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The Global Newspaper 

. Eidited ifl Paro : 

Printed SimuljaieoUslj' 
vv in Paris, London, Zorich, d 

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WEAtHQk DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 18 

No. 31,791 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


Published With Hie New York limes and The Washington Post 

7 # PARIS, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 ~ _ 


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Recalling May8, 1945: The War in Europe Ended But the Triumph Was Restrained 




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By Drew Midcflctbn / * Chiefs of Staff: “The mission of this Allied force 

New York Tima Service , was fulfilled at 0241 local lime. May 7. 1945." 
NEW YORK — There vas a brief cerembay 1 . Hostilities ceased the next day. 
in the industrial school at Reitiis, and then it was- ,\ Thus the war in Europe concluded on a note 
over. General Walter Bedell Smith, 'chief of staff" af restrained triumph, with satisfaction rather 
for General Dwight D/Eisenhewer, the supreme jban exultation. Since January, the end had 
allied commander, presided. With him cere'* been in sight. Hitler's last great gamble, the 
General Carl Spaai^of the Air' Force/ General ^Ardennes offensive, which Americans call the 
Frederick Morgan of .the British Army, Admiral 1 “ 

Sir Harold Burroueh of the Royal Navy,.^2r y ' Hitler was dead. The 

Marshal James Robb ofthe Royal Air Fortaif 


•*- r * >•: 




JiriMlant sbUBeis of the V-S. ^Tfli Array marked victory at the Nuremberg stadium, where Hitler held Nazi raDzes. 


Marshal James Robb oTthe Royal Air Fqi^k 
and France's General Fran^cfo Scs^ TheSovi- 
et Union was represented by 'Mq or 'General 
Ivan Sml^wov. 

General Alfred Jodi and Admiral Hans 
George von Fried eburg, the German represen- 
tatives. were escorted in by two British officers. 
General Kenneth Strong, Eisenhower's bead of 
intelligence; laid the surrender documents be- 
fore them. Genera] Smith asked if they were 
prepared to sign. General Jodi nodded. He and 
Friedebwg signed, followed by Generals Smith, 
Susloparov, and Seve&. 

“I warn to say a word," said General Jodi, 
straight-backed and impassive. "With this sig- 
nature (he German people and the German 
armed forces are, for better or worse, delivered 
into the victor's bands. In this war, which has 
lasted more than five years, both have achieved 
and suffered more than perhaps any other peo- 
ple in the world. In this hour 1 can only express 
the hope that the victors will treat them with 
generosity 

The Germans marched out, and the allied 
officers shook bands. A few minutes later, Ei- 
senhower dictated a message to the Combined 


Hitler was dead. The 
concentration camps 
emptied. And yet the joy was 
bittersweet. 

Battle of the Bulge, had crumpled under an 
Allied counteroffensive and unremitting attacks 
by the Allied air forces. The Americans, badly 
mauled, had reoiganized and with the British 
prepared for the final offensive. All roads now 
led to Reims. 

The Rhine was crossed- The German pocket 
in the Ruhr fell to the American 1st and 9th 
Armies. The British and Canadians swept into 
northern Germany. The 3d Army dashed to 
Lire in Austria and Risen in Czechoslovakia. 
The 7th Army rumbled to the Austrian frontier. 

Old and famous rides fell: Hamburg and 
Bremen, Frankfort and Munich. By March, the 
Germans' front had lost cohesion and tens of 
thousands of them were taken prisoner. About 
SOjOOO of the enemy were routed by a smaller 
American armored force in the Saar-MoseHe- 
Rhine triangle. Day after day. Allied bombas 


continued methodical attacks on production 
centers, supply dumps, and communications 
centers. 

As March gave wav to April. German resis- 
tance in the west dwindled. There were occa- 
sional fierce fights in which the Germans, usual- 
ly troops of (he Waffen SS. fought to the last 
man and bullet. As they advanced. Allied troops 
entered concentration camps at Dachau and 
Belsen. Men who had unflinchingly endured El- 
Day were sickened by what the)- saw. 

To the east, the Germans were better oiga- 
nized and put up a suffer fight. But from the 
congratulatory communiques issued by Mos- 
cow, it was clear that the Soviet armies were 
sweeping across Poland and moving into Ger- 
many toward Berlin. 

By the third week in April, as news of the 
Soviet advance swept through the German 
Army, thousands seemed downright eager to 
surrender and enter the safe haven of Western 
prisoner of war camps. First in a trickle, then in 
a flood. German civilians and soldiers by the 
tens of thousands streamed westward away 
from the advancing Russians. 

The surrender at Reims was preceded by what 
was probably the most effective ultimatum ever 
issued by Eisenhower. Under guard in Reims, 
the German delegation asked for another 48 
hours. “You tell them that 48 hours from mid- 
night tonight. 1 will close my lines on the west- 
ern front so no more Germans can get through." 
Eisenhower answered. The German delegation 
knew he meant it and came to the table without 
further delay. 

With so many pieces to pick up, there was 
(Continued on Plage 2, CoL 1) 


Kohl and Mitterrand 
To Meet on Alliance 


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- .. . . By Axel Krause 

'*■ * International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Chancellor Hehriot 
Kohl of West Germany and Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand of 
France, estranged during last 
. week's conference. of icdustiMna- 

tions in Beam, will meet May 28 to 
. ' discuss thefutureof their dose alli- 
ance and posable steps in Europe- 
an an cooperation, West German and 
’• iv French officials said Tuesday. 

- ’ The meeting in West Germany 
•••' was planned several months ago 
~ t and the date was fixed during the 

/ Bonn conference with, a view to 
.. consulting before -the .European 
; Community summit meetmgin Mi- ' 
’ ian aaJxaieMsad t^^ie-c^a^B 
T^ : ?2id. • 

• The atmosphere -si the KoW- 
' Miiterrand mating is caqiected to 
be stramed by what a semor Fimch 
.. offirial desmbed as “tBsorepan-. 
cies" in Mr. Kohl's behavieff daring 
the seven-nation economic summit, 

- „ which ended Satiirday. 

“This next bilateral meeting,” 
__ the official said, “wfllcatailily oe 
. influenced by what happened in 

- Boon, but it is not ytt osar what 
v will emerge.” • - 

Mr. Mittenandandhis adwers 
were upset by Mr. KidiTs derision 
to support President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s call to summit conference 
participants to start global cade 
negotiations in 1986. 

Most of the participants sup- 
ported the U.£ initiative, but 


France blocked it on the ground 
. that trade talks should be wed pre- 
pared fast and that fixing a date 
would contravene an EC derision 
to prepare for the talks before set- 
ting a date. 

is not the first time Europe- 
ans have been divided," said Jac- 
ques Attafi, Mr. Mitterrand’s spe- 
cial adviser, in a radio interview 
Monday, “and I imagine h is not 
the last.” • 

The conflict in the West German 
and EC -positions on trade talks 
was expected to be raised in the 
meeting between Mr. Kohl and Mr. 
-Mitterrand, as wdl as 'West Ger- 
man participation in . Eureka, a 
; French-led initiative dot . would es- 
tablish a Europem -research pro- . 
gram nilwgh technology.. ..... 

Birefca isregarded as an effort to 
counter the tecrmological challenge 
posedtO-EnropebyMr. Reagan's 
Strategie' Defense Initiative, his 
space defense plan. 

At the Bonn conference, Mr. 
Kriil said that die UJS. project is 
justified and indicated that West 
Germany was interested in partici- 
pating, Bat he also indicated that 
Germany might participate in the 
Eureka project. Research in areas 
specified by Eureka, such as ad- 
vanced optic and laser technology, 
new materials and artificial inteffi- 
gencc, would parallel the UJS. 
spare defense program. 

Mr. Mitterrand said that France ' 
could not Mitiripate in Mr. Rea- 
gan’s plan “in its present form." 


pp.AN'tf 

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IJ.S.MayAct 
On Subsidies 

. Untied Pros Iraematiomd 

WASHINGTON The. refusal 
of the French preadentj Franoris 
Mitterrand,' to set a starting date 
for global trade talks has brought 
an indirect threat of trade retafia- 
ik» from the US. agricnJnire sec- 
retary,' Jriu R. Bkxx - • 

Expressing “deep disapprint- 
meni and extreme frustration,” Mr. 
Block said Monday that American 
,/^annas were upset by European 
fbmxmmity produCthai and export 
subsidies that have tightened com- 
petition. 

“This i$ only going to utetoify 
their unhtqjpiness,” Mr. Block said 
in reaction to Mr. Mitterrand's 
balking at President Rmndd Rea- 
gan’s attempt at Iasi week’s eco- 
nomic summit meeting in Bonn to 
set trade talks early next year. 

. “I think it's srubbOTineffl. sdf- 

said. . • 

He raised the posabffity of tar- 



? 1 ' Eure^j«ms:m trading wheat flour, 
r poulttv or dairy products^ '• 

$ " ^. I ^ScongSflK Scnatcmajority 

' . INSIDE 

■ The US. andOmaarttrjmg 

to reach an accord cm a port call 
to Shanghai next week. Page 7. 

BUSfNESS/FINANCE 

■ A US. »«cy is investigating 
possfl^itiMtir trading in virtu- 


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TQMOMtOW 

Travel inFratme; a.S^erial Re- 
port.- • "•* - v 


* John R. Block 

leader, .Robert J. Dole, proposed 
that the United Stales reward com- 
panies that contract to sell speci- 
fied quantities of farm products 
overseas. 

/-Noting the French refysal to per- 
mit a new round erf trade talks 
nnlfcci farm whdncts are exempted, 
Mr, Dricv a RqnibBcan of Kansas, 
said: This is a setback that's hard 
to accept In facLlthink we should 
go forward with die. planning pro- 
cedures for new trade talks” any- 
wayr 

. In Senate remarks, Mr. Dole said 
that commons by Mr. Miuerrand 
during tlu Bonn meeting made it 
evident that “a negotiated resolu- 
tion of the export subsidy issue wfli 
hot 'be posable tiiis year or in the 
nearfumre.”.. 

“The United Slates," he cemtin- 
ued, "xmst face the fact that world 
trade in agricultural products will 
continue to reflect 4 huge and and 
posaty expanded role of gpvenir 
meat intervention and subsidized 
^depractieesL*’ ' , • 

To become competitive, Mr. 
said. Congress must aa swift- 
ly to allow UJS. farm prices to reach 
imeitiatibnal levels.and added: 

“I intend to support adjostmenis 
In -price-support loan levels that 


Reagan Call 
For Hot tine 
Will Repeat 
NATO Offer 

Ream 

BRUSSELS — When President 
Ronald Reagan calls for a hot hnc 
between U.S. and Soviet military 
headquarters during a speech to the 
European Parliament on Wednes- 
day he wfl] be “warming up" an 
existing NATO proposal, alliance 
diplomats said Tuesday. 

The creation of special commu- 
nications lints to reduce [he risk of 
. misunderstanding of military activ- 
ities is one ofaix confidence build- 
ing. -measures presented by the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 

Gorbadtev is ’soberly opthiBs- 
tic’ on anus taflrs. Page 2. 

tion at the Stockholm Conference 
on Disannament in Europe. 

The measure, formally submit- 
ted in a working document to the 
35-nation conference by the US. 
ambassador, lames Goodby, on 
Feb. 27, is regarded as the least 
substantive of the NATO propos- 
als. the diplomats said. 

A US. offirial at NATO ac- 
knowledged that the presklent's 
idea was “the same sort erf thing" as 
was already on the table in Stock- 
holm. 

One senior diplomat said that 
Mr. Reagan might be highlighting 

because the^United ^tateTboped 
agreement could be reached in time 
for the president and the Soviet 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, to 
have something to sign if they meet 
at the United Nations in Septem- 
ber. 

■ U.S. Wants Allies' Support 

Earlier, Bernard Weinraub of The 
New York Times reported from Ma- 
drid: 

Discussing the proposals for eas- 
ing tensions with the Soviet Union, 
White House officials conceded 
that they were designed in large 
part to enhance West European 
support for Mr. Reagan. 

A White House official said, 
“It's a pitch to the Soviets as wdl as 
the Europeans." 

Larry. Speakes, Mr. Reagan’s 
spokesman, made it dear that, al- 
though proposals for a mili- 
tary communications link have 
been offered before, the adminis- 
tration is hopeful that Mr. Gorba- 
chev will seriously consider it. 

Mr. Speakes said the nxxHtajry 
link would avert such serious mo- 
dems as the shooting down of a 
Sooth Korean airliner by a Soviet 
jei fighter on SepL 1, 1983, and the 
recent' lotting of Major Arthur D. 
Nicholson Jr. by a Soviet sentry in 
East Germany. 

Appearing on CBS television on 
Monday, Robert C McFariane. the 
White House national security ad- 
viser, said the president would pro- 
pose four specific measures in his 


non,, wl 
incom&' 


're$$re our competitive posa- 
„ Whj}e protecting basic farm 


He said these would include 
sfg-lring agreement on various con- 
fidence-budding measures, such as 
having observers at each side’s mD- 
itaiy exercises, nocking toward an 
agreement on a proposal for “no 
first use of force" if it can be «- 
-pressed in specific terms and set- 
ting up better contact between the 
military through such methods as 
the direct fine between the Penta- 
gon and the Soviet Defense Minis- 
try. 

Mr. Speakes also said that Mr. 
Ragan would again propose an 
agreement on the “no first use of 
force” proposal in settling disputes 
with rite Soviet Union. 

The administration has already 
made this proposal contingent cm 
nriBtaiy cotrftueoce-btnk&ig mea- 
sures to avoid the danger of miscal- 
culation. 


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Nancy Reagan, after watching a flamenco performance 
Tuesday al Madrid’s Royal Tb^ter, decided to get into tbe 


The Aiwxxoed FVm» 


act According to Queen Sofia, Mrs. Reagan’s one-minute 
performance showed “great rhythm — fantastic."’ 


U.S. 


cans 


By Joel Brinkley 

Vw York Tuna Semce 

WASHINGTON — U.S. miU- 
tary advisers will soon begin train- 
ing Costa Rica’s national police 
force to cope with what officials of 
both nations call a threat from Nic- 
araguan-nazoed terrorists and in- 
surants, US. officials said. 

Officials at the State and the De- 
fense departments said Monday 
that at the request of the Costa 
Rican government, 24 U.S. Army 
Special Forces advisers will begin 
later this month to train four com- 
panies of Costa Rican Qvfl Guard 
officers, about 750 men in alL 

A Defense Department offirial 
said the UJS*. advisers would spend 
about 12 weeks training the Costa 
Rjcans in “basic military skills " 
and then would return to their 
home base in Panama. 

Costa Rka has no army. The 
country’s Civil and Rural Guard 


police forces comprise about 
10,000 men equipped with little 
more than light arms. In addition, 
Costa Rica recently formed a mili- 
tia of civilians who receive light 
training and would be called upon 
in an emergency. 

Although small numbers of Civil 
and Rural Guard officers have pre- 
viously received limited military 
training in such activities as border 
patrol procedures, the officials said 
this was the first time that Costa 
Rica had asked for large-scale, gen- 
eral militar y training. 

A Costa Rican government offi- 
cial said that Civil Guard training 
in the past had not included “train- 
ing for facing insurgent groups, 
and now we find that this is neces- 
sary because” of pressure from 
Nicaragua. 

Some UB. military and diplo- 
matic officials have been urging the 
Costa Ricans to arm themsrives for 


years, but the government in San 
Jose has resisted. 

Now, a State Department offi- 
cial said, “they’ve been growing 
more concerned about Nicaragua." 
In February, after a series of border 
clashes between Costa Rican forces 
and Nicaraguan Army units, Costa 
Rican officials said (hey were con- 
sidering reducing or ending diplo- 
matic relations with Managua. 

On Friday, a Stale Department 
spokesman, Edward P. Djerejran, 
said Nicaragua had recently pro- 
vided rifles and mono' to a “Costa 
Rican secret alliance of leftist par- 
ties.” He also said that 200 Costa 
Rican “leftists" had gone to Nica- 
ragua to fight alongside Sandinist 
troops against the U.S.-backed 
Nicaraguan rebels, 

Mr. Djerejian said “there is 
clearly potential for the use” of this 


“all-Costa Rican brigade inside 
Costa Rica in tbe future" 


Echoing a theme of the Reagan 
administration, he said that this 
was a pan of a persistent effort on 
the part of Nicaragua to subvert its 
neighbors. 

Costa Rica dismantled its army 
in 1949 after units participated in a 
dvif war between the two main 
political parties. Since then, the 
country has been tbe most stable 
democracy in Central America. 
Many Costa Ricans say that the 
absence of any force able to carry 
out military coups has helped to 
keep it that way. 

Since the Nicaraguan revolution 
in 1979, however, the government 
has slowly increased the Civil 
Guard's equipment U.S. military 
aid to Costa Rica jumped from 
nothing in fiscal 1981 to $2 million 
in 1982, S4.6 million in 1983, S9.2 
mini on in 1984 and SI 1 million this 
year. 


Gonzalez 
And Reagan i 
Disagree on : 
Nicaragua 

United Press International 

MADRID — President Ronald 
Reagan and Prime Minister Felipe 
Gonzalez of Spain acknowledged 
disagreement Tuesday over Nica- 
ragua but said their nations “have 
cordial and friendly relations" that 
go “beyond our differences." 

The scheduled one- hour, final 
meeting between the two leaders 
was stretched to one hour and 40 
minutes, with the agenda also in- 
cluding the Middle East, Spam's 
membership in the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and the 12,600 
, U.S. troops in Spairt . _ 

The United States agreed Tues- 
day to-preliminary talks on reduc- 
ing tbe U-S. military presence in 
Spain, said the Spanish foreign 
minister, Fernando Moran. 

Secretary of Slate George P. 
Shultz confirmed that the two tides 
would soon discuss the issue but 
played down the importance of the 
talks. “It’s not as though some big 
deal is taking place," be said. 

As Mr. Reagan was ending his. 
two-day state visit, dashes erupted 
between 500 riot police and about 
3,000 protesters near the U.S. Em- 
bassy. At least six persons, includ- 
ing three policemen, were injured, 
ihe police said, and at least six 
persons were arrested. 

Protesters threw bricks, bottles 
and stones at police after burning 
four American flags and blocking 
traffic for two hours cm the main 
thoroughfare. Paseo de la Castel- 
lan a. Police then charged at the 
crowd, swinging clubs. 

The talks between Mr. Reagan 
and Mr. Gonz&lez were described 
by the president as a “very produo 
live discussion” that “demonstrat- 
ed a broad agreement on the kind 
of world we warn to bring about." 

Mr. Gonzalez said, “We had a 
long talk on international problems 
and regional problems that worry 
our country, " and he named Cen- 
tral America as one of the trouble 
spots. 

But the Socialist prime minister 
concluded, “We have cordial and 
friendly relations ... beyond our 
differences." 

Asked if be had asked Mr. Gon- 
zalez to intercede with the Sandin- 

(Continued mi Page 2, CoL 7) 


FalweWs Fundamentalist University: 'Not for Every Student’ 


By Donald TP. Baker 


LYNCHBURG, Virginia — 
Cheryl Moses said she fQund her- 
self “straying from ray Christian 
beliefs" during her freshman year 
at Mount Holyoke College, so 
when her mother heard the Rever- 
end Jerry FalwdL, the evangelist, 
talk about his Liberty Baptist 
College mi television. Miss Moses 
and her mother visited the cam- 
pus here. 

"It clicked,” said Miss Moses, 
23, who transferred from (he 
highly rued South Hadley, Mas- 
sachusetts, women's school in 
1982 and Monday was one of 668 
to graduate from the school, 
which has been renamed Liberty 
University. "Tve loved every min- 
ute ofitT 

Enrofimem at Liberty has risen 
dramatically since its founding m 
1971. and by next fall it is expect- 
ed to be about 6 j000. 

Liberty is part of a religiously 
oriented empire that has grown 
out of Mr. Falwdfs Thomas 
Road Baptist Church here. It also 
includes “The Old-Time Gospel 
Hour,” an internationally syndi- 



Jmy Fatwell 

caled television and radio pro- 
gram; Moral Mtgority Ino, its po- 
litical lobbying arm; elementary 
and secondary schools: a semi- 
nary; a home Bible study course; 
a summer camp; and a home for 
unwed, mothers. 

Mr FalweD, weD known for his 
mail and broadcast fund-raising 
appeals, said his various enter- 
prises will gross about $200 mil- 


lion this year. And Liberty will 
get a sizable chunk of it, including 
a subsidy of about $2,000 far each 
student 

“It’s our goal.” Mr. FalweD 
said in an interview last week, “to 
be the Harvard of academes, the 
Noire Dame of athletics and the 
Brigham Young of religious 
schools to evangelical and funda- 
mentalist boys and girls. 

“We have not arrived in any 
area," he said, “but we’re malting 
more progress than our friends or 
critics believed possible 14 years 
ago.” 

IBs dream is a 25-year plan that 
calls for 50,000 students in a 
school with law, medicine and 
other professional divisions. Al- 
ready, the school has grown far 
beyond the “Jerry FalweD IT that 
some critics dubbed iu Mr. Fal- 
weU said he has asked that the 
school never be named for him. 

He says the school’s rules of 
conduct “might trouble same stu- 
dents — they wouldn't tell me, of 
course — but Liberty admittedly 
is not For every student. Every 
student comes here by choice, 
stays by choice. They pay for the 
education they get here," about 


56,000 a year for tuition and room 
and board. 

Prospective students are riven 
a handbook, “The Liberty Way," 
that promises a campus life de- 
void of single dating (for fresh- 
men and sophomores), smoking, 
drinking, rock music and most 
movies and television (such popu- 
lar programs as “Dynasty" and 
“Dallas" are among those 
banned). The handbook also re- 
quires twice-weekly church atten- 
dance, curfews ana room inspec- 
tions. 

Students, many of whom have a 
scrubbed look about them, often 
say teat they were reared in un- 
compromisingly fundamentalist 
homes. Some even think the 
school may be becoming too lib- 
eral. 

Students said some rules had 
been relaxed from tee early days, 
when only Walt Disney movies 
were shown and interracial dating 
was banned. 

Dawn Simms, 22, a prenursing 
sophomore from Levi t town, 
Pennsylvania, who is black, said 
tear when mixed couples want to 
date, “the school calls both sets of 
parents to see if they know about 


it” That’s aU right with her, she 
said. “Parents should be a part of 
what you do." 

Mr. FahveD's television pro- 
gram, shown on more than 500 
stations, bas attracted students 
from aD 50 states and 30 foreign 
countries. 

As of May I, Liberty had re- 
ceived 2,186 applications from 
would-be freshmen, compared to 
1,135 at the same time last year. 
All applicants who arc high 
school graduates will be accepted 
if they agree to sign a pledge that 
they, are born-again Christians 
and will follow “The liberty 
Way." 

“It’s not good enough that 
someone sprinkled water on your 
head when you were 3 " said the 
admissions director, Tom Diggs 
“You must be boro again,” 

The school’s posh for academic 
excellence is beginning to pay off. 
Among next year’s freshmen will 
be tbe scbooTs first National 
Merit Scholars. 

Pressure on tee faculty for aca- 
demic achievement has prompted 
a number of young professors to 
drive tee 65 miles (100 ltiloine- 
(Gaatmoed on Page 2, CoL 7) 








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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


** 




Saudis CreatingaNew 'City 9 for Foreign Diplomats 


By Charles P. Wallace 

La r Angeles Times Service 

RIYADH — Over the next few 
months, a curious migration mil 
be taking place from Jeddah, on 
the Red Sea. to a dust bowl 
sprouting a forest of construction 
cranes on Riyadh’s western out- 
skirts. 

The Saudi government has told 
the 8.000 foreign diplomats and 
their dependents living in Jeddah 
that they have until September to 
move their embassies to Riyadh. 

Riyadh has been the official 
Saudi capital since the kingdom 
was unified by Ibn Sand in 1932. 
However, strict limits were placed 
on outsiders in the traditional 
home of the Saudi royal family, 
where wristwatches and bicycles 
were prohibited as Foreign vices 
only a generation ago and foreign 
airlines were until recently 
banned from landing. 

The strictures kept the diplo- 
matic corps, and the Saudi For- 
eign Ministry as well, isolated in 
Jeddah, a seaport that historically 
has served as the kingdom’s peep- 
hole on the world. 

In 1975. however, the govern- 
ment decided to move the Foreign 
Ministry to Riyadh, where the 
other ministries are located. The 
diplomats were told to pack up as 
well. 

The result seemed qu'tniessen- 
tiaity Saudi: A posh. 200-acre dip- 
lomatic quarter is under construc- 
tion and. despite its lavish 
amenities, it has already managed 
to evoke controversy among its 
prospective residents! 

Many world capitals have an 
area favored by diplomats, and 
some governments, notably the 
Chinese and the Russians, impose 
strict limits on where diplomats 
may live, but it is unusual to have 
a self-contained city where all the 
diplomats are under orders from 



nwNawVortrBiM 

A new diplomatic quarter is being constructed cm the outskirts of Riyadh, to which embassies must move from Jeddah. 


the host government to live and 
work. 

“It will probably be more diffi- 
cult and less satisfying to live out 
there than in Jeddah.” a Western 
diplomat said. “There will be no 
need to leave the quarter except to 
get into your limousine to visit the 
Saudi Foreign Ministry.” 

Saudi officials are trying to dis- 
pel the notion that the govern- 
ment hopes to isolate foreigners 
from Riyadh’s uliraconservative 
Islamic society by budding the 
quarter a 15-minute drive from 
the city’s center. For one thing , 
the Saudis have made plans for 
20.000 Saudis and nondiplomatic 
foreigners to move into the area. 

“We're not building a ghetto; 
this is an open community," said 


Ahmed Sail own, who is supervis- 
ing construction of the quarter for 
the Riyadh Development Author- 
ity. 

Mr. Salloum said that the dip- 
lomatic quarter had been con- 
ceived as a way to ease the move 
to Riyadh, where real estate spec- 
ulation has made land 10 times 
more expensive than the newly 
developed acreage that the gov- 
ernment is selling. 

The Saudis are spending money 
lavishly to make the complex 
comfortable. They are building 
roads, a 14-building international 
school complex, a diplomatic club 
and a huge sports facility that will 
be open to the public and shop- 
ping centers that will be devel- 
oped privately. 


Each government is responsible 
for designing and budding its own 
embassy; sites were determined 
by lottery. An enormous U.S. 
Embassy complex, at six acres 
(2.4 hectares) the largest in the 


grade) — but it lacks Jeddah's 
humidity, which the British ad- 
venturer. T.E. Lawrence, once lik- 
ened to being “hit in the bead 
with a shovel.” 


quarter, is about half completed. 


: will cost about £27 million. 


“So far, it’s a lot of fun,” said 
Guy Ducrey, the Swiss airibassa- 
dor, who moved in last January as 
the quarter’s second tenan t. South 
Korea was the GrsL 


A number of diplomats said 
that they were withholding judg- 
ment on the new quarter until 
they heard from the Saudis about 
bow much freedom they will have. 


Mr. Ducrey is one of a number 
of envoys who say they prefer 
Riyadh’s climate to Jeddah's. Ri- 
yadh may be the world's hottest 
capital — summertime tempera- 
tures hover around 115 degrees 
Fahrenheit (46 degrees centi- 


For example, foreign women 
are allowed to drive in the 
Aramco oil compound in Dhah- 
ran, which is forbidden elsewhere 
in the kingdom. Some diplomats 
hope that a s imilar policy wffl 
apply in the diplomatic quarter, 
where most diplomats will live 
some distance from their embas- 


sies. 


In Beirut, 
Fighting 
Is Worst in 
10 Months 



BRIEFS 


May 8, 1945: War in Europe Comes to an End 


(Continued from Page l) Nor was there a spirit of revenge, 

little thought of celebration. Any- Men and women were too interest- 
way. said a Frenchwoman in Me- ed in rebuilding their shops and 
lun: “Twice in my Ufetime the Ger- replanting their fields. 


mans have come. Perhaps again?” 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

lw Wade, Acadamk, Ufa fa ya ri awaa . 

Sand detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 


PACmC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 


600 N. Sepulveda BIvtL, 
Las Annelra, California 
90049, Dept. 23, U.SLA. 


Perhaps that was why the great 
burst of joy that followed the sur- 
render at Reims in Western capi- 
tals was beyond the comprehension 
of the soldiers and civilians in the 
war zone. In Paris the French, 
whose contribution to victory had 
been at best marginal swept into 
the streets shouting, dancing, and 
drinking. 

The British, who had been in the 
war since September 3, 1939, long- 
er than any great power, outdid the 
French. Their enthusiasm centered 


on a baldish, plump former cavalry 
officer who had seen them through. 
When Churchill from a balcony on 
the Ministry of Health, gave tne V 
sign he had first used in the darkest 
days of the war, there were tears oa 
his cheeks, and on those of many 
others. 


The people gathered in front of 
Buckin gham Palace and sang “God 
Save the King,” with American sol- 
diers in London joining in. Then 
the crowd moved down the mall, 
and less reverent voices were raised 
in a song written in darker days, 
whose refrain was, Tm gang to 
get lit up when the lights go up in 
London.” And they cud. 


Americans were more conscious 
than their flfliea thai there was an- 
other war still to be won across the 
Pacific. Still Times Square filled as 
the news spread. Hitler was dead. 
His armies defeated. The concen- 
tration camps emptied. And yet the 
joy was bittersweet 

A New Yorker who was there 
that day recalled two dderiy wom- 
en. one well-dressed and affluent, 
the other a worker from tire gar- 
ment district They were alternately 
cheering and weeping. The well- 
dressed woman, comfortin g the 
other, turned and said: “It’s over. 
We won. But those poor boys, 
those poor boys.” 


Gorbachev 
Is Hopeful on 
Arms Talks 


The Heritage 


v ;-' 

• • -v.:' r. 

■ : ■ =r--A'“ 

; ' ;■ • .V-.-. . - 

• - " 

. ■ 



Footprints on the sands of time — women carrying food to their menfolk. 


On Pakistan International, you’ll find that 
devotion to duty is a carry over from 
our folklore. 




Pakistan International 

Great peopteto ftjF wtth 


FLYING TO- ABU DHABI. AMMAN. AMSTERDAM. ATHENS. BAGHDAD. BAHRAIN. BANGKOK, BEIJING. BOMBAY. 
CAIRO. COLOMBO. COPENHAGEN. DAMASCUS. DELHI. DHAHRAN. DHAKA, DOHA, DUBAI. FRANKFURT. 
ISTANBUL. JEDDAH. KATHMANDU. KUALA LUMPUR. KUWAIT. LONDON. MANILA. MUSCAT. NAIROBI, NEW YORK. 
PARIS. RIYADH. ROME. SINGAPORE. TEHRAN. TOKYO. TRIPOLI and 24 destinations within Pakistan. 


1AL{PAK]-B5 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. the Soviet leader, has said 
that be was “soberly optimistic” 
about the prospects for success in 
the Geneva arms talks with the 
United States. 

In a message Monday to a soci- 
ety of French war veterans, he said: 
“What is needed for a success in 
Geneva is good political will for 
reaching agreement, given strict 
observance of the principle of 
equality and equal security.” 

He added, “Despite a complex 
and tense situation in the world 
and difficulties in the negotiations 
in Geneva, we remain soberly opti- 
mistic." 

Two weeks ago, as the first round 
of the talks concluded, Mr. Gorba- 
chev said that the United States 
had not demonstrated that it want- 
ed an agreement. He cited Wash- 
ington's refusal to discuss a ban on 
military weapons in space along 
with reductions in nuclear arms. 

In reply to a message from the 
National Council of the French Re- 
publican Association of War Veter- 
ans and Victims, Mr. Gorbachev 
said that the United States had re- 
jected a series of peaceful initia- 
tives by the Soviet Union. 

‘Unfortunately now, too, judg- 
ing from the first stage of the Gene- 
va negotiations, U.S. representa- 
tives so far have displayed no desire 
to reach agreement,” he said. “An- 
other thing is evident: the U.S.A. is 
carrying on a reckless arms race 
and actively trying to project it to 
space.” 

The question of banning space 
weapons has become the manor 
sticking point at the Geneva talks. 

On Sunday, the Soviet defense 
minister, Marshal Sergei L. Soko- 
lov, said these weapons posed a 
threat greater than the atomic 
bomb had. 

Marshal Sokolov said that if the 
United States proceeded with the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, Mos- 
cow would be forced to develop its 
own program and to begin a new 
buildup of its strategic nuclear 
forces. 


The Associated Pros 

BEIRUT — Christian and Mos- 
lem militiamen shelled each other 
Tuesday with tanks, mortars, artil- 
lery and rockets in the heaviest bar- 
rages in the Lebanese capital in the 
last 10 months. 

After IS hours of intense bom- 
bardment that claimed at least 28 
lives, militia leaden and Lebanese 
Army officers declared an “imme- 
diate and comprehensive cease- 
fire" in the city, which has been 
battered by a new round of sectari- 
an warfare. 

The cease-fire declaration did 
not halt gtmfights along the Green 
Line separating the city's Christian 
and Moslem sectors. It was the 
29th cease-tire announced in 10 
days, of fighting that seemed to 
push the country near resumption 
of full-scale dvil war. ' 

Police reported that since April 
28 at least 68 people have been 
lolled and more than 340 have bear 
wounded. 

The Christian Voice of Lebanon 
radio reported that at least 2^00 
«falk and rockets hit East Beirut 
and its suburbs. Moslem broad- 
casts said that thousands of mortar 
rounds hit the dry’s western sector. 

The relatively few people who 
stayed or were caught m buildings 
near the Green Line huddled 
around radios in bomb die! ten and 
basements. Some bad been there 
for three days. 

“The last three days have really 
been terrible," said one man at a 
building near one of the Green 
line crossing points. “But the 
worst is yet to come," he said, echo- 
ing fears that the latest cease-fire 
also would collapse. 

Burned-out cars, chunks of con- 
crete and broken glass Uttered the 
streets. After the cease-fire was de- 
clared, a few grocery stores, bak- 
eries and pharmacies opened and 
some residents raced through the 
streets to buy supplies. 

President Amin Gemayel of Leb- 
anon telephoned President Hafez 
al-Assad of Syria, the state radio 
announced, but gave no details or 
their conversation. 

Mr. Assad has been trying to 
mediate between Lebanon's Chris- 


Poland Says DTSrShouldn’t Meddle J 

WARSAW (AP> — Poland accused the United States on Tuesday of 
attempting to destabilize the country by ‘fomenting anti-govemmeht 
demonstrations and warned that U.S.-Polish relations would not improve 
unless the Reagan administration stopped interfering in the country's 
internal affairs. . 

The government spokesman. Jerzy Urban, said. These Forces, which 
organize street unrest in Boland from time to time, or try to organize 
them, take advantage erf the open, public political support of the Ameri- 
can administration. It is a fact that these forces are financed front 
Western sources." . ‘ * 

Mr. Urban spoke at a press conference a day after the Foreign Ministry 
protested the U.S. expulsion of four Polish diplomats and after Poland 
suspended the air courier service used to fly mail and supplies to the US. 
Embassy in Warsaw every two to three months. The United States had 
ordered the four Poles to leave in response to Poland's expulsion of two 
U.S. diplomats it charged took part in an illegal demonstration on May 1. 


ft 


H elsinki Review Meeting Is Postponed 


OTTAWA (AP) — Disagreements over ground roles and agenda 
forced a postponement of T uesday’s scheduled opening ofan assembly pf 
35 nations to review compliance with human rights pledges signed. a 
decade ago in Helsinki ... , ' 

Delegates met throughout the night, but failed to agree op an agenda 
and time limits for the meeting to discuss the 1975 Final Act o f the 
Conference on Security and Disarmament in Europe, or whether sessrarp}. 

should be open to the public. . 

Once the assembly opens, the United States and its Western allies are 
expected to 3ccuse the Soviet Union and East Woe countries of violations 
of the Helsinki accords. Western officials said the Soviet Union argued 
that the entire conference should take place behind closed doors. 


Strike in Sweden Interrupts Trade 


STOCKHOLM (Reuters) — Airports in Sweden remained dosed 
Tuesday and foreign trade was virtually paralyzed as a strike try Swedish 
civil servants continued in its sixth day. • . 

Shopkeepers said prices of fresh foodstuffs had risen substantially 
since the 265,000- member dvil savants’ union began selective strikes 
Thursday in support of a 3.1 -percent pay claim. Flights were diverted tp*^ 
Oslo and Copenhagen and vacationers had to travel to and from Swed^y 
by bus. Swedish railroads said all passenger trains to Denmark and 
Norway were fully booked, and that no extra ones were being scheduled 
because this would be strike-breaking. 

Unions and employers have not arranged negotiations on the strike, 
which was called by the union to back its demands. The government his 
said any increase for public employees would jeopardize its efforts to 
curb inflation. The dispute is expected to escalate next weekend, with 
employers locking out 100,000 white-collar workers. The main effect 
would be to dose schools — an unpopular move, since in most Swedish 
families both parents work. • .* 


Reagan’s Party Courting Democrats \ 

WASHINGTON (AP)— Republican leaders began a campaign Tues- 
ly to convert 100.000 Democrats to the party in the i 


a 

day to convert 100.000 Democrats to the party in the next ll 
Frank Fahrenkopf Jr., chairman of the Republican National Commit- - 
tee, said the campaign would concentrate on Florida, Louisiana, North * 
Carolina and Pennsylvania. He said it would use telephone banks, direfct* 
mail appeals, tdeviaon advertising and door-to-door canvassing, ' 

The Democratic Party chairman, Paul G. Kirk Jr., raid the Republi- 
cans’ cam p ai g n “is a transparent public relations blitz to attempt fp - 
salvage the remnants of an opportunity that is steadily going down die 
drain. Ii won't work Political opportunists who change their stripes wffi 
find themsdves caught in a revolving door.” ' t 



tians and Moslems. Mr. GemayeTs tt o wt -i o _ m. _ rj ¥7 - '■ - 

government has faOed to halt tbe U.o. Weather Satellite to Serve wirop^ 

fighting and Syria has been report- — — •• -**i 


ed alarmed at the erosion of the 
president's authority. 

A “security committee” of lead- 
ers of the main waning factions 
and senior army officers declared 
the cease-fire after a meeting at the 
committee’s headquarters. 

Committee members woe able 
to ' meet after they were driven 
through tbe fighting in armored 
personnel carriers of the French 
inice observers. 

The cease-fire declaration stipu- 
lated that militias could hold their 
positions until Thursday, but must 
open the Museum Crossing, one of 
six on the Green line that has been 
closed for several days. 

The committee said it would su- 
pervise the withdrawal of all heavy 
weapons on Thursday, but it was 
not dear who would police the 
zone. 

As radio stations broke into their 
programs to announce the security 
committee's cease-fire declaration, 
the thuds of exploding shells and 
rockets and the crackle of machine- 
gun fire echoed along the Green 
Line. 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — U.S. and European officials annohnood 
Tuesday that a U.S. satellite is being shifted in order to relay weather data 
to 13 European countries. ■. ‘ . 

The U.S. GOES-4 spacecraft over the Padfic Ocean will be over-the 
Atlantic in mid-June, the announcement said. The satellite wfl] serve aS5L 
temporary substitute for a European Space Agency satellite which has 
run out of positioning fuel and is expected to (put out of position in July. 

The failing Meteosai-1 relayed data to Austria, Beteium.' Denmark; ' 
France. West Germany, Ireland, Italy, Norway, The Netherlands, Spain, j 
Sweden, Switzerland and ^Britain. 


For the Record 


.‘tV-N 


The U.S. Some Foreign Relations Committee voted 10-0 Tuesday to 
recommend confirmation of Vernon A. Walters as the new U.S. represen- 
tative to the United Nations. (AP) 


[ORE! 


A Spanish police officer was seriously injured Tuesday in a car bomb 
explosion in Pamplona, police said. No group claimed responsibility but 
the Basque separatist organization, ETA, was suspected. (Roam) 


The Chilean state of siege was extended for 90 days Monday to keep 
opposition political activity banned throughout the nation. (AP) 


Joe Kittinger won the Gordon Bennett International Cup balloon race 
with a flight of 256 miles (about 412 kilometers) from Palm Springs, 
California, that ended in the Nevada desert. (UP!) 


U.S. Aide Denies 
Advising Reagan 
To Shun Brandt 


Reagan, Gonzalez End Talks 
After Discord on Nicaragua 


At a news conference Monday, 
the first deputy defense minister, 
Vasili I. Petrov, accused (he United 
States of ignoring tbe lessons of 
war and “poshing mankind toward 
the precipice." 

General Petrov drew parallels 
between the Nazi aggression of 
World War II and what he called 
the aggressive designs of the West- 
ern powers today. 


mtemporan7 


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AtNUE OJISE 

interim 


3F. Acnue Inise -XSOBnjsseh 
ia 02/64051.91 


New York Times Service 

BONN — Richard R. Bart, as- 
sistant secretary of state for Euro- 
pean affairs, on Tuesday denied 
reports that he had advised Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan against meet- 
ing Willy Brandt, the leader of 
West Germany’s opposition Social 
Democratic Party, during the presi- 
dent’s visit here. 

Mr. Burt was acting to defuse a 
clash with Social Democratic lead- 
ers, after West German newspapers 
reported that the president refused 
to meet the forma chancellor at 
Mr. Burt’s adviix, because of stri- 
dent anti- American tones at Social 
Democratic-fed demonstrations to 
protest Mr. Reagan's policies. 

The incident provoked strong re- 
action here because of reports that 
Mr. Burt will succeed Arthur Burns 
as ambassador to West Germany. 

Social Democratic leaders ream- 
ed bitterly to whal they considered 
a snub. Mr. Brandt refused to at- 
tend a state dinner with Mr. Rea- 
gan Sunday aighL 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ist government in Nicaragua to ne- 
gotiate with the U .S. -backed rebels, 
Mr. Reagan said: “I think there are 
some things we shouldn't talk 
about We have discussed the situa- 
tion there and I think we under- 
stand each other.” 

Asked if that meant they had 
agreed to disagree, Mr. Reagan re- 
plied, “Oh, no, no. We had very 
fine talks." 


K- 


In a statement released by the 
U.S. Embassy, Mr. Burt said the 
charge had “no foundation in 
fact.” 



★***★ 


HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 


Grand Luxe 
The Place to Stay 
The Place to Meet 


34 Qo»i Gtecnl Guam 
1211 Geneva 3 
TeL- 022/211.1344 
Tdfic 42LSSD 


Mr. Reagan was also asked if he 
believed a trip to Moscow by Presi- 
dent Daniel Ortega Saavedra of 
Nicaragua had embarrassed mem- 
bers of Congress who voted two 
weeks ago against the Reagan ad- 
ministration’s S 14-million aid 
package to the rebels. 

“I think thane are some people 
who are having second thoughts 
and discovering they are the vic- 
tims of a disinformation campaign 
— as perhaps even some of you 
present have been,” Mr. Reagan 
said, referring to the reporters. 

Mr. Ortega is scheduled to visit 
Madrid on Saturday to discuss U.5. 
policy in Central America with 
Spanish officials, a Spanish govern- 
ment spokesman announced Tues- 
day. 

Tbe spokesman said Mr. Onega 
would make the stop as he returned 
to Managua at the end of a 12-day 
visit to the Soviet Union and other 
East bloc nations. 

Mr. Shultz said “there is some 
difference of analysis" between the 


L- 1 


United States and Spain on NicaraVt •» 
guan policy but both nations be- 5 *'. > 
lieve Nicaragua should have an 
open and pluralistic system of gov- 
ernment. 

Spain does not support the trade 
sanctions Mr. Reagan imposed last 
week against Nicaragua or the oth- 
er pressure he has exerted on the 
leftist government. 

The Spanish Foreign Ministry 
said in an earlier statement that the 
sanctions threatened the 26-month 
effort by the five-nation Contadora 
group to find a peaceful solution to 
disputes in Central America. 

Mr. Reagan praised Spam's par- 
ticipation in NATO, which Mr. 
GonzAlez has promised to submit 
to a nationwide referendum. Tty- 
S parish leader favors continuec 
membership in the alliance: Public 
opinion pods indicate tbe Spmith 
people oppose it 

Mr. Gonzdlez wants to link 
NATO membership to a reduction 
in American troop strength in 
Spain. Leftists held huge demon- 
strations throughout Spam on Suit- 
day, on the eve of Mr. Reagan's 
visit, protesting both issues. 

Earlier, in the major addrwa of 
his visit, Mr. Reagan told business 
leaders that Spanish democracy 
was a good example to f-attn Amer- 
ica. 

“I know that Spain has had its 
own share of these problems,’* he 
said, referring to the nation's strug- 
gle toward democracy after Fran- ■ 
cisco Franco’s 39-year regime end- -J 
ed 1975. 







s;-. 


■ s, 


Falwell’s College Is Thriving 


v 


(Continued from Page 1 ) 
ters) to the University of Virginia 
at Charlottesville after classes to 
earn graduate credits. 

Forty of Ihe school’s 190 full- 
time professors have earned doc- 
torates, and the president, A. Pierre 
Gufflermin, expects that to increase 
to 60 to 70 percent in the next 
several years. 

A 10,000-seat basketball arena is 
part of ambitious expansion plans 
Liberty has buDt 33 buildings, at a 
cost of $30 million, on a 250-acre 


campus, which is part of 4,400 
acres (1,800 hectares) it owns at the 
edge of Lynchburg. Another $10 
million worth of buildings already 
are under construction. 

Cheryl Moses, one of Monday’s 
graduates, believes that Jesus led - 
ha to transfer to Liberty, frosf. 
]«mich she graduated cum laud*' 
The Lord gave me a brain, but I 
wasn't using it at Mount Holyoke. I 
was following the wrong crowd. 
Now I’m using it the wswhe want- 
ed me to.” 


S,K 


•x. 



L 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Page 3 


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New YorfcSeal Belts 
Oat Traffic Deaths 

/.The number of driven and 
. pa^sengers fcHkd in flucomobiie 
accidents in New Yorit state de- 
diaed by 27 percent in the ihree 
months after se at belts became 
-msendatoiy on Jan. 1, officials 
fay. They said 184 people died in 
that penod compared to 252 for 
the first three months of 1984. 
The New York TErnes reports. 

Officials said, that seat bdts 
deserved credit for the decline 
because other figures, such as the 
number of pedestrian deaths and 
the overall number of accidents, 
remained fairiy constant. 

New York was this first stale to’ 
onset a mnd&iory seat bdt law 
for occupants of passenger vehi- 
des. (Tflxis are exeunt became, 
officials say, the bdts could be 
used to choke drivers' during a 
robbery.) New Jersey’s law took 
effect March 1, and laws in Iffi- 
nois. Michigan. Missouri, Indi- 
ana and New Mexico will go into 
force within mouths. Seat belt 
laws were refected in Fhnida and 
Oregon. 

Short Takes 

Twenty-two of Oklahoma’s 77 
counties, most of them in the 
metxppdlitari areas of Oklahoma 
Oty and Tulsa, voted last week 
to legalize the. sale of liquor by 
the glass, making Oklahoma,' 
nicknamed the Sooner State, the - 
last state in the Union to approve 
at -least some form of public 
drinking. Oklahoma’s SS coun- 
ties that chose to remain dty al- 
low bottle chibs for members 
only, who bring their own spirits; 
72-hour temporary memberships 
are available for a $3 fee. 

The ewen names of Harry S. 
Tinman s grandfathers were Sol- 
omon and Slrope; and “histori- 
cal ooryectuKT is that his parents 
gave the middle initial “ST 
without specifying which grand- 
father if stood for. So says Nor- 
man J. Regie, superintendent of- 
the Truman home in Indepen- 
dence, Missouri, now a national 
museum. He said, ‘There's no 
poiod after the S, because the S 
didn't stand for anything.” *. ■ ■ a 

But Truman’s daughter, Mar- 
garet Truman Daniel, disagrees. : 
She told The New Yank Times, 
“There is aperiod after the S. My 
father; always put the poiod | 
there, even though it doesn’t 1 
stand for any name.” Which i 
should end tne argument, but ! 
probably won’t 

Remember Ferdinand, the bufi * 
who wouldn’t fight? The Defense 
Department is givmg away dogs I 



• fcxanUnuJIV— tmrnWaml 

SUPPORTING FARMERS — The actress Jane 
Fonda, left, wiped away a tear as Jessica Lange told die 
House Democratic Caucus’s Task Force on Agriculture 
of die problems she saw U.S. fanners face while prepar- 
ing for her role as a farm wife in the film “Country.” 


who won’t bile. Its dpg training ; 
center at San Antonio, Texas, 

| has 15 healthy German Shep- 
herds who excelled in obedience 
classes bat flunked a course 
called “Aggression 101,” which, 
according to a spokesman, is de- 
signed “to see if the dogs will 
-attack or can be trained to- at- 1 
. tack.” A waiting list of 135 appli- 
cants quickly formed; the 


Following the examples of 
Boston and Baltinx>re, Detroit is 
renewing its waterfront. A three- 
mfie (4.8Talometcr) stretch east- : 
ward from downtown along the 
Detroit River — long the domain 1 
of cement silos, factories, ware- 
houses and foundries — is being | 
turned into dty-sponsored, pn- - 
vatdy financed paries, offices, , 
■apartment houses and shopping 
areas. 


Shorter Takes: Three out of 
'four Americans support the idea : 
of h uman organ transplants, ac- 
cording to a Gallup Poll, but 
anfy one out of four of them said 
they were “voy likely* to donate 
them own organs af id death.... 
The U.S. Air Force quickly 
dropped a name for siting mis- 
siles far beneath the surface as 
“Deep Underground Missile 
Baring” when somebody noticed j 


the acronym h farmed. ... Daily 
-newspaper circulation in the 
United States readied a high of 
63 J million in 1984, according 
to a survey by the American 
Newspaper Publishers Associa- 
tion, although the total of daily 
papers dropped by 13 to 1,688. 


Can a Regional Dish 
Go National? 

With a fine disregard for such 
dishes of regional origin, though 
nationwide popularity, as New 
England dam chowder, South- 
ern fried chicken or Middle 
Western com on the cob, two 
congressmen, JJ- Pickle, a Texas 
Democrat, and Manuel Lujan 
Jr n a New Mexico Republican, 
have introduced a resolution des- 
ignating rhfli as the national 
(fish. 

•• Mr. Pickle said that chili Ts 
truly the. essence of American 
eating pleasure and should be 
designated the national food.” 
Mr. Liyan conceded that the is- 
sue is Tnoendiary," and he pre- 
dicted, with evident understate- 
ment, that it is “almost sure to 
provoke heated debate among 
ray distinguished colleagues.” 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HUGBEE 


Journalists 
In U.S. Differ 
On Credibility 
Of die Press 


By Alex S. Jones 

... New York Times Service 

MIAMI BEACH —Senior jour- 
nalists from, four or the naoou’s 
largest news organizations have ex- 
pressed strong disagreement over 
whether the press has a serious 
Inedibility problem. 

“There’s a tendency to carer to 
your' critics, and I don’t like 1C 
Benjamin G Bradlee, the executive 
editor of The Washington Post, 
told members of the American 
Newspaper Publishers Association 
gathered here for their annual con- 
vention, 

Mr. Bradlee and Don Hewitt, 
executive producer of “60 Min- 
utes” for CBS News, argued Mon- 
day that the press was no less credi- 
ble now than in years past, and that 
credibility was largely an issue cre- 
ated by people with an ideological 
bias. who. objected when reporting 
did not conform to their opinions. 

But Larry Jinks, senior vicepres- 
ident for news for Knight-Ridder 
Newspapers, said the press had a 
“ Serious credibility problem” fu- 
eled by “three sins: inaccuracy, un- 
fairness and arrogance.” 

And John Seigemhaler, editorial 
director of USA Today, cautioned 
journalists not to “brush aside and 
ignore real concerns” that the pub- 
lic has regarding the credibility of 
newspapers and televirion. 

The debate, organized by The 
Associated Press, was moderated 
by Louis D. Boccardi, president 
and general manager of Tne AP. 

In part, the catalyst for the dis- 
cussion was a study indicating that 
there was a broad public percep- 
tion that news organizations are 
prejudiced. Mr. Boccardi said that 
54 percent of those polled felt that 
peramal biases of reporters were 
reflected in thrir articles. 

Mr. Hewitt said that such statis- 
tics were prompted by people who 
'confuse coverage with mas. 

“They assume you are expressing 
approval because you’re interview- 
ing people,” Mr. Hewitt said. “We 
would have interviewed Hitler.” 

Both Mr. Hewitt and Mr. Brad- 
lee said that ranch of the credibility 
issue was being manufactured by 
extreme conservatives who did not 
want f urness, but a conservative 
bias. Extreme liberal groups, they 
said, also have been critical. 

But Mr. Jinks said it would be a 
serious error io dismiss the issue of 
press credibility as a “conspiracy 
theory” by political extremists. 

“Fairness is the ultimate issue,” 
he said, adding that news organiza- 
tions were “perceived as mare pow- 
erful than they used to be, and 
people dislrustpower.” 


Mayor in Oregon Makes Offbeat a Virtue 


By Bill Peterson 

lYashtoginn Past Soviet 

PORTLAND, Oregon — Ac- 
cording to the sign above the bar at 
the Goose Hollow Inn. the tavern 
owner was out. “Gone to City 
Hali,” it said. 

The sign was wrong. 

J.E Clark, mayor of Portland 
and tavern owner, was ming lin g 
with the after-work: crowd at the 
Goose, a homey, gathering spot for 
young urban professionals. His tie 
was loose. He held a draft beer in 
one hand. His wife, Sigrid. sat at a 
bar stool nearby. 

“Hi, Mr. Mayor,” a half-drunk- 
en man said as he stumbled up to 
Clark, 

“Hi. Mr. Gtizen,” replied the 
mayor. Sigrid Clark giggled softly. 

The Garks are not your typical, 
stuffy political couple: She is first 
violinist for the Oregon Symphony, 
owns an antique shop named 
Mother Goose and manages the 
family tavern now that her hus- 
band has another job. He is an 
appealing free spirit, a maverick 
holding his first public office. 

A campaign poster on the tavern 
wall hints at this. It pictures- Mr. 
O ark, who is known as Bud, in a 
full gray beard, serving a beer. 
“This Bud's for You,” it says, in a 
takeoff on a beer commercial 

Mr. Dark, 54, has been in office 
only a few months. Although the 
opening reviews are good, a sense 
of uneasiness persists. “He is a sin- 
cere, good-hearted guy,” a busi- 
nessman said. “But I'm just afraid 
be doesn't know what lie is doing. 
A lot of us are hiding our breath 
and hoping things wdl t v™ out 
O.K.” 

The new mayor, however, has 
attracted the kind of national at- 
tention most politicians only 
dream about This includes invita- 
tions to appear on televirion talk 
shows. 

Mr. Gait turned down one invi- 
tation. His staff expressed concern 
that the talk show host would talk 
only about Mr. dark's famous 
“Expose Yourself to An” poster, 
which has sold more than 300,000 
copies nationally. It pictures Mr. 
dark, back to the camera, in a 
raincoat that he is flashing open 
toward the statue of a nude female. 

Compared to. most politicians, 
Mr. dark is different. He rides to 


work on a beat-up bicycle called 
“the Stump Jumper” pushes his 
canoe down the Willamette River 
with a pole, straps pictures of peo- 
ple who drop by City Hall with a 
pocket camera and shouts every- 
where he goes. “Whoop! Whoop!” 

Some think this kind of behavior 
silly or at least undignified for a 
mayor. “He makes it look like we in 
Portland don't take this mayor 
business seriously,” a businessman 
complained. “We do.” 

“We all like a good joke, but 
Portland’s future is at stake.” said a 
campaign advertisement last year 
for Frank Ivande, Mr. dark’s pre- 
decessor. “Do you warn to put a 
self-proclaimed born-again pagan 
in the mayor’s, office, someone 
whose chief claim to fame is expos- 
ing himself to a downtown statue?” 

The ad did not work. Mr. dark 
upset Mr. Ivande in the nonparti- 
san primary last May and faced 
only token opposition in the gener- 
al election. He is now seen as a 
populist, not an oddbalL 

Part of Mr. dark's appeal is that 
he understands something few noli- 




boons do: how to make people 
smile. It is a powerful, underrated 
weapon. It helps him connect with 
people. 

Bur it is wrong to dismis s Mr. 
Clark, a Democrat, as frivolous. 

“I'm not a funny man. I'm a 
serious man,” he said, “fm a con- 
servative. 1 know you have to have 
money in the bank to pay your 
bills. People who think I'm an ec- 
centric misjudge me. Everyone in 
the world is different That's what 
makes it wonderful. I've been rid- 
ing a bicycle for a long time. 

“People didn't use to run,” he 
said, noting that now the District 
Attorney “jogs around downtown 
at noontime in short pants. There’s 
been a revolution in the way people 
lode at the world.” 

This is especially true in Port- 
land, a picturesque port dty of 
371,000 with a magnificent view of 
Mount Hood. Once a town of qui- 
et, old wealth and discreet culture, 
it has become one of the most 
pleasant, most lively cities m the 
United Slates in recent decades — 
a place where one finds a backpack 
store on almost every corner and 
people on downtown streets after 
dark. 



The *»ioo qt cd hm 

Mayor Bud CTark, and his police chief. Penny Harrington. 

Mr. Clark has made several ma- r 

jor changes. His new police chief. ■■ - . 

Penny Harrington. 42, is the first / T ■_ 

woman to hold that posL in a major \ I !■* I'-cI 1Y 
American dty. He has proposed J. J. 

major budget cuts, including reduc- jIl 

mg the size of the police force, and u * 

raising taxes on tickets to theaters 
and sporting events. He has also 
revived a long-dormant conven- 
tion -center project. 

But Mr. Claries biggest accom- 
plishment is intangible. “We’ve 

changed the spirit of the city,” be I V 

boasted. He has placed major em- | 

pharis on neighborhoods and a | 

common-sense approach to prob- | gm'- \ -. * fy 

Jems. When residents of one neigh- [M-W • — ~ 'MI 

borhood complained about speed- 

way noise, he spent a night rilling - 

in people's homes to verify their 

complaints. 

Each Thursday, he invites citi- 
zoos with grievances to a sandwich 
lunch at City HaUL When he hears 
about something good or bad in the 
city, he slips away on his bike to uim-thin. 

investigate. qiuitz. waicr imitoni. 


N.Y. Welcomes 25,000 Vietnam Veterans 


“tody's match. I 

ultio-thin. 

quoitz. water mutant. I 
Mot Wort trrjtcd steel i 
and qoid plated. j 


United Press tntenuakml 

NEW YORK — About 25,000 
Vietnam War veterans marched 
Tuesday in a “welcome home” cele- 
bration that was 10 years late. 

The veterans crossed the Brook- 
lyn Bridge and marched down 
Broadway through the heart of 
city's financial district along the 
path taken in the past by Charles 
Lindbergh, astronauts and others. 


The parade ended a two-day cele- 
bration honoring the veterans 
called “It's Time,* a reference to 
the belated nature of the celebra- 
tion. 

Tons of ticker tape and confetti 
showered down, obliterating street 
signs in a blizzard of paper. The 
veterans were cheered by thou- 
sands of spectators who lined the 
route or who watched from win- 
dows. 


Mayor Edward I. Koch, who es- 
tablished the commission that or- 
ganized the parade, led the march 
by pushing the wheelchair of John 
Beenon, a Medal of Honor winner 
who lost both legs in Vietnam in i 
1966. Nineteen Medal of Honor 
winners look part in the parade, j 
“This is great,” said a veteran < 
who served in the 25th Infantry 
Division. “It’s about time. But it’s 
10 years too late.” 





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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 





Iferalb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sri butte. 


Pnblidial With The New York Time* and The WHiUnphw Post 


Reagan’s Visit to Spain 


: The chief purpose of President Reagan's 
European trip is to draw the democracies a 
little closer together, and that is the business 
that has taken him to Spain. This brief visit is a 
gesture of some importance and represents 
(fro days well spent. 

■ During the long years of geriatric fascism 
under Francisco Franco, Spain remained iso- 
lated from the rest of Western Europe. Its 
neighbors dealt uneasily with Genera] Fran- 
co's Spain, and usually at arm's length. But 
with Franco's death a decade ago. the rest of 
Western Europe and the United States extend- 
ed warm support to the new parliamentary 
government. Eventually it was -invited into the 
rtwo international organizations that have been 
•the foundations of Western Europe's security 
land prosperity for the past generation. 

! Spam joiaed the North Adamic Treaty Qr- 
; ganization in 1 982 and will enter the European 
'Community in January. Mr. Reagan’s arrival 
in Madrid constituted a celebration of Spain's 
membership in good standing in the associa- 
; lion of parliamentary democracies, with all the 
privileges attached thereto. And, as Mr. Rea- 
lgar) will probably find the opportunity to re- 
.mind his hosts, those privileges are not trivial. 

; Portugal has followed a closely parallel path, 
and Mr. Reagan will make a similar visit there, 
for the same reason, before he leaves Europe. 


For some Spaniards, the case for joining the 
Western military alliance has never been per- 
suasive. The size of the U.S. military presence 
in Spain also has been an irritant for some 
time. Prime Minister Felipe Gonzilez and his 
Socialist Workers’ Party have promised to 


hold a referendum on Spain’s membership in 
. favor: 


NATO. Mr. Gooz&kz favors staying in, but 
recent polls suggest that most voters oppose it, 
Mr. Reagan is not likely to attempt much in 
the way of public persuasion, since he needs to 
avoid any impression of exerting pressure on 
his hosts. But his presence is a calculated 
reminder that, in a dangerous world, it is better 
to have reliable friends than not. Perhaps it 
will turn out that the size of the American 
forces assigned to the four Spanish bases can 
be negotiated downward, as an indication of 
American responsiveness on a sensitive point 
There is a nice symbolism to Mr. Reagan’s 
schedule. He is to leave Madrid for Strasbourg, 
France, to address the European Parliament 
— the EC's elected legislature — before going 
on to Portugal. The itinerary delicately traces 
the line between the recent political evolution 
of the Iberian countries and the democratic 
traditions represented in the European Com- 
munity they are now joining. That is a useful 
connection for an American president to draw. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Bonn: A Nonfatal Failure 


: Thanks mostly to President Francois Mit- 
terrand of France, the Bonn summit confer- 
ence can be certified a failure. Looking even 
more intently than his partners to his political 
■ Hanks at home, he refused to schedule a new 
round of negotiations to reduce trade barriers. 


His posturing, at a time of mounting proteo- 

trated. 


tiooism. is unhelpful but also overrate 
. Summit conferences habitually exaggerate 
their own importance and then feel compelled 
.to emphasize agreements and to paper over 
differences. This time, the seven — West Ger- 
many, Britain, France and Italy plus Japan. 
iCanada and the United States' — could not 
conceal what divides (hem. Hurrah for that. 

: The Reagan administration had been press- 
ing for more than two years for new trade 
negotiations. Conservatives believe in free 
trade and rightly want more of it. As time 
'passed, even more urgent reasons appeared: 
.America's soaring imports and sagging ex- 
ports. Both trends have been greatly acceler- 
ated by the high value of the dollar, reflecting 
the administration’s big budget deficits. 

! To ward off congressional threats of trade- 
inhibiting protections, President Reagan went 
to Bonn hoping for commitments to start ne- 
gotiating more liberal trade rules next year. It 
is doubtful that this alone could satisfy legisla- 
tors representing jobless workers, but a prom- 
ise of freer trade seemed better than nothing. 


Quite rightly, Mr. Reagan also wants to 
broaden the talks to cover agriculture and 
services, like banking and technology, that axe 
not much affected by tariffs and quotas. The 
French have no enthusiasm for lowering barri- 
ers in those sectors, but Mr. Mitterrand — 
facing parliamentary elections next spring — 
is particularly deferential to his large and high- 
ly protected farm population. So he refused to 
set a starting date. Butthere can be no mean- 
ingful negotiations without France, which can 
veto the participation of its partners in the 
European Community. Now Washington 
blusters about proceeding without Western 
Europe, but nothing useful will come of that. 

The much-headlined disagreement presum- 
ably helps Mr. Mitterrand, but he did put Ids 
name to an unequivocal objective: “Protec- 
tionism does not solve problems; it creates 
them. Further tangible progress in relaxing 
and dismantling existing trade restrictions is 
essential." And the French leader agreed to a 
preparatory meeting of senior officials this 
summer to seek a consensus on what to negoti- 
ate. and how to do so. 

Whether at the summit or later, the political 
pressures inside each nation are bound to 
shape the negotiations. The Boon meeting ex- 
posed some of the pressures at work, but it also 
reaffirmed the arguments for pushing ahead. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


Challenge Alter Bonn 


For reasons that have little to do with sound 
economic logic, the French are objecting to the 
resumption of trade talks. Their stance is hard- 


of folly for European countries to give the 
American protectionists a lead. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


ly surprising. French farmers will be up in 


arms if the protectionist fence is lifted, and the 
implications for the increasingly unpopular 
Socialist government are immense. 

Still, this does not mean that measures con- 
venient for the moment are necessarily good 
for the future. There is no quick remedy for the 
struct ural faults within the industrial econo- 
mies, but protectionism is certainly not the 
answer. An early resumption of trade talks 
seems to be the sensible way out. 

The movement away from free trade is only 
one aspect of the malaise plaguing the world 
economy. Unresponsive exchange rates mani- 
fested in an overvalued U.S. dollar share the 
blame. The need for monetary reform cannot 
be dismissed, and the French argument for a 
world monetary conference deserves serious 
consideration. The Boon summit has focused 
attention on these important issues. For such 
summits to remain relevant, some action 
should be taken before the Big Seven meet 
in Tokyo next year. 

— The Straits Times (Singapore). 

Instead of pillorying the Japanese for their 
indulgence in practices that are loo much the 
rule in international trade, we should be urging 
them to help correct the undervaluation of the 
yen resulting from (he laxity of their domestic 
monetary environment. 

The problem of the dollar is more funda- 
mental. Given time it must be seif -correcting: 
The hazard is that it will not correct itself in 
time to silence the protectionists. In these 
circumstances, however, it would be the height 


After Bxtburg, a Better View 


We approved of President Reagan's formal 
reconciliation with today’s Germany, an hon- 
orable country run by honorable men. The 
debate it provoked has probably done the 
West a lot of good. The Bilburg controversy 
allowed us to gain a better view of the past in 
order to better protect the future. 

— The Bangkok Post 


Egypt and Islamic Law 


The struggle between Egyptian partisans of 
Islamic law and their adversaries has ended for 
the moment in a tie. The Constitutional Court 
has abrogated the 1979 decree that accorded 
rights to women; it was held contrary to divine 
order. But the Egyptian Parliament has also 
shelved a proposal that called for complete 
and immediate application of sharia. The two 
developments are not of equal consequence. 

The overwhelming majority of deputies re- 
fused to embark on the dangerous road to 
Islamic law. The application of sharia could 
destroy national unity, alienate the Copts, un- 
dermine the confidence of the business classes 
and Lead to the kind of economic crisis that 
contributed to the fall of (he Nimeiri regime in 
Sudan. But the debate revealed the increasing 
vitality of the Islamic movement, which feeds 
on the problems of Egyptian society — corrup- 
tion, blatant social and economic injustice and 
the Westernization of the privileged classes! 
The situation calls for sweeping reform. 

— he Monde [Paris). 


FROM OUR MAY 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: King Edward YQ Is Eulogized 

PARIS — The world press remarks on the 
death of King Edward VII, Le Temps of Paris 
says: “Edward VII will figure in a good place 
in the annals of diplomacy, with an original 
physiognomy or modern policy, positive, well- 
advised, os ‘matter-of-fact' as possible, safe 
from any excess or imagination or deduction, 
the far-seeing preparer of the necessary con- 
cussions in an epoch which . . . has lost the 
taste for fighting and all power of suffering." 
The Tribune of New York remarks: “The 
death of King Edward deprives the world of 
one of the most conspicuous and most useful 
of its citizens." The Observer of London adds: 
"King Edward was in the strictest sense a great 
constitutional Sovereign, who wielded con- 
stant and immense Influence upon the State 
without . . . straining his prerogative." 


1935: Lusitania: A New Recounting 
NEW YORK — On the occasion of the 20th 
anniversary fMay 7] of the sinking of the 
Lusitania, the “American Mercury" publishes 
the “True Story of the Lusitania," by Oswald 
G. Villard. who says that the publication of 
Gennan Ambassador von BerustorfTs warn- 
ing to passengers mi the day the liner sailed 
from New York was the sheerest accident, 
since von Bernstorff received orders to publish 


it some time before, but delayed, “hoping 
r. ViUard 


Berlin would forget it" Mr. Villard suggests 
that ir the British Admiralty had published the 
same warning it “would have been cited as an 
act of notable humanity." He ridicules the idea 
that the torpedoing was prearranged, saying a 
combination of fog and the British captain's 
changes of course and speed made it possible 
for the submarine to sight the Lusitania. 


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WALTER WELLS 
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ROBERT K. McCABE 
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LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

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0 1985, International Herald Tribune. All tights reserved 



Poland: Insidious Signs of a New Repression 


N EW YORK —The suppression last week 
of the largest demonstrations in Poland 
since Solidarity was declared illegal m 1981 — 


By Jacek Kalabmski 


more than 15,000 people marched peacefully in 
i 2,000 dashed with police in Gdansk 


Waisawand: ... 

— was only the most recent and obvious ago of 
the regime’s efforts to impose neo-Stalinism. 

Nor was that by any means the only evidence 
Two leading dissidents — Jacek Karon and 
Sewetyn Jaworslri *— were sentenced to three 
months in jail last week after negotiating with the 
riot police to ensure that no violence was associ- 
ated with the demonstration in Warsaw. Lech 
Walesa, w inner of the Nobel Peace Prize, is 
confined to the city of Gdansk, which he cannot 
leave without a police permit 

Adam Michmk and two other leaders of the 
Solidarity movement — it is still active despite 
the ban — are in jail, charged with fomenting 
social unrest. Their trial, which is to open before 
the end of this month, could bring sentences of 
five years of prison and reopen the cases against 
them that were suspended last year under 
a government amnesty. 

Clandestine independent publishing is being 
decimated by the secret police: One hundred ana 
fifty editors and printers are being held under 
arrest. Yet the government continues to maintain 
that there are no political prisoners in Poland: ft 
has coined the phrase "noncriminal prisoners" to 
refer to these publishers. 

Official newspapers and broadcasts have 
ceased to speak of political opposition. Now it is 
“Western-insured agents" or “imperialist sell- 


outs." In an organized campaign, the govern- 
mem-owned newspapers have been publishing 
letters from readers demanding a new law to 
allow the police to seize public-address systems 
in the Roman Catholic churches where such 
"agents" often speak. Many of the letters com- 
plain about the way “freedom of speed!! is 
abused” in these churches. 

Thus, ironically, the official media of a Marx- 
ist regime are osiemdhlydefaidiag the religions 
purity of the church — a purity supposedly 
threatened by priests who dare to speak about 
moral and social issues. The regime has also 
hinted publicly about a possible accommodation 
with the primate, Gaminai Jozef Gleam, and 
other “realistic" members of the church hierar- 
chy — those who are ready to limit the church to 
purely liturgical functions and deprive it of its 
role as a defender of human rights. 

Finally, a secret government report, leaked to 
Western correspondents, called m March for 
“securing more disciplined activity of- universi- 
ties, the Polish Academy of Sciences and other 
research institutions.” Intellectuals are to take 
warning “that ami-socialist activity will force the 
authorities to change their attitude toward aca- 
demic activity” and that "determined opponents 
should be eliminated." 

Many in Warsaw have noted that the govern- 
ment line seemed to become noticeably 
about three months ago, just as Mikhail S. 


bacbev began to take over the reins of power in 
Moscow. General -Wqjciech Jaruzeisld and hri 
advisers in Warsaw arc said to have sensed that 
the new Soviet leader would impose a harsher 
political line, and they pre-empted it by stepping 
up repression and adding a new. threatening 
overtone to their official raetoric. . 

They apparently do not realize how mlfujujt n 
would be to rrimpose Stalinism on the Polish 
people: It will be difficult, not because General 
Jaruzelski is a liberal or a pragmatist, as he 
pretends to be. The reason has more to do with 


“countarevoluDMaries.’’ Gone are the nights 
when people trembled in their homes, awaiting 
the sound <rf the bell — the policeman at the door 
— that could lead to a death sentence. 


'Normalization,” the artificially quiet state so 
ply desired by Moscow and by General Jaru- 


, cannot be imposed on a people deter- 
mined to retain at least a de facto right to free 
expression, self-determination and association. 
The political and moral awakening of the Poles 
during Solidarity’s 500 days of legal existence 
cannot be eradicated now by a repressive regime. 

According to Karl Marx, history repeats itself 
as a farce. So it is with Stalinism in Poland today 
— a grim, depressing farce. 


The writer, who was a journalist on Polish radio, 
is a visiting fellow at Yale University. He contribut- 
ed this comment to The New Fork Times. 


Mondale’s 
Costly Vow 
On Taxes 




By Tom Wicker 

N EW YORK — Walter Mon- 
dale’s campaign promise to 
raise taxes if elected president was 
not merely a gamble that failed, at 
high cost to him and his party; it is 
also an indirect but powerful factor 
in this year’s budget battle. 

The promise probably did not de- 
feat Mr. Mondale; after a series of 
primaries that exposed his weakness- 
es and strained the seams of his party, 
be had tittle chance to win anyway. 
But his promise of a tax increase 
almost certainly inflated Ronald 
Reagan's victory margin. 

After initial hesitation, the presi- 
dent came down hard on the other 
side of the issue. Even Democrats, 
particularly in the South, denounced 
Mr. Mondale’s plan; and be was fur- 
ther damaged by the realization that 
the new revenues he sought would be 


used not to provide goodies for the 
it to reduce the deficit. 


voters but 

There was, in fact, no great public 
demand for deficit reduction, outride 
Washington and Wall Street; few 
candidates for office in 1984 found 
that a burning issue. Mr. Reagan was 
even able in his debates with Mr. 
Mondalelo get away with the claim 
— now discreetly abandoned — that 
economic growth would eliminate the 
defidL So the Democratic nominee's 
gamble that the public would honor a 
candidate who was frank about his 
intentions only proved once again 
that elections are not often won by 
promises to raise taxes. 

That lesson was not lost on mem- 
bers of Congress, few of whom have 
shown enthusiasm for raising taxes 
even in the face of 5200-billion feder- 
al budget deficits. Wefl-infonned Re- 
publican sources say, moreover, that 


had Mr. MondaJe nor so directly 
challenged Mr. Reagan on the tax 
issue, the president might not have 
campaigned so strongly last year 
against raising taxes (“over my dead 
body”), and might even have been 
persuaded to support some form of 
non-income tax increase this year. 

That could have made substantial 
deficit reduction possible without the 
brood assault on social programs — 
including Medicare, Medicaid, stu- 
dent loans and school lunches — that 
Mr. Reagan and Senate Republicans 
have launched. * 

But as a result of Mr. Mondale's 
promise and his own campaign, Mr. 
Reagan now has planted his feet in 
concrete against what he derisively 
calls “the tax increasere”; and Re- 
publican leaders, who once conceded 
that new revenues were essential to 
responsible deficit reduction, seem to 
have resigned themselves to the presi- 
dent's position. 

For the Democrats, political fall- 
out from the Mondale tax proposal 


has continued beyond the election. 
Before the San Francisco convention, 
Mr. Mondale was visited in Minneso- 
ta by Senator Bin Bradley of New 
Jersey, a co-sponsor of the Bradley- 
Gephardt “Fair Tax" — a tax-simpli- 
fication plan that predated by two 
years the roughly similar proposal by 
the Reagan administrations Trea- 
sury Department in November 1984. 

Mr. Bradley tried to persuade Mr. 
Mondale to adopt the Fair Tax and 
campaign for it, much as Mr. Reagpn 

i i * i. .i _r . “ 


had made the idea of a “supply-side 
• of nis 


tax cut the centerpiece of tits 1980 
campaign. But Mr. Mondale was not 
convinced and, instead, took his di- 
sastrous tax-increase gamble. 

The Bradky-Gepbardt bill had 
given the Democrats strong claim to 


sponsorship of tax simplification, al- 
though Representative Jack 


: Kemp of 

Newport" and Senator Robert fas- 
ten of Wisconsin, both Republicans, 
later introduced a similar j? Ian. Had 
Mr. Mondale made the Fair Tax a 
central theme of his campaign, no 


doubt be would have lost the election 
anyway — but tax simplification 
would now be identified primarily 
with the Democratic Party. 

Publication of the Treasury De- 
partment plan changed all that Until 
then, Mr. Mondaknad lost only the 
election; now he and the Democrats 
might also have tost one of the most 
important issues of the future. 

Mr. Reagan endorsed the Treasury 
plan in his State of (Ire Union Mes- 
sage, has pledged to seek congressio- 
nal approval this year, and may ulti- 
mately be able to claim tax 
simplification as a Republican 
achievement — a potentially crip- 
pling blow to the Democrats. 

Tax simplification offers lower 
rates, the closure of loopholes that 
enable the wealthy to pay little or no 
taxes, and less paperwork. That is an 
obvious route by which Democrats 
might regain the favor of the middle 
class, and they cannot afford to tot 
Mr: Reagan trice it away. 

The New York Tima. ■ 


The 'Instant of Grace A Holocaust Survivor’s Story 


P ARIS — As a hua; Sherman tank 
rumbled across the battlefield, a 
scared, skeletal boy jumped from his 
hiding place and ran through ma- 
chine-gun fire toward the virion he 
never thought he would see. “God 
bless America,” he yelled at the top 
of his lungs. A tall black GJL pulled 
him to safety, and freedom. 

Forty years cannot diminish the 
memory of V-E Day, or tarnish those 
moments when concentration camp 
survivors like myself were snatched 
from death by Allied soldiers. 


By Samuel Pisar 


ay. the history of World 
been obscured by the 


citemenl What advance? British? 
Russian? American? 

The war was dearly coming to an 
end. Bnt as the hope of pulling 
through became more real the dan- 
ger increased as welL With the ad- 
vance of the Allied armies, the 
ground shrank under the Nazis' feet; 
when they had no more room to re- 
treat, they would destroy us. 

We were marched down back 
roads. Word spread that we were be- 


would earmark me for last-minute 
destruction by my brothers. 

Suddenly, my friends made a clum- 
sy, uncoordinated run for the trees. I 
kicked off my dogs and bed ted after 
them. Most were mowed down by 
machine-gun fire. Five of os made ft. 

We ran and ran, gasping for 
breath, finding strength we did not 
know we possessed. Deep in the for- 
est, our feet sore and bleeding, we fell 
to the ground and sank into sleep. 1 


War 11 has 
needs of politics and diplomacy. Yet 
those of us who are still around to 
testify — survivors and liberators — 
cannot forget that living instant of 
grace when, in the same struggle, 
American soldiers liberated Dachau 
and Russians liberated Auschwitz. 

For me, the moment of deliverance 
from Dachau remains as indelibly 
engraved in the soul as the Auschwitz 
number tattooed on my arm. I was 16 
at the time. 

tn the early spring of 1945, the 
nightly silence of our labor camp was 
torn by a barrage of distant explo- 
sions. Inmates with military experi- 
ence thought it sounded tike artillery. 
At dawn a platoon of SS guards tinea 
us up for evacuation ahead or the 
“enemy advance." These forbidden 
words, never beard before, were now 
openly murmured. 

We were beside ourselves with ex- 


The ground under the Nazis’ feet teas shrinking; 
when thty had nowhere to go, they woiM destroy ii& 


ing taken back to Dachau, At the 
■ 1 1th hour this could only mean one 
thin g- certain death. 

A few of us worked out a plan: At 
the first, opportunity we would break 
for the woods. Our chances hinged on 
the bet that the guards would not risk 
losing a whole column by going after 


woke up with the spring sun in my 
i and 


eyes and the Jong-forgotten chirping 
In disbelief I 


a handful of escapees. The qpportu- 
i of Ameri- 


niry arose when a squadron of Ameri- 
can fighter planes, mistaking us for 
Wehrmacht troops, swooped down to 
strafe us. Our guards hit tire dirt, their 
machine guns blazing wildly. 

I stared at the planes, transfixed by 
the thought that my saviors were only 
a few feet above my bead. Having 
endured so much at the hands of my 
enemies, I could not believe fate 


of birds in my ears, 
looked around me — no barbed wire, 
no guards, no dogs. 

By darkness we moved toward the 
Western front, but fell upon dense 
concentrations of German troops 
faring General Patton's Third Army. 
On the outskirts of a small village, we 
broke into an abandoned barn. 

We holed up in the hayloft for 
several days. Then in the stxUness eg 
one bucolic afternoon I became 
aware of a hum, like a swarm of bees, 
constantly growing in volume. Sud- 
denly a machine guo opened fire 
alongside the bam, and when it 
stopped, there was that hum a gain 


— only louder, unearthly, metallic 
I peeped through a crack in the 
wooden slats. Straight ahead, across 
the field, a huge tank was approach- 
ing. followed by a long convoy. 

1 looked, instinctively, for the hat- 
ed swastika. Instead 1 made out an 
unfamiliar emblem, a five-pointed 
white star. Instantly, the realization 
flooded my mind: After surviving 
two years of Soviet occupation ana 
four years of Nazi slavery t was look- 
ing at the insignia of the U-S. Army. 

My skull seemed to burst With a 
wild roar I broke through the 
thatched roof, leaped to the ground 
and darted toward the magnificent 
vision. The German machine pm 
opened up again. An American mor- 
tar answered. Thai all was quiet 
I was still running, waving my 
arms, when the tall black soldier ap- 
peared in my path, swearing at me m 
a language I could not understand. I 
fell at his feel, threw my arms around 
his legs and cried, “God bless Ameri- 
ca.” My striped rags, shaved head 
and sunken, eyes must have told him 
mare than my words. With an unmis- 
takable gesture he motioned me to 
3. Tenderly, be helped me 
the hatch of his vehicle. 


ANotoPIX) j],-rt ,! 
Is No Way to* ,}„.!<>* 
Make Policy 


w 


on 


By Philip GeycKn 

ASHINGTON — “No cm- 
* of or individual acting 
of the U.S. government 
shall recognize or negotiate wth the 
Palestine Liberation Organization or 
representatives thereof, so long as the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
does not recognize IsracPs -right to 
exist does not accept Security Coun- 
cil Resolutions 242 and 33$. and docs 
not renounce the use of terrorism. 

If that heavy language rings a WL 
yew may be thinking of Henry Kis- 
singer's written commitment to Israel 
in 1975. restricting U.S»_ diplomatic 
access to the PLO as partial payment 
for Israel’s agreement to disengage 
part of its forces from Sinai. If so, you 
probably believe that the Kissinger 
policy is not binding oa further ad- 


ministrations. Just recently, Ronald ij. 

r have both* 


Reagan and Jimmy Carterhave both 
talked about it in a way that gives 
precisely that impression, that sug- 
gests the president has a free hand. 


Not so! The language cited is the 
.Last Qctofc 



law of the land. Last October, it was 
surreptitiously tacked on to what is 
known as a “continuing resolution" 
— the legislative last resort for fund- 
ing government spending at current 
levels when Congress is unable to 
agree on new appropriations Tor the 
coming fiscal year. It is a lousy way to 
legislate anything, but that is only 
one reason 1 bring it up. 

Another is that it will come as news 
even to those who follow Middle East 
events with care. It was news to me 
when I found mention of it in a hand- 
out from the American Israd Public 
Affairs Commission, the Israeli lobby 
which had to know about it, having 
had a large hand in its enactment. 

It turned out. after asking around 
among knowledgeable authorities, to 
be news to all but a handful of ad- 


if 


tin 




ministration officials, its congressio- 
members of 


nal sponsors, and the menu 
congressional committees who wrote 
it into the money, measure without 
hearings. That was the only time the 
question was puL directly to a vote. 

If that is a poor way to legislate, it 
is an even worse way lo make foreign 
policy — as you would suppose the 
Reagan administration would be the 


firet to agree. Only a few days ago. 
roe Shi 


lultz was lectur- 
ing his State Department employees 
on the terrible legacy of “congressio- 
nal restrictions on presidential flexi- 
bility, now imbedded in our legisla- 
tion* as a consequence of Vietnam 
and .Watergate. “Not only the War 
Powers Resolution, but a host of con- 
straints on foreign aid. arms exports, 
intelligence activities and other as- 
pects of policy," he said, have “weak- 
ened the ability of the president to act 
and to conduct foreign policy, and 
weakened our country” 

Yet Section 535 of last year's con- 
tinuing resolution is specifically de- 
signed to restrict ^presidential flexi- 
bility ” It was inspired by revelations 
of secret meetings in 1981-82 be- 
tween PLO representatives and a 
State Department consultant 

Had it been in effect ai that time, it 
probably would have prohibited the 
Reagan administration’s successful 
US. mediation in 19S1 of an 11- 
month cease-fire agreement between 
the PLO and IsraeL It would have 
made it unlawful in 1982 for a US. 
envoy to deal with the PLO on ar- 
rangements for the removal of PLO 
guerrillas from Beirut under escort by 
a multinational force, which included 
US. Marines. 

Its toms, moreover, go beyond 
both the original Kissinger commit- 
ment and President Reagan's stated 
conditions for dealing with the PLO 
by adding the requirement that the 
PLO “renounce the use of terrorism." 

The administration's acceptance of 
this tightened congressional restraint 
(while denouncing all other congres- 
sional meddling in foreign policy in 
general and in Nicaragua in panicu- 
lar) speaks volumes about the spirit 
with which the Reagan administra- 
tion approaches the responsibilities 
of what Mr. Shultz calls “global lead- 
ership” — when the case at hand is 
the Middle East The maintenance of 
“momentum toward 'peace in the 
Middle East” is Mr. Shultz's stated 
goal You would assume it is also part 
of his purpose for stopping by Jordan 
on his way back from a trip to brad 
at the end of this week. 

But the sense, shared among Arab 
and Israeli diplomats alike, is that the 
secretary is going through the mo- 
tions ana that the addition of Jordan 


J — 
ftiolojl 




.to his itinexaiy is a courtesy. Thai j, 
impression was reinforced by tfae^ 


The writer, a Polish-bom lawyer 
who war granted US. citizenship by 
special act of Congress, was one of the 


survivors of Auschwitz and 
~~***m. He contributed this to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Money Polities vs. Nature 

An hour after ! had finished Al- 
dous Huxley’s “Time Must Have a 
Slop," published in 1944, 1 picked up 
my copy of the International Herald 
Tribune. On the editorial page, Dan- 
iel S. Greenberg’s opinion column. 
“Acid Rain: Better Call in the 
Shrinks" (April 13) sent me rushing 
straight bats to Mr. Huxley. 

On the face of Mr. Greenberg's 
modern insight into the age-old quag- 
mire of money politics vs, nature, a 
thought on this subject from the Hux- 
ley novel might bear repeating: 

“In politics we have so firm a faith 
in the manifestly unknowable future 
that we are prepared to sacrifice mil- 
lions of lives to an opium smoker’s 
dream of Utopia or world dominion 


future to present greed. We know, for 
example, that if we abuse the sod, it 
mil lose its fertility, that if we massa- 
cre the forests, our children will lack 
timber and see their uplands eroded, 
their valleys swept by floods. Never- 
theless, we continue to abuse tbe soil 
and massacre tbe forests. 

“In a word, we immolate the pre- 
sent to the future in those complex 
human affairs where foresight is im- 
possible; but in the relatively simple 
affairs of nature, where we know 
quite wdQ what is Hkdy to happen, we 
immolate the future to the present. 
Those whom the gods would destroy 
they first make mad.' " 

JEANAFTEN. 

Baden Baden, West Germany. 


speak." Now, thanks to Henry Kis- 
singer. we will learn “newthmk." In 
his analysis “Vietnam: A Noble Goal 
but a Flawed Strategy” (April 8), be 
chastises tbe media, saying that it is 
easy for them “to record the horrors 
of modem warfare, much more diffi- 
cult to distinguish between what was 
inherent in modem weaponry and 
what represented deliberate cruelty” 
1 gather that from now on it is 
considered perfectly all right and not 
at all cruel to drop napalm on civilian 


Hard-to-Digest Secrets 

Regarding “Categories of Classified 
U.S. Data " (fiB/gfos, April 34): 

Betides the “Burn Before Read- 
ing" classification mentioned in the 

last sentence, there is the following 
one that ZHT readers discovered m a 
“Wizard of Id” cartoon: 


populations, so tong as it is done to 
freethemfro 


or perpetual security. But where nat- 
ural resoi 


Kissinger’s 'Newthmk’ 


resources are concerned, we sac- 
rifice a pretty accurately predictable 


George Orwell, in his novel 
“1984," introduced us to “new- 


them from what is deemed to be 
bad for them: twntntmism, totalitar- 
ianism. The atomic bomb, poison gas 
and germ warfare represent advances 
in weaponry, winch must be “distin- 
guished” from erndey. 

1 find Dr. Kissinger’s nice dis- 
tinction appalling. 

JESSIE WOOD. 

Spetsai, Greece. 



downbeat reports on the recent swing 
through the area by the assistant sec- 
retary, Richard w. Murphy. 

The Israelis, it seems, are standing 
pat; King Hussein of Jordan thinks 
he has gone as far as he can go. The 
core issue of Pales tinian representa- 
tion at any peace talks, in short, is 
unlikely to be resolved by Arab or 
Israeli initiatives. 

That is not to say that the United 
States ought to make the' procedural 
breakthrough by embracing the PLO 
unconditionally as a negotiating 
partner. Etui neither is H to say that 
the Reagan administration should 
abjectly abandon the right to play an 
eMradk; queuing, honest-broker's 
role. Yet that is wnat is happening. 

When the instigators of section 535 
in last year’s cob tinning resolution 
say they have Suite Department en- 
couragement for writing the same 
language (with provision for emer- 
gencies) into some more permanent 
piece of legislation this year, you have 
to figure that in the Middle East the 
high principle of presidential policy- 
making does not apply. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


iei 


ALPHONSE BERNS. 
Brussels. 


tetters intended for publication 
should Ibe addressed “Letters to da 
bailor' and must contain the writ- 
es signature, name and fuB ad- 
dress. Lesters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible far the ream of 


f 













^ No to 
Is No \\ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Page 5 


'’'‘ill,. , 




Paper to Aid Nicaragua Rebels 

Washington Times Announces Drive to Raise $14 Million 


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>.jH^ ■ r ■ 


By Michael Isikoff 

It uiAingiiV! Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Wash- 


ington Times has announced that it “fned Monday by a Washington 
is sponsoring a fund-raising cam- spokesman for the Nicaraguan 


States for weapons to be sent over- he said, about 40 percent was for 
seas. . arms and the rest for other forms of 

The Times's campaign was wel- assistance. 


While House and Slate Depart- 


paign in collect S14 million for the Democratic, Force, the largest of 
rebels opposing the Nicara guan th® rebel groups. The spokesman, 
government. . Bosco Matamoros, said that the 

Tbe * e w Sp a PC r' s campaign, moncj for food and clothing «uU 
coming two Wffiks after the Houa r ™/“"ds “f»t other sappl.fi. 
of Representatives rejected Presi- -■'SiitiSoSf 
den, Ronald Reagan's truest for .g™£* SUSSES 


.spokesman for the Nicaraguan mem spokesmen da lined to com- 
Democratic Force, the largest of mem Monday on the Times cam- 


paign. 

n O'Neill Chides Ortega 
Margaret Sluipiro and Joanne 
Omang of The Washington Post re- 


Mr. de Borchgrave said he con- ported earlier from Washington: 
av«i the idea for the campaign on Th e House speaker. Thomas P. 


ey for the anti-Sandinist rebels. SrVSe uSfica” 

Aenaud de Borchgrave the pa- and president of Nt 
per's editor, announced in -a front- CommunicatioDS, Inc., the parent 
page editorial Monday that ibe company of the Times, 
newspaper was setting up a non- Co]one , ^ Mr . de 


Myung -Mooo. Mr. Moot is the after the House refused to aid Nic- 


leader of the Unification Church tebels had “embarrassetT 

and president of News World lawmakers. 

Communications, Inc., the parent jh e Massachusetts Democrat 
company of the Times. added that House sentiment may 



U.S. Agents Upset German Police, Jews 


By John Tagliabue 

Vor Yort Times Since 


Rabbi Avraham Weiss of the He- 
brew Institute of Riverdaie. in New 


BELSEN. West Germany —The York City, viid it was "distressing 


sun bad barelv risen Saturday 
morning when West German po- 
licemen surrounded about 35 
French Jews who were camped out 
in the parking lot of the Bergen- 
Belsen concentration camp memo- 
rial site. 

The Jews, including camp survi- 


for Jews to be denied access, for After a diM‘us*ion. the Jews were 
any American to be denied the allowed to conclude a service. Po- 
righi to express moral outrage." Jure then escorted them from the 


Iv. We ha' e no weapons. You must unhappily contrasted the images 
leave and wc have orders to escort with those of the tumultuous wel- 
vou out." come accorded President John F. 

After a discussion, the Jews were Kennedy on his \isit to West Gcr- 
ai lowed to conclude j ser\-i.*e. P t v nianv in 1%3. He noted that the 


Mr. Weiss was one of a dozen or 
so Jews whom police escorted from 
the camp's document center late 
Saturday night. The> had beer? 


lice then escorted them from the somber views from Bergen- Belsen 
building. One policeman, in a ges- an d the Bitburg nulildiy cemeiety 


lure of support, pul his arm around 
j Jewish protester. 

Mr. Weiss said Sun da v ihat he 


\ i sited by Mr. Reagan were "empty 
of people.” 

This seemed not onl\ the result 


mTStaStS r 1 ! 1 ? r Ku in ^ F " dj > 10 “If 

Uitcf fighters protesung President »>«i f the Sabhath and protest the 


newspaper was sciung up a non- Colonel Pak, Mr. de Borchgrave. be .shifting toward resuming assis- 

pledged SJOO.OOO to thelrive. ranee to the rebels. 

^ T1ie poor's, initiative comes “He embarrassed us. to be per- 

ate independently from the papers w j,jj e a closely related fenly truthful, ” Mr. 0*NeiJl said, 

news operauons. conservative groups, such as the suggesting that some Democrats 

He said that J^ne J. Mrkpat- World Anti-Communisi League had come under fire at home be- 
rick. the former U.S. representauve and -the United States Council for cause of Mr. Ortega's trip and 
to the United Nations, would di- World Freedom, have been con- might vote differently next time, 
reel the corporation and .donate a dueling independent fund-raising The Reagan a dminis tration is 


Jeane J. Kirkpatrick 

wants, Mr. O'Neill said many 
Democrats now think that the 


Ronald Reagan’s visit, were later 
dragged to a waiting bus and es- 
corted from the site by police, who 
said they were acting under orders. 

Recalling the events. Rabbi Mi- 
chael Koenig, who survived World 
War 11 by mding in the Nether- 
lands. said Sunday that it had been 
“frightening to hear a German po- 
liceman say, ‘I’m just following or- 
ders.’ ” 

“It’s very frightening to hear the 


president’s visit. 

Twenty or so cars of policemen 
arrived at the center’s squ3i con- 
crete building, and Friedrich Wil- 
helm Thick e. a police official, told 
the Jews, his voice cracking with 


had been "overwhelmed with an- N security precaution*, but also of 
guish that German policemen cv broadcast design. Although about 
coned me. a Jew. out of Bergen- l*-00 Jewish protester* were 
Belscn.” ' massed in Bitburg at the foot of a 

Little of the confrontation be- camera platform “of West Germa- 
tween Jewish protesters and the po- ny's Second Channel, the earner j- 


hce Vi js evident to German televi- 
sion viewers. 

German officials were generally 


emotion: “We have come peaceful- content with the coverage, but one 


man atoided swinging toward 
them. One brief shot showed a 
.small cluster of Jewish demonstra- 
tors walking dow n a street. 


ate independently from the paper's 
news operations. 

He said that Jeane J. Kirkpat- 
rick. the former U.S. representative 
to the United Nations, would di- 
rect the corporation and .donate a 
lecture fee to the cause. 

“The money is not being turned 
over to dte resistance,’’ Mr. de 
Borchgrave said, but will be used to 
purchase “medical supplies, food 
and clothing” and othn* nonmilt- 
lary supplies. Federal law prohibits 
fund-raising within the United 


ight vote differently next time. medicine and clothing or include 
The Reagan a dminis tration is such items as trucks, boots and 


House would vote to provide some same thing 40 years later. 1 he said, 
form of “nonlethak” or humani tar- Yet the orders were not given by 

inn aid, to the rebels. Germans, but by U.S. Secret Ser- 

The principal issues are whether v ' ce officials. Over the last week 
the aid will be limited to food. lhe .v established a control over 
medicine and clothing or include events in West Germany that made 
such irems ns rmekv honts and one television commentator liken 


drive to funnel military and other expected to renew its push for rebel other uonlethal equipment needed 
aid to the rebels. funding soon, arguing that pressure by an army; whether it will be dis- 

Adolfo Calero. political chief of must be maintained to move the uibuted through the Central Intel- 


Adolfo Calero. political chief of must be maintained to move the 
the Nicaraguan Democratic Force, leftist Sandinist government to- 
estimated uiat, since Coagress cut ward democracy. 


ligence Agency, an international 
organization such as the Red 


them to “Roman legionaries in a 
foreign country." 

Jews were not the only ones to 
fed brusquely treated. A senior of- 
ficial close to the French delegation 


“The T70 offers the beginner 
|r| , decision-free photography 
b and simple operation . . .the 
i||| l experienced photographer 
H p] has a camera unsurpassed 


Medical History: It’s in the Cards 


By Irvin Motors ky 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Maryland branch of 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield, which provides hospital 
and medical insurance, has announced that sub- 
scribers will receive membership cards that can 
contain the equivalent of 800 pages of information 
on their medical history. Nationwide adoption, the 
insurer said, is expected in a few years. 

The card, which hospitals would use in deter- 
mining treatment, employs the laser optics tech- 
nology used in video disks and compact audio 
disks. • 

The information can include a di gitalize d photo- 
graph of the cardholder, a facsimile of his or her 
signature, the extent of the health insurance, a 
copy of an electrocardiogram, a chest X-ray, a list 
of medicines being taken, the names of physiaans 
who have provided treatment and bther elemeots. 

The information could provide life-saving de- 
tails in an emergency. Blue Cross said, or it could 
help a hospital avoid unnecessary procedures. 

Thomas HL Sherlock, executive vice president of 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Maryland and chairman 


off assistance to the rebels last year. While a majority of the House Cross; and whether the rebels or that President Francois Mtt- 
his group had received “close to remains opposed to providing the noncombatants will receive the terrand had fat “senously tnsull- 

$10 million” in private aid. Of that military aid that Mr. Reagan funds. ed.” On Thursday, Secret Service 

agents reportedly held op the 

French presiden t's limouane for 20 

^ • ¥l ‘minutes after a forma] dinner for 

e f /|T*/|C 0,UUU in ranama the summit meeting leaders at Fal- 

Mo ^ kenlust Castle, near Boon, until 

Protest Military Mr. Reagan’s car had lefL 

ment Systems, a subsidiary _ , ^ . , French diplomats said that pro- 

(l ttBurer to develop the card, Knift Ifl 1 lahniftf tocol dictated that Mr. Reagan 
d be distributed to the 1.6 leave first and that the delay caused 

Maryland at no cost to them. The Associated Press n0 m ruling But others who at- 

irs, hospitals and other health- PANAMA CITY — About [ended the dinner described Mr. 
□dicated that they would up- 6,000 demonstrators marched Mitterrand, waiting impatiently in 

the subscribers’ cards without through this city, accusing Pana- the limousine, as incensed. 

rrta’s government of corruption and West German officials shared 

is exnected next vear after asserting that there was military the French distress. A senior offi- 


A quote from ‘SLR Camera' in the UK 


of Health Management Systems, a subsidiary'' 
formed by the health insurer to develop the card, 
said the card would be distributed to the 1.6 
million members in Maryland at no cost to them. 

He said that doctors, hospitals and other health- 
care providers had indicated that they would up- 
date information on the subscribers’ cards without 
cost, as well. 

Full distribution is expected next year after • 
Further testing this fall Mr. Sherlock said. The 
cards are expected to be available in the rest of the .. 
United States in 1987. 

Douglas Becker, 19. one of the developers of the 
card, said the system would be less costly than 
using expensive telephone connections to link the 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield computer with, say, a hos- . 
pita). Instead, a person would carry the health-care 
record directly to the hospital. 

Some people concerned about privacy in the 
computer age have advocated such a personal card 
as a way to increase confidentiality. 

The card costs $1-25 to $1.75 to make and 
encode. Mr. Becker said. 


6,000 in Panama 
Protest Military 
Role in Cabinet 

The Associated Press 

PANAMA CITY — About 
6,000 demonstrators marched 
through this city, accusing Pana- 
ma’s government of corruption and 
asserting that there was military 




intervention in the running of the rial said he “found it somewhat 


country- 


disturbing that I was in the ehan- 


Earlier in the day Monday, Presi- cellor’s complex and was prevented 
dent Nicolas Ardito B arietta swore from going up ibe stairs by Ameri- 
in a new 12-member cabinet, vow- can security services." 


Schroeder Has Brain Hemorrhage 


By Martha Barnette Officials said the hemorrhaging 

Uat/inyEiMi Pas r Service was discovered when a highly de- 

LOU1SVILLE. . Kentucky — tailed X-ray. known as a computer- 
UTMiain J. Schroeder, who received ized axial tomography, or CAT. 
an artificial heart on Nov. 25, has scan, was made of his head 
sufl'cred a brain bethonhage and Ms. Hazle said that doctors haw 
has been readmitted to the in ten- discontinued blood-thinning drugs 
sivv care unit at Humana Hospital administered since he suffered a 
Audubon. stroke on Dec. 13. 

j Mr. Schroedcr's condition stabi- Mr. Schroeder had become 
hzed overnight and his vital signs weaker Thursday. Since his stroke, 
were normal Tuesday morning, he has been plagued by an undis- 
The Associated Press reported, dosed number of seizures, in which 
quoting Donna Hazle, a hospital be stares blankly for several nun- 
spokeswoman. utes. followed by periods of weak- 

j“He is awake some or the uroe,” ness and extreme drowsiness, 
she said. "He is breathing on his Mr. Schroeder received a blood 
own at this time "1 transfusion last weekend to Fight 


Officials said the hemorrhaging decision when doctors said a hit- 


man hean transplant would be 
risky because of his age and be- 


ing to continue the policies that he 
enacted after taking office last OcL 
II. Members of the previous cabi- 
net resigned Friday, with little ex- 
planation from the government. 

The move was widely believed to 
have been the result of pressure 
from the military and the seven- 
party coalition that placed Mr. 
Barletla in power. 

The new cabinet is comprised 
mainly of persons loyal to the mili- 
tary in the Revolutionary Demo- 
cratic Party, which ruled Panama 
directly or indirectly for 16 years 
before last year* s presidential elec- 
tions. Jorge Abadia Arias, a leading 
party official, was named foreign 
minister. 

Opposition leaders have asserted 
that the appointments amount to a 


spokeswoman. 

[“He is awake some or the time," 
she said. "He is breathing on his 
own at this time."] 


tzed axial tomography, or CAT, cause he is diabetic. Opposition leaders have asserter 

scan, was made of his head. The Schroeders originally looked that the appointments amount tor 

Ms. Hazle said that doctors hare to the device as a treatment “so he virtual military 'takeover of the gov 
discontinued blood-thinning drugs would be able to get better and eminent. 

administered since he suffered a come home " Mrs. Schroeder said 

stroke on Dec. 13. in the current issue of Life raaga- 

Mr. Schroeder had become zinc, which bought exclusive rights p__» „ a jl._ o r ^j 

weaker Thursday. Since his stroke, to their story. ftOSSian ASKS Sweden 

he has been plagued by an undis- But after the stroke and other F nr p n lHi#»nl Aevlnm 
dosed number of seizures, in which setbacks left her husband unable to vjuju 

he stares blankly for several min- talk clearly, remember recent The Associated Press 

utes. followed by periods of weak- events or care for himself, she told STOCKHOLM — A Soviet as- 

ness and extreme drowsiness. -the magazine. "I see it_as more of a sisiant professor has applied for 


The forcible removal of the 
French Jews was only one of nu- 
merous confrontations Sunday in 
which Jewish leaders said that the 
West German police had shown 
remarkable restraint. What trou- 
bled them, they said, were indica- 
tions that the police did not am on 
German orders, but foDowed Se- 
cret Service directives from ibe 
White House. 

On Sunday, Secret Service 
agents had events tightly under 
control accompanying West Ger- 
man police patrols, giving orders 
and checking the credentials of re- 
porters and others attending the 
service at Bergen-Belsen. 







AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER r,Q 

FOCUS tA 

POTOS 

FOTORAGAZn - 0 PD 
morocMRRRT .>1 
l>HOTOMA(MZIME F 

Turn KJTOGRAF* ' I 


Canonl© 

European camera of the year 84. 


the magazine, i sec n as more or a sistant prolessor has applied for 
research experiment. The longer he politico] asylum in Sweden after 
lives, the more information" doc- defecting via Finland, police said 


Mr. Schroeder, '53. of Jasper, In- anemia, a side effect of the pump- tors will get. She added. “Only for Tuesday, 
diana. who had grown increasingly mg action of the mechanical device, us. it’s just so hard sometimes." Y uri Nagzodsky was reported to 
weak and listless in the last few Meanwhile, there are indications Mrs. Schroeder said. “He’ll nev- have taken a ferry from Finland to 
days, was returned to the hospital that members of Mr. Schroedcr’s er be the way he was. If he had Stockholm, where he applied for 
Monday afternoon from the apart- family are beginning to change anticipated the hardship that it has asylum on Monday. He became the 
ment across the street where he has their view of his decision to accept been on the family, he might not ninth Soviet citizen in two years to 



lived for a month. 


an artificial heart He made that . have done it.’ 


defect via Finland. 











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Seychelles Coup Leader, 
Freed by South Africa, 
Prepares Book on Role 


ConqnM t» r Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — Michael 
Hoare. a white mercenary leader, 
whose career has spanned more 
than two decades, said Tuesday 
that he would write a book “to set 
the record straight’' about his role 
in an attempted coup in the Sey- 
chelles. 

Mr. Hoare was freed Monday 
from a South African prison where 
he served less than three years of a 
10-year sentence for hijacking. 

Mr. Hoare, a former British 
Army major who took the title of 
colonel as a mercenary, was sen- 
tenced on July 29, 1982. after he 
and more than 40 other mercenar- 
ies commandeered an Air India 
Boeing 707 in the Seychelles Is- 
lands ui November 1981. 

The mercenaries were fleeing af- 
ter a bungled effort to overthrow 
the Socialist government of Presi- 
dent France Albert Ren£ in the 
Seychelles, an Indian Ocean island 
group. 1.000 miles off the African 
coast. 

Mr. Hoare and his followers had 
arrived at Mahri the main island of 
the former British colony, posing as 
rugby players attending a beer fes- 
tival. They called themselves “The 
Ancient Order of Foam Blowers." 

They were detected at the airport 
when a customs officer noticed a 
rifle in baggage packed with chil- 
dren's toys supposedly brought as 
gifts. A 20-hour battle followed 

with Tanzanian -hacked Seychelles 
troops, and most of the mercenar- 
ies fled in the hijacked plane. 

Mr. Hoare, 65. who holds an 
Irish passport, is believed to be the 
last of the mercenaries to be re- 
leased. He was freed under an am- 
nesty offered to aged prisoners last 
year by President Pieter W. Botha. 
Most of his followers had been giv- 
en lesser sentences and served only 
a few months. 


Mr. Hoare offered his thanks 
Tuesday to the Seychelles president 
for freeing seven of his companions 
who were captured and said he 
would never again light for money. 

At his tome outside Pietermar- 
itzburg, he said at a news confer- 
ence that he planned to write a 
book about the failed Seychelles 
coup “to set the record straight."' 

The coup attempt and subse- 
quent hijacking aroused interna- 
Uonal criticism and gave rise to 
allegations that the South African 
government had helped the merce- 
naries beforehand. The Seychelles 
government has been an outspoken 
critic of the white-ruled republic. 

During the trial, a witness 
quoted a Hoare lieutenant as say- 
ing that seven or eight members of 
South Africa's government had 
been involved. But Mr. Botha, who 
was then prime minister, denied 
that there had been any official 
backing for the coup. 

In interviews at the time; cap- 
tured mercenaries in the Seychelles 
said they each were given a $1,000 
advance to cany out the invasion 
of the island and that they expected 
more later. 

Mr. Hoare fought with the Brit- 
ish Army in Burma in World War 
1L He later moved to South Africa 
where he set up a safari company 
and his mercenary operation. 

Mr. Hoare, whose nickname is 
Mad Mike, achieved renown in 
Zaire, then called the Congo, in the 
early 1960s, when he and other 
mercenaries fought on behalf of the 
various factions that vied for ascen- 
dancy in the years that followed 
independence from Belgium in 
1960. 

A movie was made in 1970s, 
called “The Wild Geese", the mer- 
cenary nickname for themselves. 

fJVyT. Reuters. l/PI) 



Sudan 'Shakes Off Past 
After Nimeiri Downfall 

Leaders Shun Rewlutionary Rhetoric, 
Encourage Political Parties’ Renewal 


Michael Hoare at a press conference in Pietennaritzburg, 
Sooth Africa, on Tuesday, after bis release from prison. 


Mengistu Is Said to Deny 
Role in Razing of Camp 


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By Gifford D. May 

Nen York Tina Service 

ADDIS ABABA. Ethiopia — 
The Ethiopian leader. Lieutenant 
Colonel Mengistu Haile Mariam, 
says that he did not authorize or 
approve the forced evacuation of 
tens of thousands of famine victims 
from a relief camp last week, ac- 
cording to Kurt Jamison, the senior 
United Nations official here. 

Mr. Jannson. the UN assistant 
secretary-general . for emergency 
operations in Ethiopia, said Mon- 
day that be had met with Colonel 
Mengistu to express the concern of 
the United Nations and of Western 
donor nations over the events at 
Ibnet in Gondar province. 

Relief officials and diplomats 
say that as many as 60,000 refu- 
gees. including children, pregnant 
women and the ill, were driven out 
by soldiers over a three-day period, 
beginning April 28. 

Mr. Jannson quoted Colonel 
Mengistu as haring said that local 
officials had been responsible for 
the evacuation and that the nation- 
al authorities had not been in- 
formed. 

“He emphasized that the action 
was not authorized and that he did 
not agree with it or approve of ilT 


Mn Jannson said. “He also stressed 
that such actions will not be al- 
lowed to recur." 

At least one local official is re- 
ported under arrest in connection 
with the evacuation. 

The Ethiopian leader did not 
shed any Light on why local officials 
had ordered the closure of the 
camp. 

His assertions appeared to con- 
tradict a statement issued by the 
Foreign Ministry this weekend. 
The statement said that only able- 
bodied people had left the camp, 
that they had done so “of their free' 
wiT and that all had been issued 
“sufficient food and other require- 
ments that could take them 
through to the next harvesL" 

It is unclear where most of those 
dispersed from Ibnet are now or 
what condition they are in. Only 
about 10.000 are estimated to live 
near the camp. An effort by Mr. 
Jannson to find the others by plane, 
was hampered by bad weather on 
Sunday and Monday. 

“It is very rough, mountainous 
country out there," a Western dip- 
lomat said. “It may be that these 
people have disappeared into the 
mountains and canyons and no one 
will ever know what happened to 
most of them." 


By Jonachan G Randal 

Washington Past Servici 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — In the 
month since President Gaafor Ni- 
nxiri was overthrown, the Suda- 
nese have tried to rewrite the text- 
book for political change in the 
Third Wend. 

From the start, the process has 
been refreshing — if sometimes 
confused and slow — as they dog- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ly try to turn back the dock to 
perhaps idealized days of par- 
liamentary democracy in the 1960s. 

But it is precisely that trial-and- 
enor approach that sets the experi- 
ence apart and justifies the Arabic 
name — infitidah, at shaking off — 
for what has happened following 
Major General Nimeirfs 16-year 
rule. 

A month ago, the professional 
elites demonstrated in Khartoum 
streets with great dignity until, on 
April 6, they forced the reluctant 
armed forces to take over. 

Most striking was what was left 
out of the usual formula. 

The coup leaders did not call 
themselves a “revolutionary com- 
mand counriT or proclaim them- 
selves a “corrective movement." 

When they seized the radio sta- 
tion, they had no Communique Na 
1 prepared for instant broadcast. 

naming a new government and jus- military delegation received a $50- 
akeover with a list of million check ft 


vilians. They note that it was be* 
cause of civilian dithering in the 
critical days after the coup that 
army leaden set up the now-nfiing 
Transitional Military Council to- f 
fill the power vacuum. 

Also worrying is the knowledge 
that Iraqi and Libyan money r 
pouring in to finance various politi- 
cal parlies. In general, the parties 
tolerate the interim civilian govern- 
ment out of a desire to get on with 
their own cam p aig n i ng and to 
avoid responsibility for Sudan's 
enormous problems. 

Many Sudanese forewarn that 
fixings are bound to get worse be- 
fore they get better. That means 
more famine, chaotic economics 
and the likelihood of no quick solu- 
tion to the insurrection in the jt 
south, which is sapping public fi- W 
nances and confidence. 

Undeterred, the watchdogs 
sound determined to step in and 
scale down wage demands expect- 
ed from among the more than 150 
trade unions that now are members 
of the original anfi-Nimeiri alliance 
of six professional groups and three 
political parties. 

So far, most foreign help is dic- 
tated by fear. Saudi Arabia was so 
concerned that less moderate men 
might seize power that it has sup- 
plied more funds than in the final 
Nimeiri period. 

Soon after the coup, a Sudanese 


r 


rifying their takeover with 
promised, if vague, reforms. 

Now, every night in the Khar- 
toum area, after the heat of the day 
abates, Sudanese flock to open-air 
rallies of parties that only recently 
emerged from hiding. The crowds 
follow the speeches with all the 
fervor of a people long deprived of 
democratic dialogue. Even hecklers 
’ore tolerated. 

But many Sudanese remember 
that after independence from Brit- 
ish rule in 1956, the political parties 
.were much to blame for the insta- 
bility that led to military rule in 
1958 under Field Marshal Ibrahim 
Abboud for six years, then to Gen- 
eral Nimeiri’ s takeover in 1969. 

- This time, some members of the 
Sudanese elite are determined to 
avoid past errors. 

Think tanks have formed among 
the professionals who spearheaded 
the final opposition to General Ni- 
meiri to ensure that the transitional 
government stays on track until 
elections are held in a year. 

These watchdog groups are out- 
spoken in their criticism of their 
fellow professionals and other ci- 


from Saudi Arabia 
and $62 million in oil credits that, 
along with $82 million previously 
committed by Washington, should 
keep chronically strapped Sudan in 
petroleum products through Au- 
gusL 

But how Sudan, with foreign 
debts of $9 billion, will work out its 
salvation with its Western creditors 
and the International Monetary 
Fund remains unknown. 

Until Sudan can find $120 mil- 
lion to pay its IMF arrears, few 
donor countries are expected to 
produce the extra funds that some 
of them are considering to bolster 
the return to civilian rule. 

The public and officials console 
themselves with rectifying the er- 
rors of the Nimeiri era, an essen- 
tially inexpensive enterprise. 

With calm and thoroughness, the 
authorities are investigating cor- 
ruption and wrongdoing. Uncon- 
firmed reports insist that various 
Nimeiri middlemen now under ar- 
rest are offering to exchange their 
ill-gotten gains for a ticket out of 
the country. 


A > 


Anhvitatim 



What can we teflyou 
that your taste buds cant? 







The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytica 
present a Special Conference on 
The International Business Outlook 
Christ Church, Oxford, September 19-21, 1985.. 






r L\? -VS*.. \ J • 


esOffp 

ib- V 




ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Page 7 


<n Vll |, Agreement on Pori Cali 
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Eludes U.S. and China 


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By. Berriaid Gwenzman 

lie w 7 mi ThnaSmKt 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States and China are engaged in 
, “delicate negotiations* to decide 
J whether navy destroyers will pay a 
. - planned portcall to Shanghai, next 
. week, aooqniing to a State Depart' 
mem official-- . : 

TBe.tafts, bong hdd in Beijing, 
- teve been gtsng on siflee China 
said - last mobth that the United 
States lad pledged not to indude 
ships carrying nuclear weapons. 
The United Sates denied it had 
given socfi assurances, and discus- 
sons have SO far failed to resolve 
the dilate. 

The issue is denned so important 
by Washington dot a senior State 
Department offidal said Monday 
4 that the port call by three destroy- 
er ers might have to be postponed if a 
satisfactory agreement was not 
worked out in the next few days. ' 

The United States has a long- 
standing policy of not discussing 
whether a warship is carrying nu- 
clear weapons. Earlier this year, 
roilitaiy exercises with New Zea- 
land were canceled when the gov- 
ernment of Prime Minister David 
Lange insisted on assnrances that a 


did not have n 
aboard. 




Soviet Says 
POWsKiUed 
biPaJastan 

The AtModated Press 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
- Twenty-four Soviet and Afghan 
prisoners of war were killed when 
they tried to escape from an Islamic 
guerrilla base in Pakistan, the Sovi- 
. . et ambassad or to Pakistan charged 
h‘ Tuesday. 

Ambassador Vi tali S. Smirnov 
said by telephone that the Soviet 
Union was considering lodging a 
formal con^iamt with the Pakistan 
government for allowing the guer- 
rillas to keep Soviet prisoners on 
Pakistani territory. He said this vi- 
olated international law. 

“We are fully aware that they 
have been doing this and my gov- 
ernment is considering making a 
protest,” he said. 

Mr. Smirnov was the Erst Soviet 
official to confirm that Soviet pris- 
oners were being hrid at a guerrilla 
base near the city of Peshawar and 
that the prisoners tried to escape 
•. and were killed April 27. 

/ The Pakistani government last 
week denied that any Scrviet prison- 
ers were bring held in the country. 

It said the incident at theguetnl- 
la camp was between two rival 
guerrilla factions and that one man 
was killed and several injured when 
an ammunition dump was blown 
up. 

Mr. Smirnov said that 12 Soviet 
prisoners and 12 Afghan govern- 
ment sddiers were bejpghdd at the 
base when they overpowered a 
guard and escaped. The prisoners 
seized a weapons storehouse and 
demanded to be handed over to the 
Soviet Embassy, he said. 

The guerrillas opened fire on the 
prisoners, who tnro blew them- 
selves up to destroy the large stocks 
of weapons and ammunition and 
prevent bring recaptured, the am- 
bassador said. 

Afghan guerrilla sources said re- 
cently thal Soviet prisoners were 
being held at the camp and that 
there had been an escape attempt 
The prisoners seized an arsenal and 
negotiated with guerrilla leaders 
for several hours before the guerril- 
las opened fire, the sources said. 

The sources said that 13 Soviet 
troops were killed, but they said 
nothing at the tune about Afghan 
Army prisoners. 

The Soviet Union has an esti- 
mated 115,000 troops in Afghani- 
stan supporting the country’s Com- 
munist government in- its battle 
with Islamic guerrillas. The guerril- 
las operate from bases in Pakistan 
and Iran, but Pakistan says it pro- 
vides only humanitarian aid to Af- 
... ghm refugees and that there are no 
military operations. 

■ Soviet Asians Again in Kabul 

Troops from Soviet Central 
Asia, long considered unreliable 
for use in Afghanistan because of 
their Moslem background, have re- 
appeared in patrols in the capital of 
Kabul Western diplomats said 
Tuesday, according to a Renters 
report from Isla mabad . 

Up to .40 percent of Moscow's 
troops in Afghanistan were. origi- 
nally Turkomans, Uzbeks and Ta- 
jiks from Soviet Central Asia who 
were ethnic couans of the people in 
northern Afghanistan. Moscow lat- 
er reduced their number as they 
fraternized with Afghans. 




Romania Poet Repeated 


er, 


J? tutors 

FRANKFURT — A Romanian 
and writer, Dorin Tudoran, 
nas been repeated missing after 
starting a hunger strike April 15 in 
an attempt to be allowed to enti- 
graie, a human rights organization 
said Tuesday. 

The Frankfurt-based Interna- 
tional Society for Human 
Osaid that Mr. Tudoran, 39, 
been undo 1 anyriBaoce by die Ro- 
manian seem police and that tele- 
phone links wrth his home in. Bu- 
charest had been oil He began a 
hunger strike April 15. \ 


weapons 


■ Since then relations between the 
two countries have become 
strained, with the .United States 
cutting New Zealand off from in- 
telligence information and cancel- 
ing all joint maneuvers. 

In the Chinese case, the iKoe was 
revived on April 10, when Hu Yao- 
bang, the leader of fee Chinese 
Communis t Party, Ibid a group of 
journalists from Australia and New 
Zealand that China had received' 
assurances feat no visiting Ameri- 
can ship would be nudear-anned. 

' The next day, fee State Depart- 
ment denied feat it had given such 
‘ assurances. The Chinese Embassy 
in Canberra, Australia, reacted 
April 15 by saying: 

“United States .conventionally 
powered naval vessels may call at a 
Chinese port on an informal cere- 
monial visit. This is a matter solely 
between China and the United 
States and there are questions re- 
maining to be settled between fee 
two sidles." 

On Monday, a State Department 
official confumed that fee strips . 
planning to visit China were con- 
ventionally powered, but repeated 
that there had been no easing of 
policy over the question of nuclear 
arms 

He said hie “folly expects” that 
the ship visit wiH take place, but 
said be could not predict when. 

The United States and China 
have viewed the port call as a sym- 
bolic demonstration of the im- 
proved state of relations in recent 
years. American, officials said that 
the Chinese, who have had nndear 
weapons since 1964, were caught 
between their desire to see the 
United- Stales maintain a strong 
military presence in the Pacific to 
offset the Russians and their desire 
to play a prominent role in Third 
World affairs, where anti-nuclear 
policies are papular. 

A Pentagon official said Ameri- 
can official* have speculated that 
some Chinese officials were wary of 
any appearance of a military rela- 
tionship with the United States and 
were working behind fee scenes to 
block the port calls. The Chinese 
are currently engaged in negotia- 
tions wife the Soviet Union on im- 
proving relations. 



General Fabian C Ver 

Ver Decries 
Trial Delay in 
Aquino Case 

■ ■ The Associated Pros . . 

MANILA — General Fabian C. 
Ver asked a court Tuesday to speed 
his trial on murder rftarg ee in the 
assassination of the leading govern- 
ment opponent, Bem'gno S. Aquino 
Jr, saying postponements were 
causing bit*? “mental M^giinth, anxi- 
ety and humiliation.” 

General Ver was armed forces 
chief of staff before being suspend- 
ed from duty by President Ferdi- 
nand E. Marcos after being indict- 
ed for conspiracy in & case. 
Lawyers for 24 other soldiers and 
one civilian with General 

Ver said they were also adopting 
similar motions. 

The motion noted that hearings 
on the case by a three-judge court 
had been postponed at least 21 
times because fee prosecution said 
its witnesses woe not ready or that 
it could not locate them. 

“But the numerous postpone- 
merits now appear interminable 
and unending,” General Ver’s law- 
yer, Antonio P. Coronet said in a 
motion asking fee conn not to 
grant any more prosecution re- 
quests for delays. 

Ernesto Bernabe, fee prosecutor, 
denied that he was deliberately de- 
laying the proceedings. The presid- 
ing justice; Manuel Pamaran, sche- 
duled debate on the motion for 
Wednesday. 

Among the witnesses fee prose- 
cution has failed relocate, despite a 
nationwide search, are two private 
airport guards and an airline cargo 
loader. 


Emigration 
Of Soviet 
Jews Is Said 
To Increase 

By Gary Lee 

JffcxUn pot Post Soviet 

WASHINGTON —The emigra- 
tion of Jews from fee Soviet Union 
readied its highest level in nearly 
two years last month, according to 
State Department figures. 

In April, 166 Jews left, compared 
wife 97 m March. The March- to- 
April jranp represents a 71 percent 
increase over fee month before, 
and the peak, feus far, of a slight 
but gradnal rise since fee beginning 
of this year. 

Jewish exits from the Soviet 
Union last showed , such a sha 
increase in July 1983, when 1 
left. A U 5. official said the A 
tally was ‘‘more reminiscent of 
ores in 1982.” after which Moscow 
allowed fewer to leave. 

Since 1979, when 51320 Soviet 
Jews were granted otit visas, Soviet 
emigration ifkg i a sharp de- 
cline. In 1984 about 900 Jews left 
fee Soviet Union, compared wife 
1,314 fee year before. 

A State Department official 
called the April emigration in- 
crease “encouraging” but added, 
“We would like it to be a lot more, 
and we'd liken to be sustained.” ■ 

The official feat, besides 
last month's increase, the State De- 
partment has noted two other mod- 
est, encouraging qgpals from Mos- 
cow. 

More than the usual number of 
“refuseniks,” or Russians who had 
been denied exit, are now leaving, 
and there has been a jump in the 
number of Moscow residents 
smuwg recent Emigres. 

However, while the numbers of 
visas issued for residents of the 
capital have increased, they are re- 
ported to have decreased elsewhere 
in fee Soviet Union. 


Henm to V»t New Caledonia 

Rat err 

PARIS — Defense Minister 
Charles Heron of France will leave 
Wednesday far & 24-hour visit to 
the Pacific territory of New Cale- 
donia, official sources said Tues- 
day. 



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Greek Parliament Dissolved for Elections 


Rouen 

• ATHENS — Greece’s parlia- 
ment was dissolved Tuesday, pav- 
ing the way fix' elections on June 2. 
after deputies gave a second vote of 
approval to constitutional changes 
proposed by the ruling Socialists. 

“It is now up to the people to 

decide,” the par liame ntary speak- 
er, loannis Alevras, a senior Social- 
ist official, told the legislators. 
“Good hid in your campaigns." 

The dissolution order was signed 
by President Christos Sartzetakis, 
whose appointment brought about 
the constitutional crisis’. 

Earlier, 182 Socialists, Commu- 
nists and Independents voted in 
favor of chan ges trimming fee dis- 
cretionary powers of the president 
in appointing a prime minister, dis- 
solving the parliament and pardon- 
ing criminals. 

The constitutional amendments, 
which cannot be ratified until a 
new parliamentary vote after fee 
elections, were opposed by 113 
deputies, main ly opposition con- 
servatives. 


Former President Constantine 
Caramanlis resigned in protest in 
March over the government’s pro- 
posals to curtail fee powers of fee 
head of state. The parliament, or 
Vouli. then voted in Mr. Sanzeia- 
kis as president but fee conserva- 
tives refused to recognize his elec- 
tion as valid. 

A Socialist deputy. Fives Rouiri- 
kas, who is gravely ilL appeared in 
parliament to cast his vote. Prime 
Minister .Andreas Papandreou em- 
braced him as deputies cheered 

Amendments to fee Greek Con- 
stitution must be approved in prin- 
ciple by 180 or more deputies ip 
two separate votes, and then rati- 
fied bv a new parliament after gen- 
eral elections. 


Both Mr. Papandreou and fee 
conservative leader. Constantine 
Miisotskis. bead of the New De- 
mocracy party, already have been 
touring the country addressing 
mass rallies. 

Mr. Papandreou. who says he is 
sure of getting at least fee 48 per- 
cent of the vote that swept him into 
power in 1981. has defended his 
record on health, welfare and-pub- 
lic works and, id campaign posters 
spread across Greece, nas promised 
“even belter iunes.” 

Mr. Mitsotakis also has concen- 
trated on domestic issues rather 
than foreign policy, an area where 
fee Socialists favor greater inde- 
pendence from fee West, while fee 


conservatives want a more 
pro- Western stance. 

Commentators have said feat 
they expect a close race between 
Mr. Papandreou and Mr. Mitsota- 
Ids. who surprised voters last week 
by offering to cut the price of im- 
ported cars if he is elected. 

Soviet Flame Crash Reported 

A font FrumvPnrsst 

MOSCOW —-The crew and pas- 
sengers of an internal flight from 
Tallin to Kishinev' via Lvov were 
killed in a crash on May 3, the daily 
Sovietskaya Estonia reported in an 
issue on sale in Moscow on Tues- 
day. The paper did nor give fee 
number of dead or fee type of air- 
craft involved. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 



INSIGHTS 


Hanoi 'Attack’ in Tonkin Gulf: Evidence Indicates It Didn’t Happen 


By Robert Scheer 

Los Angeles Times Service 

1 0 S ANGELES —Twenty years ago. on the 
blackest of nights in die Gulf of Tonkin, 
A when the moon died and dense fog, an- 
gry seas, electrical storms and luminescent 
ocean microorganisms conspired to play tricks 
with a sailor's mind, America went to war. 

- A murky incident — a purported attack on 
U.S. vessels bv North Vietnam — led President 
Lyndon B. Johnson to order the bombing of 
North Vietnam, to obtain a congressional reso- 
lution approving the Americanization of the war 
in Southeast Asia and eventually to station half 
a million U.S. troops in Vietnam. 

•- However, a reconstruction or those events, 
based on once-secrcl government cables and 
formerly classified, witnessed accounts, indi- 
cates that the attack never occurred. 

The confusion began the night of Aug. 4. 
1964, high on the bridge of the Maddox, an 
aging destroyer outfitted as a spy ship. Unable 
(o see objects a few feet into the blustery dark. 
dependent on electronic information gleaned 
from radar, sonar and intercepted enemy com- 
munications. Captain John J. Herrick — a 44- 
yearold veteran of two wars — concluded that 
the mysterious dots on his radar screen were 
North' Vietnamese PT boats bent on attacking 
his two-ship flotilla. 

Captain Herrick, commodore of the 7th 
Fleet's Destroyer Division 192. radioed an 
emergency call to Pacific naval headquarters in 
Honolulu that would soon be read to the presi- 
dent. who was eating breakfast in the White 
House 1 2 lime zones away. Johnson was furious. 

Two days before, the Maddox had fired first 
on three North Vietnamese PT boats that had 
closed to within IQ miles of it in what Captain 
Herrick believed was an immin ent attack. Now, 
there had apparently been a second incident, 
and for the next 14 "hours the president’s men 
would plan a retaliatory air strike. 

J OHNSON — in the midst of an election 
campaign — insisted that decisive action 
be taken soon enough for him to announce 
it on television that night, even as his staff 
frantically tried to determine whether an attack 
bad indeed occurred. 

In order to meet that deadline, Johnson 
would overrule the commander in chief of the 
Pacific Fleet and announce the bombing of 
North Vietnam before some of the U.S. pilots 
had even arrived over their targets. 

(n (he daylight of Washington it was all very 
clear and simple — but not so clear back in the 
darkened gulf. 

From its inception, the purpose of Captain 
Herrick's mission — which had been conceived 
in the White House and directed by the presi- 
dent's national security adviser — was largely 
secret even to him. It had begun a week earlier, 
when (he Maddox was re-equipped as an intelli- 
gence-gathering ship and seat to obtain infor- 
mation on Hanoi’s radar and communications, 
as well as to make a show of force dose to the 
North Vietnamese coast. 

Simultaneously. South Vietnamese Navy per- 
sonnel. trained by the United States and using 
U.S.-supplied boats, had begun conducting se- 
cret raids on targets in North Vietnam. 

Unknown to Captain Herrick, one such at- 
tack had begun the night of July 30, immediate- 
l> before he began sailing along the North 
Vietnamese coast. The North Vietnamese PT 
beats (hat closed on the Maddox on Aug. 2 were 
probably retaliating for that assault. 

Dean Rusk, secretary of state at the time, 
conceded as much in a classified cable to Gener- 
al Maxwell D. Taylor. U.S. ambassador to Viet- 
nam. the following night. The “Maddox inci- 
deni is directly related to [North Vietnam’s] 
efforts to resist’ these activities." Mr. Rusk said. 

On Aug. 3. the day after that first Gulf of 
Tonkin episode. Captain Herrick reouested that 
his patrol be ended because he thought the 
mission made the Maddox vulnerable. He was 
turned down by Admiral Ulysses Grant Sharp 
Jr., commander in chief of U.S. forces in the 
Pacific, who fdt this might call into question 
U.S. "resolve to assert our legitimate rights in 
these international waters." 

Admiral Sharp recently said that he had ob- 
tained permission from the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
to strengthen Captain Herrick’s patrol by plac- 
ing a second destroyer, the Turner Joy. under 
his command. 

Radio monitoring — which was the purpose 
of Captain Herrick's mission — was conducted 
b> a communications box that had been placed 
between the Maddox’s smokestacks. Intelli- 
gence experts stood watch inside the box, inter- 
cepting and translating North Vietnamese com- 
munications. Occasionally, the officer in charge 
of monitoring these communications would pop 
out with messages about what he thought the 
Nonh Vietnamese were doing. 

On the night of Aug. 3. another U.S.-directed 
South Vietnamese commando raid was 


< ■■ 


1*8 



The Maddox, a destroyer that was Hie focus of the 1964 incident that led to U.S. entry into the Vietnam War. 


launched and. according to communications 
monitored bv the Maddox, the North Vietnam- 
ese confused that mission with Captain Her- 
rick’s patroL 

Early on the evening of Aug. 4, the intelli- 
gence officer reported to Captain Herrick that 
the radio communications indicated an immi- 
nent attack on the Maddox and her sister ship. 

Captain Herrick passed the warning on to 
Washington. U was 9 AM. Eastern Daylight 
Tune when the message was handed to Secretary 
of Defense Robert S. McNamara. 

Twelve minutes later. Mr. McNamara called 
the president, who had been with Democratic 
congressional leaders. 

“They have?" Mr. Johnson thundered when 
he heard about the supposed attack, according 
to House Majority Leader Carl Albert, who had 
stayed on after the congressional breakfast. 
"Now, I’ll tell you what I want," Johnson said to 
Mr. McNamara. “I not only want those patrol 
boats that attacked the Maddox destroyed, 1 
want everything at that harbor destroyed; 1 
want the whole works destroyed. I want to give 
them a real dose." 

At this point, however. Captain Henick had 
noL said that his ships were under attack, only 
that his radio intercepts pointed to the likeli- 
hood of an attack. 

Immediately after breakfast, Johnson — who 
was preoccupied with his campaign against the 
Republican presidential nominee, Barry Gold- 
water — took a walk with an adviser. Kenneth 
O'Donnell. 

“The President was wondering aloud as to the 
political repercussions and questioned me rath- 
er closely as to my political reaction to his 
making a military retaliation.” Mr. O’Donnell 
recalled four years later in a letter to Senator J. 
William Fu [bright. Democrat of Arkansas, then 
chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. 

“The attack upon Lyndon Johnson," Mr. 
O’Donnell wrote, “was going to come from the 
right and the hawks, and he must not allow them 
to accuse him of vacillating or being an indeci- 
sive leader. The emergence of the [Gulf of Ton- 
kin] resolution itself was nothing but political 
coloration for a decision already taken." 

While denying that Johnson wanted to ex- 
pand the war. his national security adviser, 
McGeorge Bundy, said recently that the presi- 
dent was concerned about his image as a leader. 
Johnson wanted “to be seen to be capable of an 
adequately quick response, no doubt about 
that," Mr. Bundy recalled. 

O N the Maddox, the man in the commu- 
nications box whose reports of an im- 
pending attack stoned the incident was 
known to some as “the hair bail man" — after 
the character in Mark Twain’s “Huckleberry 
Finn" who looked into a hairball and foresaw 
(he future. 

“Every time the hairball man came out of that 
van, l got worried,” said Dr. Samuel E Halpern, 
who was the ship's physician and is now a 
professor of radiology' at the University of Cali- 
fornia at San Diego. “He’d go running onto the 
bridge, and then the order came over the inter- 
com and said that these PT boats were ap- 


proaching us and that they were going to try to 
torpedo us. And so we weren't going to wait, we 
were going to fire and we did, of course." 

Dr. Halpern added that after the battle, 
“some of the chiefs were really upset about the 
hairball man and the box. And one of them said, 
‘We ought to throw the goddamned box over- 
board.' ” 

Later, investigations within the executive 
branch and Congress would cast doubts on 
whether the radio intercepts of an impending 
attack even applied to the action around Cap- 
tain Herrick's ships. In testimony four years 
later before the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee. Mr. McNamara disclosed that the com- 
munications intercepted that morning of Aug 4 
consisted simply of North Vietnamese orders to 
“make ready for military operations" sent to 
two boats that were incapable of carrying torpe- 
does. 

That nighL though, with the radio man's 
intercepts in hand. Captain Herrick and his 
officers began to interpret oddly moving radar 
dots and sonar noises as torpedo attacks from 
enemy vessels they could not see. The Maddox 
increased speed lb its maximum 30 knots and 
followed a zigzag course. 

At 9:52 P.M., Captain Herrick reported that 
both his ships were under torpedo attack. Be- 
tween 22 and 30 torpedoes were counted during 
the next two hours, during which the destroyers 
thrashed about in high-speed evasive action 
while frenetically firing their cannon at targets 
that simply were not visible. 

The report of so many torpedoes aroused 
suspicion among the Maddox's officers because 
the North Vietnamese Navy was thought to 
have only 24 torpedoes on all its PT boats. 
Ultimately, the Americans began to suspect that 
whatever their instruments said, no attack was 
in progress. 

As Dr. Halpern recalled: “Immediately after 
the attack, the officers came streaming into the 
wardroom and it was hysterical, just hysterical 
laughter. Everybody was laughing like mad, and 
then suddenly, 1 realized 1 was laughing too. the 
same wav. And it was this tremendous release 
from pressure." 

Fighter pilots from two nearby carriers that 
were providing cover for the destroyers 
swooped down dangerously dose to the break- 
ing waves to drop flares and fire volley after 
volley where the radar dots said the targets 
would be. However, they also could not confirm 
the presence of enemy boats or torpedoes. 

At the end of the “battle." no destroyers had 
been hit and no torpedoes exploded. Back in 
Washington, however, the gears were moving 
inexorably and without the complications of 
doubt. 

About 10 A.M. on Aug. 4, Mr. Bundy's broth- 
er. William, assistant secretary of state for East 
Asian and Pacific affairs, who was vacationing 
on Martha's Vineyard, off Massachusetts, got 
an urgent call from Mr. Rusk asking him to 
return to Washington. 

“So. I got down to Washington at 3:30 in the 
afternoon," William Bundy recalled, “and I 
went to the office and learned that [Undersecre- 


tary of State] George Ball and Abe [Abram] 
Chayes [who had recently resigned as the State 
Department’s chief legal adviser] were drafting 
a congressional resolution. 

“I was told the basic story that there appar- 
ently had been a second attack and that the 
president was determined to retaliate and to 
seek a congressional resolution." 

Mr. Bundy said that he never heard anyone in 
the State Department that day, from the secre- 
tary of state on down, express the slightest 
doubt about the facts of the attack. 

“My understanding." Mr Bundy said, “was 
that the president was looking to McNamara, 
and he in turn was looking to Admiral Sharp 
and other intelligence people for what he, in the 
end. judged to be solid evidence that it had 
taken place " 

In the gulf, the evidence was collapsing. Sev- 
eral hours after the so-called attack. Captain 
Herrick climbed to the bridge of the Maddox, 
his stomach tight with apprehension that a bi- 
zarre error might have occurred. As Captain 
Herrick readied the top of the ladder, his worst 
fears were confirmed. He was met there by his 
second-in-command. Commander Herbert L 
Ogier. skipper of the Maddox, who informed 
Captain Herrick that the reports or the attack 
had been wrong. 

The destroyer had been going unusually fast 
and zigzagging, and some, if not all. of the sonar 
sightings had simply been the ship's electronic 
signals bouncing off its own rudder rather than 
enemy torpedoes. Commander Ogier told Cap- 
tain Herrick. Then. Captain Herrick and his top 
officers huddled and agreed on the 'ource of the 
error and the necessity of informing Washing- 
ton. 

Captain Herrick cabled word of his discov- 
ery: “Review of action makes many reported 
contacts and torpedoes fired appear doubtful. 
Freak weather effects on radar and over eager 
sonar men may have accounted for many re- 
ports. No actual visual sightings by Maddox. 
Suggest complete evaluation before any further 
action taken." 

Captain Herrick's report went up the chain of 
command to Mr. McNamara, but back in 
Washington a gung-ho spirit every bit as strong 
as the one Captain Herrick had fought to over- 
come was driving events. 

“There were two factors at work,” recalled 
Bill Moyers, the longtime presidential aide who 
was then working on Johnson's reelection cam- 
paign. 

“The threat from the right of a Bany Goldwa- 
ter and the threat within his own party from the 
hawks, from the Cold War wing of the Demo- 
cratic Party — which a lot of people have 
forgotten was still very pronounced in the early 
’60s and chiefly had "been carried into Demo- 
cratic policy by the Kennedy wing of the party. 
Johnson would look at the Kennedy people 
around him, .like Robert McNamara and 
McGeorge Bundy and Dean Rusk, and he 
would later muse out loud as to what they would 
think if he had taken a position which in their 
mind would have seemed softer." 

McGeorge Bundy insisted in an interview. 


however, that it was Johnson himself who took 
the initiative: "This. I remember quite specifi- 
cally. He called me up and said we’re going to go 
for a resolution and I said something skeptical 
[because] of a general feeling that if you want a 
durable congressional resolution you don’t go 
for it on the basis of some snap event and a 
surge of feeling around the snap event And he 
makes it dear to me that the matter’s decided 
and he’s not calling for my advice — he's calling 
for my staff action in carrying out a decision, 
which I then do." 

Thai telephone call between Mr. Bundy and 
the president took place in the morning. There 
was still no reason to doubt that an attack had 
occurred when, at 1 P.M., the president had 
lunch at the White House with Mr. McNamara; 
Mr. Rusk: Mr. Bundy; the director of central 
intelligence. John A. McCone; and the deputy 
secretary of defense. Cyrus R. Vance. Johnson 
was insistent that die Nonh Vietnamese be 
punished. 

The record shows that Captain Herrick's ca- 
ble expressing doubt about (he attack arrived in 
Washington at 1 :30 P.M.. but there is no indica- 
tion that the men at lunch were informed of its 
content. Mr. McNamara received the cable 
sometime after lunch and then called Admiral 
Sharp in Honolulu. 

The conversation between Admiral Sharp 
and Mr. McNamara, which was not declassified 
until 1982 under the Freedom of Information 
Act and which was omitted from previous De- 
fense Department compilations of telephone 
conversations pertaining to the Gulf of Tonkin 
incidents, shows the developing uncertainty that 
afternoon. 

Mr. McNamara asked Admiral Sharp. “There 
isn't any possibility there was no attack, is 
there?' Admiral Sharp replied. “Yes. 1 would 
say there is a slight possibility." Mr. McNamara 
then said. “We obviously don’t want io do it 
[attack Nonh Vietnam] until we are damned 
sure what happened,” and asked Admiral 
Sharp. “How do we reconcile all this?” 

When the admiral suggested that the order to 
retaliate be postponed “until we have a definite 
indication that this happened.” Mr. McNamara 
instructed him to leave the “execute" order in 
force. 

At 4:34 P.M„ Washington time. Captain Her- 
rick. in response to Admiral Sharp's insistence 
for clarification, cabled. “Details of action pre- 
sent a confusing picture although certain that 
original ambush [mi Aug. 4] was bona fide." 

Captain Herrick said there were also some 
sailors on tbe Turner Joy who reported seeing 
lights on the ocean as well as torpedo wakes. 
Some experts, including Captain Herrick and 
Admiral Sharp, now discount those sightings as 
a common visual effect created by luminescent 
ocean microorganisms. 

In his cable Captain Henick was responding 
to what he had been told about intercepted 
North Vietnamese communications rather than 
to what he saw. As he recalled recently: “Who 
am 1 to doubt stuff that’s coming to me on 
official messages from the intelligence people in 
the services, you know? And 1 think that's what 
McNamara used. I think that's how he made his 
decision.” 

F OUR years later. Mr. McNamara would 
tell the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee that the second Herrick cable re- 
moved all doubt that an attack had occurred. 

At the lime of the Fulbright hearings, Mr. 
McNamara cited then-classified government ca- 
bles to counter the committee's suspicions that 
no attack had occurred. Yet. recently declassi- 
fied documents show that throughout the eve- 
ning of Aug. 4. the defense secretary had his 
own doubts but was under mounting pressure to 
make sure the matter was resolved in lime to get 
the president on the evening news. 

In a now-declassified phone conversation 
with Admiral Sharp at 8:39 P.M.. Washington 
time. Mr. McNamara said: “Part of the problem 
here is just hanging on to this news, you see. The 
president has to make a statement to the people, 
and 1 am bolding him back from making it. but 
we’re 40 minutes past tbe time I told him we 
would launch." 

At 9:09 P.M.. Admiral Sharp told Mr. McNa- 
mara that the planes could not finish arriving at 
their targets before midnight. Washington time. 
“How serious do you think would be a presiden- 
tial statement about tbe time of launch?" Mr. 
McNamara asked. Admiral Sharp replied: “I 
don’t think it would be good, sir. frankly, be- 
cause it will alert them. No doubt about iL 
Wouldn't recommend iL” 

In tbe next hour. Admiral Sharp had to in- 
form the defense secretary that the air launch 
had to be delayed further for technical reasons. 
Bui Mr. McNamara replied, “The president 
wants to go on the air at 1 1: 15 P.M.. that is the 
problem." 

The pressure to make a televised announce- 
ment before the nation went to sleep went on to 
distort two interconnected and critical process- 


^ was the >tiU-onno>ing detail of deicr* 

*: . mJiuck had. m fact, occurred, 

SgtSSffiS! cdk Admiral Sharp 
■ ifrinticjllv to send messages out to 

C £ hi™ demanding clarification on the al- 
,hC ! Sat?" other concert! was that all 
!he oiam> to attack North Vietnam must £ 

<& « Mh n«* 

uere sent to bomb North Vietnam i heTtWAJim- 
Jreword was reached from the >*»*«*' 

, attack — and a number of those planes 

SS^dM Sdr destination after Johnson hod 
informed the world of the raid 

In the attack, two planes were shot down. One 
pilot ua> killed and the other captured. 

P Admiral Sharp Mill believes that there was a 
North Vietnamese attack on the two destroyers 
Aug. 4. Vehemently tapping a coffee table m hts 
livSg room, he Mid U.S. retaliation was ncc«- 
sarv to “send a message, especially when you re 
dialing with a bunch of goddamned Ccmmu- a 
nists because they're ruthless bastards. W 

On the night of ihc sulf incident, though, the 
record shows that Admiral Slurp was concerned 
up until the end about whether a PT boat attack 
had actually been made by the Nonh \ wtnam- 
cse A couple of hours before the planes were 
launched. Mr. McNamara had a top aide con- 
tact Admiral Sharp at his Honolulu headquar- 
ters to check once again. Admiral Sharp sent a 
message to Captain Herrick asking him to con- 
firm that his ships had been attacked. 

Captain Herrick's reply was received in 
Washington at one minute before 1 1 P.M.. 16 
minutes after ihe first U.S. planes had taken off 
to attack North Vietnam: ^ 

"Maddox scored no known hits and ne'er W 
positively identified a boat as such . . . Weather 
was overcast with limited visibility. . .Air sup- 
port not successful in locating targets . . . There 
were no stars or moon resulting in almost total 
darkness throughout action ... No known dam- 
age or personnel casualties to either ship . . . 
Turner Jov claims sinking one boat and damag- 
ing another . . . The first boat to dose Maddox 
probably fired torpedo at Maddox which was 
heard but not seen. All subsequent Maddox 
torpedo reports were doubtful in that it is sup- 
posed that sonar man was hearing ship’s own 
propeller beat." 

Recently. Captain Herrick said he confirmed 
the one torpedo firing because he assumed that 
the Maddox was moving at a slower speed and 
the sonar equipment only picked up rudder * 
noises as torpedoes when the ship was moving at jw- 
more than 25 knots. But when shown for the 
first time that his notes and the ship's log 
indicated that the Maddox had been traveling at 
30 knots when the first alleged attack occurred. 
Captain Herrick conceded that in all probabili- 
ty. no torpedo had been fired. 

At 1 1:37 PAL. while Admiral Sharp was still 
searching out evidence to confirm an attack, 38 
minutes after Captain Herrick's last cable listing 
the missing signs of a battle. Johnson went on 
television and denounced the North Vietnamese 
for (heir unprovoked attack. 

“Renewed hostile actions against United 
States ships on the high seas have today required 
me to order the military forces of the United 
States (o take action in reply.” Johnson said. 

He continued that he would ask Congress for 
a resolution that authorized him “to take all . 
necessary measures to repel any armed attack - 
against ihe forces of the United States and to 
prevent further aggressiin.” 

What had begun as a murky skirmish against 
mysterious dots and slashes bn a radar screen 
became the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, a finely 
honed legal justification for America's partici- 
pation in what would become its most divisive 
foreign war. 

The president got his television appearance 
and won re-election. Mr. Goldwater suffered a 
crushing defeat that November, and in a recent- 
ly published 1980 interview told the Congressio- 
nal Research Service that he thought the whole 
Tonkin Gulf incident had been politically moti- 
vated. 

“I’ll be perfectly honest with you.” Mr. Gold- 
water said “I think it was a complete phony. I 
think Johnson plain lied to the Congress and got 
the resolution.” 

Johnson aides such as McGeorge Bundy say 
such accusations are false, but there are indica- 
tions that even the president had his doubts. As 
Mr. Ball recalled in a recent interview, the 
president complained to him about “those god- 
damned slap-happy admirals shooting at flying 
fish." > 

Mr. Ball added that Johnson “wasn’t con- 
vinced at all after the thing But they had been 
wailing for a provocation for a hell of a long 
time. I don't think he was sure, I think he had 
grave doubts that this attack had occurred. But 
from the point of view of the president and 
those who were around him who were eager for 
a stronger American line to be taken, this served 
the purpose." 


Hugo Block: A Man and His Complexities 


By David Margolick 

AVu- York Times Service 

T USCALOOSA. Alabama — Next year, 
when hi.- alma mater marks Hugo L 
Black's lOGih birthday, the topic will be 
his years on the U.S. Supreme CourL Those who 
filed with Justice Black or worked for him or 
hare studied his long and eventful life recently 
gathered at the University of Alabama Law 
School to ponder something more complicated 
Mill: the kind of man he was when he got to the 
court. 

For the better part of a day. relatives, former 
clerks and scholars retraced Justice Black’s jour- 
ney from .Ashland. Alabama, to the Supreme 
Court, where only two men have served longer 
and few have had as great an impact. They 
sought to connect the dots that make up the 
man's life, to see whether Justice Black’s judicial 
career represented an extension or a repudiation 
of his youth. 

Justice Black, a U.S. senator in 1937 when 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt named him to 
the court, used to describe himself as a “back- 
ward country fellow." In fact, he was a complex 
and private man who. when he died in 1 97 1 , lefL 
in addition to his legal opinions, a legacy of 
maddening contradictions. 

How. for instance, could a man who became a 
m mbol of individual rights have built his politi- 
cal career on his support for Prohibition? How 
did this anti-establishment populisL who cham- 
pioned the ’‘little guy," emerge from a relatively 
affluent childhood and Birmingham’s prosper- 
ous South Side? 

AND, perhaps most perplexing of all how 
could Justice Black, who wrote or joined 
-LJLin most of the landmark civil rights 
ruling* in the court of Chief Justice Earl War- 
ren. once have belonged to the Ku Klux Klan? 
And not only belong to the Klan but have even 
extolled it once for upholding “the real princi- 


ples of American manhood and womanhood" 
and for “loving the pride of Anglo-Saxon spirit" 
and for remaining true to “the heaven-born 
principles of liberty written in the Constitution 
of this country?" 

These are questions every bit as unfathom- 
able and frustrating as the history of the South 
itself, a history with which Justice Black was so 
closely bound for his 85 years. The answers 
offered varied, but they seemed to build to the 
same point: that Justice Black, far from being 
the "traitor to the South." as he often was called, 
actually represented many of the region’s no- 
blest traditions. 

“Hugo Black was one of us" said Jerome 
Cooper, a Birmingham Lawyer, who was Justice 
Black's first law clerk, “He’yielded to no one in 
his love For the South. But he was also an 
American and a world figure, and we produced 
him." 

Indeed, several people noted that Justice 
Black's very Southemness. along with his stoical 
pride, was what protected him best when he was 
virtually excommunicated by the state of .Ala- 
bama in the aftermath of Brown vs. Board of 
Education, the case that led the Supreme Court 
to strike dowm racial segregation in schools in 
1954. and other court derisions. 

“He never had any great bitterness toward the 
people of Alabama because he alwavs felt he 
was one of them.” said Justice Black's' sister-in- 
law. Virginia Durr, S2. who attended the sympo- 
sium. which was organized by the law school. 

“It’s very difficult in the ’South to be self- 
righteous," she said. “We were all segregation- 
ists when we grew up. You can’t say everybody 
else is a son of a bitch or wrong if you were 
exactly the same way yourself." 

Not surprisingly, the old enmities toward 
Justice Black have not died altogether. A few 
years ago the town of .Ashland, where his father 
ran a genera! store, refused to name its new 
library for him. and over time it allowed his 
boyhood home to disintegrate. 


Still, the extent to which attitudes have 
changed is apparent from his alma mater, which 
now enrolls about as many blacks as there were 
places in the justice's graduating class. Once, 
according to Roger K. Newman, who is writing 
a biography of Justice Black, the law school 
refused to place a volume of his legal opinions in 
its library and declined to invite him to his 50th 
class reunion. 

Now. although situated on Paul W. Bryant 
Drive, tbe law school seems to be one place in 
Tuscaloosa where “Bear” Bryant, the late coach 
of the Alabama rootball team, is ranked only 
No. 2. 

To most people. Justice Black's membership 
in the Robert E Lee Klavernof the Birmingham 
Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s would be a little 
more than an oddity. But at this gathering, the 
topic was discussed as impassionately as when 
the disclosures were first made. 

M OST explanations that were offered 
centered on such things as political 
expediency, bad judgment or Justice 
Black's “joiner mentality." all theories that his 
most fervent followers can live with. They had 
more difficulty, however, with the hypothesis 
offered by J. Mills Thornton 3d of the Universi- 
ty of Michigan. 

Mr. Thornton, an authority on Southern his- 
tory, argued that Justice Black’s Klan involve- 
ment had been far more “extensive and ardent" 
than has been generally supposed. But Tar from 
being solely a racist and regressive organization, 
he said, the Klan was actually a “fountainhead 
for liberalism" for Justice Black and other polit- 
ical figures in the state. 

The Klan. he explained, was in large pan a 
protest movement by poorer and more marginal 
whites, one that helped sensitize Justice Black to 
the rights of the downtrodden. 

Moreover, like the banning of alcohol under 
Prahibilioa which Justice Black also supported, 
it both reflected and reinforced his idealized 



In Flanders Field, Again 


the 

Con- 


11* X w oo rtaH ft«» 


Hugo L. Black 

view of early American history, particularly 
nobility of the Founding Fathers and the C 
stiiution they wrote. 

Mr. Thornton’s theories were greeted with 
anger and annoyance by several former clerks, 
who suggested that one cannot always believe 
history that is written by historians. Others, like 
Melford Cleveland, who clerked for Mr. Black 
10 years earlier, viewed the theories more philo- 
sophically, 

“In my book, he was so much larger than life 
that none of this really mailers." he said. “It’s 
just like a group of people standing at the foot of 
the Lincoln Memorial and talking about Abra- 
ham Lincoln." 


By Samuel Abt 

IniermUonal Herald Tribune 

\\ T AREGEM, Belgium — Past die lin- 
den trees, in leaf uow along the path, 

YY and the rhododendrons in flower lies 
the Flanders Field American Cemetery, The 
guide says that no poppies grow among the 
graves but that during the summer, they do fill 
nearby fields. 

This is tbe smallest American war cemetery 
abroad, 368 graves on a 6-acre (2.4-hectare) site. 
Most of the soldiers served in the 37th and 91st 
Divisions of the U.S. Army in World War I, 
moving from the Meuse-Argonne sector in 
France to the front lines in Flanders on Oct. 30, 
1918. 

A general attack eastward started at 5:30 the 
next morning. The 91st Division took many, 
casualties in capturing a wooded area, called 
Spitaals Bosschen. a few hundred yards east of 
the cemetery. The woods are now flanked by 
prosperous suburban homes. 

The 37th Division moved under heavy fire to 
the outskirts of the village of Crayshautem. 

After further advances both divisions were 
relieved during the night of Nov. 4, re-entering 
the front lines on Nov. It). The American troops 
progressed almost unopposed against the re- 
treating German Army the next day. just before 
the armistice went into effect at 1 1 A.M. The 
war was over, and this part of Belgium 50 miles 
(80 kilomeiersi west of Brussels began to bury 
the dead. 

They lie here in immaculate graves, the grass 
watered daily and cut to military shortness. 
Their names axe unmistakably American: Pri- 
vate Charles Maogogna from New York; Ser- 
geant Alfred Foster. California; Private Joe 
Carpen, Ohio; Private Stanislaw Labno. Ne- 
braska; Private Jacob Yoakum, Illinois; Pri- 
vate Arthur Segail. Pennsylvania; Private Nor- 
beth Fnith. Minnesota; Private Ole Olson. 
Wisconsin: Private Axel Rydell, Minnesota; 


Private Julius Plaskawicky, New York; Private 
Camfllo Trorano, Pennsylvania; Private Mi- 
chele Chimienti, Washington; Corporal Aloy-** 
sius Feely. California; Lieutenant Lionel An-^ 
derson. Kansas; Private John Dziurzynski. 
Ohio; Private Emil Wiser. Montana: Private 
Norman Stein, New York; Private Roscoe 
Stubbs, Iowa. 

Tbdr headstones are aligned in four areas 
around a white stone chapel that stands in the 
center of the cemetery. On the chapel gold 
letters say: “These graves are the permanent and 
visible symbol of the heroic devotion with which 
they gave their lives to the common cause of 
humanity As if it were needed, a small sign in 
Flemish and English appeals for “silence and 
respect. 

The guide notes that the name of the cemetery 
has a special meaning to older Americans be- 
cause of the 1915 poem by John McRae that 
many Reamed when ii was still taught in grade 


In Flanders Fields 

In Flanders fields the poppies gmr 
Between the crosses row on row. 

Thar mark our place, and in the skv 
The larks still bravely singing, fix " 
Scarce heard arridst the guns below. 

We are the Dead. Short days ago 

dai F L saw suns * glow. 

iftsizBir* 

Take up our quarrel with the foe 
**** » 

if ,or . ~~ 1* yours to hold » hteh ■ 

shall not sleep, though 
I” Handers 

Bui what are words? 


* 





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Jeao-Pierre Ponnefle, left, and Daniel Barenboim during rehearsals. 

French Flair, German Analysis 
For Ponnelle’s Don Giovanni’ 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 

F t AR1S — Opera is a mixed medium, and few of its 
practitioners bring a more mixed background to it 
than Jean-Pierre Pound] e, stage director and designer 
of the “Don Giovanni’’ that opened the fourth Mozart 
festival of the Orchestra de F^ris last night. 

Indeed, except for his collaboration since 1 982 with 
Daniel Barenboim, the orchestra’s music director, on 
the productions of Mozart's three meat “I talian " op- 
eras, Ponncile — although bom in Paris 53 years ago 
— has worked hardly at all in his native city. 

Until he burst onto the international scene with Ids 
1968 Salzburg Festival production of Rossini’s “Bar- 
ber of_ Seville." Ponnelle had worked almost entirely in 
the German theater world. Yet, while Ponnefle is a 
seemingly contradictory mixture of French flair and 
sense of style and German professionalism and pas- 
sion for analysis, he comes by it naturally enough 
through ancestry, education and happenstance. He 
has homes in Munich and in the Sologne region south 
of Paris and, as he said during a break in rehearsals, 
“when I'm in France I miss Goman organization and 
professionalism and when I'm in Germany I miss the 
French — I don’t know — atmosphere.” 

The Ponnelle family has been a leading Burgundian 
winegrowing clan for generations, although Jean- 
Pierre’s grandfather was also a music critic and his 
father a journalist and broadcaster, whDe his mother's 
side brought a Central European theatrical back- 
ground. But a crucial event in PonneQe’s adolescence 
came when his father was appointed to found a radio 
station in Baden-Baden, in the French zone of occu- 
pied Germany. The Southwest German Radio be- 
came, and remains, a hotbed of traditional and avant- 
garde music, and many prominent mtiskaans passed 
through the Ponnelle household. 

“Those first years after the war was the time of my 
puberty, when I was discovering the world, and the 
puberty of postwar Germans, their rediscovery of all 
their art that had been banned by the Nazis,” Ponnelle 
recalled. “I was in the French school there, but I was 
always at die radio listening to rehearsals.” 

Hans Rosbaud. the radio's music director then, was 
invited to conduct by the newly founded festival at 
Aix-en-Provence and the conductor needed a crash 
course in French. Young Ponnelle and Rosbaud devel- 
oped a symbiotic relationship. “We would go for 
walks in the forest while be tried to understand what I 
told him about French, and I would try to understand 
his analysis, in French, of Bruckner's symphonies." 

in Baden-Baden he became friendly with Hons 
Werner Henze, then early m his composing career. The 
friendship continued in Paris, where Ponnelle pursued 
a classic French education in philosophy, art history, 
pointing (with Fernand L&ger), and a lot of hanging 
out in bistros. One result was that Ponnelle designed 
the world premiere of Henze’s first major opera, 
"Boulevard Solitude,” in Hannover in 1952. 

The success of this production brought the utterly 
inexperienced 20-year-old more designing jobs in Ger- 
man theaters, and brought him into contact with two 
formidable personalities — Karl Heinz Stroux, for 
many years director of the DOssddorf Schauspielhaus. 
whom Ponnelle regards as a kind of second father, and 
Carl Ebert, then mtendant of the St&dtische Oper in 


Florence 'Don Carlos’: A Gala Event 


Bv William Weaver 

F lorence — Verdi's “Don 
Carlos” is hardly a rarity by 
now. In one form or another, it is in 
the repertory of every major opera 
house. And yet its demands are so 
great that any successful produc- 
tion is likely to be a gala event. 

Thus it was a suitable choice as 
the inaugural work for the 48th 
Maggio Musicale Florentine, 
which opened at the Team) Co- 
munale last week. 

Although hardly an ideal perfor- 
mance. the Florentine “Don Car- 
los” (or, properly “Don Carlo,” 
since this opera, originally written 


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for Paris, was beard in the standard 
Italian translation) had much to 
recommend it, in particular the Eli- 
sabetta of Mirella Freni, an inter- 
pretation refined through long ex- 
perience that has gained even 
greater depth while losing none of 
its radiance. Set against this mov- 
ing characterization was the unfa- 
miliar but almost equally effective 
Eboli of Giovanna CasoUa. stately, 
impassioned, warm-voiced. The 
other female member of the cast — 
Patrizia Pace — revealed a bright, 
appealing soprano, first as the page 
Tebaldo and then as the heavenly 
voice: 


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In the title role, Luis Lima 
looked perfect: young, ardent and 
romantic — and. except for a few 
moments of crooning, he also 
sounded good. His beautifuL open 
vowels were a balm, and his voice 
blended ideally with the resonant 
baritone of Piero Cappucdlli. Si- 
mon Estes, King Philip at the pre- 
miere, was indisposed by the sec- 
ond performance and was replaced 
by Bonaldo Giaiolti. a creditable 
artist in good form. The same can 
be said of Paolo Washington, as the 
Inquisitor. 

Young, as be is, James Coni on 
has cond acted the opera many 
times, but at this Florentine debut 
his approach seemed tentative. 
Lovely orchestral textures were 
sometimes marred by fll-judged 
tempos. Stage and pit — especially 
in choral scenes — were not always 
together. Nothing went badly 
wrong, but one omy occasionally 
had the feeling that all was abso- 
lutely righL 

Her Luigi Pizzi designed the sets 
and costumes and was responsible 
for the staging. Designer Pizzi — 
dividing the stage horizontally by a 
broad platform, with an open pit in 
its center — did director Proa a bad 
turn, litniiing and confusing the 
acting area. The garden scene was 
dark, the auto-da-fe cramped and 
the final moment ineffective. StiB, 
this was opera on a grand scale, and 
the complex score, the perceptive 
libretto with its affecting charac- 
ter carried the day. 

Devised by the critic Fedele d’A- 
mico, acting as guest artistic direc- 
tor. the calendar of tins year's Mag- 
gio is long — a May that stretches 
almost to July — and full of allur- 
ing events (including Alban Berg’s 
“Lulu” in 2 new translation into 
Italian by d’Amico). In the stormy 
paranoia of Italian cultural life, the 
festival remains a fixed star. 


'Old Times 9 9 Revived , Is Haunted by Past Players 


West Berlin, from whom he says he learned absolute 
respect for the music and how to read a score with the 
eyes of a stage director. 

This was interrupted by obligatory military service 
to the Algerian war from 1959 to 1961, which on a 
personal level provided time for reflection and a 
decision to add stage directing to designing. Stroux 
came through with the first offer, to stage Camas's 
“Caligula” at the Schauspielhaus, followed by his first 
opera, “Tristan und Isolde” at the DQsseldorf Opera. 
Until the watershed Salzburg “Barba,” it was a career 
mostly in German spoken theater, although the range 
encompassed Greek classics, Shakespeare. Ionesco 
and “Kiss Me Kate” and “Hello Dolly!” 

Since that 1968 “Baiba,” however, Ponnelle’s ca- 
reer has been that of an international and peripatetic 
operatic jneneur-en-sr&ifc but one with a rather Ger- 
manic penchant for systematic cycles. Among them 
have been the celebrated Monteverdi cycle at the 
Zurich Opera with Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Wagner's 
“Ring” at Stuttgart, and above all Mozart — fust in 
Cologne, with Istvan Kertesz then Sir John Pritchard: 
to Zurich with Harnoncourt; at Salzburg with Herbert 
von Karajan. Karl Bdhm and James Levine; and to 
Paris and Washington with Barenboim. 

The Paris “Don Giovanni - " is being billed as a new 
production, which is not altogether the case. It uses 
sets that Ponnelle designed three years ago, but illness , 
kept him from doing the staging then, and he also has 1 
redone the costumes. In any case, says Ponnelle, with 
Mozart there is no end to discovery. “When I do a 
revival of something from the usual repertory, it is 
more or less mechanical- With Mozart — never!" 

Then there is the matter of adjusting for the singers 
on hand. “This Don Giovanni is really green, young 
and aggressive. To have a Giovanni dimbing to the 
balcony after the serenade is good for a young man, 
but it might not be so good for a not-so-young man.” 

If conductors like Ponnelle. and they usually do, it is 
because he responds to them. “Opera is a partnership, 
and since I am both the director and designer, my 
partner is the conductor. They see that I know music 
— a lot of stage directors can’t read music — and I 
change to relationship to different conductors’ tempi,” 

Ponnelle frankly works with an elitist audience m 
min'd, educated and knowledgeable, who will get the 
intellectual jokes he finds throughout Mozart and 
understand the social relationships. “Mozart is impos- 
sible to interpret if you don’t know what the church 
was in the \8tb century, or what the relationship was 
between nobles and peasants. And the translations of 
da Pome’s librettos are so miserable — there is often a 
second level that gets lost in puritan translations.” 

Despite a nonstop pace, Ponnelle has not done 
everything yet He has his eye on Wagner's “Die 
Meistersinger” and Berg’s “Wcizzeck," and to July the 
Munich Opera Festival opens with his first staging of 
Berg’s “Lulu," with Catherine Malfitano in the title 
part aad Friedrich Cerha (who completed Berg's 
score) conducting, 

Mozart’s “ Don Giovanni. " The&tre des Champs-Ely- 
sees, also May Jl, 14 and 17. The festival continues 
through June 13. with concerts at the Salle PleyeL 
including Mozart !r version of HandeCs ’’Messiah” (June 
9h and chamber concerts at the palace of Versailles 
(June 12) and Saint- Mem Church in Paris (June IS). 


By Sheridan Marley 

International Herald Tnbune 

T QNDON — Back at the Haymarkei The- 
atre Royal 15 years after its London 
premiere, Harold Pinter's “Old Times” 
conies up looking very strong indeed, thanks 
largely to a new production by David Jones 
that, after his “Betrayal' on film, invites us to 
consider another well-made mystery instead 
of one of the old pause-filled enigmas. 

Three people in a room: a man (Michael 

mBRmSH STAGE "" 

Gambon) and two women (Liv Uilmann and 
Nicola PagetO, all of whom have at some 
time been sexually involved with one other 
and are now inhabiting different dimensions 
of time and space. Echoes of Sartre’s “Huis 
Oos” are here, but so too are even stronger 
ones of Coward's “Design for Living": bisex- 
uality and the utter impossibility of living 
eitha apart or together if there are three of 
you is what "Old Tunes" is essentially about, 
but unlike most of Pinter it is hedged around 
in old songs and wartime movie references 
that make it among the most accessible and 
even nostalgic of all his plays. 

It’s also now a play haunted by the ghosts 
of the original players, who died before their 
time: Vivien Merchant to London, and Rob- 
ert Shaw and Mary Ure on Broadway, all 
brought an energy to the first productions 
that seems to be lacking here. 

Liv U Hmann, in ha London stage debut, 
brings to an essentially hothouse evening 
that air of Scandinavian health and efficien- 
cy with which Ingrid Bergman used to blast 
through Sh3w. Michael Gamboa is suitably 
bemused as Deeley, but it is Pagett as the girl 
that the other two are fighting ova who is the 
revelation here. 

No longer just a pawn to someone's else’s 
power game, she becomes the central focus 
of a struggle on two levels of time, past and 
present, which are intercut and overlapped 
by Pima to allow endless permutations of a 
sexual confrontation played through to a 
dully end to language that seems to have 
been lovingly hacked out of granite. 

□ 

Coward’s “Cavalcade,” newly staged to 
open the 1985 Chichester season in only its 
second professional revival for more than 
half a century, is a stage epic of stunning 


ambition conceived one afternoon to Foyles 
bookshop in 1929. when Coward was leafing 
through some bound volumes of old maga- 
zines and happened upon a photograph or a 
troop ship leaving for South Africa. From 
that angle historical image grew 3 grandiose 
show in three acts and 22 scenes covering 30 
years of English upstairs-downstairs life. 
When indeed they came 40 years lata to 
make the television series "Upstairs. Down- 
stairs.” it was surely in tribute to Coward 
and “Cavalcade” that some of the characters 
bore the same names. 

“Cavalcade" first opened »n October 1931. 
a few weeks after Britain had come off the 
gold standard and two weeks before an elec- 
tion was to return a national government: 
Coward, as ever bleakly uninterested in poli- 
tics. had failed to notice the significance of 
his accidental but as usual immaculate tim- 
ing. His show was. hailed as a triumph of 
patriotism, where he had in fact meant it to 
tic nothing so simplistic or jingoistic 

This is an epic devoted to the much wida 
concept of duty that runs through most of his 
work, and somewhere to “Cavalcade” you 
can find almost everything that mattered 
about Coward as a dramatist and as a man: 
the strong sense of the immediate past, the 
concept of duty and decent behavior as 
above all else, the brisk edginess of a love 
scene on the Titanic, and. overall, a cascad- 
ing sense of shea theater. "Cavalcade” is not 
just about duty to nation: It’s about duty to 
family, friends, talent, circumstances and 
ideals, and to among its great processional 
crowd scenes of war and celebration is actu- 
ally a much smaller play, entirely concerned 
with the fortunes above and below stairs of 


onecross-seciional English famib from 1SW 
to 1929. 

But raiher than leave it as Lite domestic 
convention he later explored in “This Happy 
Breed" and “Brief Encounter." Coward de- 
cided that an audience haltered by the De- 
pression might like to see something a little 
more lavish, not least Queen Victoria's fu- 
neral. it is to the credit of John Gale's new 
Chichester management to have rounded up 
200 local amateurs to add 10 the resident 30 
Equity professionals and staged all of that. 

It is also good to notice that the director. 
David Gilmore (who recently also staged 
“The Hired Man” and is becoming some- 
thing of an expen on stage pageants), has 
seen and avoided the one great danger or 
“Cavalcade," which is that it can end up 
looking like a Tory party conference set to 
music. Did not Mrs. Thatcher quote (without 
acknowledgment) its famous "dignity and 
peace and greatness” toast in her last pre- 
-elecuon address to the nation? 

“Cavalcade" is not at all to do with politics 
of that kind, and if 1 have any objection to 
the new production (in which Joanna 
McCall um and Lewis Fiandcr admirably 
lead us through the 30 years from Mafeking 
to 1930) it is that Gilmore has drastically 
reshaped the end. so that instead of the scene 
or nightclub chaos suggested by Coward we 
get 200 people singing "Jerusalem." If Noel 
had wanted his epic to end at the last night of 
the proms, he’d have said so in the script. 

□ 

Stretched in more ways than one across 
five acts and 90 minuted Jeun- Jacques Ber- 
nard's “Martine," which had an unaccount- 


able European success in the early 1930s and 
is now being given its first London revival to 
more than hair a century on the National’s 
L> nelton stage, is a coy rustic fable about the 

farmgirl of the title being loved and ihen left 
b\ a young Parisian journalist in search of a 
more sophisticated wife. It’s the kind of show 
Marie Antoinette might have commissioned 
for one of her farmyard evenings at Ver- 
sailles. and its appearance at the National 
seems curious until you remember that the 
director. Sir Peter Hall, also gave us “Aken- 
field" and seems to see something more in 
wheat fields than the chance of hay fever. 

Manine is quite beautifully played by 
Wendy Morgan, while around her are 
grouped Andrew C. Wadsworth as ihe faith- 
less journalist. Jean Anderson as his craggy 
grandmother. Jessica Turner as the smart girl 
he marries and Barrie Rutter as the village 
hoy with whom Manine eventually settles 
into a loveless marriage. But neither they nor 
the beauty of Alison Chitty’s settings can 
disguise the fact that this is a fey and whimsi- 
cal period piece llwt might jusi'aboui survive 
as a Rene Clair movie or a French musical of 
the “Parapluies de Cherbourg” variety but 
that looks desperately thin and lethargic at 
the Lyttelton. 

.As pastoral romances go. “Martine" de- 
serves a footnote in a history of French 
drama for having introduced what its author 
called “the value of the unspoken word." but 
despite the elegance of John Fowles' transla- 
tion (marred only by his maddening use of 
the English "one” for the French “0/1”) it 
would. 1 suspect, also benefit from the value 
of the unproduced revival. 


Poor Season Cuts Tony Nominations by 3 Categories 


Hen- York Tima Semen 
NEW YORK — Tie nominating commit- 
tee for the Tony Awards has dropped three 
categories this year: for leading actor and 
leading actress in a musical and for choreog- 
raphy. Theater historians and Tony adminis- 
trators say they cannot recall an instance 
when one category was dropped, much less 
three. 

The truncated Tony program reflects the 
bleak state of the Broadway musical this 
year. “The category is for ‘outstanding per- 


formance by a leading actor in a musical' and 
the nominators immediately jumped on the 
fact there wasn't one." said George White, 
president of the O'Neill Theater Center and 
one of the 1 1 nominating-committee mem- 
bers. Similar reasoning lay behind the deci- 
sion to drop the other categories. 

The musical "Big River" collected 10 
nominations. Of productions imported from 
Britain, “Much Ado About Nothing.” took 
seven and “Strange Interlude” six. David 
Rabe's “Hurly burly” and the revival of Peta 


Nichols's “Joe Egg" each received four 
nominations. 

Nominated for best play are “Hurlybur- 
ly.” William Hoffman's "As Is.” Nell Si- 
mon's “Biloxi Blues" and August Wilson's 
“Ma Rainey's Black Bottom." Other nomi- 
nees for best musical are “Grind." "Quilters” 
and "Leader of the Pack.” 

Nominated for direction are Keith Hack 
for “Strange Interlude." Terry Hands for 
“Much Ado." Marshall W. Mason for “As 
Is" and Gene Saks for “Biloxi Blues.” 


“Your on-board entertainment 
deserves an Oscar.” 


This is an authentic passenger statement. 






1;, — , 



Lufthansa 


William Weaver is a writer and 
translator who lives in Italy and 
writes about the arts. His latest book 
is the biography "Duse . " 





... . ^ 



- : ** m * t ' : >sv - - r ““j - • _ 

INTERNATIONAL H 

EBALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY M 

AY 8, 1985 




Dow Jones Averages 


lntfM 134823 H4U7 1243.15 12SL76 + 4J7 

Trans 5B6J7 59123 94.15 53846 + UO 

UIH 15542 1SL14 15625 157.6/ + 130 

Comp 50U3 J1381 5BSJS 51021 + IB 


NYSE Index 


HM Low Cteto WW 
I04Jt 10420 I0«J» +041 
11952 119.17 11932 +042 
96.10 9547 94.10 +042 
5540 J5J9 5588 +034 
11141 11145 HUES +043 


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Uttntiw 

Finance 


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NISE 

dosing 



NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 


cun arao Apo 

oSji + M7 mg 
27042 +124 S#»89 
24&.U +0192 247.10 
253.15 +0JV 2®JI 


NYSE Diaries 


Daw Jones Band Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Dadtnad 
Uraftonped 
TaM issues 
Now H lofts 
Now Laws 
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vatu aim down 


4tt 498 

2012 2001 

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Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bnr Sales •sun 

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War 3 104713 390417 1743«3 

May 2 _ 181739 <11224 SJ34 

Mar 1 109410 398,951 1409 

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HWi Law dm CbUe 
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Finance 2140 2140 2126 +0L14 

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27 1410 AVX 22 22 12 S7 1490 1410 I4H + 10 

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73VO 6110 AtaP pi 980 12J 200x 73 72* 73 

71 57 AloPpf AM 117 400(70 70 70 +1 

68 56 AlaPpf 840 124 200x6790 6610 4610—10 

1490 11 AOXHCS 144 74 1 66 14* 14 M — IA 

22* 91A AISkAIr .14 A f 661 22* 21* 2290 + VO 

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113*99 AtoCppfliOO 115 1 108*100*108*—* 

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144 98* AHaspf 150 25 2 140* 140* 74890 + 10 

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27* 34* ABrd pf 273 103 10 36* 36* 26* 

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55* 40* AmC«l 290 85 10 421 52 60*63* + * 

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56* 43* A Cyan 150 X712325751 59* 55* + * 

29* 18* ADT 52 37 25 456 24* 24 34* +1* 

21* 15* AElPw 2260104 8 1784 21* 21 21* + * 

44* 25 Am Exp US 1915470044*43*43* + * 

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33* 19* AGnCP 140 XI 10 2560x32* 32 22* + * 

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79* 52 AlnGrp 44 A 19 1241 70* 77* 70* +1 
135 112* AIGPPf 545 44 1 132 132 132 —1* 

28* 18* AMI 72 10 12 4435 23* 23* 23* + * 


United Press Internationa! 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange made modest gains Tuesday, 
apparently aided by hopes for lower UJ3. inter- 
est rates. 

Oil stocks continued to dominate the actives. 

The Dow Jones industrial average added 4.97 
to 1,252.76. Advancing stocks topped declining 
ones by 4-3 ratio. Volume totaled 100.2 million 
shares, up from 85.7 milli on traded Monday. 

Despite narrow gains in the past three ses- 
sions, the market is sliXL nervous because of light 
volume and lack of breadth, said George rir- 
rone of Dreyfus Corp. 

Mr. Pinone said there seemed to be a consen- 
sus that a rally would abort near the 1.260 level, 
when participants see an opportunity to take 
profits. 

“More institutions are becoming convinced 
that there is a possibility that the market win 
move up from here," said Trade Latimer of 
Evans & Co. 

“Bull markets are built on walls of wony,” 
she said. Concern about missing an upward 
move prompted portfolio managers to do “a 
little nibbling,’' especially in blue-chip stocks, 
she said. 

Buying seemed to be based on fundamentals 
rather than rumors of takeovers or restructur- 
ing, she said. 

“The market still lacks the conviction it needs 
for a sustainable rally," Charles Coma of Op- 
penbeimer and Co. “Selling will come in if it 
rallies much more,’" he said. 

On the trading floor, USF&G Corp. was the 
most active NYSE-listed issue, gaining Y< to 
33U. 

Uniroyal followed, slipping V* to 19%. 


Aroo was the third most active stock, advanc- 
ing 14 to 63JL 

In other petroleum issues, Mobil lost % to 
31%, InterNorth added 1% to 46% and Exxon 
lost % to 5 Hi. 

Unocal fell % to 46%. 

AT&T added % in active trading. 

IBM jumped 1 to 125%. In Other technol- 
ogies, Burroughs and Honeywell advanced. 

NCR Corp. and Control Data were slightly 
lower. 

Digital Equipment and Control Data wen: 
slightly Iowa. 

Tobacco issues rebounded. Phffip Morris 
rose 1 to 83 and RJ. Reynolds gained 1% to 
74%. 

Geico fell 3 to 69% and Tonka advanced 2% 
to 42%. 

Meredith gained 1% to 65% and Capital Cit- 
ies Communications added 1% to 215%. 

McDonnell Douglas increased 1% to 70%. 

Coca-Cola added 1% to 68. 

The New York Stock Exchange index rose 
0.41 to 104-59 and the price of an average share 
increased 13 cents. Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
index rose 0.77 to 180.76. 

Prices were higher in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. BAT Industries led 
the actives, unchanged at 3%. Gulf 03 Canada 
followed, rising %io 14%. Wang Laboratories 
class B was thud, unchanged at 17ft. 

The American Stock Exchange index gained 
0.26 to 226.04. The price of an average share 
increased one cent Advances topped declines 
253-251 Volume totaled 7 nriJEon shares, tip 
from 63 million Monday. 

The National Association of Securities Deal- 
ers index of OTC stocks added 1.04 to 280.89. 



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uses such tests as the Ror- 
schach one, differentiates be- 
tween “normaT and “abnor- 
mal” behavior. This, 
psychology is based on dim-:, 
cal observation of emotionally 
disturbed patients. By con- 
trast, occupational psycholo- 
gy is based on observation of] 
function and drifts, such as tec 


Rorschach tests 
are a gimmick 
rather like . 
graphology.” 


igled out for their work- 
er managers. 


After the Rorschach test, the comptroller was given a boot of 
wooden toys: houses, trees, a factory, shops and a church — and 
asked to build a village. He built one with a angle shopping street 
because, he told the psychologist, he had been in Normandy the 
previews weekend, where many villages are of that type. Had he 
gone to a tJJSL suburb for the weekend he might have done it 
differently. - 

P ARTLY because of .a resistance by job candidates to such 
tests, British companies are switching from clinical-psy- 
chology tests that reveal personality “abnormalities^ to 
nxire job-specific psychological test^ according -to British psy- 
chologists. - - ' .' 

. “Rorschach tests jpmmkJc rather Kke graphology Jjtbe 

■a^ny^que butties dubious whether it ^answe^^^estions** 
about potential job performance, says Joshua Fox erf Career 
'Analysts, a London-based group of occupational psychologists. 

But most French companies, according to psychologists in 
“France, still have faith in clinical psychology. 

* Although job-specific tests may be frequently able to deter- 
mine whether a manager is emotionally stable, they are mote 
'acceptable to the interviewee than tests using clinical psychology. 
'-Most function-oriented tests are based on empirical evidence 
t after testing of a sample of managers assumed to be normal 
‘ “We did use a form of inkblot tests,” says Vic Duluwitz, 
manager of psychological services at Standard Telephone & 

' Cables PLC “A few years ago we decided to drop it because a lot 
"of candidates thought it was a joke and it undermined the tests' 
.'credibility.** • 

Saville & Holdsworth Ltd, the largest British company of 
- occupational psychologists and a test publisher, estimates that it 
rhas 200 corporate cheats. Career Analysts also lists 200 corporate 
'clients. Independent Assessment A Research Center Ltd, a 
smaller British company of occupational psychologists, lists 20 
■ corporate clients. 

Large companies, such as British T decommunicatiom PLC 
have in-house occupational psychologists. “We carry out a job- 
anaiysis then develop a test in relation to it. It’s a lot more useful 
.[than clinical psychology tests],** says a spokesman for British 
Tdecpm.. ~ . '■ ; _ 1 . . ■ . . 

"Shine Briti&psydrokjgistsaigiretiwtthc switch from dinical 
. psychology to function-oriented psychological testing in Britain 
‘ started after the introduction in 1975 of the Sex Discrimination 
Act and the Equal Pay Act banning, among other things, sexual 
> bias in hiring. “Wefind Rorschach-type tests difficult to justify in 
terms of the Equal Opportunity Act,” says JUl Nyfield, one of 14 
psychologists with Seville & Holdsworth. . 

Saville A Holdsworth has just published an occupational- 
(Coutinoed on Page 17, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


. Lola interbank rates on May 7 , exdudmg fees. 

' Official fixings for Amsterdam. Brussels, Frankfurt and Milan. New York rates at 4 
PM 


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BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


** 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


Page 11 


Debate in Europe, U.S. 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

- launmtonal HtraUl Tribune 

P ARIS — When comptroller with 12 yeaw’ experience 
'-.applied for a middljsmaoagoncn t job with a French 
multinational, the company required psychological tests. 
Among other things, the tests purport to check out a job 
candidate's emotional stability. But som e m^nayr a resent having 
to take tests, devised for psytibotics and schizos. 

In the French case, the comptroller first had to IcxA at a senes 
iOf Rorschach inkblots. The. Rorschach test is a personality amt 
intelligence test in which a subject interprets the inkblot designs 
in terms that reveal intellectual and Mryi t jpnfd factors. The 
comptroller replied to the request by saying that he s imp ly saw an 
inkblot . _ 

Clinical psychology, which m i f 


Bayer 
Profit Up 
By 28% 

First Quarter 
Spurs Optimism 

By Warren Getler 

. International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Bayer AG’s 
first-quarter international pretax 
profit jumped 28 percent to 820 
million Deutsche marks (S252J 
auUion) from 636 miThrm DM a 
year earlier, Hermann-Josef 
Stronger, the managing board 
chairman, said Tuesday. 

Bayer is the second. West Ger- 
man chemical group to say it will 
match 1984 record net profit after 
posting strong first quarter results. 
Hoechst AG made a similar an- 
nouncement earlier. Bayer is the 
second largest West German chem- 
iB^company, by 1984 sales, after 

“We assume 1985 profits will be 
just as good as last year’s,” Mr. 
Stranger said. As previously report- 
ed, Bayer earned a record 1.17 bil- 
hon DM in 1984, up 56 percent 
from the 754 mfllioo. DM the year 
earlier. The Leverkusen- based 
group has also announced that it 
was raising its dividend on 1984 
results, to 9 DM a share, from 7 
DM. 

Mr. Stronger declined to provide 
a precise profit forecast for the 
year. He cautioned that a slow- 
down in the U.S. economy and er- 
ratic changes on the foreign ex- 
change market present certain 
risks. 

World group revenue rose il.i 
percent to 12.04 billion DM from 
10.84 billion DM. with sales in 
North America and South America 
posting the strongest gains, Mr.. 
Stranger said. The North American 
sales were aided by the strong dol- 
lar; the South American sales bene- 
fited from strong demand for agro- 
chemicals. 

Bayer’s share price fell 1 30 DM 
to 2122 DM on the. Frankfurt 
Stock Exchange Tuesday. The 
drop, analysts said, reflected mar- 
ket wariness erf those companies 
whose earnings are strongly affect- 
ed by the exchange rate of the U3. 
dollar, which has become increas- 
ingly erratic 

An analyst at Commerzbank AG 
said he expects higher 1985 earn- 
ings for Bayer and its two chief 
domestic rivals, Hoechst and BASF 
AG. BASF reports first quarter re- 
sults later this week. 



SEC Investigates 
Share Trading of 
Pickens Targets 


Ike New VeA lines 

Dam bar P. DhungeL, director of the Securities Exchange Center of Nepal, points to 
a blackboard containing a list of (be companies whose shares are traded. 

Nepal’s Fledgling Stock Exchange 


By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Times Serriee 

KATMANDU, Nepal —It is not easy to run a 
stock exchange in one of the world's poorest coun- 
tries. 

There are no computers, ticker tapes or video 
terminals to speed the stock transactions, for ex- 
ample. The telephones gp dead constantly. And 
when someone wants to buy, employees of the 
stock exchange occasionally have to gp knock on 
doors to find someone to sdL 

Yet the Securities ; Exchange Center of Nepal has 
been doing a brisk business since it opened its 
doors to stock transactions five months ago. 

Its success is considered by many to be a symbol 
of a trend toward free-madeet capitalism m the 
developing world, where for years planners have 
rdied on tbe government as the engine of econom- 
ic growth. 

“The volume and turnover and impact of the 
exchange may be smaD." said Leon J. Weil, the 
UJ5. ambassador to Nepal “But it has a very 


important symbolic meaning It underscores the 
direction that His Majesty’s government is taking 
in stimulating the private sector to stimulate eco- 
nomic growth." 

Nepal a mountain kingdom of 16 million people 
with an nnuat per capita income of 8140. would 
hardly seem the place where a stock exchange 
could flourish. Most Nepalese subsist by eking out 
a living on farms in the valleys and terraced hill- 
sides south of the Himalayan range, areas accessi- 
ble only by foot 

Until recently, many of the country’s biggest 
companies were owned and operated by the gov- 
ernment But last year. King Birendra began a 
program to have the government divest some of its 
shares in various companies, opening them for sale 
to the public. 

This week, for example, shares of stock in the 
Nepal Industrial Development Corp. went on sale 
for the first time. The government-owned corpora- 
tion has invested in hotel construction, cement- 
(Cbotiraed on Page 17, CoL 1) 


By Fred R- Bleakley 

Hew York Times Serriat 

NEW YORK — The U.S. Secu- 
rities and Exchange Commission is 
conducting a broad investigation 
into possible insider trading involv- 
ing virtually all of the takeover tar- 
gets of T. Boone Pickens, chairman 
of the Mesa Petroleum Co, a re- 
cent court document discloses. 

Die investigation is in addition 
to a narrower SEC investigation of 
trading in shares of the Unocal 
Corp„ Mr. Pickens’ current target. 
Mesa disclosed that investigation 
last week. 

The broader inquiry suggests 
that the agency is trying to deter- 
mine whether someone who knew 
of Mr. Pickens’s plans tipped off 
others before the plans were made 
public 

The investigation came to light 
in a decision issued in April by a 
federal district court in Amarillo, 
Texas, where Mesa is based. The 
decision granted the SECs request 
to see depositions taken last De- 
cember from friends and associates, 
of Mr. Pickens. The depositions 
were for a civil suit that has been 
dropped. 

In its 15-page decision, the court 
said the SEt issued a formal order 
of investigation on Jan. 28, 1985, 
“in the matter of certain trading in 
securities erf Phillips Petroleum and 
other issuers." 

The other issuers under investi- 
gation indude General American 
Oil Co., Cities Sendee Co., Superi- 
or Oil Co. and Gulf Od C<rp., all of 
which along with PhflKps have 
been targets of Mr. Pickens, the 
court said. Shortly before the an- 


EC Simplifies Its Rules on Technical Standards 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity ministers a grw-ri Tuesday 
on new rules aimed at creating sim- 
pler and quicker common technical 
standards for manufactured prod- 
ucts. 

The accord was bailed try diplo- 
mats as a major step toward the 
free flow of goods in a truly com- 
mon European market 

The ministers, responsible for 
the community's internal market, 
adopted a proposal by its executive 
commission that will enable prod- 
ucts to be fredy traded within the 


community if they meet minimum 
safety requirements. 

In deciding whether national 
norms should apply throughout the 
community during a transitional 
period, the commission will be 
guided by a consultative committee 
of national experts, diplomats said. 

This simplified system replaces 
the current procedure under which 
ministers took op to 12 years to 
agree on some of (be 177 directives 
already in force, with the result that 
these were often overtaken by tech- 
nical developments. 

Denmark, which had originally 


insisted that new standards could 
only be adopted unanimously, fi- 
nally agreed to a qualified majority 
voting system, the diplomats said. 

They said the new regulation 
would not only speed up the intro- 
duction of community-wide norms 
and standards but also improve 
trade conditions within the bloc 
and help companies in one member 
state to tender for contracts in an- 
other. 

France's Minister for European 
Affairs, Catherine Lahmriere, was 
quoted by diplomats as saying that 
ministers wanted a European solu- 


tion rather than national norms in 
the future. 

West German diplomats said the 
agreement would resolve a long- 
standing dispute with France on 
whether West German Industry 
Norms (so-called DIN norms) 
should apply to goods entering 
West Germany. 

“A new European norm certain- 
ly will replace our DIN norm when 
necessary but the new procedure is 
also fuQy in line with our safety 
rules,” a senior West German dip- 
lomat said. 


nouncements of tender offers or 
proposed tender offers, tire volume 
and price erf both the common' 
stock and the call options of those' 
securities "increased significantly.’’ 
the SEC found. 

As is customary, the SEC would 
neither confirm nor deny whether 
an investigation was under way. 

Mr. Pickens said Monday that 
the investigation was “ridiculous." 
He added, Tve never tipped any- 
body on anything.” He said that 
whenever someone asked about his 
specific intentions he said: "Both 
of us could go to jail for talking 
about that. Would you like to go to 
jaflr 

Sources dose to the commission 
said that its interest was aroused by 
the riling of a dvfl suit last Decem- 
ber by Phillips Petroleum that con- 
tended that Mr. Pickens “has un- 
lawfully . . . engaged in the practice 
of tipping friends, fellow officers of 
Mesa and fellow members of the 
Amarillo Country Club of his vari- 
ous plans to acquire stock of major 
oil companies." 

Depositions were taken just be- 
fore Mr. Pickens and Phillips 
agreed on the company's repur- 
chase of the shares he had acquired. 


Dollar Slides 
In U.S. 9 Europe 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
retreated sharply Tuesday in 
U.S. and European trading, 
ending a recent rally. Dealers 
blamed continued speculation 
that the U.S. Federal Reserve 
would lower the discount rate. 

In New York, the pound 
dosed at $1.2220, up from 
SI-2083 on Monday. The dollar 
ended at 3.1680 DM, down 
from 3-24; at 2.6680 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.718; and at 
9.6425 French francs, down 
from 9.8575. 

In London, the pound ended 
at $12185, up from $12083 at 
the previous dose on Friday. 
The dollar ended in Frankfurt 
at 3.196 DM, down from 3249 
on Monday; at 9.724 French 
francs in Paris, down from 
9.9 1 15; and at 163 Swiss francs 
in Zurich, down from 2.7225. 


Saudi Arabia to Defend 
Oil Price, Yamani Says 


AD these Bonds haw been sold.^ This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


Nw Issue 


April 26,1955 


raw . raw 
i% raw 

IS 3/M 73 3/75 
12* law 


5 i 
ttm m. 


United Press International 

KUWAIT — Sheikh Ahmad 
Zaki Yamani, Saudi Arabia's oft 
minister, said in an interview pub- 
lished Tuesday that his country 
would defend present oil prices bat 
world demand for oft had readied 
its lowest level 

“Saadi Arabia and OPEC as a 
whole will do their best so as to 
prevent a further drop in oil 
prices,” Sheikh Yamani told the 
Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Watan. 

He said the Organization of Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries was 
determined to preserve the present 
price structure even though de- 
mand for oil dropped so far. 

He added that “maintaining the 
current oft prices will not require 
Saudi Arabia and other OPEC 
member-states to further reduce 
OPEC’s current ceiling of 16 mil- 
lion bands per day.” 


West Germany 
Reports Drop 
In New Orders 

Reuters 

BONN —The West German 
economy showed few signs of 
recovery in March after a bleak 
sian in 1985 because of severe 
winter weather, according to 
government statistics released 
Tuesday. 

The Economics Ministry said 
preliminary figures for March 
showed that new orders for 
manufacturing industry, an in- 
dicator of future output, fell IB 
percent from February. 

News of the drop in orders, 
which took into account sea- 
sonal factors, followed a gov- 
ernment announcement on 
Monday that industrial output 
was the same in March as it was 
in February. 

But economists said expan- 
sion-should soon pick up and 
reach at least 15 percent for 
19S5 as forecast by (be govern- 
ment, banks and research insti- 
tutes. 


= CHARTER = 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE*. 

I2> Pl 12 pcnon&go anywhere. 
Wc arc the best in Greek Islands, j 

Mediterranean Cranes Ltd. 

3 StadhwSu Athens. I 
TeL: 3236494- T1X3 222288, I 


“The worid crude oil market can- 
not deteriorate further. We are de- 
termined not to allow prices to fan 
below their present level,” he said. 

The Saudi oft minister accused 
non-OPEC producers, particularly 
Britain, of producing “at the ex- 
pense of OPEC” bat he ruled out 
any retaliatory measures against 
them. 

“Their alleged losses are merely 
figures cm paper,” he said. “One 
day we talked about such retalia- 
tory measures, but the simarion no 
more annoys os, because we know 
the standing erf OPEC win improve 
over the coming period,” he said. 

Sheikh Yamani, whose country 
is the world's largest oft exporter, 
said on Friday that Saudi Arabia 
had reduced its ail production to 
defend OPECs price structure but 
declined to give specific figures on 
production levels. 

Saudi Arabia has acted as 
OPEC's swing producer since 1984 
by rarangorlowaingits output to 
stabilize the carteFs oft prices. 

Sheikh Yamani presided last 
week over a meeting in Geneva of 
OPECs executive council in charge 
of supervising the adherence of the 
organization's member states to 
production quotas and prices. 


CNT 

Caisse Nationale des Telecommunications 

ECU 150/000,000 Guaranteed Bonds 

comprising 

ECU 75,000,000 9%% 1985-1992 Guaranteed Bonds 
ECU 75,000,000 9 %% 1985-1995 Guaranteed Bonds 

uncondirionally g ua r ant eed as to payment of principal, p re mi um, if any, and interest by 

The Republic of France 


BaxKpieBnixdBes Lambert S-A./Bank Brossel Lambert N.V. 


Banque Nationale de Paris 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
C0MPTRENDD 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF 5100,000 
ON JANUARY? 

OF EACH YEAR . 

Yielded the Mowing 


M 1980: +1 65% 

K 1981 : +137% 
1982: +32% 

M 1983: — 24% 

IN 1984: —34% 

MAY 2, 1985 
. EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
US. $ 81 , 901.99 

Management, he, 
WfeBSMet Ptaza. NewMxk. 
Newjtfrt 10005 21 2-269-1 (Ml 
. TetaxBMl 667173 UW 


Algemene Bank Nededand N.V. Amro International Limited 

Banque Fndosueg Banque Int ernat ionale a Luxembourg S A. 

Banqoe Paribas Capital Markets Caisse des Depots et Consignations 

Credft Commercial de France Credit Lyonnais 

Credit Suisse First Bosbmtlndbed GawairiulHldiB Zentralbank AG - Vienna 

Knt to bank I ntgnalicn al fjonp Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Morgan Guaranty Ltd Nippon European Bank S.A.-ITCB Group 

SodeteGenerale 5odete Generate de Banque SA. 

Stvi^BaidcCrapcRatk^IntmtatfonalLrniited S.G. Warburg & Ca Ltd. 

VAfesfdeatsdie Landesbank Garozentrale 

Al-MalGioap BancaGnnmerriakltafiaxu Banes Mansard! &G Bona Nationale del Lavoro Banco £ Roma BankAmarkaCaqAal Markets Group 
Bank GatzvriDe*-, iGs-z, Bung*»er (Overseas) Untied Baaklpp* BwJtMees AHopeNV Bankers Trust fotenutiaiui Lanital 

Banque da Bom&kS-A. BanqneBnixdks lambet (Safest) SA. Banque de Commerces A. Banque Gn&tfii Commercial Banque DegroofSXIS. 
>Ut^» Ai Cor nin iTcg Exte ic ur Baaqne Gtni ral e da Lmtunhoorg SA Banqac de t m a anb ooigSA. Banque RojbasBeJgiqtieS A. 

BbfiqredelUdonEiirapteBK Baring Brothers &Co^ limited BayeriaAe Hypo thfkm- und Wechset-Sank A ktfrny r4»n%diift 

Beytriadhc V ^ emA ank Ak tkn g wrh diaft BerfinerHandds-nndBwddhita Caisse Centrak des Banqtws Populalres 

rjww JTjMtgMerieraat Ai CrapJ-Dach^dcl jjr e mb o iug fBanQoedefEtat-? CriSKG^n&aledT^pai^neet deBebatte/AlgHneiieSpaar-en L$inentekas 

CERA-Centtal* Raiflwwikjs Oi-Bdgmm GHcorp Capital Markets Croup Cc w a m ga hari k Aktiengadbchaft Cempapde MonJg»qne de Banque 
County Bank Umfted G eA ta nstak-Banfcvwwn CrfefiAgricofc Cr^CcmxmmaJ ABefe»q« S^WCemeenfAnstfiet van Brig® NV. 

IrtArtrid et Commercial de fans Cr&tft dn Nord CredBoItaBano DaHcittKangyo huernatioijal Limited 

Dam* Europe Limited Peo nawfee Crafltbank ( Uu cem li ci iirg )SA. 5 A. Oewfin N.V. Domndcn Securities Pitfidd Linded 

DrqA»erBignk Ak U e n g rjeBtadi aft FrwHkb S rcnriti es S fop«B ft» vi«k» tjufcflih limfad Fup Internationa] Finance Limitted 

GgtagTtT^ni^BaidcderB Bteu ei d iisAenSra ri i TS ^AkliengeaeCsdvBft Goldman Sadis IntmationalCcwp. HambrosBanklindtcd 

Aft fatentffcmal Limited IstSatoBanxarioSmRaobA'Eidno K]dnwort> Bason Lamterf Kmfietbank N. V E van Lmscfaot BankorsN-V. 

LuanlRrensetO Lb^BduABmarnatkasdlJiiAdl MteuHddFkunrebto Samuel Montagu & Co. Lmdied 

Moegan Grenfdl & G>. Limited MMganStanhyhUen iat ional bfcd erfen d s dic MktrfiTC t aiw fcfaiiknv Npdrrfa n ri s c Cmfiethank nv 

The Securities Co. ■ (Bmrope) Ltd. N^ m r a l nt»ngiinntl t antod Orion Royal Bank ( .tmited Pierson, HeldringA Pierson N.V. 

Pbctipankki PrivatbanJwn A/S Rabobank Nederland Sjdom(mBiudienIiilmiatk»aIliniM Sbearsonl^hmanBrothmbtenrtic^ 

fgnhak Akarj>uiii deBanooe. LnxegEboMig SodjtfNaMcmle AOfafa Aflndastrie/NationaleMaalsdiaocB voor Kmfietaan 

Sparckassen SOS Svenaka Hanrfchlrnikui Grpdp Tikugin liilemarionaJ Bank (Europe) SjV. Union Bank of Finland Ltd. 

T Tninn Bank of Sw fta erfa n d fSo orri tt ci } Ijnftcd United Overseas Bank (lowmbourg) 5-4. VVtsipac Banking CaipCMtion 

Wood Cody Inc. Y a m a trfa Intc mat ioBal (Btfope)Uarited YaatdaTmst Europe UmBed 








; * 


Tuesdays 

M SE 

Qosb^ 

Tulles Inctotfe the nnttomurido prices 
up to ttw dosing on wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


2 rss 

31 14% 

0i 29% 
49% a 
if 12 
5Mb cm 
4 5% ZflV> 
km im 
16 1» 
IM 11 
48 «1% 

cm sm 
35* ZB 
37% 31% 
62U 51 

7m a* 

4T+ MM 
A 7 * 
48 27 

62% 40* 
IP, « 
384 am 
am 21% 

SBW 48% 
504 am 

am m 

84 3 
85H 584 


tuned from 

J2b X 46 

040 SX 

9 11 

140 S3 

9 

AJ9o 9 3 


M J 

s 

130 13 

7 

130 27 

■ 

130b 84 

n 

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136 143 

a 4 



3X4 7.1 

a i 

3L60 104 


LW 11X 


U0 11.1 

2 

U0 1L1 

2 

SO 

13 




134 

5.1 

7 

212 

73 


X2 

13 

73 

30 

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12 

134 

u 

12 

30 

37 

13 

M 

84 

9 

330 

47 

7 

AW 

ax 



■mJ* 


am— 4 

am 

am + 4 

24 + % 

nh + h 

36% + % 

m 

13 + % 

744 +1* 

494 

114 + 4 
33+4 
am + m 
m* + % 

274— 16 
44— 4 
304 +48 
36 — % 
174 

21 + W 
am— 4 
KM + % 
S»% +* 

04+4 
224— M 
25% + ft 
UM— Vh 
2 * 

1M— » 
»% + ** 
l 

34 +14 
UK + 4 
f74— 4 
114 + 4 
M + 4 
04— 4 
H4 + 4 


U.S. Futures 


ess 


15—4 
«* + ft 

im + w 
sm— 4 

*£* + 4 
2 T 4 + 4 

§5+5 

S5 + 4 
£+* 

g + % 

2 *1% 

2 S%— % 

am + 4 

M* + ft 

6% 

44—4 

a + * 

P + 4 

i»-4 


EsLMes 3A50* PnwlaM u« 
Prev. Day Ouaa int. 1UM «p» 
ORANGE JUICE (MYCEJ 

1MWK-08tM8rfc 

10530 I5U8 May IfBM IAS 

1SUS I SI 50 M 1SL» 1SUS 
nut 15173 Sw 151 JS UUB 

181.00 15020 NOV 15008 15050 

MMO 75000 Jan _ 

17750 732.00 MOT V9 JO W930 

15250 loom MOV 

15750 U730 Jul 

W3D 17975 M» 

EASda 390 Prev. Salt* 811 

Prev. DoyOpbh I nt 4208 oflKH 


15700 157.10 
IQS me 
151.10 151.15 
149J3 WAS 
W»l 30 
189 JO 14940 
WMO 


130 
tX 736 135 
of 350 732 
or in ii5 
Pf 140 122 
Pi V.I2 1X6 
Pi 844 1X5 
40 X3 
740 122 
237 1X1 
240 15 
40 10J 
140 45 


14 
7* +1 

354 + 4 
44— 4 
4484 +14 
5*4—4 
104 + 4 
344—4 
25—4 
S4 —4 
264+4 
am 


14 

32—2 

&*^ 

514 

no +4 
1064 + 4 
244— 4 
304 + 4 
144 

544 + 4 
264 + 4 
29 +4 

144 + 4 
67 

64 +1 

124 + 4 
624 +14 
in 

234 + 4 
74 

am + 4 
64— 4 
144— 4 
324— 4 
264 + 4 
11—4 
25 

114— 4 
04 + 4 
294— 4 
234 
274 

164 + 4 

am + 4 

45 + « 

133 
114 


354 
224 
II 

<m 34 
344 224 
2*4 174 
TOT* 64 
114 84 

51 
2S4 
304 
394 
544 
114 


200 

44 

X2 

24 

30 

29 

JM 

X 

271*159 

X4 

13 

40 

IX 

140 

&1 

32 

24 

172 

U 

ixa 113 




30 

29 

140 

44 

40 

23 

130 

93 

134 

114 

172 

93 

3X2 

7 9 

1X0 

44 

35r 

3 

F230 

113 

AO 

24 

572 

8X 

2X2 

82 

437 

123 

M 

13 

1225 

74 

1X0 

XI 

70 

24 

i XD 

U 

2X0 

54 


|l 


314 

1 l> 

264 

204 

654 

574 

ft 

4 434 

194 
4 394 
" 304 

4 224 

4 » 


7W 


65 124 124* 
34 204 204 
67 S94 994 
715 364 3» 

23 254 25 

378 37 36 

S3 <4 54 

24 134 134 
T7U 17 
364 34 
574 574 
354 344 


in 

244 254 

S £ 


944 944 
624 624 

h¥ 

164 17 

£2 3% 

174 174 

35 S* 

154 154 
44 44 


654 654 
394 294 
154 154 
32 32 

344 354 
53 524 

W4 104 
05 105 
94 94 
554 554 
94 94 


1.92 

17 

133 

44 

144 

51 

140 

24 

30 

4X 

36 

24 

X2 

25 

240 

57 

32 

34 

36 

34 

130 

29 

IXOQllX 

.12 

37 

74 

73 

1X0 

33 

1X0 

7.1 

140 

51 

130 

03 

140 

37 

40 

1.10 

u 

134 

97 


oS 

3 !% 

S %% 

«! 


754 744 
» 374 

344 334 
224 224 
194 19 
25 254 

19 104 

244 244 
194 194 
464 45 
904 894 
374 364 


194 + 4 
514—64 
44 44 + 4 
134 134+4 
164 144— 4 


35 3$ 

134 134 
204 214 
364 354 
3S4 394 
124 124 
24 24 
3T4 22 


35—4 
324— 4 

§4 ±5 

1§4 
304— 4 

364 + 4 


m 


224—4 
194 + 4 
254—4 
104—4 

am— ft 

194 + 4 
664—4 
194 + 4 
364 + 4 
10 +4 

264 + 4 
2 SVi 

264 + 4 
214 

19 —4 
23 —4 
2Z4— 4 



334 214 
124 94 
234 14 
44 24 
284 19 
54 24 

17 54 

464 28 
i» 74 
254 104 
74 34 
104 84 

454 254 
444 354 
57 54 

76 674 

874 574 
844 584 
554 524 
54 514 

214 114 
414 28 
78 404 


S IU 
40 IS U 

A0 20 13 

148 

1.20011.7 
42 IS II 

sjk ii.i 
' 7J2 120 
808 HO 
&40 705 
975 11 3 
771 117 
' 7 AS no 

14 

11 

2J0 U 11 


114X204 
299 74 
16 184 
609 42 
4001 45 
1804 544 
744 
308 B2 
TOQz 834 
220z 65 
620i 64 
» 204 
45 40 
13 73 


32 324 

104 104— 4 
224 234—4 
24 24 + 4 
204 214 + 4 
24 24—4 

84 84- 4 
2m 284—4 
MM 104 

30 20 

74 74— 4 
70V, 704 
414 614— 4 
45 45 +14 

644 664—14 
7 44 744+4 

82 82 —14 

83 134—4 

55 55 

54 54 

204 204 
394 40 

724 724—4 


37V. 37% 
154 154 
2S4 44 
52 534 

134 

314 MU. 
194 194 
74 74 

74 74 
74 74 
644 444 
59 994 

52 S3 

57 5 

34 34 
94 94 
94 94 
144 


mm 


12 

im im 
114 114 
354 254 
W4 294 
W% 134 
35 35 

43 43 

444 444 
184 184 
304 204 
1014 
664 
S3 
34 




CATTLE ICMJE) 

40000 ax.-anfapwlb. 

6930 5935 Jun MSS 40.10 

4747 4045 AM 6735 62X0 

4M 6010 Oct 61-15 61-71! 

47-85 41-50 CMC 6X50 6X10 

6745 62.10 Feb 6170 6375 

47.57 5150 APT 5U0 6448 

Est Scrip 1X677 Pm. Sotos 25436 
Prsv. Day Open ML 5094 oft 2998 

FODEK CATTLE (CME1 
44,000 bL- cents per to. 

7275 6150 May 4X85 4X58 

7170 6447 AIM 6543 46J0 

7X00 6460 Sep 6195 4425 

7X32 64,25 Oct 6175 66-10 

7X20 6125 NOV 6455 6485 

7X60 6460 Jan 67 JO 67J0 

EsLSatos 2800 Prev. Sotos 2489 
Prev. Day Open laL 7843 off 55 
HOGS(CME) 

3X000 Ka.- cents POT UlL 
5540 4440 Jim 4530 4SJQ 

5177 4785 Jul 47 JS 4737 

5437 4737 AIM 4X15 48.15 

5735 45X0 Oct 4195 46X0 

5035 4430 Dec 4732 4732 

59X0 4435 Fab 4840 4X40 

035 405 APT 4120 4120 

4935 4490 Jun 4730 4730 

49X0 4735 Jill 

EstSato 4J5S Prev. Sotos 7359 
Prev. Day Open Hit. 233» off 730 

POlUC BELLIES (CMC! 

3X080 lbs.- certs per tb. 

82X0 <830 May 6135 6130 

82X7 6135 Jul 6235 6X10 

8035 6030 Aug 62X2 6235 

7630 6115 Fab 70X5 7030 

7140 64X0 Mar 70X5 70X5 

75X0 70X0 May 

76X0 71X90 Jut 

EsLSatos 4251 Pray. Sotos 7346 
Prev. Day Open InL 11323 on SOI 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37 joo Bn.- cents per lb. 

152 X 0 122 X 1 May 146 X 8 147 X 0 144 X 0 

149.20 tnxa Jul 14+55 147 X 5 14 X 30 

147 X 0 ) 27 X 0 5 *p U 628 14490 14170 

146 X 0 12935 Dec 14125 14450 143 X 0 

14530 12130 Mar 14435 14435 142.18 

14100 UUB MCV 

14030 13530 Jul 14130 MUD 14130 

142 X 0 13275 Sep 

Est. Sates 4 X 00 Pm.Satas 546 
Prav. Day Open Int 13355 
SUGAR WORLD 1 UMYCSCE 1 
Itzxoo IlMe seme per Itk 

*95 3 X 9 Jul XI 2 3.12 293 

935 331 Sep X 25 325 3 X 6 

9 X 5 X 35 Oct 336 3 X 6 331 

733 W 5 Jo, 171 174 U 7 

9 X 3 4.16 Mar 4.15 4.17 4 X 3 

7.15 4 X 6 May 4 X 4 4 X 6 <24 

639 140 Jul 439 4 X 0 4 X 5 

6 X 8 415 Sn 

Od 430 430 430 

Est Sales 1X650 Prev. Soft* 8X92 
Prev. Day Opanlirt. 80331 off 454 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 

7 0 metric tons- S per Ion 

2570 1*98 May 2345 2378 2316 

2400 1998 Jul 2092 21 T 7 2092 

3415 1987 Sec 2049 2065 2049 

2337 1945 Dec 2008 2017 2008 

2190 1955 Mar 2007 2015 2000 

2130 I 960 May 9010 28)1 2 B 05 


Uf T.MLLSUMM) 

51 million- pts of 100 net 

92 X 4 87.14 Jun 9226 92 X 3 

91 X 4 86 J 4 Sep 9137 91 X 7 

91 X 0 8537 . Dec 91 X 2 91 X 7 

91 X 2 UM Mar 91 X 7 91 X 7 

KL 74 87 X 1 Jun 9084 9031 

90 X 6 88 X 0 Sep 9059 9034 

9025 89 X 5 Dec 

99M 8931 Mar 

Eat. Sales 10187 Prav.Salee 7 X 39 
Pm. Day Open Int. 41 X 16 UP 596 
18 TR. TREASURY (CBT 1 
SKKl 00 Qpr 1 H-Dta 432 nd* oflOOpef 
82 + 70 + Jun 82-7 82-17 

81-13 75-11 Sep 8 V 7 H -15 

8022 75-13 Dec 80-11 80-18 

808 75-14 Mar 79-16 79-21 

79-26 7+38 Jun 

fit idee Prw.saM IM 

Pm. Day Open InL 46389 off 32 
US TREASURY BONDS (COY) 
(lPcNSl«X 0 »alB« 32 ndlol loopet) 
77-15 57-20 Jun 727 72-19 

76-2 57-10 S«P 71-5 71-18 

7+5 57-8 Dec 70-6 70-18 

72-30 57-2 MOT 69-71 69-23 

70-14 5+39 Jun 68-21 6+39 

70-3 56-29 Sep 0-31 6+9 

69-26 5+35 Dec 67-13 67-20 

69 - 12 5+27 Mar 66-20 4+90 

49-2 63-12 Jun 

6+26 63-4 Sep 6+2 6+9 

6+8 62-24 Dec 6+25 65-25 

Est- Sates Prev. Sales 71 X 64 

Prev. Day Open lnt 22+€29 up 1 X 75 
ONMA(CBT) 

KOODOO pr 1 n-pts& 32 ntU oF 108 PCt 

70- 17 57-17 Jun TO-W 70-20 

69-24 5+13 Sep 4+25 6+28 

6+18 5+4 Dec 

6+1 5+38 Mar 

6+1 5+25 Jun 

67-7 65 Sep 

Est Sates Pm. Sates 303 

Pruv.Dav Open InL +142 o «31 
CERT. DEPOSIT tlMM> 

K mm ton- pts of loo pet 
9131 85 X 0 Jun 9132 91 X 7 

97.10 * 5 X 0 Sep 9145 71 X 2 

9039 * 5 X 4 Dec 9030 9830 

90.18 8636 Mar 90 X 8 9028 

• 9 X 3 16 X 3 Jun 

0933 87 X 6 Sep 

■59 88 X 4 Dec 

Est. Sate* 817 Prev. Soles >9 

Prev. Day Open InL L 787 oP 36 


92 X 4 92 X 5 
9137 9139 
91 X 1 91 X 2 

91 X 7 91 X 8 
90 X 8 90 X 1 

9059 9057 

90 X 6 
9017 


ta 82*1 

8+31 81-1 
■+2 8+2 
7+9 7+9 

78 -M 


7+31 72-1 
7+29 7+31 
49-31 7+1 

6+4 69-6 

6+13 8+14 
67-24 6+24 
673 (OS 
6 + 1 T 4+19 
MX 
6520 65-20 
6+7 6+7 


1+12 7+15 
6021 6+23 


9132 9137 
91 X 4 91.12 
9030 9065 
9038 90 X 7 
90 X 5 
89 X 8 


Stock indexes 


SR COMP. INDEX tCME) 
points and cents 

W.M 15*. W Jun HUS 183X8 

19230 U0X0 Sen 186X0 18535 

79S35 198.18 Mar 

EsLSalel 44XB6 Prev. Sates 37X84 
Pm. Day Open lid. 87X81 off 658 
V ALU E UWE D CMn 

219X0 mxo Jun 19130 1*4.10 

212X0 18535 Sep 19635 198.15 

218X8 aoon one 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 1438 
Pm. Dav Open lot 5X48 up 43 
8TM COMP. INDEX tWYPNI 
points and cents 

JJHS 2^52 7 *U» 195 X 5 

111X8 91^ Sep 106X6 W7A0 

11X75 UUD Dec 10MB 189X0 

113X5 UMD Mar 110X5 11035 

E»t5cte« 10X23 Pm. Sates 7.123 
Pm. Day Open InL uil unll 


1 * 4 X 5 lUJO 
187 X 5 tSSi 


19225 193 X 0 
19830 19735 
282 X 0 


10630 18+28 
18*35 187 X 0 
10040 189.15 
rau iii.ia 


Commodity Indexes 


‘ ao» 

ftApody 1 * flAjOOf 

Routers 1 ( 885^0 

DJ. Futures 121.10 

com. Research Bureau-. - 237 JB 
Moody^ : base 100 : Dee 31. 1931. 
p • preliminary; f* final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dcmi Janes : base TOO : Dec. 31, 197*. 


Previous 

912J0I 

148100 

120.54 

236J» 


47 V* 3216 Xerox 3 X 0 63 19 1257 46 N 4526 46 W + W 

30 V, 4516 xerox Pt 5 X 5 J 04 9 S2Vi 52 K, 5216 — M 

29 1 * XTRA 44 U 10 540 23 % 251 * 25 % 4 - 1 * 


38 24 ZateQj IX U I 20 2716 27 2716 + V 

23 W 19 V 6 ZotopfA 40 U 1 21 21 21 + 1 

24 % 13 % Zapata X 4 63 25 7268 13 % 13 13—1 

62 % 32 Zavre XOb 3 13 4 H cm 66 *CA 6 +1 

30 % 18 V* ZentffiE 8 8 S 0 20 % 19 % 20 — V 

21 % 14 % Earns X 2 L 7 17 102 18 % 18 % 18 % 


London Commodities 

May 7 


sudan"* ■-"■“**■“** 
narBoe per metric Ion 
AUf 97 X 0 * 3 X 0 9330 94 X 0 99 X 010040 
Oct 100 X 0 97 X 0 97 X 0 97 X 0 103 X 0 103 X 0 
Dec IBLMS 102 X 0 182 X 0 10240 10830 109 X 0 
Mar 117 X 0 114 X 0 114 X 0 114 X 0 120 X 0 12030 
May 171 X 0 119 X 0 119 X 0 120 X 0 124 X 0 124 X 0 
Aug 12630 135 X 0 134 X 0 125 X 0 131 X 0 131 X 0 
oa H.T. N.T. 137 X 0 132 X 0 136 X 0 13740 
Volume: 1379 lets of 50 tans. 

COCOA 

Star tag per metric tan 
May 1324 1307 1310 1312 1 X 98 1300 

Jlr 1 X 59 7 X 42 1345 1 346 1 X 40 1 X 41 

SOP 1349 1332 1 X 39 1 X 40 1 X 28 1 X 29 

Dec 1 X 00 IXffl 1 X 95 1 X 96 1 XH 5 7 X 87 

Mar 1 X 95 IX* 1 X 93 TX 94 1 X 80 1 X 83 

Mtry 1 X 05 1 X 05 1 X 95 1 X 05 1 X 89 1 X 93 

Jty N.T. N.T. 1 X 95 1315 1 X 70 1320 

Volume: 2329 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

1 tori Mo per mslrtc tea 
May 2.109 2.135 L 135 2,140 2,161 E 165 

jry 2^5 2.195 1197 2300 2 X 08 2 X 10 

Sap 2 X 75 2 X 25 2 XX 2 X 32 2 X 52 2 X 53 

Nov 2 X 00 2 X 60 2 X 60 2 X 70 2 X 81 2 X 82 

Jtm 2 X 15 2 X 8 S 2 XB 5 2 X 90 2 X 10 2 X 12 

MOT 2 X 15 2 X 69 2 X 75 2 X 76 2 X 90 2 X 95 

MOT N.T. N.T. 2 X 30 2 X 70 2 XS 0 2 X 38 , 

Volume: 2305 lots af 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

U 3 . dollars per metric tan 
May 21930 21730 21930 219 X 5 21830 21930 
Jue 21630 21330 21+75 71730 215 X 5 21530 
JTV 2 I 5 XS 211 X 5 21530 715 X 5 214 X 5 27430 
*ug 216 X 5 21530 2167 S 21730 21630 21730 
S«P 21830 21730 718 XS 219 X 5 71730 21 BX 5 
OCt 21938 77930 219 X 5 72230 219 X 5 22230 
NOV N.T. N.T. 72130 22830 22230 22830 
Dec N.T. ALT. 22330 23030 22330 23030 
JOB N.T. N.T. 22140 23038 22630 23040 
Volume: 1 X 90 lots of 100 tan* 

Sources: Reuters and London Potntoum e<- 
a*mge (easott). 


Paris Commodities 

May 7 


High Low Bid ASk Ctrue 

SUGAR 

Freocb mm per metric tan 

» 1 ^ 1 X 55 1 XS 5 1 X 60 —16 

1^8 1 X 75 1 X 75 1 X 80 —15 

Dec 1 ^ 1 X 20 1 X 05 1 X 20 —13 

Mar 1 AOO 1 X 80 1 X 78 1 X 80 —30 

May 1,450 1,445 1 J 15 7 A 35 — X 

Aug *LT N.T. 1,473 1 J 00 —18 

Est. voL: 1389 tats of 50 tuns. Pm. actual 
■alas: 488 tots. Open Interest: 15363 

COCOA 

French francs par W8 kg 

Mav 2.1 20 2.108 2.111 2.120 +3 

JfV N.T. N.T. 2.140 — ,+ ie 

5 *P 1135 2.125 Z 12 S 1135 +6 

Dec 23 * 2365 2360 2375 —18 

Mor 23*0 2375 1070 2375 —12 

May N.T. N.T. 2375 — —10 

Jly N.T. N.T. Z 37 S — —18 

Est. voL: 109 tats of 10 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 108 lots. Oaaa Interest: 720 

COFFEE 

French trams par 180 ka 
M ay N.T. N.T. 1460 1510 — 35 

Jly N.T. EX'. 1545 1575 —27 

SOP 2 JHM 2388 2387 2388 —55 

Nov 23*0 2395 2 J»S 1600 —61 

Jun N.T. N.T. 1585 — —55 

Mar N.T. N.T. ■ 2377 — —58 

May N.T. N.T/ 2367 — —43 

Est. voL: 51 lets afs fens. Prev. actual sates: 
28 tots. Oasn merest : 216 

Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


Dividends 


M«y 7 1 1 1 Cash Prices Mxy 7 


Company Par Amt 

PUT 

Rk 

DISTRIBUTION 



KoBtr Co _ 30 

M 9 

7-1 

INCREASED 

On! Motors E 0 . 35 

+10 

+14 


Coffee 4 Santos, lb 
PrlntdeUi 44/30 38 %. yd _ 
Steel bn lets fpmj.tan— 
Jren .2 Fdry. PhUa.tan, — 
Steel scrap No 1 hev Pitt. _ 


tea, in — .. ■■ 
WJ Tta (Strait*), lb 

a™ Pol kidium. m 

Silver N.y,n : 

Source: AP. 


S&P 100 Index Options 


Asian Commodities 

May 7 


London Metals 

May 7 


O 

35 

Q 

X 5 

O 

.15 

5 

.10 

Q 

39 

Q 

xs 

Q 

71 


X 0 

Q 

JO 

Q 

— JO 

Q 

nxs 

Q 

30 

Q 

35 

a 

40 

Q 

.11 

a 

30 

A 

.10 

a 

.16 

O 42 % 

Q 

30 

a . 

Q 

. 16 % 

20 

a 

39 

a 

43 


pace nor Jm jit AmiMm 

141 11 - - — — 

US lVVi tHi m im' 

in m n m w* 

775 1+ 4 M ttt 

HO U T» » M 

185 .1/14 14 ]« 1% 

IN - 1/16 7/16 — 

195 1/16 — — - 


mb 17674 L 4 VUSJ 2 
Source: CBOK. 


^|| U&TVeasnyMRates 


NYSE Higfag-Lowa 


45 % 28 % OuokOs 1 X 4 24 12 831 434 * 43 % 43 % + % 

22 % 15 CMH 50 JO 19 24 96 30 % 23 % 20 % — % 

11 % 6 % Ouanex 33 147 8 % BU 8 %— W 

3 <% 23 ouestar 130 53 10 172 32 31 W 31 % + % 

25*4 14 Ok Ren X 40 IX 16 76 20 % 20 'i 20 % + 14 



Avan Prod East Kodak 
I CM Prep n KeWAI59Pf 
MnutAsK NatQwStrs 


EastKodakwf vIEvaiPPfB 
LTVCpAA MB Lids 
NBrlndPS TaeemBoat 


AMEX Highs-Lows 



HEW HIGHS IS 


BcaniOil 
DomcPtr wt 
OSutllvai 
SCEBTOPf 

Bla Rad Laos 
Lundr Bk 
PGE 2S7pfW 
WtOftPOSl 

Own AM pi 
MSARftyn 
SofMOtrea 
vnfieT a 

OaJVel 

Marfclvs 

SCEJJOpf 


NRW LOWS 7 


Broican A o 
ManBuad 

Huh spin Ind 
NatatailXT 

IrdTharedn 

THreeDB 

lAffWpi 


•M Ask Bid 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric Im 
soot 97630 92730 92230 

forward 9423 D 94330 93940 

CDPPER CATHODES CHWfl Gratt) 
Sterling per metric las 
wot 1^30 1 X 4030 1 X 7538 

forward 1 X 2730 1 X 2830 1 X 1100 

I COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 
Sterling per metric fan 
wot 1 X 3130 1 X 3830 1 X 0430 

forward 1 X 1630 1 X 1*30 1 X 0330 

LEAD 

Starring par metric tea 
y» _ 31*30 31530 31630 

forward 31030 31530 31430 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tua 
spot * r g?niYi j r TOQQ Latin , 

forward 431030 631130 433230 , 

SILVER 

Pence par fra* ounce 
Mot 51630 51&40 51000 

forward 53230 53330 53630 

TIN (Standard) 

Starting per metric foe 
snot 9320.00 933030 937830 • 

tarward 934+00 935030 931030 ! 

ZINC 

Staruau per metric taa 
spot 71730 71930 71930 

forward 71630 71730 71630 

Source: AP. 


Canadian Ontpnl Dedines 

Realm 

OTTAWA — Canada's season- 
ally adjusted index of industrial 
production fell OJ percent in Feb- 
ruary, after a 0.8-percem decline in 
January, the government reported 


m 


a-ammi; A+MmlMy; <+Quarfertr; S-SemF 

AihUKd. 


DM Futures Options 

May 7 

ft Gan* HdUSflB mats, arts per mat 


22 ? _ C ®S- S ^„ _ P«r 3 eta« 
Price Jm Sep Dec Juo Sep Dec 
38 143 3 149 8.15 U9 ID 

31 135 141 2X8 IT 13 1.15 

5 153 Uf |J1 (LB UT U3 

g uj w a lii S - 

« g-15 !33 240 260 - 

35 03$ M7 077 US 135 342 

Estimated fetal Ml L92* 

S2? : H2- *P8u taL47X61 
Pub : Moil m. 4 M 2 aa M. 31392 
Source: CME. 


Hong Kong Exchange 
Starts Reorganization 

Realm 

HONG KONG —A reorganiza- 
tion of the Hong Kong Commod- 
ines Exchange began Tuesday, and 
the exchange was renamed the 
Hong Kong Futures Fjfrhnn g e 
A bill to amend commodity trad- 
ing rules to cover trading in index 
futures had been drawn op and will 
be presented to Hong Kong's legis- 
lauve council in July, officiate said 
A Hang Seng futures contract will 
be set up shortly afterward. 


»«»r Bta YhM neta 

3 -monlli ■ 7 J 7 7 X 5 834 73 « 

Fmomfi . 738 748 8 X 4 8 X 4 

Oneytor 837 835 669 U 2 

Saorco: Salomon Brothers 


Lebanon Duty Prompts 
Suicides in Israeli Army 

Reuters 

TELAVTV — Twenty-one Israe- 
li soldi ers_have committed suicide 
in I^banon since the 1982 inva- 
sion. and the stress of military duty 
in the volatile south was partly re- 
sponsible, Defense Minister Yitz- 
hak Raimi said Tuesday. 

“A preliminary investigation has 

shnom thm it riafiAiiX..^ — ■ . 


“ 7 , UU auiie 

radio. Mr. Rabin disclosed in the 
Knesset on Monday that 12 sol- 
diera knied themselves in Lebanon 
1982 and 1983 while niru» com- 
tnitifid suicide last year. 


ooysiHifismgmSeaOffU.K. 

The Associated Press 

PENZANCE. England - Four t t 

^ a wave T 
wept 1 1 children into the sea Mon- ? 

te 1 l jf l «x*s at Land’s i? 

&»S , S‘ s,en “ i p rfa ' s 

















































































































'■•r - . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Page 13 


S S , BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

? s S«gg *r • 

^fUfliroyal Agrees to 


out 


The Associated freis 


■ proxies mthereceatfy. enacted 




i _«• . i a levttaaed .rash buyout worth offer Umroyai aright of first refus- 

-.i ■ *•■ l jeariy $746 million that would es- ai on any stock that he or ‘Tcahn 

: ■ ;V; v s ^ .tatiaUy make Uniroyal. a private mri ties” proposed to sdL ' 

*■' ' - " .< i propany. . .Meanwhile, Unirpyal and affiji- 


jjn n joint statement Monday, the ates o£ Clayton & Dutafier said the 
>o companies ' also . announced ' leveraged cash bnyoutwouldhe for 
bat they had reached agreement $22 a share of common stock. Unir- 
rith Cart C. Icahn. a financier, to oyal at present has .33.9. million 




•••■■*,.< S J hd an unfriendly takeover, bid 
££? i tairet Uniroyal, the fifth largest 

... tire company. 

;y - v, ;'t . ; in Uie agreement, Uniroyal said 
^ v ^ ^ :■£ .f , : would pay Mr. Icahn S5S million 

* '• ^V; s J j p end a tad by. his RoWn Acquia- 

" * fon Corp, which had sought to 
^ .«'?* x equire 18 miHkm shares of Unir- 

*£•’ ** yal common stock. 

**— ^ . : “The nartks also aerttd.tn difr 




^ •** 


*5gt n “The parties also. agreed to dis- 
, aiss withoui prejudice the pending 
• liigadoo in New Jersey state supe- 


shares of common stock outstand- 
ing. mdqng .the transaction worth 
$745.8 miMon. 

-. The raider offer, which is ex- 
pected to be completed in the third 
quarter of 1985. expires cm Nov. 6, 
1985, the statement said. 

Clayton & DnbDiar is a private 
investment company that special- 
izes in buyouts involving manage- 
ment participation. 

In a leveraged buyout, a group. 


■or court tdatuig to the vaHdity of mmyfty ta kes a 


k **■ * • *> 
* *.**- - .. 
ai. , i 


lit ;« 


JE"** Murdoch (hiM Be Ptamung 

TV Network, Analysts Say 

mi -"i By Parti Domrn pain of an eacfcer plan, now aban- 

5^.* f ? | Return . doned, for the U.S. dirett-broad- 

:B£ >•? • S’sJ-iiNEW YORK — Rupert Mnr- casting-by-sateDite market. 

'JPB r £,*•' * * ‘f och and his partner, Marvin Da- Analysts isaid these interests 
J |s, may be laying the groundwork . could provide the framework for a 
bra fourth U ^.television n^worit .new type of national network oper- 
.gg **:• '?* -■ , t ^th their proposed $2-taIH<m pur- ating in amarket between the three 
Cm "t'^iiase of seven big-dty statHsas majors and local independent tclc- 

iS, !!f ; *•£ Metromedia, analysts -said vision stations. 


Vi|||g ■■ V I | lUi MWMI vuuvu £ 

• m 2 r “t ; u i rase of seven big-dty statKK 

:'=#« Sv^i om Metromedia, analysts sai 

-*■ ; 'uesday. 

. flan “*• « !; • Television broadcasting: in tb 


IW ,1 



*;• Television broadcasting m the 
* \ (nited Stales is currently dominat- 
i by three privatdy owned.net- 
orks, ABC, CBS and NBC . - • 


.new type of natmnai network oper- 
ating m amaiket between the three 
xnqors local independent tele- 
vision stations. 

As part ta the agreement with 
Metromedia, a new. company 
formed by Mr. Murdoch and Mr. 
Davis would own stations in New 
-York. Chicago, Los Angeles. 


< *»* 
a* , t ... 



t; aire Mr. Murdoch to obtain US. doch couldlcee Us Australian teto- 
u TizensUp, was Us second major vision intocests if he takes U^. ati- 


t- aedia coup this year. 

! ; In March he took-a 50-percent 
: take in Mr. Davis's Twentieth. 


zensbdp. The Associated Press 
reported Tuesday from Sydney. 
But the Australian Broadcasting 


+T. * ; Tentury Fox Film Corp. It gave Tribunal, wUch . regulates radio 

u* - - -r- njf. Murdoch access to one of the and television licenses, sad Tues- 
liggest U5. film libraries, a key day it would take no immediate 
ttora i^.iT^tsse 1 for his cable tdeviaon vm- action a gain st Mr. Murdoch. “As 

no change has taken place to date 
,,M * 1 Mr. Rddy said any move by the in the dttettldpof Mr. Murdoch, 

w T7 *: ■■ Mrtners toward building a fourth no action is warranted at this stage 
? t v f • ‘network, would take several years, by the tribunal,” the agency said. 

'once the Metromedia stations were Only Australian dozens are al- 
* * " locked into contracts for syndicat- lowed to hold television licenses 


W *■ t 


and dual i 


]! p , Wall Street investment analysts Washington, Dallas and Houston. 
Z' *i ’ ud the Murdoch-Davis agreement' The sale requires the blessing of 
*■ v i anounced Monday could steer the . Conununicalio csCogir 


lanouaced Monday could steer the the Federal Communications Com- 
: -. leiro media broadcast operation miwjrfm', whose rules prohibit trie- 
ward aetwork programming. virion stations being owned by 
; “We see the germ, at least the non-U^S. ritixens or by persons 
nbryo, of a part-time fourth net- * who own a newspaper in the same 
■ork operation," srid John Reidy, • 

:‘Z"“ . 

: The transaction, which wouldre- .. Under Australian- law. Mr. Mur- 


ed programs. and dual auzenshrp is not penmt- 

Mr. Murdoch's News America ted in Australia. Mr. Murdoch has 
' i group already owns sa ieHite com- two stations in Australia, in Sydney 
munications ’ facilities bought as ’. and Melbourne. . . 


company private by buying control 
with borrowed money to be repaid 
from anticipated future revenue of 
the company. 

The statement said Uniroyal's 
board had unanimously approved 
the merger agreement Approval 
was stiff required by Uniroyal 
stockholders. The agreement was 
also contingent upon meeting ap- 
plicable laws and regulations and 
upon, the completion of financing, 

The statement said Dayton & 
Dubilier and Drexel Burnham 

Lambert Inc. had agreed to arrange 

all financing for the transaction. 

Larry dark, a Uniroyal spokes- 
man, said the merger essentially 
made Uniroyal a private company 
because following a successful 
tender offer there would be no 
common shares of stock outstand- 
ing. However, existing publicly 
had preferred shares were expect- 
ed to remain public domain, the 
statementsakf. 

Joseph P. Flannery, Uniroyal ■ 
chairman, president and chief exec- 
utive officer, planned to participate 
as an investor in the merger and 
would remain as bead of Unirpyal, 
the statement said. 

Uniroyal has been trying «tw* 
April 10 to fend off an unfriendly 
takeover bid by Mr. Icahn, who 
had been scheduled to begin on 
Monday a court challenge to a 
shareholder vote that narrowly ap- 
proved two measures designed to 
.thwart hostile takeovers. 

Mr. Icahn had offered $18 per 
share for up to S3 percent of Unir- 
oyal’s stock. Unirpyal then would 
have: been merged into one of Mr. 
Icahn’s companies, with remaining 
shareholders getting $18 a share 

worth of debt securities. 

IBM Providing 
Free PC Software 

Hew Turk Times Service 

. ATLANTA — In a surprise 
move that brought outcries in the 
personal computer industry. Inter- 
national Business Machines Corp. 
has begun to provide dealers with 
free software to accompany some 
IBM Personal Computer models 
theysriL 

The move; which IBM (fid not 
announce tail- confirmed in re- 
sponse to questions Monday, 
means that dealers will be able to 
offer free software for word-pro- 
cessing and accounting with each 
machine. 

The action was immediately at- 
tacked by software executives, who 
said IBM was trying to use its posi- 
tion as the leading computer hard- 
ware company in an effort to grab a 
large share of software sales. 


MidbrndBank 
MayTakeFutt 
Montagu Control 

Reuters 

LONDON — Midland Bank 
PLC is holding talks that could 
bring it frill control of its 60- 
percent hrid merchant banking 
subsidiary, Samuel Montagu & 
Co„ banking sources said Tues- 
day. 

At the same time, Aetna Life 
& Casualty Gx, bolder of the 
remaining 40 percent of Moflta- 
gy, would take on all or most of 
the ownership of Montagu's in- 
vestment management division, 
the sources reported. The swap 
may be achieved without a bnge 
amount of cash changing 
hands, they added. 

Separately, it was announced 
that Midland's perpetual float- 
ing-rate notes, issued Tuesday, 
will rank as primar y capital un- 
der the new Rank of England 
guidelines; 

Montagu, the lead manager, 
said the SSOO-mtilion issue, 
which pays 14 percent above six- 
month London inter b ank of- 
fered rate with a mminuun cou- 
pon of 5 percent for the first 10 
years, has total fees of 65 basis 

points, with a 40-basis-point 
sprflmg concession and com- 
bined management »nd under- 
writing fees of 25 basis points. 


COMPANY NOTES 

British Telecommunications 
PLC said it has agreed in principle 
to buy CTG Inc. of Canada, a tele- 
phone-interconnect company, for 
about 20 million Canadian dollars 
($14.5 million). 

Eagle Computer Inc. of Garden 
Grove, California, said it has 
reached an agreement under which 
Aceco Electronics Co. Ltd. of Seoul 
will manufacture computers for 
Eagle. 

Elders IXL Ltd. of Australia said 
it was planning to raise 100 million 
Australian do Cars (565.5 million) 
through an issue of one preference 
share for each three ordinary shares 
or two options hrid, with the 
capital to be used for group devel- 
opment. . . 

Internati onal Thomson Organi- 
zation Inc. or Canada said it has 
acquired Gale Research Co., a De- 
troit-based publisher, for $66 mil- 
lion. 

Home Savings of America, the 
second-largest US. savings and 
loan association, has agreed to ac- 
quire four of the 70 S&Ls in Ohio 
that were dosed in March during a 
deposit run on some of the stale's 


Marks & Spencer Net Rose 8.6% in ’85 


By Bob .Hagcrty 

Internationa] Nendo Tribune 

LONDON —Marks & Spencer 
PLC Britain's largest retailer, re- 
ported Tuesday a modest 8.6-per- 
ceni increase m pretax profit for 
the year ended March 31, partly 
reflecting tougher competition in 
women's and children’s clot h i n g. 

■ Responding to that competition, 
the company said it planned to in- 
crease its capita] spending in Brit- 
ain to E7_?n million ($260 million) 
in the current fiscal year and £260 
million next year from last year's 
£134.3 mfllran. ■' 

Marks & Spencer said pretax 
profit rose to 003.4 million from 
£279.3 million a year earlier. Net 
profit increased 8.8 percent to 
£181.1 minion, or 6.9 pence a share, 
from £166.4 million, or 63 pence a 
share. Sales grew 12 percent to 
£331 billion from £2.87 taUioa. 

\ The profit was toward the lower 
end of expectations, and Maries & 
Spencer snares dosed on the Lon- 
don Stock Exchange at 134 pence, 
down 2 pence. 

The spending is planned for snch 
areas as expansion of shopping 
space, refurbishing and a charge- 
card operation introduced five 
weeks ago. As a result of the higher 
spending, the company estimated 
that its borrowings wifi rise to 20 
percent of equity over the next few 
years from near zero at present. 
Thai would imply net borrowings 
of around £250 minion. 


privately insured savings institu- 
tions. 

Hong Kong land Co. Ltd. said its 
rights issue of 15 13 million prefer- 
ence shares at 5.10 Hong Kong 
dollars (66 cents) each was 40 times 
oversubscribed, with trading in die 
shares to begin May 15. HK Land’s 
ordinary shares dosed five cents 
off at 5.75 doDars Tuesday. 

RCA Cotp-’s president, Robert 
R. Frederick, told stockholders he 
sees good growth potential for its 
Hertz car rental unit despite the 
fact that profits in the first quarter 
were depressed by a combination 
of a highly competitive domestic 
car rental market and lower profits 
from sales of used cars. 

Samos Ltd. of Australia said it 
has budgeted for a 100-m3fion- 
Australian-doQar (5653-million) 
increase to 250 million dollars in 
earnings from operations in 1985. 

Securities Investor Protection 
Gorp^ a q oast-governmental UJL 
corporation, said it has asked a 
federal judge to place Bevill, 
Bresler & Scbulman Inc. under its 
trusteeship so it can liquidate the 
troubled securities brokerage. 


Though modest, the borrowing 
would be a departure for the com- 
pany. which has not had significant 
debt since the 1960s. Under Lord 
Rayner. who succeeded Lord Sieff 
as chairman last summer, the com- 
pany has adopted a somewhat 
more aggressive approach to com- 
peting with such high-flying oppo- 
nents as Burton Group PLC and J. 
Hepworth & Son PLC. whose 
trendy Next stores have denied 
Maries A Spencer’s sales of wom- 
en's dothing. 

Analysts say the new manage- 
ment puts more emphasis on mar- 


keting and research than did Lord 
Sieff. who tended to follow his in- 
stincts. 

“They're looking at a lot more 
options.** said John Haiherly of 
Capd-Cure Myers. “They’re a lot 
more flexible. He said it was too 
early to judge such experiments as 
edge-of-town rites, flashier store 
design and mail-order sales. 

The total dividend rose to 3.4 
peace a share from 3.125 pence. 

British operations accounted for 
95 percent of pretax profit, and the 
rest came from Canada and conti- 
nental Europe. 


V.1L Plans to Sell British Gas Corp. 


The Associated Tress 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment announced plans Tuesday 
to sell the British das Corp- the 
country’s most profitable state- 
owned industry, as part of its pro- 
gram to transfer government-held 
sectors of the economy into private 
hands. 

Energy Secretary Peter Walker 
told Parliament the sale would take 
place “at the earliest opportunity,” 
but he set no date. Market experts 
put a value of at least $73 billion 
on the sale. 

Mr. Walker said shares in the 
corporation would be offered to 
employees and the general public, 
with clauses to prevent the new 


Trafalgar House PLC said it 
asked Haden PLC to supply more 
corporate information in order to 
put Trafalgar on equal terms with 
the competing bid for Haden that 
was launched last week by Manu- 

gOOd 1*4 a Trmrmgf-rrv-n t an d insti- 
tutional consortium. 

Trinkans A Burkbardt, a West 
German merchant bank, mid it has 
changed its corporate structure 
from a limited partnership to a 
company with giexieral partners in 
order to increase its financial flexi- 
bility and enable a planned reduo 
turn in Midland Bank PLCs stake 
to about 70 percent 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

racBATi^ase 

A: US. DCtLAR CASH $1039 

b MUTTCURRS^CV CASH $10.14 

C- DOUAKBCN3S $1089 

D-. fJUXOMB^Cf BObOS $1045 

& STESLNG ASSET £1088 

FCfiBGN &CCUCMAL 
MANMSBiB>IT 0B5&9 UMTB> 

14 MULCASIBt STBSTSrJBJBUBESHjG. 
TR: 053*27351 TEBt 4192063 

FOR OTHER F&C FUNDS, SB 
aVTERNATTONAt FUNDS UST 


company from coming under for- 
eign control. 

With profits of $12 billion in the 
latest year, British Gas is seen as a 
bonanza for the stock market 

It will join the British Telecom 
communications giant. Jaguar au- 
tos and BriioQ. the gas and oil pro- 
specting company, in going private 
under Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher’s program of rolling back 
state ownership of British industry 
and services. 

The opposition Labor Party, 
which launched nationalization 
when it won the 1945 general elec- 
tion. attacked ihe plans. Labor's 
energy spokesman, Stan Orroe, 
contended that privatization of 
British Gas would only create “a 
massive new private monopoly.” 


Westland PLC said in London 
that it has appointed Goldman 
Sachs & Co„ the investment bank- 
ers, to advise the company follow- 
ing a recent takeover bid by Bris- 
tow Rotorcraft Ltd. 


Hilton Reports 
Anti-Takeover 
Steps Approved 

Lm Attffks Times Semcr 

LOS ANGELES — Hilton 
Hotels Corp. says it has appar- 
ently succeeded by a comfort- 
able margin in gelling share- 
holder approval of several 
anti-takeover measures at its 
annual meeting. 

Passage of the measures wilt 
make it virtually impossible for 
Golden Nugget which Hilton 
had considered an unfriendly 
potential acquirer, to pursue 
moves that could result in its 
talung control of Hilton. 

The anti-takeover measures 
require a 75-perceni vote of Hil- 
ton’s stockholders to approve a 
merger with anyone owning 
more than 10 percent of its 
stock or to remove directors. 

Hilton management's suc- 
cess, announced on Monday, 
was foreshadowed last week 
when a Los Angeles County 
probate judge refused a Califor- 
nia attorney general's petition 
to bar the voting of a 27.4 per- 
cent block of Hilton stock in 
favor of the proposals. 

After the estate executor had 
turned down Golden Nugget’s 
offer of $72 a share or >488 
million Tor the block last 
month. Golden Nugget cot tin- 
ned to fight the measures. 


DEGREES^ 

f pi.ni Y-«tSIE»M UNWgsm 

TgasWss. 


acttbonds Investment Fund S.A. 

Socicit Anonyme (Tlnvestissement 
Luxembourg- 37- nie Notre- Dame 
R.C. Luxembourg B 20.081 

Avis de convocation 

Messieurs les Actionnaires sour con vogues per le present avis a 
r Assembles Generate Siatuiaire qui aura lieu le 17 mai 1985 £ 11.00 beo res 
dans les bureaux de la Kredietbank SA.Luxembouqseoiie.43. Boulevard 
Royal. Luxembourg, avec J'oidre du jour suivant : 

Ordre du jour 

1. Exaxnen des rapports du Conseil tf Administration et du Cotnmis- 

saire aux Complex. _ .. . 

2. Approbation du bilan et des cxwnptesde resultaiau31 decembre 1984. 

3. Affectation de ces rfcsultais. 

4. Dicharge aux Adrtri nistrateurs et au Conunissaire aux Comptes 
pour Tann6e fccoutee. 

5. Approbation de la cooptation aux posies d - Administraieurs de 
Messieurs Jacques de Froissard de Broissia et Christian Lecotncc. 

Le Consol d* Administration 




*.#»?! t rtr*' 





gStn : J rM* 




For nearly a hundred years, the Statue of 
Liberty-has been Americafe most powerful sym- 
bol of freedom and hope. Today the corrosive 
action of almost a century of weather and pollu- 
tion has eaten away at the iron framework, . 
etched hofes in the copper exterior 

Less than a mile await on?l% island where , 
the ancestors of nearly half of all Americans fust 
stepped onto American soil. the Great Hall of 
the Immigration Center is a hollow ruin. Rooms 
are vandalized, walls crumbling in decay. . 

Inspiring plans have been developed to 
restore file Statue and to create at Ellis Island a 
living monument to the ethnic diversity of this 
country' of immigrants. But unless restoration is 
begun now. these two national treasures could 
be dosed at the very time we celebrate their hun- 
dredth anniversaries. The 230 milKdii dollars 
needed to carry out the work is needed now. 


All of the money must come from private 
donations; the federal government is not raising 
the funds. The Statue of Liberty-Eilis Island 
Centennial Commission appointed by President 
Reagan is asking every American to contribute. 
The torch of liberty is everyone's to cherish. 
Could we hold up our Ag l( y£ 
heads as Americans if JgKMg 
we allowed the time JBflHa k Ifrrp 

to come when she fltti 

can no longer hold TUC 

• lflt 

. ftu can keep TADQL 

torch of liberty burning . j” >V * 

bright. Send your tax- |[ 

deductible contribution 
to The Lady, Box 1986. 

N.YC. 10018. Or call. w ... 

toll free, V800-USA-LADY. 


C£ 984 .Th 0 Statue of LEberty-GBs Island Fou ndat ion 












' to .r - -iv»" <. *•**'•.. «jr.’ 


Pa 


V 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Over-the-Counter 

WU»y7 

nasoaq Notfonoi Market Prices 



safMtn 

life HUk LOW iRALOTe 


V 


ASM Fd 
ADC 71 
AEC 32 
AEL3 
AFC 
ASK 
AT&E 
ATE 
AVM 
AomRt 

Abram* M 33 
Acodln 30 23 
ArfigpR* 

Acrtrfn 

AcuRoy 30 J 
Acatoa 
Acfvsn 
Admarf 
Adadji 


OA M M „ 
3JW* 13* IW- * 
2114k 114k 11*-* 
534* 241k 24*— * 
4721 S0» 31 + * 

330144k MVk W% — * 
3T9HH 9ft 9% + ft 
SM » M „ 
OM 10 10 — » 

31204k 3044 2» 

35 *ft 6% 6ft + * 

‘sss a sr* 

211 m 2 rn 23ft + ft 

- 4, f Wl f kl» + 4 S 

30528ft BH aw +1 
94* 54k m 54k + M 
149 9 m TO 

I + s 

sa s% 5%+a 

297124k H 1» + J 
114 * 5* 6 + ft 

430 414 3% 4ft 

AarSvs » » ... 

All Bib 30 50 10015(4 Mft 15ft + ft 

AscyRi t i72m am am + * 

AfrMd .10e 3 7312 114k 114k 

Airwbc auuKi is* is*— ft 

AtakBc 1M M 5ft— tt 

AMcMI 35a 16 Ml* 1514 1514— ft 
AbkNt t 3 ito ito ito— lk 

ANkPc JOB 13 6073* 251k 25* 

AttxB 130 33 12537(4 37 37 

Alftal 34420 l«k 20 + Jk 

Alsorox 46 7(4 7 7ft— ft 

All Coin JOB 4 453 52 53 — Ift 

AtaOWI JOe 3 15122 21* 22 — 14 

Allas Bv 60 2.1 37419ft W* T94k + % 

AlktBn M4 JJ 54025(4 24% 251k + ft 

ACWCOP IjOOB 4 3 7221* 21ft 21ft 
Alloat 170 24k 24k 24k 

AllrCor 4012(4 11* 12 +14 

ATOMIC HAMM 


AdtanW 

Afflo 

Adydr 

AflvGan 

AtfvSam 

AtfwTel 


[Gold Options Qahxxbi S/oz-V 


Mew 

tor 

N* 

Nk 

310 

525. 773 

18001919 

__ 

320 

208 400 


•nnvn*n 

SO 

100.225 

tsoius 


34D 

on 14) 

525- 775 

025-142 

3 a 

025- 125 

450-600 

UUD410O 

3D 

EDO 040 

275- 423 

775 92S 

SD 

— 


525- 775 


GottSOUD -31000 


ydmWUteWcM&A. 


u * Mam Ume 
II Gcam I. SMEacrfmf 


Ul 


iTcL 310251 - Tckx 28305 


8% Bond Loan T976 dm 1983/M 
of U Sp QfOOQ^O O .— 
National t-No do rien do n Rhomb 
C oipantiaa (Carapo) N.V. 


On April 23, 1985 tha drawing for the 
third m a nd a tary redemption took 
place. In OOCPr d an ce wHh tha Hiputo- 
lion of tha tnntaod ai oreount of 
USSAOOO^oa— would haw to bo 
redoomo d The debtor ha mad tha 
poaMfity in c c i nfa n i i ity with arlido 5 
of lha trustdeed for ma n datary re- 
demption to turrendor to tha trustee 
&308 bold* of US$lj00a— each, 
which meo w that 1,692 bond* of 
US$1,000.- — each haw been drawn 
for redemption. 

A fat of the numbers drawn for re- 
demption am be obtained free of 
charge at the trustee's. 

The 1/92 bonds thus drawn whh 
coupon of June 15, 1 986 and follow- 
ing wS be be pay a ble a from June 
15, 1985(MlhdwheadeRieeiaf Am- 
stordam-fiotterdtzn Bank NY, Alge- 
mono Dan* Pfoaonana ixv, wra 
Mem & Hope N.V, in Ams t er dam (the 
Netherlands} a wefl as with CrArft 
Suisse, Paradeplatz B, Zurich (Switar- 
land], Eurapeai Americai Bade & 
Trust Corapaiy, 10 Hanover Square, 
New York NY 10005 (LLSAJ, Swim 
Bank Corporation, 1 Aachanvor- 
stadt. Bade (Switxariand) and S.G. 
Warburg & Ca Ud, 30 Gredan 
Street, London EC2P 2B5 (United 
Kingdom) and Banque Gfcdnde du 
Luxembourg, 14 Rue Akkingen, Lux- 
embautg, LUXEMBOURG. 

The outstanding amount after this 
redemption amounts to 
US$1 5,000,000. — i 

liltBbi 

laUUNBtinUMSUilMU 

UMqda-m 

nun 

May 2. 1985. 


Sate* to Met 

lots HWi Low JP-M-COfc 


60 23 
JOB 13 


54 

*3 


AtonGa 
Altmcr 
Attw 
Amcast 
Amrfrd 
AWAirl 
AmAdv 

ABkCts U0 
ABnkr 3D 
AmCarr 

AContl 

AmEctX 

AExet 

AFdSL 4H 43 
AFlIrm 132 45 
Am Fret t 
A Rate 13D It 
AFurn 38 23 
AOraat 
AmtnLf 


AtndF 

AlnvLJ 

Amusr 

AMusnt 

AMS 

AMdSv 

AMMH 

ANtHM 

ANtlna 

APtrvG 


1.12 


4 3 3 3 

173 74k 74k » + ft 

12210 Hk Wk— ft 

nwik 14W I4W + 14 

1773 0U B M + ft 

206 94k 9 m + * 

imir* u» n»-» 

2*14 24tt 
4* 4* 

2m »V*r— 1 

13 2535* IK 52S=S 

u (Sm* urn ti* + w 


139 74k 
M2S 
45 4* 
721414 
1130 
3 7 

£2*414 


1.16 


ASKCl .132 33 
AmSfTa 


ASura 
AWBtCP t 
Amrltrs 130 43 
Amrwst 


AmakB 

AimXXtf 


Aniootc 
Andy I 


32 33 
30 U 
.10 13 


AndrOr 


.12 13 


AedeC 
Ant Bio* 
ApktCm 
AnWMt 

apwsv 

Archly* 

AraoSy 

Art® 

Artel 


AadBCP 31b 23 


AsdHst 

A draM 

Astrran 

Aatron 


Atcor 
Athoys 
AlKHUt 232 
AtlAm 30 
AttntBc 30 
AltflFd 
AH Fin 
Annas 
AtSoATS 

AudVW 

Austron 


AutTrT 

AutMad 

AotoSV 

Autmlx 

AMbCP 

Auxton 


Avnter 

Avntek 

Avatar 

AvtatGa 

AztcM 


12191k 194k Wk— ft 
IS Mfc 4» 4J* + ft 
If B TO TO— ft 
723701k f* 944 + 14 
217 17 17+14 

.16 13 3*1* 15* 1^ + 14 

•• im ljft 

5S53IK. 32* 3214 
57 54k 5* 54k— 14 

IS * * * 

172714 27 V — 14 
411* 11* 1144 
7* M 3JJ. 3V3 
125 » 4k * 

2 7* 7* 714+14 
9322* 32ft 32ft 
3214k 21ft 21ft— * 
110 64k 64k 6* + 14 
10422ft 22(4 22ft + ft 
2418(4 1814 18*—* 
1 6ft 6ft 6ft 
SIS 13* 13ft 13ft— ft 
99 TO TO TO 
212 12 12 
241314 12ft 13* + * 
49121* 20* 20*— 14 
163 4* 4* 4ft 
281 9 •* 8* — ft 

442221ft 29 20 — ft 

442928 19* 19* 

19520* 20* 20*— Ml 
915* 15* 15»— K 
30123* 22* 23* + * 
10 9* 9ft 9* + * 
45 6 3* 5* 

9018ft 18* U* 
53927* 26* 27*— ft 
19 6* 6* 6* 

90 «4 7* S — * 
112B 27ft 27ft + ft 
4 6 6 4 

.12 13 39712* 12* 12*— Ik 
40 9* 9* 9ft- ft 
IM 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
1413ft 12* 12* 

48 7* 7* 7*— U 

221 17 (6* 1C* 

310* 10* W* 

221 31ft 30* 31ft + ft 
5022ft 22* 22ft + * 
1431* 71ft 31ft 
200212ft lift 12ft 
4910* TO* 10U— ft 
6034ft 34* 34* + ft 
36514ft 13* 13* 
21719% 19ft 19%+ ft 
6 4ft 3* 4ft + ft 
J1TO 1TO TTft 
4 8 TO ■ 

95 4* 4 4ft + ft 

1410ft 10ft 10ft 
144 7* 4* 7 
60 8 TO ■ + * 

102 5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 
m 6 5ft 5* 

14H10* eft e*— i* 

124721* 21 21* + * 

1018* IS IS* + * 

1117 16ft 14* 

109 5 4* 5 + ft 


Mb T9 


JB J 


M 26 


U 

1J 

29 


30 43 


■ B 1 

BBDO 

208 

46 

11449* 

49ft 

49* + * 

BG5 



25 7 

7 

7 

BlWCb 

.10a 10 

1 61k 

TO 

6ft + ft 

BPlSy 



25 2* 

2% 

TO 

BRGore 



610 

9* 

10 — * 

BofndC 



62 7Vt 

7ft 

7ft + * 

BokrFn 

100a 17 

735 

34* 

35 + * 

BaldLy 

JO 

Ll 

24 70 

65 

70 +3ft 

Batfeks 



2 a 

a 

a — % 

BallBcp 

05(1 

3 

34923ft 

23ft 

23* + * 

Bn Pane 

204 

45 

1150ft 

40 

49* +1* 

BancPe 




23 

23 + ft 


JO 

40 

6*20 

»* 

30 + % 


104 

X9 

1231* 

Sft 

Sft— * 

| :,fl i ™ 



4 I* 

a* 

8* 

BansH 

00 

90 

54 8ft 

7% 

■ft 

BkDfll 

100 

42 

13829ft 

20ft 

28Vk + ft 

BfeGran 

60 

16 

1 toft 

23ft 

28ft 

BkNE 

204 

41 

1370 

69* 

70 — * 

BkSou 

68fa 24 

5228* 

28% 

28*— % 

Bklowa 

106 

30 

1950 

46ft 

47ft— 1 


1|BS HtOh LOW IPALOSUC 


96 


BfcMAm MM 
Bankvt 
(Santas 
Baron? 

Bark* a 

Barrts 

Barton 

BasAm Jf 

SsatF .JOo 23 
Burflks 2JB AS 
Bavtv .12 U 
Bl Fuses 
BatlMt 

Bel nr .ldb lit 

Bncha 
Bonbon 
Barton wt 
BerktoY -33 R.1 
BerMna J0 4.1 
BorkGs 200 9.1 


IMS M 




Blearc 

BJeteR 

Blntlnc 

Blrtdir 

DIshOr 

Blckind 

BRdaun 

Baanui 

BobEvn 

BoNTc 


U0 46 
J38 16 
.14 2.1 


Boon El I 
Boathln 


651 96 


BooOiFl JO 16 


BstnDIg 

BstnFC 

BradvW 

BraoCe 

BrnchC 


JDe 12 
■10a J 


1JD 36 
.12 2S 
Brito Fd J09o 2J 
BrwTom I 

Bruno a ,M L0 
Bufflon 
BuUOTTT 

Brahm JO 1.1 

BumpS 

BurrSr 

Burnt t 

BMA XBB U 

BdrM 

BuHrMf 1J2 4J 


2910* 10* 10* 
14412* nft 12ft 
3415 14ft 14%—* 
17 BM 8 8ft _ 
77 1 * 1 + Ik 

33217ft T7 17ft + U 
19 3* 8* 3* 

74 9ft 9 9 

MW* W* I0» 
13435 34* 34* + * 

7251% SD* 51% + * 

24 4* 4* 4* 

31 7 4* 4*—* 

130 2ft TO 2 — ft 
5110* M 10 — * 
10 8* ■% 8* 
4118% 17* 17%—% 
2812* 11* 11*—* 
20815ft 15* 15* + * 
210* 12 Oft + ft 
521* 21* 21*— 2ft 
8*5 815 825 +M 
11534 33% 34 + * 

38423* 22* 23* + * 
2514ft 15* 16ft' + * 
1014* 14* 14*— * 
129 4% 4 4ft— * 
71912ft 12* 12*— ft 
211 4ft 4 4 

243 6ft 4 6 

4314 15% l» + M 

17Q 2% 2ft 2% 

7 13 7U S + • 
139 9 8% 8* + ft 

111 5ft 4* 4ft + * 
1 5 5 5 —ft 

56 SV. (% 8% 

217% 17% 17% +* 
2934 33% 34 

314 21ft 21 21 

25 8 TO TO— ft 

44 6% 6ft 6% + ft 
16% 6% fi% + ft 

301 4ft 3ft 4ft + ft 
28 U* 18ft 18* + ft 
327 2D* 19* 20* + ft 

45 7* TO 7* 

1917 14% 17 + U 

4036* 39* 3 TO 
4113% 13* 13ft 
2033% 33* 33% + ft 

437 5 4% 4%— ft 

27 4ft 4 4 

7307 1% Hk Hk— ft 
76414% 14% 14ft 
833 Hk 1ft 1ft + ft 
5424 21* 23% 

OSWK II* 18% 

129 lift 8* 8ft— ft 
718* 18ft II*— ft 
T13* 13* 13* 

399 57% 54* 55* — 2ft 
542 7ft 7 7ft— * 
3727 26* 26* + M 


CCB 8 
C COR 
CP RM> 
CBTCP 
CCXNt 
CML 
_ I 
CPT 

cap 

CatofTV 


61 23 


180 42 


J6I 2 9 

36 13 


UM 56 

JOB 26 


4J 


CACJ 
CbrvSc 
Cadmus 
Calibre 
GalAmp 
QalFBk 
CaLlkv 
CalMIe 
CalStvg 

convtrs 260 
CdtonP 
Calny .14 1J 
Cahimt .140 U 

ConooG 

CapF5L 30 2.1 
ConTm JSe 43 
CUnCrb 

CardOIS J4r 3 
Cannes 
CUramk 
Confix 

Coraerc JM U 
CoroBn 
Cortort t 


ADVEBTISKMEIVT 


N.V, 


The ndnmd m ou n oa« flat m 
Mmj 23L, 1985 at Kaa-Aamcntie 
Spu i eatal 172, AaM badm , <fir. 
4t efftsC riflanSCHU« 
UMTKU rej*. 5 sbs. of tdinmm stock of 
ILS. SI, — par raloc, b« payxbla with 

Me- Mb bob per Certwcate nor. 
S aba. and wbli Due. 102.— perCmrmft- 
eete i«mr. 100 d* 

(<fiv. per iwxkte (GLiaiSeS; US. »— v30 


^orafacr^ 


CntrBc 

Centcor 

GonBas 

CnBshS 

CFdBk 

CJerBk 

CRnvLf 

Centran 

Centurl 

Gerdyn 

CerbrA 

Cermtk 


1JB 5J 


3732* 31* 32* + ft 
34 • TO 7ft— U 

905 7* 6% TO + ft 

7443* 4Z9k 43* 

3019 19 19 — ft 

510ft U* 10* 
34817 14* 17 +K 

464 6 5* 6 + ft 

92 7* 7* 7* 

73 1% 3% 3% 

31 3% 3* 3*— ft 

290 4% 4% 4* + H 

16319% 19* 19ft + ft 
6521 28* 21 +1 

11 1ft 1 1 +ft 

34 2% 2ft 2ft— * 
1 19* 19* 19* + * 
237 37 37 -H 

344 7* 7% 7* + ft 
99 4% 4% 4% + ft 
441 42 43 + ft 

124 3ft 3* 3%— ft 

1012ft 12ft 12ft 
70 9* 8% 9% + ft 
116419 lift 18ft— * 
144x9ft 9* 9* + ft 

iss a 

118* 18* 18* + ft 
4711* 11% 11% 

21510 9* TO 

90 8% Mik Sft + ft 

££ % *-» 
7610% 10ft 10ft 
1319* WH 19% + ft 
6331* 30ft 30ft— * 
11130* 30ft 30ft— ft 
IS* + * 


In Net 

hOs Hleb Lew IP.M.efc'w 


cmmc 

Gebrnts 

CaWbR 


Call 

omms 

CoIABn 

~ lA 


68b U 

-40k 46 

U4 9J 

CotOapt TJ8 106 
ColLfAC U0 25 
COIrTta 

CWaHt - 74 35 

CoblFd 

GoiSov 

Quail a 

Comarc SB. .1 
Carnots ,u A 
Comma .U 16 
ComSa! 

Camera 2.10 55 
Com Bab 200 41 
GomClr 232 27 
CmesU UM 3J0 
CmBCol J6 26 
CmdOn 2 M 43 
CmBbr JOo 50 
CwItbB UM) 46 
CWIHIF L244153 
CmwSv 
CotnAm 
Gomlnd 


CmaGds 

CempM 

CinaaT 

CmpCr 

CnwsL 


Comae b 

CmaSire 

Comow* 

CCTC 

CmaAs 

CptAut 

CmpOt 

Cptent 

CmptH 

Cmpldn 

CmpER 

CmatM 


CmTadc 

Cnwitn 

Galen 

Cmotrc 

Cmarvm 

Gomshr 

Comatk 


LOO 46 
168 76 
300 130 
161 49 
168a WS 
300 136 


36 

50 


Comte h 
Cancatl 
Cantfrs 
ConnWt 
CnOap 
CnCaat 
CCaaR 
rr— » 

CooFbr 
OlPOPS 168 
CamflB 162 
Consul 
QxisFn 05» 16 
CanWtS 160 53 
CnHBca 204b 57 
atHtta 

criHitc 

Cantlne .12 6 

OLasr 

QmvFd J4e 46 
Ctxwst 
Convraa 
CoprBlo 

CaarsB 60 26 

Goavtol 

Cancom 


GoreSt 

Carvus 

Cosmo 

Oaurars 

CourDla 

OxrjP S 

Covnst 

CrkBrl 

CrotfTr 


200 40 


50 26 


60 17 


CracEd 

Cronus 

CroxTr 

CnAuts 

CdlnFr 

Cullum 

Cycora 

CyprSv 


446 2» TO 2ft 
30019* 19 19ft 
103 4* 4ft 4* 

SH* W* H% + ft 
2519 18* » + * 

88 4% TO 4* 
*18* 17ft IS* 

2214 13ft 13ft 
7317ft 17* 17*— ft 
217 17 17 — ft 

3735* 31* 35*—* 
100815ft 15* 15*— ft 
15319ft 19% 19% 

45 8 0 ■ 

71 TO 8* Ift + ft 

Wk 13ft + ft 
29IS MM 15 +* 
J72TO 34ft 34* + M 
7T1 It* 11 li* + ft 
533 3ft 2* 2* 

93* 37* 38 + * 

1351* 51 SI* + * 
4270ft 77ft 77*—% 
40JTO 34% 34ft- ft 
1714ft 14 14ft + ft 
3342% 41% 42* + ft 
1510* 10 ID 
121* ZHt 21* + % 
20 I 7% 7% — ft 
3312* 12 12 

348 2ft 2* 2*— * 

17 121622 21 ZI* + ft 

46 TO 0* 9 

84420ft 19* 20ft +1 

1494 8% 8* 8%— * 

231)1* 11 u* + * 
16 20127 2TO 27 + ft 

■90 Sft 5* 5* 
10912ft tZft 12Ka 

47 1* 1ft 1* 

2M 1% 7ft TO + ft 
»M 1 3 — ft 

32 9% 9ft TO — * 
33434* « 24ft— * 

10 7ft 6ft 7 — ft 
0 7310% 9ft TO — * 

30 7* 7* 7*— ft 
4 TO TO TO 

16 7* 7* 7* 

16 61 6ft 6% 4%— ft 

771 4ft 4% 4% 

7 8ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
13 9* 9* **— ft 

3 17773 73 22 +1* 

143 7ft 7* 7*— * 

55 4ft 5ft Sft— ft 

31 7* 7 7 

79 3% 3* 3% + ft 

32 9* 9 9 

2511* tt 11 — ft 

40 5% 5% 5% 

85 1ft Hk 1%— ft 
163 7% TO 7* + ft 
2924 23% 24 

1920 ITO 19* + * 
146 24 22* 22 — Ik 

7718* If 18 — % 
9215ft 15ft 15ft 
11423ft 22% 2Z%— % 
44 6ft 6ft Aft + ft 
19441* 48ft 41* + * 
930ft 30* 30ft + ft 

114 4% 4ft 4ft— ft 
6 TO 3ft 3ft 

30434* 25ft 36* + U 
1936 35* 36 + * 

15913% 13ft 1TO+ * 
20 Sft 4ft 4ft— ft 
36938ft 34W 28* +1* 

17 6ft 5ft Sft— ft 
31 7% TO 7* + ft 
905 7ft 7ft TO— ft 
2917 Mto U* 

13 3ft 3* 3ft + * 

181 M* 16ft 16ft— ft 
23422ft 21ft 22 + * 

51 7 6ft 6ft— ft 
376 9* TO TO + ft 
17752ft 52ft 50%— * 

115 2% 2ft 2ft— ft 
251 4ft 4ft 4%— ft 

723* 22* 23* + * 
TO 6% 6% 4% + ft 
14223* 21 23 

167 % ft ft— ft 
L2 140013ft 12 12 —1 

4.1 45 0% 13ft 13% 

2 10 9% 10 + ft 

28922% 21ft 22% + * 
1014* 14* 14* 
42024% 24% 24% + ft 
2 4 4 4 

2420* 20 20% 

15121ft 21ft 21* + ft 
1621* 21* 21* 

3010* 9% 9*—* 


1C E -j 

EH lot 



19 1% 

1* 

i%+ft 

eip 

-H 

U 

155 9% 

9 

9 -» 

EMF 



80 TO 

3 

3 — ft 

EMP1 



44 6* 

TO 

fli 

EZEM 



73 H* 

** 

« + * 

EoofCM 


10977 ft 


Boom 



672 TO 

2* 

3 +ft 




3ft 



200a 76 


^ - y’1 

26*— * 

EataiF 




□I 

10 — ft 

Eanut 

104 

15 

J 


2TO+lft 

EdCroc 


IrhlH 


t* 




U -Ui. j 



El CNc 




9% 

10% + » 

BPaa 

164 


1182 UU 

15 


Sun 

078 

J 

2810ft 



El bit D 


110ft 

i.'.J 

10ft— ft 

Elea % 

22 


9W 


17* + ft 

EMorB 





EkkirB 



2 TO 

Sft 

TO 

etoedto 




7% 

7* 

Eicon a 





27*— * 

EleNucI 



2*415* 


15*— * 

Eicftnt 



1212% 


12ft 

ElcSd 



5630* 


20ft 

ECWsrl 



fan* 

iL 

11*— 1k 

ElctMls 



64 *ft 

9 


EltzWW 

260 


9635ft 

33% 

35* +1 




30627* 

27 

27 — ft 

Eb-oaEI 



£"* TL 

+ ft 




380 8 

TO 

7%— ft 





7% 

■ + ft 

Enctto 



66 3% 

3ft 

3ft— ft 




S 7 

6% 

6% — ft 

EndaLs 



3*114* 

13* 

14ft + * 

EndwtB 



13 9% 

9* 

9% + % 


160 

55 

17324ft 


24ft + ft 

Enantti 

IM 

50 

1718 


11 





C*4 f ■ 


EnFact 



8310% 


»% + ft 

Enaoas 

EnaRsv 



f ’k vli vvl 


00 

10 

mm 

Fa 

13 + ft 

18 

EatrCpt 







2930 

29 

to 




2512* 

l 

12* +1 




4S14* 


14 —ft 




25 9% 

CP 

9% 




31915* 

K 

15ft— % 

Eriukm 



» Sft 

Ev 

5ft + ft 

EatBCP 

04b 30 

3525% 


25* 

EcflwaB 

** 


107 23ft 


25 

Eatoa 

23 

44 8* 

C 

«* + ft 

ErtcTl 

1030 30 

33431% 


S — ft 

EvnSat 



to’l-.l 


12% + * 

Evrod 



23 4* 


3ft— * 

Exavlr 



19410* 

u 

9ft 

■ F -1 


32 


11 


OtmpPf 

OmcCp 

ChenEn 

Chord! 

CbarCh 

ChrmSs 

ChrtFdl 

Ctuvos 

ChkPnt 

CDkTcb 

ChLvm 

Chemex 

CD Fab 

Oierofco 

CtirvE 

CbKN 

Chirac 

anus 

ChHend 

Chomer 

Chranr 

arDwe 

Chyras 

OTOMe* 

SK 

drain 

Ctzaou 

CtzSGa 


TJObAS 

■ZEij 

4M r + % 

o 1 

1.12 

30 


33* 

34M + ft 





100 

4.9 

I.i f (;.j 

24* 

24* + ft 

DBA 

118 15* 

15 

10* + * 


13 

•-ll- ll 



DCNY 




00 

XI 

•MW. 

38ft 

38ft- ft 

DDI 

W 3% 

3* 

3ft 



22 1% 

1* 

In + h 

DEP 

128 9ft 

9ft 

9ft + ft 



5611% 

11* 

ii* 

□Utes 

43512 

lift 

12 + ft 

.12 

10 

19 6H 

Sft 

6(6 

ONAPi 

19S 7ft 

7* 

7% + ft 



1 2* 

2* 

2% 

DSC 


18* 

18*— * 



10011ft 



Dad bra 




.10 

10 

1 TO 

TO 

5ft + ft 

DalrMf 

♦ 23711 

10* 

10ft— * 


1J 


04 Sft 5 5 

214% 14* 14% + % 
14* 6* 4* + ft 


i+ * 


21514% 14% 16%—% 
9* + * 


.13 .1 


U 


.12*10 


5 9* 9* 

615* 15ft 15* + * 
6410ft 18 18ft + * 
16 8* I 8 
8)29% 29ft 29ft + ft 
177 5% 5* 5*— ft 
10 6 6 6 — ft 

4515 14ft 14ft— ft 


LOO 11 J l?Hft 

fUT 

25 110315ft 


1011% 11% 11% + ft 
1578 9* 9% 9ft— ft 
4481 80* >1 + ft 


10* S3 


33 

.10 



20e LI 


35 
15 

CtzFlds L04 37 
CtzGIP 6Be 23 


s 


49 + * 

]5**S 

4ft + M 

164^k Sk 21% +’ft j 


104 9J 




2J0 40 


tfindaxl diaUibulian m oat subject to 
mahoifog tox to wxnce. 


(fuiiuoriy Ado 


Banque do Paris at dee Faya-Bea B.Y.) 
Amtomdam. Apnl 29, 1985. 


amt a 
C tzUTB 
cnyFed 

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CxfSav 

CebRsc 

CobeUt 

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t 


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104 40 
M 
08b 36 
104 20 
.10 6 
00 35 


200 90 


J0e 25 


U 


21 

6132* 32 32ft— 

40910ft 10* 10ft + 
526 25* 26 

234 34 34 +ft 

108323* 22 23* +1% 

10425ft 24% 25ft 
7 7 7 7 + ft 

1417 14ft 16ft + * 
6220ft 20 20M 

9415 14* 

615* 15* 

24 7 6* 

21 14ft M 
29 TO 3* 

32916* 16* 

3434* 34* 


100 XI 


60 43 


04 33 


£ , 
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TO 

st-* 1 


13214% M% 14% + % 


04b 10 
100 30 
104 40 
0D LI 
60 26 
00 38 
0Oe 14 
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130425 24* 

328% 28% 

111 5 4% 4* 

3294 94 94 

10717ft 17 17*— ft 

42912ft 11* 13 — * 
491 4* 4ft 4ft +% 

M 7* 7* 7* 

5 Sft 3ft 3ft — * 

1919 19 19 

4 TO 3* 3* 

21 5* 5% 5* + ft 
7937* 34ft 37* + * 
714 13ft 14 — * 

1 4 4 6 — * 

3910* 10 10* + * 

25613% 13ft 13% 

11 2* 2* 2*— ft 
7225 24% 24* 

3514 15ft 15*— * 
11% 1% ' 1% 
4611ft W* lift + ft 

2 4* 4* 6* 

18 1% 1ft 1ft— ft 
1497 4ft 2* 2*— 0ft 
BOW M 6*— ft 
3046* 45* 44ft + ft 

3 4% 6% A* 

1 5* Sft 5ft— ft 
31 lift II 11 — ft 
691 3* 3ft 3ft— ft 
3832 31ft 3Hk + M 
3012* 12 12 +* 

510 TO 4ft 7ft + ft 
3 6 6 4 — * 

2124* 23* 23*— * 
J TO 91* 9* 
12634ft 33* 33* 

991 KM 10* 10*— Mi 
319 5% 5* J* 
84324% 24 34* +1 

21732* 31ft 31ft— ft 
51 2D 19* 20 — * 
6 17ft ' 14% ITO 
22 15* 14* 15* + ft 
11823* 22% 23 
1317* 12 12ft + * 
3316ft 16 16ft + * 
22528 19* 19*— ft 


Sam in Hat 

1881 Hleb LOW 3P0A.OIYW 


DrawNT 

Dnudr 

DrevGr 

DuckAl 

DU0H8 

DunkOs 


J2 20 


W 


04 10 


Durban 70s u 
Purti w* 04 30 
DurFU .18 El 
Dream 
DVmai 
DvntebC 


115 1ft 1ft Ift 
178518 K* 14ft. + Mi 
7417ft T7 17* 
10716ft. W% 16%— ft 
22 3* TO 3* + % 
4519% 19% 19%— * 
2223* 32ft m + * 
1419% 19% 19* 
4139% 39* 39* + * 
4710% 10% 10ft + ft 
26414 15ft M +ft 
TOW* 10% 18* + ft 
25 4% 4* 4*— ft 
33434 23ft 23ft— * 


FDP 

FMl 

RtoWtll 

FalrUl 

FoirRn 

FaraHis 

FnmHm 

FartnF 

FrmHo 

FrmG 

FarrCa 


0% J 
0D I J 
.14 25 


7* 


17* 7* _ 

474 6 5* 53b + ft 

5 ITO ITO ITO + ft 

72 4% 6% 6ft— ft 


A* IV* 


65525 34* 34% 

t 10 2D* 2D 2D — * 
I 75 4 3ft 3%— ft 

174 30 120158* 58* 51* + M 


F edGas 

Feroftu 

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PldJcr 

FtftbTs 


Jt ii 
JOe 20 


344 AS 


1 lift lift lift + ft 
2210* 10* TOM 
TOUTS* 14% 17*— * 
184 5% Sft 5*— % 
15917* 17 17* + ft 
21955% 55 55% + * 
7451* SD* 51* +2 
+ % 


Ftoole 

M 

XI 

2233 

32ft 

33 

FUmtec 



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■ 1 

15* 

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0 

3J 


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4ft 

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115 7% 

7ft 

7ft 

Fin loan 



51712ft 

13. 

12 

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Ll 

40 

1926 

to 

26 

FtAmar 

6 

26 

316* 

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14% 

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U 

20 

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37% 

FABPBA 3 

20 

125)0* 

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23 

327 

26ft 

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103 40 


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60 17 
160 43 
100 4.1 


100 56 
160 40 
04b 50 


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2928* 27ft 27* + * 
5932 31* 32 +% 

98712* lift lift— * 
914* 14* 14* + K 
234 15* 15 15 — ft 

120* 2DKt 3®k + * 
4419ft 19 ITO + ft 
10010* 10 10 
1113% 13* 13* 

23 Sft 0* 8ft + * 
3 8* I* 8*— ft 
2511* 11* IT* 
837* 34ft 37* +1* 
5821ft 21 31ft + ft 
2523ft 23% 23% 

5930 29% 29* + . 

134* 24* 34* +* 
3218* lift lift— ft 
1312 11% 12 +* 

17032* 31* 32 
4340* 40 40 + ft 

3411ft lift lift + ft 
3429* 29ft 29% + * 
124 24 24 

4431* 30* 31* 

1 Hk 1ft 1ft 

16* + * 


100s Hleb Lew 3P0.WN 


IlntrTet 


InfWPtl 


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FOTSCft 6 4% 4% TO ., r , - , L 

FOrtnF 07930 1*» ITO . - JlSjSSSj? 

Fwtna 1550 1% 1% 1ft + * trfrfFtr 

Forum 04 6 214 9ft 9* 9*— ft ilntrtOC 

Foster .10 U 7N 5* 5ft 5* + % 

Fwunyr 14521 34* 34*— 4* 

FmkO 04 36 415* ITO 1TO + * 

FrnkRi 3TZTO SP SPft + * 

FrtaFdt 77 0* S* + S 

PraeSE MU* 9% VO* + ft 

Fromm 61 1J 45428% 33 2TO + * 

Podrefc 790 8 7ft TO + % 

FelHBS 02 22 116 M* ITO 14* + * 

Funtme 05r 10 4 5 5 5 +1 


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GlltrtA E10 40 
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GWCetT 63a SB 
Gome a 04 10 
GtfTaco 


2315* 15 15* + * 

22 8% I* 8M— ft 
4115* Mlk If*- » 
13712* 11* Wf + *| 
WTO TO + * 
438 2% 1% TO + ft 
13249ft 41* 49ft 
113* 13* 13* 

821 21 21 

■ 15* 15* 15* 

42 2ft 3% TO— ft. 
18 2* 3% 2ft. + % 

452 7ft 7 7 — ft I 

TO 4(6 

TO SHi Stfc . 

30815 14* 13+ * 

_ 76 TO 4ft 4% , 

10 187320ft 19ft 20ft +1 
1 16* M% 14* + % 
2426* 34 24 — % 

■ H% 14% 14% 
3412ft 11% 12ft 


IBMIM 

InCaFfi 

Intaiit 

I Gama 

IntNM 

IntKIno 

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Itutoobil 

hit Rest) 

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I nt Total 


tiivcra 

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liraSsU 

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itolwt* 

ltd of 


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ltol Hleb Lew 3F68.aCbi 
U 2ft TO TO + ft 
MW* » h- H 
Mli 14% 15 + * 

55 TO 7ft 7ft 

Sf « «- » 

14316% Uft ITO 

lS TO TO «*— ft 

49 4 4 4 

ss&ssir-* 

MlS* Wk W* 

S l 8% ’S «* -ft 

B 7* 4% 7* + ft 

2034* 33 34 + ft 
72 5% 5% 5th 
00 16 245414% 14* ITO 
01* 0 4 4ft 4* 4ft— * 

04# 1.1 6 TO Sft TO 

134811ft « 1J% + % 

313 7ft 4% 7 
5 4 4 4 

MM 3M 34 +% 


04 U 


Gott 

GeuMP 


36 40 
64 3J 


393140k 141k ITO + ft 
4113 12* 12M— ft 

U17 16% 17 +* 


Gnstol 

GrattSc 

Grave® 

GtLKFd 

GW FSB 

GtSoFd 

GraanT 

GwfliFd 

Start 

GuarFn 

GuarC 

GwardP 

Guests 

GuRfrd 

GITApid 

GtfBUC 

GHNuc 

Gull 


■ -ft 

7ft— * 

13 — ft 


60 2J 
64 29 


5 8 8 

101 7% 7ft 
47413ft U 
1577 4% 4ft ... 

2 8 8 0 — ft 

4911 * n* 11 * 

Mil* 18 18% . .. 

15810* 1M WK + M, 
13417ft 17 I7M + ft 1 
SI5M 5* 5M + * 
11611* IT* 11* 

5 6* 6* TO— ft 
121 21 21 — M 

7AS 15 15 +1 

4313ft 13* Uft + ft: 
6517 ITO If*— % 
11 8* 8* 8*— * 
141615 14* 14* 

30 1* 1* 1* 

in 12 12 +%: 


H 


HHOIIT 
HBO 
HOW 
HEITk 
HEIMn 
HMD Am 
Hart Go 
Habers 


Jlto J 


HatoSyn 
Halifax 
Halnri 
HamOfl .10 6 

Hamrtn 04 10 
HaroG 04 1.1 
HrtfHt 160 56 
HrffStm 330 33 
Harvlns 
Hatbwi 

60t 20 

Havrtv 32 73 

00 29 

HHhCSa 

Hlthdyn 

HertsA .16 0 
■ .10 6 
HetonT 

Hal |x 

I ton rdF 02 23 
Hortoy 

HlbarCs 108b 40 

H1c1.il 


HmFAtl 

HmFFI 

HmFAr 


714 5 «ft 5 + 
215ft 15ft 15ft 


HmoSL 
Hon hid 
Hoover 
HnnAlf 
Horxlnd 
HwBNJ 
HunoTB 
HunUB 
Hntelts 
HuntgB 
Hurts 


HvdaAl 


KytakM 




36412% 

12 

12H + % 



»am 

29* 

20* 



21 1 

7ft 

7ft— * 



29227ft 

25ft 

25ft— 1ft 

.56 

23 

27221 

20ft 

20* + * 

100 

46 

4927ft 

37 

27ft + ft 



29 5* 

5* 

8*— ft 



13 3M 

jf 

3ft— * 



7623% 


22% 



19 Sft 

Sft 

Sft— ft 

05a 

0 

5727 

to* 

26*—* 



4710 

9% 

9%— % 

160b 30 

1142 

41% 

41% 




3* 

4 — tt 



3620ft 

to 

20ft 



63 5% 

TO 

5* 



37 7* 

7 

7* 



26 7* 

7* 

7* 


20 

30 


LTD 45 


FtStbn 
FToilNt 160 43 
FTUnCi 1.12 27 
FTVafv s 100 36 

gytFn uaa 47 

FlWFn 30 36 
FMtor 200 40 
Floater 0% 10 
Ftafcay 

Ftexsn 68 27 

Ftobtln 

Ftortxs 

FtaCom 04b 10 
FlaFdl .Uo J 
FtoGoH 

FINFts 02 XI 
FlowS* 

Fluroch M 20 
Fonar 

FLionB 07 6 

r- Eton A 09 0 

Far Am .W XI 


— * 

6ft TO— % 
M 34ft + M 
9ft 9% + ft 


ate .1 51216* 15* lfi 

60 29 2214 13* 14 +ft 

1310 U 10 + ft 

232* 33* 32*— U 
2025* 

JO 7 

2*98 

5337% 

40942 

«»% » 

3 i s s:^^+* 

2212 * a* ii* +* 

143 7* 6* 7 + ft 

913* 13 13 

10 3* 3* 3* + M 
1 3ft Sft 3ft + ft 
530ft 30ft 30ft 
221 17ft 17* 17% + Mr 
1015% 15% 1TO + * 
5134% 34ft 34ft 
25113ft 12ft Uft +* 
71 12 11* lift— ft 

273 3ft 3% Sft 
1717 W* 14% 
45515ft IS 15* + * 
15830% 30* 30% + ft 


AT NOVA 

WE'RE BUILDING THE FUTURE 
WITH ENERGY. 


Report for the Year Ended December 31, 1984 


CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET 
(audited) 


As ai December 31 


1984 


1983 


NOVA is a major Canadian energy company 
headquartered in Calgary, Alberta. Activities 
or i he NOVA companies extend into several 
industry sectors, including gas transportation 
and marketing, petroleum, petrochemicals, 
manufacturing, consulting and research. The 
NOVA companies employ more than 7,800 
people and our assets exceed CS 6.4 billion. 


• Through NovAiel Communications Lid, 
NOVA is involved in (he development and 
marketing of the innovative 
Aurora cellular mobile 
telephone systems and 
related equipment. 


[thousands of Canacfian doDare) 




Current assets 
Investments and advances 
Plant, property and equipment (nei) 
Other assets 


Sl.010.862 

103.019 

5.190.296 

123,712 


SI .090,627 
94,528 
5,541,801 
69.100 


S6.427.889 S6.796.056 


• NOVA owns 
and operates (he 
.Alberta natural 
gas transmission 
system -one of the 
largest systems of its land in the world. 
NOVA is also co-owner and operator or the 
Canadian segments or the Alaska Highway Gas 
Pipeline. The CS 1 billion Phase 1 or this project 
is currently supplying surplus Canadian gas 
to .American markets. 


• NOVAS gas transmission and pipeline 
development expertise is marketed around 
the world through Ncvacorp International 
Consulting Ltd. Novacorp's CanOoean Division 
develops, manufactures and services high 
technology oil and gas production equipment 
and consults in 
specialized 
engineering Gelds. 


Liabilities; 

Current liabilities 
Long term debt 
Deferred income taxes 
Minority interest in subsidiary companies 
Shareholders' equiry: 

Preferred 

Common 


S 972^38 
2,874,278 
496.802 
560,954 


S1.03U54 

3,404,578 

434,729 

485,075 


780,594 

742,923 


800,907 

639.413 


S6.427.889 S6.796.056 


CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME 
t audited) 


• Through Husky Oil Lid. |67°o owned), NOVA 
pursues conventional exploration and 
production, heavy oil 
development, enhanced 

oil recovery and offchore 
drilling activities. 




Fbr the year ended 
December 31 


1984 


1983 


I thoiaanda oTCanatfian doltas] 


Operating revenue 


53,793.533 53,823.005 


Net operating income 

Equity in earnings (losses] of affiliated companies 
Allowance for funds used during development 
and construction 
Other income (expenses) 


676.988 

(6J67) 


544,063 

(8,605] 


31.800 

1551 


• NOVA produces 
basic and derivative 
petrochemicals ai 
world-scale facilities 
managed by Novacor Chemicals Ltd. Novacor 
also works w markei these products 
imemationaliv 


NOVA is a public sharehokierowned company 

trading on the Toronto. Montreal and Albena 

stock exchanges. Copies of the 1984 annual 
report are available from the investor relations 
manager at lhe head office address below or 
from the Company's paying agent: Bank of 
Momreal, 9 Queen Victoria Street, London. 
England EC4N 4XN. 



NOVA A 


Income before income taxes, minority interest and 
extraordinary items 

Income taxes 

Minority interest 

Income before extraordinary items 

Extraordinary items* 

Net income 

S_ 

362.207 

(150.2001 

(56,739) 

155,268 

48,082 

203.350 

tamings (loss) per common share 

Before extraordinary items 

Basic 

s 

0.63 

Fully diluted 

s_ 

0.60 

After extraordinary items 

Basic 

s_ 

1.02 

Fully diluted 

s 

0.77 


50.168 
f 1.434) 
(317,031 ) 


267.161 

(78,080) 

(38.348 ) 


150,733 

(115,605 ) 


S 35,128 


0.60 


058 


(038) 


fO-38) 


BUILDING THE FUTURE 
WITH ENERGY. 


'The 1984 extraordinary items comprised a gain from the sale ofUS. petroleum assets, reduced by 
writedowns relating primarily to certain manufacturing and petrochemical investments. In 1983, 
the Company recorded the writedown of certain deferred project costs and other investments and 
incurred fosses on die disposition of certain manufacturing fed] i ties. 


NOVA, AN ALBERTA CORPORATION PO Box 2535. Postal Station M, Cal 



1 J 1 

JBftst* 

04 

11 

29 Uft 

W* 

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5* 





5T7ft 

17* 

17*— * 

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f 


84 6* 

M 

TO—* 




14231% 

39 





4421% 

21* 

2Hfc + ft 

jamWtr 



2718 

171k 

10 + ft 




12318% 

lift 




<1 

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39 


JeffNLa 



421% 

zm 

23ft— ft 

JafSairf 

60a U 

15817* 

17* 






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0 

73*19% 

19 

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64 * 

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14 5* 

5* 

5*— * 




91 5* 

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240 5% 

5* 

5% + U 

Jorrtwi 



U 8% 

life 

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8* 

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20X2% 

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Justin 

60 

2A 

9619* 

lfft 

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KLA* 

KMWSV 

KTran 

KVPtx- 

Korean 

Korrtr 


04 XT 


4 S 5 S 

1.1 esaifft lift w + ft. 

16 40 6* 4 TO + * 

SOtZft 12* 12*— ft 
3 5% 5% TO + % 

sin n* iTO— ft 

1.1 122 22 22 —1 

4419* lfft 19ft— * 

4S TO TO 4* 

193 2* 2% 2*— * 

to 1 1 1 

3 6 4 6 + * 

7S4 2% 2* TO— ft 
26214% 14% 14% + ft 
1231ft toft 38ft— ft 
1230* 30ft 381k 
11129ft 29% 29ft + ft 
3505ft 84ft *5 + ft 

13516* 15* 15ft— ft 
3 7* 7* 7* + * 
514 M M 

109X7% » 19 

133 9% flk 7% + ft 
toll* 11 11* + ft 

298 3% 3% 3ft + ft 
27241k 24* 26* 

4S2SVk to to 
145 Sft 5* 5% 

6032* 32 32 + U 

533% 33* 33* 

31 5% Sft 5ft— % 
41121* 90* 21 
34 7* 9ft 7ft 


KOVUOn 
KOVpra 
Kaarm 
vIKatvJ 
KallySA 
KaltYS B 
Kama 
Kbhcop 
K anotn 
KvCnLJ 
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Kavttn 

KawnSa M 
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Kiricke .16 
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U 


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01 16 


JO 20 


l»M 171k IS + % 
112 12 12+16 
23 5* 5ft 5* + ft 
67 7% 7% 7* + % 

6227% 27 27* 

19*16% Uft 16ft + % 
274 16ft 14 14* 

40 Oft ■% S% + ft 
77 TO TO 3% • 

srs nt 

25134ft 53% 54 + W 

142 4% 4ft 4* + * 

14* n row id* + ft 

8541* 41 41* 

4 TO 6ft 4ft— * 
15 6* 5% TO— M 
1412% ITO .ITO „ 
47 •* 7ft 7*k— ft 
43 1 2* 22 22 +1 
19 229 29 29 — 1k 

2^ ft f*+ft 

i Sts U 6* “6% + g 

U 8414ft 14ft ITO— * 
,0 TOlTOUftU*-% 


15 


LCS ■ 

LDBrnk 
UN 
LSI LH 
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UlZBV 100 X9 
LodFrn .lXi J 


35 TO 4 4 

102 7ft TO 7 
10413 12% U 

85313* 12ft 13* + ft 
007 14* M ITO + ft 
347 IS* M* 14% — * 
5942* 41* 42 +% 

SITft 17% 17% — ft 


Lofcttw 

UflTBk. 

Loreto 

Lamar 


Lanai 

LriLnSL- 

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LaneCO 

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1H6 Htoh 

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■ M u nSft ft ™ + * 

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I §. .wur e 

M 36 mft% 14% )Mk 







92 39 
354 33 
04 16 
0i 10 


LOWUF 
Lntasa 
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As 08 


04b U 


106 30 


UncTal 

Undbrs 

UnarCa 

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user. 

LOCOtF 

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Lyottos 


730 

,14 


J2 14 
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JS J 
sn 3 
101 56 


60 30 


fiyss 2 *-E 

mtii 

iiii*:;- 

744ft 4* 44 — % 

3122ft r* 22% + ft 

3 244% iTO 44% 

3 Sft Sft Sft - 
U SU* W* M* + ft 
10 599636ft U* 14% j- • 
328727* 91% 97ft + S 
U 3333% 22* 32* f-V 
121 5% 5 » ' 

22 5 TO 5 + ft • 

1849 47 44 +1 •* 

13221ft to* 22%- » .. 
49737% 34% 97 — M 
TC6U% 14* Uft- A 
14S 24 93% 23ft- ft 

9228 3> 34% 27 — 1 

4Q18 17* 18 

10 Balk 31ft 24% 
136917* MM 17ft + ft • 


10 


M 


-45819 17 17% +1% 

7290-8* IV, c% 

ff» 7* 4% 7 + ft- 

10 411* IT* IS* + %. 

91T3TO 29* 14% + ft 
47 7ft 7 7ft + Ik 


MUGG 900 


Moorer 


MARC 
MCI 
MtW 
MTS* 

MTV 
MortTc 

ModcTr mb wi m m 

- y.i mam 34* 94 *— ft 
*» to aft m— ft 
it 21ft 17ft 91ft +1 • 

M 14 41» m, ITO + ft - 

? 8 K 1 Wi Wi 

0ft 4814* 15% 15% 

47713% 13* 13% 

60 14 5420* 32 22 

6721ft 21 21% ♦ % 

200 36 1354 55ft 54+ ft 

jftimill 12 7ft 7ft 7* 

SErncl 160 40 52 «» to* 29ft 

MTwon JO 4.1 7120* 19% 17* 

SSS * 4 £12* ik-w 

Wf, A a W2S2P + it 

NWMN. So 13 ‘mwx. 2TO 9TO + ft 
uw f i l . . ... SU 5ft . 5* Sft 
MaasuT 2 ** 2 * xi «% + * 

306 4. “ 


Mol to 
Mairtta 
MotSd 
MonOw 
MonlHs 


• t n 

1=^. 


.10 


Atoftex 
Motrxs 
Moxcra 
Mojh b bI 
MayKi 

MayncM 

S 2K 08-20 

McFOd 

MCFOTI 

McGrth 

MadU 05 6 

MadCra 

MaddSt 

MadSbs 

MatBGI 


163 U* 13% 12% + ft 
S 9» 36ft 96ft 
84Bto 27ft 97% + ft 
3413* lift 12* + ft - 
77 TO 4% 4% 

TO 4 4 4 +.A . 

W 8* ■« a* 

32231 34% 34% + * ' 

410ft 10ft 10ft— * - 


2312% ITO 12% 
7* f* 


*•& 


Maom* 


mentrO 
MarcBc 162 
MarcBk 16S 
TOrBFu 160 


108 26 

Mrttc 260 32 

M?® 7J 

(Continued an Page IS) 


30 7* 9* 7* 

3 7* 7 7 

Oft Oft 6* 

IS 13 U 13 
823* 23 23* + ft 

18 5 4% 3 

.11194* at 24* + ft 
M 5% 5% 5%—* 
206 H W* 19 +.* 

105723ft 22% 23 
1737* 37ft 37ft 
25 40 6Hh <> + ft 

242ft 42ft 42ft 

IM 2 9 + ft 

749* 49 49ft— ft 

8045 43ft 45 
233 31* 22 + % 

1215* M IS 


Ii i T 

IEC 



23 5* 

5 

5 — * 

IIS 



70 S 

4ft 

5 +tt 

IMS s 



81223* 

27ft 

23* + * 

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13 2 

1% 

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57110ft 

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IVBFn 

233 

63 

5632ft 

37 

33ft + * 

lent 


271 TO 

5% 

5* 

IdK-WId 

JB 

30 

1021 


23 + ft 




2 

2 —ft 

iimmex 



201 61k 

ilk 

6% + ft 

inwsio 



15 4ft 

4% 

4%— ft 

Imupen 



427 2ft 

1ft 

2ft + ft 

Imam 



14 5ft 

3% 

TO 

IndpHir 



1825* 

25* 

25* 

ImBk 

0Or 36 



8 —ft 

Ire&xiF 



3 4ft 

4ft 

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tndIN 

160 

17 

8638 

37% 

37* + * 

imONpr 




29* 

29% + ft 

IdpllMxt 

266 

86 

30731% 

31* 

3Hk + ft 

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4 2* 

2* 

2% 

InartDs 



11 4% 

4ft 

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Intalnti 

00 

10 

212 

13 

13 




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infoRsc 



1025ft 

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InfSolD 



26 3M 

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520ft 

20ft 

20ft 

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145 7* 

7 

7* + ft 

InsttuE 



13 8 

1 

■ + » 

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303 4ft 

m 

4% + ft 

InJtNtw 



27 01* 

27ft 

to — * 

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1 


3 4ft 

4ft 

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Intacm 



857 5ft 

Sft 

5% 

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3 TO 
1511 

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64 4ft 

4 

4 + * 

ISSCO 



6421 

20ft 

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InlaaFn 

04a 

0 

91 8* 

7* 

8* + * 

InM 


374426% 

25* 

to + ft 

InttSy 



135 7ft 

7 

7ft + ft 


ADVERT 




NT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
7 May 1965 . 


Tha not asset vatoequotottomslmni below art nnmtlad bvttroFuaot OHM with IM 
excauttaH of some funOs wtMM quota art basM on tout artcas. Ttw faUawtuu 
marotaBl nrrebeu buHcatc rraowney of aoetattom iommM far nw IHT: 

(a)- daily; (w) -week hr; (W-Urewathly; (O-raotUorlv; (lt-lrroffulartv. 


ft 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
tw) AI -Mai Trust. 8JL 


BANK JULIUS BAER 4 CaUd. 
— td > Baarbond 
4di Condor. 


OBLI FLEX LIMITED 
S 14X9? — tw) MummrroBCT...-...- 
— (wl Dollar MorfhimTonn. 
— tw) Dollar Law T« 



— loi iautbar America. 
—Id > Baetisioer EuraM. 


ccfi Snm — fw) Jtwanese Yen 


Jt 1X34 


.DM law 


-FL iau 

_5F 908 


BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
— Id } Aslan GrawMi FumL. 
— iwt Dlvarband. 


13140 


— IwJ FIF— Amartco. 
— (w| FIF— Eunwr. 


-Iwl 
— idl 
•Hdi 


wl FIF— Pod— 
■ilndomi MulfRwrea A. 
indasuac MuttUxnds B_ 


SF 163A0S* ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

PB 05571, Tlw H0OM tDOI 44KDB 

_ s ma -W 1 Sewr n e to ool n oan i t — . 

- SF 8XS8 PARI3BAS— GROUP 

_ 5 1409 — td Corttow U tierae H and saui 

— *1089 — lalOBU-OM-— OM 1.17901 

51500 — iw) QflLiqESTlQN— . ..I SF VXJ5 

58840 — (wi OBLHXM.LAR—— _ tl.131.9S 


S 145J5 -tWIOBU-YEN. 


— jFlOBLVGULDEN. 


■fd 1 PARQIL-FUND« 


lriO60H0O 
FLW4071 
5 104.77 


BRITANNMLPOB 2n, SL MaUar, Jorsoy 

Brt.O ollorln coree %ojbv | PARINT SRFURD— — ; tlBXtt 

— Iwi BrR5 ManmCurr — _____ **r% — W) PARUSTreaiurf Bond_^_ 9 10208 


— Id > Brtt. InfLS MaiKiBJiortf . 


— jdl Brit InfUMqnggJtoif. 


<«) BriLUniwertal Griwrth. 
— IwJ BriLGold Fund. 

4wi r ‘ 


— Iwi BrWAAaoao-Ojrrancv . . 
— Id > Brtt. Jaaon DlrfftrL Fd. 


“1 w? BrttJroa? GOT Fymi... 


—Id ) Brtt. World Lab. 

— «J Brtt. Wdtm Tectm. Fund 


31039 

(1.182* ROVALB.OFCANAOULPOB24LGUERN5EV 
SUM *+f wi BBC Conation Fund LU— _ S1U2 

40044 +i wt RBC For Etnf&PoOflc Fd. 11051* 

(1422- -Hwl RBCInrlCrtllalPd.— — _ 32058- 
30984 -Hwl RBC Ml fncama Fd____ 11093 

10216- +id ) R8C MonXUrraaCY Fft 32X10 

31059 -Hwl Rac Norm Amur. Fa,.. . ..... (966 
30741 


rn; 


9 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— Iw) Capital inn Fund 

— 1«> Capital Italia SA 


SKANOfFDND INTL FUND (454-214270) 

- — Iwllnc; BM IMPQttor — — 35JB 

33508 — IwIAqc.: BM ■ WlHOWor 3561 

• 1201 


SVENS KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES^ 17 ’ DownMro S46JIMfe)n4M77-8(M0 


— (d I Action* 5uiS» 
— <dl Band VWarSwf. 


—Idl Band Valor D-mark. 
— <d) Band Vbtar US43DU 
Band Valor Yen. 


— «> ) SHB Band Fund. 

SF 10473 —tw) SHB inti Growth Fund. 

“SM SWISS BANK CORF. (ISSUE PR ICES). 


Convert Volar Swf_ 


YM 1054900 — <dlAmark»Volor, SF 60135 

- SFlSS ”*(*? WtarfcBand SNecMon DM11608 


—Id 
-Id 
—Id 
— td 
—Id 
— ta 
— td 
— td 
— td 


DrerarfVolorUSOOLlAR._l 


Canaetc. 


cs r e n d a Oom te- 
cs r anda inflj 


Eunjpo— Valor _ 
Podfic— Volor. 


SF 04808 — (O ; riorm oano artccjKKi— FL 12064 

SF74j5 — Id ) Itttanwlor...... SF 9200 

HH120O “IS i Portfolio— —ZT SF 87675 

CU570O — «) > Stertirw Band Selacttaa__-C 10174 
— (d ) Swiss Hnigfl Bond Sal- • 

— jd } SwfHvMor Naw Series- 


CS JSonev AftStS Fund PMim0O ""jn | arto^Sn 

.ftwrai^vater- *Fjn* SSSSSmgSg- * s VKffl 

UMtc — SF 1900 — * Umvareal Fund SF 12X25 

SF 173J» “(0 ) Ybn Bond 5otoctlan Y 978400 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Hd | Concnntra. 


— Hd ) in n toatonfoad . 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

DM2469 — <d | Areca lXS. Sh. SF410O 

DM8800 ”1“.! 


Bantt4nwaxt_ 


Dwin.8 HortAf 6 Ltavd Georae. BrvM»B 
Comcnodltr Pool- 


— tml dah 

-—|m) 


—Ire) Currency 6 Gold Pool— 

4 ml winch. Life FuL Pool— 
mi Trans World FuL Paoi- 


— _i d i ForaaSwtoSn. 

no. Brvusls ~(d ) Japan-inyaet— 
l_ 333071— — id Sofll Sooth Afr.J 
— * !?371 — — (d ( Slnw (stock prft 


S4M04 — 
*85167 — 


SF 4800 
SF 13900 
SF 74800 
SF 51900 
SF 19630 


F AC MOMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Louranoe Pounty Wfl, 6C4. BMZM4N 

— tw) FS£ABontic 11104 

— Iw) FAC European 31056 

' FAC Oriental 32617 


-tw) 


UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— UUntnla DM 4130 

— <5 ) QiMtande dm 2X90 

— td J Unlit* DM 7760 


Other Funds 


FIDELITY POB 470 Hamilton Borawda 
— <m! American Vaiuet Common- 38657 
— <m) Amer Values CutnPraf — S101JB 

FktofltYAmer. Asset* 34502 

PMeltty Australia Fund 34J0 

Fidelity Discovery Fund — Siam 

Fidelity Dlf. 5VU.Tr. *123.12 

Fktotttv Far East Fund—. 3)704 

Fidelity I an. Fund S55J7 

Fidelity Orient Fuad- 32619 

Fidatttv Rmnarl Fund 31304 

FkJeilty Pacific Fund— 312702 
Fidelity Sod. Granttl Fd 31402 


(wl ActBxvKt 

!m) AJttedLh 


!wl*^ta. | n | amittta n oi Fimd_ s 11508 


384802 

. . % l .oi ti 

lr n lAE'FJ 31021 

twl BNP Intarbond Fund 3 10300 

{wl Etomtse lax- Issue Pr SF 13405 

jg 1 .* Croadp GtrFMortjWfla Fd 3 901 

Eflgltaj Prawrv. PdLIntl SliJO 

CIlQdal Fund jljjj 

CJ.R.Auxtralft Fund— s 1D.14 


tWy world Fund. 


S3I1XI 


FORBES PO BSS7 GRAND CAYMAN 


JF 1 .* Sj evetopd Offshore Fd. s 200568 

FLUAIS 


Londo n AoantQM3 M0n 

■■Gakt Inaonrie-^^to 


— Iw) 
— tw) 


iw} 

—ini) StratastoTrodlna. 


■tAporadatlon. 
4 tor Inctmie^^re 


(w 


1707- , 
3413 tw. 
*864 
S 1.14 


GEFI NOR FUNDS. 
— Iw) Fast Investm 


■B world Fund, 
i Si. American to 


S344XS 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 119.31 Peter Port Guernsey. 0481-28715 


(mj FuturGAM 3 
inlOAMAtlliJi 
tw) GAMertca Inc. 


(w) GAM Boston Inc J 
(wiGAMErnilftweJ 
(w) GAM Frano+dHI 
lid ) GAM International i 


Acttboiid* Investments Fund. 

wllntl 

lUtL 


3 2099 
31070 
3300 


Finance I.F. 
b ) Arlone. 


d 1CJA Japan Fund. 


Iwi GAM North America Inc— 
'wt GAM N. America Untt Trust. 
GAM Pocfflc Inc. 


(w> 

jS 


. .GAM Start. 6 InH Unll Trust. 
!m) GAM Systems I nr. . _ 


GAM Worldwide I 


ITU04 w 
* 121.15 tw 

3 13453 (w 
318404 tw 
_ 31381 
SF9504 (d 
3 10400 
1 10421 
10400a 
*m74 
13000 p 
310707 
3 13367 
S11U1 


m) GAM Tyrte 5A. does A — 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

— Iw) Berrv Poe. Fd. Ltd. 

— <d 1 C.T. Applied Science 

— tdj 6,T.AeeonHje.GwthJFd — 31264 

— Iw)C.T. Asia Fund 3252- 

— Id | G.T. Australia Fund 52X75 

— td ) 6.T. Euran* Fund— ____ svj» 


3905 

31403 



— jd i G.T. HambuPreMnder 


.0 1 G.T. inveshnent 

m I <1BS!S 

1 CLT. South China Fund 31478 IS l ““totenum SeL 


—Idl 


s 1418 (o ) Me te o r # 

HILL SAMUEL tMVEST.MGMT- IHTI » <w) NAAT — . ... .. 

Sgess?* 

=& aussn s 

—Id) ITFFdtTi 1 


-«) asetd Fd IN. AME! 


*^1CA)_ 


COMETE. 


Convert. Fd. mn A 
Convert Fd. mn B c« 
n 

D. witter ww wine Ivt 
Drafclair Invest^und N, 


Dreyfua America Fund 
DrtVfm Fund Inti 


PbWjurv Group Ml 
pxadincome Trane 
Fonaete* laeua Prra 

Forexfund 

Fonnykl S elect ton | 

Fandttolto^Hd 


■saffls 



EHmyfmlnlercorUhiantS 

The EefttoHrtnront Trusl 

fvroMi Obilootlara^TO 
Flrat Hoole Fundrt 
Fltty store Ud-to 


saaffiMsg 


juj et nm rkirt Fund _ 331600 ' 

^aBsauaj g-"- »sssf 

t ! 1 — 


PT’c’hc Fund . * Jswr 


IP. 1 iifcri~TMu£Z=--, mj Itm 


*(76S twl Luxhmd. 


■sJTsS 

.31104 
Y 111040 
31055 


314400 

3157.71 


BBC TRUST CO.IJERSEY1 LTD. 
MSodeSLSL HellerroS3*-343J| 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 


Tfiu 

*2707 i ^ &n«vo SF 109700 

bimSSSi^‘ ,#F,mdM - V 51 -25471 

(Wl PSCO Frnid N.V* 

“l PSCO iXnv_ 



j * *** S! BStenfc-* 

\ j-g jgg" Jgft- . Y 4758 !— ! §~** 5t. Bonk Ewdtv HdauNV « oSi 


iFAffl£! cs -‘ A « > — Isl «S»JS?S5St=rvW 


t iSi I iSS InH 9 oikg S 10800 W I TuraSoSSBuSi** JR17 

— +| w| Lloyds IWI Grawtn Ifik» ^ sxiSS 

— f wj Lloyds FnHlreinwZ: SF3§m l ^y^- grawne n.wX103iB SliSS 

— «w) uoyds fnfi ii 4^X0=; J?^T»rssrir.arawtii(UJc.iiiu. «« 


uSS IIS £jfflSS5- ■ tob td i uwigfr £2^ <(/x > "- v ' 

31015 
33203- 


— Iw 


ion g - uj. _ 
C-jopcbi. 




DM — Deutsche Mart.- BF - JB J 

Lu»emfa ourg Francs; SF — Swh« PnawS- « roflc *f Fl - — Dutch Florin- i a W 





' T- 













L 



INTERNATIONAL HF.RAT.n TRIBUNS, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 198S 


Page i . 


31 

23? 

no 

491 

4ft 

5ft 

4ft 

Tft 

8335 

1A3 

aft 

Aft 


iy= 

as 

u 

4ft 

5ft 

so 

34 

ISO 

Sft 

aft 

5ft 


H + V» 
18ft + ft 
8ft 

M 

3ft + ft 
»m + ft 
XU 

9ft— 44 
15ft 

7ft— ft 
6 — T 
9ft + ft 
ISft 

3ft — ft 
5ft— ft 
34ft 

31ft + ft 
U 4- ft 
19 
32ft 

W4 + ft 
7ft + ft 
30 4- ft 

5ft 

10ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
10ft— ft 
31ft + ft 
3ft 

14ft— ft 
8ft 

24ft + ft 
Aft 
7V» 

A 4- ft 
31ft— 2ft 

m 

5 — ft 
4ft 
1Mb 

S3ft 4- ft 
Aft 
lift 

4 — ft 
5ft 
5ft 
48ft 

5ft— ft 
13ft 

21ft + ft 
1ft — ft 
14ft — ft 
99ft— ft 
10ft 
Ift 

22ft 4- ft 
31ft + ft 
37 

7ft 4- ft 
4ft + ft 


QMS s 

snilft 

11 

' 

lift + to 

Quodnc 

1M 5ft 

5ft 

Sft— ft 

QuakCs 

48 >4 911ft 

lift 

lift— ft 

QualSy 

24 2ft 

2 

2ft — ft 

Qntm» s 

81 13ft 

12 

12 — ft 

Quo firm 

M2 21 

20ft 

20ft + ft 

Quorxs 

1 Sft 

Sft 

Sft 

OunTM 

14? 4 

Sft 

4 — ft 

Quntcti 

14 9 

8ft 

9 + ft 

Qulrrtrrt 

1 7ft 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

Qulxot. 

18410ft 

9ft 

10V. + ft 

Quoim 

479012ft 

lift 

12 + ft 


VlciroS ' 

VtedBFr .229 w 

Vlfcloa 

VlralMc 

vasedi Jar VI 
VHTACh . 

VHram f 

Vodovl 
vauco . 
vasrinf 

WOWO 

M JB 


5* Jft 54 a Ke 
WHSi lift II":— 
1711ft 11 II 
3 16ft 1H« 16ft + ft 
15 7 7 7 

5 1ft 1ft l'« 

1! Aft A Cm 
15118 Oft 10 4ft 
. A .» JW ,3ft 
3M 17ft 17 STft + '-« 
27738ft Mft ST-.-— -0 
519 °V fU Cvi + 

5 6ft oft Aft 

21 + ** 


44 

£4 

40 

ZD 

ao 

23 


a 

48 

34 



23! 4ft 4ft 4ft— U 
519 7W 7ft 7ft 4 ft 
1781.13ft -12 » 13ft + ft 


YlonFI 1J0 VO 18303*1 3Jft 35ft 


RAX 

RJ Fin Me .5 
RLI Ca Ji 23 
RPM9 M 3 A 
RMSya 
RodtnT 
Roam 

Rolnrs 1J0 36 
RomFIn US <1 
Ramtofc 

Royrnds JO VI 
RoyEn 34 1 A 
R «t*ma 


9ft 9ft— ft 
24ft 34ft 4- ft 
Uft 18ft— ft 
8ft 9 — ft 
10ft lift + ft 
Sft 5ft + ft 
27ft 27ft 
2 f 25 — U 
4ft 4ft— ft 
22ft 22ft + ft 
17 17ft— ft 

1¥ft 20ft + ft 
Aft Aft + ft 


Notice of Redemption 

Philip Morris International Capital N.V. 

&Vz% Guaranteed Sinking Fund Debentures Due 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the provisions of the Indenture dated as of June 
1 . 107 1 . under which the above designated Debentures were issued. Citibank, N.A. ( formerly 
First National City Bank*, as Trustee, has selected for redemption through the operation of the 
Sinking Fund, on June 1 . 1985 I the “redemption date”) at 100% of the principal amount thereof 
(the "redemption price"), together with accrued interest to the redemption date. S1.2S0.000 
principal amount of said Debentures bearing the following distinctive numbers: 


SlOOfl COUPON DEBENTURES BEARING THE PREFIX LETTER M 


Our business traffic 


44 4U87 
165 -1099 
243 4100 
g- 284 4105 
I.' im* 

! IMS 4120 
346 4121 
371 4130 
379 4131 
384 4137 
394 4133 
335 4144 
403 4149 
410 4151 
416 4157 
420 415 * 
423 4159 
42 S 4163 
450 4164 
460 4165 
951 4167 
964 4173 
1046 4264 
1172 4804 
1186 4805 
1213 4831 
1155 4*33 
1456 4841 
1537 4844 
1655 4866 

1586 4998 

1587 4999 

1588 5003 
1588 5006 

1594 5014 

1595 5017 

. . 1598 5037 

X, 1624 5043 

1625 5053 
1718 5060 
1729 5068 
1731 5069 
1941 5070 
2178 5076 
2187 5087 

2202 5091 

2203 5104 

. 2204 5105 

2242 5106 
2246 5119 
2219 5121 
2257 5123 
2262 5124 
2282 512S 
2284 5132 

2286 5136 

2287 5137 
229u 513? 
2291 5224 
3507 5228 

' , ran* 5230 
(nr 3826 5264 
' 3827 52*17 

3831 5274 
3990 5277 
4042 528 i 
4053 5290 
4U55 5306 
4061 5315 

4065 5328 

4066 5352 
•1072 5358 
4073 5364 

4076 5388 

4077 5390 

4078 5391 

4079 5113 

4080 5418 
4U81 5430 
4082 5440 


5445 6370 8262 

5466 8971 8264 

5467 6:574 8268 
5473 6398 8277 
5487 6400 8280 

5491 6407 8282 

5492 6415 8288 

5496 6417 8290 

5497 6118 8292 

5498 6420 8300 
5500 6443 8301 
5507 6451 8303 

5550 6476 8306 

5551 7129 8307 

5552 7209 8312 

5553 7216 8322 
5560 7219 8323 
5562 7462 8324 
5505 7464 6327 
5566 7465 8329 
5568 7466 8331 

5584 7407 6132 

5585 7468 8331 
55*9 7475 8342 
5591 7484 8343 
5593 749-1 8344 

5596 7518 8346 

5597 7527 8347 
5599 7528 8349 

5602 7529 8350 

5603 7530 8351 
5606 7531 8352 
5007 7532 8353 
5608 7550 8354 
5610 7551 8355 
5045 7:752 8356 
5646 7554 8360 
5071 7559 8363 
50*77 7561 8364 
5764 7576 8368 
SMK* 7578 3309 
581* 75*3 8372 
5983 7585 8379 
5986 7588 8388 

6064 7592 8390 

6065 7594 8394 
6068 7608 *395 
0*>S9 7609 8401 
6095 7712 8403 
6102 7707 8414 
6105 7768 8120 
6509 7782 8441 
61 !« 77*3 848*1 
4124 7788 8476 
4176 7798 8477 
6187 7*t)5 8-178 
6190 7800 8491 
619:5 7*07 8497 
6201 7815 8518 
6221 7*16 6530 
622:! 7817 K59U 
6225 7813 8598 
62«8 7819 8599 
6269 8055 *6* HJ 
627M 8062 8608 
•127! 8079 *610 
•1273 80*3 *011 
6273 80*4 8630 
».2*J 8088 8631 
0-J84 8089 8632 
6314 809-1 8636 
*«« 8188 8648 
6*5:17 8216 8656 
63-14 8222 8661 
6,345 8227 8662 
6352 8232 8663 
6:t64 8243 8665 
• K106 8250 8666 
636* *258 8078 
C:'69 8201 8687 


8688 9119 
869t> 9121 

8692 9122 

8693 9126 

8694 9127 
8697 9128 

8750 9129 

8751 9130 
8775 9131 
8780 9137 
8782 9138 
8788 9140 

8807 9141 

8808 9144 
8823 9150 
8825 9159 

8827 9166 

8828 9175 

8829 9190 

8830 9191 
8842 9194 
8*53 9198 
8834 9201 
8856 9202 

8861 9203 

8862 9204 
88*53 9206 
8*66 9210 
8887 9212 
8889 9213 
8*92 9214 
8396 9216 
8898 9220 
8905 9221 
8924 9223 
*925 9237 
*926 9242 
8929 9243 
8932 9251 
8935 9252 

8937 9266 

8938 9267 

8939 9285 

8940 9280 

8941 9288 

8942 9291 
8946 9292 

8957 9297 

8958 9298 
8965 9311 
8970 9312 

8974 9013 

8975 9319 
*978 9324 

8979 9331 
*982 9333 

8980 9352 
8999 9356 
9002 9357 
9008 9359 

9016 9369 

9017 9371 

9018 9375 

9019 9378 

9020 9384 
9025 93*5 
9029 9386 
9032 9387 
9042 9088 
9045 93*9 
9099 939*1 
9103 9391 
9105 9393 
9107 9397 
9109 9401 

9113 9403 

9114 9-W6 

91 15 9408 
9117 9415 
911* 9418 


9-119 10132 
9424 10133 
9426 10136 
9434 10137 
9437 10143 
9451 10188 
9453 10189 
9458 10190 
9460 10192 

9462 10193 

9463 10199 
946* 10213 
9483 10218 
9485 10222 
9496 10228 

9500 10230 

9501 10233 
9503 10234 
9505 10235 
9511 10243 
9513 10244 

9526 10252 

9527 10253 
9529 10255 

; 9539 10266 
9540 10269 
9545 10334 
9561 10335 
9576 10337 
957* 10341 
9579 10348 
9012 10358 
9616 10360 

9626 10366 

9627 10375 

9629 10379 

9630 10388 
9722 10390 
977* 10395 
9801 10396 
9805' 10401 

9806 10406 

9807 10412 
9812 10413 
9*14 10414 

9815 10416 

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airline’s during 




We must be doing 
something right. 





The Debentures specified above are to be redeemed for the said Sinking Fund at the option of 
the holder fa/ at the Receive and DeHver Window-Sth Floor of die Trustee, No. 212 Wail Street, 
in the Borough of Manhattan, The City of New York, or (bt subject to any laws or regulations 
applicable thereto, at the main off ices of Citibank. NA in Amsterdam. Frankfurt/Main. London 
1 Citibank House 1. Milan. Paris. Brussels and Citicorp Bank 1 Luxembourg I S.A. in Luxembourg. 
I L Pa*, menrs at the offices referred to in f b 1 jbove will be made by a Ignited States dollar check drawn 
- on a bank in New York Citv or by a transfer to a United States dollar account maintained b>. the 
payee with a bank in New York City on the: redemption date. 3t the redemption price together 
with accrued interest to the date fixed for redemption. On and after the redemption date, interest 
on the said Debentures will cease to accrue, and. upon presentation and surrender of the said 
Debenture:, with all coupons appertaining thereto maturing after the redemption dale, payment 
will be made at the redemption price out of funds to be deposited with the Trustee. 

Coupons due June 1 . 1 9S5 should t > e detached and presented for payment in rhe usual manner. 

PHILIP MORRIS INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL N.V. 

By: Citibank, N.A. 
as Trustee. 

NOTICE 

Withholding n| ~0‘". of gross redemption proceed' of any payment made within the United 
/ft. States is n.i|iiired b 1 . the Interest jnd Dividend Compliance Act of 1 9S3 unless the Paving Agent 
ha-* the correct tax identification number l social security oremplc«yer identification number) or 
exemption ter; if i-. ate of the Payee. Please tarnish a properly completed Form W-9 or exemption 
certificate or equivalent when presenting your securities. 

Mav J. PWi 








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Tuesday 

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Closing 


Tobies Include the notionwWe prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Pros 



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i y<> 




Hotel Parker Meridien 
A monument to the fine art of living 

in Newark 


Frenoi Company 

HaUBBOOK 1985 



Now in the 1985 updated edition, 200 
pages of indispensable information .in English on 
a selection of 84 of the most important French 
companies, as well as basic fads on other major 
firms. Includes information on the French 
economy and major sectors of activity, an 
introduction to the Paris Bourse,, and a bilingual 
dictionary of French financial terms. 

Each profile indudes detailed information 
on: head office, management, major activities, 
number of employees, sales breakdown, company 
background, shareholders, principal French 
subsidiaries and holdings, foreign holdings and 
activities, exports, research and innovation, 1979- 
1983 financial performance, importcmt devel- 


opments and 1984-1985 highlights and trends. 

Indispensable for corporate, government 
and banking executives, institutional investors, 
industrial purchasers arid other dedsfon-mafcers 
who drould be more fuHy Informed on major 
French companies. French Company Handbook 
is bdng sent to 8,000 selected business and 
financial leaders in the United States, Japan and 
the Middle Bast. 

■ Other interested parties may purchase the 
Handbook at $38 per copy, inducing postage in 
Europe. Five or more copies, 30% reduction. 
Outside Europe, please add postd charges for 
each copy: Middle East $4; Asia, Africa, North 
and South America $7. 


-ii" . 

-••A. . 

• :\r: 


s J : 


1. *,'**»" 

l Ur:‘; V . 






In the heart of Manhattan 
stands a hotel where the 


service, the exquisitely 
refined facilities and the 


refined facilities and the 
luxurious decor have 
established a veritable 
monument to the fine art of 
living in New York 


The Hotel Parker Meridien, 
experience the fine art of 
French living. 

For reservation: Hotel Parker 
Meridien: IIS West 57th Sir., New York, 
NY 10019; Tel: fL2181 2455000. or call 
"Meridien Reservation International" 
(MRI) 49L35.I6 in London, 

There are over 40 Meridien hotels 
worldwide, in Paris, Montreal 




New York, Boston, Houston, 

San Francisco, Newport Beach/LA, 
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Abu Dhabi Tokyo, Hone Kong, 
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Dakar... and many other cities. 
Opening soon in Vancouver. 


The international hotels with a french touch 

Travel companion of Air France 


AStOSPAHAlE 
AR FRANCE 
AISIHOMAILANTXaUE 
AVKXS MARCH. DASSAULT- 
(SRBGUET AVIATION 
AXA (MUTUBIE5 UNES- - 
DHOUOT) 

EtANQUE KDOSUEZ 
BANQUENATIONALE OE PARJ5- 
BNP 

BGGWLSAY 

HDBttAANN 

BONGRANSA. 

BOUYGUE5 

BSN 

CAMPENON BERNARD 

CGSAISTHOM 

CGMGROUP 

CHAJJBCWAGS DC FRANCE 
{CDFJ 

CHARGEURSSA 
OMENTS FRANgAIS 
OTAICATH. 
CLUBM&fTBtRANfe 
COGEMA 

COMPAGNEDUMU 
CQMPAGNE FRAN^ASEDB 
P&ROIES- TOTAL 
cqmpagneg£n£baie 
DEECIWOTfi (CG£) 
CCWPAGNEG&4&AIEDES 
EAUX 

GQMPAGNR: lah£nin 
a&XTAGOCOLE 
CS&fTCOMMaOAlDE 
FRANCE (GCF} 
CR&STDUNOBD 
CSfeXT NATIONAL 
CROUZET 
DARTY 
DUMEZ 

HECIRONfQUE SERGE 
DASSAULT 
ELF AQUITAINE 
ffEDAEOEniANDFAURE 
ESSSjQR 
HVES4HE 
FRAMATOME 


FRANQVSEHOKHST 
G&4&JALE BtSClir 
GROUPEVICrOBE 
(METAL- 

JEUMONT-SCHNBDER 

corEal 

LOUIS VUTTON 
LYOM^IAISE DES EAUX 
MATRA 
MEMDB4 
MERUNG80N 
MJCHHJN , 

• MOBr-HB*eSSY 
PARKAS 
P8INOD RICARD 
PEUGEOT 
POUET 

PRMBtfS GROUP 
PRQMOCte 
■ QUR1BRY 
LARHX5UTE 
R&4AULT 

RHflWPOUENC 
ROUSSaUCLAF 
SAOLOft 
SASNTOOBAN 
SAMOA 
■ SCOA 
SCRBB 
SEB GROUP 
SHTA 
SNECMA 

soG&ifi g£n£raie 
SOO fttGfrlftALE 
. D’B4IREPHSE5-SAR'RAPT 
A BRICE 
SODEXHO 
SOMMBl ALU8ERT 
SPEBAHGNOUES 
THSAECANiQUE 
. THOMSON 
1HCMSONCSF 
UNKJNDES ASSURANCES 
D6PABS(UAPJ 
USNOR 
UFA 
VALEO 

VALLOUREC •' 


3Ccr^h<a£^@nbunc 

FmKH COMPANY HANDBOOK 1985 


Pubnihed by 

int er nationa l Business Development 
with the 

IwioR'i iQkJw %4 Herald Tribune 






■ International Herald Tribune, Bex* Division 

1 181 owenue QicrtesdeXSaufle, 92521 NeuSy Cedex, France. 
Please send me copies of fiiendi Company Handbook 1985 

■ i ; — 


□ Endased s my payment (Payment may be mart, in 4 

D Please charge to my crecitcxydrVlSAL] DINB5n AMBcD 

CMOMMXX : 


SIGNATURE 

hr sadr cad ado* 


[ NAME ^vtuwini. 
J POSTOON. 


COMRANY. 


ADDRESS. 


OTY/COUNTRy, 


8^85 




T~M'virr ^ ■vA- 
























































Page 17 




- - '.■*•#; 7^. • . 


INTERNATIONAL HF.KAXJ) TRIBUNE, ‘WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


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1985 


»m#nf 




t i\1*7 "' 

VP * 

r-i. 1 *•-**'■ 


^gtinand Semler Picked 
Ttljoin Baimier-Beiiz Board 


.J^&cndaHag^ty 

_• ^Jiai^adpt^/IerMTrilme 
LONDON — Daimkr-Bcnz AG 
aadthediairman of its supervisory 
boari^WWiitti GdA. and Jo achim 
^aluX.i^oard maj*cr,willrdm- 
quish tbcirdndcs m Jdiy3. 

rf the 

posed they be, succcede^^ 
! Klaus Mertm, a member of- the 
exerotiY^ board of Deutsche Bask 
AG T and JohmaesSernkr, a mem- 
ber of the executive boaid of Mcr- 
cedes-Aulomobfl-Hddirig AG. A 
chairmafliis expected to be named 
later. ,; 1 : v ■■ 

In addition^ die .supervisory 
boaid promoted "deputy executive 
board: member Manfred Gena, 
’tfhois^ponsbteictf Jjersocmd, to 
a fufl. doectorehip. 'Pfcter Sanner 
'wasjjanMd dqnity executive board 
igoobec, «sponsible for materials 
irjjjdie^^Sier Ulsamer, exccu- 
- trre board TBember foe thisportfo- 
lio, isto'adreon Dec 31. ". 

An w* Inc, the U.S.-based natu- 


ral-resources group, has appointed 
Erika Tordjman a vice presidenL 
As president of Paris-based Amax 
Europe, Mrs. Tordjman isrespon- 
sibk for aQ of Amax's European 
op«atic(ns- ‘ : : . 

• Dow Chomcaf Etnope has ap- 
pointed Kurt Leu ten as ii$ general 
. manager for West Germany, based 
in Frankfurt He will succeed Wolf 
Rittershausen, who is retiring. El- 
marDortsch,. Pow’s comnracial 
diraaor for industrial spedalities 
at the bead office in Midland, 
Michigan, trill succeed Mr. Leu text 
as director of the plastics commer- 
cial department dr Dow Chemical 
Europe, bated in Horgen, near Zu- 
rich. . 

- Manrtfacturere Hanover Trust 
Co. of New Yoric. has named W. 
Tnsvor Robinson executive vice 
president in charge of its British 
operations, lie has been seniorvice 
president in diarge of the bank’s 
London: branch. 

GOleiteGorpL, the Bdstoojjased 
consumer rproducts company, has 


named' John Symons a vice presi- 
dent. He continues as group gener- 
al manager of Gillette Europe and 
as managing director of -Gillette 
Industries Ltd. in London. 

County Bank Ltd, the merchant 
banking arm of National Westmin- 
ster Bank PLC, has appointed J. 
Scibor-Kaminski to its board. Mr. 
Sdbor-Kaminslti, who previously 
was with Soricte Gcn£rale in Lon- 
don, assumes the post of managing 
director (Europe) of County Secu-. 
rides Ltd, a new international eq- 
uities company owned by NatWesL 

Caterpillar Tractor Cd, the U5.- 
based maker of engnes and con- 
struction equipment, has appoint- 
ed Donald F. Coouan a vice 

? resident. He tvOJ succeed Merle 
/. Dargel who win retire July 1. 
Mr. Coon an will also assume re- 
sponsibility for Latin American 
operations on the retirement on 
July -1 of Made Verhyden, a vice 
president. Mr. Coonan formerly 
was president of Caterpillar World 
Trading Corp.. a uniL 


said Seddlk Belyamani was named 
president, international sales, for 
the Middle East, Africa and. Latin 
America. He was a rales director 
for the Asia-Pacific region. Cbm 


Longridge was appointed vice pres- 
idem-marketing. He was sales di- 
rector for Europe. Ron Woodard, 
formerly sales director for Africa 
and the Middle East, was named 
vice president of sales and market- 
ing. Robert Norton, who was vice 
president for Africa, Latin Ameri- 
ca, Asia and the Pacific, becomes 
vice president, Asia-Pacific, inter- 
national soles. The parent. Boeing 
Co., is bated in Seattle. 

PepsiCo Ik. fans appointed Da- 
vid Jones regional vice president 
for the Pacific Batin. He was opera- 
tions director of Pepsi-Cola 
(Northern Europe). 

Salomon Brothers International 

Ltd. in London has named Bruce 1~ 
Koepfgen manag er. He formerly 
was manager of Salomon's Atlanta 
office. 

S.G. Warburg & (X the Lon- 
don-based merchant bank, has ap- 
pointed James M. Stewart an exec* 
utive director of the bank and its 
LLS. subsidiary, S.G. Warbuig & 
Co. He previously was a managing 
director of Morgan Stanley & Co. 
Mr. Stewart will be based in New 
Yoric and principally involved in 
expanding Warburg's international 
corporate financing and issuing 
businesses. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Looking for 200 Shares of Yak & Yeti? Try Nepal 


(CoatiDaei from Page 'll) 
and : brick-making factories, food 
processing and other buanesses. 

“1 am buying shares because I 
hope to get i dividend,” said KLB. 
jOirestha, owner of a small shoe 
fjbtory iij Katmandu who stopped 
„ by to purchase SI shares. “Tve al- 
ready bougbtshaies in several com- 
. parries, "he added. “R’s a good way 
- to protect my sayings.”' 

Among the other companies 
; traded oa the exchange are the Ne- 
Bank Ltd. and the National 
ranee Corp., also once exdit- 
sivdy owned by the government. In 
addition, shares are available in the. 
: Hotel Yak and Yeti, a luxury hotel 
in Katmandu; 'and the Nepal Bat-, 
iery Co, a subsidiary of Union 
*. Carbide at India. 

Only 11 companies arc listed’ for 
trading on the blackboard of the 
-^fircurities Exchange CEnter.whkh 
¥ ti mated in a' mandated two- 
' stray building off an alley near - 
downtown Katmandn. Outride the 
center, cattle andr «bats" tramp 
through die streets and vendors t^ 

. to sell knives, trinkets and otln- 
souvenirs to tourists. 

The^ exchange center opened in 
1976 as a vehicle for trading in 
' government bonds. Late last year, 
n began overseeing trading in . 
equity sharesas part of the govern- 
ment's effom to mobilizE coital 
and create opportunities for pnvate 
ownoship hi industry. ' 

According fo Daxnbar P. Dhnn- 
geL director and manager of the 
center, in the last fire months there 

"nT-’ ‘ * 


have been 90 transactions of shares 
worth barely more than $100,000. 
But, be says, he is convinced that is 
only the beguiling. 

“It’s growing at a very uneven 
rate,” said Mr. Dhungri. “Some 
weeks,, it -is very active, and some 
weeks it is almost zero.” 

Evqy day, someone new regis- 
ters with the center to buy or sell, so 
that a list of several hundred per- 
sons is kept. “The buyer or seller 
cranes to us to register their offers 
or bids,” said Mb-. DhuxigeL “Then 
we try to find a seller or buyer firan 
our fists. Sometimes we do it by 
phone. Sometimes we have to 
knock on doars.” ■ 

The success of tbe center is such 
that there arc plenty of buyers, but 
not many people who want to sdL 
So Mr. Dmmgri and his coBe^pes 
are searching for ways to create 
transactions .without making the 
market too volatile. ' 

Mr/ Weil,, a former New York 
Gty investment banker, has been 
assisting Mr. Dhungd in NepaFs 
venture into capitahsm. The -am- 
bassador suggested that the center 
encourage companies.-, to sptit up 
their stocks, so that each share had 
a smaller cost. That way; more peo- 
ple might be able to afford to buy. 

; << We aregoing to try cutting the 
unit price and iDcreasethe number 
of outstandixig shares,” said Mr. 
Dhungd, 42, as economist who vis- 
ited the United States earlier this 
year on a -State Department pro- 
gram arranged by Mr. WeiL 

In addition. Mr. Dhungd said. 


the exchange center hopes eventu- 
ally to introduce independent stock 
brokers into the picture. And, he 
said, he would encourage the gov- 
ernment to accelerate its policy of 
divesting ownership erf its corpora- 
tions. 

“We have high hopes the market 
will go very fast with a decision by 
the government to privatize more 
units” he said. 

About 4,000 people own stocks 
in tbe 11 listed compames, Mr. 
Dhungd fgnd, adding that his goal 
ts to confidence in the center 

itself. That means keeping price 
fluctuations — and speculation in 
trading — at a nrinimnm. Today, 
there are* some ups and downs in 
the price of stocks, hot not much. 
The trading is still so slow that the 
exchange usually steps in to negoti- 
ates pnee for the stock when buyer 
and seller disagree. 

Since one of the problems in the 
stock maikei is a lack of people 
who want to sell, Mr. Weil has 
suggested experimentation in such 
practices as uriHng short In selling 
short, an investor agrees to sell 
stock at its current price at a later 
date, and then waits until later to 
buy those shares, hoping that by 
then the price will have gone down. 

. For now, Mr. Dhungd said, sett- 
ing short is too speculative a prac- 
tice to encourage in Nepal. 

Mr. Dhungd said be learned 
many things when visiting the 
American and New York stock ex- 


I* 


their old statements, which in some 
cases have not been updated in two 
or three yean. 

But what impressed him the 
most, Mr. Dhungd said, was the 
effort by the securities industry to 
educate the public about the busi- 
ness. He referred to advertising 
mailing s, offering statements and 
analyses in newspapers, all relating 
to the buying and setting of stocks. 

“All that education shows that 
even in the .United States, much 
can be done to generate awareness 
about stocks among the people,” fie 
said. 

“In Nepal,” be said, “our job is 
so much greater. Education is 
probably our most important ob- 
jective. We have to stake people 
aware of the market. We have to 
explain that people can use their 
savings and invest them, instead of 
keeping them idle.” 






Revenue and profits, in ml I Hons, are hi local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


(Contimed foam Page U). 
personality questionnaire designed 
to look ai personality traits rele- 
vant to senior management Savflle 
& Holdswortb asked 2,000 manag- 
ers what made a senior manager 
effective. The tea is meant to tdl 
you, among other things, whether a 
manager is persuasive, .contraffiog 
or independent; modest, democrat- 
fo or caring tradrtiQaal or dian^r 
oriented; innovative, forward look- 
ing, detail-conscious or 
conscientious. * 

Before testing a job applicant, 
Career Analysts will ask a company 
to define the requirements for the 
job and to evaluate tbe criteria for 
success or faihirc in that job. Ca- 
reer Analysts has devised a special 
Questionnaire for senior managers 
are typically important players 
in small teams. “At some pcantyou 
know how you like to play in a 
team. There are some people who 
enjoy feeding stuff in out not im- 
plementing it Others would rather 
not make the decision but emoy 
implementing it,” says Joshua Fox 
of Career Analysts. 

Career Analysts also has. a ques- 
tionnaire for managers who want 
to start their own business to see if 


they have the required entrepre- 
neurial skills. .. . 

- Some large European compa- 
nies, such* as Semens AG, do not 
use psychological testing at afl. 

They argue that mature executives 
have a proven trade-record and 
that personality and ability tests Bavy v 
are irrelevant. They rdy on person- MQHr . 
al interviews to decide whether the S22** — • 
candidate is emotionally stable. 

British Petroleum PLC, for in- 
stance, asks only university gradu- 
ates to take psychological tests. 

In France, some companies and 
most headhunters prefer grapholo- 
gy to psychological tests. Charboa- 
nages de France, the coalmining 
concern, uses graphology but not 

U.S. execu- 
tive-search companies like Russell 
Reynolds & Associates and Korn 
Ferry International. 

“We never dopsychological test- 
ing,” says Marc Laray of Kora Fer- 
ry International in Paris. “Between 
35 and 45, executives have already 
proven they had certain qualities. It 
is all right for a beginner, but there 
is no point in torturing senior man- 
agers by asking them m fittin little 
hoxes.^ 


Britain . 

Maria & Spencer 

Y*or rm m 

Rov»noe xwo. 

pretax Met — XU zraj 
pv Share— M» WW 

Canada 


Bow Valley W. 
mow- «g 

Revenue 23AJJ 18S3 

Profit J2J M 

per Snore — 0» «.» 


MacMBIan Btoedd 

istQvor. VK m* 

Revenue ssw *}V> 

Net uoe». ~ 27 23J 

United States 

Columbia Gat Sys. 
wont. ws mt 

Revenue IJXX. '-Wa 

%ZZLz: iam i S 

a: ten. WJ wt indHet 
eftarue of 007 mfWan. but 
}9M4 If I WCA4M IM of 


G^sAar Com. Natural Gas 

_utOt wr. nw itfonr. .iw mi 

^ (nSn town** — U4*. U1S 

Prow* S27 (OPJI ,pc. 99.18 1BKS 

or tan. Per Share — Zfl i51 


isfQaer. WS mt 

Revenue— — J , 


Quart. rm IfM 

Remu* 364U ZUJ\ 

net inc. i*22 

PerSharr— OA« 1« 

Mack Trucks 
ItfQoar. 1»K Wg 

Revenue SSUO *39-2* 

Net lac. f.15 11^* 

Per Shore — ail QJM 

Wddbaom 

istaaor. ms m< 
Revenue — . 4TO^ 3908* 

NM Inc. J2 11* 

Per Share— 453 M0 

West Germany 


1st Qoar. ms _mj 

Revenue I2W0. 10MB. 

Pretax Net_ mo 63*31 


KEEP UP TO DATE WITH 

BUSINESS PEOPt£ 

APPEARING EACH WEDNESDAY 
AND FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


The G 







REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FUBKH HVHKA - Mea. Luwnous 
teodwti npanmeni on the top, had 4 
Swig, raom, big terrace *tm pon- 
orenae ocean vew, eabn area TQ 
Mutes weft to sea. 1725,000 / ben 
offer, urgent by owner Fran (93} 75 
5241. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


IOUVKBOC5, 15 KM WBT OF 
Pars, tovety houn, l bedrooms. 2 
baths, 3 recqXiOK with ured tx^oint 
hose, svMtmimgpootgaden next to 
Mcrh Forest G&oitice hors Ports 
5571216 


. EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


( Continued From Sack Page) 


Domestic 

POSITIONS WANTED 




AUTOMOBILES 


New 1985, fufl US. tpeetfitonons 

500 Sa t from 

500 SE 
500 SEC 
500 SL 
190 E-2S16V 

Mhcry 2-3 wmIcl 
C ontact MrMcdta weddm 12-5a 
Tek (212) 279 18 « New York <5 


AUTO RENTALS 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EXCAUBIA 

AUTOMOBtIB 

ore corepietely hont^buBt in America 
Only *4 of the 250 uni production for 
19K one baina tdaeded to the Empe- 


New for 1985 (far Europe only) a a 
speed Genet o Motors 57 EtreVB en- 
one produana 300 HP. in iti ndurol 
farm or 435 HP. when uperdtrgaL 

Phar Part a USJ64B00 + optional 
equipment (FOB factory]. 

The wbw of fw 15th 


changes, tbe Chicago Board of 
Trade and several brokerage firms 
in tee United States last year. 

He said he was impressed with 
the emphasis on Wail Street on 
disclosure, and that Nepal must 
move to bring about greater disclo- 
sure standards. The Nepal stock 
exchange only recently began re- 
quiring semiannual corporate dis- 
closure statements; including au- 
dits and financial reports. Mr. 
Dhungd said more requirements 
would be imposed in the future blit 
for now tee exchange is Dying sim- 


Treder & Negotiator 

Wifi k n owledge ad m rifliw 
in Africa. Pgrhafy b&guaf 
Fr ench / En gith 

Phase send^eri&ff'reswne and 
photo to: 

Caf Pasfde87 
CH-1211 Genova 4 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A HJBOPEAN 
CAK MTO TIC UiA. 

Thb documera enpibns fufly whm one 
mat th to bring a cor into the LLS. 
xi hif aid iogdy. it mduda new £ 
used Europear euro prices, buying lips, 
DOT & ffAoonveroonaddreses, cus- 
tom deoranee & shipping proaKiures 
as wall as legd paMTSecaae d Ihe 
drang dokr, you can save up to 
USSrBjDDO when buying a M e rcedes, or 
BMW m Europe & exporting n to the 
States. To receive tho manual tend 


Tel: 33 - 93 - 25 63 91 
Teton 449870 MCS 

We wil shortly be opening showrooms 
in Cannes and Gwvo 


NEW MERCEDES 

P08SCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CAB 

FROM STOCK 



mu im ni osi hi USA 

RUTH INC 

Taunusstr. 52. *000 frwfcfurt, 

W Germ., td R fiW323ST, the *l\5S9 
tnfarmcteon only by p h i t na or tries. 


10 YEARS 

MwCsilo tbm World 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


TffiMAGNIHCm 

STHIA 

SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISB 

To the Greek Uands. Turkey, 
Egyr^ 5 hraeL 

SaSng Every Monday from Pfcoeus 
end 

THE YACHT-lpCE 
STHIA 


SERVICES 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY PA 
bpreswUrae semes for VIPs 

ZURICH 830.58.88. 


YOUNG LADr 

PAi‘ Interpreter A Tourom Gvde 

PARIS 562 0587 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL V.IJ>. YOUNG LADY 
Dotmguahed. Begant. Multiknguri. 


YOUNG HEGANT LADY 

PA. PARIS 525 81 01 


W LAUY GUIDE 
Young, educated, riegore A mhtgual 
for days, e vwinm A Travel. 
PACK 533 80 26 


TOKYO: 442 39 79 

European young lady comparson. 



3 AM) 4 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek Islands & Turkey. Suing 
every Monday & Fricfay from Piraeus 


2 Kre. Sernas SL, Athens 10562 
Trie* 215621, Phone 3228883. 

tea tekftS 80 36 
Mmicfc tot 395 613 
Geneva tel. 327 110 
Zurich fat 3W 36 55 


- . a LONDON. Young Germon/French aA- 

LTUW at Begance once to rad you on your vnu to 
London. Tel: UK 01-331 C&52 

*■ to lh# GHSC BLANDS “ ^ 

uiw kkoc EGYPT, ISRAEL A TURKEY hong kong (k-3) m ia 37 

T Young lophatioated conipoteon. 

5. VOLVO CHONX OF 7-4-3-W DAY H»1CH HV1BIA. Irttraeter Travel 



PARIS: 520 97 95 

BILMGUAL YOUNG LADY PA 


PAMS TO* 80 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
UUr gud. 


PAMS LADY GUIDES 334 Ol 32. 
elegoU, educated. hYI lor 


ffJTBtNATKJNAL REAUTTFU1. People 
UM.TD. USA & WORLDWIDE. let 
31 2-765-7793 1 7657794 


FKANXHIRT. Young lady oompanoa 
Engidi, Rendt. German spokea Free 
to travel. 069/44 77 71 


SOGER: DIANE PAMS 260 87 43 
Men & women gwdes, security 6, iRil- 
car servieei. 8 am - 13 



TOKYO LADY COMPANKM. PA 
Personal Assatom 03-456-5539 


FRANKFURT YOU9G LADY contoav 
TeL0(W/6M52 


HONG KONG 3-671267 VIP lady 


LONDON - YOUNG CARIBBEAN 

01-724 IBS? Airports / Travel 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 



* ONE OF TFC LARGEST CENIHS 

* ALL WORK COMPIETH) AT OUR 
SHOP 

* FRC5T QUALITY COMPOIBffS 

* ALL TESTING IN OUR OWN 
FBDBtAUY REOOGMZED 
LABORATORY 

* CUSTOMS BROKHAGE AND 
BONDMG AVAILABLE 

1714) 898-2182 

lUt 704355 (BAB COM UD 



AUTOS TAX 


FROM GBtMANY 

Experienced car trader far Mercedes, 
Andie or BMW. kmUt dekvery. 
M service import/ export US. DOT & 
B*A fcr tourist and dealer. OCM. Teer- 
ri efl tarir . a 4 Duessaldorf W. Germo - 
rry- tot PI 711-434646, telex 8587374. 


EUROPORT TAX 
FRS CARS 

CaB or write far free attdog. 
Bax 13011 


LONDON: EDUCATED LADY Com- 
pm<W Guide. Tek 889 I6M. 


747 59 58 TOURIST GUIDE. Pwd, 
7 anjiadrtdv. brt'l travel 


YOUNG LADY COMPANION Ion- 
doa/HearivMr. Tek 396 7671. 


LOS ANGELES, Tour Guide Server. 
213-773-2762 


BRU55B5. YOUNG LADY VJA 
TM 344 08 90 


MIMCH - GERMAN LADY conipon- 
ion and rity-Quide. Tel 311 U Qdl 


TOKYO 645 2741. Tawing & stop- 
" interpreters, etc. 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 Young 


RAMS INTL PERSONAL/ BUSINESS 
Anawd. Tek 828-7932. 


PARS YOUNG SOMSTICATB) VIP 
lady. trSngucf PA 256 85 91 


Aup prt, Ho le 

[1&623&77 
m B’CAR M 


FORTHE LATEST WORD ON 




READ CARL GEWIRTZ 
EACH A40NDAY IN THE IHT 


DOMESTIC 

positions wanted 


TAX FRS CARS 

lOUR GUIDE TO DINING WELL 

tt&S&BSIP* PATRICIA WH1S 

IN RIDAYS WEEKEND SECTION 


ESCORTS & 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 


Head office in New Yort 
330 W. 56th St, NYC. 10019 USA 

21 2-765*7896 
212-765-7754 

MAJOR OBIT CARPS AND 
CHIOS ACCSTCJ 
Private M — rbte^hjpr AvaikMe 

Uri* mvar d m ' mmme service In 
been f e iri wed ae #te too A roost 
ewtorive Escort Stmt# by 
USA A k ifa modonnl news medra 
irxtudtofl rot fio at d TV. 


REGENCY 

WORUTMOE MitTILMSUAL 
ESCORT SERVICE 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

Tek 312-838-8037 
' 8 21 2-753-1 S&4 

* USA & TRANSWORID 

A-AMERICAN 

BCORT SBMCE. 
EVSYWWBE YOU ABE CS GOL. 


Surtbertussfras5e 150 
CWOOO OiteaeUorf J, W. Gernwty 


OF THE IHT 



ESCORTS A GUIDES J ESCORTS A GUIDES I ESCORTS A 


Portmrei Escort Agency 

67 Gfam Street; 
London WT 

Tek 486 3724 nr 486 1158 
Ml motor trorSt ecerts a w e te l 


ZURICH amstodam nicole 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SB1VKZ 
TH-- 200 8585 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

BCORT SERVICE 

10 KB4SMGTON CHURCH STLW8 
TR: 9379136 OR 9379133 


SanMroBw’e Escort 8 Guide Service 
Mato l Fernto* Tefc 01/57 75 96' 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

CNNG8TS BCORT saiVICE. 
TEL 01/363 0864-022/3441 86 

LONDON 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBCVKE 
01-229 4794 


★ MADRID * 

TASTE BCORT 5BVKX 
TEL 411 72 57-259 61 96 


ESCORT SERVICE 020-999244 


MnMhpril Escort Service 

Tefc 22/35 93 68 


MILAN ESCORT 

saeVKEi 02/69762402 


LONDON TOPS 
BCORT SSEV1GE. 385 3573. 



LONDON CLASS 

BCORT SERVICE 

LONDON, H6ATHROW* GMWOC 
Tab 01 890 0373 


ZURICH 

AIBOS BCORT SBIVICE 
IHr 01/47 55 83 - 69 55 04 


JASMINE 

AMSTERDAM BCORT SOV1CE. 
THi 0 20- 26 66 5 5 


Guide Servo. Tel: 283397 


FRANKFURT AKA - ANGHJOUFS 

biSngud Escort + travel service. Tek 
069/01 B8 05. Credt Oris occepted. 




AUSTOCATS 

Leodon Escort Service 

128 Vfigmun 5>, London W.l. 
Al tartor CtkSs Lords Accepted 
13- <37 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - widnighl 


1-813-921-7946 IA VENTURA 

tnm fmm Ui. IJD0.2374B92 


Crf free from ILL: l«0-^-MW 
CeAfrM from Bcrida 1-800-2320692. 
iowel Eastern eeicotne you badd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SKVKE 

N NEW YORK 

TH.- 212-^7 3291. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

facarf 5epri(e. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


BRUSSBS MKHHlf BCORT AND 
GODE semCE. IK: 733 07 98 


ICW YORK ESCORT SBVICE 
212-888-1666 


MADRID INTI 

ESCORT SBVKE 
l£L 2456548. □BXT CARDS 

MAYFAIR CLUB 

«JK SBMCE frm 5pm 
ROTTSUXAM J0M0-3541SS 
DC HAGUE [6] 70-60 79 96 

ZURICH 

CASOUC ESCORT fflMCE. 
Tel: 01/252 61 74 


GBaVA-BRST 
ESCORT SBtVKE 
IB.- 022/86 15 95 


* AMSTERDAM* 

SHE Escort Service. 227837 

★ KITTY ★ 

Madrid Escort Senrice 250 34 96 

BOW CUM HftOffi BCORT 

& Guide Service. Td; 06 / 5892604-589 
1146 (tram 4 pm to 10 pre| 

CHfiSEA BCORT SSMCT. 

51 Beaudunp PIool London 5VQ. 
Tek 01 564 6513^49 (4.12 pnj 

G0CVA BCORT 

SBVKE. Tel: 46 IT 58 


GBCVA » BEAUTY* 
BCORT SBVKE. 
TH: 29 51 30 


GSCVA TB5T ESOIRT SBVKE 
far Weekend + Travel Ptean 
Reserve. Tefc 022/32 34 IS 


GBCV A - HBBC BCORT sanflCE 
Tefc 36 29 32 



MADRID SBJECTIONS BCORT Ser- 
vice Tefc 401 1507. CrtxSf Cor*. 


LONDON BAY5WATER ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01 229 0776. 


LOKBON GABRUUA BCORT Ser- 
vice. Trii 01-229 6541. 


ZOE WET Escort Agency 
Tefc 01-5797556. 


DOMNA, AMSTBtDAM BCORT 
Guide Service. Tel: (0201 762842 


FRAMQURT AREA-Femde 4 Mde 
rocort + trowel serviCB. Tel: 62 64 3Z 
BtANKRMIT JB4NY ESCORT + trav- 
al service. Tefc 069/55-72-10 
MADRID IMPACT escort and guide 
service. MukSnguaL 2614142 


FRANKFURT “TOP T9T Escort Ser- 

wg, 069/59-60-52. 

LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Hegthrew/GaNeck. Tefc 834 7945. 

MIMCH SUPREME BOOST Service. 
Tefc 089/4486038 

FRANKFURT SOMJA ESCORT Scr- 
vice. Tel: 06968 3* 42 

MUNICH -BLONDY 8 TANIA Escort 
Service. Tefc 311 79 00 or 311 79 36 

BRUOTS ANTWHEP NATASCHA 

Escort Service. Tefc 02/7317641, 
FRANXHJRr/ MUNICH Mato Escort 
Senin. 069/3864*1 5 069/3518236. 
HAMBURG - SABIUNA Escort Ser- 
vice. Tefc 040/58 65 35. 


HEATWOMT LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 994 6682. 


LE MUST DE VRiA MARRON Fratk- 
fat Escort Service 069-5601229, 

POLAM) ESCORT SStVKEFiankfurt 
Tefc 069/63 41 59. 

BRUSSELS. CHANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
viOfa Tefc (0/520 23 65. 

lONDON 1JJCT ESCORT & Gude 
Service. Tel: 01-373 02? I 


MUNICH - PRIVATE BCORT + 
Grode Service. Tefc 91 23 14 

VKNNABCORTAGENCY.TefcVien- 
M375239 


AMSTERDAM SYLVIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice (ffl 20-255191 






SLDA'S ESCORT SBTVKE Frcritfurt, 
TeL 069 - 88 S5 99. [ 

MLMCH WBCOME Escort Servn. 
Tri, 91 84 g 

NEWYOBCarr, MOMQUt Otosh- 
ta-Beth Escort Setvia. 212-807-1756. 

STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
efcOTIl / 282 11 50. 

HQUAM KB ESCORT SStVIt^im! 
222785,03094*530, 02997-3685. 
LONDON TRUttE BCORT Service 
Tefc 01-373 8849. 


* V 



































































T 


rkn r t~l‘i « 


. j ! z L 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MA^f 8, 1985 


*> 



peanuts 


Pear Sweetheart, 
I miss you 
morning, noon 
and night. 




WHEN TOU WRITE TO 
A 6JRL, YOU HAVE TO 
BE MORE SPECIFIC.. 


kv*. 



I miss you. at 
8-J5, 21:45 and 
9=36- 



BLONDIE 


1 In 

(stagnating) 

5 Merino cries 
9 Olympus name 

13 Fish entree 

15 Former queen 
of Greece 

If Gather 
carefully 

17 Asian capital 

18 Sailors' 
guardian 

20 Ind. city 

22 Mr.Tsgroup, 
with "The” 

23 Parachutist’s 
cry 

28 " evil" 

27" the 

World.” 1856 
song 

28 Sentry’s order 

29 Midler or 
Davis 

30 Aspersion 

32 Sponsorship 

36 Shoulder: 
Comb, form 

37 Louis from 
New Orleans 

48 "The Lady 

Tramp,” 

1937 song 

41 Roman or blue 
follower 

43 Shea nine 

44 Wishy’s 
partner 

48 Dog-days 
sound 

48 Mr. Bones 


48 Strong person 
52 Pilate’s words 

54 Gulf or Calif, 
bay 

55 Refer (to) 

58 "Keep It in the 
Family” 

58 Citified 

62 Shells on the 
Big Mo 

63 Vigodaand 

Fortas 

84 Golfer Calvin 
65 Writer Uris 
68 Besides 
67 Act 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to (arm 
tour ordinary words. 












HAL ET ! 


LJ 

m 



GLINJE 


TTXXj 

Ll_ 


INDOWS 

^ j 

L 

~rxx) 

□ 

□ 

Now arrange Die circled tatters to 
form the surprise answer, a* sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 

C 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday's I JumWes: SHEAF FOAMY INLAND OPENLY 

I Answer What the egotistical nudist was all wrapped 
up in— ONLY HIMSELF 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Aleanre 

•mstrrdimi 

Alton! 

BbtwImw 


HIGH 
C F 


19 
If 66 
24 75 


Banin 
Brvuell 
Bucharest 
Bwtnwil 
Cotonhnwa 
Costa Del Sol 
MbUn 
EdinMrM 
Florence 

Frankfurt 

Gene vo 

Hettlnkl 

iifontol 

inMnw 

Lisbon 


14 S7 
24 75 


72 


22 
18 
22 72 
24 75 
M 41 


If 64 
12 Si 


13 S5 
15 59 


23 
IS 59 

14 57 

15 59 


MOdrtd 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Monies 

Nice 

one 

Ports 

Prague 

fieykkfrvik 

Route 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

ZBHdi 


22 
15 59 
IS 44 
12 54 
IS S9 


LOW 
C F 
« 48 
f 48 
14 57 
7 45 
14 57 

14 a 

» SO 
11 52 
14 57 
• 44 
9 41 
3 37 
3 37 
It SI 
U 57 
B 46 
3 57 
10 50 
17 a 


ASIA 


Ba ng k o k 

MUtof 

Hons Kang 

Manila 

New Mini 

Seam 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 


HlOH 
C P 
36 97 

33 73 
31 a 

34 n 
42 108 
TO 68 
22 72 
34 93 
28 82 
17 63 


LOW 
C P 


23 73 
25 77 


24 7$ d 


16 41 
28 82 


15 59 
13 55 


AFRICA 


Algiers 
Cairo 
Cape Town 


14 
U 44 

15 St 

16 61 


19 
If 
10 SO 


7 45 
0 32 
II 52 
0 46 
U 50 

10 50 
6 43 
ID 50 

11 52 
3 37 


Harare 

Lagos 

Nairobi 

tumi 


19 66 8 46 

35 95 27 81 
21 TV 12 54 
19 44 13 55 
25 77 12 54 
33 ft 27 Bt 

23 73 15 59 

24 75 9 43 


a LATIN AMERICA 


17 43 It 52 


20 48 
14 


IB 44 
22 72 


BaenasAiras 20 68 8 46 

Lima 20 68 14 57 

Mexico ah' 34 75 7 48 

Rio <M Janeiro 25 77 19 66 

Sag PaHo 


— — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


16 Ai 

MIDDLE EAST 


13 55 
12 54 


Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 


7 45 


27 81 0 44 d 


— — — — no 

28 82 15 59 O 

27 81 IB 64 a 


Detrail 

Heooitflo 

Haestoe 

Los Angeles 

Miami 

Mlens og s U s 

Montreal 


Ankara 
Bel nil 
Damascus 

Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 
OCEANIA 

Auckland 10 44 II 52 fir 

Sydney 2t to 14 57 fr 

Cl-Cloudv; to- foggy. Ir-tair; n-noll; o-avercast; pc-nartlv 
sh- showers; sw-snow; st-stormy. 


New York 
San Fraadsce 
Seattle 
Tenon 
W ashin gt on 


52 2 
82 15 
61 7 

68 6 
73 7 

66 I 
II 20 
84 17 
70 15 
84 21 
72 4 
43 4 
82 21 
72 13 
41 W 
61 6 
50 7 

81 14 

ctaurfv; 


PC 

fr 


34 
57 
45 
4J fir 
45 PC 


a K 
St a 


n 
c 

39 
TV 
55 
5B 

42 
45 
57 

twain; 


PC 


WEDNESDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL; Very choppy. FRANKFURT: 
Ctaudv. Temp. 20—13 IM— 551. LONDON: Cloudy with rolrv Terns. 17-8 
141—441. MADRID: Fair. Tams 14 — 10 (61—50). NEW TORN: Fair. Temp. 
31 — 10 (70 — Ml. PARIS: pouay. Temp. 16— 10 Ml— »l. ROME: Cloudy. 
Temp. 19 — 12 144 - 54). TEL AVIV: Cloudy. Temp. 26 — 16 (79—61). 2JIRICH: 


33 *-25 (90 — 77). TOKYO: Rainy. Temp. 15-12 <57— 54). 


World Siock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse May 7 

CJoting prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AKZQ 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A 'Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

BuehrmannT 
Co land HkKr 
Elsevfer-NDU 
Fokkar 

Gist Brocades 

Helnekon 

Hooeovsns 

KLM 

N carton 

NatNOOder 

Ned la yd 

Oce Vender G 

Pakhoed 

PIjIUps 

Rotoco 

Rodamca 

Rodnco 


Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommertn 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


42250 431 

218 210 
W450 18SJ0 
in JO 112J0 
22250 22SJ0 
241 241 JO 
BJS 805 
7280 7*60 

20150 202 

WJ0 8930 
3750 38 

119 119J0 
IfflJO 129J0 
N&20 18850 
1S2JD 1500 
61.50 4120 
59-60 5900 

51 50.10 

,6680 6780 
17D70 171 

324 323 

6630 6650 

5640 56J0 

7X40 7350 

139.18 13980 
4840 6050 

4SJO 4550 
20740 2U50 

3S2 301 4» 
7950 2940 

16850 14550 
210 20950 


ANP.CBS General 
Prevtaas : 21380 


Index :2TU8 


B uuwte 


Artec 

Bekoert 

Cockerdi 


EBES 
GB-imw-BM 
GBL 

Gevaerl 

H oboken 

I ruer com 

KredJetbonfc 

Petrafina 

Sac Generate 

Sortoa 

Saivyy 

Traction Elec 

■JCB 

Uiwrv 

vied ta Montagna 


1715 1725 

5400 5500 
223 ZD 
3180 535 
3805 3075 
3075 3340 
1920 1940 
3605 3750 
CTO 5320 
2155 2170 
8110 8200 
6310 6800 
1850 1660 
677V 7110 
4150 4150 
388$ 3900 
4740 i 
1705 1715 
6350 6070 


Currant Stack index : 22HJ8 
Prevtaas : 2285.17 


Frankfurt 


A EG> Teletun ken 11080 11150 


Alliens vers 
Altana 
BASF 
Haw 

Bar Hive Sank 
BwVtrtMwk 
BBC 

BHF-Bonk 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cent Gum mi 
Daimler •Ben? 

Dawjssq 

Deutsche Babcock 163 leaia 
Deutsche Bank 4715D 467J8 


1235 1215 

201 48 20170 
2 1 220 21X50 
225 221 

345 343 

212J0 209 

284 283 

367 JO 36450 
177 17070 
11550 13SJC 
661.50 6fl 
3S0 34B5D 


OradAtr Bank 

GHH 

Harpener 

Heenttet 

Haecnst 

Hanoi 


22X50 21X50 
15080 151.50 
320 323 

470 475 

21150 21240 
109 109 JO 


1 Ctose Prev. 

Horten 

168 

169 

Husaei 



IWKA 

318 

316 

Kail + Sate 


Karstodt 


Kaufhoi 

228 

230 

KloecknerH^J 

251 25150 

Kloeckner Werke 

7050 


Krupp Stahl 

TO7 109 JO 


43650 

426 



MAN 

146 14950 


161 to 


Muencti Rueck 



Nlxaort 

56680 

588 


626 

620 

Porsche 

1212 

T22Z 

Prevssag 

273 SO 



12S501265D 




Rtteinirtetoll 

32450 


Sctortng 

43150 



35958 36450 

Siemens 


Tin unit 



veto 

18050 11150 

Volkswag«n— 1+ 

21020 21150 


571 

569 

Commerzbank Loan • imijo 

| Prwtoos : 1236J0 



II Baa^Uoufj 1 

Bk East Asia 

2690 


Oisung Kono 
CMna Cos 

1750 

17.10 

China L low 

1550 

1690 

Green Island 



Hone Seng Bank 

47 JS 


Henderson 

130 

225 

HK Electric 

8JS 

120 

HK Realty A 

11 JO 

1150 


3750 

38 




HK Stone Bank 

*20 


HK Telephone 

B3 

83 



655 

Hutch Whamooa 

2450 


Hyson 

055 

056 

inttCIty 

094 

097 

Jardne 

11.78 

12 

JordlneSec 

13J0 

1350 

Kowloon Motor 

1090 

KUO 

Miramar Hotel 



Now world 

755 


Orient Overseas 

2JS 

7J75 

SHK Props 

1250 

HID 

Staiux 

.130 

2575 

Swire Pacific a 

3450 


To! Chevns 

159 

1.91 

Wah Kwcna 

156 

150 

wneetock A 

730 

725 

wing On Ca 

140 

"U!h 

Wlnsor 

6775 

680 

work! Inn 

125 

135 

Hone 5e*9 IPO*x 
Prevtaas : 1*9653 

1*9X3* 


1 Jkh. 

m. 

n 


AECI 

800 


Anglo American 

2575 

2575 

Anglo Am Gold 

17200 17200 

Bor Iron 



Blyvoar 

Buffets 


1400 

B100 

De Beers 

1058 


Proton Wn 

4975 

5025 

Elands 

1*80 


GFSA 

Harmony 

m 

3325 

2825 

H Iveta 5 tael 

390 

310 

Kloof 

7400 

TWO 

Nedtonk - 

1170 


Pres Stem 

5600 

wm 

Rusolof 

164Q 

1625 


^A Brews 
St H e l ena 
Sosfll 

West Hatch ng 


738 740 
3550 3575 
612 612 
6450 4300 


Cwwwslta Stack Index ; 1864J8 


AA Carp 
Allied -Lyons 
Angle Am Geld 
Ass Brit Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Barclay* 


5129fi 5129k 

U2 182 

S36S83Vzxd 
234 — 


BAT. 


BICC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bowater Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 
Brtt TeJeoam 
Brflt 
Bril oil 
BTR 
Burmah 
CaWe Wireless 
CotourvSehw 
Cnartar Cons 
Commercial U 
Cora Gold 
CourtaukH 
DoJgeiy 
De Beers i 
Distillers 
□riefontaln 


156 

H7 

i 

I 

276 
178 

B 

. 293 

150% 148% 


223 

23 

540 

162 

J95 

SJ7 

£3 

s 


714 


FrceStGed 

GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
Giaxa C 

Grand Mat 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 


SM« 5259k 
W .300 


S2S% 

196 198 

560 566 

234 337 

11 19/3211 45/64 
288 390 

>71 


ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lcnrlto 
Lucas 

Marks end Sp 
M etal Bee 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
PandO 
Pllklngten 
Pieseey 
Prudential 
Raced Ele ct 
RcixJlouieln 
Rank 
Reed inti 
Reuters 
Royal Dutch! 
RTZ 
SootsW 


§?$ 
437 
7. 44 

TU 

aa 

304 

49S 




270 

as 

354 

442 

fl 

673 

194 


nOWIRBS 


Sears 
Stoll 
STC 

Stri Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tata and Lyle 
Tesa 
Thorn EMI 
TJ. Group 


SlOIHr 5705% 
MS 348 
$54 554 

380 

4«L 4*7/32 
SO 634 

m 6K> 

34S 348 

86 87% 

733 7» 


204 

474 

I 

439 

344 


451 

340 

457 

340 


Tratotpor Hse 
THF 

Ultramor 
Unilever t i 
United Biscuit* 
Vickers 
Wootwortti 


Banco Comm 
Centro le 
Ctoctotets 
□rod Hal 
ErtdanJa 
Farm I Id la 
Rot 

Flnsktar 
Generali 
I FI 


■taigas 
Holmobillarl 


Montadtoi 

Oihrettl 

Pfraflf 

RAS 

Rtnascenfe 

SIP 

SME 

SnkJ 

Sfaooa 

Stal 


68X50 


MIB Current 
Previous : ns 


tides: 1227 


AirUaulde 
Atethom AIL 
Av Dassault 
Ban calru 
NIC 

Bongraln 


BSN-GD 
Carre tour 


OubMed 
Dartv 
Dumez 
HK-Aouttalne 
Europe i 
Gan Earn 



LateraeCep 
Legrand 
Lcslcur 
I ‘Orest 
Mortell 


1891 1892 

tSS - 51 - 3 


2055 
721 724 
3430 2415 


Martin 
Metotin 
Mod Honncssy 
Moulinex 
O cci dent a ls 
nod Rk 
Perrier 
Petnrtes (tsej 
Peugeot 
Prtntamps 
Rallatedin 
Redauta 
Roussel Udaf 
Sonoff 

Skis Rossignoi 
Tetemecan 
Thomson CSF 


1770 1771 

1900 1905 


1874 7845 

.*35 930 


1853 1851 

10280 102 


W5 
7T0 710 

S25 521 

266JO 267 JO 
343 344 

i^ 4 

1730 I7ffl 
721 729 

IH>7 1505 
2480 2495 
535 538 


AoeN tedex : 20987 
Praytoas : 289JS 
CAC index : 217J8 
Prevtaas : ZUL30 


BOOKS 


* 


THE SIOUX 


By Irene HandL 344 pp. $15.95. 
Alfred A. Knopf 201 East 40th Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10021 ■ 

Reviewed by Michele Slung 


For many nasons. and noljurt ufisaw^ 
nauue of this particular set of Gallic pluto- 
crats, “The Sioux" isn't an easy book W raw. 
Keeping up with the characters' ever-cnangmjg 




CC^he Sioux” is a novel chat calls to mind 


the familiar image of (be rabbit frown 
in the glare of headlights. In tins case it's the 
hapless reader who’s caught, mesmerized by 
the hard glare given ofT by the family Benoir, 
an elegant but ferocious French-Creche “tribe” 
whose nickname gives the book its title. Irene 
HandL describing her creations, with ihor 
great wealth and even greater whi msical ity, 
brings their barbaric rituals to life with some- 
thing like an anthropologist's eye. 

"Outsiders, beware” is whai a sign posted on 
the Sioux reservation should caution, as Vin- 
cent Castletan, an En glish banker from a whol- 
ly different aristocratic tradition, airickly 
learns. Newly .married to the beautiful Mar- 
guerite Benoir, whose third husband he is, 
Castieton tries to rearrange some of his in- 
laws’ rituals. His efforts at mild reform, in fact, 
are all that might be considered plot in "The 
Sioux”; the rest is a sort of literary diorama, 
with the Benohs on display much as they might 
be in a museum, behind glass. 

Peering in, rate can’t help but view them as 
exotic and unreal creatures, maintaining their 
hothouse existence in residences on two conti- 
nents. When the Benoits leave France for Loui- 
siana, or vice versa, along go their Rolls- 
Royces — and the impeccable chauffeurs to 
drive them. Favorite delicacies and special 
pieces of furniture cross the Atlantic with 
equal regularity, as does a large feudal retinne: 
two valets (for one man — Armand, Margue- 
rite's brother and the head of the family), a 
chef, a maitre d'hote!, assorted maids, a nanny, 
a governess and a bodyguard. 

Armand Benoir, a small, charismatic pea- 
cock of a fellow, sees nothing at all odd in his 
family's way of doing things; in mattere of 
opulent fastidiousness, he quite sets the pace. 
At ail times, even when in bed with his mistress 
of the moment, Armand keeps perched on his 
shoulder his bad-te mp ered pet monkey, and 
he's capable of sulking for days if forced to 
dine before -9. ' 


a iidiULU'U taitaMta — _ _ _ t 

half-French actress, is now 83; she has wrtitta 
only one other novcL This one is q luridly • 
seductive enough, despite its streak of unpleas- 
antness. to make us want to know moot . 
about the author and her work. 


Michele SbaiR wrote this renew for THe 

Washington Post. - i 


BEST SELLERS 


Tfce New YortTVata - ■ 

7Iti* bu khwrin rcp«» Iroa mac an . ZOOObMnMm 
dirouabi» ibe VMttd Suies. Weeks eu bt m not Bccevaray 
ooiHecudve. i 


FICTION 


T Vs 

Week 


i Bto- 


SheUoc 


TTffi HLWT POR^RST OCTOBER, by- 

n^pEj^crraiPB. S**g*?* i£ ~~ 

CHAPTERHOUSE: DUNE, by Frank 
Herbert-. 


THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John 

D. MacDonald — . 

FAMILY ALBUM, by Dametk Sttd — 


QUEENIE. by Mkhad Korda 
PROOF, by Dick Franca 


EnehS.Ml._~, 10- 



liam F. Badklcy Jr. 


MIDBEND, by Robin Cook 


IS HOTEL DU LAC. by Anil* Brookner _ 

NONFICTION 

XXTA: Ac Aatobioyaphy. by Lee la- 
i with William Nowak 


IACQCCA: Ad 
cocca 


BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Shevdienko ... 


3 SMART WOMEN. FOOLiSJ CHOICES. 


by Cooadl Conn andMdvyn Kinder .... 
TOE COURAGE TO CHANGE, by Den- 


na Whotey 

LOVING EACH! 


be 


OTHER, by Leo Bmce*- 
BLOOD OFABRAHAti. by iimray 


Solution to Prerioas Pncde 


Carter , 


ONCE UPON ATMBlbyi CHori* Vimh^ 

MU 


moan nnaaB aaaa 
ddho naann □□□□ 
□nnn □□□□□ anaa 
nnaaaaaaQanaaaa 
□□□□ OG1C3 
dido DHaaDBaanHa 
dddedd ana □aoa 
□EDO □□□□□ Dana 
□DOO □□□ □□0QQ 

□BQonDaaaQa ana 

□HQ □□□□ 

ncHnaaaaQaaaan 
□hoe aaaan □□□□ 

DEED DaanD DDQD 
eqdd □□□□□ naan 


THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach 

10 "SURELY YOU'RE JOKING, MR. 


FEYNMANN."^ Rkherd P. Feynman 
11 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shd Sdver- 


octo 


12 CTT1ZEN HUGHES, by bfiefaacl Drosnin 
iJOaTKEMAS.byDo«|las 


13 METAMAG 
R. Hotaadltr 


14 DISTANT NSGHBORS. 

15 SON OF THE M 

EvaaS CooneO 



ADVICE. HOW-TO APS MISCELLANEOUS 
NOTHING DOWN. by Robert G ABen ■" L 


K>WN.by 

WEIGHT WATCi&RS QUIC1 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by 
dctdi 


CK START : , 
Jean N»- ..i. 


DR. ABRAVANEL*S BODY TYPE PRO- - 
GRAM FOR HEALTH, FTINESSTAND ' 
NUTRITION, by EffioiDAbravDd -. "* 
WHATTHEY DONT TEACH YOU AT : - 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL.' \rf 


Mark H. McConaedc . 




5/8/B6 


THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jt« ~ 

Snath , .C : Vi 


BRTOGE 








By AJan Truscott 


brie 


I T is hard to concave of 
bridge as a game for any 
number of players other than 
four. A three-handed gaoK, 
Towie, enjoyed some vogue in 
the 30's, and there have been 
several attempts at deviang a 
two-handed game. 

The best in the second cate- 
gory is no doubt Bridget te. The 
Bridgette deck includes two 
special cards that together 
with the dub deuce, are “co- 
lons.” These are playable at 
any time as “losing jokers," 
permitting a player to evade 
the normal obligation to fol- 
low suiL Another unique fea- 
ture is ibe opening call of “zero 
no-trump,” which ranks jnst 
below one dub. 

Bridgette was long the fa- 
vorite two-handed game of die 
late Waldemar Von Zedtwitz, 
one of the great names in 


He, 

in Hawaii with Kansd, who is a 
professional games inventor. 
The creative imagination 
showed itsdf on the diagramed ■ 
deal, played many years ago, 
with KansQ in the South seat 

The orthodox opening for 
South is one dub. but he chose 
one spade, keeping his seven- 
card dob suit as a surprise for 
the opponents. This would 
have backfired if dubs had 
been the right spot for North- 
South, bat as it was, it worked 
like a chann. 

West, who employed the tra- 
ditional strong jump. overeall, 
could not rerist doubling four 
spades and so giving Kauai a 
vital due to the location of the 
spade jade 

The opening heart lead was 
raffed, and die spade king was 
led. West won and. pbiyed a 
second high heart, forcing an- 
other raff. The spade nine was 



finessed, 'and when lias 
and fias&BBbnmtsufc 
breathed a sigh of relict He 
took a winning dub finesse 
drew the. last trump and w- 
peated the dub finesse to make 
anavertricL . * 


:i3fne%;rtii ! 


MEBOi 


NORTH 

~*QB> 

o jun 

. O ICQ 7 4 

*194 


fl-ll 

*7 


EAST 
*93 
Vf 74 
0109931 
*KI1 f 


•• SOUTH CD) _ 

* K 10 5 4 3 

W— I 

71 

*AQ J 0933 

BWfa tide* w ar n valnekvbta. The 
MdcSng: 





West lad the hvrt kkif. 


gees 



Close 

•rev. 

Si me Darby 

1 J 8 


Sbare Land 

166 

256 

S’nunt Pi rm 



S Steamship 

UK 

NA 

SI Trading 

452 

654 


159 


DOB 

630 

430 

1 Straits Times lad. Index: 

78931 

] Previses : nut 



ill StacUnbi II 

AGA 

420 

420 

Alfa Level 

206 

2 B 2 

Asec 

346 

346 

Astra 

440 

438 

Allas Copco 

115 

114 

Bo) Men 

216 

N.Q. 

EJectraiu* 

316 

315 

Ericsson 

285 

290 

Esse he 

355 

845 


191 


Saab-Scanta 

NjQ. 





Skonska 


93 

SKF 

226 


SwedisttMelch 



Volvo 

246 

245 

AHaersnanom Index : 399 JO 

| Prevtaas : 3 » JO 



II 11 

ACI 

228 

223 

ANI 


■ 1 

ANZ 


K. I 

BMP 


tn 

Bora! 

32 * 

322 

Bougainville 

KJ 

220 

Breen bits 


380 

Cotas 

370 

378 

Comal cu 

226 

235 

CRA 

642 

640 

CSR 

290 

299 


225 

213 

Ektarsixl 



Hootor 


■Til 

Magellan 


■ 1 

MIM 



Myer 


179 

Oekbrtdge 


« 


kII 

430 

PosekJon 

405 

405 

ROC 

540 

536 

Santos 





■All 



■Til 

WaodsMe 

157 


tftrmsM 

360 

362 

AR Ordlnartat lodn W 8 J 8 ■ 

Prevtaas ^ 75 iN 
Source; Rowers. 



il Tmkym \\ 

Akai 

440 

440 

Asohl Ctom 

663 

B 6 S 

Asanl Glass 

881 

890 


834 


Brkigestono 

1273 

527 

1280 


Iff 

1690 

C.itati 

3 SS 

Dal Nippon Print 

uno 

1030 


33 

set 


m 


NJL 

9240 

Full Bank 

NA 

1500 


NA 

1740 

FulltSU 

NA 

1170 

Hitachi 

NA 

SOS 

Hitoenl Cable 

NA 

713 


1360 

13*0 

Jaeen Air Lines 

7300 

1600 

Kajima 

306 

300 


Kansal Power 
Kmraaaid Steel 
Kirtn Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
MatauEleclMb 
Matsu ElecWorto 
MMMIM8 
Mlfsubism Own 

Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Haaey 
MHsublsMCora 

Mitsui and Co 
MHsukratU 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
KHctaSec 
Ntopon Kogoku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Stoel 
Nippon Yuaon 
Nttaan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pioneer 

Dlrnh 

ATWI 

Sharp 
Shhnani 

Shlnetsu Ctiemtaal 
Saar 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Ctan 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tetsei Cora 
Tdsho Marine 
TakeOaChem 
TDK 
Teiiln 

Tokyo Elec, pomot 171 D 1708 , 

Tokyo Marine 835 835 , 

Topcon Printing BSI SSI 1 

ind 457 452 i 


GnaSm stodb i 


*ri\ 


Ht«b Law Close Oge 


1738 


Taray in 
Toshiba 


ToyoTc 
YernakMSec 


NIKMI/D_L index : 1358630 
Prae teM : 139513 * 
new tndex^WTJtf 
P r e»taui : 97 X 54 



259 

252 

3BS 

NjO. 

U! 

Praserfiieove 

694 

496 

Hgw Par 

202 

203 


242 

243 

utai Banking 

6 

5.90 

3CBC 

835 

MS 

SUB 

254 

256 

Jverseas Union 

278 

NjO. 

ShansrHa 

2JB 

NO. 


Zorich 


Adta . 
Aknmsse 
Bank Lou 
Brawn Bowl 
aba Gator 
Credit Suisse 
Elect rowc+t 
Georg Ftacuer 
Halderbank . 
irtenflscount 


LwtoHCyr 
Nestle _ 


3400 AMI Prce 
DIO Asnlco E 
500 Agra Ind A 
16370 Alt Energy 
300 Mia Nat 
SO AtooCom 
SOAtgomaSt 
lOOAndnWAf 
SUOArgeen 
65750 Alco I f 
1970 SPC 
71031 Bonk I . 
135439 Bank NS 
M 508 BarrMa 
633 a Bonanza R 
3 SD Bratome 
SOOBramatao 
9418 BCFP 
51005 BC Res 
8425 BC Phone 
400 Brunswfc 
WOO Budd Con 
13328 CAE 
3S300CCLA 
SOOCDbtbBi 
175650 Cod Frv 
9600 C Nor West 
”4950 C Pacfcrs 
W 743 can Trust 
200 C Tung 
800 CGE 
53410 CI BkCem 
ItSOCdn Nat Res 
91848 CTtre A F 
TOO Cara 
4400 Cakmese 

iscetonlTSe 

400 C Dlstb A 
SDOCDtetbBf 
25885 CTLBoto 
4000 Convenlra 
200 Conwest A 
SOOOCosekaR 
150 Conran A 
22 S 50 Crawra 
15790 Czar R 88 
3671 V Daon Dev 
800 DooaA 
13044 DsntsanAp 
34544 DentoanBf 
BOODsv el con 
6 WQ Dtcknsn A I 
2300 Dicfcnsn B 
142 * Damon A 
12956 DofOSCO 
26)00 Du Pont A 
500 Dylan A 
5200 Ernes 
3400 Equity S*T 
30050 FCAIrdl 
7425 C Falcon C 
T 03 « FtoJbntae 
1050 Fordv Res 
409 Fed Ind A 


ST7% 179k 17W+ Vk 
S1£k lMk 168k + lb 
S 7 W T* 7V. 

S21S6 Hit 21 %— It 

nm ten ten— u 

ai 2041 TOVt- V. 
XZ2 22 22 + Vk 

53416 3416 3416 - 1 - Ik 

531 20% 21 + % 

»U I 9 
535 * 35 % 35 %+ % 
55 % 546 5 %— % 

512 % 13 % 13 % — % 
133 129 129—3 

440 430 440 +W 

470 470 470 +5 

517 % 17 % T 7 H— 86 
59 % 8 % 9 — % 

M 231 235 

5 Z 2 21 % 22 

*15% 15% 15% — % 
S 2 M 23 % 23 %+ 16 
516 % 16 % 16 % 

* 27 % Z 7 » 27 % — U 
SS% 5 % 5 V»+ % 

5 ) 4 % 14 14 %- 8 fc 

522 3 M 6 21 % — % 

529 XV. 28 %+ 16 
53756 37 % 3716 — U 
513 % 13 % 13 %—% 
562 62 63 

531 % 31 % 31 %+ % 
38 - 38 28 +1 

— — 9 


*• 


100 WcGtw’H 
13 S 99 MertandE 
10129 Malsan A f 
TOO Motion B 


506 Murphr 

iNobficoL 


10001 

197836 Norondo 
9332 Narcm 
228617 NVO ABA f 
UOOMomcaW 
2W60 NuWst» A 
38000 akwood 
MOshawoAf 

700 Panvwr 

Wl PanCan P 
5400 Pembtoa 


3300 Ptonlx Oil 
-Point 


«a Pine I 
4600 Place GO o 
44107 PJaeer 
17600 Provtoo 
«0Oue»*rg» 
700 Ram Pel 
6tooR«toorfi 


33000 Wd M entis 

mmamtsarvi 


512% 12% 12V^— V6 


4650 F CJty Rn 
iGcndltA. 


1*33 I 

27*00 Geoc Camp 


11000 Geeenxta 
iGibrottor 


SBC index : 444JD 


N.O.: not auetad: NA; net 
available; xd: OKilvMentL 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE UKE 
WTTHOUT n? 

YfiBGND 

EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


24041 

4tniSGeideerpf 
7300 Grandma 
175 GL Forest 
970GiPecme 
mOGreytind 
252&8H Cravp A 
i50Howfcer 
903 Havas D 
2117 H Bov Co 

78609 ImaSCD 

2900 mdo) 

10*35 inland Gas 
214558 Intt Thom 
57006 inter FHM 
2500 Ivaoe B 
1S600 Jannedi 
SOKamICatta 
32S Ketsey H 
1545S) Kerr Add 
5819Lahott 
17447 Lae Mnm 
600 LOntCem 
1500 Lotanp 
nnuLoc 
34215 LottowCn 
3640 MlCC 
9S90MUanHX 


*6% 6% 616— % 
51716 1716 1756— % 
SK* 5% 5%+ % 

5% 5%+% 

V ^ 

3 B V< ‘ 380 ^ ISO 1 ' + ^ 
513 12 12—16 

S191V 1916 19%+ % 
1*0 19J +2 

415 400 400 — 5 

ffO 400 409 +10 

SIM. 13% 13% 
fl2% 12% 17% 
w% 8 S%+ % 

%% 8 t%+% 

MS 230 230 — 5* 

S ?T B&+* 

& 21 7 S + “ 

gW* ««* 1*16-% 

»0 37t 276 —4 

*21 21 21 

13 1316—% 

5?«< 29% 29% + % 

SI all* 3^1* 

*16 9W+ % 

2» 25% 

19% »«, 19%-% 
*18 9% 9% — % 

*T4 15, 16 

»fi% 26% 36%-% 
JJ 14% 

518 17% (8 

JWJ » 8% 

S3 

^ T*' 

S3% 22% 

Sffi Jr a +1 

SS*23S 2 iS u ‘ +v ‘ 

*12% 12% 12% — % 



11600 Rostov 1 
78«R«vn Pro A 
400 Rovers A 
OTPO gomon 

2100 Scott* I 


1620 Stott Con 
80150 StorrUt 
3008 Stoma 
59 ao stator %( 
3041 Saottwn 
16*75 St Brodest 
121 158 Stetao A 
17267 Sutotra 

6 NB steep R 

*Hi , i!£ arB,r 

tbjoo Sydney o 
4500 Tat oarp 
1960 Tara 
♦“TertCtj-A 
43900 Tecfc B t 
lion Tea can 
»_iaiTncm n a 
fWKTorDmBk 
18 072 ToretorBt 
27 OT 0 TrnsMI 
900 Trinity Res 
TOMTmAlio UA 
JWBTrpanPL 
-CTOTriinoe 
ZPOgTrizecAf 

<7000 Turbo f 

WUSIscoe 


’ 522% 22% 22%— . U 
405 480 400 ; 

*15% 1516 15% • - 
*16 14 16 . 

525% 25% 25%+% 
*25 25 25 + K 

SI 616 15% 15% 
515% 15% T5%— % 
*5% 5% 5%— % 

521% 21% 21% - 

50 48 4* + T 

S9% 9% 916+ % 

52£k 24% 24%+% 
■7% 7% 7% + % 

533 32% 32% 

*18% MM 18%+ 16 
*7% 7% 7%— tt 

• 529% 29% 27%+ % 
136 128 135 

*24% 24% 7416— % 
HS% 18% 18% + % 
425 425 425 +5 

S4V6 616 6% 

*10% IO% 10%+ M 

S3 £*&+? 

sii% roa 
*39 39 3* 

,86% .6% 69b 

*M% 25% 25%+ % 
*8% 8% 816—'% 
*29 28% 29 + % 

*6% 6% Mb— 16 

5816 816 8)6+16 

59% 9% 9% 

. .54916 48% 49 16 

*19 15% 18 +2% 

M0 19% 19%— % 
»B • 280 298 +W- 

230 220 230 +5 

B4% 24% 24% + Ik 

6 3S S +< - 

ra% TO6-U. 

Ss a 

«T% 56% 57% +1% 

gB% 20% 5o%— « 
*21% 21 21 — % 
yp-JPJS »»ts 

395 388 390 + S 

*26 ’6 26 26%+ 16 
*26% ^ 26%— B 

450 635 43S 

526 36 26 

53 51 52 —2 

*7% 7% 7%— % 

*11% 11% 11%-% 
ni% 11% 11% 


$£. 



2300 


VerettAI 

Vesleron 


Smi 10% lB%+% V'/ti.*. 

W. 95 95 +r:‘ 


56% 5% 5% , 

lQm&esttart a3Vl SI ^^ W ’7%+ B ^ - * 
10000 WesHorto IS. 15 15 

JgwwMtmin *16% 14% 14%-%. 

5®5Weston 58V 80% 80%—% 

M» St S%^ , 

Total Sates: H378JEB stares 


^T' 


TCEnSMteU 


due 

U1L40 


Provtael 

2AMM0 


MlUlVal May 




ggj Batik Mont 
Wmo Can Bam 

M40 

wo Mat Tret 
wn NatBkCda 

SS 70 o£! ttCar * 

JBB Rofland A 

R^dSank 

HK Boy Tret Co wun 

T2M StataCrB A 538% 

Total Solasr 2*5*16 snS5s 


High Law Case One 
*26% .26% 2f% 
*|6% !i% 16%+ ta 


10 % rote— % 


*|5% lSIk 15% + Jh 


*18% 18% 1B% + 


*33% 33% 33%— 9a 
§W* 19% 19% 
*28% 28% 2B%— W 






Industrials Index: 


10856 


Prevfoa* 

109 J +1 


Sv J 



I 




1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


1 ■ ’*•«! .MS... M L, P ^ f * ■ ;• 

.*'? *vnsr i . ‘Car- i.. *• -fir-.i 

r - /.a? Ai\'thoftv < 


Thomas Still the Pistons’ Drive UEFA: S ® 1800 of Inconsistency 




. E. •& Anthony Coccon 

i' r ?' "»■ - n. '“'Tiita / BEOlOrrrrltwasilBd^ 

. '» ll- ' l ' ‘■•if.iL ,, h%l j afWfljcDeirotl.PistonslJcatdo- 
, r; 1 ' l “ 1 b.«h f , Tending champion Bono* 125- 

_j, ’■'••tfc l-ULffl: Game 3 of the National 

- jiL Basketball Association's Eastern 

' ‘ ’ ,; » lV Qwferccce acaffinals. It should 

v a , iare.-been j_ relatively happy 
— i- ’ 

P WtT ■ 1 Kstorguard had had. 26 points 

1 k r, *'i-r 4 R$ ^ ■ . ^-I6>«ists (and te w(wld go 

: * - - - ’ ' on to ride', np 21 poiim and .10 

: rebounds inSun day's scries- ty- 

“w 1 ingvictoryjr , . 

41 '* But'in'fioat of his locker after 

*vt»k ^ ! ' inafternoon practice, his only 

trux demotion was a ScowL 
; Only a&tt the media horde has 
^ Uj - ! , !! ' ■ . . - d*rarteddDes!*rhoinas relax. 

“ “ ,!s '• vss,. A 1 v, ' ^^Tbepmsshas&jobtodoand 
>»? ki!«.s ' . t ; ' lundosUndihaChes^^But 
\ it seeaoislike.tf you’re sot saying 
M Vii" • .i 6 ^anything amtroversial, ttot get- . 

'• ‘-jia 5 - ' ' ting into a words war, tSiey don't 

* t k t; 5 , vrtntiaiear ft.- They walk away 

V1 . *' • ■ and : act Eke: Tm not helping 

iuttjtVx - 1 ! ; , than.Igo^H'sthdffpibblfiiiL’* 
‘i..,.'*" ;; J • As recently as last season, he 

t - ;. * ! ■» i- : ; ■ nrighthave assumed the fault 

: v ??". v ' was. his. The first-draft 1983 

p. m i u ■ V'l'fe ‘ ' choice from Indiana remains one 

I. r * ■*” J 1 rf dm Jeagntfs most dmnknl 

, v ‘ 1 i !; r pteyt^bm h&dimteaiOTcaiFp- 

■* ... k ... ■ t : day was pan of .an ongoing 

M»NFh ii4.\ * : trantfdnhaim “Tmpretty sure 

\»’>* ^ „|.i... ... n , it’s there, t ’;hesaicL “Tm not one 

•£'•?* " , to atbadc and analyze myself, 

ill? ■' ’ v ' ‘ ^ fr'rj hot I fm dewetoping as a 
'' ' «•: w. . J * T person.''' • ' 


i, 


*»‘TniS 

Uj..! . . 

*. > •*.i‘ s "i“. 

'h Kl ?t m ... 

ii} . r f-h.,.,... 


^ { K K s.i 

- '.Ji • v 

m , i,i 

“ T 

I- ; ; 

‘li U. ! 

.*J| ; s 1 , : i 

«»A|iu.x:^', 1 V - - i; 

■■ •. I ' 

XK *' v.». 4 ■! .... ... j . 

Mi\Fh in.\ 11 ‘ : 

l A.. 1 .'.’ .. | 

V-4.A ■' 

u ’ v,jtt ** * 'frv 

!I', Uv; <.v;;. 

VI/4., K 

UV :; 

llt'I in u ! • ; Bu ^ "t 
H>svv*v f 4 ^ '» 

«i! 4IWAIUV • , : ri>i 

A;:vt 

l: A\ It < 1-i.r.H^' 1 

V.U i=J v * ’ 

‘ 5:1 , j : * 1 - '-i 

<t«s. v,„ ! 1 


Thomas, who Turned 24 last 
week^has become Ins own per- 
son. He’s no longer **Podcet 
Magic," a slightly bdinfing ref- 
. erence to Earvin Johnson rf the 
Los Angeles Lakers, another all- 
star who also happens to be 
Thomas's best friend. 

These daws, he's simply Isiah 
Thomas, basketball player. 
Looking at the numbers, that’s 
nd bad thing to be. An aDwtar in 
each of ms NBA campaigns, 
Hwmas averaged 21 punts a 
game and set a league record for 
assists (1,123) in the 1984-55 reg- 
ular season. In the playoffs, his 
scoring has increased to 23.S 
points; he's averaging 13 assists a . 
game and is footing 51percent‘ 
from the field. 

That. Thomas's playoff stats 
are better, that he seems to have 
a grimmer aspect — and that the 
Ptsrons are in the second round 
of the idwofisfor the first time 
since 1977 —aren’t random co- 
incidences. “I think up to tow 
he's, been searching for where he 
belonged, on the -team or in the. 
league,” says center KH Laiin- 
beer. “Now it’s just established 
that he's a grea t player. He’s, the 
authoritative figure on our team. 
What he s^s is the final word on 
how things will go for us.” 

Thai comes from an all-star 
who plays the focal-point posi- 
tion on most NBA teams. It’s not 


i*‘At ?r.‘v.v. 


’j 

i-. 





»U .:*»* V •• 4 :v 

ill. Mill.'..?.. . : 4f, i 

na.?«i tvs •‘«‘.nii,Mni 

.. 

Vi* ft*.-. ■*'.►. \Ttfl 
* I ■4.:Va I’.. - -K 1 • 

-AN U ' •• •: •:v l > 

t, in. V •’! ■.>!■• 

l 1 ■ v • •••; : , 

A l*M - i '• ■ t\* 

x ,^-Vfc, ^ ; 

•.,*!. i - . 1 v; . 


* . - 

. ■ 

i- i... . . .. ... 

{.• it:. 


buMnOM Kb btanctond 

Thomas, finessing the bafi past Bostimfs Dennis Johnson. 


riv-1; h-hlAA- 


Transition 




ATLAHTAf— P tO CW POSOHl PfffB. P«CtV- 
OK Ifw ■UppMnm*a( , lMBV : AnbM IW. 
Raadlad Jtff Dcdmon. ottetw, from RWv 
mood of Hw Intornaftonol UNttuo- 
PITTSBURGH— AcffVOtad Tim FolLflwrt. 
stop, from the dbafakd IU. Saul RMool Be*. 
i laid, wwiHIbiw to Hovmtl at itw pacific 
Coaa Lmm, 

FOOTBALL 

Canadian Footbafl LHBM 
- ' - TORONTO— Stonod Lnmont Maaetwm. 
aonwtwck. and Frank On Kina. fltW a fwi 
(odd*, to muRtvoor oMBracf*. 

NMMmI.FmIMI LM«M 
: CHICAGO— Stonad Mik* TomczQk. ouar. 
torbaefc, to a thnw-yoor conlr act 
INDIANAPOLIS— StonM PHI Basao,auor- 
'' •rtwt*; Corf Alkani cod Edward L*o,wld*» 
ibcelvtra; Jom»Ora»and RonZlQikowsU, 
flMbadurund EHeSmtttV'dcfmSIvo bock. 
-KANSAS CITY— Stonod Bobby Dantoto, 
Caesar AUtsmrt, Dm Fla la, and Malcolm 
Hairston. ummuAws; Handy vooltcw. 
ouardr Lorry stontwnsan. nuartorbackj By- 
ron Brown and ante SmRtv runHng backi; 
Oavld Wood, wide receiver.- Mark Dowdell 
and John Waitor. Haiti endar Doug EUwr. 
Terry Gooden and Bill Tumor, offensive Ifaw- 
dm; BHf Evtonf, Scott Hanlnoton and Joe 
O'Brien, defensive linemen; Mark Brandon. 
■MUteMcCoeMond. defensive Dock*, and Dkk 
iMwn and Dodee Scttworftbvra.' ktekers. 

' MIAMI— Acquired- Brvan Clark, ooorter- 
JDOCJC, ftwn Cincinnati for More eooskJer- 
otlonv - - 

WASH! NOTON— Stoned David Mills, itotd 
end; Tonv Keaona. suord; Don Eernloseo. 
BIB Leas and Mike Wooten, ceidert; Rea Po- 
Areon, todd*; Tony Kenona Manr Alton, Bo. 
rhiPenderargwondAndro Gory, wide receto. 
era,- Kurt Kotontlxls and Mike Kenealy. 
safeties; Marv Allen and AM* Satete. line. 
Jddm ; Deri Coteman, defensive Tack to. and 
VMlte Newton runrina back. 

HOOCBY " 

umMmoI Hirfryt LmuM 

' BOSTON Nam ed Butch Corine conch. 
MHtoMtftnKV OMfctant ooocn. and Jean Ra*. 
telle jpeckrf odsUflflHflt scout. . 


Soccer 


L Curtis Stranoe 

$397,115 

- z Colvin prat* 

smfto 

X BcrnhanJ Lantwr 

$267435 

4. Mark ffllMan 

S24Z311 

S. Onto Sfodter 

K23Z99S 

. 6. Loony WOCflttos 

$230991 

- 7. Rav Ftovtf 

$225,147 

S. Funy Zraikr 

574*156 

9. Tom KJto ■ 

$149402 

10. Tom wotm . 

$144,999 

11. Mark Mcaimbar 

smau 

1Z Frod Couatai 

$130995 

11 MJks Sfnltti 

$131,109 

U. Sin BQltesfens . 

*130771 

IS. Larry ftfnfear 

snua 


EhSUSN RR8T DIVISION 

Coventry fli Liverpool 3 

Leicester X Sunderland D 
wtti 'Ham 1, Jlorwfcfe 0 
Patau standtaes: Ivertoa ttoOMe tOTsO 
M; Moncbtsler Unltea 73: Toit«nbQm71; Uv- 
erpoai <7; Arsenal 45; Southampton^; SbeF 
field Wednesday S2 j Notrtmdinm ParatfAl; 
dieton Ui Aston Villa St; Leicester, west 
Brantwich.Neweosito5l ; Queens Park Raae- 
mSB; WaHordWl LVtaoNU uwwWiM: Wesf 
Horn. Norwich AS; Coventry, Sunderland 40; 
State*. 17. 

WORLD CUP QUAUnrOffi 
- - - Asm eraap >b 
• t|BB % Qatar 1 fin CeleufM). 

Spiraa o u aH f ka tor second round! 


— Football 
IJSFL Standings 

RASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T Pet PF PA 

Ttnrwo Buy B 3 D .727 2tt- £E 

Birmtaphcrat 7 4 fl AK 264 JI* 

tlew Jersey . 1 a 0 M 2H » 

-tocmwvfne . * s 0 3*1 27* 372 

MempMS i 3.o JO 20 22? 

Sommer# 5 S \ S» 300 1» 

Orlande - 2' f 0 .1*3 1** 3t0 

. ' : WESTERN CONFERENCE 


4M 2P 2U 
J636 Vi 3W 



.1 

7- 

3 t 
3 • I 

Donvor . 

• ,7- 

4 0 

Arizona 


7 _ 0 

• &»Ano*tat 

.-3 


V. Pomona . . 

3 


. , San Antonio 

3 



JB 179 2tt 

an’w in 

J73 U» *t 


Houston AS, Perttand 7 


SCORING 

LDon Paolayf TUf. 2, Craft SMtwr, 7M7. 3, 

Larrv Mb«,7tU5.4. LarwrY Wadkins. 70S0. A 

- CaMn Peale^BJlaDan PohL31M.7.CurUs 
stramK.7an.i.Corav Pavin,m77.». Ed Finn. 
7079. ift Tora Wflfaon. 70*2. ... 
AVERABC DftlVINC DISTANCE 
I, Fred Oximes. 27L1 2. Andy Dean. 276.1.3, 
Gn» Nbrmbn, 274JL 4, BUI Oknson. 23KX S, 
Mac VGrady and sondv Lyle. 2714. 7, Jim 
DenL 2713. a Dai PohL 271A 7, Em Twtess. 
7ns. 10. Bobby WOdkJns. 3JU. 

ORiVINO PGRCENTACe fM FAIRWAY 
L CaMn Fedhe 4QA 3, Hale Irwtn, JOS. 3. 
David Ethwrth. 793. A Tim Nofrlfc 774. 5, 
Taitt KHe. M. A Mike RCU, 745. 7. Larry 
Notion. J«a A Jack Renner. 750, 9, Bruce 
Ltoteke oM Scott stnvsorv 749. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
LJock Nlcklaus,J34.2.AICeltttrDWV727.3,. 
Bruce Uetxfce, 736, ADaaFohL72S,&Calvln 
Poele, .72*. A Mm Mtaaffey, 717/7, Corey 
Pavin. JEL ADoue Towel I, J89. 9. Tze-Ctamti 
Chen,7C7. 1A MoC CTCrodV, 7S5. 

AVERAOE PUTTS PER ROUND 
t> Klta» AraL 3774. 2, Lorn Roberts and: 
Morrls Handsky, 2t48L A Nick Mat, SUB. ft 
an Oil Roaiauu.2as7>A Ed Fiort,2SAS.7, 
Fixrnk Conner, aeja. A Funv Zoeiler. 2A77. 9. 
Three fled Wttft 297k. 

PERCE MTAOC OF SUBFAR HOLES 
I.CratoStadler.JOA&tjarmyVtodkfiiAJJt 
1 Tm woieoii 72t A IW Sutton, 721. A ta- 
Owraia»#n.7i>.ACurtlsStranoeondPtiOUp 
Btodmer, J97. A Dnn Psolev. Tli 9. Fred 
Couples, JUX 1A Ed Fieri, 711. 

- .. _ CAOLEX • 

V Lanv R Inker. 9. % Curtft Strange, Fred 
Catiole* and Buddy. Gardner. B. $, Crato 
Stoner, Curvy Pavfai and Howard Twltty. 7, X ' 
Ftvo tied wtti) a • 

BIRDIES ' 

L Fred Cowles, am. X Crato Sndtor,197. 3. 

• Bernhard Lanoer.WlA Curtis Strange, H7.A 
. Jeey Sfndeipr, J*S A Hoi tottarv W. 7. Scot# 
SbapHKL WL A Larry Rtafcer, 145. 9. Gary 
Knot and Dm Paoley. -MIL 


COLLEGE 

CALIFORNIA IRVINE— Named Bata 

Thole assistant men's braket b oll oooch. 

FAIRLEKM DICKINSON— Gove Tom 
Green, boskehMll coach, a three voar con- 
tract extension, 

IONA- Named. Harold Cracker football 
conch. 

LOCK HAVEN— Honied Kurt Kanasfcie 
men's ba sk etball coach. 

MCNEESE STATS An n ouncod the rattre- 
ment of Emi# Ouplechla athletic director, 
ettacrive July L 

PRINCETON— Named Chuck Yriaoyen di- 
rector of athletic -conununteatlbns. . 

TENNESSEE WESLEYAN— Named Ken 
Henry football coach. 

SOUTHERN CONFERENCE— Announced 
Ibat Kennett) G. Gennann,comnilsUoner. will 
retire affective Jim I9BA . 

VIRGINIA— Stoned Gaonie Welsh, football 
coach, and Terry Holland, basketball coach, 
to KHvuar conirads. 

UA. AMATEUR BASKETBALL ASSOC— 
Named Lee Rdm of South Florida coodi of the 
UA. team tar the World UpMirsttv Games. 


Golf 

PGA Leaders 

. Statistical leaders on tke P r ototo tawH Oetf- . 
era Areedatlon tour hi reran ttw Touowroear 
o* Ctaamptoes: 

EARNINGS 


that way with Detroit, winch 
used to give Coach Chuck Daly 
pause for concern, “It’s a bn 
strange being so depouteni on a 
Wodt-1 [1.85-meter] guard, bat 
obviously Isiah is an outstanding 
player," Daly said. “There's a big 
load placed on. you with any suc- 
cess, but is the time Fvc been 
hoe Iaah’s only become more 
maha^ his concentration level is 
oonssteatly Wgher. 

“The decisions he makes .are 
the best thing for oar dub." 

Sometimes Thomas’s deci- 
sions involve inapediate, hands- 
on action. In a game dominated 
by behemoths, it may be his dir 
minutive stature that creates 
such a stir when such moments 
occur. The ultimate came in the 
fifth game of last season’s first- 
round playoff; New York wot, 
but not before Thomas forced 
overtime — by scoring 15 points 
in the fourth period’s final 1:57. 
“There are nines.* 1 said Daly, 
■^when he feds he can go fxne-on- 
Gve and no one will stop him.'’ 

Thomas no longer tries to 
fathom such incandescent mo- 
ments. “The game isn’t that com- 
plicated to me. AH Tm doin’ is 
playin' bafi," he said. “People 
ask me to break things down, to 
describe the science of passing. 
Man, by the time you’d try to 
stop and think about all that, the 
play’s over." 

Some ttanwnflt« say Thom- 
as’s greatest contributions come 
away from the basketball, and be 
indeed may be proudest of his 
leadership qualities. In Thurs- 
day’s Game 3, on Boston’s first 
possession after Robert Parish 
leveled Lahnbeer with an elbow, 
Thomas took Larry Bird out of a 
shot with a fo re arm to the head. 

“If one of my guys is fighting 
or needs help, men I’ve gotta be 
there. If I'm with you, fm with 
you all the way,” he said. Tm 
not gonna sit around and watch. 
Even if I get beat up, at least I 
can say, *You got a mack eye, I 
got a black eye, but we were 
there.’ That’s a Jot different than, 
‘Man. you really got messed 
up-’" 

Thomas knows there are more 
subtle forms of leadership as 
welL To make everyone on die 
team happy, I think that’s really 
my job, to keep them away from 
problems off die court and on. 
Chuck may ydl at a guy during 
practice. HI go to the guy ana 
say, ‘He’s telling you right —just 
don’t take it personally because 
he’s ydhng,’ * 

Thomas is able to impart such 
advice now because he's taken it 
to heart himself. “If they still 
want to think of me as a little 
Magic, that’s OX It docsnU - 
bother me. Tm very comfortable 
with myself. I respect myself.” 


Baseball 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pd. GB 


Boltl more 

Taranto 

Detroit 

Boston 

New York 

Clevetana 

Milwaukee 

California 

Minnesota 

Kansas CtTV 

Chicago 

Seattle 

Oakland 

Texas 


West Division 
17 9 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Dtvtste 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

cttJcaoo 

14 

■ 

■936 

— 

New York 

14 

0 

AM 

— 

Montreal 

15 

9 

m 

— 

St Louis 

11 

13 

Asa 

4 

PhHwtotoWa 

ID 

13 

-4 35 

41ft 

Pttttburpti 

0 15 

Wed DMsbu 

J40 

6Vj 

Las Ansctao 

w 

12 

530 

— 

Son ohm 

12 

11 

xa 

Mi 

Houston 

m 

12 

JQO 

1 

Atlanta 

if 

1Z 

-478 

ito 

Cincinnati 

n 

13 

A5B 

2 

Son Francisco 

9 

15 

JJ5 

4 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The season’s 
curses are coming home to roost 

Between now and the end of 
May, the grand finales of European 
dub soccer will be tinged with ridi- 
cule. Two of tin three major com- 
petitions — the UEFA Cup final's 
first leg this Wednesday and the 
Cup Winners’ Cup final a week 
latex — involve teams which, in 
common justice could not both be 
there. 

Rapid Vienna reached this stage 
in the Cup Winners’ Cup because 
UEFA ruled that a missfle thrown 

Rob Hughes 

from the crowd and knocking out a 
player is cause to replay a match. 
Real Madrid reached the UEFA 
Cup final because European soc- 
cer's rulmg body decided a missile 
thrown from the crowd and kayo- 
ing a player is not cause to replay a 
match. 

The one consistency is that those 
UEFA bureaucrats, who made 
monkeys of themselves and 
brought such mockery to the game 
they purport to administer, wul be 
on public view as they grab the 
annual limdighLs at both prize cer- 
emonies. May tbear consciences be 
as untouched as we all hope the 
entire playing staffs are. 

No two inrideals are the same, 
although alarming similariti es link 
the Celtic-Rapid Vienna and Real 
Madrid-Internaztimale Milan con- 
troversies. 

Both were second-leg matches, 
and both Rapid and rater were 
losing substantial leads when they 

Rap id^hacTalready forfeited its 3-1 
advantage, and its players were vis- 
ibly inciting riotous behavior with 
all manner of blatant bodily as- 
sault. 

Two bottles landed near the 
goal-mouth; one, Rapid daimed. 


mg minutes a man short. Inter 
nude full use of a replacement, 
although that reduced later op- 
tions. 

The cynics say that UEFA, hav- 
ing repeatedly threatened to force 
British clubs to curb “the English 
disease” of hooliganism, has one 
law for Celtic, another for the 
mighty Real Madrid 

Nonetheless, tears for Inter 
might not fill a Milanese fountain. 
The Italian media berated the dnb 
for its depresangly defensive ap- 
proach to the second leg. And some 
remembered 1971. 

la that year, Inter persuaded 
UEFA to replay a European cm 
match it lost, 7-1, in Mflnchmglan- 
bach because Roberto Boniusegna 
had been laid out by a Coca-Cola 
can. Inter drew the replay and ad- 
vanced, and only last year Sandro 
Mazzola, who had passed the can 
to the 1971 referee, confessed that 
his was full and the one that struck 
Booinsegna had been empty. 

So Madrid, after its worst home 
season in three decades and forcing 
the resignations of its president and 
coach, suddenly stands on the 
brink of yet more European glory. 
Coach Amando Amaro, after in- 
heriting ba<% from Alfredo di Ste- 
fano and trying perhaps to push 
youth too far, watched as a specta- 
tor as two veterans pulled Real 
round against Inter. 

Midfielder Michel Gonzalez 
Struck the winner, but the old war- 
horse Carlos Santillana had scored 
twice and Uli Stidicke made a 
goal-line clearance. 


Santillana, 33, played because 
Emilio Butragueno had not recov- 
ered from a kicking in Milan ; Sticv 
licke deified predictions that his 
season was over because of hepati- 
tis. The old rose, the sick walked 
and Madrid, for the third time this 
European campaign, reversed 
losses that appeared terminal. 

Madrid is also away Wednesday, 
to Videoton — the electronics com- 
pany team of the andent Hungar- 
ian town of Szekesfehervar. Video- 
ion competes with Real for the 
Houdini award for escapotogy. 

It scores late, often from defen- 
sive positions. It is happy to hang 
in for a penalty shoot-out It reties 
heavily on goalie Peter Diszti, on 
the rhythm set by Ferenc Cson- 
gradi, the tricky wingplay of Lmos 
Majer. the sometimes stunning fin- 
ish from Jozscf Szabo. 

Just how the Hungarians will te- 
am to 1 10,000 Spaniards at the re- 
turn leg in the Bemabeu 

— or to the more brutal ride of 
Madrid's game — we shall see. But 
nobody is immune to this age of 
violence. 

Brazil, rehearsing for next 
month's World Cup qualifiers, has 
wot twice in a week against Uru- 

to unsee rnty*L rawls with the erratic 
winger Eder among those sent off. 

In Asia, same game, same ten- 
sions, slightly different aggrava- 
tion. 

In Hong Kong, one player was 
taken to a hospital, and several 
others treated on the spot, when 




ttw AnWIMdnia 

Inter's Gmseppe Bergomi, felled in a UEFA Cup semifinal. 


Kung Fu fighting erupted between 
Seiko of Hong Kong and Liaoning 
of China in an Asian Super Club 
qualifying match. After an un- 
scheduled 15-minute martial arts 
display that left players writhing on 
the ground, Seiko completed its 2-1 
victory. 

There will, nlas, be no resump- 
tion of World Cup duty for Leba- 
non. A week ago, this column paid 
tribute to that country's pluck in 
sending a team of able-bodied men 


out of civil war to play for honor 
abroad. Alas, unknown to me the 
Lebanese withdrawal had reached 
FIFA. It is unable to fulfil] its fix- 
tures; it retires hurt at 4 matches 
played, 4 matches lost, 2 goals 
scored and 22 conceded. 

It was still something of a tri- 
umph that the Lebanese competed 
at all, if ultimately an unreal effort. 
Why the rest of us turn sports 
grounds into battlefields is harder 
to understand. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Tony Kornheiser 


One Vote for Triple-Jeopardy Romance 


Washington Post Service 


of Pittsburgh. You can keep that 


caused the slight but apparently WASHINGTON — Every time Or you can trade it for what’s be- 
conenssive snick on defender I think about whether Spend A hind curtain No. 3.” | 

Reudi Weinhofer's brow. Video- Buck ought to go to the Preakness Td like to think it'd be a piece of 


r's brow. Video- Buck ought to go to the Preakness Td tike to think it'd be a piece of 
tape replays disproved the bottle on May 18 and try for the Triple cake, 

theory, so Rapid's dub doctor tes- Crown, or to the May 27 Jersey I mean, what’s the worst that 

dried that something else, possibly Derby and try for the golden egg, I could happen? TbeyTl open up the 
a coin, caused a wound requiring see myself on the set of “Let’s curtain and there'll be a live goat 

two stitches. Make A Deal” dressed up as a pan standing there. Big deaL 


two stitches. Make A Deal” dressed up as a pan 

UEFA cashed in — fining the pizza, listening to Monty Hall as he 
Austrians 30,000 Swiss francs offers me my choice: 


“Monty, batty, open the drapes.” 
Live the fantasy, right? 

Obviously it’s easy for me to sit 


u i jo - 

IS IS M0 1 
13 9 J91 lto 

13 n 40 4 
u 13 JS to 
10 14 A17 5V* 

10 U 417 » 




17 9 A54 — 
13 11 542 3 

11 Q to 

10 It AH 4to 

12 w ASU s 
u is Jta i 

I U to to 


Monday’s line Scores 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

■ LOS Ang eles BM ra 002 2-5 13 a 

CMtw KWMM I I 

HenMser, Castnio tS). Diaz (U. Howell (9) 
end ScOosda; Eekersley, Smith (8). Fontenot 
<101 and Dawls. W H owell. 2-1. L— Fontenot, 
0-1. HRs— Lea Ang e las. Sdoscta (IK Chicago. 
Coy m». 

San Franctace DM 3M ra— 7 to • 

Ptttttwuti OM 13S J0M 11 I 

Lftsknv. Minton IS), M. Davis (7). Garretts 
<91 and Brenly; DeLeon, Guante 161, Rabin- 
son (S) and Pena, w— Laskey, VI Lr-DeLeon, 
o-s. Sw— Garretts <21. HR—BrenlY {31. 

San Diene *11 606 MB— 2 > 1 

SL Laatl WMM-5K 1 

Shaw, LmtfmrH 0U and Kennedy; On, Hor- 
ton |9), Law (9) and Porter. W— Ow, 2-1. L— 
Show, 3-2. HR— Son Diego, Me Reynolds (33. 


Tennis 

Toar Leaders 


1. Jolm McEnroe, sm«M. Z Ivon Lendl, 
3Z7C457. X Tkn MOvattt. *234.177. e. Tamos 
Smu. SOI. Ml S> Antlers JarryiL SMUM. L 
Jimmy Cannon, S13&S70. 7, MBadav Msdr, 
$126425. B Stem Edbero, SlTUttL f. Mate 
Wf lander, KI1M5L 10. Scott Davis. ni7,l«L 
ATP Ci Heeler RaMdan 
1. John McEnroe, nttapoi o». 2, Ivan Lervfl, 
TUC X Jimmy' Connors, 11571 «, Mali WW 
under. 9&U. 5. And res Gomez, UJ7.&, Anders 
J«rytf,56SO.Aaran KiK*steliv49.27.&,K»- 
vta Curran, 4UO. 9, Pal Cash. 4473. KL JoaUm 
Nysirom. 44J2. 


1, Martino Navraulwa. S6HUB7. 2. Chris 
Evert Lloyd. SX&M7. 1 Nana Mawflttnva. 
sasutf. 4, Hetono SukBM, S19AS15. X Ztao 
Garrison, TOUTS. 4, Claudia KntttoHCnsai, 
sm.ro. 7. Cortina Ba**itt PIAt Kathy 
Jordan, 39*05. 9, Catarina LM«vtot,»UK. 
W, Pom Strtvar.WMOtt. 

wta CMvator RoMdoas 
1. M art ino Navraflkwa. 17073*1 notate. Z 
Chris Bverr UoweC, UUK 3. Hona MancU- 
kova, PRIM*. 4, Manueia feateeva, 7L1B4A. & 
Helena Suttwa, MJJtn. 6, Ztoa Garrison, 
AML 7, Ctawtta Konde-KIMi 574JH a 
Wendy TurnbolL 5X7691 9, para Sbriw. 
52.1940, TO. Cortina BaSMtt, *OU 


(about S2 1,000) for “egwrially in- “Now Tony, you’ve already won Obviously it’s easy for me to sit 
correct conduct of its team" and the speedboat, the water bed, the back and tol the owners of Spend 
nicking the Scots 12^000 Swiss five-piece living room set, a year's A Buck where to race nexL It's not 
francs for crowd misbehavior. It . supply of whole milk, $750,000 my horse, and it’s not my money, 
also ordered a neutral-ground re- worth of gold and all the land west But if it were, Td like to tunk I’d go 
play, which, after horrendous as- 
saults by drunken spectators on 
two Rapid players, reversed the re- 
sult. 

This column suggested then that 
such a precedent was an open invi- 
tation to teams or supporters to 
pervert losing situations. The Real 
Madrid-Inter semifinal may or jhjjl & 
not have been a direct repercus- 
sion. 

Thanks to an early Madrid goal. 

Inter's 2-0 home lead was waning 
when, in the 31st minute, Milan 
center-back Guiseppe Bergomi fell, 
never to return. After the 3-0 de- 
feat, Inter of course protested, of 
course produced a doctor’s evi- 
dence and the offending weapon — 
a glass marble, handed to a press 
photographer. UEFA was happy to 
fine Madrid 30,000 Swiss francs 
(against 5740,000 in match re- 
ceipts), but refused Inter a replay. 

Officialdom, ever peremptory 
with reasons (if any), has nolto my 
knowledge panted out that where- 
as Rapid had used its permitted uwAmaradhn 

substitutes and played the r emain- Groom May Ann Hale and Spend A Bock after (be Derby. 

McGee, Coleman Pace Cards’ Victory 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches power in the fifth inning a gains t ’ The Padies went Up by 2-0 in the 

ST. LOUIS — Willie McGee Eric Show to score four runs and third on Kerin McReynolds’ home 
went 4-for-4, stole two bases and put the game away. Coleman sin- run. 

scored twice to spark Sl Louis lo a gled, stole second’ and third and “Speed does it for you every 
5-2 victory over San Diego hare scored on Andy Van Slyke’s triple, time,” said San Diego's manager, 
Monday mghL To mm y Herr doubled home Van Dick Williams, oT the wining rally. 

Since returning to the starting Slyke to tie the score, 2-2, and They’re a speedy dub- Coleman is 
lineup after being hampered with McGee doubled home Herr before an outstanding kid. He’s very excil- 

scoring on Terry Pendleton's two- ing — he gets on, our pitcher wor- 
RACFRATT RnTINTlTTP base hit. ries about him and he steals a cou- 

— PAaapiUAi nuuiwur . Danny Cox went eight innings pie bases. It's still 2-1, but thty get 
a pulled hamstring and a thigh in- for the triumph before needing four extra-base hits. Coleman set it 
jury, the Cardinal outfielder has hit ninth-inning help from Ricky Hor- up.” 

m seven of eight games with six ton and Jen Lahti, who earned his Said Whitey Herzog, the Cardi- 
stolen bases and six runs scored. second save. naJ manager; “Four extra-base hits 

Meanwhile, Cardinal rookie San Diego had taken a 1-0 lead in an inning is amazing for us.” 
Vmce Coleman stole two bases, in- in the second when catcher DarreD Dodess 5. G*s 4 

creasing his major league-leading Porter dropped Coleman’s perfect , -*• 

total to 19. throw from left field for an error, . lo Chicago, Candy Maldonado 

St Louis, which stole five bases allowing Carmelo Martinez to singled and scored the ue-brralang 
on the night, combined speed and score. ^ “> a two-run 10th that 


for the glory. I'd run him in the 
Preakness. 

1 know next to nothing about 
horse racing. Like many, I plug in 
for the Kentucky Derby, memorize 
the winner's name and then follow 
his progress for as long as be stays 
alive in the Triple Crown. But I do 
know that if you win the Kentucky 
Derby you also have to win the 
Preakness and the Belmont Stakes 
to win the triple, and 1 know that 
only 1 1 horses in histoiy have won 
it; three in my lifetime — Secretari- 
at, Seattle Slew and Affirmed. Ev- 
ery great horse didn’t win the Tri- 
ple Crown, but every one that did 
win was a great one. 

I have no idea who ever won the 
Jersey Derby. 

1 know there's a load of money 
involved. Spend A Buck would get 
$600,000 for winning the Jersey 
Derby and a bonus of $2 million 
for having already won two stakes 
at Garden State — the Cherry H33 
Mile and the Garden State Stakes 
— plus the Kentucky Derby. In less 
than two minutes Spend A Buck 
can earn $2.6 million for his own- 
ers. Think about it. They are. 

Said Dennis Diaz, right after 
winning Saturday’s Kentucky Der- 
by: “Sometimes 1 think this busi- 
ness of making studs has gotten out 
of baud. We’re in the business of 

winning purses, too We wiD 

have a $2.6 minion payday by win- 
ning the Jersey Derby — that's the 
biggest payday in the history of 
raring. By God, don't let anybody 
think we don’t want that" Spend A 
Buck would get about $350,000 for 
winning the Preakness. 


Who knows? Someday down the 
road, maybe the traditional Triple 
Crown lineup will be changed, and 
the Preakness and the Belmont 
Stakes will be replaced by the Jer- 
sey Derby and the Breeders’ Cup. 
Maybe than won't even be a Triple 
Crown. Maybe every guy with a 
state-of-the-art car phone and four 
blocks of downtown real estate will 
put up a $7 mi11in n purse and get 
on the bandwagon. Instant tradi- 
tion: Have money, seek class. 

But for now the stature and con- 
cept of the Triple Crown is pre- 
eminent. This triple is the only one 
out there. 

Clearly, there's no guarantee that 
Spend A Buck would win all three 
races. And you could probably 
make the case that if Spend A Buck 
were to lose either the Preakness or 
Belmont, his stud value would be 
substantially decreased. If owner 
Diaz was able to buy him for 
$12,500, how good could his blood- 
lines be in the first place? The 
smart money would probably say 
to run him u the Jersey Derby — 
on a track he loves and against a 
weak field — and Forget about 
charing a historically improbable 
triple. Take the money and run. 

But because it’s so public, tins 
isn't an ordinary business decision. 
If Dennis and Linda Diaz deride to 
run Spend A Buck in the Preak- 
ness, every raring fan — even we 
casual ones — would stand up and 
cheer a victory for tradition and for 
romance. 

i don’t care too much for money. 
Money can’t buy me love. 

Take the curtain. 


power in the fifth inning against 
Eric Show to score four runs and 
pul the game away. Coleman sin- 
gled, stole second’ and third and 
scored on Andy Van Slyke’s triple. 
Tommy Herr doubled home Van 
Slyke to tie the score, 2-2, and 
McGee doubled home Herr before 
scoring on Terry Pendleton's two- 
base hit 

Danny Cox went eight innings 
for the triumph before needing 
ninth-inning help from Ricky Hor- 
ton and Jeff Lahti, who earned his 
second save. 

San Diego had taken a 1-0 lead 
in the second when catcher DarreD 
Porter dropped Coleman’s perfect 
throw from left field for an error, 
allowing Carmelo Martinez to 
score. 










* " J 

. ■ r-.-*- 

. V - -• 


the Aoudond Pres 

Weathering a knock-down arrival at the plate, Pittsburgh 
catcher Tony Pena tagged out Scot Thompson for the final 
oat of Monday’s sixth miring. Thompson had readied base 
on a two-run single that spurred San Francisco’s 7-5 victory. 


The Padres went up by 2-0 in the 
third oa Kevin McReynolds’ home 
run. 

“Speed does it for you every 
time.” said San Diego's manager, 
Dick Williams, of the wining rally. 
‘They’re a speedy dub. Colonan is 
an outstanding fad. He’s very excit- 
ing — be gets on. our pitcher wor- 
ries about him and he steals a am- 
ple bases. It's still 2-1, but they get 
four extra-base hits. Coleman set it 
up.” 

Said Whitey Herzog, the Cardi- 
nal manager: “Four extra-base hits 
in an inning is amazing for us.” 

Dodgers 5, Cubs 4 

In Chicago, Candy Maldonado 
singled and scored the tie-breaking 
run to ignite a two-run 10th that 
carried Los Angeles past the Cubs. 
Maldonado angled off Ray Fon- 
tenot, went to third on Ken Lan- 
dreanx's single and scored when 
shortstop Shawon Dunsion booted 
a sharp grounder off the bat of 
Pedro Guerrero: Mike Marshal's 
single then plated Landreaux. 

Dodger Mike Sriosda’s two-run 
homer in the ninth bad knoticd the 
score at 3-3. Rot Cey hit a home 
run leading off the Chicago 10th to 
cut the margin to one run. 

Qante 7, Pirates 5 

In Pittsburgh, pinch hitter Scot 
Thompson’s single highlighted a 
four-run sixth that lifted San Fran- 
cisco to victory. With one outinthe 
inning, Jos6 DeLeon walked Gary 
Rajsich and Bob Brenly around 
Chris Brown’s infield single to bad 
the bases. 

Josfe Uribe singled home Rajsich 
before Thompson greeted reliever 
Ceciiio Guante with a two-run sin- 
gle to right. Uribe scored on Dan 
Gladdens grounder, making the 
score 6-3. 

Brenly Ml his third homer of the 
season in the eighth for the win- 
ners’ final run. 

DeLeon struck out nine but 
walked ax in his 5% innings; he has 
lost 14 of his Last 15 decisions over 
the last two seasons. The Giants, 
who entered with the league's low- 
est batting average of J207. had 10 
hits. (AP. VPI) 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Ladar Keeps WBA Crown on Decision 



fa . ■ 

; % :'J 




l adar in action Monday night 


GRENOBLE. France (AP) — 
Santos Ladar of Argentina re- 
tained his World Boxing Associa- 
tion flyweight title Monday night 
with a unanimous derision over 
Antoine Montero of France. 

Venezuelan judge Luis Rodri- 
gues scored the 15-round fight 
148-142; Gordon Volkman or the 
United States saw it 147-139 and 
referee Stanley Christodoulou of 
South Africa had it 146-141. 

Lariar waged an intelligent, 
patient fight, relying on superior 
skill and experience. It was his 
ninth successful title defense 
since regaining the flyweight 

oj^jJlay 1. 1982, and his 58th 
victory against six losses and nine 
draws. Ranked No. 3 by the 
WBA, Montero is now 23-2-1. 

Laciar dominated most of the 
fight with inside coumerpunch- 
ing. He had trouble reaching his 
taller opponent from a distance, 
but repeatedly got the better of 
their exchanges on the ropes. 

Montero had a shot at Wom- 
ing the first Frenchman to bold a 
world title since Alphonse HaUmi 
lost the bantamweight title to 
Jose Becera in Los Angles on 
July 8, 1959. 


Goring Named Coach of NHL Bruins 

BOSTON (AP) — The Boston Bruins, stung by dwindling National 
Hockey League fortunes, on Monday named veteran c enter dutch 
Goring, 35, head coach and defenseman MiKe Mil bury assistant coach. 
General Manager Harry Sin den had served as interim coach after firing 
Geny Cheevers Feb. 13* 1985. 

Goring, a 16-year veteran, was acquired by the Bruins on waivers from 
the New York Islanders in February. Milbuiy. 32, has been a Boston 
regular for nine years. Sinden said both will retire as players to concen- 
trate ot coaching. 

After finishing fourth in the Adams Division this season, the Bruins 
lost to Montreal in the first round of theStanley Cup playoffs. Boston has 
not won the cup since 1972. 

Spinks WiD Defend Tide Next Month 


LAS VEGAS (UPI) — Michael Spinks, the undisputed fight heavy- 
weight champion, will defend his tidenere June 6 against Jim McDonald, 
it was announced Monday. It will be the 10th udedefense for Spinks, 28, 
who has a record of 26-fl with 28 knockouts. McDonald, 26, is ranked 
No. 7 by the World Boxing Association and is 164) with 15 knockouts. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MAY 8, 1985 


Page 20 


OBSERVER 


The Red Banana Menace 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — What has 

58.000 telephones, almost as 
many people as Houston, and 
threatens the security of the United 
States? 

As every student of the World 
Almanac knew immediately after 
reading the first two dues, the an- 
swer is Nicaragua. Those same stu- 
dents know that when the count 
was last taken the United States 
had only 191 milli on telephones to 
match against Nicaragua's 58,000. 

The arithmetic is ominous: For 
every 58 telephones with which 
Nicaragua can hit us, the United 
States has only 191,000 telephones 
with which to retaliate. 

Closet Stalinists and America- 
haters will say that American supe- 
riority on this scale proves Presi- 
dent Reagan overrated Nicaraguan 
power when he ordered a trade em- 
bargo to shield the United States 
against an avalanche of Marxist- 
grown bananas. Don't be deceived. 

If superiority of 191,000 to 58 
looks impressive, consider the pop- 
ulation figures. What the soft- 
headed liberals overlook is that 
while our telephones must support 
a nation of 2342 million people, 
Nicaragua's have only 2.8 million 
people to serve. 

□ 


say “Unde," as Reagan has polite- 
ly asked their insolent government 
to do? 


Has it occurred to you that 2342 
million people with 191 million 
telephones do not have enough of 
these vital machines to equip every 
citizen with a phone? Simple arith- 
metic reveals why the Pentagon is 
deeply alarmed. 


Fact: With 2342 milli on people 
and 191 million telephones, we 
have a desperate shortage — one 
phone for each eight-tenths (0.8) of 
a ddzen. 

More Fact: With their 58,000 
telephones the Nicaraguans have 
one phone for every 48 people. 

Doesn’t this put them at a disad- 
vantage? Hah! To believe that is to 
fall for the drivel spread by the so- 
called Neo-Old New Deal Big Go- 
vemniks. 

Consider how many Nicara- 
guans yearn to be free of their Red 
masters so they can live under a 
new government freely chosen by 
the U. S. Central Intelligence 
Agency. Would you guess that 47 
of every 48 Nicaraguans, given the 
blessed opportunity offered by a 
telephone, would hesitate for an 
instant to call the White House and 


Why are these 47 of every 48 
Nicaraguans not calling the White 
House already? It Is obvious: In a 
country with one telephone for ev- 
ery 48 people, the 47 who want to 
gd rid of the government are going 
to have a hard lime getting a tele- 
phone installed. 

To get a telephone in these 
straits, it is probably necessary to 
cotton up to the powerful Marxists 
who run things and promise to col- 
laborate in their schemes for put- 
ting Red bananas on the breakfast 
cereal of unsuspecting North 
Americans. 

These hard facts demonstrate 
why people who really care about 
America axe in favor of the presi- 
dent's huge new ** Banana Wars” 
budget. 

If we can provide two telephones 
for every Irving American — ex- 
cepting only the handful of surviv- 
ing big-govemment liberals who 
can't stand it that the president has 
a fantastic smile — Nicaragua's 
chances of getting its Mamst-Le- 
ninis t bananas into the innocent 
North American stomach via the 
oatmeal could be eliminated. 

This is the assumption behind 
the multibiUion-dollar “Banana 
Wars” project It would provide 
every U.S. citizen with the tele- 
phone wherewithal to call three 
other dozens immediately upon 
rising and caution them to make 
sure their bananas are not Red Nic- 
araguan bananas before slicing 
them onto the cereal. 


On the Central American front 
the DA would be authorized to 
slip thousands of heavily equipped 
guerrilla telephone installers (the 
“phontras") into the Nicaraguan 
countryside to install telephones in 
the huts of all who are willing to use 
them to dial Washington and call 
for an end to big government ex- 
cept at the Pentagon. 

Interested sources say Nicara- 
guans refusing to let the “phon- 
tras” install phones definitely will 
uot be shot provided they have a 
reasonable excuse, such as having 
teen-agers who would drive them 
crazy if there was a phone in the 
hut 


Ate* York Tima Serrtce 


Pioneers of Jet-Age Aircraft Design 


By Michael Keman 

Washington Post Service 

W ashington — E ven be- 
fore Pearl Harbor, the skies 
around San Diego were always 
full of planes. They were prop 
planes, and they made a lot of 
noise. You could tell the different 
roars, and after a while you didn't 
bother to look up. 

But there was one we kids all 
watched for. It was sleek and 
gHm, with twin fuselages like a 
catamaran, and it whipped past 
you without a sound, so smooth 
and fast you weren't quite sure if 
you’d really seen it. The roar 
came after. Even the roar was 
smooth. 

That was the P-38. The elegant 
Lightning was perhaps the only 
plane the American public loved 
just for the look of iL 
Its designer was Clarence L. 
(Kelly) Johnson, who was in 
Washington recently for the 
opening of an exhibit, “Designers 
for the Jet Age,” at the Air and 
Space Museum. So was another 
legendary aircraft designer, Ed- 
ward H. Hememann, who de- 
signed the first plane to fly at 
Mach 2, twee the speed of sound. 

“The P-38 bad only one seat,” 
Johnson said, “so when I went on 
the test flight I had to sit piggy- 
back on the piloL Five horns al 

25,000 feet Its problem was its 



TluVIWivtantat 


Edward H. Heinemann, left, with Clarence L. (Kelly) Johnson. 


it is to say, when the plane 
went into a vertical dive ap- 
proaching the speed of sound it 
tried to curl under and its tail 
vibrated dangerously. Johnson 
redesigned the wing, and the P-38 
became a vital long-range fighter- 
escort in the Pacific theater of 
World War a 

Fighter pilots liked it despite a 
certain reputation as a jinx, be- 
cause it could peel off equally 
well to right or left, a rare quality 
in those days, when spinning pro- 
pellers created a constant torque 
or twist to one side or the other. 
The P-38's twin props turned in 

r osite directions, neutralizing 
torque. It was the first plane 
to do this, Johnson said, since the 
Wright brothers* craft. 

Johnson. 75, began drawing 
planes as a kid, and decided at 
ago 12 that he would design real 
ones. He worked 50 years for 
Lockheed Corp.. starting as a tool 
designer in 1933, and helped de- 
velop more than 50 planes, from 
the F-104 Starfighter (the first 


operational jet to achieve Mach 
2) to the U-2 spy plane. 

In 1943, working against rime 
and in deep secrecy, Kelly John- 
son (the nickname came from his 
green neckties) designed and 
built the first American jet fight- 
er, the F-80 Shooting Star, using a 
British engine. He bad only blue- 
prints of the revolutionary de Ha- 
villand engine, and the hardwa re 
itself arrived only seven days be- 
fore the airframe was completed. 
The engine cracked on the first 
test flight, so a new one had to be 
flown in from England. This time 
the engineers and executives 
watching saw what a jet could da 

As the Lockheed account has 
it, the test pilot, Mflo Bantam, 
“made one low pass across the 
field and went whistling up out of 
sight. Then the show begin. Ac- 
customed to the controls, Bur- 
chain came down from high alti- 
tude so fast that no one knew he 
was coming until he passed over- 
head and the roar hit the crowd.” 

One of Johnson's favorites was 
the SR-71 Blackbird, a 1960s re- 
connaissance aircraft that Hew 
faster than a bullet, at Mach 3 
(Washington to Los Angeles in 
about an hour). Everything in the 
Blackbird had to be pioneered — 
the titanium forgings that would 
bold at 800 degrees, the hydrau- 
lics and fuel systems, the escape 
system that had to work at 

100,000 feet (30,000 meters). 


Today Johnson is senior advis- 
er to the “Skunk Works,” Lock- 
heed's advanced projects depart- 
ment, where “if I can talk about 
it, it's obsolete.” 

Johnson said he appreciated 
the time saved by computers, es- 
pecially in cOmmating much of 
the trial and error in design de- 
tails. But be still has his slide ruk. 


H einemann, 77, like JohnSOfl a 
Michigander displaced to Cali- 
fornia, has been a chief engineer 
at Douglas since 1936. Something 
of a prodigy, be quit high school 
at 17 and started buildmg boats 
up to 60 feet long, studying on his 
own. Within a year Douglas 
snapped him up as a designer. 

His creations include the SBD 
Dauntless dive bomber, the D- 
5582 Skyrocket, the F-4D Skyray 
and the A-4 Sky hawk, which was 
in production for 25 years, the 
longest far any jet combat .air- 
craft. He deigned the AD-1 
Skyraider under a 24-hour dead- 
line. He also designs boats, and at 
the exhibii opening he was hand- 
ing out a brochure for the Super 
H-3 patrol boat, “designed in the 
Heinemann tradition of COSt-effi- 
deat military systems.” 

This is the catch in designing 
planes: It's one thing to draw a 
lovely air-smooth shape, but 
quite another to pack it effirienl- 
ly with all its equipment. 

“I never worked with contract 


engineers," Heinemann said. “I 
always had my own team. I was 
the head guy with all the respon- 
sibility. I ran the damn show. My 
people came in with an air condi- 
tioner that weighed 25 pounds 
when it was supposed to be 12 
pounds, and I said, *001! Do it 
ova-!' They brought it back in at 
10 pounds.” 

Some say it was the carrier- 
based Dauntless that won the 
Battle of Midway and turned the 
tide of the Pacific war. 

“1 must have made 50 full-cut 
dives in that thing in the rear seat 
behind Vance Breece,” he said. 
“It was land or exciting.” 

Every plane designer has a 
back- to-th e-old-dra wing- board 
story to te£L Vance Breece was 
also the pilot on a Dauntless pre- 
cursor, the BT-1, Hememann re- 
membered, when Hugh Dryden, 
now of NASA, asked for a test 
dive. “Vance came down - and 
said. The bomb tail fell off! 1 and 
we were yelling and swearing at 
each other, and Dryden walked 
up and said politely, ‘My good- 
ness, are you still using that 
bomb? I tested that bomb in 
1925.' 


“I said, “Well, we better build a 
proper bomb.' So I designed a 
basic shape for various weights 
and five different makes of 
planes, and it's still the interna- 
tional standard shape.” 


PEOPLE 


Hu’s Wife 



Li Zhao, wife of Hu Yacking, the 
Chinese Communist Party chief 
who popularized the wearing of 
Western suits, toured a glittering 
display of fashions by Yves Saint 
Laurent on Tuesday. T think , at 
first she was startled.'” the couturier 
said later. “But then she tayoyed 
herself.” Dressed in a conservative 
trouser suit. Li, a retired textile 
factory manager, toured an exhibi- 
tion of 25 years of Saint Laurent 
creations, accompanied by Foreign 
Trade Minister Zheng Tnobin and 

the wife of Deputy Premier Wan LL 

□ 


■ publicized trip to the Soviet Union, 
will star -with Robert Wagner this 
fall in a weekly ABC-TV adventure 
series set in the United States and 
London. Her father. Arthur, left hj& 
job as an English professor to de- 
vote his time to handling his daugh- 
ter’s public appearances: 




The country group Alabama 
took three top honors at the 20ih 
annual Academy of Country Music 
Awards in California, making it the 
top winner in the academy's histo- 
ry. “If we never win another award, 
it's been a great career,” the group's 
Randy Owen said. “But I don't see 
us gptring out of the business." Ala- 
bama was cited as entertainer of 


Mayor Hans Dan Ws of Bonier 
dismissed the. city's chief orchestra 
conductor,. Gustav Kids, Monday 
after a dispute in which Kuhn 
slapped the director of Thfr opera 
house, Jean-Claudc RSher. two 
weeks ago infront of Bow’s caltur. 
al committee and a ttac&d the op- 
era’s cultural standards iti ati inter- 
view in the pcwsmagariqc Der 

Spiegel. Kuhn, an Austrian. 1 was 
hired in 1981 as chief conductor of 
Bonn's concert hall orchestra and 
opera house musical dit&for: He 
accused the Swiss-born , Rftier of 
paying good singers big money to 



It*- 


bama was cited as entertainer of froot of, scesoy tfcflL 

OTS2M5PK ; v|V ■ 




and For album of the year, 
mother-daughter team of Naomi 
and Wynonna Jodd won song of the 
year and vocal duet for “Why Not 
Me?" Ricky Skaggs, a- mandolin 
player, won an award for specialty 
instruments, and his Ricky Skaggs 
Band won for touring ensemble. 
Top male vocalist was George 
Strait and female vocalist Reha 
McEntire. Wiffie Nelson and Jufio 
Iglesias’s “To All the Girls I’ve 
Loved Before” was named top sin- 
gle. 

□ 


Unfurling a 10-story crimson 
banner bearing the legend “A 
Building for Year 2000," Governor 
James R. Thompson formally dedi- 
cated the new State of Illinois Cen- 
ter in Chicago. Enthusiasts, have 
called the glittering $ 1 72-million 
structure a modem Taj Mahal, 
while critics have compared it with 
a Tat alderman." The prqect, for 
which plans were announced in 
1980, was plagued by cost overruns 
and last-minute concerns about fire 
safety. “What we build says who we 
are," said Thompson, whose office 
is in the new building, “and we are 
a brave people undaunted by new 
and innovative ideas.” The prqect 
was the costliest ever financed by 
U.S. state taxpayers. 

□ 


The 40th Anniversary Allied 
Vicioiy Film Festival, opening 
May 23 at the Americas Him Insti- 
tute in Washington, wULhonor the 
American fihnmaker Frank Om 
and his Soviet colleague fiba Ka- 
Enina for contributions to the art a/ 
documentary film. The event is co- 
sponsored by the International 
Film Exchange and SovomonfOm, 
the film-export office of the Soviet 
Union. Capra, known for “It Hap-, 
pened One Night” and “Mr. Srajqpr 
Goes ro Washington.” did WorW 
War II propaganda films for the 
“Why We nght" series. Kalinina's 
“Recollections of Pavlovsk” and 
Capra's The Battle of Russia" will 
be shown. ... 

D 



Peter W. Bernstein, the Wash- 
ington editor of Fortune magazine, 
wflljOuiU. S. News ■& Worid Re- 
port the first week of June as a top 
editor Qua title remains unsettled) 
fOTbiiSlO^ economic and person- 
al-finance coverage. 

v; - □ 


Samantha Smith, 12, whose 1982 
letter to Yori Antbopov, then the 
Soviet leader, gained her a much- 


Hal Holbrook, in his celebrated^; 
one-man-show as Mark Twain, ac- 
companied by bis wife, Dixie Cta 
ter, and three daughters, begins a 
monthlong U. S. Information 
Agency tour next week, to London, 
Lisbon, Bucharest, Td Aviv, New 
Delhi and other stops in India. . . 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS n, 
Engfohjfari* (doBy) 634 5965. Roma 


HAVE A MCE DAY! BaU. Haw a 
nice day! fiokeL 


SUM. N.Y. TIMES - braes May. 
Write Keyset, PQ6 2. EIMOBiubA 


PARK ON THE EUR Fw logging toon 
of Paris, GA 567 12 5/^ 


MOVING 


DEMEXPORT 

PAMS • LYON • MARSB1E 
UUE • MCE 


eel moving by speoafat from ^rno ioc 


ri*ie» in Frtnci to dl atm «i the 

ToB free from France 16 105) 24 10 82 
fiEEF ESTIMATE 


MOVING to & from brad by lit dam 
expert* offering ful doar-tcHioor ser 
viee, packing, nunra and doat- 
mxrearion. Amnsodor Forwarders 
Lid, Bmt Gibor mfl. 6 Prof Kaufman 
SIM Aw Ml brail. Tit 3- 
650039 Tx 341177 com J ext ASD 


MOVING 


CONTMBC Cotfbwters ra 300 dries 
worldwide - Ak/Soa Call Oxrfe 
281 1881 Para (nan- Opera) Can loo 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


IEVAUMAM. 75 km northwuf Pbrii, 
lfth century gntte. 10 rooms, com- 
fort*, beautiful 14 ha paft, golf & 
■port dub n vicinity, Jriy/Aug. 
ftOOO/monfo. Resident maid avt»- 
obte. Tils Paris 524 66 17 after 6 pm. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MAGMRCB4T MVHSIDE 1 ft 2 bad- 
room flats. BeauftfJty furnished in 
new purpose-buit bloat. Quilt))' atu- 


afed enjoying panoramc views over 
Thames & Oieaea Embankment, lift. 


porter, video entry, underground 


porting. Rrt from £350 - £450 par 
week. Td; Weekends 0483/275827, 


office CP37/822718. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON, CHB5EA. Attractive setf- 
contained furmrind flat, 1 double 
bcctoxxn, silting room, kitchen & 
bathroom, noaiorvce, Lock-up go* 


rtne. Six marie minimum eu o xjuuy 
— 1-352 Sla 


ter' £175 per week. Tektn- 


MLCONQUHAR CASHE Estate, 12 
mies from St Andrews, Scotland, lux- 
unam 3 double bedroom vila avail- 
able July 12-26, 1985. £1,300. Tet 
Mnbunfr t03l|22S8000 


LONDON. For the best furnished flats 
and houses. Consult the Spadoistt 
PhStB, Kay and Lewis. Tel: London 
352 8111. Tdex 27846 KESJM CL 


ANSCGMBE A BNGLAND with of- 
fices in St Johns Wood & Kensington 
offer the best iwviai in residential 
letting, let 722 7101 (01). UK. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8fh 


Stucfia, 2 or 3room op ortenen L 
One mantis or mare. 

If CLACBM3E 359 67 97. 


CUT YOUR HOTEL BRJLtiy a flriold 
apartment net* the Bflet Tower. Lux- 
ury studios to Sawn opo fi ne r i s , 
from one vreek upwards. RATCflE. 
U rue du ThMlrt75015 Pais. Trt 
575 62 20. He 205211 F. 


61H CHARMING. Aportmerf m 18th 
century bufefag in quiet sunny court- 
yard. uveig room + bet k qom. Kgh 
arSngs beams. CJ to wew after 
May 4th; fait 325 8395 


5HORT MENTAL M PARK shrfo. 
and 2 roams, beau&fiAy decorated. 
Contact; Sonra®*. 6 av* Defense. 
75008 Pais Ttful 399 99 SO 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


7TH NEAR ST.GSMAIN. elegoUqu- 
ef smofl apartment, ifl equipped fee- 
pfeasTe^4626ovm5r^ 


SHORT IBM in Latm Quarter. 
No agents Tefc 329 38 83. 


HOLLAND 


Renfhouse International 


020448751 (4 lines] 

Nedarbmmn 19-21, Amsterdam 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA. POUB45A. Luxurious 
vflfo, 5bedrooan (I peopfej, 4 baffa, 
big gotten, pool and & g a dtner. 
Juie& SegUSEOOO. July U5S250C. 
Pori* 620 38 12-348 9666. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA 


AMBASSADOR PARK 
PARADISE FOR TIC HAPPY FEW 
An exdusive Mediterranean vflage a 

S ix* right by the sea on dvs most 
Fui site on Mallorca. Ideal loca- 
tion, 20 minute* from Palma Spacious 
apartments, 1 to 3 bedroom s, cti with 
forge terraces- Very high cpsatty 


lebvjenqiid f e BAenuHuau dee iL 
VISIT AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
BE GONVMCED 


Fa information: 

GLOBE PLAN SJL 
Av. Mon&pas 24 
CH-10Q5 LUJSANNr Switoknd 


Teb (21^223511 Tlx 25185 MBiS CH. 


■ Enquiries Welcome 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 


Lovely apartments with ma gmf ioent 
views of lake Geneva and m ou ntain* 
Montreal Won, Verfaier, Les Dfobler- 
ets. Chateau if Ou new Gstaad, Ley- 
on. Cwll e n t OpportaaititaB Par 


Price* tram SF123ff Q. 

Liberal mortgages al 6 rK ir* crest. 
GLDKHAN SJL 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tel. (21) 22 35 1Z Hu 251 85 MBJS 
CeMiMied Since 1970 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWIT2KLAND 


Forejqner * con buy STUDIO APART- 
W&ft l CHALET^ LAKE GOffVA ■ 
MONHSUX a in rime world famous 
resorts. CBAH S-MONT ANA, IB 
DtAMJBKTS, VBHHE£ VULARS, 
JURA, etc from SF1 lObSL Mortgoge* 
60% ct 646% interest 

REV AC SJL 
52 Marthfcnt, 0+1202 
GENEVA. Teb 022/341540. 
Teh* 22030 


LAKE GENEVA S LUGANO, Mon- 
tram. Gstaad Wriloy + many aha 
famous mountain resort*. Faeigpen 
con buy mogn ifa r* APARTMENT'S 
VtiAS/CHASTS. Price from about 
USJ40JM0, Mortgaga W ffl Wt mfur 
ML Vnt/Phonei lf»01£ SAJour 
Grim 6u 0+1007 Lauscnoe.Tel21/» 
2611: U* 2C98 STOOL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


CAIIPOHMA PRIME FARMLAW 


With oB the bad new* about Americai 
famen. fam land prices ban 
plunged. There ora in veMnertopporto- 
mries as never before, at prices below 
ma ke * value. 

• 607 Acres? Tata County. CbRbran 

• Oast I soft Whew and Tomatoes 

• 4 u o d etyomd weh for c n aylet e 

• &SS8+ tq. ft. storage b u Mrngs 


3fl00+ «|. ft^ih gp 


from Sacramento, 


loc ated 
CaHbmia 

$3300 ra aos 

Market Approbai 2/85 at $3/00/Aao 


Prafomiond form maiagemen* atA 
able to stay an and manage the propa 
ty. We have been ii rite form mange 
men* busmen for 10 years. Do not pom 
up this opportunity. 


TOOBY FARMS 
2500 Footha Bhfe. Suite SOB 
ffoxsdeML GAforreo 91107 
(Bwl 4498321 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PRESIDENTIAL 


MANHATTAN. NYC 

XHRUUIMAIE N 


. ^ CC3NOOMMUM_UWIO 
TRUMP TOWSt - oil fifth Aue 
MANHATTAN PLACE - W A» & 


MAv&SBSI 

Nm« efogaR, prartbow units htfiit 
Afiadiv^ tecum an privae 7. 4, 5, 

berfe»K(15D0ta3in«}. 

Mt-tkwtfy bon a mm. 

Canach Ur. tL.fbmi 
Erafn Ma i oge m ent Corp. 
11835 Queans BWdL 
Fore» Ml NY 11375 USA 
ToL 71B5 w-4848 


IV 


Pog« 17 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


ATTRITION EXECUTIVES 


mthmharmaUandHmMTrt- 
barn, whrrmmora thtn a third 
of a edfon reader* warM- 
uifo mod who at or* i i 
h eneu end industry, wfl 
read ft. Jutt trim* w (An 
613595) baton IO tun, an- 
m n iij mot hi aei tolas* you 
back, on/ your momaqo wU 
appear wmii 48 ham. Tho 
rate ts US. f9.80 or load 
oquhirdonl par Eho. You mutt 
indoda cmpl e te and net#. 
cida bdEng odtbaSM. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


International Business Message Center 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


OFFICE SERVICES ; .•*- 


HARD DISK DRIVE (HDU) 
MANUFACTURING 
EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


A kmSng US manufodurer of 5J5 
rich hatThoight 10 MByte had <£*k 
drives wS sel productan rigfos aid 
eauipmartl Maiufaciuring pocess e 
fully documented. Eq wpment a lea 
than 2 years old and a capable of pro- 
ducing in excess of 600 drives per 8 
hour shift. Over 150.000 high quotty 
reives produced to date. 


GONTABNERWORLD SHTVJCE5 UU 
HQH INCOME PLAN 
EARN 17% PER APMUM 
On hnraetara nte of $5320 
from 5 to 15 yea r * 


bnm 


et *2730 
Containerworid Services Ud manage 
aei opaate o first doss vrorldwrie 
oontamer tearing senice to the 
doping ridustry and speckfae 
in prmndm investors with a 
HJGH mss INCOME 
WITH SECURITY 

hr Ml deMh af tin KrJi Income An 
(NOW INCORPORATING f*W 
CAJPtTAL REPAYMENT OPPORTUNITY] 
contact: CONTAOCRWOillD 
SHtVKXUD 
25 OUSTS TBUtAOE, 

SOUTHAMPTON 
SOI 1BG, B4GLAM) 

Tet 0703 335322. 

The 4761ACNTWIO G 
Person* interested in beconing an mter 
medkry. please contact Mike Gaker at 
Canftnner Worid 


MONEY TR^ ? 


Abo awxfoUe are deriam far i25 mdi 
half hagte 20 MByte and 3J inch 10 
Affiyte hard dak arms. 


YESI hweit in one af Aownco's mod 
uccrting tedmcrioacal brnridteonghs m 
a teSan dofla industry. We hove prim- 
ed mare nut net m 1984 that aty 
other developer in our State. 

Kgh le v nuj e w nbi Q* nwimeri for 
many, many years and, wagwran- 

taa to jte Bew BW favw rt men t. 
BROKHG’ B4QURIE5 HW1TH3. 
Motand avcdaUe in Btorih. French, 
German. Box 1993, Herald Tribune, 
92531 Netdfy Cede*. France 


i Price 
PfedpehOnty 


T. Gardner 

475 Orjanecd Poriway 
Suramrm*s. CA 

9406 USA 


(USA] *08737-4400 


DUNG DYNAMIC MuWngod trod- 
rig agent wil be your contact ei 
Europe tele* 11419 Bdgvm. 


MAOflNES * B4GWES far earth 
mowing, materrif handkng, fareflry & 
ooRStruchon. Al metes A t»p«. 
Trortsmuodi Bcfeun, Gedebeaan 21, 
8-2241 ZoerteCBeteum. Tel: 3Ziii 
10 54. The 3Z3Q2TKANSM B. 


PARTNBL neuired to purchase BB 

tneiumaf E60J100 


of laid in Kent for _ _ 

{a $75,000) to pateapoSe in krisunt 
project. Homing appfcabon is neces- 
sary. Very high return if suocmfuL 
Ben 40ra^ litT, 63 lung Acre, Lon- 
dan. WC2E 9JH. 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE A UK 


LTD COMPARES 


RKorporaton ond inunuuBniBnf lit UK, 
Ue of Mon, Turin, Angu*o, Otams! 
bkmds, Panama, Leeria and mail other 


bfexh, Panama 
dMm ana*. 

• Confidantiaf advice 

• rienedate awaifobiriy 

• Nomriee sendees 

• Beorar shares 

• Boa ragrtretan s . . 

• Acooumng L odrnrinnton 

• Med, talepinm & taka 
Free eatew to y booklet from 

5&ECT CORPORATE 
SERVICES UD 
Head Office 

Ml Piemen*, Donates. Isle of Mai 
Teh DooMw (&6 24| 23718 
Teton 628554 SHKT O 
London Rmresentivn 
2-5 OU Bandsllandon W1 
Tel 01 -493 4244, He 28247 SCflDN G 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


MaOng - Telephone - Telex 
FUI Moafaid services 
■do of Mon, Jersey, Guernesy, 
Gibrdta, Pokhiml Liberia, 


Lwembourg, AritBe^ UK. 
Ready made i 


Ready 

Free exptaiamry 
Baa regbtratkxti 
London reprasentaiv 


Alton Co mp any F a m cflora 
Dept T), 8 Victoria St. Dougicn, 
Ue of^ Man. Tak 0624 2S>1 
Telex 627691 SPIVA G 


SAJCON VALLEY USA 
BUSINESS CONNECTIONS 


Wan to sefl your podud* m LL5A.T 
Lookria for a hawse or fenr verrin 
partnnT Nead ampiter^eaxnnun. 
rations a other HIGH-TECH products 
From LEXA.T We oai Snip. We tpeod- 
in in rapraunting foreign animates in 
UAA ter eddtiond i%L pfeae ran- 
tod us with sperific needs. 

MR BUSR4ESS VBmiRB me 
630 ft x ». el tx i Drive 
Swmyvt4& Cdfamia 940H7 USA 
f«8J 739GS2 


ENTS 

EUROPEAN 

MARKETS 


UX manufodurer of elec t r feJ 
aid efedroric componerts seeks new 
praduds to fabricate or assemble in 
fritan 

PALMS! HARGREAVES LTD., 

28 Corporations Street 
Coventry, UX, CV1 IGF 
T ele p hone: Coventry 2JF~ 

Tetae 312444 T/P16 


OCEANHKJNT RESORT- BeaufiU 
oantmensas nce arfmnl rettogrgnr«n 
weond floor, Ihind floor lounge, first 
flow aaeanfrant fidmg pew & rartau- 
rqnt & conaeufon Tns a adforied 1 
wmi motel & aparttnente. Owners 
wan to ratn. Prime gross area an 
North Gcrotno Caaa jWrightsvae 
Beadri USA. S4 iriSaa Saious inqui- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


NIBMATIONAL OfVSHORE 
COMPANY MCORPORATIONS 
FROM £1 10 

Gomprehenrive Ad ie i tehrriiu n. 
Noarriee service*. Powers af Attorney. 
Regntered offices. Telex, te l ephon e , 
md forward ng. 


Balocurrie house, 
Sunewrid, 

Ue af Mon, 

Tefcjp624l 28020-20240-28933 
iSn 628352 Uand G. 


asranuMiY for rnanoal 
A REAL STATE ADVISORS 
Located in Europe & Ada Become one 
of our exdusive e u n mna oned tfehriu- 
tors tor ov cusimarad & a^ieukral 
prop ei Hes loeaed m Cufifoniu USA. 
Gucronteed return on invmfmerrts for 
yw dirt. Write or phone: 

1 1 LUVR 

The Owrtered GraupUcL 
Am Office Box 430 
Walnut Creek, CA USA 94597 
Tet 415-947-1047 


SWITZERLAND 

Sdety fint for you and your fanjhr: We 
help set up busriess and raBOrtid 
property, obftxn permane nt residency 
foenret 8, work permit, pernxt C & nato- 
rofizahonf. Confidentid intonnation 
only by o personal int er view in Europe. 
Said us your te l ephone rwmber&M! 
inform you proagtfy. Necessary invest- 
ment around L^ntiOOO - USS65bQQ0. 
Please write Boot 2126 LHjJ lfrie- 
drichstr. 15, £000 FraBurt/Man 


BBIMUDA 

“WUB. OF 7« AJIANIK" 


OfWiare b n r eeta ienl Opport nn fty 
far the tenaim/R£ dev el oper, he*- 
ww hotel & timediare resort cenfrai- 
7 looted an 7 acres feauring a fbl 
aranries podum & vdbafafe Brensa 

PlentoT,! tTni- ■|*‘|J| 

myiiopiniDT lYnwra 

ST S rriSan 

Cal Joyce Gref 401-849-9000 USA 


PRODUCTION CAPAOTY 
AVAILABLE 


large uencdfa European M cnufactu ra 
has cmdoble through sunxtter mantis 
paductfon space for high quaSty sports 
accessaries aid bogs, 0c 
Al enquiries in confiotKB to- 


48527 


, HONG KONG. 


IN UA - FOR MULTRRATJONAU 

ben Alio ■ CT A . Fa ^ 
e ■ rr-u* 0 ? remrtmg, 

rmaioal & buanets services - real e»- 

"■HMOLDCi^SSrS^ 


IWIAMA COMMFffiS with nomriee 
dtectoreond ewridwWSwtsa / Par- 
aea bank acmuM formed in 48 fxtws 
wrerUyjMribL Offshore bail 
formed for SOOOLCurrendef or fondl 
move d mto Euroaxrency time dtpostf 
acownts with tar free interest and 


■•vim, 10 rare nace, st. jqbhs's, 
London SW1A ILT.Tdk 01-408 2007. 


fittf EQUR-MBW, Become adorive 
«™™*w « new uniqM golf 
jury. Write RQ.Box 8. Bsm t, 1050 


Tlx 61344 & 


kUum. Tab 322/539)332. 
I B. tngunes under ref. 364. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SOUTH AMERICA INFORMATION 
Dtscreto. reScblo ransuhrig for 
2nd EvaBmoc^ res fe t ne e petnit, 
nolurfzDtan n o stable country, 
ridwidud wishes con be considered. 
Haase write to: Bax 2141, LH.T, 
hierfe ch str. 15, DrtSOOO Frankfurt/ 
Mari or toh 3RD-221/551822. 


GBSTINO CARD BUSV4ESS far nfo. 
Toronto, OrtarioConada. Wei es- 
tabSshed manufortwer & ritfributor 
of greeting areds & jyft cord endo- 
wre*. Ow ne r prep exed to assist in 
tranritexii Grind A Zeidcnberg, 
3995 Bathurst St, Suite 300, Dowsv 
vw w, On tmo M3H 5V3 Canocki. 416- 
6303000. 


GOLF SWING ANSWBtOrte pat- 
nen/xweston to ratal unique 


_ . j fad Scan , , 

has adwerfeer's panel & Correas .. 
pableai dxits dwrig play. Fint of ill 
kind. If rmxktjhnrj flar & wSng to 
rivesr, rend suratnaryt Liddy, Caktos 
de Mondeque 8590, Algoive Forttigd 


SAUDI ARABIA compaiy vnridng as 
marketing candtonh/c^rts in Ifi- 
yodh & throughout Mideast seeks fur- 
ther cereffliang re agency assign- 
ments. Offices aba Gmeva & Pans. 
Avak±4» for tSsaasrons mid-Moy 
tendon or Free. Write Bat 2156, 
Hwc4d Triune, 92521 NsuSyCedex, 
France. 


USA entertamrt company lock i ng 
for investors for video / mat concerts 
/ Atlantic Gty shews / Mcxfaaa Sq 

Gotten events /ritemationd tovrjL 

STOjOOO ranmumta $250,000. Cal / 
write RhC Om 71 lake toad, Man- 
hasset, NY 11030 {516365^0 ]- ltf 

yean experience 


GERMAfff , GOMMBK1AL represai- 
Wive with sx c elrt business retorian 
to hcspbidi in the field of high-tech. 
Djagnasriooi eguip mrt seeks conneo. 
eon to foreian maiurotourer far rep- 
reuraodon. Plaom write Box 2144, 
LH.T, Friedridetr. 15, 6000 Frank- 
fort/ Mm 


« SAFETY FIRST * 

What interested in a second mm! 
werenert plero gri m touch with ire 
LAMCOO.Apdo. 195. 
ALTEA/Afcorte / Span. 


OBBBCT FACTORY Dstributan for 
high qw*y raxodty i fo mte g cook- 
wore. Several fates avafloble writ 3, 
5. or 7-p!y cxxetntofan. ConvenBandL 
sene or vaua cover knob astemUv 
B« 1646, Handd Tribute, 92521 
NauBy Cedex, France. 


PARTNER NS» FOR FINANCING 


hoteLrastounad fofdgrori mfl! 14741 
V roans for an- 


on the Tara river, jr roans tor pri- 
vote says or in meetingL 70 fas 
from Toulous e. Mute Ktoema. Moufct 
de Moesat; 82200 Maesac, Frrere. 
Teh KB 04 03 B. Tbt S21615F 


YOURUJ. GONWOION-Ca&fan- 

Infly etcorporate ri Odowre. No 
peregngl pretence or copifd needed. 




RcL Wlmrigton, Dfi l«Dai#h 
33/7*001% Tbc: 757674. 


ALOraiA. EttCUTlVE m Commerce & 
hdusfcy. compatrt & seritxs, having 
office m center rf Algerid seeks cct 
foborarian with tnfl firm who has 
activities in AigeriaWrite fax 2132, 
HerddTrfcune, 92521 NetdyCedex, 
France 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WK YORK- Successful fashion jewel, 
ry import company with affice/show- 
room ri Empire State BuiUng far sde. 
Owner spooks French & Itftaa Wil 

help set up operai oa . Col a write 


Steven Herinon7 Morton St, NY, NY 
212-924-7176. 


10014212 


COSMETICS, HAS PRODUCTS, look- 
ing far fui fate of very r a osono bfy 
priced coBneha, hair & other beauty 
products to be k*J nduralr in Qi 
no. Contact telex 53890 5ft HX t* 
write gm Bax 4011. Haw Kong, 


SWSS COMPANY WU assist you in 
Brope/Swibertand, to handle yaw 
troreadions, or con act re your agent 
ri Imporl/Expcxt/reHiivaiang etc. 
Ptaase aantact Tbs 423 CTO Geneva. 


VWTURE CAFTTAi GROUP has bud- 
netias & riwgment opport u n it ies ri 
USA & Engknl for owner opera te s 
& absentee avnere. Contact an Lon- 
don 01-351 4518. 


EXPORT TO USA - New wide pro- 
Office & US 


pared by US Customs 

Gowinwit Mfcory/GvJ buyers in- 
dex. Send US $32. Federd lamnnt^ 
Boat 15301 Wfahrigtan, DC 20003, 


LONDON. Los Angeles restart de- 
signer seals tarexi/rivastar/partner 
far 1 bedroom bafaxttr flat Vfa* 2 to 
be moderniied. Shori or long term 
nweetment. Tet pi) 723 482A 


GOMFUTBtS forbuBMEB and person- 
d use. Authorried deder for RML 


Apple, other*. Best prices. CoB Mr. 
LmWme. Pm 563 2989/ 348 3000 


LARGE U.S. ou t pu i ut iwi rats to oo- 


JHandor ddtfouton fa. 

rafiee ri Europe. Bax 2155. Herdd 
Tribune. 92527 tfaJy Cedex. France 


PAIWMA UB8F1A. CORPORATIONS 

from U5S400 ovoi dbla n ow. Tet 
D624 2024a Telex: 628352 ISLAND 
SfrioUia 


SWISS LAWYB is ready for ei kmfa 
durauaf mandate*. Worldwide. Com 
tad Box 2081 Herald Tribune, 92521 
NeuJy Cedex, France 


COSTA DB. SOL We seek 

far joint venture in 

Ptaese write toSegarra. BfoadoSar- 
kmo, 60 Mafadfa, Malaga 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


NTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUfWTH) BMC 
USX A WORLDWIDE 


A anpleta sodd & bumeas tenra 
* s ooledrin of 

& neillifinginl 
fa d eoeasiaK. 
212-765-77V3 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.YjC 10019 
Service toprmnMMts 
Needed worldwide. 


OFFSHORE SSVKES 


UX non restart t wpaiet writ 
nominee di rectors, bearer shores aid 

eadtaenihd baft ootounis. Fid boducp 
ft support urvieec. Ptonamo & Ubariai 
e n mpo ni e*. First rate catfideakd 
profoBrind senrioK. 


EWwTdJffl Stt5S!t£1W11G 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


AS9GNMENTS OR BOLANDS ri N.Y. 
or wriwi US. AbiHai to oomadt 
Carp*. bvocM, redd stores 
ifotrfoutan (at 


fast”! Business 
Assockrfion A Pubfisher 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CMRES 


with large mrarianFep aid worid cw- 
aroge.seab S3fo S5m otadde finaritag 


OFFer Free report to Qooom pfchobiec- 

bves a requred- GE1TNGTHNK 

DONE INlHE US. FOB YOUI Con - 
tact Bchoid Foster, 359 W. 20 St, NY, 
NY 10011. Ttat 21^741.1990, 


to e s l iu le major e xp an si on program. 

investment. 


Secure, hnwidvattageoui 

Reply to: Box 2121, Henid Tribune, 
92521 Neufly Ledex, France 



* C orporate laps 

• Short or laoa 


xdtarinSeretce 


St II MG UP OF raamerdd - and 

■■inmiLii 
URMIIiny 

ayflom ert v fbancid 
' — tervioe, td 

phone, rent your oaifar- 
nOOSe lin^ m 

SA, FOB 2436. LI 024 Luwndxurg. 
Tet 495643. Hx 2251 U1XCO UL 


BANXQUOTE 

Rafting of Americo's highest roles for 
CDs from anoro 1&000 Federdhr In- 
wired rierihit jorePu bfahed weekly 
MASTBtHJFD MC 
575 Mafisoo A ue. NY, NY 10022 
let 213888843% Ho 125864 


Territorial licemrig Avofable 


AMSIBRMM tore Beene* Center v 
Kecrer*araodif991 01 5CH Awards 
TeUag 227035. Telex: M183. ■ 

A7UHV Executive Service^ Atben 
Tower ft Suite 506, Alhem 611 
TelJpojJ 7796 232. Telex: ?16343 
■OMtAY: tohefe Choabn. 213 
Naimaa Point, Bombay 400 021. 
Ttft 244949. Tefeo 01T-68W. 


•'T •to 


BSt 4, toe de ri Prew 
faraefa Tet 217 83 60 


YOUR BUS SES C ONTACT 
M 5WTZBBLAM) 

Wei mrroduoed in Busrie* ft hduterid 
aretes, with all offiea facStiet. 
JMB, CP. 10, 121B Grand San™ 
Geneva Tel (022)98 31 21 


OECTOMC ft UITXASOMC Spe- 

aiftred company in ftae 2 field* 
*mA* finanad patnen for new appfi- 

2117. Herald Trfcune, W521 NeuBy 
Cedex, Franra. 


OOMPRB®SIVS SBWKEfo bud- 
ax ana manual gudanae, nsuronce 


HAVE LARGE AMOUNTS of US dcil- 
ion to eKnange far lhdic*i Lira ar 
Sww Francs. <5k 056/491 362 out- 
«de Zuxk 


ata reynuroxB. GETKO Geneva 
SI, 1211 


72 r. de IrMianne, CP.2881, 
Geneva2 fofaefaj 


DIAMONDS 


TOBfiTdfrt 


DIAMONDS 



Y txx bed buy. 

Rn# oa n o n ds in any trial range 
at farad whoteroleSfoB^ 
arect fam) Antwerp 
certnr of the Samond worid. 
fiAguorortee. . 

Far Free pm fat wnte 


~v— ■ ~ South Amencu. rur m 
Wamahor wine: Mydeest ConsU- 
S^VfeorioTSSgfos.tae 


1928 

Pdfamndraa 1 4BJ B-2018 Antwerp 
i - TtaTp? 31 234 

:■-* jd fo At rtjeDtamood Club. 
Heart or Antwerp Drareond indudry 


1000 

Tehee 25327 
DUSAfc P.Ol Bck 1515, DNAIA 
Atame Centre Dubtu, lLA£. 

Tet 214565 TJtoTffiftl 
U3MXMr llOTTw Strata, 
tendon WC2R OAA, 

Te t pi) 836 8918, fix: 24973 
MADfabi C/Orae hT«; , 
Madrid 280Q0L Tel 270 5600 / 

270 6604. Telex. 46642 . 

J a^A4tai. B W86%^/B0 59 279 
Telex.- 320343 

ICW YORK 95 Marina Aram 
Now Yorir. NY 10022. Tet pra 605- 
020a Tetet 125864 / 237699,. 
want OOS, 15 Avenue Wctof Vk» 
75116 Pbri*. Ttar 502 18 00 ^ 

Jelax: 620893F. * 

ROME Vfa Sorafe 78. 00198 Bara 
T*8532 41 .M4 80 70. 

Tele* 613458 

mOAFORE: 111 North Bridge *L 
#114)4/05 ftareeufa Fta* r 
STore 0617. Tet 3366577. Tbt 36033- 
ZUWOt Remrao 32, 8001 2u*h 
Tet 01/214 6in 
Trine 612656/81 2981. 


-'to. 


4»- 






.'■'.'I 




IWVAJE DETECTIVE SCANDMAVIA 
ft*»d. 0^ Norvray: 24 hour* 02- 

4*1 7*3 I A Tto 1 DO AO b ia. 


« 72 14. Tbi 18949 Agent Manager 
pobceAxmy offi. 


G. Cektev, fanrar ^ 

a*, contoca worldMds. tet to Jem- 

bonetarttet4.N01S40do1 Norway 


HONG KONG. YOUR TAX Shelter, 

renter, tummees, trade 


Shopping in Antwerp? Visit 

D1 AMONDLAND 

The targes* showro o m in 

Antwerp, Dianond Gty 

Apprimautr 33A. Tet 323/2343612 


GB4EVA 

Fuly nqufoped office* to rert Dt-sr« 'a- 
atoi (mail, irtx & abaft}. Trade, sofa* 
a g™yotio n & s ecfe toidl senoce*. 
TBS, 5Jhe de Oienev 1 207 Ge nera 
Tet {22} 86 17 33/*t 428388 KBS, 



KARSIBS BUSBCSS 


The 39644 DSMtSl Tet 3^211833 


<mffice services 


YOUR LONDON OFFICE - 
- a the 

CHESHAM EXECUTIVE CB4TK 
Cony e han fr re ratoe of roc* 
ISO Regent StrertTuxtaat Wl 
Tet [01J4S9 62M Tte 261426 


MONEY AVAEANE- CoreW Rnav 
dal Corparrtaon, 2817 E. Oaktota 
Farit OM, Ft. Utudadrie. FL 33308 
USA Tet 30S561 4)993 Hx= 332425. 


your own oma m London, 

100 yad) from foe American Ernbas- 
syforSSperweek.GrtawnarSecre- 
tand Services. Tri 01-629 2931. 


► BFASOU DFaSTBASEF-Rnenro 

ft Mana ge ment^ tn fans offers the 
wpwtto ft mn ftlunteftiy gfq nfeor 

yaw remp ay in France. Or fifty 
.’•MwetefaX 

< W I IV *1 f inra uruna MM |J„ i i . . 


hmm ia aa nW . 

farmriiaa 4- 


(40W TO GET a Second Passport, re- 
pat, 12 countries ondyaed Detoih: 
VmA, 45 Lynfaunf TCE, S*. 507. 

Control, Hong Koog. 


YOUR OHKE ADDRESS GENEVA. 

Tram Mai Savice. 16 nie V rita re . 
04-1201 Geneva. Tet ( 022 ) 454725 . 


urftrtjriraiareiMnti Writ b- 

& woBobSef 

f^ r»hre- Computeraed 
ISff CB fWi ” o re o un t any . Totr 
«*«>■ egawenre roan for an 


Sendee hi 

Aacourting/rompaty fiamriiora . 
“wsgrawnt/secreforid/ phorWte- v v> 
ta/moi G»ft» Finer. 12-14 H \ i 
, . A ?^!2 cl 1&. n60 Luxeatoour^ Pterw s - 
(+3M) 492151 Tbo 1431 . 


YOUR SWISS BUSINESS . ^ 

■AJtt W LUGANO 




, - n®) service* / 

qdyng ht riai / bookU 
091/23! Ml . lb* 795*4 


0177021: 


TAX SERVICES 


US TAX -Star 


r 55000 tollS 


orrenponyt 
■ drimrl tac 


ikYjCInt, 

Trie* 47645 




■ Write 
1 1/7 28002 Madrid 


YOUR MADID OfflCE 

wtjjewtbusiwbawrbs 

jmfa. - mod - facumte, pmenei 
biigucl secretaries. 

Corporate ma r eia it uiiuu 


Y CTapgKI WCAKADAMafo^ 

-Dmre^qf^jmJ&^oo^trodx 
rtM, admiutrriian ft teorianri^ 

SJ^ttSiSrcSi'iS 

218. Tb£-5i4337-S612 




IS INCOME TAX reform aid ouefa 
by profewooct Pari* 5W 9i 23. 


LBONCTON 

Teh 4590190 - Tbo 48614 


PARK AriORBsf^M 

■SnrelWUJ.prcwSSjB — . 
■IftMterifaioi raant 5 roe a . Artait 
fet a? 47 (U,7te 642504. ■ 


impnme par Offprint, 73 meek rEvtmgile, 75018 Perns. 


■US5BS ADDRESS* fiW e&» 

a trie*.' tooetaria f 

Mm Busmeo Crtri- T* 
w*ul (12 tried- Ac 61 3M 8 


'j, ,