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Published Full The New York limes and The Washington Post 


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No, 31,788 

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" The' Associated Press 

IV .. ;• WASHINGTON — Senate lead- 

fy.fp ft. i. ». Ci „ ^smiggW Fnday to Iwld toieth- 

J-* w««ii! Jn}.^ p er tireremaining mews ota dismtes 

^***rthTtv jijerating ' Republican, budget 

E ... , • I'a >.;AfaHMnwdse» while President Ron- 
S\$l nuViuT. . . aW Reagan denounced as “arurre- 

I. Nq*»s sporiribte acT a vote the day before 

to scale backiris proposed mili tary 
P' feiwfj v ' ‘ hufldUpV ‘1 
* . *utan .» "■ ' On a 9^to-6 vole Friday, the 

— ‘Cbwiiaittiii. l V~. Senate approved an amendment 
&.Muc Sen’ offered by Republican leaders 
‘ , -it:.: i' themsdyes.to cat Medicare and 


F; CtaMantin. ~ ^ cnate approved an amendment 

LlMuc Sen offered by Republican leaders 

c . i: -‘i:;: k '.‘ themsdyes.to cat Medicare and 
t TjTthr i + ' ‘ r *' « Medicaid funds.— but by $2.6 bil- 
. - ! . ' " f Kon less over the next three years 

'* - : than -ihe- Reagan administration 

ft'SShw N r^- :.‘ had asked. - . 

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PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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"Ih t'AssOtiated Proa 
WASHINGTON — Senate lead- 


the full appr^riation for Medi- 
care, the -program of health insur- 
ance for toe. elderly, and Medicaid, 
whichprovides medical asasuwee 
to the poor. . 

President Reagan, in Boon at- 
tending the economic summit, -de- 
nounced the vote the day before to 
cut his proposed military spending 
increases. • ; . 

“It’s an irresponsible act. We’ve 
already made reductions we could 
make m military spending without 
reducing our ability to maintain the 
security, we must have," Mr. Rea- 





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^.fUldirt v " th^ Uie Reas 

N ^' : ' - had asked.' . 

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ht .*:v U; ... r-f' to trim nwriy 

federal 

* contain further" dam^e to the bud- 

" '• :j Jon'. «« P* an - offered the measure to 
l.a blunt a Dmtocn 


a DemoaabG move to restore 


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U.S. House 
Devises Plan 
To Resolve 
MX Dispute 




iiRii: _ By Bill, Keller : ’ 

iSv'* J ( .. ..\. ’ • W^Torir T&RoAwiCff . ; . 

ill<k!i.v.i.; "*:■■■ - WASHINGTON — A diverse' 
group of House Democrats has 
f ' ;i: reached anmloaaaJcanxasBS that 

they say may finally resolve the 
at-.,. "■" ^ long dispute over the firture of die 

J Kt .vl ‘.s’/ MXmisalft 

r- FOfiv^ They smd their plan, which has 
auracred past opponents as wdl as 
- — '— supporters of the MX, would ulti- 

l umi 'xa mwy limit tteptoymenfUMO rms- 
BPrvvJ [^__ v T sfles rather than the 100 desired by, 

^L r I the Reagan administration. - 

ry-' It also would allow continued 

-£"V. ■* Y V-T- production, rrf a, few missiles each 
> ■ , r.s year. pra^$:<&jght T^ey f^d ' 

j*- . V, rt7 ^beusediitttStfirgfitS,iasSpatfeafta' 
■5-.. " to keep producdmi fetes movingm 

It C at >(-« *H' case of tamctgency, aoconhng to 

Houre members and aides, some cf - 

•*’_ ' whom spcAe on the condition they • 

not be identified. 

«c- If the agreement hekt it would 

resolve an intense dilute vwtlrin 
w- the Democratic Party between hb- 


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the Democratic Party between lib- 
" ends who have long opposed the 
missiles and . moderates who have 
supported the adnrinBtraikm’s MX 
requests to give tbe^ ^United States 
more leverage in aims control talks 
wiih the Soviet Thaon. .; .. .; • 

With the House of Representar 
lives con trolled by Democrats,- the 
division "within the party’s ranks 
has been aiticai to the MX> fat& 
Tbe moderates' stq^ctrt of the mis- 
sile over thc last two years has pro- 
vided the margm of victory-far the 
administration in keeping the pro- 
gram alive. 

“We decided this emotional issue 
; has divided us long enough," said 
one Democrat too has .worked 
with the different factions on the 
latest .agreement. “We don’t need 
' io prolo^ the agony.” Tbe agree- 
nsent would entau. conasskms on 
both sides. : = 

Some past supporters of the mis- 
sile have agreed to break with the 
administra tion and to famt the de- 
ptoymem to 40 m^siles through 
leguilatioD. 

. In turn, some MX aides have 
agreed to accept production of a 
few missiles a -year, abandoning 
their insistence that the productkai . 
lines be shm down. 

The idea of limiting the ultimate' 
force to 40 missiks and building a 
A few spares each year is swUar to a 
f Senate plan promoted -by four 
Democrats lea by Senator Sam 
Nmm of Georsb. : 

' The MX, winch stands for mis- 
ale experimental, is a 96-ton (86- 
mctric tan) interccattmcatal missile 
that can tarry : 10 waihesds aimed 
at separate iatgjrts. Plans call fra 
deploying it in existing Mmuteman 
sDos. : 

Congress has approyed produc- 
(Coothmed «» P^e^GoL S) 


EVSIDE 

lbnd bribed Christians fieo- 

■ jpg battles in Lebanon to safl to 
a port north of.Bdnit Fage Z 

■ Chinese offidUs, hoping; to 
lure tourists, have allowed golf 
mmake a oomebacL iji tgtS. 

svsn^^FmNCE 

■ Sieutens AG rf West Germa- 
ny said world group profit 
jumped 56 percent in the Gist 
W of focal 1985. Page 13.. ■ 

SPEOAL REPORT 

■ The GooW Sale: . Did ail. the 
. promotion backfire? Arts' and 
;Antigms.;: ; .; ^.:;; ;pagt9. ' 

'■ r.-V- MONDAY 


His spokesman, Larry Speakes, 
said the prerident believed he bad 
co m p r ran i sed enough on defense. 

“We may be able to turn it 
arotmd in tne ftial resoluticni of the 
matter" said Mr. Speakes, raterat- 
mg comments of senate Republi- 
can leaders. 

' On a 51-to-48 vote Thursday , the 

~ ftmaft*. mfftd tn retiiuv. the fldmtnfg - 

tratkra’s mib tary buildup by $17.7 
billion, over the next three yen£. 
holdiug the 1986 rise in Pentagon 
spemfing to the inflation rate.- 

Freadrat Reagan originally re- 
quested a. 6-percent increase over 
the' rate of rnffatkai for next year. 
He later compronrised with Senate 
Rcpublkan leaden on a 3-pcrcem 
after-inflation increase. 

■ Under .the action taken Friday. 
'Medicare and Medicaid funds 
•would be cot $17.5 bflliaa over the 
next three years, instead of the 
S20.1 billion proposed in the ad- 
ministrafiOD-backed budget plan. 

Medicare premiums for out-pa- 
tient treatment would rise begin- 
ning in 1987 under Friday’s action, 
but by 5 percent instead of tire 10 
peroent sought by the adnrimstra- 
tioo. In addition, states would be 
required to take over a smaller pro- 
poroonate share of Medicaid ex- 
penses, tinder Friday's action. 

*T hope the presideni will under- 
stand,” the Senate majority leader; 
Robert I.' Dote of Kansas, said af- 
ter Thursday's defense spending 
vote. He said he had . done tire best 
&t could to ny:to wi n ^ proiwFof 
Mr" Reagan’S prqxBaf'defeosc 
spending levds. 

Tlte Senate abo voted Tluasdi^ 
night, 79rto-17, to recommend cre- 

(Coothwed on Page 5, Col 4) 


Dollar Advances 
]hlLSa Trading 

, The Associated Press 

f : NEW: YORK — The dollar 
r advanced stnmdy in light New 
York trading rriday, unde- 
terred by aladduster economic 
report and a decline in UJ5. 
interest rates. 

.-."nit Federal Reserve Board, 
said that index measuring 
the dollar against 10 other cur- 
rencies rose 1.5 percent cm Fri- 
day. bricking its gams since 
April 18 to 72 percent Prior to 
the rebound, the dollar had' 
. tumbled 12.4ncrcaii from Feb. 
25 to April 18. 

The British pound fell 
against the dollar^ slipping to 
S 1 . 1 970 from. 5 1 21 65 Tate 
Thursday inNcw Yonk- - 

Dollar rates, in New York, 
compared with late rates Thurs- 
day, included: 3,2305 Deutsche 
maids, up from 3.1780; 2,7150 
Swiss franca, up from 2,6675, 
and 9.835 French francs, up 
from -9.690. 


Bonn 


. l > . /- " 



eeks 


Compromise on Trade 


Iht Aiaodotai fVsa 

Leaders who are participating in tbe Western economic summit in Boongalhered for a 
group photograph on Friday. From left are Jacques Ddors, the president of the European 
Commission, Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of Italy, Presadent Francois Mitterrand of 
France, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of Britain, Presadent Ronald Reagan of die 
United States, Prime Minister Yasubiro Nakasone of Japan and Prime Minister Brian 
Muboney of Canada. Tbe host, Chancellor Hehnut Kohl of West Germany, is not visible. 

Dispute Over Reagan’s Remarks 

Bonn Affirms Comment on Collective Guilt; U.S. Denies It 


By Bernard Weinraub 

time York Tima Service 
BONN — A dispute has Hup led 
in Boon over, reported comments 
by President Ronald Reagan, who 
was quoted by a West German gov- 
ernment spokesman as having said 
be “regretted" that some Ameri- 
cans believed in German collective 
guilt for the murder of six million 
Jews. 

At one point Larry Speakes, the 
White House spokesman, vehe- 
mently denied that Mr. Reagan had 
nude the comment 
The West German spokesman, 
Peter Boenisch, said that Mr. Rear 
gan had expressed this view in an 
hourlong meeting with the West 
German chancellor, Helmut Kohl 
“He never said that,” Mr. 
Speakessaid. * 

West German officials, told Of 
Mr, Speakers remarks,' reiterated 
that Mr. Reagan had made the 

comment. 

By early Thursday evening, with 
the start of the 11 th economic sum- 


mit of Western nations here, the 
U.S.-West German dispute was ex- 
tended to a n oth e r U.S. official, 
Richard R. Burt, the assistant sec- 
retary of slate for European affairs. 

Administration officials conced- 
ed Thursday night that the contro- 

Some former Waffen SS men, 
less defensive than before, hold 
a three-day meeting. Page 2. 

versy over Mr. Reagan's scheduled 
Sunday visi to a Germany military 
cemetery had virtually dwarfed the 
economic summit mwtfinp, on the 
UB. side. 

In an apparent effort to quiet the 
uproar over Mr. Reagan's plans io 
lay a wreath at the cemetery, rela- 
tives of Germans who actively op- 
posed Hitler and the Nazis are be- 
ing included in the ceremony, a. 
West Gentian government spokes- 
man said Thursday. 

Tbe West German spokesman, 
Mr. Boenisch, said that among 
those who would attend the cere- 


mony would be -Colon el Berthold 
von Siauffenben^ son of Claus von 
Stauffenberg. a German Army offi- 
cer who tried to assassinate Hitler 
in July 1944. Claus von Siauffen- 
berg was executed soon after the 
assassination attempt. 

Beyond ihat. and amid the em- 
barrassment of U.S. officials, it was 
plain that Mr. Reagan's and Mr. 
Kohl's “reconciliation’' efforts 
have now evolved into a chain of 
pnWic misunderstandings between 
the United States and West Ger- 
many on the night the summit gath- 
ering began. 

Mr. Boenisch said that Mr. Rea- 
gan “mentioned that the United 
States and its allies had already in 
the Nuremberg tribunals turned 
away from the idea of a collective 
guilt of the German people.” 
—The 'West-’German- spokesman- 
said that Mr. Reagan told Mr. Kohl 
that he “regretted that new tones 
were emerging that give the ideas as 

(Continued on Page 2, CbL 1} 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — The seven-nation 
Bonn economic summit, dead- 
locked over trade and monetary 
issues, sought compromise solu- 
tions Friday to overcome obstacles 
to global trade talks promoted by 
tbe United States. 

In the meantime, the partici- 
pants — the United States and its 
six major Western allies — issued a 
political declaration giving firm 
backing to U.S. positions at arms 
talks with tbe Soviet Union. 

On the economic front. Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand of 
France firmly opposed the U.S. ad- 
ministration's strong desire to be- 
gin global trade negotiations early 
u 1986 on the grounds that such 
talks must be adequately prepared 
and should include the developing 
countries, many of which are either 
lukewarm or opposed to the talks. 
They would be conducted under 
the auspices of the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade; a 
90-member body based in Geneva. 

But compromise proposals on 
trade and monetary reform issues 
surfaced Friday afternoon. Likely 
to be negotiated throughout the 
night before the end of the summit 
on Saturday, they raised the possi- 
bility that the s ummi t, which earli- 
er appeared headed for failure, 
might prove to be a partial success. 

“There is room for negotiating 
but it is too early to say what might 
result,” Michd Vauzeue, Mr. Mit- 
terrand's spokesman, said late Fri- 
day. 

However, Mr. Vauzdle appeared 
to rule out any possibility that the 
French leader might agree to set- 
ting a date for the beginning of the 
trade mlks as tbe Reagan adminis- 
tration is seeking. 

Mr. Mitterrand could stop tbe 
summit from endorsing a definite 
date because decisions at such 
meetings must be unanimous. He 
was supported in his opposition by 
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of 
Italy and Jacques Deters, his for- 
mer finance minister who is attend- 
ing tbe summit as president of tbe 
European Commission. 

- Both Mr> Craxi and Mr. Delore 
bave~told' the snmnut'thaC' while 
they support the idea of starting 
new trade liberalization negotia- 
tions, they want them to proceed in 
parallel with reform of the mone- 


tary system, with a view to estab- 
lishing greater stability in world 
currency markets and greater influ- 
ence over monetary questions by 

What is the economic rhetoric of 
this summit and what does it 
portend? Page 13. 

the International Monetary Fund. 
The Reagan administration has re- 
peatedly rejected these suggestions. 

Mr. Mitterrand told other sum- 
mit participants that European 


Community uade ministers, in a 
joint declaration on March 19. sup- 
ported tbe starting or the trade 
talks, but declined to set a date. 

“That remains the European po- 
sition whatever some may say.** an- 
other French official said. 

In their first meeting on econom- 
ic issues, the other leaders — Ron- 
ald Reagan. Helmut Kohl of West 
Germany, Margaret Thatcher of 
Britain, Yasuhiro Nakasone of Ja- 

(Coatinued on Page 2, CW. 4) 


U.S. Won’t 'Go It Alone’ 
OnSDl , Reagan Pledges 


By Hedrick Smith 

New Jtvi Times Service 

BONN — President Ronald 
Reagan, promoting Western sup- 
port for his space arms program, 
has pledged not to “go it alone” 
and deride on deployment without 
consulting UJL allies and holding 
discussions with the Soviet Union. 

In a series of individual meetings 
with British, French, West German 
and Japanese leaders hours before 
the seven-nation economic summit 
conference began Thursday, the 
president encountered a lukewarm 
response to the US. proposal that 
other industrialized Western na- 
tions take part in the research pro- 
gram on developing a space-based 
missile defense system. 

From Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
Mr. Reagan received strong expres- 
sions of interest of West German 
involvement in the research effort. 
But both President Francois Mit- 
terrand of France and Prone Min- 
ister Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan 
shied away from signing up for the 
project at this stage. 

After the French-American talks 
Thursday, Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz, asked whether 
Mr. Mitterrand had shown interest 
in joining tbe research effort, re- 
plied, “I didn't see any indication 
they intended to.” The French have 
begun promoting the idea that Eu- 
ropeans should work together cm 
nonmilitary research rather than 
joining the Reagan plan. 

Another top American official 
quoted Mr. Nakasone as saying the 
Japanese were “understanding" 
about the president's intention to 


pursue the program, but were still 
“studying” Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger's proposal for 
American allies to take part in it 

Mr. Kohl in apparent enthusi- 
asm for the project, said that he was 
receptive to it and that be wanted 
to tiy to achieve a joint European 
approach on cooperating with 
Washington. 

But Mr. Shultz, summing up tbe 
day’s conversations, was more cau- 
tious about the prospects. “Some 
want to participate in it; others are 
studying it; others probably 
won't.” be said. 

Reassuring the Japanese prime 
minister. Mr. Reagan appeared to 
go further than before in pledging 
as one American participant put it, 
that “we don't intend to go it alone 
as far as deployment is concerned” 
and make a derision on deploy- 
ment without the “closest of con- 
sultations with our allies” and 
without negotiations and discus- 
sions with the Soviet Union. 

Peter Boenisch, Mr. Kohl’s 
spokesman, said that Mr. Reagan's 
Strategic Defense Initiative had 
been the primary topic of the one- 
hour meeting between the chancel- 
lor and Mr. Reagan. 

He said Mr. Kohl had told Mr. 
Reagan that “without any ifs, ands 
or bats, we consider the research 
justified on SDL” but that so long 
as there was “no substitute for de- 
terrence, there should be no lessen- 
ing of security.” This was apparent- 
ly an allusion to German appeals 
for Washington to continue its reli- 
ance on offensive nuclear weapons 
for several years to come. 


Siege of Stalingrad Continues to Haunt Soviet life 


By Dusko Dodcr 

Washington Past Service 

VOLGOGRAD, U.&SA — Forty years 
after its end, World War II remains a haunt- 
ing presence in Soviet life. But there are few 
places where its presence seems so aU-em- 
braring and overpowering as in this Volga 
River city, the site of the fateful battle erf 
Stalingra d 

It is brae that one begins to comprehend 
the almost mystical hold the war has an the 
hearts and minds of the Russians. In the 
struggle for a 70-square-mik {18&«qnare- 
kilometer) slice of territory, more than one 
million combatants and rivflians died in a 
single battle m 1942-43 that lasted 138 days. 

The battle of Stalingrad remains an ap- 
palling memory — appalling in a manner few 
Americans can understand — in the way war 
can be when it is fought in your own town, 
outside your own windows, in your back- 
yard. 

It was a battle that turned the tide of the 
war on the Eastern Front in Europe, tians- 
fonned tbe Rod Army from victims to purai- 
ers of the German Wefarmacht and ultimate- 
ly brought Soviet power into Poland, 
Hungary, Czechoslovakia and eastern Ger- 


many, altering, perhaps forever, the map of 
Europe. 

Yet here, too, is a good place to observe 
how the painful memories are blurred by 
Moscow’s tendency to mold hisiory to its 
own purposes and to use the victory of 1945 
to explain its behavior in 198 5. 

A huge statue of Mother Russia, about 260 
feet (78 meters) high and waving a sword. 


The. war also seems to be exploited for 
menu immediate purposes. 

Its memory helps justify today’s huge soli- 
tary expenditures by emphasizing the theme 
“never again,” a reference to tbe lack <rf 
Soviet military preparedness in 1940. 

Similarly, the Soviet stance at the current 
Geneva arms talks with the United 
States is based partly on Moscow's view that 


Painful memories are blurred by Moscow’s tendency to 
mold history to its own purposes. 


dominates this dty from a h2L More than 
three milli on tourists come here annually to 
view the monument and the panorama of the 

Stalingrad battle. 

The authorities appear to nurture the 
memories of wax because they appeal to the 
Russian sense of ^patriotism and at the same 
time legitimize Soviet power. The snuggle 
against Hitler was a unifying experience far a 
country that was sabjectm to Stahnist terror, 
forced cdlectivaations and the gulags. 

Yet patriotism seems to be only a part of 
the answer. 


Hitler attacked because he was convinced 


KremKn leaders vow they will never again be 
pot into a position of real or perceived inferi- 

Thtehoge ^^ties^^^rtructitm also 
provide a tacit explanation far other current 
shortcomings, particularly in tbe economic 
sphere. Most people are told — and believe 
— that life here would have been better and 
vastly different bad it cot been for the war. 

Finally, remembrances of things past seem 
to provide some justification for the contin- 


«ErSS£S¥s! 700 , 000 Alien Workers 


ena 


rjriteni.tixy.meel 


The Associated Press 

LAGOS r— Ntgeria began Fri- 
day its second mass expulsion of 
illegal immigrants since 1983, 
opening its headers to let oat an 
estimated 700,000 aliens, Lagos 
Radio saitL- 

Tbe ill^ ^icas, most from 
orighbortng West African states, 
were to be driven to the borders in 
Interim Ministry vdudns, or al- 
lowed to buy kufine tickets with 
Nigerian currency, 'the radio said. 
Ordinarily, foreigners must pay in 
foreigncurreticy.' 

' A deadline of May 10 was set tor 
the inunigrants to leave. 

. Nigeria attracted millions of mi- 
grant workers during the boom in 
oil prices in the late 1970s and early 
I9SGs but began deporting them 
when priira dropped. In January 
1983 it expelled about two mfllion 
illegal resKkati'Moa were, from 
Ghana and Niger. - 

This, time, This Nigerian military 
govwomeni appeared to be (tying 
tosmooththe passage. 

The permanent secretary of the 
Interior Ministry, Alhaji Saidu 
Bardejnwt with envoys of 11 West 
African ctwntries on Thursday to 
^jswss the ' ejiodus. He. said his 
mmbnys^ ^ offices wouW be. open 
round , the - dock tb enable aliens 


either to obtain residence permits 
or to arrange thrir departure. .. 

Mr. Baroc appealed to Nigerians 
to treat tbe aliens “with every cour- 
tesy and understanding, and to 
-avoid taking advantage of the pre- 
sent situation to exploit their 
brothers and sisters who are leaving 
the country.” 

Nigeria dosed its. hod borders 
with its four immediate neighbors 
— Benin. Niger, Chad and Camer- 
oon — in April 1984 when anew 
currency was introduced as part of 
a campaign to stamp out corrup- 
tion. 

The aim was to prevent money 
that had bees smuggled out of. the 
country from being brought bade 
to be exchanged for the new cur- - 
rency. 

.. The army overthrew the elected 
government of Sbehu Shagari on' 
Dec. 31, 1983. It has since sen- 
tenced several Shagari officials to 
prison toons of more than 20 years 
forcomjptibm 

. On Friday, immigration officials 
searched the departing immigrants 
for food items and Nigerian cur- 
rency. 

. Returnees were b eing aDowed to 
take paly 20 naira ($22 ) out of the. 
country. Many complained that it 
would not be enough money to get 
them home. . 



Taylor G. Wang, floating in space, repairs 


UwAamMPr*M 

a fluid dynamics experiment. 


ued regimentation of society, for frequent 
“vigilance'’ campaigns against foreign sub- 
version and, in a broad sense, for Moscow’s 
“peace" policy. 

For Pyotr Makarov, 79, of Volgograd, the 
war seems to have ended yesterday; ois dead 
friends and colleagues seem very much alive. 

Mr. Makarov was among the defenders of 
a 300- foot-wide strip of land along the Vol- 
ga, the Soviet-held sliver of Stalingrad that 
prevented Hitler from claiming victory and 
served as a beachhead for the Soviet on- 
slaught on Field Marshal Friedrich von Pau- 
lus’s army when it became crapped in the 
dty. The last German forces surrendered on 
Feb. 2, 1943. 

According to a 1985 issue of a Soviet 
military encyclopedia, the Germans suffered 
840,000 dead or wounded in the battle. The 
Russians took 330,00 prisoners of war. 

How many Russians died in the battle is 
still a secret In a census conducted 28 days 
after the battle ended, according to Mr. Ma- 
karov, only 14 persons were discovered living 
in the city, whose population in 1941 was 
400,000. Until 1950, be said, “we were clear- 
ing the dty from corpses.” 

Yet, in almost the same breath, Mr. Ma- 
(Contmoed on Page 2, CoL 1) 


2 Experiments 
Are Revived on 
Shuttle Mission 

The Associated Press 
HOUSTON — The astro- 
nauts aboard the Ui>. space 
shuttle Challenger revived Fri- 
day two experiments that had 
been given up for lost and start- 
ed the second half of their eight- 
day scientific mission with 13 of 
15 research instruments in 
working order. 

Following instructions from 
the ground, (hey brought a 
complex cosmic ray detector 
experiment to life by doing 
some rewiring and reprogram- 
ming. 

The crew that launches with 
broken equipment brings back 
good equipment," said the pi- 
lot, Colonel Frederick D. Greg- 
ory, as tike device suddenly 
starting given off agnals. 

Ten bours earlier, Taylor G- 
Wang repaired a fluid dynamics 
experiment that also had been 
dead since the beginning of the 
fiighL He spent 2# days rewir- 
ing around a short dram. 

The device is designed to sus- 
pend drops of fluid and then 
cause them to move by the use 
of sound waves. The findings 
could determine the practicality 
of using contain erless process- 
ing techniques in space for 
making exotic alloys. 


PokmdExpeb 
2 Diplomats; 
U.S. Ejects 4 

The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — Poland an- 
nounced Friday that it was expel- 
ling two U5. diplomats whom it 
accused of taking part in an illegal 
demonstration. In retaliation, the 
United States decided to expel four 
Polish officials, UB. officials said. 

Customarily, diplomats are ex- 
pelled on a one-for-one basis. Ex- 
pelling four Poles was seen as an 
expression erf strong U.S. distaste 
for tbe Communist government's 
action in Warsaw. 

The two Americans. David Hop- 
per and William Harwood, were 
accused Friday of hindering the 
process of Polish stabilization and 
given seven days to leave 
Identities of the Polish diplomats 
to be expelled were not immediate- 
ly known. 

The State Department said the 
U.S. Embassy “vigorously protest- 
ed” and categorically rejected “the 
ludicrous allegations” of tbe Polish 
Foreign Ministry. 

“We can only assume that the 
Polish government is trying to cov- 
er up abuse of diplomatic person- 
nel.'' said Edward Djerejian, a 
State Department spokesman. He 
denied Polish charges that the 
Americans were taking part in an 
illegal pro- Solidarity May Day pa- 
rade in Krakow. 

A senior Polish official had 
charged that the two diplomats 
were part of an orchestrated U.S. 
effort to strengthen domestic oppo- 
sition to tbe government. 

Tbe U.S. Embassy in Warsaw 
called the Polish allegations “com- 
pletely erroneous” and stud the two 
officials were “performing normal 
diplomatic functions as observers 
of events.” 

Tbe U.S. Embassy statement 
said that when the two Americans 
showed their diplomatic identity 
cards to police, one of them was 
“pushed, struck, kicked and 
forced” into an unmarked vehicle. 

On Thursday, two leading activ- 
ists of the outlawed Solidarity 
union — Jacek Kuion and Seweryn 
Jaworski — were ordered impris- 
oned for three months for partid- 
paling in an fflegal but peaceful 
May Day march in Warsaw. Mr. 
Kuron is Poland’s leading di«kfrnt 
intellectual, and Mr. Jaworski is a 
local Solidarity leader. 

Both Mr. Kuron and Mr. 
Jaworski, who were released from 
prism in August undo- a govern- 
ment amnesty, had pleaded not 

guilty to charges that they “refused 

to leave an illegal gathering,” 










Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATCRDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


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SS Yets Seem to Take Heart 


Reagan’s Bitburg Visit lifts Spirits at Annual Gathering 


By John Tagliabue 

Sent >«nt Times Service 

NESSELWANG, West Germa- 
ay — They stood relaxed, shaking 
hands, introducing wives, these 
men of Germany’s dark past, iook- 


“We were soldiers like all the 
soldiers in the war, and 1 think 
that's what the president is trying 
to say," said Geid Hofer. 77. a SS 
veteran and a native of Graz in 
Austria. “You have to congratulate 


ing forward to a three-day mating your president. When he says yes. 


oariahs of West Ger- c®, “ but *** shows w * re so1 " campaigns that often led to the 
fbrthrir record of d * eis ’ j 051 the others. I never jjifing of large numbers of rivil- 

r j ,u„ committed a war crime, and I don t j an c 


that began here Tb 

The Hotel Krone, in this Swabi- 
an ski resort, where about 250 vet- 
erans of the Waffen SS Death's 
Head Division have gathered, is 
closed to outriders. But the veter- 
ans, in the loden coats of postwar 
German prosperity, are more re- 
laxed, less defensive 

Long the 
man society 
atrocity and brutality daring the 
Third Radi, this year they are re- 
turning reporters' telephone calls 
and talking, quietly, assuredly, over 
beer, in the bars of the Nesselwang 
hotels where they flee unusual May 
snowfalls. 

Conversations with the veterans 
leave no doubt that President Ron- 
ald Reagan’s insistence on going to 
Bitburg, despire an ornery from 
U.S. veterans' groups and Jewish 
organizations, has made them feel 
better about their role in history. 


he means yes. 

In response to a reporter's ques- 
tion about whether he felt rehabili- 
tated by the president's gesture, Jo- 
han Rosenberg. 63. a Death's Head 
veteran, said, “I can only say he is a 
real straight guy." 

“It took a long time,” he went 


According to George H. Stein, a 

U.S. historian and author of the 
book “The Waffen SS; Hi tier’s 
Elite Guard at War." the Death’s 
Head Division was set up as a com- 
bat force in 1939 around a group of 
about 6,500 former concentration 
camp guards. Its commander until 
bis death in 1943 was Theodor 
Eicke, who beaded the entire con- 
centration camp system starting in 
1934. 

Besides their fierce fighting at 
the front. Death's Head soldiers 
were particularly involved in hunt- 
ing partisans in Eastern Europe, in 


committed i 
know anyone who did. We didn't 
have time for that sort of thing. Our 
guys were disciplined, and we were 
too busy fighting." 

Officials with the Reagan party 
in Bonn, asked to respond to the SS 
veterans’ remarks, aid not return 
telephone calls from reporters. 

The veterans insist the units of 
the Waffen SS were fighting anils, 
distinct from the uniformed bands 
that ran Nazi Germany's extermi- 
nation camps. 


tans. 

Asked about these charges. Mr. 
Rosenberg replied: "Sure, there 


was maybe one in a thousand guys 
But 


Bonn Affirms, U.S. Denies 
Remark on Collective Guilt 


(Continued from Page 1) 
if there were a collective guilt of the 
German people." 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz said be had not heard these 
words, although Mr. Shultz said 
that he had not attended the entire 
meeting. 

Early in (he day, Mr. Reagan was 
warmly praised by the West Ger- 
man federal president, Richard von 
Weizsficker, for his “courage" in 
persisting in his plan to visit the 
Bitburg cemetery, where 49 Waffen 
SS troopers are buried. Mr. Kohl 
then thanke d Mr. Reagan for send- 
ing “a very powerful message” in 
deciding to proceed with the visit. 

At the same time, Mr. Kohl told 
Mr. Reagan that "all the Goman 
people know what be has endured 
in recent weeks." 

Mr. Kohl said that he under- 
stood as a politician how "difficult 
it is to swim against the tide." 

But the warm comments in the 
morning were overshadowed later 
in the day by the dispute about Mr. 
Reagan’s comments to Mr. KohL 

At one point, Mr. Burt stalked 
out of a briefing with reporters who 
had badgered him about the issue. 
Later in the day, a Bom govern- 
ment official complained that Mr. 
Bun had “turned West German 
policy on its head” because of a 
quote he attributed to Mr. KohL 

The events began when Mr. 
Boenisch said that Mr. Reagan had 
told Mr. Kohl that he “regretted 
that new tones were emerging that 
gave the idea is if there was a 
collective guilt of the German peo- 


ple." The comment was reportedly 
made in Mr. Reagan’s hourlong 
meeting Thursday morning with 
Mr. Kohl at the Federal Chancel- 
lery bene. 

Mr. Boenisch said that Mr. Rea- 
gan and Mr. Kohl agreed that the 
U-S. president's visit “marks for us 
not only the end of (be war and the 
end of Nazi barbarity, but also the 
beginning of a new partnership and 
friendship." 

He said, "The former foes have 
become friends and tins friendship 
has in many ways proven itself/ 


I don’t recall thep resident say- 
. Shultz. 


Bomb Explodes in Cologne 

The Associated Press 


COLOGNE — A bomb explod- 
ed before dawn Friday at a French 
firm that repairs computers for the 
West German Army, causing con- 
siderable damage but injuring no 
ofie, police said. 


ing that," said Mr 

Meanwhile, Mr. Burt became in- 
volved in a parallel controversy 
while conducting a background 
briefing with reporters. 

At one point a remark by Mr. 
Burt stirred laughter, and he said. 
This is serious stuff." Moments 
later, Mr. Burt said that Mr. Kohl 
told Mr. Reagan that "we must 
never forget and we can never for- 
give and that he understood." 

A reporter shouted: “Who, who 
could he never . . 

Another reporter said: “He can 
never forgive?" 

A third reporter said. The U.S. 
press." 

The comment stirred laughter. 
Mr. Burt said, “Goodbye,” and 
walked ouL 

Later, Mr. SpeaJces said that Mr. 
Burt had stalked out of the briefing 
“because you were all snickering 
and malting fun of a serious state- 
ment-" 

Mr. Burt is scheduled to be 
named ambassador to Bonn. His 
comment that Mr. Kohl had said, 
“We must never forget and we can 
never forgive" immediately stirred 

other administration officials to ex- 
plain that Mr. Kohl was essentially 
saying that Germans understood 
that some people could never for- 
give, them for World War II and the 
Holocaust 


who did something wrong, 
show me the army where that 
doesn't happen. Show me the divi- 
sion records of the Americans, the 
French or the Russians — and I 
mean the real records. No one ever 
said war was nice." 

Hitler set up the SS — for 
SchutzstaffeL or guard anil — in 
the 1 920s as a ragtag bodyguard to 
protect Nazi leaders in street 
marches and sometimes turbulent 
demonstrations. Its real impor- 
tance, however, began in 1929 with 
the appointment of Heinrich 
Himmler, then 29. as its leader. 

Under Himmler (be SS grew rap- 
idly, assuming many police func- 
tions and gaining a reparation for 
ruthlessness. With the outbreak of 
World War II, its combat arm, the 
Waffen SS, was forged into crack 
rank and infantry divisions. 

Civil rights groups and Jewish 
or ganiza tions, riling the Nurem- 
berg war crimes tribunal, which 
branded the SS a “criminal organi- 
zation." and subsequent West Ger- 
man legiriarinn Hanning the USC of 
signs and symbols relating to Na- 
zism. have bounded the veterans, 
making their annual gatherings the 
targets of violent demonstrations in 
recent years. 

The meeting of the Death's Head 
Division, which ends Sunday, the 
day Mr. Reagan visits Bitburg. is to 
be followed By a comparable gath- 
ering of veterans from the First SS 
Panzer Corps, consisting of the 
Adolf Hitler Bodyguard and the 
12th SS Panzer Division, the “Hit- 
ler Youth," on May 1 1-11 

The town council of Nesselwang. 
population 3.000. has distanced it- 
self from the meetings: the town's 
Catholic priest has condemned 
them and refused to allow the vet- 
erans to lay a wreath at a local 
cemetery. A local political action 
group has sprung up to oppose the 
gatherings, and labor unions, with 
the support of several political 
groupings, plan a protest rally in 
the town. 

This enraged the men from the 
old soldiers' organization. 

The Zionists stop ax nothing.” 
Mr. Hofer said. “But the president 
is an honest man. He made his 
decision, and he sticks to it" 

There were anecdotes about the 
fubrer, usually in a lone of subdued 
reverence. “My proudest moment 
as an SS man," Mr. Hofer related, 
“was when I stood guard outside 
his hotel room in Leipzig, in 1941." 

“He was such a modest man," he 
said, with a slight, fleeting modula- 
tion in time. There were six of us. 
He would come out, take you by 
the arm, chat with you." 



WORLD BRIEFS 


OB I Mediterranean 


ETA Claims 5 Bombings in Spain 

ALICANTE. Spain (AP) — A bomb end ‘ ‘ 

beach and four others exploded in the Spanish 

on the second day ci a what appeared to be ft bomfcg awp.;^ 
Basque separatist organization, ETA. . ’ - “ J 

No one was injured in the blasts that damped * discotheque, two car 
rental agencies and an auto cm a raDroad car, polioe said. The bombings 
occurred in San Sebasti&n, Vitoria and Beasahi. ABoOtt hombomloded 
on die beach of Alicante in southeastern Spain. On Thursday, bombs 
exploded harmlessly on beaches at Valencia and Benkkam. two of 
Spain's most popular Mediterranean resort cities. 

Shortly before the Alicante explosion, a mas identifying himself as as 
ETA member, called a radio station and announced the beach bombing. 
He also said that ETA. which stands for Basque Homeland and Liberty, 
was responsible for Thursday’s explosions, the radio reported On Friday, 
telephone callers claimed the day s bombing* in the Basque country foe 
the ETA. The separatist group dedared last wedc that it would begin a 
bombing campaign against tourist centers aimed si pressuring the gov. 
eminent to grant independence to the Basque country: 



H 


l: 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, Britain's foreign secretary, turned photographer at the Bonn econom- 
ic summi t on Friday. Looking on were, left to right. Finance Minister Michael Wilson of 
r«twHn and Japan’s finance and foreign ministers, Noborn Takeshita and Shin taro Abe. 


Bonn Summit Seeks Trade Solution 


(Continued from Page 1) 
pan and Brian Mulroney of Cana- 
da — ag reed that (he tr ade ialk< 

should begin early in 1986. Later, 
there were some signs that the U.S. 
administration was prepared to ac- 
cept the fact that the summit would 
not endorse the 1986 date. The tim- 
ing was sought by Mr. Reagan and 
his advisers as a means of counter- 
ing protectionist pressures in Con- 
gress. 

A U.S. official said, “By pointing 
to a specific dale, we could go to 
the protectionist lobbies and say: 
*we will obtain trade liberalization 
through GATT negotiations next 
year, so hold off on protectionist 
moves.’” 

A sign that the administration 
was preparing to accept a partial 
failure was reflected by a senior 
U-S. official's comment to report- 
ers Thursday evening. “I wouldn't 
want to call it a make-or-break is- 


sue," he said, noting that prepara- 
tory work on the trade talks had 
already begun under GATT aus- 
pices. * 

The same official said Friday: 
“It's not the end of the world if we 
don’t get iL" 

The compromise proposal, asde- 


a meeting would resemble the 
meeting recently suggested by 
Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 
3d, conference sources said. 

"AD compromises are an the ta- 
ble," Mr. Vauzefle said, confirming 
the UiL proposaL 
A declaration about the 40th an- 


UN Starts New Plan for Boat People s 

BANGKOK (AP) — The UN refugee agency began a resettlement 
program tins week that it femes wiQ encourage ship captains to rescue 
more Vietnamese boat people in the Gulf of Thauand and the South i 
China Sea. 

The office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees sad fignrcs 
show merchant ships have increasingly ignored refugees m distress. It 
said ships c# only IS countries recued refugees last year, daws fuDU&in 
1981. The percentage of boat refugees rescued last year dropped to 8 
percent of all arrivals in the first asylum countries, down from percent 
in 1980. - 

reseirie/232 Vietnamese. Rescue at sea places Harden oocamtrics 
whose ships pick up people because nations of first asylum is die region 
generally require resettlement guarantees before they allow the refugees 
to disembark. The new plan distributes the burden among a 'poo? of 
countries. 




Legionnaire’s Disease Kflfe 27 in UJL 


railed by Mr. Vauzelle. called for a niversary of the end of World War 
high-level meeting of officials to II con tained the support for U.S. 


examine what consensus exists for 
starting new trade negotiations, 
both among industrialized and de- 
veloping countries. He did not cite 
a date or a place, and emphasized 


positions at the recently resumed 
arms talks in Geneva. 

The three-page statement -« W ; 
The partnership of North Ameri- 
ca, Europe and Japan is a guaran- 


ST AFFORD, England (Renters) — The fust roqpr outbreak of Le- 
gionnaire's disease in Britain was confirmed Friday after 27 people died 
m what doctors bad been treating as an influenza epidemic. 

A spokesman for Mid-Staffordshire Health Authority in central En- 
gland said that 12 cases of the disease had been identified among die 27 
people who died and 70 who havebeen infected. ■ 

Legionnaire's disease, a form of pne umonia, was first recognized in 
1976 m the United Slates when 29 persons died from an outbreak at an 
American Legion convention in 1 


that France would vigorously resist tee of peace and stability in the 
any efforts to include the EC agri- world." 
cultural policy in the trade liberal- U.S. officials described the sup- 
ization talks, as some governments port as encouraging. The sta temen t 
have already planned. said that the summit leaders “ap- 

M can while, U.S. officials were predate the positive proposals of 
said to have proposed a meeting to the United States of America" and 
examine monetary reform steps “urge the Soviet Union to act posi- 
that would be held in Paris at the lively and constructively to achieve 
end of this year, or early 1986. Such significant agreements there." 


Hundreds in U.S. Protest Apartheid 


NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of anti-apartheid protester? briefly 
held a South African diplomat behind a barricade ft! Harvard University, 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts, while rallies in two other states resulted m 
e arrest of m 


Israeli Army Aids Fleeing Christians 


United Press International 


HAIFA Israel — Three private- 
ly owned Lebanese ships docked 
here Friday, took on about 800 
Christian refugees and left for a 
Christian-held port north of Beirut, 
Israeli military spokesmen said. 

The rescue operation was orga- 
nized by the Israeli Army and in- 
volved ships supplied by the Leba- 
nese Forces, an Israeli-backed 
Christian militia, according to 
sources in Beirut. Israeli military 


Maine Forest Fire Contained 


United Press International 

EDMUNDS. Maine — A four- 
day-old forest fire that decimated 
more than 1,100 acres (445 hect- 
ares) of eastern Maine, including a 
l^rge part of the Moosehora Na- 
tional Wildlife Refuge, was con- 
tained but not under control offi- 
cials said Friday. They said they 
suspected that the fire had been set. 


officers would say only that the 
ships were privately hired. 

The army said that about 800 
Christians, who abandoned their 
homes near the south Lebanese 
port of Sidon as Moslem militia- 
men dosed in. boarded the vessels 
in Haifa after bong transported 
across the border in Israeli civilian 
buses. 

They were among 18,000 Chris- 
tians that the army said had fled to 
Israeli-occupied areas of southern 
Lebanon over the past week 

Israel has said it will not inter- 
vene directly in the sectarian 
ing in Lebanon but is pro vie 
humanitarian aid to the refugees. A 
military spokesman in Tel Aviv 
said there were no plans to ferry 
more refugees, but added, “I cer- 
tainly wouldn't exclude it if the 
need arises .” 

The three ships docked in the 
Haifa harbor early Friday and were 
expected to arrive early Saturday in 


the Christian port of Juoieh. 12 
miles (19 kilometers) north of Bei- 
rut- All the ships flew Lebanese 
flags. 

The refugees had been living for 
the past few days in tents, schools 
and private homes in the 3- to 11- 
mile-wide Israeli-held strip near 
the border with Lebanon. 


the arrest of more than 200 people. 

At Harvard, about 200 students barricaded the door of ft room where n 
South African diplomat was speaking on Thursday until a group of 
campus police led him through the crowd. Abe Hoopenstem, consul- 
general for South Africa in New* Y ork. was escorted to an unmarked car 
about an hour after he was scheduled to. leave, a spokeswoman at 
Harvard said. 

In Berkeley, California, police cited 1 12 demonstrators tor blocking 
public access. In Iowa City, Iowa, 136 protesters were charged with 
criminal trespass after they refused to end a sit-in at the University of 
Iowa president's office. 


U.S. Funds Study of Playboy, Hustler 


Memory of the Battle of Stalingrad Still Haunts Soviet Life 


(Continued from Page I) 
karov asserted that “we would not 
have won without our Communist 
Party; we would not have defeated 
Hitler without our Communist Par- 


ty- 


were joining the party in tfe 
of the battle to be able to 


When reminded that the Com- 
munist Party did not exist when the 
Russians defeated Napoleon, 
whose invading French farces had 
managed to take the Kremlin in 
Moscow, Mr. Makarov quipped: 
“You don't understand. People 
the midst 
die as 

communists." 

Figures, to some extent, illus- 
trate the Russians’ proprietary atti- 
tude toward the war, which they 
regard as their own — the Great 
Patriotic War rather than World 
War II. 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PAms 

AMERICAN CATHEDRAL IN PARIS, 23 Ave. 
George-V, 75008 Paris. The Vary He*, 
lames R. Loo, Deeo. Mi lr a. O no rpe -V or 
Almo-Mcrc*au. Sunday: 9 oa, II ojn. 
Church school and nuriory 1 1 an. WmIc- 
dayt. 12 noon. Tof.: 720.17.9Z 


CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 Rut du 
Vlwm-Colo wb i w. 75006 Pori*. Metr o St.- 
Suipko. Sunday worship in English 9*45 
a.m_. Rev. A. Sanmnvit. Tot: 607.67.0Z 


PASS SUBURBS 

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH. ReuUMal- 
manan. English spooking, O* deno mi no- 
Harts, BMo study: 9,45, worship: 10:45. 56 
Rue Bom-Raisin*. Tel.: 749.15-29. 


EUROPE 

UNlTAIUAN4/NIV0tSAU5T, worship a*J 
activities in Europe. Contact EUU, Steve 
Pick. S er in g stroot 20, 1271 NCHuizen,The 
Netherlands. Tel.: (+31] (0) 2152 55073. 


STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUEL CHURCH near dty center. 
Friendy Christian fellowship. Sunday 1 1 400 . 
Tel.: (OS) 316051. 151 225. 


TRiPOU 

UNION CHURCH OF TRIPOU. P.O. Box 
6397, Andafcis. Tel.: 71468. Friday services 
10,30 o.m. 


To place an advertisement 
in this section 


plane contacts 
Me Efeabetli HERWOOD 
181 Ave. Qi.-Midle, 
92521 NeuiUy Cedes, France. 
TeLi 747.12.65. 


The scope of nationwide destruc- 
tion was enormous, according to 
the encyclopedia's figures, which 
essentially are considered to be cor- 
rect: more than 20 million dead 
and more than 25 mflHon left 
homeless: 1,710 cities and towns 
and more than 70.000 villages ei- 
ther fuQy or partially destroyed; 
more than six million buddings 
completely demolished; more than 

32.000 industrial enterprises and 

99.000 collective farms destroyed. 

At the same time, the Red Army 

destroyed 607 Nazi divisions on the 
Eastern Front (while Anglo-Ameri- 
can forces ‘ destroyed or took pris- 
oner 176 divisions,'’ according to 
the Soviet encyclopedia). The Ger- 
mans suffered more than 75 per- 
cent of their total losses in World 
War II on the Eastern Front — 
losing 10 milli on men, 62,000 air- 
planes, 56,000 tanks and assault 
vehicles, and 180.000 guns and 
mortals. 

And yet, one also can see here 
how the authorities are selective 
about what war memories are nur- 
tured and preserved. 

For example, about 100,000 Ro- 
manian troops fought alongside the 
: of Stain 


Germans in the Battle of Stalin- 


grad, but this fact is missing from 
the encyclopedia accounL 

Romania, a member of the War- 
saw Pact was an ally of the Axis 
powers during the darkest days of 
the war. To recall this apparently is 
politically embarrassing. 

The same goes for Bulgaria, 
which was allied with Hitler until 
1944. An outsider finds it puzzling 
when local television talks about 
the “Soviet and Bulgarian armies 
fighting shoulder to shoulder" in 
World War A while there is hardly 
a mention of US. aid to the Sovid 
Union in 1941 and 1941 

Perhaps the most difficult ques- 
tion — why the Germans were able 
to quickly penetrate all the way to 
Moscow m 1941 — is not discussed 
by Soviet historians. The role of 
Stalin likewise remains unclear, al- 
though he has been rehabilitated in 
the course of the past year as a 
diplomat and military leader. 

Even the name of this city, which 
Nikita S. Khrushchev changed 
from Stalingrad to Volgograd in 
1961 during his de-Sulinization 
campaign, is a point of contention. 
All residents of Volgograd asked 
about its name during a two-day 
visit dedared unequivocally that 


they wanted the name Stalingrad 
restored. The dty council has for- 
mally appealed to Moscow, asking 
that this be done. 

Judging by press accounts deal- 
ing with Stalin, the change win 
come eventually. A Soviet com- 
mentator, Igor Sedikh, recently in- 
terviewed Stalin's En gli sh transla- 
tor, Vladimir Pavlov, who spoke 
about his former chief in glowing 
terms. 

Mr. Pavlov described Stalin as a 
man with a "great sense of humor" 
who was “calm and balanced" al- 
though "occasionally sharp." 

“But one could argue with him, " 
Mr. Pavlov said, “and he was able 
to acknowledge when his interiocu- 


The greatest Russian poet, Push- 
kin, a victim of official persecution 
during his entire adult Life — a man 
who said that living in Russia was 
“like living in a privy" — neverthe- 
less swore that not for anything 
would be consent to change his 
motherland. More than a century 
later, Boris Pasternak viewed as the 
greatest calamity the prospect that 
he might be forced to live abroad 
when he came under vicious criti- 
cism over his Nobel prize for litera- 
ture. 

There seems to be hardly any 
doubL that Russian nationalism 
more than Communist fervor was 
essential in bringing victory over 
Germany in the war. S talin himself 


tor was right, even though he did so acknowledged this when in his Red 

in his own way by keeping silent," ° *■ “ VT ~ ** 

Why do the Russians place such 


enormous emphasis on an event 
that took place such a long time 
ago? 

Viktor Dobrotov, a local journal- 
ist and author who was 16 years old 
at the time of the Stalingrad battle, 
suggested that the answer is the 
“Russian soul" — that is, Russian 

itriotism and attachment to the 


Square speech on Nov. 7, 1941, he 

recalled the ancient Russian saints me army also nas reinforced the 
and heroes rather than l uminari es border with spotlights, floodlights, 


■ Lebanese Protest in Sweden 

About 50 Lebanese took over 

Lebanon's embassy in Stockholm 
on Friday. United Press Interna- 
tional reported, and demanded im- 
mediate action by the Swedish and 
Lebanese governments to “stop the 
bloodbath in southern Lebanon," a 
spokesman for the group said. 

“We will stay here for as long as 
it takes, even as long as a month if 
necessary.'’ the unidentified 
spokesman said. 

■ Beirut Fighting Continues 

Christian and Moslem militia- 
men fought Friday for a sixth 
straight day in Beirut and Dmze 
gunmen dashed with the Lebanese 
Army in nearby mountains. United 
Press International reported from 
Beirut. 

Sniping and barrages of rocket- 
propeDed grenades and mortars 
continued through the day after at 
least three persons were lolled and 
32 others were wounded in over- 
night fighting among waning fac- 
tions. 

The hospital at die American 
University of Beirut was hit by an 
artillery shell but no casualties were 
reported. Shortly before, seven 
shells hit Barbir Hospital, wound- 
ing an employee and damaging 
three floors of the building. 

■ Israel Reinforces Border 

Israeli Army engineers are build- 
ing obstacles to prevent suicide 
bombers from crashing through the 
fence on the border with Lebanon, 
The Associated Press reported mili- 
tary sources saying Fnday in Tel 
Aviv. 

The army also has reinforced the 


WASHINGTON (WP) —The US. Justice Department has approved 
3 S734J71 study of Playboy. Penthouse and Hostler magazines to 
determine whether they play a part in juvenile delinquency or sexual 
exploitation of children. 

According to the Justice Department, issues at particular concern 
include; “Sexual depiction of children With fairy-tale characters and 
themes such as Santa Claus, Dorothy and the Wizard of Dz, Snow White, 
etc." as well as “use of child paraphernalia, inriu&ng teddy bean, hair 
bows, bobby sox and dolls, in cartoons, as wdl as pictures depicting adult 
women as "pseudo children.' r 


•vv. 


# 


The project, which is based at the American University School of 

*n fun-time and a 


Education in W; 
dozen part-time emp 


so far reportedly involves seven 1 


For the Record 


Prime Minister David Lange of New Zealand said Friday that his 

United States. The Reagan administration has artsame defense links to 
protest the La nge government's anti-nuclear policies. (AP) 

Construction of Taman's forth nuclear power phut has been indefi- 
nitely postponed. The government received strong protests from fisher- 
men and legislators in me past month, government officials in Taipei said 
Friday. (AP) 

Minor problems at the Union Carbide pesticide pbni at Institute, West 
Virginia, delayed on Friday the restarting ofproduction of methyl 
isocyanate, the chemical that killed up to 2^00 people in India five 
months ago, a company spokesman said. - (UPI) 

Robert Lada, who was arrested for wandering about the White House 
on Inauguration Day, Jan. 2L was arrested m Denver for fading to , 
appear in a Washington court on an unlawful entry charge. (UPI) 
A request by the Bdgsn foreign master, Leo Tjndemans, to meet 
Solidarity trade union members led to a postponement of an official visit 
planned for this wedc, the official Polish news agency PAP said. (AP) 
The faaffly of a passenger who died when a Sennet fighter shot down a 
Korean Airlines plane in September 1983 will receive $100,000 from the 
airline in a court settlement, a New Brunswick lawyer said. The lawyer 
named him as Raymond Petroski, one of 269 victims. (AP) 

Panama's 13-member cabinet resigned Friday, a presidential statement 
said, adding that the resignations would allow President Nteolfts Ardito 
Bari et la’ 5 government to confront the ehanenyg of "economic, social 
and political development" (AP) 


!M\ 




\ :■ 

l 


:42 


till! 


Britain’s Tories Suffer 


Big Loss in Local Voting 


Suxuien State Panel Threatens 
To Lock Out 80,000 Workers 


The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden's 
state employers organization said 
Friday it would lock out 80,000 
civil servants beginning May 11 in 
response to a strike by 20,000 key 
white-collar workers. 

The Civil Service Employers 
Board said 55,000 teachers would 
be among those affected. 

A 262,000-member white-collar 
union for state employees began a 
selective walkout at noon Thurs- 
day. crippling Swedish shipping, 
halting commercial air traffic and 
and impeding police, postal and 
other key services. 

The union called the strike in a 
quest for an immediate 3. 1-percent 
wage increase that it said would 
bring members’ wages in line with 
salary levels in the private sector. 


The civil service board has offered 
only a 2-percent increase starting 
□ext January. 

The Swedish government has 
said that it will not legislate an end 
to the conflict, as Denmark did last 
- month to end nationwide labor dis- 
turbances there. 

Government officials have esti- 
mated thaL the strike could cost the 
country 1 billion kronor (SI 20 mil- 
lion) a day. The strike is Sweden's 
most serious labor crisis since 1980, 
when about 900.000 workers went 
on strike or were locked out by 
employers. 

In an effort to rearrange its inter- 
national flights. Scandinavian Air- 
lines System has moved its Swedish 
fleet to Oslo and Copenhagen. Last 
month. SAS shifted flights from 
Copenhagen to Stockholm and 
Oslo during the Danish disputes. 


The Russian love of country is 
more akin to a religious faith, devo- 
tion that always has tended to re- 
main unshaken despite the persecu- 
tions that the authorities so often 
have inflicted on individual citi- 
zens- Hardships and other evils tra- 
ditionally made little difference to 
this attitude. 


of Marxism. At (hat time the Ger- 
mans were 20 miles (32 kilometers) 
from die Kremlin and the troops 
taking part in the military parade 
were marched into the battle. 

Rewriting history is an old Rus- 
sian custom. The Great Patriotic 
War, however, is a collective expe- 
rience that does not, at least at mis 
stage, require major rewrites as the 
Russians were victorious. 


more watchiowers and electronic 
warning devices, the sources said. 
In keeping with military regula- 
tions. the sources spoke on condi- 
tion they not be identified. 

One source said there are more 
soldiers guarding the border than 
there were a year ago. and (hat the 
force includes a larger percentage 
of professional soldiers, rather than 
reservists. 


U.S. House Democrats Agree 
On MX Compromise Plan 


Sweden Drops Charges 
Against Heart Recipient 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — A court case 
against Europe's first artificial 
heart reripieut, Leif Stenberg, 52, 
who faced lax-evasion charges, has 
been dropped because of his condi- 
tion, a Stockholm prosecutor said 
Friday. 

The prosecutor. Claes Zeime. 
told Swedish radio that the case 
against Mr. Stenberg, a Swedish 
businessman, was dropped because 
his condition was not good enough 
lo withstand the strain of a trial. 
Mr. Stenberg was fitted with a plas- 
tic and metal heart last month. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
lion of 42 missiles. The U.S. Air 
Force says that to deploy 100, it 
must build 223 to allow for spares 
and a test flight program of seven 
shots a year. 

According to several House 
Democrats and aides, the starling 
point for the new MX plan is an 
amendment sponsored by two 
Democrats on the House Armed 
Services Coimnitlee. They are Rep- 
resentative Nicholas Mavroules of 
Massachusetts, who has been on 
influential MX opponent, and 
Representative Dave McCurdy of 
Oklahoma, who has supported the 
missile. 

Their amendment would provide 
$828 million to depl 
while prohibiting 


ployments and providing for no 
additional missile production in 
the military budget for the next 
fiscal year. 

The proposal was defeated 
Wednesday in a closed Armed Ser- 
vices subcommittee meeting, but 
has a good chance of passing the 
full House later this month, aides 
and lawmakers said. 

Mr. Mavroules said Thursday 
that he doubted that such a propos- 
al would be acceptable to the Sen- 
ate, which is expected to approve a 
measure more favorable to the ad- 
ministration. 

But he predicted that a House- 
Senate agreement For a 40-missile 
limit could be reached if liberals 


40 missiles like himself accepted annual pro- 
ditional de- duction of about right missies. 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher's ruling Con- 
servatives have suffered' major 
losses in the biggest electoral test 
since the BotisnTe&der won a sec- 
ond five-year term in June 1983. 

The results, announced Friday, 
showed that the main opposition 
Labor Party also suffered sharp re- 
verses in voting on Thursday for 47 
county councils in En glan d and 
Wales. 

The centrist Liberal-Social Dem- 
ocratic Alliance gained seats at the 
expense mostly of the Conserva- 
tives but also of Labor. 

With 45 of the 47 results de- 
clared, the Conservatives had over- 
all control of 9 county councils, 
down from 18 in the last county 
council elections in 1981. Labor 
had overall control of 9 down from 
14, and independents had overall 
control of 2. down from 4. 

The alliance had overall control 
of only one council, the Isle of 
Wight off the southern Fn rffah 
coast, which stayed with -the Liber- 
als. 

But sweeping gains of individual 
seats in county councils around the 
country gave the alliance the bal- 
ance of power in the remaining 
councils. In 1981, no party had 
overall control in 10 councils. 

“The alliance has exceeded all 
expectations. The political map of 
Britain has changed. We are now a 
major contender for government," 


said David Steel, the Liberal Party 
leader. 

it was the first tmm that the 
alliance had contested county 
council elections. And it proved a 
more formidable contender than 
the Liberals alone. 

The alliance, formed six months 
after the 1981 election, won 25 per- 
cent of the vote in the 1983 general 
election, though onty 23 of 650 par- 
liamentary seats. 

The voting on Thursday took 
place as the gpverome&t issued fig- 
ures showing an increase in unem- 

■ - fit! 


j 

! 


force, one of the highest 
ures in the industrialized West. 

The figures had been expected to 
decline os file spring encouraged 
building and other outdoor work. 

Energy Secretary Peter Walker 
on Thursday night attacked Mrs. 
Thatcher's restrictive monetary 
policies and called for greater gov- 
ernment efforts to provide jobs. • 
Coinmcn latere said his speech at 
Cambridge University could cost 
him his cabinet post. He has be- 
come increasingly disaffected with 
Mrs. Thatcher's eco no m i c policies 
and wants more government ^ 

SDcndine to boost the rcrmnmv nnrl r. 


; Sh. 

! ...Mm! 


ty- 


te unemployment and pover- 


In a wide-ranging speech, he add 
that Britain was “standing stiQ 
while others have been' furiously 
eating into oar market shares." 


PORE: Ter^'n--lJT9fl -81). TOKYO: j GHH^ 

(77 — 611 


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AMERICAN TOPICS 


Excerpts from the 
unit Orientation Handbook: For 
Foreign Students and Scholars 
p lannin g to Study in the United 
‘-States,* published by Ac U.S. 
Infonnation Agency; . 

■ !.♦ Americans "like to dress in* 
‘formafly, entertain informally, 
and tbey treat each other in a 
very fefonnal wav, even when 
Khereis a great difference in age 
"'•or social Mamting." 

• ‘Friendly joking or bamef 
js ’“natural to Americans," af- 

ough foreigners “my find it 
erbesriji| or disagreeable." 

• ‘‘Americans are achievers" 
aid “keep business achievement 
charts dn their office walls and 
sports awards displayed in their 


• ‘Americans -aslc a lot of 
questions? and “you may be 
asked very personal questions by 
Lsoureorie you have just met. No 
r impertinence is intended.** 

•'“Americans value punctual- 


ity, they keep appointment cal- 
endars and- five, according to 


schedules. 

• "Silence makes Americans 
jKTVoua .They would rather talk 
abootrto'Weator than deal with 
L^enceina conversation. 


Eracnlfreg Worth , 

Their Weight in Gold 

GMporam dtakmen are liter- 


ally worth Jhcir weight in gold, 
according toXJ^Sw News & World 
Report. magazine. It found that 
1 / the median pay. for chairmen in 
2Q2«rf the Ingest American cor- 
poratioaup was. $780,769 .in 1984. 


That amount, with gold selling at 
S329.7S a trey ounce at the lime 
the magazine's cunent issue 
went to press, would buy 162 
pounds (about 73 kilograms) of 
gpld. roughly the weight of some 
executives.. 

Business Week, magazine says 
thaiT. Boone Pickens, chairman 
and president of Mesa Petro- 
leum, made a total of 
522.823,000 last year, giving him 
non of any 
executive in Jailed States. 



T. Boone Pickens 


Short Takes 


Mario M- Coomo, the Demo- 
cratic governor of New York, 
noting that' the press has been 
widely criticized as being overly 
critical of the government, said 
in a- recent speech to newspaper 
editos,; “What would concern 
me. far more than the frequent 
complaints by public officials 
would be a constant chorus of 
praise” from them “over the sto- 
nes they read about themselves 
in the paper” 


INTERNATIO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUWPAY MAY 4-5, 1985 

Republicans 
End Walkout 
In House as 
Tempers Cool 


Page 3 


Richmond, Virginia, capital of 


the Confederacy and proud of it, 
has long been criticized for ding- 
ing to the past. One resident 
spoke of its “GvQ War-museum 
quality” But new office build- 
ings, stores, restaurants, holds 
and a shopping arcade have pul 
new life in the old Dixie Bole, 
and taken the sting out of the 
joke about bow many Rich- 
monders it takes to change a 
light bulb. Answer Three — one 
to remove it and two to sit 
around and talk about what a 
fine old bulb it was. 


Shorter Takes: Nearly 74 per- 
cent of American women spend 
seven houre or more in bed every 
24 hours, sleeping, reading or 
watching television; while 70 
percent of men report spending 
seven hours or more in bed, ac- 
cording to the Gallup PolL . 
Wyoming, whose miners and 
construction workers stay on the 
move, has 30,000 mobile homes, 
or 183 percent of its dwellings, 
the highest of any stale. New 
York and New Jersey, at less 
than 2 percent each, have the 
fewest .. . The heart attack rate 
among men has declined 25 per- 
cent since the mid- 1 950s, accord- 
ing to a study of Du Font Co. 
workers published in the New 
En gland Journal of Medicine. It 
credited more exercise, less 
smoking and more moderate eat- 
ing habits. . ... The gift catalog of 
the Kwittiwnnian Institution in 
Washington lists a Nostalgic 
Game Box for SI 8 . The contents: 
a rubber ball, set of jacks, mar- 
bles, Old Maid cards and a yo- 
yo- 

. — Compiled by 

- ARTHUR FUGBEE 


By Margaret Shapiro - 

Washington Post Serna 

WASHINGTON — House Re- 
publicans, who staged a walkout on 
Wednesday ova 1 the seating of 
Frank X McCloskey, a Democrat 
as the representative from Indi- 
ana’s 8 th Congressional District, 
have returned to their seats but 
continued parliamentary st all i n g 
tactics to mow their displeasure 
with the Democratic majority. 

However, tempers seemed to 
have cooled somewhat on Thurs- 
day and the disruptions were 
milder than they had been during 
the last two weeks when the Demo- 
crats at times were forced to ad- 
journ the House in frustration. 

On Thursday, House Republi- 
cans allowed debate lo begin on the 
State Department authorization 
bill for fiscal 1986, which had been 
pulled from the floor five times in 
the last two weeks because of the 
partisan crossfire. 

Enactment of the bill was re- 
quested by the Reagan admmistra-. 



Brazilian 
Government 
Faces Wave 
Of Strikes 


Aaooc— d PtflU 

Ramirez Mercado, 

s- WcY president; Humberto Ortega Saavetfra, tiro defense minister, Julian 
Cuba’s ambassad or, and General ArnAldo Ocb6a Sfinchez, the semor Cuban 


Bidding farewell to 100 Cuban mffitary advisers are, from left, Sergio 
«‘ M nnuiiiMif- Humberto Orteea Saavedra, the defen 


JSSj^&^taNicaragua. General Ocb6a did not return home to Cuba with Ws troops. 

. 100 Cuban Soldiers leave Nicaragua 


st Apartheid 

Mr told 


1 . . ►" sl ' !M rt» HteTh 

hk*lila-x.:: 4 Ji 
WOrthcr *l.ites rttyigi 



infection,” said Dr. Notions, who is chief of the oral democrats rigged the 


tiom Republican lawmakers said 
Thursday that once the Indiana By Stephen Kinzer 
seating dispute was settled they had New York Tima Se rrice 

no intention of jeopardizing the ad- MANAGUA — One hundred 

ministration’s legislative agenda. r u ban military advisers have left 
In addition, their floor tactics are xj- lcaragua ^ scheduled, but Nica- 
likdy to occur less frequently from raRuaQ officials said their depar- 
now on, in order to keep the other signify any change in 

side guessing,” one Republican of- p^. 

XXubtansbcganawarof 
words ana parliamentary man e u - ®3l 

vers against the Democrats two 
weeks ago, after a House task force 
with a Democratic majority ruled 
that Mr. McCloskey, the incum- 
bent, had won the Indiana congres- 
sional race last November by four 
votes over Richard D. McIntyre, a 
Republican. - 

' that the 


Minister Humberto Ortega Saave- 
dra said Thursday at a farewell 
ceremony for the Cubans, “We are 
going to show our enemies that 
they will never force us to our 
knees.” 

Mr. Ortega also denounced the 
trade embargo on Nicaragua im- 
posed by President Ronald Reagan 



. I u ivi uiv a 

fKitoor ,*f ,i ’• * herpes vaccine i — r — - „ « . , 

ants’ .i cor rf ' breaks of the disease, researchers al the UA National 


Democrats rigged the task force bn Wednesday as “the beginning of 

1 that the panel had not counted — — 

the votes it sbould have in order 


the commercial and economic 
strangulation of our country.” 

‘They want us to give upjwr 
dignity and our independence," he 
said. “It doesn’t matter to them 
that Nicaraguans suffer." 

The decision to send the 100 Cu- 
ban advisers home was announced 
in February. 

The farewell ceremony marked 
the first time a group of Cuban 
military men had been officially 
presented to the press. Among 

those cm the dais were Julian Lopez 
Diaz, the Cuban ambassador to 
Nicaragua, and General Arn&ldo 
Ochoa Sanchez, the senior Cuban 
officer here. 

General Ocb 6 a, who according 
to Western intelligence reports has 
directed Cuban combat operations 


in Angola and Ethiopia, accompa- 
nied the departing advisers to the 
airport, but did not leave with 
them. 

U.S. officials in Managua said 
they were not impressed by the 
departures. “When you talk about 
100 mt»n, that does not represent a 
very significant number,” said a 
spokesman for the U3. Embassy. 
“It can’t mean much if they say the 
advisers can return at any time.” 

None of the speakers touched on 
the size of the Cuban military pres- 
ence here, which is a matter of 
debate. U3. officials have said 
there are several thousand Cuban 
advisers; Nicaragua says they num- 
ber in the hundreds. Most are be- 
lieved to be drill instructors at mili- 
tary t raining camps. 


khe H.fc’jviWii::. *^ 4 . 
TOltx! t*».ir 
CC^C, a *5vk«’»!».«Ki2r. 


lhstitutes of Health have mmotmeed. T!h«y^ ‘called it 
"the first step toward developing a. vaccine at the 

Studies on inice show that the^ vaccine, unlike others 


#rr .iurjfj 
M4fl 3( to \ , cmv rf 


teicy,” which is the potential for subwtplenl mfeo- 
•tions, for some weeks or months after initial exposure 
‘to the herpes vims. Dr. Abner L Notions, 


certain that Mr. McGoskey PoUcG OffiC€T8 
getting into the nerves." . . „ bad won. They demanded a new w JJ 

He called the preliminary results “very promising InMefat 1 mNY 

bat said more search was needed. For man y Republicans, the Indi- Mjmm&msu* Uh 

“We still have 10 determine the duration of umnnm- dispute became a symbol of r n ‘ *. /t 

ty,” said Dr. Notions. “We know it lasts several dieir frastrations with Democratic in nrUtOutY IMSC 

months, but we don’t know yet if it lasts much longer domination of the House. Nm York Timet Senia 


Honduras Says the U.S. 
Guarantees Its Defense 


saea- 


fa&U Hustler 


Oapwimr*: ..r?r.n«i 

id Hustk- r.' 

itr driiRqu- '. * 'Cmu! 


tist on the project, smd Thursday. 

However, X>r. Notions emphasized that even nme 
experiments continue to prove successful, a human 
vaccine iasdll four or five years away. Thevaccme.if it 
were developed, would be valuable only in protecting 
.“those people who have never attracted herpes. It is 
to have any effect on those who already 
idisease. 


■not 

have 


It* id pirth i.wrni 
a!...:-.*:” and 
ftwtiirtfO.- V-v^tof. 
IdWhng led.”- S-- 1 V halt 
IK jpirfuia »)q* n ,'Jull 


f f- strain re^onsible for gjmtaThetpes. an 
9 Incurable, sexually transmitted disease. With gonial 

7 • J .I, .nA mnnnnK trt 


than that* _ _ . , 

“Only when we get the answer will we be able to 
make a decision about going cm to human studies, be 

Dr Notions conducted the work with Dr. Bernard 
Moss of the National Institute of Allergy and Infec- 
tious Diseases. 

The researchers said that the experimental vaccine 
gave the mice initial protection against two kinds of 
herpes viruses: hopes simplex I. which causes human 
cola sores, and he^es simplex II. ... 

In January, the Food and Drug . A d mi nis tration 


Democrats said the recount was 
done by the nonpartisan General 
Accounting Office and that it was 
fair. They said the Republicans 
would not have agreed to a new 
election if Mr. McIntyre had won 
by four votes. 


genilid 
come Co. in 


the first jnll to tnat and prevent outbreaks 


An Urn* civ-' v-m! -rf 

iteiwmfuii ond a 


je pill, sold by Burroughs Well- 

Uvemthegang^OTn^oomnBS,wi™i«w “^6 svmploins ^ reduce the chance of 

« R-. Tk. dn.g- S generic nn* fe 

hopes, it has to prevent the devdopment of this latent acydovn. 


Vote Assailed 
By Reagan 


mtj f 

iSitjirv 

WCX dcUTv : r.k I.’ 

ifcacv 1 

•r abut hj - **>' ■"•“di- 

up* £?!.>;.-•• :, ' iicr : 

motIkm:- 

. . . »... WN 

tjmu ,■ 


Milton Eisenhower, 85, 
fenvoy, Educator, Dies 


York Tima Serna 


with 


S. Truman reargauize the 

• MP W YORK — kfilttm S. E- tin* Department, negpthu«i 

43 Uor who was president ot tnree 
•restitutions of Ingho learning and 
jjn adviser to ax presidents to 
'United Slates, raeluding his brotb- 
1 at Johns 


President John F. Kennedy, served 
President Lyndon B. Johnson as 
h ffffi l of a connusskm on violence 
and headed study groups for Presi- 
dehx Richard M. Nixon. 

He was Preadent Eisenhower's 




inr* 

.fti Ti •.lv 


United Slates, 
o;DwighLdied 

fe ^ y ;^5i?Eseffivo hadbSbopi- closest adrirer. Morethan 

^ ialized with various ailments sever- o person, he was smd to have bom 
al times in recent months and had responsible for the president s 
Ottered to hoarital again five days statement, at the end of his a dm ip- 
. bcf orf hf s istratha. wanting of the dangers in 

' Mr. Eisenhower was a curious a military-industrial complex. 
■Bend of urban sophistication and Mr. Eisenhower vmalsoprea- 
: jural industriousness. His long and dent of Kansas State College begin- 
’ distinguished career -- 

'Hum a half century a 
into the highest echelons of educa- 

• ^Hew^ov^toyears, a trouble- 1967 and 1971 to 1972. 
sbootarfcr President Franklin D. Although be reanA more than a 
Rcxacvdu bdped President Hany decade ago to become president 



(Continued from Page 1) 
atioo of a minim um income tax on 
both corporations and individuals. 

Mr. Reagan has opposed all ef- 
forts to reuse taxes, c h a ll e n ging 
Congress to send him a tax-in- 
crease bill be could veto. 

However, the measure approved 
by tbe Senate was a nonbinding 
resolution that would do nothing to 
reduce the S200-bflUon federal def- 

idL 

Tbe vote to reduce proposed de- 
fense spending increases came a 
day after the chamb er rejected an- 
other major part of the plan negoti- 


NEW YORK -—Five police offi- 
cers. including a lieutenant as- 
signed to guard against police bru- 
tality, have been indicted on 
charges that prisoners in their cus- 
tody were beaten and assaulted 
with an electric stun gun. 

The officers have pleaded not 
guilty. Their lawyers said Thu reday 
in court that they would be exoner- 
ated of charges that they tortured 
Tour men who had been arrested on 
charges of selling small amounts of 
marijuana. 

If convicted of assault, the most 
serious charge leveled against 
them, the officers would face up to 
seven years in prison. All of them 
were indicted on at least one felony 
charge of assault in connection 
with the incidents, which allegedly 
occurred February and April in the 
106th precinct in the borough of 
Queens. 

The accusations of brutality have 
resulted in a department shake-up 
and the abrupt retirements of sev- 
ered police officials- In announcing 
the indictments. District Attorney 
John J. San tucri of Queens said the 
had been hampered by a 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Two senior 
Honduran officials concerned 
about Nicaragua's military buildup 
said they have negotiated an explic- 
it commitment from the United 
States that it trill defend Honduras 
in case of attack. 

Foreign Minister Edgardo Paz 
Bdrnica and the armed forces chief 
of staff* Colonel Efraim Oon zktez . 
said Thursday that the commit- 


ment is part of negotiations to re- 
heoilai 


oujci uujui inquiry naa Deen nampereu uy a 

ated by the White House and I Sen- 0 f cooperation from other offi- 

ate Icaxlei^ Jri^g proposed lmnis ^,5 ^ the predncL 


ifUini: ■> 


AP/ 1 M 9 

MatonS. Eisenhower 


on cost-of-living increases in the 
Social Security program of retire- 
ment and survivor benefits. 

Tbe tax measure, brought up un- 
expectedly by Republican leaders, 
would leave the size of the mini- 
mum tax up to congressional tax- 
writing committees. Revenues from 


After a’ hearing in Criminal 
Court in Queens, an acting state 
Supreme Court justice released 
cadi officer on ms own recogni- 
zance without bail and sched u led a 
hearing for June 12. 


VC5W- 5?-* 
U»M’i '■ 1: ' 

a : 

Wsfclm! N 
es ‘sv-" 


.1 

itir 


tl 


emeritus of Johns Hopkins, be cem- 
tinued to serve on presidential 


the tax would be used to reduce Hlns t Injures Opponent 

individual tax rates or exempt more * . ** , 

low-wage individuals from taxes al- Of Unification LnUTCn 


together, the resolution stated. 
“This is not a tax increase.” said 


.... »\ij» 



presidential 

lariy received groups of students at 
his apartment m Baltimore, just off 
the Johns Hopkins campus. 

In government service that be- 
gan in 1 926, Mr. Eisenhower served 
with the Department of Agricul- 
ture for 16 years. In 1942 be was 
_ directorof the War Relocation An- 

I Voting’ Of Operetta Family, Is Dead 

War In/onnatkm and as a member 


SliflVr Dame BridgetD’Oyly Carle. 


S.Vfi. 


r.:r>' 


fit-1 


he 
id *-’=■' 

‘iif 

oK in 


. !".ll it 1 '" 
...nru ■■ 

.. ibas 


risr.' 


The Amktaied Pass 

I,: LONDON — Dame Bridget 
EPOyly Carte. 77, the last survivor 
of the fam^ that. presented to 
Gilbert aiuMSuHivan c^erettas in 
Britain andNorth Ammea for 107 
has died, burihess-assodates 


0.1 


?*■ 

-fji 




i.V’l 
,■ ft*i 


r ; ;v:. 1 <-.•■ 


IIV 


( 

itfir 

, - 1 

’i ha.! V‘ : 

j ! 1 

. r.:eh: 

■;:\C ■ 


\\ r* 
... >|V 


* l '“ MO 


ynuw. “T" r” ' t| * 

ai her home in Qialfont St. Giles, 
northwest of Lpnfov :was ■■ an- 
nounced by the tfirectos of the 
Savoy Hotel, of which shewasprtsr 
'ijnL The cause of her death was 





irf:*** 


t,.‘ f f- 


r x-w »■’ •; ... ,.y 
-t* t.‘ nr i> i 

IJfc- '' ' ; i 

.. 

■rU : **’ , «:*' 1 

fcsti' tit* q 
uiiitkrl - 


■i; 


ft 


; The Savoy Hotel , was bmlt m 
Tr 8 $f by: her . great-grandfather, 
Rvri*nrd ITOyfy Carte, to accom- 
BjbSte whoa to his Savoy The- 
L ater, where the cheerfully tuneful 
and. gently satiric operettas were 
;perfonne<£ . • 

•r Dame Bridttt was assfetam at 
to Savoy tocher father, Rwt 
front 1933 apd took ovtt the iD!Qy- 
:ley Carte Ojjera Co. when he died 
.in- 1948. ’* • 


BridgetD’Oyly Carte 


Cross." “Khamsin" and “Dark 
Corridor.'’ Some of her novels ap- 
Har- 


of to executive board of the Unit- 
ed' Nations Educational Scientific 

and Cultural Organization. 

President Eisenhower had al- 
most unbounded admiration and 
affection for Milton, to youngest 
of seven Eisenhower brothers, .and 
was closer to him than to any of the 
others. ' . . 

^ S » IoraandMaitO. HatQddof Ok 

Wl,Mn HfcSdlS S». It ta heavy Dengue 

test member of our fare- support- 

OV ” ana then added, “Thai’s no Twelve Republican senators 
idte compliment. It’s the plain joined 39 Democrats m voting m 

support of the amendmeuL 


principal author of to resolution. 
“It is designed to levy a tax on 
individuals and corporations with 
large incomes who now pay no tax- 
es.” 

Senator Bill Bradley, a Democrat 
of New Jersey and an advocate of 
tax reform, called the measure 
“round one-half in a 15-round bat- 
tle" toward a fairer tax code. How- 
ever, be said it was irrelevant to to 
present effort to reduce to deficit. 

Sources who spoke only on con- 
dition they not be identified said 
Republican leaders brought up the 
resolution primarily to bunt Dcm-' 
oerat-backed efforts to mandate a 
minimum corporate tax and use the 
revenues to help lower to deficit 

The vote to limit to defense 
spending increase came on an 
amendment by two Republican 
E. Grassley of 


The Associated Press 
SEOUL — Tahk Myeung-hwan, 
a religious authority known for his 
opposition to the 'Reverend Sun 
Myung Moon’s Unification 
Church, was injured seriously Fri- 
day when a bomb exploded under 
his car at home, the police said. 

Mr. Tahk, who was admitted to a 

hospital with injuries to his eyes 
and right arm, had been lec tu ri ng 
on cults at a church here, his wife 
said She said he had argued Thurs- 
day with followers of the Unifica- 
tion Church after giving a lecture 
an to group. 


new to bilateral economic and se- 
curity agreements of 1954. 

“One of to issues discussed was 
the written guarantees of security 
offered by to UJ3. and its armed 
forces to Honduras in case of a 
Communist-type threat," Colonel 
Gonzalez said. 

The officials said that to negoti- 
ations for a new economic and se- 
curity agreement, which be gan in 
November, envisage a joint decla- 
ration on the U.S. guarantees. 

Colonel Gonzdlez added tinttthc 
declaration would express “the 
willingness of to United States to 
assist^ Honduras within to frame- 
work of the Rio Treaty, while pro- 
viding specific guarantees for its 
security." 

Tbe Rio Treaty, formerly known 
as to Inter-American Treaty of 
Reciprocal Assistance, stipulates 
that an armed attack a g ai n st one 
Latin American nation shall be 
considered as an attack against to 
entire hemisphere. 

Honduran diplomatic sources 
said the new declaration will state 
specifically that tbe United States 
will consider an armed attack 
against Honduras as an attack 
against its territory. 

The sources said tot negotia- 
tions were continuing, but added 
that to new agreement is expected 
to be ready by the time President 
Roberto Suazo Cdrdova visits tbe 
White House in three weeks. 

U.S. and Honduran armed 
forces have been carrying out three 
separate military exercises in Hon- 
duras, involving thousands of 
troops, for to past few weeks. 

Colonel Gonz&lez said that in 
to negotiations it was decided that 



By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO —The new 
civilian government of Brazil is fac- 
ing a wave of crippling strikes for 
higher wages less than two weeks 
after overcoming to crisis pro- 
voked by to death of President- 
elect Tan credo Neves. 

The new president, Jose Sarney, 
has pledged to respect to right to 
strike even though legislation in- 
herited from the miliiary govern- 
ment gjves trim the power to de- 
clare strikes illegal. But officials 
have warned tot violence and oth- 
er “excesses” would not be tolerat- 
ed. 

After some striking workers oc- 
cupied factories and detained man- 
agers, several Brazilian newspapers 
asserted that leftists were behind 
the movement. Others have ac- 
cused a powerful labor leader, Luis 
Inario da S3va, who heads to 
Workers' Party, of exploiting to 
situation for political purposes. 

On Tuesday. Mr. Sarney sent 
two ministers from Brasilia to S&o 
Paulo to mediate a strike of more 
than 200,000 metalworkers that has 
paralyzed to city’s automobile and 
auto parts industries. They flew 
there m a government aircraft be- 
cause most domestic commeroal 
flights have been grounded by an- 
other strike. 

Further stoppages were an- 
nounced for S5o Paulo, to coun- 
try’s main industrial center, to halt 
bus a "d suburban train services 
and the subway system on Friday. 
Dozens of other strikes of lesser 
political impact also are taking 
place around to country. 

Although some strikes had been 
expected even before Mr. Neves 
fell ill on March 14, just hours 
before he was due to assume office, 
they now are presenting the new 
adminis tration with its first SeriOUS 
political lest 

Foreign bankers said the govern- 
ment’s handling of to strikes 
would clarify whether Mr. Sarney 
gives greater priority to fighting in- 
flation or to seeking popularity to 
consolidate his political base. 

• in a nationwide address Tuesday 
night. Mr. Sarney announced a 
doubling of to minimum wage — 


to around $60 a month — as part of 
he also 


NTT 


Efraim Gonzftlez 


longer is necessary and will be dis- 
mantled in June. 

“It seems tot it served the pur- 
pose for which it was created,” Col- 
onel Gonzalez said. 


a biannual adjustment. But . 
cautioned that recovery of lost pur- 
chasing power by the country’s 
poor would have to be gradual to 
avoid exacerbating inflation, which 
reached 230 percent last year. 

Having committed itself to com- . 
bating inflation, to government 
was cheered by news this week tot 
the general price index rose by only 
12 percent in April its lowest 
monthly rate in almost two years. 
But this was due in part to price 
controls imposed by to new gov- 
ernment. and economists forecast 
that to latest wage increase would 
bring a higher rate soon. 

Brazil's ability to control infla- 
tion by bolding down public spend- 
ing and wages mil be to ceattal 
issue in mlk* with to International 
Monetary Fund on a new economic 
program. 


a regional militaiy training center 

is, ran by ' 


in Honduras, \ 


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V 


Page 4 


Kerala 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. 


FaUabcd WThe New Ywk TW md The WwWngUw Part 


The French Argument 


The French have an important point: There 
is a direct connection between international 
trade and currency exchange rates. It is hard to 
talk about one without taking account of the 
other. But that is not quite an argument for 
trying to reform the world's monetary system, 
as the French government proposes. 

At the Bonn summit meeting. President 
Reagan pressed for a world trade conference 
next year to begin another round of disman- 
tling the array of national laws that restrict 
commerce. It is a good idea. The increase in 
trade across national boundaries has been a 
constant contributor to economic growth since 
World War II. and this kind of conference is 
periodically necessary to keep the process go- 
ing. In response. President Francois Mitter- 
rand of France said he wanted a monetary 
conference “in the same process" to tie the 
European. Japanese and American currencies 
more closely together. 

The United States supports both confer- 
ences, but it opposes any formal link between 
them. The reason is that substantial progress is 
altogether possible on the trade issues, but 
probably not on exchange rates. This is not 
because governments do not like fixed ex- 
change rates; the world used them until the 
early 1970s, and commerce flourished. They 
were eventually destroyed by prosperity ana 
by the rapid increases in the amounts of pri- 


vate money moving from country to country. 

By the 1970s, the flows of private capital 
were large enough to swamp governments' 
attempts at intervention. For the past dozen 
years, the rates have been set mainly by the 
daily buying and selling among banks and 
brokers in the currency markets. The Reagan 


administration is quite right when it says that 
U.S. government has the re- 


not even the „ 
sources to move those markets very far. 

The fact that the American dollar is danger- 
ously overvalued has little to do with the 
structure of the monetary system. The causes 
go back to the huge U.S. budget deficits. 

But there is a way to make exchange rates 
more stable, and such stability would benefit 
every trading country in the world. If govern- 
ments can learn to coordinate their economic 
policies — and that is the purpose of meetings 
such as the one in Bonn — that exchange rates 
naturally will settle into a more predictable 
and dependable pattern. That has been dem- 


onstrated by the great success of the European 

; and west 


Monetary System, in which France 
Germany are the major partners. 

Closer cooperation would require the Amer- 

- i • _ .L-:- a-j 


icons to bring their budget deficits down and 
h their growth rates up. 


the Europeans to push ... 

Stable exchange rates are the result of good 
policy — noi a substitute for it 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Peru’s Fragile Democracy 


In Latin America, preserving democracy has 
always been even harder than periodically re- 
storing it. If Peru actually inaugurates Alan 
Garcia Perez, ihe victorious candidate of the 
American Popular Revolutionary Alliance, as 
president in July, it will mark the first time in 
40 years that power there has been transferred 
democratically. That achievement has become 
more likely since the withdrawal from active 
campaigning of Alfonso Barron res lingan, an 
independent Marxist, who ran second and 
would be the only opponent in a runoff. Mr. 
Barrames recognized that he bad no chance; 
he drew 23 percent in last month's first round, 
against Mr. Garda's 47 percent. 

Mr. Garda's party was founded and led for 
half a century by Victor Radi Haya de la 
Torre, a charismatic, controversial politician 
who died in 1979. Under him the Revolution- 
ary Alliance was Peru's mqjor civilian party, a 
factor in every democratic dection without 
ever attaining power. It is now approaching 
power because all its mam rivals, including 
the military, have had their turn and failed. 


Sadly, this also af 
ian government of President Fernando Be- 
la trade Terry, who five years ago won a con- 
vincing 45 percent of the vote. Ibis year, bis 
party's candidate managed only 5 percent. Mr. 
Bda trade’s term was marred by deep reces- 
sion, spiraling inflation, a crushing foreign 
debt and a brutal counterinsurgency campaign 
against the S hining Path terrorists. Peruvian 
society, divided by regional and ethnic in- 
equalities, became even more demo ralized. 

Now it banks on Mr. Garda. To the extent 
that he fits any political classification, he is a 
man of the moderate left After the strong 
showing of Mr. Barrantes's party, the balance 
of congressional power will be further left 
Leftist civilian government is a novelty for 
Pent But there are no known ideological solu- 
tions to its major challenges: combating ter- 
rorism by democratic means and paying over- 
due bills with inadequate resources. Mr. 
Garcia will need all his charisma, and abun- 
dant help from democratic friends. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Sweden’s Nuclear Tests 


What? Is Sweden a secret member, or al- 
most- member, of the nuclear dub? 

The thought is astonishing, cutting across 
Sweden's reputation as a state whose nuclear 
self-denial is a matter of domestic law and 
international treaty, and Prime Minister Olof 
Palme's personal reputation as a preachy Mr. 
Nuclear Gean. But it may be only a thought. 
Notwithstanding the furor created by a report 
in a Swedish technical journal there is no 
evident basis for thinking that the Swedes have 
been living a nuclear lie. 

In the 1950s, in an atmosphere colored by 
NATO’s deployment of battlefield nuclear 
weapons, Sweden considered building such 
weapons too. It has not been in a war since 
1814 but, counting as it does on a balance of 
power kept by others, it has its moments of 
strategic loneliness. Eventually, however, the 
Swedes decided that going nuclear would be a 
misuse of limited defense resources and, far 
from firming up deterrence, might instead 
make the country a target for pre-emption. 

According to the available information, 
Sweden then turned its fonnidable scientific 
capability in the nuclear field strictly to mat- 
ters of defense. In 1972, it seems, it conducted 
the tests — it insists they were conventional 
explosions to measure effects on different ma- 


terials, including plutonium — whose disclo- 
sure by the Swedish journal produced the 
recent stories about a nuclear test. 

In these sensitive matters, it is best not to 
take any government's denials too categorical- 
ly. The Swedish government's further detailed 
accounting of its past work in nuclear defense 
research has been promised and should be 
helpfuL It is only fair, though, to keep in mind 
that Sweden is not the sort of desperate or 
defiant country commonly suspected of har- 
boring nuclear aspirations. 

It is an exposed but well-armed and reason- 
ably secure country with a non- antagonistic 
foreign policy. It is an open society in which 
nuclear self-denial has long enjoyed the sup- 
port of informed consensus. And it is a lead- 
ing, even evangelical supporter of internation- 
al efforts to check the spread of nuclear arms 
and to control the arms possessed by the 
nuclear powers. It is also a country facing 
elections; the Swedish press is asking whether 
the journal article was an attempt to embarrass 
Prime Minister Palme and his party. 

People are right to be nervous about the 
spread of nuclear weapons to more countries. 
Sweden, however, strikes us as about the last 
country that would be templed to cbeaL 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Nicaragua: A 'Cuban Scenario?’ 


History never repeats itself, but a quarter of 
a century later, the "Cuban scenario’' seems to 
be on the verge of recurring in Nicaragua. 

The trade embargo is a warning to Mana- 
gua. The Reagan administration firmly in- 
tends to force the Sandioists to return to the 
"starting tine" or 1979 and to fulfill the prom- 
ises of a mixed economy, political pluralism 
and nonalignmenL Managua claims n has not 
broken those original promises. 


But with the high financia l and h uman costs 
of defense, a foreign debt of $4 billion, prob- 
lems in getting oil from Mexico, the exhaus- 
tion of fordgn-airrency reserves, the Nicara- 
guan economy, nearing bankruptcy, will have 
to turn closer to the East bloc. In the 1960s, 
U A economic retaliation against Cuba doubt- 
less pushed that country toward Moscow. Are 
we now witnessing the same causes and same 
effects? Mr. Reagan's advisers have answered. 
They say the Sandinists are Soviet allies now. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


FROM OUR MAY 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Japan's Host Diplomats 
PEKING — Early announcement of two most 
important diplomatic moves, greatly affecting 
Lhe Far East, is confidently expected here, 
in official and diplomatic circles lhe convic- 
tion prevails that the negotiations for the new 
Russo-Japanese convention have passed the 
signature and ratification stages and will be 
published about the middle of the month. 
Well-informed Japanese picture the conven- 
tion in the nature of an alliance providing 
for complete Russo-Japanese cooperation vis- 
6- vis China, with definite understandings 
concerning the domination of the respective 
Manchurian and Mongolian spheres of influ- 
ence. Coincident with the publication of this 
convention is expected the promulgation of 
Japan's annexation of Corea. 


1935: Revolt Ends in Philippines 
MANILA — Armed troops and constabulary 
were patrolling the streets of this city tonight 
[May 3] following an armed uprising which 
spread to the provinces of Bulacan, Laguna 
and Rizol and had for its objective a march on 
Manila. Late today authorities announced that 
the revolt had been crushed and quiet restored 
after more than fifty rebels had been killed in 
skirmishes with government forces. The sharp- 
est fighting occurred at Cabuyao, where the 
Sakdalisla, the radical group opposed to the 
new Philippine constitution which would give 
the islands dominion status for a period of ten 
years prior to full independence, held the town 
for several hours before they were dislodged. 
The Manila “Herald" reports sixty dead and 
forty wounded in the fighting there. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman I95&-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ART 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Exeaahe Etitar RENE BONDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Anode* Pafc&fer 

Depay Eater STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Oimaort 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Direatrej * 

ROLF D. F 


KRANEPUHL Director of Ad*e I 


Imexnational Herald Tribune, 18\ Avenue Charies-d e-Gaulle. 92200 NemRy-sur-Sdne. 
France. TcL: (1)747-1265. Tdex; 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 


Directeur de la publication. : Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennem RtL. Hong Kang. TeL 5-285618. Telex 61 J 70. 


\ capital de . 

US. subscription.- 3322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at long Island City. N. Y. 1 1101. 
<0 1985. International Herald Tribune. A0 rights reserved. 






SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 





TFe’re not trying to overthrow them — 
tee onfy leant to change their structure.* 


Putting the Squeeze on Nicaragua 




jin 


-A 


W 


rASHINGTON — Having 
. . failed to convince Congress to 
approve military aid to the Nicara- 
guan rebels, the Reagan adminisira- 


By Richard E. Feinberg 


non has used its executive powers to 
j. This is a 


impose a trade embargo, 
hasty, foolish step. Trade sanctions 
are unlikely to moderate or topple the 
Sandinists and could produce reac- 
tions contrary to U.S. interests. 

The embargo seems to be more the 
result of domestic politics than for- 
cakuiatioa. The White 


tration's intention is to overthrow the 
Sandinists. the embargo will not suf- 
fice. The Sandinists have survived 
several years of severe economic de- 
cline by building a powerful security 


apparatus and extensive political or- 
t, UK dr 


ganiza lions. In contrast, the domestic 
political opposition is disorganized 


. . . was piqued at Congress’s de- 
nial of aid to the “contras'' and seized 


on the suggestion from Democrats 
that economic pressures would be 
preferable to mftiiary ones. Yet the 
administration ignored many Demo- 
crats' important caveat that an em- 
bargo should be considered only after 
a period of negotiations and should 
not be imposed without the support 
of other countries in the region. 

Second, the objectives of the em- 
bargo are unclear. If the purpose is to 
strengthen middle-class opposition 
within Nicaragua and to loosen Ma- 
nagua's ties to Moscow, a blockade is 
hardly likely to be effective. On the 
contrary, it wOl bankrupt firms in the 


For an embargo to bite, 
it needs wide backing. 
The US. embargo *5 
unilateral. Some Latin 
states mar even help 
Nicaragua around it. 


and demoralized. The Sandinists’ po- 
litical strengths will surely outweigh 
the embargo's effects. 

Nicaragua can blunt the embargo's 
impact by finding alternative trading 


still si gnifican t private sector and 


probably compel the Sandinists to 
tighten their grip on the economy. 
The Russians, who have been cau- 
tious in increasing their economic 
presence, will be tempted to do more. 

If, on the other band , the adminis- 


partners. Anticipating such hostility, 
the Sandinists nave already diversi- 
fied their trade: Last year, they pur-, 
chased only SI 10 million in O.S.- 


made products — down from S247 
million in 1980 — and sales to the 


United States dropped precipitously 
million. 


Nicaragua can find new markets 
for the fruits, meat, shellfish, coffee, 
sugar and tobacco it sold u> US. 
buyers last year. It will miss Ameri- 
can-made spore parts for machinery 
and transport but substitutes can be 

found for fertilizers and chemicals. 

This will not be the first time the 
Sandimsts have found ways to evade 
U.S. economic pressure: In 1981. the 
Russians stepped in to provide grain 
ihe United States would not ship; in 
1983. Algeria opened its market to 
sugar America would no longer buy; 
and several other donors — Mexico, 
Brazil, Guatemala. Sweden. Libya 
and the Soviet Union — have stepped 
in to replace blocked credits from 
international financial institutions. 
Today. Nicaragua receives more for- 
eign aid per capita than any country 
in Central America. 

For an embargo really to bite; A 
should have wide international back- 
ing. The administration's embargo is, 
and will probably remain, unilateral. 
The General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade has already opposed Un- 
economic pressure os Nicaragua. 
Nor could Washington expect much 
support from Latin Americans, who 
fear to legitimize measures that vio- 
late the charter of the Organization of 
American Sums and ought one day 
be used against them. Indeed, the 
larger Latin states — Mexico, Argeo- 


toa mereSSS 


tina. Brazil —may hdp Nicaragua to 
blockade. 


In Leningrad , ihe 'Great Patriotic War 5 lives On 


circumvent the 
In fact, the embargo could harm 
UJS. interests. The economics of 
friendly nations in Central America 
will be hurt by Nicaragua's loss of 




L eningrad — u is a raw spring 

/ day and the war is aD around. I 


By Ellen Goodman 


have driven a half-hour out of the city 
into a landscape painted from a 
monochromatic palette of gray and 


beige. To my left," a tall groveofwhite 
birch trees hovers 


over lines of gray 
tombstones. In front of me. fangs 
rectangular mounds of earth stretch 
out in rows, identified only by a dis- 
creet granite marker with a number 
1942, 1943. In each mound is buried 


forged a nation out of its diverse 
nationalities. The war still impresses 
the Soviet people with their vulnera- 
ble place on the European map. The 
war still subliminaily persuades 
many that sacrifices have to be made 
for defense. 

Bat here, before me. is another 
reality. A small sample of death. 


10,000 people. 

In all. there are 460,000 Soviet 


Twenty million Soviet people died, 

ns 


dead in this vast. Haunting place, the 
Memorial Cemetery. 
They are meal and women and chil- 


Piskariovskoye 


dren killed during the Nazi's 900-day 
siege of Leningrad, killed during 
what ihe Russians call the Great Pa- 
triotic War. As my guide tells me in 
morbid one-upsmanship, there are 
more Russians buried in this one 
place than the total number of Amer- 
icans lost in the war. 

For the past week. I have watched 


this country preparing to celebrate 
40th anniversary of vic- 


May 9, the 
tory. It is not being commemorated 
coolly a» some distant historic event 
here, but emotionally, with all the 
immediacy of a recent and nearly 
fatal wound. Every night, on televi- 
sion, there is another war movie. Ev- 


The figure translates into spouses, 
parents, and now grandparents. Of 
ail the men born in 1922 and sent to 
the front, only 3 percent survived 
The figure translates into a genera- 
tion of 20-year-old widows, now 60- 
year-old widows. 

Among the older people, these 
memories are vivid. Just mis morn- 
ing. Vasil isa-Kalik Emezova. a warm, 
engaging Leningrad grandmother 
who lived through the siege, talked to 
me in the rhythmic cadences of a 
practiced storyteller about the winter 
of 1942. For seven months, she re- 
members. people lived on a ration of 
125 grams (4.4 ounces) of bread a 


ber. To forget means to forgive.*' 

It is an article of faith with the 
Soviet people that Americans do not 
really understand war because it has 
not touched American soil for so 
long. Even a young Jewish “refu- 
senik** whose own parents fought on 
the front echoed the refrain: “Ameri- 
cans do not understand what Russia 
went through in the war.” 

In recent days, Arthur Hartman, 
the U.S. ambassador to the Soviet 
Union, tried to counter some of this 
feeling. In a letter published here to 
commemorate the meeting of Soviet 
and American soldiers on the Elbe, 
he wrote: “Our sacrifices remain as 
real and as vivid to us as those of the 
Soviet Union are to its people. We 
hold them no less sacred. And we 
learned no less from them." 

His message was erased by reports 


of President Reagan's plan to visit 
the Bi thing cemetery. The Russians I 
met, in government or out, called that 
trip to lay a wreath in a cemetery 
where Nazis are buried incredible, 
insensitive, even sacrilegious. 

Walking down the path between 



these common graves, counting by 


the tens, the tens of thousands. I am 
suuck by how far the two powers 
have traveled from the Elbe, from the 
time when war made us allies. What a 
cemetery this would have been for a 
presidential visit — a place io side 
with victims, not aggressors. It is the 
victims who inhabit these grounds 
now. hundreds of thousands of them. 

And on this damp and dismal day. 
at die nadir of relations between my 
country and this one. those great 
humps of common graves seem less 
like a memorial to the distant past 
than it warning about the future. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


$225 million in Nicaraguan debt due 
to commercial banks m the United 
States is also jeopardized. 

The irony is that the Sandmisls 
already agreed, last Septeniber, to 
sign a Contadora peace accord that 
addressed basic llS. security an- 
cons. Yet Washington failed to test 
their sincerity by negotiating the de- 
tails of that agreement. 

The administration seems deter- 
mined lo change Nicaragua’s govern- 
ment — thus going far beyond tradi- 
tional U.S. foreign policy goals. The 
embargo will not produce this 
change, but it is an alarming escala- 
tion of the conflict between the Unit- 
ed States and Nicaragua. 


y*’ • 


:i ‘ ' 




The writer a we president of the 
Overseas Devetopmatt Council apub- 
tic-puhey organization. He contributed 
this comment lo The Hew York Times. 




day. Young girls brought food ra- 
weak to 


ary morning, the newspapers cany 
it is the tale of a 


another story : Today it 
woman who lost nine sons. 

The theme of war is as somber and 
relentless as the Russian music 
broadcast from the loudspeaker over 
the cemetery. It is so heavy, so con- 
stant, that I am tempted to dismiss 
the war as a retie resuscitated for 
holidays, waved in front of the people 
for current needs rather than past 
The Great Patriotic War, after all. 


lions to people too weak to get their 
own. Some of these girls brought 
back the live babies they found in the 
arms of the dead parents. 

Middle-age Russians, born dining 
or just after (he war. talk about what 
it was like to grow up with shortages 
of everything, especially fathers. 
Even teen-agers who confess {rolling 
their eyes) that they are turned off by 
war movies and have overdosed on 
this spring's portion of history pay 
their respects. As a 17-year-old high 
school student said: “I do not like 
to talk about it with my grandpar- 
ents. Bui it is important lo remem- 


The Russians’ Myth: Why 
They Fought the Nazis 


By Amos Perhnutter 


W ASHINGTON — The Western 
democracies are makin g a mis- 
take in inviting the Soviet Union to 
participate in our celebration of V-E 
Day. Why. after all, must we main- 
tain the pretense that the Soviet 
Union helped us lo liberate Europe? 
We should instead remind our- 


selves just why the war was fought 
1 what it was i 


and what it was supposed lo achieve. 
The goal was the liberation of Europe 
and the possibility of spreading de- 
mocracy throughout the world. But 
the result was asi much the loss of 
freedom in Eastern Europe as a recla- 
mation of freedom elsewhere. The 


war produced the defeat of Nazism, 
but it also resurrected Stalin’s totali- 


tarian empire. 

We must also put to rest the myth 
that we could not have won the war 
without the help of the Soviet Union. 

To begin with, we must not forget 
that in 1939 Stalin concluded an odi- 
ous pact with Hitler that allowed him 
to gain dominion over Half of Poland 
once Hitler attacked iL 

Then, on June 21. 1941, when Hit- 
ler attacked the Soviet Union, Win- 
ston Churchill asked that all Hitler's 
foes assist Moscow — bnt even this 
avowed foe of Bolshevism failed to 
ask that we impose conditions. Thus, 
the Western Allies did not insist that 
Stalin give up land tho ugh the 
pact with the Nazis or that Poland be 
guaranteed independence. 

Certainly, Hiller faced consider- 


able obstacles in the Soviet Union — 
its vast territory, its industrial poten- 
tial and the patriotism Stalin was able 
to call on. Yet even so, it is unlikely 
that Stalin would have defeated Hit- 
ler without the money, food and am- 
munition he received through the 
American Lend-Lease program. 

Beyond this, let as not forget that 
even at the height of the war, Stalin 
made overtures to his old comrade 
Hitler. (That Hitler did not respond 
does nothing to exonerate Stalin.) Let 
us not forget that even today, Soviet 
history books point to World War II 
as “the Great Patriotic War” — with 
nary a mention of the Soviet Union’s 
allies or the reason that we were de- 
termined to defeat the Nazis. 

True, Lhe Russian people paid a 
horrible price for Hitlers invasion — 
and for Stalin's folly and ambition — 
but in the end Hitler was defeated 
primarily by American industrial and 
economic power. 

We should celebrate V-E Day, but 
we must stop perpetuating myths. 
The Soviet Union's victory over Na- 
zism was the triumph rtf one totalitar- 
ian state over another — and the 
result, for millions of East Europe- 
ans, was merely the substitution of 
one set of chains for another. That is 
nothing to celebrate. 


The writer, a professor of political 
science at American University, con- 
tributed this to The New York 'Tanes. 


A New U.S. Recession? Verdict Is Mixed 


By Hobart Bowen 


W ASHINGTON — Is the American economy go- 
ing to slip into a recession, a “growth recession,” 
or some other form of downturn? At the economic 
summit in Bonn, President Reagan and his aides have 
had to admit to recent disappointments, but they have 
staunchly denied that a recession is likely. 

Others are hopeful, but not so sanguine. Preston 
Martin, the vice chairman of the Federal Reserve 
Board, said in a thoughtful speech recently that “a 
growth recession" — that is, slow growth, accompa- 
nied by rising unemployment — must be considered a 
real threat. “The data currently available suggest that 
the economy is on the edge between healthy, sustain- 
able growth, and a growth recession,” he said. 

Mr. Martin added that if the Commerce Department 
is roughly correct in its estimate of 125-pcroent first- 


quarter growth of the gross national product, “the 

23-percenirate 


economy has advanced at only about a 
in the past three quarters." 

The economy has been weakening since mid- 1984. 
In the presidential campaign, even as Mr. Reagan was 
extolling the virtues of Reaganomics and assuring the 
world that the United States could “grow its way out” 
of the deficit, the bloom was coining oft the boom. But 
the evidence did not show up until later. 

Another sign of weakness is that despite the upsurge 
in 1983 and in the fust half of 1984, the unemployment 
rare has been stuck in a 7-perccnt to 7.5-percent range. 
It now threatens to go higher, as Mr. Martin suggests, 
unless the economy gets a lift. Privately, this is what 
worries Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 3d and 
other administ ration economic officials. 

Some economists do not agree with Mr. Martin 
about the danger of a growth recession. Monetarists 
who blame the current slowdown on the Federal Re- 
serve Board’s tight monetary policy from March to 
October 1984, predict some improvement in the econo- 
my later this year became the Fed has since eased up. 

Thus, Robert J. Genetsld, senior vice president of 
the Harris Bank of Chicago, says: “Interest rates have 
moved lower amid concerns over a weak 
However, the economy is not weak. Rather it is on 
verge of a period of rapid growth.” 

No one can doubt that the Fed’s policy swings affect 
the economy. But perhaps a more basic factor in (he 
slower growth of the economy since mid- 1 984 has been 
the negative impact of Lhe overvalued dollar on U.S. 
manufacturing industries. 

Since imports represented 14.5 percent of the value, 
in constant dollars, of all goods purchased last year in 
the United States (and that is three times the import 
share of 20 years ago), a sizable amount of gross 
national product was transferred from Ihe United 
States lo the nations where the goods were produced — 
along with jobs to foreign factories. 

This process is referred to as “leakage” by Rimmer 
de Vries, an economist with (he Morgan Guaranty 
Bank. What be means is that the trade deficit has the 
effect of moving domestic demand abroad. For 1983 as 
a whole, 2 points of the 8.7-percent rise in domestic 
demand leased abroad. 





Mr. Genetsld pooh-poohs the leakage theory, argu- 
ing that the money spent far imports available and 
will be used for the purchase of UJS. goods.” But the 
Fed’s Mr. Martin dies the decline in manufacturing 
production and the loss of jobs, and says some of thrs 
seems to be permanent. 

It appears that the trade deficit, exploding in the 
past two to three years, has finally become ihe main 
roadblock to resumed growth of the American econo- 
my. So long as the dollar remains high (and even the 
gloomy first-quarter statistics have not caused a signif- 
icant tumble) American exporters are going to be at 
a competitive disadvantage. 

If the huge American budget deficit remains un- 
tamed, the danger is that the government will find itself 
paralyzed: The Federal Reserve, fearing a new infla- 
tion, will be inhibited in its desire to boost domestic 
activity by substantially reducing interest rates. And 
the White House can hardly resort to fiscal stimulants 
when it has a budget dose to $200 billion in the red. 
^ Th is all ^^ro ^^ur^for Congress to do 

piously endorsed by those at the Bonn summitSt 
(me step that might encourage enough of a slide in the 
dollar to take the sting out of the trade defidL But even 
ihar is unsure: The reason the dollar has stayed strong, 
despite the spate of weak economic reports, is that the 
United Stales still looks like a good place to invest — at 
least when compared to Europe. 

The Washington Post. 




> . 
+ . 




if; 


. - 


V * 

& 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


An Afternoon at Bitburg 


This afternoon at the Bitburg cem- 
etery I watched on elderly German 
woman and man place flowers on the 
grave of one of the 49 SS troopers 
buried there: SS Panzer Grenadier 
Fritz Scfaweonberger, killed Dec. 30, 
1944. He was not a relative, she told 
me; she only honored a German sol- 
dier who gave his life for his country 
and what he “thought was right." 

She is not alone in this honoring: 
.Practically all the SS graves are 
marked by recent floral memorials. 
Germans, it seems, have come io pay 
their respects to the dead SS, almost 
to the exclusion of other “victims of 
Nazism" who lay buried there. 

No doubt only a few have done this 
because of the recent notoriety. 

But I wonder. 1 do not know. I 
have not had the tune to research the 
possibility that young Sch weinberger 

acted as a member of the 1st Panzer 
Grenadiers of the SS who murdered 


86 U.S. POWs at Malm£dy, Belgium, 
in December 1944. And of course, 
even if he did not. it makes little 
difference. One joined the SS sub- 
scribing lo its views, what one 
“thought was right,” and if these men 
were young, and if they were naive, 
and if they would now know better, 
and if as Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
tells us, they have been dead longer 
than they were alive, so too are the 
American boys, forever 18 and 20, 
who lie in fields far from their homes, 
who also subscribed to certain beliefs 
and what they “thought was right.” 

In the small dairy and farming vil- 
lage of Osweiler, in Luxembourg, 25 
kilometers (15 miles) from Bitburg. 
there is a stone set beneath the Amer- 
ican flag and the Luxembourg flag 
and on the stone it is written: 

“From September of 1944 to 
March of 1945 the valiant soldiers of 
these US. divisions liberated and he- 


freedom. We the living must ensure 
that they have not died in vain.” 

In Bitburg too there is a stone. It 
bears these words: “There is no great- 
er gift a man ran give than to give his 
life for a friend." 

Who lies in Bitburg? In Bitburg 
there lies, of coarse, only ashes. But 
the hemes of those ashes? The 
dreams? The beliefs and values of 
those SS boys and men. do they lie 
there too? Or are they elsewhere, still 
alive and waiting? If they lie there, do 
not honor (hem, Mr. Reagan. And if 
they are still alive, God help us alL 
BRADFORD T. WRIGHT. 

Luxembourg. 


geous acL It is time to recall the 
moving words of the British poet 
Wilfred Owen, repeated in Benj amin 
Britten’s “War Requiem”: “I am the 
enemy yon killed, my friend. ... Let 
us sleep now." 

GARRY FULLERTON. 

Paris. 


sians at bay. As an additional benefit 
we will not have to n gfwww- over fu- 
ture graveyards of G er ma n soldiers. £ 
HANK B. PERRY. ~ 
- Riyadh. 


As a former -artillery forward ob- 
server in the 25th Panzer Division 
(Wehrmacfat) on the Eastern Front in 
World War II, a graduate of the Sovi- 


et prisoner of war camp system, and a 
5th Infai 


As a person who has disagreed — 
often violently — with Ronald Rea- 
gan on virtually every issue, I feel 
compelled to come to his defense 


rotcaOy defended this area. . . . Many 
gave their lives so that we can live in 


with regard to the Bitburg visit. 
For once, he is righL it is tit 


tune to 

forget the enmities of 40 years ago, 
and his gesture is a good and coura- 


veteran of the 5th Infantry Division 
.of the U.S. Army before the Korean 
conflict, I have this advice for Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl: 

Withdraw West Germany from 
NATO, disband the West Ge rman 
armed forces and let the defense of 
the Western world take place on Mi- 
ami Beach and the shores of Long 
Island. The poison pens and clacking 


As a citizen of the Federal Repub- 
lic of Germany, 1 fed ashamed that 
the government and much of the par- 
liamentary opposition insist on in- 
ducting the visit to the Nazi-Wehr- 
macht cemetery at Bitburg on 
President Reagan's program — even 
though U.S. Congressmen of both 
parties asked tbat Bitburg be 
dropped from the itinerary. My rea- 
son? As long as the Wehrmscht exist- 
ed the concentration camps existed. a 
RICHARD KOLBE. * 
Cologne. 


c. 






typewriters of the Western jsress 


alone will suffice to keep the Kus- 


An American president bowing at 
the graves ofthe SS, Waffen or not, is 
too horrible to contemplate. 

STANLEY MEADOWS. 

Paris. 


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Describe Its Evacuation 

jEtftiopion Soldiers Reportedly Forced 
50,000 to Move, Then, Set Camp Afire 


Long-Assailed 'Rich Man’s Sport’ Returns to China 


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• Wasii»jiDn faff Se/vtoe . 

ADDIS ABABA, -Ethiopia — 
Rrfirf workers at Ibaa, ^ned until 
last weekend was Ethiopia’s largest 
famine rdief camp, haw. described 
how' Ethiopian soldiers forced 
more than 50,000 beopk to evacu- 
ate the center ana then set fire to 
the camp as the people were teav- 

hundreds of readeats of Iboet, 
s mated in the central highlands of 
Ethiofna, resisted the evacuation 
bv string in their huts tmdl the 
shelters were set afire, according to 
a tape recording made of an inter-, 
view with Danny Hawley, an 
American nurse for Wodd Viatm. 

Mrs. Hawley said she witnessed 
part of the evacuatiem. World Vi- 
sion; is one- of four relief agencies 
woftiagat IbndL 

Rdief workers at the camp said 
Thursday that they saw two resi- 
dents Idued durihg the tlnee days 
that the camp was being cleared 
out.' 

Em KjnseQaof Concern, an Irish 
relief Agency, saM he saw sobers 
setting lire to the grass huts, in 
which radcots of Ibrat had been 
hymg. C<uicem n£ef workers con- 
firmed that on Monday, thesecond 
day of the forced evacuation, they 
counted 17 bodies on the road out- 
side the eamp.* 

Mrs. Hawfey said: “You see, the 
patients said, ‘We would rather die 
here than go bade to what we lmow 
is nothing.' And so' they wouldn't 
leave, and while the flames were 
going on there wan still people 
who had hesitated. 

. “When . things were b urning ' 
around them tluy decided to bring 
their pbesesoons out and at least 
come out of the flames. Bat I saw 
people coating from the hilts that 
were bong burned at the time they 
were still there.” 

The statements of the relief 
workers were made to two British 
reporters and other members cf a 
UN and Flhinfwan w w wii nyfll 
delegation that flew by helicopter 
Thursday from.Addis Ababa to lb- 
net. Their staternents contradicted, 
official explanations by Ethiopian 
officials Thursday about how the 
evacuation was conducted. • 


would die on the way,” she said. 

Tens of thousands of former resi- 
dents of Ihnet, induding several 
thousand children under the age of 
five .and thousands of adults who 
are weak from malnutrition, now 
are out walking in the rugged high- 
land mountains of Ethiopia. Many 
of them are Hedy to die of expo- 
, sure, hunger or flfoess, rdief work- 
ers at the camp said Thursday. 

. The United Nations has begun 
emergency preparations to attempt 
to airlift food and other aid. 

At the Addis Ababa airport on 
Thursday morning, Dawit Wolde 
Giorgis, commissioner of the Ethi- 
opian govenuBcnt’s Rdief and Re- 
habilitation Commission, d«H«i a 
WashingtaaL Post reporter's request 
to^cymF^^timga ^flymg jtp 

WiDiaia Stowcross, who' is »■ 
porting for the Lcmdon Observer 
and RoOing Stone magazine, and 
Midael Woobidge of the British 
Broadcasting Corp. were then al- 
lowed an the fSght Both reporters 
provided information to The Post. 

After a two-boor flight to .the 
town of Gondar, the capital of 
Gandar province, the visiting offi- 
cial and reporters were given a ver- 
skm of the evacuation that was sub- 
sequently .oaitradicted by rdief 
workers at IbneL 

Gondar officials of the Workers 
Parry, of Ethiopia, winch under 
Ethiopia’s Marnst government ad- 
ministers the region, specifically 
detned that the military was in-' 
vohredin the evacuation. They said 
that it hj>d been planned for more 
thanamonthand that 7,000 people 
a week had left the canm danng 
that time with ratious of rood. 

The officials said (hat the people 
had been given the option of reset- 
tlement in the western pan of Gon- 
dar province and were told that if 
they refused they would be sent 
home. This was national policy, the 
officials said. 

Dating the course of the day, 
Ethiopian party officials provided 
reporters with three versions of 
how Ibnet was burned. All versions 
denied involvement of soldiers. 
One version described the bunting 
as an accident, a second called ita 
sanitation measure, and a third said 


'^KStmo 


E T H i o ii?r\ 


UGANDA 


KENYA < 


noon, after vduch time party offi- 
cials said that no one from Wek> 
and Gondar were to be givea food, 
water or medical assstance. 

Mrs. Hawley said that the burn- 
ing began on Sunday and that 
wink she did not see soldiers set- 
ting fires — because she .was or- 
dered to stay in the World Vision 
medical compound nearby — she 
talked to several camp residents 
who said they did see soldiers set 
fires. 

Mr. Kinselk of Concern said he 
personally saw soldiers setting 
fires. 

Mrs. Hawley said that some**but 
not alT of the evacuees were given 
dry rations of food, IS kilograms 
(33 pounds) for adults and seven 


Get Bail in South Africa 


Compiled tp 0*r Sujf From IX^atthei 

PIETERMARITZBURG, 
South Africa —axtcec South Afri- 
can anti-apartheid campaigners 
facing possible death sentences for 
high treason won their battle Tor 
bail Friday after months in custo- 
dy 

A Natal Supreme Court judge 
granted bail totaling 170,000 rand 
($85,000) but laid down stringent 
conditions, which defense lawyers 
said amounted to virtual house ar- 
rest in some cases. ■ 

Eight of the 16 have been in 
prison awaiting trial once August . 
1984, while the other eight were 
arrested in December. 

- One of them is Albertina Ssuln, 
a joint president of the United 
.Democratic Front anti-aputhcad 
movement that f onus the umbrella 
for some 600 social, poKtkal, reli- 
gious and labor groups. 

The treason trial, the biggest 
since Nelson Mandek the African 
National Congress president, was 
jailed for life in 1964, is scheduled 
to start May 20. If they are found 
guilty, the nttriamm sentence the 
16 could face is death. However, 
legal sources said the state was un- 
likely to ask for tbo death sentence. 

Ui p iHc«uW(< vhn ram. 


paigned for abolition of South Af- 
rica's apartheid laws, are accused 
of belonging to orga n i z ations 
seek to topple the white-minority 
government through revolution. 

Defense lawyers said that under 
the bail terms, the 16 are required 
to report twice daily to the pefe- 
Tbey also -are confined u> their 
homes from 9 P.M. to 6 AJVC. and 
■cannot attend political gatherings. 

Two of the defendants woe ar- 


Abotit 3,000 discontented and 
de&ant widtelarmas resolved Fri- 
day to withhold com crops from 
South Africa’s government buyers 
ffx one week to press demands for 
higher official prices. 

The de^^, made at a rally in a 

Botha,' who refused Thursday to 
increase producer prices for com. 

The impact, however, will be fdt 
mainly by the country's blade ma- 
jority of 23 million people, for 
whom white com is a staple. A 
farmers' representative, Piet Gans, 
forecast shortages by Monday, 
raising a prospect of further dis- 
content inolack townships. 

The farmers gathered in this con- 
servative gold mining town west of 
Johannesburg a day after their rep- 
resentatives met with Mr. Botha in 
CapeTown. 

Heamie & lager, the dhamnah of 
the N ational Association of Maize 
Producers, said that the encounter 
bad bees the most unpleasant he 
could recall and that die South Af- 
rican leade r had warned the farm- 
ers thai coro was a strategic crop. 

In withbdlding supplies, Mr. Bo- 




ers wqe “playing with fire” He 
was said to have threatened to 
withdraw support from the com 
industry if fanners kept their crops 
on their spreads. 

in Sooth Africa, much agricul- 
tural produce must be sold to gov- 
emment buyers who set prices after 
cakariatmg tire, farmers’ costs is 
growing the crop. The farmers’ de- 
cision, Mr. Gam sa id, means that 
farmers will not barest com or 
dehvhr it to official depots for salt 

The price dispute erupted last 
week when tire authorizes an- 
nounced that there would be no 
increase this year in the price paid 
to com fautiers for their crops. 


al months in the British consulate 
in Durban. (R euterxAP) 

■ Protest by Farmers 

Aim Cowell of The. Nw York 
Times reported from. Kkriesdorp: - 


I WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CUN1C 

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iMi T jiiii M A .-ji i ia i nf f i f i i fi a (T in mm i 


MWlUdiHiNiMl 




“We have ri nthin g and blankets” 
to give to evacuees, Mrs. Hawley 
said on the tape, but the soldiers 
“wouldn't allow us to distribute it, 
and we also had seeds, which they 
wouldn't allow.” 

Government officials said 
Wednesday that those walking 


- IfoWtfirtfMFed 

away from Ibnet, who would be 
arriving home in tim e to plant 
crops for the coming growing sea- 
son, would be provided additional 
food en rente by local peasants' 
associations and mat they would be 
provided with seeds and farm im- 
plements in their home areas. 

■ Floods Threaten Settlements 

Sodden floods in the Qgadea de- 
sert of southeast Ethiopia have 
made thousands of people home- 
less and thr y^feri to nrin settlement 
projects, an Ethiopian relief official 
said Friday, Reuters reported from 
Addis Ababa. 

Tsegaye Meheretu, of the Relief 
and Rehabilitation Commission, 
said that the towns of Gode »n4 
Kelafo were flooded when the 
Wabe Shebdle river burst its 
banks. 

Speaking by phone from the re- 
gional capital of Dire Dawa, the 
official said that helicopters were 
used to rescue 1,900 people from a 
^*mp at JCorahc, about 700 kilome- 
ters (425 miles) southeast of Addis 


By John F. Bums 

New York Tana Serna 

BEIJING — The Communists 
who rule China have accommo- 
dated to fast food and Coca-Cola 
and disco. Now they are trying 
their hand at golf. 

A game that has not been 
played in China since the days of 
wooden-shafted dubs, golf made 
a comeback Thursday at a gather- 
ing in the valley of the Ming 
tombs, 25 nules (40 kSometeis) 
north of here As part of a tourist 
development, a Japanese compa- 
ny has started laying out an 18- 
bok course within a fairway or 
two of the mausoleums of 1 3 em- 
perors of the Ming dynasty, who 
ruled from 1368 to 1644. 

The ruling Politburo dis- 
patched one of its members. 77- 
ycar-oid Wang Zhen, to preride 
at the ceremony. The former 
army general put aside his lac- 
queredcane. took aNo. 3 iron off 
a temporary tee and after an ini- 
tial air shot sent the ball tumbling 
down a fairway whose arid soil 
had been flecked with tofts of 
green cotton for the occasion. 

Mr. Wang, who joined Mao on 
the Long March of the mid- 
1930s, am ceded that it was his 
first acquaintance with the game. 
Although there was a golf dub on 
the outskirts of Beijing for the 
foreign community as early as 
1929, it was plowed under after 
the Communists took power and 
the game was denounced as a 
“sport for millionaires.” 

These days, it is less the socio- 
economic nature of the that 

concerns the n»hiB» relera than 
its capacity to attract tourist 
money. They appear to be think- 
ing mainly of the Japanese, bnt 
Americans also play a part in 




Hw Am oouhS Pra» 

Wang Zhen, a Politburo member, takes a swing on the 
new golf coarse situated near the M mg dynasty tombs. 


their plans. Their hope is that by 


China will come doser to meeting 
its goal of 10 million tourists by 
1990, a five-fold increase over the 
1984 figure. 

A course designed by Arnold 
Palmer, the American golfer, al- 
ready is in place at the Zhong- 
shan hot springs in Guangdong 
Province, north of Macao, and a 
18-hole course will open nearby 
cm Saturday at Tangjiawan in the 
Zhnhai special economic zone, a 


brief hydrofoil ride from Hong 
Kong. 

Now Japan Golf Promotion 
Inc., which financed the Zhnhai 
course, is spending $1 1.8 million 
to bring the game to the bean of 
what was once one of China's 
most sacrosanct spots. Only the 
imperial family and its retainers 
were allowed into the valley of 
the Mina tombs until die collapse 
of the Chlng dynasty in 191 1. 

Earlier this year, officials pre- 


sented a plan to bring a horse- 
racing track, an aquarium, an 
amusement park and several ho- 
lds to the valley, as well as the 
gdf course. In addition, 1 1 of the 
Ming tombs, which have been al- 
lowed to fall into picturesque 
ruin, are to be renovated. Two 
others were renovated in the 
1950s. 

The plans have stirred protests. 
The novelist Han Suyin, who 
lives in London, wrote in the Chi- 
na Daily, an English-language 
newspaper in Beijing, that “be- 
side debasing the peasant sur- 
roundings” of the tombs, the golf 
course would prove “an expen- 
sive liability, not an asset” 

Her outrage was shared by oth- 
ers whose letters appeared m die 
paper. A woman from San Diego 
said that while she' enjoyed an 
occasional game of golf, the fur- 
thest thing from her mind on a 
writ to China would be trying to 
shoot par in the Ming tombs. 

Left unanswered by the pro- 
moters was whether any attempt 
will be made to attract Chinese to 
the game. Officials or the regional 
government are partners to the 
Japanese investors, but their in- 
terest is likely lo lie in the reve- 
nues rather than in the sport it- 
self. Mr. Wang said he believed 
that greater prosperity must ar- 
rive before the Chinese will devel- 
op interest m the game. 

Coverage of the ceremony 
Thursday by the Xinhua news 
agency offered an unintentional 
inright into how the Chinese view 
the sport A reporter, perhaps un- 
familiar with the reference to 
“par 72” in the Japanese compa- 
ny's brochure, reported that the 
course was to have a hold and 72 
bars. In fact, there will be only 
one. 


• . . m. it was the act of one misguided 

person who ii now in prisoiL 
-Thursday mght &om Ibnta, Kj ^ am ^ reporters learned 

that rdief wXisESworid Vi- I 
tary-generri for ememw operar ^ had been told by the local 1 

£ ■»»«;». ygayti. 

m r^,S“ d *'* inadeq ” ffle from reported 7ro,T>fc 
preparation. * Dawit, among others, they dis- 

“It is alsoclear/* he said; “that cussed the episode, 
there has been and wiH be suffering . The rdief workers from World 
as a result of (he hastiness.” Virion and Coocero said that there 
: At Ibnet, Mrs. Hawley said that bad been no mass departures from 
several of the people forced out fdt the camp before last weekend, 
that they had floatance to nuvivea They said (hey had first been in- 
walk home. “It was their belief that formed of the party's decision to 
they expressed to ns that they evacuate Ibnet on Saturday after- 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATLRDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


4 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Anselm Kiefer’s Mythmaking Paintings 


Nt 


By John Russell 

New York Times Service 
EW YORK— One of the test 
I things happened to Ger- 
many in 1945 was that Anselm 
Kiefer was bom. Today Kiefer 
stands out not only as one of the 
most gifted artists now at work 
anywhere in the world bnt as a poet 
in paint (and other substances), a 
maker and remaker of myths, a 
witness to the distant and forma- 
tive past of his country and a man 
who can work small and very tag 
with equal success and conviction. 
Whether in mixed media or in 
quite small works on paper, a 
pointing by Kiefer is not like a 
painting by anyone else. 

For these reasons, one of the 
shows that I most look forward to 
seeing in the next few years is the 
Kiefer retrospective being pre- 
pared for the Philadelphia Musaun 
by Mark Rosenthal, curator of 
20th-century ait. Anyone who saw 
the Kiefer retrospective organized 
and annotated by Jurgen Harten 
for Dusseldorf, Paris and Jerusa- 
lem last year will know that Kiefer 
can stand exposure on a very large 
scale. The more we see — or so it 
seemed to many visitors — the bet- 
ter he looks. Meanwhile there is 
plenty to see, at the Marian Good- 
man Gallery in Manhattan, where 
recent Kiefer paintings, large and 
small, can be seen throngh May 1 1. 

For those who have not yet come 
to terms with Kiefer it may be 
worth saying that, though not pre- 
cocious m the cocky sense of that 
word, he began early. By 1 969, at 
the age of 24, he was making books 
that were works of art. They were 
picture books, as big and fat as a 
Gutenberg Bible, with covers that 
looked as if they were made with 
coal dust and tar and images that 


were mostly photographic in origin 
but that had been waited and re- 
worked until they were unmistak- 
ably and inimitably bis own. 

Two of these bodes, both dated 
1969, were called "Heroic Allego- 
ries” and "You Are a Painter.” 
These titles were the epitome, in a 
few words, of what Kiefer was 
about. Heroic allegories of one sort 
or another — drawn from myth, 
drawn from legend, drawn from 
history — are a large part of his 
subject matter, while “You Are a 
Painter,” means Kiefer was taking 
on not simply the professional sta- 
tus of a painter but the moral and 
historical obligations that went 
with it_ 

Kiefer was raised during World 
War ITs immediate aftermath and 
went to school in the late 1950s and 
early ’60s, when the notion of a 
renewed and decontaminated Ger- 
many was beginning to be taken for 
a short and cautious walk. In that 
notion, a renewal of painting in 
Germany would have its part to 
play, if a painter could be found 
who could prove again that a great 
painting is about the most eloquent 
thing there is. 

None of this is ever touched 
□poo directly in his painting, but it 
is there by implication. To "be a 
painter,” in Kiefer’s sense, in Ger- 
many in the late '60s was not to be 
an amiable confectioner. It was to 
be a man who made sense of Ger- 
many past, Germany present and 
Germany future, with all that that 
involved in the way of universal 
obloquy. 

The Kiefer books — each of 
which existed in one copy only — 
wore not so much objects of com- 
merce as dreams solidified and 
nightmares turned to base matter 
and made perpetual. As for his 


paintings, they spoke for the re- 
newal of oil painting but also for 
the potential of its partnership with 
other m»t«Tr ials — emulsion rwim 
shellac, sand, woodcuts, photo- 
graphs, photographic projection 
paper, pieces of broken mirror, 
straw, day, string, twigs. There are 
huge paintings in the present show 
that almost defy a dose reading 
and yet turn out to have a total 
command of the rnatl i-r in hand 
when we step back a pace or two. 

As the show at the Marian 
Goodman Gallery is much con- 
cerned with the miradc of the ser- 
pents as it is recounted in the Book 
of Exodus, it may also be worth 
saying that the serpent made its 
appearance in Kiefers paintings as 
long ago as 1973, in a painting of an 
interior called “Quaiennty" and in 
a painting; primarily of a forest, 
called “ResnnexiL" The year 1973 
was, by the way, an annus mirabOis 
in which, still some way short of 30, 
he produced at least seven huge 
paintings, each charged with ideas 
that were to occupy him for years 
to come. Fundamental to many of 
these ideas were the ark-like con- 
struction of the disused school- 
house that he had just taken over in 
a village deep in the country and 
the gaunt, history-haunted fields 

and forests nearby. 

No kiss to the point is the fact 
that some years ago Kiefer — ever 
preoccupied with the burning, 
blackening and cauterization of 
landscape — produced a watercol- 
or in which standing corn had 
turned black. Hie tall, thin ears of 
com, suddenly hooked like walking 
sticks and rendered in a deep fune- 
real black, were like pre-echoes of 
the serpents in the “Mirade of the 
Serpents” in the present show. It 
was as if there were a universal 


family of forms in which Aaron’s 
rod, the serpent into which it was 
turned, and the disnatured ears of 
blackened corn were all cousins. 

It is also relevant to Kiefer's am- 
bitions that landscape, for him. is 
not a matter of delectation He has 
produced landscapes that look 
bade to Caspar David Friedrich 
and, way beyond Friedrich, to the 
dense forests of the northern Re- 
naissance as they were portrayed 
Dttrcr and Altdorfer. There is m 


present show an enormous un- 
titled pointing in which the miracu- 
lous serpents rear up, strongly and 
alarmingly characterized, in a 
treescape that could almost have 
teen signed fay Altdorfer. 

But landscape in these paintings 
is not so much a thing in itsdf as an 
echo, a pretext, a metaphor and an 
allegory. Not only is it haunted by 
history but it is subject to quasi- 
human misfortunes. It bleeds, 
bums, cries aloud. Blowtorch and 
ax have their way with the canvas. 
(At one time, Kiefer conceived of 
images in which stocks of gasoline, 
stored underground by the army, 
had begun to leak and to soak up- 
ward, to be set on fire at ground 
leveL) 

Names from the past, beloved or 
abhorrent, bang from the brandies 
of the forest luce roosting birds; 
and when a great plain is in ques- 
tion. as it is when Kiefer evokes the 
immense flat spaces of the Maxkt 
Brandenburg, he brings a prodi- 
gious variety of physical texture to 
play. Furthermore, he logs, name 
by handwritten name, the places 
we should expect to find on a map 
of the area. 



“Mirade of the Serpents,” theme picture of Anselm Kiefer show in New York. 


non of unprecedented textures and 
in a figuration that denands to be 
deciphered and wiQ not allow us to 
leave the gallery without having un- 


is made in the Old Testament, and 
there in the background is (me of 
the most sumptuous of Kiefer’s 
panoramic landscapes. It is not like 
riddled it In looking ai these paint- any biblical landscape that we have of an unrhetoricalqnc has made its 
ings, we are not looking at “another seen before, and it speaks for mix- way back into painting . 

Kiefer," however modi we might — ■ ■ ■ ■ 

enjoy that experience. It is a new 


cures of blood and dung, stubble 
and tar, daylight and star shell that 
will keep their seams for many a 
year. But it proves that the notion 


equation that he sets before os, and 
one that is as 


ne sets oeiorc us, and r* 1 IT * T 1 

Edward Lear in London: 

ways, he gives more of his private 
self in the smaller paintings. 


In the stnalW paintings on pho- 
tographic paper, Kiefer goes far- 
ther than before, both in the inven- 


The theme of the show is 
summed up, above all in the paint- 
ing called “Departure From 
Egypt," 12 by 1 8 and a half feet (3 5 
by 5 J meters). There in the fore- 
ground is the rod of which so «*mch 


No-Nonsense Paintings 


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L ONDON — Every' well- 
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sense.” Very few later learn that 
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watercolorist and an oil painter of 
landscapes who profited by travels 
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sense” was a spin-off from his pro- 
fession of painter, since be wrote it 
to amuse tne children of the Earl of 
Derby when he was at Lord Der- 
by's home, Knowsley Hall, from 
1831 through 1837, portraying the 
birds and animals in the private 
menagerie. Some of Lear’s early 
natural history drawings and paint- 
ings form the first section of the 
show “Edward Lear” at the Royal 
Academy of Arts. 

These early works are drawings 
and watercolors. some of such crea- 
tures as the yagpurandi {a South 
American leopard), a mottled 
goose and a crowned crane from 
the “Menagerie and Aviary of 
Knowsley HalL” Sane are from 
the illustrations to Lear’s first per- 
sonal enterprise, a picture book, 
"Illustrations of the Family of Psit- 
taridae, or Parrots.” published on 
subscription by him in 1832, por- 


est of his oils, "The Pyramids 
Road, Gizah” (1873). Low por- 
trayed the Pyramids in the distance 

in the blazing noon sun. or from the 
shaded causeway and avenue of 
trees planted five years earlier by 
Empress Eugtaie of France on the 
opening of the Suez CanoL 

Happily this exhibition does not 
neglect Lear’s nonsensical vein. 
Not only did he write nonsense 
vases and songs, but he Qlusiraied 
them, and made other nonsense 

ful are^ serieT^rom the Bdnecke 
Rare Book and Manuscript Library 
at Yale University, from “Noth 
sense Botanies,” which includes the 
“Piggrwiggia pyramidalis.” 

“Edward Lear 1812-1888.” Royal 
Academy of Arts. Burlington House, 
PiccadiUv, London Wl, through July 
14. 

□ 

A contemporary traveler who 
has recently worked in England, 
Italy, the Middle East and the 
United States is the English artist 
Julian Barrow, whose works are at 
the Morion Morris Gallery. 

Tire English landscapes are of 
Norfolk, Oxford. Wiltshire and 
Somerset; the London scenes are 
often of Chelsea, where Barrow 
lives and worts in the stndio that 
long housed John Singer SargenL 
The Italian scenes indude Rome, 
Venice and Florence, where, in the 


ft., kinl* — Mnilv vcnicc unu rmraux, wuuc, in me 

~^s Gardens in Regent’s Park. “8 mlh Py * ro ***&«*- »* 




i early works also include the 
originals for many of the bird 
books published by John Gould 
81), a lithographer who 
has ever since had a high reputation 
based on the unacknowledged 
work of other artists. For example, 
69 of the prints in Gould's "Buds 
of Europe* wens drawn and printed 
by Lear. 

Lear never lost his interest in 
natural history, nor his attention to 
portraying flora and fauna accu- 
rately, but in 1837 he set exit cm 
travels that kept him abroad for 
most of the rest of his life. First be 
went to Italy, where he shuttled 
between Rome and Sicily for a de- 
cade. Hoe he made many pencil 
and ink drawings, of which "Villa 
Adriana,” an loan from the British 
Museum, is typical. 

Lear was unm tenth 
to later art historians, carduliy 
signing, daring and annotating his 
work, so that we know his ink-and- 
wash drawing “Near Suez” of a 
group of desert Arabs around their 
fire was painted in "Evening Jan. 
15. 1849. 

We also know bow greatly he 
appreciated the colors and liveli- 
ness of Egypt. ‘The contemplation 
of Egypt must fill the mind, the 
artistic mmd I mean, with great 
food for the rumination of long 
years,” he wrote to Chichester 
Fortescue, later Lord Carlingford. 

A quarter of a century later, on 
his fourth visit to Cairo, en route to 
India, he was still expressing en- 
chantment and wonder at the 
place, and panning (me of the fin- 


versation pictures (interiors with 
people talking), and portraits of 
country bouses are games that be- 
came popular in the 18th century. 

" Julian Barrow : Landscapes, 
Conversation Pieces and Paintings 
of Country Houses, ” Morton Morris, 
32 Buy Street S l James’s, London 
SW1, through May 17. 

□ 

Comparatively little is known 
here of Irish painting or painters, 
so “Celtic Splendor. An Exhibition 
of Irish Paintings and Drawings 
1850-1950,” at Pyms Gallery, 
which shows the work of 28 Irish 
artists, is particularly welcome. 

Even more wdcome is the range 
and quality. Notable are tbe land- 
scapes of James Richard Marquis 
(fl. 1853-1885) and Nathaniel 
Hone (1831-1917); the workshop 
interior, “The Umbrella Man,” by 
George Atkinson (1880-1941); a 
lyrical Western Ireland panorama, 
“A Western Caravan,” and a stun- 
ning "Self Portrait” by Sean Keat- 
ing (1889-1977); a splendid por- 
trait by Sir William Orpen 
(1878-1931) of yoong “Master [An- 
drew] Spottiswoode , and two sur- 
prisingly strong marines, “Moan- 
tain Pond” and “Dooks, Co. 
Kerry,” by Mary Swanzy (1882- 
1978). 

"Celtic Splendor: Irish Paintings 
and Drawings 1830-1950, ” Pyms 
Gallery, 13 Motcomb Street, Belgra- 
via. London SW1, through May 25. 

Max Wykes-Jqyce writes regular- 
ly in the JHT about London art 
showings. 


Hara Art 
In Tokyo 
Is a Treat 

By Terry Tnicco 

T OKYO — Life is sweet for 
those specializing in Japan's 
traditional aits, but things get 
tougher for anyone involved m 
art's contemporary International 
strains. New Yofk-style gallery 
support hardly exists and museum 
shows are rare. Those with talent 
and nerve often flourish best 
abroad. 

All this makes the Hara Annual, 
a yearly spring sampling of new 
Japanese art at Tokyo’s Hara Mu- 
seum. a treat The show, which this 
year features works by 1 J youngish 
artists, is one of the rare opportuni- 
ties to see a cross section of con- 
temporary Japanese- work. Hus 
year's show includes video and a 
performance piece os well as paint- 
ings, sculpture .works on paper and 
several room-size en vironmen ts. 

As in many group shows here, 
quality is uneven, but the overall 
effect is appealing. Katsuhiro Fuji- 
m urn’s gigantic scul pted va ts, 
w himsical m slashed corrugated 
cardboard, stand at attention on 
the museum’s roof. Kotuen Oot- _ 
subo has turned a small white- 
waited roan into a curious nature 
chamber, a huge spike-edgod wood 
sculpture grows up from the floor 
and climbs the walls while shar- 
pened spikes in the blanched wood 
assault aU who walk through the 
door. The media are chopsticks and 
toothpicks. 

The museum’s garden also gets 
its due, with Fusako Tsu2kTs enor- 
mous tre e- bran ch, sculptures and 
regularly scheduled performances 
by Min Tanalo, a leading figure in 
buto, the expresaooistic dance style 
that grew out of Japan’s postwar 
turbulence. 

But Fusako Yusaki’s witty vid- 
eos, filled with animated day 
scalp turns, are the show’s stand- 
out An houriong collection had 
enraptured onlookers riveted to 
their seats laughing- Sculpted out 
of crayon-colored day, her images 
shoot across the screen, swift and 
sharp, chang in g into the unexpect- 
ed. A boat becomes a ship and then 
a bigger ship. And before the view- 
er can take in the detail, it is 
slapped into a ball and caught by a 
big day hand 

This was Yusakfs first show in 
Japan. In 196S, when she was a 28- 
year-dd sculptor, she wot a schol- 
arship from the Italian govern- 
ment, and she has lived in Milan 
ever sinceL Sie displays what may , 
be Japan’s main contribution to the 3 
international art wodd — the abili- 
ty to blur boundaries between art 
and craft, fine art and commercial 
art. 

“Hara Annual V “The Hara Mu- 
seum of Contemporary Art. 4-7-25 
Kitashinagawa, Tokyo, through 
May 12. 

Q 

When it cones to Western cul- 
ture, the Japanese are unabashed 
framcophUes. The latest proof is the 
rousing reception given an exhibi- 
tion of vintage nun contemporary 
wares presented by the Gnnite Co£ 
bert at die charming Teien Muse- 
um of Art On a recent Sunday, 
visitors waited more than an hour 
to enter. Once inside, most lingered 
longer than usual, inspecting the 
Louis Vmtion book trunk, com- 
plete with fold-out table, once 
owned by Leopold Stokowski, and 
scrutinizing one of Rent Lacoste's 
white teams Jackets, c. 1927, com- 
plete with alligator. 

“buy fordgr^^C^k^Qjlhcrt — 
an association of 69 top French 
companies, including Baccarat, 
Cbristofle, Chanel and Chaumet — 
couldn’t have had better timing. 

But it was the vintage pieces, these 
owned and often created fa the 
rich and famous, that drew the 
aahs. On view are the exquisitely 
embroidered Porthanlt sheets se- 
lected by the Duchess of Windsor 
and a version of a mmning black- 
and-white evening gpwn worn by 
Jacqueline Kennedy as first lady. 

The museum, an art deco house 
once home to Prince Asaka, has „ 
wonderful Lalique glass windows t-' 
and proved the perfect setting. 

“Arts de Vhre en France, ” Tokyo 
Metropolitan Teien Museum of Art, 
5-6-9 Shiragana-dai, Tokyo . 
through May 12. 


si 


Terry Trucco, a Tokyo-based 
journalist, is a frequent contributor 
to the IHT. 


* Big River 9 Bogs Down in the Script 

By Frank Rich If the makers of "Big River” can send us floating 

New York times Service dreamily down the Mississippi, it should be simple for 

N EW YORK — "Big River: The Adventures of them to acc omplish s u ch relatively easy tasks as telling 
Huckleberry Finn” is the last Broadway m usical the novel's plot, repeating its jokes and dramatizing its 
of the season — and the first that audiences can attend resonant love story between an outcast boy and a 
without fear of suffering profound embarrassment or runaway slave. But "Big River” does the hard things 
terminal boredom. This snow has a lot going for it: a well and the easy things sloppily. William Hauptmans 
tuneful score by country music's Roger Miller, exuber- script is as formulaic as McAnuffs staging is daring, 
ant performers and a gifted director, Des McAnuff. Hauptman attempts to include too many of the 


If all of "Big River” were up to its high-water marfry , 
the season might have found the exciting new musical 
it desperately craves. But too often the imaginative 
flow of “Big River” slows to a trickle. While young 
theatergoers may well enjoy the entire enterprise, 
adults may find the evening a mixture of the modestly 
engaging and tbe tolerably bland. 

At its best, "Big River” is much more faithful to its 
source than one ought expect. The musical’s creators 
understand that Twain's novel is not merely a boy’s 
adventure tale. When Huck (Daniel H. Jenkins) and 
Jim (Ron Richardson) board their raft to a rousing 
song called “Muddy Water,” McAnuff and his design- 
er, Heidi Landesman. magically convey the characters* 
exhilaration at fleringhome: the moonlit river rises op 
on stage like a silver ribbon, tugging (he audience a 

liamaa alilnifitA a hhmIaJ^... . fl j ■ m *_ 


novel's anecdotes, and in so doing, must often trun- 
cate or rush (hem to the point where their comic 
payoff (and, at times, narrative thrust) is lost. Yet the 
incidents he does leave out — the Grangerford-She- 
pherdson feud, the vigjlame lynching — are precisely 
(hose that are most essential to preserving the novel’s 
bite. Worse, the show shifts its focus away from its 
heroes to center on those vagrant con men, the Duke 
(Rene Auberjonois) and the King (Bob Gumon). 

The music and lyrics, often riding on giddy banjo- 
and-fiddle-fledted boedown arrangements, at first rise 
wefl above the text Act I con tains one lively s<mg after 
another, including a taDring-bhus diatribe against 
_ “Guv'ment” (ffinuty delivered by John Goodman os 

ie moonlit river rises op Pap Finn), a sweet spiritual for anonymous slaves and 
h aun ti n g anthem, "River in the Ram.” Bat once the 


heroesalike into a mysterious, uncharted wilderuessof book bogs down irrevocably in Act IL Mfllerlurns to 
the American spim. dich£s. 








Vj . X'*' L" - V: 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


Page 7 


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“By Michad Gibson 

- ; Inlenuaionat Hendd Tribune 

P I ARIS t— Jean Amado, a fine 
and imagdaijve artist of . 63, is 
not all that well known despite a 
long add saHd career. Hie cause of 
this k- no. doubt . that when, art 
cdzbes to depend on the media and 
on fashionable soefafirins m Fans 
- lo thfrexunt that it does today, an 
artist with practically no.sjgumcant 
.ptodqctiorbota highly developed 
thcoriaical disaBirsCTiffl be seen at 
all the bfa'shows, while someone 
like Amado, who works a. lot but 
lives btPoovebce and has no special' 
. 'desire to talk about -Ms sculpture, 
will spend most of his career in 
relative-obscurity. , 

. Amiao’s^pro&ctiou^ consists of 
cement sculptures both large and 
small, made, with various types of 
basalt-sand that give a warm red or 
hrowit-rqdtiike -hue. They are ill 
oompo^ constructions thatmost- 


: laborer who needs slowness and 


and enrich us. I’m persistent, that’s 
'dL w -Tins' is 'hardly the way one 
does things today, and many artists 
have, worked out a strategy that is 
intended to give the press souie- 

teyvrordTor statemen? that may 

be useful when . confronted with 
something downright perplexing. 

Amado’s work is not perplexing, 
although he' recalls how people re- 
acted to a large sculpture of his — 
about 130 feel <40 meters) high and 
20 wide — commissioned some 
years, ago for a bousing develop- 
ment in Algiers. Once it was set np 
the occupants wanted to have it 
demolished. 

“What does ir represent, any- 
way?” they asked the architect, 
“h’s a totem, of coarse,” the archi- 



The Wallace Collection: Monument 
To a Very Rich Man’s Way of life 


er-rounded. rock formations that 
are : part of the: landscape in the 
. neighborhood of Aix-en-Provence, 
where Amado fives. 

When- asked to talk about his 
work, the -diffident Amado says 
things Hbk “Oh, they just grew that 
way,” and after mumbling a few 
more things in the -sane vein he 
falls alenL-Or he may add: “I’m a 


everyone. It had no bearing on the 
artist's intention, but the architect, 
with his calm authorin', had prof- 
fered a word that could designate 
and define the peculiar object in 
their yard. . 

The 20 sculptures that Amado is 
showing at the MnsCe des Arts Dfc- 
coratife are all beautiful objects — 
.like immortal sand castles — and at 
the same time poetic fantasies 
about rocks and vanished ages with 
their fortresses and palaces; or 


“Capraia,” a 1977 cement sculpture by Jean Amado. 


Buigeras Design at the V&A 


- front «h.' - 

mi Ar h-' » 


Reuters . 

LONDON — The Victoria, and 
Albert . Museum’s choice -of the. 
immbuxgcr as the pinnarTt* of n s 
design may strike some as an an- 
ti-American. swipe, but other na- 
; tionalities axe just as fikdy to be. 
provoked by .a hew exhibition. 

The hamburger roeaks jnoath- 
, fills about American deam,” reads 
a sign near a seSamc-seed bim ex- 
hibited at.^arianal Omucteris- 
. tics in Design.” It adds that the 
hambrnge^r is w a paradigm of 
American amsumer culture — 
mass-produced, cheap, efficient 
and essentially juvenile:' 1 

The. exhibition lodes at design 
from eight nations, in products 
r anging from cycles to shoes. It 
seeks to unravel the “Britishness” 
of a Jaguar car’s finest -the. “Ger- 
manness” of an effitient Brann 


dock, : the “Frenchness”, of the 
smoky imagery on a packet of Gi- 
tanes cigarettes. 

While admiring the Jaguar's 
quality and bxxuzy, the exhibition 
-concludes: “British product design 
is often compromised — the aes- 
thetics of appeasement.” Nearby 
sits ah un a ppetizing can of steak 
and kidney pie. 

: “Russian, design,” reads another 
panel in the exhibit, Ts so unrevo- 
lutiooaiy that if the posters and red 
stars didn’t exist, no erne would 
bdiewe that there had been a revo- 
lution.” 

-• The ritual and manners of the 
Japanese are reflected in the preci- 
sion of roach of their design, says 
rite commentary by Jonathan 
Glancey of- the Royal Institute of 
British Architects. A wristwatch 
tdevjsiori set is an view. 


about Egyptian temples and impe- 
rial Chinese ships. There is even a 
petrified locomotive. In a sense 
they are the ultimate elaboration of 
childhood fantasies about strange 
buildings, and their complex struc- 
ture is also developed reward so 
that most of the works include in- 
ner chambers and passages to tease 
the viewer's fantasy some more. . 

Amado is- probably right not to 
talk about them. A formal analysis 
would be technically dull (Amaao’s 
preparatory drawings are like an 
engineer's blueprint) and the com- 
mentary they could invite is too 
self-evident, while the mute plea- 
sure and wordless fantasies (hey 
provide is not 

Jean Amado, Musee des Arts De- 
coraiifs, 107 Rue de RfvoO, through 
July 13. 


Colette Bnmschwig is showing 
some large, abstract quasi-mystic 
drawings on paper at the Galerie 
Clivages. These are also rather a- 
Jem works that make admirable use 
of the range of black and white ami 
evoke a certain tension of light and 
dark and an emerging presence. 

Colette Bnmschwig. Galerie Cli- 
vages, 46 Rue de rVaiversite, 
through May 25. 

□ 

Facundo Bo has made Ms mark 
in Paris as on&of the founders of 
the Argentine theatrical company 
known as Groupe TSE. Their pro- 


ductions have been quite varied 
and occasionally marked by a ba- 
roque sexuality that is also appar- 
ent in the color crayon drawings Bo 
is showitm at the Caroline Cone 
Gallery. The effect is somewhere 
between naughty Roman frescoes 
(revised by reDrni), medieval un- 
cials and decorative 18th-cennny 
embroidejy. It is also lively and 
well balanced and shows a pleasant 
talent. 

Facundo Bo, Galerie Caroline 
Com, 14 Sue Guinegaud, through 
May 11. 


Pablo Reinoso, another Argen- 
tine, is a gifted sculptor who also 
works as a photographer, and his 
present show is devoted to both 
facets of Ms talent- His sculptures 
are mostly horizontal low reliefs 
that take on the appearance of rip- 
ples on water or occasionally the 
scaled-down geographical ripples 
of hills. Some pieces evoke a deh- 
cate marble curtain. The pieces 
shown ai the Gervis Gallery are full 
of a thoroughly poetic elegance. 

Pablo Reinoso, Galerie Daniel 
Gervis. 14 Rue de GreneBe. through 
May 20. 

□ 

Other shows indude “Paul Klee: 
The Last 10 Years” at the Galerie 
Karl Ffinker, 23 Rue de Toumon 
(through May 31); a selection of 30 
oils and 15 watered ora by Albert 
Marquet at the Galerie de la Prtsi- 


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***** 



fijr^eariy a hundred years,-theSfafue of 
Liberty has been America^ most powerful sym- 
bol of freedom and hope. Today the corrosive 
action of almost a centiriry of weather and pollu- 
tion has eaten away at the iiM irarrtewo^, ■ 
etched holes in the copper exterbr. 

. Less tlran a mile away, on Ellis Island where 
the ancestors of nearly halfof all Americans first 
stepped onto American soil, the G^eat Hall of 
the Immigration Center s T a hollow ruin. Rooms 
are vandalized, walls Grumbling in decay. 

Inspiring plans have been developed to 
restore the Statue and to create at Ellis Island a 
fiying monument to rite ethinic diversity of this 
country of immigrants- But unless restoration is 
begumnow these two national treasures could .. 
be dosed at the very time we celebrate their hun- 
dredth anniversaries. The 230 million dollars 
needed to carry out the viork is needed now. 


All of the money must come from private 
donations; the federal government is not raising 
the funds. The Statue of Liberty-EIiis Island 
Centennial Commission appointed by President 
Reagan is asking every American to contribute. 
The torch of liberty is everyone^ to cherish. 
Could we hold up our 
heads as Americans M 

we allowed the time Iff 1 1> 

to come when she "wttr 

can no longer hold TUET 

up hers? ,flt 

You can keep TVWHj 

torch of liberty burning i rr~ 

bright Send your tax- IT 

deductible contribution 
to The Lady Box 1936, 

N.YC. 10018. Or call, - w 

toil free, 1-800-USA-LADY ‘ 


KEEP 

THE 

TORCH 

iLU 


01984 The Statue of Uberty-ElBs Island Foundation 


deuce, 90 Rue du Faubourg Saim- 
Honore (through June 30); draw- 
ings and watered ors by Renoir at 
die Galerie Hopkins-Thomas, 4 
Rue de Miromesnil (through May 
30); Renoir and other painters. Im- 
pressionist and modem, at the Ga- 
lerie Daniel Malingne, 26 Avenue 
Malign on (through June 15); a se- 
lection of gouaches and collages 
done by Joan Mirb in 1953 on the 
theme “L’Enfance d’Ubu,” at the 
Galerie Manvan Hass, 12 Rue 
tT Alger (through Jane 28); and a 
collection of 40 drawings by Al- 
berto Giacometti at the Galerie 
Claude Bernard, 9 Roe des Beaux- 
Arts (through May 30). 

DOONESBURY 


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Jrl/ 4 


By Hans Koning 

L ONDON — The modem museum is didactic: U 
/ lakes you by the hand and leads you through the 
life of an artist or the an of a period. For an additional 
small sum of money it will electronically whisper a 
lesson in your ear. It has come a long way since its 
European beginnings in the 18th-century “cabinet of 
curiosities," where a dried frog with two heads might 
be sitting between a medieval immature and the bap- 
tismal cup of the owner’s grandfather. 

The way from one to the other led through ibe 19th 
century, when the rich collector who had filled his 
mansion with “beautiful objects” would allow proper- 
ly introduced strangers a look around. The Wallace 
Collection in Half end House is much closer in fed to 
(he collector's mansion than to (he National Gallery. 

Two factors put the Wallace Collection into a dak 
of its own: The family that created it was not just rich 
but exceptionally rich; and many of the items wae 
chosen with exceptional taste, discrimination or per- 
haps simply luck. Thus ware brought together Rubens, 
Murillo, Guardi, Canaletto, some of the best-known 
Dutch interior and landscape painters of the 17th 
century, Watteau, Fragonard, Poussin, Titian, Velaz- 
quez. All this in rooms filled with aucien regime boulle 
furniture, porcelain from S&vres and objects such as 
gold and silver barometers, an “eternal calendar” 
made for Louis XV — things the nearly empty rooms 
of Versailles by light should show but do not. 

A key bonus of the Wallace Collection, is that it not 
only displays art but is a monument and a record. It 
shows how a prominent ait collector a hundred years 
ago arranged Ms coDection around hims elf and lived 
within il 

Hertford House sits in one of (hose squares that are 
among the surprises of London. The mansion was 
bmk for a Duke of Manchester about 200 years ago, 
and it is in Manchester Square, less ihan a minute 
from Baker Street. 

Manchester sold his house to the Hertford* and it 
was the third Marquess of Hertford who got the 
collection going. The marquess, who married an heir- 
ess when he was 20, is on record as being the model for 
the unpleasantly lecherous Lord Steyne in Thacker- 
ay's “Vanity Fair.” Fortunately for his memory, he 
was also the buyer of many 17in-centnry Dutch mas- 
ters . S&vres porcelain and Titian's “Perseus and 
Andromeda.” 


His son, the fourth marquess, who lived most of his 
life in Paris, did the real work on the collection. With a 
yearly income of £250,000 (then an enormous sum), be 
became one of Europe's best-known ait buyers. He 
lived as a hermit (“He has never bad anyone to 
dinner” the Goncourt brothers wrote of him in their 
journal a year before Ms death in 1 870) and encapsu- 
lated himself in the an and artifacts of the 18th 
century. 

The marquess's 18th-century approach to life is the 
reason that his collection is now a public one, and that 
it is named the Wallace Collection. Richard Seymour- 
Conway, fourth Marquess of Hertford, never married, 
but at tite age of 18 he sired a son. Next to nothing is 
known of the mother but her name, Aipcs Wallace. 
From 1824, when the boy was 6. be lived with his 
father in Paris. After the marquess’s death, his English 
relatives found to their indignation that all his unen- 
tailed possessions were left to this son, Richard Wal- 
lace. That included the entire art treasure as well as 
Hertford House. 

The fourth marquess died one month before Napo- 
leon IK capitulated to the Prussians at Sedan. Richard 
Wallace was caught in the siege of Paris, and be used 
his new wealth so liberally for the relief of the starving 
Parisians that afterward he was made a member of the 
Legion of Honor and was created a baronet by Queen 
Victoria, who was as a rule not fond of irregular family 
situations. For once, the queen was less prejudiced 
than English society: Sir Richard moved to Hertford 
House with Ms French wife but the two were never 
really accepted. It did not help that Lady Wallace was 
known to nave started out as a shop assistant, that she 
spoke no English, and was, by a contemporary de- 
scription, “heavy. Urge, scowling.” Wallace went back 
to France eventually; his wife stayed in Hertford 
House, rarely seen, and outlived him by seven years. 

After her death in 1897 it turned onl that this 
unaccepted and scowling French lady had bequeathed 
the collection to the British nation, with the stipula- 
tion “that it shall be kept together, unmixed with other 
objects of art, and shall be styled the Wallace Collec- 
tion.” 

The Wallace Collection is open 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 
Monday through Saturday and 2 to 5 P. M. Sundays. 

Hans Koning is a Dutch-bom American writer. His 
latest navels are "De Witt’s War ” and " America Made 
Me'* 


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V / ■j’\ : -w -Jf . - / ’.ZTirailisi , 


French Company 

Handbook was 


Now in the 1985 updated edition, 200 
pages of indispensable information in English on 
a selection of 84 of the most important French 
companies, as well as basic fads on other major 
firms. Includes information on the French 
economy and major sectors of activity, an 
introduction to the Peris Bourse, and a bilingual 
dictionary of French financial terms. 

Each profile indudes detailed information 
art head office, management, major activities, 
number of employees, sales breakdown, compcny 
background, shareholders, principal French 
subsidiaries and holdings, foreign holdings and 
activities, exports, research and innovation, 1979- 
1983 financial performance, important devel- 


aebospahale 

AR FRANCE 
ALSTHOMATlANnOUE 
AVKXS MARCB. DASSAULT- 

BREGUET AVIATION 
AXA [MUTIJELIES UNE5- 
DROUOT] 

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BANQUE NADONAtf DEPARB- 

Q|^> 

B&GHN-&AY 

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BOUYGUES 

BSN 

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COM GROUP 

CHARBOMUGES DE FRANCE 
(CDF) 

CHAfiGHJRSSA 
OMB4T5 FRAN£AIS 
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COGEMA 

COMPAGMEDUMEX 
COMPAGhE 9ANQAI5E ECS 
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compagne g£n£rale 
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EAUX 

COMPAGNELAH&'B't 
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atfcfT COMMERCIAL DE 
FRANCE (OCT) 
attar du no® 
attar NATIONAL 
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DAISY 
DUMEZ 

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FRANCAISE HOECHST 
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l’Or£al 
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PARIBAS 
PERNOD RCA® 

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PROMOD fe 
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THOMSON 
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UMON DES ASSURANCB 
DE PARIS (UAP) 

USMOR 

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VALLOUREC 


opments and 1984-1985 highlights and trends. 

Indispensable for corporate, government 
and banking executives, institutional investors, 
industrial purchasers and other dedsion-makers 
who should be more folly informed on major 
French companies. French Company Handbook 
is being sent to 8,000 selected business and 
financial leaders in the United Slates, Japan and 
the Middle Bast. 

Other interested parties may purchase the 
Handbook at $38 per copy, inducing postage in 
Europe. Five or more copies, 30% reduction 
Outside Europe, please add postal charges for 
each copy: Middle East $4; Asa, Africa, North 
and South America $7. 

Kcralb ^^Srib unc 
french Company handbook 1985 
Prtfished by 

huemationd l Business Development 
with the 

International Herald Trftxme 



International Herald Tribune, Book Division 
181 avenue Chariesd&Gaufle, 92521 Neuly Cedex, France. 

Please send me copies of French Company Handbook 1985. 

D Enclosed is my payment. (Payment may be made in 
convertibl e Euro pean currency of your drone at current 
exchange ratesj 

□ Please charge to my aedtcradVlSAO CHNBSD amexQ 

CARD NUMBER BP. OA7E 

9GNA1JJRE- 

fmaamrlar<imttaidtxckat 

NAAC fabbAhmt _ 

POSITION 

COMRAW 


ADDRESS 

CfiY/CDUNTRY- 


4^85 









^&sd!sST&ia&i&* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 



Dow Jones Averages 


India 13071 T 2 SU 6 T228J0 U4724 + 49 7 

Trans 579.72 589.13 57AM 58448 + *53 

Util IS3JS 13557 1S2BS 15*95 + U3 

Como 50440 51007 50171 SB7J2 + 342 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

Industrials 

Trorao. 

unniles 

Finance 


HM Law Close Ol« 

10*28 HMD 10*18 +0i6 
11900 1185* 1IM0 + U1 
9055 VASO 9SJS +058 
SS7S 55-57 un +034 
11121 11031 11131 +1-57 




Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bends 
uril I ties 
Industrials 


Ooze Cove 

TOM +008 

TT97 +0.10 

78.16 +006 




Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Mav2 — 183339 41232* 

Mav I 189010 398351 

Anri I X 178450 441413 

Anri) 39 172024 457 J01 

April 26 172496 414.159 

•ind uded m me sides flaunts 



NASDAQ Index 


Co mn a s He 


Ctese CtfN 

aaua +ub 

391 J1 +1-41 
3WJU +134 
33AM +136 
27044 +232 
26731 +0J4 
25232 +159 


2SA.M tsm 

2*7.16 mm 

KLd 27036 
338.92 25543 
274.13 21AM 
3*832 VU9 

251+7 222.19 


Tables include Rie nattaawM* prices 
up to tbc dosing on Wad Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Stocks Finish With Modest Gain 


13*4 
24V. 

1896 

22» AMR 
19 AMR 
8 API. 
ASM 4416 ASA 
27 14*6 AVX 

34*6 1446 AZP 
54 36*6 AML 


S3 


s i a 

2% 4% 

38 2616 

5SS* 

mvjiizv* 

2m lm 

<££* 
CM 25 
1316 5 
IBVj 1246 

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27*6 

£&s& 

11*6 4*6 

BOW 58*6 
33 2646 

4346 im 
11246 60 
2946 21*6 
2816 1846 
16 8*6 
69 5016 

3846 2616 
24 1246 


4*6 1*6 
2446 15*6 
30*6 1914 
43*6 2446 
1214 9*6 

2316 16*6 
04*6 59*4 
45*6 
1316 
16*6 89k 
14*6 914 
216 46 

19*6 15*6 
37*6 2714 
30 26 

3946 17*6 
2114 
21*6 

3*6 

24ft 

19*6 
29 
2(46 


1+6 


5814 
29*6 
8646 06*6 
7646 78*6 
130*6135 
22*6 2296 
346 
6416 
26 




209k 2116 

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71*6 79 

109 112*6 
24*6 25 
26 2646 

10*6 1016 
6646 MM 
29*6 30 
1246 12*6 
26*6 27*k 
4346 4316 
346 39k 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Slock Exchange finished with small gains Fri- 
day. but some analysis said the market’s down- 
ward drift was not over yet. 

Most activity centered on speculation in en- 
ergy issues, and some technology issues im- 
proved. 

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 
4.97 to 1 . 247 . 24 . For the week, the Dow lost 
27.94. 

The murke r had been up more than 7 points 
earlier in the day, following Salomon Brothers' 
announcement that its respected chief econo- 
mist, Henry Kaufman, saw improved prospects 
for a cut in the discount rate. 

Volume slowed, with 94,870,000 issues traded 
on the Big Board, down from 107,740,000 trad- 
ed Thursday. 

Friday’s bounce was due to the news of a 
possible lower discount rate, said Lew Smith, of 
Bear Steams. Both the stock and bond market 
reacted, he said, but not in a sustained way. 

“The rather dull rebound suggests that the 
market has not found itself a bottom yet from 
this decline,” he said. 

Hie current low level of the Dow “is an 
indication that short-term skepticism is up, and 
short-term bullishness is down,” said Alfred 
Goldman, of AG. Edward & Sons in Sl Louis. 

He said it was likely that the market could 
experience further selling early next week, pois- 
ing it for an upward move. 

“A blue Monday and lower prices could set 
us up for a rally starting by the middle of next 
week,” Mr. Goldman said. 


C : 


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On the trading floor, Arco was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, adding % to 62ft. 

Houston Natural Gas followed, gatin g ft to 
67ft. InterNorth agreed to acquire it for 570 a 
share. InterNorth was also active, losing lost 1ft 
to 46ft. 

Mobil was third, adding 1ft to end at 33ft. 

In other petroleum issues, Unocal closed un- 
changed at 43ft and Amerada Hess advanced ft 
to 32ft. Amoco slid ft to 66ft and Phillips 
Petroleum lost ft to 38ft. 

EF. Hutton gained 2ft to 31ft in acme 
trading. After pleading guilty to 2,000 counts of 
fraud and establishing an S8 minion reserve 
fund to make restitution to banks, a shareholder 
filed a class-action suit for unspecified dam- 


17*6 e moral uo 80 
5T**r Eascbpf A0491L8 
91*6 Emck«8UM14 
21 CmCmi 
116 Emnt 
9*6 Entora 

1516 EctfxEa MW7 
16 Enttxla UO 7J 
1646 Ewdxl LM 42 
3 Eadnit _ 

1116 Eamkpf 231 135 
289k Eatftm 172 31 
TO » SauttCB .12 3 

89b Ertmrmf JO U 
1296 EzaBsn 44 23 
18*6 EnaC Mb S3 
1716 Ea rl nr 32 40 
10 Ethyls 36 28 
1*4 vfEwonP 
25k vlEvtm pf 
30 ExGrto 130 43 
EH* Excel*- UAellA 
38 Exxon 140 63 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Man low am an» 
IMohldi 200.17 19U1 19935 +0.94 

Traps#** 15221 15124 lJfM +231 

Uftattm 8132 8133 8137 +029 

Finance 2139 21.13 2139 +045 

Commit* 10030 17931 180-00 +137 


12 Month 
HtahLow Stack 


2686 1716 
73*6 45*6 
4296 30 
3416 3514 
81*4 5896 
2716 12 
25*4 1116 
946 7 

33 20*6 

1796 816 


AMEX Sales 



4 P4A volume 
Prav.4 PA vakxnr 
Pr*v. com. volume 


AMEX Stock index 


HMh LOW Om ClAn 

22938 225.17 22540 +036 


Otv. YKLPE lOOzHWl Low Quat- 


26*6— *6 

8» 

2016— 16 

246 

1046 + 16 
1746 + 16 
17*6— 16 
2616 + 46 
646 + 46 
14*6 — 46 
45 + *6 

13 +16 
1116 + 46 
1916— *6 
2516 + *6 
10 + 46 

1996— 46 

2 

2*6 

3514+46 
14*6 + *4 
51*6— *6 


Philip Morris feU 1ft to 82ft in active trading. 
RJ. Reynolds, also active, added ft to 74ft. 

CBS gained 2 to 108ft after announcing a 
two-year agreement with the investor, Ivan F. 
Boesky. Mr. Boesky win limit his shareholding 
to 4J percent, and not participate in proxy 
contests or takeover moves. 

Autos strengthened, with General Motors, 
Ford and Chrysler all gaining slightly. 

Some technologies improved. IBM (ex-divi- 
dend) gained ft to 125, Digital Equipment 13i to 
99 and National Semiconductor ft to 10ft. 

Eli Lilly moved ahead 1% to 77ft and Upjohn 
jumped 2 to 89ft. 

Among the day's gainers were Chubb, adding 
2ft to 69ft. Cummins, up 2ft to 64, Ggna, up 2S 
to 54ft and Dayton Hudson, up 2 to 3Sft. 


13 Month 
High Low Slock 


Dlv. YkL PE IHbHMi Low Ouot Chbc 




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991 
175 
537 

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480 2816 
99 116 

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(Condoned 00 Page 14) 























































































































, > ".T\ 





HcralbSSSrttmn* 

MOM watTW Stp V«*TW»—rfTW VOkM PM 


ARTS AND ANTIQUES 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


Page 9 



State-of-the-Art Restoring 


Replaces Tweezers With 


evices 


**? 

>» *■ 
iiu ? *£ 5V 

‘T*: *•'!?» l? 

>« a 5 u .>* J* 



HS S*g* 


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fl & $*■ 

S '*k'i 

if **5 *• 

»'■ «: 
if :r •- 


Photogrammetric 
image of a 
statue of 
■ r . StAnthony 
lathe Church 

•vif 



1 r 
;! «-* 



* H 


ut 

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* •» *•<■«•> . 
*«. -‘R-a *, 
A'*l V 

». , »■*: 


L 1 . ...... -By Kite “Singleton 

M ILAN Far many people^ 

■da restoration of art "works / 
i mages of a bespecta^ 
bI paintbrush anti' 
tweezers in iand,-6ent over a dark 
and cracking “Madonna and 
Quid’* iq-a lonely workshop. At 
best, this- view fc simplistic, bat 
mostly, itjs completely mistaken. 

.This is partly because in recent - 
[years the whole concept of festora- 
^on has gfawig wi- 
- Once, it was hdd that . ait works 
shnold be; restored to what they 
were when they were created Since 
“there often was no way of finding 
.■pat just how -they, had been, tins •' s .- 
approddr and. the outcome were, to a degree, shbjeo- 
ttve. Soch an impelling desire for historical veracity 
-could also bring about some hidfczoos-sifnations: die 
■ destruction cf a splendid Baroqne f acade, for instance, 
.in order id reveal a rather average Renaissance one 
.concealed beneath it ' 

* Drastic aetkm, of this sort has now bear supplanted 
■by a more conservative attitude;. Restoration should 
mean gentle denning, the conservation of the art wort 
Jin hs present ^condition and tire fullest possible docu- 
joentatioD on all aspects of its generis and transforma- 
tions: 

“ For seme years now, highly sophisticated tedi- 
4 iiqaes have been used to achieve these goals. Various 
'kinds : cf remote-sensing techniques, ranging from 
•^canning electron microscopy to hotograpby and 
radiology, allow researchers to collect types and quan- 
. tides of uLfotmation regarding a pamting, sculpture or 
budding that would otherwise be inaccessible. Hue 
-data embodied in the images obtained are collected 
without damaging the object in question (tm&ke tak- 
ing actual samples) and can be stored on film or fed 
into ai «wpp»ff by means, of an. inilogiatdigtil 
jeonverterand stored there. 

■ ; Howevaytbe computer cando more than just store 
imajres. It can process them and thus come i^nith 

-construction, materials, original cbtos and so cm. 
Since the procesmig has to begmded^Ou the sense that 
[the researcher has to know more or less what be is 
looking toVthe use of computers^ in restoratibnean be 
■said to fit in between the observation of the phenome- 
noo an the ooe hand and- its interpre ta tion on, the 
other. 

i XtbpafSTvjfl^ ^ttospmtdsffairtyjtm^htforwmd. In 
yeafity, il has called fortingor efforts at ovacommg 


In Varese. 



AiditocfcP.Caoda 


C r* 


wo 


until Olivetti stepped in as something more than a 
sponsor: a host almost Since then, the company has 
also supplied the Venice authorities with funds, tech- 
maans and equipment for malting computerized in- 
frared reflectOKOpe surveys of paintings in the Acca- 

demia. 

The person who has probably done most to promote 
such collaboration, to train a new generation of restor- 
ers apd . to imbue the authorities in Rome with a 
iruninmm of awareness, is Prof. Umberto Baldhri, a 
former head of the restoration' 1 workshop of the Qpifi- 
do ddk Pietre Dare in Florence and now director of 
the Central Restoration Institute in Rome. 

Mr. Baldim has backed up important exhibitions on 
the subject with scholarly but accessible pblications 
[_ (for instance, the catalogue “Metodo e Saenza,” pub- 
' ' ' in Florence in 1982, or the more 


a on 


•t; 


i 


IM (■- «-%»»-* 

•a > »* : " 

k • — •* , :■ 
U t« *m » ■ s »* 

G ■ ins »•* » 

p ,#• -J “M * 


In Italy, as dsewheve, the curators df ptibSc galleries 
and monuments tend to be art historians; restorers are 
trained in one of the country's three restoration insti- 
tutes fin Rome, Florence and Venice); and the end- 

.peers, informatics experts and tedurioans wtohanSe M raTlf . w _ 

photoKrammetry, X-ray surveys, themud mmpng sys- ^ ccn } Marco Aurelio Mostra di Cantiere, pro- 

d«cd by h.s R«*) Md b, got tta 


ijl M M Mi: *•- * 

mhn z 

f a.r “i* *** ** 

i-ga*?r5r' 

w q 1 ,. .■** * •' , 

IP: * y.t *,-* •:* !■ 


•even nuhtary research. 

So yoa need artiustorians who are aware of what is 
yang osi m fbe acrenca,and saentisUvrith a senatiu- . 
tty to history and the am who are also capable of 
.applying to a new field tcrJmiqnes developed to 
completely different purposes. 

Breaking down these and ^ other barriers calls for a 


restorers he.has trained to train others throu^i semi- 


nar series such as thepresent “Image Processing to 
’ hdd on Fridays ii 


Art Worits," hdd on Fridays in Florence. 

The first remote-sensing technique to be called in 
when an art work is being studied is, at least theoreti- 
cally, the photogramme tnc survey. Used withpaxticu- 
lar success by the Italians and die French, photogram- 


j„ „ „ metry offers absolutely objective graphic and 

calya. my h *pno* or, OBarad^. imB ^ ical J ^ ^ 


The deamngof Leonardo At Vincfs 
TnAfibu was undermined by waiting facttois 


(Continued on Page 11) 


Gould Sale Shows Limits of Promotion 


$1 Million Bid to Attract 'Greenhorns 9 May Have Backfired 


By Souren Melilrian 


N EW YORK — The Gould 
s ate of Impressiomst paint- 
ing hdd an April 24 in New York 
will be remembered as a land- 
mark in the art market, althc 


not quite in the way that ' 
: wished iL 


eby*s might have 

After months of the heaviest 
hype campaign ever witnessed in 
art muHraf annaig, the 56 draw- 
ings and paintings from the col- 
lection of the late Florence Gould 
made more than $31 million. This 
should have enhanced Sotheby’s 
prestige, bat where professionals 
are concerned, that goal was not 
achieved. 

Sotheby’s overstated its case. 
Too much was expected of too 
tittle. The sale was widely de- 
scribed by dealers and collectors 
of old ■rfawHfng as one of the dul- 
lest they had attended, despite all 
the talent of John Marion, a hriL 
bant auctioneer Highly receptive 
to the mood ot Iris public. 

A tartirai migrate qj the orga- 
nization of the auction may have 
made thing* more difficult The 
first six lots were 18th-century 
drawings which were not particu- 
larly attractive and were totally 
oat of context in a catalog tilled 
“Impressionist Paintings and 
Drawings from the Estate of Flor- 
ence J. Gould.” To new buyers, 
attracted by the hype of the Im- 
pressionist collection, they meant 
nothing. To experienced collec- 
tors, the estimates seemed ab- 
surdly high 

The inevitable happened: The 
drawings sold below the lowest 
estimates or just cm the line. 

Boucher opened the 
hags. A “Landscape With 


Figures by a Watermill” in Hack 
chalk, heightened with white on 
blue paper, was unfortunately 
foxed. Prolonged exposure to 
daylight had turned the “blue pa- 
pa” into a pinkish gray. It was 
sold for $20,900 instead of the 
$30,000 to $50,000 anticipated by 
Sotheby’s. 

The next Boucher drawing, 
Two Patti in Clouds,” went for 


$19,800 (the estimate was $30,000 
IjOOO). A portrait of a seated 


to$50j 

girl by Fragonard in red chalk, 
one of the few that tbe French 
artist bothered to sign »nd d fl te 
( ] 785), sold for 588,000 (estimate 
$100,000 to $150,000). A medio- 
cre drawing of a woman in red 
and blade chalk with white by 
Watteau made up at the top was 
bought to $165,000, a huge price 
although this was only die lowest 
estimate. A very poor sketch in 
ink and gray wash by Francisco 
Goya remained unsold at 
$220,000, which points to a total- 
ly unrealistic reserve price. 

The false start had a drilling 
effect cm the new buyers who had 
come for the Impressionists. They 
learned that the estimates printed 
by Sotheby’s in their catalogs do 
not have to be taken at face vahra 

At first, the negative effect 
seemed compensated by two 
paintings that did extraordinarily 
well A small study by Corot in 
oils of a “Greek Officer” in tbe 
Greek War of Independence 
against Turkey zoomed to an in- 


Toulouse-Lautrec: 
“La Qownesse 
Chft-U-Kaa” 
Oil oo board, 
painted in 1895. 
From tbe coDectfon 
of the late 
Florence J. 
Gould, sold by 
Sotheby's of 
New York. 


Turkey zoc 

credible $200,000, boosted not so 


1826-1828), which sold at a huge 
$935,000, over Sotheby's highest 
estimate of $700,000. 

After that, the auction went up 
and down. A small portrait by 
Corot went to collector Ian 
Woodner of New York City for 
$ 66,000 (estimate 5100,000 to 
$150,000). A Courbet still life was 
sold to 51.21 miffin n, a gigantic 
price. Third-rale paintings by the 
third-rate artist liaine went very 
wdl, a mediocre Sisley not too 
wcD at 5286,000. A marvelous still 
life of peaches an vine leaves by 
Manet made about tbe right price 
at 5330,000, although modi less 



Sotfwby'l 


much by artistic splendor, which 
was conspicuously larking as by 
its historical value to Greeks. 

Next came the masterpiece in 
the sale, a small landscape of Co- 
rot’s early Roman period (around 


than Sotheby's exaggerated 
to $500, C““ 


5400,000 to 5500,000 estimate. 

This led up to the Van Gogh, 
which apparently disappointed 


Sotheby’s as h soared to a record 
19 mfllion. Y 


59.9 million. Yet the price is bril- 
liant So were those at Toulouse- 


Lautrec’s portrait of w La Qow- 
nesse Cha-U-Kao ” sold for 5528 
million, or of the record Pissarro 
landscape, to $935,000. There 
were few inexpensive pieces such 
as the Seurat sketch in o3s bagged 


by Heinz Berggruen of New York 
for 5286,000. 

In any other context such 
prices would have turned the sale 
into a sensational success. It is 
(Continued on Page 12) 



Going After the Unobtainable 


L ONDON — The hunt for tbe great names of 
i European painting of rhe Renai««ng panH fte 
Baroque age is stepping up. 

Few great works by great masters of the past are 
to be seen outside museums and a few European 
churches. When one turns up in the open market it 
generates great excitement. This is what happened 


m London on April 18 at tbe end erf Christie’s 
Mastea 


auction of Old : 


Mantegna's “The Adoration of the Magi.' 


Om'i 


taster paintings. 

Ai the idea that they might acquire an ‘impor- 
tant” work try Andrea Mantegna, museum direc- 
tors and millionaire collectors bidding up private 
museums to serve as mausoleums to their memory, 
lost any sense of proportion. 

Under the spotlights, the painting came alive for 
a few minutes. What must have once been the 
warm, intense vermilion of Saint Joseph’s cap in 
the “Adoration of the Magi” became red again. 
The yellow of the Virgin’s turban took on the 


golden shade that it must have had when the 
painting was executed, sometime around 1500, 
toward the end of Mantegna’s life. For, without the 

pale. Tiiis, Christie's experts explained, is because 
the mixture of ml and tempera has beat absorbed 
into the linen. The fact that it was rdined 90 years 
ago may wdl be responsible for the unpleasant 
sleekness of the pamt surface. 

Whatever the cause, such a faded color scheme 
would have been enough to kill the painting only a 
few years ago. The fact that no less than several 
versions of the same “Adoration of the Magi” are 
in existence would not have helped it either. And a 
third handicap would have been its lack of docu- 
mentation back beyond the late 19th century. 

The huge £8.1 million the picture was sold for 
points up the awareness among the great coDec- 


(Conthmed on Page 12) 


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In the cenrer of New York G Icy, Fifty-Seventh Street 
intersects the world’s greatest collection of distinctive 
shops and businesses. Antiques showrooms, galleries of 
fine art, elegant furniture and fabric houses, interior 
design showrooms and studios, renowned jewelers and 
celebrated specialty shops serve the sophisticated tastes of 
an international clientele; 

Jn the midsr of rhis incomparable location, a new 
concept is about to debut at 125 East 57th Street. • 

Madison Equities proudly unveils Place des 
Antiquaires, America's most fashionable and 
comprehensive assembly of the finest antiques and 
collectibles from throughout the world. 

Place des Antiquaires will feature 90 shops and will 
consist of more than 50,000 square feet of prime space 
exclusively devoted to the retail sale of the finest art 
objects, collectibles and period pieces. Most importantly, 
all stores and public areas will be fully finished to the 
highest standards by landlord at Landlord's our. 

No stone has been left unturned in the planning of 
tiiis marvelous facility. Tenants will be serviced by 
24-hour-a-day , seven-day -a- week climate and humidity 
control equipment, an international telex and a freight 
elevator capable of handling the largest pieces of 
furniture. Additionally, the management 
will provide the services of a resident Place deS Antiquaires 

expert, refmishet, crating and 


shipping specialist and a 
photographic studio. For the 
convenience of both tenants and the 
public, two cafa will be installed 
and an exhibit hall furnished with \ 
audio-visual equipment will be 
available for dealer shows, seminars 
and conferences. 

Place des Antiquaires: just east 
of the comer of Park Avenue and 
57ch Street- Inquiries are invited. 



Une grande 'premiere' pour les Eta is- Unis, une 
opportunity unique pour les antiquaires frangiis: la 
creation & New York de la Place des Antiquaires. 

Un ensemble commercial de tres grand standing 
exclusivement consacre au commerce de detail d'objers 
dart et de mobilier ancien, comme il n'en existe nulle 
part ailleurs aux Ecats-Unis: 4 .700 m J au total, 90 
boutiques ou les antiquaires de roures les grandes villcs 
du tnonde seront represences. 

La meilleure adresse de New York, au No. 125 Ease de 
cene celebre 57e Rue, ‘plaque toumame’ du commerce 
international de luxe {mode, joaillerie, art, decoration. . . 
tous les grands noms sonr la, les classiques comme 
I’avant-gaide). 

Tous les equipemencs er les services d'un ensemble 
exceptionnel ou rout a ere pense en function des besoins 
specifiques des antiquaires. Technique de pointe pour 
les systfrmes de secutire et de dimatisation (controle 
bygromerrique fonctionnanr en pennanence). Telex 
international, monte-charge, studio de photo, expert. 
<&cnisre-re$cauiareur, special isce du transport des 
objets precieux. salle de conferences et ^expositions, 
brasseries, ecc 

Aucun frais d'inscallanon: les boutiques sont Irefees 
cleft en mains (avtc les prestarions les 
plus luxucuses) a les finitions sont 
prises en charge par le proprieraire du 
compltxe. 

Demurrer une affaire aux Ecats- 
Unis dans le cadre de cetre Place 
des Antiquaires dont rout New 
York parle deja. e’est sassurer les 
mcilleures chances de succes. 

N'hesicez pas a vous rtnseigner 
sans Je moindre engagement en 
appelant. 



Agent Exclusif /Exclusive Agent 

RCC, Subsidiary of 

Soocre de? Centres Com mere uux 


Pour tour rrmscipnnni.-m. 


En Europe/ In Europe 

SOCJETE DES CENTRES COMMERCJAUX 
Depan mem S.C.CL. — U.S.A 

20 place Vendumt. 750UI. Paris - Trl. < Jl * Telex i 


A New York/in New York 
FSCJC 

«75 Third Arenue, New York. NY 10022 - Tel; l2 12) .^55-0500 • Telt-c 2«6H5> 


I 





Y 


r 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON ARTS AND ANTIQUES 


y „ \H 


Furniture Collecting Is Mostly Mise en Scene 


EVV YORK — Period furai- 
liure is bought these days by 
very rich people who seek a decora- 
live effect even when they see 
themselves as collectors. This fun- 
ihjnieniai motivation accounts for 
the apparent contradiction that 
may be noted in almost any impor- 
tant furniture auction, beii in Lon- 
don. New York or Paris. 

Tee latest example was provided 
by Christie's sale of English furni- 
ture in Me* York on April 20. 
j nere has been a craze in the last 
two years or so for English furni- 
ture of the second half of the 18th 
century and early 19th century. 
Neoclassical design drafting heavi- 
ly on the Greek and Roman reper- 


toire and favoring such architectur- 
al devices as triangular pediments 
has been especially popular. 

Early in Christie’s stue, a marvel- 
ous mahogany ciagere. as Christie's 
catalog chose to call the book- 
shelves. illustrated the Regency 
version of Neocl ass icis ro. The 
shelves carved with reeding were 
supported by balusters and topped 
by a Roman-style pediment. De- 
spite some missing pieces, the eta- 
gere went up to $7,150. With an 
additional $1 .000 restoration bill, it 


*-ART AND DESIGN 


N MAHLER’S VIENNA 

Onfit^^vMay 

''itSifrale^Cafabque available, price $JO. 


mam 

INEART 30 King St., St. James’s, 
IMITED: London, SW1. 

mOH 


EDWIN ENGELBERTS GALLERY 
HOMAGE TO BERENICE SYDNEY 


Private view May 9th 6 - 8pm 
Exhibition May 10th - end of June 
Fine etchings, lithographs, water colour brush draw- 
ings. oil gouaches & papyrus works by this distin- 
guished British artist. 1944-1983, already represented 
in major US & European Collections. 

Also abstract oils. Corporate terms apply. 


Eda in Ensvlbert's .An Comemporain 
1 1 Grande rue. 

Geneva 

TeI.:iO::i:S3*32 


London cat 

TeL: lC 1 1-245 6565 



32 £cjf57S;» 

’ Tuesday through Saturday 10 to 2 


Amm MOELLER FINE ART 


HASTES DSAWINGS 

MATISSE PICASSO 
CMAGAIL KLEE 


32 2 iiST 76 ™ STREET NEW YORK 

(2H2) OSS 8483 tuesdat-saturiat, t*ni 


V ■ ’ / *4 




ZABRISKIE 


LESTER 

JOHNSON 


Kft mi 1‘jinlmn $ 

’24 Filth Ave, New York 


JEAN LUC 
POIVRET 


f.Vi ml Painting* 

I ” cm? Quint jmpoix. Paris 


VUILLARD, BONNARD, 
MOORE, CHADWICK, 
BOTERO, ARP, OTHERS. 
LILLIAN 

HEIDENBERG GALLERY 

50 West 57 St, New York, NY 10019 
(212) 580-3808 


GLASS GALLERY 


id i.Cr.TR-%. CAKS UlM - SUlTl BVt • NfW Vim. NY YXCt 
M. 1- * ITU 


JAPANESE L7CIYG-E PRINTS. AMERICAN WORK IN ALL MEDIA. 
EUROPEAN GRAPHIC, APPRAISALS. ESTATES HANDLED 


EXHIBITION HOURS: 

WEDNESDAY .iATVWMY l-v FM AND BY APPOINTMENT 


Toward the end of the sale an- 
other elegant but not unique piece 
did well too. This was a George III 
mahogany breakfront bookcase. 
Very slender columns divide its 
panes and are topped by exquisite- 


ly carved capitals supporting 


cusped arches. These greatly add to 
its elegance. Although it was seen 
in a London sale at Christie's last 
year, it sold without difficulty at 
$39,600. a stiff price that looks 


moderate only when compared 
- 350 


will be a dearly acquiredpiece, very 
unique. For 


with Christie's 535,000 to 550,000 
estimate. 


pretty but not unique. For decora- 
tion. however, it is ideal: Thanks Lo 
its small size, it can be fitted into 
many places. 


In contrast to these two pieces, 
an absolute rarity caused no great 
sensation. This was a George II 
bureau bookcase belonging to the 
very first wave of Neoclassicism. 
The base of the desk simulates 


od, as is proved by a portrait by 
Van Loo dated 1763 in which pan 
of it is depicted. When the bureau 
plot surfaced again in November 
1983, this time at a Drouot auction 
conducted by Jacques Tajan. it was 
snapped up by the J. Paul Getty 
Museum cn Malibu for 7.187 mil- 
lion francs. 

Maurice Segoura’s bureau plat 
was advanced for its time but not 
nearly so as the English bureau 
bookcase datable to the late 1730s. 
Its earlier date underlines the un- 
derpricing of such pieces in the 
market although Christie’s, which 
had given it an estimate of 515,000 
to $25,000, was pleased with the 
outcome. 


stone masonry. The upper pan is 


designed as a Roman arch. A sinj 
band of carved omamcm runs ha 
way up. Bidding stopped only at 
548,720 for the marvelous piece. 

Yet the importance or the En- 
glish bureau bookcase to the histo- 
ry of furniture is comparable to 
that of an extraordinary ebony bu- 


reau plat that was sold in 1978 by 
‘ liennale 


Maurice Segoura at the Bi 
des Antiquaires in Paris. The bu- 
reau plat was also in Neoclassical 
style, with tapering grooved legs of 
a "type later favored by the Louis 
XVI cabinetmakers. It was, howev- 
er, designed in the Louis XV peri- 


furniture of the Regency 
period that is fine and nice to look 
at but not rare is on the rise. A 
rosewood breakfast table with ebo- 
nized and parcel-gilt legs and 
stretchers went up to 527,500. Hie 
colors, decidedly on the showy side, 
helped it in the context of a New 
York sale where the emphasis con- 
cerning furniture is increasingly on 
the spectacular. 

Indeed, the American taste for 
the theatrical touch has resulted in 
some extraordinary prices concern- 
ing types that have little or no fol- 
lowing in Europe. That is true, for 
example, of Chinese furniture in 
the English taste made for the West 
European market in the 18th centu- 





CHRISTIES 

GENEVA 

Important Spring Sales 



11-16 May, 1985 


at the 
Hotel Richemond, 
Geneva 


The week of sales 
will include: 


Jewellery, 
Art Nouveau/Deco, 
Bookbindings, 
European Porcelain, 
Gold Boxes, 
Objects of Vertu, 
Watches, 
Russian Works of Art 
and Faberge, 
Silver and 
Fine Wines. 


The sales will be on view 
at the Hotel Richemond 
from 10 May, 1985 10-18hrs 


For catalogues 
and information, 
please contact 

Christie's Geneva 

8 Place de la Taconnerie, L204 Geneva TeL - 022/28 25 44 

Christie’s Monaco 

Park Palace, Monte Carlo, 9800 Prinripauce de Monaco 
TeL (93) 25 19 33 

Christie’s France 

17 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris TeL 01/261 1247 


AGNEW 

established 1817 


Old Master Paintings and Drawings 
Modem British Works of Art 
Sculpture and Engravings of all Schools 

Summer Extaibitioci: 

Venetian Paintings of the 18th Century 

June 5 - July 19 

43 Old Bond Street London, Wl. 
01-6296176 


COLNAGHI 


ESTABLISHED 1 T <W 


Experts, valuers and dealers 
in Old Master and English Paintings, 
Watercolours, Drawings and Prints from the 
Fourteenth to the Nineteenth Century. 
European Furniture, Sculpture and Works of Art 


ANNUAL WATERCOLOUR EXHIBITION 8th - 24th MAY 


ESKENAZI 


Oriental Art 


Foxglove House 166 Piccadilly London W1V9DE 

'opposite Old Send S‘res:> 's ! eohonu 0‘ -49.'* Ai6-- 


ry. On April 20 at Christie's, a pair 
of black lacquer armchairs with gilt 
motifs of bowls and vases Hied 
with flowers went up to S 13.700, 
easily twice the price u would make 
in London. 

More astonishing still are the 
heights to which some late 19th- 
century furniture from England 
will now rise ou the .American mar- 
ket. In the April 20 sale, a canter- 
bury and folio stand in satin wood 
made around the middle of the 
19th century went up to 510,450. 
This is a sort of table with four legs 
rising from a pedestal on wheels in 
which a drawer is concealed. Divid- 
ers. which in this case were artisti- 
cally carved with lattice work, help 
keep the cumbersome folios 
straight. These can be rested 
against the stands incorporated 
with the top of the table. 

The New York piece was of the 
best quality for its style, box suf- 
fered from the heaviness that is 
typical of its period. The price is 
enormous. It is due to the strong 
color of the yellow veneer and the 
mise en scene to which it will lend 
itself in some expensive library or 
study, filled with rare folios for 
display, not reading. 

The figure, however, seems mod- 
est, as does the appearance of the 
piece, compared with the writing 
table of the same period that was 
sold an hour later for S 29,700. The 
vralnut burr top inlaid with rose- 
wood ivory and mother-of-pearl 
marquetry was so ornate that there 
was hardly a place where the eye 
could rest. It was covered with 
scrolls and flowers without much 
concern for consistency and bal- 
ance. To make it look richa, the 
cabinetmaker had thrown in a gilt 
molding that runs around thelobed 
top ana more gilding still on the 
feet. 

Christie's furniture expert. 



George 11 

Bureau 


. .i- 


Bookcase 


A George 11 
bureau boukcasc. 
belonging to Ihc first 
nave of 

N eodassicixni - Its 
base simulates 
masonry . Bidding 
stopped at S4S.720. 


4 


prices. In March 1984, the finest set 
of mahogany armchairs bv Georg 
II Jacob that this reporter remem- 
bers seeing in the market came up 
at Drouot. The model, based on the 
Roman design for curafe chairs, 
fthablv 


was probably executed around 


1 800. 'It is a masterpiece of archi- 
tectural balance — the leu 


Charles Beyer, says that 10 years 
ago you could noi get much more 
than SI. 500 in New York for that 
type of writing table. 


tegs form a 

semicircular arch and the seat and 
arms affect the shape of an inverted 
arch tangent to tnc former. With 
the added advantage of its admira- 
ble detail and its perfect condition, 
the set of four Consulat armchairs 
was not exactly overpriced as 
Christian Delorme sold it for 
288.000 francs. 

Allowance must be made for the 
deficiencies of the Drouot market- 
ing technique. Even so. bad there 
been a highly competitive market 
worldwide, dealers would have jos- 
tled to gpt the set. They did not 
because it is too austere and too 
rarefied for anyone’ who is not a 
collector. And collectors’ criteria 
This financial promotion is all would appear to be by and Luge 
the more striking as other types of inoperative concerning furniture, 
19th-century furniture of great rar- English or French, 
ity continue to make very moderate — SOUREN lyfELKIAN 


'Objet Extraordinaire 9 Invades Left Bank 


By Jean Rafferty 

F I ARI5 — Browsing through the 
kaleidoscope of antique shops 
that dot the picturesque streets of 
Sain t - Germam-des-Pits is one of 
those Parisian pleasures equally en- 
joyable whether your discoveries 
are shipped home in a container or 
travel simply in the mind's eye. 

Next week, antique hunting 
takes on a new dimension when the 
120 dealers of the Carre Rive 
Gauche, a square area bounded by 
the Quai Voltaire, the rue du Bac, 
the rue de rUniversite and the rue 
des Saints-Peres. present their 
ninth annual tribute to the “Objet 
Extraordinaire.” 

During the five-day festival, 
from May 9 to 13. the somewhat 
intimidating ambiance associated 


with antique shops disappears. 

pie are expected 


About 50,000 peopl 
to wander in and out of what be- 
comes a vast open house, running 
uninterruptedly from 1 1 AJVL until 
10 P.M. each day. Dealers will an-' 
swer questions and entertain with 
historical anecdotes recounting the 
provenances of the rare, beautiful 
and exotic paintings, objects and 
furniture assembled especially for 
this show. 


the Rothschilds, has created a sc- 
ries of decorative tableaux, one in 
the gilt and polish or what is known 
as the Rothschild taste. Down the 
street, at M. Thenadey's, Philippe 
La Querrieie sets the scene in the 
more natural English manner. In 
the window, a pair of life-size terra- 
cotta sheep from Madame de Pom- 
padour's Chateau de Bellevue graze 
among grass and daisies. 

Some of the objects are redolent 
with the souvenir of vanished 
splendor. A charming and very rare 
pair of chiseled gilded bronze 
plumbing fixtures in the form of 
two children, at the Galeric Perrin, 
belonged to Louis XV. A striking 
sculpted and gilded mahogany 
chair, stamped by Jacob Des- 
malter, from Jean Waneoq’s, beats 
the bronze arms of Napoleon’s 
Marechal Davout, Due d’Auer- 
staedt, while a 19th-century Rus- 
sian chaise longue, banded in leath- 
er and wood at Nicole Altero’s, 
belonged to the aster of Czar Nich- 
olas II. 



& ■ 
m 

m 




An 18th century plate and a Htron cup. Qande Bonnet 


The theme of the "extraordinary 
object" is present in aQ shapes ana 
colors: a splendid Italian Renais- 
sance sculpture hewn from pietra 
sererur, a charming candleholder in 
the form of a cabbage, which, un- 
covered, reveals a new baby, illus- 
trating the French folktale of how 
babies arrive; a frankly bizarre 
carved wooden fork with which the 
Fgi Island cannibals used to greet 
unwary visitors at the beginning of 
the 19th century. 

The Cant has long been cele- 
brated for its concentration of an- 
tique dealers; some, like Nicoher, 
Vandermeersach, Segoura, Lefeb- 
vre and Bresset, have been passed 
down in those families for genera- 
tions. 


The superb paintings on show 
record two very different pastoral 
pastimes. An early Nicolas Poussin 
celebrates a voluptuous “Baccha- 
nal With Guitar Player a la 1 Nea- 
politan" at Brimo de Laroussilhe's, 
while Hubert Robert's "Haymak- 
ing in the Roman Countryside" de- 
picts an industrious peasantry at 
Jean-Max Tassel’s. 




-as- £ 


* & 


vY, : ' • S'" . . 

■ 'nwwH'y*;,' ' 


J View ftK."- 

: ;.t»- : 


Great antiques and grand deco- 
ration often gp hand in hand. Not 
to be trussed is the dramatic setting 
of the Galerie Camoin. A double 
staircase sweeps upstairs to where 
Alain Demachy, who decorates far 


Some objects are enchanting. 
Biancare&f s exhibits a small green 
and gold spinet, painted with danc- 
ing figures. It was carried by travel- 
ing Italian musicians in the 17th 
century who placed it on their 
knees or a table to play. At Veroni- 
que Girard’s, a mysterious 19th- 
century Viennese lapis lazuli tower 
opens to form two small boxes for 
jewels or spices. 

Seme things are eccentric. Ma- 
dame Farmer at the Galerie des 
Saint- Peres is exhibiting three ani- 
mal mummies dating from 300 B.G 
A dog, a cat and a baboon, repre- 
senting three Egyptian gods, ac- 
companied (heir master on bis last 
trip. 

Prices from dealers who were' 
willing to reveal them vary from 


An 18fh -century French key. P. Leroux, J. Badin. 


450.000 francs ($46,870) fora 19th- dallion with a bas-relief sculpture 

from the Galerie del Borgo. 

On most days, the me de Beaune 
will be reserved for pedestrians 
while other streets remain open to 


century tapestry of Joan of Arc at 


court from the Galerie Chevalier, 
down to 16,000 francs for a 17th- 
century wrought-ixon key decorat-- 
ed in silver with the crown of a 
marquis from Philippe Leroux-Jac- 
ques Badin’s. For 80,000 francs, 
one can choose between an enam- 
eled terracotta 15th-century Flor- 
entine frieze of a pilgrim from the 
famed ateliers of Della Robbia at 
Robert Montagut’s, or a 16th-cen- 
tury Tuscan allegorical marble roe- 


traffic. On Sunday, May 12, the 
Paris marathon. 


running of the 

which passes the 37-kilometer 
mark on the Quai Voltaire, means 
that areas of the dty xriU be cor- 
donned off, including parts of the 
Left Bank. The Carre is easily ac- 
cessible by Mttro, station me dir 
Bac. 


DOUWES FINE ART 

esL 1805 

Old Master Paintings 
Drawings and Prints 
Valua t ion - Restoration 
38 Duica Street, St. James's 
London SW1 , ENGLAND. 
TeL: 01-839-57-95. 


MARLBOROUGH 

6 Atbenwk Si., Wl. 01-429 5161 


FRANCIS BACON 


Paintings 


29 May - J/ July, 1985. 
Man.-frL UUHOL Sets. 10-12.30 


FuSy Sustrofd aOatagum avaBabb 


48 Davies Street, 
London 'WTY 1LD 

01-629-3397/4018 


BLUETT 


Oriental Art 

Man-Fri Pt^O-X'30 


LECER GALLERIES 


13 Old Bond St., London Wl. 


IMPORTANT PICTURES 
FOR COLLECTORS 


Mond/ivs - Fridays 


LEFEVRE 


SPECIALISTS W 
FINE XDC AND XX CENTURY 
PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS 
BRONZES AND 
CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS 
ALEX REID & LEFEVRE LTD 
30 BRUTON STREET 
LONDON WIX8JD 

TeL: 01-493 1372/3. Tbc: 298226 
Cables: Drawings London Wl 


QUINTON GREEN 

5-6 Cork St. W.L 01-734 9179 


Painting & Sculpture by 

JOHN WRAGG 


until 8 June 


Mon.- fri. ! 0-5.30 - Sat. 10-12.30 


Master Prints 

1800-1950 

Regular Catalogues issued 


William Weston 
Gallery 

7 Rural Arcade Albemarle Si 
London Wl TeL: 01493 0722 


PICCADILLY GALLERY 

16 Cork St., London, Wl. 
01-629 2875 

ConUmportay Figurative Pninterx. 

Also ip ed dul ng m 
Symbols! Works it 20lh Century 
European Drawings 
end W a t e rcolours. 

Moo. -Fri. 10-5.30] Salt. 10-12230. 


Galerie Paul VaUotton 

Grand Chen* 6, 

CH-1 002 LAUSANNE 
Switzerland 


EXHIBITION 

FELIX VAUOTTON 

Oils and Engravings 
Catalogue an request 


Information requested on cSls 
by VaUoton for a catalogue 
raison ne being prepared of 
the artist's works. 


GALERIE 39 


96 George St, London, Wl 

KEIKO HASEGAWA 


Ratal Ceramics 
1-34 Hay. 01-487 5(08. 
MofL-Fri. IOC and by appointment. 


tfr 1 



GALERIE 

CORRATERIE 


ECOLE DE PARIS 




!E 


* _ 


BOUDIN, RENOIR 
UTRILLO, 

VLAMINCK, MARQUET. 


18, Corroterie, Geneva. 
Teh 022/28.88.80 


THROUGH MAY 25 

BLACK ON WHITE 


from Monet to Kiefer 

TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, REDON, BONNARD 
MUNCH, KIRCHNER, PICASSO, MATISSe! 
RAUSCHEN BER G, JOHNS, BASELITZ. 
KIEFER AND OTHERS. 


GALERIE BETELER 

Baumleingasse 9, 4001 Basel 
Tel-s (61) 23 54 12 











- - v 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


Page 11 


-•/A'.; 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON ARTS AND ANTIQUES 


Chinese Antiquities: An Embarrassment of Riches 


«™rs h 

f**n j 

trf u Him 

S **>*■ 

ai S4s -v 


y.O ftPQN -r-The most bfearrei 


V 


:u 


‘k 


•»v 


st.. 


if’ M 4 . v . 
*i!bv.-,^ ... 

* :: • ;!' 

*4" 

fe , 

«. I: ... 

*t*i ■ 

awciiL:* ,.i, 

M afLv: ij ., 

S tsms;.',: . 

4WJ«i 1:M .[ 
Wt >M , 
t IKH ei.,.i 

fwtjaf. IV!, 

ittV Lrj;>, . 

:i.. 

ttnwio i 
■f*chp.u|U-: 

• « highly, 

Wwidr «ir.ri ‘. 


. _ T ^deoftite 

art market since Worid'War Rbe g ar ; npfnhi . 
icg about toat.ycaxs ago. It Is now ^Iring the 
maidtet -for Chwere.antiquhitt 'oa-ro unprece- 
dentedscak; . : . -- . 

When the first rumors of cland e s tine vtigpmg ' 
and sm ug gl in g of an treasures out of mainland 
China started spreading-in the 'Wesl via Bong 
FCob& dealers greeted fee news with skepticisra- 
Tbey began to pay closer attention around 1982* 
ite.;m«D^aaed-vessds-Qf-ihe Han period 
suddenly seemed to thm up in droves — thaewas- 
no reason why Western collectors ' . 
should all attaffie have tired (rf one .... 
particular category. •; 1 
Last fall, mcoatrowrtible evp; . 
deace. rif.the : im <hiiVtrafrlr; yittfacrri ' 

dry’s atidSdstie’itoxS-A^ 

New Yoifc»asakof JTineCIhinese . 

Ceramics and.Worics of Art" was -. . 
held at Sotheby’s the day after the '• - 
• 'sup-^ /^sbetio© of the celebrated Sctdoss , ;■ 

v^'t' rafcoflectioit It included a rare and . . -- 
- v beautiful.protopoicdainttr (tf the 

Western Hah period. The lower. . J-. 
half was a fine rusty brown wUle 
the appef part, divided in ccmcen- 
tric bands by ribs, was covered with 
ah oDve-green. Triln glaze.” Two 


■12„. 



-V. 


d quality. Suipris- 
inqnded another 


>!!;• 


ll:. 


i V.i-j,. J : 
.• . ■ "<C 


Uto-sr. Stic 


:r' l 


•Mr: 


tm it 
tffcd for .!.•! 

M ARK.h 

PtftilVt rv- 

(fakoi hru. !• ‘ *'*■ 

- soiwa \ IliJfe 


,‘v 



toitsmonnmeol 
ingty, the sale 
piece that dosdy resembled ft* only 
jnrVing the conical knops on either 
side of caching. 

On Dec. I l,ihase who had been 
lit hi blew Yak and wereriow attend- ‘ 
' iifg Sotheby’s Loudon-safe looked 
in disbelief at a third jar, which 
matched the first New York piece 
within a fractibntrf an inch. The 
main difference was that the oonj*? 
cal knops were set sHghdy farther 
away from the lugs, a variation to 
b6 expected m an Oriental pair. 
The Lpndott jar and the New York 
annpamon piece could only have 
come out of the same funerary 
chamber in which such jars wore 
deposited. 

'Smriliar pans could be noted 
among the Qsb-centnxy wares. Lot . 
256 in Sotheby’s New York sale 
was a.vcsy fine and rare Yingqmg 
A jar and cover with lotas blossoms 
” carved under a. translucent ghizeaf 
pale greenish-NmshhiK. The g^ze 

wm ihinnw tlum reraftjnyl tt y Jug. 

er had a polylobed rim, wbich is 
oncommon- By some fluke, ka 215 
in Sotbebtfs London sale mduded 
the wiattbmg piece. 

There wotp other ranarkable. 
Txanddenccs.” fit a sale held as 



debate its beauty. The new pieces 
lack that smooth 


A large 
: rare 


thick glaze that 
they mould have to suit current Far 
Eastern tastes. The vase and cover 
with carved lotus blossoms from 
the pair referred to above failed to 

■ sdl in New York and was bought ip 

11517,500, although its lowest cst> 
mare, $20,000, was far below the 
top prices for similar pieces six or 
seven years ago. 

Further foaefr in time , Han pot- 
. toy, mostly of the 1st and 2d cen- 
turies, has been severely hit 

The lukewarm reaction to types 
of pottery previously unknown is 
more saronang. They should have 
generated itnmwi^ e interest. Chris- 
tie’s London sale, far example, in- 
cluded some remarkable pottery erf 
the 10th to 11th cent uri es, probably 
originating from the rian area on 
the outskirts of China proper, 
which did not sdL A highly inter- 
estingfooted vase with a rich honey 
daze, estimated at £2,000 to 
£3,000, did not even read] that lev- 
el and was bought in. The same 
mishap befell a saucer with ocher 
and almond-green splashes on 
white glaze. 

In contrast is the enthusiasm 
wife which early gih bronze pieces 




of a new type have been greeted. A 
figure of a Bodahisattva, 


So*»b*'» 


less thian five vases from Henan 
province wife rnsty-cokxed blos- 
soms under a bnrish-hrowri to 
Uadc^aze. The typebdongs to the 
late Song' or earn Ytian period. 
.Until the late 1970s, they were so 

n wtvrf flwamfrte that imy T ravinn 

deater-who had one 
fesplayhin Us window. 

V The . yndrfpT) nmhqjlkatioii of 
sodrraritres, d which several ofeer 
instances were providedby fee De- 
cember sales m New York and 
London, could only mean one 
Jiing i New sources had been 
tapped in China. The finite tuny 
dipped across fee border ea masse 
asfT.land^d.'in.Hong tfnn^ to be 
ofieredtofee representatives of fee 
fending . auction houses. Sofefe/s 
lad broken up pans in order not to 


was confirmed by that peculiar 
bloom retafeed% some of the ear- 
ly potteiy wife iridescent glaze (af- 
ter years of handling, the bloom 
gets tarnished). 

The effect of fee sodden over- 
abundance has been drastic. The 
prices far Henan vases of medimn- 
range quality have tumbled. In 
Christie's Dec. 10 sale in London, 
three out of five remained unsold; 
two others respectively went for 
£4,752 and £4v536. In New York, 


Christ&s m London a day before .give fear sale a repetitive appear 
Sotheby’s session, there were no ancei That fee - finds were recent 



Gold and silver inlaid beithook. 


(I'toiii 1 H»ear. 



State-of-the-Art Restoring Replaces 


._. (CarttoedRiouiFhgeS) 
graphed- This tneans that proent 
and future states of tbe sculptnre, 
fresco or brakfing can be ootn- 
pfircd. It is also ah unequakd meth- 
od far budding up descriptive ar- 
chives of artifacts. _ 


(oration as «e& as fordocumentaty 
purpose s . 

In the next aqi, remote-sensing 


;P- j jpiuu' I 


squt being carried out in the Bran- 
cacdi Chapd in Ftorence also hope 
to reveal fee gia mate di ktvoro 
(work days) in fee fresooes Ma- 
saccio, Masdino and Filqiptno 
A^LtopL Htis was fee work that the 
inter actually carried out in one 
ly, identifiable because paint was 
1 onto wet plaster feat would 
and fix it, so feat the artist 
' as modi as he 
(. Such 
forres- 


codd cope with in one day. 
information ^may be useful fc 


studies may be used to 

<fiagnore an tsl wocftpafeotogica! 
state. To rive erne example, experts 
from the National Optics Institute 
in Ftoratee and fee National Re- 
search Council in Milan worked 
together mbotographic and feer> 
mo^caphic tests on one of the Ou- 
bero bronze panels (“The life of 

Florence. These pands ; arc 
duty, and fee dark layers covering 
them make them absorb more sun- 
light and accmnulate more beat. 
Sadr tests woe able to show fee 
kinetic behavior of fee artifact in 

response to thermal stress. 


-GAUEME MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


,6/ toe Jeon-Mermoz, 75008 PAWS. Td.i 359,8244 , 




APRIL - MAY - JUNE 1985 


W 


EFJK0ll^ f< 



JOAN MIRO 


EXCEPTIONAL SERIES 
OF 15 GOUACHES 1953 


Catalogue available 


GALERIE MARWAN HOSS 

12 Rue d'Aiger Pari* 1" 

Tel.: {1 ) 296 37 96 - 296 39 45 

i dosed Satortby afttruoon «w*p» by flppeirtmanli 


GALERIE FRAMOND 


DESSJN ET COULEUR 


9 Mai - 12 Juiliet 


IAV - 

I WH* TE 




HN« 




GALBUE LOUISE IBSIS 

XT, Rue deMoncem,, 7 SOOB PA»S 
S63ABS-MX37.U' 


F. LlGER 


55 works 
1 913 ~ 1953 


■ Apr3'24VJufMT- ' 

W Daily except Sup. & Motu* 


DCZ5AVRILAU 15JUWI985 



RENOIR... 


ET 

xiNEXPOsrnoN: 


"MATTRES 
IMPRESSIONNISTESI 
ET 

MODERNES” 


Catalogue upon request :10 S 


daniel 

malingue 


26, avenue Matignon 75008 ftris - TtL 26660 JS 


gplerfe tamenaga 


18 av. Matignon - 75008 PARIS - 266.6L94 


OGUISS 


mai 1985 


GALERIE CLAUDE BERNARD 


{ > Rue <lc> Beaux- Art.-. 750U(> PARIS - Tel.: ?. 26-97-07 


Alberto 

GIACOMETTI 


drawings 


April if) - June 15 


OALEKIC feTHNME SASSI 

U Avenue Mo6gnon r 75008 Peril - TaU 723a40^8 


ANDRE BRASILIER 


MARTHE ORANT 

(1874-1957) 

i on permanent and exefusive exhibit 



GALERIE HOPKINS-THOMAS 


Aj Rue de MiroreesnH, 75008 Paris - TeL 265-51.05 


RENOIR 


Drawings and wafercolors 


; Until June 29. 1985. 


CLARA SC REM IN I GALLERY 


ART and GLASS 


fro»N 1950 umi! Todav 
for collectors and museums 


. ,y l‘‘ '. • ! f’>l ( f lAROSNf- .TSri : - TEL.: 1 1 • ?s.s.ss.56 

will open frum M.sv ]4. i'.<XS 


j 




Sotheby’s bought in one Henan 
vase and sold another for S2JQ0, 
half the lowest estimate. They all 
lacked the. calligraphic quality in 
the floral designs in rusty brown 
feat fee Japanese look for. 

Yingqing porcelain fared poorly 



Rare protoporcelain jar of the Han Dynasty. 


SoHwbyt 


stunning figure 
which, sources in Hong Kong said, 
had only come out of China three 
months before the sale, zoomed to 
£47,000 at Sotheby’s New York. 
The price was fully justified by the 
rarity and importance of the object 
A week later in London, Chris- 
tie's sold a sensational gfe-brooze 
reliquary at a steep but equally jus- 
tified £73,440. Similarly, the finest 
bronze belt hook of the Waning 
States period (481-221 B.C), inlaid 
in g old and silver, established a 
record for its type at £35,700. The 
reason is that in case the 


pieces were unique and perfectly 
adjusted to the Japanese or the 
American taste. 

Dealers are worried about (he 
present situation. Those who deal 
essentially in fee venr top aid of 
the market, such as Giuseppe Es- 
fcenayj of London, say they are re- 
assured after an initial period of 
anxiety. Others, such as Roger 
Bluett, perhaps the finest connois- 
seur of Chinese pottery, fed that 
great psychological harm is done 
by the cartloads of medium-quality 
wares coming on the market, ob- 
scuring the fact feat masterpieces 
are almost as rare as ever. 

According to reports from Hong 
Xoog, fee export of excavated an- 


**You wouldn't get another one** 
remains the most powerful selling 
argument. 

— SOUREN MEUE3AN 


ities has stopped. This has yet 
led. The i 


to be confirmed. The next June and 
July auctions should tell Whatever 
the outcome, the jolt that has been 
given to the Chinese market — per- 
haps the soundest of aD, thanir< to 
the widely scattered buyers from 
Japan and Hong Kong to Europe 
and America — is a useful remind- 
er that the price put on art depends 
more on the lure of rarity than on 
intrinsic merit. 


ANTIQUES FAIRS 

Tbe best way to see and boy. 

[ Plenty of dunce tauter one roof. 
DATES FOB YOUB DIARY: 


CHELS EA 

Cheka Old Town Halt, SW3. 
Mottiiemi me 1830. 
SEPT. KK31, MARCH 11-22. *86, 


WEST LONDON 

Kensington Town HcO, W8. 

Mon items pee 1870. 
AUG. 15-18. JAN. 16-19. '86. 


BRIGHTON 

The Corn ! 

Most items pee 
OCTOBER 17-20. 


ARDINGLY 

Nr Haywards Heath, Soeeex. 
600 staOs! (all dales). 
SEPTEMBER 25, APRIL 23. ’86, 


Penmm Antiques Fairs 
TeL: 04447 2SU 


Am.-»‘£TCVt;jj - Niouue -Spi ^;,v!.s I r;ui {/^ r."i chi 
nciir Riiksmuscum 


The Leading Dealers 


ARONSON ANTIQUA1RS 

Dclftwart, Chinese uoredain,. stiver, 
French furniture • ■ vw--;- ••*</.•/ Vcs/l 


HEX KAB1NET J. BEEKHUIZEN 

European pewter, Deiftware. 


BLITZ ANTIEK EN KUNSTHANDEL 

Oriental Ceramics and works ol" art. 


FRIDES LAMERIS 

Glass, Ceramics. Collectors ilem>. 


KUNSTHANDEL J. POLAK 

Medieval ail. art obiecis. 


l O t ‘ L * j i : LL l j t \ { L j i 

b. i i i 0 \ • L, JLA * - i m , 



La revue d’art la plus prestigieuse. Abon- 
damment illustree en couleur, Peinture, 
sculpture, architecture, meubles et objets 
precieux. Confrontation des esthetiques 
contemporaines et traditionnelies. 



OUl, je desire m'abonner pour 4_mofe.au tarif excep- 
tionnel de 128 FF au lieu de 160 FF (prix au numero), 
sans engagement ulterieur. 

MOM 


ADRESSE 


PAYS 


Bon a d6couper at a adresser avec votre rfeglement 
a Conrtaissance des Arts, 25, rue de. Ponthieu, 75 008 
PARIS (France). 


ANTIQUAIRES 
A PARIS 


DIDIER AARON & CIE 

32. av. Raymond-Poincar^ - Paris W - Tfl. 727.17.79 


AVELINE & CIE 

20, rue du Cirque - Paris 8* - Tel. 266.60.29 


ETIENNE LEVY S.A. 

178. Fg Saint-Honor* - Paris F - Tfl. 562.33.47 


MICHEL MEYER 

24, av. Matignon - Paris 8* - Tel. 266.62.95 


JACQUES PERRIN 

3, quai Voltaire - Paris 7* - Tel. 260.27.20 


MAURICE SEGOURA 

20, Fg Saim-Honori - Paris 8 s - Til. 265.11.03 


BERNARD STEINITZ 

4, rue Drouot - Paris 9* - T&. 246.98.98 


Association of seven famous antique dealers 
who are top specialists in French 17th and 
18th century Furniture, Works of Art and 
Old Master Paintings. Their skilled know- 
ledge and professional reputation offer col- 
lectors a guarantee of “QUALITY and 
AUTHENTICITY”. 




% 








; A / •• -V-- 

. .. :%j ' L = ' ;/{ 

fcw i r — ea.-: . 



A PARIS 

^ dpMlTER DES ANTJQUJURESi] 


du 9 au 13 mai 1985 
LESS JOURS 

DE L’OBJET EXTRAORDINAIRE 


de 1 1 h a 22 h, dimanche inclus 

Oigaobe par Je "Curt Ri*e GaucAe", Association des Aitfijuaires a Caieries tTArt. 


LE LOUVRE 

I»S AOTIQXJAIRES 



HO pages (143 Illustrations 
98 In colour) 

Size : 200 x 250 mm. 
PRICE: 70FF(curopean coan tries) 
VS dols IO (others coanirics) 

( Including posiaKc). 


Return this order form to : * 

LE LOtJUtE DES ANTIQUAIRES Service de Promotion 
2, Place dn Pfelals-Ropd. 7S001 Paris (France) TeL (3111 ) 297.27.20 
Name - — - Tel 

Please forward copies 

Enclose bankers draft to the order of SatfCC. 

Orders will only be accepted If accompanied by payment. 


ENGLISH OAK FURNITURE 
xvn th & xvm th centuries 


A CHOICT OF: 

BUREAU - COFTCR - GATELEG TABLE 

side board - drsser - 

DRESSER BASE - COURT CUPBOARD 
WARDROBE - WRITING TABLE - 
JACOBEAN CHEST OF DRAWERS - 
CHAIR & ARMCHAIR 


EXPORT PRICE- CZKnnCAJE OFAinUEVnOTY 


RAPID SHIPPING 


FLOURENS 

ANTIQUITES 

expert •*^'CEA. 


lANTIQUITES 268" 

2(8, Rouktvrd Raspail 75014 Aaris. 7VL ; 335.28.23 
MAGASDS OUVESTDV MAROI AU SAMEtM 
DE 11U A 19H 

“LE LOUVRE DES ANTIQUAIRES’ 

2, Place duPulaJsRmal- 75001 Paris 
MAGASNSOUVEHTS DU MARDI AU DIMANCHE 
DEUHA19H 

24 et 33. Ante Boulle - Pa-de-risauss6e 
TEL - 297JS8.02 



10th BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES 

FONTAINEBLEAU - APRIL 25 to MAY 5 
43, rue Roydc - Daily from 1 1 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Weekend: 1 0 a.m. to 8 p.m., evening on April 26, till 1 0 p.m. 











-«♦». afeS.' -. .A' 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON ARTS AND ANTIQUES 


■*> V'-i — 


^-^xrxxjcsr '■asraKXJ'^: - 


V. - - 





. k‘ 


i' 


Price of Going After the Unobtainable ; : i ’• ■■ f/; : 3 


♦ * 


(Continued Frau Page 9) 
tors, public or private, that the 
great names are going if not already 
gone. 

The provenance of the Mantegna 
underlines the present situation- It 
was sent for sale by the marquess of 
Northampton. His is an old and 
important English collection that 
one would not expect to come on 
the market The reason for the sale 
was the need to finance the costly 
maintenance of the marquess's his- 
toric house, which is now open to 
visitors. 

The Mantegna is not the only 
painting in relatively imperfect 
condition and with no past history 
that went through the roof this 
year. 

“David Holding the Head of Go- 
liath,” considered by Sotheby's ex- 
perts to be a late work by Guido 
Reni. offers an interesting parallel. 
When the large-size canvas, 84% by 
56W inches (214 can by 143 cm) 
turned up out erf 1 the blue in Soth- 
eby’s early suing sale of Old Mas- 
ters on April 3, it was so grimy that 
two cleaning tests had to be carried 
out before the experts could satisfy 
themselves that it was by RenL 

The painting was acquired in 
northern England by the vendor's 
father at the mm of the century. 
There is no record of it before that 
time. It also exists in several ver- 
sions and, like the Mantegna, it is 
considered to be a late work by the 
artist. At £22 million, it stunned all 
the professionals, starting with 
Sotheby’s experts, who had first 
anticipated bids in the area of 
£250,000, later revising their esti- 
mate up to £500,000. 

It is this climate of yearning for 


Baroque and Renaissance Masters 
Produce Auction Room Excitement 


ihe unobtainable that, in port, ac- 
counts for the abrupt promotion of 
several groups of Old Masters. 

The most remarkable case is of- 
fered by the French school of the 
second half of the 1 8th century. 
There were two sensations last No- 
vember. The first occurred in Mon- 
te Carlo, where a Paris auctioneer. 
Jacques Tajan, was auctioning 
painting s and 18th-century furni- 
ture from three French collections. 
A pastel portrait of Dumont le Re- 
main as a guitar player by Maurice- 
Quentin de Latour went up to a 
stupendous 4.4 million francs. 

Dumont was a minor artist un- 
der whom Latour studied: this 
gives the portrait a mild historical 
interest Latour, for his part was a 
highly talented artist, if one who 
adhered somewhat dosdy to the 
academic conventions of his time. 
A quarter of the price paid at Mon- 
te Carlo is the maximum one would 
have expected. Even if allowance is 
made tor the French auction 

E 'S brilliant marketing and the 
ablation of the unnamed ven- 
dors not to let it go before the high 
price they wanted. The outcome 
highlights the dramatic rise in pub- 
lic esteem of French 18th-century 
portraiture. 

The trend was borne out two 
weeks later in Paris at a sale con- 
ducted by Luden SofaneL A por- 
trait by Madame Vigee Lebrun, as 
Louise Lebrun is known in art his- 
tory, shot up to 7.649 million 
francs. True, it is one of the four or 


five of the artist’s finest achieve- 
ments. It made fashion history in 
1784, when the artist asked the al- 
ter, the young Duchesse de Gram- 
morn Cadfrousse, not to spray her 
coiffure with white powder, as was 
customary. She was to come with 
her black curls floating freely. She 
did, and the sitting gave rise to the 
new hairdo au nature!, which was 
widely adopted in the next 10 
years. 

The color scheme, with its associ- 
ation of black for the bodice and 
crimson red for the velvet skirt, is 
marvelous. The picture is big and 
will make a splash in the museum 
where it will eventually end 
resold at two or three times 
auction price. 

The other school of Old Masters 
that has spectacularly risen is the 
Neoclassical school, which special 
emphasis on French Neociassi- 
cistn. 

In December 1983, a painting by 
Louis-L£opold Boilly. an unimpor- 
tant artist, showing a crowd stand- 
ing in the Louvre in front of Jac- 
ques- Louis David's “Coronation of 
Napoleon,” was sold at Drouot by 
Raymond de Nicolay for 2.695 mil- 
lion francs. 

A year later, a lame drawing in 
pen and sepia wash heightened 


£ 


with white executed by BaHly as a 
preparatory study for the painting 
was sold by Luden SOtanet for just 
over 2 million francs. If the normal 
ratio of the finished painting to a 
drawing, however detailed, were to 
be observed. Bothy's “Coronation 
of Napoleon" would now be worth 
at least twice the price h made in 
1983. 

Such impressive records do not 
mean, however, that every related 
picture goes through the roof, far 
from it. The upgrading of schools 
hitherto regarded as minor is only 
just b eginning . There are monthly, 
if not weekly, examples of low pric- 
ing where 18th-century painters are 
concerned. 

In Sotheby’s auction in which 
the Guido Reni established its re- 
cord, one of the finest portraits by 
Jean-Bap tiste Greuze, signed and 
dated 1763, was sold for £19,800, 
which was well below the lowest 
estimate. 

Greuze is mostly known for his 
sentimental portraits of simpering 
or lacrymose young ladies, which 
had a ready market in his day. 
When be forgot to be commercial, 
he was brilliant, as shown by the 
London portrait of a man, which, 
on top of its artistic merits, is su- 
perbly preserved- It would proba- 
bly have done better in Paris. 

Even in its home country, how- 
ever, the Greuze would hardly have 
gone for more than twice the Lon- 
don figure. 





; cl*. :• v .-.^ ~ ■* — ^ ^ '■+ ■< : 

'yi ■ : f . \v: ■ 


~ mr -+ 

\ m y_ + z \ ■ 



A Boilly painting sold at Drouot in November, 1984. 


When a superb portrait of a 
woman by Henri-Pierre Danloux 
was sold for 610.000 francs by Jac- 
ques Tajan in Monte Carlo last 


November, it was considered a big 
success. Measured by the price p«id 
For painting at large, be it a Reni or 
an I m pr e s si onist portrait, the Dan- 


loux was very inexpensive and the 
Greuze dirt cheap. 

This situation win probably last 
another two or three years at least 


m 

Hto. laowi Scfanx. Omutf 


because of the relative abundance 
of lSth-cenuixy paintings from 
France still in private hands. 

— SOUREN MEUKIAN 


* » 


Gould Sale of Impressionist Works 


LEMPERTZ 

OLD ART 

Sale 606 Old Masters • Important 19th G Paintings: 

May 20-22 The Collection Brendd-Cotta, DQsseMorf 

Porcelain ■ Fayence • Sflrer • Jewellery ■ Tin 
Excavation * Furniture * Oriental Carpets 

Preview: May 1 1-18 except May 12 and 16. 

Richly illustrated catalogue: DM 30. — incl. postage. 
D 5000 COLOGNE 1 • Neumarkt 3 • TEL 210251 


(Continued From Page 9) 
not, either financially or in terms of 
Sotheby's public image. 

The money spent in “promotion- 
al efforts” was, m Sotheby's public- 
ly stated estimate, in the area of SI 
million. The traveling exhibition to 
London, the flurry of parties in 
New York and elsewhere, added up 
quickly. Profits were further re- 
duced as a result of the drastic 
terms believed to have been forced 
upon Sotheby’s by the shrewd exec- 
utors of the Gould estate. The trade 
is convinced that Sotheby’s gave up 
the vendor's 10-percent commis- 
sion and was content with getting 
only the 10-percent charge paid by 
the buyer. 

As early as February, Diana 
Brooks, executive vice president of 
Sotheby’s North America, was 


quoted in The New York Times as 
saying, in reference to the buyer- 
financing plan for the Gould sale, 
“We don’t want to make money cm 
this one. we just want to create 
activity in the sales room.” 

Financing is a lofty word for 
advancing money to the seller, 
which has been done for a long 
time, and to the buyer, which is 
new. Michael Amslie, president of 
Sotheby’s Holdings Inc„ said the 
procedure had been used by three 
persons in the Gould sale but de- 
clined to say on which items and 
for what amounts. 

Never before has there been any- 
thing like this startling admission 
that all the efforts that went into 
the long preparation erf the Gould 
sale were meant io put up a show 
and get greenhorns to chime in. 


Auction Sales ev Paris Nouveau Drouot 

9 Rue Drouot, 75009 PARIS. Tel.: 246.17.61 - Telex: DROUOT 642.260 


Exclusive advertising repres e nt a tive far French public auction sates-. 

EMEU PUBLKCITE 

50 Rue de f'Hctekte-Vnte, 75004 PARIS. TcL: 277.B3M. 


M* Pierre CORNETTE DE SAINT CYR 

Auctioneer 

24, Ave. George-V 75008 PARIS 
TaL: ( 1 ) 720.1 5.94 - 723.47.40 - 723.47.42 
Telex: 2 1 03 71 F/ 608 


MONDAY MAY, 13 1985 - ROOM 7 

EXCEPTIONAL COLLECTION 

16 SILK RUGS 

MAINLY FROM 1880 TO 1920 

Public viewing: 

Saturday May 1 1 from 1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

GatdogonrequestF.fr. 100. 



M- Christian DELORME 

Auctioneer 

1 4, avenue de Messina 
75008 PAWS - Tel. (1 ) 562.31 .19 

FRIDAY, MAY 10, 1 985 - ROOM 6 

OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 
FURNITURE AND OBJET5 D’ART 

Matnfy XVlRth Century 

Experts: Messrs. Kanfor and Lacoste 


loub XV wood cartel dock veneered wHh 
stained ham. Signed by Marehand. K. 1.28 m. 


M- Michel BOSCHES 


Associated Auctioneer 
3, Rue cT Ambofae, 75002 PARTS 
Tel. : (1) 260 87 87 - Telex: 216 910. 

Wednesday, May 22, at 2:30 p.m. — Room 7 

IMPORTANT OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 

by J. de Borgognc, S. Bourdon, Fragonard, Greuze, 
Jordaens, Jouvenet, Lastman, Ledoux, Le moire, L. Lotto, 
Mercier, Poussin, Hubert Robert, C. Verelst. 

Catalog available $5 


COMPAGNffi DB COMM1SSAIRE5 PRISEURS DE PARIS . 

NOUVEAU DROUOT 1 

May 6 1985 - doom 4 at. 2 pan. 

Pubfic viewing: May 4 1985 from ?1 am. to 6 pun. 
and May 6 from 1 1 am to 12 noon 
JEWBIS among which a ring mounted witii on im pa fca ri .. 
sapphire, rings, braocte, emerald mid efianond brocetefa by 
sin and Cartier. 

SILVER GELT, 1 S3 piece cujtery cabinet, plotters, vagefc&te cfches, soup 
tureen cmd otter pwces. Chocolate cup signed by Odbt 

CEZ ^ ^ aSAMANO ' 

Ivory, hard stones from Qiina end jgxm. Poi nting on ivory plate 
originated from Dalmatia, XVRtti Century. 

1950 pieces of fumfore fay Thonet, Herbs! and tend. GAI1E cmd 
DAUM voses and lamps. 

XVI, XVH, XVffl and XDGh century funtiture and cfajets dart 

***? nmar AA MATH! AS ftiwflrwT 

78 Ru* da la Growt-OateSm, I9 Rub AnpofBi 

79009 MRS -T«L, 7708360 7S0I7 PABS - TeL 6227025 

Teh* DROUOT 642 260 

RapnsanMbm in Suftwriand: Ri. Iidiih MOSBt 

10 Ave. de St.-Poul, - 1208 Genne - TeL- (022} 36 87 051 


BERNARD OGER - ETIENNE DUMONT 

Auctioneers 

22, rue Drouot, 75009 PARIS - TeL: 246.96.95 

TUESDAY JUNE 4 1985 - ROOM 4 

Splendid flintlock double barrelled turnover HUNTING 
GUN (1655) with effigy of young King Louis XIV on the 
trigger guard. In its original embossed leather case. Present 
from Empress Josephine to Hippolyte Charles. 

Expert: Mr. Johnson. 


M* Guy LOUDMER 


18, rue de Provence 75009 PARIS 
TaL: (1 ) 523.15.25 - Talma 641 958F 

Monday June 3, 1985 at 1 p.m. and 7 pm 
Tuesday June 4, 1985 at 11 aun. and7pjru Rooms 5 and 6 

ANTIQUE AND ISLAMIC GLASS 

Former collection of Mr. D. 

Pubiic vfewtngs: Saturday Juno 1, at 11 am and 6 pm 
and from 9 p.m. to 1 1 pm 
and Sunday June 2, from 1 1 am to 6 pm 

Thursday June 20, 1985 at 230 pjn. and 9 pjn Rooms 5 and 6 

IMPORTANT MODERN PAINTINGS 

Courbet, Degas, FougHu, Renoir, Vlaminck, etc. 

PuUie viewing: Wednesday June 19 at 11 a.m. and 6 pm 
and 9 pm and 1 1 pjn. 

Thursday June 27, 1985 at 1 1 am. and 2 pjn. Room 9 

PRIMITIVE ARTS 

Collection of Louis Carrf 

Public viewing: Wednesday June 26 at 1 1 am and 6 pm 
and from 9 pm. to 1 1 pm 


M # A. LABAT 


10. rue de la Grange Batriiera 75009 PARIS - TeL: 824 70 18 
Monday May 13, 1985 at 2 pjn. Room 6 

OLD MASTER DRAWINGS 

by Chantereau, Picart, A. Btoemart, Logneau, Bated, Van Slingeiand 
Attributed to: Lonfranco, Capconi, Busin, Berlin, Monde, Van Dyck, TBborg, 
Fontebasso, Von Uden, Peyton, XVHtj, XVBfh, XVI 1 1th Century French and 
foreign schools. 

OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 

by Ben on RegnauH, L Tocque, J. Aved, E Lesueur, V. Coddazi, J. Tassel, A. 
Lesueur, N. Katie, J.F. Cohan, H_ Detaporfe, A. Fredeau. 

Attributed to: S. Conca, A_ Long hi, F. Angutesola, J.G Vers p rondc. 

Experts Messrs, de Bayser and Ryoux 
Pubfk Viewing: Saturday May 1 1 from 1 1 am to 6 pm 
and Monday May 13 from 11 am to 12 noon 
— Catalog on request at the Office .... 


Mai ires AUDAP - GODEAU - SOLANET 

Auclioneen 

32 Rue Droaot, 74009 PARIS. TeL: 770.67.68 
Friday- May 31. 1985 ai 2:30 p.m. - Rooms 5 and 6 

ART DECO FURNITURE 
from 

M e Madeleine VTONNET 


MEMENTOS of J 
Bronze 


DOUCET 
MPON 


Friday June 14, 1985 at 2:15 p.m. 

IMPORTANT MODERN & OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 
XVIIIth-CENTUKY FURNITURE 
AND ORJETS D’ART 

Public rireuf 

The daji before lie sale [ram 1 1 am lo 6 pm and from 9 pm to 11 pm 


Sotheby’s new leaders are con- 
vinced that. “The was of buying art 
at auction is much less utilized than 
it could be.” as Mr. Ainslie put iL 
Id short, they want to get the lion’s 
share in the market bv gradually 
pushing out the dealers. 

In the short term, this must inev- 
itably lead to an inflationary trend. 
“Financing" amounts to introduc- 
ing additional liquidities. The mid- 
dle-tens result, over three to five 
years, is likely to be counterproduc- 
tive. The basic problem of the art 
market is the dearth of goods. The 
greenest of greenhorns may be 
made to believe for some time that 
a bad painting is a good painting, 
but not forever — there are such 
criteria as composition, brushwork, 
color balance, relative importance 
within the artist's oeuvre and. not 
least condition. If he is a sound 
businessman, he will soon learn 
where to find real independent ex- 
pertise. When the new buyers start 



4 4 


1 


Corot’s “Rome: Island and bridge San Bartolomeo,'’ painted circa 1826*28. 


Sataby'i 


MAYER 

1985 

ENGRAVINGS - DRAWINGS 
WATERCOLORS 
PAINTINGS - SCULPTURES 

3QJM 0 sale prices L361 aactianutei 
hsxed in Fi i ftf. Gaunr. rngl i nri . 
Aotfria, BrtgrilW. Hcnn a H c. Spain, 
HoQwd. IbJt. Smte. SwinreUad ad 
Amalia. Bruit. Canwk. Bcug-Koog. 

jqpMH t United 

op rtTZ over 12^TO 
(incieni and moder n) on tbe 

400 block and <Mtt reprina and 16 foQ 
P*gc color roprisu. bound in 

French edition: FJr. 710.00. 
EngKab « dhte: FSt. 980.00. 

Ob tee at EDITIONS MAYER, 
224 Avenue An Maine. 75014 Parte. 

EegSeh E£boa bow bdeg prepared 

INTERNATIONAL 
AUCTION RECORDS 1985. 


unloading hastily acquired goods, 
the market will crash. 

If Sotheby’s should, on the other 
hand, succeed in drastically reduc- 
ing the dealers' role, which it prob- 
ably will not, the crash would only 
be worse. When private buyers fed 
depressed or are reluctant for any 
reason, it is the dealers who come in 
to buy the undesired wares at a 


dPhdlips 


OBCVA SHUNQ AUCTIONS 


HorawunvML 

14* May* 17:00 h 

FINE JEWELS, 
SILVER AND WATCHES 

tefc Vtefo g Pay* 

10th, 1 1th, 13h. 13th and 1 4* May. 1985 
Catalogues SJr. 2Cb— 

Enquinm oorftaufap nfc 

ten S. BbwfhhL 
PHttUPS SON « WAI£ SJL 
6 fore da la CM, 1204 Owtare. 
TaL: (022) 28.6828 - Tutasu 22985. 

rr ■ 


F. iMtlCIJX, 

\m» I'fm: .-Vicr ’At cnoMiii.' 1 1 wrm m. Esrn. it**.-. 


113 th AUCTION 

14th May 1985 

Antiques (16th-18th Century) 
from the Estate of an 
important Art Dealer 

Catalogue available on request 


F. DORLENG 

NeaarWsn 40/42, 2000 Hamburg 36 
W«t GcrxBony 


T«L 040/364670 
Tete ibd 0214457 
Cobte: DOEHUNGANT 


BREST FRANCE 


Me Yves THIERRY - Me Hubert MARTIN 

26, nw du ChSteou, (29200) BREST - TaL (98) 8O50J3 

SUNDAY MAY 19th dt 2-30 p.m. 
Sate of 

GfLBSTE DUCLAUD'S 






Collection 
and of others 

MOMM MMVMOS 


PubSc viewing; 
ham W ■dretday May 15 ta 
Sunday 19 

Cotatogum on rmqomti 

AfciA Aia • panebta by 

MBtO PICASSO- tare gaMrefnxbxbont 


FONTA^BIEAU FRANCE - HOTEL DES VBfTES 

5, rue feyate • Hoeadu Chateau - TeL ffi) 4222742 - Engtah spoken 
SUt€tAYMAY3h 1985 at 230 pm. 

OBJETS D’ART 

Haute Epoque docks and iMua 
IMPORTANT XVBUh C84TURY MMIHQS 
LOUIS XV MARQUETRY FURNtlURE 
Me OSB4AT ) 


lower {vice. They act as natural 
brakes in any market recession and 
are thus indispensable to the ecolo- 
gy of the whole market system. 

One of the least convincing parts 
in Sotheby’s plans, as outlined by 
Mr. Ainshc in an interview with the 
Times, is to persuade buyers to 
“have more fun" with their collec- 
tions rather than have these stay 
with them for an average period of 
20 years. In plain English, tbe idea 
is to get people to buy quickly and 
sell just as quickly in order to do 


Sotheby's the courtesy of multiply- 
ing buyersl. and. sellers’ commis- 
sions. ■ 

This idea can- only occur to 
someone who does not buy art for 
art's sake but as a feather to stick in 
his hat or a status symbol Collec- 
tions formed with this aim in mind 
are not the best, as witness the 
Gould assemblage. Those who d# 
this without the millions of Mrs. 
Gould and without the advantage 
of having a top dealer as apersonal 
friend fare even worse. 


* u 


CONTRIBUTORS 

SOUREN MEUKIAN, an authority on the international art mar- 
kets. reports regularly for the International Herald Tribune. 

JEAN RAFFERTY is a Paris-based journalist who writes about, 
interior design and French lifestyle. 

KATE SINGLETON is a Milan-based journalist who writes about 
Italian culture, design and architecture. 


* it 



Henri Mat* . 

MiawNatonritf Art Uod«ne |W 


Fenetres sur Fart. 


Ouvrez er regard ez_ 

Pdnrtire, sculpture, architec- 
ture, photo, arts ptasriques, anti- 
quiics, Beaux Arts Magazine met 
sous vos yeux unices Tes formes 
de la Creadon artistique d’hier ct 
d'aujourd’hui, chefs-d'oeuvre 
dassiques ou productions d’a> 
vanr garde, valeurs sures ou 
jeunes talents. 


L'art n'a pasde fronrieres. Beaux 
Am Magazine non phis. C’est un 
guide international. Son cairn- 
drier du tnois voua in forme |q 
temps) sur les manifestations cn 
cours eti venir en France, cn Eu - 
rope « dans le tnondc. Vous sui- 
wzaussi les grandcs vernes « |« 
cours du marche de Tort, cn un 
mot vous Stes ou couranr dc tout. 


W > 


* * 


Beaux Arts Magazine 

Chaque mois : 29F. . 






Statistics Index 

AMEX RTlOM P.I6 
AMEX htofoSlaw»P.)4 
NVSE prim P. B 
HYS£ titau/low* P.14 
Canadian *«*» P.W 
Currency rules P.13 

ComnuHShM P.14 
Dtvkknth P.14 


Eamtags resorts P.i» 
Fltno raw notes P.15 
Caia markets p.ia 
interest rata P.u 
Market summary P. 8 
Ontions P.14 

QTC iriaek P 1A 


JlcralbSKSribune. 

BUSIN ESS / FIN AN CE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report) Page 8 

.Page 13. 



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54 

O 

<rt 

a 


ECONOMIC SCENE 


5 Economic Lingo May Be 
Key to Summit’s Results 

By LEONARD SILK 

Nets York Tima Swlce 

B ONN — “Good rhetoric." a wise economist once said, 
“has to precede good policy actions.” What is the 
rhetoric of this Bonn summit conference and what does 
it portend? 

Convergence: Originally, the concept of convergence meant 
the ostensible tendency of capitalist and co mmunis t economic 
systems to resemble each other more and more, with capitalist 
systems assigning more important roles to government bodies 
and communist systems giving greater scope to markets. 
tV In the l anguage of summitry, this meaning of convergence bas 
" been abandoned, as President Ronald R eagan , Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher, Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl and others, 
with the exception of Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand, 
seek to reverse the growth of 
government. 

Instead, convergence has 
been given a new meaning: 

The drive lo make rates of 

inflation in the different capi- . . _ . 

talist countries converge to a common, low rate of inflation. Sues 
convergence is now the Holy Grail of the monetarists. However, 
pragmatists and moderates [no one here is willing to confess to 
* being a liberal or a Keynesian] think that it remains necessary to 
pursue not only the goal of low inflation but also the goals or 
accelerating growth and reducing unemployment. 

Yet the rhetoric of new-style convergence inhibits actions to 
expand demand as a means of spurring faster growth and lower 
unemployment. Under the spell of convergence language, the old 
concept of “reflation” has become a dirty and unutterable word, 
dnpp even pumping up the economy when its tires are flat is taken 
as risking inflation and stimulating demand instead of strength- 
ening supply. , . . 

Compatibility of policies. This phrase, lovely in its obscurity, 
to imply that, as nations seek convergence, they should 

.. __ 1 u... nMW: cari1v identical. 


Co mpatib ility theory 
may imply a certain 
contradiction with 
convergence theory. 


seems to impiy uuu, as unuuus m*.-. wuw. e , 

follow policies that are harmonious but not necessarily identical. 
Indeed, the compatibility theory may imply a certain contradic- 
tion with the convergence theory. For instance, if the United 
States economy is slowing, other countries ought to pursue 
policies for speeding up. . 

World public sector borrowing requirement. This is a way of 
rationalizing compatibility of policy. The concept of a national 
public sector borrowing requirement, the money a government 
must borrow to finance its budget deficit, was bora in Bntmn. 
The mandarins of Whitehall have now produced the world 
borrowing requirement, implying that if some govenunems 
shrink their deficits, there is room for others to increase theirs. 

The world borrowing requirement is far-oul stuff that has not 
yet achieved respectability. But it may yet give pragmatic activists 
a stick with which to beat passive monetarists. 

1 ARGET zones. The range within which currencies may be 
allowed to vary in relation to each other. The creation of 
such exchange^ zones appears tojre 

* the * ~ “**" 

tzom 

they 

currencies within the zones. . , , , 

But the French point to what they consider the success of toe 
European Monetary System, a fixed-rate system wuhsoax. 
flexibility, as evidence that a wider and more stable system can 
work. The French appear determined not to permit a dale to be 
set. as Mr. Reagan ardently wants, for a new round of trade 
negotiations. As this conference has evolved, a date in 1986, 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 4) 

late interbank rates on May 3 . excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels. Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rctfes at 
4 PM 


,* « 

Amsterdam ‘ 1X1 OH 
BmSSflUla) 64J463 77.75 

Frankfurt 11W U* 4 

London IW IS® — 
Milan 24H87Q WSIXO 

NMYufttlO M3S4 

Ports *-M 11 'TO 

Tokyo 

Zurich 1AW 

1 ECU 0X995 USE 

1 SDR 0979653 8X1077 


I 

1 1 Eauiv- 1,1 1 ,l " 1 T USX 

" um AustraUoaS 1J1M 

04*5 AMtiton seWUloo 
00156 BriOteB flU-frOOC 6420 

07757 Canadian S 1-3*8 

00677 OanUikraM 11485 

01524 Hnated markka 65* 

00072 OrMkCnKhmu 138* 

01B4 Haas Kong i 7JBS5 


DM. Ff. IU- 
1I2J7" 37X4 " 81777" 

10.115 ASMS 3.1*35 • 

3XM" 1-5»* 

38905 HAS 247000 

635L80 20023 

3JJ05 9X35 2X41X0 

1049 4X025 X 

Closed 

84X5 * Z7S7 ■ 8.1328 " 
22*9 6X335 1422X0 

113293 9.54182 1.98742 

Dollar Values 
s 

Eoviv. 

099 Irish t 
O0011 Israeli stahet 
32982 KaaaUIOUwr 
04014 Motor, rtngflil 
01094 None, krone 
0X542 PHIL peso 
00056 Port, escudo 
02769 Saadi rival 


cur. B.F. 
— 54.19" 

17X04 

8821" 4X71 " 
4J92 78.125 

561X2 31X5 

3433 6445 

2499 15175" 

7444" 6185" 

2X319 4SX693 
3X36* *2.93* 


S.F. Ven 
13440 "14243 V 
23.9SS 2SJ6" 
119X8" 1-2*2" 
328 305725 
753J5 6-004 

1713 254X5 
34263X465* 

1X614" 

1X841 177.185 
24318 NJQ. 


Curroncv 


Per 

UXJ 

1X101 

946X0 

2491 

9.14 

1845 

177X0 

1411 


Cu money 


s 

Ewh. 

04473 Skmapare S 
05025 5. African rand 
0X012 5 Korean Mm 
80057 Spat-poseto 
81091 Swod. krona 
80251 Taiwan l 
00361 Thai baM 
82723 UAL dlrtwm 


Siemens 
Net Profit 
Rises 56% 

Sales Up 33 % 

In First Half 

By Warren Geder 

international Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Siemens AG. 
West Germany’s largest electronics 
group, said Friday lhat world 
group net profit jumped 56 percent 
in the first half of fiscal 1985. 

Consolidated net earnings 
climbed to 640 million Deutsche 
marks ($203.2 million) from Octo- 
ber through March from 410 mil- 
lion DM a year earlier, the Munich- 
based conglomerate said. 

World group sales, led by elec- 
tronic components, automation, 
communication systems and medi- 
cal technology, climbed 33 percent 
to 26.7 billion DM in the first half 
from 20.1 billion DM the year be- 
fore. the company said. 

Consequently, biemens was able 
to raise its profit margin, the eara- 
ings-to-sales ratio, to 2.4 percent in 
the first half from 2.0 in the year- 
earlier period. Siemen's fiscal year 
ends Sept. 30, 1985. 

Siemens noted, however, that 
world sales increase largely reflect- 
ed payment for several power-sta- 
tion projects. Excluding power-sta- 
tion business, revenue rose 10 
percent. Siemens said. It did not 
provide figures. 

In the first half, foreign sales 
increased 8 percent to 11.8 billion 
DM while domestic revenue, in- 
cluding receipts for the power sta- 
tions. jumped 64 percent to 14.9 
billion DM. Excluding those re- 
ceipts. domestic sales rose 7 per- 
cent. the company said, again with- 
out providing precise figures. 

Order intake expanded 11 per- 
cent to 28.8 billion DM in the first 
half, with foreign orders up 18 per- 
cent to 14.8 billion DM ana domes- 
tic orders 4 percent higher at 14 
billion DM. 

An analyst at a Frankfurt-basal 
investment group said that Sie- 
mens’ first-half earnings were 
above expectations, but he said 
that s imilar profit growth was not 
likely for the full year. 

“First-half earnings may have 
been boosted by extraordinary fac- 
tors, including payment for com- 
pleted nuclear power stations, 
which are likely to be absent in the 
second half," said the analyst who 
requested anonymity. "For the full 
year, we see profit growth of be- 
tween 30 and 40 percent to 1.4 to 
13 billion DM from 1.07 billion 
last year." , 

The analyst said Siemens chief 
risk would be whether its planned 

raultibillion-Deustche-mark in- 
vestment in microchip technology 
would generate marketable prod- 
ucts on schedule. He said Seunens's 
performance outside core electron- 
ic operations also would weigh 
heavily on 1985 results. 

Siemens shares rose 730 DM 
Friday to dose at 535 DM on die 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange. Sie- 
mens shares consistently have been 
among the most traded in raxm 
months, attracting strong foreign 
interest. 

Siemens's managing board chair- 
man, Karlheinz Kaskc. said in 
March that revenue for fiscal 1985 
would be considerably more de- 
pendent on fluctuations in power- 
station business. He said Siemens 
expected 10-percent growth in 
group revenue on the year. 


Sears, Roebuck & Company: 
Changing the Emphasis 


1 984 Sato*: $38.8 bllUoo 

Pv lir»M C ! P> MMO* >30**5 

Sears MetctvanChse Croup 525 5 

Allstate Insurance Group 9 0 

Dean Witter Financial Servces 2.5 

CoKtwefl Banker Real EsUie 0 8 

1984 Net bicom*: *1 -46 bKHon 

n, ,«><-. <ji t.isuxss.s m minions cJ doUai! 
Seats Merchandise Group 
Allslate Insurance Group 
Coktwetl Banker Real Estate 
Sears World Trade 
Dean Water Financial Services 
(Corporate E/penses) 


1 980 Sates: $29.2 biUon 

Bvuresotbusrtess inbuhonsot'W*«s 

SI8.6 
61 
OX 
0.1 


Sears Merchandise Group 
Allstate Insurance Group 
Dean Witter Financial Services 
CoktweS Banker Real Estate 



1B80 Net Income: JBIOmHHon 

B> lines ol Dusmess. >n m*wns ol dollars 

Allstate insurance Group 5456 

Sears Merchandise Group 229 

Cofdwefl Banker Real Estate 11 

Dean Witter financial Services 10 

(Corporate Expenses) -96 


U.S. Jobless Rate 
Was Unchanged 
In April* at 7.3% 


Th, Na« York Timra 


Giant U.S. Retailer Sears Is Gambling 
That Even Bigger Will Be Far Better 


Steven Greenhouse 

,VfH- York Tunes Service 

CHICAGO — Sears, Roebuck & Co., long 
viewed as a stodgy pant, now- is moving in so many 
new directions at once that it is almost dizzying. 

On ihc financial side, the United States’s hugest 
retailer will introduce its long-awaited general pur- 
pose credit card. Discover, in Atlanta this fall, with 
nationwide distribution next year. It recently pur- 
chased a bank in Delaware and is negotiating to 
buy one in South Dakota. 

It has installed 306 Sears Financial Network 
centers in its stores. These centers consiSL of three 
Sears subsidiaries: an Allstate insurance broker, a 
Dean Witter securities broker and a Coldwell 
Banker real estate broker. 

On the retail side. Sears opened a small-scale 
test store in February in Alma, a central Michigan 
town of 10.000. and plans to open dozens of such 
stores throughout small-town America. This is a 
new market for the Chicago-based company. 


Meanwhile, the 11 new Sears Paint and Hard- 
ware Stores in Chicago and New York have done 
so well the company plans lo open 40 more, all in 
big cities, next year. 

And, while all this is going on, Sears is sprucing 
up many of its 800 existing stores into what it calls 
Stores of the Future. 

“The exd ting thing is that Sears is moving,” said 
Edward R. Telling:, 66, chairman of the company 
once known best for hardware and home appli- 
ances. “I know the market is there for what we’re 
doing." 

Nevertheless, not all of the new ventures are 
thriving. Dean Witter, which Sears purchased for 
$607 million in 1981. had a loss of S33 million last 
year. But company officials say much of the loss 
resulted from a rapid expansion, during which 
1,000 brokers were added. 

Despite some setbacks in the far- reaching «- 

(Contimed on Page 15, CoL3) 


By Jane Seabeoy 

Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. ci- 
vilian unemployment rate in April 
was unchanged at 7 3 percent for. 
the third consecutive month as the 
manufacturing sector continued to 
lose jobs because of the economic 
slowdown, the government report- 
ed Friday. . . 

Jobs in the manufacturing indus- 
tries declined by 45.000 in April, 
the Labor Department reported. 
The total has dropped by 130,000 
since January as economic growth 
slowed to a crawl during the Brat 
three months of the year and the 
influx of imports continued to dis- 
place domestic-made goods. 

Overall, the number of employed 
declined by 174,000 in April, to 


sector, particularly in electrical and 
electronic-equipment production. 

Employment in those sectors feO to 
the level of last summer, about 23 
minimi, the report said. ■ 

Additionally, the average weekly 
hours of production workers on 
private Donagricultural payrolls de- 
clined Oil hour in ApriL Hours for 
factory workere dedined 0.1 bour^ 
but overtime work increased 0.1 
hoars, the Labor Department sard. 

The unemployment rate rose for 
whites from 62 percent to 63 per- 
cent and the rale for Mac ks ros e 
from 15.2 percent to 153 percent 
The rate for Hispanic s rose from 
103 percent to 10.3 percent. 



Beij ing-Seoul Trade Expands Quietly 


Wadunpun PaaSemce 

TOKYO — Although officially 
still at war. South Korea and China 
are carrying out trade with an esti- 
mated value of up to S8Q0 million 
annually. The exchanges are in- 
creasingly open, and they now ex- 
tend beyond commerce to official 
contacts. 

China and South Korea fought 
each other during the 1950-53 Ko- 
rean war and have never officially 
made peace. But ships bearing the 
red star of the Chinese merchant 
marine can sometimes be seen at 
South Korean docks these days, 
unloading oil. coal and yam for 
textile factories. 

Across the Yellow Sea. South 
Korean vessels are frequent callers 
in ports on the China coast, bring- rival companies 
ing consumer goods that China is - — 


future.'’ said a Seoul analyst who 
follows the trade closely. 

Exporters prefer affluent, devel- 
oped markets like the United 
States, which bought more than 
$10 billion in South Korean goods 
last year. But they are fearful of 
protectionism. 

Many erf those with first-hand 
experience in China, however, real- 
ize things move slowly there. 

From 40 to 50 South Korean 
trading companies with branches 
in Hong Kong are de ali n g with 
China. Contracts often are negoti- 
ated by Hong Kong Chinese or by 
Korean-Americans. But increasing 
numbers of exporters themselves 
are going into vhina. 

Electronics account for many of 


textile plants. In the last three 
months of 1984, South Korea was 
reported to have bought 385.000 
tons of Chinese com. about half its 
total foreign purchases of corn in 


106.9 million, and the number of 
unemployed was unchanged at 8.4 
million for the third consecutive 
month, according to a Labor De- 
partment survey of households. A 
separate survey of businesses 
showed that jobs increased "by 
217,000 last month. 

The unemp loyment picture has 
changed little since last tall and the 
unemployment rate has dr~ 
only from 73 percent last 
Economists said Friday thaL 
latest report confirmed predictions 
tha t the economy may oe headed 
toward a “growth recession." 
when too few jobs are created to 
prevent the unemployment rate 
from rising. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, disagreed, saying 
that “the nation’s economy re- 
mains strong. Despite the fact that 
the unemployment rate has not 
fallen intnrce months, we still see 
total employment in this country 
pi nning at all-time highs." 

Ac tually , employment was high- 
er in March, with 107.1 million 
persons with jobs. 

“We have some serious prob- 
lems, deafly," Mid Janet L. Nor- 
wood, commissioner of the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics. ”1116 restruc- 
turing of our employment and the 
disparities in manufacturing are 
not easy to adjust to.” 

Tbe nondurable manufacturing 
industries have recovered’ only 


Dollar’s Rally 
Continues 
In New York 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
staged a powerful advance in light 

trading Friday, extending a rally in 

which it now has regained more 
than half the ground tost in a steep 
selloEf earlier this year. 

Even such usually bearish devel- 
opments as a lackluster economic 
report and a decline in interest 
rates in the United States failed to 
halt the dollar's surge. 

“The steamroller for the dollar is 
m its way and no one is pbing to 
stand in its way because it is shrug- 
ring off all negative news,” said 
Albert Soria, a vice president at the 
New York branch of Swiss Bank 
Corp. . . 

jBut traders now are viewing the 
slowdown “as a very temporary 
thing,” said Jack BaxfaaneL a first 
vice president at Gruntal & Co. 
Itkl, a New York investment firm. 

Mr. Baihand said the British 
pound, which had gained the most 
from the dollar's slide, has been 
amrmg ihemajorlosers as thedol- 
lar rebounded. 

In Loudon, the dollar continued 
to rise against the pound bn Frf J ~* 
with, sterling slipping to St. 


that period. uumuuiu ■«.•* ■ — ■ — - ~~~ j 

China's leaders appear to want about twtKhirds of jobs louring 
to reduce tension in*eregion and the recessioa wS Lrlier. Lattt^riday in New 


concentrate on development By 
dealing with South Korea, they 
build trust while getting low-cost 
goods for their own petmle. 

South Korea, meanwhile, favors 
almost anything that will loosen 
ties between the North and China. 
In addition, trade brings a de facto 
recognition from the world’s most 
populous country. 


bte products— those that generally 

last three years or more — have 
recovered slightly more, she said. 

David Jones, chief economist for 
Aubrey G. Lanston & Co., said the 
increase in payroll employment 
was much smaller than many ana- 
lysts had expected, suggesting that 
income growth in the future Mil 
slow, leading to a posable growth 


. , . „ the sales. Daewoo, the giant indus- 

Korean vessels are frequent ratters trading group, and two 

in ports on the China coast, bnng- companies in the field, Sam- w 

ing consumer goods that China is , unean d Gold Star, are selling tele- the return of a -j— — — — — r — ~ 

providing its purple is part of mod- airliner and its passengnn. more perynave. Ttojs mm con - 

- ■- nrMwamc Tplwiciilll _ . .. • ■ In Men'll 


USX 

irm 

1.99 

U940 

17525 

9.17 

39X7 

27X65 

3X729 


K STtfflD9" 1X438 iridi i 

Urt Commercial franc tbt Amounts m*0«l to tm one rouns iciAmowibnetaBaiohuvoMOoiiari-) 
unmol loai«1UnilsoMX«IIv> Units ol HUM) 

SSSwMl; Banco Commercial* t lot torn (Mlonl; Bam iue 
Bamue -ro* ei tntemotumole MM-M 
I amor, rival, dirham). Other data from Reuters and AP 


Interest Rates 


<V 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


May 3 


Oolior 
IM. 8W -8». 

2M. 16 -8% 

1U. 8 

6M. 8W - * 

IY. 9Vj ■ 9H 


SwfcH 
p M a rt Front 
5 ■w - 5 ■*. 5 ■ SW 

5 • 5 - SU 

Stt - S* SW ■ 5*. 

- 6 s*t - s». 

6 /. - 6 *W 3 9W ■ 5fc 


Franc* 

StarUno Front ECU SDK 

ITU ■ 1T9» 10 V. - 10 *• - 9W Bta 

12%. I2v. HP6 - 10» 9 t. -9^, 8 "u 

12W - 124& 10».- 10*. 9^ - 9ta 8'<* 

12ta ■ 12 1 * 1W6 - HJta • 9*. Slrc 

12 vi. . 12 6, I0*k-11*k 94i -9 1 *. Bta 


to Interbank deposits at SI million minimum tor equivalent). 
^SSStdeaor. DM. SF. Foun* FF>: LUtvdS Bonk tecUii 

tSDR). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


May 3 


1 mo. 

Bta -8* 

Source: Reuters. 


1 mss. 
Blfe -Bta 


3 mo*. 
Bta -836 


4 ITHJV 

846 •» 


I tear 
9Vi -Wi 


Key Money Rates 

United States 


Britain 


i. 


Close Prey. 

B 8 

7V. 8*9 

IQVj 10Va 

9U-9M 9'*.9V» 
8.10 820 

7X2 720 

7X1 8X0 

7.90 7.95 

7.95 8X5 


DlSCOiml ROta 
Federal Funds 
Prim* Rot* 

Broker Loon Rata 
, Comm. P0P*r. 30-179 dors 

3- month Treasury Bills 

4- month Treasury BIBS 
CD's 30-59 da*l 
CD's 60-89 days 

West Germany 

Lombard Rota 
OvarrtOlrt Rota 
On* Month inter bonk 
3-month Interbank 

5- enantn lnlortxyvti 

France 

imervenllon Rale 
Call Money 
One-month Interbank 
> month interbank 

6- monih interbank 

C" hWH.- Stouten. Cenunenbank. Credit LV- 
onnats. Uovds Bonk. Bank at Tekve. 


Bank Base Rale 
Call Money 

91-dav Treasury Bill 
3-manlh i filer Dank 

Japan 

Discount Rote 
Cou Monev 
60-Oar Interbank 


Close Prev. 

12'n 12'* 

12ta 12W 
12 3/16 12 1/T6 
12Se 12k. 


5 S 

Clsd 6W 

— M 


6X0 

US 

5X5 

5-95 

6.10 


6X0 

5X5 

5.90 

6X0 

6.10 




I0«i 
lOVa 
»0'fc 
10 5/16 10 S/I* 
lave low 


igu 

lO're 

lOha 


AXIL 

314X5 

3I«X0 

315X3 

314.0S 

31170 


PA 

314X5 


Hang Kang 
Luxembourg 

Paris <125 klloi 315X3 3T3J4 

2urkb 114.05 31195 

London 313.70 31275 

Hew Var» - 31 *40 

OHidal hyingn lor London. Para an d U n*m- 
txurg. aaening and etoslno prices tor H cngK ong 
and Zurten. New rqr* Comen curreM rnlraci. 
All prices « \|1S oer arnce. 

Source Reuters 


Chba 

— 0X0 

— 030 

— 026 
— 020 

— 0-50 

— 3X0 


West German 

Unemployment 

FeUinMarch 

Reuters 

BONN — Unemployment in 
West Germany Tell last month 
as the weather improved after a 
particularly severe winter, but 
the number of people out or 
work remained higher than in 
April of Iasi year, ihe Federal 
Labor Office said. Friday. 

The jobless total fell to 2.30 
million, or 9.3 percent of the 
work force, from 147 million or 
10 percent in March, ihe office 
said. The toial in April of Iasi 
year was 125 million. 

Heinrich Franke of the labor 
office, said the figures showed 
that unemployment caused by 
one of the coldest winters in 
years was falling. 

During the worst of the bitter 
weather in January, unemplov- 
rnen L hit a post-war peak of 2.62 
million, with jobs in the con- 
struction industry especially 
hard hit. 

The government has said that 
ihe jobless total should fall this 
year, bui the country's five 
leading economic research in- 
stitutes predicted this week that 
unemployment would rise in 
1985. 


ernization programs. Television 
sets, radios and textiles are com- 
mon items. 

The trade began in secrecy in the 
1970s, often using Hong Kong 
middlemen and faked documents. 
Wraps are slowly coining off. and 
ships sometimes sail directly be- 
tween the two countries, which are 
only about 200 miles (322 kilome- 
ters) apart 

Commerce has grown to the 
point that cargo routed through 
Hong Kong alone in the first 11 
months of 1984 was worth at least 
5300 million and estimates of the 
total for 1984 through all ports run 
as high as 5800 million. 

Trade has smoothed ihe way Tor 
govern meat - 1 o-govern men i con- 
tacts. In ihe view of many analysis, 
the Beijing-Seoul thaw has helped 
raise chances for serious dialogue 
between the intensely hostile gov- 
ernments of North and South Ko- 
rea, although Few expect dramatic 
breakthroughs. South and North 
are to resume talks on family re- 
unions and economic cooperation 
this month. 

Officials who run South Korea's 
export-fueled economy still rou- 
tinely refuse to discuss the trade. 

“The Koreans believe lhat China 
is the only large markeL left for the 


South Korea's purchases focus 
on industrial supplies, farm prod- 
ucts and energy. Chinese cotton 
vam now is widely used in Korean 


Although Bdjmg and Seoul have recession by the end of &e year, 
no diplomatic relations, they are in “More important is the decline 

frequent touch. Official contacts in manufacturing employment, 
began in 1983, when a Chinese del- Mr. Jones said. “Since late sumroer 
egation visited Seoul to negotiate tbe drag on the economy from the 
rf a hijacked Chinese deepening trade deficit is becoming 

its p assenger s. more pervasive. This is more con- 

In March, the two governments Firmation that the UA economy is 
made contact in Hong Kong to being de-industnalized. 
arrange the return of a Chinese The largest job loss m manufac- 
torpedo boat. wring was ra the high-technology 


York, s&erimgfdl to $1-1970 from 

$12165 late Thursday. 

David Pakner, a senior vice pres- 
ident at First American Bank of 
New Yoik, said that with trading 
extremely light, the pickup in de- 
mand for dollars pnrvided an exag- 
gerated lift for the dollar, . 

: Dollar rates in New York, com- 
pared with late rates Thursday, in- 
cluded: 32305 Deutsche marks, up 
from 3.1780; 2.7150 Swiss francs, 
up from 2.6675, and 9.835 French 
francs, up from 9.690. 

Earlier in. Europe, the doOm^s 
rate, compared to Thursday, in- 
cluded: 3.8905 DM, up from 
3.8668; 9.74 French francs, up 
from 9.623, and 2689 Swiss francs, 
up from 2655. 


On the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENC H 
CASINO WITH A FI LL 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 


Markets Closed 


Financial markets were dosed Friday and will be closed on Mon- 
day in Japan because of holidays. Financial markets will be dosed 
Monday in Britain because of the May Bank Holiday. 


Gold OptMKlS ifriatkVo 



Mo* 

*•* 

No. 

310 

TtUBMIXD 





320 

sm 630 

14501801 

• 


225 271 

12501330 

mmjix 

W 

■ DO. 2W 

UMQ00 

1601730 


am i« 

575 725 

1250 U30 

360 

02. 073 

*00 590 

430H* 

310 

— 

230. *00 

'00 830 


Vafan WUteWeM SLA. 

f. Qua 4 b Moot- Blanc 
1211 Gam I. SwB m l eu d 
TcL 310251 - Tdn 2SM5 


Loews 
LaNa R oule| 

li\c minute* drive 
lri»m dimni«ivvn < 'unites. 

• in i he beach 


FOR INFORMATIONS : 
PLEASE CALL 
(93) 49.90.00 


Phibrobank AG is pleased to announce that its 
business will be conducted in the future under 
the new name of 

OMNIBANK AG 

As before, its business activities with an 
emphasis on portfolio management, invest- 
ment consultancy, securities, new issues, 
money market and foreign exchange oper- 
ations as well as trade finance and commer- 
cial credits will continue to be carried out in 
the thorough and traditional manner of Swiss 
banking. 

OMNIBANK AG 

Head office in Zug (Switzerland) Posrfach 561, CH-6301.Zug? 
Branch in London, Moor House, London Wall, London EC2 Y 5ET 
and shortly also in Zurich; subsidiary in Hamburg, Hamburger 
Handelsbank GmbH & Co., Postfach 132304, D-2000 Hamburg 13- 


r : 

-. *i 

if 


i ij 

I ij; 

! i 





.3 




Page 14 - 


I INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATCRDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 




firidays 

NISE 

Qosiii^ 

Tobies Include Hie notionwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


H Month 

HWiUw Stack 


SI&. QOM 

Dlv. YW. PE lD0sHWlLOwQlWt.CWVC 


S* 20 * I aaCM 03 1 J '< ** SS ?!ft + * 

* % \r ig Ig^s 


21 Vi 12 % Saoawl .If 32 * If* ISS ISS ... 

2 m l* 1 fc SwUAJr >0 IB 13 XU 34 22 % 22 £— 

1 M im SooIPw 1 BO 13 7 230 3356 Oh 23 % + J* 


« Month 
High Low Sloe* 


sis. Class 

OlV. YU. PE IQQSHtOh Low Pool- Ctraa 


(Continued from Page 8) 

SMS IS PSA d U S 3 2 SS 24 % 24 MW 

19 % 1314 PSAdPf 1.90 97 28 19 Y, 19 % 19 % + Vi 

13 % llh POCA 5 184 lid IS IIU 13 % 13 % 

law 13 PacGE 172 9 0 7 2417 18 % 18 18 % + Jk 

44 % 30 % PocLtu 132 80 11 483 £ 2 * 41 — 2 

29 21 VI PcLurn 170 47 IS J 3 S 25 * 24 % 25 % + * 

9 % 5 % PocRos JBr J » 104 *» • «* + ■* 

19 13 % PocRoofiOO 11.1 28 18 17 % 18 

17 % 111 k PocSd Bl U 17 33 15 * 1SV. 15 * + % 

raw 54 PoCTofe 172 88 8 1083 70 % 49 % 70 + 1 % 

13 9 V> PocTln do 33 10 IS 12 % 12 12 % 

2 gk 21 * PodfCP 237 12 8 » 3 W »5 Oh 

3 M& 27 % Fadf pf 4 B 7 128 17 31 % 31 * 31 *— % 

42 * 25 PolnWb 00 13 49 1297 34 * 34 3 M + Vk 

34 Vk 26 % PalnWpf 22 S 7 d 188 2 W 4 ® 29 * + * 

39 244 k PcrimBc 130 3.1 T 7 40 38 Vi 38 * 38 % 

28 % 20* PanABk 30 27 I 10 26 * 24 2 * — * 

4 * 4 PanAm 3193 5 Vk 4 * 5 * + * 

3 * 1% PanA ivt 190 2% 2 Vj 2 * + % 

21 13 * Pondcfcn 30 18 19 77 15 * 15 * 1 » + % 

39 * 31 PanhEC 280 64 10 1208 34 3 «k 3 g% +1 

5 * 3 PantPr 10 «* 5 * 5 * 5 V. 

19 * 12 * PopTCfl JO 45 M 120 17 % 17 % 17 * + % 


45 * 37 * SaarteG 1 B 0 2B 14 Ml 49 * 49 4 V* + * 

37 * 29 * Scars 13 * 41 9 <ns 34 * »» 34 W + % 

HK n 1 . 1 . M Lit IM* 85 10 105 103 * 105 4 - 1 * 

31 % 19 sSR?Sl« 4 J 7 U 71 £% W» ZT -* 
20 * 11 * jolnll 5 17 * 17 * IT* 

35 * 23 * SvcClil 40 IB 14 1199 31 * 31 * 31 *— Vk 

20 * im jS Sd 3 ? 2 I 2 J J 2 £ £SS 

25 * TO* Shawl O dO 29 7 89 M 222 2 £ +W * 

40 52 * Studio 200 14 11 63 S 9 % S 9 % Sgk 

39 % 28 * ShaUT 157 * SJ 5 29 » 34 35 % g% — £ 

30 th 17 V. ShclGlo JO U 1 76 3 §Jk 25 * »% — % 

35 * 24 Sftndn 52 2d 12 373 35 * 34 * 35 %—% 

gUi jv> SMftwn 6 78 6Ui 61% + tm 

mi 12 SMWtt i0 45 1) 12 11% 11% 1JV* — J6 

im T 2 % s 5 ?« IBM 8 »9 TTVk 17 TAk + * 

37 24 * Slonal 1B0 10 13 2044 MV 33 % 2 *” 5 

59 * 48 * Sonipf 4.12 7.1 4 58 % SB 58 — % 

38 * 24 Sinner .10 3 9 894 35 * 34 * 35 + * 

31 * 26 * Stnorpf SdOlU 2 30 * 30 * 3 ^ + * 

» 12* Skyline 48 3 d 19 101 0 U 4 K 

20 * 9 * Smith rn 32 3 B 247 18 * 10 * 1 W 6 

44 * 50 * ScnkB 2 B 0 43 10 5443 4 Mk 44 * M* +1 

57 * 34 * Smuckr IBS 2 B 14 20 53 * S 3 * 53 * 4 - Vk 

41 * »* USES lS 3 B 12 tg am 34 * + * 

43 * 27 Sorat IBS ijb 8 4008 40 * 37 * 40 +1 

mk :r* IS? CP -W. IB 13 741 14 * U* 1 HJ- Wf 

29 * 22 * SoaLJn IJ 0 4 .T 1 S 44 29 * 28 * 29 * + * 

38 * 27 * Source 120 04 33 37 M* g + * 

22 * 18 5 rcCnpf 240 IQS 20 H 2}V. M + * 


18 * 10 W Pordvn 33 

21 * iz* PorkEs 10 

12 * 5 * PorkDri .16 25 
39 * 25 * PorfcH 1.12 3 JB 9 
19 * 13 ParkPn S3 U 31 

2 * l* PulPtil 14 

17 * 11 * POVNP dO 47 II 

21 * 13 * PovCsh .16 A 19 

11 * 6 * PratxJr B 0 27 

1 * Penoo 

54 * 41 * PenCen 11 

55 * 44 * Penney Ui il ■ 
27 * 30 * PaPL 256 104 8 
37 * 30 PoPL pf 450 13 J 
70 57 * PaPL pf 840 124 

27 * 23 * PaPLdP IXO 123 
24 * 30 PoPLdortSO 12 B 
a 56 * PoPL or 840 I 2 S 
27 * 22 * PaPLdpi 025 12.1 
30 * 25 * PaPLANOTS 1 ZB 
84 * 45 * PaPLpt 934 107 
96 * 81 * PaPLprllJOO lid 
103 94 * PaPL PTT 3 B 0 127 

45 54 * PaPLPT BB 0 128 

70 58 * PaPL pr 8 JD 13 B 


33 64 13 * 12 * 13 * + * 

10 25 14 * 14 * 14 * + * 

.16 25 53 4 * 6* <* 

.12 18 7 838 29 * 38 * 29 * + * 

52 25 31 53 18 * 18 * 18 * 

14 74 2 * 2 * 2 * 

3 ^ i 9 i^ja^iSS + 5 
" 17 42 ^ ^ TU* 

11 191 S 3 * 52 52 * 4 - * 

56 5.1 B 729 46 * 46 46 * 

L 56 104 8 853 24 * 24 24 * 4 - * 

50 113 40 x 34 * 36 * 36 * + * 

L 40 124 52 ttt 49 * 48 * 69 * +1 

43 113 23 27 * 27 * Z 7 * + * 

ISO 125 9 24 * 24 * 24 * 

140 125 ’Mte 45 65 65 — * 

125 12.1 51 27 26 * 24 * 

175 12 B 25 39 * 29 * 27 *+ M 

54 107 lffifa Bfi* 86* 84 * 

B 0 lid 190 z 94 * 94 * 94 *— 1 * 

B 0 127 10 x 102 102 102 —1 

BO 128 7UU 62 * 42 * 62 * + * 

70 135 8001 67 67 67 


26 * 22 SaJerln 
49 * 41 Soudwn 
30 * 22 SoetBk 
11 * 5 * SaetPS 

25 * 18 SCalE s 
20 * 14 * SeuthCe 
25 * 17 SoInGes 
41 * 29 5 NETI 
34 * 31 * SeNEPf 
24 * 21 * SoRypf 
31 23 SaUrtCo 

33 * 23 Sauttnd 
17 11 * So Roy 

8 * 6 * Soumrk 
54 * 48 Samk pf 
24 14 * 5 wAlr 1 

22 * 11 * 5 wl Far 


40 * 31 * Patwtt 250 45 11 104 »k 34 * 34 *— M 

25 * jo Penwpf IdO 7 J 25 22* 21* 22 

54 * 30 * Pennzol 250 4.1 35 1444 54 * 53 * 54 * + 1 * 

17 * V* PeaaEn 150 75 7 435 16 * 15 * 16 — * 

38 23 * Pep Boy 40 1.1 16 12 37 * 37 * 37 *— » 

55 * 39 * PepsiCo 17 B 35 22 2 S 41 53 * 52 * 53 * + * 

36 * 17 * PerkEI 56 24 13 1 M 5 23 * 22* 23 * + * 

10 * 7 * Prmlan 154 el 48 121 8* 8* 8* 

22 * 12 * PetvDr 58 15 13 310 18 * 17 * 18 * + * 

39 * 28 Petrie 1.40 18 14 86 37 * 36 * 37 * + * 

30 2 «* PetRs 372 elU 120 27 * 27 27 * + * 

16 * 14 PetRs pf 157 95 123 17 16 * 17 +* 

7 * 4 Ptrlrrv lBOeZl.l 81 4 * 4 * 4 * + * 

45 * 29 * Pfizer 148 35 14 4110 44 * 44 * 44 * + * 

24 * 12 * PholpD 2677 19 * 19 * 19 * + * 

48 * M Ptietppr 550 lOd 61 47 46 * £ + * 

41 * 2 D* PtilbrS 54 14 24 5711 39 * 37 * 39 + 1 * 

16 * 9 Phi la El 250 145 6 8703 15 * 15 * 15 *— U 


24 * 17 * S to 1 «V 80 45 

21 * 16 * SIBPnt 54 27 
20 * 11 StMoh- 52 3 d 
50 * 39 * SMOOh 280 SJ 
78 73 * SOOh pf 355 5 L 1 

18 * 6 * StPacCs 

17 11 * Standex 52 35 

30 * 19 * StanWk 56 35 
la* b* staMSe 1 5001 Id 

3 * 7 * Steeao .12 3 d 

20 * 14 * Starch! J6 29 

11 * 9 * StrtBCP M 7 B 


L 80 SL 7 B 1497 SO 49 * 49 *—* 
155 SL 1 301 73 * 73 * 73 * 

9 40 16 * 16 * 16 *— * 

52 29 9 90 14 * 13 * 13*— 1 

96 35 II 551 27 * 27 27 * + <k 

1500114 39 10 * 18 * 10 * + * 

.12 3 d 38 3 * 3 * 3 * 

56 29 10 101 20 T 9 H 19 *— * 

74 71 t 57 II 10 * 10 *—* 


33 * 23 * SferiOo 150 27 T 3 5501 32 * 31 * 32 * + * 

22 15 * 5 fevnJ 150 75 10 134 17 * 17 * 17 * 

36 27 * SMWm 1 48 6.1 16 16 27 * 27 * 27 * 

12 BU StkVCpf 150 87 130 zll* 11 11 * 

45 * 32 * SlaneW IdO 17 9 1 42 * 42 * 42 * 

39 * 25 Sfonec 4023 9 117 26 25 * 25 * + * 
53 * 25 StopStm 1.10 24 10 380 45 * 45 45 * + * 

21 * 15 * Stor-Efl 154 93 14 91 36 * 19 * 19 *— * 


12 * 2 vlStorT 

79 * 33 * Stow 
21 * 18 * SMMtn 
18 * 14 * StridM 
8 * 3 * SuavSfl 


154 93 74 91 26 * 19 * 19 *— * 

569 2 * 2 * 2 *— * 

40 5 825 76 * 76 76 * + * 

40 * 2.1 SO 19 * 18 * 18 * + M 

50 55 2 B 1480 15 * 14 * 15 * + * 

4 5 * 5 * 5 * 


35 35 PMIEpf 440 128 100 Z 33 * 33 * 33 * + 1 * 

35 25 * PtlllEpf 4 dB 134 180 x 35 35 35 +1 

10 * 9 * PHIEpt 1.41 123 VA 10 * 10 * 10 * + * 

10 * 4 * PtlUEpf 133 124 81 9 * 9 * 9 *—* 

57 43 Ph»E pf 785 148 1 » 56 56 54 — * 

10 6 * PtdJE pi 158 125 73 9 * 9 * 7 * 

120 * 97 Ptlllpl 17.12 144 100 ZI 19 119 119 

MB* 87 PMIEnf 1&25 145 10350 x 107 * 107 * MI 7 * — * 

68 * 51 PhJIE Pf 980 145 650 x 67 * 44 * 66 * 

57 44 PtlllE Pf 780 14.1 210 Z 55 * SS 55 * 

54 * 40 * PtlllE Pf 7 J 5 145 40 x 54 * 54 * 54 * 

71 * 15 * PMISub 132 6.1 13 71 21 * 21 * 71 * 

95 * 42 * PtitlMr 400 48 11.8905 83 * 82 * 82 *— 1 * 

S IN Ptlllpl n 48 25 10 407 x 19 * 10 * 19 * + * 

54 * 33 * PhllPet 320 71 I 5916 39 38 * 38 * — * 

20 * 16 * PtllfVH 40 18 9 146 22 * 22 * 22 * 


56 * 33 * PhllPet 380 78 0 5916 39 38 * 38 * — * 

20 * 16 * PtllfVH .40 18 9 146 22 * 22 * 22 * 

32 * 22 * PiedA s 50 18 8 2790 28 * 28 28 * + * 

32 * 23 * PleNG 232 74 9 » 31 * 31 * 31 * 

71 14 * Fieri 12 11 19 * 19 * 19 * + * 

49 * 34 * Pllsbry 134 34 II IU 2 44 * 45 46 * + 1 * 

34 21 * Pioneer 154 46 5 624 26 * 26 * 26 * + U 

24 * 17 PlonrEI . 17 r 18 35 145 18 17 * 17 *- * 

43 * 27 * PllnvB 150 33 111501 38 37 * 37 * + * 

84 55 * PHnBpf 2.12 28 2 75 * 75 * 75 * 

14 9 * PltMn 423 IT* 11 * 11 *— * 

15 * B* PlanRs 50 15 12 92 tl* 11 * 11 * + * 

13 * 7 * Ptantm , 16 b 25 IT 388 7 * 7 7 *—* 
13 * 8* Plavboy 3 129 10 * 9 * 9 *— N 

33 * 19 * Pleeev die 27 11 1 2N 33 * 22*— * 

22 * 15 * PooaPd dO 25 32 942 17 * 17 * 17 *— * 

32 24 * Palarld 180 37140 5791 77 * 26 * 27 * + * 

22 * 11* Pondrs 40 5 13 74 12 11 * II* + * 

20 15 PepTal 80 61 30 19 * 19 * 19 * + * 


HW 21 * SunBks 150 37 II 101 33 * 32 * 32 * 

35 V> 24 * SunCh 48 14 10 30 34 * 34 34 — * 

14 * 6 * SunEI 79 6 * 4 * 6 * + H 

59 439 k SunGo 250 64 II 1200 53 * 57 * S3 + * , 

121 * 90 * SunCPf 225 21 6 108 107*108 + 1 * 

49 * 34 * Sundetr 180 63 11 1320 43 40 * < 1 * + * 

13 * 7 * SunMn 24 194 I 7 * 0 I 

34 * 24 * SllprVI 68 21 II 097 32 * 32 32 — * 

40 * 19 % SupMkt 42 1.1 13 62 39 38 * 38 * 

17 * 14 Swank -SO 5 B li JZ 15 * 15 * IS* + * i 

21 * 16 * Svbnm 1 B 8 60 10 235 18 V. 17 * 10 * + * 

35 * 20 * Svtmpf 240 75 4 32 31 * 32 

15 * II* SymaCp 18 9 B 9 13 * 13 * 13 * — * I 

59 * 38 * 5 vnte» 182 34 14 1485 57 * 55 * 57 * + 1 * 

30 * 25 * $VSC 0 56 18 IS 982 3 S 34*35 +* 


30 19 * 19 * 19 * + * 


51 35 * 

32 * 24 
13 * 7 * 
17 * 11 * 
25 * 17 
11 * 58 * 
MU 3 * 
70 * 53 * 
17* 11* 
20 * 14 * 
74 46 * 

3 S* 23 * 
15 * 13 * 
60 * 51 * 
5 * 2 * 


19 * 13 * Portec 40 26 50 52 15 * 15 * 15 * + * v^; ts f £ 
19 . 13 * PoriGE 182 95 7 2145 19 * 19 19 * + * ^TiIE 


103 * 90 PoGpf 11 J 0 115 340 X 102 * 102 * 

22 * 17 * ForGpf 260 115 8 22 * 23 * 

34 28 * PorGPt 440 135 24 33 * 33 33 *—* 

33 * 28 * PqrGpf 632 115 3132 * 32 * 32 * + * 

38 * 25 * Potttch 184 48 12 157 34 * 33 * 34 * + 1 * 

29 * 19 * PotmEl 2.14 75 9 1581 29 * 29 * 

39 31 PotElpf 604 107 JlTOz 30 37 * 

25 * 17 * Pretnl s 54 17 16 158 21 * 21 * 

38 * 25 Prttnric 280 55 7 219 37 * 37 

20 * 11 * PrtmeC 13 m 16 * 16 

»* 13 * PrtmMs 89 5 24 129 27 26 * 

59 * 47 ProetG 260 SJO 12 1511 52 * 52 * 

15 7 * PrdRsh 52 25 19 23 14 13 * 

47 * 31 Prolor M U 9 6 37 * 37 Vi 

21 * 16 * PSvCol 200 98 8 1774 21 * 21 


340 X 102 * 102 * 102 * 71 * 

8 22* 22* 22*—* 35S £-£ 

24 33 * 33 33 *—* £?? S 2 

31 32 * 32 * 32 * + M .SS ££ 
157 34 * 33 * 34 * + 1 * ‘E™ 

1581 29 * 29 * 39 * + Vk ^ 

119 Hz 38 37 * 37 * + * 

isa 21 * 21 * 2 i*— * 55* S2 

-tin T71L T7 TILL IL •* 4IFX 


a 16 * PSCOt pf 110 106 
9 * 6* PSlntf 1 J» 127 
25 19 * PSInpf 380 160 

8 * 6 PSInpf 104 1 X 9 
fl 6* PSInpf 108 164 
47 36 * PSInpf 7.15 145 

41 * 49 * PSInpf 944 157 
55 44 * PSInpf 482 161 

55 43 PSInpf 858 161 

57 * 46 * PSInpf B.V6 163 
6 3 * PSvNH 

12 6* PNHpfB 

17 * 10 PNH PIC 
15 8* PNHpfD 

15 * 8* PNH pfE 
W 7 * PNH Of F 

14 7 * PNHPfG 

27 * 19 * PSvNM 2 J 8 115 
»* 2 D* PSvEG 232 98 
13 * 10 * PSEG pf 140 104 
45 * 35 * PSEG pf 538 121 
106 * 92 PSEG pflldS 105 
18 * 15 PSEG pf 217 1 IO 
SJW 46 * PSEG Pf 680 no 
20 * 16 * PSEG pf 243 IIO 
64 * 53 PSEG Pf 770 11 J 
45 51 PSEGpf 740 IIO 

4 * 2* Pufatlck 

i»k 8* Pueblo .16 14 
»fc 6* PR Cum 

15 9 * PwoetP 174 124 


2^* M*— * 
37 37 * + * 

16 16 * + * 

iSSS + 2 

mi 37 * + * 

21 21* 

19 * 19 * + * 
744 7 * + * 


41 * 31 * 

47 * 32 * 

36 * 24 * Tams ue 
34 * 25 Texlnd M 
149 * 90 * Tcalnsi 200 


57 e d 19 10 43 * 43 * 43 *— * 

254 7 d B 403 30 * 30 * 30 * + * 

16 43 11 * ID* 11 

US 74 8 44 17 * 17 17 — * 

46 14 54 22 21 * 21 *— * 

300 61 10 479 70 * 49 * 70 * + * 

309 3 * 3 * 3 *— * 

1.12 17 13 289 67 * 65 * 65 *— * 

05 e J 14 249 17 * 17 * 17 * + * 

un &0 42 20 * 19 * 20 + * 

350 64 14 46 72 * 71 72 * + 1 * 

15 3828 31 * 3 SW 31* +1 

13 4 14 * 14 * 14 * 

100 10 8 189 57 56 * 57 — * 

7 28 3 * 3 * 3 * + * 

9 134 243 * 242 * 243 * +1 

52 15 31 192 21 * 21 * 21 * + * 

11 704 41 * 40 * 41 * + * 

64 10 1 275 34 * 33 34 +1 

202 64 13 4738 44 * 44 * 44 * + * 

I 1 O 0 IO 7 5 107 * 102 * 1112 * + * 
10 2510 21 * 20 * 21 * + 1 * 

48 34 128 11 * 11 * 11 * 

2.16 9.1 12 23 * 23 * 23 * 

turn 70 36 5165 3 V 38 * 38 *— * 

1.52 66 a 153 33 * 33 * 33 *— * 

186 69 6 596 33 33 32 *—* 

MS &9 10 3948 39 36 * 36 * + * 


00 ) 26 14 38 28 * 28 * 28 * 

J 00 25 9 2505 92 * 91 * 91*— 1 


95 7 1849 
10.4 27 


22 19 * 19 * 19 * + Vk 

Mi! World Bank Says 

SAOZ 53 52 * 53 +* W f e Tl 

Indonesia Faces 
J 1 1 j§= i Crucial Changes 

195 24 25 * 25 *—* ------ — 0 


PSEGpf 7 JO no 
PSEGpf 740 110 


10 * PulfeHm .12 O 23 142 16 * 15 * 15 * + Vk 


38 * 22 * Purokrt 158 50 40 
10 * 5 Vi Pyro 8 


SB 25 * 25 * 25 * + * 
340 8 * 7 * 8 * + » 


45 * 28 Vi QuafcOl U 4 ZJ 12 674 42 * 42 * 42 * 

23 * 18 QuakSO JO 30 24 101 21 20 * 20 *—* 

11 * 4 * Quarto* 34 204 8* I* 8* 

34 * 23 Queetar 140 5 J TO 387 B 31 * 30 * 30 *— * 

25 * 14 QfcReil 54 a 15 15 184 17 * 19 * 19 *— * 


14 * 6* RBInd 
43 * 29 * RCA .... _ 
39 * 29 RCA pi 380 69 
1 W, 71 RCA pf 400 63 

32 * 24 * RCA Pf 112 7.1 


37 * 29 % RCA pf 348 9.9 
9 * 6* RLC 

4 % 3 RPC 
18 1 J* RTE 

11 * 6W Radlce 


13 * 7 * ReadBt 40 61 
23 * 14 * RdBat pf 2 .T 2 IIO 


!* 9 * RlIRkf UDe 9.9 ID 

17 * 9 RecnEa 1? 

12 * 8 Rearm JO 36 16 

1 * * Regal 

23 RektiC 80 25 10 

3 * RepAlr ■ 

Z I* RepAwf 

12 Ji 4 % RpGvps 50 35 9 

47 * 31 * RobNY 164 38 9 

34 * 21 * ReaBfc T 64 SI 7 

»* MV. RapDkDt 2.12 73 

14 * RshCof J 2 15 23 

32 * 22* Revce JO 34 12 

14 * 9 * vl Rover 


14*9 28 * 28 * 28 * + * JAKARTA — The World Bank’s annual re- 

»x «* «* 43 *- * view released Friday praised Indonesia for ad- 

“’iSvS’iSvt’S + vS i^S w lowcr ol1 P" 0 *- 1,111 ^ crucial 
i«e* g* gw- j* economic changes were vital to avoid serious 
3600X ss» m% 65* + * social problems. 

7A * 3 * ^Sk *Sk +T, ‘ "The bank's confidential report said Indone- 
4 n* n* n* na's economy grew by 6.5 percent last year. But 
Si iflf ISS !m+* 11 forecast ^ual growth at under 4 percent for 
SB 2 s* 25* 25 * + * the ncxL two years because of poor oU demand. 

so a* 7* ■* + * Indonesia relies on oil and gas for 70 percent 

I of its foreign exchange and the bank wants 
674 42 * 42 * 42 * more iudusirial development to get the econo 
mi 2 i^ 20 % 20 % — * my away from this dependency. 

387B 31 * 3o* so* - * The report urged contributing nations to at 
i8« it* it* 19 % * least match the $2.4 billion they committed to 
j Indonesia last year. Bui it also called on the 
55 7 * 7 * 7 * government of President Suharto to borrow 
Tan 4o* 39 % 4o* + * cautiously on the world's capital m arke ts to 
'TSSSsm*-* keep its high credit rating. 

1 *4 37 * am £%- a Unlike the overall debt structure o£ many 

22 SS 2* 4 % developing nations. Indonesia’s remained 
33 w im it sound, the report said. Indonesia owed $24.6 

652 42* 4i* 42* + * billion at the end of 1984. 

100 3 17 * 17 * 17*“ ^ One pf Indonesia’s major challenges, the 

'Si 6i* m* 4 o* + * bank said was to adjust its trade policies and 
1684 45 * 44 * 4 s* + % stimula f c l b e industrial sector to provide 
307 f* 9* 9* — * enough jobs for a rapidly growing labor force in 
” is* iSk !m the country of 160 million people. 

2 '1* 'a* 'i*- * II a significant number of the 65 milli on 
s * * *-K workers were paid so little that their households 

mb H* ^ + * lived in poverty. It noted that the work force 
'ss i* J* 9 % would K row by 17 million people in the next 
7i 47* 47 * 47* + * decade. 


.16 XI 55 7 * 7 * 7 * 

1 J 4 2 d U 2250 40 * 39 % 48 * + * 
3 J 0 0.9 100 x 39 * 39 * 39 * 

600 63 1 92 % 92 % 92 % — * 

2.12 7.1 134 30 * 29 * 30 + * 


24 7* 7% 7* 

22 4* 4* 4* _ _ 

86 13 9 35 17 _ 16* 17 SOUnO, Uie KpOIt SUKL II 

< 3 vi RnfsPur ibo x 4 is 652 4 i* 47 * + * billion at the end of 1984 . 

2i* il* Kf j4 4j m 10< 3 it* 17 * im“ ^ l ^ ae Indonesia's m 

9* 3* Ronero 107 3* a* 3* bank ^aid war to ndiiiot i 

66 47* Ravcm 64 .7 30 91 61 40*60* + * ^ , . “J 1 " 1 * 

i7* io% Ravmk 5 io* io* in* stimulate the industrial 

48% 34% Raythn 160 38 15 14M 45* 44* 48* + % . ■ . . j, lal 


307 9 * 9 % 9 %—* 

11 19 * 19 * 19 * 

1 13 * 13 * 13 * 

71 11 * 11 * II* 

34 8* 8* 8*— * 


64 5.1 7 107 32 31 * 31 * + * 

-12 73 13 27 % 37 W 27 % + * 

■32 15 23 51 2 D* 20 * 2 D* + * 

JO 3 d 12 143 MM 23 % 23 * — * 

24 13 12 % 72 % — * 


“ Meeting the employment challenge depends 
crucially on the skill’* with which Jakarta “ man . 


«£ & aiar U- X, .* 9^ S2* g* JSSi: S *■“ *« dependency to a 

m* 2S2S -3 S ’2 ,1? 122 + n™* diversified semi-industrialized econo- 

5?% S’* fjS I 4 1H mw n* 74 * h- * my." the report said “There is a risk of serious 
■£ rovm'pi iS “”*n*n*^* eraploymem problems emerging.’’ 

m. SSSrf \m « 10 'S im mi it* + “ A Indonesian junior minister appointed to 
* 7 * ’J* SJrok'.i ■“ 1J “ ^ + v stimulate investment, Ginandjar Kartasasmita, 

so* 27* romiw i.i 2 3j 7 4s nr* 3o* so* recently warned a luncheon of foreign business- 

i 2 rSSIS ,j6 ° 44 * ^ S* m* tb*”* 1 men that if Jakarta fails to deal with unemploy- 

SS ^ toSri Si ’Sa io m* Mb SuT * mcnl “ lhe consequences are frightening. We 

rnS «* Kti is S ? "g S* SS s* + a wpuid f “* social-economic upheaval, regres- 

g %SL SKn"„ do ,d a? U SLSSEfi 11 P r °e resaoa ’ P^ble de- 

JJJJ 7* RallnE 1 B7e 5 29 499 25 % a* 25% + * Stabinznuon. 


«* 6 * Rollins 

4 * 2 Rmson 
19 12 * Roper 

MVk 34 Rorer 
14 * 8 % Rowan 


d6 63 16 366 io% m* io*_ ^ “Should such a situation arise, the conse- 
i.n 38 u 9 uen ces would be felt worldwide,” Mr. Ginaod- 

60 * 41 % Sirn *1 “id- do not think I need to elaborate 

ij* SyS » U7M ii a M ffibiT*i4vS + * further bow awesome the implications are if we 
U% rSb? * m m 4 » a* wS 21 % —i* faiJ to “ninnun our stability and progress." 


9J II 11 27* 27* 27* 

2d 11 30 42* 41% 42% + M 

60 9 28 29* 29% 29*— * 

24B 21 33 7 6* «k— Vk 

XI 8 2894 25* 25 25M + M 

9.7 6 3861 19* 19* 19* + * 

75 8 115 25* 24% 25 + * 

67 ID 1452 - ^ 39* 40* + * 

10d 10 36% 34* 36* 

106 3 24* MW 24* + * 

45 234 28* 27% 27% + Vk 

13 10 2036 30* 29* 30* +1M 

821 903 14* 14*14* + * 

ID 5 254 6% 6* 4* 

164 4M 50 49 49*— * 

5 16 1097 M 22% 24 +1* 

22* II* SwfFttr 27 47 12W 12* 12* 

16% Iff* SwtGos 134 74 U 170 16* 16* 16* — * 

78 55 SwBon 600 (8 B S47 74* 74 74* + * 

28V5 19% SwEnr 82 IJ II 35 27* 27* 27* 

24 17 5wtP5 1JB7J 9 921 23* 23* 23*+* 

17* 11* spartan 82 60 44 118 13* 13* 13*— » 

27* 16% SwjdP 133 19 17* 18* + * 

54* 33% Sperry 182 XB 10 3406 50* 49* 50* + * 

38 30* SpilllM 182 47 10 28 32* 32* 32* 

43* 31* SauaxO 1J4 il 10 318 36* 34* 36M + W 

58* 37* Squibb 160 2J 15 BBS 57* 54* 57* +1* 

24* 17% StOfeV JO 63 16 776 IB* 18* 18% 

21% 16* SIBPnt 54 17 11 7M 20% 19* 19*— * 

2D* 11 SMtotr J2 2d 10 129 12* 12* 12*— % 


14 % RuxsBr 

« 15 * RusTdb JA 45 9 

28 * 17 * RyanH IBO 62 13 


wohh ibo 45 13 2B MVk M 24 _ m u ^ World said impressive gains had 
i£% i 5 u, gX Sr? H. H .5 ,9 S n»22*ra* + * been made m the agricultural sector u 1984 , 


24 % 12* Rykmd 
IS* 8 * Rvmer 


M “ 's s fn f» with growth at 5 percent Rice output rose by 7 

|T 5 1 percent leading to self-sufficiency. 

* It said healthy foreign exchange reserves and 

+ % ? f ua6 ^ ance of Parents radiated that 
» it* s pst« c jo u u 38 27 * 27 * 27*—* Indonesia s austerity measures, including a de- 

16 sabnRv 2jJ I 4 J “ ’IS 17 * mi 17 *=% valuation and the delaying of billions of dollars 

's* ifSote ■* m S ’s* 'SS '«*-% ° r Project after oil prices fell in 1983, had 

ag^lSSn? do .5M ^JS^ja + ib •«*«*■ ...... 4 

gjv |I% fa 10 ,8M 31 * 31 3i% + * The report said the adjustment had produced 

22 * la* sijolp 1.73 SB " '** li* li% mm a decline in investment and sluggishness in 

w* s* SnStant 1M ,,J m ’s% ’IS- % construction and manufacturing. But these 

sRk §S Clift 4 «. 74 M ffl^l % wera ““washed by agricultural achievements 
2B2 ’IS a ]L,K ,? a 25 ^ “* + * and an increase in non-oil exports such as 

m! ftiSSS roo ’°- 1 SS m io* io% plywood and textiles. 

S* liLSdSTiH im u is 5S ^ SS The bank report said Indonesia’s total public 


28 21 * 21 % 21 % 
25 13 * 13 % 13 % 


50* 35* 5 CM 
12 % 8 % SL Ind s 
30 19 * SPSTec 

24 * 15 SMltno 


H 9 5 Paul 

10 * 3 * vlSatanl 

34 * 2 j% satlleM 


The report said the adjustment had produced 
a decline in investment and slu ggishness in 
construction and manufacturing. But these 


SS* ib% sAnttRi im i 5 13 246 zj% §* * The bank report said Indonesia’s total public 

8a gs !52 s il ‘22 sis r 4 s* : a rat i° was ^ p*^ 

as tsxk f a t? a i m* 8* ** ^ M K 2 1989 


112 

.18 IB II 2745 
282 9.1 7 1717 

1 J 0 X 9 II SO] 

^ *' 41 il 
23 59 

154 X 9 14 249 
886 63 9 _D 
JO 19 7 273 
dO 11 13 184 

JO 55 204 

3550 
714 

1 J 0 1.9 15 1454 
187 IJ 2 

15 703 

154 27 IS 5 M 
1 J 0 a U 16 44 

133 45 7 56 

48 2 d 11 99 

253 M 2 5 415 
172 1 X 5 31 

X 75 1 X 5 100 

Jd 7 1 X 5 7 

458 1 X 7 2 

256 UB 4 

251 1 X 9 1 

7 1 ST 
48 b 1.1 13 19 

1 B 0 XT 13 78 

dO X 7 9 74 

444 

6 

25 14 U 
54 1.1 14 442 
64 6301 
225 168 237 

US 1 d 440 
184 58 » 506 
222 115 26 

1 B 0 85 14 13 

114 b 4 B II 205 
187 60 64 

250 105 39 

5 74 

685 8 d 10210 c 
884 98 4 b 
150 188 2 

13 13 

LU 58 7 30 

d 8 18 11 498 

20 

150 105 2 

2 B 4 65 10 IBM 
616 77 130 

UM 143 306 

dO 18 19 20 

180 17 B 13 
84 10 16 332 
Me 73 12 24 

50 10 16 31 

80 JJ 89 
. 10 b 4 41 IM 
1.10 85 51 

100 75 9 340 
50 47 10 T 
80 25 9 62 

40 19 7 749 


UAL lBOe 25 7 3975 

UAL Of 240 7J 474 

UGCEL 19 121 

UGI 104 88 M 84 

UNCRes 57 

URS 40 15 14 » 

USFGl 120 67205 2336 

USGs 188 69 6 837 

USGpf 1J0 3B 2 

UnIFnt 50 18 11 91 

Unitvr 1 J9a 13 9 7 

UfllNV 3JS6 3J 9 71 

UCMO 184 68 M 977 

UnCarb 140 9.1 9 70S 

UMonC 46 

UnElK 172 97 6 lOM 
UnEJpf 480 118 20X 

UnEI pfWWBO 135 38 

UEIpfL &08 127 40Qx 

UnEI pf 2J8 HO 101 
UnEIPf 113 11J 10 

UnElpf 272 1X9 7 

UnEI Of 744 110 9001 

UEJpfH OBO 119 630 j 

UnPoc 1J0 16 T2 23M 
UnPlCPf 755 67 33 

UrWroyl .18 18 12 2713 

UnrylPt 880 11 J 2Td 
umiDr 138 28 

UnBrnd 16 75 

UBrdPf 6 



3% f 

ja + * J 

i:" lu.s. 

si ■ 

9* 

2 *k + * 

32 ? + g Snub Soasoa 
HWI Law 


Opm Mon uw oom aw. 


Dm MM0 La* Oom Owa. 


U.S. Futures ib 8B sr SS =3 

-I EXMa Prav. Sates MB 

Pr«v. Day Op«a lot. 3 X 374 off tn 

. T|I|II nuNoiJUKaomn 
■Bn SMNQ Unn mhj .AGMRiufftK 

oft Low (tan Mloft Low don Cfta. i ttna 15180 May WX 75 1 S 9 . 9 B WUS 1 *g +■« 



lf 6 ^^ NW| Law (tan Won Lo» aon Cfto. 

w% + % 

t Groins 

49 * + % 

50 
30 * 

S2 + * 

^ CORM(CST) 

StatamliiliM»aeltanMrMNi 
im + * UB 169 % Mov IB 183 * 281 % 281 * — 81 % 

JJJS 131 172 JlM 277 % X 7 t» 177 % 177 * —BOW 

S 5 + T 2 f 351 * 166 * Sea 167 % 148 % 287 267 * 

55 "— W 295 140 % D(C 162 163 161 * 262 

75 ?— J" IM 289 % MOT 2 Jff% 171 ZJD 170 % + 80 % 

1 M— * 351 % 174 * May 275 % 275 * IM* 175 % + 80 % 

15 286 176 * Jal 177 + 80 W 

J 5 * . „ E 5 *. Solas Praa.Salas 32871 

21 * + % Prpv.DavOaan Int . 112437 offIJW 

u +1 50 TBEAK 5 (On 

>M UOObamlnlfiioavdaltaniNrbiiSbai 

26 % 7 J 7 UK May SjB 5 X 3 * 577 % 577 * — 83 * 

30 + % 7 J 9 1 X 0 * Jut UP* 5 X 7 % 581 % XXI* — 84 % 

If* + % 7 J 4 5 X 2 Alfa 588 * 589 * U 3 583 — 84 * 

■mS 471 581 SW SJO *91 SX 4 * SX 4 M -Ml 

53 % + y, 668 * 83 * NOW *99 * 99 % * 92 * * 93 % —83 


18685 15640 Jm U 78 J W 7 JS 156 » J 56 ^ —23 
M 2 B 0 15*00 Sw 154 X 0 15575 156 M IMS —25 


M 2 B 0 15*00 Saa 154 XD ISS 8 IJJ 8 IMS 

18100 15 U 0 Maw 15260 15385 15250 l£dS 

MOD 15 LM Jan V 5 X» 

177 JO 15200 Mar 


M5 -Si aUBOOOLLXRVIMMI >4 

« - l-lHrflrg S3? S5! H » ® 

» SS S| SS g g :e 

1672 dan iMI 8 U 5 8*83 **J 1 + 4 » 


U88 

S 3 CMC M 

■784 MO T, 88 J *_ 

sa . „ I EsL'ium P iaw. Sam Bib 


■890 RE 

KK 


g WJ ] S3 

m 


soTBEAKstcarn 


384 134 — 86 * urjg 157 JD Jal 

231 381 + 80 * 18080 17*75 Sh» 

381 % 382 +JB EafcSata* Prwv. Safe* 298 

381 % 381 * +B 0 M Pvkv.DarOpaa im. 4874 aim 

384 % 386 % + 80 * 

1 XM 382 * —DIM 

I Metals 

COPPIK (COMBX) 

281 % 2Mm — BT% a ^S?“ , " B 5 !S , * r |&y 6185 61-45 4 A 90 

277 % 277 * — 80 % 4675 4188 Jon 4170 4178 6 TJD 

Zmn MTS 57 B 0 Jul 4240 6270 4175 

JS* ^.mu. “- w STJa *■* 4110 «W0 4S^ 

170 170 % + 00 % wit n n rw- .im n « 42 X 0 

274 * 175 % + 00 % B 4 m 9960 Jan 

177 + 80 % bud 5960 Mot 6480 6480 4130 

7*00 61.10 Mov 6 X 30 4380 6)80 

7640 6180 Jul 6655 4460 4648 

rasa 62 J 0 ta 4650 6650 4650 

7080 4600 Ok 

577 % 577 *— 83 * 7680 45 JQ job . __ 


is torn ram m im « 

aunoa* Hatton par buSboi *400 Doc 

* 70 % May s S 3 *X 3 * 577 % 577 * — 83 * 7680 4580 JOB 

* 80 * Jul MO* *S 7 % 581 % XXI* — 04 % _Mor 4600 46 

*82 Aim SXS* SX 9 * 1 X 3 583 — 04 * EM. SalM lgJP Proa. WW 6872 

SX 1 SM *90 *91 *X 4 * *X 4 * — 84 * Prav. Day Oatn InL 8 X 471 

* 83 * Now *99 5 l 99 % * 92 * SJ 3 % — JS ALUMUHIMtCOMUQ 

* 94 * Jan 608 * 689 603 * 603 * —85 «uni£:a*£^ 

684 * MOT 619 619 613 * 6 M* — 84 * •**■ 180*6 


44 * + % 47 * 594 * Jan 608 * 489 4 B 3 * 603 * —85 

SnS— * 782 684 * MOT 619 619 613 * 614 * — 84 * 

rn + * 779 485 May 686 * 486 U 622 * 683 * — 04 * 

TV* 64 * 658 632 * Jul 628 — 04 * 

(a -3 Eatsata* Prav. Satan 34744 

Sk Prav. Day Oo*n mt 59638 aH 1872 

17 * 50 WEAN MEAL (CBT) 

5 ,, + % 100 tans-aalIar»P«rton 

m + * 2n*m nvso May i22JD nzn mao t2ijd +wio 

ISV , 19650 12 UO Jwl tZ 7 m 1215 D t 2 L 50 13680 —30 

17 % + % HOBO 12160 Aim QUO 13160 12960 12*80 —20 

44 % +ra T 79 J 0 13 UD Sap X 33 B 0 134 B 0 13 X 30 13260 — M 

$*n + H i«fl *e\ mm fV-» turn ma nun rum 

+ Mi JS«SB UfJO Doc 14180 14 XM U 03 B m 3 ® — .20 


4760 MaV 4160 4175 4250 

4110 Jun 

4630 Jul 4980 *5 AXO 

4985 3 H 49 JS 4990 48 

SS3S Ctae 5 LU 51 JS 5 X 15 

5175 Jan _ 

5165 Mar 5385 5260 5385 

5 X 95 May 

5585 Jut 

** as 

Jan 

Mar 


14 X 20 Jan M 3 J 0 14450 14 X 50 14 X 50 —JO I E ft .S nlw 1333 Prav.SataS 294 


20650 147 B 0 Mar 14250 14250 14*00 142 X 0 +80 


42 *—% 16 X 50 ISCSI May 

m— * 14700 15500 Jul 

**— i Est Sam Prcv.Sataa 12876 

Ptw. D ay O shW 498 « op 1889 

uw SOYBEAN OtLICST} 

38% + % AaoooBta-aoBanptrloain. 

m + Vk 3690 2 ZJ 0 Mov 31 JS 318 

34 %— % 3272 2270 Jul 3099 306 

SS + * 31.95 2250 APO 3964 297 


PfOv.Pay Qp0 H Int 1379 
SILVER (COMfUO 


I 548 D — 1.10 ] 5800 tray ax.- cmn oar tray ax 


3408 

ZUO 

Mav 

31 JS 

3105 

3106 

3102 

32 X 2 

22 X 0 

Jut 

30 X 9 

3048 

2985 

3008 

31.95 

•nm 


2904 

29 X 5 

29.15 

2950 

31 X 0 

2350 

Sn 

21 X 5 

2900 

2165 

2875 

3087 

22 X 0 

Oct 


2880 

2700 

2705 

2955 

2280 

Doc 

2708 

2705 

27.15 

2782 

2907 

2360 

Jan 

27.70 

2705 

2605 

2701 

3 B 6 D 

2460 

Mar 

3&85 

27 JS 

26 X 0 

2680 

2705 

2400 

MOV 

2650 

2650 

2650 

2650 

E*L Sates 


Prav. 5 a la 27 .N 8 




43 + % 2060 2640 Mar 261 H 2770 2630 26 X 0 

30 % + % 2765 2640 Mar 2ASO 2650 2650 2680 —30 

13 % 4 - % EtL Sates Prrv.Sales 27 . 1*8 

23 % + % Pnv.Dev OB*n lot 57804 OH 1333 

vTS «. oats iam 

I 2 JT I? 58001 m mlulmmn-aoUars par ft us ftri 

+ * L 91 160 % May 162 162 % 161 % 162 + 81 % 

J£* + * 178 * 187 'A Jut 180 % 18 * 187 % 181 +BD% 

W*— 8 % 17 * 186 % SOP 187 181 187 187 + 00 % 

g* . ^ U 2 * 160 % DOC 181 * L 42 Ul* Ul* + 80 * 

+ * 167 % 163 * Mar 165 160 165 184 * + 00 % 

97 *—% Est Solos pr— Sates 678 

Ouen Irt.il 03 .rff TO 4 

37%— % 

5 * 

17 % + % i 1 

I Livestock J 

S®, CATTLE (CME 7 

. . 4 UUO Bn.. CMttlOEf ttL 

™ + 69 J 0 6165 Jun 6185 6167 6082 6082 — MO 

3 4. If. 6767 6177 Aua 6250 4287 «1 82 6182 —180 

g .T,™ 6580 6160 Ocf 6190 *195 4060 6040 —180 

MwTlU. 6785 6 X 0 Doc 6 X 40 6 X 40 6197 6 X 05 —162 

*««?+» NAS 64 B 0 Fob 6403 6405 6 X 75 *100 —185 

VJJ? ^ 087 6500 APT 6500 6*00 6380 6380 —170 

J 52 + % EsL Sates 17848 Prav.Sala I 7 JM 


15138 55 JB MOV <200 <B 

14618 5620 Jul < 3*0 63 

118 X 0 *738 Sop 064 64 

12300 9908 DSC 6 SU 65 

12158 5958 Jan 

11938 4070 Mar 6668 6 * 

TO 4 RO CHS fitoy 4340 47 - 

**50 4350 Jul 6888 681 

*400 4410 Sop 

7*90 4670 Dec 7218 72 

7890 MXD Jan 7250 72 

7410 3418 Mar 

Est. Sates 15800 pro*. Safes UK 0 
Prow. Dav Oaon Int. 70861 


S ia +.is i i “ ~ 

M +:« iMTHH PQWjo rtMsy 
inn +.15 speraowxF 1 motet ■waOrWBOOl , M . ... 

mn +.1* 1 8380 10235 Jun UM 180** J.jjH ME! —325 

1 46 SD 1 0300 Sop 1.1920 l.mff 1.T7* tin — Zfl 

1 IAN OM 1.1X75 U*00 1.1*4 1.1720 Im 

TfSS Mar 1.1873 im MW MSB -248 
- 10250 1.1905 M . *<H*5 -310 

J 

CANADIAN DOLLAR tLMMl 
lporair-i— fe»oouafe5080Bi 

^ 555 58 SE S ^ 3'S =S 

ZdS 8010 .JIM. JW.JW JOB -00 

=s ksjSSopmih tt&Mur 

— « FRENCH FRANCO MM) 

—5 sportranc»lP0*iWo<R«ta «XB0 M lM _ 

=| « » S :SSjS:SS:B J3 

— g .104*0 0*478 _Poc_ . .HOST 

—35 Eft. Sate* Prow.Safea 

Pray. Dav Oaon inf. Wl« 

GERMAN MARK (1MM) 

Spot man- 1 paftH *auafe 80X801 

J 733 8*05 Jun JU 0 8 M 0 8101 JM 3 — u 

+81 kS SS J 1 a BU J 129 3 l 3 Id 

So Si IW JW J 2 JW 3 

J« 1 * 8040 Mar jm JWS jhs jHo -jd 

JAP ANNI E YE W (IMAP 

lsarvon-lpatMoquatainBWNN 

0XU50 

004SD BOOMS DK 6M0U BOM* ARMS 

00040 MM MOT 

Est. Safes __ Piay.5afes *955 
Prow. Dory Oaon an. I7J41 oMUff* 

SWISS FRANC OMM) 

5 nor franc- ipofetaouafe 508001 " 

6*00 J 43 * Jurt JJ 50 J «5 3 W JW -M 

1 U( _U 6630 JOB HP 33ms 3 M 8 » 55 

iSs Hi 6360 9531 Doc JUS JUS 9742 9744 -92 


fig IT 25 as S8 SI ^ 

s & » a* « B 31 sSfec :te 

is ^ ^ ^ SS ^ I Industrials 

4410 Sap 6*49 —119 

6670 Doc 7219 7218 73 U 7129 — 1 X 1 LUMENRICMU 


W 38 Jan 7258 7258 7258 71*6 — «9 
7410 Mar 731.1 -UJ 



LUMEERIGME) 

fc * 1 l fi£? < ra *. » U2JQ ra*-M uuo +xn 

50 SSi^SSSS^ 

.10 137*3 Now 130,00 15300 1090 13030 +1JO 

80 14468 Jan 15688 15780 15680 15700 +X 2 D 

13000 Mar 16 X 10 142 X 0 16 XXB +190 

15 X 00 Mov 16790 147 JO M 4 X 0 )SS +260 


184 * 

2 

PALLADIUM (HYME) 

NO nw at- doNoro per of 

HflQ^ 1 QVJB -l -_ 5 Q 

15990 10690 Jan 11 X 50 11 X 75 11080 11 X 25 —75 

14 IXS 10*25 Sep 10990 11070 10*93 109 X 5 —SB 

14190 10590 Dec 110 X 5 11 LD 0 *990 10*00 —25 

TX 790 10690 Mar 11180 11180 11 X 35 10 X 75 

Est. Soles 9 » Pre*. Sates 501 

Prav. Dav Open im. 7 X 50 up 2 S* 

OOLD(COMEX) 

100 fray at- dal tors oar travaL 

32700 29200 May 31180 31180 31180 31100 —380 


mm m.<n swjd —UD Esi. Salas JUT* Pr«v.|ataa 1033 
27*00 27X90 274J0 I Tl Prow. Dav Open M. XMl UP MS 

30400 30X00 2RJ» -440 COTTON 2 (MYCE) 


MunoRMh-caaisparw, 

79 X 0 6 X 31 May <790 6795 <705 4765 +.N 

7*05 6 X 8 S JW 65.10 65 X 8 6465 4470 —37 

7790 * 4 X 5 Oct 6460 4465 400 6430 —05 

7300 64 X 2 Doc *461 440 X 605 4445 +.83 

7 A 7 S 6595 Mar 6*50 Ml* 6565 4360 +J 0 

mm 44J0 mov «.n +Xf 

7085 66 X 0 Jw< 46.17 *493 4 X 17 6 U 3 +. 14 . 

6590 6580 OCf _ 64 H — » 

Est. Safes PTH.Safes 3019 

pro*. Oav Open lot. 14341 1 » 4 » 


UCWTV 

.14 0 

62 

659 

39% 29% 29% 

72X5 

6385 


UnEnrs 

208 8J 

21 

479 

0 29% 29% 

73X0 

6*82 

Aua 

U Ilium 

200 120 

3 

70 

6U 16 16% 

7300 

*685 


Uinucf 

307 140 


48 

7% 27% 27% + % 

7287 

6600 

Oct 

UllUiPf 

400 148 


11 

S 27% 28 + % 

73X0 

6785 


Uiiluaf 

1.90 13X 


13 

14% 13% 13% + % 

7940 

6905 

Jan 


Unttlnd 94 17 0 
UnKInn X2 6 26 
UJerBk 18 U 9 


UxalrG .12 0 7 1838 

USHom 840 

U 5 L 0 OS 80 2 X 0 00 

USStwa 86 27 13 126 

USStcal 1 X 0 X 6 19 6592 

USSIIPf 641*120 130 

USStlPTl 2 J 5 97 351 

USSftpf 22 S 78 IM 

USToft 172 49 12 327 

USWast 572 77 0 616 

UnTdis 140 U I 3117 

UTcftPf 295 79 220 

UnTTal 192 89 9 2124 

UnlTl pf 190 49 1 

UWRS 1 X 0 67 H 72 

Unltnte 70 8 IS 0*9 

Unlvar 80 43 7 2 

UnlvFd 104 49 11 27 

UnLeaf 180 S 3 7 4*3 

Unocal 1 X 0 21 11 6514 

Uplaftn 256 27 17 2085 

USLIFE 184 27 11 319 


4 %— % Prow. Dav Open int. 5*765 Off IS* 
13 % FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

u% + % 44000 lbs.- cmsaarib. 

39% 7275 6X85 way 4X90 6X! 

29% 7X70 46X2 Aug 6690 46J 

WV 7380 6695 See 64JS 46 : 

27% + % 723? 6660 OcJ 6690 o6J 

28 + % 73X0 67 JS Nov 6790 <7: 

1» + H 7960 690S Jan 6X90 <Xi 

2D*k— Vi Est Sates 2.172 Prcv.Sates 171 s 
36 — Vk Prev. Dav Oaan Inf. 7.9S6 oH24 


IIU 9 

98 13 531 

1 X 7 9 


UsifeFX 
UtaPL 
21% UtPLet 
21% UtPLPf 
17% IMP Lot 
15% UtPLaf 
UtlllCO 
UtfICopr 


33 % 21 % VFCons 1.12 34 9 142 22 % 
12 % 5 % Valero 1338 11 % 

23 % t 4 Voter Of 304 149 40 23 % 


30000 Ibi- cents oar lb. 
5540 45 X 0 Jun 

4500 

4*85 

44 X 5 

4402 

-05 

55 X 7 

4885 

Jut 

4840 

4800 

47 JS 

4700 

—US 

5*37 

4750 

Aua 

49.10 

4980 

4700 

4787 

—103 

57 X 3 

4500 

Ocf 

4670 

4600 

4500 

4582 

—05 

5005 

4*30 

Dk 

48.15 

4837 

4700 

4782 

—108 

5000 

4625 

Feb 

4870 

4870 

4810 

4810 

— JH 

4785 

4500 

Aor 

45 X 9 

45 X 5 

44 X 5 

4500 

— XS 

4905 

4700 

Jun 

4810 

4810 

4750 

4705 

— JS 

4830 

47 X 5 

Jut 

4900 

4*00 

4900 

4879 

—05 


8200 

6 LU 

Mav 

6385 

6385 

6187 

6187 

-O 0 O 

8247 

62.15 

Juf 

6400 

64 X 0 

4257 

<257 

— 300 

8085 

60 JD 

auo 

6309 

6305 

*100 

6107 

—103 

76 X 8 

6115 

Feb 

7150 

7150 

7080 

7003 

-85 

7500 

6400 

Mar 

70 X 0 

71 JO 

7000 

7005 

—100 

7500 

7000 

Mav 




7105 

—uo 

7600 

70.90 

JUl 




7105 

—00 


Est. Salas 0943 Prav. Sates 93S6 
Prev. Day Open Int. 12759 off M 


4% 2% Vaterln 
38% T* VanOrs .92 49 6 
6% 2% Vans 
18 5% varco of 

46% 29% Varkm X6 7 M 
13% 9% Vara 00 37 14 
25% 10% Veaco 00 U U 69 2D 

7% 3% Vendo 153 553 7% 

10% 0% Vests® 1X00110 38 10% 

45% 25% Viacom 03 10 If 482 42% 

43 36% VaEPpf 500 1IX 

87% 67% Vo El pf X40 103 

83% <8% VaEPpf 975 110 

63% 51% VaEPpf 70S 129 

31% 11% Vbhays 14 

41% 27% Voracd __ 11 

78 60% VuknM 280 38 11 


39 % 22 WICOR 2 J 0 XI 
WabR Pf 450 110 


7 24 k 

.92 49 6 32 20 % 

33 2 % 

1 mt 

X 6 7 14 3563 29 % 
00 X 7 14 IS HP* 


38 10 % 
If 482 42 % 
58 z 44 % 
400 z 87 
51 SBz 84 % 
450 z < 2 % 
14 54 20 % 

11 8 40 

11 30 73 % 


HOGS(CME) 

r £2 30000 lbs.- cents nor lb. 

31 % + M 556 B 4570 Jun 4 SJ 0 4495 4475 4472 —85 

7 I % 5577 4895 Jut 4800 4870 47 X 5 4700 — 1 X 5 

^ ™ 5437 4790 Aua 49.10 49 J 0 4780 4787 —103 

3n! + % 5175 4500 Ocf 4470 4*70 4588 4582 —95 

XT* T r 5085 4430 Doc 4 X 15 4 X 37 4700 47 J 2 —181 

Su, I S* 5000 46 X 5 Feb 4 X 70 4 X 70 4 X 10 48.10 —95 

IM till 47 J 5 4500 APT 4575 4575 4475 4500 —75 

M +'l 2 4905 4700 Jun 4 X 10 4 X 10 4790 4775 -JS 

M 43 ° 475 Jul 4980 4*80 4900 4 X 79 —85 

Est. Sates 9.117 Prev. Safes 5 X 18 
snk + % Pw. Oav Op«n Int. 2 X 968 up 57 
34 + % PORK ■ ELLIES (CME) 

22 % 38800 Ibse cents par lb. 

33 % 8200 6 LI 5 May 6 X 35 63.35 61 X 7 61 J 7 —080 

19 + % 8247 6 X 15 Jut 6460 6470 <297 *297 —200 

S ejms mm Aua 6145 *30 5 6100 6 iJ 7 —173 
+ % 76 X 0 *115 Feb 7 108 7190 7 DJ 0 7062 —15 

24 % — % 7500 6400 Mar 7170 71 X 0 7080 7065 —100 

19 % + % 7560 7000 Mov 7105 — L 20 

45 % 7600 7 X 90 Jul 7165 —80 

■ 9 % +2 Est. Sates 8943 Prav. sates 9356 
38 Prev. Dav Open Int. 12759 off W 

33 % + % 

25 % + % I — 

25 %— % Food 

21 %—% 1 

^ . .. COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 

T J* 37900 lbs.- cents per Hx. 

32 % + U 15200 12201 May 146.10 14790 14505 t 46 JI +03 

I wa 12100 Jut 14625 14700 14300 14690 +01 

14790 12700 SOP 14*20 14765 US 95 14669 +69 

14660 129 X 5 D*« 1*525 14635 14500 145 X 0 —05 

_ 145.50 T 2 AJ 0 Mar 14500 14500 144.10 144.18 —93 

M 32 % + X. 14500 13800 May 14*03 —25 

10 & 11 — % 14050 13590 Jul 14395 

23 Vz 23 % + % 14200 13275 S*P MX 50 +100 

*5 *2 .. Est. Sates Prow. Safes U 37 

2 OTS»%— % Prev. Oav Oaen lot. 1 X 175 off <7 
Mk— % SUGARWORLD 1 UNYCSCE 1 
2s a£l— 1 % 11280011a.- cents oern*. 

1 D% inh + u. 995 X 3 S Jul 3 JS X 35 X 2 S X 26 —15 

r iSr _2 975 152 Sep X 53 393 3 JB 302 —16 

ta! + 2 w 164 Oct 303 X 63 393 X 56 —15 

in% im! 775 405 Jan 400 400 195 191 —14 

4 T% 47% + lk 408 Mar 462 406 4 J 4 436 —30 

44 UM 1,2 7-15 472 Mov 468 408 494 498 —XI 

mv. S%— 3 U LW 4 J 9 S Jul 487 A *0 47 * 477 — XD 

” «" “ S 3 475 4M 4K |S 1 -22 

20 ^"+ % “-Solas 1835 Prev. Sates 9801 
40 3 — % Pw- Do* Open int. 72,100 up 4 J 

73 73 %—% COCOA (NYCSCE) 


100 tray az.- dal Ian oar tray ol 
32700 39200 May 31180 31180 31180 

510 J 0 21700 Jun 31460 31570 3 I 2 J 0 

Jwl 

Aua 31 X 10 31900 31600 

oa 321 X 0 333 X 0 32170 

Dec 32680 32800 32590 

Feb 322,10 32 X 10 332 . to 

Apr 
Jun 

Oa 

Dec 

Prav. Sates 3 M 01 

utf-uans 


Rnandal 


HEATING OtL(NYME) 

42000 dal- cants par M 

too 7 X 60 6 X 80 Jun TUB 72 .M NH 7071 —81 

— un 79 X 0 6 X 35 MM TOSO 7065 <PJO PJ1 —61 

Ijno 7390 68 X 3 AIM 71 XS 71 X 5 7 X 10 1 X 14 —65 

7645 7 X 25 Sep 7288 7280 7180 71.13 — 81 

-is® 77.10 7200 oa 7205 7390 7 X 45 7200 — 6D 

Z30O 7495 2375 Nov 7480 7490 715 D 7 X 01 —69 

ZJjO 78 X 5 7200 Dec 7400 M0O 7400 7400 —50 

I^LM UN 7590 Jan 7500 —50 

— se n M 7 SJ 0 —SO 

Mar 7490 —JO 

_ 3J0 7 LOO 1480 Aar 7158 — 90 ' 

— Esi. Sates Prw. Sates M 15 

Pnrv. Dav 0 pm In*. 14953 off 263 


a million- pteonoabcL 






92 X 5 

87.14 

Jun 

9280 

*281 

9280 

92 X 7 

+.14 

91 X 7 

8*94 

Sob 

9106 

9100 

9106 

* 1 X 7 

+. 1 * 

9182 

85 X 7 


9 L 28 

9185 

9 U 4 

9184 

+82 

9893 

8600 

Mar 

9087 

9095 

9007 

9008 

+83 

9004 

8701 





*008 

+83 

9086 

8800 

3 «b 




9009 

+JS 

mio 

8905 

Doc 

9001 

9001 

9008 

9030 

+J 6 

0906 

8951 

Mar 




890 * 

+J 6 

EH. Salas 


Prav. Saioi 8 X 04 





Prav. Day Open Inl. 40031 off 413 
18 YR. TREASURY (CRT) 
Si 0 Q 800 pfln-pfsX 22 ndsatl 0 Opa 


CRUDE OIL (MY MU 
UX» Mri.-aeUor> oor DDL 






2955 

3630 

Jun 

7700 

2700 

27.15 

27 J* 

—07 

2954 

34.18 

Jul 

3*00 

2*91 

2*25 

2*66 

—M 

2957 

34 J 5 


3602 

26 X 2 

3603 

3*52 

— 0 + 

2950 

2408 

Sob 

3600 

3605 

3 * 8 * 

3609 

+01 

2950 

2405 

Oct 

2456 

2156 

2603 

3609 

+05 

2950 

2400 

Nov 

2600 

2*60 

3*45 

2*09 

+05 

2950 

2190 

Doc 




3409 

+09 

2*50 

2403 





3*09 

+03 

2906 

2608 

Fob 




1109 

+01 

3905 

un 

Mar 




3 * 4 * 

+01 

2*05 

26*2 

APT 




240 * 

+jn 

2706 

3692 

MOV 




2 * 0 * 

+03 

26 X 0 

24 X 0 

Jun 




3409 

+03 

2708 

25 X 5 

Sop 




3 *a 

+03 

Est. Safes 


Prav. Sate* UX 78 





Prev. Day Oom int. 48 JN upljn 


820 

70-9 

Jun 

* 1-30 

82 -* 

81-27 

11 - 2 * 

+13 

81-13 

7 SU 1 

Sop 

• 1-1 

■ 1-8 

80-27 

80-29 

+13 

80-22 

7 V 13 

Doc 

804 

BO - 10 

89 

80-1 

+n 

80-8 

75-14 





79-9 

+13 

79 - 2 * 

74-30 





78-20 

+» 

ESL Sates 


Prav. Safe* 12885 






Prev. Day Open ML 44 J 2 S up 872 
US TREASURY BONDS (CET) 

18 pa-S 100800 tets XX 2 mtsat IMpcD 


77-15 

57-30 

Jan 

71-31 

73-10 

71-35 

71-38 

+13 

76-2 

57- 10 

Sap 

70-31 

71-7 

70-33 

70 - 3 * 

+13 

76-5 

57-8 

Doc 

* 9-29 

704 

* 9-36 

6*28 

+73 

72-30 

57-2 

Mar 

49-5 

* 9-11 

1 * 

69-1 


70-14 

56-29 



68-18 

484 

68-10 

+13 

70-1 

5 * 4 * 


67-25 

• 7-25 

67 -t* 

6320 

+11 

09-24 

54-23 

Dec 

47-7 

47-7 

67 

431 

+70 

69-13 

56-37 

Mar 

66-20 

6623 

66-15 

* 6-15 

+8 

69-2 

63-12 





65-31 

+7 

68-26 

634 

Sop 

65-22 

652 * 

* 5-14 

65-16 

+5 

604 

63-34 

Doc 




* 5-9 

+3 

ESL Sates 


Prav. Safes ! 10823 





Stock Indexes 


mill I 5 LU Jun 17885 18 X 90 17800 18 X 78 + 1.10 

18270 14 X 00 Sep 18 X 18 16405 18273 IBUO + 1.15 

19600 17570 Dec MSJS M 7 .N 18575 16705 + 1 X 0 

19575 19 X 10 Mar V 98 JS + 1 X 0 

Est, Sates 39737 Prev. Sates 43081 
Prav. Dav Owen int. SUM off *83 


Prev. Dav Ooen lntX 22721 UP 331 
GNMA (CET) 

SinUMOprb+pti X 32 nd* af WO pa 


9.95 

135 

Jul 

385 

385 

3 XS 

136 

- 1 . 1 * 

9 X 5 

153 

Sep 

153 

383 

388 

302 

— . 1 * 

905 

164 

Oct 

163 

163 

153 

386 

— v !5 

7 X 5 

405 

Jan 

400 

400 

1 » 

191 

— vl* 

9 J 3 

408 

Mar 

402 

406 

484 

48 * 

—20 

7.15 

4 X 2 

Mav 

401 

401 

454 

4 J 8 

—XI 

609 

495 

Jul 

407 

4 X 0 

4 J» 

4 X 7 

— XB 

6 X 0 

5 X 2 

S*P 

Oct 

4 X 5 

4.98 

■495 

503 

5.13 

— 22 


70-10 

57-17 

Am 

70-10 

70-77 

70-7 

704 

+3 

49-19 

59-13 

trap 

49-31 

6904 

49-15 

69-17 

+2 

68-18 

594 

Doc 




68-29 

+2 

• 8-1 

58-20 

M nr 




< 8-11 

+2 

< 7-28 

58-25 

JUn 

4700 

4700 

67-28 

67-28 

+2 

67-7 

65 

Sop 




67-14 

+2 

ESL Sala* 


Prav. sates 

301 





+Q paints mid cents 

fra 21*60 17X00 jun kijx ms mjo trtja +s 

611 212 S MM 3 Sep NXW T 97 X 0 1*365 1*500 

HO 21000 30007 Dec 30 X 30 

+« EsL Sates Pr*v. Sate* 380 • 

+7 Prav. Day Open Int. 4339 of »45 

4 J NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
paints and cants 

11000 9080 Jun 104 X 0 10480 U 480 10468 +60 

111.90 9 U 5 S*P 10410 10475 1060 S 10695 +60 

11375 10 U 0 Dec MOM 10090 10805 10805 +00 

_ 11 X 45 10*180 Mar WTO 11000 WJ 0 11 X 35 +40 

+2 EsL Soles X 325 Prev. Sates 99*7 


Prav. Dav Open lid. 4.154 nn 57 
CERT. DEPOSIT (MUM) 


Est. Sales 1875 prev.satei 9801 
Prav. Dev Open int. 72,100 up 43 


IB metric tons- S per tan 


2570 

1998 

Mar 

3355 

2370 

2355 

23*2 

—29 

24 U 0 

1998 

Jul 

2 D 91 

Z 1 W 

2077 

2085 

—28 

2475 

1987 

Seo 

2050 

2050 

2035 

3041 

— »* 

2337 

1945 

Dec 

2018 

2020 

1990 

3009 

—26 

2790 

1935 

Mar 

2012 

2012 

1996 

2806 

-27 


si mintan-ptsaf ioqpc* 





+.17 

9105 

■580 

Jun 

9100 

91 X 7 

9100 

91 X 1 

9108 

8508 

5 *o 

9099 

9102 

* 0.90 

9103 

+80 

90 S* 

8584 

(tec 

9005 

9050 

9005 

9050 

+33 

HUB 

8*56 

Mar 




*007 

+25 

8902 

8603 





89 X 3 

+28 

89 JO 

8706 

Step 




B 903 

+80 

88 X 9 

8834 

Doc 




09 . 1 * 

+J 1 


YVaehv s 180 28 11 2 D 4 36 % 


Waddrt 60 
Wolnoc 
WalMrt XB 


475 137 
0 24 957 
18 17 845 
79 



Wternwl 79 

WKHRsal 0 O 585 

WcdCSv 05 10 16 58 

Watt Jin IdO 40 7 538 

Warned 88 4.1 11 Z 1 
WraCm 5112 

WamrL 168 19 13 1257 
WnshGs 166 69 8 116 
WsflHaf 108 42 8 62 

WNIWt 268 110 8 160 
Waste 80 10 17 TOO 
WatfcJn 36 14 10 122 
WavG Pf 100 80 8 

WeanU 28 

Weanpf Jlk 5 

WetlbD XOe 1.1 13 296 
WelsMk 70 18 14 6 

WottlP 260 46 7 377 
W 8 IFM 280 109 II 30 
wendrs XI U 17 2878 
WestCa 64 20 13 39 

WPenPpHJD 11 X 1301 

WStPtP 2 X 8 63 10 235 

wsterra 10* 27 6 

WRAirL 75 1120 

WtAIrwt 133 

WAIrpf 280 113 63 

WAIT pf X 14 110 38 

WCNA 3521 

WCNA Df 7 X 5 149 4 

WUntan 554 

WnUnpf 3 

WnUpfC 1 

WnUpfS 47 « 

WnUPfE II* 7 % 

WUTIpfA 14 S% 


Asian Commodities 
May 3 


London Metals 
May 3 


dose Preview Commodity and Unit 

low Bid Ask Md Aik Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

*U 2 «* ^ Printctath 64/30 38 %, vd — 

Sterifeapn- metric ton Steel biltets (Pfttj. ton 


28 % 38 % 2337 1945 Dec 2 Q 1 B 2020 1998 2009 -26 E^t Sqlw Prev. jgtes _ 536 nSS In™ 

41 — 1 % 2190 19 S Mar SOU 2012 1996 2806 -27 I Prav. Day Otal lid. 5826 UP 97 I UOWJOfW 

3 S%- % 

IK - 

* I Paris Commodities I Asian Commodities I London Metals 

33 % + & I May 3 | May 3 | May 3 

+ % kEtaMNEMHB^^ 

2 ^TS ctwe HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES dose Preview 

Mien Low Bid Ask arm ujlspw ounce nw low Bid Ask Bid Ask 

I? SUGAR Close 

S 2 + J! Frencft francs per metric Ion Hfeb Low BM A* 

sntttt An 1 X 95 1 X 75 1 X 89 1 X 90 +1 - JJ-I- S?- 2 £ 2 £ 55^2 

a — % oa IJ 15 1900 U 05 UIO +3 -Js*~ N.T. N.T. ^500 31 ZS| 

30 % Doc N.T. N.T. 1 X 40 1 X 46 + 10 J't — N-T. N-T 31800 320 S® 

Vi, MOT 1025 1025 1015 1620 Unch. AuO - XnjX 32000 31900 3 Z 10 O 

TIte 2 MOV XT. N.T. 1670 1673 +10 OCt_ N.T. H-T. 22400 mno 

jjrt* ^ ass. 

S+.-S T^**"** 0 ""'"'™* '*** ^oTG^»^2x. m,X0 

16 % + % Fmai francs per IM kg SINGAPOREGOLD FUTURES Srttoi per metric tan 

»% 40 + % *•» *JS MO? 2 -JE +2 UAImr Pence May 1802 1 X 91 1 X 98 1800 1 X 97 1882 

“J? S- J ” Jlv N.T. SJ. I 2.150 — Unch. Prev. J|y 1044 1833 1840 1841 1838 1840 

int 5 s*® 1,35 1130 2 - 130 was +14 tpoft. ,U* Some Settle sap 1835 1820 1828 1829 182* 1830 

’a* J? Dec 2075 2075 2070 — +20 Jun 31660 31600 31600 316 J 0 Dec 1 X 87 U 77 17*5 1787 1779 1780 

«k l% + % {£!! SI' H-I- - +Jf JJ-T. N.T. mw MX 60 mar 1785 1 J 74 1780 lJH 1778 1779 

MOV N.T. N.T, 2875 — +15 Sen N.T. N.T. 222 X 0 32280 May 1800 1719 17*9 1793 1790 1794 

IT* mi'S Jf* N.T. N.T. 2875 — +15 Volume: 113 toto of lOCor jfy iff! N.T. 1770 1820 1730 1820 

^ - % JnS- witeE S 5 n°int^% l ? rEW- 0Ctu0 ' KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER Volume: 1660 tats ol 10 ton*. 

49 % so" +1 '• ™ ^ ■ 701 MOtaWtal cents MTJdte COFFEE 

8 % 8 % COFFEE CJOM> PrOViOUS. (WKMMroyMcbn 


[ Commodity Indexes 

Go» 

Moody's 912 J 0 f 

Reuters IJSSjOO 

DJ. Futures—————. 12001 

Com. Research Bureau- 236.90 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31 . 1931 . 
p- orelfmlnarv; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18 , 1931 . 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31 , 1974 . 


Previous 
916.00 f 
108130 
121-24 
23800 


Cash Prices May 3 


Year 
Frt am 
U 8 168 
-SjJ -5 fiJM 
47 X 00 Mini 
21300 21300 

»-80 100-101 j 

20-21 26-28 m 

49-72 7240-74 r 
.X 3 B 57 60094 

06 S .67 0 JiJ 3 
1 W 157-1 St 
6 X 05 6.99 


1 X 0 40 10 4139 30 



BM 

Ask 

BM 

Aik 

Mav 

189 JO 

19000 

190 X 3 

19180 

Jun . _ 

19000 

19025 

197 J 5 

19200 

Jlv 

19300 

19150 

19450 

19500 


196 JD 

19700 

19700 

19900 

Sep 

198 X 0 

19900 

179 X 0 

20088 


MHtVC 

182 

38 

8 

126 

3 

% 


180 

47 

18 

1140 

2 


WWTPI 

200 

60 


4 U 

4 

% 


488 

98 


/6 

4 

% 

,lwbPlt 




118 


% 

rlWPItpfB 



1001 2 


riWhPttpf 



30 z 1 

% 

OTUriaJ 

200 

49 

9 

2012 


IL 

WtiHC 

100 

SJ 


113 

P 

Tn 
• f 1 

WhltoM 



11 

75 

p/ 


Whlttafc 

00 

30 

IB 

74 

F- 

it 





1 

HE 


Wllfrif n 



11 

11 

Ij 

ft 

Aj 

William 

100 

4 X 

7 

7179 

F* 

4 

iVTUnEI 




163 


rT« 

0 k, 

MMbO 

.10 

18 

15 

49 

■ 

-*4, 




13 

95 



Wlnnba 

.101 

8 

U 

195 / 

i 

T +1 

k 




46 

42 

t 

in. 

wtecEP 

308 

78 

7 

352 

r 

1 





- 

wbGpf 

285 

90 


1 

T 

ff. 

WbePL. 

204 

70 

9 

153 

> T 

WIscps 

286 

78 

8 

77 

rt 


WItoo 

108 

43 

■ 

67 

ft 


7 % 7 %— as YZi'iJi LunraniiuHi 

JJZ J, . , sates. 144 mfs. open interest . rat mninnifi ffe rH per JcRo 

8 % 8 % COFFEE Ctase 

27 % 27 % + % French francs per IM fes Bid i 

31 % + % Mov 2670 2670 2050 2800 +70 jg-g ” 

39 k— % Jty 2850 2825 2845 7875 +53 Jp" 1 « 0 O 15 

79 k + % Sea 2020 2 JB 5 2015 2020 +65 J* — II 

8 % + % NOV N-T. N.T. Z 635 — +M JW JW-g 

299 k + 94 Jan N.T. N.T. 1620 — +40 SOP — . — HEJO 11 

38 % + % Mar N.T. N.T. 2005 — +45 Volume: 72 tots. 

27 % + % MOV . N.T. N.T. 2885 — +40 SINGAPORE RUBBER 

40 % Eat. vol.: « jots of 5 Ions. Prev. aetuol sales: Staeaee re oMIs per kilo 

4 *% + % 26 lots. Open Interest: 211 daw 

-7*4 + % Cwim,- Bid I 

» — % aavrxm . rss 1 May . 16775 14 

16 % 1 RSS 1 Jun— 167 JS 14 

41 J rs* -J J RSS 2 May. imjd 14 

S8 + 8 I Dividends M.y 3 gi;—- ia g » 

23 % + % RSS S May- I 5 SJ 0 15 


Awg 10 X 00 9980 99 X 0 10008 UCSO 104 X 0 Iran 2 Fdrv. Pbila. ran 21300 21300 

oa 10700 10320 10300 HB60 10700 10780 Steel SCTOPNO 7 hw Pitt. _ 7980 T0O-1Q1 j 

DM 11100 10 B .40 10800 10900 11200 11300 Lead Spat. Si 20-21 26-28 4 

Mar 12400 12060 12000 12000 12500 12600 Copper elect- lb 69-72 7256-74 r 

MOV N.T- N-T. 73*60 12480 12180 J 306 B Tin (Straits), » JJIHJ <6094 

AeO 13400 13200 13100 131 X 0 13400 13400 E. St. U Bails. » 005-67 082-83 

Oa N.T. N.T. 13600 13708 13600 14000 PMIadkm. OZ i RJ 9 lS^lSt 

Veluma: 1,114 tats of 50 tans. Silver N-Y-ca 6 X 05 X 99 

COCOA Satrca: ap. 

Sterflna per metric tan 

Mar 1802 1 X 91 1 X 98 1800 1 X 97 1802 

Jly 18*4 1833 1840 1841 1838 1040 

Sep 183 S 1820 1828 1829 1829 1830 ry t * v* V 

5*5 is Sta nd a r d Bank, 

May 10 H 1 X 89 1 X 89 1 X 93 1 X 90 1 X 94 • 

•Br N-T. N.T. 1 X 70 1820 1 X 30 1820 mfl - a 11 * v 

co^ffee 1 10 ** ta» oi 10 ton*. Midland to Issue 

Sterling per metric tan _ 

May XUS 2.124 Z 161 1165 1132 ins DApnohi nl 

J A ^ im i£§ ^ Perpetual rKTNs 

fiT feutrra 

uSr nx nj? 2 ^S IS 2^0 2J7Z LONDON — Standard Char- 
^iraiume: 2 , 1*2 lots of stons. . icred Bank PLC is issuing $400 


II is ili il Standard Bank, 

N.T. 1 X 70 1820 1 X 30 1820 mfl - a 111 V 

» tats oiio ton*. Midland to Issue 

etrictan „ 

1126 1161 XU5 2,132 1135 Paimntii nl ITDlVT^ 

i^erpetual rKTNs 


Ask I U J. OoUnrs pot metric too 


Reuters 

LONDON — Standard Char- 
tered Bank PLC is issuing $400 
mfllicm of perpetual floaung-raie 


RSS 1 May. 6775 168 X 5 16880 16900 Mav 221 JO 218 X 5 27850 21900 220 L 5 D 220 X 3 caoilnl notes, the ImH m , 7 a — 

RSS 1 Jun— 167 X 5 168 X 5 16 BJ 0 16*00 Jun 217 J 0 21500 215 X 5 Z 15 JSS 217 X 5 217 ^ “P ™ 1 toaO manager, 

RSS 2 MOV- 16600 167 J 0 167 X 0 14850 Jly 276 J 0 214 X 5 274 X 5 2 I 4 JB 27600 7 WX 5 Credit Sujsse- First Rnctnn T ,6 _ 

RSS 3 MOV- 16*50 16550 16550 16650 Ana 2 TB 50 21700 21600 21750 21000 218 M JUlMC-ruSl DOSlOtl 

RSS 4 May. 140 ^ 1 * 1 ^ 14350 Sfe> 22000 21900 7 I 75 D 218 X 5 219 JS XHX 2 S S 3 ld Friday. RP 


11 % + % Co mp any 

+U4 « 
JSf * J? Comdus Comm. 


R 5 SSMOV- 15550 75750 15650 15650 Oa 

— . __ ___ KUALA LUSSPUR PALM OIL 

Per Amt Pay Rec Matarsian rtaseits per 25 tons 

ASED Cto se Prev kwi 


nlt! n!tI m’ro CTn* miR Midland Bank PLC said it plans 

N.T! 10 a perpetual floating-raie 

e: ixa tots o< loo tons. note, also ranking as primary caoi- 

: Rmvtars and London PetnUaum F*. ..l _jii iT 77 ?. . J “r" 


jP.l + J? Co md us Comm . O 09 6-5 5-20 Wav 1500 I 5 » ! 5 B 0 1030 Sources: Reuters and London PetroJmvm £>- t a 1 ihsr anil lw«H.iiL . 

t J* Conti Tel e c o m O 65 6-3 5-15 Jun NjQ. 1690 1830 1560 enaaaa (aaralli. lai, U 13 ( Will be Similar U) the QOle 

*537 T 7 * ... — Jlv 1 X 95 1615 1630 16 MI —.6 M J! -u , . . . 


7 % + % 
34 % + % 


STOCK SPLIT 


wi » - Dart 4 Knifl — Wor-1 
RLI Corp— 340 T -3 

34 + % U! 

34 + % 

Tiu, !Z Amer Income Lite 

OTk _2 American Standard 
TPA—Z ApoehaCora 
4TU + 2 Bank Bkta A Equip 
m + % Bella Hawaii 
61 % + % BemteCo 
12 * Best Products 

u C Om eran Iran Works 

T7 s!_ S Con industries 

Corning Glassworks 

Employers Casualty 
Gen Corp 

Kerr Glass Mlg 

sasa-* fcss'sss-s 
B + SS^SSSTSp 

I Mu rally OU 

Newell Campania 
Norm Amor Philips 
2 A 4 W 26 % Saoway Food Town 

139 k 14 +16 SvSCOnCarp 

sb% 59 % + % Temront 
20 % 209 k + 16 Total Petroleum 
,7 * ,8 * + * 

m Universal Leaf Tob 


Wotvrw J 4 20 3 121 

WoadPt 80 30 14 395 

WoirrHi 200 48 9 381 

WrtdAr S 

Wrtgly 180 a 2 J 9 11 90 

WUrtftr 3 

WvMLb 82 28 9 69 

wvrms 00 30 7 25 


47 % 33 % Xerox 308 65 19 2587 4 * 

52 % 4 S% Xerox of 505 186 4 92 % 

29 19 XTRA 04 25 10 210 25 % 


30 24 ZtataCo 1 J 2 SO 8 54 26 % 

24 % 13 % Zapata 84 60 27 183 M 

62 % 32 Zavr* 60 b X 15 472 x 40 

31 % 18 % ZwlfttlE 8 635 30 % 

719 k 14 % Zaras J 2 10 17 47 IBM 


Mav 

Jim. - 

Jlv 

Aug 

Sen - 

BM 

1800 

NjQ. 

1895 

1805 

1890 

ASk 

1850 

1090 

1015 

1825 

1810 

BM 

1880 

1820 

1030 

1 J 4 S 

1820 

ASk 

1030 

1860 

1060 

186 ! 

I 860 

Nov 

Jan ______ 

Mar 

1865 

1850 

1850 

UBS 

1870 

1.270 

1,195 

1875 

1875 

1815 

1825 

182 S 


Volume: ixa tats of 100 Ians. 


60 7-1 6-10 


Volume: 0 lots of 25 tons. 


0 07 7-31 6-28 Source: Pouters. 

O .10 6-7 5-30 

a % &5 Ijo I London Commodities 

Q 03 6-17 63 I M a 

q 02 % mo <14 I May 3 

Q 0 42 6-10 I J 

§ 8 67 58 tatB^^^RMSROMOr 

J7 V, 5-31 5-15 


May 3 

W. Gstnan Mat-t2SM6 marts osfc per mort 


Jos 

Sap 

Dec 

Jon 

Sap 

D«C 

201 

254 

— 

000 

039 


188 

19) 

284 

086 

034 

088 

045 

186 

180 

041 

I.M 

189 

081 

098 

183 

1X4 

1X3 

179 

an 

046 

097 

207 

286 


us 

044 

049 

299 

113 

— 


Esllmatad total voL 10880 
Cans: Thun, rat 45 * 2 open tel 4 


NYSE Highs-Lows 


n ir , , Ctasfl Prav teas *> a.E) 04S 0.9/ w u 

a 05 7AS 6-n "W Bkf Ask bw* a* « oas a** <u* if* ii 

Q 08 6-38 6-14 aw-metrietpn Esthaotad total voL 10880 

M M A »1^.!a3s!Ss:Bi!a 

S . 12% 6-3 5-17 OK 11100 10000 10000 10900 1120011300 Source: CME. 

JS 7-2 6-17 Mar 13400 12060 12000 12000 125.® SSW» . 

a .17 5-24 5-14 MW N.T. M.T. 13400 12480 12880 13060 I 

Q 07 5-31 S-15 Aug 13400 13200 13100 131X0 13400 13400 ■ sic rav_ nm r 

O X3 6-7 5-24 Oa N-T. N.T. 13600 13700 13800 14000 I U-S. Trea t y BUI I 

a 06 6-20 Ml Volume: 1.114 tats of SO taw. I J _ 

§ I V- (S I w * y3 

O 5 ri ilii ssoy 1802 1X91 1X98 1800 1X97 1802 

a S M wf Jte 10« ijra i8*o i8*i ijo* i^m 


U-S. Treasury BUI Ralea 

May 3 


34 % 2 M Sot Wei 160 4 X 14 530 30 30 4 - % 

18 % 14 % Soul RE JO 1.1 46 3 10 % 18 % 18 % 

30 % 14 % SOVEIP 700 «0 7 78 20 % 20 20 % + % 

21 % 15 % SavEA 1-34 68 1 Z 1 % 21 % 21 % + % 

11 % *% Save pf 1 J 8 UIX 5 12 11 % 12 +% 

9 % 4 % Savin 44 8 % 8 % 8 % — % 

13 % 9 % Savin pf 150 12.1 5 12 % 72 % T 2 %— % 

26 179 k SCANA 2.16 85 9 761 25 % 25 % 25 % + % 

* 4 % 33 ScnrPta 108 38 12 877 43 % 42 % 43 % + % 

54 % 34 % Sett I mb 100 30 * 3523 39 % 39 39 % + % 


ra 20 % 2 o 20 % + % before dedining to 22 percent by 1995. Howev- 
s ii% 12 “ + % er.ii said, Uie debt senna ratio could peak at 26 


m- % percent in 1989 if oil prices weaken. 

S* IWT % -n _ 1 l ■ 



wernu c o O Xk 7^1 4-14 ■%* 1802 1 X 91 1 X 98 1800 1 X 97 1802 

SStCo Q VI u u Jly >844 1833 1840 18*1 1838 1840 

. _ __ •** ' * Sow 1835 1820 1828 1829 182 * 1830 

A-Anmml; M-MeelblT: O-Onortartv; S- 5 eml- Dec 1 X 87 1 X 77 1 X 85 1 X 87 1 X 79 l?ao 

oonuoL Mar 1 X 85 1 X 74 1 X 80 1 X 81 1 X 78 177 ? 

Source- UP! May 10 ® 1 X 8 ? 1 X 89 1 X 93 1 X 90 |jw 

Mrar - UP'- Jly N.T. N T. 1.770 1830 1 X 50 1820 

I ■ -■ Volume: 1060 Ion of 10 Ions. One year 

■ S&P 100 Index Options sSriSw »er ™wc hm 

N __ _ r Mar 2.165 2.124 2.161 2.165 2.132 2 .I 2 S 

B Mav 3 Jiy 2 x 12 2 . 1 B 1 2 joa 2 x 10 xml tw 


BW YleW YieM 

7 JO 7.90 80 S 

788 854 001 

808 174 U 8 


Source: Sotomoo Brothers 


2 * 17 % scana ut u 9 761 2 s% 25% 25% + % The report said a key achievement was cut- 
54*J 2% ISSmb ira i 0 jS me + % h n 8 die current account deficit to around 2.4 

mS 2 ^ seaSind m mi” 2^2 27% wi? T 2 percent of gross national product, compared b^tTm 

3 §% S% iSJ? 1 X 4 15 'S 46 * S2 gs St % with RJ percent the previous year. Inflation fell EEu3“ 

i6% 11 % scoitvs j 2 il to s? 13% u% 139* + % to 9 perrenL compared with 12 percent ia I9S3. SSaSSc 


A VK Cp Alan 

CNNWst Compfvan 

FIBTxad] pf GUReepfA 
McLean wt Piantron 
TacomBaat Tex Com Bn 


1 May 3 SB* zm urn uio xiS I'm 

Lmmhb^hhe-' n» lif VM w im SI Million in Grasshoppers 

BSite. ten 52*0? Am 552; }J, 2X95 2XS5 2 ^ Reuters 

Mta MOT Jta in An Mn JH A A« May N-T. N.T. 2J50 2X» 3J20 2J7S _ 

“ m n* wv Z K“ sJk T™ 1,43 Ws 0,3 B *£P NG “ f, 3 ™ 5 ™ *»“**»" 

■ 5 S r r * W nr metric ion «rn Chinaj madeS Imillioa last y«ur 

in k. i» a n n sk » t mw 22150 21A25 21856 219J0 23050 im « by exporting grassuoppers. wtuen 

MS W 76 W 1 » IN 1 % m M Hit - Jun J 17 J 0 21*00 215 X 5 21500 217 X 5 21700 ..Ll t n IWvt rnoml hirrk I ho 

in ifu mt i/m - - - - - Ji* 21 650 7 i*xs 714 X 5 21450 71600 2145 »> re usea to >eeu cagea Diras, uie 

«_, n4 __a-- - AW ngjo moo 21 am 21750 31000 jmlso Xinhua news agency said Friday. 

” &?: SiSgSgail 

ffiSSBlS!, Sf M K:f:gSgigga^ ro "S£SS!S DON 

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— issued earlier this week by Lkwds 
Bank PLG Donald Barron, "the 

° Midland chairman, did not disclose 

the size of his issue. 

t Meanwhile. Lloyds Bank an- 
*-* pounced that its issue had been. 

, increased for a second time, from 
fee $600 million to S750 million, be- 
jo cause or strong demand. The issue 
j* was raised Tram $500 million short- 
~ iy after its launchin g 

Credit Suisse-First Boston said 

the Standard Chartered note would 

use the mismatch structure, under 

— which the coupon is refixed month- . 
ly but paid semiannually, to pay m 
J/8 perrem above Lonckm Inter- 

sw-month rate. The notes. 

■» available in denominations of 
Prav $10,000, will be listed in London ' 

TtaM They are callable at par after five 
“ yews and have a minimum coupon 
£ of 5 percent. If the yield curve in“ 
verts, the coupon will be fixed at 
1/16 Percent above the London In- 
terbank rate for the number of 
■s months remaining m the interest 
payment period. 


Awn 

PARIS . — French industrial 
wholesale prices rose a provisional 
0.3 percent in March after a down- 
wa^revKihl OJ-pereent increase 
m Febraaty, the Nanonal Statistics 
Institute said Friday. 











INTERNATIONAL HF.RAI.fi TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

Ethyl Reported to Offer 
Buyout Plan to Uniroyal 


By John Crudele 

Sew Yorti Tima Scrrice 

NEW YORK — Uniroyal Iqc’s 
board has met in a special session 
to study a buyout offer from Ethyl 
Corp.. according to Wall Street 
sources, but the negotiations be- 
tween the two chemical companies 
were said to have broken o if. 

The sources said that Uniroyal, a 
producer of tires and chemicals 
based in Middlebury, Connecticut, 
was studying alternatives, includ- 
ing a management-led leveraged 
buyout. 

Neither Ethyl nor Uniroyal 
would comment. 

The Wall Street sources, who 
. asked not to be identified, said that 
Ethyl was offering to pay $21 a 
share, or about S713 million, for 
the 33.95 million shares of Unir- 
oyal, a company that recently 
claimed victory in a proxy fight 
with Carl C. I calm, an investor. 

But they said the talks might 
have been scuttled when Ethyl Be- 
came concerned about not being 
able to seD Uniroyal's tire business 
lo a third party. The sources said 


Trafalgar Profit 
Increases 25% 

United Press International 

LONDON — Trafalgar 
House PLC, which operates in 
property, construction, engi- 
neering, shipping, oQ and gas, 
said Friday that profit rose 25 
percent in the six months end- 
ing March 31. 

. Trafalgar said profit was 
£57.4 milli on ($70.14 million) 
for the Oclober-March period, 
compared with £45.9 million in 
the like period last year. Sales 
volume rose 34.6 percent to 
£944 million during the half- 
year from £701 million last 
year, the company said. 

Trafalgar's chairman. Sir Ni- 
gel Broackes, said be regarded 
prospects for the full year as 
encouraging. But he warned of 
difficult conditions in the con- 
struction market, which makes 
up the largest part of the 
group's business in terms of 
sales volume. 


the Uniroyal board met on Thurs- 
day. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Icahn said he 
would challenge, during a court 
hearing on Monday, Uniroyal's tal- 
ly of votes on two anti- talc co ver 
amendments to its bylaws. 

He contended that 500,000 votes 
bis companies filed against the pro- 
posals had been disallowed because 
of a technicality. If the rotes were 
accepted. Mr. Icahn said, the mea- 
sures would have been defeated. 

The measures involved a stagger- 
ing of directors' terms and a “fair 
price" provision. Uniroyal said 
Thursday that the final count 
showed that 67.49 percent of the 
voles had been cast in favor of the 
board changes, and 67.85 percent 
favored the fair-price proposal 
Each amendment had to win a two- 
thirds majority to be enacted. 

The anti-takeover moves came at 
a time when Mr. Icahn was accu- 
mulating his nearly 10 percent 
stake in UniroyaL He later made a 
tender offer of $18 a share for 
enough slock to give him 50 per- 
cent of the company, but it was 
conditioned upon the defeat of the 
anti-takeover amendments. He 
planned to pay $18 worth of debt 
securities a snare for the rest of 
Uniroyal, once he obtained con- 
trol. 

UniroyaTs stock closed Thurs- 
day at $18,875 on the New York 
Stock Exchange, down 12.5 cents. 

Ethyl based in Richmond. Vir- 
ginia. closed at $20.25 per shore on 
the NYSE, down 125 cents. 

Rumors have been circulating on 
Wall Street in recent weeks that 
despite the apparent success Unir- 
oyal has had in fighting off Mr. 
Icahn, its management might still 
be interested in selling the compa- 
oy. 

The sources said that one possi- 
ble alternative to an acquisition by 
an outsider was a leveraged buyout 

Japan Wage Increases Slow 

The .Associated Press 

TOKYO —The average wage of 
Japanese manufacturing and in- 
dustrial workers last year rose 3.6 
percent over 1983 levels, the second 
lowest increase in 16 years, accord- 
ing to a Labor Ministry report pub- 
lished Friday. It said the average 
worker earned a monthly wage of 
$819 last June. 


Floating Rate Notes 


May 3 


Dollar 


Gres Western 95 Mi 

HIH Samuel M 1(K 

Hill Samuel oen> Mi 

Hlssono Americano 9S 


Hitachi Signs Pact With China 
To Develop Computer Software 

The Assedated Pros 

TOKYO — Hitachi Ltii. Japan’s largest electronics company, has 
signed an agreement to jointly develop Chinese-langnagr microcom- 
puter software and to export personal computers for use by the 
Chinese government, it was reported Friday. 

Under the agreement, readied with China’s Research Institute of 
Railway Science, Hitachi engineers wfl] work with the Chinese to 
develop the software by the end of July, the leading economic daily, 
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, said. Over the next two years, Hitachi wiD 
export 30,000 personal computers to the ministry of railways. 

The ministry of railways, which has a work force of two million, will 
start using the' computers and software in August, the newspaper said. 

Hitachi officials were unavailable for comment became it was a 
national holiday. 

This is Hitachi's first joint agreement with China on microcomput- 
er exports, although Beijing already has ordered 97 largo-size comput- 
ers from Hitachi the report said. 

BMW Parent Net Rose 12.8% in 1984 

Reuters The company reported a provi- 

sional 17.5-penxnt rise in world 
MUNICH — Bayerische Mo- group turnover, to 16.48 billion 
icren-Werke AG. the maker of DM in 1984 from 14.03 billion in 
BMW automobiles, said Friday 1983. Parent company volume rose 
that parent-company net income to 1293 billion DM from 11.48 
rose 12.8 percent from a year earli- billion the previous year. BMW 
ex. to 325 million Deutsche marks said. 

(about $101.5 million), from 288 The company said it would pay a 
million in 1 983. The company gave dividend on 1984 results of 12-5 
no figures for the world group. DM. including a 1-DM bonus. 


Murdoch Vows to Become U.S. Gtizen -*5 


Baloise Group In Pact to Acquire Deutscher Ring 

Rcutm proval of the West German Cartel 

ha< 5 i p cwiiM-ifiiui — Ttv- Office, would create a group with 


BASLE. Switzerland — The 
Swiss insurance group Baloise said 
Friday that it had agreed to acquire 
the Hamburg-based life-insurance 
company Deutscher Ring for an 
undisclosed price. 

U said the acquisition was a sig- 
nificant step forward in its declared 
aim of strengthening its position as 
an international insurer. 

The merger, which needs the ap- 


gross premium income of some 
3.32 bulion Swiss francs (about 
51.23 billion). 

Deutscher Ring is the parent 
company of a group active in all 
sectors of insurance business with 
gross premium income last year of 
1.58 billion Deutsche marks (about 
$495 mill inn 

Baloise is already active in West 
Germany. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Rupert 
Murdoch, the Australian publisher, 
told Federal Communications 
Commissioners on Friday that he 
will become a U.S. citizen so be can 
dear a legal hurdle and become an 
owner of six of the biggest TV sta- 
tions in the United States, one of 
the commissioners said. 

Commissioner James H. Quello 
said Mr. Murdoch told him "be 
would not apply [for the transfer] 
until he became an American citi- 
zen." 

Another participant in the meet- 
ings said he believed Mr. Murdoch 
would sell his newspapers in New 
York and Chicago to comply with 
the rules. 

Mr. Murdoch, who owns daily 
newspapers in Chicago. New York. 

. Boston and San Antonio, Texas, is 


COMPART NOTES 

Alfied Investors Corp. said it may 
pay a special interim dividend of 5 
Hong Kong dollars a share (64 
cents) for the year ending Dec. 31 
after deciding to seD its 6.8-percent 
stake in Wheelock Marden & Co. 

Casio Computer Co. said it ex- 
pects net income for the business 
year ended March 31 to rise 10.5 
percent from a year earlier, to a 
record 12 billion yen ($28.8 mil- 
lion). The company said sales 
would rise about 19 percent, to 210 
billion yen. 

Cooper Industries said it has re- 
ceived about 15.65 million com- 
mon shares, or 94.5 percent, of 
McG raw- Edison Co. in response to 
its S6 5- per-share tender offer. The 
company said a merger in which all 
on tendered shares will be acquired 
at the same price is expected to take 
place around May 31. 

Ford Motor Co. said it would 
offer 8.8-percent financing on sev- 


discussmg buying six Metromedia- 
owned stations in New York. Los 
Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Dallas 
and Washington, or merging his 
film company with Metromedia. 

Mr. Murdoch and Metromedia's 
chairman, John W. Klu g e , met on 
Friday with four of the five FCC 
commissioners and commission of- 
ficials involved in approving sta- 
tion transfers, according to a com- 
mission spokesman, Wiliam A. 
Russell Jr. 

Russell said Mr. Klu°e and Mr. 
Murdoch had lunch with the com- 
mission chairman. Marie S. Fowler, 
on Tuesday. 

An FCC official said the com- 
missioners were told that there 
would be a news conference an- 
nouncing the transaction on Mon- 
day. 

News America is Mr. Murdoch's 


era] models, inducting die luxury 
Continental series, through June 
10. GM and Chrysler have already 
announced programs. 

Floor Corp. said it has signed a 
joint-venture agreement with a 
Chinese company to manage the 
construction of petrochesncal fa- 
cilities . The accord is the compa- 
ny’s first in China. 

Frontier Airlines said talks ainyH 
at a buyout by an Oklahoma in- 
vestment group have resumed de- 
spite a refusal by Citicorp to help 
finance the takeover. Frontier said 
the group had olher financing pos- 
sibilities. 

Haden PLC said it bad accepted 
a £55.8-m31ion (about $67 million) 
takeover offer from Manugood 
LuL, a newly formed consortium. 
Trafalgar House PLC, which had 
earlier bid 240-pence a share for 
Haden, said it was reviewing its 
options. 


Stodgy Sears Gambles That Even Bigger Is Better 



(Continued from Page 13) 
pansion of Sears itself, many ana- 
lysts are enthusiastic about the 
changes. 

“1 think it’s all going to payoff in 
a few years," said John S. Lands- 
chulz, an analyst with Mesirow & 
Co. in Chicago. "Their historic 
business, retailing, has reached ma- 
turity. so they're seeking lo invest 
in dynamic areas to increase their 
return on investment. Their move 
into financial services isn't without 
some risk, but it isn't without some 
experience either." 

The basic strategy seems a sim- 
ple one: to pump more dollars into 
Sears's vast empire. The more busi- 
ness its stores handle and the more 
credit billings its computers pro- 
cess. the more profit the company 
stands to make. Last year. Sears 
earned $1.46 billion on 538.83 bil- 
lion in revenues. 

The in-store financial centers are 
one example of how Sears is trying 
to milk more business from its ex- 
isting stores, said Stuart M. Rob- 
bins. an analysL with Donaldson. 

Ontario to introduce 
Electronic OTC System 

Reuten 

TORONTO — The Ontario Se- 
curities Commission said Friday 
that it plans to begin an electronic 
quotation system lor its over-the- 
counter trading sendee later this 
year, which will open up trading in 
shares of junior companies. 

The new system roll have a quo- 
tation and reporting service similar 
to that of Nasdaq in the United 
States, giving brokers instant infor- 
mation on bid and ask prices and 
trading volumes, the commission 
said. With the present system, mar- 
ket information on Canadian OTC 
stocks is available only on the fol- 
lowing day. 


Lufkin & Jenrette Securities Corp. 

"When you're a mature company 
servicing 80 percent of the popula- 
tion, it’s unlikely that you'll attract 
many new customers," he said. "So 
you try lo get more of the business 
from the customers you have." 

Sears, already strong in durable 
goods, is trying to get its customers 
to spend more on its higher-margin 
□ondurables. Thus, the 1 10 Stores 
of the Future ate increasing the 
ratio of such nondurables as cloth- 
ing to such durables as refrigera- 
tors. 

In addition. Sears, both in its 
stores and its catalogues, is stress- 
ing more fashionable, brand-name 
clothing instead of its less stylish 
private labels. Sears also plans to 
begin selling brand-name dec iron- 
ies. such as Sony and RCA televi- 
sions and video cassette recorders, 
in test markets in San Francisco 
and Atlanta next month. These will 
be in addition to the private labels. 

Analysts and company officials 
agree that Sears's biggest move this 
year is the introduction of Discov- 
er, an orange and black credit card 
with a sunrise emblazoned on it 
that roll be issued by a subsidiary, 
Greenwood Trust Co. Sears al- 
ready has extensive experience in 
the credit card field, with 28 million 
active Sears card holders. 

But while the company hopes to 
build the distribution of the Dis- 
cover on its list of existing card 
holders, the new card will differ 
markedly from the present one. A 
customer will be able to use it in 
restaurants, hotels and s Lores other 
than Sears, and wfll be able to cash 
checks, withdraw cash from auto- 
mated teller machines and earn in- 
terest on money deposited in the 
card account. 

Edward A Brennan. Sears's 
president and chief operating offi- 
cer, who will become chairman 
when Mr. Telling retires this year. 


said surveys showed that 38 per- 
cent of Sears's card holders ana 29 
percent of nonholders would wel- 
come the Discover card. 

But many analysts question 
whether competing retailers will 
accept the Discover. "If it’s clear 
that Sears is associated with the 
card, it’s doubtful that many comh 
peting department stores will par- 
ticipate,’' said Walter F. Loeb, an 
analyst with Morgan Stanley A Co. 

Sears officials responded that the 
travel and entertainment industry 
accounts sought by the company 
have responded enthusiastically so 


Our continuing success has resulted in a vacancy lor a 
self-starting person to coordinate and develop all of the 
business activities of our recently established, rapidly 
expanding Taiwan Company. 


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= The candidate, to be based in Taipei will ideally have had I 
| at least 5 years working experience in Asia and have a | 
| proven and successful track record in management, ad- f 
| ministration and general business development prefera- s 
| bly in the Health Care or related industry. | 

| Please send CV with recent photograph to: § 

| MCC P.O. Box 974, Makati, Philippines. | 

aaffifmiiiifimfiiiafniiiiiiiiiirmiiiiuniifffinifuiriiamirirmiuiamnfWwniiffiififK 


SALES VICE PRESIDENT 

In response to last conversations. Chairman of Board 
will speak to previously selected candidates. 

Call between 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. from May 6th 
to May' 9th: 

Annette HALE, 

P.O. Box 164041, Miami, FLORIDA. 


SALES MANAGER 

FRANCE 

for U.S. high technology Engineering company 
Paris based, 

this new position involves considerable travel throughout 
France to generate a rapid and significant presence in the 
market. Additional responsibilities include setting up and 
managing a small sales office, and meet ing gales and profit 
goals. 

Applicants must demonstrate 

a successful career in sales and should be 
qualified to degree level in engineering 

(or related subject). Complete fluency in Englis h is ess ential 
(Preferred age range 28-35) 

Hie excellent package includes attractive salary. 
Incentive bonus and car. 

Applications mtii detailed CV. to: 

Box 034798, 1HT, 63 Long Acre. 

London WC2E 9JH. 


!cW\t>©V 



U.S. company- Mr- Davis and Mr. 
Murdoch own Twentieth Century 
Fox. 

A commission rale that stands in 
Mr. Murdoch's way is one that says 
an owner of a newspaper cannot 
own more than 5 percent of a 
broadcast station in the same city. 

Mr. Murdoch's newspapers and 
Mr. Kluge's TV stations overlap in 
New York and Chicago. 

Mr. Quello said he sees no bar to 
the agreement,' if Mr. Murdoch 
meets the citizenship standard and 
does not ask to keep the newspa- 
pers. 

Federal law prohibits nonciti- 
zens from owning more than 20 
percent of a TV licensee or 25 per- 
cent of the licensee's parent compa- 
ny. 

To become a citizen. Mr. Mur- 
doch would fust have to become a 


Manufacturers Hanover Trust 
Col said it has agreed to offer re- 
duced-rate loans of up to $50,000 
each to some of its borrowers in 
settlement of a class-action lawsuit 
ehatltwiging hs lending practices. 
The proposed settlement requires 
approval of the New York Supreme 
Court- 

Mesa Partners 2, an investor 
group led by T. Boone Pickens. 
chairman of Mesa Petroleum Co n 
said it is extending the expiration 
date of its offer for shares of Uno- 
cal Corp. by one week, until May 
23. The group is offering 554 a 
share for 64 milli on shares. 

Sedgwick Group PLC said it has 
been appointed leading reinsur- 
ance broker for China's first com- 
mercial-scale nuclear plant, being 
built near Canton. Toe London- 
based company said it was also 
named adviser to People's Insur- 
ance Co. of China. 


Page 15 


permanent resident alien in the 
United States! 

Mr. Murdoch owns 50 patent of 
the company that controls Twenti- 
eth Century Fox Film Corp» but 

with so many potential partici- 
pants. the agreement could be 
structured in a way ihat would 
leave Mr. Murdoch below the own- 
ership Emits that would apply if he 
retained his Australian citizenship. 

Through ownership of a filin 
company and mayor market TV 
stations, the company would have 
the ability to become a major 
broadcast company. 


RES IN OB* 

An Arrow* for the Cautious Investor 
-to Protect end Increa se Capital 

US. DoBar De n ominated 
Insured by US. Govt. Entities 
Import a nt Tax Advantages 
Co m p et i tive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
Wnmgdnte Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiality 

CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RES IN DEP 

r ntji Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus arid 
account application to: 


Address. 


Net mU* wUmibe USA 


far. As for retailers, Mr. Telling 
said, “If we have milijons of cards 
out, our competitors will be eager 
to take them because it roll help 
their sales.” 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
3 Moy 1985 

The net asset vaMe awflailoas shew* Mow ere svmlMbv ttw Feeds BsMAwttjte 
exception of some lends Mftose quotes are based m issue Brices. Tim tallowing 
mwgtaat symbols Indicate t T eeee nor of tro Oe D oP s nmpfle d fo r tee I HT: 
on -da l tv; (w) -weekly; Q» -bMnoaTWv; trt-reeetertr; 01 -tr rw wterly 


AL MALMANAGEMENT . 
<W) Al-Mol Trust. SA— ■■ - 


ly about the “synergies” their fi- 
nancial network makes posable. 
Sears hopes customers who buy a. 
house through Coldwdl Banker 
roll obtain property insurance 
from Allstate, get a mortgage 
through an aim of the financial 
network and use the discount book 
obtained from ColdweD Banker to 
buy a Sears washer and dryer. 


OBLI FLEX LIMITED 
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1. Laurence Rauntv HIIL EC4. DI-42J-WW — Id I Unlrek j— DM 77 JO 

/-Other Funds 


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Btcor Infl Fd. (AEIF1 
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S%XJ (wf AdRwMfe Invutments Fund. UUI 

FIDELITY POBdl Hamilton Bennuiki Sm’i - Siazo 

— {ml Anwrican Values Common- S te57 

— tmf Amor Values CMThPref 1 1BUB }•? 

-Id) FtarWTAma-.Amjrti S4SJ6 

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— Iwl GoM Income t}JP MBMfcN.MlB 

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— Iwl Doitor Income 
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GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— (w) Etot Investment Fund. ■ S 34159 

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Conn GnM.I WLLogAamUn-dnCM 
GLOBAL ASSET AMNAGEMENT CORP. 
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tw GAMEmsitage 
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—Id j G.T. Japan small CaFand 
—Id J G.t. Techno Kigv Fund 
—Id ) G.T. South CMoo Fund 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL.SA. 

Jersey, PA B« O. Tel 0534 768 » 

WnsPA Bo* 3(22. Tel 4131 33051 

— ? gg temy iFur s osn sfhjb 

— id) CSF (Balanced) . 

—Id) Intel. Band Fond 
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— (d ) Op*»A 

— w Oms-us. 

— Iwl OamC- Jam 

dm — Deuiadte Marks BF — Befgfem Moot: NL'^. Dutch Pto<ta;7l_F — 
t-yxo uP py u_ P rones; SF — Swiss Francs; a— -asked: +— Offer Prto©5 — bid 

change R/VSIB tan ogr unit; N A NutAvaHabte NX^-NofGanmiBjeteedto— 

New; S — Susp ended: Sre — Stock Sofflj *-^ E*rOM3gn8t“ — Ess^ «- 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


Br idayfe 

AMEX 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to Hie dosing on wan Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The .Associated Press 


KtiS Slock otv- YU. PE lflO.HMlLOWttMl.gi 




13 

TJr U 14 




& 




13 
12 
II 
2 

62 35 32 

63 38 30 

15 

-Mb 1 3 M 
3 

271 

27 

M 24 7 

13 56 
275 

31 S3 II 

24 
■ SO 
6 3 

14 2 

16 12 

JO 25 11 3 

13 16 

.15 18 93 


6* 

W* 

w 

tv. 

141% 

6* 

141% 141% 
3* 31% 
21 % 21 % 
51% 51% 
31% 31k 

13(6 131% 
21 % 21 % 
SV% 51% 
61% 61% 
6W AW 
91% M 

nt n% 

20W 




J5t 

58 

.12 

.7 

.72 

451 

43 

3L4 

40b 

43 


AW 

31% 

UVk + * 
151% + W 
I2W—W 
tw — W 

m> — is 

3V. — i% 
13* + » 
45* + IS 
M 

214 + u 
391% ♦ (i 
4%% + 1% 
144% + 4% 
SOU — 1% 


ft*'* 

»«** 

■811 
a: i *- 

i a m 
n n » 

jsxvr 

2u% m m 
ina ti. ii%% 

ua sis is 

In Rn 

9*4 ** 91% 

1% 51% s% 

m «% n 


if* 

3M-n 


16 NRMn 

SW NOMefc 
1I(% NtGiO 40b 

raw mootni .10 

1 NeWLB 
111% NMzAr JW 
II NPbim 89 
13 NProc 1-20e 
26 NYTIlM 62 
4H NevrtjE J3e 
10* Newcnr J2 
51% Nlebots 
2V. Nolan 
to motor n 
m MoOia g 
21k HnHrzn 
7 NucLDf 
9 Nutnac 


152 16(6 
26 71% 

1 1M 

262 131% 

a 11% 

2 111% 
in 151% 

234 tit* 
631 43(6 
15 41% 

a ?2i% 

47 111% 
22 34% 
29 111% 
7 141% 
14 3 

11 I 
10 101 % 


161%— Ul 

7* + W 
131% 4- 1% 
1316 
11% 

151% — '4 
isw + h 
1S'.% + u 
431% + 1% 
416 

tr«— % 
111% + v% 

TVS — 1% 
111 % + 
MW— U 
7% 

716— 14 

1M% + 1% 


m 






4*- 


40 5.1 


■ 

7* 

7* 

7* 

J2 22 

40 

22 

14* 

14W 

14* 


10 

21 

< 

6 

6 


14 

19 

2* 

2* 

2* 

1J» 4J 

8 

5 

23%% 

22* 

231% + * 

LVfelfJ 

3 

9 

a* 

a 

av% + * 

.12 


518 

11* 

ii* 

m%— 1% 



a 

1* 

i* 

1*— w 

140 62 

12 

11 

22* 

22W 

22W + * 



92 

4* 

41% 

4* 


56 

ZM 

7W 

7* 

71k— 16 

JBe J 


3 

12 

12 

12 


9 

1 

12 

4 « 4 £ *+* 

JOe 2J 

8 

60 

13 

12 

13 +1* 

40 20 

7 

4 

IV* 

19* 

m%— * 



1 

Mi 

Hi 

7* 

-72c 21 

a 

2 

a 

35 

35 


18 

5 

31 Mr 

3TM 

3TW— 1% 

.10 U 

54 

1 

BW 

a* 

aw— '6 

JO 25 

54 

29 

81% 

a* 

BW + W 

400 53 

9 

Tl 

■1% 

B 

8 


1716 

12 Jodvn 

30b 38 

9 

3 

14 

14 

14 + '.% 

8* 

SW Jacobs 




a 

6*% 

6* 

CW— w 

5W 

2* Jot Am 



5 

74 

2* 

2* 

2* 

21% 

W Jet Awl 




5 

W 

W 

l%- “k 

8V% 

4* Jetton 

49! 

64 

14 

14 

716 

71% 

7* 

6W 

2* John Pd 




83 

4* 

4* 

41% + Vb 

11*% 

716 JoUlAm 

JO 

38 

IS 

22 

I0>6 

10W 

10* 

11* 

21% John Ind 



3 

It 

7 

6W 

7 + W 

716 

3* JimUkn 



5 

17 

4* 

41% 

4W— W 


15* 9 
916 5 

41% 11% 
19 131% 

m. 91% 
131% 10 
25 151% 

61% 3% 
11 % 1 % 
16 94% 

221% 131% 
24 18!% 

3616 251% 
13 41% 

13 71% 

111* 71% 

*» £ 


20b 1J 143 


M 10 14 
16 

138 9j8 9 
AO 25 30 


3a 11 10 


17 

.10 J >5 
17 

46115.1 7 


12 1516 
495 9W 
« 216 
3 171% 
27 121% 
99 131% 
■22 241% 

1 % 

10 151% 
65 15 
1 2216 

2 321% 

5 81% 
2 121 % 
M DM 
26 10 
52 4* 


151% 1516 + Ml 
9 91% + 1% 

21% 216 + to 

171% m%— 1% 
1316 121% + 1% 
12% 13 


321% 32W — 
8% 8% 

121 % 12 % 

II im 
io iq—1% 
416 4H 


37(6 

2816 KnCsti 

458 112 


20x 34V» 

34W 

341% + W 

3* 

11% KoaokC 



■ 7 

31 

2* 

21* 

2U- W 

i 15W 

10 KovCp 

JO 

14 

18 

6 

141% 

14* 

MW— (« 

1M 

9% KoorN n 

JO 

08 

15 

22 

73V> 

13* 

7X8— U 

20* 

14* Kenwtn 

80a 45 

9 

1 

T7* 

17* 

17H— * 

mu 

low Ketdim 

38t 

19 


5 

MU 

MU 

M*— * 

9Va 

5* Key Co 

JO 

17 


1 

7Vs 

r.% 

rw + ■% 

T7V% 

8 KevPti 

JO 

2J 

15 

»1 

9-k 

e 

95% + W 

131% 

5 KevCa 



8 

10 

5* 

SW 

5* 

9W 

7V% KevCa un 



10 

Pa 

7W 

7W— W 

4* 

2v> KkMcwt 




7 

3* 

3* 

3*— W 

4W 

3W Kiiem 



34 

7 

41% 

I'-i 

4W 

5* 

3* Klnark 



20 

100 

416 

4<6 

414 

6* 

3 Klrbv 




55 

3* 

3W 

3* + * 

5* 

3W Kit MU 



11 

13 

4W 

4* 

41% — W 

3* 

2 KleerV 

J2r 18 


77 

2W 

2 

2—1% 

15* 

9* Knoao 



17 

76 

14'% 

13U 

141% + * 

151% 

8* Knoll 



14 

M 

12W 

1216 

121% 

271% 

21 KooerC 

232 

88155 

44 

avi 

aw 

25* — % 


4=J 


I 




7W 

416 GRI 




42 

5W 

5 

5W 

4* 

2V% GTI 



» 

4 

3* 

3* 

3* 

14* 

9* GataaC 



8 

121 

11* 

n* 

11* 

MB 

lW GclxvO 



40 

a 

2* 

2W 

2* 

a 

24* Canon 

1J0 

61 

9 

3 

29W 

26* 

29W + * 

18V% 

8* GatUt 




23 

9 

8* 

R6~ W 

10* 

7 Gavlrd 



15 

IK 

BW 

BW 

«V%— * 

13* 

9* GelmS 



15 

42 

11* 

11W 

11* 

4* 

2* Gemoo 



73 

13 

3* 

3* 

3(6 + W 

171% 

121% GOetrts 

38 

63 

1 

73 

14 

13* 

14 

5 

2* GnEmp 

JO 

62 

15 

1 

4* 

4* 

4* 

7* 

2* Gantoao 




14 

4* 

4* 

416 

15* 

11* GenvDr 

SO 

U 

12 

4 

12* 

12* 

12* 

13(6 

7V> Geo Res 



5 

17 

13 

12* 

12*— W 

4 

1* GeoRwt 




33 

3* 

3* 

3*— W 


3* 

1(% LSB 




21 

1* 

1W 

1W 

3* 

2* La Bare 




2 

2* 

2V% 

2» 

7* 

2* LaPnt 



A 

6 

4* 

4W 

4* + W 

41W 

23* Lakes b 

.15o 



2V 

a 

35* 

a*— i* 

17* 

17 Ldmks 

J3 

11 

11 

14 

15W 

151% 

15W 

15W 

9W Laser 



49 

62 

121% 

T2U. 

12V. + W ; 

27* 

23* LoarPP 




a 

23V) 

23Vs 

23W 

9* 

21% UwPh 



14 

63 

6W 

A* 

4* 

31* 

12* LeWahs 



11 

a 

28* 

2716 

281%— 1 

5* 

3* LeliwT 



19 

A8 

AW 

S* 

6W + >6 

aw 

71% LbtPPh 

JO 

TJ5 

8 

784 

20 

19 

20 + U 

3* 

1* LHeRst 




34 

2* 

3W 

r% 

3W 

1* Lodoe 




74 

2*6 

2 

2U + W 

39* 

23W Lcrlmr 



18 

296 

34Vs 

34* 

341% 

TAW 

8* Lumas 

M 

8 

25 

59 

13* 

12* 

1X6 + U 

13* 

AW LuntvE 



17 

a 

13(6 

13 

13-6 + •» 

15 

io* Lurie 



B 

59 

12 

11* 

11* 4 W 

M* 

10 Lydois 



4 

23 

14 

14 

14 

35* 

13W LvnCSv 

JO 

.9 

M 

39 

32* 

32U 

37W— W 

10* 

8* LynchC 

JO 

12 

15 

30 

916 

91% 

9W— W 


■UK 



18 

13W 

13W 

1X% + 

40 

216 

2*% 

2W 

8 

IP6 

8* 

8* 

11 

1W 

1* 

1W 

34 

7W 

7* 

7*— 

10 

3* 

a* 

3* + 

2 

11* 

n* 

11(4 — 


1 US8M M 

8% UHntW JO 

>% IMKorn IS 

ili% untcpp* Js 36 
■* untfitr n 39a 65 _ 
14(6 UAH pc M SJ> M 
I6W UnCokF ■ 14 

11% UNwdA .10 57 >8 
1(4 UFMdV J8 

lOVk UHH90 14 

104% USAGkd 
tVk UnHUV M14I 22 
7% LmvCrn 16 

54k Unhrfb M 

94k unvPol 


II 8% 
110 UU 
13 % 

31 135% 


8% •*». 24k— tl 


too m 

a TJ46 


TOO GH6 + V 
mmtit 
in iti%— !•- 

in un-'w 

nr ii 
*M> 4*— % 
« 13 - Ki 

Wfc 7% 

13t% 12% + 16 


4 + 


w* m 

18% W* 
274% 16% 
131% 416 

lit 21% 
23% MW 

n% 3% 
1SU 41% 
■ 13 

r.a 5i> 

6 « h 

Hit n*% 

641. 524% 
41% 64% 

124% 5 


VST n 306 X0 
VallvRk t.4B 7.7 14 
VofeprA -44 19 13 
vwm 

Vorfl 22 

VUnC 40b 2.1 4 

VtRsb 

vomit pun 

wr ■■ u n 

vwS* Mr J W 
Vaintt 

Vbuato JO 34 11 
Vaetw J* 3J 12 


m it n% » 

s a tt &+.a 

” 5* 48% SSI’S* 

i w if . it -,m 
I * 4 4 

» » n *w + w- 

12 41% 4 4 

*5 S? 2t 5S** 

7 n n n 

5 in* 151% ISM * 36 

• 63* *24* 63%%— U. 

7 »*% 61% «% + t% 

M w» W* 10* — V. 



•UrWr 


TV, 

4V, 

4V% 

3W 

51% 

81% 

aw 

M 


231% 231% 231% 
4W *W 41% 


TU% 

AW TBar 

Jit 

7J 

32 

55 

7 

6* 

7 

n* 

m TEC 

-I0e 

8 

22 

37 

13* 

12 

13* + (% 

lew 

5 TIE 




1181 

4* 

A 

6* + W 

14* 

6W Til 



45 

V 

TO* 

91% 

10* + * 

iaw 

13 TdbPnt 

JO 

LI 

12 

4 

17* 

17* 

ir%- w 

15*6 

9* Tasty 

.48 

Z.9 

It 

4 

14 

M 

M 

4U 

2U Team 




23 

4 

3* 

Hh— W 

4* 

1E% TchAm 




4? 

2* 

2(6 

2* 

22* 

131% TetiSvm 



14 

195 

U 

15(6 

15U — * 

60* 

33(k TecftOo 



13 

3 

5SW 

5SU 

S5W + 16 

■ 

3U TotiiTp 



T 

23 

4U 

4'.k 

4U + 1% 

a* 

71: Tectilri 

JO 

15 

e 

a 

MU 

UW 

14* + (% 

3 

1* Tectmd 




10 

2U 

:u 

2U— * 

180 

77V) TeionR 

JOe 

JIM 

2001174 

1741% 176 +3 

S* 

3 Ttiecan 




45 

?* 

2* 

2*- 1% 

31* 

21'-* TtilUk 

M 

14 

13 

45 

27* 

27 

27 — * 

II 

8U TefDia 

3&a 34 

13 

46 

IQ 

9tk 

18 + W 

16W 

7'% Teisd 



a 

22 

8 

7U 

7* + W 


AMEX Higha-Lows 










NSW HIGHS 14 


BWRodLObB 

vIContAh- 

Graannumi 

SonJOMW 

BWRad A 
vICMMJref 
Hmatirdi 
Sarvstnon 

BatarfMarm 

FkTWVOBcp 

Mel Pro 

SCE UKM 

Chart Mdet 
FirtKarpn 
OSuHlvan 
TextoAfrCP 


mwum n 


BnfSlUA 

CoTDdlQB 

Mksnouod 

&nfSMQ 
HalUMSM 
Movie Star 

BraaeanAB 

mntiarpf 

PwdaGrdlt 

CfnmnHo 

MSlCMMCa 

SanrbKO 


IF YOU GET A KICK 
OUT OF SOCCER, READ 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE IHT 


Over-the-Counter 


May 3 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales la Nel 

1 00s Hlab Low 3 PJM. Ch'oa 


Sales in Hal 

150s Htaft Low 3 P-M.OTB e 


Soles hi Nal 

ID8i High LOW SPALOUK 


Sties bi Net 

188i High Low SPALOToo 



Sties In 


Ml 


T0H Hieti Lew 3 P-M- CtiDe 

Avnttic 

6421 

20* 

20*— (% 

Avatar 

1BV18FW 

18* 

18* 

AvtatGo 

58916* 

16* 

IAW 

AzfcM 

JO 60 2 5 

5 

5 + * 


1-00 

U 

JO 

i 

5J 

JOT 

.9 

25e 1 .4 

JOe 

1J 

MO 

18 

JOa 

A 

-DSe 

J 

JO 

22 

M 

3.4 

lJHa 67 

■40 

3-7 

1 JO 

56 

JO 

4J 

M 

64 

IS2 

64 

IA0 

36 

J8 

2 J 

J» 

17 

JO 

36 

1.12 

5 S 


1B29W 
45 41k 
225261% 
9351% 
8313V. 

244 n% 

9829W 
14 6V% 
1551 7%% 
417 
25 3W 
369 1616 
15221 
36 7 
316 9Y% 
1855216 
52 2H 
388 .416 
264 CW 
14*3V> 
45 1 
tl 13W 
13 9%6 
1279 221% : 
471 141% 
311341% : 
17 4VS 

* 12(4 
90251% : 
7220V% : 
a 21W : 
27 a 

S022W : 
1 1016 


29U— 16 
41k— V. 

a +16 

3SW 

13 

5W— V% 
a —l 
6W + U 
716 + 1% 
17 

JU— »fc 
16V* + W 
21 +1 

7 

9 ♦ M 

5F6 + Ui 
2W 
«* 

6%k 

23W + 1% 

1 

13 

9*. 

22 + ?% 
1416 

34W + 16 
4W + V% 
mi 

251% + 1% 
30 — W 
212% + 16 

8 

2216 

1016— 16 


147 

140 tJ 96 
!JBbd4 15 
199 

a 

83 

56 

8 16 6 
41 


loss Hub Low iPjkLaroo 

601 a 25(6 25W— 1W 
3 216 » 216 
14621 201% jm%— 1% 

M 71% 71% 7(%— M 
213291% Z7W 25W 
I 216 41% 4 41% 

512 SV% 516 51% 
1411016 MW WK + W 


ASacCs 1JD2 38 

AmSfti 

*£o9ar 


88 

27 

52 32* 

3114 

32* 




11 8 

7* 

7* 










42*3 

4X6 

42* 




225 If 6 






3810* 

ID* 

10* 






16W 




433 A 






M 7* 

7 

7* 

— * 



_25 3* 






334 5 

4U 

«W 




257 19* 

19* 

19* 

— * 









9 2* 






619 










240 


134 4* 


4* 



7742 






59 31% 




.14 

IJ 

401 12* 

12W 

12W 




97 aw 







T9* 


+ * 


16 






am. 

16(6 

1616 


JO 

2J 

138 916 






47 5* 






IS16 2V% 



+ Ik 

JUr 

J 

318 

17W 

I7t% 




6111* 

II* 





4410* 

ID 

10 





• 

BW 




141 4W 





50 2* 

SW 

2* 




844 low 

low 





3819* 

19* 

I8**b 

+ w 



131* 

31* 

31* 


1J0 

58 

131* 

am 

31* 

- w 



11% Ik. 
SW SVr 
1»% 171% 

2 31% 

6(6 646 

t 3 

3 av« 
3W 3W 
7W 7Vj 

MV. 1016 - 
2SW 28W- 
14(6 141k- 
■W 91% 
15* 154% 
91% 9*%- 
141% IS 

io taw 

MW 10W - 
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16W 16(6 
41% 41% 

7W 7W 
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29 516 54% 

IV 1716 171% 
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4318W 18 
44391% 39W 
51716 1716 
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388*9,, 18* 
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118 5W 5 
5 54% 5W 
37 516 5(6 
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a 191% 16* 


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516 

17*— * 
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39 

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I7W + W 
18—16 
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(Contuiwd on Page 17) 


















































































1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


How Hutton Got Interest-Free Loans 


Bv James Sterngold 

•V« York Times Sen ice 

NEW YORK — Taras like “fi- 
nancial system and “banking net- 
works" typically conjure up images 
of a spaghetti of wires through 
which billions of dollars whiz in 
ultra-efficient electronic impulses. 

But as was demonstrated Thurs- 
day m the announcement that E.F. 
^nnn 1 * ^ pleaded guilty to 
3 1000 counts of wringing illegal 
profits out of its daily dealings with 
bonks, the system is flawed to the 
degree that it provided the oppor- 
tunity to earn interest on somebody 
etse's money. 

According to the Justice Depart- 
ment. Hutton used the system's in- 
efficiencies to turn the task of col- 
lecting all of its branch income in 
one place into a way of illegally 
earning extra money. 

Of necessity, companies have de- 
veloped extremely sophisticated 
methods for collecting and making 
/the most efficient, and profitable, 
’■£*se of the often-buge amounts of 
cash that they process every day. 
According to the Justice Depart- 
ment. Hutton's branches processed 
as much as S200 million a day. 

The focus of these cash-manage- 
ment systems is to keep all avail- 
able funds invested, even if just 
overnight, to earn income until the 


Canada 

Con. Tire 

lit Quar. if® in* 

Hwnw 329-3 <97.9 

.Profits 937 1152 

l tor Shore 0.11 0.M 


kst possible moment when they 
must be paid out to meet obliga- 
tions. 

According to the Justice Depart- 
ment's complain L Hutton's scheme 
took advantage of the lag between 
the time a check is presented for 
payment and actually paid to the 
beneficiary. 

When a check is deposited in a 
bank account, the bank must then 
collect the cash from the account of 
the person who wrote the check, 
and credit it to the account of the 
person to whom it is payable. Even 
in an electronic era. this transfer 
takes time, usually from one to two 
days for banks. 

in the mean lime, the person who 
wrote the check has the use of the 
funds until they are credited to the 
other person's acounL 

This time frame, which can be 
stretched out by such unusual 
events as a severe snowstorm, is 
known as the “float-" When (here is 
such a float, the person who wrote 
the check has use of the funds until 
the check does clear. 

Hutton's system was designed to 
encourage this float, which then 
allowed it to effectively earn inter- 
est on the bank's money, or, pul 
another way, take interest-free 
loans for several days at a lime. 

There have been many kinds of 


abuses of these various time delays. 
For example, some brokerages 
adopted a practice of paying cus- 
tomers on the East Coast with 
checks drawn on West Coast 
banks, and vice versa. This was 
called “remote disbursement." 

Thus, when a New York custom- 
er deposited the California c h eck in 
an account, it would take an extra 
day or two to dear. That was an 
extra day or two that the brokerage 
could invest the funds. 

The Justice Department charged 
E.F. Hutton with two basic abuses. 

First, it said. Hutton used exces- 
sive drawdowns against uncollect- 
ed sums in its checking account. 
E.F. Hutton had a system to man- 
age cash whereby, each day, its 
branch offices would inform its re- 
gional bead office of how much it 
bad deposited in local bank ac- 
counts. 

The regional office would then 
write a check that would transfer 
money from the branch office's ac- 
count to the regional office's bank 
account. The regional office would 
then transfer all the funds to Hut- 
ton's master cash centers. 

The second charge was that E.F. 
Hutton deliberately conducted 
multiple transfers in the system lo 
manage cash as a way of provoking 
some float 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are in bed currendes 
unless otherwise indicated 


Interpreting 
The Rhetoric 
Of Economics 

(Continued from Page 13) 

other “early” or “during." has be- 
come absolutely crucial to prove 
that something 'of value happened 
at this summit conference. Hence, 
it seems likely that the United 
States and others will, before the 
summit conference ends, make a 
package deal with the French for 
both international monetary and 
trade talks to begin relatively soon. 

Though the odds are that a way 
will be found to oblige the French, 
at least rhetorically, the actual rhet- 
oric employed mil be vital, and the 
French will scrutinize it to see 
whether it implies action, and if so. 
what kind. 

Surveillance. The United States 
and the others may seek to simulate 
international monetary discipline 
by advocating greater surveillance 
of national policies for achieving 
more stable exchange rates. Sur- 
veillance means more than just 
looking at a nation's policies and 
budget deficits, in the case of poor 
Latin American and other Third 
World debtors; It means cutting 
them off from loans 

I Todd Shipyards 


4tb Over. 

Revenue _ 

Net Inc. 

Per snare 

Year 

Revenue 

Nel Inc. 

Per Snare 


1915 19W 

1123 1 6339 

5 M U1 
135 250 

ins 19M 

50651 62251 

1858 7157 

4J6 454 


Hawker SkkMey 

id Quar. 1985 1904 

Revenue 875 115.7 

Profit 2.75 £53 

Per Share 031 057 


Texaco Can. 

1st Quar. W8S 1984 

Revenue^— 1500. 1580. 

Profits 995 1195 

Per Share 051 0J4 

United States 
AIco Standard 

2nd Quar. 7885 >894 

Revenue 1374. 1526. 

Nel Inc. 2951 2839 

Per Shore 1J4 137 

Beneficial 

lit Oner. 19® 1984 

Net Inc. 27.1 263 

Per Share 154 0.98 


General Dynamics 

lit Quar. 1985 WM 

Revenue Tints. \ mb. 

Net Inc. __ 927 77.5 

Per Share — 2.19 152 


General Re 

Id Quar. 1985 i«M 

Revenue - 5125 4195 

Oner Net _ 2952 3359 

Oner Share— 055 073 

1934 net excludes ooln ot sat 
mutton from change in ac- 
counting. 

Gen. Pub. Util. 

Uf Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 7625 6911 

Net Inc. 343 XU 

Per Share — (L54 053 


Halliburton 

1st Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1.170. 13W. 

Nel Inc. 5636 757 

Per Share — 0 l52 054 


Lincoln National H *1 ly- - — 


Id Quar. 1985 1W4 

Revenue . 1,11ft. 155& 

Ouer Net — 4351 4258 

Oner Share— 0.99 0.96 

Nets exclude gains of S24.4 
million vs 8358 million 


Peoples Energy 

2nd Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue— rata 760. W 

Net Inc 5114 4937 

Per Share 1J0 158 

Id Half 1983 1984 

Revenue 1.178. 1.162 

Net Inc. 7739 6394 

Per Share — 230 254 


Southland 


Peabody 


2nd Qaar. 1915 1984 

Revenue — . 7881 8633 

Nel Inc 077 2231 


Ramada Inns 

1(1 Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue — 13756 14431 

Net Inc (OII33 035 

a; toss. 

Sthm N Eng. Tel. 

Id Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 32D5 314 

Net Inc 298 3U 

Per Share— , MS 157 


Id Qaar. 19» 1984 

Revenue 2810. 2871 

Nel Inc 151 14J 

Per Share 052 030 

Tesoro Pet. 

2nd Quar. IMS WM 

Revenue , 6315 72V 

Net Inc lal436 574 

Per Share — — 035 

Id HOH IMS 1984 

Revenue 1 Jit 1 

Net Inc — - lallj 1152 
Per Share — — OSS 

a: loss. 

Texas Air 

Id Quar. IMS MW 
Revenue — - 41 13 255.7 

Oper Net — 577 10)45 

Oner Share— 033 — 

a; loss. 


Travelers 

id Quar. 1985 1984 

Net Inc 895 715 

Per Sharp OJ* 082 


Valero Energy 

Id Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 6968 5422 

Net Inc 6.9 5.1 

Per Share—. 031 0.10 

I9S5 net Includes aainofSIl 
million from sale at assets 
and lass of SHU million. 


Wendy’s Int’l 

Id Quar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2365 2055 

Net Inc 14.5 138 

Per Share— 030 018 

its* results adiusted lor *- 
tor J Hill In March 


Over-the-Counter 


Sates ki Net 

lOU Mah Lew 3PJM. Chine 


May 3 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Salas la Nat 

nos hw un* 3 pal are* 

(Continued from Page 16) 

_ .. 3619 1846 ini 

Bn 13M103 4113% 13% 13% 

Y 200 47 37043 424b 4216 + Vb 

1247V, 47% 47% + It 

342616 26 2616— 16 

S9% 61 +1% 

hrs 30 13 217169b 16V, it* + % 
34 19 137314b 111b 11% 

1129 29 29 

2S 516 5% 5V. 

210 31b 346 39b 

9 9 

3 3V, 31b 31b + lb 

151b 15% + 4b 
4347 34b 3 346 + 16 


sales la Net 

I80s HU Law SPALOTge 


.NtrSuns 
5 Nowaia 

* Kssr 


NucMrt 
. NudPh 
1 VudSot 
a -Sum rent 

Numeric 

NutrlF 


OhsKnts 180 35 
OWNBl 280 38 
Old Rep 88 23 
Otdsme 288 73 
OMSPfg 230 113 
OMSptC 260 128 
OneSCP J8e 13 
OnUne 
OnV* 

OptlcC 
OortcR 
OPtrfCS 
Orbanc 


OttrTP 276 87 
OwenM 30 2.1 
Oxoco 


PNC 232 4.1 
PotatB 

Paccar 130a 38 
PocFit 

PcGaR 180 43 
PocT«l 80 63 
POCWB 86* 18 
PucoPh 
Pane* 

PartKh 

PaacMx .13 13 

Pansob 

Par Pits 

ParTch 

Portsan 

ParkOn 

ParkOn 50 4.1 
Purtcwv 

Pus FOB xse 3 
PntntM 
Partex 
Patrfcl 
Patriot 230 63 
PautHr 
PaulPt 

1 "Paxton 38 27 
■5 *ovn 

Raven* 

PaakHC 

Peer l H 

Poo c; Id jut 7 
Perm vo 150a 35 
Penhcn 380 46 
PanaEn 230 49 
PanMrs 58 27 
Pond 

PeapB* 52 28 

POeaRT 

Percept 

PrrpA 

Falrtfi 1.12 38 

Pitmwi 

PHI mtf 

PhrmcJa JUu A 

pnrmlct 

Phrtnwrt 

PSPS .Me 5 
PBIKM 50e 22 
PHXAffl 


PtcCate 50 2.9 
PtanPfU Me 27 
Pianos JO 15 
PtonHI 92 21 
planSI s .13 15 
PlontrC 96 23 
PlzCBC .no 13 
Plenum .96 18 
Poftolk 
PievMa „ 
PMKtF JSr 23 


4V, 41b + 46 

4W 4b 
116 116+16 
64b 69b— tb 

fft «% + 9b 
211b 2316 + lb 
5% Sib 

9% 3+16 
30V, 301b- V, 
231b 2316 + 16 
2flb 244b— 4b 
51b Mb 
Wlb 16V, 

1116 1116 
W 19V, + 16 
71b BH + tb 

1016 101b 
94b 946 — 16 

23 23 

20V, 20V, 

401b 4046 
42H 4216 + lb 
6V, 646— 16 
916 916 

616 64b 
23% 234* — % 
33V. 33V, 

31b 344 
271b 27V,— 16 
94b 94b— 16 
54* 54b + % 
174* 174* 

301b 3014— 1b 
331b 3316 + 16 
2316 2346— 1b 
3% 41b + 4b 
19 W + 46 
21* 3 + 1b 

47% 481b 
1316 131b 
51b 5%— 1b 
141b 1446 + 16 
71b 71b 
2616 264* + V* 
71* 71b— 16 

1046 1046 


11b 

31b 

24b— lb 
24b- V* 
131b— V, 
24* + 16 
4M% + 1b 
55 + W 

3046 

5 + V* 

28V* + tb 
52 +1 

3846— Vs 
29 +16 

21 +46 

214b 

19 + W 

7 

2 «*— 16 
154b + tb 
411b +% 
14 

1746— 16 
7 — Vi 
9*h + lb 
546 

17tb + tb 
13V* + 4b 
31% + V. 
184* + 1b 
14b + >6 


564b 57 +46 

94b 9% 

394* 40 
114b 1146 
2346 2346— >6 
13 13 

cv. cu 

1216 121b— Vb 
1% i%— K 
316 34b— 1b 

716 71b + 46 

1ST* 191b + tb 
1716 18 + 4b 

16 16 + 1b 

1*46 131b + 46 
35 35 + tb 

141b 1446+16 
204* 2116 + 46 
12% 1246 
5 51b 

44b 5 + 1b 

79* Bib + Hi 
3546 3546- 46 
1916 1916 
10% 114% +% 
IB 18 

ZJU. 2316 
12 12% + 16 
131b 12% 

22M 22W — 16 
8% 84* — V* 

441b 45—16 
30 30 

32 32 

24V, 25 
1146 1216 
10 lOVi + % 
1816 T» + h 

16 S + A 

7 7 

161* 1716 + V* 
3V, 31b— 16 

2916 29V. — V, 

10% 1046 + Vi 

S 896 + £ 

IS* 15V, — 9* 
216 24* 

796 79* 

24% 2416 + v* 

*«-* 
1816 19 
3JV* J246 + V. 
7V, 79b 

2916 291b 
516 5% + 16 

32V, 32V3 — % 
10% 101b 
25 24 V, + * 

104b 10%— % 
214* 214*— % 


Powrtc 
PwConv 
PracCst .12 
PfdRsfc 83 
PrpdLo 
ProsUt 
PrdnCn 50 
Prewov 
PrtaTl 
PiicCmj 
PrlcCos 
PrlnvD .15 
Prtronx 
Prod lOV 
ProdOp .16 
Proflnv 
ProoCo .16 
Proon* 
ProptTr 170 
ProtCes 52 
Protcol 
Provln 
PrvLfA 755 
PrudBk 
PubCoC 

PMNC 180 
PoSdBc 1.12 
PulusP 50 
Puiimn 
Purl Bn 


33 21b 
2915 
3 fftb 
5 3225 

25 431 

7 6 
2624 
35 2015 

116 5 
500 416 

81 im 

9215446 
25 23 616 

11X11146 

18 6 

28 17 5V, 

17 51b 
J 11844816 
6 54* 
8J 18814 
38 «21V, 

41416 
28 2SOO 


l JO XI 
74 15 


1% 1%— 1b 
141b 15 
84b 841— tb 
2446 2446 
31 31 

5K 546 + 14 
2316 2346— 4k 
1446 1446— 16 
44* S + tb 
4h 4% 

10% 10%— 16 
5316 5446 + tb 
61b 6tb 
1116 ill* — lb 

4 4—16 

516 3V, 

5 3V, 

48 4816 + 16 ! 

54* 59* 

134* 134* i 

2046 204b— 1 | 
IV, 2 + V, 

1416 1416 — 16 
99 100 + 41 

1016 1096 „ 

116 Ilk + Ki 
22V, 225b 
31 31% + tb 

2646 26%— tb 
716 7% + % 
21% 21% — tb 


25211% 10% 11 — % 
166 5% 546 5%+ 16 
61 2% 216 216 — % 
251416 1416 1416—% 
184 21 46 2046 21% +116 
104 416 3% 4% + 16 

144 94* 9% 946 + 16 

237511% 1046 1116 + % 


916 + % 
2416 + 16 
1616— 16 
9 % — % 
1046 
7 

54*— % 
274b + % 
4 — 4b 
23% 

T7 

19% 

61b — % 
30% + 4* 
94b 
11% 

646 + % 
1246 + 1* 
6 % + % 
4% — % 
* — % 
3 % — % 
446 

1896— n 
9% + tb 
16% + 16 
11% + 16 
3 

3 — % 
134* 

11%— % 
274*— % 
1146 

64* + % 
38% 

1116 + % 
746 

51 —1 
2% 

154b— % 
26% + % 
13% 

44* 

14% — % 
11% 

19 

10 %— % 
8% + 16 
lib — % 
20* + % 
1946 

42—16 
10% + tb 
9—16 

4 

89 * — % 
4% + % 
14% + % 
17 


Z71TI46 11% 
2715% T4% 
13916% 16 
14 4% A 
2520 % 2016 
15104* 104* 

50 3% 3% 
27 896 84* 

319 3% 2 
MM M 
34444V, 4396 
9 7 446 

2113% 1316 
1724% 24 
3444% 44 
15 1716 1716 
1915% IS 
2423% 2316 

51 5% 5% 

33328% 28% 

1824 2546 

33 446 4% 

192a 4146 

274 1 % 

218 9% 8% 

171316 1316 
52719 18% 

23 4% 4% 
411% 1046 
1 2% 7% 
41516 1446 
434 8% 8 
5 4 5* 

5025 24 

4451516 1446 
2054 £3% 

14 416 4% 

523 23 

221S5V. 54% 
424 5% 5% 
194 4 5% 

39 4% 616 

413% 13% 
12116 2116 
1 1416 1416 

30 9% 846 
4011416 14 

354% 54% 
428% 274* 
3117% 1716 
50 4% 416 

2836 134 : 

31 4% 416 

54052 50 

35 9% 9 

61 15 15 

204 3% 3 
1520% 20% 
29177144 lib 

1308 lib rib 

128 5% 516 
I 3% 3% 
614 IS 
14116 4116 
1318% 18 
1 916 916 

411% 11% 

32 3% 3% 

1 841 8% 

711% 11% 

137 41 % 

34 3% 316 
5712% K 
9 3% 3% 

9314 13% 

132 4 3% 

441446 14% 
24823% 23 
377 4% 4% 
2110 «% 
12 4% 641 
« 19% 1916 


13 

1596 
23% 22% 
24* 2% 

MUi 14 
18% 1816 
5% 5% 
216 2 
7% 7% 
-92 4J 2002116 21 
74 49* 4% 

» 8 7% 7% 

" Ik lb 
I 

1416 
10 % 


11% 

12% + >6 
17 +1* 

10% + % 
15 +16 

1896 
7 

30%— % 
14% — % 
38% + 4* 
1416 

1116 , 
474* + % I 
396 
716 

Mb + tb 
36%— % 
3Mb 

916 + % 
12% + 4* 
10 %— % 
17 

TB + % 

7*4 

8% + % 
416 

4 %— % : 
84* + % ; 
6 %— % 
IS% + % 
38 —1 
9 + % 

49* + 16 
596 + % 
17 +1 

14% — 96 
2246 + 16 
3% + '* 

3 + % 

22 

916— % 
746— % 

1% + lb 
12% — % 
35% + 16 
28% + 96 
4% 

1416 

2916 + % 
33% — % 
189* + 16 
179* — % 
291* 

14% + 16 

5 — % 

7 — % 
4% + 6< 
7% 

11% 


12% 

20 +96 

896 + % 
716 

12 % +1 
49* — % 
20% + 9* 
5 — % 
21 % + 1 % 
H%— 16 
7% + % 
IS + % 
30 +1% 

996 

1516 + 9* 
15*6 — % 
23% + % 
2%— % 
14 — % 
18% 

5% + ’* 
216 

7% — % 
2116 

446 + % 

7% 

2% — ’4 

1 

14% + % 

1096 

13% — ’4 
946 + % 
40% 

2716 +1 
10 % — 6 * 
846+9* 
15% — 16 
8% + 4* 
5% + % 
126* — % 
I0V6 
%— 1. 
U96— '6 
39% 

17% + 46 
J5% + % 

4% 

1946— % 
2% — % 
39b— % 


CBOE Lowers Charges 
On Some Transactions 

Arums 

CHICAGO — The Chicago 
Board Options Exchange said Fri- 
day ihai it plans to cut automatic- 
execution transaction fees for Stan- 
dard & Poors- i 00 options and 
double the number of contracts 
that can be executed through the 
system. The changes, which require 
board approval, will he retroactive 
to May 1. the exchange said. 

Transaction fees for member 
firms using the CBOE's retail auto- 
matic-execution system were re- 
duced by about 75 percent, to 25 
cents a contract, the exchange said. 
The limit on the number of con- 
tracts that can be executed auto- 
matically was raised to 10 from 
five. 


Sates In Net 

1005 Midi Low 3PALCWW 


11% 

15% + 16 
14% + % 
4% + % 
289b— % 
W% + % 

& 

3% 

816 — % 
4416 + % 
4%— % 
1316— % 
24% 

44%— 16 
17*4 
18 

23% + % 
5% + % 
28% + % 

24 + V. 

4% — % 

4196 
%- 16 
B%— % 
1316— 16 
1B%— % 

W46-% 

2% 

14% + % 
816 + % 
4 

25 + % 

15 + % 

54 

4% — % 
23 + % 

S4% + % 
5% + % 
5% + % 
4% + % 
13% + 16 
2116- 96 
14V. 

9% 

14(6 + Vi 
54% 

2796 — % 
17% + 16 
4% + % 
136 +1 

416— 16 
52 +19* 

9 + % 

IS — % 

3% 

20% 

* - % 
5% + ■* 
3% 

15 —1% 
4116 
18% 

916 

11% +% 
3% 

B9k 

11% + 96 

% + lb 

3% + % 
12% 

396— % 
13% 

3% 

159ft + % 
23—16 
49* — % 
9% 

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19% + >6 


Triads/ 

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6% + ■« 
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31 


241* + S. 
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23 

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191 «% 4V, 44* 

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fc&s&to*..: llOL j 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAV MAY 4-5, 1985 


ACROSS 


1 Shot to the 


5 Garden 

bloomer 
10 Boot tie 
15 Stagehand 

19 A Turner 

20 Crept in on 
little cat feet 

21 Came up 

22 Tops 

23 Florist's bet : 
1914 

25 Wall St. bet: 
1333 

27 Sparkling 

28 Disguise 

30 Shade of red 

31 . . the 

scooped in 

vain”: 

Chancing 

32 Arctic 
explorer 

33 Last Supper 
depiction 

34 Group 
sponsoring 
vocational ed. 


ACROSS 

47 Meets a poker 

bet 

48 Toward the - 
mouth 

49 Campbells. 

50 Elevator cage 


51 Poet's bet: 
1917 

55 H. G. or 
Carolyn 

56 Certain 
greenhouse 

58”... and 

hungry look”- 
Sha It- 

SS Shrew's 
harangue 

GO Tarry a while 

61 Double this for 
a sweet 

62 "The Age of 
Anxiety” poet 

63 Saddle part 

65 Tenor 


35 siecle 

(decadent) 

36 Made plans 
40 Golden brown 
43 Weatherman's 

bet: 1909 

45 Fearful 
reverence 

46 First of a 
Kipling trio 


67 Religiously 
neutral 

70 Like Old 
Nassau’s walls 

71 Bet by scads of 
people in 
Washington: 
1977 

73 Polly Holli- 
day's TV rote 

74 Twerp 

75 Sneak a gander 

76 Told a whopper 


ACROSS 

77 Painted 
metalware 

78 One of the 
Hagens 

79 U.N. bet: 1973 

83 Went a round 

84 Gravelly-voiced 
actor Eugene 

86 Ci ty on the 
Allegheny 

87 Swale 

88 Refinery 
fodder 

89 Ardent fans 

90 '’LaBobCme” 
waltz girl 

94 Amorous 
hanky-panky 

97 Chilean pianist 
Claudio 

98 Permit 

99 Publisher’s 
bet: 1976 

101 Saint's bet: 
1983 

103 Assiniboin’s 
ally 

104 Slammin' Sam 


Better Derby Bettors by Frances hansen 


PEANUTS 


|| It I 1 1 M In I |H I" Mm III In |M |n ■! I I I || 


sou pipnY HAVE to 

6JVS THE TEACHER 50 
MANY FLOWERS, SIR.. 


IT WASN'T A 
COMPETITION, YOU KNOW 


foOWVSEA POOR 
<L056R, MARCE/ 


Aourr it... you 

WERE OUTFOSiEPf 


137 130 139 





BLONDIE 


HONEV.WHV ^ 

ape y ou just, 
SrmNGTHEHE 
V4ASTINS TtfAE - 


iou*tas 


HUNDRED OTHER 
THfMGS VOU 

(coulo ee 

b coins 


RK5HT 


.-rvtATISTNE] 

h sporr.'H 



n I 


105 Yoga position 
106” Tu,’’ 1932 


107 Kind of beat 
£08 Words on a 
Wonderland 
cake 


191 1 92 |»3 


109 Producer- 
director Josh 

110 Pace a racing 
horse 


BEETLE BAILEY 

&KFSl OUT OF \ X WON’T TELL | 
BOUNPSJSA I ANYONE IF 


^1 


TWO-STROKE 
PENALTY/ v 


YOU MOVE 
.YfcLlfc BALL, 
^ SIR 


GOLF IS A SAME , 
OF HONOR LT. FUZZ* 
TO MOVE MV BALL 
IS CNEATINO 


MOVE 

THE 

SION 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


My- #|“ 

m'r 'P 11 


1 Chokes up 

2 Handel’s 
birthplace 

3 Ashley 
Wilkes's sister 

4 Choral 
composition 

5 State 

6 35.315 cubic 
feet 


14 Walked ina 
wobbly way 

15 Door-todoor 
meter reader 

16 Church court 

17 Pt.ofa 
monogram 

18 Gourd or 
melon 


37 Huntsman's 
bet: 1930 

38 “Haider’s 
Death” poet- 
dramatist 

39 Crowded 


'V Near York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


oirroF 

SOUNPS 


OUT OF 1 
FOUUCKS 


DOWN 


7 Fat little jug 

8 Chosen, in 
Chartres 

9 Symbol of 
worthlessness 

16 Hercules on 12 
occasions 

11 Deck out 

12 Rival of 32 
Across 

13 Greenland 
native: Abbr. 


24 Eared seal 
26 Legendary 
Irish king 
29 Do a dock job 

32 Oblast in the 
Pripet 
Marshes 


33 Lambaste 


35 Hot-tempered 

36 Island in the 
‘Firth of Clyde 


40 Taxco treat 

41 The Safine, 
once 

42 Ensign's bet: 
1337 

*43 Spent 

44 "Los 
Caprichos” 
painter 

47 Sniff 

49 Homophone 
for series 

51 Gave the eye 

52 Powerful force 

53 Up in the 
rigging 


54 Streisand 
vehicle: 1983 


55 Golfer's wife, 
perhaps 

57 Put a handle on 

59 Pitched a 
piano 

62 Shoelace 
appendage 

63 Artwork in a 
G.I.'s locker 


DOWN 

66 Croupier’s 
implement 

67 Kind of flu 


68 “Winnie 

Pu”: Lenard 

69 Betty of 
songdom 

71 Conventicle 
conveners 


72 Disney's 
middle name 


64 Mrs. Culp 
Hobby 

65 He built a 
better plow 


75 N.L. Rookie of 
the Year: 1963 
77 In unison 
79 Printing stroke 


DOWN 

80 force 

(strokes of 
genius) 

81 First letter in. 
communica- 
tions 

82 Turndown 

83 Russet pears 

85 Squiffed 

87 Owner of the 
Blue Ox 

89 Freshwater 
fish 

96 Biblical food 

91 Bride's head- 
gear, often 


DOWN 

92 Galsworthy 

- book 

93 By (photo- 

finish phrase) 

94 Start of a kin- 
dergarten 
chorus 

85 Links cry 

96 Small circus 
performer 

*7 Aid'spartnar 

98 Fly in the oint- 
ment 

100 Spinoff of DNA 

102 Bob Hope’s 
“baby” 


1 1 IjtnMii 


ANDY CAPP 


1 WHEN THEY B 83N-< 
.TOGETSBBKXglTSt 
TWETO GIVE 'EM . 
THE ELBOW, AWE— ] 


tflg&MM^rtwKwgD 

^5NS)^^rii®Bi§pR 

TWAN THE SOTHC3FUS .. - 


Dni 4, Km *Mncl SyMuk ■ 

Oft ’ ? ' TgjW&ilSaf w-', I » : 


7Vl£y 
k you j 


WIZARD of ID 


RHYTHM - A-NIN G: Jazz Tradition and 
Innovation in the ’80s 

By Gary Giddins. 291 pp. S 17.95 . 

Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by Francis Davis 


BOOKS 


from the distant pasu" Giddins muses in hfe intro- 


duction. He returns to the same thought in his 
remarks on the accomplishments of the pianist 


c HEN we talk about a renaissance in jazz, we 

YY are tallrine about a wealth of in teres tine 


VV are talking about a wealth of interesting 
music, not a broad-scaled awakening of interest in 
that music." Gary Giddins cautions in the introduc- 
tion to “Rhythm-a-ning," his second collection of 
essays on jazz_ And be ends his profile of a young 


tenor saxophonist on a cote of resignation: “Jazz 
remains so isolated by the virtual blackout in the 
mass media that the hardest question raised by the 
appearance of a David Murray is: What must an 


exceptionally gifted American musician whose art 
falls between the shores of the academy and the Top 
40 do to get the hearing he deserves?" 

The banishment of jazz to the no-man’s-land 
between fine art and popular culture is one of the 
recurring themes in this miscellany of articles origi- 


nally published in Hie Village Voice, where Giddins 
is a staff writer, and other publications. The essays 
also discuss the musical atavism of the newest wave 
of jazz prodigies, the best-known of whom is the 
trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. “My intuition (ells me 
that innovation isn't tins generation's fate." Giddins 
writes, “[but] the neoclassicists have a task no less 
valuable than innovation: sustenance. . . . Musi- 
cians such as Marsalis are needed to restore order, 
replenish melody, revitalize the beat, loot the tradi- 
tion for whatever works, and expand (he audience. 
That way well be all the hungrier for the next 
incursion of genuine avant-gardists, whose business 
is to rile the mainstream and keep it honest." 

Id addition, “Rhythm-a-ning” bears witness to 
the gradual ascendancy of the jazz composer — a 
paradoxical development for a music in which un- 
lettered expression has come to be regarded as the 


remarks on the accomplishments of the pianist 
Anthony Davis, whose compositions for small en- 
sembles are often entirely written oul leasing very 
little to the discretion of soloists. “Jazz is forever 
marked by quests for and away from compositional 
form." Giddins says, “but never as urgently as in the 
20 years since the avant-garde violated the sanctity 
of blues and song structures." 







mv 

w&w 


These developments are open to interpretations 
other than those that Giddins offers. Marsalis's 


offers. Marsalis's 


swift rise to prominence may be less an indication 
that jazz is marking time before the next upheaval 
than a sign that jazz can stand no more upheavals. 

Be that as it may. one measure of this book's 
value is that the issues Giddins raises are so perti- 
nent . It is all the more remarkable that such issues 
should surface in what is essentially a logbook of 
artist profiles and reviews rather than a book-length 
monograph. The author s ability to recognize and 







/ « \ 
( WAGOt 

mepem 

mg m 

TflCTBLe errHep 
-tiu, -m 
\ my it fgtu 
1 Xf9t^r 1 


REX MORGAN 




improvising soloist's sacred right. “Jazz has always convey the historical and aesthetic subtleties sur 


been a dialectic between improviser and composer 
when the improviser gets out of hand, the composer 
emerges with new guidelines, sometimes borrowed 


rounding a jazz performance makes “Rhythm-a- 
ning" (named for a Thelooious Monk composition) 
an indispensable guidebook to jazz in the 1980s. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 




/ K 


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□nuu □□□□ □□□□ nano 

□naan □□aaa □□□□ 
naaan aanaaa aooma 
aaaaa aaaaaa aanaaa 
□□aaaaaaaaaaaa □□□□□□ 
□□□□nuu □□□□□□ □□□□□□ 
□□□bqdo □□□□□ □□□□an 


As with Giddins's 1981 collection. “Riding on a 
Blue Note.” one comes away from this volume 
impressed with his graceful prose and the breadth 
and depth of his critical understanding. Refreshing- 
ly free of party ties, he is as knowledgeable and 
enthusiastic in his appreciation of the balladry of 
Frank Sinatra or Tony Bennett as of the free jazz of 
Cecil Taylor or the Art Ensemble of Chicago. The 
enduring legacies of Duke Ellington and Thelonious 
Monk, the recrudescence of hard bop. the fitful 
influence of Miles Davis, the link between A1 Jolson 
and the late rhythm-and-blues singer Jackie Wilson, 
the impact of Ornette Coleman and his progeny, the 
emergence of a distinctly European school of big- 
band jazz — a partial listing of subjects covered in 
this book reveals the wide scope of his passions. 



CLAUDIA /HAVE YOU..] 
FALLEN ASLEEP % * 


■Mz- 


GARFIELD 


HERE, KITTS*, 
KITTS* KITTY . 


THERE 

HE IS . 1 


Francis Davis, a contributing editor of Musician 
magazine, is working on a book about younger jazz 
musicians. He wrote this reriew for The New York 
Times. 


J 



^ I’M SORE VOORi 
>' MOTHER HAS 
,TOLP YOU NOT 
TO PLAY WITH, 
SHARP OBJECTS 


& 




V^brid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse May 3 

dosing prices in local currencies unless athenetse indicated. 


Trafalgar Hse 34$ 344 Sim* charftv 

THF M4 Ui S pore Land 

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PKI 613 610 AS* Dairies 

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PWA* 13*50 12240 BJLT. 

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siemens 525 527.40 BOC Group 

Thysson 97.10 9550 Boots 

veto 1505b 1 79JD Bowoter Indus 

volkswoeenwork 20850 20650 BP 

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Brit Telecom 
Brii AerMpaci 
Briruli 
BTR 


1 8k East Asia 
AHP.CBS General index : 21X10 
Previous : jiejo Chf« p<= . 


B e aswels 


China Gas 
China Ltoht 
Green Island 
Hone Seng Bank 


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21 7D 14 57 tr 

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Venice 17 

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Retraflna 
Soc Genera le 
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Vlellle Montosne 


hk Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HKShcmg Bank 
HK Teteptiana 
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5*7 RAS 4*450 

310 Rinascente 467 

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37 Snta 2747 

511 Standc 13950 

Z75 Stel 2595 

2M MIB Current Index : 1223 

570 Previous : 1222 

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765 758 

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638 

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322 

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215 

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375 

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370 

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235 

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636 

C3R 

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7900 7850 
3970 3940 
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16 61 1 34 Ir 


current Stock Index : ]»jt 
Previous : 2TKLD1 


23 73 IS 59 


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inn Cltv 
Jardlno 
Jardlna Sue 
Kowloon Motor 

Mlromor Hotel 
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Oresdner B<mK 2IQJ0 20850 Harmony 

GtIH 15150 169 Hlveld Steel 

Horaener 322 33080 Klool 

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352 35150 Barlows 


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nans si nil? Aeetl Index : 208JH 
3« ” sm Previous : 30783 
« CAC Index : 213.10 
S ”* prevtem : 21*40 


(Thursdays and 
Saturdays, boo) 
Start your day 
with a smile with 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


Chiefs Crown, Once Vulnerable, Putts Away from the Pack to Become Derby Favorite 


No.) J 

A 


By Steven Gist 

New York Tuna Seme* 

LOUISYILl.E, Kentucky - Last 
week. Chiefs Crown looked like one of 
at least half a dozen colts with about 
u eqnal fiances of winning ihe lllthKen- 
lucky Derby Saturday, and most of the 
racing world considered him a vulnera- 
ble favorite. 

Now he is the strongest Derby favorite 
m six years and a legitimate aspirant for 
a sweep of the Triple Crown. 

It took the small, bay-colored colt one 
nunute 47 3/5 seconds to change the 
Derby picture — his running timg in the 
Blue Grass Stakes on April 25. He bad 
been expected to win the race easily, but 
not to run in sizzling time or to get 
stronger with every furlong, running his 
last splits faster than bis early ones. 

_ Suddenly, instead of bong a profes- 
v sional little colt who had racked up vic- 
r^ijries without r unning much faster or 
' ‘ more impressively than his Derby rivals, 
he was something really special. It was as 


if he had finally justified his record and 
reputation, and exceeded iL 

A headline in The Louisville Tunes the 
day after read: “Now, disbelievers, kind- 
ly get off The Chiefs back. 

While the revisionist view of Chiefs 
Crown is probably closer to the truth 
than the cloud of doubt under which he 
had raced until the Blue Grass, the Der- 
by is still no walkover. What bad looked 
like the worst crop of 3-year-olds in a 
decade is beginning to blossom, and 
Chiefs Crown still has a few things to 
prove. He is bettable at odds of 9 to 5, 
but not unbeatable. 

About the only people who were nei- 
ther surprised nor impressed fay Chiefs 
Crown's Blue Grass were those closest to 
him, the trainer Roger Laurin and the 
jockey Donald Mac Beth. 

“With his breeding and the way he 
acted in the mornings, I knew he was a 
good colt," Laurin said. “But I had no 
way of knowing he could be a champion 
until he'd been to the races a few times. 
The fust time he ran as a 2-year-okl, 


there was a fast horse in the race who 
won by nine and another horse threw his 
rider, got loose and bothered this edi 
The tune after that, he took awhile to get 
settled on the track and then he closed 
big to get second.” 

Since that defeat. Chiefs Crown has 
won 9 of 10 starts. He went to tbe front 
to win a maiden race at Belmont by five 
lengths July 5. then won tbe two premier 
2-year-old stakes at tbe Saratoga meet- 
ing. the Saratoga Special and the Hope- 
fuL In both of those starts he came from 
slightly off the pace; turned in a strong 
l3te run and won going along. 

He then went into the fall season, in 
which champio nships are won. and lost, 
as the premier 2-year-old in the East. IBs 
next start proved to be bis only defeat in 
the past 10 months, but it was also the 
race that convinced laurin just how 
good the colt might be. It was the Futuri- 
ty at Belmont, and the track was sloppy. 
Chiefs Crown broke sharply but then 
began dropping back steadily. MacBeth 
could teQ that the colt hated the track. 


and swung Mm to the far outside to 
avoid (be slop being kicked back in tbe 
face. 

“Thai he began running, picking off 
those horses one by one ukc be didn't 
want to lose." MacBeth said. “It really 
showed a character.” 

The coll fell a length short of catching 
Spectacular Love, but he had been more 
impressive than ever before, and be has 
not lost since. He came back to drown a 
weak Cowdin field by six lengths. 

Chiefs Crown struggled a bit to win 
tbe Norfolk at Santa Anita, but was dead 
sharp for tbe Breeder's Cup race, bulling 
his way through a large Geld to score 
over Tank's Prospect and Spend A Buck, 
two Derby rivals. 

He was almost a unanimous selection 
as the champion 2 -year-old, but there 
were doubts about how he would fare at 
3. He had never run an impressive time 
and his one race around two turns, tbe 
Norfolk, bad been his weakest 

There was also the virus in January. A 
Hlv in La min’s barn wbo caught tbe 


same bug died, but Chiefs Crown recov- 
ered after missing three weeks of train- 
ing. 

Laurin now thfnlrc it may have been a 
blessing. Chiefs Crown got a late start, 
delaying his debut until the Swale Stakes 
Marcbi but he is coming into the Derby 
fresher than many of his rivals. Laurin 
thinks the ooit is peaking at just the right 
time. 

His races this year support that the- 
ory. In tbe Swale, he dm not have to 
work bard to beat a moderate Field going 
seven furlongs. He ran back four weeks 
iar»»r in the Flamingo. He was disquali- 
fied and placed second for possible in- 
terference in a call so controversial that 
the decision was reversed 10 days later. 

Then earne the life-mile Blue Grass, in 
which the colt again went to the front, 
and instead of drifting and tiring he got 
stronger, as if he were fitter and improv- 
ing. The time of 1:47 3/5 was only one- 
fifth off tbe trade record. 

“It was about what we expected,” 
Laurin said. “It wasn't a big jump up or 


much different from his other ra c es. Hrfs 
won five in a row. He just keeps on 
winning.” 

The one thing he has missed this year 
is real competition or any adversity of 
any kind. Although all his victories last 
year were earned from off the pace, this 
year he has found on the lead 

without a straw in Ms path every time. 

“That's just coincidence,'' Innrin 
said. “We never wanted the lead. When 
(hey Stop running such slow fractions, 
we’ll stop being on tbe lead- 1 can't see 
Mm being in front all the way Saturday.” 

That is indeed unlikely with one-di- 
mensional front-runners such as Eianal 
Prince and Spend A Buck in the race. 
Chiefs Crown figures to be slightly off 
their pace »nd then to make his move on 
tbe far turn, slightly before the cavalry of 
stretch runners, led by Proud Truth, 
Rhoman Rule and Tank’s Prospect, be- 
gins to charge. If the colt finds hnnseff in 
dose quarters, w31 he be able to pod 
away? 


“Sire,” Laurin says. “He does what- 
ever be has to do to win.” 

John Vtitch, who trains Proud Truth, 
the likely second choice, said. “Horses 
run full tilt 99 percent of the time. People 
talk about how horses could win by more 
if they were pressed, or how they do just 
barely enough to win. I don’t buy the 
idea of horses figuring out the minimum 
they have to do to wm and then doing 
only that.” 

Veitcfa gels an argument on that score 
from Eddie Sweat, Chiefs Crown’s 
groom. Sweat knows a tittle about what 
u takes to win a Derby, having been die 
groom for Riva Ridge and Secretariat, 
who won the Derby in 1972 and 1973 
while working for die trainer Ludcn 
Laurin, Roger's father. 

“This colt is no Secretariat.” Sweat 
says, “but he’s a lot like Riva Ridge. He 
acts just Tj k p htm l eats hrm i sa me 
personality. He’s a smart, quiet horse, all 
business when he goes to uie races. He's 


gpt what it takes to win races and he can 
win tbe Derby.” 


Nordiques, in Overtime, 
Win Rattle of Quebec 


United Press International 

MONTREAL — The Battle or 
t Quebec may have turned on one 
" i^oint — the Montreal fanariir»n< 
can’t beat the Quebec Nordiques in 
overtime. 

When P«er Stas toy scored at 
2:22 of overtime Thursday night, 
Quebec defeated Montreal 3-2, to 
advance to the Stanley Cup semifi- 
nals. In taking the Adams Division 

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

championship series. 4-3, the Nor- 
i diques won three times in overtime. 

■ Quebec next meets the Philadd- 
! pbia Fivers in the best-of-seven 
Wales Conference finals. The Nor- 
diques will have the home-ice ad- 
vantage with Game 1 Sunday night 
. j/it the CoHsee. 

y _ The Nordiques have already won 
“provincial bragging rights for a 
a Vear. 

r “It won’t be tbe same feeling,” 
Quebec goalie Mario Gosselin said 
of the coming series against Phila- 
delphia. “About 90 percent of the 
people living in Quebec won’t fed 
as intense about it” 

“Both sides had chances,” Mon- 
t treal Coach Jacques Lemaire said. 

“We just didn't lake advantage of 
| ours. 

■ In five overtime playoff games 

I over three years, Montreal has yet 

L to defeat (Quebec. 

“Sometimes it seems as though 

C there’s no justice.” Stastny said. 
** Seven games and one mistake, 
and one team must lose. It’s too 
bad they both can’t win. but I'm 
AirSd r glad we came up winners.” 

*9“ Quebec rookie Bruce Bell 
opened the scoring at 3:27 of the 
Just period and Jean-Franco is 
Sauve gave Quebec a 2-0 lead at 
1:24 of the second period on a 50- 
foot slapshot. 


The Worst Way to Lose’: 
A’s Defeat Brewers, 5-4 


The Associated Press 

OAKLAND, California — It 
was a tough loss, and therefore an 
easy one for Milwaukee Brewers 
Manager George Bamberger to sec- 
ond-guess. 

“There couldn’t be a worse way 
■> jo lose,” he said after the Oakland 
A’s put together four two-out hits 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

in the bottom of (he ninth inning 
off Rollie Fingers and Ray Searage 
fora dramatic 5-4 victory Thursday 
that strapped a seven-game losing 
streak. 

Bamberger conceded that he 
might have marie a mistake when 
he lifted Fingers, the major leagues’ 
all-time save leader, after he had 
given up a two-out single to Bruce 
Boehte. 

Left-hander Ray Searage came 
in to face left-handed hitter Mike 
Davis, but the strategy backfired 
/gien Davis singled. Donnie. Hill 
followed with the game-tying single 
and Alfredo Griffin knocked in the 
winning run. 

“In the middle of the year, 1 
might not have taken Rome out,” 


Bamberger said. “Right now, 1 wish 
I'd have left him in. 

Red Sox 2, Mariners 1 
In Seattle, A1 Nipper and two 
relievos combined on a five-hitter 
and Rich Gedman cracked a home 
run to lead Boston over Seattle. 
Nipper held the Mariners scoreless 
until they punched across a run on 
Phil Bradley’s sacrifice fly in tbe 
eighth. Bob Ojeda and Bob Stanley 
finished up, with Stanley recording 
his fourth save. Gedman. the Bos- 
ton catcher, lined a homer off Seat- 
tle starter Mike Moore in the sec- 
ond. The Red Sox scored the 
winning run in the fourth on an 
RBI single by Jackie Gutierrez. 

Angels 3, Blue Jays 2 
In Anaheim, California. Juan 
Beniquez’s pinch single with two 
outs in the bottom of the ninth 
boosted California over Toronto. 
With the Blue Jays leading 2-1. 
Ruppert Jones led off with a single 
and took second on a sacrifice by 
Doug DeCmces. Reggie Jackson 
walked, and Rob Wiifong singled 
to score Jones with the tying run. 
Beniquez then singled home Jack- 
son for the game winner. 


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SPORTS BRIEFS 

Kite Takes Lead in PGA Tournament 

CARLSBAD, California (AP) — Tom Kite matched the course and 
tournament record with an S-undcr-par 64 and established a 4-stroke lead 
Thursday in the first round of tbe Tournament of Champions. 

Fuzzy Zoeller birdied the last two holes for a 68 and was second alone 
in the tournament, which brines together only the winners of PGA Tour 
events of the last 12 months. Greg Norman. Wayne Leri. Mark 
\ TcCumber and Lanny Wadkins were next at 69. 

Tulane Pulls Out of Sports Conference 

NEW ORLEANS f AP) — Tulane University withdrew from the Metro 
Conference on Thursday, bowing to the wishes of a league that did not 
want a member without a basketball program. 

Tulane's president, Eamon Kelly, canceled Tulane’s basketball pro- 
gram after allegations of point shaving and NCAA violations. At the 
same time, he said he would ask (he Metro to waive its rule requiring 
members to play men's basketball. The Metro Conference voted. 7-0, last 
week to ask Tulane to drop out rather than fighL expulsion. 

WBA Lightweight Bout Canceled 

.WEST PATERSON, New Jersey fUPI) — Livingstone Bramble's 
jrld Boxing Association lightweight title defense against Tyrone Craw- 
ley has been canceled because of a training injury to Bramble, promoter 
Dan Duva has announced. The bout, scheduled for May 26. has not been 
rescheduled. 

Bramble suffered a stress fracture of his left hand while sparring on 
Monday. Duva said, and has been advised to take al least six weeks or 
complete rest. 


Montreal scored at 7:23 of the 
second period when Pierre Mon- 
dou deflected Mats Nashind's wrist 
shot between Gosselin’s legs. Mon- 
treal struck again 10 minutes later 
when Naslund gpt the rebound off 
a blue-line wrist shot by Montreal's 
Larry Robinson. 

In overtime, after Montreal goal- 
ie Steve P&nney stopped Pat Price’s 
slapshot from the point and stunt- 
ed Stastny on the initial rebound, 
Stastny lifted the second rebound 
over the sprawled goalie. 

Gosselin was injured after tbe 
6:00 mark of the second period 
when a slapshot by Mario Tremb- 
lay hit him on the chest Gosselin 
stayed in tbe game after laying on 
tbe ice 10 minutes. 

“We’re tired.” Stastny said. “It’s 
hard to get into the conference fin- 
als from our division. It’s question- 
able whether we have anything left 
for Philadelphia.” 

In the Campbell Conference fin- 
als. the defending champion Ed- 
monton Oilers have home-ice ad- 
vantage starting Saturday against 
tbe Chicago Black Hawks. The Oil- 
era have been idle since April 25, 
when they completed a four-game 
sweep of Winnipeg in the Smythe 
Division finals. Chicago clinched 
the Norris Division Tuesday 
against Minnesota, taking the se- 
ries, 4-2. 

The Oilers, rested and with great 
depth, are favored. But the Black 
Hawks have been stunning at times 
in the playoffs. - - 

Edmonton has (he more explo- 
sive offense. The teams, however, 
are well-matched on defense with 
Oiler Paul Coffey and Black Hawk 
Doug Wilson among the league’s 
best Chicago goalie Murray Ban- 
nerman has been streaky, while Ed- 
monton’s Grant Fuhr has been un- 
beatable. 




> i$.-V 


«r' f* 

n 

Sgv-L ' • 

' -- 



The Canadians' Bob Gainey, right, and Nordiques' Paul Gillis up against the boards. 

Czechoslovakia Wins Gold in Hockey 


Canyiled by Oar Surf/ From Dispatches 

PRAGUE — Leftwinger Jiri 
Sqba turned from a relatively un- 
known player into a national hero 
Friday as he banged in a hat trick 
to give Czechoslovakia a 5-3 vic- 
tory over Canada, its first world ice 
hodtey title since 1977. 

In the game for the bronze med- 
al. the Soviet Union defeated the 
United States. 10-3, in a match 
ending that included one of the 
worst brawls ever at the interna- 
tional level all 44 players from 
both sides ending up on tbe ice. 

Sejba’s most stunning goal and 
the one that turned the game (o 
Czechoslovakia’s favor came at 
13:00 of the second period with the 
game tied 2-2 and the Canadians 
holding a one-man advantage. 
Sejba stole the puck from defense- 
man Larry Murphy, was chased 
down the rink by Scott Stevens, 
pivoted around him to break free. 


then skated in on goal lender Pat 
Riggin and deked him as wdL 

The Czechoslovakians, support- 
ed by a wild, flag-waving crowd of 
14.000, won all three medal-round 
games in the eight- learn tourna- 
ment. The key game was an emo- 
tional 2-1 victory over the defend- 
ing champion Soviet Union in the 
medal-round opener. Then, they 
trounced the United States. 1 1-2. 

Canada bas not won a world 
championship since 1961. 

In the U.S.-Soviel game, play 
was interrupted for several minute 
in the third period as players lashed 
out at anyone on the opposing 
team. Teammates ran on from the 
benches in support. 

The Soviet Union had earlier 
demonstrated its clear supremacy, 
leading 9-0 before the United 
States managed to score. 

“If anyone would have told me 
before the tournament that we 


would play the Russians for the 
bronze medal I would have consid- 
ered him crazy." said Art Berglund, 
general manager of the U.S. team. 
“Even fourth, we accomplished 
more here than we expected. We 
beat both gold medal contenders in 
the preliminaries. This was our best 
showing in a world championship 
for two decades.” 

On Thursday, Finland downed 
Sweden. 6-1. and West Germany 
defeated East Germany. 4-1, in the 
final games of the relegation play- 
offs. 

Sweden played a listless game to 
finish behind Finland for the first 
time in the history of the world 
championship. The Finns secured 
top spot in the relegation round, or 
fifth overall while Sweden finished 
sixth, its worst showing since 1937. 

West Germany finished seventh, 
and East Germany last {UP I. AP) 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pet. 

Murohv All 

20 

74 

21 

30 

J9S 

Walling Hta 

19 

40 

11 

23 

383 

Herr SIL 

20 

74 

IJ 

28 

378 

V Hares Phi 

20 

75 

11 

27 

-340 

Orsulok Pit 

14 

45 

5 

14 

•354 

Walktcft Mon 

21 

78 

9 

27 

344 

Crux Hta 

21 

84 

11 

29 

437 

Dawson Man 

19 

75 

13 

25 

333 

Corcoran Phi 

19 

47 

4 

15 

319 

Hemondex NY 

19 

72 

8 

23 

319 


Ran: Murahy. Atlanta, 21; Kommlnsfc. At- 


Basketball 


NBA Playoffs 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Ballon M 28 34 21—117 

Damn IS 24 34 27—125 

Laimbeer 10-18 7-9 27. Thomas 9-18 7-10 28; 
D-Johnsan 11-19 5-4 27, Bird 9-20 7-7 25. Ra- 
bounds: Bos ion 58 (Bird 13); Detroit 54 
(Lcrimbeer 12). As»Wv. Boston X (Bird 81: 
Detroit 26 (Thomas id). 

Utah 34 32 22 21 4—123 

Denver 32 38 34 2$ 12—131 

English 11-23 4-5 24. Nort 9.16 6-8 24; Green 
IMS *4 2S. Oanfiev 8-17 4-8 70. Wilkins 9-24 2-3 
2a Rebo u nds: Utah 57 (Donllev 14); Denver 
64 (Lever 131. Assists: Utah 2 9 (Green 10); 
Denver 2B (Eng Inn 13). 

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
EASTERN 

(Boston leads series 2-11 
toerr S: Boston at Detroit 
Mav 8: Detroit at Boston 
4 -Mot 10: Boston at Detroit 
v-Moy 12: Detroit at Boston 

(PBIFoOetpntcj tracts series Ml 
Mav 3: MHwautoe ol Pnli-gdatphia 
Mav s: Milwaukee at Pnlioeeipnlo 
x-Mov 8: Philadelphia at Milwaukee 
■-May 10: Milwaukee ot Philadelphia 
•-Mav 12: pnhadetoma ot Milwaukee 

WESTERN 

ILA Lakers Moos series 2-41 
May 3; LA. Lakers ot Portland 
Mav 5: LA Lakers al Portion) 

■-Mav 7: Portland at t_A_ Lakers 
r-Mav 9: LA Lakers ot Portland 
»-Mov II: Portland at i_A. Lakers 

(Denver Mads series 24) 

MOV 4; Denver at U:an 
Mav S: Denver at Uran 
r-Mcrv t- yign al Denver 
■-Mov ?: penvgr at Utah 

■ -Mav II: Uton at Denver 


lolls. 17; Samuel. Ph Itadclphla. 1 3 ; Scndbera. 
Chicago. 14; 8 ore tied with 11 
RBI: Mwrphv. Atlanta, 32; C Davis. San 
Francisco. 14: Broofci Montreal. 15; G. WH- 
son. Philadelphia. 15: Herr. St. Louis. IS. 

Hits: Murphy. Atlanta. JO; Cruz. Houston, 
29; Herr, SI. Louis. 28; V. Havas. Philadelphia. 
27: waliocn. MantredL 27. 

Doubles: Wol Inch. Montreal 8; Murohv. ai- 
lonto. 7; 7 are tied with L 
Triple*: 12 ore tied with 1 
Homo Runs; M-urohv. Atlanta 10; Straw- 
berry. New York, 4; Dawson, Montreal, 5: E. 
Davis. Cincinnati. 4; Kennedy, San Diego, 4; 
MorsnaiL Los Angeles, A 
Stolen Bases: Coleman. SI. Louis. 12: Lo. 
Smith. Si. Louis. II: Dernier. Chicago. 8; Sam- 
uel. Philadelphia. 8; E. Davis. Cincinnati. 4; 
M Wilson, New York, 4: Raines. Montreal. A. 

PITCHING 

winning Per ce nta ge (2 decisions); 11 ere 
tied with 1300. 

Strflceouts: J. DeLeon. Pittsburgh. 42; Sola 
Cincinnati. 34; Valenzuela Los Angeles, 35; 
Gooden. New York. 34; Eckerslev, Chicago. 
31 

Saves: Gossoge. San Bleep, 4; Reardon. 
Montreal. 6; LeSmiltvOilCBoaS; Candelaria. 
Pittsburgh. 4: Sutter. Atlanta, a 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pet. 
Franco Cle 20 73 14 28 J84 

Cowans See 11 II It 21 

Boctne Oak 21 40 t :i JSD 

Bemzrd CJe 18 S3 9 IS 440 

Baines Chi 11 77 11 U 38 

Whttoker D*» 17 AS 14 22 .333 

Grteti Cal 2) 41 IS 22 J2fi 

RJones Cal 18 « 9 13 425 

Puckett Mbi 21 96 II 31 J23 

Toiler CJe 21 SI B 24 J21 

Rons: MJ30VIS. Oakland. 23: Carew. Cali- 
fornia- 20. Murohv. Oakland. 18; Prtlls. Cali- 
fornia. 17; Cowms. Seattle. 14. Rice. Boston. 
16 

RBI: M.Ddvfs. Oak knuL 23: Armcs. Bmlcn. 
18: P.Brodlev. Seattle. 18: Brunanskv. Minne- 
sota. 17. Dempsey, Baltimore, 17; Puckett. 
Minnesota. 17. 

Hits: Puckett, Minnesota, jl: Carmens. 5eot- 
tie. 79: Franco. Cleveland. 28; Halclter. Min- 
nesota. 20 : boots. Beslan. 27. Wilson. Kansas 
City. 27 

Doubles: Gaetli. Minnesota. 8. Leman. Dc- 
rrad.a.- MotTlngty. New York, 7 • Orta. Kansas 
Cltv. 7; 7 ore lied with 6 
Triples: Wilson. Kansas CHr.S. Petrs. Cali- 
fornio. 3; Trammell. Delrali.J.Sare tied with 
2 

Home Nans: MOavls. Oakland. 9; Prate t. 
Seattle. 7: Armas. Boston, i: Srunonsk v. Min- 
nesota e; GThomas. Seattle. 6 
Stolen Bases: Colima. Oakland. 12; Pettis. 
Californio. 11; Mnebv. Toronto, a; Sheridan, 
Kansas Cltv. 6; Garda. Tor onto. 5; GrttHn. 
Oakland. S: Lew. Chicago. 5. 


PITCHING 

Whining Percentage (2 decisions)-. 11 ore 
tied with 1X00- 

Strfkeouts: Morris. Deiroit, 34: Clemens. 
Boston. 33; BotcL Boston. 30; Hough, Texas; 
29: Nlekra. New York. 27. 

Saves: j.HowelL Oakland. 6: Rig heftl, New 
York. 4: Caudill. Toronto, 5: WaddelL Cleve- 
land. 5: 4 are lied with 4. 

Thursday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Milwaukee 380 108 008-4 IT 8 

Oakland 280 811 002-5 I 2 

McClure. Kern 161. Fingers If). Searage CM 
and Maoro; Sutton. Atherton (0) and Heath, 
w— Atherton. 2-2 L— Searage. 0-3. hr— O ak - 
land. Kingman 151. 

Toronto 081 800 818-2 7 1 

Cantorota 000 180 003—3 4 8 

SHeta. Acker (91 and Whitt. MortlmK (8): 
5 1 at on. Clements (8) and Nan-on. Boone (8). 
W— Clements. 2-0. L— Stieb. 1-3. 

Boston 818 100 808-2 9 0 

Seattle 800 888 010—1 S 0 

Nipoer.oieda (Sl.Steniev (9) and Gedman; 
Moore. Best (4). vande Bora (8). Stanton C9> 
and Scott. W Nipper, I- 1, L Moore. 3-1 Sv— 
Stanley ( 4 ). HR— Boston. Gedman (21. 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 

Baltimore 13 7 050 — 

Toronto 14 8 436 — 

Detroit 11 t 570 iv- 

• 10 12 .455 4 

Milwaukee 9 12 429 4ta 

Cleveland I 13 J8I SW 

New York 7 12 J6I SV» 

West Division 

California IS 1 40 - 

Minnesota 12 9 571 2 

Kansas Cltv II 9 550 2V4 

Chicago « » J* Jti 

Oakland 10 13 .435 S 

Seattle 10 13 ^35 5 

Texas M] jso w 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. G8 

Chicag o 13 6 Mi — 

New rork 12 7 A33 1 

Montreal 13 8 A19 I 

Philadelphia B 12 J00 5Vi 

SI. Louis I I) Al !H 

Pittsburgh 6 13 Jit 7 


Pistons Stifle Bird for Victory 




United Press International 

.DETROIT — Larry Bird was 
bdd lo 2 points in tbe fourth quar- 
ter while Terry Tyiez scored 16 of 
his 18 pants, carrying the Detroit 
Pistons to a 125-117 victory over 
the Boston Celtics in their Eastern 
Conference series. 

The Pistons trail 2-1 in the best- 
of-seven National Basketball Asso- 
ciation series. Game 4 is in Detroit 
Sunday. In Denver, in the other 
quarterfinal playoff pmn Thure- 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

day, the Nuggets defeated the Utah 
Jazz, 131-123, for a 2-0 series lead. 

On Friday night, the Milwaukee 
Bucks and the 76ers were in Phila- 
delphia and the Los Angeles Lak- 
ers and tbe Trail Blazers were at 
Portland. Tbe 76er$ and the Lakers 
both lead, 2-0, in their series. 

Bird, who stung Detroit for 42 
points in Game 2, did not make a 
field goal in the final period. His 
only points in the period came on a 
pair of free throws with 1:21 left — 
the Celtics’ last points. 

Tyler, a 6-foot-7 reserve forward, 
made the Pistons’ last eight baskets 
after scoring just two points in tbe 
first half ana none in the third. 

Center Bill Laimbeer led Detroit 
with 27 points while guard Isiah 
Thomas scored 26 and guard John 
Long 20. Dennis Johnson led Bos- 
ton with 27, including 15 in the 
third quarter. Bird bad 25 awd Ke- 
vin McHale 24. 

Detroit doubled up on tbe ball 
when possible with fresh players to 
try to contain Bird. Tyler and Kelly 
Tripucka did a goodjob of fronting 
the Celtics' forward, keeping the 
ball from bis hands. 

Detroit, which broke from a 62- 
62 halftime tie and never trailed in 
the second half, led 98-96 entering 
the final quarter. 

“I cherish every game we slay in 
contention.** said Tyler. “If we had 
lost this one; our backs would have 
been against the wall Sunday. We 
didn’t want to get swept.” 

Boston Coach K.G Jones had 
little trouble putting tbe game into 
its proper perspective. 

“we picked up the shovel and 
jumped in there with them — start- 
ed helping those people (fig our 
own grave” he said. “The playoffs 
aren't a matter of life and death — 
they’re more important than that.” 

Nuggets 13L Jazz 123 . 

Lafayette Lever scored 22 points 
and Wayne Cooper hit two critical 
baskets ra overtime to lift the Nug- 
gets past tbe Jazz. 

Game 3 of the Western Confer- 
ence series is Saturday at Utah. 




WWRWV ■ «• • -V. 

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The Amsiofad Press 

Boston’s Larry Bird grabs for bis own rebound after 
Detroit center Bill Laimbeer biodeed bis first attempt 


Kentucky Derby 


Son Dteoo 
Los Anoalos 
Houston 

AHan la 
Cincinnati 
Oan Francisco 


11 9 J50 — 

12 10 345 — 

11 10 314 Vi 

10 10 300 1 

10 II Alt H*i 

7 13 354 4 


The ftaM for Saturdays 1119b Kentucky 
Darby, wttfi post raHtton. bersel same, lock- 
er's wm» out odds: 

1. Irish Flower Dor 30-1 

2. Chiefs Crawn MocBetti W 

3. a- Rhoman Rule Vasauez 5-1 

«. Tank’s Prosoect Stevens 0-1 

S. o-Etsmol Pit nee Mfeflare 5-1 

4. Sleo ho n* s OdvsMV Phtcay 8-1 

7. Encolure Arctotn 30-1 

L I Am The Game McHaraue 30-t 

9. Floating Reserve Hawley 20-1 

10. Soond A Buck Cordero 4-1 

11. Prwid Truth VWasauez 9-2 

il Skywoixer Oetahoueeayo 12-1 

11 Fast Aecoiwi CMcCorron 20-1 

la— Brownell combs 1 1 -owned entry) 

Trainers (by sett pasmoel: I. Billy Bor- 
ders. 2. Roger Lourin. 2. Angel Persia. Jr. A D. 
Wayne Lukas. 5. John Lera in L, Jr. A Woody 
Stephens. 7. Tom Morgan. & Kina T. Leattwr- 
burv. 9. Joseati Moral. 10 l Cam GombohUL 11. 
John Veitctt 12. Mike Whlttlngham. 11 Patri- 
cia L. Johnson. 

Owners (brpootoasnion): 1. ircy Prater. 2. 
Star Crown Stable- X Brownell Combs 1 1 and 
others. 4. Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Klein. S. Brian 
j. HursL Goaras m. Slelnbrenner, Browned 
Combs 1 1 and John end Pouletta Past, k Hen- 
rvk deKwlatkawskl. 7. The estate of Fred Par* 
ter. A King T. Leatherbury. 9. Robert E. HiP- 
perl. 10. Huntar Form. 11. Darby Dan Farm. 

12. Oafc aiH stabta. aw. r. Hawn. 
Weights: 124 pounds eoch. Distance: U4 

miles. Parse: S5813SQ II 13 start. FTrsi place: 
M04300. Second Mace: SlOOXOa Third place: 
ssaooa. Foartb piece: SZU0Q. Pea time: 5:38 
pjn. EDT. 


PAST KENTUCKY DERBY WINNERS 
1875 — Arlstfdes 
1874 — Vagrant 
1877 — Baden Baden 
1078 — Day Star 

1879 — Lord Murphy 

1880 — Faroe 
mi — Hindoo 

1882 — Apollo 

1883 — Leanatus 

1884 — Buchanan 

1885 — joe Cotton 
1884 — Ben All 
18B7 — Montrose 

1888 — Macbeth M 

1889 — Spoka n e 

1890 — Rllev 

1891 — Klnemai 

1892 — Azro 

1893 — Lookout 
18*4 — Chant 
1895 — Hotma 
18*4 — Ben Brush 
18*7 — Typhoon II 
1B9S — Plaudit 
18*9 — Manuel 

1900 — Lieut. GKnon 
>901 — His EnMeice 


Denver held tbe Jazz scoreless 
(he final 3:30 of overtime, allowing 
them only 4 pants. . 

Utah had the last shot in regula- 
tion, but Darrell Griffith misrod a 
20-fom jumper with three seconds 
to play to send the game into over- 
time tied 11 W 19. 

Cooper then hit a pair of jumpers 
early in the overtime to give Denver 
a 125-121 lead. Jeff Wilkins made it 
125-123 with 3:30 to play blit tbe 
Jazz were unable to score again. 

Alex English bad 26 points and 
Calvin Nait 24 for Denver. Rickey 
Green scored 25 pants and Wil- 
kins and Adrian Dantley 20 each 
for the Jazz. Dantley scored only 6 
points after halftime. 


Horse Racing 


• Ahm-o-Oal* 

• Jude* Himes 

• Ehraad 

■ AMI* 

- Sir Huon 
•Pink star 

■ Stone Street 
’ W ln t ara raen 


“I think when you shoot 24 of 33 
from tiie foul Ime in a game that 
ends in a tie, you’re probably going 
to lose in overtime,” Jazz Coach 
Frank Layden said. 

“Anytime you give up 38 points 
in a single quarter [the second] on 
the road, you’re probably gong to 
lose,” he said. knew if we got 
into a game over 130 pants we 
were gomg to lose, because Denver 
plays that type of game better than 
we do.” 

Denver Coach Doug Moe said, 
“I don’t think we played with great 
intensity until we got down 1 10- 
103, and then we sawed 10 straight. 
From that pant on, I thought we 
played great.” ■ 


- Mertaan 

- worth 

- Doneran 
-Old Roeebad 

- Regret 

- Goora* Smith 

- Omar Khowam 

- Exterminator 

- Sir Barton 

- Paul Jonas 

- Behave yo utj o H 

- MorvtCb 
-Zev 

- Block Sold 

- Flv tag Ebony 

- Bubbflno Over 

- Whiskery 

- Ralgti Count 

- Clyde Van Damn 

- Gaftant Fox 

- Twenty Grand 

- Burgoo King 

- Brokers Tip 

- Cavalcade 

- Omano 

- Bald Vesture 

- war Admiral 

- Lawrtn 

- Johnstown 

- Galtahooton 

- Whlrtewav 

- Shut Out 

- Count Fleet 

- Pensive 

- Hoan, Jr. . 

- Assault 

- Jot Pool 

- Citation 

- Ponder 

- MWdiagroend • 

- Conor Turf 
. Hill Gail 

- Dark Star 

- Determ i ne 

- & WN 

- Needles 

- Iran Uaoo 

■ Tim Tam 

- Tomv Lea 

• Venetian Way 

■ Carry Back 

- Docklodir 

■ OtaNoueav 

■ Northern Dancer 

- Lucky Debonair 

■ Kauai Kino 

■ Proud dorian 
Forward Pass 

1 Malesrtc Prince 

■ Dust Cammaader 
Cdnonera tr 


- Riva Ridge 
-. Secretariat 

■ Cannonade 

- Foonsb Pleasure 
•Bold Fortes 

■ Seattle Slow 

• Affirmed 

1 Spectacular Bid 

- Genuine Risk 

■ Pleasant Colony 
Goto del sol 

■ Sonny's Haro 

■ Swale 


Hockey 
NHL Playoffs 

THURSDAY'S RESULT 

OM« — - 1 -1 8 l-J 

- M um re al 8 18 8-4 

Beit (2), Sauve (3), p. Master CO; Moadou 
(21. Nasttmd (71. Shots on goal i Quebec l Pen- 
ney) > 440—8; M ontreal (on Gossefln) 4 - 12 - 
04-44. 

. DIVISION FINALS .. 
Ad e msi 'Quebec wins stales 4 fl- 
Patrick: PtmadeMila wins' series '4-1 - . 
Norris: Chtaago wins series 44 
santtbos Edmonton wins series 44 


Tennis 


MEN'S CHAMPIONSHIPS' ' " 

'- (at Hamburg) 
QaarlmNalais 

Mots WDarter. SwMen, del. Gumerma vi- 
tas. Argentina. 4-14-0 - 

. Henrik Sundstrob. Sweden, dot AadrvsGo- 
mtL Ecuador, u. a-0 

Jaso-Luts Clera. Argentina, dot. Jan Gan- 
norsooa Sweden. 6-4, 4-2 - . 

MBastaV Modr, Cakhaslduakia def. Joo- 
klm Nvstram. Sweden. 4-£ u - 


Transition 


OAILLAND— Sent rim Conroy, olfoier. hj 
Tacoma of Nw Pacific Coast League. Placed 
Mfchor^n the isdov tOsabled 
HU. Coiled up Ttai Urtsb* ptteber. and hum 
Oaliraa. tetwder.' tram Tacoma. 

rORK^P|be*4 Rog-fiardenttiretn. 
(Wdor. on the 15-da? disabled-list. Recalled 

^CwkstafcoutflMder..^ 

■». IntinaUuml-LiMUK -- 




-L rtUl ill 1 







EES! 




L 


Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 4-5, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Chateau Coke , 9 85 


Vassar Gets McCarthy Papers — All 6,500 Pages 


jm p 


W ASHINGTON — There are 
only three great “Master 
Coca-Cola Tasters" in the world. 
One is Beauregard Cokely from 
Marmaduke, Georgia. Beau has 
been producing and bottling the 
finest vintage Coca-Cola in the 
South for the last 40 years. 

His palate is so sensitive that I 
have seen him perform a blindfold 
test where he was able to distin- 
guish between unmarked bottles of 
Coca-Cola, Dr. Pepper, Seven-Up 
and Miller’s Lite 
Beer. 

I have attend- 
ed Tour-star ban- 
quets where 
Beau, by just 
holding his glass 
up to the light, 
was able to teD 
the year a Coke jm 
was bottled, the M/gpr 
district it came , . . . 

from and. what BudmaM 
was more astounding, the first 
name of the truck driver who deliv- 
ered it to the supermarket. 

It was no wonder, then, that 
when Coca-Cola announced it 
would introduce a new formula for 
its drink I sought out Beau to dis- 
cover exactly what was going on. 

I found him in his famous Coke 
cellar ai ChSteau Lafile Atlanta 
with his wife and daughter. The 
three of them were hip deep in a 
large vat stomping on juicy red cola 
grapes in their bare feet 
□ 

Beau climbed out of the vat and 
greeted me warmly. Then he bent 
over, opened a spigot and poured, 
some cola syrup into a tin cup. He 
sniffed it, sipped it, swilled it 
around in his mouth and spat it 
out. “Stomp a little harder." he 
yelled up to his wife. “It's not sweet 
enough.” 

He handed me the cup. "What 
do you think?” 

1 tasted it and also spat. “It 
shows extraordinary promise, and 

Sadler’s Wells Seeks Funds 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — Sadler’s Wells 
Theater has launched an appeal for 
£7 million (S8.5 million) to make 
major improvements. Stephen 
Remington, the theater director, 
said plans for the 50-year-old 
building in Islington include a lam- , 
er stage and a community work- 
shop /student theater. 


its honesty can’t be questioned,” 1 
told him. 

Beau nodded. “I believe that 
1985 could be one of the great vin- 
tage years for Coca-Cola. You 
would have to go back to the glori- 
ous reds of ’31 and '35 to match this 
one for body and bouquet. The sun 
has finally shone on Georgia.” 

□ 

"Is it true that after 99 years 
Coca-Cola has a new taste?” 

"We haven't changed the taste. 
We’ve improved its virility. In place 
of the light, dry bubbly that has 

been our trademark, we’re produc- 
ing a mature: full-bodied, more dis- 
tinctive cola.” 

He went over to a Coke case 
marked ”1984.” “Taste the differ- 
ence between this and the '85,” he 
said. 

I did “Now that you mention it, 
the ’84 does seem to lack breeding.” 

“Of course it lacks breeding. To 
give Coke back its nobility, we've 
made this year’s vintage rounder, 
smoother and bolder. We're allow- 
ing the cola to mature in its six- 
pack a week longer and the bubbles 
to breathe in the can. We want our 
customers to be part of an entirely 
new soft-drink experience.” 

“Rumor has it that you are just 
pandering to the Pepsi generation,” 

I said. 

Beau was furious. “It's an insult 
to mention Coke in the same breath 
with Pepsi -Co la. Pepsi consists of 
nothing but carbonated water, sug- 
ar, caramel color, phosphoric add, 
caffeine, citric ada and natural fla- 
vorings. Coke, on the other hand, is 
Lhe real thing. It will always be the 
pause that refreshes because every 
American knows things always go 
better with Coke ” 

Beau's wife and daughter were 
leaning over the ride watching us. 
He looked up and yelled at them, 
“Who told you to stop stomping?” , 
They went back to jumping up and 
down. 

I said, “Beau, could you tell me 
what the Coke formula is all 
about?” 

Tm sworn to secrecy." 

“All right, just nod your head if 
I’m right or wrong. Would it have 
anything to do with making the 
syrup with your bare feet?" 

Beau kicked me out through the 
cellar door. 

“What did you do that for?" I 
asked. 

He said, “You're getting too 
close to the secret for comfort" 


By Deirdre Caxmody 

New York Times Service 

P oughkeepsie, New York 

- Folder after folder. 
Crammed In cardboard box atop 
cardboard box. Stashed row upon 
row. On shelf after shelf in the 
basement of the Vassar College 
Library. 

These are the papers of Mary 
McCarthy — novelist, essayist 
journalist critic and best-known 
member of the Vassar class of 
1933 — that have just been ac- 
quired by the college. They con- 
tain more than 6.500 pages of 

persfgafteys andnotes. 

The collection, which mil be 
available to students and scholars 
. when it has been cataloged, is a 
treasure trove for those who take 
their literature and their gossip 
seriously. It includes hundreds of 
personal letters from friends and 
writers like Robert Lowell, Han- 
nah Arendt Stephen Spender, So- 
nia Orwell, Dwight MacDonald 
and Elizabeth Hardwick, as well 
as correspondence and legal pa- 
pers detailing McCarthy’s stonny 
second marriage, to the critic Ed- 
mund Wilson. 

A letter Grom McCarthy to 
Arendt, a dose friend, shortly af- 
ter the death of Arendt's hus- 
band, tells about a visit from Ste- 
phen Spender, who intimated that 
the poet W. H. Auden, an avowed 
homosexual, had just proposed 
marriage to ArendL 
“It is true.” McCarthy said re- 
cently in a telephone interview 
from her home in Paris. “I think 
Auden was slightly put up to it by 
Stephen Spender. Hannah was 
absolutely devastated by this. She 
felt that be was asking her for 
shelter and that she could not do 
it. She felt that somehow it was an 



unfriendly act on her part to re- 
fuse.” 

In the folder marked “Corre- 
spondence With Edmund Wil- 
son,” who died in 1972, are three 
tiny pieces of paper; Written in 
pencil in her precise handwriting 
is McCarthy's note to Wilson 
limshei 


McCarthy in Paris 


telling him she is leaving him. 

“Clear Edmund,” she wrote. 
“This is the note in the pincush- 
ion. I'm afraid I don’t see what 
else there is to do. Perhaps the 
fighting is mostly my fault, but 
that’s not a reason fra- our staying 
together. 

Tm soxiy,” the note says at the 
end. “This could probably all be 
managed with less ddat, but the 
only way I can ever break off 
anything is to run away.” It is 
signed ,: Mary” 

One folder contains reactions 
from Vassar al umnae to the 1963 
novel “The Group," a fictional- 
ized account of the lives of some 
members of the class of 1933. 

A member of the class of 1917 
writes: 

“My head droops in shame, my 
pride is gone and I deny any aso- 
cial) on with my Alma Mater. The 
Group’ is a catalogue of venery. a 
disgrace to the primed word and a 
blight on the reputation of a fine 
institution. It will bring a vicari- 
ous thrill to the ‘underprivileged’ 
and an impetus to the oversexed.” 

McCarthy’s novels include 
“The Company She Keeps,” “The 
Groves of Academe” and “A 
Charmed Life.” Last year she re- 
ceived the National Medal for 
Literature and the Edward Mao 
Dowell Medal for her outstand- 
ing contribution to literature. 

She said that over the years 
several institutions had ap- 
proached her about donating her 
papers. At the time, authors were 
entitled to sizable tax deductions 
for donating their works to educa- 
tional institutions, but she said 
that idea was repugnant to her. 

“Why would someone like to 
give their papers during their life- 
time?" she asked. “There's time 
enough when they’re dead.” 

But the tax law has been 
changed, and writers are no long- 
er able to lake such deductions. 
The result has been that colleges 
and universities usually have to 
pay to get the collections of prom- 
inent people. When the president 
of Vassar, Vir ginia Smith, first 
approached McCarthy two years 
ago about acquiring her papers. 


the writer said she was “really 
strongly tempted, and then I have 
nice feelings about Vassar.” 

McCarthy and Smith both de- 
clined to say what Vassar was 
paying fra the papers, but Smith 
emphasized that me cost was be- 
ing financed In’ outside dona- 
tions, not the college budget. 

She s aid the acquisition was in 
line with Vassar's tradition of 
having students deal with original 
source material whenever possi- 
ble. She also made the point that 
with the increased use erf word 
processors, on which mistakes can 
be deleted by pressing a key, there 
will no longer be first drafts with 
the cross-outs and revisions so 
dear to scholars. 

What will not be available in 
the collection for some yeans are 
the correspondence and legal pa- 
pers about the lawsuit brought 
against McCarthy by the late 
playwright and memoirist Lillian 
Heilman. In an appearance on the 
Dick Cavett Show in 1980, Mc- 
Carthy called He ilman “a bad 
writer, overrated, a dishonest 
writer.” The suit had not reached 
trial before Heilman's death last 
year, but it polarized intellectuals. 

Asked if she had anything to 
add about the HeUman suit, Mc- 
Carthy said she would rather not 
talk about it Then she paused 
and said, “I don't think the gossip 
about that woman will subside for 
along time." 

McCarthy, when asked what 
might, be of particular interest in 
the papers in the coflection, sug- 
gested a number of folders that a 
reporter might want to browse 
through. Among these was (he 
Frfmnnd Wilson folder, which 
contains letters from th*rr early 
courtship and during their mar- 
riage from 1938 to 1946. In the 
folder are also legal papers in con- 
nection with their separation and 
the custody of their son, ReneL 
In a depostion taken Feb. 23, 
1945, McCarthy, who was 17 
years younger than Wilson, 
states: 

“Before we were married he 
gave the appearance of a man of 
quia habits with an interest in 
bodes, pictures and music. He 
was wdl known as a literary critic 
and I had admired his work even 
before 1 met him. During his 
courtship he held out great prom- 
ise of a quiet settled life and the 
rearing of a large family. 

“Directly after our marriage I 



The Nm To* Ti 


Cartons of McCarthy papers being stacked at Vassar. 


discovered that he was addicted 
to drink and our life together be- 
came a series of violent episodes. 
After I became pregnant he began 
beating me with his fists, he 
would lock me out of bed and 
again when I was on the floor. A 
short time before our son was 
bom he knocked me down in the 
kitchen and kicked me in the 
stomach. Ai tunes he would hold 
me down on the bed and when I 
opened my mouth to scream he 
would hit me on the face and 
about the body. I was distraught 
and did not know what to do in 
my condition. 

“Since the birth of our son I 
have tried to see this mani«y 
through but from its inception to 
the present time I have been com- 
pelled to suffer physical and men- 
tal humiliation at the hands of the 
defendant This has occurred in 
the presence of strangers, in the 
presence of friends, before our 
savants, the defendant’s daugh- 
ter by a forma marriage and even 
before our son who is now 6 years 
old. He has publicly accused me 
of infidelity. He has made this 
accusation before our son.” 


An undated deposition from 
Wilson states: 

“At no time did I ever attack 
ha. I have found it necessary to 
protect myself a gains t violent as- 
saults by ha in the course of 
which she woald kick me, bite me, 
scratch me and maul me in any 
way die could. She has even gone 
so far as to break down a door to 
my study to get at me and she has 
on other occasions pushed papa 
under the door to my study and 
set fire to it. 

“P laintiff is the victim of hys- 
terical delusions and has seemed 
for years to have a persecution 
complex as far as I am concerned. 
She seems to believe "that I have 
attacked ha and struck her on 
occasions when nothing of the 
sort has happened.” 

And in a letter, dated July 13, 
1944, Wilson writes to McCarthy: 
“It may be that you and I are 
psychologically impossible for 
one another,” and adds, “I have 
never wanted things to be as bad 
as that because I have really loved 
you more than any other woman 
and have felt dosa to you than (o 
any other human being.” 


PEOPLE 

Mrs, Craxi Gives Purse '] 
To Busy Nancy Reagan ;! 

Nancy Reagan could not fil any 
shopping into ter 46-hour visit to 
ludy but she got a taste of Italian 
fashion Friday: Fashion-industnj 
sources said Anna Chon, wife q| 
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi, gave 
Mrs. Reagan a pink crocodile eve- 
ning purse decorated with rhine- 
stones, by Valentino. ^ 

O . 

.Pope John P aid D trill lead a 
recitation of the rosary today “to 
repair the offense inflicted” on the 
Virgin Mary by Jean-Lee Godard's 
film “Jc Vous Salue. Marie" (Hail 
Maty). The recitation will be car- 
ried live by Vatican Radio. In Pesa- 
ro, on the central Adriatic coast. 
Magistrate Albedo Menritkri or- 
dered showings of the film halted. 

Sarah Cddwdl, recovered froma 
serious boat with double pnaun<£ 
nia, is back at work, at the Opt 8 #? 
Company of Boston. The portly 
conductor said she was on a 600- 
cakzri&a-day diet, ami added, “I 
intend to be the thinne st lady con- 
ductor, at least in Boston.” 

The SOth-axuuversary Drama 
League Award was presented in 
New York to Derek Jacobi of the 
Royal Shakespeare Company. Yid 
Ihynha was the first recipient of a 
special musical award. . . . The 
musical “The Fantastkks,” by Tom 
Jones and Harvey Schmidt, started; 
its 26th year Friday. ' W- 


Raymood Bonner has won' the 
fifth annual Robert F. Kennedy 
Book Award for “Weakness arid 
Deceit: U.S. Policy and El Salva- 
dor." The 52^00 prize was estab- 
lished by the historian Arthur 
ScUestaserJr. 

□ • 

A woman who was given a fertil- 
ity drug after complications from 
years of anorexia nervosa, or obses- 
sive dieting, has given birth to sex- 
tuplets, ter doctor said Frida 
Cambridge, England. Dr. 
Wffiamsoa said the two gii 
four boys born by Caeserion. so- 
tion to Jane Underfafii were 14 
weeks premature and weighed a 
total of 9 pounds (4.1 kilograms). 

. Jennifer Stockman, wife of 
die White House budget director, 
David Stockman, gave birth Friday 
in. Washington to the couple's first 

child, nam ed Radtfl Lauren. 


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(39-6) 3387012 - 3387015 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 




GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 




EMPLOYMENT 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDER 

“VfTraNAnONAL POSmONS” 
PAGE IS 


MKROFROCBSOR 1 UNIX 
software design engnear with 7 yews 
experience (3 years foreran) seeks po- 
sition abroad. BinajaL American. 
Thomas Mefenan. 435 Acetones Dr_ 
*2B, Sunnyvale, CA 94086. 


By Phone: Cdl your barf JHT r ep ree an t at tve with yew tout You 
vriB be informed of the cost imrarfatefr . and once prepayment is 
made your ad wdl appear within 48 hours. 

Cast, The base rote is 89,80 per fate per daqr + barf Bates. There are 
25 letters, ngm mid spoon in the tint foe end 36 in the Mowing Em. 
Minimum spaa is 2 fairs. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cede American Express, Diner's Out. Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access end Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


Paries (For dasnfied only): 
747-4&00- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RFNT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


LATIN AMERICA 


■venae JUree 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312) 

Owayaqul: 431 M3/43T 
Unas 417 852 
Pomma: 64-4372 
Sat Jaeat 22-1055 
SwUogo: 69 61 555 
S«» Pantos 852 1893 



Wf Mow* Lft, 


MONTE CARLO 
PARK PALACE 

fioent apartment. 116 sg, meters 
furnished at Pork Palace, appo- 
' cosno end Hsrtef de Para, n the 


Gdden Triangle of Manse Cmte i 
biding, 5th Hoar with front and i 
terraces, cdksr & parting. 

For Infonnuimie Ream arffc 
Mw K SeNechter. at Ehrmbert 
West Germany Tefc 02843) 1821 


ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS *i 


Engksh Pans {dcrity) 634 59 Ai Rome 
678 03 20. 


Piy chattier ryy + Cornpuhrre Eating 
Masters & Johnson. Para 348 9042 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurqet dekvwy. 
Wine Keysor, POB 2. B1000 Brussels. 


PERSONALS 


VrfiNAM MIA'S documentary film re- 
searching personal stones. Anony- 
mous ai came bad wa this film. Cdl 
London 834 3972 or Bov 40909, W.T . 
63 long Acre, London, WC2E 9JK. 


Golden Triangle of Manse Cmte. 
BRUSSELS: Ziegler SA biding, fth fear with fro nt and 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 

Offices Worldwide 


BUST CLASS SBtVKX 
ASSURED EVERY MOVE 


DEMEXPORT 

PAMS ■ LYON e MARSEILLE 
UUfe MCE 

Int'l moving by Reoalai horn incur 
ahe» in France ta dl ernes in the world. 
Toil free hpm fi ance 16 {05} 24 10 82 
RtB ESTMATB 



A5JVERGNE, VOLCANO PARK, 
Comfortable chdet in a large perk, 6 
bedrooms. 2 bads, monthly boss 
F14,000.rel(4U5501 61 


GREAT BRITAIN Who, in tom, 

AVAILABLE FOB HOLIDAY & com pa- 

Sbhrtrid^! ’K? d Phone: 6794325, 6793450. 

PWwe oed England (483} 572448 001 B 6 Rome. 


International Business Message Center 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


In the charmmg meomam resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENES 

Overlooking a splendid Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 rum. from Montreux and !■■*» 
Geneva by as. 

■ you i eon own quefity residences 
with indoor swimming poof Old 
fitness faoSves n an ded 
enwonnent for leisure and qoorts 
Jski. golf. etc}. 

- nranamal bw SF. rates 
141 to Eu% mortc uu es. 

PlecBM contort . 

Rasidanee Urs Franes, 1854 Leyrin 
SWITZERLAND 

Tel: (025) 34 11 55 Tb: Mdra 26629 CH 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely oportmens with mogn l fi m n 
views or Lake Geneva end r n ouitfans . 
Mantreuv. vaicn, Vetber. Les DioHni ■ 
efo. Chateau (TOn nee* Gstood, Ley- 
prij ^ pTmrtl snt Opportunities For 

Prices from SF123JWI. 
liberal mortgage at 6 W merest. 
GLOBE; PLAN SLA. 

Av Mon Be pas 24, 

0+1 0ft5 Lausanne. Switzerland. 
Td pit 22 35 12. The 251 BS MEUS 
Established Sms 1970 


rate a UJ. $9.80 or fared 
eqvhyterd per tine. Yea matt 
toowde oompfoto tmtd varits- 
aN* b*ing address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 



THIS WEEK 
MAY I3fh, 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


• Jm n Baker's Treasury 


• Mcsronicn Is 
gmbargo** Ttt 


Fronea A Socrirfrif Yuppie On The 


MONTBEUX or m these world famous I • b twwafcm d Orttoete Sana 


NATO M ar t i Keep Straying 
From The Haul 

NOWON SALE 
AT All INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS.