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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Puis. London, Zurich, 


INTERNATIONAL 



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No. 31,790 


FAO Says 
Africa Aid 


At Bitburg: Enter 
A Subdued Reaga 


ZURICH, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


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Agency Predicts 
Disaster Without 
Promised Food 

Complied by Our Surff From Dupettha . 

NAIROBI — Food aid pledged 
but undelivered to African coun- 
tries suffering from drought and 
famine is needed to “avert a major 
disaster” in the countries most se- 
verely, affected, the United Nations 
Food &nd Agriculture Organiza- 
tion said Monday. 

In its latest report on the food . 
crisis in Africa, the FAO said 42 
percent of the grain promised by 
donor governments has not been 
received. 

“Only concerted action in the 
craning weeks by the international 
community and the governments of 
the affected countries. can avert a 
major disaster in the six most af- 
fected countries, namely Chad, 
Ethiopia, Mali, Mozambique, Ni- 
ger and Sudan.” it said. 

“These six countries constitute 
the. hard core of the problem in 
terms of sheer size of areas and 
hitman numbers affected, the de- 
gree of malnutrition and threat to 
life.” 

The FAO said that IS other Afri- 
can countries were also suffering 
severe food shortages. 

' The UN agency expressed con- 
cern that aid pledged to some coun- 
tries had not materialized, particu- 
larly in Sudan, where less; than 20 
percent of 1.1 million metric tons 
of pledged aid bad arrived.' 

It said the food supply situation 
in Sudan was “extremely serious 
and deteriorating rapidly ” 

“Exceptional measures to deliver 
the pledged amounts are needed 
before the onset of rains in June if 
widespread deaths from starvation 
ore to be avoided,” it said. 

For Chad the food supply situa- 
tion was critical because of a lack 
of trucks to move relief supplies 
and limited capacity at prats in 
Cameroon and Nigeria. Chad is 
landlocked- ^ • 

Of the estimated 13 mflEdh peo- 
ple of Chad’s population of 43 
million in need of food aid only 
470,000 people are bemgasristed.it 
said. . - ■ 

Lack of transport also affected 
the flow of food aid to Mali, which 
needed seed to begin planting the 
2985 crop in June. The seed supply 
in the country was termed precari- 
ous. 

The transport situation was no 
different in Ethiopia, where nine 
minion people risked starvation 
and distribution of food was ham- 
pered by lack of vehicles and secu- 
rity problems. Rebels are lighting 

(Continued oo Page 2, CoL 4) 


Shuttle Euds 
^ 'Excellent’ 
Science Trip 

7Trc Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The U.S. 
space shuttle Challenger and its 
seven astronauts landed in the Cal- 
ifornia desert Monday, ending a 
weeklong Spacdab flight that 
NASA called “an excellent science 
mission.” 

Challenger was brought down on 
the dry lake bed at Edwards Air 
Force Base instead of its home base 
in Florida because its sister ship, 
Discovery, had locked b rakes ana a 
tire rupture when it landed at Cape 
^Canaveral, Florida, on April 18. 

” The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration was still 
studying what caused the Discov- 
ery's problem, but decided that it 
would be safer to (and Challenger 
in the open desert 

There was no problem Monday 
as the shuttle settled onto the ron- 
way. 

Forty minutes after touchdown, 
the seven astronauts emerged. They 
all appeared in good health and . 
walked steadily as they made a 
quick inspection of the ship. 

Two monkeys and 24 rats that 
were aboard the shuttle for experi- 
ments win be Down bade to Cape 
Canaveral for medical examina- 
tions to see how they fared in 


|s,50e 


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P* 




-lASSf* 1 V 



Several scientists waited at Ed- 
wards Air Force Base to retrieve 
thdr Spacdab experiments, divid- 
ed into five disciplines — materials 
processing, medical, fluid mechan- 
ics, astronomy and atmospheric: 

*We had an excellent science 
°“ssiou, H the Spacdab mission 
manager.' Joseph Cretan, said in 
Houston. . 

A mission scientistsaid a prelim- 
inary look at data provided by a 
sun-study instrument indicated 
?£scovery of a molecule emitted by 
'ytc.sun,;.. _ . 

The astronauts grew a series of 
crystals, ywbkh scientists expect 
will be ofhigbor quality and greater 
purity thaB these grown w the 
gravity of Earth..- ’ • 


■ % Lou Cannon 

Washington Post Strtict 

BITBURG, West Germany — 
Whenever President Ronald Rea- 
gan Sods hinKrif in political diffi- 
culty, his instin ctive arid time-hnn- 

ored remedy has been to solve his 
problem with a speech. 

On Sunday, trying to dampen 
one of the most troubling contro- 
versies of his preadency.'Mr. Rea- 

NEWSAJtALYSB 

gan gave two speeches. While nei- 
ther measured up to the 
extravagant advance billing of 
White House advisers, the presi- 
dent’s performance saved his pur- 
pose of demons tra ting that he un- 
derstood both the “uniquely 
destructive” nature of the Holo- 
caust and the critical importance of 
postwar reconciliation. 

At Bergen-Belsen, where his 
voice was muted and sometimes 
strained, Mr. Reagan talked of the 
m order of Jews, “whose death was 
inflicted for no reason otter than 
their i«y existence.” 

At the Bitburg air base, where 
Mr. Reagan’s spirits rose in the 
presence of bands and approving 
U5. military families, he came as 
dose as be ever has in a major 
speech to admitting that he might 
have made a 

The president acknowledged 
that his decision to lay a wreath at a 
German military cemetery bad 
“opened old wounds” during a visit 
that was supposed to be “a time of 
healing.” Earlier, Mr. Reagan had 
nrwifidad to an intimate that he W8S 


On Page 2: 

•The Boon meeting’s fail- 
ure on trade may prompt a 
■ protectionist reaction. . 

• U.S. rallies protested 
^President Ronald Reagan’s 
visit to the Bitburg cemetery 

• Bergea-Bdsen: Excerpts 
from the speeches by Presi- 
dent Reagan and Chancel- 
lor Helmut KohL 

• Israeli leaders criticized 
President Reagan for-visit- 

Tng ithe Bitburg military 
cemetery. . 


angry at being depicted as insensi- 
tive to the Holocaust after 40 years 
of speaking up about “Nazi 
crimes” against the Jews. 

Afterward, Mr. Reagan rolled 
the day one of “hope and remem- 
brance,” but his undmrascteri5tical- 
ty sober mien seemed to say that it 
was also an ordeal. Mr. Reagan’s 
speech at Bergen-Belsen pro- 
claimed that “horror cannot outlast 
hope,” but Mr. Reagan appeared 

somber rather than hopeful 

Before he spoke he viewed the 
photographs of stacks of corpses in 
die camp’s Document House, then 
strolled through a series of memori- 
als above mass graves. 

Mr. Reagan has always been sen- 
sitive to the notion that he is a 
former actor who can weep on cue. 
At Bergen-Bdseu he appeared to 
be trying not to cry, almost trying 
not to act, as he gave a speech 

pffeafli ng “tin* monstrous , merimpn- 

rable honor” of the camp. 

But his voice broke T»ouefhele$ s 
as he read from a passage in the 
diary of Anne Frank, a I ^year-old 
Dutch Jew. who died at the camp, 
which said, “I still believe that peo- 
ple are good at heart.” 

Mr. Reagan prefers to speak 
from notes or a tdeprompter. On 
Sunday, he appeared hampered in 
his delivery, particularly at the con- 
centration camp site, by having to 
read from a prepared text 

He bad one minor slip, referring 
to the camp as “Berger-Belseo" and 
added rare brief passage in winch 
be said he had reflected, as he flew 
in over the green countryside, (hat 
“there must have been a time when 
the prisoners at Bergen-Belsen, anti 
those at every other camp, most 
have felt the springtime was gone 
forever from tbor fives." 

In his subsequent Bitburg 
speech, written a week ago. Mr. 
Reagan read from a text describing 
his visit to Bcrgcn-Bdsen and say- 
ing he ted fat “great sadness" 
there. 






m 




Sr 










Girls waiting Monday to greet President Ronald Reagan m incoming helicopter. A youth rally at the 11th-century 
Ha inherit, West Germany, received a buffering from his Hambach Castle was Mr. Reagan’s last stop in Germany. 

Fear of Brain Drain Influenced Mitterrand on SDI 


Mr. Reagan’s speeches, largely 
crafted by his premier political 
speech writer, Kenneth Khachi- 
gran. woe notable for what they 
omitted as well as wfaal they sad. 

At Bagm-Bclsen, where more 
than 60,000 civilians, including 
30.000 Jews, perished, Mr. Reagan 
made no 'mention of' the 50,000 

(Continued oa Page 2, CoL 4) 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Tunes Service 

BONN — Fears of a scientific 
brain drain to American industry 
and of unrest at home largely ex- 
plain President Francois Mitter- 
rand's objection at the Bonn sum- 
mit conference to setting a date fra 
new trade talks mid his rqection of 
Washington’s invitation join its 

trials and otter^^pants say. 

West European governments, 
these sources say, fear that the S26- 
bUlion tmssie. de fense research 
program wiH divert Europe’s best 
scientists and skills to American 
industry, giving the United States 
an unassailable lead in ultramod- 
ern technologies with extensive ci- 
vilian applications. 

By refusing for. the moment to- 
’join the. Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, the French president hopes to 
increase support for the European 


space research program that be has 
proposed, these sources say. 

The program, called Eureka, 
would provide for joint European 
research in many of the nrmmfli - 
tary areas covered by the U3. plan. 
These include high-powered com- 
puters, artificial intelligence, lasers, 
{tensors and advanced telecom- 
munications. 

Mr. Mitterrand, explaining his 
Sedrion not to accqn the U3. inve- 
ntion. said Saturday night, "The 
xnin tries of Europe must preserve 
heir skills and gray matter.” 

" West European governments are 
reportedly becoming restive over 
the large subsidies they are paying 
farmers to produce surplus food. 
The payments are s eep as draining 
money from scientific and indnstri- 
if research. 

by blocking the start of trade 
CStitnanl&s the United States ex- . 
empts European farm policy frbm 
the discussions, French officials 




1 



A Moslem mffitiaman provides cover for two coDeagues puffing a Soviet-made recoCQess gun near Beiruti's Green Line. 

Hundreds Flee Homes in Continued Beirut Fighting 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — Fighting Monday 
between Christian and Moslem mi- 
btiamen kjfled three civilians in 
Beirut after overnight battles 
forced hundreds of persons to flee 
their homes. 

Police said that four other per- 
sons were killed and more than 50 
wounded in overnight gun-baules 
during which an estimated 13 shells 
bit Beirut airport and dozens of 
rockets and mortars smashed into 
civilian areas. 

President Amin Gemayd called 
an emergency season of army com- 
mandos Monday to seek a way of 
ending nine days of shooting 'and 
shelling along the so-called Green 
Line that divides the capital 

As dashes with rocket-propelled 
grenades ori the Green Line grew, 
ambulances brought in more casu- 
alties. Soldiers moved thdr vehicles 
under com. Radio stations ap- 
pealed toresidoits to stay in bomb 
shelters. 

Two persons woe killed and 
eight wounded in West Beirut and 
a woman was lolled and four otter 
persons were injured in East Beirut 
by renewed shelling of the capital 
nine hours after an earfy-marnmg 
mice ended 22. hours of combaL 

An airport spokesman said that 


four employees of Middle East Air- 
lines, a Lebanese carrier, were 
wounded by an estimated 13 shells 
that hit the runways late Sunday 
after the airport dosed for the 
uighL He did not say who shelled 
the airport 

In^ Vienna, a spokesman f or Ans- 
trian Airlines said that Monday’s 
flight from Vienna to Beirut via 
Damascus failed to land in Beirut 
because of “the usual problems” in 
the Lebanese capitaL The plane re- 
turned to Vienna. 

Sidling in Beirut broke out as 
Mr. Gemayd and army command- 
ers discussed “military condmoos” 
and the status of a six-member Mil- 
itary Council the official Lebanese 
press agency said. 

The Lebanese defense minister. 
Add Gsseiian. was unable to at- 
tend the meeting in the Besnn sub- 
urb of Baabda as the six mainroads 
across the capital remained dosed 
for a second straight day. 

Beirut tdeviskm said that Mr. 
Gemayd was working on plans to 
establish a militia^ approved army 
mux to take control of both sides of 
the Green Litre. 

Hundreds of Christian and Mos- 
lem civilians used Monday’s lull to 
hastily pack a few belongings and 
leave their homes near the Green 


Line fra safer parts of Beirut and 
Lebanon. 

In the latest violence, a Soviet- 
made multiple rocket-launcher 
fired 12rodcet$mioBeirut , sArme- 
nian quarter of Bmnj and at least a 
dozen maitais crashed into streets 

and hit b uildings in rhriMinn Pact 

Beirut, military sources said. 

The renewed firing cam^ shortly 
after witnesses Said that Moslem 
gunmen barked by a Soviet-made 
T-54 tank had masted on the west- 
ern side of the Green Line for what 
the Christian Voice of Lebanon ra- 
dio said would be an attack on East 
Band. 

“Anything can happen in this 
war,” said an officer in the Shiite 
Moslem Amal militia when asked if 
hismen wonid advance. The Chris- 
tian Lebanese Forces miEtia has 50 
U.S.-mads M-48 tanks. 

Despite a series of attacks and 
counterattacks on the Green Line 
since the latest round of fighting 
broke cut Ajuil 28, both sides have 
faSed to gam ground, but at least 
30 people, mostly civilians, have 
been lolled and 230 wounded. 

■ Ltd Reported in South 

Moslem guerillas and the re- 
treating Israeli Army appear to 
have reacted a . urit cease-fire 


agreement in southern Lebanon 
despite guerrilla threats to continue 
hil-and-nzD raids. The Associated 
Press reprated from Mazrct Frotm, 
Lebanon. 

The guerrillas have launched 
only one attack since the Israelis 
withdrew from the southen prat of 
Tyre on April 29. 

The Israelis said they killed four 
nm who they claimed were plant- 
ing a roadside bomb. 

The lone abortive ambush un- 
derlined tire "wffkeri drop in guer- 
rilla activity from the large-scale 


mg the stages of the 34- 
month Israeli occupation. 

The loll suggests that the Israelis 
will be able to complete the final 
phase of their withdrawal sched- 
uled to aid early next month, with 
a minimum of harassment 

“Something big is going on,” 
said a senior officer of the UN 
Interim Force in Lebanon. “There 
must be a secret deal at a high level 
in New York. Some agreement 
must have been made.” 

There was no official confirma- 
tion thfli the United Nations had 
struck a deal to head off trouble b 
the UNIFIL zone, through which 
the Israeli front fine now runs. 


say, Mr. Mitterrand is seeking 
‘ tighter control ova any changes in 
the European Community’s farm 
system, railed the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy. 

Roland Dumas, the French min- 
ister for external relations, said 
Sunday that France was acting “in 
the best interests of Europe and the 
Third World" by blocking the start 
of trade talks. 

In the Bonn talks, F nn ym 
leaders generally expressed reser- 
vations about the military implica- 
tions of the U.S. research pr o gram 
for space-based weapons, warning 
that such weapons might under- 
mine nuclear deterrence and gener- 
ate an arms race in space. 

But officials say preparation for 
the summit conference was marked 
by a growing realization among Eu- 
ropeans that the space research 
program is also.a hup subsidy to 
U.S. companies and could help 
than achieve world dominance in a 

Bonn, Paris 
Estranged 
At Summit 

By James M. Markham 

New York Tunes Service 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl has emerged from President 
Ronald Reagan’s state visit to West 
Germany deeply beholden to the 
U.S. leader and momentarily es- 
tranged from his principal partner 
in Western Europe, President 
Francois Mitterrand of France. 

If me relationship between Bonn 
and Washington can be likened to a 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

poker game, Mr. Kohl wait into 
the summit of major industrial de- 
mocracies in Bonn last week with a 
stack of blue chips won through 
having secured the deployment of 
Pershnag-2 missiles in West Germa- 
ny despite street protests and Sovi- 
et pressure. 

But, in the view of West Goman 
officials and foreign diplomats, by 
going to the military cemetery at 
Bitburg in the face of an emotional 
outpouring of opposition at home, 
Mr. Reagan has played a winning 
hand that leaves him holding the 
jackpot. 

“Some people argue that KM is 
now so deeply indebted to Reagan 
that his capacity to implement Ger- 
man interests or withstand any 
American pressure is seriously in- 
hibited," said Karl Kaiser, the head 
of one of West Germany’s leading 
foreign policy think tanks. “I doubt 
that But the priority of energies 
will now have in turn tn ipmimiymg 
damage to the Franco-Gennan re- 
lationship." 

At a state dinner Sunday Tor Mr. 
Reagan, West Goman politicians 
and policy-makers expressed relief 
that the president's stops at the 
Bergen-Bdsea concentration camp 
site and the Bitbuxg cemetery had 
unfolded ^ without serious mishap or 
violence. 

There was a virtually unanimous 

view that whatever the fallout of 
the visit might be in the United 
States, Mr. Reagan’s popularity 
had risen sharply in West Germa- 
ny, particularly among Germans 
old enough to have been involved 
in World War IL Mr. KohL, too, 
was depicted as a significant politi- 1 
cal beneficiary of whal many Ger- i 
mans call “the noble gesture” at i 
Bitburg. < 

But at the state dinner, a senior 
German policy-maker expressed 
concern about Mr. Mitterrand’s 
apparent irritation ova the out- I 
cmne of the summit. The French i 
leader stood alone on its two key 
i s sue s , tariff barrios and space ! 
weapons. ] 

“We are hearing tones out of 
France that we have not heard in a : 


large range of new “dual purpose” 
technologies. 

Although details of President 
Ronald Reagan’s invitation to lake 
part in the research program re- 
main vague, many European offi- 
cials say they doubt that such coop- 
eration would be on an equal 
footing. They say they fear that 
European companies would be 
treated as subcontractors and 
would be denied the complete re- 
sults of the work. 

So far, the United States has 
asked the Europeans only ta pro- 
vide a detailed catalogue of their 
industrial expertise, which a £uro- 

K official described as u fr head- 
er’s list of our best scientists.” 
A French official closely in- 
volved in the preparations said that 
France’s alternative project seeks 
to “coordinate and reorient” Euro- 
pean research priorities -to com 
areas that companies engaged in 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 



J. Robert Oppenfaduner 

A-Poisoning 
Weighed by 
U.S. in 1941 


By Boyce Rensberger 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A newly de- 
classified letter reveals that top sci- 
entists in the Manhattan Project, 
the World War Q effort in the 
United States to invent the atomic 
bomb, considered a plan to poison 
half a million of the enemy with 
radioactively contaminated food. 

The plan, never carried out, is 
mentioned in a letter, dated May 
25, 1943, from J. Robert Oppenha- 
mer. who directed the Los Alamos 
bomb laboratory in New Mexico, 
to Enrico Fermi, the Manhattan 
Project researcher who achieved 
the first controlled midear chain 
reaction a year earlier. 

In the letter, Onpeahenng refers 
to the plan as if it were Fermi’s 
idea, discusses technical problems 
to be solved and concludes: 

“1 think we should not attonpi a 
plan unless we can poison food 
sufficient to kill a half a million 
men, since there is no doubt that 
the actual number affected wifi, be- 
cause of nonuniform distribution, 
be much smaller than tins.” 

The letter does not give details 
on how the poisoning plan would 
be carried out but suggests that 
strontium, a radioactive byproduct 
of atomic fission, “appears to offer 
the highest promise.” Presumably 
the strontium would somehow be 
mixed into food supplies destined 
for the tables of Gomans or Japa- 
nese. 

Hie letter was found by Barton J. 
Bernstein, a Stanford University 
histo rian. 

Mr. Bernstein describes his find 
and its implications in the May- 


ESTAJBUSHED 1887 


Reagan 
Arrives 
In Spain 

He Urges Unity 
In Last Speech 
In W. Germany 

United Press Imcnuuumai 
MADRID — President Ronald 
Reagan arrived Monday for a two- 
day state visit from West Germany, 
where he had called for European 
uni ty. 

King Juan Carlos 1 and Queen 
Sofia welcomed Mr. Reagan and 
his wife, Nancy, on their arrival in 
Madrid. 

Mr. Reagan’s visit is aimed at 
underlining U.S. support for Span- 
ish democracy and the importance 
of Spain, a member of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, in 
the West's defense. 

Mr. Reagan's spokesman. Larry 
Speakes. stud before leaving West 
Germany that the presidou would 
make a major nuclear arms-control 
proposal to the Soviet Union when 
he addresses the European Parlia- 
ment in Strasbourg, France, on 
Wednesday. 

“In the Strasbourg speech, there 
will be concrete proposals to the 
Soviet Union," Mr. Speakes said. 
He gave no details but indicated 
the proposal might be a variation 
on an undertaking not to use nucle- 
ar weapons first/ 

“He will propose open borders 
from Moscow to Lisbon,” Mr. 
Speakes added, without elaborat- 
ing. 

The Soviet Union has declared 
that it will not use nuclear weapons 
first and often has criticized the 
United Slates for failing to respond 
to its gesture. 

Mr. Reagan ended his mission of 
postwar reconciliation with West 
Germany Monday with a strongly 
anti-Soviet speech. 

“Democracy will be only be 
complete when all Germans and all 
Europeans are united,” Mr. Rea- 
gan said in his half-hour address to 
about 10,000 people at Hambach 
Castle. 

“Europe today — divided In- 
concrete walls, by electrified 
barbed wire, and by mined and 
manicured fields, killing fields — is 
a living portrait of the most com- 
pelling truth of our time: the future 
belongs to the free,” Mr. Reagan 
said. 

Hambach Castle, a restored, 

1 lth-ceotuxy fortress, was the ate 
of the 1832 Hambach Festival, 
where 30.000 people met to give 
first expression to the nationalist 
movement for German unity, de- 
mocracy and freedom. 

The castle, called “the cradle of 
German -democracy,” was the last 
in a list of carefully chosen symbols 
on a state visit that included the 
Bergen-Belsen concentration camp 
and the German war cemetery in 
Bitburg. 

“Those first patriots cried out for 
a free, democratic and united Ger- 
many,” Mr. Reagan said to the 
cheers of an audience that was 
mostly invited youth. “We do so 
again today ” 

Mr. Reagan aimed his criticism 
at the Communist stales of Easton 
Europe with references to the wall 
that divides Berlin, the forma Go- 
man capitaL and with a pledge of 
“solidarity with the freedom fight- 
ers in Poland." 

Mr. Reagan told the West Go- 
man youths that they must be real- 
istic about the need for a strong 
defense against the Soviet Union. 

“Unless and until there is a 
changing by the other side," he 
said, “the United States must fulfill 
a commitment of its own — to the 
survival of liberty." 

“The first frontier of European 
liberty begins in Berlin.” he added, 
“and I assure you that America will 
stand by you in Europe, and Amer- 
ica will stand by you in Berlin.” 

Mr. Reagan's support for the re- 
unification of Germany was certain 
to anger the Soviet Union, which 
considers the borders agreed on at 
the end of World War II to be 
inviolable. - 

Mr. Reagan’s visit to tbe ceme- 
tery at Bitburg which contains (he 
graves of 49 Waffen SS members, 
was hailed by the West Goman 
press. 

“We were enemies — we are now 
friends,” one headline said. “A day 
of dignity — Reagan and fCobf 
look to the future ” said another. 


inside 


■ Even in Congress, the shape 

of the U.S. budget remains un- 
clear. PageS. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ MoM Crap, said it plans to 

shed its Montgomery Ward & 
Co. subsidiary. Page 9. 

tomorrow 

The purported attack on U.S. i 

dups 20 years ago in the Gulf of , 

Toulon that led President Lyn- 1 
don B. Johnson ro enter the 
bombing of North Vietnam 
may never have occurred. 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) (Continaed oa Page 2, CoL 5) 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


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Fears of a Protectionist Surge 

Bonn Failure to Agree on Trade Could Bring Backlash 

Bv Hobart Rowen sLartinii dais. he art negative negotiations might force a down- 


S*?i' *» 

■ **< 

* / 


By Hobart Rowen starting date, he added, amative 
Washington Pan Semce trade news, such as high monthly 

WASHINGTON — Failure of trade deficits, will stir emotions on 
the Bonn economic s ummi t confer- Capitol HflL 
ence to set a starting date for nego- jj.S. officials are disappointed. 


Hl a tSfl some - of n 

^e^wmstirernodonson 
II c are disannointed. The same source said that Mr. 


tiations on global trade is likely to but not surprised, by the failure to 
increase protectionist pressures in get unanimous agreement in Bonn, 
Congress, according to Secretary of even though six of the seven coun- 
Labor William & Brock. tries wanted m insert 1986 as the 


Mitterrand appeared worried that 
France may not be competitive in 
the services and high-technology 
products that the united States 


Congress, according to Secretary of even though six of the seven coun- tne services ana rngn-iewmoiogy 
Labor William E. Brock. uies wanted to insert 1986 as the products that the United States 

Mr. Brock, who until last week starting data President Francois hopes to pul on the table during 
was U.S. trade representative, said Mitterrand of France had in dicat- new trade negotiations, 
in an interview Sunday that if the earlier that be would attempt to Mr. Reagan also went to Bonn 


prcparaloiy meetings scheduled for delay a new trade round. 
July should bog down, “There will Th(!nfricWattV thatM 


I earlier that be would attempt to Mr. Reagan also went to Bonn 
da y a new trade round. committed to get Western Europe 

The officials say that Mr. Miner- and Japan to expand their econo- 


be a lot of pressure on Congress to ± w hfl c linking a demand for mies lo replace some of the declin- 
ing unilateral actum,'’ thoroughgoing monetary reform iug thrust of the U.S. economy. 

Beyond the specific trade issue, ^ade negotiations, actually The U.S. contribution to this 

there was a sense of dismay in fe^ a u-ade round that might sub- package was to have been a pledge 


The U.S. contribution to this 
trVs pp was to have been a pledge 


Washington on Je more general to n^^Sti^in ITS t£ sSoStaT uT 

lack of results at the Boon meeUng. ^ bjgh technology. budget deficit and a new willing- 

SSSS.WXSSS^ “Tlie nub of it is that this is the — •m-** -W»<“ 

Sr- 


force in global growth over tb 
two years, may be entering a 
period.. 


The existence of an actual start- an administration official referring 
ing date for a new trade round, 1® the European Comm unity s po- 
whi'ch was President Ronald Rea- licy that Jays down minimum prices 
gan’s declared objective, could for farm products, 
have deflected specific protection- The essence of the Uik position 


U U u luai uuo w uw “ - _ - . . a _ i« 

not Line of defense A reduction of the deficit could 
ing anything about the lead to lower interest rates and a 
agricultural Policy," said more stable dollar, 
tration official referring With some bitterness, the UR 



U.S. Protests WORLD BRIEFS 

Mark V isit y g Envoy $byt»^s Moscow Parade 

PiimptArV MOSCOW (AP) — TOrUA-ainbassadar to Moscow, Arthur a. 
1 U U5lUCtt5I y Hartman, will not attend a Red Square parade commemorating the 
" defeat of Nazism because the killing of a UR Army cJficer m East 
TV__ Germany is “still unresolved." an embassy spokesman said Monday. 

DY UCaHall Major Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. was shot and killed by a Soviet sent™ 

J "O on March 24. The Soviet Union said the officer, a member m the UR 

New York Tima Semcc liaison miwipn in East Germany, was spying in a restricted nnitfery area. 

NEW YORK — Many Ameri- U.S. officials denied the charge. ... . 

cans reacted with sorrow and anger “At a time when the Nicholson case is still unresolved, me embassy 

over President Ronald Reagan's spokesman said, “we did not feel it was appropriate for the ambassador 
visit to a German military cemetery or a militaiy representative to attend a military parade on Rea Square," 
as the United States the But two diplomats of counselor rank would attend, he added. The UR 

40th amn'wsary of victory in Eu- statement followed an announcement from the British Embassy that the 
raoe. British ambassador would attend the parade Thursday. 


U.S. Envoy Boycotts Moscow Parade 

MOSCOW (AP) — TOrUJS-ambassador to Moscow, Arthur A. 
Hartman, will not attend a Red Square parade commmorattog the 
defeat of Nazism because the Idling of a UJL Army corner m East 
Germany is “still unresolved," an embassy spokesman said Monday. 

Major Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. was shot and killed by a Soviet sentry 
on March 24. The Soviet Union said the officer, a member of the UR 
liaison mission in East Germany, was spying in a restricted military area. 


40th annivercaiy of victory m Eu- 
rope. 

In New York, Washington and 
in cities and small towns across the 
United States, people assembled 
Sunday for marches and rallies. 

The reaction os the president's 


to the European Communityspo- team law the blame almost wholly 
licy ih&t lays down minimum prices on Mr. Mitterrand. 
for farm products. “French politicians believe they 

The essence of the UJk position gain when they’re isolated," a UJS. 
is that Mr. Mitterrand, whose gov- official said. “They like to say to 


ist bills. Mr. Brock said. is that Mr. Mitterrand, whose 

But so long as the administration eminent faces parliamentary 


the French people, ’If we're isolat- 


es not able to rite an imminent tions next year, fears that new trade ed, we must be right.' ” 




IhtaMMhg 

Jewish war veterans placing flowers to honor American 
soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington. 
Sunday's ceremony was one of 20 held around the country 
in response to President Reagan’s visit to Bitborg. 


French Move 
Tied to Fear of 
A Brain Drain 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the space defense project want to 
explore. 

Mr. Mitterrand’s domestic polit- 
ical troubles are widely seen by 
European and UK diplomats as 
expl aining his decision to hold up 
trade miles until he gets firm assur- 
ances that the interests of Europe- 
an formers will be protected. 

A senior U.S. official warned 
Saturday that the French president 
saw his country’s social fabric as 
“dangerously thin.” 

Although France was once a net 
beneficiary of the subsidies paid to 
European farmers under the Com- 
mon Agricultural Policy, this is no 
longer the case. 

France recently joined Britain 
and West Germany as a net con- 
tributor to the EC, giving Mr. Mit- 
terrand’s Socialist government a 
new interest in controlling farm 
spending. 

■ Company Denies Report 

A French state-controlled com- 
pany denied Monday a weekend 
report that it was among two 
French companies taking part in 
research into President Reagan's 
Strategic Defense Initiative, Reu- 
ters reported in Paris. 

A spokesman for the electronics 
group Tbomson-CSF said: “There 
is no link between SDI and the 
work we are doing.” 

He was commenting on a report j 
in Le Monde that said that Thom- : 
son and (he Compagnie Generate 
d’Eleciridie had agreed to work on 
laser research for the UR project. 
No comment was available from 
CGE. 


The Daily 
Source far 
International 
Investors. 




Cabinet b Reshuffled in Singapore 

The reaction to the president’s SINGAPORE (AFP) — Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew reshuffled his 
visit to Bribing cemetery was over- cabinet on Monday, shifting control of the finance; communications, and 
wbdmingly negative, ran gi n g from trade and industry ministries. 

mated criticism to outright denun- a statement issued by Mr. Lee’s office said that the changes, which are 
dation. Leading Jews, the leaders to go into effect Tuesday, would distribute responsibilities more evenly 
of other religions, Holocaust sum- amrvng the ministe rs and make for more effective government. The 
von, spokesmen for veterans current cabinet was formed four months ago. The statement added that 
groups and labor organizations, there would be further chan ges at the end of the year when several 
members of Congress and thou- ministers had completed certain 

sands of other Americans joined j a the n ew cabinet, Tony Tan, the minister of finance, education and 
the choruses of rejection. health, will become minister for trade and industry and education. Track 

But there were also words of and Industry Minister Richard Hu will take over finance and health from 
praise for the president’s speech at Mr. Tan. Yeo Ning Hong will become minister for communications and 
the site of the Bogen-Bdsen con- information, 
centra ti on camp, and some leaden 

said his quest for reoondliatioa had _ ... , 


A p Walk Into the Past 9 

Washington Post Service 

Following are excerpts from the speeches by President Ronald Reagan 
and Chancellor Helmut Kohl at the site of the Nazi concentration camp 
at Bergen -Belsen, West Germany: 

□ 

Excerpts from Mr. Reagan's speech: 

This painful walk into the past has done much more than remind us 
of the war that consumed (he European continent What we have seen 
makes unforgettably clear that no one of the rest of us can fully 
understand the enormity of the feelings carried by the victims of these 

camps. 

The survivors carry a memory beyond anything that we can 
comprehend . 

Here lie people — Jews — whose death was inflicted for no reason 
other than their very existence. Their pain was borne only because of 
who they were and because of the God in thrir prayers. Alongside 
the m lie many Chris tians — Catho lics and Protestants. . . . 

Today, we have hem grimly r emind pit why the c ommandan t of (his 

camp was named the “Beast of Belsen." Above all we are struck by 
the horror of it all. the monstrous, incomprehensible horror. . . . That 
is why history will forever brand what happened as the Holocaust 

Here, death ruled. But we have learned something, as well Because 
of whai happened, we found that death cannot rale forever. And that 
is why we are here today. 

We are here because humanity refuses to accept that freedom or the 
spirit of man can ever be extinguished. We are here to commemorate 
that life triumphed over tbe tragedy and the death of the Holocaust — . 
overcame the suffering, the sickness, the testing, and, yes, the gass- 
ings. 

We are faere today to confirm that the horror cannot outlast the 
hope — and that even from the worst of all things, the best may come 
forth. Therefore . . . there must be some purpose. And there is. It 
comes to us through the transforming love of God. 

We learn from the Talmud that it was only through suffering that 
the children of Israel obtained three priceless and coveted gifts: the 
Torah, the land of Israel and tbe world to come. Yes, out of this 
sickness — as crashing and cruel as it was — there was hope for the 
world as well as for the world to come. Out of the ashes — hope. From 
all the pain — promise. 

□ 

Mr. Kohl's remarks: 

Mr. President, jyou have come here to commemorate the victims of 
tbe National-Socialist tyranny. Bergen -Bdsen was a site of unimagin- 
able horror. And it was only one of many places of an insane bent 
towards annihilation. 

At a ceremony here two weeks ago I, as chancellor of tbe Federal 
Republic of Germany, acknowledged our responsibility to history. 

You. Mr. President, represent a country which very derisively 
contributed to liberating Europe and finally also the Germans from 
Hitler’s rule of terror. We Gomans respectfully pay tribute to the 
soldiers of your country who paid for this work of liberation with thrir 
lives. 

We bow down in mourning for tbe victims of murder and genocide. 

The highest goal of our political efforts is to render impossible a 
repetition of this systematic annihil ation of h uman life and human 
dignity. 

Therefore, the Americans and Germans stand together with their 
partners and friends in a community of values and as allies . . . in 
order to secure the unconditional and inviolable dignity of humans in 
freedom and peace. 


Bitburg: A Subdued Reagan SS{E3£5!2SS Police Site b Bombed Near Brussels 

° iho RR l IKKF1 S ( Rmtml — An installation, of the oaramihtarv mitoe it 


Russian 


an prisoners 
earlier in tin 


of war who died controv 


performance would subdue the 


the controversy over tbe cemetery BRUSSELS (Reuters) — An mstauauon oi me paramilitary ponce m a 
viai to rest. Brussels suburb was bombed Monday, and urban guerrillas of the 

In New York, an estimated Fighting Communist Cells said they bad set off the bombs. Political 
240,000 people at a rally for Soviet parties and trade unions, meanwhile, were preparing a demonstration 
Jews heard Elie Wiesd, the writer against terrorism. .... 

and Holocaust survivor, call Mr. The exploaoo Monday, which shattered windows in the neighborhood 
Reagan’s visit to the Bitburg cexne- but caused no injuries, was the 15th bombing fay the organization in a 
toy an insensitive act that had seven-month campaign aimed mainly at NATO-related targets. The 
“wounded" the world’s Jews and organization is believed to be linked to the Direct Action guerrillas in 
distorted history bv pqimtinp Holo- France and the West German Red Army F action. 

■ . . ■ T ■ 1 Jk* A Laamnh tka Ai*nim’r rO<j .CtC 1 1 '«u l nniM.i.i i f/iimJ an kTiaa».i^ 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — An installation of the paramilitary | 
Brussels suburb was bombed Monday, and urban guemll 


the war. 


The While House has been 


And at Bitburg, Mr. Reagan con- buoyed by surveys taken by a veter- 
verted his calf for reconciliation an Reagan pollster. Richard Wirlh- 
inio a familiar attack on Conmm- lin. said to show the president's 
man when he recalled President popularity holding firm m the face 
John F. Kennedy’s declaration thm of Bitburg. Some other surveys, 
he was a Berliner. He went on to however, give conflicting results. 


compare himself to a Jew, an Af- While it probably vriH be days or caust victims with Nazi soldiers. 
ghan, “a prisoner of the gulag," a weeks before it becomes clear At Arlington National Cemete 
Vietnamese refugee, a Laotian, a whether Mr. Reagan has succeeded near Washington, a survivor of ti 
Cambodian, a Cuban and a Miski- in patting Bitburg behind him, the Holocaust told a gathering of 71 


to Indian in Nicaragua. 

He did not mention Adolf Hitler, 


controversy has left two legacies. 
One is a conspicuous deteriora- 


although he portrayed the crimes of don of relations with the press, 
Nazism as the evil work of “one whom Mr. Reagan and his aides 


man ” an act of deference to his 
German hosts. 

Whfle some of the president's 


blame for blowing the incident out ity for the Nazi terror. 


r proparti 
The othc 


While some of the presidents the other is an unaccustomed 
aides effusively praised the speech- defensiveness in the Reagan White 
es — Assistant Secretary of State House after a string of defeats on 
Richard R. Burt called them “a budget matters and foreign policy, 
brilliant performance'’ — the pri- His more sensitive strategists rec- 
vate expectations of the president's ognize that Bitburg could become 

ining presiden- 


advisers were more subdued. 


the symbol of a i 


The expectation of Mr. Reagan's cy if Mr. Reagan cannot reverse his 
strategists was that a satisfactory fortunes. 


caust victims with Nazi soldiers. A statement bearing the group's red-starred emblem, found in Namur, 
At Arlington National Cemetery southeast uf Brussels, blamed the paramilitary police for the death of two 
near Washington, a survivor of the firemen in the car bombing Wednesday at che Belgian Employers 
Holocaust lold a gathering of 700 Federation headquarters. It said the police had failed to heed a warning 
Jewish war veterans and their fam- to clear the area, 
flies that the president's trip to the 

Bitburg cemetery was an attempt to ,, « « -n /-i u> 

obscure German moral responsibil- [J.3. KcLuOOH IwCC 1 OO OOS6 tO Call 

^^i^Sericanpres- . SPRINGS. California (UPI) -TJe Gordon Bennett In tenia- 
other is an unaccustomed idem, norimier how wefl-mten- tional Cup bajopn race was too dose to caU Mwday astheddending 
‘ — tional going to a German ceme- rirampion. u, helium supply nearly exhausted, hovered over Nevada near 

tery sends to tbe world the wrong ^ Blooded leader. , . V 

tssjosaeS itgsssssgasssqsett 

men were the same, that they “f 1 ® 5 b ® fo1 ? commg down m the Nevada desert Sunday night. The 
fought with good intentions." winner in the race, which began Saturday in Palm Springs, will be the 


A New Crisis 
Seen by FAO 

(Continued from Page 1) 
in northern Ethiopia, an area ajthe 
country hardest hit by drought. 

The report said that the major 
problem faring Ethiopia was that 
of 961,000 tons of pledged cereals 
for 1985, “less than half will have 
been received by the end of April. " 

“Shortages of seeds and other 
inputs are likely to adversely affect 
the planting of the 1985 main sea- 
son crop," the report said. 

About 15 million people were 
affected by food shortages in Mo- 
zambique, and in Niger 400,000 
people had left their homes to seek 
food, the FAO report said. 

Seed has been eaten in many 
areas to stave off starvation, and 
tbe FAO predicted that even if 
weather was favorable, food defi- 
cits would continue into 1986 un- 
less tbe seed is replaced. 

. The 21 countries with insuffi- 
cient food supplies identified by 
the FAO were: Angola, Botswana, 
Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape 
Verde, Chad. Ethiopia, Kenya, Le- 
sotho, Mall Mauritania, Morocco, 
Mozambique, Nigfr, Rwanda, Sen- 
egal Somalia, Sudan. Tanzania. 
Zambia and Zimbabwe. 


Peres and Rabin Criticize Reagan 
For His Visit to Bitburg Cemetery 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister Shimon Peres and Defense Min- 
ister Yitzhak Rabin strongly criticized President Ronald Reagan on 
Monday for his visit to the German military cemetery at Bitburg. 

Mr. Peres called Mr. Reagan's decision to lay a wreath at the 
cemetery Sunday during his visit to West Germany “a painful and 
grievous error." Mr. Rabin said Mr. Reagan’s “historic mistake” was 
“in comparing murderers with thrir victims.” 

“For this comparison, he wfll not be forgiven by enlightened 
humanity and the Jewish people," Mr. Rabin said. 

Mr. Rabin spoke Monday at a convention of survivors at the Yad 
Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem. Mr. Penes said last week 
that Mr. Reagan's derision to visit Bitburg was a mistake. But he went 
on to add that Mr. Reagan had shown himself to be one of the most 
supportive UJS. presidents in land's history. 

The statements were tbe strongest yet made by senior officials of 
the Israeli government, which has taken a deliberately low key 
approach to the Bitburg controversy. 

Former Prime Minister Menachem Begin was quoted by The 
Associated Press as saying Mr. Reagan's participation in the ceremo- 
ny at Bitburg, which contains the graves of^ 49 SS men, was “one of the 
saddest days in the history of the Jewish people.” 


Nuclear Poisoning of Foes 
Considered By U.S. in 1941 

(Continued from Page 1) nearly impossible goal in the hope 



n. Tanzania, (Continued from Page 1) nearly impossible goal in the hope 
June issue of Technology Review of stopping it. 

(Reuters, AP) magazine. He said he came across -Or” Mr. Bernstein said, Op- 

the letter while perusing recently penhebner “ may have lacked, or 

declassified documents at the Li- ai rcady overridden, personal 
brary of Congress. doubts about the ethics of mass 


winner in the race, which began Saturday in Palm Springs, will be the 
balloon that goes the farthest. 

The helium balloon race, which began in Paris in 1906 and was an 
annual event until World War II, was revived in 1979. It is named for 
James Gordon Bennett Jr., founder of the Paris newspaper that became 
the International Herald Tribune: 

Justice Minister Resigns in Kuwait 

CAIRO (IHT) — Kuwait's justice minister, threatened with a no- 
confidence vote in parliament over charges of embezzlement and mis- 
management af public funds, bos resigned, according to aews reports 
from Kuwait He is the first cabinet minister to resign under pressure 
since 1961. when Kuwait achieved independence from Britain. 

The resignation of Sheikh Salman al-Duaij al-Sabah was accepted late 
Sunday and of fi nall y announced Monday, the reports said. A member of 
Kuwait's ruling family, he stepped down two days before he was lo race a 
no-confidence vote in parliament The vote would have been the first of 
its kind in Kuwait 

He will be succeeded by Khaied al-Jassar^who is minister of Islamic 
affairs. The resignation followed prolonged, stormy sessions of question- 
ing in parliament on the collapse of Kuwait’s unofficial stock market in 
1982. During a session last Tuesday, Sheikh Salman did not deny 
opposition charges that his 12-year-old sou had received 1.4 million 
Kuwaiti dinars ($4.6 million) from the fund. 

For the Record 

The trial at three Sikhs cbaq»gd in connection with the assassination of 
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi wiD begin Monday in New Delhi. The 
three were members of the prime minister’s security force. ( Reuters) 

A ftijacka- was released from prison in South Africa on Monday under 
an amnesty after having served less than 3 years of a 10-year sentence. 
Michael Hoare was convicted of hijacking an Air India plane to Durban 
in 1 982 after an attempt to topple the Seychelles government. (Reuters) 

Hundreds of Illegal knmigraiits filed through the western border of 
Nigeria into neighboring Bemn on Monday as the May 10 deadline set by 
Nigerian authorities for their expulsion drew nearer. (AFP) 

Tbe death toff in Britain’s worst outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease rose 
to 30 on Monday when a 60-year-old woman died at Stafford District 
General Hospital an official there said. (AP) 


‘“J w doubts about the ettucs of mass r ,, t . 

The plan is not mentioned in any killi ng s He may have been Iron- vAJ ITCCUOI1 


history of the Manhattan Project, bled only by tenhnfcal matters of 
Neither, Mr. Bernstein wrote, was efficacy and access to resources.’’ 
the plan remembered by any of 16 Onnenhrimer died in 1967. His 


In the Specia 
4-5 editions, an 


inepian remcmoere qpy ay oi re Oppenheimer died in 1967. His the origin of “Greek Officer." The wort is by Delacroix. A prepa 
leading M a nh a tt a n Project saen- brother, Frank, also a study in pen and wash heightened with white by Boflly, showing a 

^ . physicist who died in February, standing in the Louvre, was mistakenly identified as the painting 

Most of itese scientists, he described the letter “bloodthirsty." 

wrote, have forgotten or never -t_ j*,- - p—.t. r>_^L 

knew that in 1941 a scientific advi- _ 


ort on Arts and Antiques that appeared in the May 
e on tbe Gould Collection sale incorrectly attributed 
Officer." The wort is by Delacroix. A preparatory 


; as the painting. 


knew that in 1941 a scientific advi- hehner nxalied. “w C talked kf> 

that the United States develop the 
radioactive products of fission as 

w *£ ons " . . 17 Killed in Crasl 

The commutes gave the pursuit 


West Germans Are Closer 
17 Killed in Crash ^ UmS*^ Spht From Francs 


of such weapons a higher priority AfTT C npli/vnifpr (Continued from Page 1) sembUng of the 90-nation General 
than the quest for the bomb itself. ricuuiu long time," cautioned the official Agreement on Tariff s and Trade, 

I/. nn, nnl “Ufn will hull, M lu «^..l " /-ITT . I . 


sembting of the 90-nation General 


Mr. Bernstein said it was not 
clear from tbe letter that Oppenbti- 
mer supported the plan. 


IhiW “We wfll have to be careful" or GATT, to combat fwotection- 

Umud Pros rmavatianai Bernard BrigouUax, a veteran ism. 

TOKYO — A U.S. Marine hefi- French journalist, reported in This put Mr. Kohl at loeger- 

mlAr onlh 17 vwgaik nhmrH _ f r _ » r _ , . . f , 


By suggesting the killing of a half copter with 17 borons aboard Monday’s editions of Le Monde heads with Mr. Mitterrand, 
million people, Oppenheimer crashed into the Pacific off south- that Mr. Mitterrand’s “bitterness Even more forth riehtfv. 


a million people, Opp enheime r crashed into the r; 
may have bon trying lo impose a era Japan on Mi 


abroad were apparently killed, a even secret. 


i soutn- that Mr. Mitterrand’s “bitterness Even more forthrightly. Presi- 
and all has been able to remain discreet, dent Mitterrand 1 resected the Sira- 

ttileo. a rowi tnwi" r*_r . i .L. I r c 


UK spokesmen said. 


tegic Defense Initiative, the U5. 


iTues 


FV«lh IvIK ji*I 
U'jr hunliilhr 


Gommodilies 

Column. 


m visiting m 

New York City? 

Gramercy 
Park Hotel 

Distinguished 500 room 
hotel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail Lounge, 
Room Service and Piano Bar. 
Overlooking Gramercy Park 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. 
Singles $85-95 
Doubles $90100 
Suites $115-175 

Group rates and attractive 
monthly rates available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. Tom O’Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
21st St. and Lexington Ave. 
New York, N Y. USA 10010 


“But for Mr. Mitterrand, who space arms research program. 


The CH-53D helicopter attached has largely founded his European Until the summit, Bonn had, 
to the First Marine Aircraft Wing strategy op the Bonn-Paris axis, . through opaque policy fonnula- 
of the 36th Marine Air Group at here there is a somewhat discourag- tions. sought to avoid making a 
Camp Butler in Okinawa went mg lesson," he said. choice between Washington and 

down off the island of Yakushima, Having committed itself to Bit- Paris on what may be a central 
according to U.S. militaiy spokes- burg, the Reagan administration strategic question or the next de- 
men. felt confident enough to announce cade. France, too, hides behind 

The hefapta was flying to Oki- words: Its ttepet concern isthat a 

nawa fromthe U.S. Marine station J 01 ™ 11 }' ORaed- thcimpositionof Soviet countmteployment of space 
at Iwakuni in western Honshu. SS? °? Nicar ^- ^ weapons would render the French 

US. and Japanese patrol ships and ,8°Y*nmient was given two independent force de frappe obso- 
S«seS15SucraSyfar boars advance notification of the lescent. 

survivors. Tbe canse of the accident m ?£ a S2S il |JS . 4 semor West P 0 ^ 


was not immediately known. 


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move, according to an offiaaL A senior West German policy- 

The timing and setting of ibe maker commented recently that he 
Nicaragua announcement ap- was not afraid of the U5. project's 
P caret ^ L partly intended to strategic implications — an erosion 
steer the US press and television of the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
away from the damaging Bitburg nization’s classic deterrence doc- 
tneme, but for west German offl- trine, for example — “because 1 
aals it seemed also to reflect the simply do not believe that such a 
administration s upper hand in system will ever be capable of bang 
their bilateral ties. Bonn dutifully deployed." £ 

muted its known reservation's Bui as long as space weapons? 
about the Nicaragua sanctions, remain on NATO’s agenda, the 

tv f°«7 ero !5 sumn “ [ coo- frictions between Paris and Bonn 
wneo. West Germany had openly may fester, 
aligned itself with Washington on “We will have to. straddk the 
the conclave s senunal economic is- gap,” said another Bonn aide, 
sue. ana plumped for a quick as- “And that is nothing new for usT 



1 , 



Page 3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR11H NK. TUESDAY >1AY 7, 1983 



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LITTLE THtUP CHt RACTEK LICkNBED BY BUB I LI 1 |NT ! * QGK 


Pape I 


Tl'ESDAY MAY 7. 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL 


PubibM WlihTfee >n» York Time* and TV VcnhUgloa Porf 


Bitburg’s Hard Lessons 


1. 

Alb X> 
Ala 1, 
Am 1 
Alb 


It is over, but the Bilburg blunder, too, 
should not be forgotten. President Reagan's 
regret at having promised such a cemetery 
tribute was palpable. He walked through it 
with dignity but little reverence. He gave the 
cameras no emotional angles. All day long, he 
talked and talked of Hell and Nazi evil 
to submerge the event. 

No 10- minute gesture requiring all that ex- 
planation could retain much symbolic value. 
Not even Mr. Reagan's eloquence before the 
mass graves of the former concentration camp 
at Bergen-Belsen could erase the fact that his 
visit there was an afterthought, to atone for the 
inadvertent salute to those SS graves. 

What now needs remembering is how quick- 
ly even a ceremonial error can develop a politi- 
cal. indeed geopolitical life of its own, per- 
suading the most powerful leaders that they 
are helpless hostages of history. 

For dl his pain at having to offend so many 
Americans. Mr. Reagan put it starkly: to aban- 
don his promise to walk with Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl through the Bitburg cemetery would 
have looked as if he had "caved in” under 
pressure. And as Richard Nixon and Herny 
Kissinger were summoned to testify, breaking 
even a small promise to an ally in the nuclear 
age would be a grievous sin. 

This diplomacy of appearances insists that 
every presidential act has strategic signifi- 
cance: Since peace depends on nuclear weap- 
ons that can never be used, a president's will- 
ingness to use (hem rests entirely on threats 
and promises — on words: therefore, a presi- 
dent's words cany cosmic weight, his inter- 
national promises must be impervious to 
pressure; indeed, the rougher the going, the 


more persevering a president must appear. 

The theory is dangerous precisely because it 
tests on a foundation of truth. When practiced 
relentlessly, it can enshrine the most foolish 
commitments. And if pursued to absurd 
lengths, as in Bitburg. it makes strate gic dut y 
the enemy of democratic values. True strength 
resides securely between obduracy and com- 
plaisance. Strong leaders avoid both extremes. 

Still, one could almost hear Mr. Reagan’s 
lesser rationalizations as he let Mr. Kohl drag 
him through this “act of reconciliation." Had 
not the chanc ellor stared down even stronger 
protests to plant Pershing missiles on his soil? 
Will not “star wars" get a boost from his 
gratitude for this political favor? 

Sunday’s final travesty was the pretense that 
German-Araerican reconciliation still required 
affirmation — four decades after the Marshall 
Plan and the Berlin Airlift. This alliance mil 
survive the folly of Bitburg, just as it would 
have survived the cancellation of Bitburg, be- 
cause it is now deeply rooted, in the democrat- 
ic politics and prosperity of all its peoples. 

So too are the economic dysfunctions that 
worried all seven leaders of the industrial de- 
mocracies at tbe Bonn meetings prec edin g 
Bitburg, No mere words and gestures of fel- 
lowship at tbe summit could move President 
Francois Mitterrand of France to schedule a 
conference on trade barriers, which might 
threaten the protections of his fanners. And no 
mere lip service to interdependence could 
overcome the leaders’ political fears of tamper- 
ing with the world's monetary system. 

It was a troubled summit. But what a bless- 
ing to find democracy behind tbe troubles. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Milton Stover Eisenhower 


“If it wasn’t for his name." President Eisen- 
hower once said of his youngest brother, “he 
would have a very high governmental post." In 
fact. Milton Stover Eisenhower, who died 
Thursday at the age of SS. bad held very high 
governmental posts when Dwight Eisenhower 
was still an obscure officer in the peacetime 
army. He was, as those who knew him were 
well aware, a great deal more than tbe “Ike's 
Brother 1 * of a thousand newspaper headlines. 

Milton Eisenhower was super-bureaucrat, 
diplomat, university president and the good 
era \ eminence on any number of panels, com- 
missions. study groups and task forces. As The 
New York Times wrote many years ago. “His 
friends have come to think of him as ... 
supremely endowed with the gif t of getting the 
word across. They say his success is based on 
his ability to express exactly what he means, 
the w ay he can knife through to the heart of an 
issue and the way he can get others to work 
with him and for him gladly." 

Dwight Eisenhower said that it was these 
qualities, not just the fraternal bond, that 
made Milton one of his most trusted confi- 
dants during both administrations. Milton's 
stature was such that his presence in any 
venture could lend it additional respect, which 
was why he was called to serve on 12 presiden- 
tial commissions over the years, including the 
one appointed by President Lyndon B. John- 
son to study the causes and prevention of 


violence in 1968. Dr. Eisenhower (his many 
doctorates were honorary) was not a popular 
figure with the right wing of his brother’s 
party, and in fact he admitted to occasionally 
voting for a Democrat for president. *Tm a 
middle reader.” he said in a 1949 interview. 


“and it bums me up when people call that a 
neutral or negative position. It isn't. I believe 


neutral or negative position. It isn't 1 believe 
in getting things done.” 

For the past 28 years Milton Eisenhower 
had lived in Baltimore, where he served two 
stints as president of Johns Hopkins Universi- 
ty and spent a good deal of time watching the 
Baltimore Orioles. He was regarded with great 
affection, there, and a library on the Hopkins 
campus was named for him 20 years ago. It is 
perhaps the most appropriate memorial to a 
man who believed in tbe rational application 
of human knowledge to vexing problems. 

In June 1968, two years before the violence 
at Kent State University, he gave a speech on 
that Ohio campus, “As never before in our 
history.” he said, “we now need citizens who 
can reason objectively, critically and creatively 
within a moral framework. We need, in other 
words . . . Americans who will devote as much 
time and energy to being wise, democratic 
citizens as they do to being good physicians, 
engineers or businessmen.” 

What we need, in other words, is more 
Milton Eisenhowers. 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Bonn: In Disunity, Strength On Oil, a Lesson Forgotten 


The summit attendees in Bonn failed to 
reach agreentenr on two crucial questions — 
when to start a new round of global trade talks 
and whether to support U.S. research into the 
Strategic Defense Initiative. But the leaders 
demonstrated, as they had at previous sum- 
mits. that the basic fabric of Western solidarity 
remains intact. 

France opposed a proposal to initiate a new- 
round early next year. U also objected to the 
SDI project. By choosing to differ, however, 
France seems to have gained something it 
hasn't had — a negotiating advantage that can 
he exploited in the coming talks in Paris be- 
tween Mr. Mitterrand and the Kremlin's new 
leader. Mikhail Gorbachev. 

The achievement of the Bonn summit is that 
it maintained an essential degree of coopera- 
tion and unity. 

Ehe stage is set for the proposed trade round 
to roll back protectionism: the question of 
tinting can he settled in due course. The ab- 
sence of a consensus on the Strategic Defense 
initiative, which is still largely a question of 
rite future, is not a warning signal, but a 
healthy indication that Western society can 
live null a diversity of opinion. 

— The Japan Times (Tokyo). 


In late 1973. the United Stales woke up to 
the fact that it is dangerous to depend too 
much on foreign oil suppliers. That lesson may 
be starting to fade. 

Last year, for the first time since 1979, U.S. 
crude-oil imports rose over the previous year’s 
level, by 6.5 percent Even more troubling was 
a 30- percent rise in gasoline imports. Major oil 
producers have been boosting their refinin g 
capacity and expanding their exports of gaso- 
line. This has been a major blow to the U.S. 
petroleum industry. The United States, in 
common with other industrialized countries, 
now has a huge glut in refining capacity. The 
problem goes deeper: In 1983, spending by the 
U.S. petroleum industry on exploration and 
development fell 36 percent. 

Last year, about one- third of the oil that 
Americans consumed was imported, at a cost 
of S60 billion. If U.S. consumption grows by 2 
percent a year, fully 46 percent of the nation’s 
oil will be imported by 1994. 

What’s to be done? Further conservation 
remains a matter of urgency as well as sound 
economics. Research into non-oil energy alter- 
natives needs a boost Most important, the 
search for new oil supplies must expand. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR MAY 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: King Edward XHh Dead 
LONDON — King Edward VII succumbed to 
a cardiac affection supervening on pneumonia 
Jon May 6|. He was sixty-eight years old and 
hud reigned nine years. King Edward struck 
the keynote of his reign in his first Message to 
his people, in which, referring ro Queen Vic- 
toria. he said: “I shall earnestly strive to walk 
in her footsteps, devoting myself to the utmost 
of my power to maintaining and promoting 
ihe Itighest interests of my people, and to the 
diligent and zealous fulfillment of the great 
and sacred responsibilities which, through the 
will of God. I am now called to undertake." 
The continuance of the machinery of govern- 
ment and (Ik loyalty of the Empire constitute 
a monument to his wisdom. Says the Stan- 
dard: "It is our melancholy consolation that 
our grief over the tomb of his late Majesty will 
be shared bv all the civilized world.” 


1935: George V Fetes Silver Jubilee 

LONDON — In one of the greatest displays of 
pageantry the world has ever seen, his Majesty 
George the Fifth, by the Grace of God King of 
Great Britain. Ireland and of tire British Do- 
minions. Emperor of India, drove with his 
Queen through the streets of London to Sl 
P aul’s Cathedral [on May 6] to return thanks 
i£> God for the first twenty-five years of his 
reign. As this memorable pageant of triumph 
and splendor unfolded through the brilliant 
May sunshine of London’s streets to mart the 
beginning of England's celebration of the Sil- 
ver Jubilee of their Majesties, tbe cheers of 
three million persoas swelled into a mighty 
crescendo of affection and loyalty. The King, 
resplendent in scarlet and gold of a fidd- 
marshal's uniform, was visibly awed by the 
clamor of the throng. Queen Mary was a 
stately and gracious figure in white. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


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■v 1935, International Herald Tribune. AU ngtus reserved. 



T am a Berliner. I am a Jew . . 


L OS ANGELES — To President 
/ Kennedy’s “Ich bin ein Berlin- 


By William S afire 


er,” a powerful and personal state- 
nenl of identification with people 
struggling for freedom. President 
Reagan has added: “I am a Jew in a 
world still threatened by anti-Semi- 
tism, I am an Afghan, and I am a 
prisoner of the gulag, lam a refugee 
in a crowded boat foundering off the 
rras i of Vietnam, I am a Laotian, a 
Camb o dian, a Cuban ami a Miskito 
Indian in Nicaragua. L too, am a 
potential victim of totalitarianism.” 


be part of an upbeat trip. Like so 
many, he praised “remembrance” so 
long as h involved no personal pain. 

The discovery of SS graves in the 
scheduled cemetery visit saved him 
from the sin of avoidance. So Mr. 
Reagan —and the worid —had logo 
to a death camp and bear witness. 

Then some invisible pedagogic 
band led him to equate the victims of 


Die poet- theologian John Donne 
ade point in his “no man is an 


maHf. t hat point in his “no man is an 
island” passag e , and Ernest Heming- 
way used a phrase from Danne in the 
title of his book about resistance to 
fascism, “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” 

Many Jews mil remember the les- 
son from the seder service that re- 
quires commemoration of the need 
lor personal identification, during 
which it is recounted that an arrogant 
son asks, “What did the Almighty do 
for you?” and is castigated for not 
asking as a Jew, “What did the Al- 
mighty do for me?” 

To understand humanity, you 
must be an active part of it. 

Mr. Reagan, a month ago. had no 


Reagan's [ painful walk 
into the past 7 opened the 
minds of millions to the 
costs of reconciliation. 


the death camps with the dead sol- 
diers of the Third Reich. 

He soon learned, along with mil- 
lions who had never given the matter 
any thought- that no reconciliation 
could ever come about by glossing 
over the enormity oFthe enmes com- 


mitted by the Nazis and aU the Ger- 
mans who enthusiastically abetted 


real grasp of the moral priorities of 
the Holocaust or the fear of forget- 


the Holocaust or the fear of fo 
ting that prevents forgiveness. 


journey to Mndp r waniting — his own 
“painful walk into the past” — 
opened the minds of millions to the 
costs of reconciliation in a way that 
no other process could have accom- 
plished. In driving home the lessens 
of history, his incredible series of 
blunders turned out to be a blessing. 

At first he did not wont to go to a 
concentration camp. Too gloomy to 


man* who enthusiastically abetted 
them. Feeling sadness at the grave of 
soldiers is on a different order of 
magnitude from feeling agony at the 
slaughter of innocents. 

The president absorbed the point 
In an inspiring penance in the Oval 
Office, he led a huge audience in 
listening to tbe testimony of Elie 
Wiesd, the quintessential survivor. 

The invisible teaching hand would 
not let go- An ignoble motive (fear of 
appearing weak and subject to pres- 
sure) merged with a noble motive {the 


concern about insulting a new gffler- 
ation of Germans) to send him to a 
place tainted with the graves of storm 
troopers. Dus posed a test: Would he 
understand, and be able to articulate 
both the need for remembrance and 
the requirement for reconciliation? 

In part One Of this amaying meant, 
he stood at Bergen-Bdsea alongside 
the German chancellor, a man of re- 
lentless repentance, “to confront and 
condemn the acts of a hated regime 
of the past” 

The Jewish prayer for the dead 
speaks not only of the dead, but de- 
terminedly of faith in God; fittingly, 
the president stressed the message of 
the doomed Anne Frank, “I still be- 
lieve that people are good at heart.” 
No photograph can be as affecting as 
that example of intefligent innocence 
and pure hope snuffed out: The ritual 
“never again” had context. 

In the final part of the test, at the 
Bitburg cemetery, he acknowledged 
tbe presence of the Nazi graves first 
by turning his back on them, then by 
contrasting than with the remains of 
young draftees, and left, the judgment 
to Heaven. He did not equate them 
with their victims or with the soldiers 
who feD in a moral cause. 

One false note was an extended 
anecdote about the suspension of 
hostilities on a holiday — as if die 
Wehrmacht had been up main- 
ly of sentimental berys — but ne drew 
tbe central lesson dearly: “that free- 
dom must always be stronger than 
totalitarianism, that good must al- 
ways be stronger than eviL” 

That followed his uplifting “I am a 
Berliner, I am a Jew in a world stiO 
threatened by anti-Semitism” pas- 
sage, and for me redeemed the 


* 

t- 

<S 





Historically Blind, We Are Intellectually Defenseless 


W ASHINGTON — History has 
been in fashion here for a few 


W been in fashion here for a few 
days. We have been wallowing in tbe 
anniversaries of the wars we failed to 
avoid, but most of the time, even in 
Washington, history is a parade of 
forgotten memories. 

The new secretary of education, 
William J. Bennett, has recently been 
deploring this national absentmind- 
edness. He notes that tbe study of 
history, as distinct from “social stud- 
ies,” is no longer required in most 
high schools, and that in many states 
even the teachers of history have little 
or no serious training in the subject. 

“The present decline in the status 
of history in our schools is very seri- 
ous,'' he told a conference on Civic 
Virtue and Academic Excellence. 
“To put the matter plainly, to be 
ignorant of histoiy is to be, in a very 
fundamental way, intellectually de- 
fenseless, unable to understand tbe 
workings either of our own society or 
of other societies.” 

This is not a new idea, as Mr. 
Bennett recognizes, for be collects 
more quotations than anybody rim-p. 
Bartlett, and stuns his listeners with 
the findings of every student of edu- 
cation from Thomas Jefferson to 


By James Reston 


Daniel Patrick Mnv nihnn But the 
idea is still important: “We cannot 
hope that our students will know why 
tbe world got into its present situa- 
tion — or even what that situation is 
— if they know so little of tbe events 
that came before them.” 

What Mr. Bennett did not say is 
that if we do not teach history in the 
high schools and, in addition, turn 
our universities into employment 
agencies, we should not be surprised 
if tbe people elect members of Con- 
gress and even presidents who share 
their shakv knowledge or even igno- 
rance of the history of the world. 

It is not only our children who, 
without historical memory, are left 
“intellectually defenseless.” Presi- 
dent Reagan could not possibly have 
blundered into the cemeteries of Ger- 
many, with the best of intentions and 
the hope of “reconciliation,” unless 
be was ignorant of the brutal and 
tragic facts of the last world war. 

He is not the first or the worst of 
recent presidents who have neglected 
history. Herfley Donovan, the former 
editor of Tune magazine, has written 
an excellent book on his days in the 


White House of Jimmy Carter, when, 
as be says, “I was offered almost 
unlimited access,” and he reports on 
this experience with candor. 

Mr. Donovan obviously respects 
,Mr. Carter, and thinks historians of 
the future will be more generous than 
today's journalists about his adminis- 
tration, but he k ps an interesting 
observation about the Georgian’s 
“odd lack of a sense of history. 

“In Carter’s immense storehouse 
of information,” Mr. Donovan says, 
“plenty of history must have been 
packed away, yet it never seemed a 


steady presence in his thinking' 
I think the links between ed 


I think the links between educa- 
tion, history and politics are vital to 
the security of the nation, the defense 
of freedom and a decent order in (he 
worid. But l do not think these rela- 
tionships are dear or are getting the 
attention they deserve. 

It may be mat the disappointments 
and tragedies of U.S. foreign policy 
since the Iasi world war were not 
military or strategic, but misjudg- 
ments of history and philosophy. 

We fought the Korean and Viet- 
nam wars on the assumption that 


f Moral Equivalence 9 : More 
To It Than Dark Subversion 


By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


W ASHINGTON — The neo- 
conservative intellectuals — 


YV conservative intellectuals — 
Jeane and Midge and Norman and 
Irving and Melvin and the rest — 
gathered in Washington last week to 
stomp on the notion of “moral equiv- 
alence,” which is the idea that there is 
□o real moral difference between the 
Soviet Union and the United States: 
The two are both great powers and 
they act the value-free part 


rious in victory. I felt it, anyway. 

There was another nagging and un 
satisfactory element at this “trans- 
Atiantic seminar for intellectual lead- 


ers, policy-makers and concerned cit- 
izens." The conference was put on by 
the Shavano Institute of Hillsdale 
College in Hillsdale, Michigan — so 
far so good — “in cooperation" — 
watch it — “with the UlS. Depart- 
ment of State.” Tbe State Depart- 
ment quietly kicked in about $45,000 
to help pay for the conference. 

The chairman of Radio Free Eu- 
rope. Frank Shakespeare, introduced 
Gilbert Robinson as tbe person who 
had hatched the idea for the seminar 
while serving as an adviser to Secre- 
tary of State George Shultz for “pub- 
lic relations” (a slip: Mr. Shakespeare 
meant to say “public diplomacy”). 

In short, a group of otherwise 
fiercely independent-minded intel- 
lectuals gave the appearance last 
week of lending themselves to a gov- 
ernment-inspired dog-and-pony 
show. Imagine how these close stu- 


An example of a moral equivalence 
argument: Both countries are nuclear 


powers {“two scorpions in a bottle") 
and therefore both equally threaten 
tbe nuclear peace. This is, the neo- 
cons believe, a glib assertion ignoring 
(he more fundamental truth that the 
American strategic purpose is to de- 
fend the realm of freedom and the 


This keeps people from 
distinguishing betueen, 
say , US. intervention in 
Grenada to serve the 
people's choice and 
Soviet aggression in 
Afghanistan to impose a 
pro-Moscow regime. 


mu 




dents of values in politics would rate 
a conference of Soviet intellectuals 


Soviet purpose is to extend a realm 
that denies freedom. 

Another example: Both powers 
sometimes ase force in dealing with 
other countries. Again, this formula- 
tion keeps many people from distin- 
guishing between, say, American in- 
tervention in Grenada to serve the 
people's democratic choice and Sovi- 
et aggression in Afghanistan to im- 
pose a narrow pro-Moscow regime. 

The speakers I heard were con- 
vinced that the idea of moral equiva- 
lence is widespread, deeply rooted in 
our political culture — not least in 
our media — and is darkly subver- 
sive. It lowers us in our own and 
many others’ eyes to the Soviet level 
and it puts us at a disadvantage in the 


ana it puts us at a disadvantage in the 
struggfe'to bold up our end of things 
in the world. Sitting there. I found 


myself nodding regularly in agree- 
ment as one luminary of the right 
after another skewered the plain 
frailties of the lefL 
At ihe same time, the tone or it all 
was curious. Underneath the some- 
times gleeful lib-bashing lay a ner- 
vousness and anxiety that would have 
seemed more suitable if George Mc- 
Govern, not Ronald Reagan, had just 
been elected to a second term. It was 
as though the demonstrable conser- 
vative gains in Western political and 
intellectual life in recent years had 
not happened. Bui the conservatives 
(fid win. They are insecure and ungra- 


a conference of Soviet intellectuals 
conducted by a Moscow institute “in 
cooperation with the Soviet Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs.” 

I can hear some of the speakers, 
reading this, declaring that they have 
been furnished an example of pre- 
cisely the nefarious phenomenon the 
conference was convened to naiL 

There he goes, they may say: set- 
ting up a false and invidious equiva- 
lence between an American event 
and an (imaginary) Soviet event, as 
though, whatever the technical facts 
of conference sponsorship, American 
intellectuals were not the masters of 
their minds and tbe American gov- 
ernment was not basically respect- 
ful of them 

Which brings me to what is wrong 
with the whole current neo-conserva- 
tive focus on the evils of the moral 
equivalence doctrine. In the hands of 
enthusiasts, the assault on moral 
equivalence leaves too little roam for 
fair and necessary criticism of one’s 
own government and sodely. 

If the shortcomings in Weston life 
and policy are going to be played 
down on the basts that, yes, we have 
our faults but we are an open, demo- 
cratic society and we are working on 
those faults and meanwhile we have 
to fight for freedom in a dangerous 
world, then those shortcomings are 
not going to be identified and at- 
tacked with anything close to the nec- 
essary vigor. 

The campaign against moral equiv- 
alence and “superpower symmetry” 
has something useful to teach — tbe 
priority of the survival of freedom. 
But it also has something useful to 
learn — the requirement of inteQec- 
Luals that they remain in a position to 
speak truth to power. 

The Washington Post 




Oswald* m ExcMHor Ultexko Cltvl. CAW Syndicate. 


In Praise of the Disgruntled, 
The Holdouts, the Soreheads 


By Eugene R. Fidell 


N EW YORK — Let us push aside 
tbe cast of reputable — and 


IN tbe cast of reputable — and 
conventional — characters that dul- 
ler the podiums each year on Ameri- 
ca’s Law Day, sermonizing on the 
principles of order that, we are told, 
are tbe glue of society. In«i«wH, we 


should reserve space on this minor, 
but important, holiday for the un- 


but important, holiday for the un- 
sung heroes —society s soreheads. 

we should honor every neighbor- 
hood activist who dares ask a ques- 
tion in a town mewing 
Every rumpled and disgruntled 
holder of two shares of slock who 
rakes the floor at the corporation’s 
annual meeting. 

Every write-m candidate. 

Every taxpayer who fights back 
during an audit. 

Every last person who comments 
on proposed federal regulations. 


tester of jaywalking tickets, filer 
of s mall claims. 

Every objector to advertising on 
license plates. 

Everyone who wears a beard when 
shaving is in fashion, and who shaves 
when beards are in vogue. 

Every proud owner of an EdseL 


Hie Outflow ^ |jn 


Of Dollars Is 




No Problem 


By Horace W. Brock 

M ENLO PARK, California — It 
is generally agreed that there 


is a positive side to today’s strong 
dollar and enormous trade drftriL 
This is tbe inflow of foreign capital 
into the United States credit market 
—a foreign “subsidy” that is keeping 
interest rates lower than they would 
otherwise be. What people do mu 
understand is tbe surprising stability 
of the current situation. 

Fear is afoot that the present slate 
of affairs is untenable. Financial 
commentators insistently caution 
that foreign investor sentiment may 
sour on American financial assets. 


causing a large-scale ouuiqw os capi- 
tal from the United States. Such an 
outflow would put severe pressure on 
interest rates, imperiling economic 


recovery as well as the prospects of 
Third World debtor nations. 


thoughtless early planning of this 
trip. In seeking at lust to sidestep 
smoldering resentments, the presi- 
dent brought on a firestorm 40 years 
after a Holocaust, which in turn 
forced a forgetful worid through a 
most necessary grief. 

The Neve York Times. 


In point of fact, there will not be, 
and cannot be, any such outflow of 
funds in tire next two or three years. 
It is a near certainty that capital in- 
flows will continue, and at a rate 
exceeding I984*s record $100 billion. 

How can this be? The answer lies 
in understanding an accounting rela- 
tionship of international finance: 
The net foreign capital inflow into a 
nation running, a trade deficit will 
exactly equal us trade deficit. (In 
technical parlance, the nation’s “cap- 
ital account surplus” will equal its 
“current account deficit”) 

The only time this will not happen 
is when the central bank intervenes in 
the foreign exchange market — 
something the Federal Reserve Board 
has been loath to do in recent years. 


Russia and China had composed 
their ancient quarrels and had 
formed a military alliance that would 
dominate the Asian-European conti- 
nent from the Sea of Japan to tire 
Ruhr, the Rhine and the North Sea. 
But history told in the end; they feO 
opart, ana tire United States now has 
better relations with both Moscow 
and Beijing than they have with each 
other (which is not saying much). 
Now the rhmeae arc trying to deride 
between the new sweetened Coke and 
Pepsi and are even raking up golf. 

So what? Fast, I think it u a bum 
idea to introduce golf into China. It is 
a punishment for man’s ana The 
missionaries tried that in the 18th 
and 19th centuries and it didn’t work. 

Second, I think Mr. Bennett should 
insist on tnwhing lan guage as wdl as 
histoiy. We arc sitting around in our 
Toyotas, listening on our Sonys 
about the trade gap, because every 
child in Japan is taught to speak 
English, and most of us, even at IBM, 
can’t say “howdy” in Japanese. 

Even so, as everybody agrees, 
something should be done about the 
innocence of histoiy in tbe schools 
and politics of America. 

The New York times. 


Why does this accounting relation- 
ship hold? From an international 
bookkeeping standpoint, what is ca- 


sually referred to as a “foreign inflow 
of funds” is the money that finances 
the trade deficit It plugs tire financial 
gap that arises when a country im- 
ports more BMWs than it exports 
Chevrolets. Slice America cannot 
sell enough Chevrolets to finance its 
consumption, it must sell something 
else, and it does: financial assets, pri- 
marily IOUs such as Treasury and 
corporate bonds. This is the “inflow” 
of foreign funds. 

What does all this have to do with 
the likelihood that foreign inflows 
trill continue? Everything. Tbe ac- 
counting relationship makes dear 
that if the country continues to run a 
trade deficit, then it is guaranteed 
equal and offsetting capital inflows. 
But the United States is going to run 
a very significant trade deficit for the 
next two or three years, perhaps long- 
er. Turning around a trade deficit is 
like turning around a supertanker. It 


will require two to three years to right i i • 

today’s deficit —once the dollar falls ; j j 

and U.S. goods become competitive. •« 'I 1,1, 1 1 
This argumentiinplicitly treats for- » 1 

den investors ax hostages to the U.S. r i 


and U.S. goods become competitive. 

This argument implicitlytreals for- 
eign investors as hostages to the U.S. 
trade deficit, for which they are hard- 
ly responsible. But who says these 
investors must go on acquiring large 
quantities of financial assets in the 
United States, thereby financing the 
U.S. trade deficit? Should sentiment 
turn against U.5. assets, wouldn't 
these investors be free to sell their 
dollar assets, withdraw their funds 
and run? The answer is yes, but no. 
Foreigners will end up “selling" to 
other foreigners. 

Suppose assets in the United States 
suddenly become less attractive, per- 
haps because of a drop in interest 
rates. Certain foreign investors would 
sell their doQar^enominaled assets, 
and in doing so flood the foreign 
exchange market with dollars. But 
the resulting “cheaper” dollar would 
make U.S. securities relatively more 
attractive to foreigners who, taken as 
a whole, go on acquiring them. When 
the dust settled, the dollar would 
have fallen in value, yet tbe net inflow 
of foreign capital — measured in dol- 
lars — would be unchanged. 

With time, the now-lower dollar 
would stimulate American exports 
and cut imports. Thus, tbe trade defi- 
cit would slowly ebb and so would 
the off sating foreign inflow of funds. 
By the time (his adjustment process 
was over, the nation would have is- 
sued several hundred billion dollars 
worth of IOUs, would confront an- 
nual deb 1-servicing costs of $30 tril- 
lion to $40 billion and would no long- 
er benefit from subsidies of foreign 
capital. This is tbe flip side to today's 
inflow of foreign capital 


The vmier, president of Strategic 
Economic Decisions Inc., a consulting : U - 
company, contributed this comment to ~ j 


The New York Times. 


LETTER 


Remember Costa Rica 


Regarding “ The Awkward Success 
of America's Salvadoran Friend" 
(April 15) by William PJaff: 

The fragile barque of Mr. PfafTs 
argument is often m danger of being 
swamped by his own simplistic 
speech. He complains that “Wash- 
ington has held the Central American 
crisis to be a seamless whole." Yet a 
few paragraphs further along he him- 
self says, “But it is difficult to be 
optimistic about Central America, a 


Everyone who actually puts a sug- 
gestion in the suggestion box. 

In sum, everyone who is different 
and wants to remain so. 

These are our fellow citizens whose 
“saint’s day” — Law Day — was 
observed Wednesday. In all their dis- 
order, noise, ability io annoy, pride of 
difference: in all the expense they 
impose on the courts, legislatures, 
schools, businesses; in all their pied 
beauty, the celebration was theirs. 

Let us. therefore, honor them, for, 
by their very being, they breathe Hfe 
into the Constitution, perhaps more 


i proposed federal regulations. 
Picketed of all shapes and sizes. 


including every “street crazy” who 
patrols public buildings with sand- 
wich si gns deploring injustices, both 
real and imagined. 

Every writer of letters to the editor, 
jaflhouse lawyer, holdout juror, con- 


region without strong political struc- 
tures or traditions. . . r 


Has Mr. Pfaff forgotten that Costa 
Rica is right in the middle of Central 
America? Hus independent nation 
has enjoyed constitutional democra- 
cy for more than 100 years; it boasts 
of a healthy political structure and a 
long-s tanding tradition of providing 
education and health care. Few na- 
tions can match this record. 




effectively than the loftiest 
on the First Amendment 


The writer, a Washington lawyer, 
contributed this comment to The New 
York Tones. 


haven for the “huddled masses" of 
Latin America. Today, vast refugee 
camps give asylum to nearly 50,00Cl>. 
citizens of Nicaragua who have beenfv 
forced to flee tbe “democratization 
process” inflicted upon their nation 
by the Sandinists. Costa Ricans re* 
gard it as their duty to help oul 

STEIN L. HALVORSSEN. ■ 
Oslo. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


Page 5 


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Dole Maneuvers in Effort to Prevent 
Unraveling of White House Package 


By Jonathan Fuerbringex 
New York J!«m Service 
WASHINGTON— As the Sen- 
ate resumes debate on the budget 
this week. Senator Robert J. Dole, 
the majority leader, wiH be maneai- 
vering to keq> the White House 
package from unraveimg after los- 
ing several key votes last week. 

But even if die Kansas Republi- 
can is successful, the Senate will 
have just begun the long and tortu- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


oust 


t process, a 

game wnose outcome is usually un- 
dear to the viewer and often un- 
known to the players. 

After' the Senate conies the 
House, whose Democratic but 
writers have chosen to let the 
publican-controlled Senate and the 
White House go first. - 
Based od preliminary discus- 
sions^ Democrats on the House 
Budget Committee say they have a 
very different plan m store, one 
that assumes even greater reduc- 
tions in the military buildup than 
voted in the Senate and avoids the 


grapis, a top priority of the White 
House -plan: They also say they are 
very reluctant to approve any limit 
on the cost-of-living increase for 
Sodal Security. 

The shape of a final budget, 
Ihenforet i? still undear. 

The Samite voted, 65-34, last 
week to reject a proposal to limit 


Sodal Security cost-of-living in- 
could be 


* 


AiMi-ifv! 

l ! *5T:t •* 


creases; but that vote 
turned aronnd this week. The Sen- 
ate also rejected, 51-48, a proposal 
to increase military spending by 3 
percent, .in addition to inflation. 
Although-.' President Ronald Rea- 
gan stiff insists on the 3 percent 
increase, the lower spending levd 
could become part of a final pack- 
age 

Even though there is general, 
agreement among Democrats and 
Republicans that any budget 
should reduce the deficit by $50 
trillion in the fiscaT year 1986 and 
by neariy $300 bfilion over the next 
three, fiscal, years, disputes over 
what programs should be cut and 
the possibility of tax increases 
could undermine this consensus. 

The congressional budget pro-' 


cess is so long; usually lasting well 
into the fall, and so subject to 
breakdown that the focus on the 
day-to-day drfeat- or victoiy can 
obscure what is happening. In 
1983, for example, both the House 
and tiie Senate voted for the outline 
of a major deficit-reduction plan 
that was never carried out 
Before the process for the 1986 
budget is finished, the House Bud- 
get .Committee and them the full 
House will vote on its own plan for 
restraining lie federal deficit, one 
likely to be veiy different from the 
Senate's. There would then be an 
effort by the two chambers to forge 
a compromise in conference com- 
mittce. In the end, there is likely to 
be a round of negotiations with the 
White House. 

If. the House and the Senate 

X e, they would have produced 
i is called the budget resolu- 
tion, a success in itself. But even 
then there are stHl votes to be won 
and opportunities for breakdown. 

The budget resolution sets ceil- 
ings for spending and taxes. It does 
not specify any rathe spending cuts 
or, if there are any, tax inrTfta ses, 
assumed in reaching the whole. 

Next both branches would have 
to pass and the president sign what 
is called a reconciliation biff, mak- 
ing the changes in law necessary to 
achieve the spending cuts mmtwiwI 
for programs like Social Security, 
federal and military pensions. 
Medicare and Medicaid, and bene- 
fit programs for the poor. 

ui addition, Congress would 
have to meet the targets set for 



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On the Range, Skies Are Cloudy 

Cattle Ranchers in American West Fall on Hard Times 


NTT 



proving the actual spending 
m its 13 .separate appropriation 
bills, which the president also signs. 
Mr. Reajran can veto them if he 
believes they are too high. But if 
Congress gives him less man what 
hp wants, which is possible in the 
case of the Pentagon budget, his 
veto would be no weapon. 

This whole process has its politi- 
cal costs. And it keeps many sena- 
tors looking over their shoulders at 
the House. 

“You want to be direful about 
your votes," said Senator Tom 
Haricin, an Iowa Democrat, who 
used to be in the House,. “You 
know the House is going to come in 
either higher or lower.” 


In the Senate this week, Mr. Dole 
is hoping to fed his way to a final 
plan, in part with backroom negoti- 
ating and some deals to ease the 
proposed cats in some programs. 
He might offer life support to some 
of those scheduled for termination, 
including the Job Corps, the Small 
Business Administration gnri may-, 
be even Am Irak. 

Based on this negotiating and 
vote counting, Mr. Dole is expected 
to offer a new budget, which he 
hopes will attract the approximate- 
ly eight to 10 votes be needs from 
Democrats to cover his expected 
Republican defections and gel the 
plan out of the Senate. 


By Iver Peterson 

New York Times Serrice 

SARATOGA, Wyoming — The 
calving season is almost over on the 
range, anti in the lower pastures 
newborn calves totter behind their 
mothers on stiff legs that will soon 
start to carry than to the high 
meadows of their summer grazing 
grounds. 

These spring days are usually a 
time of renewal optimism for cat- 
tie ranchers in the American West, 
but that feding has been hard to 
come by for many stock growers in 
recent years. 

In a parallel to the much-publi- 
cized troubles of American grain 
farmers, cattle ranchers have been 
beset with similar problems of sur- 
plus supplies, declining demand 
and high interest rates. 

Some ranchers are reducing herd 
sizes to tiy to stay in business, and 
others, their credit exhausted and 
with some cattle prices at five-year 
lows, are giving up and getting out 

“We're finding more and more 
people in trouble in this business 
than we ever, expected,” said' Jim 
Berger, a rancher here in southern 
Wyoming who is president-elect of 
the Wyoming Stock Growers Asso- 
ciation. 

In addition to the problems of 
farmers, the cattle operators have 
other worries. One of them is a 25- 
percent decline in consumption of 
red meat in the United States over 
the last decade, prompted in part 
by fears — ^misplaced, according to 
a new industry campaign — that 
red meats are heavy in fat and calo- 
ries. 

Meanwhile, people with secure 
outside income have invaded the 
ranges fra the romance of calling 
themselves ranchers. 

The small herds of these “hobby 
cowboys," usually operated with- 
out expectation of profit and often 
fra a tax write-off, have increased 


competition for markets with full- 
time ranchers and have depressed 
prices. ( 

Mr. Berger, who started in the 
cattle business as a hired hand in 
1947 and now owns 4,000 acres 


ence has arisen over federal agricul- 


tural policy between the men and 
en who 


(1,600 hectares^ suffered his first 


loss last year. To stay in business 
for ibis summer's busy season of 
irrigating hay fields and moving his 
500 head of Black Angus cattle to 


'We’re finding more 
and more people in 
trouble in this 
business than we ever 
expected,’ said Jim 
Berger, a Wyoming 
rancher. 


their summer pastures in the Medi- 
cine Bow Mountains, he has gone 
deo>er into debt. 

Cattle are raised for slaughter in 
every state, but most cattle opera- 
tions are in the West, where water 
is loo scant for large-scale grain 
crops and land is cheap enough to 
allow the huge acreages needed to 
graze cattle. The stories coming out 
of the small towns of this beef re- 
gion sound much like those from 
the corn and wheat states: foreclo- 
sures, forced sales, failin g banks. 

Bui when Congress considers the 
Department of Agriculture’s pro- 


women who drive the cattle and 
those who drive the tractras. Crop 
growers support federal interven- 
tion in support of faun commodity 
prices; ranchers argue that, with 
the important exception of the allo- 
cation of public grazing lands, the 
fewer federal programs, the better. 

Kendal Frazier, a spokesman for 
the National Cattlemen's Associa- 
tion , in Denver, said there was no 
question (hat die typical beef pro- 
ducer had suffered as modi as the 
wheat grower. “Bui from a philo- 
sophical standpoint,” be said, “that 

cattle producer has not gone to 
Washington and said, ‘Answer my 
problem."* 

“It's a long-standing ideal,” he 
said. “Cattle people just do not 
want the government involved in 
the cattle industry, and that philos- 
ophy has been in this business 
probably since the West was set- 
tled.” 

In addition, the two often have 
opposite goals when it comes to 


commodity prices. 


posed changes in federal farm pro- 


grams in the debate over the 1986 
budget, few voices from (he cattle 
country will join the chorus of 
fanners seeking to maintain high 
federal price guarantees. 

Thai is because a distinct differ- 


When the government in 1983 
instituted a new program to cut 
surpluses, excess grain was given to 
farmers as payment for leaving 
land fallow, and this helped drive 
up feed prices fra cattle ranchers. 

And when the government paid 
dairy farmers to reduce their milk 
surpluses by sending some of their 
cows to slaughter, the flood of beef 
drove cattle prices down. 

So when President Ronald Rea- 
gan promised to veto Congress's 
farm relief program earlier this 
year, the National Cattlemen's As- 
sociation applauded. 

The cattle growers idy exten- 
sively on outside income from ur- 
ban jobs, track farming and cash 
crops to supplement their income. 

Here in Saratoga, Joe Glode is 
both mayor and the major dealer of 



Some cattle growers Id the U.S. are reducing 


Brazil Fears Epidemic as AIDS Cases Grow Sharply 


Los Angeles Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Public 
health authorities are wanting (hat 
an epidemic of. acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome, or AIDS, 
may be devdopins in Brazil with 
pew cases of the disease being re- 


ported at therate of onecactulay. 


IjMJirub. . :r 


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Sandinist Foes Report 


Si 




Acquisition ofMissiles 




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tr*V j.-: 


By James LeMoyne 

New York Tuna Service ' 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
Nicaraguan anti-government guer- 
rillas recently have acquired sur- 
face-to-air missiles and have 
moved out from their main tamp 
on the Honduran border, accord- 


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official here. 

Hie rebel spokesman, Frank 
Arana, said the guerrillas had ac- 
quired supplies in the last month 
and ^ooldsoon attack inride Nica- 
ragua. But Western and Honduran 
officials here question the guenil- 
las* ability to mount an offensive, 
saying that as many as 7,000 of the 
13,000 armed rebels in the Nicara- 
guan Democratic Force are still in- 
side Honduras. 

The reported acquisition of sur- 
face-to-air missiles would represent 
a major imp rovement in the weap- 
^ons available to the rebels, who 
appear to be the first guenffla force 
in Latin America to receive such 
weapons. An NBC News crew re- 
cently was allowed to film a rebel 
holding a missile in the main guer- 
rilla camp on the Honduran bon- 
der. An effcul to reach the base was 
unsuccessful, and a rebel official 
said it was now closed to: 

The vote last month in 
rgecting $14 ntiHion : worth of re- 
newed assistance to the guerrillas' 
appears to have had less of an ef- 
fect here than was expected: Rebel 
and Honduran officials said in in- 
terviews that they believed Presi- 
dent Ronald R eagan would eventu- 
ally win new assistance fra the 
jxbels and that Honduras remained 
^fining to allow them to operate 
from us territory. 

“We consider the vote in Con- 
jo be a farce,” said a senior 
londuran Army officer, who is 
considered ft key adviser lo (he high 
command. “Any UJS. corporation . 
could come' up with $14 million.” 

Mr. Reagan telephoned the Hon- 
duran president. Roberto Suazo 
Cordova, after the congressional 
vote to reassure him of the adminis- 
tration’s continued commitment to 


the rebels, Honduran and Western 
officials here said. 

A high-level Honduran delega- 
tion was in Washington discussing 
the guerrilla force, as well as in- 
creased UJS. economic and ntilitaiy 
aid to Honduras, the officials add- 
ed. 

“1 do believe they are convinced 
of the determination of the admin- 
istration to prevail an tins one,” a 
Western diplomat in Honduras 
said.: 

It appears that although the re- 
bels may not have sufficient sup- 

E lies to sustain an offensive, they 
ive established a support network 
that allows them to survive as a 
fighting force, according to Hon- 
duran and other Western officials. 

Honduran officials said that 
their chief concern was that the 
rebels would remain insde Hondu- 
ras, prompting Sandinist attacks 
that embarrass the government and 
occasionally cause riritian casual- 
ties. 

A Western diplomat said he be- 
lieved that thecontingrainy season 
would give the guerrillas a breath- 
ing apace since Sandinist units 
would find ii more difficult to oper- 
ate and get supplies in the isolated 
northern provinces, where the re- 
bds cany out most of their attacks. 

There appear to have been al- 
most no guerrilla attacks inode 
Nicaragua in recent months as the 
rebels have waited for supplies on 
the Honduran border. The Sandm- 
ists have taken advantage of the 
rebels' weakness to relocate thou- 


Since 1982, when the first 
carrier was discovered in Brazil, the 
number of reported cases has risen 
to 316. Of these, half have come to 
the attention of medical authorities 
since Jan. 1. 

AIDS has killed 109 persons in 
Brazil. With the rapid growth in 
reported cases, health authorities 
expect an increasing number of pa- 
tients requiring hospitalization. 

its ability to i^^i^ection. ft is 
transmitted through sexual contact 
and through blood or blood prod- 


uct transfusions. Its principal vic- 
tims thus far have been male homo- 
sexuals, intravenous drug abusers 
and hemophiliacs. No cure has 
been found. 

Medical officials say that Brazil, 
which has a population of 130 mil- 
lion, appears to be second to the 
United States in the impact of the 
disease. 

Minister of Health Carlos San- 
tana last week ordered a national 
information campaign on how the 
disease is transmitted, how it can 
be recognized and what preventive 
measures can be taken. 

The national network TV-GIobo 
devoted part of its prime time pro- 
gramming Sunday to a report on 
AIDS. 

Although the number of AIDS 
patients is small compared with 
those suffering from other conta- 


gious diseases in Brazil, where 
40,000 new cases or malaria are 
reported each year. AIDS has in- 
creasingly alarmed the public. 

In slo Paulo, where 71 percent 
of Brazil’s cases have been report- 
ed, the state public health system 
has set up an emergency AIDS 
alert system through hospitals, 
neighborhood clinics and the medi- 
cal profession. 

Mr. Santana has called a meeting 
of public health secretaries in the 
nine states where cases have been 
reported to coordinate a federal 
plan to combat the disease. 

In Rio de Janeiro and Sflo Paulo, 


the increase in the disease has 
alarmed those dues’ large homo- 
sexual communities. 

been formed in Sao^PauS?which 
has a population of 10 million, to 
assist victims. Posters warning 
against sexual promiscuity are be- 
ing distributed m sauna parlors, in 
bars frequented by homosexuals 
and in motels. 

Paulo Cesar Bonfim, a member 
of the support group, is organizing 
a series of public discussions 
through which he hopes to alert Lhe 
homosexual community to the dan- 
gers of the disease. 


farm equipment. He has not sold a 
new tractor since August 1983. 

“The spread between expenses 
and return is getting wider and wid- 
er for the cattle industry,” Mr. 
Glode said. 

While waiting for prices lo re- 
cover and land values to stabilize, 
cattle ranchers may also face a 
sharp increase in lhe fees the feder- 
al government fhar gre for grazing 
cattle on public lands. 

The ranchers now pay about 
$1.37 a month to graze each ani- 
mal. Western cattle ranchers paid 
the government $20 million last 
year to run their herds on more 
than 300 million acres of public 
range- 


One option bein.- r. 
make the ranchers 
cost or federal m' :. 
supervision of graz :.. • 
industry officials e-; : - 
would push the . 
fee to more than . 
so would drivi; r. r. . 
public lands. 


Jd 
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this 
-ing 
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“I'd say 75 pero. r. 
ers are in trouble,” 
Budd, executive vie .■ y 
the Wyoming Stock •'!: 
sodation. “We’re $..••• 
them forced off the 
“Some of them get , . 
then the land is 
them; others sell r. 
because they can k.. .. 


nd 

lo 

nd 


The only hotel in the \\ 
on N. Rodeo Drive. 


A Max Baril Hotel 

THE BEVERLY RODEO HC 




360 N. Rodeo Dr., Bewrtv Hill*. CA 90210. Telex No. (y-V 


sands of people suspected of sym- 
id to 


pa [hiring with the rebels ant 
move about 6,000 troops to near 


gress: 

Hond 


the main gueniBa basc, rebel and 
officials: 


Weston officials say. The Sandin- 
isis have also begun to build a road 
to the area, they added. 

It is not dear how the rebels 
managed to acquire. the. missiles, 
nor is it certain that they will use 
them. One of the guerrillas' chief 
worries, however, is that the San- 
dinists will soon use Soviet-made 
Mi-24 helicopter gunships against 
them. 


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Marcos Reduces Penalties 


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The Associated Pkb Agapito AqiriDO, brother of Ben- 

MANTLA — President Ferdi- igrio S. Aquino Jr, the opposition 
oand E. Marcos has reduced the leader who was slain in 1983, said; 
penalties fra acts considered harm- “Let's not be happy too soon. He 
ful to national security — the death merely gave back what he took 
sentence, ^ life imprisonment or loss from us. 
of citizenship. One of the decrees, signed in 

The new decrees provide penal- 1981* imposed the death penalty or. 
tits ran g in g from four months in life sentences for acts defined as 
jail to a maximum of 14 years and rebellion or sedition. The other 


• 4 ’ 

r- - * %l 

;i - ■ 

■ J"-’ 


eight months and a fine of 15,000 
pqos ($830) for crimes of sedition, 

rebellion, insurreetkm .and illegal 

assembly. 

^-Opposition hades holding a na- 
uwaal conference were cautious in 
their reaction, . . 

“If it's true, h.*s good because it 


provided for the confiscation of 
property and loss of citizenship. 

No one was executed nor was 
citizenship stripped from anyone 
under the old decrees. 

The preamble to the new decrees 
said: “In the spirit of national rec- 
onciliation, the government has 


was alrodbiis before,” Lorenzo deemed it wise to temper the paul- 
Tanada, a former senator,, said ties fra subversion and crimes 
Sunday. against public order." 




ZeMonde 

diplomatique 


MAI 1985 


SPECIAL TIERS-MONDE 


LE HERS-MONDISME 
EN QUESTION 


La mode en Occident esi aujourd'hui aux lamentations strr 
les echecs economiques du tiers-tnonde et a la critique de ses 
r^imes poliliques. 

LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE rfivfcle le veritable sens dc 
celte campagne : 

- L'analysc dcs thSses economiques en presence ; 

- La perc£c politique du tiers-monde ; 

- Les raisons de rendeuement : 

- Le role des socieles mullinationaJes; 

- Le devcloppemenl dcs echo ages commerciaux Sad-Sad. 
LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE donne egalemcni la 
parole aux ecrivains du tiers-monde. 


UN GRAND DOSSIER DE 23 PAGES 


EGALEMENTA V SOM M AIRE : 

LA GUERRE DES fiTOILES 


A la menace que le tiers-monde ferait peser sur 1 ’Occident 
s’ajoulc la peur d’un conflit nud&ure en Europe. La • guerre 
des Stoiles- peut-elle ; 

- Assurer aux democraties one paix durable? 

— Donncr an Vieux Continent son aolbnomie scientifique et 
strategique? 

LE MONDE DIPLOMA TIQUE 6c laire les vrais enjenx d’nn 
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LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE 
S. me des Italkns, 75427 PARIS CEDEX 09 


The Daily S^nzoe for 
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V?; - •' ' 




.■ry 'jSC : 




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Pa 


Nuns 9 Deaths Covered Up 9 Salvadoran Says Sir D. Bailey, 

Inventor of 
War Bridge, 
Is Dead at 83 


JBv Lire)' Rohcer 

Vin Yrrk Ttnic*. Service 

NEW YORK — A lawyer as- 
signed 10 defend a Salvadoran na- 
tional guardsman later convicted of 
murdering four .American church- 
women says he was forced to take 
part in a "conspiracy" aimed at 
preventing higher-ranking military 
officers from being implicated in 
the case. 

The lawyer. Salvador Antonio 
Ibarra, said Sunday that another 
defense attorney had pressed him 
not to contradict a statement that 
"the possibility of a cover-up had 
been thoroughly investigated'’ and 
rejected. Mr. Ibarra said that decla- 
ration was “an outright lie" and 


U.S. Missionary 
Is Killed in Peru 

Tlu’ Associated Pros 

LIMA — An American Baptist 
missionary was shot and killed 
when he" fought lo rescue his 
daughter from five men who had 
invaded his home in a town north 
of Lima. Peruvian police reported 
Monday. 

They said that the Reverend 
Thomas Dean Brown. 43. of Jack- 
sonville. Illinois, was shot in the 
heart in the attack Saturday and 
that his 17-yeur-old daughter es- 
caped unharmed, Mr. Brown was 
the pastor of the Baptist Bible Fel- 
lowship Church in the Lima suburb 
of San Marlin de Poms and lived 
in Puente Pkdra. 22 miles (40 kilo- 
meters) to the north. 

Police said that it was not clear 
whether the gang intended to rob 
Mr. Brown or Iddnap his daughter 
for ransom, but there was “no evi- 
dence of terrorism." 


added that he was specifically 
warned not to pursue the case on 
his own. 

After it became clear he would 
not cooperate fully. Mr. Ibarra said 
in an interview, he was abducted by 
Salvadoran security forces, held 
prisoner at National Guard hod- 
quarters and tortured. The objec- 
tive. he said, was to gel him off the 
case, either by killing him or forc- 
ing him to Ike the country. 

On Ocl 30, 1983. Mr. Ibarra was 
abducted by what he says were Na- 
tional Guard troops dressed in ci- 
vilian clothes. Only through the in- 
tercession of the American 
Embassy and the International 
Red Cross, be said, washereleased 

Mr. Ibarra left El Salvador im- 
mediately afterward and was treat- 
ed for broken ribs at a hospital in 
Los Angeles. 

Mr. Ibarra's remarks reopened 
one of the most controversial as- 
pects of the murder of the three 
American nuns and a lay worker, 
who were shot by Salvadoran secu- 
rity forces after being stopped at a 
roadblock near San Salvador Inter- 
national Airport in December 
1980. 

Human rights groups and some 
United States diplomats have long 
argued that the guardsmen were 
not acting on their own. but carry- 
ing out orders issued by their supe- 
riors. The groups also have charged 
that the Salvadoran government 
sought to hide the involvement of 
those high-ranking officials. 

17 Bombs Set Off on Corsica 

The Associated Pros 

AJACCIO. Corsica — Seventeen 
small bombs exploded at offices 
and homes in the Ajaccio area early 
Monday, causing material damage 
but no injuries. 


“To us, this is further evidence 
that there was a cover-up at the 
highest levels of the Salvadoran 
National Guard,” said Scott 
Greatbead. an attorney affiliated 
with a lawyers’ committee on be- 
half of the families of the slain 
churchwomen. 

A classified report prepared for 
the State Department in 1983 bya 
Tonner federal judge, Harold E Ty- 
ler. also concluded there was an 
official cover-up. It found that the 
Salvadoran government had sought 
to “conceal the perpetrators from 

justice” through a pair of "sham” 
investigations that would "create a 
written record absolving the Salva- 
doran security forces of responsi- 
bility for the murders." 

But Mr. Ibarra is the first person 
directly revolved in the case to 
charge there were irregularities in 
the judicial proceedings and a de- 
liberate, concerted effort to limit 
culpability in the murders to low- 
ranking members of the Salvador- 
an National Guard. 

In December 1982, Mr. Ibarra 
was appointed defense attorney for 
Carlos Joaquin Contreras Palaaos, 
one of five Salvadoran national 
guardsmen accused of murdering 
the churchwomen. Mr. Contreras 
Palacios, the only one of the ac- 
cused to confess to the murders 
before the trial, was convicted in 
1984 with the other four defen- 
dants and sentenced to 30 years in 
prison. 

Mr. Ibarra. 38. was quickly 
joined in the defense by two other 
lawyers, Cesar Augusto Canos and 
Tom&s Guillermo L6pez. Mr. 
Ibarra says that when he learned 
their identities, his conviction that 
the “politically delicate” case was 
“ extremely dangerous ” become 
stronger. 


Mr. Cartas, he said, is the half 
brother of Colonel Aristides Napo- 
ledn Montes, then director of the 
Salvadoran National Guard. Mr. 
Lopez presented himself, said Mr. 
Ibarra, as a "childhood friend" of 
Josh Guillermo Garcia, then El Sal- 
vador's minister of defense. 

The two men, said Mr. Ibarra, 
came to bis office in Zacatecoluca, 
where the trial was to be held, 
shortly after the appointments 
were announced. Mr. Canas. he 
said, immediately declared that he 
would determine the strategy for 
the c?ise and said he wanted Mr. 
Ibarra to "pledge” to cooperate 
with him. 

As Mr. Ibarra remembers the 
conversation, Mr. Canas said that 
"we bad to give the impression that 
we were doing good work on the 
case.” But at the same time. Mr. 
Ibarra said, Mr. Canas made it 
clear that Mr. Ibarra should not 
talk to reporters or make any effort 
to defend his client. 

“It’s not that I was afraid of 
Cfcsar Augusto Canas himself," be 
said when asked why he did not 
speak out at the time. “But I was 
afraid of the brother of the director 
of the National Guard and what be 
might do." 

■ Civilians Reported Slain 

Salvadoran paramilitary forces 
executed at least 14 civilians, in- 
cluding three small children, early 
in Apnl in a contested region, the 
Salvadoran archbishopric said 
Sunday in a report released in San 
Josfc, Costa Rica, according to 
Agence France-Presse. 

Shortly after the killings, guerril- 
las attacked, and 15 members of 
the pa ramili tary group and four 
civilians, including two children, 
were killed. . 


Waskatpm Pest Service 

LONDON —Sir Donald Bailey, 
83. the Englishman who invented 
the movable Bailey Bridge that 
played a key role in the Allied vic- 
toiy in World War II. died Sunday 
in Bournemouth. England. 

Sir Donald's bridge was assem- 
bled from welded panels of light 
steel linked by pinned joints and 
stretched across pontoons. It could 
easily be carried by a few men and 
could hold loads weighing several 
tons. Used in the Normandv land- 
ings in June 1944. it carried Allied 
troops, tanks and guns over scores 
of rivers and gorges in Europe. 

The Bailey Bridge was designed 
as a collapsible steel bridge, and its 
ease in construction meant not only 
that it could be moved quickly but 
also that if it were destroyed, it 
could be rebuilt or replaced in a 
matter of hours. Superior to com- 
parable American models, the 
bridge was popular with both U.S. 
and British forces in Italy. U 
proved especially useful there be- 
cause German forces came to rely 
on bridge demolition as a central 
tactic in delaying the .Allied ad- 
vance. 

Sir Donald was bom in York- 
shire. England, and spent much of 
his childhood making model 
bridges from pieces of wood and 
string. He sketched the original de- 
sign for his bridge on the back of an 
envelope and took it to the War 
Office, where it was accepted in 
1941. He was paid a fee of £12JD00 



The Afloomf Wm 

Sir Donald Bailey with a model of his military bridge. 


— then the equivalent of $48,000 

— for the invention. 

Although Sir Donald was mod- 
est about his achievement, saying it 
was “just part of his job" as a aril 
engineer, he accepted a knighthood 
in 1946. 

Carter Brown. 61 , 

Mystery Writer 
SYDNEY (API — Alan Yates. 
61. the mystery writer known pro- 


fessionally as Carter Brown, died 
Sunday in Sydney. 

In his 32-year career. Mr. Yates, 
as Carter Brown, wrote more than 
270 books that sold more than 55 
million copies around the world. 

Perhaps the the best-known 
Brown book was “The Stripper." 
which was also made into a movie. 
Mr. Yates also wrote under the 
names Tom Conway and Paul Val- 
dez. 


Swedes Fear 
Major Blow * 

To Economy 
By Strike 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — The Midi 
Industry Federation warned Mon- « 

dav that strikes that have virtually * 

halted foreign trade could critically 
affect the economy in a few days. 
However, it expressed optimism 
about the overall outlook for 1985. 

The 265.000-member civil ser- 
vants* union. TCO-S, began a selec- 
tive walkout Thursday, disrupting 
Swedish shipping, commercial air 
traffic and police, postal and other 
key services. 

The union is seeking a 3.1 -per- 
cent pay raise. The Civil Service 
Employes Board has offered a 2- 
percent raise starting in January. 

On Mondav. the union eased a 
walkout by postmen to allow deliv- 
cry of pension and other welfare 
payments. 

But employers, describing the se- 
lective strikes as a danger to society 
in key sectors, said after all-night 
talk s with the union that the con- 
cessions were not enough. 

The strike has only had limited 
effects on industry, although cus- 
toms officials have begun refusing 
goods at the country's main ports. 

The Swedish Industry Federa- 
tion said deliveries of pulp and pa- 
per abroad would be hurt by the 
stoppage. # 

The dispute is due to escalate 
this weekend. The board has vowed 
to lock out 100.000 white-coliar 
workers in the public sector, in- 
cluding most of the country’s 
teachers. 


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Constitution Approved 
In Turkish Cypriot Vote 


The Associated Press 

NICOSIA — Turkish Cypriots 
have voted overwhelmingly to ap- 
prove a constitution that the Greek 
Cypriots say could undermine at- 
tempts to reunite the island. 

The election board said Monday 
that, according to complete but un- 
official returns. 7021 percent en- 
dorsed the measure, with 49,447 
votes for and 21,012 against. 

U reported that 783 percent of 
eligible voters participated. 

One policeman guarded each of 
the 4 1 5 ballot boxes on Sunday and 
no problems were reported (hiring 
the voting. 

Rauf Denkiash. the Turkish 
Cypriot leader, said after casting 
his ballot, “The manifestation of 
the will of the Turkish Cypriots at 
the end of the referendum will be 
helpful to peace talks.” 

He added. “After this referen- 
dum and the upcoming elections, 


the Turkish Cypriot community 
will follow peace talks more power- 
fully and more effectively through fg 
authorized bodies.” 

Turkey is the only nation that 
recognizes the Turkish Republic of 
Northern Cyprus. It declared inde- 
pendence from the Greek Cypriot- 
controlled government of Cyprus 
in November 1983. 

Resolutions of the United Na- 
tions Security Council have ruled 
as invalid the proclamation creat- 
ing the state. 

Greek Cypriot newspapers on 
Monday criticized Secretary-Gen- 
eral Javier Perez de Cufellar for not 
speaking out on the holding of the 
referendum. 

“The silence of the secietaiy- 
general is inexplicable," said the 0 
weekly, Anexartitos, die official 
newspaper of the Greek Cypriot 
Socialist Party. 


Black Men in U.S. Face 
21-to-l Odds of Murder 



By Don Irwin 

Los Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Black 
American men race one chance in 
21 of even mall y bring murdered, 
odds about six times greater than 
those confronting white men, ac- 
cording to a survey by the Bureau 
of Justice Statistics. 

The bureau, an agency of the 
Justice Department, included the 
data Sunday in its new Crime Risk 
Index, a statistical indicator devel- 
oped from five years of estimates 
compiled for the bureau’s continu- 
ing National Crime Survey. 

The survey of a nationwide sam- 
ple or about 125.000 persons every 
six months uses the results to chart 
the incidence of violent crime. 

“The crime risk index shows that 
males are more likely than females 
to be victimized by violent crime, 
blacks more likely than whites, the 
young more than the old. the poor 
more than the wealthy and the un- 
married more than the married," 
the bureau’s director, James R. 
Schlesinger. said in announcing the 
findings. 

Using figures for the years 1978 
through 1982, the bureau found 
that overall risks that an American 
of 12 years or older would become 
a victim of the violent crimes of 
rape, robbery or assault were about 
3 percent a year in the period. 

Homicide data compiled by the 
National Center Tor Health Statis- 
tics of the U.S. Public Health Ser- 
vice indicate, Mr. Schlesinger said, 
that “a person in this country has 
about one chance in 10,000 of be- 
ing murdered in a single year, but 
the risk is one in 133 over an entire 
lifetime.” 

The statistics also showed that 
the lifetime risk could vary with 
race and sex. Overall, the estimated 
chance of bring murdered was put 
at 282-to-l for all females and 84- 
lo-l for all males. 


The odds on a white male's be- 
coming a homicide victim were es- 
timated at 131-to-l, much less than 
the 2l-to-l chance for blacks. For 
females, the risks were put at 369- 
to-1 for whites and 104- to- 1 Tor 
blades. 

The study estimated that an 
overall 32 percent of the popula- 
tion, or approximately 6 million 
Americans over the age of 1 1, be- 
came victims of violence in 1982. 

But the impact fell disproportion- , w* 
ately on poor, young, unmarried t 
males. 

fa its summary of all covered 
crimes, the survey estimated that 
5.9 percent of while males and 7 
percent of blacks in the 12-15 age 
group were victims in 1982. 

Among males 16 to 19, the vic- 
timization estimate was 83 percent 
for whites and 83 percent for 
blacks. The estimated rales tapered 
off to 4.9 percent for whites and 6 
percent for blacks between 25 and 
34, then fell steadily thereafter for 
both races. 

Permanent Council Seat 
At UN Sought by Japan jp 

The Associated Press 

JAKARTA — Japan is seeking 
the support of Indonesia and other 
developing countries for ejection as 
a new sixth permanent member of 
the United Nations Security Coun- 
cil, a special envoy from Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone of Ja- 
pan said here Monday. 

Masayulti Fujio, policy board 
chairman of Japan's governing Lib- 
eral Democratic Party, said he 
made the request during a meeting 
with President Suharto. The coun- 
tries with permanent membership 
on the Security Council, which giv- 
en them veto powers, are the Unit- 
ed Slates, the Soviet Union, Brit- 
ain, France and China. 



C H A N N 


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Bertrand Tavenden A respect for the lonely "outlaw.” 

French Director Searches 
For the Jazzman’s Soul 


By Michael Zwerrn 

International Herald Tribune 

E l AMS — “Long Tall Deader" 
Gordon, a photogenic 6-foot~5 
with bushy gray sideburns, the link 
between Later Young and John 
Cdtrane, has been signed by the 
French director Bertrand Tavernier 
to star in bis next film, “Autour de 
Minini," scheduled to be shot in 
July in Paris. 

The title is a translation of The* 
lonious Monk's “Round Mid- 
night.” Gordon will play a compos- 
ite drawn from the lives of Yoong 
and Bud Powell, and front PowdTs 
relatio nship with the French pho- 
tographer Francis Paudras. He wiB 

to Tavernier, 

Sunday in the Country," the film 
“searches for the real sensitivity at 
a jazz mma ajn. " 

There is no valid motivation far 
playing jazz other than love— out- 
law motivation in a profit-motivat- 
ed society. Those who choose the 
insecurity at improvising for a liv- 
ing tend to transpose musical val- 
ues to a fife view — eschew insur- 
ance, make abrupt turns on short 
notice. It takes a tough skin, steady 
nerves, a stout heart and psycholo- 
gical balance. 

The casualty rate is high- Before 
his terminal retreat from (be world. 
Monk reportedly said: Tm tiredof 
trying to .convince them." Taver- 
nier adds: "There was a strong sui- 
cidal streak in die Gist gmeration 
of black bebop musicians. Many of 
them eventually closed themselves 
off from the world. Dexter is one of 
the rare survivors.” 

This breed of lonely “outlaw" 
has long had the respect of the 
film’s executive producer, Irwin 
Winkler (“Raging Bull,”' "The 
Right Stuff”), who found the S3 
million in financing, and of Taver- 
nier, who said: “It is only because 
of our passion that this film exists." 

Herbie Hancock plays Gordon's 
pianist, both audiuly and visually 
(with Billy Higgins, .drams, '.and 
Pierre Michelot, bass). He is also 
composing the score; he began to 
write it even before signing the con- 
tract. 

“1 felt very proud to be a jazz 
musician when I read your screen- 
play,’' be told Tawnier. “It’s so 
berate." Tavernier collaborated on 
it with David Rayfid (‘Death 
Watch,"“Jeremiah Johnson”). 

People like Winkler, and Taver- 
nier who hHve succeeded within so- 
ciety’s structures often have an out- 

DOONESBURY 

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IN TERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 

ARTS /LEISURE 




American Sportswear: Accent on Understatement 


MONSIEUR 


sized love for jazz, as a form of holy 
lonely endeavor they wish they 
were capable of. Tavernier wants 
“to dramatize the force of these 
imHririans and their music." 

Michel Boutinard Rouefle, foe 
another example, inaugurated the 
Paris Jazz Festival when he was 
director of culture for the dty. "T 
felt so proud to be able to hire 
Miles Davis,” be said, laughing, 
somewhat embarrassed to define 
hhnsdf in such a “groupie” per- 
spective. "Autour de Mimrit* is 
about the relationship between an 
Afro-Am erican. saxophonis t, 

“The dramatic idea," Tavernier 
explained, "is a strange friendship 
between two men from different 

cultures. The Fren chman, ^pla^eri 

love witlrtiie music and the saxo- 
phonist whojplays it that his own 

his obligations toPhis 1 1-ywSd 
daughter. Jazz is his unstress, in a 
way. It’s a love story, really.” 

A Frenchman saves Gordon’s 
. fife in the film; a real-life drama 
mirrors this plot Gordon, 62, has 
been ill recently; a victim of past 
excess, the wearying road life and 
age in general "lam veiy content," 
Tavernier said, "because I think 
this raje Juts given Dexter a reason 
io five. He was very weak a- year 
and a half ago when I first talked to 
him about the film — weak, and 
skeptical But he is exercising and 
he has a dietitian now." 

A wide variety of mutical materi- 
al wfll indude standards like “As 
Time Goes By" that are associated 
with Gordon; original composi- 
tions by Hanc«±; and Bud Powell 
tunes, from “Un Poco Loco” (a 
tenor saxophone “cutting session" 
with Wayne Shorter) to ms forgot- 
ten ballad “Time Waits." Bobby 
Hutcherson, Freddie Hubbard, 
Ttay . Williams and Ron Carter, 
among others, will have playing 
and speaking roles. 

“There are many things I can 
never understand about the life of 
an Afro-American jazz musician," 
Tavernier said. “I did not grow up 
in that xrdfiea. That is why I struc- 
tured the plot around the Franco- 
Araerican relationship. It permits 
me to roolmysdf in the story. Ob- 
viously in one film we cannot ex- 
press the totality of the jazz mental- 
ity, but I do know the real thing 
When I bear it” 


ARSYOUtmm,MflN* 

mmMtmsALiTHE mts 
mcAWNicmp mi? 

HAHPLS! / 


ImemaBcmal Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — American 
sportswear triumphed as New 
York collections rolled into high 
gear with Bill Blass, Calvin Klem, 
Parry EDis, Ralph Lauren and 
Donna Karen. Okar de la Renta 
stayed on the dressy, glittery side. 

The trend toward sporty, under- 
stated clothes that started in Eu- 

Hebe Dorsey 

rope in last month’s shows took on 
its full meaning in the United 
States, where sportswear was bora. 
The result was clean, no-fuss, no- 
frill tailoring, uncluttered neck- 
lines, sporty coats and an abun- 
dance of jersey, which made a lag 
impact on evening wear. 

There were strong echoes from 
Europe, such as Bybias’s knits, Un- 
garo’s side-draped dresses, Valen- 
tino's skinny, slurred and high- 
waisted silhouette, Lageif eld’s 
Watteau colors for Chanel, Gard- 
ner's tapesliy sweaters and a multi- 
tude of Saint Laurent’s shapes, in- 
cluding lus spencer jacket. Alaia’s 
naughty - curves were also very 
much around. 

But the overall sportswear ap- 
proach was J 00-percent American 
and full at new accents, such as 
alli gatAT shoes and belts and the 
use of black vdvet for sporty turtle- 
necks (at Lauren, who mono- 
grammed them with gold) or shirts, 
embroidered in gold (at Karan). 

Even Blass, who can gp over- 
board with frills and ruffles, was in 
a sober mood. His collection was 
based on a simple, rounded and 
short sUhouette. 

The best moments of this lean 


collection were the pared-down 

biacktiieath dimfrinp, hudj^unSL’ 
the chin, its bold back dfeoHetage 
held together with rhinestone 
straps. 

The most important evening 
trend in New York has been the 
floor-length evening coat, which 
had all but disappeared, inured of 
being made of fur or rich fabric, it 
is in wool jersey now, which gives it 
a pleasantly low-key yet elegant di- 
rection. Blass had several of them, 
including a gray wool jersey. 

His collection was not monastic, 
however, and daytime splendor 
madcap /or evening simpliriw. He 
opened with a bright red-and-black 
pkid coat edged with sable. As for 

ihe black broadtail suit topped by a 
silver fox coat, it would be just the 
thing for a grand entrance at 21. 

Blass’s plaid or tweed suits with 

body were^ttim and^drei^dly 
short; his hemlines stayed around 
or above the knees. His Slack dress- 
es were mainly laced with white 
satin or jeweled buttons. 

Calvin Klem emerged as a leader 
of American sportswear with a col- 
lection that had a deceptively sim- 
ple polish to it, from the pristine 
white shirts, their collars standing 
up like those of evening shirts, to 
(he slouchy, hand-knit cardigans 
finished with beaver lapels. Except 
for an occasional swirling skirt with 
a Western accent, Klem showed 
pants, mostly hijgh-waisted and 
pleated down the sides. 

Klein opened with three slouchy 
paisley jackets that had tbe ease of 
men’s smoking jackets. He often 
brake up tbe look with contrasting 
coats and jackets and put yellow or 


Indian’s View of India 


By Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 

F (AR1S — India is alleged to 
have tiie most profitable of mo- 
tion picture industries- Few of 
these films come West, but they 
play lucratively to audiences at 
home; in South Asia and in Africa. 

Tbe majority are manufactured 
to a set f ormula, depicting humble 
famil y life in chaste and sentimen- 
tal f ashio n, and are of a pace and a 
Length that try ocridailal patience. 
They have an affinity to American 
television soap-operas and occa- 
sionally break into tearful song. 

India, however, has its elite dne- 
asts, too. In that company, fore- 
most is Satyajit Ray, whose “World 
of Apu," "The Music Room" and 
others have gained him interna- 
tional recognition. 

In his new film, “Home and the 
World," he pays tribute to his coun- 
tryman, Sir Rabindranath Tagore, 
the Bengali poet-playwright, whom 
he knew in ms boyhood in Calcut- 
ta. 

Tagore was a household word in 
the era when Rudyard Kipling’s 
exotic Indian tales were in world- 
wide vogoe and when “Indian Love 
Lyrics," penned by the wife of an 
officer in the British Indian army, 
were sung at Sunday socials in the 
parlors of English-speaking lands. 
Tagore received the Nobel Prize in 
1913 and undertook several lecture 
tours in the United States. 

The Tagore novel from which 
Ray has derived his script is set in 
Bengal, circa 1900, when tbe Brit- 
ish authorities were playing Hindus 
against Moslems in a dividc-and- 
conqper game. 

A liberal-minded maharajah 
seeks to educate his young wife in 
ways contrary to native customs. 
He engages an English governess to 
instruct hex and to develop her 
■tin ging voice, and he permits her to 
quit the women’s quarter and to 
mingle in mixed society. His dose 
comrade, a fiery, corrupt Hindu 


U£ARNB?70SURmjm. 

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green three-quarter coats over 
tweed pants, Pmo coats, an Ameri- 
can perennial, were bade in force 
and turned up in both camel 
navy. Klein used jersey extensively, 
for black le gg in gs and high-neck 
sweaters tied into a bow al tbe chin. 
The full-length evening coat at the 
end was made of cashmere. 

De la Renta is from Santo Do- 
mingo but learned his craft in Ma- 
drid and Paris, which explains why 
his collection was the most Europe- 
an. He and Blass have the same 
kind of Himide, but this season de 
la Renta went for a more colorful 
and opulent approach. 

Clashing colors like cymbals, he 
combined raspberry, purple and 


revolutionary, and his wife fall in 
love and she is unfaithful to her 
gentle husband. Subsequently the 
maharajah is slam trying to quell a 
dash between Hindu and Modem 
hotheads that has been instigated 
by his treacherous friend. 

The incidents of the story are 
recorded in a slow tempo, bat tbe 
moods evoked by their subtle treat- 
ment cast tbe film’s binding spdL 
With infinite artistry Ray recreates 
a vanished epoch, its people and its 
problems, capturing exquisite vi- 
sions of its scenic splendor and 
drawing from his players perfor- 
mances of uncommon sensitivity 
and emotional depth. Victor Ban- 
etjee, who played Dr. Aziz in David 
Lean’s “Passage to India,” is cast as 
the wronged husband. 

O 

Claude Chabrol, a new-wave 
pioneer, has settled into being a 
purveyor of bloodletting shockers. 

The best of Chabrol's gruesome 
melodramas was probably “Les 
Bonnes Femmes," a memorable 
study of a compulsive killer. It was 
strong stuff, too strong for the taste i 
of its time — in 1966 i — but it i 
would be worth revival to perhaps 
reverse the public's initial thumbs- 
down verdict. 

His latest thriller, “Pooler an.vin- 
aigre,” e flmhmeq malicious mock- 
ery of the traditional movie hair- . 
raiser with an interest-holding 
whodunit He plays Ind^and-scek 
with the machinations of high- i 
placed officials attempting to dis- 
possess a crippled widow and her 
postman son at tfaar- property. 
They are brought to book by a 
cynical detective, played by Jean 
Foiret, who might have stepped 
from the pages of Raymond Chan- 
dler. Chabrol has recruited a cast of 
tile first order. Stiphane Andran as 
the harassed widow, Mkhd Bou- 
quet as the sunre, stone-faced oper- 
ator and Jean Tojart as a dishonest 
doctor aid in bringing a sinister 
reality to this macabre scenario. 


SUREtMAN. mi SOU 
ON&WDfFWR, OP 0OOY 

semjmwz- coumjoo? 


Calvin 


cardigan. 


HOTEL Ml RHONE GENEVA 

A prestigious dwelling 
on the Riuer Rhone 
Next to business and 
shopping center. 

Quai Turrettini 
1201 Geneva 
Phone 1022)319831 
Tx. 22213 hrho 

A member of HRI 
The Leading Hotel* 
of tbe World. 



The collection of the ltd fan 
designer “Roceo Barocco” 
and the Knap label with its 
creations in silk, suede and 
leather. 

KNAP - 34, FAUBOURG 
SAINT-HONOR^ 


by softly tailored three-quarter 
coats. In a more dressy mood than 
Blass, he showed sum sweaters 
draped down the front or the sides, 
accented with contrasting buttons. 

De la Renta offered an impres- 
sive set of party options, melmting 
a basic: the blouse and big skirt, 
which is emerging as an important 
evening story J The prettiest were in 
soft satin pastels, mixing oatmeal 
and turquoise pr pink and aqua. 
Included in this group were page- 
boy pants, also of satin, belted with 
black vdvet 

There were also elaborately em- 


broidered sweaters and black bull- 
fighter jackets covered with lavish 
jgpid embroidery. The paisley, gyp- 
sy look, with silk-fringed shawls, 
was rich, and the tricolor jersey 
evening coats gave a final up note 
to this colorful collection. 

Lauren, who sponsored the 
“Man and the Horse” fashion ex- 
travaganza at the Metropolitan 
Museum, came up with a horsey 
collection that had a strong Victori- 
an accent. 

Every other designer cat both 
sides of the Atlantic has done the 
romantic, tapestry and paisley 
look, but nobody did it as well and 
as thoroughly as Lauren. The result 
was young and fresh. 

Jodhpurs and dandified brocade 
or suede vests were worn with vel- 
vet jackets, topped by little capes. 
Accessories emphasized the look 
with derbies, ivory lace ascot col- 
lars pinned with cameo brooches, 
peaii chokers, riding sticks and 
gold watch chains. 

But the delivery was no camou- 
flage for beautiful dothes that 
could stand on their own. The long, 
tailored coats, slamming the body, 
could be worn anywhere and by 
anybody. So could the tailored 
Harris tweed jackets, the smooth 
and pale suede pants and swirling 
skirts and the tapestry Nehru jack- 
ets in faded chintz coins. 

The Paris designer Karl Lager- 
feld made a successful debut with 
his fust American-made sports- 
wear collection. In better form than 
in Paris, Lagerfeld showed he could 
gel a good grip on this market with 
strongly shaped and tailored 
clothes that manag ed to have a lot 
of Lagerfeld's old wiL The suits, 
with strong shoulders and skinny 
skirts, were beautifully cul Graph- 
ic, colorful knits, winch be called 
“video knits,” were rammfc and 
the sporty, leather outfits looked 
great. Unfortunately, the short 
cocktafl dresses, which featured 
strange peek-a-boos, looked cheap. 

Perry Ellis’s collection revolved 
around miniskirts «nd long jackets 
that somehow had a skimpy look. 
The evening version was of satin, 
with one. two or three little ruffles 
at the hem- FIHs called them slips. 
There was a slightly medieval feel- 
ing in the hooded and short shapes, 
the short sleeveless tops over ad- 
ored legs. EDis fared better with 
striking animal sweaters, featuring 
unicorns or Russian wolfhounds. 

He also scored with wonderful 
men’s clothes, strong, colorful and 


quite masculine. This division, cre- 
ated four years ago. now makes as 
much money as the women’s line, 
according to Manhattan Indus- 
tries. which owns Perry Ellis. 

Donna Karan dosed the week 
with her first solo collection. She 
used to design the enormously suc- 
cessful Anne Klein collection joint- 
ly with Louis dell'Olio. 

Both have strong personalities 
but Karan has a softer, more femi- 
nine approach. Her use of gold ac- 
cessories was quite effective. 

The most important single item 
was the body stocking, which was 
worn under everything, including 
long and swirling skirts. Bind; tur- 
tleneck sweaters, men's trousers 
and long polo coats made the best 
and simplest state men l There was 
a great selection of coats, from 
short cashmere trench coats to sat- 
in-faced cashmere bathrobes. 

Seduction was the name- of the 
game, with body-hugging black 
cashmere sheaths, their sculptural, 
draped skirts unfolding all the way , 
up the leg. 




100; Clwmps-Qysees 
Parts 8* 

44, rue Franpott-T** 
Parts B" 

237. meSaM-Honor* 
Parts f" 


BRING WITH VOU 
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Delta Flies Nonstop From Frankfurt To Atlanta, 
id Nonstop From FrankfurtTo Dallas/FortWorth 



And On To Over 90 U-SA. Cities. 


Prom New York to Texas, from Delta also has frequent daily Or call Delta in London on 

Florida to California, Delta flies you service from the New York and Boston (01) 668-093 5. Or call Delta in 


Delta also has frequent daily Or call Delta in London on 




to just about anywhere in the U.SLA. gateways to cities across die South. 


Catch Deltas nonscops from 
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Delta-toDelta connections to over 
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eyternational 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


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In 1985 Pan Am's service WW ww Whether you're flyinj 

will be even bigger. We're adding more nonstop Far East or Australasia, 
flights to cities we now serve, plus new service to Pan Am try to make your 
even more cities throughout Europe. journey easier. Same 

So now you've an even bigger choice when you terminal connections in 


you separately 

m Clipper Class. 

F W And friendly 

cabin crew that take a real interest in you. 

Big around the U.S. 

Whether you're flying to the U.S. or on to the 


fly Pan Am. most major airports 

In fact everything about Pan Am is bigger. around die World. (We're 

And, for travellers, that means better. x big enough to arrange that.) 

Bigger on the inside. At New York, our 

We're in the process of enlarging our 747's. Worldport® is the only 

terminal 

at JFK to have international and 
internal U.S. flights under one 
roof. So you can step off your flight 
from Europe straight onto your 
flight to a U.S. city. 

Big in the Apple. 

If you're travelling First or 
Clipper Qass to New York the 
Pan Am experience doesn't end at 
JFK. A free helicopter serviap * 
Not much we could do on the outside, but inside awaits to whisk you to Manhattan or Ne vydjj tr 


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we've given you a lot more space. More space for 
business with wider six across seating in 
dipper® Qass. More space for luggage 
with the cavernous overhead luggage 
bins we're installing this year. 

Little things that make us bigger. 

We've also added lightweight 
electronic headphones and a brand |H 

new Sony video system. 

So now everyone has the best 

hardware that makes a 

enjoyable; it's the software too. 

Like carnations and silver 
service in First Class. And your 
choice of main course served to 


In the evening a free limousine is 
chauffeur you to your hotel in Manbji 
No other airline offers 
better service than this. 


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At Pan Am we don't 0 just give you a 
comfortable flight, we believe in making 
I your journey easier and more enjoyable. 

^ That 7 s why, all in all. Pan Am is a bigger 

I experience . Next time you fly to the States, 
f think big, think Pan Am. 

Call your Travel Agent or the nearest 
Pan Am office. 

Pan Am.\bu Can't Beat The Experience: 











Separately 
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HcraUfiSESribune, 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 

Report, Page 10 


TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


Page 9 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 


Common Processing Move 
Takes Industry by Surprise 


By HJ. MA1DENBERG 


China Set 
For Large 
Stock Sale 


; ATew York Times Service 

N EW” YORK — “After years of talk about common 
processing and dealing c ff securities in futures and 
options trading, common sense has finally prevailed 
and this will soon become a reality,” Leans J. Horo- 
witz, president of the New York Futures Exchange; said. ■“We are 
arranging to have Options Gearing Corp. process and dear out 
index futures and options transactions.” 

But Mr. Horowitz’s surprising news on Friday, while the most 
important, was only one of several far-reaching developments 
that excited — and dismayed —many in the futures and options 
industry last week. 

In discussing the breakthrough in common- processing and 
clearing, Mr. Horowitz also • • 


Issue to Finance 
A New Railroad 


noted that the move would 
also be a giant step in the 
integration of the securities, 
futures and options markets. 

The New York Futures Ex- 
change, for example, is a sub- 
sidiary of the New York Stock 

Exchange. ; 

The autonomous Options 

Gearing Corp. basically transfers the debits and credits of its 
exchange members and helps process trades, thus rfiiwhiatmg 
di 


entity allows hedgers 
to use surpluses 
to cover debits. 


i implication by individual options exchanges. 

Currently, the corporation dears the trades of the stock and 
index options traded on securities exchanges as well as the 
Philadelphia Stock Exchange’s foreign currency options and the 
American Stock Exchange’s hew (ash-settled gold options. 


I T “may have made sense in the quill-pen era to have each 
exchange do its own ctaaring, but today the futures and 
options business is too big, too vital, to be hobbled by 1 1 
separate and costly clearing operations,” Mr. Horowitz noted. 
“Not only is one clearing entity cost effective, but it will greatly 
increase market liquidity, by, in effect, p er mi tting traders to 
stretch their capital by die cross-collateralization of their futures 
and options positions,” ■ 

Put another way, a single dealing entity would allow hedgers 
and tr ader s to use $nrplwys say, on their futures arrpimts, to 
cover debits on their options positions and vice versa. 

Also, a unified clearing system would serve as an early warning 
indicator of the impending insolvency of brokers, exchange-floor 
traders and other market participants, because they would all be 
reporting their .positions to one entity each day, Mr. Horowitz 
added. 

The second major surprise was delivered by Mi chael NJHL 
Jenkins, chief executive of the London International Financial 
Futures Exchange, during Ids visit to New York last week. On 
June 27, his exchange plans to start trading Eurodollar options 
that buyers will be able to margin the same way they now do the 
underlying futures. ■ 

“One of the pro Wems of options, be they settled in cadi or 
through the delivery of underlying futures contracts, is that the 
investor cannot tap any a ccumula ted profits unless the instru- 
ments are exercised," Mr. Jenkins said. “By letting options 
investors buy on margin, which only options grantors can do at 
present, they can use their profits to increase their positions.” 

However, the options buyer's limited-risk advantage would 
continue to be protected, he said, because tire buyers maximum 
Joss would still be limite d to tbcpremhnn paid for thc rightto buy 
(call) or self (put) the underlying iuQp fiS.a t gjjXcdppce fliggtg 9 
set period of time. But/mstcad%f $actmg op the full cost eff the 
premium, buyers would be aide to make a^majl cash payment. 

(Grimed on P*g*15,CoL 5) " 


Currency Rates 


] 


' Lota interba nk rotas on May 6 . exdudng fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Mrk», Paris. New York rales at 

2 PM. 


The Assoaaicd Press 

BEUING — China has sanc- 
tioned a stock sale to liaise $385 
nwltino for building the nation's 
longest railroad line, an offi cial 
news report said Monday. 

It appeared to be the biggest 
stock offering since tbe Communist 
Party resurrected the once-de- 
nounced capitalist practice last 
year to help finance economic de- 
velopment. 

The stale-run China News Ser- 
vice said tbe slock will be offered 
by the government of the Inner 
Mongolia autonomous region, a 
vast plain along tbe Mongol ian 
frontin’. 

Tbe news service quoted Inner 
Mongolia’s Communist Party sec- 
retary, Zhou Huni, as saying the 
stock sale will finance the proposed 
Jining-TongEao railway, a 540-mile 
(832-kiloinem) project that, when 
completed, will be China's longest 
single rail fine. 

It is to rim from tbe Inner Mon- 
golia city of fining northeast 
throagh Liaoning province to tbe 
city of Tongfiao m Jilin province, 
opening an important corridor to 
move freight and passengers 
through Grata's northern interior, 
tbe report said. 

There was do explanation of how 

(he stock will be sold and whether 
tire buyers will be Chinese, foreign- 
era or both. The report also gave no 
details of share prices or drodends. 

But h was likely that the buyers 
will not be limited to Inner Mongo- 
lia's 193 million people; many of 
them herdsmen who subsist OD the 
barren plains 

Mr. Zhou was quoted as saying 
the stock sale will begin shortly and 
that die railway construction is ex- 
pected to take five yean. 

The offering follows calls in the 
official press for larae-scale stock 
sales and hints that China may re- 
open the Shanghai Stock Market, 
dosed after the Communis ts came 
to power in 1949. 

“Profitable, well managed enter- 
prises should be able to raise capi- 
tal by selling shar es and bonds, 
thus alleviating the huge strain on 
Vtbfj State.** Imitect .-financial re- 
sources,” the magazine China’s Fi- 
nance said last month 

Shanghai banking managers 
have said in press repots that a 
stock market may be established 
within the next few years. 

The English-language China 
~ :i 7 said reopening an exchar“ 
— ’s largest metropolis is 


Chief Steers NYSE Toward Change 


Municipalities Are Called 
Inept After 2 Failures 


By Stan Hmden 

Washington Post Service 

NEW YORK — As a boy, John J. Phelan Jr. 
delivered newspapers in an affluent Long Island 
community where he learned an eady lesson about 
the risks and rewards of business. 

“The bigger the house, tire smaller tire tip,” be 
jokingly recalled 

As chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, 
‘Mr. Pbelan, 53, still is concerned about risks and 
rewards as they affect the future of tire Big Board, 
competition among the stock exchanges, the prac- 
tices of the securities industry and protection of 
tbe small investor. 

One key concern for Mr. Phelan at present is the 
unwarranted investment risk he believes some mu- 
nicipal officials are taking with public funds in 
their search for high returns.' 

He also is critical of municipal officials who, 
while unwilling to hire professional money manag- 
ers, are more than willing to invest their rands with 
what he called “a firm that nobody in the world 
had ever heard of before” in return for a “point 
and a half over prime." 

And he chara cterized tire actions of snch munici- 
palities as “ineptness" and a “lack of professional- 
ism.” 

Mr. Phelan expressed these- views against tire 
background of two recent failures of unregulated 
government-securities bouses. These companies 
offer rnimiripiiHtiai a rinwing to improve the yields 
on their funds through so-called repurchase agree- 
ments. 

The failure in early March of ESM Government 
Securities Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, for 
instance, will cost a dozen or so municipalities and 
five savings and loan associations an estimated 
$315 miTlinn- 

One of the losers was Beaumont, Texas, which 
lost $20 million when it could find no record of the 
government securities that supposedly served as 
collateral for the money it loaned ESM. 

ESM, charged with fraud by tire Securities and 
Exchange Commission, pledged the same securi- 
ties for loans from several customers. 

The second failure, concerned BeviH, Bresler & 
Sdmlmao Asset Management Corp., of Living- 
ston, New Jersey, an unregulated government- 
securities concern whose clients may lose as much 
as $198 milli on. The company, which collapsed 
early last month, dealt mainly with savings and 
loan associations. 



John J. Phelan Jr. 


But Mr. Pbelan is also concerned about change 
and the way the 192-year-old NYSE does business. 
He considers global 24-hour trading “inevitable." 
He envisions the exchange attempting to forge 
electronic links with other exchanges without low- 
ering its financial antf-ethical standards. 

New York, London and Tokyo wifi be linked, he 
forecast, adding that the exchanges will have to 
guarantee the trades within the system and ex- 
change surveillance data 
“1 think you can work that out on an interna- 
tional level," he said. “And I think that (by) 
providing the ifwrtmnicms in which the execution 
(of trades) can take place, you’ve almost got (be 
entire audit trail there.” An audit trail provides an 
electronic record of trading. 

The NYSE, Mr. Phelan noted, is holding lalfcc 
with tire Pacific Stock Exchange on a possible 
merger, which might allow the NYSE to extend its 
trading hours. (The Pacific exchange currently 
operates- from 7 AM. to 1:30 PAL, or from 10 
AM. to 4:30 PM. New York time. That is half an 
hour later than the NYSE) 

The tails are exploratory. “But tire world is 


(Continued on Page 15, CoL 6) 


Mobil Is to Shed, 
Restructure 


Ward Subsidiary 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatcha 

CHICAGO — Mobil Corp. said 
Monday it plans to shed its Mont- 
gomery Ward & Co. unit, and has 
brought bade a former executive of 
the sixth largest U.S. retailer to 
restructure it into an independent 


Mobil said it will write off $500 
milli on after taxes in 1985 to recov- 
er the cost of the restructuring. 

“It is our intention to maximize 
Ward’s value by shaping it into a 
business which can operate as an 
independent, free-standing, profit- 
able re tailing company without 
Mobil ownership or financial guar- 
antees,” Rawleigh Warner Jr., 
chairman of Mobil, said in a pre- 
pared statement. 

Montgomery Ward wifi become 
a smaller, more concentrated busi- 
ness, Mr. Warner said 
It will restructure its core busi- 
nesses — retail, credit and insur- 
ance — and dispose of those pieces 
that “cannot contribute to the prof- 
itability of a new Ward's." he add- 
ed 


Unprofitable operations in tbe 
corporation's catalog operations 
also will be eliminated Mr. Warner 
said 

Further, administrative costs 
will be “significantly reduced,” 
partially by reducing employment, 
although the number of employees 
affected was not determined the 
company said 

The derision to sbed Montgom- 
ery Ward which Mobil bought for 
$1.7 billion in 1976, is not a sur- 
prise. Mobil, the second largest 
U.S. oil company, hired Goldman 
Sachs & Co. in February to help it 
evaluate its businesses. 

MobO had put more than $600 


million into the subsidiary as of the 
first or this year. 

Montgomery Ward suffered 
through unprofitable years in the 
early 1980s but posted a profit of 
$40 million in 1983 and $53 million 
in 1984. 

Bernard F. Brennan, who re- 
signed as executive vice president 
of the retailer in October, 1983, was 
named its president and chief exec- 
utive officer, Mr. Warner said 

The executive, 46, replaces Ste- 
phen L. Pistil er, who resigned at 
the end of 1984 to become chair- 
man of McCrory Corp, the retail- 
ing subsidiary of Rapid-American 
Corp. of New York 

Mr. Brennan served as president 
and chief executive officer of 
Household Merchandising Inc„ a 
subsidiary of Household Interna- 
tional Inc., after leaving Montgom- 
ery Ward. 

He earlier had spent 12 years as 

assistant national merchandising 
manng pr for Sears Roebuck & Co. 
Inc. 

Mobil stock was up 62 J cents to 
$33.75 a share at mid-day on the 
New York Stock Exchange Mon- 
day. 

Analysts said the return of Bren- 
nan, 46, who had been an executive 
vice president at Montgomery 
Ward in 1983 when he moved to 
Household in 1983, would help bol- 
ster the retailer’s performance. 

Industry observers said the com- 
pany has been slipping since Mr. 
Pistners departure. In tbe interim, 
Richard F. Tucker has overseen 
Montgomery Ward as the presi- 
dent of Mobil Diversified Business- 


es. 


(AP. VP1) 


Bonn S ummit .: A Look at the Economic Fallout 


m 


. s c 

Amctenkun 3MK 052. 
amntsta) 45J0 77*875 
U tata l 3*49 3*52 


Milan uuuo 2X100 

HowrorktO 0J447 

Ports wra 1034 

Tokyo 

Zurich 27225 3319 

T CCU fl*W2 05822 

nn 


DJM. 

PS. 


8 Mr. 

BJ=. S.F. Yen 

11M0- 

37 JUS * 

ami- 

— — 

5*22* 134.14 *14*08 Y 

20*77 

4 St 

3.1733* 

T7J89 

23J83S 2SJ9 • 


32*0* 

15805 x 
Closed 

8B5S* 

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— 

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Closed 

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urns 

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01513 

uen 

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2230 
fin. franc 4470 
5 130 

11385 
43125 
14040 
f 739 


Wot Avertable 

Dollar Values 
s 

loot*. 

0973 frfabt 
0*011 Hratl 
17774 KuMHfdtoar 
UIK iMn.rinMtt 
01878 Him 
O05*» PtA 


02Mt 


(US 

00277 04454 Ital U 2344 

HUB 0502 VAfttovraM 17*2 
0951 tani LKowm 87135 
23825 00054 SMOtaftta 178*0 

9272 OW4 ft ta U a r w V3M 
1822 8*251 WH JM1 
1749 UMI TtaltaM 27345 
34109 03723 UA£«m 34725 


W r o mm sr cto HronctM# — s nfsn sa rtw amwroa't W4(c) ABMuottS M d ia iateryonactoflort*) 

IMtsnfMftflMls«IU9fVlUMsollU9 

■0Q-; not qMMd: we: nImObHl 

Sources: Manuvc dm Beaokm (M nuntsj y Mm Co mm on** HoBrnm tMBoat ; CtamJcmr 
Book m tw York}; Mnm Now ode dm Parts (Ports}; IMF (SOW; aoooua ARM at 
lBtt* mt ttematod r larm stis**m o o ttcHBor,r1rol,tBrOam).onordBtBmm BaatmrsoodAP. 


“the debate of the day in financial 
circles.” 

The Shanghai newspaper Wen 
Hid DaDy reported in January that 
the southern city of Zhuhai, a spe- 
cial economic zone designed to lore 
foreign exchange and technol 
would set up a stock market wit 
the help of ‘Hong Kong financiers. 

On Jan. 14, thousands of buyers 
queued by 3:30 AML far the first 
stock issue in Shanghai since 1949, 
snapping up shar es in Yanzhong 
Industrial Co. The total issue was 
wrath $1.8 million and sold out 
within hours. 

Last July, the Foshan Trust and 
Investment Corp. in southern Chi- 
na's Guangdong province i ssi i g ri 
$36 million in shares, at $35 each, 
to finance municipal factories and 
utilities. 


By Leonard Silk 

- New York Tima Service 

BONN — When the high emo- 
tionalism and controversies that 
nmrtfprf the summit conference 
daring the past week have faded, 
wbai will. be. the economic conse- 
quences of Bonn? ~ 

The conference gave strong sup- 
port to supply-side economics of a 
more conventional soil than that 
practiced by tbe Reagan.- adminis- 
tration during its first fern. De- 
spite expectations before the con- 
ference began that the United 
States would put pressure on other 
countries to expand their econo- 
mies more rapidly as the U.S. econ- 
omy slowed, there was no evidence 
of any urging here of more stimula- 


tive fiscal or monetary policies for 
expansion. 

Indeed, the United Slates 
seemed to be makin g a moderate 
“mea culpa” for having gone too 
far in expanding its own budget 
deficit. In a section of the final 
communique or the conference. 
President Ronald Ragan stressed 
the importance of “a substantial 
reduction in the budget deficit.” 
Last year, at the London summit 
conference, former Treasury Secre- 
tary Donald T. Roan, who now 
serves as the president’s chief of 
staff, made a strong statement in- 
sisting that budget deficits have 
nothing to do with high interest 
rates. 

. High interest rates have been at 


the root of European and Japanese 
concerns about U.S. economic po- 
licy. Tbe Europans and Japanese 
blame the deficits and the interest 
rates for the overvaluation of the 
dollar and the UJS. trade difficul- 
ties. 

To increase economic "growth, 
the Boon summit conference put its 
heaviest emphasis on making eco- 
nomic systems more adaptable and 
flexible. 

This was not spelled out in any 
detail although it was made dear 
that tire governments represented 
here were particularly concerned 
about obstacles in “tire labor mar- 
ket.” Some considered tins a figbtfy 
veiled reference to the intransi- 
gence of labor unions and to undu- 
ly high and rigid wage rates. 


Although tire conclusion erf the 
conference emphasized such poli- 
cies for growth as enhanced train- 
ing, espedaDy for tbe young to im- 
prove their occupational skills, and 
stronger support for technological 
progress, not as a foe of jobs but as 
a creator of new employment op- 
portunities, some analysts of this 
conference were concerned that 
these were measures for the long 
run and that loo little attention was 
paid to policies for short-run ex- 
panrion. 

At a time when inflation has 
come down to low single-digit lev- 
els in most of tbe industrial coun- 
tries, and unemployment, except in 
Japan, has remained relatively 

(Continued on Page 15, CoL 1) 


Dollar Higher, 
Gold Is Down 


United Press Intemarionai 


LONDON — The dollar was 
higher on European money 
markets Monday, continuing 
the strong tread of last week. 

“There is no special single 
reason for the dollar continuing 
to rise. The trend simply is still 
firm and upwards,” a Swiss for- 
eign exchange trader said. 

In late Frankfurt trading, the 
dollar was at 3249 Deutsche 
marks, up from 32305 on Fri- 
day. Other rates included: 
2.7225 Swiss francs, up from 
2.7150; 9.9115 French francs, 
up from 9.835 and 2,058 Italian 
lire, up from 2,028.70. 


lore 

5 Billions of Japanese Investment Dollars Pouring Into U,S. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


May 6 


an. -n 

Source: Reuters. 


2 mo*. 

94* -BV4 


3m*. 

8 N -I*. 


4 mac. 
8*k-l*b 




Key Money Rales 

United States 


Britain 


Ooca Pm. 


Discount Rata 
Fadorel Funds 
Prima Rot* 

Braloar Loon Rota 
Comm. pomt. 30079 dm 
Xnantti Tramrv 8 HU 
44*M 8 » Trasurv Bills 
CD’S 30-59 days 
CD'S 40-89 dQVS 


8 8 

8 7W 

Xte Toys 

9-W» «Ur9tt> 
8.10 

737 732 

7*5 7*1 

735 7.90 

730 7.95 


Bank Bom Rots 
Call Mm 
9Mov Trsasurv Bill 
dmon ta Interban k ' 

Japan 

Discount Rate 
Can Atarwv 
today i n terbank 


2V5 T2*i 

3sd 120 * 

— 12 3/14 
— W» 


5 5 

CM 4K 
— AM 


West Germany 


Lombard Rote . 
OwamtoM Rate 
On* Month in te rtun* . 
3-month Interbank 
ft-tmuuft Interbank 


ADO 4M 
575 US 
5*3 MS 
« 5.95 . 

4.10 4.10 


Gold Prices 


j 


France 


intervutte n Rate 
Colt Money 
OfNMnonfb Interbank 
smonOi Inteitntk 
MnoMh in te rbank 


10W WV. 
TOW 

10 3/14 TOW 
10W 10 5/14 
» 1/14 am 


Saunas: Reuters, Cammeaamk.CraattLv 
annate LMa Book. Book of Tokyo. 


AM. ■ PM Chte 
31)75 310*5 - 400 
31030 - —4.10 

30830 30032 —54 2 

31095 30* JS — 330 

CM 

- 30090 -VO 

Official ftdnes far London mis and Luxsnv 
baura. apantas and dasteBeriess lor Hona Kona 
and Zurich. New Yoffc Oxntz currsnt co nt ract 
An pricts to U4J p*r wu. 

Source: Room 


H*te KMO 
LMfflten 
Ports CT25 UtoJ 
Zurich 
London 
Maw York 


Markets Closed 


Industrial Output 
Increases Slightly 
InWest Germany 


Rouen 

BONN —West German in- 
dustrial production, seasonally 
adjusted, rose a provisional 0.1 
percent in March after falling a 
revised 03 percent in February, 
the E conomi c s Ministry said. 

Tbe production into, base 
1980, rose to a provisional 99.9 
in March from 99.8 in Febru- 
ary. In March last year tire in- 
to stood at 97.4. 

Hie ministry stud overall pro- 
duction in February and March 
together was ! percent lower 
than in the December and Janu- 
ary period, primarily because of 
a 15.5-percem drop m construc- 
tion resulting from bad weath- 
er. 

However, production in Feb- 
ruary and March 1985 was 2 
percent higher than a year earli- 
er. 

Manufacturing output rose 
33 percent in the two months 
against tire same period in 1 984, 


By John Bur 

Washington Post 

TOKYO — Just as the automo- 
biles and video machines of the 
Japanese have become mainstays 
of the U3. economy, so now have 
tireir investment dollars. 

In a fundamental shift in world 
financial Dows, Japan is exporting 
a mammoth wave of dollars to pur- 
chase foreign stocks and bonds. 
Much of tire money is going to New 
York, where it plays an important 
role in financing the federal deficit. 

It is bring likened to the flood of 
petrodollars from tire Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries 
that washed into Western financial 
centers a decade ago. Huge stores 
of dollars that Japan has « massed 
through years of trade surplus are 
now flowing to wherever they earn 
the best return. 

Capital exports gained steam in 
the 1970s as Japan strengthened its 
in d ustrial base and loosened con- 
trols on foreign exchange transac- 
tions. But last year, spurred by at- 
tractive interest rates in the UiL, it 
shifted into high gear, mushroom- 
ing almost three-fold to a total of 
$57 billion. 

Comparatively litzle is direct in- 
vestment in Japanesfrtun factories. 
In a typical transaction in today's 
business, an Osaka insurance com- 
pany buys U.S. Treasury bills or a 
wealthy Tokyo family invests in 
floating-rate bonds offered in Lon- 
don. 

“There’s every reason lo think 
it's going to continue to grow” says 
George P. Hutchinson, managing 


ply. Yes, Japan is running an enor- 
mous trade surplus with the US. 
($37 billion last year), but the dol- 
lars are shipped straight bad: as 
investment. 

In Washington. Japan’s money is 
seen as a mixed blessing. It does 
tend to puD interest rates down, it 
is agreed, but it pashes the dollar’s 
value up and pope tuates Japan’s 
trade surplus. It is a cycle that feeds 
an itself, because more surplus 
means the Japanese have more 
money to invest. 

Washington and Tokyo periodi- 
cally trade inconclusive proposals 
on bow to tackle it In the mean- 
time, the capital exodus continues 
to mount. In January, $3 J billion 
left the country, in February $4.7 
billion, in March $6.6 billion. 

Tbe Japanese say the solution is 
simple: control tire federal budget 
deficit. It has created a chronic 
shortage of funds in the United 
States. That drives interest rates 
up, to the point that U.S. govern- 
ment securities now yield between 
four and five percent more than 
comparable Japanese government 
ones. 

Japanese investors, like any oth- 
ers, want high returns. It is unfortu- 
nate some of them drive the U.S. 
currency’s value up by selling yen 
to boy tire dollars they need, offi- 
cials here say. But they would not 


be in New York at all if the U.S. 
reined in tire deficit and brought 
the interest rates down. 

Interest rates are low here due to 
proverbial frugality (Japanese 


households saved about 18 percent 
of disposable income in 1982, com- 
pared to 6 percent in the United 
States) and a relatively slow eco- 
nomic growth — about 5 patent a 
year, only half the rate of the boom 
years in Lbe ’60s and early ’70s. 

“We have more money than we 
need for that growth rate." says 
Srigo Nozalti, a senior deputy di- 
rector general at tire Ministry of 
Finance. Money is plentiful enough 
too for tbe Japanese government to 
finance its own deficit. 

Controls on foreign placements 
by Japan's institutional investors 
were loosened in tire early 1970s. 
However, many of them, including 
insurance companies and trust 


banks, are required to limit foreign 
>10perce 


holdings to 10 percent of tireir port- 
folios. Many are now pushing up 
against those ceilings and cam- 
paigning for a rise. 

Even with those controls, the 
volume is enormous. In 1984, Japa- 
nese plowed about $31 billion erf 
new money into foreign securities, 
according to tire Normura Re- 


85 billion of trade credit and $12 
billion of loans. With other minor 
categories included, total outflow 
was $57 billion. 

During the year, foreign inves- 
tors were unloading Japanese 
stocks from their portfolios. The 
only significant flow of term mon- 
ey into Japan was in bond pur- 
chases by foreigners, making total 
inflow to only S7 bilhon. Tbe result 
was a $50 NOion net outflow. 

At tire dose of 1984, according to 
Normura, Japanese commercial 
banks held around $18 billion in 
foreign securities, a 62 percent rise 
over 1983. Life insurance compa- 
nies' holdings rose 31 percent to 
$15 billion. 

The U.S. is believed to have ac- 
counted for about half of Japan’s 
new securities purchases in 1984, 
with U.S. government paper bring 
the most popular acquisition. 

Many Japanese fed a bit uneasy 
with the US. corporate securities. 
“So many takeovers, so -many 
~ tes. It’s a kind of a fed- 
feel much better with 
U3. government securities,” says 


If U.S. interest rates can’t come 
down, an alternate step would be 
for Japan to choke off the outflow, 
as some officials in Washington 
have called for. 


“Our position is quite dear. We 
will never do that,” said Mr. No- 
zalti. 


Ministry’s 

son. 


Foreign Capital Divi- 


snxac 

DeVoe-HoIbem 
I nt^ r wu l l onn l 1>V 
Gly-Qock 
I nte rnation al nv 


uss 


5% 


2K 


USS 


6*4 


3% 


Quotes as ab May 6, 19B5 


investors seeking above average 

rIk ' 


capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 
10178T Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3 120 260901 
Telex: ] 4507 firco nl 


search Institute. That dwarfed the 
other categories of capital export 
— $6 billion of direct investment. 


director of the Tokyo branch of 
Salomon Brothers Aria, a subsid- 
iary of tbe New York firm. 

Senior government o fficials in 
Japan often depict the outpouring 
as a timely service to the United 
States, whore capital is in short sup- 


Finandal markets' were dosed Monday in Japan, Britain, Thailand and 
the Philippines for holidays. 


To Our Readers 


Cur tain statist ical data is missing from this edition because of technical 
problems. We regret tire inconvenience to readers. 


tfp- 






IHEINTHtNATlONAL 
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A WEEKLY GUIDE BY SHERRY BUCHANAN 
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\ 


l Page 10 


UNTERNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 




AS 

AC 

AE 

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AF 

AS 

AT 

AT 

AV 

Ac 

Ab 

A< 

Ac 

AC 

AC 

AC 

Ac 

AC 

Art 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 


NYSE Most Actives 


AtlRfsh 

VO*. HM 

30913 <1% 

Lew 

62* 

Lot 

<1 

Modi 

24304 34* 

32ta 

33* 

A Cyan 

13542 SOW 

49b 

50 

HeuNG 

11347 68% 

67ft 

m 

Unocal 

BIS 46* 

44 

44% 

USFG 

8408 33* 

33* 

31 

Gaedvr 

8237 a* 

25% 


Ntsetnl 

8156 „ 

10% 

TO* 

PhllMc 

7417 nw 

01% 

82 

AT&T 

7221 a* 

aw 

ab 


4845 Sft 

51ft 

S2W 

AmHas 


33b 

33* 

W5TOE 

4454 aw 

30 

20% 

FortM 

6556 41* 

41 

41ft 

MarLvn 

43a 30% 

2V* 

29* 


+ w 
— W 


Dow Jones Averages 1 


Indus BUJI IMMD 1MTJ» 1247.79 + as 
Tna SH3S 39261 SUM 58/36 4- 2 * 

utu !5 h gut inn ms a? + *5 


Comn SJ7.IT 


3M40 500.18 + IX 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

industrials 

Tiasp. 

Vllillttas 

Flmncn 


Prrrtocj _ Today 
HMi Low Omc 3 PAL 
10466 1BJ0 1007 1009 
119X I1BJ4 IIRS 119.21 
9SJS 9690 9155 95.90 

5L7S «J7 5565 513} 

111.21 i,Ul 11161 HUB 


I 



NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uadwnoed 
Total teeuee 
Hew HUH 


ns 

940 

<91 

563 

497 

4N 

2001 

mi 

00 

« 

17 

n 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Mays . 
Mav2 , 
1 


Aar 1 1 X , 
April 29. 


Bay Sain *Strtt 
182L713 3K417 17443 

18VT» 412X4 £634 

1B9.UH) 39BJS1 1439 




177,021 


‘included in the safe* tenures 


sim 


Mondays 

NkSE 

dosing 


VoLotSPJA. 


Pr«T.3 PJA.VOL. 

Ptbt cbrsoMoM close 1T2647.M , 


49,1001188 

0620X0 


Tobies Include nw nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street osd 
do nor reflect lot* trades elsewhere. 

fie The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Declined 
Unchanged 
Total iBMta 
New Htata 
New Lows 


275 

206 

747 

n 

n 


766 

2M 

242 

744 

17 

12 


NASDAQ Index 


Aeo 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

in nines 

Bank* 

Transfl 


Wwk veer 
Close Noon Aw 
2S0L31 28069 784.14 
»U, 29164 »M6 WO 


27044 — 
247J1 — 

■SOT? — 


m« u&a 
774.13 21AB 
77 20152 
25147 222.19 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Previous _ Today 
KM Lew dose 3 PAL 
industrials 200.17 1M81 199JS 200.17 

Trow. 15221 15024 15292 15466 

unutles BU2 8163 8147 81 JO 

Finance 21J9 21.13 SIX 3152 

18060 10040 


Composite 


1 793)1 


AMEX Sales 


3 PAL volume 
Prev. 3 PM. volume 
Pro*, eons, volume 


asm 

SjVMW 


amex Most Actives J 


vw. 


HIM LOW Lnt 


BAT 

Amdahl 

TIE 

WondB 

WDMHI 

OatoPd 

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Previous Today 

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NYSE Prices Rise Slightly 


United Press International 

NEW YORK. — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange woe slightly higher late Mon- 
day in moderate trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
2.43 at 1,249.66 an hour before the close. Ad- 
vances led declines by a 4 — 3 ratio. Volume 
amounted to about 67.9 million shares, cam- 


pared with 82.3 million in the same period 
Friday. 


Prices were higher in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 


But if the stock market were going into a 
further decline, it would have done so last week, 
said L. Crandall Hays, of Robert W. Baird & 
Co., Milwaukee. 

TTie prospect of Iowa interest rales was pro- 
pelling Monday’s early gains, be said. 

“It seems like last week was just a technical 
downturn. We should be off and running 
again." he said. 

The decline of more than 27 points in the 
Dow last week "scared a few people,” he said. 

On the trading floor, Arco was near the top of 


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M 
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Although prices in tables on these pt 
from the 4 PM. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 


the actives, and slightly Iowa. Mobil was up a 
idink after taking steps toward 
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The stock market is looking for direction from 
two sources — the bond market and the econo- 
my. Neither is offering any right now, said 
Hugh Johnson, of First Albany Corp. 

Mr. Johnson noted that the trade summit in 
Europe produced nothing encouraging. 

“Money managers are more pessimistic, 
guarded and extremely edgy," be said, and are 
“skeptical of economists’ forecasts of 3 to 4 
percent growth in the gross national product in 
the second quarter." 

The market is in an intermediate- term correc- 
tion, said Robert W. Colby, of Smith Barney, 
Harris Upham. Depleted institutional cash lev- 
els and a scarcity of bears have left the market 
exhausted, be said. 

Despite some positive minor technical indica- 
tors, Mr. Colby said the market's upside poten- 
tial was limited. 


bit in active trading after taking st 
the sale of its Montgomery Ward su 

In other petroleums, Exxon. Phillips Petro- 
leum, Texaco and Chevron were fractionally 
higher. 

American Cyanamid was Iowa in active 
trading, on rumors that the Food and Drug 
Administration required more resting for a new 
anti -cancer drug. The company said it still 
hopes for approval for the drug by year’s end. 

Gannett was up a bit and CBS was slightly 
lower. 

Storer Communications was fractionally low- 
er. It approved a SI. 64 billion leveraged buyout, 
but speculation continued that Tele-Communi- 
cations may make a play for the company. 

Both Warner Communications and Chris- 
Craft Industries were higher. 


In technologies, gainers included IBM, Digi- 
tal Equipment. NCR Corp. 


and Honeywell. 
EF. Hutton was off a bit on reports it may 
have to pay up to 350 million in restitution to 
banks it defrauded. Hutton said the reserve of 
S8 million it established would be adequate. 


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21 ta T7ta GaPwof 254 123 
21* 17 GaPwpf 252 III 
25% 21b GoPwpf 265 1L9 
S3 51 ta GaPwpt 762 125 

30% 20% GerhPs 1.16 X» 11 _ . _ _ . 

23% 12b GerOS* .12 M 12 1012 16 15% 15ft— % 

17% B% GkmfP 6 10% TO* 10% 

11% 5* G®rFn 5 582 1IW 10ft 11 — W 

27 16* GfffHBI 52 2 2 73 93X 24W 24 34% + ta 

62% 42* Butene 2*0 63 II 450 60* 59ft 59ft— W 

17* 11% G leasC 2 12% 12% 12% — ta 

Bft 3b OtoUM 64 £4 546 4 3* 3*— b 

25* 17* GtobMofLSa ILI 39 19* 19b 19* 

13% BW GklNug 17 175 11% lib 11* 

4 I* GUN wt 46 1 2* 3 

31* 11 G10WF 30 ,7 7 212 30* 30* 30* + * 

33ft 24* GdrtcB Ml U H Mi 31% 31 31 — ta 

87 73* Gdrcti pf 765 96 5340r 87 05% 85% —7ft 

29% 73 Gootfvr 150 S3 7 KBt 26% 2SW 25*— b 

19 13* GarrkU J2 14 17 M TO* 15% IS* + % 

32ta 19 Gould Al 36 55 1430 2BH 20b 20*— % 

44% 34% Grace 280 7.1 TO «9 39% 38* 39W + b 

69 47 Gratear 166 26 12 TO 58ft 58% 58%—* 

T7% 0* GtAFrt M L9 0 **3 16ft 16% 16* + W 

10% T3* GtAtPc 8 18V 16* 14% 14%— * 

S!% 27% GtLkin MO 16 TO 103 53 ta 52 52b 

41% 31 GINNk 152 44 9 521 3S* 34* 14*—* 

2V* TOW GUY Fin 88 36 9 1613 2SW 24* 25 — * 

17* 11W GMP 162 106 9 32 17 16* lift 

29% 18* Grate 1-20 49 10 1470 2BW 28b 20* + b 

45 37% Gravh pf 465 108 2BX 44 64 66 — 1 

4b 2* Graller 8 356 4* 4* 4* + * 

13* IW GrawGS 20 29 17 45 13 12ft 17ft— % 
T2W 6* GrabEI 88 8 14 368 9% 9* 9% + * 

30 23* Grunin 180 36 7 227x25W2S*2Sb + * 

8% 4b Gruntni .16 Lt 47 5b 5% Sta — ta 

27* a ©urwrd 58 iff 9 18x 22ft 22* 22* + W 

39% 25% GtfWrt JO 26 13 1599 38% 37b 30 + * 


7* KDI a LS 9 221 
9* KLMs II 904 

33 KM) Pi 450 118 1 

41% 27% Kmart 140 Ll 9 2111 

40b N KN Ena 188 36 18 SI 

16* 12* Kotor AJ .151 

22* 14* KatoCe 26 16 

20* 15b KatCpf 167 BA 

15* 9* Krenti M 4 A 

26 MW KCtePC 236 116 4 

TO* 14b KCPLpf 260 ILI 
70 15% KCPLpf 163 126 

54* 34% KCSau 180 28 I 
19* 12% KanGE 264 1L8 4 
37b 28ft KanPLf 286 LI 8 
22% 10 KaPLpf 262 106 
21% T7b KaPLpf 263 I0A 

43 18 Kotvln 

115 49 Katypf 186 16 

10* KuutBr 80 25 3 
18% 12ft KoufPf 150 98 
50b 29% Kellogg 166 36 13 
TO* 22 KeBwd U0 U 7 
3* W Kenol 

27% lf* Kenmt JO 17 15 

27 20* KyUlll 284 98 W 
16* 10 KerrGl 84 46 
NW 17* KerGrt 160 96 
34 aw Kerr Me 1.10 38 32 
27* 16% KSvBk IX 58 6 
19* 14 Kerslnt 88 28 17 
36* 26% Kidde MO 17 f 

44 63* KldprS LOO 56 

53ft 39* KImbO 262 48 18 
36* 29% KnrtrtRd 66 26 TO 
28* 17* Koper ZX 85 34 
29* 15* Kolmor 33 ZO 15 
73 17 Kop ers 20 46 73 

35* 30% Koprp* 480 116 
104 96* KopprpflOJO 108 

16 12* Korea n 

29% Kroger 280 48 11 
27 )| Kuhlms AD U 15 

«% 4T% Kyocer 63e 8 23 

23W 13 Kysor M 69 6 


0b B B —ft 

16* 16* 16* + W 
37ft 37W 37ft + * 
34* 33* 34W + V% 
39* 39% 29% — W 
1201 TO 13* 18*—* 
73 16* TO* 16W + ta 
1 16 M TO + W 

199 9% 9 V 

2590 21% 19ft 20* — IW 
8k 18% 10% TOW + * 
BX 19 TOW 19 + W 

155 5DW 49* 4V* 

5182 17% TO* 17W 

2ii a* a* a* 
a 22% a 22% + % 
19 aw 7 i a — w 

1706 32ft 29% 32% + % 
5 84 78 04 + * 

a to* is* 15* + b 

73 15* 15* 15*— ta 
791 a 47W 47* + b 
57 30* 30* 30*— W 

109 1% 1 1 

225k a* 21 21* + * 

T91 27* 26ft 77b + b 

a io* tow ib% — % 
7 10b 10 low 
411 32* 37b 32b — % 

34 a a a + w 

100 17% 17 77 — * 

23 32* 32% 32W— V% 

1 75% 75% 73% — 1% 
XW 52% S1W 52% + % 
136 33ft »% 33*— W 
76 27 26* 27 + W 

110 17 1M% 16%—* 

4» 77% 17 17% + % 

7ta3S% 34% 35% + * 

1 99* 99* 99* + ta 
66 13% 13b 13% 

3a 41% 41% 411%— ta 1 
33 26* 26* 26* + b 
9 a* a* a* + % 
44 17% 171% 17% + % 


1* ta MVF 
46b 33% NWA 
41* 38% NcteBca 

a Notco 

29* a* Nashua 
10% 11% fttCnv s 66 
X 22* NalDtSt 260 
lib NafEdu 
29% 10% NatFGi ljo 


£3 17 
L9 7 
10 
3D 14 
36 10 
38 8 
16 

LS V 


19% NFGpf 260 1L1 
_ 27 Nalftap LN 4A 6 

4% 2% NtHom 

33* 23% Nil 3S 18 61 

66 32% Nil pf 580 9.1 

29% 17* NMedE 52 

11% 6* N Mines 


a 19% 18* TO*— W 
37V 61* 41b tlb— % 
931 TO* IS Uft + ft 
134 a% 21W 21fc + ta 
103 40 39% 39% — % 

2590 26* 26b »U— ft 

sa lift ii* n* 

9S2 39% 39% »b + % 
30V STOk 59b 59* + * 
128 23* 23 23% — W 

127 27* 26* 27% + * 
374 lift 11* «*— W 
391x29* 29b 29* * * 
90 14* 14% M* + % 
M 27* 27% 27% — ta 
1 22* 32* 22*— W 
469 Mta 4ZV% 43% +1* 
7S 3* 3% 3%— ta 
43 Mta 24* 34*— * 
1 55 35 55 +1 

28 13 1835 26ft 36* MW— * 
17 9ta 9% 9W— % 


26 16 
46 12 
56 12 
7 

li a 

78 X 
14 
£8 7 


16* 


22b HtPrast 180 L8 12 55 26* MW 24* 

_*ta NlSaml 13 8156 11 10% ID* + ta 


a 


L77B1IU 10 


3 


34* T1W GuffRs 
X 16% GuHRpf IX ... 
15% 10 GffStiff 184 1)8 
3Sta 30% GlfSUpf 480 128 
49* 39 GlfSU Pf £86e113 
30% 24 GtfSU pr LN 128 
34b 27 Gttsu pr 480 128 
lift 12* GAera 49B 44 
m% 14 Gotten 80 18 


115 16ft 16* 16%—* 
2 21% n% 21% + ta 
6 4637 14* 14 14b 

'on a 36 a + * 
i a 49 a +i 

9 SOW 30b 30b 
26 34* 33* 34b + b 
5 288 TS 14ft 15 
3 161 IS* IS* IS* + b 


H 


3* 

lb 

16* 

19* 

Mta 


53 42% EaKoarrt 

Mta 37* Eaton IX 
30* 20% EChKn 

32ft 2BW Eckert 
39% 31% EdtoBr 
IB* 13 EDO 
Mta 19 Edwort 


99 

164 

188 

s 


27 7 
LS 12 
Lf 11 
66 It 
16 1? 

28 15 


Lift 19b EPGdPf L35 103 
39% 2Sta EPGpt 335 112 
TO* 23* EPGpt 
IS* t* El Torn 14 

IX* 8% Elcer X 2A 
7b Zft EtecAs 


a a 42% 42* + b 
3729 S2* SW 52b— * 
4= 25* 25b 25* + W 
SCO 26* 26* 26ft + % 
89 34ft 34% 34* 

112 15* 15% 15ft + ta 
46S 28* 3b 28% + ta 
6* 22ft 2ft 22* 
4x20W 2B* 28* + W 
sxa a a + ta 

a 14* 14* 14* + w 
IS 10b 10 10 

2 Ab 4'A 4b 


27ft 19* HallFB 
40* XW HalMn 
1* « Haltort 

11* Sta Hated rt .56 
35% 25* HornPS IX 48 ID 
13* 11% HanJS 1870109 
3 15* HanJl 164a 98 

5S% 27* Handlm 1.12 ZJ 15 
27* 12ft Hard I erf 
28* 1S% HondM 
22% 16* Hanna 
S3* 25 HcrSrJ 
a 17b Hortnda 
13* 7* Horn Mi 

33% 14% HrpRrt 
35 22* Harris 

TO* 10* HarGrn 
19 Hotscb 


IX 46 1* 25% 75 

IX 66 10 3414 30* X 
68 SJ 19 374 


57 

310 

31 


80 

IX 


X 


164 


X 

X 


33ft 23% Harrmx IX 44) 
14b 13ft Natron ix iij n 
23* 15* HflwEI 
13* 8 HOVMA 
3«* 23% Haztetn 
«% 9 HazLab 
31 nwHimAs 
TV* 10* HIWSA 
11* 9ft Hecks 
2816 1314 HedaM 
26* If* Hellmn 
S IS* Halite 
49 32 Hriltz 

B 12* HOMeC 
a* IS HrtmP 
6b 3* HemCa 
12* lift Mnminc 
37’i. JTx Her cull 


S 

30 —ft 
1% 1* 1% 

TWk 10% WH— W 
30ft 30% XV — ft 
_ 13% lift 11% + % 
29 19b 19% T9W 
87 49* 49b 49% 

4 25 25 S 

23 19* 19% 19% — ft 

171 17V» ]8ft 19b + * 

,S 3* " ® — * 

ID 30% 29b 29ft + % 
127 10W 10% UFA 
12 27% 27% 27% + ft 
BN ab 25* 26% — W 

'2 15^ W » + * . 

ssasftgr* 1 

TO MIX 15ft ISta + ta 

131x21* a% a% 

S 10* IBta 10b— b 
56 25 24ft 35 

5 W* IBb 10b— ta 

M 20% 19* IVft + ft 
475 1Kb 17% 18 + * 
» U% 13 13% + % 

» « W* 10* + W 

3a it* h 19% + * 

n 32 31ft 23 +1% 

IX Ll W ran 46* 46% 44* + ta 

1* 39 14 13* 14 + ft 

64 IJ 26 392 27ft 22W 22% + % 

72 4 A 6 + % 

90e 74 7 12ta 17% 17% + ft 

160 £0 10 572 ISta 31ft 32 — b 


38 19 
Ll 24 
18 13 
1.9 19 

19% 
38,2 

IX L7 11 


Xb 22* LN Ho 
16% 7* LFE 
10* 6ta LFE pt X 46 
17M 17ft LLE Rv 2.18*156 
4* 2 LLCCP 
16ft Bft LTV 
24ft 14 LTVA 83t 36 

29% IBta LTV Of 364 ILI 

SOW LTV Pf 525 9S 

,8b 13 LTVdI IX 96 

17 10% LQulnt 19 

29* 16ta LodGs IX 77 6 

IT* 6* Lnfcrae 90 29 

31 73 LQfrapf 284 186 

14% 9ta Lamur 9 94 26 14 

4% 1* LOnia 175 

14% 10* Lcwtint J4 L5 TO 

25b 13% LaterPr 90 1.1 10 

X* 20% LearPptLE7 11J 

52ft 37% LOarSa IX 39 9 

20ft 14 LeaRrtfl 80 16 14 

34ft 24% LswyTr ljff Ll rt 

39ta 22 LeeEnt 62 28 18 

15b V LmMss JS Ii 8 
21% 15% LeoP tel 88 2J V 
4b 2ta Lett Vet 
37 25 LVInpf 

ISta 13% Lehmn VStolU 
15% 9ta Lennar 90 13 IB 
24ft 10% LeucMa 4 

36* 23 LevUt 
50ft 4Zb LOF 
32W 22% LlbtvCP 
SOU. 53 Lilly 
42 15b Limited 

45% »b UncNti 
22* 18% LlncPt 
N *1* Liner) 

53% 32* Lockfid 
42b 28b Loettte 


2a 

2 

1552 

1 

348 

6 

S 

M 

M 

129 


16 24* 26* 26*— * | 
954 TO* TO* TO* +2% 

~ 12* Iff* 12* +1* 
14* 14* 14% + b 
IW 2% 2% 

9b 9 9ta— W 
14% 14% 14%— ft 
22 a* 21* 

53 Slta S3 
13ft lift 13ft— % 
,7b ,3 taw + ta 
22b aft 22% + ta 

7% 7* 7% 

12 24 24 24 + % 

64 n* nw nw— w 

35 3% 3* 3ta + W 

233 Iff* 12* 12% + W 
118 18% IBta Iff* 

IX 34ft 24% 24ft 
199 46ft 46* 44* + % 
13, » 19% 20* +1% 

34 29W 2Bft 2VW + * 
N 38* a 3Bb + % I 
27 14 13ft 13ft- * 

9 20ft 20ft 28ft + % 
9* 2* 2* 2* 

3 2S 2S 73 
257 13* 13% 13ft 
44 12ta 12 


a* Ntsvcin ix LS n 
lift NStand AB 29 }} 
10 Nerain Ate 58 7 

29* a* MoePw 296 9A V 
T4W 11% MevPpf IX ,18 
12* BW NevSvL 30 48 8 
40ft 75ft NEnpEl 38) U T 
26* 22* NJRsc 264 7A 9 
34* 16 NY5EG L44 103 £ 
70 55% NYSpf LB0 12J 

26* 19* NYSpfA 269911 J 
18* 13% NYSPf L12 1L5 
19 13* Nmd X Ll 10 

SO* 32b Nvwtal V60B198 31 
TOW 11* NewMI 4J0O328 
10% 7b NhMRj 2J0oJ 1J 
48* 31 Newnrt IX 26 40 
5% 1* Ntrportc 

18% 13* NtaMP 2X 1,6 6 
®W H NteMpf 380 116 - 

31% 22% NtoMpt 3X 12J0 
33 24b NloMDf L90 15L2 

35 a NtoMpf L10 ILI 
24% 19* NtaMPf L77«1L1 
62% 40* NMHpf 762 TL7 
18* IS NloBSh 1J50126 
TOW 10* Ntootet J2 9 IV 
31% 2<ft NICOR 364 I Off 
TOM 12% NOMAI ,12b 8 
69 48% NarfkSo 140 56 

31 14% Non In 

42* 29* Narstr 240 18 9 
49* 43 Narstr pf4A9e 96 
19 12 Nortefc x j a 

56* 43* NACoal IX U 7 
45W 28% NAPNI IX 28 0 

20% 13* NEurO 1 JBe 08 It 
TO 10* Noertltt IX'lLl 5 
15% 11 NlndPS 1J6 14ff 0 
46* 35* NoSIPw 364 7.1 8 

35% 20 NSPwpf 380 108 
37% a* NSPwpf L10 1,6 
37% a NSPwptLU 116 

SI? 5L. WSPTOP* &60 115 

79* D* NSPwpf LBD 116 
43 51 NSPw pf 700 116 ’ 

42W 29ft NorTrt 30 
4ft 2ft Nthoolu 
49 73 Nortrc B IX 26 11 

46% 41 NwCPpf 58X128 
62b 40ft NwttiuJ 288 
19* 8ft NwSIW 
38ft 30* Norton LOO 58 II 
30* a% Norm! IX 7.1 15 
£8W 40% Nwstpf 6.1 lei Iff 
«* 50 Nwstpf £860116 
50* 20* Nava _22e 8 19 

» a Nucor 40 Iff 10 

BW 3 NutrtS jn 

85% 98* NYNEX 680 13 fi 


HI 


29 28* 2Slk— % 

ft 14 13* 13* — U, 

119 lift 11* lift + ta 
48 2Bft 28* 28*— ft 
170Z 13* 13* 13* 

104 10* 10W 10% 

141 40* 48* 40* 

64 26* 26* 24* + * 
1843 26 23* 23* 

300i 70% 70% 70% +1 

; a a a — w 

2 18* 18* 18* + ta 
25 Mta 14 16 + ta 

aa 51ta 5V* SB* + * 

14 14* (4* 14* 

94 MB 8% B* + % 
425 44* 44ta 44% + ta 
14? I* 1* 1* 

604 Iff* IBta Iff* 

26te 28* 28W 28* + % 
320x30 a a —1% 
7te 32 31 ta 32 

2Wx M 34 34 + % 

2905 »% »* 22% +1 
rah 61 41 61 — % 

» 15* 15V. TOta 
roe 13* 15* 13*— % 
659 am* 30 30* + * 

203 IS* 15* 15* 

405 « 64% 64* + W 

20 TOW 15 15 + ta 

15 41* 41b 41b— ta 

394x47* 47 47* + ta 

l|ft + % 
7 S3U S3 53 

104, 3ff* 37* 37*— * 

24x18* TO* 18* + ta 
W28 IS* 15% IS* 

4S70 11% 11M llta— b 
1257 45ft 45* 45* 

310k 34% X 34% +3 

too* aw aw aw + * 


5 600 1 37% 37% 37% 


... »* 59* 59*— 2* 

150178 76% 78 

150z 62 60ta 62 +1 

51 7 33 34* 34ft + % 

50 4b 4ta 4V, + % 
517 43* -Ota 43% + ta 
_ 4 43ft 43ft 43ft— ta 

4J 21 4830 57 S6ta 5aft_ % 
6 10* 10* 10* 

100 35 3c» 34ft 

2B7* 25* 25% 25b + ta 
15 W. 54* 54* + % 
36 52% 52 52 4-1 

168 as* a aw + <*, 

87 34* 31* 33*- ft 
40 4* 4b 4 V. — % 

1090 CH 82ft 82*-* 


. _ 12 — W 

a so* am 2 o*+ ta 

165 SJ 29 1BT0 MW 33* 33ft— * 
162 36 7 285 44% 43b 43%— % 
6226 17 ■ 38ft 30* 30ft + ta 

LX Ll 11 « JI 77* 77ft + * 

62 a 27 TO03 41ft 41% 41% + b 

IX L7 10 1673 39% 39 39% — * 

L740IL1 6 22* 22% 22% — % 

200 38 10 480 47* 66* 67 — * 
A0O1J 8 1370 45* 45b 45* + * 

X 2ff 11 94 29% 28* 28*—* 

51ft 23% Loewis IX 26 T! 2734 46* 4+ft 45% — b 

35 IV* Lootcan 90 A TO 4] 3lta 30* 31% + % 

34 19W LanFIn 1.16 U 12 

25b ,4* LonUMIk L44 102 18 

2* 2 LomMwl 
26b T7* WnSter 1.90 7.9 6 
52% 44 LoneS Of 5J7 1L1 


S* 1ft Oaklnd 113 I* iat_ % 

3# OaUtoP 1J2 4J 11 53 JI* 31* 31*— ta 

S'* SJ? g«Ert.»SD BJ 10 5170 30* » 30ta -Hta 
65 I?W 12 12W 4- £ 


re 

V 


IJ 9 
20 6 
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11 17 

a 

SB 

X Ll 
x iff a 
88b 3J 12 
36 1A 12 


Bft 

27 

43 

44 
20 % 
BW 
20 * 


3ft LILGo 
16 LILofB 
21% LILefJ 
23ft LILpfK 
8% LILpfX 
V LlL PfW 
9ta LILpfV 

ab nw lilpiu 
19% 8* LlL PIT 
IS* 6 LlL PIP 
,7% 7 LlL ptO 
29ft 17 LenpDs 
Ob 72 Loral 
IS 10* LeGenl 
a 2TA La Land 
21* IT LuPoc 


15 

40 1A 17 
.54*47 IB 
IX 26 11 
60b 46 36 


32% 18ft UlPLat 460 153 


116 38* 33% 33*— % 

97 24 23% * + ta 

41 2% 2b 2* + * 

292 24b 23* a% + % 
49 4*ft 4ffta 41% + W 
1145 6 5ft 5* + ta 
20X26 2 2S — % 

10BE 41% 41% 41% + % 
100*41% 41% 41% + b 
44 14* 16% It* 

83 17% 17 17 

19 17% 17 17 

4V 20* aw 20b— % 
1 16b Mta 16b 
4 12 12 12 — % 

4 15 ,5 ,5 

2N 28b 27* 37* + % 
449 IVft 29% 29% + % 
13 12 11* 17 + % 

sa 35ft 35% 35% — ta 
2M MW IVft 19ta— % 
U 11% llta 11% * Vi 


.17 9% OecJPerf 

117% ■ OcelPpf L60 LS 
S* 20b OcaPpf LSD 116 
2D* 17% OcdPpf 2.12 108 . 

,51* ,4Mk OCCiPot 425 1L2 
T3 105* OcdPnfUSO IL, 
lOBtalOlbOeelpl 1482 1JJ 
33* 22 DDE CO IX LO 18 
31* 24% Dtxten IX 40 14 
14* VK O hto Ed IX 1LB 
a 22% Cm EC Pf 3.90 136 
34 25ft OhEdpf 48D 1L8 
a 26% OrtEd Pf L96 136 
41 U. 45 OhEdpf BX ,36 
26* 10% OhEdpf 150 13J 
?9% 21 OtiEdor L92 13A 
IS 11 OhEdpf ix 126 
64 47% OT1 Ed pf BA4 117 

74 OhRpf MX 1241 
•9ft 77 OfiEpf 10J4 12.7 
WW Mb OhMotr X 13 13 
« 52 OhPpf 8314 1U 

63* 51% OtlPpfB 750 125 

«% “ 22 P ?E ?■« 1 2A 

m2 12 “ ,Pd ! C 593 111 

IS 25, 2JiPptoi4x lu 
«B 98% OhPpf FILM U5 
68% S4 OhPpf E BX 128 
45 51 ta OhPpfD 7.76 113 

a* 19% oitaGE 2X BA 10 


(ComiraKd on Page l ! ) 


1 93ft 93ft 93ft —3% 

B 22% 51ft JJ* + % 

A I?!? * % 

57 51* SI* 51* 

27 MB* 109% 109* + * 

5 106 106 lS -% 

« ^ Mft 2SU + % 

195 29* 27% 39* + u 
4 20U UH 14% 14% 

B00t 30% a 30 

*8 S I 

g » 63 +1 

702 B7 87 B7 + % 

30* 85 85 85 * 

iiLIP* n n - 

,122? SJ 41 41 — rUt-' 

15O0y £1 60* 61 + i er 

24B0y 41% 61% 61% + % 
18ft 18% 18ft— % 
WWS IK Ito + % 
now— i 

6rA 67u +i* 
,30V 61 61 81 —2 

400 33* 23 U 23ft + % 




■ r r jgj 


J • 


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IVIonda^i 

MSE 


ToWw incfttda the rtattamrtdft pries* 
up to Ml* doting on Walt Street 
and da not reflect kite trades eisewhem 


et 6J5 U.2 
Pf 181 K4 
p(U)|U 
pf 1.3 07 

Pf 7 JO W9 
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26% »»*— Hi 

rot si*— vt 
im in- % 
27 37%— fi 

21 211* 
m m- i* 
7M 71k— V* 
7ft 71* 

7Yi 71* 

441ft 441ft 
0ft IM- Mi 
S3 S3 
53% 52V» 

57% St — » 

ss ss 

4 4 — 1ft 

*9* 94* 

«« Mft— V* 
15 15 — Vk 

T2U T2H — Vft 
131* m* 

11 — ft 
114*— 1ft 

§5^ 

u%— ft 
3SVk — V* 
43 +1* 


Ctee 
Law Quel. 


454ft am* QuafcOl 134 29 12 1905 43ft 421* 431* + 4ft 

224ft 13 QimfcSO JO 99 34 17 2S4ft 2D% 204ft— ft 

114ft 64ft Outnx 34 97 »* II* Mft 

344ft 23 Quator UO 5.1 W 1U 311* 104ft 311* + 4ft 

2S4fc 14 MMI Ma 13 15 400 204ft 194b 20«k 4- 1* 


U.S. Futures 


4ft RBIOd .16 
2TA RCA 194 
29 RCApt 358 
344ft RCA pi 2.12 
294ft RCApf 345 
6Vft RLC JO 
3 RPCn 
121ft RTE M 
44* RaRca 
Sift RoPPur MO 
51ft Rnmod 
141* Rones J4 
34ft RnnarO 
471* Rowan 84 
10ft Rayrafc 
344ft Rayffln 140 
74ft RaadBt M 
164k EWBafpflW 
n* RBRaf 1338 
9 RpcaEfl 


21 RotchC JO 22 10 75 

lift RBpAh- ■ 290 

11* RooAwf 94 

44ft RpOvpb JO 32 9 42 

311* RBpNY 141 14 1 27 

20ft RNYpfCXU 129 3 


TV* 71* TV* 

40ft 48ft 48ft 4 4ft 

e39 an* 3 bvj — i 

304ft 3% 304ft 4 4ft 
344ft 364ft 361ft— 1ft 

a 79ft 74ft— 1ft 
4ft 44* 4 ft 
171ft 169ft 17 
Wfc 946 99h + Vft 
4246-42 dft 
71ft 74ft 14ft 
TTIft -171ft TTVk— It 

31* avft aift— vft 

42 404ft 62 +n* 

10lh 10M 101ft— Vft 
451* 444* 444ft— 4* 
99* 944 74* + V* 

mb mb IM— Vft 
131* 13** 131* + Vft 
Tift vfv* lift— ft 
tH I Mb— 1ft 
n* 844 Sft 4 ft 
ft 1ft ft 
361* 354ft 3S*b + Ift 
49k 61* 6% — (ft 
14k lift Tift + Vft 
( 9V* M M 
479* 479* 479b + tft 
26ft 26ft 21ft 4 ft 


220 

17 

248 

94 

180 

23 

1J9 

40 

1451234 

284 

XI 

19S 

97 

180 

7J 

27! 

67 

240 107 

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6J 

MO 

X3 

.12 

8 

JO 

an 

7.128148 

■U 

4 

M4 

7£ 

680 

XI 

42 

18 

Ml 

79 

Si 

29 

192 

17 

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21 

140 

n 

M 

« 

46 

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J2 

24 

280 

27 

375 

21 

42 

39 

96 

34 

180 

29 

1J00118 

.12 

57 

Jt 

u 

74 

79 

179 

28 

MO 

7.1 

148 

XI 

180 

9.1 

140 

17 

M 

23 

1.T0 

24 

184 

9J 


221* 144* 
274* 181* 
234* 15V. 
S3 » 
BV4ft 45 
43 239ft 

10 84b 

251* 204* 
2S* 214* 
261* 214* 
1916 15» 
23 Ui 15 
22ft 184ft 
WVs 28Vn 


UiWvor 
UnlvFd 1 
UnLoaf 1 
Linocoi 1 

UcHshn 1 

USLIFE 1 
UilfaFd 1 
UtoPL S 
urPLpf : 
UtPUpl 5 
U9PL.pt ! 
UtlllCO 1 

UtHCapr; 

UlUCo pf ‘ 


7 4 19 

11 S 244* 

7 1SS 194ft 

12 8733 46% 
17 1832 TO'ft 
>0 4ES.3TO 

IS 10 

13 793 24% 

6 25Vi 
97 26<* 
9 191a 

8 Z9 23% 

6 Zt'7 

7 341: 


IS 7 * 19 
34V 34% 

If 'ft Iff* + «i 
46 4S% + ft 

C7 B3U — (* 
3546 3St— 1% 
9 To S’*- V* 
234. 244* 4- 4k 
Bft CP-i — V* 
2T* 2i 4 ft 
191* 191a 4 -.i* 
li'ft 2813 + ft 
23ift 221* 4 'ft 
34 34!* + i* 


194* 

246 + V* 
75V. — 4* 
18% 4 V* 
1546 4 It 

2 + “ 




HWi Low Opan HMi Low dan dig. 

OMIW 8 juicaanrasi 

12800 *>&- cants oar lb. 

18S9Q moo MOV 15X50 15X75 15X80 15X25 —1J0 

15485 15440 J ill 15650 15X50 15X59 154.15 —220 

1X2M 15*80 Sap 15250 15X10 15173 15TJ0 —2X5 

KIM 151 JO NOV 15180 151 JO 15020 150.15 — 2J0 

18080 151 JO Jon 15180 15180 15080 149 JO —130 

T77J8 15280 MOT 150.15 —125 

14X50 14080 Moy • 150.15 —195 

157.50 157 JO Jul 15X15 — 1JS 

UOJD 17975 S«P ,15X15 — 1J5 

Est Sotos 700 Prav.Solas 373 1 

PTVV. Day Often tat. 6X13 up37 


Metals 


EURODOLLARS <IMMJ 
SI miman-ptaaMOOpcL 

9U9 BX4V Jun 9124 9L39 9U2 9127 

9X72 3X53 Jap KLM 9072 9X64 9X67 

9020 8480 Dec 9014 9021 9X13 9X17 

B9.7V 86.10 6 tar 1972 B9J7 072 8977 

084 8673 Jun tSM 083 WJ6 19X3 

B9.14 8788 Sap 89 JB *»J5 89.1 D 19.12 

•927 S72B Dac MJC 8X89 8X80 IXBS 

0X44 8784 Mar 8X81 

Eat. Salas 22889 Prwtf. Solas 46818 
Prav.Doy Open Inta 1X494 up 1252 

BRITISH POUND (1MM) 
spprppimd-ipatnraiMiiiinnnm 
12350 18225 Jun LT790 1-1 BO LMM IIW 

14450 18200 San L1480 1.1720 1.1SN) 18640 

12800 18200 Dec 1.1400 1.1490 LUBO 1.15*0 

12200 18640 Mar LISTS 

12250 1.7905 Jun L15S5 

Etf.Sates MJ30 Prav.sates MJ05 
Prav.Doy Opan I fit 34873 UP Mil 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

5 Par dtr- 1 point etma la 2X0 001 
7825 7054 Jun 2198 7235 7197 7*0 

7595 7821 S9P jm J?OS 7174 2779 

7566 7006 OUC 7155 2190 2155 2156 

7304 J9B1 Mar 2150 2150 2150 2142/ 

2330 2870 Jdtl 213* 

Eat. Sola 2J36 Prav.sates 3892 I 

Pruv. Day Open InL 12084 up 708 j 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) / 

SperfraPO-lPOtf inna te K LHCPQT 

.11020 8900 Jun .10150 .10160 .12115 .10110 

.10940 896H San .10105 

■10*40 JN90 Dac .MOW 

Eat- sa laa IM Prev.Sotea 8 . 

Prav.Doy Opan lot- 1417 up 3 I 

BERMAN MARK (f MM) 

2 p ar m ark - 1 poin t a quo > 1*08001 
J733 2905 Jun J089 JQ3 JO 73 JDM 

2545 2932 Sap Jill J143 2095 2117 

-3*18 2971 Dec 2W5 J165 2123 J144 

2415 2040 Mar 2177 

EsLSote* 37701 Prav.Solas 31225 
Prav.Doy Opan hiL 43 J7I up 1262 
JAPANESE YH (IMM3 
Soar ran- 1 pc6w ! anu nU ni .oono o i 
004450 803KM Jun JOT3B 803942 80392S 883*31 

004150 80300 5ap JOfg 803961 803946 8(0953 

004350 803905 Dac JBOM 803M> 803*77 803982 

004140 804099 Mur 804030 

Eat Sates 4721 Pray. Satea 10268 
Prav. Day Open InL 158M 04T28S 
tm FRANC (IMM) 

Spartnmc-1 polct aoootiSC8001 
8900 J439 Jun 2471 2714 2659 J490 

8830 2480 SBp 2698 2746 J«9 J718 

8360 2531 Dac 2744 J775 2 DO 2755 

8900 2835 Mar 2810 

EsLSote* 2L676 ■ PnnUtates 25^ 

Prav. Dev Opan InL 23851 upL498 


3316 33 33(6 

321* 32 321* 

37 369b 369b 

56V* 561* 561* 

2M 28V* an* 
929b 9196 92 
21b lift 21* 
18V* 171* Ml* 
319* 

27% 

316 


331* 71% VFCotp 1.12 XS 8 
IP* 5% Valero 
23% 14 Voter ni 384 ISO 
4% 21ft Vft lay In 
281ft 19 VanDrs ,19 45 I 
51* 2U Vara 
17 5% Vprcnpf 

46% 28 Vartan 26 .9 14 

13% 91* Varo 80 19 13 

2S% 18% Veea> 80 U 14 
79ft Sift Vanda 158 

18% 8% VestSa 120311.7 

45% 25V* Viacom 82 18 18 
44K> 36V* VaEPpf SOB 11 J 
M» 52V* VaEptJ 773 117 
631ft 49% VaFPol 770 117 
63V* 51% VaEPpf 785 118 

21% n% Vbhays 14 

41% 38 Vtxnad 11 

» 60% VgicnM 380 18 11 


187 E'e 32Vft 22U — >i 
1734 11 10% lfl>— I* 

97.% 23 W1 23 + Vj 

16 2% 2% 2% 

35 21 30% 3)% — ’.* 

19 Tit 2% 2% + l* 

20 81* 8% 8V* 4- % 

2374 3S% 28% 29%— % 

86 10% 10'ft 10% — % 
174 2QU 70 HA* -4 % 
431 7% ;»* 7% U 

29 10'<ft 10V. ICft — la 

<81 42 41 'ft 411ft— V; 

13:43% 431-9 43'*l—l 
£fh» M% 66 
50x 6Hz 61 d 61%- Va 
MfcM 63 l 3 64 49% 

38 20U 20' 4 C3-j + % 

62 40V* 40 *0 

7 73% T. 73% 



U.S. Consumption 
Of Energy Rises 


WASHINGTON — U.S. energy consump- 
tion rose last year for the first time since 1979, 
but domestic energy production rose to a new 
record and more than matched the increase, the 
Energy Department said Monday. 

In its annual energy review, the department's 
Energy Information Administration reported a 
continuing shift in consumption patterns from 
oil and gas to electricity generated by coal and 
nuclear power. 

But petroleum continued to the country’s 
single biggest source of energy, accounting for 
42 percent of total energy use, the pane! said. 


Nigeria Seeks 
Debt Moratorium 

Reuters 

LAGOS — Nigeria has asked its trading 
partners for an 18-month moratorium on pay- 
ing its trade debts, the country's leader. Major 
Genera! Mohammed Buhari. said in a radio 
interview. 

The debts include payments due for goods 
and services from the west. Credit agencies that 
guaranteed the trade have refused any resched- 
uling until Nigeria reaches an agreement with 
the International Monetary Fund for a $2.5- 
bilKon loan. 

The Lagos government says it will not accept 
some IMF conditions, such as a sharp devalua- 
tion of the naira, the Nigerian currency, or 
removal of fuel subsidies and liberalization of 
imports. 

General Buhari said “the immediate trade 
arrears [situation] is causing a lot of concern to 
our trading partners. For that we haw been, 
trying to negotiate if they will agree to give-us a 
1 16-year grace period.” 

He said that during that period Nigeria 
would pay the interest, which is 1 percent above 
the London interbank offered rate. "While we 
are negotiating, we are honoring the interest 
payable to our trading partners." 

General Buhari said the short and long-term 
debts, estimated recently at over $15 billion, 
were “not bad by our economic standards.” 

Nigeria expects to earn about S9.6 billion this 
year from oil, and 44 percent of the income is 
targeted to service external debts. General Bu- 
hari said. 

He said, “we have been able to service our 
debts, the medium and the long term debts. 
That is a positive aspect.” 


47% 33 (ft Xante X00 65 19 7235 46H 45% 44 4- ft 

52% 451ft Xante pf 585 104 15 S2% SZ% S2% 

29 19 XTRA 84 25 10 M3 25% 35 25(4 + lb 


38 24 ZolaCp M2 4.9 8 2327 269*27-6% 

24% 13% Zopato 84 XI 27 103 14 13% 13Tb— V* 

62% 32 Zayra 80b 7 15 39l40%S9%59% + % 

30% 1»* ZanlttiE 8 748 20% 20% 20% — ft 

21% 14% Zaras J2 17 17 68 lift ISft 181*4-% 


Asian Commodities 

May 6 


LST 


Pit. Waa 2X000 Prav. Sol K 23725 
P rev. pay Open lnM30828 up 735 


Financial 


Paris Commodities 

May 6 


Htetl Law BM Mk C 11(08 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric im 
A ue 1J00 U72 1771 MM — 17 

Oct 1 315 1 J95 1789 1795 —15 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1720 1730 -IS 

Mar 1830 1805 1800 1810 —13 

May 1870 1870 18*5 1865 —18 

AU0 1720 1730 18*5 1JI5 —20 

EsL voL: 390 lots of 50 Ians. Prov. actual 
rates: 1741 lots, open Inlerast: 1S754 
COCOA 

Freed! fraacs par KM k« 

May X105 X110 2.105 XI 15 —20 

Jly N.T. N-T. X130 — —5 

See 2.133 2.125 zm 2128 —9 

Dec X0X5 LOSS 2X80 Z0U +4 

MOT X0B5 X065 — 2JJ90 UnCtL 

May N.T. N.T. — X100 +5 

Jly N.T. N.T. — X100 +5 

Est. voL: 56 tats of 10 tons. Prav. actual 
sales: 26 tats. Open interest: 698 
COFFEE 

Frencti fraacs per 100 ha 
Mov N.T. N.T. 2880 2550 4- 50 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2573 2600 4-27 

Sea 2646 2630 2641 2646 + 26 

Nov N.T. M.T. 2655 — +10 

Jon N_T. N.T. 2640 — +10 

Mar N.T. M.T. 26*0 — +2S 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2620 — +30 

Est. voL: IS lots of 5 tons. Prav. octuol sales: 
72 lots. Open Interest: 216 
Source.- Bourse au Commerce. 


U.S. Treasury Bill Bales 
May 3 


Dividends May 6 III Cash Prices Ma* 6 


Company 

Per 

Amt 

Pay 

Rec 

USUAL 




Bank Montana Syv 

Q 

85 

5-17 

5-3 

FXM Nortonol 

Q 

.19 

6-28 

5-24 

General Blndino 

a 

99 

X24 

9-24 

Hovortv Furn. CoS 

Q 

.13 

5-24 

5-13 

Keloey-Haves Can. 

a 

75 

7-2 

6-7 

Morrison- Knudsen 

0 

J7 

6-17 

5-13 

Taxaca Canada 

a 

JO 

6-3 

5-U 

Veaco instruments 

Q 

.10 

5-24 

5-13 

A'Anmurl; M+Mmfllly 
Annual. 

O-Doarterfy; 5-SemL 

SOivca.' UPl. 






Comniodltv and Unit 


Coffee 4 Santas. Itt. 

Prlntclotti 64.-30 39 1*. yd _ 

Steel billets fPHt.l. ion 

Iran 2 Fdrv. PhMa- ion 

Steel scree No I fivy Pit!. . 

Lead Snot, lb 

Curoer elect, lb — 

Tin ISIraltsl. lb 

Zinc. E. SL U Basis, lb — 

Palladium, az 

Silver N.Y-C5 — 

Source: AP. 


Year, 
■von abb 


Volume; 0 tors of 25 ions. 
Source: Reuters. 



OBer 

BU 

netd 

Pray 

Ylotd 

3+nanlti 

772 

7JD 

?.ra 

899 

6-montfi 

798 

m 

134 

IM 

One year 

LIB 

898 

874 

LM 

Source; Solomon Brothers 





•2-1 

+4 

81-1 

+4 

8X4 

43 

79-n 

48 

7*21 

4-1 

71-31 

43 

704* 

43 

6M1 

+3 

0-4 

43 

60-13 

43 

67-34 

44 

67-5 

44 

66-20 

+5 

64-4 

45 

*9-22 

46 

654 

+4 


tack ind 


Prav. Day Open IRL222A54 0HU7 

SSEbb ort+pn 4. Uncb of we net 
78.T7 . sRj Jun *11 W-B 7B4 

6*fl4 59-13 sap IM) 69-11 

W-1S 5M Dec 

68-1 3MB MOT . __ 

<770 »B Jun 46 »1 « 

M 45 ' Sep 

E^-Srias _ Pnv.satas m 
Prav. Day Open InL 4.T73 unl9 

C«I»T. DEPOSIT IIMM) 

NfttOjJpn-pMo* )R pet 

TL77 8570 Jun 9175 9178 9U1 

njB. J&SS Sw 9286 n.10 n* 

. 9X56 ' 1574 Doe 9057 9X5* 9X56 

-K.18 8656 Mar 90.17 9X17 9XW 

WJ2 8683 Jun MS M IBM 

■MB . . -8754 Sea 8953 8X53 8*52 
8X99 88J4 Dec _ 

ENrSotag 388 Prav. Sofas 483 

Prav.Doy Open InL MB off 3 


OMnaa cowl ted Ntarttr Oatai 
XP COMP. INMDCCCMBJ 
Mints and cants 

189.10 156.10 Jun 18X90 I81JK 

19270 16000 S8P 1*115 1B4J8 

1*680 17278 Dac U7J0 UM0 

19575 79X10 Mar 19040 19UD 

Est.SateB .Prav.Solas 42222 

Prav.Doy Opan Int ajm offU21 
VALUE L tMMX KEKTt 
colrrts and cei*s 

21940 17X06 Jm 79225 19270 

21230 1*375 SUP 19X30 19X85 

EstSatas Prey. Sates 24*7 

Prav. Dor Opm 186. 5405 ofTTM - 

NYSE COMK' INDEX CVYFS} 

Mints ond cents 

11X00 raw Jin VMJD MSJ0 

11298 01J5 Sap 10675 18780 

71372 WHO Dae 0X38 10X70 

5*1 Softs Prav.Cotes *j2S 

Prav. Day Opm InL 2793 nfilC 


' Rtarttet dosa) 


flgjg 18X50 ** 

1*340 18388 —ID 
WJO H7^J +J5 
19X40 19X90 +S5 


J9U* 19195 +.10 

19X95 19X80 +70 


wur WUO — JB 

10X58 10645 
70X30 70X3B +35 


CammoditY Indexes 


Ptmm 

911301 


Tribadswoik. 


DM Fa lures Options 

May 6 

W. Germoi khrt-OCOO rate, ceds per mark 


Sftlke Cal it- Setae PutsSeffJe 

Frits ion Sea Me jub Scp Dec 

» 201 153 - (LOT XM — 

30 UI IM U! US Ui X92 

31 B6S 132 140 DOT 1.16 MB 

32 0-51 0.93 186 ITS 17* 141 

33 011 065 1JB 216 142 - 

34 ft 06 041 049 IDS LM — 

Estimated total voL 1 1521 
Coflv. PrLvoL 7.1 76 aowhu. 43638 
Pul* : Pri.nrt.3Ji1 open Int JZ374 
Source: CA IF. 


Panama Increases 
Military r Influence 

The Associated Press 

PANAMA CITY —The Chilian 
president of Panama has named a 
new cabinet that gives more influ- 
ence to the military-backed coali- 
tion that helped bring him to pow- 
er. 

Ricardo Arias Calderin, an op- 
position leader, charged Sunday 
that the changes amounted to a 
virtual military takeover of Presi- 
dent Nicolas Ardito BarieUa's sev- 
en-mom h gov emrorn L The cabinet 
resigned Friday, provoking rumors 
of a coup. A communique issued 
Sunday by the presidential press 
office described the new 12-mem- 
ber cabinet, which includes six 
holdovers, as “more representa- 
tive’' of the parties that backed Mr. 
Barletta’s candidacy. 

Jorge Abadia Arias, a leading 
official of the powerful Democratic 
Revolutionary Party, was designat- 
ed foreign minister. His party, 
which was founded by General 
Omar Torrijos, the late Panamani- 
an military leader, is widely be- 
lieved to have prompted the change 
in government because of its dis- 
content with Mr. Badetta’s. han- 
dling of Panama's deepening eco- 
nomic crisis. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

May 3 


tbm ran 13+83 

Total coll Dim W. uxs^> 
Total Pol Mtsmc HUH 
ToU pot crmint»Mi: 
Index: 

HMD ITiffl LM 11453 


Source: CBOE. 


Num- ofjenne 
CBQ T 

BOND 

FUTURES 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Aim Humroi .mil 

Futures Opiinns on 

COMKX HOLD ft SILVhR 
' [M.M-CURRLNCIES 
Law Cemrmsun JUw 

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At/ OVERNSGHT 
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trattdins; jv i ttattrjeu ,Vr 
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Bfc«£v 1 • 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


Page 13 


:f BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Australian TV Outlets 


CANBERRA, Australia — Aus- 
tralian representatives of Rupert 
Murdoch’s NewsCorp Ltd. met 
Monday with officials of the gov- 
ernment organization that regu- 
lates broadcasting in Australia to 
discuss Mr. Murdoch’s plans to 
buy a chain of American television 
stations, a spokesman for the body 
said. 

The meeting follows a statement 
by David Jones,. chairman of the 
Australian Broadcasting Tribunal, 
that Mr. Murdoch's current hold- 
ings in Australia; would contravene 
broadcasting laws in the country if 
he became US. citizen. 

Mr. Murdoch said in New York 
Saturday that he planned to be- 
come a URriuzea to dear the way 
Tor the purchase of six television 
stations owned try Metromedia Inc. 
for approximately $2 billion. 

The proposed transaction in- 
volves stations in New York City. 
Los Angeles, - Chicago, Dallas, 
Houston and Washington. To com- 
plete the transaction Mr. Murdoch 
may have to sell newspapers he 
owns in New York, ana Chicago 
since U.R regulations prohibit 
joint ownership of both a television 
station and a newspaper, in the 
same city. 

In Australia, News Coxp. con- 
trols television stations in M dr 
bourne . and Sydney. The: licenses 
for both stations are up for renewal 
by the tribunal this year. 


Under Australian law, owners of 
television stations must be austra- 
lian riiitent Official sources said 
ibe government was unlikely to 
change the legislation to enable Mr. 
Murdoch to retain the stations. 

One possible way Mr: Murdoch 
could by to keep control would be 
for the stations to be placed in a 
trust to be administered by an Aus- 
tralian board, media analysts said. 

The two Australian stations 
would be worth up to 300 million 
Australian dollars ($195 million), 
financial analysts said. 

■ Tribune Stock Rises 
‘ The pace of stock of Tribune 
Co^ .which owns the- Chicago Tri- 
bune and the New York Daily 
News newspapers, rose sharply 
Monday, reflecting a belief that 
Mr. Murdoch’s entry into UR tele- 
vision would lessen newspaper 
competition-in New York and pos- 
sibly Chicago. 

Tribune stock had risen 2-1/4 to 
44-7/8 by midday after a delayed 
opening. Tribune and Mr. Mur- 
doch each own newspapers in New 
'York and Chicago. 

‘‘Assuming Murdoch does wind 
up with the TV stations in New 
York and. Chicago, it seems likdy 
he will choose to dispose of the 
papers rather than the stations.” 
said J. Kendrick Noble, a newspa- 
per analyst at Paine Webbor Co. 


AMCtdlmport 

MoreRenaults 

Realm 

DETROIT — American Mo- 
tors Coip. plans to import up to 
100,000 compact cars a year 
starting in 1987 from its French 
partner, Renault, to expand its 
product line for North Ameri- 
ca, according to the trade pa- 
per, Automotive News. 

AMC, in which the stale-run 
French carmaker is the major 
shareholder, has said it needs to 
compete in more segments of 
the UR cur market. 

AMC currently imports some 
Renault models as well as 
building Renault-designed sub- 
compact cars at its plant in Ke- 
nosha, Wisconsin. The compa- 
ny also builds four-wheel drive 
Jeeps at its plant in Toledo. 
Ohio. 

Alaska-Orient Gas Shipments 


JUNEAU, Alaska —The Atlan- 
tic Richfield Co. has signed an 
agreement with Japan to study the 
feasibility of shipping natural gas 


Honda Sets Its Sights on Passing Toyota in U.S. Auto Sales 


from Alaska’s North Slope to the 
Orient, Governor W illiam Shef- 
field of Alaska said Monday. 


By Warren Brown 

Washingwn Ran Service 

MARYSVILLE, Ohio — The 
freshly panted car bodies looked 
perfect They were gun-metal gray, 
a popular color made lustrous by a 
special treatment 

Honda dealers all over the Unit- 
ed States make extra dollars on the 
gun-metal gray Accords. Bui these 
car bodies were not on ihrir way to 
final assembly on the floor beneath 
the paint department of Honda's 
automobile plant here. They were 
going to the repair lines, to be sand- 
ed down, repainted and rebaked. 

“The paint’s okay on most of 
these, but it’s not good enough Tor 
us,’’ said Scott N. Whitlock, Hon- 
da's Marysville plant manager. 

“Look at this,” said Mr. Whit- 
lock, pointing to a tiny pimple in 
the paint' of one of the car bodies. 
“That's dirt. You can’t let some- 
thing like that get by and still say 
you want to be number one.” 

Honda, according to some UR 
auto industry analysts, could wind 
up No. 1 among the Japan-based 
auto makers seflmg and assembling 
cars in the United States. 

“Honda simply is doing every- 
thing right,” said James E. Har- 
bour, pre sident of Harbour & As- 
sociates, an auto industry research 
firm in Berkley, Michigan. 

Honda built its first car, die 


sports S360, in Japan in 1962. it 
exported its first car, the N600 se- 
dan, to the United States in 1970. 
In 1971, Honda introduced a car 
with something called the com- 
pound vortex controlled combus- 
tion engine — the Honda CVCC. 

Many buyers did not understand 
the physics or the engineering. 
They did understand that the sub- 
compact CVCC got good mileage 
on cheaper gasoline— and that the 
car did not need an expensive cata- 
lytic convener to meet UR emis- 
sions regulations in effect at that 
time. 

The CVCC, perhaps more than 
anything else, helped establish 
Honda's reputation for automotive 
quality in the United States, indus- 
try analysts say. 

The Honda story in Marysville is 
being written by 2.800 people who . 
prefer to call themselves “asso- 
ciates.” Their enterprise is Honda 
of America Manufacturing Inc. 
They call it “HAM" — now Ameri- 
ca’s biggest producer of motorcy- 
cles, and the company that makes 
Honda Accord sedans and hatch- 
back cars for distribution in the 
East and Midwest. 

HAM turned out 138572 cars in 
1984, enough to rank Honda fifth 
in production among the six auto 
companies making cars in the Unit- 
ed States last year. 


Combined with imports from Ja- 
pan. Honda sdd a total of 508.420 
cars in the United States last year, 
well ahead of American Motors 
Corp.'s 202,498 cars and enough to 
overtake Nissan Motor Co. Ltd. 
Japan's second largest auto maker, 
which sold 485,298 cars in this 
country last year. Toyota, Japan’s 
premier auto company, still led 
with 1984 UR sales or 557,979 
cars. 

Toyota controls 46 percent of the 
auto market in Japan, compared 
with Honda's relatively skimpy 9 
percent. Toyota's worldwide reve- 
nue last year totaled $23 billion 
a ga inst Honda's $102 billion. 

Toyota is building subcompact 
cars with General Motors m a 
joint- venture company. New Unit- 
ed Motor Manufacturing IncL op- 


erating in Fremont, California. But 
those cars will be sdd by GM’s 
Chevrolet division and will not be 
tallied in Toyota’s U.S. sales. 

There are not many computers 
or robots in the Marysville plant, 
even though there is one huge, ra- 
tio ticized machine that opens its 
octopus-tike arms, grabs the left- 
and right-side frames of a car body 
and welds them into a car frame, 
complete with roof and floor-pan. 

“Mostly, we are going to rely on 
our associates.” Mr. Irunajiri said, 
referring to the young work force 
— average age 29 years — em- 
ployed here. 

A day in HAM’S 1-million- 
square-fom automobile factory in- 
dicates what Mr. Irimajiri and oth- 
er Honda officials mean when they 
speak about “togetherness." It 


simply translates into one “asso- 
ciate" pitching in to help another to 
get a particular job done. 

For example, during □ die- 
change operation completed in a- 
rda lively swift 9 minutes and 37 
seconds, workers who finished one. 
function immediately moved to an- ■ 
other position on the Une to help ' 
other workers 

No one stood around and wailed . 
after his or her assigned job was' 
done. And no one complained 
about having his or her territory 
invaded by a colleague. 

None of this means that what 
Honda does here is perfect. On the 
contrary, the “repair line" — the 
holding area for cars that made it 
through final assembly with defects 
— was filled to capacity one day 
recently. 


The Perpetual Calendar 


AG, said it expects 

Kearns Is Xerox Owinrian 




■* “in. 


rf 




The Associated Pres 
STAMFORD, Connecticut — 
David T. Kearns, president and 
chief executive officer of Xerox 
Crap.,, has .been named chairman 
effective May 16. the congjany said 
Monday in announcing a shift in 


New York Air Ejqwids 
Service to Florida . . 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — New York Air- 
lines Inc. said Monday that it 
would begin daily nonstop service 
between Washington and Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida, an May 20. It 
said it would fly two roundtrips 
daily. 

The company said it will also 
expand existing service between 
Washington and Orlando, dou- 
bling daily nonstop roundtrips to 
two from Dulles International Air- 
port and starting service with one 
daily roundtrip netween Orlando 
and Washington’* National Air- 
port. 


responsibilities of its three-member 
corporate office. 

" Mr. Kearns, 54, who has held his 
present position, since May 1982, 
will replaceC. Peter McColoughas 
cfaainnan and .will continue as chief 
executive, the company said in a 
s tatement . ' 

Mr. McColough, 62, wffl become 
chairman of the executive commit- 
tee of theXerax board of directors, 
a position Mr. Kearns has held. 

In addition, William F Galvin, 
S3, will assume the new post of vice 
rhanman- He has been an execu- 
tive vice president since 1983; 

Mr. Reams said the new align- 
ment will permit Mr. Galvin to 
spend more time with him on stra- 
tegic planning and permit Mr. 
McColough to continue gradually 
re&ilcing- Jris duties as planned 
when Mr. Reams succeeded him as 
chief executive. 

The position of president will 
not be fined, Mr. Reams said. 

Tbe changes will take effect after 
the company's annual meeting 
May 16 iq Rochester, New York. 


AEG Telefrmken Kabelwerke 
AG Rfaeydt, a 98-percent-owned 
subsidiary of AEG-Telefunken 
AG, said ii expects 1985 results to 
equal last year's satisfactory leveL 
Net profit m 1984 rose to 15.4 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (S4.8 million) 
from 142 million DM in 1983. 

ASed Cop. said it will transfer 
some of the manufacturing of auto- 
motive components done by its 
Bendix subsidiary to a new Bendix 
plant in Gallatin, Tennessee, fol- 
lowing tire closure of a plant in 

S<imTi Indiana 

American Telephone ft Tele- 
graph Co. said it has proposed to 
expand its international toll-free 
800 service to the Caribbean island 
of Antigua on June 17, allowing 
people of that nation to place toll- 
free telephone calls to businesses in 
the United Stales. 

BeviU, Bresler and Schuhnan 
Inc.’s creditors filed a petition for 
involuntary bankruptcy against the 
broker dealer, riling claims of more 
than $S4 millio n by three creditors, 
Worthen Bank ft Trust Co„ Great 
American Federal Savings ft Loan 
Association and Fort Lee Savings 
ft Loan Association. 

Brierly Investment Ltd. said it 
canceled its bid for full ownership 
of Emco Group Ltd, a car assem- 
bler, launched on April 17 because 
of a one-for-five bonus issue and 


extra dividend announced by Emco 
since the bid was made: 

Bull wifi boy a 40-percent equity 
stake in the government-owned 
Spanish computer company, Tde- 
sincro SA, Mario Guerrero, the 
general manager of the French 
company said. State Industrial 
Holding will retain 30 percent and 
Tderincro is seeking a third part- 
ner for the remaining capital. 

Castlemaine Toobeys Ltd. said it 
will lease 248 New South Wales 
hotels owned by Tooth ft Co. and 
has sold its wine subsidiaries to 
Fenfolds Wines Pty., a subsidiary 
of Tooth. The price of the sale was 
not disclosed. 

Cementation PLC Groqp, a Brit- 
ish company, and the Oman gov- 
ernment have agreed on a price of 
$115 million for construction of a 
teaching hospital to be buflt as part 
of the country’s Sultan Qaboos 
University. 

Crane Go. said it purchased Val- 
ue Systems ft Controls of Houston, 
which specializes in solving fluid- 

system at valves and ^controls ^co 
meet exacting specifications. 
Terms were not disclosed. 

Harris Corp. said it has an agree- 
ment with Philips Export a subsid- 
iary of NV Philips of the Nether- 
lands, for Harris to sell, service, 
install and support throughout 


North America the Sopho-Net sys- 
tem, an advanced wide-area pack- 
et-switch communications net- 
work. 

Panes Industries Inc., which is- 
currently liquidating, said it has 
entered into a contract to seD the 
business and assets of its last re- 
maining operating subsidiary, 
W undies Inc., to a new corporation 
formed by an investor group led by 
Chaterhouse Group International 

Shamrock Acquisition Inc, led 
by the Roy E Disney family, said it ! 
extended until Wednesday its offer 1 
to acquire all the common shares | 
outstanding of Central Soya Co. j 
for $2425 m cash. The offer had : 
been scheduled to expire last Fri I 
day. . I 

Tdepicteres Carp, said it bought : 
Us magazine from MacFadden , 
Holdings Inc. in a partnership with I 
Rolling Stone magazine. The com- j 
pany said the magazine will be op- 
erated as a joint venture with Jann 
S. Warner of Rolling Stone serving ; 
as editor and Donald E Welsh of 1 
Telepictures acting as publisher. 

[degreesk« | 

* «HHEB»-WEsSw» WHWEBS nY I 


MemarsPlMt 








Five succinct reasons 


wi 


is New Yaks 


Comfort 


The kind of oonofort that comes from 
investing $130 million in oarhoteLover three 
years, including oar Park Avenue lobby; aS 
public and private function rooms, our restau- 
rants, and our new, luxury guest rooms 

Entertainment. 

The choice of entertainment you get 
from three of New York's finest restaurants, 
offering haute cuisine and live grand piano music 
nightly at Peacock Alley, hearty steaks and 
fresh seafood at the BoS & Bear, or gourmet 
Japanese fore at taagiku. Sir Harry’s unique 
safari lounge, the Terrace Lounge, the popular 
Oscar's restaurant, and more. 


security to visiting heads of state, as weD as 
helping each of our daily guests who need the 
impossible done immediately. 


Elegance 


The unparalleled elegance of a priceless 
coflection of Art Deco treasures which adorns 
our hotel And the Waldorf Towers, which has 
been the celebrated residence of a former 
president of the United States, the leaders of 
our corporate industry, a great national hero, 
and those most prominent in society and 
international diplomacy. 


Wue 


Innovation. 


The kind of innovation regarding our 
guests' unique needs that makes us the only 
hotel in the world which hosts a nation's 
embassy, and enables us to offer privacy and 


The value that comes from staying in 
New York's finest hotel, but not New York's 
most expensive hoteL You can spend more, but 
you can't get more. 

When business or pleasure brings you to 
New York, stay at New York's finest luxury 
hoteL 



Withxjtthemi^itMNew^rk 

Park Avenue at 50thStreet, New York City 1 0022 *(212) 355-3000 Telex: 666747 

A Hilton Hoed 


1 










— -- — 1- - - '-'iwiiJi'^.fta, liijni • ■• • 


Pa 


FPagce E 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


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Consumer Confidence Rises Butcher Pleads 

Guilty to Charges 
Of Bank Fraud 


I’rsittJ Pre.w bih'rnjr.rrjil 

NEW YORK — U.S. consumer 
confidence turned up in April but 
remained below levels of early this 
sear and well under expectations of 
a year ago. the Conference Board 
reported Monday. 

The more optimistic outlook did 
not translate to plans to spend 
money on homes, automobiles or 
major appliances, the board found 

GuH Resources 
Markets Holdings 

Rmhn 

NEW' YORK — Gulf Resources 
&. Chemical Corp. said Monday it 
was negotiating with several pros- 
pects for the sale of a number of 
company properties. 

The company made the states 
mcni in an advertisement asking 
shareholders to support the man- 
agement nominees for the board 
rather than the slate promised by a 
dissident group of stockholders. 

Gulf said Ijm fall that it had 
retained Citibank to explore the 
sale of the company as a whole, hut 
“in light of the unenlhusiastie re- 
spmise to Citibank'* inquiries, the 
board decided not to pursue (he 
sale of (he company in its entirely.*' 


in its monthly survey. The Buying 
Plans index fdl to 98.1 (1969-70 
equals 100). down from 113.8 in 
March. 

The board's Consumer Confi- 
dence Index climbed nearly S 
points to 92.6 in April but still did 
not recoup the 8 points lost in 
March. The increase reflected a 
more confident outlook for their 
jobs last month and for the next six 
months and a more optimistic as- 
sessment of business conditions 
generally. 

Consumers' pessimism in March 
matched that of business leaders in 
another Conference Board survey, 
who “were far from bullish" on the 
labor market from. The chief exec- 
utives of businesses of all types are 
surveyed every three months. Since 
workers often are sensitive to their 
employers* view the second quarter 
survey to be released in in July 
could be more optimistic. 

Fabian Linden, executive direc- 
tor of the Board’s Consumer Re- 
search Center, said although the 
level or optimism has improved, it 
is “most disconcerting" mat expec- 
tations are “now considerably less 
positive than they were a year ago." 

The Consumer Index, which Mr. 
Linden said has “an impressive re- 
cord” in predicting future econom- 


ic trends, stood ai 97.9 in ApriL 
1984. 

Only 7.8 percent of consumers 
planned to buy a new or used auto- 
mobile in the next sox months, 
down from 10.1 percent who had 
such plans in March; 3.4 percent 
plan to buy a new home, down 
from 3.6 percent; and 25.7 percent 
plan to replace appliances or fur- 
nishings. 

Carpeting and washing machines 
were the only categories of home 
purchases to post gains in the latest 
month. 

OPEC Session Tough,’ 
Nigerian Minister Says 

Reuters 

LAGOS — Oil Minister Tam 
David-West returned on Monday 
from a debate on quota cfaeatingby 
the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries and said it was 
the toughest session of the cartel he 
had ever attended. 

He declined to comment on re- 
ports that Nigeria was currently 
producing about 400,000 bands 
per day of crude oil above its 
OPEC quota, but said that Ecuador 
and other countries he did not 
name were given conditions to 
meet or be expelled from OPEC 


The Associated Press 

LONDON, Kentucky — Jake 
Butcher, a Tennessee financier rac- 
ing bankruptcy after the collapse of 
his two-state banking empire, 
pleaded guilty Monday in U.S. Dis- 
trict Court to a series of bank fraud 
charges in Kentucky. 

Mr. Butcher, who previously en- 
tered guilty pleas before federal 
judges in Tennessee, had been ac- 
cused of defrauding the former 
United American Banks in Lexing- 
ton and Somerset by siphoning off 
S42 milli on for business and per- 
sonal expenses. 

In all, federal prosecutors say, 
the two-time candidate for gover- 
nor of Tennessee took $40.8 million 
from banks that once were part of 
his SI 3-billion business. 

Under an agreement with federal 
prosecutors, Mr. Butcher pleaded 
guilty to three counts of bank fraud 
and one count of conspiracy. Other 
charges of wire fraud and mail 
fraud are to be dropped. 

Jane Graham and Barbara Edd- 
man, assistant U.S. attorneys, 
plumed to ask for a 20 -year prison 
term, to be served concurrently 
with punishments handed down 
elsewhere. 


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21ft 

2166 + 6k 

23ft 

1766 PGEpO 232 113 


4 

fl r L 1 

21ft 

2£4 + * 

916 

766 WSEjrfH 1.12 1U 


2 

9ft 

fft 

fft 


15% PGEPfR 2 37 113 


94 


X 

2D 


1366 RGEpfP 2A5 113 


21 

■ 

1766 17% + » 


13ft PGEnfO 230 113 


X 

flrl* j 

Wft 



Uft PGEptM 130 113 


3S 

fl*" 1 

14% 

10ft + % 


Mft PGEpfL 235 T2J 


4 

ink 

iBVt 

U%— ft 


766 FOEtfl IX 1U 


5 

966 

m 

JJ* .. 


14% PGTrn 1J4 53 
X PodJpf 4JA 1U 

» 

27 

21ft 

21% 

21 Vt— ft 



50zX7 

37 

17 


31% fiacupf 4J0 1L6 


50X3966 

2966 38% + % 


84 PocLfpMJS IM 


307x41% 

41% 41% + ft 


5366 PaeLlPf 7J« 123 


FT1 

■ ■ 1 


01ft— 6% 
ft .. 


29% fiotlQ* J9 M 

19 

78 


34 

Mb+tt 


5% Pontot 

a 

5 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 


1566 ParkCh 300 U 

9 

3 

21% 

2166 



766 PWTdl 

21 

32 

966 

f* 

2ft Payffon 

X 

15 

4 

3% 

2ft 


•% PaetTa 40b 4J 

15 

7 

•% 

«% 

Jkk— ft 


344* P#nEM IXDZ8 



r - T 



TES ’St^S 

11 

iB 


1966 

1 

X — ft 
1ft + ft 

38% + ft 


2566 Pan RE 2 M 02 

IB 

34 


38% 


M96 Ponrfl JO 13 




121* 


PH 


*2 


lft 

16*— ft 

23 PartnlC JH OS 

45 

J 

r< 

26% 20ft 





rtl 



Q 

9ft Perm) pf LM 93 


45 

ink 

lift lift— ft 

e3 

2ft PWLM 


4V 

j 

Sft 

Zlk— ft 

0% PetLepf 135 XJ 


in 

7ft 

7% 

&5S 

1 m 

766 PettApf 2X 3*0 


» 

9ft 

9ft 

I 71 

116* PatLeof 233 222 
1ft PtdILO Xa123 


39 

14% 

1466 

2% 

2 

145 

2ft 

2% 

2%—% 

966 

3% PtaaPd 


34 

4% 

496 

4% + ft 

4 

2% Ptarlwt 

2 

X 

36* 

3ft 

3ft 

M 

4ft PtorvSy 

7 

u 

• 466 

4% 

4% 

Sft 

4ft Ptrwwo J0 TU 

10 

4 

5% 

5% 

5%.— ft 

14% 

17 PfiOM JO 23 


4 

13% 

1396 

Uft— ft 

71ft 

an* Ptttwor IX 23 

to 

s 

L-4 

70% 

78% — % 

B- 7] 




■ J 

Bft 



13% PierDg JO 


37 

r.1 

1766 1796- ft 


9 PtyGoik 

12 

77X1466 

Uft 

Mft +1 

7% 


9 

45 

■ ■ . j 

4ft 

4ft— U 

Uft 

7ft PortSvs 

21 

M 


10 

»% + ft 

17% 

12ft PeaiiPr Mm 13 

14 

2 


14ft 

149k— 1* 

27ft 

T3 PdwtT s 


70 


X% 

24% 

7ft 

5% PrntrO* 


as 


7% 

71* 

34ft 

1866 Pram. 32 45 

9 

34 


20ft 

20ft— ft 

Bft 

0% Pratt Rd .12 13 


X 


7 

7„ „ 

166 

% Fremlta 


2 

ft 

%— fc 

n% 

0% PmRB X U 

4 

M 

10 

U 

M 

* 

36* prexd 

12 

2 

3% 

3% 

2ft 

21 

15ft PreCTH 132 73 

11 

10 

206k 

206* 2896 + % 

zn* 

X ProvEn 234 73 

* 

2 

29 

29 

9 

27 

30% PSCeiM 4J5 113 


18By 34% 

30% 

20% + ft 

19% 

Mft Pat etc 234 122 


2 

19ft 

19 

191* + ft 

22ft 

26ft PsfPfE 437 117 


B 

2? 

31% 

32 

9% 

3% PontoO 


90 

3ft 

266 

2 — % 

| . 


L_ 




1 

XI* 

10 Quaba* X 


104 

25ft 

24ft 

2 *ft— ft 



R 




1 

966 

5 RAI JB 53 

12 

15 

066 

0ft 

0ft 

56* 

3ft RMS El 


3 

296 

366 

316— ft 

18% 

13% Room .12 J 

as 

2 

10% 

10% 

10% 

X 

12% RonsbA 22 435T7 

325 

15ft 

15% 

15%— ft 

1966 

19% RltSoun 


29 

19% 

19ft 

19ft— % 

4% 

1ft Radlaw 


26 

3% 

2ft 

3ft + % 

k 

10% RaaafB 300 43 

M 

our 

13% 

151* 

15% + ft 

5866 

276k Rasrt A 


901 

4566 

45 

45 —ft 

Bft 


12 

32 

8 

7% 

76*+ % 

4ft 

31* RsxHor .106 24 

11 

3 

4% 

4% 

4%— % 

1764 

m RttMP X 23 

11 

10 

10ft 

10% 

10% 

2X6 

15% Rckwvs 56 22 X 

23 

20% 

2* 

3% + ft 

30ft 

X% Raaen .12 3 

11 

22 

24% 

Ml* 

7 



21 

29% 

2ft 

2ft + % 

33% 

24% Rudckpf 56 13 


1 

2966 

29ft + ft 

7ft 

9% RBW 

■ 

24 

0% 

09k 

4ft + ft 

10% 

lift RoxtmO SO 13 

IT 

40 

If 

14ft 

Uft + ft 

Xft 

UVk Rykatt SO 13 

U 

AH 

20% 

19ft 

19ft— ft 

r 


5 







1 


7ft 7 SFNofA 

13ft 7 Sam __ 25 

10ft 5 Satatn .Mr 13 11 

3ft ft 5Carto 
9 7ft SDooM 140 11.1 

8 0716 SDOO M 944 124 

% 776k SODOM 247 ?L4 
38ft 31ft SOootrf 445 125 
62 34 ScnJW 2J0 4J 10 

Sft 3ft Sanmrk 437 94 11 
4% 46k Sound A JO 13 0 
10ft 9ft sound of 14B 114 
51* 3ft scoptrn 
22ft ISft Scbelti 40 24 10 
3 lft SctwHP 35 

86k 3ft ScfMof .18 24 
28 14ft SGIL0B B 

02 34 SbdCp 40 4 5 

15ft Kft SteCos Mm LI 8 
59* 2 % SotoPto 

Bft 4k SotaDtt 
Sft 3% Solo* 4 

5% 3ft SollaAa 14 

46k 216 Sum tch 

15ft 9ft Srvtaco M 44 M 
lift 7ft Sorvo 20 

9ft 4¥* soraotr 4HU I 
ISft 10 Sotans .12 4 10 
1416 0ft Shows 140k S3 0 
lft ft 5baran 
10ft Oft HmmH .10b 14 
14ft 12% SftrHsn 
13 1016 StarSun 37 ! 24 29 

ISft 10ft Sferan 40 25 IT 
7% 59* SHCO JO 34 20 

IS 8 SBcaAl 30 14 M 

0ft 3ft Siftrert 
596 2% flUncoS 

18ft 109k SmttlA 40 25 
10ft Vft smtt» 40 37 


137 

1 

u 

1 

3 


7ft 

Bft 

Sft 

116 

9 


7%— ft 
Bft + ft 

56* 

lft + ft 
9 


100z Blft lift lift + ft 
M 21ft 21ft 21ft + ft 
63 37ft 36ft 37ft + 66 

0 61% 61ft « 1 % + % 
44 4ft 4% 4% + ft 

7 6 6 6 

IT 10*. Kftk 10ft— ft 
21 5 4% S 

14 19ft 19ft m* + 66 

1 2ft 2ft 2M 

4 4ft + ft 
106 16ft + ft 
59 0 

M M — ft 
3 3 —ft 

16k 
0 % 

5ft 
Sft 
9ft 
9 

9ft 


59ft 

m 

k 

§ 

966 

9ft 


VS 


6 ft 
Sft + 66 
3ft + ft 
99ft— ft 

SftTfc 


2 
30 
12 

1 15ft ISft ISft— ft 

6 * "*”&-* 
4 156* 15% 15% + ft 
ISO 13ft 12ft 12% 

21 11% lift lift— % 
3 lift lift lift 
Mx Sft 5% 5% 

25 M 13% 13ft — ft 

1 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

2 3% 39* 39* + ft 

7 17% 17 17 

10. 10% 10% 10% 


Sales flours are unofficial. Yearly Mgh» and laws reflect 
Hie previous 52 weeks Phis Wie current week, but nof ffie latest 
fradins day. Wtwra a colli ar slock Avklend amauRfina to 35 
percent ar more has been paid, ttw veer's hlan-low range and 
dividend are shown lor the new Bock only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rote* of dividend* ore cbwiuoJ disbursement* based an 
Me latest dedarotton. 

a — dividend atia extra (5). 

b— annual rata of dividend plus stock dividend, 
c— UuuktafingdlvWentL 
etd— coded. 

8— now yearly law. 

• — dlvtaend declared or poM In preceding 12 months, 
a— dividend InConadkw funds. wtUed lo 15% non-residence 
tax. 

—dividend declared afiar spllhjp or stack dividend. 

— dividend poia Ms rear, ocnllted. deferred, ar no action 
taken a» krteef dividend msettno- 

k— cHvWand declared or paid this rear, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n — now Issue In the past S3 weeks. The hloWow nmae baatns 
with me start of tradins- 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — prlat-eamtaes ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paM In preceding 12 month* plus 
stock dividend. 

s— stock Split. Dividend begins with date of split. 

f — dividend paid in stocA In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on ex -dividend or ex-distribution date 
u — new year I v h tah. 
v— trading haltad. 

vl — in txxWmptcy or recefvpr st i k i or betnp reorppniied un- 
r ttw Bankruptcy Act. or securities omened hr such eonv 


nriantti 

mbimM 


Oie.YM.PC 


Sft 

MfcHMILW* 


BrtOjU 


M% 32% Bo eder 24* 133 IS 
■ft Sft Sejltran W 

,r ifg&figxu 


Mft 


76* SC Ed Of 


16.9 


a 3 £33 ISIS 

2066 16 SCEdPf 221 70J 


77 

10 

20 % 

7ft 

15 

11 % 

3 

Bft 

2 % 




<1 

9ft SPdras 
3ft SpettOf* 
M Speneef 
BH spnaftn 
lft Spndtwt 
4% smavn 
lft Sfttovwt 


114 

’5 * 8 1 , 

JX 27 23 
41 13 33 


23% 13ft HdPrd 40 34 6 
g stonwd 
nek storrlti 

Bft Mnfitp l 2 « 1 J 1 M 
46* Bfenm 48 35 M 


11 % 

306k 

25 

” 5 * 

Sft 

23 

fit 

3% 

11 

lift 


‘l *5 *% % + R 

5 «% 914 0%+ ft 

H 946 9% 99k + ft 

5 41 m 4B 4 n 

5 y % i 

34 30 19% 19% 

i a a a-* 
,3 a a=s 

n 6 i 6 + 6> 
15 1% J% J*- % 

40 2166 Offik W6— ft 

1 Bft Bft Bft— ft 
0 17% 1761 17% + ft 
II JO ZJ 21 
« 19% 19% T1%— ft 




1 % Start 
766 Strl Ext 
591 StarfSR 
19* ShKtW 
0 % SunCtv 
.... s sunsLn 

20% 10ft WrjFd 

2 % % SimCra 

10 6ft SIMM 
1566 lift 50Pr» 
6% 4ft Staaush 
2 % 1% S*»ttE n 

2B 19ft Swtfiln 
ai* 496 svnaiov 
1496 *% sesttSne 


12 

M 

.13e 14 25 


44b I J 11 

40 D 14 11 
46 24 18 

12 

1JD 55 9 
.10 4 17 


n 

* 


5 +6* 
1 % 

196* 

8ft + ft 
2% t- 66 
796— ft 
S 


2 5 
S 1% 

4 T9* 

08 Sft 

32 2% 

4 7% 

SI Mft 2466 30% + M 

H 1% lft lft— ft 

31 13% 12% 12% + 16 

29 15 1M6 M% + % 

144 56* 5 5ft + ft 

11 1% 161 lft 

43 2216 21% 32 + ft 

12 4ft '496 4ft— % 

B3 lift Mft lift + % 


40 29 12 S M 


M 

7 

4 14 f 

JOB Jl«2 
44 14 12 
44a 34 13 


M 


lift 4% T Bar 

12% m TEC 

10ft 8 TIE 

14% 0% Til 

109* 13 TabP rd 

ISft 9% Tasty 

4 39 * Team 

4% 1% TiJiAin 

22% 13% TdtSvm 

7% » TochTp 

20K 7V4 Techfrl 

rd 

106* 7V6 Toted 

5ft 2ft Tetesph 

0% 396 Ten««v» 

JIHr 22% TexCdB 140 
Mft 5% TaxAtr 4 

10% 5ft T0XAE -Wt 04 42 

22V* 16% TexAEnf 
U9* 3 % Tuscan S2 

7% 39k Tta-DB 40 LS 11 

796 39* ThTOA M US 12 

6% 2 % Tidwell 

31ft 23 ToiEdPf <28 UJ 
61 47 ToiEdPf 842 1X9 

72% 50% Tot Ed pfHLBO 119 
9ft 5% Tortoi J9t 54 10 

TZ% 796 TatIPtS M 

11% fit TrnsLx 4Sr 4 11 

19% lift TrnsTBC 
>SU 70ft T roman 
10% 7% TriSM 

«% 0% TrtoCB 

0% 39k TrlHroe 
14ft 3ft TrMex 
4 2ft TubMex 
15% W* Tultex 
20ft 20% TumrC 
3% 1ft Tylrwts 


41t 74 31 93 7 066 «6- ft 

.Me 4 22 5 12% 12% 13% 

1492 M « 0ft— 16 
40 47 1096 W* 1096 + ft 

JO 1.1 12 _0 IS 17% 17% 


44 34 . 
40 24 7 
40e 4J 

49t 7.1 ^ 

25 

44 34 11 
130 U 1 


M 

3 4 . 4 4 + ft 

37 2ft 2ft 2ft 

122 U Mft 15% + ft 
9 4% 0% 466-% 

20 10% MH Mft + % 
20 2% 7ft 2ft— ft 

sstom 'JSft'i* +3 . 

32 27 20% 2C66— % 

32 M 9% TO 

70 B% I 0% + % 

41 3ft 3% 396 

12 5% Sft 5% 

54 25% 25ft 25ft— ft 

017 13% 13% ISft— 66 

111 6 5ft Sft— ft 

37 20 20 20 

84 Sft Sft 3%— % 

1 Sft 3ft 3% 

0 4 3% 4 +16 

23 3 2ft 3 + 66 

225i 31 11 31 + % 

mr a 00 u 

s£ 72 72 72 +166 

10 7% 790 7% + ft 

11 11% 11% 11% 

17 lift 11 lift 

29 17 10% 17 + ft 

44 U 1596 1396 + ft 

10 9% 9% 9%— ft 

2 966 966 99*— 16 

5 5% Sft .5ft 

20 0% 0% 066— ft 

15 3% 266 3ft— ft 

37 12ft lift 1266 + ft 
10 20% 28ft Bft + % 
240 1% 1% 166— ft 


24% 866 Uttmf* 10 

% % unknne 14 

11% Unto pf J73 55 
lift K96 Uahnrn 50* 44 
21 1466 UAirPd -54b 34 ID 

23 1096 UnCasFs . 14 

366 196 UPoodA .10 &3 19 

3ft II* U FoodB IB 

Uft 10% UlMed 14 

22% 10% USAGwt 
■ft 0ft UnftaiV J4M&0 22 
14% 7ft UflvCm 14 

1096 Sft UnhrRj . 24 

23% 1596 UnlvRu 40* 44 7 
1590 9% UnvPat 


a 

25 Uft Uft 13% 

309 lift 11 UK + ft 
7k TB 17% 11 +% 
3 19ft 19% 196*- ft 
20 1% 1 9k 1% + ft 

12 16k 16* 16* 

15 13% 13ft 136* + ft 

1 17 17 17 

» 0ft 0ft 0ft— ft 

16 12ft 12% 1296—% 

17 76k 76ft 7% 

43 Uft 10% Mft— % 
19 1266 12ft 12%— ft 


10% 966 VSTn 40* 24 

lift 10ft VullyRs 140 b0 13 
27% Mft Vaisprs 44 20 12 
12% 4% Vertrtm 

2366 14% VtAmC 4Bb 24 10 
79% 36k 6/tMl 
lft % Verna 
766 3% Vertpie .10 25 

9 5% Vicon 11 

4 2% Vtato* 

10% lift Vlrco Jr J H 

0466 52% Valntl 

1266 8 Voptex Jk 34 12 


iM h nn 

38 IB 17ft 1796—% 
11 22% 226* 2266—% 
106 796 7% 7ft + ft 

00 2016 19ft 1966 + ft 
74 4 3% 3%— Mi 

ft % ft 66 
4 4 4 4 

3 7% 7% 7% 

■ 3% 3% 3% + ft 

2 15% 15% 15ft— ft 

3 01 63 43 + W 

11 10ft 1066 10*6— ft 


W 


.10 

.11 


40 

140 


42a 


20 
1J 13 
U 10 


06* 0% WTC 
27% 1766 Wetaar 
15% 10% VMcs 
31% 15% wmfi 
32V. 14 WangC 
2% 6* WrrtCwt 

9ft 390 WtftHk 
117 73 WsnPsi 

20 179* WRIT 

7% 266 W lW rd 
46k 1% Webcor 

566 3% Wadca 
17% 1166 Wedtcn 
M 464 Wbkttra 
466 2ft WeiGrd 
29ft 14% Weeco 
4*6 % Wesacp 

Uft 79* WstSrC 
13% Bft Wsttx-B JO 
M 5% WDtoftt 
18% 7ft WtHtthn 
19ft M96WIRET 142 74 
30% 1* WstnSL 4Be L7 13 
30% 9% WhEntX 20 

11% 7ft WlllCxG 4 


42 24 0 


S Tft 7 7—16 

23% 23% 23ft— ft 

30 15% 1564 15% + ft 

4 12 1401 17% 17% 176* + ft 
4 13 7 17% 17% 17ft + ft 

48 1 1 I 

n 7% 7% 7% + % 
3k 117 115% in +ft 
U 24% 34ft Mft— ft 
34 5% 5% Sft 

11 1% )% )%— ft 
3 49k 466 466+ ft 

4 Mft 14ft 14% + ft 
29 lift 10ft 11 — ft 
47 Sft 3% 3ft— ft 
7 2*% 20% 2066— ft 
5 lft lft lft 
12 8% 8% ■% + ft 
7 Uft 11 11 — ft 

~ J2tt 11% 12ft + % 
MM Uft 10% + ft 
19% 19% 1966 + 66 
ft 29 21% 2060 

T» 28 27ft 2B + ft 
5 96k 9% 986 + ft 


4 

4 14 
L4 14 


13 

.1 19 
12 


19 M81 
14 29 

M 74 


Sft 

1 WUsnfi 


9 

lft 

lft 

lft 

23ft 

19ft Wlntln 

2240102 

17 

XI* 

216* 

21 % 

15% 

11 WkWear 

J2 33 7 

47 

13ft 

1310 

Uft + ft 

4 

2ft lVwdeE 


44 

4 

.H* 

4 

17ft 

12ft WWdtPf IX 122 

*» 14ft 

Mft 

Mft 

34 

17% Worthn 

JO 2J 8 

45 

206* 

X 

20 ft + ft 

21 ft 

12 Wraths 

m .1 

90 

19 

19 

19 

7ft 

3% WrgtHo 

J96 24 

M3 

766 

06* 

7ft + ft 

I Y _ ■ 

1368 

56* YonkCo 

f 

25 

066 

066 

096 

1 ** 

4 Yardny 

X LS 13 

IN 

fft 

Sft 

5ft + ft 

| 


z 





11 

566 Timer 

.18 M 

37 

0 % 

0 % 

0 %— % 

£* 

WEX Highs-Lowg 




May 6 



y — ex-dividend and sales in full. 
‘ — yield. _ 

-soiesintuiL 


BtoRadLabB 
vtContAIrpf 
Flratcorpn 
MarklVo 
5CE I30pf 


EtacAudDy 
imThorpf 
PuntaGrd is 


NEW MIONS 19 

BtoRadA Ba ta rptw r ni BrwHiForB 

DeiVal Dixta, FstWvoBra 

Green men « Juaitbrlnd UbtvPedPMI 
PGE 2pfO SeUgmnAsc Semotran 

Untmarn MbtoNafl 

NEW LOWS 11 


ESPUVMIO 
Kevst Cam un 
RMSEtactr 


Harvey Gr Hbtomter 
NetaonLB PetraLaw 
RHSauunn 


l^uisX^ntton.Tke art of travel. 



■ Some people have a talent for 

tiaveL They look upon tizveUing as a fine arc. 

These true connoisseurs require the best. It 
is for them that the Louis Vuirton craftsmen 
create luggage and perpetuate the tradition of 
custom-making perfected over die last 130 
years. 

These skiHpd artisans ensure that each 
trunk, suitcase and bag, be it of the dasric 


“Monogram'' line or the new “Challenge" 
iintf hears the Louis Vuitton stamp of 
strength, durability and refinement. 

They meticulously select their materials; 
traditional leather and brass, or innovative 
space-age fabrics such as Kevlar* and authen- 
ticate their work with the renowned initials. 

_ The Louis Vuitton concept of luggage is 
unique. It has been maintained since 1854. 


In Paris and the major dries of die world. 


f 


In Europe, exdoaTciy * 5 tfae Louis Vunrou shape. 

Paris . Nice ■ Monre-Cario • Loodon • Brosscb • Geneva • Luiutt • Zurich - Milaa 
Florence . DOsseldorf . Ftankfhn • Hitnbuig • Munich. 



■uaONRMSRiBa 


•Vgamd todratrt; Do Po« Jr Nw*, 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


Page 15 


Bonn Emphasized More-Flexible Economies 


*•**> 

« •« 

tor 

l«Mr*rr B r. ■ 
*ry. v 


i ' > > 

Jr’ B’t 


(Contfewed from Page 9) 

high, with ihe European countries 
averaging 11 percent unemploy- 
ment, the communique was stiD 
pointed primarily at fighting infla- 
tion rather than unemployment. 

If there is to be stronger empha- 
sis on monetary and fiscal polities 
for growth in the period ahead, it 
will have to come not from any 
joint pressures evident at this Bonn 
snmmit conference but from inter- 
nal forces within the separate coun- 
tries. There are in fact signs that 
such pressures are building from 
labor groups, rival political parties 
and even, from some business 
groups concerned about their mar- 
kets. 

President Reagan himself, as re- 
flected in the final communique, 
has become a more cautious advo- 
cate of supply-side economics. 
There was no sign that ether he or 
his chief financial officer. Treasury 

Canada J 

Gnorge Weston I 

id over. ms m* V 

Revenue 1.95a urn. I 

OMTlWI lil HO I 

Oper Short— W U1 I 


Secretary Janas A Baker 3d, made 
an effort to lean on other countries 
for fiscal stimulus. 

A significant effect of the confer- 
ence could be to increase the drive 
for deregulation and freer markets 
in Europe. The executive commis- 
sion of the European Economic 
Community, represented here by 
ks president, Jacques De5ors,a for- 
mer French finance minister, said 
that it was jutting a high priority 
on completing “a gamine internal 
market without barriers," which 
would dominate rigidities and gen- 
erate fresh economic growth on a 
Commumiywide scale. 

The hassle over setting a.date in 
early 1986 for a new trade round, 
which the United States urgently 
wanted and which France opposed 
and finally vetoed, may have put an 
exaggerated stress on French po- 
sition to more liberal trade. While 
it is difficult to say how severe a 
blow President Francois Mitter- 


rand dealt to freer trade by his 
action, he nevertheless supported a 
new round of trade np gnriminns 
under the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade to begin “as soon 
as possible." Dramatizing the con- 
flict on die date, the communique 
said, “Most of us think that this 
should be in 1986." 

Some Americans thought that 
the shift from "some" countries to 
"most” countries was an important 
step Forward, although that seems 
dubious. 

The flavor of the c ommuniq ue 
was strongly anti-protectionist. 
"Protectionism does not solve 
problems; it creates than," the 
countries all said. 

But Mr. Mitterrand took the 
leadership in emphasizing that pro- 
gress on trade liberalization was 
unlikely to s uc ceed in the absence 
of more stable exchange rates re- 
sulting from an improvement in the 


Company Earnings 

Revenue end profits. In nriUoiK, ore in locd currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


1H Quar. IW 19M 

Revenue 87X7 M42 

prom — 104 154 

Per Shora (UB 0.13 

Full name at company Is 
Maya, on Alberto Com. 

Thoms o n New*, 
lit Quar. ms mt 

Revenue 214.1 18X4 

Profits 3124 3037 

Per Store 071 061 

France 

MichoGn 


working of the world monetary sys- 
tem. 

In seeking more specific terms 
for monetary reform. Mr. Mitter- 
rand gained little support. Part of 
his bitterness at the aid of the con- 
ference apparently stemmed from 
his belief that he had not received 
the backing he had expected from 
Mr. Baker. 

Afl the communique said on the 
subject of improving the monetary 
system was what everyone already 
knew: that there would be an ex- 
amination of a repon an the func- 
tioning of the international mone- 
tary system by the finance 
ministers of the Group of 10 lead- 
ing industrial countries at their To- 
kyo meeting in June, and that thdi 
proposals would be discussed at the 
October meeting of the interim 
committee of the International 
Monetary Fund in South Korea, 
"with a view" to making the mone- 
tary system "more stable and more 
effective." 

Malvilo 

1st Over. IMS 1M4 

Revenue BMJ 79B.T 

□per Net 120 MB 

Oeer Share— 006 0.16 

Mol excludes loss of 17 
cams oar snare vs 6 cents 
from discontinued opera- 
■■r dons. 


United States 

ABk-Chakners 


1st Qua 
Revenue. 
Net Lota . 


ms not 

2467 3305 

51-57 15X3 


ABtofia 


IftV £. 

ir 

V**c »• 

fife 

wee*** 


'tern W 1 M 2 

Revenue MIT 247T 

Profits 21X00. TUOa 

T: trillion. 


Amor. Prw k tont 
1st Quar. IMS 1M4 

Revenue 2317 22X9 

Net inc. 92 M2 

Per Share ■ 647 122 

Farmer* Group 
MOW. IMS 1M4 

Revenue 237.91 2UX2 

Net Inc. 454 3722 

Per Share 1X4 UD 

Far West fin. 

let Quar. IMS 19*4 

Net Inc. 2 jb 192 

Per Share 1JB7 046 


1*1 Quar. ms mj 

Revenue 27X4 2317 

Oner Net 194 245 

Op er Share— 1X4 120 

Nets exclude pains .et S3 
cents per ebare vs 3f cents. 


4th Qua r. IMS 1M4 

Revenue U1X U1X 

Net Inc- - 1829 1406 

Per Share 049 038 

Year ■ ■ - Mi MM 
Re ve n ue — • 5X78. 5222. 

Net Inc 21578 - 47.55 

Per Shane— X5V .127 
Putt name at company Is 
Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea. 

Harcourt Broca J. 


1*1 Qaa 
Revenue. 
Net Inc . 


T9BS 1984 
145X3 I2S28 

421 489 


Haroco 

WQuar. ms . MM 

Revenue 300,0 2CL1 

Net inc HU 03 

Per Share 05* 042 

Houston Nat. Gas 

_ 1st Quar. ms MM 

Revenue 9387 579J 

Net Inc - 39X1 29X3 

Per Share — 122. 174 

Nets Include gain of 
SStOMt us SU mil fmn from 
fBsconllouett opera t io ns . I9S4 
net also Includes eharve of 
S2t million. 

Jefferson-Pilot 
_ 1st Quar. IMS 1M4 

Oner Net 297 227 

Oner Share— 046 0X1 

Nets exclude ot dm of SPAS 
atHNon vs SSA minion tw 
net also excludes pain ot 
S6X9A00 from discontinued 

o pera tio n s. 


Kemper 

let Quar. MB 19*4 

Revenue 5B4B 486. 

Net Inc 7X2 faJI.T3 

Per Share — 053 — 


Provident life 

lit Quar. 19*5 MM 

□Per Net 247 21.1 

Oner Share— 255 226 

Nets exclude eains at SIX 
motion vs sejmtmon. 

Smith bit’l 



1*4 Quar. HB 

1*64 


Revenue — 1749 

1713 

WM 

Net inc. (alias 

127 

iaao. 

PerShare — 

014 

5278 

allots. 



wets Include pains et USA 
motion vsSTXl mUUon. 


1st Quar. 1985 19M 

Revenue—. 4314 3924 

Net Inc 184 21 JJ 

PerShare— 038 043 


Utihr. Leaf Tob. 

MQaar. MB 1M4 

Re vena e licui mx 

Net Inc 9X9 882 

PerShare — 057 051 

IMoriki (90S 19M 

Revenue 91846 <7373 

Net inc - 39X1 31X0 

PerShm— 227 1X0 


*i*< .*>• 

as?: -2 * 


tiz > 




INVITATION OF BIDS FOR PETROLEUM EXPLORATION 

His Majesty's Government of Nepal Department of Mines & Geology, hereby invites bids for Pecroteun Exploration 
in the fbflowring Exploration Blocks located in the southern pari at Nepal. Companies desirous of undertaking 
Petroleum Operations In Nepal can participate In the bidding according to the Petroleum Laws ot Nepal, 2041 (1985). 

• Opening of Invitation for bids: April 9, 1965. 

• Closing of bids: October 15, 1985 (5:00 p.m.) 

• The location and size of the offered Exploration Blocks are as follows: 

Block No. 1 - Dhangari 4941 sq. km. Block No. 6 - BirgunJ 4880 sq. km. 

Block No. 2 - KamaD 4838 sq. km. Block No. 7-Malangawa 4920 sq. km. 

Block No. 3 - Nepaigun] 4908 aq. km. ■ Block No. 8-Janakpur 4841 sq. km. 

Block No. 4 - Ltanbinj 4965 sq. km. Block No. 9 - Rajbiraj 4854 sq. km. 

Block No. 5 - CHUran 4945 sq. km. Block Na 10 - Biratnsgar 4696 sq. km. 


Block No. 6 - BirgunJ 
Block No. 7-Malangawa 
Block No. 8 - Janakpur 
Block Na 9 -Rajbiraj 
Block Na 10 - Biratnagar 


4880 sq. km. 
4920 sq. km. 
4941 sq. km. 
4854 sq. km. 
4696 sq. km. 


• The Bid Appticatioa along with relevant supporting documents for each Exploration Block, should be submitted 
in dupficata in a sealed envelope addressed to the Department of Mines & Geology. His Majesty's Government of 
Nepal, Lafnctxxr. Ka thmandu, Nepal, Attention: Director General, on or before October 15, 1985 (before 500 pm) 

The sealed envelope should be prominently maikad "Enclosed is 8ld tor Exploration Block due 15 October 1985'. 

• The appDcatioiifee shall bo U.S. $500 for each Exploration Bbck.appBed for and shaUbe pakJ in bank cheque 
payable to the Department qf Mines & Geology. The fee shal be paid at the time of submittal of each application 
and shall be non-refund able. A separate application must be filed for each Exploration Block applied for. 

• Applicants do not need to register in Nepal nor appoint an agent in Nepal as a condition to submitting an 
application of Hd. 

• There are ctiflerent Data Sales Packages “A" Birough “H“ available to those who wish to purchase from this 
. . Department upon payment of a fixed price. However, the Bidders must purchase Data Package "A" (available 

on payment of LLS. $12,000) before submitting their bids. Purchase of Data Sales Package “A" will also entitle 
the Buyer to a one time visit to the Kathmandu Data Center at the Department of Mines & Geology. 

• For further Information. Inquiries should be sent to: 

De par tment of Mines & Geology 
Mr. JJL Tatar 

Deputy Director General and Project incharge 
Lainchour, Kathmandu, Nepal 
Telephone: 4-13541, 4-14740 
Telex: 2320 MINES NP 



Subsidiary of IOB BankhnMng Corporation LimHed 


Statement of Condition 

as of December 31, 1984 ■ 


Assets 

Cash and Due from Banks 
Government and Other Securities 
Deposits with and Loans to the Government 
Loans 

Bank Premises and Equipment 
Other Assets 

Total Assets 


Liabilities 

Deposits 

Government and Other Deposits for Granting Loans 
Debentures, Floating Rate Notes and Capital Notes 
Other Liabilities 
Total Liabilities 


Capital Accounts 

Capital Stock, Reserves and Surplus 

Minority Interest - 

Total Capital Accounts 

Total Liabilities and Capital Accounts 


$4,420,554,000 

1.467.419.000 

2.018.157.000 

2.645.176.000 

183.363.000 

109.118.000 
$10,843.787.000 


$8,467,589,000 

935.576.000 

999.690.000 
51,602.000 

10.454.457.000 


346.404.000 
42.926.000 

389.330.000 
$10,843.787.000 


OVER 270 BRANCHES AND OFFICES M ISRAEL AND ABROAD 


U.S. SUBSIDIARY 

ISRAEL DISCOUNT BANK OF NEW YORK 

511 Fifth Avenue, New York (212) 551-8500 

MenawfOlC 

Other Subsidiary Banks and Offices: Buenos Aiies/C&yman/London/Los Angeles/ Luxembourg 
memt/ M ontevideo/Montreal/Nassau/Ncw Yorfc/Rlo de Janeiro / San tiago /Sio Paulo/TOronto 

ThB ftnenael state me nt tas been aOrawBaHy vansaeq tram Israel sheqete. adjusted tor the eflea rf mflaon 
. based on sw Coneunwr Pace fader tar Ngvamb* ISM, at the rapneenueve rate ot oobenge ptetog on 
MceiiMr 31. 1984. 1.S. «38.7l -US- Si 0O.rtMy br IM coa^Mmeef Wlei 


Futures Move 
Cruises Stir 

(Continued from Page 9) 
Those who grant options would 
continue to face unlimited risk, Mr. 
Jenkins added. 

If the London exchange’s plans 
to margin its new Eurodollar op- 
tions are successful, as many think 
they win be, the system may be 
adopted by domestic exchanges. 
Indeed, one industry leader, 
George DJF. Lambom, who beads 
the commodity operations at Don- 
aldson, Lufkin & Jenretle Securi- 
ties Corp„ has long been an advo- 
cate of margined options. 

Separately, the 'National Associ- 
ation of Securities Dealers, which 
previously announced plans to in- 
troduce options on an index of 100 
over-the-counter stocks in August 
said it win file a proposal with the 
government in a few days for an 
index on 100 financial shares. 

But not everyone is the industry 
is happy over all these develop- 
ments. Alan C. Leventen, president 
of Twenty-First Futures, a division 
of Twenty-First Securities Corp., 
said. ‘The flood of new options 
that wfl] soon descend on ns should 
deeply concern, not the 

industry. For one, our industry is 
still struggling to cope with the 
highly complex options already be- 
ing traded. 


NYSE Chief Steers Toward Change 

(Continued from Page 9) the NYSE might soon change its we’ve got 43 or 44 million ind 


(Continued from Page 9) 

c hang ing and is not going to be an 
old lO-to-4 world," Mr. Phelan 
said. 

The response to a NYSE survey 
of 4,000 industry, academic and 
news-media people earlier this year 
to assess their interest in 24-hour 
trading was a unanimous, "Non- 
sense. Forget it," Mr. Phelan said. 
Despite this, there are some people 
who are willing to trade sizable 
blocks of stock out of NYSE hours, 
he added. 

“It’s there in currencies now," 
Mr. Phelan said of global 24-hour 
trading "It’s there in gold and in 
money trading, and I suspect it’s 
there in Eurobond trading in one 
form or another. And it’s going to 
be there in stock trading" 

Pressure for round-the-clock 
txading, Mr. Phelan anticipates, 
also will come from investors with 

E nal computers linked to 
and brokerage houses and 
who now can send orders at night 
to be stored for execution the next 
day. 

“If over the next few years that 
builds up as a major source," Mr. 
Phelan said, "then those people 
may want to have some land of 
market access up to a certain peri- 
od of time:" 

Although Mr. Phelan was not 
specific, other exchange officials 
said that current thinking is tha t 


hours by opening at 9:30 A.M. in- 
stead of 10 AJvL This would create 
less of a problem for the exchange 
than remaining open from 4 P.M. 
to 4:30 P.M. because of end-of-the- 
day bookkeeping. 

One element of the changing 
scene at the NYSE is the role 
played by mergers and acquisi- 
tions. In 1982, 1983 and 1984, the 
Big Board added 235 companies to 
its listings but lost 258 to mergers. 

A current challenge faced by the 
NYSE is the move by corporations 
— concerned about the threat of 
takeovers — to two classes of stock, 
typically an A-dass stock with a 
majority of voting power and aB- 
class slock with limited voting 
power. 

Big Board tradition requires 
companies to have a single elks of 
common stock, but the exchange is 
now reconsidering its position. 

Another indication of change at 
the NYSE is an increase in arbitra- 
tion cases brought to the exchange. 

In 1979 there were 311 cases; in 
1984 there were 1.008. The cases 
represent complaints by customers 
against brokers, companies bat- 
tling other firms or brokerage firms 
acting against broken. 

Growth and volume are respon- 
sible at least in pan for the rise, Mr. 
Phelan said. "In 1975 we had 25 
million individual investors: Today 


we’ve got 43 or 44 million individ- 
ual investors. There are more peo- 
ple in the market, and more institu- 
tions.” 

The thought given to longer trad- 
ing hours reflects the NYSE's de- 
sire not to lose market share to 
either the domestic exchanges, in- 
cluding the American Stock Ex- 
change and the burgeoning over- 
the-counter market operated by the 
National Association of Securities 
Dealers, or to overseas exchanges. 

Competition between the Big 
Board and the NASD has been 
particularly fierce in the last several 
years. 

The NYSE appeared to have 
scored at least some psychological 
points over the AMEX when Mr. 
Phelan recently hired Robert J. 
Birnbautn. president and chief op- 
erating officer of the AMEX, for a 
similar job at the Big Board. 

Mr. Phelan said there was no 
plan for a merger of the two ex- 
changes. 

"1 think competition in any form 
makes you beuer,” he said. "We’re 
probably paying more attention to 
our companies today than we did 
five, six or seven years ago, because 
they deserve that attention, and 
they have an alternative." 

He added: "You know, when we 
had the whole ball of wax 15 years 
ago, you could sit there and take 
everything in the world for granted. 
We can’t do that today." 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

* (Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL I 


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LONDON: EDUCATE) LADY Gonv 
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SERVICES 


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Far imnatEata restivatiam contact 

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Ftraddurti p69] 7WJ5. 
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Sara dan; 0B 7569229. 

Tel Avne 03455 559. 
Vimm Contact Franfcfort 

UNTO5TAIB 

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papr.3T9 

O u nynga R i 431 943/431 
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MIDDLE EAST 


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MADRID IMPACT and and guide 


■ai.-^LLUll XV.'.T'.'HJLri 


AMSTERDAM .EANET Escort Service 

Tefe m 3JW2D or 340110. 


AMSTBTOAM FOB 8QSH Escort 
Service W 20-964376 


HtANBUHT- AIMPS Escort Serves. 
TeL 069 / 2881-03. 


FRANKFURT “TOP TOT Escort Ser- 
vic*. 069/59-6052- 


BRU5SBS MKHEUE E5008T AND 
GUDt SBtVKS. TBj 733 07 98 


r T' w-ii: »9? i 


IHi 030-366655 


* AMSTERDAM* 

57f Escort Service. 227837 



NEW YORK Renee & Gafariefc Escsn 
Service. 212-22M670. 


LA VENTURA 


MAYFAIR CUB 


BELGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


ROME OUB EUROPE ESCORT 
& Guide Serwe-TeL 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 ptfl 


OBSEA BCORT SSVfCE. 

51 Beaudnnp IfcCA London 5WG. 
TeL- 01 5B< 6513/2^49 (4-12 pn^ 


GB4EVA BCORT 

SHWItt. Tab 46 11 58 




LOMTON ESCORT AGB4CY. 

Tefa 935 5339. 



JBMffiTS BCORT C TRAVa Ser- 
vice Frobfurt TeL D69/555973 


MUWQj SUPREME ESCORT Service. 
TeL 089/4486038 


RAMOUtr SONIA ESCORT 'Ser- 
vm. Teb 06968 34 42. 


MUNKH-BLOWYATANjAEsmn 
Service. Tefc 311 79 00 or 31 1 79 36 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Tab 0711 / 362 11 50. 


NtANXftJRT/MUNKH Mata Escort 
■Service. 069/386441 & 089/35182%. 


HAMBURG - SAIRMA Escort Ser- 
vice. TeL 0«1/5B 65 35. 


HEATHROW LONDON BCORT Ser- 
va. TeL 994 6682. 


II MKT DE VILLA MARRON Frtnk- 
furt Escort Strvtce 069-5601229. 




BRUSSELS. CHANTAL ESCORT Sv- 
viefc Tefe 02/520 23 65. 


UXOON LUCY BCORT & Guide 
Service. Tefe 01-373 0211 


MUNCH - PRIVATE ESCORT + 
Gwde Sen**. T* 91314 


VIENNA ESCORT AGBICY. TeL 37 
52 39 


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IONDON TOME BCORT Serviee. 
TeL 01-373 B849. 


LONDON OBOE ESCORT Servia. 
TeL 3707151. 




























































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1 THINK I LL JUST 
UJEAKTHE SLEEVES. 

me 


ACROSS 


1 Inclined way 
5 Love, in Pisa 
10 High cards 


14 Ripley's 

"Believe 

Not" 

15 Prickly pear 

IS Undiluted 

17 Actress Raines 

18 Admiral or 
duck 

19 Thomas 

Edison 

20 Tomlin’s 
blossom? 

23 Poet Teasdale 

24 S.A. country 

25 Angelico 

28 Memorizer’s 

bloom? 

34 Impacts 

38 Diminutive ■ 
ending. 

37 Painful 

38 Cruising 

39 Plat, circular 

objects 

41 Flag in the 
Murdoch 
garden? 

42 Yankees or 
Mets 

43 Corrode 

44 One of the 
Bermudas 

45 Soda jerk's 
boutonniere? 


cathedral city 

50 Papal office 

51 Jacob’s twin 
brother 

S3 Rev. John’s 
flower? 

81 Wing! ike parts 

82 Fishing boat of 
India 

S3 Hi-fi buff’s 
concern 

84 Billy’s 
American 
Beauty? 

85 Weird 

88 Network of 
nerves 

87 Observed 

68 Units of force 

89 Egyptian god 


BOOKS 


— IK 


DOWN 


1 Cambodian 
coin 

2 Kingof the 
Huns 

3 Flanders of 
fiction 

4 Beseeches 

5 To 

(alternating) 

6 Pestle’s 
partner 

7 Brightly 
colored fish . 

8 Roue 

9 Raises 


®Afe» York Thoea. edited ly Et^ote Moleskn. 


s DENNIS THE MENACE 


REX MORGAN 


*1 t)0NT HAVE ANY WRET3RUMS...BUT WXJLDYABE 
INNERESTED IN61MN' A REAL LOUD COMS&lV 



\W^KM\ WONOER T PRESTON, T 
how many i think / 

LIMES SHE SHE'S L 

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GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
i« by Henri Amok! and Bob Lea 


Unscramble these four Jimbfes, 
one letter to each square, to frjftn 
four ordinary words 


FEASI 

H 


'1 

c 

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□ 

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MAYOF 



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WHAT THE 
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NUC7IST WAS ALL 
WRAPPED 7 UP IN. 


a*** nxEraum 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: ADAGE MOUSY STOLEN CARBON 
Answer What he said when the judge sentenced him 
to be hanged— THAT'S BAD "NOOSE" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


■remit 


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Edinburgh 

PtoraWB 

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14 57 
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13 SB, 
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Room 

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Strasbourg 

Venice 

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11 52 

10 44 
19 46 

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11 53 

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13 55 
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IB 50 

17 41 

18 44 
If 44 

15 Sf 

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It 41 

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B 46 

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U 64 


MIDDLE EAST 


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18 

64 

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Seoul 

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Shanghai 

32 

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17 

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Staaaaara 

31 

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25 

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TOtaef 

28 

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24 

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AFRICA 






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59 

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Cairo 

38 100 

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32 

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Beanos Aires 

22 

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Linn, 

71 

70 

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Moteo City 

33 

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24 

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Anchorage 

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27 

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Boston 

17 

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22 

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Danver 

25 

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Delrec 

24 

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HooeUDo 

30 

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Hoastan 

» 

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17 

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25 

77 

20 

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Watte 

29 

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Mlnesagens 

23 

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San Prandseo 

17 

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0 -m*rc 8 $t; Bc^ortfy ciouoe: 

rfOln; 


TUBS DAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: V*rr ehot w r- FRANKFURT: Rainy. 
Tenw. 11—? <52—45). LONDON: Rater- T otb. 13—5 155— 41}. MADRID; 


Cloudy. Tenw. 14—4 161—301. NEW YORK: Fair. TtfflB. B— 12 (72 —541. 
PARIS: Rainy. Temp. 14— B (41—441. ROME: Showers. Tmm. 18—14 


<44 — 571. TEL AVIV: Cloodv. Toma. 24— 12 (75—54). ZURICH: Rainy. Toma. 
15— 7 IS*— 45|. BANGKOK; Foggy. Temp. 37—7 


.39 <90 — 841. MONO KONG: 


Cloudy, Temp. 30 — B 1*4 — ai!. MAIIILA:jniow«tV_Tenp. 31 — 23 <M^- VY 


SEOUL: Homy. Toma u— M <tl —57). SINGAPORE: stamv. Tenw. 32 
I to — 77). TOKYO: Showers. Term. 23 — 19 173— M). 


World Stock Markete 


Via Agence France- Presse May 6 

doting prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACPHeidfoD 

Aegon 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ATTom Rubber 
Aim Bonk 
BVG 

BUOtl HWII I T 
Coland HWO 

EUovler-NDU 
FoKkOr 

cm r 

Helnekon 


431 

210 

1BSJ0 

11220 

24) JO 


24) JO 
LBS 
7340 
202 
85 JO 


«» 

U450 
1 1 3 JO 
•m n 


KLM 

Noantan 

Nat Madder 

Nedllayd 

Ore voider G 

Pah hoed 

Philips 

Robins 

Rodomco 

RallntD 

Rorento 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

Vcm Qminoreo 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


119.50 
129 JO 
1B8J0 
154J0 
6130 
59 JO 
50.10 
*7 JO 
171 
323 
6450 
S4J0 
73J0 
139.40 


4JJ0 

2TIJC 

M 

2SS 


US 
7SJC 
JOS 
01 
37 JO 
”2-50 
726J0 

i£2 

172JB 

324J0 

34JD 
72B0 
139 JO 
68 
45 

21080 

3020 

®J0 

16X30 

210 


Ctoie Prov 


HusmK 

IWKA 

Kan+Scdx 

•content 

Kaufhef 


149 149 

291 20130 
314 31 ft 
253JS2SL3 
22638 22630 
230 27130 


Kloecknar H-D 25330 25230 
Ktoeckner Werk* 71.90 7130 


Krapa State 
U ndo 
Ujflhoma 
MAN 


10930 108 

426 42430 
lftfl 50 IBS 
14030 150 


Muencfl Rueck 

Mixdort 

PKI 

P orsche 

Preussag 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhetametall 


I®'* 


1370 


SEL 
Sl emono 


... 613 

12630 12430 

S 15630 
3SS3B 

36*S 3 


18130 18030 


Veba 

Voiksrragenwerfc 21130 30UQ 
Welki 369 569 


C o m i ww i hwdc Index : I2S6J8 
Preview : 12ZLM _ 


ANP CB S Oo—ral Index : 
hotan : 212.10 


iu« 


Artec 

B e ha r t 

Cockenii 


1725 


EBES 

GB-limo-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 


1MB 

sg» 

227 228 

hk nx 
30 75 3870 
3340 
1M0 ira 
3730 3740 


lut or com 

Kredretaank 

PdreHna 

See Generate 

Safina 

Satvoy 

T««ton C tac 

Unere 

Vletlle Mon Inane 


2170 2160 
8200 8200 


1840 I860 
7118 7150 
41*0 4l$» 
3000 3900 


1715 1710 
6070 6BSQ 


Cyrraet Stock tod w : 228*79 
Pitvlem : 32B5J0 


AEG-Tetofunlen 

Allianz Vera 

Aliens 

BASF 

Buyer 

Bov HW9 Bank 
Bey Vendtebonk 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gununl 
Daimler-Benz 
Daaucsa 

Oewtsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
□raawaaik 
GHH 


I 1 ,1 1* n 6 f ■ 5 
IIWVIIURi 


11130 10030 
1215 1180 
36130 361 JO 

3oi» ana 

21130 21130 
331 34430 
362 30 

200 207 

S3 WSJ 
34130 332 

l7R7fi 14930 
135J0 132 

681 67*50 
3483Q 349 

160.10 141 JO 
467 JO 46430 
21538 211130 
15130 15130 

m 3zz 

47S 477 


21248 21258 

■' is 


10? JO 18830 


Bk East Asia 
CheurtQ Km 
China Gas 


QilnaLJjdit^ 


Green I 
Hana Seng Bank 
Henderson 
HK Electric 
HK Really A 
HK Hahns 

HK Land 
HK Shoos Bank 
HK Te le ph one 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whomnoa 


2438 200 
17,10 1430 
9A0 9JS 
14.90 1430 
SJO B 

2J3 

«D 7-73 

’H8 37 

530 


« 

81 




mnewy 
Jardlnr 
Jardtns Sec 
kowtaon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New world 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Proas 
Stains 

Swire Pacific A 
Yal Chews 
WahKwong 
Whaatock A 
Wing On Ca 

WM90T 

World inn 


2438 _ . 

066 <U4 

an an 
12 11J8 
■ nee nei 

ro3o me 

3230 31 

738 7 JS 
2375 120 
12.10 1L68 
2325 2373 
2*10 26 
131 136 
130 138 
735 735 
2375 235 

430 4375 

US 2225 


Hana Sene lodes : 
previeos : 155U8 


159633 


Mi 


AECI 

Angie American 
Anglo Am Cota 
Bor lows 
Blnoor 
Buffets 
De Beers 

OrtafMtein 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

HtweM steal 

Kloof 

NeaoailL . 

PrssSieyn 

Rusrttt 




800 

2S7S BSD 
17209 173 
1140 1125 
1400 74Q0 


fW Hg 


1050 1 _ 
5825 5100 
J68D 1600 
3225 ZED 


SLrg 


7500 

UTS 1198 
5550 5608 
1629 MSS 


Cleee Frye 


SA Brews 
51 Helens 
Sasol 

west Holding 


74 0 740 
3575 3575 
612 612 
6300 6550 


: II 


1 MBra 1 

Banco Comm 

17258 

>7120 

Centro Jo 

3010 

3035 


7699 

749 

Crad Ital 

2071 

2079 

e/ntateo 

9309 

9375 


12397 

13300 

Flat 

295D 

2920 


NA 

a 


44500 44050 


7450 

7473 


16900 

86430 


1638 

1610 

Hainwteitarl 

76730 73950 

Merftotarcn 

S4480 

8439 


1622 

1615 

OHvottl 

6169 

6165 

Pirelli 

2250 


HAS 

64150 64450 

RJnascents 

678 

667 

SIP 

2008 

1974 

SME 

1337 

1213 

Stea 

2799 

2767 


13790 12958 

Stat 

2605 

2595 

1 MIB Currant index : rm 


J Prevloa* : 1223 



Is ^ 1 

Air Lloulde. 

624 

296J0 

<18 

A«Q0*OUll 

Bonaire 

1S57 

665 

1563 

665 

BIC 

517 

513 

Borteram 

TUTS 

1875 

Bouvauas 

709 

696 

BSN45D 

2524 

2S2S 


2147 

71« 

CMrgeers 

49850 


aim MXS 

566 

1127 


1308 

1284 


618 


EH-Aoultalne 

236 232.18 

euroae 1 

870 

868 

Gen Sou* 

629 

tag 

Hachetta 

1892 

1B48 

LatareaCap 

£13 

SOS 


2055 

2040 

Leileur 

7M 

730 

ItTreal 

2415 

2400 

Morteil 

1771 

1751 

Moira 

19QS 

1908 

Marlin 

1545 

USB 

Midwlln 

930 

920 

Mow Hpvwssy 

1853 

1857 

Moulinex 

102 

101 

OcddertWta 

707 

691 

Pernod RK: 

710 



SSI 

512 

Patroies Use) 

267-80 26650 


344 

343 

Pr Intern ns 

B: f^ri 

Roawtedm 

* i -ti 

Reroute 

1380 

tr'.-ll 

Roussel Uckn 

1748 

1731 

5teofl 

729 

711 

Skis OattUtnel 

15QS 

1780 

Tetamecan 
Thomson CSF 

2 S38 

2510 

536 

A 9*fi index : 299 Jf 



Pravlew : 2HJ1 
CAC Index : 216J8 



Prevtaas : 215.11 







Cow Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 

How Par 


Mol Banking 

85b c 

Overseas Union 
ShongrMc 
5 kne Darby 
Spare Land 
Snore Pres* 

S Steamship 
SITrofflno 

Un fled Ov er s eas 
UOB 


Straits Tunes lad. 
PrevfOss : 79*87 



AGA 

Atfa Loyal 


6JS 


AsJro 

Atlas Copco 


Ele ctralw c 

Ertcssae 


Esseffe 

Monde«»nken 


- 9 

346 NO. 
438 425 

114 1M 
N.Q. 216 

SJB 

•% M 

^ NA. 


ACI 

AN) 

ANZ 

BHP 

Borm 

Bougainville 

Bra mutes 

Cota* 

Camcfco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dun log 

Eiders bd 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MIM 


223 

272 

472 


322 

220 


37 B 

235 


299 

ZI3 

812 

161 

265 


223 

271 

465 

628 

322 

215 

375 

370 

235 

636 

294 

212 

no 

159 

26S 


Pete 

PaM 

RGCl 


Southland 

WoodsMa 

Warmold 

Alt I 


179 

■5 

<30 

405 

SM 

614 

176 


177 

95 

412 


Ui 

362 


5tf 

606 

175 

25 

158 

356 


WITH FRIENDS POSSESSED: 
A Life of Edward FiteGeraid. 


By Robert Bernard Martin* 313 pp- $17.95. 
Illustrated 

Atheneum, 597 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 10017. 


Reviewed by 

Quistopha Lehmann-Haupt 


T HERE arc two passages in this life of 
Edward FitzGerald (1859-1883) where its 
protagonist cones especially alive. In one of 
them, the writer best known 10 posterity as the 
translator of “Die Ruhaiyal of Omar Khay- 
yam” learns as he is silting down to dinner That 
his companion is about to have a ship named 
‘ after him, According to the friend, FitzGerald 
expressed playful honor, “jumped up, chair 
and aH,” and took himself “into the far comer 
of the room, professing he could not presume 
to sit at the same table with one about to have a 
ship namnH after him.” 

m the other passage, he is r 
the streets and beaches of the East — — 
town of Lowestoft, carrying mm and tobacco 


and looking for attractive sailors to befriend. 
As RobertBemard Martin writes* “He was a 
distinctive figure on the lonely Loweshrft 
beadt, bis obviously expensive but ill-tended 
dotbes thrown on anyhow, his top hat p- 
chored against the sea wind by a scan tied 
mi d” * his chin, on his face such a curious 
comb ination of apprehensive hauteur and ex- 
cessive vulnerability that many" of the sailors 
“thought he was mad.” 

Throughout this estimable life, Martin 
stresses the (dayful side of FitzGerald, and 
there is abundant evidence in the anecdotes 
and correspondence he dies of a man forever 
in search of Inn who sometimes carried his 

jokes to extremes. But it is the latter portrait of 
FitzGerald we take away with us. For however 
much the joker and playful companion is 
stressed, we find it hard to forget the image Of 
FitzGerald as the son of an overbearing moth- 
er, as a friend so dependent on the handsome 
men he adored that the very topography of 
eland was colored by his feelings for them, 
fas a nun whose only time of unadulterated 
unsay was provoked “by a brief and disastrous 
marriage, after his mother’s death, to a woman 
be referred to uncharitably as “the contempo- 
rary." 

Nonetheless, one must be leery of fabricat- 


f 4 


$ 


Sotmioa to Previous Puzzle 



□BDQ □ 

aa 

□Q □ 

ana 

EEDE H 

an 

mn a 

□□a 

cnaciQn 

□□ 

□□□□ 

□□a 

BEG3Eanaa 

□□□ 

3QQSI3 

□DQnana 



sity and the University o 
numerous studies of Victorian literature, in- 
cluding “Tennyson: The Unquiet Heart” 
(1980) —assures us that FitzGerald “probably 
never directly faced the emotions” that attrac- 
tive men provoked within him. He writes that if 
*our own day overemphasizes sexuality as Che 
cause of behaviour and emotion,” conversely 
“many Victorians manag ed what seems to us 
the difficult balancing act of believing that love 
between men which had no overt physical 
consequences was therefore untouched by 
physical motivation." We must accordingly 
hold in our minds an image of FitzGerald that 
would be difficult to sustain were he living 
now. 


N 0{kf|AlN|f (S jA(N 
A P 


DO EJOC30D 

EE □□ BUaCJO 


Christopher Lehmann -Haupt is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


of- 

ws. 


B eware of old 
fering peaceful 
They are not always sincere. 

The master of the draw offer 
that is not meant to be accepted 
always was and still is Samuel 
Reshevsky. Now 73 yean old, 
the Spring Valley, New York, 
grandmaster boned the of- 
fer to draw into a potent strate- 
gic move. 

The most recent punishment 
Rcsheysky meted om for scorn- 
ing Iris offer was directed 
against Sergey Kudrin of Stam- 
ford, Connecticut, America’s 
newest grandmaster, in their 
seventh-round game in the Lu- 
gano International Open Tour- 
nament in Switzerland. 

• Kudrin's 6 P-B3 was a rare, 
curiously tame move that 
braced the center what such 
aggressive methods as the 
Richter- Rauzer Attack with 6 
B-KN5 and Bobby Fischer’s 
favorite, 6 B-QB4, could well 
have been chosen. A suprise 
without bite is no suprise at alL 
Kudrin continued to follow 


could afford to be casual about 
the game. 

It worked. Instead of playing 
the prudent 14 P-QR3 (or- 
agreeing to a draw), Kudrin be- 
lieved dial he could provoke 
the old man with 14 K-Nl? 
without suffering ill conse- 
quences. But, oh, how wrong he 
was began to become dear 
when Reshevsky sacrificed the 
exchange with 14 : . . RxN!: 

15 QxR, QXPch, 16 K-Bl. 
Before Kudrin could get to 

die safely of an end game with 
17 Q-R3, Reshevsky sharply 
broke open lines for attack with 

16 . . . P-Q41 Countering by 

17 P-N5? would have been an 

error permitting 

17 . . . NxP!; 18 PxN, 



V-* 1 


wutouwin 
FaaMoaaftarShiP 


Resbevksy’s 26 . . ; QxP 

him bis 


gave turn bishop and two 
patau for a rook and his attack 
was stiff in full siring 
On 28 . . . Q-K4. Kudrin 
could not play 29 KR-K1 be- 


BxPch; 19 B-K3, P-Q5: 20 RxP 
(20 RxB, Q-R8cb; 21 


K-Qi 

PxQch; 22 K-Kl, QxRchl; 23 
KxQ, PxP; 24 B-N5ch, PxB; 25 
K-K2, B~R7 would cost White 


cause of 29 . . . Q-R4ch; 30 
P-B3. B-B5; 31 Q-B2, 


. Q-Q4ch. 
However, 29 QR-K1 could not 
hold out much longer — 





29 . . . Q-R4ch did not pa- 
til 30 K-C 


mil 30 K-Ql in view of 
30 . . . B-B5; 31 Q- 


an idiosyncratic path, dewl^- 


ing his queen with 8 
which indeed prepared far 0-0- 
0 without detracting from the 
power of a white rook at Ql. 
But why Mode the white KB 
this way? 

On 11 . . . R-Bl, Kudrin 

h art tn gjw h« nAtf j tirm - 

al pr otectkxL, since a smashup 
of the white king position by 
12 . . . RxN! loomed 
In playing 13 . . . Q-R4, 
Reshevdry offered a draw, al- 
though White was the only one 
exposed to a ny danger in the 
position. The idea was surdy to 
seduce Kudrin into thinking he 


Moreover, I7.PJtP?, NxP; 18 
QxP, 0-0 would haw created il_ 
terrible threat of 19 . . B- 
B3, and if 19 P-N5, then 
19 . . . B-QN5!; 20 F-B3. 
NxP! would have been devas- 
tating. 

Reshevsky’s 18 . . . R-Ql! 
not only transported a rook to 
the important queen file but 
also set a trap: 19 P-N5?. B-Q3! 
snares toe iniite queen. 

After 22 . . . NxKPI, Black 
of course threatened 
23 . . . Q-RSmate, while 23 
P-B3? allows 23 . . . RxB; 24 
RxR, Q-R8ch, winning materi- 
al It was now usdess to jday 23 
Q-R3, smee 23 . . . QxQ; 24 
PxQ, N-B7 would result in a 
warning aid game tor Black. 


R8ch; 32 K-02,R-Q5ch; 33 K- 
h. forcing man 


K3, Q-B6ch, foremg mate. 

After 34 . . . Q-R7ch, 
White either gets mated follow- 
ing 35 K-Ql, B-N6ch or imme- 
diately with 35 K-K3, Q- 
B7mate, or loses the 
35 Q-B2, R-B7ch. 
up. 


the aueen by 
Kudrin gave 


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U.S. Steel Chairman Urges 
Restrictions on Imports 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The chair- 
man of UB. Steel Carp, oat Mon- 
day predicted the industry would 
shrink over the next five years and 
said his company would survive 
only if imports are restricted and 
labor unions want concessions 
Chairman David Roderick said 
the company was hopetul that vol- 
untary import restrictions sought 
by the Reagan administration wifl 
vwjtL 


company’s stance that pay and pro- 


ductivity concessions were vital to 
keep ILS. 


Sled competitive with 
domestic and foreign producers. 

Last week, five major Americas 
steel compani es canceled a toree- 
decade-dd policy of coordinated 
bargaining with unions. That move 
was seen as weakening unions and 
enhancing toe possibility of a strike 
in toe 


But he wasn’t overly optimistic. 

from foreign 


The import level 
steelmakers, rather than de 
tons far ui 1985. has rises to 27.t 
percent” of the domestic market, 
Mr. Roderick said at toe compa- 
ny’s annual meeting. 

“If the [voluntary import restric- 
tion] program is to be of help, it 
must begin to show some positive 
results soon,” Mr. Roderick said. 
“Its effectiveness rests upon its vig- 
orous and rigorous enforcement.* 
Mr. Roderick also reiterated toe 


Mr. Roderick declined to spera- 
late on the prospect of labor strife. 

He predicted that company camp- 
ings would rise, but only slightly, 
through 2986. 

earned $493 mil- 
519.1 billion in 1984 
it of $58 million on 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 7, 1985 


Page 17 


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PHILADELPHIA — Moses 
Malone scored 31 points Sunday as 
the 76ers beat Milwaukee, 121-1 12, 
for a four-game sweep of their Na- 
tional Basketball Association East- 
ern Conference semifinal playoff 
■> series. 

Andrew Tan^ added 23 pednts 
*: and 11 assists for Philadelphia, 

which wifl take on the winner of the 
Detroit-Bosttffl series. The Pistons 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

evened that confrontation, 2 - 2 , 

■ v " with a victory Sunday night Mean- 
'" wide, in Western Conference sgmj - 

finals, Portland stayed alive by do* 
" . . Seating the Los Anades Lakeraand 
f Denver downed Utah to take 3-1 
lead. • •* 

Milwaukee, wbich reached the 
? r second round by defeating Chica- 
go, led by 71-63 with 4:53 to play in 
■~. the third quarter. But Philadelphia, 
which advanced to the second 
* ' round by dimmating Washington, 
then ou tscored the Bucks, 20-6, for 
'•*. an 83-77 third-period lead. Ma- 
lone, Toney and Maurice Checks 
sparked the pivotal singe, 
r The Sixers boosted the margin to 
97-87 with 7:01 r emaining , in the 
game. Milwaukee never got closer 
' .* than five points in the Fourth quar- 
' - * ter, the last rime at 113-108 with 
:■> 1:41 left. 

Sidney Moncrief and Paul Pres- 
sey scored 25 points apiece for Mil- 
waukee. 

Malone, who also pulled down 
13 rebounds in the series-ender, did 
not fed the 76en> had dominated 
—■"« the Bucks. ‘They were four tough 
games,” said the winner s* center. 
“All three of their centers showed 

they could play when things were 

, really physical under the basket” 

" — Coach - Don Nelson, whose 

| Bucks surprised the league by 

5 h breezing to the title in the Central 

? Division, said he was stunned by 

If the sweep. “Philadelphia,” he said, 

“is no longer a sleeping giant 
Somewhere along the line in. the 
Washington series they woke up — 
and they’re rolling now” 

Pistons 102, Cdtics 99 

In Detroit, Vinnie Johnson 
poured in 22 points in the fourth 
7 ?- quarter to put the Pistons past Bos- 

r:* ton. Game 5 will be played 
Wednesday night at Boston Gar- 
den. 

Detroit won the game with ag- 
gressive final-period defense and 
Johnson's scoring. The Cdtics held 
an 87-76 lead to start the quarter, 
but Johnson wiped that out by 
making his first six shots; in the 
r . period, the Pistons held. Boston to- 
$ just 12 points — the sixth-bwest 
total in playoff history — and only 
three field goals. 

The lead changed hands 
throughout the final quarter before 
Johnson broke a 96-96 deadlock on 
a jump shot with 1:51 left Boston 
guard Danny Ainge hit a 3-point 
field goal with 44 seconds to play; 
the Cdtics got the ball back, but 
Larry Bird missed a jumper with 
six seconds left Irish Thomas then 
was fouled by Kevin McHale and 
dosed out the scoring by making 
two free throws with three seconds 

‘ * “JP- 

£ . Thomas scored 21 for the Pis- 
Urns, while Terry Tyler had 18. 

» ' McHale led Boston with 24 points, 

l ^ Bird had 21 and Parish 16.' 

; r Johnson’s was an almost unbe- 
t : lievable display of clutch shooting 
.£ in the fourth quarter. Making 10 of 
»> 1 1 shots, he finished with a total of 
- 34 points in 30 minutes coming off 

■S f* the bench. 

• i ^ Almost all of Jchnson's shots in 


the quarter were from about 13 
feet. The biggest was an off-bal- 
ance 15-foot lean-in jumper with 
the shot dock running down that 
gave Detroit a 100-96 lead with 38 
seconds remaining. That was the 
final blow to the Cdtics, an iron- 
man team that wilted to a pomt-a- 
minule aggregation Sunday’s the 
last 12 minutes. 

* “The only ihmg I was thinking 
about,” said Johnson, a six-year 
veteran, “was, ‘Hey, Tm going 
gnat, the crowd’s into it — Id’s 
win.' My game was just to get os 
even with them.” 1 

Johnson, 3-for-15 in the two pre- 
vious games, nude 16 of 21 shots. 
“Vinme can do that every day in 
practice.” said Coach Chuck Daly. 
“When, he’s in that rhythm, he’s 
awfully tough.” Asked how many 
shots Johnson bad to make before 
the team, would b egin going to him 
exclusively, Daly answered with no 
hesitancy: “One.” 

Trail Blazers 115, Lakers 107 

In Portland, Oregon, Mychal 
Thompson scored 6 of hi s 17 points 
in the final 30 seconds to help the 
Trail Blazers hand Los Angeles its 
first loss of the playoffs. Game 5 
wifi be played Tuesday in Los An- 
geles, where the Lakers have won 
21 straight 

Clyde Drexler had IS points, 10 
assists and 7 rebounds; he also 
keyed a surprise trapping defense 
that forced Los Angeles into 28 
turnovers that turned into 32 Port- 
land points. 

The. defensive ploy lifted the ' 
Trail Blazers into a 10-point half- 
time lead. They eventually upped 
the wtflTg m to 16, and the Lakers 
were never able to recover despite a 
series of rallies. Kareem Abdul- 
Jabbar and Earvin Johnson (who 
had 31 points and 13 assists) led the 
final charge, pulling Los Angeles 
within 108-105 an Johnson’s two 
free throws, with 1:13 to {day. 

“We had 17 turnovers in the first 
half because we were not ready for 
the trap," said Laker Coach Pat 
Riley. T don’t mind turnovers so 
much but when they outscored us 
by 17 txririts in the [second] quar- 
ter, it disturbed me.” 

In the crucial dosing seconds, 
four of Ttompson’s paints came on 
consecutive foul shots. He was 
fouled purposely; he has a reputa- 
tion as an erratic free-throw shoot- 
er. “It’s a big mistake on their 
part,” said the Blazers' resident free 
spirit T said to myself, ‘Just relax 
and think about lying in the sun- 
shine with a Mai Tai in one hand 
and my^girifiriend Una-in the Oth- 

■CT 

Nuggets 125, Jazz 118 

In Salt Lake Gty, Alex English, 
scored 40 points as Denver hdd off 
a fourth-quarter rally to take its 
commanding series. The Nuggets 
can eliminate Utah with a home- 
court victory in Tuesday night's . 
Game 5. 

- English scored 22 points in the 
first half as the Nuggets ran up a 
24-point advantage. But the Jazz 
whittled away, and pulled to within 
one point lale in (he fourth quarter. 
Thun Bailey dropped in a lay-up 
with 45 seconds lot, pulling Utah 
to within 119-118. But Dan Issd 
scored four of Denver’s final six 
points to help keep the Nuggets out 
of reach. 

Forward Adrian Dantley led 
Utah with 33 points while Darrell 
Griffith added 28 and Bailey had 
21 . Calvin Nail scored 18 points for 
the winners; teammate Mike Evans 
had 15, including a trio of three- 
point goals. (AP,WP) 





Quebec 2-1 Victor in Overtime 


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Wayne Cooper’s game-high 14 rebountb (the one above hanied down between Tburl Bailey, 
right, and Utah teammate Jeff WiDdns), helped Denver to its 125-118 victory Sunday night 

Cruz Powers Astros Past PfdlMes 


By Robert Fachet 

Washington Par Service 

QUEBEC CITY — Peter Stastny picked up right 
where he left off against Montreal, and so the Phila- 
delphia Flyers find themselves in a bole in the Nation- 
al Hockey League playoffs. 

Stastny s 40-footer sailed past goalie Pclle Lind- 
bergh at 6:20 of overtime here Sunday night to carry 

STANIEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

the Quebec Nordiques to a 2-1 victory over the Flyers 
in the opener of the Wales Conference championship 
series. It was Stastny who last Thursday scored 2:22 
into sudden death, eliminating Montreal in the sev- 
enth game of the Adams Division final. 

Again joining Stastny as a Nordique hero was 
gpaltender Mario Gosseun. He blocked 27 shots and 
was beaten only by a deflection off his own defense- 
man, Pat Price. 

Gosselm made two sensational saves early in the 
extra period. First be closed his legs on Todd Bergen’s 
close-range drive, then he gloved Dave Poulin's back- 
hander from just outride the crease. 

Of perhaps even greater importance to the Flyers 
than their third loss in the last 26 games was a first- 
period knee injury that forced right wing Tim Kerr out 
of action. Ken- collided with teammate Ron Sutter and 
did not return. 

The diagnosis was a strained right knee — the same 
knee Kerrhun March 8 in Washington. He was out six 
games and has played with a brace since. 

Whether Kerr, the team’s leading scoter, would be 
able to play in the second game of the series here 
Tuesday was problematical Obviously, the Flyers 
would miss him, since be scored 54 goals in the regular 
season and eight in the playoffs. 

Stastny beat Montreal on a rebound, but this time 
he unloaded a long shot that seemed distined to sail 




Baseball 

Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

PHILADELPHIA — Jose Cruz 
continued his torrid hitting here 
Sunday with a two-run first-inning 
home run that started Houston to- 
ward its 4-3 victory over Philadel- 
phia. 

Cruz, 9-for-lR in the last four 
games, also had a double to raise 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

his average to 354 — and he still 
isn’t satisfied. T still don't fed 
comfortable at the plate," said the 
veteran left fielder. “Maybe," he 
added with a smile, TT1 fed better 
when I get to 360. 

“I love this park — come to think 
of it, I love every park. It doesn’t 
make any difference to me where 1 
play." 



Astr< 

Jos6 Cruz 

'Nobody ever seems to notice.’ 


Cruz’s second homer of the year 
gave Joe Niekro the jump that en- 
abled him to tie Lany Dierker’s 
record — 137 — for most victories 
by a Houston pitcher. 

Cruz has been the Astros’ offen- 
sive leader for the last decade and 
has hit over .300 five times. In the 
last two seasons he has batted 318 
and 312. Said Houston's manager. 
Bob Lillis: “He keeps putting num- 
bers on the board year after year, 
but nobody ever seems to notice.” 

(Sands 5, CanSnais 0 
In Sl Louis. Dave LaPoint's five 
hitter shut out the Cardinals for the 
first time this season. Although be 
is 1-4, LaPoint has an earned- run 
average of 1.69, fifth best in the 
National League. In his previous 
four games , San Francisco had 
scored a tots! of four runs. 

Bravest, Expos I — - 
In Atlanta, Rick Mahler im- 
proved his record to a major 
league-leading 7-0 and Terry 
Harper drove in three runs with a 
double and single to spark the 
Braves. 

Mcts 3, Reds 2 

In Cin cinnati, Dwight Gooden 
struck out nine and rookie outfield- 
ers Lea Dykstra and John Chris- 
tensen each batted in a run to lead 
New York past the Reds. 

Pirates 3, Dodgers 2 
In Pittsburgh, bases-loaded 
walks to Joe Orsulak and pinch- 
hitter Johnny Ray by relievers Tom 
Niedenfucr and Canos Diaz helped 
the Pirates to a two-run eighth mat 
downed Los Angdes. 

Cubs 4, Padres 2 (suspended) 

In Chicago, the Cubs-San Diego 
game — delayed three times by rain 
— was called after six innings be- 
cause of darimess. 

Orioles lQ,l>rins5 
Ln the American League, in Min- 


neapolis, Jim Dwyer's two- run 
home run sparked a five-run fourth 
and Cal Ripken went 5-for-6 with 
four RBI5 to propel Baltimore toils 
ninth victory in the last 11 games. 
Ripken had 10 hits in IS at-bats in 
the weekend series as the Orioles 
took two of three. 

Angels 5, Brewera 1 
In Anaheim, California, Reggie 
Jackson drove in three runs with 
his 508 tb homer lifetime and a two- 
run double to power st reaking Cali- 
fornia past Milwaukee. The Angels 
have won 9 of their last 1 1 games 
and have a 17-9 record, the best in 
the majors. 

Yankees 6, Royals 2 
In New York, Rickey Henderson 
and Don Mattingly hit back-to- 
back fifth inning home nms to sep- 
__port_the combined four-hit pitch- 
' mg of Phil Niekro and Dave 
Righetti as the Yankees swept their 
three-game series with Kansas 
Q'ty. 

Tigers 4, White Sox 3 
In Detroit, Darrell Evans’s two- 
ran homer capped a three-nm sixth 
that enabled the llgers to edge Chi- 
cago. 

Rangers 7, Indians 2 
In Cleveland, Julio Franco's sec- 
ond-inning error allowed two Tex- 
as runs to score and Don Slaughl 
homered to help the Rangers snap 
a three-game losing streak. 

A’s 6, Red Sox 3 
In Oakland, Calif ornia, Carney 
Lansford hit two home runs, in- 
cluding the game- winner in the 
sixth, as the A’s got past Boston. 

Mainers A Blue Jays 1 
In Seattle, Toronto fell to to 4-8 
against left-handed starters tins 
season as Mark Langston turned in 
a route-going five-hitter against the 
Blue Jays. (UP I, LA T) 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
caicoM m no kk-j 4 • 

Detroit AN 013 BOX— 4 5 1 

Dotson, Jones (S) ond HIIL Fisk (7); Baron- 
ouer, Lomu (7), Hernandez (I) and Parrish. 
W — Bereft ouer. W, L — Dotson, 0-1. Sv— Her- 
nandez 15). HR— Detroit. Evans (2). 

Texas no no 310—7 n i 

aevetaMl 000 002 MO-3 > 1 

Houoti. Hoc ton (6). Harris (7) and Slautmt; 
Schulze. Thompson (4). Von Oh ten (7). Jetf- 
aoat (9) and Banda. W-Houoh. 2-1. L— 
Schulze, >1. Sv — Harris (1). HR— Texas, 
StotieM (2). 

Kansas City MO DU tM-2 4 > 

New Vane Ml on 01 x— 4 9 0 

Blade. Beckwith 101, QtUsenberrv (I) and 
Wottian; Niekro, RtotwtM U) and Wyneoar. 
w— Niekro 4-Z L— Black, 2-2. Sv— Rlahettt 
(7). H R — Kansas Cttv. Balbonl (4). New York, 
Sample (l), Henderson 173. MUttnsty (1), 
Grtllev (1). 

Baltimore ' 010 Ml 201—10 If 1 

Minnesota M2 200 BID- S 12 1 

Baddteker. Aase (SI and Nolan, Rayford 
(9) ; Butcher, FI Ison (4), Lvsonder (A).KIawlt- 
ter (I) mid Salas. W— BediScker. *-l L— 
Butcher, 3-2. HR— Baltimore. Gnus (2). 
MflvWfeM mo no ne— i | i 

California 002 820 tlx— S I ■ 


Major Leagne Leaders 

NATIONAL LEAGUE - 

G AB R HP 


Murphy All 
Herr 51 L 

UWoshltn Mon 12 42 « 15 357 

Cruz Hln 24 99 14 35 J54 

walllna Htn 22 a 11 24 J33 

Flannery SO 13 44 7 U 311 

VHoyes Phi 23 M 12 30 .341 

WaOach Mon 24 B8 11 30 J41 

VI roll PM 21 68 10 23 .338 

Calemtsi STL 14 47 13 22 JOS 

Home Rons: Murphy. Atlanta 10; Dawson. 
Montreal, A; Marshall. Los Anastas. 4; Straw- 
berry, New York. 4; 10 tied with 4. 

Rum Batted la: Murphy. AM onto, 32; G.Wlh 
sun. PhJIadelahia, 19; Brooks; Montreal. 17; 
CDavti. San Francisco. 17; Esaskv. Cincin- 
nati, 17; j.cioric, SL Louis. 17; Moreland, Chi- 
cago, 17; Dawson, Montreal 14; Garvey, San 
CM eao, 14; J.Thomnson, Pittsburgh, 14. 

Stolen Bases: Coleman. SL Louis 17; 
USmlth,S>. Louis 11 ;5anuieL Philadelphia 9; 
Demler. Chicago 8. 

Pitching 

Victories: Mahler, Atlanta 7-0; Hawkhs, 
San Diego 54; Smith, Montreal 43; Antful or, 
St. Louis. Eckerslev and Trout Chicago and 
Gooden. New York 4-1; Soto. Cincinnati 4-2 
Eamed-Ban Average: Valenzuela, Los An- 
geim0J)7; Browning, Cincinnati 1 JJ; Gootfen. 
New York 1-57; Krakow. Son Francisco 158; 
LaPoint. San Francisco 149. 

stilkMeli: Gooden, Now York ond Valen- 
zuola, Los Angeles 43; DoLeon, Pittsburgh, 
and Sato, Cincinnati 42; Ryan, Houston 38. 

Saves: Gassnse. San Diego; ond Reardon, 
Montreal 7; Smith, Chicago f; Candelaria 
Pittsburgh 5; DlPIna Housota and Sutter. 


23 87 22 33 J79 

23 84 15 30 J57 

12 42 4 15 357 


4 15 J57 

99 14 35 J54 

48 11 24 J53 

« 7 15 341 

88 12 30 J41 

11 30 Jfl 
ID 23 JB 
13 22 J28 


Darwin and Sdvgeder; Witt, Moore (8) and 
Boone, w— Witt. 2-3. l— D arwin, 3-2. Sv— 
Moore 14). HRs— California DeCInces (5). 
Jackson (51. 

Boston DM IN 811—1 1 1 

Oakland M0 1M Us— i 9 1 

Hurst, Truillln (7), Clear (8) and Gedman; 
Com roll, Howell (9) and Heath. W — CodlroJI, 
3-t. l — H urst. 1-2. Sv— Howell (7). H Rs— Bos- 
ton. Rice 2 (7). Oakland, Lansford 2 (4). King- 
man 14). 

Toronto OM 801 0MS-1 5 • 

Seattle M0 4M osi 1 4 a 

Clancy, Key (5), Acker (8) and Martinez; 
Langston ond Kea mev. W— Langstaa 4-2. L— 
Clancy, 0-1. HR*- Seattle, Phelps (2), Calde- 
ron (l|. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Houston 218 lit 809—4 5 8 

Philadelphia 1D1 0M 189-3 I B 

Niekro. Daw ley (8). DIPIno (9) and Bailey; 
Rawiev, Hudson (7) and Dauttan. W— Niekro, 
23. L— Rowley. 3-2. Sv— DIPIno (4). HR— 
Houston, Cruz (2). 

San Francisco 020 BN MO— 5 ■ 8 

St. Louis 8M BN 888-8 4 3 

LaPoint and Trevino; Annular, Day ley (5). 
Hassler II) and Porter, w— LaPoint. 1-4 L— 
Anduktr, 4 -l 

Montreal lie MO 080—1 | 2 

Atlanta 210 820 01*— 4 It 1 

Gulllckeon, Burks (5). Rogers (7) aid Fitz- 
gerald; Mahler. Sutter 191 and Benedict. W— 
Mo filer. 7-0. L — Gulliduon, 1-2. HR— Montre- 
al. Dneseen (4). 

Hew York Ml 3B0 000-3 I 2 

Cincinnati BM 2M 008-2 7 1 

Gooden. Orosco (8) and Carter. Reynolds 
(9); Browning. Price (5). Franco 18) and Van 
Gonter. w— Gooden. 4-1. L— Browning. 2-1. 
Sv— Orosco (3). 

LM Angeles 818 OM 818-2 9 1 

Pittsburgh 1B0 BM 02*— 3 IB ■ 

Reuse. Niedenfucr (8), Diaz (I). Howe 18) 
and Sctosda; Rhoden, Candelaria 19) and 
Pena. W— Rhoden, 23. L — Nledentuer, 1-1. 
Sv— Candelaria 15). H R— Las Angeles. Mar- 
shall (41. 

San Diego 881 818-4 4 8 

Chicago BM 303— « 4 1 

Hoyt, DeLeon 14) and Badiy; Trout, Frgzier 
(Al and Davis. H R— Chicago; Moreland (21. 


over the net until it suddenly dipped, struck the 
crossbar and caromed down behind Lindbergh. 

“I certainly didn’t shoot thinking it was going to go 
in,” Stastny" said. “But I got the puck m a good 
situation, in motion, and you never blow — it might 
gp in at that stage.” 

The game-winner came about 90 seconds after 
Lindbergh (Displayed a long shot by Alain Cote that 
struck the right post 

Lindbergh “was probably getting tired," said 
Stastny, “because on Cote's shot from the blue line be 
barely made the save and pushed it to the goal post 
On mine, the puck bounced before I hit it and wasn’t 
flat — it was rotating. It seemed to be going over the 
net, then suddenly it hit the crossbar and went in.” 

Lindbergh, who stopped 42 shots, and Gossdin 
were sensational all night long. There was no scoring 
until 7:13 of the third period, when Dale Hunter's 
midair deflection of a shot by Michel Goulet put 
Quebec in from. 

The Flyers tied il at 13:02, when Price unwisely 
tried to play Brad McCrimmon’s shot from the blue 
tine and wound up deflecting it past Gossdin. 

It was the Nordiques’ fourth overtime victory with- 
out a loss in the playoffs. Stastny frit part of the reason 
was a chang e in philosophy. “Last year we were 
terrible in overtime, because all we did was defend,” 
he said. “If you just defend, yen’ll tie or lose. And in 
the playoffs there are no ties. This year we’ve tried to 
show more offense in overtime ana when you win a 
few, the way we have, you do develop a certain 
instinct.” 

Stastny said the Philadelphia game was enjoyable, 
f oDowing Quebec's bluer series against the Canadiens. 
“Nobody was hooking and holding all the time," he 
said, “and there was not so much body contact. There 
was so much involved in Montreal there was no fun to 
playing." 


Hockey 
NHL Playoffs 

SUNDAY'S RESULT 

PUtadotohle B D I o— 1 

Quebec B B 1 1—1 

Hunter [31, P. Stostnv 14); McCrkrunon (2). 
Shots on goal: Philadelphia (on GaaseiEn) 4- 
144-2—28: Quebec (on Lindbergh) 8-15-1S4- 


CONFBRENCE FINALS 
Walts 

(Quebec toads, series 14) 
May 7: Philadelphia at Quebec 
May 9: Quebec at Philadelphia 
May 12: Quebec at Philadelphia 
k-mov u: Philadelphia at Quebec 
sWMoy 14: Quebec at Philadelphia 
x-Mav 19: Philadelphia at Quebec 

Campbell 

(Bdmantao leads lertes, 14) 
May 7: Chicago at Edmonton 
May 9: Edmonton at Chicago 
May 12: Edmonton at Chicago 
x-Mav 14: Chicago at Edmonton 
x-May 14: Edmonton at Chicago 
x-May 18: Chicago at Edmonton 
OH necessary} 


Basketball 


NBA Playoffs 


Soccer 


VANTAGE POINT/ ShiHey Povich 

The Heavyweight Swamp Deepens 


*. i , 


>■ * • : 

-i g ~ 

* ’ *.-■ 

• ' . “*■ 

‘.V. .’T . . ' - 

' » • 

T | 


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i : 


T »• 

, : •:* 
:t- -r : 
f ... 


Washing ion Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — It may 
have escaped notice, in the 
murky state of boxing’s heavy- 
weight division, but by the latest 
census there are now four heavy- 
weight champions of the world. 
Two more ware acclaimed the 
other nighb in a Don King Pro- 
: ducuons, Inc. title carnival - in 
1 Buffalo. 

Greg Page was unhorsed from 
his World Boxing Association ti- 
tle by one Tony Tubbs, and earli- 
er in the evening on the same 
card TunWhhcrrooon won rec- 

r iion as world champion of 
North American Boxing 
Federation by knocking oat 
James Broad, a flabby 261 
pounds (118 J kilograms). 

Witherspoon's feat offers a 
commentary on the whole taw- 
dry heavyweight division: It was 
the first time a heavyweight 
championship of the world was 
ever won in a pre&mnary bout. 
Soch is the wretched state of the 
heavyweights. 

No boxing championship was 
ever more populated Already in 
place as. the most recognized 
damp is Lany Holmes (47-0)* 


representing something called 
the International Boxing Federa- 
tion. There is also Pinklon 
Thomas, who fights in the cause 
of the World Boxing Council as 
its heavyweight champ. 

Gone are those wonderful, 
simple times when everybody 
knew who — exactly — was 
heavyweight champion of the 
. world. The title was absolute and 
> Ttonotiihit It was owned by the 
■likes of Jack Dempsey. Joe 
Louis, Rocky Marciano. Mu- 
hammad AJi and Smokin’ Joe 
Frazier. There were no pretend- 
ers. The champ was the champ. !. 

The heavyweights teed to be 


the glamour division. Now they 
are a cut below, forced to operate 
"on network television, the low- 
rent district of the business, as . 
opposed to middleweight - 
Hagler and Hearns, who could 
draw S20 per set on closed circuit 
TV. Before that the big gates 
were commanded by a welter- 
weight, Sugar Ray Leonard. 

There no longer is an^ focus 
on the heavyweight division, so 
cheapened by the proliferation 
of tides and alphabet-soup acro- 
nyms: WBC, WBA, NABF. IBF. 
Holmes himsdf walked out of 
the WBA title and kissed off the 
WBC, too, proclaiming himself 
the world champion of the new 
outfit, the International Boxing 
Federation. The NABF, the 
North American Boxing Associ- 
ation, was confected somewhat 
later* 

The high irony is that, Holmes, 
unbeaten in 47 fights and appar- 
ently with aU the credentials for 
demigod status, actually has 
been no asset to the division. 

In the ring, he is the mechanic, 
with his Stand-up fighting style 
that is overly patient and lacking 
in delight The most stirring men 
merits of his- fights, it may be 
said, were provided by Mike 
Weaver, Renaldo Snipes and 
Earoie Shavers, three B-Leagne 
opponents who suddenly decked 
him. Nor has Holmes's boasting 
about all the money Ik has made 
and wifi continue to nuke gener- 
ated much cndearmenL 

For the last couple of years, he 
has been fighting “my last fight" 
and threatening- to. retire. It 
hasn't evoked -any protest 
marches. Nor were any, cheers 
heard when be recently told USA 
Today 'that be was taking Ms 
wife’s- advice again, and would 
fight “for a few more dollars,” 


a/ 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Kite Takes Obampions Golf by 6 Shots 

neS 6 ^^^^ CARLSBAD, C^prnraW- 

daimed Carl WflliamsT in de- Front-nmner Tom Kite dosed the 
fense of his IBF title May 20 in door with 3-imdcr-par 69 here Son- 

bMjM wrid and Olhas can Kite had a 275 total. Dander par 
^Spraducuinsh^-I “£,^J|i^ LaC ° stilC "”- 

discouraged the proliferation of - i. ^ 

tiU^JNetnodoplace some store 

OH lire wimere of PGAttmthSts from 

the 12 month5, was 

QdSZsges or control from - “ total purse of 

26 fightere, he told The New 
Yrak Turns. Need a match? It M 

wd^Snpions is offered by soins ■*“ 

Paw* who mlosiiig is title to ™«<« for good wthaprtdt from 
iffis. VOS soSg his third ‘ 

defeat of his last four bouts. He ~ 

OT e asssi 

hand, his lefL His nght was d- Sf^i 

ther useless or nonexistent. ZreJwm? 

ZStei^retet^to withiuloSsof^LfaSa? Tom KHe: Never headed 

^°Tnbbs taumecfclranqjiM Pa^ Husband, Wife Win in U.S. Marathon 

PITISBURGH(AP)—^ten and Lisa MutinpuDed away&MB thar 
a respective competitors m Sunday’s Pittsburgh Marathon to become the 
unanimous^ dSsion^ut he “d wife team to win indivkinal titles in the same major 

wfthprwwK^whft Snatched Martin, the defending Athletics Congress national champion, won the 

225ES2- 0 ^ toen's diviaonbTKs, 12 mmuieC 57 seconds (Joree Gonzalez of 

That WrinPD tin ihe fasdn*iiftn Voeno Rico was second in 2:13:08). Martin’s Austtahan-bom wife, 
of those calrareoords thev have winning bo: fourth maqor race since 1983, finished the women's race in 

1 MSiS? F0 ^ —d wid. . 2:32:06 doctor 

•* Jofan Moreno, running a 2:12:50, beat Bfll Rodgers by nearly two 
o£ * r UUS A^ ^Wmerfronthtaatbon in Jersey City, New /ersey. 

just who ^ were those auaintchaiv Laura ArbcK - m 2t38:46. 1 ®a5 the first woman finisher. 

l5f ♦ Alan Lind retained his Mile High Marathon tide in Denver with a 
” *53SSi?5i S time of 2:25.181 Abbie Wade won ihe women’s division in 2:57.23. 

MVMv!£ihnim'iv •Australian Adrian Welfingion won the Vancouver Marathon in 

way w semi- obscuniy. 2;24:34 . ^ 2;55;34 ^ Jap3n 7Kikue Teshima topped the women. 


Atlanta 4. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
G AB R 

H 

Pet 

Sates Min 

14 

42 

5 

14 

J&1 

Franco C4e 

23 

83 

14 

30 

■361 

Bacttle Oak 

24 

70 ■ 

10 

25 

J57 

Puckett Min 

24 

Ill 

14 

39 

-351 

Cooper Mil 

21 

88 

7 

30 

■341 

WMtaker Det 

20 

77 

15 

26 

338 

Cowans Sea 

24 

92 

17 

31 

337 

R token Bit 

23 

89 

19 

30 

337 

Mattingly NY 

22 

85 

11 

28 

329 

Baines Chi 

21 

89 

14 

29 

326 



Homo Run*: MJDovto, Oakland, 9; G. Tho- 
mas. soattto, 7; Prestov. Saattto.7; Rico, Bos- 
ton. 7; Armas, Boston, 4; BaOxxiL Kansas 
□tv, 4; Bnmanskv.MlmosataS; Eos lor. Bos- 
toa4; G>EolL Toronto. 4: Kingman, Oaklamt, 
4. 

Robs Battod la: Rlpkoa Balt I mars, 24; 
HDovb, Oakland. 23; Puckett, Minncsn To. 20; 
G.Themas. Soattto. 19; P.BraOtov. Soattto, W: 
Rice. Boston, 19; Armas. Boston, 18; Bruo- 
ansky, M lni wo l a. 14; DeCInces, California 
18; Demasey, Baltimore, 18. 

HUM Bases: PettfaCaiHornla 13; Collins. 
Oakland 12, Mosebv, Toronto 8; Shertdon, 
Kansas Cttv 7; Garda. Toronto 4. 

PitcMog 

vict ones: Alexander, Toronto 4-0; Bod- 
dicker, Baltimore 4-1; Langston. Seattle, 
Niekro, Hew York, Petry. Detroit and Viola, 
Minnesota 4-2. 

Earned- Run Average: Kev. Taranto 1-24; 
LdbraML Kansas City 1A5: Heaton, Ctovg- 
land L95: Burris. Ml hoottkeo 100; Notos. Tex- 
as Z0B. 

Strikeouts: Baytf. Boston 42; Morrlg. Detroit 
34; Clemons, Boston 33; Hough, Texas 32; 
Al e xander. Toronto, and Niekro, Now York TL 

Saves: Howell, OaKland, and Rktaettl, New 
York 7; CaudllL Toronto, Moore. California 
and Waddell. Cleveland 4. 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dfy&toa 



W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Baltimore 

15 8 

452 



Taranto 

IS 10 

408 

1 

Detroit 

13 9 

J91 

IKi 

Boston 

12 13 

480 

4 

New York 

M 12 

455 

4ft 

Oeveteod 

10 14 

417 

5ft 

Milwaukee 

10 14 

417 

5ft 


Wat Division 



CalHomla 

17 9 

454 

_ 

Minnesota 

13 11 

342 

3 ’ 

Kansas Cttv 

11 12 

47S 

4ft 

Chicago 

10 11 

476 

4ft 

Seattle 

12 14 

442 

5 

Oakland 

11 15 

423 

6 

Texas 

8 15 

348 

7ft 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



east Division 




W L 

Pci. 

GB 

Chicago 

14 7 

467 

_ 

New York 

14 B 

436 

ft 

Montreal 

15 9 

435 

ft 

Philadelphia 

10 13 

435 

5 

SL LOuM 

10 13 

433 

5 

Pittsburgh 

8 14 

364 

6ft 


West DMslen 



San Diego 

12 10 

445 

— 

Los Angela 

13 12 

430 

ft 

Houston 

13 12 

400 

1 

Atlanta 

11 13 

478 

1ft 

Cincinnati 

11 13 

49 

2 

San Francisco 

5 IS 

34 

4ft 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
CONCACAF OraaP 3 
Guaiamala 1, Canada 1 
Points standi nos: Canada 5. Guatemala X 
Halil X 

Remain too matches: May X Haiti vs; Cana- 
da; Mav 15, Guatemala vs. Canada 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Arsenal l, goulti n ipton o 
Aston Villa X Luton 1 
Chelsea 2. Sheffield Wednesday I 
Everton X Queens Park Rangers 0 
Ipswich X Stoke 1 

Mandwstar United l Nottingham Forest 0 
Newcastle X Tottenham 3 
Paints standings: Everton 84; Manchester 
United 73; Tottenham 71; Arsenal 45; South- 
ampton, Liverpool 64; Sheffield Wednesday 
42; Nottingham Forest 41 ; Chelsea 40; Aston 
Villa 56; west Bromwich. Newcastle 51; 
Queens Park R angers 50; Watford 49; Leices- 
ter, Luton «; imridi 46; Norwich 45i West 
Ham 42; Coventry- Sunderland 48; Stake 17. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
Motional League 

ATLANTA Placed Pascual Perez, Pitch- 
er. on Ihe supptomento] 15-day disabled list. 
Recalled Jeff Dedmon, pitcher, fram_ Rich- 
mond of the International League. 

NEW YORK— Optioned Doug Sisk. Pitcher, 
to Tidewater of me International League. Re- 
called Wes Gardner, pitcher, from Tidewater. 

PITTSBURGH — Reactivated Marvell 

Wynne, outfielder. Released Jerry DyhztosU. 
infielder. 

SAN DIEGO— Announced that Alan Wig. 
gfnt, second baseman, wtti no) play for the 
remainder of the season. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

NEW JERSEY— Nomed Bern's Mann pres- 
ident. Announced that Joe Toub. prlndpal 
owner, has sold his Interest to lour other pwI- 
ners. Alan Aufzlen, Jerry Cohen. David Ger- 
slain, and Mann. 

FOOTBALL 

national Football League 

ATLANTA— Stoned Cedric Jones, running 
bock; Marshall Lowe, wide receiver; Joe 
S«*v, defensNe end. ond G«8 Walker, off an- 
shm tackle, 

GREEN BAY-Announced that Ronnie 
Burgees, defensive back, Ikk signed with Ot- 
tawa of the Canadian Football League. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Cate Gilbert, worter- 
back. 

WASHINGTON— Stoned George Rogers. 
CBmerback; Rod Fatter, safety; Tony Hunt- 
er, Ron Jodksen and Roger SuoJtor. running 
hacks; Floyd Laytwr, tackle; Aaron Moog, 
defensive end; Bohbv Pom and Scott Zn- 
tensXI, guards, and Keith Smith, ttoht end. 

United States Football League 

NEW JE RSEY— Signed Charles Cook, nose 
tackle, and Gary Moton, unetncber. 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Boston 23 M M 13- 99 

Detroit 24 28 22 24—112 

V Johnson 14-21 2-2 34. Thomas 8-14 34 21; 
McHale 1 1-172-324. Bird 9-23 2-221. Rcboonds: 
Boston 45 (McHale 10). Detroit 49 (Lalmbeer 
12). Assists: Boston 26 (Bird 7), Detroit 23 
(Thomas 10). 

LA. Lakers 38 W 25 13— 1 87 

Portland Z1 M 27 29—115 

AAThampson 54 7-1 D 17, Vandewetfw 6-15 5- 
5 17. Carr 7-171-1 15. Drexler 5-1254 15; John- 
son 8-13 15-14 31, Abdut-Jahhar 6-16 9-12 21. 
Rohet n tdt; Lai Angeles 64 [Abdul-Jcbbor 17). 
Portland 51 (MTtiampson 101. Assists: Los 
Angeles 34 1 Johnson 13), Portland TJ (Drexlsr 
ID). 

MOwaakue M 27 24 35-112 

PMtadelpMa 30 22 31 38-121 

Malone 11-23 9- 13 31. Toney 11-140-223; Mon- 
crief 9-T3 74 7S. Pressev 9-1464 25, Cummings 
9-22 5-7 23. Rebounds: Milwaukee 49 (Lister 
14). PhiiadelpMa 54 (Matone 13). Assists^ Mil- 
waukee 22 I Moncrief 8). Philadelphia 32 
(Toney ill. 

Denver 36 31 29 27-125 

Utah 24 29 31 36—111 

English 14-19 12-14 4& Nott 7-11 4-4 18; Dcxit- 
I ev 10-1* 13-14 3X Griffith 11-20 64 28. Re- 
botrads: Denver 56 (Cooper M), Utah 44 (Kel- 
ley 0). Assists: Denver 34 (Natt 10). Utah 29 
(Stockton 10). 

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
EASTERN 
(Series ttfft 7-2J 
Mav 8: Detroit at Boston 
Mav 10: Boston at Detroit 
x-mov 12: Detroit at Boston 

(Ptukxfefpbta def. M^waoke*. 44) 

WESTERN 

(LM Annates leads series, M) 

May 7; Portland at Las Angeles 
x-Mav 9: la. Lakers at Portland 
x-Mav 11: Portland at LA. Lakers 
(Denver Maas series. 3-1) 

Mav 7: Utah al Denver 
x-Mav 9: Denver a) Utah 
x-Mav 11: Utah at Denver 
U4 eecessaryl 


Golf 


top mutters and earn ings in the Toarap- 
nseuf of Champlans, which eaded Sunday at 
(he Amt-yard, par-72 La Cotta Country a Ota 
co u rse la Carlsbad, California: 


Tom KHe. 572400 
Mark McCuznber, 549400 
Scott Sbnpson, S32J00 
Mark OMearn. 522475 
Fuzzy Zoeltor. 52ZS75 
Larry Netoen, S1K2S9 
Ray Flavd. 515.137 
Crafo Stotoer, Sl 5.133 
Lonnv Watfktas. S15.133 
Joey Stndetor. S1X100 
Woodv BkKMra, 512,100 
Bill Krafzert, *9325 
lm Travtna. SUS 
Wavne Levi, 59,725 
Oern h ord Longer. 19,725 
Curtts Stranger 57450 
Ramie Block. 57450 
Tom Wdtssn. 54447 
Greg Norman, 5U47 
Hubert Green. S4A67 
George Archer. *1700 
Jack Nlcklaus, SV0Q 
Peter Jacobsen, &7M 
Scott HoctoSUOD 
Bob Eastwood, s&iOO 
Denis Watson. 55X00 


64-72-70-49 — 275 
49-71-71-70—381 

72- 7847-73—082 

73- 73-7047 — 253 

68- 72-70-73-283 
7049-72-73—284 
70-75-7246—385 
73-71-71-70— 2B5 
4948-73-75-285 
784672-78-286 
77-7076-70-287 

72- 71- 73- 72— 281 
7647,74-73—288 
49-73-73-26-288 
7644-72-74— 2BS 
70-75-72-73-290 

70- 74-71 -75 — 290 

75-73-73-70—291 

69 - 76 - 71 - 75—291 

73- 73-70-75 — 291 
75-72-71-74—292 

74 - 72 - 72 - 74-292 

73 - 72 - 72 - 75-292 

74- 77-73-70-294 

71- 75-73^6-295 
734040-77—298 


Football 

USFL Standings 


Tournament Tennis 


MEN 

(At Lm Vegas) 

Staple* Final 

Johon KrkA. Ui-deL Jimmy Arles. UJ-6- 
A 54. 4-4.62. 

Doubles Final 

Pat Cash. Australia, and John Fitzgerald. 
Australia, del. Paul Amaeoao. U-S. ad 
Chrtsfo Ston Rensbura. South Africa, (104), 6- 
7 (7-9), 74 (7-3). 

WOMEN 

(At Soaor LawL Tens) 

Singles Final 

Martina NavretUova, UJ, def. Eltoe Bur- 
gin. ua. 64. 4-L 

Doubles Rnoi 

NavraNieva and Etargln def. ManuHa Ma- 
leeva, Bulgaria, and Helena Gukova, Czecho- 
slovakia, 6-1, 34, 4-3. 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
W L T PCL PF PA 
Tampa Bov 8 3 0 JO 288 228 

Birmingham 7 4 0 434 266 218 

New Jersey 7 4 0 271 343 

Jacksonville 6 5 0 J45 278 272 

Memphis 6 5 0 SIS 242 229 

Baltimore 5 5 1 J00 200 173' 

Orlando 2 9 0 .112 14* 2» 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Houston 7 3 0 J00 316 227 


Oakland 
Denver 
Arizona 
Portland 
Las Angelas 
San Antonio 


482 247 218 
434 281 208 
M4 208 229 
V47 219 
■273 179 268 
3n 149 241 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Bottlmore N, Arizona 19 
Denver as. sm Antonio 9 
Jacksonville 2& New Jersey 20 
Oakland 31. Ortondo 7 








Pa LL* 


r 


Amt 


7 l « 

1A 


14 

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ART BUCHWALD 


Reconciliation Week 


W ASHINGTON — S nee this 
is a period of reconciliation 
and the president is in a forgiving 
mood, I called one of his dose 
n^m dates and asked him, “Now 
that President Reagan has forgiven 
the Germans for what they did in 
World War 0. do you think he 
might forgive 
the American air 
traffic control- ' 
lers who went 
out on striker 
"The presi- 
dent would nev- 
er go that far. 

You have to re- 
member what 
the air control- 
lers did. Wien _ . ,, 

they walked out Bucnwaid 

00 their jobs they committed an 
atrocity against every man. woman 
and eland in the United States." 

**I know it was a despicable thing 
to do." 1 said. "But I thought after 
Bitbtirg. it would be the perfect 
lime for the president to heal the 

. J . A « 



“I guess there is no way for the 
president to reconcile with the 
American farmers who went bank- 
rupt because of bad management" 
“By reconciling with the fanners 
at (his rime the president would be 
sending the wrong signal to the 
agricultural community. The Ger- 
mans may have made some mis- 
takes in world War II, but you 
could never accuse them of looking 
for a bailout from Washington 
when they couldn’t sell their 

“T,‘ 


"I don't imagine that the presi- 
dent would be willing to make a 
gesture of reconciliation toward the 
congressmen who voted down aid 
for the contras fighting in Nicara- 
gua." 

“How can you compare what the 
people buried in the Bitbuig ceme- 
tery did to left-wing, spiteful legis- 
lators who exterminated Mr. Rea- 
gan’s foreign policy in Central 
America?" 


wounds here at home. 

□ 

“The president is the first 
to let bygones be bygones, but to 
my knowledge he has never forgiv- 
en anyone who has gone out on on 
unauthorized strike. 

“O.K. Forget the air controllers. 
Do you think in his present mood 
of reconciliation Mr. Reagan might 
foigive the mother in Chicago who 
chiseled on her welfare?" 

“How could he forgive her?" 

“Maybe the president could fly 
to Chicago and lay a wreath in 
from of the liquor store where be 
piaims she bought a bottle of vodka 
with her food stamps." 

• "Too many people in this coun- 
try have suffered because of that 
welfare mother in Chicago. It's one 
thing to forgive people you fought 
against dining a war — it's another 
to turn the other cheek to those 
who cheat on their food stamps." 


tional Reconciliation Week 1 
thought the president might want 
to forgive those who voted against 
him on Nicaragua, just so he could 
get his budget package through." 
□ 

“Nicaragua is a moral issue, and 
Mr. Reagan will never compromise 
on a moral issue for political gain. 
That was the message of Bitburg." 

“Is there any possibility the pres- 
ident would want to make peace 
with the big spenders in the Senate 
who for the past 40 years have 
driven this country into debt with 
their wild socialist schemes?” 

“It’s much too early 10 offer an 
olive branch to them. Although ev- 


eryone who fought on the German 
War II is 


Artifacts Found in Nepal 

Agmce France-Prase 

KATMANDU, Nepal — U.S. 
and Nepalese archaeologists have 
discovered remains of what may 
have been an ancient city about 20 
kilometers (12 miles) north of Kat- 
mandu. officials report They said 
the excavation at Dumekhd yield- 
ed artifacts unlike any previously 
found in Nepal, dating from the 
first century. 


side in World War 11 is no longer 
alive, there are many big spenders 
walking around scot-free who have 
never answered for their economic 
crimes. Someday they wiD have to 
face a higher judge than the presi- 
dent of die United States." 

f asked. “Do you think it's too 
soon for the Reagan administration 
to bury the hatchet with those peo- 
ple in the media who have blown 
the Nazi thing way out of propor- 
tion?" 

“If you're asking the president to 
pardon them for what the) have 
written about Bitburg. the answer 
is no. Their stories are too fresh in 
this administration's mud. Mr. 
Reagan still believes in 'collective 
guilt’ where the journalists of (his 
country are concerned" 


dues to Women’s Cults of Antiquity 


By Eric Pace 

Ncv York Tims Service 

N EW YORK — The excavation of a 
mysterious shrine in southern Italy has 
renewed scholarly interest in a shadowy all- 
woman cult that was among the oldest and 
most prestigious of all religious groups of 
ancient Rome. 

Three seasons of digging, under the field 
direction of Iota Griffiths Pofley of the 
University of Michigan, have turned up dues 
about the secret rites of the goddess known in 
Latin as Bona Dea — the good goddess. 

Pedley, a professor of classical archaeology 
who is director of the univeraty’s Kelsey 
Museum of Archeology, said, “We are gener- 
ally getting a much clearer view of what the 
inside of a sanctuary of Bonn Dea was like." 
Strange anatomical models, left by cored or 
ailing women, have been unearthed, along 
with quantities of cups thought to have been 
used lor drinking wine. 

Pedley said the cult may have arrived in 
Rome as early as the sixth century B.G 
Evolving over rime, it continued into the 
third century AD. 

Scholars believe that early on the goddess 
came to have wide and varied powers in the 
eyes of her devotees. She was sometimes 
identified or linked with Venus and Juno. 
Over the centuries, her intercession was vari- 
ously sought for healing, fertility, freedom 
from slavery, fruitfulness in agriculture and 
protection of the Roman people. 

Excavations of the shrine and other sites 
where women's cults gathered in antiquity 
are particularly important, said Sarah B. Po- 
meroy. a professor of classics at Hunter Col- 
lege, because ancient authors, almost all of 
them men, wrote very little about the cults, 
and what they did write was generally biased 
and often incorrect. 

“Given the fact that these cults were often 
secret, how could any man know what was 
actually going on?" mid Pomeroy, author of 
the 1975 book “Goddesses, Whores, Wives 
and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity." 

Pedley and his co-workers hypothesize, on 
the basis of ancient texts and inscriptions, 
that the goddess who became known as Bona 
Dea was brought to the Italian peninsula, 
under the Greek name Damia, by the Grades, 
who in about 600 B.C founded Paestum, 
southeast of Naples, where the shrine stood. 
Originally named Posddonia, the city was 
later occupied by a warlike southern Italian 
people, the Lucanians, before being taken 
over by the Romans in 273 B.C. and given the 
name Paestum. 

The sanctuary remained in use until AJD. 
79. when an eruption of Mount Vesuvius 
dumped volcanic ash onto the city. 

Some scholars say the cull's longevity re- 
flected the prevailing conservatism in reli- 
gious matters. Bui Larissa Bonfante, a pro- 
fessor of elastics at New York University, 
said its durability also illustrated the hold it 
had on its devotees. 



authors as Cicero wrote about it. It was a 
major Roman state cult in which high-bom 
women g ather ed to do her honor in all-night 


rites twice a year: in Mot in a temple dedicat- 
ed to her at the fool of the i 


tutor Mow d A lOmdogr 

Recently discovered figurine. 


Opinions also varied as to why women of 
antiquity engaged in religious cults such as 
that of Bona Dea. Pomeroy voiced the view 
that, as she put it in the book. “We tend to 
forget that — despite a dazzling veneer of 
literary and artistic achievements — Greece 
and Rome were warrior societies. What really 
mattered was winning wars and maintaining 
an empire. Except in their role as bearers of 
future soldiers, most women were peripheral 
to those concerns.” Roman religion, she con- 
tended, “afforded an outlet for those whose 
lives were circumscribed in other ways." 

But Professor Mary R. Lefkowitz. a classi- 
cist at Wellesley College, said cult activity 
had very important social functions. "It gave 
women a chance to meet with other women 
outside their own families and obviously to 
gossip," she said. "It was a social occasion." 

It was in the city of Rome that Bona Dea 
was worshiped particularly extensively, but 
the goddess also had devotees at the Roman 
port of Ostia and elsewhere, as far afield as 
what is now southern France. 

By the first century B.C. a form of the 
worship of Bona Dea had evolved that be- 
the best known, because such famous 


came 


_ tAventineffiRone 

of Rome’s seven hills, and in early December 
in the house of a magistrate. 

Weaving together ancient writers’ scanty 
accounts, the Oxford University scholar 
JJ.V.D. Balsdon wrote in his 1962 book, 
“Roman Women: Their History and Habits," 
that the magistrate and other men of his 
family left ibe house for the night and “repre- 
sentations of male persons and anjmah in 
statues, paintings and mosaics were decently 

veiled." 

Balsdon wrote, “The central point of die 
evening's celebration was the sacrifice Of a 
sow. Houses in the center of Rome not being 
large, it was, one would guess, a crowded, 
stuffy and smelly occasion.” 

“Of what took place," Balsdon noted, 
“naturally, men knew no more than women 
chose to tell them" — which was evidently 
Jink. The Greek writer Plutarch concluded 
that the ritual was decorous, but the Latin 
poet and anther Juvenal described it as lead- 
ing to debauchery with men. 

Painting what Pomeroy called & distorted 
picture of thing? he wanted to denounce, 
Juvenal wrote: “My god! Women get ah 
stirred up with wine and wild music; they 
drive themselves crazy.” 

As practiced at the Paestum sanctuary 
complex, the cult had a different setting. The 
rites went on in two buildings a rectangular 
temple, about 30 by 50 feet (9 by 15 meters), 
and a rectangular hall, 70 feet by 50 feet, both 
originally built in the fifth century B.C. 

PecQey is returning to the site this month 
for a fourth season. He and co- workers have 
written about the first three in articles in The 
American Journal of Archeology. The exca- 
vations have been fmtmrgri by the National 
Endowment for the Humanities, by private 
donors and by the universities of Michigan 
and of Perugia in Italy. 

The excavations are under the joint leader- 
ship of Pedley and Professor Mario TordH, 
director of the Institute of Archaeology of the 
University of Perugia, in collaboration with 
Werner Jahannowsxy, an Italian scholar who 
is superintendent of antiquities for the region 
of Italy that includes Paestum. 

Almost 2,000 objects, left at the shrine as 
offerings from the goddess’s devotees over 
the centuries, have been unearthed by Ped- 
ley' s team and earlier excavators. 

Among the objects are small terra-cotta 
models of arms as well as wombs and eyes — 
left by women who were either asking the 
goddess’s aid in healing physical and mental 
ills or thanking her for such help. 

Pedley’s excavations have also unearthed 
quantities of terra-cotta female figurines and 
terra-cotta loomweights, winch were em- 
ployed to keep threads tight daring weaving. 


PEOPLE 


Flight to the New Moon 


Sultan Salman Abdel Aziz at- 
Sftad,.28, a nephew of Bag Fshd of 
Saudi Arabia, has. been asked to 
sight the new moon that ends Ram- 
adan, the Islamic month of fasting, 
on his trip aboard the spaa shuttle, 
Saudi scientists stud. The prince 
also will take pictures and partici- 
pate in a medical experiment tim- 
ing the seven-day mission on the 
Discovery, scheduled for launch 
June 12. He will be ranked as a 
payload specialist for Arabsat. a 
communications satellite that the 
shuttle is laundiing for Saudi Ara- 
bia. 

□ 

Fnmbfin D. Murphy has been 

fiamed chairman of the board of 
the National Gallery in Washing- 
ton. Murphy, chairman of the exec- 
utive committee of Times Mirror 
Co. of Los Angeles, succeeds Paul 
Meflon, the gallery’s major patron 
and its board chairman since 1979, 
The gallery’s origual budding, de- 
signed by John Pope Hennessey 
and opened in 1941. was given by 
Mellon’s father, Andrew. Paul Mel- 
lon and Ms sister, Alisa, donated 
the East Building, designed by 
L M. Pd, at a cost of 5944 million. 
It opened in 1978. Murphy has 
served 21 years on the National 
Gallery baud, longer than anyone 
except Mellon. 

□ 

The Apollo Theater in Hariem 
has reopened with a glittering cast 
stretching bade to the 1940s. The 
legendary theater celebrated its 
50th anniversary and J10.4-mflliQn 
refurbishing with a show hosted by 
B9 Cosby, who appeared on the 
Apollo stage in the early 1960s. The 
rousing exhibition of gospel rock 
V roll and Motown inclodedSte- 
ne Wonder, Little ffidard, the 
Four Tops, WQsoo Pickett, Gregory 
Hines, Cab GaBoway and Patti La- 
BeBe. Most of the 1,500 people in 
the audience had paid 51,000 each 
for tickets for the benefit show to 
aid Ethiopia. Outride, a crowd ap- 
plauded celebrities such as the Rev- 
erend Jesse Jackson and Motown’s 


threw a party for the 350-member 
staff of the Royal Opera House. 
Covent Garden, explaining: “This 
was my 1,800th opera appearance 
and it's traditional for me that after 
every 100 performances 1 give a 
party like this." 

□ 

Hundreds of armed police, thou- 
sands of hunting enthusiasts and a 
group of ecologies led by Brigitte 
Bardot converged on France's 
southwestern Medoe region last 
weekend in a battle over the turtle 
dove. Dove hunting has developed 
into a traditional May event involv- 
ing hunters with shotguns front all 
over the country. Authorities have 
not enforced recent regulations 
against dove hunting. "When a tra- 
dition becomes murder, it must be 
stopped.” said Bardot, long on ani- 
mal rights .activist 

□ 


r i* 

> 


rtf 


To mark German-American 
Friendship Week, Eleanor Dries, 
89, sister of former "U.S. Secretary 
of State John Foster Dries, was 
awarded the General Lndus DuB. 
Chy medal by the Federation of 
German-American chibs in Wies- 
baden, West Germany, for her ser- 
vice as head of the Berlin office of 
the LIS. State Department after 
World War II. The award is named 
after the general who ran the US. 
military government in occupied 
Germany after the war. 

•O 



After many failures. Norway got 
its first victory in the 30th Eurovi- 
rion song contest in Goteborg, 
Sweden, edging the West German 
and Swedish favorites. A duo called 
Bobbysocks, Elizabeth Andreasson, 
26, and Home Krogjh, 29. won with 
“La Det Swinge" (Let U Swing), 
composed by Rolf Lortand. Nor- 
way’s best previous placing was a 
third spot in 1964, and in recent 
years it has often been at the bot- 
tom of the field. 

Q 




founder. Berry Gorily Jr. The En- 
iinaer B 01 


for city 


glish rock singer 
stopped to sign aul 
price. 

□ 

Phcado Domingo, unperturbed 
by technical problems that delayed 
by 35 minutes the start of his per- 
formance in the title role of Umber- 
to Giordano’s “Andrea Chfinier," 


For the fust time in five years, 
there has beat a wedding in Ran, a 
moun tain vfflage in the Spanish 
Pyrenees. The groom, Mariano 
Loste, 38. a fanner, was one of 140 
men who placed an ad for wives in 
a regional paper in January after 
seeing the US. film “Westward the 
Women" on television. Jacinto 
BraHans, the parish priest, married 
Loste and Maria Angles Pedreris, 
29, a nurse from Barcelona. 


il 11 
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Tab 


> 1 : Demria. ( 0624 ) 23718 
Taira 628554 SELECT G 


london Bmxesennve 
2-5 Ota Band 5 »., Uxtaon W 1 
Tel 01-493 4744 . 7 b 28247 SC&DN G 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANE 

Mating - T el eph on e . Teba 
Fu8 se c eta nal services 
We of Mai, Jersey, Guernesy, 
Gibrnbor. Pnn o rn o. Ubena. 
LwemWa Areles, LK. 
Ready made re speaaL 
Free explo r a to ry booklet. 

Bare regcfnsm 
London representative 


Aston Company Formations 
Dept T 1 8 V&ona Si.. Dougk 
We of Man. T* 0624 2 UY 1 
Telex 627691 SPWA 


MONEY TREES? 


YEH Invest in one of Amenta's mast 


exoting 
afcrCondrfre 


We have plant- 
ed more mf trees in 198 * than any 
other developer in our State. 

> 4 b reran earning* 1 rain ed far 
many, ■nrayyeenami wegerem. 
tee to rapardttte im rettirad at 
oiqht times eanlnra 

secKar a»cw5ae invttkj. 

Mqi « >d ovciabte n> English, Fiend). 
Cmrm Box 1993 . Herod Tribune. 
925 JJ NeuEy Cider, froa 


EXPORT TO USA - New rude pro. 
pored by US Customs Office & US 
Govermert MStory/Gv 4 b 
eex. Send US S 32 . Federal 
Bo* 15301 Washington. DC 


PANAMA LB 80 A. CORPORATIONS 
from USS 400 ovtriabie new; Tel 


g«q mo. Tele*.- 628352 SATO 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTI 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 
uNLUunroiNc 

U.SJA A WORLDWIDE 


A complete coded & business service 
f rmtirg a ungue eoleetkn at 
taientod vertade 8 . murtSfieud 
vxtanduab for cd umman . 
212 - 765-7793 
212 - 765-7794 
330 W. 56 lh SL. N.YC 10019 
Service RujutuSuh ves 
Needed Worldwide. 


OFFSHORE SStVlCES 


UX. non resident cOtifxnei with 
nu n vn ee ctiredora, bearer shxo txta 
confidential biett aaaowdti. faU badritp 
& support senhcee. Puhjuki & Uberion 
compcrees. fast nde cpdiifatid 


AP.CIL 17 Wdegate St.. London 
E 17 HP/Tet 01 3771474 .HX: ^93911 G 


INVEST 2 WBBC 5 in Bettor Hedth. 
Enter Gardae Rak Prevention & 
Hearth ' -- - - 


Segant mondotL peocera Suttoj 
countryside, Eighty qudrfied medod 
suparvreon, Wat Wan Medical Can- 


wpervreon. 
ire, Enton near Gaddiwng, Surrey 
GUS 5 AL 45 ran. London. King 
1042 ) 6 / 92233 . 


GOURa SBVUL Privoto & confi- 
dential from San Diego, CA to Eu- 

Bijvioixi. xno rrauess s> uj far bud 
of M. Afceit MDrreTlWfi Raymond 
lre». Oceanside. CA 72D54 tSt 61 9- 
094885 . 


HOW TO <^T a Second Passport, te> 


pan. 12 countries andyzed. Dretdfi 
rre 7 CE, StoL 507 . 


WMA. 45 Lymfxrar 
Centrd, Hong Kong. 


DIAMONDS 




Your bed buy. 

fate dustmnds m any (nee ronge 
at toweg whatasde prices 
dueLt from Antwerp 
eerier of the rfa eu nd world, 
faO guarantee, 
far hen price fat write 


Estabtdwd 1928 

Peftu^bh red 62 . B- 2 D 1 B AHwetp 


Bdawe - Tet (32 31 234 07 51 
Tht 71779 syl b. At the Cfcxnpnd 


,b. At IheDirenond dub. 

tost of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORID-WIDE 
BUSINESS CENTRES 

limite d E xm e uft vu Of Rot* 
Complete urite Secretarial, Tetex 
K ifci deh l io li .e , Corporate 


K e p re e e ntofi o n A Ofter fadPB e e 


Ti 

A 3 

Ti 

Teh 


AMSTBB 1 AM Eure Busmess Canter 
r, 99 , 10 15 CH Amsftvdam 
227 &S. Tetex: 16183 
Brautive Sarwces, Athens 
!. Suite at Athens 610 . 
il) 7796 22 Telex: 216343 
’: fefya CJtcinb&v 2 T 3 
Ncriman Port, Bombay 400 021 . 
Tet 244949 . Tetot 011 - 6897 . 
isussasr 4 L Rue de to Prase 
1000 Brussat Tot 717 33 60 
Tehsc: 25327 

P.O. Bra 1515 , ONATA 


Airfae Centre DibaLUAE. 
toxT&ni 


Teh 214545 Telex, 
LOfDOrtt no The strand. 
Union WC 2 R QAA, 

‘778. TU: 


270 66 04 . Tetex: 46642 


MILAN: Via Baooocao 2 , 

86 7589/80 W 279 


20123 «Oan.T# 

Triou 320343 

P*W YORK 575 MoSam A seme 


New Yorh, NY lOCCZ Te^^?) 605 - 


0 X 0 . Tetex: 125664 / 23 71 
PARS: SOS, 15 Avenue Ycta Hugo 
75116 fans, Te h 502 IB 00 
Telew 62309 S 5 . 

ROME; Via Sawia 710019 B Rome. 
Teh 85 32 41 . 844 80 70 . 

Tetex: 61345 B 

111 North Bridge fa. 


4 S 11 - 0 WB Ptemola ftenTSTtra 
7 . 7 It mi 


0617. Teh 3366577 . 


ZURICH: Retxtweg 32 , 8001 Zurah 
214 6 in 


Teh 01 / 214 1 
Tetex 812456 /B 12981 . 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 

RJU.Y RCTK 3 RATH) 


BUSNESS SSY 1 CE 5 
CLOSE TO FINANCIAL CHffBI 
faneritod Offices / Con f erenc e taoms 
/ Telex t Moil Sarwces 
/ Tre 


Tatephora 
te&d ft _ . . 
uiiiuiff Fonn 

B 4 TBDUTIONAL 


_ OFBCE 
32 Rerenma. 0 - 5-9001 Zurich 
Teh 01 / 214 61 l 1 , Thu $12456 INOF 

MBHER WORLD-WDE 
BU 5 D 6 S (S 4 IRE 5 


TOUR OffiCE IN MRS: THS, 
ANSWOUNG SSWCE. secretiry, 
mudbax, fare 24 frdoy. 


TeLRW: 609959 i 


IMffiTUS * ZURICH * 252 76 21 . 
Phone ! tetex /nxdfaox. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In the charm ng muu reoin rend of 

IETSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENK 

Owrioofang o spterttfcf Alpine panora- 
ma. 30 nan. from Montieux rad Labe 
Geneva by are. 

- you ran own qratity residences 


with mdaqr swimming jttd rad 


T erras fcxjlties in ra 
env e omnent for leaira rad spoils 

• fre^^d towSF. ro tas 
up to itxsrtgageL 
PI ease UJiUut. 
Res ide n ce lee Frraes, 1854 Leyton 
cui romsw i 

Tet ( 025 ) 3411 55 Tht Mokn 26629 CH 


20 Minutes Free, 


GENEVA 


AUTHORIZED 
Luxuriow apartmerds tor sde. View an 
tahe of Geneva m) auxd cnd pt 
onx no on tfa Aips. Fro m S Fl^SO ^ 
Fix banking rtormation exxj baric roi 
Swia Voikdxxik. Geneva, 
far xi fe ni nri i on : 

Belvedere de L'Observntoxe SA 
13 BflxL des PtricHophes 


0+1205 Geneva 
_ 10 12 22 . 


Teh 22/20 
Trie* 22822 STL CH. 


ATTENTKX4 FORBGNOS 


longer ponnlto toreireten to boy 


e piram e nte fa Monteeure, weept tor 

ipprora w« a wn craapi ror 

residenca, chrectfy an Ldm Ge- 


neva, with several m og n rti cei* apret- 
raetei av q toHe. Useraf fatrad 


Bouncing. 

far trrforrnreian! 

GLOBE PLAN 1 A. 

A v Man Repas 24 . 


0+1005 Lausanne, Swifrertand. 
Tet ( 2 1)22 35 12 . 1 %fel 


85 ME 1 ISCH 

1970 


LAKE GENEVA « UtGANO, Mon- 
keux, Gitaad Voky + meny other 
famous i n u unMii i resorts, fareirams 
can buy mu grT flurt AFACTM&JTS 
VILLAS /CHALETS. Price from rixtut 
Mortaowot 6 W% 
est. V»/Phor» H ScSCXD 
Grate 6 , 0+1007 Ususannt 
26 II. 1 U 24298 5 BO CH. 


5 A,Tour 

TelZl /25 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


from 


CALIFORNIA 
BEVERLEY HH1S 

Located only a tew ramtas 
radurte shoppe^ aetecs 
esr i mpres s wo various corternporary 
edrie writ pooh npasm frntg roam 
tor enfertoinng end 4 bedrooms, far 
torthor detafa gtecae antac* 

AGEDI 

26 be Bd Pr in ce ss* Charlotte 

Monte Crete, MC 98000 Monaco 


Tab ( 93 ) SO 66 00 jto 155 ) 


Tetex: 479 417 . 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NORMANDY. GBANVUE + Mont 
9 Atidwte , ate beach house, sieops 


h, F 7 p D 0 per mstth. Wy & Aug. ire 
R 000 per morrii ra one year Eon. 
Cabinet Poston 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MMMHCBff RnrotSlQE 1 & 2 bed- 
room flris. BrautmAy tuntafad in 
nan purposebnlt hloo. Ouiedy reto- 


otod ef^oymg panorami c item over 
Thames & Cmebo Errixre 


porter, vateo 


«... -.-^nfaneitf. lift. 
1 entiv, undarnrauno 
par long. Ren! from SSQ ■ C 450 per 
UetTeh Weekends 04 SV 279 &, 
office 0737 / 822718 . 


LONDON, CHS 5 EA. Attractive sdf- 
ra rea n ed famished Rat, 1 ctoubte 


bedoom, stttig roam, Ictdter & 
bathroom , nxrea servioe. Lodvop go- 
rage 5 x months nsnenum compev 
la. £175 per weeh. Tel- 01-252 Ml 


LONDON. For the best hmshed ftes 
and houses. Crasufi the Spaoafiste 
PM ga,^toy Ota fates. Teh London 


Trie* 27846 RESIDE G. 


PBBONAL LETTING Senwx. London 
ftfa Raven Mgyfar 01-629 9896 . 


ITALY 


ROME ( 5 M Ntgt SQUARE AMA) 
120 Sqjn. opa tnnt. Ptf n nhtd, tram 
May TSth 10 August 31 it 52300 per 
momk Tet 4 W« 5 . 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


ITALY 


SABRflA ITALY taxunaus vria 
Pdumbrixa Costa Smerrida. 5 ten- 
utes to Porta fatinta. 20 nwiutes to 


Porto Gav o^MO^ re^m. + lOOsqjn. 


terrace. 3 douUe rooms each with 
own bathroom, one jnesds room 4 - 


WC. big bring, fateheft private path 
to the sea 2 fufl fime mads with there 


own ear. face per week July/ August 
US$ 2603 . Srat. USfiJOO. hhm 2 
werics. Teh Mandar - Friday 9 JO ojil 
- 6 JX) am. hriy - Venice ( 41 ) 31161 or 
The 41(052 PSaioa 


PARIS AKEA FURNISHED 


Embassy 

8 Are de 


Service 


75001 faete 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AG04T IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 


FACING HOTEL 
CONCORDE LAFAYETTE 

Luxurious drain snefios, bath, phone. 
No ogencyfeK. F 6 . 10 Q net by north. 

- ’ vSttodorll 


Short term lease. Vire today: 
“5 Hi' “ ' 

47 . 


I am. to 


6 ^A 95 Bd Gomrion S» Cyr. fans 178 * 


81 AVEFOCH 


l eiMitee Stefas 

Phone, color TV, fatehea short term 
tame. No agency fees. F4.500/I 
Vorf today 11 am. to 6 pm. 

Tfafc 574 82 57 . 


AT HOME IN PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

AMKIMBITS R 8 l l®ff Oil SALE 

563 25 60 


74 CHAMPS-aYSBES 8rfi 


Studio, 7 or 3 -raam aportmert. 
One morth or more. 

IE OUUBDGE 359 67 97 . 


6 TH; CHARMING. Aportmert <a 18 th 


oenhxy burtefag in quirt s rany court- 
yred Living roa 


room + bedroom, tfaft 
artngs, beams. CaD to view rtfer 
May rih. Peris 325 8395 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotel without inaravemnees, feri at' 


and more in PrtB. SQRHJMe 544 39 
40 . - SO rue <fa njhrverate, fans 7 th. 


SHORT R 84 TAL M PAWS: shitea 
end 2 roomL beaotiUfy decora ted . 
Conte* So &OM, 4 ore Meats*. 
75008 Paris TeQ fi 359 99 50 


ICAR MONTPARNASSE, krege beat- 
trhJ rtetiar, ceody to Sreii with gar- 
den. Tri: 542 49 84 from 9 am - 1 Tren 
&fipm- 8 pm- 


NBU) TROCASERO rad Victor 
800 m + firing. View, modern, hswy. 
Shart^imiB QirabteOvm^no agen- 


cy. FBTO 0 : 553 5678 1 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


ST. GERMAIN des Pres • 
Garden, barely refined 
terrace on raraen. quiet, ,, 
nSD 0 Q/morttv 329 


Sap- 

14 


IDEALFOR foreign students, nicely hir- 
rxshed rental, snort stay, S possdse by 
rear. Teh 544 52 97 


SHORT THU* to Latin Quarter. 
Noopertv. Teh 329 38 83 . 


16 TH SPONlN. No ra nueis u o n . Stu- 

«*o, luxary, F 43 ». Teh ( 1 ) 504 83 - 17 , 


BOIAOOrtE METRO, Stirefa 30 1 

terrace. F 3300 net Teh 500 21 1 


16 TH:Sti«fca 2 rooms, nevriy redone. 


From rajOQ. Teh 720 941 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


ON GO(f 

ST NOM LA BRETECHE 
Beautiful freestone bufcfina, 400 sqm. 
fivtag s pa ce, firin g, dririp , Sidy. 6 b ed- 
rarera, T grates roren, 4 brttreooni^ 3 - 
ear garage^ AXClc^’ri krid. F240JJ00 


par year. 


Large doub le 
toeing south raDOO. 


16THFOCH 

+ 1 


542164 


FAST EXECUTIVE HOMHrtDfNG- 
| Pras A suburbs, tofc/stes 551 0945 


SPAIN 


MAUORCA. POUENSA. Luxurious 

vrio, 5 bedrooms (8 peopfej, 4 brtto, 

Peril 12-345 9666 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

VILLARS 


Oriy 75 mm from Genera Airport 
ifa - term - golf and sun 


MAGNTHCENT CHALET 
for mn 

wrti wonderful view ewer the Mpe 


private perfc of 15 jX 30 xqjp. 

12 beiiuios 


very kauriomc 
3 reoe t riew roo ms. 6 berths 


T month; USS 20 D 00 + choraes 
speed rate for a longer perSds 


far tafc nuulhm. 
taenafaitere de VSar* SA. 


P.O. Bara 62, Of -1884 Vim 
’ i 25/35 35 31 


Tefc 

Trim, 486 213 GESE 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


AMBBCAN 

nahed flat. 



REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

JRGB 4 T - ON ASSKNMBff - Sea* 

2 bed opiriniert ten 16 -iune 16 
furnished near pafa. 6 rf (SA 417 - 
482-8938 business ham at 617 - 522 - 
3631 . KS.VJ*. en angbis. 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 

Mt MANAGEMB 4 T Consultant, te 
terrxjhooal trade buduyound. 27 , 
leeks dxiQen^np career opportunity 
in mitenotiraac fagfah, Spoeh 
French, Dutch + German. Williiw to 
rriocate. Plerae contact: T. Vra Host, 
Grdgeretf 19 . 22 E, Gravrawewl, 
B 4 luiHLTehl 23 / 3 S 95 B 2 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

1£5 RAWSJEX 00 ( 1005 ) 
RESTAURANT CLUB 
needs young & good looting waten 
reetrewu bar-tanden daormra tor part 
tme jatx GA 887 01 80 fee* 
from 9 an to 7 pm. 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED - 

ava BMRra. sh^e. Bntah .15 
yean varied experience in water re- 
sow ces & dfanioQC wdt cowuMrt. 
govermnents & ertT arandes, VJK 
quetihed, widely tiaveSraTteob •»- 
ptayment in IK or omrteoa. VflSng 
to travel, salary negotiable. Kunro- 
swidanm. 15 Claranoe Are. New 
Malden, Sixrey. UK. Td 01 -W 9 0199 . 

PBOICSSX 3 NAL WOMAN- Adapt- 
able ta ray oAurid anm owner*, 
lived France 8 yem, fluent. Specific 
Xtifa in devriaftog defy ptannrng 
orgunhing eeatig hafamg leader- 
dsa inAuaKing tupanndng human ro- 
tations seehs new dxdtenge. L Mo 
Dondd. Bn 4270 , Conan CA 90744 

AMBBCAN BIUNGUAL MAUL 24 , 
BA in Frendi BA in Rcxfioffelevmon. 
ram— niorttvely ildted. oteenlly En. 
gteh Anidrat m France ti erd of 
May, seefa tab «ih rampray in West 
Europe or UsT Tet (SOL 5173 - 85 . 

PRIVATE SECRETARY, 28 , very rt- 
tractive, nertrve Genuuic Used to rep- 
rnserrtceion, fawlot with mil bush 
nest, seels new pastaon. traveling 
welcome. Write to Sox 2133 , IXL, 
FrieSidetr. 15, 4000 Frarkfurt/Mrtn 

YOUNG .GOMAN fashion model, 
higlhly tiduatecl loob tor cm irterest- 
■tg position. London 2454080 . 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

AMBBCAN SCHOOL IN SURRY 
soeta teocherx tor Amenran airacu- 
hw. Grades K- 1 Z Teachers needed 
lor severe! ttactaines induing Sbrra- 
arrtitp hrtary/Spoish. raaert rwf 
Americsn history, mothemotiei/pby- 
■a. Interested candidates pfeeee send 
«M* cJa TASS England, Cohjhar- 
brar Lane. Thorpe, near Eghacv Sir- 
ray. Cngkxid TW 10 8 TE. 

LANGUAGE SCHOOL seeks toll or 
port time maher-tongue Dririi 
teadien. AW ham EEC passport Or 
o vaEd ~a»te do trorarT'. GA 747 12 

80 Sofar Longues. 

DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SAN RANOSCq area frariy seeks 
ra pcrir / gri fridoy. Mat speeri: 
EngSwriL Write / tfvhriejrioto / 
Mr J Carbone. 1532 Vim* £„ San 
Ltiondro, CA 94577 USA. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
positions wanted 


Sines COOK, AGE 19,1 
. oprWricBShp, seeks chal. 
portunity in For Edit in .... 
broaden ha knowledge & ideas. Hotel 
or private yadrtL nern* reitfe Bax 
21 X HertfiTribune, 92521 NeuBy 
Codnx, France . 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AH 


af ll 


1 , mm's hefaen & r 
drat bre-ei damesK 
help workhMdei CcA Soane Bureau, 
London 730 8122/5142 (24 km) U- 
CEMPAGY. Thr B 950670 SLOAh£ G. 


ALWAYS AVAMAULOMOTrt only 
babyrmndert & lfl ctan-d al y noth. 
Slocme Bunww; London 730 8122 f 
5UZ Dcancud employment agency 
CNAUmUE, very good retorenaa. 
Gajdo, 17 rue Dau, Pmn fth. 


AUTOMOBILES 


ma f sD Bma 

New 1985 , M US. spea fi c ati ons 
500 Sa's from U 5 S 47 .D 00 . 
500 5 f 435 D 0 

500 SEC 49,000 

500 H. 4 WXM 

190 E - 23 - 16 V &C 00 O 

Defrery M weeks. 

Cortoet Mr. Malta weekdays 12 -Spm. 
Teh ( 212 ) 279 18 40 htew York Oy 


V- 


AUTO RENTALS 


AUSTMA A EAST HACK US $1540 
per day. Autahcma, Frtnzntibrued- 
ertth'. fa A-lUOVfanm. Teh 241694 . 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


Sd 


12921 


THE CAR SHOTING 
STtQALtSTS 
PAHS (1 1 530 0304 

CANhB/hKE Bil) 39 43 44 

HlAh 83 \J 8 T (061 roiBO 51 

BOW 4 / COLOGNE !D 22 S)> 
STUTTGART 

MWMCH .. 

BR 04 SHAVH+ ( 0 * 71 ) 43043 

rt®V YORK BtZM TO« 

HOUSTON ffl 3 931 7405 

LOS ANGUS M 568 9288 

MONTREAL ' ( 514 ) 866 4681 
AGENTS WC ' 

leave it to u to bring 8 la you 


m 880611 
93 10 45 


1% 




s r r 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


JS-.i. . ■ 

>> *»’•- 
- S*.| 4 

•iff.? r 


■ r^ _ ' 

'“'St,.".'' 


FRANCO ^ 
BRITANNIC £ ^ 

TAX FRS CARS 

ROILS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 
RQVK 

RANGE &1AMJ ROVER 
Europecai .delivery 

21 AveiGeber 
73116 PARIS 


\y' M; V 
•* 'hj r... 

^ •' li 


^ ; V . 


ix>.v 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


, MS 0 . 

Temporary agency xeefa tor 
mternati u nol 0 QSf»mes in hreis 
Engtxh mother tongue 

B1LR4GUAL 

5ECRE7ARIB 


Word pramang experience <» asset 
Apply. 156 rue Mortmortre^ far* 2 
or «8 233 17 54 


EXECUTIVE SECKETAKY rented far 
smart mt'l a sso ch rtto ri Dote rreo in 
fare. Enghsh ntodier tongue, fhtert in 
Frondr. good educationd bafc- 
grorad, eMefent seorearid fUb, 
sense «f mrirtme, deep mratveinenr 
tawo^&goodmnsertfatiorLDivn. 
fied artnrAes ineto*ig hoduig stativ 
lied data Send handwri tte n oppfaa- 
hon 4 - CV & sdvy reqreamn rt to 
Bob 2131 . Herald Tribune. 92 S 2 I 
NwJy Cedes. Frame* 


BXJNGUAL 
Amencra «lua«ri sysw 1 rad 
9321 rtteorty Cedex. Frrace 


SeCRETAHLU. 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


utumie SSCS tor AMBBCAN 
JWPttKVC FIRMS in PABSr 


Engtish, 
ramtina, 
qured T 
leferisK. 

Victor Hugo. 7511 
727 61 W 


CUdi or German 
or french ro- 
ta- BStinggal 
le or phone: ‘ 38 Avenue 
0 Paris. 


Paris. Frinz. Tel; 


U-S. law firm mb a 

BIUNGUAL 

SECRETARY 


Fluent Frendi o«ynj£sh 


CoB Pm, 743 25 : 


few 


PAKTNHB SECHRART 

& / Fraodi requaot _. 

acco u n t i n g finn. Sh orth u nd. 
iypng, w ord proeen ap jx p eim Be. 
vdiivw wpsnanoi w nnonool re- 
pom. rrsttne tad Jiff refirae*. Teh 
fans 723 00 43 far- oppra ame nt 


AUTBJB, fans. Top pay for high fare! 
experienc e + researai and boofaep- 


fLk 




ite 92»1 Necsly Codex. Aon 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


wanted aromw language 

stouiChund/typtet, speed wrrtcng not 
™=«e, pennonart po^T^Pori. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


“J®* boss who needs right 
hand. OH-hfi: extensive experience 


Traxme, 92521 Neu»y Cedex fag 


WWSTAD 
SUNOUAL AGSrtCrTlly 

«^=7sai a 40 Ten,w, &S 


EXECUTIVE SECRET AIR 9 HIH etf» 

totes pwhon m Genera 

«o « other ports of Swfaeifand 
neow wna ta= Bra 2 UA Hereto 
Trtaune. 92521 Neuter Cedra fSS 


^ OHMS. The 

gJPWXM>^f«Pta » ftw- 


't 


Tl:(l J757 50 80 
Telex: 620 420 


Si- . • ■ 




TAKE 1HE FRONT 


On your new Europe* ado putrfnte 

nde tfvorir bu& buying prren an»U* 
far your ndvkkica purchase 


Painless hnport 

* you hfy the profit 

• we do the warh 
Wor l dwide stoptaenli to your 


Send tor a oyotabon ' 
MYCA 8 
of UMbridga 
'ram Lon*' 
Street, i 


{.Sfytetertjram Loreto Ai tpari) 



MYCAR 


L ■’'••l* il |J,, 


PAGE 15 
FORMdRE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


Printed by gdz In Zurich (Switzerland) 




1