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The Global Newspaper 
Edited iiz Paris 
; Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, ■ 

• The Hague and Marseille 


WEATHSt tMTA APPEAL ON PAGE 1 

No. 31,793 " 



INTERNATIONAL 




Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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** 


PARIS, FRIDAY MAY 10 , ^85 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


Brazil Reinstates 

i.. . 

Direct Elections 
For Its President 




The AssKWed Press 
BRASILIA — Congress voted 
unanimously. Thursday to amend 
Brazil’s constitution to reinstate di- 
rect presidential elections, meeting 
a popular demand frustrated by 21 
•- ^vears of military rule. 
r ~* The Congress passed several oth- 
er major political bills. These will 


bte the Continunist Party, estabUi 
■ r - direct elections Jar mayors of state 
. Mr,; - capitals, grant greater freedom to 
- form and operate political parties 
and end a system that allowed a 
congressman to be dismissed for 
- - voting against a party proposal. 

Representative JoSo Gflberto, 
who sponsored the bill allowing di- 
''■/ rect presidential elections, called 
v 1 the vote “an enormous advance for 
. > ; ^deaiocra< 5 . M He stud, “There was 
. ‘^ '■yesterday and there’s today and lo- 
; '■ day is totally different Today we 
■ have an absolutely free political 
system.*’ 

“It cleans the house of the mili- 
tary re gime;" said Representative 
Arthur Vugilin Neto, of the gov- 


ernment’s Brazilian Democratic 
Movement Party. 

Brazilians last voted for presi- 
dent in 1960. The mffitary seized 
power in 1964, yielding only this 
year to civilian rule. 

The presidential election mea- 
sure was sent to Congress by Presi- 
dent Jos6 Sarney, who had beat 
elected vice president by an elector- 
al college and took office on April 
21 when President-elect Tan credo 
Neves died after a- 38-day illness. 

Mr. Neves won a lopsided vic- 
tory over Paolo Salim Mahif on 
Jan. IS in the 686-member electoral 
college because of defections from 
the military-backed Social Demo- 
cratic Party. 

In an initial round of voting, the 
constitutional amendment was ap- 
proved in the Chamber of Deputies 
on Wednesday, 458-0, and the Sen- 
ate approved it with 62 of a posa- 
ble 69 votes. 

On the second and final ballot 
Thursday* the Congress unani- 
mously approved the measure in a 



Reagan La^es 3B|tck at Gorbachev; 
Soviet Parade^Mresses Military Might 


President Jose Sarney 


joint session. It takes effect imme- 
diately. 

The right to vote for president 
became a emotional popular issue 
early last year. Millions of Brazil- 
ians took to the streets to demand 
direct dec lions, showing a political 
force virtnally unknown under the 
mfiitaiy regime. 

But there were few people in the 
congressional galleries during the 
voting that began Wednesday 
flight. 

“The rules have changed since 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6} 


Parly Rivals Seize on U.S. Trade Issue 
But Attacks Appear to Aid Nakasone 


• By Clyde Haberman 

Lf New York Times Soviet 
#o TOKYO — Rival pohtidans in 
the governing Liberal Democratic 
Party have seized upon the trade 
crisis between the united States 
and Japan as an issue cm which 
they hope to challenge Prime Mm- 
ister Yasuhiro Nakasone. 

. But none has made noticeable 
headway so far, and some political 
commentators say they suspect 
: v that Mr. Nakasone has grown 
stronger as the result of open dis- 
unity within the party. 

Til The bag question has been what, 

' if anything, the government should 
do to stimulate domestic demand 
and thus improve.the chances that 
. ~ Japanese wffl heed their prime min- _ 
■aster's caD-io buy more foreign 
f ^products. A-cabinet advisory panel 
last month recommended new tax 
' policies and stimulative govern- 
ment spending as ways to increase 
. buying power, along with shorter 
working hours to give people more 
time to spend their money. 

Mr. Nakasone, although general- 
-^T |y welcoming these proposals, has 
reacted icily to suggestions that 
taxes should be cut and pnbtic- 

. works programs expanded. One of 

•» his main priorities since taking of- 
— - fice in late 1982 has been to resdnee 
Japan's huge budget deficits, which 
in percentage terms are larger than 
those of the United Stales. Conse- 
quently, his cabinets have adopted 
only austerity budgets. 

To reduce Japan's considerable 
trade surplus against the United 
States, the prime minister has put 
less emphasis on increasing domes- 
tic demand than on removing tar- 
; iffs and other barriers to imports. 
'k: ?.'d support, the government's Eco- 
’ c „’ t npnric Planning . Agency issued a 



Mar*** 

Yasuhiro Nakasone 

report this week asserting that in- 
come-tax reductions would neither 
stimulate consumption nor alter a 
basic Japanese tendency toward 
high savings rales. 

But other Liberal Democratic el- 
ders say government priorities 
should be reversed, and for than 
the trade crisis coaid not have come 
at a more convenient time. 

Even before the protectionist fe- 
ver in Washington reached its pre- 
sent level some of than were call- 
ing for lower taxes and more 
government spending. Their con- 
tention was that Mr. Nakasone had 
tightened belts too far and that 
Japan should be building the high- 
ways and new bousing that were 
neglected during its economic high* 
growth years. 

As they now see it, the trade issue 
is simply one more reason to adopt 


the sort of “reflationaiy’’ policies 
that the prime minister has resisted. 
The result has been a choosing-up 
of rides among senior party mem- 
bers, most of them old rivals of Mr. 
Nakasone. 

Opposing him are two former 
cabinet members, Toshio Kotnoto 
and Kiichi Miyazawa, and the par- 
ty’s vice pres dent, Susuxnu Nt- 
kaido. Supporting the prime minis- ' 
ter are such current cabinet 
members as the foreign minister. 
Shin taro Abe, and the finance min- 
ister, Noboru Takeshi ta. 

The most important factor may 
be the one thing all these men have 
in common —an ambition to suc- 
ceed Mr. Nakasone when his term 
expires in November 1986. 

Mr. Miyazawa and Mr. Komoto, 
for example, have championed ±c 
cause of looser budgets for some 
time. But others have not been in- 
volved conspicuously in economic 
matters until recently. Mr. Ni- 
kaido. for instance, appeals to have 
grown concerned only since last 
fell, when he briefly, and unsuc- 
cessfully. challenged Mr. Nakasone 
for the party presidency. 

Still the prime minister seems to 
have strengthened his hand. For 
one thing, political commentators 
say, his opponents are divided. For 
another, he has begun to emerge 
from the shadow of his chief bene- 
factor, former Prime Minister Ka- 
kud Tanaka, who was found guilty 
in 1983 in the Lockheed bribery 
scandal. 

Mr. Tanaka, often described as 
the Liberal Democratic kingmaker, 
was hospitalized on Feb. 27 after a 
stroke. In the absence of a strong 
behind-the-scene figure, Mr. Naka- 
sone has found it easier to assert 
himself, some commentators say. 


Moscow Holds 
A Huge Rally 
ForV-EDay 

By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
marked the 40th anniversary of vic- 
tory over Nazi Germany on Thurs- 
day with a Red Square parade that 
included tanks and artillery from 
World War D as well as some new 
weaponry never seen in public. 

World War II veterans in then- 
old uniforms and a contingent of 
partisan fighters in soft caps, their 
chests bright with medals, joined 
the march. 

Addressing the parade, Defease 
Minister Sergei L. Sokolov spoke of 
the “invincibility erf the land of the 
Soviets” and said that “retribution 
will be inevitable” for anyone who 
encroaches on the security of the 
Soviet Union or its partners. 

While paying tribute to its war- 
time allies, including the United 
States, Britain and France, Mar- 
shal Sokolov said, “The whole 
wo rid knows that it was the Soviet 
Union that made the decisive con- 
tribution to victory” and to “saving 
world civilization.” 

The Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, led the 13 members of 
the ruling Politburo in reviewing 
the houriong parade from atop the 
Lenin mausoleum. 

in an address at a reception later, 
he said: “In the Russian language, 
the word ‘tnir’ which is dear to us 
all has two meanings. One is ‘our 
planet/ The other is ’absence of 
war.’ And these two meanings are 
indivisible.” 

The UJS. ambassador, Arthur A. 
Hartman, boycotted the parade 
and a speech by Mr. Gorbachev on 
Wednesday night in which the So- 
viet leader criticized the United 
States as an aggressive force in the 
world today. American spokesmen 
said the reasons for the boycott 
were the belligerent tone of the cel- 
ebrations and the shooting in 
March o: a ILS. military officer in 
East Germany by a Soviet sentry. 

Throughout the sunny afternoon 
after the parade, veterans from 
around the city gathered in the’ 
squares and parks of Moscow for 
the reunions that have become a 
Victory Day tradition. 

Around the country, from the 
central square of Leningrad, which 
withstood a nearly three-year seige, 
to Volgograd, where a million peo- 
ple died in a battle that turned the 
tide of the war, the parades were 
followed by similar outpourings. 
Volgograd then was known as Sta- 
lingrad. 

Moscow’s parade began with a 
20-minute march- through that in- 
cluded detachments from Poland 
and Czechoslovakia and troops 
from modern units. 

Then the Russian armor roared 
to life, and 20 museum-piece T-34 
tanks, the pride of the defense of 

(Coutinsed on Page 2, CoL 3) 


ECsBudget 
1 Advanced by 
; Parliament 


Keuters 

STRASBOURG, France — The 
European Community cleared a 
major obstacle Thursday in efforts 
jo get a working budget for this 
vdar when its Parliament passed 
the bulk of the 1985 budget propos- 
als that had been approved by 
member governments. 

But the Parliament refused to 
approve a final spending figure, 
saying a more realistic sum should 
emerge at a second budget reading, 
expected next month. 

The Parliament rejected the bud- 
' get in December because the 
spending proposals of 26 billion 
European Currency Unis ($19 bil- 
lion) were below the foreseen com- 
mitments. The 10 governments 
have since agreed to provide the 
subsidies needed to make up the 
difference, estimated at 2 billion 
ECUs. 

Another breakthrough Thursday 
was the defeat of proposals that 
Would have Nocked payment of a 
budget rebate to Britain that had 
been agreed to by the other nine 
community governments. 

The budget deficit resulted from 
the exhaustion of the community’s 
main source of revenue, a 1 -percent 
share of value-added-tax levies. 
This share is to be increased to 1.4 
percent next year. 

Members of Parliament say that 
a final budget figure can be agreed 
on only after agriculture ministers 
j¥%e finally fixed 1985 farm prices. 

iThey also want higher spending 
on food aid and other projects, 
which could bring total spending to 
a record 28.5 billion ECUs, com- 
pared with last year’s -27 billion 
ECUs. 


New Budget Package 
Wins Reagan’s Support 


United Press Inrernaziomil 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan agreed Thursday 
to a sew Republican budget plan 
that would limit miliiary spending 
increases to the level of inflation 
and delay Social Security raises, an 
aide to Senator John C. Steams, 
Democrat of Mississippi, said. 

The aide said Mr. Reagan tele- 
phoned Mr. Stearns from Lisbon, 
where the president is ending his 
European tour, to lobby for his 
vote on the budget compromise 
plan. 

{The White House spokesman, 
Lany Speaker confirmed Mr. Rea- 
gan's support of the proposal. The 
Associated Press reported.] 

The new budget plan was put 
together by the Senate majority 
leader, Robert J. Dole of Kansas, 
who said it would cut “553 to $36 
billion” from the deficit, which is 
currently estimated at about S2O0 
billion. 

Mr. Dole, who was unable to get 
the Senate to agree to the original 
budget be worked out with Mr. 
Reagan, has spent this week seek- 
ing the support of both senators 
and the Wmte House for the new 
plan, including the limit on military 
spending. 

Last week, Mr. Reagan called 
(hat approach an “irresponsible 
act" ana pushed for approval of a 3 
percent increase in mintaiy spend- 
ing above inflation. 

Mr. Dole's revised budget would 
also freeze Social Security pay- 
ments at current levels, delaying for 
a year scheduled cost-of-living 
raises. The Senate voted last week 
to gram full payments, rejecting a 
more modest cut proposed earlier. 

The new Republican budget plan 
also would retain, at lower levels, 
many of the domestic spending 


programs Mr. Reagan wanted to . 
end. The proposal contains no tax 
increases. 

Earlier Thursday, the Senate vot- 
ed Thursday to continue federal 
subsidies through fiscal 1986 to 
Amtrak. the U.S. passenger rail 
system, which (be administration 
had wanted to phase oul 

On a vote of 5341, the Senate 
approved an amendment from Sen- 
ator Artec Specter, Republican of 
Pennsylvania, to keep $616 million 
in subsidies for the National Rail- 
road Passenger Corp. Thai is 90 
percent of the current amount go- 
ing 10 the railroad. 

“The thrust erf this is to keep 
Amtrak rolling,” Mr. Specter said, 
noting that if the funding is not 
provided, “Amtrak will stop oper- 
ating on September 30 and cause 
an enormous national dislocation 
affecting 20 million riders.” The 
action would still have to be ap- 
proved by the House. 

After that vote. Mr. Dole said he 
still did not know if be had enough 
support to push a revamped ver- 
sion of Mr. Reagan’s budget 
through the Senate. His party has a 
5347 majority in the chamber. 

The situation was confused by 
the fact that three senators were 
hospitalized Thursday. They were 
J. James Exon, Democrat of Ne- 
braska, who had abdominal pains; 
John P. East, Republican of North 
Carolina, who has a thyroid condi- 
tion; and Pete Wilson, Republican 
of California, who underwent sur- 
gery Wednesday fra- a ruptured ap- 
pendix. 

Vice President George Bush cut 
short a trip to Arizona to return to 
Washington in case he was needed 
to cast a tie-breaking vote. 

Meanwhile, Senate sources told 

(Condoned on Page 4, CoL 6) 


INSIDE 

■ Chinese authorities are mov- 
ing toward accommodating 
protesters’ demands to resume 
residence in Beijing. Page 2. 

■ Paul Thayer’s prison tom 

marks a growing U.S. detenni- 
narion to crack down on insider 
slock trading. Page 3. 

■ Three Palestinian leaders 
said the PLO must choose who 
could meet with U.S. officials in 
Middle East talks. Page 7. 

WEEKEND 

■ David Mamefs plays com- 
bine intellectual sensibility and 
gritty eloquence. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Cart G Icahn disclosed that 
he bolds 20J percent of TWA 
and may seek control. Page 13. 



TV Assobofcrl Press 

Soviet marines marched through Red Sqqareon Thursday during Moscow’s celebration of 
the 40th anniversary of V-E Day, top, as did elderly veterans and partisans who served in 
World War Q. Moscow celebrated the end of the war one day later than its Western 
wartime allies because it did not consider the war over until Prague was liberated on May 9. 

Russia Planning to Replace Missiles 

Rockets in Silos Reported to Be Changed for Mobile Ones 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union has told the United Slates in 
Geneva that it will replace older 
SS-I1 intercontinental ballistic 
missiles in sflos with new SS-25 
lCBMs to avoid undercutting what 
Moscow considers to be its limits 
under the unratifisd strategic arms 
limitation agreement, accenting to 
sources. 

Moscow said it would initially 
deploy 18 of the new mobile single- 
warhead SS-25s and remove 20 ^S- 
11s from silos, sources said. 

Soviet officials discussed the 
missil e exchanges two weeks ago 
before the U.S.-Soviel Standing 
Consultative Commission, whose 
normally secret sessions deal with 
questions about adherence to terms 
of arms-control agreements. 

Word of the Soviet move came 
from persons intide and outside of 
U.S. government who are critical of 
what they say are preparations by 
the Reagan administration to break 
out of t&e treaty limits. 

President Ronald Reagan is re- 
quired by law to report to Congress 
by June 1 on the consequences of 
continuing U.S. adherence to the 
limits in the imradfied treaty. An 
interagency committee is develop- 
ing options for him. 


The administration is also pres- 
sured by the fact that the United 
States could exceed the limits for 
multi-warhead missiles in October. 
Ai that time, the U.S. Navy is 
scheduled to deploy a Trident sub- 
marine whose 24 missiles would 
put the United States 14 missiles 

President Ronald Reagan ap- 
pears to have contradicted a 
king-standing U.S. position on 
Soviet missiles. Page 4. 

above the limit if no compensatory 
step were taken. Among possible 
steps are the retirement of a 16- 
tnissile Poseidon submarine or de- 
activation of 14 Minuteman-3 
land-based lCBMs. 

Assistant Secretary of Defense 
Richard N. Perie, an arms-control 
policymaker in the Pentagon, told a 
Senate Armed Services subcommit- 
tee Tuesday that in his “personal 
view,” the United States should not 
continue to respect the treaty limits 
after the agreement expires at the 
end of this year. Although the trea- 
ty was never ratified, both super- 
powers agreed to respect its limits. 

Mr. Perie contended that the 
United Stales had more to lose 
than the Soviet Union by adhering 
to the treaty. Because of the Tri- 
dent submarines due to be de- 
ployed over the next few years and 


the 1 0-warhead MX intercontinen- 
tal missile due in December 1986, 
the United States would have to 
retire a “significantly larger num- 
ber” of missiles than the Soviet 
Union. Mr. Perie said. 

Randal] Forsberg of the Institute 
for Defease and Disarmament 
Studies said Wednesday that a 
study of Soviet weapons programs 
showed that Moscow has the most 
to lose from the treaty limits. He 
said Moscow was dose to the limits 
for land- and submarine-based 
missiles, and had many missiles 
coming on line that could only be 
deployed by retiring others. 

In discussing the Soviet SS-25 
presentation in Geneva, an expert 
said Wednesday: 

“They are sending us a mixed 
message. They say they are interest- 
ed in continuing interim restraints 
on missiles, but they want us to 
know they can expand their offen- 
sive forces rapidly” if the treaty 
limits are drorped. 

The SS-25 iarj c up for discus- 
sion, a source said, because Wash- 
ington said the SS-25 missile violat- 
ed the treaty provision limiting 
each country to one new ICBM. 
The Soviet Union responded that 
the SS-25, which also can he carried 
on a truck-like mobile launcher, 
was not a new missile but a modifi- 
cation of its earlier SS-13 ICBM. 


Lisbon Speech 
Is Critical of 
Communism 


The Antvuacd Press 

LISBON — President Ronald 
Reagan, addressing the Portuguese 
legislature Thursday, sharply criti- 
cized Soviet and Nicaraguan lead- 
ers and declared that Western na- 
tions must remain militarily strong 
“so that never again would we be 
forced” to “resort to violence” to 
safeguard liberty. 

Warning of threats of Soviet ag- 
gression that have persisted since 
the end of World War 11. Mr. Rea- 
gan rejected criticism from the So- 
viet leader. Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
and accused Nicaragua of “inter- 
fering with democracy in the .Amer- 
icas.” 

At a Kremlin rally Wednesday, 
the Soviet leader had called the 
United Slates “the forward edge of 
the war menace to mankind.” 

[The House of Representatives 
passed. 322-93, a nonbinding reso- 
lution Thursday c alling for Die ex- 
pulsion of Ambassador Anatoli F. 
Dobrynin unless the Soviet Union 
apologizes for the shooting death 
of U.S. Army Major Arthur D. 
Nicholson Jr., United Press Inter- 
national reported from Washing- 
ton. 

[The sponsor. Representative 
William Broomfield, Republican of 
Michigan, said he had not checked 
with the While House or State De- 
partment on the resolution, an 
amendment to the State Depart- 
ment spending bill but said “it is 
time to gel tough.” 

[Representative Henry Gonza- 
lez, Democrat of Texas, countered 
that the resolution “stinks, literal- 
ly" and that if Republicans want to 
be tough on the Soviet Union, 
“pass a resolution declaring war. 
Thai will really send a message.”] 

Aboui 40 Communist Party dele- 
gates to Portugal’s Assembly of the 
Republic walked out of the cham- 
ber before Mr. Reagan delivered 
the final major speech of his 10-day 
European tour, after conferring 
with Prime Minister Mario Soares. 

The president began his speech 
by ad-libbing to the remaining del- 
egates, “I’m sorry that some of the 
chairs on the left seem to be un- 
comfortable.” 

At another point in his address, 
which was warmly applauded by 
those remaining of the 250-member 
assembly. Mr. Reagan interjected 
that the meaning of democracy in- 
cluded "the right to speak, to as- 
semble, to publish and to vote, even 
to walk oul” 

Afterward the Communists is- 
sued a statement saying their walk- 
out was intended to display “indig- 
nation and repulse as to Mr. 
Reagan's presence, especially after 
his homage to Nazi criminals, 
members of the SS, in the cemetery 
of Bitburg." 

The president congratulated 
Portugal for turning away from 42 
years of dictatorial rule to embrace 
democracy, and criticized commu- 
nist societies. 

He said it is in “the collectivist 
world that economies stagnate, that 
technology is lagging and that peo- 
ple are oppressed and unhappy 
with their lives.” 

Citing Portugal's heritage of pro- 
ducing explorers, Mr. Reagan said, 
“Once again, you are charting a 
new course, not just for Portugal 
but for all others, especially those 
people of the Third World with 
whom your long-established ties 
permit you to speak with a special 
trust, wisdom and candor.” 

In summing up his trip, he said, 
■*I have seen in these past days 
reminders of the tragedy and tfte 
grandeur of our time: I have heard 
the voice of the 20th century. It is 
humanity's voice, heard in every 
cenmiy, every time. 

“And the words are unmistak- 
able; they call out to us in anguish 
but also in hope: let the nations live 
in peace among themselves, let all 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


Reagan Having a Hard Time With Soft Sell on European Trip 


By Lou Gmn on 

Washington Pan Service 

STRASBOURG, France— President Ronald Reagan has 
spent a week in Europe promoting his vision of democracy 
and private enterprise, an effort that was supposed to culmi- 
nate Wednesday with an inspiring address to the European 
Parliament commemorating die 40ih anniversary of the 
Allied defeat of Nazi Germany. 

The national security adviser, Robert C. McFariane, had 
said the day before that the speech would feature “a very soft 
sell” of the president's "ideas for resolution of the problems 
with the Soviet Union." 

But for Mr. Reagan, who prides himself on his persuasive 
skills, it has been a week in which he encountered unusual 
difficulty in making a sale. 

The president’s ragged performance Wednesday, caused 
in part by a breakdown of his TelePrompTer and partly by 
leftist hecklers among the parliamentary delegates, deepened 
a weeklong impression that Mr. Reagan's journey to Europe 
was a mission gone awry. 

At the economic summit in Bonn, Mr. Reagan found all of 
his European counterparts opposed to U.S. economic sanc- 
tions against Nicaragua and most of them skeptical of his 


space anti-missile plan. France rejected almost everything 
that the United States had proposed in either economic or 
foreign affairs. 

The day after the summit ended Mr. Reagan tried to 
extricate himself from the predicament caused by his deci- 
sion to lay a wreath at a German military cemetery where 49 
members of lbe Waffen SS are buried. " 

He partially succeeded with two powerful speeches, but 
Jewish leaders refused to participate in the ceremony at the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Bergen -Belsen concentration camp site, and the event was 
further marred when more than 30 Jewish protesters, some 
of them the children of Holocaust survivors, were hauled 
away by West German police outside the camp gates. 

Mr. Reagan held talks Tuesday with Prime Minister 
Felipe Gonzalez of Spain that both leaders described as 
relatively successful 

But these talks also failed to produce the favorable televi- 
sion publicity that is always a central purpose of Mr. 
Reagan's journeys abroad. Network coverage of his visit 
Tuesday to Madrid contrasted the friendly ceremony erf the 
state dinner that he was attending with’ pictures of anti- 


Reagan demonstrators bang charged and bloodied by police 
near the U-S. Embassy. 

In addition to these conspicuous embarrassments, Mr. 
Reagan's effectiveness has also been hampered by a series of 
minor mishaps that conflicted with the White House's repu- 
tation for smoothly choreographing events. 

When reporters asked why Mr. Reagan had made no 
mention in his Strasbourg speech Wednesday of the Soviet 
role in World War IL White House officials produced a 
letter that they said Mr. Reagan had sent Tuesday to the 
Soviet leader. Mikhail S. Gorbachev. But Mr. Reagan 
seemed unaware of the letter when he was asked a question 
about it by a reporter. 

White House officials may also have slipped up in failing 
to alert reporters to Wednesday's protest at the European 
Par li amen l which they now say was anticipated. Mr. 
McFariane held a briefing Tuesday nigh t that tasted longer 
than the president’s speech Wednesday but did not mention 
expected heckling. 

Although Mr. Reagan has been less successful than usual 
in achieving the rhetorical triumphs that have been a feature 
of his presidency, his speeches have placed him squarely in 
the mainstream of post- World War II presidents in appeal- 
{ Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 





P«gc 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


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Authorities May Permit 
Some Resettled People 
To Again Live in Beijing 


By John F. Bums 
, A'«n- York Timex Semcr 

• BEUING — A week after criti- 

ewng as “shameful"’ the behavior 

• “ sewral hundred men and women 

■ who held a sit-in at the Communist 
rarty headquarters here, city au- 

. (bonnes have begun moving to- 
■ward accommodating the protest- 
; ere demand that they be permitted 

■ to resume residence in the Chinese 

■ capital. 

The protesters were made up of 
■young people Who were resettled in 
. “ e countryside during the Cultural 
.Revolution and who now wish to 
come home. The authorities’ con- 
; cession took the Form of a circular 
to ail work units in the city, inviting 
applications on behalf of certain 
categories of those who had been 
resettled. 

In all. about two million young 
Beijing residents went to the coun- 
tryside in the Cultural Revolution, 
and about 400.000 never returned. 

The circular took many Chinese 
.by surprise, since officials had pre- 
viously ordered the protesters to 
leave the capital forthwith and to 
immerse themselves once more in 
; the “glorious” tradition erf working 
for the common good in the poorer 
parts of the country. 

For several days, the party -con- 
trolled press has been mounting a 
campaign to extol “educated 
youth" who have persisted without 
complaint at their assignments in 
remote areas, and to praise others 
who have come forward as volun- 
teers. 

Beyond this, the cnmpai gr) has 
denigrated as selfish and shameful 
the tactic of public protest, c allin g 
it a relic of the Cultural Revolution. 


the 10-year period or political up- 
heaval that ended in 1976. 

As word of the city authorities' 
new circular spread. young Chinese 
concluded that senior party offi- 
cials .had adopted a two-pronged 
response to the protest: upholding 
the resettlement policy before the 
nation as a whole, but moving qui- 
etly to meet the grievances of at 
least some of those who took the 
risk of protesting in Beijing, 

The logic of this approach is said 
to lie in the opportunity it gives for 
the leadership to show flexibility 
while simultaneously guarding 
against the problems that would 
develop if hundreds of thousands 
of young people around the coun- 
try suddenly flooded back to the 
cities. 



BEIJING INFLATION — Shoppers fined up to buy food in Beijing Thursday in 
anticipation of major price increases Friday. Beef, mutton and fish are going up by more 
than 100 percent, for example. After Friday, food prices wfll be set by supply and 
demand. Beijing is the 23d dty to institute the government ordered market reforms. 


Huge Soviet Parade Marks V-E Day 

on behalf of three groups of former O •/ 


behalf of three groups of former 
Beijing residents: those who were 
single, a group that apparently in- 
cludes those whose spouses have 
died, as well as those who never 
married; those those who married 
other former Beijing residents and 
settled down together in the prov- 
inces; and those who married a 
spouse who remained in Beijing. 

It was not clear bow many peo- 
ple would meet the criteria. 

What the concession meant on 
an individual basis was demon- 
strated by the reaction of a young 
English teacher at the university in 



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who rushed to a friend's home in 
Beijing after hearing of the circular 
and talked late into the night about 
the prospect of returning to the dty 
where be grew up. 

“1 never dreamed I would have 
chance of returning to Beijing per- 
manently,” the young man said. He 
spoke of his “embarrassment” that 
his good fortune had come from the 
“courage” of those who mounted 
the sit-in, while be had done noth- 
ing. 

On a broader basis, many Chi- 
nese took the concession as fresh 
evidence of the relative broad- 
mindedness of the administration 
of Deng Xiaoping, the 80-year-old 
party leader who was himself exiled 
to the provinces during the Cultur- 
al Revolution and forced to work 
as a lathe operator. 


(Continued from Page I) 
Moscow, Stalingrad and Kursk, 
raced into Red Square. 

Among the modern equipment, 
the silvery, short-range SS-2I mis- 
sile with a nuclear capability was 
on public display for the first time. 

Also seen were the T-64 tank, the 
M-1976 artillery gun, an armored 
personnel carrier and an air-trans- 
portable short-range artillery piece, 
Western military attaches said. 

■ Gorbachev Backs Detente 
Earlier. Serge Schmemann of The 
New York Tima reported: 

Mr. Gorbachev, in his speech 
Wednesday to war veterans, de- 
nounced the United States as the 
“forward edge of the war menace to 
mankind” but affirmed his fidelity 
to the “priceless" experience of di- 
ten te. 


He also said: “From our point of 
view, detente is not the ultimate 
aim of policy. It is needed, but only 
as a transitional stage from a world 
cluttered with arms to a reliable 
and all-embraring international se- 
curity system.” 

Diplomats said this was Mr. 
Gorbachev's most elaborate expo- 
sition of his interest in a revival of 
detente which is one of the basic 
themes of his administration. 

In the speech, Mr. Gorbachev 
seemed to seek a balance between 
the assertive patriotism demanded 
by the occasion and an appeal for 
renewed cooperation with the 
United States. 

“The policy of the United States 
is growing more bellicose in charac- 
ter.” he said, “and has become a 
constant negative factor of interna- 
tional relations.” 


He avoided mentioning Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan, but Listed So- 
viet accusations against his poli- 
cies. including the effort to develop 
a space-based defense system, hos- 
tility toward the Sandinist govern- 
ment in Nicaragua and support for 
the anti- Communist insurgents in 
Afghanistan. 

The Soviet leader also was criti- 
cal of Mr. Reagan’s visit to the 
West German mililaiy cemetery at 
Bitburg, where 49 Waffen SS sol- 
diers are buried. Among the West- 
ern leaders meeting in Bonn, he 
said, “there were politicians read 


Reagan Says 
Communists 
Are a Threat 
To Americas 


(Condoned from Pfege 1) 

ties abide in the feUowship that 
intends." 

Speaking indirectly to the Soviet 
leader, Mr. Reagan said the West 
has learned after World War II that 
it is a mistake to believe “it is 
enough only to wish for peace:" 

“Instead, we accepted reality," 
Mr. Reagan said. “We took seri- 
ously those who threatened to end 
the independence of our nations 
and our peoples. And we did what 
peoples who value their freedom 
must do. We joined together in a 
great alliance. And we rearmed. 

“But we did so only so that never 
again would we be forced —under 
the weight of our betrayed illusions 
— to resort to violence,” he said. 

Asked what he thought of Mr. 
Gorbachev’s speech, Mr. Reagan 
replied, “What I usually think of 
him.” When a reporter said Mr. 
Gorbachev had called him a men- 
ace to mankind, the president 
snapped: “Who is he to talk?" 

He also criticized Nicaragua's 
president, Daniel Ortega Saavedra. 
Told that Mr. Ortega, who is tour- 
ing Eastern Europe, had called for 
an end to U.S. interference in Nica- 
ragua, Mr. Reagan replied: “We 
are not interfering. They’re inter- 
fering with democracy in the Amer- 
icas," 


to forget or even justify the SS f m gM*t 

cutthroats and, moreover, pay hon- *-*■'*' V UM/ 

ors to them." 


But Mr. Gorbachev also paid 
tribute to the “military valor” of 
Allied soldiers in World War II. 


Reagan’s European Mission: Off the Track 

George P. Shultz, who wanted the 
speech to take a constructive ap- 
proach. he said. 



&vi ® 

Est. 1911 

tell the taxi driver "sank too doe noo’ 
5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 
Falkentunn Scr. 9, MUNICH 
M/S ASTOR at sea 



(Continued from Page 1) 
mg to the traditional values that 
grew out of the wartime alliance. 

Throughout the week Mr. Rea- 
gan has quoted from Franklin D. 
Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman. 
Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. 
Kennedy in appealing for U.S. -Eu- 
ropean cooperation. His speech 
Wednesday ruled out any UiL goal 
of achieving nuclear superiority, 
once a Reagan goal. 

He also said that “the United 
States does not seek to undermine 
or change the Soviet system nor to 
impinge upon the security of the 
Soviet system." This was in con- 
trast to the emphasis of Reagan 
statements during his 1982 Europe- 
an trip, when he talked about the 


eventual collapse of the Soviet sys- 
tem. 

It was phrases like this that 
brought Mr. McFarlane into con- 
flict with the White House commu- 
nications director, Patrick J. Bu- 
chanan. who reportedly favored a 
harder line toward the Russians. 

A White House official said that 
Mr. McFarlane had wanted to go 
beyond deploring Soviet conduct 
to make a number of practical sug- 
gestions for improving U.S.-Soviet 
relations, as Mr. Reagan did 
Wednesday. 

“Reagan is a conservative, and 
this was a dispute between conser- 
vatives." said the official. “But it 
was clearly a victory, for McFar- 
lane** and Secretary of State 


Although in his speech Wednes- 
day Mr. Reagan praised European 
values and said the United States 
was committed “to the re-creation 
of a larger and more genuinely Eu- 
ropean Europe.” he has spent much 
of the week suggesting that the ba- 
sic elements of his domestic pro- 
gram. especially reducing govern- 
ment regulations and cutting (axes, 
should be adopted even by social- 
ist-minded European governments. 

Paraphrasing a saying of Presi- 
dent Kennedy's about stimulative 
tax cuts that “a rising tide lifts all 
boats," a White House offitial 
said: “We believe that a rising tide 
lifts ail Europeans.” 


For Brazil 

(Continued from Page 1) 
last year,” said Representative 
Amaral Neto of the Social Demo- 
cratic Party. “The electoral college 
ended the last chapter of a rope, 
and now we are all in favor of direct 
elections.” 

President Sarney. 55. said 
Wednesday he was planning to step 
down in 1989, but would leave a 
final decision on the length of his 
term, as well as a date for elections, 
to a constitutional assembly to be 
meet in 1987. 

“The next step is to clean up the 
electoral law, freeing access to ra- 
dio and television and cutting out 
fraud,” said President Ulisses Gui- 
maraes of the Chamber of Depu- 
ties. 

He said that a new package of 
constitutional legislation to be pre- 
sented in a few months would also 
include greater freedom to form 
and organize labor unions, a new 
press law and a revised national 
security law. 


Vatican Silencer® 


WORLD BRIEFS , 

alian Theologian 

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP)«^tM$&do Boff, the Franciscan friar who is < 
■a leading proponent of hbera&W'tKeology, said the Vatican has ordered 
him to stop speaking in public for an undisclosed period of time qs 
punishment for his views. '■ 

In a written statement Wednesday, Father Boff. a theologian and 
author, defended his views and declared that be was not a Marxist. “By '■ 
the decision of Rome, I must refrain from speaking in public for a certain - 
time,” be said. . ' 

According to a statement released Thursday by cite Vatican, Father / 


church bad — „ — . _ - - 

3 ted the terms “with religious spirit." It said he could not speak 
pnbficly or write during what it called, the “period of respectful sdenceT 


Boff was informed of the punishment May 1 because of teachings that the 
dhurch bad termed “dangerousT* The Vatican statement said he bad 
accepted 
publicly, i 

MPBow Urges Using UNESCO Reserve 

PARIS (NYT) — UNESCO's director-general. Amadou Mahiar 
M’Bow, proposed Thursday that money be 
help make up the. loss of Washington's 25 


\ , 


bu 


be used from a reserve fund to 
percent contribution to the 


The proposal came at the start of a six-week meeting of the executive 
board of the United Nations Educational, Scientific ana 1 Cultural Organi- 
zation. The board is trying to draw up a budget and program for the next 
two years following US. withdrawal from the agency. 

Western delegates appeared hostile to the idea of using the reserve , 
fund, saying that would violate regulations and weaken pressures on Mr * 
M’Bow to revise agency policies. Meanwhile, the board decided Thursday 
against debating a US. report critical of the agency’s management. 

Blow Blamed in South African’s Death 


JOHANNESBURG (NYT) —An am 
kSoutfa 


on Andries Radit- 
seta, a 29-year-old blade South African labor leader who died after being 
held by the police, said Thursday that his death had been caused -by brain 
damage “consistent with a blow or falL” 

Hospital officials said Thursday that a second black activist died over 
the weekend after being questioned by police an charges of public 
violence. 

The developments coincided with continued unrest is black townships 
near Johannesburg, in the Orange Free State and in the Eastern Cape that 
claimed five more lives, 

Snipers Keep Beirut Crossing Shut 

BEIRUT (Reuters) — Snipers foiled efforts on Thursday to reopen a 
single crossing along the Green Line between East and West Beirut after a 
week of Christian-Moslem fighting. 

A police spokesman said two cars quickly crossed the line after it was 
officially declared open this morning under a cease-fire agreement, but no 
more drivers risked the journey before the route was shut again less than 
four hours later. 

Rifle shots were fired over the 400 meters (about 437 yards) of dividing 
land between Christian and Moslem barricades at the crossing's eastern 
and western ends. Workmen on both sides gave op trying to d ew earth 
barricades, the police said. About 70 people have been killed and 
hundreds wounded in the worst sectarian fighting in Beirut fra nearly a 
year. 

For the Record ( 

The Torftish Cypriot constituent assembly passed a motion in Nicosia 
on Thursday scheduling a presidential election on June 9 in the self- 
proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. (APJ 

Chancellor Hdmnt Kohl of West Germany is to visit Britain on May 18 
for talks with Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher topreparc next month's 
European summit, it was announced in Bonn on Tnnraday. (AFP) 
Five more patients with Legionnaires' disease were admitted to a 
hospital in Stafford, England, cm Thursday, brin g in g the total thereto 
144 cases, including 31 deaths, in three weeks. It was the worst recorded 
outbreak of the disease. (Reuters) 

The US. government does not have to contribrte to the settlement of 
the Agent Orange class-action suit by Vietnam veterans and their 
families, a US. district judge ruled Thursday in New York. Seven 
chemical companies that manufactured tin: herbicide and had agreed to a 
SI 80-ndDioa settlement had sued the eovernmenL (AP) 

SwedBh employers and moons agreed Thursday to resume pay negotia- 
tions fra the first time since a weeklong strike by civil savants dosed 
airports last Thursday. (Reuters) j 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


Page 3 




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Career Plans 
Backfire for 
Diplomats in 
U.S. Service 


By Maureen Santini 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — About 100 
Foreign Service officers may find 
their, diplomatic careers abruptly 
halted as they are fenced into early 
retirement because time are not 
enough promotions to go around. 

“These are good solid perform- 
ers and it’s coming as something of 
a shock to them.” said Dennis K. 
Hays, president of the American 
Foreign Service Association, the 
union of career dipl omats “These 
are not the duds.” 

The problem is the Foreign Ser- 
vice’s new retirement system that 
was designed to make way for tal- 
ented employees on their way op by 
reducing the number of senior offi- 
cers in a system that had been criti- 
cized as top-heavy. 

But no one knew it would work 
oat quite this way. 

Under the plan, jf a career diplo- 
mat does not win apnunotion mto* 
the senior ranks within six years, he 
or she is retired mandatonfy. It is 
the diplomat who decides when to 



Veterans Swap Memories of Patton 

Monument Dedicated at Desert Camp in California 


General Pattern during a campaign in World War EL 


By Charles Hillingcr 

Los Angeles Times Service 

CEflRIACO SUMMIT, California — Veterans 
of Genera] George S. Patton Jr.'s World War O 
battles in Africa and across Europe commemorat- 
ed the 40th anniversary of V-E Day at the desert 
camp location where they trained for the war 
against the Nazis. 

About JO veterans trae among the 400 people 
present Wednesday as a stone pyramidal monu- 
ment was dedicated to the World War fl Desert 
Training Center, which was located near this tiny 
town 30 miles (48 kDatoetera) east of bidio. Cali- 
fornia. 

■ Before and after the ceremony, the former sol- 
diers swapped tales, showed each other vintage 
photographs and reminisced. 

For seven months in 1942, General Patton and 
bis 60,000 tank corpsmen and artillerymen learned 
to fight and survive in the desert in preparation for 
the African battles. 

Charles Jeglinski. 74. of Los Angeles, and Ralph 
Delgado, 60. of Ontario, California, showed up 
wearing their old uniforms and brought along 
memorabilia and photos. 

“Here's one you fellas don’t have.” said Frank 
CanoU 65, of Phoenix, Arizona, who trained here. 


“Remember what Patton said he was going to do 
when he reached the Rhine? Here’s proof he kept 
his promise” 

Mr. Carroll reached into an envelope and pro- 
duced a picture of the general urinating into the 
river. 

Next to the monument and speaker's stand was 
a sign that proclaimed: “Future Home of General 
Patton Museum.** 

Gerry HiDler, California desert district manager 
for the Bureau of Land Management, said that the 
monument was the first step by the bureau in 
developing a Patton Memorial Visitor’s Center to 
bouse nis personal papers, artifacts, and reminis- 
cences and records of those who trained at the 
desert center. 

Some of the men at the dedication said General 
Patton would interrupt programs on the camp 
radio station and either compliment his soldiers 
“or give them belT for something they had done 
wrong. 

The invocation at the ceremony was delivered by 
the Reverend William B. Pettigrew, 64, of the 
United Methodist Church of Walnut Creek. Cali- 
fornia. Mr. Pettigrew was a sergeant in General 
Patton’s European command. 

“He was firm, yes," he said. “But he was also a 
warm, caring human being, a great genera).” 


Los Angeles Agrees to Raise Pay of 3,900 Women 


By Janet Clayton 

Los Angeles Tunes Service 


Kehb Connie, the dty compared court order requiring payment of 
entry-level jobs and found that retroactive pay. 


•VttfNIUOi ti!Kc« »• hi, 4 


u Crossing Shm 

Ui<yv.> ;k.- 

f &eum u , jpats - 


*Pmil Thayesy a former deputy defense secretary, and Ids 
wife, Margery, leave a Washington comthoose after be was 
./sentenced to low years in prism for obstructing justice. 

SEC Calls Thayer Case 
A Wamins to Insiders 


the diplomat who derides when to LOS ANGELES — In a major 
begin the six-year dock, cmce he or concession to the idea of “compa- 


LOS ANGELES In a major ones occupied by women and those Mr. Comiie said that if the union 


she has reached the top of the rid- rable worth,” the dty of Los Ange- a f 5-percent wa«: 
die ranks. les has agreed to bring the wages of . *n additional ; 


occupied by men were separated by had pressed its case in court and the' dty and San Diego County or 
a 15-percent wage gap. won, “there would have been retro- illegal’ discrimination iu hiring 

An additional group of a few active pay due,” potentially forcing women and minority group mem- 
hundred employees, including ex- the city to pay back wages from as bers. 
ecutive secretaries and principal long ago as 1978. , . . 


won, “there would have been retro- 


dle ranks. les has agreed to bin 

About 150 officers, some in their 3,900 women heidin 
mi<M0s, began the process in 1981, low-paymgjobs into 


The 1977 San Diego decree re- 
sulted from a 1976 lawsuit by the 
Department of Justice that accused 
the city and San Diego County of 
illegal discrimination iu hiring 


: with those ecutive secretaries and principal long ago as 


the firatyear the new system was in of re® 1 in jobs on the same skill 
effect, there, decisions were based lev®- . . . _ - • . • 


clerics, are likely to receive similar 
types of “pay equity” raises in the 
next few months, he said. 


I San Diego Quotas Dropped 

Ronald J. Ostrow of die Las Ange- 


MEJESKUK tZttSXSSGSZ 


what the promotion rate would be has used comparable worth as a 
in the coming six years. Their terms basis- for setting wages,” said 


StticnuK' 

lurrti 

“i! S'r. 
-iW.V’ (•; ! . , 


!!:r '■'■K'lnjjg. 
Rvr.sfoij. 


m the conung six years, lfietr terms 

wiG be up from the beginning of Cheryl Parisi, a 

1987 the American Fi 

Ifc Ha„ said: “Mos rf to SBSSifi 


- will be upfrom the begumiug of Cheryl Parisi, * spakeswomm for 
1987 . the American Federation of State, 

information about a company, is <awrf- “Most trf ^ County and Municipal Employees, 

every wettvT^ winch negotiated -Wednesday’s set- 

say that the growing SUhfS’iftTl tfke a dement with the dty. 

good record. I might as well take a She said that other cities, such as 


numberOf coiWaie merns and 80°“ rccoro. i nugm asweuiaKe a She said that other dries, such as re an dat es, or without strikes or sit- The tamest was the first iomt counties have said they would join 

jr***—*—.*- >*■“ - >■*»• 

of the «Suhrf compos stacs, :7~ _ . gT theadaricsoflibrmiiisandlhosc ““““f- . ... „ Bali that the quotas be dimmared. 

me SO beefflue Tm too 

plqyment Opportunity Commis- 
sion in 1981, alleging wage 


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Kiii clft;*.- • v . 
•rthctu * -.j-w 

«muitt . 

- ; ; • 

d tel—. " *H 

Wtrrs' u 

"briT 

iftfr *v'efc A.' 

tw In nuMsdurv : 
u* 

'rfi* i 1 -*:"' : .. : 

rtr*: ihr 
(w ■■■• 

ta) r- 


! ;, -”.t.r E N c 
JiiTlC c .7 


7; . By Mary TTlbmton information about a company, is ^ “Most of them 

■' and Howstffl Kurtz a*™™* said, Tm a bright guy. Tve got a 

- Waskmgun Port Strike SLSS, good record. I nugfu as well take a 

'' WASHINGTON — The four- chance and get pranoted reaDy fast 

.jarpriwntamta-ftuITtaya-.^ S 

Joimer dopmy dtfaw ^^ry, u ? ^ 

jrn unnsmfty hardt sentmee m a mties tomake imnd and SprS- valuable, 
case involving insider stock trad- ©n the stock market ' “The trouble is. there are 150 
in& and marks a gttmng federal Busm^ WeA magazme recent- othcr WP havc 

(teteratmanon to oack down on ^ c ^ kl ^ insidetSStg “an tm- tbesame tiring, and not aB of them 
this increasingly wide^j^ad j*e-_ denric.^ a stody oftafaovns Sd »*■»«»¥ 10 ** P”™ 0 ® 1 - 
nomenon. ; _ ~ mexere invdvini pubBdv traded KteraUyjwa cannot get across the 

V ^ . Securities , and- Exchange m tS^last two years, it tiireshold because momotioa rates 

Gnmnusston settles most- such . gonStto the price rose in the >■"« appreciably lower than 


agreement between the dty and the 
union as a “landmark break- 
through” in reaching pay equity for 
women. 


UB. district judge has ap- 
d a request by the dty of San 
> and the UE. Justice Depan- 


In January 1983, the county 
asked a federal court to dissolve the 
decree; Judge Schwartz turned 
down the request the following 
April. However, San Diego County 
is among the 50 jurisdictions where 
the Justice Department now wants 
to drop the hiring quotas. 


Diego and the \JS. Justice Depart- to drop the hiring quotas. 

He said the dty barf settled the nie 9* drop hiring quotas for mi- Revnntrf« rfwiinmt m nwnfv 

tKr r. Tr , ^ nonty and women aty employees . Mr - Keynoiasaecimedtospeaiy 

from a 1977 federal drcree. ^ °* ^ e . 50 citia and 


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u ." 

ir 


Commission settles most - such 
■cases through dvil consent decrees 
in which, defendants, ndther admit 
•qor deny guilt but agree to repay 
.illidi profiK. ... 

u iu recent years, however; the 


cmgers. involving pubfidy traded Btoallyjust qmnot get across the 
companies m the! tetW years, it threshold because promoboa rales 
toma that the —*«• — - « it., have been anoredablv lower than 


dominated by women. But “this is 
the first time we’ve talked about 
ccmmaralrifity, saying, *See what 
truck drivers mkke and pay cleri- 
cals the same;’ ” she added. 

■ The agreement, if approved by 
the City Council, will cost the dty. 
$12 mulion in special salary -in- 


goals. 

By either mw-trng or exceeding 
the quotas. San Diego already has 
achieved many of the decree’s ob- 
jectives, said William Bradford 


the Justice Department in as! 
that the quotas be eliminated. 



discrimination against female em- J“ uve h ^ wuuam Braoiortl 

ployees in the oty*s salary suuc- attor- 

n^gpi^^ Wednesday. ^ 


Always the superb choice 


7 . 1 “^ found that the ry nrt rose m the muuon m spcuaj saiaiy.m- 

ttawghtavfl consent decrees ■ ^ 0 ^; before the announcement *** w ® 16 *} “ e these peojrie creases, averaging 5 pereent a year 
iich.4efaidwits neriher;admri 72 .percent of the time. General made this decision,” he said. through June 1988. 


awiaafts 

£-5^'*“ 

jaewsttas 


percent,it said. 


account for 52 The rales have been 30 percent to 

40 percent lower for several tea- 





April i; would bring the wages of 


" I 5, reccQ , t ^ however, the Curt a Mueller, anSEC at- sons: the large number of pofitical secretaries, clerks and Bbrarians, at 

•SEC hasrefened many more cases fonwnent official, said that such appointees who are given diplo- in pereent <* wnnw Mve t** 0 serveq Wltp a 

frw Ainmiflftl nmoAntitrm nftMt a- a.r. I H * .rT^. . _ 1 9 * . A — - 1 . r . j t _ ■ *_ _ ... 


J- • for ctumnal prosecution, often - trading “skewers the market” made posts; less voluntary attrition en, close to wages paid for jobs of 

Jcadmg to charges of obstruction of “People aren’t going to invest than anticipated; and an increase omilar skin levels dominated by 

- 2 justice, the charge to whiA Mr. their money if they think they’re from 60 to 65 in the mandatory moi, such as gardeners, garage al-. 


wthout a negotiated settlement the 


r 1 w~i 
••• 


•justice, the charge to which Mr. their money 
-Thayer. 65, ana a stockbroker F nm P t 0 get 
■ fneud. BDly Bob Harris, 45, plead- ^ 0 ^ whhi 
'ed guilty in March: • • . i • 

‘ Both men , were sentenced : to, sortem 


said. ‘ 

: In seuteooag Mr. Thayer, US. 


d off by. the big retirement age. 
knowledge,” he For most of the officers vnlnera- 
• „ ble to mandatory retirement Ihe 

j next year wiD be the last fa- win- 


East German Grosses toWesi 

Reuien 

HANOVER, West Germany — 


ten dan ts, drivers and maintenance HANOVER, West Ge 

personnel. An East German crane 

In arriving at the settlement, said crossed the border Weduc 
the city administrative officer,- West Germany. 


Court decision last June that bona 
fide seniority systems supersede 
quota plans. 

The dty had petitioned for elimi- 


Beverly Wilshire Hotel 

Wilsfaire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. 90212 
(213)2754282 Telex 698-220 


rane operator nation of the quotas even before 
ednesday into the court’s ruling in a Memphis. 


Tennessee, case. 


London (01) 583-3050 
Frankfun (069)29 04 71 
Hong Kong (5) 22 11 42 


London (01) 409-0814 
Frankfurt (069) 28 75 24 
Hong Kong (3) 68 23 33 



tioiL - • erf ruinois and gossip about poso- 

*■ Mr. Th^er r e si gne d from the hie takeovers, mergers . . . from 
Defense Department one day be- people who have no busness cBs- 
fore charges woe filed against hrsn cusangin such places made infor- 


in January. 1W4. ... *. - . - 

The ^SECs en/raccment dief. 


marion. Many people take advan- 
iage of that” . 

A 1984 law enables the SEC to 


Hays said. 

William L Bacchus, of the State 
Department’s personnel bureau, 
said: “Basically, the system is 
based on vacancies. There’s got to 
be a vacancy at the next level be- 


A 1984 law enables the SbC to ^ a ~ v JT, 

recover triple damages in insider on ijomote somebody, 

-jeare nroopg, mmb^saMaa^ tradnur caso. “The lakes are feet- however good they are.” 


3age to those Who abuse insider 
formation ot the investigative 
"TwoceSS:” SEC officials said drat 


trading cases. ‘The stakes are get- 
ting higher, ” said Anne Flannery, 
SEC enforcement chief in New 
Yodc The risk of getting caught 


U nlike the Gvil Service where 
employees may remain at one 
^;u «a» '**■*- «. gpAiuK urngm grade level permanently, the For- 

^&ey jcquM not recall a stiffer : «n- ^ pmsec J£rx mtich eign' Service requires people to re- 
I -;. . . - grater tfian u was.” sign if they have not been promot- 

* Gordon S. Maddin, fffesidmi of Robert fi. Robbins, a Washing- ed ina certain hnniber erf yean. 
^ie National Asstxaaticm of. Somri- ton securities lawyer, said the sen- The average re tirement age is 56 
jiesDealto, said Mr. Tfu^s sen- teace u vriIlbeadetesFeaL”Headd- with 28 years of service, and that 
^nee^was not toobarriL Hesaid ed dial “there are probably more can in dude mffitaty service. Offi- 
Jiat mader . trading, buying and cases than die SEC, with their Km- cos may retire after 20 years at 42 
paling stocks based on pritmeged ited staff, couW prosecute.'’ percent of their salary. 


it matter tradmg, buying 
ting stocks based on priv 


percent of thdr salary. 


w 



JI.S. Hospital Assailed on 24 Deaths 

-Polity AUoived Handicapped Babies to Die, Groups Say 


. JEty Al Kamcn The letter said the formula after a federal law ^proved last 

wJbingiM Aa Service . means that the “hospital team fao- faU takes effect in October. The law 
•*. WASHII^jTON An Qklafeo- -tms-. into its fife-and-death ded- forbids the wit hholding of m ed i cal 
tfca City hospital has been accused . sions" such political and fiscal mat- treatment from handicapped new- 
*Sf aBbwing two dmrn severely, reduced ioverament bubasedon .some i<rf the criteria 

IhaadkapptS infants todie without - spending for medfcaT care and afiegedty used m Oklahoma. _. 

s prficy that based “geo^^Bcal and fiuanaalhmita- Mr. Bopp said it was not certain 
^Sait dedskSmpart on the : ... wh^er ibe hospital had changed 

Icfe^Efl’s tnaital apd rmyrical po- . “Dqjcadmg <m the team’s as- 115 P^y- 



aas/’ whether u 

“Dqjendmg cui the team’s as- tepediey. 


said it was not certain 
hospital tmrf changed 


JnDietLessens 
Heart Disease 

lot Angeks Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Dutch 
researchers have found that eat- 
ing at least a pound of fish each 
week appears to reduce the risk 
of dying from heart disease. 

The 20-year study, published 
in Thursday’s New England 
Journal of Medicine, provides 
the strongest evidence to date 
that fish contain some sub- 
stance that appears to reduce 
the risk of heart attacks. 

The Dutch scientists, from 
die Institute of Social Medicine 
at the University of Leiden, be- 
gan their study at I960 with 872 
men aged 40 to 59. 

After excluding subjects with 
known heart disease and am- 
ducting detailed analyses of 
each man’s weekly diet, the re- 
searchers followed their sub- 
jects for 20 yeara By the sidy’s 
end in 1980, 78 men had died 
from heart disease. 

All the subjects had beat di- 
vided into categories based on 
the amount of fish con .■aimed 
The average was about five 
ounces (142 grams) a week, but 
some consumed none and oth- 
ers ate more than a pound (4S3 
grams) a week' 





imim 








“Thats the difference unth 
StandariChartemd 
cadi transmission” 


n 


<4ajtfai : and- the financial status- trf sessment of the ’contributions' 
^thefr patents. from home and. society,” the letter 

•' J^epreseQtatives of organizations said, “one child may be rtcom- 
j ^Cor retarded and. disabled people, mended- for life-saving surgery 
‘ joined by the American Gvil liber- while another, withideatical physt- 
ties Union, said Wedneslay that cal prognosis, may be recommcnd- 
they would file a class-action law- ed for death." 
wit by May 31 unless ttgaals at “Membtedup in aradal imnor- 
ibe state-run Oklahoma. Childrens ^ ajmst having a high 
Memorial Hospital chafed the ounigh'quaSy of life* under your 

P°fe .... . aitei^i,” it smd. “A person who is 

Widespread pubhcjiwweness of ^ ^ ^y- ^ 

the policy grew from. a 1 58J mags- mended for treatment than aper- 
aae arnae published by the Amer- sonwhoiswinteL” .. 
ican Academy ctT Pedutnfcs, ac- - - . u 

cording !0 tones *. tod of Mr- B oot aid ito a ®bsm- 

ifie National Legal Kt for the S ^ 

Medically Dependent and Dis- tt^ were hladc M Mian, tat he 
• r •: • said he did nctkndw how many. 

The article, written by the Okla- JR^rfwrt -Fdton, &ectmofthe 
homa phyricians inydved, de- 

scribed a 1977-82 experiment in- Services, winch oversees the hospi- 
vdving 69 infants bom with spina ^ d ^ ue ° My-.mqrfopriety. 
bifida, a condition where the spine 'The aUegations that be behind 


J. v is not closed at birth, and other ti& intended legal action are irre- 
’ birth defects. sponsible, they are irrvriid," Mr. 

Of tiie 69 babies, 36 were given Fulton said Wednesday in a pro- 
extensive treatment and surgery pared statement. Those making the 
and all lived Another 24 babies aaai3ation&-“are quite insensitive 
were denied surgery and all died lo tbc famffies" who had children 
within about six months. - who sufferedfrom spina bifida. 

In a letter sent Wednesday to . . Th«« fanfiiies are bearing ter- 
staie and hospital officials, the 'rific burdens by having children 
groups ched'a portion (rf the 1983 bora with terrible binhdefects,’ 5 Is 
arude m whidi tbe.doctora said added, 
they, had been “influenced by foi^ ■ r . . TT - - „ . „ 

mulation of the quality of Se. In A^ h inIwS?^iA,h^SSipS 
thisforniuia.QL-*NEx(H+S).” 


y navmg 
lebinhdefi 


ects,’ , he 


SSSBiftSSLIirS 


flying the Infant's physical and 
mental condition by the anticipat- 
ed “contribution from home and. 
family” and “the contribution from 
society.” ' ■ v,y_ . .. * -\ 


Thai rituatiem, and the ability of 
states to ^udte action, may change 





Some day when you’re feeling strong, just sit down and 
work out hew much your company is losing on international 
transactions. 

Through delayed payments, and lost interest on funds. 

Through time-wasting ineffi derides in paperwork. 

Through misse d opportunities because you weren’t in 
close couch with the market 

Then come and talk to Standard Chartered. 

Vlfeie one of Britain's largest banks, with over 125 years’ 
experience of international trade, and with over 2000 
branches in more than 60 countries; linked by common 
systems using the latest in reiecommunkations technology 


The result: fester transmission of funds. Transactions 
handled by specialists in Internationa] trade. And the avail- 
ability of direct local knowledge and experience iii every 
market you’re likely to be dealing with -literally, from Austria 
to Zimbabwe. 

Add this ro one of the worlds leading foreign exchange 
dealing networks; skills in every sort of trade and project 
finance from acceptance credits to countertrade; and 
resources big enough to cackle any problem. And you’ll see 
that the Standard Chartered difference could be a highly 
beneficial one for your business. 

Benefit from it soon. 


Standard ^Chartered 


Direct 


Stan d ar d Chartered Bank Head Office: 10 Clemen is Lane, London EC4N 7AB. 











Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


-••••-? j* rff « 


- For Spain, a Diplomatic Role 


MadndHelps Bridge Gap Between U.S. 9 Latin America 


By Edward Schumacher 


New York Times Service 

i- MADRID — After Prime Minis- 
ter Felipe Gonzalez saw President 
Ronald Reagan off at the airport 
Wednesday,- he immediately began 
preparing l or another visitor Satur- 
day, President Daniel Ortega Saa- 
vedra of Nicaragua. 

Mr. Ortega’s visit, announced 
while Mr. Reagan was here, offi- 
cially was being called a refueling 
Stop, although it was not part of his 
itinerary as he returns home from a 
trip to the Soviet Union and East- 
ern Europe. 

.. He is to meet with Mr. Gooz&ez 
m what Nicaraguan o fficials say 


will be an attempt to exploit the 
differences between Mr. Gonzalez 
and Mr. Reagan over the U.S. trade 
embargo of Nicaragua. 

How successful Mr. Ortega wjQ 
be is undear. Mr. Gonzalez also 
has reservations about the demo- 
cratic intentions of the Saadinists. 

But for Spaniards, the two visits 
are part of what they see as 1 their 
larger role as a sometimes spokes- 
man for their former colonies and a 
bridge between them and the in- 
dustrial West. 

“We look at Latin America dif- 
ferently than the United States 
dott,” a senior Spanish official 
said, “and we think we understand 
it better." 


“HIspanidarT is what Spaniards 
call thor shared feeding with Latin 
America, and it carries some re- 
sentment of the United States that 
dates bade to the Spanish- Ameri- 
can War. 



Reagan’s Stance on it 
Contradicts Past U.S* 






l\. X- 


Position 


Hispanidad crosses ideology. 
Leftist Spanish missionaries have 
been central to radical church 
movements in Larin America, and 
the rightist dictator Franco ignored 
the American trade emhar gfi of 
Cuba and maintained good rela- 
tions with Fidd Castro. 



But it has been under Mr. Gon- 
t 6 W that Spain once « g»hi has 
consciously turned activist in the 
region. The economic ties are mi- 
nor, but the political and cultmal 
ones axe blossoming. 



Prime Minister Gonz&Jez, shown greeting Fidd Castro in 
1984, has increased Spain’s political and coitural ties. 


By George G Wilson . 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has contradicted a 
long-standing .contention of the 
U.S. goymnment by contending 
that a new mobile Soviet missile 
increases the danger that Moscow 
plans to strike fust in a future war. 

From President Kennedy, inau- 
gurated in 1961, until Mr. Reagan’s 
speech Wednesday in Strasbourg, 
France, the White House has con- 
tended thatmissiles that could sur- 
vive a first strike and be fired only 
in retaliation stabilized the balance 
of terror. 

The missiles to worry about 


led them, under tons of concrete, 
and designed them to be mobile 
and thus hard to locate and hit. 

Mr. Reagan said Wednesday 
that the th e Soviet Union "has cho^ 
sen to bmtd nuclear forces dearly 


that the SSXJ4 “wffl probably be -V. 
slo-deployed at first, with inffijLV 
deployment expected in 1986." 

"Rail mobile deployment 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


follow by one to two, 'yean,* thd 
booksakt 

. Administration official* afcj . . 



CARAVEL 

HOTEL 


The government has a S 100-mil- 
lion Larin American aid program. 
Ills developing a Hispanic commu- 
nications satellite that is to be 
launched in 1992 as part of the 
500th anniversary of Columbus’s 
arrival in America. Its Institute for 
Ibero-American Cooperation in 
Madrid sponsors students and a 
great Dumber of joint studies and 
cultural exchanges. 

In the last two weeks alone, 
Spain has played host to a meeting 


of 17 former Spanish, Portuguese 
and Latin American presdents and 
a separate meeting of about 100 
directors of leading Sp anish and 

-Larin American newspapers and 
magazines. 

The self-assumed role of spokes- 
man has sometimes seemed pater- 
nalistic to Latin Americans. But 
Mr. GonzAlez and his foreign min- 
ister, Fernando Morim, have been 
careful to offer their availability 
ami not their solutions. 


The government itsdf is divided 
on bow much to defend Latin inter- 
ests. The testing ground is Nicara- 
gua. The Foreign Ministry argues 
for a harsher confrontation with 
the Reagan administration. 

But Mr. Gonz&lez runs his own 
foreign policy. After a meeting 
Tuesday with Mr. Reagan, the 
prime minister said he would tell 
Mr. Ortega that “there has to been 
effort for peace and to preserve 
political plu ralism. " 


most, it has been argued through 
the years, are those that stand still 


the years, are those that stand still 
above ground, where they would 
have to be fired at the first' sign of 
attack or be lost — “use them or 
lose them,” in the jargon of nuclear 
strategists. They feared that the 
United States or the Soviet Union 
mig ht fire nudear missiles in re- 
sponse to a false alarm. 

Both superpowers have spent 
huge amounts to try to protect their 
nuclear forces from a surprise at- 
tack. They have taken strategic 
missiles to sea in submarines, bur- 


designed to strike first and thus 
disarm their adversary.” 

“The Soviet Union,” he contin- 
ued, “is now moving toward de- 
ployment of new, morale. MIRVed 
missiles which have these capabili- 
ties phis the potential to avoid de- 
tection, monitoring at anns-con- 

trol verification. In doing this, the 
Soviet Union is undermining sta- 
bility and the basis for mutual de- 
lerrence.” 

The acronym MIRV means mul- 
tiple independently targeted re-en- 
try vehicle; it is a missile with more 
than one warhead each of which is 
aimed at a separate target. 

The White House national secu- 
rity affairs adviser, Robert C. 
McFarlane, told reporters traveling 
with Mr. Reagan that the president 
was referring to theSSX-24 missile. 
The Defense Department said in its 
1985 “Soviet Military Poweri* book 


Council staff -were taken ty-ino- fi 
raise when Mr. McF&riantftodMr ■ 
Reagan linked mobility Mink'. 
strike intent. • . 

Weapons experts said Vfodnes- 
day that Soviet SSX-24s in ri&oad 
care could achieve the actmacy - 
needed to destroy U^. tnasBu-in k . 
surprise strike, the can worid & . / 
haired at p re pa red mots afcregte 
railroad line from which targeting - / 
data had bees calculated and fee .'"-.I 
gravitational field, which -affects - 

the guidance system, aatiyatfr,. 
these specialists said. ” ». a. J 

However, Spurgeon fieeoy Jr., “i 


executive director of the noogw- * 
emmeatal Arms Control Assoqof . r.' . j 
turn, said it was a coatiadtakn.-to - - > 
describe a mobile system »«** . : 
manly “first-strike weapoosaujw ~ 
the point of incurring the cost Jo - 4 
achieve mobility is to survive ad' \ » 
initial strike, by the other side." • - v • • « 


If you come to Athens (Greece) 
and you like a Hotel 

100% fireproof and 100% earthquake proof 

all 420 rooms and 72 suites with facilities, such as 

Mini Bar, color T.V., 

free indoor-outdoor swimming pool, 

free dry cleaning of your ties, 

the best food in Athens, 

24-hour Room Service and 
also a beautiful Mosque on the 
roof garden, then come to 


Murdoch Undecided on Sale 


Of 2 U.S. Papers, Aide Says 


The Associated Press 


CARAVEL HOTEL 


the only Hotel in Athens 
with these privileges 
for its clients. 


NEW YORK — Rnpert Mur- 
doch, who is buying six US. televi- 
sion stations, has no plans to seek 
exemption from federal regulations 
that could force him to sell his daily 
newspapers in New York and Chi- 
cago, a spokesman said. 

During the last few days some 
“very serious inquiries have come 
in" about baying the Chicago Son- 
Times and the New York Post, 
Howard J. Rubenstein, the spokes- 
man, said Wednesday. Hie said 
there were separate inquiries about 
those newspapers as well as The 
Village Voice, a New York weekly, 
but Ire refused to be more specific. 


If you like enjoying your life . 
there is also CARAVEL No. 2 
on the island of ZANTE in the Ionian Sea, 
for the most exciting vacation. 

Reservations: Tel.: 0695/25261-2-3 


Head Office: CARAVEL HOTEL - Athens - Greece 
P.O.Box; 18106 GR 
Tel.: (01) 7290721 (60 Knes) 

Telex: 214401 CH GR 


On Monday, Mr. Murdoch and 
bis business partner, Marvin Davis, 
agreed U) buy Metromedia Inc.'s 
seven television stations for more 
than $2 billion. The stations are in 
New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, 
Washington, Houston, Dallas and 
Boston. 

Under the agreement, Mr. Mur- 
doch and Mr. Davis would keep six 
of tire stations and simultaneously 
sell the Boston station to Hearst 
Crap, for about $450 millio n in 
cash. 

Mr. Rubenstein said that Mr. 


Murdoch still had not decided 
whether he would seQ the Post or 
tire Sun-Times to comply with a 

Fwferal Cn mrninrica firms Cn mnmu 

skm rule that prohibits ownership 
of television stations and daily 
newspapers in the same markets. 

He said that Mr. Murdoch “has 
□0 intention of applyingfora waiv- 
er of the cross-ownership rules." 

Mr. Rubenstein also said that 
Mr. Murdoch had “no intention of 
closing” the Post and the Son- 
Times, as some reports had sug- 
gested was an alternative to then 
sale. 

“Hie newspapers are valuable 
assets and be is quite proud of their 
contribution to the two dues," the 
spokesman said! 

Mr. Murdoch also owns newspa- 
pers in Boston and San Antonio, 
Texas, and several magazines as 
well as media companies in Britain 
and Australia. 

Mr. Rubenstein said Wednesday 
that lawyers were preparing Mr. 
Murdoch’s application for U.S. cit- 
izenship, to comply with another 
federal requirement that limits the 
percentage holding a foreign inves- 
tor may have in American broad- 
cast companies. 





j£„, •»" 


Ei'» SS 


c •* 

:***: • 
1 J“ ,ih‘ • 




Jf. j 1 

{Saw** 1 


FRENCH PRISON UNREST — Inmates on. the roof 
of file Fresnes prison, south of Paris, after security 
police fired tear gas Thursday to break up a protest 


against overcrowding. One of the 70 prisoners died after 
slipping as he threw a tfle at police. At the Compifcgne 
prison, north of Paris, sue men brieffy occupied the roof. 



Deputies Protest Noumea Violence tow Morale 


Reuters 

NOUMEA, New Caledonia — A 
constitutional crisis deepened 
Thursday in New Caledonia as 
moderate deputies representing the 
indigenous Kanak people walked 
out of the Territorial Assembly to 
protest racial violence Wednesday 
in which a Kanak youth was killed 
and 95 persons were injured. 

A statement by all six members 
of the Kanak Socialist Liberation 
Party said they could no longer 
govern with the anti-independence 
Rally for Caledonia in the Repub- 
lic Party, which they blamed for the 
street battles between European 
settlers and Kanaks in Noumea, 
tire capital The Rally for Caledo- 
nia party is a rightist group domi- 
nated by people of European de- 
scent. 

The dashes were the worst since 
null tan 1 Kanaks, who are indige- 
nous Melanesians, began agitating 
for independence in November. 


The withdrawal of Kanak depu- 
ties left tire assembly in tire hands 
of the Rally for Caledonia party 
and appeared to be a blow to the 
French government’s efforts to se- 
cure a consensus on independence 
for the Pacific territory. 

The Kanak deputies asserted 
that a race war was averted 
Wednesday only because the ma- 
jority of the population had ig- 
nored the rightist party’s call to 
arms and because the Kanaks had 
remained on the defensive. 

Witnesses said that tire violence 
broke out when sealers of Europe- 
an descent attacked Kanaks who 
had been bolding a rally in defiance 
of an official ban. This account was 
confirmed by Edgard Pisani, tire 
government’s special envoy to New 
Caledonia. 

Jacques Lafieur, the leader of the 
Rally for Caledonia party, rejected 


” C fymonbers of his Cited inU.K, 


Mr. Pteanfs allegations of“ddiber- 
ate aggression” by members of his 
party, and reaffirmed his determi- 
nation to prevent the Kanaks from 
staging illegal demonstrations in 
Noumea. 

He threatened to mobilize more 
than 25.000 people if the Kanaks 
went ahead with a planned rally 
June 8 to protest the French gov- 
ernment’s decision to mcrease its 
military presence in the territory. 

The resignations of Kanak depu- 
ties could complicate the govern- 
ment’s plans to replace the assem- 
bly with a congress made up of four 
regional councils as an interim step . 
toward a referendum on indepen- 
dence in 1987. 

Both sides have rqectcd the gov- - 
eminent plan and threatened to 
boycott elections for tire new coun- 
cils in August 


Secret Stwvictii 


WOU LD WIPE 
ENTERTAINMENT 


12.0V. qaorqcv tel. 723 . 32 . 12 

PfiRIS - FRANCE 


Reagan Supports a Freeze 
On MUitary, Social Security 


Reuters l- 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher presented td 
Parliament on Thursday an acf 
count of drunkenness and low moj 
. rale in Britain’s security services- ■ 
Releasing an official report intq 
events leading up to the unprisany ' 
ment last year on spying charges 0 $ 
Michael Bettaney, who had been a4 
officer in the : MI5 oountertntdm 
gence service, Mrs. Thatcher dtoj 
several serious criticisms tire report 
made of the .management of the: 
security services. - : : ' 

Mr. Bettaney was arrested aftej : 
attempting to pass a secret assess? 
ment of Soviet intelligence activity 
in Britain to the Soviet Embassy in. 
London and to gal" recruitment ad 
an agent Cor tire KGB security serj 
vice. He was imprisoned in April': 
last year for 23 years. 5 . 


Mrs. Thatcher' said a. fouri 
readier security commission. bad- 



mil HORSE 


for and away 
the best nude revue 
in the world 

. . . scyi the press 


(Continued from Page 1) 

The Associated Press that to earn 
the support of farm-state legisla- 
tors, for its budget package, the 
Reagan administration had agreed 
to restore 51.14 billion to tire agri- 
culture budget over the next three 
years and institute a hew export 
subsidy. 

The administration agreed dur- 
ing meetings Wednesday to boost 
by about $300 million its spending 
for soil and water conservation 
programs and to restore the $600 
million it previously had proposed 
to cut from U5. crop insurance, 
the sources said. 

. In addition, the adminig t ratimi 
offered to provide $240 million to 
help bring down interest rates for 
the most financially strapped farm- 


at the bar only ZAOfrs 
+ 75' ; service chqrgc 


David A. Stockman, director of 
the White House's Office of Man- 
agement and Budget, also agreed 
on behalf of tire president to offer 


farmers an additional SI billion in 
guaranteed operating loans next 
year, in addition to the SI billion 
already specified in a budget com- 
promise, the sources said. ; 

Mr. Stockman also agreed to car- 
ry out a Sl-bflHon program that 
would use surplus government- 
owned commodities as bonuses to 
entice foreign countries to buy UJS. 
farm products. 

On Wednesday, the Senate de- 
feated two Democratic alternate 
budgets designed to keep many of 
the programs Mr. Reagan warns 
cut and pay tor them by mcreasiiig 
taxes and giving the Pentagon less 
money than sought by the presi- 
dent. 

The Democratic losses Wednes- 
day were expected. But tire spon- 
sors pushed Preplans hoping that if 
all tire other budget packages even- 
tually fail, some Donocratic ideas 
win have to be incorporated into a 
final compromise to reduce the drf- 
irit, estimated at $200 billion. 


-member security commissi on bad 
concluded in' its. report that “daenj 
should have, beecir But was not, *- 
very foil investigation of Bettaney’s. 
lifestyle, which would probably 
have led to. the removal" of hS 
security clearance - V 

The commisaon’s 34-page report 


fs 


portrayed Mr. Bettaney as a j 

who' drank heavily and who hacp 
problems in his relationships whtj 
women. It said he adopted a Maix-j 
ist ideology during his time as a ■ 
Ci. unterinielligeiice officer, whflq 
renurnimf a devtmt rmhAlw - j.. 

was drinldiag th^eqitiva^^ctf a 
bottle of liquor a day, the report* ~ 
said. It added that he wna frequent^ 
ly . seen , drunk in public and ovens;. 


! 5J> 

S*u 

[fu S*. 

pa X" 


heard saying such things as: “Tirf 
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.. The report said that heavy drink-_ 
mg was widespread m the security 
forces and that its risks had b w"i 
underrated: Staff members wacj 
"*«wnmended- to report excessive^ 
dnnking ty colleagues, { 


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Mrs. Thatcher said the reptat’s^ j 
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The Associated Press 49 

ROME — Prime Minister Bet-^ 
nno Craxi of Italy haa.recdved an-. ; 
official communication from Albas -= 
ma conveying “expressions df ‘ : 
fncn ^&, Jfr CraxPs office ar^ -J 

nouncedwednKday. ; - J ? 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


Page 5 


U.S. Drops Curbs on Food Aid to Ethiopia 


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V - By Blaine Harden 

Wajfungiou Pasi Service 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
The United States has dropped jc- 
ttridfioas cm food aid to Etlndpifl 
that relief officials here have said 
were damaging efforts to help this 
country recover from famine. ■ 

The lifting of restrictions on de- 
velopment aid to Ethiopia means 
that relief agencies in Ethiopia now 
wifi he able to itse US; food and 


Rdteanf^mlAd Case . 

' 'i Washington Post Service 
V WASHINGTON — The Wash- 
ington Tost' has asked the full U.S. 
Cestui of Appeals to reconsider a 2- 
•1 decision last month that reinstal- 
l'd a lower court jury's decision that 
the newspaper libeled a former 
presided! of the Mobil Oil Con)., 
William P. Tavoulareas,!m a 1979 
artide aboot Us business dealing * 
The newspaper contended that 
the derision, if left standing, would 
* ‘radically transf orm the law of li- 
ber and that investigative report- 
ing would undoubtedly be discour- 
aged For The Post to win a 
i&eaimg at least 6 of the 10 appel- 
late judges would have to agree. 


money to support projects that 
help farmers rebuild their farms, 
dig irrigation ditches or build 
roads. - 

The restrictions had prevented 
the use of food sent by- the United 
States in food-for-work plans. Un- 
der such plans, peasants were given 

food in return far work that helped 
them rehabilitate their farmland 
that had been seated by drought. 

The restrictions had been cri ti- 
cized by relief officials in Ethiopia, 
a Marxist country whose relations 
with the United Slates are largely 
unfriendly- U& aid amounts to 
$222 mflfion , about one-third of 
-the international famine relief ef- 
fort ia Ethiopia. • _ • 

Commenting recently on the re- 
striction, Niels Nrtolasen, head of 
the Lutheran World Federation, 
complained that relief officials 
could gjve U-S. food aid only to 
people. who were not working. 
“This is. schizophrenic aid,” he 
said. “You keep people alive only 
to starve.” 

The change in U.S. relief policy 
for Ethiopia was mandated, in pan, 
by Congress in language of a 
Sl 37.5-miflion supplemental ap- 
propriation for emergency famine 
relief in Africa. The change also is 
the result of a more liberal Stale 


Department interpretation of cost- 
ing laws. 

During the past six months, since 
the United States became Ethio- 
pia's largest donor, restrictions on 
U-S. aid had forced offidals of the 
UJS. Agency for Internationa] De- 
velopment into mating SCOTCS of 
decisions about which uses of US. 
aid were “refieT and thereby al- 
lowed, and which were “devdop- 
mentaT and proscribed. 

Two laws, the Hickaikioper and 
Brooke amendments to the Foreign 
Assistance Act, which penalize 
countries that have not paid Amer- 
ican debts, forced the agency to. 
make these distinctions. 

The April supplemental faming 

appropriation waives the Hteken- 
Iooper language bailing develop- 
ment aid to countries, such as Ethi- 
opia, that have nationalized 
American property. The bill how- 
ever, did not waive the Brooke 
amendment, which prevents devel- 
opment aid to countries that fail to 
repay U.S. government loans. Ethi- 
opia has not repaid a U.S. loan 
made nine years a go for militar y 
equipment. 

The i letter going ootto relief offi- 
cials in Ethiopia, however, says 
that the U.S. government now does 
not consider- the -Hicksnloopcr or 


Brooke amendments to inhibit the 

use of the supplemental money for 
development 

Before the change, the AID of- 
fice here had not permitted U.S. 
food or money to buy seed, trucks 
or sbovds. The office had derided 
to pay for water wells in villages 
affected by drought but had 
warned that the water could be 
used only for drinking, not for irri- 
gation. 

Now, according to the letter sent 
to relief agencies here, UJL re- 
sources can be used for a range of 
previously proscribed rehabilita- 
tion programs, including the pur- 
chase of seeds for planting, fertiliz- 
er, pesticides, farm implements, 
farm animals, shelter, small scale 


money can be spent 
for-wark programs! 

The intent of the change is to 
help drought victims return to pro- 
ductive fa nning through small- 
scale projects. 

The ending of restrictions on the 
nsc of U.S. aid is likely to increase 
the proposed projects that AID of- 
ficials here must approve and su- 
pervise. They are now managing 
(be $322 mflnon of aid with a staff 
of five: 



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Ethiopian famine victims receiving U.S.-supplied grain. 



Many Foreigners 
In Nigeria Won’t " 
Meet Exit Cutoff 

The Assunaitd Press 

LAGOS — Aliens repelled by 
Nigeria left by plane, ship ana 
truck convoy, but unofficial counts 
indicated that only a fraction of the 
700.000 would make it by the Frit 
day deadline. “ 

The military government's into-' 
nor minister. Major General Mo- J 
hammed M a go no. said Thursday 
that the government did not intend 
to extend the deadline, but also' 
Indicated no force would be used 
against those who did not get out 
by Friday. Nigerian authorities or- 
dered the exodus last month. 

“They have no cause to fear," he 
said of the aliens, who are accused 
of taking die jobs of Nigerians now 
that the oil boom is over and of- 
causing high crime rates in cities. 

Millions of West Africans, most 
ly Ghanaians, ffed from famine 
and political upheaval to Nigeria in 
the 1970s during on oil boom. 

Aliens waiting without shelter at 
the border have been drenched by 
heavy rains that began Tuesday 
night. As many as 100 vehicles at a 
time crossed into Benin on 
Wednesday, most them headed for 
Togo and then to Ghana. 


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IMKBWTIOWL REAL ESTATE 



. Hawk ojjersdistingiiished services far the owners and gisesls of out 
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CANNES CALIFORNIA 

Cote d'Azur 

- Private owner sells directly: 

SPUENDID VILLA WITH CHARACTER 

Luxuriously fitted, gardens, swimming poor, large out- 
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Excellent price due to departure. 

Mease contact in Paris: 

Madame Amide Rfegnier, 

130 Rue de Rivoli, 75001 PARIS. 
Telephone: (1) 508.46.39. 



OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your own vacation land on the fabulous Lake of the Qzarfcs hi Central 
Missouri fhght hi the heartland oF America. Away from dries, noise, 
pollution and the rat-race of the woricaday world. 

Foibcs Inc., pubfahen of Fbihes Magazine, through Its subsidiary, 
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you to acquire one or more acres of our choice Missouri lakeland. 

There's no better time than right now to find out It Forbes Lake of the 
Ozarfcs Is the place for you. AH our homesttes. Including lake front and lake 
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Cash prices start ar $6,000. One or more acres of this incredibly beaUfM 
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For complete Information, Including pictures, maps and full details 
on our Ibeial money-back and exchange privileges, please write to 
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Obtain the Propert y Repor t required by Federal ta»» and read t bet ore 
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d Ws property Equal Cmdc and 


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Your own 
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in Mallorca. 
Play it or let it... 
it can pay for itself. 



Mallorca has become a golfer's * 
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admire the fairways from your 
own terrace or take a short stroll 
to the first tee. Wc are offering 
one. two or three bedroom 
apartments with fully fitted 
kitchens and gracious Mallorcan 
architecture with extravagant 
landscaping at prices that will 
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Bend in at is Mallorca’s most 
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squash, water sports and the 
excitement of Prince 
Alfonso Hohenlohe's 
Anchorage Club. With all of 
this, the private golf course is 
“ r a handica 


hardly : 


heap. 


The leisure investment 
of the ye 


Hease write or telephone: Sales Director, Bendinat, _ „ , 

Passeig des Bom. 15 - 7° C, - 07012 Palma de Maiiorca. Spain, Tel: 71/ 22 16 51 


U.K. Sales Manager, The Bendinat Estate. - 53, Upper Brook Street, 
London W.l. England. Tel: 01 - 629 0883 


SWITZERLAND 

Montreux -Geneva Lake ' 
APARTHOTH. BONIVARD 

For sale luxurious apartments, 
from 1 to S rooms, overlooking the 
prettiest part of Geneva Lake. 
Prices: Sir. 123.000 mcL equip- 
ment and furniture. 

60% mortgage available at 
61fe% interest 

Phase contact the Builder: 

RiGlE DE LA RIVIERA SJV. 

32 avenue du Cam 
1320 Mnatteux- S w i l ml flnd 
Tel.: 011/635351 

Telexi 25873 >8 di 



South of France 
Provence 

Two exceptional properties for sale 
deep in the heart of Provence 


Le Beausset (Var) 


Delightful, modernized Provencal farmhouse, 8 ktm. from sea and 
set tri landscaped terraced: gardens, with spectacular views over 
medieval Nlitop villages and sea. 

— barge reception with open fireplace; 

— Superb provencal-tiled kitchen/ dining room; 

— Two bedrooms, bathroom and w.c.; 

— Guest/ staff cottage, set In snature gardens onto; 
—Olympic-sized swimming 'pool. 

F.Fr. 2,100,000 (approx. $210.000). 


Sanary-sur-Mer (Var) 


Pretty modem Provencal viSa, serin garden overlooking the 
spectacular bay of Bandd and Island of Bandor. 

—Reception with open fireplace; ‘ 

— Games-room; ... 

—Study/bedroom 4; . . 

— Master bedroom, ensutte bathroom; ' 

— 3 further bedrooms, bathroorn and 3 w.c.s? .. 

— Fully fitted kitchen and utility room; 

—Garage' arid storeroom. . 

FlFr.. 2,500,000 (approx. $25$00O). 


STOP PRESS: BANDOL (VAR) SUPERB LAND WITH 
EXTENSIVE SEA VIEWS AND NECESSARY BUILDING 
CONSENTS AVAILABLE. 


inspection Rights and accommodation arranged 
■ ■Confacft- 
Mme. Luce GhHti, . 

GMTTIMAR CONSULTANT SJL . 

72S6, Route de fkmdol, 83110 Sanary-ax^Mw, 
F«Mice.Tef„- {94} 79M.64. Tt: 40199QF. 





. ip* 






iiS-v-v- 


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• As the largest full service 
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REALTORS* - 

DavWDonoskyCeO ;. 


Bryan 
OaflaKltoas 7S201 
ZWwSSrt T«f«(.73&tS9 

OftHng Pons *l Dw (M 
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Tlx. 312605 
^PRESIGG. 1 - 




West Germany! 


Bavarian Coi 

in a dream location son 




House 

of Munich 



Panoramic view of the Alps 
in scenic countryside setting where no 
further building is permitted . 

Sire of lot 15,300 m J 

Can be used for all purposes such as formal occasois, training 
courses, and eminently suitable for private purposes. 
Conversion into condominrams possible. 

Floor space a ppr o xim ately 850 nr, 16 rooms, + 2 separate 
apartments, + room with fireplace, + dining halt + entry haD, 
+ skittle alley, + double garage and parking places, deep ceDar 
and cellar story, etc. 

Alterations within building possible 
Sales price: $ 13 million 

Please address inquiries to: ' : 

K & M Werbeagcnnn GmbH - Sl Benedictstrafie 4 
^2000 Hamburg 13 • West Germany 


INDUSTRIAL GEMS 

Maui, Hz This Netherlands AnB- 
les corporation vrith wrauhoy e 
holdings m Miami is an uttiuctew 
investment, espedoffy for an off- 
shore purchaser, not liable for tax. 
doth warehouses are in swsnme 
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316309. Sl^OftDOa 
Winter Haven, FL Almost new 
food processing plant and aistriu- 
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co nnect io ns consols of oonunissay 
and office bidfcfings and 
house. GmiffliiMry highly nsJotod 


with fine temperature 
chin* IHT-816307. 
Leasehold. 


control Bro- 
$700,000 


Previews inc 

"The First Name in Fine Real Estate" 


309 Royal Poinciano Plazo . 
Palm Beach, H. 33480 
. (305)832-7131 




SJFr. 119.000 

Vercorin, Central Valais, 
Switzerland. 

Summer and wmUrr resort. 

Sold directly by owner. 

2-room apartment: ] bedroom, 
living-room, kiteben. bathroom, 
balcony view ou the Alp*. 

A. CORVASCE 

CH - 3961 Vercoriu 
Phone: 0041/27/55^2.82. 


SEABURY HOUSE 


GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 

A Ini- lined drive lead* to I his majestic Georgian mansion, long a round hill 
landmark. Mrticuloush resiorcd and remodeled, (he house b both impressive 
and Karmk appeulinp. Situated on 12.7 acres, the estate includes a butler’s 
cotupr and oca pool with jacum set in a pillared fla^tone terrace ovedooking a 
five acre Like. 

A brood front portico with tall columns introduces the sensational reception hall 
enrotnpaam^ a threc-storv stairwell crowned by a stained glass skylight 
Palladtan window*. French doom. beaotiTul carved mol di npt and fireplaces 
euhaiwe (he stunning main rooms. A large counfirv kitchen and bright garden 
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ample servant* quarters. Brochure available upon request 


r wm\ r PF(EFEJ^F(ED 

\ r T^'PROPE^iES 


175 W. Putnam Avenue, Greenwich, 

. CT 06830 Call Collect: (203) 869-5975. 


SWITZERLAND 


Porticdier loue sur les HA UTS DE FlCHY 
superfoe villa neuve de 9 pieces reparfies sur deux etages (avec 
grand sow-sol, l&gumier, A pieces efeau, garage pour 2 voitures) 
sur parceHe de 3 500 nP. Bail de courts dnrim a tfisposrtfon. 
layer mensvel de SFR. 5 000-7 000/- sefon dune du boil 
Pour tout renseignements: T6L: (022) 47-45-45 (M. Scmto) 



**e«rt» 


Elegant Office Building 
in the heart of 

Londons Mayfair 

7300 sqft to Be Let 



Chartered Surveyors 

26/28 Sockvfe&uteL Loudon W1X2QL. 

==01-734 8155= 


Wes 265162. 



CHEYNE WAUL OID CHH5EA 
L0MX3N, SW3 

SMandk»BP»af*»ftv* r"W BH i wlwdM^Ufi BU warefag<w 
hors and Oredw of Him Wi Mao Hawa to t» roar. Ttin i 
Grads Ifl l*B b««i VyU. ondii n tamjoAHi cm 

BarhrooiB A Drnina looni, 4 (artW Usms an wka Ikshnxn A Shnmr Roam. ncanHo** 
In floor Drwino toom Donig toom, Ubranr. Kildm C|—pdis . 5«ff BOt Sq i mrt Staff Hot 
GasCHTO. Gordon. 

long Imoo £1.1 nBon (Staringl 

SOUTH TBRAtt nOOHISHDOE 
LONDON, W8 

b. bak IW«d Horn nna V. vflh HiSh bcina GwdM awl 


r d» Kwr Thamw or Hw 
■ swd Ml fsriod Hoi— ttotad 
eondoon-StemrStiWof D oarootn, 


don is Saudi Konw^on WjiitaM^.Mbg dtaaioa of rtnrrwk 3/4 facsfSion toew, 


S/6 Bsdrvona, 3 Bathroom, 
baawd/Ysars 


SOON 


ROAELIBK 
LONDON. V 

li furing Gansrn 


ban-GadavGa CH 
Offcre io owaa of £SStU»> pucfafll 

XMflNGTON 

Wi 

dew to am, idnob and Hw iacBiai of 


Madsmlwd Md Frwhald oikh 100 H 1 faring 
SanGwdn 

t Boon *ddi 9towar laow Gerdsn. Go Ot 


IQarineon Ugh Straw and KsadMan Gardm. S ladbaaon, 7 Wadaaa, dmbii B^dien tooav 
Kwng bn, IQdwn, 9df/Fm$ Ro 


MSAOOfSMCngl 


1 17-1 19 MbamKttad, London. 5W3 6K. 
TnU 01*99 1132. 


fs 

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LLli'U.iili.liif . : i .Jfl 


Nowcastiel^Tyiie-Bimles- Simderiand 


FREEHOLD FACTORY 
FOR SALE or To Lease 
S96, 650 sqft on 18.38 acres 
Might Divide 



" to - 

ImVlllllIp WI MU Mnj UHL 




UoSoA. 


SUN BELT 

Invest and make immediato profit 
from your property asset. 

Your town-house (villa) part of a high qualify complex, 
with leisure facilities (swimming pod, tennis courts). 

Outstandmg return and stove average capital gem. 
Rid administrative end rental ser v ices at your dhposaL 
far queries of d et a ile d brochures, please contact: 

JAWER SJL, P.O.B. 420, CH-121 1 GB4EVA 3 


PROPERTY FOR RP^T 

of CONCHES 

Geneva's finest location 

The rods v ccmpla tel y r«wd wd h yo - 
daua'recBplian roomi end be 'eraria 
Kitchen vdh madvr) equanei*. 4 mein 
tadwmi, 2 btffo. 3 b«*ww* in biic ancf 
bdhroom for Ihe naff . Garage to 34 an 
Garden 5000 m2 
Lemt long torn 
Vocort vwttdn ihert bm* 

Rent per month 5fr. 15-000. — 

TaU 22/21^1,11 in Genova 
vwfabC&L 11 Gen. Dufbar 
• 1211-GBCVE11 ‘ 


South of France 


CENTRAL LONDON 

Var 


SUBSTANTIAL 4 STOREY 

Between Tourlour end Aups 


DETAQH) MANSION HOUSE 

> 1 i "H-rt- L .- L 4- nr f-i . 

ragnmeenr eSdtre, 

XVHtii century court-house, 


FREEHOLD FOR SA1E 

8 rooms pits outbuldmgs. 


FOR DETAILS CONTACT 

30 hectares 10 of which cufercied 


CONRADRITBLAT + CO 

quita excepfond environment. 

Price: 2*000.000,00 EF, 


AUCTION DEPT. 

14 MANCHESTER SQUARE 

• •TeL (94)7014 71 or 


LONDON W1M 6AA 

(93) 44 50 10. 


TEL 01-935-4499. 


CUJHHWU PRIME FAfiMLMI 

WHh * the bad news about Amenasi frei 
an, form land prion hum dunged. Thera a 
i tawa roew opporamies at never before, 
prim beta* market value. 

■ fi07 Am Yolo Gouty, Caffondo 

• Gob I uA Wha« red Tonanac 

* 4 vndergrowd web for condole kifoota 
*54300+ iqne fool tiorege buddnm 
*3/100+ square foot shop 

- Located 12 milu from SocramaUQ, Ccifon 
$9LUDhrAat 

IMukel Appraid t/BSaS S3j000 far Acn 
Prafewond farm monap en ig il avrifoUe 
star an and manage the property. We ho 
oe«n m tfate hwm »wwynii butinflK f 
10 yem. Do nol pass up Mt opportunity. 

TOOBY FARMS 

3500 L Foote M. Svfen S06 
Pnmri.nr, Cdifinnlu 91 W 


449-8321. 


I 











~ Page^6 


s 'Jtmlb 


INTERNATIONAL 


ndtlislwd Widi The Nw YoHt Tima and The Wadringua Port 


Anti-Sandinist Sanctions 


' J; i' J immy Carter tried to accommodate die 
■k Nicaraguan revolution, and the Sandinists 
^ '-moved left toward tighter internal control 
sponsorship of a guerrilla “final offensive” in 
El Salvador, closer links with fellow Marxists 
in Havana and Moscow and greater tension 
j with Washington. Ronald Reagan ceased ac- 
,. t .cominodatmg and applied pressure — and the 
V: Sandinists moved farther left. The record does 
not justify confidence that anything the Unit- 
- ..red States does wfll soften the Sand in ists* deter- 
-i. .initiation to consolidate power. Yet serious 
ij people in the hemisphere continue to try. 

-j.i We say this by way of addressing the eco- 
-vLnomic sanctions that President Reagan an- 
r:- nounced on May 1. There was broad agrcc- 
mem — from liberals more in anger, and 
conservatives more in sorrow — that ending 
— direct trade and cutting air and sea links is too 
little, too late. Quickly the conventional wis- 
dom became that if these measures make any 
mark, they will add to the people’s misery, -hurt 
good guys in the private sector and drive the 
Sandinists into the Kremlin’s arms. 

‘ '' Had Daniel Onega Saavedra not provoked 
and embarrassed the UiL Congress by visiting 
Moscow right after Congress said no to the 
... “contras,'’ the reaction doubtless would have 
£ been even sharper. All this despite the fact that 
. ‘“some of those who bad-mouthed sanctions had 
opposed military intervention a week earlier 
" on grounds that lesser remedies, such as trade 


'restrictions, should be tested first. 


' In fact, what the objections amount to is 
__what all of us should know by now. The 
Sandinists are a resourceful crew. In the pre- 
r ? vailing circumstances, it is cot easy for Ameri- 
' cans or anyone else to get at them. A soft 
policy has been tried, and a hard policy, and 
r - ' assorted blends, and nothing worked. 

Still there remains reason for applying pres- 
l r ' sures that, while of uncertain effect, at least 
' 1 ‘' express the distrust and wariness that Ameri- 
J 1 *. cans of different persuasions fed toward the 
:’ 1 ’Sandinists. It is not ignoble or intrusive or 
L ’’ bullying for the United States to take a neigh- 
bor’s interest in wanting to see countries in the 
_ , Western Hemisphere move toward democracy 


About the Meltdown Risk 


-■ What are the chances of a meltdown at one 
_ of America's 100-odd nuclear reactors in the 

- next 20 years ? Nearly 50-50. or 45 percent, is 
. the surprising figure that (he Nuclear Regula- 

- tory Commission recently gave Congress. 

How can the commission also declare that it 
finds the risk acceptable? And are the odds of 
catastrophe really so bad? 

The short answer is that the commission's 
estimate is a conservatively biased shot in the 
dark. Meltdowns are probably less likely than 
the raw numbers suggest, but there is still no 
room for nuclear utilities to relax. 

For an individual reactor, in the commis- 
sion's latest estimate, the odds of severe core 
damage are 3 in 10,000 per year. For 100 
reactors over 20 years, that accumulates to a 
45-percent risk of a meltdown. A severe core 
melt would sorely endanger the health of the 
reactor’s owner, which could see a 52-bflHon 
asset abruptly converted into a $2-biUion li- 
ability. However, to harm thepublic, radiation 
must escape from the site. Thai is less likely 
because even after a core melt most of Ihe 
radioactivity is likely to be contained. 

The risk-assessment technique depends on- 
identifying chains of accidents that could lead 
to a core melt But the uncertainties accumu- 
late down the chain. That means that the 
technique is a quite useful guide to the proba- 
bility^ accidents early in a chain, but dose to 
meaningless for the bottom-line disaster of a 
core melt. Also, as the commission notes, risk . 
assessments are biased toward the pessimistic. 
Many more early signs of accident would have .. 
been reported if the odds of meltdown were 
worse than the assessments suggest. 


Up to a point, the commission's professed 
satisfaction with the status quo.fc understand- 
able The perceived risks of a meltdown have 
edged slightly higher in the last decade, but the 
perceived risks of con tainm ent failure and 
radiation escape are now being sharply re- 
duced Far less radioactivity escaped from the 
damaged Three MBe Island reactor than was 
predicted for snch an accident, largely because 
the radioactive material turned liquid or solid 
instead of leaking as a gas. But even if melt- 
down should turn out to be a smaller public 
threat than assumed, the risk to the industry 
seems uncomfortably high. A second accident 
like Three Mile Island’s could do te rminal 
damage to the industry’s pubhc standing. 

The nuclear industry takes the predictions 
of disaster calmly because it regards risk as- 
sessment as a useful but self-invalidating tod. 
By acting to forestall the most likely accident 
chains, the utilities can reduce the predicted 
risk. The Nudear Regulatory Commission, 
too, would like to reduce the chances of a 
meltdown. It says 3 chances in 10,000 per year 
is acceptably low, but it is considering a safety 

- goal that aims for a risk of 1 in 10,000. 

One way to attain that goal Would be for all 
plants to conduct their own risk assessments to 
identify the most likely paths to a meltdown. 
At present only plants under construction, are 
required to undertake such an analysis. Anoth- 
er way would be for the commission to focus 

- on the few riskiest plants that .drag up the 
.industry average. The public may already be 
. safe enough, but nudear power is too valuable 

to let its suppliers live dangerously. ’ ' 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


^JReagan’s Ideas: Arms Control? 

- Four-fifths of Mr. Reagan’s address to the 
^ European Parliament was avowedly ceremoni- 

--aL and even in total it did not deserve the 
- walkout and the strong silence on the beaches 
_of the left The purpose of his reception was to 
T-crecall the defeat of fascism. In that and in the 

- postwar reconstruction and defense of West- 
'era Europe, the help of the United States was 

", yand has been crucial. When Mr. Reagan 
.turned to the incipient conflict of today, how- 
' ever, a conspicuous bole appeared in his do- 

- qucnce. He has lost interest, if be ever had an 
*' interest, in arms control as commonly under- 

-stood, and seeks only a live-and-let-livc ar- 


rangement with the Soviet Union until such 
time as technology, as applied to “star wars,” 
provides a new fix for the world's safety. The 
four ideas he put to the Russians have either 
been publicly aired before or offered through 
diplomatic channels. They are designed to ap- 
proach a system of crisis management. 

Mr. Reagan has cast around for some means 
of breaking the deadlock' or ending the spiral. 
Thai the chosen method is liable to make 
relations more difficult, not less, and to eat 
away resources and ingenuity which could be 
much better applied, is everyone’s profound 
misfortune. The old man believes he is doing 
something Tor peace, and that's the tragedy! 

— The Guardian ( London, Jl . 


FROM OUR MAY 10 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


^_1910: George V Is Proclaimed King 

LONDON — With all the ancient ceremony 

* .that has been observed on such occasions for 

centuries past. George V was proclaimed [on 
" May 9] King of Great Britain and Ireland and 
■of the Dominions beyond the Seas, Defender 
of the Faith and Emperor of India, not in 
. ^London only but in all parts of the kingdom. 

In London, in particular, the ceremony was 
< marked with imposing scenes. Superb, in its 
‘-imposing pomp, was the ceremony at Sl 
■‘-J ames' Palace. No less imposing, and perhaps 
~ more interesting by reason of the manner at it. 
_ _was the quaint ceremonial at the entrance to 

* .the Gty where the old Temple Bar used to 
-siand. From the steps of the Royal Exchange 

' the proclamation was read in the presence of 
~ the Lord Mayor of London, surrounded by 
. .City officials in their robes and chains of state. 


1935: Hider Shims an Eastern Pact 
NEW YORK. — “I would rather hang myself 
than sign an Eastern pact of mutual assis- 
tance," Chancellor Hitler says in an interview 
in the “Literary Digest" [on May 9]. “We win 
sign non- aggression, pacts with all the world, 
provided we are treated fairly,” the Fflhrer 
said. “We wfll not sign a multilatera l pact of 
mutual assistance in the East, for in no circum- 
stances would Germans fight for Bolsbevflri. 
Our nation amply would not march. We are 
ready and always have been ready to place our 
signature to any document whose full require- 
ments can be foreseen and whose clear outlook 
is toward peace." Germany, Herr Hitler add- 
ed. had renounced waging war over territorial 
questions. War, he declared, would now mean 
the rain of the capitals of Europe from the air 
within an hour of its breaking out. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

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^ 1985, International Herald Tribune. AU rights reserved. 


FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


6 


Isolationist 4 * 


Put Central America Back in Perspective 

.a . » . • a . _ — . _ ... _ ’« . I i. J . — aha nffirial JL 


L OS ANGELES— I once heard a former U 5. 
/ ambassador to Brazil sum up how Frestdcm 


and respect for neighbors. Ir is legi timate , 
and right. The Sandinists in coming 
to power sought and received the hemisphere's 
support by promising democracy and respect 
for neighbors. Ibis is the case for sanctions. 

That said, we must add that President Rea- 
gan has gone about imposing than in a slap- 
dash way. They could have bear introduced as 
part of a careful strategy worked out with 
Congress and with the Contadora democracies 
and the Europeans. One verson of such a 
strategy has been suggested by Senators Nunn, 
Johnston, Battses and Boren. Instead, Wash- 
ington is acting alone, without commitments 
from either Latins or Europeans and, wane, 
without a clear and agreed statement of what 
the sanctions are meant to achieve. 

United States policy should be trying to 
induce the Sandinists to trim-the activities and 
connections that trouble Ni c ara g ua ' s neigh- 
bors and to move toward a political opening. 
.Bat if, as seems evidftnVthe Kfeagfti adffnmV 
(ration is still striving to remove the Sandhi 
ists, then the new sanctions are going to be 
widely not as a turn toward a more 
sensible and sustainable Nicaragua policy but 
as a feint in a presidential battle with Congress 
over relaunching the “contras.” 

Then there is South Africa. Intellectually it 
is not bard to grasp the proposition that sanc- 
tions make sense in same circumstances and 
not in others. Yes. we would say, in Nicaragua, 
where such a lever, properly applied, could 
help mobilize the pressures supported by 
many anxious people in the hemisphere. No in 
South Africa, where sanctions might undercut 
internal forces pressing strongly for change. 

As a practical matter, however, Mr. Reagan 
may already have forfeited the chance to have 
either case considered on its merits. On the 
Nicaraguan sanctions he acted alone and in 
haste when at least a brief pause and some 
consultation were plainly in order. On South 
African sanctions, which he apposes, the polit- 
ical tide was probably already going against 
tnm and has been given new impetus now. In 
both places. Ids policy is in trouble. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


J— # ambassador to Brazil sum op how President 
Reagan’s obsesaon with Nicaragua has distorted 
the U.S. perception of tatin America: "You 
could take Central America — all seven coun- 
tries, their total papulations and then combined 
economics — drop them into die northeast of 
Brazil and not even makr, a difference.” 

He was exaggerating. While Central America 
covers less than one-fifth of the area covered by 
the nine states of Brazil's northeast, its popula- 
tion of 20 million is almost half the number of 
people who live there. All the same, the former 
ambassador’s point — that Brazfl is as significant 
to the United Slates as Central America, and 
deserves just as much attention — is valid 
71101 never hit me more (dearly than when I 
returned to my office last week after a trip 
through Brazil, Argentina and Peru, and found a 
stack of mail about Nicaragua waiting for me. 
The material had built up before the House of 

E tatives’ vote rejecting Mr. Reagan's 
squest for S14 million to hdp anti- 
rebels continue their war to overthrow 
the Nicaraguan government, and before Mr. 
Reagan's imposition of trade against 

that country. It is an important issue, but Ifindit 
iroofcthat the United Slates is spending so much 
time debating the future of a small nation of 3 
million people while countries much bigger and 
in the long run Tar more important are struggling 
to sustain fragile democratic governments. 

Last month Peru hdd one of the most signifi- 
cant presidential elections in its long history. The 
voting was remarkably peaceful, considering the 
economic troubles ana political terrorism of the 
last two years. The election was a tribute to the 
faith that most Peruvians still have in democracy. 

The electors elevated a new and potentially 
interesting individual to the international some: 
Alan Garda, 35, a congressman who was the 
candidate of the leftist and fiercely nationalis tic 
APRA party. When Mr. Garda is inaugurated in 
July, Mr. Reagan will have to deal with another 
aggressive young Latin leader who is not aQ that 
different from some Sandinists. 

Yet Mr. Reagan must hope that Mr. Garcia’s 
government succeeds, because if it does not a 
guerrilla war that is being waged deep in the 
Andes by a mysterious and violent Maoist group, 
Sender© Lammoso. could spread and give Peru 
troubles that would make B Salvador’s blood- 
shed look mQd by comparison. 

Argentina’s new civilian president, Radi Al- 

Fnnsin . faces a similar dO-OF-die rchflUangp- He 

took over bom a discredited military govem- 


By Frank Del Olmo 


meat just over a year ago and is still struggling 
with the economic shambles it left behind. 

By putting nine members Of the Juntas that 
pretided him on trial for human rights viola- 
tions, he has the military cm thedcfensvci but his 
real problem is with Argentina's middle classes. 
The Argentines have been spoiled by their coun- 
try's abundance, and have even grown accus- 
tomed to inflation-fed prosperity since the war- 
time boom of the 194Q& Many political analysts 
fear that they arc unwilling to accept the auster- 
ity that Mr. Atfonsm must impose if the country 
is to pay its 535-bfllkm foreign debt. If he pushes 
too hard, Argentines could turn away from him, 
tempting the military to oust him. 

Brazil faces an even bigger foreign debt (more 
than 5100 billion), and most replace a beloved 
political leader, Tancredo Neves, who died be- 
fore he could take office after 20 yares of military 
rule. For now, the nation's leaders have rallied 
around Mr. Neves’S" vice president, lost Saraey, 
who has pledged to relam the late leader's ap- 
pointees and carry out his campaign promises. 
But even the most optimistic Brazilians expect 


that consensus to break down once the official 
period of mourning is over. 

Then political sparring will begin to see how 
tong Mr. Saraey remains in office, wm be stay 
for four years, wink Congress rewrites the mili- 
tary regime’s old constitution? Or will the many 
political factions that want directpresidential 
elections by 1986 have their way? The da n g e r is 
that Brazil? xmlftaiy does not want a direct vote. 
It fears that a popularly elected leader might 
haw the clout to punish the military as, 
Alfonsfn is punishing Iris generals and admirals. 

An imponanr period has began in which all 
these countries will require dose attention. Can 
their weak democratic governments remain via- 
ble? Can they pay off burdensome foreign debts 
and keep their middle and working classes con- 
tent? T'nn they keep their mOitaiy men under 
civilian control? Most important of all, can they 
develop economically so that the living standards 
of char many poor people can improve? 

Those questions may not be as immediate as 
the fate of the “contras" in Nicaragua, but they 
are every bit as important to the Western Hemi- 
sphere’s fixture stability — even if Mr. Reagan 
has not realized it yet. 

Los Angeles Tunes. 


By Daniel 3 amem 


N EW YORK— Main 
anese for the trade * 


make domestic poUticil satseJa ihe £ 7 
UnitedStatcsbatittmdD&'lfobioai- 


cal sense: Apart from the 
-over the Uiwapaatseira 


turity as a wesrid power are by them- 
selves making, it more s part of (he 
international maimtrtan^ more cos- 
mopoHtan, more open, to tradfc- 




Ol)CH 




c*y:v\ 

, ^77$) 


Sundays afternoon m Tokyo’s Yogoori 
Park. They gather by ihe hundreds 
and dance -wildly to , the tancs of 
American rode, music For j 6c fcb. 
pest of the bin, orifo America Garr^l 
cigarettes wffl do —despite a law that 
forbids advertising Araericnl ciga- -r 
nates in Japanese. Real American p- 
Levi jeans are tfoi&KU& and social 
standing is meases by foe size of 


An open Japan would 


from Europe^ Qma 
and othercountrie*. 


’V 



fjhde Sam’s sure-fire hangover cure. 


ft ** 


For a More Realistic and More European Germany 


P ARIS —It is time to count up the 
damag e done at the Bonn suro- 


JL damage done at the Bonn sum- 
mit. It chiefly was damage to Ger- 
man-French and to German-Ameri- 
can relations, but beyond that there 
was damage to the West Germans’ 
sense of solidarity with their allies. 

The French were angered that 
Chancellor Kohl, grateful for Presi- 
dent Reagan's Bitborg cemetery visit, 
gave him whatever be asked; indeed, 
mat he scarcely waited for Mr. Rea- 
gan to ask. Thus President Mitter- 
rand blocked agreement on world 
trade talks. But the French also on- 


By William Pfaff 


derstand perfectly wd] why Mr. Kohl 
he did, and i 


did what 


that Bonn mil 


line: “Though guiltless, you must ex- 
piate your fathers’ sins.* 

So must we alL A ceremony in a 
cemetery is irrelevant to tins. 

Vary bad things will come of this 
affair if the West German sense of 
estrangement from the allies is fa- 
ded. The solid, essential accomplish- 
ment of the postwar years has been 
West Germany's moral as well as 
economic and political integration 
into Western Europe. The enlarged 
European Community, however, no 
longer provides its members a re- 
sponsive or very rewarding political 


turn now to patching things up with, instrument- Because America is the 


over those with Paris, The Hague, 
Brussels, Rome and London. When 

Anv-riranc itiap p nint ll>w n | 35 in the 

Bitbmg case, the shock is the greater 
for the investment that has been 
made in the American tie. 

Something constructive could re- 
sult if Germans were influenced to 
take a more detached view of their 
strategic dependence cm W ashingto n, 
and were more seriously to consider 
the possibilities for impoving securi- 
ty cooperation with the principal 
West European allies. The west Ger- 
man reaction to new initiatives in 


better funded European research in 
miUtaiy-rdalBd 'science and techno- 
logy, have met a guarded response in 
Bonn because of German sensitivity 
to what Washington thfahL 
This is a rmsudgment. Indeed, 
Americans as well as Gennans need 


BvaPrc^t^otfleeiionsi'Iliiyis 
hardly a pdcttnt of a coiuuaty dosed, 
to American products. di ' 

From HmtemxmVttOMtfot novels "> 
to - IBM mainframes, from Ralph - , 

Lauren to KetXthcky Fried. Chjcteo, . ^ 

Japan actually buys more ftriiRthe *' 
United States than any other country - ' 

except Canadai Tn» fatt. alone 
should give Americans prase before 
thqr are swept up in JapatHasUng. 

True, Japan’s mates are fettered 
by reguktum^nd aHi#! in vrays 
that run against the .«&.«(' ^frte - 

trade.' But even if the jttpmse ate 
nothing but Amcxican steaks and or- |NP & 
snges, stroked nothmg but American 
cigarettes, equipped^ their armed Jl *“ ' 
forces with notmhg but.Ameriean 
weapons and agreed to refrain from 
exporting* trade carlo America,-the ^ j 
buterc^stswfoceaixade deficit as .* .'.»■ • 

high as $20 biDioiv wilh Japan, 

Even if aB regnbftk*B Myc lifted, : 
that is no guarantee fiat. American 

their maifaa Aikdpa Japan 
would also be bpeato pafeicts from • 

Europe, China andofficrtoncpun- . . i, 
tritt. In ihoaqtTwm^msitis far 


better to understand that it is & basic fwyw jjbu Anfo& q pqrtire ts 


interest of the Unhed States, as wdl would be as qoi 
as of Western Europe, that Europe p lc on Capitol 
steadily improve its aUHty to assure Thm tberei 


assomepeo- 


its own securify — that me “Europe- tuns.' Japan 
an pillar” of the Western alliance be third of the wtxkfe 


.Paris. This much is Jess tharr seribu£ 
German-American relations seem. 


superpower/ and the guarantor of 


superficially, better than ever, since 
Mr. Reagan did make his pilgrimage 
to the Bifburg cemetery. But a ixew 


West Germany, Gomans have given April, and to the French ^Eureka" 
relations with Washington priority proposals for more ambitious and 


and were more seriously to consider an pillar” of the Western alliance be 
the possibilities for inqHxmng securi- as soft das possible, capable of stand- 
ty cooperation with the pnndpal ingalone if necessary. . 

West European allies. The west Ger- That way lies a trans- Allan tie rda- 
man reaction to new initiatives in tkmship of confidence and nratiial 
military cooperation taken by (he-'-- respect. -which would hawt.na.nKgl 
West European Uition ministers in ■’• for gramitous displays of the Itiad 
April, and to the French “Eureka” seen, and suffered, at Ktbuxg. 
proposals for more ambitious mid C 1985 WUBam Pfaff. 


Then there.is the bfanar trade.pfo 
ture. Japan rocotmts for only 'one- 
third ot Ac woridwide American 
trade dafkiL-D^b deficits wilh the 
European Community and with ^new 
Japans" such mi South.Knraa and 

nr . j*«« 


West German reject for Mr> Reamm 
is one thing. There is considerable 


is one thing. There is considerable 
bitterness as well that for Mr. Reagan 
to go to Bitburg required a consider- 
able act of political courage. There is 
resentment at the scale of American 
popular opposition to what was, after 
aQ, meant to be a decent gesture of 
friendship between two nations that 
have been allies for 30 years. 

There is bitterness that Americans, 
and others, oo the one hand refuse to 
ignore Germany’s past but depend on 
West German/s mOitaiy and eco- 
nomic contribution to the alliance, 
and, as many Germans see it, expect 
Germany to supply the battleground 
for a future Rnssum-American war. 
The West German “Greens” move- 
ment has fed upon this sense of vic- 
timization. offering a view of the con- 
temporary world m which not only 
the German people but Germany’s 
lands and forests arc jeopardized by 
foreign forces beyond control 

The sentiment of victimization 
dearly exists on the right as welL 
Among the least happy thing s that 
have happened during this controver- 
sy was the argument made by some 
Gennans which implied that to have 
fought against the Russian army dur- 
ing World War II was somehow to 
have provided a service to Western 
civilization that present-day Ameri- 
cans ought to acknowledge. 

The Bundestag has in recent days 
passed the so-called “Auschwitz Lie” 
legislation, m a kin g it a crime to deny 
that the death camps existed, or to 
m i n i mi ze the number of their victims, 
but seeming to equate the death camp 
victims with those nearly 3 million 
Germans who died as a consequence 
of having beat driven out of the east 
by the Russians at the war's end. 

This seems to ignore the heavy fact 
that there would never have been any 
need to fight a Russian invasion of 


Reagan Misconstrues a Terrible Century 

D OSTON — The essence of Ron- By Anthony Lewis played at Bitburg, there were most 

fl alrl pMIMn ttrOC AvwicWl Ot Rvt_ " tvtitil Pm ■■■■■■« ■ * i f eu ft i 


B OSTON — The essence of Ron- 
aid Reagan was exposed at Bit- 
burg. Confronted by the most pro- 


burg Confronted by the most pro- 
found questions of man's nature and 
responsibility, he responded with 
narrow ideology and warped Mstoiy. 

“I am a Jew m a world still threat- 
ened by anti-Semitism," Mr. Reagan 
said after visiting the German mili- 
tary cemetery. “I am an Afghan, and 
lama prisoner of the Gulag I am a 
refugeem a crowded boat foundering 
off the coast of Vietnam, I am a 
Laotian, a Cambodian, a Cuban and 
a Misldto Indian in Nicaragua. I, too, 
am a potential victim of totalitar- 
ianism/* So freedran-kwing people 
around the world must say today. 

That was brilliantly effective rhet- 
oric. But thmlr about the message . 
Every victim Mr. Reagan mentioned, 
after the reference to anti-Semitism, 
was a victim of communism. He was 
saying that the serious violations of 
human rights — the only ones worth 
mentioning in the shadow of the Ho- 
locaust — are all the work of Com- 
munist governments. 

Not a thought there for those who 
have suffered and died in General 
Pinochet’s Chile, for the Baha'i and 
other victims of religious terror in 
Iran, for the South Africans who live 
under institntkmalized racist tyran- 
ny. Not a word of memory for the 
Armenians who died at the hands of 
Turks in this century’s first genocide. 

The point is not to play down the 
existence of cruelty in Communist 
regimes. The point is to recognize 
ihfli- inhumanity of ap palling kinds 
may appear in all kinds of societies 


and systems —and must be opposed 
regardless of ideology. 

That is roe of the most obvious 
lessons of the history of the Nazi 


period. There were people who ar- 
gued that we should not object too 
strongly to Hitler's racial ideas be- 
came after all he was anti-Commu- 
nisL Some political excuse Can always 
be found for doring one’s eyes to the 
horror of an Idi Amin, of tne Khmer 
Rouge, of the tortures of the {generals’ 
regime in Argentina, of Stalm. 

The concept of human rights must 
be universal to have mcmmig If we 
have not learned that, we have 
learned nothing from what Hannah 
Arendl called this terrible century; 
But Ronald Reagan, speaking in the 
shadow of its most terrible crime 
against humanity, saw an pnnasion to 
make an anti-Comminrist paint. 

Along with the zealot’s one-eyed 
view of human right* Mr. Reagan 
offered an extraordinary version of 
the great crime that left its imprint all 
around hmn Nazism. Jn his edited 
history, Nazi Germany was not a 
system, not a terrifying mass phe- 
nomenon, but the work of one man. 
“One man’s totalitarian dictator- 
ship’* was Mr. Reagan’s phrase for it. 
But Hitler was not alone. MQftons 
voted for him, mouthed his ideas, 
hated and killed with him. Seemingly 
ordinary men pushed Jews into gas 
chambers. Ana there are still advo- 
cates of fascism today. 

In the Reagan memory, as dis- 


respect. which would turaq notnegd ^ia some <^«vm»te^tiiap the . 
tor grtunitous displays of the kind - imbalancc^S&Jbi^i its ; 
seen, and suffered, at Ifttburg. . combination- of prosperity mid pro- . 

C 1985 WUBam Pfaff. tectiamsm, jtiSL happens to be the 

most convarieni scapegoat, 

•7 -g y-| In the metutime* Americans tend ' ‘ 

ible Century f ■ 

with Japan, tariader the htgh^edF 

played at Bitbutg, there wete mostly ■ aofogy revofaitien. It could never ’ 
pood Germans: teen-agers drafted have happened rapidly or dramati- ■£/. 

mto the anny, “soldiers to whom N&- 7 caDy watnour the sharp decline in ~ r/T - 
nan meant no more , than a short the price of stliGoa chips and other ■ 
fife,” the mother and scat in the Read- . computer components — a- deefine ' 
eris Digest stray told by Mr. Reagan spurred- by the Jmnuxese .dectnauc 
who welcomed both American and industiy, with its higher productivity, . 
GermaiLSoIdiasto their cottwe in lower wages and aggresave compcti- . •' 
the woods on Christmas Day 1944. tionwilh American comnanks, ' ' " 

“We do not b^eve in collective True, a flood, of *^SSporis “ 


***.» I-. > 


played ax Bitburg, there were mostly 
good Germans: teen-agers drafted 
mto the anny, “soldiers to whom Na- 
zism meant no more , than a short 
fife,” the mother and sauin the Read- 


who welcomed both American and 
German soldiers to their cottage in 
the woods on Christmas Day 1944. 
“We do not befieve in collective 


guilt, 1 * the president said, and he was have cost some American jobs. "But 


right But nrither can wei^htiy dose 
our minds to the terrible knowledge 
that nriffions followed Hitler. It is 5y 
facing that fact that successive gem- 
ations of West German pr^lticm lead- 
ers have done so mnen to create a 
healthy Federal RqrnWic. A perfect 
symbol of Mr. Reagan’s attitude was 
his refusal to meet one of the bravest 
of those leaders, an eady anti-Nazi, 
fanner Chancellor Willy Brandt. 

In his speech at the U.S. air base 
in Ktburg, Mr. Reagan said he had 
received many letters about his 
planned visit to the mi li t ar y ceme- 
tery: some s u ppo r t i ve, some crax- 
ceroed, some opposed. He described 
only one, frem a young Jewish wcan- 
an who recently had had her bat 
nutzvah, “She urged me,” Mr. Rea- 
gan said, “to lay the wreath at Bit- 
burg in honor of the future of Germa- 
ny, and that is what we have done.” 

The young woman was identified 
by the White House as Beth Flom of 


the long-term soda! and econom i c 
benefittoAmaica-^tteciteatioaof.- 
a large, new high-tech sector at a ray 
low cost — is immense. 

Or look more carefully at the S37- 


tnllkm U.S. trade deficit with Japan 
last year, expected to grow to rtadyJItjg:.' 
S50 bfllirai this year. The numbers -> • 
sound fririitcning — until one read- 
izes that au those scuphs dollars and 
more are pumped hack into the 


H T e xt 110111 ^ TheWn^S 
Mrfboro Township, New Jersey. She the “pressure" nl 
udd The Associated Press that in a the embareassinlj 
the president cm April 21 Minister 


bills. This supply of investment dol- 
lars has helped keep US . interest 
rates lower man they might otherwise 
have beai and allowed the American 
economy to continue growing- with- 
out si gnifican t inflatiooL ■■ 

Of course, Americans need-toim— 
prove their exporting capabilities if 
they are to remain c omp e ti tive in ah 
increashqfy. globalized marketplace. 
But Japan-bashing wfll hardly nekj. 

The main exmeession produced cy, 
the “pressure” placed an Japan m. 


, v- 
iv-,.. 

T.-* ■>' 


'•fev-'- 

: .o' 


proved offos visit to fotbuig. fondm: sets andtnmis rackets -as if 

tne new ror* Tones. America’s was a cokmial economy 


77>e New York Times. 


Central Europe, nor would there have 
been any Germans expelled from 


been any Germans expelled from 
their homes in the east, had Germany 
not attacked the Soviet Union in 
1941. Russia today dominates the 
East European nations, occupies Eu- 
rope to the Elbe, partitions Germany, 
has annexed parts of prewar Poland, 
East Prussia, and Ruthenia — and 
the Cold War exists, with UB. troops 
and nudear weapons in West Germa- 
ny today — all as a direct result of 
Germany’s attack upon a Soviet Rus- 
sia which at the tune was doing its 
best to appease Hitler. 

The geopolitical catastrophe that 
ensued, like the crime of the death 
camps, certainly is not the responsi- 
bility of Gennans of the present gen- 
eration. Germans, however, like the 
rest of us, have to live with the conse- 
quences, making the best of what was 
done by another generation. 

The reconciliation of old enemies 
does not annul historical and geo- 
political realities. This is an essential 
point. TO say that Germany must 
bear the responsibility for us own 
and Europe's present division is not 
to hold present-day Germans to 
blame for the sins of their fathers. It 
is to say something different Ddicta 
maiorum immeritus lues, in Horace’s 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Seeing the Difference ■££ 


whose handicrafts could bdp rmnt 
cash at a charity affair. 


Congratulations for the fine edito years ago and the Germans at today. 

■ i n j. , « — — da xiim nrtvro 


rial cm President Reagan's visit to 
Bitburg (“Bitburg; Time to Mow On," 


doubt well meaning Chanceflor Kohl 
but also, far more seriously, by his 
own uninf ormed staff. The president 
would be better served, and the 
American people with him, if he 
would rdy more on the advice of 
America's many competent Foreign 
Service officers abroad and less on 
his amateur White House coterie. 

Their inability to distinguish be- 


stow mat Americans can and do as- architecture for controflmg the axn- 
tmguish between the Nazis of 40 mmrications of data within a «rnp] | e 
years ago and the Germans of today, system of computers and peripheral 
DANIEL BOYER. devices. Other manufacturers have 

Paris. their own proprietary network aichi- 

_ . tectores. In addition, IBM publishes 

The uproar accompanying Prea- . detailed information about SNA that 
deni Reagan’s visit to a Goman nnh- allows these manufacturers to desizn 

torv Mm Afwiv tc fl ear? tn/Kptvnmf /if .i ■ 1 


To trade effective^, innovative ac- 
. tion is needed from waslnngion, not 
charity from Tokya Fra example, the 
U.S. government, shpidd be wfang 


measures to coomete witii the Japa- 
nese government’s considerable snp- 


tary cemetery is a sad indictment of 


mankind’s inability to forgive past 
transgressions. That the SS were re- 
sponsible fra genocide will never be 
forgotten, but that is not the paint 
here. Mr. Reagan’s gesture represents 
a genuine attempt to heal <dd wounds 
and strengthen the Western alliance, 
and for tins 1 9»hin* him 

HOWARD RICHARDS. . 

Singapore. 


tween Bitburg and Bergen- 
harmed the United States around the 
world, as weD as U ^.-German rela- 
tions. It will take a Jong time to heal 
the freshly opened wounds and to 


IBM’s SNA, ISO’s OSI 


. then products so they can be at- 
tached to SNA networks. 

OSI is a non-proprietary architec- 
ture being developed by the Inter- 
national Standards Organization to 
control the communication of data 
betwe en systems of different archi- 
tectures. It kcoraplementaiy to SNA : 
■ and other proprietary architectures, 
IBM has oraic as much as any 
company in the industry to support 
OSL since its inception, as a set of 


port for the . development of fifth* 
generation computers. Washington 
should be bolstering jjrivatB-sector 
efforts to learn the aepnn i n g game. 

This may at first seem to run 
counter to uj. economic rpjd W o***, 
hut it is crucial in, a world of “new^ 
Japans j— all of whose governments! 
are helping to organize and fmatio e 


— ■v,**. ’■ 


Ilte teen-agers m YttyQgr Pazk are ■ 
g rown g °P- As there generation ma-' - ? ’■ 
unw, Japanese isolation and confer- v 
n»ty wfll mvariably give way to great* - 
w openness and mversitv. C ’. • 


OSL since its inception; as a Set rST ITJS 

mtemaitonally accepted standards : ^l 

for becomes, the ab&ty to sdi 


Leoerr intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and must camaw the writ- 
er's signature, name aid full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsoGdted manuscripts. 


Regarding “ Companies, Govern- 
ments Focus on International Stan- 
dards ” (Office Automation, April 15): 

This iqwrt characterizes the Inter- 
national Standards Organization's 
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) 
cramept as a “challenger” and “coun- 
terbalance" to IBM’s Systems Net- 
work Architecture (SNA). Tins is an 
erroneous potceptioa. 

SNA is IBM’s proprietary network 


for communications between svs- oStS’ ““ty to Ameocan 
tans. We participate in a nnmbenrf. Jje — aMm thenratofthe 

national and international OSf ahm- matter -- will not J* 

■* — — -■ aetennmed bv the anffidnns «- 


daidsdevdopment organizations, wc 
him prafocts aqmortmg various umAma 

software under dwdojmBithS 3^ri^ 

SSntSWffl CBS 

,^ V CA SSANt - The writer, at 
■ President Dreecteur GfatihaL on. business and. 

- IBM Europe, Paris. edthistol 


worm, Rg that matter — will not be 
by the concessions ex- 
tractod. It will depend an iheprod- 
hasdwaen^fotegog 


■ l.V. * 

,; : V ' . • 


ed this to The New y«£ 


commentator 
gy. contribut- 


■ •jSS.” 



tm 





J V INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 







Page 


3 Leaders Reject Non-PLO Role in Talks 


By Judith Miller 

New York Tima Serein 
TUNIS — Efforts to revive long- 
stalled Middle East peace talks 
have suffered a setback with three 
key officials of the Palestine Liber-, 
anon Organization saying that only 
declared PLO members chosen by 
(he group’s leadership would be 
permitted to meet with American 
officials to explore possible peace- 
talks with Israel 
In interviews Wednesday, Ah- 
med Abdel Rahman, the PLO’s 
chief spokesman, and two other of- 
ficials known for their hard-line 
views, Saleh Khalef and F&rouk 
Kaddounri, ruled era! a meeting be- 
tween American officials and any 
undeclared PLO members. 

Edward Djerqian, the U.S. State 
Department spokesman, said Tues- 
day that the Reagan administration 
was considering a w ith 

members of the Palestine National 


Council the PLO’s unofficial par- 
liament. The United States does 
not consider all council members 
pan of the PLO and has refused to 
recognize (he PLO unless it explic- 
itly accepts brad’s right to exist, 
which it has refused to da 

The rejection also reflects grow- 
ing tensions within die FLO over 
its agreement to pursue joint peace 
talks with King Hussein of Josdan 
to secure the estab lishment of a 
Pales tinian state in confederation 
with Jordan. 

Several Pales tinian* here 
that the agreement had seriously’ 
weakened the leadership of the 
PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, who 
signed the accord with Hussein on 
Feb. 1 1. 

[Mr. Arafat said Wednesday in 
Amman that he and the Hug had 
agreed on the makeup of a joint 
delegation to advance peace ef- 
forts, but he denied a report that he 


and Hussein had agreed on the 
composition of a team to meet with 
U.S. officials. The Associated Press 
reported from Amman. 

{“We agreed upon the contents 

Of a joint Jpi flfaT\iBn -P»il rCTwii»n 

delegation, which is the first dele- 
gation which wili operate on the 
international field," be said. 

{Asked to comment on a report 
that Jordan and the PLO had 
agreed on names of non-PLO 
members who could meet with U.S. 
representatives to start the pace 
process, Mr. Arafat replied: nNot. 
yet. Not yet,"] 

Mr. Khakf, the second most 
powerful member of Mr. Arafat's 
d-Fatah, the largest and most in- 
fluential PLO group, criticized the 
February accord in an interview 
Wednesday night 

“The Amman accord has weak- 
ened Yasser Arafat,” said Mr. Kha- 
leC, who is known as Abu Iyad. “If 


the Americans break the PLO, 
there is another leadership waiting 
in Damascus. They'll make the 
problem worse because, unlike us, 
none of them wants a solution to 
the Arab- Israeli conflict at all.” 

Mr. KhaleTs reference was to 
Syrian-sponsored Palestinians who 
rebelled against Mr. Arafat's lead- 
ership in Lebanon. In November 
the PLO effectively split into two 
organizations. 

■ Arafat Visiting Beijing 

Mr. Arafat arrived in Beijing on 
Thursday and was met by Foreign. 
Minister Wu Xueqian, Reuters re- 
ported from Beijing. 

The PLO leader, who was ac- 
companied by a group of Jordani- 
ans and Pales tinians, is in China at 
the start of a drive to lobby the five 
permanent members of the UN Se- 
curity Council in support of an 
international conference on Pales- 
tine. 


Israel Asks Interpol to Help in Search for Mengele 


New York Tima Sorter 
TEL AVIV — Israel has asked 
for help from Interpol in its effort 
to find and obtain the arrest of 
Josef Mengele, the Nazi concentra- 
tion camp doctor, so he can be 
extradited. 

On Tuesday, the Israeli govern- 
ment and the World Zionist Orga- 
nization, offered a Sl-miDion re- 
ward to the person instrumental in 
bringing Dr. Mengele to justice in 


In its application Wednesday to 
Interpol, the international police 
organization, the Ministry of Jus- 
tice said that the Magistrates’ 
Court in Jerusalem issued an arrest 
warrant Nov. 20 on charges of 
“mass murder a nd wounding anti 
causing grievous bodily harm to 
many thousands of persecuted ci- 
vilians imprisoned in the Ausch- 


witz-Birkeaau concentration and 
death camp.” 

The application said: “Please 
search for and arrest” Dr. Mengele 
“with a view to Us extradition to 
Israel” It added that a request for 
an “international red nonce” was 
being prepared. 

Interpol is an international clear- 
inghouse that seeks to promote mu- 
tual ‘assistance between police 
forces. Hrillip White, a UJL Justice 
Department lawyer, said that nor- 
mally when a government notifies 
Interpol that ills seeking a fugitive, 
the agency sends “red notices” to 
various countries, guaranteeing 
that the original country wiQ seek 
extradition of the indhodual if he 
or she is arrested. 

Justice Minister Moshc Nissim 
said Wednesday justice de- 
partments in the United States 


West Germany were cooperating. 

According to information sup- 
plied by the Israelis to Interpol Dr. 
Mengele’s last known residence 
was in Paraguay. He was natural- 
ized there in 1959 but was deprived 
of his citizenship 20 yean later by 
order of the Paraguayan Supreme 
Court. He is 74, if still alive. 

■ Dead Granted Gtizensfaip 

Israel has granted posthumous 
citizenship to the six million Jews 
killed by the Nazis during World 
War H, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Tel Aviv. 

“On the 40th anniversary of the 
defeat of Nazi Germany the State 
of Israel grants commemorative 
citizenship to six million of our 
brothers who were exterminated in 
the Holocaust,” Education Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Navon said Wednes- 
day. 


The proclamation be signed also 
awards honorary citizenship to 
non- Jews who helped Jews flee and 
hide from German soldiers. 

Under Israel’s Law of Return, all 
Jews have an automatic legal right 
to Israeli citizenship if they choose 
to live there, but it was not immedi- 
ately dear how honorary citizen- 
ship for non-Jews would affect 
them if they chose to live in Israel 


121 Pardoned in Yugoslavia 

T he Associated Press 

BELGRADE — Yugoslavia has 
given pardons to 121 prisoners, in- 
cluding 61 sentenced for political 
offenses, to mark the 40th anniver- 
sary of the country's liberation 
from Nazi occupation. Tanjug, the 
Yugoslav press agency, reported 
Wednesday. 


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY^ MAY IQ, 1985. 


"Wien a man is tired of London he is tired of 
life; for there is in London all that life can afford. 
Dr. Samuel Johnson, 20th September 1777 ■ 


Take a Stroll down Cloth Fair, or a 
walk through Plantagenet Place, or 
even Carbuncle Passage 


by Moss Murray 


P aris is a city to be visited, and Rome a capital to be seen. But London is a metropolis to be 
explored. Its narrow streets, hidden mews , ancient alleys, are not only a continual source of 
delight, bat scenes of never ending surprises. Where else can you stroll down Cloth Fair, Maiden 
Lane, Axe Court, Baker Street, Beggars H31, Carbuncle Passage Way or Plantagenet Place. 

What makes London so delightful is that half the fun is free. Top of the daily summertime bill is the 
chang in g of the guard at Buckingham Palace performed by the Queen's Guard. 


A regimental band leads the 
St James's Palace detachment 
which carries the Colour. At 
11.30 each morning in 
summer, and every other day 
in winter, the new guard, con- 
sisting of 3 officers and 40 
other ranks, marches into the 
forecourt of Buckingham 
Palace. 

The Queen’s Guard is trad- 
itionally formed by one of the 
five regiments of the Foot 
Guards. Each unit can be id- 
entified by the plume on their 
bearskins, the position of 


tonic buttons and the uni- 
form’s epaulettes. Only the 
Scots Guards have no plume. 

At Horse Guards Parade in 
Whitehall the guard is formed 
by mounted units of the 
Household Cavalry - the Life 
Guards and riif Blues and 
Royals. When die Queen is at 
Buckingham Palace . an 
officer, one corporal and 16 
troopers, plus a trumpeter on 
a grey horse, parade. The 
event takes place at il.OO on 
weekdays and at 10.00 on 
Sunday. 


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Get there early. It is one of 
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soldiers will be wearing dis- 
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not changed Th e 17th 
century. It is worth looking 
closely, if you can, at the sup- 
erbly embroidered heraldic 
banners, known as Colours. 

Like the eagles of the 
Roman legions, they are ded- 
icated before being handed 
over to the regiment. They 
represent battle honours won 
in past wars when they were 
also a rallying poinc for men 
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nobody can enter the Tower 
until daylight — not even the 
Queen. 

Traditionally British 


Before going to the Tower 
for the Ceremony of the Keys, 
why not find yourself a rest- 
aurant that is typically 
English, too? Where better 


which used to be a Turkish 
bath, or Pomegranates, close 
to die river Thames. 

The food served at the 
former restaurant is unique, 
not overpriced and, for an 
evening meal in delightful 
comfort, hard to beat. Start, 
as I did recently, with quails 
egg salad escorted by avocado 
and bacon. Your helping mil 
be generous, but not so large 
as to spoil your enjoyment of 
the wwin course. For this my 
choice was lamb's kidneys 
shallow fried and served with 
a deface pepp er corn sauce 
that was subtle, almost sub- 
lime. 

As an alternative, the mix 
of seabass and wild trout were 
balanced by a champagne 
sauce and garnished with 
scrips of tomato and avocado. 
Portions are more rfam suffic- 
ient to satisfy die hungriest 
appetites. 

Or go to Pomegranates. 
This is at 92 Grosvenor Road, 
by the Thames, and is a fav- 


However impressive these 
cavalcades of marching mci\ 
may be, the greatest, brat and 
biggest of them all is Troop- 
ing the Colour which takes 
place on the official birthday 
of the Sovereign in mid-June. 
Tickets are available to mem- 
bers of the public to watch 
this two hour ceremony 
whose origins lie in the early 
18th century when the Colour 
was marched, or ‘trooped’ 
before the regimem so that 
every soldier would , learn to 
recognise his own Colour in 
the smoke of battle. 

This is an occasion when visit- 
ors to London can see half a 
dozen members of the Royal 
Family in a single morning. 
They join the Queen to watch 
the colourful pageantry of 
marching, and counter 
marching and parade discip- 
line, from specially reserved 
windows. For those unable to 
get tickets for the main event, 
there is a dress rehearsal the 
previous Saturday which is 
just as glamorous and spectac- 
ular as the real thing. Only 
the Sovereign is missing. 



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designed by Leonard MoreCLademl. 


Another ceremonial occas- 
ion that is worth watching, if 
you can, is the oldest of them 
all. The 700 year old ritual of 
the Ceremony of the Keys is 
performed at the Tower of 
London when the Chief 
Warden, escorted by Yeoman 
Warders in their gold and 
silver uniforms [hat dace back 
to the days of the first Queen 
Elizabeth, goes through the 
Tower each night ceremon- 
iously locking the gates. 

When be has done so he 
hands the keys to the Govern- 
or of the Tower. After this, 


than Greens, perhaps the fin- 
est restaurant in London’s 
West End which unashamed- 
ly believes in serving tradit- 
ionally British food. Here, 
according to the Good Food 
Guide you can ‘eat the best 
oysters in town’. 

But if oysters are not your 
favourite food, do not des- 
pair. You can sip champagne, 
or an excellent Sancerre, in 
tire bar before going into the 
restaurant where chef, Beth 
Coventry, formerly at 
Langan’s, has a deft touch 
when it comes to such typical- 
ly English dishes such as saus- 
ages and mashed potatoes, 
shepherd’s pie, liver and 
bacon, oxtail stew, kedgeree, 
steak and kidney pudding 
and, to finish, treade tan. 


Typically French 


If your taste is for some- 
thing more international, 
your destination should be 
Monsieur Thompsons at 29 
Kensington Park Road. Al- 
though it is never easy to 
transplant something so typic- 
ally French as a bistro to the 
heart of London, here the 
near impossible has been 
achieved. 

This restaurant is so 
French it would fit naturally 
akmg any boulevard. Nor 
need this surprise anyone. It 
is owned by a Frenchman, 
Dominique Rocher, and his 
front of house manageress, 
Catherine, is a Farisieane and 
with a sunshine personality. 
But most important, the chef, 
and his two assistants, are all 
experts who received their 
training at the Hotel Grill on. 

With such a pedigree I was 
not surprised to be served 
nouvelle cuisine that breathed 
originality, and included 
those expected touches of 
class [hat have already won 
the restaurant recognition in 
Mickelitt. It cannot be long 
before it moves higher up the 
ratings. Here there are end- 
less variations of a theme 
without any inhibitions about 
everything served having to 
be ‘natural’. 

If you warn atmosphere, 
and a touch of Paris in 
London, try Monsieur 
Thompsons, even though it is 
a little off the beaten track. 

If you prefer a more central 
venue eat at either Ormond’s, 


ounce with almost every 
member of Margaret 
Thatcher's cabinet, although 
Che Prime Minister herself has 
not yet appeared. The charm 
of the place is not only the 
lunches and dinners they 
serve, but the delightful bon- 
hommie with which Welsh 
patron, Patrick Gwynn- Jones, 
welcomes all bis guests 
whether first timers or regul- 
ars. However, be warned, 
there are so many of the latter 
that it is wise to phone and 
book a cable (01-828 6S60). 

When you arrive the 
dances are that, whatever 
your home country, there will 
be something from it on the 
menu. Where else in London 
can you eat Welsh baked trout 
in oatmeal and bacon, Mexic- 
an baked crab, a Jamaican 
pepperpot, or Husseini 
Kebab. As Russians are not 
too much in evidence, Patrick 
also feels it is safe to serve 
Kabul Kebabs with chutney 
and rice. 


Dine and Dance 


If your preference is for 
something more formal, walk 
across the road and dine 
(evenings only, except Sun- 
day when they serve Brunch) 
at the unique Elephant on the 
River. 

Once associated with a 
famous London dub in 
Curzon Street, it is now 
independently owned by four 
expert Italian restaurateurs - 
Luigi Buosi, Toni Arbia, Orl- 
ando Gennaniand Domenico 
d’Urso. Any restaurant run 
by four Italian professionals is 
certain to be good. This is 
more than that. It is 
delightful . •- 

Is the restaurant, where 
there is dancing each night, 
except Monday when the 
Elephant packs its trunk and 
is dosed, the ambience is as 
elegant as anywhere in 
London. This is a restaurant 
where ladies can wear their 
finery . . - and also expect 
considerable competition 
from other guests who may be 
Londoners, or from as far 
away as Australia, South 
America, Hong Kong or the 
States. Although it is a dub, 
viators are welcome at the 
Elephant on the River. 

However, there is more to 
London than pomp, page- 


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antry and good eating. There 
is also excellent shopping 
whether for. the world's best 
made suics, exclusive 
woollens, finest h a ndmad e 
shoes or the most extensive 
collections of antique silver. 

Nowhere is the art of the 
modern craftsman so appar- 
ent as in the New Bond Street 
salon of Van Qeef & Arpds at 
No IS3, almost at the junction 
with Conduit Street. It has 
been called the most beautiful 
jewellery shop in the world. It 
is a claim few who visit the 
showroom will deny. 

The manager, Christian 
Strang, mid me: “The em- 
phasis is on Paris middle chic 
and we have been successful 


Antique SQver 


Another salon not to be 
passed by is Marks Antiques 
in Curzon Street where they 
boast, with some justification, 
. one of die finest displays of 
antique silver anywhere in 
London. 

Prices are reasonable and 
sensible. Equally important, 
the layman, and the browser, 
are as welcome as the serious 
shopper apd collector. It is a 
family business and the staff 
treat everyone who comes like 
one of the family. 

Last time I popped in to see 
what was new on the crowded 
shelves , I was offered a cap of 
coffee and the opportunity to 
sit down and sip it at leisure 
while owner, Anthony Marks, 
regaled me with tales of die 
many lords and titled ladies 
who either come to Him 
seeking to extend their know- 
ledge, or to ask him to find a 
buyer for items they no longer 
need. 

And even if you, personal- 
ly, were not bom with a silver 
spoon in your mouth, at 
Marks Antiques you will cert- 
ainly find a set of six to rem- 
edy this defect . . . and at 
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, 4 L INIEIINfllONAL M « 4 

Herala^feeribune . 

WEEKEND 

The Blue-Collar Eloquence of David Mamet 


Page 9 


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v ’ David Mamet 



The following is excerpted from an article in 
The New York Times Magpstoe, 


by Samuel G. Freedman 

■'!" EW YORK — The poker game 
I starts at 7:30 every Wednesday 

I \ night It ends, David Mamet says, 
JL n any time between 1:30 A-M. and 
noon Thursday. The men eat ham sand- 
wiches, drink beer and smoke a Lot of cigars, 

and thousands of dollars move across the 
table. But if this sounds Eke a typical card 
game, it has its peculiarities. The regulars 
mcinrift a painter, a film professor ami, in 
Mamet, a Pulitzer Prize- winning playwright 
And their conversation, for all the usual 
Muffing and msBitig_ often turns to art or 
liieratnre or organic gardening. 

If one can know a man by his rituals, then 
the poker night reveals something essential 
about David Mamet His card game, like his 
writing, like his life, brings an intellectual 
sensibility to a working-class world. Mamet 
employs Aristotle’s rales of drama to write 
about petty thieves and sleazy salesmen; be 
composes free verse out of grunts, sighs, 
obscenities and sentence fragments. In both 
his stark writing style and his fas cinati on 
with the male tribe, Mamet resembles Ernest 
Hemingway more, perhaps, than any writer 
of his generation. 

Over the last decade, Mamet has proved as 
prolific and as successful as any American 
playwright. After bursting onto the scene as 
a wonderland with "American Buffalo” — 
written and produced is 1975, when be was 
27 — he has demonstrated a staying power 
rare in a field of fickle aedann. Mamet 
endured some critical doubts in mid-career 
over plays like “The Woods,” “Lone Canoe” 
and “Edmond,” but he continued to write 
every day in his workmanlike way. 

“The idea that one can become a better 
writer, a more famous writer, a richer writer, 
has been the ruination of many many writ- 
ers,” Mamet says, “and I do not plan to be 
one. It’s like a guy who makes chairs. It’s 
something I can do and I can do wdL And 
obvioasly if I keep at it, within the limits of 
'the form, I should get better at it in small 
increments. But. the important thing is not 
my becoming a better chair maker, but the 
chair. You don't become better in general, 
the chairs become better.” 

In the last three years, Mamet’s regimen 
has yielded the highly regarded screenplay 
for “Hie Verdict” and the caustic comedy 
“Glengarry Glen Ross,” for which he won 
both the Pulitzer Prize and the New. York 
Drama Critics Circle Award as the best 
American play of 1984. He won Tony nomi- 
nations last year for both “Glengarry” as the 
best drama and “American Buffalo” as the 
best revival, a rare aduevementThis year, 
Mamet has renewed his traditional ties to. the. . 
Goodman Theater in Chicago. The theater 


Europe’s Summer Festivals: 
Tradition, Music and the Box Office 


by John Rockwell ■ - . 

E UROPEAN summer' festivals are 
best symbolized by Bayreuth in 
West Germany and Salzburg in 
Austria. They are the two ofdest 
and grandest of the large-scale, mternation-' 
al-style events, and between them they de- 
fine what such festivals can and should be. 
These days, though, every European village 
seems to gather together a few mnsjaamt and 
call the convocation a festival, and there are 
some economic reasons; as well as musical 
ones for that. • : - 

Bayreuth is the classic festival created in 
fuffitiment of a single viston-That virion was 
by Richard Wagner, tit course, and its sub- 
ject was himself. What makes Bayreuth so 
special is the very single-mindedness of the 


( It »’lf «•'' 




experience. If you don’t much like Wagner, 
you shouldn't be there in the first plaice. If 
you do like Wagner, any flaws in pafor- 
mance or production — arid under the shaky 
leadership of the less talented of the two 
Wagner grandsons, Wolfgang, therehave 
been plenty of such flaws m recent yean — 
win be swept aside by the intensity of the 
Wagnerian zmmersion. 


Salzburg is a festival on a different model 
Yes, its focal point is Mozart, thedty being 
his birthplace. But Salzburg’s true purpose, 
when it was founded in the early 1920s, was 
to provide a festival paradigm of the frag- 
mented Hapsbarg Empire — an Austrian 
artistic image of a cosmopolitan, heteroge- 
neous entity bound together in a communal 
spirit. Thus the festival offers a little bit of a 
lot of different things, but it can all work as a 
unifying experience because of the concen- 
tration of artistic energies, the charm of the 
city and even the touristic bustle that can 
otherwise seem so distracting. It is also, be 
warned, mercilessly expensive. 

I F those two festivals are the models, 
there are others that speak to more con- 
temporary impulses. Many recently 
founded festivals seem to owe their origins to 
nonmurical motives. That doesn’t mean they 
aren’t interesting or enjoyable, but it does 
mean that they may have been, planned to 
attract tourists and foreigQ currency, to ful- 
fill union contracts or simply to provide 
local opera subscribers with gala casts at 
inflated prices. 

Festivals of this sort usually lade the con- 


centrated time span and thematic unity of 
the smaller, more focused attractions. They 
spread over entire cities or even countries, u 
the countries arc compact enough. Examples 
of such nationwide festivals arc those of 
Flanders and the Netherlands, both full of 
good things that a tourist should pick by 
event; it makes no sense to “go to the Hol- 
land Festival” as a thing in itself. 

The best-known city festivals are those of 
Munich, which is basically the Bavarian 
State Opera gussied up with flossier casts 
than usual and more expensive tickets, and 
die Vienna Festival, which besides its own 
productions and visiting attractions, on 
almost all of the city's theaters and musical 
ensem b les. The Benin Festival — actually 
festivals, since East Bain's brans just as 
West Beriin’s is coding — is another example 
of such a citywide effort, in which the vari- 
ous cultural n rgant7Jrtifvns of a given city are 
coordinated and mobilized to special efforts; 
so are Florence’s Maggio Musical e, the Ed- 
inburgh Festival, the Lucerne Festival and 
the Israel Festival in Jerusalem. 

In Eastern Europe, Dresden’s festival 
should be particularly glamorous this year 

Continued on page 11 


> 9°^ 




1 ha.?'- 

f»W *"£•; 

U-** V* - ; 



staged his adaptation of Chekhov’s “The 
Cherry Orchard" in Match. Mamet’s latest 
plays, the one-act dramas “The Shawl” and 
“The Spanish Prisoner," began perfor- 
mances recently at the Goodman’s New The- 
ater Company — an offshoot devoted to new 
American plays — and a revival of “The 
Water Engine” began recently on the Good- 
man’s mam stage. It amounts to a Chicago 
Mamet festival. 


T HAT is appropriate, for there is do 
better place to begin to talk about 
Mamet than Chicago. He grew up 
there, and references to the city pervade his 
plays. In the Goodman Theater and in its 
artistic director, Gregory Mosher — who has 
directed all but one of Mamet's 12 plays at 
tin Goodman — Mamet has found a securi- 
ty few playwrights enjoy. Although Mamet 
now divides his time between a Chelsea town 
house and a Vermont farm, he still belongs 
to the lineage of Chicago writers. He echoes 
their direct style and their loathing of pre- 
tense. 

It seems logical that, since Mosher recent- 
ly was named artistic director of the Vivian 
Beaumont and Mhzi Newhouse Theaters, at 
Lincoln Center in New York — Mamet’s 
plays may have their premieres in New York. 
Mosher, however, is retaining his ties to 
Chicago as artistic director of the New The- 
ater Company. In any case, that would not 
make Mamet any less of a Chicago writer, 
for more than sharing a landscape with his 
literary forebears, Mamet shares a state of 
mind. 

“It carries with it a certain intolerance for 
the purely ornamental,” he says of the Chi- 
cago literary tradition, “and a great support 
for the idea of brashness and the application 
of the individual intellect Chicago is: ‘Have 
a good time, get a girl, have a beer.’ There’s 
also the idea of completion, of production. 
You don’t have guys sitting around in cafes 
with cigarettes trembling — ‘Oh, my God, 
I'm a writer, but I can't write.’ well, in 
Chicago, the answer is, ‘Go home, you sissy. 
If you T re a writer, write.* ” 

Hemingway, too, was a Chicago writer. 
That he has fallen into a certain disrepute — 
too machrt for the age of feminists and tbe 
“sensitive man” — makes the parallel with 
Mamet even more apt. At 37, Mamet seems 
part of his generation only by the accident of 
birth date. He has rejected both the subur- 
ban experience of the 1950s and tbe counter- 
culture of the '60s, embracing instead the 
sort of life to which Hemingway’s Nick Ad- 
ams might have aspired. With his broad 
chest and round shoulders, his down vest 
and his close-cropped black hair, Mamet 
looks more like a millwright than a play- 
wright 

At a time when his contempo rari es in 
theater often turn to Freudian exploration of 
family themes, Mamet writes out of a wider 
set of experiences. “Glengarry” derives from 


a job in a high-pressure real-estate office, 
“Lake boat” from a summer on a Great 
Lakes ore boat, “American Buffalo” from a 
series of poker games with the ex-convicts 
who frequented a Chicago junk shop. 

Mamet stands apart from many of his 
peers not only as an experiential writer, but 
as a self-taught one. Mamet initially wanted 
to become an actor and when he was 20 
started writing scenes for himself and friends 
to practice. Within four years, he had formed 
a theater company, and had become its resi- 
dent playwright. 

“I never really wanted to be a writer,” he 
. says. “1 never spent any conscious time de- 
voted to the philosophy or technique of 
writing until I'd been writing for a long time. 
Sherwood Anderson talks in one of his sto- 
ries about how he was writing advertising 
copy for a living and one day he just started 
writing a story instead. And be looked at it 
and said, ‘My God. that’s writing. I can do 
that. How about that.' ” 

Mamet presents himself as both an aver- 
age Joe and an intellectual. His style is to say . 

Mamet’s card game, 
like his writing, like his 
life, brings an intellec- 
tual sensibility to a 
working-class world. 

“ain’t” in one sentence and quote Jung and 
Tolstoy in the next He wears a crumpled 
baseball cap with the insignia “Twelfth 
Night” 

It is no accident that Mamet often writes 
in a cabin without electricity, that he abhors 
the very idea of a word processor. To him. 
writing is a craft, a job. He is utterly uninter- 
ested in discusring his writing process — 
“Tbe process is not important What differ- 
ence does it make?” — and when be does 
talk about writing, he is likely to grab hold of 
a handmade chair in his kitchen and 
himself to its maker. He loves writing in part 
because it involves producing something 
tangihle, something he can hold and read 
and ultimately see on stage. Mamet's blue- 
collar ethic insists on preparation, on daily 
discipline. Far from being a modernist, as 
some critics deem him, he is a traditionalist 
in both process and product. 

If one theme recurs in Mamet’s plays, it is 
the exploitation of the weak by the strong, of 
the individual by the institution. The sales- 
men of “Glengarry.” buried into combat by 
a sales coolest with a Cadillac as prize, turn 
on one another, their customers and their 
boss. In “The Water Engine,” which Mamet 
subtitled “An American Fable,” a man dis- 
covers an engine that can run on water his 
rivals steal and destroy the machine and 
ultimately murder him. One can view the 


thieves of “American Buffalo” as Mamet’s 
analogs to big-busincss men. 

His new one-act plays both derive, in 
different ways, from confidence games. In 
“The Shawl/’ a psychic and his homosexual 
lover try to relieve a customer of her 
$700,000 inheritance by playing upon her 
vulnerability and trust. “The Spanish Pris- 
oner," which takes its title from a con game, 
is essentially one man’s denunciation of the 
abusive society around him. “The sole test of 
life is the will to exploit.” the man says at one 
point. “Whoever does not possess ‘this will 
must die.” His sense of outrage is dearly 
Mamet’s own. 


S UCH plays have earned Mamet a rep- 
utation as the chief critic of capitalism 
among American playwrights. He did, 
after all, entitle an essay about advertising 
“A Nation of Pimps.” But it is too simple to 
hang any political label on Mamet, for he is 
probably more of a libertarian than a liberal 
or conservative. The salesman Ricky Roma 
in “Glengarry” declares: “I swear, it’s not a 
world of men. It’s not a world of men. It’s a 
world of clock-watchers, bureaucrats, office- 
holders. . . . There’s no adventure to 
it. . . . We are the members of a dying 
breed." 

“The problem of our age,” Mamet says, 
“is that society is tending toward the totali- 
tarian in all aspects. Obviously, it’s clear in 
the Eastern bloc countries. It’s less obvious 
in this country, but it's nonetheless true. 
Conglomeration, the disappearance of indi- 
vidual initiative, the inability of the individ- 
ual to address grievances. If you look at both 
Western and Eastern civilization, you say 
something’s going on here. It’s obviously not 
a trick of the light. You have two disparate 
systems, and in spite of their philosophical 
differences they are heading in the same 
direction. S omething is happening in human 
nature.” 

Tbe hero, then, is the person who can 
resist. In “Glengarry,” it is the most hapless 
of the salesmen, but the one who can mutter, 
in one of the last lines of the play, “Oh, God. 
I hate this job.” 

“Maybe what Fm saying in the plays is 
that h uman natur e does not change, but 
individual nature does,” Mamet says. “So 
that the only redemption for the individual is 
not to change with the institution, not to 
become pan of the institution.” 

In other plays, Mamet’s societal concerns 
boil down to the difficulty, almost the im- 
possibility, of individual connection. “A Life 
u the Theater” and “Squirrels” — about the 
relationships between a young and (rid actor 
and a young and old writer, respectively — 
address themselves to the search for a men- 
tor, for continuity across generations. Even 
in “The Shawl,” the psychic is trying to teach 
his craft to his lover, a younger man. Plays 


Continued on page 10 


In Search of Garcia Lorca 


by Mary Peirson Kennedy 


M ADRID — “He has a halo of 
sanctity that almost no other 
writer has ever had ... his 
assassination catapulted him 
into world fame." 

Ian Gibson, 47, is speaking of his favorite 
subject — the Spanish poet, dramatist, com- 
poser, writer Federico Garcia Lorca, whose 
biography he is in the process of completing. 

With modi fanfare the first volume of 700 
pages, “Federico Garda Lorca: de Funte 
VaquerosaNuevaYork, 1898-1929” (Edito- 
rial Grijalbo, Barcelona, 2,500 pesetas j was 
Launched in Madrid April 24 at the National 


Bayremh’s FesUspieUunts —for Wagtier only 


Bernards Alba.” The author hopes to have 
the second volume come out next year to 
coincide with the 50th anniversaiy of Lorca’s 
death at age 38, on Aug. 19, 1936, at Viznar, 
in the province of Granada. 

Gibson, in Irishman who became a Span- 
ish citizen last year, has written the biogra- 
phy in Sp anish, but an English version is 
scheduled to come out next^ear at the same 
time as the second volume m Spanish. 

“This biography, I suppose, began 20 
years ago, although I only started putting it 
together seven years ago, Gibson said. 
“When I watt back to my notes about my 
rime in Granada in 1965 they were very 
complete. There was a great deal about Lor- 
ca that had nothing to do with his death 
. . . all along I had been unconsciously pre- 
paring to write more.” 

“The Nationalist Repression in Granada 
in 1936 and The Death of Federico Garda 
Lorca" by Gibson was first published in 
1971. It was the result of a year in Granada, 
originally planned as a year off from his post 
as lecturer in Spanish at Queen’s University 
in Belfast to wot on his thesis, the poetry of 
Lorca. 

' “When I got there and started to talk to 
people, I soon discovered that everyone 
thought I had come to write about the death 
of Lorca." This was a brutally forbidden 
subject in those days under Franco, but 
Gibson soon realized that as a foreigner 
people would talk to him, say things that 
they wouldn't say to another Spaniard out of 
fear. And in the end it was the poet’s death 
that be wrote about, not his life or his poetry. 

After being turned down by several En- 
glish publishers, the book first came out in 
Spanish, published by Rnedo Iberico in Par- 
is, that great salvation during the Franco 
years for many Spanish and foreign authors. 
After thie book won the Prix International de 
Presse de Nice in 1972, British publishers 
suddenly took interest and Gibson was 
quickly established as a Lorca authority. To 
date it has been published in 14 languages, 
one of the most recent being Russian. 

In doing that first book, Gibson discov- 
ered he had an ability for research that he 
wasn’t aware of, an indefatigable drive in 
poring ova notes, letters, newspapers and 
above all talking to people. “Or better said, 
listening to people. Sometimes I found peo- 
ple would go onto another subject which 
would have nothing to do with Lwca, or so it 
seemed, tot all of a sidden they had urid me 
something very useful” 





■ <7*^’' w- 





Ian Gibson at work. 


According to Gibson, Spain is a difficult 
place to do research. Years of scholarly ne- 
glect have taken their toll, bibliographies are 
not plentiful, smaller libraries lack catalog- 
ing, things are in disorder. One of his biggest 
problems was the abundance of anecdotes 
about Lorca, some of them simply not true. 

Has he come up with new facts? 

“A few, a few unpublished photos.” Tbe 
family erf Federico, as he is known all ova 
the country, was most cooperative and 
showed him any correspondence he asked to 
see. The nephew of toe poet. Manuel Fer- 
nandez Montesmos Garda, is head of the 
Federico Garcia Lorca Foundation, which 
has in practically all of the Lorca correspon- 
dence besides many other things, including 
tbe manuscript erf an only recently published 
play, “Los Suefios de Mi Prima Aurdia” 
(The Dreams of My Cousin Aurelia), which 
with “La Casa de Bernards Alba” Lorca was 
preparing for production when he was shot. 

“Federico, you know,” said Gibson, “was 
not some kind of a strange duck that turned 
out to be a talented genius. His was an 
artistic family foil of vitality, energy and 
ability themselves. They sang, wrote, 
danced, painted, and Lorca was the culmina- 
tion erf all this talent, be was their dearly 
beloved poet-” 


David Bam 


Nationalists, after having killed him used a 
smear campaign against the poet in order to 
confuse the facts surrounding the Franco 
government’s order to shoot him. 

Lorca's meat friendship was with Salva- 
dor DalL They met whm they were both 
students in Madrid and part of the first 
volume is devoted to this friendship and to 
the time that Lorca spent in Catalonia, espe- 
cially in the 1920s and ’30s in Cadaquis, the 
village where Dali still lives. Much of the 
information comes from Dali himself and 
from his sister. Ana Maria Dali, who wrote a 
book entitled “Salvador Dali, Visio Por su 
Hermann” (as seen by his aster). There is a 
touching passage in the book when the au- 


soroe cases still is) denied or ignored. The 


touching passage in the book when the au- 
thor tefls about Holy Week of 1 925 wheat, at 
Dali’s insistence, Lorca read aloud his latest 
play, “Mariana Pineda.” 

Putting forth all his talents as an actor, 
Lorca threw himself into the roles, and as the 
cliche goes, there wasn’t a dry eye in the 
house. Dali looked at them all, as if to sav 
“See, didn’t I tdl you?” 

Gibson emphasizes that his biography is 
not an official one, although as rar as he 
knows it is the only one coming out for the 
anniversary of the poet’s death. In ante of all 
that has been written on Lorca, this is the 
first complete biography, dealing with all the 
aspects of his short me. 

Gibson admits he sometimes feels strange 

Continued on page 1 J 








" . ' .'"iT' i- 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL^ HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


TRAVEL 


You 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN, Tivoli Hall (tcL 
14.17.65). 

CONCERT — May 16: Tivoli Sym- 
phony Orchestra, John Frandsen con- 
ductor, Yozuko Horigome violin 
(Bach, Mozart). 


EXHIBITION — To June 25: “Brie 
desArts.” 

PARIS. Centre Georges Pompidou 
(td: 277.1233). 

EXHIBITION— To May 27: “Fer- 
nando Pessos, poet: 1888-1935." 
•Gakrie daude-Beroard (id: 326. 
97 jorn. 

EXHIBITION— To May 25: "Draw- 


OERMANY 


HONGKONG 


ENGLAND 


•Galcrie Kart-Fliaker (tel: 325. 
18.73). 

EXHIBITION — To Mot 31: “Paul 


LONDON. Barbican Art Gallery — 
To June 30: “American Images" Pho- 
tography 1945-1980." 

Barbican Hall — May 16: London 
Symphony Orchestra, Myung Whim 
Chung conductor (Beethoven, Prokof- 
iev). 

May 17: London Concert Orchestra, 
Bnmrwcll Tovcy conductor (Gersh- 
win, Copland). 

May 18: Dallas Symphony Orchestra, 
Eduardo Mata conductor (Pence, 
Mahler). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Omraany — May 1 1, 13. 14, 15: 

May 17: “HamlertSbakeroeare). 
•London Coliseum (tel: 836 3 1.61). 
OPERA — May 16: “The Marriage of 
Figaro” (Mozart). 

May 17: “Madaxna Butiefly" (Pucd- 
ni). 

•Museum of Mankind (tel: 
636.1 5 35). 

EXHIBITION — May 14-June 14: 
“Neath American Indian and Eskimo 
artists.” 


Kke: The Last Ten Years. 

•Le Petit Journal (tel: 3263839). 
JAZZ — Mot 14: Benny Waters Quar- 
tet + Paula Jourdan. 

Mot 15: Waterate Seven + One. 

• Maison de Victor Hugo (tel: 
272.16.65). 

EXHIBITION — To June 29: “Le 
Voyage du RHn.” 

•Mus6e Bourdelle (td: 5483737). 
EXHIBITION — To May 1 6: “Bronze 
Mimriatures." 

•Music d'Art Mod erne (tel: 
723.6137). 


BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA— May 14 :“Manon Lescaut" 
(Puccini). _ 

May 16: “Pdifcts et Mdisande" (De- 
busy). 

•SchlossChariouenburg (id: 3201-1). 

EXHIBITION — To May 25: “An- 
loine Watteau.” 


ITALY 


FRANKFURT, Aire Oper Frankfurt 
(td: 134.04.00). 


CONCERTS — May 12 and 13 


Frankfurt Opera and Museum Or- 
chestra, Michael Giden conductor 


chestra, 

(Haydn). 


RECITAL — May II: Christoph 
Escfcenhach, Justus FranK piano (Mo- 
zart, Schubert). 


HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
34.91.71). 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


VIENNA FESTWOCHEN 


VIENNA — This festival celebrates the turn of the century with Bach 
and Handd and runs from May 15 to June 16. This weeks events 
include: 


•Rogal^ Academy of Arts (tel: 


EXHIBITION — To July 14: “Ed- 
ward Lear, 1 812-1 888.” 

•Royal Opera (tel: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — May 11: "The Sleeping 
Beauty" (Tchaikovsky). 

May 13, 14, 16: “Swan Lake" (Tchai- 
kovsky^ 

May 15: “Les Sy Ip hides" (Mikhail Fo- 


BALLET — May 15: “Raymonds" (Petipa, Glazunov). 
CONCERTS — May 16: Vienna Philharmonic, Loren Maazd con- 
ductor, Wolfgang Schulz flute (Bach. Bruckner). 

May 17: Leningrad Symphoniker, Alexander Dinritriev conductor. 
MUSICAL — May 17: “My Fair Lady” (Lerner, Loewe). 

OPERA — May 16: “Aida" (Verdi). 

OPERETTA — May 15: “The Beggar Student" (MfflScker). 

May 16: “The Lana of Smiles” (Lemr). 

For further information td: 57.96 32. 


JAPAN 


kine). 

OPERA — May 17: “Samson a Da- 
lila” (Saint Safask 
•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITION —To June 2: "The Po- 
litical paintings of Meriyn Evans 
(1910-1973). 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To June 9: “The 
People and PlacesoT Constantinople: 
watercolours by Amadeo, Count Pre- 
ziosi (1816-1882),” “MOUIOU Roth- 
schild: paintings for labels." 

To October 22 : “Textiles from die 
Wdkotne Collection', andent and 
modem textiles from the Near East 
and Pern." 

May 15-SepL 15: “Louis Vcdtion: A 


EXHIBITION — To July 8: “Mare 
Riboud." 


•Muscede la Marine (tel: 55331.70). 
EXHIBITION — To May 15: “SO 
Years Ago. ‘Normandie’." 

• Mus6e de Montmartre (tel: 


606.61.11). 

EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Montmartre, its origins, its famous 
residents." 

•Musie du Grand Palais (tel: 
261.54.10). 


BALLET— May 11, 12, 14: “Onegih" 
(Tchaikovsky). 

MUSICAL — May 17: “My Fair 
Lady” (Lerner, Loewe). 

OPERA — May 16: “Die Zanber- 
fldee." 

MUNICH, Gfirtnerplatz State The- 


ater (td: 201.67.67V 
MUSICAL — May 12 and 15: “My 
Fair Lady" (Lemer, Loewe). 

OPERA — May 11 and 16: “Die Zau- 
hezlldte" (Mozart). 


EXHIBITION — May 16-Sept 2: 
“Renoir” 


AMSTERDAM, Canoertgebouw (td: 


71^3 j45V 
CONCERTS— May 1 1: Netherlands 
Symphony Orchestra, Willem Wiese- 
bahn conductor (Haydn). 

May 12: ConcergebouwortestZoltin 
Pesko conductor, Youri Egorov piano 
(Brahms, Liszt). 

RECITAL— May 17: Vera Beths vio- 
lin, Remben de Leeuw piano (Shosta- 
kovich). 


May 14: “La Bohfcme" (Puccini). 
•National theater (td: 22.13.16). 


feil Ander- 
son and David McLeUan guitar duo 
(Scarlatti, Handel). 

May 15: Martino Tirimo piano (Schu- 
bert). 

May 17: Simon James guitar (Bach, 
Aguado). 

NOTTINGHAM, Royal Concert HaD 


•Musfedu Petit Palais (td: 265. 12.73). 
EXHIBITION —To Jane 30: “James 
Tissoi: 1836-1902" 

•Muste Marmottan (td: 224.07.02V 
EXHIBITION — To June 2 “Dun- 


•National theater (td: 2213.16). 
OPERA — May II: “Elektra” 
(Strauss). 

May 13: “Salome" (Strauss). 

May 14: “Tannhfluser” (Wagner). 


ductor, James Galway Bote (Ibert, 
Stravinsky). 


FRANCE 


NICE, Acropolis (td: 9280.05V 
CONCERTS — May 1 i and 12 Nice 
Philharmonic Orchestra, RgrislavKln- 

bucar conductor (Beethoven). 


•New Morning (id: 52331.41). 

JAZZ — MayllrZakaPercuskxL 
May 15: Jimmy Witherspoon. 
CONCERT — May 15: Orchestra de 
Paris, Daniel Barenboim conductor 
and piano (Mozart V 
OPERA— May 1 1. 14, 17: “Don Gio- 
vanni” (Mozart). 

•Thtttre de 1a BastQle(td: 357.42 1 4). 
CONCERT — May 12 and 13: Jon 
HassdL 

•Thfeficrc du Rond Point (tel; 
704.74.87V - 

RECIT ALS — May 12: Patrice Four 
t-tnamsa violin, Bruno Rigntto piano 
(Beethoven, Mozart V 
SAINT- PAUL-de-VENCE, Fonda- 
tion Maeght (td: 328J63V 
EXHIBITION — To May 16: “Piet 
Mondrian” 


ATHENS, AithousaTehnisPsydnoou 
Ganery(td: 671.7266V 
EXHIBITIONS —To May 17: “Miki 
de Saint Pfaalle." 

Through Mar. “Martin EckhanL” 
•Argo Gallery (td: 36226.62). 
ETOilBrnON — To May 14: “Boats: 

Amurtajda Yianinri ** 


SCOTLAND 


•Medusa Gallery (td: 724.45.52). 
EXHIBITION— To May 16: “Yior- 
gosKazazis.” 

•Nees Morphes Gallery (tel: 


GLASGOW, Mayfair Ballroom (tel: 
33238.72). 

JAZZ — May 14: Chicago Blues. 
•MitcheD Theater (td: £>259.61 V 
DANCE— May 16 and 17: The Jodi 
Hall Dancers. 

•Tron Theater (td: 5524267). 
THEATER— May 14- 16: “In theBd- 
ly of the Beast” (Abbott). 


361.61.65V 

EXHIBITION— 


EXHIBITION —To May 20: “Dimi- 
tris PerdDridis.” 

•Tholos Gallery (td: 323.79 JO). 
EXHIBITION — To May 15: “Rena 
Anousillia.” 


SPAIN 


WEEKEND 


BARCELONA, Centro de Estudios de 
AneCoutenmoranco(td: 329.19.08). 
EXHIBITION —To May 19: “Antho- 
ny Caro." 

MADRID, BibGoteca National (td: 


435.40.03V 
EXHIBITION — 


SHOPPING 


When 

JOT 

own 

initials 




EXHIBITION — Through May: 
“Frida Kahlo, Manud Alvarez Bravo 
and Vicente Rojo.” 

•Fundacion Joan Mir6 (tel: 
329.19.16V 

RECITAL — May 13: Juan lima res 
violin, Francisco Salanova oboe. Per- 
fects Garcia Cbornet piano (Bach. 



Handd). 

I •Fundaci6n Juan March (tel: 
435.4240V 

EXHIBITION — Through May: 
“Russian Vangoanfism.” 

•Museo Municipal (td: 2225732). 
EXHIBITION — Through May: “Los 
Madrazo." 

•Pasco de la Castellana (tel: 


419.04.40V 
EXHIBITION — Through May: 
“Richard Hamilton.” 

•Palacios de Vdfizquez y Crista] (tel: 
274.77.75V 


EXHIBmON — May 11-31 : “Span- 
ish Sculpture: 1900-1936." 


BOTmVHffitt roma salrta san sebastianello 16/b 


CLINICS 


HOTELS 


VALMONT 


BERN, Musde des Beaux -Arts 
(td:2209.44). 

EXHIBITION — To May 19: “Ca- 
mille CLaudd and Auguste Rodin.” 
GENEVA, Petit Palais (td: 46.1433V 
EXHIBITION — To June 15: “Marcel 
Leprin and Mnnnartrc.” 

LUGANO, Palazzodd Congressi (td: 
585133V. 

CONCERT — May 17: The Swiss- 
ItaHnn Radio and Television Orches- 
tra, Bruno Amadncti condnctor(Gou- 
nod, Verdi). 

SCHAFFHAUSEN, Stadhaus (id: 


WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CUNIC 


GHon-sur-Montreux, Lake Oemmi, Switzerland 

Uxoltd at 2,000 fmt altitud* In a modorato and pro te cted dtmate, Hw 
dMc hasi tha- finest oooommadatfans avoiahte far your comfort. In a 
baauttful and calm setting overlooking tiw Ldov of Geneva end the Ment- 
Btanc chain the CUNIC VALMONT pravkfa* comptet* mocScol check-ups, 
outstanding mmflcol core as well as rest, indrvkknl diet add rejuvenation. 
Centers are provided far cardiology, physiotherapy, electrothera p y, 
hydrotherapy, electrocardiogram. X-ray and laboratory analysis. 
Rooms with air conditioni n g. - 

F&sase ask for our bmdnjre and price*. 

Write to Mr. H. Tuar - Dtrocter 
CLINK VALMONT. IS23 O Un-e o r Montre ux . Switzerland 
To lophowx 021 /63 48 51 (lOHnw] -Talma 493 1 97 vnhnr-ch 



81333). 

CONCERT — 


HOTEL CHAMARHN 
MADRID 
378 rooms. 

Business bdEties. 
first dass. 


CONCERT — May 17: Hungarian 
PhSharmania, Klaus Cornell conduc- 
tor, Peter Waters piano (Bach, We- 
bern). 

RECITAL — May 18: Gustav Leon- 
hard t organ and cello (Handd). 
ZURICH, Ojttnhaugri^l .6920V 


•TonhaHe(td: 2213283). 
CONCERT— May 15: T< 


Esacidn Chamartia 28016 Madrid 
1^1911 733 71 11 -733 90 11 
■Mac 49201 HCHM E 
Cable ENTURSN 


onhaUc Or- 
chestra, Cristobal Halflter conductor | 
(Bach, MozanX 

RECITAL — May IS: Flam Srtrmai 




HONG KONG, Tsuen Wan Town 

HaU(td: 7917521). 

CONCERT— April II: HongKon® 

P hilharmo nic Orchestra. Maxnn Sho- 


PhiTharm nnic Orchestra, Maxim Sho- 
stakovich conductor, Choi Sown Lee 
piano (Tchaikovsky V 


BOLOGNA, Galleria (TArte Mo- 
demaftd: 5038 J9). 

EXHIBITIONS —To May 20: “Tul- 

lxo E^ericoli,” “Roberto Baml” 

•Teatro Comunale di Bologna (td: 

2229.99V 

OPERA — May 14 and 16: “Faust” 
(Gounod). 

FERRARA, Palazzo dd Diamanti(td: 
35017V 

EXHIBITION —To June 15: “Joan 
Miro." 

MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (tel: 
SO.91.26V 

BALLET —May 14, 16. 17:“Ilameo 
and Juliet” (Prokofiev). 

OPERA— May IS: “Macbeth” (Ver- 
diV 


1 ^ 

4 'TV 


L R« 






. •» li • • 
V -r ' 


nM 


ri ' 


in* ■ - 




piano (Debussy, 3 


IMTEDSTATK 


WEEKEND 


HOTELS 

GERMANY 



appears every 

Friday 

For information 
coll Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 747.12.65 
or yonr local IHT 
representative 

(List m QassUSed 
Section) 


GRANHOiaSARRIA 

BARCELONA 

314 roams 
Badness fedGfes 
first dn 


NEW YORK, Guggenheim Museum 
(tel: 360.35.00} 

EXHIBITON —To June 16: "Gilbert 

& George." 

•Metrwolitan Museum of Art (td: 


535.77.I0V 

EXHIBITIONS —To Sept. 1 : “Man 
and the Horae” 

To Sept. 5: “Revivals and Explora- 
tions in European decorative arts." 
•Lincoln Center (tel: 87035.70) 
BALLET — Through June 23: New 
York City Ballet 

•Museum of Modern An 
(td:708.94.0qv 

EXHIBITON — To June 4: “Henri 
Rousseau.” 


GRAND HOTEL 
SONNENBOIL 


Audi Sarri3, 50. 00029 Baroetonj 
Ty, (93) 239 n 09 
TMBc5HH3y5W38GHS8E 
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Getmeny 
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Odila: 05-9632 


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Tdexi 7424Q488 AD Hotel PM. 

Cabtei Admitsl Manila 

Telephone; 572081 To 94 


CARDIFF, SL David’s Hall (td: j 
37.12J6V i 

CONCERT —May 12 Philharmonic j 
OrefaestraftChorus, Carlo MariaGiu - 1 
lini conductor. Elaine 1 Woodssoprano, 
Robert Lloyd bass (Beethoven). 


rtian Minramr K paintings frojn the I 
XVII to XDC Centuries." I 


VENICE, Ca* Veadramin Calem(td: 
7039.09). 

EXHIBITION —To May 19: “Figu- 
rative Japanese Art: 1873-1964." 



TOKYO. Idemitsu Art Gallezy (td: 
2133138V 

EXHIBITION— To June2: “Turkey. 
Land of Civilisations.” 

•Japan Folk Craft Museum (td: 

467.4527). 

EXHIBITION —To June 23: “Crafts 
of North-Eastern Districts." 
•National Museum of Western Art 
(td: 8285131). 

EXHTBITION —To May 26: “Poin- 
tillism.” 


teMOnfei*- j 


Teatime in the Heart of Texas 


by Flaine Davenport 


A USTTN, Texas — A Dutchman and a 
A Frenchman in char ge of afternoon 
/ 1 tea, English style, in the capital of 
4. X. Texas? Improbable but true, and a 
great success. 

“It’s really takdn off,” says lan van Riems- 
dyk, general manager of the old Stephen F. 
Austin Hotel, just down Congress Avenue 


says van Riemsdyk. “I think Texans are the 
most history -oriented Americans,” he says. 
“Austin is a capital with slot of history. And 

n. . * e> n. . ’n._. 1 . 1 .A Eiirnu. 


Texans are very friendly. They like Europe- 
ans, from die dd continent, because they 


arts, from the dd continent, because 
also have an old history." 


The afternoon teg takers were happily 
nvins him riaht. Seated on comfortable 


from the state capital “It’s a must for any 
deluxe hotel ana I think it's a very nice 
tradition, too," says Jean Loubat, the food 
and beverages director. 

No cowboys have appeared yet for the 
ritual, but a plate of chorolate chip cookies is 
on hand, just in case. “After all, this is 
Texas," says Loubat 

More traditional afternoon tea fare in- 
cludes scones, cucumber sandwiches, tarts 
and cakes, edairs, and a choice of tea — Earl 
Grey, Daqeelmg, Jasmine and Orange Pe- 
koe. Coffee and soft drinks are included in 
the $5.95 price, but alcoholic beverages are 
extra. (Champagne is very popular.) 

“ Ladies come and stay the whole time, 
from 3 to 5 P.M^" says Tina, a tea waitress. 
“They try a little bit of everything and just 
talk and talk" Friday is the most popular 
day. 

European customs are welcome in Texas, 


proving him right. Seated on comfortable 
sofas and high backed chairs in a setting 
reminiscent of a grandmother’s stylish living 
room, groupings of hotel guests and Austin- 
ites were eyeing the pastry cart. 

“We lived in London for six years," said 
Jerri McReynolds, a native Texan. “The am- 
bience is as trice as in London — like at 
Brown's Hold." Her husband, Don, a re- 
tired ml executive, said the food was not as 
plentiful as in London, but very nice, any- 
way. 


clotted cream for the scones. £n fact, loubai 
had Devon dotted c re am m hud, but 
thought it had become too bttttayhrtnuwi 
and chose not to serwit - fi> 

But no one seemed to mind that tea bJ*i 
been slightly Texamzed. fepedfttyjtift il« 
harpist Anita Harvey playing dined Ital- 
ian and 18th-century porno mu&casa hack: 
ground. “Some people ask ft* jftecas- 
leeves,'" she says, bui^ofterrise fiat get 
comments about die harp — Bkt-Tnt harp 
rings its own song’ and 'It’s si tMgBfficeni 


obsession. 

Formerly the principal harpist of tia Nr* 
Haven Symphony in CaanocriOG^.IbLrve)' 


came to 'Austin, liked it and stap£ Why 
harp music as an accc tfnpan imettt-^vader- 
noon tea, just like at Loudon’S StJivqjcHotd'.’ 

“I only know that harp musteiflaplobinj; 
rive and has a clarity, dignity ma townth." 

she says. 

The Stephen F. Austin Hotel his two 
stablemates — both mCaKfon»."-;» , htfe' 
afternoon tea is also pojnilar. VaA&ABsdyk 
says it is increasingly nvadaKc at .bcnrr 
American hotels. “Tea is not ahig^isKr as 
far as profit,” says van -Riemsdjat^tot it’s 
that little touch which is needed for * deluxe 
property. It’s weQ wordtsC V >:) ■ 


NDEED, you nri^it expect the Texas 
teacart to be overflowing with bigger 


tarnth/ 


-Land better everything. “We keep it 
small” says Loubat, “with a few selections. 
It’s not a large buffet full of food.” 

Another thing that might make the true 
Brit raise a disparaging eyebrow is that tea- 
bags are available, as well as loose tea. Who 
never heard of “Cinnamon Stick” and 
“Lemon Lift” teabags at a primer afternoon 
tea? And the cream, instead of nrilk, served 
with the tea would be a sacrilege in Britain, 
to say nothing of whipped cream instead of 


Elaine Dtnenpor^ a 

journalist and tekvi^m prodwir. 


David Mamet 


Continued from page 9 


like the recent “Goldberg Street” and “The 
Disappearance of the Jews” deal with as- 
similation and the loss of ethnic identity 
among Jews. 

“Somebody said that progress occurs 
when two generations agree,” Mamet says. 
“I would say happiness occurs then. But the 
generations have not agreed in this country 


for a long time. That’s what really fell down 
after the Second World War. And that's the 


after the Second World War. And that's the 
story of my generation of Americans.” He 
returns to the chair. “Look at tins," he says. 
“It's a beautiful old Windsor chair. I bought 
it at an auction. We needed some more 
chairs for the house, so I gave this to a chair 
maker down the road to copy. Now, be never 
had anyone who taught him how to make 
this trinH of chair. It took him 20 years of 
, working on different chairs, reading books 
just to ieam how to make a Windsor. So 
there yon have a thousand years of knowl- 
edge breaking down. That knowledge disap- 
peared in the 20th century.” 

In a more specific sense, Mamet’s concern 
with legacy arises from the instability he felt 
in his own upbringing. He was bom Nov. 30, 
1947, in Chicago. His parents, Lenore (who 
died nine months ago) and Bernard, were 
both Jewish, the children of immigrants, but 
MameL felt they rejected their Eastern Euro- 
pean past in the desire to assimilate. The 
family first lived in South Shore, then a 
largely Jewish middle-class neighborhood, 
but moved when Mamet was 13 to Olynmia 
Fields — a suburb the playwright calls “New 
South. HdL” Mamet sought the ethnic and 
community bonds be missed by drawing 
dose to ms paternal grandmother — “She 
was from the shtetL Real simple, real loving. 
She adored me and I adored her” — and by 
exploring Chicago on weekends, sometimes 
sleeping m Jackson Park cm weekend nights. 

Mamet’s parents divorced when he was 
10, and although he refuses to talk at length 
about the effects on him, they seem pro- 
found. 

Mamet’s unsettled childhood also may ex- 
plain the hostility and profanity so evident in 
his plays. Asked where he refined his ear for 
insults and obscenities, Mamet replied, “In 
my family, in the days prior to television, we 
liked to wUHe away the evenings by "wiring 
ourselves miserable, solely based on our abil- 
ity to speak the langnajy viciously. That’s 
probably where my ability was honed.” 


Mamet has written several children’s plays 
and a children's book, which are as poignant 
as they are fantastic. He married tire actress 
Lindsay Crouse in December 1977 — and 
their life in Vermont, with its woodstove and 
homemade apple butter, seems an attempt 
by two urbanites to reinvent themselves as 
Ma and Pa Kettle. By all accounts, Mamet 
especially delights in the couple’s 2-year-old 
daughter Willa. 

But it takes more than the sum of experi- 
ence, however powerful or wrenching, to 
make a writer. Robert Brustein, a drama 
critic for The New Republic and the artistic 
director of the American Rqjertocy Theater 
in Cambridge, Mass, cites several distinctive 
elements in Mamet’s work. Mamet uses as- 
pects of naturalism — in media* res open- 
ings, sfice-of-life format — but he writes 
with a moral underpinning that Brustein 
says is rare in naturalistic plays. The reason 
that moral sense may not be obvious, Brus- 
tein suggests, is that Mamet lets stage action 
— a fight, a burglary, an argument — rather 
than speechmakmg carry his plays. 

“He manages to embody the attire mean- 
ing of the play in the action,” Brustein said. 
“He's not didactic or tendentious. There are 
none of those moments when a character 
comes to the front of the stage and says, 
‘Attention must be paid.’ Bui you leave the 


mail. And that's not su 
David’s aesthetic.” When 


ismg, knowing 
two men begin 


rehearsals of a play, a system of mutual 
support takes over. Mamet is that relatively. 


rare playwright who adores, and' busts ac- 
tors. He says he takes his cues on touting or 
changing lines from the actor’s easemspeak- 


theater after a Mamet play and realize it’s 
exploded in your brain. You're asking aues- 


exploded in your brain. You're asking ques- 
tions about the nature of our society. His 
writing might be called behavioristic, but 
that’s too sociological a word, because he's a 
poet, too. Call him a behavioristic poet” 


T HE relationship between Mamet and 
Mosher is central to the writer’s suc- 
cess. Few American playwrights, even 
the very finest, know any stability. One year, 
they wm the Pulitzer Pnze, the next they gpi 
rejection letters. It is not surprising, iiyn. 
-that some of the most accomplished play- 
wrights — Lanford Wilson, Sam Shepard, 
Mamet — are those who can depend on one 
theater and one director. 

Mama, and Mosher operate on a kind of 
honor system. Mamet usually writes in the 
seclusion of his Vermont home — the cabin 
outside it, to be precise — and Mosher waits 
“J might hear David's working on a play and 
have a vague idea what it’s about,” he says. 
“It’s not Eke 20 pages of notes come in the 


ingthem. And Mosher is a director w&ng to ••• - 

subordinate his visum and ego to that of the • A!',*-, 
writer. 

This points up one drawback of fbeGood- a*-".-..-- 
man approach. For all the support, for all the •• 

familial feelings, italsocedes to apteywright- «... 

— especially a gifted and strong-willed one . •, 
like Mamet . almost total antaaooqr. Ma- 
met is surrounded by people who awe their- u.v. ... . 

careers to his plays, people who nsghz wdl j!.n - \i . . 
be loath to dispute him. . 

“l would follow David to the ends of earth -t.-"- ' 
because of his willingness to follow his be- r, •<, .] 
fiefs,” William Macy, the actor, says. ^But he C 

can be hard to budge, rmpretty sure one of _ 

the reasons David didn't like acting is that he " 

wasn't in charge. I think he goes .out of his ■ *1. _ 
way to surround himsHf ,witb people who ' 
won’t question him. It's not as though you. a''" ' ’ ■ 
can’t dissent. Bui David comes from a great- * > ,* 
tradition in theater, the director, or in his : - - 

case the writer, is in charge of the play* and. : , 
you can do h his way or you can qpiti" >^ -. . 

Mameds certainty usually serves aim well, •• • 

but in the case of “Lone Caooe" it led io - 

failure. With “Lone Canoe,” Mamet left the 
con temporary urban nwli«» of “American” ‘ 
Buffalo" and “Sexual Perversity” write >. 
about a 19th-century explorer who -musf^ a 
choose between returning to hs native En- 1 *" r 
gland or remaining in a utopian Indian vil- /ri/Vlfc 
lagp in Canada. The play was greatly phflo- ^ vj! 
sophical, a meditation an Big Issues,' and the 
language was stilted, even pretentious. The i ^ 
underlying problem, Mamet suggests, was > 


“The dan ger is fading you havc iL-ficked, 
like with ’Lone Canoe, ” Mamet says. “That 
play was in one of those periods where \ 
thought I had it all fickeo. 45id you ever 
gamble? ‘Aha,’ you say, *why do «fi these' 
silly idiots risk their money and lore it when ■ 
all yon have to do is M«h ■ Kfah Mah. 1 . Nert 

thmO umi - - — • - U Lj — - ' on iL . 


thing you know, you’re waking up' in the 
Traveler’s Aid Society. That JO 4. 'certain 
extent, is what happened to me^riifi» -*Lone' 

ria/u'H * 


Canoe.’ 


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FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY KAY 10, 198S 


TRAVEL 


Page 11 


j by Roger CoHis 

I T was 11:30 pjil at JFK Airport in 
NewYork. Pan Am flight 82 had been 
due to take off for Nice at 5125 PAL 
The plane had been sitting on the 
! tjrnnac for about 45 nmni« when the pilot 


-rTrm. 


iWdass 

>. ;■ dOWI 

■ — ^ coop! 


exas 


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t : 4l 7 llitTc;t:-i ■:;.■■■ .’v. 


staff was friendly and efficient — -the expeti-' 

nice did nrrtfitng In Mihimm Pan Am\ favi fr 


<b loadi « ■• 




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■nivj*. pcdtive edge as this troubled airline prepares 
- j.a to shed its Pacific routes and plans its renais- 
. . sance on the North Atlantic. 

~ '"fc i On April 28, Pan Am also inangnnrted a 
daily nonstop New York-Hambnrg sendee 
as well as services to Amsterdam, Athens, 
Belgrade, Bucharest and Vieirna. “Adding 
these cities makes Pan Am the largest U. S. 
, . r : - carrier on the North Atlantic,” says 
r ' J6m> Krimslri, Pan Am’s senior vicc presi- 
■; ; ' J dent for madeeting. The airime has added a 
' ^ second daily flight from New York to Paris 
and now flies nonstop from Los Angeles and 
Washington to Frankfurt, Detroit to Lon- 
••;v< Am and Washington to London. 

'f~ ; ltisnocoinddencetliatacoujde(tf weeks 
agp. Pan Am announced die sale of its Pacaf- 
./ : ; ■'? c ic division to Unitod_Airiines fix' $750 mfl- 

■ the inchides the sale of 18 air- 

i cfaft (1 1 long-range Boeing 747-SPis, 6 -Tri- 
Stars and one DC- 10) is about $900 million, 
j which znakes It the largest transaction in 
■' » aVdation t Iristoiy, eatoepiing' the, record $750 
million that Pan Am paid for National Air- 
— mm lines in 1981. United,; the warid*s largest 
airline outside the Soviet bloc, is fulfilling a 


longstanding ambition by acquiring Pan Am 
routes to destinations like Tokyo, Bearing, 
Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and Sydney. 
It is taking them on as ft going concern, along 
with 2,700 Pto Am employees, induding4I0 
pilots. It was Juan Trippc, the founder of 
Pan Am, who picaieaed these routes 50 
years ago. All that remains win be Pan Am’s 
service to Hawaii, which is part of its domes- 
tic network. 

’ Pan Am’s retreat from the Pacific (23 
percent of its revenue last year, second only 
to the Atlantic, 43 percent) which is the 
world’s fastest growing airline market, was a 
Strategic necessity. Pan Am had an operating 
bss'of $223 milhon in 1984 (the only major 
jj. S. airline that fhSed to. make a profit) 

[ yhich brings its cumulative losses over the 
list four years to $762 million. It has a debt 
Estimated at SI billion. A monthlong strike 
jpread oyer March and Aprfl further deplet- 
^jd-itsTesources. - 

According to a Pan Am spedtesman in 
. London, the airline would have needed to 
invest SI 2 WHon to re-equip itsFadfic fleet 
with long-range Boeing 747-300s (which oust 
,'more than $110 million each) ana develop a . 
: feeder network into the West Coast gate- 
|ways, which United already has. “We mdtft 
i have the resources to do this. The United 
i deal should rednee our drf)t equity ratio 
■ : from 6:1 to 0.75:1. It gears us to make full 

• 1 useof our Airbus mds: and devdop Europe; 

: the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean and 
, South America,'” he says!. 

Pan Am recently placed orders with Air- 
bus Industrie for A320s and A3 10-3005 at a 


and A310-300sat a 


Garcia Lorca 

being a foreigner, writing . about one of 
Spain's greatest writers, but “I can tell yon 
oue thing, if Franco had lost. the war, proba- 
bly none of us would be h»> Hugh 
Thomas, Gerald Brcnan, Herbert South- 
worth, Gabriel Jadcsoo, Jeao-Loois Schon- 
berg, Oaodc Couffon and the many others, 
who wrote about Spain, her revolution and 
the life afterward Up nntil the time of Fran- . 
cq the country bad a flourishing andbriflani 
culture, but ft was siqipmssed, . laniards 


LMUlU UU jiff i£j «WI|w NWK» * *■■■ LV “ IT 

! Nobody could be more ent h us i a stic about 


dpd is the most exciting city in Enrppe ; 
toda y- It is an am az i n g rixcoomcnai, so 
miv£ ifi oAine on to those who knew Marina 


IT " — 

« -C - 


to 4 


% U 




^Vyears back it is nothing short-of a miracle . 

, Tpor someitxnay be bloody awful, butfotme 
h is the sanctum sanrtorum.’’ . 
I'tjibson who has lived in Madiiusmce- ■ 
1978 with his 'English wife, Card, and 4eir 
4wo teen-aged children, says that Madrid is 
ike Dublin, it has a lhm^ center, not like 
|x>ndoo where things arc spread out. 
i After graduating from Trinity Colle ge,- 
, Dublin, with honors, he ta ught first at 
I Queens CoOeae in Belfast and then at Lm- 
■ don University and finally gave up teadmg 
3i 1975 to devote himself to writing. His 
other works include **En Busca de Josfc An- 
S»io" (In, Search oT-Josc Antomo). La 
.'.■■"‘^oche que Mataron a Cairo Soldo (The - 
NigbiTflev Kakad Cdvo Sotelo), “Panwaid- 
tos: Como Fue? (Paracudlos: How It WasX 
^Un JWandes eh Espaim" (An Ins^Jn 

Spun) and “The English Vice, tins last 
being a snidy of .brutality in British public 


qaaiy treaiea, dui i ao askyou to be patient 
f for a few minut es longer. The madnnrir* are 
still working OB somber two ftn gmff and X 
■ expect to. have some news momentarily.*' 
Shortly beftne miriniohr the enmne cowling 
" y&s replaced, the engines started up and the 
• plane cleared for takeoff. - 
1 Of course, ddays hkc this are familiar to 
. t}ie seasoned traveler. And whoeanblame an 
j drline for a last moment hydraulics prob- 
I ifem? The point is, that although the fizst- 
<Vdass passengers had been fed and watered 
■’ v and offered a tree sauna in the Clipper Chib, 
where the air-conditioning had broken 
down, everyone e&e, acrordxra to a young 
couple in business class who had arrived that 
afternoon from Los Angeles, had been left to 
die slender resources of a $7_50 voucher 
4uring their six-hour wait. An elderly Ameri- 
can lady said she had chosen Pan Am be* 
dauise it was a nonstop flight, but . would fly 
£ir France next trine. One wag ventured th at 
perhaps this was supposed to be an inangu- 
ijai daytime flight. More to the point, said 
somecHieelse.tocyim^ithavec^eredevery- 
ooe a glass of champagne. . 
l, To make matters worse, business dass in 
i this particular Boeing 747 was the dd eight 
seats across configuration mytead of the 
much landed six seat arrangement of Pan 
Am’s new “Clipper Cass,” for which passen- 
gers were paying a cool £2^58 for the round 
trip to Nice. 

i lt is probably unfair to single out this, 
flight for critkasmL.Bnt it wasjust three days 
after its inauguration an April 28 as the first 
nonstop service between New York and 
Nice. And although- there was nothing to 
complain about once in the air — the cabin 


e in Europe 

potential cost of $1 bflHon. The former will 
be used as feeder aircraft in the U. S. and 
Eurime, while the twin-engined A3 10- 300s, 
due for delivery in two to three years, may 
ultimately be used in extended range opera- 
tions cm the Atlantic. 

Many of Pan Am’s current problems Stem 
from the National Airlines acquisition — ill- 
timed in retrospect — which coincided with 
the upheavals of U. S. deregulation and the 
economic recession. Says Knraslri: “Pan Am 
suffered from not having aU.S. domestic 
network and in the merger with National 
bled itgdf of tremendous resources. We sold 
our boud5, our bULEdLog, an at a time when 
business was falling off. It was a serious 
reversal." ■ 

Last year. Pan Am’s domestic operations, 
which accounted for 20 percent of its reve- 
nue. made an operating loss of about $280 
milli on This compares with profits of $100 

mmirin qq the A tlantic and $50 millinn cm 
the Pacific. 

The airline has been bedeviled by infehd- 
tous timing. According to Kriinski, a “prime 
component” of the Pacific sale is that the 
long-range economics of Pan Am’s existing 
747 fleet are not as attractive cm the Pacific 
as in Europe and South America. The reason 
is that right years ago, Pan Am purchased 
Boeing 747-SPS, a small version of the wide- 
bodied 747, carrying half the number of 
passengers (250 compared with 450). At that 

Deal with United 
marks retreat 
from the Pacific 


time the SP was the only plane capable of 
long-range operations. Bat today, the 747- 
300 has the same range and a significantly 
lower cost per seat-mile. “We fly two 747- 
SPs a day from New Yotk to^ Tokyo, ^ whereas 
Japan Airlines flies one wide-bodied 747. 
They’re flying half the number erf planes, 
half the crew, half the number of engines for 
tbe same revenue," Krimslri says. 

Pan Am is coanting on getting the eco- 
nomics right fra its entrepreneurial push into 
Europe. This will depend on the load factor 
— how many people are sitting in the plane 
and how much they pay — especially on 
thinner routes simh as Nice. Value for money 
in first das and business dass, which will 
account fra about a third erf the flight reve- 
nne, is important, especially when compared 
with the high quality of in-flight service 
provided by some European carriers. (Will 
the business traveler be prepared topay .a 
premium erf around 12 percent fra “Cupper 
doss '* in Fan Am?) Ana additional capacity 
is being provided by other U.S. carriers. For 
example, American and Delta are now flying 
nonstop to Paris from Dallas and Atlanta 


Krimski is confident. “Tbe secondary cit- 
irawenbwserrewillc^enhpmaikdOTpor- 

tumties we never had,” he says. At JFK, Pmi 

Am is promoting its “World Port” terminal, 
where you can change from international to 
domestic flights under one roof. Fra busi- 
ness travelers, there is a free helicopter ser- 
vice to Manhattan and Newark. And Pan 
Am’s “World Pass" maybe thefrequent flier 
program offering the most benefits; the big 
payoff is two passes fra 30 days of interna- 
tional travel when you reach 175,000 miles. 

But according to Krimski, the key to the 
leisure market is innovative fares, a hard 
thing to achieve in Europe's restrictive legis- 
lative climate. In April, Fan Am ran ads in 
the United Stales for introductory one-way 
fares of $199 from New York to Nice and 
Hamburg and $249 one way to Amsterdam, 
Athens, Belgrade, Budapest and Vienna, 
subject w “government approval.” The only 
restrictions were midweek travel with a $50 
weekend surcharge. The fare to Hamburg 
has been accepted by West Germany, but 
that to Nice was summarily rejected by Air 
France. This means that the cheapest pro- 
motiooal round-trip fare between New York 
and Nice is $779 for both airlines. 

Nevertheless, Krimski expects to get a 
thousand new tour passengers a week to 
Nice. *T will certainly make money to Nice 
this summer" he says. “But I’ve got to have 
some interesting pricing opportunity for the 
off-season. The three major components fra 
stimulating tins market are price, price and 
price." 

Aggressive marketing, additional capacity 
and pressure from tourist agencies ana con- 
sumers may yet open up Nice and other 
markets to healthier competition. But if Pan 
Am is to succeed, its prodnet will have to 
match the promise of the promotion. ■ 


Continued from page 9 

schools. He is also working on a four-part 
documentary with the film director Juan 

Antonio Barden cm the life of Lorca. “1 think 

it is going to be very exciting — they are’ 
casting now, it most be a person with enor- 
mous- charisma. I personally would like to 
see Jack Nicholson, but I don’t suppose he 
would be interested.” 

Gibson considers the finest poems arc 
those in “The Poet m New York” and he 
especially Kkes “Poemas dd Lago Edem 
Mills” (Poems from Edem Mills Lake), a 
lalrein Maine where the poet visited and was 

wvrWiiftH by the plants that reminded him 
of Granada. “The poem has a wonderful, 
lyrical, wistful melancholy. 

“As for his plays, I like them all, but I 
think the best one is “La Casa de Bernaxda 
Alba," which deals with an embittered wid- 
ow and her four daughters. “His style had 
ti g h te n**! up and he hid broadened ms hori- 
zons after the New York experience.” 

“But,” said Gibson, laughing ruefully, 
“there is little about the man I don’t like. 

Modern man has lost the sense of being part 

. of nature. Lorca helps him to return to this. 
Tie has a mystical, ewitnito quality that will 
always appeal to me, his fantastic use of 
metaphors, Lorca puts one in touch with the 
deeper levels of the mind, he takes one l ack 
to their roots." 

In his first book, <3bson quoted a Giana- 
da friend of the poet, Gerardo .Rosalcs who 
said of’Lorca. “Como un mflri de m3 quin- 
. centos anas" (Like a child of 1,500 years). ■ 

. Mary Peirson Kennedy is a journalist who 
wrfres on Spanish cultural affairs. 


A Busy Springtime in London 


by Jo Thomas 

I ONDON — The endless days of spring 
and summer, when the light lingers 
long past 10 PJ&, offer a perfect 
J time to visit London. If you are 
coming from the United States, the strength 
of the dollar makes it easier to stay hoc, 
although you may find yourself compdled to 
buy another suitcase before you leave. 

• Bring your sense of humor .and brace 
yourself for crowds of Americans buying np 
the place and living like kings. Try, however, 
to make your hotel reservations early. The 
American Bar Association has London prac- 
tically booked up from July 9 io 22, but at 
other times there are still drtrghff nl places to 
stay in a wide price range. Avoid sche du ling 
anything on May 27 or Aug. 26- They are 
bank holidays and everything— from banks 
to galleries and mnsninm — is dosed. 

There are many guides to London and its 
history, and taxi drivers are a fine source of 
information, but if yon want to see a lot in a 
short time, a few hours an a tour is recom- 
mended. 

London Transport offers a double-decker 
bus torn to Westminster Abbey, tbe sights of 
' — and historic gossip about — tbe West End 
and, when possible, the Chanring of the 
Guard ceremony at Buckingham Palace. The 
price is the equivalent of $10, $625 for 
children. The tour leaves at 10 Ail from 
WB tan Road Coach Station, near Victoria; 
Station, and returns at 1 PJVL Book through 
London Transport or through your hotel, or 
call 222-1234. 

If you decide to show yourself around, 
London Transport has free maps, but a 
street guide called “A to Z (here called A to 
Zed) Inner London in Super Scale" is espe- 
cially useful. It’s small, costs $2.60, and can 
be purchased at many bookshops. 

T HIS is the 400tb birthday of the City 
of Westminster and tbe 300th birth- 
day erf George Frederick Handd, and 
if yon happen to be here on July 13 don’t 
miss the free concert at the Serpentine in 
Hyde Park, which trill stmt at 10 PM. and 
combine Handers “Royal Fireworks Music” 
and “Water Music" with a fireworks display 
launched from rafts. The music wOl be per- 
formed by Andr6 Previn and the Royal rhft- 
hannonic Orchestra. 

The Royal Opera in Convent Garden is 
offeringfive performances in May of “Sam- 
son etDalfla* with Plficido Domingo and 
Agnes Baltsa. In June and Julyyoa can see 
Jessye Norman or Rosalind Plowright in 
“Ariadne anf Naxos” and Frederica von 
Stade in “La Donna del Lago.” (Tickets £7 
to £37, about $8.50 to $45.) A high point of 
the summer will be the En glish National 
Opera's new production of Michael Tm- 

S 's “The Midsummer Marriage" at the 
don Coliseum in May and June. (£3 JO 
to £15 JO.) 

The Royal Ballet is presenting “The Sleep- 
ing Beany’ and “Les Syiphides” in May, 
“Swan Lake” in May and July, and “Romeo 
and Juliet” in Anguk. (£4-50 to £21.) 

On stage, fan McKellen is in “Coriolanus” 
on Olivier stage of the National Theatre May 
31 and June I. Michael Frayn’s version of 
Chekhov's “WOd Honey” win beat the Lyt- 
telton May 15 to 23. (£5.50 to £11-50.) The 
Royal Shakespeare Company is presenting 
“Richard H,” “Hamid" and “Henry V" in 
May and June at the Barbican. (£4 to 
£11 JO.) . 

In a large industrial paint depot at 98A 
Boundary Road in St John’s Wood, an ele- 
gant private gallery of contcmporaiy art has 
opened. It is London’s newest museum, and 
it still has no name. Chari es Saatdn, of the 
advertising firm of Saaicbd & Saatchi, and 


-0.yVir,V 

1ENTSW 


si 


British 

k Musm» 


Paul’s 

thsdral 


s*’®!£S 


Horns 




S3S 


/ Westminster! 
Hamxla \ / Abbey 1 




his wife, Doris, have collected the work of 
artists they admire and are showing a small 
part of their collection, the weak of Andy 
Warhol, Donald Judd, Bruce Nauman, 
Richard Serra, Cy Twombly and Bruce Mar- 
den. It is open from noon to 6 PM. Friday 
and Saturday and on other days by appoint- 
ment. (624-8299.) 

The British Museum (Great Russell 
Street, WC1) is opening seven new sculpture 
galleries in the basement to show the bulk of 
its Greek and Roman collection, some 1,500 
objects that have not been on display since 
1939. They include exhibits from two of the 
seven wonders of the andeut world: figures 
from the tomb of Mausdus at Halicarnassus 
— which gave the word “mausoleum" to the 
world — and carvings from the Temple of 
Artemis at Ephesus. (Monday through Sat- 
urday, 10 AM. to 5 P.M-, Sundays from 2:30 
to 6 PM. Admission is free.) 


0 Mh ft 


THi New YoA Tnu 


china. The latest prices on Burberry rain- 
coats are tbe equivalent of $285 for men and 
$269 for women (including IS percent Value 
Added Tax, which is refundable). 


M ANY shoppers start at Hairods, 
which has everything, or at Marks 
St Spencer on Oxford Street, which 
has wonderful clothes and low prices. Marks 
& Spencer takes no credit cards, has no 
dressing rooms, and will take traveler's 
checks only in pounds. Women's cashmere 
sweaters in a classic pullover style at Marks 
& Spencer are $53 and come in gray, navy, 
camel or red. Men’s cashmeres come in more 
colors, including yellow and light blue, and 
seem to be even better in quality at $69. 
Beautiful all-cotton sweaters sefi fra SIS for 
women and $17.50 for men. Lamb’s- wool 
pullovers are $14 for women or men. 

The Scotch House in Knightsbridge is 
famous for quality knitwear, kuts and plaid 
materials. A classic cashmere sweater costs 
from $80 to S 125, while a hand-knitted cash- 
mere sweater is $250. A plain cashmere 
sweater dress is $150. 

There is enormous variety at Gray’s An- 
tique Market, open Monday through Friday 
only, during business hours. Take the under- 
ground to the Bond Street station and walk 
down the street past the Hog in the Pound 
Pub. The shops in tbe maiket offer every- 
thing from antique toys and jewelry to 
swords and helmets. A sterling stiver dress- 
ing table set — comb, brush and minor — in 
fine condition was $130. Heavy silver frames 
are $125 to $250, and crystal perfume bottles 
with silver tops go for about $175. You can 
bargain with many of the dealers. 

The largest collection of British contem- 
porary glass can be found at Coleridge, 


D IAL Children's London at 246-8007 
for recorded information about activ- 
ities for them. An excellent guide, 
“Kid’s London," published by Piccolo, is 
about $3. 

Tbe universal favorites seem to be the zoo 
at Regent’s Park, which has a children's zoo 
(admission is $4 fra adults and $2 fra chil- 
dren, 9 to 6 Monday to Saturday and 9 to 7 
Sunday); Hamley’s 188 Regent Street, a toy 
store that can only be described as colossal, 
and the Science Museum (Exhibition Road, 
SW7), winch is connected to tbe Natural 
History Museum so you can walk next door 
for the dinosanra*(Monday to Saturday 10 
to 6 PJVL, Sunday 2:30 to 6. Free.) 

Fra a reliable baby sitter tiy Childminders 
at 935-2049 or 935-9763. There is a registra- 
tion fee of $3.75, but the hourly charges are 
reasonable (from about $2 to 52-50 an hour, 
depending on the time and day), and the 
sitters are available on very short notice. 

Shopping is nothing less than breathtak- 
ing in London, if you are looking for a good 
buy. Clothes, especially woolens and cash- 
meres, are favorites, as are antiques and . 


For c hina, you might try Harrods or walk 
a short distance to the Reject Shop at 183 
B romp ton Road, at the corner of Beau- 
champ Place, which sells perfect china at 
popular prices. The best-selling Royal Al- 
bert Old Country Rose goes for $174 at the 
Reject Shop ana at $193 at Hairods for a 
service for eight five-piece place settings. 
Coal port Couniryware is $155 at the Reject 
Shop and $172 at Harrods, also fra a service 
fra eight. 

R ENE Bajard, who was head chef at 
Le Gavroche. Britain's leading 
French restaurant for 10 years, has 
just opened Mazarin (30 Winchester Street, 
SW1) in Pimlico. The menu is French and 
small — two fish and two meat dishes, appe- 
tizers and cheese or a dessert. You can 
choose from four good and simple wines, 
included in the price. We had cream of leek 
soup, lamb with tarragon sauce, a warm puff 
pastry with grapes ana a bottle of Muscadet. 
(Monday through Saturday, dinner only, 7 
to 1 1 :3Q, $27 a person. Tel: 828-3366.) 

For attentive service and very good food 
in beautiful surroundings. Rue St. Jacques, 
just one block off Oxford Street at 5 Char- 
lotte Street. Wl. is recommended. The Ger- 
man chef, Gunther Schlender, was offering 
grilled guinea fowl in a juniper-berry- fla- 
vored sauce recently, but the menu changes 
frequently, offering the best of what is in 
season. You're now likely to find new lamb 
with Madeira sauce or grilled duck with 
ginger and honey. (Monday through Friday, 
1230 to 2:15 and 7:15 to 11: 15: $70 for two. 
tax and service included. Tel: 637-0222.) 

A third choice, especially for lunch if you 
happen to be antique-shopping on Porto- 
bello Road, is Garke's at 124 Kensington 
Church Street, W8. Sally Clarke, tbe owner 
and chef, cooked at Michael’s in Santa Mon- 
ica before coming here. (Monday through 
Friday 12:30 to 2:15 and 7:30 to 10:30, 
Saturday for dinner only. Lunch $9.25 or 
$11.75, including tax and service; dinner 
$16.75 inclusive.) 

If you're shopping on the King's Road in 
Chelsea, Foxtrot Oscar (79 Royal Hospital 
Road, SW3), is a jolly, reasonably priced 
place for lunch (352-7179). Lunch or dinner 
with a bottle of wine would be 520 to $25 for 
two people. Hilaire (68 Old B romp ton Road, 


SW7) has a lovely hmcheon menu fra $11.75 
if you’re in South Kensington (584-8993). 

For accommodations, the Connaught, the 
Berkeley, the Savoy and Garidges are still 
delightful and still expensive, starting at 
$144 for a double room. If you know them, 
you might want to try an elegant Mayfair 
bote! whose address is its name, 47 Park 
Street (491-7282). It has suites, all with mod- 
ern kitchens even (bough room service is 
from La Gavroche, and the porters will do 
your grocery shopping. With a minimum 
stay of three nights, rates start at $1 85 for 
one bedroom, $310 for two. 

Tbe Stafford Hotel, in a quiet cul-de-sac 
between SL James’s Street and Green Park, . 
is convenient to shops and the theater. 
Rooms begin at $144 double (493-01 1 1). In 
the same price range is the Hyde Park Hotel . 
in Knightsbridge, dose to some of the best 
shopping. Double rooms are $150, or $175 if 
you face Hyde Park (235-2000). 

Less expensive hotels that come weD-rec- 
ommeadea are tbe Ebury Court (26 Ebury 
Street, SW1; 730-8147; from S52J0 double), 
an unpretentious and charming hotel where 
you may get a four-poster bed, and Number > 
16 Sumner Place (16 Sumner Place, SW7; ' 
589-5232) from $65 double), which, will bring , 
breakfast to your room, provides a refrigera- * 
tor, but has no restaurant. An elevator is ' 
bring installed. Staying there is like being a 
guest in an elegant home. ■ 

© 1085 The t Veto York Tuna 


which has its main gallery at 192 
Items include Anthony Stem’s b 


Items include Anthon 
($330 to $500), subtle l 


s bright vases 
>es by William 


Walker ($290 to $375) or plates by Brian 
Blanthom ($1,000 and up). You can also 
find glass nuggets and marbles from about 
10 cents. 


Europe’s Summer Festivals 


Continued from page 9 . 


because of the reopening last February of the 
gorgeous Semper opera house and East Ger- 
many’s attempt to attract stellar performers. 
The Prague Spring Festival is worth attend- 
ing, too, in part for unusual Czechoslovak 
opera repertory — in particular the works of 
Smetana, Dvorak ana Janacek — and in part 
for the sheer beauty of the city. 

Qne other category of festival might be 
singed out, in which an' unusual setting 
provides a lure of its own. Chief among such 
festivals are the opera performances in the 
Roman arena in Verona, Italy, and in the 
Roman theater in Orange, France, as well as 
on the floating stage in Lake Constance at 
the Bregenz Festival in Austria, in the court- 
yard of tbe former archbishop’s palace in 
Aix-en-Provence, France, ana the bucolic 
arcadia erf Glyndeboume, south erf London: 
Picnicking in formal attire on the manicured 
lawn of a country estate across a fence from 
contented cows is aG very English and really 
quite wonderful. The music isn’t bad, either. 


All the festivals mentioned thus far are 
proven winners; longstanding events at 
which distinguished t ni^eal offerings are 
almost guaranteed. But there are many other 
festivals, and what follows is a more idiosyn- 
cratic selection based on what seems inter- 
esting to me. 

The most obvious trend tins year is the 
attention paid to the tercentenaries of Bach, 
Handel and Domenico Scarlatti and the qua- 
tercentenary of Heinrich Sch&tz; the cente- 
nary of Alban Berg, conversely, is being 
slighted, which goes to show that the music 
business honors its own only if they have 
proved themselves at the box office. 

Some festivals are designed by their very 
concentration on the Baroque to do honor to 
Baroque composers. The Ansbach Bach 
Week in West Germany, for instance, offers 
a fine assortment of eariy-mnsic specialists. 
The Netherlands, home erf many erf those 
specialists, has an Ancient Music Festival in 
late August and early September in Utrecht, 


as well as an Amsterdam Sca rl atti Marathon 
in October, with 55 musicians plowing 
through aD of the conmoror's 500-phrs harp- 
sichord sonatas. And then there is Sweden’s 
idyllic Drottningtolm Court Theater, which 
oners some of Europe’s most imaginative 
eariy-mnsic performances in a perfectly pre- 
served Baroque theater (the one used in 
Ingmar Bagman’s film of Mozart’s “Magic 
Flute"). 

C ONNOISSEUR’S delights? Try En- 
gland’s Aldeburgh in June, the festi- 
val founded by Benjamin Britten and 
carried on by ins friends, among them Mur- 
ray Perahia, the Ameri c an pianist; there is a 
pendant in August in the form of the Rostro- 
povich Festival, also in the Snape Mailings 
Concert Hall near Aldeburgh. 

Or the Bordeaux Festival tins month, 
which offers a particularly rich collection of 
French musicians. Or toe Festival Hector 
Berlioz in and near Lyon. Or Austria’s Schu- 


bertiade Hobenems, a feast of Schubert’s 
music by leading Keder and chamber musi- 
rians, including three different accounts of 
his song eyrie “Die Wintemase.” Or Gian 
Carlo MenottTs Spdeto Festival in Italy, or 
Finland’s Savonlirma Festival. For those in- 
terested in cxmtemporaiy music, there are 
three fine fall festivals: the Festival d’Ao- 
tomnein Paris, the Warsaw Autumn and the 
Styrian Autumn in Graz, Austria. 

Whatever your musical tastes, there 
should be something to enjoy. And remem- 
ber: what makes a festival special is not just 
the quality of its performances or the charm 
of its setting. It is the very fact that visitors 
have extricated themselves from their every- 
day lives, made a journey from afar and 
hence have become especially receptive to an 
artistic experience out of the ordinary. It 
doesn't always happen just that way. But it 
happens often enough to make tbe journeys 
worthwhile. ■ 

C 1985 The New York Tunes 





Salzburg's Felsenreitschule, as it appeared for Max Reinhardt’s 1930s u Fausf’ production. 


.ITS*- 1 



Page 12 




Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utinnat 

Industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


OlWI HIM LOW Class OlIM 
Indus 1251.88 126157 134438 12M2T + 1JU9 

Trans 59133 60151 S9Z34 6000 +?Jf 

UI6I 15779 13973 1J7JM 199.11 +13 

Como 512J4 518.97 561944 514.90 + 5Jt 


NYSE Diaries 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


NYSE Index 


1 


man low Close CSV* 
Composite 105.31 1064* 10131 + 075 

inchrelrloH 119.93 119.93 119.93 + 078 

Tiansn 97.07 94.75 97.97 + 115 

U il Miles SMI 5423 SMI + 0J3 

Finance I1U7 11240 11167 + iM 





Bnv 

Sam 

"Ston 

Mov 8 

1S6.8M 

3*1184 

60S 

May 7 _ — ■ 

195304 

418501 

1753 

Mav 6 — 

183303 

437,983 

4434 

Mar 2 

IB8J13 

3VM17 

17.00 

Mov 2 

18+739 

412234 

5436 

■included In ttw tales llguros 




Thursda y^ 

MSE 

Closing 


VoC Gt 4 PJIA 110.990400 

Pre9.4PJA.roL 18UJWM6 

Prev CMtalifcrted close T2UW49 


Tables include rite nationwide prices 
up to fbe closing on Wan Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



Standard & Poor's Index 


HIM Law Close CUV* 
Industrials 301 JO MUM 301 M + 1 31 

Transa. 15741 155J4 157J1 + 175 

Utilities BSL3S 81.97 8227 +039 

Fbwnaa 2230 2T45 32.19 + 0J4 

Composite IB1 J7 18043 181.93 + IJO 


NASDAQ index 


Comomite 

indusrriois 

Flounce 

Irtsuronc* 

Ulimias 

Bonks 

Tramp. 


Went 

aitw am 

+ 2J0 27V ill 
+ 173 2XM0 
+ 1.70 3*540 
+ 2.79 332.90 
+ 02B 24772 
+ IJO 24457 
+ 141 35043 


AMEX Sales 


4 Pjw. volume 
Prev. 4 P J4 voluma 
Prtrv. cons, volume 





AMEX Stock Index 


KM LOW OBW aw 

*»45 225X4 23464 + 1 J» 


r+t: 




33 9 

54 118* 
4453 448k 
69 55V* 
752 331, 
47 3 

1238 SO 
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400 37 


Dow Average Up 10.49 Points 


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211% + lb 


The Assodared Press 

NEW YORK — Stock prices made their 
biggest advance in more than two weeks Thurs- 
day, rebounding from a modest setback in the 
previous session. Bank stocks posted some ex- 
ceptionally good gains in a relatively busy day 
on Wall Street. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 
down 2.98 Wednesday, climbed 10.49 to 
1.260.27. for its best showing since it rose by 
12.15 points April 23. 

Volume on the New York Stock Exchange 
reached 110.99 million shares, up from 101.27 
million Wednesday. 

The market had slipped Wednesday on indi- 
cations from the Federal Reserve ( chairman. 
Paul A. Volcker, that the central bank had not 
taken any recent steps to relax its credit policy. 

But analysts noted that Mr. Volcker also 
hinted at a possibility the Fed's strategy might 
be changed when its policy-setting Open Mar- 
ket Committee meets May 21. 

Interest cab's dropped in the credit markets 
Thursday as investors awaited the results of the 
third and final day of the Treasury's quarterly 
sale of bonds and notes, which totals a record 
520.5 billion. 

Rates on short-term Treasury bills came 
down 3 to 4 basis points, or hundredths of a 
percentage point. Prices of long-term govern- 
ment bonds, which move inversely with interest 
rates, rose about S5 for every 51.000 in face 
value. 

Meanwhile, investors' spirits apparently got a 
lift from reports that President Ronald Reagan 
was planning to retain favorable treatment for 
long-term capital gains in his forthcoming tax- 
reform proposal. 

In bank trading. Bankers Trust New York. 




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31 31 — 4i 


U.S. Money Supply Falls 

Tftr Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The basic measure of the 
U.S. money supply known as M-I fefl $900 
million in me week ended April 29, dropping to 
a seasonally adjusted S575.2 billion from S576. 1 
billion the previous week, the Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York reported Thursday. 

M-I includes cash in circulation, checking- 
type deposits at banking institutions and non- 
bank travelers checks. 


rose Pi to 68’i. Banc One ft to 3m, Citicorp 
I '4 to 47ft. Republic New York 2 to 4Sft ana 
Amsoutb Bancorp 1ft to 29ft. All five issues 
made the list of stocks reaching 52-week highs. 

Mattel rose 1 to 13ft. It reported an operating 
profit of 25 cents a share for the first quarter, 
against a loss from operations in the compara- 
ble period a year earlier. 

K mart, which posted a 119-percent sales 
increase for April while most other retailers 
turned in mixed results, gained V* to 35ft. Other 
retail issues typically recorded smaller gains. 

Trans World Airlines rose ft to 1 6ft. After the 
dose. Carl I calm, the financier, said he and 
companies he controls bad acquired 20-5 per- 
cent of TWA's stock. 

In the daily tally on the Big Board, more than 
two issues rose in price for every one that 
declined. The exchange's composite index 
moved up .75 to 105.31. 

Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those slocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 
totaled 13019 million shares. 




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FACT!! 600% PROFITS 


In advocating the purchase of GULF atS 31. fit was subsequently absorbed at 
$ 80), our analysts noted ... The oil glut will prove a temporary illusion. The fissures 
that catalyzed the OPEC crisis have never h eated, indeed, they are more distinct now 
than they were when hydrocarbon stocks gushed. While It is true that a statistician 
can “deduct" that Jacqueline Bissetisconcave. one tact persists; the United States is 
exhausting Its oil and gas reserves- The dominoes are quivering. Pan-Arabism is little 
more than a facade disguising bitter doctrinal and nationalistic differences. 
Fundamentalism and secularism, Sunni versus Shiite, the classical antithesis in the 
cradle of dvilizatioa Will the cradle become a crypt? 

The final flare up between adversaries may be imminent, a “Jihad” that will spiral 
petroleum prices, ft may be unduly frigid to conjure up capital gains by alluding to 
chaos. We are security analysts not moralists. The “Seven Sisters", the international 
oil Amazons, are avaricious, juggernauts in jodhpurs riding over hurdles to achieve 
roseate profits. Ignore the platitudes of sages who insist that oil prices will plummet. 
As contrarians, we mock the "consensus’. 

The Sisters are corporate courtesans. They will writhe like Salome, creating a 
script that will erupt oils above OPEC highs. Buying ofls now will proveaspresetenias 
having climbed aboard Aero-Space shares when CGR, as mavericks, recommended 
BOEING at $ 18 and LOCKHEED at $ 41. (Boeing climbed to S 66, LOCKHEED flew 
over S 140 before a 3-1 split) 

Our forthcoming letter focuses upon energy shares that may be ingested by oily 
predators. In addition, we recommend a low-priced emerging Venture Capital entity 
with the dynamics to vault, as did a recently reviewed “special" situation’ that 
escalated 600% in a brief-time span. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to or telephone.. 


fn CAPITAL 
B GAINS 


Name: 

Address: 

Phone: 


ftast performance does not (pjarantae future results 


CYC. Capital Venture Consultants 
Amsterdam B.V. 

KalwsfStraatTi2 

1012 PK Am s ter dam , The Netheria nde 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex: 18536 



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Page 13 



•Pot 

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... TECHNOLOGY 

Afccient 'Lost-Wax’ Meliiod 
3 : Is Hot Topic in Casting 

;L 4 . : ByJOHNHOLUSHA ! • ’ "• 

! _ ‘ Ww York Times Sender 

l Tr^^wETROlT — Tiw origins of 4e “lost-wax” process of 
casting xnetalare boned in. antiquity. Archeological 
^ cadence suggests it was in use as caafy as 2000 B.C In 
j the Middle East and some of the findy detaled gold 

; ~#nd copper figmines that survive from the- period are prized 

^ A varia^jmcaithis ancient theme,.‘1ostfoam r "is a hot topic in 
i Monndiy aides these days. Mmor manufacturers such as General 
: fcjkfotors Coipn John Ifceie & Co., the TJJS. power and farm 
i jgnadunoyxnaker, and Ford Motor Co. are applying it to prodriee 

gyie casting s that are the~bagcfa lrilding Mriftfeg ref shear esmt ttnclfc 

> *Limd tractors . GM has said the ' ^ . L, 

*5prccess wjffbe an important rn_ ni w 

&art of its SatunTorniedL lM ToBfrT WP T 


^'process wfllbe an important 
impart of its Saturn project, 
^winchis to be a new GM 
t^xhaitaar division, to cut auto ' 
tj^nanufacttiring costs by using 
‘Snew technology. - 
i ££ Conventional casting prac- 
jrtioes are based -on sand, which 
%an withstand the 2.600-de- 


China Is 


verjrpredse. 


• I’rovidt, 


Wlllf ^ 

rivMipftmi 1 
moa 


^AiOpo, in J-tgree Fahrenheit (l,339^degrees Celsius) te mp erat ur e of molten 
, ,, n j v £uron. Boxes of sand, mixed with chaoaicatg mat bind the grains 

, . 7* ; *5ogethet; are pressed overpatterns and that bated to form upper 

, laaim lower xnmds for the.ptece to be cast. If the piece is not sold, 

■ cric-Myit ; Aand cores must also be made and put in the mold to farm hollow 

renuscs i, » spaces for such things as the cylinders in an engine block. 

pi Suinijy ; •' : ■■ - - •>-- .••••'• : - • - • - -■ 

' * 11 * lia' ! *i%V / • 1TH the cores in place, the upper -and lower molds are 

V clamped together and the moiiten metal is poured in. It is 

rn-vT,^ . if vv a hot, diity process, with sparks flying in afl directions. 

, >. ec " Us «* When the molten metal has cooled and hardened, the mold is 
“ n: ' moa ^opened and the casting is shaken to remove core sand from the 


m 


■fh'i 

g--! 

.{K * ■» 

«■ * 

f t t o. 

I* 

kit 

** * ?> 


>1 ihe ,tub, 
• Cun Wi 
• W tot*. 


vent 

v 

'is 

xdx 

'lith 

ff 


►Jnierior. Tben _grmders take off die excess metal left where the 
-^wo halves of the mold met, and cleaning operations takeoff sand 
r^tuck to the metal by the birring agents. 

The vJost-wax" prbcess produces very praise castings, but it 
^consumes a pattern for each piece. made, which is why it is used 
Opostly for jewelry and art otgecte today, and is not practical for 
Orach high-volume applications as (^tinder heads or exhaust 
-^manifolds. A wax model the exact size of the desired piece is 
►^piade and put inside a box that is then filled with a molding 
*i«oateoaL After the matwial solidifies, it. is heated, melting the 
' ijvax, which drains out of hedes put in for that purpose. The 
^ Resulting cavity is then filled with metal and the mold broken 
^t^iopen after it settl 

“Lost foam," winch goes by other names, including “evapora- 
— tivc-casting process," uses patterns made out of expandable 
polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam— tlje stuff of disposable 
-coffee cups.- Dense beads of the material axe poured into molds 


Eurobond 

Questions Unger 
On Pne- 9 49 Issues 


By Allan Saundason 

Return 

FRANKFURT — The B»nlr of 
China wffl proceed this month with 
its first bond issue on a European » 
market since 1949, despite opposi- 
tion from holders of pratvolutioo- \ 

ary bonds repudiated by the Com- 
munist government, Tvwrt jrmAet j 
sources said Thursday. . ~ /i 

Tbsy said there was considerable •*•*- 
interest in the new issue, which is 
expected to be a straight Eurobond - T ni 
dL about 200 million Deutsche 
mazks (S6Z8 million). - jt 

The Frankfurt-based Deutsche AB 

Bant wOl be 1^ ttn>n»yr 1 die _. 

sources said. Ja 

Deutsche Bant has not con- 
firmed that it will underwrite the 
issue, but spokesmen for holdets of O 

the old bonds have already written C oup 
it to outline their claims. ’ ■ mob 

“Our view is that they [the Chi- ing i 
nese] should not be issuing bonds P°nc 
ai all while they’re in defamt,” said -weaf 
Mkhad Gough, director of the bene 
Council of Foreign Bond Holders, chid 

which is based in London. 

Mr. Goa^i said the council .*** 

could not take l^al action to pro- . •“ ar 
vent n»iiia from issuing debt in 
maxis, but he hoped to persuade we 

the Deutsche Bank to inwtinn in L— — 
the prospectus that bonds issued 
before the 1949 revdtndoa have yet O. 
to be redeemed. |j{| 

The Be^nggovenxmml has said 
it has no responsibiHty far debt 
'warned before 1949. 

Bat in Hannover, Wflheim Kuhl- 
mann who has written a bode . ” . 
about the bonds, said there is grow- byc^m 
ing specnlatic® that die rhfniwt 



Icahn Discloses 
20% TWA Stake; 
May Seek Merger 


1>» Naur YcritTn 


A 1966 Quattro in a wind-tunnel test; Audi was a pioneer in aerodynamic styling. 

Audi Keeps Its Faith in Technology 

Ttm/vMiiAti Cam. ons other than swords, so we can don that now is a division c 

innovation occn stay two or three years abrad of Volkswagenweik AG maids 

* g-\i up j " than. " higher-cost autos, has follow 

AS Unfy r/1g ft OH Despite the scramble by UJS. Particularly since the arrival c 
. auto companies to reduce the Mr. Piech in 1972. 

Jaoanese Makes Japanese advantage of 52,000 or It was Audi that introduced 

*1' more a car in nrodnedon 'costs, five-evlinder casoline eneini 


New York Tima Serwice 

COLORADO SPRINGS — 
Competing with Japanese auto- 
mobile companies is like engag- 
ing in a sword fight with an op- 
ponent who keeps honing his 
.weapon to an ever finer edge, 
observes Ferdinand Piech, the 
chief engineer for Audi, the West 
German automaker. 

“The Japanese are better at 
sharpening swords than the 
Western worid,” he mid recently. 
“We have to try to invent weap- 


ons other than swords, so we can 
stay two or three years ahead of 

them.*’ 

Despite the scramble by UJS. 
auto companies to reduce the 
Japanese advantage of 52,000 or 
more a car in production 'costs, 
through such efforts as die Sat- 
urn Corp n the subsidiary set up 
by General Motors Corp. to 
make a new subcompact car, 
Audi officials maintain that Ja- 
pan's fine-tuning of its assembly 
lines and (he rise of .low-cost 
manufacturing countries such as 
South Korea will make it'impos- 
sible to dose the gap. The solu- 
tion for specialty manufacturers, 
they say, is innovation. 

Ibis is the formula that Audi, 
once an independent corpora- 


tion that now is a division of 
Volkswagenweik AG making 
higher-cost autos, has followed. 
Particularly since the arrival of 
Mr. Piech in 1972. 

It was Audi that introduced a 
five-cylinder gasoline engine, 
confounding the conventional 
wisdom that only an even num- 
ber of cylinders could be used. 
And it was Audi that emphasized 
a smooth, aerodynamic styling 
iiv-mp now bring emulated in 
Detroit- 

Three years ago Audi intro- 
duced the Qaattro, equipped 
with full-time four-whed alive 
for improved handling , rather 
than off-the-road operation. 
This, top, is also being widely 
(Contmaed on Page 17, Col I) 


Compiled bv OtffSoff From Ospordus 

NEW YORK — The financier 
Carl C. I calm disclosed Thursday 
that he has bought a 20 J percent 
stake in Trans World Airlines Inc. 
and is evaluating whether to seek 
control of the airline. 

In a filing with the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, Mr. lcahn 
and a group of companies he con- 
trols said they were evaluating their 
alternatives, including seeking con- 
trol of the carrier. 

The group also said it “may ex- 
plore the possibility of ACF Indus- 
tries Inc. making a proposal for a 
merger or business combination” 
with TWA Mr. Icahn is chairman 
of ACF Industries, a transporta- 
tion- leasing concern. 

Mr. i cahn said his group had 
paid $95.2 million for 6,745,100 
shares of TWA and that 5,156,300 
shares were purchased in the open 
market since March 21. He said 
said he believes TWA stock is “un- 
dervalued, particularly if the pres- 
ently unsettled labor situation is 
satisfactorily resolved.” 

The gram's representatives also 
have had <a«ks with TWA manage- 
ment, but TWA executives report- 
edly gave them no encouragement 
to make a merger proposal. . 

Business Week magazine report- 


Study Cites U.S. Banks 9 Ability to Withstand Jolts 


. By Curl Gewirtz 

Imaimtomd Herald Tribune 
PARIS — A new study profiling 


tral hanire can provide their hanks 
with cash but not dollars. 
However, a study published 


This wide difference in the stnic- the Ame ricana However, Luxem- 
ture of VS. banks’ business, ob- bourg banks draw a larger percent- 
serves the BIS, in part reflects the age of their total deposits — 29 


sand is poured in and then the wfaede box is vibrated to force the 
*! sand^ to flow into internal passages. 

When molten metal is poured m,t]U low-density foam quickly 
»■; burns off, thn« giving the procedure its name. But the coaling, 

' known as a “core wash,” holds the sand in place until the metal 
' hardens. The big advantages of thr process, foundry eagmeers 
^ say, are that it allows more complex shapes to be cast and 
eliminates cores and core removal, along with grinding and most 
• cleaning. It also allows designers to lighten, casting by -using 
Thinner walls, since the foam can hold sand to tolerances impossi- 
yc bfe wahJcoces. , -• • _ , 

Ford, whichis using “k»i foanTtb cast intake manifolds for its 
new Tanxus/Sable models, estimates that the process has cot 
i ; costs by 30 percent at the foundry and produces adtfitional 
\ savingsin later operations.^ The reason is thatlhe casting which is 
. closer to the final object, reduces the amount of ma c hining 1 
-'required. Producing castings fhad xaprirekss finishing has keg. 

(CanfiBKdwPageT5.CoL3) 


XennremvSl modify its poa- u - s - banks “ *** ^ 

tkm border to gam freer accessto supplier and laker of cash — are 
mtemational amhal maikets. among the least vulnerable to dis- 
Bond marketsmnees say bar- tnrbances in the interbank market. 

rowings in ddlais or sterling are jbe interbank market, where an 


what b anks do in the Thursday by the Bank for Interna- large international network which percent — from non-related banks 
market shows that tional Settlements shows a more the U.S. banks have developed. than do the Americans. 

- the largest smrie fundamental reason -why U.S. Only the Swiss, among the 13 The data show the Swiss draw 


virtually ruled out while daims estimated Jlitriffion was lent and 
against the Comxnnmst govern- ^ 0 ^ last year by hanks for 

relativdy short periods, is the cen- 

. ** 1983. **» Bntxsh government m1 f sr nf the miernational 


rn,’- wi P^laj of the international cent with related offices. For the funds are considered less volatile 

£•”, banking market and accounted for U.S. banks, the relationship is re- than interbank money. 

dad ™ 9rcv ' some 66 percent of total business, versed: Transactions with non-re- By this measure, Luxembourg 


^ t _ Jrdls to the interbank market’s. lated banks account for 32 percent banks rank high, drawing 69 per- the market, (accounting for 24 per- 

smooth functioning risk causing of assets (loans) and only 22 per- cent of their funds from customers cent of total 1984 assets versus 28 
than! oriv m ^ or problans for banks, cent of tiabilities (deposits). compared to only 38 percent for (Confirmed on Page 15, CoL 3) 

about 514 million worth are U.S. banks have always been 

thought to be outstanding to Ger- considered less vulnerable than ' ' ” 

man investors. others to an interbank crisis be- w ■ 

Scan or h anking sources said the cause the bulk of the business is j 

Bundesbank was unEkdy to object transacted in dollars. That means I Sjt » 


fundamental reason why U.S. Only the Swiss, among the 13 The data show the Swiss draw 
banks are less vulnerable to inter- nationalities for which data is pro- only 47 percent of their funds from 
bank shocks: They rdy less on out- vided, rely less on deposits from customers, but the study notes that 
side bank financing than any other non-af Abated banks (16 percent of this probably understates theposi- 
national grouping except the Swiss, their funding.) tion because much of the Swiss 

Overall, 43 percent of the total There are. of course, other ways business is channeled through 
international banking market is to measure vulnerability. One trustee accounts; which do not 
made up of transactions between .would be to look at the amount of show up on the banks’ balance 
non-afffliated hanks, and 23 per- non-bank deposits since customer sheets, 
cent with related offices. For the funds are considered less volatile By contrast, Japanese banka 
U.S. banks; the relationship is re- ihan interbank money. which rank behind the Americans 

versed: Transactions with non-re- By this measure, Luxembourg as the most important players in 


ed in its May 20 issue that TWA 
already has hired the investment 
firm Salomon Brothers Inc. to map 
out a defense strategy. 

The SEC filing said the 6.745 
nullioa of TWA's 33 million com- 
mon shares were bought at prices 
ranging from 512.625 a share to 516 
a share. News of the purchases 
were reported after the close of the 
New York Stock Exchange, during 
which TWA’s common stock 
climbed 3716 cents a share, to 
$16.50. 

The rise in the price of TWA's 
stock over the past three months 
was accompanied by rumors an 
Wall Street that Mr. Icahn was ag- 
gressively buying into TWA Previ- 
ously Mr. Icahn had not comment- 
ed on the rumors, but once an 
investor acquires 5 percent or more 
of a company’s shares the SEC 
must be notified. 

Earlier published reports had 
speculated that Mr. Icahn’s interest 
in TWA might reflect his desire to 
exchange his TWA shares for some 
of the airline's jets, and then lease 
those jets back to TWA or other 
airlines. The TWA aircraft, the re- 
ports suggested, would expand the 
operations of ACF Industries, 
which leases railroad freight cars. 

(AP, Reuters) 


DoUar Declines 
bi Europe , U.S. 

Compiled bf Our Staff Fran Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
dosed sharply lower Thursday, 
and dealers said there was no 
news to account for the drop. 

In New York, the British 
pound closed at $1.2255, np 
from SOHO on Wednesday. 
The dollar ended against the 
Deutsche mark at 3.1310 DM, 
down from 3-1790; at 9.5075* 
French francs, down from 
9.7000; and at 2.6330 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.6730. 

In London, the pound rose to 
$1.2375 from $1.2060 on 
Wednesday, while the dollar 
fed in Frankfurt to 3.1355 DM 
from 3.1878. (UPI, AP) 


to the China issue, having no 
ilations that govern borrowh 
sovereign issuers. 


US. banks can always cum to the 
Federal Reserve for dollars in case 
of a cash crisis, whereas other cen- 


Currency Rates 


I Lota interbank rate on May 9 , a xdu dn g fees. 

•j J ' Offirid firingtfar Aimtartfa m , Brunei f r u nltf ur t, Mflcp, fare. NawYoA rtVes ct 


Amsterdam - 3337 435 HIM • 37JB55- MW 5J1- nuVMJIUBr 

unmtatal 0*4 .777475 . 30.14 tM& Ufl' U KB — - 2X9Z7S 2400- 

Fnmkfarf 3L13SS - JJW 34tl» 13<75x «375* 4M7- 11*35 *1305 • 

London C*J IJBTS 3JW» TU3W' TJS 2M 434 * S ' 7733 123J 31LK 

■Utaa I3S&50 Z49K73 0630 JWjO* ' , 56U5 7J34I 7»30 7317 

VnrYnWO 0316 3.131 93075 139100 330 6330 3331 232.10 

ram 93335 J7J5 ' 3049 -— 47* X 3L7B7. ULMI • 3SBS 3J7B* 

Totem 251 J7S 3093* 7939 3625 T2i3- 7002 399 JH* 9535 

XurtCfe 33205 03404 04JB5* 17355 ■ OttT7* 7430B« -437* UUH- 

VtECU 07178 030H 123*9 63265 1.42632 23382 6S3723 13811 110369 

-MSDft O90&536 DJ0XM 639316 930408 136935 140M 401907 230 248306. 

. . Dollar Values 

■Wtv. ° unua U S3 E m*. Curnlm:r US3 BOOM. 0ornacr 053 

UHMMMt . 13B 09811 tftefc* ” 13WJ 844M tkOWNf 12253 

Qj 0*46 Austrian sOMOtam 2244 OM1 ta« ShU 95730 849*5 S.AMCM rata 2302 

0JHM MglmlhlftBC 6430 33913 KmolUatear . 83011 . 03011 tK wnwi tMJO 

07254 CamatemS US8S A4M «*^rinonB MBS. MOM I wnaa w la 17935 

CEoaa DatfteknM 1U3 Win Mn.kmi 038S 43 W M krona 9305 

3-1512 Ftotehnwtfca 63t25 03542 NLowa 10645 03251 TMmt 3M1 

1UH7Z ermk drachma ■ 13930 MOSS Port, man*# *30 0362 M biU 32315 

' 0.1305 HM9 KUOS 731 02W 9MMS rival 3311 03721 OAJLdFrtHB 33725 

f Siarilna:l329S Irtste i . . 

4a) Camnwrckd francQ))MnwiiHiiaMlMitabairaMaaand (el Amaiail(nmMtetwv>M4Blter (*) , 
Units ri UO (x) Untti of UBO (ir) Ufllts oMMOO 
«jQ.: not quoted: »UL! net awlkMn. 

•soansar Bonn* Hu son tux (BrutsoM; Banco CammtnMm UaOana (Milan); Banuue 
rMteaoio do Farit (Parh)S IMP (SDfU: Booout Arab* 1 IntnmatlonoU rfVnvnjftaaamrf 
«Haar. riraL dlrt>oai).OIti*r data from PoatonandAP. 


Brazil Seeks Debt Terms 
That Will Allow Growth 




pm * » 






a 

El: 


t' s B 


* 


Interest Rates 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tima Service ' ' 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazffs 
new civilian government has called 
for repayment terms from its credi- 
tors that win permit the country to 
resume its economic growth. 

But the government, Much took 
office March 15, also proposed 
sharp cutbacks in spending and 
subsidies rimed at reducing a 517- 
hilH^Yp budget deficit and curbing 
inflation, which readied 230 per- 
cent last year. 

In an address, to Congress on 
Wednesday, Finance Minister 
Francisco Domelles said: “There 
can be no healthy and sustained 
growth with Web mflatiou. The in- 
nationaxy spiral is principally 
gauged through financing the gov- 
ernment defiat with new money . * 

Mr. Domdles’s first major po- 
licy statement came hours before 
he flew to Washington to seek the 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Miter omrt tenc. Starttw Fxvm c . ECU SDR 

ifA. tWi - Ilk 5H - M 4K -49b CM • 12H 10W - T8V. .9h - 99b 79b 

2M. «fb -*tb Sib -59b .49b - 49b - I2te: 10 lb- W tb' 91b - 9»b 0 

■3M. 1 9b - 0 lb 5 lb - 59k 4 9b • 5 K' t»i - t» . W6 - WO 916 -96* Sib 

6WL Mk - 896 5W - 5» 5. - 590 mh - 1210 »»b- WH» 99b - 9Tb 89b 

1Y. n> ■ fte- 6 - *16 S --SM 1370 *1286 109b- IDfO. 91b - » 8% 

Kata avOcable la L ihrt Mk dgoo W irfsi mOOoa mtntmum(or oroteotePO. 1 
Sourcmt: Morgan guaranty (dollar, DM. SP, P o und FF); UovtB Boat (ECU); floaters 

? sow. • , 




- Asian Dollar Bates 

J D ,( .JIM, * mo*. amoo. 

:• avo-aM oib -BO • • ■ *9b-*9h 

- Source; Rmriort. 

4 tQ$ i^ Money Rates \ : 

• . - V ilMted States . . oom ... w». . Brihan 


An accord with the IMF is a 
prerequisite f cr completion of a re- 
structuring of $45. mllion in com- 
mercial debt maturing over the 
next six years. Brazffs foreign debt 
w>talsS10Zb0Kon,thclargcstinthe 
devefajpmgwodd. . 

Talks wth-a 13-bank advisory 
co mmi ttee, wbKh represents about 
600 creditors worldwide, were sus- 
pended in January after die IMF 
refused to overlook the former mft- 
itary governments violation of nu- 
merous deficit and inflation targets 


during tee last quarter of 1984. The 
burden of applying new austerity 
measures was thus passed to the 
civilian go v e r nm ent. 

The finance minister said he con- 
sidered that a seventh “letter of 
intent” sent by Brazil to the fund 
last December was now “without 
effect” and said that new targets 
would be negotiated that should 
not add to tee “social costs” of the 
economic adjustment. 

He noted teat, while tee broad 
fines of an agreement with foreign 
creditors had been drawn, indud- 
ing a multiyear reschednBng as well 
as a reduction of financial charges, 
several points still required danfr- 
catiou. 

He told Congress teat Brazil 
would adopt a realistic approach to 
the debt negotiations. “But,” he 
added, “creditors must also recog- 
nize that a country of 130 million 
inhabitants cannot halt its econom- 
ic growth.” 

. The main emphasis in his ad- 
dress was on the need to slash tee 
government’s budget deficit as the 
principal way of redacting inflation. 

Mr. Domelles did not announce 
specific economic targets fra 1985, 
but he expressed tee hope that in- 
flation would not exceed 200 per- 
cent He noted thattee April price 
rise of 72 percent was encouraging, 
while a Si-bOBon-trade surplus last 
monte tespefled earlier feats of a 
sharp drop in Brazil’s exports this 
year. In 1984, Brazil, achieved a 
record S13-b05oo trade surplus. 




For the man with exceptional goals, 
a new dimension in banking services. 


U.S. Halves Oil Estimates 


tfefiMmt Rota 


0 

‘EadnTU fund* 

‘ - 0 

7 

Prim* flat# 

10ft 

10ft 

BrafeartAOn Rota 

9 

■9 

'Comm. Popor, 30-179 days 

835 

too. 

3+Mflm Tnamv Bltlr 

739 

776 

Junonth Treasury BUM 

730 

753 

CO'S 30-59 <*>ys 

730. 

735 

CD* «M9 days •- 

in — j- — 

735 

770 

west Germany 

Lombard Sate . 

630 

630 

Ovotniahl Rata • 

■ 535 

NJL 

■On* Menitv Interstate 

535 

— , 

3-«nnfli tetarta* 

190 

■ — 

6-teortfi inunwwt ; 

630 

■ — ' 

yr&anee. 



' Uarvaatfoft Rata ■ 

' WWr 

10W 

tnu Moray 

W6- 

W ft 

OnMnaath iwtartiunK 

10 3A6 10.3/16 . 

3knonm im*rto r* - 

• 10 2/16 

ww ■ 

3-meftth MJartaMc 

» i/M » VH 


1216 T2V4 

' 12 ft 12ft 

12 1/32 12 3/16 
1396 1296 


S 5 

6T/M 13/M 

. 696 696 


Gold Prices 


Samoa: flovtaw Commonoea*.CridBt#. 
,j*. omots. UoydaBaak, BoMt ot Totom. 


AM. V fm. Qfm 
Hotel Mona 3K2S 3U^5 +1.10 

uanlwi . .SUM' — ,+UO- 

ParH n2SK3a) ’ SW.13- 31436 +539 

IwftJI ••‘.''aiSaS - 315.10 +XTO 
LtBdoa .- 31450 : 31X10 +225 

NMYak- m SHOO +0J0 

omcite fhteos ter LsndMb Peril and Lomov 
.aobmourndmaad dMtevartaa fcr How Ka* 

oM brieVNM.YW* Comm comot amlroct. 
.MTpriete to 4133 nor ouaea. - 


la Angda Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — Hte De- 
partment of the Interior, reflecting 
tee dismal results of recent search- 
es fra o2 and gas off the Allantic 
and Alaska coasts, has reported 
that it has halved its estimates of 
petroleum reserves teal remain to 
be discovered off U.S. shores. 

The agency estimated that only 

122 Hum bands of afi remain to 

be found, 55 percent less than when 
estimates were last issued in 198L 
Forecasts of ynrifanrwm ri natural 
gas reserves dropped 44 percent, to 

90 J trillion cubic feet (15 trillion 
cubic meters). 

The report was issued Wednes- 
day to coincide with the opening of 
b e aiiug s oa the subject by the outer 
co ntinen tal shelf subcommittee of 
the House Merchant Marine and 


Fisheries Committee.- Industry ex- 


the forecasts. 

In a report For release Thursday, ' 
the congressional Office of Tech- . 
oology Assessment said the figures 
“should be critically considered for 
both their accuracy and the impfi - 1 
cations for U5. energy policy. j 

The revisions cut most deeply in 
areas where recent exploration has 
turned up strings of dry holes. 

In Alaska’s Beaufort Sea, long 
considered as the United States’s 
tidiest ml field, estimates of undis - 1 
covered o3 reserves dropped from 
7.8 billicai to 890 miifio n bands, 
and gas reserves from 39 J trillion 
to 1S3 trillion cubic feet. 

Oil reserve estimates off tee At- 
lantic coast were slashed by 87 per- 
cent and gas reserves by 48 percent. 


TTThat makes Trade Develop 1 
Wment Bank exceptional? To 
start with, there is our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well For example, 
trade and. export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
your needs, wherever you do 
business. Reason: We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 89 offices in 39 
countries, to bring you a whole 
new dimension in banking ser- 
vices. 

While we move fast in serv- 
ing our clients, we’re distinctly 
traditionalist in our basic poli- 
cies. At the heart of our business 
is the maintenance of a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 
portfolio of assets is also well- 
diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
servative ratio of capital to 
deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity-sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
with us soon. 

TDB banks in Geneva, London , Paris, 
Luxembourg, Cbiasso, Monte Carlo, 
Nassau,. Zurich. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 62.8 billion and shareholders’ 
equity of US$ 44 billion. 



Hade Development Bank 


Shown at left, die head office 
of Trade Development Bank, Geneva. 


An American Express Company 


i 






Thursday^ 


Tables Include the nationwide Prices 
up to the closure an wan street 
and do not reflect kite trades etsewoere. 


XB 

9X 

32 

+1 

1X4 

+1 

258 

U 

230 

+4 

t48 

26 

JO 

43 

136* 

93 

M 

21 

64 

2X 

X4 

26 





S3 17 B 1» 

18 7 182 CVS 

ii lire lflt 
15 13 3 am 

M ? * 89W» 
12 ■ 6131 Wz 
17 3272 12 

M f 360 “* 
2354 4B& 
404 5Kb 
25P 23* 
06 20 
953 1W* 
955 29* 
164 IS* 
39 20 
651 41 
258 4 
V 25* 
56 
27H 



XI 

29 

U 

160 

45 

8 

jSB 

23 

56 

1X0 

96 


1X4 11X 


132 

96 

7 

3J2 

7 X 

12 

130 

4X 

15 

XSr 

X 

29 

2X0 nx 


60 

25 

12 

532 

83 

8 

XO 

22 

W 

232 

+3 

8 

4X7 IU 


68 

13 

51 

335 

76 


138 

22 

16 

31 

26 

8 

30 

13 

» 

2X0 

SS 

11 



19 

XO 

46 

15 



34 



10 

.16 

26 


1.12 

19 

9 

X2 

2J 

32 


3 




61* 23 

68 

15 

1X8 

15 

0 

6 

XO 

40 

M 

26 

5X0 

68 

1JD 

96 

11X0 113 

260 116 
460 121 

432 1X1 

1X6 

+5 

2.16 

73 

264 

28 

+04 106 

36 

13 

2X0 

53 

l X9 

3 

260 

53 

32 

22 

168 

XT- 

2X0 

96 

F 2.10 109 
1X0 111 
134 146 
8X2 1+1 
096 163 


r»h + u 
Wk + is 

7 3* + fc 

sn + s 
4M + U 
2516 
36 +1 
36 — 1 
®s»— is 
a»g + * 
SOS + vs 

6546— -1 
2J14 + Ofc 
2W+ + Vi 

N +m 

66 + 7 * 
3M+K 

am 

s»— * 
M — 1 
J7H +4* 

jo +m 
» + » 
m— ui 

■to 

II + * 

9M 

m + s 

K*— H 
M-h 
45* + * 
SB 4-40 
«*» +110 
48* + * 
1M4 * 
2M— 110 
rnt + s 
fM + 16 
1060 

no + io 
J* +J 


no +2 

tom +TWr 

71 — 1 

54 H 5516 + 4k 
MIM 1 M 
2S» 2216 32» + VO 

gSgStt’S 

am » Su 4^u 

2B0 2215 2240 + 40 
»* TO* 2M0 + 06 
SM. 3210 2360 +110 
tolh 19 If ~ 16 
47* 4C* 47 + 10 

2Mt 3746 20 +40 

TOO T7 1710— 16 
3L 3. *9 -H 
7710 7546 7710 +0 
12 1W 12 + V. 

mo ms lib - 16 

no t no + 1 & 

946 ns no— vo 

3246 2M 33* 

51 1710 1710 1710 
1159 3M6 20 MO + 40 
157 11V> TI16 1116— 16 
IS 20 1*46 20 + 16 

1» 17 MM 17 +46 
230k MHO 7910 MO -MIS 
713 19* TOO 1946 + 16 

MBS— Vr 
22I0 + 10 
3310— 16 
33 + VO 

3446 + 16 
2f* + M 


300 32M PurPM 10 +8 « 177 MO 26 MS , 
10V6 S* Pvn> • 29 8 * 7* H 6 + M 


4510 ans CKoiai I7< ZJ IZ ta 434 * ** ou, + u 

35 u ouakso »u« 194 * 30 * »i 2 n + ft 

mo <4 oouh« 34 m I* ns ns + u. 

M6 B QMStar UD 41 It 7T7 3316 31* 3316 +110 

S* M JOU M 111 2m 29 21 — (A 







2 H 0 

W* 1916 

£ % 

53 53 

Moago 

r 

9 
14 
D 

24 WO 1210 
17 HHO TOO 
47 lift mo 
122* 2510 2516 
1373 2910 2910 
TOO 
3446 
3540 


B — 10 
3116 + 16 
T7 +T 
-2mo + * 
5046— VS 
13* + 16 
36 —16 
2146 + * 
1916 

716— V0- 

710— * 


m + m 

14—16 

n 

12* + VO 
TOO + 40 
ino +46 
25*+ * 
29* 

TOO— 16 
3416 +140 
3540 — * 
44 —06 

ino 

59 42* 

sms + * 

MVS + 46 

44 

■no + * 

MJ + VO 

*446 — 60 
UK + 60 
1540+ 16 


U.S. Futures 


Season Shu* 
NMi Low 


Opm High Low 


WHEAT (CBT) 








+J0* 

4X5 

132* 

May 360* 360*6 

137 

360 

190 

174* 

IK 

Jul 331* 124* 
Sop 124* 125* 

350* 

332 

123* 

323 


363* 

3X0* 

Dec 134* 356 

332* 

154* 

+Mh 

334* 

136 

Mar 368* 360* 

258 

339 


+02 

132* 

May 333 134 

153 

334 

—31 

EsLSala 


Prnv. Sola, 4X36 




Pm.DavOMn InL 37X12 up 115 




CORN (CBT) 





£000 bis mlnlnxjm-dollaraptn-bfatxH 






May 281* 231* 

279 

230 

—31* 

131 

233 

Jul 237* 278* 

236* 

270 

+X0* 

331* 

266* 

Sep 268* 269 

267* 

269 

+XI* 

235 

260* 

Dec 264* 266 

264* 

265* -hXI* 

118 

269* 

Mar 232* 174 

272* 

233* -kin* 

33116 

174* 

Hat 238 179* 

Jul 239* 238* 

231 

279 

+31* 

2X6 

276* 

279* 

2X0* 

+0* 

EPLSatei 


Pro-Safes 24J0 




Pro. Dav Onm 10.106306 affljll 




SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5X00 bu mbrimum-itollarapar bualwl 




1 st 

530* 

May 539* 5X3 

538 

512* 

+X2U 

7X9 

537 

Jul 512* 537 

5X1* 

5X5* 

+35 

7X6 

539 

Auo 5X4 i» 

5X3* 

5X7* 

+34* 

631 

IS* 

Sep 536* 590 

5X5 

5X7* 

+34* 

668 

Mov 5X3 5X8* 

+92* 

599* 

+XS 

639 

594* 

Jan +B4 4X8 

6X4 

6X6 

+X4* 

7X2 

+06* 

Mar +13* +U 

+13* 

+17 

+35* 

739 

+15 

iifiav 631 +26 

651 

655* 

+36 

+50 

+24 

Jul 429* 431* 

+29* 

+31* 

+0 

EsLSatw 


Prav. Sates 25X23 




Prav.DavOpan 10. 59X97 up 547 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT1 

100 tons- doUm per tan 




BOBO 

11890 

MOV 123X0 12+90 


m5o 

+UO 

19658 

12190 

Jul 12730 I29J0 

12750 

12830 

+10 

inoxo 

12+50 

auu U 02 D nut 


13130 

+170 

179X0 

12930 

Sap 13330 135X0 

13330 

134X0 

+10 

1*050 

13X01 

Oct 136X0 13850 

136X0 

1360 

+170 

104X0 

137X0 

Dec 141X0 143X0 

641X0 

142.10 

+10 

163X0 

140X0 

Jan 14450 M+50 

u+oo 

1440 

+10 

20650 

145X0 

Mar 10X9 151X0 

mxo 

10X0 


142X0 

15050 

Mery 


1520 

167X0 

15450 

Jul 


14+80 

^50 

Eat. Sates 

Prav.Salas 13X71 




Pro. Dar Open 10. 51322 up IXM 




SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

6UM lbs- doitara per 100 lbs. 




34X0 

2290 

May 3160 313S 
Jut 30.70 3060 

31X0 

3172 

+0 

2232 

22J0 

29X8 

3855 

+0 

31.95 

2150 

Auo 29J0 29X0 

280 

00 

+57 

31.10 

2150 

Sep 2850 2865 

28X5 

280 

+0 

3037 

2290 

Oct 2730 2790 

2750 

2170 

+.17 

29X5 

22M 

Dec 3+85 27X0 

2630 

2+93 

■MS 

29X7 

2360 

fem 1+55 2+75 

2+13 

2665 

+J5 

2+0 

2440 

Mar 260 2+50 

26X5 

2650 

+.13 

2765 

2460 

May 


2+15 

+0 

E*L Safes 

Prav.Salas 21785 




Pro. Dav Open hn. s+6«s up 1X09 




OATS (CBT) 









1.91 

UOtt 

May 163* 163* 

\sa 

169* 


1-7** 

1X7* 

Jul 160 160* 

ixm 

+0* 

139 

1X4U 

Sep 1J0K 1X8* 

10 

1X1* 

+X0* 

L82* 

160% 

Dec 162* 16** 

161* 

162* 

-30* 

JX7* 

1X3* 

Mar 165* 165* 

165* 

165W. 


Est.SateS 

Pro. Sates 1M 




Pro. Dav Open int. 2X94 up n 





Season 

Season 






High 

Low 

Open Hfen Law Clou 

dig. 

2130 

I960 

May 



2020 

+54 

2110 

I960 

Jul 



2820 

+34 

E0. Sates 1864 Prev. Sales 2X68 




Prev. Day Cnen InL 21368 up 42 





ORANOE JUICE (HYCR) 





ismo ibL- cents per lb. 





185X0 

I5UU 

May U+5S 

75+35 

100 

15565 

-JO 

184X5 

152J5B 

Jul 15350 

15350 

15173 

1520 

—JO 

mxo 

1500 

Sep 15073 

1580 

1500 

1500 

SO 

1810 

14875 

Nov 1480 

1490 

1480 

14875 

■^5 

10X0 

1480 

Jan 14850 

1480 

14+15 

T4&+5 

— 35 

1770 

1490 

Mar 



1480 

— 0 

16250 

moo 

May 



1480 


15750 

157.30 

Jul 



1480 

—60 

28050 

77971 

Sep 



1480 

— 60 

EM. Soles 500 Prev. Sate, 

689 




Prtv. Dav Open Int &1T7 off 535 





Livestock 





Scmofi Simon 

Hhrti Low Cham Hfsh Low Cfese 

auRODomimnMMi 

21 milllon-pis of in pcL _ „ „ 

91 J® 02 M Jun 9134 91X1 9179 91X2 

9084 0+53 SW 9064 90L75 9*61 98L73 

9033 84J0 DK 9017 9024 90.14 9075 

8997 8+10 Mar 89X4 0979 89X0 S»J® 

8965 IU3 J» »ja 890 09X9 09X0 

89X5 17X0 SeP 0975 0973 0975 0973 

■927 <770 Due 09X3 09JU HUD 09.10 

00X9 07X4 Mar 0U4 HU MX* 8891 

EsL Sates 39757 Prev. Sate* 44JS5 
Pnrv. Dav Open lnf.117767 ua 3,179 

BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

Suer pound - 1 pglnf equate «JWn 

0350 UUZ3S Jim 17300 173*0 17255 L 220S 

1X450 1X200 Sep 12190 17250 17145 15173 

12000 1X200 DM 17120 17150 1 7005 1 7W0 

17000 1JM80 Mar 17075 17095 17035 17075 

i-WSB 1.1905- Jim - ' 17055 

Em. Sates 127*6 Prev. Sates 9713 
Pro. Dav Open Int 34379 upMt 

CANADIAN DOLLAR flMMl 
Sppfdlr-i p oin t eq u a te B LOW! 

7835 70S* Jim 7250 7251 7233 7240 

7505 7025 Sap 7221 7225 7209 7215 

jsm Mm Dec _ __ 7195 

7504 J98i Mar 7175 7175 7170 7T79 
73S3 7030 Jail 7U8 

Eat. Solan L914 Pnrv, Sato* 1077 
Prtnr. Dav Open Int 11X00 w>0 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Spar frun c- 1 ! pqhif eq u als 90X0001 
.iia» jJMio Jun .was 

.10940 X9H0 Son .10460 

.10*40 39670 Dm .10*32 

EsLSalaa Pro. Sates 

Pro. Day Open hit 1X07 oflW 

ORRMAN MARK (IMM) 

7233 72B 3214 

W 7930 Son ™ M5U jew JOXJ 
J6M OT ttK JSS S! JW »4 

X4is jam mot xi ff 

Esi. Sales 25X95 Prm.SaWi 21^ 

Prav.DavOpan InL 47,118 off 1X01 

JAPANESE YBtaMM) 

1 PqE* am»c4» tojMENl 

004*50 -B Q3BM Jim XMRtl XwW JWjr/7 JOW1 
00*150 xaxro Sep xoiom j»4iiii saom xmjo* 
«M2S? M3KS DocMmejomcMmmjxHBB 
004160 X040ra Mar X04075 

Etf. Solas 4X99 pray.SaM.3X32 
Pisv.DayOpmlnt 13X99 off* 

SWISS PRANC (IMM) 

iperhane-l mWaouatsWJOOI 

£ |S||S| 

XOW 3KB Mar JMQ 


U IS 
2J 10 
XO 29 13 
JU 7 2S 

tin 

IX B 
SB 10 
U 10 
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T7VS 1246 
37 2*6S 

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IS 1266 

41* 2966 

TOS B4* 


e*5i 


20 10 

II 

XO IX 13 
1X0 +1 7 
1X0 20 15 
174 SJ 9 
1X2 *X 7 
XO tX 16 
72 57 31 
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2X0 IX 11 
LflftSjt S 
JBJ 12 4 
.92 25 13 
6 
14 


31 4616 
SS 10* 
33 276S 
9 1766 
142k 74* 
278 166S 
9 M6 
43 33VS 
134$ mt 
122 2436 
30 a 

’a’tt 

25 29* 
473 25* 
414 Hk 

so levs 

613 3316 

26 23* 

MOO 27V. 

334 3S66 
113 20* 
3 22 
11 11 * 
204 166 
13 TO* 
217 2666 
■27 43* 
4100 3986 
567x1196 
297 361S 
113 39* 
SSI 36* 
72 13* 
S 41* 

SS* 

<7 15* 
51 13* 
926 W» 
12 466 
wo 40 * 
97 17* 
549 24* 
240 24* 
CM SO* 
SOM 3** 
13*0 2M6 
1248 32* 
171 12* 
179 n* 
37 SI* 
nos 35* 
TOS 24* 
2H7 36* 
91 6 * 

23 13* 
247 17* 
13SS 34* 
42 51 




276 30 

34 

E5 

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25* 17 SOI 
41* 29 
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31 23 SoU 

33* 23 


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56 

36 

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27 

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26 

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16 


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4X1012.1 
1275 JJ 
2X5 7J 

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1X0 37 ■ 

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1566 Unix*? >£ 5-' 

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SS 
st sx 

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133 10X 
UBMUL 6 .. 

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vst 

23* 
32* 
3384 
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22 * 
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946 36* 
H 55* 
14 29* 
1163 9466 

a* 

1966 
32 
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52H 
20* 

S 

1466 __ 
19* 19* 
77* 17* 
7* 71A 

7* 7* 
S3*. 52* 
16* 16* 
49* 41* 

30 1*6 

17* 17* 
26* 26* 
27 26* 

24* M* 
SO* 30* 
17* 17* 
16* 16* 




■A+4+ 


t* 
u* 
is* 
7* 6 * 
49* tow 

121 * 121 * 
«* . »* 
27* 27 
3* 3* 
7* 7* 
0 * 0 * 
31* 31* 
30* 37* 
27* 26* 
39* 39* 
47* 47* 
7* 7* 
lift 11* 
M* MM 
42 40* 

B 25* 

41 40* 

2SU 27* 
3<* 24 
9* f* 
11* 1ft* 
29* » 
4* 4* 
6* 6* 
35* 34* 
13* 12* 
7* 

3* 

35* 


+ « 

+ * 
+ * 

tft 
+ * 
+ * 
+ * 

A*— * 
35* + N 
63* + * 

8 *afc 

35 * + 4 

R VS 


3$ 34 ZoMCp 1JO 47 J a 27*. 37* 27* + * 

3i* 12* ZoPtrta A4 6X37 317 13* 'B* 13* +* 

43* 32 Zayra X6 4 U 78 eft il 61* + * 

30* W* ZwOhE 0 417 m 19* 30 + * 

21* 14* Zero* XI IT 12 M OM ISM 10* + * 


NYSE Highs-LowB 


u, w 

S s* 

s % 

* » 

* nM 
u 15v ? 

S 40 

* M 
J7 17* 

* ■* 
* 

* 


25* 25* 

61 d* +* 


NEW LOWS n 

AanaElact BrockHH CBI lad CoKhapfB 

CoiGojpro FtOTxodl pf catvNHo u OtobMorPf 

OlfRmpCA lUinfop StrofMto Untnwolfr 


COFFEE CCHYCSCKJ 
37X00 I08l- cents nor lb. 

153X0 122X1 Mov 14US MASS 

149X0 T21XQ Jut 143X0 U3JO 

147X0 127X0 SOP 14L55 144.10 

146X0 129XS DM 140X0 14430 

MA50 120JQ MOT 142X5 142.95 

145X0 131X0 May 

141X0 135X0 JUI 

I43J» U2J3 S«P 

Eat. Salta 1X75 Prev. Sales UD 
Prtv.DavOpm int. 13.125 off St 
SUOARWORLS 11 (NVCSCO 

mxooit>s..eBflsMrib. 

9.95 193 Jut 102 1X9 

979 3X6 Sap HE 3X5 

9X5 121 OCI US 136 

7J5 3X7 Jan 174 175 

9J3 4X3 Mar 411 416 

7.15 424 May 4X2 4X5 

6X9 445 Jul 455 4» 

423 4H to 

4X5 470 Oct 4X5 4X7 

Es*. Sales 7X60 Praw.Satas M36 
Prev. Day Oaen InL 00X10 up 223 
COCOA (MYCSCR1 
» metric fonvl per tan 

2570 mo May 2316 tus 

2400 1990 Jul 2105 2140 

»1S W to W W 

7337 1945 Dec 2011 2050 

2190 1955 Mar 2006 2045 


Finonciol 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 
si mlinen-pfsoflfloact. 

92X4 87.14 Jim 9224 92L31 

91X7 S6X4 SOP 9175 91X3 

9147 0577 Dec 91J* 7144 

91.10 8640 Mar 91A6 91.10 

9091 87X1 Jun tom 90X0 

<*64 wxo sep 

9033 »X5 Dec 

9R15 89X8 Mar 

Eit Sates 7X61 Prev. Sale* 7417 
W» Bar Open ML ojn off SB 
H T* TREASURY ICBT) 
naunQpriipptoBsaiKtiofWOpct 
02-17 70+ Jun 01-20 82-2 

81-75 TOW Sen 80-18 81-8 

09-22 75-13 Dec 79-21 80-4 

■M 75-14 Mar 

7926 74-30 Jun 

EN. Safes Pro. Sate* 1MH 

Prev. Dav Open lift. 46,193 bp 1X90 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
ItPCt^lBOLOOOpIsAUKkDMDOlXt) 
77-1 S 57-20 Jun 71-11 72-2 

76-2 57-W Sep 70-15 71 

7+5 57-8 Dec 0-18 70-1 

72-30 57-3 MOT «M1 W+ 

70-16 5*0 Jun 47-81 68-14 

7M 5+29 S«P 67+ 67-24 

69-26 5635 Dec 6^30 65M 

69-12 5627 Mar 663 66-16 

69- 3 63-12 Jun 

63-24 CM Sep 45-2 65-W 

684 62-24 Dec 

Esf.SaM Prev. Safes 147 AM 

Prev. Oar Open (WXZ2X27 up WM 

ONMA(CST) 

SMPIfr W» BlMoal WOpef _ 

70- 20 57-17 Jun 7M» 70-25 

69-28 59-13 Sep 6M1 70 

49-3 594 Dec 

68-1 BB Mgr 68-24 6624 

664 5B2S J<» 

67-7 62 Sep 67-19 47-38 

EstSates Prev, Sate* 3W 

prev. Day Open InL 4X20 ud 64 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM 
f| million- PMoilOORCt 
91X7 K30 JUfl 912$ 9129 

91X3 ftSXO Sm 91X3 *.W 

90X0 BJ4 Dec 90S «XJ 

90X8 8656 Mar 

0X3 M Jim 

Sttl 87X6 Sop 

88.97 88X4 Dec 

Eat. Sole* 287 Pro. Sates 246 
Pm. Day Open lot. MZl off 129 


92J9 92X0 
91J1 91X2 
91X3 9144 

91X6 91-13 


* 1 - 1 * 0 
88 -T 8 * 1-2 
79X1 80-3 
79-» 
78-19 


71-15 72-2 
70-12 71 
69-14 70-1 
68-30 0+ 
47-30 68-14 
47-6 47-34 

66-29 47-4 
662 66-18 
661 

652 65-1B 

65-5 


79-14 RMS 
49-21 4+30 

69-W 

6904 6804 
JH 
47-19 47-28 


91X7 91X9 
91X3 91.11 
9052 90X3 
90X6 
0X7 
0 X 2 
0X0 



London Commodities 

May 9 


CM** Previous 
HfoX Law Bid A* BM Art: 

Sterting per metrician 

Abu 96X0 94X0 94X0 95X0 95X0 9600 

od loaxa 9 wa m.m nun wmimm 


Dec 105X0 104X0 10400 10480 105X0 104X0 
Mar 117X8 11530 115X0 115X0 117X0 117^ 
May 121X0 1 19X0 120X0 120X0 121X0 121X0 


Ao* 124X0 125X0 125X0 125X0 I27XB IBXf 
Od 131X0 130X0 130X0 131X0 131X0 133X0 
vatume: 1X16 tot* at 50 fens. 

COCOA 

SMri bm per metric ton 

May 1X03 L786 1397 1399 1X04 1X04 

£ ?StiS!ai5 9i3 


1J82 V71 1J79 1J81 US1 IM 

Mar 1383 1372 \JtO 1.782 1JI2 1J«3 

May l5fi ISM 1590 1J94 1395 1297 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1J95 1X05 1J90 1X00 

Volume: 4030 lata oMO fens. 

COFFEE 

Sterana per metric tan 
May 2430 2X90 2X95 2X97 2445 2448 

Jly 2490 24+4 2.154 2.154 2305 2307 

Sea 2322 2414 2491 2494 2342 2343 

NOT Z2S3 2315 2320 2325 $365 2300 

Jem 2370 2342 2343 2345 2393 2305 

M» -),y^ 2330 ->, m 2372 23M 

May N.T. N.T. 2300 2330 23M 2X00 

Volume: 2765 lets of 5 tons. 

GASOIL _ _ 

US. Boilan p er m e tric top 
Jen 21+75 21450 21+50 216JS 2JAK 21+00 
Jly Z1A5D 21150 215X0 215.75 21235 2I3JM 
An 21735 21S25 217JB 217-M 314JO 215X0 
Sep 219X0 217X0 21+50 21073 21+75 217X0 
S3 N.T. 219X0 222X0 ZI800 2193S 

Nov N.T. N.T. 21X0 224X0 218X0 mM 
Dee N.T. K.T. moo rax* raxo MM 
Jan N.T, N.T. 232M 2 23X9 220X0 23200 , 
Feb N.T. H.T. 222JJ0 236X0 New — 
Vatume: 974 lots at 100 tans. 

Sources: Reuters and London Pmtrofmm Ex- 
change <00300!. 


Paris Commodities 

May 9 


Men Low Bid Ask arw 
SUGAR _ 

French francs per metric ion 

Auo 1356 13* IJ» ] 3 S 2 —4 


London Metals 

May9 


Close Prevtmn 

BH Ask Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sfertlnu P*r 

btnl 92aS 92L50 «0 X0 SSIJ0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hloh Grade) 

Starting per metric las _ 

SPOt 1X07X0 1X10X0 1X3+00 1X18X0 

forward 133+00 1337X0 1347X0 1348X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Stamm per metric ton 
SOOt 1325X0 IJWUD VBBJDO l ,?pf D 

forward 1321X0 1322X0 1337X0 131800 

LEAD 

SferihHi Per metric fen 
Spot 3fl2J0 mOO 317X0 3RX0 

forward 304X0 305X0 309X0 309X0 

NICKEL 

SterHnn Per metric toe . 

snot +450X0 +440X0 +610X0 4X30X0 

forward +445X0 4X50X0 +5BSX0 +590X0 


Asian Commodities 

May 9 


HOMC-KOM0 GOLD FUTURES 
UXiS per oonee 


Cush Prices ■ May 9 


Dividends 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMD 
points and cente . 

1040 15+10 Jan 181X0 18130 

192X0 16000 Sep 185.19 18fc» 

196X0 17570 Dec MBXB 10+5 

jfsjs mw Mar mx mss 

est- Sales «UM0 Pro.Sale* 40X48 
Pro. Dav Open mt S4XM oH3M 
VALUE Lite* occur) 
points end cv nl * „ 

M'» 6 BW 

Mte. 2 * u ”p^sate, 1*7 
Pro. Dow Open hit as* oh2» 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYVE) 
pamt* md cente 

110X0 98X0 Jun HS50 10630 

111X0 9135 5CP TO7.40 1*20 

113X3 10130 DftC 109X9 110X0 

iuas mxo Mar mxo 11220 

EN. Sales 9X30 Pro. Sates 9X03 
Pro. Day Often InL L6T7 off 572 


D. VK W. 'K 7X04 -17 

mS tLT. I+T. \M 1^ — 15 

Aug N.T. N.T. L460 +09 — 17 

EsL voL: 1318 lots of « sons. Pro. actual 
sales: 2044 lot*. Open Interest: «2QS 
COCOA 

FtWKft frmo per W0 n 

May 2125 2105 2124 2125 «-9 

Jly H.T. N.T. 210 . — ; UlxJV. 

S8P 2125 2110 11249 2W0 —3 

Dec IDS 1055 2050 20* —f 

Hat 2X60 2X55 23050 SX59 —II 

May N.T. N.T. axao — — S 

jft N.T, M.T. 2X0 — — » 

EsL voL: o lots W 10 tons. Pro. oetuoi 
totes: 115 tots. Open Interest; T18 
COFFEE 

FrescN iroac* per WO kt 
Mov 2430 2450 2450 205 — E 

Jly K.T. N.T. 2X95 ZS02 — £ 

Sw 2547 2551 2X40 2X42 -j£ 

NOV 25® 2570 2S» 2574 — 25 

ft K if -« 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2X50 2600. —3 

^egjWR^wimof^lw^Pro. actual uae*: 

Source; Hoarse do Commerce. 


1367 —II 
1304 -17 


181X5 1823 
1*5.10 106X 
MAM 103 
191X5 ms 




HUB U2A9 


1375 1355 1334 I3ffi — T6 

N.T. N.T. 130B 1XW — 15 

N.T. N.T. L460 +09 — 17 

: 1318 lots ot S Sons. Pro- ac , «*' 


Commodity Indexes 


aose 

Moody’s 919501 

Reuters 1,87150 

DJ. Futures 121.77 

Cam. Resaarch Bureau- 22000 

Moody's ; base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - pretfmlrwrv; f - final 
Routers : base iao : Sep. 1B» 1931. 
Dow Janes : base 10Q : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
917.10 f 
1,877.50 
121.06 
23700 


To Our Readers 
The S & P 100 index options 
were not availabte ta (ids ediion 
because of tcansmisaon delays. 


9Pof 51250 51150 519X0 i 

forward S29XO 5XLOO 53SJ30 i 

TIN (Staadardl 
B te i lk i e Per metric ten 
mat 9X3 LOO ti32X0 9X10X0 9J 

forward 9X20X0 9X21X0 9X80X0 9X 

ZINC 

SlerHae Per otelric ton 
Stat , 687X0 MUD 708X0 7 

forward 485X0 685X8 708X0 7 

Seurat: Ap. 


Ghana Gets IFC Loan; 
London Writes Off Debt 

United Press International 

LONDON — Ghana signed a 
loan agreement Thursday with the 
International Finance Corp M an af- 
filiate of the World Bank, for S55 
million to help modernize and ex- 
pand its impohant gold mining in- 
dustry. At the same time, Britain 
announced it had written off loans 
of £50 million ($603 million) to the 
Commonwealth nation. 

A five-year, $ 158-million project 
for -the Ashanti Goldfields Carp, 
should increase the West African 
country's gold output by 50 per- 
cent, the UrC said. Expansion mil 


traducing a new processing plant. 


VohHrm: 9 wf* of 25 Ions. 

source; Rarttm. 


US- Treasury Bill Rates 
May 9 


mt 


2 x*- H* 

- XT 448 
a J5 .7X 

3 ' .10 • 63} 

3-» 

3 ft ft 
Q ***3 tS 

i t % 

I”! I 

or ts* 

§ 


i a.A 

d 'M ^7 

1 1 f 

« 32 4-M 


Canadian Stnpins widens 

Rmm 

OTTAWA — Canada's trade 
surplus rase to $233 biflioc in 
Marah from an upward revised 
$1.70 trillion surplus in February, 
Statistics Canada, a government 
agency, said Thursday. In March 
last year, the surplus totaled $137 


ZURICH — Union Bank of 
Switzerland, Credit Suisse and 
Swiss Bank Corp. will cut their cus- 
tomor time-deposit rates by a quar- 
to of a percentage point across the 
board, to 414 percent, effective Fri- 
day, a spokesman for Credit Suisse 
5 *“ Tpursday- The move follows a 
softening of Euro-Swiss franc rate 


source: UPK ’ 


DM Futures OptxoitfJ- 

May 9 " '• '*y 

<*■ Grata Mart^SSMinartoQNtl tornoa," 






























































































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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


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* r - Imdtiahowd HeraidTribme 

• - LUDWTGSHAFEN, West Ger- 

* many BASF AG. West Genna- 
^k-iaigrii. chemical . company, - 

>■' said Thursday thar group' pretax 

* profit dhnbed 16 percent. in the 
i firet qoiirter^ to 742 million Deut- 

marks ($233 million), from 
*;y540mfllfi» DM a yeareariicr. 

•£”- HansAIbers, BASF s managing 
» board chairman, said the year be- 
■j-gaa on a flat note, with January 

„ ptKM^^raSriii Eaio^^ASF? 
togesr market. But ■ he said . a 
■ .^booming” March gave the compa- 
? ay the momentum heeded for 
-£ ^xong" profit growth at least until 

* simmer. 

'.Ronaldo Schmitz, die company’s 
■ f fruance director, said March ^ profit 
the stran»est ever for that 

- month, boosted by bride Ui sales, 
^ ^.MWsIiutyiE agrochemicals. 
pS**. Mr. Schmitt said firat-quartcr 
j ^les iir^ffic Urnted States inmeased 
> awreent in dollar terms, to.5669 
. -nSEon,' &oni $649 rruTUon. In 

i ^ l__l__J__I !_!__! 

- COMPANY NOTES 


Deutsche marks, he said, that con- 
vened to a 22-p«rcoat increase. 
Pretax fim-qcartcr profit in the 
United States rose 8 percent in dol- 
lar terms, to $44 xuUGmi; Mr. 
Sdunitz. did not provide DM fig- 
ures. . .-: 

' " Mr. Albers smd BASF receutly 
moved to bolster its position in the 
United States, which, accounted for 
lfi.peroent of 1984 group sales,' fay 
completing the acquisttioa of three 
subsidiaries of Celanese Co. of 
NewYmi. 

The takeover, which company 
officials said . cost $135 milli on, 
gives BASF a solid foothdd as a 
supplier (rf spetaalty plastics and 
carbon fibers to the vS. aviatiem 
and aerospace industry, Mr. Albers 
said. - 

BASF is studying other US. ac- 
quisitions. One board member said 

umitan to Inmont (Sa^ibe automo- 
tive paint-making subsufrary of 
United Technologies Corp^ with 
1984 sales of nearly $1 biluon. 

Mr: Albers said worldwide sales 


• J ! [American General Corp.'s Cahex CM Bong Kong lid. is 
15-year con vertibk EnrobcHidjssue planning a major joinl- venture 
* has been increased to $300 million property devdopment at a former 
from the initial $250 miDion, said di dqjot, ft said, but It would not 
the lead manager, Credit Suisse/ grve the cost or name the partner. 


*. iron) the initial $250 million; said oil depot, ft said, but it would not 
the lead manager, Credit Suisse/ grve the cost or name the partner. 
’ '«i ** First Boston- Ltd. Hans ..call for 6^00 martznents 

^ ti«ci .- - Anstrafian National Indnsbies covering a total of 4 million square 
will buy Anax Pty, a sribsid- feet (371,600 square meters). 

^ ^^Vfy of Qakbridge Ltdl, on Jtme l . Coast 1 LV:uic. said it has agreed 
l* ^ tindisdosed amount of cash, ' to acquire the wholesale recrearion- 

i-h'dtt ^th companies sakL ■■•••• al-vehide. parts business of Rogers 

* Bice Te fe cbt um H in c^ion Gabies Distributing Corp. for an undis- 
-tcobq, - ‘ujL said it has won a SlO-milKon closed price. The Rogers unit bad 
1£ ’ ^ “ omtract from North Supjdy Co. of sales of about $22 mfflioain 1984; 
** t Kansas, a unit of United Telecom- Coast had sales of $17 nuDicm. 


Kansas, a unit of United letooom- 

... miinigarinn^ ' Tiif. 10 mah* and lay 


Flext ron fcs said it has acquired 


|c (cubs “ 370 miles (600 kilometers) of bpti- Maubfactming. Resources, a 
■ m cal-fiber cable. The cable will be ducer <rf printed ciraut-boar 


io ■■■ cd-fibex cable. The cable wi 
in J h * put of a UJS. trunk network. 

miiM m. *_ * * ! : ! : “ " 


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semHies, 


ted dremt-boam as- 
a Esteriinc Corp. far 


-ADVERTISEMENT - 

irnTmiTONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Suppfied by Funds Listed 
9 May 1985 




’ ALMAUMANAGEMEHT ■ 

|w| M-Mcri Trusl, ^ 

BANK JUUUfrBAEIt A CO. Ltd. 


SFf3U5 

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-rid ) SToCkSar SF lt6&00* ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

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(«r) FIF— Am«r^Z~_Z__ *1109 -48] Cortexo TijltnwHOivrf SS&.71 

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rose 103 percent, to 1U4 billion 
DM, in the lust three months from 
10.1 billion in first-quarter 1984. 
Top performers were engineering 
plastics, fibers, specialty chemicals, 
crop protection products and phar- 
maceutical s, he said 

While acknowledging that the 
strong dollar had boosted BASF 
sales m the United States, as well as 
in foreign markets where the com- 
pany competes against U.$. and 
Japanese chemical grants, Mr. Al- 
bers stressed that cost-cutting mea- 
sures at home and iheimroauctim 
of new specially products, particu- 
larly in plastics, had helped the 
company’s profits. 

. The company remains troubled 
by losses in oil refining but has 
managed to cut these considerably, 
Mr. Albers said BASF cut its defi- 
cit in refining operations last year 
to 120 miliion DM from 200 mil- 
lion DM, narrowing the loss fur- 
ther ibis quarter. 

Fertilizers returned to profit in 
the first quarter after showing a 
loss at years end 


undisclosed terms. Flextronics also 
makes printed circuit boards. 

Hunter Douglas Group said it 
had begun construction of a $20- 
milTion manufacturing and service 
center in Tupelo, Mississippi. 

Korea Steel Chemical Co. a sub- 
sidiary of Daewoo Corp. of South 
Korea, has agreed with General 
Motors Corp. to form a 50-50 joint 
venture to produce plastic car 
bumpers, Daewoo said The ven- 
ture wQl build a plant in South 
Korea by next year. 

Knfeje-ICC Corp- and the West 
Australian government failed to 
reach agreement in talks on a stake 
in a $7 50-miHion al uminum smelt- 
er in Worsley. Australia. 


Bamada Project 
Set With Intasun 

Return 

LONDON — Intasun Lei- 
sure Group PLC and Ramada 
Hotel UJL LttL, a subsidiary of 
Ramada inns ino, said Thurs- 
day that they have formed a 
joint hotel venture in Britain 
which will invest £100 million 
($120 million} in its first phase. 

The initial phase wD involve 
buying or leasing eight to 10 
hotels in London and the prov- 
inces in the next three to four 
years. 

In a parallel move, Intasun 
and Ramada have formed a 
joint hold management compa- 
ny ro manage die joint venture 
hotels and other Ramada holds 
in Britain, the statement said. 
The joint venture has the exclu- 
sive right to develop Ramada 
hotels in Britain ana will also 
manage London’s Barbican 
Gty Hotel, which wiU become a 
Ramada Inn on completion of 
refurbishment. 


Mostek Corp. has. laid off 1,600 
workers in Carrollton, Texas, and 
plans to dose a wafer-making plant 
in Cdorado Springs, Colorado. 

Tandy Com. said it has signed a 
contract for Computadoras y Ase- 
soramiento SA of Mexico City to 
malm Tandy 1000 personal com- 

P Tdxon^JKT smdrts 1 board*^ 
proved a 3-for-2 stock split payable 
June 21 to holders of record on 
May 20. 

Toys *R7 Us Inc. said sales for the 
quarter ended May 5 increased 3 13 
percent to $3243 million from the 
1984 period. Revenues were aided 
by strong sales oT Cabbage Patch 
dolls, it said. 


Pan Am Loss Rises to $138.7 Million 


The Atsotjiutd Pntt 

NEW YORK — Plan Am Corp. 
said Thursday that its first-quarter 
loss widened to $138.7 million from 
a loss of $703 million a year earlier 
because a mouth-long strike cur- 
tailed operations of its Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways unit 

Operating revenue fell 223 per- 
cent, to S68L9 million from $8783 
million a year earlier, mostly as a 


result of the March walkout by the . 
Transport Workers Union, which 
reduced flight schedules to about a 
third of normal ca paci ty. 

“We are now taking steps to 
quickly rebuild our traffic through 
new marketing and pricing Inins, 
lives and have expanded our sum- 
mer schedules in anticipation of 
heavy demand, especially to Eu- 
rope,” said Gerald Gitner, Pm 

Arc's vice chai rman 


Goldsmith Fails in Board Bid 


Reuter* 

SAN FRANCISCO— Sir James 
Goldsmith, the British entrepre- 
neur. failed Thursday to win any 
seals on the board of Crown Zdlcr- 
bach Corp. at its annual meeting. 

The company’s chairman, wil- 
liam Crcson, said a preliminary 
count of proxies showed the man- 
agement nominated directors were 
overwhelmingly dected. 

He said the official count may 
not be known for weeks. 

Sir Janies is Crown Zeilerbach’s 
largest shareholder and announced 
on Wednesday that he had doubled 
his stake in the company, to 19.6 


percent of the common shares out- 
standing. 

Earlier, Sir lames failed in an 
attempt through a federal court in 
New York to delay Thursday’s 
meeting of shareholders. He did 
not attend the meeting. 

But a representative for the fir 
nander placed Sir James and two 
other namff s in nomuiatiotL 

The challengers also proposed a 
resolution which aimed at ending a 
complicated “poison-pilT provi- 
sion designed to prewait any unso- 
licited takeover. 

There was no immediate indica- 
tion on the vote on that resolution. 


Staff Cutback Begins at AMC 

C5 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — American Motors 
Corp.'s layoffs of white-collar 
workers, which have started in the 
company’s regional offices, are so 
severe that “everyone's getting hit,” 
including people with as wmeh as 
18 years of service, sources say. 

The struggling auto company 


BIS Study Lauds U.S. Banks 
For Relative Invulnerability 



(Continued from Page 13) 
percent for the Americans) drew 
52 percent of their funding from 
□on-related banks and only 20 per- 
cent from customers. 

.. Measuring risk in toms of credit 
exposure, the Americans rank first. 
Although their dealings with non- 
*rela ted ranks are small in percent- 
age terms, in actual numbers they 
are the largest suppliers of inter- 
bank credit — taking less from and 
lending more lonon-rclated banks 

— than any other national group. 

Among the countries studied, 

only five rank as net suppliers of 
credit to lion-related banks: The 
United Slates ($703 billion), Swh- 
zeriand ®263bflfion)rlhe Nether- 
lands ($4.4 billion). West Germany 
and Luxembourg ($2.1 billion 
each). 

U3. banks are. also the largest 
suppliers of credit to non-banks — 
a total of SZ76.b(21ion at end-1984 

— followed by the. Japanese with 
$154 billion. To give an idea of how 
these two groups dwarf the market, 
the next largest are British banks 
for a total of $63 billion. 

— However, qn a net basis after 
subtracting dqposits received from 
non-bank entities, the Japanese are 


the laigesi suppliers of credit ($113 
bQlion) to non-banks, followed by 
the French ($35 bOfion), West Ger- 
mans ($29.4 billion) and the Ameri- 
cans ($29.1 billion). 

As the study is the first to detail 
activities by nationality of bank 
ownership rather than by location 
of banking offices, the data pro- 
vides the first real measure of mar- 
ket share by nationality. 

In the standard BIS studies 
based on location, for example 
Britain ranks as the second leading 
market center after the United 
States since so many foreign banks 
have U.K. offices. 

However, the new report shows 
that the.British account, for only 7 
percent of the total market, putting 
them in fourth place behind the 
Americans. Japanese and the 
French, who account for 9 percent- 

The Swiss place, only in eighth 
place, behind the West Germans 
(63 percent), the Canadians (4.1 
percent) and .the Italians (4 per- 
cent). However, the BIS estimates 
that if allowance is made for the 
off-balance sheet trustee accounts 
of the Swiss banks, they would 
probably rank with the British as 
the fourth most important players 
in the market. 


made official Wednesday the first 
layoffs of a crash plan announced 
last month, when it said it would 
close four of 12 regional rales and 
service offices and lay off 72 em- 
ployees from those offices in Bos- 
ton, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and 
Kansas Gty, Missouri. Larger cuts 
in could be expected on or before . 
May 17, company sources said. 

* AMC, which is 46-percem 
owned by the French cannaker Re- 
nault, reported a $29-m0Bon loss in 
the first quarter, which it attributed 
to slow sales of its Renault Alliance 
and Encore subcompacts made in 
Kenosha, Wisconsin. Renault re- 
cently reported a $13-biDk» loss 
for 1984. 

AMC has not said how many of 

Chrysler Flans Expansion 

United Press International 

DETROIT — Chrysler Corp. 
announced Thursday it will invest. 
$150 million in new facilities to 
increase four-cylinder engine ca- 
pacity at its plant in suburban 
Trenton, Michigan from 800,000 to 
more than* one million a year. 


its 6,100 white-collar workers will 
be laid off, but sources say many 
will be long-time employees. The 
layoffs are pan of a plan to cut 
internal budgets by 25 percent. 

A company spokesman, Jerry 
Sloan, would not comment cm the 
severity of the cuts but said some 
workers conceivably could take 
early retirement if laid off. Depart- 
ments that can save money by dhn- 
inating projects — and use layoffs 
asa last resort — are being allowed 
to do so, he said. 

In March, the company threat- 
ened to dose the Kenosha plant, 
the oldest car-assembly plant m the 
United States, and over the week- 
end it outlined its demands in a 
letter to the United Auto Workers. 

Those demands included 40- 
cent-an-bour pay cuts, eliminati on 
rtf nine days off annually and major 
revisions m job classifications. The 
company also gave the union until 
May 24 to “make a commitment" 
to its plan, Mr. Sloan said. 


®£tccc- I 

DEGREES r-v- 

I ssnss— — ■ 

1 -gassE 


Pan Am said the airline had a 
pretax loss of $141,6 million in the 
first quarter compared with a loss 
of $74.8 million a year earlier, while 
revenue fell 25.8 percent, to $584.8 
million from 5787.9 millJon. 

Jt said airline operating capacity 
in the first quarter was down 253 
percent from a year earlier and that 
as schedules were gradually re- 
stored in April, the airline operated 
ai 673 percent of capacity. 

With a schedule change on April 
28, Pan Am said its operations rose 
to more than 100 percent of last 
year's capacity levels and that it 
will expand further in June. 

Pan Am said the drop in revenue 
in the first three months of the year 
was only partly offset by a 15.1- 
percent decline in expenses, to 
$7083 million from $833.9 million. 

It said many expenses, including 
rentals of aircraft and airport facili- 
ties, interest payments on debt, de- 
preciation of assets and most em- 
ployee benefit costs, were not 
reduced by the strike. 

During the first quarter, the air- 
line had! capital ffwrre of 516. 1 mil- 
lion from the sale of six aircraft, 
compared with capital gpins of S3. 6 
million a year earlier. 

The company last month agreed 
to sdl its huge Pacific division to 
United Airlines for $750 milli on as 
pan of its continuing efforts to 
stem losses and improve its balance 
sheet 

Mitel Expects 
Big New Investor 

Return 

KAN AT A Ontario — Mitel 
Corp. said Thursday a major multi- 
national corporation may buy new 
equity in the company at eight Ca- 
nadian dollars ($5.83) a share to 
obtain a controlling interest in the 
Canadian electronics concern. 

MJtd said it is currently in nego- 
tiations which could result in a 
“substantial” investment through 
newly-issued shares. A statement 
was expected soon. 

Trading in the stock was halted 
on the Toronto Stock Exchange. It 
resumed to climb 135 dollars, to 
nine dollars, before the dose. 


Net Asset Value 
on May 2, 1985 

Pacific Selection Find N.V. 
■-S.J1.47 per U.S.J1 unit 

Pacific Selection 
Fond N.V. 


Page 15 


Total’s Profit, 
Aided by Dollar, 
Up 120% in ’84 

Reuters 

PARIS — Cie. Fransaise des 
Pfetroles, which markets under 
the Total name, said Thursday 
that earnings rose sharply last 
year due to the impact of the 
dollar’s surge in value. 

It said net attributable con- 
solidated profits rose 120 per- 
cent, to 1.71 billion French 
francs ($180 million) in 1984, 
from 774 million francs the pre- 
vious year. 

Operating profits before de- 
preciation ana provisions rose 7 
percent, to 8.72 billion francs 
from 8.14 billion francs. 

The figures were boosted by a 
1.4-billion-franc gain on the re- 
placement value of Total oil 
stocks due to die surge in the 
dollar’s value against the franc 
last year, the company said. 

Exduding this dement, prof- 
it before depredation and pro- 
visions fell 7 percent, to 732 
billion francs from 7.84 billion 
francs, ii said. 

Operating profits were de- 
rived almost entirely from oil 
production, notably in the 
North Sea, Total said. Refinery 
and distribution activities con- 
tinued to make losses because 
of depressed market conditions. 


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Announcement bya South African ocganizatioa 


RAND MINES -A LEADER IN COAL 

AND GOLD 

Mr. A . A. Sealey , Deputy Chairman of Rand Mines and Chairman of the Coal and Base 
Minerals Divisions , talks to David Carte, Editor of the “ Sunday Times Business Times." 


'Lost- Wax 9 Method Retried 


(Continued from Page 13) 
been a goal in the industry. “Why 
whittle when you can cast?” ob- 
served one foundry spcdalist. 

“Lost foam is an integral pan of 
the Saturn plans,” said Thomas R. 
iWiltse, manager of GM^ foundry 
division. “There will be a lot less 


“Lost loam is realty coming into 
its own right now,” said David 
Kanicky, the editor of Modem 
Casting magazine. “Research on 
the process is very intense and it’s 
good (hat people are discovering 
that there are materials other than 
sand and iron.” The expiration of 
patents protecting the process a 
few years ago increased the interest 
of some companies, he added. 

Both GM mid Ford have used 
“lost foam” only for casting aluroi- ■ 
num parts in mass production. Alu- 
minum is cast at 1,200 degrees to 
1300 degrees Fahrenheit, more 
than 1,000 degrees cooler than iron. 


and presents fewer problems than 
the hotter meiaL 

One particular problem with 
iron is that it stays molten longer 
than aluminum, requiring the sand 
mold in the “lost-foam” process to 
hold its shape longer. But George 
N. Booth, general manufacturing 
manager of Ford's casting division, 
is confident that the diffioilties wOl 
be overcome. 

“We have a pilot plant now 
where we are experimenting with 
evaporative casting of iron and we 
have done several thousand water 
pumps,” he said. “It is just a matter 
of time and some ingenuity.” 

Alcoa Is to Reduce Ontpat 

Rearers 

PITTSBURGH — Aluminum 
Ca of America said Thursday it 
will reduce output of aluminum by 
31JKX) tons a year. 



Mr,A.A.Sealex,JDfptay 
Chairman of Rand Mines and 
Chairman of the Coal and 
Base Minerals Divisions. 



QOVERHO DO ESTADO DO RK> GRANDE DO SUL 
SECHERHA DEBBKUA, MINAS E COMUNK»Q0eS 
rawwira ii AMoai>M*eB*aEra«nw m ftc A o 


INVITATION TO TENDER 
Nr. 001/85 

The COMFANHIA RIOGRANDENSE DE MINERAQAO, lo- 
caled In the city of Porto Alegre* state of Rio Grandedo Sul, 
Brazil, at Botafbgo street 610, will purchase the following 
equipment, Throug an International Invitation to Tendec 
This acquisition has the financial support of thelnterame- 
rican Development Bank, IDB^tay Ift loan nt 73/lC-BR. 

EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION 

-1 (one) Drilling Machine (Drill Rig) with electric drive, com- 
plete with all accessories. 

instructions to bidders and complete specifications of the 
equipment will be available at Auxifiadora street 215, Ftar- 
to Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, until may, 22nd, 1985 
at the cost of CrS 2.000.000 (two million cruzeiros). 
Proposals wlllbe received at theabovementioned address 
on July 08th, 1985. 

Porto Alegre, 10 de maio de 1985. 




M£A ASUAHUTCZ- 




M uch of tire gold behind the 
recent success of Bariow 
Rand’s venerable old 
mining house, Rand 

Mines, has been black- yes, coaL 

Rand Mines’ gold mines produce 70 tons 
of gold a year but no South African 
mining house s less dependent on the 
yellow metal than Rand Mines. 

Coal accounts for 44% of the group’s 
taxed income, compared to gold’s con- 
tribution of 33%. Chrome, fluorspar, 
forestry, manag ement fees and property 
provide the balance. 

Total revenue from gold at roughly 
$750-m£Llion exceeds toed income from 
coal,at$400-million. Butcostsare higher 
in gold mining and the company’s four 
gold mines- Harmony, Blyvoonticicbt, 
Durban Roodepoort Deep and East 
Rand Proprietary Mines-are all less than 
30% owned. 

Consequently , only dividends from gold 
are brought do account. The coal mines 
arc mostly wnsolidated. Coal is therefore 
more important at the bottom line. 

While its four gold manes and mining 
bolding company, Transvaal Coosoti- 
daied Lands (TC Lands), are listed on 
several world stock exchanges, .Rand 
Mines itself has not been quoted since 
Barlow Rand took it over in 1971. 

Rand Alines -has been an innovator in 
mining since it was founded by gold 
pioneers Herman Eckstein, Alfred Brit 
and Julius Wehrner in 1887-. 


It played a key role in the development of 
the cyanide gold extraction process, wasa 
leader in rock mechanics and pioneered 
extensive and deep level underground 
mining at Crown Mines - until recently 
the biggest and deepest mine in die 
world. 

It was one of the first mining houses to 
investigate the Free State gold fields and 
it was a Rand Mines chemist who disco- 
vered uranium in Witw&tersrand gold 
ores. 

But for indecision and neglect over 
decades by its farmer London parent, 
Rand Mines may today have been one of 
the two biggest mining houses in South 
Africa with several times its present asset 
base. 

Rand Mines’ most recent pioneering step 
was to concentrate more on coal than 
gold, shortly before successive oil crises 
in the seventies pushed up international 
coal prices. 

“When Barlow Rand took control of 
Rand Mines in 1971, mostofRand Alines’ 
gold mines were ctfd or nearly worked 
out,” explains coal division chairman, 
Allen Sealey, “But its subsidiary, Trans- 
vaal Consolidated Lands (TC Lands), 
had enormous unexploited c «y» l 
reserves.” 

“The late Punch Barlow, who was 
chairman of Bariow Rand at the time, 
supported the Rand Mines’ management 
view that its future lay in coaL Coal 
markets w i t hi n South Africa were 
limited, so Rand Mines looked abroad. 
Having done pioneering work extracting 
low arii coal from bituminous coal by 
gravity separation, we were able to par- 
ticipate in South Africa's first 11-year 
contract to supply Japan.” 

The rest is history. South African coal 
exports that year were about a million 
tons. Now they are around 40-m3fion 
cons and by 1989 they will be 80-million 
tons. South African cool producers have 
won increasing; market share in world 
markets through an outstanding record 
of reliability. 

They have had an edge on their rivals in 
labour dependability and in technology. 
South African COal *nmi«g and handling 
facilities arc among the roost modem in 
the world. Rand Mines, a founder 

nxmberoftheRichardsBaycoaltenni-- 

nal, Iras been in the forefront of this drive 
and accounts for 30% of exports. Its 
biggest customers arc in Germany, 
France and Japan. 


Rand Mines has also been a beneficiary of 
soaring coal demand within South Africa 
because of huge expansion by Escom, the 
country's major electricity utility, which 
now burns 5S-minion tons of coal a year. 

Rand Mines’ Duvha colliery supplies 
Escom’ s Duvha Power Station exclu- 
sively. It has been contracted to supply 
two more 3,600 MW power stations - 
Kendall (Khutala mine) and Majuba. 
Each entails devdopment of a new mine. 
Rand Mines started its first open cast 
operation on the Wdgcdacht mine in 
northern Natal in 1976. This was fol- 
lowed by three-other huge coal mines in 
the Transvaal - Rietspruit, Duvha and 
. Middelburg. These developments 
required capital investments of $500- 
- million. Shell is a 50% partner in the 
Rietspruii export colliery and BP is the 
utaj or partner in the mine at Middelburg. 
Today, the mines Rand Mines manages 
produce nearly 28-million tons of coal a 
year, 14-minion tons of which are 
exported. Most of the coal comes from 
open cast pits, employing same of the 
biggest walking draglines in the world. 
Unexploited oral reserves arc massive at 
approximately 14.5-billion in situ tons. 

While it has concentrated on coal, 
recently Rand Mines has not neglected 
gold. It is spending $150-miUion 
rejuvenating ERPM and Harmony and is 
exploring a promising gold prospect 
south of Johannesburg. It has also 
stepped up gold extraction from old mine 
dumps. 

The company has some of the biggest 
chromium reserves in the weald. It* 
exports large quantities of are bur large 
volumes are upgraded to ftnochrame for 
further conversion to stainless steel at 
Bariow Rand’s Middelburg Steel and 
Alloys. 

The Bariow Rand group takes its social 
responsibilities extremely seriously. 

Says Mr. Sealey, “We go to enormous 
lengths to improve the quality of life for 
all staff . In every area possible, we are an 
equal opportunity employer. We are 
working to eliminate areas where there is 
statutory discrimination.** 

Today Rand Mines employs 92,000 per- 
sons and has about half a million depen- 
dents. The wage bUi is $300-million a 
year. The company pays $300,000 every 
day in tax. 

So, apart from being a lucrative vehicle 
for investors, the company is an impor- 
tant serial asset. 






















































































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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


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; . (Confirmed fromPage 13) ; 

anted. And this year it-is introduc- 
ing a inodet that adds, anrilock 
brakes to Foar-wfted drive. 

'The impetus behind these inno- 
vations,- Audi executives and indus- 
try watches agree, is Mr. Piech. A 
grandson of Ferdinand . Porsche, 
founder ofthe Porsche automobSe 
eqrapanY and designer of the origi- 
Volkswagen, Mr. Piech comes 
Qt his technical indurations natu- 
rally. He was. the setws; technical 
director at Porsche until he left as a 
result of adiamte whhin .thelam- 
Uynm-troDcd company. • . 

!He and Bwer Fischer, vice pzea- 
dtet of Volkswagen of America's 
Audi division, say the company is 
rdying on advanced technology to 
give the brand credibility when 
compared with more established 
tomes such as Mercedes-Benz and . 
Btow. arid to move into.thdr price 
range. 

!The firm's, new.modd,^ the 5000 
Turbo Quattro, trill be priced at 


Britain * 

1 Keyed Bk Scotland 
-year no in 

Pretax N*t_ 75a SU 
Per Share 0.178. UU 

Canada . 

. . Iiimibco . - 

4lttQ oar.' UH 083 

Revenue- - WHJ «U 

Dper wet, su* ■ 3U4 

Oper Share 047 <LW 

,W — -IfM IK 

Oder Met—, ZM.U m .17 
DperShanu, 23S ISO 

S 

'jrNoican biergy 

- JtlQuar. •-'IIM - WBJ 

a5g==.-«s ag 

Ppr Shore . 044 OJO 

* United States 

Arrow Beer 
IttQoar. W85 . - 1N4 . 

Rawwe ISM mo 

NrtllK. OJO U 

^ Share— . 8AS <U» 


■almost $30,000. The car. which was 
introduced in Qjbrado Springs to 
editors of auto magazines during 
Mr. Pitch's writ; wflljg) on sale 
later this year. 

Faith in. technology has paid off 
well for the division. 

In 1976, it sold 33,316 cars in the 
United States at prices not modi 
above Volkswagen’s top-of-thc-lme 
models. The cats were -ontiistm- 

guished in styling, according to 

automotive experts, and plagued 
with reliability praWcms. Mice, 
sales have fluctuated in the 36,000 
to 51,000 range, bat lari year And 
5 dd more than 70,000 cars at prices 
ranging from $14,000 to 335,000. - 
Mr. Piech’s ^proachis generally 
praised by automotive critics. 
“Audi has used technology to move 
itself up in the mark er and I think 

they have advanced die awomobik 

as a whole,” said David- E l Davis' 
in, the editor of Car and Driver 
magazine. “Technology was stag- 
nant Torso kmg. It is only recently 
that h has' begun lo change.* 


Mr. Piech avoided ^jerific ques- 
tions about, automotive innova- 
tions an the ground that to do so 
would disclose the company's fu- 
ture product programs- But he said 
gearboxes probably would be im- 
proved, if only became they bad 
been neglected for so long, and that 
aerodynamics would remain an im- 
portant field df research. 

A penguin, he noted, has a drag 
coefficient of 0.1, compared with 
about 033 for the best Audi cars 
now. “It is an ugly bird, it lodes like 
a station wagon, bat it has 0.1 rat- 
ing,” he. said. “If a penguin can 
have a 0.1, my engineers will have 
to find a way to do it, too, even if it 
takes 20 years.” 

Cars will also gradually lose 
weight as mat e ri als and tec hniq u es 
pioneered in ai rcraft construction 
.are adapted to automobiles. Ibis 
should solve one of the auto indus- 
try’s big problems, Mr. Piech said, 
by ; allowing the same baric car tobe 

shifted toward fuel efficiency or 


Company Earnings 

Revalue and profits, rn mrfions, are in local currencies 
unless otherwise indented 


: Capital Hdgs 

IMQaar. 11*5 HH 

-Revenue 4*05 -eou 

Net Inc 3&C5 ' U71 

Per Star* 053 047 

Nrti Include rwattzod In- 
vattmant potn of 340000 ** 
tostofSLSmUBaa. 


Fremont General Pan Am Perini 

_ mOm t. imb n*4 ' ntaoer. ms 

Reven u e QM . WQoor. 1JB m« Revenue 1V7JB 

Opert4»»_ & 88 9ST Reyeoo* 4C9 Bras Ntt]n c 0.17 

Mrte exeAxfe notes of S72&4, N*t<-n«S 138J 703 pwShar* 105 

mOliarr YfXtmJBkn. 


^ ^ Qu, i Oner Net m. 

Bmnraoa nee. - onerShant-. 


2nd Qw. ms uh 

Revenue uzol ljufl. 

Net Inc - ... ffJt tut 
P*r Stare— 142 t33 

taHdf - ms IfM 

Revenue zaoa. ijm. 

Nerinc. - mjr 

Per Shore 277 - W 


Mattel n__ mnwl 

wow. ms IfM - rarkmr Pan m 

R www — &?■* raj «aw. ms ms oJZSSrr wE 

Over Mel 154 (aiTJ ' Revenue 195.9 1804 m«> Ir^- 34. 

OPerShor*-. (L25 — Met Inc (alXO 143 25 

- or fcm Hats ax e t u da oabta ■ Per Star* — — 0.10 

o/S»fnrmcn vs UA mu/tari - 

Mrl ii*i tnAieliim o«im« Bn? Tosco 


McUalhd OSh i cS Revenue MU 7tU 

MM 1M . M*t Inc S38 • 114 


ttalnc- tn)M 11^^ 0 . toOM, Net Inc 

't**'- 438 cttoreeafSSJmnikm. a: loss 

O. H U S H 


bi^i perfonnance, depending on 
prevailing public demand. - 

Some question whether devotion 
to technology alone can be a suc- 
cessful long-term strategy for a rel- 
atively high-cost auto maker, par- 
ticularly with the aggressive 
Japanese companies also seeking to 
move to a higner market level. 

“I think it leaves than tremen- 
dously vulnerable,” said Leon 
MandeL editor of Aumweek maga- 
zine. “It is so easy for somebody 
dse. to take the technology edge 
away. Mazda, for example, is work- 
ing an a four-wheel steering car. 
Nobody has a lock on technology. ” 

But Mr. Piech said he is confi- 
dent of staying a step or two ahead 
of the Japanese. “Take four-wheel 
drive,” he said. They looked at us 
for a few years and then derided to 
startThey look at what we do right 
and what we do wrong and do wiBat 

we do right We think we are able to 
be more innovative ihati Japan.” 


Tramohio fin. 

1 st Quor. ms mm 

Revenue S04 MS 

Net Inc 245 ro)036 

Per Star*— 042 — 

a: kas. MSS net tndudas 
gain of S2J million ant! 
eharoo af snsJHO. 

•r Washington Natl 
M Quar. . IMS IfM 

Met Inc l&Ot 9J6 

— ParStar* 049 045 

_!*■! Nets Include gains of JO 
cants oar sdarv vs 47 cents. 

“° ' Wettarau 

4Dt»ucr. ms' rnt 

Revenue 7925 671-3 

Net Inc 6 l5 5l2 

Per Star*— 053 044 

Year ms IfM 

198 Revenue— 1)00. 1700. 

Met Inc $0 M 

Per 8to* 124 144 

West Germany 
40753 Mauiesmann 


Johnson & Johnson Appoints 
3 Executive Vice Chairmen 


By Brenda Hagerty 

IntentoDDmi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Johnson & John- 
son, the diversified UJ5. maker of 
health-care products, has appoint- 
ed three members of its executive 
committee to the new posts of vice 
chairmen of the committee, each 
responsible for a principal sector of 
the company’s business. 

The vice chairmen and their re- 
sponsibilities are Robert E Camp- 
bell, professional health-care prod- 
ucts worldwide and companies in 
Mexico, Central and South Ameri- 
ca and the Caribbean; David E. 
Collins, consumer products world- 
wide and companies in Europe, Af- 
rica and the Middle East, and Rob- 
ert N. Wilson, pharmaceutical 
products worldwide and compa- 
nies in Asia and the Pacific region. 

Johnson & Johnson said the 
move was “designed to better coor- 
dinate the company’s diverse busi- 
nesses and to enhance faster deri- 
sion- making.” It added that the 


new structure was appropriate be- 
canse of its expansion geographi- 
cally and in product technology. 
The new vice chairmen will report 
to David R. Clare, president of 
Johnson & Johnson and rhairman 
of its executive committee. 

Ciwfit Suisse of Zurich opened 
an office Thursday in Beijing, mak- 
ing it the first Swiss bank to have 
representation in the Chinese capi- 
tal The new office is managed by 
Hans- Peter Brunner. 

Standard Chartered Bank PLC 
of London has named Peter 
McSloy genera] manager. Europe, 
succeeding Ian Watson, who re- 
tired. Mr. McSloy moves to the 

bank’s head office from Brussels, 
where he was managing director of 
Continental Bank. In addition, 
Philippe Bouckaeit, formerly Con- 
tinental Illinois Bank's general 
manager in France, has been ap- 
pointed an assistant general man- 
ager with Standard Chartered. Mi- 
chael McWifliam, group managing 


Floating Bate Notes 


May 9 


director or Standard Chartered, 
said the appointments were pari of 
a plan “to strengthen the manage- 
ment group in Europe.” 

First Chicago Ltd. said Yoshimi 
In one has joined its Tokyo repre- 
sentative office as vice president. 
He previously was a vice president 
with CilicoTp Capital Markets 
Group in Tol^a 

General Electric Co. of the Unit- 
ed States has appointed John Fritz 
regional manager of its South Pa- 
cific aircraft engine operations, 
based in Melbourne. He was in the 
Seattle office as manager of new 
commercial programs, responsible 
for the integration of GEs airline 
marketing and sales effort with 
Boeing. 

Esso Exploration & Production 
UK Ltd said Keith Taylor is to 
become director July 1. 

He also will jomthe boards of Esso 
UK and Esso Petroleum Co. Mr. 
Taylor, who now is based in New 
York as executive assistant to the 
parent Eaton Corp.’s chairman, 
will succeed George Uthlaul, who 
is joining Exxon USA in Houston. 

Armstrong Rubber Co. of Con- 
necticut said Kurt J. Jofaannsson, 
formerly executive rice president 


CMMaMat Bid 
»«) 

9 22® 


Page 17 

Reuters Names 
Hogg Chairman 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — Sir Christo- 
pher Hogg, chairman of Cour- 
taulds PIT, the British textiles, 

become of 

Reuters Holdings PLC on July 
1, the Reuters board announced 
Thursday. . 

Sir Christopher, 48, joined 
the board last year when it was 
expanded after the company 
went public. 

He will succeed Sr Denis 
Hamilton, who has been chair- 
man since June, 1979 and a 
Reuters board member since 
1967. The chairmanship of 
Reuters is a part-time, non-ex- 
ecutive post 

of its European group, has become 
manag in g director of Blacksione 
Europe, a division that makes radi- 
ators and coders. His appointment 
is part of a restructuring of the tire 
and rubber maker’s businesses. 


Dollar 







Non Dollar 


I44Q1 
27-83 1 
UH. 2MB 
14Mi 2MB 
13H 15-05 
14* 0544 
21-83 1 
0W1 
1403 1 
22021 
12* 1507 
1044 I 
14% 2445 
Uh 87-04 
12% 8101 


HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 




■ mi .^i I’.i r.m 

[■■■I 1*1 !*I| Ik’ 1 .1* !■■■] 

■UJi’.k:iJikii.:..ii. si-ajweMl 

V«tiiiiiHHi*4tnni>ifini 

«i»im in##/#/ 

awwimi'z/yAwwi i nw/jJ 

^vww ' S\v i 1 


SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
Budapest, June 1 3-1 4, 1 985 

The Infematbnd Herald Tribune conference on ‘Trade and Investment Opportunities in Hungary" 
will be of keen interest k> any executive concerned about future economic relations between East and West. 

The conference provides an extraordinary opportunity for business leaders to examine 
how the Hungarian government is approaching questions of ckxnestkandinterrK^bnafeccxKxn^ 
and offers Western executives ext unusual occasion for direct contact with business leaders from Eastern Europe. 
Senior executives wishing to register for the conference should complete and return the coupon below. 


JUNE 13 
Keynote Address: 

Mr. Jazsef Morjd, Deputy Prime Minister 

The Economic Oirfook 


JUNE 14 

The Banking System 

Mr. J6nos Fekete, First Deputy President, Naticnd Besik cf 
Hungary 


Professor J6zsef Bognar, Director, institute of Worid Economics Western Banking raid Hungary 


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of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences 

Foreign Trade 

Mr. ktvon Tbrok, Secretary of State for Foreign Trade 

The five Year Pkm 

Dr. Janos Hods, Secretary of State, National Phoning Board 

A fternoon Addr ess 

Dr.Armcnd Hamms', Chairman and Chef Executive Officer, 
Occidental flsfrofeum Corporcdion 
Investment ince n tive s end Tcoc Free Zones 
Dr. Peter Medgyessy, Deputy Minister of Finance 

Barter 

Mr. Sdndor Denxsdk, Generd Manager, Hungarian Forekp 
Taxing Bank 




* ’ 5 o r #' ?i ; » .■ 


Mr. Gabriel Setter, Vice President aid Generd /Manager, 

Berk of America N.T V Vienna 

bxkistrid Ovtiook 

Mr. Ferenc Horvrith, Secretary of State for Industry 

Pond of Hungarian industridists 
Afternoon Addr ess 

Professor Rkhtrd Porte, Director, Certm fa Economic Policy 
Research, London 

Joint Ventures 

Mr. Laszio Borb&y, Director General, Depalmentfa 
International Monetary Affdrs, Ministry of Finance 

Panel of Foreign Composes 

Moderator: Mr. Tamos Bed, President, Hungaicm Chamber of 
Commerce 


rfT’TTWIwW.v 




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COWNYAOWIT 


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.Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


t k 3 4 5 * 


17 IB 19 110 111 112 


PEANUTS 





I LOVE GOING OVER 
TO UXXX&WOCS NEST 
TO UlATCH TV... 







HE'S THE 
ONLY ONE 
WHO HAS A 
5ATELUTE 
. D|5H.. > 


books 



RANDALL JARRELL’S LETTERS: 
An Autobiographical and Literary 
Selection 


Edited by Maty Jarred. $29.95. 
Houghion Mifflin, 2 Park Street, 
Boston, Mass. 02108. , 


BLONDIE 


Reviewed by Monroe Spears 


rsi 


IS SHILLED ONIONS 
r SUPREME k, 


OKVW. THAT SOUNDS 

INTERESTING, * 

7 I'LL TT7V IT ) 


WHAT COMES 

■MTHTH ATr 


T HESE are wonderful Jettere, fully as good 
as I hoped they would be. Witty, often 
brilliantly perceptive, often touching, usually 
fumy, they have many of the best qualities of 
Randall Jarrell's criticism and bis comic novel, 
“Pictures From an Institution." 

Precocious and prodigious though be was,' 
Jarrell retained both a child's curiosity and a. 
child’s cruelty. (Or a cat’s, for there was some- 
thing feline in the way this great cat-lover 




IfGCJOO 
& PLANNING 


I Ml IsT 




fell 




ACROSS 
1 Libra’s symbol 
7 All-day rain 

13 Bach work 

14 Tunisian coin 

15 Purple 

17 Baseball pos. 

18 Fodders for 
livestock 

19 Genetic initials 

20 Wicker basket 

22 Remote 
broadcasts 

23 Item in a bar 

24 Piano part 
26 Pea or carrot, 

for short 
, 27 Winnows 
28 Mock 

30 Churchill's 
successor: 1945 

31 Debussy 
contemporary 

32 Writer Loos 

33 Sluggish 
35 Gets an 

■ extension 

37 Become a 
member of 

38 Play by E. E. 
Cummings 

40 Kind ol 
therapy 

42 Honors during 
a rubber 


43 whole bog 

45 Mlie.'s 
counterpart 

46 Blue Eagle 
inits. 

47 Wise 
counselors 

49 Football pos. 

50 Tan 
53Typeof 

diffusion 

54 Frosted cream 
puffs 

55 Thwart 

56 Saturates 


DOWN 


1 Flubbed a 
drive 

2 Gray 

3 Item in the 
holy of holies 

4 Vientiane is its 
capital 

5 Mischievous 

6 Standard for 
altitudes 

7 Dams’ mates 

8 Ransom, the 
carmaker 

9 Subject of a 
Sbeedbook 

10 Blue 


11 Spring forth 

12 Fall back 

13 Friable 

14 Second son of 
Japheth 

16 Confessed, 
with “clean” 

21 MardiGras 
events 

23 Brooding hens 

25 Reddish brown 

27 Attack, 

scorpion style 

29 Cub Scoot unit 

39 Suffix for a 
paraffin 

32 Vest pair 

33 Sheds 

34 Cover with a 
hard coating 

36 Mill, near 

Sacramento 

38 Parasites* 
victims 

39 “Leave 

Beaver” 

41 Young salmon 

43 Islamic spirit 

44 Construct 

47 Unless, in law 

48 Hawker's goal 

51 Henri or 
Jacques 

52 Inventor’s 

initials 




§m 


thing feline in the way uus great cat-iover 
toyed with his prey.) At the same time, this 
most formidable of aitiesprofessed an abhor 


BEETLE BAILEY 

NEEP Y HeY/ lMUeKZ.YfZ 
THE MaMiJRS?/ PON 
SALT jKKEACUaCZOZ-U 


LOOK WHOfe TALKING 
MAKERS WITH HIS 
v MOUTH FULL V 


I 

i iOnt&e 


AN01T& NOT POLITE t 
TO POINT AT PEOPLE! 


rence of criticism and suspicion of the intellect, 
and as a poet his great subjects were pity and 
nostalgia for childhood. - 
1 have the impression that Jarrell is read and 
enjoyed more now than the other New Grides. 
It is a fining irony that be. who spent much of 


his time attacking criticism, and especially 
■those kinds now regarded as New Critical, 
should wind op in this pigeonhole. But it is a 
sad irony that JarrelL who yearned to be re- 


membered as poet rather than as critic, should 
be suffering toe fate he feared: Port of latent, 
critic of genius, seems to be the verdict of even 
his greatest admirers. Some of the reasons for 
(his preference are obvious: Jarrell as critic, as 
these letters diow once more, is more readable, 
more entertaining than his peers. He is less 
concerned than they with attempting to formu- 
late principles of general validity: His specialty 
is undermining the whole critical enterprise. 
He flatters his readers by making them the 
final judge, urging them to read for pleasure 
alone. 

This allows Jarrell to express both sides of 
ins nature: exalting the natural, the simple, the 
spontaneous (also the naive, die childish, 
sometimes tire sentimental), in a kind of ro- 
mantic primitivism; and expressing aggres- 
sions by attacking with savage glee both his 


_j£uLn5ir ANDY CAPP 




s oggy , pet i ixxiGurSoCr 

WEKEKUSE - I DlDwnV' 
WANT HER TO CATCH ME l 
EAnNG THIS DOUGHNUT J 


' X THINK XX/ C> ^ 

Setter pack in 
this SUMMING 

. LARK— WE'LL. 
V — _ ALL BE 

t$[ tvRKKSV ) 


rivals and the criUCS from «1KM 

£ an Oedipa! tinge to this: He OK 

matemaL emotional poet* 
others and directs hte WiUwwwajDl be mas 
culine, paternal inidtanual stdr. tab**, 
he strikes the father dead. 

Auden was the earliest and nni l «"gg; 
ous of these ftfhertore: taw® 
cation was a review in 1934 of 
he wanted to wntc his gusto’s 
eventually a book on Auto and Auto S 

influence on him both as poet and as ttonUp 
was enormous. Yet the two long WM 
Auden that he did publish were, though bnt- 
liant, essentially demolition worit, destroying 
the foundations of Auden's reputation. 

Something of the same pattern may be seen 
in the relation to ADeu Talc,, who helped get 
Jarrell published and was repaid bv remoteness 
tinged with hostility. John Crowe Ransom and 
R, p. Blackmur. too, were kind and helpful to 
JarrelL With Tate, they were h a d i n g figures of 
the Age of Criticism that Jarrell made his 
reputation by attacking. The hand that fed 
Jarrell was lady to gpt bitten. 

These letters, edited and annotated lovingly 
by Jarrell's widow, are described as an “auto- 
biographical and literary selection." She chata 
some 400 of about 2.3)0 letters available n? 
her, ranging from Jarrell’s senior year at Van- 
derbilt in 1935 to bis death in 1965. The letters 
to his first wife dining his service in the Air 
Corps (1942-46) are especially interesting. Jar- 
rell established his reputation as the leading 

- .l. ut r t InU 


poet erf the air war in “Utile Friend, Uttle 
Friend" (1945) and “Losses" (1948). Jarrell 
served as a gromid instructor, he washed cutis 
a pilot, was never sent overseas, and was never 

• 1 «... .-IV ; ■ ..IJ In. 


in combat. Bui, telling stories told to him by 
participants in battle, & shows the imaginansc 
empathy worthy of his reputation. 


There are 


its on in literary history. 


including backstage views of Blackmur anJ 
John Berryman ai Princeton, Leslie Fiedlff 
and Robert Fitzgerald at the Indiana School Of 
Letters, the Safcbnre SesniiUB; the Poetry Con- 
sul tan tship at the library ol Congress and 
faculty controversies and feuds at Greensboro. 
There are tetters to people ranging from Han- 
nah Arendt (to whan & confesses, “Indeed 1 
don't read Greek — it's a wonder 1 can read 
English. In my earlier lives l couldn’t read 
anything, but just sang songs so that people put 
gold bracelets on my arms or threw big bones 
at me") to Edmund WHson, Elizabeth Bishop 
and Marianne Moore. 

The letters are not an intellectual autobiog- 
raphy, os too many topics are untouched, but 
there are some brilliant pages. Robert Lowell 
called Jarrell a “radical liberaT; for some peri- 
ods, in some sense, he was a Marxist, unlike his 
Southern peers. _ 6- 

The most revealing . letters are those to the 
women he loved: the wartime letters to his fust 
wife, Madde; the series to Elisabeth Eider, the 
Viennese woman with whom he felt in love at 
Salzburg in 1948; and the letters to Mary, from 
l951on. - - 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


New York Tones, edited by Eugene MaJedta. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


VIZARD of ID 


W'si 




I'M 

<zom 

rorne 

TWr 


- lO-JL 3 


t 


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AJOZAt 
A&G&P 
z-rA&e i 


W I'M 

( Gc/mio I 
a mvim p 
PA too J ! 







□BCiEa aaaQEi aaa 
□noma mamas ana 
EnnujQsaaaoa dbq 

DQQOBD □□□□□□□ 

GDCK3QIQ Cl HQ 3 

DB0D aaaa ana 
EEHnasaa □aaran 
□nana □□□ anama 
mEOBa aaEaaaaE3 
nna asaa □□□□ 

EDQD QGIHQQQ 

EDasana naanaa 
□□□ □□aanniGianaa 
edq □□□as naana 
ebq aaaQE pppde 


Monroe Spears, Moody Prqfesst 
at Rice University, is the author of 

t-.J *» j ,L 


of Auden” and “Dionysus and the Ciiy. H He 
wrote this review for The Washington Peat 


author of^The Poetry 
a arid the City.” He 
Washington Posl 




REX MORGAN 


E" 


MAYBE YOU AND 
CHARLEY SBT76R 
DRIVE CLAUDIA 
BACK TO HER - 
HOTEL/ see that 
SHE GETS TO HCR| 
rrrm ROOM ' r-d 


OKAY— 
BUT WHAT 
’DO YOU 
*] SUPPOSE 
| HAPPENED 
ILTU HER? 


1 DON’T KNOW/ 
HER PULSE WAS 
IRREGULAR. AND 
THAT CAN MAKE 
THEM PASS OUT/ 


YOU 
MEAN 
LIRE A 
CARDIAC 
arrest? 


ITS BEEN KNOWN TO 
HAPPEN/ 1 THINK THAT 
WE DODGED A BULLET, 

‘ — — TESS / k — ' 


BRIDGE 


Bv Alan Truscort 




• I TOOK OUTTHE CAR -LI FTER SO YOU COULD GET 
MORE SUITCASES IN THE TRUNK.' 


II mn~\ 

GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
m by Henri A/ncJd and Bob Lee 


OKAV, TftWMV. 
STOP JUMPINGr 
lONTHEBEP > 


[JA OMMEEEEE/J ^ 


’■ Unscramble Uiese (our Jumblea, 
one lener to eacti square; 10 torn 
. (our oRteary Morris. 


NUTED 


<? 





RYGOL 


wun 


ilTl r ' 


a player who leaves in the 
/a. middle of a bridge event 
For any reason other than ill- 
ness is normally summoned 
before a committee and per- 
haps subjected to some disci- 
plinary penalty. But for several 
reasons no action was taken 
about the most famous such 
departure. 

During the Fall National 
Championships in Richmond 
in 1941. the late Oswald Ja- 
coby made a dramatic depar- 
ture. The date was Dec. 7, and 
on the loudspeaker announce- 
ment of the Pearl Harbor at- 
tack be got up and left for the 
war, in which he rose to lieu- 
tenant commander, serving in 
Navy intelligence in the Pacif- 
ic. 

One of the few players who 
can recall that departure, 43 
years later, is Raymond Farber 
of Pompano, Florida, who won 


a title with Hal Oliver in the 
same tournament. Farber, as 
West on the diagramed deal 
outsmarted Jacoby, who was 
the declarer in six hearts. 

The opening pre-emptive 
bid of three chibs and the raise 
to five dubs crowded the auc- 
tion, bat North-South charged 
ahead. Jacoby chose to bid ms 
four-card major at the five-lev- 
el rather than his five-card dia- 
mond suit. This was just as 
wdL for six diamonds would 
have been hopeless. Six hearts 
had some chance of success 
through an end play. 

Jacoby followed a plan that 
rated to succeed against the 
actual distribution: Win the 
dub ace, cross to the spade 
ace. ruff a dab, take the spade 
Jang and three red-suit win- 
ners. Ibis would set up an end 
play, for a trump lead would 
force West to win and give a 
ruff-and-sluff. The diamond 
loser would disappear. 


Bui Farber was alive td this 


threat When a trump was taf 
to ihenee, z bepot up the khaf;- 
suie that South would fi 


sure that South would finesse 
if necessary- This brilliant de- 
fensive move frustrated, the 
end play, and the defense eveh- 
tufilfyscored a trick in each red 
suit to-defeat the slam. , i 


NORTH 
4Q1095 
9 AJ1043 

♦ AM 

*A 

WEST CD) HAST 

«83 AJ784? 

9K5 9Q2 

OJS. O 093. 

♦ KQJ8742 *M*8,\ 

SOUTH 

♦ AE 

•98*7t . 

. 0 107541 

*54 

Nortb and Souft. ww wrtnwaM* 

TbBbMdSnr 


ANGOLSi 


DEBUMI 


HOW THAT PERFUME 
HELD? HIM. 


W)rid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse May 9 

dosing prices in local currencies unless Othendse indi ca ted. 


Trafalgar Hx 344 344 

THF MS MS 

U I from or 71S 7X5 

UnUever t II T7/H11 3S/4* 

United Biscuits 175 184 

Vlcfcers 3» 304 

WVwfworTfl * 1 » 013 1 


I close gr*». 

Sim* Darby \S7 UW 

ST»oreU>nd 2.72 2A7 

SWr Pres* 4-10 6^ 

l.’SSSS- is JS 

t%i is s 


F.T.34 Index : tn.18 


stramTbnei led. Index: m Jt 

Previous : 7SILSJ 


Now airartge the circled tetters to 
tomi the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


ABN 

ACP How l no 


CIom Preu. 
16V5D T4870 
Huxs«l 391 293 

IWKA 31SJ0 31BJ0 

Kdll-t-Sab 243 

KOrstOtJt 234J5 727 

Koufhof 326 324J8 

KtoeduwrM-O 250 250 

Kleecluier Worfcu 71 7U0 

Kruop Stafri 188 187 

LJnckJ 425 42450 

Lufthansa 189 . m 

MAN MAS) 14450 

Mamwsmann MOJO 1 * 1 -K 

Muench Rueefc 1379 >370 

NbaJorf 5B2 58150 


(Answers tomorrow 


YOSI onlay's JumW ®S- CHESS MIRTH SHREWD PITIED 

Answer. What a miniskirt is— A “TEMPT ORESS" 


WEATHER 


A (serve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Beta raae 

Barf la 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budap es t 

CmmlUHfl 


HIGH LOW asm 

C F C F 

22 73 12 S4 fr Banukak 


15 59 9 48 d MIIOO 

24 79 15 5? Ir HeauKora 


17 43 9 48 (r Manila 

16 61 13 55 a New Doth I 


10 SO 9 48 a Shanghai 
X 04 It 52 o Singapore 


Budapest 18 64 9 48 a Taipei 

Ceumhagefi 0 46 7 45 r Tokyo 

Costa Dal Sol 23 73 12 54 fr 

Dp blip 10 50 4 39 r AFRICA 

Edinburgh 10 50 7 «S a M ts a 4 « fr 

Florence IS 59 10 50 a 30 M » M Z 

Frankfurt 18 44 5 41 tr S57 T __ 5 ! S S J 

Geneva 10 50 7 45 r EZJZZ. S 2 S E 

Helsinki 13 SS -1 X tr S2Sr«“ M 79 14 « £ 

Istanbul X 48 to «l sft 2 2 g Si * 

Las Palmas 21 70 17 63 cl C 2! „ 2 5 

mss. a is s 2 s z 

SST S S 3 S : ^in AMERICA 

MOSCOW 15 59 9 48 If BueilMAim 14 41 4 43 d 

Mnicti M SO 7 45 sh Una K 44 14 57 cl 

Nice IS 59 12 54 o MndcaCllv 24 79 8 46 d 

14 61 3 37 fr Rio Be Janeiro 20 B7 22 72 fr 

U 59 10 50 cJ SOoPoulo — — — — no 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

33 91 26 79 si 

24 75 10 64 d 

29 84 25 77 tr 

33 91 29 84 tr 

39 103 29 M o 

27 81 17 63 tr 

17 63 15 99 o 

31 SB 27 81 O 

25 77 22 7J a 

2? 72 18 44 cf 


AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ADom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVS 

BuehrmemiT 

Co fond HWo 

EtsevWr-NDU 

Fekker 

GHI Brocades 

Helnetien 

Hoooovens 

KLM 

NaorxJan 

NOT M odder 

Nadllovd 
Oca Vender G 

Pakhoeo 

Philips 

Rabeco 

Rodotrco 

Rollnco 

Rorento 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

Von Ornmeron 

VMF Stork 

VMU 


SA Brews 
St Helena 
5csoi 

Wed HoJdlno 


765 731 
3700 3400 
415 412 
6600 4580 


Composite Stack lade* : 110640 
Previous : 187U0 


PKI 

Persdw 

Preussog 

PWA 

RWE 

RheJnmetMl 


634J0 63020 
1203 1203 
274J0 27450 
J2SL50 72£40 
157 157 JD 
325 334 

43950 *41 

35920 361 

543 54140 
10030 9650 
10150 iai 


I VonuwageTTwark 23550 713 
1 WellO 574 573 


Prerieus : T34640 


'Prague 

Revktovik 

Rome 

Stadmelm 

Streskeura 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

ZurM 


*• 75 I 4* fr 

30 16 20 68 fr 

21 70 15 99 Ir 

31 70 9 40 fr 

26 79 16 61 fr 

» 04 23 72 a 

25 77 17 63 d 

22 72 II 52 d 


| AMP.Ces General lade* ; HU 
Prerlow : 31158 


Bk East Asia 
Qwuns Kona 
Chino Gas 
China UoM 
Green island 
Hano Sena Bank 


LATIN AMERICA 


Arbed 

Bekoeri 

Cockerlll 

Cobeea 

EBES 

GB-lnqu-BM 
GBL 
Gevaert 
Hgbeken 
, inter cam 


. jCredleibank 
Petrafina 

Sac Generate 

Soflna 

Sdvov 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

unerg 

vimiie Mentos ne 


’» « \ S Sh WORTH AMERICA 

15 S9 12 54 r , 


- Z - - « ABdmroBe 5 fl -l 30 r 

is S9 *9 40 d W 04 4 5 fr 

3 S ■ S 1 sax s « is s ^ 

", 2 2 r 2*W> 21 82 6 «3 fr 

9 48 7 45 f Mooculu 30 86 20 68 tr 

VST Houston 29 84 10 64 PC 

LAs Angeles 23 72 U S pc 

37 01 10 SO Cl Miami 38 82 20 U PC 

Z Z T. « *7* M 86 U 57 fr 

J J * ® ««frwd to M 8 32 fr 

S ** “ " HWWU 29 B4 16 61 d 

29 84 19 66 o New York 21 70 8 46 fr 

San Fraacisco U 61 9 a j r 

Semite is n 5 4i pc 

15 59 0 46 fr Tgrpitto 13 55 -I 30 PC 

19 64 13 55 fr WBSBlnotaa 24 75 13 55 fr 


Zurtcta 9 40 7 45 

MIDDLE EAST 


18 64 10 SO Cl Omar 

» « 5 * a . 


Ankara 37 01 10 SO 

Beirut — ~ — 

Damascus 32 90 14 57 

Jcnnotem 29 84 17 43 

Td Aviv 29 04 19 64 

OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Svdnrr 


Current Stack Me> : 231SJ4 

PrevknK : 2imi7 


r -9 » « r Honolulu 

VST Houston 

— LAs Angeles 

37 01 10 9) Cl Miami 

— — — — no Mleneapolte 

5 90 u 57 fr Montreal 


fVanldkvrf 


HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanp Bank 
HK Tele Phene 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Wh u maoo 
Hnon 
IntTCity 
Jcrdtae 
JardlneSec 
Kawtoan Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Praps 

Statu* 

Swire Pod He A 
Tui Cheung 
WatiKwons 
wtreetock A 
Wine On Co 

Winter 

World inn 


Cl-doudr; lo-taeey; lr-talr; ivhall: oaveraat; pc«arilv cloud v. r-raln: 
sn-snowers. sw^now; st-siarmy, 


FRIOAVS FORECAST — CHANNEL: Rough. FRANKFURT: Kakt. Temn. 
14 - 6 157 - 4J» LONDON: Overcast. Temp 14— 7 (57-4S).MADRID; Ctaudr. 
TeihO. 10 — 4 (64 — 391. NEW VQRK: F«r. Temp. 24—14 (79 — 571. PARIS: 
Showers. Temp. 15 — 6 (59 - 46) ROME: Clouav. Temp. 17—12 163— Sri. 
TEL AVIV: Cloudy. Temp. 29—10 (04 — 44). ZURICH: Cloudy. Temp 10—7 


(SO — 441. BANGKOK: mundersfomK. Terna. 31— 26 (95— m. HONG KONG: 
Fair Temp. 31 — 28 188—121. MANILA: Cloudy. Temn 35 — 25 (95— 77). 
SEOUL. Foggy. Temp. 27— II (61—531. SINGAPORE: Thwaerstanns. Temp. 
Jl —74.(38 — 751. TOKYO: Showers. Temp 23— IS 173— 591. 


AEG-Teletanken 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Haver 

Bar Hypo Bane 

Bevverelna&ank 

BBC 

iSfw 6 ** 

CommerTtMik 
Cont Gum ml 
Daimler -Benz 
Deeussa 

Deutadw BMicock 
Deutsche Bank 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 
H a r pe,iei 
HocMief 
Hacchst 
Hoeseb 


mao nuo 
1233 1241 
363 34258 
304 203.90 
21170 21 MO 
337 321 

344 346 

213 21220 
284 289 

373 373 

176J0 172J0 
140 I38J0 
609.10 60160 
350 351 

143 16X50 
47150 474J0 
22150 224.90 
14720 14950 

5 320 

473 675 


Hong Sang Index ■ MtUf 
Prerioos : M31A5 


AACora 513* S73MJ 

AlltadULyorw 1M 

Apple Am Gold so » 

aKss - * g g 

|^ s S IS 

^om g | 

il cc *5 *5 

Bhje Circle SM 06 

OOC Group 227 274 

Boots tag 176 

Bowater imtae m » 

BP 538 HI 

Bril Home SI » S 

Brit Telecom 155 153 

Brit Aerospace 408 405 

Britall ZTS M6 

BTR 779 TU 

Burmok 256 2S3 

Cable Wireless 545 565 

Cattaury Schw 141 162 

ChortarCora. 2» 201 

Commercial U 216 212 

COnsGoW 544 534 

Courtoukls W IK 

DataoTY <2 £5 

De Beers* 5« so 

Dts Tillers JSC 291 

Drietantsifl 52S9k CfS 

Flsons m Ml 

Free SI Gad SB* sn 

GEC W t« 

Gen Acctaent 595 570 

GKN VO 214 

Glaxo C 1119^1119/32 

Grand Met 293 290 

GRE 703 690 

GubmefS 257 2S7 

GUS 845 645 

Honson 2Z3 221 

Hawker 07 439 

ICI 754 751 

Impend Group 184 183 

J09W 376 232 

Lana Securities 383 306 

Leaal General 668 493 

Liams Bank S«6 579 

Lonrtm 17B 174 

Lucas. 270 270 

MorkeondSn 139 137. 

Metal Box 396 398 

MhUpnd Bonk 359 JS4 

Net West Bank 457 639 

Panto 348 351 

Pilkinpton 280 278 

Piessev 180 102 

Prudential 66S 673 

Raari Elect 168 190 

Rondtanletn SIM^ JIOJVj 


Banco Comm 
Centra le 
androids 
Cred Itaf 

Er klanla 

Farm It olio 

Flat 

Flnslder 

Generali 

IFI 

l to ice menu 

Itarpai 

llatmobfUari 


Moniedison 

Olivetti 
Pirelli 
, RAS 

I Rlnascenie 
SIP 
8ME 
Smo 
Stcnda 

Stet 


1725D 17300 
2981 9M 
7475 7S00 
2051 aw?, 
9410 9365 
12250 12065 
2979 2950 
75 66 

44100 43990 
750 1 7470 
B73W 66*00 
1665 1*48 
73600 73100 
84995 14500 
1605 1593 
6370 6280 
2260 2235 
65000 64120 
686 661 
1779 1980 
1280 1290 
2S43 2772 
14295 13950 
2608 2*10 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 


Astra 

Atkn Copco 

BoUden 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essede 

Hondefshanken 

Pharmoda 

5aob-Scanio 

Staidvlk 

SkansJto 

SKP 

SwMUhMatcti 

Vetve 


"its 202 

344 343 

46$ 45 5 

115 1 U 

NG. 216 
318 317 


365 360 

153 160 

192 192 

IS N ^i 

94JD 9X50 

S iS 

NA 243 


AltaeneeerMgn Index : 40230 
PrtWaas : 40X80 


Sy+aey 


MIB Correct I rtf 

Previous : 1329 


Lana Securities 
Lanai General 




ASCI . 

Anaia Amerkzn 

Mela Am Gad 

Barlows 

Blwoar 

QLtHris 

De B oers 

Driefontatn 

Elands 

GPSA 

Harmony 

Htvefd Sled 

Kloof 

N edPank - 
PresSlevn 
Ruspw 


■00 loo 
2300 2659 
17500 (7400 
1Z10 1180 
1435 1490 

fSS mi 

SIS 4975 
1773 1710 
3458 3H9 

7825 7S58 
1350 1210 
6100 5850 
1660 1640 


Leocl General 
UoyssBonk 
Lonrtm 
Lucas 

Morksond Sn 
Metal Box 

M id l an d Bank 

Nat West Bank 

PandO 

nikinatan 

Piessev 

prudential 

Roan Elect 

Rondtonldn 

Rank 

Reed Inti 

Reuters 


Air Llaulde 
Alstham AtL 
Av Dassault 
Banco ire 
BIC 

Banpraln 

ns®* 

Cane lour 
Chorvevn 
dub Mod 
Darty 
Duma 
Elf-Aoutlalne 
Europe 1 
Gen Eom 
Hodiette 

L ofarpe Ccp 

LJWOnd 

Lesieur 

] 'Oreo I 

Marteil 

Matra 

Merlin 

Mlchdlfl 

Mod I tannessr 

Moulinex 

occldentate 

Pernod Ric 

Perrier 

PetrefesifMl 

Peuaeet 

Printemas 

RodteKOm 

Rcdeuta 

Roussel Octal . 

Sonofl 

SkO Rossi anal 
Tetcmecan 
TltomSan CSF 


ACI 

ANl 

ANZ 

BMP 

Borai 

Baupafitvilla 

Brambles 

coles 

Camateo 

CRA 

C5R 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 

Hooker 

Mmllon 

MIM 

Mtar 

Oakbridoe 

Peka 

Pos ei don 

RGC 

Sdtrtos 

Sleigh 

Southland 

woadilde 

Wormoid 


335 224 

275 2KZ 
482 «2 

652 644 


225 222 

401 390 

375 374 

235 230 

654 656 

285 295 

222 220 

S 306 

>60 


Kaltma 
Konsal Power 
Kowosokl Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Work* 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and Co . 
Mftsukasbl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NlkkoSec 
NIppoo Keoaku 

Ntooon Dll 

Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 

Nomura Sac 

Olympus 

P i o n e e r 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Shlmazu 

Shkrwtsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Oiem 
Sumitomo Marin* 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tofcset Cora 
Tatstto Marine 
Takeda atom 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo C lec. P ower 
Tokyo Murine 
Topoon prlntine 
Toray I na 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YamaidtISec 


West 

Noth EMC 

Saab 

3# 

DM. •- 

fi V ■ 

Pass 

0 0 Pass 

Paps. 

Pass 



West lad tfw dub king. . 

Jt 


Htee.LaneCteae 

dm 


Canadkn stocks na AP 


742S AantoE 
2057 Asm Ind A 
38930 Alt EAerOV 
400 Alta Not 
266 Alaema St 
208 AndraWA f 
esoOAracen 
6B6 ArousC pr 
5600BPanada 
28966 Bank BC 
146191 Bank NS 
40800 Barrictta 
450 Baton At 

6014 Bonanza R 

SlOBralorne 
2*00 Bramaiea ' 

1445 BCFP 

18265 BC Res 
21300 BC Phone 
ISOOBranswk 
37108 Budd Cm 
2R275CAE 
7000 CCLA 
4600 CDlsftj B t 
76SOO Cod Prv . 
22100 C Mar West 


Htah Law Close Chae 
Step. 16M 16'A 
S7N, 714 7%b- «■ 

S2tta< 20W 20Vi— H 
S14M 14Vs 14V: 
S21W 2114 21 Va— 16 
S24V, 2415 24V: + VS> 
J20V: 20 20 W— % 

SH 11 11 

SUk 34 344k 

S5V» $14 5VS+ VS 
512V» 1VW 12H+ Vi 
133 730 130 —2 

S17 17 17 

430 420 420 — 5 

480 475 480 +10 

5171* 17 17 — W 

*** ** V* 

235 232 23S + 4 

522 Zl* 21*k 
514 U. 14V. 1416 
S23W 23% 23V. + Vk 
8163k 16» 16M 
5Z7W 27 2716: + 44 

SSVs SN 54%+ Vk 


27135 NcnwSCD W 
40693 NuWst sp A 
6400 Oakwood 
4400 OshaiMa A f 
700 Pamaur 
MOOPonCcmP 


S2T’4 

50 47 50 +2 

59 9 - 9 - j 

S24» 34V> 24* + * 

J33V> 33»k 
52946 2m 29Vk-4 
135 125 127 —8 

S25 ’ 36* » +* 

sisVk Jiw if* . 

430 410 4lfl — 3 

916 ,*Vj 0U+48 

■* 11 . to* 1 L. . i. 


12865 Pina Paint _ — 

11600 Place GOa 135 125 

now Placer- 525 3* 

W92°Provtae S18V7 Iff 

looo aue Stare o 430 410 

700 Rayrocfcf. 589k ff 

5300 Redoath *11 „ W 

5S452 Rd Stenbs A 520* 20 

10300 ResServf 289 369 

1400 Revn Pro A 1M 1« 

rm Ropers a . *r 9 
500 Roman 5105k W 

180 Rothman 5391* 381 

1 3000 Stalls? sSSS J 

rimlhSl’Sr SOTh Sff 

21950 Sherrltt S7 6= 

600 Stoma 58W .11 

100 Staler Bt 59* ff 

M6So uthm *46*i 46! 

JJMO Sr Brodcsl 120 W1 

544VSteicaA 519* 181 

900 Sulat n> 275 m 

700 5toeb R -325 228 

aoosunwpr 524 34 

2 ^®4Svdneya 27 » 

5000 Talanto 91 91 

4W0 Tara S23VS 231 

, 500 Tock Cm" A *13 W 

179*4 T«* 5?. S33W \3 

400 Tetadyne *11* 111 

3W»Ta*Can S3S 3ri 

37292 Thom N A . *19* 191 

54056 Tor Dm Bk *20* 20 

11400 TorstarB I - SBlta Si 

J7STIYMMI STOW . TO 


Ml MK 

27 271*+ 94 


7200 C Pocfcrs 
6900 Can Trust 
26414 Cl Bk Cam 


343 143 

182 rS4 
96 96 

450 455 

425 413 

5ffl MO 


Nlkket/DJ. Index : 1247AS1 
Prevtea* : 12S21JB 

Hew Index : 99147 

Preriavs : 98337 


ZtsrM 


IS s 

357 3S7 


A4fia 

Aiusuieee 
Boik Leu 
Brawn Baverl 


2980 2980 
788 795 

3618 3 STS 


138128 CTIre A f 
400 c util B 
0300 C Dtstb A 
460QCOtstbBf 
2450 CTL Bank 
SOOConvontrs 
108 Canwest A 
<2tX)CaM+oR 
200 Canron A 
T067O6 Crownx 
4700 Czar Res 
35256 Doan Dev 
1*047 Denison A a 
264 Deniton B I 
2550 Devw con 
3400 Dtcfcnsn A f 
600 Dlcknsn B 
9420 Daman A 
WMaDotwco 
33100 Du Pant A 
35650 OvkU A 
16500 Equity SVT 
900 FCA inti 
_Mt»CFmomC 


SSVs 5* 5*+ Vh 

5T4* 14 14*+* 

5211* 21 1A 21to 
W 38U. 29 +* 
537 36* 34*— * 

531* 3114 II* 

26W 2»W 26Vk_ w 
59* •* 8*- U 

I1W 17* 17*+* 

«s » «i 

*5* 5* 5*+ * 

510* 10W. lOVi— * 
SS* 5* 5*— M 

58 8 8 — to 

330 375 380 

511* 11* 11* 

519* 1» 19*+ * 
198 191 191—7 

405 395 400 +to 

*13* IJto 13* — * 
*22* 12* 12*-* 
SB 7* 8 

56* 6 V. 6*r+ to 

* 

^ 1 
W’i; 2S* 28 +* 
5* 7V7 7*— U 

Tv 21 to— * 


Si*- ST- »*+v: 

289 2*9 789 - -- 

175 H5 '170 - 5 - 
19 9 

SIO* 10* W*- (k 
ns* 25* 2S*. - 


OH ns M4+P 
528* 28W »*T-5- 
S7 6*’-T +* 

SB* ..IS **+.«• 


59* 9* J* i 
*46* 46» &£-* 


*20 19* 19* 4?*- 

519* ISlk^lJ*#*- 

2 B •$ Wri 


S 

34 2* II 

Wi nw+1 

If- S*iw 


sn* na 


»sgo Trinity Res 

149131 TrnAltariA 


Credit Suisse 
Etactrawatt 


AH Onftaartes Index :B89 j 8S 
PrwtwS ;89k0B. 

Source: Reuters. 


Gecra Fischer 

Holderbeak 

Interdlscotoll 

Jacob Suchard 

jetmali 

Landis Gyr 

Ma even oic k 

Nesile 

Oerlliaw-B 

RoctteBabV 

Sandac 

Schindler 

Suiter 

SBC 

Swtsrnr 

Swiss Aahtsuranee 
Swiss ValksDank 
Union Bank 
Wlntarihur 
Zurich ins 


Rank 341 34* 

Reed Inti 954 550 

ft tutors 374 377 

Rerul Dutch t 4617/3248 17/32 
RTZ 632 634 

Soctert 620 623 

Sainsburv 344 348 

Sears Holdings 86W Bill 

Shell 710 735 

STC 200 200 

SM Chartered 469 472 


Afrit index : 21*24 
Prevtotn : 28927 
CAC Index : «7At 
Previous : 217.38 


Aka I 

AFthiChem 

Aeahl Glass 

Bank of Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Cnh 

Cltoh 

Dal Nloeon Print 
DOtriO House 
Dahra Securities 
Fonwc 
Full Bordt 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hllocni Cable 
Hondo 

Jason Air Linos 


641 440 

873 09 

S7S BIO 
823 KZ7 
520 530 

1260 1260 
1690 1700 
37D 352 

WO 1800 
574 580 

325 840 

9110 9210 
1560 1580 
1720 1730 
1170 1170 
796 0DQ 
-712 720 

1360 1370 
4850 6979 


30J0 3020 
2475 2465 
2*15 2270 
780 770 

765 750 

2020 2018 
SON 5750 
1975 1975 
1660 7446 

3925 3920 
6620 6620 
1395 1300 
8573' 8550 
7925 7875 
4150 4000 
380 374 

397 305 

1095 1095 
10025 70WS 
1695 1475 
3710 3605 
4825 4025 
25400 25400 


10000 Fed Ind A 
5100 F CUv Fin 
7KU Gencis A 
1700 Geac comp 
5600 Generude 
12600 Gibraltar 
21423GoXdcorp f 
600 Goodyear 
7400 Grail G 

7950 Grandma 
783 GL Forest 
600 Gi Pacific 
4fl00 Grevtwd 
llOSHrdtngAt 
108 Hawker 
1387 HamD 
499 H BOY Co 
7D432lmasco 
3200 indM 
9300 inland Gas 
4590 Inti Thom 
6974 inter Ptoe 
. 2450 lyacoB 
47850 Jannock 
200 Kelsey H 
14525 Kerr Add 
35550 Lobott 
IriflLwMnri* 
WOLCMICem 
1000 LOCona 
929 LL Lac 
9606LobtawCa 
3031 M1CC 
101987 Melon H X 
6914 Me Hand E 
15730 Mahan A I 
2320MOUon B 
3000 Nabisco L 

713914 NororxJo 
+530* Nor em 
100807 NvaAltft I 


SBC IndM : 05040 
Pmiaus f 64859 


NO.; not awotad; NA: not 
available; *d: gx^fividend. 


Sun Alliance 
TdtoondLyte 
Tescn 
Thorn EMI 
T.I. Croup 


451 448 
44) 440 
240 230 
434 442 
244 246 


Cold Staraoe 

DBS 

Fraser Heave 
Haw Par 
inehenne 
Mat Banktao 
OCBC 
OUB 

Oveneas union 

Stionari-ia 


2-15 2A6 

5.95 *90 

5 4.94 

109 2J» 

238 2JO 

6 *90 
*90 *05 
*52 *57 
*78 238 
NA- - 


FORTrtlATHTWDTOON 

BIROBONDS 

READ CARL GBtmi 

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Page 19 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


a,.., , ^ :■ ■ 

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1 tVX4 


SPORTS 


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/.By Anchony Cotton - 

* tv,: 'v . Washitigm Pott Service . 

■■’ -. BOSTON — Larry. Bird, held to 

i.is..-j' At H^ two petals m tbefota& quarter in 
«asfa. gf the two previous pm** 
s m x! ■ s 501 **? 17 ia the final 12 ostnutes 
l,”i..''< f, t.' .Wednesday fa a carea playoff 
**A*i3&b pomtt as d* Boston 
:: * nv " ir. ”»■ defwed. the Detroit Pis- 

•S-:^ - MBA PUTOFFS 

: ; m u S‘ ions, DO-123, m Gamr5 of Adr 
l .National Basketball Association 

setter y if ' 

,; Cv :^ . - Iannis Johnson, cooentent 
. throoshoat-the night, prowled 30 

t.'..T b,riJ {"■• ^^^ tbeb^of-sevdx Eastern 
Confenice' semifinal series. Game 
. . ' ' 6 will be played Friday nirin in 

vii- 1 V "*5-:- Dcowt . ..v . . 

:. ,..,,7'' - VuMte Johnson, a thorn in the 

• .>Cdric^ ^<fc daring the Pistons’ 

7 !'• '^(Q2r9? victory in Game 4, kd De- 

tro* 1 30 poirits bid his team 
. , *i' 'could not overcome Bird, Dennis 



field but the predominantly out- 
side-shooting Pistons couldn't 
make a fourth-quarter mi ry jp As 



Ryan Misses No-Hitler, Expos Prevail 


the rim, the Celtics’ grinding even- 
tually took over. 

Besides die problem of playing 
against the Critics in Boston Gar- 
den, where they have won 17 of 
their last IS playoff games, De- 
troit’s Tsiah Thomas had to do it' 
without Ins uniform, stolen dining 
the day. He shirt Thomas woe 
lad a 42 but lacked a name. That 
was fitting, because the perfor- 
mance of the player wearing it 
wasn't especially noteworthy. 

“When they unpacked ibt uni- 
forms tonight mine wasn’t there, " 
Thomas said. “It threw me off a 
little hit I don’t think my head was 
in the game during part of the fust 

. viuuic junnauu, a uuu m me . _ , , quarter. It just didn’t fed riahL” 

DCT ~ JO *“ on jaEtu 

S^'Sbt SdS that the . SSS^S^athSne in ^fifth 

°y g ro°?9 peoms Cdocs took advantage of. eameofa2-2series.StflLnoone on 


k 

^ '1 

hi,. 

«• ^ « 



* i 



3! cr^’ ' Jdmsoa or the Critics' m&zksman- 


1 

Lit-. .,i la: ^ 


drip from the free throw line. 

* “We Jcnew wfaai we had to do as 
> team and we did it,” said Dennis 
Johnson, whose status at gank^ time 
had been uncertain because of a. 
sore back “Maybe we hdd the ball 
back a few times when we should 
have passed it forward, but for the 
most part we did it.” 

■ Tb&'y was move the basketball 
tiia the fast break, which, tritennot 
netting 151 easy lay-ups, created anr 


c-iotcs in aflvmttage ol game 0 fa2-2 series. Still, no oneon 

M “We haven't be» fotcmg om the PUtons was realty to concede 
offense on their defease, thafs Boston a spot in the conference 
what we waked on the last couple fi n »u aeainst the Hriladdphia 
of days,r said Deturis Johnson. 75^ ^ 

times, tonight I saw- the team that “We're a capable team, they're a 

we were bad 50 or so games into capable teamTWght they made 

-I J 



Compiled by Our Sufi From DUpouha 

MONTREAL — Nolan Ryan of 
the Houston Astros was on the 
trade of another no-hitter Wednes- 
day night at Montreal against the 
Expos but lost bis bid for his sixth 
career no-hitter in the sixth inning. 

He had lost the game even earlier. 

Although he strode out 10 bat- 

BASEBAIX ROUNDUP 

ten in seven innings, Ryan and the 
Astros were beaten, 1-0. by Expos’ 
rookie Joe Hesketh. 

Wildness, a longtime Ryan buga- 
boo that had largely disappearedm 
recent years, beat him again. In the 
second mning. Ryan walked Dan 
Driessen, hit Hubie Brooks with a 
pitch «nd walked Tim WaHaeh to 
load the bases. He then walked 
rookie Herat Winningham to force 
in a run with nobody out Also in a 
typical Ryan performance, he then Joe Hesketh 

struck out the next three batters. 

Ryan lost his no-hitter when Lynch notched his third career 



the plays and we iSdnV 


That included Bird, troubled re- •n K m>as. “I think all the pressure's 
centtybybunafcinlrisrightdbow. on them. They have to win again to 
The problem was anything but no- end the series. They’re the defend- 

taechm^andhavetoitpal.We 
on 17 or & snots jromtne field. , weren t even supposed to get this 
Detroit shot 50 percent from the far so there's no pressure os us.” 






B*Utorfr-Uratod Prut ti M ^ pj -* Tf>r u ^ 

The Pistons’ KdBy Tripncka (front) and the Celtics’ Kevin 
McHafe on the floor, wrestling for possession of the baH 


Driessen singled in the sixth inning, complete game. 

Hubie Brooks followed with a sin- o puffin 2 

gfc but Ryan worked out of the ln Philadelphia , Dave V an 

Ryan was not happy with his Wl *■ **“ "jJSjflC 

performance, even u u was the f 1 ^ a three-run shot mat 

I^th game in which he struck out h^hhahied a fom-ranax* inning, 
10 or^TrSTtoSiS *o leadthe Reds. ^yTlbbs was the 
strikeoirttoud to3^2. winner and John Denny the loser. 

“That's no way to lose a game,*’ Padres 12, Pirates 2 

he said. “I was We lose ^ ^ Andy Hawkins 


S'- • i'“' J> 
■“ 1 r...- ' .; ‘ ■ ‘i 


VANTAGE POINT/ Scott Ostler 


^ Wandlwalkintheontyr^ coasted to hisrixth stnught victory badTu^ 
^,“12 and Teny Kennedy keyed a five- p«iy. Wllj 

Hesketh strode om 12 battes. nin fourth innin g with a three-run sixth save. 
Ifegave vny to Jeff Reardon after double to lead the Padres. Steve 


ning ran to lead the Dodgers. Jack 
Clark hit his fifth homer for Sl 
L ouis. 

Mariners A Brewers 2 
In the American League, in Mil- 
waukee, Mike Moore came within 
three outs of pitching the first no- 
hitter in Seattle history. With the 
help of reliever Edwin Nunez, 
Moore and the Marinos survived a 
ninth-inning Milwaukee uprising 
to defeat the Brewers. 

White Sox A Indians 0 
In Gevdand, Ron Kittle and 
Jerry Hairston hit home runs in the 
second and Briu Burns and three 
relievers combined on a three-hit- 
ter to lift the While Sox. 

Red Sox. A Angels 1 
In Boston, Tony Armas hit his 
eighth homer ana Dennis Boyd 
pitched a four-hitter to lift the Red 
Sox to their fifth victory in six 

A’s d, Blue Joys 4 
ln Toronto, Carney Lansford 
collected three hits, including an 
RBI double, and Dusty Baker, 
Mike Davis and Donnie Hill had 
homers to power the A's. Steve 
McCatty was the winner and Jay 
Howell earned his eighth save. 

Tigers 4, Rangers 1 
In Arlington, Texas, Alex San- 
chez belted two home runs and 
Lance Parrish added another to 
back the strong pitching of Dan 
Perry. Willie Hernandez pasted his 


S& nth "W 1 Garvey hit his fifth homer 'as San 
1 byMJDoranmthee^ it h. DicgoWd out 15 hits. 


From the Horse’s Mouth: If Spend A Buck Could Only Reply 


LotAtigeks Tima Service 


arid Famous*? Will you tiny me a ment and tradition of the 


LOS ANGELES —Jty now. ev- beach bam on Maui? A Gucci sad- Then they take the money and run. anythin g «•»" brin g f»m tn confront 


eiybotty involved in the Spend A' die? A 
Baric controversy has ^been^ beard *We 
, from. Everyone except Spend him- repaint 
sdf, the kid who is doing the ran- . “On 


izzaT Great cha 

have your stall tired to stud 


Diaz is letting down his sport. If minor league status by refusing to 
aythme can bring fans to horse confront die realities of amateur- 


os have been re- racing, it's a fast, froat-nmning, 
the equivalent of tbwhfng horse snch as Spend A 
: And now die Buck. 




repainted” their rookie year. And now die Buck. 

“On the odmrhand, if 1 win the horse of the decade comes along Superstars are in short supply 
Freakness, rm on my way to a and his owner sdls out his chances these days, and sports fans are ea- 
Triple Crown, winch will greatly at theTriple Crown for a few dob _ and J ^ fl linK to adopt even a 


ism, the Triple Grown people have 
sacrificed prestige by not keeping 
tbeir purses conqjedtivt 


Reardon retired four batters in a 
row to earn his eighth save, tops in Cubs L Giants 

the majors. In San Francisco, Rh 

“The 40-degree weather [4 do- struck out a season-hi, 
grees centigrade] didn't bother Ryne Sandberg hit a : 
me," Hesketh said. “1 grew up in homer to lift the Cub 
Buffalo and learned to pitch in gave up six hits and waft 
weather like this." in recording his dun! 


Cubs L Giants 0 RBI, help 

In San Francisco, Rick Sutdiffe game losi 
uck out a season-high 12 and LaCoss pi 


Triple Crown, which will greatly at the Triple Crown for a few dob 
enhance my popularity around the lars. O JC, a few milli on 


what say? Horses can’t talk? Triple Crown, which will greatly 
Wrong. '• . enhance my popularity around the 

There are people now who claim angles' barns when I'm finally 
to be abfe to converse with horses, standing at stud." 

Bat maybe it’s trine we allowed Spend A Back's owner; Dennis 


Some p 
with Diaz. 


e people 
iaz. He c 


Ic will sympathize 

ran m»lrp. hiirnylf a 


.die hooes to have a voice in thrir Diaz, didn't consult with 


-own career decisions. 


.fere ilwMng to pass up 


quick y? mrnirar by winning the 
lossy race. 


four-legged one. A horse 13 
A Buck can capture the 
collective imagination. 


even a 
e Spend 
public’s 


They lost Spend A Buck by try- 
ing to save a buck. 

StflL Diaz is the main heavy of 
the hour. If he owned the Dodgers, 
he would probably pass op the 
World Series for a more lucrative 


Mete 4, Braves 0 
Id New York, Ed Lynch pitched 


A Buck by try- a five-hitter for his first career shut- 


in homer to lift the Cubs. Sutdiffe I 1 

in gave up six hits and walked just two . 

in recording his third complete 
game of the season. Hrbek i 

3xj Dodgers 5, Car dinals 2 pace the 
it- In Los Angdes, veteran Bill Rus- played u 


out and Keith Hernandez hit a two- sell singled home rookie Mariano 
run homer to defeat the Braves. Duncan from second with the win- 


Royab 9, Orioles 8 
In Kansas Gty, Missouri, Lynn 
Jones broke his slump with four 
RBI, helping the Royals end a five- 
game losing streak Reliever Mike 
LaCoss picked up the victory, and 
Scott McGregor was the loser. 

Twins 8, Yankees 6 
In Minneapolis, Gary Gaetti 
belled a grand slam and Kent 
Hrbek added a two-run homer to 
pace the Twins. The Yankees 
played under protest, contending 
that lighting in the Metrodome is 
inadequate. (LAT. UfJ) 


But not by running in the Jersey -barnstorming tour of Japan. 


Right now would be a good trine league Preakness and nm his horse would be worth only $300,000. 


Af«l» a vicory 22* ? LSS JS * £ 


Spend A Buck runs in that race. 
Who would remember Willie 


to stmt, with Spend A Buck in a bush leame race in New Jersey. But whai the hock, Diaz rally 

• ^Bigfetti,*’lns owner would ask; Once apmT the qxnt of horse paid $12^00 fra the horse. You can "ft? , Vic . Wert f “JJ 54 

"Wild you ratherrun in the Prcak- raring has Mown its cover. pay more than that for a new car, H had taken place mspirngtram- 


- ness or the Jersey Doby?” 
“What’s the d&ference, bosST 


It has esqiosed itsdf as being as winch can’t even stand at stud. 


Tradition? Glory? Ultimate 
competition? Who needs it? 

Maybe the horse does. Racing 
people constantly try to humanize 
their animals. A trainer or owner 


Union Says f Maybe 9 to Drug Testing 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Pea Service 

WASHINGTON — Baseball's 
team owners cheered, the Ameri- 


wffl talk about how his or her bone 0811 Gvfl Cherries Union booed 


“WeD, in the Preakness, you comer 


much a sport as is a game of street- Many fans and members of the The racing establishment doesn’t has a lot of heart, or is very inteDi- and the major league players 
(vimpr (TMiin mm miimi nf nhirnnir iw. zet off the hook here, either. w>ni nr invK ihi> iTiriti rtf rartno uiuttered a “luavbe” wednes 


imytin woe critical of Olympic he- S c ^ off the hook here, either, 
are always trying roes Car! Lewis and B21 Johnson Through arrogance, raring's pow- 


-would'be running for prestige. In Horse people are always trying roes Car! Lewis and MU Johnson Through arrogance, racing’s pow- 
the Jersey Derby, you would be to convince the skeptics that raring for expressing a desire to cash in on ers have allowed the Triple Crown 
running fra money.” - - ’ realty is a sport, not just a Mg state their g lor y. But at least Leads and to be devalued to the equivalent of 

“And if 1 rake m aB this money lotiay cin hoofs. Johnson didn’t skip the Olympics a dime-store tiara. 

.in Jersey; will I beoqnie a candidate They tell us about the beauty and to earn big bucks by competing in Like the Boston Marathon peo- 


has a lot of heart, or is very inteDi- and the nuyra league players umon 
gent, or loves the thrill of raring muttered a “maybe" Wednesday as 
and really understands his purpose a cas c ad e of reaction followed 


.in Jersey; wiD I become a candidate They teD us about the beauty and 
to appear ot lifestyles of the Rich grace of the anrmak, the exrim- 


Ashe Prepares Hiinsell 


the “Battle of the N 


Like the Boston Marathon peo- 
ple, who have let (hat race fade to 


for being on the trade, or realty 
responds to the cheers of the fans. 

If that's so, then in this case at 
least, the animals have an edge on 
the h umans. 



By Dave Anderson roe, after haring lost to Sweden, 4- 

. .. New York TUrta Service ■ l.indoOtS (ft day in GOtebOfg fast 
NEW YORK — Under the yeri. all would probably be forgiv- 
-dinuBed gkw cf crystal durnddSns eii, whether ra not he had sipied 
in an opnk&t oval ballroom, Ar- the camnntmenL But if the United 
thur Ame had been applauded. States lost with McEnroe compet- 
along with mere' dim three dozen tng without a signed conunitinent, 
other tennis personalities. Ashe knows he wooLd probably be 

As dim as a service lin^ - the. .discha r ged ascaptam. 

Davis G^captam was one Monty " Gomphcatnig the nt o ati o u is 
five playeismtxoduced at Teams Gramras’ refusal to sign a cozxunit- 
magaane^ TWh 'ynwrvw M iy party meutfor cup competition this year. 

. as among both the top 20 of thelast “Tvc got a collectra’s item," 

two decades and the 20 “most in- Ashe said. *Tvc got Jimmy’s signa- 
BnajdiTm the sport in that era. tore on last year's coranrinnent” 
The other doable honraees were . Sindy without Connors, whose 
-■^ran Bo^fc Emmy Connors, Billie boorish behavior at Gotebarg tar- 

- J«m King and Chris Evert LJaytL niriicd the Davis Cop final and 

- And when the party ended Tbes- pr omp te d enforoement of the cotd- 

day evening, Ashe was sUmding on mhment, and perhaps - without 
the carpe t e d bal con y above the McEnroe, Ashe is considering Aar- 
Hemstey Palace lobby when amid- on Kricfcstem, Hira Tdtscher and 
dle-aged woman was riiaodnced to Timm y Arias as singles players, 
him. . McEnroe^ however, tod not sign a 

“ Congatol arions ” die said bomriutment to play cm die team 


hands. “Fbr all of last year, Astm said. Nor had he 


us fans, you’ve ft.” signed rate m any previoas year, 

Ashe mdred has done h: Wim- notably in 1981 and 2982, when the 
bled on chammon. U.S. Ooen United States won. the cop in 



Commissioner Peter V. Ueber- 
roth's derision Tuesday to institute 
mandatory drug testing fra all 
baseball personnel other than ma- 
jor league players. 

Marge Schott, owner of the Cin- 
cinnati Reds, made a typical man- 
agement response, saying. “I think 
the commissioner is taking a strong 
stand on something he considers a 
serious problem. The youth in this 
country looks up to sports figures, 
and if we are all wiling to do this, 
maybe the players will fall in line.” 

Joe Altobefii, manager of the 
Baltimore Orioles, said: “If the 
commissioner of baseball wants me .. , ^ 

to lakeit, m beglad to doiL If be Peter V. Ueberroth 
wants us to try something that he 

feels is in the best interest of base- mg somebody prove their inno- 


ball. Fm all fra that. 

“And I think if this leads to help 


cence without knowing he’s guilty." 
Perhaps the most surprising re- 


some ball players, Fm all for that, action, and the most welcome to 
too." Ueberroth, was the way union lead- 

The ACLU's director, Ira er Don Fehr left the door open for 
Glasser, however, criticized the a re-evaluation of the drug agree- 
new program — which wiD encom- -meat between players 

pass more than 3,000 baseball em- and owners last year, 
ployees, inc l uding minor league “Fm Dot foreclosing the possibil- 

, . ity of chanaes.” he said. 'This, of 


nity to a dozen planers from nine 
major league teams m exchange for 
testimony, has moved its focus to 
St. Louis and Atlanta. 

According to spokesmen for the 
Cardinals and Braves, neither of 
those dubs knows anything about 
drug investigations involving its 
players. 

Seldom has any derision by a 

baseball c ommissi oner provoked 
such strong and diametrically op- 
posed response. 

“He’ll never get it," said the 
Braves’ captain, Bob Homer, of 
Ueberroth's request that players 
join in his testing program. ‘The 
guys who are on drugs in this 
league are obvious. If dubs paid 
dose attention to how a guy is 
playing or acting, they’d spot 'em, 
too. You’re talking about 50 guys, 
while 600 are dean. That’s not jus- 
tification for testing” 

“If you don’t have anything to be 
afraid of, why not submit to the 
test?” Schott wondered. “This is 
something that a lot of private 
companies have already done, and 
some of them have been shocked at 
the results.” 

The players union initially react- 
ed with anger. “We had no advance 


r ^ „ 'O' °f changes.” he said. This, of 
This is the sort of cynical stuff coq^ ^ a voy sensitive issue; it’s 

« inflammatory one and SB an 
make a pubfic-rdatians pram, he emotional one.” 

mESEESEl The issue of the sport’s image 
lot Minnooent people get hit by the became .mcreanngly ^important 


a re-evaluation of the drug agree- knowledge and that’s ... not an 
meat negotiated between players appropriate way to do business; we 
and owners last year. needed to be consulted, not to be 

“Fm Dot foredosing the possbO- informed,” said Fehr, whose first 
ity of changes.” he said. This, of response wasiocaD the plan grand- 


Press toonTtioS, Sassra aSo <* **£&?£** 

called the program “an example of 10 Sf Th ? e 

unreason£e^S* aiS^are" wiD be ihmgs that will damage the 

g ame. 


appropriate way to ao uusiness; we 
needed to be consulted, not to be 
informed,” said Fehr, whose first 
response was to call the plan grand- 
standing. 

However, by Wednesday eve- 
ning, be was more condhatoiy. He 
said that if, in the opinion of the 
dubs and the Joint Review Com- 
mittee of drag experts, the current 
program is not working, then the 
union would take the matter up 
again with its executive board and 


bledon champion. U.S. . Open 
cbampkiuRazalty elected to the 
Tennis Ball of Fame, he wiB be 
formally inducted July 13 in New- 
port, Rhode Island. During his 
time tennis, he- has been the 
“first Mack? American male in ev- 


wasa’t surprised at being 


named meoftbe topp^yenofthe 


United States won , the cap in 
Asfaefe first two years as captain. 

“For seven years," Asm said, 
“John’s attitude was, ‘Just call me 
and tell me when to show up.’ ” 

. If the UmtedStates is to qualify 
for the Davis Cup fmal-diis year, it 
must get by West Germany mere in 
July. Tlxn it would probably have 


A LEG UP — Ricardo GaDego of Real Madrid, in witife, fighting for the ball with players 
of Hringary’s Videoton In Wednesday’s first-leg final intheUEFA Soccer Cop. Real 
Madrid overpowered the Hungarians, 3-0. The return iwrtrfi vriD be May 22 in Madrid. 


and “an invasion of privacy." 

Dale Murphy of the Atlanta “We ve got to stop drugs in b 
Braves, twice the National bafl. We just fiat have to do it 
Leagues most valuable player, said According to sources, the s: 
the plan was Iflce “assuming a guy is FBI investigation that started 


Feto refused to say how many 
. , . , players have been treated for drug 

we ve got to stop drugs m base- abuse since the voluntary program 
ilL We just fiat have to do ft." was adopted last May. “Placing 

According to sources, the same numbers on this is not a healthy 
51 investigation that started in exercise,” he said. “It’s none of 


plan was like as s umin g a guy is FBI investigation that started in exercise,” he 
ty without knowing. It’s mak- Pittsburgh and that granted immu- your business. 


SPORTS BRIEFS , ^ 

— Baseball 

’s Watanabe Retains WBC Title Wednesday’s M^orLeagae line Scores 


combe. Rod Laver and Ken 


. . _ TOKYO (UP!) — Jrro Watanabe of Japan, scoring steaffly with 

If both the United States and accurate bk^wcaiaunammoosl2-nnmddcciaon over challnigcr Julio 

ojwrvn ‘ mwp In TMoti th« Kri4l «_■ w . . .t-V- nrw « • >i i i m 


Rosewafl. inthai nrder. **Bnt britw Swedbi ;wereto reach the &ral Soto Solano of tie Dramnkan RqmMic Thursday in the seamd defease 
raw of the most influential people agam, ttai showdown would be of his Worid Boxing Council super flyweight title, 
made me stop and flunk. Maybe it S 1 ™ 6 y*** mtheUoited Stales. There were no knodtdowus. AD three officials scored thefiriitm favor 

— r_ “ Win or lose the Daws Cop, no -»« t — vt_j — > — v.ju, «_.j 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
3UG090 mmim-e t • 

Jmkrt MO eoa MM s 1 

Burro. NtliBa (*), Asoston (VI. Jama* (9) 


That were no knodtdowus. . 


made me stem and thmkMaybeit ““^™?^ m ' t heUmted Stales. . Than were no knodtdowus. AD three officials scored thefightm favor 
was for setting an example across , m . Qr J“ c .'5® Daws Ctq), no of Watanabe, 3d Larry Nadayag of the Hn&roioeshadit 117-114, David 
the board.” ■ • ,TTT. .' .- ^ologiesby Ashe willbc neces- GilhootyMHraigKrag, 115-H3, andVmccDcfeado of the United 
.... • sary. And none was necessary after Stales.120-113. 

United Shoes failed to mm^)^llOw24-^ratelitte^PaymPcxto(rfT^Baaadin 

°* J5 y® 1 . Wllh Osaka oo Jofy 4, 1984, and defeated hin again with an Illh-nrand 

lions. Bm he wffl soon be sa>&gin -peo^T^ Ashe VKt< *« san ‘ itwoliraws - 

an even tougher type of nnUtei. said, -what I tan idl McEnroe and ^ „ o. , _ 

By Ms nature, Ashe wefos to Cramorsd^^iIlgaInaldL* , Fo rPlgll Stars til MfiY OT1 Italian TPi mia 

avoid confront at ions and dontro- Laie tW rt pwrmp matph «t . _ 

ftsy. But as die Davis Qip cap- Goi*ora last De^nber, Connors „ ROME(UPI)— Thepresitimtoflml /ssw cerlcagnehasgtvgiafirm 
, tato, he is about to confront 'tiie ^ about to walk onto the court to requests Ity the^AranOM and Bmffiaa federanrais that Sooth 

U.S. Tennis Association over against Mats WDandcr American stare in Italy be^<^ed to Jam tenatiraial teams before the 

McEnroe’s status this year. McEn- ^E^wassteammK." Ashcre- cndttf tbeltahan .season fm 'Worid CupquaEficatongmies. 
roe has declined to flgn a Daws called/Se didztoramtto ^be Acre l Fedoico SradiB^ rcspondms to a tdex sem ca^er fcs week by the 
Cup “boutract," wMch tbeassocra- iTSe fiat Mace because hft wife heads r So “ th Amencan fcdcranoig, smd: “It is abstAnriy 

tion plans to enforce riptffy. Under was about to haveababy, he hadn't «cessary that th c roxjsgners remain at the efisposmon of tter respective 

it. a . player pledges not 'only to played in five and one lalfwe^s.^ ^ until the end of the season. . 

make Sif available to die team, .Ld he hated olavinzon dav. I tMd y seems to put an md to hopes that such stars as Argentine 


Old FUK; Hector, Wadttll U). Eotfertr (Vj non Whrtt. W-Mccottv. 2-1. o-Aijaxanaor, 
and Banfoa. W— Burns. *-l L-HMdoa 2-Z M.Su-HWWlI (BkHRs-OaUo»l.Bah«-M). 
HRO-Cniaso. KJttle £2), Hairston (11. Dwi* (TO. HBi (a. Toronto, worn (31. Beil 

Ml S *5^4 m 8 S ^ 0B iron 1 M— Its • 

Staton. John IS). Corbett (41, Luoo IB and 
Boone; Boyd and GMim W-Bowtd-L L- 

> i i a « rm fliMlfin imvK fit KffTH (A)iSUlfUUB(lii nHOSTB I t) Wfl5GB 

SttoUlE mlm ni^WWWli MJ liw IBfa j. , iar aiww I 1_| n 


■o T mo ftnmmo Comm m.Xoehrv ttl.Takuh* (fl ondVlr- 

KliUCOtoira bU-W— T ttJbs.j-4.L“OBnnv.l-lHR— ancln- 

Oaktand oez in 0M-4 a C nQt4 ' Van m. 

Toronto 18 Ml MV- « V S PBtsliurak IM Ml 1M-- 2 11 • 

MeCefty, Kniner (61. AOwrtor (6J. Homofl SOn Dleao Ml SB MX— 12 IS • 

(M end Hanoi; Alexander. Kor (8). Adcar (I) Mcwuitaim. Guanto (5). Scurry (71 ml 

ond Whitt W—McCanv,3-t.O— Ataaxander, Perm. MawWim, LDoLaan 19) md Konnady. 
4-7. Sw— Howell (BkHRo— OaMomt. Baker (4|, Poetry (7). W — Howk&w. M. I — McWllltams. 
Davis (ID). HBt (21. Toronto. WMtt (31. Beil VL. HR— Son Dleoo. Garvey 15). 

(7). • CMaao IM Ml MB— 4 I I 

Seattle lnotlM-Itt • Sea France mi mb MB— • 6 1 

MUrnMno 0M 808 00-3 « l SuteiWe and Jitavlu KraUw, Minton (U 


Transition 

BASMJfTBALL 

Haftaooi MsfeotMl Asutiotlon 
LEAGUE— Flood Akeetn Oalinwm of 
Houston fisoo for shlklng Billy Paulti oi 
Utah In on A*rO 20 Ptoyo f f oarno. 

ATLANTA — Named Willis Rom assistant 
eoach. 

DALLAS— walvod Tom Sta&y, guard. 

FOOTBALL 

Natteaat FoathaH Laague 
CHIC AG O.. Named Andrew J. McKenna to 
me Hoard at candors. 

DENVER— Acquired Scott Rorldoa oftav 


Moorm. Monaz ff) am) Kearney; Bunli and Bronly. w-6utdMfB.4Atrt-KnmDm.aA ^(jnmjaafrtmlwIailoWitoMoxt^^ 


t (U. Fingers (?) and Sciviio- HR — Oilcaao. Sandberg (4). 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Bust DtolsNa 


dor.W— Moore, M.L— Burris, V-LSv— Munoz 
(51. HR— Seattle. Davb (2). 

DetroO IM Ml 108-4 t I 


SL Louis toO ON 140 — 2 i 3 

LM Angotas Bll 181 «*— 5 4 1 

Tudor. Allan (B> and Porter; Honeycutt. 
Howell (D and Yaaoor. W-HonoyoKL 2-1 


for an utModosed drett choice. 

MINNESOTA — Signed Tim Lang, offensive 
tackle. 

PITTSBURGH— Signed Tom Dixon, cen- 
ter; Gtan Homo, tackle; Charlie Dickey, 


Late in the opening match 


f isy. But as die- Dans Cup cap- Goiebraglast December, Connors • ROME (UFI)— The wesutentotiai; 
1 , tsK he is about to confront 'the ■vmSZ-wv* -tofeotert 

.U.S. Tennis Association over a gms t Mto Wihndg Ameairan gms m Itelybealiraved to jra 


McEnroe's states tins year. McEn- 
roe has declined to agn a Dams 
Cup “contract,” which the assotia- 


available to the team, 


ack to barira.' He lQst°SS raum hon “ teforc ***■ ItaBfin First P”® 011 P 1 ^. M=y 2°- 



W 

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Detroit 

15 

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J05 

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Tam lo 

14 

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Boston 

14 

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It 

15 

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New York 

18 

14 

417 

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Cleveland 

10 

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Basketball 


Petty, Honwndoe (fl and Parrish; Mann. L— ' Tudor, l-4. s u llowcll Ml. HR— SL Louis, guard; Randy dork, defensive back; Cornell 
Hootan (71, Ruzeato (9) and SkiuahL w— Ctaric 15). Gaexty. w nw Hwdt ; Kate Bowens. Stove Ut- 

Petry.Si L-MaMtoMSv-Heraondox UL «•- and Dave Scaruiia, defensive ends. 

HRB-oetrait, Ptrrtah Ml. SanctaK 2 (3). SEATTLE — Stoned Nathan Pools. tuB- 

■bmimn m tm oi-i > o " i Anthony Bouertoy. Julio Cone* and 

^sa-teLSSKSfJ Basketball SSSSKKK 

tomoeov; Jocksorv LaCoss <4), Qulsenherrv SS 

9) andSundburo.W — LfiCoss.l-0.1 — McGre- wm* 

NBA Play ofis 

ff II 1 WEONESnAYW RESULT pnd Tony Wo od Idcto-. ^ 

Cowttv.D.Coouor (41, Fisher (8) and Wyne- Detroit 3J W J3 H-T23 H""* 

or; Smithson. FHson (81 and w— Boston 38 34 V 35— no ARIZONA Wohmd Mite Robinson. Helen. 

mffhsotw«4L 1— Cewtoy.fta. Sv-nison (W. Bird 17-33 M 43. DJOhnsen 13-14 44 30; **•«*- 

i r» N ew York. Grfftov m. MlnnosahL vjohnson 11-14 84 30, Trleuckfl MS +5 20. NEW JERSEY— Ptoaed Donnea Daniel, 


m andSundberu.W— LoCoss, V0. L— McGre- 
gor, V3. HR— Kansas City, White (4). 

dot Yortt 434 808 183 ■ 4 7 8 bbkjji * 

HIM, Hill SM 390 IBs— 4 II 1 meONESDArS RESULT 

Cowtev,D.Coouor(4),F1sher(81andWyne- Detroit 33 3( 33 33-123 

par; Smithson. FHson (81 and Salas. W— Boston 38 38 37 35— 131 

Sfrtlthsoft, 4-3. L— Cowtay, 0-2 Sv— Risen (U. Bird 17-33 M a. DJohnson 13-14 44 30; 
HRs Hew Yortu CrtftOY (2). MllWOtalq, V-Jahnson 11-14 84 30. TrlPUCka MS *6 20. 
Gaetti (3). Hrbek (fl. R O bOtMr. Detroit 48 ILaUnbeer-Uft Boston 


NBA Playoffs 


.listened.”.. 

cup matches. - . . After two heart- 

- “If Jdu doesn’t agtC* Ashe tioas, Ade triows 
f saijk “There may be other ways to fisten, especially to 
i, on the team. His v?HKng= afteo the anesthesia 

jy r _ ness* to play nugbi bc acccptahlc. .T .reinemba’ the 
And if he-makes Jrimsdf available, operations fike they 


.rejlFVtf 


^'’XfitTto Mears Breaks Unofficial Lap Record 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Eat Dtvtefea 


fislen, espedalty to his own voice INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) — Rick Meats, Lhc deb 
when the' anesthesia wore off. 500 champion, broke the unofficial lap recrad at the 

.“I .remember the dates of those Speedway on Wednesday, 
operations fikfrtitev were my birth- . Meats drove lus 1985 March-Coswrafh al 213J7! 


And if he makes himsdf available, operations fiketiiey were my tarth- . Meats drove his 1985 March-Cosworfhal 211371 mph (343.378 kph)i 
FD p&k -MuL .whefher he sigz2S or day — 12-13-79 and/d-21-83," be breaking the nDoffirial track record of 2I2JU6 mph (342.484 kph) set on 
no t" \\ : saw. “And wtet I vroke' im after Tuesday Ity Roberto Guerrero. Tom Shievahalds the official mark, which 

-.If the United States -wete : to re- each one, Isaid to myself, ‘Here we can-oaty b6 posted in qualifying or the race, of 220.689 mph (339.062 
capture the Davis Cup >wthMcEn-. gQ agam.’” kph). Official quafitying fra the May 26 race begins Saturday. 



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NATIONAL LEAGUE 
All DOtti OMOMMO— I S 8 

NSW York 3M in tax— I 7 * 

Barker. Smith C5>, FOrstor Oh Dodman (8) 
and Carons; Lyneh and Cartor.W-Lvncn.2- 
llr4MMf.Ba.HB- NSW York. H s monooz 

m. 

IIGJltan — SOO BBS B 4 D 

M untreul 418 8M 00»— 1 3 1 

nyan, D5mWi in and Bailey: Hatfetm. 
Roardon tt} and FrbaenPd. W-HtsketXJ-i. 
L — Ryan. 2-2. Sv— Reardon. {■). 

ChshmaH W 00« 204-0 t ■ 

PMtadatoMa. 3M 0M M8— A 7 2 

rate Price (71 and Vcn Gsnkr; Denny, 


R Oh O— a s: Detroit 48 ILnhnbear-Uft Boston “tatyimtholnlyred r*oorv*lls}.5tanod Le- 
53<Blrdl3>.Asslsis! DotroTtTI t Thomas 75; mart Jeffers, Undsadcar. 


Boston 21 (Djohnson, Atago 6). 

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
EASTERN 

(Bostoo leads lortosSdl 
May ID: Boston at Detroit 
X-MOY 12; DoiroH at Boston 

(PhOmtaUta defc MOwOMCftt, 44) 

WESTERN 

(la. uaxrs del. Puttand. 4-1) 
(Dsmr doL Utah, 4-1} 


PORTLAND— Waived Doug woodward, 
qwrtarhoduand Scott Byers,dotanslvo back. 


European Soccer 


UEFA CUP 
(FhwL First Leo} 
nm Ntadrld X Vidootan O 
Next Match: May 22 In Madrid 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Chelsea X Luton 0 
Ev *rton X West Ham 0 


J 


! 






Page 20 


Nc 

E 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY MAY 10, 1985 


OBSERVER 

A Change of Image 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I used to work 
hard at being Humphrey Bo- 
gart- The trend} coat, the cigarette 
cupped in my gun hand while I 
coolly appraised beauties I 
wouldn't hesitate to send up for 20 
years if they knocked off my part- 
ner, the snap-brim hat that could 
double as an umbrella if I had to 
wait in a Paris downpour sometime 
for a scrumptious Mrs. Victor 
Laszlo who would never appear — 
1 worked at the full construction. 

All right, it was not always suc- 
cessful. My friend Finney told me 
to forget the snap-brim hat. “It 
emphasizes your pointy head," he 
said, so I gave it up, but not gra- 
ciously. Finney was working hard 
at bang Errol Flynn, and though 
the mustache he had grown for this 
purpose wasn’t really bad, I said, 
"You ought to get rid of the mus- 
tache, Finney; it emphasizes your 
resemblance to Groucho Man." 

Afterward, I felt so rotten about 
this — - the mustache was the only 
trimming on Finney that was a bit 
like Errol Flynn — that 1 went to a 
bar and tipped the piano player to 
play “As Time Goes By” and want- 
ed to drink too much but didn’t 
because of what my doctor had 
recently told me about my liver. 

Those were the days before Fin- 
ney and I lost our passion for the 
great existential heroes of modem 
tunes. Fm not sure what happened 
to us, except age. It’s inevitable, I 
suppose, that a man whose joints 
creak when he gets out of bed will 
lose his zest for standing in Paris 
downpours waiting for women he 
knows win never show up. 


1 don't recall giving up Bogart 
He slowly worked his way out of 
my bones and psyche, so slowly 
that T didn’t notice he was gone, 
until Finney came over for pinoch- 
le one night and entered saying: 

“Mis. Finney cautioned ine that 
this game would be too hard and 
urged me to avoid it Take the easy 
way, Mr. Finney.’ she said. And do 
you know what I said to her? 1 said. 
’Mrs. Finney. I will never take the 
easy way.* And do you know why I 
will never take the easy way? For 
seven reasons. Reason No. 1: The 
easy way is. . 

No, Finney was not raving mad. 
He simplv was working hard at 
being Richard 


Nixon. I respected 


that My own life had seemed emp- 
ty ever since Fd lost Bogart: I imag- 
ined Finney had felt the same emp- 
tiness since the creak of his knees at 
rising had started making a mock- 
ery of his Errol Flynn hopes. 

Yet a man had to work at being 
somebody other than himself. 
What was' more American in a man 
than crying to filch a personality 
from somebody famous? 

Why were famous people always 
before us. infesting magazine cov- 
ers and television and movies and 
newspapers, except to show that 
their famous personalities were so 
superior to our dull, unfamous per- 
sonalities that we had better slip 
into one of theirs? 

“But why Nixon?" I asked. 

Well, it was the age of conserva- 
tism. He was too sedate now to 
work at being a glamorous conser- 
vative movie starlike Frank Sinatra 
or Charlton Heston, and he didn't 
fed the call to work at being a 
famous conservative parson Hke 
Jerry FalweiL 

T would have started working 
on Ronald Reagan if you hadol 
already absorbed the role so thor- 
oughly,” he said. 

□ 

Until Finney mentioned it, I 
hadn't realized I’d been working at 
Ronald Reagan. Now suddenly I 
understood why for months I had 
been walking briskly along side- 
walks, looking over my shoulder to 
the world behind me and, with 
hand cupped to my ear. shouting. 
“I can’t near you." 

“When the president does that 
number, it’s because they’re rev- 
ving up the helicopter engines to 
drown out the reporters' ques- 
tions," said Finney, “but when you 
do it it just makes you look aBy, 
like the old days when you were 
working at Bogan and would gp 
into your trench-coat pocket for 
your rod and come out with noth- 
ing but your right index finger-" 

Working at Ronald Reagan, Fm 
now equipped with six-guns in- 
stead of rods. That’s why vou’ll see 
me walking around, shoulders 
back, arms crooked at the elbows, 
bands just a few inches away from 
the hips — just the way the presi- 
dent walks. 

1 may look funny, but it's health- 
ier than standing in those awful 
downpours waiting for beauties 
who never show up. 

New York Times Service 



An artist’s rendering of the Windstar, mm under construction in Le Havre. 

Cruise Line Returns to the Days of Sail 


By Joseph Novitski 

P I AR1S — A tall sailing ship, the first in 
three-quarters of a century to be built 
from the keel up for strictly commercial pur- 
poses, is bong constructed for an American 
cruise line in a French shipyard. 

The Windstar, whose four masts wiQ each 
tower 1 88 feel (57 meters) above the water, is 
neither an anachronism nor an experiment. 
The cut of her modem rig. the largest of its 
kind ever undertaken, would be recognized 
on sight by most cruising sailors, but it is 
being designed and developed by computers. 

Computers will also control the external 
stabilizers and internal ballasting, as well os 
the interaction between sail and auxiliary ■ 
engine power. But the ship was designed from 
the start, in Finland and in France, to more 
best and fastest under sail. 

The staysail schooner saOplan. with sails 
i ha t will roll up like window blinds on remote 
command to huge hydraulic winches, has half 
the total area of the last and largest square 
riggers. But it has such efficiency and ease of 
operation that a tum-of-th e-century sailor, 
bound around Cape Horn, might have cried 
for iL 

All those involved in the project, from the 
American board chairman to the French pro- 
ject engineers, point out that, for them, prac- 
ticality rules, not nostalgia. The $33-million 
ship was commissioned to make money car- 
rying cruise passengers, not to test theories of 
energy conservation. 

“Fuel economy was nor the primary con- 
sideration." said Karl G, Andren, the Finn- 
ish-born sou of a sea captain. He formed 
Miami-based Windstar Sail Cruises Ltd. as 
the ship's owner and operator and is the 
company’s board chairman. Andren. 38, 
moved from a career on Wall Street into 
shipping 10 years ago and is now president of 
the Circle Line, which carries passengers on 
tours of New York’s harbor. 


‘The primary consideration was a market- 
ing derision, based on study, that the cruise 
market was ripe for specialization, for a new 
kind of cruise." he said. 

Still, all the leaders of the project seem to 
have a sense that they are making history by 
bringing new technology to bear on the an- 
cient art of going to sea under saTL Even a 
delegation of unionized French shipyard 
workers, visiting management on other mat- 
ters, asked for permission to photograph the 
recently completed scale modd of the new 
ship type. 

The construction plans for the Windstar 
show two decks of outride cabins ooly.public 
rooms with roofs that roll away at night to 
give a view of the sails and stars, ana oat- 
board-powered launches to lake pas 
diving, water-skiing or touring. Other 1 
will include intricate cabinetry and individual 
video players in the cabins. 

The Windstar and an identical ship. Wind- 
song, were ordered in November by Windstar 
Sail Cruises at a cost of S66 million- They are 
to carry 150 passengers, in a luxury setting 
designed by a P arisian architect, Marc Held, 
on two-week cruises in the Caribbean and, 
eventually, the Mediterranean. 

The first ked was laid March 27 in Le 
Havre. The Windstar s maiden voyage, after 
extensive fitting and testing, is scheduled for 
early December 1986. Bookings will be taken 
late this year. 

The Windstar will be long, lean and lofty, 
and, at 440 feet overall and 361 feet on the 
waterline, larger than the largest square- 
rigged training vessd now s ailing . Its hull 
more closely resembles the last commercial 
square-riggers than a modem passeager ship, 
but its four masts will be taller than the tallest 
mast on the famous Cutty Sark dipper. 

“There is no doubi that she is to be a sailing 
ship." says Francois Faury, 44, the engineer 
in charge of the yard in Le Havre where 80 


welders are cutting and fitting plates and ribs 
in rusty-rose-colored steel while engineers 
and computer-programmers design and test 
the hull and sail propulsion system. 

The sailing system, assisted by three diesd- 
electric engines, is descended from the big 
Yankee schooners that traded between New 
England and the Caribbean in the dying days 
or sail between the two world ware. The 
French builders are also drawing on research 
that began when the Arab oil embargo of 
1973 first started naval architects, shipowners 
and governments thinking about a return to 
sail power for shipping. 

The Japanese shipyard Nippon Kokan 
K_K_ has launched five coastal tankers and 
two bulk carriers with airfoil sails to assist 
their main engines when conditions are right. 
Still, 10 years have passed rince a University 
of Michigan wrhnieal study commissioned 
by the UJL Maritime Administration pre- 
dicted that modem sailing vessels with auxil- 
iary power might cover Pacific trading nxites 
more cheaply than motor vessels if the price 
of bunker fuel rose above $15 a band. The 
price has now reached S40 a barrel but no 
test of a modem sailing rig on this scale has 
yet beat undertaken. 

The Windstar marks such a departure from 
current designs that it will undoubtedly serve 
as a practical test for others interested in the 
energy savings of safl. As Faury said at an 
engin eering symposium two years ago, of an 
experimental Japanese ship: “She has made it 


iems and to make shipowners and 
aware of the idea, which is certainly not new, 
that the wind is an inexhaustible source of 
energy that is quite easily converted." 

Joseph Novitski, a former correspondent for 
The New York Tunes and The Washington 
Pose, is writing a book about the Windstar. 


PEOPLE 


Being No, 2 at No, 10 


4 


Denis Thatcher, husband of 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
of Britain, says that, far him, living 
at No. 10 Downing Street means 
“always being present but never 
there: a few steps behind, staying 
out of trouble.” In an interview 
given to his daughter, Oral, a re- 
porter for the Dait 
Thatcher, who turns 70 
said he took pride in his 
appearance and was philosophii 
about his age. “I agree with Mau- 
rice Cherafier. who said. Tl feds 
fine when you consider the alterna- 
tive,’ " he said. “I can still play 36 
holes of golf in a day. It gets a bit 
like hard work sometimes but I can 
still walk around." Often asked 
how he keeps fit. Thatcher said he 
regularly made old ladies giggle 
with his stock reply: “Gin and ciga- 
rettes.’’ 

□ 

U Chengxiang, artistic director 
of the Central Ballet of niiim, has 
announced the company’s first 
U-S. tour. From Feb. 23 to April 
20, 1986, the Beijing-based compa- 
ny will present works including 
Chinese ballets, a ballet for four 
men, choreographed by Anton Do- 
Bn, and one by Ben Stevenson of 
the Houston BalleV which recently 
Visited China Li, who mprie the 
announcement in New York, said 
the 25-year-old company bad 
toured in Europe and Asia. 

□ 

The French are ready for a face- 
lift for their national symbol pre- 
ferring the actress Catherine Den- 
awe to replace Brigitte Bardot as 
the model for the “Marianne" fig; 
ure that decorates town halls across 
the country. A poll of 1.826 people 
said 36 percent of those surveyed 
favored Deneuve over celebrities 
including the singers MfrefUe 
Madsen and Sylvie Vartan and 
Princess Caroline of Monaco. 

O 

. A London court has imposed a 
four-year driving ban cm Rkk Par- 
fttt, guitarist for the British rock 
band Status Quo, after be pleaded 
guilty to a charge of drunken driv- 
ing. Parfitt, 36, was fined £350 
($420) and ordered to pay costs of 
£100. He said be planned to buy a 
bicycle “and a couple of track 
suits.” 

□ i 

The Americas actor Gary Mer- 
rill picketed a bookstore near his 
home in Falmouth, Maim-, carry- 


ing a handmade sign that read 
“Please Boycott ‘My Mother s 

Keeper"” to protest claims made Ut 

the book by Barbara HynM. a 
HangVitpr - of his former wife Bette 
Dans. Merrill was Hyman's adop- 
tive father during his stormy 1950- 
1960 marriage to Davis. The book, 
which depicts Davis as an abusive , 
alcoholic, accuses Merrill of beat-# 
ing Davos and Hyman and of 
dri nkin g incessantly. 

□ 

Thomas R. Kendrick, director of 
operations of the Kennedy Center 
in Washington, wiD resign in Sep- 
tember to become executive direc- 
tor of the S£5-5-rmUion Orange 
County Performing Arts Center be- 
ing built in Southern California. 
The Kennedy Center has been un- 
dergoing radical changes with the 
inauguration of the American Na- 
tional Theater under the direction 
of Peter Seflars, but Kendrick anf* 
the center’s chairman, Roger L» 
Stevens, denied any connection be- 
tween the resignation and the es- 
tablishment of the theater. 


The exiled Czechoslovak novelist 
Mibn Kundera, accepting the Jeru- 
salem Prize for the Freedom of 
Man in Society, said be believed 
the novel had “come into the world 
as the echo of God’s Laugh urr." 
Kundera has lived in Paris since 
1975. The jury of Israeli professors 
and writers said they gave KundeiU? 
the pros because be wrote abour 
“the power of the totalitarian re- 
gime and the power of Western 
excess consumption" in such nov- 
els as “The Unbearable Lightness 
of Bring." 


Luciano Pavarotti became over- 
tired daring rehearsals fora French 
tderisaoo program and returned to 
Italy after bemg ordered by a doc- 
tor to rest, the program's host said 
Thursday. Pavaroftv 49, i$ also 
scheduled to sing in Verdi's “The 
Masked Ban," op ening May 18 at 
the Paris Opria. A spokesman for, 
the Opria, however, denied report^ 
that the tenor had canceled his en- 
gagement. . . . Prince Bernhard, 
73, husband of former Queen Jrf- 
ana of -the Netherlands, was dis- 
charged from a hospital Thursday 

eration inT^^TJniveraty hospi- 
tal, a government spokesman saixL 


i 1 

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& W i 

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BUYING A reOFKTYIN THE UK? 

We am find you atytfeng from a 
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son. 69150 OEQNE54.YON, Fie 


RELOCATING TO DC UK? Sara tone 

& effort. I w| reach for the home of 
war choice v«r ^ london. Arhdovm 
Relocotion (073522) 3074. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE REAL STATE 
OPPORTUtflTTB SEE 
PAGES 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

Old riverside house below the charm- 
mg village of Aucivau. 20 mins. Fran 
Canna. Transformed & modernized to 
indude 2 rec e ptions, 3 bedreera, 3 
boHwoons. complete peace. Three 
quarters ot an acre of garden 
Pnca only FI .200,000- W: TW. Apply? 
John taylor sjl 
55 Us CrooettE 
, 06430 Comes 

Tel: f»3| 38 00 66. Tlx 470921. 


|4 KM DEAUVHLL 


□gnmeent t7ih 
century manor home, tody furrvshed. 
•age iecef*ion. 7 bedroom. 2 fufi 
bathrooms J 3 hdf baths, ksge 

rapxpped kitchen, 45,000 sqm. land, 

targe swinonng pool, sauna, poo! 

house. IBto cei 
house ... . 

- . . Price 

. „ Tefc (II 548 22 83 / 222 71 

13 or » ji AAt.. 9 rue Jecn Fer- 
rari*. 75006 Pais. 


SAINT LAURENT 

rive gauche 

Women shop 


19 et 21 avenue Victor - Hugo 
75116 Paris Tel. (1) 500.64.64 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FRANO-NORMAM>Y-DEAUVIU£. 

Casino, god, hones, hsarous rea- 

dme. modem, pot 7 ha terns. 
sracA stone Normandy house. 4 
roams. 84 sqm. 2 bars, equpped 

Imchen, pork. Urge bay randows 4 

rl high 10 m. lags. Superb view on 
Seine doma. Centred healing. Tel: Par- 

a monwm week days a eranna 584 

02 52. fox 2170, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuBy Codex. France 


COTE D'AZUR 

Cap O' Ai, heswaen Nice & MorteCa- 
kr, mqaxficBnl patoraric mew, 80 
sqm. Ring. 2 bedrooms. H£0 •000- 
Contact Jean Great* 9, 

X Avenue Fobron, 06200 hfa. 
Tel (93) 44 53 41. 


COTE D'AZUR 

CAP VAR 

BETWEEN MCE t MONTE CARLO 

po noron uc mu gndiewt view. 00 sqm. 
King. 2 bedrooms. FB50.00Q. Contact: 
Jean Gregoire, 30 Avenue Fctoron 
06200 ffco Franca. T«t (1693) 44 584) 


FOR SA1£ 50 KM SOUTH NANTES 

nenr by the awt borde rin g fish 

Main. 5UPSB PROPERTY £N7KE- 

IY KNOVATED. on large enclosed 
fend, landscaped, pond d uxufa ts. 
Absolutely awn. R2Q.QOO cfl tedud- 

ed. Write or cal in French t» flATtS- 

SEURS CHAUANDAS. 8OT0 Bcxs de 

Gene. Tel: (51) 68 12 98 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

GREAT BRITAIN 

YOUR CONTACT IN KOVBKE. 

Houses vrth duxocter. Chaining 
properties. Estates. Ende GABON. 
UTSS. 13532 ST8EMYOE-PSO- 
VB4CE Cedex. Tefc (90) 910158 +. 

pjii 

I£S MS4LRRE5, ALPS. 2000m attitude, 

ftroom raxxnnerfc. 6 beck, very rai- 
ny. comforts, lags ski damaxi on 
three voters. Tefc (3) 955 07 05. 

7195l Priricipob only. 

pPfj 




GREAT BRITAIN 

EATON SQUARE LONDON SW1 

London's mast prestigious square dose 
to Harrads. Spacious Apartment in era 
macufate conation with own beauefuf 
73 ft gordea 4 bedrooms, 3 brihroams, 
2 reception rooms- Torri outgoings 
£4700 per anraea £185/100 foe finr 
lease from July 1985. 

RUS5EU. SIMPSON 

I0A Miner Sheet London SW3 
Tel: (01) 225 0277 

LOMX3N, PEftWODGE SO. W2. 
Spacious 3 bedroom flat situated in 
cfauiJe fronted penad buiefina beou- 
hfri views, parquet flooring irroo^v 

04. ElSSDOft Tefc 01-221 0548 

IRELAND 

UBAF01 TYBIBISPASS County 
Westmeath. 60 trite from Dubkn on 
the man Griwroy bad, 2-storey rid 
redory over wel lad basemenl, 4 
bedrooms, 2 bothf. modem WdteA 
perfect condition, cutlet yard & 
oufoddngs. lrh£150JX». Far more 
information tel 353/ 44/23232 kriand, 
from May 5*h on. 



VAJSON LA ROMANS South of 

France. subOanhd stonebutit Pro- 

ven^d m ers, re stored. 5 betkoares. 

living, fxeplace. 3 garages, mtbaid- 
ngtVO Daaw km planted with lav- 
nxitv. etc. Private spring, hunting & 

fohng. Very fine view overlooking 

Ventouv. Freehold property. Uses, tefc 
(75) 26 01 56. 


UNUSUAL 
COTE D’AZUR 

One of the last duplexes right-on-sea 
Somt-JewOto Fw/ai. F2.10O.DOO. 
GAIUAN: 01 48 87. 43 Bd. Joffre. 

06310 BeouCeu S'Afar. 


BUNCH RIVERA . Nkb. Luxurious 
modern cjfxxtment on toe top. bed & 
King roam, bg terrace unto port- 
come ocean view, calm cxea. 10 
rrinufes walk to sea F72S.000 ! best 
offer, urgent by owner. France (73) 75 
5241. 


GUd'tCf 

morion l 


LUXURY 6 BEDROOM CHA1H. 

acre 40 rrxnufes Geneva at 

fesMefriseaHauteSovcn.sk) 

& of season alpne resort . mognrfi. 

cent veto of k*e. FI .250,000 or fecal 

equvafert. Private sale Mrs IGngdon 

xiU K (066731) 729 


IMKXJE CANNES necr CROfSETTE 

On the beach. In Roped pari veto 

swintfrang^tool. iauno. wonderful top 

Hoar, ?-Seiocrn oparteienfe SS sqm. 
Terrace 15 sqm. UND8! VALUE 
Fl.100.000. S 47. La Ooaene. 
06*00 Cannes. Tefc (93) 38 19 19. 


SOS. ~Mobot de Caracter". 1 hour 

Paris, 5 minutes from canon. 3 bed- 
rooms. Irving, study, drang, kitchen, S 
marble firnploces. 1930 Slone con- 
strucrion. 1977 renovation, oak floors, 
8100 soft, goider. Fl^DqaOO. No 
agwes. Cal 8. Anderson (11 520 53 57. 

CANNES OUTSTANDING 175 sqm. 

apartmer* to tenaoe, fanecssc sea 

view. Lrinnq dmng. 3 bedrooms. 2 
get ages. Passfate hjnrahnd. Urgeni 
Mer value F l&Qjm. Co* aTc- 
Mur (93) 94 40 53 


BEAUX PROVENCE l ARIES. BuJdmg 

ke BS0 sq.m- AO fealties w pme fores 
& immauded ww. Tefc erarungs Rev- 
mand &W-945597, 31-1719T39I9. 
41-22 575324 Box it 71, Herald Trv 
bune. 92521 Neuay Cedru. fteg 


COIE D’AZUR. Cannes CoSferme.lu. 
unous 2/3 room Ike, 70 sqm.. 20 
sqm. terrace. 9to floor, sea view, in 
privene pari; pod. terma court, golf 

driving ranra. J4 hour porte ro g u . 

FI .400,000. Phong (93) 42 00 22. am. 


5 KMS FROM MONTE CARLO. Ox 

eny gem of a nxxfermzed hoedoy ffer 

for 7 in mesheval vflJaga. superb sea 

m>. FF630JB0 funder S70X00). Me- 
radar. View KooKbrune. 06190 
Ftanae. Td: (93) 35102S3. 


VB4CE core D'AZUR, Beautiful 82 

sqm.. 2 bedrooms, ftvirm. American 

style hedwn. terrace, cefc. o crima 

very pleasant & giml area F75QXTO. 
Wnte Berne. 22 Bd. Jean Mermaz, 
92200 NeuJfy Tel: (1) 747 51 48. 


VBOK 25 bm sea. Ma^rdKen do- 

■nun. 1 4th century . Lor ge recqrncn, 5 

bedrocra. 2 bdhj. shower, ferd/sJd 
tirefJace. 3 ha pool. slotdH & feet 
toms. Ui**«3rSlF)J0aCa). Fur 
lushed, F2 ,000 .000; 16-51 69 18 35 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


IRELAND 


BEAUTKULY RJUY RJRM5HH) 2 
bedroom cottage with 1 acre in coast- 
ol area af CourVy Cork. £27 ,000 Ster- 
brg. Tefc Breda 33613 


HOLLAND 


THE HAGUE 

Aitrodwe wdWept towitoouse 
in the center 

rigW behind Longa Voorhort" 
Lota of space, now Roots, 4 fire- 
places, South facing wtdadsn ^xricn. 

Brochure on request. Info: 
HQ5IA VANDERUNDEN Red Ectade 
Noordemde 37. The Hogue 
Tefc Haloid (0)7045 69 !2 
Ask far Mr. Mebe or Mr. Kamel 


ITALY 


fTAir PORTO SKXX£ stone budr 
fam9y house • 710 sqm. with Icrgr 
terrace in lov ely vofcy overiooh riq 
forts & sea. 2 sepceate apurtmerto. 4 
batfis. tferas 7. 4RJ0 sqm. garden & 
land. Tefcte6U833317. 


ITALY - TUSCANY. Beautiful, old 
fomhouss, wtaly restored & tar- 
rished. Luxurious baths with ar*tex, 
22 ,000 sqm. land. Lcc ep UxxJ view, 
located nets Psa. BRfflCO (Paris) 
533 6691. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE-CARLO 
Extremely vraS ^ poi n ted Oscar of 
Penthouses for sale. Comprising 1 (fin- 
ing saloon and 2 very large sdoors 
each one wdh guests totes and enor 
mout brerthtetong sea/mouneciR view 


g^mi/terracE, 


2 large double beixxxrB and 2 

smoker bedrooms with beshrooras and 
ckessng, 3 go r oges and staremoms, 
heofedswimwiB g pod. tormb end M- 
dteo‘s playground 24 hour (toormat & 
“ife-iecumy system assures perfect 

S JOHN TAYLOR A SON AGBNT 
2a Bd. dei Moufas, 
Mante-Corlo. 

T* (93) 50 30 7G 


MONIE CARLO 
PARK PALACE 


—.116 sq 

pally furnished at fuk Pcfaat, oppa* 
toe toe ammo and Hotel de Por^ in toe 
Golden Tnongfe of Monte Cmfe. i 
baking . 5th floor with fro nt and i 
terraces, oehr & po d i n g. 

For Info nxto o n: Pleoee cot 
Mbs H. ScSechier, at Bheirtoi 

War Germany Tefc (02843) 1G 


International Business Message Center 


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MANY CLAIMS 
AK MADE 
REGARDING 

CONTAINER INVESTMENT. 

FOR EXAMPLE 

EARN HXW INCOME OF 

17% -20% 

PBl ANNUM 

W* CTC no* rrckmg such dents 
because we beicra ton cat be 

GREATER ADVANTAGES, 1 

We ere a mejor cotraner feesng cam- 
pony (founded 1773) wrh cn exceSent 
record O# return & service fer OW de 
ant s. W e ore currently ■'nonqjic over 
1 7JJ00 cormsnera far over 2i00 oenfs. 

If you si consderutg at arvesanert m 
cantcaners -to suggest you comae us 
before maiung your demon. 

SHJRISTAR 

I NTERNA TIONAL SALES 
KHZRSGRACHT 534 
1017 « AMSTERDAM 
TBr (020) 272833 


HARD DISK DRIVE (HDU) 
MANUFACTURING 
EQUIPMBJT FOR SALE 


A tearing U.S nan u fartirer cf S?6 
mch hah heoh: 10 MSyte tertf risk 
dnvrs will produchcn ngris arid 


eqjtpmert. MstufaCur.ng process 
fu*y documented. Equ^mr.r ij less 
toon 2 yeers rid end is c-a pc b fe of pc- 

rirang m races: <r. eOG drves per 0 

Kwr shift Over I SC 000 rsgh quc5ty 
drr.f. produced to ise. 

Aha awxfeqte are deS'STi f v 5 25 *rti 
hdf height 2£i MSyte y*j 35 mcr« '0 
MByte ™ risk irives. 


PrvxipaL Only 
Write or Triephone. 

T. Gardner 

475 Ocrinteod P~r*~ r 
Sum-rreie. CA 

94066 USA 
(USaj <08-737 toCOU 


US$75,000 NBDW b, promote- & 

dnenraSy of irdusfia enpreer- 

m^gre^ far nmpJe^an T CoMepl 


raw 


fv*iy beretira 
CaflV Snarda 352-43:331. 


L'J. 


BUSINESS 

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INVEST IN 
FUTURES 
TODAY! 


The Tnsuwurid Fgtgne Pool 
■ A date? based investment fend bod- 
cS mesor fitoxts induring GOLD, 
crude od and stock 

indices. 

- Lmked to computer (raring systems 

with 30% overage yearly 'etum since 

1979. 

Write for REE brodmra 
ffera indude your phono number: 

(Minimum Investment US$10JXXJ| 

Trans World Convnodnes lorited 
Deto AT519 

6 Avenue Uoyd Georges, Bax 2 
1050 


Tel: (02) 640 32 
Telex 22961 TRANS B 
Kestncted in Betgum 


MONEY TREES ? 

YE51 Invest in aie of America's most 
B-coong techralopcd breridfeaughs in 
a hBon dolor maustry. We hove plant- 
ed more nut trees in 1984 rhen sty 
other de wi op er in our State, 
fcfigh artnud rae ni uBii mured for 
many, nony yews and *te guano* 
tea to raptoriMH krvortment 
BHOraS^ aWlSBES R4VTTBD. 
Material ervodo fate n En^sK r ranch, 
German. Box 1993, Herald Tribune. 
92521 NewBy Ceife*. Fra» 


TRADER COMMOOniES 

meriumstae European T rorin g Compo- 

K rqwres experienced trader, prefer* 
with good ccnneokn in eaten 
COunmes - 


»i qam, 
_ , vegetable & iv 
coffee and general pet 
duce - to be v tonon e d in Zundi office. 
Please send C.V. to P.O. Bax 526. 

CHS&: Zundx. 


MAJOR US KAITH 1 BEAUTY ad 

ao wishes to espbre buuness opp a - 

rumves ^i SwxroMavi fVu nsrdy «fw- 

csed m hedlh and beauty qd prod- 

ucts thet can tte exported to USA 
morket and'ev sold in Switzerland. 

Arrange merit con be outright pur- 

chcaes. bcerarg o, oihor arratge- 

rrenq Reriv USA Hedlh and Beauty 

Art Ca . 944 Indfen Peel Id. RoBng 
mt. Coefomo U5A 90274 Attention 
Ms. Werner. 


LOOXJNG FOR HQLDB5 OF CD 

pc x sports orrt/cr CD auto Uf?P- HI 
AG. Frewstrcsse 1 55. CKB03x7urieh. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


P ETROOfEM f CAl (N WiS TRY, pla n 

engineering, construction coopotel; 

our new low ra&oge pomr tads of 
oulstenring technolo^ccd features. 
Looking far ogi 2 n(s m antiCft courv 
Ina having the required contact*. 
Soles Prcrnoaon Enferpriia. POB 113, 
3027 Bern. SwifcatoxTlefc B31 56 « 
87. Tbu 911145 Alto. Frundan 


MONACO GRAND PRDC tatay 19. 

70ft luxury yocH dtarter. deeps 6/7. 

Arrive VVea. fm leave Man. noon. 

Prime plaoe in Monaco port. A1 com- 

plete price mrturing food, wine & 
tpinta. d dwgra. USSS^OQ. ffease 
ato Aasel Utnt m Aittte Franoe (93) 
34 04 7B5 or Tfe 461131 (YocNs). 


YOUR US. CONNECTION M Afkxv 

n. Save tune & (Lto our mufeftnguri 
Hoff ai YOUP LL5. addrou asset in 
es tob li st iin g and mrin totn ing valuable 

txxsnes eotows. TeB ia yew needs. 

Write to New Direction PCS 76)12. 
Roswell. Georfto 30(g6. USA 


ARBITRAGE. COLLATERAL far arb- 

IraraaOiom provided Rapid 




based Tefc 01 244 9592/01 3S5 

5492/01 930 8926. Telex 3951622 

TARRCOG. 


PANAMA UBB0JL CORPORATIONS 

from USS400 ovaUrte now. Tel 

(06241 2024a Trie* 628352 ISLAND 

ajwUQ. 


COSTA DB. SOL We seek partners 

For irim venture in toe Morbelo area. 
Please wnte to Segarra. Bcordo Sor 
ana 60 Marbefla. Mafago 


COMPUTBS far busness and person- 

ri use. Authorised deafer for BM, 
Apple, others. Best ericas. Col Mr. 

Lawrence. Pahs 563 2989/ 348 3000 


SITU BUYING SWATCH WATQE5. 

Paying cash, any style cert quantity. 

Mr. eftfwwer. Zurik Tefc 0I/36T { 7 

77. Tetex 816 055. 


LOW COST RESIDENTIAL STATUS in 


focal porqrile, no ^ 


required. Apply Bax 

of Mai 


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HOW TO GET a. Second Passport, re- 

port. 12 cortriej analyzed. DetoSs: 

45 Lyndfarst TtE Sto 507. 
Central. Hong Kang. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTh-CAMLO TWTHOtSF 
Extremely wril afpomted Oscar of! 
Perdhouees far safe. Comprises 1 riraig 

srioon & 2 very foot saloon eodt one 

with guests laflett & enarraaus hneafh- 
• ’ ‘ ’ ter. 


race, very large eqiepp. _ 
large double bedrooms • 2 

bedrooms veto bcths & dressng erv 

suiteL gcrqges & itosraaai. (barman & 

eh/searSy system awn perfect 

JOHN TAYUDRA^ON AGENCY 
20. Bd. des Mouins, MonteCarix 
Tet (93) 50 30 7a 
Tlx TaViC* 469)80 MC 


MONI^CARLO 

Private maarion near Monaco Prim 
Palace, fwjesiic p uuu ik view. Tel 
lieeMayt 11 tun. P5 30 46 54. 


EXCEPTIONAL PRICE. _ 

Monte-Carlo. Flat, 2 brihs, 3 ram 
jwwht view^ferrace. newt buMng. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


EXCEPTIONAL PANORAMA 
ON THE SBC VAILEY 
7B-YveSnes on N13. 60 fee. Boris 

LARGE 04GOSH RE3DB4CE 
wffh CHARACTBL 1200 sqm. on 
3 fevrifa 20 rxms vSidi 

Uxvs XB wtxsd wol 
nfesed infirided 
wood. 

91 rue du FG. ST-HONORE 
75008 PARIS THEX 642.066 F 


pj tel nQ. on 7 ho. widosad is 


INVEST 2 WffitS n Bolter Hedlh. 

Enter Gonfioe Bdc Prevention & 



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COURIER SERVICE. Private & canfi- 

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Accounting rcomfxrry formahons + 

m m xj g eme nt/se ci esotiri/ phone/ 
le*/maL Contact finser. 12-14 f 
d'Avrandtes, 1 1 60 Luxembcn 
(+352) 492151 Tbt 1431 


Bd. 


GIRO BUSRCSS CBfTS 
99 Kazersgrodd: 1015 Ol Amsterdam 
Tel: 31.20.55 57 49 Telex 16161 
World-Wide ffrmnrrr Centers 


PAJS5 ADDRB5, __ 
Seme >757 157. prorates 

trie*. 


75008. 


mvvfbnq r 

. TefcS? 


rooms. 5 rue dArtod, 
■47 04. Tlx: 642504 


YOUR OfRCE IN PARlSd THEX 

ANSWBSNG SSTVlCE. s c oetary. 
erronch, ma/ben, he 24H/doy 
TeL PATi 60795 9d. 


BTABUSHB3 RELOCATION agency 

saris vida for arose border cooper 
atetn. Wnee PO Bn 5075. 1 0D7AE 
Amsterdam 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


y hrOtvIf] 

ora, 10 offices on380 sqm. 10 pair 
mg spaces. 562 42 45. 


lmprime par ujjprinu 7 3 rue de I'Erangile. 75018 Paris. 

\ 


UNTANXfA SB15 

VHh SAINT-GERMAIN 

LUXURIOUS I 


SUPERB DUPL EX 
FEph qx*y services. fBSFECT. 
Xvfch century butkfina. 

Dcauavire (^ 56 I- 9&91 


STNOM LA BRETEOff 
SUPHB PROPBmr 

217 sqm. tram specs, 
indoor antored_^aaL Finnish 
prak. 


roan, 1^ 

VERY HIGH C 

FZBOQJJOO 
COP. (3) 954 92 00 


DOURDtN-DORESSAY 

Heritor in la Class ft qu ertiB 
Telex: 613BQ7F 

(1) 624 93 33 


REAL ESTATE 

FC®SAL£ 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


PARS 16 PASSY- Architect remod- 
eled lint floor u portme ri in priwde 
square. Urge firing roanrvrifli ceing 
to Boor MriM, dry bockooo) rath 
built -«n daseta, modem bath & kitch- 
en. VWd to wrif oorpeimg. Chanq 
cmteience, co n veenc e. 2 ran. from 
axHm.L&S12D J 00D USA Gl^ 738- 
4657 or Bax Ti®, Horrid Trrbune. 
92521 NeeGy Cedex, France 


RAMBOUUET 65 km from 

Part, la 
peaceful 


Pmis, lovely old country 

'ri 15na perfa rwceprixial jor- 

Sl 

iliau, oubu noaapncvL naooc pooc 
l guftit houaxL stables, inndt / 

tSmsdaQcTSfmSrP) 

MS til 01 from noon to 8 pm. 


80 KMS MSI OF WUHS, 1 «i itwtey 

house wSb dtarodeiTHrif fieiberad 
an 1 800 sqjn.gcxttefL Ground fkion 
Svinoarr Zlevris (S5 jq/nJ rath fre- 
ptace, kitchen, M brih. Id floor: 3 
bedroone* brihroexn. 2hd floor: feeng 
+ betkaoaL Cribr, autbuBcSnq. Prkr 
n.lOOJOOLTA6db4»53 


ST. GERMAN mi WYE (nwa) 
7B YVHJNS5 

Broom modem vOa an 8030 sun. 
land, rath pari. AI axriorts, 3 bows. 

MAJKEAlk 720 01 44 


HEAR T OF PAMS . 

tin. tnospificari 2 rooms, 
dratex top floor, fa ' 

r*novcmxl. ... 

F850J0D. Tefc 604 04 67. 


Mor- 


CHAMPS B.YSBS 

. add 7 roams, 2 maids' 
eeBan. 2nd sol. 

Bt Owner 267 <S 30 


BARBARA FRBJNG 

Averxjn Gdbrfel 300 sqa. 587.18 79 


1 71H WARETOBE, Duplex. 7Dsqm. 
ordea Pcrfcmg aradrite. Price FI 
Tet 5721515. am. 


3rd 


NORTH MONACO, T im sea very 

rvaehouse.olaxriortx.Trt:5443940 


SPAIN 


MARBBLA. Usurious vSq 250 sqja, 
very wel buSt, 3 bedrooms with bate 
swvort s room w6h brih. Gcragq 
gardwt- l^SDsqm. Wbodedri mw 
«B Mrabrita end the Afrioao uuC 
Pnae U5S1 50^00. Contact) PriateG. 
Wabonsky, la Rrvofia, Urbcnaodon 
la JPavoha Real Aportodo 217. Mor- 
bdo/Jririafla fel W. 77 36 01. 


SPAMSH CA5HE / COSTA BRAVA 

rath otygetri r hoe u e JoJ tower, 
T0«0 nm. parti teodi 3 fen, en- 
Jrtteoe hri. itrarr.'fr be&oam, 2 
boths, 2 WCi Bodega rixjutljOOO 
sqm. dortwric trocf, rid Catalan far- 

rSto, USS2HL00Q. Aifoget 

Schubert. Loefcedar Sir. 6, 
Criogne-40. (0) 223473604. 


REAL ESTATE 
- FOR SALE 




4 

m 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 

fn the boy of Primq 5 neat- Prima 1 
(nets, airport, 444 tartht 8 Co 38 r * 

2 far to 60 meters each. I 

TV/mams/ water/ phone flOtmedm. 

ftu feii i o nri port ns r ufle ied co. Fd 

marine service*: tovn», radio, sfri, trav- 
eLfit, repair, iuef o u tdoor 

ar 


r H»'- 


fVi. 

: 3 



Xteriesneuby. Cauiramri area aom- 
prites 85 anife an 13,171 tqm. m dk 

Plus 21 swerapprimris above &7B in 

le Rmny ognda- al in front ine 


arin pin Top nvesbneulll 45% 
Jnnynowtefarenraf prior risef 
Contact ctredfy devefdpe m. 

PlJOnO PUNTA POKTALS, S A 
Oirector Camenxi 
C/Moriaa lOl Poriah Nora 
Malotea. Span or Tfc 68686 CAUU E. 


1MMCMG ABOUT 

TfeiJiJ Mmi JH tali 

joctiw uaaoQ o 

Big for Marfaek 

' 

and (portnMX beach- 


Contact w« We buy, ceS, rent, corn 

StTUCt, vitas , “* ’ ' 


sd^eti 

We we rrihw sore la have got 1 . 
you oni looking far twf if net wel 

prodooe it far you! FROMCFIUR 1 

Aportodo 118. Motte ja. S pam. Tbt 
77610 OIUR E. ThtflST Property. 
. 


TS Off FROM TOUR FRONT ■ ar 
Mdwn daat? In Guadringina G rf> 
paroriy race flats, X**rM 
rath ooerai view, rice sur. 
& wfeniafiond resdenta 
' 6vmg the easy Guo- 
fe. Inforrnabon- 
Aportodo 118 - Mor- 
brifa - -Spin. Tla 77610 OTW E"Th* 
BEST Property Pecde*. 



MAJOGDLpeaoriW vflo on rine dad 

hB. Magrtowtfvfews of seaS valtry. 
Exoric terraced garden. 4 doubta beo- 
rooms,.3 brihs, J unites superb sen 
ta tewnfe y , 5 nxnries shops, restoj- 
rats tier hours rirport, £7DJXXfc 
Hrroraey, 7 The Qtase, Umdon SW4 
ONP. TriitiUdK VM& after tan. 


M AUO RC At KAUTIFUL fanriarae 

with graden 4 tats from sea, 4 bed- 
roaara 3 foaxfew bathrooms, fedy 
eq caring room. 3 6vfag rooms with 
I w tcc m . gg^ aAx ratw^ cF & 

ZXOIM?7734. N1 


•"3 


Pi 


MMMNfeWW (Art 

fe*ray nestorod art deco ' 


PAGE 7 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


FLY TO SHMUAH, DUBAI ABU 
DHABL AttrocovB fares one way ar 
return fr t oi mog Eurcpeon rir- 
pons every Tuesday return every 
Wednesday. Agents inquiries weft 
corat East Africrat Hofdoys.,Genrari 
5ri» Aaeris far Aratooa A rtm- 
spart, 93 Begenta Street first Hoor, 
London WTT7TE Tefc til-734 9837! 
Tbt 2S859 PADAR 


STAND BY FROM PUBS one way 

New Yack FI 200, SI 25 Friday. Sura 
day. LA. & Frisco FI 700 5176 Thw> 
doy. Your USogenr Tri (^) 522 20 X. 


NY ONE WAY $150. Everyday N.Y. . 

5145. Ptxis 2292 T" 


West Caret! 


190. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


SARB4G M GREECE. Carter 39 fa 
sloop avadofate far darter with e*pe- 
n e need tappet. Fafa custcni no ' 

rronosa raiVQqL tqsm5q$ ravfou _ 
Peiroera. Greece- Tefc 301 4125488. 


ISZA. SANTA BAAIIA 

Mly furnished apartmeM (open . _ 

Cal W. Graroraty f3f 21?- 


OOMINGTO RJ3RSJA7 Why mt rant 
a Rob Rayee, tora H t r «A4*vu ^ 
Ferrari. Gri far eonqfate firing $ 
mfai rauteyy 3057615010 or in 
U^A. 1-8005514)584. 


HELLAS YACHTING. Yafc Cbaeun. 

Atad e. ra g 26. Athens 10671. Greece. 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


CRUSE AROUND 
ITALY 1H5 . 
SUMMB 

Luxury. 7-doy cruises abotrd 
our fiagdiip Ocean Princess 

• Week 

tfc?. 



For e nmede te resri ra ri a ra atataefr 

OCEAN CRUISE UNB 

venica Son Motco 1497 
Teh (41) 70022 , 

Nkto: Gfaude Travel . .. 

37^Ave_ Mattchri fixfi - 


CHAJOTR A YACHT MG8SCE. Df- 

tect from- owner of Irageet fleet 
American raonoge n ra*. Pmelent 
oews. goM. bonefed. Vrief Yachts. 
A*ti writto ktew t 2 2C - tl ra e ra : 
Greece. Tefc 4529571. 452W86. Tbb 
21-3000. USA offtoto Fir Road. Am- 
bier. PA 19002. Teh 215 fifllSd 


Per more HOLIDAY A TRAVEL ADS 
PLEASE HUN TO . 

PAGE 10W 

MTTCWraBO SECTION - 


HOLIDAYS Sc TRAVEL 








HOTELS 


FRANCE 


MBS-HUIH. UlMmr-VBOOfti 

■ / Tafcries. Ci*eX <Sr^f 


PARS - Plan Mfr^eau a "*Mi in 


CTEAT BRITAIN 


BM PLAZA 


.• Ayra.ri& Bestourgtt/ brx / sSo/ 


.S&R3kS? !l - b ^ J 

Tefc 01 703 4175. 


London SE1