Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats



Wvs f't 


•ptthin 


auk 








fc 


Tire "Global Newspaper 
. Edited in Paris 

Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 



enternahonal 




-WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 20 


Uteh 


m- 


lNt> 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


Ataeno__ 6J0 On. 

Mran DA»0«o 

4SSLR. 
OMNiD — tiuo 

Cffm -CXB 7 D 

IWqrl^aOODJl/. 

Em» 'OOF 

FMcnj 7 DO FJA 

Fma _M 0 f. 

9 Gamicnr ISO DM 

GrMSrara SOf 

&tta 80 IV. 

In«i__ IISUl 


bi «1 l&BSO 

Hair 1500 Lilt 

_«MRi 


Kanyo- Shi. 140 D 

M J»f* 

Labmn &MB 

Lbra Una. 035 

law^aiirg^. Lfr 
Madera 105Bc 


Monona $50 DH 

Iran. 


Norway — .TUB Kb 
Own MOO ft* 

Portugal 90 be. 

Qokx 450 ft* 

hp,9HMfad-70P. 
bt^AraW -JjHE 
ltu?W 

h«do».-7.au>. 

Swnrfcrt.lXJS* 

liras 0500 Dp 

Tu>Uy T L iOO 00 

UAt 4J0WI 

US ML (EmJm..$98S 
Tigstbaa SOD. 




pTil| 






No. 31,792 


ZURICH, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1837 


Hans 




ji'tn 

It.:- 

■•WUa J ^ 






kV’S** 




>■ HUl 1 *! m ‘ -W 




P*M«K y.^M 


•PJVJt 


m 


vs »?vT, 








I’ll* 40 : 
Vk-Umv h,j:, 

Mj. 


Til* 

O 


.KpSsSl 

ttki lmN., x , u ^ nF m-iv 

«Ui/nvr :fJlA r S ! m - 
«2j"'Kwka, V eJ 

dfefiin. 

Guson I'.ipu'V UCl ;fe: 
i«V% |.i \Vj,i{ iri .,^%£ 

War 11 

RiSjirtUvit.-inx „| pj^ 




Pern W 

Httpon cJ-.i, 


®WMpiB p.- 

KVonc4 ; t,. io iro^‘ 

l N v^iv: 
P»t ihc ; 



War’s End 
Is Marked 
In Europe 


German Calls 
Nazis’ Defeat 
A f Liberation ’ 


A billboard in Moscow celebrates the Soviet victory. 


■awn 


P»t 
editor ifci* ; 
far Kimucv 


«Vi of 

•causiQ 


.nj,w 


■ vrr,! «c 




Rrt HilE*nklk |v. vA f 

lie mar. a ^ 


Many Americans Abroad 
Fail to File Tax Returns 


s _ 


one 

: month! i 
tt- A jvru v i ;x\s mai. 
If-; H::; 1 ..vu *-ij 

►v : DrHti -vw . , ■: 


\ 1-_ 


J* RKU.ISHS 

1 

&•-■-. ; t u>eeri 


•#**<»< 


,iA!rix"p, -.• 

, «w*w» 

*- : 4* '*.V‘ •*«'•. r-“¥ 

***» .W-tt- «A,r^.a.- a \ •-.* 


3,905 Ampjdmf ttiitgm Auffria, do> jy mfortnatfofrinafcbing wbr 




By Robert C Siner 

Inunuaiotsdi Hit aid Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Aboiii 61 
percent of Americans livinginfotir 
foreign countries did sot file US. 
income tax returns, according to a 
General Accounting Office survey 
released Wednesday. But GAO and 
Internal Revenue Service officials 
said they were unsure bow much 
money this practice is costing the' 
government, or .how filing require- 
ments could be enforced.- 
. Jn testimony before a House 
Government Operations subcom- 
mittee. Johnny C finch of, the, 
GAO said' the. survey' - included 


available in the. United States on 
Americana abroad, Mr. Finch said. 
Fimherraore, he said, the U.S. Pri- 
vacy Act generally prevents the 
IRS from obtaining passport infor- 
mation and other <t«la that migh t 
be useful in dealing with the prob- 
lem. 


The acting IRS director, James L 
Owens, , told the panel that “the 
problem is great enough” to justify 
talcing action. .. 


He outlined three investigative 
methods used by the IRS: a pro- 
gram that identifies taxpayers who 
have filed in thepast, bat no longer 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Forty years after it 
ended, the agony of World War n 
in Europe was recalled Wednesday 
across me Continent 

West Germany’s president pro- 
claimed Hitler's defeat a day of 
liberation, the Russians honored 
their war dead and Britain stressed 
reconciliation. 

On May 8. 1945, the surrender of 
Nazi Germany was announced, 
and the European war that began 
with the invasion of Poland on 
Sept. 1, 1939, was over. Europe 
celebrated the anniversary with pa- 
rades, religious services and other 
memorials. 

President Richard von . Web- 
s&cker of West Germany told the 
Bundestag that all Germans, 
whether or not they had participat- 
ed in Nazi war crimes, must accept 
the past. 

“We have no reason to take pari 
today in victory celebrations,'’ be 
said. “But we have every reason to 
recognize May &, 1945, as the end 
of an erriog way in German histo- 
ry” 

“The 8th of May was a day of 
liberation. It freed us all from the 
system of National Socialist tyran- 
ny. There was no zero hour. It was a 
chance for a new beginning, and we 
have used it as well as we could.” 

Mr. von Weizsacier said Ger- 
mans must take responsibility for 
World War II and its results, in- 
chiding mEBions of deaths, postwar 
hardships, and a Europe divided 
between East and West. 

President Ronald Reagan sent a 
message to the Soviet leader. Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, saying that the 
best way to commemorate the an- 
niversary was to work harder for 
world peace and the elimination of 
midear weapons. The letter said: 

“The 40th anniversary of the vic- 
tory in Europe is an occasion for 



Soviet Harms 


Stability With 
A New Missile, 


Reagan Charges 


President Ronald Reagan addressed the Europe* i Parliament as some of its members 
unfurled banners protesting against the Strategic L efense Initiative and nuclear weapons. 


West German Generation Gap 

War Is Only a Distant Memory for Self-Reliant Young 


By James Mi Markham would visit the Bitburg cemetery. 
New York Turns Service even at the cost of straining West 

BONN — For the majority of Germany’s ties with the United 
West Germans the solemn event .States. 


The Bitburg debate underscored 
that many older Gormans see the 
40th commemoration of Germa- 
ny’s capitulation as a watershed, 
one that they hope will finally end 
■the painful and wearisome discus- 
sions about tire Hitler era. There 


r%' 








i* via s-ir* 

«* 


Ml 




Page N 
FOR MOH 
CLA551R® 


II 

WIN 


ill HO 


WOllD-* 2 
8{J5iN£55 &* 


* --r-' •" 

<nu 




Km 


rim 

• 'Jim** ■" ■*»'* 


m 




»>• 


fnm Of 






JlONK. 
HW - 




n 




IIN 




K» 


rar> s 


Italy, West Geramny and. Mexico. 
It found that 6019 perbent of theto 
had not filed lax returns from 1981 
through 1983, he said. 

VS. citizens who liveateoad are 
subject to the same filing require- 
ments as those in the United States. 
In 1984. an expatriate was required 
to file a return if his income exceed- 
ed 53,300, evoi if that income was 
lax-exempt. The law also allowed 
for an exclusion of $80,000 of far-' 
dgn-eamed income. 

Mr. Finch told the panel that in 
the survey, people who may not 
have been required to file a return 
or who filed under a joint return 
would have been counted as non- 
filers. Bat even allowing for this, he 
said, the high percentage of non- 
filers still indicates that a substan- 
tial problem exists. 

Mr. finch said that the IRS is 
aware of the problem, because it 
received only 246,000 tax returns in 
1983 from the estimated 1.8 million 
Americans abroad not working for 
the U.S. government. 

But the IRS faces a difficult task 
in trying to resolve this situation, 
he said, “because there is little for- 
eign or U.S. information available 
to the Service which would be use- 
ful to identify rvonfilers.” 

The GAO found that of the 34 
countries with tax treaties with the 
United States,' only 17 share tax 
information, and this information 
almost always concerns interest 
and dividend income rather than 
wages and other earnings. 

Few countries maintain data on 
U.S. citizens resitting within their 
borders, or collect information otb- 
m *?er then what their own taxing an-. 
■?tiiorities need. 

There is also tittle information 


grams that examine data 
by tax-treaty countries and byTJR 
agencies in an attempt to identify 
tax liabilities, and a “spontaneous 
exchange” program in which for- 
eign governments supply informa- 
tion to the IRS without a U.S. re- 
quest. 


that was marked Wednesday, the 
40th anniversary of Nazi- Germa- 
ny's surrender, is a reminder of the 
end of their parents' or grandpar- 
ents' war, a war that is, at most, 
only a childhood memory. 

. „ „ . The passionate debate of the last .. . 

both of .our countries to remember month, which was set off by Pfcsi- :^uW he, in’ this view, no 50th- 
.. i ! acl ~fe .T^ “f* -doit RonaJd'Rcagan’s plan to'viat:’ :5 tomiVersary -commemorations of 

the German military cemetery M the^oflapse of Hitler’s Germany. 
Bitburg, iDnstrated what some soci- 
ologists and pollsters say is a-deep 
generational divide between older 
and younger West Germans. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 55. 
was determined that' Mr. Reagan 


women everywhere who gave the 
last full measure of devotion to the 
cause of fighdhg tyranny. 

“Together with our other allies, 
our two countries played a full part 
in that long struggle. We demon- 
(Coutxmied on Page 2, Col 1) 


Tab .emergence of new genera- 
tions of post-Hitler Gomans has 
brought a sfrnewhat more self-reli- 
ant tone to public life and foreign 
affairs. Yet the fathers of today 
worry uncommonly about thor 


11 Blacks Die in South Africa Unrest 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

• JOHANNESBURG — Police 
firing tear-gas cannisten and rub- 
ber bullets Wednesday sealed off 
the black township of Tsakane near 
Johannesburg to fry to halt street 
battles between migrant tribesmen 
and local black residents- in which 
1 1 persons were killed. 

Witnesses said groups of black 
men faced each other armed with 
axes,, slides, stones, long knives 
known as pangas, sharpened iron 
stakes and garbage-can lids. 

A police spokesman said two of 
the (had were migrant workers liv- 
ing in meo-ouly hostels in the 
township about 30 miles (48 kOo- 

roeters) southeast of Johannesburg. 
The rest were permanent residents. 

The township, same of interne- 
cine black violence over the past 
week, was totally cut off Wednesr 
day afternoon, and telephone lines 
also were severed or disconnected. 

A number of bouses, a men’s 
hostel and a beer hall reportedly 
were damaged or destroyed Tues- 
day night and early Wednesday. 

Reporters in the township said 
streets were Nocked by makeshift 
barricades, and police were lined 
up between vast crowds of town- 


ship residents gathered on a loot- 
ball field and hundreds of angry 
hostel dwielkrs. 

They said (he trouble appeared 
to stem from demands by Tsakane 
residents for the migrant workers, 
mostly Zulu and Xhosa tribesmen, 
to leave the township. 

Police were supported by sol- 
diers and traveled in armored per- 
sonnel carriers, the reporters said. 
The security forces fired tear-gas 
canni&ters and rubber bullets to 
break up crowds of blacks wherev- 
er they gathered. 

By late afternoon, soldiers 
aboard armored personnel carriers 
escorted buses that were taking 
abouL 3,000 migrant laborers out of 
the township. 

Police had blamed the fighting 
on rivalries between tribal groups; 
residents denied that, saying it in- 
volved differences on how to con- 
front white-minority rule. The resi- 
dents spoke on condition that they 
not be identified, for fear of repri- 
sals. 

The residents said (he migrants, 
who live in men-only hostels, were 
angered after residents set fire to a 
hostel beer hall last week. 

Tsakane residents said bostd- 


d wellers sought revenge Tuesday 
night, rampaging through the 
lownship and sending residents 
fleeing into fields. 

In nine months of unrest protest- 
ing racial discrimination, younger 
blacks have attacked beer halls and 
liquor outlets as symbols of while 
domination. 

The migrant workers are rural 
tribesmen who work in the dries or 
m the mines on one-year contracts 
whDe their families stay at home in 
distant tribal homelands because of 
South Africa’s apartheid laws. 

Migrant workers are generally 
more conservative and apolitical 
than urban Macks and, in the past, 
have attacked those seddng to op- 
pose South Africa’s white-minority 
government and iis policies. 

Police also reported overnight vi- 
olence in five blade areas in eastern 
Cape Province and in townships 
around Pretoria, the capital. Sol- 
dim and police swepi through two 
black townships in the south out- 
side of Port Elizabeth. 

In Mamdodi. outside Pretoria, 
on explosive device destroyed a car 
and several homes, but there were 
no casualti e s, a police spokesman 
said. (UPl, A?) 


..jn 


INSIDE 


■ Israel has increased its mili- 

tary aid to the South Lebanon 
Army militia. Page 2. 

■ A rebel commander has re- 
turned to Nicaragua under the 
nation's amnesty law. Page 3. 

■ Washington has offered to 

confer with a joint Jordanian- 
Palestinian group that exdudes 
PLO members. Plage 5. 


■ South Africa’s lop police offi- 
cial says citizens should be pro- 
tected, not killed. Page 5. 


SCIENCE 


■ Six scientists contend that 
one of the most valuable fossils 
in Britain is a fake. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ The U.S. trade deficit wid- 

ened by 16 percent in the first 
quarter from the previous three 
months. Page 15. 

■ British Airways reported a 
9.2-percem increase in profits 
for its latest fiscal year. Page 15. 


SPECIAL REPORT 
■ Travel in France. Page 9. 


sons, who grew up with the as- 
sumptions of prosperity -at home 
and dfetente with the Soviet Union 
to the east. Some worry that their 
children’s assumptions about the 
world might one day subtly shift 
the country’s orientations away 
from its commitment to the Atlan- 
tic alliance. 

The grandchildren of the Ger- 
mans who fought for Hitler are 
now in universities or trying to 
break into one of the toughest job 
markets West Germans have faced 
since their fabled postwar “eco- 
nomic miracle,” 

As a generation, they are allergic 
to overt appeals to German patrio- 
tism and not terribly proud of the 
most successful democracy Germa- 
ny has ever known, the 36-year 
Federal Republic. 

As Bitburg showed, the legacy of 
the Third Reich has neutralized 
many of their emotions. 

“I don't think guilt feelings are 
appropriate,” said Bettina Die- 
trich, a 22-year-old Oriental studies 
undergraduate at Munich Univer- 
sity. “But I don’t think national 
pride is right either. I don’t have 
any” 

A former Munich psychology 
student, Gottfried Langjmstem, 31, 
who has been fruitlessly looking for 
steady work, hinted at the lingering 
inheritance of the Hitler catastro- 
phes 

“When you say that you’re a 
German,” he said, “you always 
have a packet of guilt in it. Unlike 
Americans, you can’t hang a flag 
over your bed." 

The turnover to a new generation 
was made concrete two and a half 
years ago when Helmut Schmidt, 
bom in 1918, ceded the chancellor- 
ship to Mr. Kohl, who was bora in 
193a 

The passing of power has denot- 
ed the shift from a generation that 
actively fought in World War II — 
Mr. Schmidt was a lieutenant and 
was decorated with an Iron Cross 
— to one whose offspring, like Mr. 
Kohl, were dragooned as teen- 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

STRASBOURG. France — 
President Ronald Reagan asserted 
Wednesday that the Soviet Union 
was undermining stability by de- 
veloping a new first-strike nuclear 
missile. 

Mr. Reagan, who spoke to the 
European Parliament on the 40th 
anniversary of the capitulation of 
Nazi Germany, was warmly re- 
ceived by most of the 434 members 
oT the body, who interrupted with 
applause 31 times. 

But hecklers booed as Mr. Rea- 
gan defended UJS. policy in Cen- 
tral America and continued as he 
reiterated administration policy on 
nuclear weapons. 

About 30 protesters left the hall 
after Mr. Reagan declared: “The 
hopes for broader and lasting mod- 
eration of the East-West competi- 
tion foundered in Angola. Ethio- 
pia, Afghanistan and Nicaragua.” 

Mr. Reagan warned of a danger- 
ous new turn in a Soviet nuclear 
buildup. 

Robert C. McFariane. the U.S. 
national security adviser, said that 
that president was referring to the 
multiple-warhead SSX-24 missile 
that Moscow has not yet- deployed. 

Mr. McFariane indicated that 
Mr. Reagan was focusing on the 
issue now possibly to head off the 
Soviet deployment He said that 
deployment of the SSX-24 was 
“still susceptible to influence in 
anus-control talks and that's why 
reference to it is timely right now." 

Despite the occasion of the anni- 
versary, Mr. Reagan did not ac- 
knowledge the role of the Soviet 
Army in the victory over Nazi Ger- 
many nor did he renew his earlier 
proposals for a meeting with the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. 

Mr. Reagan’s proposals to ex- 
pand U ^.-Soviet cooperation in- 
cluded the exchange of observers at 
military exercises, regular high-lev- 
el military contacts and establish- 
ment of a permanent communica- 
tions link between U.S. and Soviet 
military headquarters. 

Mr. Reagan also repeated that 
the United Stales was ready to dis- 
cuss a Soviet proposal for a decla- 
ration on nonuse of force if Mos- 
cow agrees at the European 
Disarmament Conference in Stock- 
holm on military confidence- build- 
ing measures. 

The rest of the speech, broadcast 
live in Europe and the United 
Slates, included reminiscences 
about the end of World War n and 
praise for democracy and freedom. 

Protesters held up banners read- 
ing “Hands Off Nicaragua” and 
“Star Wars, No," a reference to the 
U.S Strategic Defense Initiative. 

Observers said that about one- 
third of the parliamentarians indi- 
cated their dissatisfaction with 
parts of Mr. Reagan's speech by 
crossing their arms or remaining 
silent throughout the 45-minute 
speech. 

Others were more vocal Mr. 
Reagan ignoredjhe protesters at 
first but responded when a chorus 
of boos and desk-pounding greeted 
his declaration that there were “So- 
viet efforts to profit from and stim- 
ulate regional conflicts in Central 
America.” 

When some parliamentarians 
hooted, he interjected, "They 
haven’t been there. I have.” 

Mr. Reagan visited Costa Rica 
and Honduras in 1982. 

When he completed his text, Mr. 
Reagan was loudly applauded 
when he said: 

“We’ve seen evidence here of 
your faith in democracy, in the 


ability of some to speak up freely as 
they preferred to speak." 

“And yet 1 can't help but remind 
all of us that some who lake advan- 


tage or that right of democracy 
that if f 


seem unaware 


the govem- 


Deputies of 10 nations acquire a 
European outlook. Page 2. 

U.S. opinion is divided over the 
Bitburg visit, poll finds. Page 2. 


meat that they would advocate be- 
came reality, no one would hare 
that freedom to speak up again." 

More than 1.000 demonstrators 
rallied in a city square and marched 
through the center of Strasbourg 
protesting his visit and Washing- 
ton's Central American policies. 

Mr. Reagan flew to Strasbourg 
from a two-day visit to Madrid. 

Mr. Reagan later arrived in Lis- 
bon. where he will end the iU-djy 
European tour that began in West 
Germany on May 1. He is to return 
to Washington on Friday. 

Two bombs exploded Tuesday 
night at a Radio Free Europe trans- 
mitter near Lisbon but no injuries 
were reported. (AP. NIT, Reuters) 


U.S. Official 
Favors End 
To SALT 2 
Observance 


By George G Wilson 

HfoAingron Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The De- 
fense Department’s chief arms con- 
trol dffidal has said that in his 
“personal view,” the United States 
shouk} abandon the SALT-^agree- 
meat rather than retire nuclear 
forces to conform to its limits. 

Richard N. Pede, the assistant 
secretary of defense for interna- 
tional security policy, testifying 
Tuesday before the Senate Armed 
Services. Committee, said that the 
1979 strategic arms limitation trea- 
ty should not be observed beyond 
its expiration date of Dec. 31. 

The treaty agreement was signed 
by President Timmy Carter and 
President Leonid L Brezhnev. The 
treaty was not ratified by the Sen- 
ate^ bui both nations pledged to 
observe the limits. 


Although President Ronald Rea- 
gan will make the decision on 
whether to continue to observe the 
missile and bomber limits in the 
treaty, Mr. Perle's testimony was 
the furthest that any administra- 
tion official had gone in a public 
forum toward renouncing the trea- 
ty- 

In a public statement last week, 
Mr. Perle said it was “a peculiarity 
of Americans” that, to demonstrate 
good faith, “we should abide by a 
treaty” that the Soviet Union “was 
violating.” 

Mr. Perle has been the most m- 
Quential Pentagon official on arms 
control issues since the early days 
of the Reagan administration. 

Mr. Reagan campaigned against 
the treaty in 1 980, calling it “fatally 
flawed.” But after succeeding Mr. 
Reagan in office in 1981, he an- 
nounced that his administration 
would continue to respect the limits 
it set on superpower arsenals as 
long as the Soviet Union did the 

(Continued on Pago 2, CoL 3) 


iff*-"-* 


".Wl 


* 

M 

r jr- 







r!*; 


a^ A 




Puts 2 Satellites in Orbit 


Raders 


v ' 


rS- 




y£P' 

!.v< *7V. f 5 


.-rdV' f 




#w«* 


•> 

A 






+ J4l — . 

t V* 


f™7 ? * -■ 


j 

. vO r t * 














»*-• 

sW 




KOUROU, French Guiana — 
Europe's Ariane rocket has suc- 
cessfully put two communications 
satellites into orbit, boosting the 
confidence of Europeans that they 
can compete with the United States 
for lucrative space markets. 

Ariane blasted off from its jungle 
base -in ‘French Guiana late Mon- 
day with only 13 minutes left of its 
launch “window,” the optimum pe- 
riod for placing satellites in station- 
ary orbit. 

The launch was beset by pro b- 
lems, including a frozen pressure 
vah« in Ariane’s liquid hydrogen 
fad tank. But the liftoff of the 
49-meter (160-foot) rocket was per- 
fect 

The mission was the fifth Orga- 
nized by Arianespace,' the West Eu- 
^ropeao space company. 

- The head of Arianespace, Frife- 
'dine d'AHest of France, said that 
the flight had Underlined his team’s 
ability to launch satellites success- 
fully and cope with problems* effec- 
tively ... 


-. The two satellites, Telecom- IB 
belonging to the French govern- 
ment and Gs tar-1 owned by the 


American GTE Spacecet Corp. 
will move into orbits 36,000 lob- 
meters (22,000 miles} above Earth. 

. Arianespace says it now has 
about SO percent of the booming 
commerdm satellite market. The 
company has 18 Grin contracts, 
and revenues have totaled 5650. 
million, 

Arianeqpacc’s main rival, the 
U5. space shuttle, has lost three, 
satellites, two of which were recov- 
ered in spectacular rescue opera- 
tions. 

The U.S. National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration’s prob- 
lems in launching satellites from 
the shrntle have had a Serious effect 
on the insurance .market. 

Brokers say there are fewer and 
fewer insurers wffling to take the 
risk. A source at Kouzou for the 
launch said dm 5100 million in 
insurance, normally considered 
enough for one flight, was all that 
was available for the whole of L985. 



At Harvard, Division on a Reagan Honor 


Ariane rocket lifts off from Kourou base In French Guiana. 


By Robert Pear 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Harvard 
University’s 350th birthday party is 
still 16 months away, but the event 
is already vending out reverbera- 
tions that reach to the White 
House. 

Planning for the observance bc- 

S five years ago, and the presir 
t of Harvard, Derek G Bok, 
recently invited President Ronald 
Reagan to speak at a convocation 
scheduled for Sept 5, 1986, at the 
university’s campus in Cambridge; 
Massachusetts. 

But the possibility that Mr. Rea- 
gan might be awarded an honorary 
degree has provoked dehate among 
the faculty members and alumni 
planning the celebration. 

Itis a question of some delicacy 
because Mr. Bok, who would be 
Mr. Reagan’s official host, has 
been leading a campaign by college 
presidents opposed to Mr. Rea- 
gan's effort to cut federal aid to 
college students. 

Mr. Bok is chairman of the Asso- 
ciation of American Universities, 
and he was at the Capitol last week 
io buttonhole senator, with h'b ar- 


guments. The White House propos- 
als, be said, “would reintroduce 
distinctions based on class and 
wealth into our system of higher 
education” and “would put higher- 
priced colleges beytmd the reach of 
lower-income families.” 


Two Harvard alumni, Caspar W. 
Weinberger, the secretary of de- 
fense, ami Donald T. Regan, the 
White House chief of staff, have 
been urging Mr. Reagan to attend 
the celebration. Because Harvard is 
the oldest college in the United 
States, the celebration of its found- 
ing in 1636 will also mark the 350th 
anniversary of higher education in 
the nation. 


Harvard officials said that the 
Reagan administration had dis- 
creetly inquired whether Mr. Rea- 
gan would receive an honorary de- 
gree. They said they could not give 
a definite answer at this early date. 

Some at Harvard also said they 
believed the White House was try- 
ing to negotiate a degree for Mr. 
Reagan as a condition of his at- 
tending neat year’s ceremonies, but 
White House officials denied that. 

Honorary degree* are ghen reg- 
ularly bv U.S. colleges and univer- 



DerekCBok 


sides. At Harvard, decisions on 
such degrees are made by the Har- 
vard Corp. comprising the presi- 
dent and fellows of Harvard Col- 
lege, on the recommendation of an 
advisory committee. The commit- 
tee includes professors, members of 
ihc corporation and alumni who 


serve on Harvard's other governing 
body, the 30-member Board of 
Overseers. The panel that is to 
make recommendations Tor Sep- 
tember 1986 has not yet beat 
named. 

The argument for giving Mr. 
Reagan a degree is that Harvard 
would be honoring the office of 
president, not necessarily the man 
who holds it The argument against 
giving him a degree is that Mr. 
Reagan has not earned it by intel- 
lectual attainment and that Har- 
vard will primarily be celebrating 
academic excellence at its 350th 
birthday. 

Administration officials said 
that Mr. Reagan would welcome an 
honorary degree from Harvard. 
However, Frederick J. Ryan Jr., 
director of presidential scheduling, 
said thai “we have never looked 5 
the past at whether he’d receive an 
honorary degree in deciding w helh- 
er to accept a campus's imitation." 

David Riesman, a sociologist at 
Harvard, said it was “quite appro- 
priate for Reagan to speak” and to 
be honored. 

“Aficr all.” he said, "this is 350. 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


*** 


■ 







*4 


Page2 


INTEHIVATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUTE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Israel Increases Aid 


To Christian Militia 



r 


In Strasbourg, a European View WORLD BRIEFS 


i i 

_ y * 

£ </>•> 


Fnmi Parliamentary Pot, 10 Nations 9 Aspiratioml&nerge Lords Delay Local Government Bill 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Post Serbia 

JERUSALEM — Israel has in- 
creased its flow of ammunition and 
other military supplies to the South 
Lebanon Army militia in an at- 
tempt to buttress the force's de- 
fense of the Christian town of Jez- 
zine and its credibility as Israel’s 
principal ally in southern Lebanon, 
informed sources said Wednesday. 

The stepped-up supply effort 
was said to involve mostly ammu- 
nition for light arms, tanks and 
artillery to replenish the stocks of 
the South Lebanon Army units that 
are deployed in and around Jez- 
zine. The town is a Christian 
stronghold to which thousands of 
Christian refugees have fled in the 
last two weeks in the face of ad- 
vancing Lebanese Drnze and Mos- 
lem militias. 

Commanded by Brigadier Gen- 
eral Antoine Lahad, a Christian, 
the miiiria is supplied, financed 
and supported by Israel- It is de- 
signed to be the backbone in a 
system of local militias that are to 
police Israel's "security zone," a 6 - 
to 15-mile-wide (9.6- to 24-ldlome- 
ter-wide) strip of territory along the 
IsraeU-Lebanese border. 

' Israeli officials repeated 
Wednesday that they would not 
intervene militarily to defend Jez- 
zine, from which the Israeli Army 

■-.Li a n I ..UaU 


General Lahad and his Israeli 
suppliers appear to be winning the 
gamble that Jenanecan hold. After 
driving thousands of Christians 
from their villages east of Sidon, 
the Drnze and Moslem advance 


’■ -ft* ; 

. . •v.r -?- v 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 


light when you come here,” Mr. 
Falconer said. “You understand 


The British are good humored, 
the Irish are folksy and the Grades 


STRASBOURG, France — that, although we may not have had are natural orators. The West Ger- 
Wben President Ronald a rivfl war in Britain since 1666- mans tend to produce streams of 

addr e ss ed the European Pariia- odd, these people have had civil statistics along with an occasional 
meat on Wednesday, he may have wars all the time. I don’t like quot- display of angst. The Dutch and 
seen Alex Falconer wearing outsize mg Churchill, but it’s definitely the Chines are the most earnest. 


LONDON (AP) — The government has suffered two defeats in the 
House of Lords on a bill to abolish the governing bodies erf London and 
sU metropolitan counties. 

The lords have no power to quash bDls passed by the Commons, but 
can delay their enactment by voting for amendments. The amendments 


halted last week in heavy fighting 
around the village of Kfar rakxis. 


around the village of Kfar rakxis, 
west of Jezzine. 


■ Modems Bar Attacks 

Lebanese Moslem leaders have 
told Syrian-backed Palestinian 
guerrilla leaders that they wQl not 
be allowed to launch rocket attacks 
against Israel from southern Leba- 
non, Reuters reported Wednesday 
from Beirut, quoting political 
sources. 

The Moslem leaders, the sources 
said, made it dear to delegates of 
the Palestinian National Salvation 
Front that there would be no return 
to the situation existing before bra- 
d's 1982 invasion of Lebanon. At 
that time, the Palestine Liberation 
Organization controlled southern 
Lebanon and periodically Launched 
rockets into Israel 



“Hands better to have jaw, jaw, jaw than pun c tua t in g their speeches until re- 


can ultimately be overturned by the Commons. Ken Livingstone, who 
stands to lose his jobas head of the Greater London Council when fee bill 
passes, hailed the vote as “a major victory.” The abolition of the bodies is 
a cornerstone of Prime Minister Maigaret Thatcher’s iCoasesvatiw Party 
manifesto, and has been vigorous^ fought by the opposition Labor Party, 
which controls most of the councils under threat. 

The Lords, helped by a Tory backbench revolt, voted for two anrend- 
roents obliging the government tosetiro highway authorities and wildlife 
protection agencies to fifl the gap left try the councils' abolition. The 
government argues that the councils are unnecessary because all their 
functions can be handled by the boroughs and Whitehall, the seat of 
government. The councils say the move is anti-democratic and wffl 
concentrate even more power in government hands. 


Off Nicaragua” and "No to Star war. wai; war." quests to their more excitable Latin 

Wars.” Derided by many as a "talking colleagues to keep "both feet firing 

Mr. Falconer, a Scot, belongs to shop” with little real power, the planted on the ground.” 
what many of his feQow deputies is European . P arliament is a strange The pnKriga ] spectrum ranges 
Western Europe's first -directly political ammaL Debat es take fr -nm neo-fascists to militant Com- 
elected assembly regard as the far place in seven langnagfs smuuta- mti«<> c Seated at the frrek are an 
left. Hungs that most of his col- neously. The P arliam ent h as b een assortment of environmentalists 
leagues are for, he is against: the described as a Traveling arcus, ^ radicals, inrlt wW a good 
Atlantic allian ce, the European constantly moving from Stras- ^ n^nie who, in the 

Community, even strengthening bomg, where plenary sessions arc p j lrase ^ a Northern Ireland La- 
the powers of the Parliament of hdd, to UiKmbouxg, where the {Jorite, John Hume, seem to be 
which he is a member. 3, 000-member secretariat is local- up to the moon.” 

And he has become noticeably ed, to Bnissds, the site of commit- Enrooean asoira- 

more European in outlook in his 10 tee meetings and party caucuses. - 

^teasVBiro-MJ*. uim a modadidc giro urn do mb I* fan 


Derided by many as a "talking colleagues to keep "both feet firmly 
op” with little real power, the planted on the ground.” 


Richard N. Perte 


Official Urges 
SALT-2’s End 


withdrew cm April 29 and which is 
far north of the bonier security 


far north of the bonier security 
zone. 

They have acknowledged in the 
past providing food, medicine and 
Other "h umani tarian aid” to the 
refugees in Jezzine, bat this was the 
first tim e officials in Jerusalem also 
confirmed a deliberate attempt to 
shore up Genera] LahatTs military 
capability in the area. 

"The whole idea is not to let 
(hem collapse,” a senior official 
said of the militia. 


■ More Shooting in Band 

Firing across Beirut’s Green 
Line threatened a Christian- Mos- 
lem cease-fire with collapse and de- 
layed plans to reopen roads 
Wednesday, United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Beirut. How- 
ever, a militia source said the shoot- 
ing was "acceptable cease-fire 
violations.” 

The latest cease-fire, which halt- 
ed the worst cross-city shelling in 
Beirut in 10 months, remained 
fragile as militia representatives 
failed to reopen any of six crossing 
points between the city’s Christian 
and Moslem sectors. 

President Amin Gemayel hdd 
talks with Prime Minister Rashid 
Karami and other officials in a new 
move to halt the violence that has 
claimed 57 fives since April 28. 


Another impetus for the Reagan 
administration to make a decision 
on future adherence to the treaty is 
a congressional requirement that it 
file a report in June on the conse- 
quences of continuing to observe 
the treaty’s limits. The treaty limits 
both superpowers to 1,200 multi- 
ple-warhead missiles, of which no 
more than 820 can be land-based 
intercontinental ballistic missiles. 


Mr. Perk said' Tuesday he did 
not expect Soviet Forces to grow 
more rapidly without die treaty 
than with it "as the Soviets inter- 
pret the treaty ." 


Europe Commemorates End of War 


(Continued from Page 1) 
slra led that despite our differences 
we can join together in successful 
common efforts. 

"I believe we should also see tins 
solemn occasion as an opportunity 
to look forward to the future with 
vision and hope. I would like our 
countries to join in rededication to 
the task of overcoming the differ- 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGRE 


I BACHBXXS • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

IhrWHiAaMcUhfcqNMHn. 


Sand detailed mume 
for free evaluation. 


ences between us, and in renewed 
progress toward the goals of mak- 
ing peace more stable and eliminat- 
ing nuclear weapons from the face 
of the earth. By pursuing those 
goals, we will truly honor those 
whose memory we commemorate 
today.” 

In Moscow, Mr. Gorbachev led 
other members of the Politburo of 
the Communist Party in laying 
wreaths at Lenin’s mausoleum and 
the tomb of the unknown soldier. 

The main celebration of the vic- 
tory, which cost the Soviet Union 
20 million lives, mil be Thursday, 
the anniversary of the day news of 
Germany's surrender reached the 
country. 


President Franqois Mitterrand 
of France sent a message to Rus- 
sian leaders in which he nailed "the 
brotherhood of arms” that had 
united the two nations in wartime. 

In Paris, 200 young Germans 
took part in a ceremony displaying 
the battle flags of all the French 
armed forces on the Champs Ely- 
sees. 


PACIRC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

M0 N. Sepulveda Blvd* 

Las Anew las. California 
9004V. Dart. 23. USA. 


1984 Air Safety Record 
Called Best in 40 Years 


exposition 


TAPIS 

IRAN 


orient 


HOTEL MARTINEZ 

a CANNES 


jusqu'au 10 mai 


The Associated Press 

MONTREAL — The 1984 safe- 
ty record fra- scheduled air passen- 
ger services around the world was 
the best since the International 
Civil Aviation Organization began 
compiling statistics 40 years ago. 
according to figures released by the 
United Nations agency. 

A statement issued by the Mou- 
creal-bascd organization Tuesday 
said that preliminary statistics 
showed that last year 224 persons 
were killed in 15 fatal accidents 
involving airplanes belonging to 
the 155-member agency. That com- 
pares with 809 fatalities in 20 fatal 
air crashes in 1983- 


In Britain, Queen Elizabeth H, 
her husband. Prince Philip, and 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
led a congregation of 2JXX) in a 
sendee at Westminster Abbey. 

"The cost was heavy in a war 
which engulfed Europe and extend- 
ed far beyond it," said the arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, Robert Run- 
de. He recalled the liberation of the 
Netherlands, the bombing of Cov- 
entry and a memorial in Leningrad 
to one million people who died dur- 
ing the German siege. 

The war “was not a panacea for 
every ill” be said, “but the victory 
which closed down Belsen, Buchen- 
wald and Auschwitz is in itself suf- 
ficient cause for thanksgiving.” 

The British domestic news agen- 
cy Press Association said Mis. 
Thatcher had asked that the service 
not be a formal state occasion be- 
cause she was "concerned that the 
spirit of reconciliation with Germa- 
ny must be uppermost in people's 
minds.” 

Mrs. Thatcher released the text 
of a letter from Mr. Gorbachev in 
which he said the R ussians wanted 
to cooperate with Britain to pre- 
vent another world war. 


Ce parfum qui fait revet:.. 



which he is a member. 

And he has become noticeably 
more European in outlook in his 10 
months as a Euro-Mi 1 . 


(Continued from Page 1) 
same. The Soviet Union said it 
would do so. 

To stay within the treaty's limits, 
Mr. Reagan would have to retire a 
Poseidon submarine, which carries 
16 multiple warhead missiles, when 
the new Trident missile submarine 
Alaska goes to sea in late Septem- 
ber. The Trident carries 24 multiple 
warhead missiles. 


His political disdai" for the as- and-concrete building overlooking 
semblv has softened as a result of one of Strasbourg’s many canals, 

. . ' • r - .l. a. 


and radicals, including a good 
number of people who, in the 
phrase of a Northern Inland La- 
borite, John Hume, seem to be 
"wired up to the moon.” 

Recognizable European aspira- 
tions do seem to be emerging from 
this melting poL 

"IT you took the first three or 


Thais Say They Repulsed Vietnamese 


for centimes sitting down to squab- 


of Europe, you would have a group 


U.S. Opinion 
Divided on 
Bitburg Visit 


exciting cauldron of different na- 
tionalities and political traditions. 

“If you sit in the chamber for an 
afternoon, yon get a very vivid idea 
of the amazing diversity of Europe- 
an culture,” said Katherina Fofcke, 


in the Resistance. “The encourag- 
ing thing is that ih«c very average 
people begin to think like Europe- 
ans when you mix them together.” 

Pieter Dankert, a Dane and a 
former president of the Parliament, 


BANGKOK (AP) — Thai forces supported by air stnkes and artillery 
barrages Wednesday repulsed most cf the 800 Vietnamese troops who 
had intruded into Thailand in pursuit of Cambodian guerrillas, a Thai 
Navy spokesman said. . 

Rear Admiral Sak ch a i Kaewjinda said a combined farce of marines, 
border police and army rangers Wednesday recaptured an area in Ban 
Chamrak village earlier seized by the Vietnamese. The villagc is about 175 
miles (280 kilometers) southeast of Bangkok in Trat province, on the 
southern border with Cambodia. 

Admiral S akchai said a Thai ranger was killed and eight others 
wounded by Vietnamese mines in five days of military operations. He 
said tire bodies of eight Vietnamese troops were found in the area, bat 


that actual casualties were probably 
fighters. 


due to air strikes by F-5E 


the German leader of the Socialist commented; “It’s difficult even for 
group, the largest political faction ^ anti -Common Marketeers to 


in the Parliament “You find out 
which nations speak with their 


By Adam Gymcr 

New York Times Service 


sustain total opposition for very 
with their i„„,. jj they want to function effcc- 


NEW YORK — After four for feels. 


arms, which with their legs, the 
style of their rhetoric, and their 


weeks of intense national debate The Italian deputies arc by com- 


over . President Ronald Reagan’s moa , consent the most emotional. 


gether in a community of 10 differ- 
ent nations can force you to adopt 
European attitudes.” 


visit to the German military ceme- 
tery at Bitburg, the American pub- 


For the most] 
business is ipm 


irt, parliamentary 

merican pub- have nothing to do with business is made up of more mun- 

over whether issue being discussed. The dane items,,sucb as debating a fish- 
Q v™-ir French pride themsdves cm the in- erics agreement between the Euro- 


tic U equaUy divided over irfretb^ issue oemg cacusseo. ine aime nans,, arena 
he should have gone, a New York French pnde themsdves on the in- enes agreement b 
Times-CBS New Poll shows. controvertible logic of their arai- pean Community 
In telephone interviews conduct- ^ the elegance of their or agonizing aboi 
ed Monday night, 41 percent of lan 8 ua g t - youth unemployn 

those polled half of whom angled 
out the need for good relations with 


Ethiopian Camp Reopened, UN Says 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (NYT) — The senior United Nations 
official in Ethiopia, Kurt Jamison, says that the approximately 60,000 
famine victims reportedly expelled from the relief camp at Ihnet are free 
to return, and so far about 2,000 have come bade. 

After a daylong visit to the camp, in the Gondar Province about 200 
miles (320 kfometerc) north of Addis Ababa, Mr. Jamison said Tuesday, 
“There was a time when authorities refused to feed those who returned 
but now they are under orders to give food and wherever possible 
shelter.” 

Mr. Jamison met Monday with Lieutenant Colonel Mengistu Haile 
Mariam, the Ethiopian leader, whom he later quoted as saying that the 


mity and Madagascar 
about the increase of 
loymenL 


expulsions had been ordered by local authorities without his approval 
Colonel Mengistu indicated that those responsible would be disciplined. 


miiS Possible Honor for Reagan 

tery Sunday. An equal 41 percent, . T „ , ^ 

Divides Harvard Campus 

S?X, l l^ ft “ dl8PO " (Continued from P^e 1) was unworthy. Franklin D. I 

cent had no opmion. years .” while the hostility to Mr. vdt, a Harvard alumnus, so 

■JSH anEff, jffigtiS; Ry iojoao-momenarypas. Ha™d’s raanaJS S 

_ George Wald, a Nobel prize- Sdv hadb^^k. 


Critic Decries State of Learning in U.S. 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Clean th Brooks, literaiy critic and professor 
emeritus of rhetoric at Yale University, said Wednesday in the annual 
Jefferson lecture that the state cf learning in the United sates "amounts 


692 people, whichcames a margin w j nn i n g Harvard biologist, said, 
of sampling error of plus or mmus4 5 ,*^ appallsme!" 


percentage. points. scribing Mr. Realm’s presence at “ ~~ 

MenfavaredthevTsit,by46to41 the jmmversmySbration as “a 
percent, Mule wommopposed it, disgraceful necessity," he said he 1 /v. _ r . 

by 40 to 36 percent There were no wo^d notstay tolnLiif Mr. Rea- House Panel VOteStOlMt 

clear differences of opinion by age. ~, n gngke m fij C university RimimiiV c t 

Mibtaiy veterans woe narrowly m Thb historical^recttteits are Space SnxTialnje 


was unworthy. Fr anklin D. Roose- 
velt, a Harvard alumnus, spoke at 
Harvard's tercentenary in 1936 but 
received no degree because he al- 
ready had been given an honorary 
doctorate cf laws in 1929, when he 
was governor of New York. 


emeritus of rheronc at Yale University, said Wednesday in the annual 
Jefferson lecture that the state cf learning in the United sates "amounts 
to a disaster, and one of Pearl Harbor dunensions." 

Mr. Brooks said in the prepared text of a speech sponsored by the 
National Endowment for the H umanities : "In important respects, we are 
an illiterate nation. A large section of our population cannot read at all, 
and many of those who can read do not read books.” 

The author of textbooks which introduced generations of Americans to 
prose and poetry, Mr. Brooks cited studies that stowed four 17-year-old* 
m 10 could not comprehend ordinary documents, 23 millio n adults were 
functionally illiterate and only 20 percent of high school seniors could 
write a coherent essay. 


PCs 1 


Heart Patient Suffer ed 2d Stroke 


Military veterans were narrowly in 


kv**- ^ percent to 42 percent. Of mixaL AbAsw received 

the M Jew interviewed, 21 said he ^ honorary degree from Harvard 


mixed. Andrew Jackson received N*" Yorfc Times Service 

an honorary degree from Harvard WASHINGTON — The House 
in 1833, three years before its bi- Armed Services Committee has 


should not have gone and the other ^ 1833, three years before its bi- Armed Services Committee has 
was undecided. £ centennial. John Quincy Adams, voted to cut SIJ2 billion from Presi- 

The poll also suggested that for whom Jackson defeated in the 1828 dent Ronald Reagan’s proposal for 
all the attention the nsit has re- presidential election, called the de- a space-based defense against mis- 

gree a "disgrace.” s&TTqjecting propoSsto cut 


television, the argunonis about it Grow Cleveland attended the more deeply into the program, at 
did not aU penetrat e. A tofeltrfM 250th anniversary celebration in cording to members of the panel 
percent of those fa voting the visit iss^ Ki,t n^icwt m t imn. -tv® unt> in • aIm®) 


LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (UPI) — Brain hemorrhaging suffered earli- 
er this week by William J. Schroeder, the artificial heart patient, was a 
second stroke an the left side of his brain, his hospital said Wednesday. 

“This event is considered a hemorrhagic stroke.’’ said Donna Hade, a 
spokeswoman for Humana Hospital Audubon, where Mr. Schrocda-, 53, 
was given an artificial heart on Nov. 25. He suffered 8 firststrake two and 
a half weeks later, blamed on a dot that apparently brake loose from his 
mechanical heart. . 

A weakness has been detected in Mr. Schroeder’s right arm mid leg, 
whose movements are controlled by the left side of the brain. His 
condition remains critical but stable. 


percrat °f those fayramgUB vrat jggg but refused to accept an ton- The vote, in a dosed meeting 1? A1 . R/uvuvl 
said they did not know why others dncmraie of laws, saving he Tuesdav. was the first mninr issue Dr UlC llCCOrCI 


orary doctorate of laws, saying he Tuesday, was the first major issue 
no. — SKSSyte 

U.S. Cemetery Strike Settled wyMjB 


could exj^ain why^qr fduto way 

they did Among supporters the ar- . SAN FRANCISCO — A tenia- 

eument of good relations with West ^ contract agreement was an- c h ai rman of the committee, said 
Germany and Chancellor Helmut noimced Wednesday^ a«m«ay 

Kohl was do minan t workers strike that has left about ““ feQta 8 on oply enough of an 

Among the opponents, many 750 hahes burial at 19 yar to make up 

ritedtbl Nazi oSSation (rf graveyards here. for inflation, about 4 percent. 


SAN FRANCISCO— A tenia- pin, a Democrat o f Wiscon sin and 
live contract agreement was an- chairman^ of the committee, said 


Andrei D. Sakharov, the dissident Soviet scientist, is still in internal 
exile in Gorki, the Soviet health minister. Sergei P, Burenkov, said 
Wednesday. Pressed on the state of Mr. Sakharov’s health. Mr. Burenkov 
said al a Geneva news conference only that “Gaifci has one of the biggest 
dimes in the Soviet Union and covering the whole m edical field." (UPI) 
British health officials are investigating a new outbreak of Legion- 
naires’ disease after the death last Thursday of a 64-year-old nurse in 
western England The officials said there was no apparent connection 
between the death in Bristol and an outbreak in Stafford in -central 
England, where the virus has killed 31 people in the past month. (Reuters) 


Other foes spoke of the war more 
generally. A 30-year-old South. 
Carolina man said he was opposed 
because "U.S. troops lost their lives 
in World War II, and Reagan is 
letting them down." 


Anniversary of Surrender Highlights German Split 


(Continued from Page 1) 
agers into the Reich's doomed war 


The survey showed no sigoiG- effort in its dosing months, 
cant change in Mr. Reagan’s over- Some call it the generation of 
all standing with the public Al the “flak helpers,” since many un- 
end of February, a Times-CBS trained teen-agers were given the 
News Poll showed that 59 percent job of firing anti-aircraft guns at 
of the public approved his handling Allied airplanes, 
of his job; in the latest peril, 56 This specific experience of the 
percent did war’s end came through in Mr. 


Kohl's repeated attempts to ex- nior officers who served in the war, Neumann predicted in an interview 
plain away the 49 Waffen SS sol- is one of many institutions where (hat a cancellation would not lead 
diere buried in the Bitburg ceme- the emergence of postwar genera- ■ to anti-American feeling, butratb* 
tery. Whatever their war roles may tions is striking. The World War II er would lead West Germans back 
have been, they became in the veterans are all in their last days of into “a deq ? hole of resignation” 
chancellor's view very young men army service. The highest ranking dug in the deep-felt conviction that 
drafted unwillingly mio the con- soldier in the army today. General- they will never be free of the bur- 


Tbe 335,600-strong West Ger- was a "flak hdper. 


Inspector Wolfgang Altenburg, den of the Nazi pasL 


man Army, which has only 92 se- Of 217 active general officers, 71 


From the outset of his mandate, 
Mr. Kohl has consciously tried to 




were born between 1933 and 1944, style himself as his country’s first 
and 147 between 1924 and 1932. At "postwar chancellor” and, through 


the level of colonel, the pattern of homey language and symbols, his 
renewal is even dearer — 764 of tried to convey a sense that die 


1,044 colonels were bom after federal republic is a normal coun- 
1933, meaning they were 12 years try, one that looks to its future mid 


In Jakarta 

there's a superb hotel 
that is more like a 
luxurious country dub. 


old or younger when the war ended, not to its dark past. Bitburg 
Notoriously prominent Nazis, showed, though, that his emotions 


too, arc dying out, making the gjob 
al hunt for war-crimmals-al-largi 
increasingly a search for old men. 


lie on the cusp of the war and the 


l-large postwar years. 

men. Mr. Kohl sprinkles his speeches 


HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
INTER- raiSTITNENTAL 


Rudolf Hess, 91 years old, once with appeals to “the fatherland" i) 
deputy leader of the Nazis, is the and has encouraged the sin g in g of 
lone occupant of the red-brick the national anthwn. the “Deutsch- 
Spandau prison in West Berlin, landlied,” which will soon be insti- 
watched by rotating guards from tilled as the formal end of program- 
me four powers that occupied Ger- ming on West Germany's two main 
many at the war’s end. The most- television channels, 
wanted Nazi, Josef Mengde, the In an interview, Mr. Kohl once 


former Auschwitz doctor, is 74, if spoke of the need for “a normal 

be Is alive. Datriotism" in the ferteml renuhtic. 


“ , , patriotism" in the federal republic. 

The ages of the accused, and the “When 1 lay a wreath at the mon- 
ages of the witnesses, are making iimeni to the unknown soldier in 
our work increasmElY difficult." Paris.” he Mid w» cino the 



.Wo 

Win,, 


tral office for investig a t i ng Nazi anthem in the gmte way.’ 




Mr- KoU-did not buckle to the 
‘P y^hein West Germany, emotional demonstrations that 
and x* 1 cresI ®^ jus* before the dep kmnent 

witness** who of NATO Pershing-2 mSSes in 
say. I don t want to say anything. I late 1983 s 

don’t want to know anything more Aides uv his 


atom this. I ^ * be left fe 

. nehnildiiM, nf C mwimii 


A series of opinion polls has con- 


vi . ucia m j n anon. . . 


West Germans. 

younger opponents 
in the streets, ttouXofShraSd 
themissDfiissoctntennsofnation- 

ei sovereignty, challenging the no- 
Wert Germany as “the most nessi- don t h 


THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL* 


mistic nation you can find." ‘ ” SSfaTlJS 3 


•>. INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS 


Jalan Lapangan Banteng Srfatan. (EO, Box 329k 370108, Tdex: 44156 
For reservations call: Hong Kong: 5-8440311/3, 

Tokyo: 2150777. Singapore: 2202476, Osaka: 2640666, 
or call your nearest Inter-Continental sales office. 


she said, arguing that a 
cally lamed nation is « 
to Communist props 
blackmail from tire Sc 


subject have 


Conservative politicians also $2 
tve sympathy for such concerns. ” 


t ini — * call it ‘nationalism’ 

aowi union when young Germans ask, *Why 


Mlta,™* r0p0S S ons7 ’ " said Vo11 " Rute 12 !*= 
STl'ni.cd sSSWaSE! gWtortato-fcChM- 
















• "V ... * 


£££&£>. 'M 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBINE, THURSDAY MAY 9. 1985 


PageS 


» ! 'rTn 1 ... 1 V " '* • .1,1 " 


U.S. Defends Trade Embargo 


ihf 


■’ K1 1- 


•*"*T.r* * iv „ , 

* r._. ' " '• ~ 

V JR;..., . ' 


. . • • k,-. • ‘Its.- 

I. ‘ WA 
• 11 . 

t 

fru*di-. !*•» - ! i 1 . •* 

e*u->.- 5l -, x ; ‘ : T It 
? ?’» ■ • . " ’ 


W asr i; : i..k , ‘ 

.Hkv-— 

... . , • .p, 

w> <«.-*« . .. 1 -m • 


h? m.*i. ...... ... ■ •. v . 

MTrtiV-IV-if •; J. . ■ ’ " Jli." 7 


Sputa 


**■‘1 ^ iflnafc 

»i -n r-;.. •‘ - o. 


lOHfci j£ l ^ ..... 


rt* M*<i i.. . , 

. . ; , ... ;V 

te : ) .‘7 ■? 


I * ATip; ; i» ,j . 


*!Nt •<;*-•« 
ahj\ 


Reopened. ( U 

NYT? -- 

Mi Wi s . 

l Hit c .V;:v* ! ; 

HWV. h 

m» M’abi V; - ., "■ v 
tfck*. rrtnv.l !•> 'cJ 
tb* fi\t: - 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth - 

JV*v York Tuna Smite 

WASHINGTON — The track 
embargo imposed against Nicara- 
gua by the Reagan administration 
will have “no perceptible adverse 
impact" on the UJ3. economy and 
will punish Nicaragua for “aggres- 
sive and threatening behavior," ad- 
ministration officials said. ■ 

The assistant secretary of state 
for in ter- American affairs, Lang- 
home A_ Motley, said at a House 
hearing Tuesday that El Salvador 
was die only country be could im- 
medjatdv hat that supported the 
U-S. embargo, announced May 1 
by Plresidort Ronald Reagan. 

But Mr. Motley quickly added 
that the United States did not nm 

its foreign policy “on the basis of a 
popularity pdf among different 
countries,”. •. 

[Belgium condemned the trade 
embargo on Wednesday, Reuters 
reported, one day after Italy an- 
nounced it would proceed with a 
p S- mflli on power project in Nica- 
ragua.; 

Mr. Motley, along with Joseph 
F. Dennin. assistant secretary of 
commerce for international eco- 
nomic policy, and John M. Walker 
Jr„ assistant secretary of the Trea- 
sury for enforcement and opera- 
tions, testified before a joint bear- 
ing of two House forej& affairs 
subcommittees. 

Democrats, on the panels ex- 
pressed strong criticism of the ad- 
minisrratiou's faflure to. consult 
with Congress or U.S. allies in im- 
posing the trade embargo and other 


colm Baldrige and Treasury Secre- 
tary James A. Baker 3d argued that 
breaking 'existing contracts would 
damage the United States' reputa- 
tion as a reliable supplier, accord- 
ing to administration officials. 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
Weinberger and the national secu- 
rity adviser, Robert C. McFartane, 
took die position that with contract 


sanctity, - the embargo would lack 
IdgiveNic 


economic sanctions, and predicted 

; Nicaraguan 


ttfc \ kuiiv,..!. • 

. 

i fiHM juit:. > 
iifciw t\\-- 


it would only drive the Nicaraguan 
government closer to dm Soviet 
Union. 

■ The administration, after a 
bruising internal battle, prepared 
to pot our its final regulations, de- 


bite and would gjve Nicaragua time 
to get alternative sources of supply 
for the pesticides, fertilizer, feed, 
agricultural machinery and spare 
parts that it buys from the United 
Stares. 

There was a tentative agreement 
Monday night to grant a broad 
con tract sanctity exemption, which 
would have permitted many com- 
panies doing business with Nicara- 
gua lo continue doing business. 

According to the administration 
sources, Mr. McFartane and Mr. 
Weinberger were angry and ap- 
pealed directly to the president. 
The result was that the final regula- 
tions, which were lo go into effect 
at midnight Monday night, had still 
not been sent to the Federal Regis- 
ter late Tuesday. 

Under the regulations, according 
to Mr. WaDcer, only those imports 
that wer&paid for in cash when the 
embargo was announced would be 
permitted entry. 

On the export side, the regula- 
tions provide for contracts to be 
fulfilled only if one of three condi- 
tions was met; goods w ere in tran- 
sit May 1; no alternative export 
market could be found for the 
American company; or obligations 
under a performance bond would 
be set in motion by nonperfor- 
mance. 


jfcof lA‘;irnin»ij,| 


tailing the w&^ the sanctions would 


# lOWniBf /* :•;. 

HUrifeV > 

liinr. 

Mtr ur<<>. 

' 2D p^ >v.; •* 


be pm into effecL The big question 
was whether contracts in aristeace 
when the embargo was declared 
would be honored or brako. 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, Commerce Secretary Mal- 


■ Itafian Project to Proceed 

EJ. Dionne Jr. of The New York 
Times reported firm Rome: 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi 
said Tuesday that Italy would not 
Join the embargo against Nicara- 
gua and intended to go ahead with 
the $25-rmUicm project. 

Mr. Craxi sa id at a news confer- 
ence that Italy “found itself in the 


same position” as the countries of 
the Coiuadora group, which have 
expressed opposition to the embar- 
go order. 

The Contadora group, consisting 
of Mexico, Panama, Colombia and 
Venezuela, are seeking a negotiated 
settlement in Central America. 

Mr. Craxi said that Italy intend- 
ed to “keep its commitment"' to 
build a power plant in the southern 
pan of Nicaragua. Italy has made a 
$25-miUion commitment to the $50 
million plant, in which several oth- 
er European countries are involved. 

The project, which would produce 
electricity from Che energy of volca- 
nic gases, has not started. 

Mr. Craxi's foreign policy advis- 
er, Antonio Badini, said after the 
news conference that Mr. Craxi 
viewed the boycott of Nicaragua as 
“ray counterproductive.'’ .. 

“We are not going to participate 
in the boycott, Mr. Bmim Said: 
“We are not going to cut aid to a 
country that cotdaotherwise go to- 
ward the Eastern bloc." 

Mr. Badini also noted that Presi- 
dent Daniel Ortega Saavedra of 
Nicaragua would visit Italy next 
week. Mr. Ortega, who was in War- 
saw on Wednesday, also has sched- 
uled a visit to Spain and is said to 
be seeking approval for an official 
visit to France as wdL 

[In Brussels, a spokesman for 
Belgium's Foreign Ministry con- 
demned economic sanctions 
against Nicaragua, saying "eco- 
nomic sanctums do not generally 
contribute" to a peaceful solution 
of conflicts. The spok esman de- 
clined comment on reports that 
Belgium would step op banana im- 
ports to bdp Managua overcome 
the effects of the embargo. 

[A spokesman for the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
said the international trade organi- 
zation would bold a special meet- 
ing May 20 m Geneva to discuss 
the embaigo at the request of Nica- 
ragua, which is a member. 

[Foreign ministers of the 25-nar 
tioa Latin American Economic 
System will meet Wednesday in 


UPI’s Troubles Go Back a Long Way 


flfeml 2d Strut 


afi-** 


Sire 


MMlt Alb>, :v 


rmibir 


t\- 


-• 

v.v. 


lk> T^-*- 


ita !&*/ 

# JA 




w-*# 


I ¥*■ 


By Eleanor Randolph 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — In some 
ways, it seemed like the last straw. 
United Press International was fil- 
ing Chapter 11 papers in U.S. 
Bankruptcy Court more than a 
week ago when the White House 
called and asked for 530,000. 

It was up-front money, the UP1 
people were told Without it. the 
news service's White House team, 
including the dean of White House 
reporters, Helen Thomas, could 
not go on President Ronald Rea-, 
gan’s trip to Europe. 

“I agreed to guarantee $15,000 
and Tony Insolia guaranteed 
$15,000" said James D. Squires; 
editor of the Chicago Tribune. Mr. 
Insolia is the editor of Newsday. 

“No one wants to nm in on that 
barely breathing body and tramp 
on it," Mr. Squires added. 

If UPI has almost always seemed 
to be on the critical list, the next 
few weeks could determine once 
and for all whether it will survive. 

Deep in debt, mired in a tug-of- 
war between the owners ana the 
managers, the news service beau 78 
years ago may emerge as something 
different — a data service, a photo 
service or perhaps a sports wire. 

Or it may not emei^e at an, mak- 
ing room for other wire service ex- 
pansions, particularly the older and 
larger Associated Press. 

As American editors sit at UPrs 
bedside, however, the question lin- 
gers about what has happened lo 
the wire service that spawned, 
among others, Walter Cronkite, 
David Brinkley, Eric Seyareid, 
Harrison Salisbury and the late 
Merriman Smith. 

A series of editors, broadcasters, 
and present and former employees 
of the wire service suggested in re- 
cent days that UPI has suffered 
from a variety of ailments over the 
last few decades. 

Art the most basic difficulty, 
most of them agreed, was the dif- 
ference in the way AP and UPI 
have been operated since their be- 
ginnings. 

In the tumultuous and tough era 
of journalism at the turn of the 
century. The Associated Press had 
established a firm hold on the 


fledgling news service business. 
Formed in 1 892, The AP was set up 
as a nonprofit “cooperative." a 
news service run jointly by the 
press barons who took The AP 
wire. 

AP had its own management and 
staff, but it could also tap into the 
fatalities or the news reports of all 
its member newspapers, an agree- 
ment that stands today. The re- 
wards to AP members were that 
their wire service would often 
freczc out competitive papers in 
their nuuket. a method of doing 
business that was eventually 
stopped,. 

Irritated that this franchising by 
AP madeit difficult for him to start 
newspapers at the turn of the cen- 
tury, R.W. Scripps decided to cre- 
ate his own news agency. It was lo 
be a plucky, street-fighter of a ser- 
vice up against the then-stodgy As- 
sociated Press. 

United Press was a business, not 
a cooperative, when it was set up in 
1907. But it would also become a 


newsroom joke that “UP gets it 
lust; AP gets it right" 

If it was more fun al UPI, it has 
always been a life that bred ulcets, 
loyalty and poverty. 

The service, notorious for its low 
salaries, has always run on energy, 
often young energy. Almost every 
newsroom m America is peopled 
with reporters who got a toehold in 
rhe business by woriong for UP} •— 
“the only place where you could be 
a bureau chief in Nigeria at 24,” as 
an editor recalls advising those 
yearning to be journalists. 

Some of the good ones stayed al 
UPL but many more of them left, 
especially in recent years. 


riod for UPI in recent decades was 
in the years after United Press 
merged with the International 
News Service. The consolidation, 
announced May 24, 1958, was 
p afnwt United Press International, 
and UP became UPL 


mission for R.W. Scripps. 

A classic history of UPI called 


history of 
“Deadline Every Minute” by Joe 
Alex Morris quotes Scripps as say- 
ing in his later years that he be- 
lieved he had “made it impossible 
for the men who control The Asso- 
ciated Press to supprea the truth or 
successfully disseminate false- 
hood.” 

He added, “I regard my life’s 
greatest service lo the people of this 
country to be the creation of Unit- 
ed Press." 

StQl, UPI was always in a posi- 
tion of selling a service to newspa- 
pers that already owned their own 
service — AP. So, to compete, UP 
more than often sold its news for 


“The problem from the begin- 
ning was that UP charged less for 
its services,” said a newsman from 
a smaller wire service that could 
benefit if UPI disappears. “They 
got into chargjng on the cheap and 
they never got out." 

In iheyears that Scripps paid the 
bills, UPI was mostly a shoestring 
operation, a stepchild that some- 
times put out great American 
scoops arid at other tiroes faltered 
on its own methods— thus, the old 


Amid Crisis , UPI Owners 


Feuding with Managers 


By Eleanor Randolph 
and Mark Ports 

Washington Pan Sent ce 

MIAMI BEACH —The owners 
and managers of United Press In- 
ternational , feuding over who 
should control the wire service, 
have presented their arguments be- 
fore two of its key constituencies. 

Douglas Rube, a co-owner of 
UPI, and its president, Raymond 
Wechsler, met Tuesday with credi- 
tors in New York to explain then- 
differing versions of who controls 
the company. It was Mr. Rohe’s 
first meeting with the creditors 
since the company filed for Chap- 
ter U bankruptcy protection last 
week. 


increase of ?£ percent to remain 


so. 


Mr. Nogales has claimed that 
Mi^Ruhe and Mr. Gassier signed 
over control of the company to his 
management team during a finan- 
cial crisis m March. Mr. Ruhe 


the bankruptcy filing voided that 
at 


Meanwhile, the company': 

lies, whe 




. 8 

chairman, Luis Nogales, who 
claims that Mr. Ruheand the other 
, co-owner, William . Gassier, no 
- longer have any say in the compa- 
ny's affairs, tried to assure the 
newspaper publishers who pay 
U PI*s bills that the wire service was 
still a going operation. However, be 
said Tuesday al the publishes' 
convention here, it needs a rate 


. . nth the two tides already fight-* 
ing in the boardroom and (be 
courtroom; the battle for control of 
UPI took a new twist last weekend 
when the wire service transmitted a 
2300-word piece that quoted UPI 
management officials as saying 
that Mr. Rube and Mr. Geistier 
had diverted $23 million of UPI 
amey to a management company 
they owned abused millions more 
scarce UPI dollars to set up "ques- 
tionable 'venture deals" for the 


^ Gregory Gordon, 

a UPI reporter, accused the two, 
who bought UPI for.SI in 1982, of 
reneging on si pledge to invest $2 
million in the company in 1983. 

Mr. Rube said Monday in an 
interview in New York that "we’ve 
made our sbare of huslakes," bnt 


Grant Dillman, who retired in 
1983 as UPI vice president and 
Washington manager, said: “That 
was partly based on optimism of 
Scri^»-Howard that UPI could fi- 
nally compete on an equal ground. 
For several years, there was a very 
orderly mem system for raises. In- 
evitably, the economic base tended 
to dwindle. It got tougher and 
tougher." 

The Scripps family reportedly 
began to lose its devotion to the 
news service in the 1970s. Some 
estimates on annual losses ranged 
up to $12 milli on a year. 

“At that time they came around 
and asked every major company if 
they would buy it,” he said, “rat 
the problem was that you could 
either lose money or fold it and 
nobody wanted to forever be 
known as the guy who killed UPL” 

When the newspaper industry 
foiled to come to UPEs rescue, 
Scripps had what one editor called 
“a fire sale." The wire was sold in 
June 1982 to a group headed by 
two young “enirq^renenrs”, as they 
called themselves: Douglas Rube, 
then 38, and WUtiam Gassier, 36. 
both of Nashville. Tennessee. 

The sale for $1, included a pay- 
ment by Scripps of more than $5 
million for working capital, accord- 
ing to sources close to the transac- 
tion. Scrims also wiped out a pen- 
sion debt, the sources said, handing 
over an operation that one insider 
called “virtually debt free." 

Mr. Ruhe and Mr. Geistier later 
sold UPFs foreign newspictures 
service to Reuters, a competing 
British-owned agency, for $5 nut- 
lion, including deferred payments. 
Company officials said the price 
was far below market value. Mir. 
Ruhe said, “If we hadn’t desperate- 
ly needed the cash, we wouldn't 
have done the Reuters deal.” 

After shopping for months for 
an editor in chief for UPL the two 
owners found Maxwell McCraton, 
former editor of the Chicago Tri- 
bune, a respected newsman who 
could tend his name to their trou- 
bled news service. 

Still, many of those who use UPI 
believe that the post-Scripps crowd 
were facing problems that had fitfle 
to do vrilh who was salting in the 
executive offices. At the smaller pa- 
pers, UPI been to bite the dust 

William B. Brown, executive edi- 
tor of the Columbus (Geoxgja). 
Ledger and Inquirer, said his paper 
derided about five years ago that 
they could only afford one wire 
service, so they can c eled UPL 
' “Even though I always fdi some 
underdog sympathy for UFL when 
I had to deode where I got the most 
bang for my buck, we 'went wfth 
APT he added. 



Anti-Sandinist Rebel Accepts Amnesty 


Langhorae A. Motley 


Caracas to discuss the embargo, the 
group's permanent secretary, Se- 
bastian Alegrett, said Tuesday in 
lima. Pern. Mr. Akgrett called the 
embargo “a very dangerous princi- 
ple in inter-American relations."} 

■ 800 Arrested in U.S. 

9 More than 800 people were ar- 
rested in five states Tuesday in pro- 
tests against the economic sanc- 
tions. The Associated Press 
reported. More than 5(K) people 
were arrested Tuesday in Massa- 
chusetts. while there were 258 ar- 
rests in San Francisco, 20 in Con- 
necticut, 17 in New York and 14 in 
Vermont. 


By Robert J. McCartney . 

Washington Peer Service 

MEXICO CITY — Jose Efren 
Martinez Mondragon has become 
the first commander of anti-San- 
dinist guerrillas to return to Nica- 
ragua under the terms of an amnes- 
ty law approved carter this year. 

The defection ended what Mr. 
Martinez Mondragon described as 
a prolonged personal ordeal of sev- 
eral years as he grappled with his 
doubts about the rebels’ cause and, 
even more, about their behavior in 
the field. 

In a four-hour interview Mon- 
day. he said he left the rebels be- 
cause be was disgusted with what 
be said were their routine practices 
of murder, kidnapping and rape of 
Nicaraguan civilians. 

“They are kidnapping and kill- 
ing people who just want to work," 
the 26-year-old defector said. “This 
wasn’t a struggle. It was banditiy." 

While there have been news re- 
ports of alleged killings and abduc- 
tions by the rebels of civilians who 
were, or were believed to be. San- 
dinist sympathizers, Reagan ad- 
ministration officials io the past 
have denied that such practices 
were routine and have character- 
ized the reports as propaganda. 

In another assertion that was 
likely to be controversial, Mr. Mar- 
tinez Mondragon said that the 
Honduran. Salvadoran and Guate- 
malan armed forces have supplied 
the rebels with the bulk of their 



Unitad Prmj hfcmartond 


Qflus von Bulow, right, and his lawyer listen to the judge. 


Judge in VonBulow Case 
Denies Motion for Mistrial 


By Jonathan Friendly 

blew York Times Service 


PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island — A judge has refused to grant a 
_« i Bulow, a move sought by his 


lurors 


mistrial of the case against Claus von 
lawyers on the ground that: thejuxy had been prejudiced by statements 
that his wife was involved in"a struggle the night before site was found 
in an irreversible coma. 

But Judge Corinne P. Grande left open Tuesday the possibility of 
granting the motion later if the state failed to produce enough medical 
testimony to allow the jury to conclude that a struggle had occurred. 

Mr. von Bulow, a 58-year-old New York and Newport society 
figure, U being tried for the second time on charges that be tried twice 
to murder Ins wealthy wife, Martha, with insulin injections. 

His lawyers said the trial should be halted immediately because 
dd be unable to forget a witness’s references to a fight in the 
suite of the Von Billows’ Newport mansion on Dec. 20, 

1980. 

Defense lawyers said a mistrial was unavoidable because Judge 
Grande barred testimony on Monday by the witness, Dr. Jeremy 
Warthutgton, a neurokwsL They said Dr.’ Worthington was the only 
prosecution witness willing to say that Mrs. von Bulow suffered 
bruises and scratches resisting an assailant that night 

Mrs. von Bulow was found on the bathroom floor the next morning 
in a coma that doctors say is irreversible. The defense suggests the 
coma was caused by dqigs. alcohol or some naturally occurring 
mediod [condition. The state contends that the coma was caused by an 
insulin ixnection. 

Judge Grande said she eventually would be have to order a mistrial 
if the only evidence introduced concerning a struggle was "flagrantly 
impermissible" or if she believed she could not effectively instruct the 
jury to ignore prejudicial suggestions by the state. 

But the prosecution may stul establish its theory abom the struggle 
through nodical testimony, she said, adding that “it has not reached 
that point where a mistrial is called for." 

With the jury was absent from the courtroom, and before ruling 
Tuesday, the judge explained her interpretation of what she called the 
state’s theory: 

“Here is a woman, drugged, partially drugged, in her own home, 
where normally she would be safe, secure, with a husband she’s come 
to rely upon, care for, hie concerned about, and she suddenly awakes 
from this drugged condition, as you suggested yesterday. 

“Perhaps she is in asma-drugged state. It is the middle of the night. 
No one rise is around. She awakens to find her husband injecting her. 
And she struggles, struggles for her life. And in the struggle — the 
stale’s theory — she is scratched." 

The judge said that prosecutors could allege that the straggle 
occurred if they submitted sufficient evidence, “meeting all the 
guidelines that the law has put into place.” 



I 


ammunition and other military 
supplies since the U.S. Central In- 
telligence Agency stopped financ- 
ing them a year ago. 

Because of the severity of his 
allegations, Mr. Martinez Mondra- 
gon ’s change of heart could con- 
tribute to the political debate that 
extends from Managua to the U.S. 
Congress over whether Washington 
should resume financial backing 
for the rebels. 


were unavailable T uesdav for com- 


ment on his specific allegations. 
But the rebel force aires 


In 1980. Mr. Martinez Mondra- 
gon was among the first Nicara- 
guans to join the anti-Sardinist re- 
sistance. Formerly a sergeant in the 
National Guard of the deposed dic- 
tator Anastasia Samara, he worked 
his way up in the resistance move- 
ment to become a task force com- 
mander. 


Eight weeks ago. Mr. Martinez 
Mondragon and nine other per- 
sons. including two other guerril- 
las, claimed political asylum in the 
Mexican Embassy in Tegucigalpa, 
Honduras, and last week the Hon- 
duran authorities let him fly to 
Mexico City. 

The defection has already trig- 
gered a flurry of activity by several 
of the players involved, either to 
control the damage or to maximize 
iL 


heady has 
suggested that the defector had lost 
some of his menial faculties be- 
cause of an automobile accident. 
The force has also charged that Mr. 
Martinez Mondragon 's lover was a 
Sandinist spy who may have en- 
couraged his defection. 

The Nicaraguan government 
quickly made the defector available 
to the media, presenting him at the 
interview Monday night and at a 
news conference upon his arrival 
Tuesday in Managua. 

In the interview, Mr. Martinez 
Mondragon said that the rebels 
have regularly killed Nicaraguans 
who refused to join the rebel cause 
after crossing the border into Hon- 
duras or after being abducted. He 
said that there were several clan- 
destine cemeteries for such victims 


along the Nicaraguan- Honduran 
border. 


Spokesmen in Miami and Hon- 
duras for the Nicaraguan Demo- 
cratic Force, the largest or the rebel 
groups and the one to which Mr. 
Martinez Mondragon belonged. 


“If you won't fight," he said, 
“then they think you are an infiltra- 
tor and kill you." 

Mr. Martinez Mondragon also 
said that guerrillas had frequently 
raped civilian women in Nicaragua 
ana abducted them for sexual pur- 
poses. 

At one time, he said, he radioed 
Enrique Bermudez, the leader of 
the Nicaraguan Democratic Force, 
to complain about the treatment of 
civilians. Mr. Bermudez told him 
“to stop interfering in business that 


doesn't affect you," the defector 
said. 

Mr. Martinez Mondragon said 
that he had complained several 
times to rebel leaders about abuses 
of civilians and had received unsat- 
isfactory responses. 

He also said that the armed 
forces or Honduras. El Salvador 
and Guatemala were providing the 
rebel force with the bulk of its am- 
munition. uniforms and bools. 

Mr. Martinez Mondragon said 
that other rebel commanders had 
told him that “the CIA advisers 
arranged for the Salvadoran. Gua- 
temalan and Honduran armies to 
provide materiel.’* 

■ Mifitazy Freeze Asserted 

Nicaraguan military officials 
said Tuesday that the government 
has frozen the size of its armed 
forces and the size of ib arsenal, 
The Washington Post reported 
from Managua. 

The ‘officiate said the armed 
forces have temporarily suspended 
the military draft, which is believed 
to have at least doubled the size of 
the Sandinist militarv in 17 
months. The Sandinisis will resume 
the draft later this year, the officials 
said, but only to replace soldiers 
released from duty or killed in ac- 
tion. 

The armed forces mil import 
arms, munitions and equipment 
only to maintain current firepower, 
they said. 


Ex- U.S. Aide Sentenced in Stock Case 


United Press Inurnaucnal 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. 
judge sentenced Paul Thayer, the 
former deputy defense secretary, 
and Billy Bob Harris, a Dallas 
stockbroker, to four years in prison 
Wednesday for giving false infor- 
mation to the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission during an in- 
vestigation of insider stock trading. 

More than 60 prominent people, 
including former President Gerald 
R. Ford. Senator Barry Gold water, 
Republican of Arizona, and Gener- 
al John W. Vessey Jr„ chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had asked 
U.S. District Judge Charles R. Ri- 
chey io be lenient in sentencing Mr. 
Thayer. 

. Mr. Thayer, the former chairman 
of the LTV Corp„ a maker of oil 
field and aerospace products, and 
Mr. Harris pleaded guilty two 



Lawyers for the defendants said 
they reached a settlement with the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion on Tuesday in which Mr. 
Thayer agreed to pay $555,000 and 
Mr. Harris would pay S275.000 in 
restitution. 


months ago touring to government 


Paid Thayer 


investigators. Mr. Thayer resigned 
his government position in January 
last year after charges were filed 
against him. 

Both Mr. Thayer, 65, and Mr. 
Harris, 45. to whom Mr. Thayer 
had passed stock tips, could have 
been sentenced to five years in pris- 
on. Both men were fined the maxi- 
mum $5,000. 


Mr. Thayer and Mr. Harris were 
directed to report to an unidenti- 
fied prison in Texas on Monday. 

U.S. Attorney Joseph E diGen- 
ova said thaL while the men would 
be “technically eligible for parole 
in 60 days, under the parole guide- 
lines tb^ will serve at least a year 
given the nature of the offense." 

Attorneys for Mr. Thaver and 
Mr. Harris had requested that they 
be placed on probation and or- 
dered to perform community ser- 
vice. The govern mem asked Judge 
Richey .to sentence them to a term 
in prison though “not a substantia] 
term-’' 


Prosecutors bad accused Mr. 
Thayer of providing inside infor- 
mation to Mr. Harris on prospec- 
tive company takeovers that al- 
lowed Mr. Thayer's girlfriend, 
"Sandra K. Ryno, 39, Mr. Harris, 
and Mr. Harris’s friends to make 
stock purchases that yielded a prof- 
it of about S3 million. 


Rejecting these arguments. 
Judge Richey said he sent the two 
men to prison “to maintain the 
integrity of our system of justice." 

“In a case like this, just as in the 
case of many other famous men 
who have stood by the bar of justice 
in this courthouse, there is a sacred 
trust we have in this country," the 
judge told the defendants. 


Senators Protest to Meese 


For Not Trying Hutton Aides 


United Press International 


WASHINGTON — Democratic 
senators have written to Attorney 
General Edwin Meese 3d saying 
they are “deeply concerned” that 
the Justice Department declined to 
prosecute EF. Hutton & Co. exec- 
utives for a multimillkm-dollar 
stock fraud, but sent a shoplifter to 
jail for 30 days. 

EF. Hutton & Co, one of the 
largest U.S. brokerage firms, plead- 
ed guilty May 2 to an elaborate 
fraud that allowed it to earn up to 
$8 million. None of its officials was 
prosecuted The company's presi- 
dem, Scon Pierce, is the brother of 
Barbara Pierce Bush, wife of Vice 
President George Bush. 

The shoplifter, Karen E H£Q, 
was prosecuted by a U:S. attorney 
in the District of Colombia less 
than a week before the Hutton 
plea. She was convicted of stealing 
four swearers worth about $200 
and jailed for 30 days. She had once 
been convicted on a marijuana 


charge and was arrested in the 
1 97Cte for soliciting for prostitution. 

"She gets time," the 15 Demo- 
cratic senators said in a letter Tues- 
day to Mr. Meese, “EJ 7 . Hutton 
officials get no time." 

EF. Hutton pleaded guilty lo a 
fraud that let the firm use millions 
of dollars a day of bank funds with- 
out paying interest 

Afterpleading guilty to 2,000 fel- 
ony counts of wire aria mail fraud, 
thefizm agreed to pay $2 million in 
criminal fines and the govern- 
ment’s $750,000 costs of the inves- 
tigation. 

The senators said their concern 
about the case had been deepened 
by further information that they 
said was “reportedly offered by 
Robert Ogren, your lop prosecutor 
for white-collar crime." 

The information, they said was 
that Hutton's fraudulent scheme 
“very likely involved checks total- 
ing more than twice the amount 
initially believed." 



The Centurion Executive. IB karat gold. Quartz. 
Waiter -resistant. With sweep-second hand; day and date. 
An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 



MELLERIO 


9. rue dc U Pa» 
750G6? PARIS 
261 57 S3 


EXPOSITION DE LA COLUECTION 


Tonight could be 


the night 


A touch o' eiegance and st yle 
Ccsrnopol/.an dining flair 
Anc a fnng vv:th Lady Luc\ 
What more exciting way to 
unwind and relax 
rTo make year evening out an 
evening to remember, discove: 
thece 3 glittering, gib -edged 
addresses. . 


Spielcasino 


Aachen d-T . 

intriguing international atmos- 
phere Avanlgarde inter, ors 
with more teen 100 works by 
Jeadir-g comemporary aPists 
First class Gala Restaurant 
uvfiphehn start t Dancing m 
Club Zero A 


Spielcasino 

Oeynhausen 


Germany's fates*, -astefu! 


gaming ssiens in the micst of 
the lovely Kurcark. Sophisti- 
cated ambience created by 
innovative architect ure. lighting, 
color and ad Gourmet amirg 
Slot machines. Rcuietie. Black 
Jack daily from 3 p.n _ 


:1 I t i: t I! 1 I! Ml 


Spielcasino 

Bremen 


Warm, inviting dot atmosphere 
on celebrated Boucherstrasse 
Choice dishes >n the Fiett 
Restaurant, drinks in the 


Nautilus Bar. 


Roulette -Blackjack 

(Baccara m Aix-ia-chapeLei 


dally from 3 p m. 


Messieurs, Mesdames ~ 
Raitesvosjeux. 





. P *g e 4 


Ueralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



©ribune. 


PnUUbed Tidi Tbe New York Tunee «ad The ffwimpBq P«l 


Hanging On in Lebanon 


New battles in Lebanon, new waves of refu- 
gees: Two things are going on. The Israelis, 
long cursed for entering and staying so long, 
are leaving, but they are leaving behind a 
vacuum that the contending Tiffbfl n ese tribes 
are struggling to GIL Tbe Syrians, having out- 
lasted all of Lebanon's would-be foreign pa- 
trons (French, American, Israeli), are impos- 
ing an order of their own, but only slowly and 
partially. Between Israel’s withdrawal and Syr- 
ia's hesitation, Lebanon bleeds and fragments. 

At this point in the withdrawal, Israel has no 
energy left to serve the purpose — manipulat- 
ing die large affaire of Lebanon — that succes- 
sive governments in Jerusalem pursued by- po- 
litical and military means from the mid-1970s 
on. Those Lebanese, mostly Maronite Chris- 
tians, who bet on Israel are paying dearly for 
iL Only in the swath of southern 'Lebanon 
closest to their border do Israelis expect to 
exercise concern — a concern limited to bor- 
der safety. They will rely mostly, and tacitly, 
on the awakened Shia community to keep the 
enfeebled PLO from forming up again. 

The broad Syrian purpose is to dominate 
Lebanon — for considerations of security and 
Syrian and Arab politics alike. The particular 


Syrian purpose, is to wipeout tbe gains made 
after the Israeli invasion of 1982 by Lebanese 
elements not subordinate to Damascus. This 
explains why the Shia and Druze are on the 
march in the south and in Beirut and why the 
Christians are on the run. Those on the march 
are, as usual, going too fan The Syrians could 
use their influence to reduce the pain — specif- 
ically, to defuse the confrontation building up 
around Jezzine. The fate of teas of thousands 
of Lebanese (and much else in Lebanon) de- 
pends on whether the Syrians will actually 
assen the imperial authority they claim. 

One hears much about Lebanon's tribes and 
warlords these days and little about its govern- 
ment. The Christian president faces a rebellion 
by a well armed Christian militia leader who 
claims that the president has bowed excessive- 
ly to Syria. Tbe Sunni Moslem prime minister 
resigned in ApriL The United States, badly 
burned, transmits good wishes cautiously from 
tbe sideline. It should keep a brighter spotlight 
on the bloodshed and upheaval, and it should 
funnel more humanitarian aid through the 
lone custodian, brail as it is, of the idea of 
Lebanon — the Lebanese government. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Ethiopia: The Next Stage 


The Ethiopian government's latest contribu- 
tion to the welfare of the Ethiopian people is a 
forced evacuation of some 50,000 refugees 
from a feeding camp, ostensibly to .resume a 
normal life in their home villages. The result- 
ing international outcry forced the country’s 
leader, Mengistu Haile Mariam, to disavow 
the action. The sequence underlines the con- 
tinuing tensions between Marxist-led Ethiopia 
and the democratic nations supporting it, and 
the difficult new stage of the country’s ordeal 

The West has made possible a relief effort of 
nation-saving dimensions. For Ethiopia's rul- 
ers it is a great embarrassment to need help 
from countries they profess to abhor, to suffer 
the interventions that the donors rightly insist 
on in order to bring mercy and to have to 
accept criticism of the regime's policies that 
caused or aggravated the crisis. Among the 
donors the thought regularly stirs of whether it 
is worth providing help that saves lives but also 
props up a squalid ana hostile regime, one that 
. has countenanced massive suffering — espe- 
cially in rebel-held areas — to stay m power. 

The very success of relief may be sharpening 
these tensions. The camps offer refuge but also 
spread disease and dependency; they are not 


for all time. Meanwhile, foreign donors have; 
through their efforts, created a possibility of 
starting to move people back to their old 
villages or to new villages. But the donors are 
ill-prepared for this necessary next phase. 

For instance, American law penmts only 
relief, not rehabilitation, in countries such as 
Ethiopia with which the United States has 
unresolved property and debt disputes: Gram 
for bread, yes, grain for seed. no. In all the 
donor countries, the compassion that sus- 
tained the rescue of stricken children diffuses 
as families, saved, trickle back to the land. 
Development was faring poorly before the 
present drough t-plus-nhsmamgemcnt crisis. 
Few in the West think it makes economic 
sense, let alone political sense, to rebuild the 
country the Marast leadership's way. 

There is no clear path through these difficul- 
ties, but it helps to keep in mind what the 
priorities should be: 1) save lives; 2) ease the 
political disputes between Ethiopia and some 
of its neighbors that generate refugees; 3) let 
Ethiopia, for its rehabilitation, move out of die 
charity ward back into the realm of the inter- 
national development institutions. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Remember the Armenians 


President .Reagan's failure to grasp the pow- 
er of remembrance has got him into fresh 
trouble. He asks Congress to defeat a joint 
resolution that would designate next April 24 
as a day of remembrance Honoring Armenian 
victiids of a genoddal massacre and dispersion 
in 1915. Mr. Reagan contends that the obser- 
vance would harm relations with an important 
ally and inadvertently reward terrorism. 

Ibis reasoning is bitterly resented by law- 
abiding Armenians in America, whose ances- 
tors were killed or driven into exile by the 
Ottoman regime. Speaking for them is George 
Deukmejian, governor of California: 

“We recognize that Turittty is a military ally 
of the United Stales, but a mature society 
should be able to admit its past mistakes. 

“Why should we be so concerned about a 
tragedy which occurred 70 years ago? Tbe 
answer lies in the events that have happened 


since ... A terrible pattern has repeated itself 
over and over a giin Hitler decided he could 
get away with the extermination of 6 milli on 
Jews because, as be put it, ‘Who still talks 
nowadays about the extermination of the Ar- 
menians?' And in April 1945, exactly 30 years 
after the Armenian genocide, allied forces lib- 
erated tbe death camps of Nazi Germany. 

“And exactly 30 years after that, in April 
1975, came the fall of Southeast Asia and the 
beginning of the reign of terror in Cambodia 
that destroyed over one-fourth of the Cambo- 
dian people. A new generation — a new geno- 
cide ... If the civilized world continues to be 
silent, this cycle of horrors will go on repeating 
itself over and over again." 

Mr. Deukmgian has grasped tbe point that 
somehow eluded his friend in the White 
House. Congress should pass the resolution. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A 1940s Lesson: Don’t Pretend 

We can more easily agree with our former 
German enemies than whh our former Soviet 
allies on the definition of* what we were fight- 
ing for. Of course the alliance with the Soviet 
Union was a strategic necessity. The Red 
Army played the largest part in defeating Nazi 
Germany in Europe. No ideological differ- 
ences can be allowed to obscure this plain 
historical truth. Yet with hindsight we can see 
that one of the Western allies' greatest mis- 
takes was to pretend to the world, and to 
themselves, that the Soviet Union was also 
Gghting for a liberal world order: that we and 
they meant the same thing by words like “de- 
mocracy" “freedom" and “sdf -determina- 
tion." The lesson of this historic mistake for 
today’s defenders of the free world is: Do not 
pretend. Do not pretend that the enemy of our 
enemy is automatically our friend. 

— The Times (London). 


No Idea Is Too Preposterous 

Did you ever notice bow, when you hold 
Procter & Gamble's man-in- the-moon logo up 
to a mirror, the curlicues in the old geezer’s 
whiskers form “666" — the symbol of the 
Antichrist? Go ahead and laugh. 

But someone somewhere did such reflecting 
and concluded that the household products 
conglomerate was promoting satanism. Thus 
began a 1980 whispering campaign that took 
cm a devilish life of its own. Neither Jeny 
Falwell nor Dear Abby nor even a toll-free 
telephone recording — P&G enlisted the help 
of all three — could snuff the rumors. So the 
company is redesigning its packages. 

The saga would be fnnny if it were not such 
a frightening object lesson in the power of 
irrational thinking. No idea is too siHy or 
too preposterous, it appears, if enough people 
believe it to be true. 

— The Milwaukee Journal. 


FROM OUR MAY 9 PAGES. 75 ATVT) SO YEABS AcJ7 


1910: Now Wives May Rob Husbands 
CHICAGO — Married men who have been in 
the habit of giving (heir wives excuses on 
which to run the house were thrown in a panic 
when Judge Gennadi in the Municipal Court, 
decided [on April 29] that a wife has a right to 
rob ho* husband whoa he fails to give her any 
regular money. The decision was released 
when Gustave H. DeKoIkey had his wife ar- 
rested on a charge of robbing him. According 
to Gustave, his wife, her brother and a braider 
bore him to the floor. While the two men 
festooned themselves on his prostrate form, his 
wife made a tour of his pockets, which netted 
her $11. “He hasn't given me a cent for a year," 
said Mrs. DeKoIkey. Said Judge Gcmmdl; “A 
wife has a right to iwld up' her husband when 
he does not give hex enough for her support." 


1935: Scientists Tame’ the Neutron 
PARIS — A long stride toward solving the 
problem of releasing atomic energy which 
would make available unlimited sources of 
power has been reported at the annual meeting 
of the American Physical Society in Washing- 
ton. A group of Columbia University scientists 
reported that they had tamed the neutron, 
recently discovered fundamental unit of mat- 
ter. and that in its tamed stale it possessed 
powers exceeding those it bad exhibited in the 
wild state in which it went through the densest 
matter as easily as light goes through 
Scientists have found a way to collect these 
un electrified particles as a cloud of the strang- 
est gas and with properties that stagger the 
i magina tion. A puff of this gas would probably 
be the most lethal agency ever discovered. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairman 195&-I982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISJE 
WALTER WELLS ' 
SAMUEL AST 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIR1Z 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PubtUter 
Exeaane Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY . 

Associate Editor FRANQOIS DE SMA 1SONS Director of Cmdatien 


Deputy Publisher 

Associate Publisher 

Associate Publisher 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dtrcaar of Acbtrmmz Sales 
IsureatknaV Herald' Tribune, 181 Avenue Cfcaries-dc-Ganlk, 92200 Neuffly-sur-Sdne, 

France. Tel: (1)747-1265. Tefcx: 612718 (Herald). Cable Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-805Z 
Director de bt pubbearion: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hemessy Rd., Hang Kong. TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

Managing Dr. UJC; Robin MacKkfm. 63 Long Aar. London WO. TeL 8364801 Tetac 262009. 

Gen Mgr. W. German: W. Lautebaek, Friedtidtar. IS. dOOOFraridunlM. 71 (069)726755. 7& 416721. 

S.A. tin capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Uamerre B 732021126 Cannassm Pariuire No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. II 101. 

*■ I99S IniematMiud Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved 



THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


l« 


The Lesson 9 Simply, Is That War Is HeU 


P ARIS — President Reagan's visit to the site 
of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp 
and then to the German military cemetery at 
Bitburg was to symbolize what has changed 40 
years after the defeat of the Third Reich. There 
were amazingly clumsy mistakes and ugly under- 
tones in arranging all this, but the affair serves to 
highlight both how far the world has moved and 
bow much remains essentially the same. 

In 1962, on the occasion of President de 
Gaulle's dramatic trip of French-German recon- 
ciliation, the Social Democratic politician Carlo 
Schmidt, who had been an anti-Nazi exile, wrote: 
“If de Gaulle shakes bands with us, then our 
handle are no longer dirty. Alter everything that 
has happened, we could not after all gram our- 
selves absolution.” Twenty-three years later. 
Chancellor KohL who was 15 when the war 
ended, showed that the German craving remains. 
But no one can grant absolution. 

Alois Mertes, the Bundestag deputy from Bit- 
burg, told Mr. Reagan: “We Germans have pro- 
vided mankind with great and splendid accom- 
plishments, but we have also committed terrible 
acts. However, it is not in keeping with Jewish 
and Christian ethics to apportion blame collec- 
tively. It is always the individual who bears 
responsibility." That should be accepted. 

And that is why President Reagan was wrong 
to speak repeatedly of “one man's totalitarian 
dictatorship," “the awful evil started by one 


By Flora Lewis 


flowered city sttwts and the named and nameless 
oaves, because of apresent that keeps parti of the 
Germans on the other ride of an armored line, 
man.” (He never pronounced the name of Adolf and because of an uncertain future, , 

Hiller, or the word genocide.) It was oot rate man No one could have foreseen the wdl-being and 

who killed so many mini ons Thai myth should friendships now enjoyed. They, too, arc the result 
not be allowed to grow. of many individual responsibilities. They were 

It is not even quite true, as Mr. Reagan said, not inevitable. Neither is the future. 


that “we can mount the German war dead today 
as human beings, crushed by a vicious ideology. 
No one dies abstractly. 

What must be true, for alL is Mr. Reagan’s 
pledge at Bergen- Bclsem “Never again." 

The 40 years have transformed the world in 
many ways, especially Germany. It is hard now 
to revisualize the charred rubble fields of the 
tines that I saw myself soon after ihe war. In the 
whole city of Cologne, near Bonn, 300 houses 
were left undamaged.- In DQsseldcrf, 98 percent 
of the homes were uninhabitable. Ravaged Berlin 
was left with 170 women to every 100 men. 

It did not requirca conscious will for reconcili- 
ation or forgiveness to offer food to the old 
women who fainted from hunger on the streeL-It 
did not matter what ideology they believed. Our 
own human instinc ts mattered, and still do. 

West Germany is aprosperous country, capa- 
ble of generosity to those who are starving in 
other parts of the wadd. It lives in freedom. But 
it is a troubled country — because of -the past 
lying beneath the bright skyscrapers and be- 


Mr. Reagan spoke about the “totalitarian 
darkness" tl«t remains in the world. While he 
did not mention the Sonet Union, that was 
dearly his tiKff*»"g And he spoke of peace. 

There have been some 140 armed conflicts 
since World War II, but the peace has been kept 
in Europe, so long the tinderbox of conflagra- 
tion. Not all wars are caused by ideology. Tbe 
human yearning for tranquillity can still be out- 
matched by human greed, human stupidity. 


It is not wireigh to proclaim the best intentions 
and to denounce the adversary. Peace must be 
won by mutual effort, sober judgment, the pru- 
dence of the wise. It certainly does not help to 
compare tbe dismal, ' repressive Communist re- 
gimes of today to Nazi Germany. That sounds 
too much like another crusade. If there is to be a 
celebration of 80 years of peace one day, and 
there must be or there will be nothing, it is the 
responsibility of leaders on bath rides now. Tbe 
lesson is Lbe simple old one that war is belL 

The Here York Times. 


Gorbachev’s Slow System 
Has a live Private Sector 

By Ellen Goodman 

M OSCOW — One of the many imagination and whet the appetite, 
surmises in this massive. Ium- An American friend here says, J ‘They 

make' 10,000 toasters a year." 

To my Western eye, an extraordi- 
nary amount of time and interest is 
invested in getting hold of something 
scarce and desirable. I am regaled 
with boisterous stories about the 
search for food for a party, a good 
pair of boots for the winter, tickets to 
the theater. Americans work to ac- 
quire the money to buy these items; 
in Moscow h is equally important to 
have contacts, develop a relationship 
with the butcher, exchange and share 
with friends, know someone with ac- 
cess to a store where goods are sold 
for foreign currency only. 

The enormous vitality of this sec- 
ond system, this private sector, con- 
tradict the Western stereotype of So- 
viet citizens as dependent and pass- 
ive. The state may regulate produc- 
tion, distribute bousing and control 
wages, but in tbe reality of everyday 
life the struggle to enrich life is met 
with imagination, flexibility and a 
passion largely lacking in public life. 

Indeed, u there is a collective spirit 
in Moscow it is not in die government 
but in the effort to get something 
done despite, around, over, under the 
government It is the difficulties, the 
daily hassles, that throw people to- 
gether — families, neighbors, friends 
— into webs of interdependence. 

Even as a visitor, I catch glimpses 
of this. T tty to change my botd 
reservations and encounter a barrier 
of new rules. To change a reservation, 
1 must pay for the whole stay all over 
again. This is crazy, I tell the cleric, 
using my most useful Russian phrase. 
We smile at each other; she demurs, 
cuts through the reddest of tape and 


surprises in this massive; lum- 
bering capital city is the palpable 
energy and ingenuity of the people 
who Uve here. Tbe formal Soviet sys- 
tem may grumble at change and may 
muffle initiative in blankets of bu- 
reaucracy, but there is an informal 
tystem at work, one as chaotic and 
irrepressible as human nature. 

The spirit of free enterprise is 
thriving; and not merely in the semi- 
offltiaTpeasant market where private 
fanners sell their hothouse tomatoes 
for $5 a pound. It is part of the 
psyche of Muscovites, who have ris- 
ing expectations and Western tastes 
in a Second World marketplace. 

In seven days on these streets, I 
have seen some of the most passion- 
ate shoppers that a mall-weary Amer- 
ican could ima gin e. It is rare for a 
Muscovite to pass one of the stands 
set up on street comers or in door- 
ways without checking the contents. 

When a line forms at a shop, than 
is a universal uige to see what is for 
sale. Even my translator, walking our 
rounds of formal appointments, veers 
automatically into a shoe store that 
expects a shipment; then, catching 
herself, she backs out in embarrass- 
ment. Most private conversations 
with urban Russians turn to prices. 
How much does a shirt cost in Ameri- 
ca? A good coat? A tape recorder? 

The stores are not empty of goods. 
The state supermarkets nave enough 
staples to satisfy hungier, if not relieve 
boredom. A constant, defensive re- 
frain from a Soviet companion is, 
“We have that, too; we nave that, 
too.” The Soviet Union makes almost 
anything made in tbe rest of the 
world, but in quantities that tease the 


suddenly, unofficially, it's done. One 
way to move the immovable is to 
appeal directly for a commodity in 
great demand in this city: help. 

At the same time I begin to sense 
and share the Muscovites r pleasure in 
personal victories. A woman tells me 
in great and ironic detail about her 
monthlong campaign to get the right 
travel papers — a success story. Tbe 
third item we tty to order from a 
restaurant menu is actually available. 
I applaud. I dredge up a telephone 
number in this city without directory 


A New Leader Finds a Computer Threat to the State 


N EWARK, Delaware — Official 
American visitors to Moscow 
soon discover that the only accurate 
street map of the titv is provided by 
the US. Embassy. Up to now the 
Soviet attitude has been, “If you 
don't know where you are, you 
shouldn't be there.” But what would 
happen to Soviet society if informa- 
tion became common? Could the So- 
viet Union be transformed by enter- 
ing die computer age? 

After years of distrusting Western 
microcomputers as a kind of elec- 
tronic hula hoop, the Soviets have 
suddenly reversed themselves. The 
first positive review of personal com- 
puters appeared last year in the Sovi- 
et journal Science and Technology. 
The journal, after detailing the nu- 
merous advantages of the prolifera- 
tion of Western microcomputers, ob- 
served, “Personal computers are a 
direct link to people, providing them 
with information ... which allows 
decision-making in areas they have 
not had access to before." 

New information? Individual deci- 
sion- making? These are hardly famil- 
iar Communist tenets. Yet Science 
and Technology dismissed ideologi- 
cal concerns with only a shrug: “WQl 
these computers be good or baa? This 
is a matter for philosophers." 

A few months later the “philoso- 
phers" of Mikhail Gorbachev’s new 
Politburo derided to adopt universal ' 
computer literacy training for 9 mil- 
lion Soviet schoolchildren. Tbe cho- 
sen tool is, apparently, a familiar 
symbol of America's technological 
innovation: the Apple II computer. 
Tbe common Apple has come m for 
considerable plaudits, while Soviet 
imitations have been ruddy dis- 
missed in Soviet commentaries. This 
is an astonishing tribute to the Soviet 
inability to purloin even mass-mar- 
keted high-tech gadgetxy. 

Recently, Soviet sources began a 
campaign to lure foreign computer 
manufacturers with the prospect of 
enormous purchases. 

Perhaps Mr. Gorbachev had ner- 
vously noted the appearance of Ap- 
ples in Chinese classrooms some 
years ago. Another explanation of the 
new Soviet embrace of computer lit- 
eracy is as an admission that the 
Soviet Union risks becoming a spec- 
tator to a new technology dominated 
by microprocessors. 

The implications of the explosion 
in consumer microcomputers in tbe 
West, as the Soviets have acknow- 
ledged in print, are ai least as pro- 
found as the reread of the telephone 
or the rise of the automobile. But this 
may understate the matter for the 
Soviet Union. Old Bolsheviks have 
been able to accommodate cars and 
telephones without much ideological 
dislocation, or without (he prospect 
of relinquishing their practical levers. 


By James A. Nathan 


of power. Betides, the distribution of 
telephones and cars has been small 
by Western standards. The pace of 
their introduction was slow and their 
quality was never particularly good. 

But information is different. Infor- 
mation has been a key to the domi- 
nance of the Cdhimuhist Party. Par- 
celing out knowledge has always been 
the prerogative of the party or the 
state. Even telephone numbers are 
hard to come by in the Soviet Union. 
But telephone listings can be generat- 
ed by the simplest computers, and a 
vast index of numbers can be stored, 
traded and transferred on a piece of 
SM-inch vinyL Two-dollar disks 
could make the dangerous labors of 
samizdat — the typing of countless 
copies of unapproved news and liter- 
ature — a boom indusuy. A child’s 
floppy disk could contain his algebra 
lessons; an instantly reproduced copy 
of “Dr. Zhivago" or even the Bible. 

If computers become common- 
place, tbe right to know may follow 
the ability to know. On the other 


hand, if computers become as com- 
mon as radios, a malevolent govern- 
ment could require their use in all 
communications. In a world of uni- 
versal computers, the state, with Or- 
wellian thoroughness, oould monitor 



all telecommunications. The post of- 
fice would simply be abolished. 

And yet floppy disks would still 
be transportable and would enable 
people to transfer and trade vast 
amounts of information. 

Between a Soviet world .where the 
computer is everywhere and a world 
of relative computer scarcity, there is 
a probable chasm of generations. In 
the short run, microcomputers in the 
hands of schoolchildren will bode ill 
for the police state. 

This embrace of microcomputers 
for schoolchildren holds out the pros- 
pect for breathtaking change. Cer- 
tainly there have bran false starts 
before. From Lenin’s “New Econom- 
ic Policy" to Khrushchev’s schemes 
for leapfrogging the West Yet in this 
endeavor to jump the raring train of 
technology, the Soviets may Gad 
themselves in uncharted terrain- a 
brave new world where citizens can 
read what they choose. 

The writer, a professor at the Uni- 


# 


{■ 





assistance, where telephone books 
are at a premium, and I cheer. 

But it is also clear to this outsider 
that too much creative en< 
into these victories: beatings 
era tic obstacle, chasing a shortage. 
Hie energy siphoned off from wont 
or public life is as obvious as tbe sight 
of government workers standing in 
grocery lines at 3 o’clock in the after- 
noon. I da not envy the new leader 
who wants to change these systems in 
the cause of productivity. 

Washington Pan Writers Group. 


A Summit 
With Little 
To Show 

By Hobart Roweit 

W ASHINGTON — When peo- 
ple started calling it the ^Bit- 
burg summit," you could be excused 
for thinking that nothing much was 
gang to be aa»mpfished on econom- 
ic problems. In the end, the Bonn . 
economic summit indeed turned out 
to be dose to a busu I 

At a time when the global economy 
dearly needed the benefit of active 
steps to ward off protectionist trends, 
spur economic growth and reduce 
unemployment, the seven leading in- 
dustrial nations failed to promise 
much beyond the status quo. 

.These were several coated .eco- 
nomic goals at Bono, chief among 
them the U S. arid Japanese aim to 
get a new round of multilateral trade 
negotiations started in 1986. Despite ft 
pledges by earlier summits to roll 
bade protectionist devices and meth- 
ods, ail sons of trade restraints have 
been proliferating. But an adamant 
French president — defensive about 
the cheap rate of the French franc 
against the strong American dollar— . 
blocked the will of the other six. 

Fearful that a new round would 
reduce present protection of French 
farmers under Europe's Common 
Agricultural Policy. Francois Mitter- 
rand said: “They asked me for dis- 
cussions in 1986 when (he around 
isn't fully prepared I said no/’ j 
F rench stubbornness is not new. In ft 
1978, at the fast Boon summit, Vald- 
ry Giscard d’Estaing said he would 

Failure at Bonn makes 
summitglbokjutile. Yet 
it is better to be talking 
than not talking. 


block a trade round then about to 
begin. But he bent to pressure; he did 
not want to be isolated in Europe, or 
risk a break with West Germany, 
France’s largest trading partner. 

“Mitterrand's willingness to be iso- 
lated,” said an American observer, 

“may be the best indication of the 
degree of France's economic trou- 
bles, and the extent to which Mitter- 
rand is worried about next year's par- 
liamentary elections." Polls indicate 
that the conservatives will win. which 
could make it difficult for Mr. Mit- 
terrand to remain in power, although 
his term runs until 1988. 

Naturally, Reagan administration 
officials put the best face possible os 
the failure to get a starting date for 
tbe trade negotiations. They point 
out that alL including France, en- 
dorse the idea of a trade round “as 
soon as possible, 1 ’ and that a prepara- : k 

toty session wm be held in July. ^ 

. . The hard Ttplity is that this group 
will not be working under the disci- 
pline that would result if they had a 
deadline to meet If they get ‘ 


\.. m 


down ttying to. create an agenda i 
will satisfy Mr: Mitterrand, there is 
the danger that the UJL Congress, 
already sounding protectionist, will 
be difficult to restrain. “There will be . 
more political opportunities for Con- . 
grass to blow its cool," says an expert . • 
ehced trade negotiator. 

The failure at Bonn goes beyond 
tbe trade issue. The Americans want- 
ed to encourage West Germany, Ja- 
pan and possibly Britain to expand 
their economies so as to take up some 
of the economic slock appearing in 
America. They struck out European 
leaders made dear that they give a 
higher priority to avoiding a renewal - 
of inflation than to stimulating, 
growth, despite high unemployment. ' 

By the same token, few lough .. 
words were addressed to Mr. Reagan 
about the U.S. budget deficit and the 
overvalued dollar, or to the Japanese m 
about their global trade surplus. Ear- 
her talk of a monetary conference 
disappeared into the vague notation 
that the matter would be discussed at - ~ 
the next annual meeting of the World 
Bank and tbe IMF. Luce the others; 

Mr. Reagan got away with a pledge-' 
that does not go beyond the commit-” 
meat of present Amaicaxr policy. 

And what did the Third World get 
out of Bonn? The debt problem was 1 
brushed off in ho-hum lan guage - The 
leaders said they “stand ready" to 
discuss greater resources for" the 


..r. 


'ill 

il? 


sne wnter. a projessor at the Um- World Bank, even though evefvbodv 
verstty of Dehware, contributed this knows ihaU in nStSuSS 
ro™** w the Uk Angeles Ttmes. Stales is oj^osed to t£ £L 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Reconciliation at Bitburg? 


I am a Jewish American married to 
a Dutch national and I have lived in 



regarded 

tory and that I had forgiven (he Ger- 
man * ‘ " 1 

tore 

real feelings, 
and fed entirety different. 

Why? Became the scars of the war 
dot their landscape and are engraved 
in their people. Some who survived 
the Holocaust have unerasable num- 
bers. Some, like my husband’s family, 
will never forget the “razzias," the 
hunger and the odd of the last winter, 
the tulip bulbs for dinner, even the 
accidental RAF bombings. 

The house I live in has a hidden 
cellar with an escape door under a 
bush in -the garden. Near where my 
son takes his music lesson is a giant 
bunker. About four blocks from our 
home are the remains of an anti- 
aircraft battery embedded in the soil 
It takes IQ minutes to drive to the 
dune in Tbe Hague where tbe Ger- 
mans executed resistance fighters. 

Every year, on the evening of May 
4, there is silence as thousands of 

remembrance. The Dure? tourittof- 
fice unofficially requests German 
tourists to stay home on that day. 

Peopledo try to promote reconcili- 
ation and do intellectually realize - 
that we cannot foist the sins of the 
fathers and mothers on the children. 


But it is the new Germany, born out 
of (he wartime rubble, that deserves 
honor, and not the dead in a German 
military cemetery. 

ROBERTA ENSCHEDE 
Wassenaar, Netherlands. 


As a Briton whose adolescence was 


fall of France and America's entry 
into the war — when Britain stood 
alone against the Hitlerian jugger- 
naut — and who is proud to nave 
served in World War II, I am most 
profoundly shocked and distressed 
that the leader of the free world per- 
sisted in paying a “reconaKauan” 
visit to s German military cemetery. 
Even had there been no more than 
one Waffen SS grave at Bitburg, it 
should have been more than suffi- 
cient reason for giving the cemetery a 
wide berth. There can be no reconcili- 
ation with tbe horrors of Nazism. 

Such utter callousness, lack of 
jud gm ent and sheer ignorance in the 
president of the most powerful coun- 
try in the world is truly frightening. 

This letter should not be construed 
as anti-German, just anti-Nazi. 

PEGGY FENN. 

Geneva. 

In response to ■ the opinion column 
“Vietnam's Five Lessons for America” 
(April 26) by Henry Steele Commager: 

When in the future I visit the me- 
morial in Washington to America's 
dead in Vietnam 1 will weep for all 


the men and women who died there 
— - including those who dropped na- 
palm, and also those who suffer still 
from its effects. Are we to remove the 
names of soldiers who dropped the 
napalm? Could they have refused? I 
wept as a young girl reading of that 
war, as my own friends died there. 

Of the quarter of myself that is 
German, must I now be ashamed? 
W01 it be thought wrong to say “some 
of my best friends are Germans"? 

Isn't there enough hate in this ever 
smaller world already? As a Christian 

I am taught to forgive. I am not asked 

or asking to forget. To live with tbe 


In reaching for one token of su& 
cess, American officials cite the en- 
dorsement by all nations of 
supply-side and market-oriented 
techniques which the Reagan people 
assert account for the recovery and 
job spun in America. But there is 
nothing in the communique to- sug- 
gest that European advances on this 
front will go forward any faster be-" 
cause of anything that. was said- or 
agreed upon at Bonn. ' 

The most serious fallout from 
Bonn is that the failure ranforces the 
argument that summits at best are a 
wasteful exercise, taking up huge 
“towns of preparatory time that 
only serve narrow political 
But I would argue that these sum- 


hate brought forward by so many is w * uch brin 8 the leaden face to 
in itself a kind of death. lace °n economic issues mm a year, -- 

must continue. It isespe-'~" : ’ - — 
tnnt for the American 


Revenge is jiot mine; true forgive- ^ sl continue. It Is especially impor- 


ness may be divine. We don't seem to 
have come very far after alL ' 

J-A- WALWORTH. 

Paris. 

A War That Was Lost 

- j- - — u&vu ruuncMwi 

Mr. Commager’s column (see pie- \“ nencaQS are beginning to rfi- 
ceding tetter) is an affront to the him- , L much prosperity is 


I" - • — „ «wu UlOlUUlt to 

gtten to the problems of the others, 
for too long the United States has 
gone about us business, not caring 
much about the impact erf its enor- 
mous economy on the worid. But as 
imports cut deeper into American 


dreds of thousands who fled South 
Vietnam after the collapse of the gov- 
ernment m 1975. It is estimated that 
half of all “boat people" perished at 
sesL This tragedy was not inevitable, 
and Mr. Commagefs concept of 
America V*morai tradition ofhonor 
and magnanimity" would find little 

** wraps. 
People fled because the war was lost 
noi because it was fought. 

I H. ambrosf.. 

Hong Rung. 


lied to 
to be 


— prosperity - 
looal prosperity. It js better 
ung than not talking. 

The Washington Past. 


«Mor and must contain the writ: * ’ 
erjjtpi ature. name and Ml ad . 
™ if ,ters dwMi* brief atti 
Z "**** We dmnot ' 

^ for ,ke mm of 

unsolicited muniacnpis. 


-I! 


\ 







JDVTERNATIO-NA1 HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Page 5 


. Nt 

* Littl e ‘ 

» Sho* 

! «M ...it,,' *h.-n 

r..-.. ,/" C 

It*; ;**■;■ ■i*.*'* 
V '5* V* 

TT* 

J“ r <r 
,J| ^. 
-t.., |. 1 ' , ’" S K 

•Milr-i lJ “nia D , 

fj - -•? ; »i/y::>>*i 
\«u. V 1 ^ 

liut .. . . „ . •' 

H*k*. f .... ■ ricnj, 

air.!!, 1 ;•!. ‘-^n 

" 

‘"‘T.'-'. - : i,/"* 

■ L ,u “"i*| 

^ in Hwn 
iif.« /nciiV f-ifj/r. 
WrtoivtoU^ 

1ul U 


V. Hl’ *1; .•; • 

l»-* ;v • • •:. 

iTll |\ 

Ul>:v 1 1 
rt.tiivi' ■•• 
i\1 -t; t 
lire ; » 

i ! 

«u- •. 

.-^r-r.! •*- 
'v i‘ ! ~: ;• : 
A1 : 

fci-.-'. ••. 

:> fi,A, . 

rp. -.!••: ■■ 

*t?V. £••• 
p*t! ;i« 

IT ti* ■;:! 


U.S. Offers 
fo Confer 
With Arab 


on 


By Bernard Gwcrtzman 
Kw Y&k''rimes S ***** 
^.WASHINGTON —The United 
Sates has offered tohddtalkswith 
a Jordamafr-Palestmian group pro- 
vided that it does not indude mem- 
bereofihePalestme Liberation Or- 
ganization, according to State 
Department officials. 

The officials said Tuesday that 
there riso would have to be agree- 
ment that balding such talks would 
enhance die. prospects for peace 
•with brad. 



South Africa’s Police Minister Urges Minimum Force 


By Allister Sparks 

Washington Peat Service 

CAPE TOWN — “A police- 
man's duty 's to protect panic, not 
kill than, said Louis Le Grange, 
sitting with the erect posture of a 
guardsman in his cabinet office. 

It would have sounded trite, ex- 
cept that daring the past eight 


ANG I mrn these things over in my 
rrmd and try to Aid solutions.” 

Political opponents also detect 
what they describe as two sides to 
the nuro 

- He defends whatever the police 
do almost as a matter of principle, 
yet whenever I discuss matters with 
him at a personal level I find him 


Commissioner Johan Coetzee told 
the commission. 

The inquiry has yielded other ev- 


“No, i don’t think so,” Mr. Le 
Grange replied. “It is unfortunate, 
very unfortunate, that we have had 


months the police force for wmS mo*® flouWe and reason- 
Mr. Le Grange is responsible as Fredaik van Zyl Slab- 

South Abaca’s mirrisigr q[ law »nd bert, leader of the liberal Progress 
order has killed nearly 300 people « v * Federal Party, the main 
in a <l<ffg rww>Md attempt to quefl opposition in the white-dominated 
disturbances among the country’s Pa r^ment- .... . n 


idence rf-rmaglng to the police: Of- that number of lives lost, but you 
ficers were under ordezs not to take most keep in mind that we 1121 % 
tear gas and rubber bullets with k® d l 9 do wilh laige crowds and 
them on the day of the sh/ynfii o sometimes very violent crowds; 
only lethal weapons. They had or- P «P lc wi} p altaclc lhe P° Uce 
do s 10 “etimmate" any notes tfwi stones, brides, petrol bombs, even 
throwing a bomb filled with easo- gt m s- We have been shot at In the 
line or aad. light of that I don’t think our use of 



voteless black majority. 


Helen Suzman, the leading civil 


Mr. Le Grange, 56, who looks tights figure in Parliament, whose 
like a middle-aged Clark Gable frequent appeals for political pns- 


George P. -Shultz 

dais sad. The cornual, winch has 


with his sleeked-down graying hair oners have brought her into dree 
and trim mrmarhr, is an enigmatic contact with Mr. Le Grange, said 




figure. - 
He has 


JordanM officials said these abmrt .400 membcis. saves as a ™age 


conditions had been met 
PLO, bnt ihe. American 


partiamaaL 


the same- 

presented an iron-man “He has a blind loyalty to the 
e defending his police police,” she said. “But there is also 
,et «eneaaiiv a reasonable side to him to which 


force against criticism. 


Hani al- Hasan, who is thejpofiti- since 2D members of ab 


one can a 
“He fee 


cal adviser to Mr. Arata. said in a were shot to death near the dty of “H* reels himsaf to be a tamer 
»dA^.hid-bem.iiodaKat rcocnli!tcr(jcw ^ moM® Uilmhagc in Marti. Blacks regani figure ora jta police forej said 
mWrA cionoir »• Cario that the PLO had agreed to him as an ogre, and five of the eight his presssecretaiy, Cdond Leon 

S 


ttiZDlflllCC. - . - - Uituv<i>w Willi WOUIW mumg 

^e are gettiiig mixed signals,” Cario thai die PLO had agreed to huni 
an official ‘ / hare non-PU> mrabos rewesent poht 

Ha State Department officials Pakstuuans. But he indicated harm 

said that Secretarytrf State George ^ 

P. Shultz would affinn the PLO calyto.meering the Ye 


Mr. Le Grange did not want to J on * ^ ^ 5een cxcess ^ vc - 

talk about Uitenhage whfle the in- 

quiry was still in progres, but the 
views be expressed seaned 10 con- = 

flict with these wders and much of l EXPEUENCE COUNTS! 
the evidence on what happened. NnN-RKlDENTIAL 
"My approach is that the police nc/zDCC PCfV^P AMC 
should try to calm dtwn a siiuation 

as effeciively and quickly as possr- ****** a*3*t<x \ tx>**r , J Booord <r» 

ble without the use of force.” Mr. 

Louis Le Grange Le Grange said. 

“They should talk to the people ^T rT , 
tenhage shootings, presents his re- first of all” he went on. “If that 

port within the next few weeks. doesn’t woik and force must be . ip^pmlamwivt 

Testimony at the inquiry has re- used, then 1 am adamant that it 
vealed that Mr. Le Grange’s first must be the minimum force neces- _™ r 


Bbdxiar-i 


Louis Le Grange 


it have called for his rerigna- 


Yet in a conversation in his of- 


tvwtirth when he meets iMs week- UA terms for excluding the PLO fice, Mr. Le Grange came across as average p ouce m a^ ineiiiosi_icyai 
*SSTs£ from the jomt team.'lmt to stating who is coiSrned . about the a government could wish to 


MeUeL the men love mm. pared was incorrect. His loyal po- 

“I understand a policeman,” Mr. gave ta y^ jgg blame. They 
Le Grange said in the interview. “I briefed him incorrectly. Police 

know’ how his Timid works. The _________ 

average policeman is the roost loyal I . _ 


report to Parliament of what hap- sary for the occasion.” 

peced was incorrect. His loyalpo- Did the killing of nearly 300 peo- 

Jjce have taken the blame. They pie not indicate an excessive use of 


end tnunlra o enter aoawrrisjmer* pro- 
MMindao donderd theta. It* mt * 
n odereaai itw «na (er raep Wca 8 dun. 

•rmd. Domd for worUno nrofeMmook. 
Oearoa n*»n»i by *» Cakfcrreo DrjxjrV 

men of frtmion. SMdertt waddunde. 

CALIFORNIA UN(VH?SITY 
for ADVANCED STUDIES 
School of P ro fe i B o n d Mtmawneni 

Office of Hie Dean, Room HT-1 
100 Golfi Drfvo. 

Novato, CA 94947. (415) 382-1 600. 


y^cumkat 

30 bis, Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 

(thru the archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 

When in Paris... 
visit our Museum 
and showrooms 

Open Mondjy - Frida) 

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Saturday 10- 12 am - 2-5 p.m. 
Also io selected st«vo 
near your home. 
Catalogue on request 


end with Prime Minister S3mnon we jomi xeam, mu to stating a man wno is amconea acorn tnc 

Peres of IsraeL Preadmi Hosni 11181 ta ^ cs would improve the growing casualty list m the unrest, 
Mubarak of Egypt mid King Hus- <*■“ dircct nieetmgs with and he took pains to anpharize his 
sdn of Jor&anT^ thelsradis. bebef that the police should use 


belief that 


ist in the unrest, ‘ , ,, , _ \ 

to anpharize his Tbe lest of Mr. Le Grange and 

JittThnuld use tiie pohee may come when Judge 
Donald D. iinnemeyer, whois 
. conducting the inquny into the Ui- 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


■SSSjSL’SSnnfe “^foreefb^riou. 

that Mr. ainltz may meet with a coKenis the type of taQcs ^ public statements Mr. Le 5 y 

joint Jordaman-Palcstiman group J? 42 Grange has assailed the major 

if American conditions are met, but East. The Umted States and Israel black political movement, the 

this is not considered li kel y wtth the Ar- (jmted Democratic Front, blaming L/jtill Publisher 

■''AUS. officials have met with non- Sr 8, f?*® were rad with Egypt jt for instigating the unrest. He has « w 

FtO Pakstinians in the past, bat ? 1 ? 2 ^ calfcd the group a front for the Sees tt Danger fa 

the iAn> nf a meeting with a Pales- talk with the Israelis only as part of African National Congress, or 


talkwith thelsradis onN as part of ^can NStioial Congress, or 
tinian-Jordanian group has' been ^.^ternatiqnal confermce at ANG the black underground that 
proposed by the Arabs as a way of vdnai the Soviet Union and .other is committed to trying to overthrow 
providing momentum to the peace naj»ons wonId be represented. • white minority rule by guerrilla 
process. Previously, the United _ to Amman on struggle, and he has described the 

States has been cod to the idea 1 y esda y ®“ d ““ Hussem m congress as a Communist organiza- 
unless there was a guarantee that it ««OTce- oi .Mr. Shultzs arrival don directed from Moscow. 
would lead to direct talks with Isra- s ^ a ^' , . .. _ . tOTl In the interview. Mr. Le Grange 


1C RAF 


struggle. 


has dmcribed the 


In the interview. Mr. Le Grange 


Jordanian officials, who want uk 

the United States to play a more ? 
active role, . have said thm the PLO 
has agreed to the exclusion of its 

members from the joint team and «ess«*XKtedfrom Anmum.] 
that U was now up to Mr. Shultz to ■ Egyptians, Israelis to Meet 


P^Arafatsaidonamv^’-rhe 

V 01 *® 1 Stares is ignonngtlto fads cx^nation for the unrest and that 
m Um Middte East region, mclnd- aKt part of the cause was frus- 
r^dre legitimate trios at teVaL. tration ££mg blatks at being ex- 
emman people, Tie Assooated duded from the government's re- 
press reported from Amman.] ^ consdtujioiJkonns. 

■ Egyptians, Israelis to Meet “One cannot just blame a partic- 

Egyptian and Israeli represents- ular organization or individuaL” he 


act. Egyptian and Israeli represents- ular organization or individuaL” he ers Asso c ia t i on at mar annual 

jp-'But aides to Mr. Shultz said that tives w31 meet in Cairo next week c»h “One tnnut have a broader meeting, said he viewed with alarm 
no such: clear-cut PLO agreement for tailw on bilateral issues, United approach. I am not one of those efforts of political groups of the 
has been received. They said that Press International reported Tue$- who says it is just because someone right or lrfl to take oyer major 

DCaIimJ H/ i/ii«tovkn nivietemi J * ' - ^ 1 r rvwnmunimbMC 


US. News Media 

New York Times Service 

MIAMI BEACH — The pub- 
lisher of an Argentine newspaper 
has warned that some UJJ. news 
organizations are in danyr of be- 
coming like those in l -»tin America 
controlled by ideological or eco- 
nomic interest groups. 

Rani E. Kraisriburd, publisher 
of El Dia in La Plata, Argentina, 
who spoke Tuesday to members of 
the American Newspaper Publish- 
ers Ass ociation at thqr animal 
meeting, said he viewed with alarm 
efforts of political groups of the 


(Nairobi based) 


Richard W. Murphy, assistant sco- day from Cairo. 

reiary of state for Near Eastern and : 

South Asian affairs, transmitted nUn^FRRITRY 
the American offer to Hussein last WUMfeanUKi 

month, but did not receive a satis- YOU KNOttiUOLL^AFim 

factory r^ponsc. gKSw fiiUHBVHEJSIliLQtfT 

toe KG to! reloaded . SS SS 

PWI ?^'|' T, S l TR£m?t*BUfcGOT 

matt officials said that Mr. Shultz 0 

would try to straighten out die ap- - N 

parent ambiguity. \ C^’ 

Hussem and Yasser Arafat, the * — -^WSr ? i 

PLO leader, agreed Fdb. li on a § SS! 

plan that provides for a Jordanian- 
^estmian dd^ation to meet in « — l k^ : JifKUj*® 

Ccconlext ofaqinteraational con : Ya^yTgM^ 

IBence to negobate tbe end «rf the r . ' J 
Israeli occupation.. of the West n^prm n, Mr 

Bank. 

Originally, the PLO inrisred on 
having its members on the team. ^ 

But land will not at down mth • 

known PLOfigures and the United ANPPI6TH&. FB&T&tY 
Stores is pled^d not to deal with jH t &iSQ(TTQ&tBUm. 
the organization until it recognizes 
Israel’s right to exist and UN. Seal- COHEJ&€tBO&,BI6 
rity Council Resolutions 242 of fjnW^yffCMOOSf 
1967 and 338 of 1973, which pro- ^ 

vide the bass for talks. ' • . f fiL£ 

The Stare Department officials WBL Cd] 
said that Mr. Murphy, on lus recent ■ — 2J 
trip, told die Jordanians that the 
United States would meet with the 
joint group even if the PLO ap- - — K IfKuZntjA | 
painted the Palestinians, provided ^ 

that they affirmed they were not ^ F - K g gl 
representing the PLO. 

There are members of the Pales- r — V r~W" 
tine Natiraal Cotmdl who are.not Wf&L 

affiliated with the PLfr US. offi- >»✓ 


is a Communist, or a member of the 


TELUe~A8CUrtr,MN.l 

axx&ONrrmY&Rs. 

1 FmVfpEC&B? THEfltr 

MYMSMf(MR£AL 

Hm t /WIFZiJPP&. 


mmimim ra tifins mrn panif^ 

He gave as an example efforts by 
Fairness in Media, a group that has 
said CBS News has a Ubetal bias, to 
take over CBS for ideological rea- 
sons. 

He described as potentially dan- 
gerous efforts by some large non- 
communications companies to buy 
news organizations, comparing 
such acquisitions to newspaper 
ownership by banks and oil compa- 
nies in Latin America. 


We are seeking an experienced executive to direct the Finance and 
Administration functions for our dent, the International Council for 
Research in Agrafe restry in Nairobi. Kenya. 

Responsibilities include treasury, budget, accounting, disbursement, 
personnel administration and related administrative nmetions tor this 
international non-profit research council funded by a variety of govern- 
ments wortdwkte. 

The successM candidate should have a degree in Business AdnBrestia- 
!ion. Finance or a related field and at feast 10 years of progressively 
responsible experience in finance and administration, some of which 
should have been In a research organization. Some international 
organization experience in tropica! countries, preferably Africa, is 
desirable. 

Excellent salary and benefits packages are offered. 
Resumes, which must include salary history 
and requrements. should be sent to: 

EMPLOYMENT MANAGER 

Institute of 

International Education 

809 United Nations Plaza 
New York. NY 10017 10SAI 
An mqunl opportunity mmpioymr 


Dans la cadre de sas actlvhds A I* export an 
Lybie, un important groups industrial franpais 
recherche son 

Responsable 

d'agence 

implant6e & Tripoli 
parfaitement bilingue arabe 


Ce Gestlonnaire polyvalent, veritable lien de 
coordination entre le Si&ge A Paris et I'agence 
6 Tripoli, assure : 

- 1© suivi financier des contrats {relations avec 
las banques et las divers Organismes d'EtaO, 

- la gestion administrative du personnel de 
I’agence, 

- la tenue de la comptabilito g£ngrale. 

Une premiere experience de ce type r&ussie h 
I’ Granger, et de pr6f6rence au Moyen -Orient, 
constrtue un atout. 

Nombreux avantages sociaux - salaire 
motivant - facilrt^s d’ installation pour le 
candidat et sa famine. 

Si ce type de fonction vous irrr&resse, merci 
d’adresser C.V. + remuneration sous la 
reference 298/FX S 



dica 


UlUCl selection 

69. rue Lecourbe - 75015 PARIS 


A&P&JHG.F&SnXY am. 
NjhSBtrvcRENML memi 
TNOMBSUm^m GOTA 
COHEJ&efBO&BG MBfioe* 
mAP5,VCtU0RX& 


F0HNWXN6 
A GOLF COURSE, 
MAN.60FJ&m. 


m,GU15! 

muGFi- 

MLVfGOT, 

A FARADS! 


mTESNAKlONAL POSITION 






mwmm 




I ['TvaTif TaiH * 1 »Ti i • l »• 


package, negotiable according to 
experience, wifi include an atfractive 




EEC LAW - 
BRUSSELS 

Coward Chance wish to recruit a 
lawyer to work in their Brussels Office. 
The office deals with a wide range of 
interesting and complex EEC legal 
matters, but specialises in competition 
law and in the expanding area of 
international trade law. 

Applicants should be solicitors or 
barristers and preferably qualified for 
two or more years. Experience of EEC 
competition or international trade law 
and a reasonable fluency in French 
would bean advantage. The successful 
applicant will be willing to travel and 
take considerable responsibility at an 
early stage. Salary and other benefits 
will be competitive and com- 
mensurate with experience. Please 
write with full CV to: 

Mis D. Peg*, Coward Chance, 
JRoyex House, Aldermaubmy Square 
London EC2V 7LD. 

COWARD CHANCE 


European Manager 

Structural Building Systems 


Our client is a world leader in the design of 
structural budding systems s py l and 
aluminium componentry. To exploit its 
market potential it now seeks a high calibre 
individual who, following a period of product 
familiarisation abroad, will assume profit 
responsibility for establishing, from scratch, 
a European venture based in the Netherlands. 

Reporting at board lewd the successful can- 
didate will be required vd: 

• identify and negotiate with companies in 
establishing a network of lkensee/joint 
vemure partners throughout Europe 

• moniror the performances of and provide 
ongoing technical and sales support to 
individual com panies . 

Essential prerequisites fcr this new and 
challenging position are an impressive 
commercial track record within the 
structural steelwork/ construction i^— ^ 

industry, a high degree of KI 

mobility and an age 9} 

range of 35 to 45. 


Experience in the negotiating and manage- 
ment of licences and/or joint wntures would 
be a particular advantage. Preference will also 
be given to candidates having relevant 
engineering q ualifica tions established 
contacts in the industry. 

It is expected that eventually the appointee 
will {day a key role m initiating the com- 
pany’s further expansion internationally, 
possibly into North America and/or the 
Middle East. 

Salary and conditions will reflect the 
importance of the position, a remuneration 
package around 150,000 guilders/aiujuxn 
bring envisaged. Exceptional candidates 
should not view this as a constraint however. 


too 

BY 


The identity of candidates will not be revealed 
. to ourcUem ztnihout prior permission. 

I Please ztmze with full (Loads in English 
A quoting the ref.nr. A/1, 396 to tftf 

(mention of dn. J. H. d£ Boo. 


PA Personnel Services 


Sopbialaanla,2514 JP VGravenhage NL-, Telephone 07fHS00930*,Tefex 31401. 


d 


Advertising 


^INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS” 

mppeuws 
every Thwrsday 
A Saturday 

TO PIACE AN ADVERTISEMENT - 
contact your iworest 
biternaffMal Herakf Tribune 
v-Aipf •iMtatiw* or Max Farrero: 
*181 Av«. Owlii-df-GevHa, 
92521 NauQljr Cacfex, France'. 
Tel.-. 747-12-65. telex: 613 595. 


THINKING OF CHANGING ? 

And ready to act ? 

If so, bere'.is a third question : your annual salary, is it over 
S50JM0 ^ Like many other executives who have readied the 
higher brackets, you may well find that the job-change methods 
you used earlier in your career can no longer produce the result 
you seek’ today. 

We . are specialists helping executives such as yourself to 
mount and conduct a sophisticated search of the hidden side of 
the international job market. Our statistics show that is where 
65*:* of the action lies. 

Your first step ? Telephone us Tor an initial meeting without 
cost or obligation. One of our consultants will review your 
situation, check out your objectives and explain if and how we 
can be. helpful to you in achieving your particular goals. 

Forgeot Weeks 

Paris ; 58, n» St Ferdinand 75017 - Ta. : (I) 57434.24 

Genbc : 9, route des Jeuncs 1227 - Tfl. : (022) 4ZS2.49 


EXCEPTIONAL CAREER CHALLENGE IN EUROPE 

Intergraph in Europe is currently expanding its activities for the U.5. Federal Agency 
organizations located in Europe. This offers an outstanding opportunity for a 

senior sales professional 
in computer graphics systems 

The pos it ion 

The successful candidate is expected io sdl Intergraph equipment and manage 
accounts in Europe, supported by the local Intergraph organizations. 

in# reison 

Wb are looking for a highly motivated, goal oriented U.S. citizen who is willing to 
relocate and has an overall business experience of 5-10 years, with proven sales 
performance in advanced commuter systems. Knowledge of avi! engineering is an 
asset. Individuals with U.5. mintary experience and familiarity with U.S. 
government purchasing regulations are profaned. 

Intergraph offers you an excellent compensation and benefits package and a 
promising future in a dynamic and professional environment. 

Application 

If you are interested and qualified, we await your resume including details of your 
work experience. 

AU responses will be handled in strict confidence. 

Please' address your appScation, under reference number 850411 to 
Mrs. R. Everadijx, Manager Human Resources, at the fallowing address: 




In tel gra p h Corporation is one of the world's 
top three CADrCAM m omi fadunn. Our 
interactive graphic systems are used in 
applications as diverse as mechanical and 
electronics design as well as manu f acturing, 
plant design, architecture, mapping, energy 
exploration and technic a l publications. 
Intergraph has i nstated ever 1600 of He 
systems in 21 countries worldwide. 
Throughout Europe, Intergraph has Hs awn 
subsidiaries where growth has been conti- 
nuous over the last 5 years. 

Our European Head- 
quarters are based 
near A ms te r dam. 
One of the activities 
is to coordinate and 
support the needs of 
aO the European 
subsidiaries In the 
field of Sales and 
Marketing. 




INTERGRAPH EUROPE INC 

P.O. Box 333, 2130 AH Hoofddoqx 
The Netherlands. 

Telephone 0031.2503.66331 


INTERGRAPH 








L 1 


I’auf 6 



IVTKKVVTIO.VU. HHKALD TRIB1 NK. TIU'RSDAV MAY 9. 1985 _ 

Fight Grows in Japan to Free Convict , 93 


By Clyde Habcrman 

Wetr York Tones Strut* 

TOKYO — For 30 years, Sada- 
michi Hirasawa has been waiting in 
prison lo die. 

On May 7. 1955. the Japanese 
courts pui their final stamp on a 
death sentence imposed on Mr. 
Hirasawa for the bizarre poisoning 
deaths of 12 bank employees seven 
years earlier. No one else, any- 
where. is believed to have sat on 
death row for so long. 

Mr. Hirasaw is 93 and in uncer- 
tain health. He does little more 
than wait for tomorrow at the Ha- 
chioji Medical Dentention House 
outside Tokyo. He is. by now. an 
unlikely candidate for hanging. 
This means, his lawyer says, that 
his life will simply expire like a sigh 
one of these days. 

For years, supporters have main- 
tained that Mr. Hirasawa is not 
guilty and was convicted, in part 
on the strength of a forced confes- 
sion. 

A few months ago an American 
free-lance writer made public mili- 
tary documents from 1948 suggest- 


ing that the United Slates occupy- 
ing forces and Japanese police 


Melanesian Killed in New Caledonia dashes 


French riot police used tear gas Wednesday to disperse anti-independence demonstrators in 
Noumea, capital of the Pacific territory of New Caledonia. A 19-year-old Melanesian youth 
demonstrating for independence was shot and killed, and about 70 poople w ere injured, at least 
10 with gunshot wounds, during 10 hours of street battles between pro and anti-independence 
forces. Order was restored at nightfall and a dusk-to-dawn curfew, lifted Friday, was reimposed. 


mg forces and Japanese police 
investigators bad believed that 
someone else was guilty. 

Now Mr. Hirasawa's lawyer, 
Makoto Endo. says it is time that 
his client went free. 

He says that under Japanese law 
a statute of limitations applies 
when 30 years pass wiLhout a death 
sentence' having been carried out. 
That m eans , according to Mr. 


Endo. that Mr. Hirasawa should 
have left prison Tuesday. 

So far. the Justice Minis try dis- 
agrees with that legal interpreta- 
tion. but the courts may be ready to 
take action anyway. A Tokyo judge 
said Tuesday he would decide what 
to do after he takes the unusual 
step of interviewing the frail death- 
row convict on Thursday. 

From the beginning it was a 
strange case. 

On a drizzly Jan. 26 in 1948 a 
middle-aged man with close- 
cropped hair knocked on the doors 
of the Teikoku Bank branch in To- 
kyo's Shiinamachi section. The 
bank had just closed, but the man 
identified himself as a government 
health inspector and insisted that 
be be let in. 

He announced that a case of dys- 
entery had broken out in the neigh- 
borhood and that the government, 
fearing an epidemic, wanted people 
to take preventive medicine. He in- 
duced 16 bank employees to drink 
an “antidote" that be had brought 
with him. 

Within minutes the workers were 
writhing on the floor. The liquid 
actually was a cyanide-based poi- 
son. 



Bureaucracy , 
Blamed for 
Vulnerability 
OfPershings 


By Bill Keller 

Sew York Times Semi c 

WASHINGTON — A senior 


Pentagon official says a “bureau. 

I'M tir iiinolf" eaw rise to ivmHi- * 


Sadamichi Hirasawa, at his 1955 Tokyo murder triaL 


Twelve of the 16 died, and. while Since then, many Japanese have stances and techniques employed 
venone was immobilized, the bo- become convinced that Mr. Hir- by a chemical warfare school in the 
*is health inspector fled with near- asawa was railroaded. A vocal Japanese Army. 


erotic jungle" gave rise to eondj- * 
lions that left Pershing-2 missiles in 
West Germany vulnerable to ter- 
rorist attack for more than a year. 

The official, the undersecretary 
of the army, James R. Ambrose, 
blamed the bureaucracy that gov- 
erns construction projects at over- 
seas military installations. 

Mr. Ambrose said army requests 
for missile sheds and other im- 
provements had been bogged down 
in the North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization, which shares responsibil- 
ity for maintaining the bases. 

But Mr. Ambrose conceded that 
the army did not press for improve^ 
merits because it did not occur to 
officials that the sites were serious- 
ly vulnerable. 


“They never did have a plan that 
loked at that as ‘Here is the site to 


ly 180.000 yen in cash and checks, “Save Hirasawa" movement was Japanese military men assigned 
about $500 under prevailing ex- formed, led by a novelist named ^ Manchuria had '“used this poi- 
change rates and. at the time, a Tetsuro Mortkawa. The con- ^ on faunas anj animals suc- 
considerable sum in Japan. demned man and his supporters - Mr. Fujita bad said. 


considerable sum in Japan. 


Seven months later, after ques- have appealed for a new trial 17 
tinning hundreds of suspects, die times and asked for amnesty 5 


looked at that as ‘Here is the site to 
be secured.’ ” he said. 

He said the army realized the 
problem while investigating an ac- 
cidental Ore that killed three sol- 
diers at a Pershing base near Heil- 


AUTOMOBILES 


TRANSFERS! TO U.S.A., must tell 
1985 Peugeot 505 GT1. dork grey, 
500®un. or, sun roof, alarm, mag 
-heeli, Europe !pea. Send wnWn 
offer to B. Anderson. 9B rue 
<T Epluehev Si Ouen LAumone. 95310 
Prance by May 13. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


SERVICES 

HONG KONG 3-671247 W lady 


police arrested Mr. Hirasawa, who times. nhrasef “firet^ue" and “ 

was a 56-year-old tempera painter On occasion, speculation has 

stmeeline to act bv. In his Dockets, arisen that his release was immi- ThlS ’- l0a ' 


Moreover, the bank robber, in 
handing out the poison, used the 
phrases “first drug" and “second 
drun." in English. This, too, resem- 


bronn in January. 
In a letter to Coi 


AUTO SHIPPING 


AUTOS TAX FREE I LOW COST FLIGHTS 


lAJYf HJSTMJUlflS SERVICES NEW YOfiK V.LP. Young bdy cum- , 

NV OPE WAY $150. Everyday MY. - lamON. ELEGANT nTntoil SZZSOJ*! 7 !. 

W«l Coast $145. Rare 225W90. Gnfni*, T* 

■■■■■ * mw raw oil Uwfa " 


LONDON - YOUNG CARIBBEAN 
Lady 01-72A ]W Airport} / Travel 
LONDON: EDUCATED LADY Can- 
panan/ Guide. Tab BS9 I6W. 


struggling to get by. In his pbekee, arisen ,*« his nfaw was immi- b pSlte irS 

^ PC ^,mSf^ anQnUSUaIl) ' chemical warfare school which had 

large amount of cash. sort of talk grew more insistent L ._ i— . 

His handwriting supposedly re- recently, both because of the 30th rfTokvo ° 

serabled that used on a business anniversary and because of new . . - , . , _ 

card that the “health inspector" disclosures from a Washington An o ther Ainencan document, 
w KonL- TrirJrtt dated March 12. 1948, said that 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAM SHIPPING 
SPECIALISTS 

PADS fll 500 ff 

CANNES/' NICE KB 3* £ 

FRANKFURT |06l 07} « 

BONN - COLOGNE 0228} 212 
STUTTGART form | m 


COOPER ST JAMES 

omoAL agent 
OF BMW (G8) LID 


had given the bank manager. An writer named William Triplett. . . - ... ...... „ 

investigation also uncovered that a Mr. Triplett, using documents ^- Fujna was i mvratigating all 
short lime earlier Mr. Hirasawa that were prepared by the Ameri- P“"™. JL2L9S“ 
had deposited money in a bank can forces occupying Japan after "JP™ “ ad “5 

account, using a fictitious name. World War 1L, disclosed that the Teikoku Bank 


London 381 98 47. 


investigation also uncovered that a 
short time earlier Mr. Hirasawa 


L 5 ^ S WMe >ov we Europe, vn» am offer 
an 5f co«»dnrt*le sarogs on brad new. 
•<J7} SJ51 BMW cart la mosf jpetifientioro. FuS 
,217921 factory warranty. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL sS SSSmb : ZJ T. Chicago. You™ man ax«arox account, using a fictitious name. World War IL disclosed that the 

555n5 * YAOff 5 1 aEa ^Z co mpani on. Engkifi + g5Si i^ Payi/ewwng fajji2580-gw. A month after his arrest he con- Tokyo chief of detectives. Jiro Fu- robber - 
too from owner of largest fleet, jg* f 1 ™ g n P«*t Tot 051/^38Zti. 747 59 SB TOURIST GUIDE. Pans, fesflid jjja. told U.S. militar y iDIVStHBIOR TfUS 

kvl hovel 


MUNICH (689} 93 10 

BEEA1ERHAVEN {0471} 43C 

YORK 1212} tfJ5 711 

HOUSTON pi a 931 7e 

LOS ANGaES jl3 So6 92 

MONTREAL 5lfl B6o 6fl 

AGENTS WORLD WTO 
Leave it lo in to bring h fo «ou 


mil 88081 

1} 93 10 45 We cm abo 


L09BON. Yeung Gern'm/Ftendi db- 
owws. govt, bonded. Vajef Yodrts, ana; to meet you cm your wa lo 
^ Tht ?^£2a. 2 7£u.?r*S n ' London M UK 01 -381 6852 


7 anv/'mid rigtu. IntT Iro weL 

YOUNG LADY COMPANION ton- 
don/ Heathrow. Tet 386 7671. 


f essed jita. told U.S. mili tary investigators This sort of technical informa- 

But at his trial he retracted the in 1948 that the poison and the don about poisons, along with a 

confession, saving he had been co- methods used by the bank robber knowledge ctf English, were beyond 

erced. had been “very similar" to sub- Mr. Hirasawa's competence, sup- 


” JlJjS We as> afao supply right or left hand 
ta * WWt 3 tourist meet. 
7065 We aba supply factory burft bufat- 
21 p,oo{ BMWsond Ihe Alpim BMW 
S? 0 ZtS t ,ar> 9 B h» Aw. 


Greece. Tel: 452W1 4H9466. = a " vnm,ow ' ,tv 

21-2000. USA offices: f» Road. Am- MNGAPORE INR GUDES. Col: Sin- MLNCH - GERMAN LADY 
Her. PA 19002. Tel: 215 1624. Wore 734 96 28. m and atv-owde. Tel: 311 


bier. PA 19002. TeL 215 641 1624. 

SERVICES 


HONG KONG [M» 723 12 37 TOKYO 645 2741. Touring & shof> 
Yrxmg sophsti me d cornperwn. pmg guides. irtwOretwt. etc. 


Cefl Utodon (01) 629 6699. 


^^ ER a c I D ^ 

sr-KR*ani* FROM S toCK 


more. MD 21224. Td- 301^8611, 
Th: 499 VIA US Autos avalalBe . 
m Belgium Tel- 32-50-715071. T* 
82209. 


***** 

YOUNG ELEGANT LADY PA 
Represented* services (or VIP's 

ZURICH 830.58.88. 


FRB8CH RfVtBUL Interpreter Travel PAU5 INTI PHBONAl/BUSINBS , 
cumparvaii [93) 61 78 65 Assstont Tel: B267932. 


PARIS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA & bingud int ap ieter. 


PAHS YOUNG SOMSnCATB VB> 
lady. iriSraud PA 256 05 91 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMMNIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


TOKYO LADY CQMPAMON, PA PRANKfUKT 069723338a Young 
Persom4 Ageiam 02-456-5539 lady V.LP. compervor 


“Europe's Best View" 


I FKAWUKT YOUNG LADY ronjpav I HONG KONG - 3-620000 raung 
+ eavel gutfe. Tel: 069-628432 | lady lAsiai/Westem} cor^omon 


ALTOS TAX FREE 


for MIMBM4JE deWry 
BEST SBtVICE 

Far ihipping, I ne rwm , bond 
ww i nioH in U.SJL 


YOUNG LADY 

PA7(nterpreter & Tourbm Guide 


PROGRAM THURSDAY 9th MAY 


PARIS 56205871 


1305 FAMILY 

14 30 WAYNE A SHUSTER 
15.00 SKY TRAX 1 

15 45 SKY TRAX 2 
1630 SKY TRAX 3 
(7.30 MR ED 


1800 THE LUCY SHOW 
1830 CHARLIE'S ANGELS 
19.20 SKYWAYS 
20 10 THE UNTOUCHABLES 
21.05 DAVIS CUP TENNIS 
2200 SKY TRAX 


RUTEINC. 


TAKE THE PROFIT 

On your new European auto purchase 

MYCAR 

mate their bulk buying paces avalaHe 
for your mckvidua puiehcse 
Pauiieu Import 

• you take the profit 

• «e do the work 
Worldwide shipments to your 

specification 
Send For a quotation ta 
MYCAR 
ai Uvbndge 

[15 minutes from London Airport} 

5 Windsor Street. U abridge, 
IWdrflese*. England U88 1AB. 

Tel. UK jOl 8^5 71073,72103 
tl»- LK 8813271 GKOMS G 


Tounusstr. 52. 6000 FraAfirt, 

! W Germ, (el (CH 69-232351. lb 4ll559 
; Infontuvan aaty by phone or telex. 


* * PARIS 553 62 62 * * 

FOR A REAL VJJ> YOUNG LADY 
Dstingunhed. Begmt, Muhtngud. 


Place Your Qassified Ad Quickly and Easily 

blfw 

INTHtNATlONAL HBAID TRIBUNE 


10 YEARS 

We Deliver Cara to the World 


YOUNG HEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 



VP LADY GUIDE 
una educated, elegant 6 trvbtgual 
tor tfcyi ove rings & travel. 

PAHS 533 80 26 


MYCAR 


“TAX FHEE” 


AMSTRDAM 182197 

1WSTHJL LADY COMPAMON 
Owning, educated, (rovet 


IMMHMATE DELIVERY 


ROLLS BOYCE CAMARGUE- 
CORNfCHE LIMOUSINE STRETCHHJ. 

BENTLEY MULSA/JNE TURBO, 
MASERA7TI Hi TURBO MBKHJES 1 000 
5GL -60 cm STRETCHED • bufet 


fEW 1985 

MERODB BBtZ, BMW PORSCHE. 
ROLLS ROYCE FERRARI, 
V.W. / AUU, VOLVO 


TOKYO: 442 39 79 

ferapean young lady companion. 


LHD/RHD, Euro/ US specs. 


proofed, the only ongnal AC Cobra n 
beautiful cckr> & nme ttom tiOOcors 


I mandate/ Ecrly defmery. 
G.T. VBfldE EXPORTS LTD. 
Tel: Louden (Oil 493 4218. 
Ibc 299824 BAMtCO G. 


PARIS: 520 97 95 

BILINGUAL YOUNG LADY PA 


teautnul ccior, & mote ttom t jOOcon 
ne» S used. We offer (he largest 
Jelecnon of erdusve. exotic tad 

GERMAN CARS 

™ AUTO ' AFTYFR 73 fKM SBIMANY 

WHS - BCUkCK Experienced «* trader far Mercedes, 

SuubertinmaiM: 150 Porsche or BMW. Immed kil e de&vw 

DJ00Q DucsseUorf I. W Germany Full service impart/ export US DOT 


PARS 704 80 27 
V* PA YOUNG LADY 
MufOngual. 


Porsche or BMW. Immed htf e delivery. 
Fufl service impart/ export US DOT & 


HfROPORT TAX FREE CARS 

Call >a free catalog. 

Bo« I2PI1. Kottcrdam Airport. Hafkmd. 
Tel: 01Ck,ZXT7. TV.- 250?l EPCAR NL 


H*A far hum md dealer. CCM. Teer- 
stegenstr. 8. 4 Duesseldorf W. Germa- 
ny Tel: (0) 211-434646, telex 8587374. 


TRANSMUNM BadUM. 21 Gesfd- 
letoan. B-2241 Zcenef. Antwerp Tel- 
03-3J4 1054 Tl» 22307 Trorem B In 
itocl Meicodei BMW. ASO 




SOCffTE DUNE PARS 260 87 43 
Men & women guules. security &r«nt- 
mg car lervrcej, 8 am - 12 pm. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & 



By Phow L Cdl your bed IHT representative with your tat. You 
wiH be informed of Ihe ccst immediately, and once Repayment is 
node your ad wil appear within 48 hours. 

CaA The bese rote is $9.80 per line per day + local taxes. There tae 
25 letters, signs and spaces m the first fine taxi 36 in Ihe foBowaig Hies. 
Minnun space is 2 Km. No abtaeviatians accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express. Dinar’s Oub, Eurocord. Master 
Card. Access and Visa. 


SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION. RATES. MARKETING & 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT THE SALES DEPARTMENT 
SKY CHANNEL SATELLITE TELEVISION PLC 
TEL LONDON (01) 636 4077 TELEX 266943 


porters say. 

Other documents suggested pos- 
sible links to a related unit, the 
731st Regiment, which was known 
to have used Chinese in Manchuria 
as human guinea pigs for germ war- 
fare research. 

Mr. Hirasawa’s supporters main- 
tain that the American occupation 
forces knew of the 731st Regi- 
ment's activities but declined to 
prosecute its leaders for war crimes 
because they hoped to acquire mili- 
tarily useful information. 

What Mr. Hirasawa himself 
thinks of all these developments is 
not known. He has not given a 
press interview in many years. He 
has few visitors. His wife divorced 
him in 1952 and his five children 
have disowned him. 


In a letter to Congress announc- 
ing a four-stage plan to fortify the 
bases, the army said the missiles, 
which are visible behind cyclone, A 
fencing and concertina wire, had'iflii 
become rallying points for anti-nu- 
clear protests. 

Army and congressional authori- 
ties stressed that while the missiles 
were exposed, the nuclear war- 
heads were not at risk. They are 
secured in concrete vaults at sepa- 
rate locations. 

■ Protesters Arrested 

The West German anti-missile 
movement Wednesday attempted 
to blockade the Pershing base in 
Mutiangen and 12 people were ar- 
rested, United Press International 
reported. 


Saudi Arabia Pledges 
$100 Minion for Africa 


Return 

WASHINGTON — Saudi Ara- 
bia has pledged S 100 million to the 
World Bank s special fund for sub- 
Saharan Africa, the bank an- 
nounced. 

The donation, to be paid over 
three years, brings total contribu- 
tions to the fund to $12 billion, the 
bank said Tuesday. Saudi Arabia, 
along with Britain. West Germany, 
Japan and Switzerland, has agreed 
to finance lending projects selected 
by the fund. 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMSUCA 


Pori*: (For dasafiod onty^ 
747-4660. 


EUROPE 


An n in ( km : 2636-15. 
Alta* 361-8397/360-2421. 
BnMMfa 343-1899. 
Copanhasm: (01) 329440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 7247-55. 
U*mrnm* 29-5694. 

Labors 67 -Z7 -73/ 66-25-44. 
London: (01) 8364802. 
Madid: 455-2891 /455-3306. 
•Man: (02 ] 7531445. 
Norway: (03) 845545. 
■on** 679-3437. 

Swadon: 08 7569229. 

Tot Aviv: 03-455 559 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt 


Branco AJrot: 41 40 31 

Pepl.312) 

GoayaqvB: 431 943/431 
linn 417852 
ISo i uuiu. 64-4372 
Son too* 22-1055 
Sartlago: 69 61 555 
Sao Paula: 852 1893 



MIDDLE EAST 


Bdmdi: 246301 
Jordan: 25214. 
■Cuwwfc 5614485. 
Inbanon: 34 0044. 
Oate? 416535. 


: 667-1500 
ifaai 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNITED STATES 


Btafljkofc: 39006-57. 
Hang Kong: 5-213671. 
ManSa: 81707 49. 
Soeub 725 8773- 
Sfagcyorv . 222-2725. 
Tohrm 752 44 2579. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 



Now York: (212)752-3890 
Wort Coart: (415) 362-8339. 


AUSTRALIA 


Sydtoy: 929 56 39. 
Mdboumo; 690 8233. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 


SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SHIVICE 
TEL- 200 8585 


AMSTERDAM NICOLE 
ZURiCH-GENEVA ESCORT 5ERV1CE 020-999244 


GINGarS BCOW SBtVKE 
IHr 01/ 363 OB 64 -082/ 34 41 86 


GBCVA WHCOME 
Multfingutd. Eicort Swvko 
Tofc 22/35 93 68 


Hr->1 oPkb in Now tOfk 
t.Vl W Swh 5i . Ml C 10019 USA 


LONDON 


212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


KENSINGTON 


EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBtVKE 
01-229 4794 


MILAN ESCORT 

SERVICE 02/69762402 


MAJOS CREDIT CARDS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTED 
Pnvrtv Monhv Jvpi AraKofala 


ESCORT SERVICE 

10 TOCJNGTON CHURCH ST. W8 
IS: 9379136 OR 937 9133 
AH mcqar awSt ccrdi attagtod 


★ MADRID ★ 


TASTE ESCORT SERVICE 
TBj 411 72 57-259 61 96 


Tlwi o w ad- w innin g torvico ha 
boon footorod <n tho top 6 mod 
•■dudva Escort Smvks by 
USA A intomaManal nawi modki 
•ndwdkig radio end TV. 


LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT SBtVICE 


ZURICH 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AM 5 R/CAN 


LONDON, HEATHROW 4 GA1WICK 
Tofc 01 890 0373 


AIEXB ESCORT SHTYKE 
TEL 01/47 55 82 - 69 55 04 


_ ESCORT SERVICE. 
ElBTVWHBi TOU AJE OP GOU 


ARIStOCATS 


JASMINE 


1-813-921-7946 

Cell !■« from IJJ 
CcJt Ircrr Fl.juder I c?<).2S?4ffl92 
law-Ml Eaurrn wrlcomir, yt u bacij 


London kart Statin 

128 Wgmore Si.. London W.l 
AD mt^o« Oecfct Cardi Acoepied 
Tab 437 47 41 ! 4742 
12 noon - 


* AMSTERDAM* 

« Exsrt SvrvtoL 227837 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SBtVICE 
IN NEW YORK 


LA VENTURA 


PRESTIGE 


MEW YORK ESCORT SERVICE 
212-888-1666 


London boon Semes 
TeL 988 3163 . ’ 08833 3163 


IN NEW YORK MADRID INT’L 

TEL- 212-737 3291. ^ JSS. ^cards 


ROMI i OUB BOORS ESCORT 

& Guide Swviw.Tst: 06/589 3604. S89 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm} 


CHBMA E5COJT SERVICE. 

SI Beauchamp Place, London 5W1 
Tel- 01 584 6513 '2749 (4-12 pm) 


LONDON 


BELGRAVIA 

Escort Sorvica. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

6UPE ®VKE from 5pm 
BOTTBU1AM (0) 10254155 
IHE HAGUE (6) 7040 79 96 


gmvabcort 

SBtVKE. Tat 46 1 1 51 


ZURICH 


GBCVA • BEAUTY* 
ESCORT SBtVICL 
TEL- 29 51 30 





AMSTTOAM ESCORT SERVICE GS * VA "i5“??fff2F r SBWa 
TBj 020-366655 T,t 36 29 37 


i. i Si-' ' [ T ;• v. y. r? -s ' 

l»i 


Lid 


CAROUM ESCORT SERVICE 
Td: 01/252 61 74 


LONDON JAPAM5E SCORT S*. j FRANKFURT - PETRA Euod i Timrt 
vice. Tel: 01 821 06Z7. I Sw«k«. TeL 069 / ofl 24 05 


Porfmon Escort Agency 


67 CM tom StMOt, 
London W1 

Tot: 436 3724 or 486 1158 
AB major ovdrt cards oceaptod 


ZURICH 


GBCVA FIRST BCORT SBtVTO 
For Woofcond + Travel, PleoH 
R— onro. Tab 022/32 34 IS 




'Lone of the best guides in Engfii. And 
mon Dieu, it was done by an American. 
There will be consternation in high piaa 

- Frank PriaL The New 'fork Tin 



INrawr far otJ owdsan, 


SMMdha'i Efcort 8 Gokfe Sorvica 
Mrto 1 Foingfe. Tofc 01/57 75 96 


GENEVA -BBT 
ESCORT SERVICE 
TH.- 022/86 15 95 


if.i 


•rrr,.-i iiMi 1 ,’. 1 ' .■ ->■1---'.'. Jpr 


1 
























































mp>' 

in 


ivruKv ino\ vi. iikhai.d tkibi \e. tiii ksd n m u <>. i« 


,1V!: 1 ! K..J 

„ . . "■ 1 , u 

•**«* llSti}.- 1 ,- ‘ ‘ 

;n* 

*"'k*u m j.:; 

^•ca ;u- i C; 

^nulKjH.,. '.'•‘•.I, 

Mi At::iir, ^ 

W m!v 

> r V\, 
ilLu : v. .) ■ ; „. ; j ** ■?•' 

hui Mr ^ 

won*. 5v». ; . lv , . '‘"t- . 

irffw-Ufe 

»'* H'litn.iW,- CM,p :? ‘ 

“llta-n W \ tf . tll j. 

Uv*tu{ ;i! !; -7,- 

brwcuM.!/- . 

He van! u-v ....... . . 

‘ '•<' 

VulctlM' . ,0 

^,i 4r;s;t^ 

IftjfcllC! j..' llV| 

!** 4 , " i, ‘ "■•v* rij;* I,, v 

EES W; 

*™* 41V MMlV ' 

Jetfciiu* .iro a.-!. cr . ip : ‘*V- 
taumv Mlhin,*. ■*? 

vicar pmu-!\ 1 l! ' 

Amiv jni'. . i , is»Tftv V ”, ; . . 
»«* fciiev*.! iV.jwpjIj J: 
•ear f\p.n. u! ;Jj ; ^ v ; 

brad-. were ■ms ;i j 
jrtwcil !P i-.v;. VJl v 

MU* 

IK HtatCMm Vifelci 

iv w,, 

m.’xr.-r.i:; .. 

. frt ftilki.1.!.' h’i . 

.- MlHatRj'.i :i . ’1 f.-r 

.:rOIM. I ii:u j 1:-' 

nt^srlr. 

Smidi Vrahia 
SUM! Million forfr; 

VW.VSI I'Nt -II'N - 

Kj» ly. . 

.. •• ■ .. 

/_S*twi V. . • ' -j 

- . WfjRWV 

I»n •• s •.. 

ilterr »v>' ■ '• 

ihsttMs .• ■ 

< ;K»!XL ■W'lli ■ 1 

V ...- v- - 

t • JUiw.» ■■: 

»' fcfl'E ■*•■■.■ - - 

= to it**: u.:-. i 



Ineorcu^' 

«d- 

• v 

jrfT fr ■-”•» 

V .. ... ' V,-; 
W?5v 1 , u 

fk'STi •* :■« 

AiOp; 


t . • rtff* 




SCIENCE 



IN BRIEF 


By William J. Broad 

‘ Nw yurt Tuwt Serruv 

I ON DON —A team of sa srien- 
/ lists has parked a controversy 
■with its contemioo that onto! the 
most valuable fossils in Britain is a 
fate. 

At the center of the dispute is a 
priceless sperimen-of Archaeopter- 
yx that has been considered since 
the 19th century to be die earliest 
known bird. Kept undo- lock and 
key at the British Museum of Natu- 
ral History, it is now being put 
through a battery of tests by muse- 
um scientists in an attempt to prove 
its authenticity. 

The controversy started with a 
scholarly paper pabtfsbed in March 
in The BndshJotimal of Photogra- 
phy, in which six scientists, includ- 
ing the astronomer Sr Fred Hoyle, 
asserted that the feather impres- 
sions of the museum’s specimen 
had been fabricated in a I9tb-cea- 
tury hoax. 

.“It's rubbish,”' Dr. Cyril A. 
Walker, a paleontologist at the mu- 
seum, said of Sir Fred’s contention. 
“Absolutely ludicrous,” added Dr. 
Angela C Miner, a senior scientist 
in the museum's department of fos- 
sil amphibians, reptiles and birds. 

Museum scientists said they 
might have ignored the charges but 
for the specter of an old a*n<fai. In 
1953, toe skull of the celebrated 





— - 

•* *- r ' 


•' • -C' ■ ■ ■ : '1 


^ X - - • ^4 


K.;:> - 

r -' v v^ v - 


• . , i- ’ . ' I? - i ! 

. ■ ; -r:x :r*. 





The Natural History Museum’s Archaeopteryx. 

Piltdown man was found to be a have planted the FQtdown bones to 
fake after gracing museum cases discredit British scientists, who had 
for neariy haul a century. Sir Arthur ridiculed his belief in spiritualism. 
Conan Doyle, the creator of Sfeer- The world’s leading authority on 
Jock Holmes, was recently said to Archaeopteryx, Dr. John Ostrom 


of Yale University, said the muse- 
um had little to worry about in the 
current dispute. “I am mystified as 
to why the accusers put themselves 
out on a limb,” he said. “Maybe Sir 
Fred has been looking at the stars 
too long." 

Archaeopteryx (“ancient wing”) 
is one of the world's most famous 
fossfls, hailed as proof of Darwin’s 
theory of evolution. With the body 
and tep4h of a small dinosaur and 
the feathered wings of a bird, it was 
cited as a missing evolutionary link 
between reptiles and birds. 

In 1861, two years after the pub- 
lication of Darwin’s “The Origin of 
Species," the fim specimen of Ar- 
chaeopteryx was found in a Ger- 
man quarry of lim estone estimated 
to be ISO million years old. The 
British museum added it to its col- 
lection in 1862, and it' has since 
been considered one of its most 
valuable possessions. The fossil, 
whose value has been estimated at 
several million dollars, is kept -un- 
der strictest security, while the 
public is shown a fiberglass replica. 
In their paper. Sir Fred ana col- 
leagues, based mainly at Univenity 
College in Cardiff, Wales, cited evi- 
dence from recent photos of the 
fossil to suggest that the feather 
impressions occurred on material 
that was much finer-grained than 
the underlying rock and chat some 
of the impressions looked like 


“flattened blobs of chewing gum." 

One of the authors. Dr. Chandra 
Wickramasinghe, an astrophysi- 
cist, has been quoted in a British 
newspaper as saying the purported 
hoax was carried out by someone 
who “made a paste of crushed lime- 
stone from the same period, 
smeared it around a genuine reptile 
fossil and then imprinted the feath- 
ers” 

The six accusers die as further 
proof of a hoax the fact that the 
fossil’s slab and counterslab are not 
mirror images. (Workers at the 
German quany said they split a 
sheet of rock in two and found the 
Archaeopteryx inside.) 

To defend the fossil, scientists at 
the museum said they wen; prepar- 
ing a comprehensive paper that 
they would submit, with new pho- 
tographs, to the respected British 
scientific journal Nature or to Sci- 
ence, its American equivalent- The 
charges will be completely demol- 
ished. with evidence from chemical 
and other types of tests, they said. 

The fossQ’s authenticity is evi- 
dent even without chemical tests. 
Dr. Walker said. He said none of 
the arguments offered as proof of a 
boax were threatening, noting that 
fossil specimens often have differ- 
ences in the texture of their sur- 
faces and that the slabs are not 
mirror images because the fossil 


was not split exactly down the mid- 
dle. 

The clincher, he argued, is that 
the accusers m their paper noted 
only two Archaeopteryx specimens 
(found in 186! and in 1877), when 
in fact five skeletons have been 
found at different sites. 

The most recent specimen, in- 
voked as especially telling evi- 
dence, was identified in 1972 by 
Dr. Ostrom. It had been uncovered 
in 1855 and originally identified as 
a pterodactyl, an extinct Dying rep- 
tile without feathers, but dose in- 
spection by Dr. Ostrom revealed 
faint feather imprints that make it 
more likely to be an Archaeopter- 
yx. 

The original discovery. Dr. 
Walker noted, occurred six years 
before the purported hoax ana four 
years before the publication of 
Darwin's theory. 

He added that none of the accus- 
ers was a paleontologist, suggesting 
that this might explain why some of 
their observations are ofT the mark. 

As for alleged photographic evi- 
dence of fakery. Timothy W. Par- 
menter, a photographer at the mu- 
seum. said none of the accusers' 
photographs showed anything new. 

He also noted that one of ihe 
photos in the original article had 
been printed upside down. 

“It’s another nail in the coffin,” 
he said. 


Study Predicts Trace Gases Will Cause Serious Climate Change 


■ By James Gletck 

New York Time/ Senior ' 

N EW YORK r— Tiny quanti- 
ties of more than 30 rare gases 
threaten to warm the earth’s atmo- 
sphere even more rapidly over the 
next 50 years than carbon dioxide 
will, according to a study by a team 
of atmospheric scientists. 

Their findings reinforce a grow- 
ing conviction among scientists' 
that the trace gases, many of them 
industrial byproducts, are playing a 
leading role in (he “greenhouse ef- 
fect,” the warming of the earth as 
less and less heat is able to escape 
the atmosphere. 

The new feport, the first, to ana- 
lyze these trace gases systematical- 
ly, predicts that they will more than 
double the warming effect of car- 
bon dioxide in the decades to come. 

‘'You now' have to think of a 
change that's two or three times 
bigger than we thought due to car- 
bon dioxide alone,” said Ralph J. 
Cicerone, director of atmospheric 
studies at the National Center for 
Atmospheric Research, where 
much of the research was done. 

Recent U. S. government studies 
of the greenhouse effect have coo- 
cluded that the Earth wOfsee pro- 
found climatic changes tn the next 
two decades. The level of . the 
oceans is expected to rise as the 
icecaps mek, and changes in weath- 
er patterns are expected to cause 
costly disruptions m agriculture 
• Unlike carbon dioxide, a prod- 
uct of combustion that has been 
rising steadily since the Industrial. 
Revolution, most of the trace uses 
are new to the atmosphere Most 
were not even measured there be- 
fore the 1960s, and even now most 
are rarer than one part per billion. 

But they have proven effective at 
trapping beat. A single molecule of 
some chlorofluorocarbon* absorbs 
as much heat as 10,000 molecules 
of carbon dioxide, the study says. 

John S: Hoffman, director of 
strategic studies for the Federal 
Environmental Protection Agency, 
said be considered the study very; 
significant in alerting scientists to 
the effects of gases that had not 
previously been considered. 

The report explores the chemical 
interactions of trace gases in the 
upper aimo^ihere and the climatic 
effects that can be expected as the 
wanning takes bold. In both of 


these areas, ihe authors stress, un- 
certainty remains. 

- - It is still .unclear, for example, 
why the long-anticipated warming 
has not yet been measurable over 
the. random year-to-year fluctua- 
tions in climate. Some have sug- 
gested that particles from volcanic 
eruptions have anted the effect 
by producing a temporary cooling. . 

The new report suggests that the 
greenhouse effect has already 
caused a “perturbation” in the di- 
mate but that the oceans have ab- 
sorbed much of the heat, cushion- 
ing the change. One of the authors, 
V. Ramanathan, said the oceans 
created a time lag of 20 to 80 years. 

It was Dr. Ramanathan who 10 
years ago first proposed a. green- 
house role for certain trace gases. 
Sinre then, following research into 
a variety of gases, the idea has tak- 
en hold Bat the debate ait the 
greenhouse effect, and on whether 
any thing can be done to stem it, has 
continued to be framed largely in 
lerms ol carbon dioxide. 

Fart of the explanation for the 
surprising role of trace gases lies in 
tberr peculiar light-absorbing abili- 
ties. Sunlight heats the earth at a 
.wide range of wavelengths, mainly 
those of -viable light. Die beat es- 
capes as invisible infrared radiation 
in a narrow blind of the spectrum 

— through a narrow window, in 
effect Carbon dioxide absorbs ra- 
diation only at some of those wave- 
lengths, so no matter bow much 
carbon dioxide there is, it blocks 
only part of the window. 

The trace gases that pose die 
greatest threat are the ones that 
block. the rest of the window, ac- 
cording to the study. They absorb 
radiation at precisely the wave- 
lengths where the atmosphere has 
been transparent. 

Among the gases the study sin- 
gles out for greatest concern, the 
most plentiful is methane, a prod- 
uct of organic decay and the major 
constituent of natural gas. Meth- 
ane's greenhouse role has been 
studied seriously for several years, 
but scientists do not know how to 
explain its rapid rate of increase in 
the atmosphere. I percent to 2 per- 
cent a year. 

Sources of methane include rice 
paddies and livestock, as well as 
leakage from natural gas wdls and 
pipelines. Bui the proportion Of 
methane is the atmosphere may 


also be indirectly raised through 
chemical reactions resulting from 
an increase in carbon monoxide, 
not in itself a greenhouse gas. 

Other important gases include 
nitrous oxide, released into the air 
from coal burning and from nitro- 
gen fertilization of soil, and a vari- 
ety of chlorofluorocarbons released 
from different industrial uses. 

Sonte of tte chlorofluorocarbons 

are the gases whose use in spray 
cans was banned by the United 
States in the 1970s because they 
were shown to deplete the ozone in 
the. upper atmosphere. Emissions 
of these gases declined, but are now 
growing again, the study found, be- 
cause they are being ured more for 
such essential purposes as refrig- 
eration, and because other coun- 
tries are uring them more. 

The researchers also singled out 
some rarer gases, such as bromotri- 
fluoromethane, used as a fire extin- 
guisher. 

Ozone contributes to the green- 
house effect, too, but its role is 
particularly hard to calculate. It 
reacts chemically with other gases, 
and its concentration seems likely 
to vary at. different altitudes. The 
study predicts that ozone will de- 
crease in the upper atmosphere and 
increase doser to the earth. 

Although the outlines of the 
greenhouse effect have become sci- 
entific orthodoxy in the last few 
decades, scientists and policy mak- 
ers continue to argue about the 
urgency of the problem. 

The Environmental Protection 
Agency issued a report in October 
1983 warning of “unprecedented” 
climate changes over the next cen- 
tury, beginning in a decade or two. 
By 2040, it estimated, global tem- 
peratures would increase by about 
3.5 degrees Fahrenheit, with dra- 
matic meets on the weather. 

The role of the trace gases was 
noted as a major uncertainty in the 
report The new study suggests that 
the wanning effect will be signifi- 
cantly greater than the agency had 
estimated. 

But three days after the 1983 
report appeared, the National 
Academy of Sciences Issued a re- 
port of its own, agreeing in sub- 
stance but not in tone. The acade- 
my report said that the world could 
expect serious and rapid climate 
changes by the end of this centoiy, 
but that there was no need for im- 
mediate action. 


President Ronald Reagan’s sci- 
ence advisor, George A. Keyword) 
2d, praised the academy report and 
criticized the EPA report as “un- 
necessarily alarmist” 

The chairman of the committee 
that produced the academy report. 
William A. Nierenberg of the 
Scripps Institute of Oceanography, 
said the report had taken full ac- 
count of the role of the trace gases. 
Although he said he had not yet 
seen the new study, he stressed that 
predicting the future growth of 
trace gases was very difficult 

The study’s authors — Dr. Ra- 


manathan, Dr. Cicerone, H. B. 
Singh and Jeffrey Kjehl, counter 
that they were deliberately conser- 
vative with their estimates. The re- 
port is to appear in the June issue 
of the Journal of Geophysical Re- 
search. 

"This problem is so enormous, 
with the potential global effects, 
that we’ve tried to do a very cau- 
tious, scholarly job,” Dr. Cicerone 
said. “We sweated blood over the 
trends in the concentrations of the 
trace gases that are actually being 
observed now and tried to see 
whether those trends would contin- 


“Greeohouse Effect” 
Estimate for 
The Year 2030 

Earth SwTact Twnparatim Chang* 
{In cuRxitetv* *K) 


pJf 2 1 

i i It 

nmrW- 

ir fr 

r li 

I <3 


New Microscope Photographs Atoms 

WASHINGTON (WP) — A new microscope capable of magnifying an 
object 300 million limes is giving scientists their first view of the atoms 
that make up ihe surface of ordinary objects. 

The microscope uses a newly discovered phenomenon, electron tunnel- 
ing, to make a picture of surface topography in such detail that every 
atom shows as a fuzzy ball or a bump, “what we’re seeing is absolutely 
remarkable,” said Gerd Binnig, one of the developers of the method at the 
IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, where ihe first devices were built. 

Called a scanning tunneling microscope, the device employs the 
phenomenon that occurs when two electrodes are brought close together 
but do not quite touch. If the electrodes touch, an electric current will 
(low from one to the other. Or. if the current is high enough, the electrons 
win have the energy to jump the gap as a spark. Bui. if the current is too 
low to spark, electrons can still cross the gap if it is small enough — only a 
few atomic diameters wide. Since the electrons lack the energy (front ihe 
voltage) to “jump over” the insulating barrier, physicists say thev arc 
“tunneling through” it- 

Ants Evolve Own Water Management 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — Every desert animal has to cope with a 
baste problem: scarcity of water. A species of large black ant that lives 
around Bangalore, in southern India, has evolved an ingenious method of 
harvesting dew, a Harvard University reports in National Geographic 
Research magazine. 

The five hot months of the year near Bangalore can pass with hardly a 
drop of rain. Light dew often forms early in the morning but evaporates 
in one to three hours. The ants have evolved a way of trapping the 
dispersed droplets each morning. 

Around the entrances to their underground colonies they pile feathers 
and dead ants. At night considerable moisture condenses in the piles. 
“Even on mornings when no dew is evident elsewhere, moisture is usually 
available for an hour or more cm the feathers and ant remains” said the 
Harvard scientist, Mark W. Moffett. As they leave the nest Tor their daily 
work, the ants spend 2 to 15 minutes sipping from this reservoir. 

Research Stations Pollute Antarctic 

LONDON (Reuters)— Pollution from research stations in Antarctica 
is harming the continent's fragile life forms, according lo a report in the 
British magazine New Scientist. 

The report, “Man’s Impact on the Antarctic Environment," quoted 
concents bases of countries such as Britain. Argentina and Chile on that 
continent, which is one and a half times bigger than the United Stales and 
98 percent covered in ice. Primitive life there, mostly tiny plants, worms 
and mites, is being damaged by the pollution, noise and waste from 
research bases, and some species could take several centuries to recover, 
the report says. 

Its authors, William Benninghoff of Michigan University, and William 
Bonner of the British Antarctic Survey, suggest that Antarctic operators 
prepare environmental assessments for their stations. “The greatest value 
of the Antarctic continent to mankind resides in the wealth of informa- 
tion it contains and yields about the planet Earth,” the report says. 

Hybrid "Whale-Dolphin Dies in Japan 

TOKYO (AP) — “Kuri,” the world's only offspring of a whale and a 
dolphin, has died of pneumonia at an aquarium in Kanag gwa prefecture 
south of Tokyo, the Japanese news agency Kyodo reported. 


- ' ' 


«- X+-. V' r V' J'. . ... .. 

WORLD OF BIG BUSINESS JETS 
SSfcMEETS THE LEADER. 









’ ’ ■ 

V •• >>-C ■ 


THE FALCON 900. 










In Bangkok 
the utmost in luxury is 
a business resort 
amidst 26 acres of gardens . 

HOTEL SIAM 
INTER* GONTMENTAL 





.»?**- - . : • ' I t .. 




THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL* 

•XINTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS 

. Srapatum Palace Property, Rama One Road, P.Q Box 2052, 252 9040/60, 
Telex: 61155. For reservations cad: Hong Kong: 5-8440311/3. 

Singapore: 2202476, Tokyo: 2150777, Omlta: 2640666 
• or call your-neafmt:lnter*Continenfcal sales office. 


A Falcon 900. demonstration flight January 15.1985. 

The Falcon 900 demonstrates leadership qua- 
lities in every important respect. First, it oners an 
extraordinary level of passenger comfort. All 
passengers wno flew In it are unanimous to praise 
the quietness and comfort amenities of a very 
lar^e cabin (2.34 m wide over 10 m long and 
1.87 m headroom). 

The Falcon 900. is a Leader in performance, 
too. With an effective range of 7,000 km (carr- 
ying 8 passengers and NBAA IFR reserves), it can 
easily fly from Paris to New York, from London 
to Abu Dhabi, from Tokyo to Jakarta. And the 
Falcon 900 can climb directly to 39,000 ft which 
puts it above international commercial air traffic. 
The Falcon 900 can cruise at up to Mach :85 
(904 km/h) and has been flown at 94% of the 
speed of sound In test flights. 

The Falcon 900 is also the Leader In effi- 
ciency. For long range operation, take-off weight 
is 20 tons, 10 tons less than Its closest competitor 
under the same conditions and with the same 


payload. Thanks to its latest-generation Garrett 
engines, its excellent aerodynamics and lighter 
weight, the Falcon 900*s fuel consumption is 
record-breakingly low: some 1/3 less than the 
above competitor, whose engine consumes 
almost as much fuel when idling on die runway as 
that of the Falcon 900 when cruising at Mach.80, 

These figures highlight the sophisticated 
aerodynamic design of the Falcon 900, utilizing 
Dassault computer technology developed for the 
famous Mirage fighters - an experience that’s u ni- 
que among producers of business jets. 

The Falcon 900 also scores first for safety. In 
the unlikely event that one engine should fail, the 
remaining two can easily supply the requisite 
thrust and maintain operation of the aircraft’s cri- 
tical systems. This level of security obviously can- 
not be matched by twin-jet aircraft, either now 
or in the future, whatever the developments in 
international regulations. 

If you would like to know more about the 


Falcon 900, please contact us for full information. 
It will be our pleasure to introduce you to the 
new Leader in the world of business aviation - the 
Falcon 900. 

Dassault International 

Please send me the Falcon 900 color brochure. □ i— ~ ! 
I would like a sales presentation. □ 5 1 

Name/Title: . 

Company i 

Address * j 

City .. .. Country I 

Zip Phone— 1 

Now flying a j 

Please return this coupon to Mr. Paul Delorme, i 

Dassault International - 27 rue du Professeur Pauchet , 
92420 Vaucresson - France - TeL (1) 741 .79.21 
Telex 203 944 Amadas. I 


Business takes off with Falcon. 




Page8 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


An Urgent Message To Ail Stockholders Of 


Gulf Resources & Chemical Corporation 


from 

The Stockholders Committee 
for Leadership and Maximum Value 


Dear Fellow Stockholders: 


Three years ago, a slate of dissident nominees led by Alan Clore 
gained control of the Board of Gulf Resources. 


The dissident nominees were elected, having run on a program 
they claimed would "afford GRE stockholders an opportunity to 
realize the maximum value underlying their GRE Stock." 


CLORE’S LEGACY: STAGNANT 
FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE 


Clore assumed control of Gulf Resources in mid-1982. The last full 
fiscal year of the previous management was 1981 . Compare the financial 
results of 1981 with the 1984 results under Clore: 


We believe the stock market price of Gulf Resources 
demonstrates the basic failure of the Clore slate to live up 
to their promise. We also believe the time has come for a 
new board, consisting of dedicated businessmen with sub- 
stantial Gulf Resources stockholdings, to make good on 
Clore’s failed promise. 


Revenues: 

Income from 
Continuing Operations: 

Stockholders Equity: 
Working Capital: 


$268.6 million 


$282.9 million 


$19.0 million 
$106.9 million 
$86.5 million 


$14.4 million 
$117.6 million 
$77.9 million 


THE CASE AGAINST CLORE 


• In the past three months, Alan Clore, Chairman of Gulf 
Resources, sold 396,425 shares at an average price of $15.56 per 
share. Included in this amount is Clore's sale of 92,600 shares on 
February 21 , 1985— the day before Gulf Resources publicly re- 
leased its 1984 fourth quarter results which showed a loss 
from discontinued operations of $12.2 million and a net loss 
of $7.7 million for the quarter. Such results reduced net income 
to $12.1 million for the full year, including a loss of $2.4 million 
from discontinued operations. Clore sold the remaining 303,825 
shares within four days after the financial results were reported. 


CLORE’S LEGACY: STAGNANT STOCK PRICE 
On April 30, 1982— the last trading day before the mailing of 
Clore's proxy statement for the 1982 proxy contest— Gulf Resources 
common stock closed at $18.88 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average 
closed at 848.36. 


Three years later, on April 23, 1985— the last trading day before 
our Stockholders Leadership Committee filed a Schedule 13D stating 
ownership of 5.95% of Gulf Resources common shares, the Gulf Re- 
sources common stock closed at $15.63, and the Dow Jones Industrial 
Average closed at 1,278.49. 


During the three year reign of Clore— who had promised to 
“realize maximum value’ 1 — Gulf Resources stock has actually 
fallen 17% while the Doinr Jones Industrial Average rose over 50%1 


• In each of the years since Clore took control, he has shown 
up for less (han 75% of all the Board and committee meetings he 
was supposed to attend. Gulf Resources stockholders in the mean- 
time have witnessed a revolving door procession of three Chief 
Executive Officers since Clore took over. 


WHAT WE WANT 


• Michael Edwardes-Ker is a British lawyer who is president of 
Clore’s private investment company. He has received $545,400 
from Gulf Resources for serving as Special Counsel to the Chair- 
man of the Board (Clore) and for legal services— all since the 1982 
proxy contest began. He is a director of Gulf Resources and does 
not own one single share of stock. 


Three years is long enough. We believe Clore has had every 
opportunity to restructure Gulf Resources for the benefit of stock- 
holders. We can’t understand why, after sixteen months, the 
stockholders were told, that, basically, the status quo was the 

best course of action. 


• Clore solicited stockholders’ support in his 1982 proxy contest 
by promising "to immediately cause GRE to retain a nationally recog- 
nized investment banker to study the assets held by the Company 
and to recommend alternative strategies for the redeployment of 
some or all of GRE’s assets." 


It wasn’t until sixteen months after Clore and his slate took 
control that a press release was issued stating that the Board "has 
determined that in view of current economic conditions and other 
matters it is in the shareholders' best interests that the Company 
continue to be operated substantially as at present . . ." 


As fellow investors, our money also is on the line. We own nearly 
$10 million in Gulf Resources stock. The Stockholders Leadership 
Committee’s nominees pledge to place the highest priority on pro- 
ducing real value for stockholders. Based on the experience of 
our nominees, the Committee believes that opportunities exist for 
Gulf Resources to consider a leveraged buyout, merger, partial 
liquidation of assets, spinoff of subsidiaries to stockholders,, and 
other corporate-related transactions that will create value and 
translate into a higher market price for all Gulf Resources 
stockholders. 


At no time has Gulf Resources informed the stock- 
holders of the “results” of the final report issued by their 
investment bankers. You, the stockholders, paid the investment 
bankers for this report. You, the stockholders, never got a 
chance to see it. 


We are not waging this proxy contest to win and then “do 
nothing." The only comfort we will ever receive from our 
success in this proxy contest will be a higher stock market 
price. Although we cannot predict future stock prices, we believe 
the investment community will agree with our dedicated approach 
to leadership and maximizing values. 


On behalf of the Stockholders Committee 
for Leadership and Maximum Value 



David B. McKane 
Co-Chairman 


Bengt Odner 
Co-Chariman 


TAKE ACTION NOW 


The Annual Meeting is on May 14 — only a few short days away. If you own your Gulf Resources 
stock in your own name, we urge you to call our proxy solicitor at the number listed to the right in 
order to phone in your proxy vote on our special toll-free number. If your shares are held in street- 
name at your brokerage firm, please call your stockbroker immediately and authorize him or her to 
execute a BLUE committee proxy on your behalf. Then call our proxy solicitor at the number to the 
right to insure that your proxy has been received. 


Carter 


ORGANIZATION, INC. 


116 John Street, 26th Floor 
New York, New York 10038 
800-221-3343 (toll-free) 
212-619-1100 (collect) 


n.i 

*■ 


tv* 

W,," 






' ."•?5rSP r 







It cralOd^ ertbunc, 

UU»l«Ulb>n lrtTtar.amnWVaiUiifMiif'M 


TRAVEL IN FRANCE 


.ion 


ft last fills j 

tffrianciai ! 


19 million 

t4miUion 

^(IrhiHion 

^ihiuliion 


muting o* 
iNOurCes 


•yilMbfwc 
Pvfatins 
Gull Hi - 
Industrial 

M n t Md to 




.fcW ew-\ 

Hf of SfOl h- 

with*, me' 

r wii the 


Own rto.v '• 

rtty on r*- ■•'• 

W*noni:f ’ i-' 

8$ i\ v 
Q0r pa?- ■- 
aWPfC-. .:•••• 

r*lu« and 
(•sources 

J thlM: 

from our 

A market 

Wi? t’vl:? ■' 1 


'ttliet.* 




A SPECIAL REPORT 

THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Page 9 


The Change in Bordeaux 


By Frank J. Prut! 


P AUIlXAC — Some years 
ago, Alexis Uchine the 
winemaker erected signs 
along the highway leading 
to his chateau, Prietn^-Lichine, is 
the Med oc, nonh of Bordeaux. The 
signs were large but hardly dis- 
tasteful. They amply noted that the 
PrieurA was just up ahead, that visi- 
tors were wdemne and that wine 
could be purchased. 

The other chateau owners — in 
fact most of the Bordeaux wine, 
community — were incensed. Even 
if there was no law against roadside 
signs, even tasteful ones, well, it 
just wasn't done. One entertained 
one's exporters and agents, celebri- 
ties visiting the wine country and 
an occasional journalist. Bat the 
general public? Good heavens! 

Wine bad always been some- 
thing of a gentleman’s game — or 
so the old-timers recall it The Bor- 
delais, with their long and same- 
times legitimately aristocratic tra- 
dition, were simply hot timed In to 
modern huckstering. . 

Mr. Uchine has spent most of his 
adult life in the MAdoc, never ceas- 
ing to rail at the indifference of .his 
colleagues to modem selling tech- 
niques. “Do you realize,” he says, 
his voice quivering melodramati- 
cally, “that there is no sign, not 
one, showing the way out of the 
center of Bordeaux to the wine 
country?" 

To some extent Bordeaux is not 
to be blamed. The Bordelais have 
been making wine for 1,000 years 
or so, but have had to contend with 
aggressive tourists only for the last 
10. Look at a map. Bordeaux is not 
on any important land route. In the 
Middle Ago, pilgrims stopped off 
nowand then on their way to Santi- 
ago de Compostdla in Spain, but 
for the most part. Bordeaux has 
been a maritime city with its back 
to Europe and its eyes on the sea 
and the lands- beyond. Its wines 
have always been more popular it 
London than in Paris. 

Bordeaux’s winemakers have al- 
ways traveled the world in search oT 
customers, but until fairiy recently, 
the idea that the customers would 
travel ro see them trawkf have been 
unthinkable. 

Slowly — very slowly — Mr. 
Uchine and a few other growers, 
among them Philippe de Roth-, 
sclrikl at Chateau Mouton-Roth- 
schild, began to convince their col- 
leagues that casual vision can be 
an important pan of the wine busi- 








Sypa 

Philippe de Rothschild 

. > 

□ess. As a result, there are currently 
dozens of wine chStcaus hanging 
out welcome signs, offering tours 
and happily selling a couple of bot- 
tles or a couple of cases to the 
passersby. 

Bordeaux still is not Burgundy. 
Beaune, the center of the Burgundy 
wine country, is three easy hours 
from Paris an the automate. There 
are plenty of hotels and restaurants 
and everyone speaks English. Wdl, 
almost everyone. Bordeaux is 400 
miles (640 ktioroeters) from Paris 
and it is not an easy town for a 
first-time tourist who has not made 
any advance plans. 

. What’s more, the city of Bor- 


deaux is not the wine country of 
Bordeaux. The great chateaus of 
PawUac — Mouton, Laiour and 
Lafiie are 30 miles to the north; Sl 
E milios is 30 miles to the east and 
Sau terms is 30 mDes due south. 
There are plenty of good hotels and 
restaurants in the aty but they are 
fiill in woefnlly short supply out 
among the vines. 

The best way to visit Bordeaux is 
to plan in advance. Select the cha- 
teaus you want to visit Determine 
whether or not they receive visitors 
and whether or not someone will be 
able to speak year language if it 
isn't French. The Comite Inter- 
prof essionel des VxDS de Bordeaux, 
commonly known as the CTVB, can 
provide information on most of the 
principal wine areas within the 
Bordeaux region. Most visitors stay 
in Bordeaux and range out into the 
wine country to see their favorite 
chateaus. Unless yon are wealthy 
enough to hire a car and driver, a 
Ratal car is a necessity. Hertz, Avis 
and Europcar have agents at the 
Bordeaux airport ana near the 
Ga re Sl Jean, Bordeaux’s main 
railroad station. The flight from 
Paris, by die way, is just an hour: 
the train trip is about four and a 
half hours. With the new ainoroute, 
the drive down from Paris is about 
six hours. 

In his “Guide to the Wines and 
Vineyards of France," Mr. Iichine 
offers ah itinerary for a three-day 
visit to Bordeaux. On the first day, 
after checking into a hotel, there is 
plenty of time for a drive through 
the Ham MAdoc. Route D2 con- 
nects the city with the most famous 
red-wine towns in the world — 
Margaux, SL Jnlien, Pauillac and 
Sl Est&pbe. Most of the chateaus 
along this route welcome visitors, 
but only a few, Mr. Uchine’s 
PrieurA among them, are open on 
Saturdays and Sundays. The peat 
wine museum at Chateau Mouton- 
Rothschfld is one of the highlights 
of this trip but it is open only by 
appointment. A letter in advance is 
best, but sometimes the hotel con- 
verge can make arrangements on 
short notice. 

Lafite-Rothschlld, Motiton- 
Rothschild. Margaux and Laiour 
are the highlights of any trip in the 
MAdoc, but so are Louoenne, in Sl 
Y zans, and Beychevefle in Sl Ju- 
lieol Their sweeping vistas of vine- 
yards and the Gironde River are 
unforgettable. 

In visiting the Bordeaux wine 
country, it is important to remem- 
(Cootimjed on Phge 13) 


T - ^ 

ik-*: -4t*j • • 



■ • . 

V i v 
'>- V. $ h 


.s'* - ■ _ / V-** " v 

• - ; J • ,‘v ■- -- ' > 

I 




. 

. . • 


- . 

- • ■ tv • . 


? .. 




V 

' i:-.- - ■*- - % 

*■ __ ->■ 

Vr^’ 

'T-- ’ 

•• . 


•i.w - y/1 
. • 

' , -< Vl . .. 

* 


Geometric patterns in tbe gardens at VOlandry. 


When the Garden Outshines the Chateau 



By Barbara Befl 

V ’ ILLANDRY —Touring the splendid halls of too 
many of even the most beautiful of France’s Loire 
Valley cMteaux in the space of a few hours or a 
single weekend tends to, induce a malady known as 
“being chSteau-ed out" Attention wavers, perception dims 
and one longs for a breath of fresh air. 

Happily, country air and vast space under peaceful skies 
await at Villandry, the one place in the Loire Valley with 
gardens much more spectacular than the chateau they ad- 
join. Visitors here are encouraged to wander at will on gravel 
paths past ornamental hedges trimmed into such elaborate 
shapes as hearts atwf daggers, along nx)at5 and canals where 
swans swim and catfish sun themsdves near the surface and, 
in ViH an dry’s remarkable kitchen garden, among cabbages 
and beets planted in colorful, geometric patterns. 

The historic three-tiered gardens of ViUandry, 20 kOome- 
ters ( 12 miles) west of the dty of Tours facing the Cher River, 
also include a lake, an herb garden, masses of wdl- tended 
flowers, more than 1,000 lime and fruit trees and even a 
maze. 


Fountains, from which gardeners originally filled their 
watering cans, are so numerous that, as in a Moorish garden 
in Spain, one is rarely out of hearing range of gently 
splashing water. Facing many of them are wooden benches, 
each sheltered by its own rose- and jasmin-covered arbor, 
inviting visitors to rest read or simply absorb the color and 
serenity of the gardens as church bells ring from the tower of 
the neighboring Romanesque church. . 

Unlike many of its neighbors, ihe chateau of Villandry has 
always been privately owned and the personalities of its 
owners have given it a special, idiosyncratic character. Jean 
le Breton, financier and minister to Francois I who built the 
Renaissance structure in 1536, was knowledgeable in both 
architecture and garden design. To add a dash of architectur- 
al piquancy, he gave its residence wings of slightly differing 
lengths and even “misaligned" the windows of the facade 
facing the courtyard so that they remain today distinctly off 
center. 

From the beginning, the chflteau was upstaged by its 
gardens. As early as 1570, the cardinal of Aragon reportedly 
wrote to the pope that he had seen in VUlandry’s kitchen 
garden “finer salad vegetables than in Rome.” This kitchen 
garden was of a type originated in the Middle Ages by 


French ntonks and common throughout the country In the 
, 16th century. 

Tbe gardens are now unique in France and classified by 
the government as a historical treasure. Temporarily lost 
when the chateau's 19th-century owners tore them out to 
follow the fashion with an English landscaped garden, the 
original gardens were reconstructed and replanted early in 
this century by Dr. Joachim Carvallo, a Spanish-born re- 
search physician married to an American steel heiress. 

Dr. Carvallo, who based bis works on old plans and 
drawings, placed tbe kitchen garden just under tbe drawing- 
room windows of the chateau, where 16th-ceutuiy lords 
wanted their vegetables planted so that they could personal- 
ly supervise species, such as the tomato, recently brought to 
Europe from the Americas. 

The energetic Dr. Carvallo installed a Moorish ceiling 
from Spain in one room of bis Chilean, brought to it a 
collection of Spanish paintings, part of which remains for 
visitors to see, and restored the building’s original facade. He 
also founded the French association of owners of historical 
dwellings, called Demeure Historique. and was one of the 
(Continued on Page 12) 


Ballooning Offers 
Earthly Pleasures 
And Machicolations 



"• " v * 


‘ , • V- . yr+q C — { 4. _ . 1 


By Katherine Kriorr 

B EAUNE — It’s not exactly a bird’s eye view, but it 
comes close, and it is about as tranquil and unhur- 
ried a vacation as you can find. If you have already 
driven and trekked or ridden a barge through the 
Burgundy wine country and the Loire Valley chateaux 
region, try seeing them from a hot-air balloon. 

Buddy Bombard, an American pilot and sailor and the 
head of “Buddy Bombard’s Great Balloon Adventures,” 
offers short stays is the two areas that include accommoda- 
tions in good hotels, fine food and wine, shopping and 
earthbound sightseeing, as well as daily balloon flights. 

Tbe balloons, decorated with huge, brightly colored flow- 
ers, take off and land in some of the most beautiful country- 
side in France, in the shadow of some of its most famous 
ch&teanx and near the vineyards that produce Meursanll, 
Montrachet, Aloxe-Corton and many other memorable 
wines. How else Can a tourist truly see, close up, the machico- 
lations of a Chilean, the ancient tiles on a 1 4ti>-century tower 
or the graphic patterns of miles of vineyards? 

These balloon trips require no experience, and no dare- 
devil streak; participants have included children and elderly 
people, and, m one case, a woman in a wheelchair. The most 
strenuous part of the trip is climbing, with the help of 
footholds, into the wicker basket (Bombard does recom- 
mend that women wear ducks), and of course eating and 
drinking. Fear of heights does not operate in balloons, and, 
in fact, one hardly feds motion. And the balloons generally 
stay dose to the ground, unless hardier travelers want to 
explore the heights. 

As for weather and speed. Bombard promises little of 
both. The balloons, each of which is directed by an experi- 
enced pilot and trucked by a ground crew in a mini-bus, take 
off only in winds of 8 knots or less. Winds are carefully 
monitored during the trip, and the company operates tbe 
latest weather-tracking equipmenL Bad weather during the 
May-to-Octobcr season is rarely a problem in Burgundy and 
the Loire Valley, as most winds calm down toward late 
afternoon and evening when the balloon rides take place. If 
weather prevents a balloon ride, Bombard makes it up as 
soon as possible during (he tour by flying more than once a 
day. 

The larger balloons accommodate a pilot with six passen- 
gers; other balloons take four passengers. AD are ferried to 
the takeoff place in a mini -bus, which meets the balloons at 
their various landings. 

Although balloon flights cannot be plotted with the pred- 
skm of anplanc rides, Bombard says that the pilots an 
careful to guide the sightseeing by choosing tbe right takeoff 
area, then using winds and tbe burners properly. 

“If you're good, you can land exactly where yew want to, " 
be said. “The pilots always try to give people what they come 



,.*V *- • W/ 







An array of cheeses in a Savoyard store. 


In Savoy, an Ideal Blending of Food, 
Lakes, Mountains and Vineyards 


By Patricia Wells 

C HAMBER Y — They're tiny vineyards, most 
of them barely known, nestled at the foot- 
hills of the Alpine stretch that sweeps down 
toward the sparkling Lac du Beurget south- 
west of Geneva. From towns like Aimavigne, Saint- 
Andre-l es-Marcb es and Brison-Saint-Jnnoccnt come 
many of the crisp, light white wines of Savoy — 
Roussettc de Savoie, Seyssel and the seldom-seen 


Fhoto/Tba Beobcid 5oaety 


for.” This getting as close to cMteaux ana their 
carefully laid -out gardens as- they possibly can, mid even 
nearly touching down on water and historic bridges — 
■{Continued on Next foge) 


These are tbe sort of wines wine writers often write 
off as “amusing,” at best But when traveling about 
France, most of us aren't necessarily looking for 
rapturous, self-important wines.- We just want a wine 
that makes perfect sense when it’s drunk with the food 
that springs naturally from the same land — in this 
case, a crispy fnture of local perchetles or goujon, a 
sturdy mountain Beaufort, wands of cured sausages 
flavored with the local marc de Savoie. 

Set aside a day or two for roaring the northern edge 
of Savoy, be sure to include a leisurely drive around 
the Lac du BourgeL Chart the course to include a visit 
to a local market, and take in a restaurant or two to 
discover the region’s lake fish, superb cheese and 
wines. 

The tour ought to include a visit to Aimavigne and 
the cellars of NoSI Dupasquier. Here, as generations of 
Dupasquiers before mm, the winemaker tends the 
family’s 7 hectares (about 17 acres), a patch of vines 
set along a sleep mountain incline. He makes a lovely 
wine, one of the best I’ve sampled in the region. U's a 
pond era Rousseue de Savoie, called Marestd (pro- 
nounced Ma-ray-td) made entirely from the day 
white aitesse grape. 

“It’s not reaDy a grape that growers love,” explains 
Mr. Dupasquier os he uncorks a bottle in his spotless 


cellar, a series of rooms arranged like a tittle Savoyard 
museum and filled with old farm implements, butter 
chums and ancient wooden kegs. 

The aitesse is not a very productive grape, so yields 
are low, and it’s a delicate one to vrnify. requi ring 
attention and patience. Bui in the hands of a careful 
man like Mr. Dupasquier, it produces a golden, aro- 
matic wine wilh plenty of flavor. lots of finesse, and 
overtones of honey. 

Also for sampling in the Dupasquier cellar: the light 
and rangy bkmc de Savoie “Jacquere," and a variety of 
reds, including the local Pinot, Gamay and Mondeuse, 
uncomplicated wines that go well with the local cheese 
and chamaerie. 

In the compact Savoyard town of Seyssel, which is 
sliced is half by the Rhone, there's a wonderful Rous- 
sel te de Seyssel to be found in the tasting rooms of 
Varichon el Gere. Therr roussetre, agpd in oak barrels 
for at least six months, is a golden, refreshing wine, 
also made solely from the ahesse grape. The house, 
which offers a variety of wines, each with a different 
character, is very proud of its Royal Seyssel, a bubbly 
methode c hampenoise white. 

Despite my tendency to rqect outright any bubbly 
wine that isn’t true champagne, tins one tasted surpris- 
ingly good, and although I didn't find the taste of 
truffles that some speak of. Royal Seyssel is worth 
trying when spotted on a local wine list 

It’s too bad that Varichon et Clerc is dosed on 
Mondays, when tbe village market is in full swing. On 
market day, fishmongers, cheese merchants, butchers 
and produce vendors set up shop along the road that 
tumbles downhill into the Rhone, and everyone st » me 
to be walking about town with a giant courom w, a 
crown-shaped loaf or bread, under his arm. Make a 
(Continued on Next Page) 









Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON TRAVEL IN FRANCE 


La ligne de cceur 
defied. 


Ballooning Offers 
Earthly Pleasures, 
Machicolations 


Van Gogh Aura Surrounds Last Retreat 


By Linda Hales 




The Freds heart lines, 
une nouwelle ligne 
de bijoux en or jaune et 
cceurs paves de Drillants. 
Fred adore 
teshistoiresde cceur. 


(Continued From Preriom Page) 

sometimes with several balloons in formation. Daily 
schedules for most of the trips include sightseeing — 
parks, chateaux, ancient wine cellars — and shopping 
in the morning, followed by lunch in the hold, a 
balloon ride in late afternoon and a late “picnic". 
I (actually an elaborate buffet dinner) in different his- 
toric sites. 


A" 


UVERS-SUR-OISE — The view from the 
window was a frequent theme in Vincent 

L van Gogh’s correspondence, mostly to 
his brother Ibfio. In one letter he wrote, 


900 pamrinff , and that [o his brother on whom he Gacbct's house is at 82. tue du Docteur Cachet; it 

depended for financial support. cannOt be lOUTCd. 

Van Gogh retreated to Auvers to the care of Dr. The cafe across from the tnauie. In Van 

Paul Gachet in May 1890, after he departed from Gogh's time, a was a working man’s haunt named 
the San Rfany asylum Pissarro lived nearby in Ravoux's, and Van Gogfr wok bU meals there. 
Poutoise and Ckn nni» and Cbarlcs-Fran^ois Dau- Now the Matson de Van Gogh, it is ah inviting, if 
bigny *l«n worked in the area. low-key place offering cafe and restaurant fare. A 


In Burgundy, the tour’s base is the Hfltri dc la Postc 



FRED 

lOAILLlEP 


f'J Jf Pj*r l.t 2e.. >L- Cln»lj?’ /■>. C hjr.a\ £ I Kyr 

II t -1 «fc- U L' - »y) ■!nr..rti‘>4to..' <Jfln • 40'. 

IN' jr o. M r . 1 1 G- ,.«■ .Er-.*!. Hi- -Htvo- .Cuu- .Ne* l.m 


the week, and at the Domaine de Beanvois in the 
second half. Tours leave from the H6td CriDon in 
Paris. 

In the nine years since the balloons have operated in 
the Burgundy region, they have become a familiar 
right for many local poysans. 

They float like fairyland apparitions above brown- 
stone farmhouses and farmland dotted with sheep and 
cows, with the burners occasionally flaring above the 
wicker baskets and against the sunset. 

When they land near a village, they bring out most 
of the children and a lot erf the adults, too; die balloon 
operators serve soft drinks to the kids, and trine to the 
adults, and this allows the travelers to get closer to the 
local people than on most other kinds of trips. 

These trips are not cheap, and participation is 
limited. They generally operate from early May to late 


a long time before sunrise, with nothing but the 
morning star, winch looked very lag.” 

The morning star is possibly rho only thing Van 
Gogh could have seen from his final window, m the 
rented roam two floors above a cafe wherehe spent 
the Iasi two months of Ms tife. The window, angled 
toward the sly, is bardy one foot by two, slightly 
less than one-fifth of a square meter, too *m»fi 
even for the tiny, cramped room. Beyond the 
exposed Gghtbtdb that now hangs from the ceiling, 
the window is the only source of that crucial 
Impressioaisi dement — fight. It is perhaps from 
this startling contrast that the roam at Auvers 
draws its greatest poignancy. 

Anvers, a village 36 kflometers (22J miles) from 
Pari &wj^t he Last place that Van Gogh painted. 

his brilliantly colored “Paysage au Soled Levant.” 
Thai painting sold two weeks agj in New York for 
S9.9 million. When Van Gogh was buried in the 
Auvers cemetery, be had sold only one of his nearly 


In Auvers. Van Gogh completed 70 paintings, 
including the marie bedecked with flags, his pro- 
found portrait of the doctor, which he described as 
conveying “the heartbroken expression of our 
tunes," and the massive 12th-century church on 
the road that climbs out of town. 

The road leads to the Adds he painted and in 
which, mi July 27, 1890, be shot himself. Van 
Gogh, who survived for two days longer, was 
buned in the cemetery beside the odds. 

Auvers h»< chang ed liule tb^n_ nninn* 


many of the Seine valky sites painted by Renoir, 
Manet, Monet and others. They have borne the 


Manet, Monet and others. They have borne lh 
brunt of urbanization. And there are no crowds. 


The cheerful marie, the church and the fidds 
appear almost as they were when painted. In town, 
an occasional sign alerts visitors to a sight that Van 
Gogh painted, or points the way to the walled 
cemetery, which in spring is awash in the color of 
flowers. A map at the entrance indicates the loca- 
tion of Van Gogh’s ample, ivy-covered nave and 
that of Tbta, trim was placed beside him. Dr. 


low-key place offering cafe and restaurant fare. A 
bm is to the right of the door, and simple wooden 
tables are covered with cloths when meals are 
served. One may be forgiven for thinking that 
many of the customers resemble Van Gogh; some 

^y^tiS'are Ling on the walls. TTnougj?£ 

a brigh7art gallery. Further tip. 
the stairwell becomes d a r ker, the walls unpapered. 
At the top, the first door was Van Gogh’s. 

The room is slightly longer than the iron angle 
bed, which is bare to the springs. It is about two 
paces wide. There is a marble-topped chest with a 
vase of fresh flowers beneath the window. Prims of 
Van Gogh’s church. Dr. Gachet and a self -portrait 
art hong on the wails. 

An empty easd has been placed in the corner. 


Auvers is reachable by car or train, with a change 
a Ponlase. The Office of Tourism, Parc Van Gogh, 
is dosed Monday nomine. There is a 2-star Mime* 
lin-rated restaurant on DvlS, at Pontoise,tke Retais 
Ste.Jeanne(Teb 466-61-56). 


high season, to 51,875 
Lore, seven-day trips < 
occupancy); four-day 


r j r r ~r — J : — J Tv 7 J r T* — J 3 7" — 7~~7~ “ 7 “ ““ vuueu auu», ua*naj maasuaa me own- oatlOOH in France for 8 shorter time. Hrscomnanvakn 

October. In Burgundy, for five-day tups, prices range surcharge for those traveling alone. In Enropc, mfor- bard Society, 6727 Curran St, McLean. Virginia, ooerates balloon 

from $2^500 per person (double occupancy) duringLhe matron and reservations can be obtained from the 22101, Tel: (800) 862-8537, or (703) 448-9407; or a /Uwria. m ^ S m Swita ™™’ fbily and 


PRIVATE FRENCH CHATEAUS 

in Normandy, Brittany. Anjou, Poiloo, 

Charenlea, Auvergne, Languedoc, Burgundy, 


lle-de-France. etc... 

Weekends, short or long stays 
PAYING GUESTS WELCOMED BY OWNERS, 
Including board, meals and entertainment 
Catalog on request: (US 85) from 


In Savoy, a Mix of Food, Lakes, Mountains and Vineyards 


; on request: (US 85) from 

(Hi 


B.P. 4 - 78220 VIROFLAY - FRANCE 
TeL: 33 (3) 024.18.16 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
special stop at the Dubouloz cheese 
stand, usually set up beneath the 
covered market near the river. Here 
you’ll find an outstanding local se- 
lection, including a perfectly aged 
Reblochon, a two-year old Beau- 
fort d’alpage and one of the most 
beautiful SL MarceHin’s I’ve ever 
seen, with a golden exterior and a 
creamy, ninny interior. 

Once you succeed in finding 
your way into Raymond Quenaid’s 




Happy Hour 
Monday to Friday 


RESTAURANT 

Champs- £]ys6es 


A Taste of Perfection 

iwaunnA : — , 

Galerie Beni Washington - 5, rue de Beni - 75008 Paris TfcL 563.78.49 

Car park with direct access to the restaurant 


cellars in Chignm — everyone in 
town seems to be named Quenard 
— you won’t be disappointed. The 
lean and vigorous winemaker was 
out trimming vines in the late after- 
noon sun when we name to visit 
Mr. Queaard and his son work the 
family’s six hectares, and make one 
of the most interesting wines in the 
region, the Chignin- Bergeron. IiVa 
white made exclusively from the 
roussanne grape, the same grape 
that goes into the elegant white 
Hermitage. A late ripener, the rous- 
sanne grows well on Mr. Quenanfs 
sunny hillside, which climbs up be- 
hind the house. 

Chignin-Bergeron is a wine that 
ages well, but can also be drunk 
young, as we discovered while sam- 
pling it in nearby Albertville, at the 
well-known restaurant. Million. 
The food at Million. I’m sorry to 
say, lacks the finesse of Mr. Quen- 
aid’s wine — the fish arrived a hit 
soggy and overcooked, and many 
of the di^has on the menu are sim- 
ply repetitious — but the beautiful- 
ly decorated restaurant does offer a 
good selection of local wines, 
there’s a good-looking cheese ptat- 


ter and service is thorough and pro- 
fessiouaL 

A better choice in Albertville is 
Uginet, a small riverside restaurant 
where the young chef, Alain Rayfc, 
shows plenty of promise. His wine 
list offers a good assortment of lo- 
cal wines, many of in half 
bottles, making it even easier to try 
several, and his menu is coura- 
geously original Among the best 
dishes sampled: a ravioli of escar- 
gots; carefully roasted fresh bar set 
on a flavorful bed of potatoes and 
onions; a creamy soup of oysters 
and petonda, or tiny scallops; and 
an inventive rabbit msh served with 
thin “pancakes” of saurfed celery 
root and a thyme-flecked sance of 
black olives. 

One of the great food and wine 
marriages of the region is white 
Savoy wines and a friture, a platter 
of piping hot, tiny baiter-fried lake 
fish. Today, it’s almost impossible 
to find an authentic friture any- 
where in France. Too often the fish 
are not even local, they've been 
frozen, and perhaps even cooked in 
rancid ofl. For years, I’ve been 
searching for the perfect platter of 
-tiny fried fish. Well, I think . I found 
friture heaven at Rdais de Chau- 


tagne, a roadside bar and restau- 
rant in the village of Chindrieux. 

The restaurant’s loaded with lo- 
cal color, a meeting place for busi- 
nessmen and families. The fish are 
netted each morning in the nearby 
Lac du Bourget, which has - only 
recently been reopened to fishing 
after a major cleanup. The catch 
varies from pochette to gpujon, de- 
pending on the season. 'Die per- 
chette we sampled were fresh, crisp, 
tender, light and not the least bn 
oily. The best sign of all: They were 
thoroughly digestible. 

Roussette de Savoie-Maresteb 
Nod Dupasmder. Aimarigne, 73170 
Jongieux; leL: (79) 36.8123. CoD 
ahead to make sure there's someone 
to greet you. About 20 francs per 
bottle 

Roussette de SeysseL Van chon et 
Clerc, “Les Siehtulas,” 01420 Seys- 
sek leL- (50) 5923.15. Closed Sun- 
day and Monday. Opai for visits 9 to 
11:30 AM. and 2:30 to 5 P.M. 
About 30 to 40 francs pa- horde. 

Chignin-Bergeron: Raymond 
Quenard, “Les Tours, u 73800 dug - 
nin; let (79) 28.01.46. Call ahead 
About 20 francs per bottle. 

Restaurant Million, 8 Place 12- 


berti, 73200 Albertville: tel: (79) 
3225.15. Closed Sunday evenings, 
■ Monday at lunch (except from July 
14 to Sat. I); April 25 to May 10; 
SepL 25 to Ocl 10. CraSt cards: 
American Express, Dinas Chib, 
Pisa. A la carte, from 250 to 300 
francs per person, including wine and 
service. 

Restaurant GrinalAMn Rayi, 8 
Place Qtariex-Aibert, 73200 Albert- 
ville, ; set (79) 3100.50 Closed Tues- 
day; Jime 25 to July 5; Nov. 12 to 


Rhone 


Seyssel 


Annecy 


Lac d? Annecy 



Shopping, family, business . . . 

RENT YOUR 
PIED-A-TERRE 
IN PARIS 

for a few days or weeks 


Onnrinwmc . 


lAix-Jea-Bahu 


Albertville ( 


NOW YOU CAN WATCH 

THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION OF THE CBS EVENING NEWS 
IN YOUR OWN HOTEL ROOM THROUGHOUT FRANCE 




2 Residences : Les Halles or Pont de Neuilly 

One or two room flats 

For information : 

. . Residence ORION, 39, rue de Surene 
75008 PARIS - Tel. (1 ) 266.33.26 - Telex 650 1 33 


Cbembfay .. 


Seinfr-i 

10 km. 4 


tabJ OotMouMWr 


The home 
of Burberrys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) ' ' 



-a*- •- S . f 




1 !' K 




■ ' / 


foe 

fs 

m 

J 

- /Cr 

\-M 








K / c *jfAe 


v lU * 






Dec. 6. Credit cards: American Ex- 
press, Diners Cbsb, Visa. 280-franc 
menu. A la carte, from 250 to 300 
francs per person, including wine and 
service. 


U Reims de Chaatagne, 73310 
Chindrieux, on Route de SevsseL D- 
991; set (79) 54 20 27. doied Mon- 
day (except in July and August) and 
Dec 26 to Feb.. 15. No credit cards. 
About 90 francs per person, includ- 
ing wine and service. 


inns / 


•zRj'fcr*, 








*■ ( an 




wmm 




KEEP UP WITH DEVELOPMENTS IN 
THE UNITED STATES AND AROUND THE WORLD 




I . Classical 
f t Burbenys 
rainwear 
V from 

1.730 FF 


M l* 


The full fimge"of 
traditional Burberrys Mens, 
Ladies & Children clothing. 




TUNE IN TO DAN RATHER 


IN ANY OF THE FOLLOWING FOUR STARS HOTELS : 


PARTS 


NICE 


Qub Mdditerranee . Commodore . George V . Inter Continental . L'HdteL 
Montparnasse Park . Nikko . Meridien . Novotel Paris-la-Dijense . 

Royal Monceau . Scribe . Sofitel Bourbon . So fitel Paris . Concorde Lafayette. 

Beach Regency. 




NINA 

RICCI 


Burberrys 


8. bd Malesherbes 
Paris 8* -266.13.01 


V. 


Paris 


CANNES : Carlton . Fran tel Beach . Gray d r Albion . Cannes Palace Hotel 
MONACO : Loews Monte Carlo. 



ADVERTISERS CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS EXCLUSIVE CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION » 
SERVICE BY CALLING : BRIGITTE CATTAN. F.F.E.. ( IT 2012S2S). 202j01 ^0 IN PARIS. I 


39, Avenue MONTAIGNE -17, rue FRANCOIS-I' 


KBff A SAB Y CARMACK 

You m is F«» or Ljm, foe 
• wcuk or mure, „£[„ yom . 

Mby aeenrky and comW 

welww iOI yon need fo r 

young dnUnn incL car 
■««*, KroHera_ 

l*hone morniugB only 

Ddhroy name Aomin 

PUSUCULTURE 

MDiaorvSi 

(Y4> 552113 







INTERNATIONAL HERA1J> TBIBl’My. TUI RS1)AY MAY 9, 1983 


I’ajsr I I 



Hit?- •... 


V' ’’ • 

V*rt \ „, r i. 


wav.r. .. , 

w., 

tetttV.-, ■ 

flfcrita-., *■ ■ • • 

■P * ' •:•• •'■ 

«flri 

Mtii'.sn \ “• .>;■ 

S, 

*W V !.. . . 

**«* -i - ;*■ '■ 

*w»*.Vk\.:« ... ' 1 

*: i*.. 

ijfilU. ' ’ 

ffil» r«tVr. ; 


r ** *\ = . 

■W (31 J3? 


MM oft;.; 

iil'S' J Jn-: ,7 "■ : -. 

w Sl : 



} - . /Vi . » ■ i • 

L /*«■%-. • 

trjf-jmefiu. A .. 
ty; trua-' j\ i , • 
«:• riWv..' 



\{*ie rft|i ! i 




V.n 


V 


' I 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON TRAVEL IN FRANCE 


•U 


Norman 

Waters 

Lure 

Anglers 

By George Gudaiiskas 

P ARIS — “If yon’re a trout 
fisher, action in Norman- 
dy is excellent” Bob Nau- 
heim of Fishing Interna- 
tional said one day after fishing 
some of the famous streams west of 
ParS. 

“Our French trig has been a 
great success.” be said, having cast 
a line over trout cm a few of Nor- 
mandy’s best dial}? streams, includ- 
ing die Nonancourt and the Ride. 

Nauheim should know what he’s 
- talking about. His California-based 
organisation sponsors worldwide 
travel for anglers. Far-flung fishing 
trips include such destinations as 
Norway and Alaska. 

But others have found Norman- 
dy’s waters fascinating, too. 
Among them was Charles Ritz of 
hotel fame. Ritz, whom Ernest 
Hemingway once described as “the 
very finest fly fisherman 1 know," 
loved the Ride. 

Describing the Aclou Reach of 
the river. Ritz said he believed *lt is 
the finest in the world,” surpassing 
even the renowned Test, Itchen or 
Wytye in England 
“The whole reach has been 
fished for years,” Ritz said. “But 
the enormous quantity of Gsh never 
grows less. 

“Throughout its length, h is a 
practically unwtaivpted stretch' of 
banks of weed divided by innumer- 
able narrow channels.” 

“Its depth is nowhere greater 
than four feet,” he wrote in his 
book, “A Fly Fisher’s Life.” 

“The upper part and the begin- 
ning of the secondary aim have fast 
currents, the remainder medium to 
slow.” 

“I have never been there without 
seeing rises," he recalled. 

But the Aclou Reach — Eire al- 
most all of the trout- fishing waters 
of Fiance — is in private hands, a 
fact possibly disturbing to fishers 
accustomed to waters open to the 

S ublic as they»are in the United 
lutes. 

But, in France; the fisher's skills 
of persistence and patience can pay 
off. and quality f uming may be en- 
joyed throughout the country. 

For example, if you're interested 
in fishing 400 meters (1,320 feet) of 
the Risk, yon may. by smply stay- 
ing at the hottl Le Soleii <TOc rata 
Rivkre Thibouville. .. 

It has a fine, well-stocked reach 
within view of its restaurant win- 
dows. Or, the proprietor and chef, 
Marius Hervieux, can put you in 



touch with contacts in Paris who 
can arrange for your trout-fishing 
needs. 

Also excellent sources of trout- 
fishing information are tackle 
shops in Paris, such as An Coin de 
Ptane and Dobos Maison de la 
Moudm And don’t overlook the 
town hall or mayor’s office in the 
localities you care to fish. 

Of course, official information, 

«it rinding mope , may he had from 

the French government’s Consol 
Supericur de la P8che and from the 
dozens of fishing associations 


up to 3 pounds (135 kilos). An 
occasional larger fish shouldn’t sur- 
prise you. 

Besides the Risle and the Nonan- 
eourt, waters worth considering in- 
clude the Charentonne, a tributary 
of the Risle, and the Andelle in 
Normandy that Ritz also favored. 

Ritz also liked the Aube in the 
higher reaches of Normandy, de- 
scribing it as a “small stream con- 
taining very big fish indeed.” 

Consider, too, the River Aflag- 
non in Burgundy. It's a peat- 
stained stream of pools and riffles 



The Elusive Trout 


throughout France whose names 
and addresses are readily available 
to tourists. 

As for the streams themselves, 
the spring creeks of France are very 
much like those famous in Mon- 
tana, Idaho or California. 

“Many wander through lush, 
meadows passing colorful farm-' 
steads, milhandandent chateaus. 
Some flow through Alpine forests,” 
said Fishing IntonationaTs sum- 
mer guide to fishing these waters. 

Almost all hold brown trout of 


bolding many fine trout and gray- 
ling. 

Southeast of that area run the 
rivers Doubs and Loue. The latter 
is renowned trout water and is lo- 
• cated not far from the Swiss bor- 
der. It’s a crystal clear and gentle 
mountain stream running through 
forest and containing trout up to 3 
pounds. 

Area streams, it is said, are noted 
for their blanket mayfly hatches 
and for the evening caddis rise. 

These are but a few of the 


Spring’s Flurry of Festivals 



By Jean Rafferty 

P ARIS — Springtime in 
France heralds a flurry of 
festivals. The Eure Valley 
in Normandy, midway be- 
tween Paris and the Norman coast 
and already marked as a tourist 
“must” for Monet's house and 
dens at Givemy, celebrates 
som time by providing a “bouquet 
of happenings” over five successive 
weekends, from May 1 V to June 9. 
during the “Eure en Fleurs” (the 
Eurein Flower) festival. 

As festivals go, this one is re- 
markable rex' the prodigious choice 
of amusements and exhibitions it 
offers to the public (130 different 
events are scheduled). . 

The festival kicks off at 7 AAL 
cm May 11 as a dozen hot-air bal- 
lons take off from VascoeuQ, with a 


second launch later that afternoon. 
Those who prefer more terrestrial 
travel can opt for a scries of prome- 
nades through meadow, plain and 
forest A wild-flower walk leaves 
from Bec-Hdloum cm May 12, or 
ene can learn all about hedges in 
Samtoppportunej-la-Mare. 

Picking up speed, there will be 
rallies forbicyde, car and airplane, 
plus a pedal-car race for adults. 
Trials for the first DeauviD e-Paris 
hydro-ULM rally will take place on 
the water at Poses the weekend of 
May 25-26. 

River outings in dude half-day 
cruises or lfe-hour circuits tearing 
from Vernon. Les Anddys ana 
AmfreriDe-sous-les-Monts. Espe- 
cially picturesque: boating on the 
river at night in flhmnnated sail 
boats fallowed by fireworks at 
Poses on June &. 

Local craftsmanship wiQ be dis- 


Cartier 



18 CT GOLD AND DIAMOND CC SPRING RING AND BRACELET 

earlier jewellery is sold exclusively in the Cartier-jewellery stores 
and me Must de Cartier boutiques. Each piece tt 
accompanied by a certificate guaranteeing its authenticity. 



T f L >- 


ill 

■ Mtf 


Wiwi****^ 1 : 

:-x >• * ...if- 1 . .. 

"i t ri** r ' « »' 

li * • »• 

■a: , 


:■$ n ;; •* # . r .p 

I I 7 ^ 3 . 


boudque/ 1 & mu/t" de Cartier 

PARIS: 

13. ruede la Pavx 

7, place Vendome - 23. place Vendome 
23. rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore 
■ 12. avenue Montaigne 
HOTEL HILTON 18. avenue de Suifren 
HOTEL GEORGE V 31, avenue George-V 


played in all its facets: pottery 
making in Muids, stained glass 
window manufacture in Lyons-la- 
Forftt, the ait of wrought iron in 
Conches and die 16th-century tech- 
nique of painting on wood in 
Bnonne. 

Technology, too, is on show. The 
traditional: Noblet-Leblanc opens 
its venerable wind instrument 
workshops on June S and its muse- 
um every weekend at Couture- 
Boussey. The ultramodern: At 
Mesnil-sur-l’ Estree, Rrmin-Didot 
will demonstrate one of the world’s 
most sophisticated printing ma- 
chines June 1. You can even learn 
about Parisian tap water when the 
Verneuil-sur-Avre laboratory of 
the CSty of Paris water department 
holds open bonse. 

Cultural manifestations indude 
Baroque music at a dinner concert 
in the Moulin d’Ande, the nrasc of 
Ravel, a native s on, at Lyons-la- 
Forit, a rousing trumpet concert at 
the Chilean de Champs-Balaflle, a 
sculpture show at the Chilean (TA- 
very and a literary tea featuring 
local authors at the Chilean de 
VascoeuiL A dif f e r en t style of con- 
cert is the high point of the Brioune 
“Fete du Udre,” where a pop 
group .will perform. 

. Antiques can be hunted at the 
Chilean de Bizy the last two wok- 
ends in May or a great fhid discov- 
ered at the French answer to a 
garage sale; called “Empty the At- 
tic, “ on the quai at Les And * 
May 26-27. There are also dog, 
and flower shows. 

Besides playing host to these cul- 
tural events, 20 dtiheam and man- 
or houses akmg with their parks 
trill be open to the public. Worth a 
detour the imposing hilltop rains 
of Chitcau-Gaillard, built in 1 197 
by Richard the Lkmhcartcd, which 
gives a spectacular view over the 
Seine at Les Anddys. 

- This being a French festival, the 
palate is not ignored. The old town 
hall at Pont-Audemer will be 
turned into a bakery for a bread 
contest over the Ascension week- 
end. The joys of country life may be 
appreciated over a glass of the local 
pari (a pear liqueur) or homemade 
dder after a visit to a local farm. 

These is much more. Villages go 
medieval or 1900s. There aiecberry 
festivals, cider- making demonstra- 
tions, folklore evenings and even a 
conference explaining the Norman 
sense of humor. The complete pro- 
gram for L’Eure en Fleurs is avail- 
able from the Conriti Dfoar t e m en- 
tal de Tourisme, B_P. 187, 27001 
Evreux Cedex, and in Paris at the 
AN IT, 8 Avenne de TOpira, or the 
Office de Tourisme de Paris. 127 
Avenue des Champs-Elysees. 


streams worth fishing in France. 
Others may be found in the Pyre- 
nees and the Haute-Savoie — and 
even within a short drive of Paris. 

La Chaise Dieu du Theti, run by 
Paris jeweler Jean Pucci, is one of 
the latter. Three kilometers of wa- 
ter is available to fly fishers, as is an 
the equipment you need, and trout 
of more ihan 2 pounds be 
readily taken throughout the year. 

Rainbows and browns are both 
stocked, though rainbows are more 
numerous, as one young woman 
noticed when she landed a beauty 
on her first cast of an imitation ant. 

She found fishing here a delight, 
with the grounds bordering the 
River I ton, another famous French 
trout stream. 

Wading is unnecessary, though 
boots are advisable, and the trouf 
are willing — provided you have 
the $30 a day to fish the waters and 
enjoy the lovely scenery of this old 
converted 


mOl 
fantasy. 


into a fisherman’s 


Maps — Consol Svperieur de la 
Piche. 10, rue Peeler, 75015 Paris. 
Phone: 8411000 

Fishing Tours — Historical Tunes 
Travel (FIv Fisherman Magazine). 
P.O. Box 8200, Harrisburg Penn- 
sylvania 17105. Phone: 1 -800-22 3r 
8907 

Fishing Tours — Fishing Interna- 
tional. 400 Montgomery Drive, De- 
partment A, Santa Rosa, California 
95405. Phone: (707) 542-4242. . 

Resaved Fishing — La Chaise du 
TheiL 80. rue de Provence, 75009 
Paris. Phone: 526. 71.45 . 


PRINTEMPS 
I THE MOST 


DEPARTMENT 
H STORE 





mflBI If i* nwoiwscw 
□moth mi restomu 
on® stmue of ikitt 



VlRA I-IOMTTS 


Christian Dior, Chanel, Yves St-Laurent, 
Courrfeges, Guy Laroche, Georges Rech, 
Revilton-. all the great names of French 
fashion are featured at Le Printemps, 
the department-store in Paris that blooms 
year round- Inside, top fashion 
designers adorn the “Rue de la Mode" 
with their triumphant creations.. 
A garden of delight for your home: fine 
gold and silverware from Christofle, 
delicate china from Limoges, dream-like 
crystal from Baccarat.. The most 
prestigious names in perfumes celebrate 
the changing seasons. Le Printemps 
also provides a multitude of services for 
long distance travellers : export discount, 
store guide-interpreters, credit card 
services and a foreign exchange office. 
Mgtro station Havre-Caumartm. 
64, boulevard Haussmann - Paris 9". 
Open from Monday to Saturday, 
from 935 am. to 630 pm 
Major Credit Cards accepted. 




ADVERTISEMENT 


JEAN PATOU 


SETS A TREND. 

A startling collection of 
twelve “parfums d’epoque 


Jean fttou. celebrated for ing 
haure couture and fabulous fra- 
grances, is reviving twelve perfu- 
mes created by the House bet- 
ween 1925 and 1964. Called “Ma 
Collection", they are twelve ti- 
meless, yer very up-to-date fra- 
grances whose evocative names 
each have a fascinating tale to 
tel 

It is a significant step 
in Patou’s cur- 
rent come- 
back under 
die leader- 
ship of the / 

designer’s > 

great- ne- 
■ pbews, Jean 
de Mofiy, 

5 3. Presi- 
dent of the 
firm, and his bro- * — 
therGuy, 3I,heaJ 
of tire New York 
subsidiary. 

“We wanted 
to give to- 
day’s wo- 
men 
the 



rente 

ijuulicy 


The 

calls 

exper 


chance to dis- 
cover these very mo- 
dem perfumes that 
have played » much a 
port in the history of our 
House”, says Jean de Moiiy, 

“And at the same time rip our 
hats to our predecessors". 

The captivating fragrances of 
Jean Patna are ao integral pact of 
tiie extravagant mystique that 
surrounds the couture house. To 
Patou, perfume is the vied in- 
gredient of a woman’s elegance, 
an exquisite way of communica- 
ting her own innate style and un- 
derfming her personality. 

For decades Patou has made 

special orders of these distinc- 
tive fragrances at the request of 
their clients. “Ii was like a family j 
secret we shared”, says de Mouy J 
“We were touched that they re-' 
membered these fragrances and | 
we reproduced them from the ' 
original formulas we found among 
the treasures of the Haute”. 


When a limited edition of 
Normandie for Bloomingdaks 
Fete de France Promotion pro- 
ved a smash success in New 
York, de Mouy derided to re- 
launch the twelve perfumes to 
meet die resultant demand from 
their rich and famous clients all 
over the world. 

Barit fragrance is an authentic 
replica of the original, bottled 
in precious bodes inspired by 
Louis Sue’s Art Deco designs for 
Rrrou perfumes in die *20’s fea- 
turing the same labels and de- 
signs Each bottle fa surrounded 
by a vibrantly coloured silk scarf 
based on original Art Deco 
fabrics discovered in the Patou 
archives. 

"Ma Collection” is produced 
with the v same insfa- 

on impeccable 
TJ that has cha- 
• T ‘ ' rised Joy since 
. ' creation in 19 30. 
formula of Joy 
fevr only the most 
sive ingredients 
-hand-picked jasmi- 
ns from Grasse, nwes 
from Bulj5rriiu“kis bu- 
sed on the narural har- 
vest of rare flowers”, 
says de Mouy. “That is 
why wc can only make a 
limited number 
of hotties of 
Joy each year”. 

To guarantee 
the same exacting 

perfection and 

creative origina- 
lity Parou has 
had their 
own perfu- 
mer since 
1925 and all 

perfumes are 
created in the 
house. Their 
’’perfumer to- 
day, Jean Ken 
leo. who com- 
posed “IOOO’’ in 
1972, is a world re- 
nowned perfume 
"nose". 

Jean Patou believed 
“fashion should always 
reflect a woman’s mind, 
f it can never dictate to 
f her'*. Patou’s style, now 
determined by young talen- 
ted designer. Christian La- 
croix, 33, fa based on discre- 
tion, caste and distinction - 
clothes and perfume to com- 
plete a woman’s personality, 
not invent one for net. 

“Patou fa the ultimate in so- 
phistication". says dt Mouy, 
"marvellously subtle. No one 


will really buy a Patou dress as 
their first dress, nor Joy or “1000" 
as their first perfume. Fashion is 
like a pyramid. We are acihe very 
rip, very exclusive and very se- 
lective". 

Patou style fa also understated 
elegance, harmony of design, re- 
finement; superb workmanship, 
a subde glamour which allows a 
woman to dominate her clothes. 
“What is a successful drew?" asks 
Jean de Moiiy. “When a woman 


enters a room and people say 
*What a lovely dress’, then we've 
failed. But if they say, *Whata lo- 
vely woman’, it’s a success". 

Joy, the cosdicst perfume in 
the world; Jean Patou, die subde 
elegant simplicity of true haute 
coumre: these two legendary' re- 
putations are now joined by the 
startling revival of “Ma Collec- 
tion" which has set an audacious 
new trend. 



The key to Jean Patous “ma Collection" 


AMOUR AMOUR- 1925 
(Love Love) 


P atou’s fim tribute to wo- 
men, Amour- Amour is as 
intriguing as die scan of a 
delicious flirtation. It fa compo- 
sed of a fresh top note lent by ne- 
rob (an essentia! oil obtained 
from orange flowers), narcissus 
and bergamot (tangerine), war- 
med by the savour of jasmine 
and rose. Carnation mingling 
with vetiver releases its final sen- 
sual richness. 

JJESA1S-JE?- 1925 

what do I know—) 


s 


T his fruity chypre perfume 
expresses the hesitation, 
the suspense of new love. 
A fruity warm top note of peach, 
apricot and orange blossom 
blends with the floral essences of 
jasmine and rose. 

Carnation and iris add their en- 
dowment of mellow richness. 

ADIEU SAGESSE- 1«25 
(Goodbye Wisdtwn) 


T he last of Jean Patou's 
love trilogy underscores 
the decision taken- It’s 
the perfume for the sensual wo- 
man daring toasserr her feminin- 
ity. A fresh lighr nmili, daffodil 
and lily of me valley top note 
evolves towards a more exotic 
midJIe note lent by carnation, 
tuberose and opopanax. A back- 
ground of musk finally releases 
its warmth and sensuality. 

CHALDEE -1927 

(A region of Ancient Babylonia) 

B ased on the scent of die 
first suntan oil created by 
Patou, its fingering aroma 
recalls the sun in aU its glory. A 
spicy, flowery, ambered perfume, 
warm and intense, it is composed 
of orange blossom, hyacinth, jas- 
mine, narcissus and lilac, under- 
lined by the soft, powdery base 
□ore of vanilla, opopanax and 
amber. 

MOMENT SUPREME 

(Supreme Moment) 


his warm, piquant scent 
evokes excitement, temp- 
tation and passionate de- 
sire. A spicy, ambered harmony. 


T 


its first soft sensual warmth is due 
to lavender, geranium, doves 
and bergamot. Then a rosejas- 
rame heart lends elegance and 
refinement before blossoming 
into the amber background. 

COCKTAIL - 1930) (Cocktail) 

A light and lively fragrance 
with a fruity chypre cha- 
racter, h is as fresh and sti- 
mulating as an aperitif A spicy, 
fruity blend of la vender and ho- 
neysuckle fa enriched by a flora! 
bouquet of jasmine and ylang 
yiang, before evolving into a 
musk note. A savvy woman with 
a vivacious personality will de- 
light in this fragrance. 

DIVINE FOUE-l9tt 
(Divine Folly) 

R ich, warm and intense, it fa 
a spellbinding fragrance; 
the ultimate expression of 
the pleasures and excesses of 
true luxury. Neroli and ylang 
yking provide the exotic sparkle 
of this floral spicy ambered per- 
fume; orange blossom, styrax, 
iris, vetiver. rose and jasmine, the 
unpredictable elegance. Musk 
and vanilla evoke the irrestiblc 
memory of a moment of mad- 
ness. 

NORMANDIE-1935 
(Normandy) 

C reated for the maiden 
voyage of die legendary 
ocean-liner “Norman- 
die" to New York, this strong sty- 
lish perfume isasefegantand soi- 
gne as a thirties evening gown. 
A predominant carnation top 
note evolves into an intense flo- 
ral bouquet of jasmine, rose and 
moss, underlined with vanilla, 
balsam and animal notes giving 
Normandie a warm, sensual rich- 
ness 

VACANCES - 1936 (Holidays) 

he countryside! What a 
blend of flowers and spicy 
notes, fresh rich and invi- 

K ring! A refreshing breath of 
horn, hyacinth and galba- 
num develops into a floral blend 
of lilac and mimosa. Musk em- 
phasises die fullness of this out- 
standing fragrance. 


T 


COLONY - 1938 (Colony) 

T his fruity chypre perfume, 
reminiscent of sun-ripe- 
ned fruit and the metting 
amma of spices, transports us to 
the tropics. The initial surprise 
comes from pineapple and ylang 
ylang from Nossi-Be. Then a 
woody green heart blossoms in- 
to iris, oak moss, carnation, opt* 
panax and vetiver. 

A distinctive leather and musk 
base note spell out the sultry sen- 
suality of a tropical afremtKXi. 

L’HEURE ATTENDUE - l*>4t» 
(The long-awaited moment) 

I nspired by the euphoria of 
the Liberation of Paris, this 
perfume recaptures the spirit 
of freedom and joy. Lily of the 
valley, geranium and lilac make- 
up the top note which blends in- 
to a warm bouquet of ylang 
ylang. rose and jasmine. Vanilla, 
sandalwood and patchouli deli- 
ver the striking finale which ex- 
presses the“joic de vivre" of the 
first celebration in four years. 

CAlINE- 1964 (Tender Caress) 

T his young and romantic 

perfume recreates the at- 
mosphere of dtc“Bal des 
Debutantes” when innocence 
reigns supreme. Mimosa, manda- 
rine, bergamot, basil and neroli 
form its astounding aura; iris, 
patchouli, orange blossom, spicy 
moss and coriander stamp it with 
seductive floral originaury. Be- 
cause of the musk background, 
Cafinr becomes gently, brestibly 
feminine. 

Jean Patou’s “Ma CoQec- 
□on", available in perfume, eau 
de toilette and spray 
eau de toilette, is 
sold in exclusive 
department stores 
such as Bergdorf 
Goodman, New 
York, Harrods, 

London, die Gaie- 
ties Lafayette. Paris, and 
other selected stores 
well gs at Jean Patou. 7, 
rue Saim-Florentin, 

75008 Paris. TeL. 

26036.10. 






Page 12 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON TRAVEL IN FRANCE 


rMTFRISATlONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Something Special 



By Judy Yabtonky 


P ARIS — France, re- 
nowned for its gourmet 
food, wines and chSteauS, 
also is a country of and for 
shoppers. Le shopping, the term 
oyj . is both an avocation and a 
vocation for the French, practiced 
year-round, especially during vaca- 
tions. And tourists to Paris each 
year spend milli ons of francs on 
clothes and perfumes, as wefl as on 
other items “Made in France." 

But the capital is not the only 
French city for shoppers, native 
and foreign. AU of France can be a 
shoppers' paradise. Each region, 
city and the smallest oT villages has 
its specialties artisanaks, excluding 
food and wine, for sale. Many of 
these specialty items have been 
made by hand or produced by ma- 
chine in the same town for centu- 
ries. 


A listing of the old handicraft 
industries, many now modernized 
and competitive on world markets, 

could fill a book, but here is a brief 

tourists’ selection of towns with 
artisanal, or handicrafts, to seQ, 
and related museums. 

• ALENCON — Alengon, in lower 
Normandy, was the center of a 
lace-malting industry m die nth 
century and gave its name to the 
point tTAtenqon, a special type of 
lace, which stfll is produced locally. 
To see: Musfce Municipal. 

• AUBAGNE — Santons axeinadc 
throughout Provence, but Au- 
bagne, is one oenter for these figu- 
rines. Modeled in day, fired _and 
naively painted, ana sometimes 
dressed, santons often are charac- 
ters from the Bible, as well as from 
historical legends or local tales. 
Christmas cliches made of santons, 
or santouns in Provencal, which 
first appeared during the Revolu- 
tion, are to treasure. 

I • AUBUSSON — Artisans in Ao- 
I busson imported their skills from 


Flanders in the 14th century and 
have been making tapestries and 
carpets ever since. Nowadays, tap- 
estries are made following the de- 
signs of modem artists, as well as 
the traditional scenes. To see: Cen- 
tre Cultural Jean Lurgal (Salle de 

<r ■ /'n.iMwnninpV PnW 


• BACCARAT — Made famous 
by its factory of the same name. 
Baccarat, in the Vosges, has been 


-chandeliers, decanters and glass- 
es — since 1 764-. To see: Musfce du 
GristaL 

' • BESANQON — Besangon, the 
capital and largest city of the 
Franche-Comtfc, has been a city of 
watches and clocks since the 1793 
arrival of 25 watchmakers who left 
Switzerland to flee religious perse- 
cution. To see: the Eccle Nahonale 
de Chroncmfctrie et de Micromfc- 
canique; Music des Beaux-Arts 
(Section d’Horlogcrie); Horloge 
Astronomique. 



Cutlery made in Thiers. 


Nina Meert 


EXCLUSIVE 
COLLECTION 
SUMMER 1985 
Lingerie flnthing 


Nina. MEERT, 

4 Rne de Varenne, 
75007 PARIS 
TeU (I) 222.13.79 


t South of France 

Provence 

The dollar stretches a long way now in 
the South of France .. . 
vineyards and villas for sale by the sea in the 
Heartland of Provence. 

Flights and accommodation arranged. 

Contact Mmm Luca GWtti 
Gh hHm a r- Coneahowti SJt 
2256 Route de Bandol. 

83110 SANARY-SUR-MER, France. 

Tel.: (94) 29.86.64. Telmt 401 890 F. 

London office phonet 01-584 6045. 


Men's collection 


A light and airy blouson 


Lanvin has created the most extraordinary blouson 
you can imagine, ideal for a vacation lunch in the sun 
or an informal dinner. 

It is made of linen, the coolest and most airy natural fiber that 
exists, associated with a knit that gives it body. 

Sei'erul models are available with this combination of materials, 
which ensures ci'en greater comfort and elegance. 

. is a complement to this marvellously cool blouson, 
ue offer a polo shirt in lisle. For Us new collection, Lanvin 
has created dozens qf new designs which, in accordance with the 
1985 trend, are mostly in pastel tones. 


• CHOLET — Flax and hemp, 
jipmp and flax, the fields around 
Cholel abound with both, and 
w o r ke rs in this town in the center 
of France have been producing lin- 
en — handkerchiefs, tablecloths 
and other household linen — since 
the 11th century. The center of 
town is lined with shops selling 
linen. To see: Musfce d’Hisioire. 

• GIEN — Gien. in the Loire Val- 
ley, is known for the color blue, a 
deep blue enhanced by a golden 
yellow hand pain ted on Us local 
porcelain. Gien ware comes in 
complete dinner services, or single 

and striking — objeis if art. Tour 

the factory and see how the pieces 
are from mold to the painting 

of the most delicate signed pieces. 

• GRASSE — Surrounded by 
fields of flowers. Grasse, an old 
Provencal town, is home to the 
French perfume industry. Once 

usans^o^rrasse switched to per- 
fumery when perfumed gloves be- 
came the fashion in the 16th 
century. Today, most of the es- 
sences — rose, jasmine, lavender. 


quality first 
sines 1946 


VLENDBl 


LANVIN 

IS, me du Faubourg Saint-Honore, 75008 Paris - 7Ef. 265.14.40 
- 2, rue Cambon, 75001 Paris 


His and hers superb 
custom-made 
Leather Furs Rainwear 

{Rttinfl wiJfrin 48 hrs.] 


3 Faubourg St-Hanorii ( 3 rd floor) 
75008 Paris. TeL 2651236 


French Company 


HmBDOOK 1985 


Now in the 1985 updated edition, 200 
pages of indispensable information in English on 
a selection of 84 of the most important French 
companies, as well as basic fads on other mqor 
firms. Indudes information on the French 
economy and major sectors of activity, an 
introduction to the Paris Bourse, and a bilingual 
dictionary of French financial terms. 

Each profile indudes detailed information 
on: head office, management, major activities, 
number of employees, sdes brededown, company 
background, shareholders, principal French 
subsidiaries and holdings, foreign holdings and 
activities, exports, research and innovation, 1979- 
1983 financial performance, important devel- 


ABtOSPAIlALE 

AR FRANCE 

FRANCABE HOKHST 
G&BAIE BBCUTT 

ALSFHOAAtLANtlQUE 

GROUPEVOOHE 

AVK3NS MARCS. DASSAULT- 

METAL 

BREGUETAVtAlKW 

JSJMONr-SChNECa 

AXA (MUTUBiES UNB- 

L’ORfeAL 

DROUOt) 

LOUS VUITTDN 

BANQUENDOSUEZ 

LYONNAISE DES EAUX 

BANQUE NATK3NAIE DE PA1BS- 

MATRA 

BM> 

MERDB4 

BfiGHNSAY 

MBU4GERN 

BCERMANN 

MJCHBUN 

BONGRANSA 

MOET-HB^CSSY 

BOUYGUES 

PARKAS 

BSN 

PERNOD RICAKD 

CAMPBNON BERNARD 

PBJGEOT 

CGS ALSTHOM 

POtfflT 

CGM GROUP 

PRtNTEMPS GROUP 

CHARBONNAGES DE FRANCE 

PROMOOfiS 

(Q* 1 

OUtlERY 

CHARGHJRSSA. 

LARHXXJTE 

OMB4TS FRANKS 

RB4ALU 

OtALCAta 

RH0NBPOUtB«: 

CUUBM&XTBIRANfe 

ROUSSaUCLAF 

COGEMA 

SAO.OR 

COMPAGNE DUMOI 

SAI4T-GOBAM 

CX3MPAGME FRANCABE DES 

SANOR 

p£tkxes -TOTAL 

SCOA ‘ 

COMPAGMEGfr^ALE 

SCREG 

DHBafWart(CGQ 

SB GROUP 

COMPAQ* GfrfeALEDS 

SBTA 

EAUX 

SNECMA 

COMPAGMEIAH&ON 

soc&t g§n6wie 

Ot&XT AGRXXXE 

SOafrtG&J&UOE 


opments and 1984-1985 highlights and trends. 

Indispensable for corporate, government 
and banking executives, institutional investors, 
industrial purchasers and other decision-makers 
who should be more fuBy informed on mqor 
French companies. French Company Handbook 
is being sent to 8,000 selected business and 
financial leaders in the United States, Japan and 
the Middle East. 

Other interested parties may purchase the 
Handbook at $38 per copy, inducing postage in 
Europe. Five or more copies, 30% reduction. 
Outside Europe, please add postal charges for 
each copy. Middle East $4; Asm, Africa, North 
and South America $7. • 

Hcralb^^Sribunc 

FRENCH COMPANY HANDBOOK 1985 

. Published fay 

U Hamolionai Business Development 
with the 

In ternational Herald Tribune 



FRANCE (CO) 
O&XTDUNORD 
CB&TT NATIONAL 
CROUZET 
□ARTY 
DUMEZ 

BEORONK3UE SERGE 
DASSAULT 
BFAQUrTAME 
B’toAJEKTRANDFAURE 
ESSfcOR 
RVESlAiE 
FRAMATOME 


DTMJEPHSE&SANRAPT 
& BRICE 
SODEXHO 
SOMMER A1UB8U 
SHE BATIGNOUES 
TBEMECANQUE 
THOMSON 
7HOMSONCSF 
UNION DES ASSURANCES 
DE PAHS (UAP) 

U5JNOR 

UTA 

VALEO 

VALLOUREC 


International Herald Tribune, Book Djvoipn 
181 avenue CharfesdeCxmle, 92521 Neu»y Cede* France. 

Please said me copies of French Company Handbook 1985. 


n is my payment. {Payment may be made in 

convertible European currency of your choiae at current 


□ Please charge to my credit carctvtSA Q DINKS □ AMEXO 


CARD NUMB. 


SIGNATURE. 

kHHyirni 


NAME inud'lata). 


POSITION. 


COMMNY. 


ADDRESS. 


OTY/COUNTRY- 


■ 0-5-85 


orange blossoms, mimosa, gerani- 
um and numerous herbs — are 
treated with fixatives in Grasse and 
sent to Paris for the ac tual p er- 
f time-making. To visit: Perfumer- 
ies Fragonard. Gaiimaxd, MoHn- 
anL 

• LIMOGES— The capital of por- 
celain. pnee (be 18tb century, and 
eoamdware. since the 12th centu- 
ry, T imngps now produces 50 per- 
cent of all porodaiit made in 
France, and 1 jmng es dinner sets 
are famous around the world- The 
city has store after store selling 

and roads in and out adver- 
tise discount warehouses. Not as 
visible, but just as beautiful, is the 
city’s enamel ware: cloisonnis, 
champletb andpeints. To see: Mu- 
s£e National de la Cfenunique, 
Adrien-Duboudifc, the Musfce Mu- 
niwpl To visit: an m9rn ri atelier. 

• LYON — Lyon, France's sec- 
ond-largest city and once the capi- 
tal of Roman Gaul, was a dty of 

yit and remains a center of the 
French textile industry, especially 
for dress fabrics. In 1804, Jacquard 
invented a machine allowing one 
man to do the work of six in mak- 
ing the multicolored alh Luxuri- 
ous silks still can be bought in 
Lyon. .To see: Maison des damns 

comas means sflkworicms; the 

Musfce Historique des Tissus. 

• MILLAU — Millau makes 
gloves, gloves and more sheepskin 
gloves — more than 700,000 in 
1980. one-third of the French pro- 
duction that year. The entire area 
around this town in the Causses 
region is known for its tannin g, 
dying and glovemaking, as weD as 
production of leather dothes, bags . 
and shoes. 






:>r ritet «r- 




Jf-w - 





>!«** 


inf*; 

jt% 


»: • 

.. t ■ 


■ La G-otsette, Canoe’s beachfront promenade. 

Sidewalkfids of Glamour for Cannes Crowd 


G o to Cannes during the film festival! There 
are those who wouldn't have it any other 
way. These hardy souls, we hope, woe 
diem for the opening yesterday — with hotel 
accommodations and restaurant reservations con- 
firmed well in advance. 

For the next 11 days, Cannes will be given oyer 
to movie-viewing and deal-m akin g. More movies 
may be bought and sold during the festival than m 
any other single place. Part carnival, part cut- 
throat, the atmosphere still is pure glamour. It is 


derived as much from the natural attributes of the 
players as from tfo combination of sea, palms and 
sun on La Croiseiie. Ether way. for those who 
don’t min d crowds and do appreciate a spectacle, 
there is much to be enjoyed. 

The terrace of the Carlton is a good vantage 

toSwfll da Expect to see more rock stars than 
movie stars. And heaven forbid it should rain. 

— LINDA HALES 



• MOUSTIERS STE.-MARIE — 
Moustiers Ste.- Marie. a small typi- 
cal Provencal village not far from 
the Riviera, has been known since 
1679 for its Moustiers ware, a pot- 
tery with a dear, luminous blue 
glaze. Fabrication stopped in 1874 
but was revived in 1925 by Marcel 
Provence. To see: Musfce de la Far 
fence. 

• ST.-CLAUDE — St.-Claude, 
tourist center for the Haut-Jura, 
also is the Capitate de la Pipe. At 
the end of the 18th century, wood- 
workers using lathes made pipe 
stems for silver bowls produced 
elsewhere. Later, they began mak- 
ing entire pipes in box, cherry, wal- 
nut and pear wood; however, these 
bunted with the tobacco. In 1854, 
briar roots were brought to a local 
pipemaker by a Corsican and pipes 
were made from the more durable 
and carvabte briar. The modern 
day industry has expanded to in- 
clude a variety of smoking tods, 
like cigarette folders, replaceable 
pipe stems, and tobacco containers 


4 : ^ W & to?-'::- 



in wood, ivory and even plastic. To 
see: Exposition des Pipes. 

• THIERS — Perched high on a 
hi pri de alongside the Durolle Riv- 
er, this medieval town with its an- 
cient houses is the Capitate de la 
Coutelterie frarupise, or the capital 
of the ladle industry. The art of 
making cutlery, iron and silverware 
has survived to this day both as an 
artisanale handicraft- Fronting nar- 
row, cobblestoned streets, shop af- 
ter shop sells knives of all shapes 
and sizes, for all purposes, as wril 
as scissors, stainless steel flatware, 
and professional tools. To see: tire 
Maison des Coutdkrs, the Musfce 
Municipal de la CouteGerie. 

• TROYES — Ancient capital of 
Champagne, Troyes has been mak- 
ing la bormeterie or hats and hand- 


made qftriUng t since the 16th cen- 
tmry. The first hannakere started up 
in Troyes in 1505, and statues on 
the books date to 1554. As recently 
as a few years ago, the industry, 
with 100 small companies, em- 
ployed 20,000 people. To see: Mu- 
sfce de la Bonnetene. 

• VALENCE — Valence, in the 
heart of the Rhone Valley, pro- 
duces today, as it did in the 17th 
, te tissu provcn^al, or hand- 

S and steadied fabrics. Re- 
tire colors of Provence 


to make lovely gifts sold through- 
out the region. .? 

• VILLEDIEU-LES-POELES - 
Artisans in VHkdieu-les-Pofcles, a 
village in Norinandy, have been 
making Cannes • or round-bellied 
milk flagons, as well as ewers and 
vases, and po&es or frying pans, 
and even befls, the same way — 
Hammer ed or beaten out of copper 
and other metals — since the 17th 
century. Todayrpou and pans, and 


other kitchen utensils in both cop- 

ner and aluminum are for sale. TO 


natural dyes of red, blue 

and ydlow, these fabrics are used 


per and aluminum are for sale. To 
see: Musfce de la Poeslerie, Fon- 
deriede Cloche. 


Gardens at Yfllandry 


. j:-. • : ’ A 


LA FRANCE EN PENICHETTE 

. Waterways in France 




I'ECWSC * SO* &CUSMIK. ■ • 


u si? k 

iim.m 


(Cantmned From Page 9) - 
first private owners to open his 
chiteau to the public. “My grand- 
father was a remarkable man,” says 
Robert CarvaDo, Vfllandiys cur- 
rent owner, who works four days a 
week in Paris as an investment 
banker. “He wanted to show Yfl- 
landry to people because he was 
convinced that it contained a cul- 
tural and mystical message for 
them about art and nature and 
God.” 

From Joachim Carvallo's death 
in 1936, the chflteau and gardens 


were somewhat neglected until 
1972, when Robert Carvallo and 


SOUTH, BURGUNDY, BRITTANY, ANJOU, 
CHARENTE, ILE-DE-FRANCE, LORRAINE 

100 Self-driver, barge - amenities 

LOCABOAT PLAISANCE 

Port-oo-Bois 89300 Jai^iy 
* T«U (86) 62.06.1 4 - Telex: 801.184 F 


his wife, Marguerite, took charge. 

“My wife and I decided to take 
Vfliandry in hand and put it into 
shape," he said. “Since 1972, our 


annual number of visitors has qua- 
drupled. to 230,000 hut year, and 
many a f them — especially foreign- 
ers from. far away — tell us mat 
Vfliandry represents for them the 
‘quintessence of France.’ " 

Marguerite Carvallo plans and 
supervises the work over the entire 
17 acres (7 hectares) of the garden. 

including *h® trimm ing of box 


hedges and planting of tulips, for- 
get-me-nots, dahlias and panaes by 
the thousands in the decorative 
“Garden of Love" and “Garden of 
Music.” Tbese are on VflJandry's 
puddle tier, irrigated, tike the ret 
of the domain, with water from the 
lake on the top level. 

. Vfllandiy is 160 miles (254 kilo- 
meters) southwest of Paris, almost 
all of that by expressway. There is a 
pleasant country hotd a shon walk 
from the chAteau in the village of 
Vfliandry, the Cbeval Rouge [Tel. 
(47) .50.02.07] with a dining room 
serving Loire Valley specialties. 

Admission to Vfliandry is 16 
francs for a guided tour of cMtcau 
and gardens; 14 francs to viat the 
gardens without guide. Children 
are admitted for free up lo 8 and 
from 9 to 16 pay half price. The 
chateau is open from Palm Sunday 
to Nov. 11 and the gardens stay 
open from 9 AM. to 7 P.M (or 
sunset in winter) every day of the 
year. 


» i 

■ . ■[ 

• It > 


- L .• 

• D • i. 



PRESENTATION OF Tl€ OOTSTANOWG 
NEW CREATIONS BY flAI III 9 




HOTEL SAN FBHtO***- 

Soinf-Rcqihasl/Vdescuro 
between Cannes & St Tropes 

Id the heart of a pine forest. Hotel 
San. Pedro offers -aB the comforts 
of its harmoniously decorated 
rooms. A few minutes from the 


-e. * 

W, •; 

2 a -* 

* t * ■■ 
? il 

•ei • _ 


-f. 

, ... 




cristal 

FRANCE 


beaches and the thalassotherapy 
center of St.-ftapha8i next to the 18- 
hoie golf course, the San Pedro 
welcomes you to a Unique spot on 
the French Riviera. 

Route du Goife de Valesarra 
•3700 St.-RcnhaKL 
TeL- (94) 52.1034/52.1534 
=T«kac FREAIS- Son Pedro 461-360: 


V *'*■* » \ .. 


COUPS « RIVIERA - F 3250 

AU VASE ETRUSQUE 


11, place de la Madeleine - PARIS 8" 


H e speaks english, he speaks french, he is 
an international voyager, he dreams of 
adventure and lives the minute 
He is professional or amateur in his life. 
Cultivated, fashionable, he likes arts arid me - 
dias, discovering is his passion. 

. He is handsome, macho and tender... he is 
2 5 to 40 years old and women adore him As 
cool and suave as James Bond and when the 
rythm counts, he is more funky than James 
Brown . 

His name , DICK... for the man at his BEST. 








J\ • ■ . ■■ /,jLZ 

/■ *.‘v “i.A. 


DICK, a man you can read .. intelligent, dyna- 
mic. colorful, motivated and rust down to 
earth. 


V- 






DICK a new french bilingual, french and 
english magazine, one hundred page, inter- 
national men's monthly on sale world-over at 
25 FF. June 3... 




DICK 




•«** 






May 3 T . 1 985 1. Thar.k you to ^ r J™ ,ted ,0 

and return edreas made to the order 0?DlC?maMS^^C^ e 
DAJEPI. BEST - 1 3 , rue de Toumon. 75000 Rarie 


— v. u'vr. magazine, so 

' T oumon, 75000 Pans, FRANCE. 


For all informations or reservation of adven.smgend photo 
s P 0 . c !i'. c ° n i act 0ur Pans-ofl.ce Math, 


editorial 


SUBSCRIBE NOW 


5 paces, contact our Paris-ofl.ce Mathis rl™ . 
027 53.18. Soph-e Grap.nei or Garland ^n^.fe If 

Ptwlr CV»B< -lils-.'s Iir f on ,:^, 








m 


M 




of ih* 
! uW 


tillage 
grand 
* ttUn 
in. 


U*S 



i lEUv-lijjlt- 


ms ~ 

***tr l<m 

Mfii 
• iftjf i'juv 
sr.^aj — 




t 

r*n*.*M 
tartu** 
*uk To 
nw. Vott 


h{ 


i-A 

X\ 

*^V 


a*4w* 

<H £**Ml 
tlWftffakA 
At*» »*tk 

vjK*r or 

m*t ***«n 
aatwr* 

4t\ * 

<4 Shtteaii 
%yvfvi vfH 
L&tUrcn 

f.V-*' 

ii.-tv 

t &«l4*S 

jviu*:* Ma\ 

* C.V »»-2 
ilil >4 ^ 


C 


»MV 


E 


t'*r~ **• 
Mte apt- t 

*■#« * f 

+ :• 

V *•* ^ f; 


* : : 

in* .si 
• •i.'WIrt 


— 


Y 


. \Sf * 'v >c 



% 


t* 




;*? ■ • • 

S. .:' 


” r- 


t:. 


?.-■■*■ 

'.*>'• 




4/^; 

■fte 


*■' rt 


K 


*: 


<X i. ’ 


%)- 


% 


R 


A 


-^* s 


*►*: *?' 


r •*■: 


*v 


l\TKK\ \tiON \l. HKH MJ> TKHH ML Till KSim MU <*. !*)».> 


IW 1.5 


A SPECIAL REPORT 0> TRAVEL IN FRANCE i 


¥ 


Guidebooks Geared Discriminating Traveler 


By Roger Coifis 



NTIBES — Can. you let me have , the address of 
Cofuml 


Christopher 
me on laeoh 


Jumbus in Calvi, my editor asked 
me on the phone from New York, referring to the 
■ Corsica chapter of a guide 1 had filed the week 
before. I must confess I had not climb ed to the Columbus 
house, but when you’re trying to cover Corsica in three days 
on fixed expenses you have to cut a few comers. 

What this illustrates is that most guides ^re compiled by 
t eams of fallible-people like myself, backed up byconsrien- 
lious editors in New Y ork or London. We can t possibly visit 
every restaurant, hotel and museum -we recommend. And, 
most guides are inevitably out of dale by the rinw they ate 

puWisned- 

In my wew.the more limited the scope, the more useful 
the guide. 

There are; exceptions. For example, the encyclopaedic 
“Gride Hachctte 1985” lists 8,000 towns, eharwiiw and 
museums in the 28 regions of France, with 500 tourist 
itineraries, 300 regional and city maps, 8,000 hotels and 
restaurants, 1,000 camping sites and 5,000 addresses for 
sports and leisure activities. 

An especially useful guide for North Americans is Bira- 
baom’s France 1985" guide. This is divided into five sec- 
tions- — getting ready to go (practical tips), a guide to 16 


French dries, 19 major leisure activities, from fishing to 
gambling, and 17 detailed driving tours. 

The classic authority on holds and restaurants is the 
Mfchdin red guide, which sells 750,000 copies a year. Miche- 
lin is renowned for its objectivity and the guide** restaurant 
stars (three is the maximum) are a covetedaward. 

A gastronomic guide with more color and imagination 


has 40 years experience seeking out the best of French 
. His classic is “Travelers France,” . 


than the Mididin red is Gault & Mfllau, a quirky, opinion ai 

ants and hotels h 


ed and irreverent guide to 5,100 restaurants and hotels in 
France and neighboring Belgium and Switzerland. The 1985 
edition has a set of excellent road maps. Gault & MiOaii is 
published in En glish, but I recommend the original French 
version as h is more up to date. 

Value for money can also be found in the “Guide ties 

Rdais Routiers,” which lists 3,600 establishments where you 

can eat well for less than 40 francs. 


Two excellent regional guides, Paris and the South of 
France, are included in the American Express pocket travel 
guides series, which pack in a huge amount of detail. Appar- 
ently, they haven’t had the commercial success they deserve - 
as some people wrongly believe that the recommendations 
are slanted towards American Express card outlets. 

But my very favorite guides are those written and com- 
piled by individuals, reflecting their personal tastes and 


cuisine. His classic is "l revelers France,'* and he has recently 
published “The French Selection," a guide to 50 hotels, 
ranging from less chan 80 francs a night to more than 400 
francs, and “Le Weekend.” loaded with practical informa- 
tion on hotels, restaurants and shops in a host of towns and 
villages. 

In the same genre is Peter B rereton’s “Through France” 
on minor roads, a guide to seven leisurely routes through 
some of the country’s most beautiful scenery, divided into 
stages of 100-130 kilometers, with route maps, stopping 
places and recommended small hotels. 

Richard Bums is another author who has covered 22 
regions of France in his recently updated “French Leave 3." 
This is a guide to hotels restaurants, wines and cheeses and 
contains a glossary of 1,000 menu terms translated into 
everyday English. 

A guide that is a delight to read as well as follow (like the 
best of armchair cook books) is “The Food Lover's Guide to 
Paris,” by Patricia Wells, a personal selection of restaurants, 
wine bars, markets, charctaeries and patisseries in Paris. It’s 
evocative and highly practical at the same time. 


SOME CMDAEN WILL MAKE 
MORE FRIENDS THAN OTHERS 
THIS SUMMER 


One such author is British-based Arthur Epernoo, who 


The author is a contributing editor to Bimbaum’s Travel 
Guides, published ty Houghton Mifflin. 


In Paris: What, When and Where 


*W ~J~ baloix to Paris generally come aimed with 
\f reservations, guidebooks and advice. More 
▼ and more, they know where to stay and what 
to eat. But when it comes to what to see, the 
guidebooks don’t have all the answers. When 
crowds gather on main boulevards or pack into 
small places , travelers want to know one thing — 
what’s happening? What follows is a selective 
guide to events — horn street theater to art to 
sports — that will take place in Paris this summer. 


Special Events 


PARK INTERNATIONAL MARATHON: May 1 1. 6 
P M- -8:30PM. Sun and finish of the nee: Avenue Foche 

— ldtharToudissemenL 

SPRING THEATER IN PARIS: May 20-Jone 30, per- 
romances by young artists. Phone: 887.5442. 

PARIS VILLAGES: In June, the different Parisian 
quarters come alive with parades, foQdodc groups sad 
musicians, "aarcons dc oft" races and d af wre etc-. 

FIREWORKS AT MONTMARTRE: lone 29, Phone: 
277 92.26. 

VICTOR-HUGO SHOW: Lucres Borgia, End of June 

— Beginning of Inly. Place des Vosges — 3d antreBsse- 
meni. Phone: 277.9?.. 26. 

JOUSTING: July. Lutfcce Arena. Phone: 277.9126. 
BASTILLE DAY CELEBRATION: July 13—9 P.M. 
Balk and dances in die sheets of Puis. July 14 — 10:30 
P.M. Muse and fireworks. 

Art Exhibitions 

JAMES TISSOT OU [/IMPRESSIONISM MON- 
DAJN: Through June 30, 10 AM--5:40 P.M. dosed on 


Mondays. Petit Palais Museum. Avenue Winstosi Chur- 
cfaJH — 8th ammdi&semeh! 

L’ART ET LE PARFUM (ART AND PERFUME): 
Through September, 1 1 AM.- 7 PX, dosed on Mondays, 
Le Louvre des Antiqaaires, 2, place dn Palais-Royal — ier 
anoodttsemenl. 

FLAGONS DE PARFUMS (PERFUME FLASKS): 
Through August 18. noon-6 P_M_ closed an Tuesdays. 1 1 
A2ML- 6 P-M- Saturdays and Sundays. Music des Arts 
Dhontib, 107, roe de Rjvoh — ler arroncfisseoenL 

RENOIR: May 15 — September 2. 10 AM.- 8 PM~ 
dosed on Tuesdays. 10 AM.- 10 PM. on Wednesdays. 
Grand Palais, Ayenue Winatoo-Onirdnll — 8th arroa- 
dssenienL 

SALON DES INDEPENDANTS: From the Bible to- 
Chagall, June 6 — Jnly 28, Grand Palais, Avenue Wmstoo- 
ChnrchOl — 8lh mr niufi | c w wi i > 

FRENCH ARTIST EXHIBITION, INTERNATION- 
AL BEAUX-ARTS EXHIBITION: Through May 21. 
10:30 AM. - 6:30 P-M_ Grand Palais, Avenue Wirutno- 
OmrrAfU — 8 th xrrondissemenL 


Sporting Events 

THE FRENCH OPEN: May 27 — June 9, Roland 
Garros Stadium, 2. avenue Gordon-Benneti — 16th amm- 
dissejnem. 

PARIS GRAND PRO: BICYCLE RACE. June 15 — 
12:30 P.M_ Avenue de GravcOe, 12th azroodissemenl. * 

TOUR DE FRANCE FINISH: Jnly 21 — 1 P.M.- 6 
PM. Avenue des Champs Elysees. 8th arrondissement. 

GRAND STEEPLECHASE OF PARK: Ime 23 —2 
PM.. Longchamp Hippodrome, 16th amrodissetnent. 

PARIS GRAND PRIX: Jane 30 —2 PM_ Longchamp 
Hippodrome. 16th anondissemenL 


Paris on $500 a Day, 
Other Guide Nuggets 


By Joseph Fitchett 


P ARIS — New guidebooks 
in French can open up in- 
teresting vistas for travel- 
ers beyond the classic cul- 
ture of the green Michelin and the 
contemporary consuming of Gault 
& MUkuL All it takes is a little 
French and enough ingenuity to 
span the gap when words fail. 

A new big-spender’s guide to 
Paris, “Paris Luxe." by Michelle de 
Leyrat (published by Editions 
M-A^ 120 francs), handily lists 
prestigious Paris businesses from 
grand hotels to vintage wine deal- 
ers or a trendy vet 
The guide, sponsored by the Col- 
bert Committee, a self-selecting 
group of top merchants, claims to 
tdJ readers ^what things are to be 
adored and what are to be de- 
spised.’ 

-best 


la Vie de Chateau," by Philippe 
Couderc (Flammarion, 90 francs), 
provides 260 palatial addresses, of- 
ten complete with aristocratic man- 
ager and with prices ranging from 
very expensive to bargain-base- 
ment — recommended for Mr. 
Couderc’s reliable, often caustic, 
description of each address. 

Parisians and other denizens of 
the capital who want to get away 
for a day or so will want a just- 
reissued guide to getaway villages, 
“52 Weekends autour de Paris,” by 
Gilles Pudlowski (Albin Michel, 59 
francs). For each locality. Mr. Pud- 
lowski. a renegade from Gault & 
Mill au. describes the most pictur- 
esque country inn and best local 
restauranL For example, in Barbt- 
zon, the 19th-century painters' vil- 
lage an hour's drive from Paris near 
Fontainebleau, he suggests the Au- 
berge de Bas-Breau, which hosted a 


Less grandiloquently, it uas-oreau, wmen nreiea a 

provides guidance about *W for European heads of siate 

buys” among these “must" 

Maxim's, for example. 


last year. 


era 


Change in Bordeaux Wine Country 


(Continued From Page 9) 
her that the ch&teaus themselves 
are rarely open to the public. One 
visits the cellars, the grounds and 
vineyards, bat rarely- the house. 
Countless visitors, as eager to see 
elegant rooms and old furniture as 
wine vats, have been disappointed. 
Occasionally, unsuspecting tour- 
ists, usually American, call or write 
for reservations, dunking that the 
wine ch&teaus are hotels. They are 
not. They are private homes and, in 
France, private means just that 

A good stop for lunch in the 
Medoc is theAnberge du Savoie, in 
the center of Maigaux. The only 
connection with the Savoy region 
of France is the name. The cooking 
is local and very good. Needless to 
say Lhe wine selection is, too. The 
Relais de Margaux, the M Woe’s 
first truly deluxe inn and restau- 
rant. was scheduled to open this 
spring with a ready-made two-star 
restauranu the Aubcrge Sl Jean, 
transplanted from Sl Jean de 
Blaignac near St. EmiHoo. 

The second day of any Bordeaux 


trip should be devoted to Sl Emi- 
lioo and PomeroL SL Enufion is a 
lovely country town whose wine- 
makers pretend to be bumpkins 
who mock the pretensions of the 
elegant M&docaras. The SL Enu- 
lion wine people are quite sophisti- 
cated but they are also relaxed. 
They are warm, friendly and acces- 
sible. Come to think of it, so are 
their wines. Chfttean Ausone, 
thought to have been the country 
home of the Roman poet Ausonius, 
is an important place to see. So are 
the vineyards of Cheval Blanc and. 
in adjoining Pomerd, of Chilean 
P&nis. Pfctrus, which makes one of 
the most famous and certainly the 
most expensive wines in Bordeaux, 
is little more than a country farm- 
house. The designation “chateau” 
in the French wme country means 
just about anything its owner wants 


it to mean — so long as his wine 
qualifies for high praise. SL Emi- 
llon is a pretty town to walk 
through and either the Hdlel de 
Plaisance or tbeLogjs de l&Cadeoe 
are pleasant places for lunch. 


If there is time for another day of 
touring, it could include Glares; 
which begins at the dty line, and 
Sauternes, some 30 minutes to the 
south. There, the tourist landmark 
is Chateau d*Yquem, which pro- 
duces probably the greatest sweet 
wine in France. You will need an 
appointment to see the cellars but it 
usually indudes a lasting. You w3I 
not be blazing new trails. Thomas 
Jefferson stopped here in 1787 to 
buy wine from the owner, Comte 
Lur-Saluce, whose greal-great- 
great-grandnephew runs lhe cha- 
teau today. 


courses in cooking (and eating) 
Burberry’s replaces trench-coat 
buckles free. Bulgari offers & life- 
time supply of matches Tor owners 
of its gold matchboxes, which retail 
for 19,600 francs apiece. 

A useful book for those trying to 
do Paris on $500 a day. 

If. on the other hand, you warn 
to see France on $50 a day, an 
interesting way, increasingly fa 
vored by French city dwellers, is to 
make your holiday headquarters na]_| 
a working 'farm in your favorite 
region of France. 

An annual guide, “Vacances et 
Weekends a la Ferine;" by Michel 
Smith (Balland. 95 francs), pro- 
vides a full description (often with 
photographs) of 300 farms across 
the country that regularly take pay- 
ing guests. 

The attractions are strong: spa- 
cious, cheap accommodation, ac- 
companied by breakfast and usual 
ly dinner and a glimpse of the 
region seen from lhe land. It can be 
an unbeatable formula for families 
with children. 

For people who prefer chi tea us 
to cottages, a new book, “Guide & 



FASHION 

HANDBAGS AND BETS 


3 Rue Oombiges - 75008 Paris 

Tel: (1)723 6999 


L. Close to Ave. Montaigne 


CONTRIBUTORS 


BARBARA BELL is a journalist based in Paris 


ROGER COLUS writes the business travel 
column. For Fun and Profit, in the International 
Herald Tribune. He is a contributing editor from 
the Cbte- d'Azur to Bimbaum’s Travel Guides 
(Houghton Mifflin). 


KATHERINE KNORR is 
International Herald Tribune's 
coverage. 


ible for lhe 
and leisure 


FRANK JL PRIAL is a wine columnist for The 
New York Tunes. 


JOSEPH FTFCHETT is a staff correspondent 
for tbe International Herald Tribune. 


JEAN RAFFERTY is a Paris-based journalist 
who writes about interior design and French life- 
style. 


GEORGE GUDAUSKAS, a journalist based in PATRICIA WELLS is the International Herald 
Paris, writes on a variety of topics including travd Tribune's restaurant critic and a frequent contrib- 
and lifestyle. He has fished intensively in Europe utor to The New York Times. She is the author of 
and North America. "Tbe Food Lover’s Gmde to Paris” (Workman). 


LINDA HAUSS is the editor of tbe Interoation- J UDY YABLONKY is on the editorial staff of 

al Herald Tribune's special reports. the IHTs sperial reports department 


IPaMRIIS look 

Leather Goods 


Perfumes Cosmetics 
Fashion Accessories 
DUTY FREE - 40% 

13 Avenue de ('Opera PARIS 
297.43.88 


-rr[ 


Chooae Irom 30 Aeti*»Y noiiday centra* 
and tiom just £52 you wont hnd a Dnw 
•way for your Children to en(oy adventure 
end challenge In a framework of saloiy 
and fuW Introduce them lo smlmg 
ndmg. canoMttg. a/ entry, mai bikes and 
much, much more 

Write or phone lor a biocitumanddeteds 
at all our Holidays for boys andgirfs 7- x7 
ve» Free video available chowmQ the 
PG.L Magic in action 1 

PGL Young Adventure 
(Cl Station Street. 

= Roe* -or* Wye. HRS 7 AH 


Tel. UK: (Ross-on-Wye) 63511 
Tel. PARIS: (1)742 4939 


New collection 


ESCAEH 


at European 
export prices 

Marie-Marline 


8, Rue de Sevres, Paris 6th. 
TeL: (1)2221844. 



OLD ENGLAND 


Purveyors of the finest clothing for men, 
women and children 


Old England, 12 Bhd. des Capoeines, 75009 PARIS 
TeL: (1) 742*1.99 

— Old England has no branches - — . 


( 

5 

3> mitos 

% CXTTEDAZUD 

**** LUXITRY hotels 


ANJBB-066OA 


HOTEL DU CAP-HXN ROC 

TeL (93) 61-39.01 -Wex <70763 


BEAUtmS/MBt- 06310 

LE METROPOLE 
M(93]0IJK10I-Mk470BM 

LA RES9VE DE BEAUUBJ 

Id. (93) OUXUn -T4n47U30) 


CA!*£S - 06400 

GRAND NOTH. • La Oofastta 

W. (93) 38.1545 -Tele* <70777 

HOIB. MAJESTIC - In CMmK* 

M- (93) 68.91X0 -Telex 470787 

HOTH. MARTINEZ. La Oobena 

TeL (93) 68.91,91 -Tele* 470706 
MONTHHJRYA* 

TeL (93) 68.91 ^O-Uor 470039 


EZBSUKMBl. 06360 
CAP E5IH. HOTH. 

TeL (93) 01 -Sau-T^e* 470305 


JUANiESPHS- 06100 

HOIB. BH1ES-R1VE5 

TeL (93) 61 02-79 -Telex 470984 


PRNOPAUTY OF MONACO 
MONTE CARLO 

HOVH.DE PAMS 
M. [93) 5030J0- TeUe 469925 
L*HBUMTAGE 

TeL (93) 5Q6731 -Mex 479432 

NOTH MRABEAU-Av. Mae. 


TeL (93) 30.9001 -Men 479413 
MONTVCAUjO BEACH HOIB. 

TU (93) 783140- tUex 479413 


NCE - 06000 
HOVH.MGRBCO 

TeL (93) 883931 -T<ex4ft0040 


Sr.JBANCANBNAT- 06230 

IAVOUVOR 

TA (93) 01. 13-13-TUex 470317 


SANHWJLC&VB 4 CE- 06520 
1£ MAS D’ARTIGNY 
TeL (93) 373434 -Mar <70601 


SAJNT-TKOPEZ- 83990 
IE BYBLOS - la I 
M. (94) 970004 -Max <70235 


VB4CE- 06140 

DOMAMEST^MARIM 

TeL (93) 580202- Tele* WQ282 



Breguet: 

Precision mastery since 1775 


Abraham Louis Breguet (1747-1823) 

was one or the most phenomenal watchmakers 

history has ever known. 

His genius was an overriding influence 
not only on watch-making techniques 
but also on the beauty 
of the finished object. 


'aetO 


'/Vi 

/ 

Since 1775 
Available at 

CHAUIV1ET 

[eweler since 1780 




Paris: 12 place Vendome 
London: 178 New Bond Street 
Geneva: 2 rue du Rhone 
Brussels: 82 av. Louise 
New York: 48 East 57th Street 




SHALIMAR. 


Gueriain 

PARIS 


Envodtantetsensuel iroubianletsdducteur. Shalimar, feparfum defetemelteminin . 

WBS: 6BCHAMPS'€LYS£E5. 2 PlACt VENDOfvff. 93 RUE DE WSSY. 29 BLtt DE SfVTSS. REGION RWaSSM^E. RMQ: I»OSIMttS «4CR££S. 



In Paris 

the luxury of the last century 
is alive. And breathtaking! 



HOTEL 

INTER • CONTINENTAL 
PARIS 



THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 


•> INTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 



3 Rue de Castigone, 75 040 Pbr-Cedex 01. (01) 260 3780, Telex: 220114 


■reservations call: London: (01) 491-7181 
Frankfurt (069) 230561, Amsterdam: (020) 262021 


/ 


JEAN RAT0L 


\\\ COLLECTION 















N. 



W' 


JEAN PATOU 
7, rue St Florentin 
7 5008 Paris 


i 








• • - — i V i fc . , ■ V 


INTERNATIONAL HEBAU> TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY % 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Hot BvollaW* a) PiW ikfw 


NYSE index 


provisos Today 

HM LM O0M JP.M- 
It. 10 459 10428 10459 10437 

nSZnS*, TO82 l»B »** 

£» SS 25 

Ftma 11131 11145 11135 11 233 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


NYSE Diaries 


Noi«Dllnblaatpy«H"w 1 


Bends 

utmna 

Indwtrlatx 


Odd- Lot Trading in N. 


Bey Sola 

Mo* 7 19S504 41U0I 

MOV 4 10303 0730 

May 3 — 1BBJ13 391417 

May 2 153339 411224 

gov* — - l8Wjw ^ 

'included in ttn K*n fleuras 


VVeAiesdays 

MSE 

■ 3pum. 


Volet 3 Pi* tuauoo 

Pm.3PJA.n4 W.TB3W 

PrnrcnBoflriatafdae W.lfcJW 


Tables Include tte notion wide prices 
up to the cfostas on Wall Street and 
do not refladtate trades etscwbere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


KM available at gm ftw 


NASDAQ index 


comnash* 390J9 MM3 Sfl TOO 

ISST 39^ BBS 

SSB8P %£& z %$%£ 

«. wzhu 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Previous Today 

KMh Low dose 1PJ4 
IrtdaStttOtS 30033 19949 20044 19943 

tSS. 15436 15X79 15454 15471 

Uttlttles 1132 . fllJI 8TJK2 0134 

Ftoana 71JQ 3140 1UI 1U9 

Commsita 18159 17937 15076 18023 


AMEX Sales 


AMEX Most Actives 


VaL HM 

7371 3* 

M U* 

S i W* 

* 5 

ml 
on iso 
U77 am 
WO 140 

W Sso 

390 Mto 


Lad 

08. 

J* 

14ta 

— to 

12* 

17* 

— to 

1* 

+ to 

12* 

— * 

lift 

— to 

Mb 

34* 

— * 

U* 

+i 

34 

+ to 

1.1* 

+ to 

14 

+ * 

■ 

+ * 

9ft 

+ to 


3PA4vaUana 

3570500 

Prav.3PJM.Mhm 

5590500 

Prwv.eoBxwftm 

49*0080 


AMEX Stock index 


12 Monti 
High Lea Stock 


HOittgtiLou ttsa. Clfac 


U AAR 45 23 13 41 17 14* lM-« 

19to 9*AG3 12 37 15 M* 14* — SO 

WO 9S0 AMCA I II 11 11 + 10 

21 Vl in AMP 50 25 57 997 8M 19* 19% + to 
43to 241* AMD 10 7066 4ZV. 40% 42* +11* 

2146 1M AMR pi 210 104 S32 71to 21 21 

23 Tf AMR pf 212 HU I Mto 20* 28* 

14U. 746 APL 37 46 «V6 8V. 016 + 46 

6561 4446 ASA Z30 33 IS 51 5040 5046— to 

27 1416 AVX 31 11 13 505 1516 1444 1516 +1 

3496 M AZP 273 IU 7 CM 23V. 2314 2314 + 1* 

54 3tAk AfatLob 188 27 15 1093 S3 5116 5146— ft 

2516 17 ACGoWds 84 20 17 228 23V. 32 2214 + 16 

21* 12Vr AaneC 49 U 64 MU 14 14—96 

10* Bto AcmoE 32b 3d 10 9 046 046 846 

1741 U AOcEx 1320114 47 1616 1646 1616 + to 

20 1146 AdRiMI 32 11 6 4 1546 1544 IS* + 16 

1996 346 AMn J3I 24 16 78 916 946 996 + 46 


New York Trading Is Active 


UMeMO 

KFOOLOW Stock 


Hv 3 PM. 

05r.YU.PC taQjHttl Lon fluotCWB 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 


quarter merchandise Uade deficit had a slightly 
negative impact on early trading, he said. 

Arco was the most active NYSE-listed i-cme 


Stock Exchange headed lower early Wednesday off ft to 62ft. Arkla Inc. followed, up ft to 23 
afternoon in active trading. Mobil was third, off 1* to 30*. 


afternoon in active trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver 
4.97 to 1047.78 shortly before 3 P. 


was off 


In other petroleums, Amerada Hess was off 
1ft to 31ft on speculation that it may have 


Declines led advances by a 8-7 ratio among problems getting anti-takeover measures passed 


4116 2516 AMO 12 1411 28% 27* 2S* + to 

1246 646 Adwnot .13 U II 8* 0* 8* — 66 

1446 B46 Aorftex 11 29 1316 1196 114b— 16 

4416 27V6 AetnLf 264 53 33 2121 4446 4346 4446 + 46 

5346 5246 Aatt.pl 553B1U 1 5546 35% 5514 

3S 1546 Atom 130 MU 164 33W 32*i 3346 + 16 

416 316 Alloon 22 7 246 246 TO 

51 3396 AlrPrd 130 25 11 933481643 4H6 + 46 

2446 13 AlrbFrt 80 23 10 60 18 1716 18 

2 1 AIMOOO 23 20 146 146 1* 

2716 21 AlaPof 2540185 29 37 27 Z7 

32V. 2646 AtoP plA 293 124 3 3146 3146 3146— 46 

716 4 Ala P dot 37 118 7 746 746 746 + 16 

73*. 4115 AlaPpf 930 120 4382 75 7246 K « 

10316 3516 AlflP pi 1130 103 50x102461024610246— 16 

9 56 AlaPpf 838 I2J lOfa 67* «7to 67ft +1 

M46 II Alaaoco MU 65 3 47 15 1416 15 +> 

2246 916 AMlAlr .14 8 9 402 22 2146 2146—46 

1716 KJV5 ASjrtofl JB 22 18 3 1616 UU 1416 

3146 22*1 AOrtva 76 25 U 133 31 3046 3046— 16 

3116 2316 Alcan 130 21 12 2237 2346 2346 2346 + V6 

3616 2716 Alois rd L20 IS 12 94 3416 34 34 

32 17 AlRAte 139 27 1390 27*6 2716 2716— to 

24* 2046 AI#xdr 19 137 2Z» 22to 2246 + 46 

■916 69 AltoCP 236t U 34 27 7944 79 7946 + 46 

2846 1846 Alslnf 180 58 131 3616 3416 206 

28to 1516 Alelnpf 219 11. T 14 1946 19* 1916 

9446 81 AtalpfCIMS 122 4 9146 9146 91* 

31* 2496 Alto Pur 270 87 9 3036 3146 21* 31*— K 

21 1546 Alton G -Mb 32 14 157 1916 19 19 — M 

4646 2016 ARdCp 180 40 9 3518 45* 4446 45 + * 

66 53* AMCppf 624 105 30 64* 64 64 

113*99 AJdCppRXDO 172 5 100*100*100* 

33% T2% AMPd 78 J IW TO 1W 

59* ]i AIMSIr 212 29 8 596 55* 53* 54*— * 

12* 5* AUbCb 36 7 6* 6*— * 

34* 34 AJbCol 10 30 2946 30 — * 

27* 20 AU.TL 184 65 9 30 2696 26*36* + * 
39* 29* Alcoa 120 35 15 3437 30* 30* 38* + 16 

25* 19* Anton 20 12 6077 16* 16 M* + to 


the 1.923 issues traded. ’ by some institutional holders. 

Five-hour volume was about 822 million was r .°^f ^ 

shares, compared with 82.4 million in theequiv- was °“ ™ 10 

aient period Tuesday. National Semiconductor was unchanged at 

10% and Motorola was up ft to 31ft. Apple 
Before the stock market opened, the govern- Computer was off ft to 19ft. 
ment reported that the merchandise trade defi- Autos were lower, with General Motors off ft 

dt for the first quarter widened to $28 33 bil- io 68ft, Ford off ft to41ft and Chrysler off ft to 
lion- 34ft. 


Five-hour volume was about 82-2 million 
shares, compared with 82.4 million in die equiv- 
alent period Tuesday. 


taro 27* 27* 2716— V 
19 137 Z» 2H6 22* + * 

24 77 7W. TV 7916 + 16 

131 34* 34* Z(to 

16 19* 19* 19* 

4 91* 91* 91* 


180 48 9 3588 45* 44* 45 + * 

I 624 MLS 30 64* 44 64 

4200 172 5 108* 108* 106* 

75 5 1« TO TO 

212 29 8 5M 53* S3* 54 V.— * 
36 7 6* 6*—* 

10 30 3946 30 — * 
184 65 9 30 26* 26* 26* + to 

120 3>9 15 3437 30* 30* 30* + 16 

20 LZ 6077 I6M 16 15* + to 


Despite early losses, u the market is in good 
shape and could close on the plus side today,” 
said Marvin Katz of Sanford C. Bernstein. He 
said the only negative is that cash portions of 
institutional portfolios are low. 

Mr. Katz said the market was moving in a 
trading range between 1 ,250 and IJOOand that 
a discount rate cut in next two weeks could 
spark a flurry that would take the Dow though 
the 1JOO mark. 

■ Wednesday morning's report on the ftrsl- 


CapitaJ Cities Communications was off ft to 
215ft, CBS was up ft to 109 and Chris-Craft 
Industries was up ft to 49ft. 

Tootsie Roll Industries was up 4ft to 48ft 
after reporting first-quarter profit of 73 cents a 
share, compared with 48 cents a share in the 
year-ago quarter. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. Gulf Oil Canada led 
the actives, off ft at J4ft. Sbarro Inc. followed, 
unchanged at 12 in its first day of trading. BAT 
Industries was third, off 1-16 to 3ft. 


42 32* AmOKPf 380 98 7 33* 33* 33*— 1* 

34 7246 AmHes l.H) 38 22 5588 31* 30* J1V6— 1V6 

144 mtAHtopt 380 26 3 134 134 134 —6* 

3* 1* AmAa 134 2 1* 1*— * 

20 15toABofcr 8 97 M 19* 19*— to 

70 S3 ABrond 290 4.1 9 580 64* 63* 63*— * 

65 52 AQrdpf 120 28 1 61* 61* 61*— 3* 

7746 24* ABrdpf 275 102 0 36* 36* 2816 + to 

70* 53 ABrdpf 287 4.1 4 65 45 65 + 16 

115 55* ABdof 180 IS 17 4400 110*109*110* + 16 

24* IVto ABMM 86 38 IX 54 36 25*76 +16 

37* 20* ABittPr 84 25 15 4 2516 2516 25* 

5516 40* ArnCon 290 5S 10 207 S3* 52* 53*— * 
19* 1646 ACOpBd 220 11.1 45 19* 19* IP*— to 

32* 25V* ACapCv 2518 87 32 29 7S* 29 

II 6* ACanfC II 75 fl B S 

56* 43* ACVon 1.90 17 12 3301 51* 5046 51 + * 

2946 18* AOT 72 17 25 191 24* 2446 34* 

21* 15* AEJPw 2360107 8 784 21* 21 21*— * 

441k 29 Am Exp 178 29 15 2075 44 43* 4346— * 

30 14* AFomll 84b 23 13 260 28* 20* 28*— to 

xm im agocp im 11 » etc 32* a* 32* + m 

13* 6 AGO! tot 77 13* 13* W* + * 

57 51* AGM of A 678*118 193 54* 54* 5446 

90 53* AGn(PfB5.90o 6J 265 87* 87* 87* + * 

3 * 44* AGnlpf 375 43 768*67*68*+* 

40* AGnpfD 284 41 1127 6446 64* 6446 + * 

3216 2S46 AHortt 170 29 9 5 31 31 31 — * 

13* 7* AHalst II 9* 9* V* 

62* 4646 AM Dm* 290' 47 12 1499 5946 59 5946 + * 

38 26* AHtop 1.12 38 10 1685 3044 38* 38* + * 

87* 6246 Afnrtdl 680 78 8 1968 85* 84* 84*—* 

7V1* 52 AlnGrp M 8 » !6M 78* 77* 7716— H 

28* 18* AMI 72 28 13 8110 2546 23* 2546 +1* 

5* 3 AmMst 1474 2* 3 3* 


13 Mann 
KMiLato Stock 


Dtv.YM.Pe 10tt H66I LOW Dual. CKW 


172 67 21 
112 87 7 
29S IU 
70 IS fl 
1J6 5.1 15 
MU 25 15 
ISO 11 7 
<48 IS 15 
80 48 7 

216 IU 

12 

184 14 71 
180 28 fl 
212 97 
556011-1 
84 58 15 
180 47 11 
42 29 SN 


1896 1*46 1846 
2* 2* 2* 
21* 20* 2Mh 
38* 38* 38* 
32* 32* 32* 
20* 20 20* 
27* 26* 2646 
42* 42* 4246 

32 31 32 

33 32* 3216 

16* 16* 16* 
17* 17* IT* 
17* 17* 17* 
25* 25* 25* 
SSto 5446 54* 
22 21* 23 

49* 49* 49* 
14* 14* 1446 
60* 59* 60* 
10 17* 17* 

3 3 3 

fl* 7* a 


7W6 53 AlDGrp M 8 T9 ISM 7816 

28* 18* AMI 72 28 13 8110 2546 

5* 3 AmMrt 1474 3* 

65* 2746 ANatRo 272 14 12 16 6446 
43* 34* APrmU 29 3 381 2546 

18* 12V6 ASLFlpf 219 16.1 3 5.3 

16 10* AStato 80 67 9 17 11* 

35* 22* AmSM 180 68 9 1315 27 

56* 26* ArnSter 8* 17 9 754 50* 

6646 46* ASIrpfA 470 77 780 60* 

3696 51 A5lrplB 680 I U 5 55* 

ZM IS AT&T 170 56 16 8787 21* 

30* 30* ATITpf 384 98 1270 38* 

t^S* 

- 


27* 1446 AWatro 180 28 
69* 37* A Wat pi 183 23 


38* 19* AmHott 280 97 8 
«8» 53* ATrPr 584 82 
II* 4* ATrSc 
80* 50* ATTUn 584 7.1 
33 36* Amaraii 180 SO 7 

4396 20 AfitosDo 70 J 22 
113 62 Antaapf 572 48 


74 21 * 20* . . 

15 68* 48* 48* + to 

15 ID* 18* 10* 

I 79* 79V. 79* + * 

15 32* 32 » — * 

9 44 43* 44 + * 

1 112 112 112 -1 


9to 9* 

» 5946 + to 

38to 38* + * 
Of* 84*— * 
77* 77*— H 
23* 25* +1* 
3 3* 

64* 64*— to 

luS 

26* 26*—* 
49 49 — 1* 

^ 55* + 5 

ssa^+to 

sjssii* 
66 * 66 *—* 
20* 21 + * 
48* 68* + * 


29* 21* Antotak 80 37 13 102 25 
27* 18* Amtoc 20 26* 

M I* AmtOK 4 28 ID* 

69 50* Amoco 370 51 9 4|S2 65* 
3M 26* AMP 72 28 18 2*73 30* 


38* 26* AMP 72 28 18 2473 30* 30 

24 12* Amoco 70 25 16 858 12* n 

21* 12* Afflnol 8 3 16* UM 

38* 19 AmSItl 180 *8 8 132 28* 28* 

43* 35* AmMwJ 180 38 M 123 42* 41* 

1* Anocmp 195 3* 3* 

24* IS* Antoas 17 434 20 19* 

30* 19* Anchor 188 67 79 22* 22* 

42* 34* Anaav 172 37 18 149 36* 35* 


24* 24*—* 

30 30* 

12 12*—* 

41* 42* + * 


04* 59* ZOO 25 W 1363 flO 79* 79*— * 

40 45* AatMUPl 380 67 308 57* 5546 57* + * 

20 13* Anlxlr 78 18 17 SB 14* 14* 14*—* 

16* 8* Antttom -04 7 14 341 12* 11* 12 — » 

151A 10* Alfttny 84b 17 B 1 12 12 12 + to 

Mto 9J6 AltodtM Tfl 23 12 124 12* 12V. 12V.— * 

J* * Ap«Ptot . 78 146 1* 1*— * 

19* 15* ApdlPwaiO 106 563 19* 1946 1946 

S,, SS?? ?-!2 ,a<< life 46* 65* 65*— 2* 

3146 2716 ApPwpf 4.11 121 4 32* 32 32 — * 

39* 1716 AMDtO 1.1 2t 37 17 19 3116 3U6 3116 

30* 8 ApoJMo 95 13* U« 13* + to 

21* «* An»Dn .Mb 7 13 543 20 1914 1944— to 

X 23 ArtPpf 3J8 127 18 28* 38* 28* 

23* 1346 ArkBrf 80 20 0 135 30U 1946 20 + * 

»» ,4 „ *rkta UM 48 2212042 2» 22* 25* +1* 

* ArtnM iso h 

UK, l«6 Armada 24 M JI* II* M* 

w t rma L, 634 7* 7to 7ttwto 

!S? 2.10 117 35 17* 17* 17* + to 

24* Wl Amun 4 17 I 47 llto lfl M — U 

38 22* ArtnWIn 170 38565 1293 34 33 33* + * 

3* J** {™Wp»a» 105 2B0S 3516 35 3546 + 46 

19 ^raCp 170 48 7 13 2646 2616 2646 + to 

Mto 13to AlTWfg 70 17 9 46 JKI46 13* 13to- * 

26* 16 Artio 72 A 71 27* 26 27to +lto 

I— ^ vln * * « • 79 20* 20V6 20V.— to 

29* 17* Aoarco 110 334b 23Vb 2316— to 

S2 JSS**. MS » 87 31V. 3D* 30*_ W 

S’* 347 4«» 44* 44* +1* 

41 31* AoMOpI 384 98 32 40* 40* 40* 

M «to A !S®. 240 47 10 196 iOH 60 6046 

n *S°9l 473 SjO S 9546 95* W4-1 

2Sto II* A Won* 180 8.1 9 2 If* 19* 1916 

27* If* AiCyEI 288 9.1 9 47 27W 27 2716 

Mto 40* All Rich 480 68 2922131 4316 62V. 42*— * 

’2 ” ^ 34 150*149 150 —2 

2> 11* AttcnCp 76 1Mb Uto 13* + * 

33* IB* Auaat 80 1J 19 42 22 7146 22 + * 

4* to 32 AutoDI 83 18 IS 381 43* 43* 4Jto— * 

5 4* Avalon n 21 4* 4* 4* 

27* IS* AVEMC 80 22 M 11 27* Z7to 27V. 

23 A vary 80 IJ 13 187 33 32* 32*— to 

IS* 10 Avkriln ■ 190 1416 Uto Mto- to 

fl 71 Avnof 50 1J 13 1734 29to 2816 29* + lib 

2Mb 19* Avan 280 XL! 9 8011 20 TOW* 


195 3* 3* 3 to— to 
17 434 20 1946 1916— to 

79 22* 22* 27* + to 
149 36* 35* 35*— to 


-56 17 12 85 21 2016 28*— to 

280 25 W 1343 80 79* 79*— * 

380 43 308 57* 5646 57* + * 

JM U 17 SB 14* 14* 14*— to 

B4 J 14 341 12* 11* 12 — to 

8«>H .5 - 1 !£. 15 II + to 

JB 23 12 124 13* 17V. 12*— * 

I 78 146 1* 1*— to 

fi-10 W8 563 19* 1946 1946 
117 128 life M* 65* 65*— 2* 

All 111 4 32to 32 32 —to 

1.121 U 17 W 3116 3U6 3116 

95 13* Uto 13* + to 


180a 5-7 13 04 2546 24* 2446— to 

380 28 19 2653 109 IDS 10616— * 
9 31 6 Sto 6 

28B 49 65 782 54 53* S3*—* 

275 9.1 7H 30* 30 30* + to 

21 5* S 5* 

13 89 47* 41* 41* + to 

1.200118 IB 10* 1046 1016— to 

220 53 10 731 41* 40* 41* 

180 62 9 25 22* 22* 221b— * 

135a B8 79 20* 20* 264b + * 

ssis 

.92 25 ^9 

15 180 13* a* 13 

88 V 6 1029 IE 1716 18 — to 


-* 
45* 45* + * 

33! ST * 

If* 28 - to 


25 17* HuflMp 3X U 9 1830 19* l«* If* + 46 

33 21* Kornan 88 *28 14 1644 284627*28*+! 

41* 23* HuttttF JO 16 U 2173 31* 30* 3116— to 

2846 Tfto HvdtvN XJXt 49 9 ZM 2846 2f 38* + * 


2J2 

93 

M2 

65 

54 

37 

ua 

85 

425 nj 

1J» 

23 

Mm 

5 

M2 

37 

31 

15 

UJ0 

U 

50 

25 

181 1X0 

JB 

A 


SI 

ra« 40* 
44 34* 
MSS 16* 
1849 77 
3b 1W 
15 17* 
611 5M6 
33 26* 
33 2516 
448 m 


443 23M 23 23* 

IQS 77* 77 77 

SM 12 II* II 
33 40 40 « 

23 9* 9* 9to 

<8 19 1816 IB* 

MB 5446 5316 54* 
93 4846 46 4846 

22 V* 29* 29* 
726 Hb B46 ■* 

119 IBM 18* 18* 
78 5* <* C* 

46 2Mb Mto Mto 
a 29* 29* 29* 
195 23* 3246 23 


S3 

23 

SO 

XI 

230 

38 

280 

u 

L34 

IU 

154 

25 

84 

31 

50 

7J 

154 

If 


£ ^ £5 £*£*_* 


JO 21 195 216 115*215*— to 
JB XI 12 713 25* 25 25to 

. M 11 11* II 11 —to 

V« 1JQ3J 10 66 3316 33* 3344 + * 

=» 40 IJ 10 134 21to 20* 21* + to 

or 280 95 » 845 27* 27* 27*— V 

d 287 114 M 23* 33* 23* 

C 2.10 57 9 46 3716 36* 35*— V. 

m 3 13 62 9* 9to 9* 

■tr 1-30 28 I 54 42to 42* 42* 

!W 7-» <J 7C 65 304b M* 2M6 

^ 18 12 32 32* 32* 32*— 10 

1J0 7JB 8 141 17* 17 17* 

390 11* 18* 11* + V 
125 4 20 23 20 

80 18 853 31* 31* 31* + to 

■74 13 11 392 22* 22* 22* + * 

440 47 9 m 94 93* 93*— * 

450 11.1 4 40* 40V, 40* + * 

2JB SB 9 435 41* 41 41* + to 

9 29B 21to 71to 21* + * 


r 450 111 
238 SB 


’ 2BZ 45 7 IBS 24 ZP4 23* 
i 2B4 TOJI 6 86 2646 36* 36* 
184 SJ 10 256 18* 1«6 18H 


„ . . 76 1Mb U* 13* + H 

82 14 18 311 43* Sto Sto- * 

40 22 M ?! ^5 ££ 3& 

80 IJ 13 157 33 32to 32*— to 

_ . _ ■ 190 1«4 14 V, 14* — to 

80 IJ 13 1734 29* 2816 29* + * 
200 HL1 9 SOU 30 wi wS 


19* ID 
35* UM 
21* 15 
2416 10H 
2* * 

s* 

33* 

14* 

43* 

30* 

5* 

42 
48* 

27* 

21 

32* 

M* 

2416 

12 * 

31* 

24* 

Mto 
W 23 
33* 19V. 
is* n, 
3816 17* 
18* 7144 
25* 17* 

33V. 21W 

3816 29* 
33* 3416 
«2 46* 

is* rz 

50 30* 
S*h 4* 

n 

17* 12* 
30* 39* 
■a 66* 
30 22* 

27* 19* 
30 27* 

55 4M6 

29* 11* 

4i* a 

36* 30* 
38 32 

7* 3* 
24 7* 

6* 3* 
17 10* 

24 

52* 37* 
25* 10* 
3Mb 23* 
24* 19* 
19* 13* 

at* it* 

32* 21 
40 14* 

S3* 37 
66* 37 
44* 32* 
57 46 

29* 15* 
7216 S3 
24* 16* 

a* 4* 

30* 25* 
1096 

51 

31* 

SB* 

30 


SJM12D IBS 

>7340(238 234 

S UB 4 
55 13 223 




184 aj 10 256 18* IS* IB16 
ZQ8 5 5 7 33 24* 24* 24*— W 
•I41B no 2 34* 34* 84*— v 

i 140 15.1 5 315 9* 9V6 91b— 14 

■14 35 lfl 9 24* 34* 24* 

1A0 10J 5 39 17*17*17* + * 

579 4* 4 4+1* 

n J0 M I 75 ion Iff* w* 

240 128 1 25 19* 19* 19* + M 

S JO 25 IJ 75 21* 2416 24*— H 

- 80 2.1 16 38 lfl* IB* WH 

80 IB 943 22* 22* 22* + * 

.480 93 II 49* 49* 49* 

80 45 13 142 9 S* «*— to 

153 2* 2V. 2* 

180 7.1 6 7BS 54* 53* S3*— to 

5JS 11J 5 45 45 45 

653*120 IBS 34* 54* 54* 

>T28C«fl2B 234 54* 54* 54* + * 

,J1 U I 4 18* Mto Uto + 16 

152 55 13 223 28* 2716 27*—* 
288 6J 6 3156 39* 39* 39* 

[ 187 48 1 39* 39* 39* 

f 4530118 43 I5TV 55V. 35*—* 

154 35 10 51 35* 35 35*— * 

200 58 10 SB78»3S*X5* + to 
280 6B 8 39B6 36* 35 35*—* 

45 1309 17* 16* 17* + «b 
70 32 144* 144 144 — * 

f _ 3 76 76 7b—* 

■10* A 7 20 22* 32* 22*— * 

531 2.9 94 31 8* 8* B*— * 

881 Ml 81 49* 49* 49* + * 

78 13* 13 13 — * 

171 14 10% 10V. 10* 

180 25 3 2538 34* 34* 34*— * 

,220 32 16 464 69* 66* 66* + * 

4 425 7.1 50 *0 589. 59* +1 

*,84 X4 13 647 17* IS* 14*—* 

122 19 9 27 25 24* 25 + * 

3-12 6B 8 43 46* 46 46 

2.16 145 6 787 14* M* Mto 

4X0 113 1001 30 30 30 

VJ0 U7 SUM 18 it 
784 135 200z 55* 55* 53* + « 

•72 15 24 2M 31* 20* 20*— * 

-74 23 14 856 32 31* 32 + to 

OB 513 42325* 24*23 +* 

,, IJ M MB 34 24* + * 

. J2* 4J 7 4360 47 46* 44* + * 

1 419*10.1 420 01 BO* 81 + * 

9 1025 37 36* 37 + * 


IJ 41 1 

18 

.115 15 

448 4 9 

K 

30 11 

10 

34 18 

8 

-74 15 

IS 

U0 115 

7 

7J0 I3LI 


56 IJ 

17 

150 35 

34 

152 75 38 

50 15 

7 

J2 25 

17 

MO 45 

13 

180 43 

11 

188 10.1 

7 

550 55 


932 125 


788 1X6 


3J4 1X5 


X13 1X7 


2JS 11J 


380 1X7 


382 1X7 


400 125 


412 1X1 


1280 125 


2J8 123 


SO 42 

10 

54 43 


1J4 93 

Tl 

400 108 


150 25 

9 




GENEVE 






iACOOEqTdN.SfORnVE 


fl fillohl o nt l i o irki a lonolMio riiiililtiliTli 
Chopard li e* 8A. % it* do Vafitol- Qinko^ZZ K17 17 


31* 20 
34* 23* 
34* II* , 
13* 10* . 
43 26* , 

3* 24* . 
61 46* , 

SB 45* . 
16* 12* . 
Mto 5* . 

«* a . 

46* 37* . 
26* 15*. 
27* 21* . 


1.12 3B 16 
56 11 9 
.12 J lfl 
1840M.1 
152 16 4 
4JJ0 1X3 
412 135 
7JB 1X2 
2.18 1X2 

21 

1JD Z9 If 
IBfo 46 • 
50 12 M 
1.40 SJ M 


99 30* 29* 
305 27* 27* 
30 2776 21* 
4M 11* lfl* 
423 42 4116 

109x 30 20 

610z*l 60 

IS8z5V* SPW 
19 M * 16* 
6 9* 9* 
1699 41 44* 

221 3» 3*to 
107 25 94* 

99 24* 34* 


29*— to 
27*—* 
27*— * 
11 — * 
41* + K 
30 +1 

60 —1 
9Pto +1* 
M*— * 
9* 

44*— 1b 
3Mb—* 
34* 

34*— K 


71 14* 

50 614 

M 6* 

a SI 


7* KDI JO 2J 
9* KLMs 

33 KMI Pl 450 12B 
27* Kmart 180 4.1 
28 KNtaa 188 3J 
1214 KalsrAI ' .151 
14* KabQB 3B 13 
13* KatC PI IJ7 43 


X72 9X 
M 37 
1.14 2.1 
120 4J 
J2 25 
1J0 55 
JB 15 
JO 4J 
SB 40 
UB T45 
88 IJ 
3L00 58 
351 105 
450 105 
2 88 7B 
470 149 
BJD 115 
259 M.1 
3B5 115 
BM 11J 
220 30 
256 1X2 
PtA 210 128 
Pl 2AS MB 
PIG in M3 
prK 2.10 1 17 
PT X31 125 
PT 2J5 115 
pl 720 133 
80 5J 


7* 7* 
16* 1C* 
37* 37* 
34* 34* 
39* 39 
13* 13* 
Mto l«* 
14* MM 
• fl* 
21 28* 
31 XV, 
Si Uto 
IB* 11 
IB* to* 
SB* 49* 
17 16* 

37* V 
21* 21* 
30* 19* 
M IS* 
15* 15* 
4SVh g* 
30* 30* 


7*— * 
16*— * 
37to- — * 
34to— lb 
39 — * 
13* 

I«b + * 
14* + * 

r+a 

30*— 1* 
»*— * 
Mto + to 
IB* 

49*—* 

Mto 

37* +* 
21* + K 
29*— 1* 
U + to 
15* + to 
4B + * 


11 2794 
21 
S10 
4 70 

10 23B 

11 W 

35 Sflto 


S 


21 *—* 

27* 

lfl —to 
lfl — * 
Uto + to 
2SH — » 
M— * 
If* 

31to— to 
74 —11* 
STO 

34 —to 
27* + * 
Mto— to 

Mto ^ 

uto + to 

4ito + ■* 
24to + * 
41 —1 
17* + * 


280 35 
rf 287 115 
J2 141 


57 57 

24* 22 
7 7to— to 


1.10 SB 21 219 20* 3H6 28*— * 

i , 13 6 12 llto 12 

180 5.1 B 15 19* 19to 1916 

282 1X3 6 391 20* 20* 20to + to 

rf 780 12J 1000Z 58* 531b 381* +1 to 

80 46 .MU Uto 13 + to 

*1 UM mfl 12 17* 17 17 

154 30 11 1W 34* 34* 34* + * 

» .10o 5 IB 173 2D* 20to 2014 + * 

1J» 33 12 MS 30* 30 30 — to 

IBB 53 6 If 19 19 — * 

80 II 13 IS 13* 13 U — * 

80 B II 111 51 to SOto 5014 — * 

1 -{□ 33 4 56 Mto 55to— to 

2M 44 87 306 68* 67to 67*—* 

381 M* Mto 14*— to 

U* Mto SIS?* ,-aBb W » 2J90 Mb « U * Sto— * 

C " lA,k ’ fi StTS 

180 51 9 747 27VI> 27* 22* 

X50 44 9 195 55* SJto 54*—% 

■JB JOB B 63 29* »* 29* + * 

556911 J IDS 48* 47* 47*— 1* 

■ UJS 144 310x104 104* Wt +1* 

416 47 9 XM 46* 45to 46V. +1 
154 54 11 1377 33V. 31 to 32 
JB 7 j 4 lfl T27 14* 14(4 M*— to 

56 25 15 24 17* 17* 17*— to 

_ . 3 132B 10% 9* to + to 

M0 lflj 7 4327 TOb 29V6 29* 

1J0 115 19 16 15* 16 

2B0 11B 17 17 IS* 17 

'BiH 

5 

1 -20 13 10 SM 31% 31* 31to— * 

JI J M 127 33* 33* 32*— * 

80 23 9 B 27* 27to 2»to— to 

T 333 MVfc 13 Uto— to 

52 ISM 15* 14* 14*— to 

57 ZJ IS TO 31* 3Mb 31*— to 

Jto IB »***«*- to 


280 95 I 13 
80 30 6 107 
280 78 7 B55 
£pl 465 IU 2300 

^Pf 550 115 - 5 

: rts 1.10 35 IQ 372 

IG 232 49 9 781 

iPw 1* 4S4 

PtA 416 >40 100 

P« 450 1X7 im 

BID 7AS 165 2BA 

plE 7J2 165 340 

“PIG 7J» 1*7 240 

bcV 480 17.1 21 

P oru 380 1*9 43 

P prT 178 172 17 

P*rR4j»l7J a 
PorP UB 17.1 ia 

PprH US 1*6 16 

PorM 250 M8 H 


• 13 34* 36* 

6 107 Uto 13* 

7 US Uto 32* 
23008 feu SPA 

■ 5 48* 49* 

10 372 2fto 28to 
9 781 66* 4S* 
M 454 fito 6* 
loteJS a 
muss* a* 

200x45 45 

340(46 46 

2403 46* Mto 

21 M 25* 
43 21to 21 

17 2 TO a 

22 2Tto 23V. 
10 23V, a* 
16 23V. 23 


49* 43*— to 
Mto 79 + to 

ia ‘gr 1 

a at + to 

Mto 28% + * 

lils-" 


1J0 SB 
206 WS 
330a 42 

1 

180 

27 

W50 

45 

JB 

35 

154 

X9 

ISO 

47 

30 

15 

JO 

25 

235 1X1 

3J5 103 

J4 

38 

150 

U 

a 

3 

50 

S3 

280 

u 

JUf 78 

50 

13 

180b S3 

1J4 

B7 

87 1B8 

JO HU 

JI 

HJ5 

J2 

25 

54 

18 

180 

4.1 

UJBOT78 


19* 19to 
25to 35* + to 


56 

48 

20 

LI 

257 ItJ 

200 

43 

80 

25 

150 

SI 

.92 

28 

20 

15 

88 

22 


- to 

■ to 
to 

■ to 

■ * 

- * 
• to 

* 21*— lb 
to 51to— I* 
■ lb 




350 HO 
786 1X4 
432 143 
JlaBB 
205 WO 
IJ8 13 
04 15 
254 44 
UB 128 

48 52 

84 38 14 643 
350 46 12 1922 
2J» 70 ■ TOO 

at 

s» 

7302 
» 
*7 
1*2 

250 &4 11 203B 
2JD0 15 9 595 


to 
to 

to. 

67to + * 

* 


15 20 930 

13 26 164B 

47 4 W 

95 24 

Z9 • 199 
75 • TO 
IJ 14 1*4 
35 37 45 

18 592 

23 11 85 

IB 14 447 
U 11 2017 
05 

a* 

30 
« 
1549 


ifto 19 

»* Mto 

am 36M 

IP* KUk 
Mto 34 
37* 37* 
W* 141b 
13* 13* 
27* 27V6 
IS* ISto 

U II* 
as* as 
2V, 3* 

14 13* 

19 18* 

22 21to 
38* M 
53* 53to 
49* 49* 

4to 6 
19to 18* 
Mto MIA 

^ >5 

32* 32* 
Mto 33* 
9to •* 

15 15 
u Uto 


« Uto 14 

11 W M 

l&ZZZ* 

i<az32to jzvs 

»LS*g* 

* lajgs 

781 31* M% 
TO Mft 15* 

804 65 uik 
« ]» Wk 
57 42* 

74 IS* 

52to 

37* 

18* 

IS* 
llto 
44 
33 
34* 

371b 

asto 


(Continued on Page 













































































































Y:'v- -3^.': 


SwtwfieH Index 


HemibS®ribune. 


/- 


is 


A 


.■ t 

■i 


ite:- 


.r.V't-'tf 


7 


■•niV. ■ 






■• ’t r -* '/■ 



*■*-. 


S‘ 




* * 


AMEXwiccs .PJB .EerafwnnrteP.l? 
AMEx MWkHttP.il . fling rate notes P.l* . 
NYSE vricn* P.M Go*d mnrt tfa P.Vt 
jme J|MAm P-16 Mtnd roles P.15 


CaiwCBan Ms PJO mm s u ro si ra p.u 
Option 


..„•. CoaentyroM MS Onflow PJA 

CMnimawn p.u ore m pjb 

1 *V DM*Mk . P.U Ottw mortem pjo 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 14 


THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985. 


P age 15 


WALL STREET W ATM 


While Stocks Chum 
4 Investors Can Fiddle 



“J 


By EDWABD ROHRBACH - 

Intmutkml HcmM Tributut 

P ARIS — “Churning,” ,whal stocks do when they don’t 

know which wa\ ‘ 

Street since. 

the market has probably 
shoriterm.'' 

However, Mr. Zwdg, editor of Zwdg Forecast and a noted 
student .of the market, said Wednesday that her thinks rimming 
has ended. Historically, stocks have turned weak after the process 
is over, usually for a period of weeks. But mainly because he sees 
monetary condition s so Favorable, Mr. Zwdg bdieves the market 
is now looking brighter. 

He measures churning by figuring the difference between the 
number of stocks advancing and those declining daily, ignoring 
which total is' greater. When for two weds or more the figure 
remains low, that is, advances 


BA Profit 
Rose 9.2% 
For Year 


Airline Supports 

Early Public Sale 

Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 


Bob Hi 

national Hi 

LONDON — British Airways 


portfolios unattended 


* 


and declines stay nearly in m» -j * - • * 

balance, the market has Fhe day Of private 
“rimmed enough to flash a 
near-term warning.” 

This is did April 19, he said, 
warning then, that it could 
“continue for many weeks be- 18 over." 

fore the market gives out.” , : 

Since 1968 thane have been 

21 prior cases of churning. The pattern in the aftermath is for 
stocks to rise slightly before topping out. Then the Dow Indus- 
trials have fallen an average, of 5.5 percent, with the broader 
market dropping 7.4 percent. ■ 

However, Mr. Zwejg pointed out that in eight of those cases, 
when monetary conditions were “extremely bullish ... as they are 
now,” the declines have been substantially less. 

He sees the market’s “downside risk from here modest” and 


any "back off in prices now is probably a buying opportunity. 


T HE Bank Credit Analyst, published in Montreal, makes 
the print in its May issue that there is a good side to the 
market's dull performance. “Major tops usually coincide 
with peaks in speculative activity which, in general, is not evident 
at this time,” writes J. Anthony Boeckh, editor in chief 
Robert E. Linton, chair man and chief executive officer of 
Drexel Burnham Lambert, warned in an interview that investors 
cannot be lulled by the current slow period because the “most 
obvious and interesting trend in the stock market is how trading 
gets compressed and intensified in everahortentng moves.” 

In Europe this week as the firm marks its 50th anniversary, he 
noted that major upswings or downswings used to take six to 18 



: gratification,' 

of Wall Street by huge institutional traders as the reason prices 
can move so abruptly. 


ed is over — the coupon-cutter is a dying breed — individuals 
now must also take this short-term view,” said Mr. Linton, who is 
a director of the New York Stock Exchange. "I never used to 
recommend that, but now I set targets myself and if astock rises 
to that level in two days, ID sdL” 

Admitting that “stocks almost always go down right after I buy 
them,” he said investors should be less price conscious in buying 
an issue than selling it- "If you like a stock, buy it, but have an 
objective.” 

An irony about Wall Street, he said, is that' the so-called 
derivative products such as options were developed to mitigate 
risk. m 

“And a risk-control factor does exists that never did before. 


PLC reported Wednesday a 9 
percent increase in pretax profit for 
the year ended Match 31 despite a 
steep decline in second-half results 
blamed on severe winter weather. 

BA also said that it hoped (he 
government would be able to go 
ahead with plans to sell the airline 
to the public before next March 31. 

The sale bad been expected this 
spring, but the government has de- 
layed the plan to allow time foe 
settlement of a Sl-bflHon U.S. anti- 
trust suit filed against BA and 1 1 
others by the liquidator of. Laker 
Airways. 

•Lord King chairman of BA, 
would not comment on recent Brit- 
ish press reports that an out-of- 
court settlement costing BA nearly 
$30 million was imminent. “We’re 
progressing along quite steadily.” 
he said, “and sensibly 1 hope.” 

BA's pretax profit rose to £202 
milli on ($246 million) from £185 
million a year earlier. 

Taxation fell to £3 millio n from 
£4 million, but a deriing in extraor- 
dinary grins reduced net profit to 
£210~m01ion from £214 millio n 
The extraordinary profits arose 
from excess provisions for sever- 
ance pay. The provisions were 
made to pay for huge cuts in BA’s 
staff, down to about 38,000 from a 
peak of 58,000. 

Revenue increased 17 percent to 
£2.93 billion from £251 billion. 

In the second half, pretax profit 
slipped 63 percent to £13 million 
from £35 mfllinn. although revenue 
rose 21 percent to £136 billion 
from £1.12 bflfion. Colin Marshall , 
chief executive, cited severe weath- 
er last winter, which he said con- 
trasted with unusually mfld condi- 
tions in the prior year. 

BA repaid borrowings of £3 30 
million, reducing its debt to £647 
milli on, still about twice the com- 



7}m Mw York To. 

TDe trading room of DiDon, Read & Co. The investment hank has made a comeback 
under its president, John P. Birkehrod, right, and chairman, Nicholas F. Brady. 

Dillon, Read Repolishes Its Image 


By James Stemgold 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When T. 
Boone Pickens began a takeover 
bid for Unocal Carp, last month, 
Unocal mustered the toughest 

defense it could, leaning nn the 

advice of two investment banks: 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. and Dil- 
lon, Read & Co. 

To be a player alongside fi- 
nancial titans as they square off 
in multibflfion-doUar battles is 
precisely where an investment 


bank wants to be, but for Dflkm, 
Read the role also marked some- 
thing of a milestone in a come- 
back. ■ 

The firm is one of tbe oldest on 
Wall Street, and at one time was 
one of tbe most prestigious. It 
had connections with wealthy 
families and counted among its 
clients a number of tbe country’s 
largest corporations. 

But the financial tumult of tbe 
last two decades upset Wall 
Street’s traditional order and, by 


the 1970s, the once-envied Dil- 
lon, Read name had faded far 
from the first ranks. It also had 
lost its exclusive hold on some 
important clients, such as Rank 
of America, Texaco and, more 
recently. New York City. It was 
losing laurels to rest an. 

“They were increasingly irrele- 
vant to the market, with their rid 
style,” said one investment bank- 
(Cootinaed on Page 17, CoL 1) 


Trade Deficit 
Of the U.S. Grew 


16% in Quarter 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
merchandise trade deficit on a bal- 
ance-of-paymenis basis expanded 
16 percent, to $28.33 billion, in the 
first three months of 1985 from 
$2439 billion in the final quarter of 
last year, the government reported 
Wednesday. 

The Commerce Department re- 
port, one of several ways that U.S. 
trade is measured, exdudes mili- 
tary trade of U.S. military agencies, 
unlike a more widely publicized re- 
port on merchandise trade. 

The deterioration in trade 
stemmed from a 5- percent increase 
in imports and a 1-percent drop in 
exports during the first three 
months of the year compared with 
the October-December quarter. 

The new report confirmed paral- 
lel figures released last week that 
showed on even deeper merchan- 
dise trade deficit of $32.8 billion 
for the first three months of the 
year. 

The soaring U.S. trade deficit 
has been blamed as the chief reason 


March, the lowest rate in more than 
two years. 

The Commerce Department said 
that imports totaled 584.4 billion 
during the first three months of the 
year, up $3.7 billion from the Octo- 
ber- December quarter. 

The gain came despite the fact 


that petroleum imports dropped 25 
number of barrels 


percent with the number i 
imported daily, at 432 million, the 
lowest since the third quarter of 
1971. 

The average price per barrel de- 
creased to $26.86 from $27.59 in 
the fourth quarter. 

Non-petroleum imports, rose 1 1 
percent, however, with big gains 
recorded for household appliances, 
automobiles and other manufac- 
tured goods. 


Exports dropped 1 percent to a 
' of $56.1 billion. Tbe biggest 


the economy slowed substantially 
rfirs 


during the first three months of the 
year. 

Economic growth, as measured 
by tbe gross national product, rose 
at a sluggish annual rate of 13 
percent Trom January through 


total 

decline was an 11 -percent drop in 
agricultural sales, which fell to SSJ 
billion from $93 billion in the pre- 
vious quarter. Wheal shipments 
dropped 35 percent, com sales were 
off 12 percent, soybean sales fdl 5 
percent and cotton sales dropped 2 
percent 


Fed Member Assails Faster U.S. Money Growth 


By Jane Seaberry 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Martha 
Seger, one of the governors of the 
U.3. Federal Reserve System, has 
tokl an American Bankers Assoda- 
‘tion conference that the current 
sluggishness in the economy does 
not mean that the expansion is end- 
ing and that unrestrained money 
creation by the Fed wouldmot help 


the economy's current problems. 

1 Tuesday that any 


119 million. The government's 
sale is expected to involve the injec- 
tion of a large amount of equity 
capital into the carrier. 

For the latest year, capital 
spending amounted to just £103 
milli on, down from £250 million. 


Mrs. Seger said’ 
relief from faster money growth 
and the decline in interest rates it 
would cause would be short-lived, 
because greater inflationary expec- 
tations and higher actual inflation 
would be reflected in upward pres- 
sure on interest rales. 

Mrs. Seer’s remarks contrasted 
with those late last month by the 


Fed’s vice rhairman, Preston Mar- 
tin, who warned that tbe United 
States was on the verge of a 
“growth recession" in which output 
is not great enough to prevent an 
increase in the unemployment rate. 
As a result, Mr. Martin said that 
faster money growth and lower in- 
terest rates may be needed. 

“A growth recession must be 
considered a real threat,” Mr. Mar- 
tin said. “In fact the data currently 
available suggest that tbe economy 
is on the edge between healthy, 
sustainable growth and a growth 
recession.” 

Earlier this week. Commerce 
Secretary Malcolm Baldrige said 
that the economy will not grow as 
fast this year as. the Reagan admin- 
istration originally expected. He 
said that the economy will grow at 


a rate of 3.5 to 4 percent. The While 
House has targeted growth at 3.9 
percent for this year. 


Mr. Baldrige’s estimate was dose 
to growth forecasts of the members 
of the Fed’s policymaking Federal 
Open Market Committee,, who said 


shifted away from domestic-made 
goods to foreign products. 

Other economists have said that 
a less restrictive monetary policy 
by the Fed last fall would lead to 
higher growth during the second 
Quarter of this year. 


growth this year would range from 
325 to 425 oen 


percent Most of the 

members' estimates clustered 
around growth of 33 to 4 percent. 

Economists appear to be divided 
into two camps, much as they were 
after the weak 1.6- percent growth 
in gross national product in the 
third quarter of last year. Some 
economists have said that the econ- 
omy will continue sluggishly be- 
cause of the drag of imports on 
domestic production. Although do- 
mestic demand is strong, it has 


■ Vokker. Policy Is ‘Neutral’ 

Paul A Vokker, the chair man of 
the Federal Reserve Board, said 
Wednesday that Fed policy is cur- 
rently neutral, but the next Federal 
Open Market Committee meeting 
on May 21 would debate whether a 
change is needed, Reuters reported 
from Washington. 

Asked at a Senate Banking Com- 
mittee hearing if monetary policy 
was still “in neutral,'’ Mr. Volcker 
said, “I think that's a fair charac- 
terization.” 


Dollar Firmer 
In Europe Trade 


Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar 
closed firmer Wednesday in Eu- 
rope, recouping part of Tues- 
day's sharp losses but without 
establishing a trend, dealers 
said. 

They said sentiment for the 
dollar was generally strong al- 
though debate continues over 
the strength of the U.S. econo- 
my and the course of interest 
rates. Wednesday’s rise also 
was seen as partly a technical 
reaction to Tuesday's decline. 

In London, the pound ended 
mostly firmer at $12060, but 
still down from Tuesday's clos- 
ing $12185. The dollar was 
fixed in Frankfurt ai 3.1878 
Deutsche marks, off from Tues- 
day's 3.1960, and in Zurich at 
2689 Swiss francs, up from 
Tuesday's 2680. There was no 
trading in Paris because of a 
holiday. 


(CootimetfoB Page 17, CoL Si 


Currency Rates 


] 


Late interbank rates on May 8 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings far Amsterda m . Bruneh. Frankfurt. Mkxi. Paris. New York re*es at 
2 PM 


Hong Kong Shares Hit 
Highest Point Since ’81 


■ j-s’-.-. 9 

; 

I 

I 

DAL 

FJ=. ILL. 

GBfr. 

■J 5 . 

sj=. re* 

fe • « '■ 

Amtantani 

3406 

OSA 

mso* 

37X75* 0J7B* 

— 

S427* 

13447 *142.45 V 


BracnWol 

Alias 

77 ja 

aunts 

64005 IW 

I7J99 

— 

23571 25J5- 

Sw r ’.** • 

i FmkAirt 

3.JB7S 

USB 



32X25- 1S745X 

8856 * 

4581 • 

119JU* 174* 

■ * 

London lb) 

IXOA 

— 

1*5*8 

11X01 244448 

4357 

775A5 

32441 30543 

• 

MBon 

VO&JOO 

U5LW 

<3450 

3BU5 . 

. 54275 

SUM 

73320 7319 

-fc -ai %-■ 

HawTorklc) 

- 

0X3K 

MW 

97238 2X2250 

14025 

A442 

24815 25320 

# 8 

Pans 

Tokro 

asms 

30745 

79-45 

CfetMd 

2AXA 1254* 

7029 

395-64* 

M42 

«F\4 m tMr 

Znrich 

3489 

134* 

•42)45 “ 

2740* Q.132A* 

744*5* 

4.3825* 

MHZ* 

Fj*... , • 

i ecu 

Wtt 

05804 

7306 

6529 L432JM 

25M 

KIMS 

L8832 T77JIB 

w » \ 

1 SDR 

0.980841 

0X1035 

3.13472 

MXL VMM 

35369 

625964 

24257 347259 

• 

cL omaa 

Par 

USX 

Dollar Vahtea 
eL. uu 


. 04M AKtraOMt 

L50C 

0MB . 

MMC Urat 04474 Stt 

vont 2235 

• ' .BM5 AHtrioa MiHttH 

2122 

0817 

KrMBsMttt 94756 0583 S-AAtaaraM IMB7 


By Dinah Lee 

Jniemabano] Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG Bullish senti- 
ment for Hong Kong stocks pushed 

the 1 , 600 ^ barrier *Wednesday°u> 
close at 1,621.45, tbe highest level 
since the 1981 property-market 
boom. 

In only half a day’s trading, the 
leap of 28 points from Tuesday’s 
dose surprised few brokers, who 
had watched a total gain of 80 


points in Jbe Friday and_Manday 
‘ay*s 


- 40157 

ana 

QJUK 

aisit 

00071 

aias 


s 

Krone 


CUD 

13B45 

Tl-429 

ASK 


U8H Kuvoffi 
04014 
0JW5 
OI57I PUL 


24* turn son. 

1.13 ami Sand. 
17.50 08351 TdtenS 

1MM MS6J iMhoU 


mat 

9.1475 

am 

27455 


7.7*2 . 0277 Saadi rlnl 


3410 02723 (UkE.dMm U7Z5 


t Storing :1 2335 Irteht- 

(olCwmuerdcifrwcIbl AJTioonttnfattKjfobuyonaPoanaCcJ ArawrtsneebrttDbovooectofbjrCI 
Units ollOB (xlUUfi ol 1000 lv» Unit* oMOOOl 
N A.: not «nMj HA: not owoDaM*. 

Sources: Amu* du Bonetux {Brussels/; Banco Commarda/a Havana (Mlkmf.-Otenrtcoi 
Bank I New Yen}; Boom Mrtwwfe da Puns { Parts}; IMF (SOB); Banaue AraOe el 
inrtmattenate<nmestfssemenl tdtnar.rtYoLdktmn). Othtrdafa tram Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


sessions, lney said that Toesda 
downturn of 5.17 points represent- 
ed only a pause for slight profit 
caking and did not indicate, flag- 
ging interest. 

Alex Yeung, a director at W.L 
Carr, Sons & Co. (Overseas) LuL, 

next rcsistariee^^ cotddt*: ex- 
pected at 1,700. But he said the 
market's conditions were suffi- 
ciently different this time around 
so that, “there is not much of a 
technical picture we can draw 
. Basically we’re talking about 
; sky being the limit.” 

Mr. Yeung attributed the surge 


erty market has demonstrated a re- 
covery after a three-year slump,” 
he said. 

In Hong Kong, the property 
market accounts for nearly 35 per- 
cent of the total weighting of the 
Hang Seng index. In addition, 
about one-third of aD bank loans 
are property related, with the bank- 
ing and finance sector accounting 
for another 20 percent of the in- 
dex's weighting. 

Brokers also said a late- morning 
revival of recurrent rumors related 
to a possible takeover bid for the 
trading and investment group. Jar- 
dine Matheson & Co., also created 
interest. 

Since the beginning of tbe year, 
various parties have been linked 
with these unconfirmed rumors, in- 
cluding Comity Bank Aria Securi- 
ties, a subsidiary of National West- 
minister Punk PLC, the Singapore 
property entrepreneur Khoo Tech 
Puat, and Li Ka- siring, a local 
property magnate who is the ebair- 


nagn 

man of Hutmison Whampoa Ltd. 


upon.! 
the sin 


However, one Chinese broker 
with a British brokerage house 
warned that the market sentiment 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


May 7/May 8 


of confidence that has brought the 
/s 746 le 


'“■•VL 

£ 


surttu Franc ECU SDR 
life -aw 57.-5*. 4 V. - 4^ B*- rtOh 1BW.- 10* *fc - ?¥U 7W. 

BVh -ft 5tk -5H. 5 - 5* 121fc- 12«K. W*,- 10 ft. 9* - «* 8 H. 

3M. Mb-Sto 5W-S% 5V» - 5V1 12H - WW»- 10 ft -»N rtfc 

MM. 8-H.-DW. 5«.-S% SW - SV6 1»-T» HH-IMk fh -II. Ih 

IY. 9M. - Ih i Mi- - AM. 5W *5W -im KHk- UIW YU - VW, S1V 
Ratos aopucattto to rntertxu* deposits of St mlttion minimum (ormmtvrdent). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty IdoUar. CMC SP. Pound. FFJ.- Lloyds Bonk (ECU); Revters 
ISDRJ. 


index up from last July's 746 level 
to an accumulation of favorable 
faclors. 

Political uncertainty has moved 
to the back of people's minds, in- 
terest rates are down, and the prop- 


itive conside rations, including 
effect of China's credit squeeze on 
business with Hong Kong. A crack- 
down on illegal currency trading 
has cut mainland orders for Hong 
£ong goods by nearly half. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


May 8 


1 DM. 

■ Ml -tV. 
Sauna: Reams. 


2 mm. 
B*. -IK. 


IBM . 
Sib -IX 


Ark 
Bib • 5% 




Belgian Bank Cuts Key Bate, 
Ties it to Market Conditions 


Realm 


Key Money Rates 

United States 


n -i - - - 

Britain 


Ctasa Prcv. 


Obh Prcr. 


□Haunt Rata 
Federal Fundi 
Prune Rare 
Broker Loan Rate 
Comm. Pauer, 30-179 dOVB 
a Xrantn Treasury Bills 
i. )tmontn Treasury Blits 
an XFOT davs 
COM (AV days . 

West Germany 


i s 

ra 7*. 

Wi ISVj 
9 9 

7 M MM 

1M ?X 
IK 7.90 
7JS5 7JI 
7 JO 7 JO 


Bank Base Rate 
Coil Mean r 
tWw Treasury Bltl- 

3-*nea» interbank ■ 


12Vj 12Vj 

rub 

12 in* 12 V14 
IS* UK 


Discount Rate 
Qdl Money 
tfrday Intarba* 


S 5 
KA. A VIA 
*- AH 


Lombard Rate 
Ownlsht Rata 
One Month Inter bank 
3-monltt I nt erba nk 
interbank 

France 


me me 
NLA. NA 


Gold Prices 


] 


In te r vent ion Rote 
Call Money 
One- mo nth Interbank 
NmnDi Interbank 
Mwnili Int e rbank 


IMfr lift 
CM KM 

— 10 VIA 

— 10W 
— U VM 



AM. 

FA 

CPN 

Hons iCene 

33425 

31335 

+ 200 

Luxembourg 

31340 

— 

+ 300 

Paris IlUkOet 


CM 


Zurich 

31400 

3I2M 

— 050 

London 

3T325 

31205- 

— 045 

He* VOrit 

— 

KJL 

— 


Sounat; Reuters, CetnmenMnk, Crddft Lr- 
omafg. Uords Bank, Bank at Tokra 


Official 8xkw lor Lea don, Peris ond Lumn- 
beure.epmlnooHideiine price* »w Hong Kong 
aid Zurich How YBffc Cemex ctttTWi centred 
AC prices blLUnreim 
Source; Pouters. 


Markets dosed 


All banks and financial markets in France were dosed Wednesday in 
observance dfVE Day. 


BRUSSELS — The Belgian Na- 
tional Bank said Wednesday (hat it 
cut its key bank lending rate to 9.75 
percent from 11 percent and re- 
duced tbe rate on ordinary ad- 
vances to 1025 percent from 12 
percent. 

The reductions,, effective Thurs- 
day, coincide with the introduction 
of a new’ system aimed at malting 
the bask rate more flexible and 
tying it more to market conditions, 
a spokesman said. The hank rale is 
the interest rate at which central 
banks lend money against govern- 
ment paper collateral 

The lending rare now will closely 
linked with the rate on. short-term 
Treasury certificates, which have 
been dianged several rimes in re- 
cent months. 

• ‘ The latest reductions were on 
April 30 when the ono-month rate 
was cut to 925 percent from 93 
percent and two- and three-month 
rates to 93 percent from 9.75 per- 
cent 

Bat the bank rate has hdd at ! 1 


percent since February 1984, winch 
a spokesman said bad led to an 
excessive rigidity that gave changes 
excessive importance. 

The three-month Treasury certif- 
icate rate was progressively re- 
duced to the current 93 percent 
from 1225 percent m F&ruaty 
1984. 

- The spokesman said that 
Wednesday’s changes were 
prompted by the bank’s long-term 
intention to change the system 
rather than by specific monetary 
considerations. The reduction to 
9.75 
lab! 

month rare. 

Under the new rules the rate will 


75 patent was necessary to es- 
blish the fink with the three- 


be fixed each Wednesday by the 
the three- 


bank’s board based on 

-month Treasury rate in force on 
the previous day. 

The board also will give its man- 
agement board tbe power to vary 
the rate between certain fixed, but 
unpublished, limits during the 
week if changes in short-umi mon- 
ey market rates make them neces- 
sary. 


• « f 

4 » 

.•v, t 


wK. via " '.it 


,v ** '• * V 




r 


■». V , * . A 

* v .. W * . V 
r r / .*f- •?. . 




T- 


• • / ■ • M < of”, 

~ 


°? S r S V ~ 


v 










a 


Reshaping the Landscape 
of International Financial Markets 


The new Philadelphia Board of Tirade 
announces the commencement of trading in 
Options on Eurodollar Three-Month Time 
Deposits. Eurodollar Options provide a 
significant new dimension in option oppor- 
tunities.. .and an important alternative to . 
international money markets. 

Eurodollar Options enhance risk manage- 
ment by allowing hedgers to take advantage 
of favorable interest rate fluctuations while 
minimizing downside exposure; and 
maximizing yield 

For more information on these important 
new instruments.- contact The Philadelphia 
Board of Trade at the address and phone 
number shown below. 


CimimctSpnilicutittns 


Eurodollar Options Symbol XED 
Contract 


Premium (Juolalinns. 
ELwrcise Price Imenvls. 
Minimum Premium Chamie. 


Annualiz'd Yield t in u ThrevMnnlh 
Eurodollar Time Deposit buvim * u 
Prinapul VuhieofSI Milium 
Busts ftunis 
2S Basis Prints 
nl or l Basis Point. 

In Dollar Terms S25 


Ecen ■«** und Dehivrv Provisions 


AlExpiruwm fmly 
With Cush Settlement 


Expiration Cycles; 
Issuer and tJuuranlnr 


Three. Six and Xine Months 
The IruermaHtel Cleunnfi 
Corporation f ICC I: a subsidiary at 
The Options Clearing Corporation 


G23? Philadelphia Board of Trade 


(X The Philadelphia Stock Exchange 

1900 Market Street . Philadelphia, PA 19103 (215)496-5000 Telex: 902636 
European Office: Basildon House. 7-11 Moorgate. London EC2R 6AD Telephone- 01-606-2348 Telex. 892*35 PHLX'l'K G 




I 






r 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


U 


Pa 


Vkednesda*s 


MSE 


3pjn. 


Tables Include the nattonwtdg prices 
w to ttw doslno on Wall Street 
and do oat reflect late trades ofiewhero. 


a Month 
Utah Low Stock 


Dfe.YM.PE lOKHUiUw 


mi 


ipjfk 
QuBLOm 


I 


(Continued from Page 14) 


ew« 

HML 


23% 

If* 

IBM 

no 

4M 

21* 

33 

14* 

IM 

37 


5* ntOoklnd 
J* TO* OoktteP 1JB 40 II 
3S* 27% QcctPff u U I 
17 moedpwt 
BH OedPpf 2.M 44 
712% BB OedPpf U 0 U 
20* 17% OedPpf 111 W 
22* lmOcdPpf ZJO 114 
' SM ffikOtdPDiUS121 

113 ios* ocdppnsxo 14.1 
101*101* OcdPf 1443 114 
■ im loo occJPpfuoen* 

33* 22 O CHE CO 140 44 IB 

. 31* 24* Oodm 1 JO 60 15 
14th PM OMoEd 140 124 « 
30* 22* onedpf 240 134 
34 25* OhEd pf L48 13J 

41* 45 Oh Ed pf 040 113 
26* IBM Ohedpf 230 123 
29% 31 OhEdpr 1V3 114 
u 11 otiedpf 140 iu 

<7 51 on Ed pf 9.12 124 

44 47* Otl Ed pf 144 134 

1716 1U6 OhMotr M 33 13 
44 52 OhP Pf 844 124 

44 51* OhPPfB 740 120 

31 25* OhPpfH 275 122 

30 19 OhPpiG 227 114 


44 V 


31* 

10 * 

17* 


im 

41* 

12* 


4* 

31 

38* 

2 

27* 

32U 

7* 

73* 

ItSM 

40 

14* 

22 % 

17* 

31* 

3116 

34* 

22 

34* 

Bt* 

20* 

20 * 

94* 

31* 

21 


34* IV* OWoGE 240 
35M 26W Olln 150 
24* 5M Omncre 
W* 14 OnokJa 40 25 10 
23* 34* ONEOK 234 84 10 
24V4 19% OmnHk 244 74 9 
13* 7* Drone# 33t 44 14 
31 1TO OrlooC M XI 50 

13* 0* OrtonP 37 

31* 24 Orton pf 275 93 
31* 18* (XftbMi 44 IS 9 
31* 17* OvrnTr J] u 11 
■19 13 OvShhi JO 24 9 

37 25* OwnflC 14 U I 

4416 31M OmnlU 148b 34 9 
US 94 Own 1 1 pf 4.75 34 

13* 10* OKfbrU 44 17 11 


410 1* 1* 1*— 16 

14 31* 31* 31* + * 
2037 27* 37* 27*—* 
381 O* 12 12* + * 

2 47* <7* 47* +1* 
2 75* 95* 75*— * 
2 If* 19* 19*— * 
1 2016 20* 2016 + * 
307 51* 31* SI* 
33110 107* 1H 

51 IMttlOMlSOK + * 
50zHB*108*HO* 4- * 
10 25 24M 24% — * 

192 3014 30 30* 

2215 14* 14 14* + * 

U0z 30 30 30 

201 JJM 32M 32M + * 
230* 63 41* 42 + * 

40 24* 25* 25*— * 
33 27* 23* 2K- 16 
9 IM 14* 14* — * 
20QE 4816 4U6 4Bth +1* 
10OZ 44* 44* 44* + * 
SS 12 12 12 — * 

7O0Z 47 43* 47 +4 

2007 43* 43* 43* +1 

12 am so* 38*— 1* 

17* 19 19* + * 


84 10 2054 ZJ% 23V. 23*— 16 


31 30* 30* + * 

Ml tf* 4* 4* + * 
20 MW 14* 14* + * 
83 22* 31* 31*— * 

S 24V6 24 34*— * 

11 id* him — * 

24 25 24* 24*— * 

274 11% II 11*— K 

13 29* 29* 29*— 16 

238 23 22 22 — * 

Z18 S 27* 27*— M 

38X M* 14* 14* + * 

349 31* 3116 31* + 16 

1495 45 44* 44*— * 

1 133 133 m 

227 17* 11* 12 + % 


44 

in* 


57* 

12 * 

34* 

27* 


3216 IB PHH 

40 2« PPG _ _ 

24* IS PSA JO 24 53 
19% 13* PSA dol 1J0 9J 
13* 11* PDCAS 1J4 114 
WVt 13 PocGE 131 9J 7 
44* 30* PocLfa 132 7 ? 12 
» 21* PcLum 1J0 4J IS 

9* 5* POCRM Ur 58 

IV UW Pod* pf 200 11.0 
17* It* PocSd 40 24 12 
7316 54 PocTeto SJ3 82 . 
13 916 PoCTTn 40 13 10 

am 21* PocHOP 232 84 a 
33* 27* Podfpf 4517 TZB 
43* TO PolnWb 40 IJ 49 
34* 24* PaFnW pf22S 74 
39 27 PaimBc 1.20 12 14 

6* 4 PcmAin 

3* 1* PanAwt 

21 13* Ponddtn Gun 

40* XT ~ 


2* 

a 

a 

45 

27* 

70* 

1U 

a* 

27* 


IV* 

3216 

11 

54* 

29* 

21 * 


... 10 12 89 X 29* 29*— * 

140 44 ■ 1430 35 34* 34*—* 

37 24* 24* 24* + * 
4 TO* 19* 19* + * 
47 13* 13* 13* 

1723 18* IS IB* 

114 42* 42* 42* 

41 25* 25* 25* + * 

42 9* 9* 9*—* 

34 IB* IB 10* 

32 15* 15* 15* + * 

2488 70* 49* 49*— M 

1 n 12 ia 

409 28* 27* 27*— * 

9 31* 31* 31* + * 

233 34* 34* 34* + * 

4 29* 29* 29*— * 

3S7 * 37* 37* — 16 

2293 5* 5 516 + 14 

US 3* 2* 2*—* 

247 IS* 1516 U* + * 

PonhEC 230 SS 11 B1» 41* 38* 38th— I* 
s* a PmdPr 19 514 5* 5* 5* 

19* 12* Poprcfr 40 44 15 303 18 18 18 

18* 1016 Par-dim 33 2148 13* 11* 1216 + * 

21* 12* ParkEs 10 12 14* 14* 14* 

11* 3* ParkDrl .14 24 123 6% 4* 4* 

39* 25* ParkH 1.12 19 9 477 29* 20* 29 +* 

19% U PnrkPn J2 29 30 32 18* T7* 17*— * 

2* 1* PatPtrf 14 44 2* 2* 2* 

17* 11* PeyNP 40 49 11 400 12* 12* 17* 

21* 13* PavCtfl .M 4 19 1494 20* 20* 20* + * 

11* 4* Peabdy JO 24 II 1(0 8* 7* 7*— 16 

1* Penan 21 * * * 

54* 41* PenCen n 1151 37* 54* 55* +1 

55* 44* P80WP 9 234 5J 8 B54 47* 44* 47* + * 

27* 20* Pa PL 2J4 10.1 B 30T 25* 25* 25*— * 

34* 30* PoPLpf 440 124 33Qz 35* 35 35 

37* TO PoPLpf 4J0 123 Mz 36 36 34 

27* 2316 PaPLdOI&fl 124 54 27* 27* 27* 

24* a PoPLdprtJO 120 17 24* 24* 34* 

47 56* PaPLpr 840 124 230x44* 44 44* +1* 


19 Month 
tOKiLaw 5U* 


Dfet YM. PE lgbrttaiupr 


3PJ* 
Ourf-Ortu 


lb 


27* 22* PoPLdpiflJS 11J 
30* 2516 PePLdPf3J5 127 
M* SI* PoPLprllXO 114 
44 54* PdPLpr 1H 129 

4016 31* Penwlt 227 64 11 .. 

am ® Penwpf 148 74 4 

54* 30* Pannxoi 220 62 a 798 
17* 9* PsopEb 1 JO 7J 7 393 
a 23* PeoBov JO IX 17 31 

SS* 99* Posted 128 34 22 1541 


30* 17* ParkEI J4 24 13 
W* 7* Prmlan 1 JbUl 
22* 12* PorrDr Jl 14 13 

39* W PoM# 140 37 15 

a am pen* ajaus 

17 14 Potftapf 147 94 

7* 4 Pfrinw L0087U 


*716 ac* 27* + * 
27* 29* 29* 4- M 
74* 94* 94* + * 
42* 43* 42* 

36 34* 34*—* 

»* 27* 21*— * 
54* 5ZM »— 1* 
17* M* 17* + * 
30* 30* 38% + * 
53* a* a*—* 


448 S3* 23* 23*—* 

J? JE& JS* + * 

in 17* im i7* + 

771 30* 37* 31 + 

54 am a a 

44 14* 14* w*— K 
36 « 4* 4*—* 


«6 m Hta* iJUUm 4*6 gfc + 

22* 12* PIMpO 991 19* 19* 19* + * 

40* 34 PtMlppr 500 mi 11 44* 44* 44*— * 

41* am PhbrS £4 14 9* 2705 »* 39* 37*- * 

14* 9 PhHael 2JD 143 4n« 1» 15* 15* 


PMEpf 440 U3 


a so* PhREpf &7S U2 
n* 9* PTUlEpf 141 U3 
10* <* Pbsem U3 T16 
57 43 Phaept 7JS 143 


3b 32 33 S +1 

20b a* 41* 41*—* 
' 54 10* UM 10*—* 

s n n w 

159* 55* 55 55 — * 


10 

6* PMlEpf 

178 IU 


£6 

*% 

9* 

9* 

68* 51 PhSE pf *JD 143 


330 

ST 

46* 

64% — V 

57 

44 PtMEpf 7X0 147 


42B 

56 

55 

55 —1 

22 

15* PhRSito 

1J2 

S3 

13 

140 

72* 

ti 

22* + * 

95* 

62% PMIMr 

4X0 

4J 

11 

4345 

Bi% 

83* 

04* +1M 

as 

10* PTdfeit) 

Ji 

2J 

» 

151 

Itat 

Wft 

19* + ft 

56* 

33* PtSFet 

3X0 

7 3 

■ 

233S 

19* 

31* 

39 — * 

28* 

16* PhffVH 

JO 

IJ 

9 

TO 

32* 

22* 

22* + * 

3246 

22* PledAe 

J8 

IX 

8 

445 

28* 

30 

28* 




77 






TO 

14* Fieri 



12 

14 

19* 

19 

19* 

49% 

34% Ptlsbry 

1X6 

14 

H 

2S4 

44* 

44 

44*—* 

34 

21% Pioneer 

174 

4J 

6 

1189 

27% 26% 

TO* + ft 

26* 

W* PtanrEJ 

-17r IX 

34 

3 

17* 

17* 

17* + * 

43% 

27% PJtnyB 

170 

37 

11 


H 

37* 

37*— * 

14 

9* Ptftatn 





11* 

n* 

lift— * 

16* 

8* PtonRs 

JO 

U 12 

60 

11* 

II* 

11* 

13% 

7 Ptantrn 

.14b 2X 

n 


7* 

7* 

7* + * 

13* 

0* Playboy 



8 

10 

tab 

9% 

9* + * 

33% 


Jl* 27 

10 

5 

TO* 

33* 

33*— * 

22* 

15* PwaePd 

JO 

U 

22 

12 

17* 

17* 

17* 


32 at* PMDrid 
21* 11* Poudra 
a 15 PbpToi 
it* 


HM 70. 


1JOO 34143 1943 28* 27* _ 

48 J 13 72 11* 11* 11* 

JO 4J I 19* 19* 19* 

40 23 40 2 14* If* 14* 

190 97 7 435 19* Tf* 19*— ft 

PnOPt 1L50 1L2 2270004*102*103 + * 


13* Portae 
U* PortGE 


22* 17* PorGpf 240 114 
34 28* PorGpf 440 011 

33* 21* PorGpf 432 13.1 
38* 25* Pofttch LS4 45 13 
39* 19* Pofraa 2.14 7J 9 
44 34 Pot Kerf 450 165 

a xi Poteipt 46* io4 
25* 17* Praml s J4 L7 16 

38* 2S Prtmrk 2J0 &2 7 

20* 11* PrfcaaC 12 

a* 13* PrhnMs M 3 34 

59* 47* ProefG 240 

13 7* PrdR* J2 

47* 31 Protar 140 33 
21* 14M PSvCol 2J0 95 
a M* PSCofpf 110 I1J 
9* 4* PSInd LOO 123 
8* 4 PSInpf L04 141 
■ 6* PSInpf 148 143 

a 34* PSln pf 7.15 14J 
61* 49* PSInpf 944 143 
55 44* PSInpf SJ2 141 

55 43* PSInpf 8J8 143 

57* 44* PSInpf 894 174 
« 3* PSwMH 

11* «* PSNHpf 

12 4* PNH piB 

17* 10* PNHpfC 
IS I* PNH PIS 
15* 9 PNH pfE 

13 7* PNHpfP 

14 7* PNHpfG 
2 7* IV* PSuVIM 248 113 
29* 28* PSvBG 272 VJ 

14 10* PSEGpf L40 ULS 
29M PSEGpf 430 114 

43* 33* PSEG Pf 545 124 
18*15 PSEGpf 2.17 1U 
58* 44* PSEGpf 440 T21 
28* 14* PSEGpf 243 1U 
JOfih 96 PSEGpft22S TZB 
44* 55 PSEGpf 740 114 
47 55 PSEGpf Bu0> 122 

4* 2* PubBck 

13* Mh PlItMo A» 14 
9* 4* PR Cent 

15 93* PuoafP 134 124 
PUItoHl ” 


4 22M 2» 2ZM + * 
42 33* 33* 13* + * 
T2 32* 32* XOk— * 

los as am 34* + * 

411 _ ' _ 

noz 44 a 43 — * 
12b 38* m aw + * 
I- 21* 21* 21*— W 
23S 38* 37W 38* + * 
499 14 15* 15*— * 

253 27* 27 27* + * 

54 12 1444 52* SI* 51*— * 
23 If 16 U* 13* 13* + * 

v 4 am a am + * 

a 372 21M 21* 21* — * 
10 19* 19* 19* 

7 1854 3* 7M 7*— M 
SOOz 7* 7* 7*— * 
Zlb 7* 7* 7* + * 

20b 44* 44* 44*— H 
10b 58 a SB — m 
10b 53 53 53 

51* 50 51* +1* 


9 
5 

.... WW Putts Hm .12 J 22 
3C* 22* Purofcd 1.28 49 42 
M* 5* Pyro 8 


31* 


9* 7* 9* 

a 9* 8* 8*—* 

4 14* 1W UV6— * 

5 II 12 12 

25 12* 12* 12* + * 
23 Iff* 10* 10*—* 

10 1UA 11 11 — * 

1476 25* 25 25*— * 

£72 29* 29 29* + M 

11 UW 13* 13*— M 

20b 36* 34 34* + * 

Kb 42 42 42 —1 

14 18* 18* 1866 + * 
43b 57* SC* 54*— 1* 
1 2D* 20* 20* 
4S0UOH4 101* 101* 

10b 44* 44* 44* 

20b £4 44 44 —ft 

35 316 3 3 — M 

10 11* 11* 11* 

1 4* At 4* 

212 Wt 14* 1416 
1823 14 15 15*—* 

S3 24* 2416 34*—* 
249 I 7* 7*— * 


■O* 30* QDOfcOs 134 29 12 

22* IS QuokSO 40 39 24 

11* 6* Quonox 33 

34* a oubfcr 140 u M 

25* 14 QkRnfl Mo 1.1 14 


179 43* <3* 43*— * 

54 20* 20* 20* + * 

47 B* m m 
19 32 31* 31* 

155 Z116 38* 2IM + « 


■ 6* RBInd 
43* 29M RCA 
39ft a RCA pf 

32* am RCApf 


.14 2A 53 a 8 8 + * 

1J4 25 12 2184 41* 40* 48*— * 

3J0 9J - 15b 37* 37 37 —1 

212 7JJ ia 38* 38* 38* 


Bttnffl _ 
HU Law StaA 


Ota. YM. PE 


96. 

BbHniLaw 


3P4L 
.QBatOtW 


345 1U 
JO 27 11 


J4 23 


9 

a 

a a is 
n 

4J 10 


J 31 


» 


u mum am— 

732 7* 7* 7ft— 

ii m m 4* + 

39 17* 17* 17*— 

7 9* m 9*— 

571 CM 41* 41*— 
234 7* 7* 7*_ 

41 17ft 17* 17ft 

«3 7* 2ft 2ft— 1* 

104X 43* a 43* + 

4 Hft Iflft IBft 

493 45 44* 44* — 

77 ib m 9* 

1 2Zft JZft 23ft + 

9 13* Uft 13ft 

42 IT* IT* 11* 

47 8* tV, ■* — 

at * * xi 

a 34* 34* am + * 

KS Gh 4* £* 

31 1* 1* 1* 

47 9* m m— * 

204 45* 45* 4(16 + * 

5 «ft 25* 106- M 
1 54* 54* 34*—* 

113 32 31* 31*— ft 

7 27* g* 27* 

4B 28* 29* 20* 


37ft 29* RCApf 
tat 4* RLC 
4* 3 RPC p 
II 13* HTE 
11* 8* Radio* 

45* 25* Rdlamr UO 
m 5ft Ramod 
21* 14ft Roncp J4 
9 3* RonofO 

44 47ft Bsytan 44 
17* IBM Ravmk 
«M 3m Rayfln 140 34 
13* 7* RvodW 40 43 

as 28 fUBefpf 1X0T4J 

14* 9ft RUfbf MS* 99 H 
17* 9 Racne« 11 

13* 8 RadOM JO 34 16 
1* * Repot 

39 23 RefcSiC JO 22 10 

7 3* RwAfr ■ 

2 1ft fftpAwt 
12* 4* RpGvpb JO 34 9 
48 31* RapNY 144 IS f 

3m 28* RMYefCUZ 119 
58* 52 RNYeCAUSellJ 
34ft 21ft (brnSk lit U 7 
29* 2m R*efcpf212 7J 
2J If* R*SCB» J3 u 23 
mb 22ft Raves JO 34 12 
14ft 9* vIRever 
40* B* Revtan 
am 17* - 

3* ll* _ 

IT* 52* Reynln 3J0 <9 7 4975 75* U 75* + * 

49* 44* Rayln pf 4.M 89 15 49ft 49* 49ft 

41* 34 IbVMfl 18 U ( 131 U 32* 13*— * 

xm am ftznvck ugh vm b aa* n + * 

3C* 17* fUnelT MB A7 45 28* 30 20* +1* 

33W 17ft RWAJd JO 1J U TOI 27* 27* 27* + * 

J* Tft RvrOKn 11 30 4* 4* 4* + ft 

36* 27* Rotator in 17 7 930*30 38ft+* 

4CW SIM gobtan 140 44 20 74 M CT* S5— * 

2m 12 RBUna 2517 18 17ft 1| + ft 

21* W* Roch G 2J8 IU 4 1819 21ft 20* 27 

» R"^ 71 . TM U II HI 38* 9M 38ft— M 

39* 23* tttetart U II MW B 34* 34* + * 

71* 48* RnbmH 2JD3JI8 75 59*9*59*+* 
££ »W Bohrm 9 37 49 48* 49 + * 

22* 18* RofCmn 40 1J 31 121 22ft 2SM 22ft + * 

24* 7* RnUnE S J7» J 28 108 25* 25* 2S*— * 

U* 4* gmnn» 44 4JU 49 18* KM Unt + * 

4* 2 Ronton 4 Z* 2* 2* 

K, ]2ft Rflpw 44 43 9 30 15ft 14* 1416— * 

im 24 wear 1.12 34 15 7H J7* 29* 3DM +Ht 

lift 8ft Reman J2 U 47 nt. 9ft 9 V + ft 
fJS ***** 5 7412 5SM 57* 57*-l* 

S R g y lnl » „ 18 41 14* 14* MH— M 

S gufarTnd Jf lj 17 30 48 47* 47* 

M 1«* RUMSr 14 344 Z 21* 22 + * 

20 15* FEU8T0B J4 4J I 3» 17* If* 14*— IM 

»* VP* BrawH ISO 62 13 3Sk 24* 23* 24 

n* T9 Ryt tare 48250 1349 34 23* 34 +16 

M MIS 229 ZHh 21ft 21* + * 

18* 8ft Rvxner 5 U 13* 13ft Uft 


719 24 23* 23*— ft 

gmn 1J4 5.1 12 SSi a=« 

gsa ajn is « k 


JM 25ft BOM 3J0 44 12 1021 44M 45* 45*— ft 

T2M i* S L in dt 22 11 M SS 10* Wft 10*— * 

30 19ft SPSTec JO 2J 13 Tf 27* 27* 27*— * 

— J 15 soblna 94 J7 38 1222 17 T7 17 — M 

a* 1* SdbnRr 271*1519 243 17* U* 17 

immjigg. J4 uu S^i^^+ft 

^3^33^3^ + * 
MA Oft Srfawv 140 51 TO 1255 3116 30* 31*- * 

38* 24* Saga 9 U N 492 24* 24* 25*— M 

« ’ 5 gPul . 1 JO 119 3 10* 10* ft* 

10* 3* vfSotant 43 c* <m 5M + ft 

34* 22K SalltaM J4 S 14 347 29* 2PM 2W6— M 

53* 50* SCUM pf 493a 74 200 Sk Sh 53* + ft 

JM 7 Jft XM>m 2.TB U I S44 25M £* Sta 
TO* 4* SJUWiB J8aT0L3 T# IM 8* fftt 8* 

51 31 Sondr i6 U M 14B 33M 32* 33* + * 

25* 18* SAnfiRf 154 U 12 57 23* ffih BM— H 

30* 20M SFoSoP 190 37 11 2E2 37* 17 Z7M— ft 

39* 34* SaroLaa 144 38 11 «4 S* 37 OT6— * 

»» Mft SOU1RE X Ll 44 1 Tift 70* 18* 

1« fcvpP 140 79 7 17 20* 20M 20M 

4* Savin Ut 8 7* 7ft— ft 

13ft 916 Savin pf 148 12.1 1 12* 13* 12* 

17* SCANA 2.14 84 9 204 25* 236 

. 33- ScfirPTa 148 UUl«mtata + lh 
32* 34* Scflhntl 120 XI IMnm 3H>— * 
~ tft sdAit .12 u 17 137 mb n im 

SS ? c °9i- r> ? 94 25 11 335 as* 26* 24* + * 

£0* 4816 ScdfFat 10 3B 39* 59* 5fft + ft 

3916 2» ScoHP U4 34 9 11® 34* 34* 34*- * 

IS? »» W M uhStitt 

S* Si? Sc 5?l' 14 3 41ft 41ft 41ft 

45 Zgt SadCnt 42 1J 4 143 35 34ft 34ft— ft 

'2* 7* SadCfpf 144 124 4 U IF* lift— ft 

® SaoCpfB2.TO 1X3 2 15ft 15* lSS + ft 

iS SmoCRGeRJG UB 7 15* 75* IS* + * 

2J? -fi 39 4 1115 ft* 17ft 17ft— M 

SS 2 moar !P M 10 9 1407 39* 39ft 3PM. + ft 
2Ub 12* Saaaiil 17 3» 14* M* 14M + * 

S? iS? RUB 7B 23* 23M 23M + ft 

m* 1« SaoPw LOO 43 7 45 24* 23* 23*— ft 

AS*. 37* SaortaG 190 29 15 132* 50* 49* 50 +ft 

®ft »* 194 53 9 2886 3416 33* 34ft— ft 

V. j""!* *£• B4 5 104 104 104 

nft 19 SacPecS 1J2 43 7 1075 28* 27* 2m + ft 

a?* lift SdMLt 3 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 

£59** S '1 15 i«* si to* ii 

a 11* strauee 92 sj 31 n 12ft 12ft 12ft— * 

25* 10* Mamin 41 U' 7 73 21 28ft 20ft— * 

— * 5S Sh ^R vn ZA n 37 59* w* w* 

3816 28* SHOUT U7# 5J 5 1711 34 35M 35ft- ft 


U* 


13 

57 

78 

71* 

47 


| U.S. Futures m *ys 


Htab 


Law 


Ooao High Low 

14Z5D 15050 May 

14790 15450 Jul 

Esl. Sates Prev. Sola qn 

Prmv. Day Open InL 49424 up 6 


Ctom On. 


High 


I5DJI 

15790 


Open HWi Low Dow a*. 


+.10 

-HJ0 


SNMA (CBT3 

5100003 Prtivpft A atadtof MBpet 


12ft 

42* 


Seoon Staton 
High Low 


Opan High Low Obe Che. 


Qniina 


% 


% 


10* 

18 

35* 

54* 


54ft 

22 * 


WHEAT {CHT1 

&00I bu minimum- dot Ian par bwhel 
495 3J2W May 138 341ft 3JB 

390 3.TH6 JUt 134 121ft X22M 122* — 92M 

HS2 }■!!£ 5?* H* 4 xaVi tuo* -^n* 

34W» 130* Dee 134M 134 X33* 394 —91* 

174* 136 Mar im 340* 138* 13? — *1 

492 332* May Ut Ui US US — Jl 

EaL Softs Prav.Sates 4188 
Prav.DavOaanlrd. 37,197 up 74 

CORN (CRT} 

5900 bw mlntrmmt- dal tart per bahal 
UB 247ft May 292ft 2B2ft 2J1 291 M — m 

191 273 Jul 297ft 27IM 277 27716 

331* 144* Sap 147ft 248* 247* 247ft 

295 240ft Doc 243 246 243 244 

J-W 249M Mar 27116 272ft 171 M 272* +9116 

32116 294* May 278* 277ft 274* 277ft +91* 

29816 Jul 23116 27916 27m 279 +91 


2S 

3490 22J0 

1292 22JH 

31J5 Z2J0 

31.10 22JO 

30J7 ■ 2290 
27J5 2290 

2997 2340 


2745 


MOV 

31 JS 

3U5 

30X4 

31 Ji 

Jut 

39J0 




Aug 

29 J5 

29 JS 


29.13 

Sop 

28X0 

28X5 


2833 

Oct 

Z7J5 

28X5 

TOX3 

2753 

Dec 

27X0 

27 JO 

2640 

2671 

Jon 

26-73 

27X5 

2445 

2650 

Mav 

2640 

3640 

26.19 

2625 

2195 


—97 

=5 


7040 

57r17 

Jun 

70-13 

49-28 

59-a 

Sep 

69-TO 

48-18 

59-4 

Dee 

483 

48-1 

58-28 

Mar 


48-1 

5825 

Jim 

684 

67-7 

45 

Sen 



70-16 78-12 
88-23 49-19 

8*3 8*1 


78-13 


8*1 


-9 

+1 


War 48-15 

Jw 8H IH fl 48 

Baa _ 47-19 


—M Prwv. Day Open int 4458 up 14 


Com modify indexes 




Prwv. Day Open Int. 57J38 ipU) 

OATSCCBTl 

6000 bu minimum- dodart par buWwl 
!-?L. MS? '* QY !•« '-MM 143 143M +9016 

1-53? i ul , - 55 f-Wft m 1-5916 +J3C* 

HL- J-SK* *«> T- 3 * UW LS7ft L57ft +JTOH6 

3S? 3-fS? S' 6 1-A7M 142V* 142* +9016 

I-*** 193* Mar 145* 145ft 145* 145* +90* 

Eid. sates Prev.Satet 217 

Pigw. Day Open lot. 2.981 off® 


Moody's. 


Reuters. 


DJ. Futures. 


□098 

NA f 
1,877.50 
NA 
NA 


Com. Research Bureau. 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 


Previous 

916J»f 

uas^o 

121 . 10 - 

237.00 


p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Daw Jones *. base 100 : Dec. 31,1974. 


iu 

29* 

27V 

18 


24 

21* 


43V 

49 

24V 


4» 

23V 


188 

m 

141 

» 

191 


EsL Sates 

Prwv. Day Open lnt.lB7.747 afflW 
KCBTJ 

5008 buiwt nl m utu - do Hart par btmftei 

MOV 375* 593 574* 579* +9Zft 

VS 577 Jul 579 5J3W 577 5J8ft +81 

J#. t 09 HL 52^ ^v* seat, +JB* 

871 591 Sap 183 585 5J1 5JEM +JUU 

448 593* Nov 599* 592 597* 590ft -j£* 

H! fSS? **** 578* 491 M — 

MQr 6J5 ’ 6-12 4JJ» 4.11* 

Ii! f-1* “?V 8-18* 479* 6.14* 4.19* 

841 632* Jul 634 625* 634 625* 

Ert-SojM _ Prev. Sales 34400 

Prwv. Day Open tnL 58350 US 879 
SOYBEAN MEALCCBTl 
108 tenp doner* par tan 

SS IJM2 "« 9HS 11470 12140 +TJD 

w m % ^ ip as ss » 

8 mS S3 S3 S3 i!3 

Mar 14658- 147J0 14490 tiZDO +190 


n Month 
tftaUw Shdt 


Ptr. YML PE 


StL 

MftlHMiLom 




am 


12 Month 
Woo LOW Stark 


ofv. ym. pe to toan LOW 




am 17* ShefGta 90 33 6 

37 24 Buvrte JI Z ill 

8M 4* shoetwn 8 

18ft 12 Shantrt 48 45 M 

17* TZM SterPac 140 9J 8 


97 25 2m 28ft— ft 

200 Mft as* 38* 

47 8ft 4* 8ft + ft 
2 13(6 m la* + ft 
228 T7ft 17ft 17ft + ft 


37 am Shaft 190 39 13 1074 34* 33ft W*— * 

f» 48ft Slant pf <12 7.1 22 57ft 57* 57* 

38* 34 smear .18 J 9 335 35ft 98ft Mft— ft 

31ft 24* Snprpf ISO 114 1 38* 30ft 38*— 16 

U ffii Skyttna 48 37 79 204 12 12* 12ft— ft 

»ft 28* Skrfterr Jb JU 16 16 2Sft 26M 26ft— ft 

SH6 m SariffHP JS 29 312 11 TOft 10ft 

44ft ShSfflfcB 2J0 63 18 1839 84ft 83* 44* + ft 

57ft 38ft Sowtar 198 29 M 7 54* S4M 54* + * 

41* 29ft S w Oa U8 — — — 


34ft 24* UAL of 240 77 1440 3114 38ft 31ft + ft 

15ft 7ft UCCEL IB MS 18 Oft M — ft 

24* 14* UGI 2X4 84 10 49 23* ZN6 23ft + ft 

am muGipf »im 
n* 3U uncrbs 
14 is URS 40 36 16 
36 17ft U3FG 130 67206 
35ft 22WUSGB 148 68 « 

19H 13 UnlPnt X I J 11 
102* 75 UnlNV 3BB 39 9 
61* 30* UComn 194 49 » 

57* 32* UnCart *40 U 


“ lift lift lift— ft 
33* 32ft 33 —ft 


lA 


573 3Sft 38ft ^ + * 


32 n 

43* 27 Sand! US 4J I 
W* U* SeoyCp .I8a U 13 
30ft 22* SeaUn 1 JB 68 15 
3f* 27* Source 3J0 87 
22* 18 srcCPPf 248 IU 
28* 22 SoJelia 248 89 11 
48* 41 Soudwo UN 23 11 
38ft 22 SoatSfc U0 68 9 
Hft 5ft SOBtn 1651234 32 
»b U SCufEs 294 A2 • 
30* 14ft SocttCo L92 94 7 
25* 17 SotaGoe 1J0 79 I 
41* 29 SNBT1 272 87 70 
31 23 SdUtlCe 172 47 

33* 23 SoottPd UN 32 tt 
17 lift sonsy .12 i n 
8* «* Soumrk JO 39 5 
36 UftSwAbt .13 
S* UftSwfFor 


114 SC* Eh 35* 

404 39* 30* Wft — ft 
■77 16* 18ft Wft— ft 
85 20* 29* » —ft 
11 34* 34* 34* + * 
8 22 * 21 * 22 * + * 
8 21 27ft 27ft— * 
11 Oft 43ft 83* + ft 
58 ■* 30* 38ft + ft 
*7 6ft 7 
3*9 25 24* 24ft + * 

SW SB* 20 W* + ft 
38 25ft 25ft 25ft + ft 
120 80* 48* 80ft 
127 20ft 27* a + ft 
316 3in SOM 31ft +1 
a 14* 14* 14* + ft 
MB 4* 4ft 4ft 

4 15 »I4 23ft 23* 23*— ft 
26 2U 12ft Tift lift—* 


16* UN SnflGos 134 71 H 139 U 15* 14 + * 

78 55 SwOaO 690 89 ■ 854 75* 74* 75ft + * 

27 17* BWEHT 9 U II XZ 2B* »M 31ft— ft 

34 17 SwtPS 198 89 9 3540 2H 23* 23ft 

17ft 11* Spartep 3J 39344 10 UM 15ft 1» + ft 

27* lift SpacfP 115 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 

54* 33ft Sparry 172 34 IB 5408 53ft 51* 53 +1* 

38 so* SsrtMt LSI 44 W 8 32* 22ft 32* 

43ft 31ft SguorD L84 5X W 483 36* 36* 36* + * 

58ft 37* Soateb 140 27 U len 5SM 57* JSM + * 

am D* sinier jo u u <a m im n + v. 

21V* 14* smpnt 36 2J 11 384 38* 19* 20* + ft 

20ft n StMatr J2 ZS 11 194 12* 12* 12ft— ft 

50ft TO* swoon 2J0. 5J a 1346 49* 48 48M— 1ft 

Uft 8* SfPoeCa 9 149 18ft 18* 18*— ft 

18ft 11* Stonctax 9 U f 44 Uft 13M 13M— ft 

SOft 19* StanWk 96 35 11 73 2BM 27ft 27ft—* 

35* 23* SJorrwtt 1X0 29 11 10 34M 34* 34ft— ft 

im Oft SfoM54 TJQalU 33 10* 10U. 18ft + * 

. 3ft 2ft Sfeegp .12 27 18 Sft 3* 3U 

2SM 14M Stwreftl 76 39 M 2 19* 19* 19*— M 

lift tah STHBcp 74 7X » 41 TOft 10* 10* 

33* 23 ft StarSTB U0 39 13 2259 31M 30M 30ft + M 

Zlft 15(6 StevnJ 1J0 44 II 2249 IM IM Mb +1* 

34 27ft SfwVrm 148 6X 17 IM 38M 27ft 28* + * 

U B* SfkVCPf 190 89 lb 11* lift lift 

*5* 32* StaohW 140 37 9 IS 43* 42* 42ft—* 

39 25 StaoaC 48 23 9 ZM 24ft 24M 2414 — M 

S3* 35 StopShP LW 29 10 133 45 48ft 44ft 

mu 15* stored L84 94 14 B3 Wft 19* 79M + M 

Uft 2 vIStarT 847 2ft 2ft 2ft + * 

79* 33M Starar M S 1«2 75* 74ft 75* + * 

21* IS* StrtMln 4b 11 32 »ft IS* 18ft— M 

UM 14* Stritfld JO 5.1 29 10 M 15* 15ft + * 

BW 3ft SoovSZt 22 5* 5M 5* 

33* ZTft 5«nSki L20 34 12 412 XJM 33 33 

35(6 M* 5unCh 41 14 W 3 34* 34M 34M 

■“ 4* Send 493 7ft 7ft 7* + ft 

. oft Bunco 2Je 64 ii ran 52* si* 51ft— ft 

TM 98ft SunCpf 225 2.1 2 TOB 107*107*— * 

47* 34* Sundstr I JO 65 11 497 40* 40 40 —1 

Uft 7* SonMfl 34 149 S 7ft ~ 

MW a<* SoprVt 41 13 11 23022*32*32* + * 
40ft 19ft SubMM 42 Ll 13 70 39ft 39 3** + M 

17* 14 Rank 98 SJ 14 2 15* 15* 15ft 

21* 16* srbran 1X8 69 >0 47 n 17ft IB 

35M 28* Sybm Pf 240 75 10 32 32 32+ft 

Uft II* SvntCP 11 210 13M 12ft I3M + * 

192 U 14 Ml 58* 57ft 55M + * 

J6 19 IS USl 35M 34* 34* — ft 


7* 4ft ifntanc 
18* 12 UnEteC 192 94 
SB 21 UflElpf 358 127 
37 27* UnElPf 656 124 

53 39* UnElpf 640 121 

Sft 31* UflEipfMUe 121 
25ft IBM UnElpf 298 129 
UW Uft unEipf 2.M n.1 
U 49 UEIPfH BXO OJ 
51* am unite: UB U 
112 B2 UnPepf IX 67 
28* 9ft OnSnwt M J 

7B 53* Unrrlpf MO IU 

6ft 2ft Unitor 

IB* IBft UnBrnd 

15* 9ft UBrtfpf 

40 as* UCMTV .18 4 ft 

32* 2Z* UnEnre Z4* IJ 71 

17ft V Ulltam 298 1X1 3 

2Mb 19ft Ullhipf X97 149 
17 Uft UlRupf aJD 139 
28ft 21* UtltdOf 600 U5 
14* 10 UUtapf 198 163 
8ft 14* Untltnd 94 U 8 
41* 35 UntUiM 32 4 2? 

42 34 UJarSk 19 tf 9 

14* 7ft UtaMM 4 

2ft 2* UPkMn 1 

a* 22 UtofrG .12 4 7 
8* 5* USHotn 
42* 29* USL008 JB 23 8 
— _ 94 27 U 


114 13ft tJW 

38 98* 97ft VI —ft 

7Ti sm sc* am— ft 
f 3490 am 37* sm + w 
10 9ft 5ft Sft— ft 
6 513 IN U 18 

5b 27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
2001x36* 36 34ft— U 

■12b 53 51* 53 4* 

51 30ft 30ft SOft + ft 

45 am 38 am + * 
4 it* mb mb— ft 

lflb 62* 62* 83ft +1 
12 88*9 SOM 49ft SOW— ft 
MlUftW 189 -2 
U 4193 IM Uft Uft 
2Mb 60 59 59 -0ft 

138 JO 4ft 4* 41b— * 
17 335 14* 13ft 14 + * 

3 MW 18* 18* + ft 
386 SPft 99ft 39ft 
Ui 38* X 30ft +ft 
298 1516 1516 W-“ 

ui sm am 5ft 

ms lflb uw Mft + ft 
13 37ft 37* 37ft— (6 
U9 13M 12* 13ft— ft 
41 2lft 21* 21ft + * 
» 37 36* 37 + ft 

6 39* 39ft TOft— ft 
21 T2ft 12* 12ft 
32 2* 3ft 3* 

770 32ft 33* St* + * 
619 7 6ft «ft— ft 
28 35* 35ft Mft— ft 
437 32* 31ft 31ft— ft 


33 23 USShOe ... 

29* 22 ussteat 1X0 X4 » 2*43 a* 27* 

. 50* 4W4 USStlpf 64*129 174 53* 53ft 53ft + * 

USWUSft USSWprOJS 99 411 m* 133 LOW + ft 

27* 2zw usan pt 22s tm 2 » 29* am am— w 

39* 31ft USTob 131 61 n 819 35 34ft M + » 

74ft 5516 USWetf 572 74 8 1182 75* 7SW 7S14 + W 

13 m tiStakn 21 9 Sft 8ft 8* 

85 29* UnTchs 140 U 7 3T7S 37ft 34ft 34ft— * 

39ft 28* UTchef US 74 277 34 XT* 33ft— U 

am 17ft UnTTat ui u f iut 22ft m 22* 

IX 65 U IX X 19* 19ft + ft 

JB J 14 29 25* 25ft 25* 

JO 8J 7 1 18* X* IV* 

tm 63 ii a am am am— * 

I J0 SB 7 62 20 19* X + * 

24 11 3650 66W 85* 44*— ft 


21 Uft UWRa 

Sft 22 UnRrde 

22* 18ft urdver 

27ft IS* UnlvFd 

23ft 15ft UnLaof 

53 30 Unocal 

90ft 45 UPtatal . . .. 

43 23* U5LIFE 1X8 29 10 

vo m uettaFd UMOMU 
25* 20* Uteri’ L 2X2 9 S 
25ft 21* UtPLpf 2X0 IU 
X* 21ft UfPLpf 2J0 IU 
lift 17* UtPLPf 236 1L8 
Uft 15* UfPLpf 3X8 107 
33ft 15 UftttCe 1X2bX7 
21 17ft UtllCopf 248 1IJ 
22* IBft UniCoprSXI 1L7 
38* 28ft «JfffCan8+T2 11 J 



Growing with, 
the need to manage 
our water resources 


Products from several Ametek 
Divisions are used to manage 
the capacity of deep welts, help 
farmers reduce irrigation 
needs and provide clearer, 
better tasting drinking water. 

Write for latest repo its to: 


AMETEK 


Dept. H, 

410 Paris Avenue, 21st Hoor, 
New York. NY 10022. 



« 


luff 10 


?J 17 464 WM Wft «9*- 



tt Mart 

HfchLo* Stock 

Db.YU.PE MHlflllW 

3 PAL 

owl arm 


U 


7» 37 34ft 34ft + 16 

4 TO IB 10 
3U 24ft 24ft 24* 

5 25* 25ft 25(6—16 

41 24 34 26 — * 

70 214b 21ft 21ft + H 

X 3» OH 2M + H 
5 20ft 20ft 28ft— ft 
22 22ft 22ft 27* 

1 34ft J4ft 34ft + ft 


34 

XS TO 


U 15 
68 U 


SB W 35ft TDK 
I2W 24 TEOD 
13* 7* TCIF 
17* me tnp 
= - 17 TRE 
r* 5Mb TRW 
tab 2* Toe*.. 

TOft 52* Toftard LIS 17 U 
Uft 12 Toitav JBa J 14 
20* 14ft Tatter pf TJX) 4J 
» 44* Tarnbrd XX 44 14 


J7» 4 18 
136 M I 
16 

1JS 7.1 ■ 

UK AA M 
3X0 83 TO 


35ft 23ft Tandy 
15ft T7H Tndvcft 
48ft 51* Tektra* 1X0 
5ft ZW-TMcom 
302*153* TeJehn 
a< 13* Tat rota X 
88ft 21ft Tatax 
39* 25* Tompfn 48 
45ft 32ft Tmnco 2X2 


3 42 42 82 — 16 

219 31ft 31* 31ft + * 
27 11* 10* IT — ft 
lb T7ft 16ft 17* + * 
562 UN 27* TIN + * 
414 70 69* 69ft 

992 3ft 2ft 3ft + ft 
503 45* 45ft 45* +1 
149 IS* IB 15* + * 
21 20ft 20ft 20ft + * 
179 72ft 72ft 73ft + ft 


33ft 21ft VFC0TP 1.12 
12ft 5* Valera 
23* 14 Volar Pf 344 1X3 
4* Sft Vdavtn 
28ft 19 vonora J2 63 
Sft 2ft VUrco 
17 5ft Vorcopf 
66* x Vartan 
Oft 9* Vara 
25ft IBft Vceco 
7ft 3H Vanda 
10* Sft VBfltSe 
45ft 25* Vtoajm 


U 8 


« 3CW VaEPpf 5X0 IL1 

87 Si VOEPpf 7J2 11J 

82ft 49M VaEPpf 7 JO TIJ 

44 51ft VaEPpf 745 11J 

21ft lift VMMV8 14 

41ft X Vomad 11 

78 60* VnknM 2J0 3J 11 


477 27ft 31ft Sift— ft 
BM WH 10* IM- ft 
41 22ft 22* 22*— * 
17 2ft Sft 2ft— ft 
9 21ft 21* 21ft + ft 
74 2ft 2ft 2* 

13 8* 81b 8ft— K 
J14S578 25* 27* 28ft + * 1 

19 13 SB IB* IB* IB* 

20 13 71 X 19ft X 

IX 302 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft | 

1 JB0I14 72 Wft 18* Wft + ft 

jB IJ U 9S2 41* 41* 41* 


40 

48 


20b 45 44 45 

100b 44* 44ft 44* + ft 
Mb 41* £1* 611b 
10b 45 65 IS +1 

9 30ft 20* 20ft 
31 48 88 X 

99 72ft 72ft 72ft— * 


31ft eft vfWmPtt 

41 14* vMMtpfB 

49ft 36ft WNrtal UN 68 
32* 38* WhHC UD ~~ 

42 36ft WTlifCpfOJO 
29ft lTftWMtaN 
25* WW WM1TC4C 60 
12ft 6W wtaBW 

6 8 WWrdn 
311b 22* Win tem 148 
X 2 WHmQ 
9 6* WIMirO .W 

35* 25ft WTnDtx 148 
J 7ft wmnbe .We x 
73ft 5* Wlnaar 
7* 3ft WtntarJ 
35ft 25ft WtacEP 248 7J 
7S. SfftWlBEpI 7JS1BJ 
23* WlaGpf XSS WJ 
3R6 25* WfacPL 268 76 
38ft 25* WtecPS 2X8 74 
40* 37ft Wltco 148 63 
15ft 9ft WntvrW J8 13 
27 MftWDOdPt X iSX 14 
44* X Wutwth 2X6 64 10 
42ft 44ft Wofwpf ZJD 36 
48ft 41 Wttafy lJOd 2J 11 
.-j Jft.Wlirttzr 
18 If* WVtaLfa J2 XI 9 
l 17 Write* 40 14 7 


S 7* 7ft 7* + * 

Mb 18* Uft lift- ft 
916 41ft 41 41 - ft 

2)7 28ft 23* 21ft— ft 
3 48ft 80* 40ft— ft 
94 27ft 27ft 27ft 
34 » .21ft 23* 

2 9* 9* **— * 

U 11* IT* 11*—* 
510 99* 28* 2946 — * 
X 4* 4ft «*— * 

40 4ft 4ft 4ft 

~ 35* 3SU 35* 


n 

509 

12* 

12% 

12* + * 

45 

42 

7* 

7* 

7*— * 


8 

5* 

Xft 

5* 

■ 

431 

25* 

25* 

38* 


1X71 * 

72* 

72% — * 


1 

25 

TO 

TO 

0 

178 

35* 

34* 

34* +41 

• 

148 

34* 

34* 

34* + ft 

■ 

.73 

34% 

34* 

34*— % 

3 

ia 

10% 

10* 

10* + * 


12* 21ft _ 

371 43* 43ft 4346 + * 
3 61 68* 61 + * 

31 41* 41 «*- * 

S m 44b 8ft + * 
12 1146 11* 11*—* 
II 17ft 17ft 17ft + * 


14 1594 30* 30* 30*— * 
12 114 13* 13* 19* 

L7 • 173 SB* SB 58* — * 
7 73 3* 3ft 3* + * 

t 408 244* 240 240*— 3* 

ix a si a ai* 2ift 

.11 403 41* 4046 45*— ft 

IX • 74 34* 34* 34*— 4b 

67 11 3881 4446 Oft 43W— V, 


W 


183* 17* Tencpr 11X0 107 X 103* t££* 103* + ft 

81 45 Tencpr 7X0 9J 8 804. 80* BO*— * 

35* 20 Tordyn 10 na a* 20* 21* + * 

U* ta6 Tatars JO 36 180 11* 11 11*— * 

3344 2D* Tasorp# 2.14 9.1 7 23* 23% 27ft— * 

am 31* Texaco 3X0 XI X 8056 38* 36ft 37 — M6 

41* 31* TxABc 69 9 55 333% 33* 32* + * 

44ft 32 TexCm 1J6 4J t 3840 32* 31ft 32* + * 

TO 24* TxETOl 2J0 XI 18 817 36* 35* 35ft— * 

57* 52 TxETpf 6J5eU3 1 56* 56* 54* 

3«4 25 Texlnd JOtl 2X 14 50 29 2B* 2SH + * 

M746 TO* Texlnat 280 U9 18B8 92W92 92* + 46 

1 TfPOnt 1654 2* 2ft 2* + * 

Sft 14* TaxOGd .1* S 12 4803 U* 18* If* + ft 

28* Txftec JO 1 J X 2 31ft 31ft 31ft + * 

20* TaaUtl! 252 Xf 7 2088 2B% 28* 2T* 

3 TaxfJ In 15 346 9ft 346 

87ft 26* Taxtran 1X0 19 11 792 44* 44* 44* + * 

52 28* Taxfrpf 208 61 8 50* 5046 58* 

41* 23* Tarfrpf 1J0 24 1 41* 41* 41* 

TO* m TTwdc 45 -2 9* 9* 9%—* 

— . Uft Therm 6 23 15 23* 23* 23* + * 

43* X* Throb* 1J6 39 15 275 35* 3446 35 — * 

TON 72* Thom In JBh 4J 9 13 15* 15* 15*— * 

36* 13* Tft mM ed JO 29 * 7 45 14 13* 13ft— * 

a* 14 TJolffy JO XT U 779 19ft 19* 19* + * 

TO* 17 TTdWtr JO XI 37 17ft 17* lift— W 

8ft Ttaarlo B21 T46 7* 7ft 

SJ JL, I!®' 11 * 56 7* 7* 7*—* 

gft Sft Time 1X0 IX 14 1251 54* 53 S3*— 1 

23% 12 TlniPta _ 15 X Iff* 14* 14* + * 

5146 38* TtenaM IX 27 15 S29 50* 49* 49* -1 

TO* 87* Timken LBOn 26 16 99 50* 50* JO* — * 

** SW TodStai IJ2 64 7 19 3W* 3M- * 

TO 14ft Tokhms X SJ M 12 26* 19* 

U* 13ft TWEdb 2J3 T65 5 3236 17ft 1716 1746— * 


29% 22 WICOR 2X0 82 B 127 21* 27ft 39* + % 

37% 21* Wodiva UB2XU 254 38* 35* 36* + *: 

25* 16* Vtackhi JO 3J lln 18* 18ft 18* + * 
TOft 6U Wnlnoc 469 42 9N 9ft 9ft— * 

48* 34* WolMrt X X 25 1944 87* 4£* 47* + ft 

54* 38* Wotom 9 UM 257 4916 89 49*— ft 

27* 14V. Wlemwl 34 23 24* 24ft 

22ft 15* WkHRjoIJO 16 21ft 21ft TO*— ft i 

38* 23ft WatCSv J5 IJ 17 147 35 34 34* +1 

V 22 WoltJm 1J0 63 7 319 33 32* 32ft + 4 

9ft 7* WaltJ pf 1X8 IU 107 8ft 8ft 6ft 
2H4b 1746 Woraco M 61 11 134 21* 21* 21ft 

30* 17 wmem 3434 28ft X X 

39* 25ft WamrL 1J8 6X 13 T7X 37% 34* 37* 

20% 18ft WahGB 1X4 62 8 102 20* 20 38ft 

28* 15* WlhNot 1J)B 62 8 ‘ 

21* 16 VKHWt 2JB 1L5 B 

54ft 27* warn JO IJ 17 

20 WotkJn M U HI 

1246 Sft WayGb JO U 9 
26 20* WBTGPf 168 XS 
12* 4 WeanU 
23ft 12* WBbbo jb u 13 
40 29ft MBtsMk JO 1 s 14 

57 30* WaltaF 2J0 46 B 

28% 22* WalFM 2X0 MX 1] 

17* TO* Wendy s jl 

24* 16* WasICa 


1 x 1 

47* 

33* Xerox 

3X0 

64 19 

isn 

46* 45% 45% — 46 

39 

19 

XTRA 

J4 

2X U 

• 9 

29* 

3S%- 35% + * 





Z 



1 

30 

24 

ZateCp 

1J2 

4X 8 

49 

27% 

37* 27% + * 

24* 

13 


X4 

as as 

Asa 

13% 

12* 13 - 

42% 

TO 


JOb 

J 15 

140 

41* 

60* 41* + * 

30* 

IS* ZenUhe 


8 

438 

20 

19* 19*— % 

TO* 

14* tell 

32 

17 17 

- 3 

Wft 

11% IB* + * 


34 WPanPpILSO 11 J 
46* 34* WsfPIP 2J0 XI » 


71 25* 25% 25* + * , 

194 21* 21* 21* + ft : 

419 58ft 50* 58ft— ft | 

TO 23* 23% 22ft + ft 

7 9* 9* f* 

5 70 X 20 — ft 
61 9 ■* Sft— ft 

790 18* TO* Mft + ft , 

12 X 37ft 3746— tt 

458 9446 54* 5m— ft 

47 26 2546 25*— ft 

IJ 17 2556 1646 15* 15*— ft 
IX 13 132 22* 22* 22* + % 


Belgrade, Banks 
Set Talks on Debt 


’t* 

If™ 

Uft 

10* 


40 

V 

IS* 

» 


9% Water To 1X8 
2* WliAlrL 
ft WtAIrwf 
8% WAIT pf 2X0 IU 
WWNrd 2.1* IU 
4 WCNA 
5* WUnlon 
24* WnUnnf 
2* WlHJpfS 
4* WnUefE 
Sft WUTIpfA 


181 X 80—1 

115 3«ft 35* 35ft + * 
42 11* Tift lift 
3005 4* 4 «ft 

92 146 18b 1ft 

M M* Mft IS* 

TO U Uft 19 +ft 
982 7* 7 7 —ft 

2» Sft 8ft Mb 

2 26ft 24ft 26ft— ft 
59 Z* 346 346— ft 

30 7* 7ft 7ft + ft 

X 8ft 8* 8*— ft 


Return 

BELGRADE — Yi 
fives of its creditor banks will 
the next few days aimed at 

debt-re financing negotiations ihnl 



April 12, Finance Ministry sources said 


Wednesday. 

A threetaember team from Manufacturers 
Hanover Trust Co. of New York, which heads 
the International Coordinating Committee of 
the 600 creditor commercial hanlm, was to ot- 


to* 24ft TolEdpf 172 U6 
21* 22 TolEdpf 175 136 
36* 20 TolEdpf 147 13+ 
3146 25ft TolEdpf 6X U5 


18* Ott TolEdpf 2J6 T3J 
IBdpf 2J1 129 


i IX 15 
U 1 


324 

391 

2M 

211 


13> 

19 

29 

24> 

X 

34 

34* 

26' 

26> 

rr 

29 

TO 

4> 

41 

43 


25 

TO 

64 

153 

X 

X 



U* 13* Toll 

83* 13* Tonkas 

44* 19* Tootttea 

41* 19* Tretank IX 
17* 9ft To 
4* 1 To 
19* 8* Towle 

35* 25* ToyRUS 27 

19% Trocar J4 1.1 M 
M 7ft TWA 48 

lift TWApf 225 169 
14ftTWAPfB2J5 



43 27* 27% 27*— ft 
TO 27* 27* 27*— * 
25 26 25% 25*— * 

7 TOft 31ft 31* + ft 
11 17ft 17ft 17ft 
5 17* 17ft 17* + ft 
227 <2* 40* 41 —1ft 
IS 48* 44 47* +4* 

559 50* 48ft 4846 + ft 
68 14ft Uft 14* 

364 2 1ft 1ft 
TO 9* 9ft V* 

552 35 34% 34* +1* 

89 32 31* Sift— ft 

4484 14ft Mft M + ft 
UP 15% 15 IS* + % 
U 215 27% 24* 27% + ft 

U 13 324 ■ 29* 29ft— ft 

Trmine 232 11 J TO 19* 1 tab 19* 

TARffy 1X0 83 14 19 12 12 12 — ft 

££ 25 I mn »2 Jl? fi 1# 726 S3* 51* 52ft— * 

SS? SS J fm g pt 3 44 48 44 — ft 

I ronElt WJ 477 21* 21 21*— ft 

13% ihTmaoi 5 70 8* 8* Sft— ft 

79* 43 TrGPPf 4JS M 10b 78 76 74 —1 

93 77 TrGPpf 1+4 9A 10b 90 90 90 

££ 150 ,0J „ I 23* 23* TO* 

156 «ft TrraOh 13 47 12* 12 12 — * 

££ 2„. P BW yy ’-S K .? u 31*— * 

SJ ^ I n P* W - M 1-5 11 1258 32* 32% 32* 

2016 9* TWtdwtA 1 15* 15* 15ft— W 

31* 22* Twfcfpf U0 67 I 29* Wft Stab 

17* M* Twldpf LM 109 2 mb TON im 

SS Z ni *Z V?. «M25U85%44*4W + ft 
54% 50% Troy pf 4.16 IJ 27 5m 54 54* 

Tri^n 2SaT4J S3 24ft 24* 24ft + % 

28* M% TrtCnpf 150 9 J 6 TO 24ft TO 

28* 12ft TrinJnd JO IJ IB 24 25* 25% 25% — * 

?“• TftaPe IXB 3J 8 TOl as* Sft Sb- * 

«JS agj Trtbun# JH IX 17 2234 45% 44* 45 +* 

*** » Jrtra J UB J 8ft 6% 4ft— ft 

TOft 12* Trtrdy 50 TO 735 13* 13* 13*— % 

24* 11* TrttEnp -TOO J 43 48 23* ON 2TOb- ft 

M Sft Trite pf 1.10 El S3 14 13* 1JH— % 

»ft Tuaep 3X0 7X » 1<D4 39% M* 39 + * 

W 16 TWtaDs JO 4J 10 12 14* Uft 14* 

41 27% TycoLb JO 2J B 400 33* 33* 3M- * 

TTft lift Tyler* JO 3J 7 583 13* 13ft lift + ft 


TO* 19* WsfoE IX 3X W 1530 31* Xft 31ft + * 

41 31* Wastvc IX U I 139 38* Xft 31ft— ft 

34 25 Wayem 1J0 4J 18 1S23 Z7 26ft 26ft— * 

44ft 34* Wavrof 2X0 7J 22 39ft 3Vft 39ft— ft 

51* 43* Wear pr 450 9J 22 47* 47* 47* 


rive in Belgrade on Wednesday night. 

ICC rfuirmfln Fui- 


The team, headed by the I( 


vio Dobrich. will meet Thursday and Fridav z. 

v+tL Vhm.i..J.v j_l. ... .i XT 



of IntonadOTal Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 


Trib ads work. 


1X0e 12 7 3848 45 43* 44* +1* | 


with Yugoslavia’s chief debt negotiator, the 
assistant secretary of finance, Cvitan Dig movie, 
the sources said. 

Yugoslavia and the creditor banks are trying 
to agree to terms for a multiyear p--***^ to 
refinance repayment of $3.4 hfilion of debt 
falling due between 1985 nod 1988. Talks in 
New York broke down April 12 after disagree- 
ment over interest rates and other issues. 

Yugoslavia's total hard-currency foreign debt 
is $18.8 trillion, the eighth largest among devel- 
oping countries. 

Yugoslavia wants a revision, backdated to the 
Stan of this year, of interest rates negotiated 
with commercial banks for 1983 and 1984 refi- 
nancing agreements, as well as favorable terms 
for the 198S-88 period. 

The search for agreement with the commer- 
cial banks is part of a conykx debt refinancing 
that also involves 16 mainly Western govern- 
ments. It is underpinned by a $300 million 
standby credit arrangement with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund, which was approved by 
the’ IMF’s board of directors April 29. 

Yugoslavia’s internal attempts to improve its 
economy and make it more eroort-orieated^' 
have been complicated by inflation now nrnff 
rang at 70 percent annually. 



London Commodities 

May 8 


SUGAR*’ 1 * 1 ’ *■" ** “ ** 

Starling pro mettle tan 
ABO 9420 9320 9480 96X0 9380 94X0 

on 7D020 97X0 99X0 100X0 9720 97.40 

Dee 105X0 m00 105X0 106X0 10220 102JO 
MOT I17J0 11440 117X0 11720 11420 11480 
May 12180 119J0 121.40 12188 119X0 120X0 
Aaa 127X0 12580 127X0 1TO20 124X0 125X0 
M 131X0 131X0 131X0 133X0 12780 132X0 
Volume: 2893 Inis of X Ions. 

COCOA 

Staritag per Bterlc tan 
May 1X13 1X00 1X04 1X04 1X10 1J12 

Jly 1JS2 T834 1X39 1J40 1X43 1J44 

Sep )M 1X27 1J2B ISO 1J39 1X40 

Dec 1291 1279 1211 1283 1295 1296 

Mar 1291 1280 12*2 1283 1293 1294 

Star 1295 12*5 12*5 1297 1295 V 

JIT N.T. N.T. 7290 1X00 1295 1, 

Volume: Z4B6 lot* ot 10 tens. 

COFFEE 

metric too 

Btay ZUS ZI30 2,745 2148 2135 2140 

Ah 2208 2186 2205 2207 2197 2200 

2245 2315 2242 2243 2230 2232 
2TO0 2244 2M 2280 2260 2J70 


1JI5 


1290 2277 2393 2305 22B5 2290 
2272 2385 2275 2276 


Jhr 


2270 2260 

Mot N.T. N.T. 2260 2300 2330 2270 
volume: 2530 lota of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

111 tailor* per metric ton 
MOV 219X0 716X0 31450 315X8 21950 219.75 
215X0 21250 71275 214X0 21675 217X0 
214J8 21250 31275 21 IXB 215X0 21525 
215X0 71450 214X0 215X0 31475 317X0 
217X0 21650 31473 217X0 TO875 21975 
319X0 718X0 718X0 71975 21975 ma 
mr N.T. N.T. 21EX0 224X0 221X0 222X0 
K N.T. N.T. 32200 232X0 223.00 230X0 
m N.T. N.T. 220X0 232X0 223X0 230X0 
Volume: 1X99 lor* of 100 tans. 

Sources: Reuters ond London Petroleum Ex- 
^**** ^ ^~ f pbmkl 


Od 


UA Treasury fill Sales 
May 7 


Mi 


Offer 

BM 

TleM 

Ytofd 

7J7 

7JS 

804 

7X6 

7X0 

7X8 

834 

834 

807 

US 

849 

873 


Sa/rce: SaiomeB Brothers 


S&P 100 Index Options 
May 7 


The International Herald Tribune. Bringing the World’s Most Important News to the World's Most important Audience. 


SWf QSIMjtf 
Frtte May to J8 taf 
MV--. 
W lift U* IM 14* 
170 M 7ft M HK 
n mi ft, ia 

M ft Hb 7% 3ft 

NS UU ft 1ft 1ft 

IN — 1716 7/16 - 

TfJ \ni - - - 

Tta l a m i n ta iui 149X31 
TMaEeMRtaLMn 
HUM ntans fUM 
MUM MUIUB 


„ MlOtf 
tan Jbb ji* mb 

- i/16 1/16 - 

— 171* U ft 
Jf]B ft 13/16 1 1/11 
JVlil* 237ft 77/16 
4ft 4ft 4ft - 




HM 11834 Leu 17522 Ocs* I71I4 + LJ9 
scarce: CBoe. 


Asian Commodities 

May 8 


HONC-KOKGGOLD FUTURES 
U XX per n ee c e 

HWl Low ST^c 

Wov_ N.T. M.T. 313X0 315X0 310X0 312X0 
Jun_ .T. N.T. 315X0 317X0 312X0 314X0 
Jly — N.T. N.T. 316X0 31800 JUXO 31SJJ0 
AUB _ N.T. N.T. 319X0 321X0 316X0 31800 
Od — N.T. M.T. 323X0 325X0 320X0 322X0 
Doc _ N.T. N.T. mX0 329X0 324X0 236JB 


i 


London Metals 
May 8 


Mtf ABk 




- TO7X0 339X0 33400 336X0 

Volume: 24 lots of 100 oz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXXporoanee 

Mftrt Low Settle Settle 

Jun — 31670 315X0 315.10 31220 

Aug N.T. JLT. 31^10 31420 

Sea N.T N-T, 321.10 31840 

Volume: no tots of 1 00 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malayslao oeots per Id to 

_Ctoee Previous 

_ M Aik BM 

May 

i 


ALUMINUM 
Starling per metric too 
Boot «U» 939X0 926X0 9Z7XC 

950X0 951X0 942X0 943X0 
COPP ER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Stemna per metric tan 

1X34X0 1738X0 L338JN 1X40X0 
1747X0 1748X0 TJ27X0 7728X0 


COPPER 

Sterling 

seel 


R CATHODES (Stantara) 
per metric Ion 


LEAD 

Staritaapi 

seel 

te rw w T l 

NICKEL 
Ster n no pi 
spot 
forward 


1750X0 l.mm 17J1X0 
1737X0 1738X0 171400 


1738X0 

1718X0 


r metric ton 
' 311X0 312X0 31400 
TOOXO 309X0 310X0 


315X0 

315X0 


JIV. 


Volume: ll tots. 

SIWGAPORR RUBBER 


IB97S 19075 188X0 189X0 
19075 19075 1B9X0 190X0 

193X0 19X25 19275 19375 

19550 194X0 195X0 196JD 

19450 197X0 196X0 197X0 


■ metric toe 
4JKLO0 I7*iii(i 4X30JH 
4 5 8 5 . 0 0 4X90X0 4X10X0 


4X25X0 

4S11XD 


SILVER 



Oese 

Pi CVolUf Ii 

RSSlMay- 

Bid 

169X0 

Ask 

170X0 

10?S 

167X 

RSS 1 Jun— 

14675 

167X0 

166X0 

167X0 

RS52ABOV- 

166X0 

167X0 

166X0 

167X0 

RSS3«tor. 

164X8 

165X0 

144X0 


RS54M07. 

M9LS0 

162X0 

160X0 

167 fill 

RSS5M0V- 

1SSJ0 

157X0 

155X0 

157X0 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 



Sl-gO aoxo 516X0 518X0 
TO5X0 534X0 522X0 mm 

TIN (Stantard) 

Staritae per metric ton 
raot 9X10X0 9 J 15X0 9 A 20X0 9X30X0 


torwara 9X80X0 


I 9X45X0 9X50X0 

I ZINC 

SterHmg per metric too 

855!....,, jwxo 7pxo 719x0 

ror wKd 708X0 709X0 714X0 717X0 
MRWf; APm 


Matorsion rtogpJts per 25 tens 
data 
BM 

May L478 

Jun — 1J80 

JIV J7M 

Aug — 1^5 

Sap 1715 

Od - 1.185 

Hoy — 1,175 

Jan 1,165 

Mar M65 


Volumev 0 lot* of 25 lon& 
Source / Revlon. 



DM Fntnres Options 

May 8 

W. anon ihvMBHiaoife arts KT mark 


; 


Siemens Boys U.S. Company 


sm» cadi S Bfm petfrsetn. 

***£5 !S 2“ is SS 

£ S ^ & K S 

31 SS OB !| “Si* 

34 107 853 094 265 1B1 _ 


Reuters 


MUNICH — Siemens AG said 
Wednesday it had bought Paceset- 
ter Systems Idcl, an independent. 
California-based producer of heart 
pacemakers, and would mage re- 
search, development, production 
and marketing operations in a new 
U-S. -based company, Siemens 
Pacesetter Inc. It gave no financial 
details on the accord. 


Erttanted fetal vaLBJSB 

OM: Tub*. Ml 4737mataL«Mf 

Puts: Tuts.**. 2X91 oputaL AM 


Scarce: CMff, 


To Our Readers 


Floating Rales Notes were not 
available in this edition because of 
computer problems. 


Rockwell to Cut 1,800 Jobs 

United Press International 

LOS ANGELES — Rockweg 
International Co. plans to elinti- 
nare 1.800 jobs at too Southern 
California plants and to cut mart 
workers tots 1 this year in the expec- 
tarion that Congress will discontin- 
ue production of the space shuttle. 
As many as half the workers wil] he 
rehired at other Rockwell divisions 
company officials said Tuesday. ’ 




Cash Prices 


May 8 


Comm odity end (luff 


Coffee 4 Santos, R>. 

itetotfi 64TO038 %. yd _ 


PrinL . „ . 

peel billet* CPIttJ. fan 

Iran 2 Fdrv. Ptiikx, ton 

Sg cSS: 




Si S*- L-’ B<»?nb 
B?i™h*m,oi --- 

Sliver N.y_ or 

Source: AP. 


178 

DJ3 

471X0 

21X00 

SS? 

65-72 

HA. 

0J5-J7 

109 

HA. 


1J8 


45X00 
213X0 
MB- 1 81 

TOSS 

638T7 

052^53 

157-159 

871 


j Dividends 


May 


Conwaar 






Per Amt Pay 
DISTRIBUTION 

Source CMtal _ jbo ms 

INCREASED 
DaHo*con> Q.16% 7X 

Berber Products Q JO 6-W 

Sou tab Cora Q H tlO 

INITIAL 

El Tori to Rest q jg 

STOCK SPLIT 
BDMMfl-MM 
EneroeiCo — 2 Jor-l 

TbIxo Carp — X-tor-2 . . 

USUAL 

«£ WBW6III8 
AHtUoteo FO 

Aloo Standard 

Amor BlHrlie 

BgWwfnS.Lvora 
Coooer Tiro Rub 


Rec 

S-34 


6-19 

5-20 

S-7 


3-. 


7-10 6-1 



E IP Mlc rowoife 
Emytan Electric 

Pot Photo 


■OteWorcSSQ 

Hilton HatSs 

imascoLM 

jweo ElecLLP 

E»raooaivpL 

K*T-MeCea 

KaoerCa 

y ,*"T. PropertlM 

UhertvCafp 

J}CAInc 

MCarp 

Merrill l Cap Fd 


{ftfffin I L Sw" via 

jg^lera 


VrtmBootft 

Virginia 

Sefonco 

SLPmxco* 

Smn Bancoro 

«»tadsh« n 

Thnken Co** 3 
u&Uie man M 

S«^S? dCaB ‘ 

Source. UPl. 












■' 1 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Page 1' 



BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Philips Profit Falls 7.8% in Period 


Raders 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — 
Philips NV, Europe’s largest deo 
trarucs group, said Wednesday that 

■ .1 . MV H KwBt *1 0 dunu-t L_ .1 


K profit fell 7.8 percent m the 

i 


first quarter of 1985 in part because 
of a drop in the U5. market for 
integrated circuits. 

Philips said that profit fdl to 260 
million guilders ($72.18 miHkHi) 
from 2S2 mfllirm guilders in the 
first three months of 1984, 

Operating profit rose 83 per- 
cent, to 901 million gailders, from 

thehke period last year, the compa- 
ny said. 


Sales volume increased 7 per- 
cent, Phfljps said. Sales increased 
14 percent in the quarter to 13.68 
bfluon guilders from 1203 billion 
guilders. Half of that increase, Phil- 
ips said, was due to higher sales 
volume, primarily outside the Unit- 
ed States. 


Income from operations in Eu- 
rope and Latin America increased, 
but income dropped at operations 
in the United States and Canada. 


Philips said that roost product 
sectors performed favorably, but it 

Mamed b usiness in the United 


States for a marked decrease in the 
industrial supply sector. 

Growth in fighting products and 
electronic components in the Unit- 
ed States slowed in particular, Phil- 
ips said. 

Johannes 7antma«i a P hilip s 
vice president, said that integrated 
circuits were no longer scarce on 
the world market, leading to a drop 
in sales volume and pressure on 
prices. He did not give precise fig- 
ures for losses caused by an overca- 


Peugeot’s Loss 
Narrowed in 
’84; Sales Rose 


Reuters 

PARIS — Peugeot SA re- 
ported Wednesday that the par- 
ent company’s net loss nar- 
rowed to 204 million francs 


(S213 million) last year, from 


parity in the US. chip market, 
hat the 


Nixdorf to Expand in Asia 


first quar- 
for 
United 


i -hew.. 


•nrna^ 


Ml* |T i- 
“=**«*>■ 


V. 




• * • • • . _ 
:S = .i ii* 


Roden 

PADERBORN, West Germany 
— Nixdorf Computer AG is plan. 
ning a major expansion in Aria 
that, it expects, win grow by SO 
percent a year, a managing board 
member said Wednesday. 

Amo Bohn said Nixdorf is bedd- 
ing talks in India and China on 
setting up joint- venture companies 
and that a key area far the compa- 
ny will bethe Pacific basin, where it 
expects to increase turnover by 80 
percent this year, to 86 nriBiou 
Deutsche mam ($27 million). 

He said that in the next five years 
growth in the area, which is bound- 
ed by Japan, Australia and Indone- 
sia, should average SO percent 

Underfilling the lucrative out- 


look in the basin, Mr. Bohn said, 
Nixdorf has won a 60-nriHkm DM 
contract to supply nearly 2J0Q 
computerized cnecK-ont tins to an 
Australian department-store 
Myer Emporium Ltd. 

This yeart turnover forecast for 

tha ha.<dn l frw itn« not 

production in Singapore, winch be- 
gan in 1982. In the next three yean, 
he added,' about 100 million DM 


mil be invested in building a plant 
wiD rank as Nix- 


in Singapore that will 
dorfs third largest after those in 
Paderbom and West Beriin. 

Nixdorf. which floated 20 per- 
cent of its shares last June, also 
to set up a subsidiary in 
i Korea to replace its repre- 
sentative offices there in time to 
the 1988 Olympics. 


He also noted that 
ter of 1984 was a 
Philips, particularly in 
States’ chip market. 

Philips blamed the fird.-quarter 
showing on the fall in its share of 
income from non-consolidaled 
companies to 2 mfllmn guilders 
from 41 million guilders in the like 
1984 quarter. That drop was due 
largely to losses at Grundig AG, 
the west German electronics firm 
which Philips bought last year. 

Grtmdig said h lost 286 milli on 
Deutsche marks ($89.48 million) in 
the 1983-84 fiscal year and has said 
that it does not expect to return to 
profitability until 1986-87. 

Mr. Zantnwm declined to rive 
specific figures, but said that Phil- 
ips’ stake m Gxtmdig's losses would 
peak this year and would be halved 
in 1986. The break-even point 
would be reached in 1987, be said, 
with Phifips expecting to see a prof- 
it from Grunaig in the following 
year. 


st ye 

1.03 billion in I9S3. Consolidat- 


ed sales rose 7.4 percent 

The loss included provirion 
to 77S million francs against 
tax liabilities for previous years, 
and providing 1.4 billion francs 
against unspecified charges of 
its Automobiles Citroen subsid- 
iary. The consolidated figure 
will be annrmnreH next month. 

The automaker said it ex- 
pects its consolidated group net 
loss to the year to be substan- 
tially less than half the 259- 
billion-franc loss of 1984, a 
company statement said. 

The group's French ' market 
share rose to 33.1 percent in 
1984 from 32_2 percent in 1983, 
although total french new car 
registrations declined 129 per- 
cent, the statement said. 

In other European ra prV^q 
where overall registrations 
dropped 0.5 percent, the 
group's share rose to 7 percent 
from 6.8 percent. Group pro- 
duction of cars and light com- 
mercial vehicles in Europe fell 
4.8 percent, to 1.6 million in 
1984. 


Dillon, Read Regains Some Prestige 


r 


(Continued from Page 15) 




■at It*. Haiti 
rt Talk-on H 


•? 

■t 



some 

grill wn phawi-s its t raditional cor- 
porate services, but has added 
some new lines. But, unlike some 
other small firms, Dillon, Read has 
not adopted a strategy of surviving 
by finding specialized niches. 

John P. Birkehmd, brought in to 
become DflJon, Read’s president in 
1981. has moved aggnssmfy into 
such lines as venture capital, lever- 
aged buyouts and mergers. Mr. Bir- 
kriund and Dillon, Read’s chair- 
man, Nicholas F. Brady, derJmed 
to be interviewed. But in a brief 
conversation, Mr. Birkehmd said, 
“I wouldn’t count ns out” 

The firm hired Edmund W. Litt- 
lefield, former duunnan of Utah 
In ternatio nal Inc, the mining con- 
cent, and James W. Stevens, former 
head of Citicorp’s venture-capital 
arm, to strengthen the finn\ ven- 
ture-capital business. It has tried to 
build asset management and 
equity-research departments. It 
joined with Rare Monssa, former 
head of Banque Paribas, to (Erect 
its European operations. 

DSkm , Read’s involvement, in 


major deals also tends to attract 
more good busmess. 

- “Just that perception that you’re 
always in the best deals is a draw- 
ing card,” said Samuel L. Hayes 3d, 
a Harvard Business School profes- 
sor and expert on investment bank- 
ing. 

As Robert A Gerard, a forma 
Dillon, Read managing director 
now with Morgan Stanley & Co, 
noted: “The lifeblood of any firm is 
developing new business.” 

In addition to Unocal, Dillon, 
Read advised Slorer Cotmnnnic&~ 
tkms in its current merger contest 
Storer has agreed in principle to be 
merged into a corporation formed 
by Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts & 
Co. 

The investment bank was hired 
by General Mills and RJ. Reyn- 
olds Industries to advise in major 
restr u cturings, and it helped Chev- 
ron Corp. r efinanc e some of its 
borrowings used to purchase Gulf 
03 last year. 

Dilloo, Read held 15th place in 
the underwriting of taxable securi- 
ties last yeaq andwas 20th in tax- 
exempt securities — — respectable 
levels for a firm of its size. 

But few expect Dillon, Read ever 
to regain the kind of influence it 
in WaS Street’s dubhier 


days. Experts insist that in certain 
areas, such as securities trading, it 
can never compete fully with bro- 
kerage behemoths such as Merrill 
Lynch St Qx, Shearson Lehman- 


/ American Express Inc. and Salo- 
rs Inc Sr 


moo Brothers Inc. Salomon, for in- 
stance, has $1.27 billion of capital, 
compared with DOloa, Read’s $65 
million, which ranks it 30th. 

Even in its heyday, DOloa, Read 
was never a large firm — it ranked 
120th in capital in 1969. But, Mr.' 
Hayes said. They had a lot more 
clout than their capital might sug- 
gest” 

That was because it was one of 
four firms that made up the most 
elite “special bracket" group, 
which also included Morgan Stan- 
ley, First Boston Inc. and Kuhn. 
Loeb & Co. The special bracket 
firms always appeared at the covet- 
ed top spots in the listing of under- 
writers in important deals in what 
are known as “tombstone” ads. 
Where a firm is listed in the ads 
generally describes how large a pan 
of the underwriting, and profits, it 

rlarms. 

Today, small size can present 
handicaps. Added financial musde 
allows the bigger investment banks 
to take on vastly more risk than 
smaller firms, particularly in the 


Mon, Read* Co/s 

uafMUs rosMOfi 555 

At year end; in miBons* 



Source: Saowfltos MkMtjr AModtflon 
Yearbook . 


However, growing too big also 
holds perils. 

“You must avoid becoming driv- 
en by your overhead." said Felix G. 
Rohatyn. a senior partner at La- 
zard Freres & Co., a firm even 
smaller than Dillon, Read. Lazard 
has pursued an almost identical 
strategy of emphasizing nimbleness 
and quality service. “Once you are 
big, it is impossible to become 
small again." 


I longkongBank group 1 M84 


Profits rise by four per cent 

to another record 



a 


The signing of the Sino-British 
agreement on Hong Kong’s future 
presents us with a significant 
challenge and a unique opportunity . 




■ MGR Sandberg, CBE, Chairman 


inancial I liuhliuhtv 




PftJHT GBOWiH 


• 

• w. 


*:» 




H: 

“1 



□ A one-for-ten bonus issue 
is being recommended. 

□Profitability in 1985 is 
expected to allow the 
maintenance of at least the 
same dividend, of HKS0.46 
per share, on the increased 
capital as proposed- an 
increase in distribution of not 
less than 10 per cent. 


□ Profits of The British Bank 
of the Middle East rose to 
£28.9 million. 


□ Profits of Grenville 
Transportation Holdings rose 
to HK$387.7 million. 


Main Results 


□ Profits of Hang Seng Bank 
rose to HKS831.6 million. 




Q Profits of Marine Midland 
■ ** rose to US$106.5 million. 



1984 

1983 

1984 


HKSm 

HKSm 

USSm 

Total Group profit 
Attributable Group 

3375 

3332 

• 432 

profit 

Total dividend 

2391 

2.492 

' 331 

distribution 

1316 

1358 

168 

Shareholders’ funds 

20363 

19386 

. 2,667 

Tbtal deposits 

422303 

411.280 

54,009 

Total assets 

481407 

470315 

61379 

Earnings per share 

HKSS.9I 

HK50.87 

USS0.12 

Dividends per shoe HKSR46 
Total number of 

HKS0.44 

USS0.06 


shares b issue 2859^67,220 2287,893 .776 


SHAREHOLDER'S AJWS 

HWWthMM 


Copies of the Annual Report may be obataedfrom branches of the Bank m Ac *orttTs principal finandat centres. 






A 


■r 

«****■' 

P. 

pi** 1 -. 


wmmmmmm- mm 

jmmm 

mmmmMzmmmm 

mmmm 

assess * mi % 


HongkongBank^X^ 


The HoBgkoog tad Shanghai Banking Corporation 

Marta MHtad Bank - HoBgkoog Bank of Canada -The Britt* B»k of the Middle East 
Seng Bank Ltated - Wardky Lkafted • Wanfiey London Lfcafted 




Fast derisions. Worldwide. 

M^.f^^. nw^-PO Ifc»TVq va lt1rfi. r i|Tr I^rf M Ef3PZLA.T l Firfll^MM« 




Vf 


I 


Nestle Sales Increase 57% 


Reuters 

ZURICH — Nestlfe SA reported 
Wednesday that revenue for the 
first four months of the year rose 57 
percent, to 15 billion Swiss francs 
(55.6 billion). 

When sales of U.S.-based Carna- 
tion Co„ which was acquired earli- 
er this year, are excluded, the rise 
was 18 percent. Nestles managing 
director. Helmut Maucher, saii 

Mr. Maucher also said that Nes- 
tis planned to sell two of Carna- 
tion’s activities with total annual 
revenue of $440 million, and buy a 
coffee roasting company in the 
United Stares that has revenue of 
5150 millioa. 

Mr. Maucher said be expects 
earnings for the year to increase 
from last year’s level, although 
profit as a proportion of sales is 
expected to decline, which the gian t 
foods company attributed to ex- 
traordinary costs resulting from the 
restructuring of Carnation. 

In April, Nestle reported that 
1984 group net income rose to 1.49 
billion Swiss francs from 126 bil- 
lion francs in 1983, repr e s e n ting 4.8 
percent of sales of 31.14 billion 
compared with 45 percent of 1983 
sales of 27.94 billion francs. The 
dividend was raised to 115 francs 
from 109 francs. 

The 11.4-percent value increase 


in sales compared with a volume 
rise of 3 percent, Mr. Marcher said. 

Reto Domeniconi, general man- 
ager. said the decline in the profit- 
sales ratio would result from ex- 
traordinary costs during the 
restructuring of Carnation. “Wc 
w31 try to get all this behind us in 
1985,” he added. 

Mr. Mancha said he expected 
group sales to all of 1985 to total 
about 43 billion francs. 

Mr. Domeniconi said ihm half 
the amount needed for the $3-bfl- 
Jion purchase of Carnation, which 
has annual sales of about 53 5 bil- 
lion. had been paid in cash, with 
the rest raised by issuing comma- 
rial papa. 

Nestl£ currently has 51 billion in 
commercial papa outstanding, but 
it aimed to reduce tins debt ova the 
next two years. Mr. Domemconi 
said be foresaw the debt-equity ra- 
tio falling to one by the end of this 
year from a current level of 1.13. 

Mr. Domeniconi said Nestle was 
not planning to raise new funds on 
the Euromarkets. 

Another official said Nestl6 
to sdl Carnation’s Herff 


Woodddeto Offer 

Share Evaluation 


Reuters 

MELBOURNE— Woodside 
Petroleum Ltd. said Wednes- 
day it planned to respond for- 
mally Thursday to the takeover 
bid made by Sbell Australia 


Lid. and Broken H3I Pty. 

iwul 


It said the response will con- 
tain an independent evaluation 
of Woodside shares. The evalu- 
ation was commissioned after 
directors rejected the takeover 
offer of 1.60 Australian dollars 
($1.05) a share as inadequate. 

Shell and BHP now own 
more t ha n 52 percent of Wood- 
ride's shares, woodride’s direc- 
tors have urged minority share- 
holders not to seU 


Gold Options (ptaiis/aLi 


Mm 

*r 


Km 

SO 

&2S-7J9 

tuswao 

— 

320 

20-40} 

hbuub 

2UD2US 

SB 

US- ZE 

U04UO 

uauam 

3 € 

OO LA 

425 775 

1USU2S 

SB 

025. US 

4 50-600 

KUStUD 

an 

0»0B 

375 42$ 

7JSMS 

» 


— 

A25.7JS 


(MS MtSJ-STOfl) 

V«iemWMteWd4&A. 

U Qwi 4* Mo w Blue 
1211 Gm 1. 8 tal«ltat 
Ttt 310251 - Teles 2S3K 


ISE Canadian Finance Ltd. 
9J4% Guaranteed Debenture* due 1386 

Notice is hereby riven to Debentnrehold- 
m that during the tweta month period 
ended May 1, 1985, no Debentures were 
pnrehued as the purchase requirements 
for this period were satisfied in the pre- 
vious year, 

ISE Canadian Finance Ltd. 
May 9. 1385 


es subsidiary, which has annnal 
60 million. Tbc transao 


sales of $160 
tion is expected to be concluded in 
about two months, the company 
said. 




Weekly net asset value 


Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 


L J on May 6, 1 985: U.S. $1 32.26. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


Information: Pierson, HeMMng> Pierson N.V., 

Herengracht 214,1016 BS Amatentan. 


Stocks Chum, 
Buyers Fiddle 


important securities trading opera- 
tions. 


“If I lose a couple of milli on 
dollars on a trade, that’s a bad 
day,” commented a senior trader at 
one of the largest investment bank- 
ing houses, who formerly worked at 
Dillon, Read. “If DQlon loses that 
much, it’s a bad year." 


(Confirmed from Page 15) 

which is good,” he said. “But at the 
wme rimt* than? instruments can he 
used for leverage — and are — 
making the market today a very 
leveraged game.” 

On this theme. Frienne Van 
Campenhout. partner and invest- 
ment strategist at the Brussels bro- 
kerage firm of Peterbroeck, Van 
Campenhout, observed that “virile 
some of there strategics may seem 
aggressive, actually they ran mini- 
mize risk.” He described a lever- 
aged. yet what he considers a safe 
method for investing on Wall 
Street. 

He recommends that clients use 
a part of the interest on funds in- 
vested in Belgian or other Europe- 
an government securities to buy 
“caEr options cm UJ5. stocks. 


DEGREES" 


KENNEDY -WESTER* UWU* 1 ™ 


NOTICE OF EARLY REDEMPTION 


National Westminster Bank PLC & 

US$150,000,000 Floating Rate Capital Notes 1990 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the holders of the outstanding US$150,000,000 Floating 
Rate Capital Notes 1990 (the “Notes”) of National Westminster Bank PLC (the “Bank”) 
that, pnrsuant to the provisions of Condition 7(c) of the Terms and Conditions of the Notes, 
the Bank intends to redeem 411 the Notes on June 27, 1985 at a redemption price equal to 100% 
of the princi p al amount thereof. 

Payment will be made upon presentation and surrender of the Notes, together with all nn- 


matured coupons appertaining thereto, at tbe_mam offices of any of the following: Morgan 
Guaranty Trust Company of Ne 


few York, 30 West Broadway, New York, New York 10015; 


Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York in Brussels, Frankfurt am Main, London and 
Piaris; Morgan Bank Nederland N.V. it 


in Amsterdam; Caisse tfEspargne de FEtat in Luxem- 
bourg and HmAJahawlr N.W. in Zurich. Payments at the office of any paying agent outside the 
United States will be made by a dollar cheek drawn on, or transfer to a United States dollar 
account with, a bank in New York City, New York. 

Coupons due June 27, 1985 should be detached before presentation of the Notes and collected 
in the " ^ni m a n ner. 

Interest shall cease to accrue on the Notes with effect from and including June 27, 198S and 
all coupons relating to any Interest Payment Date falling after that date shall thereupon 
become void. 


Any payment made by transfer to an account maintained by the payee with a bank in the 
' States m 


United States may be subject to reporting to the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) 
and to backup withholding at a rate of 30% if payees not recognized as exempt recipients fail 
to provide the paying agent with an executed IRS Form W-8, certifying under penalties of 
perjury that the payee is not a United States person or an executed IRS Form W-9 certifying 
under penalties of perjury that the payee's taxpayer identification number (employer identifica- 
tion nnmhw or social security number, as appropriate). Those holders who are required to 
provide their correct taxpayer identification number on Internal Revenue Service Form W-9 
and who fail to do so may also be subject to a penalty of S50. Please therefore provide the 
appropriate certification when presenting your securities for payment. 


NATIONAL WESTMINSTER BANK PLC 

By: Morgan Guaranty Trust Company 

of hew roaa. Principal Paying Agent 


Dated: May 9, 1985 



OPTIONS ON 
EURODOLLAR FUTURES 



THE BUCK STARTS HERE. 


The Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the 
world's most successful futures and options 
market announces yet another way to 
manage business risk more effectively - 
Options on Eurodollar Futurea ' 

The CMEs underlying futures contract 
in Eurodollars, introduced on its Inter- 
national Monetary Market (IMM) in 1 981 , 
quickly became the most active short-term 
interest rate contract offered by any 
exchanga in fact, current trading volume 
has averaged more than 40,000 contracts 
per day, representing an underlying value 
of $40 billion. 

Now that Eurodollar futures and 
options are trading side-by-side, liquidity in 
both markets will be enhanced and, in 
addition, their comparative values can be 
assessed. 

Leading banks, institutions and 
government dealers can now also use 
Eurodollar options as an integral part of 
their interest rate dealing operations. 
Options enable them to provide attractive 
and innovative services to their customers, 
resulting in increased fee income 
opportunities. 

Corporate treasurers can use 
Eurodollar options as “insurance policies” 


against future interest rate fluctuations in 
their borrowing and investment needs. 
Additionally, they can employ these options 
to enhance investment yields or reduce 
borrowing costs. 

Eurodollar options, in becoming a part 
of the CME’s aiready-impressive range of . 
interest rate products, now give bankers, 
dealers and corporations even greater 
flexibility in managing rate uncertainty. 

For a free copy of “Options on 
Eurodollar Futures: An Introduction,” write 
to or telephone Keith Woodbridge at the 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 27 
Throgmorton Street, London EC2N 2AN. 
Telephone (01) 920 0722. 


CHICAGO 
MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 

Bn twiHlw l Monetary Mariat- Indux and Option Itafeat 

FUTWES AND OPTIONS WWLDWDf 



27 Throgmorton Street, London EC2N SAN 01-920 0722 
30 South Waeker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

67 Wall Street. New York 10005212/363-7000 















inteknational 


TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Wednesdays 

A\fEX 


.3pm 


TObln Include the ratkmwkto miens 
op to the doting on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tots trades elsewhere. 

Vm The Associated Press 


rV 


* 

31 "ft 

Ufa M W 

.17 jh 

inu b 

ISO 55 

umso ^ 

jam u n 

JMUIO 
JO J 13 


KH 


UK AK 

14W n 

am TTVk 
2V. S 
» » 
W 

m m 
I3K 7K 

am am 


V 

7 7K 
i sK 
Mb 7W 
raid WA 
IM I7W 

tk m 

Sfa 3W 

« 

Ufa 
MW 

T 


3±a 


•» ..'i.ur 


•l'rMl.1, 



UM 

AK 

Ufa 

aw 

37W 

Mfa 

aw 

fa 

an* 

U 

36V 

am 

32 

UK 

M 

SW 

1*W 

M 

Ufa 

im 

17K 

7Tb 

raw 

m 

2K 

fa 

M 

4K 

5 

aw 

Ufa 

9K 

m 

ZK 

13V 

AM 

34fa 

2fiK 

IM 

m 

7fa 

ZK 

17W 

Ufa 

7fa 

3fa 

UW 

1 

13K 

Tfa 

Alfa 

am 

AZK 

39 

M 

7K 


57 7 fa 
M Mb 
14 271% 
37 1 

SW 30W 

35 * 

» zw* 

28 7fa 
as iw 

1 Ufa 

17 Ufa 

3D » 

S !* 

14 2fa 
11 lSfa 
3i m 
10 KM 

34 SK 
177 Ufa 
14 3U 
S UK 
ns 41% 
4 MW 
7 lifa 
4 40K 
9 AOK 
iaa ow 


7V. 7V. 

Bfa »fa + fa 

sow am + w 

1 i + K 
30fa JOW + K 
3SK 36 + fa 

aw aofa + w 

7fa 7fa— fa 
91% 9K— K 
13K Ufa + fa 
15)b ISK— fa 
Sfa 5fa 
1 1 
5K 5fa 

m m + w 

13fa Ufa + u 

aw aw + w 

WW TOW 
3Zfa 3244 + 
Ufa UK— 
m 3W— 
Ufa Ufa— 

4 4 

MW Ufa— fa 
11« Ufa 
40 40K + fa 

40 40 

I m— w 



am Ufa Rckwys JA 23 1* 

am am mn .12 j 11 
7 a RaanPn 
5fa 3fa RoyPIra 
34 34fa RtKfldt 56a 19 11 
33K MW Rndckpf Ji II . 
7fa aw raw _ • 

Ufa nw RusnU jo id ii 
aafa in Rvhofi jo u n 


n7 MW asw asw — ja 
a am asw am + fa 
n m zw aw + w 
ao 1% m m + w 
i am am am- fa 
i at a* 2i —« 

7S 7 7 7 

25 uk Ufa uk 

U Ufa Ufa 19K 


in am 

9 4fa 

4fa aw 

Ufa 4fa 

£ ft 

Zfa lfa 
4M 2SK 
lOfa 4W 

atw low 

Zfa Mb 
3K 2fa 
9fa Ah 
U Ufa 
4fa ZK 

a w 

17W M 
AW 3W 
Ufa 7fa 
ffifa 7fa 
3SW 17fa 

asw law 

SK 2fa 


JS J n 57 
la io 
4117 U 1 

as 4 
.la 13 20 10 

.11a 45 8 134 
12 

JS 253 

. 11 74 

jo u n 4i 
9 153 

231100 1 

JO 9 

.12 14 21 5 

133 
13 

IS 25 
413 1 

400 M0 
103 
11 4 

17 4 

joa 27 as a 


m m 

iiK Ufa 

5W SK 

aw aw 

i« lfa 
37fa 37 
TOW lfa 
atfa 24 
lfa lfa 

2W aw 

9M 9W 

12 n 


7W 7 
4W 4W 
M ■ 
SU Tfa 

27K 27W 
34 am 
3 3 


92W— 2fa 
6 W— fa 

aw— w 
uw— w 
m— fa 
2U— TO 


7 

4W 

8 +fa 
7fa 

Z7K 

34 + W 

3 + fa 


17 14 

Tfa SW 
27 T2W 
lfa fa 
UW 11 
20W u 
4cw a» 

Afa 4W 
Ufa 5¥b 

aw aw 
ra* Su 

17fa I3fa 
35 29fa 
Sfa 2W 
11* 7W 
1ZW 9 


NRMn 

Nontcfc 14 

NtPUnt .10 3 14 

NataUI 

NP&iRt IjOZ AJ 1A 
NPree 1-200 44 m 

nytum ja u m 

NewbE JS* S3 4 
Nktwta 9 

Notax 14 

NordRit I 

NoCdOo 

NIPSpT 4J5 iaa 
NoHrxn S 

NodOt ■ 

riumoc 


107 14fa M 
29 7W Tfa 
1*4 M Ufa 
101 fa fa 
107 15K UW 
29 MH 1>W 
2D 44fa 43V 
3 Afa Afa 
304 UW ITVb 

10 m aw 

34 11W 11W 
21 1M UK 
30DE33W 33 
43 2* 7K 

11 Tfa TVS 
11 10W 9W 


14W + fa 
Tfa— W 

Tfc+t 

1SW— fa 

ww 

44»— fa 
Afa— fa 
law + fa 

aw 

nw 

isw— w 
am + w 
aw 

7W— W 
TW— W 


am 

MW Oakwd 

OOP 

J 11 

34 

77K 

17 

17 4- U 

12 

A OdatAo 


3S 

4 

7 

7 

7 

16M 

Afa OdMBl 


49 

3 

Mb 

9K 

*Tb 

20W 

10 Otstm* 

04 

12 17 

15 

19V 

I9K 

19K— W 

7K 

3K OOktaP 



n 

S 

4K 

4Tb 

7VS 

jfa opratin 

JO* 

3 33 

s 

Afa 

Afa 

tfa— K 

1 

SK OrloBH A 

.15 

24192 

5 

Sfa 

5fa 

Sfa— V 

3K 

T Orairad 



4 

IW 

IW 

IW 

3Mb 

27V OSuthfl. 

J3 

10 U 

HI 

AOK 

39V 

4m 4-IK 

m 

AK QxfnlF 

J21 4J 10 

Zl 

W 

9* 

n + K 

n 

7fa OrarkH 

JO 

24 0 

26 

Mb 

OW 

ow 


r 




Ufa 
Tfa 
3W 

2Mb 
40 
Ufa 
3W 1W 
23K Ufa 
5fa aw 

9fa SW 

sw aw 

w 

fa 

uw 

aw 


JO 52 


ia 

Tfa 

Tfa 

7Tb— K 

J2 22 39 

33 

MW 

14K 

MW 


19 

16 

AK 

SK 

AK +K 


14 

9 

Zfa 

2K 

Zfa 

un 44 

1 

1 

Z2fa 

22V 

22V— V 

4J6P19.1 

Z 

IA 

36W 36V 

JAW— K 

.ta 


1493 

UK 

IIK 

UK— K 



7 

Mb 

IW 

TW— K 

1J0 AJ 

13 

9 

221% 

2ZW 

22W 4- V 



35 

AV 

Afa 

Afa 


59 

197 

Tfa 

7W 

71b 4- fa 


9 

7 

499 


A 

Vi 

4 

K— K 



4 

fa 

ft 

ft— TO 

JO* X3 

a 

5 

12K 

UK 

UK— K 

J6*1SJ 


7 

aw 

a 

3 — fa 


9 

M 

MW 

im 

raw 4- fa 

JO 21 

7 

79 

raw 

19 

19V— K 



11 

IK 

IK 

1K + W 


10 

S 

nw 

31K 

Jlfa— W 

JOb U 

9 

ao 

■w 

0 

■ — w 


10 

3 

SK 

SK 

SK 


17V 

12 Jodm 

JOb 3A 

9 

21 

I4W 

Ufa 

14 

ss 

2H 

SW 

ZK Jet Am 


5 

81 

2W 

3K 

ZK— K 

i 22 

2 

W Jet A art 



12 

W 

W 

W 

3D 

SW 

AK Jetron 

Jtt AJ 

M 

11 

7fa 

7Tb 

Tfa 4- fa 

33 

SVi 

3K jotmPd 



5 

4 

A 

4 

73 

UK 

TV JatnAm 

JO 30 

IS 

as 

WK 

10 

raw 

20 

UK 

ZW Jehnlnd 


3 

60 

Sfa 

AK 

Afa— w 

ra 

32W 

33 Jupttar 


1 

4 

S3 

32W 

33 + W 

17 

u 


15fa 9 
9fa 5 
4W lfa 
Ufa Ufa 
19V tfa 

raw io 

75 1IW 
4W 3Tb 
Hb W 

T % 

22W 13fa 
34 10W 

n m 

5V 2fa 
13 7W 
Ufa 5W 
43W 34 
4Tb 3W 

aaw isw. 


aw FPA 33 

14W FoWnd JO 2.1 7 
4Tb Ffetata 

9W FlCom lJOa 93 7 
21W Fstcmn 
TlW Ftactrf* JOU I 
7fa FttcGE 4 

33fa RtGEpT 4J0 14J 
25W Flo Bek JO 1J I 
22fa Flub* U0t SL3 10 
4W FoMfrm t 

7W FootaM 

4W FttUHG 20 

48W PterfCn fl4J>0» 

U ForatCA .15 J a 
U ForsfCB Ot A U 
IIK FomfL 34 

fa FoTomt 

14 FraqEl 10 

5 FrlaaEn 

19fa Frtona JO 27 11 
Ufa Frtsdi* 72 U 17 
9 FmtHd 
4W FrtA wt .172 10 
Ufa FurVItn 19 


9 3U 
Tfa 4W 

Afa aw 

Ufa Vfa 
3W 1W 
33 24fa 
ISW tfa 
Wfa 7 
Ufa tfa 
Afa Zfa 
T7M 13W 

s zfa 

7w aw 
13fa 7fa 
4 lfa 
UK SW 


GMCEn 

CRI 

GTI 30 

GoInxC 8 

GotxyO 40 

Goran 140 G I 
CofUt 

Coylrd IS 

OonnS 15 

OfllKO 73 

GOefra R 42 I 
GnEmp 40 U 15 
Genlaco 

GaoRh 5 

GooRwt 

GooRapflOO 92 


5 Ufa 
13 Ufa 
At S 

u uw 

1 Zifa 
42 nw 

m s 

it am 

17 Alfa 

29 25K 

30 9K 
3 Mb 

» tfa 
U0C92W 
3 21 

i am 

472 Ufa 
102 lfa 

u azK 

so aw 
u Ufa 

a aoK 


24 3W 
20 5 
10 3fa 
A >Ub 
79 Zfa 

Its Ufa 

22 Mb 

30 BW 
n Ufa 
ra m 
a w uw 

10 4M 
47 4V> 
10 T2fa 
IS 3fa 
M MW 


UW UW— fa 
Ufa Ufa 
4K 4 fa— W 
TOW 1BW— fa 
21fa Zifa 
law raw + u 
Tfa 7K — fa 
24fa 24W— fa 
«rw 41W— W 
asw 25K— W 
tfa tfa + W 
Mb Mb— W 
■fa lfa 

n ta — fa 
am am— h 
am am— w 
u im + w 
lfa lfa + w 

23 w aaw— w 
iw aw 

18W Ufa 

sofa aow + w 

U 14 
Sfa Jfa + K 
19 19 + fa 


Mb 3W— W 
5 5 — W 

3fa 3fa 
Ufa Ufa + W 
Zfa ZW-f-W 

as am +.w 
■fa m— w 
ow aw 
ms mi— w 

3fa Zfa— fa 
13fa 14fa + fa 
Afa Afa 
Afa Afa + lb 

Ufa tzw— fa 
Sfa Mb— W 

im im— fa 


37K 30 
aw iw 
ISW is 

Ufa 9fa 

aow uw 

I7W TOW 
W, Sfa 
17W 0 

raw s 

9W 7 
Afa 2W 
Sfa Sfa 
5fa 3 

M aw 
3fa a 

15K VW 

uw m 
aaw ai 


KnGtPf 4J0 117 

KopnkC 4 

KoyCp JO u n 
KwrNn JO U M 
Kanwta JOdAA 9 
Kafctan J8t 3J 
KavGo JO 25 
KavPti 40 U 15 
KOVCO 7 

KoyCnun 
KhWhiwt 
Klnark 
larar 

KitMta u 

KJmtV JOr J 
Knooo IA 

KiwT 13 

KawC US 00156 


Jfa ISW SAW 
34 zw aw 
95 IS 14W 

5 nw uw 

1 T7W T7W 
10 UK Ufa 
ra o Tfa 
174 9 Mb 

12 5W 5W 
A 7 7 

93 3W 2W 
10 Afa Afa 
33 3W Ufa 
a Afa Afa 

32 aw aw 

1 13Tb T3K 

» IM n 

uo asw asw 


asw + w 
aw— fa 
u + fa 
raw— w 

17W— w 
14K + fa 

■ + w 

Ab— W 

sw— w 

7 — fa 
Zfa— fa 
AW 

Sfa 

Ab— fa 
Zfa + fa 
UK— fa 

12 -W 
34W + W 





lifa AKt 

B P 

Ufa Afa 
Ufa 13 
Ufa Afa 
15K Mb 
a afa 
Ab Hb 

aaw nw 

400b 3Bb 
Mb aw 
aow 7w 

3 lfa 
T«4 77» 

sfa a 

3Hb aiu 
sw 

ldfa 7V> 
Sfa 2W 
ffa Mb 

nw aaw 

MW Sfa 
low sw 

Ufa ZW 
3W _ 
7fa ZK 

Afa aw 

tfa 5W 
lifa 7fa 

aw fa 
uw m 

ltfa I1W 

isw 
ww 

tfa 
4fa 
14W 



raw 

9K VST n 

JO* u 


A4 

10 

9K 

TO 

zn* 

1AW Vatrar* 

J4 20 

ia 

4 

22K 

22K 

22Vb 

12K 

Afa Varbtm 



35 

7V% 

TW 

7W— M 

SK 

Zfa v*rtt 


a 

2 

Afa 

Afa 

Afa— K 

23fa 

14K VTAroC 

JOb so 

u 

A 

WK 

19K 

WK 

7Tb 

Jfa VHtjtl 



33 

3K 

JK 

3K— K 

ISW 

tw Varan 

JO 21 

it 

3 

9K 

tfa 

tfa 4- K 

9 

bv ± vioon 


u 

2B 

7K. 

7K 

7Tb— K 

ISK 

Ufa Vlrco 

04r J 

9 

34 

15V 

UK 

ISK— fa 

lfK 

raw vutocp 

JO 4.1 

11 

Z 

1*K 

19K 

19K + K 


BW 10 Qunfasa JA 


s as as as 


MW » MGOHd 7 

3W lfa MCO Ra 27 

9W Mb MSA n Tfa 7 J 

2W 1 MSA wt 

17fa 7fa MSI Dt 14 

5W 3 MSR 

ISW Afa MocGra 13 

T7fa 0W MocScn .14 15 20 


1A 13W 13K Ufa 
97 2W 2W 2W 
10 9W 9W 9W 

ao iw iw iw— w 
n w fa h + k 
s aw zfa zw 

M Ufa 11W Ufa A- W 
as ii ww Ufa— w 


5 RAi 

raw Romm 
low Rmn 

ltfa RltSoun 
lfa Radtaw 
raw RaaalB 
aMb RaartA 
Sfa RnstAac 
3W RnxNsr 
10W RIoAIg 
fa RkiGOr 


J» SJ 12 
72 45 S3B 
42 U I 


13 

.10a 3J 11 
JO 2J 


AW AW 
1AW 1AW— W 
Ufa Wfa+fa 

im im 
zw aw 

Ufa uw 
A4fa ASW + W 
7fa 7fa 

17W 17fa— fa 
fa fa 


MnOwniara urdftdaL Yaartv hlstn and knra rvflact 
ttw previous 52 wiaiisphJSRia currant nrab. but not ttwkJtKt 
trading day. Wham a wiTt or aWdc dMdand ornowrtktu ta 25 
oareantor man Im baan paid, ttw yaarf MottAow ram and 
dMdand art afmiwn far Rm naw atocb only. Unla» omarwlM 
notnL rataa ot dtvWaniti art omuol dUmnanignls baud an 
Iha laftat dadaretta. 

0 — dtvUand otto axtratalTI 

b— annual rate of cflYMand ptua dock dMda«L/I 
c — HquMaltns dMdandTI 
cm— coHad/t 
d — nawf yaarlv IomTI 

• — dMetoad dadarad or paid bi pracatSno 12 mantta/l 
a — dMdaad In Canadtan tuwia. suMacf io 1 Sfa run-mldfatca 
tax. 

t — dMdand dadorad cflar mtttmp or dock dMdand. 

1— dMdand paid ttiia nor. omittad. dtfotrsa or no action 
ttdian at lotest dWMand maatlns. 

k— dvidand daefared or paid ttm war. on oocumukittva 
tafuowttb dWIdanda In orraora. 

— naw taua In Nw poat 52 waafct. Uw WatMow ranoa batins 
wttti tna atari of trndlno. 
nd — next day daOvorv. 

P/E— prtoatarnlnpa ratio. 

r — dWMand dadorad or paid In nraeacflng 12 months, phis 
■MCkdfaMnd. 

a— alack rant DtyMand batbia wllti data of bpIR. 
da— aoiai. 

t— dMdand paM fa afack In praeadbB ta monmwaaHmalad 

caati vtdtja on ax^OvkiancI or ax^llsMbuttaa data, 
u— mwyaarlv blah, 
w— tradlnahaltad. 

»1 — In bankr u pt c y or racatvo nhl p or bafao raoroonliad un- 
darttw Bankruptcy Actor sacurNtM anunad by rack com- 
aaniai. 

tod— adwndla l rlhutad. 
fal— whan laiuad. 
ww— wttti aa nui l i 
x — aMASvtdand or oPAlaliti. 
rib — ax-dMrBwHon. 
xw— without warrants, 
y— ax-dtvkfano oxl adaa In Ml. 
yM— VMM. 

*— rataa In ML 


IJ 

20 

13 

XS 

9 

J 

13 

J 

ra 

Ji 

A 

IA 

AJ 

IA 

22 

5 

LA 

A 


13Tb SK YonkCo 

9 957 IK 

AK 

M 4 lb 

SK A Yonkiy 

RUN 1 SK 

SK 

SK 


. The Daily So uce far 

MB ■Jfaramra wfaAra Araw wral 

international nyrestars. 


Over-the-Counter 


May 8 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


km low 3 p.m. art* 
2S7BW Ufa 12 + W 


SalMln "PI 

Ufa High Low SPJLCnc 


SMaato Nat 

Ufa HIM Low JPJM.Ch'M 


Sotaala Hat 

Ufa HWb Low 3PJM.arao 


2 5W SW 5W— W 
413W UK 13K 4- W 
27 Bllfa Ufa Ufa 
2AMW Z4W 24W 

lroam 20V. am— w 

•79 14W M MW 

1«M VYl 9fa— K 

am zk zk 

34 WW W MW + W 
i2afa 20fa 20fa 
2J 254 v tfa tK 

- *K 9K— W 

J 359 22 W 22 2214— K 

1UW 15W UW 

M 9W * 9W 

« 1 K W 
7JS9 Jaw 2? + w 
27 Sfa 514 514— 14 

ai jw sw aw 

2J 2Z9 29 29 — 14 

J 33 22W 22 22W + W 

34 IK 7fa 7fa— 14 
128 Jfa JW SW— W 
HB* 12V. 1214— W 
107 A 5K 5K— W 

a 414 4 41% 

711b M IM 

30 2191A ISW 14 + Vi 

92*fa 29 2914 + 14 

T 49Ua JU Aft 

3 3711W UW UW— W 

944l5fa 15 U — fa 
1J A MV. 14 M +14 
H **k asw + w 

3J 2S237W 37 3714 + W 

4119W I9W 19W— W 
651 J Afa 6Tb— 14 
J 44B 21V. 22 

xi ajoim it im + k 

14 5®25fa 34K 25 — W 

L6 aoaifa aifa 2 lfa + K 

153 m Zfa 3W— Vb 
121 AK AK AM 

ii* i a 

72 ,7K Tfa 7fa + W 

951 10 9K m- W 

AUK 111% UK— K 
3J 214W MW 14W 

IO M 4 4 4 

650 OK I OK 

„ 260 10K m 10K + fa 

S3 ait it iv + w 
43 3309 Ufa uw UK + M 
141 Ufa Ufa 10»— 4% 
IBM 7h » 

36Z4W 36 36 — W 

_ 103 5W Afa 5 + K 

43 24 H M M — K 

44 U JO MW 30 + W 

34 191 44K 44 44K + K 

H J UW Ufa UW + M 

1J 30A3S 33W 33W— lfa 

H win* uw uw 

u V TVK HK 19K 
“ JJ* *K Afa 

•7010 TO H + W 

.. n * nil Ufa 17fa + W 

ls w 1! 9t ** 

34 2A3ZK Jlfa Jlfa— fa 

33 S J ^ 

37 K 2 J? 27 27 W + w 

tliaw Ufa 12fa 4- fa 

40 B75BW DB OW + fa 

21402114 21 Vb 31W 

s J8«S« + * 

X2 2 37 JT 37 —3 
U 31«K UK 10K 
U 1 Afa Afa Afa + K 
AMUfa Ufa 13W— lb 
1*6*1* 914 914— fa 

5«1J UK 13 
R13 Ufa 13 — K 
'KSl 20W 2BW— K 
, . 12 Afa 4W 41%— K 

,J ■ * H* 9 + W 

93*038 19 19fa— fa 

3W01W4 I9K lffa— K 

2S320fa 20K aow + W 
• Ufa ISK ISfa-K 
ISK 3ZK— W 
“ MS tfa 9W— K 

SJ Mb Mb Sfa— fa 

__ *IW« ISW 1IW+ W 

a« am— k 

47 J 4 ?? 1 *** «w— lfa 

5 Afa AW Afa 

1043 a 7 Tfa— fa 

“ mm ^“2 

o 

u Mim IT* 17* + fa 
a Wfa low 1014 
K »"w 31 31V.— W 

1.7 3423 aaw 22K + K 

2i Ml 31W UW 31W + K 
*5 UK UK Ufa-W 
•aim 10 10—14 

313414 34 34 —fa 

M0MU Ufa UK 
48320 k lffa aow + fa 
1*17Vi 17W 17W 

.5 ! m * 

170 4 4 4 

rail iow 11 + w 

7w 7 7K + fa 

AI Bfa > lfa + K 



2 J 0 45 24 SB 49 K 4914 — to 

A 714 7 714 + K 

. 1*0 15 135 AW 6 AW 

99 Zfa ZW 2 K + W 

1 tfa tfa tfa— fa 

4 Tfa Tfa Mb— W 

UDOa 33 3433 24 V JS + fa 

ii m aw n* + fa 

- 03 a J 117 2 JW 2314 23 fa + W 
2 J 4 4 J 150 30 50 -H 

622 K 22 K 22 W— W 

00 4 J 92*20 raw 19 W— K 
1 J 4 30 3131 * 31 M 37 fa + K 

382 M ■ Sfa 
JO 185 372 IW 7 K 0 + W 

UD A3 IT 29 V, 2 * 30 — W 
3 JM 40 1 SZ 70 V 70 K 70 K 
JSb 2 J II 28 W 28 W 28 W + W 

1 13 U 13 — W 

1 JA 13 A 47 47 47 

MM fj 4 WK I 0 K ISK— fa 

365 U Ufa Ufa— W 
94714 *. TAW UV— W 
14 IW lfa tfa + fa 
23 1 I I 
*51714 171 % 17 W + fa 
23 4 Jfa Sfa 
3 9 K 9 9 

U 4 t 90 96 TOfa IOW lOfa + fa 

J 0 O 2 J 19 3514 MV 35 V. + W 
132 4 j 5 10451 K 31 K Slfa— W 

.12 1 J 74 AK Afa Afa— W 
35a XI 1 UW MW UW + fa 
A 3 7 Afa 7 + fa 

137 2 lfa 2 
.lObll 73 WW 10 H 

26 IW AK OK— 14 
173 10 Ufa UK— lfa 

100 Ufa 10 U 10 K— IW 

33 XI 199 ISW ISK ISW + W 

JO 4 J 1 12 13 13 — W 

1 J 0 XA 39634 33 W 3 m— W 

JO X 4 7341 * 27 V 24 fa 4-1 
JIT TAW ISK 16 — W 

■ 1 AV 7414 14 V + W 

310 4 K A 4 K + Vb 

4212 V 12 W Ufa + w 
222 6 5 K 5 fa— Vb 

M AW A A — fa 

3175 V ISW IM- lb 

A 4 3 mm 

174 Bfa 7 fa M + fa 

39 9 *fa IK— W 

7 SW 4 K SW + 14 

f 47 Afa 5 5 

jo* aj 5 >fa ok m-K 

AS 4 K 4 Tb— W 

I 91 K K K 
IH 44 A 34 33 fa 34 

JO 1 J 11121 K am 21 K + K 

.11 11 40 7 V 7 W 7 fa + K 

376 7 K AW 7 + K 

101 4 W 3 K 3 K— fa 

l JO 1 J 99 1 * UW 19 + fa 

322 20 W 20 fa 20 K 
21 Tfa IW 7 W 

Jam U 34017 MV 16 fa 

.ua J 51736 3 SW 36 + W 

21 13 V IJVl 1 JW 

IB 35 1434 33 W 34 + fa 

.11 U » 1 4 K 4 K 

09 * 22 I 4 W 4 W 4 WA-W 

t 1733 lfa IW IW 

11024 33 W 21 + W 

193 m Bfa m + fa 

2 1 IW ISW UW + fa 

IM 30 1 A 1 S 51 & 53 53 W- 1 K 

14 ? 714 7 7 —fa 

1 J 2 SO 7 SAW 3 IW 2 fW— fa 


iSSt U 
f im 

2 am aow aow + k 
un A 0 733 m 30 30 — w 

SAAISfa 15 lSfa + W 
XUbLS 9 ASW A 5 W ASW— fa 

15 B 40 7932 SOW 31 W + W 

1.12 13 7 A 34 W sm 34 fa 

1 J 0 40 1434 V 24 V 24 V + W 

.U U 76 UK 72 W 12 K 

J 91 J 10 13 W UK 13 K — 1 
15412 Ufa 12 +K 
.13 IO 23 Afa AK AW 

26 aw afa m 

33 UW Ufa UW 
■H II 40 SW SK SK— K 

a Sfa s sw + fa 

Z 1415 K 14 K ISK + K 
JD U 3 NMfa MK 1 AW-W 
10 9 V Vfa tfa 

SOAlSfa ISK lSfa— fa 
00*37 A 22 K Zifa Zifa — K 
101 10 W UK UK— K 

zo a ■ 

JS U 4 M 29 K 29 W 39 fa 

74 Sfa Sfa SK— fa 

39 IS I 4 W 15 

■Ua IO lOSUfa Ufa Ufa + K 
1047 tfa 9 W 91 b + fa 
ion am n + fa 

17271 b 26 K ZCK— H 
100 SL 3 1 19 W 19 — W 

*3521 27 V 2 P 4 - fa 

94 OK OK >K— fa 

Ji XS 249 ISW Ufa UW + W 
.U 1 J 3433 lfa 7 71 * —Tfa 

2 UA 9 AIK Am— K 
Olr 34019 K UK T 9 K 4-1 
.HP J 5 33 32 33 

1273 17 K 1 AW 16 V— K 
t U AW AW AW 4 - fa 

9 SK S S 

IJ 9 3 J TV 35 W 35 V 3 SW 

7 A 30 29371 Tb Zifa Slfa 

um x? 14 jaw 2ov am— 1% 

t 3 Z 3 AW 2 A 36 — fa 

UM A .1 732 W XI 32 — W 

JO X 8 399 * 0 W Ufa UW 4 - W 

Mb 33 aooam 3 A 2 AW + w 

MM 20 213 37 W 34 fa 37 W +IW 

M A 1*5734 23 V 23 W 

OB U » 2 SW 35 25 

A 7 7 7 

13717 MW 1 AW 

200 to 572 ow aa am— fa 

aa lsv i 4 v 15 

1515 W 15 Ufa— fa 
JS* 30 22 7 Afa Afa— K 

2014 14 M 

3 S 3 K 3 K 3 K— fa 

53 Wfa 16 V 16 V— W 

54 a IJ 435 35 35 

117 MW M 14 — 1 b 

3337 W » TO 
15319 W IM 19 — W 
■7 4 V 4 W 4 V 
101 14 V 141 % 141 b— fa 
73 A 19 W im 19 
M Afa 4 W AK- W 

Mm AA a*M 13 W UW 

156 90 AS 17 W 17 W 17 K 4 -W 

1 O 0 HL 4 1 17 V T 7 K 17 V 4 - fa 
TOO XI 4634 3 SW 3 SW 

39 ISW 15 V 15 V— 1 % 
-74 30 34219 H Ufa ltfa 

28 lfa Tfa Tfa— V 

S OW BW SW + K 

■ 613 V lZfa Ufa— W 

02 .1 2 A 4 Ufa lAfa 14 W 4 - K 

-T 2 A 1 1326 V 2 »% 26 V 
.16 U t 4912 fa lifa 13 4 - K 

430 3 fa 2 fa 3 + K 

xio ss 4703m M am 4 - W 
3 17 17 17 4 - K 

ZOO 4.1 AS 51 3 BW 51 — fa 

XU 27 11 78 W 7 *W 7 IW 4 - V 

104 30 1033 33 3 S +W 

M XS B 14 fa 14 fa Ufa— fa 
200 AJ 542 fa 42 fa 42 fa 
500 SO 12 10 K 10 n — fa 
1 J 4 elS 7 » 7 Tb 7 W 7 Tb 4 - V 
20 U 12 12 — K 

UO SJ 16291 % 29 V 29 K 

T 5 Z 2 W 2 fa 3 K + W 
J 8 17 34222 V Z 1 V 22 K 4 - fa 
59 m av Bfa— fa 
JO 45 I tfa 9 K tfa— K 
24 BIW 19 W 19 W— fa 
■ 7 fa 7 V 7 fa + K 

„ A 6 > aw ok aw 

Olr _ 4 UW 11 11 W + K 

JO 15 37*27 Bfa 37 +Vk 
U SW sv SW + W 
IAA law IM GHtlb 
I IW lfa IW— fa 
1530 SW 7 W OW + W 

13 2 3 

17 *K 9 W tfa— K 
4024 W 34 V 24 K— V 

— . • *K AK AK— K 

OO O 43101 % tfa 10 K + K : 

% ss+a 

.13 IO MB 7 ** AK AK— lb 

117 4 V. 4 K 4 W 4 - fa 
» 7 K m Tfa— W 
34 Bfa 7 K Sfa > K 
un 4 A 

- - 2.2* * *W— Vb 

* -i raa aiw an%- v 
g g- fa 
70 5 K fa SK 
■4 3 K 3 fa Zfa 
A OK lfa Mb— W 
ID UK 11 UK + K 
34 SK Sfa Sfa 
M IK IK lfa— fa 
26 Tfa 7 W 71 b— W 
OO 49 1924 V 23 V » 


rfr 




IOW 4- K 
17W— K 
14 — K 
Mb + W 
Bfa 4- V 
27 —fa 
151b + K 
Ufa 

aow 

12V 

9K — W 
36 V +lfa 

ra_. 


SohsIs Net 

MM HMl Low ZPJLCKOP 

33 7 Sfa 7 — K 
3 0 7W 7W— fa 


JA 

21 

2A4 

40 

40 

XI 


. ISW Ufa 
1 OK OK 
, Mfa 14 fa 
1 Ufa Ufa 
1 9W tfa 
AK » 

Tfa 2h 
4BW ASW 
UK M 
2ZV 23 
WK MK 
ZW ZW 
2K 2Tb 
Afa AK 
41W 41W 
Jfa Jfa 
Sfa Sfa 
UK 14Tb 
AW AK 
14K 14V 
20 2Dfa 
Ufa Mfa 
M 
Ufa 
19W 
fa 
MK 
UK 
16V 
Ufa Ufa 
■U SU 
Tfa 7fa 
I3K I3W 
ZK 3V 
Afa Afa 
Tfa 7W 
Ufa Ufa 
Ufa lOfa 
Ufa IOW 
AK 
17U 


19W 
19V— U 
tfa — K 

m 4- w 

SK 

Ufa 


Ufa 
10 

33fa 
24fa 
AW 
24V 

raw 

9K 

aetb 

AIK 

H3D 30 
1037 37 

70 A SK 
AI 
S4 
21 
19 
131 


.u 

LI 

9 MW 

MU 

14U 



A Sfa 

Sfa 




4T7V 

T7fa 

17V + Vi 



AS AW 

AW 




112339V 

3SW 




272214 

21fa 





17W 




4 UW 

UK 



4.1 

3ZPW 

am 

39W + W 

■4fc€ 





JOO 23 

»u 

17K 




SB TW 

7K 



J 


194* 

K 

WK4.K 



1 SK 

Sfa 

3U 



10 SV 

SW 





5K 





SK 




4 SK 


SK— V 



7133V 

3FB 



2.1 

» Wfa 

raw 

raw- K 


LCSa 

■ AW 

aw 

6W + 1% 

LDfimk 

A4 7K 

AK 

7 — K 


1D1WW 1» 1M+V 
HAD SW OK IW + U 
. 36 7 7 7 

a flrararjs 

« a S%b^ 35 w +w 

. iujSSzKzr+w 

am w* ® 

ao 

iz ^ Sw— » 

17 UK 1AK— fa 

»» 7K 74* 4- V 

*5 72 *v nw aaw 

A nw u 4- v 

__ “SJSfi Ufa M 4- K 
H 22?* !«b I7H + K 
J* SOW A2fa A2W— W 

34 ?f 2 1 Si am am + k 

sw sv + K 
*«w 4 a 42 — fa 

*2 < .ZK 3Tb— K 

A 2S a* — w 

si® aw 2 s am 4 - w 

7712W a J2K 
. * ! m 4K+W 

J 811 nw ii + fa 

S4 A 4 
3 9 Bfa sv 
X5 19135 IM 35* 

i»im iow uv 4 - v 
3 /iyv nw jaw— k 
« 1 JW 9 W *W— K 

J m 9 9K + K 
AS Afa AK AK 
MW l*fa 13K 4- K 
,223*. av m 

11624V 24 24 — U 

in ®w am— w 

u Jg fiw 42W 

o 10 3l " +w 

J ?n% aiw + k 

ifcga=s 

3 « jw% im iw + w 

L1 'J® 

IS ]5 +B 

187 4fa 4V AK— H 
<9 OK SK m 
9 522 7 K Mb Ufa 

"SS S SS ft— K 
’Sft ft $*“* 
raft SS + w 
* ^ £ ta 

5 

^ 762k 3514 W i — il 

a is 14 1" 4 

7 naS aft aft-iv 


Wl Paw Hf) 









































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


Page 19 


a-j j 


M * 


■l <• ,•> lo 


Osfo Plans to Expand Antiquated Stock Exchange 


’« .H'l 

■i V i 


M 4* ?(, 

i ta- 
li! fci? 


•*; it 

■i 4*2;^ 


-** «s J 


«» '• 


'i 


By Simon Hay don 

/totters 

OSLO — Norway' is planning 
major changes in its securities laws 
and an expansion of the Oslo Stock 
Exchange to cope with a sharp in- 
crease in market activity here. 


Three goverameiit ministries, die 
Bank of Norway and the stock ex- 
change secretariat have been walk- 
ing to adapt the small exchange ton 
12-fold increase in turnover, to 21 
billion kroners ($13 bflhon) in 


* t* 3 


w ■* 


fc > 
>« l» 


:s js • 
< % 

; * 

^ t ' 

s;» 

r ^ i 


-4* 


Crude Oil Prices Weaken, 
Extending Month-Old Slide 


1984 from 1.7 billion kroners in 
1981 

Hrik Jarve, commissioner of the 
Oslo exchange, said that the most 
obvious change would be a new 
tradingfloor to be introduced in 
1986. The new floor would allow 
constant trading in the top 17 listed 
companies, a departure from the 
antiquated auction system now 
used. 


foreign ownership in Norwegian 
companies to 33 percent, the com- 
missioner said. 

Foreign involvement in the Oslo 
Stock Exchange more than trebled 
last year, with non-Norwegians 
buying 83 billion kroners worth of 
shares and selling shares worth 5.6 
billion kroners. 


"n 


jfc 


■ii S'.' 
A 

P 1 






i-j 

•i* <_« 


*1.; 


4».' 
* • 




TO- 

*9 


ra : < » s -i'l 

Mi X . . . • ■ . ,.’-1 

■* '** *»*J 


By Bob H 

■Iwtnuaionol HtraQ Trk 

LONDON — Crude oil prices 
weakened again Wednesday, ex- 
tending a month-old decline. 

In European trading. North Sea 
Brent crude for June delivery was 
quoted late Wednesday at about 
$25.95 a band, down from $26.15 . 
Tuesday and about $28 a month 
ago. 

On. the New York Mercantile 
Exchange, crude oil for June deliv- 
ery was trading early Wednesday 
afternoon at $27.14, down 17 cents 
from Tuesday's settlement. 

Analysts say the weakness re- 
flects stagnant demand and rising 
sales by such major producers as 
the Soviet Union, Iran, Nigeria, the 
United Arab Emirates and Oman. 
Soviet exports have rebounded 
strongly from the weather-related 
decline last winter. 


Some analysts say prices are like- 
ly to continue fading in coming 
weeks. “I think it’s a brave man 
who would say it’s hit the bottom," 
said Tony Lesser, managing direc- 
tor of Czamikow Schroder, a Lon- 
don energy futures brokerage. 

Paul McDonald, a 1 London- 
based analyst for American Ex- 
press Co.’s Shearson Lehman 
Brothers unit, said that, aside from 
relatively strong US. gasoline de- 
mand, “all the signs pcant south." 

He predicted that 03 demand in 
'the non-Comnnudst countries this 
year would be little changed, from 
last year’s average of 46.1 milli on 
barrels a day. Bui Mr. McDonald 
'said he did not expect the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries to reduce its official 
prices again, as it did most recently 
in January, despite discounts on 
those prices offered by same pro- 
ducers. 


Stockbrokers, whose numbers 
have grown 40 percent in the last 
year, now squeeze into the quaint, 
white-painted exchange facing Os- 
lo’s harbor and main trading is 
done in a tiny room. 

Insider trading, difficult to de- 
tect or punish under rules dating 
bade to 1918, would be outlawed 
under new laws, which carry a max- 
imum penalty of one year in prison. 

“Grcemnailexs," investors who 
buy into a company and make sud- 
den takeover bids before selling out 
at a profit, also would be curbed. A 
Finance Ministry spokesman said 
that purchases involving 10 percent 
or more of a firm’s shares would 
have to be disclosed. 


Some of the planned changes de- 
pend on the showing of the opposi- 
tion Labor Party in general dec- 
ided for 


m _ 

lions scheduled for September. 

“Obviously, very few slock ex- 
changes." Mr. Jarve said, “would 
Hke to see a socialist government 
replace a conservative one, espe- 
cially one which has liberalized fi- 
nancial markets." 

The stock market has grown be- 
cause of an oil-led upswing in the 
Norwegian economy. And Mr. 
Jarve said that growth had run par- 
allel with an upsurge in the liquid- 
ity of Norwegian industry. 

“Companies have not known 
where to put all their money, so it's 
ending up in the exchange,” he 
said. 


Mr. Jarve said that he also ex- 
pects growth in foreign interest in 
Norwegian industry, which is now 
limited to 10 percenvof banks and 
20 percent of industrial concerns. 
The conservative coalition govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Kaare Wfl- 
loch plans to raise the ceiling for 


Oslo stockbrokers said thaL past 
gre enmailing activities probably 
spurred the government’s decision 
to announce new legislation limit- 
ing such activities. The green- 
mailers, mostly young investors 


with an eye to'a short-term profit, 
to the ex- 


also have contributed 
chang e's fast growth. 


V 

> 


Over-the-Couiiter 


May 8 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


■••• ;v, 


r- 


_> -i . 
•»:. 


Sain In IM 

IMi mob Low IPJyLCtrm 


’ ■*- 
* " \ 1, ' 


(Continued from Page 1 8) 


i ;*} -« 


I 01 

. i« rv 
if 








* a *' 

m -1* 

.** : . : 

r- f! ‘ 

• 


M ; 


1 * 

<« 

4 ' 

MdwFn 

120 

7.1 

. 817 

17 

17 +1 



J 

MUlHr 

40 

U 

“1* 

33 

STO + ft 


ft 

tL* 

MUHcm 



3ft 

3ft — 

ft 

1 • 


J^' 

MlJllpr 

44 

12 

299 37ft 

37 

37ft — 

ft 

• t 

4 9 


Mtotacr 



922 TO 

3ft 

3ft— 

ft 


ft 


Mhwtnk 



2 i ns m 

TO 

•ft + ft 

■ 



Mbtstar 



K— Jc 

22ft 

23V* 


•i 

-'ft 


Mixctwr 




15 

IS — 

ft 











■ ’ | 



MoMCA 




Ift 

■ft 




MobfCB 



Bft 

TO + ft 

# ' t -» 



MobGo 

.9* 

72 

wiro 

13ft 

13ft — 

ft 




MOCON 

JH* 

J 

1* 6% 

4ft 

TO— 

ft 



J 1 " 

Madinas 

3T 

10 

n in* 

18ft 

Mft— 

ft 



I 1 




94 7 

TO 

TO — 

ft 



■J* 


JQ 


413TO 

341* 

34ft — 

ft 




MonCa 

140 

11 

1324* 

4TO 

44ft— 

ft 







152 TO 

TO 

* ■ — 

ft 


1 


Mama 

250 1 J 

S3 ITO 

ITO 

lift— 

ft 

* 


MonArit 



20 9V. 

TO 

TO— 

ft 




Monol It 

UO 


473 m* 

im 

12 






4.1 

ism 

31ft 

31ft + ft 

• 

* * 

i 

MaoreF 

120b 43 

m 

25ft 

39ft— 

ft 

1 

■ 


MorFto 

jn 


ITO 

ITO— 

ft 

• 


? -i 

MarKo 

.138 1.1 

i7ian 

12 

12ft + ft 




MCSB 



2424ft 

2TO 

24 



ft 

a 


40 

15 

284 ITO 

19ft 

19ft 





Motatay 



623 4ft 

TO 

4ft 



- 


Matamo 

MatOb 

2* 

20 

ID 

12 

w 

lift 

14ft 

12 

Mft— 

ft 


- 


mwttar 

128 

74 

122% 

77ft 

32ft 





Muhbks 

44 

7J 

18)23 

72 

Bft + 
55ft + 

ft 

i 

. 


Mutimd 

4* 

12 

112755% 

55ft 

ft 

• - 

•- 

*■ 

My Ians 



203822ft 

22 

22ft + ft 


40 24 


tatty Source fa 
tf yMrial invests 


si 1st- 






HtUnnb 

XNUcri 


Hi 
Nil Pro 
NTBCtl 
Ntwnu 

NtnwdP 

NatrBty 

JESS* 

js&r 

NwkSnc 

NtwkS* 

NtwkEI 


* 

I.. *• 

— - 
* 

+:■«* 

ATO* * 


.f 




« ,,r 

dt'-n 

*-«■ 


i 9 *' 


A 



TO ,3ft +"jS 


15% 

414 ft ^ 

ih. m 
n "7jS 
TO TO 
28%. 21ft + % 
TO 5ft + 14 
a a —I 
TO TO— ft 
30ft 30ft— ft 
aro 34%— ft 




ITO 17 +ft 
lift lift 
IV if —IK 
TOO +14 
i— ft 


% * 


ITO 7TO 
10 mb .+ ft 
M *14 -t- ft 
jn 24 +i 
20ft 20ft— ft 
41ft 41ft + ft 
41ft 41ft 
ift Oft— ft 
TO TO 
TO 5ft- ft 
an nft 
Mft W 
3ft 3ft 
a » +1 

TO TO— ft 
5 S 

15 15 —1ft 

1714 10ft + ft 
an » -eft 
32ft 32ft — ft 
23ft 73ft + ft 
5ft TO 
4 4 — ft 

TOUi 10ft + ft 
TO TO 
40ft 40ft + 14 
13 13 —ft 

5ft 5ft— ft 
14ft 15 + ft 

7- 7ft— ft 
Stft 26ft— ft 
«ft 7ft + ft 
10ft 11 


OCGTc 

OWfiec 


■Mr* 1 1 

««=-■ * 




ir».' <■* 


ocfllat 
OfftLao 
Ochms 
O aftav 
onioCa 
OJltJrl t 

OUKatl 
'T^tfNBk 
= M» 
Odsme 
OMSplB 
OM5PK 
OftWlF 
OnaBCD 
OrlLM 
OnvK 
OprlcC 
OattcR 
Oplrtci 
□rtjooc 

Orwr 

OnoMt 

OrfbCp 

Orton R 

OsmncE 

ottrTP 

OvrE«p 

OwmiM 

Ones 


UM. 2J 
2.1* 7 A 
200 M 


M» 24 

2JD0 20 

JO 23 
200 7.1 
240 1IJ 

2 M n .1 

JSm UO 

Mb U 


250* 


2.74 24 

M 11 


54 1ft 
41* 3ft 

40. 2ft 
21 ITO 
33 TO 

07 «m 

829ft 

52B5TO 

3oSft 

W29ft 
120ft 
4521ft 
6 ITO 
110 10ft 
II 7 
238 7ft 
13»» 
16342 
10 ITO 
10*18 
in m 

1S2 £M> 

2317ft 

S3 IS 
10332ft 
1010 
US 19ft 
TB3 1ft 


1ft lft + ft 
2ft » + ft 
2ft 2ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
2 2ft 
4014 40ft— ft 
29ft 2914—1 
Sift 57ft +W4 


+ ft 


20ft 39 
51 52 

39ft 39ft— ft 
29ft 29ft— (4 
20 ft 20ft + ft. 
21ft 21ft— ft 

ITO 12ft— 2ft 

10ft 10ft + ft 

Aft Aft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
15ft 15ft— ft 
41ft 42 +ft 
UH 1TO-M4 
ITO 17ft— » 
<ft Ok— ft 
0 Oft— ft 
5ft 5ft— ft 
17ft 17ft + ft 
14ft IS + ft 

31ft 32ft -C lb 
W IS +» 
10 W 
lft m— ft 


In Net 

lift wan low 3pjm. ana* 


PNC 232 4J0 
PTCom 

Poccor 1.20a 29 
PacPsr 

PcGaR 100 42 
PocTrt JO AuD 
PacWB Mb 10 
PackSr 


7025714 

3911ft 


PoaoPh 


PnxMx .13 1J 


10* 40ft 
9611ft 
■ 103S 

S IM 
TO 
I Oft 
l*ft 
JJ2ft 
77 2ft 
74 3ft 


J] 


ParPtia 

ParTcli 


ig-** 


PartOh JO 40 


55ft 57ft + ft 
11 lift + ft 
9ft 9ft 
4014 40ft + ft 
lift lift 
2TO 34 + ft 

13 13ft 
5ft TO + ft 
9ft 9ft 
ITO ITO 

3ft 3M + ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
19 10 

lift UM— 1M 
15M 1* — M 
12ft ITO— ft 
14ft 14ft— ft 


PnPdB 

PatntM 


Patrkl 

Patriot 1J0 34 

PatrtPf Z2D 42 

PaNHr 

Paul PI 

PayN 

Paytfnc 

POVCDS 

PaakHC 

PaartM 

Pear MT n 54 

PMGkl JAt 3 
PmnVO lJOo 35 
PanoEn 220 40 
JO 37 


T2M 12M — ft 
5 5 — ft 

4ft ift— ft 
Oft 


(ft -f M 
29ft mb+ Vt 


35M 3M 
WM I9M + ft 
lift lift— ft 
23ft 23ft 
12ft 12ft -f ft 
17ft + ft 



Pftrm:_ 

PSPS' JSe 
PMIGI -50b 
POnxAin 
PhataCs 
Ptivsin. M 



^i^iSS 


11 2ft 




43 


jo_ : 

PtonFfB 49* : 
PlanG* 30 
PtOflHI M ! 
PlanSB 
PlanStt .13 
PtaRtrC M - 
Plenum M : 
PaFalk . 
PtcvMfl _ 
PonceF Jte 1 
Pam 




Bt 2ft 

5M J^+ft 
23ft 21ft— % 
21ft 21ft -Cft 
ITO 13ft -CM 
lift 19 
32 32 —ft 

TO TO + ft 

7ft 0 + 14 


PM Foci 
PMSOV 
PnxfLn 


PntnCp 

Prawav 


PrteCm* 
PrloCoo 
PrtnvO 3* 
Prtroox 
ProdOp .16 
Praflnv. 
Proms 40 
PraaSvs 
PrnuQi -U 


ProotTr 130 
PratUe J2 
Previn 
PrvUA 200 


pbSMC ua 
PeSdBc 1.12 
PiUasF 40 
Pul linn 
Pulmwr . 
PnrtBa 40 


32ft 32ft +ft 
18ft UM 
22 23 + ft 

IBM IBM 
21ft 21ft 
2 2ft 
ITO lift— ft 
Oft Oft 

24ft 24M— ft 
CM TO + ft 
7ft 7ft 
5ft 5ft— ft 
90ft 21ft— lft 
14M MM— 14 
TO 5 

4ft 4ft— ft 
10ft TOM — ft 
Sift 54ft +1 
*ft ift 
lift lift 
5ft 5ft 
5ft 5ft 
12ft 12ft + ft 
5 5 — ft 

40 40 

TO 5M 
13ft ITO + ft 
21ft 23 +TM 
14M lift 
99ft 90ft— 1 
1ft 114 
ITO 22M— ft 
30ft Sift 
2M aro— ft 
TO TO 
TO 4ft + ft 
21ft 21ft 


QMS a 
Quodrx 


11 — ft 


33 


Qntmxs 

Quorrtm 

Quanta 

QueatM 

Queatch 

Quintal 

oUotr^ 


2*4 UM n 
192 TO 5ft TO 
SUM TIM lift 
U 2ft 2 214 

2191214 Oft 11 —1 


28521 

2Bft 

20ft 

. .5 5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

198 4 

TO 

3% 

7 9ft 

TO 

TO— ft 

12 TO 


7ft 

3210ft 

10 

10 — Hi 

unra 

lift 

lift— ft 


RAX 

RUfT ' 

RLlCp 

RPM8 

Roffiya 

Rodin T 

Rodion 


5* 23 
4* 33 


Rom Fin U05 42 


Itaudi 

Rovmda 

RoyEn 


t . 
JO XI 
34 M 


120 0 Oft 
15IM 51ft 
324ft 24ft 
109 17 MK 
234 9 Mb 
15711ft lift 
1 7ft 7ft 
47 9ft 5ft 
«R2H 27ft 

r - 


Oft- ft 
51 ft +1 
24ft 

ITO + ft 


Radttm. 44 2J 


Ratac 


ROMAN) 

Rellab 

RenaT 

RntCntr 

RaAaia 

ftpHHn 

RMfllne 


T 

30 33 
49 J 


J no -3 


320 23 


. — . 4ft 
1122ft 22M 
*1714 If 
9928M 19ft 
5 Aft Cft 
420ft 30ft 
197310ft TO 
3312 lift 
07 «ft TO 
■ JH* 12ft 
159 TO 7ft 
3* 4ft 4ft 
70 AM ift 
40 3ft 3ft 

410 10ft 
10 OM 0 
*911710 1AM 
1011ft lift 


lift + ft 
7M— ft 
5ft 

77M— ft 
35 —I 
4ft— M 
414 
32ft 

17 —14 

20ft + ft 


30ft + ft 
10 

im— ft 
TO— ft 
13M+ ft 
7ft + ft 
414 ' 
4ft 

3ft— ft 

IBM — ft 
OM + M 

rro + ft 

im 




-**•*-■ 

«.V 


Company Earnings . 

Revenue and profit* tn millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 




\ Britain 

British Airways 


Netherlands 


M/ A Corn 


Year 19M WSJ 

Pnstw Net— 302.0 105J 


Canada 


i ' 


CAE Industries 


MOwar. IMS W0* 

Revenue 2102 1(74 

Uplift- 9.9 741 

Per Share 023 018 

MKNr we 1904 

.«■»;_ ie ,_. Revenue : 4074 3S55 

United States y inc. — «j uj 

Pw Share 044 035 


FhSpaGkMtL 

SS £3 


Year 1904 17*3 

Revenue 3274 20.1 

Oht Net 3082 . 2X74 

Oper Shane_ OJA 044 


ml- * 


I ntw piw . Pipe. 

ictQacr. IMS 1984 

Revenue 112.9 1078 

Prenw— . 37J' 34J4 

Per Share un 09J 


Continentai Ccxp. 
Mttuor. rm rm 

twine. — ft* 

Per Share— 078 4M- 

tM oaf tadudas aata at 
SSMnriBlan 


Pioneer 


■ *■*' . . 


Moon Coop. 

IMS - WM 


'W'- 


-MQear. 

a -sj 

Pee Shore-— OJA 832 

Reran* J» UL& dOHara. 


FairdiM htd. 
KtQaar. ITO W 
Ravenve_ ansjs 2144 
StiSc “ 10311-1 . a* 
PerStiora— . — M0 

or fan. HWnNtadMtwrw- 

TOVtf 07X29 nMMon. -- 


■ WOm. INS 19J*4 

Revenue »U .1114 

Net UK. 1X7 1448 

Per Shore 038 OJA 


White Cons. kid. 


Gafbar Prcits 


France 




Yi 

KM 


Pougwt 

HM IfOl 

344 yua 


Revenue— 
Nil Inc 

Per Shore — 
Year 
Revenue 
Net me. 


247.9 

1732 

niK 

1! 

. 9294 

50W 


m ? 

0M 


fttqaar. IMS KM 

Revenue 4324 4598 

Oaer Net 371 - 1U 

Oeer Shores 021 078 

HOW«dMBfagd l C4 
miwwftwB 
ereHeaa, 


Woolworth [F.W.J 


i— - 9294 1054 Revenue — 

— 1 5439 . SOU Met Jhe. 


Per snore — X77 


IN (tala'. . -IMS .„. 

Re ma m a 1340. 1310 

N«J The. • *8 44 

017 O10 



18K 

Mob Law IPJft.aroa 

- 


nos 

Mob Low iPJiLarw 

ftafCxp 









307 Bft 

7% 

7ft— ft 

RustrSy 



10013% 

13ft 

13ft +% 

ft 

1 



12815% 

15% 

15% 


.15b U 




3Com 



112 8% 

■ft 

8% 

RmitrH 

Jl* 

J 

6027% 

27% 

27% — ft 

Timor Id 

-t 


*1 6ft 

Aft 


RavarA 

144 123 


11% 

11% 




52 lift 



Rnxon 

1.S4 

U 

33 TO 

6% 

TO 

TnwFlb 



r°% 


\Ti ff 

Rhoctas 

M 

XI 

340)11* 

lift 

lift 

Tofu 5 



A0 Mft 

Mft 









190 




40ft 










.518% 

17ft 


RtaasN 

UM 

19 




TrokAu 



2815ft 

Mft 

15ft + % 

Rttzvs 



8 TO 

2% 

an + ft 

Tnmlnd 

t 


11 4% 

4ft 


Rival 

JO 

XI 

227 15% 

15ft 

15% + ft 


1.74 

ta 

220 



Roods i 

UO 

33 


2*ft 

24% — ft 


jar 

j 

40 6% 






413ft 


13ft— ft 




111 2ft 

2% 



» 


0 Aft 

Aft 

TrwIBc 



15 TO 

TO 



JA 

A 



14 —ft 

TrtodSV 



97 7ft 






ISAilft 

10% 

10ft— ft 

TrtMtc 



31 5ft 

5 


RCfcwH 

.14 




9 +% 

TribCm 



11 3ft 



RMUnd 


75 M 

INk 

B% + ft 




1006 m 

1% 

lWl + 

RfcMIG 

48 

59 



lift + ft 


in 

13 

3 Bft 


8%— ft 

RomSB 

38a 1J 

934 

74 

24 

TrusJD 

40 

1J 

17836% 

26ft 


* 1- rB 

48 

3.1 

»17ft 

19ft 

19U— ft 

TBkGa 

L00 

29 

16435ft 

34% 



1JS 

24 

13642ft 

47 

42ft— ft 

TTBNY8 

128 

39 

1938ft 


30ft +1 


.TO 1J 

4110ft 

99k 

9%— ft 

TudtDr 



AZ Aft 

6% 


RayPfm 



111.9ft 

9ft 

9ft + ft 

TumCfy 



273 % 



Wl 



14 5% 
6 TO 

1 TO 

5ft 

Bft 

TO 

5% — ft 
8ft— ft 
TO 

Tyion s 

Jl 

4 

825 21 

20ft 

20% — ft 



1 u 1 



3417ft 

14 

IM 

16 

17tt— Hi 






21 — ft 

,uu 



US LJC 8 

JO 

13 

11821ft 

21 



9M— ft 
13ft +lft 




10 

ISM + ft 


EandCM 

Satefas 

SatelSy 

SavnF 

SvBkPS 

SaxenO 

Samoa 

ScanTr 

Scherer 

Schofau 

SdlbnA 

Schnea 


.12 U 
140a 44 
J4 28 


Mil 9M 
34513ft 12 
24413ft 13M 
7Mft ITO 
510 to 
' B15M IS .... 

13 ITO T7M ITO 
2 714 7ft 7ft 
1471TO MM »4M + ft 
144140ft 40 40ft + Ml 
21TO ITO ITO 
A 2014 20% 2014— ft 
40710ft TOM 1014— ft 
114549ft AOft 69ft + ft 
50 TO 3ft 3ft— ft 
21 7ft 7 7 —ft 

sfc » 


31 47 


10 ITO 3*14 3AM . 

141 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

pi: 


SeawPd 40 35 
ScNtBM 1.M *7 
SacNtt 130 35 
SecAFn ,10b J 
132 SB 

SecTaa 

SEEQ 

40 37 



CM S* + M 


Wft 15ft + ft 




Semkn 

Senior 

Srvmut 


Senior US 3 


Svinost 

Setvloo 

SvcFrct 

SevOak 

ShrMed 

Shwmts 

Stemra 

Shekiis 

Shonevs 

ShonSqa 

SvMmt 

Stance 

StomoR 

Silicon 

silicons 

snievai 

SBIcnx 

Slltec 

SlmAIr 

Stmpln 

Sfaaln 

Staler 

Sklaaer 

Sky Exp 

SkxaiTc 

sratttiL 

SmlttiP 

Sadety 

SoctySv 

Soflech 

SoftwA 

SonocP 

SonrFd 

SoMlcG 


JO J 

L.12 3J 
t 


.14 XI 
41 17 
SJS 5J> 
.14 5 


.15 5 

.IDe XI 


JO SJ 
JA 4 


UR) XA 
-Ua J 
1J» 84 


SCoJWl MO 74 


StaJPn St 15 
Soutrat uo 35 
SwElSv 1J0 7.1 
Sovran .10 15 
Sovran 140 48 
SPCMIC 

SaanA 

Sadran 

SnecCtt JA 5 
Soctrm 
SaerHD 
Sake 


StafBId JO X3 
Stnndya M» U 
StCTob 40 24 
StdMIc . 

SMRflB UO 23 

Sfondun 

StonMT 

StoStS LOA U 
StoteG .136 X7 


SMwSlv 

StewSa 

SHW 

STockSv 

Stratus 

StrwCa 

Stryker 

StuDS 

stuartH 


Super El UOIIU 


ISubAkl 

SubrB 

Sudbrv 

ISuKSS 

Sum™ 

Sumtfis 
SumtHl 
SunCst 
SunSL 
Sunwif 
SUBRtel 
|ste)Sfc y| 
taOTOEII 
[Suartexj 
SuarCta 
SurpAf 
SnrvTc 
Sykes 
SrmUn 
iSytWbT 
Svncor 
Svntech 
iSyntrex 
Syecon 
SrAioc 
SyoMn 
Syslnta 
SvatGn 
Svstmt 


05 1.1 
140 13 
J05 13 
152 34 


.12b 4 


.96 41 
J9e 3 


140 33 
.1* 5 


31 17 


M 3 


I*ft l«ft-ft 
330ft HUM 30ft 
219ft lift 18ft— ft 
2422ft 33 22V, + M 

59 3 TO 29b 
84 3ft TO TO— ft 
10521ft 20ft 21ft + ft 

12 9ft 9ft 9ft 

1 7ft 7ft TO 
SS 7ft 7ft 7ft „ 
2*8 lft lft lft— h 
69013ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
171 ITO 3*ft 3TO + ft 

520ft 19ft Wft 
21 6ft Aft *14 + ft 
3714ft 1414 1414— ft 
414428ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
19234 33ft 33ft— 14 
IBft 18ft — ft 
2112ft 12ft 12ft — ft 
40729 2814 mb— V> 

19 MM. ITO ITO— 14 

2 4ft 4ft TO 

30 7ft 7 7—14 

48 4 TO 4 + ft 

458 7ft 7ft 7M 
771114 IBM 11 — ft 
1316 UM 14 + ft 

1919 lift W +ft 
64 714 7 7 

418512 lift lift + 14 
1775 lift 74ft— ft 

47 ITO 1AM 1AM 

29921ft 20ft 21ft + ft 
1147014 10 1014— ft 

15 3ft 3 3 — ft 

78 8ft TO 8 — ft 
*97 3ft 3 3 

8 Oft 814 8ft + ft 
2194* 44ft 4* +lft 
12* lift 13ft 12ft 

48 7 TO 7 + ft 

247 TZM 12M 1IM— 14 

3546ft 46 4AM 
71318ft TTO 18ft + ft 
42 18 18 18 

2520 1VM 28 
8424ft 23M 3414 + ft 
206 SM 5 5 — ft 

228 20 20 — 14 

1936 25M 25M — 14 

52SM 25ft 25M 
27 TO TO AM 
18742ft 41M 42ft + ft 
34 114 lft 114 + ft 
316 TO TO TO + ft 
31218ft 1716 IM + ft 
51 6M 6ft TO— ft 
21114 1114 lift 

2 2M 2M 7M 

1015 15 IS —14 

WO 814 I 8—14 
3 Met 6 5ft 6 
3226M 25ft 24 
120ft 20ft 2M4 
9914ft Mft ITO— ft 
11 5416 S4 5414 

34 <14 *M *ft 
60413ft 12ft 13 —ft 
80059 STO 59 +lft 

35 5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 

24 « TO * + ft 

254 14M M ITO + M 

3 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
2 Aft TO Aft „ 

33 9ft 9 * — ft 

2321514 MM Mft— M 
25*55 54M 5TO + ft 

720ft 28M 28ft + M 
42 ITO 17 17 — ft 

8 TO TO ift— 14 
123U5M 134M135 

* 4ft 414 414 

B553 52 53 + ft 

13 9 lft TO- ft 

• 15 MM MM 

T6 3ft 3 TO + M 
2930ft 30 20 — ft 

5*7 12ft lift l* + ft 
2W IS TO 3“ 

202 5ft SM TO 
242 42 42 

115ft ISM 18M + 1* 
2 TO TO TO— ft 
1* lift ITO lift 

JH M M 

*1014 W* TO— 14 

09 3ft 314 3ft + ft 
441214 lift lift— ft 
1 2ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
14214ft 13ft ITO— M 
82 Mb TO »- ft 

48123M 22ft 23 +14 

is ia ts % 

20 7 TO Cft 
4220 19ft 20 + ft 


TBC 

TCACb .12 4 

raf lnc M 1.1 

TSR8 

TUCVIvb 

Tandem. 

Tendon 

Tehran 32 14 
YcCotn 

TChlnca J03 4 
Telco 

TtanA I 
TafiPhn 

Tdcrft .. 

Telecrd J2 XI 

TWealct 

TeMd 

Tetans 

Teixon flle 
Team 

TH S. E v. 

TeraCp 

TermDT f 

SS3 Sf js» u 

TtmrPr 

Thrmd* 

Tnettd 

ThdNB IM 32 
TCBY1BS 


25312ft 12ft 

2*2014 ITO 

in lit 

3 7 7 

123 lift 1114 
13S TO *14 
211321ft 20ft 
*12 5ft 5 

aim im 

57 9 Oft 
*1 t 7ft 
1241414 ITO 
12472PM 29ft 
790 Mb TO 
4515 lift 
2791 TTO 15 

i<2 23ft aft 
129 TO TO 
201414 14 
37919 lift 
31' 5ft 5ft 
132 2ft lft 
ID 3 1 

28 414 ift 
71 TO 714 
45 214 2ft 
1*9 ITO Wft 

1131114 lift 

43* 12ft Oft 

MW TO 

1*4044 4814 

113 271* ICft 


12ft? . 

ITO— ft 
Bft + ft 

7 —ft 

lift + 14 

TO + ft 
20ft— ft 
JSM + ft 
ITO 

Ift + ft 

8 +14 
MU- ft 
294b— ft 

9ft 

MM— ft 

1514 — ft 

a 

2ft + ft 
lift 

19 +ft 
5ft— ft 
lft— ft 

4ft-ft 
TO+ ft 
214— ft 
14ft + 14 
im— ft 

ITO + 1b 

n 

4014— Va 
37 +14 


TJ2B 40 

OAe J 


UTL 
UltrBcp 
Ultrav 
Unman 
Uoffl 
UnWrcs 
U nlmed 
UoBcp 

UnFndl 

UnNatt 244 45 
UnPlntr ION 4J 
unwam 


1J0 24 


2722ft 2ZM . 

73214 31ft 32U +ft 
5)8 7ft 7ft 71* — M 
15213ft Oft 12 —ft 
6(0 9ft 9ft 9ft 
2011ft 111* 1114— ft 
71 9ft 9 9—14 

342 40 42 +lft 

11» 9ft TO 9ft + ft 
44514 45ft 45ft +1 
2502314 22ft 22ft— ft 
40010ft TO 10ft + ft 
9017M 16% 16% 
433514 35 35 — ft 



VLI 



679 TO 

Cft 

4% — ft 

VLSI 



8811% 

11 

ir „ 

VMX 



295 6% 

Aft 

6ft— % 

VSE 

.168 L5 

210% 

10% 

10% 

VaUdLs 



50011% 

11% 

im— ft 

VatyBc 

UB 

19 

621 

36ft 

20 +1 

VaIPBL 



MM% 

14% 

14%— % 

VINBcs 

L50a 13 

2245 

42 

45 -M 

ValNtl 

UO 

33 

145 36% 

36% 

36ft 

vumrd 

40 

3J 

1019% 

19% 

19% 

VQHak 

-Ota 14 

42 6% 

Aft 

6% 

VnnShk 



3 8% 

8% 

8% 

Vanztal 



108 B% 

7ft 

■ 

vancrs 



72 7% 

7% 

Tfc+% 

VOdrG 



67 % 

% 

VatoBd* 



81 TO 

9% 

9%— % 

Vmttrox 



238 3% 

3% 

3% 

vtFnd 

-LlOa 48 

130 

30 

38 — ft 

VornaT 

30 

U 

20 15ft 

15 

15 


Veto 

VIconF 

Vlcurp 

VtdBn 

VtctraS 

ViodeFr 

viraMt 

Vataeh 

VKTech 

Vodavl 

VoHCp 

Volt UK 

VMrc 

Vortec 

VVWBt 


4*9 J 
U» 48 


46 ft 
45 3 


JOB U 
Mr U 


80 J 


125ft 
17 TO 

norm 

Midi 
14 7 
42 TM 
40810 
10 4 
2741714 
17520ft 
29 10 
5 TO 


14 ft 
TO TO 
26 26M + V» 

25ft 25M + ft 
TO TO— ft 
Tift 7Hb + ft 
16ft 16ft 
Mb Mb + lb 
114 114 

9ft 9ft— V. 
4 4+14 

XI 17 — ft 
SOU 28ft— M 
PM TO 


rz 



W 


1 


M 

4.1 

8521% 

20% 


IV,r?T-l 

48 

Jl 

3330 

Z9 

ijU 

wikrTta 



32* 9% 

9 

9 + ft 



84 



WF5L8 

JOb 26 

8531ft 

30% 

31 — % 

WMSB 



15013 

Bft 

12ft— ft 

WkhScx 

J2 

S 

4827% 

22 

22% — % 


.n 

48 

IS 

1 6 

15213% 

A 

12% 

6 + % 
13% + ft 


44 

2J 

915ft 

15ft 

15ft + % 

Wavatfc 



SS 7 

Aft 

Aft— % 

Waxrai 

■08 

4 

7410% 

10ft 

10ft + ft 

WMbba 

M 

■23 

1113ft 

Oft 

13ft + ft 

wadotii 

LOSbkL* 

1 7% 

i% 

TO— % 


92a 9J 

50 9ft 

9% 

9% — ft 

Wipe 2 


30 ■ 

1 

0 

WAldBC 

3 0 

40 

3710% 

17ft 

17ft 


WetCap 

wktra. . 

WMICTC 

wsteer JO tx 
WTlAa 

WmorC 40 U 

vhenmo ' job 4 


88 3J 

What 

wucom 

wnand 

Wllhnl 145 42 
WWWW M 44 
WIIIAL 

Wlllml t 
WlnsTr SUB 34 
wuanp 

WftenH JO 14 

WlWon 

Window JJ7 lj 
WbHiEn 
wtasrO 40 
. 1 * 


3412% 12M ITO— ft 
49212 lift Tift 

norm in* ms + ft 

3 7ft TO. TO— ft 
3 9 9 9 —11* 

1262314 22% 23 — ft 

1517ft 17 17ft 
10728M 27ft 27ft— ft 
13725ft 34ft 25M + ft 
11927 2*M 26ft 

■96 414 ift ift 
10* TO ift Aft— 14 
9 6 5ft A — ft 
ans 39 +14 


WWWnJ 


212ft 
14811ft 
* Bft 
13155ft 
343 • 
119ft 
27 3ft 
231 AM 
190 7 
6219 
121 Aft 
91 Mft 
At 25ft 
3511ft 
7122ft 
7910ft 


12ft 12ft 
lift lift 
■ft . Oft 

sm sm + ft 

7ft 7ft— 14 

19% 19% 

3ft 3M — ft 
« A — 14 
TO Aft 
UM UM— 14 
Aft Aft 
U14 1414 — ft 
25 2Sft + ft 
11M lift 
2lft 2214— ft 
10 UM 



CnMul 

OwMMrif nth |fcr «rin jhn 
afQytflAtaHBbaeHti 


pmk ■uAhdalipadS'TDfnr 


LmfatBkataNW r\ 

amtaUKcaqi Oi 


ausiifBtaaifaNvaata 
DvMti.pLMlaa') atari . 
■Maw ArMij.adkiSrEta 

otaSna Em ata ifaMieta mod. 


fabfyuefaTPafttaiftl 
BnttaRc(a*eCftt 


. JiRtaanrCtariLmAn 
etaLataetPtasTt 
SbMtabtarntfrCfaarilfa 

n ■■ ■ ~ ■ 


KMarkdwapntm- 
’afta ib abpwatiiftetatai 
SaneMBfi e Bijpwv 
■uoxnuiritai ■ BblobuI 
Sotafad 

Sofa’HflOrrfn * nri Aw end 
sloop NwrfefeneMftaa! w 
Im. lnottni Krfarkpnva 
pmAsJbr wo jmrtBp vets 
ufaptuta. pfabvtrpmitaflta 
tamotlWnp 


Wright Olphartf'tjbe 

Sorveyor 





JDek&esfaL . 
rtBtb«fci*sj<ifcrCjqi 
RfaerilhcfaolriSItaM's 

wuflfriptar s ** 


eMCfama- 3£ 



WE BELIEVE CONTAINERS 
BELONG IN YOUR 
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO 


PRIMARY 
PERIOD 
5 YEARS 


INCREASE 

YOUR 

WORKING 

CAPTTAL 

100 % 


GUARANTEED 


SECONDARY 
PERIOD 
10 YEARS 


RECEIVE 
EARNINGS OF 

280 % 

ON CASH 
INVESTED 


PROJECTED 


TERMINATION 
PERIOD 
15TH YEAR 


RETURN OF 
. CASH 
INVESTED 

100 % 


* Containers are high earning, 
fully insured, tangible assets 
with a 15 year working fife. 

$ The Transco Group is the 
world's leader in producing the 
highest annual rental return 
with the lowest commercial risk. 
a{: 2000 serious investors have 
already purchased containers 
worth over US$35 million 
which are managed by the 
Transco Group. 

$ These serious investors 
enjoy a secure US DOLLAR 
income from participation in 
international trade. 

* DO NOT MISS THIS 
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
TO ADD CONTAINERS TO 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
PORTFOUO. 

* For full details, without 
obligation, fill in our coupon 
today. 

TRANS 
CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 

Geflertstrasse 18, 

CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Tel: (061) 4223.77 
Telex: 64446 taco ch 
MINIMUM UStfeOQO INVESTMENT 


GUARANTEED 



To: Trans Container Marketing AG 
Gellertstrasse 18.CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
Please send me full details without obligation. 


NAME: 

(BLOCK CAPITALS! 


ADDRESS: 


I 


I 


I 


OFRCE: HT13J 


ADVERTISEMENT - 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
7 May 1999 


The nrt aeiet value quotations Move hptaw are Mutated by Uta Pmw» liifedwllti the 
ucomtaa or sonw had* wnota quotes ere based on Issue prices. The fallmrM 
mn retool symbols Indicate rreauency of quotmons upelied lor the IHT : 

<d) - daily; I w) - weekly; lb) - bt-manttilv; Irt - reuuJorty; H) • Irreeatartv. 


At MAI, MANAOEMENT 
(w) Ai-Mal Trust. XA 


_ OBL1 FLEX LIMITED 
1 169J9 — iwl Multicurrency. 


BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Ud. 


—id) BaereoncL. 


—Id 1 Contoar- 


— id ) Eaulbaer America . 
— (d ) Equltioer Europe _ 

—Id ) Eaulbaer Paclttc 

— Id 1 Grabar 


— IdlStoekbor. 


5F915J0 
SF 1210J0 
_ S 130140 
5F 1199 40 
SF 113540 
SF 1027 JO 
SF 163LOO* 


— iwl Dollar Medium Term. 
— Iwl Do) lor Loop Term.—. 
— Iwj Jaaanew Yen. 


-3 10-19 


J 1033 


.S10L30 


— In) Pound Star I Ira - 


-5I0J4 


— (wi Deutsche Mark . 

— (wl Dutch Florin 

— Iwl Swiss Franc 


.11X29 


_FL MLI1 

^SF 948 


BANQUE IND05UEZ 
—Id 1 Aslan Growth Fund. 
— (w) Dlverband. 


— Iw) FIF-Amertai. 
— (wl FIF—Eurem— 


—Iwl FIF— Pariflc- 


— Id ) Indosucz Mwltlbonfls A. 
—Id ) indoniei Multibands B. 


. 5105* 
SF 8250 
. S 18.69 
. S1059 
. S15JD 
. *8840 
S U5J3 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB (SS7X The Haoue 1070) 4MUQ 
— (d I sever Beteo«noe(r++ 


13X60 


PAR l$BA$— GROUP 
—Id I Corfaxa imemailo no i 

— far) OSU'DM 

-iwl OBLIGE ST ION 


— (Wl OBLI430LLA. 
— <WlOBU-YEK 


britanniaj’OB ZH. si. Heller. Jersey __ 

— Iw) BrltJMlor Income SU70 

-fw) BrUJMtaVto-Curr— — S8J* 

— Id l Brn.inlUAtanoBAorH Min? 

— (dl Brit. UrtUlWaioftPortl. — M.I82* 

—l«l BrH.UrvvereaJ Growths SX960 

-tw) Brit.Geld Fund *0444 

— I wj Brl LMc»ioo.Cia rencr — — 

— idlBrU.JopanWrPert.Fd— SL9B4 
— (w) BrILjarsev Gilt Fund— — ta2 l£ 
— (d I Bin. world Lett. Fund— S1459 
— tdlBrtL World Tertin. Fund — *0.761 


-Iwl OBLWULOEN 



— Id I PAROIL-FUND 


-(d) PARI NTER FUND 
—Id I PAR US Treasury 


ROYAL B. OF CAN AOAPOB 34LGUE RM5EY 

■He) RBC CeneABen Fund Ltd SUJ2 

>HnI RBC F6r Eost&Pactflc Fd iiass- 

-+4wl RBC Inti Capital Fd. SMJB* 

-*{w>HBC 161*1 Income Fd *1X93 

!BC MonjCunencv FcL S 23.10 

- *9.4* 


■+W ) RBC ManjCurrencv Fd 
-Mel RBC North Amer. Fd. 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— iwl Control Inrt Fund. 

— tw) Capital Italia f " 


SKANDI FOND INTL FUND I4A4-23A270I 

— (w> Inc.: Bid SSJSOHer S53B 

— (w)Acc.: Hid 5SJM Otter— 1541 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

— Id I Actions Stnsses— — . SF37AH 

—Id) Bond Valor Swt SF 104.75 

—id) Bond Valor Dmarh DM 10746 

—(d) Band Valor US-DOLLAR 51 13-15 

—(d) Bond Valor Yen Yen 1054940 

— «) Convert Valor Swt. 5F TD9J5 


SVENS KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire 5«L.Lixidcm-0 1 -377-9040 

— (b I SHB Bond Fiml * 21 JA 

— iwl SHB Mil Growth Fund *2X31 


— fd) Convert Verier US-DOLLAR. *11149 

-Id )Conos«c_ S F «aM 

— (d i CS r mdti nrau tt SF 7475 

— (d 1 CS Fond*— Inn SF 11X00 


—id ) CS Moray Market Fund — *i«7J0 
—Id l CS Money Market Fund DM I03HJ0 

— (fl ) Enereto— Valor 

— fdiuuoc 


— Id ) Evnm- 


— id) Pacific— 1 Valor. 


SF 17140 
SF 97940 
SF152JD0 
SF 17340 


SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

— (d 1 Amerlcn-Valor SFA0L25 

d > D-Mark Bond Sotedion DM11648 

d) Dollar Bond Selection S12S41 

a 1 Florin Bond Selection _ FL12XM 

dl mt— no, ■ SF V2aa 

d i Jatian Portfolio SF 87X75 

—Id > Start Ina Bend Selection 1 10IJ6 

d) Swim Foreton Bond SoL. SF 10*46 
d ) Swtetvaior New Series— SF 30*40 

d ) Universal Bond 5elact SF 8*40 

d } Universal Fund SF 12333 

Id J Yen Bono So led Lon Y 948440 


D1T INVESTMENT PFM 
— fid 1 Concentre. 


— Md) inn Rentenfond. 


DM2449 

DM8840 


Dural 4 Herein a Lloyd Gearec. Bnjuol* 
—(ml D&H Commoditv t 


j Pool- s 330.71 

—(ml Currency B, Gold Pool 8 195J1 — 

— (m) Winch. LHe FuL Pool _ SAUOA™ 
—(ml Tran* World Fut. Pool- *85147"* 
FAC MQMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
I. Laurence PaultV Hill. EC4.01-A23-46B0 

— (wl FBC Atttalffc 8 1144 

-(w| FB.C European *1X56 

—Iwl F&C Oriental *26.17 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— (0) AmcoUJ.Sh. SF (140 

— (d ) Bond-lnvefl 5FA848 

— Id) FOMa Swiss Sh. SF 1394a 

—id I Jnpan-lnvest SF 96850 

— Id) satlt South Air. Sh. SF 51940 

— (d I Sima IMocfc price! SF 19*50 


union INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

—Id I Unirenta DM «U0 

— Id I UnHonda DM 2X90 

— WlUnirak DM7740 


Other Foods 


FiDEUTY POB A7X Hamilton Bermuda _ 
— (ml American Values Common- *8557 
— (ml Amor Values CunvPret — . *101 M 

— Id ) Fidelity Amer. Asssts — *6552 

— IdlFtdeHtv Australia Fund sob 

— (d > FkMItv Dtecmwrv Fund HOJrt 

— Id ) Fidelity Dir. 5vos.Tr S 12X12 

— Id ) Fiaeuty Far East Fund S19J4 

— (dl Fidelity I nrt. Fund - *5577 

—Id ) Fidelity Orient Fund 126.19 

—id) Fidelity Frontier Fund 11344 

—Id) Fidelity Podflc Fund 812942 

— Id) Fidelity Spcl G rowth Fd. SI4J2 

— (dl Fideittv World Fund. *3X21 


(wl Actflwnds Investments Fund. S 2X99 

Iw) Atofteet Inti S 1070 

(m) Allied Ltd S340 

Iw) Ammo inlernailoral Fund„ 111*88 


ir ) Arab Flnence l.F_ 
(0 1 Arlan*. 


*81842 

... SIJ84J3 

(w) Truetoor inM Fd. lAEiFl *1X71 

tw) BNP mterbend Fund 1103-60 

Iwl BendMtax-luue Pr SF 11445 

Im) Canada GliMAortaaoe Fd * 941 

Id ) Capital Preserv. FX I nil *11 JO 

Iw) aifutal Fund 1142 

(d ) CJ.Kl Australia Fund - 11X14 

<d I CJ.R. Japan Fund 19.95 


im) Cleveland onshore Fd. — . 1240X41 


FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-839-3013 

— <w) Gold Income *747* 

—iwl Gold Appreciation ■ *4.13 

— (w) Dollar Income SX4A 

— iml Straleaic TracUra - *1.1* 


GEFtNOR FUNDS. 

— fw) East investment Fund. 
— (w) Scottish World Fund 


— Iw j Slate SL American . 


Coptl.GukLLtdJ-onAaent4l-4914228 


*34*25 
£11423 
1 15741 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 119. St Peter Port. Guernsey. 041V 28715 


(m) FuturGAM L 

(m)GAM Arbitroo* Inc. 
(wl GAMerlca lnc_ 


(wi GAM Boston Inc. 
(w) GAM ErmHape— 
(w) gam Fret 


Id ) GAM international Inc. 


(wl GAM North America Inc 

(w) GAM N. America Unit Trust, 
(w) Gam Pacific Inc. 


(wl GAM Steri. & Inti Unit Trust, 
(ml gam Systems Inc. 


Iw) GAM Worldwide lnc. 


|m) GAM Tvdie SJL Class A. 


S 11546 
S 121.15 
* 13453 
*10444 
. S 1341 
SF 9*54 
' *104.90 
S 10424 
10440 P 
*11324 
13X50 P 
*10727 
*13347 
S111J1 


Columbia Securith 
COMETE.^^H 


Convert. Fd. I nrt A t 
Convert. Fd. IntT B ( 

_ 


D. Witter WM Wide Ivt Tst 51X15 

Drakkar lmcstJ=iind N.V- S 1.11545 

Dreyfus America Fund S1X01 

Dravtus Fund inti 53*53 

Dreyfus Intercontinent *3X79 

The Establishment Trust S 1 40 


I Europe Obi loot Ions. 
First Era!* Fundre 
| RHy Stars LMta 



Finsbury Groupl 
Fixed Income Tfll 
Fanseles I ssue Pr. 

Fprt'iiitraJ' 


Farm uta Selection 
FondJtalla 


Govern m. sec Fund*. 


Id 1 Franfci-Trusi Interzlns DM 4249 

Iwj Houssmam Hkla*. N.V S 111.15 

(wi Hestta Funds S1B3J5 

(wl Horten Fund *1,11545 

(b) ILA Inti Gokl Bond S9JS 

Id t Interfund SA _______ *1241 

(wl Intannarket Fund S31AJ0 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 
— (w) Berry Pra_ Fd. LttL- 


—ld ) G.T. Applied Science 

—Id ) G.T. Asean H.K. Gwth.Fd 

— |w>aT. Asia Fund. 


—Id ) G.T. Austnrita Fund. 
—Id ) G.T. Europe Fund. 


— Iw) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund. 

-Id I G.T. Dollar Fund 

—Id ) G.T. Bond Fund. 


. IMS 
(1443 
S1X64* 
1X92* 
1 2275 
. *926 
_ 51157 
*1444 
*1X11 


id 1 I nt*r mining Mut. Fd. CLV- *407.98 

(r) Inti Securities Fond *941 

Id ) Imresta DWS DM4523 

|rl invest Attontlauos *753 


(r | Itartonfune IntT Fund 5A ^8 1148 


—la I G,T. sum Tectinlov Fd $1232 

— Id j G.T. Honshu Pathfinder *2*43 

—Id S G.T. investment Fund *1745 

— (d) G.T.Janon Smell Ca Fund — *4046 
— <d> G.T. Tectirioioev Fund __ . *2541 
— (d ) G.T. South CWna Fun d *14.18 


Iw) Japan Selection Fund *10449 

(w) Japan Podflc Fund SUMJU 

(mlJetterPtns.lntLLtd *MU»-00 

id l KJeliiwort Benson inn Fd — 12141- 

(wl KtainwortBeraJaiLFd *7054 

(wl Karoo Growth Trust S9J8 

Id 1 Utcom Fund 


I w) Leverooe Coo Hold, 
d ) Uquibaer 


(wl Luxfund. 


(m) Maanafund N.V., 

(d 1 Mediolanum SeLFd- 
(b)AMeore 


*1.17X25 
*17143 
*120140 
. *7128 

*113 


HILL SAMUEL I NVEST.MGMT. INTL. SJL 


Jersey, PXL Bax AX Tel 0534 76029 
2622. Tel 4131 224051 


(wl NAAT. 

(d I Nlkko Growth Package Fd 


Y 111540 
*1055 


Berne, P.O. Box 
—Id l Crossbow (Far East) 
— Id) CSF (Balanced) 


(w) Nippon Fund. 


—Id ) intnL Band Fund. 


— (d j Int Currency U5.. 


SF11J7 

SF25J0 


1920022 

, . *2952* 

(w) Novatec Investment Fund— *9120 
twt Mtuc *14420 

Iml N3P FJ.T. 115721 


—Id > ITF Fd (Tectmiloay). 


— (d > O-Seos Fd IN. AMERICA) — 


S1XT4 

*2757 


Id I Podflc Horizon Investment F 0*97928 
tw) PANCURRI lnc— — — — . *1527 


ESC TRUST CO.f JERSEY) LTD. 
12 Seale SUM. Heiler;053+3A331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND: 

6(d) Inc.-. Bid *1X31 Offer — 

Hid) Cap-: Bid *925 Otter. 


INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
I Short Term ’A’ (Araiml 


■ SUL53A 
.19548* 


lr) Parian 5w. REst Geneva SF1297JD 

(r 1 Formal value Fund N.V *125623 

fb/PWades JJBMjW 

tw) PSCO Fund N.V. *12127 

Iw) PSCO lntL N.V * 

(d j Putnam Inn Fund *5741 

(b J Prt — Tech SB49J5 


— Id 


—Id ) Short Term 'A 1 j Dlsfr) 

■B' lAccuml — *1.1098 


— (d ) Shari Term V , 

-Id ) Short Term 'B' (Dlsfr) 
— Iw) Lara Term, 


* 14683 
S1J159 


(wl Quantum Fund K.V.. 
Id ) Renta Fund- 
ed ) Rentinvest- 


*05469 

*2127 


JARDINE FLEMING. POB 70 GPO Hn Kp 

— (b ) J.F Japan Trust Y47SB 

—lb ) J.f South East Asia *3323 

— lb) J.F Jman Tedinolaav Y 22433 

—lb ) J.F Pacific SacSJAcc] *520 

—(b) J.F Australia *19> 


. S3425M 
LF220U0 

^ LF1JS5J0 

Id 1 Reserve Insured Deposit*- *107X72 

(w) Samurai Portfolio SF 10940 

Id 1 SCiTTecb. SA Luxembourg *949 

(w) Seven Arrow* Fund N.V *92941 

' State SL Bank Eaottv HdnsNV *929 
Slratepy Inve s tment Fu n d — *2Xn 


K| 


LLOYDS BANK I NTU POB 43X Geneva 11 

—Hw) Uovds Irrft Dollar S 10X33 

— Kw) Uovds I nrt Europe SF 11220 

-Hwi Uoyds Inn Growth— SF 18520 
— Hw) uovds inti income — SF 32350 
— Hw) Uoyds Inti N. America-. S100J5 

— Hwl Uovds Inn Pacific SF 74720 

— Hw) uovds Infl. Smaller Cox- *1162 


d) Syntax LNL'ICtass AT *757 

w) Techno Growth Fund SF B5J9 


w) Tokyo Poe. Hold. (Saa). 

w) Tokyo Pac. Hold. N.V 

iwl TranspacHIc Fund—. 
Id ) Turquoise Fund. 


89651 

*13440 

*84.17 

*9628 


NIMARBEN 

—Id) Class A 

— (w) aSsB-US.. 


.18929 


w> Tweedy^rowne rvvCkBsA *112443 
w) TWndrJmnM n.v43atsB S 151522 
m) Tweed v^rowne(U.K.)n.v. *140X00 

;d I UNICO Fund DM7940 

d) UNI flood Fund S97R1B 

» I UNI Capital Fund 1107945 

(d)UNIZlNS DM 11X30 

(w) Vaixterem Assets *1144 

(m) winchester Financial Lid— *1X15 


— <w> Class C- 


Iml winchester Diversified^* _ S223T 
id ) World Fund S4 *1063 


(w) Worldwide Securities S7S 3ft. *42.19 
(w) Worldwide Special S/S TO. $152694 


DM — Deutsche Mark; BF - Befalum Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF - 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prices, -b — Md 
change P7V *10 toll per unit; NJL — Nat Available; NX.— Netcomm un leal ed;o — 
New; S — suspended; S/S — Stuck 5 pIII; * — Ex-Dividend; ** — Ex-Rts; — 
Grass Performance Index March; ■— Redompt- Price- Ex -Coupon; Formerly 

Worldwide Fund Ltd; @ — Offer Price (net. 3ft prelim, choree; ++ — dally stock 
price as an Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


An Invitation 
to Oxford. 


The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytica 
present a Special Conference on 

7^ The International Business Outlook. Christ Church, Oxford, 
September 19-21, 1985. 


m. 



X 


1 

■ 

XMH 

115 TO 

4% 

TO + ft 


Xkor 

280 7ft 

7ft 

TO+ ft 


Xkiex 

302613% 

13ft 

13ft + ft 

m 


Ytowpf 

YurkPd 

ZahnM 

ZenLhi 

ZeoNH 

Zentec 


UO 

M 


a 


12034 
7 IS 


33ft 

Mft 


33ft— ft 
15 +1 


40 5.1 


ZHel 

22yod 

Zondvn 

Zycnd 

zymoe 


7 *b 3ft 
*4740% 39ft 
4413ft O 
33 3 TO 
44 1011 11 

II 3ft 3ft 
, IT TO TO 
34 5310ft 9% 

733 TTO lift 

143 TO 2ft 


TO— ft 
48 -ft 
13ft + ft 
TO— ft 
11 + ft 
3ft— ft 
5ft + ft 
10 
EMr 

3ft 


JtMuy 

BEUING — Prime Minister 
Zhao Ziyang of China will visit. 
Britain, West Germany amt (he 
Netherlands be ginning June Z, a 
Foreign Ministry spokesman said 
Wednesday. Mr. Zhao is to return 
to China on June 19, 




rr? 









I 















r 


lr Pa 


23ft 

mt 

raft 

21 VS 

43V6 

mk 

a 

Ml* 

6516 

27 

2* 


21ft 

10ft 

17ft 


ran 

41ft 

12ft 

14ft 

44ft 


25 

4ft 

51 

27ft 

32V. 

7ft 

73ft 

MBft 


14ft 

22ft 

17ft 

31ft 

31ft 

Sift 


2§ft 


20ft 

Mft 

31ft 

21 

44ft 


773ft 

23ft 

57ft 

12ft 


27ft 


25ft 

43 

31 

144 

2ft 


70 

45 

27ft 

7-m 

115 

ZCVi 

27ft 

55ft 

ink 

Mft 

11 

56ft 

29ft 

21ft 


13ft 

57 

<0 

71ft 

a 

32ft 

13ft 

62ft 


87ft 

Wft 

20ft 

5ft 

SS 

JS5 

M 


S3 

27* 

S3 

S3 

HU 

s« 

113 

29V 

27V 

16 


309 

31 

m 

21V 

43V 


24V 

s 


i» 


15 

14V 

» 

19? 


321 

39V 


21? 

30 


*3 


m 

19 

29 

341 


36 

341 

26' 

34> 

Tf 

19 

31 s 


41 

63 

IN 


153 

20 

33 


4f 

< 

27 

21 

14 

X 

4i 

2 * 

i! 

r 

1 
3- 
X 
X 
1. 
X 
1> 

2 
3 
X 

3 

4 
I 

5 






Page 20 


DAY MAY 9, 1985 



BOOKS 


HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK: 
Preacher, Partor, Prophet 
By Robert Moats Miller. 608 pp. S29S5. 
Oxford University Press, 200 MaeBsmAve- 
me. New York, N: Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by Harvey Cox 

O N SUNDAY MORNING, 

Harry Emerson Fosdick _ 
the mast famous sermons ever delivered. It was 
entitled “Shall the Fandaxne&taUsts Win?" 

pby compares the sermon 

pty Fort Sumter. It was not csract- 


21, 1922, 
one of 


and fundamentalists, bu was the signal that 
the liberals were determined not to be dis- 


.nte 


I Rectifies 
• S ummon ed, in 
away 

U la-la 

14 Eskimo, e.g. 

15 Actress 
• Hervey 

If Word an a tote 
board 

17 Blue points 

19 Wedding vow 

20 Lever in a 
steam engine 

21 Predominated 
23 Horseshoes hit 
28 Farm tract 
27 Alan from 

N.Y.C. 

31 Twerp 

32 “The 
Greatest" 

33TSte-4-ifete 
35 Gold or silver 
38 Winglike part 
30 Antique car 

41 Coins in 
Islamabad 

42 Hayseeds 

43 Dances in 

polka time 

45 Rom. tongue 

46 U.S. inventor: 
1847-1922 

47 Chimney on 

Ha«tHan$ 


48 Surplus word 
50 Scene of a 
miracle 

52 Start a voyage 
54 Joined 
50 Actress Alicia 
<0 Old radio show 

•3 "My Sal" 

04 Fissures 

65 Musical based 
On a comic 
strip 

66 Wapiti - 
67 Moves 

sideways 
88 Retreats 
DOWN 


24 Of nerves: 

Comb, form 
S Hailed the 
guests 

27 Jewish month 

28 Someone not to 
bring 

29 Gibberish 

30 Listening 
eagerly 

32 Elec, units 
34 Tobacco kiln 

36 Killers near 
Cairo 

37 majesty 

46 Moreporks 


BEETLE BAILEY 


1 Jigger, e.g. 

2 Mr. ixwh 

3 A tide 

4 Kind of truck 

5 Cox 

6 Turnover, for 
one 

7 Rainbow 

8 Equipped 

9 Script 
direction 

10 Lucy’s ex 

11 Mum. combo 

12 Addendum of a 
sort 

IS Electrolytic 
terminal 

18 Cheat a buyer 

22'Helmet-shaped 


44 City in 
Cattaraugus 
Co.,N.Y. 

46 Inhere 

48 Okla. Indian 

49 Corrupt 

50 Crusted with 
ice tufts 

51 Russian river 

53 Rhine feeder 

55 Bowling alley 

56 Pubs 

57 Tailor a tale 

58 Coloring 
agents 

61 Sault 

Marie 

Cits ears 
sprouted on 
Midas 



ANDYCAPP 



SOV*BC»/*SIN 
Ia GOOD MOOD J 
CONSIDERING! 

HBfc HUSMNDSy 

■LEFT HER— ■ 





I rVEDqN 6 AGOOI> 
MORW45*S WJRK.DBUR. 

I iVHttC TH& ATrfewp-Jsl 
AT WRmN5-R3 At*#' 
ABOUTA HBP0N CIL |4aaWi| 
—AND DESTROYED ■ 



fu ndamentalis ts did open fixe, and the 1 
rought bade. The ecdesfostical carnage had 
begin. Before it was over Fosdick had been 
removed from his pulpit, John D. Rockefeller 
Jr. had built the Riversute Church on Morning- 
side Heights for him, and Protestant misaon 
boards, seminaries and church presses were 
rent asunder by the strife. 

The bank never really ended: There are and 
always have been two contending partieswith- 
in American Protestant religious life. To call 
them "liberals” and “conservatives” may miss 
the point There are those who believe that the 
oily way to state an old truth in a different ago 
is to stare it differently, and those who view 
any such reformulation with deep suspicion. 
The first side always runs the risk of overac- 
commodation, the latter of obscurantism and 

antw yiarianiiwn 

One might expect that any church would 
make room for both, but the history of religion 
does not provide much ground for such a 
sanguine hope. Fractions adversaries seemly 
love the more dramatic examples of die other 
side. If religions liberals did not have Jerry 
Falwefl today, they would have to invent him. 
Likewise was the flamboyant Fosdick the fa- 
vorite whipping boy of the fundamentalists. 

And no wonder. As Miller documents, Fos- 
dick was a zealous celebrant of everything the 
modem world, especially in its American ex- 
pression, stood for. He wanted faith not only to 
adjust to but to doxologize reason, progress. 


science, democracy. Tolerance might be added 
to the list, bntFoalick's iresric spirit Hand in 
the face of religious ottcsrqus he dgtitab 
After a trip ra ihe Hofr Land, bedeacribcd the 
Orthodox and Roman Catholic service he 
attended there as “garish," “hideous” aod*VUs- 
gusting.” After visiting a Greek monastery, he 
pronounced the moaks to have been “ignoiant. 
Lazy, stupid, frowsy, a mongrel breed,” 
Throughout his career, Fosdidc’s comments on 
forms of spiritualty that differed from ins 
show that fundamentalists arc not alone in the 
scorn with which they view positions other 
than their own. 

Too much psychology m a btography re- 
moves its subject from the larger patterns of 
the age, and loo much sociology erases the 
tinman face, M3fer avoids both tern ptatWHM, 
Fosdick’s life, 1878 to 1969, manned half die 
history of the American repuHic. He grew up 
in Buffalo in a Baptist Church' and his family 
was warmly religious, opes to new ideas (ins 
father embraced the theory of evolution the 


■p 


I 



Solution to Previous Puzzle 


C Neto York Tana, edited by Eugene Maiaka. 


WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



Jmas Ms ro 
[Mk 

■rpschcou 




HifT 


vmu w&ycms 

i icmi&oFWimiie 
Fiv^/MII^TD 
GOIOCL 



REX MORGAN 


SORT OF RE/MEMBER 


r MOW WHAT HAPPENED/ I SNORTED A COUPLE 
OF LINES AMD BEGAN TO FEEL L.I6HT-HEADED 
SO I CAME HERE AND STRETCHED OUT/ Z GUESS 
1 MUSTVE FALLEN ASLEEP/ I'M TERRI BLy . 



□ QUID H3QQG3 □□□□ 

□□□□□ aaaa aiana 
□□□□a □□□□□□ana 
□aaaaa naaaa 

BGCUGJCJOIIEf EDSfOCiKIlEI 

□□□□□□ aana 
□Bsaaa aana aan □ 
□□s □□□□□□a □□□ 

□EO O □□□□□ 

□□03 □□□□□□ 

enasaa aasaiasaEi 
□□□□□ naanaa 
□Donmnioa □□□□□ 
□□□□ aaaaa 

□□□□ aaaa Eiaaa 


first time he heard about ilX supportive of bard 
work and adriercment, ami genuinely “cv«n- 
gelicaL’’ “The fundamentalists in later yean 
have hated me plentifully," be once wrote, “but 
I started as one of them.” 

Neva- really wedded to a ^particular denomi- 
nation, Fosdick served both Presbyterian and 
Baptist churches before settling in 1923 into 
Riverside Church. It was bout for bim by 
Rockefeller with a total cratributioo, indud-. 
ing subsequent gifts and endowments, of more 
than S32 millkin. 

When it became known that Rockefeller 
would be the main financial angel cS Riverside' 
Church, the Socialist newspaper the Daily 
Worker smelled a capitalist plot. “Fosdkflt is a 
‘modernise ” its editor wrote, “but Rockefel- 
ler knows that he can be relied an to pfcQau- - 
phize about the Bible and keep the mind of the 
workers from their troubles with the bosses, ** 
and the*xflk stocking crowd entertained” DM 1 
is patron? The record is 
never quite uprooted the up- 
state racism he absorbed as a youth and was 
not avenc to nsmg “darity” Stones in his puWic 
lectures. His views on war were often contra- 
dictory. Still, he helped write the controversial 
Federal Council of Churches document. “The 
Church and Industrial Reconstruction,” a cri- 
tique of laissetfairo capitalism, and^ was on the 
American Civil Liberties Union board. Fos- 
dick was obviously no Rockefeller stooge, as 
their occasional disageqoaits show. ' 

The link between Fosdick and Rockefeller 
eludes any ample conspiracy theory, because 
they did not need to conspire. They woe both 
energetic boosters of the crave new world of 
American enterprise that finds more advocates 
now among the followers of Jerry FfclweHiium 
it does amonit the dwindfing band ' 




Fosdick disappoint 
mixed. Fosdick nev 


% 


it* 




• vi t r.‘ ' 


k Kt 


cal “liberals” for whom Fosdi(± is still in 
exemplar. The main critics of Fosdick’s ap- 
proach, on the other hand, are the U. S. Catiio- 
lic bishops, Jackson's Rainbow CoaEtion and 
the liberatianists whose anderiying the ' 
might appear to Fosdick as ignorant and i 
evaL 


S/8/B5 


Harvey Cox, author of ^Reti gion in the Secu- 
lar City, “ teaches at Havard Divinity School 
He wrote this miep for The Washington Post 


■■ * 




TiflRfc YOU'VE BEEN WORKING 


HARD A^NOT GETTING ENOUGH 


REtr/'SW HERE WHILE WE GET 
THE CAR AND DRIVE YOU 
“ BACK TO YOUR HOTEL f 

MORNING/ 


Hey*. WHATlS ALLTHE QUIET AeoUT2 


Unscrambto these four JumMes, 
oneJetter to each square, la form 
four onfinaty vwmta. 


THAT SCRAMBLB) WORD GAME 
• by Henri AmoW and Bob Lee 

r 


SHECS 



□ 

m 

in 


HIRMT 

* 

LI_ 

□ 



DREHWS 


TTT 

J 


TIPIDE 


□znz 



s-1 



WHAT A 
MINISKIRT IS. 



BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


M ANY years ago one of 
the game’s most profit 
fic writers, Terence Reese, 
coined the term “oddball/ It 
was to describe situations in 
which a defender plays a con- 
spicuously abnormal card to 
alert his partner to the needfor 
some decisive action. 

A top-ranked partership 
reached a magnificent slam 
contract as shown in the face 
of competitive bidding. One 
dob was strong and artificial, 
and West pre-empted with 

time rHurnoivk- 

When 'the bidding readied 
five diamonds North’s pass 
was encouraging in the 


The slam was sore to suc- 
ceed with any normal chib 
split It was sure to fail if West 
held all four nnssmg dubs, but 
that was highly unlikely in 
light of the bidding. As it was, 
however, the result was in the 
balanoe. 


ace wotdd no dbubt collect the ^ 
setting trick without a ruff. If v 
South had recognized the odd- - 
ball for what it was he would ~ 
have taken the dub finesse on - 
the first round of the suit and 
made his slam. -...- 


nerdiip style: With a' 

ne would have been ex- 


hand 

peered to double. This slight 
encouragement induced South 
to take a shot at six spades, a ■ 
j action in view of iris 
four spade-bid. 


South played 

winning the diamond I — . 
cashing the spade king and 
ace, and leading a dob to the 
ace. When this revealed die west 
bad news he crossed to the «j] 
spade jack and led tire dub ten ?ajs 4 • 
for a marked finesse. East nat- 
orally refused to cover, and 
South was reduced to playing a 
heart He was down one when , 

West produced the aoe, 

South had not paid enough 
attention to the fact that West 
had squealed by leading the "n* HMif* 
diamond deuce. He was sog- *“■*■ w “ 
gesting a dub return for a ruff , 
but tins oddball was greedy. If 
East could win a trick the heart 


NORTH 

♦ AJ4 
9712 

♦ as. 

• hi'isi 

EAST 

♦ sa - 

PQia« 

♦ QJt 
*1872 

SOUTH (D) 

* K Q 10 8 7JI 

« A 

* AKQ4 




North «nd Soath 



Now arrange the circled letters to 
fbnn the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday’s I JumW«* BIH.GY LATHE JINGLE DISOWN 

| Answer: What nobility usually is— “SNOB-JUTY” 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


ADMM 


IftlllHIl 


AMsire 

Mnrt 


Jamotmi 

TKAvtv 


OCEANIA 


SfttMV 


HIGH 

LOW 

C 

r 

C 

p 

20 

68 

10 

50 

n 

44 

12 

5* 

25 

77 

14 

37 

If 

M 

0 

46 

25 

77 

-w 

50 

a 

73 

14 

57 

n 

64 

10 

50 

29 

M 

m 

50 

16 

61 

8 

46 

17 

63 

• 

46 

34 

75 

10 

50 

IS 

59 

6 

a 

16 

41 

4 

39 

11 

64 

9 

41 

a 

73 

U 

39 

12 

56 

7 

45 

is 

59 

1 

34 

34 

» 

U 

55 

22 

17 

17 

a 

ra 

64 

10 

SB 

16 

61 

10 

SO 

IS 

59 

2 

36 

12 

54 

9 

48 

U 

55 

0 

a 

11 

52 

5 

41 

14 

S> 

10 

a 

17 

63 

4 

39 

15 

S? 

10 

a 

U 

61 

6 

43 

8 

46 

5 

41 

17 

63 

10 

a 

21 

70 

ra 

55 

W 

U 

9 

« 

19 

66 

B 

46 

a 

a 

a 

55 

16 

Cl 

s 

41 

EAST 



,27 

11 

n 

S 

29 

84 

10 

66 

a 

■6 

u 

61 

a 

90 

» 

6C 

a 

91 

21 

JO 

a 

61 

w 

a 

a 

72 

14 

57 


ASIA 



HIGH LOW 
C P C P 

V 54 24 75 d 

29 »4 17 53 fr 

2S 12 25 77 o 

35 95 26 79 tr 

40 1M 38 82 O 

23 73 9 48 tr 

22 72 14 57 d 

29 84 25 77 cl 

29 M 33 73 e 

» « 12 54 D 


W 66 W 57 d 

39 95 19 66 a 

17 63 7 45 IT 

U 54 • 41 tr 

25 77 11 52 fr 


21 JB IS 59 
20 41 11 52 


LATIN AMERICA 


■MMAfaW 


23 73 7 45 d 

22 72 15 59 la 

Mazlca CHr 24 75 W SD pc 

■Uadktalaaalro 9 82 3D 9 I r 

— — M 


NORTH AMERICA 


— — — ■ — no 


*na«la 

■ratal 

emcoeo 


'York 


d<t«Ktv; fHocev; trtar; twnfl; 

wvwwvMrs; MHcnow; sMtanmy. 


S 46 
35 77 

u a 

a is 

28 19 

19 44 
30 86 
30 06 

22 72 

29 B4 
25 77 

20 68 
21 B 2 

23 73 
16 61 
16 61 
19 « 
25 75 


5 41 

19 66 
7 45 
7 45 
9 41 
< 43 

X 60 
17 a 
W 57 

20 61 
9 41 

6 43 
20 61 
11 52 
10 SO 

6 43 
6 43 
13 55 


t M irartmt; pewamv ctoudv: r-rnln; 


^ IM—atU, TEL AVIV; Portly daudy, Ttfno M If (43 ut 


Wdd Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse May 8 

dosing prices in Local currencies unless odtaviae indicated. 



Qn> Prav 
168J0 168 


3UL20 " 


IWKA 31620 Sa 

Kou + Sdl SSM 33830 

KorWodt S 7 S 6 Q 

KouPwr 77*. <T 228 

■OoKknerlLD 250 251 

Ktaacknarwirk* 70JH IttSO 

Krupa Sldil 107 107 

JJ«g9 ****** 

luiuiuiiiu 



bk East Ada 
Chauna Kane 
China Gac 
CNnaUaM 
Gran island 


3140 3180 

SIS 

30SD 3075 
1915 1920 
3630 3605 
5320 ynw 
2210 Z155 
. 8118 ffll® 

ft m 

6730 6770 
4160 4150 

3920 ms 
WO 4760 

Montaens Ml 6^ 
OwhHrtSMdtMra : 21N.17 


HK Electric 
HK RaoHvA 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 


u-a n -» 

37J5 77 JO 


| HK Shano^Banl: 



HKN 8 R 

kk Wharf 
Hufchrata 


AEG-Telefunfcan 

AUtawws 

Altana 

BASF 

Bavar 

gw Hypo Bonk 

BwyerwMnk 

BBC 

BHF-Bonk 

.BMW 

eawh iwi U taA 

CantGummi 

Oaknlsr-danz 


Dcuftdw Babcocfc 
D6vHdMBwifc 
DrosoBM-Baak 
GHh 

Harnener 

Hoduicf 

Horarai 

Moncn 


11120 11080 
1241 t2» 

203.90207 
211 JO 212— 
331 335 

346 345 

202021250 
289 284 
373 3050 
1»3# T77 

138J0 135J0 
68150 48150 

uS a 

ass 

14950150.1 
320 320 

473 470 

211.90 21180 
107 109 


Hram 

rnn ary 
Jardbia 
JanS n aSac 
Kowtoan Motor 
Miramar HaM 
HawWoru 
Orlant Ovorsaos 
SHK Praps 
Slohn 

sraraPadficA 

Tal amine 

WehKwana 

WhaaiaekA 

WMOnCo 

wtaaar 

World Inn 


Hww Sapa tadax ; 
Prvrfens : 10 UI 


M21A5 


AECI 




Anglo American 
Am Gold 


I Anglo H 

Bartaws 

Blvooar 
Buffets 
De O aa r s 
DrtatantWn 
1 gland s 
GFSA^H 


HhwidSfM 

KkxH 

NadDanie 

presswwi 



Rusptaf 
SA Brews 
StHHana 
Sanl 

Was! Hokflne 


1640 1640 
730 730 


612 4T2 

6500 6450 


C107M0 


AACorv *13ft SI 2ft 

AlOBd-Lvons 05 183 

Anola Am Gold 
Asx Brtt Foi ' 

Ass DoJrtss 


BJLT. 


8 ICC 
BL 

Bhir Clrcfa 
BOC Group 


234 236 

154 156 

369 367 

342 937 

E 315 

390 


34 36 

526 57! 

276 276 

176 ■ 178 

Bowotar Indus 284 272 

951 535 

294 293 

153 150ft 

405 405 


BP 

Brtt Home St 
Brtt Tatacora 
Brtt Aar wp aca 
Brttoil 
BTR 
Burmoh 
Cnfato Wlraiast 
Cadbury Srtiw 


Con* Gold 


734 712 

253 239 

565 560 

162 162 

201 . 199 

Commanded VI 212 215 

~ " 91 W 

135 135 

478 471 

530 — 

291 _ 

924% 924ft 

301 200 

SZ7 925ft 

194 196 

GaoAccMant 570 948 

GKN 234 334 

GkM C 11 19/3211 19/32 

□rand Mat 290 

GRE 690 

Gubmara 
GU5 


Dalgalv 
Da D a w s « 
DWIIIOfs 

Drtatantafn 

Haora 

FraaStGed 
GEC 


ia 

Irmartot Group 
Jaguar 

Lipid SecurfHra 


LaaeiGanand 
Lkwtt Bank 
Lonrho 


Starts and Sa 
NWOlBta 
Midland Ban* 
Nat West Book 
P and O 
Pilkinafan 
Phauy 
Prudanrial 
Racateiad 


691 

257 252 

645 850 

321 2W 

439 437 

731 744 

183 185 

302 20] 

306 306 

693 699 

579 579 

174 176 

ZTO 278 

737 131 

398 390 

354 356 

699 642 

351 351 

278 SSI 

182 188 

673 573 

190 194 

9103ft UOlft 
348 345 


Rank — 

Rradinfl 550 

Reuters 377 

Royal Dutch! 4817/32 *» 

RT2 634 637 

Saotad 623 620 

MftMBikV 
Boon Holdtnos 
5htH 
STC 

SMChortcred 
5w Allkme* 

Toieona Lvle 
Tosco 
TBom EMI 


348 
16ft 86 

730 733 

200 2D4 

472 474 

448 446 

448 448 

238 238 

442 439 


Msswr T 


WP -a ■ = ^ 



gwi Wdyjuo 
m*w»:Ruk . 


Ik. 


8 S 


17200 

2965 

7510 


ElKtank* . 
FarmltoUa * 

FU A- In 

FtaNder .. t-;S *' 
Ganoiall ;¥(. 

1FI 5. l.—ai 
-■//- 


93991 

721S0 


Itolmobmart 


OJhrettl 
PlraUIB 
RA5 ■ 


SIP 
SME i 



star . ram 24 is 
tarn CurrmtfimdtK : q» 


Cold Storage 
DBS 


How Par . . 

wSscrtto’ 

nm c. 


1M 149 
sjo ms. 

242 


OCBC 
OUB 
OversaaOplao 

Store Lana 
SI sorePrara- 1 

S Sfarroh ln - 


as 


StTradkM 
imm ‘ 

UOB 

sirau Tumwjdd. 


AOS 

152 154 
17* 278 

w-a 

167 246 

AOS AOS 
U 6 IJB 
4-M 4J2 
L*7 159 

4J8.' AN 


AGA. ' - 

AHo Laval, 




iutre' 

aiioi Qapce 

BoBdan. " .T>,* x,o 

Elactratwc 217 316 

Ellcnon - 284 .205 

Easene 'i ;«;«*■ 36* SB 

PBarmadav- 192 

SSSS??^;:% 

' ® as 

?N-.:s.^i:<i«ta»«2^ -• 2K 217 
Volvo va 246 


191 


gssstfte***: 


- ; 462 ' 473 

, 664 646 

Borai V 322; 324 

BouaotavtUv :<• 222 715 

Brambtes -.jr"' 3*0 384 

co»s. • vjifc • Sr S® 
Cemaico ‘ 230 * 236 


CRA 
CSR 
Dunlop 
Elder* lid 


CUM 


Pr»*. 

\ 642 


MaoaUan 

MIM 


Ookbrldaa 


220 

306 

163 

260 

343 

104 

96 


161 

265 


1 «* 

9S 


P w al dw 

RGC 

Santas 

5W0ti 

Southland 


Wormald 


415 

540 

S30 

178 

25 

158 

3S7 


405 

540 

620 

177 

25 

157 

360 


Nl 

Nomura Sac 
Olympus, 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Shore 

siumazu 

Shinetsu Chomloal 
Sony 

SumlhHTKi Bank 
SumltamoOiem 


621 

U30 

1218 


617 

TI10 

1220 

2 5 S 


Sumitomo 

Sumitomo 


O ral— St Index :88»J0 
Prevtaa* ; 


Tety 


> Metal 

TaBelcarP 
Tobho Marine 
ToJeadaCham 
TDK 
Ted In 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marina 
Toppari Prfnttng 
Toruy ind 
TotfiHM 
Toyota 
YamokM Sac 


■ 920 
989 ... 

7B9 719 

1010 1020 
4150 4240 
1790 1740 
230 332 

626 618 
144 145 

227 230 

452 447 

879 8S8 

5310 5408 
432 437 

1760 1710 
845 835 

B44 OS* 
458 457 




I Nfkkal/DJ. Index : 12Dira 
Prevtoo*: laracJi 


gsa-. Print 


gohm SacartHes 


Fall Bonk 
Rill Pin 
FulltSU 

Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Unas 
KcUbna 
Kama) Pow er 
Kawasaki Steel 
Prtn Br ewery 
Komatsu 
Kutmto 


Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu E lac Works 
Mitsuuuii Bonk 
MfoubUM Chera 
MtaubtaM Elac 
Mhiuhlatil Heavy 
Mitsubishi Core 
Mitsui and Co 
MttsukasM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insulators 
MkkaSac 
Nippon Kana ka 
Nippon oil 
Nippon Stoat 



OmaSm ttoda via AP 


May 7 


3400 Abfl Pres 
4310 Asnico E 
sm Agra Ind A 
163» ah Enarav 
am Alta Not . 
90 aim Cent 
SOAteomaSf 
100 Andre WAf 
snoAracan 
657SB Atco I f 
1970 BP Canada 
21021 Bank BC 
13543V Bank NS 
U8Q3 Barrkko 
6330 Banana R 
SSOBiutorne 


HWh Lowaow.cfeae 


9418 BCFP 
51005 BC Res 
805 BC Phone 
400 Bruaswk 
1000 Bwdtf dm 
18328 CAE < 

3B200CCLA 
SOOCDIStbBf 
T25650 Cod Prv 
MWCNorWasf 
4fSDCPocicn 
70743 Con Trust 
200 c Tuna - 
BOOCGE 
53410 Cl Bk Com 
1W0 Cdn Not Ras 
91848 CTiraAf 
ISO Cora 
4400 CaRmass 
lSCatan I75p 

400 C Dtslb A . 

noCDisibBf 
25885 CTL Bonk 
4000 Co n ve n t re 
200 Corniest A 
SOaocosekaR 
150 Conran A 
ZHSDCrawnx 
10700 Car Res 
2671* Doan Oeu 
SOODaonA 
13044 Demon A p 
24544 DanHanBI 
100 D a ve lo on 
jraODtAORAf 
ZMWDkknsnB 
1428 Daman A 
129S6 DotaSCB 
16100 Du Part A 
SDODytax A 
9200 Emca 


*17ft 17ft 77ft + ft 
5]£ft lift 16ft + ft 
S7ft 7ft 7ft 
Clft 2116 Ztft— ft 
514ft 14 ft 14ft— U, 
- CT 20ft 20ft— ft 
522 22 22 + ft 

SJft 24ft 24ft + ft 

wft T ” 

S ^ «±.a 

TO*- ^ 

132 1» 129 —3 

440 430 440 -RS 

470 470 430 + 5 

517ft 17ft 17ft— ft 

•f £;£■-* 

822 21ft 22 
JISft 15ft 15ft— ft 
S2» 23ft 23ft + ft 
*l*ft Uft left 
IDft VVl 27ft — ft 
SSft 5ft 5ft + ft 
«4ft 14 14ft- ft 

S 21ft 21ft— ft 
taN 2B8+’ft 
937ft 3716 3716— ft 
S13ft 13ft Uft— ft 
M2 62 62 

33Vft 31ft 31ft + ft 
28 '21 20-4-1 

W 8ft 9 
*t» Uft 12ft— ft 
Mft «e 6ft— ft 

IS ^ ’Stirs 
X A iSSUi 
ju js Sftta 


H0 McGrow H 
13909 Martand E 
lOWMolsonAf 
UDMotsonB 
SM Murphy ' 
lnoNdbfscaL 
19 7836 Horamta 
. 7332 Moreen. 
228617 Nva AHA t 
1400 NowscoW 

^SSSKSS* 

- SSOOshowo At 
708Pamcmr 
MIPanCanP . 
SOBOPernMna 
3300 Phonlx OU 
608 PkM Point 
4600PtacaGOo 
44107 Placer 
17400 Prevtoo 


22ft 22ft— ft 
400 400 


WOa-tago, 


ns* 15ft lift 
«16 16 14 

raw 2 3ft Bk+ Ik 
ras 25 25 + ft 

*14ft 19ft 15ft 
na lift i5ft— ft 
Mft 5ft 5ft— ft 
921ft 21 Mi 21ft 
50 ' 40 49 +1 

Oftfc 9ft 9ft + ft 
ra*ft MM 24ft + ft 
ran 7ft 7ft + ft 
933 ]» 32ft 

9Tift IBM 1fft+ ft 
raft 7ft 7ft— ft 
«fft 29ft 29ft+ ft 
«5 131 135 " 

ra«6 24ft 24ft— ft 
fMft Mft 18ft + ft 
425 425 425 +5 

Mft 4ft 6ft 


'r.rrjj.J,. 




7.- Jr> “i 

e? ; i. .. 

:V:„. " r • 


NA: not auoledj na: n 
available; xd: exdMdand. 


-“■swr 


30050 
2425C FotaonC 

10360 RcnbrdM 


The Global 
Newspaper. 



400 Fed latfA 
4690 F atf Fin 
JTOGen&A 
27800 Gaac Comp 

11000 Geocruda 
3*84 Gibraltar 
40355 GaWcorpf 
7300 Grandma 


970 Gt l 

WMGrartmd 
2S208H Graun A 
ISO Hawker 
903 Hayes D 
2117 H Bov Co 

158133“ 

10435 intone Gas 
1214550 Hitt Thom 
57006 Inttr Pipe 
2900 1 vacs B 
19600 Jcnmadc 
TOKom Kotla 


134930 Kerr Add 
MlfLabaH 
17*47 Lee Mnrls • 
. 400 LCJnt Cam 

isoOLaeau 
2271 ll Lee 
J4213 Lotrfow Co 
26*00 MICC 
95190 Melon HX 


912 12 12 — ft 

raVft 19ft 19ft + ft 
WS 190 193 +2 

. 415 400 40D 5 

400 40Q 400 +10 

rara 13ft IMS 

nm i 2 ft m 
WU 8 8ft + ft 

Uft 6 4 ft + ft 

*4 4 4 —ft 

ZEE 230 23D — 5 

S-S 

Jgjj 17 nft+'u 

91MJ 19ft 19ft — ia 

Iff* ink raft- ft 
» w a —4 

ra i 2 i 21 
91 2ft 13 13ft— ft 

my. Mft 29ft + ft 
S? »W4 lift- ft 

9ft + ft 

a - a* Ft? 
g™ it' 

IBS & » 

a .s* 

936ft 26ft 
9MU 16 
«)« 17ft 

J8& 

SS 



ST V* $*+' 

3M toft+ft 
912ft 12 ft ^ 

* 1 ?> 12 ft 12 ft • 
5416. 4| 4TM+1 

JB Wto+M 
240 235 2*0 
M 2 ft 12 ft 12 ft— it 


SE‘ 


lgft-M 

Ift 

13^6* 


TOO Rom rwi ■■ift nift AIAA 

flBBi* -r 

T |S| 22 ™ 6 ft 6 ft 

tBW taitlsf raSft'2SM 2Sth+ M 

87973 Sears Can • Mft 0ft 8H— 16 

WBKgmUCan *» ]» » + M 

SSffiE?., gft 8 M 816+16 

25SS5T®* .gS « fra 

imrjfff T L- . 4W6 49 — M 

SS uft— ft 

uSIumb ss as® 290 +'• 

Mn&foapR 2X 330 730 -4-5 

3raSISS0?r 24ft ’MW + ft 

^raoialm 0 S « g +* 

I9 60 Tom J23V, an 6 2316 

43»StSS , ? A ■ P* ™ St-M 
fiSoTtatfi; Sft ss 

ratal Thom N A' * m H*6+1U 

4ragTor^mBk 120 ft Sm Sn^S 
me77 T«ras prai nift 21 21 ^ ft 

tnsMf 110 ft mu 4 , u 

av” ^SmJm 

ar^ 4r- fi 
■g S 1 

x 1 % ifctt 

iSvi?taS? A ^ w* vm 

Total Safes: iL87l^38WMrea ** 





• l • ,u 

*4 - . ’ “ W: 
. , ' ' • 1 ' .. 




: l 

' 




-+I-. 
■<r. . . 

' 3‘ .• 


6 M 


•- P: - . ' 


TSEJHIPdoc 


.Obi Previous 

UUM 141048 


Hs 7 \ 


BMkttjont 


*M 0 Con w 

Si 

Total Sotos: MKUkstmnT 


»«* Low Ctaae cnee 

®*Bfi** 

1M lift- 


- -i. 


lift W 6 +UB 
ini— M 


fn ft 19ft ink 
rag* m 28 M— ft 
Sft » sim— ft 
mMh+itt 


V-. 


[industrials huNxi 


Oam Previous 
- 109.14 


.. 









IVIT.KYVnOYVL I IKK A LI) TRIBI’NK. Tlll'RSDAY MAV 9, 1983 


Page 21 





T*’5c» ii, 

‘W«v s ; Ir ““ n »shn. u 

(Witt f-tp, ”' v v ^ni 

‘fei’JiptS 

f«»H , . rhpp nY?4 


■ in? 


SPORTS 


Flyers Tie Series; Oilers Shell Hawks, 7-3 


•»*»* ihai 

■tort** *!*»* s5* 
•A ifo 


Compiled ftp Our Staff Frm Dispatches 

QUEBEC CITY — It may be- 
that whoever wins the series be- 
tween the Quebec' Nordjques mid 




*i*Sl STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 




iv-muZH 


HI 


t 1 fl «n"*fec‘u hl 


nut** 
liUc 


■“¥n n a ,:j8 

AVI.™**, 
41 *h» 1\ Kui.' . 5TJ St) 


^ the Pbibddphia Flyers- will be too 
beaten up to chaUeoge the Edmon- 
ton Oflirs for the National Hockey 


lb... 1,* |Nfcij fII W5 
tinri..- ... . ■ FnrmniL^ 



While the Oilers were outskatmg 
the Chicago BlackHawksagain, 
more men fell by the wayside bere 
as the Flyers evened the s emifinal 
series at a game apiece with a 4-2 
victory Tuesday night. 


Dave Poulin, shortly after scor- 
ing a short-handed goal midway 
through the first period to give the 
Flyers the lead for good, joined 
linemale Tim Kerr on the injury 
-list; both have knee problems. Dur- 
ing the regular season, Ken- and 
Paulin scored 84 goals between 
them. .. 

But youngsters Murray Craven 
and Ilkka Szdsalo scored second- 
period goals, and Philadelphia, at 
least for Game 2, didn't miss their 


when he was hit in the head with a 
stick by the Flyers* Ron Sutter. But 
after getting stitched up, Siasmy 
retumed. 

The Nordiques were hardly the 
team that outplayed the Flyers in 
Game 1. Twice they gave up the 
puck directly in front of goal tender 
Mario Gossdin, and twice Phila- 
delphia converted. 

The only time Quebec showed 
real hustle was early in the final 


I'kniilif.K ‘ ,n bi B - 

Mtter.r ,1hc «W? 

Wd.lf.1 hf 4-x.,. 

,!l a '<-l.il 

,w -*"55 



tii a 
jwi 
in 

caror know ii 
um ftiuL-vu! 


*•« R« 


d d Cupi|.il 1s , 

»l» Mi-lr. l 

hr i an s r i * K *tii 
f Bible audkiL^lfi 
lh«« ir,*iNr% wuh u*£ 

R??' rwTbelS 3 


ncvc; 


^ « 4u,:r i^WT 

C ahv-rtvd j% 

Wig ■*.!., rix-„ orrCM ^ 


tc Hnp u wnir !hc am*? 
•ri n! i. hi . 

tUKUi^jj 


14 V* Wt, i 1 hW{ 
T ' r “' *"”''***£ 

IWrt:: 1 1 4 Sd R,\-Uv. 

npfe«.vu-;v.i.: :Scm.!to 



AMwvUWed fee* (nemcBcool 

With Quebec trailing by 4-2 In Tuesday night’s final seconds, Dale Hunter took a deter- 
mined run at Pfriladeipiria’s Peter Zezel — who sidestepped and went untouched as Htmter 
(with a nudge from ZezeTs stick) hurtled into die boards and dislodged a panel of Plexiglas. 


tenon, who went In on Gossdin to 
score and end (he threat. 

In a co nt roversial trade at the 
start of the season, first-year Gen- 
eral Manager Bobby dance traded 
popular captain Darryl Sittler to 
Detroit for Craven, an untested 
rookie. He also named Poulin tbc 
new captain. 

“When you see your best shoot- 
ers go out," Craven said, “you’ve 
got to understand what has to be 
We knew we had to pick it 
had lost a lot of 
jy with a split 
ook forward to 

going home.’ 

The next two games will be 
played in Philadelphia, where the 
Flyers have not lost since March 3. 

Oilers 7, Black Hawks 3 

in Edmonton, Alberta, Jari 
Kuni soared three times as the Oil- 
ers, in taVrng a 2-0 series lead over 
Chicago, set an NHL record by 
winning their 12th consecutive 
playoff game. Montreal and Bos- 
ton had previously won 11 straight. 

Kurd snapped a 1-1 tie in the 
Gist period, scored again in the 
third period to give the Oilers a 2- 
goal m»fgin [ and then finish ed his 
hat trick with a shot into an empty 
net 

Although be didn’t score a goal, 
Wayne Gretzky had three assists to 

maintain his snoring lead in the 

playoffs. 

The Black Hawks, humilia ted by 
11-2 in the opener, fought back 
twice to tie the game, but the first 
NHL goal by riefonseinan Larry 
MeLnyk gave Edmonton a 3-2 lead 
at 7:19 of the second period. 

“I didn’t even know it went in,” 
said Meloyfc. who was playing in 
his 140th game. “1 don’t even know 
who passed it to me. 

“I shouldn't say this, but it was 
just luck.” (LAT.UPI) 



Lakers, Nuggets 
Will Square Off 


Denver’s Calvin Natt was held for no gain by Rickey Green 
on this play, but the Nuggets did gain the NBA Western 
Conference finals by beating Utah, 116-104, Tuesday night 


Compiled by Ovr Staff Frm Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Closing out 
ihrir respective semifinal series 
Tuesday night, the Los Angeles 
Lakers and the Denver Nuggets 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

will meet Tor the Western Confer- 
ence championship of the National 
Basketball Association. 

The winner mil go on to play 
either Philadelphia or the survivor 
of the Boston-Detroit series for the 
league title. 

Labels 139, Trail Blazers 120 

In Inglewood. California, Los 
Angeles dimmated Portland in fire 
games behind Earvin Johnson’s 34 
points and 19 assists. With the 
home-court advantage in Satur- 
day’s opener, the Lakers have 
gained the conference finals for the 
sixth throe in seven years. 

“This is another step,** Johnson 
said. “We know what we have to 
do.’’ 

“I think everybody was very 
businesslike,'’ said Byron Scott, 
who chipped in with 16 for the 
winners. “We were not joking and 
playing in the locker room.” 

it was business as usual on the 
court, too, although the Lakers did 
manage to enjoy themselves. John- 
son set a record for assists in a 5- 
game series with 83. 

The Lakers, up 68-39 at halftime, 
had broken a 43-43 deadlock on 
Bob McAdoo’s jump shot midway 
through the second period In win- 
ning for the 22d straight time at 
home. Los Angeles used an 8-0 
surge late in the third quarter to 
boost its lead to 100-80. The Blaz- 


ers dosed to 119-109 with 4:44 re- 
maining, but the Lakers scored the 
next 9 points. 

Nuggets 216, Jazz 104 

In Denver, 30 points by Alex 
English and Calvin Nall’s 21 
sparked the Nuggets to ihdr 4-1 
series triumph over Utah. It is the 
first time Denver has won two 
NBA playoff series in one year and 
the first time since 1978 that it has 
advanced to the conference finals. 

Nait struck for 1 1 points in the 
game’s first five minutes, putting 
Denver ahead, 18-8. The Nuggets 
led by 43-23 after one quarter and 
71-45 at halftime. Thor lead was 
90-61, midway through the third 
quarter, before the Jazz rallied for 
16 straight points to dose to 90-77 
with 2:21 left in the period. 

Mike Evans broke the 5 16- min- 
ute Denver drought with a pair of 
free throws and a basket in the next 
minute. Rookie Willie White, start- 
ing in place of the injured Lafayette 
Lever, hit a 3-point basket with two 
seconds to go in the period to give 
Denver a 97-79 lead. The Jazz nar- 
rowed the defidt to 108-100 with 
2:35 left in the game, but came no 
closer. 

Rickey Green fueled the Jazz 
comeback with 13 of his 22 points 
in the third quarter. Teammates 
DarreO Griffith had 20, fburl Bai- 
ley 19 and Adrian Damley 17. 

Said Doug Moe, Denver’s coach: 
“If 1 had to wager on the Laker 
series, I’d bet on LA. But that 
doesn’t mean J don’t think we can 
beat them. They're a great team 
they’ve been awesome — but we’re 
the best team in the West with a 
chance to beat them.” (VP I, AP) 


urn i«: 

r?c" : 
ye faiLter** . 
.ihr ifo : 

U* UT| 

C W, t: ; ' V 

w* v^ ‘ y • 
V- L i . 


■V-- •►- 


■- ll/o Il.Tfj* 
r.-u r.ftt 


laivii- 

«i 1 ;v - 
■■ ?:vuv.;. 


| (Mole Rookie Pitching, Power Beat Royals 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Baseball 


•if 

i'S-c i. 


» 






Compiled bp Oar Staff From Dispatches 

KANSAS CITY. Missouri —It’s 
becoming as perennial as the base- 
ball season itself: The weather 
turns warm, trees begin to bod and 
another hot rookie or two begin to 
blossom in Baltimore uniforms. 

This year’s harvest 
includes Ken Dixon an* 

Sheets. In beating Kansas City. 4-1 
here Tuesday night for their 10th 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


*r. . 

Vv.' 1-i 

v: v-ak 

I Ut-- IK 
t.V ?■-* ■ -■ • 


victory 
d: 

Dixon and a towering two-run 
tc run from Sheets, a .powerful-. 
’ built left-handed hitter. 

The unbeaten Dixon, the Only 
American League rookie with three 
victories, struck out three and 
walked one before getting nin th- 
inning relief help from Tippy Mar- 
tinez and Sammy Stewart. 

“If anybody’s going to come up 


four, five hits a game — it just isn’t 
good enough to win.” 

Tigers 10, Rangers 1 
In Arlington. Texas, Larry Hern- 
don and Nelson Simmons homered 
on consecutive fourtb-imting pitch- 
es to hi g hli g ht Detroit’s rout of the 
Rangers. Kirk Gibson went 4-for- 
< 4. drove in three inns and scored 
' three times. 

Brewers S, Marinas 2 
In Milwaukee, Ben Oglivie drove 
in three runs with a home run and 
two singles to back the five-hit 


the Cubs down Los Angeles. 
Lopes, a former Dodger, lira the 
score with a third-inning sacrifice 
fly and singled in an insurance run 
in the sixth. 

Padres 12, CanBnab 2 
In SL Louis, Steve Garvey went 
4-for-4 and Tory Kennedy drove 
in four runs to power San Diego 
past the Cardinals. 

GtsotsS, Pirates 3 
In Pittsburgh, Gary Rajsicb had 
two nm-scoring singles, and Jim 
Gott and two relievers combined 


■ is. A. im lwu “/ uakA. uik unruii UU11 auu l»U ItUtVUJ kUUIUUlCU 

0 pitching of Moose Haas and lead on a seven-hitter to lift San Fran- 

j^t strong rnmngs^ pitcher ^ Br ^^ SeatUt dsco over the Pirates. 


TWias 8, Yankees 6 
In Minnesota, Tun Teufel dou- 
bled, stole a base and hit a two-run 
homer in pacing Minnesota to its 
12th victory in its last 14 games. 

Red Sox 6, Augds 4 
In Boston, Tony Armas drove in 
three runs, two on a fifth-inning 
home run, as the Red Sox cooled 


dsco over the Pirates. 

. Astros 3, Expos I 
In Montreal, starter Bob Knep- Phillies. 


per scattered three hits in 5% in- 
nings before a 1-hour. 46-minute 
rain delay, and BQ1 Dawley allowed 
rally two the rest of the way as 
Houston downed the Expos. Knep- 
per gave up a single to Hubie 
Brooks just as the rain began. After 
the delay, Terry Francona singled 
off Dawley; the ball got past left 
fielder Jose Cruz for an error, al- 
lowing Brooks to score Montreal's 
only run. Jerry Mumpbrey, BQl 
Doran and Jerry Bailey all bad RBI 
tingles off starter David Palmer. 

Reds 2, Phases 0 
In Philadelphia, Ron Oesler tri- 
pled home a fourth-inning run that 


USFLTeam and Individual Leaders 


Tuesday’s Major League line Scores 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Tim OMmm 


f UPI.AP) 






** : 


j * 


* a 


M i 


LiE 

*11 

♦as 


. i 


* R s’ 

►. I 







l.| . -I • _ ■- I _ ■■ IIV U W ■»««) »WV WVIW 

With a great roobe pitcher, you off CaKfomia. which had won 9 of 
know its going to be Baltimore, ius previous 11 games. . 

Hue Jays 10, 1 

In Toronto, Ernie Whitt, Willie. 
Upshaw and George Bell each 
drove in two nms as the Blue Jays 
buried Oakland. 

WMte Sox 7, Indians 4 
. In Cleveland, Greg Walker's 
two-out, two-run bomer smmped a 
4-4 tie in the fifth to rally Chicago 
past Cleveland. Floyd Bannister 
struck out nine to post his first 
victory after three losses. 

Mets 5, Braves 3 
In the National League, in New 
York, Gary Carter’s' grand-slam 
home run off Bruce Sutter with one 
out in the eighth boosted the Mete 
past Atlanta. Carter looked at ball 
one from Sutler before hitting a 
split-finger fastball into the pavil- 
ion in left field for Ms eighth, career 
grand slam and Ms fifth homer and 
fourth game-winning hit of the sea- 
son. 

Cubs 4, Dodgers 2 
In Chicago, D&vey Lopes drove 
in two nms mid Bob Dernier had 
two hits and scored twice to help 


said Frank White, whose double 
and tingle were two of the losers’ 
four hits off the right-bander. “We 
knew he had good stuff because we 
saw him in spring training,” White 
said. “He’s got a big, slcrw-brealdng 
curve and a hard slider, and Ms 
fastball seemed tike it was over 90 
miles [144.8 kilometers] per hour” 
Sheets staked Dixon to a 3-1 lead 
in the fourth with his fourth homer 
of the season. 

“They seem to do it year after 
year," said Kansas Gty Manager 
Dick Howser of the Orioles and 
«yir rookie talent “Other teams 
come up with good rookies, but 
they seem to do it every year. It’s a 
credit to their organization." 

It was the fifth straight loss for 
.... the Royals, who have gone into a 
i pronounced batting slump. “I 
,* - , don’t know what we can do," said 
/ r*' Howser. “We didn’t Mt or scare 
■- *.i any runs the first part of last season 
.*» 1 either, but we didn’t have George 
Brett or Wfllie Wilson then, so we 
■ don’t have any excuses now. Well 
• ’ jy ’ just have to wait it out. I’ve seen K 
J‘- ; before and l’H see it again. Three, 




Yards Rush 

Pass 

Tampa Bay 

4224 

1346 

2878 

Mew Jersey 

3896 

2377 

1519 

Baltimore 

3628 

1428 

2288 

Memphis 

3574 

(613 

1961 

Birmingham 

3539 

1509 

2038 

Jacksonville 

3477 

1323 

2154 

,Ortando 

2633 

1154 

1479 


Team Defease 



Blrmlneham 

2978 

1155 

1823 

Tampa Bay 

3298 

1380 

1998 

Bo Ml more 

3303 

T3» 

1973 

Memphis 

3382 

1317 

2065 

New Jersey 

3594 

1218 

296 

Jacksonville 

3830 

1571 

2259 

Orlando 

4140 

2W5 

2045 


llnnrNrtocH 




Alt Com 

Yds 

TD In 

Lewis. Memph. 

172 92 1488 

IS 


281 165 3890 

19 .1 

Furtrtn, Bait. 

301 186 2192 

9 i 

Reaves. TJ. 

341 193 Z740 

17 V 

Luther. Jack. 

254 157 1738 

10 1 

Fiutie, NJ. 

224 189 1673 

12 1 

Collier. OrL 

201 1B1 1198 

3 


Rushers 




ii 

Bradiav. Hou. 
Minor. SA. 

Pott 1 1 to. LA. 
Muter. Port. 
Trlmbte. Dan. 
Rnooamorc, Hou. 

Mania o<*. 

Delaney. Dan. 
Smith. Artz. 


Toltav. Oak. 
Gossett Part 
cteBrufla Ariz. 
Partrtdvt LA. 
Walters. Hou. 
Mike-Mover. SA. 
Sn e e l m o a Dea 
Hartley. SA. 


No Yds La Td 


V 79 
A 113 

a a 

5 60 
5 41 
4 91 
4 19 
3 n 
3 66 


Ydi Ava Tb 120 LB 
44 1940 443 4 19 7* 
43 1807 42JO 4 9 56 

30 1540 407 
51 2W7 40.1 
36 1429 397 
25 960 387 

31 1179 3RD 
22 777 353 


2 13 72 
1 13 53 
4 7 56 

3 6 55 
1 350 
0 254 


Walker. NJ. 
Radar. Jack. 
Anderaon G. T.B. 
Cribtn. Blrm. 
Bryant. Balt 
Btedtoa. Orl. 
Cartharw NJ. 

Lewis, Mem Oh. 

HanHn, Balt 


Fltckab Balt. 

Ale* Is. Jack- 
Smith J, Birin. 
Brodsky. TJL 
Moser. Memph. 
Kemp. Jack. 
Crawford. Memoh. 
Keet Jack. 
Anderson G. T.B. 

Ii 

Clanton, Blrm. 
Lush. Ball. . 
BessiHleu. Memph. 
Spencer, Blrm. 
Gearsa. Ort 
Sutton. Bart. 
Justtn. NJ. 

Bailey. T3. 

Quinn, TB. 


Yds Avs LB TD 
2J5 13T 57 a 11 
IN 069 44 23 7 
1C 747 42 68 12 
179 747 42 19 6 
136 657 43 82 4 
155 5W 3J 20 2 

122 545 4j 55 5 
56 *67 13 42 3 

107 423 44 47 3 


Yds Avb LB TD 
53 Ml 12.1 37 2 
50 624 1Z5 51 2 
40 757 1JJ56 9 
42 671 160 47 4 
38 807 212 59 4 
X 52S13J344 
37 649 17.5 46 7 
37 393 104 40 i 
37 319 84 20 3 


Martin, DerL/Ariz. 
McKelL Hou. 
Gunrw LA. 

Halt Port. 

Harris, ArizTDen. 
Faulkner. Ook. 
Banks, Oak. 


Peat Returners 

No YdB Ava Fc Lb TD 

13 14] 11.0 4 C 0 
25 272 157 2 79 I 
14 14) 100 9 45 1 

14 IX 9.1 4 32 0 

X 245 87 2 23 0 
13 86 64 3 19 0 

12 70 54 0 13 0 


Kickoff Returners 

No Yds Ava LB TD 
Verdin. Hoil 21 617 29-4 102 3 

Faulkner. Oak. 17 414 1U 57 0. 

Harris, ArfzJDan. 19 4S7 24.1 76 0 

Jackson, Port. 15 341 222 53 0 

Ricks. Pori. 17 363 214 41 0 

Turner L. Dea 22 449 204 X D 

Bocfefie, LA. 18 151 19.5 29 0 

A 16 297 184 31 0 


Cater, OrL 
Landeta Bah. 
Miller, Memott. 
Sadder. Jack. 
Aitdrusyshva TB. 
Partrhfae. NJ. 
Parsons, Blrm. 


Na Yds Lo Td 
11195 49 1 
6 121 56t 1 
5 83 X 1 
5 33 13 0 

4 X 61 0 
4 73 X 0 
4 51 42 1 
4 64 X 0 
4 11 11 0 

Pwotars 

No Yds Avb Tb IX Lb 
57 2450 430 5 15 64 
43 1825 424 12 9 60 
23 963 417 4 7 53 
37 1533 414 
35 1376 3 93 
39 1522 WO 
43 1451 384 


'Buck’ Will Pass Freakness 


-a,- 


r-S- ' 


****** 






\ * M 


By Andrew Beyer 

Wtnhl/tgtcm Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Ken- 
. tucky Derby winner Spend a 
Buck will not run in the Preak- 
ness Slakes on May 18. He wifi 
give up the chance to become 
. racing’s 12ih Triple Crown win- 
ner to compete in the May 27 
Jersey Derby al Garden State 
' Park, where a victory would 
: give him the largest tinde pay- 
•, off in history — $2.6 muHon. 

> Owner Dennis Diaz an- 
. nounced tire decision at the 
Cbemi Hill, New Jersey, track 
i late Tuesday. “Dre heard from 
'people about tradition and tra- 
dition and tradition, and ’you 
’owe tMs to raring,"’ be said. 
“But those are the same people 
telling you the Pre&kness is 
more lucrative" (in view of the 
home's future stud- value). 

When he became interested 
pt racing, entrepreneur Robert 
Brennan did so m a characteris- 
tically big way: He raised more 
-ban SlOO million to rebuild 
warden State Park, which had 
reen destroyed by fire. His 
tack offered impressive stakes 
or its first season; including a 
{I. million purse for the Jersey 
jerby — scheduled only nine 
ays after the Freakness- As a 
pedal inducement, be offered 
S2 mfllkn bonus to any horse 
ho won Garden State’s two 
irlier 3 -year-old — the 


Cherry Hill MUe and the Gar- 
den State — plus the Kentucky 
Derby and the Jersey Derby. 

That seemed a one-in-a-mil- 
lion possibility until Spend A 
Buck went from Garden State 
to Chnrehill Downs and scared 
a 5VMeoglh victory. 

“Our goal,” Brennan de- 
clared, ns-to go for the best 
horses we can attract every 
year" His challenge almost cer- 
tainly, wil] force change in the 
financial Structure of the Triple ■ 
Crown races. 

Purses for the Derby, Preak- 
ness and Belmont Stakes have 
been dwarfed in recent years by 
money offered, for other major 
races. Brennan surely recog- 
nized that the 3-year-old clas- 
sics have depended on tradi- 
tion; the disparity between the 
Garden State pot and the win- 
ner’s share of the Preakness — 
about $300,000 — would tempt 
any owner. 

Spend a Buck probably wDl 
face a weak field in the Jersey . 
Derby. If he scores an easy vic- 
tory, he would probably go into 
the Belmont 12 days later. ‘ 

But Diaz denied that the like- 
lihood of soft competition 
swayed his- thinking. “We don’t 
have to prove anything to any- 
body,” be said. “Our hrase went 
into the lion’s den the other 
day, and he ate the lion and 
didn’t leave any scraps.” 


Cardinal catcher Tom Nieto, who’s been having defensive 
problems lately, again had his hands fail — hot not fnD 
enough: In Tuesday’s first inning, he dropped a throw that 
was mere in time to nail Padre basenmner Terry Kennedy. 

Ueberroth Orders Drug Tests 
ForAttbut Unionized Players 

Compiled by Oir Staff From Dupalcha agreement, and C Ottlm nes [Q OOSl 

NEW YORK — Asserting that now wide the players and the own- 
be wants organized baseball to _be a ers are negotiating a ’ 


No 

McFoddon. Blrm. 
Jackson V. OrL 
Lon*. Ball. 

Williams H. Memph. 
DonteL NJ. 


Parrish, Ort 
McConts. BOIL 
Ktinn Jack. 

PtBues. NJ. 
Carruffi. Bfrm. 
Butts. Jack. 
Matthews, jack. 
Williams H, Memph. 
Will toms, TB. 


Yds Avs FC LB td 
1B 2JS 111 9 45 8 
20 212 104 171 0 
28 291 104 3 20 8 
28 161 8.1 0 47 0 
13 71 55 3 15 0 


No Yds AVB LB Td 
34 003 234 95 2 
311 207 37 0 
264 203 28 0 
384 2DJ 38 0 
333 194 26 0 
357 184 33 8 
218 184 46 0 
430 17.9 49 0 
260 17.9 30 0 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
CUcobo 911 228 WB-7 8 0 

Cleveland 408 888 888-4 7 2 

F .Bannister. Seaver (7). BJomes <» and 
Fkak^ Blylevea Creel (61 and Banda. W— 
FAonnWer. 1-3. L— Btytwtn. 1-1 Sv— 
BJomes (3). HRs-CMcOBa Kittle (11. 
C. Walker a). Clevekmd. Jacoby (2). 
Oakland 888 801 888- 1 9 2 

Toronto 188 216 0**— 10 12 0 

Sutton, Warren (6), Blrhas (7) and Heath. 
Ttrnrim 17); Stletv LavMte (7), Mussel man 
(8). Caudill (91 and Whitt. w_51lob. 2-1 L— 
Sutton. 21 HR— Toronto. Whltl (21. 
CoHfaroia 808 280 820-4 8 ■ 

Boston 281 011 Wx— 6 11 1 

MoCaskilL Clemonls (5), album (6) and 
Booh*. Narron (I); Clemons. Stanley (Bland 
Gedmon. W-Ctemons. H L-McCasWII.0-1 
Sv — Stanley (s). H B» Coll tom lo. Downing 
(2>. Boston. Armas (7). 

Seattle 000 018 818—0 S 0 

Milwaukee 128 082 88x-S 11 0 

Beattie. Stanton (7). Vanda Beni IB], Nunez 
(81 and Kearney. Scott (8); Haas and Schrne- 
dw. W— Hoas. 2-1 L — Beattie, 1-1 HR— Mil- 
waukee. OoIIvIb (1). 

Baltimore ItOEONM 8 8 

Kamos City 881 188 808-2 S • 

Dixon. TMartlmz (9). S5tewort (9) and 
Dempsey; SabertioBM and Sundbem. W— 
Dixon. M. L— Saberttasan, M Sv— Stewart 
(51 . H Rs— BoMmora, Sheets (41, M-Youno (3). 
New York 208 8 to 083-6 II 1 

Minnesota 338 828 na— I 15 2 

Whitson, Monietaaco (2), Fisner 16) and 
Wynesar; viota. wardle (8). RJtaWs (9) and 
Salas. W— Viola 54. L— Wtilfson. 1-4. HR— 
Minnesota TeuM (2). 

Detroit 801 214 2M— II 15 8 

Texes 690 88? 880- I 6 4 

Morris. Looez (81. HemcxnSaz (9) md Pnr- 
r ten. Castillo (9); Notes. Schmidt 14). Stewart 
(31. Bobos (7). Harris (81 and Slought w— 
Morris . 41 L— Note*, 2-1 HRs — Detroit, 
Herndon (3). Simmons (2). Parrish (3). Whi- 
taker (3). Texas. Bell (2). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
See Frandsce 083 no 180 6 10 1 

Pittsburgh 808 110 818-4 7 2 

Gott MJTavls (8). Garretts <91 and Brentv; 
Tunnel i, scurry (61. Robinson (8) and OrtU, 
Pena <l>. w— Gott. «L I — TumelL n Sv— 
Garrelts 131. 

San Dteao 511 M3 008-11 11 • 

St. Louis 818 ON 118— 2 I 4 

DravecJcv. Stoddard [7), Booker (9) and 
Kennedy. Bochv (9); Forsch. Camobell (3), 
Hauler |6J. Daytey (8) and Nieto. W— Dro- 
veckr, 1-2. L— Forsch. 2-2. HR— San Dteoa 
Martinez (4). 


Los Anaetes IN 881 888-0 11 1 

ChlCoM 881 B21 BOX— 4 11 0 

Brennan. Diaz (61. How (7) and Sctosda; 
Ruthvea Fontenot (7). Smith (81 and Davts. 
w— Ruthwea 1-1. L— Brennan. 1-2. Sv— Smith 
(71. 

Atlanta 888 818 BB-3 14 1 

New York ON 801 Ota-5 4 8 

Bedrasiaa Dedman (7). Smith (71. Suiter 
(81 and Cerone; Darllnc. Orosco (9) and Car- 
ter. W — Dart too. 2-1. L— Smith. 2-1 HRs— At- 
laniaWadiinBton (11. New Yark,Jehnson (I), 
Carter 15). 

Ctachuiail ON 1H 000-2 5 0 

PMladeWiia ON 000 900-8 5 • 

Sola Franco (81. Power (91 and Van 
Garden ; tCGrom. Human 16), Rucker (8) and 
VholLW— Soto. 5-21 — iCGrass. 2-1. Sv— Pow- 
er 14). 

Hoastan Ota ill 880-3 9 1 

Montreal . OH 081 880—1 S 1 

Knepper. Dawley (4) and Bailey; Palmer, 
Sdiatzeder (6). Glynn (71. R oberge (B) and 
Fttzgerald. W— Knapoer. KL L — Palmer. 3-3. 
Sv — Dawley (II. 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dtvttiao 



w 

L 

PCL 

GB 

Baltimore 

16 

8 

JO 

— 

Toronto 

16 

10 

415 

1 

Detroit 

14 

9 

409 

lib 

Boston 

13 

13 

.508 

4 

Milwaukee 

11 

14 

440 

51b 

New York 

10 

13 

435 

5Vb 

Cleveland 

ID 

15 

400 

61b 


West Division 



California 

17 

10 

430 

— 

Minnesota 

14 

11 

460 

2 

Chicago 

11 

11 

-500 

31b 

Kansas City 

11 

13 

458 

4 Vb 

Seattle 

12 

15 

444 

5 

Oakland 

11 

16 

407 

6 

Tens 

8 

16 

J33 

7Yj 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EON Division 



w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Chicago 

15 

a 

452 

— 

New York 

15 

a 

452 

— 

Montreal 

15 

10 

400 

1 

St. Louis 

11 

14 

440 

5 

Philadelphia 

18 

14 

417 

51b 

Pittsburgh 

8 16 

West DFvtdoa 

433 

79b 

San Diego 

13 

11 

-542 

— 

Houston 

13 

12 

-520 

1b 

Let Anaetes 

U 

13 

sn 

lb 

Cincinnati 

12 

13 

480 

11b 

Atlanta 

71 

13 

458 

7 

San Franctscn 

10 

15 

400 

31b 


Basketball 


Jim Kefly of Houston 

The USFL’s top quarterback. 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Utah 23 22 34 25— IN 

Denver <3 28 26 19—116 

English 1 1-168-103& Not! 10-18 1-1 21 ; Green 
8-146-7 22. Griffith 8-16 342IL Rebounds; Uloh 
52 (Kelley 11); Denver 64 (Cooper ii). As- 
sists: Utah 30 (Green 7) ; Denver 26 (English 
61. 

Portland 33 *7 34 37-lB 

LA. Utters 33 35 33 39—139 

JohnsonMS 14-1734. AixJuMoBiJar 76- 14« 
2S; Kersey 6-6 6-8 1& Drexler 4-16 9-10 17. 
Rtbo e n dr : Portland 55 (Carr 11): Los Ange- 
les S3 (Johnson 9). Assists: Portland 31 


(Drexler 121: Las Angeles 35 (Johnson T9). 


CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
EASTERN 
(Series lied, M> 

May 8: Detroit ot Boston 
May 10: Boston ot Detroit 
x-Mov 13: Detroit at Boston 

(Ptmndemtihi net Milwaukee. «-0) 

WESTERN 

(l— A. Lakers deL Portland, 4-1} 
(Denver del. Utah, 4-1) 


leader in eradicating drugs from 
society. Commissioner Peter Ue- 
berroth on Tuesday ordered all ma- 
jor-league personnel except the 

unionized players u> submit to drug 

tests. 

He also urged the players io join 
the program. 

“We will include everyone from 
the owners on down,” the commis- 
sioner said. More than 3,000 nri- 
nor- league players wifi be tested, 
along with afl scouts, coaches and 
other nonplaying personnel ^ the 
26 major-league teams. The staffs 
of the American and National 
and the central baseball 
offices, including Ueberroth, wifi 
also be subject to the testing. 


new basic 

agreement 
Drug use, Ueberroth said, “is a 
problem in sport, a problem in so- 
ciety, and ba^ball has gotio dean 
it up." He said he had sent “an 
orgeat letter of request," to Donald 
Fehr, the MLPA’s executive direc- 
tor, asking the players to join the 
program voluntarily, but Fehr dis- 
missed the move as “grandstand- 
ing" by Ueberroth in an effort to 
force the association to join a pro- 
gram it opposes. 

“He’s engaging in a public rela- 
tions effort to co-opt tire collective 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Teem Ornate 




Yards Rush 

Pass 

Houston 

4431 

642 

3789 

Denver 

3997 

1412 

2585 

Oakland 

3790 

1461 

2329 

Arizona 

3502 

1329 

2173 

Portland 

9091 

M04 

1687 

Los Anaetes 

2885 

1272 

1613 

San Antonio 

2597 

935 

1662 


Teem Defense 



Denver 

3272 

1231 

2041 

Oakland 

3340 

1049 

2291 

San Antonio 

3362 

1320 

2042 

Arizona 

337S 

1439 

1936 

Las Angeles 

3673 

1219 

2454 

Portland 

3784 

1599 

2185 

Houston 

3933 

1362 

2571 


Quarterbacks 




At! Com 

Yds 

TD im 

Kelly. Hou. 

459 298 3758 

34 15 

CagHane, Den. 

133 80 960 

8 6 

Hebert, Oak. 

295 153 2264 

20 13 


• Transition 


BASEBALL 
Amsrfcon Loonue 

BOSTON— Placed Steve Crawford, pitcher, 
on Hw 15-day disabled fat Activated Bruce 
Ktean, uttdier. 

CLEVELAND— Soot Jose Roman, pitcher, 
to Maine at the I n ternational League. Re- 
coiled Keith Creel, Pitcher, from Maine. 

KANSAS CITY— Signed John Schutrtwlz. 
executive vice orntdent and oenora I manag- 
er, to a lifetime cont rac t. 

TEXAS— Signed Date Murray, Pitcher, to a 
minor- league contract and assigned him to 
Oklahoma a hr of the American Association. 
Signed Eduardo Soto. Pitcher. 


decision,” Fehr said. 

“It won’t work.” 

Noting that the drug p rogram 


Ueberroth would give no details _ 

of the program, which he said approved last yearby the MLPA 
would begin within a month, but provided for mandatory testing of 
indicated that the emphasis would a * 
be on helping rather than punish- 
ing those found to have abused 
drugs. 

The players could not be includ- 
ed by the commissioner because 
they are members of a union. Last 
summer, the Major Lsagnc Players 
Association and the owners 
reached agreement on a drug pro- 


Noutwteat, SA. 
Yoono. UL 
Wood won!. Port. 
Souror. I— A, 


3(0140 2)84 
260 137 1853 
238 126 1646 
153 79 1109 
155 62 831 
143 71 *7 
Rushers 


European Soccer 


of players only in narrowly ddl 


had determined a medical need for 
such a test, Fehr would not say how 
many players had been asked to 
submit to tests under tire program. 
But be said he knew of none who 
had refused the tests. 

Ueberroth said the inclusion of 
minor-league players in his pro- 
gram would have an eventual effect 
os tire m^'or-kague level by assur- 
ing that players called up to tire 


circumstances. That program exists majors in future years would be 
separately from the basic labor “dean." (NYT. AP) 


Johnson B, Den. 

AH Yds Aug La TD 
120 817 6X 33 9 

Bentley A. Oak. 

122 721 49 57 1 

Brown R, Artz. 

128 699 45 44 7 

Jordan, Port. 

87 523 &D2S3 

Williams J. Oak. 

101 426 42 21 2 

Gray. la. 

89 361 Al 26 1 

Nelson. LA. 

93 297 12 32 1 

Williams V. Port. 

67 285 43 17 0 

Lang, Arlz. 

95 284 3J0 17 4 

Verdin. Hou. 

Recelvero 

No Yds Ava La TD 
66 740 113 74 6 

Johneo»V Hate 

64 BOS 126 5210 

Harris L Den. 

60 733 02 46 S 

Lewte. Pen. 

49 716 146X4 

White, Den. 

45 537 113 49 5 

Carter A. Ook. ' 

40 749 183 50 8 

Banks, Oak. 

39 659 149 43 4 

McNeil, Hou. 

37 769 248 69 6 

►tarred. Hou. 

35 3(5 9.9 SS 1 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
European Group 5 
Austria 4, Cyprus 0 

Points staxdtaas: Hungary 11 Austria 7. tho 
NetnerlandE & Cyprus a 
Rtnwlnta* Htotab: M«y 14, Kto Hotter) and* 
Qt Hungary. 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Bantomnt 3. Strasbourg 2 
Montes 2, Toulouse 2 
Brest 0. Monaco a 
Auxmtc a Soehaux 0 
Tauten X Nancy 1 
Metz 4 Lera 1 
Parts SG a Laval l 
Bauia a RC Parts 0 
Ulte 1. Mrallte 1 
Tours 2, Rouen 0 

Points rtmaltaos: BenteaiixSS; NantKSD: 
Monaco 43; Aram* 42; Toulon 41 / Met 1 48: 
Lera 36; Soehaux 35: Brad, Laval 34; Tou- 
louse 32; Haney. Parts 50, Marseille 31; 
Stretaom, BasHa 29; LJIle 28; Rouen, Tours 
27; RC Parts 34, 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Wattora a west Bromwich 2 


National Leoaw 

ST. LOUlfr-Reocttvaled Tito Landrum, 
outfielder, amt outrtoMad Anav Hosier, 
M totter, to Louisville of the American Associ- 
ation. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Trotted Johnnie L»- 
Mastor. shortstoo. to Cleveland tor Mike Jett- 
coat, pitcher, and Luis Quinones, inftalder. 
Assigned Jeffceatond Quinontt to Phoenix ol 
the Pacific Coast League. Activated Duane 
Kutoer, mtteUer. 

FOOTBALL 

National FaatMt Link 

ATLANTA— Stoned Harold Nortaltsa. run- 
ning bock; Almon Young end Nick Llewellyn, 
guards, and Mike Wallace, wide receiver. 

CHICAGO — Signed Bruce Ko! I meW, kick- 
er; Kevin Gray, defensive back; Jot Spivak. 
offensive guard, and Matt Lorn center. 

I NOIANAPOLIS— Signed Mark Broaksand 
Rick Dwenger, ramring backs. 

NEW ENGLAND— signed Dgv* Pereira, 
defensive back. 

N.Y. GIANTS Mggil John Four-code, 
quarterback; Tony Baker, Nick Kowatos and 
Lorenzo Chambers, runr.lng backs; Damian 
Johnson and Mark Setter, offensive linemen; 
Mark Harman, pi ge ek tak er; Jim Colquitt, 
punter; Rick Cbagmen. Km Culpepper, 
Maurice Bell and Mike Hooks, linebackers; 
Leon Canton. Ran Watson and Lamr Winters 
defensive backs; Al Marvin md Dave Band, 
defensive tackles, mid Eric Roshood, wfde 
receiver. 

n.y. JETS— Signed Duane Barnes ond Phil- 
lip Titles, offensive tackles; Todd Campbell, 
Hel en s! ve tackle; Jimmy Hunter. Ed Judte, 
Kevin McArtnur and Owl Parfaveccnia, line- 
backers: Don Newman. safety; Keuy Osborn, 
defensive end,Dav» Retienon wkto receiver. 
Md Bret W right, nailer, 

PHILADELPHIA— Placed Jerry Steamer* 
end Dave paceiki, otfensive taekMAea walv- 
era. 

SEATTLE— Signed Adam Havsbert. wkto 
receiver; Matt lot tan and Bruce Manley, 
defensive backs; Dan Lb Bom me, running 
back; Date Darning, defensive end; Leraan 


staples and Crag Haeuster, ibwbackarA and 
HeiwGrlmmlnger.Carltonwolkgr.JehnTu- 
Ebtr. Pgto Blazefc, EmestHIneb Thomas Nev- 
ille and Barry Wood, offensive linemen, 
united States Football League 
ARIZON A A oaulrod Kan Gillen, defensive 
end, from Son Antonio tor two undisclosed 
1966 mu d c holera. G ranted g H mee- dav tryout 
to Rush Biwmv defensive tackle. 


Hockey 


INHLPIayofis 


Chicago 1 1 1-3 

Edmonton 2 1 i- 7 

Anderson 2 (7), Kurri 3 (ii). Metavk (i), 
Caffev (8); B. Murray (21. Sutter (8). B.WU- 
soa (4i. Shots oa goal: Chicago (an Fuhr) go- 

11- 10—31; Edmonton (on Bannemiem) 0-12- 

12- 37. 

PfeUadetehta 1 2 1—4 

Qaebec 8 8 3-2 

Poulin (D. Craven (i). Sbusato (4). Pafer- 
son (i) f SAM (4>, Kumpal (3).Shotsan goal: 
PMtodolPhta (on Casseiln) 1 1 -66—25; Oue- 
bec Ion Undbargb) *4-15-2?. 


CONFERENCE FINALS 
WALES 

isertes tied, vu 
May 9: Quebec at Philadelphia 
May 12: Quebec at PhUadetohla 
Mow 14: Philadelphia at Quebec 
x-Mov ie: Quebec at PtiUadetaMa 
*-Mnv I?; Rniladetphta at Quebec 

CAMPBELL 

(Edmeeten leads nries, 3-01 
MOy 9: Edmenten at Chicago 

May 12; Edmonton at Chicago 
x-May 14: Chicago al Edmonton 
*-Moy 16: Edmonton at Chicago 
*-Mar 18: Chicago at Ednxmtan 
(*■11 necessary) 







T' 


i - 


Pa 


£ 


12 Aten 


331 h 
IP* 
WM 
am 
4M4 

Z* 

MU 

45U 

27 

IT 


7m 

IBM 

I7M 

a 

IBM 

4m 

i» 


44Vl 

r 

■T 

MM 

2 

Z7U 
33U 
7M 
73M 
103 U. 
H 
MU 
22b 
T7U 
Jib 
37U 
3Mti 


2 SVi 
tSVi 


20M 


am 

31 

4M4 

M 

1T3U 

an. 

sm 

I2M 


Z7U 

m 


42 

34 

144 

2b 

a 

70 

45 

27U 


ns 

MU 
27M 
5 Sb 
IBM 
32b 
11 

5AU 

29b 

21 * 


SK 

57 

«0 

7116 

47 

32U 

UMi 


c 


79b 

3M 

SVj 

MU 

43V6 

L" 

JSU 

5416 


ss 

ss 

37b 


I 


11 * 

SOU 

& 

113 

SE 

it 


r 

S 


4* 

24V 


42* 

S? 


M* 

TSV 

14* 

ZV 


3» 

m 




n 

Si 

23j 

111 

» 

3? 

Ml 


36 

341 

24' 

34> 


2T 

31> 

<r 

47 

43 


35' 

77 

44' 

153 

a 

a 

44 

5 

27 

a 

T5 


43 

n 

21 

it 

X 

M 

3« 

*: 

x 

2 . 

5> 

X 

X 

r 

21 

li 

2 

X 

X 

3 

4 
7 

5 


y .j fc 




Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MAY 9, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Is Anyone Listening? 


W ASHINGTON — If people 
don’t think Attorney General 
Ed Meese is aH heart, they ought to 
take another look at last week’s 
settlement of the Justice Depart- 
ment's case against the brokerage 
firm E. F. Hutton. 

.The company pleaded guilty to 
2,000 felony counts of mail and 
wire fraud that 
involved kiting 
checks worth' 
more than SI 
billion to 400 
American 
banks. 

EF. Hutton 
made a deal with 
the government 
and was sen- 
tenced to pay a 

Sue of $2 mil- BucfawaM 
lion (which boils down to 51,000 
for each count) and S8 milli on to 
the banks it defrauded. 

When somebody asked the attor- 
ney general why no individuals 
were prosecuted. Mrl Meese re- 



“You’ve sent people up the river 
for stealing a lot less." I pointed 
out. “1 know a lady who embezzled 
510,000 from her credit union and 
she's doing seven years in a federal 
penitentiary." 

“That was a serious white-collar 
crime, and if we had let her plea- 
bargain we would be sending a 
message that we were soft on cred- 
it-union theft The Hutton scheme, 
on the other hand, involved over a 
billion dollars, and the attorney 
general decided he'd rather collect 
restitution for the banks than try to 
send a few misguided employees to 
jaiL" 

“Why couldn’t he have done 
both?” I asked. 

“You mean you would want us 
to Tine one of the leading brokerage 
bouses in America ana also put 
their people behind bars? What 
kind of aphreils do you think wc 
art?" 

□ 


plied, “In this case it was more 
important to get recompense to vic- 
tims [read banks] than to prosecute 
the individuals." Meese called the 
settling of the case a “comprehen- 
sive and open-ended restitution 
plan." He said the plea-bargaining 
agreement showed the Justice De- 
partment's concern for victims and 
“its desire to make whole those 
banks and other institutions who 
suffered any loss.” 

□ 

The attorney general’s decision 
to let E. F. Hutton buy its way out 
of trouble for a few million bucks 
made us reassess our opinion of 
Meese as a tough law-and-order 
man. When it comes to crooked 
brokers. Ed Meese is a toasted 
marshmallow. 

1 called my man at Justice and 
asked why the big turnabout on 
crime by the Reagan administra- 
tion. 

“E. F. Hutton has suffered 
enough," he said. “Will justice be 
served if we send anyone to jaQ 
over a little bOlion-doQar check- 
writing scam?" 


“Nobody wants anyone to go to 
jail," I assured him. “But what kind 
of message are you sending white- 
collar criminals if people can get 
away with stealing S8 million and 
not have to worry about going to* 
the pokey?" 

“1 suppose you’d want us to pre- 
vent E. F. Hutton from selling se- 
curities as well?" 

“Why not, if it would make other 
people who deal with the public’s 
money think twice about commit- 
ting fraud. One crooked bond deal- 
er m Florida almost brought down 
the entire banking system of Ohio. 
1 say if you commit a fdony you 
should get out of the investment 
business and gp into making license 
plates where you belong.” 

He protested, “Even if we want- 
ed to we couldn’t prosecute anyone 
in the check-writing scheme." 

“Why noir 

“Everybody turned state's evi- 
dence so we wouldn't send them to 
jaiL” 

“Why did you agree to that?” 

“Because we would have never 


had a case against them if they 
hadn’t told usnow tl 


President’s House listed 


The Associated Press 

STANFORD, California — The 
U.S. Interior Department has des- 
ignated the Lou Henry Hoover 
House, a residence of Herbert Hoo- 
ver, a historic landmark. 


they did it.’ 

“FH take your word for it that 
you were as tough on Hutton as 
you possibly could get. But what do 
I tell the lady who is doing seven 
year s for stealing from the credit 
union?” 

“Tell her she has to pay her debt 
to society like almost everybody 
else.” 


Horowitz to Give Recital — on FiL 


By Harold C Schonberg 

New York Times Serttc* 

N EW YORK — Vladimir 
Horowitz plans to give a 
Carnegie Hall redial But be will 
not be in the loll to play iL 
The celebrated 81-year-old pia- 
nist completed on May 2 a 90- 
minute film that will primarily be 
a concert devoted to muse by 
composers he has long favored 
The film, which will alio contain 
documentary dements, is to be 
shown as “a Horowitz redial" 
and Horowitz will be in the audi- 
f pr* Carnegie HaO has been 
asked to bold open several eve- 
nings during the 1985-86 season, 
and the “redtal” will take place 
Mien the film has been edi t e d . 

There may be parallels for this 
in the annals of the concert reat- 
aL In the early 1930s. a French 
film called “The First Film Con- 
cert” presen Led six famous pia- 
nists, beaded by Ignace Jan Pade- 
rewski in concert Each played a 


sonata or an equivalent group of 
. Since then, there nave 


pieces. . — 

been any number of televised 



. _ refused to discuss the 
financial arrangement Horowitz 
is the highest-paid classical musi- 
cian active today. 

The recordings will be issued 
by Deutsche Grammophon. Un- 
til now, Horowitz has recorded 
only for RCA Victor and Colum- 
bia. William King, the location 
recording engineer, said the digi- 
tal recording would be made with 
one microphone taped mi (he un- 
derside of the piano Ed, and no 

engineer will tamper with the vol- 
ume levels. As- is customary to- 
day. the final product wQl be edit- 
ed, with splicing if necessary. 
Thus, any mistakes or memory 
lapses wQl be edited out 

“I need something technical” 
Horowitz said after playing the 
Scriabin piece. Pfeiffer suggested 
the A fiat Polonaise. Horowitz 
nodded and swung into iL 

“Wboo! Whoo! Now I can rest 
a little," be said after finishing. 
He moved from the piano to a 
couch and looked at fas hands. 

“I have young fingers,” he said. 


concert and opera performances, 
' i Horowitz. But 


including many by - — . 

the idea of a famous pianist using 
modem technology to take over a 
concert hall without appearing on 
stage will make history of one 
kind or another. 

During the filming, the elegant 
Horowitz town house in the Up- 
per East Side of Manhattan was 
in turmoi l, bulging with film and 
audio technicians, equipment 
and Stetnway representatives, 
with cable all over tbe house. Al- 
fred and David Maysles, brothers 
who specialize in documentary 
films, were always on hand with 
their crew. So was Franz Mohr, 
for many years Horowitz’s tuner, 
and Jack Pfeiffer, who has 
worked on recordings with Horo- 
witz for decades. 

On one day, Horowitz ap- 
peared at the piano a half-hour 
before filming was to start He 
wanted to warm up. Horowitz 
warms up not by playing scales' 
but by improvising and then 
playing bits of pieces as his fancy 
dictates. His film program will 
consist of a Bach- Busoni Cho- 
rale-Prelude. Mozart's Sonata in 
C (K. 330). Schubert's A flat Im- 
promptu (Op. 90. No. 4). Liszt's 
D flat “Consolation” and “Au 
bord d’lme source,” Rachmani- 
noffs G sharp minor Prelude, 


Th) N*» York Tkw 

Horowitz d ur ing filming at Us bouse. 


Schumann’s Novelette in F. 
Scriabin’s Etude in C sharp mi- 
nor (Op. 2, No. 1) and three Cho- 
pin pieces — the A minor Mazur- 
ka (Op. 17, No. 4). the B minor 
Scherzo and A Oat Polonaise. He 
has not previously recorded tbe 
Mozart or Schumann works. ■ 
Horowitz played none of these 
as a warmnp. From his fingers 
instead came fragments of music 
be has seldom or never played in 
recent decades. He fooled around 


with Chopin’s Etude in Thirds 
tbe **Wmt 


and the ^Vinter Wind” Etude, 
the Liszt Piano Concerto No. 2 
and Tarantella. Mozart’s “Turk- 
ish March.” 

He had taped several pieces Lo 
his satisfaction in previous ses- 
sions. Now be was to address 
himself to the Scriabin etude. He 
took his time, loath to stop “noo- 
dling” at tbe keyboard. Finally, 
Pfeiffer addressed him firmly: 
“Scriabin!" 

Two cameramen explored 
close-up shots as Horowitz 
played. He was asked io repeal 
the work, for more camera angles. 

Horowitz said be would follow 
the film with a real concert later 
in tbe season. He is also ihmlrfng 
of concerto appearances, and has 


been looking over, among others, 
tbe Li sa Piano Concerto No. 2 
and the Saint-Sa&ns Piano Con- 
certo No. 4. 

For the past two years, Horo- 
witz has been away from the con- 
cert stage- He was also inactive in 
1936-38. 1953-65 and 1969-74. 
His last public performances, 
about two years ago, were not up 
to his standard, and he was un- 
happy with them. 

Sources close to him say he was 
in ill health and had teen overme- 
dicated. But a few months ago his 
health improved and he started 
working at home. 

Nevertheless, a recital for an 
octogenarian who is not too 
strong, and after a protracted ill- 
ness. was not (o be taken lightly. 
Peter Gelb. his manager at Co- 
lumbia Artists, suggested that ac- 
tual appearances could well be 
preceded by a film as a way to 
ease into tbe strenuous life of 
touring. 

There will be a digital record- 
ing of the program, to be issued 
on compact disc, long-play re- 
cord and cassette. Tbe film will 
be shown in major concert halls 
and opera houses of the world 
and in select movie theaters. The 


■ Preview in Paris 

David Stevens of the Interna - 
tional Herald Tribune reported 
from Paris: 

Horowitz, in Paris for the first 
time in almost 35 years, inter- 
rupted a vacation Wednesday to 
appear at a news conference 
called to announce the film pro- 
ject and his new recording rela- 
tionship with Deutsche Grarnmo- 
phoo. 

A two-minute segment of un- 
edited film was shown in which 
tbe pianist played Moritz Mosz- 
kowskf s Etude in A flat (Op. 72, 
No. 11), a favorite Horowitz 
showpiece, which will be includ e d 
in the film as an encore. 


After the brief film showing, 
ife. Wanda 


Horowitz, with his wife. 

— daughter of Arturo Toscanini 

— answered questions from a 
gathering of mask critics and 
journalists, joked and told anec- 
dotes. all in fluent French. He 
tantalized the audience fay saying 
that he would give a Pans redtal 
when he returned to concert 
work, and that he would make 
further recordings for DG. in- 
cluding perhaps a recording of 
improvisations. However, his joc- 
ular manner and his known aver- 
sion to long-range plans at this 
stage in his career leaves such 
matters in doubt. 


PEOPLE 


The Force of Gravity 

Ray Bradbury, who writes about 


space, doesn’t necessarily want to 
rip there. The Times- 


hazard a trip 

Union newspaper of Rochester, 
New York, recently ran an editorial 
nominating him as the next civilian 
on a space shuttle tmssicra. “What 
are you doing? Trying to scare me 
to death?" the science-fiction writ- 
er responded in a letter to the edi- 
tor. “1 am 65 yean old now and 
while I am in good health, I am one 
of those former beach boys who 
think lying in the sun is better than 
running around iL I think that I 
would prefer to be nominated to 
rapt ain the Goodyear blimp closer 
to Earth." 

Q 


iilB 


. has fired another salvo in 
its celebrity endorsement war with 
Coke by deciding to sponsor Tina 
Timer on her 70-aty “Private 
Dancer" tour from July through 
December. Turner is the fourth 
concert act the company has har- 
nessed in the past two years, fol- 
lowing the Jackson Brothers, Lio- 
nel Richie and Menudo. Coca-Cola 
has picked up endorsements from 
' Jidio i gfrndae and Duran Duran. 

□ 


mother of Representative Barney 
Frank, a Massachusetts Democrat' 
delivered a message to her son thir> 
read; “Promises made to the moth- 
era of America about Sodal Securi- 
ty ought to be as solemn as prom- ft] 
ises made to ChaoceOor Hdmqj/i 1 
KofaL" •••* 

□ ■ I* 

A 51 -million fire in (he woreJ(*| ^ J 
bouse headquarters of the Su\ 
Francisco root promoter BO Gra j 
ham has destroyed a large coHcc |s ■ [ 
tion of memorabilia. Authorities II “ * 
said arson was suspected. Graham * 
a German-born Jewish war orphai 
who lost relatives in the Holocaust 
recently gained public attention fa* . • 
tunning full-page ads in local news - 
papas condemning Pres id e n t Rob- ... 
aid Reagan's visit to Bitburg ceme - - 
toy in West Germany. 


The American actor Stacy Reach 
plans to many the Polish-boro ac- 
tress Malgosia Tomassi, 28, when 
he completes a jail sentence in Brit- 
ain for cocaine smuggling, accord- 
ing to his publicity agents. Reach, 
43, was sentenced to nine months 
in prison Dec. 7 after he was arrest- 
ed at London's Heathrow Airport 
in April 1984, and is serving the 
term in Reading, west of London. 
Keach and Ins wife, the actress Jill 
Donohue, have been separated for 
a year, and be is bringing divorce 
proceedings against her, theagents 
said in a statement II said Keach 
denied newspaper reports that 
Donohue had not been informed of 
the lawsuit 

□ 


Studs Terkd says he b’sfaockcc 
by the efforts of a citizens’ group ir , 
Bethel, Washington, to stop pro/, 
duction of a high school play basa 
on his book “Working.” Reverent 
Kn Doubt, pastor of a Bands 
church, and Jean Hstaraon navi 
been gathering signatures for a pe 
tition opposing the play, “lobjtc 
to prostitution being presented as; 
glamorous profession," Halversca 
said, maintaining that prostjtutes- 
“for tbe most part were lured ktr- 
their profession by such ideas a 


their profession oy such ureas a 
this play prefects — big monev - 
furs, jewels ana expensive dothes.*. 


But Terkd, referring to the charw 
ter in the play, countered: “Tb 
whole-point of the part is that it’s ; 
terrible and a sad life she has chd 
sen." 


D 


The Older Women’s League, or 
OWL has taken its concerns about 
Social Security and other Reagan 
administration budget cuts affect- 
ing the elderly to Congress. Tish 
Sommers, 70. the founder andpres- 
ident of the organization, gave her 
impression of Mother’s Day. which 
Tails this Sunday in the United 
States: “For men. they created the 
retirement plan, medical beutfls, 
profit-sharing and gold watches. 
For women, they created Mother’s 
Day." Bae Frank. 72. the widowed 


Helen Dewar, The Washingtof 
Post’s chief awgrcuaahal corn: rt* 
spondem. bus won the $5,000 Etah‘ h jf j ( 
ett McKinley Dufcsea Award to*' 1 1 
distinguished reporting -of- Con' 
gross m 1984. The award come, Iff/fJ* 
from the Dirksen Congres&iona.iii**' 1 
Center, an educational institutiaT 
in Pekin. Illinois. 

□ ' 


Anita Bryant, who was a com-’ 
men face on television orangejuic- •• 
commercials in the United State:-' 
until she became belter kunnri fa 
her opposition ui the homuseuu 
rights movement, has returned a -J - 
on entertainment reporter in a loct. v 
television news program in Allan _ 
ta. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCMBE 
to flie 

INTERNATIONAL 


HERALD 

TRIBUNE 


AM) SAVE 

As a now ufaicrilxr to Am 
bitamokond Harold Tribuna, 
you can sow up to WF 
*■ iM w iita n d pricj depending 


on your uuufey of read a o. 


For dWaih ^ 
on Mi ipmn l Un Uidory oiler, 
wills Kt 


nr 

1B1 


r Sutncripfiam D qwrtm S Ht 

.AMBMQHWGSk 


93300 NwBy 


Or tab hi 747-07-29 


IN ASIA AND PACVIC 
contad out loed ifa fcfc i to r nr j 


h to wdu d H«ftU Tritons 
loasTdr * - 


HONG I 
Tst HK 5-38672A 


DIVORCE IN 24 HOURS 


Matud or uu i4sUs d action, low cost 
Hah or Domini ca l RoauUc Fa nfor- 
incfca land S375 for 24-page boaidaf 
fonjna to Or. F. GaranEn, OQA, 
1835 .ITS! N.W., Wadsngtai D.C 
70006, USA Teh 202 


WKE NENCH POLITICS SERBS 

Diaw Geddas of "London Tima*. 
How Tto Frsndi View The Soodab. 
Monday. Atoy 13, 7:45 pm. ACT 
Grand W. 31 FF75 


pcycbla cd door. Tat: 55591 73. 


ALCOHOLICS 

Ira 2o1 


ANONYMOUS 


Engto^ftjns (ddM «4 9 45. fame 


NAVE A MCE DAYl BokaL Hove o 

nee day) Bated. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES INTL 


OVER 1000 AGENTS 
W USA. - CANADA 
350 WORLD-WOE 
F*& ESTIMATES 

PARIS O-bad 

(01] 343 23 64 

FRANKRfllT 

|OW) 250066 

MUNICH LALS. 

(089] 142244 

LONDON 

(01) 933 3634 

USA Affted Vsai lm> tall Carp 
(0101) 312-681-1100 


CQNHNEX GostiNUtfi to 300 dim 
waldwida - A* /Sea. Call Chafe 
281 18BI PornfoecrOoerejCcntoo 


MOVING 


•WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTL 


CALL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
NUBS (3)036 63 11 
’l] 578 66 11 


MOVMOto&i 


G to & from Israel by 1st dow 
i offering U door-todoa- ser- 
nwronCE and doQ#- 

tessada Forwafdan 
Ltd. Beit Gibor J116], 6 Prof Kaufman 
St. Tal Amt 68012. braeL Tefc 3- 
450039 Tx 341177 coin 3 ad ASD 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CANADA 


CANADA FOR WVESTMBITS in ho- 

fts- erffabgrp. 

cwmeniKB, proreanGnci 
rad eMs sanaCM in Canada. Wja 
Bax 2016. Herald Tribune, 92521 
Nealy Cede*. France. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


5Y. raora (SAUN5) 

By owner. 220 ?qjn. via. 


sqm 


equipped kitchen, teed 

. . gaato covered terraces. 

500 m. from tea Canpaty deduction 


Wile Havas Mon te-Gato 692, 

4, rue del kis, M.C 98000 Manarn 


FRSNOI RIVBA • Na Luxurious 
modem uma toierti an the top, bed & 
Suing room, big terrace «n pon- 
aremie ocean wew, edm ma. 10 
minutes weft to sea. F72SreO / best 
offer, irgenl by ownor. France (93) 75 
5341. 


CA»MB CROtSSTTE. Near 'Polos des 
FmJrvah'. In fogh doss resdence. 
SplemU 97 sq/n. cmcrtmenl. 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 bahv Office. Equipped 
L i M x m Atormlaijs ferroce & 


, Garage FTJOOflCO. SSL 47_la 
Cronette.0M00Oxxies.93 


.93/38 19 19. 


VRLHRAHO* ON SBL View Cep 
Ferre t , Botfide Pr ov en ccft , 9 rooms, 
hrxunaui fittings, caretak e r's 1 
gaden 1800 sqjtu, swimming 

KJOOflW. NaaaSon Mazat. 
Ma»xt 04000 bteeTek |931 B7 082a 


ITALY 


PORTO CBIVO xi toe jet sel marina. 

Owner mb exxxrng berth for yodrt 
up to 100 feet (30 m cto t) . Privileged 
location, private telephon e kne. cov- 
ered p a l in g- Catect: M . A * * ' 

Mlav Tel 02/780351. Tbe 
Price: fatal Lag 330 J00J00 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


PARIS, EXC5T10NAL 

HEART OF EXCLUSIVE 
BYSSES AREA 

Mott e le gan t , top Boa. 2 level 
4, with lovely garden terrace. 
. 2 baths, 2 expaurns. 


AMBBCAN ADVISORY SBtVKXS 

50 A nence Focb, 75116 Pare 
Tab 500 61 5a 


ST. GStMAM DES PRES. 
MagrafaxU sfudfo 50 sqm. al 
axBfarts^etg^^to^morea 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

PARIS & SUBURBS 

VH1A MONTMORENCY 

DWlHt. MAGNBKENT 
‘ATH ta D’ ARTIST 175 SOM. 

an bnmtifuj privrffl ganisn. 

Trlpifl rocepbom, 2 bedroons, 

EXCSmONAI CONDmOn 
EMBASSY SERVICE 562 16 40 

6*: BEAUX ARTS. 

90 arim, 3rd floor, 

HKUaACE bum 
moahr ukxttuio 

SBMSE KAYSERi (1) 329 60 60 

METRO EXHAUN5. Beautiful 193 0 
bridng, late 2roam, perfed contk- 
han, grama-floor on yad, fadng 
West 272 «} 19. 

MONTPARNASSE. SptemEd toxkt. 

upper floor, eievator, recent bUVfing. 

SEOOadPA 222 6819. 

171H ICAR ETOR& Dutriex. 70 sqA 
or laxden. Parkxto awxiabte Price fl 
nroen. Tel 572 1515. mi 

16th HEM8 MARTS4, 210 sun. 
umptuaoi. prokftg, sure 503 475Z 

SPAIN 


SWITZERLAND 

VILLARS 

WWTBl & SUMMBl 
PARADISE, 20 MINUTES 
FROM LAKE GENEVA 

Apartments, roving from stuefios 
toVrootmTAvauite For Sc4e To 
fiarefamn. Fantastic view, hgh quofi- 
ty. sfterted readpnwl orecn. ftiees 
from 5F195LD0 to 5F635.00Q. Mort- 
OTBmrifte at arly 65* interest. 

iW l» JW4YVjThjft 

GLOBE PLAN SJL. 

Av. Mcrvfiepos 24. 

CH-I005 UUSAhife; 5vetrertcmd 
Tet pij 22 3S 1Z lb MISS Mats CH 

Estafefitoed Since 197D 

USA RESIDENTIAL 

CALIFORNIA 

PALM SPRINGS 

A mognificerx Mediterranean style re»- 
denoe, located ei the endusroe Las FtaL 
maiorea: 1- storey 9 room coretirutocm 
with beautiful swxnnngpooL A tushy 
hxvbcoped garden aDows year-round 
entertafing. 

For turther drteto [tease conMW! 

AGHH 

26 Ks Bid tencroe Charlotte 
MONTE CARLO. MC 98000 MONACO 
Tel: 5d.66.00 - ba. 155 

Telex 479417 MC 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RJE3NT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

LORE VA111EY. Oxnrong tarn 
home. 114 hours Paris, stocle with 
pontes, 3 ha 3 beckoocra, 2 bath- 
roona. large tying roam, Aun thru 
September S900 per monih. Tet day 
|54|32 54 98 w everitv M 32 58 24 

FROVB4CE M GORDGS. OU Sraom 
hmse for 4 persons, dt comforts, 
ejoceatioriol spot & garden cobn, ro- 
man bath. FSoO/week May ft June. 
Bax 2153, Herald Tti nti, 92521 
NeuRy Cedes, Francx 

COIE D'AZUR 

fart summer, efeaert country hamn. 

3 beds, 3 battaTTek (95 37 70 22. 

- mere, togh firing. 4 bedrooms, 3fol 
btrihs, parting. ftMBblty sete. Tto 
(93} 474571. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

MAGNFKENT RWBBRX 1 ft 2 bed- 
room flats. BeautifoUy fonfthed in 
new pwpas&huil toxx. Quftdy ritv- 
tried enpyiroj panoranxc views orer 
Thanes ft Chelsea CnteutlmMul. Lift, 
porter, video enlnr, itodereround 
parting. Rent from 050 - ECO per 
week. T«k Weekends 0483/775827, 
affkn 0737/822718. 

LOfBON, CHB5EA. Attractive seff- 
eoreofted fomdhod flat, J doatte 
bedroom, sttiag max kitten ft 
bathroom, nxtidi sennas lodwp ga- 
rage. Sx monte nuumxri company 
tet. C175 per week. Tet 01-352 5075 

LONDON. For the best furnitoed flete 
cud homes. Constft the Speotrixte- 
nOm. fay and Lewis. TsHareton 
352 Sill. Tetex 27B46RE3DEG. 

HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUSMG COOK R.V. 
Oefcas rertofs. Vcterwsstr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020471234 or 623777 

ITALY 

When in fane: 

PAIAZZO AL VHABRO 

Luxury upui liuert Iojss with ftifrisfied 
flats, avoUte for t vroekcxri more 

Phone: 6794325. 6793450L 

Write: V.C M Vetabra 16, 

00186 Rome. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

Embassy Service 

8 Awe am nrokw 

75008 fate 

YOUR REAL STATE 

AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 

LARGE APARTMBfTS 

FLVEhPOME. AV FOCH. INVAUDES 
AWETS! CONCORDE 

Tefc (1) 245 11 99. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AGENCE DE I’ETOKE 

REAL ESTATE AC04T - 

764 03 17 


SHORT TERM 


STUDIOS^ 2 -ROOM RATS 
ARP ELYSES CONCORDE 
TeL- (U 265 II 99. The 640793 


74 CHAMPSaYSSS 8th 


3raom aptxtment, 


nan or more. 

LE OARRXZ 359 67 97. 


WEST. EXCHTONAl PROPSttY an 
8 <*3*^ 30 ranutos From Etoie. 


large house, foxtxxjtoJy decanted, 
rent Serious, ratoenca r»- 


quretL Write Bon 21 
bone. 9252' 


Hereto Tri- 
Frcxa 


SHORT THU* STAY. AdvataM of a 
hoM without uKonvee djnees. feel at 
home in nee stotSas, one bedroom 
and more in Paris. SQRajMr 544 39 
40. - 80 roe de fUnivenito. Pad 7th. 


8ASII1E ArtotWf, l»sqAL Sanr. 
kitthenetfediaacier. June / July i 
Aug. F6£q0/morth. Refmenres re- 


gured. Otoq, 1 roe du Ddanxy, 

raon PorisTi* 3714)1 6a 


SHORT RBITAL M PARS: jtudas 
axl 2 root*, bemitififty decanted. 
Cento* Sofirepe. 6 am Masse, 
75008 Pcx» Teh [if 359 99 50 


NEAR IROCADOO and Vrdtor Hugo. 
Room + twig. View, modern, luxay. 


Short tonn [xgAlc/Qwo a^n oogBP. 


cy. FS,000; 553 56 78 a : 


CBOra OF PARS lovely decorated 
sunny 4/5 rooms, c# ewppecL lot 
Boor. Mranurc 2 roams. F13JOOO 
charges mdafed, Teh g4 60 91. 


3EAL FOR foreign students, nicely fix- 
reihndTW'hJ^stortUay, d pcasiie by 


SHARED ACCOMMODATION, Offal 
lower, it bea/tful 150 sqjg hr- 
iwhed roam even short term. 3067879 


SHORT 

Na 


TERM in lchn 
Teh 329 38 81 


Quarter. 


4TH BEAUBOURO Sraom 
ly/Aug. J800/raoxK Teh 272 


PAH1S AREA UNFURNISHED 


RANCC6 IB 


High dam, hxge^rogigticn. 


2 b e d rooBB. 

■AC 

7 bedaanss, 2 bad* 

"i room. F16JXX1 

R HUGO 

dees, 12 r am ie, 350 iqjn, 3 bean, 
garage. F25#J0 

EMBASSY 563 68 38 


STSUmCE. 5 ROOMS 

1UXURMU5 
newly redone, F9500 
EMBASSY SBIVia^ 563 68 38 


ETOA£. DBLUXE 
rate latches F38CO.- 709 


82 


»pa- 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

16THFOCH 

Large cfoufte firing + 1 bedroora, 
facing south. HsOOOj Embassy 563 68 jB 

16* P94THOUSE, 4 beds. 4 betos. 
200 st^n. terrace 250 sojil, F15JOOO 
+ key money, fofc 551 09 i5 

SPAIN 

MALLORCA POUENSA. Luxurious 
via, 5 bedrooms P peoptej. 4 baths, 
big garrieo, pool, matd ft gorriener. 
June ft Sort. UOTOOO. jufotfiS250Q. 
Paris 620 S 12 -348 96 &l 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


EMPLOYMENT- 

R3R MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 

LOOK UM3BL - 

“WTERNAnONAl. POSmONS” 
PAGE 5 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE ' 

COSMOPOLITAN. AXIRAOTVE 
DYNAMIC, EXM4SIVE BUT 
WORTH n 

PrcrfetiiroH PR/nxukuting/lobbyw 
warm, with top coreads cxcund the 
world who tipeaes EngSto, French, Heft 
ion, Portuguese and Spanish seeks pro- 
ton with tel man or group. Free to 
koveL 

CV. ft refer enter ordetee upon 
reared. New Yort TeL 212-5»M58 

TUT 226000 ETUU8 AH BML 

SHPmtO EXECUtTVE 43, Dutch, to 
fttgud, good persancSTy, held key 
paction bi htidde End, Gm rutivy, LA, 
USA. Subroreinent. 23 yn broad ex- 
perierom in transportation ft froghr 
farwarrtng, ypfiafist el contamer 
topfxna fanner cHef ft 

Sautf Audta, seda dxdtngng pat- 
tan &Ja busneis appalroity. Bax _ 
40877. LKT„ 63 Lang Acre, London, 
WC2^9JK 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

DOaORS (NLD-J WANT81 to pro- ~ 
ride conuereion ft endoroemav set- w 
vice for US cosmetics company, liber. Q 
d reaftnerrenn for 1 day / monto. 
Contort: 8. Burton ft M. wemre, Zu- 
ndi May 8 - Hotel Zunfo Mflan May 

9-11 - Hotel Pridpe Satina. Dusset 
devrf May 14 - Bretdretfladtcr t-fcsf. 
Pans May 14-20 ■ George V. 



Van Cleef & Arpels. PARIS Place \endomc.Td:261.58.5K - GENEVE 3L Rue du Rhone^Tel: 28 . 81 . 66 . "Id boUtlQUe 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


rent position vnth Anar icon family in 
ettm. e*. 


Pans. 8 yeas in pre se nt position. I 


erf torae 

v Has waked in Pais. Awft 


Fronde 

diie at once. Re f erenc e s. Write* WJ 
ban her, Ecst Blue tH. Mane 04629 
USA 


26 ttca dnfciuig poflfKXL bnvxx- 
Hunt fonth/kto/foi. BA hH. 
Afhxi ExceSent ctxnmunoaim & 
edritng dak. Had wortmg, effirient, 
fondioni weU under pressure. Tap 
t references. Write: Bn 
CT 06830. 


Me to ary cutiurd eovxonmeni. 
lived France 8 yeas, fluent Specific 
skte m devefa pn g detal ptanmg 
u rgon gi ng executxig Wpmg leader- 
rnwtnang supefviwig hunonif 1 


DewtM. Bar 6270. Carson 


choBenae. L Mc- 
CxmiCA 90746 


teas. 

f poo wnen wcxna comtxna 
y, aadaa pursuits & inter. 


considered. Free to travel, Ben 4QB79, 

IH7-. 63 long Aa% London, WC2g 


w . Fufidt/Gctiui looks 
tong pastion in Europe a 
Bn il^Hentid TrSme. 
92521 Neufty Cedetc France. 


figWy educated, look* far an iaterest- 
«B position. London 2450080. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


LADY, 
tee 

tom, wicUy 
sdts 

other , 

Europe or America. Beneti, 
Pomotowdu, 75012 ftxn. France. 


Otroc- 


& HI 5eeb fob, eouria a any 
po si tion in the travel ridustry, 
m or America. Benisti, 57 Ba 


8 UNIX 

soffvma design engineer umh 7 years 
etyenence (3 yeas farsan} seels po- 
etton abroad ShiatoC Americun. 
Thomas Mstoat, 4E Acetous Dr, 
*28. Samywft.CA 9*006. 


AMBBCAN BRMGUM. MALE, 24, 
BA in French. B A r_Ra k>Tat»» ia on. 
eo nrwi nitd m iy ddej axrsntfy Etv 


gUi Antoxtf «t Fnxtco M end of 


Europe or 


seels tab 
iSTefi 


tconmanml 

poismfe 


xt West 


MGH CAUBBt personal osadoni, cx- 
rruungual, is ioobng far 


paienced, _ . _ 

ch dleng rtg position iw^srirg total 
awnoitaort. Some tnraunQ pro* 
fared. Bepty to Box 40728 LHT, 63 
m London 


Long Ace, I 


i WC2E9JH. 


EXPATRIATE MASTS medme con- 
str wdion e quipra apt seeking chtfteng- 
ing porition in a third wax! brvtov 
roent Hepto 8 MacDonald. Aylmer, 
Quebec, Ganda J9H 3R4. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Dmltoa 
MTONATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL FOSmONS 

TUBDAYS 

to «m BIT OtoM Section. 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MiMrmrr seeks fa amebon 

hWHIVt FKMS m PAB& 


EngfaK 


EngTeh 

Write 




Dutch at German 
of Frnoch !•- 
Bhnd 
138 Avenue 


727 i 


751 l(fft!x£ France. T«t 


16IH ETOOL bspanstet, bfingoerf 
French/ Enpfoh hostms-sccrakxy, 
attractive tc4o- 


rf able. Wnto^roc 21 51, Henrfd 


y it ata 
intone. 


92S2I NetftyCedex. France 


WANTS) ENGUSH LANGUAGE 
tooth andJiy pA spae d writing net 
aeauMe, pernramnt pat, TelTFaqs 
500 3361. - 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY WITH utoo- 

tnqw. rronav oanajn, ir**v 
seen axAenging postoon in Geneva 
ana or otoer ports of Switzeriaid 

Ftoae write ta Box 2146, Herald 

Tribune. 92521 NeuHyCedex. France 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


LANGUAGE SCHOOL seeks fuB or 
part time mathertangua Engfito 
teachers. Mto how EEC passport or 
a vafcd "carte do trovofl". Coll 747 12 
60 SoFor Longues. 


NATIVE ENGLISH teacher, . e xpert- 

nCWWQfl 


once, pemersn 
Centnrs, Pans; 


neoesstxy. TeL I 
(1)686 15 78. 


DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


. ^ bv»*i 

ho >| w rfi T HyffT^i 
quired, wel n sm — ra ted. 567 0974. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE ■ AU PARS' 
tMdrariiixmy, mam’s helpers & a 
branches oHtf eta iwntduaeto ■ 
help woddwxfe GA Shxm Buraai 
London 730 8122/5142(24 hourti LT 
CB4FAGY.Tto8990670SLOAI«G- . 


ALWAYS AVARAIIE LONDON oaL 

iutoinadwt ft Itf dan daiy makr 
Sbcxie Bweau. London 730 8122 
5KZ ikmani empksyma* apoKy- ■■ 


EATON BUREAU NANMES • & c 
profowand damolics avatabh nov 
Cxxfon 730 9566.1 36 Skxxxi St, SW-i ' 
ticenced UK Emt ioy i iwnt Agency. 


EX7BSB4CS) COOK / Martro cTHc , 
Id / chauffeur, frfwenan, French 


Ertjito. «efc.su»tobte pcanon m Pa , 
A Tet 6T 


658 6561 Parti 


AIRFREIGHT 


LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 1983. M> 
loaded. ^OOO^nlas.- Nwr'YW 


ptew-Sl 


.Col tens 758 49 DO*. 


AUTOMOBILES 


MHKH1BRB4Z 

New 15®5, foS LLS. sprafiatooni , « 

500 SH.‘s from USS47jM0 

5DQ SEC ‘ «9M0 .' ?i!\. 

900 SL SgSoO \v L - .. 

190 E-2J3-16V jXSOI V “ 

DeSwxy 2-3 ;, -'”L 


Contact Mr. Marta weekdays 125MJ 1 ,.,- . 
Tet (212) 279 18 40 New York ©T ?.‘" 


PAGE 6 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




tv-, 


‘Oi'.ST 




International Business Message Center 


ATTBinON EXECUTIVES 


_JI£SSHL 

bane, where mo rs tha n a third 
d a mtdnjfi wdns wb rid- 
wid A matt at whom at ft 
b udnamt and iti kto y, nR 
read ft Just Mn at (Park 


613595) batata JOt 
mat wa a 


... at Mb jxdb 
bade, and roar massa g e w!3 
epptar wi&ki AS tom. tha 
rata ft US.S9.SO or toad 
•qu iv rda n t par toe. Yea nwf 
atdada oarnpiate twtd vtriB- 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OfTSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


wb 

• Confidential advice 

• tonKficXB « 


avdUftiy 


• Boat 

6 txk iai to i toun 

... ft triex 
booklet franc 
. IE 

SERVICES LTD 
Head Office 

Telex 228554 5S£CT C 
London tepresantive 
2-5 ad Band ijondcmWI 
Tel 01^93 4244, Ux2S247 SCSUM G 


MONEY TREES? 


TEH Invest in one of America's most 
anting ledmoiowd breakthroughs in 
a faftan dotor mauiry. Vfc hove pkxu- 
ed more nut trees in 1984 than any 
other dev el oper xi our Stela. 

wim earrings routed far 
uiftwegeam- 


mouse wvirai. 

Mataid avoikririe xi Engfoh. frendv 
Gemas. 8m -1999, Herald Tribune, 
92521 Nenty Cede*, Frtxw 


LUXURY 18-fRBBt 
DUTCH (HARTER BARGE 
NOW LYMG CANAL DU MSH 
AVAUA8IE FOR IMMBXA1E SALE 
F254LOOO 


Oeetah MAOUU|0) 


3810 65 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


1NVHTMB4I5 
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 
19 EUROPE - 21 ASIA 
TRANS CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 


OGEANFRONT RBOKT- 


Beautiful 

. lestoinxU on 

second floor. Hard floor lounge, first 
floor ocecaifiont fitoina pier & restau- 
rant & mnero eon. Inis is 
with motel & tyx tewtnls. 
wish to retee. Prone gran area an 
North Cvo&na Coast (Wri^usvfle 
Beach) USA. 54 mSan.5«fcaamqui- 
riesoHy.PX>. Bob 5111, 

NC 


GOT SWWG ANSWaOeriro pert- 
nen/xnestort to nxxtiet unquo 

2S8LSj‘,i faiifkSS 

lAxOtte ran saxl toiaout, TXi podteT 
has advertiser's panel & oorrecs 40 
problem toots during day. Aft of its 
kind. 5 marketing far & w#ng la 
■west, send summroyr Liddy Oriacz 
deMondtjqoeBgO.AlQonmPtxlgBtri 


FOR SALE M ROMCJIAL.Y. Good 


I 400 sqm. 


property. Good location. FuBy' 6- 
axtovGood- 


ceroed oriental arts and 

wdl 30 yecn. Showrooms, godovms. 

Bax 95669 Trim Sha Tsui Kontoon 
Hoag fag. 


■USME55 WOMAN, SWISS, experi- 

mosd m eheraiari & heato care can- 
salting, ft generd managenrori, wd 
art as yaw roles/Tncxiro agent m 
torape. Own office. Bat 21S?fietaU 
Trfoune.92521 NegftyCede».Fnm 


REACH T HE GM E MARK ET. Adver- 

tae in Etnporiwn. tested to I 1 

■esses! »l the 


10X00 

I the ad 10x6 civ Send 
your ad to flodon. P Q Ben 21030. 
Athens 11410. Td SU 5882. We con 
dbo art as your agerts m Graeco. 


VB4TURE CMWL GROUP ha buti- 
neses J investnw# oppartunMes ft 
USA ft England far owner operators 
ft absentee owners. Contort on Lon- 
don 01-351 4518. 


EXPORT TO USA - New 


pared by US Customs 
Gevamete W 


MSfory/Gwil . 
dtx. S«d 15 J32. Federal 
Box 15301 WatomBtog, PC 


ft's 


LONDON. Los Angeles reeded de- 


signer seeb tewftefcrfgre 


for 1 badroron bdosnyflot 
to ew da nex ed Sheri 


or Iona term 

iovetofleet, Tft pi) 723 4824/ 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

PM4AMAUBBHA. CORPORATIONS 
from USS400 avadabte now. Td 
P624) 2024a Telex: 6283S2 ISLAM) 
G.fv'aUa 

WEALTHY AMBBCAN MVE5TOR 

^ shc 8 *- ^ 

Germany (0) 76IG0227 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

•m. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPIE 

UMMUTD MC 
uiA.8 wanowix 

A complete toad ft buriness service 
pravirtng a tniare aritedfon of ■ 
tatereeft venedteft mdtSngud 
nSvtduaa for art doatmom. 
213^65-7793 

10019 

COUWeR SBcym.. fnvete ft confi- 
d * lW from Son Dwgo, CA la Eu- 

wtodiri Send reqoeas to otortxjn 
of Mr. Afaert Moms, _1906 teymond 
Lon^Oceonaia, CA 92054 USA 619- 

HOW TO GET a Second Paapart. re- 

vanra, Hong tong. 

«*®CN ft wonoww answering 
rortnee, open 24 hours daily. Nurses, 

ssvfotex rSbisr 

financial 

investments 

infl Business 
Assodation & hAfisher 

”^*9® »gnb«Hip and world aye- 
«WrofaS3 toSSmoutadefiro^: 

p,oor ^ L 

«S?7 Nadfy Otidex, France ' 

“g*** 1 * * VttBASONK. Spe- 

jEftayasuftiS 

^iAKOEAMOONTS of US dal- 

OFFICE services , 

* ZUKCH * 252 76 21 
Rtone / mIh / meffbofc ° 


OFFICE SERVICES ; 


$ud”t 


GENEVA 

SWnZBUAM) 

. Full Service 
is our Business 


Diced i 

men 


• Wen wi end Itwmltaxes 

• Atofca*. Wephane end tetac 


tin 


• Jaxe toion gndte ge tond 
ft Fee motion, domidfiation oreT 
attowalration of Swiss and 




c omp ro ees ■ , Tj;'...!., 

Ful confidenc e cxid doe r ution oWW-'l'lc;. 

BUSINESS ADVISORY 
SERVICES SJL 


7 Rue Mazy, 1207 GB-CVA. 
Tefc36»40' 


l Tetoe 23342 


• . 

***** 
•Jj 




Your folly 
Domioidi 
«les. 


U. . 

S -5t--,^ 

MIOTajJUOTWJ 
AGENCE «VK35 'i>, . 

i office in Frax*..,*^,. t ' 
W phone], kto; .s '■■■ 

oSnatrotion a» i' ‘ ^ 


Geneva France Border 
MBA 



Mft A»V. ...... 

-■ Fran*. _ 


YOUR LONDON OFFICE 
CHBMAM EXECUTIVE CBCTH 



YOU8 SWISS BUSHES 
. BASS M LUGANO * 
f te wra te d UroteteMrvic w pta » 


5- •. *».: 


DIAMONDS 




■■■*- 


•f ll, r 

ruiVi 

n,-. 




Your tost buy.. 

Fine ttiamands in any price rtngi- 
at lowest atuleKrie px» 


&**Wwd l928 . 

* 8-2018 AttoteP; 


'Cl I 


Wean erf Antwerp Diamond V v 


'r* 


Printed bygdzin Zurich (Switzerland) 


if. 





I 




3K' 


I 


1“