wartd Fat. Pool. *8MJ»*** u ?j??J.^S r M£NT Frmkf ur t„ 

FAC MGMT. LTD. tNV. ADVISERS — id) Unlfonds DM22J0 

1, Laurence Pnuiriy HIIL EC4. 014234410 — <d) Unlrafc. ’ 

AiianHc Other Funds 


DM 77 JO 


— (wl FAC European _ 


— iw) FAC Oriental. 


SIB M 

*2620 (w) Adtaonda Invaatmanb Fund. 


S 21 JO 



— (d ) Fidelity Australia Fund. 


m BSSmeEf n 


—id) FMeUty Orient Fund. 


—id ) Fidelity Frontier Fund. 

-(dj Fidelity Pacffle Fund 


— Jd ) FUetttv SncL Grawffi Fd. 


(dlFkkRv World Fund. 


*24.14 

lll3J*l 
512938 
■ *1445 


Is! 


in 


FORBES PO B8S7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Apart 016363013 

— tad Gold income 57 JO* 

— (w) Gold ArwracMun 

— iw) Dollar Incama 5 M2 (d 

— (ml Strangle TrotfltiB *1.14 (b 

GEFINOR FUNDS. ,d 

— <w) Emt investment Fund *34259 _ 

— (wl SCOtTtsh WOrld Fund C 11423 }3 

— (wl State SJ American I1&38 f d 

CapHjGukLLUJjanAaantji-49M2ao j" 


I wine * m) Ltevwlond OHshoro Fd S ! 

(wrOfambtaSacurfflos FLIIii. 

- COMET ta *88979 

*6.12 


wl Convert, Fd. mrt B 

*443 (w) D.G.C. 


D WIHor Wkl Wide Ivl Tst *1023 

Orakkor inveat.Fund N.V_ * i.iisj5 

, Dreyfus Fund Inti S 3659 

w) Drwvdu* Irrtorconttnent — *3134 

The EstfatWimanr Trust S 1J9 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. I 
PB 119,69 Pater Port, Guernsey. MtV-28715 


Im) FuturGAM 


IGAM Arbfln 


(»> GAMmtcn )■ 

Iw) GAM Boston Im 



GAME rmBope. 

CAMFfafad 


GAM Intaraatlonal iHHHi 

GAM North America Inc 

GAM M. America u«ut Trust. 
GAM Pocfflc lnc.^^BH 


(wl GAM Siert. A Inti Unit Trust, 
(ml GAM Systems Inc 


(wl GAM Worldwide Inc— 
(ml GAM Tyche SA. Oats A. 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ud. 

— Iw) Berry Pac. Fd. Ltd.. 


— id ) G.T. Analled Science. 

—Id ) G.J. Asean HX.Gwth.Fd 

— |w) G.T. Asia Fund 


, G.T. Australia Fund, 
—id ) G.T. Europe Fund 


*11756 [w. 
5 I22J8 Iwt 
*13736 (w 
*10*75 (d 
S 1280 (d 
SF 9631 d 
S104J3 JW : 
*10107 iw 

704.00 p w 
*1133* Cb 

1 37.00 p (d . 
S10&J5 ("I 
111463 Jd 
S11U4 Jr 

w 

- S9J3 (r 
*1*21 ‘ 
Slut' 

* 3.97* 


Capital MH 

OScftol Fund lPM 
I CJ.R. Aastralki Fund . 


GJ.R. .Japan Fund. 


Canvart Fd. inn A Carti___ . 

Oorts *2626 


*7626 


Europe Obttootton*. 
Ufaloki Fund 


First Eogkt 
Fifty Stars I 


AL. 


S 143CT.75 


(w) Hraburv Group 
comaTi 


Fixed Income Hi 
Fcnaatax i ssue Pr. 
ForextandHH 


Jd. 


S 8793X3 
S117J6 
... S10J35 

SF 21190 


F*ir»»nuv< 2732 

Formula Selecllan Fd. SF 6827 

Fondllalla *23.15 

Gav*mm. Sec Fund" *8558 


Franki-TruM intaralns — DM 4205 

Haussm ann Hktes. H.V *11156 

H^to Funds — 1184.91 

Horizon Fund [ 1,13454 

I LA Inti Gold Band *928 

intartundSA- jljjB 

infarmarlmt Fund 532065 

Jntanntnlnp MiJ. Fd. a.-B-_ *40171 
Inn Sacufillee Fund s 9 ji 


12426 


Japan Selection Fund 
■■Japan Pacific Fundfa 
m) Jaffcr Phtt. Ind Lid 


*927 


£ 


— (wl G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fond siijy < w 


— id ) G.T. Dollar Fund. 

— (d ) G.T. Band ~l 

—id I G.T. Globed Tectmtay Fd. 

—id J G.T. HoastjU Pn tMinder 

—id j g!t.' »S!8%5 _ 


*7454 a 
S HUB w 
*175] d 


*2426 lw)Un({un ’ 

*1?J0 im) Magnohmd N.V. 




—Id I G.T. South 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MtGMT. INTL.SJL J d j 
Jeney, P£>. Box 61 Tet OS34 76029 Jw 

Berne, PA Bax 2632. Tel 4131 2240*1 
— id J CrMstow (Far East) 

— fd ) CSF (Balanced) 

—Id I intnL Bead Fund 

—id > Int. Currency U£ 


IB 


*2652* 

Iw} ttoyatac Investment Fund *9256 

*146.17 
*15521 


SFI1J6 

SF25JB NgPj-LT. 




— (d 1 0*5eas I 


U. 


EBC TRUST OU JERSEY] LTD. 

1-3 Seale SUL HaOtt^-OSS+fani 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND 

0(d) Inc: BM 1627* Oder 89571* 

fiHdIQiw: Bid J7025 Offer tuum 

I NTE R NATIONAL I NCOME FUND 

— fd ) Snort Term 'A' (Accum) $ 1.4674 id 

— id 3 Short Term 'A' town S1J3151 

—Id ) Short Term V (Accum) *1.1234 
—id ) Short Term B' (Distr) *08572 


— Iw) Lam Term. 


*2155 (wl 


JARDINE FLEMING. FOB » GPO HO Kg 

— (to ) J.F Japan Trust Y4764 

—lb ) JJP South East Asia S3U7 

—lb ) J.F Japan Tachnotegv Y 22018 

— 4b 3 jj: PodHc SecSJACC] lily 

—<b) j.F Australia 54.19 


LLOYDSBANK t.NT_U FOB 438. Geneva 11 

— Kwl Ltayds mn Dotlar * 18750 

— i-lwj (Javtta inn Euraoe SFIldJO 

— Hwl Ltoydb Infit Growth SF 17*60 

— Hwl Ltavds Inti incama— SF 31150 
—Hwl Ltoyda Inti N. America- S 10IJS W 
— Hwl Ltavds Infl PacHle— sf 13078 (d 
—Hwl Ltoyda InfL Smaller Cot. _ S13J8 (b 


NIMARBEN 

— (d) CJOSSA 

— Iw) OasaB-Uta. 
— < w 1 CM» C - Jana 


-525-51 (m> 


Jooozi (mi 


llnvasta DWS 
Invest AHantl 


DM 4521 

* 753 

Ijattarhmr fidTFuadSA 11147 


|Kle1nyrart Benson Inn 
Uetmmrt Banc jopl| 

Korea Growth Trust 
LeJcom Fund^^^m 


Levwuao Cop Hold 

UWboernnnw 



Madlota nunt SeL Fd 
MaiaoraH^^H 

MAATfa 


Hl kka G rowth Pod je Fd S9.13LM 
Nippon Fund *2952* 


g«J5f Investment FdSMUfa 

PANCURRI Inc SIU7 


Pwtan Sw. R Eat Geneva 
Psrynql Vakte Fund K.V, 
I r nil 11 m I 


PSCO Fund N.V.. 
PSCO l»dt. N.V. 


Putnam mn Fund. 
Prt— To ' 


SF 1297X0 
. *124564 

_ 112127 

S 


Quantum Fund N.V., 
Ranta Fundi^m 

Rentinveatn 


55851 

167956 


. S 353850 
LF 267260 


RSMInvMl. LF I58B58 

asawBESt- «Vk 

sci/Teeb.SA Luxembauru *9 m 

Seven Arrows Fund N.V— sijoaxn 
State SL Bank Equity HdaaNV S9JI 
Straren InwMintnl Fund *2050 

Syntax Ltd-TOctaa A]' 5 779 

Techno Growth Fund SF 84X33 

Tokyo Poe. Hold, (Sea) *97.16 

T okyo Pac Hold. W.V. SI342S 

Transpacific Fund mil 

Turtsm lM Fund . SVU2 


Tweedy Jrawne njr.CUmA *2.11154 
Tweedy3rowne p.v.ClasxB SIJ0L23 
mJ T weedy ,S rowne (U.Kj u.u * 


UN ICO Fund. 


UNI Band Fund. 


UNI Cannot Fund 
UNIZINS 

Vi - 


DM7120 
. *99564 
1107955 


OMJJ038 

Winchester Financial L»d_. 5 'i"li 
WMObaster DtverslHad**_ S Z3L2T 
-- - - *1024 

*4355 


-*9634 (d I World Fund 

(wi Wortdwtde Securinoa S/S 3M. 

(wl Worldwide Special S/S 2Ki. X 160422 


DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Betahim Francs: FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
^* w %rXJK 0, 2F ; SF ~T. *S rt “ Franca: a — ashed; + — Offer Prices.O — Md 
chatipaP/vn Ctallp eriml); HA.— Not Avaltatita; NX-— NofCommumafadm-- 
New; S — UBMndCd: S/5 - Stock Split; • — Ex-Dividend: “ — Ex-Rta; — — 
gT 0 ” p f^ I mt ? P?j( , » x *%£!•'•“ RMampt- Price- £* -Coupon; ee_ Formerly 
WwTdw I da F und LM; Offer Price IncL 3% Prelim, charw; ++— dolly stack: 

prfc* non Amatantom Stock Exchange 


i *- 


t-i 


I •- 


•i^Ei 


X-i 


,1 


it 1 

H 5 




'( . 


i i 




vr 


k 





j 


2 











s^rr.r^-r?'- -. *r 




-y y, .; *-. . ’ 


, fc . ~ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 


Page I S 


OUi 

4*. *Vi 

MU.+IU 
2*._ V. 

1BW — H 
SM6- X 
3V.- * 

1M+H 
*M— H 


U1 MU 
MJWMB.il 

“TP* 

tn t».i» 
MU3 
MOB 



tfwmftM 

foMowfao 

IHT: 


S1U0 

uua 

IIU5 

MAM 

„DM 10 IS 
„FL IBM 
_SP MO 


IlUt 


S. Steel Firms Face 


Tkr Assonant/ Press 

-Washington — owing u» 

oftii decade, the American steel iri- 
dflstry Taos continued retrench- 
tMnt. problems with imports and 
costly restructuring as it struggles 
to compete in worn markets, a new 
study says: ■ 

Even in a scenario that indudes 
effective import controls and- fa- 
vorable exchange' rates, the} so- 
called integrated .aed mills that 
m» a broad range of production 
and manufacturing functions 
would continue toclose as produc- 
ers slriveto become more efficient,' 
said the 158-page report of a pand 
of sted industry experts. ,> . /■ 

The report, prepared under die 


of Engineering and released Tnesy 
day, said if tfc steel industry is to 


JapanAuto Exports 
Rose 16,8% in 1984 

The Associated Press 

- TOKYO — Japan shipped 2.62 
hnHion automobiles to the United 
States; during fiscal year 1984, an 
increase of- 16.8 percent over die 
jHtyioosyear, a Japanese auto as-- 
- sociatkm said Wednesday. 

■; .Total automobile ' exports for 
that year were 6.13 miDioii, an in- 
crease of 7.7 Jwcofl. front 1983 and 
the highest riguresmee the wmdd’s 
largest automaker began its: “vd- 
notary resfenint 1 * on UJS. exports in 
1981, the Jtpan AritomoWle Manu- 
facturers Association said. 


shake off its financial woes, “the 
most efficient operations must be 
saved, dearly ineffidenl operations 
Should be dosed, and mixed facili- 
ties must be encouraged to mod- 
ernize and. restructure themselves.'' 
• But some factors necessary for 
revitahzaddu are beyond the indus- 
try's control, the report sauLThey 
indude the. strength of the U.S. 
. dollar and effective domestic trade- 
law enforcement and fcgplatioiL 
.. Problems with inborn, it said, 
are fikdy to get worse as develop- 
ing countries add new capacity. 
. The study mentioned, but aid not 
evaluate, President Ronald Rea- 
gan's program, initiated last year, 
of , seeking voluntary restraint 

' " to 

-S. 

steel market from 25 percent to 
ifL5percent 

- The difficulty in competing with 
foreign stedmaVers stems not from 
: a lade cif tedmical knowledge, but 
from subsidization of foreign pro- 
ducers by their governments and a 
lade of capital % American firms 
to make use of known technology, 
(he report said. 

.- James Coilxns, executive vice 
jaestderilaf the American Iran and 
Steri Institute, agreed with die 
study’s conriorion that the indus- 
try must ‘Turn out more steel with 
less people." 1 But he said the re- 
port's figures' appeared “dated.” 

.. -m doesn’t talk about the last 
; coqple of years and cost reduction. 
Oar productivity has gone up 
sharply in that time,” Mr. -Coffins 
said. 


Aid Increase 
Urged for 
Caribbean 

By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Port Strike 

WASHINGTON — Al- 
though the Reagan administra- 
tion has hailed the first year of 
its Caribbean Basin Initiative as 
a success, a leader in the region 
says that more aid is nettled 
and that small island nations 
should be separated in the pro- 
gram from toe larger mainland 
states. 

Prime Minister Mary Euge- 
nia Charles of Dominica said 
that small island nations such 
as hers needed extra aid to build 
up their infrastructure so they 
can take advantage Of the po- 
tential of the CBI to increase 
investment in the region. She 
called lumping the «nwii na- 
tions in the same program with 
larger momtund countries such 
as 0 Salvador, Costa Rica and 
Guatemala “a great disservice 
to the island." 

Miss Charles spoke at a lun- 
cheon celebrating the first year 
of the CBL the Reagan admin- 
istration program that started 
Jan. 1, 1984, to improve eco- 
nomic conditions in the Carib- 
bean Basin through private-sec- 
tor trade and investment as well 
as government aid. 

Reagan administration offi- 
cials said Monday that the pro- 
gram has resulted in increased 
investment in the region, citing 
250 projects that created 27,500 



5W» 

Mary Eugenia Charles 

new jobs in the 29 nations tak- 
ing pan. 

Kenn George, director gener- 
al of the Commerce Depart- 
ment's U.S. and Foreign Com- 
merdaJ Service, said investment 
in the CBTs first year totaled 
S153 million. 

Clarence Brown, a deputy 
commerce secretary, said that 
the new jobs and added invest- 
ment showed the GBI program 
had succeeded in its first year 
and was growing stronger this 
year. 

'The companies who today 
are showing interest in the re- 
gion tend to be larger, more 
financially secure and more se- 
rious than was previously the 
case,” Mr. Brown said. “These 
companies are realizing that 
CBI is not going to fade away 
like previous ’new initiatives’ to 
assist the region.” 

UB. imports from CBI coun- 
tries increased 17 percent to 
S3.8 billioa last year, while 
Ame rican exports jumped 6 
percent, to $5.4 billion. 




YOUNG AMERICAN LADY, bSngud 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 1 AUTOS TAX FREE 


SEOtmauL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


UIMEDUC SfflCS far AMSSCAN 
NUT**** RRMS n MBS: 


AUTO CONVERSION 


Engfch, Brioca. Dutch or Germ® 
werateies, Knowledge of French re- 
quired, BuEsh sfwfrcnd Bfaguof 
leasts. Write or phone 138 Avana 
Vfcsor Hugo, 7511o Peris, Frans. TeU 
P2761 ST 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


COOPS ST JAMB 

OfROAL AGENT 
or BMW (Oft) UD 

Wide you ora m Europe, wa enn offer 
oonadar^A arenas on broral new 
BMW can to msTtperifasora. M 
factory wonwtfy 

ocn dso tuiriy righ or left hond 
dme ten free Pw a tourist prices. 
Ufa aiso supply fanoiy built bote- 
proof BMWs ond the Alpra BMW 
range tax fna. 

Cot London (OT) 629 6699. 


NEW MERCEDES 

KXSOC, BMW. EXOTIC CAMS 

FROM STOCK 

for JMMBMIfdoSwry 
BErtSSMCf 

For dvwhfr fownwot bond 
wnmattSA 

RUTEMC. 

T ounadr. 52, 6000 Frankfort. 

W Germ., tel W 69-232351. 41 1559 

Information any by phono or telex. 


DAWAJI TRADE 


In Britain’s Bingo Business, P Stands lor Profit 


. (Conttabatf faun Page 11) 
the winner: is the one whose card 


ran **53 


case, far many womoj, the game is 
le ss imp o rta nt than the dunce to 
get out and chat with friends. 

Men tend to be scornful. Mr. 


EndhSeen 
For Stamp 

. (CoofimedfromPagell) 

adversaries: “Sametioaes you have 
to dap them on the nose with your 


j-Wurt he suggcstsmighlget the 
' corrida started is the downward 

- trend in -interest rates since mid- 
: r March and die “reliqurfication 

1 process” he detects tiiis week as 
stocks have declined, generating 
caA to fbd an advance, ' 
r : '•‘But ^the-market*r B»8al to 
Jake off because of lower rates, this 
would not be the first time if has 
been a Ettle doggish out of the 

- starting gate,” Mr. Wien said. “In 
1 987,1 cm TTcasuiyratcsbt^an to 
drop' at the end cif June, and the 
stock market did norbegpn its tm- 
precedented buying panic until 

.. mid- August ^ 

SuaSump, be added, kng rates 
peaked a May l984, eight weeks 
! beftwe the earfy-Angpst rally oflast 
. year, dthco^i he noted mat the 
bond mvket tested its low in June. 

“So perhaps we are just being 
hn oatieat, . and any trine now the 
buti Wffl begia to charge a g ain, ” 
Mr. 

- Mr. Wkn, who takes die view 
that mvestora nmst be as selective 
with large stocks as with small is- 
roes, listed these three blue di^js as 
his strongest reco mm e nd ations: 
American Express, GUktte and 
Royal Dutch mrateam. 

, t Michael R- Wosbeig, director of 
' technology research' at Frndential- 
Bache .&curilies Inc., who on 
. Wednesday completed a three- 
country European tour, found a 

- “very heavy 2-to- 1 consensus” tlat 
money managers believe the dollar 
wiB go lower wtinst other curreo- 

, - cics. Only in Paris, he said, was 
; there the tn^joriTy view that the 
‘dollar would Tisc. in Gennany and 
. England, he said, sentiment was 
strongest that the dollar is overval- 

■ 

: - BttEugeneSlarT, technology an- 
/ abet at Moseley HaSgarten who 
. vreek oonspletes an 1 l-dw tour 

West Germany, Italy, France i 
> and Englabd, said he discouoed a j 
djfitatm consensus among Europe- , 
. . an money managers about the di : 
>, rectioa of the dollar. “Everyone 
-that Pw6 asked whether they think 1 
up Or down has reph'ed, i 
ri^es.”^ . - - | 


Gold Options frAR.teSfat .1 

. a fe^T" ~~ 

. vo luma q assRsm 
3D &&77S UXH99) WJB2S 
3*0 a»4» omsoo jumcs 

» us 2 » lomruo vamm 
*0 mm mis wxmx 
VO 03S HI# S35-&7S UOMUO 
JB l ■- . 15P. 5T0 B3V1C00 

QtU3SS>-£UI . 

VatonWMteWeM&A. 
LQMia Mwi te w r ' 
UllGocnLSWMM % 
Tet 3IB2JI - T*fc* 2»3« ^ 


Hqba, a Htwi fflrianA ora holding 
superintendent, said he aright visit 
a pah instead, were it not for his 
wtttt One bingo operator attending 
a convention m London privately 
described the mine as “sffly.” An- 
other called it ^moronic.” 

“I hate die bloody game,** con- 
- fided a Wdshman who runs three 
bingo hafls but dreams of opening a 
roller-skating rinlr instead 
However unloved, the game pa^ 
ssts. The initial boom came in die 
late 1950s and early 1960s. As tde- 
viaoa cat attendance at movies, 
many theater owners converted 
their buddings to bingo dubs. Dfr 

r ‘ s restrictions lc^slatcd in 1968, 
btoriiess grew rapkfly, attract- 
ing such major mwpimiM as Bass 
PLC, Granada Group PLC, Lad- 
broke Group FLC, Rank Otgamsa- 
tjonPLC and Grand Metropolitan 
PLC, as weU as hundreds of small 
operators. • ■ 

The ^me hit a peak in the late 
i?70vwhea UCftriubs ncreopen. 
Since, the number has dropped to 
around 1,200 as operators concen- 
trate cn die larger, most profitable 
halls seating 2,000 or more. Lad- 
broke estimates that the number of 
people who day regularly has fall- 
en to 3J5 ntiflion from S3 million. 

That dedine partly refects Brit- 
ain’s uneven economic recovery, 
which has left unemplaynient at 13 
percent and barely touched many 
northern industrial areas. At the 
same time, the government has en- 
oonragsd people who are working 
to buy their own houses. So they 
spend more money and time fixing 
up their homes.. . 

. Fear of crime and the decline of 
bus services also keep people at 
borne in the evaring, bingo opera- 
tors ray. Fashions are chang ing 
4t?o: While dder women settled for 
bingo, younger ones are more de- 
mandmg. 


fit their struggle to find new cus- 
tomers, bingo operators complain 
that they are overly restricted by 
Britain’s gaming re gulatio n s . 
Except when it first opens, a Inn- 
go hall is not allowed to advertise 
using the word “bingo" Players 
most be at least 18 years old. And. 
lest any one nmfe a hasty <fajann l 
first-time playera at any dub must 
sign a membership form and wait 
7A hntmi hrftm gaming adtnismnn . 

The rules also effectively limit 
prizes to a marinimTi of £3,000 On 
any one game, and most games are 
much qnaHftr. But bingo operators 
expect parliamentary approval this 
summer for a “national” game link- 
ing hundreds of chibs by computer 
and paying a top prize of £50,000. 

wi^w^tiie^ne's dedineand 
perhaps provide a modest upturn. 
“We think we’re hitting the bot- 
tom," said Charles Stringer, who 


hwirfa operations at Grana- 
da. It plans to increase the number 
of its dubs from 40 to50 in the next 
year. 

Still, expectations are subdued. 
“There’s not going to be a major 
rebound,’’ said Barry Anderson, 
managing director of Mecca Social 
Cubs, a rant of Grand Met 

To attract a wider audience, 
some bongo operators are putting 
more emphasis on food ana drink 
«nH occasionally offering cabaret 
acts to fill in between bmgo ses- 
sions. Granada, for instance, re- 
cently brought in such nostalgia 
acts as the Drifters and the Planes. 
Mecca and others offer overseas 
vacations as prizes. 

Granada may even introduce 
video films on the fringes of bingo 
dubs that 30 years agp were riant 
movie theaters. “That would be 
coming full circle," Mr. Stringer 
said. 




LEGAL SERVICES 


mm, 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

roft A BEAL VIA YOUNG LAW 
KsfaQttshed, Segnrt. 


wuiwaume 

Youna aduaMd, eiegert 5- framgud 
tor don. owing & novel ■ 

MRS 5U » 3b 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 8? 01 


TOKYO: 442 39 79 

EirtjMan yowg lady coaporien. 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG IABY IUM6UAL VIWW 



LOW COST FLIGHTS 



Pm& 


INTERNATIONAL REMIfirUL Pe 
UNLTD. USA a WOtiDWTOE. 
■212-7657793 1 76S77V4 I 


FKANKHMT. Young lady companion. 


1 1 t€C l vT/.Vt i 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL l S ^^<S GU * )S ' 


HONG KONG (K-3) 733 12 37 


EDUCATION 



LONDON WHI HXJCAfED Young 
Tit 622 6615 ■ 


TOKYO LADY COMTAMON. PA 

Pnrional Auidcrt 03-456-553? 




YOtMG OCEAMC LADY in London 
01-245 9002 Airport»/TnjvoL 


SUppfag Wfrna UJLA. 


234 35 72 
Spockd Cwdttn N fc* Laadng 
Ai iiuup S w fl ol tonteL 


SW YOUR CAI TO A ROM USA 
VIA ANTWaP Atn SAVE, Fmn ho- 
ML Ragukr udnn. Airport dafatoy. 
AMSCq &S3froalT Anh«rp, 
BetgjjoCTet 231 42 39. Tim 71409. 


10 YEARS 

Ufa Mhw Cara to 6n WmM 

TRANSCO 

Koapina a conrittt nodi of more Ihon 
300 trand now an, 


TAX FREE CARS 
P.CT. 

AS nxAto, id madob, brad now 
fanriaon 1. 2DQ6 Antwerp, Maun 
r«t3/2J! 5^ 011 71* 35546 PHCGt S 


MU5SBS. YOUNG LADY VXP. 
Companion Td. 347 35 <9 

V4MIUI4* i Inv HONG KONG - 3-620000 Young 

YOUNG LADY briylManmiaf^Coafionicn 

PA/Morprotor & Teuton Glide HONG KONG K-6I992C. Onnsing 

PAMS 562 0587 >««*n«o fcrwfa. 


***★★ 

YOUNG fttBAMr LADY PA 
RepmentcOivo nviau for Wt 

ZURICH 830.58.88. 


AM5TS0AM 182197 

nuSTPUL IADY COMPANION 

Owming. educated, travel 




MEW YORK VJJP. Yowg lady aw 


war INDIAN IADY Companion Tel 
London 3S1 9847. 


ESCORTS A GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES J ESCORTS & GUIDES ] ESCORTS & GUIDES 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In mUUflfdL are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


United States 

Aroerodn Hera 
mowt. ms im 

Rmm 2.I0QL M3tt 

Not Inc. 3724 8M2 

Per Share ~~ 0M WM 
Mete Include paftu of SJ 
mOOort vs SSS million from 
sale at securities. 

Amor. Cot 

totatwr. ms mj 

Revenue 6&J 7KJ 

Not ln& 3*4 2&.1 

Per Share — LIS 0.97 
Nuts include tains at *Xi 
mtUfontn batti rears. 


Boeing 


HfQtwr. ms UP 

Revenue 2.930. ZQ9& 

mt tnc. nao wuj 

Per Share „ \Xt 000 


mr me. 3S4Jt 37 u 

Par Shore — LSI 7.10 

Ea stman Kodak 

IdOaer. IMS NM 

Revenue U30. 2.140. 

Net Inc. USJ IBM 

Per Shore — 050 044 

. Perthare results artfusted 
for 3- tor j split taut month. 

General foods 

4» Gear. _»9B net 

Revenue 23W. 7360. 

Oner Net 731.7 J17J 

Oaeratiqre_ 153 224 

Year INi in* 

»v«we IOKl S4KL 

Oner Wet — 347^ 377.1 
0*>er Shore— 454 4.70 

pfnetoeMctode charge of 
tar mutton from accounting 


Nat tnc. lf.l HI 

Per Share — 039 034 

IXS net mctudexgotnotX* 
mOttoa from sa/e of property. 

Grumman 

woear. IMS TM4 

Revenue 7SL5 s»3 

Net Inc. 3734 25J0 

Per Shore — OM 045 

Kerr-McGee 

IdQaar. IMS 1M4 

Revenue SOfJ MJ 

Net IK 2043 «L» 

Per Shore — 054 076 


INTONATION Al 
ESCORT 

nna 

USA l WORLDWIDE 

Head office in ffaw York 
330 W. 54* St, N XjC. 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

major amr CABS AM) 
CFSOCS ACCEPTS! 

W vtoe Me m be r*t i lp« i Avafit*4e 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SERVICE 
TBj 200 8585 




Chevron 


ms 7M4 

7XM0l 7300 


Greyhound 


IstQuar. 79BS i«« 

Revenue SXjO SOU) 


TetQuur. I« 1JM 

Revenue 3J0Q. 1,400. 

Met Loa ISM 2M 

ISS. Steel 

WOo or. IMS 1«M 

Revenue 4580. 4500. 

Net Ik 5iO 1770 

Per Share-. 034 135 



SocMtd Anonyrae 

2, boulevard Royal - LUXEMBOURG - RC Luxembourg B 6307 


* USA 6 TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 


EVBGVASE YOU ASE OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

COB free ham US.- 1J00.2374JB92 
C«J free tram Rorida 1-8OO-22M09Z 
towel G atern welcomes you bodd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SSVKE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

BEGRAV1A 

Escort Service. 

Tab 736 5877. 


Po rtmcm Escort Agency 

67 CNbera Street, 
London W1 

Tel: 486 3734 or 486 1158 
Al nafer oredR c anfa accepierf 


Al ra^er auda o«A ocapfad 


LONDON CLASS 




LONDON, NEATWOW 8 GATWCX 

Tel: of man 


ARISTOCATS 

Iwwi e ii Fr c r r ft Stfvici 
I2B Wigmore SL London W.l. 
Al motor Crer* Coni Accepted 
Tel 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - midnight 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YOBK ESCORT SBRAGE 
312-888-1666 


ZURICH 


TEL' 01/69 55 04 


JASMINE 


TBj 020-366655 


MAYFAIR CLUB 


ZURICH 

CAROUNE Eater sanna. 

Tet 01/K2 61 74 


ZURICH 

W-ltnrt Ewart 4 GNde Service 
Mete 8 Feende. Tak 01/57 75 96 


ZU RICH-GENEVA 

GMGars ESCORT SERVICE. 
TEL 01/363 08 64 -022/ 34 41 86 


GBEVA * BEAUTY* 
BCORT SERVICE. 
IH: 29 51 30 


AMS1EBDAM BRAZIUAN Emit Ser- 
viee. Trir B 20-181551 



mussas woteiE Bcotr and 
GUK 5BMCE. 1H: 733 07 98 



FRANKFURT “TOP TBT Exact Ser- 
vo. M9/SMO-52. 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Senrice. 
HeoUvow/Gntwick. Teh 834 7945. 


MUMCH SUPREME ESCORT Service, 
Tet 089/4486038 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Sennas. 
Teh 0711 / 252 11 50. 


MUXSRS ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Escort Service. Tet <0731.764!. 


RAMSURT - PETRA Esscf & Trawl 

I Service. TeL M9 / 68 NM 

FRANKFURT - YVONNE'S ESCORT 
t«f Travel Service. Tet 069/44 77 75 
GUM'S BCORTSarVKE FroAfort, 
TeL 069-88 55 99. 


Goidn Setvice. Td: 283-397 



* AMSTERDAM * 

SHE Exert Service. 227837 


. JOteE CLUE EUROPE RKO0 
& Gokfa Swvice.Tet 06/589 2604- 5B9 
1146 them 4 pm to ID fm) 





TEL: 24S6S48. CRBXT CARDS 


AMSTBtDAM hffCOLE 

ESCORT SOVICE 02CL999244 


MAAN ESCORT 




GBCVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 


VB4NA’5FWCTBCDfiTsrvw* Tet 
022444191 or 722-432, ti r«Wt 


GMHBU ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01-229 6541. 


LOMMN ZOE WBT Emrt Agency 
Tet 01-5797556 


STOOCHOtM E5CORI AND OUBE 
Service. Tet 68 34 68. 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Exact Service 
Tet JCQ0) 326420 or 340! Id 


MlBSaS. CHANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
vice: Teh 02/520 23 65. 


OOljOGtCGiBukiorf-Som-Aadwn. 
Id dox exort wvml 0221 /54 33 04 


DOMNA, AMS1BDMM ESCORT 

Guide Service. Tet REOI 762842 


FRANKFURT AREA - Femde + Male 

escort + travel lemce. Tet 62 B4 32. 


JteMffEPS ESCORT A TRAVEL Ser- 
vice Fmfcfurt Tet 069/555973 


MADRID IMPACT escort and gride 
■ ‘ 261 4142 





LONDON TjtUDffi ESCORT Sera*. 
Tet 01-373 8849. 


LONDON GHE ESCORT Service. 
Tet 3707151. 


is pleased to announce completion of the acquisition 
of the London branch of Soctete de Banque 
Occidentale. The continuing management and staff in 
London look forward to receiving old and new 
customers of the bank at: 


An Invitation 
toQxfatL 

The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytics 
present a Special Conference on 
The International Business Outlook: Christ Church, Oxford, 
September 19-21, 1985. 


LICENSED DEPOSIT TAKER 


45-47, Comhili. London, EC3V3PB 
Tei. 01-62331 10- Telex 884032 biHbkg 


JUgemtm Bank Nedaiuui N,V^ 
A t nM owlan i-RoT tat Um Buk N.V^ 
Bonk Mec* & Hope NV. 


Km-Aatadatit N,V. 

'Umstekdam depositary 
; COMPANY- N.V, 


Registered office: 2, boulevard Royal. 2953 Luxembourg 
Incorporated in Luxembourg with limited liability. 



RC- Luxembourg Q 6307 






















































































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1985 



Wed nesdays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
ua to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I ’la The Associated Press 


Sis. Close 

Dltf. via. PE lBOsHWB Low Quel, cnoe 


TVS. 

IM 

5ft 

79% 


30 


18% 

ev* 

3* 


00 


Jto ADI n 
aw ALU 
m AM Inti 
SB ATT Fd 5JWe AJ 
TVs AcmePr 
8% AOneU J3 33 
9* Adlan 
3 ACton 
_ _ ,% Admits 
ar- 17V. AdRusi 
Mb is Adobe 
B* 4 % Aeronc 
45* Z7% AfllPb * 
lift 5ft AlrCol 
Hu ArCdl of 
lft A tomes 
A5Vj Ahnffon 

Aft ALraW 

5ft Aloha 

9% Afohaln 06 J 

ft AttBA 

SBft Alcoa Pi JT5 11 3 
n AlzaCp 
Oft Amdahl 
6ft Amedeo 
4ft AR1B1H 
_ _ 4 AmCap 
34ft 12ft AExowt 
9 5ft AFrwrA 


3 

3 20 

,0 12 


Wft 

4ft 

HJ1 

10* 


lft 

34 

28ft 

18ft 

15ft 

Bb 

7ft 


20 

■OB 

.15 


51 5 5 5 

204 14ft 14ft 14ft + to 
410 4 3ft 4 

46 78% 77ft 77ft— ft 
IB 3% 3ft 3ft — ft 

12 10ft U>ft 10ft + ft 
14 lift lift lift— ft 

11 A M 3ft— ft 

14 1ft 1ft 1ft 

65 29ft 29ft 29ft — ft 

297 18b 179k 179k— ft 
» a » m 

] 4341 43ft 43ft — ft 
33 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 

IAA 10ft 10% 10ft— ft 
73 1ft 1ft 1ft +■ ft 

154 99ft 97 99b -HI* 

12 7ft 7 7 — ft 

97 7 7 7 + ft 

129 lift I Oft 11 
m ift ift lft 

UOx 33% 329b 33ft + ft 
122 24ft 33ft 24 — 9k 

1 £ ]« 1242 12ft 12ft 12ft 
1.1 21 7ft 7ft 7ft 

1.9 5 3 7ft 7ft 7ft — ft 

22 10 7% 7ft 7ft 

49 33% 31 Li SIM —I 
13 27003 45k *ft 6ft — ft 






,0b 

10b— % 


8 Comted 



T 

A* 

A* 

4* + % 

13* 

B% Coniine 



5 

Mb 

14 



% ComdrC 



54 

1% 


i% 






4b 

4% 





53% APelf 3J0 Si 21 

7 

58% 

50% 



5% CmpFet 



A 

* 


* + % 


14* Cnchm 

17% 

12% APnrcs 34 1 3 14 

33 

14% 




A* ConcdF 



3 

Ab 


Ah* 





179 

14* 

14% 

14% — Vs 


12 ConrHm 

4% 

3 AScJE 

24 

3% 

3* 






50 

2% 







1094 

3% 







18 

14% 

13% 

13% — % 

% 




10 

Aft 




4% vfContA 



54 

2b 




5* vlCfltAPl 

9* 


8, 

5* 



TO 

% Corod Ion 











2 

tVi 

6% 

6%— % 




7b Armefx IA 

78 

10b 




5* CnfCrd 


a AjvowA JO 2-4 B 






,* CourtM 



17 

fl% 







It 

10% 







9A2 

ito 




7* CrCPB 

17* 

7% Astral Of .451 

2 

10% 

10% 

10% 

TWi 

16 CwCPpf 





I 




7* 

4% Audio tr 65* 1.1 27 

7 

4% 



3* 

* CrutcS 


32* AuloSw LDOo 23 17 

4 

43% 



15% 

2b CrysfO 

ZC'k 

13* Avondl 60 5.1 13 





23b 

13* Cubic 


B 


4V; 2ft BAT 
39ft 34ft BOM 
3ft lft BBT 
3ft BSN 
7w Bodocr 
7ft Bdfcer 
7ft BofdwS 
2% BalvMwt 
21 BonFd 2TBA1I0 
4ft Banstro 


5ft 

13ft 

17% 

9* 

Aft 

24 

7ft 

9ft 

4ft 

ift 


■13e 34 432455 

.19 5 3f SO 

a 

343 

.406 4J 9 
21 

37a 35 


ift BnkBId 
2ft BnmEn 
4 BarvNG 
IXu 10ft Baruch 
9ft 4% Beard 
22ft lift BeWBIfc 100 144 
Bft 2ft Beltran 
SO 35ft BnfStdA 


5J) IB 
44 


J4t 2£ 21 
94 


JOe 


4 3% 3ft- ft 

39b 38ft 38ft- ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
24ft 24 24ft + ft 
Aft Aft ift— ft 
Oft 8 8 — ft 

2ft 3ft Zft— ft 
Aft Aft Aft 
12ft 12ft IZft 
Bft Bft 8ft 
13ft 12ft 12ft — ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft 
35ft 35ft 35ft— ft 


50b 35* BnfStdB 

JOe 


5 

15* 

23% 19 Be/uBr 

J2 IT 

IA 

705 

27 

36* 21* BIcCp 

32 36 

g 

44 

24b 

12* 9b Slav 

60 32 

24 

3 

12* 

24 19% BinfcMS 

1JH 43 

M 

5 

23 

IS* 14 BIORB 


32 

49 

20b 

18* 14% BtoR A 


32 

102 

70b 

14b 17* Blessna 

.90 2-7 

S 

,8 

If* 

2% * BtoCfcE 



71 

1% 

19* 11* Blount A 

JS 26 

8 

29 

17% 


»ft 24ft— ft 
24 24ft + ft 


Stack 


Dtv. Ykt PE lOQaHtoh Low Buct. Ofoe 


40ft 23ft BolorP 

19ft lift BoWVgl 

4ft 7V) Bowmr 

19 17ft Bowne 

99ft 21ft Brscno 

15ft 11% Brauns 

32ft 23ft BrnFA 

34ft 33ft BmFB 

4 3ft BiHF pt 

5 2ft BucJctm 

5ft 3ft Budchpf JO IA3 

34ft 19ft Budl AO 2 2 

13ft 12ft Bushn 


34 


00 

16 

M XI 15 
140 

7 

SB ZB 10 
oo u io 
40 10L3 


41ft 4014. 41ft +!ft 
WVfc W* 1»- «* 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
14ft 14ft 14ft— ft 
23H 22ft 22ft— ft 
12ft Itth 13ft 
31ft 31ft 31ft + ft 
34ft 33ft 33ft— ft 
4 Ift 3ft 
4 Ift 4 
4ft 4ft ift 
27ft 27Vi 27ft 
12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 


15ft 

9*. 

4ft 

19 

19ft 

Bft 


.10 


9 CHB 
9 CMIC» 
lft CMXCP 
13ft CRS 
9ft CoesNJ 
4ft CaalaA 
13ft 10 Cal RE 
5B IBM Count n 
Aft 39b Colton n 
lft ft CaHnert 
14 7ft Cameo 
3b 2 Camsnl 
22ft 15ft CMarca 
3AV. 2Sft C Wlne 
13 4ft Cardin 
5ft 2ft Canfll 
13 7ft CareB 
lift 7ft Care* 
lift 5ft CareEn 
7ft Ift CasMan 
22% 15ft Casl I A i 
329b 25ft Ca»Fd 
7ft 3ft Casnnd 
ft Cemeni 
lft Centtpf 
Aft Cetec 
2ft atm pH 
12ft ChmpP 

15 ChtMA s 

26 Vk 15ft ChtMB a 
21ft 14ft OtlRv 
13ft Bft ChfDvg 
42ft 34ft Cfil ID pf ATS 
24ft 9ft cniltns .17 
28ft lift Citadel 
Z7M 15ft atFst 
23ft 17 CtvGas 
42M 2Bft Ctarrnt 
12ft Aft ClorkC 
45 21ft Clarost 
27ft 13ft aopov 
8% 3 v» Caanllr 

10ft Aft Cahu 

2 CalFwts 


2j0 14 
1A 
5 

90 9 

13 2B 


32 

1 

IBS 

5 


17 
9 15 
17 

■AAtlS.1 7 
00 33 10 
Z 30a 75 


IA 


18 


24 

no 


1ft 

2M 

9ft 

Aft 

17ft 

24ft 


42 


30 


10 0 
13 

32 S3 A) 
IB 
10 

UOo 44 10 


J 22 


1.00b 17 8 
120 5.1 10 
10JB SO 
JOe ZB 10 
TSe 15 10 
.18 3 27 


out 


93 15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 

40 0ft Bft Oft + ft 

7 2ft 2ft 2ft— M 

13 lift 17ft 17ft + ft 

25 13 12* 12ft + ft 

13 5ft 5ft 59k — ft 

76 1M 13 1 3ft 

122 22ft 22ft 22ft— ft 

69 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 

■ ft ft ft 

15ft ISft 15ft + ft 
2ft 2ft Zft + ft 
15ft 15 15 — ft 

32ft ISft 32ft— ft 
0ft 09b Bft 

2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
lift 11% lift— ft 
10ft 1 0ft 10ft 
Bft Aft Bft 

S * 21ft Zlft— ft 
ft 29ft 29ft + ft 
5ft 5 5 — M 

lft lft lft — ft 

Ift lft lft 

Aft Aft Aft— ft 

2* 2ft 2* 

. 13ft 13ft 13ft 
12 23 22* 22* + ft 

3 23ft 21ft 23ft + ft 
4 10ft 10ft 18ft 
10 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
50k 30 38 38 +1 

28 22ft 22 22ft + ft 
164 28ft 27ft 20ft + * 
2 26* 26* 26*— ft 
2 33ft 13ft 23ft 
4 38* 38U 38ft 
22 10ft 9ft 9ft— * 
13 19* 39ft 39ft 
9 23* 23ft 23ft— ft 
20 4ft 4ft Aft 

42 Oft Oft Bft— ft 

A 4ft ift 4ft 

30 |7 lift 14ft— ft 
131 T8£ 10ft 10U + ft 


10 

197 

3 


* 


20 

50e 20 17 
A 


■13r 20 14 
JOAe 14 
1J2 43 IS 


I 3 

13 10 
2 


28 21ft Curtice 


09 

97 


20 11 
ai » 


9 

12 

32 U 10 
148 11.1 9 


23 

20ft +1ft 
20ft +1% 


3ft lft DWG .131 AJ S 
26ft 19 DoleEn J2 1J I 
9ft 5ft DamnC 

7* 3* Darnaon 3 

30ft 18 Damspf US lit 
34ft 19* Damapf 175 1B0 

24 lift DatdFd .16 10 7 

9ft 3ft Data mi 
Bft 3ft Den™ 

AH 4ft Dccrail 
34ft 22M Del Lab 
ISft 11* Detval 
9ft 2ft Detmed 
10ft 7ft Dasani 
16 9ft DevlCp 
10ft 5ft Dina A 
14ft 8 DtaBtfl 
B% 2 Dtakun 
2ft ft prole wt 
42ft 23ft Dlllrds 
Aft 3ft Olodes 
9ft 5ft Dlxlca 
3ft Ift DomeP 
at* 22ft Domtr-B 140 

13ft 6* Downey 3 

39 25* Durum JO ZB 12 

ft ft DipiIop 


.92111 J 10 
16 
14 

30 14 14 


TO 3 


16 
9 

.10a 1.1 9 


31ft 31ft 21ft— ft 
Uft 15 ISft + ft 
Zft Z* 2*— ft 
8 8 8 
14 14 14 

Aft Aft Aft— ft 
14* 14 14 — 14 

2ft Zft 3M 
ft ft ft 
79 59* 57ft 57ft— 2ft 
3 Aft Aft 4* + ft 
77 B% 8* 8* 

3784 2ft Zft 2ft 
23 24ft 24ft 24* — ft 
43 lift 12ft 12* + ft 
A3 29* 29 29 — H 

141 ft * * 


4 

2V 

181 

Ml 

5 
I 

2S 

14 

10 


ShKfc 


Sis. CJOM 

Dlv. Yld. PE lOOsHtgh LowOuof. Ch'oo 


31* 22ft Duple* 
19 13 DorTsI 

1AH V* DVfllet 
23ft IBM Dvneer 


.93 U 11 
400 XB 15 
37* 10 II 
JO 30 9 


2 31 31 21 


Al 14H Mb 14ft— H 
102 lift lift 13ft— ft 
3 21ft 21 21 — ft 


32 13 40 
It 


309 


59 


9H Aft EAC 
16* 12* EECO 
7* 3ft ERC 
Jto 2Vk EtrACI 
40 31% Estop 6.94*194 

12* Aft EchoB 0 .12 
3ft lft EIAudD 
23ft 15ft ElcAm 140 AJ II 
5ft 2* ElecSd 
9* 5ft Elilnor 
12ft 10* EmMdn 
5b Zft EmCar 
1 * Ena Mat 

17ft 12 E5D n 

Aft 2ft Enstrpf 
12* 5* Era Ins 

32ft 19ft Eseev 
7ft Ift Esprit 
35ft 28 EMRd T2e It 30 

34* 22 V* EtzLOv 18 

II* 7 EvrJ A JO 25 51 

9* 7 Excel 40b 4J 9 

Aft 2ft ExolSw 10 


34 
2 

3 68 

,041 


40 10 7 


8 7ft 8 
14* 14ft 14ft— ft 
AM 6 AM 
3* 2* 2ft 
35ft 35ft 35ft + ft 
13% lift 11*— ft 
1* 1* 1* + M 

9 22% 22 22* 

7 4* 4ft 4ft— ft 

89 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
4 12% 12 12 — ft 

4 4ft ift Aft 
B ft ft ft 
38 13ft 12ft 12M— I 
I 3ft 3ft 3ft — ft 
22 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
15 JO"* 2D 20% + * 
31 Ift 1* lft + ft 
34 35% 34ft 3S + ft 

3 31ft 3tM 31ft + ft 

30 ■% 8 8 — ft 

4 Bft Bft Bft 

11 5ft 5ft 5*— % 


Slock 


Sis. Oes# 

Dlv. YW. PE IPBHwn Law Qud Ch’Be 


3% 

*% 

5 

Ifft 

A* 


* HelrnR 

»% Hersno 

TA Hlndrl 
9% Htptnsn 

2* Hetman 

4ft HgdvCp 


S 

U3 

22 

I 

S 


34* 25% Morml 
191b 8ft HmHar 
8% 2% Hmttwt 371 9 3 

17ft lift HotIPTV IJO 107 10 
5ft 1ft HottP wt 
BM T/k H0UOT l.lOdUJ 

IBM H HavnE 10 

13ft 4* Howfln JO# 1J 7 
41ft 30 Hubei A i ja u 11 
429k 29 KubelB 1J4 34 I, 
56 38* Hubbl Pf Z04 39 
ID 7ft Husky a .15 


I I 1 
5i» — M 
2* 2ft 2*— M 
13ft IJ% 11% 

2* 2ft Zft 
.18* 1 3 17 4 10ft ID* 10» 

IJB 12 T2 40 33ft >3* 33* 

Jit 62 IA 2168 lift 10ft II* +1^ 

14ft 16* 1AM 

4* 4* 4*— M 

4M 4 AM 
15* 15V. ISft — M 

lClk 9* 10ft +1M 

40% 39ft 39ft — M 

39* 39ft 39ft— ft 

S3 52ft 57ft— * 

Bft Oft Bft +■ % 


91 

32 

34 

445 


40 11 7 


22* 16ft Fablnd 

11* Aft Ftoate 

,1 Oft FlCerm lDOo 94 7 

31* 18* FtFSLn 40) 1.9 7 

13ft 11 FWvmB JO 65 10 
IA* lift FlsehP 4Bt 54 8 

18 7ft FltcGE 4 

,1% BM FlanEn 

43ft 75ft FlaRdk 

im, 32* Fluke 

13ft AM Foodrm 

9ft 4ft FttllllG 

112 48ft FordCn OAJOe 

22% IS ForvtCA .15 3 

22* 15 FarstC B J9 4 84 


94 


.70 1.7 10 
1 J8t 54 ID 
9 
20 


14 

58 

17 

130 

32 


21% 11% Forestt. 
2 * Fatamt 

24 14 FreaEl 

TOM 7* Frledm 
9ft 5 Fries E n 

18* T0H Frlana 
2tEs !2ft Frisch 9 
14* 9 FmtHd 

7ft Aft FrtAwt 
19ft 10* FurVHn 


31 


IB 

JBb34 11 


2J 10 
1.1 17 


19 19 19 + % 

5% Aft 51% + % 
10* 10* 10*— M 
31* 31* 31* 

12% 12% 17% -V % 
12% 12M 12ft— ft 
8* B% Bft + * 
10 9ft 10 + ft 

43% 40ft 42% +1* 
274 25* 25% 25ft A % 
3 *M 9H 9* + ft 
28 Oft 8% 8% — ft 

200X 93% 93 93 — 1% 

2 20ft 20ft 20* 

A 30ft 70ft 20* 4- % 
43 10 17* IT*— ft 

144 1* Ift 1*— ft 

12 27* 22ft 22* 

BM Oft BM 
Bft 8* Bft— % 
lift 10ft IBM 
20% 28% 20% 

13ft 13* 13ft 
5ft 5U 5ft 
19 18ft IBM— * 


* 


90 

7* 

7b 

7* + b 

9 

3b GNC En 

14 

3* 

3* 

3*— % 


71b 

7b 

7* 



24 

5to 

5% 



8% 

RM 

8% + b 



IS 

3b 

3b 


1 

17* 

17* 

17* 


9* GolaxC 1 

703 

11* 

11* 

IT* 


7% 

7b 

7% + b 



17 

2* 



6 

ID* 

10% 

10* + % 


24* Go ran 1T0 41 9 

» 

29b 

29b 

29b + to 

1 

1B% 

til 

18% 

18% 

8* GatLIt 

AJ 

5b 

Bft 

ft* + to 

254 

7 

■ej 

A* — % 



234 

8* 

8% 

H% 

18 

3% 


3Vk 



5 

11* 

11* 

IT*— to 

127 

9% 


9 — % 



42 

3% 

3* 

3% — Vk 

20 

to 

to 

to 

17% 


85* 14b 

13* 

13* 

211 

10b 

10 

10b + to 



36 

4* 

4* 

4* 

IA 

13 

1ZA 

13 

17* 

11* GnMIcr .10 3 12 

3 

13* 

13* 

13*— to 

50 

* 

* 

H 



125 

4% 

4b 

4% + b 

49 

3Vk 

3 

3% + 




13* 

13% 

13% — to 

47 

* 

ft 

* + ft 

13* 

TA Geo Res 5 

nr/ 

,3b 

17* 

13 + to 

39 

A* 

A* 

A* — % 



14 

3* 

3* 

3* + to 


1* 

1* 

1* + ft 



9A 

lib 

11 

I, to +• to 

3A9 

Z1M 

30% 

30* + to 

39* 

21% GfarrtFd 60 £1 13 

54 

38* 

38b 

38b— to 

1 






37 




9 

,2 

13 

12 

34% 

17 Gtattlt 68 26 7 

15 

34% 

34% 

34% — b 

10 

22 

22 

22 + % 



13 

34 

33* 

34 + b 

143 

14* 

14* 

«% + ft 


Zb GlanNR 

9 

3% 

Ito 

3% 

770 

A 


— n 

21% 

10% Glaser 44 2.1 11 

32 

70* 

20% 

20* -f * 


a* 









S3 

30 

19* 

19*— * 


■ft GldFM 

589 


* 

% 

3 

24* 

24* 

24* + % 

27 

19* GauldT 160r 36 9 

t 

24b 

74b 

24b + to 





IA 

8* GrahCa J2 26 

1 

II* 

11* 

11* 4- % 




1 

12 

8b Grant 8 

13) 

9b 

9 

9 — * 







23 

11b 

11% 

11b 





34 Vk 

2Ab GtAml ,0 

23 

34% 

34b 

34* + Vk 



17h 



37 GrtLfcC 44 IT IS 

93 

37% 

1A* 

36*— to 


» 

247k 

25 

25 

A* Granms 13 

449 

24* 

29* 

21 - % 

28 

8* 






11% 

10* 

10*— % 

68 






14 

79* 



It 

19* 




5% GrdOi JSOb 43 10 

14 

71* 

lib 

ll%— to 

10 

20% 





AM 

14b 

14% 

14* 






22* Glfstr 40 U 16 

37 

30* 

29* 

29*— U 

3 

S 









4 

Wh 


5*i— Vk 

» H 1 


JOe U 3 
40 4.9 
40a 19 12 
48 24 12 


.15 J 10 


ID* 4% HAL 
14* lift HMG 
18 9% HUBC 

27 IA* Hontrd 5 
2ft 1 Horvev 

31* 13 Hasors 

34* 22M Hasbrpf 
44* 31 Hasting 
22 14M HtthCre ZOAelOJ 

9* 5ft HI rtlOl 13 

19V» 9 HlthEx 21 

15* 10M HelttlM 44 ill 8 

9ft AM HelnWr 
7ft Helnldt 
2* Heldor 
3ft Heikini 


8 % 8 % 8 % 

12% U% 13% — % 
ISft 15ft ISft + ft 
26* 24* 26* + ft 
IM 1 1 — M 


40a 1J A 


17 

5ft 

17* 


44 _ 

JOe 23 ID 
.10 4 13 

100 
so 


887 30* 30M 30ft — * 

17 34% 34 36 — * 

11 30ft 29* 29*— 1% 

39 21M 20* 20* 

52 7ft TVk 7ft + M 

70 10 9% 9% — ft 

5 17ft 12ft 12ft 

11 Bft 8ft Bft 4 M 
191 17Vj IA* 17 4 M 

20 3 3 3 — % 

71 Sft 5* 5* + ft 


til 


4* 

Alb 

2ft 

2ft 


20ft ICH 
4* ICQ 
ZM I PM 
AM ISS 
1* impGo 
_ . lft Implnd 
«% 25* ImoOllS ,40 
10* Aft inf lent 
25* I6M I n a tron JO 
2* 1* I ruts y 

2M insSyPf JSl 
6ft Intcrvo 40 
11% mrmk .12 
3ft intBknf 
ft IntBkoT 
7 tnfHyd 
3ft intPwr 
lft IntPrM 
7 intThr n 
9 InThraf 
l inJDto 
soft 17* ionics 
36ft 10* iraoBrd 
5ft 3 isalv 


II 


J5 

12 

JSr 1J 
32 73 71 
.11* 5J I 


220 89% B8M 88* 

21 A* 6* 6* 

7 3 7ft 2ft— M 


Steel 


Sta. CtoM 

Dlv. Vld. PE TOMHIOtl Lou Quor CWR 


16ft 4* Odets • 
2Bft 10 Oftkens 
7M SM OOklea 
7ft 3* apemin 
B 3% OrtolH A 
37 27* OSunvn 

10* AM OxtrdF 
II 7* ORkPfeH 


34 


SO 

1J 14 


JM .7 30 
.15 M U 
.77 1.9 14 
421 -U 10 
JO 24 » 


10 9ft 10 — 

to* n* to* 

5ft Sft SM — 

7 Aft 7 
AH A* Aft + 
18* IT* IBM +1* 
10M 10 ID 
I* o* on 


52 

i* 


Sf- 

tft 


3* 

9* 

IA 

4* 

2 

17% 

r- 


Sft 

_ H7 2% 

59 IM 

4A2 39 30* an- 
il 43 9* 9* 9* + 

45 135 25 24* 34*— M 

8 2723 1* 1* 1* 


TO* 

10* 

5* 



2% 

2* 

3* 


to 

71 

• 

8* 

8* 

+ 

to 

IA 

12* 

12* 

12* 

+ 

to 

181 

3% 

3 

3* 

+ 

to 


I 



+ 


49 

7 

A* 

7 



4 

4b 

4b 

4b 

— 


■ 

1* 

1* 

1* 

+ 

to 

392 

9% 

9* 

9% 



50 

9b 

9b 

?b 



157 

1* 

lb 

lb 




B0 


12 
17 
2J 29 


29 29 29 — % 

Bft 33ft 33ft— % 
3 ZM ZM— U 


17* ,2 Jadvn 
Bft 5M Jccacs 
Sft 3* Jet Am 
Zft ft Jet A at 
Bft 4* Jetron 
Aft 2*k JotmPd 
lift 7% JahnAm 
,1* Ift Jefvilnd 
T* 3* JmpJkn 


79 15 
3 
S 


14 

AM 

2* 

ft 

7ft 

4* 


,4 
AM— % 

*+* 
7* + % 
CM— M 


10% Uft 10% + M 
7M 6* A*— * 

AM 3H Aft + * 


37% 28% KnGspf 4J0 111 
3ft I'M KeoakC 7 

ISft 10 KOVCP JO 14 32 

,A* 9* KtarSn JO ID 14 

5* KevCo JO 23 

B KevPh J U 14 

5 KevCe 8 

7% KevCdun 
3% KJdOewt 
3M Kllem 34 

3* Klnark 21 

3 Kirby 
3ft KIIMto 
2 KieerV 
9* Knoca 
BM Knoll 
!1 KeaerC 


9ft 

TTft 

U\k 

VM 

Aft 

Aft 

5* 

6% 

5* 

3* 

ISM 

15ft 

27ft 


12 

02r 9 

14 

14 

2J2 BJ1S5 


220x 34% 34% 34*— % 
59 2ft 2* 3*— M 

1 lift Uft Uft 
9 ,3* 13% 13* 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft 

3B0 9 B* 8*— % 

fl> 5* 5* 5*— % 

37 714 to 7M— M 
14 » » H 

1 AM 4M AM 

9 4* 4* 4* 

148 Ift 3* 3ft + M 

is n « 4k 

33 3% 2M 2M — M 

290 13* 13* 13*— * 
86 12ft 12ft 12ft 
96 26* 26% 26* + M 


3* IM L5B 
JM 2* La Barg 
7* 2% LaPnl 

41ft 23* LakeS a 
14* lift LndBn n 
irk 11 Ldmks 
15* 9ft Laser 

13 B* LOum n 
27* 23* LearPP 

9ft 2M LeePh 
31ft 12* Let) toft s 
AM 3* LetsurT 
20 Vk 7ft UrtFPtl 
3* 1* LlteRst 
3* 2ft Utfld 
Tft 1* Lodoe 
39* 23ft Lori mr 
14ft Bft Lumex 
13* Aft LundvE 

14 1 0* Lurta 
lift 10 Lydol s 
35* 13ft LyhCSy 
10* Bft LvnaiC 


18 


.154 
J4 U 
32 Z1 


JO U 8 


1ft lft lft 

2* 2ft 2ft 

5 <* 4* Ah— % 

20 38 37M 37ft— * 

6 14* 14ft 14% 

3 15ft ISft 15ft— ft 

7 12* 12% 12% 4- U 

1 10ft 10* 10*— ft 

170 23* 23* 23ft— * 

137 Aft 4% 4% — M 

52 29* 29* 29ft— H 
1 5* 5* 5ft 

15 19 18* IBM + ft 

40 Zft 2* Zft 

41 2* 2ft Zft + ft 

1 3 2 2 — M 

135 35% 34* 34* + % 

204 U 12 12% — ft 

13 12ft 12ft IZft 

59 lift lift lift— % 

29 14 Uft 13ft— M 

18, 33ft 33% 33% — M 

A 9M 9M 9M + M 


M 



Season Season 
HIdTi Low 


Ouen Hmh Low Cion Clia. 


Groins 


WHEAT <CBT] 

5J00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
4J5 332V) May 149V, XAW* 143ft 145% ->03* 

3.90 124% Jul 127 327* 124ft 125% — Jl* 

174ft 123* Sop 126ft 127% 325 125% —25 

143ft 323ft Dec 134 137% 135 U5ft — Jl% 

174ft 13BM Mar 140% 111 ft 

4J2 135 May 138% 138% 138 137ft —JO* 

Est. Sotos P rev. Sales 6J33 

Prev. Day Open I nL 37.922 offl22 


CORN (CBT) 

SJOObu minimum- dollars per bushel 

130 269* May 184 2J4 2J3% 182* — JJOft 

131 213 Jul 2.79ft 2J7* 2J8ft 2IB* — JOT 

171ft 266ft Sep 269% 269ft 268ft 269% —JO* 

2.95 260* Dec 264 264% 263 264 -JX)% 

110 269% Mar 732 272ft 271% 277% — J0V, 

121% 274% May 277 277ft 277 277ft ->01% 

284 277ft Jul 279 279ft 27Bft 279ft — J)l 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales A0J73 

Prev. Day Open lrrt.117617 off 2602 
SOYBEANS (CBT1 
SJOObu minimum- dollani per bushel 
7.97 570ft May 187 570* 585* 589% +J1% 

7.99 JJOft Jul 3.84 577 5.92 57S% -KOOft 

7J6 582 Aon 5.94 5.99ft JL94ft 5.97% 

671 SJI Sep 5.9B* 6JX)ft 197 578% — OOft 

668 5J3ft Nov 607 609 604ft 604 -81% 

679 194ft Jon 617 619ft 615ft 614ft —81 

762 604ft Mar 627ft 630 627 627 

779 615 May 635 637 634ft 4J4ft 

658 AJa Jul 640 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 41743 

Prev. Day Open Inf. A2J89 off 1449 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 fans- dollars per tan 

May 1 2030 12370 I19J0 12360 
Jul 12650 13000 12569 129J0 
Aub 129 JO 13250 T2860 1 3230 
Sep 13IJ0 13550 13170 13SJW 
Od 13470 13BJ0 134JH 13B00 
Dec 140J0 14350 13950 14X10 
Jan 14250 14650 14270 145JW 
Mar 14650 15050 14750 14950 
May 15350 

Jul 

Prev.Sales 22644 


—SB 


70500 120.10 
19650 12620 
103 JO 129.10 
17950 13210 
tSBLSfl 13450 
IS4J0 1407B 
I63J0 14380 
20650 14650 
14250 15450 
1C7J0 16200 
Est. Sales 


157 JO 


+290 

+270 

+270 

+190 

+260 

+230 

+180 

+80 

+70 

+70 


Prev. Day Open Int. 48579 up 1748 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT] 
oajoa lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 


XLO0 

2260 

Mav 

XL70 

3100 


32.13 


33-72 

2ZJ0 

Jut 

3160 

31 T5 

3035 

3X78 


31.95 

<n 

Aug 

JOTS 

36.90 

3061 

30JU 

—61 


22JD 

Sea 

29.90 

30.10 


29 JO 


30J7 

22.90 

Oct 

2960 





2965 

2290 

Dec 

2X30 

2X50 

Z7J3 

27J9 

— -53 


2360 

Jon 


2X15 


2753 


3860 

2460 

Mar 

2760 

2760 

2760 

27 J5 

— JS 

76AO 2468 MOV 2765 2765 

Est. Sales Prev.Soies 30618 

Prev.Dav Oaen int MJ17 at, as 

27 JS 

Z7J5 

+65 


OATS rCBTl 
SJXJD bu minimum- dollars Per bushel 


1.91 
1.78ft 
1.79 
lXTft 
167* 
Est. Sale 


160% 
157* 
154 ft 
160ft 
163ft 


Prev. Dav Open int. 124* aft 124 


May 161 161* 160ft 160ft 

Jul 150 158* 15B 158 

5«tp 157 157% 157 157 +JQ% 

Dec 160% 161% 160% 161% +_00ft 

_M«r 164 + JJOft 

Prev.Sales 904 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME> 

40800 lbs.- cents per lb. 


AVJ0 

A 137 

Jun 


A9A9 




6XT5 

Aw 

A355 

4# JM 




4160 

Oct 

#260 





A3 60 

Dec 



634S 



A4J» 

Feb 

#4.50 

44TD 



A: 57 A5J5 Apr A550 A5T0 

EsI sales 1SJ7S Prav.salei TX71A 
Prev. Dav Open int. 57J24 up 1.100 

45JQ 

•565 


—JO 

+88 

+-2S 

+.13 

+JB 


47 JO 
47J5 
6770 
48.10 
49JJS 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME> 

4*JM0 ids., cents per lb. 

7275 6470 May 4470 

71 7D 9660 Aug 67.13 
7100 6760 Sap 47J5 

7232 67.00 Oct 67.10 

7120 47.90 Nav 4685 

_79AO 6975 Jan 4985 _ 

Est. Sains 1.TS0 Prov. Sales 2JAB 
Prcv.DavOoenlnt. 7.955 Dll 238 
HOGS (CME1 
70J00 lbs.- eenh oer la. 

5560 44.15 

55.77 *695 

54J7 4750 

51 ?3 45.00 

5085 46JD 
5000 4675 

47JS M.DC 
4*85 47JXI 
^4370 4775 

ESI. Sales 5.932 
Prev. Day Caen I 
PORK BELLIES (CME I 
3O0M lbs.- cants aer it>. 

5—00 61.15 May 64.90 *9.s s 

42.15 Jul 647D 4460 

4070 Aup 65.40 64J» 

S-IS f.* 0 71 ® P 72.90 
4460 Mar 7190 71,90 
70.40 Mev 


44.10 

4880 

44.90 

4480 

4782 

6965 


*455 

4787 

47.17 

6765 

4865 

49.10 


-82 

->10 


Jim 

4760 

4760 

45J2 

4AJM 

—JO 

Jul 

49 JM 

49 JO 

4X55 

4X95 

—37 

Auo 

49JS 

49.0J 

49J0 

4960 

—.HI 

Oct 

4760 

47.15 

4*75 

4765 

—.12 

Dec 

48J0 

4X60 

4865 

4860 

—JO 

Feb 

49.10 

49 JO 

4X80 

49.15 

+.15 

Apr 

44J5 

44.35 

4460 

4635 

Jun 

4X40 

4X40 

4X15 

4867 

— -23 

JUI 

'rav. Sates 5J» 

1. 23673 up 481 


4X90 

—.10 


8247 

OCAS 

7*J5 

75.43 

7540 


4450 

4585 

44.90 

71.90 
71.90 


.483 70.90 Jut 

Eat. Soles 7840 Prev.Sales 7853 
Prev. Dav Ooan Int. I2J80 up 154 


6+95 

4457 

44*7 

7280 

7280 

7460 

73.90 


—43 
—JO 
—52 
+-30 
— JS 


Season Season 

Htoh LOW 


Open Hlah Law das* Cha. 


ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 
15600 lbs.- cents per lb. 
10560 1 Sl-00 

15480 
15460 
15L50 
151.90 
15260 
14060 
15750 
17975 


18485 
18260 
181.00 
18060 
17750 
18250 
15750 

18050 _ 

Est. Sates 300 Prev.Sales 491 
Prev. Day Open Int. 4J73 off 110 


MOV 15875 159 JO 15660 I5BJS 
Jul 157JS 15860 15470 15+95 
SOP 15550 15580 I54J0 155L20 
Nav 15280 15280 T52JS 153.35 
Jan 15250 15275 15225 15225 
Mar 1527D 15270 15225 ,5245 
May 1S2AS 

Jul 15245 

Sap ,5245 


+.14 
+J0 
+J0 
—.13 
—.15 
— >05 


— *05 


Me to is 


COPPER (COMEJQ 
25600 tbs.- cents per lb. 


9260 

5X20 

Mav 

8X85 

6160 

6065 

61 JO 

+JS 

44J5 

6165 

Jun 

6160 

61 J0 

6160 

61J5 

ta 

8X25 

32 

Jul 

6,60 

6260 

6,55 

6X25 

83.10 

Sen 

62J0 

6X6S 

42.15 

6265 

+JS 

8425 

8420 

5X58 

S»60 

Dec 

Jan 

42TS 

6360 

4250 

AUO 

6X45 

+60 

+65 

8X00 

5960 

Mar 

AUO 

6190 

4X00 

6X80 

+JS 

7460 

AMO 

Mav 

6X53 

63J0 

6150 

64.10 

+J5 

7460 

61J0 

Jul 

4X70 

6425 

6X65 

6460 

+60 

3B.9S 

7000 

7X20 

A2J0 

A460 

A5J0 

Sep 

Dec 

Jot 

Mar 

6460 

4460 

6460 

6430 

6X15 

8X30 

6560 

+65 

+65 

+65 

+65 


Eat. Sales 9600 Prev.Satoa 1+902 
Prev. Day Open Hit. 85876 aff2JH4 


ALUMINUM (COMEXJ 
40600 Ita.- cents per lb. ■ 


8190 

4985 

5940 

7460 

7080 

7650 

7380 

4475 

4345 

5110 


4740 

49.10 


49 JS 

ss 

5185 

53.95 

5565 

5160 


May 

Jun 

Jul 


4780 4785 4780 4860 


Dec 

Jan 


4980 

5085 


4SJ90 

4970 

5085 


4980 

5085 


May 
Jul 
5ep 
Doc 

Mar 

Est. Sales 210 Prev. Salas 314 

Prev. Day Oaen Int. 2440 off 531 
SILVER (COMEX] 

5600 tray at- cents per troy at 


4980 
5080 
51 JO 
5260 
5280 
5340 
5440 
5580 
5600 
5680 


+.15 

+JD 

+J0 

+J0 


+JD 

+J0 

+60 

+60 

+60 

+JQ 

& 


151X0 

3510 

Mar 

6140 

mu 

6090 

617.1 

1461 J) 

5620 

Jut 

6700 

6300 

61X0 

6240 


57X0 

Sep 

6300 

63X0 

6340 

63X5 

121X0 

5900 

Dee 

6420 

6520 

6400 

64X0 

1215J0 

5950 

Jan 

6460 

6460 

6460 

65U 

119X0 

104X0 

4070 

6210 

Mar 

Mav 

6600 

6680 

A5&0 

66X3 

67X2 

945J) 

6350 

Jul 

6840 

6840 

6840 

68&B 

m 

ill 

Sep 

Dec 

Jan 

-Mar 

69X0 

7030 

6930 

69X1 

71X9 

723U 

73X3 


+8 

+J 

+J 


Est. Sales 22600 Prev. Salas 34674 
Prev. Day Open int 70830 off 3870 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 Irav ax.- dollars aer fmv oz. 

757 JM 251 JM Jun 27180 27180 27180 27060 —IJB 

44950 74160 Jul 27350 27EOO 34960 72130 —USB 

39360 25060 Oct 27760 27960 27489 27760 —160 

37380 24060 Jan 28360 2848D 28150 28360 —160 

Est. Sales 2J3S Prev.Sales 1297 
Prev. Day Open int. 12696 offSS 

PALLADIUM (NYME) 

1 00 troy at- doitara par az 

May 11065 +45 

15980 10AJO Jun 11160 11180 110.10 11165 +45 

Jul 60 

14175 10+25 Sep 10980 HOTS 10960 11000 +45 

14180 10580 Dec 11025 11080 10925 10925 +45 

12780 10650 Mar 11065 11025 11025 10875 +85 

Est. Sales 139 Prev.Sales 563 
Prev. Day Open Int 7617 up 40 
SOLD (COMEXJ 
100 hay az.-do)k>ra per troy ex. 

32760 29260 May 31560 31560 31560 I13J0 —168 

Jun 317J0 31780 31260 31530 —120 

Jul 31730 —140 

Aup 32160 32160 31560 319.40 —1J0 

Oct 32530 32530 321 80 32320 —148 

DOC 329.90 329.90 32520 32040 —IJB 

Feb 33350 33380 33180 33380 —180 

Aar 34060 34060 34060 mBO —170 

Jun 34480 —180 

Aup 35030 — 2JM 

Oct 35410 —220 

Dec 34280 — 240 


51060 28760 


48560 

49360 

48980 

4BS80 

49680 

43SJD 


395.70 

39960 


291JM 

29760 

30180 

30600 

31470 

32050 

33160 

33560 

34260 


EsLSotas 29600 Prev. Bales 48394 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 129649 up 1625 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- ptsef 100 dcl 


9235 

87.14 

Jun 

9109 

92.10 


9207 


9137 

84.94 

Sop 

91.45 

9159 

9105 

9156 

+08 


8X77 

Dec 

9100 

91.13 


91.10 


9X93 

8X00 

Mar 

9009 

9X76 


9X73 


90L64 

8701 

Jun 

9002 

9002 

9002 

9003 

+06 

9X18 

8906 

0X00 

B9.05 

0958 

Sop 

Dec 

Mar 

90.15 

9X16 

9X15 

9X17 

8903 

89T2 

+07 

+0A 

+-0S 

Est. Sains 

Prev.Sales 9530 




Prev. Day Open Int. 40.920 up 337 


M YR_ TREASURY (CBT) 
sioaAao prin- an a 32nas of iao ad 


EM 

7+9 

Jun 

0+29 

§1-16 


81-10 

+8 

81-13 

7+18 


8+1 



8+13 



7+13 

Dec 

79-15 

79-20 


7916 

*9 

8+8 

7+14 

Mar 

7+23 

7B-2B 

7+Z2 

7+34 

+0 

79-36 7400 

Esi. Sales 

Jun 

Prev. Sales 9J39 

7+3 

+7 


Prev. Day Open Int. 45.100 up200 
US TREASURY BONDS ICBT1 


Food 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE1 
37 JHWRis.. cants per lb. 

>2261 Mav 14580 147.15 14SJM 14764 

J“1 >*H5 14615 14*84 

?££ JIMS 46 - 70 i«-io 14+2 

Dec 144.40 14580 14440 14541 

Mar U560 14560 T4425 14475 

Mav 14480 14480 14480 14480 

Jul 
Sap 


14920 
14780 
14S.40 
14680 
1*600 
1*080 
1*2 DO 

>■*» Prev. Sates 1873 
Prey Day Oaen Ini. 13.230 up 139 

f-H^BWORLD 11 (NYCSCEi 


13160 

127.00 

12965 

12880 

13160 

13580 

13X75 


+124 
+1.19 
+167 
+80 
+7S 
+180 
14+75 +175 
13975 —.75 


1 1 -600 Ibk.- cents per lb. 

JS 142 Jul 

J<5 aj9 sen 

265 1TJ Od 

i-2 +10 Jon 

4 88 Mar 
+** 560 Jul 

A 20 SJ3 Sod 

Est Sales 5225 Prev. Sates 1X934 


382 

389 

364 

430 

485 

U4 


X57 

174 

363 

420 

489 

569 


148 

386 

Ifil 

418 

482 

564 


384 

+74 

387 

430 


568 

SM 


Prev.DovGeon Int. 71336 a« 5.1*7 
COCOblH ycscEI 
13 ISJ 1 ' tons- S pot tan 

*52 199B Mav 2342 2375 

7*00 1998 Jul WO 2100 

2*15 ,907 5*P 2030 2059 

2337 1945 Dec 2009 2023 

71*0 1955 Mar 2000 2028 

• 130 m May 

2110 I960 Jul 

Est Sales prev. Sate* A6A9 

Prev Dav Open IM, 2S8M off 41 5 


2005 

2000 


2 095 

2059 

2029 

70S 


(8pc9SlOO0O+pts X JZndsaf IOOpcI) 
77-15 57-» Jun 7+2A 71-11 


71 -A 

+14 


57-10 

Sep 

69-25 

7+10 

6920 

70-4 

+13 


57-8 

Dec 

A+Z7 

6913 

4+23 

696 

+12 

72-30 

57-2 

Mar 

68-9 

6+15 

e®« 

6+11 



5+29 

Jun 

47-12 

47-24 


4700 


70-3 

5+29 


6404 

67-2 


4+31 


69-26 

5+29 

Dec 

6+15 



6+13 


4912 

492 

6+26 

SM7 

63-11 

43-4 

Mar 

Jun 

Sen 

6+1 

65-4 

4+1 

A+» 

6+14 

6+1 

-w 

48 

+7 

4+8 63-24 Dee 

Est.Sales Prev. Sates T2U78 

Prev. Dav Oaen int J20.1A8 UP402O 


*4-32 

+7 


Season 

Htoh 


Season 

Law 


Oaen Htoh Low Close Cho. 


04.10 

8673 

8768 

0730 

8784 


Dec 

Mar 

Jun 


B«74 
89 JO 
88.93 


6845 


89.92 

8986 

8960 

0887 

8885 


8974 
89 JO 
8893 


8967 

0983 

8964 

8874 


8845 B84A 


8820 


9020 
8979 
8984 
09.14 

8977 8778 DOC 

Hi H784 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 402A1 

Prev. Day Open int.HOJMA up 193 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

Spar pound- , pobitaauals SL000I 
1J350 16235 Jun 12190 12240 12100 12225 

18450 16200 Sep 12085 12150 12000 12125 

17800 16200 Dec 17040 170*0 1.1990 17075 

17800 16480 Mar UQ55 

172SC 1.1905 Jun 17045 

Est. Sales 12849 Prev.Sales 13674 
Prev. Day open Int. 31884 oH215 


+.12 

+.12 

+.12 

+.12 

+.12 

+.12 


9ft 

2ft 

,1ft 

5% 

15% 

17ft 

2% 


— 20 
— 30 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
S per dr- 1 point equals 810 001 
7833 -7BS4 jun 7292 


7255 

7245 


7240 

7254 

7245 


7240 


7297 

7274 

7258 

7245 

.7235 


.10450 

.10425 

.10400 


•3178 


JSM JW£ Dec 

7504 89B1 Mar 

7330 .7870 Jun 

Est.SafM 1731 Prev. Sales 1,152 
Prev. Day Open tnt. 10603 up 70 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Spar franc- 1 oolnl eauals HL000G1 
.11020 69410 Jun 

.10940 69*20 Sep 

.1044? 69470 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Salas 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 1814 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S per mark- 1 point eauals sojuoi 
-3733 7905 Jun J109 J210 

■3545 7930 Sen 7213 7234 

76TO 7971 Dec 7243 7243 

7415 Jo® Mar 

EsLSalM 28749 Prev. Sales 26,957 
Prev. Day Open int. 47718 off 1808 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per yen- Ipabrt aeualt 50600001 
004450 60382 4 Jun 603948 603979 6 10942 6 03974 
004150 60357 0 Sep 603991 604004 603988 603999 
004350 603905 Dec 604025 JJ0402S 604000 604U1 
0041*1 604090 Mar 604079 

Est. Sales 4609 Prev. Sales 5649 
Prev. Day Open Int. 17693 off 541 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc- 1 point eauals 506001 
8900 7*39 Jun 7800 7841 77*7 7831 

-4830 jm Sep J8B0 7880 7834 78A5 
8340 7531 Dec 7080 7900 7880 7902 

Jm 7SJ5 Mar 7954 

Est. Sales 21*44 Prev. Sales 19653 
Prev. Day Open Int. 27,144 off 723 


-7 

-7 


—100 

=IS 


14ft 12 MCO Hd 
3ft Ift MCO RS 
7ft MSA n 
1 MSA wt 
7ft MSI Ot 
3 MSR 
4% MocGm 
Bft MacScn 
* Macrod 
H% lo^k Me PS 
25 17% Maned 

9* 4% MrtnOf 

10* 3ft MrkJVs 
27* ISft Mr shin 
38% Bft MartPr 
18ft Bft Maslnd 
Bft 5 Matee 
2211: 12ft MatRsh 
19% Bft Mat Sen 
29ft IB Matrix 1 


12 

17 21 


12 13ft 13ft Uft 

15 2% 2ft 2ft 

14 Sft Bft Sft— ft 
5 lft 1H lft— ft 
29 7ft 7ft 7ft 

20 Sft 3ft Sft— ft 
19 12% 12 13 — ft 

■ Uft U Uft— ft 
86 1% 1% 1% 

751 26 2 44 12* 12ft 12ft— ft 

2 17% 17% 17% — % 
9 44 ift 4% 4% — ft 

9 22 9ft 9% 9ft + ft 

7 24 lift 14% lift + % 

34 27ft 24ft 2A%— Ift 
34 ,4ft 16ft 14ft— ft 
74 Aft Aft Aft + ft 
44 15ft 15% 15% 

34 14ft 14% 14% — ft 
244 27ft 22ft 22ft + ft 


14 


4 
17 
6 14 
7 
21 


74 

LOO U 14 
70b 17 15 
785 20 15 


Mft 14ft MtcfilE 
43ft 33ft NUtoCp 
17ft 10ft MoooB 
17ft 10ft MoaaA 
Aft 3% MtoRtwt 
19ft 12ft MtoGfh 1-54 17 A 
ft Mortm 

2ft MIMod 18 

4% MovIeL 
3* Murpln 
3ft MuseAr 
rti Musewt 


lft 

?ft 


15% 14* 14*— ft 
A3% 43ft &3Vk 
14* 1«% 14*— ft 
14* li**, 14%—* 
Ift Sft 3ft— ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
tft Ift 


5% 

10ft 

2ft 


18 

Ift 

5% 

9 

3* 

7* 

ft 


5ft 

Sft 

2* 

ft 1 


Sft— % 
Bft- ft 
2* — ft 




7204 

-3228 

JM 

7297 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130600 bd.ft.rS per 1600 bd.fl. 

22560 121.10 May 137,40 13950 13+10 13970 

23050 729 JO Juf 14X78 14478 140J0 14360 

19750 13550 3ep 1«J0 V48.TO 14470 147J0 

18+10 1 3760 Nav 147.78 M9J0 14460 14+70 

IB760 14460 Jan 15560 15+50 15X40 15+00 

19560 ,5000 Mar 14060 14860 14060 15960 

17X00 15360 May 14460 1+460 14260 18460 

Ed. Salas 1039 Prev. Sales 3701 

Prev. Dav Ootm Int. 9645 off TIB 

COTTON Z(NYCE) 

50600 lbs.- cents par lb. 


+160 

+150 

+150 

+1J0 

+170 


+160 


79 JO 

4X24 

Mav 

6X95 

47.75 

4A-7B 

S735 

7905 

6305 

Jul 

6X10 

6X72 

6X10 

4X49 

7750 

4400 

Oct 

6450 

6450 

4X73 

6400 


6450 

Dec 

6450 

6600 

64J8 

6402 

7X73 

6505 

Mar 

6X00 

6X05 

6600 

6X57 

7X00 

7005 

6X50 

6601 

6X50 

6X00 

May 

Jut 

Oct 

6X65 

6665 

6X61 

6X*1 
67 JO 
6530 


+175 

+67 

+64 


15 

60b 29 9 
.10 3 14 


17 14 NRMn 

7ft 5ft Nontck 
14% lift NtGaO 
27 12ft NtPafnt 
Tft 1 Nats LB 
19ft lift NMxAr 
ISft 11 NPInRt 
20ft 13 NProc 
44ft 24 NYTIme 
A* Aft NewbE 
lift Sft Nichols 
Sft lft Maaflnd 
Sft 2% Notax 
13ft 10 NardRn 
IB 13* NoCdO g 
35 29* NIPS pf 473 125 

lift 7 NudDt 


J9t 47 12 
-99 67 14 
170a A6 10 
52 17 14 
75B il 4 
0 


176 

16* 

16% 

16% — to 

1 

7* 

7* 

7* 


V 

13* 

13* 

13*— * 

26S 

14 

13* 

13*— to 

6 

Ito 

Ito 

ito 


2 

18* 

18* 

18*— to 

16 

15* 

IS* 

IS*— % 

*5 

11* 

18* 

18b 


440 

43* 

43* 

43% - 

- to 

13 

4* 

4* 

<* 


38 

11% 

II* 

11* 


2 

2* 

2% 

2% 


74 

2* 

2* 

2% — to 

32 

ir* 

11 

l,Vk— * 

13 

16* 

16* 

16*— to 

lOQz 

32U> 

33 

33 — *, 

T7 

8 

7* 

8 -1 

- % 


24% 14% OEA 
2ft 14ft Oakwd 
12 4 Odd An 


13 
5 12 
34 


21% 21% 71% 

18 17ft T7ft— % 
7ft Aft Sft— ft 


13* 10ft PGGrtA 150 ,16 
17% Bft PGEnfB 177 ,15 
10ft SH POEefD ITS 116 
10* 1% PGEptE ITS 116 

ISft 8 PGEpfG ,70 ,17 
14ft 29 PGEefF 434 116 
XFm 2E* PGEefZ 46+ 127 
28ft 31ft FGEpfY 170 1Z1 
lift 17ft PGEpfW 257 176 
B 15ft PCEdTV Z32 ,17 
22 17 PSEafT 2-54 115 

2% 17ft PGEpf5 263 117 
9ft Tft PGEOfH 1.12 115 
20% 15ft POEPfR 277 11.9 
17ft 13% PGEPta 260 11.9 
lift 13% PGEpfM 1.96 126 
17ft Uft PGEntK 264 115 
9ft 7ft PGEPfi >6* ,16 
24% 14ft PGTra 174 5J 
39* 31ft PaeLIPf 450 117 
AS 53ft PacLfPf 754 117 
lft ft Peeee 
39ft 29ft PallCp 
Bft 5ft Panted 
9ft 3ft ParaPk 
24ft 15% ParkCH 
14* Tft PatTch 
13* 7% PEC tar 
1, 8ft PeerTu 
45ft 32% Pen EM 
23ft ISft PenTr 
2ft 1 PE Cp 
38ft 24ft Pen RE 


13 13 lift 12ft — 

1 lift lift lift 
5 10ft 10ft 10ft — 

34 ID* 10ft 10ft — 

59 Hta 10ft »% 

9 33ft 23* 33ft + 

20 31ft 21ft 3, ft 
A, 24ft 24ft 24ft — 

37 SI* 21 21* + 

34 19* ,9ft lft + 

9 21ft 21ft 2IM — . 
II 22 21* 23 + * 


ft 


13* S% PenobS 


68 15 ,1 
43 

8 

60o 27 9 

JOt 7.1 ,0 
60b 45 IS 
1700 26 10 
170 56 U 
39*733 
260 47 » 


51 20 19* 30 

4 14ft 14* 14% — * 
2 14* 14* 14ft 
12 IT* 17ft 17* +1 
1 to to to 
373 21% 20* 20ft — ft 
3102 38ft 381k 38ft +1% 
WHS AS* +4 +5% +,ft 

505 ft Si ft 

205 33ft 32* 33* + b 
14 TVk 7% 7H— ft 

19 9 9 9 — ft 

9 22* 22ft 22ft— ft 
19 9ft 9* »*— b 

ASOz Uft Uft Uft— % 

4 8* k* ■*— % 

1 42ft 42ft 42ft— ft 
, 20* 20* 20*— b 




96 


U 27 
16 9 

Pentmv 
32% 23 PerMC JO 36 AS 

14* tm Pertnfl 

12 9% Perhilpf 1.10 

S* 3. PetLw 

1* Hi PelL wt 

10% 4ft PetLe Pf 16S 226 

,3 7* PetLeof Z2B 2X7 

IB* 11* PetLeof 133 2X8 

2* I* PtolLD 77*127 2 

9* 3ft PkooPd 

»' 4% Ptonrsv 7 

5* Aft PffWVa 5A ,03 

lAft 11 PltDM .40 79 

71ft 38_ Pittwov 160 25 


43 

ito 

1 

1% + to 

IT* 

7»» Tot, Pig 

15 

38% 

38b 

38% + b 

3% 



IM 

IS* 

IS* 

iito 


71 

13* 

13* 

13*— to 

19* 


26 

1* 

1* 

1*— ft 

18b 





24* + to 



38 

13 

tZfli 

,3 + % 



14 

11* 

11* 

11* + to 



1140 

3% 

2* 

3to— * 

4 


57 

* 

* 

* 

15% 

9* Tulten 

46 


7to 

7b— to 

28* 

20% TumrC 

57 

** 

9% 

9* 

3* 

1* Tylrwfs 

28 

20 

33 

,4* 

7% 

4% 

14* 

Z!k 

4* 

14* 

2% 

«*— % 



3 4* 4% 4* 


12* Aft Ptxnjln 
20ft 13ft PIcrDp 
16 Bft PtoGms 
7ft 4* PapeEv 
12ft 7* Parts vb 
T 7ft 12% PadlPr 

27 13 PawrTs 

7* 5* PratrQk 

24* 18* PmtfL 
8* aft Pratt Rd 
l* ft PreniRs 

r aft PresRB 68 _ - 

15% Pn»CT» 152 76 IT 

29* 19% Proven 2JW 76 + 

33% 25ft PprpfE 07 146 

21ft 15* PalofD 274 11J 

9ft 4 PumaG 


.92 

.12 


,0 

3 

5* 

5% 


Sb 

2 USRIfld 


3 

3 

3 

3 — to 

*9 

7 

13* 

13% 


24* 

8* Ultmlr 

10 

431 

,3 

17b 

13* — * 

ta 

8 




Ik 


14 

257 

* 

TC 

ft 

16 

18 

8* 

8% 


IS* 

11% Unleppf 

.75 X5 

U 

,3* 

13% 

13* 


83 

,9b 

,11* 


l,Vk 

8* Unlmrn 

50OX7 

223 

TO* 

10* 

10* 

,1 

48 

13% 

13b 


21 

,4b UMrPd 

54b 30 >0 

23 

,8 

18 

,8 — to 

9 

78 





1* UFOOdA 

.to xr ia 

38 

1* 

1* 

,* — to 

30 

29 

9te 

9* 

'<m— % 

3* 

Ito UFeodB 

10 

IS 

1* 

1* 

1* + to 


5 





10% UfMed 

0» X7 14 

91 

14 

U* 

13*— b 


16 




21* 

,0% USAGwt 


1 

17b 

17b 

17b + to 


14 

7b 



8* 

UnlhHV 

.9*1145 22 

5 

4% 

i% 

a%— to 

9 

■ 

32% 

22* 

23*— % 

14% 

7ft UnvCm 

,7 

2« 

,3b 

13 

13b 


2 




10* 

3* UMvRS 

34 

/ 

7* 

7* 

7*— to 


14 

* 

to 

ft + ft 

15* 

«* UnvPai 


168 

12* 

11* 

i,*— * 


« 10% 9* 10 — ft 

14 20ft 20* 28ft + ft 
5 29ft 29ft 39ft— % 
18 32% 31% 3I%— * 
2 20* 20* 20* 

25 Aft 4 4 


20% io Ouebgs 78 


183 27ft 2A% 24% —1 


9* 

Tft 

20 


5 RAI 

7ft RTC 
12ft Ransto 
4 * Rati Ift 

14* 10ft Raven 
8* 4 RtlncT 

RItSo un 
ift 1* Redtaw 
17* 10ft React B 
9P4 27ft Ran A 
53ft 30ft Reart B 
■ft 5* Rest Ax 
17% 9* RlbietP 

4% * RIoGDr 

28ft 13* Rckwvs 
30* 20ft Rogers 
7 2 RoonPn 

5ft 3* RavPlm 
34 21 RwHch 

7 ft 3* RBW 
14ft 11% RusmII 
22* 10ft Rvkoft 


JSl 55 13 


72 45333 


12 4% 4% 

12 2* 2ft 

140 16H 14 


4% 

3* 

14 — ft 


37 

7 

319 


13 
26 IB 


26 20 
5 II 


540 16 II 

7 

JO 3.1 TO 
50 24 13 


!U 1% lb 
12* 12ft 12* + ft 
Bft Bft Bft— ft 
19* 19ft 19ft 
3* 3* 3*— b 
13 13 13 + ft 

44 44* 44* —lft 

lOOzSUk 50 50 —lft 

2 7* 7% 7*— b 

3+ HJ* 10 10 

42 S * * 

22 25ft 25* 25%— * 
70 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 
257 3ft Zft 2* + % 

45 ift ♦% ift + ft 

13 29% 28* 29* + * 

40 Aft Aft Aft 

31 14* 14* 14*— ft 
38 20ft 20% 20*— ft 


7* 

5* 

12ft 

Iff* 

3* 

7* 

82 

tl 


2 S 

70r 36 12 


68 HJ 


7 SFNnfA 
3ft 5MD 
7 Sane 
5 Salem 
* SCarlD 

6% SDuapf _ .. 

67* SDnepf 964 1X1 
49 SDoonf 779 >16 
21ft 17% SDoOPf 267 117 
38ft 31ft SDaapt 466 126 

23* 10ft SDnepf 268 116 

34 SanJW 2-90 +9 9 
Ift sanmrk 63t 96 11 

Aft Sound B .15 IS 7 

4* Sound A 70 12 7 

9ft Sound Pf 170 116 

3* Scentrn 


7* 

3ft 


7ft 

3% 


7* + ft 
3ft + * 


A0 

$* 

7 

4ft 

10ft 

5% 


348 
34 

4 B* 

5 Sft Sft 9% + % 
1 Tft 1ft Ift 
5 7ft 7* 7ft + ft 

SOIlr 81ft 8, ft 81ft— ft 
100x43 41ft U +1% 
17 21% 31ft 21ft— ft 
29 37ft 34* 37 — ft 

8 23ft 22* 21ft + ft 
5 59% 58* 50 ft + ft 

9 Aft 4* 4*— ft 

9 4% 4 4 — ft 

4 4% 4% 4b— ft 

2$ ,8ft 10b 10* 

5 4* 


17* 

12% MovEng 

200 14J 33 107 

14b 

13* 

1414 

22* 

,5% Scheib 

56 19 

10 

1 

19% 

19% 

19% 

«b 

15% AAaytrw 

806 20 10 153 

33b 

33 

33 

14b 

10* Schwab 

08 XI 

17 

3 

11* 

11* 

11*— Vk 

11 

8 McCOG 

20Oe22J 100 

f 

S* 

» 

8* 

4 3dMpf 



197 

4 

3* 


7to 

4% McOaw 


2T 77 

5 

4* 

4*— b 

35 

15* SdLsa 


g 

28 

15* 

IS* 

15% — to 

3% 

1* McRae A .10# 5J 9 

Ito 

1* 

1* 

40b 

30* scope 

J6 10 

ii 

25 

36* 

36* 

34* + to 

3* 

2 McRaeS 

1 

? 

2 

2 — to 

62 

34 SbdCp 

50 0 

5 

9 

61b 

60to 

Mb— 1* 

11* 

7* Medals! 

TOn 20 8 45 

Tft 

9* 

9* 

15* 

10* SecCaP 

.16* 1.1 

1 

205 

14* 

14* 

14% + b 

AAb 

52 Media 

1.16 

10 IA 42 

85 

84* 

84* 

5* 

2% SeiiPro 



10 

3% 

3 

3% 

IB* 

17% Media 

.70 

IT 15 69 

16* 

lAto 

16b 

9b 

* Sal sort 



11 

1% 

1% 

i% 

9% 

5* MereSL 

■371 

50 11 9 

6* 

A* 

6* 

ito 

3* Setoj 



7 

A* 

6* 

4* 

16% 

B% AdelPra 

.15 

S 19 256 

14b 

IS* 

16 + * 

s% 

3* SorioAs 


n 

5 

S 

5 

5 

20% 

llto AMtex 


15 9 26 

19* 

l«* 

19*- to 

4* 

2b Semtcti 



II 

3* 

3* 

3* — Vk 

» 

16% MotraC 


33 4 

23 

31* 

21* — * 

15* 

llto Srvlsco 

04 40 

30 

13 

n 

11 

IT — to 

8% 



21 75 

A* 

AW 

6* + to 

lib 





9b 

»b 


12 

Bft MldAm 

04 

XI 13 11 

11 

TO* 

10*— % 

5* 

Sft Servofr 

JIAt 10.1 

7 

45 

*b 

Hb 

8% 

45% 

38% MlnPpf 

500 110 IDO) 

43* 

43* 

a*— * 

18* 


.12 0 

11 

21 

16* 

16 

16 — * 

76% 

bS'u MtaPpf 

850 1 IT 120: 

74 

74 

76 +1 

■r.j 

8% ShaerS 

IJMe BT 

6 

3 

12* 

13b 

12b— to 

9to 

7% MlssnW 

T4e 3J 12 A 

7* 

7* 

7* + to 


* Sharon 



462 

ft 

* 

*— ft 


Bft Sfmn*l 
14ft 12* StarHSn 
,3 10% MerSan 

,5ft 10ft Slum 
7ft 5* SHco 

0 SBiosA s 
Ift Sflvrat 
Zft SI mens 
ink SmttiA 
9* SmlhB 


.14016 


'k 

ISft 

14ft 


77, 2J 31 
60 34 10 
M 15 21 
70 16 14 


15ft 12* Snyder 


m Hi**™ 


60 35 
60 37 
260 UJ 15 


3 

2 

131 

12 

JB 


So Tex 

10 7* SCEdpf 162 109 

10% 7* SCEdpf 164 ,15 
10ft 7* SCEdpf IJB 11.1 
lift Ift SCEd nf 1.19 106 
47* 13* SCEdpf 468 U 
13* 10ft SCEd pf 165 117 
21% 14* SCEdpf 270 116 
20* 18 SCEdpf 221 107 
W* AW SprtatM 
10 6* Sark pf 160 1+0 


ZO* 

7% 

lift 

3 

B* 


9* Spctre s 
3ft SpcdOP 
■ft Spndfhn 
1% Spndtwt 
4* StHavn 


69 5 


49 

2A 

24 

40 

17 ,8)9 
I 


27ft 13ft StdPfd 
77ft 54% StdShr 
20* 11* starrtH 
21 14* Stepan 

5% 4% StriCan 
1* StorfEI 
7* StrVExt 
5* SterISff 
5% SamltE 
4* SanCly 
5 SunSLn 


u 32 
16 4 
,2 
19 
36 13 


3* 

23 

■ft 

I* 

11 

Uft 


IS 

10 

.Ue 16 25 


24 14 15ft 15* 

92 13% 12ft 13ft 
B 12 13 12 

~ 11% 11% 11% 

5* 5* 5*— % 
13% 13% 13* + * 
3% 3% 3%— % 
3* 3* 3*— % 
37 17 14% 17 ♦ % 

4 Mb 14% 14b 
2» 15% 15 15 — % 

59 4* 4* 4* + % 
W * * * + % 

2 9* 9* 9* + * 
4 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

10 9* 9* 9*— b 

11 11 10* 11 + * 

TOta 44ft 44ft 44ft 

9 13% 13 13 

21 20 * 20 * + * 
20* 20% 20% + % 
8* 59k 5* 

Aft 4% 4% — % 
20 19* 19ft + % 

4* 41k 4% 

10 9ft ,0 + % 

58 2* 2% *% + % 

14 4% 4% 4% 

73 21% 21 21 — % 

I 74ft 74ft 74ft + % 
17* 17* T7* — % 
19* 19* 19* 

Aft 4% Aft— % 
1ft 1* lft— % 
19% 19* 19ft— % 
Bft B% 8* + % 
4 Sft Sft— % 
■ft 8* 8*— ft 
5% 5ft 5% + % 


17* ,1% SanJr 68 25 U 14 14ft 14ft 16ft 


Stock 


SHU I4b SvarFd 

jft '.7 PuoCre 
,4 A'-? Sudina 

15ft 11% CiWfSf 
4*k 41k Suiaueti 

38 19ft SwIMln 
8b 4ft SitnJav 
Uft Ab S*sttn» 


20a V4 M 
Jo I* ,D 


t9 


tJO Ja 10 


16 IS 


i-» 

4b 

10ft 


I, Ik Aft T Bar 

17ft )ft TEC 
ISft 5 TIE 
14ft Aft TII 
18* 13 TnbPra 
10Vk Aft TandBr 
15% 9ft Tally 
Ab 2* Team 
4ft Ift TChAm 
Sft 13% TeMvm 
40* VW TechOa 
8 3% TechTe 

3JV, 7ft Tectitrl 

184 7TV> Talon R 
5ft 2 Telecon 
31* ZV- TeUtox 
11 8b ret Ota 
l*% TVk TetKl 
3% Zb TeieiPti 
aft 3W Tenney a 
31ft 22ft TeaCdP 160 
12% 5ft TexAir 


Jlf TJ 18 

job a :> 


IN 


TO LI 


A47 

43 

31 


v* - ■» 
y-» — '* 


40 29 12 


JO 


19 

,3 

7 

,6 9 

3 IB, 


t: 

30 

13 

180 


.44 ,6 13 
JAOW .3 


•H Aft 
lt> I* '■ 

J* Vs 
,0 vb 
IBlk 18 >0 

j ; 

14 14 14 

4 3'a 4 *■ ft 

to Jb 2b , , 

igi. |Tb 1% 

U* iUl i>ft — *" 
JJ 4b Aft 4ft 

S IA* Mb IA* * H 

100:177 177 ,77 — * 

II TVS 3ft :w 

7 38 38 » 

88 eft 9 Ik 9ft— ft 

37 Ml 5 8 

57 3* 3* 3* 

16 5ft Sft »»k — ft 

4 24* 3i 24 — - J 

911 13* 11% 12b + <7 


,8% Jlk TexAE J9T +4 44 43 Ab 4ft 4ft 

21% 14ft TexAE Of I 20 to 20 

13*4 2ft Txacan 54 57 Ift 3b J>-— ft 

7* 4 ThrD B 64 16 II 51 4 3-k J%— ft 

Tft 3% ThrD* .16 35 12 54 4 3% 4 

Tft 2Vk Tidwell 20 J 2% J* — % 

31% 23 TotEdaf ATS U6 2B8> Mft »* 30ft— % 

A, 47 TalEd P< +32 1X9 200X 40 40 AO +1W 



9* 5Vk Terfel 


J9T 46 10 
34 


Hr 5 II 
Al 36 • 

60 26 7 

691 7J 


2A 


64 V II 
16 U 1 


22 81k 7% 81k + 

90 13* 13*4 12ft— % 
284 1% 1 1 — tk 

10 * 10 % 10 % 

17b ,7 17 

IS* >5* ISft— b 
9W 9» flk 

Sft 5 5 — ft 

4* Aft 4* 

Jft lft 3ft— % 

12 11* 12 
28Vi a* 38% + ft 
: 1* ib— * 


2 

32 

,3 

10 

19J 

X2 

95 

,8 

77 

137 


Uft 

18* 


12% 


9* VST n 

JOe 30 


» 

9* 

9ft 

9* 


10b VallyRs 

100 70 

14 

I 

18* 

18% 

18% 


I6lk Voters 

04 15 

,3 

12 

23ft 

77b 

22*- 

to 

4* Verbttn 



218 

7% 

7* 

7% 


Uft VTAfllC 

00a 2.1 

9 

63 

191k 

19 

19% + 

Ik 

3* vmm 



2 

4 

4 

4 


9% vomit 

TO 11 

10 

133 

9* 

9* 

9* + 

to 

4* viatech 



15 

•* 

1* 

Bft— 

ft 

Sis vksn 


1, 

3 

7b 

7b 

7b 



I 


A 2* Vtntge 
18% Uft Vlrca 
44* 52Vk Valnti 
91k Ala VIswsIG 
12ft 8 Veptex 
19ft 13% VuicCP 


64r J 10 


33 U 
3 3 13 
+t II 


3% 3b JU + % 

ISM 15ft 15% + ft 

43% 43% 63% — % 

9 Bft 9 

11b lib 11b + % 

19ft 19ft 19* + % 


.94 

160 


8b Aft WTC 
27* ,7ft Wotbor 
15* 10% WOICO 
31ft ,5ft waned 
32b It WansC 
3* b wmewt 
3ft WkhH 4 
70* WShPkt 
17* WRIT 
Zft WHttrd 

13* Wthfd pf 263 1ST 
H: WoDcor 
_ . 3% Wedco 

17ft Uft Wed ten 
4% 3* Wstman 
14 A* Wetotm 
10ft 4% Wellcp 
4ft 2b WelCrd 
ift b Wbspcp 
, 1b 7* WstBrC 
13b rJ. Wktbrs 
Sft WDtollt 
7b DVtHUtin 


•Vk 

117 

2A 

Tft 

25% 

4* 

Sft 


4 

» 14 
46 15 


62e ., 
.14 27 


11 

109 

1 

S3 


,2 


TO 


Mft 


12 
13 
17 

_ _ 14 

19% 14ft WIRET ,63 +0 15 
30* 14 WstnSL 68* 1.7 II 
30* 9ft WhEnli 38 

5* 2% Wichita 
lift 7V+ willed! 4 

3b I WHsnB 
23b ,9ft winlln 2T4eHU 
15% 11 WkWear J3 46 7 
4% 2b WwdeE 
17ft 13ft wwdepf ,60 ,16 
31 17% Worttm JO U 7 

31* 13 Wrath 1 62 

Tft 3% Wroth a 65* 


21 20 7ft 7% 7% 

68 IT IS 3 23ft 33ft 23% — % 

60 2J » M U* IS* 15* 

.14 .< ,2 2910 17% 14ft 14% — b 

.11 6 13 8 17* 17 17 — Ik 

14 I 1 1 — ft 

20 T* 7% Tft — Vk 

9 1,7 114% 117 

21 24% 24% 24% 

19 5ft 5b Sft + % 

17% 17% ,7%— W 
2 1% lft— Ik 

Aft 4* Aft 

MW Uft 14W + % 

I 5% 5% 5%— to 

39 lib 10ft 11% + Vk 

,8 8 Tft 5 + % 

20 3% jw 3n + to 

is 1% 1 1 — to 

28 8% B* ■*- b 

32 Uft UW lift + % 

379 11% Uft 11% — % 

XI 17% 14ft ,7 — % 

29 19 18ft ,9 + U 

80 29 28* 28ft + U 

,21 29W 28* 21* — ft 

10 2* 2* 2b + Vk 

55 10ft 101k Uft— ft 

lb Ilk lft— b 

31* 21b 21*— b 

Uft U 13 — Vk 

4lk 3ft 4 

15b IS 15% + b 

301k 20 20 

toft Uft 19% — ft 

7% Aft 7 — vk 


23 


23 


14 

58 

A 

25 

118 

141 


Uft 

5ft 


Sft Yankee 
4 Yardny 


68 IJ II 


4* 

5* 


4* + % 

5% 




t ' 
* 


Sft Zlnter .10 16 


7> 4% Aid AVk 


AMEX Uigfas>Lows 


Mav 


3 


NEW HIGHS 14 


ALLotn 
CHB Foods 
OSulllvon 
5010 440pf 


Bio Rod Lob B BloRad A 
GrtAmrlnd Hefnlcke 
PGE 240pfK PL to 7A4pf 
SDto 720pf SCE22tPf 


SotorPnerm 

Mefpro 
PuwerT*,* 
TexcsAirCp . 


NEW LOWS 15 


GoidWas, 
IsofyCo 
McRae A 
StarraHllhn 


Hast! nos AAf 
KevstCamun 
PotroLew 
Spark En pf 


Implndusl 
LaerptPar 
Science Mat 
ThreeDB 


IndHvdrn 

MarthnOff 

Servtsco 


Reaching More 
Than aThrrdofa 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
Around the Worid. 

HcraHLatougribBnc 


Cash Prices May 1 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santas. tb_ 


Prhilciath 44/30 38 %, vd _ 

Steel billrta (PlttJ. ton 

Iran 3 Fdrv. Ptilla- ton __ 
Steel scrap No 1 hw Pitt. _ 
Load Soot, tb 


Copaar elect, lb . 
Tin (Strolls), ib. 


Wed 

1JS 

065 

473-00 

21360 

79-BD 

20-21 


Y< 
Abo 
168 
0-84 
45360 
21360 
100-101 
24-28 


Est. Sates I TOO Prev.Sales 1600 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. i+,oi off57 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

®JM» aaV- cents per aal 
7+40 4360 Jun 7160 73L2S 

75JD 6535 Jul 70.15 7055 

7560 6+25 AUP 7060 71J0 

7465 m25 S*P 7160 7X10 

77.10 77J0 Oct 

7+55 7X90 Now 

7+25 7260 Dec 

7+90 7+70 Jan 

Feb 

Est. sates Prev.Sales +743 

Prev. Dav Open InL 1+794 off 779 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 
UWObbL-dpnars nerbtal. 


7160 

7+10 

7060 

7160 


7169 

70J1 

71.10 

7160 

7260 

7X70 

74-90 

7+90 

7060 


— .IB 
— J3 
—.15 
—33 
—TO 
—TO 
—.10 
—.10 
—.10 



24J0 

Jun 

3700 

2752 

27 Jl 

27 JB 

— JS 


24.18 

JUl 

2X90 

26.95 

7665 

3605 

—06 

7957 

24-25 

Auo 

2X70 

2X77 

2X55 

2600 

— J, 


24JB 


2660 

2669 

3650 

2X50 

—30 

2950 

2405 

Oct 

2X60 

2X65 

3608 

2600 


2950 

2X40 

SStw 

2X65 

2X67 

2605 

2405 

-JO 


2350 

Dec 

2665 

2X65 

2600 

2X60 

— >17 

2950 

2405 


3605 

3X45 

2X45 

2672 

— JS 

2906 

2X50 

Feb 

26J3 

7637 

22 

2455 

— T2 

2905 2X92 Mar 2X40 2600 

Est.Sales Prev. Sale* 1X084 

Prev. Dav Open int. 4X873 off 38 

2X40 

—37 


Stock indexes 


Zinc, E. Si. t_ Basis, lb . 
Palladium. ax - - 

Silver N.Y. ox 

Source: AP. 


71-74 72H-74 
+307 +3977 

065-67 063 

109-111 164% 

+165 962 


London Metals 

May 1 


Prov lorn 
Bid Al 


91060 

92+001 


GNMA (CBT) 

S100600 erln- ntj & 3Znds al ,00 pel 
70-10 57-17 Jun 49-22 7+2 

49-19 59-13 Sep 493 49-10 

48-18 59-4 Dec 

48-1 58-20 Mar 

47-28 58-25 Jun 

47-3 AS See 47-1 17-7 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 254 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4697 ue, 4 


70 +9 


48-21 

M3 

4730 

47-4 


9164 

9084 

9021 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMMJ 
SI million- Btsoi 180 pet 
9 IAS 8+30 Jun 9160 

91-08 8+00 Sep 9+79 

9064 B5U4 Dec 90T0 

9+11 8464 Mar 

0962 8+43 Jun 

8960 8764 Sea 

_ 88.99 8+34 Dee 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales ®2 

Prev. Day Oaen Int 5JS7 Off* 


9160 

ton 

9+20 


9164 


9024 

8963 

5964 

89.14 


+.11 

+.11 

+.U 

+.11 

+.12 

+.11 

+.11 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
Si mill ton-pti oMOOpcL 
2-31 8267 Jun 

9077 84.51 SOP 


9162 

«+TA 


9160 

TOT* 


91.17 

9+62 


+.12 

+.13 


(Indexes compiled shortly before market ctose) 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
pa bits and cents 

189.10 15+10 Jun 181.00 18160 17960 179.15 — 1 JO 

19270 14000 Sep 184.10 184.10 18225 TB2J0 —1-75 

19+40 17+70 Dec ,8+85 187.10 18465 18425 —.95 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 57643 

Prev.Dav Open Int. 5+131 up 492 
VALUE UNE ( KCBT) 
paints and cents 

21960 ,7X00 Jun 19X1 a 19X15 19+95 191.15 —175 

212J0 18+75 Sep 197 J0 197 JO 19560 19570 —160 

Est.Sales Prev.Sales 3637 

Prev. Day Open Int. +197 etf284 
NYSE COMP. INDEX CHYFE1 
points and cents 

11060 9060 Jun 10490 10495 1BX70 10+80 —160 

11160 91 JS Sep 10065 10465 10565 10+65 — 1.10 

11175 101 TO Dec 10060 10060 10760 10760 ~>90 

11365 11065 Mar 10965 109.95 10965 10969 —70 

f»- Soles Prev.Sales 14345 

Prev. Day Open Int. 9631 off 7ft 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody 5_ 


Reulers . 


DJ. Futures. 


Close 

929.10, 

1/881.50 

NA 

NA 


Com. Research Bureau _ 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; , - final 
Reuters : bene 100 : Sen. 18, 1931. 
Daw Jonas : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
937.90, 
1634.90 
12168 
239 JO 


Market Guide 


eBT: 

CMC; 


NY CSCE: 

Nvee: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE; 


Oiicoea Board of Trade 
CMeaoa Mercantile Ex ch a ng e 
urfernat tonal Monetary Market 
Of OiImo Mercantile Exqhonoe 
New York cocoa, sua+r, coftaa Exchange 
New Y ork Cotton Exchange 
commodity Exchange/ New York 
New York Mercantile Ex ch nnpe 
Kaneas arv Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


Ctose 
Bid 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling par metric ton 
spat 09+00 89760 91OJ0 

forward ®UJ0 91560 92560 

COPPER CATHODES I High Grade! 

Sterling per metric ton 
wl mija 132360 1JSZJOO 1T5400 

forward 1.19400 1,19450 U11JU UI1J0 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric ton 
pot I.lft/00 1,19260 1.19X00 iTOOjQO 

forward 1,18X00 1,19060 1,19+00 1.19B60 

LEAD 

Sterling par metric tan 
snot 31060 31160 31360 31460 

forward 30450 30+00 31760 318J0 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ten 
spot 453060 454060 449+00 450+00 

forward 466060 44)060 447960 448060 

SILVER 

Pence per troy once 
Spot 5Stm 50360 50960 51060 

forward 51X60 5VJJJ0 mg 52450 

TIN (Stamtadl 
Sterling per metric ten 
spot 936000 937000 9.33060 9J4060 

forward *73060 9.71500 9705.00 9 J 1060 

ZINC 

Sterling par metric ton 
soot 70X00 70+60 70X60 71000 

forward 70150 70150 71 760 71X60 

Sounar. AP. 


U^. Treasury Bfli Rales 

April 30 


Bid yield 


Prev 

Yield 


3-men fh 
t-month 
One year 


705 

+13 

+32 


753 

+10 

+30 


+12 

+59 

+99 


+18 

+59 

965 


Source: Salomon Brotnen 


DM Futures Options 

May 1 

W. Gvinii Mat-BSItt irorbi arts m mBk 


JM 

Sen 

Dec 

Jon 

Sep 

Dec 

309 

259 

180 

oio 

000 


IJO 

1-90 

237 

0J2A 

067 

(L0 

009 

US 

100 

063 

100 

IjB 

033 

a« 

1J5 

US 

I0S 

__ 

OR 

042 

100 

204 

US 


UM 

042 

075 

250 

384 

100 


Estimated Mat wLAJM 

Cells: Tue+wfUWoeealnLAIAa 
Puts: Tub*. 901.1455 open ML 33633 
Source: CME- 


Asian Commodities 

May 1 


HONG-KONO GOLD FUTURES 
U6J per Mmce 

Ctose Prevkxn 
Hit* LOW Bid Ask Bid Ad. 
May - N.T. N.T. 3,400 31460 32400 32+60 
Jun _ 31760 31760 31560 31760 32460 32&SH 
Jlv_ N.T. N.T. 31BJB 320JW New — 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 31960 321JH 33160 33160 
Od _ N.T. N.T. 32160 32460 33560 31760 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 32+00 33160 34060 3*200 
Feb N.T. N.T. 33460 33460 34460 34860 
Apt — 34160 34160 34060 M2JH New 
volume : 24 loti of ,00 ol 
S ource: Bouton. 


London Commodities 
May 1 


Ask 


Provtow 
BM AM 


Oct 

Dec 

Mar 


Htoh Low Bid 

SUGAR 

Sterling aer metric ton 
An 10760 ,0560 10+20 10440 107.40 10760 
Ml TO 10960 11040 11060 11160 11760 
11400 11+00 11+80 1)440 11+80 ,1760 
12X40 12740 12X20 12X40 12860 17960 
13X20 13260 13X00 13340 13160 13460 
13760 13760 137.40 13X00 ,3X60 13960 
« N.T. N.T. 14260 14460 New 

Volume: 9A4 lots Of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric ton 
May 1601 UM 1.784 1JB4 1.790 1600 

Jty 1633 1.790 1619 1621 1630 1631 

hp 1415 1/783 1603 1605 1612 1613 

Dec 1J87 1J40 1/7B4 UB5 1J84 1T8A 

Mar 1J8B 1,765 1.784 1J8A UB3 7306 

Mnv 1TW 1J93 1J89 Ijvi 1JH7 1600 

JlT N.T. N.T. IJ80 1610 1,700 1615 

volume: 53/3 lots ol 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Starting per metric ten 

May 2,104 2695 2695 2694 2106 2110 

2,145 2,150 2158 2159 21A0 2JA1 
2T0A 2193 3.194 2197 2194 2200 
7339 2220 2T21 2225 2215 2320 
2247 2T35 2335 2239 2T25 2T34 
2221 2T21 2TU 2J40 2T10 2220 
Mar N.T. N.T. 2190 1335 2190 7-m 

Volume: 218S tots of 3 tons. 

GASOIL 

U6. dan ars per metric ton 

22+50 twhii 223-00 222TS 771 75 22460 
21960 21475 21+50 21760 2T9JS 219 j0 
217T5 21+75 21+50 21660 77735 777 J 5 
21960 2 1775 21760 21+00 21960 22040 
22225 221 T5 21960 72035 msn 22275 
KLT. N.T. 222J» 22360 223JW 22+0a 
N.T. N.T. 22060 22+00 22460 22960 
N.T. N.T. 2236D 73060 33660 22+00 
N.T. N.T. 71A60 23060 New — 
Volume: 1671 tats of 100 tons. 

Sources: Routers and Lanson Petroleum Ex- 
change (gas oil). 


31* 

Sep 


Jm 


S&P 100 Index Options 
April 30 


n — 


Uto - 
i«* nv: 
sv: n. iw m 
Ik A » Ilf 
ft Ift 2ft 3ft 
l/W Vi lift Ift 
1/1« 3)14 9/14 - 
1/14 1/14 — — 


PehJLad 
JIT 


i/it im 
vii * 
1/16 ft 
1% 2ft 
Sft Sft 
Uft II 


ft 

7/14 Ma 

I 1 1/14 
2ft 3ft 
Sft lft 

II Uft 


9ft - - _ 


TDMcBintaaM mm 
Tttd tea apes let BVM3 
Take wt mown* inra 
TaM pel amo M.KJ5I 


Hftk 13+41 Lew 17172 
Source: CBOE. 


Oqk 174.95 — 040 


j Dividends 


May 1 

Company 

Per 

Ami 

Pay 

Rec 

EXTRA 




Putnam Growth 


03 

+15 

5-6 

INCREASED 



Grafton Group 

Q 









Liz Claiborne 

Q 08* 

+l 


PepsiCo 


6-39 

+ 14 

Rockaway Corp 

a 

14 

+3 

+16 


a 

M 

7-1 

+14 

STOCK 




Dollar GenJ 


20% 

+18 

+28 

T-Oar 

- 

5% 

+14 

+30 

USUAL 




Adla Services 

Q 

03 

■+1B 

6-3 

Amer Pr«C Ind. 

a 


7-15 


Don k America 

Q 


+31 


Bell (W) X Co 

a jq% 

+31 

+10 

Chevron Corp 

a 


+ 10 



a 


+30 

+14 

Cooper ma 

Q 


7-1 


Cullen Frost Bk 


7-30 

7-1 A 

CvcKku 

0 07% 

+28 

+ 14 

Electtospace Svs. 

Q 

02 

+34 

+14 

Energy North 

Q 

07 

+17 


Genl Foods 

0 03% 

6-5 


Great Lksintl 





Gould Inc 

a 

.17 

+15 



S 47% 

+31 

+17 

inoeran-Rond 

Q 

05 

+3 

+IS 

Lawtor M 

Q 



+14 






AAMCan Cora 

a 

59 

7-15 


Pork Ohio Ind 

a 




Peoples Energy 

Q 

JO 

MS 

+ 19 

Piedmont Avia. 

a 

07 

+28 

+13 

Pood Producing 

S 



+17 

Ravctam 

o 




Signal Cos 

0 

05 

+10 

+10 

Simpson Ind 

Q 

00 

+27 



Q 


+10 


West Amor Bncp 


+14 


Waodhead Ind 

a 

.15 

+30 

5-8 

A -Annual; M-McntMv; O-Oaarterlv; +Seml- 

AniML 







8 ■ 

t , 

hi 


3 


Company 


Per Amt 
INCREASED 
Am Heritage Lite 
LoblawCas 
O’Sullh/on Cord 
Ctoebecor Inc 
Scorn HttMM,. 

5a Calif Water 


Pay Rnc 


M .10 
O 68 

q .«% 

S .11 
S TO 
Q J5 


S-JA 

7-1 

7-1S 

+4 

7-2 

A-l 


5- 13 

4- 15 

6- 14 

5- 15 
+17 
5-10 


1 _* 


LIQUIDATION 
Canal-Randalati Ltd 


- +460 S-15 5.9 


OMITTED 


Crown industries 


U.S. Steel Posted 
Profit in Quarter 


Neto York Times Semcc 

NEW YORK — United States 
Steel Corp. has reported a first- 
quarter profit of $58 million, 66.1 
percent bdow the like period a year 
earlier. But the company apparent- 
ly outdid most of its steel industry 
competitors, which have been re- 
porting widened first-quarter 
losses. 

LTV Corp. said its loss in the 
first quarter widened 81 percent to 
$156.4 million, from $29 million a 
year ago. Bethlehem Steel has re- 
ported a first-quarter deficit of $62 
million, a 11.9-percent increase 
from the $54.6-inillioa loss it re- 
ported a year ago. 

U.S. Sled said Tuesday that 
profit was 24 cents a share com- 
pared with earnings of $171 mil- 
lion, or SI. 35 a share, for the first 
quarter of 1984. 


STOCK 


Amor Precision 
Energy North 


- 10ft 

- 3ft 


8-20 

7-15 


5-4 

7-1 


STOCK SPLIT 
O'Sullivan Corn — Mar-4 


Amcast Industrial 
American Brandi 
Amer Home Prod. 
Amer Herltop# Life 
Amor Heritage Lite 
Amer Indent. Find 
Ap nae e Enterprises 
Champion Scrk Plo 
Chevron 

Cl tried Financial 
Carnal. Edison NY 
Cooper Indus 
Cullen-Fros, Bkrs 
Cyclops Carp 
Dollar General 
Foster Wheeler 
Gearhart Industries 
G l Hard Hilt + Co 
Gould Inc 
Hershev Foody 
Inti Research + Dev. 
Isalv Co 
Keone Inc 
Kennametai Inc 
Kerr Addison Mines 
Koppers Ca 
Kvsor industrial 
Manitowoc Co 
McDonald & Ca 
Mohasco Carp 
Montreal Trustee 
Oakwood Homes 
Poclllc Lumber 
Poine-Webbar Gro 
Pnlm Beach 
Peerless Chain 
Popo Producing 
Pto Svc N Carolina 
Putnam US Inc Tr 
Putnam Growth 
Savanoh Eds 6 ind. 
Syntax Cora 
TNP Enterprises 
Triangle Indus 
UGI Cara 
Union Camp 
Warner-Lambert 
Wovorlv Press 


O .10 
Q 97% 
Q T2% 
M .10 
M .10 

a so 

Q 03 
O .10 
a m 

3 .10 
40 

a -38 

a T3% 

Q T7% 
Q 6A 


.11 
.IB 
.13 
.17 
J5 
69 
JD 
65 
TO 
15 
TO 
J0 
TO 
g 65 

a .10 
Q ji % 
a .02 

Q JO 
a .15 
Q JO 

2 fs 

a A5 
M .147 
Q -U % 
O ,® 
Q JO 
Q JI b 
Q .10 
Q 61 
e .4, 
a J7 
a .it 


8-28 4-5 

6- 1 M 
+1 5-13 

+28 +17 
7-26 7-15 
+15 +10 
+17 S-A 
+14 +24 
+18 +80 
+30 +14 
+15 5-8 

7- 1 +3 

7-30 7-16 
+38 +14 
5-24 +9 

+17 +15 
+20 +9 

+3 +10 

+15 +31 
+14 +34 
+24 +18 
+24 +H 
+28 +13 
+24 +18 
+U +17 
+15 +17 
7-25 7-W 
+H> +1 

+70 +10 

+14 5-31 

+29 +10 
+25 +10 
+1 +15 

7-3 +12 
5-JI +15 
A-7 +17 
+10 +17 
7-1 6- 10 

+ 15 +14 
+ 15 5-4 

7-1 +14 
+ 17 +17 
+15 +2, 
+20 +10 
7-1 5-3, 

+13 6-4 

4-10 +10 
+ 12 +28 


& 

7*' 


ft .- 


Spanish Phone Agreement 

United Pres* International 

SAN FRANCISCO — Pacific 
Telesis Group of the United Slates 
and Telefonica, the Spanish na- 
tional telephone company, an- 
nounced Tuesday that they will de- 
velop a new research facility in 

Madrid, 


SL-j 




I 






BOOKS 


THE CALL: 

An American Missionary in China 


he must try to reach (he 


By John Hersey. 701 pp. S 19.95. 
Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 40th Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10022. 


I 


1 Off one's 
trolley - 
5 Earwigs, 
mites and such 

10 Neighbor of 
Niger 

14 Accor Novel lo 

15 Poplar 

16 Enemy off raq 

17 Census results, 

e-g. 

20 Indicated 

21 Scoundrel 

22 Ac tress Ten 

23 Soccer great 

24 Cap 

27 Cowcatcher of 
a kind 

28 Stretcher with 
legs 

31 Passover 

32 Popular street 
name 

34 "Twocanlive 
as cheaply 


60 Car of 
yesteryear 

61 Nifty 

62 Charles and 
Lynda Bird 

63 Merriment 


36 Group of body- 
builders 

39 Nicholas Gage 
book 

40 Croat or Serb 

41 Tibetan monk 

42 Gridster 
Grange 

43 Clogorghillie 

45N. J.city 

47 As strong 

ox 

48 Rude little 
dude 


1 Actress 
Ullmann 

2 Romantic 
Reman poet 

3 d'Azur 

4 Swinger at the 
zoo 

. 5 It makes a nice 
sandwich 

6 Glyceride, e.g. 

7 French biplane 

ofW.W. 1 

8 Asian winter 
festival 

9 Whine 
10 British 

bishop's 

bonnet 


28 Thirst 
quenchers 
29“ — —Time." ■ 
1979 revue 
30 Lady Bird, for 
one 

33 Williams of 
"Happy Days” 


35 Like some 
headaches 

37 Hits’ partners 

38 Duds for a 
farmer 

44 Shelter (or a 
Sopwith Camel 

46 Fads 

47 Queeg's 
“Halt'" 

48 Book-jacket bit 

49 Writer Hunter 

50 Row 

51 Kett of comics 

52 Plagiarize 

53 Ano others: 
Lat. abbr. 


1 l — — ... 1 1 


: i 

WIZARD of ID 




10 ItU-UT&P'-- 





Reviewed by Eva Hoffman 

T HAS been John Herscy's virtue as a tcacb- 
er and a public figure — and some times his 
weakness as a novelist — that* against all odds 
and the grain of the times, he has sustained the 
idea of writing as a moral mission. Now, in a 
work that seems intended as a summa of his 
preoccupations and concerns, he has chosen to 
look at (he missionary impulse itself, through 
the history of the Protestant evan gel i cal move- 
ment in China in the first half of this century, ft 
is a vastly ambitious, impressively erudite, and 
unfortunately flawed undertaking. 

Herscy’s credentials for tackling the subject 
are impeccable. A son of American missionar- 
ies in China, he has a large and intimate knowl- 
edge of the American side of the adventure and 
of the figures and scenes within the infinitely 
complicated Chinese tapestry. Through diary 
entires, letters and snippets of historical docu- 
ments, this novel traces the life and spiritual 
development of David Treadup, a not on typi- 
cal “China hand," based on several actual 
missionaries. 

Treadup 's biography is recounted from his 
beginnings as the son oT puritanical Yankee 
fanners through his years as a student given to 
bouts of depression and “badness" and his 
sudden, unburdening conversion to Christian- 
ity. That episode is followed by bis involve- 
ment with the YMCA — one of the main 
organs of missionary efforts at the rime — and 
his assignment to China, with the goal of 

no thing ness than the “The Evangelization of 

the World in This Generation.” 

Hersey is well aware of the comedy and the 
misunderstandings involved in grafting Ameri- 
can and Christian presumptions onto the con- 
voluted subtleties of Chinese culture, but be 
treats his perennially well-intentioned hero 
with considerable sympathy. Treadup gains a 
nearly heroic stature, coming to represent the 
best qualities of the American character, the 
best side of innocence. 

Treadup quickly realizes that Christian doc- 
trine may not be the most charitable substance 
to adminis ter to people suffering from poverty 
and hunger, and begins his search for the social 
gospel that might rectify some of China's ills. 
Initially, be tries to work “from the top down," 
by educating the Chinese literati, but gradually 
he begins to understand that if he wants to 


have any h 
masses more 

Hersey observes that many of the collective _ 
work methods introduced by the gpsao na nes .] 
were later ta V , * n up by the Co mmunis t s, Bu t \ 
although Tread up’s progress involves a grow- / 
Ing populism, his attraction to Com m unis m is ■ ; 
short-lived, and the new faith — aftera senes ;> 
of dramatically drawn encounters — eventual- . 
ly terrifies him by its potential for fananastf* - 
and violence. . 

Herscy’s accounts of lesser-known episodes 
su ch as the recruitment of a coolie labor corps • 
by the Allies during World War I or ibe begin-' 
nines of vast literacy campaigns based on a 
simplified version of the Chinese alphabet ot ; 
Vu» f ascinating. But he tries tq tell tOO much.. 
The flTTpnnf of sheer information packed is so* 
overwhelming that is becomes difficult tq focus 
on the significance of any one event or issue. > 


Eva Hoffman is on ike staff of The New York- 
Times. 


BESTSELLERS 


Tbe New Yodt Tones 

TUibst Is based on tenons Inw more tarn LOW booksxort* 
Weeks on En are not necessaray ; 


ihroughom the Uni 
consecutive. 


TOl 

W«k 


FICTION 


THINNER, by Richard Bechmaa 

IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 


Sbddau 


THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by lobn 
D. MacDonald 


FAMILY ALBUM: 
IN SCDE. OUTSET 
THE HUNT FOR 
Tom CUacy 


DaasieHe Sued — 
Herman Wouk 
OCTOBER, by 


Dick Fronds 


PROOF, bv D 

CHAPTERHOUSE: DUNE, by Frank 

Herbert I 

GLITZ, By Elmore Leonard 


. rZ,ByBi 

THE CLASS, by Erich Segal 

SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATOR, by Wil- 
liam F. Buckley Jr. . 


. by Anita BrooJcner — 

MEXICO SET. by Lea Doghtoo _____ 


NONFICTION 


IACOCCA: An 
oocca with WtHiion Ni 


, by Lee Ia- 


BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Sbntbeako — — - 

SMART WOMEN, FOOLISH CHOICES, 
by Connell Cowan and Mdvyn Kinder — 
THE COURAGE TO CHANGE, by Den- 


4 4 


nil Wtaley _ 
LOVING EA 
6a 


CH OTHER, by Leo Buxag- 


6 “SURELY YOU'RE JOKING. MR. 


FEYNMANN ," b^RicbaidP. 


THE BRIDGE 
Ridnud Bail 


by 


CITIZEN HUGHES, by Michael Drawn 
A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC 


IC, by Shd Shier- 


Solution to PreviotB Puzzle 


E 

E 

□ 

n 

E 

□ 

O 

Q 

□ 

B 

Q 

□ 

m 

D 

0 

Bl 



Q 

□ 

0 

□ 

q 

□ 

3 

a 

a 

□ 

□ 

a 

□ 

s 

□ 

a 

0 


a 

□ 



HI 11 


10 SON OF IKE MORNING STAR, by 
Evan S. ConocD 


MOSES THE KITTEN, by James Heme* 

12 DISTANT NEIGHBORS, by Alan Riding 

13 THE SOONG DYNASTY, by Staling 

TH^UVING PLANET, by David Atten- 


1“ 


14 


aa 

__ aaa anas ana 

BCQCiaaaiaaQaaaBBi 

□□□□a 

Banaam 


T^^BANDONMENT OF THE JEWS, 
by David S. Wyman ; — 



ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 2V 


NOTHING DOWN, by Rnben a Allen 
WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 
Mark H. McCormack 


WEIGHT WATCHERS 
PROGRAM COO 
deodi 


iUICK START 
by lean NW 


2 32 


DR. ABRAVANEL*S BODY TYPE PRO- 
GRAM FOR HEALTH FITNESS AND 
NUTRITION, by Elliot D.- Abravand and 
Elizabeth A. King 


3 W 


3/1/85 


THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jett 
Smith 


BRIDGE 


i8y Alan Truscotc 


CAZER 



□ 

□ 

2C 


NAREY 


LLEJ 



three-heart bid was a 
splinter showing a diamond fit, 
slam interest and at most one 
heart. What South cooperated 
with a cue-tad of four hearts. 
North made a cue-bid in 
spades and that settled in six 
diamonds. 

The slam hinged oa locating 


the trump queen, and the bid- 
ling offer 


ding offered a clue: West’s 
take-out double suggested 
shortness in diamonds. 

South ducked the opening 
dub lead, a slightly risky pro- 
cedure. and won the continua- 


tion with the ace. He cashed 
the diamond ace, finding good 
news and bad news: Tbe queen 
was fmessable, but the break 
was bad. If the trumps were 
drawn by routine finessing, 12- 
tricks would not be available. 

The diamond ten was fi- 
nessed, the heart ace was 
cashed and a heart was ruffed. 
Three spade winners were tak-. 
en, an essential play, and a 
dub was led. South ruffed af- 
ter East discarded a heart The 
remaining heart loser was 
ruffed, and the K-J erf trumps 
in the dosed hand woe 
over East's Q-9 at the 
bringing home the slam. 


NORTH 

* A K.Q 

V3 

« A874 

* A 10 7 9 3 

WEST .(D) ........ EAST 

li"”" 111 15 & 

AKQJ9 *82 

SOUTH 

* 43 3 

VA42 

O KII053 

*BV 


Nettbur *de m vulnerable. The 






We* . 

Norib 

East 

SobA',- 

Pass 

1* 

Pas* 

1 ■> . s 

DbL 


Paw 

4C 

Psts 

< ♦ 

Pass 

s os 

Pam 

Pan 


Paw 


west M the dtab kins- 



DILERB 


~TT~C 

_L 


TESH EE , 

xrn 


□ 


WHAT WC75T4L6//4 
SUMMONS UP. 


Now arrange lbs circled letters to 
(arm u» surprise answer, as such 
gested by the above cartoon. 


^ “ rr 1 1 iT>r.xx jU’ 


TUBDAYS 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumwes: MOLDY QUAKE SAVAGE BREACH 
Answer What that girl wno looked like a million 
bucks was— JUST AS HARD TO MAKE 


WEATHER 


)V 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Algarve 

21 

70 

16 

61 

sh 

Bangkok 

33 

91 

26 

79 

St 

Amsterdani 

ID 

50 

8 

« 

a 

Boding 

24 

7 i 

17 

63 

a 

Alliens 

22 

72 

11 

53 

tr 

Hong Kang 

24 

75 

22 

72 

a 

Barotatu 

23 

72 

9 

48 

tr 

MenUd 

34 

93 

27 

31 

fr 

Belgrade 

18 

44 

7 

45 

a 

m* Drift) 

JP <02 

28 

82 

tr 

Berfln 

9 

48 

3 

37 

r 

Seoul 

24 

75 

IB 

64 

hr 

Brauats 

II 

52 

9 

48 

Eh 

Shanghai 

25 

77 

19 

66 

a 

BueOerptt 

19 

44 

4 

43 

el 

Singapore 

33 

9 ) 

28 

82 

a 

Budapest 

13 

55 

6 

43 

a 

Taiaei 

27 

11 

22 

72 

r 

Copenhagen 

6 

43 

3 

37 

a 

Tokyo 

2 * 

75 

16 

61 

fr 

Dow Del Sol 
Dublin 

23 

12 

73 

M 

12 

3 

54 

37 

cl 

a 

AFRICA 






Etflabargb 

12 

54 

3 

37 

cl 

Algiers 

30 

■6 

12 

54 

fr 

norma 

23 

72 

10 

50 

cl 

Calm 

33 

90 

17 

63 

fr 

Promt tort 

13 

55 

8 

44 

sh 

Cane Town 

19 

66 

13 

55 

tr 

Geneva 

It 

61 

6 

43 

O 

Casablanca 

24 

75 

15 

99 

lr 

Helsinki 

■ 

M 

4 

V 

r 

Harare 

34 

75 

17 

63 

lr 

Istanbul 

15 

59 

6 

43 

tr 

Logos 





na 

Las Palmas 

22 

72 

12 

54 

d 

Nairobi 

23 

73 

17 

63 

d 

Lisbon 

33 

73 

12 

54 

cl 

Torts 

25 

77 

9 

48 

Cl 

London 

13 

55 

6 

4 J 

a 





Madrid 

25 

77 

8 

46 

50 

48 

IT 

St 

LATIN AMERICA 



Milan 

Moscow 

24 

U 

7 S 

57 

10 

9 

ST 

sh 

BoeoesAlras 

)5 

59 

5 

41 

tr 

MoaHdi 

10 

SO 

6 

43 

r 

Lima 

21 

70 

17 

63 

0 

Nice 

Oslo 

19 

44 

9 

48 

cl 

Mexico City 

28 

83 

9 

48 

cl 

5 

41 

2 

34 

r 

RJa oa Janeiro 

30 

86 

34 

75 

d 

Paris 

16 

61 

ID 

50 

ri 

Saa Paata 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Proaue 

RerUaWb 

11 

7 

53 

45 

3 

3 

36 

36 

r 

It 

NORTH AMERICA 



Rome 

30 

48 

12 

54 

a 

Anchorage 

9 

48 

-1 

30 

PC 

5 tuck balm 

4 

37 

2 

36 

a 

Atlanta 

25 

77 

14 

57 

BC 

Strasbourg 

IS 

59 

8 

46 

cl 

Borne 

M 

*4 

12 

54 

PC 

Venice 

19 

64 

7 

45 

tr 

Chicago 

18 

64 

g 

46 

PC 

Vienna 

12 

54 

6 

43 

sn 

Pihvor 

21 

70 

5 

41 

fr 

Warsaw 

4 

39 

2 

36 

fr 

Detroit 

16 

61 

5 

41 

PC 

Zoricta 

13 

55 

8 

« 

ci 

HanotnkJ 

39 

84 

21 

70 

PC 

MIDDLE EAST 


10 


Houston 

Los Angeles 

28 

25 

82 

77 

20 

13 

68 

55 

PC 

cl 

Ankara 

IS 

« 

■ 1 

tr 

Miami 

23 

82 

19 

66 

PC 

Bolnrt 

33 

90 

15 

59 

lr 

Minneapolis 

23 

72 

10 

so 

fr 

DawKU 

33 

91 

IS 

59 

fr 

Montreal 

13 

M 

6 

43 

PC 

Jermoteat 

30 

48 

13 

Si 

a 

Nassau 

25 

82 

20 

68 

fr 

TelAvIv 

21 

70 

18 

64 

a 

Hew York 

24 

75 

14 

57 

PC 

OCEANIA 






San Francisco 
Seattle 

19 

IS 

64 

44 

10 

50 

44 

fr- 

ee 

Ana land 

>6 

61 

ID 

50 

fr 

Toronto 

16 

61 

4 

39 

fr 

Sydney 

19 

M 

17 

63 

cl 

WasblnatOfl 

39 

84 

10 

50 

fr 

/ d^rloudy; to-foupy. lr-talr; n-hallj 

oavercast; PC-Portly cloudy. 

r-ra|n; 


THURSDAYS FOB B CAST .CHANNEL: Rough. FRANKFURT: CtaUdv. 


I-BJTIP. 12 — 6 1M — 431. LONDON: Fair Temo. 11 — 4 152 — 39). MADRID: 
CJOUtiV. Tomp. 24— 10 173— WI.NJW VORK: Cloudy. Temp. 17 — 10 1*3-50). 
PARIS: Fair. Tamp. 15-3 IW-37J. ROME: Ckwov. Tama. 20- 14 I6B-57V 
TEL AVIV:. Cloudy, .Term. 38 - 1 B (B2-64), ZURICH: Oourfy. 7 

- — * .rwjiaas— w ivs-rsj. hong KOHO-. 

IILA: Claudv. Tamo. 34 — 23 193 — 731. 
" . Tnundanlorms. Tenw. 


W)Hd Stock \larkis 


Via Agence France-Presse May 1 

Gasing prices ui local currencies unless alhenw usdtccud. 





Amsterdam | 



Close 

Pr*r. 

ABN 

435 

430 


303 

203 


1B4J0 

180 


1 1250 

11130 


227 JO 

22650 


239 JO 

na 

Atlum Rubber 


805 


74.80 

7450 

BVG 

213 

218 

BtssMurraxm T 

9150 


Calami 

3BJ0 

38.10 

Elsevier -NDU 

117JP 


Fakker 

120 

115 

GW Brocades 

188J0 

18850 

HirfiKsteen 

15340 

15340 


61.90 

6070 


5840 

59 JO 

l 

loorden 

52 

5270 

Mar Madder 

67.50 

68-50 

Neuitavd 

174.70 

17610 

OceVonder G 
Paknoed 

6^81 


Philips 

57 

SAM 


7280 

7110 

Rpoamca 

139 

13840 


67.90 

48.W 


4*70 

4440 


20730 

30750 

unllevor 

J49J0 

350 


39.90 

29.90 

VMF Stark 

16250 

15950 

VNU 

213 

21650 

1 ANPXB5 General lades 

:2I1.B 

| Previous : 714J0 



11 1 ! 

Bk East Asia 

3 440 

U . 60 j 

Chiu no Kona 

16J0 

1630 { 


Clove Pra. I 


a ll 

ft 


Ina Gas 
. Ina Llofir 
Green Island 
Hang Sens Bcnk 
Henderson 
MK Electric 
UK Roaliy A 
HK Holds 
HK Land 
HK Shone Bark 
HK Tweohonc 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 

Hvson 

jnHClly 
Jardlno 
JartUne Sec 
Kmilaan Malar 
Miramar Hotel 
New Wand 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Prows 
5letan 

Swire Pacific A 
Tal Cheuns 
Won Kwena 
Wheolock A 
wlno OnCa 
Wtasar 
worm inri 


1440 J4JK 
7.90 7.75 

4i2S 455C 

2.10 2125 

7.70 77C 

10^0 10JS 
17 36JJ 
540 iiS 
7 AS 7.90 
00 80 
tJC SJ5 
23JD 2120 
UA3 (lit. 

0- 90 t39 
1t*0 K 
lilt 13J0 
jojKj ia« 

31 31 

4.95 iM 
vn 2075 

11.10 1IJ2 3 
2 IAS 

1A2 D 24 

1.75 1.74 

1- 4Q 140 

725 7 is 

1235 130 

4A0 4A7 i 
its 2»S 


De Beers 
Drltfsntetn 

■ Elancs 

■ GFSA 

■ Harmony 
HiveW Sleet 
Moot 

Nncbaik 
PresSfevn 
Rum kit 
i S* Brews 
51 Helen* 
Scenl 

West Holding 


Hang Seng lades : 1514J3 
previous : 152054 


1025 1033 
5725 5225 

172S 1740 

3300 3400 
390C 3985 
390 395 

7700 7900 
1195 1190 
547S 5900 
1700 1710 
740 755 

1575 3775 
410 412 

6400 NA 


Composite Slock lades : IW3JW 
previous : IMAM 


London 


Job 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Cold 
Barlows 

Slwoor 

BwttMs 



AA Com 
Allied-LlWIS 
Anglo Am Gold 
ASS Brit Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Barclays 

BOSS 

SAT. 

Beecftam 
3 ICC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 

Bawafer mdus 
BP 

Bril Home SI 
Bril Tetecam 
Bril Aerospace 

Bn toil 

BTR 

Bur-mah 

Cable Wireless 


sum 

I B0 
S879i,d 
214 


IS2 

3S2 

534 

220 

338 

233 
37 

5G8 

247 

175 

260 

544 

234 
143 
3 TO 
210 
707 
231 
533 


174 
S9C*d 

234 

148 

347 
517 
371 
358 
233 

37 

SOI 

348 

175 
M5 


2B4 

111 

395 

314 

703 

227 

538 


Cadbury Sdrw 
Charter Cons 
Commercial U 
ConsGokl 
Court Quids 
DaloeJy 
De Bmrsi 
Dial I liars 
Drlefonletn 
Flson* 

Free Si Ged 
GEC 

Gen AccMenf 

GKN 

GIokoi 

Grarui Mat 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 


Close Wn. 

164 159 


Hcwkgr 

ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Lana Securities 
Leaol General 
Llovds Bank 
Lonrlyj 
Lucas 

Marks and So 
Nirtol Bax 
Midland Bank 
Nal West Bank 
PnndO 
PiSkingion 
Plessey 
Prudenllal 
Raeal Bled 
Randtentaln 

Rank 

Reed mu 

Reuiers 

Po.af oufaic 

RTZ 

Soatchl 

5elnseury 

Sears Holdings 

Shell 

STC 

5W Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tale and Lvie 
Teseo 
Thorn EMI 
T.l. Gtoud 
T raiolgar Hie 
THF 

Ultramar 


SlB59i JllOte 
348 350 

S52 544 

385 IBS 

47SW47 37/44 
429 09 

415 595 

340 318 


728 723 
TO* 204 
449 449 
448 4$3 
448 443 
248 245 
454 444 
238 238 
344 3(1 
141 140 
235 223 



C'ose Pr*v. | 

Unilever t 

11*11 21/33 

United Biscuits 

IBS 

181 

Vickers 

267 

263 

woolworth 

820 

828 

F.T. 30 Index : 97M0 


[ Previous : 97140 



II Sydney j, 

ACI 

712 

210 

ANI 


K'r|. 

ANZ 


K;l,l 

BHP 

634 


Borul 


320 

Bougainville 


220 

Brambles 

^Kr/.l 

378 



379 

Comalca 


235 

CRA 

660 

663 

C5K 

Kl 

300 

Dunlop 

■jil 

2D8 

Elders '*1 

K3 

307 

Hooker 

158 

159 

Magrthm 

265 

278 

MIM 


346 


■ j 

178 

Oakbridae 

■lJ 

97 

Peko 

■r-l 

436 

Poseidon 

■ I 

E'-I 

RGC 

■ 1 


Santas 

618 

11 

Shrfah 

ira 

176 

Sautniand 

35 

26 

woods we 

159 

151 

WbrmaM 

356 

356 

AH ordinaries index 473.99 

Prey tea* ;87E1# 



Source; ReuWrs. 



l _ n j 

Akri 

444 

441 


an 

873 


887 

tm 

Bank at Tokyo 

803 

808 

Bridgestone 

531 

515 


1JW 


Casio 

1730 

1730 

Ulan 

350 

350 


1010 

1000 


576 

580 


801 

805 

FanwC 

9210 

9150 

Full Bank 

1470 

1600 

Full Photo 

1780 

1820 


FMlIWu 

Hitachi 

HlhicMCaWa 


Japan Air Lines 
Kolima 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin B re wery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Eieclmfs 
Matni Elec Works 


'Mitsubishi Own 


Mitsubishi I 


MtiautiWil Hhw 
Cotp 


(Mitsubishi I 
Mitsui and Co 
Mltsukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

NEkkaSae 

NipmtXenkii 
Nippon Oil 
Ntapaei Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 


pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sham 


r A W 

Shlnetsu Chemical llOO iota 

Sony 4330 4370 

Sumitomo Bank 1670 1440 

Sumitomo Cham 227 230 

Sundtania Marine 595 599 

Sumitomo Metal us W5 

ToMCtiP 230 732 

Tahho Marine 433 438 

Takedo Own 858 873 

TDK 5590 5640 

Tellta 442 434 

Tokyo Elec. Power 7710 1700 

Tokyo Marta* 824 811 

Tamil Printing cat m 

Tnrny Ind 4S5 455 

Toshiba M >88 

Toyota 1330 1310 



: 12*5145 


735 


Previous : 94728 


Rivals Spring Up to IBM’s New Personal Computer 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — NCR Corp. and Compaq Com- 


NtW YORK. — NCR Cotp. and Compaq Lom- 
puier Corp. have introduced personal computers 
intended to rival IBM's newest and most powerful 


that can serve several users at once. Like the PC- 
AT. NCR and Compaq said, their machines em- 
ploy Intel Corp-'s S02S6 microprocessor. 


personal computer, the PC -AT. 

also said Tuesday that it had cut the 


Compaq 

prices of its existing personal computers by be- 
tween 4 and 20 pereenL 
Data Genera] Corp., meanwhile, said lower costs 
bad enabled it to reduce the prices of its portable 
computers by as much as S600. 

And Apple Computer Inc. said it wouid stop 

K reducing its Lisa computer, now known is the 
lacintosn XL. a pioneering desktop computer 
that, industry analysts, said never met Apple's sales 
expectations. 

NCR and Compaq are among several companies 
with plans to market a computer that can operate 
with software designed for international Business 
Machines Corp.'s PC- AT. a powerful computer 


These developments are similar to the appear- 
" ' ‘ ' uroduced 


ance of the so-called clones when IBM int 
its original Personal Computer four years ago. It 
has become the industry standard among desktop 
machines sold primarily to business users. 

NCR, based in Dayton. Ohio, said its computer, 
the PCS. can serve up to lf> users and comes in two 
models: a basic version for 53.795 and an enhanced 
model that includes a 20-mil lion-character hard 
disk drive and costs 55.505. 

Houston-based Compaq introduced both a desk- 


top and portable model compatible with the PC- 


AT. The company said its DeskPro 286 desktop 
machine runs software up to 30 percent faster than 
the PC- AT. and provides more storage memory. 
The basic model costs S4.499: ihe enhanced 2S6 
Model 2 costs Sb.254. Compaq said its new Porta- 


ble 286, which is compatible with the PC-AT, also 
comes in two models, costing 54,499 and $6,299, 
The desktop and portable computers already are 
being shipped. Compaq said. NCR said shipments 
of its PCS would begjn late this falL 
NCR also unveiled a more basic IBM-compad- 
ble personal computer, the PC6. NCR said it pro- 
cesses data up to 38 percent faster than competing 
models. The basic PC6, with 256KL of main memo- 
ry. costs $2^83. The 256K stands, in comparer 
terminology, for 236,000 units of memory. 

Data General, bared in Wes! boro, Massachu- 
setts. said it was able to cut prices of five versions of 
its IBM-compatible portable, tire -Data General- 
One, because prices of the machine's components, 
such as semiconductors, have declined recently. 


Af*230 


(bnodun such via AP 


1145 AM Prep 
ilea E 


6300 AanlCO I 


Tran Agra indA 

26349 All Enorgy 


36349/ 

1100 ANa Nat' 
350 Alga Cant 

"MRSWf 

n Argcm 
nAsMska 

72SWAICDH 
2558 BP Co 
54777 Bonk L 

MOM Bonk N! 

3527S BOfTVCka 

425 Baton Af 
28442 Bonanza R 

33H Brafcjrno 

■MBta wda B 
34442 BCFP 
75578 BC Res 
13905 BC Phone 
2210 Bnenwk 
1000 Budd Can 
6425 CAE 

iei ca. a 
UDOCOMBB f 
MOCodFrv 
3600 C Nor Watt 
400 C PocKrs 
23550 Can Trust 
250 C Tuna 
43276 Cl Bk Can 
9900 Can Nat Res 


20535 CTitw At 


50 C Util 1 
■500 Cara 
77B2GalaiMM 
14 



HMi Law aw aw 
S» 18 18 

* l7Bl "m 1 7?t _ w 

S214L 21H Z1*+ W» 
CIS IS 15 — 

121 21 21 
5229k Z1W 214k — -Ml 
S23U 23* 23* 
smt-19* 19%-. N 
84 6 & — Vk 

SFHr 9» 9*— Vk 

5357k 35Vj 35V6— » 
SSVk 5 5W.+ Vk 

SUW n* 129k 
UZ 140 HO — 1 

aw 16* 16*+ * 

470 445 455 —25 
465 450 450 — TO 

81716 IT* IT*— ft 
59* 9Vk 9V7— * 
247. 241 , 247 + 3 
SZI* 21 vk 21 Vk— Vk 
817 M9k 161k — Ik 
822tk 239k 22*—* 
817 M* 14*— * 
536* 26* 26* 

SW 51k 59k 

523 22* B 

man, 

537* 34* 37 — * 
511* 11* 139k—* 
S31U. 30* 31 — Jk 
37 32 32 + * 

«v » « „, 

817* 17* 17* — . ft 
813* 12* 1399 
87* 7 7 — * 

41 41 

5* 3*-* 

5* 5* 

390 415 — 5. 


20M5 UDMowCo 
SOOMDSHA 
7300 Melon HX 

uBSMgrlantE 

5311 MOkSQn Af 


sit 17* 
817* 17* 
812* 12 


40QMurWiy 

SNodacoL 


I2Z75I^HH 

49440 Norondol 

■ (aaoNnron. 
61181 NvoAltAI 

A 


Ml 


ITKBIMwaWl 


lOshowa A9 

SSKSfp 

554 Pembina 
2900 ptianlx OQ 
425 Pine PoM 
7KW piocoGOa 
49073 Placer ■ 

I Proviso 
iQueSlurao 
iRanPkt 


89* f* 

525* » 



12* WH+ * 1 


13308 eaulty Sw 
3KWFCAIMI 
400 C Falcon C 
725apicnbn»e 
800 Fed IndA 


185 IBS —12 
435 -435 1 ’ 

. 33 set ft 

a §s-jk 

215** 215 1 *— 10 
25* 25*4* 

*7* 7* 7* 

817 14* 17 +* 

1* _S*-9» 



6* ■* 

i 8* ' 

to* 

if»k-yr 
2*1 — ~1 
160 +=5- 
»*.•■. - 
10 * 

39* — t* 
6 *—'* 
25 —■* 

4 




g3* 13* 


& & 
?9* W* 



lUDFruahout 
3346 Gendtx A 
WOO Gaoe Comp 

:X3t Grfororp f 

uoonmo 

1 Grandma 51 
500 Gramluc 
48800 GLForeH 
(MOGIPoctac 
SOOGraytmd 
HOOK Group A 
7000 HrdfelO A f 
Hawker 
1516 Kayes O 
2247 H Bay Co 



Gas 


UOInM 
2500 ina 
284klnU 

3250 0 Inti 

TOS973 IntPTPIpe 
500 Iwaco B 
27924 jannadt 
3400 Kan KaHa 
I oq Kelsey H 
$84 Kerr Add 
J4WLabatt 
3ISnLacMnr* 
J3;- LOnl Cam 
6I73Q Lorane 
1WI LL Lac 



J2SUi » . 

465 « . 

v-r 
812 12 
811* 11* 
no* 10 * 
105 105 


*599 5* 

811* ,11 • 
813* 13* 

- SUK 1 4* 
580 . 79* 
84 5* 

IMntHians 


On Previous 
U3&30 ZOBpr 


MWb LAwctoKCkga 
*27 25*2Ctb-<» k 

— ?Wk3t.+.* 


816* 


wwm. 


rrt . 815 IS is 


»2* igj 
813* 12* 
**» . 39* 


Industrials Index: 


Close 

11039. 


Preview 


4 -" 





n 


'..1 




•-J 



















Pag, 

Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THt RgDAY. MAY 2. 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Photo Opportunities Lost The Long Training of Amy Madigan Debate on Missed Mass 

O The canccflalion of plans for Steinberg, pftttdcM of MCA a 


W ASHINGTON — “Gentle- 
nren. I have been brought in 
by the president to find out what 
has gone wrong with his well-oited 
public relations machine. Let's 
start with Nicaragua. Can anyone 
explain the Foul-up with the Nica- 
raguan refugee kid who gave the 
president Flowers at the dinner in 
Washington?" 

*'We couldn't fund a Nicaraguan 


13 Month 
I HWlLw 


TV* » 
Mt at 
5* » 

a 

a zv 
u av 
wa n 
me a 

3W IV 

aou i7v 
WVA is 
«* *v 
4SM 27V 
li* 5* 
in n 
tv* iv 
in as> 

1DH M 

9 n 

J9 m 
i% vs 
M 3M 
an ii 
jw tv. 
m 6vs 


B resident honored at a White 
louse Rose Carden ceremony.” 


“That was a darn good photo 
opportunity." 

“It was until the woman told the 
president she couldn't live on what 
she was getting in Soda] Security.” 

“How did we know that she 
would say that? No one in the 
White House speaks Navajo." 


By Megan Rosenfeld 

Washington Pan Service 


W ASHINGTON — Amy Madigan has a 
voice like industrial-strength sandoa- 


kid, so we dug up an American one. 
The chairman of 


“Correct roe if I'm wrong, but 
dn't the lady bring some Indian 


U*b 131* 

L S5 

T F 

1*5 12 * 

* 3* 


S 3 * 


iSSS 12% 

IR ,?£ 

4te 3 
3Vt lfa 

raw aw 

T5?(t 9 

M» SW 
Z* ft 
9w at% 

TV, 5V, 
TIM aw 
HR 7W 

raw s 
m* aw 

% *» 
7W 4* 
32W 

aura m 


The chairman of 
the dinner is 
hard of hearing, 
so he introduced 
the kid to the 
president as a 
Nicaraguan ref- 
ugee. How did 
we know the 
prez would kiss — » 
her, and the 3 BiV 
press would find ^ “ 
out she was boro Buchwald 

in the U. S.?" 

“You'D admit the photo oppor- 
tunity couldn't have come at a 
worse time. It made it appear the 
White House staff doesn t do its 
homework. Which brings me to my 


next questioa. Who told the presi- 
dent the pope supported the Unit- 
ed Slates’s policy in Nicaragua?" 

“You can't lay that one on us. 
The president got a personal cable 
from the Vatican wishing him a 
happy Easter, and thought it was a 
signal that His Holiness would join 
our covert operations in Central 
America." 

“Even if the president thought it, 
how did you people allow it to gel 
on his cue cards?" 

“The president ad-libbed that 
one on his own. He does it every 
once in awhile just to keep in prac- 
tice. If tbe pope hadn’t denied it, no 
one would have ever known.” 

□ 

“HI take your word that the 
president dropped the ball on the 


jn *71 


JV& ns 
5ft 3V, 
IM 7V. 

m* tv, 

W4 7W 
4ft 7V. 
2ft 21 
JR 4H 
Nk Ah 
2* JR 
i3w is* i 

4A1 | 
22V, 111k I 
«ft 28ft I 

a asv] i 

50V. 3Sft | 
28V, 79 i 

aim 21 8h 1 
12ft tVft I 
2f lVVh I 
MAh M I 
1BU MVh I 
34 Vi 178ft | 

»J ft I 

TW Ilfft t 


WHEAT CCB 
MQObumlnli 
4S5 x: 

3«l n- 


X50 3JI 

£ 

3JM 3 

4JO 1! 

Eft. Sales 
Prvw.DavOs 


corn ccan 

UHobumJidi 
340 24 

341V, U 

239 24 

X10 24 

A2TA 27 

24ft 27 

EK. Sotos 
Pnv.bavOp 


SDOObumbiln 
7.97 i7 

7.99 IS 

74ft U 

841 58 

888 U 

6J9 S9. 

743 U 

W* 8.11 

«l 841 

Est Sotos 
Prow. Day Of* 
SOYBEAN M 
lOOtam-dana 

mso 


20450 
M250 
1040 
EA Series 
Pr*v. DavOp. 
SOYBEAN Ol 
80000 lbs- doth 
3440 22 

3-5 XL 

31 JS 22 

S3? 5 

®SS 22. 
29JB7 23. 

£60 34L 

3440 24. 

Esf. sons 
Prow.DavOm 

OATS {CUT) 
5409 bu minim 

j* 

1471* 14J1 

Est. Safes 

Prev. Dav Opo 


CATTLE 1CMI 
4X000 rtM.- cent 
4JJO 6ZJ 
8747 621 

8M0 614 

W4S 618 

££ 440 
057 U2 
Eg- SOto* 1M7 
Prev.DavOper 
FEEDER CAT 
44*0 IbA- twit 

7X70 4A4 

S-00 474 

7242 674 

7230 47.9 

7940 6*2 

g«t. Sato! 1.72 
Ptbw.DovOpmi 

e 3E! 

5SJ1 429 
<7 - s 
JpS CSJ* 
5085 463 

a 00 462 

£35 420 

4*85 47 JX 

47 

Esi.Sotol S.9X 
Prev. Day Open 
FORK BELLI! 


8200 61.1! 
1287 43. U 

8048 4ft2 
7620 621! 

*540 MJM 

7X40 TOM 
^7430 MM 
Eat.Ooto* 7M 

Prav.OovOMf, 


cogFEecon 

VAnittt.- cents 



Esl. Sales 1408 

Prm.DavOeei 


SUCARtoOBLB 

1,S f2 lb * , " e * n,! 

J-S 142 

*■2 159 

173 

jJg 610 

943 651 

449 <M 

Fr*v. Day Onan i 


S? CO *WYCSC 

rammetomt, 

*70 19M 

'3 i«7 

££ 1943 

gw its* 
2™ 1980 

■3110 I960 

f st. Sam 

Pn»v. DavOepnl 


didn't the lady bring some Indian 
gifts for the president?" 

“Yeah. She brought a woven 
blanket and a sand painting." 

“According to the newspaper re- 
ports, a White House aide came up 
to her afterward and bawled her 
out publicly for not following the 
script. They also said the aide told 
her to take her gifts and beat iL” 

“You would have done the same 
thing if a Navajo Indian screwed 
up your photo opportunity ” 

“Do you believe a scene such as 
that helped the president’s image?" 

“Well, it did send a strong mes- 
sage to anyone who was thinking of 
giving the president trouble on our 
budget cuts in Social Security." 

□ 

“All right Can we now get to 
Bitburg? Who was the brain who 
thought it would be a good idea for 
the president to visit a German 
cemetery?" 

“That wasn't our baby. Chancel- 
lor Kohl's PR people thought up 
that photo opportunity." 

“You can't blame the Germans 
for suggesting iL Who in tbe White 
House agreed to go along with it?” 


VY voice like industrial-strength sandpa- 
per. and a street urchin's face. At 34. she’s 
been an actress for only five years, but has 
packed more memorable parts into that short 
time than some performers do in a career. 

She was a “tough little kid turned responsi- 
ble parent" in “Love Child,” her first ulm — 
and first leading role: In “Streets of Fire." a 
curious rock 'n' roll “fable” released with a 
loud thud last summer, she stood out as a 
hard-bitten street punk. In "Places in the 
Heart,” she played the wistful “Sylvia Plath- 
type woman," the schoolteacher who had an 
affair with Sally Field's brother-in-law. 

Now, as Glory in “Alamo Bay," she plays 
her best role yeL a brash small-town woman 
in Texas who discovers she has principles 
when faced with a confrontation between 
Vietnamese immigrants and the locals who 
resent the newcomers’ intrusion into the 
shrimping trade. Her character, the daughter 
of a fish wholesaler, is a simple soul whose 
pleasures run to beer halls, country-western 
music and an affair with her married high 
school sweetheart, who happens to be the 
leader of the locals. 

“Glory is just this kind of real person, who 
has as many problems and is as wishy-washy 


looking at him and he took a pitcher of beer 
and poured it into tbe PA system and blew n 
up." 

But rock 'n' roll is performing, and not an 

f«i f ... rr * r. _ _ _ « IrarfflAD 


The canccflalion ra puns tor 
Prince Charles and his wuc. Diana, 


unlikely route to film. It was a good training 
ground for all the guff, hype and guile of 


as any of us, and somehow through it learns 
something about herself," Madigan said. 


something about herself," Madigan said. 
“She's a simple character in that sense, which 
was tbe appeal to me or her. She doesn’t pick 
all the cotton and stop the river and do all 


au tne cotton and stop the nver and do a 
those things — you know what I mean." 


show business. 

“1 got Into a band my first week in college. 
I met these guys at a party who were plavtng 
in tbi* band, and I lied to them. I said I had 
sung and played in bands. I lied. So they said, 
‘WelL great, be in our band' And I was pretty 
hut I was so undaunted, and I just knew 
i could do it — which I know sounds egotisti- 
cal and presumptuous, but you have to have 
those qualities if you’re going to stand op and 
perform for people. 

“But I'm one of those people who literally 
from a little teeny kid fantasizing in her 
bedroom putting dotbes on her head. I knew 
what 1 was going to do. I was in all the school 
plays and ail the piano adjudications, and I 
played sports — in all the speech contests, it 
was just very clear to me. A life of performing 
and standing in front of people — it was 
obvious. Tm sure obnoxiously obvious to a 
lot of my Friends and family 

She is from Chicago, where her father, 
John Madigan, is political editor and media 
critic for WBBM. a CBSonned radio station. 
“Her aunt used to call her the Toe Dancer,” 
be said. “Bnt she was not obnoxious. She’s 
worked very hard." 

After 10 years of baling “put together 
hand*, l oad ed equipment, borrowed money 
and driven the vans,” as well as singing ana 



to attend a papal Moss has raised 
controversy in the London press 


and brought some contradictory 
comment from British dergy. Vie- 


Steinberg, president of MCA fifid 
chief executive of Vmvcn*!, de* 
mol the charges. 

□ 


. /A 1 ■ 

ISfrkSmZ 

TN Wotopon Ami 

Mafigan: Lean and cocky. 


“The prez. He didn't tell any of 
>. We were in the dark as much as 


Her skin zs not perfect, her figure is lean 
and she has a cocky walk (in cowboy boots). 
She talks rapidly, dropping g’s with abandon. 
She looks anything but glamorous in “Alamo 


playing keyboards, she derided it was time 
for a change. As a ringer, she said, she was a 
good performer. She had made one record 
that “aside from my family and about two 
friends didn't go too far. It’s a real Madigan 
cult favorite." 


pope. Let’s get to tbe little old lady 
from the Navajo tribe whom the 


2 Whooping Cranes Gone 

The Auociaied Press 

AUSTWELL, Texas — One of a 
flock of 85 endangered whooping 
cranes was killed and another lost 
daring the birds' annual winter stay 
in Texas, wildlife offi cials have re- 
ported. They said, however, that 
this year’s flock was the largest 
since counting began in 1937. 


us. We were in the dark as much as 
anybody. Kohl and the president 
cooked up the cemetery stop in the 
Oval Office, when the chancellor 
started to cry and the president 
didn't know bow to stop him By 
the time the trip hit the fan, the 
president had hts feet in cement 
and we couldn't budge him from 
Bitbui£ We were lucky to talk him 
into visiting a concentration camp 
to give the other side an equal pho- 
to opportunity." 

“Well, what do you propose to 
do now, since the president has had 
the worst press month in his life?" 

“We have to come up with a 


Bay," with her hair bleached pla tinum and 
crimped to look as if she has had a bad home 
permanent 


“I’m lucky to have hair at this point,” she 
snorted. “It’s been burned, fused, dyed, 
rolled, curled. . . But Td shave my head for 
the right movie. That just makes it all the 
more fun.” 


So she moved to Los Angeles, got a job as a 
waitress and began studying foil time at tbe 
Lee Sirasbeig Institute, the West Coast tem- 
ple to Method acting. “1 just worked every 
day, all day, and did about 8,000 scenes, and 
got to work with Mr. Strasberg. It was a really 


good experience for me. And then I just kind 
of hit the streets. Auditioned for plays and 


photo opportunity that will make “I actually h 
everyone fenget Bitburg.” my pants las t 

“Such asr said. ‘They ha 


“We're building a ramp and 
we're going to get Mike Deaver to 
drive his BMW over the Berlin 
Wall.” 


She has had a r ather extraordinary run of 
luck for someone who turned to acting when 
she was 29. Before that she was a rock singer 
(she sings on the soundtrack of “Alamo 
Bay"), with 10 years of working beer joints, 
starting bands and di-chanding them fighting 
off unappreciative patrons and learning to 
take rejection. 

“I actually had people pull me offstage by 
my pants legs because I offended them," she 
said. “They hated roe, they hated the music, 
they hated my singing, they hated everything. 
Once we were playing a beer bar in Madison, 
Wisconsin, and a guy looked almeand I was 


of bit the streets. Auditioned for plzys and 
parts, met my current manager — be intro- 
duced me to my agents, .and they said, ‘Well 
there's something about you we like, well 
send you out for something' 

“And they sent me out for a television 
show, a ‘Hart to Hart* show'. And l got iL And 
they kind of went ‘Hmh!’ They sent me on a 
movie of the week and I got that So it 
happened very naturally." 

Last year, while filming “Places in the 
Heart" in Texas, she married her longtime 
beau, Ed Harris, her oo-star in “Alamo Bay.” 
“We’d been living together and talking about 
getting married, and bring in Waxahadue, in 


that kind of small-town situation, we 
thought, yeah, it scans like a good time to do 
tins. 

“We got up and had breakfast in this tittle 
coffee shop. Then we went over to thejnstice 
of the peace with our dog and got married, 
and that we had to go work that afternoon. 
& we went back to work and we were kind of 
giggling and saying ‘Well, guess what we 
did!' It wasa really great day. And 1 think we 
drank a lot of beer and played pool that 
evening" 

Madigan may seem a “hot” actress now, 
but rite said her phone was not exactly ring- 
ing off tbe hook with offers. “I am an unem- 
ployed person for the first time in a long time 
and it feds just fine,” she said. *Tm also in a 
different situation. I can pick and choose a 
little. But people are not aeakzng down my 
door. I'm not getting offered a Iol But I fed 
sometimes that these parts are picking me; in 
a sense. And if I don't take some tune for just 
mysdf, ID be closing myself off to a lot of 

I hinge 

“I mean, how many movies do you see that 
you really tike? There are not that many parts 
to begin with, and women’s ports —forget it 
You're ether the prostitute or now there’s 
this rash of this contemporary woman trim’s 
tike the dty D. A- who’s divorced, who has 
these two labukms kids and can take care of 
them, and also has a great sex life — that 
superwoman kind of thing . That’s why I tike 
‘Alamo Bay.'" 


comment from British dergy. Vic- 
tor Obuwmp. deputy press secre- 
tary for Bockingham Palace, said in 
Rome that plans for the royal cou- 
ple to attend Pope John Pad DTs 
private morning Mass in the Vati- 
can’s Pauline Cnapd were dropped 
for lad; of time; He said the 
prince's mother. Queen EBxabetii 
n, ployed no part in the decision. 
The limes of London reported, 
however, that Buckingham Palace 
blocked the Mass because of fears 
that it would offend Protestant tra- 
ditionalists, particularly in Scot- 
land and Northern Ireland. It said, 
without attribution, that Charles, 
36, was “highly indignant,'* be- 
cause he had hoped to become the 
first British heir to tbe throne to 
attend a papal Mass since 1534, 
when King Henry Vffl broke with 
Rome. But the palace press secre- 
tary, Mkfaad Shea, said in London 
that it was Charles who made the 
final decision, after consulting the 
queen. The prince and princess 
have ended a four-day visit to 
Rome and flown to Catania, Sicily, 
for two days of relaxation ana 
cruising in the Mediterranean 
aboard the royal yacht Britannia. 
The Rev. bn Paisley, a Free Pres- 
byterian minister and leader of the 
Democratic Unionist Party in 
Northern Ireland, said the hor to 
the throne and future temporal 
head of the state Church of En- 
gland should never have considered 
goi ng to a “blasphemous" service; 
The moderator of the Church of 
Scotland, die Right Reverend John 
Paterson, said that he would have 
warned of “some difficulties and 
opposition" to such a pint but that 
he himself bad no objection. 

□ 


Nepal's Ministry of Tourisiti an- 
nounced Wednesday that Dick 
Brss 55, of Dallas had become the 
oldest man to reach the top of 
Mount Everest and that the Italian 
climber RrinboM Messier. 40, had 
conquered Annapurna I. the 
world’s 10th highest mountain, by 
an untried route. . . . Mfke 
McGuire of La Vista, Nebraska, 
and Bob Jacobs of McCarthy. 
Alaska, who hoped to become the 
first people to walk to the North 
Pole, have ended their journey 
about 260 miles (420 kilometers! 
short of (heir destination because 
the ice pack around the pole will 
begin to break up soon. 

a 


Jihan Sadat, widow of President 
Amnr Sadat of EgypL says she will 
begin work on a doctorate in En- 
glish next fall at the University of 
South Carolina. Sadat (old her 
class at the university, where she 
has been lecturing on women in 
EgypL “I have 12 honorary doctor- 
ates, tot 1 want my very own.” 

□ 


Michael Jackson, Robert Red- 
ford and Diana Ross have agreed to 
perform at a gala charity show for 
the United Nations Fund for Popu- 
lation Activities on Aug. 18, tbe 
Norwegian Broadcasting Company 
has announced in Oslo. 

- □ 


Paul Newman and the director 
George Roy HH have accused Uni- 
versal Pictures, in a federal court 
suit in Los Angdes, of cheating 
them out of more than 5600,000 on 
revenues from videocasette sales of 
the movies “Slap Shot" and “The 
Sting." The suit seeks $2 million in 
punitive damages from Universal 
and its parent company, MCA Inc. 
It alleges that movie studios indus- 
trywide use accounting practices 
“to minimirg or eliminate” pay- 
ments to those supposed to share in 
videocasette profits. Sidney Jay 


Malcolm Forbes, mi a goodwill 
tour of Asa, roared into. Kuala 
Lumpur, Malaysia, on his Hartey- 
Davidson accompanied by two 
trucks transporting a giant do- 
phanl-shapcd hot-air balloon. 
Forbes plans to rive balloon rides 
to government officials but also has 
business meetings planned. He WtiK 
roove on today to Johore Baru, 
where he said he piaiuwUo offer 
Malaysia’s head of state, Mtihnoad 
Iskandar, a balloon ride, rv-.; 

< .z. 


President Sandra Fertbtf of Italy 
will be awarded an honorary degree 
by Johns Hopkins University tn a 
ceremony Saturday at the open 
house in Bologna, as port of an 


anniversary celebration by the 
Johns Hopkins Bologna Center, 


Johns Hi 
founded : 


kins Bologna 
years ago 


Season Sec 
Hum l 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


. SUBSCRIBE 
to «fte 

INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


MOVING 


HERALD 


ALLIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
USA RESIDENTIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS ft SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS ft SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Trocodoro. Exceptionol 


TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE 


At o new ufasoinr to rtw 
Intemofiond Herald Ti*una, 
you con wve op to tnN 
It* iwwntand pnoe depsndng 
on you coortry of residence. 


For detoili 

on Ifc naeod introductory offer, 
writo tor 


IHT Strfnaipfion* DapvfemnL 
181. Avenue ChaHetde-Goufa, 
9MQ0 N—By ww -Setaa, Fnra. 
Or tok Pam 747-07-29 


N ASIA AND PACIFIC 
contact our local distributor or-. 


VAN LINES INTI 

ova lOOOXGBOS 
M USA. - CANADA 
350 wemn-wme 

PARIS DtodJordw brtenwttand 

101) 343 23 64 

*ANKfWr J&rrfe 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH I.M.S. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON JST5C5I 

(01) 953 3636 j 

USA AKed Von Unwlnfl Carp 

(0101) 312-681-8100 


MAMM7TAN. NTC 

THE ULTIMATE M 
COimOMMUM LIVING 
TSL1MP TOWS? ■ an Fifth Amur 
MANHATTAN PLACE - 1st Av & 38 St 
New. eJegcjrt, prestigio u s undj feature 
dihncovo, secure end pnvtSe 2, 4, 5, 
bednxm. (1500 to 3000 lq. ft) Avtd- 
obta direrty from owners. 

Contact: Mr. M. Ptman 

EnvBi Management Ccrp. 
118-35 Queens Bhd. 

Forest K4 NT 11375 USA 
let 7184W-4848 


CHATHET 
DUPLEX TERRACE 

UXE A SMALL HOUSE* 
UVING + BEDROOM. ALL COW 
FORTS It* floor, elector. 0,080.000. 
SERGE KAY5BL Tel 329 60 60 


beam, hfeftmcaHtoi&Sna Tef: 
8 16 or 5208296 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

ITALY 


EXECUTIVE SOTS MAYFAIR. Usai- 

rf fvmtdwjd opantaerta. oe~+y deeo- 
rtfrd. futfy serviced, secretarii/feia* 
-foofem. U5Q/£550 per weft. 3 
monfo to 2 yoon. MoadcmoaMoi- 
ogemer* Ltd. London 01 491 3626 
I iftw: 299185. 


Infte r e wntow. 4 bedre 
poring. F2S000. Tel: 


Embassy 

6 Av* « i 


Service 


74 CHAMPS-B.YSGRS 8th 


LONDON. For ttebtotfurnafed fats < 
and houses. Carautt the Speodns: 


TSOOSNm 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


StwBq^2 or Sro ora ep u rt ewft 
worth or mare. 

IE CLABDGE 359 67 97. 


RUE DE LA PAIX 

Large 2-room. 80 sqm., dl comfort*, 
baaurful freestone buildmn^nd floor, 
elevator, sun. qwet. FC OO JOO- 


Wfien a Came: 

PAIAZZO ALVHABRO 
Unary opmtatont house vrth furnished 
1 flats, abatable for 1 weft and mare 


tWDps. Kay end lefts. Tet London I 
352 8JJ?. refer 27846 KESBX G. i 


AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 


MONACO 


hom e w to re stad 
tod mare in Paris. 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


Phoofc 6794325. 67934S1 
Wnte Ya M VWabro 16. 
001 B6 Rome. 


CONTHEt Goflbu V er s to 300 dftes 
worldwide - Air/Sea CoB Charfa 


WwMl e w l Herftd Tribune 
1005 Toi Sana Camreerdd Buikfeg 
24-34 i ltoi eft ei Read 
HONG KONG 


woriebride . Air/Sea. CoB Charfa 

281 1081 ffesfMB’GpinaJGntoo 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ST NOM LA BRETECHE 
SUPERB PROPERTY 

217 sqm. iftip space, 

■mate indoor jwimnwiojpocf, finruh 
nuna, exercise hwil 1700 sgj*. pert. 
VBlY HIGH CLASS 
F2at»i)0Q 

C.OJ>. (3) 954 92 00 


ON DUE ST. HONOAE 

*r smon D«jrOOTl, dcptl xjtoot, 
4th floor. Prices FfiloflOO. 
fmmo Bftzae 296 14 38 


MftAN R/tNBH B) 4room. 
ctoion. starting illy 1 [ pom 
month rentd). CdT 02/4983' 


MONTE CARLO 
PENTHOUSE WITH LARGE 
PRIVATE GARDEN 

240 sain. Iwmg space (garden 


Habitat Int'l 


Hoe the ffarsure ID nform you toot 
its oetrvThei Ins been taken oner by 
ABP B.Y5S5-CONCORDE 


14TH Aid A: 2 nefty redone 
tort private ardeaquiel. I ca 
igle - 51^0/mor*. 1 ecu, 
$7®/month.Tft542 4984 


3d BEALBQURG, 2 rooms, 65 sq.m. 
ft comforts beautiful duplex, sun. 

W50mQ.W7044936?Qcm/nooft 


HOLLAND 


4TH SMALL STUOtO, 25 sqjfc. beans. 
Tet 723 48 80. 


DUTCH HOUSING CBtTRE ELV. 
Win* lerfert Voteriuatr . 174, 
Amstenfcen. 020401234 or 623222. 


Z«U sqja wing space (garden 
150 sqjn.t 3 bedrooms, 3 bdhs, large 
kWieii a. service area, p tooraric 
sea & moutosn view. 

For further detais /Setae can te d: 

AGED! 

26 b» Bd Pr esa ge Choriofte 
Monte Ccrfo, MC 98000 Monaco 
Tab (93) SO 66 00 Tefau 479 417 MC 


9. me fcwde. 75008 Pons 
Tab (1) 265 T1 99. Tbe 640793 F 


dan fonitae. 723 43 28. 


UIXURT AT BUDGET PWCESi Tryffo- 
lotol cBermenh near the BWiow- 


total cy o rt ee nh near the BfriTo*. 
or. From one week upwards. My 
equipped starfias to S roortA torth Qr 
withouf hofd service. Cdnfoch FLA- 


180 sq«. {g a rm ent, 
ed. 4 bedrooms, 1 bode, W 
per mooft. Teli 380 02 (I 


TOTH, Mnedu JhMtot 750)5 
PorisTtal; 575 62 20. The 2M211 F. 


14#> MONTPj 
cony, new k 


Teh HK 5-286726 


ages, cellar; Fv^OO/mortfh -I 
roes- Teh 577-3957 or 577-4657. 


DIVORCE IN 24 HOURS 

Mutud or contested actions, low aft. 
Haiti or Dornnicai fapubfit. Par infor- 
mc*on, send S375 fior 24^jage booklet 
/Hrtorfma to Dr. F. Gonzftes. ODA, 


rhwamg to Dr. P. Gormfts. OD> 

TOST- iMaUP 



International Business Message Center 


Contact Sofireq 
7S006 Rais Tftj 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


ALCOMOUCS 

E^fok^Pans: 634 59 65. fame 


ANONYMOUS m 


ST. TBOPEZ (SAUN5) 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 1 OFFICE SERVICES 




PAW ON TIC UN. For jog^ng tours 
of Paris. Cot 567 12 57 


Bjr owner- 220 sqm vBo. 2JOO jqjn 
gorden, pool Sving, dnina 6 berhoems 
6 baths, equipped ftthon, fitted 
bmenwt. gnopB, covered fenaan. 
500 m. from sea. Cun pony deduction 
passMe- F4 1 000,000negoe'nfcfe. 


SUN. N.Y. 11MB - Eun 
Write Koyier. POB 3. B1 


PERSONALS 


WHfe Havas Man ta-G orto 692, 

4. rue d« Ira. MC 98000 Monaco 


TO MR. JIM Aft. ft MATT. Jewett 
wuaon in Cuiope the month? Cortod 
Hida TMD. Bert. 


CANNH. In kmnavs bukina \ 2 rnm. 
from Croisefte & se a. Top floor 2- 
hertoom oportirtantr 83 sain. 4- 65 

Cannes. Tft (93) 38 19 19, 

SUPER UW .Pnti&us demote, 
«rt of Ifta worid seovww, 700 tvmg 


terse, where more that a Mrd 
a f a ntiKan readers worfcf- 
wide, m a*# of wham an h 
t urinee and industry, ft 
read ft Jest hfn os {Pan 
6135951 bntmm JOtun. en- 
tering Aaf we can feint you 
back, tmd your ma na ge ft 
top*v wfttei 48 boon. The 
mtn b US. $9.80 or W 
equfaft e nf par fine Yon mist 

■ta« fmfto nmn ,, f— |— __nit Sg 

ow H rnfnpflrv twHs vmm- 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


ONTARIO, CANADA- baltol tax | 


HLSl Ang ui ta, Chora 

goids. P jiariM .LfcwiqgTdrTKgfotfipf 

• Confidential advice 

• In v o nicr e ovftabEly 


aaaoge r«ort 16 cottages *• 3bee- 
laom horno-18 oust. KasweTho 
L ft e i . Ovforio on Ihe Tart Wfter- 
wa*i Tourism Ortario 4-ear resort. 
AOfraxrnatefy 75 0 ft. late frontage. 
Pric e VS OflOO GrocSan. TftTOS- 
738-2331 FjO. Bos 126 BobcaygEon, 
Ortosio Canada K0M 1 A0. 


NTl 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UMJMmSMC 

UJhA. A WOWDWS* 


Geneva France Border 


NEAR BEAUBOURG. 16th 
| takfoa nice 55 son. rtudk 
I months. F5D0a 548 0197 / Z 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


• Bearer stores 

• Boat repstataors 

• Acnrtrn & admn alra tkn 

• Mofi, Meprione A Wei 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


spare, tou«s fttarre. 6000 sqj? 

K k, Manemg pod. coratofar's. 

se . ProrortCTi Momrt, Plan Mo- 
tart 06000 Mo& TeL (93) 87 08 20 


who ax ran youk 

NEXT tNTBNATlONAL MOVE 


ORLANDO, FLORIDA 
INVESTMENT 

• Tto arro has been nrgetad as one 


SBKVKZ5 LID 

Head Office 

rnaft, Dauoica. hfa of Mm 
Pooftae (56141 23718 
fax 628554 S&ECT G 


PARTTO NB3S) FOR RNANCB4G 
totef-re ifo urctot (oldoroin nil 1474J, 
an (he Tam river V rooms fir pn- \ 
vale Hurl or irtil meetings. 70 tans ' 
from Toulouse. Mne Kroemer, Moftn 
de Maniac. 82200 Moiaoc. Francs. , 
Tft (63) 04 03 55. Tb 521 61 5F i 


A oam pfata soaoj & business service 
irovvi^ a M e nus cftr. * c ti oii of 
wwtei vennfife & muMfagud 
•rtvirxxtis for oB occasxrK. 
212-765-7793 
212765-7794 
330 W. 56lh St, N.YX. 10019 



room cham n o, ft comforts. 
777 91 83 / 26148 76 

HOO* SAMT HONORE, 


L Plm Your Cknifiad Ad Quickly and Easfly 

I tatto 

1 

MTBNATIONM. HBUVLD TRSUNE 

a| Bp Hwoee Cal your focal IHT rcpraitiftfth* with your tail. You 

eft be informed of ihe aw rauertatefy, and cnee prepayment ji 
- - marie your od vft iftpere eftfen 48 hom. 

Caek The baric rate is S9a) per tne per day + footi taxes. Ttme are • 

h 25 fatten, agnsemd spaces m the fod fine and 36 at foe foBovteig fact. 

Mnmn spare is 2 inns. No ftibrevtahora accepted. 

Credit Carrie American Express. Oner s Cub, fiuracard, Maaw 

Cord, Access and Visa. 


° HEADOfFICE 

LA1TN AMERICA ’ 

n 

19 Perk: (For darnffad only}; 

BueitotA«ft=4l4031 
(04ft. 312) 

i. 747-4600. 

t- 

Guayorp* 431 943/431 

Lima: 417 852 

1 EUROPE 

Panrein 644372 


San Jaw 22-1055 

- Amefarriatcc 2636-15. 

Santiasa: 69 61 555 

t Mhem 361*8397 /36D2421. 

SaaPattw 852 1893 - 

^ Bfimfa: 343-1899. 

MIDDLE EAST 

- Cagmabaaent (01)329440. 

Bahnrtc 246303. 

H Frankfort: (069) 72^7-55. 

Jordan: 2S31A 


KuwaBi 561*485. 

Z Ifabore 67-27-937 66-25-41 

InfacmaR: 340044 

Qatar. 416535. 

2 London: pi) 836-4302. 

South Anrirtr 

Marti* 455 2891 /45M306- 

Jeddah: 667-1500 

UA.IL: Dubai 224161. 

is AOara (02) 7531445. 

J Norway: p3) B45545. 

FAR EAST 

Rawer 579-3437. 

Bangkok: 3904)4-57. 

5 Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Hang Ktw 5^13671. 

Mreucc 817 07 49. 

7 Ttt ArJv: 03-455 55P. 

Sawrf; 725 87 71 

r Vienna: Cimtact Frankfurt. 

Stagiftoia: 222-2725. 

Taheaac 752 44 25/9. 

1 UNTTHI STATES 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

3 

AUSTRALIA 

* Now Yorto (212) 7S2-389a 

Sydney- 929 56 39. 

2 Went Coast: (41 5) 362-8339. 

Melbourne: 690 8233. . 


* r 
tn 


Senna fapresentatives 
NrertdWarkWr. 


BTH VBUBS. ehMTMng2-roam, fadv 
■n. fxjth. equipped f3ftXJ- <«fe ffl 
9S2 5837. 


GREECE 


of rhe dyrime gramrth centers in ihe 
USA. After HtaMesttordirten d i ug e 
ei M opened, drrus lands near 
eft which was once sold far 


FOR A RH ESTIMATE CALL 


SUP® LUXURIOUS 1 Groom ftp, 5 
baths, 3 Kreptaces. swimming pool 5 


Mt PUoeart. Dom 
T eh Pooftreri 
Tefax 62854 
London Rm 
2-5 Cta aortal 
Tel 01 -493 4244, Tie 


| YOURUft. COmECTION-GofliidHv 
faffjr ^corporate in Oefawcve. No 
persond presence or cr^tal needed 


ARABIC HfBICH I B4GUSH tneo- 
lotions 8 jbc twij sJ service* Cowocfc 
MBH Services, 60 rue Roriethld CH- 
1202 Geneva. Tet (22) 31 58 11 Tie: 
27 449 CH 


lu . v ow M adrid g ma 
IN TIE BBT BUSWESS ADDRESS 
- Pumnhed eeeamve offires conplete 
ftfo Be. • mft - facsMe, persond 
Mngual seaefories. 

-Carpante representation services 


SHORT TBtM in Latin Quarter. 
No agents. Teb 38 83. 


EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


EMPLOYMENT 


PARK AREA UNFURNISHED 


Loadon W1 
Q47 SCSLDNG 


Ed. \Mkrington. DE 19802 
302/762^919, He 757674. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 
Report - 12 countries crrtyzed. 
Detafo WMA. 45 Lyrelent ICE. 
Suite 306. Centml, hong tox}. 


(DONGTON 
CASTBJANA, 141 
28046 MM3RD 
Tel; 4590150 - Tte 46614 


AMSTERDAM. 

ATHOB: 
BARCELONA: 
BONN; 



071) 89.93 JA 

01)961.12.12 
6523111 
66062 
70591 
95.63 
863144 
2001 


roefatod to 


BSMUDA 

“PEARIOF 1H6 ATlANnC 


MANCHKTBJ: 
MONKH: 
NAPIES: 
PARIS: 

ROME; 


■ Enro- A m erican hat options 
negotiated 3 years ago an fond 
Strategicfty loaded new Disney 


SWITZERLAND 


Offshore Inretlmeid Opportunity 
for the tirneriue-e/R.E. developer. Pro- 
tipous hotel £ timeshaie resort renfrtd- 
ly located an 7 acres featuring a FuB 
u nen il fas pottage & vnhxAfa ficenses. 


UM OUE qtTOCTUM Tr for □ food 
egwpmenl conpsiy to erto the U^. 
through hwestnisrt in o (yawing ILS. 
load equpmeri rrxinukrfuier. Write 

P.O. Bta lSCT Normal OtC 73070 
USA or cat! (405} 360-3371. 


YOUR OWN ORICS RJ LONDON. 

700 yrtrfs from the American Embas - 1 
sy for S8 per wuft Grosvenor Secre- 
lorid Services. Tef 01-629 2931. 


GEORGE V 

Old bufleinft deviiL cofa), on oordea 
LovWy reception, 3 berfowns, 2 baths, 
□baft 140 spin. FI 5,000/ monfh. 
Teb 225 64 54 


COSMOPOUTAK ATTRACTIVE 
DYNAMIC. EXWCJVF BUT 
^ , , WORTH IT 

ProfasBand PB/marfating/fobbvist 
vnmon, wilh tap contorts around the 
warid who speaks Engfch, French. Hd- 
m, Portugese and Spmh seeks posi- 
tion w* **L non or group. Fiee to 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


I a Art fitionerf partner^) requrad 
to compfae purchase and tc6e title 


VI LIARS 

WINTK4SUMMK 
PARADISE, 20 MINUTES 
ROM LAKE GENEVA 


• Short holding period before very 
profitrtJe re-sde or u ierted 

c# raw plus. 


VS mflon 

Cft Joyce Gref 401-849-9000 USA 


MAOflNRS 6.84G9CS for earth 
taoiftg, mrteriol honrtn^ forestry & 
conarucbon. Al mftas & types. 
Trannmi Hetium, Gestel secan 21, 
87241 ZoerseCSgum. Trt 323J8 i 
10S4.HtaSmTSANSMa 


financial 

INVESTMENTS 


YOUR LONDON OFRCE 

OBHAM EfflOrnVE CB4TRE 
Caroxerieranre rone of se rvices 
150 Stre^^ London W). 
Tub (01)439 Use 261426 


lion with eel non or group. Free to 
travel. 

C.V. A references avftabfa upon 


C.V. A references ovoriobw upon 

rB ^JS5£s Y S*¥ 212-S»365B 
Tfa 226000 ETUttJR ATT 8>U. 


SA1E5 - GERMANY 
We m a major Amnan cprporfton. 
Oir products are consumer item. IXte 
to expansion, we are loofang far onrth- 
er person to cover our LLS. rrafctary 
acmurts. The paetion is based n totnh- 
em German y , Wu offer a very com- 
petitive sftry.axt of living ftcrwance, 
profit shensg, company at & other 


from Pucfias 
Far Sale To, 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
rtXff WfNDS BSfTL 


• fevestment range USSISjOOO to 
SI mttoa 

BJRO-AMBUCAN 
WVBTMW CXWORATTON 
100 N. Bscnyne Bfvd 
Suite 1209 *W, a 33132 
Tat (to? MX97 
Tefab BtSia/ EURO MA. 


Foreign Investors 

Sutftftid foreign e wcu lor s uo l nn g ag- 
gresme returns with low risk & law 
fttatifity are invited to respond. Tto 


BACH THE GS» MARKET. Actor- 
foe in Emporium. Posted to 10,000 
basmeeses. J5D the ad « 6 cm. Send 
your ad to Sedan, PQ Bea 21030, 
Athens 11410. U BA 5882. We am 
also ad as your ogwrts m Greece. 


Inf"! Buaness 
Attodotion & Publisher 

with krge mentorship and world 
oaver u g c seeks $3 to $5m ortside 
fuxmcng to eutiote motor expansion 

PtOQfQJTL 

Secure. toH riv omO B Otti ii w emn ent. 
fcWy tar Sen 2121. herald Trixtx, 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSRCSS CBORES 

F vmi s to d E x eau te e Offiree 


BAC EXCHTONAL 

newfe redone, re c eption , 3 bedrooms, 
2 beat*, parting, mod’s room. FI 6000- 
Tet 563 68 38 

WVOU TUUBtK, Bute ft comfort 
high dots bftrtag. 260 67 29 from 2 
pm lo 6 pm. Mampiqs: 5S5 71 89. I 
7THNEARST.CTUAA1N, eWgattgu- ; 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


GB«AL MANAOat 


B fare i e nteT e n 1 Other Mfa 


imporsant top puafrty idea is only evft- 
abir foart (t»s a id fine Wa* S treet 
■firm. 8 is srtfact to inihd offering You 
must respond by May 10. Write, prim- 
ar wire; L Loteixfob; K&6HI New- 

a Center Dr„ Suite 1290, Newport 
% CA 92644 USA 7144447040. 


CALL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PARIS (31036 63 II 
LONDON (01) 578 66 11 


gage* wfafe a only merest, 
■w inrarmatat 

GLOBE PLAN SA. 

sia^pShwi 

EefebWied Sface 1970 


MONEY TREES? 


UWBT: Ideal for areraeai sfep- 
mert. Fanner Coring Brewery, Qevw- 
fatd, Ohio, am^ete as kft opernt- 
eft AU repks confidante: Bettor 
Carp, fas 1530, Tampa H. 33601. 


MAJOR LATIN AMBtfCAN oourWy 
ft prowde Sorted number of dtizert- 


YE9 invest in one of Arnerioa's most 
eeatiwg tachnftogic a l b eu kil u w rfss in 
a bBon dollar industry. We hove pfae- 


A Qua&fy Opperfuraty 

Swiss company specio fai nfl in 


SWISS BUSRC5S WOMAN, wfi art 

yy g I****- 

nans, rej utefra nas own 

offioe / tete. Please m e a d : Telex 
423 070 Geneva 


r uwesi. Hbsb write inducing 

SStis^K^IrCedeK: 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ad mare nuf free* in 1984 iter erry i 
other developer in our Slfte. 

Hi* MMicntaBi ae wiru d foe j 

» 

■■■ *• Hiyinmutu Ol 


^BAIISTT LAURENT 

rive gauche 


BROKERS* MOUSES INVTTHl. 
Mrternf avaUile in Biftsfo Frimeh 
Germs. Bos 1993, Herdd Trfoune. 
92521 NevBy Cedes, France 


teaks entranced a dMara » its 
London based sofas team. 

Send fill d etails to Bax 40856, I.H.T, 
63 Long Aire. London. YfC2t 9JH. 
Start confidence abserred 
& ft replies answered 


YB4TURE CAPITAL GROUP has busi- 
nesses & uiwtouBiir opportunities n 
USA & England for owner operator? 
& nbmr iee ewes Contort on Lon- 
don 01-351 451 B. 


Ful office cervices only, or yoar 
fvmhed office in Arkfoior^ 
South Austrdc, an a per mit bag; 


AABTBDAM Euro Bums Center 
Kej aanfp. 99, 1015 CH Arnpardapi 
TjMM 227TJ35. Tefac 16183 
ATHB4S Freart’w Services. Athens 
Tower B, Suite 506, Athens 610. 
Teh an) 7796 731 Tefe* 216343 
BOMBAY: Raffto Chambers, 213 
Narim an Paint, Bombay 400 021. 
Teb 244949. Telex, 011-6897. 
BXUSSHSi 4, Rue de fo Freni 
1000 Brines. Teb 217 83 60 
Tet* 25327 

DUBAI: P.O. Box 1515. ONATA 


pbre. Tri647 40 19pwner. 

USA 

SUB tfT NT. .Mo. dxxTTxn. E 45 

ser 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED7EXCHANGE 

STIt CHARMMO penthouse stufto 
enrtnut, furnished, beam, <ft ex- 
change far some a Monhattcn. tee 

1st to July 31st. Cft Paris 325 07 28 

EMPLOYMENT 


Cteerft monogemert podticn for men- 
utouwB footay for Coble 1KV & 

S’* 01 *- w 1*** wperienee n 
CmanS Mmogewent pooticn p**>- 
ou» sofas, morketing and ittanog an eid. 


We are IooIm for someone wrihprew 

out sdns BUenenre & a buueftrek*- 
edcaAnwrt^ee is desired but not es- 
senfial Due to Ihe nature of ns 
portion, (foptoanb lhould boar cm 
American paapert £ be prosenffy re- 
eding m Germanr- 


Pforee srod your rest™ inefodnp solo- 




D40®. FrarlShirt/Maii 


Experience m Ihe Arab countnuwould 
be a phis. Cte®ens*an based an sdo- 
! f? prow rowg. Mowing fringe 
bvienfR cmyi 

A. Housing ft Oteanca 

& SK^ <end " ,fa,,,p, * 

C One return air ticket home, 
relocation cfawnace, medcal 
nwronce and company oar. 

D. Two year contract 
CcxKicfoie should have c orra u c ta d of 
yofab wgngt and famfartly with 
Areto lanjoge a phn. PI ease mft 
resume to 

American Industrial foil . 


Stereo f BECIROMC / Table 
tourre i w pe cio n needed in Japm- 
/Toiwm. Must reacUwfa Engfak 


teh resumes to: Quftty AHOOftes. 
2231 1 BioddarsJ, Sate It, Hurfa^pon 
Beach. CA 92646 LSA. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AMERICAN BUItflt, 37, senta peniVQ- 


nere position vfth American fmy in 
Boris. 8 yeen « pr ev ent posAon. Er- 
paneered toad secretory & orgo 


Aiifae Certre DubaLUAE 
Tel: 214565 Tetoo4&911 
LONDON; 110 The Stand, 
London WC2R OAA. 

Tel-. Dll 836 BOTaTTIta 24973 
MADRID: C/Orense t* 684. 


FRENCH WEST MXES 


SSOJTOO WANTED BY PROMOTBI 
with references for cnrftetion al 
Hif^fy lucrotto mutTwnton doOor 
Agra Alimentary Prasec w pra eii in- 
valving pfart m ACP/gC caunmes. 
Offers fo Bax 7101, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuByCedto. Fronre 


e McAxm. telephone, telex and 
computer seneces 
e Full sea etai ki services mdaring 
■nubBtagual tnxsfotiora and laml 
c jita ct estobfahmer tf 
• Formation and prime esfrnftui of 


Women shop 


SILICON VALLEY USA 
BUSINESS CONNECIIONS | 

Want to sefl yair products m U5A.9 


PUMICE STONE (Pierre Beneel 
for sfte. Quarry op y rt or seeks uteke- 


tricJ interested m ties rough nrieiri 
far nfaroft catfwrheTY. TYAPET. 
27 nae de Suede. La fiodxA e , Franca. 
Tdi (46) 34 83 S3, office tain 


PANAMA LIBERIA. CORPOSATtONS 

from USS400 mcrie b ta now. Tel 


IV otert nar tau ecne m or data seath 
Marketing services for pver j e re 


Looking for a fioene or (air* venture 
pretoeit Need ogmpuer, teteotemuni- 
cotions or other nGH-TECH products 


R62A 2024a Telex: 628352 ISLAhO 
SfwaUq. 

BUYMS SWATCH WATCHES, pay- \ 
mg cosh, wry Pyle, rnraneim SOD 

ra-rasa&is&gsl 


e x port / report 
* FuD co nfid ence & 


efitofton enured 


19 et 21 avenue Victor - Hugo 
75116 Paris T«. (1) 500.64.64 


Irani U5 X? Weeps (ftp. We y crift- , 
m in rapresonfingi faroign aampa/ies in 
USA. te- a tte nd irto. please con- 
tact is with specific ncech. 

B4II BUSD'ES VBJTURE5 MC 
630 Pnrce ta n Drive 
Sunnyvale. Cftforaia 94087 USA 
» {408 739-8572 


SOUTH AMB8CA MFORMAT1QN 
fa . 

* ni >aone ponat, 

T ft u rofaation m a stable cxwtey. 
Jnetivirfud wehes can fee ep r artre d 
Plnese write to- 

Bo* 2141. LH.T, Frfaixfofr. 15. 
D-6000 Fnfthirr/Mian 


COSTA DEL SOL We seek pertam 
far |aint vertire in Ihe Morbeeo orea 
Please write to 5cgam]. Batrda Sor- 

I tea 60 Mftbelq, Mtiggp 


EXECUTIVE CENTER 
Offices raid Services 

For mare mfannatian wrae or eft us at 
GTO Bax 763, Milririe, Sou* 
A-fcftfa Atento 
Tefato AA 87443 


US$25,000 BANC GARANTE ra- 
ajnd, e eeefi ert avnmi gi on. Bar 
! 2120, Herald Tnfegm. 92521 Nrftly 
Cede*, Francs 


RflttWS SRJCON VA1IET, 2 ks- 

nets aerters . one aly certer other ai 
Thames bait, Hewfoow 20 nans. 
Fully furnished office* ft se t v i ne s . 
TeL 0628 34281 or tefao 846366- 


MADteJ; C/Orerue W 684, 

Madrid 2802a Td 270 56 do or 
270 66 04. Tele* 46642 
MRAN; Via Boccaccio % 

20123 /Am. T4B6 75 09/80 59 279 
Tefan 320343 

NHtif YORK 575 Madaan Avenue 

P ^^i“S7eV' Hw 

Tefaie 63MF. 

ROMb >te Savon 78. 00198 fame. 

0SI7. T*D66S77. TteaSl 
Tefaxr 812656/812961. 


w* ^JS®FH2^ rosmoNS 

LOOK UMJEB 

J-MIBNATICMAL POSITIONS” 
RASE 8 BJROK - PAGE 10 ASIA 


_ ,7775 Cooper Rood 
■"onrt, OH«242 USA. 
Telex: 71/4442 AMHNC 


pe h eawd soeft Moratory & organiz- 
er of forge a dart re a n cn &. Spools 
French Ho* vraried tt Fab. Ayft- 
obfo ft once. fie f areiK M . Wft» V«- 
l«n Pot. East Rfat HA fan 04629 
USA 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


muuhwgual pbsonal 
assatonl, wonts to relocate to 
NEW TOM t.qfi WASWNGTON DC 
Pruto uooft forty mtorjrcmcJramlator 
31.BAnqonqneo . 10 v«ss foreign «■- 
pw-tence bonifag and buyness oftfotis- 

Write Bre 210, 55 Vfo detia Memdt, 
00I» Rome, Hfty / Tel 06-542553 


nicrSToaEnS r«5 tS 

new predigwui interior & extenor 
demr showToom m Monaco. Must he 
feglfoi guaffied & enxnenced. Mft 
*P«o* fluent French, ttolan & Erwtah 
, ? aaB 2 & l * ofar y A oonem- 
JKm. Tefi (93) 30 17 4a 


CUNRAL P 5 YCHOLOGBT 32. tittn- 
( jud, (German vrith Uiwsny ftpfo- 
na worn France & ewimly 


vtetan ft a ureWnown Uftterety 
One tor Chid I Totfh Psyrtetay. 
MKttngMtoparfancB weA mteresf- 
echn WI edueftte. seefa rmm p a* 
bon. Box 2143. IKT_ Hedndftr. 15, 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


IMK1U5 * ZURICH * 252 76 21 
Ffiree / telex t raatMr. 


iBA. Stoantineft. 24 yrsbSi mt 

frons p nrt om m & froghl 
9» cmfat_ m contovter 
farmer cfeef reecuhve in 
ft*s rfta»en»nB pari. 

40^UiT-63la n g Ao..L oncJon . 


IP YOU CAN SB! 

YOU ARE OUR MAM (WOMAN) 
Eon good money wMsr meeting iteer- 
esftng peppb. Wort in your home area 


5W)K WfOMANi.iW .jra> g ood ecfo- 
often, bfatgeft fogfiifi/handA 
seeks atomwaw jooprefeifttiy 
bewri « Bern* er fie Stefas fare* 
cmd hotter LFree to travtiL A viable 
toUftftyrwggtotojH^Hm. 

ftd Tribune; 92521 Netfty Cede*. 




D-Ti, Suedftee 2. 
D-6W2 Mtiflfodi 3> 
sGimw (06868797. 
Tt* 44520 DB D. 


I OR MPMffKSPEAltMO 


PAGE 15 

formore 

CLAS5IF1BDS 


Primed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 


Pm 9, Metre Opera. 


PAth