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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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SJj<- On a Palestinian 
ft Peace Table Rak 

1 IU J , ffBy Bernard Gwertzman 

’«te. , lf% Y New York Tima Service 

•- TTT 1 T 1 PI T X7W •• q%. rVo 


: | ; , . 1| ‘- 1 J - JERUSALEM — The US. sec- 
11 rotary of estate, .George P, Shultz, 

laid a ns) and white floral wreath 
Friday at Israel’s memorial to the 


, h _ ' * ■■ ; 1 ■ jij k. “?■ Holocaust and the truest symbol of 

•' Y * • •. ui \,... h . , ri the victory of good over eiriL" 

? x !u vi.^,,7^ ..*^TbatiswhyIsi^in^ 

J ' "5. ' ■ 7 ■ : 1 1 -u-v! Ul P r* and that is why the American peo- 
" 1 -■*•• j,,..- ***- pte are-forever committed to lsra- 

ar.d * t r si.j |L, Ck ‘ ; 6Ts security," he said, standing be- * 
V w J' 51 --' .•<*-< tt new sculpture at the^Yad 

ih:- I'.-hn . , dit , ..j^’^&uah metnonal, dedicated to 
(ow. c! ; , r , iv ;^ Jeilra who died in such places as the 
‘ - ' - Warsaw ghetto win ADied anmes 
i'T;: t . !l J 1 5 s * fighting the Nazis, 
o) Bcs:ij ,v *5r Later, Mr. Shultz opened talks' 

Unto Israeli leaders on findin g ways 
- to enlist Palestinians in a Jor danian 

I „ delegation that could eventually 

. 1 ‘ * 2 »an«n; ^ n^gbtiate peace with Israel He 

trW hedged .to 1 the Israelis that -toe 

..‘7 ' , . r r : :r -ra' American. efforts in this regard- 

* * . ••* ! :.v.V : wee directed toward only one . 

T : 7 7 ;• £>,.^ gc^i.rfirect taftsudthtoelsraefis. 

j j'.''* . Hie hrimafflaldy found, however,' 

7*'! \-a> that the Israehs, with their national 
V^.v.c .jv.-rjj, linity government, seem as ^>lit on 

! ' v *'■■• 1 “i-. iflfflto Palestinians can .be d®bJe 

the t Jf'fiartxapateis talluas toePaJes- - 

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• IHwr'ito 

J •* Eoreigp hfimster Thdak ^ha- 


Pnblished With "nie New York Tm^s and The Washington Post 

* PARIS, SATURPAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 

U.S. Prices 
Up 0.3% at 
Wholesale 

April Rise Is Lead 
To Fuel Costs; 

Food Index Slips 

By John M. Betty 

Waskiagart Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Big rises in 
gasoline and h^ytot g ou prices 
pushed up producer prices far fin- 
ished goods by 03 percent in April, 
the largest increase since Novem- 
ber; the U.S. Labor Department 


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Secretaxy of State George P. Shrftz, left, was welcomed 
Friday ; by Foreign 'Minuter Yitzhak Shamir of Israel. 

□arty, .said Israel would reject any A senior American official said 


I iMfdlfc- Tsi 


Palestiniaij who is a member either that the United States has no hard 
of the PLO or the larger, more and fast preferences, but has begun 
broadly based, Palestine National informally “tossing around names” 


But consumer food prices fell 1 
percent, the fourth consecutive 
month they have declined. - 
Prices of footed goods now 
have risen 1.7 percent Tor toe first 
four months of the year, but they 
are only 0.7 percent higher than in 
April 1984, because prices declined 
in several months. 

The April increase of 03 percent, 
which would t ranslate to an annual 
rate of 3.8 percent, represents the 
first time in 12 months when toe 
producer price indec hasgained m 
two successive months. The rise in 
March was 02 percent, toe Labor 



Senate Approves 

Budget I .uniting 

Military Outlays 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
voted Friday for a 1986 budget toat 
would limit toe increase in military 


asked for,” The Associated Pres 
reported from Lisbon. 

(But on military spending. Air. 
Reagan warned that “if we con- 
clude that our national security is 


mending to toe inflation rate and jeopardized, I will not hesitate” to 
would eliminate toe Social Security request “supplemental funding for 
cost-of-living increase for one year. . .. „ 

The victory for the measure, as- Social Security. Mr. Reagan 

sembled by the Senate's Republi- asserted toat there was a “man- 
can leadership and supported by date” from Congress for savin gs- 
Preadent Ronald Reagan, required He said that 79 senators had “de- 
toe vote of Vice President George manded toat we have some curb- 
Bush to break a 49-49 tie. tog" of the increase in benefits.] 

And toe Republicans were that As outlined by Mr. Dole, toe new 
close only because they brought P^n would reduce projected defi- 
Sauaor Pete Wilson of California rits ty S56 billion in 1986 and by 
from a hospital to the Senate cham- nearlyS300 billion over three years, 
ber to vote yes, a day and a half toe opti mi st i c economic us- 


ing" of the increase in benefits.] 
As outlined by Mr. Dole, toe n 


d by Mr. Dole, toe new 
reduce projected defi- 


Mr .kt- 
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1,1 ■ 1 >i 


broadly based, Palestine National lniormahy "tossingarounfl names }_ 

Council because Israd regards with toe Jordanians and others to 0J2 jv Labor President Ronald Reagan considered an answer at a 

both bodies as dedicated to the see if a consensus is devdoping. Deoartment saii conference on Friday outside Qoehiz Palace in L 

destruction erf Israel. . .. - Mr. Shnltz, who is to go to Egypt . - 

•‘But Defense Minister •'Yi tzhak and Jordan on Sunday, was toJou- . forecasters expert in flation trill 

Rabin, a leading- member the saiem primarily to make a personal TT C /i 

Lato Par^Sd that no govern- visit to Yad Vashem. He placed a SStoSmalSmftoSnSS! U JM-lSflt JLOCUMlOTl 

meat dedstons had been tSde on wreath i^ainst the new nmnment V>3 * aceal C? 

^ leum prices to continue to r^e^for SALT-2, Reagan Says 

pdestinhm Hvins in the kraeli-oc- After delivering his speech, he ton^, and they generally back pro- 

Strip to wntwhhhfc^miT.^^£d- dicoons tom thepn« chawd by CompM* o* s*ffFr»n United States “and thrasei 

mknpartl recartfless of his amli- ward L Koch of New YoA. who is producers for finished goods wifi LISBON ~ Prudent Ronald to nme and place for mch 


mir, head of ihedsnsemtivc LBasd ntiou. 


part, regardless of his 


President Ronald Reagan considered an answer at a press 
conference on Friday outside Qoehiz Palace in Lisbon. 

U.S. Might Abandon 


Compiled by Otr staff From Dispaidia United States “and then second, as 


nrd L Koch of New York, who is producers for finished goods will ' LISBON — President Ronald to time and place for such a meet- 
rf/mAnwl on pw2. fw. 7t increase by only about 1 percent Reagan, ending his 10-dayEurope* ing if he is willing," Mr. Reagan 

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for the entire yrar. 


Tackling \ Human Factor’ in Flying 

U.S. Plans to Study Neglected Areii of Avialion Safety 


an trio, said Friday toat there was said. 

* ■ 1. . . .L - IT O 1? TW. 


Uasotine paces jumped 9J per- strong evidence that U.S. compli- • The White House spokesman, 
cent and fudoti prices 10 J percent ance with the SALT-2 nuclear arms Larry Speakes, said the president 
in April but toe prices of both control agreement was “rather one- “wants Gorbachev to come to 

remained about 5 percent lower Washington." 

than in April 1984. US. officials were deeply dhid- Although Mr. Reagan cam- 


remained about 5 percent lower _ ^ ^ 

than in April 1984. US. officials were deeply divid- Although Mr. Reagan cam- h^ht LririMTiiTiwn 

The higher prices for petroleum ed on the subject of land-based paigned m 1980 against the SALT- p^f S0(X , ^ a ^ 
products result from tighter sup- mobQe miss3es. Page 3. 2 treaty, he announced after talring ^ow even less for the: 

plies caused by cutbacks in refinery office that the United States would o C i oppose any limit i 

operation. sided" and declared “there is no abide by the pact if the Soviet curitycosi of living 

Spot market prices for gasoline Deed for us to continue" abiding by Union would do the same. ^ not lerminate as r 

peakedm the first half of April and its terms if Moscow violates iL The treaty, iriiich is due to expire ^ pr0 erams. 
have since fallen slightly. Heating . His statement was the strongest Dec. 31, was signed in 1979 by 
oil prices peaked a few weeks earii- suggestion yet that the United Leonid I. Brezhnev of toe Soviet .-ilL; 0 , ^ cocsw 
er and have come down nearly 10 . Stales might let the onratified trea- Union and President Jimmy Car- T' worK ““ IeTeQCC 


after his appendix was removed. 

Mr. Wilson received a standing 
ovation when he entered the chain- 
ber -in a wheelchair, dressed in a P^Irh'/to 

bathrobe and pajamas. Uw KUff/ JL UiiULo 

Right after the vote. Senator 
Robert J. Dole of Kansas, toe ma- 

jonty leader, began working to l/lUH/CUifKXi 
keep the package from unraveling. <-? 

because under Senate rules it was TH _ JL 

still subject to amendment It was MxGClQCut MTm (UTS 
possible, for exanrole, that the U 

Democrats would offer an amend- TTt |) j 
meat to remove toe freeze on cost- r/)l* JjI//jiXPf 
of-Uving increases to toe Social Se- -trtwgoe 

curity program of retirement _ 

benefits and disability payments. By Phil Czatlcy 

The vote, which came at 1:45 c 

AJri, ended months of work by WASHTNGTW-- The fOTces 
Republicans in toe Senate, led by toat apparently led President Ron- 
Mr Dole, who started work on a aid Reagan !o accept a up on four 
budget package to January. The “ record ritoxty spending 
debate in ttefeiate has lasted two axe ihe re-election concerns of Sm- 
^ ate fepublicans and toe pobtical 

Bui the Senate vote is just ow naMs ltol ■»” su *®y 
stq>, although an important one, in vtrwrc nunvcrc 
the long budget process. The House JNEWa AiYALl&Ib 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


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• By Richard Wicktn 

' -New York Tones Service 

NEW YORK— Tbc Federal Aviation Admiois- 
tratiem has drafted a plan tp jadtle one of the big 
remaining problems in aviation safety, the perfor- 
. nance of filoas and other hwoaus to^toemdmtty. 

? Tbe plaa cgrfe.fqr jjurs«mgj| list i^TRietific 
prqects to adaress .30 '*%iman ftctorV issues 
ranked mbrderqf inqxstance byaxxanmitteeof 
experts. *" “ - • - : . 

Most' of the projects are aimed at preventing 
pilot error, with emphasis on assuring that the 
accelerated use of automated aircraft and ground 
equipment does not increase the workload in toe 
cockpits;- 

“This is toe first time toat toe FAA has taken a 
comprehensive look at the one fink in toe entire' 
chain of aviation operations, , the human bring," 
said a spokesman, Deanis Fridman, “Previously, it 
has been mostly piecemeal" 

Some prcnects advanced to the FAA blueprint 
already are being pursued in a limited way. Most 


' The FAA said that pilot error has been identi- 
fied over toe years as a cause, although not neces- 
sarily the primary cause, of 66 percent of fatal 
airline accidents. Moreover, pilot error has figured 
to 79 percent of fatal commuter accidents and 88 


Budget Committee is expected to building around toe federal deficit 
begm writing its own budget pro- ^ ^ dection la5l November. 


nobOe nrissfles. Page 3. 2 treaty, he announced after talring 

office that the United Stares would 

aded" and declared “there is no abide by the pact if the Soviet 
Deed for us to continue" abiding by Union would do the same, 
its terms if Moscow violates iL The treaty, which is due to expire 


posai soou, ana u is croeciea io i n ^ of some political 
allow even less for the military bud- stralegisls> j* Reagan's reported 
get, oppose any limit on Social Se- concern could rffectively rad his 
cunty cost of livmg adjustments military buildup, although toe con- 
mid not terminate as many domes- budget proSs has a 


mi it."* -i..- 


already areoesngpnrsnea m a inmtea way. Most 
will take a long time and hard-io-obtam funds to 
carry obl 

■ Safety spedalists said that toe longstanding 
Tieed for a comprehensive assault as the problem 
has been, brought into sharp focus by two prime 
considerations. 

One is that radical advances in automation have 
. created a new environment that significantly 
changes performance requirements, particularly 
’ forpuots, but also for controllers and mechanics. 

The other is that as tire airline accident rate has 




reliability of planes and ground equipment, human 
L error, along with bad weather, has bettHne a dami- 
•» nant cause Of accidents. 

From 1964 to 1984 the number of accidents 
invctonng large airliners dropped fairly steadily 
from 59. to 12. The m^or U A passenger carriers 
went 30 months without a fatal crash until an 
Easton Airlines Boring 727 hit a mountain in 
Bolivia to January. 


V- * fc FHot groups question the validity of such statis- 

*; tiefe Tto^say toai prtosfreqneatly have been used . 
aS scapqpals and that when pikits do make mis» 
takes, inadequate efforts are applied to determin- 
ing what factors, such as fatigue, excessive wodc- 
Ioad or badly designed equipment, might have 
induced those mistakes. 

The FAA program puts great emphasis on rind- 
ing out what these contributing factors are and on 
advancing methods to minimize them. 

Approximately $1 million is bring spent on 
hnman-perfonnance research in the current bod- 
get. It is hoped that efforts to increase financing 
win be helped by "the fact that a systematic plan 
now exists. 

Whatever the fate of the total package; agency 

- officials are confident that they will be able to 
move quickly on the five or six projects at the top 
of the agenda. 

These include devising advanced methods for 
measuring crew workload, devdoping criteria 
from such measurements for authorizing use of 
advanced cockpit devices, determining if displayed 

- data are adequate to permit tbe safe changeover 
from automated to manual flight and drawing up 
guidelines far authorizing use of cockpit devices 
artivated by a pitot’s voire when he is too busy to 
press a button or dial a knob. 

: Longer-range projects indude identifying toe 
data needed by pilots to operate safety to the air 
traffic system, now undergoing major moderniza- 
tion; redesigning overly complicated and hard-to- 

- read charts that are used for prescribed landing 
approaches; perfecting procedures for mmiinizmg 
mistakes in punching data into computers, and 
gauging toe extent to which automated systems 
“may degrade a pilot's ability to fly manually.” 


tic programs. 

The two branches would then try 
to work out differences in a confer- 
ence committee. 


gressional budget process has a 
tong way to go before final spend- 
ing proposals are derided by the 
House and the Senate. 

“I think it’s gang to be extreme- 


reats a gaZIou store toen, according ty lapse at the end of the year rather ter. It was not ratified tor the Senate wunmux - i mm* ns gomgu) ue exireme- 

lo tbeJEnersylnfonnatiQ^ Admoi- - ,to aR.dismaB tie some nuctear fon» 1 but both-- nations pledged to ob~ . Mr. Reagan’s support of the Sen- ty hard for toe president to regain 
istration. * to cotxfonnTto *e pact’s limits. seiveiL ' ' ‘afe measure came despite reserv-a- toe upper haud on toe military 


serve iL 

To respect toe treaty’s limits, for 


istration. • to oxiform.tb the paci’s.limiti serve iL 

Most industry analysts say they At a news conference in Lisbon To respect the treaty’s limits, for 
do n6t expect a continued rise to marking toe end of his trip, the example, the United States would 
prices, because toe level of supplies president said he has not derided have to retire a Poseidon subma- 
still is hiah worldwide. which course to take. line, which carries 16 missiles, each 


lions about both the military and budget," said Eddie Mahe, a Re- 
Social Security provisions, accord- publican consultant and strategist, 
ing to White House officials. For W I can only guess that they’ll come 


still is high worldwide. 

The decline to consumer food 


line, which carries 16 mhoiK, p$ch the military budget, the agreement back next time and print out the 


He said his invitation for a meet- capable of carrying up to 14 nude- by the president a\ 


prices to April left that portion of tog with the Soviet leader, Mikhail ar warheads, when the new Trident the end of the rapid buildup he has 
the producer price index 0.7 per- S. Gorbachev, was still open if Mr. submarine goes to sea in late Sep- sought since taking office to 1981. 
cent lower than it was a year ago. Gorbachev comes to toe United t ember, armed with 24 multiple- [Before returning to the United 
finished goods prices other than States this fall for a United Nations warhead missies. States from Portugal President 


for food and energy fell 0.1 percent meeting, 
to April after rising 0 5 percent to “So to 
March. decide w 


re t ing . The suggestion that the United Reagan called tbe budget victory 

“So the ball is to his court, first to States should abandon the SALT-2 “sweet," saying it provided “more 
deride whether he’s coming" to tbe (Continued od Page 2, CoL 2) than 90 percent of what we have 


by the president appears to signal terrible price to defense readiness 

toe end of the rapid Wldup he has from this cuL" 

sought store taking office in 1981. The original budget chat Mr. 

[Before returning to the United Reagan sent to Capitol Hill to Feb- 
Siates from Portugal President roaiy presented the Republican- 


U.S. Indian Tribe Resisting Relocation of 10,000 


By Iver Peterson 

New York Tima Soviet 

KYKOTSMOVl Arizona —As 
Roberta Blackgoat’s children were 
born, their umbilical cords were 
buried in a corner of her sheep 
corral It is a tradition that joins 
each member of tbe Navajo tnbe to 
the land and to the gnmwk that 
provide the food and clothing nec- 
essary for survivaL 

So it is too late now, Mrs. Black- 
goat said, to ask her to move off the 
land where she was bom and where 
her great-grand m other is buried. 
Congress may have given the land 
to the Hopi tribe, bat God gave h 
to her and the Navajo people. 

“No, no matter what they are 


Sikhs Kill 35 inJndmnBomb Attacks 


,S*| * ** 1 

tw- ‘ 




t - By William Oatbomc an Utrar Prato^Srate Transport port passages m in the towns of m^iaTSdetenniiiedtoneat 

J iVaMdsnm Post Service . Gap. bus at' 7:10 P.M, killing two §rraa,JW, andAmbala. a hnlanSt m35ia?BS 

*NEW DELHI -Sikh separatist persons and nyunng sdl ; to HissM, aaording to the Umt- Mountain, theheart of a traditional 

guerrillas escalated a terrorist cam- to the nett several hours, the 1 **5 2 ““Jf’ “ lexptoswn ! was Navajo area that has been awarded 
prign Friday night by triggering a police, control room in New Delhi followed by mob violent resulting ^ ^ ^ Navaj(> . 

series, of explosions to New Delhi was swamped with caHs aboui ad- £ senous mjunes to Skh passers- Relocation Act 


M/ she said. “No matter what they do, 

we are aping to stay." 

Mrs. Btockgoat delivered this re- 
n»^^f^j?A^i^a tOTalS ^ markinaqtdeLdrienntoedtoneat 


and Haryana state that left at- least . ditional explosions at public trans- 


to the Hopis under the Navajo- 
Hopi Relocation Act 
Her vow typifies toe many prob- 


35 persons (toad and more than .100 port centers thnaigbout toe rity , . Fnday, ChouMury^ Bai- icmg faced by Congress in its falter- 
injured to bus depots and train sat- and inadjoaung' Haryana state. Se- ™ Suign, a prominent Hindu and #k- t 


■ --waj**-.- a*: 

The explosions followed the as- from toe capital .. attuty, wss to deato on ^ mmmp ent of Americans 

sasanatum by Skh guerrillas to Accordms lormnrt* received in “ l 800 ^ 1 00ls ' c ^^ 0 \.“ e of Japanese descent to World War 
Puiyab of tocstate president of toe 11 

PO^illCSl P^nV Lok DflL_ PrmiaK'art/f Woivqtm cieatm tffRM. pur, au toon ties in Chandigarh -tv. w. enzaed in 1974. redoc 




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A Navajo meeting in Arizona to show support for tribe members faring relocation. 






pcJticalpar^LokDal. PunjabandHar 

Tbe.predsrfy timed explosions, ■ u *4d»bom& 
whtoh coincided with thfiT28than- " wra ™ 9 * WHW5 
niversary of toe 1 857 Sepoy mutiny - ■ ' ' 

of Indian troops against the British 
riders of toe' suboontinent, - m>- i ' TN< 
peered to set back efforts by. toe _ iili 

government of Prime Minister Ra- 
Stiv^Gandhi to nnotiate a political -■ Sunday's * 
-rSeitlemem of SSkh demands for m- West German; 

creased autonomy m the Punjab. important in t 1 

The explosions, most of which iisoiilli Afric 
authorities said origiiiated to bob- pi^ to move ’ 
bj^trapped transistor radios left on areas, 

the scats of public buses and trains, _ . . " 

represented the most serious esca- BUSINISS/i 

latma of Sikh terrorism store be- r wl m "tf 

/ore Indian Army troops stormed 
the. Golden Tempi® «*npk* econSSSw 

Amritsar fet June 6, fcfflmg nearly 1SSSH 
1,000 Sikh guerrillas. ^ 

At leaa 14 persons were killed - » n , 

and more than 60 injured to ll - • - - 

■bus tdmmals and tram stations Sey offer ix«i 

[crowded with weekend travelers. si vc short-terni 

. PriMe sad toe rnsnaploaon oc- a m 

cured at toe main bus terminus in 7^- • 


■ jiaie, tranris- 
l public tranfr- 


INSIDE 

■ Saadis state deefitms in' 
West Germany will be the most 
important in two yearn. Page! 

■ South Africa has canceled a 
plan to move 700JJ00 blacks to 
tribal areas. . PlageS. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE ■ 

■ Leaders of Ak 100 biggest 
Ui corporations eroect dower 
-economic growth ibis year ami 
next, l?ut no recessraL ftge 9L 

MONDAY 

A winter rally of gilts, or British 
government securities, shows 
they offer potential for explo- 
sive short-term gai ns Personal 
Inv^ttog, a monthly report. . j 


ir, autoonties in nan gar The law, enacted in 1974, seeks *|f they come to pash me OHt, I will say, O JL, it is better if yon just kill 

z'.. . .. . ^ _ to settie a ecntury-old land dispute J * 4 * 

.own & £ me now ’ and leave me h we,’ “ Navajo sheepherder. 


resulting in at least one death, and 


a curfew was imposed by polire 
Official reports reaching Cnandi- 
aarb said about 20 stores were 


hectares) of land here to northeast- 
ern Arizona between toe two tribes 
and requires members of each tribe 


line cannot be met and toat the law the fatal shootings toat followed 


Reagan called tbe budget victory controlled Senate with some diffi- 
“ sweet," saying it provided “more cult political choices. It was a 
than 90 percent of what we have matter of priorities. Mr. Reagan’s 
was military spending; toe sena- 
tors' was protecting programs with 
i> -m large political constituencies to 

n ot 111 llflll their states. 

-i-vf^VFV/w Tjjg Republican legislators 
proved more resistant to White 
House pressures than some had ex- 
pected, but whether the latest bud- 
get will strengthen them politically 
remains to be seen. 

The political stakes of tbe budget 
battle are underscored by the find- 
ing of leading Republican poll-tak- 
ers that tbe federal deficit, as a 
measure of people’s concern about 
the economy, is emerging as a ma- 
jor issue and perhaps toe key to the 
1986 Senate elections. 

“Tbe thing that has surprised me 
is the extent to which to a relatively 
short time toe deficit has become a 
major issue," said Richard Wirth- 
lin, who does polling for the White 
House. “Eight or nine months ago I 
described ihe deficit as a closet is- 
sue. It never was there. About 1 
percent or less would mention the 
deficit as toe most important prob- 
lem we face." 

Now, he said, “it is toe most 
frequently mentioned problem of a 
■ wide range of issues." 

“The burden for action is dearly 
on the shoulders of the Congress." 
he said. “When we ask people who 
is responsible for the defidl SO 
percent say toe Congress. 24 per- 
cent say the president That 1ms 
embers faring relocation. been very consistent.” 

While Mr. Reagan has been in 

Europe for toe last week, some of 
i M i the 22 Republican incumbents 

5 Better li yon just Kin whose seats are open for election 
- , next year have used the Senate bud- 

neraer. get debate to assert their indepen- 

dence from the White House, going 

— - — * against toe president’s spending 

proposals on Social Security, the 
were relocated are not reedring ad- military and ether issues, 
equate counseling and that there is But some Republican strategists 


In recent weeks, three wdl-k- who ^ more 
sown non-Sikh pcbDcal leader? scattered than the J 
have been attacked and there have Hopis, hare been h 
been a series of clashes between ingonlandapporth 
Sikh separatists and pohee. pisand mustmove; 

The new attacks were viewed by Hopis have found 
Indian government officials as an the Navajo side Oi 
attempt by radical Sikhs to sabo- most of them have 
tage efforts by the government to But only 1000 t 


partition fear, the remaining Nava- “We don’t know what is going to 400,000 acres of new land in Arizo- wisdom of this, saying that while it 
Navajos, jos wifi be left without legal status come down this summer; but we na and New Mexico to compensate might yield short-term benefits toe 

km and after the expiration of the act and are preparing ourselves spiritualty the Navajos for the 900,000 acres a few senators, it could risk an 

-dwelling wflj be open to finable expulsion for whatever happens,” said Willy they will lose through partition. important party asset: poll results 

5d as liv- by tbe police departments of the Scott a leader of the movement. Although ®ost of those prints showing that Republicans now are 
) toe Ho- Hopis or the federal Bureau of In- “This is where we are going to take have been well known, tbe congres- trusted more than Democrats to 

than 100 dian Affairs. our last stand.” atonal report has had a major im- manage toe economy. 


scattered than the Vfl^e-dwefling will be open to 
Hopis, have been identified as tiv- by toe police c 
ing on land apportioned to toe Ho- Hopis or toe fa 
pis and must move; fewer than 100 dian Affairs. 
Hopis have found themselves on Such a devel 
the Navajo side of toe line, and vaios say, would 
most of them have already left both sides, and 


our last stand.” sonal report has had a major un- 

i development, some Na- The cloud hanging over the ndo- pact because of its baric conclusion 
, would lead to violence cm cation effort was summed up in a that (he program is not working, 
ss, and some young Nava- recent report by a subcommittee of That conclusion was underscored 


“In my view ” Mr. Wirthlin said, 
“the economy is going to be toe 
driving force in toe 1 986 election. If 


mge efforts by ik government to But only 3,000 of toe Navajos jos appear to be preparing them- toe U.S. House of Representatives, last month when President Ronald it is doing moderately wefl, I think 
draw moderate SiK^mronegouar have been moved so far. and the selves for it op Big Mountain. The report has been widely read by Reagan appointed William P. it will enhance tbe chances of Re- 

tlOUS lOT a settlement Ol sum UC* HpaitKn* Fn. iMlmim J - fc ~1_ - - _ e A m»Mn Inrii. mtliv rtarl Fnnwr Mwinn nf inHwinr nnklimn *> 


.tions for a settlement of Sikh dfr deadline for voluntary departures 
mands for increased autonomy m expires to Jnty; A year oTforced 
the Puryab. relocations '-is supposed to follow 

A meeting of the Lok Dal hen, until the expiration of the coegrcs- 
which is led by a former Indian Sonal tfeadlwii for completion, 
prime minister, Charon Singh, con- Juty 1986. 

-Officials in diarge of the pro- 
gram concede that the final dead- 


deemed the assassination of Bafbir 
Singh as “cowardly and ghastly . 


Members of the American Indi- critics of relocation as a dawning of dark, former secretary of interior, publican candidates." 
an Movement, young men who are awareness in Congress that tbe full- as a special envoy to press toe two In some cases, he added, “indi- 
rerivmg warrior traditions and cer- scale removal of unmUmg Navajos tribes for a solution. vidua! senators have been trading 

emonics, have established a “sur- cannot go on. In his meetings with the Navajo on very narrow interests and miss- 

rival camp” in toe area. The subcommittee's report enu- leaders, who opposed the original ing toe possibility that if the total 

They speak ominously of the meraied many old complaints Hopi call for partition and who package doesn’t reduce toe deficit 
consequences of a forced removal about tbe relocation program, in- warn the program ended, or at least and strengthen the economy 
and they make veiled aDnrions to during charges that Navajos who (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) (Continued od Page 2, CoL 4) ** 


i 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUHDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 


I f 


** ! 


Social Democrat Premier 
Aims for Major Victory 
In German State Election 


By Henry Tanner 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — Johannes Ran, the So- 
cial Democrat running for re-elec- 
tion as state premier of North 
Rhin e-Westphalia on Sunday, has 
set his sights on winning an abso- 


lute majority in the state assembly. 
This would 


1 enable him to govern 
West Germany's most populous 
and most industrialized state for 
another five years without entering 
into any alliances or agreements. 

Mr. Ran, according to most of 

the opinion polls, will come very 

dose, with a few thousand votes 

making the difference. 

The vote in North Rhine-West- 
phalia is regarded as the most im- 
portant state election since Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl wan a landslide 
victory in the last national elections 
just over two years ago. The next 
national election will be in 1987, 
and Mr. Rau is seen as a potential 
opponent to Mr. KobL 

About 12.5 million voters, 
roughly one- third of the country's 
electorate, wiD be able to vote Sun- 
day. 

Mr. Rau, 54, the son Of a Protes- 
tant preacher and one of the most 
accomplished politicians in the 
country, has been running a folksy, 
highly personal campaign stressing 
local issues and skirting someof the 
weightier ideological questions on 
which his patty and Mr. Kohl's 
governing coalition differ at the na- 
tional IeveL His aim, his aides say, 
is to win over Christian Democratic 


for its impact on the political and 
personal contest that is going cm 
within the leadership of the Social 
Democratic Party. 

Although Mr. Rau disclaims all 
political ambitions beyond his own 
state, he is being pushed by party 
centrists as the man who should 
lead the Social Democrats in the 
next general election. 

Another leading ronriiffate for 

this role is Oskar Lafontaine, the 
young new state premier of the 
Saar. Mr. Lafontaine won an abso- 
lute majority in the Saar state as- 
sembly two months ago in another 
highly persona] but much more 
ideoiogjca] campaign. 

Both Mr. Rail and Mr. Lafou- 
taine are disciples of Willy Brandt, 
the party president But Mr. Lafon- 
taine would lead the party sharply 
left on major international and do- 
mestic issues while Mr. Ran would 
move it toward the center. 

Some commentator* in the West 
German press have been saying 
that Mr. Rau has set himself an 
almost impossible goal in announc- 
ing that he wants an ma- 

jority in the state assembly. 

He has had an absolute majority 
in the outgoing assembly, nit in 
vastly different circumstances. 

In the last state election, in 1980, 
neither the centrist Free Democrats 
nor the leftist Greens obtained the 
5 percent of the vote required for 
representation in the assembly. Ml 
R au only had to beat the Christian 
Democrats to get the majority, and 


Roof Over Pool 
biSv 


nw*uunTi- 


Folk, Killing 12 


Reuters 


USTER, Switzerland, — 
Twelve persons, including six 
children, died Thursday night 
when the concrete ceiling of an 
indoor pool collapsed an about 
40 swimmers, officials of tins 
Zurich suburb said Friday. 

The ceiling fell in virtnaBy 
one pieoeana covered the pool 
like an airtight lid. Only at the 
diving board was there an es- 
cape route for those who strug- 
gled to safety. Most of the vic- 
tims drowned but some woe 
crushed by the concrete slab 
weighing about 160 tons, Mhy- 
or Walter Flach said. 

Among the survivors was 
Fraemd Nydegger, the Swiss 
women’s 200-meter breast- 
stroke champion, who was tak- 
en to a hospital in shock. 

Some 350 rescuers worked 
through the night, breaking 
through the concrete with drills 
and p umpin g out water. Mr. 
Fladi said no survivors were 
found beneath the fallen ceS- 


Waedenswiler, the en- 
gineer who led the construction 
of the pool in 1971, said that the 
ceding supports, made of an al- 
loy of chrome; nickel and sted, 
had rusted. “1 cannot explain 
that,” be said. “It should not 
happen.” He said that 
other Swiss swimming 
were constructed the sanK way. 



Divers search for victims through a hole in the concrete 
roof that feD on a pool in Uster, Switzerland, killing 12. 


Labor Panel 
Says Soviet 
Violated 
Conventions 


V- 




WORLD 


-y. 




Murdoch to Sell Chicago Sro- Tiwi^ ' • 


CHICAGO (AF) —The Chicago Sen-Times isflangup for fajfe 

second time in less than two years so that its owner, Rupert Murdodvtan " 
bay a local television station, the newspapers putter says, ? 

“Yes, it’s true that Rupert Murdoch has oecklfid to sefl-the S& 



By lain Guest 

Imemancmal Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — A panel of the In- 
ternational Labor Organization has 
asserted that the government of the 
Soviet Union is violating a key HO 
convention by refusing to permit 
the formation of indepeodent trade 
unions. 


regulations which now prohibit 
cross-ownership or newspapers ana iV stations in the samemsrftetr - 
Mr. Murdoch and, a business partner, Marvin DaviSjhivei v 
buy seven television stations from Metromedia tax. for $2 __ 
including a station in Chicago and one in New York. Mr. Murdoch i 
daily newspapers in both dries, but said be was “under nd pressure^ 
sell the New York Post, adding that "we are considering all out optkwi.’J 



a Geneva-based United Nations 
agency that monitors work condi- 
tions and living standards for 
workers. 

Its publication follows recent 
complaints from 
governments that the ILO’s farinan 
rights criteria are biased against 
them and Poland’s notice of with- 
drawal from the organization last 
year to protest an tilO report urg- 
ing Warsaw to restore trade union 
freedoms. 


stale in northern Ski Tjmir» flattened a police station on Mannar 1 
with mortar and rocket tire Friday; killing ar least five officers,’ 8 ^ 
authorities said. •- 

The United New of India, meanwhile, reported Friday in New Qdlti 
that more than 75 Tamils were killed Thursday in northern Sri Lankafh i 


secretary, M. Atelasundaram, and the president of ValvediSitural 1 
zens Committee, KL Sivathambi. 

The bodies of at least 40 men, women and children were lyingon rcfcdj 
in the area, .according to the messages. In Oocani, 25 youths. peri$htd 
when they woe haded into the community center arid the buOdrng Was 

of 1? s “e Wedocsday “ 

ventions, which are binding on the L ^ u ^ 
natio ns that have ratified th*™ 


Pope Faces Difficult Netherlands Visit : 

ir.ITKI.lT OrrU 1 11 Tok, Dm.1 IT W-rf. a Km.Jan. iji 


votes. 


His Christian Democratic oppo- 
nent, Bernhard Worms, by con- 
trast, was a virtual unknown until 
Chancellor Kohl made him his par- 
ty’s leader in North Rhine-West- 
phalia in a surprise move a year 
ago. He has been campaigning in 
Mr. Kohl's shadow. 

The election will also he watched 


this he did by a 6-percent margin. 

" e Free Democrats 


Food Prices Go Up Sharply in Beijing 


This limp; the 

Government Continues Push Toward Market Economy 

and theyarc now in a coalition with By John F. Bums 


Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democrats. 
In 1980 they were stiD allied with 
the Social Democrats. 

Hie Greens, though in decline 
for the past few months, are also 
likely to do better than in 1980. 


m 


Bonn Describes Plot 
To Bomb U.S. Radio 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 

BONN — The West German 
government, in an unusual descrip- 
tion of purported criminal activity 
by Soviet-bloc diplomats, has re- 
ported details of a planned bomb 
etfarlt on the Munich headquarters 
of Radio Free Europe. 

The planned attack, described 
Thursday in the Interior Ministry's 
annual report on extremist activi- 
ties. was never carried out. But it 
led Boon to demand the recall of 
five Romanian diplomats in No- 
vember. 

In February 1981, the station’s 
headquarters, on the edge of a park 
near Munich's center, was tom 
apart by a bomb blast There have 
been no arrests or convictions in 
the case, but the amount and type 
of explosive used have led some 
police officials to believe that a 
Soviet-bloc government was re- 
sponsible. 

The 308-page report by the Inte- 
rior Ministry describes three cases 
of purported criminal activity in- 
volving Romanian diplomats, who 
it said were foiled because of infor- 
mation supplied by a Romanian 
defector in 1984. 

At a news conference, Friedrich 
Zimmermaun. the interior minis- 
ter. said the report contained spe- 
cific cases for the first rime to make 
it “more vivid.” 

The report said three Romanian 
diplomats were involved in plans to 


According to those plans, the In- 
terior Ministry said, Mr. Constan- 
tin prepared a 13-page report of the 
station s layout. That report was 
discussed along with two others at 
a meeting in Bucharest in Decem- 
ber 1983. 

Further reports were submitted 
throughout 1984, it said. Then, last 
November, Bonn demanded that 
the three men, plus two first secre- 
taries, loan Lupu and Ion Green, 
be recalled. AD five have returned 
to Romania. 


The report said Mr. Lupu and 
Mr. Grecu were involved in efforts 
to kidnap a Romanian physician, 
who was related to a semor Roma- 
nian official and who had defected 


New York Tuns Service 

BEIJING — The steepest in- 
creases in food prices smee Jhe 
1949 Communist revolution took 
effect Friday for the 9J millio n 
residents in Beijing. 

Taking a major political risk, the 
Chinese government raised prices 
in the capital by up to 70 perooit 
for pork, 130 percent for beef, 18 
percent for eggs and 340 percent 
for yellow croaker, a popular fish. 

At the same time, city residents 
were promised a monthly per-capi- 
ta grant of 7.50 yuan, the 
lent of S2.62, to hdp meet the l 
er costs. 

At every work unit, announce- 
ments from the city authorities 
were read out during the week de- 
tailing the increases, which will add 
an average of 50 percent to the 
prices of 1,800 “nonsraple” food 
items. 

The pattern in Beijing was the 
same as rate followed earlier in 22 
other dries, inducting Guangzhou, 
Shanghai and W uhan. And as in 
those dries, consumers flooded 
stores and markets to stock up on 
the affected items. 

By the end of the week, places 
tike the Cbongwenmen Market in 
central Beijing had tittle left but 


fatty scraps of pork and low-grade 
mduded killing the defector if the s^es of dried fish. A rush on 


d killing th 

kidnapping failed. 

In a third case, the report ac- 
cused Romanian agents and diplo- 
mats of an armed robbery involv- 
ing a Romanian-born woman of 
German nationality whom it said 
Bucharest accused of anti-Roma- 
nian activity in the West 


canned foods left shelves similarly 
hare. 

The move is part of a drive by the 
government to introduce market 
mechanisms into the economy. Af- 
ter years of prices that remained 
the same or rase hardly at all, mo- 
tions of people in urban China are 


encountering steep increases 
food costs. 

How fraught with difficulties the 
process vrin he can be ganged from 
the care that party leaders have 
taken to prepare the public Fa 
months before the current round of 
increases, officials were putting 
consumers on notice that strains 
lay ahead. 

Usually, the warnings were ac- 
companied by pledges that the gov- 
ernment would do everything it 
could to ease the transition, but 
there have been periodic bouts of 
“panic buying” as shoppers sought 
to protea themselves. 

When Chiang Kai-shek was in 
power before 1949. few things 
eroded confidence as fast as the 
spiraling inflation that gave rise to 
banknotes den ominated in mil linns 
of yuan. Now, the Communists 
who supplanted the Chiang gov- 
ernment and virtually abolished in- 
flation are deliberately pushing up 
prices on a wide range of consumer 
goods, food in particular. 

The increases involve calculated 
political and economic risks. From 
the outset of the p ro g ram in 1979, 
officials putting into effect the poli- 
cies of Deng Xiaoping, China’s 
paramount leader, have been deter- 
mined to replace what they refer to 
as the irrational pricing system es- 
tablished under Mao. 

Men like Tian Jiyun, the deputy 
prime minister who has principal 
responsibility for price changes, be- 
lieve that unleashi n g the power of 
supply and demand is the key to 
the entire modernization program 
set forth by Mr. Deng. 

It is an article of faith among 
those involved in the program that 


only by allowing prices to rise and 
fall in response to market condi- 
tions can the country free itself 
from the burdens of scarcity and 
ovexsupply, shoddy quality and the 
other problems that beset the typi- 
cal Communist economy. 


panel’s finding* 

In its comments on the Soviet 
Union, the panel said that the Sovi- 
et Constitution and 1971 labor laws 
excluded the possibility of inde- 
pendent unions in favor of a “mo- 
nopoly” system of unions. 

This, it said, was “in con traffic- 
tiau” with HjO Convention 87, 
which allows for freedom of associ- 
ation. The Soviet Union ratified the 
convention in 1956. 

The par^cTs conductions followed 
several years of strain between the 
ILO and socialist countries over 
the s up p ressi on of independent 
unions m Poland, the Soviet Union 
and Romania. The three govero- 



VATICAN CITY (AF) — Pope John Paul H starts a five-day trip 
Saturday to the Netherlands, where his conservative policies have nm 
into opposition from some of the wold's mostKberal * 



till' A 


Vatican has acknowledged the 
which also includes stops in 


Dutch church is in a state of crisis,” the Vatican 
front-page commentary Wednesday. “There is talk < 

“Progressive” Dutch Catholics — and their priests — question’; thft 

M Urtli mmmJ namsw fra- r u Ammtm ■ .l{ 


faring John Paul daring hisi 
botux and Belgium.- Tro * 
the Vatican newspaper s 



t#* 

nil" 

rtVc.- ‘ 


church’s bans on artificial birth control, marriage foe priests and lha 
Mass, as wdl as the poatkm of wome 


a of laymen to 


women m^be 

and papal infallibility on doctrinal matters. The split between 
“progressives” and “traditionalists” polarizes the approximately -5i 
minim Dutch Catholics, who make up about 40 percent of thepajn|ht 
tion. • ; 1 ! 


No other nation that is formally menu have rqected the organiza- T ■ HJ - ., T* n 
wedded to the doctrines of Marx, turn's authority to conaderthe LIU JjHiruerer lietraCtS leSumOUV 
not even Hungary, the most eoo- complaints. 7 • *'■ 


nominally adventurous member of 
the So via bloc, has tried anything 
as far-reaching. 

Although Mr. Deng and his asso- 
ciates insist that the state will be on 
hand as a referee, they are con- 
vinced that prosperity will cone 
only through the fullest possible 
application of market principles 


that most Communist countries, 
China included, have spent decades 


>lem lies in the transi- 
tion from an economy in which the 
government has manipulated 
prices to keep some items — not 
only food, but also rent, electricity, 
children's toys and tens of thou- 
sands of other goods — unrealisti- 
cally cheap. 

At both ends of the economic 
chain, producers and consumers 
must be weaned from a system of 
large state subsidies that has en- 
trenched inefficiencies and drained 
at least 20 percent of all revenues 
from the government treasury. 

Asa further hedge against popu- 
lar discontent, the government has 
so far excluded food grains, edible 
oils and basic vegetables like cab- 
bage from the price changes, ensur- 
ing that commodities that form the 


The Soviet and Polish members 
of the panel disassociated them- 
selves from tins year’s criticism of 
the Soviet Union, complaining that 
freedom of association should be 
interpreted differently in socialist 
countries than in Western democ- 
racies. This, they said, had been 
deliberately ignored by the panel 

Although the United States has 
encouraged the 0.0 to take a tough 
line on Eastern Europe, it has not 
ratified any of the agamy’s human 
rights conventions, so its American 
practices are not scrutinized by the 
ILO. Diplomats in Geneva agreed 
that this is a particular source of 
irritation to the Soviet Union. 

ILO officials said that they have 
been aware of the need to strike a 
balance between the demands of 
East and West. They pointed out, 
however, that tins year’s report also 


TAIPEI (AF) — Chen Chi-li. a convicted gangttader, retracted jfr 
Friday his earlier testimo ny that Taiwan's fonnersaEtaiy inteffigsure 
chief ordered him to murder Henry Liu, a Qrinese-ApKxfcan writer 


shot to death Oct 15 in California. 

Mr. Chen told the Taiwan ! 
ed Vice Admiral Wong Hsi-lin£ the fanner it 
anger- “It was a mLsunder s tnnding ," he said. 

A military court later sentenced Mr. Wong tofifein prison ferti* 
killing . The Taiwan High Coon is reviewing a tile sentence im posed an . 
Mr. Chen last month by the Taipei di&rict court. • 



For die Record 


for Q&nsvoa 
ted murder or declare a 


was highly critical of 


employment 
policies in some West European 
governments, notably Britain and 
Belgium. 

Earlier this year, a special ILO 
investigation found that the West 
German government had discrimi- 
nated against members of that na- 


A UJ5. judge rejected on Friday 
Bulow to dismiss one of two charges 
mistrial Mr. von Billow's lawyers at his 
said that prosecutors at an earli er trial had concealed information 
to the defense. He is charged with attempting to kfll his wife. (. 

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS, a disease Eli 
reported just over four years ago, has strode more than 10,000 American 
and killed 49 percent of them, the national Centers for Disease Canted 
reported Thursday in Atlanta. . j!dfl 


Hdga Grate, wife of Austria's foreteu minister, Leopold GTatz.-fed 
meat Friday. The police said she had 


lion's Communist Party through a 

basis of the national diet wiD con- policy that excludes party members 
tinue to be available at heavily sub- from employment in the public 
sidized prices. tor. 


sec- 


found dead in her Vienna apartment 
suffered a heart attack believed to have been caused by ingestion cf 
medicines and alcohoL She had been separated from her husbandTar 
several months. (Reuteri 

Eleven Yugoslavs wee sentenced Friday in Zagreb to prison tepn| 7 
ranging from seven months to 15 years for terrorist activities aimed at ; 
splitting Croatia from the rest of the country. . (HFj 

A bomb damaged a NATO natural gas japeBue in northwestern Wes} 
Germany on Friday, the police said. No claim of responsibility -was 
immediately nmda. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
treaty was raised in Washington 
this week in congressional testimo- 
ny by Richard N. Pale, the assis- 

. , . . , _ . -t .. _ . tarn secretary of defense for inter- 

*ft*fk to* headquarters biukhm of ^ 

Radio Free Europe, the U.S.-G- for hi/vrew J ; 

nanced station that broadcasts to 
East European countries, including 


U.S. Might Abandon SALT-2 Treaty, Reagan Says Budget Plan 

Is Approved 


M t 

■ i 

- f. 

* * 


The president's chief at staff, 
Donald T. Regan, said the trip 
demonstrated that “Reagan is now 
the leader of the Free World.” 


Romania. It identified than as 
Constantin Ciobanu, the embassy 
counselor, who it said was chief of 
Romanian intelligence here; Dan 
Mihoc, a second secretary, and Ion 
Constantin, a third secretary. 

The plan, it said, was designed 
by the External Intelligence Service 
in Bucharest. 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PAJUS 

AMERICAN CATHEDRAL IN PARCS. 23 Ave. 
George-V, 75008 Paris. The Very Rev. 
Janies R. Leo, Dean. Melroi Gwge-V or 
Aiw a Mo nce ou. Sundayi 9 am., 11 cun. 
Church school and nunary 1 1 am. Week- 
days. 12 nooa TdL 720.17.92. 


CENTRAL BAPTtSr CHURCH, 13 Rue du 
VmsK-Cotarnbier, 75006 Pom. Metro SL- 
Sutpice. Sunday worship in English 9s45 
a.m.. Rev. A. SommerviRe. Tel.: 607.67.02. 


PARIS 5UBUR8S 
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, ReuS-Maf- 
maison. English speaking, a* denoin 
flans, Bible study: 9»45, warship: UM3. 56 
Rue Bansftwn. TeU 749.1509. 


MONTE CARLO 

Inti fellowship, 9 rue L NotarL Sunday 
Bible hr. (oil ages] 9i4S am Worship 114-6 
pm Tel. 255151/253115. 


EUROPE 

UNUARIAN4JMVERSAUST, worship ml 
activities in Europe. Contact EUU, Stews 
Dick, Serinptraai 20, 1271 NC Hui»a Th* 
Netherlands. TeL: (+31] (0) 2152 55073. 


STOCKHOLM 

IMMANU& CHURCH near dty 
ftierafly dwbtkjn fellowship. Sunday 11:00. 
Tel., (08] 316051. 151225. 


To place an advertisement 
in this section 


ptaOMU wMrt; 

He Elizabeth HERWOOD 
181 Aw. Ch.-dc-WOe, 
92521 Nemlly Cedes, France. 
Trfj 747.12.65. 


PflSONAUTieS PUB 

MAKYBUIME 

IN THEW^CB^ SECTION 
OF FRIDAYS MT 


Asked for his view of Mr. Pole's 
statement, Mr. Reagan said, “Ev- 
eryone’s got a right to express their 
opinion. He was doing no more 
than that." 

In arrival remarks in Washing- 
ton, Mr. Reagan brushed aside 
problems during the European 
tour. 

“We have returned home with 
mission accomplished, ” be said 
“We have had a fine trip, a chal- 
lenging trip and a successful trip." 

“We return with warm memories 
of European friendship for Ameri- 
cans,” he said, adding that the 
demonstrations mounted against 
him by leftists proved that “we 
were saying and doing the right 
things." (AP, Reuters) 

m Aides Praise Results 

David Hoffman and Lou Cannon 
of The Washington Post reported 
from Lisbon: 

President Reagan's aides on 
Thursday also gave an upbeat ac- 
count of the difficult European 
trip. 

Secretary of State George P- 
Shultz said Thursday that the jour- 
ney was a “trip of great impor- 
tance" that dealt with “issues or 
historic proportions and enduring 

significance. 


Both officials made their assess- 
ments of a trip during which Mr. 


Reagan met 
ty- 

He was the 
the 


ile adversi- 


European 
he, France 


of hecklers in 
it at Stras- 


bourg, France, and of street dem- 
onstrations in Spain against the 
presence of U.S. bases, fife was also 
the focus of a bitter controversy 
over the laying of a wreath at a 

German militar y cemetery. 

Mr. Regan said that the presi- 
dent could have sidestepped these 
difficulties but to do so would have 
been “to take the easy way out.” 

The White House chief of staff 
suggested that the preadent and 
Mr. Gorbachev, in major speeches 
Wednesday, wen; born pursuing 
similar strategies of alternately 
staking out hard-line positions 
against each other’s policies while 
at the same time indicating a will- 
ingness to resolve their differences 
at a summit meeting. 

“Notice the parallelism here,™ 
Mr. Regan said of Mr. Gorbachev. 

In an address to a Kremlin rally 
on Wednesday commemorating the 
40th anniversary of the defeat of 
Nazi Germany, the Soviet leader 
charged that the United States was 
“the forward edge of the war men- 
ace to mankind." 


“He’s talking tough, certainly,” 
Mr. Regan said of Mr. Gorbachev. 
“He's staking out positions. He 
didn't get his job because he's a 
cream puff.” 

President Reagan, in his speech 
Wednesday before the European 
Partiament, was critical of Soviet 
actions. But both leaders had con- 
ciliatory passages in their addresses 
and in an exchange of letters mark- 
ing the 40th anniversary of the end 
of World War II in Europe. 


Another issue that came 


Thursday was the fate of East Th 
mor, the former Portuguese colony 
near Australia. 


Shultz, Israelis Meet on Role 
Of Palestinians in Peace Talks ; 


On Thursday, the president met 
i Minister ~ 


with Prime Minister MArio Soares. 
Officials on both sides said there 
were few disagreements. 

The leaders muted any differ- 
ences over Nicaragua, although 
Portuguese officials said their gov- 
ernment would not support Mr. 
Reagan’s economic sanctions 
against the country. 

Foreign Minister Jaime Gama 
said he gave Mr. Shultz a memo 
seeking relaxed trade barriers on 
Portuguese goods, notably textiles, 
footwear and sled. 

Mr. Gama said be also insisted 
on the need for greater financial 
compensation from the United 
States in return for use of the Lajes 
miHtaiy base in the Azores. He sug- 
gested this compensation coma 
come through greater use of Portu- 
guese firms for naval repairs and 
armaments. 


A bipartisan group of 131 U.S. 
congressmen recently urged Mr. 
Reagan to use his visit to Portugal 
to express concern over 100.000 
deaths there since Indonesia invad- 
ed the tenitoiy in 1975. The con- 
gressmen said Roman Catholic 
Church sources had reported that 
Indonesian rmtitary action against 
Timorese resistance had left many 
people in need of emergency medi- 
cal and relief supplies. 

Mr. Shultz said, “the subject was 
mentioned but was not a particular 
issue in our discussions.” Mr. 
Gama said the United States had 
“not succeeded in being neutral 
between Indonesia and 
the issue. 


By Senate 


on 


Merritt Named to MATO Post 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has mm«l Lieu- 
tenant General Jack Merritt, direc- 
tor of the joint staff of the U.S. 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, as US. repre- 
sentative to the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization military com- 
mittee, Defense Secretary Caspar 
W. Weinberger said Thursday. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
sumptions of the Reagan adminis- 
tration. 

Mr. Dole rounded up the votes 
he needed by making last-minute 
concessions to restore spending for 
some programs, including Amtrak, 
the national passenger railroad. 
Other programs that were saved 
included the Small Business Ad- 
ministration, the Job Corps pro- 
gram to train youths, an 
transit operating subsidies. 

Despite these and other 
the plan was said by Mr. 
staff to meet the leadership’s tar- 
gets for deficit reduction. It would 
end or gradually eliminate 13 pro- 
grams, including the program to 
share federal revenue with cities 
and Urban Development Action 
Grants to local governments. 

The agreement on the level for 
the military budget was unexpect- 
ed, but reflects the recognition of 
the political reality on Capitol Hill: 
the evaporation of support for con- 
tinuation of the military buildup of 
the last four years. 

Mr. Reagan, in his budget for 
1986, had requested a 6-percent in- 
crease over inflation for the Penta- 


(Conttamed from Page 1) 
visiting Israel, and Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres to plant trees dedi- 
cated to unknown persons who 
were not Jewish who (tided Jews 
during the war. 

Mr. Shultz's speech was deliv- 
ered in restrained tones and repre- 
sented Mr. Shultz’s belief that the 
survival of Israel can be seen as a 
victory of good over eviL 

He said that while Yad Vashern 
stands in memory of “suffering, of 
death, of evil,” it also marks “a 
great victory," the emergence of a 
Jewish state. 

“Here, as nowhere else," Mr. 
Shultz said, “the evil in man has 
been recorded in excruciating full- 
ness. Here, time has no meaning 
because time cannot wash that evfl 
away. Men and women may lead 
their lives elsewhere and avert their 
eyes from this cold and awftii reali- 
ty. But no one can walk through the 
memorial and harbor the slightest 
doubt that mankind’s capacity for 
evil is unbounded.” 

Mr. Shultz at one time was 
viewed with suspicion in Israel be- 
cause of his role as head of Bechtel 
Corp., a company with large engi- 


neering contracts in the 
world. Now, Israeli officials 
quently call him land’s 
advocate in Washington becaus e 
his support for increased and im- 
proved trade and security arrange- 
ments. ;->X 

According to an American offi- 
cial, Mr. Shultz told Mr. aufpr 
and Mr. Peres that tbe Umiro 
States was exploring various possi- 
bilities for getting Palestinians in- 
volved in negotiations. . 

Mr. Shultz told Mr.. Shamir (hid 
the United' States had no firm plan 
to ^ro pose and 

was exploring various possiMStifcs 
for getting Palestinians involved Jg 
the negotiations. -On Thursday#) 
Lisbon, Mr. Shnltzsaid it 
sentiaT for the Palestinians fti be 
involved. . • - - 

A senior American official , teal 
that the United Stales has ex- 
changed ideas with King Hussafi 
of Jordan on some names that feet 
suggested ty him as poteible PaKs- 


•lr 
B Pari 


5?*-* 


In I'N 




■:u, 


5$ 




H '• 


t»:c 


ts in a jmnt dcte- . * 

galion but that these talks wrip 
informal and no' official tiSt.'W 
names has bear presented- ' " 


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WITH PORTUGUESE OYSTER POWDER 


Feel young again with P.O.P. 

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;In FraxE an 9de in Drugstore*. Hootfhfo od (tore*, etc. 


Politics Alter Budget Plans 


gem in 1986. But he then surprised 
; with the 


conse- 


(Coutinued from 

they're all going to suffer i 
quences.” 

Robert Teeter, another Republi- 
can poll- taker, said that the key to 
Republican hopes would be now 
the economy was perforating in 
1986, not how senators voted in 
1985. 

Senator Robert J. Dote of Kan- 
sas, the Senate's majority leader, 
won the president’s support for a 
budget compromise list month. 
But much of what Mr. Reagan 
warned had to be sacrificed by Mr. 
Dole to girt the package through its 
first procedural vote, a 50-49 
squeaker. 

To win that largely symbolic 


vote, Mr. Dole had to accommo- 
date the political concerns of some 
senators at the expense of the presi- 
dent. He agreed, for example, to let 
two Republican senators, Paula 
Hawkins of Florida and Aifonse 
M. D’ Amato of New York, be list- 
ed as co-sponsors of an amendment 
to protect Social Security cost-of- 
living increases. 

“I think these votes have 
streng t h e a e dour members who are 
up in ’86,” said Senator J ohn Heinz 
of Pennsylvania, chairman of the 
National Republican Senatorial 
Committee. “Nobody wants a sen- 
ator to be a rubber stamp. We've 
gone out of our way to showcase 
our members showing thtir inde- 
pendence.'' 


many by compromising 
Republican leadership on a 3-per- 
: figure. Mr. Dole narrowly lost 
telastw 


Navajos Resisting Eviction 


■ ji 


cent! 

a vote last week to sustain the presi- 
dent's request for the 3-percent in- 
crease. 


The House of Representatives 
also is moving toward a position 
that would give the Pentagon no 
more than an increase to cover in- 
flation. The House Aimed Services 
Committee agreed Wednesday to a 
military authorization bfll that only 
allows for an increase equal to in- 
flation in 1986. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

modified, Mr. Clark has issued 
veiled threats of federal delays in 

mflKnns of dollars in 

to the tribe. 


that remains is fra: the Navajo rdp- 
cation to take place." 

Congress is scheduled to 


me 


tion this s umm er , with a focus ek- 


*rr ^ ;r i 

V "' 1 

’si’A - 


The one-year freeze on Social 
Security would save about S6 bil- 
lion in 1986 and about S22 billion 
over three years. There would be no 
extra increase to make op for the 
one-year freeze; which would also 
apply to other federal pension and 
benefit programs. 


The Navajos, under the 
chairman, Peterson Zah , are 
ing out instead for a co m pro mi se 
that would allow the Big Mountain 
Navajos to remain on the land 
while compensating the Hopis with 
federal payments or with land trad- 
ed to them from some other part of 
the Navajo reservation. 



So far, the Hopis have refused 

such a deal. i 


out s at Big Mountain are 
far, if oily to pet off the 
of a dash. . 

“If they tame w push me out*! 
will say, OJKL, it is better if you just 
kffl me now, and leave me hcftJ 
said Catherine Smith, a sheepha^ 
er who was once arrested for StinS 
a shot in die direction of a 




OW 


stringing afence along thepartiqi 
“We keep hearing about a land line. 

- _ ■_ . vi 


dispute, but the land dispute is It was only a wanting "Snot,-S 0 * 
over,” said Ivan Sidney, the Hopi said, laughing, bm the fencfflgJ* 


% 
t* 

■foC' 

' i 




tribal chairman. “Congress has act- 
ed, the courts have acted and all 


Big Maintain has since been && ‘M 




‘Hi, 



pended. 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUNPAY MAY 11-12, 1985 


Page 3 


MERIGAN TOPICS 






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y^fvv" 1 ^£2 

‘toJant Use -UU.SH. 

nttCTBK..iip J!h! BcteS^ 


.^FRONT-LINE FARE — Senator John W. Warner, 
-Republican ofVirginia, feeds C rations to the Senate 
wjority leader, Robert J. Dole, Repobfican of Kansas, 
befweaC^phoLHiBlm»dheon.Tberatbosw^eserved 
jto help mam the end of World War n in Enrope. 


rfBS’s Grile Criticizes 


*>i*V “IhvTr i> .i 


Jf - “J HWT 

rb v,*3ir.>. i-jnup (rt, pg 


4ft *r’< .j-. ;nc p.^ lT .,j^ 

«0 i!»xti;n.r 


rfiMs- r*-3n;r :* —• 
MBt? ::r aS’iH *.■ rr.-^.JS 


Ptrucls Testing 


u, i v.;\ 

Jta? 1 J.p-?..-: • • 

: Hit'll S itil 

!jhc l iilMr i 

hffc C v-stt ,-r 1 

ifc. lt=s- 

•Aw# " h* - •' •• '• 

ffW^M V* U .■ 
i»i si iron*-— i 
i &$v. diMm : 


^ CBS may have “pushed too 
*-hard" in its 1982 te&visio& doc- 
omen tmy that accused General 
^William C. Westmoreland of 
fjdsifymg inldfigpnce reports 
- on Communist troop strength 
, in Vietnam, according to 
■'.George Crflc, who produced the 


eneral Westmoreland 
-'dropped his Sl20-nnDion. libel 
suit against CBS on Feb. lfL 
Mr. (Site told a conference of ; 
ra^ and tdevisum news direc- 

tors this ; month dial, while he 
considered the programiacm- 
_ , ally accurate, if he bad to do it 

-t - «.£. ' :s &ovar again he would tiy to in- 
’*">idude nwre oT the context in 


rra:-^ 5 
i ‘ 'iuKv-Vk-,- 

■''"wa V;Il 


'■■Wa 


Nfc 

♦ymatt- r-- 
.aniih-atWP.- 

m'M pm*™--- 
‘ 

a 

ifjft !«/»•./:» «biu*’«- 

: " 

eiW- 5 -••• 
a*? n---. -■; . 




^«dnch the general was opo^ing 

in Vietnam. 


K.n&VS. ccnmanderin 

“It’s dear the president want- 

good news and was going to 
\y heat up anybody who didn't 
provide it,” Mr. Crile said, re- 
„ faring to President Lyndon B. 
-Johnson. “General Westmore- 
land was a patriot He was try- 
ing to win the war. He was pre- 
simiably acting in good faith. In ' 
a sense, I tiiink we poshed too 
hard.” 

Mr. Crile said he . was not 
'dated by the outcome <rf the 
■trial, in part because of the “h»- 
j'xnan factor ;'of .attnm near Gear 
t Westmbrdatto” in court. • 
. «... ri . iTT for 18 weeks dnd^^bfitmg tbe^- 
■tmperierice of being covered by- 
-the press, ■ 




ird 

»> i> '•• 

*< ■ 

}«M»d C*’ 


-.■•'•cr 


^ModonRii 

arts in l 1 * ‘ H ' e 


Short Takes 


, - Jackie Presser, president of 
-.the l^Brinioo-member Team- 
, sters union, received salaries 
.'.from his various posts totaling 
£>30,000 last year, making him 
■ , toe highest paid M»r unioa <rf-. 
-goal in the United States. Lane 
Kiridan^ head of the American 
’.Federation of Labor-Cangrcss 
Of Industrial Otgamzalions, the 
country? biggest union with 
13.7 amfion members, was paid 
$>10,000. 


The four-year i 
dJohnW. Vessr 


n 




termof Gcner- 

'essey Jn, chairman 
of the Joint Clnds'of Staff, ex- 
pires in June 1986. His succes- 
sor is expected lo be a navy 
nan. No law says so, but tht 
-chairmanship his customarily 


rotated among the three major 
services. General Vessey is an 
army office - , his predecessor 
was Geaeral David C Jones of 

the airicKceL.The leadinjgnavy 

candidates, according to Penta- 
gon scuttlebutt are Admiral 
James D. Watkins, who as chid 
of naval operations .already is 
one of dtejosat chiefs, and Ad- 
miral WiBiam J. Crowe Jr,- 
cominander of the Pacific fleet. 


'In anoflier succession. The 
New Yak Times says it ap- 
pears that when Judy Gold- 
sontb, prerident of the National 
Organization for Women, runs 
for a second two-year tom in 

July, her opponent will be Elea- 

nor Smeal, who preceded Mrs. 
Goldsmith in the office:. Mrs. 
Smeal, wbo headed NOW from 


£977 to 1982. has since pub- 
How 


lisfaed a bode, “Why and 
Women WI1 Elect the Next 
President” 


One-Way Ticket 
Stirs 2-City Feud 


In 1982 a Fort Lauderdale; 
Florida, prostitute, given a 
choice of jail or a move to Cali- 
fornia, chose California. She 
was . later arrested there five 
times for prostitution, accord- 
ing to Santa Monica’s police 
duet James. JCeaba 
~L‘ So when pobcein the-Mjaipi 
area arrested a man three times 
in rixwedts, twice for indecent 


exposure and once for breaking 
a window, perhaps they should 
doi have been surprised that be 
had a long criminal record and 
had been seat to Miami by 
Grief Keane, with Santa Moni- 
ca paying the $249 one-way air 
fare to Florida. 

Grief Clarence Dickson of 
the Miami police said that 
Chief Keane’s decision to 
“dump” the man on Miami was 
“unprofessional and .danger- 
ous.* • 

Tt could have been worse,” 
said JoeCarolla a Miami dty 
commissioner. Santa Monica 
“could have sentns their police 
chief." 

Chief Keane, asked about 
Mr. CaroQo’s remark, said, “I 
like his sense of humor.” 


ARTHUR HIGBEE 


r* 


e> 

s? 




ip*-. :P 
b & ~ 


Edmond O’Brien, 69, Actor 
On Stage and Screen, Dies 


urk 

- 


eStu"- : - 

r^4 

5*FS=’- 1 " 

,I?W J -*■ 


: ffn> York Timet Strrice 

: NEW YORK— Edmond CTBrir 
■ eq,‘ 69, an Academy Award-win- 
. - ping actor whose 35-year movie ca- 
. E«a: wok him from leading roles in 
'the 194(h) to weather-beaten char- 
■; 'jacter parts in the 1970s, ified 
■*'; Thursday in Inglewood, Calif omia. 
had been suffering frian Alz- 
ri disease. 

; Mr. O’Brien received his Era 


House Panel Mobile Missiles Have U.S. Officials 'Tied Upin Knots’ 

Votes to Ban 


Aid to Rebels 
In Nicaragua 


By Leslie R Gdb . 

Nw York Tam SeMee 

WASHINGTON — President 


By Sceven V. Roberts 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
Select Committee on Intelligence, 
meeting in secret session, has voted 
to continue a ban on ah military 
ass stance to the rebels in Nicara- 
gua for an additional year. 

The panel also rejected President 
Ronald Reagan’s request to pro- 
ride $28 mmion in militaiy aid to 
the insurgents. Republicans on the 
committee then offered an amend- 
mfint allotting the same amount for 

namxn&iary purposes, but that also 

was defeated. 

■ The votes came Thursday as tbe 
committee worked an the intelli- 
gence authorization bill for the 


1986 fiscal year beginning Oct. 1. 
-Most of the decisions were on a 
straight party-line basis, according 
to lawmakers who attmded the 
meeting. 

Debate in the intellieence com- 
mittee focused on whether to con- 
tinue tbe ban on military assistance 
to tbe rebels. That ban, which ex- 
pires at the end of the fiscal year, is 
called the Boland amendment, af- 
ter Edward P. Boland, the Massa- 
chusetts Democrat who first pro- 
posed it. 

A proposal to remove the Boland 
amendment for another year was 


a -ban on laud-based mobile ssasr 
SlCS, according to administration 
officials, despite his ' Statement 
Wednesday that a Sonet mo tale 
missfle is deariy designed for a first 
strike and is under mining stability. ' " 

The reason why no ban has been 
proposed, the officials said Thurs- 
day, is that the administ ration re- 
mains deeply divided on the whole 
subject of land-based ambSe nris* 
ales, apart from its common dislike 
of the Soviet missile, the SSX-24. . 

Some officials maintain that 
such missiles .are gpod overall, be- 
cause they are far less vulnerable 
than immobile ones; others argue 
that they are bad, because their 
numbers are difficult to verify. 

The SSX-24, which Mr. Reagan 
singled out, is scheduled for de- 
ployment in silos next year, and the 
iyimbikrr aqgp estimates that mo- 
bile deployment could follow some 
years later. Deployment in either 
farm is permitted under existing 
aims limitation treaties. 

A dminis tration officials that 
said Mr. Reagan’s s t atem e nt about 


the SSX-24 took them by surprise. 

5,” a high official 


rejected 1 0-6. 

Two weeks ago. Congress reject- 
ed proposals to provide S14mmion 
in aid to the rebds during the cur- 
rent fiscal year. But that outcome 
left man y lawmakers unsatisfied 
and spawned a new round of dis- 
cussions on Capitol HD1 about pos- 
sible compromises. 

In addition, tbe recent visit to 
Moscow by President Daniel One- 
ga Saavedra of Nicaragua stimulat- 
ed swoon ibr some form of aid to 
the; 


Republican Leaders are working 
on another aid package that they 
intend to offer later this Spring, 
prbbably as an amendment to a 
supplementary appropriations bilL 
That proposal wcmla allocate $40 
mffliftn to $50 milli on u> the rebels 
for a 16-month period — the rest of 
this year and aft of the next one. 

The aid would be nonmilitary, 
hwfru ffi * the Reagan administration 
now acknowledges that military as- 
sistance could not make it through 
Congress. The White House stm 
wants all aid to the rebds.funnded 
through the Central Intelligence 
Agency, but the Republicans say 
they are uncertam whether they can 
en«a such a proposal in the House, 
which the Democrats control. 


■ Ortega to Get East Bloc Aid 
Mt. Ortega said at the end of an 
East European tour Friday that 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Pott Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Leftist 
guerrilla forces, in the face of a 
deteriorating military position, 
have sharply increased attacks on 
the civilian authorities in small 
towns and villages of eastern G 
Salvador, the government said. 

The Salvadoran Army reported 
Thursday that JO mayors have been 
kidnapped and two lulled by insur- 
gents since the beginning- of -the 


new US. trade sanctions wbuld se- year; six were abducted in the last 
verdy affect his oountry’s economy two weeks. 


but dial Soviet bloc states had 
pledged economic help, Reuters re- 
ported from East Benin. 

“The embargo will have a very 
serious effect on our economy," he 
said, “especially if you consider 
bow dependent we are on 
parts and machinery from 
America." 

Mr. Ortega said that no political 
conditions had beat attached to the 
Warsaw Fact aid, which he said 
would cover such areas as machine 
parts and medical goods. 

“But we are not expecting abun- 
dance and a solution to -all our 
problems from this," he added. 

Mr. Ortega was u> leave East 
Berlin larer Friday and begin a tour 
of Western Europe, in which be 
was expected to seek support far 
ending the U-S. sanctions: He is lo 
visit Spain, France, Italy, Sweden, 
Finland and Greece. 


-He returned to New York and 
stage work in a number of notable 
plays in the early 1940s, including 
“Romeo and Juliet” with Laurence 
Olivier and Vivien Leigh. In World ■ 
War IT, he joined the army and 
appeared in Moss HanV1943 air 
force show, “Winged Victory. 


It was after the war, when HoSy- 
ityte 


wood adopted the film-noir si_ 
that he became a major star, with 

hie m Dhh»t Um. 





1 


.y/as, his performance as (hc syco- 
p^aritic Hollywood pros, agent. 


George G 

We Life” and “While HsaL 1 
• Later Mr. O'Brien began to play 
'^-S^ J ? I ^ >OT V mJ 5 sc P llL ' 1 f5 n ' nwrechara^nte^ 

-• Kiewicz s “Barefoot Contessa that grizzled frontier editor La John 
wpn him an Academy. Award m Ford’s “Man Who Shot Liberty 
2955 as best supporting actor. « »- — ^ 

A'nJ 1 L. D. 



Edmond O’Brien 


AP/1965 


4*9/! •’ 

sf 


* 


Mr. O'Brien was born in Brook- 
lyn. He enrolled at Fordham Uni- 
...• r i«3ty, but dropped cart after a 
r ^ ^'ear to accept a scholarship from 
the Neighborhood Playhouse. He 
r.i was given a part in John Gidgud’s- 
f ■ • American tour of the asnpan/s 
.» flit* moiiem-dress version of “Juhos 
4 *' ■ ^aesar” and in 1937 janod Orson 

* 'dles’s Mercurv Players. In 1939 
tel lo H 


Valance." He was nominated a sec- 
ond time for an Academy Award 
Jot his role as air alcoholic senator 
in “Seven Days in May," but did ' 
not win. 

Theodore Sturgeon, 67, ' 
Science Fidioo Writer 
LOS ANGELES (LAT) — 
TheOdOTC Sturgeon, 67, a prolific 
sdence fiction writer credited with 
humanizing the genre at a time 


when it was obsessed primarily 
with wars between worlds, died 
Wednesday in Eugene, Oregon. 
Adriano Fatiten, 82, 

Amateur Athletic Leader 
LONDON (Reuters) — Adriaan 
Paulcn, 82, life president of the 
International Amateur Athletic 
Federathm, died Wednesday in the 
Netherlands. A former world re- 
cord holder in 1925 in the old dis- 
tance of 500 meters, be filled vari- 
ous posts in the federation over a 
period of 33 years. 


Also since January, the army cal- 
culated, 32 town halls have been 
sacked or burned by guerrillas, 
mostly in rural areas of longstand- 
ing guerrilla strength in the eastern 
provinces. 

GuerriQas of the Farabundo 
Marti National liberation Front, 
the rebel umbrella organization, 
frequently have taken ova small 
town halls and destroyed govern- 
ment installations or records in 
their five-year war to take power in 
B Salvador. 

But the Salvadoran Army and 
diplomatic sources described tbe 
capture and killing of mayors as a 
departure for the movement, which 
usually has sought to gain the 
broadest possible support among 
the populace. 

Major Carlos Aviles, the army 
spokesman, said the recent attacks 
against mayors reflect inability by 
the guerrillas to confront the army 
directly. His comments fit a pattern 
of increased confidence by the Sal- 
vadoran Army and its U-S. advisers 
that leftist forces have been doing 
poorly on the battlefield for the 
past year. 

■ Gonflicf Over Meeting 

Mr. Duarte said Wednesday that 
leftist guerrillas have agreed to 
bold “a private conversation" with 
bis government in an effort to re- 
open peace talks stalled since No- 
vember. But rebel representatives 
denounced tbe statement as “mi*, 
leading," United Press Internation- 
al reported from San Salvador. 

Mr. Duarte said at a press con- 
ference Wednesday. “We will talk 
without tbe press, without news, 
without making any scandals, sit- 
ting alone to see if we can find the 
path.” He said that mediators from 
the Roman Catholic Church would 
be present 

Bui Jos6 M^rio Lopez, a rebel 
official, said in a statement read 
Thursday over commercial Salva- 
doran radio stations that “Duarte 
is breaking the process of dialogue 
between the government and the 
front with Ids irresponsible ac- 
tions." 

“The latest expression has been 
the culmination of tfistortions," 'he 
added. 

Mr. Lripez, however, did not 
deny that the rebels had agreed to a 
private meeting. 


S't-- 


& 


J^ridaMon, 75 , Found Guilty m f Mercy EHling* of Wife 


'Ai 


if-’* 


w 

t-«K- - ‘ 

a-v^ * ; 

‘ WA-j •: r. 


r .'l ir . The Associated Press Jurors said the case was difficult 

FORT LAUDERDALE, Hart- because state miirder laws forced 
da’*— A 75-year-dd man has been ihem to ignore the sympathy, they 
tfcrivicied'or murder in the “mercy felt for Mr. Gilbert. 




of his wife, of 51 years -to 
' suffering from Alzheimer’s 
■- disease, and says his mandatory 25 J 
it prison term amounts to the 
ith penalty for him. 
fit’s the' end of my Hfe," said 
/R&swell Gilbert after, the jury on 
Thursday convicted. him or firsi- 
'degree murda, "What is left? Yoii 
■ think Fm going to hve over 100?” 


Witnesses - testified -that Emily 
Gilbert, 73. had begged to be al- 
lowed to die. She also had suffered 
from osteqiorsis, a pamful bone 
disriuemuon, . 

Mr. Gilbert sat stoicaSy, but Us 
only child, Martha Moran, burst 
into tears when the verdict was 
read after five boss of' defibera- 
tion.- • ' 


. “They killed my father," Mrs. shot his wife twice in the head out 
Moran aid, weeping as her has- of compassion. He called the police 
b a n d led her from the packed and surrendered after the shooting. 

courtrooni - Mrs. Gilbert, who wasr killed 

As marshals led him out of the March 4 in the couple’s condomini- 
Broward County Courthouse, Mr. um apartment, was senile from 
■ Gilbert said the term amounted to brain degeneration caused by Alz- 


a death sentence for him. 

"Is this justice?” be .asked. 
“-He’s numb right now, " said his 
lawyer, Harty GuDrin. adding that 
he would appeal tbe couvictioa. 


heimers disease. 


Mr. Gilbert had testified that he ed murder. 


The prosecutor, Kelly Hancock, 
had urged jurors to ignore pleas for 
compassion, saying that the sbooi- 
neditatc 


mg was premeditated, cold-blood-: 


RMUi 

: 4at**’* 




: ac 


m ^ ' 


i 



the single-wariiead SSX-25. Offi- 
cials acknowledged Thursday that 

ihkwac l vyaiiw tbfr ffdminis iration 


originally intended to deploy the 
' as a land- 


“YouTl notice," 
said, “that the president just raised 
the SSX-24 as a problem and did 
not propose banning land-based 
mobile missfies generally, because 
we’ve been tied up in knots on this 
issue for four years and we still 
are." 

But despite the continuing inter- 
nal arguments, the a dminis tration 
has taken the public position for 
ova two years that land-based mo- 
bile missiles are good for “nuclear 
stabili ty," drat both sides should 
move toward deploying them and 
that lira United Stales will deploy 
its mobile missile, the Midgetman, 
in the early 1990s. 

Administration officials said 
Thursday that the only additional 
point they could agree on was that 
tbe SSX-24, in particular, was bad 
for three reasons. 


An illustration by the U.S. Defense Department of tire Soviet SSX-24 mobile missile. 


■•First, they said the SSX-24's 
multiple warheads would be accu- 
rate enough to destroy hardened 
targets, such as missiles in silos; but 
they acknowledged that the Mld- 
gwmart would have the same abili- 
ty. 

• Second, they said (he SSX-24 
woidd give Moscow a greater num- 
ber of accurate warheads, because 
it is being tested with between eight 
and 20 warheads, compared with 
the one warhead planned for the 
Midgetman. 

• Third, they expect the SSX-24 
to be deployed on railroad cars, 
which will give it more mobility 
and create greater problems of veri- 
fying its numbers under aims trea- 
ties than another Soviet mobile 


ried by tractor- trailer trucks. A 
number of adminis tration officials 
acknowledged Thursday that the 
door to the deployment of such 
missiles has beat kepi open ova 
the years sot by Moscow, but by 
Washington. 

In the. 1972 treaty on- limiting 
strategic arms and is the 1979 un- 
ratified treaty, Moscow gave Wash- 
ington the choice of whether to ban 
or allow these missiles. Both times, 
Washington chose to keep the door 
open. 

In tbe second treaty the adminis- 
tration of Presidmi Jimmy Carta 
wanted to be able to deploy (he 
multiple-warhead MX ssssue is 
some mobile form, and this view 
persisted into the first two years of 


missile, the SSX-25. which is car- .die Reagan adminis tration. 


More Mayors 
Kidnappedin 
El Salvador 


Lagos Remains Most Expensive City 
In World; Belgrade Is the Cheapest 


United Press International 

GENEVA — Lagos is still the world’s most expensive dty for U.S. 
executives overseas, but most other foreign dues are now d 
than New York because of the strong dollar, according to a 


survey, 

BeJpi 


[grade, at 40 points on the index, ranked as (he cheapest of the 91 
dues surveyed by Business International SA to assist U.S. corpora- 
tions in determining living allowances for foreign-based executives. 

Lagos at 146 points on the index took top place for tbe fourth 
consecutive year, with Tokyo next at 118 points, Tehran at 1 16 and 
Cairo 114. 

All other foreign cities have become cheaper in relation to New 
York, which the index ranks at 100 points, because of the strength of 
the US. dollar, according to the survey, which was based on foreign- 
exchange rates during the week of Jan. 24 to 31 of this year. 

Oslo was the most expensive European dty with a rating of 87, 
followed by Zurich, 75, and Geneva, 74. The cheapest West European 
eity-was Lisbon at 53 points. 

Comparisons were based cm prices for food, household supplies, 
personal care items, tobacco, utilities, clothing, domestic hdp, recrea- 
tion and entertainment, and transportation. Rents were not counted. 

Tbe most expensive dties were: Lagos (146 points), Tokyo (1 18), 
Tehran (116), Cairo (1 14), Chicago (11X2), San Francisco (101), New 
York and Taipei (100V Los Angeles and Washington (99), Boston 
(98). Houston and Libreville, Gabon, (97), Miami (96), Singapore and 
Abu Dhabi (95). 

Ratings of other leading dties were: 

Asia: Bangkok (66). Bombay (54), Hong Kang (82), Manila (65), 
Sydney (84). Europe: Amsterdam (63k Athens (65), Brussels (62), 
Frankfurt (65), London (63), Madrid (58), Paris (70), Rome (68), 
Stockholm (71) and Vienna (72). 

Latin America and Canada: Buenos Aires (58), Caracas (50), Lima 
(SIX Mexico City (65), Montreal (81), Rio de Janeiro (46) and 
Toronto (78). 


New Antihistamine Drug 
Receives U.S. Approval 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Food 
and Drug Adminis tration has an- 
nounced approval of the first anti- 


histamine drug to be sold in the 
testhai 


United States that relieves sneezing 
and runny noses without causing 
drowsiness. 

Tbe drug, chemically known as 
terfenadine, will be available by 
prescription only. 

The drug, already sold under the 
trade name Seldane in more than 
20 countries, is the market leader in 
several of them, including Canada 
and Britain, a spokesman for Mer- 
rdl Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc. of 
Cincinnati said. 

Seldane will be available in phar- 
macies across tbe United States 
within a month, to be administered 
in twice-daily pills at a cost ranging 
between $1 and S1.4Q a day, ac- 
cording to the company. 

The agency noted Thursday that 
Americans spend more than 5500 
million yearly for relief from sear 
serial allergic rhinitis. 

Inhaling pollen from trees or 
weeds can trigger an immunologi- 
cal reaction that releases a hista- 
mine, which produces such symp- 
toms as runny ' noses, sneezing, 
tears and itchy noses and eyes. 

Antihistamine drugs, first intro- 
duced in 1946, block certain recep- 
tors to these substances, but the 


agency said that ah previous drugs 
on the market also have affected 
the central nervous systems of a 
significant number of persons who 
take them, causing some degree of 
sedati o n. 

Dr. Frank E Young, commis- 
sioner of the U.S. agency, called 
terfenadine “the first representa- 
tive of a new class of nonsedating 
antihistamin es " 

Company and agency press re- 
leases said that tests on patients in 
Europe and the United Slates 
found the dreg to be as effective as 
the previous antihistamines. 


Aide Leaves UJS. Pond 
Over Book Controversy 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON - Marianne 
Mele Hall has resigned from the 
Copyright Royalty Tribunal fol- 
lowing a week of public outcry ova 
ha role in editing a I9S2 book, 
“Foundations of Sand,” consid- 
ered insulting lo blacks. 

A White House spokesman said 
that Ms. Hall resigned Wednesday. 
She had been confirmed April 2 to 
the S70,000-a-year job at the tribu- 
nal which sets tbe rate that cable 
television operators most pay for 
the right to rebroadcast programs. 




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In his speech Wednesday. Mr. 
Reagan said that Moscow “does 
not share our view of what consti- 
tutes a stable nuclear balance.” 

He added: “It has chosen, in- 
stead to build nuclear forces clear- 
ly designed to strike first, and thus 
disarm their adversary. The Soviet 
Union is now moving toward de- 
ployment of new mobile MIRVed 
missiles which have these capabili- 
ties, plus tbe potential to avoid de- 
tection, monitoring, or arms con- 
trol verification." 

For over two years, however — 
ever since the report of the Presi- 
dent’s Commission on Strategic 
Forces, led by a retired general 
Brent Scowcrofl — tbe administra- 
tion made no distinction between 
the multiple-warhead SSX-24 and 


multiple-warhead MX 
based mobile missile. 

Tbe ad minis tration said further 
at the time that one good that could 
flow from the MX was that it could 
drive Moscow toward deploying 
land-based mobile missies, 

Tbe idea was that they were “sta- 
bilizing" because they' cannot be 
easily targeted and destroyed, and 
thus they do not have to be either 
used in a first strike or lost to the 
other ride's retaliatory blow. 

But Mr. Reagan derided to de- 
ploy the MX in sQos and not ill 
mobile form and to begin develop- 
ment of the smaller, single-warhead 
Midgetman. 

“At that point it was too late for 
us to go back to the Russians and 
say. ‘April fool, everything we've 
been saying until now is wrong, and 
you have to slop doing what you’re 
doing because we’re not going to do 
it any more,’" an administration 
nuclear expert said. 

The general attitude toward mo- 
bile missiles remains favorable in 
the administration, because tike 
submarine-launched missiles they 
do not have to be either used or lost 
in a first strike. 

But officials said the problems 
began when it came to acting on 
this thinking. Tbe air force in gen- 
eral continues to be cool toward the 
Midgetman because of its poten- 
tially high cost and its depiction by 
some as an alternative to the MX. 

Also, military planners on the 
Joint Chiefs of Stiff are said not tc 
like the land-based mobile missiles, 
both because those in the Soviet 
Union cannot be targeted by VS. 
missiles and because it is difficult 
to verify exactly how many the 
Russians might have. They are 
joined in this concern about verifi- 
cation by officials who argue that 
deploying mobile systems that can- 
not be adequately verified would 
put an end to arms limitation trea- 
ties. 


Father, at Son’s Trial 
In U,S., Admits to Killing 


New York Times Service 

VIRGINIA CITY, Montana — 
Tbe father of a 20-year-old man on 
trial for abducting and wounding a 
woman athlete has admitted that 
he himself shot and killed the wom- 
an's would-be rescuer. 


charges. Tbe two fled after Mr. 
Goldstein’s slaying at a mountain 
camp and were captured five 
months later. Miss Swenson was 
wounded while chained to a tree at 
the camp and was rescued several 
hours lata. 


He also told thejuiy on Thurs- Steven Ungar, the son’s defense 
day in Madison Gouniy District attorney, has asserted that the son 
Court that be had engineered the 


kidnapping so his son would have a 
woman with him in the mountains, 
where the father and son were liv- 
ing. 

Donald B. Nichols, 54, said he 
had shot Alan Goldstein, one of, the 
searchers looking for Kari Swen- 
son, 23, a member of the U.S. 
CHytmric biathlon team, the day af- 
ter Miss Swenson was kidnapped 
last July 15. 

The son, Daniel Nichols, is 
charged with homicide, kidnapping 
and aggravated assault. Tbe father 
is to be tried later on the same 


was dominated and brainwashed 
by his father, who had rejected so- 
ciety and its rules and bad estab- 
lished his own brand of “mountain 
policy." 

Under cross-examination by the 
prosecutor, the elder Mr. Nichols 
said he ahd his son had gone to the 
area near tbe resort town of Big 
Sky, Montana, to find a woman for 
the son. He said his son was fully 
aware of how the woman would be 
captured. Later, contradicting him- 
self, he said, “The woman was for 
both of us, but was originally my 
idea." 



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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL. HBKAIJO TRIBIJNE, S ATUBDA Y-SU N D AY may Il-12 % .1585 


Page 4 


SATUKDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11 - 12 , 1985 


Kerala 


INTERNATIONAL 



Eribunc 




Pnbfished With TTw Yorit TW* «nd Tbe W^Uapoa Port 


While Statesmen Quail 


Most rich countries want international 
negotiations to reduce barriers to trade. 
France's refusal to agree to a date for start- 
ing a fresh round makes Mr. Reagan a bit 
glum and Mr. Mitterrand a trifle cocky. It is 
doubtful whether this will affect the present 
economic climate one way or the other. 

These negotiations are slow — the last 
round took six years — and their effects are 
even slower. This is an argument for starting 
sooner rather than later, bat six or twelve 
months here or there is not going to make or 
break the world economy. The Reagan the- 
sis is that an early date is essential to blunt 
the new protectionist drive in Washington. 
But those lobbies are not that smtplemmd- 
ed. They know that the benefits of a new 
round would not be felt in their constituen- 
cies before the 1990s, and what interests 
them are profits and elections in the 1980s. 

It is also doubtful if the political gains and 
losses will be great. Mr. Mitterrand hopes 
that his refusal to be pushed around by the 
Americans will stand his party in good stead 
in the March 1986 elections. But political 
memories are short, and he may have a good 
deal of bad economic news to face before he 
goes to the polls. Mr. Reagan can hardly lose 
much. He has no election to go into. 

Many arguments against an early start 
were poor, particularly those seeking to 
shield agricultural protection from the nego- 
tiations. The European Community's policy 
has paid some farmers handsomely but cost 
Europe dear. At present it absorbs at least 
10 times the amount its members feel able 
to pay their European social fund to sup- 
port job creation and training for the un- 
employed — a vastly superior endeavor. 
America, too, is spending huge sums ineffi- 


ciently to protect farmers, although it prom- 
ises (or threatens, according to the faun 
lobby) radical reform. Japan is similarly 
profligate, and is doing little about it' If 
trade talks cannot aim to reduce competitive 
farm support, one might as well go home. 

Another source of reluctance stems from 
fears that the new round will concentrate too 
heavily on freeing up trade in banking, in- 
surance and information technology where, 
at great loss to the public, liberalization has 
not gone far but where it is alleged that 
America and Japan would scoop the pool If 
countries are only going to liberalize in fidds 
where they fed already fully competitive, 
again we could all pack up, because this is, 
ultimately, an argument against any free- 
dom of trade at all: Every country is more 
competitive in some fields and less in others. 

France has a more valid point when argu- 
ing that it is not the duty of the seven riches t 
■countries to dedde whether and when a new 
round of GATT negotiations should start 
That body has some 90 members, not just 
seven, and many of them doubt whether a 
new round would benefit them. 

In countless OECD meetings the rich gov- 
ernments have pledged to roll back the ob- 
stacles erected in recent years to trade in the 
products the poor countries produce effi- 
ciently — ships and shoes and sug ar cane, 
and textile goods and steel When, ask the 
poor, is this rollback going to start? Eco- 
nomic statesmanship would dictate a quick 
start now, enabling the poor to buy more 
from the rich and pay their debts. 

But statesmanship is in short supply as 
leaders quail before the supposed electoral 
power of the lobbies of the inefficient. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 



We’dbetter tone this down or George UhoUlsuem for Ubd 


Too Much Politicking Befogged the Bonn Summit 

By Flora Lewis 


L ONDON — Despite the protests, 
4 President 


Does Hanoi Want Respect? 

ae party 
televise 


can television networks have lent their cam- 
eras to a self-serving celebration of Hand’s 
only real achievement: conquest Parades 
make pictures. What got scant attention was 
the off- camera horror of unrelenting persecu- 
tion even of former comrades. Some victims 
risked their lives by talking to Barbara Cros- 
sette of The New York limes and other re- 
porters. Their story is appalling, their fate a 
major obstacle to any reconciliation between 
Vie tnam and the United States. 

One category of victims is pilloried for mid- 
dle-class origins. Western education or past 
involvement with Americans. Ten years after 
its conquest of the South, Hanoi concedes that 
it still holds 10,000 people in “re-education” 
camps, but the actual number is probably 
40,000. Reporters who were admitted to a 
special visitors* center were blandly told that 
the prisoners damor to remain in detention. 
Then why keep these camps off-limits? 

A second category of victims is accused of 
“backwardness” — insufficient zeal for Ha- 
nd’s Prussian brand of Communism. At least 
5,000 people are held in five work camps. 
Outspoken Buddhists, Catholics and Protes- 
tants have been jaded or are under house 
arrest. Thich Tri Quang, the Buddhist monk 


who did so much to discredit Saigon regimes, 
is an internal exile. So is Quang Do, a Nobel 
Peace Prize nominee in 1979. 

Similarly consigned to jail or limbo are lead- 
ers of the South's Communist Party, whose 
agitations once swayed American hearts and 
minds. Their star fell with Saigon. Tran Van 
Ta, once commander of the Viet Cong forces, 
has not been seen since 1981 Another leader, 
Nguyen Thi Birth, was among the few sched- 
uled to take part in victory celebrations. She 
never turned up, the cryptic explanation being 
that she was “out of the country.” 

All residents of Ho Chi Mirth Gty live under 
the constant surveillance of neighborhood 
cadres. The penal system cries out for the 
United Nations probe sought by the Paris- 
based Vietnam Committee for Human Rights. 
Lending urgency to this plea are signs that 
Hand plans to step up its cam p ai gn to elimi- 
nate remaining traces of Southern heterodoxy. 

The only positive gleam caught by the 
American cameras was the desire of Vietnam’s 
leaders to reach out for American respect. 
They seem to be unaware that Hand has 
squandered its moral credit by conquests and 
oppressions. When those policies change, so 
wall American feelings about reconciliation. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


to Eu- 
rope worked oat as a useful demon- 
stration that the United States still 
gives prime concern to its Atlantic 
partners even though its Pacific links 
have greatly expanded. The value will 
be enhanced u the tour leaves the 
White House with more awareness 
that hot everybody sees the world 
from the same p ersp ec ti ve. 

There was some sign of this hap- 
. in Bonn, Madrid and Stras- 
A member of one summit del- 
egation said that the Americans 
behaved like “pussycats" after the 
leonine roars mat resounded from 
Washington in advance of the talks. 

The American effort to extract a 
s tateme nt of approval for “star wars" 
was withdrawn, and the Europeans 
were given to understand that they 
could participate in research cost- 
free. They have only to tad for con- 
tracts financed by the United States. 

The French block on agreement 
for world trade negotiations in 1986 
was accepted, if not gracefully, at 
least without any table-pounding. 


Especially, the previously adver- 
tised demand that America's partners 
speed up economic expansion “to 
take up the slack” doe to slowing 


A few commentators rook the sin- 
gle theme to mean that Europe had 
converted to Reagan administration 


U.S. growth faded quietly away. 

js that Mr. 


supply-side economics. It isn't really 
sa Nor does 


It seemed obvious that 
and his team were subdued because 
of the uproar over his thoughtless 
visit to the military cemetery at Bit- 
burg. Thai put a damper on stem 
ideas about showing muscle to allies. 

One little noticed result, obscured 
by the confrontation with France, 
was an unusual new agreement on. 
basic economic policies. In order to 
avoid normally acrid ha g glin g , it was 
decided that the Bonn communique 
should let each country state its own 
objectives in separate paragraphs. 

They turned out to be all much the 
same, stressing the need to create jobs 
and fight unemployment al though 
without risking more inflation, to 
encourage small and medium-sized 
business and to break down “struc- 
tural rigidities,” which is mainly a 
euphemism for union-bashing. 


lor does anyone imagine that the 
Europ eans have the slightest chance 
of copying America's recovery by 
running up colossal deficits and cov- 
ering them with a flood of foreign 
capiiaL For better or for worse, no- 
body else has that opportunity. 

But there has been a reversal of 
attitudes away from the idea that 
governments should be the main eco- 
nomic actor and back to reliance on 
private initiative. This is an impor- 
tant swing in the cycle of Western 
opinion, and it does reflect a Europe- 
an shift toward economic conserva- 
tism as enshrined in Reaganomics. 

The cmvogpoe is a renewed force 
for Western cohesion. Unfortunately, 
it is being countered by a continuing 
rise in shortsighted national politick- 
ing, instead of producing a consensus 
for statesmanship ro deal with prob- 
lems beyond everybody's next elec- 


Trans- Atlantic Confidence 


President Reagan was at his best in his 
appearance before the European Parliament 
on Wednesday. It was the occasion for under- 
lining the record of trans-Atlantic striving 
since the defeat Of Nazi Germany, and he did 
it with modesty and some eloquence and a nice 
touch of history. His hecklers provided noisy 
evidence of American success in helping West- 
ern Europe to make itself unprecedentedly 
united, stable and democratic in the years 
since Europeans “wept in the rubble." 

President Reagan ottered his familiar views 
about Soviet power — in a tone sufficiently 
restrained to satisfy the broad European desire 
for no jostling. In almost simultaneous coun- 
terpoint, Mikhail Gorbachev was offering the 
Kremlin's perspective on the same sweep of 
history. His speech bristled with the pride in 
Soviet arms and the bitterness toward the West 
that commonly mark the Soviet altitude to- 
ward World War II. Even on a day that was 
bound to be given over to nationalistic celebra- 
tion, however, the new Soviet leader was care- 
ful as was President Reagan, to keep a door 
open for dealings with the other great power. 

Forty years later the continent that was the 
center stage of World War II remains the great 
prize in the rivalry between the United States 
and the Soviet Union. It is the place — Eastern 


Europe as well as Western Europe — that is 
regarded as most worthy of bong influenced 
by one or the other. For all of this time, the 
fust aim of Soviet policy has been to weaken 
Europe’s confidence in America; and the first 
aim of American policy has been to strengthen 
Europe’s confidence. Fortunately, over the de- 
cades, the United States has kept the advan- 
tage. At least in the latter stages of the round 
that took place in the last week, we would say, 
Mr. Reagan more than held his own. 

Beyond the atmospherics, Europeans are 
deeply interested in how the Soviet-American 
arms control talks at Geneva fare. The picture 
of Soviet-American reaching for agreement is 
a source of reassurance to them, and any 
accord would be warmly welcomed. 

At the moment, the two sides have laid 
out initial positions that, from all accounts, 
are rnile$ apart, and they are arguing them out 
before the publics Of Europe and, of course, 
the United States. The steadiness of Western 
public opinion is crucial to the Reagan admin- 
istration's bargaining strategy in Geneva now. 
And that is precisely what President Reagan 
hopes has been earned by the 40-year record 
of American constancy that he has celebrated 
during his visits in Europe. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Earnest Readers in Moscow May Not Be Amused 


W ASHINGTON — The Moscow Inter- 
national Book Fair is an important event. 
It is the one tune the ordinary Soviet citizen can 
get his hands on Western books. The lines are 
long and the place is packed. Soviet citizens come 
from afar, and wait for hours in line just to see 
and fed Western bodes that most of them cannot 
even read and that none are allowed to take 
home. Guards at the exits make sure of that. 

When they come this year in search of Ameri- 
ca, they are in for a surprise. The Association of 
American Publishers, which puts on the most 
important American exhibit, has jdst put togeth- 
er its book list- It is hard to know what the 
average Muscovite will think of it, but for an 
American it is a document for oar time. 

The list, the work of a committee chaired by 
novelist Kurt Vonnegut, contains 313 books. 
Chairman Vonnegut is convinced, or so he writes 
in the introduction to the catalogue, that “in a 
modest way" the selection reflects “bow Ameri- 
cans see themselves in the 1980s.” 

Consider for a start the list's treatment of what 
has undoubtedly been the most exhaustively de- 
bated, politically charged and internationally 
significant issue of the 1980s: nuclear weapons. 
Toe Muscovite with an interest in the subject and 
in how Americans see it wfll find three books. 
These are “The Fate of the Earth” by Jonathan 
Schell, “The Fallacy of Star Wats" by the Union 
of Concerned Scientists, and, for Moscow's tots, 
“The Butter Battle Bode" by Dr. Seuss. 

Fine books, all of them, but singly and togeth- 
er they have the balance of an Albanian election. 

The Schell book armies that deterrence, the 
foundation of U.S. nuclear strategy, is a danger- 
ous fraud. The Union of Concerned Scientists 
argues that strategic defense, Mr. Reagan's idea 


By Charles Krauthammer 


for a new nuclear strategy, is a dangerous fraud. 
Dr. Seuss argues — well the kindly doctor does 
not argue at alL He tells of the vicious arms race 
between tbe Yooks and the Zooks, indistinguish- 
able peoples except for the fact thaL one butters 
its bread butter-side up and the other butter-side, 
down. In other words, the Cdd War (believed by 
some to be about constitutionalism and demo- 
cracy, not etiquette) is a dangerous fraud. 

What is wrong with this nudear collection is 
not just the obvious bias. Nor that it is anti- 
American; of the three, only the Seuss book 
qualifies. What is wrong is that it is supremely 
self-indulgent. This is vacation reading for tbe 
Martha’s vineyard set, a bone-up for the right 
parties on the summer cocktail circuit. 

The committee has a context problem. On 


Nantucket you can go to the local library for the 

tin Me 


other side of the argument. But not in Moscow. 
And the last thing a Pravda reader needs is 
another attack on American nudear policy. Talk 
about carrying coals to Newcastle. 

The nuclear sdection gives you the drift To be 
sure, most of the 313 books are given over to 
politically innocuous stuff like baseball codring 
and art But when it comes to politics, you don’t 
need a weatherman to give you wind direction. 

Henry Kissinger savaged by Seymour Hersh. 
(No Kissinger memoirs.) Lyndon Johnson sav- 
aged by Robert Caro. American foreign policy 
savaged by Jonathan Kwitny. And books by 
Glona Stemem, Studs Terkef and tbe brilliant 
socialist Michael Harrington. Nothing wrong 
with these. But where is the balance? 

Where are Irving Kristol or Michael Novak or 


Thomas Sowell or Robert Nisbet?This list pur- 
ports to represent American life in the *805, years 
marked above all by the rise of conservatism, yet 
not a single bode by a leading neo-conservative 
has been included. Reagamsm may be a bad 
dream for Vonnegut & (Tompany, but, however 
deplorable, it happens to be the dominant Amer- 
ican dream of the ’80s. A touch of George Gilder 
or Richard John Neuhaus might have been as 
intellectually helpful to Muscovites as it is ideo- 
logically inconvenient to the Vonnegut team. 

When the National Endowment for Democra- 
cy contributed 550,000 to setting up this exhibit, 
it stipulated that the exhibit “demonstrate the 
diversity of American society and tbe strengths 
of its democratic institutions." No doubt the 
committee thinks it has done just that How 

the American ^pirifds^mtiosm/ < ^ ) ^™^ 

That idea is too dever by half. Democracy 
means dissent, yes, and dissent should be repre- 
sen led. But democracy means something else as 
well: popular government, in this world an even 
rarer political commodity. (Of the two, you find 
only dissent in the Soviet Union, for example.) 
You hardly represent American democracy by 
refusing to give fair representation to the politi- 
cal direction that Ameri cans have freely Aosen 
for themselves — twice — in the 1980s. 

The Vonnegut list tells less about the political 
diversity of America than about the arrogant 
insularity of the literary left. What are Musco- 
vites to make of it? At considerable effort and 


perhaps some risk, they will come to the Book 
Fair to find an American island in the Soviet sea 


in which they live. How are they to know they 

' party? 


have washed up at an East Hampton book 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


o me Reagan aornm- _ . 

Quiet Talking on the Hudson, Far From the Rhine 


EW YORK — What President 


FROM OUR MAY 11 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Tirst President of the WorltF 
WASHINGTON — Mr. James Barcus, of 
New York, has sent to all the Embassies here a 
book poking fun at Theodore Roosevelt The 
title is “The First President of the World," and 
the content is a speech supposed to be made in 
1920 at Tbe Hague by a delegate called Nik 
Detimi, who is addressing a convention of all 
the nations of the earth, nominating Mr. Roo- 
sevelt for “the job of being President of the 
World Federation.” Spelled backward the del- 
egate's name becomes clearer. According to 
the speech, Mr. Roosevdt has the nomination 
“cinched.” Tbe point is made that his sdection 
will result in all the armies and navies being 
placed on a peace footing, while Mr. Roosevdt 
is a man “to pull down any revolution.” 


1935: fflinois Poor Suspend Protest 
SPRINGFIELD, Illinois — After announcing 
that they would “starve on the State House 
steps” unless they were provided with food at 
once, the army of hunger marchers who had 
descended on this city decided to disband [on 
May 10]. They announced before breaking up 
that they would return when the Illinois Legis- 
lature reconvenes [on May 14] to make another 
attempt to establish a relief program. The 


Reagan intended as a journey of 
reconciliation, 40 years after the end 
of World War II m Europe, became 
too frequently an occasion for bitter- 
ness aim recrimination, even among 
friends, and wound up in a warlike 
exchange of accusations with Mikhail 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader. 

But perhaps this troubled week of 
commemoration could not have been 
otherwise, in view of the horrors and 
sufferings it inevitably recalled, and 
in a world where enemies have be- 
come allies and allies have become 


By Tom Wicker 


adversaries. History is not a predic- 
but the 


hunger marchers are hopeful that the Federal 
relief ai 


authorities will hearken to their appeal 
that “the government of Illino is has faded. Tbe 
politicians are playing politics with our mis- 
ery." Federal relief is at present being withheld 
in Illinois because the State government has 
faDed to agree on means of supplying its share. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Charmm 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

CtbOunmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWlRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Executive Editor REN£ BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS 

r D. KB 


Deputy Publisher 
Associate Pobfaher 
Associate PubBsker 
Director of Operations 

Director of Gra dati on 

KRANEPUHL Director of Admitting Saks 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Owrkade-Gaulk, 92200 NeniHy-snr-Seine, 

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© 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rights r e ser ve d. 



tion of the present or future 
necessary remembrance of the past in 
all its darkness and light; and recon- 
ciliation is not in tbe laying of 
wreaths but in the spirit and will 
of those who seek it 
That spirit and wiD seemed to be 
evident in one of the quieter com- 
memorations of May 8, 1945, at 
Hyde Park, the Hudson Valley estate 
of Franklin Roosevelt. There, for the 
first time, official representatives of 

West Germany came this week to pay 
the respects of peace at the grave of 
America’s wartime president 
In a ceremony arranged by the 
American Council on Germany, Karl 
Carstens, formerly president of the 
Federal R«r L,: - , J -' *” ■ 

wreath on 



as a group of 
and Germans gathered in the Roose- 
vdt Presidenua] Library, Mr. Car- 
stens raised what must be for his 
generation and countrymen the es- 
sentia] questions: “How was it possi- 
ble that our people followed a man so 
criminal ana so insane?" And how, 
he asked, could he enr lain “my own 
behavior between 1933 and 1945, and 
the weakness I had shown?” 

He offered no answers; perhaps no 


one could. But after 
“horror and shame" at the Nan 
Socialist regime and its murder of 
“millions of Jews,” Mr. Carstens also 
expressed his pride at the establish- 
ment in West Germany of “a demo- 
cratic state based on the rule of law 
and on personal liberty” — a state 
still suffering from “a barbed-wire 
fence down the middle," but one that 
has restored friendly relations with 
France and with neighbors in Eastern 
Europe and become a pillar of the 
West’s “common defense." 

Representatives of the Christian 
Democratic Union and the Social 
Democratic and Free Democratic 
parties spoke. Two figures frequently 
mentioned were Konrad Adenauer, 
the first chancellor of the Federal 
Republic, and Kurt Schumacher, an 
opponent of Hitler, survivor of the 
concentration camps and 
leader of the Social 

The West German representatives 
seemed somewhat taken aback by 
Americans' anger and resentment at 
Mr. Reagan's visit to the Bitbnrg mil- 
itary cemetery, where a number of 
veterans of the Waffen SS are buried. 
But Gordon Craig of Stanford Uni- 
versity, a leading American authority 
on German history, reminded them 
that “however much Ae weakness 
and failure erf mil of other powers 
made it difficult to prevent the own- 
ing of war in 1939, it was a German 
war desired, indeed lusted after, by 
thecoun 


his have been many prot 

have had to resolve and treacherous 


iblems which we 


ritfaDs we have had to overcome. 


pi trails 
There’s 

we’ll not be further tested. Tbe events 
surrounding President Reagan’s nip 
to Germany have demonstrated that 
in a dramatic way.” 

But Mr. Reagan's trip, Mr. Rogers 
suggested, had also been a commit- 
meat “to maintain (be close and 
friendly relationship between our two 
nations and peoples, who together 
must help mold and maintain (he 
future ofrreedom in the world.” 

President Reagan — despite all the 
errors of planning, the lack of sensi- 


tivity and the emotions aroused — 
did make that important commit- 
ment, to which surely no American 
can take final exception. 

May 8, 1945, was a day of libera- 
tion not just for the old Europe but 
for the new Germany as wdL And as 
Mr. Craig said, “Franklin Roosevelt 
respected history and knew that it 
had its own imperatives, the chief of 
which was to remember the past so 
that one might learn from itr 

Thus, remembrance is a necessary 
part of the continuing pursuit of hu- 
man and national reconciliation 

which need not be forgiving and can 
never be forgetting but is. finally, the 
recognition erf a common humanity. 

The New York Times. 



A Scofflaw’s 
Contempt^ 
Of Court? r 


& 


By Edwin M* Yoder Jr! 


t^^ASHINGTON —I n die matter 


the Nicaraguan cosspfea . 
the United Sum ia the 



international jurisdiction as 
Jackson once treated the jut . 
of John MarshatTs Supreme 
with impudent contempt And the#--' 
is lies a great irony.. . % 

When the World War II vkaoa 
thonsdves 40 years ago up- 
values they had fought for, one ledifll 
the rest: the rule of law. Like Wodd 
War L of which it was In so many 
ways a continuation, the war of M3& . 
45 again contested the out! M ttta 
that might makes right and tbatpow- 
er writes its own law. -r. ' 

To reinforce the coaly triumph 
over that old but unacceptable tat- 
esy, the United Stales was deter* 
rnxned to pursue whatever steps tagga 
unity could devise to straagtSaF-’ 
international low. Then: wastfie.' 
founding of the United Nations, & 


brief flourishing of the World Feder- 
alist movement and the UJS. detm - 
nation, at first resisted by Britaic^ to 
hold tribunals for war enmes. 

In those trials a standard of ac- 
countability would be laid down, and 
not by a sham* either. Unless addi- 


tion. Chancellor Helmut Kohl's insis- 
tence on the Bitburg visit was to j 
immediate political advantage, 
it is hard to find anything but desper- 
ation behind the obdurate stand on 
trade negotiations fay President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand, in the face of his 
party’s dismal electoral prospects. 

France has always been basically 
protectionist, and Frenchmen like to 


dant could be acquitted (as van Pa- 
cht later were at No- 


pen and Schacht 
rembergX such proceedings would 
be, in the words of America's dfief \ 
prosecutor, Robert Jackson, “a pot- 
soned chalice hdd to our own Ep p 
In 1946, America at last adhered 
to the World Court, in a successful 


see their leader thumb his nose at a 
superpower. But the country stands 
to lose more than it can possibly 


g?in by trying to force West Germa- 
ny to choose between dose ties with 


vsbh the indd&ty 
of Khomeini 9 * Iran* . 


the United States and France. Every 
time Paris has toyed with that tactic, 
Bonn has warned that there is no 
choice because France cannot assure 
West Germany's defense. 

French-West German strains are 
ominous for Europe, for the United 
States and for the West as a whole. 
No doubt there will be a patching-up 
effort now, Still, it’s a pity when poli- 
ticians' tricks stir unnecessary prob- 
lems. It is hard enough to hold west- 
ern policy on a steady course as it is. 

The New York Times. 


end to a battle first waged many : 
years earlier by Republican states- 
men like Elihu Root and Chariest- 
ans Hughes and backed by RepubK- 
can presidents from Harding an. ^ _ 

By a disturbing irony, the 40th ft*. ; 
nrversary of the end of World WaHjk. 
in Europe finds tbe Reagan adnaMfy 
nation refusing to respond to lie 
complaints lodged, at the WotJd 
Court by Nicaragua a year ago. 

In bnefs prepared by- 


lawyers, Nicaragua charges thaler 
subsidizing the “contras" andgnp 



bluntly vowing to force a 
of regime in Managua, the Ux 
States is acting lawlessly. W« 
ton responds — but not formally, aptd 
not in court —that the shoe is an $e 
otter foot It says tint Nicaragua^ 
unspecified aggressions against 43 - 
Salvador, is die outlaw. . 

To be sure, a World Court 
meat on such tanked conflicts i 
be, es-Lmcahrsaid of aprcmati 
Emancipation Proclamation, “I 
the pope’s bull against die comeL” 

But die merits of the dispute areal 
the moment secondary. 1 


declined to come into court and fy - - 
before an impartial international in- 
buna! its defense against Nicaragua’s - 
accusations. In this it is behaving . 
with the incivility of AyatoDahKho? ; 
menu's Iran, which five 
refused to honor the 
condemnation of the illegal detention 
of U.S. Embassy personnel 
The GKCuses-mus far offered- at the 
State Department are sdf-serviri&: 


They can only bolster the i 
that the case fc 


for subsidizing tbe “coo- v 
tras*’ or for a trade embargo is too 
feeble, in terms of the law the United". 
States pretends to honor, to stand l 
scrutiny. A case too delicate to be - 
explained to an international court 


adds unaccoimtability to contempt. 

All this has little to do with flneV - 


view of the Sandinists, or of the right 
of “seff-defense” that — 


cl aims . The United Slates 

clarify for itself its responsibilities to 
a world menaced by lawless force. - 


but not police. The Reagan j 
tration, coacrarily, seems to wantpo- . 
lice but no judges. No scheme cf 
inte rn a tio nal law and order can con- 
ceivably work without both. 

It is depressing that a Republican 
administration should be izi Cozk 
tempt of the WoHd Court Most of . 
the leading 20th century spirits of the 
Republican Party fought king aqd 
hard to admoniedge its jurisdicrum. 
President Reagan's hero Calvin G5&- ' 
lidge battled for adherence to. Ihe 
World Court as long ago as .1924.” 

America’s leaders at the end lit 
World War A had no doubts a ham: 
the obligations arising from the rifin ' 
and slaughter, and they firmly poitbe 
country behind as much internation- 
al law as the jealousies of nari/rflkl ;• 
sovereignty could digest Now Amer- 
ica seems content to sit 


giving the raspbenry to the sheriff and 
to the court summons. This is mtfte 
than an irony. It is a disgrace. 
Washington Past Writers Groups - 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

A Useful Soviet Ikeme 


Regarding t Tn Leningrad, the ‘Great 
Patriotic Wad 1 Lives On * (May 4): 


In her vivid account of bow war 
memories arc kept alive in the Soviet 
Union, Ellen Goodman omitted two 
crucial reasons why it is in the Krem- 
lin’s interests to keep, hammering 
away at the Nazi crime theme. 

First, the theme conveniently de- 
flects attention from the fact that the 
□umber of Soviet deaths and ruined 
lives for which Stalin is responsibile 


Second, these coustanT^iind^ 
of Soviet sufferings serve to imbue 


* * 


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® or y^Uer," since the warning would ■ 




Kremlin is concerned only with peace 
and security — and thereby blind us OSCAR LOVETICKi; 

to what it is really up to in A fghan, - DUssddorf.V • 

stan,. to the existence of terrorist v 

training camps on Soviet soil and to nace IS 5 till an Issue 
other nasty behavior. I for one do not 




think that making exploding toys for 
Afghan children is a proper wot to 
atone for one’s war dead. 




tatt y four milli on 
s chosen leader, and sup- • (equal to die number of Jews .who. 


KATHY MIHAUSKO. 

Paris. 


has no one noticed that somethttg" 
whim lay at the heart of Nazism^" 
racud prejudice exacerbated by ej»- 
oomic Pressures —is still aKve ania ;: 
S?* - ^* sl Earqpedembcft- :. 

A sizable portion rathe jwpokb- 


ported to tbe bitter end, with all that perished in camps just tme decade Tire uncounted mflfions of victims rion of FranctSSiS, 1 ?!? 
that meantto millions of people, by later) dead of starvation; a million or who perished in Soviet labor camne 


of people, by 
the great majority of its dozens." 

Former Secretary of State Wtiam 
Rogers pointed to the biblical nature 
erf rccondEatiort During the 40 years 
since World War It te said, “there . 



martian, 
populations 
after invasion by Hitler's 
Soviet ally; tens of thousands of Sovi- 


- - — labor ^ 

otter a better warning about the 
ture than the numbered graves of 
Lo^wdearLButnoone^ 

the Soviet Union is allowed to honor 

those victims and no en gaging grand- 


of sending “home" thowaSds of & 
sons of a different skin color 

have spent all their fives in: 


CHARLES HUNTfiR^' 

' Brussels^ 







r 1 Wt? 

y\ v 1 

L rf £ .>5as- 

J* 1 *««. jJl 1 %>£* 

“"PteViii ,,,«. 

* fcirt^s, ». I, 

W*rtif\ ltMi* 

IWI 1 

-I. .A 


1 Soudi Africa 
Cancels Plan 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 


Page 5 


700,000 


t I. l'''* 

* 4 4 iUM*,,./ 11 *JA,„ 

»rHt> !•. ‘s-Wjiuhi S 


a 

‘I 

t 

non ,.i.,-.: t 3“ 

Wlr^r ? >,Ctl l'lC 2.: 

In ilv-,. "“vniij 4 S? 

* l > ftrN ■-: 

n - n * ; - 

m it*.- >lf | ',; J 

t 

'”' '«“»5 -g! 

- 

wWi thr inririlfc* 
ofKkmuim,^ 

£}. ”' ”i ;ifM 'Heir 

^',;' J V“ ^ **«***■£ ^ 

*■* •* if-'nv few. 

■ »*■ !>' • S.»- Jft.' Rpjfjj. J? v 

U*!.":.U I' 

■riV an-:- ■•.•£:■.; j: iSftj - 

• -.i’ . v v.;-.-.. ., j-.yj 

I- hr:;! . i‘:r, * j-;' . 

N-- ,*as&Br 

«;.?» .in ^ “ 

»•*.•. ; = j|. ., 

'* * '• M-'.-U ll&lv L 


• -c . _By Aba Cowell 

\ - Hew York Times Service 

n*JOEUnNESBURG — The au-. 
’SioritiKliavcacnjcamccd what ap- 
pears W be a reprieve for an csti- 
mated . 700,000 Wado living m 52 
townships who were "duc^awd iy 
(ttxedT^oodog to -tribal -lorn* 

Tariria. =- ~~ v T . T ' • ■•" ■ 

l.-Undcr tie original: plans, the. . 
townships weft to be moved be- 
^me-wrl^-aL'die-aarikati-et- 
white cities, within 30 miles (48 
Jcflometosj of a homeiand bound- 
ary. .: ■■>■: '•■•.■ : 

'‘-Sami, de Beer, deputy minister 
of cooperation, dewacyment aod 



35,000 Walk Bade to Ethiopia Food Camp 


■ptpeTorwn on Thursday that the. 
Twmwalsf never were ready feasible 
and that the government was mere- 
ly' fadng reality in canccRng the 
policy. All new development m the 
52 uyrmships had previously been 


Tb» New York Tim. 

A viflager stands before a sign at Mathopestad, northwest of Johannesburg. Maibopestad 
» one of South Africa’s “black spots,” where, surrounded by white-owned farms, black 
families five on land to wliidi they were granted tide before laws on race were changed. 


frozen for two dccmles. But Mr. de 
Beeir last week azmoonced an end 
to thefreeze. - 

CSriL rights workers described 


2 U.S. Envoys Get Send-Off in Warsaw 


The 4ssidaud Pros. . 

. . WARSAW — Two UA <fipk>- 
ipoats expdkd from Polaad f or al- 
fj^bdly taking part in an anti-gov- 
T uwmtiignt deanonst arioa nyfh*" wt * 
> emotional ferewdl Friday from 

g r$ Fnifawy nffifMk 
'Mlfiam riarwood, 38, first seo- 
retaiy tt thaUJ^ Emaasqr in War- 


saw, and David Hbpper, 32. consol 
in Krakow, were loudly applauded 
by mote than two dozen UA offi- 
cials as they arrived at Okerie Air- 
port. ••• 

Poland dedared. them persona 
non grata on May 3 after accusing 
than of helping lead appo-Solidar- 
ity protest May 1 in Krakow. 


the derision as significant but said 
that hundreds of thousands of 
blacks still faced the threat of re- 
moval under other aspects of offi- 
cial policy. 

Some communities, for instant, 
Uve in what are r*n*J “black 
spots" — areas to which blacks 
have been given title that are sur- 
rounded by white-owned land — 
and some leaders of such groups 
say they still feel the government 
{dans to uproot them. 

Last January the authorities an- 
nounced a moratorium on forced 
removals pending a review of the 


policy. The announcement Thurs- 
day seemed to be the first result of 
that review. 

Sine* I960, according to chnrch 
groups, about 3 j mDSoa people 
have been forced to move to tribal 
homelands, or places close to them, 
under official policy that sought to 
remove all traces of a permanent 
black p re s e nce in white areas of 
South Africa. 

Recently, however. President 
Pieter W. Botha has acknowledged 
the presence of millions of urban 
blacks residing permanently in 
South Africa ana has promised 
them political and land rights. 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Past Sarict 

-ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
More than 35,000 famine victims 
have walked tack this week to Ib- 
nn, the feeding camp that the Ethi- 
opian government derided to re- 
open after it was burned and 
evacuated by government soldiers 
last week, according to an Ameri- 
can relief ofOdal 

“None of us anticipated this ava- 
lanche of people," Dr. Tony Atkins 
said Thursday. He is the director of 
World Vision, an American relief 
agency that is working with the 
Ethiopian government to rebuild 
the camp, “we are not prepared to 
deal with what is happening." 

Government messengers were 
dispatched Monday to walk into 
the bills sumxmding the camp and 
tell the tens of thousands of people 
staying there that it is all right to 
return to IbneL lbnei, about 200 
miles (320 kilometers) north of Ad-' 
dis Ababa, had been the largest 
famine-relief camp in Ethiopia, 
with approximately 58J300 people. 

Si ne* tH*n , from dawn until 
HmV Ibnet hay inundated 
with returning people, many of 
tbem suffering man exposure and 
respiratory infections, the result of 
having slept outside without shelter 
or warm clothing for more than a 
week in the cold, wet central high- 
lands. 

Dr. Atkins said that most of the 
estimated 52,000 people forced 
away from Ibnet and ordered to 
walk home did not travel more than 
a few boars from the camp. A few 
thousand walked to government 
feeding centers in the Wollo region, 
about 60 mQes east of Ibnet 

There remains confusion in Ad- 
dis Ababa about the number of 


people forced from the camp. The 
United Nations says the number 
was only from 32^000 to 38,000. 

Dr. Atkins said that Ibnet was 
being reopened to stabilize the 
health of famine victims and pre- 
pare them to go home to resume 
fanning. But he added that the 
Ethiopian government “now recog- 
nizes the inevitability of a substan- 
tial number of people remaining in 
Ibnet for a prolonged period." 

When Ibnet was evacuated dur- 
ing a three-day army operation that 
began April 28, soldiers burned 
several tfimnamd grim huts that 
had been homes for most of the 
camp's residents. Those returning 
this week must sleep outride and 
thousands of rhere are crowding 
near the stone walls of a govern- 
ment food warehouse. 

"It is such a shambles." said Dr. 
Atkins, who returned to Addis 
Ababa Thursday from Ibnet. 
“There are lines of people every- 
where. If ever there were a situation 
for a life- threatening epidemic dis- 
ease, this is it It is a very precarious 
situation." 

According to Dr. Atkins, archi- 
tect of the plan to reopen Ibnet the 


first priority at the camp is to build 
latrines to reduce (he likelihood of 
infectious disease. Then, he said, 
attention will be focused on putting 
up tents and delivering food. There 
are at least 10.000 tons of relief 
food in the Ibnet area, he said. 

After Gist denying reports that 
Ibnet had been dosed, the Ethiopi- 
an government has promised to 
discipline the local authorities who 
ordered its evacuation and is coop- 
eating with several private relief 
agencies uying to round up and 
care for those evacuated 

■ US. Waited on Aid 

David B. Onaway of Vie Wash- 
ington Past reported from Washing’ 
ton : 

The US. government deter- 
mined that "a disaster situation" 
existed in drought-afflicted north- 
ern Ethiopia on May 5. 1983, but 
waited five to six months to re- 
spond to emergency food requests 
from an American volunteer orga- 
nization working there, according 
to a General Accounting Office re- 
port. 

The report concluded that the 
delays resulted from “several po- 


High French Tax on Cars Is Y oided 


The /ioocwsed Press 

LUXEMBOURG — The Euro- 
pean Court of Justice has over- 
turned a French law that levies a 
high tax an owners of foreign cars 
whose engines exceed a certain 
powerleveL 

The court said Thursday that the 
tax, which can be as much as five 
times the regnlar automobile levy, 
was “discriminatory and protec- 
tionist" and violated the European 


Community's founding treaty. The 
engines of the largest French-made 
cars fall just below the horsepower 
level at which the tax lakes effect. 

The European Court ruling was 
sought by Michel Humblot, a 
Fren chman who owns a West Ger- 
man-built Mercedes. He filed suit 
against France’s Internal Revenue 
Service in Belfort, in eastern 
France. EC law supersedes nation- 
al law. 


licy concents" about providing 
food aid to a Soviet-backed Marx- 
ist regime. 

One of these concerns, the report 
said, was doubt about the ability cf 
the Ethiopian government, or pri- 
vate voluntary organizations, to 
cany out an emergency relief pro- 
gram that would readt all famine 
victims, including those bring in 
rebd-coniioUed areas of northern 
Ethiopia. 

In addition, the congressional 
watchdog agency said: "The Unit- 
ed Stales was also sensitive and 
cautious about committing large 
amounts of food assistance to a 
Marxist-governed country where 
detailed and accurate verification 
of real food needs could not be 
accomplished and where the possi- 
bility of food diversion existed." 

The 21-page report contributes 
to the controversy over whether 
Western donors’ response to the 
Ethiopian famine, widely regarded 
as the worst such crisis in contem- 
porary African history, was inex- 
cusably slow. Estimates of the 
death toll range from 200,000 to 
300.000. 

Despite official misgivings, the 
United States had committed S210 
million in relief assistance, includ- 
ing nearly 382,000 tons of food, as 
of March 7. This makes it the lead- 
ing donor in Ethiopia. 

The study reviews a series of 
problems faced by Western donors 
in trying to determine bon* serious 
the drought and food shortage «verc 
becoming during both 1983 and 
1984. These included a lack of ac- 
curate data, restraints on the trav- 
els of U.S. Embassy or relief offi- 
cials into the affected areas, and the 
Ethiopian government’s refusal to 
provide requested information. 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


r-- ‘.Member of the America* Assembly of ^ 

CoHegkSe Schools of Business 

Peo pl e area better fnvestmenrtfian maddnes - 
That U why the imclerigroducxte and g raduate sc h ool of the 


IMnfERSITf DE 
PARIS SOME 



&q*faMnftddth>de 
defaCMhaSan . 


r* .« : 

v« 'ii n 

- ■ ■*"! IfTTIL?- j l 

■‘=»" '.Vi i 

HHKma 

-i - "L" ] 

• •• i’,v [ [ 



' J 7 - ' • ' 

..Lmsb 


' '■ c. . 

y . 1 . •; • 

•..v .• :rsa» 

\M*n .. 




COURS DE 
CIVILISATION 
FRANQAISE 


• Univanity Courses. 

• "MAG6T&E de t 


hr! ■ 

*lr.i > ’ , '■ 

*- AVI * 


•• '-I' 

LTiTBf I 

'I 



. .. - • 

- • . ; xtic >_ 

, * VJ/UE 


• courses in email groups- an individual follow-up of the 
students- ebwi nsufx p tr iaiind ocode m i c team. 

» ncc eiesu te d progress by mean* of summer wmeifn 
Cnr es r oriented undar g r ud uaf and graduate programs in a variety of Balds 
from bodnenodhi Wd rotiprv i nlbrinolion ^sterns and economig to hotel . 

. .admiirmlibnondEi^^ 


^ 1082 o-ii * tfcWrtte* I SZ 

- UuMknbM Boyd* 3QZ&KXM Braub T*M+3a}2/2I7j4.2S‘ J 
• -carnal in Fraixii or EdoMl ' 




graduate courses uw»g*aduate courses 

• ■•MAGettWE de Unoue at de fnKi> faoe «* 3 “ w * M '*****- 

• French language and GviTHafian 

nanonoAcne* eqwwcrr 10 wa /» n „ ttaf > »—**--* *1 

CreAUiA) ; uotfwd number or 

• Sorbame Summer Session far ’miaipltans. 

. foreign Teachers & Students. Winim and Spring Semester*, 

e Coro far Teg dyn of French e Sunnsr Comes: July, Augud, 
Languooo ond uvusnon* *! 

e Speoaftted training comes in afl Jspianusi. 

fields. _ e lalerim Sesuonfc January 

Opficnein Eooweeake ad r o m sne i t iid Msdu. W n lun w and cesfifiae— 
by tbe SafasM and *• Frond, O «*er of Cenaene id bidneby. 

i — — - — : » - — » «■ s-.- » ^ ^ ^ 

j iiiumh vw cmpuuory. -nf^o — • mfi t* tne «»*Kg 

Apply to: CODES DE CIVILISATION FRANQAISE, 

47 Bu fas Ecnks. ftwfaS*. TeL; 329-I2-IS. 


fECOLE NICKERSON! 

f Longues Fnwrua 1 

r Snee 1962 1 

French ] 

C sssa^ fidfan, EngD sh, Arabic, 
Sp om ish, Portuguese, Russian 
Intensive, ext ens ive courses 
Groups or private lessons. , 
Adnlu j 

I ECOLE NICKERSON J 

L 3 Ate. do Priedem Wilson / 
\ 75116 PARIS / 

\ 5th floor / 
\ TeL: (1) 72336.03 J 


SWITZERLAND 

The (Meet dependent American 
boanftng school in Europe, founded 
b) 185& American CoBsge Prop 
Geruol Stuctes and Hill Section 
(ESL). Coed, boarding and day. 
grades 7-13. Activities, "sports. 
St-Morta ski term, end extensive 
travel throughout Europe. 


EUROPE 


ENGLAND 


CYPRUS 


35-acre country campus only IB The newest TASS campus, situated 
mfes from central London and kn the hH district ol Nicosia. Cyprus, 


6 mJJes from Heathrow airport. 
Founded in lB76,ot1enng American 
College Prep, curriculum and ESL 
Coed. grades K-t2 day: grades 7-12 
boarding. Complete sports, activi- 
ties. and travel program. 


otters dose proximity to the Middle 
East American Cottage Preparatory 
and General Studies cumcuta. 
Coed. grades 7-12 day: grades 
9-12 boarding. Diverse sports, ae- 
twttles. ana travel 


Mgrtreu*, Onm£fti«!4ZCH.I820MDnrnat«- W-(**JJ2I/d3!Ld7 
. awm in French or BigUt. • 


ptopkurt a btfr Iw vtt ment 

. thanmacWti« 

European 

university 


COLLEG 


BA & BS. Degrees in international 
and traditional disciplines- 
BFADegree. Parsons School of 
Design- Summer Sessions 


Badusktr 
and - 
Master 
Degrees 



courses 
ftt enorfsh 


»' M.' J i 1 3?:^ 

•1330 

t h > x.'i r,i j-jwt 


For Information Contact: 
Adrresscfts Office. Box K 
31 Avenue Bcsquet. 75007 Paris, France 
Telephone: 5S5S1.73/Ttetac ACfittRlS 205926F 
US Advisory BoaniPOBcKl15H.OemaeslNJ 07627 



ve 


Hie Amarlcaa Scfioot InSwitzvtaedl ExL SI. CH-SB2S Uontagarda, Swttsarlend.Tal: Lugano (DB1) 54 04 71 Tlx: 7M17 
TASS England. EXt- 42, CotAsiboarLane.Tborae. Ssnay, Entf ■ndTWTOSra.'M: Chwtsay (OB3Z8] B5 20£Tbi:B29rr2 

TOSS Cypnre, Ext. Sa,t1 Karoos Street P- O- Boa 2329,^ Htarela. Cyprus. TMiNtomhi (021) 43T14^ Tbc4fl01 

TASBHEUnXlnriibvSchoal, grod«iX13, Box 51025. Ext. 64, M5TOrOR^G>«^M^UMnsmsM26TTk:2l0973 


SWITZERLAND 

; - 5C 

Holiday Language Course 

in S^irtrs**' • • St.Gallen 

ENGLISH ■ GERMAN • FRENCH 
. with Sports (Tennis, Ice Skating, Surfing, Hiking, etc.) 

For information: Mr. 0. Gademann/Mrs. Schmid, Hoeherwveg 60, CH-9000 St Gallen 

Tel. 071-27 92 91 




undergraduate and graduate 
programs in business administra- 
tion, economics, information 
systems, hotel administration, 
communication and European .' 

•• Languages. 

CraiKHCue «2 f onaao Montroux 
T«L 021 / 65 11 67 


MLEIUR 

j TO LEARN FRENCH j 

CAran. a chateau In the Belgian Ardennes vrtiareyouleam and live — 
,1 ta French; Small groups aid private lessons. with taHor-made I 
J - pregrairimasforindMditel needs, ensure real progress. Good food. ■ 
I good company, good teachers.^ ^Came and team, atndenjoyyouraeff. ■ 
Ws teach private people. companles.err*assies, EEC.SHAPE etc. | 

I Foroompl^documertiatkin.^ndthisiaxiponorphoner ■ 

I am interested in courses lor: □ AduKs - O Young People | 

Private ' O Business . _ 



LODGING IN RtVXre AITS. AND 2 MEATS INQJJDB3. ' 

For adults. 6 levels from bagmr I to udvonoad H 
7>» nmO ovafcfcl* I u rei V cArby roeeqicn pro g rern ua% June ^ Xfy 1 adoljucr. 

Trarrf i— d taputo u hiuftd to l wJ farfliwdlMdfc 

N51RUT DE IXANgAB - E 1 1 

■ 23 Ava. Ota.-teduw 06230 VBlSfiANCHE/ MB. fafa (93) 01JS.44.. 


Institut Le Rosey 

1180 RoUe (on lake Geneva) 
Switzerland TeL: 021 75 15 37 

SUMMER CAMP 

For Roys aod girts 9 • 16 yra. from 7th July to 10th August. 


Beautiful mediaeval chateau, p arkl a nd, lakeside facilities. 
French. English, Computer courses 
IS Sports to choose from. 

Leisure and exclusion programs. 

Optional Computer Camp of Tour of France. 

For details write lo the above address - or re/j 021 75 15 37. 


PARENTS! 

Are YOU looking for the right 
school for YOUR child? 

For hue in fo rmation, please contact: 

FEDERATION SUISSE 
DES ECOUES PRIVEES 

40 Roe des VoUandes. 

1207 Geneva. 

T-*-W- 022/35S706.«_ 


To become 

A DENIAL TECHNICIAN 

• Top level Ironing 
• SfeXeaffhe-art Technology 
• Throe year course. EngfaMrendi 

Acactemfe d'Art Dentaire 

197, route du Mandemenl 
1242 Satigny-Switzeiiand 
Tel. 022/53 1953 




11 tiKTHIBI 


-CERAIM- 


COMPANY 

ADDRESS 


164, Avenue duCteteau/Ntort, 8-4880 Spa 


SALZBURG INTERNATIONAL 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

A awriucanonal American boutfingsehod in Europe's most 
beautiful city. Grades 8 to 12 phis R G. Higbest academic 
sJandards. College prejwatory and advanred ptaccmem courses. 
Extensive navel, skiM and cultural program. , 

!%r catalog write: SIPS, ModfiEb: 1064. A-SBOSalzbure. AUSTRIA 
TU.(662V44485&46SI1' 


‘ - V? 



INSTITUT MONTANA ZUGERBERG 

tn f uxjl i onci boys’ boon£ng schocd with rigorous US. oottega 
preparatory progr am for Americans. Grades 5-12 (Separate y\ 
sections for ftwh, Genrwi raid haSaivspedang students). < 5 s, 
Thorough proeboe of modem languages. Highly queified Ameriorai f - — Z> 
faculty. AfMate member hhtfianat Association of independent -f 
Schoob. College Boards. Idesdy located of 3POO fo« above sea Vfl ~~ 
level, in central S w i tze r la nd. 45 miixirw from Zurich ond lucerne. AS 3-' 

sports, excellent sU facilities. Travel Woriahu p during fixing 
vocation. Language Profpran in July raid August 

Write: Doan of tho American School, Institut Montana 
6316 luaerimta, Se ritMt laa d 


Hello mother, 
hello father... 





■ - - 

r w ! 

1 


PREPARATION FOR: 

GMAT • GRE - LSAT 
EXEC SPEEDREADING 




TOEFL 


I 


cnrmim 



TOB 


Belgium. Tei: 067/77 39 1 6. Tatec 49650 


.:X\ 


YOU WANT 
TO SPEAK GERMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US HAST 



Goethe-lnstitut 


I. -til^ ,n 


More Run 3 mffion students In 33 yam 
- 146 hatif ufas in 66 countries . 


LEARN SPANISH IN MADRID 

— Open all year round — all levels 
— Small groups — max. 5 students ' 
— Open to pupils of a/l races, 
religions and nationalities 

For OetaJeti infor mat ion apply kj: 


DINAMICA ACADhMIADI IDIOMAS 


«65 «Cr£ » J* »2e 


INSTITUT MONTE ROSA 

■ British aod American university preparation 
• • Intensive French courses 

• Business program 

6 Excellent facilities and staffing 

• Labs/CompPtg/Langpages (jndnding EFL) 

• Sports/ Cultural excursions 

Summer Courses in Montrenx and Gstaad 

riirring June, July, August 

Write to: 

MONTE ROSA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 

CH-1820 Montrenx, Switzerland 
TeL: 021-63 53 41 - Telex: 453 267 ROSA CH 



For information regarding 
programs BUhortrod under 
Federal law to Bn roll 
noo-uwmigrant aBoo atudems 
in the U S.A, please coll: 


Or Write; Dept HT 
Stanley H.Kap tan 
Educational Center Ltd. 
131 West 56 Street 
New TbriL N.Y. 10019 
Pamunant Cantors In More 
Than 125 Motor US Ottos 
Puerto Rico t mono Canada 



«. g. UxXBNB0UR6v TeL 4752S1/W 
KUALA UIMFUL TeL 423011 : 
MURNAU, TeL (0M41J 91 84 


IS iraNfutei In *e Federal RepvWe of Germany 


Fef deteBed i n fonnoHo m 

ooEiHE^smur 

ZanWqfverwcdtung 

DMKQOMnchen 2 
TeL (0) 89-5999-200 
Tafex: 522940 ■ 



American School of Mallorca 


AN INTERNATIONAL ACADEMIC INSTITUTION 

• Abmtod fay AaMUdfa Statu Aon. • Carfflsd by «» Q.O.D. Syriw far US 
GowtD«riorral-eAu6orfagdbylhe5pBriWiMHAyo(6ducBHon,6BoraA^7- 

1 7 X riny K1 7 ~ ^ \ -i rrr rrt ^ nr r ri ng wn u n n m nVxxj «Hti 

tap oofcga prep. • NofcAie reerarf of roOsga ad mta ie pi eSpacific band ng. 
tfaabtey ond ESI. program feat yirid tx o df pnt rraufe. - 

CAIirONATOlBQ,P -FOttAil NOUS - WUUI4J«C4 -SMUN 
TCLi 675130/61 -THCXM&ST AMSCE ' 



ST MARY’S GATE 

BOLTRXEMOUTH 

(Founded 1886) 

IndriKnirni Baarrfia? and Day School for Girin, 

8 - 18 Yi*ar». 

iiilt-nuliatul Summrr Srhuol tor Girls. 7 • 16. and Bow 7 - 10 vra*. 

Thv w-houl is intenulbiul in uidlook. and (here is sperialised luiiion in 
Eu-lish t. a dtftMid LujjftUf .1 ihrot^hout ihc year. 

The stall «n* hiphly <puJi/tra. and dim is a wide oo$e of subjrcw at both A 
ami 0 lni'k. 

Stuih bnJrooitks for Sitth Foms. 

TiipM-hool is nil lull'd near the beach, but stands 100 levt above sea level. 
Full drtuilf Jnxa the Headmistress. 


PACIFIC SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY 

jMaaLir i 9301 wilshire boulevard 

J L °S ANGELES, CA 90210 U.SA. 

EARN YOUR DEGREE THRU OUR 

OVERSEAS DIRECTED 
STUDY PROGRAM 

INDEPENDENT DIRECTED STUDY. NO CLASS ATTEND- 
ANCE REQUIRED, ONE-ON-ONE STU DENT/FACULTY. EN- 
ROLL NOW FOR NEXT SEMESTER. COMPLETION IN ONE 
ACADEMIC YEAR PERMITTED. 

e Business Administration e Bachelors 

e Economics e Masters 

■ Engineering • Doctoral Programs 

• Education e Many other fields 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND 7UTON GRANTS- FINANCIAL AID 
Send a brief resume detailing your background and your 
goals. IMPROVE YOUR PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. 

•AS.U. is Authorized by The California Department of education 
•PSU is a Member of N.A.SAC.U.. Washington. D C 














Page 4- 


. CA 'niDl^l v £inun * v » - _ .. 


Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAT MAY 11-12, 1985 


AUCTION SAI.ES 


ABTS/LEISUBE 


LEMPERTZ \ Galleries in London: Savoring the Engl 


OLD ART 


By Max Wykes-Joyec mi nwujfc laviAHt uxcuici WBS UK 
— to be the suburbanite man and woman in the 

snwt onino slum 


of whose favorite themes was the * 


1 0ND0N — It seems 

, prerogative of foreigners who 
it England as their home to nfiSS \* SE 


#606 
May 20-22 


OWMasten Important IWiC M itto y. 


ThaCofltCfion Bra nd ai -Cotto, O Bifl d o i f 
Works of Art - Ex ai rr a tion - Sculpture - Fwmdur* 


-M—M piaugauvt# ML IV H O ffW " " 

adopt England as their home 
explain the qualities of the indigt > 


C or p at i 

Preview: May 7 1-T8, except May T2 & 16. 


! about their daily basi- 
^Jin “Tendon Market” 

» Alan Lowndes (1921-1978), an 
I nous arts to the Enriish. It was the apprentice Muse painter bora in 
. German-bom SirNuoJaus Pevsner n^ovengte d tar cums i anoes who 
who, 30 years ago, wrote that most became i an excefleni portrayer in 
■ acute study “The Fngfohnesg of mis of his native industrial 

p i.'l a j" __ j and in his kcr mtmo vnu 


MODERN ART 

St 607 from Impreuioiriim & ExpranJonfem to fhe 

June 4 & 5 ftwenHlme: 

P d n tin flt • Wotorcolors - Sculptures * Graphic 
Preview. May 28-June 3 find. Sunday). 


Card Weight (b. 1908), Cram 
1957 through 1973 professor of 
painting at the Royal College of 
An, aim -not unjustly to be de- 
scribed as a 20th-centoy Pre-Ra- 
phaelite fantasist, as down in *The 
Angel of Consolation," where a 
very modem and ghostly angd 
hovers over a father and son 




of native upusnuu worm, Hovers over a rather and son 

Ait" and spent the rest of a nf [ m jri s last siting years made dressed m mourning black, pacing 
” " -'sh enchantin g landscapes of Glonces- a muddy seaside street 


his life hying to make the Enw*« » v«wiiMAr a IUUU UJ 3Q»a HUP 3UGCL, 

appreciate thdr architectural Ben- jmnm.vnxK be had settled with Five Very EngBsh Artists, Crane 
tage in his monumental multi-vol- nis family. . Kalman Gallery, *"* “ 

umc “The Buildings of England." »LS. Lowiy (1 887-197SX famed Road, London SW. 

Now it is Hungarian-bom Arnicas 88 artist-m-duef and in-residence n 

Kalman, who has long been a fea- to the industrial scene, and less _ u 


Gallery, 178 Brampton 
tdm SW3. to June IS. 


ASIAN ART 

#608 China ■ Japan - Soot h t at Asia 

Jima 1 1 & 12 Preview, June 1 -TO, except June 2 id. 


Kalman, who has long been a fea- to the industrial scene, and hw 
turn erf the Pngtish art scene with wcQ-Jmown as one of the greatest 

his Crane Kalman Gallery, who iiv- of Fngfirii imttm 
sists that wc look properly — “ T?: — - ™— «-=- « ~ •»— 

y^ u''i i Crtiiliak A ■ «■ 1 1 » ” 


rly at “Five • RnsJan Spear (It 19111 who 

riclifflllc in ruwfnuinM - <■ 


Richly illustrated Catalogues: 

# 606 + # 607: each DM 30, — # 608.- DM 25, — 
ind. postage. 


r ery Fngtich Artists. 

Ttey include: Londoners, sach as -n 

• James Fitton (1899-1982) one dy" in the present show. 


delights in portraying o ffinn y 
» “The Landla- 


D - 5000 COtOCTgLNBWAJaCT 3, W-Germcay-Td.: 210251 + 2459S2 


AUCTION SALES 


©Phillips 




UNE ART AUCTIONEERS* VALUERS SINCE [70® 


IMPRESSIONIST 
& MODERN PAINTINGS, 
DRAWINGS & SCULPTURE 

m— . _ 


CHRISTIES 

LONDON 

Weekend Ope ning 

From Samrday 
II May, Christie’s 
King Street: will 



Monday , May 13 

7 :00 p.m. 


at 


\Tewirjg: Tutt. Mai- "(JO-’’ \ 
Wed. May 8 f 70-51 
77; ur Mar 9 (JO-511 
Fri. Max- 10 110-1). 

Sat. Max- 11 (10-51 
Sun. Max- 12 (12-51 
Mun. Max- 13 (10-11 

Catahtgue: si 2. SH hy mall. 

Contact: Joachim Pissarro 
at (2121 T0-f65ll 

or A vntnique Stallaens 
at f 212) 5 U-# 6 tr. 


r 


Prerqosuatinn available 
during exhibit* « 


Admission to sale 
by ticket ontv 


Paul Cezanne, Baigneur a»re Bras 
Ecanes Oil on canvas. 13"x Pu*. 


(212) 570-4830 


406 EAST 79th STREET. NEW YORK, NY 10021 

licensed w cM on e nfc 

,C Wwon *r 61 SJ. M. Hobuuon # 795799 . K. Lobmn # 670108 . R. Madicy #797283 


be open £br 
viewing at 
weekends! 11 Staff 
will be available 
to advise clients - 
on works of art 
on view. 
Property can be 
accepted for sale 
on Saturdays only. 
Opening times: 
Saturday 10 am. to 1 pm. 
Sunday 2 pm. to 5 pun. 

"Except Bank Holiday weekends 

8 King Street; Sl James’s, London swi Y6QT. 

TeL 01-839 9060 Telex: 916429 

Christie’s Monaco 
Park Palace, Monte Carlo. 9800 Prindpaute de Monaco 
TeL- (93) 25 19 33 

Christie’s France 

17 me de LiCe. 75007 Paris TeL- 01/261 1247 


The fashionable and worldly 
aware aspect of Pngffafr an is ew- 
deniin “Cecil Beaton and Friends” 
at the Parian Gallery, which opens 
an May 22. Among the English 
members erf the circle with work in 
the proe m sho w are Lord [Gerald] 
Bemers, composer and novelist as 
well as twofold primer — land- 
*»pes in the style of Corot, and 
fantasies on Vkaorian/Edwaidian 
affectations; Violet Manners 
Duchess of Rutland, whose por- 
traii drawings were of aprofesaan- 
ri quality as might be expected 
from (me who had had Borne- Jones 
&s drawing master; the short-lived 
Christopher Wood (1901-1930); 
R« whistler, a quintessential En-. ■ 
gnshm ao equally adept at p »in Hnp : 
mmals and designing a bookplate; 
and Sir Francis Rose, alternately 

encouraged and deokrated by Ger- 

tmde Stem. 

Sr Cedi Beaton (1904-1980), re- 
nowned as photographer, drafts- 
man and costume and set designer, 
was also a considerable “straight” 
painter. The esMlnticin represents 
all stages of his work; some of the 

flWCf rntnii ■■■»■■ *1 - ja_ 



always been cona'dercd to have 
been in the years 1890 to !?I4; and 
these ate evoked in 28 ^portnriT 
paintings, sometimes of a iriofe 
team, more often ofim&tidoals, all 
posed in ti» EmGihtnrir’s other 
p asaon, ttefwafl gtrdcti or rurs)> 
Mmmt TWgoodottitoles axC* 
re- 

gopgly bo^se^ed at the 
SP Af a flowing iris border; and 



% M It 


- .. ■» - Jf & Shi Wixxfc* (an 
Indian pnnee and the Australian- 
tom . captain of Someraet Cotmty 
Cricket team from. 1894 through 
Im posed on a hfflcop looking 
down upon a So m ers et village 
gnsen complete with cricket pitch. 

Crickcti Golden Sommer, Chris 
Beetles GoBoy, S Ryder Street. St 
JomesXLondon SWI, to May 18 
n 


, | . 1 



Tonics, he only ^ 

instead of “to lo<^ at" one evening 
when he was waiting for a tram on 
the subway platform at Earl's 
Court Station, “after a really bad 
day of trying to. paint a modeL 
Gating at a tobacco - stall I was 


Beaton <1904-19801 

photographe^drafts- Cedl Beaton eostume for “Tbe Gyp’s Princess,” 1923. 
tunue ana set designer. 


"SS^STff5S^SSi- s 

( ggns he tfid a s an un dergraduate at ings ranging from two pastoralsbv iJtnZ show at Sally Hunter and Patrick 

idyfl by Sr Frank Dkksee f!853- /him, Bum, ™ best drawings and oaintinK 


(I817-1S75); furniture, such as the 
cane-seated chair fei gn ed by the 
Pre-Raphaelite painter Ford Ma- 

Aw Rminti /T05T 1 Oni\ a . 


France, 


—OfCOrnidt 

, though also some of 
Adrian Ryan (b. 1920). 



— was m me." 

That sense erf the significance pf 
color has iemamed vmh him ever 
since, as can be seen in his latest 


1920s. 

C ec i l Betaon A Friends, Parian 
Gallery, 11 Macomb Street. London 
SWI, to June 21. 


idyll by Sr Frank Dkksce 
1928X and Augustas John's maize 
portrait of the ballerina “Lydia Lo- 
pokova" (later Lady Maynard 


i oriental to Mey 3LRaJmdA^ract/A. ^ ^ 

ce (1853- drum Ryan. Redfem Gallery 20 jha wings a nd paintings 

ste c^ssjsbSSLS. wsssssSsi 


Mare recent manifestarioos of 
the English tradition are to be seen 
in two group shows — ^ spring *85" 
at the Fine Art Society and “Real 
and Abstract” at the Redfem Gal- 


SryS5to ( “Prior 

sss& ( ^r >byBmNicb - sa ki .ts o,<?cteLido 

nous by “Cridcefs 


w —VMMWIA Mil 

London as viewed! 

“tist. David Gentleman (b. 
1 930) rito be seen in his sixth m*- 



ifchiii*? ; 

in * 


l«y. The Fine Art Sod^r show IS/S^SSlSi .93® 

SEL^* 1 ^ “ cl J ading ST iqnSSed ^7 gunSS 

scu^toe, the carved slate work and a non-figmativeToi^ 
i^ef pamd “The Roadmakers” by for example, Adrum Heath (h 
193 ^ 192 °)^S>ofs of CaSonnc” 

& tS^’^ a J MUrof ^ ic,al 0W8) and “ComporitionBlM ^ & 

AifcS { l Mide P™® 5 ” (l^ST^Mapcndam there 
Figures” b> Alfred GcoTgc Stevens is a separate one-manroUection of 


“Real and Abstract” is a show of ^ which ioomcidea with the publics- 

Staffirs ^ iSsWwBirsft 


of Wisden Cndcet Monthly, and 
published by Pavilion/ Mkhad Jo- 
seph at £9.95, but it is a picture 
book which win delight aD cricket 
lovers. As will the exhibition of 
Gary Wright's paintings, "Crick- 
et's Golden Summer” at the Chris 
Beetles Gallery. 

The Golden Age of cndcet has 


Street, Betgrare Square, 

SWJ. to May 24, „ 

David Gentleman's London, Mer- 
toby. 26 Ceric Street. Lon- 
don Wl, to May 21 


Max ftykerJoyce writes regular- 
fy in the IHT on London art show- 
ings. 


A Subtle Change in America’s Approach to Art 

Tmenuuional Htrtdd Tribune with re,Nr A1 . •*.■■■ 


-’A- *' 




International Herald Tribune 

'N'.k ^ YORK The American approach to 
x i the ait of the past is changing A new Jevd 
of sophistaation is leaving its mark on every 

aSDect of art lift, frnm . 


3SSSSS? sKsssis-iSsirji 

assaa&tfcsSt- "KsaaaRrS!:^ 1 

ratified . exhibitions, the Kmimi Umm. 


sf 1 ‘ 

X'- 


“ -- — uuua uu every , _ 

I w, 1 *. from exhibitions to museum with a dramatic wwg« , ooiiurauiy ue Eanopean styfc 1 

acquiations, bringing U A attitudes doswS of the KyStTSS of ranfied Khftntons, the HerpcmtMoiwm 

SS2 


\v 


12, Royal Arcade 
Old Bond Street 
LONDON W1X 3HB 
TeL (1) 493 39 53 


geneve • london - new york • hong kong 


15, Ch. Grande- Gorg e 

VEYRIER-GENEVE 


— — mnumono MIM 

Duncqpe for a long time. 

. ^deej Europeans have played a role in this 
trend. This is particularly apparent in a new 
type of art exhibition. Last fall, the MetropoU- 
^ Museum of Art staged an unusualihow 
^ cd _,^? n 9°& “ teles." It focused on a 


CH-1255 

TeL 022/8409 64 


608 Fifth Avenue - Suite 309 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10020 
TeL (212) 582 9280 
Telex; RCA 237 948 


14th Floor, Swire House 
11, Chater Road - HONG KONG 
TeL 5-26 69 34/8 
Telex: 65 262 quad hx 


FORTHCOMING SALES 


fc^dof .he rto snas? SEKiTwiSiB'SMr'.r 

b y, mosl lustorians. The quoise glass bowl from 1 lth-centuty EeynL and SUnSPSh “1 m pen and 
WMk ? of amystSious perfume buraw^toS^of a ^ in 

ing beauty that had been seen in public only basilica possibly maH <- in southern ?!»» ^ B ^^^ ^msbed drawing for his fam- 
ous before, and a few never at al y SST dC 10 Italy m ^ ™ “Smyng.'nie freshness of iEe colors and 

The true novelty, however, % in its purpose. Several pieces raise unsolved nroblems of ^ ndltion ’ geocraDy spraking, 

P* 6 . &*est curator m chaise of the project, the history, dealt with at considerable leneth in th* masteiyicce as any other 

^ ^ m the Alber&a. y °T 

fiS32r pul f T raid States, where cataloguing tends to be assertive. ^ exhibirion is the smallest and most com- 
Coanes S. Mo ffett, a former Metropolitan Mu - Going through the room? where small numbers P 8 ** cunrentlyonvicwm New York. The differ- 

c AITT ,-„ M of visitors spend long moments in front of cadi a ^L th ^ S W C *5* reporter most, when coin- 

3UUREN MELTKIA N case, going back to objects that they saw some ^ ^th its European counterpart is rh* 


H ^ 


Trade 


i i __ 

3L ; .:- 


COLLECTORS’ WATCHES f™ m 16 th to 20 th eent^ 

Collectors’ wrist-watches 


IMPORTANT JEWELLERY, Antique, An Nouveau, AnDfe,^ 

Modem 


pPPOrtunt 
. 'ae? r . 

f; .. 
;r\- * * 


IN HONG KONG - FURAMA INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL 

ON MAY 27, 1985. 


EXHIBITION IN GENEVA, HOTEL DE LA PAIX, 
ON MAY 13, 14 AND 15. 











sssaasa?. 

vwsible damage, it is as much a discoUrvt " 

most people as a recent acquisition migh t be. 

_ uul ^gg concerning artistic values. 


This month, three exhibitions held simnlta- 
ncouriy in New York demonstrated that the 
Van Gogh show was not an isolated phenome- 
non. Although differing in subject matter, all 
share three features. They are fairly small, they 
require concentration from the viewer, and they 
provide a wealth of material seldom seen out- 
side its heme. 






m 


DOONESBURY 


m 


m 


✓ . 


Mi 


Exhibition in Hong Kong starting May 23, Tang Room. TeL: 5-255111. 
Information and catalogues available at above addresses: S.Fr. 40.— . 



mm 


SOMcmea J ModeR 
friyjprMeR adversary, B.d, 
M&f hods. -feH-.He. Must 
hove seen pfduRcs cF H- 
W- He. Must have.. 




MiS 
■ J j 


Hu, 

icmn 

IS» 

»•*!% 


w 


i 











f 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1983 


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ARTS / LEISURE 


AJnar, [ ) 


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New Musfemn Graces Frankfurt’s Cultural Skyline 


^ Edgerton; “Looking for information on what happens when things happen very fast” 

Master of the Stroboscopic Lens: 


- . By Carla Hall 

Wnshintkm Paa Service 


plant in Schenectady, New York, This is a defective 
earning money to attend graduate droplet isn’t pm 1 


'“WJASHINGTON — As Harold scfaooL Doing research on engines 
*■ |VV Edgerton desaftes bis photo- atMrr.heneededtoseethewhiii- 


e. See, this 
off. Why 


don’t you do it?”’ 

Edgerton himself has taken nu- 


By David Gafloway 

F rankfurt — 5n less tea 

year, three new museums have 
opened on the south bank of the 
River Main. The latest and most 
ambitions is a decorative arts mQ- 
^wim whose shimm ering silhouette 
tends Frankfort's cultural embank- 
ment a cosmopolitan flair. The 
work of the New York aidriteet 
Richard Meier, it has inspired lo- 
cals to speak of tSeii city as “Maifl- 
haftan.” ' ■* 

More than 230m3Hoo Deutsche 
marks (about S70 million) has al- 
ready been spent cm the cultural 
refurbishing of West Germany's 
banking capital. Before the end of 

the u museums wQl front 

the river, linked by parts and pe- 
destrian zones to the picturesque 
qimrtfr of fSqrh$«i hai«gii- 

Meier’s virtuoso achievement 
sets the tone fee the entire area. It is 
an extraverted bui ld in g that invites 
passersby to linger in its shaded 
courtyards or imparfr a picnic 
lunch on the granite bench that 
conns into the surrounding park. 

Thai cheerful ambience is ech- 
oed is the building’s interior, where 
individual exhibition areas suggest 
streets and squares and plazas. A 
gently sloping ramp rises from one 
level to the next, past glass walls 
and niches that deny any strict divi- 
sion between indoor and outdoor 


Hui vruert “YouVe- 

rata rcnJ^ 8 *^ formation i 

Sssit 8 ?!* “ 

£ ,h * !™ *»wp3S 

f i J 1 'Sum uC >-rfiude> tf 

ir -‘ ■' is The r 

fjl.* Uj'sd iW ■'‘worldly 
1 * t ‘ > F‘ to <ian appdi 

'-Sw* j: the McSfc WinS 
» Tisslrjpjsj u. ■ shaped 


for in- cen 



was a controlled light that 


dectrical engineer who 


Huron $[C j '^ombined . a stroboscope with a the rapidly nwving rotorsjnot as a 
^tamera and has r sperit the last 50 blur but dearly — tnfact; it looked 
’feat* catchin g fihn thfn g s that as if they were standing still. 


'•rffludothe eye. • . 

w The results aresurrcdand other- 
-~workfly: a boBet blasting throng 
'in apple lie a power drifl, spewing 


Are they ever perfect? 

“Of course not,” 

One of his daman pictures of a 
uflet shooting ont w an antique 


fr lyrmn aphHed the strobe to bullet shooting ont of an antique 
tinthnr- '■ jThotbgraphy ^F.'; fla^mig light — gun was taken m a microsecond — 
thro ugh or stroboscope — became the shut- one millionth of a second. The pho- 
spewinff ’ ter; ftocftlng enough light quickly tographs aS the bullet burrowing 


f uvi-C: &o 

•* l:i ‘“ ■* Ha S.v -1 ft.j. ^ In 


In as ifs kicked; a bird .Caught just 
-before landing, wings spxead as if 


* i Sic*.:> t - f '> f.yj ^the cre at ure is removing fi cape. . . 

d M‘ jv;. fY.'r.;i< S^~ fn the tiniest fraction of a seo^ 
v .s it r - Af,.; ‘ ‘ '■'ebd, Edgerton’s photographs dari- 


•* • “Ifs like Hghtnmg,* Edgerton Asa scientist, his endeavors have 
ays. “Except for two reasons: -1 ranged from creative to bizarre. 


*’ 3 JVI J vs r._j» . ^ 

-am Ultrirn ri.-J £ 
** t M \L. ' ”• 


iis! Bur- 
r-y :kr !!:! .» 
>*<> 


V.oir 

1 


oach to Art 


•• w. mi 

fifcall^Nr/: -.-'iVu v «r.;sy 

>r - sVl-ssa ■ 


fy the most otigmatic ^moving 
-"Objects and blur the fines between 
-art and sdenccL The jphytics of a. . 
dub strildng a golf half revealf a^ : 
modi a the sensnafiQi of the tex-: 
-tine of a imHc drop, perhaps his 
mosifamousajbjecL' 

Edgerton has boa a professor of 
-electncalengmeeringaitheMassa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology 
for about half a camny, and many 
of the photographic labors of those . 
years are' now on display at the 
Goviflda Gafloy in Washing ton ' 

, i In addition, to his dranc action 
-pbot^r^hs ot , boBets and balls , 
and bmud drpps. 'there’s aBe of i 


**#**■ 

SfW- 


0 & t V •-'! - 

i Miv ^ h - 
fww. »*i> 1 

f U -y.u; 

to 1 *: :- t t*:>' l - ' ' 

b Ms- ’*’ ■ 

m * ' >•*» Vci-diL-- ■ 

WIT - ! •' 

s l^si- ■ -• ' v 

aa*.i’T* 

ffci. *.'* I-.**’ - 1 
W fHUn •• • -"' 

: - 

r & 

¥ •• 

ttb'Nt*. - •> '• ■■ ■.• 

tkr «T 

if! •>: U.* ‘ 's* 

a i: ‘ • . . 

.fS’l I-..'-'"; • 
«n*^5-v--- : • ( ” 

- v' 

u <v ir.= ’ 


tf E‘ 1 


Jbdy^aidand and MidkcyJtooneyi. 
• standing stflLlnl940, at the inviia- 
■/tk» of MGM, Edgerton .visited 
Hollywood to show how high- 
speed photography could be used 
in fihn- (Aahort feature about Ed-, 
.gexton’s wort, “Quicker .Than a ' 
-iWink,*! won as Oscar in 1941.) 

Some Edgerton photographs are 
an the ccfledwo at the Museum of 
Modem Art is New York. Ansel 
.Adams, the renowned nature pht>- 
'tographer, once wrote him, saying, 
i .*! have of ten returned to your mag- 
-nificent wort for confidence and 
enhanced perception.” - 

Edgortoo ssyi, “I have no train- 



v' M - 

- • ,-:*i .HtV-s* .-Vi- - 


Edgerton’s 1930 photograph of the inqwct of a drop of milk. 


^enhanced perception.” - cannmke it happen where I want it The stroboscopic photographs 

Edgertcmssys, "! have no tram- to happen ana when I want it to have been known to raise some 
mg inart and photography. Iknow happen. So all I’ve done is take colleagues' eyebrows, he says: 
when a photograph is out of focus. God Almighty's lighting and put it “People said you should only do. 

Tveleanied some thina from .inaccmtrtier.'' what brings in money. You know 

artists. They flank differeatiy from At first PWyrrnn .wrf arobo- the worid is run by money. 1 made 
S^hreers.” scopic, photography cmly to work some by accidenL 

. Hep^^.oiffhisja^tigtoecpo- on motors. FI gota doctor’s degree In fact, he and two students, 

sure coctiire of a inmi swingmgii n t "A fW Hw n co iinKm» Kenneth Genneshausen and Her- 


^ . I’ve learned some things from .in a ccmtrtier.'' what 

artists. They think diffnreaiiy fr^n ^t firsts Edgerton used strobo- thew< 
eeTS - scooxc, uhotoCTanhv cmlv to wort 50016 ' 

nature of a man swingmg a nf rw dav a cnHeapne Kami 


r. - ,sure picture cs a man swingmx^t 
.^Ifchib — the photoffaph, taken 
,t '“1 at intervals or a hmmreath of a 
'recond, shows the dub roundmg 
V : the goifer I£te the spokes of a 


pjcture of a man swingmgi oat of it.") Otoe day a colleague K 6006 * Genneshausen and Her- 
emb — the photomaph, taken . came-by tosedbe strobe. “HeS, bert R Grier, formed a company in 
itervals oT a himjarMth of a *Why don’t yon wort bn something 1947 10 ma°°facture equipment 


that motor?” 


they designed. The orgamzatka. 


As tor ids picture of water 
idine out of a lancet, be says, “ 


recafis- “So that aftenioooTtwA EG&G, mushroomed into a Fbr- 
pictures of water coining out of a tane electronics company 


**Vs 1 

!•*.« :::?r 
IV ‘ " " 

jpi 

rfnir 1 . * 

(pi pep- 1 ' 

f 1 -; 

f'lffc.i - 
» 3 • 

hS-]"' 

"" 

« .tw4 r I' s 

f " ' 

$ %: M- • ■ sr 
3 . : 

»T r ’ * 


ping out of afancet.heiaya. 'TeO' fike ice scul 
pie who study the flow of h'qnids gerton wnt 
took at that and go ga-ga.” other— » go 

,L He won't say that this i* art: : bullets and! 
^Well, maybe it is in a way. I don't • H . . . . 
•^iink about it much.” • 5* JJv* 


faucet in the lab.” The result looks (f 1001 wh5 <* Edgerton is now m- 
like ice sculptare. After that, Ed- 


watftom one object to an- He’s used the indepeaideace that 
-i golf balls and footballs, comes from wealth and fame to do 
and birds. what he wants. He’s made trips esi 


Edgerton, caUed ^Doc” by 

-fliends and students, delights in his ■my . iiirni n^'rit j j,i • t_ » ■»«■ * «» "«»* j/uuwti j . ■%«- 

Irrevere n t, wise-cracking profes- ice; Edgerton has Bern looking for 

■serial image. Hestingives seminars SS,£r525ir£rtiSS\ t- imi a 90-ton granite column believed to 
and grnrobles about ms retirement £“££225 date to 1200. And he has a book 

Ttay don’t want me to do any- o 01 ^ «■ sou- 
thing,” E^erton says. “But I sal “We’re looking for things lost in 

tooeak st^m. Iwark with any land Vj^^SOfimOLoti second, 


ton 30 years ago for heft) in refimng 
W” ^ underwater photography. lnVc^ 


ice; Edgertcm has Been looking for 
a 90-ton granite column believed to 


thing,” Edgerton says. “But I stiD - 

Bneak srSSrwSwith any kind ^ about one^50,000th of a second. fl 
>af people —the younger toe better. The resulting picture is famous: 

rrhe/re more goflibJe." the^hiny, vdvety «Hona of milk a 

*• Edgerton first used the stiobe cangjit in a»5t second of a regal tl 
^vhen he was a graduate student at posewith htflex( 

MTT. He had been interested in pmg pomt ( 
fctectridty since his tOai-age days ■ *^“1 loi 


Twelve years ag>, he was 
group of scientists who . 


a group 
the USS 


round droplets top- ship >t»»r sank off 


Monitor, the Gv3 War. 


of the crown. 


Edgerton’s 


Hatterasin 
water' cam- 


t ctnnbing poles and ^licmg wkes it," Edgerton says. 

thfrdectric company in Aurora, He haistadents tiy it “Students 
Nebraska. . After graduation from crane in aod say, ‘We’re not gong 
,-tfte Univeraty of Nebrasl^, be. to takefuctares. You’ve dme it alL' 
..spent a year at a General Ekctric Softake them into the hall and say, 


. “I stffl gtf a lot of mileage out of eras were instrnmental in the sno- 
it," Edgerton sajrs. cess of the search. 

He has students try it “Students What’s left to photograph? 


“Td like to take pictures of all 
those galaxies out there.” Edgerton 
says. 


(*s*r? «• ~ 

VttL& -’■■ 


i ■ : ■ *mou 5 QCdC, a lau nun 

‘ Ban Francisco Rattled by Gible Cars 

■ V, . . -- ’ Pavilion with its mode 

By Wallace Turner : wasprcgect manager for the renovation, said, “There voli or duck into the 5 

. • Nett York Tmes Strike are manifenance problems with the new system, but ion to take pictures cd 

-CJ AN FRANOSGO — No malts how happy the rv ^ . to a gurnttamd 

. Y O tourists are with therenovatkm of ^nF^co's 1 ^aewsystenwasdueto *e tatunda front 

^ able care people who live here hsve been amassing tox relocation, landscaping, bunding res- shi, Matsoshna, Hxtac 

discontent fbrreveral months. i ' . apams, the expense of studies for a section to com- StoTa. 

r- ReBdents of areas along Hie cable cm routes com- idamts of nose and payment to contrmtora for Japanese say that, 
j I Iplain that the cars arcndSerthanrt^ were befitie the . r* 80 ®® ordered while coDStracaon was under way. they tend to be ccmf< 
/ llwtrt was done, with continual rianVmg frctmiD- “The mtUing hatch covers are either the result of . 

, s { 'fit ting hatch covers on buried equftjment vaults and a baddesignor<rffaflaretomanufactnrctodfiSi|n,"P !0 “ 3014 

i Inwsier cable ooerolian. ’ ' .said. ‘T expect either the deskner or the mamnKturer ’ecnnological sohraoas 


{ ‘mated at $58 mfllion, has increased to almost S64 : The higher noise level is a more difficult problem. 
I 'nuffion, with some costs still not settled. ■ “We tried a coaling rat the cable pulleys audit did cut 

j£; The San Francisco Chronicle recently gave-pcomH - down lhe noise," No said. “But it wore off in a few 
^nent display, to a '-critical, exandnaticar of tire new ' days, aod that creates an unaccQiiable. main tenanc e 
ijsystem.^ mchidmg statements by unidentified .creor- pqst” . 

. J^uonbers that the cars were now dangerrag. . * One of the fanner gadgets included in the new 

rv - ^ A spokeanan for the Mmndpal Railway, the city’s system was a signal system designed to allow a cable 
S . f'.pubtic iranstagency, said: “The system was safe when -car to pre-empt the right of way where two lines cross 


public transtagency, said: “The system was safe^ when- car to preempt the right of way where two lines cross ■ 
we reopened . it. It is a safe sysieril”. “ at Fowdl aou Cafifornia^ Streets and near the cable j 


Cefleefw’iGBlde 


s: j; 

■ * ■ 

in L 


V f* 
/ 1 T 

■ A" *^-1 


The cable cars were shut down in September 19S2- powerhouse and carbarn on Nob HUL Tiassystem 
, > .and reopened last June 24. ■ .. .„ aicountered too many problems, however, so flymen 

5 !> Lynn Pio, a^rity utilities commission "engineer who~ are used at those plares, just as before the renovation. 


PORTRAIT MOHATU 
\F0B8ftB~ 
Important, Uth centfflry, % 

ajusft^ 


TUBES 


ftfaMdmtiigrara 
Rattum. • 


spaces. At each turning there are 
multiple views of the park, the riv- 
er, the exhibition “landscape" that 
Meier himself desig ned. 

The 50-year-old architect is 
keenly aware of the historical irony 
of his assignment u As a Jew whose 
grandfather emigrated from the 
Frankfurt area a century ago, the 
commission gave me the' chance to 
reflea on my own roots.” 

When Mao’ began his studies at 
Cornell University, architecbmral 
fashi ons were dominated by such 
European refuses as Mies van der 
Robe, Waller Gropius and Marcel 
Breuer. Though he learned from 
them ah, he also feared the interna- 
tional style was bring reduced to 
shoe-box conformity. The only sig- 
nificant alternative was the mixture 
of logic and lyricism represented by 
Le Corbusier. 

Meier adopted his idoi's'concept 
of an “architectural promenade” 
through three-dimensional objects, 

but rapidly evolved a personal idi- 
om. Coib uaan variations on cube- 
square-rectangle distinguished his 
first private houses, bat when Oli- 
vetti commissioned a new trai ning 
center in 1971, Meier interrupted 
the geometry with an undulating 
curve to fit the irregular site (and 
spare Ok trees). 

In the following decades he laid 
increasing stress on the rich layer- 


ing of interior volumes anti their 
interaction with.the exterior. envi- 
ronment. Meier's work often seems 
to have light itself as a subject, an 
effect intensified because fte uses 
only white in- his constructions. 
“Against a white surface,” he says, 
“one best appreciates the play of 
li^ht and shadows, solids and 
voids.” 

Early in his career Meier began 
to use porcelain-coated panels to 
clad structures. Previously applied 
to industrial warehouses, they of- 
fered surprising possibilities for ar- 
ticulating the surface of a wad. 
Their grid-like joints simultaneous- 
ly establish proportions for win- 
dows and doors, while the satiny 
surface reacts to the most subtle 
changes in light. 

In such previous landmarks as 
the Athenaeum in New Harmony, 
Indiana, or die High Museum in 
Atlanta, the cost-saving panels are 
bung on a steel frame. Here they 
are applied as the outer “skuT on a 
solid concrete walL The thorough- 
ness of German craftsmanship 
amazes Meier. Double-glazing the 
windows was not enough, since an 
extra panel of glass did filtle to 
increase energy savings and added 
optical distortion, but. generously. 
Bonn subsidized a third layer. 

Steering a course through local 
politics and byzantine building 


codes required ambassadorial as 
well as architectural skills. The 
Frankfurt project was threatened 
for a time by a rival proposal from 
Albert Speer Jr. to locate public 
housing oo the site. And conserva- 
tionists objected to the disrespect 
shown io a !9ih-cemury villa that 
had to be incorporated into the 
complex. 

The superb holdings of the Mu- 
seum iftir Kunsthandwerk were 
housed there in the postwar years, 
but less than 5 percent of the 30,000 
objects could be shown at a time. 
The successful blending of epochs 
followed from tbe discovery that 
the Villa Metzler was a perfect 
cube. Ta king over those propor- 
tions. then multiplying and varying 

them. Meier achieved a harmoni- 
ous four-part ensemble. His pro- 
posal was chosen over the work of 
such distinguished competitors as 
Hans Hollein and Robert Venturi. 

On Monday, less than two weeks 
after the Frankfurt opening, the 
peripatetic Master Builder left for 
Des Moines. Iowa, for the dedica- 
tion of his own addition to existing 
museum buildings by Elid Saari- 
nen and I.M. PeL He is meanwhile 
competing for the design of a 
Kunsthaiie in Stuttgart and draw- 


says, “because they offer me ihc 
greatest range of spatial possibili- 
ties. It’s a chance to create accents, 
relationships, breathing space for 
worts of art” The challenge has 
particular appeal to a mao uho 
began his own career as a painter. 

Meier once traveled with a bin 
of paper scraps, passing time in 
airport lounges bv making collages. 
Now the finger-exercises are pre- 
liminary sketches of furniture for 
Knoll, porcelain for Swid-Powell. 
silver for Alessi, “It’s so relaxing.” 
he says, “and so much easier than 
making a building.” 

Perversely, museum personnel 
opted to open their new house with 
a show or Turkish artifacts that 
spill into areas intended for the 
permanent collection, installed 
with the expertise of a Girl Scout 
jumble sale. 

For Meier, who fretted over ev- 
ery detail, including the paper nap- 
kins in the cafeteria, the curatorial 
blundering seems an insult. But the 
graceful symmetries of his building 
triumph over the chaos. 

The Museum Jur Kunstliumhvvrk. 
at Schaumainkai I", is vpen Tues- 
day through Sunday. 10 A.M. to 5 
P.M.; Wednesdays' until S P.M. 


mg up preliminary’ plans for the 
new Getty Museum in Los Angeles, pr 
“I love building museums?’ he G> 


David Gailimay is a writer and 
professor based in Wuppertal HVsr 
Germany. 


Japan Toasts 
Technology 
At 'Expo ’85’ 

By Cycle Habennan 

New York Tuna Service 

'“p SUKUBA, Japan — Half of 
X Japan has been here to stand in 
line. Or maybe it only feels that 

to* 

In any event, there is probably 
no better place to observe Japanese 
at leisure en masse than on the 
endles s tines that curve around tbe 
cubist, pastel pavilions of Tsukuba 
Expo ’85, the country’s celebration 
of Its technological self. 

From across die archipelago, 
families come to glimpse the future 
as envisioned by electronics and 
computer companies that put to- 
gether a high-tech country fair at 
this outpost 32 miles (50 kflome- 
ters) northeast of Tokyo. The fu- 
ture, it appears, will be more robot- 
ized than ever, sparing homans 
from having to' play organs, draw 
pictures, translate Japanese into 
English, lift 440-pound barbefis or 
sing songs. 

mg Japanese corporations and 
the government were promoting , 
Expo '85 relentlessly even before ir ' 
opened in mid-March for' a six- 
month run. 

Scientists have complained that 
it has no important breakthroughs 
on display, “A high-tech Disney- 
land," was a common Humble. But 
the grousing did not deter teas of 
thousands of Japanese. 

For some visitors, Expo *85 has 
been reassuring. Japan has entered 
a period when it feds set upon by 
the rest of tbe world; the Japanese 
fed that other countries are blam- 
ing them once again for what is 
wrong with the world's economy. 

The realization has touched off 
worry, resentment and even scorn, 
although that is confined usually to 
off-the-record conversations. After 
all, people say, Japan- has done 
nothing wrong except to do wdl 
. and tfte electronic marvels at tbe 
Expo were comforting reminders of 
that fact; 

SHU, when foreigners are dis- 
pleased — say, thundering mem- 
bers of the U£ Congress — many 
Japanese become nervous. Their al- 
most automatic response is to tryto 
figure out how to make 1 everyone 
happy 

Primc Mjuistcr Yasnhiro Naka- 1 

sone went on television a few weeks , 
ago to urge (hai each Japanese par- : 
chase S1G0 in foreign goods as a ! 
way to reduce Japan’s large trade , 
surplus. Since then, virtually no 
day has mused without someone 
beating this new drum hard. j 

The Mnusay of. International 
Trade and Industry recently an- ' 
nouncod that 17 senior officials 
each had bought an average of S42S I 
worth of forc^ products — Amer- , 
jean-made microphones, British i 
speakers, German luggage and 1 
French cheese. 

Officials acknowledge that such 
activity amply underlines the pros- 
pect that surges of foreign products 

ait unfikriy — as a stroll throu gh 
the Tsukriba grounds suggests. ; 

Manyfordgncountrieshavepa- 
vifcions here, a fair number of them | 
financed by Ja pan ese companies. 

People stride through theFrench 
Pavilion with its mode Rne de Ri- 
yoli or dock into the Soviet Pavil- 
ion to take pictures 'cf each other 
next to a giant bust of Lenin. But 
the lines are all in front of Mitsubi- 
shi, Matsushita, Hitachi and To- 
shiba. 

Japanese say that, in die' aid, 
they tend to be comfortable with 
Japanese things and ways. And 
that includes an abiding faith in 
technological solutions. 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 


BASIL 








mmm 


ARlSS 

ADVEN- 

TURE! 




' \Sy QUA! VOLTAIRE 

**;■ y | o [Jl 




III 


\ \ 'A* RUE § DE ULLE £ 

tjz >4 ■Bin 


i B i Bto l 'L 

I wm* 

S DE VERNELBL | ' 


t. "i 


% \2****'\ 


RUE DE LTJNTVERSTTE ^ % 


A PARIS 


\mgp%mjER des aubqumrp^i 

du 9 au 13 mai 1985 
LES 5 JOURS 

DE L’OBJET EXTRAORDINAIRE 

de 11 h a 22 h, dimanche inclus 

Ofg ftrf par fe “Carre Rive Gaocfae”, Association des At i gnah es et Galeries cTArt. 

|f= GALER1E HOPKINS-THOMAS =a 

4, Rue de Miromesnil, 75008 Poris - Tel.: 265^1.05 

RENOIR 

Drawings and wafercolors 
■ - ■ ^ — Until June 29, 1985. - ^ 


MUSEE MABMOTTAN 

2, rue Louis-Boilly, Paris XVI® 


DMOYER DE SEGONZAC 

Retrospective 


April - May 

10 a.m. - 6 p.m. - closed Monday 


The International Art Fair for 20th century art Swiss Industries 
Fair Basel. Dafly from 11 am. to 8 p.m. Information and catalogue: 
Secretariat Art 16*85, RO.Box. CH-4021 Basel/Switzeriand. 
phone 061 / 262020 . 


BARIS 


GALER1E FRAMOND 

3. rue do? Se^nts-Peres. VI - 260.74.78 

DESSIN ET COULEUR 

9 Mai - 12 Juillet 


WAmammTm 

centre dart plosligoe conte mporoin 

7 LES NOCES CATALANES^ 

BARCElDNE-fiWS 1870-1970 1 

Pentiums - Scu&ures. 

Q Cuatro Gats, Picasso, Pico bio, 

GargaAa Torres-Gardo, Mir6, Gonzalez, Dali, Tbpies. 


S. Delaunay, Dumitresco, GiBoH, Le Parc, Malta, 
Meurice, Penalba, Rougemont, Schaffer, Valmier. 
Tapis d artistes 

MASSON ~A 

Estampes 

9, av, maf ign on parts 8 - 299.16.16 
JS~J k du man£ av samerf de 
W lOh 30 619h 15. 


GAIBUE LOUISE UIRI5 

47 . Ru* «Je Moncoau, 75006 PARIS 
56128.85 - 56137.14 


14 mai - 29 join 


F. LEGERl PaoUni 


55 worts 
7913-1953 


April 24 - June 1 
Daily except Sun. & Mon. 


CLAUDE HEMERY 

56 , R ce i’Univffiite, 75007 Pons. 
Tel.: 54-i.c3.55. 

REITER 

ECOLE DE PARIS 


LONDON 

■ — GALERIE39 

96 George Sl, Lcmdoa, W1 

KESKO HASEGAWA 
Rakn Ceramics 

2^4 Mky. 01-487 5038 
Moniri 10-6 and by appointment 


Galerie Maeght Lelong 

13, toe dc TAfren, 73008 Paris 


14 mai - 8 juin 


Calder 


Galerie Maeght Lelong 

14, roe dc T£b ^r an, 73008 Paris 


MUS& RODIN 

77, rue de Vorenne, Paris (7*) - Metro Varrnme 

Rodin/ Five Contemporary photographers 

Tm RMS, Ktastn Ittlt Btm HBET, Beoaidte TBUMB, flripr fiRZSCH. 

Dcdy (except Tuesday) 10 ajn.« 1130 ajm. and 2 fun. -5s45 pjn. 

FROM MAY, 3 leSBPIGMBBt, 30 


GEORGES FALL 

57, Quai des Grands-Augustins, 75006 PARIS. 
Telephone: 633-52.45. 

ENRICO DONATI 

Paintings 

Moy 7 - June 1 5 1 985 


GALERIE MERMOZ 

PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

n 6 ( Rue Jean-Mennox, 75008 PAWS. TeL: 359.82.44 _ 

"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 

appear on Saturday 






SATininAYjansm iv mav « 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 




) NYSE AAOSt Actives I 


VOL 

KM* UM 

LMt 

CM 

AT&T 

23794 

22% 

21% 

22% 

+ % 

Edurd 

WM 

23% 

an 

22% 

— 9M 

IBM 

22TO 130% 

128% 

130% 

43% 

PaiAm 

15157 

9% 

5% 

S% 

+ % 

TWA 

13705 

17% 

14% 

17 

+ M 

HtSemJ 

13239 

11% 

11% 

11% 

+ u 

FordM 

1264* 

43% 

42% 

48 

+ % 

FedNM 

12273 

17% 

17% 

F/% 

+ % 


120*5 

57 

51 

51 

+1% 


12058 

35 

34% 

3«* 

+ % 

Aft Rid; 

19049 

61% 

*1% 

«Z% 

+ % 


11921 

33% 

32% 

s» 

+1% 

HOWlPK 

116*3 

34% 

a 

M 

+1% 

WmOn 

11597 

29% 

2Mb 

28% 

-4% 

an cm 

11378 

49% 

48% 

6846 

+ % 



■■-n’.viT.rrr 


NYSE index 


Irida^ 


indvi W6W9 i9«2j* ia*u» hmj* + uji 
T im dim* m/J£ fiW + iJS 

ura 15931 itojo isxw yswa + oa 

cm* £53 aSS* 517J» xajs + us 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 



Mob LOW OCXS Cave 
COflWMKftl 10633 10606 106+4 +133 

Industrials 13133 13077 121J0 +L47 

Trans*. MOOS M 95 »JB +131 

UtUHlM 56 .97 5667 5674 +053 

Finance 114.12 11304 115.98 +231 


li 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y 


* Included In the sales Asms 


Bey Sales •SiYt 
180013 416769 13*1 

1B69DB 34X184 *95 

195504 41U01 VO 

18X403 437.983 405* 

110713 390417 1700 



AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


Cta* 

Fnpf. 

9M 

3D 

IB 

m 

Z» 

30 

8 V 

715 

34 

a 

7 

14 

6J63JS0 


M UMBO 



Commit* 

industrial* 

Finance 

Kssr 


w m +oif mn 

9MJ8 +330 39U1 2BJ5 
SS3 +331 34414 m» 
34500 +609 3340* jg.ll 
37701 +0U OTTO 5039 

SKitSMSSS 


Tables inctode me nationwide prices 
■ns to Hw dosing on won Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Hies Lew One cwm 
UK tmtrlata 30647 30105 30195 +150 

Tranux MlJM 15701 15U97 +1M 

tinuitas 8337 1237 8X16 +009 

FBuner 23.76 2X19 3 M +049 

canwasile 1*674 MUR 1863* +234 



AMEX Sales 


4 PM. votom* 

Prav.4 RJULwrium* 



zit -fU- 


113 
UL9 77 

119 50z 

7J 8 244 

0 9 917 
14 

14 
60 

15 
34 


NYSE Gains in Heavy Trading 


-ft 




56U, 

396. 

S* 

30 
33*4 
13% 

VO 58% 
71% 44V. 
*7 40V. 

32% 25% 
13% 7Vl 
42% 444k 
38 2416 

87% 43% 

112% 

lim 


*t+ 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Stocks rallied in heavy trad- 
ing Friday, but analysts wore divided over 
whether the market could sustain its gains. 

The market's progress was widespread, with 
financial issues and blue-chips pacing the ad- 
vances. 

The Dow Jones industrial average gained 
13.91 to 1,274.180. For the week, the Dow 
climbed 26.94. Broader-based indicators also 
advanced, with the New York Stock Exchange 
index and Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index 
hitting all-rime highs. 

Advances outnumbered declines, 1,208 to 
398, among the 2,000 issues traded. 

Big Board volume intensified, totaling 
140 , 260,000 shares compared with 110,990,000 
Thursday. 

Analysts said the market’s rally was a re- 
sponse to encouraging signs that the govern- 
ment was making progress on the federal defi- 
cit. 

President Ronald Reagan's return to the 
White House on Friday added to the enthusi- 
asm, said Eugene Peroni of Bateman Eichler, 

Hitt Richards in 1 as Angeles, emphasizing Wall 

Street's op timism about the deficit 

But the market’s gains were based on “hopes 
and conjecture; rather than on any substantive 
moves" to lower interest rates, Mr. Peroni said, 
adding, “It’s still very much a chameleon mar- 
ket" 

A strong bond market a budget compromise 
in Washington and news that three major bro- 
kerage firms had become more bullish gave the 
market a boost said Alfred Goldman of AG. 
Edwards & Sons. 


But the market remains vulnerable; he said, 
burdened by the deficit the economic outlook 
and the strong dollar. 

Mr. Goldman «iid the market is not techni- 
cally poised for a sustainable rally. 

“Four horns of good action does not makeup 
for three months of veiy puny tallies," he add- 
ed. 

AT&T was the most active NYSE-listed is- 
sue, gaining ft to 22ft. Eckerd Jack Corporation 
followed, losing 3ft to 22%. 

IBM was third, jumping 2ft to 130. 

National Semiconductor added ft to lift. 
Digital Equipment rose sharply, up 3ft to 105ft. 
Burroughs gained 2ft to 64. 

Financials gained in active trading. JJP. Mor- 
gan & Co. dunbed 1ft to 51ft, Citicorp 1 to 
48ft. Merrill Lynch 1 to 32ft and Phibro-Salo- 
mon 1ft to 41ft, all in active trading. Bankers 
Trust was up 3ft to 71ft. 

Some airlines were active. Pan American 
World Airways tacked on ft to 5ft. Trans Worid 
Airlines gained ft to 17ft. 

Amo stocks strengthened. General Motors, 
ex-dividend, gained 1 to 68ft and Ford ad- 
vanced ft to 43 in active trading. Chrysler rose 
ft to 35ft. 

Taft Broadcasting rose* 2ft 1 to 70ft, 1 ^rcoun 
Brace Jovanovic Inc. 2ft to 54ft and Capital 
Cities Communications 2ft to 219. 

Composite volume of NYSE-listed issues on 
all U.S. exchanges and over the counter trading 
at 4 pjn. totaled 160,471,000 shares, up from 
I21,C©9,500 Thursday. 


20% 

IX 

% 


32% 

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38% 

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~ ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY/ SUNDAY, MAY 11-12, 1985 



1,000 CRITICS OF 
ZAGAT REPORT 


AVENUE 

/ \ TER \ A T l 0 \ /I / 


ASPi < r\ r <i v no\ hi hi iaihd by wr\n : \ia(,azi\i: \b yurkm 


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'is friends ma; not know 
it,, but Li ii coin Center 
chairman Martin Segal is 
^ restaurant . critic of considerable 
clout whose culinary opinions are 
heeded by thousands of discern'. 
ir ing Newark diners. Similarly,. 

‘2 '^. v- Japanese-art specialist Margot 

£ jss '^Emst has a large and loyal fol- 
lowing for her succinct critiques 
of the city's formal koisefckstyle 
■kitchens. Vogue Brazir$ editor 
Rudolfo- Crespi wields Ins influ- 
ence over Gotham's gastronomes 
with siniple, if untempered, su- 
perlatives about the places he 
Jikes best— and least 
Certainly none of these ama- 
^ teur food' mavens holds the in- 
v -dividual sway of a Mimi Sheraton 
S'* g; or Gael Greene; but their coflec- . 
■live .value may . be unbeatable^ 
Just ask Tim and Nina Zagat Fbr 
years the Zagats, husband-and- 
.jvife corporate lawyers and res- 
laurant devotees who met atlhle 
law school have been polling the 
‘dining likes and dislikes of a cross., 
section of sympathetic souls— 
Anyone serious enough ahout eat- 
ing out to take time to M in 6ne 
S)f the Zagats’ long, small-print, 
^QO-nonsense questi<xinaires. . 
r The result; as New Yotkers are 
■discovering in growing numbers, 
■fe the Zagat (pronounced za-GAT) 
Mew link City Restaurant Surveys 
a handy compendium of dining 
fact and o jrinion nqjresenting the 
combined judgments of not one 
or four or even 104 finicky pal- 
ates but some 1,000 unnamed 
reviewers. Started in 1979 as a 
-modest mimeographed sheet 
passed among a select few/ the 


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.. Zagat survey is suddenly becom- 
ing, with nary an ounce of pro- 
motion or advertising, the most 
popular/ comprehensive, up-to- 
date: and, perhaps, most reliable 
lowdown on the. city's dining 
scene ever published 

Today s Zagat survey is a slim, 
.red 96-page book as compact as 
a Barron's pocket guide to stock 
and bond yields — and no less 
valuable. More than 500 entries 
are. cited in the 1985 edition. A 
numbered, scale from 0 to 30 
ranks each establishment accord- 
ing to food, decor and service. 
. The estimated price of a single 
meal, with one drink before tip, 
is provided, as are abbreviations 
for such relevancies as whether 
a restaurant is open for service 
.after 11:00 pm. or on Sundays. 
There is even an “X" to mark the 
dreaded no credit card policy. For 
those seeking specific modes of 
dining , the guide offers no fewer 
than 29 special categories-from 
the obvious ethnic and brunch 
; headings-to welcome listings for 
dandng^best wine lists, fireplaces, 
'even places suitable for singles 
or for young children. Ihe 1,000 
critics best earn their salt in the 
cryptic comments, italicized be- 
neath each restaurant’s listing 
with a notation from, the Zagats 
indicating whether the remarks 
were mixed, uniform or even too 
few to be conclusive. Here is 
where the people speak and the 
Zagats show their capable editing. 

"Staid Continental with fine 
roast beef as its main claim to 
recognition, but that's enough." 
Does anybody really need to 


know much more than that be- 
fore sampling the steadfast 
Adam's Rib on East Seventy- 
fourth Street? Of Santa Fe on 
West Sixty-ninth Street, the guide 
states: 'The city's most attractive 
Mexican with quite good food and 
great margaritas; try the fish; one 
drawback — popularity can mean 
lines." Your best friend isn't likely 
to put it more clearly. 

Nor is pith the guide's only vir- 
tue. Sacred bastions like Lutece, 
La Cote Basque and the Four 
Seasons receive an ample and 


quent source of inept service at 
some of New York's more exotic 
restaurants— are also noted. 
Where favorite chefs have de- 
parted or reservations aren't 
honored, where portions are 
stingy and ventilation poor or 
where otherwise praiseworthy 
French rooms receive “repeated 
complaints about haughty service 
and Imperfections that shouldn’t 
exist at the price," the Zagats duly 
tell us, as they do when their 
vocal constituency differs widely 
in verdict from the folks at the 


The Zagat Restaurant Survey relies on an army of secret scribblers. 


impassioned mix of voter com- 
mentary — both good and bad. 
And practical advice abounds. 
Fussy uptowners afraid to trek 
to faraway TriBeCa spots like 
Capsouto Frferes are reminded of 
the extra incentive of "easy park- 
ing.” Language barriers — a fre- 


New ybrk Times. 

Just how popular is the little 
red book? “We sell out every time 
we restock it," claims Susan 
Scott, assistant manager of Books 
& Co. on Madison Avenue, whose 
regular reorder these days is as 
Please turn page 


A t nine o'clock on a week- 
day morning, the Hotel 
Westbury in New York is 
as comfortably quiet as the down- 
stairs of a country manse. At the 
front desk a sleepy receptionist 
repeats the name. "Mrs. Johnson? 
We got two of them, I think. 
What's her first name?" 

The receptionist echoes its Lady 
Bird. Still unsatisfied she tries the 
room number given her as a trim, 
all- American -looking man looks 
up from his checkout form with 
a smile. "Ybu're expected" he says 
with a trace of a Texas accent. 
Tun'll come down for you. He's 
got the morning shift." 

A moment or two later, the 
elevator opens and Jim appears. 
It has to be Jim. He, too, is trim 
and all-American- looking: it’s a 
breed that's easy to recognize 
when you get accustomed to it. 
Tim has a Texas accent, too. Right 
now he looks uncharacteristically 
sheepish for a Secret Service 
man. “She was asleep, but she’s 
getting up now,” he says apolo- 
getically. “We thought you'd be 
by at ten. She’s pretty fast at 
getting ready, though.” 

Jim leads the way down a car- 
peted hall, past an open door 
where two other agents keep 
watch, and knocks on the partly 
closed door at the end of the hall 
before sticking his head in. 

‘Yes. please, come in,” says the 
lilting voice within. 

Looking hardly a day older 
than she did as First Lady two 
decades ago. Lady Bird Johnson 
rises to greet her visitor with a 
rush of apologies. Tm terribly 


sony to have kept you waiting. I 
hurried as much as I could— 1 
She goes on in this vein for a 
moment or two, though of course 
no 3pologv is needed or expected. 
And what one observes, as she 
ushers her visitor to a chair and 
pulls one out for herself, is how 
in real life, sprung from grainy 
newspaper photographs, Freed 
for a moment from history as an 
image of an anguished time, she 
radiates a rare and unaffected 
charm that lights up her face 
when she smiles. 

These days, she says, she spends 
a lot of her time on the family 
business: the Austin-based patch- 
work of radio and television sta- 
tions as well as ranch lands estab- 
lished by her husband back in 
1942. “During the week 1 live in a 
little apartment above the store, 
so to speak,” she says. Then on 
Fridays I go out to the ranch.” 
Since giving it officially to the 
government in 1972 as a public 
site, Lady Bird makes the 60-mile 
drive to walk into a house that 
tourists have passed by all week 
long. 'Three hundred thousand 
people a year come rolling by my 
front door,” she says without a 
trace of resentment T wave to 
them if I'm there.” 

But Lady Bird is also involved 
with a project she started up two 
years ago, a project that grew 
out of a lifelong love and brings 
her, on this clear blue morning, 
to New York on a groundwork- 
laying visit She calls it the Na- 
tional Wildflower Research Cen- 
ter, and she means it to be a way 
Please turn page 


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*•: -•* <n ■ 




CHEVALIER 

Dominique et Pierre Chevalier, Experts 


Aubusson Catpet -=• Restoration period (circa 1825) — 10ft3 x 12ft 


ANTIQUE TAPESTRIES - EUROPEAN AND ORIENTAL RUGS AND CARPETS 


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157 East 64th Street. NEW YORK, N Y. 10021 -(212)2433922 


Le nouveau classique de Christof le 

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12. rue Royalc Paris 8 r • 24. rue dt* la Paix Paris ;2 r 
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17, rue de Sevres Paris & • Centre Commercial Park- II 









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ADVEKT^™'- 8ttppi f.iwf.inT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY/ SUNDAY, MAY 11-12, 1985 


;V" 


A¥EMUEClITYSEm 




CENTRAL PARK WEST 

Living in this spacious 8 mom apartment, high above Central Kirk, is the 
bes country living in die heart ofManharan. Enjoy all aftheameniues of this 
special neiphbortVxxI, such as wonderful restaurants, shops and some of 
the city's best prhnxe schools. Priced to sell wider S1.00CL00Q. Please call 
Patricia Warburg Cliff 832-5899/ R7(y 2011 


DondlasElliman 


575 Madison Avenue, New York, NY. 10022 212-8324100 


BEEKMAN PLACE EXCLUSIVE 

Removed fiom the noise of the city an exquisite 2 bedroom, 2 bath 
apartment awaits vour inspection. Sup^ architectural renovation by noted 
designer featuring: ea-irvkftcben and well planned top quality 1 buit ins. 
Everything in Immaculate, imw-fai condition. Fully sen-iced well established 
building. Far appointment call Mb. Rayne S32-5465 /"'3+9S53. 


Douglas Elliman 


5*5 Madison Avenue. New York, N.Y. 10022 212-8324100 



FIFTH AVENUE 

In the Desirable 60's. One of the most distinguished buildings on the 
Avenue. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths with direct Park views. Exquisitely 
decorated - also willing to sell quality antique furniture if desired. Fully 
serviced building with manv extra details. By appointment Barbara 
Candozo 8324181. 


Douglas El liman 


575 Madison Avenue. New York, N.Y. 10022 212-832-4100 


GRAND AND GLORIOUS 

This 6 room apartment is one of the nicest on Park Avenue. Sweeping 
entrance gallery flows into elegant Jiving room and dining room There 
are 2 large masters each with their own baths, plus an eat- in- kitchen and 
maid's room with hath. Priced to sell, the maintenance is $1,250. Gill 


Leslie Cross! ev R32--» l-ii 


Douglas Elliman 


575 Madison Avenue. New York, N.Y. 10022 212-8324100 



PARK AVENUE (60’s) 

A magnificent spacious 12 nxxn comer apartment en 
compassing an entire private floor. Dazzling views, high 
floor, high ceilings. Tup condition. Something very special 
in one of our most prestigious pre-war buildings. 3 
gracious hednxxiw, lihrary, elegant living room & ft nm.il 
dining room, 2 wuodhuming fireplaces, eat-in-kitchen it 
pantry, double size plus singie size staff quarters. It invites 
a lovely, gracious lifestyle. Fur appointment please call 
Geraldine Shephard 832-5586, 


Douglas Elliman 


575 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10022 212-8324100 



SIXTIES 

NEW EXCLUSIVE 

Off Lexington. Sensational 6 
room co-op in pre-war building 
with doorman. Shunere and 
additional features give a 
houselike feeling. 2 masters, 3 
baths, spacious living room, 
woodbuming fireplace, formal 
dining mom. maid's room, eat- 
in o wnoy kitchen with washer 
-'dryer. Asking only $675,000 
and maintenance of $1,154.78 
includes electricity. Edith F. 
Tuckerman 832-5450. 


Z% Douglas Elliman 


Madison Avenue. New York. 
N.Y. 10022 212-8324100 



LE 

REGENCE 


Restaurant de l’Hotel 


PLAZA ATH 



Paris 


Dejeuners 

Diners * Ambiance Piano 


25, avenue Montaigne, 75008 Paris 
Telephone: (1)723.78.33 


In New York: 37 East 64th Street 


CALENDAR 


MAY 

*1 A The Society of Memorial 
-L JL SIoan-Kettering hosts its 
annual spring dinner-dance in the 
Grand Ballroom of the Plaza 
Hotel. This black-tie event in- 
cludes a raffle drawing at Sloan- 
House. Cocktails begin at 7:30 
pm., followed by dinner at 8 JO. 
By invitation only. Fifth Avenue 
at 59th Street. For information, 
cafl (212) 794-7972. 


*1 CT "An Evening in Vienna" is 
JJj the theme of the New "fork 
Philharmonic's ball this evening 
at Lincoln Center. Cocktails at 
6 JO precede dinner at 7 JO. After 
dinner Zubin Mehta and the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra win perform 
a program of waltzes in the 
Viennese tradition, led by dancers 
from the Jeffrey Ballet SchooL 
Be ginnin g at 10J0, the Michael 
Carney Orchestra wiU entertain 
for the remainder of the evening. 
Tickets are $500. For information, 
caU (212) 580-8700, ext. 381. 


1 /T The International Society 
JLO of Interior Designers' New 
'York chapter will host a black-tie 
benefit aboard the Riveranda. 
Cocktails begin at 7 JO pm, fol- 
lowed by dinner and dancing. 
Tickets are $125. Pier 62, West 
23rd Street and the Hudson 
River. For information, call (212) 
752-2762. 


The League of Women Voters of 
New York City will host its annual 
benefit luncheon today at noon 
in the Hotel Pierre. The Hon. John 
V. Lindsay will be the guest of 
honor. Tickets are $150. Fifth 
Avenue at 61st Street For infor- 
mation, call (212) 677-5050. 


"1 Q The New York Eye and 
lo Ear Infirmary hosts its 15th 
annual Starlight Ball on the Star- 
light Roof of the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel. Tickets are $200. Park Ave- 
nue at 50th Street For infor- 
mation, call (212) 598-1383. 


OA "A Tribute to Rita Hay- 
JlAJ worth" is the first national 
benefit of the Alzheimer's Disease 
and Related Disorders Association 
in the Grand Ballroom of the 
Hotel Pierre. Princess Yasmin Aga 
Khan, Miss Hayworth’s daughter, 
will serve as general chairman. 
President and Mrs. Ronald Rea- 
gan will be the honorary patrons, 
and Count and Countess Frederic 
Chandon will be the benefactors. 
Film clips of Rita Hayworth's 
movies will be shown. Cocktails 
will begin at 7:00 pm followed 
by dinner at 8:00. Tickets range 
from $500 to $1,000. Fifth Avenue 
at 61st Street For information, 
call (212) 581-7370. 


This evening at 8:00 'Y&le Univer- 
sity will sponsor "From This Mo- 
ment On/Yale Salutes Cole Porter 
at Carnegie Hall,” featuring works 
by several of America's top com- 
posers and a medley of Cole Porter 
songs sung by Lena Home. Tickets 
are $15. 154 West 57th Street An 
after-theater supper with the cast 
will be held on die Starlight Roof 
of the Waldorf-Astoria HoteL Tick- 
ets for the performance and sup- 
per are $500. Park Avenue at 50th 
Street For information, call (212) 
772-7431. 


A "I Sotheby's hosts a cocktail 
£a X. reception and auction of 
pieces created by students of the 
Isabel O'Neil Studio Workshop in 
collaboration with such well- 
known designers as Mario Buatta, 
Michael de Santis and Ruben de 
Saavedra. The evening begins with 
cocktails at 6:00, followed by a 
silent auction at 7J0 with dinner 
and dancing afterward- Tickets 
for the black-tie reception and 
auction are $50, $150 for the entire 
evening. 1334 York Avenue. For in- 
formation, call (212) 348-2120. 


To celebrate its 36th anniversary. 
Just One Break will host the an- 
nual Tiffany Feather Ball in the 
Grand Ballroom of the Hotel 


O "| Le Louvre des Antiquaires,* 
j JL in conjunctioiL with Guy 
Laroche perfumes, will present 
"Autour du Parfum." an exposition 
of 350 fragrance-related objets 
d'art from major museums and 
private collections. Among the 
works on view are 17th-century 
silver pieces and 18th- and 19th- . 
century scent bumeim Through# 


Pierre. Cocktails begin at 7J0 
pan., followed by dinner arid September 15. Two place du 
dancing. Tickets are $200, and Palais Royal, Paris. 


Lenox Hill Hospital will host its 
annual spring benefit at the 
Gershwin Theatre, featuring a 
preview performance of Singing 
in the Rain at 8:00 p-m. Tickets 
range from $100 to $200. 1633 
Broadway. For information, call 
(212) 794-4507. 


proceeds will aid this job place- 
ment agency for the disabled. 
Fifth Avenue at 61st Street For 
information, call (212) 725-2500. 


OO “The Night of the Wild- 
LaZa flowers” is the theme of 


the National Wildflower Research 
Center's benefit dinner-dance at 
the Seventh Regiment Armory. 
Lady Bird Johnson and Helen 
Hayes serve as chairmen for this 
black-tie affair, and Bill Blass, Os- 
car de la Renta, Mrs. Nelson 
Rockefeller and Barbara Walters 
are among the members of the 
benefit committee. The cocktail 
reception begins at 7:30 pm., 
followed by dinner at 8 JO and 
dancing to the music of Vince. 
Giordano and the Nighthawks. 
Tickets range from $300 to $1,000. 
Park Avenue at 67th Street. For 
information, call (212) 288-1551. 


JUNE 

3 The Mount Sinai Medical 
Center hosts a special per- 
formance of Singing in ike Rain 
at the Gershwin Theatre at 8:00 
'pm A pretheater dinner wiU be 
held at Tavern on the Green; Mazy 
Tyler Moore will serve as honorary 
chairman. 5 JO pm. cocktails prep 
cede dinner at 6:15. Tickets are 
$200. 1633 Broadway, Central Park 
West at 67th Street For informa- 
tion, caU (212) 65045976. . 


5 The Center for InterAmer- 
ican Relations will hold' its 


A Q The Rockefeller University 
ZO Founder's Ball will be held 
this evening at the Founder's Hall 
library at Rockefeller University. 
Mrs. Vincent Astor and Mrs. 
David Rockefeller will be the 
honorary chairmen. Mrs. Samuel 
P. Reed, Mrs. Sid R. Bass and 
Mrs. Gordon P. Getty will chair 
the event, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Steven G Rockefeller, Jr, will be 
the junior committee chairmen. 
Cocktails at 8:00 will be followed 
by dinner and dancing at 9KX) 
under a tent on the Esplanade. 
Tickets are $1,000. 1230 Ybrk Ave- 
nue. For information, call (212) 
765-5130. 


The New York City Ballet hosts 
its annual spring gala th^. (fam- 
ing, featuring a preview perfor- 
mance of a new Jerome Robbins 
ballet The &0O benefit follows 
cocktails on the Terrade of .the 
New York State Theatre. A tham- 
pagne supper ball takes p&ceon 
the Promenade' after the show. ! 
Oscar de la Renta wiEciajr die 
black-tie event, along torafhrhfts, 
Ahmet Ertegun, Mrs. S^meTP. . 
Reed and Mrs. William R Ray- 
ner. Tickets are $350 ttf $1,000. 
Lincoln Center. For information, 
call (212) 870-56 76. 

—Maura Kinney 


FOOD 


Continued from opening page. 




high as 200. At Doubleday on 
Fifth Avenue, manager Paul Koz- 
lowski confirms that Zagat was 
the store's number-one-selling 
restaurant guide during a recent 
month, beating out even Mimi 
Sheraton's 500-page tome. The 
Zagats themselves are expecting 
1985 sales to be as high as 40,000 — 
a remarkable number for a book 
whose distribution remains vir- 
tually all word-of-mouth 
The guide had its beginnings in 
Europe some 20 years ago. It was 
in the early 1960s that Tim and 
Nina Zagat — then newlyweds — 
moved to Paris under the pa- . 
tronage of Tim's employer, the 
old-line law firm Hughes Hubbard 
& Reed. “A lot of the heavy client 
entertaining fell to me," recalls 
Tim, whose name is actually 
Eugene. "In no time we were eat- 
ing out five and six days a week — 
it was a movable feast” 

With Tim given carte blanche 
access to Paris' best and Nina 
studying cooking at the famous 
Cordon Bleu, the couple soon 
began keeping an informal check- 
list of the restaurants they had 
tried, comparing their own as- 
sessments with the authoritative 
Michelin and Gault Millau rat- 
ings. "We started it for ourselves, 
really," says Nina, "but after a 
while began passing along our 
list to friends and colleagues.” 
Though the Zagats. haven't re- 
sided in Paris since the late '60s, 
they continue to update their 
Paris restaurant survey annually 
through regular visits and "deep- 
throat" contacts. Tim refers to 
the two-sided handout, with its 
0-3 ratings and ultraterse com- 
ments, as “the single best sheet 
in existence on Paris restaurants” 
After resettling in Manhattan 
in the eariy 1970s, the Zagats 
joined a convivial food- and wine- 
tasting group, which eventually 
prompted them to start a New 
York restaurant guide. 

The first came out in 1979— a 
one-page roster of 75 restaurants 
rated by the 100 or so members 
o f their foo d and wine society. 

Three years later the couple 
discovered they were hand-tabu- 
lating more than 200 question- 


naires in their Central ParkWest 
apartment and giving away triple 
that amount in completed sur- 
veys. “It was Nina who finally 
suggested we at least try and 
make some money out of what 
was still essentially a hobby " Tim 
says. “Maybe we could sell a Httle 
booklet and write off a few 
meals. We didn't exactly expect 
to make a killing or take on the 
city’s big-gun critics." 

But momentum carried the 
day. Though they have yet to in- 
corporate and still work out of 


their apartment, the Zagats— who f ^ 
now use a computer to organize 
their survey— seem poised foir ] the 
start of a regular Zagat cottage 
industry. In addition to individual 
book sales at $7.95 apiece, the 
Regency Hotel has begun offering 
the guide to VIP guests as an 
added amenity. A blue-bound, 
gold-edged deluxe edition suitable 
for coiporate imprints is also 
available this yean the welPcon- 
nected Zagats have maiketed It 
to contacts at Citibank, Blooming- 
dale’s, Morgan Stanley; Charles, R 
Young Company (which .has qr? 
tiered 3,000 copies) and several 
big law firms for distribution to 
clients, customers and. staff mem- 
bers. There is talk -of a separate 
composite survey for food em- 
poriums, caterers, wine shops and 
mail-order catalogs, and Tim even 
hints that a major magazine hjas 
expressed interest in publishing a 
nationwide Zagat ^directory, or 
regional on es for various cities.^ 

Despite "their willingness to 
branch out, the Zagats are 


strongly opposed to enlarging 

At - 


either the guide's diminutive for- 
mat or its selective voting. Says 
Tim: “We have to preserve tjie 
insider, clubby feeling the survey 
enjoys — otherwise it wiU begin io 
look like all the other overblown 
guides." Yet even a -dub has its 
limits. "Somebody wrote in sug- 
gesting that all of the Zagat re- 
viewers get togetheronce a ye^r 
for a big dinner," he confide! 
somewhat uneasily- "What^l* 
nightmare that would be." Spoken 
like a man who truly knows the 
passions of 1,000 critics. 

-Allan Ripp 


fi" 




s&i-iiV 


fifth annual spring party at Tavern 
on the Green this evening. ; J4iL 
and Mrs. David Rockefeller will 
serve as chairmen. Cocktatis be-^ 
gin at 7 JO, followed by dnmer 
and dancing at 8 JO. Central fcuk 
West at 67th Street. For informa- 
tion, call (212) 765-0850. ; _ 




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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY/SUNPAY, MAY 11-12, 1985 


m 


£ v '^ , L T 

par “' s “'HI 18,1, S ' 

? «eni 

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«"« h„ Ms M,; 

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MAN WHO CAUGHT 
THE RICH AT PLAT 



Ji 


floor 


’erome Zerbe's Sutton Place 
apartment in New York is 
much fike him: elegant and 
fall of memories. Its shelves coop 
- i tain a hundred volumes of 20,000 
^ black-and-white photographs he 
retook between 1933 and 1973. 
> Thereare pictures of debutantes 


ftr W‘j| s " 

IlrtfL S i h m v * h^' v. on sweeping lawns, of Grace Kdfty . 
ilmiu-r ai date with Rainier, of . - 

Ift3 > bn \ . ^Jinuny Cagaey celebrating New 


«»7lh St^'^ 


.Year’s. Eve, Hedda Hopper clown- 
/ ing with Cary Grant and Brenda 


great beauties of the 1930s and 
’40s often look foolish and un- 
gainly to our eyes. But the Brenda 
Riazier who stares from Zerbe’s 
scrapbooks looks fresh and in- 
nocent and beautiful, like some- 
one who could step from the 
pages of Vogue or Harper’s Bazaar 
tomorrow. Part of this, no doubt. 
Stops from Zerbe’s reputation for 
neverbaving kept an unflattering 
photograph: no crow's .feet or 
wrinkled necks here. 


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■nnual spn Hi , p m ^ 


Inters 


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Ni-w York fin Ba!fc,t 
itmJ ipiinp gala ife. 
cjlijiini- previe** 
c in a ih*vv JtTumrUjft 
1 The $00 benefit^ 
liliK mi) i he Terrace ^ 

Vij k Staiv Theatre. 

c supper ball talus pb 
Promenade after \k&\ 

* dr i,» Renta will dfr. - 
i tic event, alone ni$i 
n Hir^uit. Mrs. Sans 
1 AUii Mrs WifaU 
Tiskets an $3>it to SU 
*»ht I'eiilvi I'vi info^E 



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For 40 years, Jerome Zerbe’s camera captured nightlife in high society. 


■»; 




1 


Frazier as the girl of the year. 

. Zerbe, now 80, is credited by 
many with having invented, in 
the 1930s, a new form of photo- 
journalism, one that flourishes 


Zerbe did not set out to create 
a new art form He was bom into 
a socially prominent family in 
Cleveland, where his father was 
president of a coal company. He 


today in- People magazine and • . ..attended ffie Salisbury School and 

nr. »_ Tif n.jt'. 1 ti i 1 J -T "• ' v«h.' 


Women’s .Wear Daiiy. He made 
an art form of candid shots of 
■ ,, !: . 2 ;bi6 - r _ society people and movie stare in 
+ **. most private £te pubhc 

jf/«i ». ;i-;: in 
* "If u.r Num B 

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*. M.IV- w. 

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tUl ii.’il!’ 11 ' 1 - 


j: moments. Before Zerbe there 
v »* were no such photographic rec- 
^ : ords of the rich and famous at 
j r ,play. Like many revolutions, this 
lf ,.one resulted from a confluence 


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C i, of technology and sociology. The 
•a -perfecting of the flashbulb (long 
since outdated by the strobe) and 
faster films allowed photogra- 
phers to work indoors, in relaxed, 
^ - unposed settings. And Zerbe was, 
. t ^,as he puts it, "an insider looking 
7 > out,” not, as he , describes cate of 
^ C rtoday’s society columnists, "a 
n.k .’•V'^ ‘ 4. x secretary . - .looking in" at what 
-^ passes for society. 

^ There is a special quality to 
i s Zerbe's photographs. In old 
s,-| movies and other archives the 


■ t : * Jfr - 


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. I 1 '*' 


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YaTe, where his teaches told him 
he had a talent for drawing and 
encouraged him to continue his 
studies in Paris. His goal then was 
to become a portrait painter in 
the mold of a John Singer Sargent 
The Great Depression mandated 
Zerbe’s return to Cleveland. He 
started taking pictures for a new 
Cleveland magazine; Parade. By 
the time it folded, Zerbe, as the 
magazine’s society editor, had es- 
tablished his reputation for a 
unique kind of photography. He 
■ and his camera were invited ev- 
erywhere. Women who once 
m^xt have adhered to the maxim 
that their names should be in 
newsprint only at birth, marriage 
and death lined up to be photo- 
graphed by him. Zerbe’s photo- 
graphs caught the eye of Harry 
Bull, then Town <& Country’s 


editor, -who bought a few. When 
. Parade folded, Zerbe headed for 
. New York, to seek fame and for- 
tune. He ran into Harry Bull on 
the street and was hired to photo- 
graph parties for Town & Country 
at $150 a month. 

Soon Zerbe had another job; he 
arranged to take parties of his 
friends to the new Rain bow Room 
atop Rockefeller Center. He would 
photograph his socially prominent 
friends, and the pictures would 
be supplied to society pages. For 
this, Zeibe would be paid $73 a 
week, and, of course, there would 
be no tab for his elegant dinners. 
To celebrate, Zerbe stopped by 0 
Morocco for a drink and was 
promptly hired to-do the same 
thing for that nightclub, for an 
additional $75 a week. John 
Perona, the owner of 0 Morocco, 

. soon demanded Zerbe's undivided 
loyalty. "Perona told me," says 
Zerbe, "that what I'd save in taxi 
fares not going to the Rainbow 
roof would mean Id be making 

more money” 

For the next five years, be- 
tween 1933 and 1938, Zerbe and 
his camera spent almost every 
night at 0 Morocco, introducing 
friends, eating drinking and snap- 
ping photographs. "Mrs. William 
K. Vanderbilt used to come to 0 
Morocco with a pile of hatboxes, 
he recalls. "She’d put on one dif- 
ferent hat after another, and I'd 
photograph her in each.” Mrs. 
Vanderbilt mig ht not return to 0 
Morocco for- weeks, but she 
would still adorn the society 
pages, photographed on "differ- 
ent" evenings in 0 Morocco. 

After wartime service as a Navy 
chief photographer, Zerbe re- 
turned to New York as society 
editor of Town & Country. But 
mostly he took pictures. He had 
the Jergens Lotion account and 
convinced his socialite friends 
they should appear in ads pro- 
moting the hand cream. Zerbe 
photographed the wedding of 
"Babe” Cushing Mortimer to Wil- 
liam S. Paley and snapped Jac- 
queline Bouvier as a debutante. 
He photographed Firestone wed- 
dings and considered the coming- 
out party. pf Anne and Charlotte 
Ford the greatest spectacle he'd 
ever attended. Katherine Hepburn 
posed for a fashion shot on the 
lawn of Zerbe's Connecticut 
home, and Winston Churchill 
walked down to the edge of a 
beach in Jamaica so that Zerbe 
could p ose him against the sunset 
All that has changed now. Zerbe 
says there is no society left, and 
so he wouldn’t be interested in 
taking pictures. "At half the par- 
ties you see in WWD," he says, 
"the people wouldn't go, there 
wouldn't even be a party if they 
thought there wasn’t going to be 
a photographer.” Nonetheless, his 
pictures remain to jog our mem- 
oiy or encoura ge our fantasies 
of an earlier era. A Boswell with a 
camera, Zerbe has created a vivid 
record of a way of life gone by. 

— Don Rosendale 


yc 

nr 


•Jr 


HERE & THERE 


:n* 


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P- -T, 
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Continued from opening page 


?of both celebrating and preserv- out through that mysterious 
t "ijing the breathtaking variety of country. There were winding 

• s :- ,: ' 1 ' wildflowers that annually casts a sandy roads that had gnarled cy- 

^ ... i y* kjfich embroidery across her native press trees dripping with Spanish 

ct Ifexas and beyond. Abetted by a,' moss. There were black-eyed 
■foster of Upper East Skiers whose Susans and wild roses on the 
~ Social and financial clout is awe- 
, r teome even in a city awash with 
benefit committees. Lady Bird is 

n • 


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fences in spring, and there were 
bluebonnets covering the hills, 
with Indian paintbrush sparking 
' bringing her cause to the Seventh them up like hpstick on a woman." 

?J Regiment Armory on May 22 for For all then: natural beauty and 
* a onetime gala evening that in- the poetry so often evident in 
‘ eludes, for $600, $1,000 or $2,000 






their nomenclature, wddflowers 
from Cinnabar Ladies' Tresses to 
Maiden Kue-eyed Mary have been 
taken for granted or thoughtlessly 
cleared as developers cut through 
the countryside. In her native 


- r:V- 


;»• 


it.. 


a couple, dinner, dancing and— 

0 bf course— an extravagant dismay 
c bf wildflowers. 

j3*» Bor a First Lady who left Vfesh- 
* ' 4ngton a legacy of tulips and a 

^'federal highway beautification . Texas Lady Bird was saddened 
* program, and who in the process - particularly to see state roadsides 
v pointed the way for future First cleared of wildflowers, and public 
* 1 . : c ° Ladies to champion a single civic displays of "store-bought” flowers 
! ,7 ^iise, the National Wil^lower installed in shopping malls rather 
■ ; '* ... 2, Research Center is a logical next than the wild sprays of color in- 
: K !.- i: ‘^tep. But When Lady Bird talks - digenous to the surrounding land. 

‘^about wildflowers, the images ’ In 1969,. back from Washington, 
y ‘‘^at come first tomind are of her she established an annual, prize, 

. . jchildhood in East Texas. “Nature complete with barbecue party 

s ** - ® has always been my refief and - and live country music, for hlgh- 

k *»' n |ileasureahdjoy,’’ she says. ‘T grew way maintenance men who did 
\ . ? c ‘ l fip close to Caddo Lake, and I the most to help preserve road- 
. . ■' V spent a Jot of time alone walking side wildflowers. It was with her 


gift of 60 acres of land on the 
Colorado River in Central Texas 
near Austin, as well as $125,000 
(matched by Laurance Rockefel- 
ler), that the National Wildflowers 
Research Center was finally es- 
tablished. Its purpose, says Lady 
Bird, is twofold: "We want to en- 
courage use in the landscape of 
plants, flowers and trees; and we 
want to maintain a clearinghouse 
to answer questions about what 
is being done where — the agricul- 
tural schools, the botanical gar- 
dens and so forth." 

In the small talk that signals an 
interview's end. Lady Bind -says 
she’ll soon be visiting her daugh- 
ter Lynda Robb in Virginia, who 
with husband Chuck has made 
her a grandmother three time*; 
oven She says she's 72 and seems 
not to mind that at all She seems 
glad to be free of the difficult 
burden that history capriciously 
imposed on her/ though she 
doesn’t say that. And she seems, 
despite the round-the-clock com- 
pany of the Secret Service agents 
who are vestiges of that history, 
despite the tour buses rolling by 
the ranch, to be very much alone. 
But she seems, as she has through* 
out her public life, to keep a bright 
light within: of strength, of spirit, 
of a rare, transcending grace. . 

. —Michael Shnayerson 


VA 


“ANTIQUAIRES 

A PARIS ” 


DIDIER AARON & CIE 

32, av. Raymond-Poincarfc - Paris 16* - Tel. (1) 727.17.79 


AVELINE & CIE 

20, rue du Cirque - Paris 8 e - Tel. (1) 266.60.29 


ETIENNE LEVY S.A. 

178, Fg Saint-Honore - Paris 8* - Tel. (1) 562.33.47 


MICHEL MEYER 

24, av. Matignon - Paris & - Tel. (I) 266.62.95 


JACQUES PERRIN 

3, quai Voltaire - Paris 7' - Tel. (1) 260.27.20 


MAURICE SEGOURA 

20, Fg Saim-Honor6 - Paris 8* - Tel. (1) 265.11.03 


BERNARD STEINITZ 

4, rue Drouot - Paris 9* - T61. (1) 246.98.98 


Association of seven famous antique dealers who are top specialists in 
French 17th and 18th century Furniture, Works of Art and Old Master 
Paintings. Their skilled knowledge and professional reputation offer 
collectors a guarantee of QUALITY and AUTHENTICITY. 


MARIA DE BEYRIE GALLERY 



_ H. BOcOU L ITOan . D. 06 cm. 
CM lr N. TScra. L 97cm. D> B0 cm 


Pftoio jeait-Aerre Coaeaui 


Exceptional desk In dark pickled oak by Pierre 
Leg rah. with its chair, which formerly belonged 
to the writer Maurice Merlin du Gard. circa 1926. 

The desk itself is a very beautiful object, a true 
museum piece in which Legrain’s art stands out 
as a signature. (From the Cahtors d’Art 1928). 

The heavy, iridescent, pickled oak sculptural 
Object dominated the house of the writer Maurice 
Martin du Gard. Massive and robust, It symbolizes 
African art through the prism of Cubism, it is a 
perfect example of Pierre Legrein’s art, a piece o! 
furniture that goes well with the main works of 
the 1920s; “Las Demoiselles d 1 Avignon." a sculp- 
ture by Brancusi, a helmet mask from Gabon {i.e 
the former collection of Paul Guillaume and 
Jacques Douce!) . The external rusticity of this 
desk is only a better symbol of African art. Pierre 
Legrain’s works ware Often unique, especially 
created for such personalities as Madame J. 
Tachard, Monsieur Pierre Meyer or the Viscount 
ofNoaJHes. 


23, rue de Seine 75006 Paris - France tel. (331) 325. 76 .15 


In the U.S_ Suite 1200, 145 East 57th St. 




I *s 


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY/SUNDAY, MAY. 11-12, 1985 


Impressionist and Modem Paintings and Sculpture 

Wednesday, May 15, 1985 at 7 p.m. 

Catalogue #5882, $15 or $17 if ordered by mail. 



."Tv 





'T“. 




Paul Gauguin. Conversation Tropiques (Negresses Cansant). 
signed and dated 87, oil on canvas, 

24% x 29% in. (61.S x 76 cm.) 

To be sold on May 15 at 
Christie's in New York. 


Georges Braque, Vkrion et \fene, 
signed on die reverse, in 1914, 

ofl on canvas. 25% x 36% in. 

(64 x 92 cm.) To be sold on May 15 at 
Christie's in New York. 


Impressionist and Modem Paintings and Sculpture (Part ED 

Thursday, May 16, 1985 at 2:30 p.m. 

Catalogue #5886, $15 or $17 if ordered by mail. 


Jean Metzinger, Portrait de Suzanne Pbocaf, 
signed, oil on canvas. 39% x 28% in. (100 x 73 cm.) 
To be sold May 16 
at Christie's in New York. 




mm 


Barbara Hepworth. Hand Sculpture (with stringsX 
carved and polished cherry wood with string, 
29% in. high (70 Jem.) 

To be sold on May 16 
at Christie'S in New York. 


Impressionist and Modem Drawings and Watercolors 

Thursday, May 16, 1985 at 10:30 a.m. 

Catalogue #5884, $14 or $16 if ordered by mail. 




Edgar Degas, Femme Nue. Le Pied Appuye sur une Banquette, 
stamped with signature <L. 658) — whfa atelier stamp (L. 657) 
on the reverse, drawn circa 1894, 
charcoal and pastel on paper, 

35% x 22% in. 

To be sold on May 16 
at Christie's in New York. 


J Si 


Fernand Leger, Deux Personnages, 
signed with initial* and dated 29, 
brush ami India ink on buff paper squared for transfer, 
20x12% in. (50.8x32 cm.) 

To be sold May 16 
at Christie's in New York. 


Auctions to be held in our galleries at 502 Park Avenue in New York. 
Fully illustrated catalogues are available through Christie’s Publications 
Dept. AI, 21-24 44th Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. 

Please request by catalogue number and make your check or money order 

payable to Christie’s. 

These exhibitions are on view in New York from May 9 through May 14. 
For further information, please contact 
Michael Findlay or Nancy Whyte at 212/546-1171. 




CHRISTIES 


NEW YORK 






O' -. •'• - ■ " -' 

' Statistics Index 

*1 




— jK-s*tr—e- ** - 

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s. f AMEX NMc/MoP.n *%» rtde notes —'•*■*■ 

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<V fjYSE wjMflaws pjo interest ram-' p. *- 
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^LW nto .p.nMw ": ftio' 

♦i Sraraodttta .ftW OTCitac* '. -. PJS ' 

P.18 OHwrirta%Mt -P.14 


HeralKs^ (tribune. 


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DMMfidS 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 


** 


Page 9 


ECONOMIC SCENE 





■* 


f,S: 




More Rum 10ft 
refineries hare 
been dosed 
since 1981. 


* 


'M 


By ROBERT D.HERSHEY Jr: 

■ Tie* York Una Sarke _ ■£;? V h \ f 

ASHJNGTON — Eight years ago the Oirite&Staies' 
imported 8.8 million barrels of o3 a dap. abaui: 48 
percent of its total needs, fanned by such heavy 
dependence on foreign suppliers, Preskfcnt Jmnny 
Carter started a program of price decontrol and other steps that 
be said would guarantee that the 1977 import levd, would never 
be exceeded. ‘ • : 

Higher pokes, combined with recession, worked to produce a 
spectacular decline — far steeper and faster.- than anyweoqxct- 
ed. This year imports are rnnnmg at wdlnnder 4 mSHoa bands a 
tyy and few people worry any longer about AmeacaVenergy 
Vjcurity . The Reagan admmis- - - - ' • — 

tration, in fact, now proposes 
to save money by suspending 
j£j!. further purchases for the Stra- 
> ^ tegic Petroleum Reserve — a 
j*; stockpile of- cal intended to be 
*! U drawn upon in an 'emergency. 

But many of U^. oil com- 
V panics, indarirng some af the 
Sntenudoad pasts, flunk the 
\ f-i country is again becoming dangerously^ vulnerable. This time 
g-t! their worry is not about supplies of erode -pH. bat about the 
nation’s diminished capacity to refine oil. 

'5 ^ Imports of cut-rate gasoline and other refined products pour- 
& 5* ® from Venezuela, China, Romania and elsewhere now take 

JJt, |r Tume than 5 percent of the total American market, and more than 
^s. 15 percent on the East Coast A severe squeeze on profit margins 

und the ending of government-mandated subsidies nave led to the 
A*i, closing of more than 100 refineries since 1981, reducmgopexable 
IE 3- capacity to 15.6 million bands a day, from 18.6 millinn. 

'£i With half a dozen new state-owned. refineries being brought 
*1 into operation by members of the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries, American refiners have decided itis time to 
;*»k sedc protection from the government 

; They say that OPEC coontties, more interested in maximizing 

! revenues than in profitability, can undersell even the mosteffi- 
dent Americas refiner. SeOing Cut-rate gasofims is also a way to 
skirt OPECs official oil prices. 

i? ^ . ’.’■■■ 

"iii' r*TN HE American refiners say that by maintaining since the 
I 1950’s only a trivial 125-cent-«ganon (3.8 Jiten) tariff on 

imported gasofltDB, tb* g o v ern ment ism effect condoning a 
£ S' *y new form of import dependence. Oveoefiance on foreign refined 
products — and the accompanying atr^hy of domestic charity 
— isjast as worrisome as ovcrdq>mdence on foreign crude. They 
*>= - question, in fact, whether in a crisis the United States would be 
:>&; able to refine its now-sizable cal stockpile, 

£ ?. u Onr strategic reserve (ar'gasolinejs oar refining industry,” 
says Joseph L. Stratxnan; an official of Texas Gty Refining Ino, a 
££ member of the Independent Refiners Coalition. 

■ i But wouM it reaflybe a good idea to Einit imports of gasoline, 

>5' such as by a flexible quota system that would gointo effect when 
tt the utilization rale of American refineries falls bdow a pre- 
estabSshed floor? ■ 

i*- ’ A hhongb the rpfmprt* ar giuru^it rriiftK heavily on the pownhle 

5 risks to national security — and therefore cannot be fully rebut- 
ili,: ted in purely economic terms — the case for protection is not very 
!; persuasive. ... 

t. x.a For one thing , protectionism in other areas of trade ha* raised 
m - prices in. the past For another, there is little likelihood of a 
^*\jsbortage.af domestic refinmgcapadtyin the foreseeable future. 

; *? The utilizatidh rate for Ammcan refineries was only .76.7 

jr-a'-. percent during April andeven a major drawdown erf die reserve 
could behandled with little strain.. And in a. pinch some idled 
iv. capacity could be restarted, although in many cases that could 
*?:; not be done overnight or without substantial cost ' ‘ . 

p.iv; Previous efforts to restrict petroleum imports, moreover, have 
r distorted the market, held pnees up and, paradoxically, caused 
S huge refineries to be built m the Caribbean rather than in the 
7’?- United States. 


;» > 


Currency Rates 


] 


lota intarbonk rates on May 10 . wduefing fees. 

*■**- Offidd fitengsfor Ansterda n. Bnaseb, Frankfurt, Milan, Pork. New York rates at 

r*p. 4 PM 


Amsterdam 


¥ 


- x* 

«i ** 

% X* 
- 


■sf 

?s 

-;'v. 


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Milan 

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r" jn 

Earocurrency Deposits 


Interest Rates 


May 10 


Buyers 
Sought 
For EBC 

Merrill Interest 
JnBankBeporlei 

By Bob Hagerty 

. . Imemtaional Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The seven Europe- 
. an banks that own European Bank- 
ing Co. Ltd. are holding t»Hr< with 
a number of parties aimed atsdbig 
the London-based investment 
bank, David Mitchem. an EBC 
managing director, said Friday. 

' Banking sources estimated 
EBCs Value at £25 million (S303 
mflHon). The bank has assets of 
£614 mitfi on and shareholders’ 
equity of £21.5 million. The 
planned sale would not indude 
EBCs aster institution, European 
Banking Co. SA of Brussels, owned 
by the same seven banks. 

The disclosure came after the 
London bank announced the 
abrupt r esignatio n of Stanislas 
Yassukovich as deputy chairman. 
Mr. Yassukovich, one of London’s 
best-known international bankers, 
is likely to succeed Donald Roth as 
dminiMii of Merrill Lynch Capital 
Markets, a London-based unit of 
Merrill Lynch ft Co. As previously 
reported, Mr. Roth is to retnrn to a 
senior post ai Merrill’s be*d office. 

Bankers- close to the situation 
said Merrill had considered buying 
all or part of EBC London and that 
Mr. Yassukovich vigorously sup- 
ported the idea. Other senior exec- 
utives at EBC, however, want the 
hank lo be acquired by an entity 
that would allow EBC to preserve 
its, autonomy. Has disagreement 
led to Mr. Yassukovich’s depar- 
ture, the sources said. 

The bank is expected to be sold 
to an outside party or group, but 
the sources said it was still possible 
that one of the seven current own- 
ers would seek full control 

The seven owners are Mi dland 
Bank, Amsterdam-Rotterdam 
Bank,' Banca Commerriale Ita- 
lian a, Creditanstalt- Bankverein, 
Deutsche Bank, Sodetfc Gbafaale 
de Banque and Sodftb Gtofcrale. 
These banks, membexs of the Euro- 
pean Banks International Co. 
grouping, also own European 
American Bank and European 
Asian Bank 

Midland,- however, plans to. sell 
its stake in European American be- 
fore next Ocl 15. One possibility is 
that Midland w31 swap its stake in 
European American, for EBC Lon- 
don, then sell that bank. 

Deutsche Bank several years ago 
took a controlling, interest in the 
Asian bank. 

Dollar Down, 
Trading Quiet 

. The Associated Pres 

NEW YORK —The dollar Ml 
against most other Tiding curren- 
cies in quirt trading Friday, closing 
near its lows of the day, as interest 
rales fdl in the United States. 

Gold prices slipped in Hong 
Kong but rose lata 1 in Europe ana 
the United States. Republic Na- 
tional Bank of New York said gold 
bullion was hid at S316 a troy 
ounce as oS 4pJ®. EDT, up $3 from 
the late bid Thursday and up $4.50 
from the previous week’s ead. 

The dollar’s losses Friday 
brought its retreat for the week to 
43 percent, as measured by the 
Federal Reserve Board’s trade- 
weighted index against other 10 
major currencies. In the previous 
two weeks, the dollar had gained 
7.4 percent 

Is New York trading the British 
pound rose Friday to S1.2380 from 
Thursday's dose of $1.2255. In oth- 
er late trading in New York, the 
dollar fell to 3.1070 Deutsche 
marks from Thursday's 3.I3I0; to 
9.4650 French francs from 9.5075, 
and to 2H150 Swiss francs from 
2.6330. 


China’s Great Leap for Computers 

But Enthusiasm 
Has Outpaced 
Technical Skill 

By Sam Howe 

ffe» York Tima Senla 

BELTING — Unable after a 
lengthy investigation to diagnose 
a malfunction in its SIGOjOOO 
computer system, a- Chinese in- 
stitute in Shaanxi province took 
the final, reluctant, step of calling 
in a service engineer from Beij- 
ing, 725 sties (1,170 kilometers) 
away. 

The engineer, an American 
employee of the small U.S. com- 
pany that made the. computer, 
quickly discovered the source of . 
the problem: a rat. The pest had 
been foraying nightly into the 
computer room and chewing on 
a sensitive cable. The cable was 
replaced, the rat’s droppings 
swept away and a wooden plank 
nailed across the doorway. 

Then, because he was already 
there, the engineer was asked to 
take a lock ai one of the compm- 
ers terminals, which had not 
been acting just right He re- 
moved the terminal’s casing, 
leaving the power on to perform 
some tests. A cleaning woman, 
mortified to see dost on the cir- 
cuit boards, burned over with a 
wet rag. The engineer restrained 
bar just in time to stop her from 
doing serious damaga to herself 
and the ternrinaL 

This service call, made several 
months asp, was not all that bi- 
zarre by Qtinese standards. Chi- 
na has embraced computers vir- 
tually overnight but the Chinese 
face bewildering problems in 

maintaining ajjd getting iny d to 
thwn. 

'The average Chinese is sim- 
ply not oriented to this technol- 
ogy,’’ said a UJS. official here 



Tfc» N»w York Tmmt 

An employee makes repairs at rise Chinn Computer 
Technical Service CorpL, which has 41 training centers. 


who monitors sales in this field. 
Tt’s like taking someone who's 
worked on a bicycle all his fife 
and suddenly handing him a six- 
cylinder engine to work on." 

rhirtfs* and foreigners alike 
generally agree that tenhnirians 
in China ultimately will be at 
least as good as anyone rise at 
servicing computers. But in the 
short term, the problems of poor 

irMHntfrnflfH-ft and muWi Kf jjc 

critical, especially given China’s 
plans to buy Mil ions of dollars 
worth of computers in the 1980s, 
mostly from U.S. companies. 

China is estimated to have 
spent at least $425 ntifion on 
foreign-made computers last 
year. A UJ5. official here calcu- 
lated that within tine years of 
delivery the Chinese typically 
pay between 5 percent and 10 


percent of the equipment’s price 
on service made necessary by im- 
proper mawitenanra. 

The head of the China office 
for a large U.S. wynpurf manu- 
facturer -put the rate at twice 
that, by factoring in the costs of 
productivity loss suffered when a 
computer is down. Both put the 
corresponding percentage in the 
United States at well under 5 
percent. 

Official policy is to blame the 
1966-1976 Cultural Revolution 
for the nation’s technology lag. A 
recent government book on 

modernization plans maintains 

that “the 10-year turmoil stunted 
‘ the intellcctnal growth of a whole 
generation.'’ 

Whatever the root cause, the 
problem is vastly compounded 
(Continued on Page 13, CoLl) 


British Telecom 
Agrees to Buy 
51% of Mitel 


Bob Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British Telecom- 
munications PL C announced Fri- 
day an agreement in principle to 
acqiure51 percent ofXfitrtCoip^ a 
Canadian ma ker of telecommuni- 
cations equipment that has fallen 
on hard rimes. 

The price was put at about 300 
million Canadian dollars (about 
$219 million). 

Analysts welcomed the transac- 
tion and said it would give debt- 
laden Mitel a sound financial base 
and British Telecom an entry into 
manufacturing of key equipment 

Last November (he British gov- 
ernment publicly sold 502 percent 
of BT. which has a near monopoly 
on telephone services in Britain. 
Since; whileshaking off its history 
as a state-owned utility, BT has 
been aggressively seeking to ex- 
pand its business internationally. 

On Tuesday, it announced apian 
to buy a small Canadian phone- 
equipment supplier, CTG lntx, for 
20 milli nn dollars. 

Mitel, based in Kana tn, Ontario, 
was formed 12 years agp by two 
British expatriates, Terry Mat- 
thews and Michael Cowpland, and 
once was a leader in the Canadian 
high-technology industry. It spe- 
cializes in advanced office-tele- 
phone switchboards, known as pri- 
vate automatic branch exchanges, 
or PABXs, and produces other 
phone equipment and specialized 
semiconductor devices. 

BT said it would exercise full 
management control once the 
is final- Sr George Jef- 
ferson, BTs chairman, said ne ex- 


U.S. Business leaders See Slowdown, No Recession 


Reuters 

HOT SPRINGS, Virginia — 
American business leaders expect 
the US. economy to slow down in 
the second half of this year and in 
1986. due mainly to foreign compe- 
tition and federal budget deficits. 

But they see little chance of a 
new recession. 

In a semiannual report on the 
economy, the Business Council 
said inflation would remain sub- 
dued through the end of 1986, but 
there would be little improvement 
in the unemployment rate. 

The council, composed of 200 
top officers of major UJ3. corpora- 
tions, meets here twice a year. 

“The maj or concerns are over the 
staying power of the economic ex- 
pansion, and negative impacts 
from the strong dollar and intense 
foreign competition," the report 
said. 

The council's report generally 
took a dimmer view of the outlook 
for the economy than the Reagan 
administration has Mlrm 

The report predicted a 3.1 -per- 
cent rate of real growth in gross 
national product this year, down 
sharply from last year’s robust rate 
of 6.8 percent aim lower than the 
3.5-pereent to 4.0-percent rate ex- 
pected by the Reagan administra- 
tion. 

The slowdown will continne into 
next year with an even more slug- 


Chase Chairman Fears Thrift Crisis 

Reuters 

HOT SPRINGS, Virginia — The chainnan'of Chase Manhattan 
Bank said Friday that thrift institutions may be headed for a serious 
crisis that could force the banking industry to come to their aid. 

“I think we have the potential far a very serious thrift crisis,” said 
the chairman. Willard G Butcher, here for a meeting of the Business 
Co uncil. “I don’t think that the banking industry will be able to turn 
tils back on the whole thrift crisis. It’s a major problem." 

The thrift industry lacks the capital seeded to support billions of 
dollars of its assets, Mr. Butcher said. 

But Walter B. Wriston, the former chairman of Citicorp, said the 
industry’s problems would not be serious unless interest rates surged 
to about 20 percent, and he predicted that rates would gradually falL 


gish 2.2-percetn growth rate, the 
report predicted. 

But the Business Council pre- 
dicted growth at a 4.1-perceat an- 
nual rate for this year's second 
quarter, up sharply from the 13- 
percent first-quarter GNP rate. 

American Express Co.’s chair- 
man, James Robinson, who super- 
vised preparation of the report, 
called the disappointing first-quar- 
ter results “a /hike." 

He said that despite the slow- 
down, the United States probably 
would avoid a recession. 

The report blamed the earoected 
sluggish growth on “a large deterio- 
ration in foreign trade.” 

The U.S. merchandise trade defi- 


cit is expected to climb to a record 
$128 billion this year after last 
year's record of more than $100 
billion, the report said. In 1986, the 
deficit should improve slightly to 
$117 billion, it said. 

Nearly all American businesses 
have beat hurt by foreign competi- 
tion, the council said- 
The strength of the dollar, a lead- 
ing cause of the trade imbalance, 
sfculd erode gradually over the 
next year and a half, it said. 

The council blamed the dollar’s 
strength and the trade imbalance 
on the government’s budget deficit, 
which it predicted would exceed 
$200 billion this year. 

Council members differed with 


TWA Vows to Fight Any Takeover Bid by Icahn 


Compiled by Ore Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Trims World 
Airlines Inc. has vowed to “take all 
appropriate steps” to retain its in- 
dependence f oh owing the disclo- 
sure by Carl G Icahn, the New 
York financier, that he owns 2033 
percent of TWA’s stock and might 
seek control. 


and a group of companies he con- 
trols said they hold 6.74 million of 
TWA’s 33 rrnDkm total common 
shares outstanding. 

The SEC filing, said the grog’s 
holdings inducted S.15 million 
TWA shares purchased between 
March 21 and Wednesday at prices 
from $12,625 to $16 a share. 

The filing was disclosed Thurs- 
day after the dose of trading on the 


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TWA’s president and chief exec- 
utive. CJL Meyer Jr. said in a 
statement (hat ^Mr. realm’s pres- ^ I 

eoce is uninvited and undesirable.” 00111111011 ^ tock , ha ? 71 f 

InafilingwithtireSSSd ^ 10 

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dustries Inc. making a proposal fee 


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Major Ai^entme Bank (Josed tlTRf 


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Gold Prices 


] 


Ah aea 

BUENOS AIRES —Argentina’s 
central bank cm Friday dosed one 
of the country’s largest private 
banks. Banco de Italia y Rio deia 
Plata, after rgccting a reorganiza- 
tion plan. 

Tire dosed bank’s president, Joa- 
quin Abentin, told a staff meeting 
ipat bis hunk hM asked the central 
bank for a $42- million loan, a re- 
quest granted but later turned 
down. 

"The news was a surprise for 
me,” Mr. Abentin said, lire central 
bank had intervened a week ago 
and had been discussing a plan to 
continue operations. 

. According to the latest available 
figures, for 1983, the* ■“ ’ ’ 

totaled 126-91 bflKon 
mill in n) and 


profits stood ax 397.78 bfflioa pc- Service reported. Mr. 


SOS. 

. Founded in 1872, the bank has 
88 branches in Ar gentina Five 
smaller banks were liquidated ear- 
lier tins week as part at a reorgani- 
zation that be gan hi April. 

The news of the bank closure 
caused an immediate reaction on 
local markets. The black market 
dollar rate rose to 605 pesos to the 
dollar from 579 and stocks on the 
Buenos Aires Stock Exchange de- 
clined. 

■State Acquires Brazilian Bank 

Brazilian parliamentary o fficials 
said Friday the country’s House of 
Deputies has approved state acqui- 
sition of Banco Sol Brasikaro 
($2852 .which failed three m onth* a go it 
reserves and was reported from Brasilia. 


News 
Icahn is 

chairman of ACF Industries, a 
transportation-leasing concern. 

In response to Mr. Icalm’s fifing. 
Mr. Meyer issued a statement say- 
ing that because of Mr. 1 calm’s 
“known objectives and tactics, his 
purchase of a large number of our 
shares and his threat under certain 
circumstances to seek control of 
the company are disruptive to our 
business and not in the best inter-. 
ests of TWA shareholders, employ- 
ees or the trawling public.” 

Mr. icahn said Thursday that 
TWA common stock was undeva- 
lued, “particularly if Trans World’s 
presently unsettled labor situation 
is satisfactorily resolved.” 


The company is preparing for 
tough n ego t ia t ions with its flight 
at tendan t uninn and its mechanics. 

It will be trying to win major con- 
cessions similar to those recently 
won by Pan American World Air- 
ways and others following a 
month-long strike by the Transport' 

Workers union. 

Analysts have said that one of 
TWA’s liabilities is its high labor 
costs relative to its rivals. Another, 
they said, is its money-losing do- 
mestic network. that TWA’s international routes 

Mr. Icahn said in his fiW that wcrc from $493 million to 
“substantial funds coold be derived S6 34 million, 
by eliminating some of Trans Miss Browning estimated that 
World’s domestic flights and sdl- TWA’s 90 planes are worth about 
mg certain planes.” $1.18 billion. (AP, NYT) 

TWA’s domestic division, 


national operations had a profit of 
$1563 million. This year, the air- 
line expects the international divi- 
sion to do well. 

Some analysts agreed with Mr. 
Icalm’s assessment that TWA stock 
was undervalued. 

Candace E Browning, airline 
analyst for Oppenheimer ft Co, 
said she estimated TWA shares 
were worth about $25 each, includ- 
ing the resale value of the airline’s 
international routes. She calculated 


ly based at St Louis, has been a 
money loser. TWA has dimmaifti 
about 11,000 jobs since 1979 to 
reach its ament employment of 
26,000; its fleet of planes has 
shrunk from about 200 to 162. 

Last year, the domestic division 
lost $121.9 mxQioa. while the inter- 


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and LdUvUteWt Cara current uw l i act. 
M oricts B* IWS per awKB. 

Baum: Rm/tunl ' 


BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 

US$250, 000,000 floating xate notes 1982 doe 1989 


The rate of interest appticahle to the interest | 
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tire reference agent b 
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Gold Options frriMtteSteo. 


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BAe Stock Offer 
Oversubscribed 

Reuters 

LONDON — The British 
government’s sale of its 48-per- 
cent holding in British Aero- 
space PLC was oversubscribed, 
underwriters of the 1468-mil- 
lion-shares issue said Friday. 

Klein wort, Benson Ltd. and 
Lazard Brothers ft Co, two 
merchant banks underwriting 
the offer in which the govern- 
ment is guaranteed $442.8 mil- 
lion, said the allocation of the 
shares, priced at 375 pence 
each, is expected to be an- 
nounced on Monday. 

British Aerospace shares 
dosed Friday at 418 pence on 
the London Stock Exchange, 
having touched a high of 420 
pence, compared with a dose 
on Thursday of 408 pence. The 
offer is on a part-paid basis 
with £2 a share payable on ap- 
plication. 


President Ronald Reagan’s view 
that the country could “grow its 
way out” of the deficit Robert A. 
Bede. chflTTman of Prudential In- 
surance Co. of America, said the 
budget deficit could be cut only by 
reducing federal spending in all ar- 
eas. induding the unUtaiy. 

The councd said inflation would 
remain relatively low. As measured 
by the GNP deflator, inflation 
would rise 42 percent this year and 
4.7 percent in 1986, while the con- 
sumer price index would increase 
by 3.9 percent this year and 5.0 
percent next year. 

The unemployment rate, steady 
at 73 percent for the last three 
months, should slip to 7.0 percent 
by year’s end, then edge up to 72 
percent by the end of 1986, It said. 

On the positive side; the report 
predicted growth this year in con- 
sumption spending, consumer du- 
rable spending, business fixed in- 
vestment, government purchases 
and residential construction. 

■ 3.5% Growth Seen 

Despite weak first-quarter indi- 
cators, the US economy may ex- 
pand by an annual rate of as much 
as 33 percent in the second quar- 
ter, and the inflation rate is likely to 
be less than 4 percent, Roger M. 
Kubarych of the Conference Board 
predicted Thursday, Reuters re- 
ported from Chicago. 


pected Mr. Matthews and Mr. 
Cowpland to reutin roles at the 
company, but would not elaborate. 

The agreement is subject to a 
financial investigations by BT, ap- 
proval by Mitel shareholders and 
regulatory clearance. To secure it- 
self during this process, BT said, it 
had acquired options on about 183 
percent of Mitel's shares. Directors 
holding about 25 percent of the 
issued stock have given BT a proxy 
to vote their shares. 

BT plans to pay 8 dollars each 
for about 373 Bullion new shares in 
Mitrt. On the Toronto Stock Ex- 
change, Mitel shares were sdfing 
Friday at 540 pence after doting at 
456 pence Thursday. 

The capital infusion is needed to 
help retire debts that total nearly 
300 million dollars for a company 
with net assets of 271 milli nn 

BT appeared particularly inter- 
ested in Mitel’s foothold in the 
United Stales, by far the largest 
and most open telecommunica- 
tions market But BT said Mitd 
products are sold in 80 countries 
and that there is scope far vastly 
improving marketing worldwide. 

Sir George praised Mild’s tech- 
nical abilities but said the company 
would benefit from “a slightly 
more disciplined management situ- 
ation." He noted that PABXs play 
a central role in building office- 
automation systems that connect 
computers and telephones. 

BT easily can finance the pur- 
chase, Sir George said, adding with 
a smile: “The petty cash box is 
pretty good this week." 

He said BT would consider more 
acquisitions but would not go on “a 
buying spree." Some analysts ex- 
pect further arable purchases. 

U BT may take time, but it will 
rather aggressively build its busi- 
ness by acquisition outside the 
U JL,” predicted lan Galbraith, an 
analyst at Mackintosh Internation- 
al Ltd. 

In the 1970s, Mitel rapidly estab- 
lished itself as a high-technology 
wonder. Earnings doubled or tri- 
pled each year between 1976 and 
1981. But it has suffered heavy 
losses since 1983. largely as a result 
of its hectic growth, analysts say. 

Long delays in the delivery of its 
new SX-2000 digital switch drained 
Mitel financially and hurt its credi- 
bility. The switch routes voice, data 
and video signals in telephone sys- 
tems with as many as 2300 lines. 

Because of losses, Mitel had to 
curb its ambitious international ex- 
pansion plans. It shelved plans for 
a plant in France, sold a semicon- 
ductor plant in Vermont and 
dropped development of a satellite- 
communications business. 


RESERVE 

■V- INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for the Cautkw tovoscir 
to Prated and Increase Capital 


U3. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by U3. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Marieet Yields 
No Market Risk 
ImnwtSoSe Liquidity 
Absolute Confid en t ia lity 


CHEMICAL HANK. New York 
Cwtocfian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 


RES IN DEP 

Case Pastate 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 


Please Bend 
account 


and 


Name. 


Address. 


N* ntaatfe mHwi Urn USA. 


4 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 




irida^ 

MSE 

Qosbg 

Tables include the nationwide prion 
up to the dosing on wall Street 
and do not refled late trades dsewhere. 


12 Month 

High LOW 


Stock 


Sts, Clow 

OH. VhL PE HXeHtaflUjwQuOl.CnUcl 


12 Month 
Htoti Law 


Stock 


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» Month 
HUh Low 


Stock 


Sis. Close 

Dtv. YIOL PE lOOamomjBwOuot. 01*80 


(Continued from Page 8) 

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17 642 11* 10ft 11* + 

41 2ft 2ft 2ft 

8 144 14 13ft 13ft— ft 

15 198 31 3Sta 30*— * 
49 1056 9* 9 9* + ft 

S 2510 50 57ft 57* 

19 404 Mft MVb 15ft + ft 
17 194 48* <7* 48ft + ft 

14 1038 22ft 21* a + ft 
8 4M 17ft 17ta 17ft + ft 
13 349 24* 23M 34* + ft 
? 3112 25ft am a + w 
is 4M a* a* a*— 1% 

5 49 14* 14 M + * 


Oft Eft SCM 100 44 13 
I2W ■* SVIndS 42 24 10 
» W SPSTec 40 26 14 

S8 BLjU* 

36* 21* SatKfns 
34ft »* Strfewy 
35ft Eta Soso 
221h 16ft SUoLP 
lift 9 $ Paul 

10* vlSoJmr 
Eft 32* SallleM ... _ 

B* Oita SallMpf <oe 76 
Eft inhSOicGS 110 84 . ... 

10ft 6ft SJuanB .906 9J II 1076 9* 8ft 9ft + * 

lift _8ta SJuanR 22 1 1o* i5£ iota 

M 15 TO. 22 s 3314 + * 

84 12 IB 23* 32ft a* 

17 11 2286x 27ft 73 73 —ft 

g" P? Wk 38* MM + ft 

1.1 46 
73 7 

IIU 


346 47* 46ft 47* +1* 
IE II 10ft 11 + ft 

392 Bta 27U 28ta +1* 
9 17* 17 171% + ft 

114 17 lift 17 + ta 

163 16ft lift ICta + ft 
24 84 8ft Bta Ita— ft 

-40 14 a 143 33ft 32* 33ft— ft 
160 54 10 J9d6 31ft 31 a — ft 

62 10 11 280 26ft 26* 2*ta + ft 

tJi b .1 7 2i a* a* a* + * 

140 IM 76 lift 11 11 — ft 

84 5ft 5ft Sft— ft 
M J 1} 1236 30 29* a + ft 

210 53* 531% 53* + ft 
» JIB Uft 25* 26* + * 


51 31 Sondr J6 

25* 18ft SAlktRl 1-94 
30ft 30* SFeSoP 140 
39ft Eta SaroLee 164 
34* 23ft Satwei 160 
ISVi MMSoulbE 
20ft Mft SavElP 
12 9ft SovE Pt 
9ft 4ft Savin 
13* 9* SayhiDl 140 124 


40 

160 

i: 


25 30ft 29ft 29ft— ft 
» M M If — ft 
104 a 20ft 2Dft + ft 
4 lift lift 11* + * 

389 |H 8 CM + ft 

I 12* 13* 12*— ft 


a* 14* S torch! 36 
lift 9* STrIBCP 36 
Bta 23* SfrnlDo U0 
a* 15* ShrwnJ 140 
36 27* StwWm 160 

12 Ita SfkVCpf 140 
45* 32ft StoneW 180 
39 E StoneC 60 
53ft 15 stopsne 1-10 
a* 15* stored 144 
12ft 2 vIStorT 
79ta 37* Stortr 60 
a* 18* StrtAMn 60 b 
18* 14ft StrldRt JO 
aft 3ft sucrvsn 
xm 21ft Sun DM 148 
35* 24ta SunCh 68 
Mft 6* SwiEI 
55ft 49* SunCo 
49ta 34* Sundxtr 
lift 7* SunMn 
34ta 24ft SuprVI 
40* 19* SupMkt 
17* 14 Swank 
21ta 16ft svbron 
35* 2Sta Svbm pf 140 
IS* lift SymsCP 
59* 38ft Syntax 152 
38* 25ft Sysco 46 


_5 Id K71 24* 24* 34* 

26 in 12* lift lift— ft 

rj 7 45* 17 Tdta Id* + * 


77* Eft 77ft +lft 
27ft 27* 27ft— * 


32 13* 13* 13ft + ft 
161 18 17ft 18 + ft 

36 10 723254 S3* 53ta + ta 

46 10 M 32ft 32* 32ft + ft 
<9 10 21S 37* 36* 37* +1 
2J 14 3090 61ft 60ft 61ft +lft 
<1 I d 414 19ta Wft 19ft + * 
2J 11 2B20*2D*20ta + ft 

26 11 103 a* 12* Uta-ft 

so a 19a 4a* 47* 48 + ft 

9 201 !7ta 17* 17ft + ft 

36 9 1164 13ft U* 1«J + ft 

34 11 381 a 28ta aft + ft 

10 II 25 33* 33 33*- ta 

1400114 S 10* 10* 10*— ft 

42 £7 23 3* J* 3* 

19 10 11 19Va Wta 19ft 

M 9 54 10ft 10* 10*— ft 

is i3 8147 a* Bft a 

<3 11 55? 19ft 18* 19 + ft 

56 17 74 28* 28ft 28* + ft 

85 

18 8 
13 18 
15 10 
93 13 

J 

11 


W 


29* a WICOR 240 81 8 3a 2SW 20 28ta + * 

37* a* Wochys 160 17 11 411 37* 36* 37 + * 

25* 16ta WoefcW 60 12 12 11* 18ta + * 

10* d* WCrinoc 433 9ft 9* 9ft— ft 

48* 3«ta WolMrt 48 8 E 200 49ft 4fft 49* + ft 

105 75 WIMrtpf 2 108 106 1M +1 

27* 14* Wutarn i 17 1186 2M 25* a +1ft 

22* 15* WkHRsoWO 59 21* 21* 21* + * 

3*Vix 23* WalCS v 65 U 17 HO 35* 35ta 35* + * 

27 23 WdLbn 160 <0 7 1750 35 33ft 35 +lft 

48ft 29ft MtaHJ pf 160 36 1 45 45 45 +Tft 

28* 17* warm) M 42 U aft a* a aft— ft 

30ta 17 WmCm 11597 29* 28* 38* — 1* 

39ft 20* Mtarnrv 168 11 14 2735 39ft J4V. jy* +Zta 
20ta 14* WOOtlGS 166 8.1 ■ 2G2D*20* 20* + * 

28* 19ft WshMct 1 J8 <] 8 297 25* 26 Sdft + ft 

aft M WWW! 148 1U 8 HI 21* 27 ta 219% + ta 

549% 27* Waste JO 15 18 3262 53* 51* 53ta +1* 

20 WotfeJn 46 15 11 108 24ft 23* 24* + ta 

12ta 4 WeonU 10 9* 9 9ft + * 

23* 12ta WebbO 4De 1.1 13 449 Wft 15* 18ft 

40 29* W9*Mk 40 U 14 18 38* 38 30* 

30* MtalMP 140 <4 8 954 56* 53* 54ta +lft 
.. 40 WelF pf <90eTO3 10 47ft 4tab 47ft 

28* 22* WelFM 250 TOP II 


CL ^7 mJ mi 17* TO* Wendy ■ 4 U 17 dtl im U Idft + * 

US — W 3*M w* wextca 64 14 13 1492Jta22ft2Jta+ft 

10 92U 42.. 42. — ft ft U WMlUnia tl] HVA Ml Ml 


240 

UO 


62 

50 

1J8 


15 12 
14 10 


336 27* Eft 26* 

233 44ft 441% 44ft + ft 
195 19* 19 19 

325 2* 2* 2* + V% 

532 75* 7S 75V. + U 
106 19* 18* 19* + ft 
169 16* 16* Id* + * 
f 5* 5* 5* 

141 34 33* 34 +9% 

83 E 33* E + ft 
434 8ft 8* B* + ft 
491 Bta Sift 51ft— * 
1567 41ft 41 41* 

830 8ft 7ft 81% + Hr 
759 33* 33 33* + ft 

52S 37ta » 39%—* 

9 IS* 13* IS* 

325 If* T7ft 18 + U 

63 32ft a* aw— ta 


24 II 
VI 13 
54 14 
64 10 

18 232 13* 13 _ lift — ft 
12 15 2629 60* 59ta 60* +1 
14 15 300 WC 34ft 34ft— ft 


50* 35ft TDK 
32ft 24 TECO 
13% 7ft TGIF 
IS lift TNP 
25* 17 THE 

Oita SB* TRW 

177% IE TRWpf 460 29 
150 110 TRWpr <50 14 
9* 2* TqcBoOt 
70ft 52ta ToffBrd 1.12 14 14 
um 12 Tolley 45e 4 14 
20* Mft Tolley pf 140 <0 
74 46* Tombed 140 46 14 


47* 4 It 199 42ft 43* 42ft + ta 

236 74 9 1052 a 32* 33 + * 

16 33 11* 11 11 — ta 

145 66 9 240 ft 18 IV +11% 

140 44 M 43 a* a* a* + W 

100 <3 10 1737 71 40ta 69* + * 

5 154% 150% 134ft +lft 
5 OTtal31% 131% 40* 
179 3* 3* 3ft + ta 

364 a* 68ft 70ft +3% 
603 18ft 18* 18* + * 

33 21 20* 20ft— ft 

50 73* 72* 73* + ft 


E WPonPpAJOlU _ 

46% 34ft WUfPtP 240 64 W 5V Eft 35% 35* — % 

12 9ft WstcfT a 144 ft 5 lift lift lift 

6% 2ft VWlAlrV 70 1190 6ft 6% 6ft + ta 

lft ft WtAbrwt 112 1ft 1ft 1ft 

19 8* WAlrpf 240 114 77 18* 181% 10ft 

17% Bft WAlrpf 114 114 84 19ft 18ft Mft— * 

10% 4 WCNA 1058 6* <* dta— ta 

J 51 47 WCNA pf 7-25 MJ 1 49 49 49 — ta 

]l26ta 91ft WPoa 9 3 122 1»% Wft + ta 

25ft 5ft WUlden 2065 9 8* 9 + % 

60 24ft Wnunpf 1 77V. Z7ta Z7ta 

TO WHUptC 1 30ta 30ta 30ta 

V 2* WnU ftffi 45 4 3ft 3ft 

ISM +* WhUPfE 47 7ft 71% 7ft + ta 

20 WUTIpf 24 25ft 25ta 2Sta- * 

TO SVi WUTI pf A 18 0% 8% lft + ft 

22% 19ft WbtsE 140 2J 10 9022 32* 21 ta 32 + * 

41 21* Westvc 122 14 5 380 39 38*38* + * 

34 25 WlOVPrb 1 JO <7 18 3666 25* 27ta 27ft + ta 

44* 34ft WVyr pf 2-80 73 18 40* 39ft 40* + % 

51* 43* woyrpr 450 95 289 47* <7* 47% 

31* 6* vrWhPH 311 7* 7* 7* + % 

_ 18* YtWhPftPf lOOx Td* 14 Id — * 

49% 36* WWrfot 240 46 9 1U4 43ft 42* Ota +1* 
32ta 24% WWfC 150 S3 89036*26*26* + * 
29% 17ft WNfcra II 190 29ft 25ft 29ft + ft 

25* 14* Whtttak 60 25 M 189 24ft 24* 24* 

12* 6* Wlebldt <5 2 9ft 9* 9ft 

14ft 8 Wflfrdn 11 225 lift H* 17ft + * 

31ft 22ft WIBiam W0 <9 7 1122 29 2Sta 26ft— * 

5 2 WUmEl 440 4* 4ta 4ft + U 

9 dta WOshrO .10 M 16 96 7 6ft 7 + tt 

35ft 25ft Win D lx 168 45 13 34 35* 35* 35* 

20% 7ft Wtnnbs .IE 3 12 2648 14 13% 13ft + ft 

13* 5* Winner 45 18 7* 7 7* + * 

7ft 3ft Winter J 35 S% 5* 5% + ta 

35* 25* WbcEP 268 74 8 499 35ft 35* 35* + Ml 


35ft 23* Tandy 
IS* TZ* Tndrcff 
68* 51% Tefctrax 140 
5* 2% Teicom 
382ft 133* TWdyn 
24 13% T wrote 42 

4* aft Telex 
39* 25* Tcmpln 44 
45* 32ft Tenneo 192 
35* a Tnrdvn 
19* 9ft Tmoro 60 
33ft 20ft Tasorpf 114 
40% 31* Texaco 340 11 
41* a* TxABc 152 <5 
46ft 31% Tex Cm 156 47 
E Eta Tex Ext 240 64 9 
57ft 52 TkETpf 6451114 
14ft 25 Texlnd JBb 18 M 
147% 90* Texlnst 248 18 10 
3* 1 Texlrtf 

27% MU T«xOG* .If 14 13 
39 25ft TxPoc 60 14 20 
29* 20ft TexUtU 25 U 1 
5ft 2 Tftxfl In 3X1 

49 a* Textron UO 36 12 1574 50 


14 »a 30ft 30% 30* + % 
13 a 13ft 13* 13ft + * 

13 8 633 40 59 59* + ft 

4 8 3% 3% 3% 

9 292 241* 239* 241 +1* 

W 32 4X7 22* aft 22% + ft 

12 1818 43 42 43 +tft 

14 8 80735*34*35% + * 

44 13 SOM 44% 43* 43* + * 

11 1615 23% 23* 23* + * 

17 a* n in* ioft— * 

94 10 23% 23ft 23% + tt 

E 3027 37% 36ft 37% + ft 

9 4 34% E 34% + * 

4 810 33* 32% 33 — % 

9 534 36ft 35* 35ft— ft 

1 56* 56U 56* + ft 

4a 39 28* 28ft— % 

B’Sftl.M 

WS9 19 18ft 18ft— % 

4 33 32* 33 +1 

2 sb an% 28* 28% + ft 

49* 49ft +1* 


01% 

68% WtaEpI 

850 110 


ldoi ti 

m 

81 

75 

59% WtoEpf 

735 105 


102 74 

74 

74 +1 

26 

23% WtaGpl 

155 180 


2 

25% 25% 

25% + % 

35* 

25ft WbePL 

£64 

74 

■ 

*1 

35 

34% 

34% — * 

34ft 

25% WtacPS 

256 

7J 

■ 

41 

35 

34% 

35 + % 

40% 

Z7% Nitre 

168 

44 

■ 

249 

14% 33% 

34 + % 

15ft 

9% WolvrW 

94 

£3 

3 

84 

10% 

10% 

10% 

27 

18% Wood PI 

m 

17 


567 

21% 

21% 

71% — % 

44% 

32 Wttwth 

300 

<4 

10 

1472 

45% 

44% 

45 + ft 

42% 

44% Wofwpf 

£20 

15 


7 

63ft 

63 

63* +2* 

4% 

2% WrtdAr 




34 

4 

3% 

4 

64% 

48 Wr+Bty 

1J0O2J 

11 

96 

62 

41% 

42 + % 

6% 

3% Wurttxr 




9 

4* 

4* 

4*— % 

18 

10ft WytoLb 

52 

£V 

* 

270 

11% 11 

11 


23ft 17 Wynne 60 33 7 51 10* 18* II* + * 


47* 33* Xenix 340 <1 a an 48% 47* 48% +2* 

52* 45* Xerox pf 565 T 06 7 52* 52* 53* 

a 19 XTRA 64 15 10 137 25% 25% 35ft— ta 


Bft » Textrpf 240 38 3 54* 54* Mft +1* 


4 9ft 9* 

72 24* 23ft 

SZZSSt 


10* 5% Tirade 
E 14ft ThemiE 21 

43* 28* ThmBts IE 38 15 
18* Mft Thomln 68b <8 9 
Eta 13* ThmMed 68 28 * 

2Z% 14 Thrifty 
27* 17 Tldwtr 
10* 4% Userln 

10* 7 Tlgrlpf .. 

57% 33ft Time 140 15 14 2129 54 53* 54 +7* 

M2 48* Tbnl pfB 157 16 1 95* 9S* 95Vj— 1 

23* 12 Tlmpte 17 561 18* Mft 18* +1* 

Sift 34* TtmeM LE 17 IS 1515 50 49% 49ft + ft 

59% 47% Tbnknn 1 JOo 36 14 1E50ft50* 50ft + * 

39ta a* TtxfShp 152 <3 7 19 30ft 30* 30* 

a 14ft Tofchms 6826 11 55 20* » 20% + % 

18% 13ft TdEtfs 19 M6 5 1349 17ft 17ft 17% 


» 34 ZaleCp 

Eft 12ft ZWata 
62* 32 Zayre 
30ft 18% ZenmiE 
a% Mft Zeros 


142 <7 9 156 28* Z7H a + ft 
M US 441 IM UU 13*— * 
60b 6 16 1270 44ft 63ft 63ft +1% 
• 1253 20* 20% 20ft + ft 
52 1J 17 129 10* 17* 17ft— ft 


16028 8 73 M% 14% 14* + ft I 

* S M B j NYSE Highg-Lowa 

1 4i m aS ! +% 

140 15 14 2129 54 52* 54 +1* 


May 10 




27ft 24ft TolEdpf 3-72 K4 
28* 22 Tot Ed Pf 345 M2 
26* » TolEdpf 367 U4 
aft 25% TolEdpf 448 M6 

S tt 13* Tot Ed pf 246 135 
* 13* TolEdpf 19 138 
43* 13* Tonkas 7 

49 IV* TootRnl 68b U IS 
50* 19* Trctank U» 24 14 
107* 92ft TrdJPf 11 490106 
17% 9ft ToraCo 60 26 N 
4% 1 Taaca 
19* Oft Towle 
35ft 25* ToyRUs 


BnfcTr NY 
BayStaGas 
Beirsovfh 
BrttTelpP 
CNA Flm 


CInn Bell 

CwE 840pt 

CflPw440pr 

ConlCarp 

DaytonHud 

OanUnRMc 

DukepfP 

FsfBkSY 


GonRocorp 

GrtAmFsl 
HmeFdlSO 
IP amber n 


JofraJn 


147 26* 25* 2 W— ft 
X 26* 26% 26* 

14 24* E* 24* — * 

'E M 29* 29*— * 

4 17% 17% 17* + * 

8 14* 16 M — * 

418 41ft 40* 40% +1% 

51 49* 48 49* +1* 

511 49* ft* 49* +1 
ft WM0 186* Ud* + ft 
81 15% Uft 15% + % 

642 lft lft 1ft 

9 9% Jft 9ft— ft 

m * .. a 3190 36* 35* 35ft + ft 

aft iftb Tracer X 14 a a » a 32ft + ft 

14* 7ft TWA 4813495 17* 16* 17 +* 

15% lift JWApf 145153 301 15 14* Id* + ft 

27* 16* TWA PfB 245 83 1585 38* IM 27* + * 

»tt 2Eb Tram 164 56 13 464 30% 30 3C* + * 

20 16* Tranlnc 242 1W 14 20ft a 20% + ft 

IH4 lWd TARlty 140 83 M 12 12% 12 12 — ft 

57* JTft Tronscn 116b <1 n 6W S3* S3 52* + ft 

ddta 45V, TVnacpf XS7 4J 4 Ota «ta 48 — * , 

1% TronEx 230 183 179 a* a% 2T%— ft LaoEiV 

Wft 6% Transcn 5 349 9* 8* 9* + ft MO U Res 

93 77 TrGPpf 864 96 1ft 92 19 92 +lft Meredith 

24* 20 TrGPpf 150 106 4 34 23* E NUI Cp 

W* 6ft Trasoti .. 10 61 11* n% 11 % n*wy 

36 * a Tromey 140 55 9 8BI 33* 32% 32* + * NSPy" . 

37* 24* Trnwtd 60 W 11 2351 34* 52% 34* +1* PSAJncOPf 

5* 9» TwjduAA 177 17% 16% 17% +1* PjpBoy* 

Jl* 22ta Twj dpt 7-00 43 a 29% ZPBi 29% + % PMtSn 

17* Mft Ttafdpf 150 114 8 17 16ft 17 + % Pot El __ 

46 Mta Trawler 2 M 4A 10 5431 44* 45* 46* + % RJdlVk* 

54* 50% Trovpf <16 76 117 56* 55* 54% +1% SCAHA 

25* mu Tricon ISJeUO 199 25* 24* 25% + ft SouJbbCcrp 

20* TrtCnpf 2.50 95 1 2d% 24% 2d% TECO 

28% ray Trial nd 60 15 19 W1 24% 36* 2d*— * TaOwypfB 

au ao* TriaPc 1-D0 £7 t 75 Z7* Stf% 27* + ft TeysRUss 

44 24* Tribune 54 U 17 ai 44* 4s* 44 Trave lers 

4 Tricntr 68e 7J 12 1 6ft 6ft 4% HllonEnpf 

5ft Trico 2025 16 22 PS 4* 6% + * UtlnCorp 

21ft 13* Trlntv 50 34 41 13* 13ft 13ft— ft WolMortplA 

24* nu TrtiEna .i» 4« aa 34* 23* 23*—* 

M 8* Trite pf UO 73 118 Mft 13% 13% 

40* 29* TucCP 300 75 10 52340 39ta 39% + ft 

19 14 TwinDi 50 <fl 10 9 16* 14* 14* + % 

41 27* TycoLb J0139 7H35 E 34% + ft 

17* lift Tylers 60 18 7 448 14* 13* 14ft + ft 

t80e 23 8 5090 4f* 46* 47% +2% 

260 75 954 32* a* 33 + ft 

., 18 324 Mft UB Mft + ft 

244 85 10 64 ‘ 

175 116 140x23* ZZ* 23ft— * 

953 10% 9ft W + ft 


AMRCorp 
Alaska AID 
AmGardCp 
AfflGaCD254P AmlntGrp 
Arm kPi ■■■ AmerlcUn 
AmSouBcs AttatyEI 


NEW HIGHS 194 

AafnaLfe AirProd 
AmerCanpf Am Express 
AmGcnICpwf AmGerd PtB 


BametBk 
Sector Dick 


SET 


AmlntGppf 
Ameren 
AVEMCO 
BcnkofVal 
BametBk wf 
SeOl lcira l l 
Stock HR 
BUynUGas 
CfUFedpf 
OrabbCpe 
atlcarp 
CanrNG 
CnpwSNpr 
OrxnrRsdi 
D«fE342pfM 
Dreytbs 
Essex Ch 

__ r FlaEaCst 

PIHOWPOP GTE 2475pf 
GertjerPrds GlbritFto 
HandTmnwi Harcourt 
HomasWFton HeushtMH 
IhPw 1175P IHPwlUfP 



inmoBks 


Umfled 

MGMHmen 


NewEraEI 
NICOR Inc 
NSPW7B4PI 
PocGE 


JafTPBals 
XenfckyUf 
Wm N Fin 
Marlon s 
MoorsCorpf 
NVS04M 
NICOR T90pf 
OcdPPfJ 


PhetoeOSPr 

PopeTaftf POrtGeaEJ 
PrhneMote PubfvcEG 
Roekwlntpt RalOnComn 
Schero Ptoh SberwlnWm 
3unBJcslnc 
TNP Bat 
Textron 
TWA 

Trawlrspf 
USGs 
UtllCQMlP 

Wash WatP 

Wcxdwthpf Xerox Cp 



HM> 


Law 


Open Htoh Lew 06*6 Ow. 


Groins 


331* 134* +40* 
137* 339* +40% 
332 33Hb-40% 


WHEAT (CJT) 

3400 bu ml nkn u rxtoikni per buitM 
4« 122% May 339 % 346 33*ft Wfi* +45* 

ix ns* ju ism 125* 121* 32* +40% 

13% 3-2* Sep 32016 336 122* 125* +42% 

363* 320ft D*c IE 136 

S 3M 

Prey. Day Open hArvufrtt W?** 

CO Wf {CRT} 

540Qtx)mMgnja>-cto0arspertx^*l ^ ^ 

+42 

Ul 273 JU 2-78 279 227ft 229 +01 

12T* 1 68* Sep 180* 269% 260* 249% +40% 

255 160* Dec. £60* 166* 164* 268 +40% 

320 269* Mar 223% 224* 273* 224* +40% 

321* 174* May 228 279% 221 179* +40* 

206 226* Jvl UO 200* 208 180* +00* 

EstSafas Prev.Saies 26281 
Prev. Day Ooen tat W4JT7 off 130 
SOYBEANS (CBTT3 
SJOQbumlfBmum-ilennrsperbaNiel 
757 520* May 544ft 550* KM 


520* May 544ft 550* 544 590* +80 

527 Jul UT U0 5J6* 349* +46 

529 Am 510% 501% 548 591% +48 

SJ1 Sep 558 592 5JM 591 +43* 

5JBM New K0H* £99 £95* £9088 +41 

554* Jan <08 409* 446 £09* +43* 

<08% Mar SJB <31 <18* <20 +41 

<15 May £34* 425 <25* 428 +42% 

834 Jbf <71 631% 830% <01% +H 


Mae 12400 

nut 

12160 12450 

*39 

Jut 

12800 

12900 

12750 

12880 

+90 

Ana 

nut 

nu o 

1»M 

13U0 

*30 


mao 

0500 


0480 


Oct 

13680 

13780 

1K40 

13760 

+60 

Dec 

14200 


141 JO 

14280 





14460 



Mar 

55” 

mao 

15100 

15000 

14950 

15408 

15*30 

*490 

+160 

+£40 


759 

<68 
<79 
752 
729 

^SopraJ?SijSfS,2f , 

SOYBEAN MEAVfCam 
100 t ens dol l ars per ton 
30£» 118.90 

19650 mjo 

1HUJO ts*4n 
17950 129 JO 

uOjd moo 

76440 0750 

waue 140.00 
2X50 14550 

14250 15050 

147M 15850 

gat Softs __ Prev. Sotos 38»3 

Prev. Day Open InL 52677 up USf 

SOYBEAN OJLfCm 
Aaoito+aaorMa-UOio 
34J» 

XU2 
0195 

$2 

2% 

3840 

sS&m 

Prev. Day Open ML 59497 «p452 

S* ISK 5S 

12? 154* Sep 151* 1-9 T-Stt UBM +40* 

ytoy 160* Dec 162 162* 162 162* +50* 

167* 163% Mm- 165* 165* 165* 165* 440* 

Sotos Pryv. Sotos 268 

Prev. Day Open ML 3006 uptz 


2280 

May 

3150 

2200 

3162 

XUS 

+03 

2270 

Jul 

3061 

3055 


3061 

+03 

2250 


2960 

2965 

2900 

2957 

+.17 

2250 

Sep 

2880 

288Q 

2935 

2877 

+.M 

2250 

Oct 

27J0 

2700 

7355 

2750 

+00 

2290 

Doc 

2700 

27.15 

3600 

27.12 

+.1* 

2160 


26J5 

2<8S 

2653 

3678 

+J3 

M60 

2490 

Mar 

-Mar 

3665 

2463 

3603 

2660 

26J0 

+02 

+05 


Livestoclc 


CATTLE <CME) 


4950 

5905 


6000 636C 

6200 

002 

+.92 

6767 

6065 


6355 <40 

<152 

«2S 

+63 

38 

4038 

Oct 

4250 <2# 

6390 

<262 

+02 

6150 

dm 

4180 64A 

<370 

MOO 

+00 

<765 

62.10 

Feb 

<405 <471 

<405 

<470 

+00 

<757 

<350 

Apr 

6560 6569 

6500 

6570 

+00 


Prev. Day Open ML 53818 off 3 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 

«000 B>8. cents per lb. 

7223 6150 May 6555 

7170 4467 Aug 4865 

7£D0 64M Sv 4720 

7222 6435 Oct 67-4B 

7120 4555 Now 

7950 6450 J<yi 8950 

4950 64.10 Mar 

EM. safes 1673 Prey. Soto* 1573 
Prev. Day Open lot 7611 up 147 
HOOSICME] 



YWOOBx- 

emits ft< 
4460 

■rib. 

Jua 

4600 

4700 

4S8S 

4652 

+07 

5577 

4705 


4830 

2S 

4828 

4885 

+95 

5407 

4707 

Ana 

4860 

4800 

4870 

+39 

5175 

4S80 

Ort 

4550 

403 

4567 

44.17 

+65 

SOBS 

400 

Dec 

4672 

4700 

4<70 

4700 

+08 

5000 

4605 

Feb 

4807 

4855 

48H 

MJO 

+.18 

4705 

4450 

A»r 

4560 

4565 

4500 

4140 

+00 

4905 

4600 

Jun 

4750 

47 JO 

4705 

4780 

+60 

4900 

4775 

Jul 




4195 



est. Satot S217 Prev.Satas 82S 
Prey. Day open InL Z4520 up 474 
PORK BELLIES (CMR) 

33000 Riv- cents pwt Ox 


non 

6000 

May 

4170 

6203 

*162 

6205 

+95 

8367 

6155 

Jul 

6300 

MIS 

6255 

<380 

+90 

0065 

6020 

Aua 

6265 

*360 

6205 

<307 

+62 

7*00 

63.15 

Fab 

4995 

7880 

4930 

ns 

+60 

7360 

4400 

Mor 

7000 

7005 

<978 

7877 

+.17 

7360 

7060 

May 

7100 

7U0 

7)00 

7200 

*30 

7600 

7890 

Jul 




7200 

+50 


Est. Sales <835 Prev. Sato* 6534 
Prev. Day Open inf. 11JS5 pfll 


Food 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE] 
37JCO J2x> centsper a. 


TSTWl 

12201 

May 

14305 

14500 

14200 

14450 

+M0 

7490D 

12100 

Jul 

14255 

1445S 

14276 

14486 


U750 

12700 

Sep 

KUO 

14500 

14305 

1*4-77 


14460 

12905 

Dec 

14270 

144, A 

14240 

14475 


U55Q 

me 

Mar 

14200 

14<1S 


IMIS 


14500 

13100 

May 




14301 


14150 

13550 

Jut 




14201 



13273 






+100 

ESL Sola 

1901 Prav. Sales 1944 




Pruv.DavOPcnlnL 13715 aft 19 




fUGARWORLD H (NYCSCE1 





1 J2JKC tbftr cents p«r Tta. 






90S 

293 

Jul 

£10 

£15 

306 

187 

+02 


306 


306 

£26 


331 


905 

121 

Oct 

309 

362 


302 


775 

366 

Jan 

37S 

375 

373 

367 


903 

4B3 

Mar 

<19 

401 

<M 

<13 

+03 



May 

407 

<41 

409 

<35 



<45 

Jot 

463 

<64 

454 

<54 

+04 



Sep 






<57 

470 

Oct 

<M 

04 

<83 

453 



_6J00 Prev. Sale* 7037 





Prev. Day Open let 81.927 up 1.117 

cocoa (irrcscE) 

18 metric ton»-sper ion 


2S70 

7998 

Mar 

3420 

BOB 

3400 

3464 

+99 

2400 

19*8 

Jul 

2140 

2135 

2130 

3345 

+49 

ms 

1987 

Sea 

2008 

2WQ 

2000 

2094 

+32 

2337 

1945 

Doc 

2041 

2055 

2040 

2044 

+22 

2190 

1955 

Mar 

2043 

3BS8 

aoa 

3055 

■MS 


Season Season 
Wob LOW 


Open Htoh 


Lew aose am. 


3065 

W 


2130 1M0 May 

aio 1980 Jul 

EsL Sotos Prev. Sales 380 

PTw. Day Open I rd. 23335 oflAJ 
ORANGE JUICE CrVEE) 

a » 1S5S » » 

May Ml 05 


*15 

*25 


18688 

18240 

10148 


17750 

18130 

15750 


U<13 

14950 


JUl 


1958 
17923 
pu 'Vital see 
Prev. Day Open ml <2 


Sft 


— .13 
—.10 
—as 

+.13 


up! 


m 


Mato Is 


COmi(COMBOl 
25400 tb<i. cents Per #>. 


9UQ 

ftM 


CLIO 

1625 

8620 

■040 

7640 

7668 

7U0 

7020 

7B20 


5820 

6143 

5740 

K7J0 


May «8JD 8630 6390 
Jim 
JOl 


8U0 «T5 6640 
*J2S 8820 «£2S 
£U0 8620 65J0 

5960 Jan- 

5960 MW 8860 6740 
6L10 MOV 6740 <740 
6140 Jot 6760 573S 
6130 Sop 47J0 8800 
6640 Dec 

e^iIS PS— iun 

Prev. Oay Open ML 01694 uP3* 


6640 
67 JO 
6723 
67J0 


6630 

8505 

6550 

8640 

ua 

8820 

6743 

676S 

87 JO 

68.15 


69.W 


+45 


+45 

%s 

+43 

+JH 

+10 


ALUMINUM (COMRTO 
4QJS0 Ito- CETdS PW to 
BN 4760 MOW 



Prev.Salew 390 

Prev. Day Open InL 3407 up 5 
SILVER CG0MB3O 


13130 
14<U . 
T1834 






5530 

May 


<360 

<300 

6345 

5*29 

Jul 

6X8 

4440 

4360 

4415 

.mo 

Sen 

6500 

6525 

6446 

4886 

590 a 

D«c 

<445 

6450 

4480 

4446 

8*50 

Jon 

4490 

600 

400 

6 499 

6070 


4080 

4800 

4770 

<796 

<210 

May 

02 5 

4925 

020 

405 

4350 

Jul 

7800 

7080 

7000 

78U 

<410 


7X0 

7140 

7140 

71X0 

6679 

Dec 




7305 

7359 





737.1 

7410 

Mar 




705 


12154 
11930 
KM80 
9454 
9404 
-7994 
7094 
7614 

EsLSatos ” Prew.Safts 19.162 
Prev. Day Open he. 73611 up 817 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trov az- dottors per tray n. 


27140 27740 210150 37SJ0 
27750 TOM 20490 2MJ0 


- • 27190 

38740 25148 Jun 

44958 3040 Jul 

39100 25040 Oct 

37150 36000 Jen 

EsLSatoe UK Prev.Sotos 1236 
Prev. Day Open tat 1UR up2 

palladium arms) 

100 tray aa- del I arse to ox 

11450 11140 Mew 

15950 M8JD . Jon 11150 11825 

14125 10625 SOP 1T3J0 11323 

14150 1OS30 Dec 11250 11340 

12750 10650 MOT 11325 1U2S 11333 11113 

Fit Into! 490 Prev.Ootae 564 
Prey. Day Open InL 7277 up40 
OOLD(COMKX) 

M0 troy ox^ del tore p er li u y ca. 

32740 29240 MOV 31540 31540 moo 3M20 

51840 21740 Jun 33440 31850 3040 31750 

Jul 31958 

29160 Aim 31640 32230 31750 32168 
27740 Oct 22280 325J0 22156 3B40 
30150 Dec 32820 331 50 32671 330.* 
Feb 33250 33500 33250 22500 
Apr 33950 

Jan 34600 34440 34640 3*520 

Ocf 38540 35S0D 3SSJ0 35650 

Dec SUM 

Est Softs 33800 Prev.Sotos SUM 
Prev. Day Open lntniB2 opU7l 


*03 

*0S 

410 

+15 

+U 

-HA 

+W 

+U 


iSS 

S3 

-M6B 


+018 


3M3B 
43330 32050 

42860 31140 


Flnondal 


US T. BILLS OMNO 
WwilUlim pUMTWpcL 


9254 

87.14 

Jun 

*£33 

9238 

S3 

9233 

+03 

9157 

8654 

Sep 

9157 

9150 

9188 

+06 


BUT 

DOC 

9153 

9154 

TIM 

9151 

+07 

fl.W 

8668 

Mor 

91.19 

9123 

91.1* 

91.19 

+06 

*891 

1701 

Jan 

9053 

*053 

*053 

*894 

+06 

*064 

■BOB 


9074 

9874 

9874 

*875 

+06 

*033 

001 

Dec 




9856 

+08 

*au 

058 

Mar 




*038 

+06 

Ext. Sates 


Prev. Sale* 4554 




Prev. Day OP« InL 4M39 up 56 
It YR. TREASURY (CVT) 
sioaooo nrtn- Pto lOMSM MOpcI 

83-17 TO-T Jan 13-30 KHB 83-14 

BUS 7518 Sep till 8+30 81-14 

■0-23 7S-U Dec VO- 23 81-1 H60 

808 75-14 Mar 80S EM M 

7*34 7+38 Jun 

Esf. Sales Prew.Safts 11685 

Prnv-OayOpenlnt 4S.U0 off LOU 
US TREASUET BONDS (CET) 
n PcHnmaeoptoA 32ndsef HO pri) 

77*15 57-30 Jun 7233 73-1 7M4 

7+2 57-10 Sep 71-21 71-30 7+12 

7+5 57+ Dec 7*21 71-1 70-13 

72-30 57-3 Mar C948 70-5 8*19 

70-16 56-29 Jun 6038 49-U 1+27 

7M 5+29 Sea <041 6*33 

*9-34 5+23 Dec 67-18 

49-12 S+Z7 Mar 

IM 43-12 Jim 6644 67 6+M 

48-34 43-4 Sep 46 66-17 46 

664 <3-24 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev.SataslTMOO 

Prev. Doy Open 4X236469 KP1BZ2 
GNNIAICETl 

S7DB400 Prin-nfsSi 3Ms at TOOpct 


S346 

81-27 


40S 

+25 

+2S 


7*u +a 


Open HI0f> L«r 



■sss: vr 

eijo HA 

8S BS & 

ss y 

8*55 RM 
3927 8720 

BEsapS^irUi » 

15350 147 35 Jim UZM ‘-gs UUQ 12225 

iss iss as »woSS«»uh 

5ST ijSS 

Prev. DOW Open In*. 

CANADIAN DOLLAR «MM» 

"5£to^ T,, NSrAM^SS* 32St JOl sn& 
305 ff! ma was J3W 2223 

« jg Sw S« m ” 
m 

atari* -Asn Prew-Sriw iffQ 

Prev. Dor Open InL ILJM eH3to 

FRENCH FRAMCHMM) 

:J5S SSS B SR_ 

EstSdno l Prev.Sotos 
prev. Day Open ML 1.K7 
GERMAN 86ARKCMAW 

3?i Ctoc ^ 

Ss2oSSS?mt. 40560 UP1J42 
fper yen-1 CTiaW 9Mm BUm 

SKJSSfflSSSBS 

ftS^m'^LlS Pn^Srift SM 

prev. Day Ope n ML K5U upLIM 

SWDS FRANC (1MM) 


. 

Ok. 



2232 


222* 5254 

S SR 


OOfUO 403870 


itngatoj wfi tijMbNaoi 


XC2 300 Jft? 


6340 JS31 Dee -3895 9905 3 070 

6000 2825 MO T 

UL Softs U4M.Prev.fcft* 1*594 

Prev. Day Open InL 2SJ4* alf 135 


3S 


ts 


+16 

+17 

+14 

+M 

• r' 


-—10 


% 

r. 

+14 

+13 


IhduRtriolE 


LUMBER 

130400 tod. 


1*750 

an 

10740 

MS40 

17040 


*r M950 MUD 149.16 

mo jn Jul usm lff“ 15680 lS» 
5* ito> iSS 157 JO 15640 15620 
E*g SZ UUD !SJ? 15560 15630 


14640 Jon 
15M0 Mar 


m5 14140 

|RȣS| 


?S3S 


161J0 
.10 147-19 


US 

+160 

+1J0 


praw. Day Open tnt. 8JB2 »W 




COTTON 2 (NVCn 
1M0 lb** onto per lft 

7995 4U5 Jul 

7750 4443 Oct 665S 

7340 *03 Dec 

7535 6595 Mar 

7040 4*40 May 

7045 £4.17 Jxri MM e* 

H 9i s e ns Ocf 

EsI. Softs 340Q Ptm. Softs £382 
prev. Day open ml MM ofio* 


ISJ4 8622 6650 4£» 


6535 

6620 




4665 6620 4628 


HEATING OILCNYMU 


4£H0 oaf- caateMT aal 
7860 63J0 Jun 

7160 

7530 

6535 

Jul 

7835 

7530 

682S 

AM* 

7870 

7865 

7825 

SOP 

7US 

77.10 

7130 

Oct 


7455 

7350 



7825 

7280 

Dec 


7*50 

7550 

Ml 

Feb 

Mar 


7400 

7400 

Apr 


EMSatas Prev. Sate#. 

Prev. Day Open- tnt. 16007 off 2 


7165 


7140 

7125 


22 

6940 

7048 


7097 

6*27 

1*57 

70JQ 

S2 

7U» 

7630 

7420 

7320 

TIN 


sf 

3 


CRUDE OILOMYME) 

1400 M>L- dottors per btoL __ 
2955 3628 Jan 2720 

954 3610 Jul 27.B 

2957 3625 AOO 




2950 

2950 3640 Now 26J9 BUV 

2*50 XL90 Dec 3<M MAI 

Est. Sates Prev.Sotos 17606 

Prav.DavOpoa ML SUB up OH 



Stock IndEXi 


7M0 
7M8. 
TOGO 
M 
60-11 
4+22 
4M 67-1* 6W 
67-17 
67 

66-17 


79-25 

57-17 

Jim 

7V4 

710 

7M6 

70-31 

70 

59-13 

tar 

IM 

70-15 

IM 

20-7 

69-3 

594 

Dec 

<9-16 

6+26 

6+14 

49-1* 

*8-24 

5840 

MOT 




Ml 

664 

58-25 

Jun 




48-18 

<7-28 

65 

Sap 




« 


EsLSafcS Prev.Sotos _ 

Prev. Day Open InL <342 up22 
CENT. DHPOSfT(UWM) 
nmiuian-pisarinpcf 
a 57 BSJ0 Jim 9125 9154 

*U3 >540 Sep *152 *152 

*020 8554 DOC 9824 9024 

9028 MJ6 Mor 9057 9057 

0993 8167 Am *002 90X0 

8*53 S7J6 S*P 0944 89J4 

8859 8834 DOC 

Est. So to, Prev.Softn ■ H6 

Prev. Day Open InL 5561 up« 


+» 

•HI 

+ 2 * 

+29 

+29 

+00 

+31 

+31 

+31 

+31 

+31 


*0 


9LM 

*021 

9857 

*047 

0994 


9LM 

98JB 

9029 

9047 

•924 

8*51 


■Ml 

+46 

+J7 

+43 

+JB 

+52 

+51 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMS) 
urintsandonti 

ss -us & -aMB- 

EsLSatoe 4*271 Prev. Soft* 48086 
Prev. Day Open ML 54436 off 08 - 

vauh urn nccarn 



1T9J0 '17340 JIM 19640 1+950 M4f T9Utf +173, 

a lx nus Sep mS MOJO aoS2o mi; +*» 

2HJ0 30040 Doc _ SffiB ++.!•! 

Est Sotos Prev. Softs _4J73 

prev. Day Open InL £ZM mi 170 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFB) . ... 

Jun 10650- BUS H*5S NBM tOf #) 

v»» mS §£■ no At moo 7$fcS: 

11566 H9J0 Mar IIOD IUN 11440 11680 +Uf 


Eft. Softs K174 Prev.Sotos 10468 
Prev. Dav Open InL RS46 qff71 


CommocSty Indexes 


Moody's. 
Routars. 

DJ. Futures. 


. . . Ctoso Ptovhus 

92250 1 919501 

TAiS.OO 157X90 

— — . 12143 121J7 

Com. Rasaardi Bureau. 238.90 22800 

Moody “s : boso 100 ; Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Routers : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Oow-Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


London Commodities 

May 10 


S? 

DOC 

Mar 

S? 



US 1X8 1295 1405 


TafiBrdcst 


TWA 5 

TMCnnf 

UnfebnCe 

VendoCa 


4946 57% UAL 
34* 24% UAL of 
IS* 7ft UCCEL 
24% 16% UGI 
34% 19% UGI of 
11M 3* UNCRes 


Acme Elect 
GtabMarpf 


KatorAIS7of 

MyersLEn 


Geneealnc GiebMar 

LstlVeS p<A 


Unlrayalpf 


M 1° H 1 * 5 - 60 30 U 20 17* 11 11* + * 

34 17ft U5FG 131 66 214 Mil MV> 33% 34* +1 

35ft 22ta USGs It! U i 1213 16 34ft M + % 

,19% H UnIFref 2 16 11 a Uft 13* 13% + ft 

182* 75 UnlNV 3J5e 18 10 744 100% 99* 10014 +1* 

41* UCtxnp 164 48 10 1849 3Sta 34* 34% + * 

57% 32* UlCorb £40 85 9 9726 88% "" 


7% 4ft UntonC 
18% 12 UnEtoc 123 9A 
30 21 UnElpf SJB 122 

aft 24% UnElPfMUO HI 
25«b 18% Uneapl 20a 125 
18% 13% UnEInf £13 124 
40 45 UnElpf 764 >25 

Slta 34* UnPoc 1J0 
112 83 UnPCPf 723 


20 ft 9ft Uniravl .18 5 U 

» 52 UnrytPf 850 152 

... 3* Unitor 133 

18% 10* UtiBrnd IS 

15% nu UBrdpf 
40 20% UCMTV .14 6 £2 

32ft 22% UnEnrp 268 <1 20 

17ft 9 UltUm 250 111 3 

28ft 19ft UltlUPf 357 169 


51 5ft 5ta S% 

7a 18* 18 18 — ta 

5Qz27ft 27ft 27ft 
149 30ft 30% 3Mb— ta 
35 24ft 24ft 24ft + % 
17 17% 17ft T7ft 
70Q x £3 41% £3 + ft 
35 12 3366 51% 51 51* + ft 

45 80 112 111% 112 


19 15 

487 39% 39* 39ft 

551 30ft 30* 30ft + % 

316 15ft IS 15* + ta 

43 20% 26 26ft + ft 


Soles Reures ore unotHgot Ycprlv n lefts and lows reflect 
»ba pre yloua 52 weeks sHus the current week, but not the 
latest trading dav. Where a split or stock dividend 

bnoifflIW to 25 aer-CMH nr mom has been veto, me ream 

hletv-Ww range and dividend are shown tor the new stock 
only, unless Otherwise noted, roles at dividends are annual 
disbursements based on the l atest aedoratlon. 

0— dividend aiscextra(s>. 

|b— annual rate of dividend plus stock dividend. 

, j— Uauidafine dividend, 
cld — trailed. 
m- now yearly tow. 

dividend drdored cr paid In precedlns 12 memtiA 
dividend In Canadian funds. suMcct Is 15% non- 
residence tax. 

L- dividend declared otter sallMra or stock dividend. 

1— dividend paid this year, omitted, deterred, or no odton 
taken al latest divWend meeting. 

K— dividend declared or paid mis rear, an occumulatlve 
issue with dividends in armors. 

n— new Issue In the post S3 weeks. The Me Mow ranoe 
beahw with the Oort at trading 
nd— next day delivery. 

Pi E— Pric e -earnings ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 manta, plus 
Istockdiwdend. 

slock split. Dividend beolns with date of split. 

..-sales. 

t— dividend Paid In slock In preceding 12 manihs. estimated 
cash value an ax -dividend or ex-distribution dole, 
v— new yearly tifgh. 
v— iradina hotted. 

vh— In baiUtruntcv or receivership or being reorganized 
under the Bankruptcy Act. or securities assumed by such 
com oanles. 

jwd~ when distributed. 

|wi — when iss ued. 

with Murrains. 

..I— ■* -dividend or ex-rlgftts. 

Rais— ex-distruiutian. 
without warranls. 

— e* -dividend end sales in lull, 
vid— wield. 

— soire In toll. 


Pobl Gies News 
Unsettling Market 

/tenters 

LONDON — The Hood of instant economic 
news now available to world f inancial mar lritt 

i4s«x a* so* a*! + % | should be weighed more carefully to avoid hasty 
u 4* uft is + % | reactions that sometimes (resettle foreign ex- 
Jffi + changes, the president of the West German 
central bank Karl Otto Pohl said Friday. 

Mr. P5hl said some of the information was 
highly provisional and of only limited value as a 
pointer to economic trends. Yet sometimes such 
data led to wide swings in exchange rates and 
made it more difficult for authorities to formu- 
late policy. He called on markets to sift the 
information more carefully. 

A ddressing an annual Reuters lunch, Mr. 
PObl said that the rapid growth of news distri- 
bution was having a substantial impact on the 
f inancia l world, with repercussions comparable 

to those caused by the introduction of the steam 

engine or motor car. 

“It cannot be denied that the flood of infor- 
mation may also unsettle the markets and thus 
make some policy decisions more difficult,” he 
said. “The sharp exchange rate fluctuations are 
a proof of this.” 

The Bundesbank president noted that curren- 
cies now fluctuate far more sharply than had 
ever been dreamt of under the old Bretton 
Woods system of fixed exchange rates. 

Erratic dollar swings unleashed by recently 
published data on U.S. economic growth in the 
first quarter of this year — a downward revision 
to an annual rate of only 1 J percent — showed 
that markets failed to appreciate the highly 
provisional nature of the figures, he said. 


Htob LOW BM Aik BW 

SUGAR 

i pot metric toa 

9720 9500 9560 9580 *648 *500 
10160 9800 9*60 99J0 98A0 9800 
10500 HHJ0 10680 10500 10600 18600 
11860 115J0 11600 1I6JB 11840 11500 
N.T. N.T. 12100 12200 12000 12050 

N.T. N.T. 12600 12700 12500 1 

N.T. M.T. 13700 13300 13000 13160 
Vbluma: 1049 tots of 50 tort*. 

COCOA 

S BwB w pypigh+ctoB 
May 1933 U00 1J29 1J23 1297 1299 

Jly 1971 1939 1J49 1570 

JJS4 U25 1J43 1J46 
1JC7 1284 1298 1J0O 
1 J06 1285 1J94 L796 
N.T. H.T. U06 1J20 
Jly N.T. N.T. 1588 1, — 

Volume: 3J12 loto of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Storibti ppt airtic lex 
May £106 £090 £102 Zlffl 2095 £0*7 

jly £167 £147 £U4 £147 £154 £154 

Sep 2207 2J89 £203 £287 2,1*1 £^ 

Hoy 2240 2224 £238 220 2230 2225 

Jan £254 2 345 7355 2 340 220 £24* 

ft 

Vpiurmi 1212 tots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

UJl dal tars pot BMtrle too 
Jto 71850 21525 Z1S25 215J5 21650 21623 
Jly 27725 2K73 21675 21800 21850 21875 
Aug 21825 21635 21425 21AJ5 21700 21725 
Sam 22000 21150 71858 21925 21850 21875 
Oct 22000 22800 21850 22100 71900 22200 
180V AT. N.T. 21850 22400 22100 22600 
Dec N.T. N.T. 22200 22800 22300 22900 
Jaa N.T. N.T. 21800 23000 22£00 23300 
F*b XT. XT. 21800 23000 22200 23600 
Voumw : *94 tots ollOO tans. 

Sources: Revtorsmd London Petrotaum Ex- 
chonoa toasotn. 


London Metals 

Hay 10 


90850 

926301 


M J “ k BW A 

ALUMINUM 
Starttas per melriclon 
WO» 9OS0O 90700 *0750 

torword 92650 92500 92850 

COPPER CATHODES Oflgb Grade) 
®*nin9 pw umMc ton 
«« l&sm 1927000 7e3n7jO IpSIOjOO 

forward 1.72800 142900 U3L08 1^700 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sleritaa per metric ton 
spot 13X50 103800 US0O 7 <22700 

torword 1,21500 101700 102100 1,723,00 

LEAD 

staritoa per omMc too 

■Pri . 38000 30100 30258 38300 

torword 30800 30600 3045D 30500 

NICK EL 

Starting par metric ton 
W . <»» 6S8S0O <45000 <46006 

torword <47800 467800 <44800 <450100 

SILVER 

Peacn par troy eenc* 

H5* _ SF 10 S 11 - 09 S 1 '-® 51350 

torwgrd SUO SBOB 53900 53000 

TIN (Standard) 

Staritag pgr Metric tan 

Bet 954500 957800 953100 952200 

torword 954500 *55800 953800 95000 

ZINC 

Starttoc per metric top 
Pri . mOO 64100 44750 

torword <7850 67900 68500 

Source: AP. 


ffiS 


UA Treasury Bffl Rates 
May 10 


3-mertm 
6-raantk 
One year 


Offer 

BN 

YtaM 

Ptey 

YtaM 

73* 

732 

UB 

796 

m 

796 

13* 

836 

IM 

80* 

10 

871 

iBMtiert 





— AM Cfpe 

SUGAR 

Fraraji francs per metric too 
Aua 1567 1555 1555 1J63 +8 

Oct L278 1570 1570 1350 + 

One 15W 1518 U09 1515 +17 

Mar 1580 1060 1565 1573 +11 

May XT. NT. 1610 1,430 +13 

toig XT. XT. 1670 1683 +« 

BA voU 400 lota of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
satae: 1687 tots. Oxen Merest: 16971 
COCOA 

FYeack (react per IM kg 
MOV £165 £150 2J50 £170 +36 

Jly XT. XT. £1*0 — +20 

Sep £M5 2,130 £137 £145 +17 

Dec 2080 2070 2065 2075 +□ 

MCft- XT. XT, 2048 2080 +28 

MOV 2073 2070 2075 — +2D 

JIV XT. XT. 2075 — +20 

.a='gi^o£SfitaV~- ““ 

COFFEE 

Freaeb francs per IN kg 
MOV £ 470 2670 £438 £475 

Jly 2505 £505 £488 2512 —IS 

2545 £5*5 £542 2570 +3 

25M 2JM 2583 £588 +M 

N.T. XT. £550 2A70 +15 

ft U:T: £?: S «5 =. 

Source: Booroettu Oon u narea . 


Nov 



Price JOB 

See 


Jaa 

Mo 

Dec 

30 

239 

£91 

138 

807 

848 

077 

31 

158 

23* 

26* 

831 

075 

10* 

32 

8*1 

165 

£14 

052 

1.12 

163 

33 

860 

U8 

MS 

UB- 

163 


» 

814 

183 

131 

185 

225 


15 

ao* 

056 

UB 

235 

£» 

10* 


Crits: Tkun. vot 730 open tot 47JU8 
Pets: Thera, voi. 3981 eeea tot 3L213 
Source: CM£. 


Madiinists Ratify 
Eastern Contract 

United Press International 

MIAMI — The 12,000-member 
machinists onion at Eastern Air- 
lines has ratified a revised three- 
year contract, clearing a major ob- 
stacle to continued operation of the 
debt-troubled U& airline: 

A spokesman for the Miami lo- 
cal of the International Association 
of Machinists said late Thursday 
that balloting at Eastern’s stations 
nationwide Thursday totaled 5,276 
votes accepting the contract and 
3J64 votes agamst — a 61 -percent 
approval. 

eastern officials hope to have 
agreements with two of its three 
unions by next Wednesday. Its 
lenders have said if the airline can- 
not get labor agreements by then, 
Eastern will be in technical default 
on its S2J billion in loans — a 
status that would maV** it okxb 
vulnerable to actions such as in- 
creased interest rates or the imme- 
diate ca llin g in of some of its loans. 


I Paris Commodities 

■ Asian Commodities 

j Cash Prices 

May 10 

| May 10 

| May 10 

Commodity and Unit 

Fri AbT 


U5J I 


mo* .'ST. 

Jun — XT. 
Jly— XT. 
Aug - N.T. 
Ocr _ xt. 


QoM 


Prtrioug 

lbv eg ask Bid Ask 
XT. 31200 31400 31400 3*00 
N.T. 31 300 31500 31500 31700 
XT. J150O 31700 31700 31900 
XT. 31700 31900 31900 37108 
N.T. 32200 32600 32500 

Dee _ 32800 32800 32700 32900 32800 33000 
Fob - 33200 33200 33100 33308 33300 33800 
Art- N.T.JER. 33400 33800 32800 34800 
uptamg; JB tota of UDoz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJjperooocp ^ 

Ktob Low' Settle Settle 

jun 316*0 31450 31400 31550 

AUO XT. XT. 31ILB0 31950 

SOP XT. XT. 33080 331.90 

Votome: 104 lota of TOC az. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mukiyikui cento per kno 


Jun. 

Jly. 


19225 
1*625 
19755 

sep 19800 

volume: 12 lota. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
rum 



RSS1 Jun_ 
RSS 1 Jly— 
RSS2Jun_ 
RSS3Juo_ 
RSS4Jun_ 
RS55Jtm_ 


Bid 

16850 

17055 

14800 

16400 

16200 

15700 


16*00 

17075 

16*00 

16700 

16400 

15900 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MMoyatan rtaorinrer as tons 


Prevtoas 
BM AM 

16755 167J3 

14955 16975 

167 JU 16800 
16500 lT_l 
16100 16300 

15600 15800 


OeJ . 


Jan 

Mor 

Votuma: O lata at 25 tans. 
Source: Reuter*. 


1680 

1090 

uoo 

1000 

U90 

1,180 

1.158 

1.140 

1.140 


Al k 
1530 
1630 
1040 

J03O 

1000 

1.190 

1.180 

Liao 


Pr ovlon i 

i^. & 

1005 1045 

1.195 1035 

M65 1005 

1.155 1,195 

LM5 1.185 
L145 1,185 


rf Dividends 


May 10 


Co mpany 


Per Amt Pay 
STOCK SPLIT 


gnetnnat i Microwave— 3+dr-I 
erktotrarUc* fnc — 34or-2 
power Carp (Canada) — 2-for-l 

INCREASED 

Scott Pauar Ltd Q .n 7.31 7-17 

OMITTED 
Find AmarlHa Bancora 
OtolialMorbie 


USUAL 


Allen Organ 

Anthony Indud 

Coca-Cola 
Crown ZeOerftocfi 
CulbraCarp 

asaf - ** 

Groltom Core 

Guardsman Otem 

latl Flavors Frag 
135 inn Six 
IU inti 

Locona Mining • 

Landmark BkNn 
Unrein Notional 
Louisiana Land 


1 Bancorp 

Moore Pradwcto 
MW* indcntriei 
N«tsa Brandi 
P«m Engln 8. Mtg 
SaUne 

Core 

Singer Cq 
5u«rt*ta-jr Starao 
Triton energy 
Tumor Care 
U« Energy Res 
Wlnnebaao Indus 



^aoual, MMralMy; <+Quartartr; S4MU- 


Source; UPt. 


CoHaa SSamas, I 

PrintctoHi 64/30 38 %, vd _ 
SleothHtota lFmj.ton_i: 

Iren 2 Pdry. pmm. Ion 

Start^yN Ql’RvyPItr: 

CQpper alert . IP 
Tin ISIrutu.ib. 


UB 

063 

47100 

21300 


Zina E. St. L. Ba*tL to . 
Paitaflunvaz — ■ 

Sliver XV. « mzn 
Source: AP. 


IM 
OJO 
453.00 
21300 
ram 100-101 
20-21 25-» 

49-72 70%-71 
<6709 <3737 

066-67 052-03 
1TO lS2ta 

<32 B-nyy 


I SAP 100 Index Options 

I May 9 


Strtti 

J* Am 
i£ 

s a & a * 

US I/M Hi 17/142* 

S:S«!:: 

IMMutoi 1X19 . 

NU7UZ2 


WM 17752 Lee 17SJS 
Source: COOK. 


Mot job Jt* M 

- — - T/M — 

- 1/14 ta S /16 

1/1* H VU on 

« m I* 21/14 

3% J* 4 4V) 

7*s ra * - 

BM- “ “ 


117762+169 


EPA Says Smog in U.S. j 
Continues to Dedioe 

Las Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Air poflu- 
tion in the United States continued 
an eight-year decline in- 1983, ac- 
cording to the Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency's annual air quality 
review, but officials said two prime 
components of urban smog — 
ozone and nitrogen dioxide — 
showed signs of increasing. 

The results, released Thursday, 
suggested that some pollution con- 
trols may be reaching their peak 
effectiveness and that air q ualify 
will begin deteriorating unless 
“tough, maybe disruptive and diffi- 
cult” new curbs are imposed, the 
EPA said. J 


Dutch Inflation Up Sligjhtty 

Raaen 

T 1 ^.. HAGUE — The Dutch 
cost of living index rose 13 percent 
in the year to mid-April after a 14- 
Pjrcrat rise in the year to mid- 
March, according to economics 
ministry figures. 


ToOur Readers * 

Floating Rates Notes were not 
available in this edition because of 
computer problems. 










i« i* 

» 5*; fi« i *i 

'* £5 


Hfcw (|"l 

s^xr-** * 


IS S :^;r>,w 

ffl !« '4:35 

,f f 'S 

f ^WS,' " 

£ *s 3 s > 

A J '’" ' S > 

se&"£ * " 

SR. a 

(Mft< thu , v 1 


It ■. - The Aaodaud Press - 

DETROIT— Ford Motor Ox is 
looking for global affiances that 
would, allow the automaker to 
toove & larger portion of its manu- 
f pMurin g abroad, its. chairmao, 
DooaW Peteraco, sad. • 

He-tdd stockiwldeK Thursday 


of Japan, which is ! 25-percent 
owned by Ford. Mr. Petersen 000- 
-fizmed that Ford also wH export 
cars to the United Spates from a 
plant it is bttihfing in Mfisaco. 

Bihdespkeiecaid profits of £L9 
bffium last year. Fora is vulnerable 
to the rising level of drcaper. Japa- 
nese-made cars exported to the 


trial Cb. of Soon Korea. 

In addition; Ford Is tncreasfag 
Jjjmness with Mazda Motor Corp. 


tition from Sooth Korea, Mr. re- 
tersen said. - 
Ford is woddng with Mazda on 


ifct- J'.’ Si § 

* 

w'c-^sasfe 

\?t V* S 

*hk-u«m> 5 

I? 5C 5? 


SBC to Qpm Frankfurt Unit 


V- Raadt miltiAn) . The hank wonld start 

ZURICH — Swiss .Bank Corp., -orating toward the end of das year, 
Switzerland's second-largest bank, subjeet to tbe approval of anthon- 
Mtd Friday that it was pTaranrng m ties. - ... 

isi^asiwadtaiyinFr^^ Theiew bank wffi offer a range 

'new im&atkai that Swiss banks are <rf customer services indndiiig 
i 4ymg.attra c tcd to W^ Germany. - credit 1 ^transactions, foreign «- 
\7 Tbe Brsdbased bank aid its cfaang&daafipft i pv Bi n > i mt coun- 
.ded ao n was based on the size and sefineimd portfolio management, 
c woridw ide importance of the West alwSl ^s stai cxcfaangeiiansao- 
SGennan.. economy, and. was rein- 60ns . and capital mmtrf business, 
forcedby the relaxation this month Swiss BankCorp said. 
oftondal mte % the Bund®- - ^ M ^ 

r&icEt SuUsr raid t»o months 

teas . s&assa*^ 

§W- ■ 

^The Bundesbank announced last COMPANY 'NOTES 
month *hnt foreign banks legally 

Sridentin the country could par- Acfariry Co g reM cad o os W 
^ititapate in the fa e r tt u ve onderwnE-. reportal reaching agreement to 
v£ng of Deutsche mark-denonrinat- boy ratio stations KSGO and 
ed Eurobonds, which had KGON-FM in Portland, Oregon, 
tjevioosly been hunted to West gTr-hnno in g 600,000 common 
German banks. gh^ »y*ffw nn tgtahrfrntr yan ants 






UCttflt 


»S« £ 

iKhvr.ik 

SE s *£ 2? 3> 

■ 5e a 53 a gs 

3* ;'S -« S2 S; 

• M iNVMt' 

■K i; ?? ^ 4| 

S* W ■■ .* 5£p 


Swiss Bank Corn's assets, ex- 

..S' ' V - ■ ra^^raJ ra. 


fy owned by Mazda. Ford carraulv 
builds Ma^adesigned cais in Tai- 
wan and Mr. Petersen said that 
connection also could be tapped in 
the future. 

Yamaha, known primarily as a 
motorcycle maker, wfll design and 
build a 3.0-bter high-performance 
engine for Ford's new line of mid- 
aze family cars, the Ford Taurus 
and Mercury Sable. 

The Hat connection was less 
dear, with Mr. Petersen tWtintng 
to say whether Ford and Hat 
would build cars or pans together 
or enter into seme other business 
arrangement He told rep o rter s 
only that “informal discussions" 
have Been held. ' 

Ford is Europe's No. 1 car sales 
company and Fiat is No. 2. 

**We are going to do evoytlnng 
we possibly can to see how much of . 
this production we can kero in this 
country," Mr. Petersen said. 

He also made two major technol- 
ogy announcements. Feed has ac- 
quired a S20-mQ]km equity and re- 
search interest in American Robot 
Corp. of Pittsburgh, which special- 
izes in computer-integrated manu- 
facturing, and will join with Gener- 
al Electric Co. to bufld electric 
motors in a high-technology fac- 
tory at a site lobe determined. 


>Ut AGA SeeksWtc 
moty QfTodFbmin 
j£l $331-MBknBid 


Cadbury to Purchase Sodastream 


Hewers - 

STOCKHOLM - AGA 
Group, the Swedish gas con- 
cern, said Friday it wifi seek to 
raise its stake in Uddehohns-. 
AB, the tool and power compa- 
ny. to at least 90 percent from 
about 50 percent is a transac- 
tion pot at 3 bpoo kronor . 
(S33L8 nriflion). 

AGA's president, Marcos 
Stordt, said die company bad 
ma/te an offer to buy all Udde- ■ 
holms shares. He said payment 
would be made through offer-, 
mg AGA stock and carix 
Mr. Starch said AGA would 
make a share issue of restricted 
shares as part of any accord. 
He added that the offer was 
rqaA» on condition that AGA 
obtained at least .90 percent of 
the Oddebohns stock. 

- Trading m AGA and Udde- 
hn lrns shares was baited earlier 
tbu wedc ahead of Friday’s an- 
nouncement. 

Mr. Starch - said the move 
would increase AGA’s financial 
strength and provide increased 
opportunities for expansion 
intnm the industrial gas sector. 


Reisers shares 

LONDON — Sodastream Hold- rgmatf 
ingsPLC has agreed to be acquired basis < 
by Cadbury Schweppes PLC for shares 
£26-2 uuffion (S3 2-4 million) on a dinary 
share offer basis, a joint statement Cadbu 
said Friday. The accord is to be- 154 pc 
come final by the middle of June, banker 


shares of Sodastream. Tbe cash el- estimates it tad a pretax loss of 
tentative will be provided on the about £4.5 rmto m the 12 mqnlhs 

i • m m ha r * .a: wirirri9 Ann! mmnarwl with a 


bads of £50-38 and 93 ordinary sndmfc April 30. wmpared with a 
shares of Cadbury for evay 40 or- profit of £2Jmilhoa tiie previous 
dinary stares of Sodastream. The 12 momhs. T J e loss mdudes about 
Cadbuiy riiares will be bought at S* miBiM from test mmketmg m 
154 pence each by the merchant ^ Vmad States and West Ger- 


marketin g carbonated drinks sys- 
tems for home use, is owned by 


dividend. 


come final by the middle of June, bankets, Klanwon Benson Ltd , J ^ aa y* phis otceptional losses of 
Sodastream, which specializes in and will not qualify lor J9Ws final about £300,000- 
marketing csubonaied drinks sys- dividend. Jb? P 1111 ?^ ca ? se °* loss m 

tems for home use, is owned by r .. «... ... . , Britain, Sodastream s main source 

some 96 shareholders and is quoted , c ^ aa,s “J 3 Scot®* of business, was the disruption 

on a restricted basis under stock caused by the introduction of mw 

exchange rules. Cadbury officials 8“* ‘«® waon Gl0a ?J}f* ™h equipment, the company said- But 
said the acquisition isan opportu- 25^ percrat md 22.4 percent, 3es the last six months were ahead 
vnKl 4a Vi TiTr tMtA & rcspectivay, of Sodastream’s is- «r thru* few the same neriod a vear 


gua loeviaonCjronp rLC, which equipment, the company said. But 
said the acauisitioa is an opportu- <»* 29.5 percent and 22.4 percent, Ses the last six months were ahead 
xrity to break into a growth market !t T. of those for the same period a year 

with worldwide pottttiaL ““ a S recd to ago and the new equipment now is 

The stateraentsaid Cadbury tad tendcrlhorshares - inplace. r ^ 

offered 31 ordinary gh*™* , or Sodastream’s net assets April 30 Cadbury shares sold for 162 
£48.40 cash, for every 10 ordinary were £8.54 minion. The company pence after the announcement, lit- 
tle changed from Thursday’s dose 

__ _ of 161 pence. 


Dresdner Bank Chief Cites 
Rise in Business in Early ’85 


Nestle Acquires 
Coffee Roaster 

Roue 19 

NEW YORK — NestlS 
Holdings Inc_ a U.S. subsidiary 
of the Swiss-based food giant 
Nestlfc SA, said it has acquired a 
California-based coffee roaster, 
MJ.B Co. Terms were not dis- 
closed. 

Nestle said on Thursday that 
MJ.B. joins a list of 12 other 
Nestle Holdings’ companies in 
the United States. 

MJ.B. is a producer and dis- 
tributor of roast, ground and 
instant coffee with manufactur- 
ing plants in Union City, Cali- 
fornia and Denver, Colorado. 
The company also distributes 
tea and nee products. 


Roam 

FRANKFURT — Reflecting a 
strong undolying trend in the^ West 
German economy, Dresdner Bank 
AG’s busmen volume in the fust 
months of tins year rose signifi- 
cantly above that of the same peri- 
od last year, management 
board spokesman. Wolfgang 
RBfler, said Friday. 

He told the anmtflt mw^i ng that 

profits had also risen and both La- 


the world economy as US. growth 
g a slowed. 

Jest "I doubt if Europe is capable erf a 
»ntr significant acceleration in the tern- 
frst po of oqstansoc .since as active 
nfj_ growth prrficy is connected in many 
eg. countries with serious inflation and 
eat balance of payments risks," he 
me said. 

Tbe future trend of the dollar 
w may take some of the impetus out 
i*,. of West German exports, he 


Acfcafcy G wimnnk aflons Inc. signing a reoproedh agreement al- assembly of its Learjct 55, riting an terrst cctmmsaoa and trading sur- wamed - ^ Dresdns ppects the 


- Swiss Bari .Corp. said the new starting Mhy 17. 


-FM in Portland, Oregoo, 
lging 600,000 •common 
for. octstahdmg warrants 


would have an initial 
100 million DM <$31.9: 


Ameritedi MobOe ConHinmica- 
tionstnc and Cantd Inc. reported 


IS £ 


nje -ir- 
ir 

ftia ^ 

W i — vji- , "*ii 4?* 


•iictivw* 

" S? r ; 


• • ai, irf. 

?«• U> a.* 5,2 
j«k a* £ r 


- • * j/ , 




Ifgy* indwi 

•a i«ta* <•**' 
nt ,mr - 1 

K ^ hi. 

> 1 *+ p* ■*•5. -hk v r. 
.'•If tan -• a*.?,, 

W* -ear 

m •*** »»■ 

'» c"«** 

1 4ja* 



I«( Pechmey’s Plant Pinchase 
I Called in line With Polief 

- 5 Raaen Mr. Ptc fafl .became. Btehincy 

TOKYO — The recent Pfcdrincy HMiTnwn in Jannaiy, sncceednig 
SA purchased an ahmnnnm aero- Georges Besse, who is now cfaair- 
;• plant in the United Stales does man crf RenaulL Mr. Besse hdped 

t i[ l ' Art represent a policy shift, despite turn Pfccbracy around frean a net 
f ®cl983dedaOTto«IlU^.ahimir loss of 463 zzriffion francs ($48.7 
-« 3 2 mon-ingot nmnnfafrtnrmg cyera- -- wiiiTinn) in T983 to a 546-miIEon- 

* Wli tions, according to the ccmpanys , franeprofit in 1984. 

chairman, Bwnar ri Pacta, Mr sa i d his upp mTftmen t 

Losses and high power costs in reflected continuity in Pfeduney's 
ttn [the United States jnonqrted P6- p<fficies,ance he had worked close- 
* yrinvytostJltaopaaiK^therelt^ ly with Mr. Besse. . 

diiftcd its North American focus to Thou^i ahmrinnm vices have 
i £ Gsmtda, where a smdter with a been Jow lately, Mr. PSche said 

* "*ti. capacity of 230,000 metric tans there- were signs of rising demand 

(^53,000 tons) is to open next year in the transport and packaging in- 
m B&ancour, Quebec. : dustries. 

But last month Ffichiaqr paid an : He said overdl demand wotdd 


towing customers to use thorcefiu- improving maricet, and said it grad- pluses were higher than a year ago. collar to “nor malize m the for- 
Iar mobile tdqjhones in Camel’s uafiy will recall employees laid off “in total, after a pleasing start scea ^ e future and swing around a 
Canadian markets and Amerrtcch’s several months ago. -we are looking forward to the cur- 3 Deutsche mark levd, “ which both 

US. markets. - V - OobolMwine Inc.’S board voted rent year with confidence,’' he said, the B u ndes ban k and German cat- 

Bardays Uank PtC intends to to omit qnartcriy dividends on Dresdner reported in April that P 0 ^ s& ^f bve with, Mr. 
capitalize its fitaizes investumi common stock until offshore drill- group 1984 net profit fell to 375.9 RSDersatd. 
subsidiary, Barclays de Zoete mg returns toprofitafcahty; a first- million Deutsche units ($120.1 This would also increase the 
Wedd, al £220 m21uHi ($272 m2- quarter loss of 67 cents a share was milli on) from 382J rmDian DM in 
lion), and - die government bonds recoiled compared with a year-ear- 1983 on an end-1984 balance sheet 


dollar to “normalize” in tbe for- 
seeaMe future and swing around a 


the Bundesbank and German ex- 
ports can easily live with,” Mr. 
Roller said. 

This would also increase the 
ffiiMiw-t for a A-riitw in interest 


a minimum of £25 ntiffion. 

BOC Group PLC will sdl its 
UB. -based gases and related prod- 
ucts business, Aronson, to Koike 
Sanso KogyoCo.'LtiL: a new com- 
pany, KN-Aronsou Inc, will be 
part-owned by the Japanese indus- 


new company at Eer 4 cent profit 


reported co m p are d with a year-ear- 1983 on an end- 1984 balance sheet rates, be added. 


Hoarer Uwwsal Inc. sharehold- 
ers apjffoved a proposal, expected 


of 174.72 hiffian DM after 160.83 
bUJion DM. 

Mr. RdQer said weak West Gcr- 


to became effective May 12, to °^ S1 ooonomk: data at the be^n- sgkt <rf the necessity of kcqrfng a 
merge with a subsidiary ofJohnson nm S ,°f tbe year did not indicate steady, careful policy.” 

Coomls ^ ^ fiance chirf, Wolf- 

RCA Corp. said RCA Service S ^ earher the bank’s 

r« tvwaht i n7.nMwn( oal factcus. roduamg a contraction i is 


Turning to risk provisions 
against foreign credits, Mr. Roller 
trrfd shareholders, ’‘We wiB not lose 
right of the necessity of keeping a 

— 1.. e-l W 


S?=wS? 5 == HS 5 fi=H 2 SSK 


R - • • W-r' *•■«•• 
•Mm av •_»' •- 


nrv» 

5-3 =JS.i 
hi 




U. .I.T ■» t’Bfl 

t »v - mi3'J 

1 55 .'fsi 

||, a ■ ■ ' • J » 1 

l ' ur: • il 
tr*i - • 


led its North American focus to Thoo^i ahmrinnm vices have 
ad a, where a andter with a been Jow lately, Mr. Pache said 
idty of 230,000 metric tans there- were signs of rising demand 
,000 tons) is to open next year in tbe transport and packaging in- 
feancour, Quebec. ''dustries.- 

tu last month F6chinqr paid an : He said^ overdl demand would 
isdosed sum for an aerosol cobtinue to grow, though stoydy. 
t owned by International Con- - He predicted an *nnn»T growth in 
a Cam, of the United States, demand of 3 percent. 

T r. Patine said the parxdtaseraj- - Mr. Rache was in Japan after a 
ited a ccsatinaatioii of 'the visittoChma to seesmdterinvestr. 
p^tnpve&toih^^iWnjClog^ - taen^projects at Jfian in Siaamo* 
nets and into alnminum 'coaf : province and Pingguo in. Guangxi 
^products.. -proyince. • 


j ■ ‘ v • siaxe in cxx^isin 

Buttes Gas A Ofl Co. has sdd a J^teoB managem 
60-paoenl interest in its oil and 56 nnin opand ag 
natural gas operations outside the acquire cootraHm 
United States and .Canada to an three-year period, 
unidentified overseas lender in re- Squibb Corp. h 
tnm for caqralnig J20 milfinn in its U.S. animal h 
convertible subanimated seemed Solvay & Qe. SA • 
notes. ' after-tax gain of a 

Colgate- PahnoCve Co. share- U& Medcd E 
holders authorized an increase in merge with Arc 
the number of nnt standing shares, center Inc, issmr 
from 125millicaito250^Sjon; the of common stock 
co mpan y said they would be used mg common and 
for general corporate purposes. and common stoc 
David Syme & Co. directors, fol- Wyse Tedaurfc 


t cranpany, for 


weather. 

The bank estimates that the 


and 1 JO billion DM in 1984 from 
1.00 to 1.25 ffiUxm at the end of the 

* maE ° nmd n sis °” i 10 ea^yTdl md 

"“"“l-j p^J, ta gg 0awra Mr. Roller also said that 

inree-year penoa. But ^ ^ doubted Dresdner will seek a full fisting cm 

Squibb Corpi has agreed to sdl (tat Western Europe would take the Tokyo Slock Exchange, the first 
its U.S. ani m al health division to q^j- die locomotive function for West German company to do so. 
Solvay & C5e. SA of Bdgium for an 

after-tax gain of about $12 miffiou. rax i • -mv'i-T' * 

u.s. Medcri Entapnse inc. will 1 ewieco Acquires lUC-turope Assets 

merge with American Emeigi- 

center I nr. issuing 545.687 shares The Associated Press Those operations ate bong corn- 


center Inf, issuing 545,687 shares - The Associated Press Those operations ate bong com- 

of common stock for all outstand- HOUSTON — Tenneco Inc. bined with Tenneco’s JI Case Co. 
mg common and prefared shares said Friday that it bad completed fann and consiruction-cgiapmaii 
and common stock warranls. . its purchase of the French, German division. 

Wjse Technology filed with the Danish farm-eqmpment units The European acquisition was 


towing independent evaluation of Securities and Exchange Commis- of International Harvester Co. «nnmmpHi after agreement with 

the stock,, advised minority share- sion far an offering of two million - Earlier, Tenneco, a Houston- the French government on the re- 


V 1VU. X 01 4 901M UIV 

nay resented a cootinaation of 

2'! 7 


products and into 
sumer products.' . 


ing 2.19 percent 
company. 


sharofi 

store 


the Melbourne following their sale to Altos Cbm- temational Harvester’s North itive agreements with the French. 

puter Systems, a princqial stare- American and British farm-equip- German and D anish lending insti- 


Gates Learjet Corp. is resuming holder. 


mem operations for $430 million. 





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A Conference on 
Trade and Investment 
Opportunities 

Budapest, june 13-14, 1985. 

The International Herald Tribune 
conferenae on ‘Trade chkJ Investment 
Opportunities in Hungary” will be of 
keen interest to any ©teaitive concerned, 
about future economic relations between 
East and West. 

. Speakers at this landmark confer- 
ence will indude Hungarian government 
ministers, business leaders, bankers and 
ec onomists. • 

• For further information, please 
contact the International Herald Tribune 
conference offiae, 181, avenue^ Charies 
de Gaulle, 92521 Neuidy Cedex, France. 
Telephone: 74/ 1265.Telex: 613 595 F. 


PHEMAnOMAl POSITIONS 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT WANTED 

FOR EUROPE 

-i>,i »-•»■ 

. ^ Challenging executive position headquartered in Switzerland, responsible for a division 

dealing with Europe’s leading industrial firms and government agencies. 

We are seeking a v 

Dynamic Executive 

aged 35-40, with a te c hnic al engineering degree, and an outstanding performance record in 
the technical/ industrial field. A working knowledge of the En glish and Fr ench is essential. 
Other JSuxopean languages would, be an asset. 

Our group is the recognized world leader in the field of metallurgical specialities, both 
tec hno logic al l y , owing to a number of important breakthroughs, as well as in terms of 
products and marketing innovation. We have a diverse customer base covering all industry 
. - l sectors, our own manufacturing facilities, and are very research-oriented. . 

■ This is a unique opportunity for a generalist, with excellent compensation and fringe 
benefits: 

Please reply in confidence, giving business experience, personal data, and salary history to: 

■ Ref. 202 9 OTTSA, P.O. Box S453 9 1002 Lausanne, Switzerland. 





EXEOI1VVSS AVAILABLE 


GENERAL MANAGER - CONSTRUCTION 


fv.t* * 


I 11 * 1 " lire- 


■:& a 
T •• 




McDonalds b o majof tLS. corporation with an inlemotiomti branch network and 
-outstanding growth and performan c e record. Worldwide sales are well in excess of 
U.S. $10 trillion. Due to our rapid expansion we are looking for a 

European Finance Manager 

This person will be responsible for implementing a cash management system In Europe. 
He/ she will .also assist in arranging financing for wholly-owned subsidiaries, advising 
joint venture partners and licensees on their financing and assisting in the negotiation of 
kxm agreements.. ' 

The ideal candidate. w3l have a brood financial background including cash manage- 
ment, bank relationship management and local currency financing in various countries 
within Europe. Knowledge of accounting and strong quantitative financial skills are . 
required Language requirements are English, German and French. Spanish and Kalian 
would be a plus. 

Phase send resume with picture and salary requirements to: 

McDoiiaMVSyslem of Europe, lrtc. r Attn. Mr. Ernest Mafhia, 
European ConfrolW^ lifefufeclyallee 109. 6000 Frankfurt/ Main 70. 


Dutch national. 45 with 15 years experience working in third 
worid countries Africa. The Middle Last and South America. 
Tjwi^agwt Dutch, German, French. FngBA and Spanish, 
lam prepared to take assignment any where in tbe wodd. 


FormyC.V. orpersonal interview, 
Netherlands (0)4138-75901 - or ( 
19d)0 hours, continental time. 


mcaR me in the 
38-73103 after 


SWISS EXECUTIVE 

ss-R 

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[ SPAIN 

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JWyftnm/ uJBinh fiulto 
Smh •due v ii tn, 12 yuan ban te a. fatf M 
paaMont v>i*i antt uo a uuA 

!***&/ n Span. 

CM* (■qMtfftwfe 
■nc 0 jqa, HMt Ikfcn-. 

92521 NanO y C . ifanr . France — . 


ro PLACE AN ADVantSEMENT 
conted your naortrf 
I n temaG u n J Ho raid TAuns 
npnsmtaSm or Mqk Fonoroi 
181 Am, OioHas^GoufW, 
92521 Neufty Codn, France. 
Teb 747.12^5 - Tetoc 6I3S75. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
10 May 1985 

Tlanolat^vo«DfOMOtatta«»lMtMiaeli»w Bre»iff Pl l egor«»FMiiO»jMidM «Otee 
sna m tu m (X um funds «tau antes ora tend oa ksm prfen. Tbe toUnriaa 
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M>-daRv; (wt-wnttv; tb) -w-mnttrfy; (rl-rowtarty; m-irreoatorty. 

AL MAL UAMAGEMENT _ OBLI FLEX LIMITED 


AL MALMANAGEMENT . „ OBLI FLEX LIMITED 

(w) AHM TruSJ. S> % I4M9 Zjwl MaMcwranCT ===— 

BAN K JULIUS B AER & CO. Ud- —lira! Dollar Lons Torm — 

— <5 > Boortund 3F VX\2S _j w J jopon*M Yon 

— <dl Conbpr — B — (»> Pound SterllnB 

— <2> Euulbow A mor Ic n *112552 — l«i Omitecn. Morfc 

—Id I eouftaaor Europ * SF J2MA0 _<*, Dutch Florin 

3S §KKE™“ Z If 106 UQ “ S***i Prone 

SF — 1 

ssH Bggzg skm — __*b m z?_ zznzz 

3d* KUd 

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ZZZ SliJBl H»tg5i-ICEST[0 

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^d } lndw« Muihbonds B ZlH SS lI'-GulOEN 

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—Id 1 Brtt world Late. Fund— 
—Id ) srtLWwid ToOtn. Fund 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— lur) Capital inM Fund fOMf 

— Iw) COPttOI ItaDo SA JttJl 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

— Id) ActtonsSotau 
— Id) Bond Voter Sad. 

— Id) Bond VMar D-nwR 

Yin) 

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— IdiEuroBo V o i or 
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OIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— +<d > CoocooJro DM2S2B 

— Hd) Inti Roatankma - DM 1042 


*“« -IdlPARINTERFUND _ _ 

_|a { par US TraoMV Band *10X0 

CI.UN* ROYAL B. OF CANAOAPCW WLCUERN4EY 

S0.H0 -+iwl RBC ConodknFund Ud S IU2 

SOM* RBC For EoULPncmc Fd— 1WJV 

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tUU* -+ld ) RBCMonXioroncY Fd.— *2X10 

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54753 SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (46-0330270) 


«a«. 

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^lw j IhB ^Growth Fund S 2L31 

SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

—Id ) Amorlcp- Voter SF 9WJ0 

-Id O-Mork Bond Sotecrton DM116J* 

11112* —(d) Donor Bond Sotecflon l«ll 

uuo -td » Ptort" S«octton_ FL lag 

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— Id 1 
— Id) 

—Id) 


— Hd) tidl Rootentenfl - DM HU 

— (ml Currwicy X Gold Pool. — *l?SJl 


Im) WlnOu Lite Fot Pool— SCUM 
{ml Trans World FuT. Pool. S •37471 


SF 12X70 
Y 9.987 JW 

UNION BANK OFSWITZERLANO _ 

— Id ) Amen US. SB. SF«050 

—Id ) Band- Invest— — . SF '6X00 

—Id ) Foma Swte* Sn. 5E Hi-fi® 

— Id ) Jwn-liwHl SF 947 JD 

—Id ) Saflt South Air. SIl SF 52000 

—Id ] Sima (stock Mies] — - SF19L5D 
UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— (d ) Unlrooto DM4330 

— MlUnltonds DM an 

— (d)Unlrah DM 7735 

Other Funds 


—(ml Trans WOrM Put. Foot. 1*3747 

FLCMGMT LTD. INV. ADVISERS —Id ) Unitends DM2XW 

l, LourSoi PoontV Hln, EC4. 01-42344M — |d ) Ualmh_— — DM7735 

-iw> F&cAttantv - sure Other Funds 

— (w) FAC Europom SHLW inwo 

— <M) FSCOrteotat — *2077 (w) AcNbonds lovoshnonts Fund. *2036 

'wi AcfhMsHntl tttW 

— * 5330 


FIOEUTY POB 

- — Inal AmerVxm .»•» .—■»•— , 
— (ml Amor VMuos CuiilPioI 
—Id) FteoUtv Amor. Assets — 

— Id ) FhtaMv Australia Fond 
— Id ) Fidelity Discovery Fwte 
—Id ) Fidelity olr. Svas.Tr. 

— (d> Fidelity Far East F 
*d I Fldtelty InTL Fund 
d ) Fidelity Ortem Fund 
FMefity Frontier I 
-,«,FMN»yPocmcF 
—Id ) FkWBv Sod Growth 
—<d) Fidelity world Fund. 

FORBES PO BH7GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aoerd SI -£KL»13 
— Iw) Gold lermne , ■ 9 

— Iwj Gote Appreciation — 

— iwl Dodcr taemne. 

— im) si ra teol c Tredtoo- — 


lm) aThSlI 
tescanmon- lorfAartte.lJ 


SM50 <r> A ttm F lnonoi I.F 

s^are I*’ TrSwr inn Fd. iaEIF) 

**inS tte) BNP Interbond Fund 
VSS <w)Bandutwc-lsmPr .. — — - — 

SUM Im) Canada GNFMorteaoe Fd 

(d ) CssHtal PraMrv. Fd. Inti S11J0 

ifrT? Iw) Otodei Fund— __ 

SinJs Id ) CJ.R- Australia Fund 
mim (K ) CJ.R. Japan Fund 
£££ Im) Cteveiand Offihon 

*3076 tw , cmunmio soairttte* 

tb ) COMETE 

Iw) Convert Fd. inn A Crm Sfc_. 


S4U Iw) 


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GERNOR FUNDS. 

— («*) Eat Investment Fund 

— IW) Scottish World Fund 

^iluUj&LaLAWdJT^yUZJB 


*017 d ID. witter Wld Wide ivlTst—- 
* 1-17 (b ) Drakhor InvestFund N.V— Sl.ll 
id J Dreyfus America Fond 

(d ) Drevhn Fond 

(w) Drevfu* interconttnent 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 11*. St Peter Port. Guernsey. M*l-2*n5 

(ml FuturGAM SA mu 

ImlGAM ArWfrDM (nc 
(w) GAMorica loc— . 

(w) GAM Boston inc 
(w) GAM ErmHoM 

» ) GAM FranovM 

I GAM Internation al lnc_ 
iw) GAM Nodi) Amertco lnc._ . _ 


wi GAM Norte America Inc. 

iw) GAM N. America Unit Trust. IBLOOo 
Cw) GAM Pacific Inc *11324 


_ , Europe OWtootions 4123 

(w) First Easts Fund — *14415X90 

CORP. (b ) Rftv Stars Ltd. 1ML7* 

n- 7 B 7 ii (wlFImteirv Group LM » 117.14 

SUSuM (w) Fixed income Trans slOBt 

*12145 (w) FOraeteo Issue Pr SF 2)935 

S13L53 iw) Forexfimd *722 

SIMM (w) Formula Selection Fd. SF7X79 

*1X» Id ) Fondttalla 3 12X11 

SF UN (d j Govornm. Sac Fund" . S BSJ 6 

SWAM Id I Franfcf-Truslinterzfns DM 4X19 

-w) Hauumonn Hkfps. N.V *111.15 

.Wl HOSfio Funds * 1D3JS 

*11334 (wl Horton Fund. *1,11545 


GAM Slerl B> IWl Unit Trust- U05Do J"ll '■FXHojdtaw 


(m) GAM Systems Inc. 

(w) GAM Worldwide In 
Im) GAM Tyche SA. Cteos A 


G.T. MANAGEMENT IUX) Lid. 

— Iw) Berry Poc-Fd. Lid. 

—Id ) G.T. Applied Science *i*» (r) Invest A 

— (d ) G.T. Ajean HJC GwttLFd *1146 

— Iw) GT. Alta Fund SADI 

— WIG-T.AoiiralteFteid *«J4 (w) Jaoan Pacmc Fu 

—Id ) G.T. Europe Fund — _ — . — S9M im) Jetter Ptns. IntL 

—<d ) GT. Bend Fund— 

—Id ) G.T. Global Technloy Fd 
— <d \ GT. Hoostei PotWteder 
—Id ) G.T. Investment Fund.. 


I LA Inll Gold Bonn . >TJ» 

. Interfund 5A 112X7 

w) inten nor fc e t Fund .. ■ S314M 

d) intertntelnoMuLFd.CL'B-— *418.90 
lr I Inn Securities Fund *920 

Aifi (d J Investo DWS DM4X3I 

*UB3 |r ) Invest ANanttouoi *733 

*1246 (r ) ituNorluno Inti Fund SA___ S1U1 

Japan Selection Fund. *10649 

Japan PoctHc Fund *10448 

m) Jetter Pin*. iniL Ltd S10889M 


Kietewort Benson Inn F± — 
Ktetewart Bans. Jopw Fd 


*6092 |w) Luxt 


KWnwort Bens. Jop. 

I Korea Growt li Tru»t| 

Lelcom Furri 

wl Leveroae Coo Hold 
:d ) Llaultoer^H^ 


—Id ) G.T. Jaocn Small COlFiovI 

—Id ) G-T. Torimotopy Pimd S25M Im) Moanofund N.V. 

—Id 1 G.T. Soutti Qilna tend SU31 (d 1 MetBoianum ML 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTI- SA. {^1 JffJfS 
U— w On OnO TdIKtITlin, 


Jersey. P4X Box ilTel 05M 
Berne, PX). Bax »*-Tel 4131 23051 
— (d ) Crnesbow I-— * 

-rid) c*F (Bate 
— (d j tntnL Bond 
—Id I let. Currency u 

— Id I ITF Fd ITeomdogy) 

—Id 1 OSeos Fd IN. AMERICA) 

EBC TRUST CO.UERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 Seale Sl-St Heller,DDM433i 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

5 (mine: Bid sore Otter 

tdicisu BW *1025 Otter 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
— (d)SbortTarm'A'(AcqiRi) — * 


Y 110.167 

*1842 

idlNBtko Growth Podtooe Fd s ?,t».90 

wj Nippon Fund 129J2- 

w) Novotec Invextment Fund — S92JH 

,w) NAMF — * I44JD 

l (m)NSPF.I.T — *15721 


i?F FdT?^ W>: — » 1X 45 t rnvestm.nt FO»«re 

-Id ) OHOS Fd IN. AMERICA) — S27J* » ^. Sw R Ert' gSW^"Tf 
EBC TRUST CO.UERSEY) LTD. r P errnql V alue Fund N.V *i ( H4>3 

w PSCO Fund N.V 1 121J7 

*9.579 w PSCO IntL M.V. 

SI0J67 d Putnom Inti F 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND It) Pfl—TBCti — _ 

*14696 w Quantum Fund N.V. 

51-0168 d RentaFund 

— Id) Short Term viAocwn) — s 1.1127 d RontbiMBt — lp_ i, 

— (d) short Term V(Dlslr) a rV?2-S 

Hoi 1 OBB T *^*" 5 2091 w Somurcd Portfolio— - SF 108J0 

cci/Terti. SA LuMRteoura— _ . 1U2 
JARDINE FLEMING, POB 70 GPO HO KB Vi fSonIv!!^”* HM1 

— Ib ) J-F Jo«>an Trust— Y«H w state SL Bank Eoutty HdaUiV Sfre 


■5M9-7S 

P»X42SM 
Ilf X6B7JX) 
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KdaUiV S9re 
Fund — *2023 


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Cw) State SL Bank Eautty H«nNV *936 

—4b ) JF Soutti B eat Aste — *3X» i w ) strategy inwmtment Fund — *2023 

■— (b 1 JlP JaMRi Tedvnlopv^x V 214P fd J 5/rrtax LM.'(Das Al 

1 »*S5SS? c,,S ' tAcc> 5to5 (wt Techno Growm Fund 

— Ib ) J-F Australia — - 5192 j*i Tcdtvo Pac. Hold. (Sea) 

LLOYDS BANK I NTL, POB Generali J* T ofcw Poc . r HaKL N.V Veffi 

fcJSS !SR iSSSS.— s? iSS "1 1&ES £=== *«re 

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1 1 — 1 * * ■ { nffli m SF m fir) J ire tfr . imurn # ix.v \ d» p ) i Jja j/ 

I?cS) lSS inn NTAiSiiS- * ware <nd TwwgyJirejme IUJC.) n.v. *140080 


NIM ARSEN 

— Id) Clan A 

— (wICtonB-uj.— 
— tw ) Claes C - Japan. 


OM — Deutsche Mark: BF — BeteHjm Francs: FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Lummbours Franc*; SF — Swiss Franc*; a — wtcod: + — oiler Prteesjb — bid 
ettamte P/v *10 tell oor unit; NA - nol i AvalteMe: N.C— NotCommunjastedM - 

New; S — suspended; S/S — Sloe*. Split: - — E*4Wvidend; — Ex-RH: — — 
Grass Par te rtnance lode* April: •— R«temPt-Pria>- E x- Coupon; •• — Formjrtr 
WerlcMde Fund Ltd; 9 — Otter Price ted. 3% Pfollm. ehorae; ++ — oaihr stock 
price as on Amsterdam Stock Exchanoo 


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AMEX 

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UP to the closing on Wail street 

^ do . l Jf t ”■*•*«* late tnntes ebewhere. 

fjoThe Associated Press 


12 Month Sis. cwae 

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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 



EMPLOYMENT 


AUTO SHIPPING 


AUTOS TAX FREE 1 HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


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;puts the - number 
maintenance people in China at a 
>sganx ZG^OO.The traming theyre- 
cdve, foreign experts here say, is 
ttmerally-not yet adequate. 

; £?'Rep resen tativcs of computer 
companies here, say' that China's 
-gpal of semingits computers with 
^ts own maintenance corps is ume- 
^iistic. They poipt «it that relative-' . 
ly new buyers simply cannot be as 
efficient in diagnosing problems as 
-the company that makes a particu- 
lar model andregolariy sendees iL 
? When they buy computers, and 
many other kinds of technology, 
The Chinese generally insist on ro- 
‘edving extensive service t raining 
•dram the manufacturer- Their in-’ 
'tendon is 'to rdy on the mannfao- 
^turer for service only when ftbso- 
*Wdy necessary. 

Ihe Chinese also tend to insist 
j f hat any mining fey get from the' 
manufacturer be conducted over- 
seas because, in the words of David 
Fong, Hewlett-Packard's China 
“sales manager, such travel is a life- 
time opportunity" for people who 
-might otherwise never be able to 
visa a country such, as the United 
•States or Japan. - • 

" . But this ultimate perk does not 


S' Zri.. - • 
'VW. 


Tl» AancsMfPraH 

A Chinese woman, dbessed against the cold, at a computer 
shop far Beijing. Chinese mars are not always able to 
provide the atmospheric controls needed for computers. 


always gp to the techxudans who 
most logically should receive iL- 
“Soimaimespeople 10 have noth' 
ing u> do with computers axe the 
ones sent overseas,” said Mr. Fong. 
And one GCTSC engineer said ml 
his t raining jn the United States 
was on a US. compniertiiat be has 
not touched since returning to Chi- 
na. 

- China’s insistence on sdf-refr- 
ance extends to ft refusal, for the 
most part, to buy !&snnmce con- 
tracts? ■— special warranties that' 
extend . beyond ' a manufacturer's 
normal guarantees: Ounese cas- 
tmners are wining to apead^tops of 
money” for repairs, Mt-Fon^ said, 
“butthey cannot nnfletUgnd insur- 
ance buying." 


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Given the Chinese approach, 
many foreign sales representatives 
hoe . say the best solution to the 
maintenance difficulti es may be 
same son of innovative contract 
that somehow combines instruc- 
tion for the Chinese with warranty 
features that will allow proper ser- 
vicing and thereby preseive a man- 
ufacturer's reputation. 

With all this, there are also main- 
tenance problems that simply to- 
fleet conditions in China. Electric- 
ity Is subject to wide voltage stages 
and to blackouts, both of which can 
wreak havoc with computer sys- 
tems. And the country can be ex- 
tremely hot' in summer or, in the 
north, suffer fierce dust storms 


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+ fc 


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problem of cud habits dying hard. 
For example, it is an article of faith 
ff»a> any marhrnff be turned 
off when not in use to save energy. 
Personal computers tend to be 
switched on and off many times in 
a. work day. This wears down the 
equipment — mid, according to 
most studies, does not save energy. 
But the practice continues. 

Another question is just how 
much use China is getting out of its 

rniTi^Y fitCfS- 

In an article last month. The 
People's Daily newspaper said: 


!■;''< ti ‘ >1 ' v'ft i ! u i 


m a hurry trimmrf Bra rmVrrto thit 

necessary preparations and end up 
leaving their marfime* idle” be- 
cause they cannot find useful tasks 
tot the machines- The article said 
there was “a serious wastage prob- 
lem.” 

An American paTe^man here re- 
calls makmg a sales caff to a Chi- 
nese institute and finding a 
5750,000 computer already on the 
premises — unused. The maker had 
gone out of business and the insti- 
tute had neither the knowledge nor 
the parts to repair it. The institute 
bought a new computer from the 
salesman. It hraris along next to the 

idle wmehtnR, 

The Chinese have not, for the 
most part, been innovative with the 
wwrfirtwjjj they use. “In most other 
places erf the world you might boy a 
computer for one ot two reasons. 
Then two years later yon are using 
it to do 16 other things,” said. David 
R. Keys, general sales manager of 
Centred Data China loo, a subsid- 
iary of the Minnesota-based Con- 
trol Data Cop. “I haven't seen 
much of that here.”' 

Bat the cansemm among foreign 
experts here is that far Chum, self- 
reliance is decades away. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 




ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 MAYenne 
pancake 
8 Wants 
. 11 Bath, e.g. 

• 14 Snipe’s habita t 
■18 Navigational 
system 
7 28 "The 

Terrible” czar 
22 MAYapple, 

e-S 

: 24 Emulate 
Isocrates 
25Impofo 
. 26 Viennese 
violinist 

27 Employer 

28 “Separate 
Tables” actor 

28 Choir 
members 


. 30 Acrimonious 

31 Potion portion 

32 Adolescent 
period 

33 Famed queen 
or horse 

34 Fashion 

.35 Neptune and 
Pluto 


37 Musagetes 

39 Pasha, 

The Lion of 
Janina 

41 "Then of 

warm, sea- 
scented 
bead)": 
Browning 

43 Crucial time in 
1844 

.44 Two MAYors 
of N.Y.C. 

50 Pelion’s 
supporter 

51 Triumphs fora 
QB 

54 AtahuaJpa’s 
subjects 


55 Urals locale 

56 Ethiopian 
Christian 

57 Enjoy a quid 

58 S ummer 
quenchers 

SO Tiny chorine 

60 Pyrenean 
principality 

62 Turkish 
province 

63 MAYday’s 
cousin 

64 Sheet of 
stamps 

85 D.D.E.’S 
command 

67 Capstone 

68 Prink 

69 Prts. 

memorable 

Flemish 

composer 

70 Ovid topic 

71 Mother of Hera 

72 One’s chips 

73 MAYS 

80 Bucolic 

81 Moiseyev 
movement 

82TricUet 

83 Assn, begun In 

1948 

84 GaMAY, e.g. 

85 Fan from SL 
Louis 

86 Cleaver’s 

"Soul on ” 

87 Large barge 

89 License plate 

92 Mike of 
baseball 

93 Summaries 

95 Chemical 
suffix 

96 Diet 

97 Berriot’s 
colleagues, for 
short 

98 Keelbills 


99 A “Juarez" 
star and 
family 

102 "Stormy 
Weather” 
composer 

103 Curve 

104 Cherbourg 
cherub 

105MAYa,e.g. 

107J.FJC.and 

L.B.J. 

108 Hard 

199 Ending for 
gate or boot 

110 Direction for 
Dorothy 
MAYnor 

113 “Friendly" 
pronoun 

114 Prefix for trust 
orthesis 

117 Director 

Richter: 1888- 
1976 

121 Bart or Belle 

122 St. Philip . 

famed Italian 
priest 

124 Drowsy one 

127 Sandal part 


Mayhem bymaryvirgmaoma 


PEANUTS 


128 Bygone 
WAY ten or 


129 MAT 
MAYeng 

130 Shock 

131 Hawk’s haunt 

132 Popularizer of 
“Mule Train” 

133 Radiator sound 

134 Participated in 
a pep rally 

135 Tarts thief 

138 Almond willow 

137 Between 
A.S.T. and 

138 Podetia 

139 Ancient 
Briton's 
chariot 



THIS IS A GREAT GOLF 
HOLE _ONE OF THE 
BEST IN THE WORLD... 

z? — ‘ 



f-ti 


THE FAlRWAV IS UNEP 
WITH BEAUTIFUL OAK 
And pine trees... 



THE WHITE SAND IN 
THE BUNKER5 SARKLES IN 
CONTRASTTOTHEDSP 
SHAPES OFTHEGREBL- 





BLONDIE 


1 HWEA 4J 
MEETING 


I MA/E A BASkETBALL 
(SAME 








BEETLE BAILEY 


COOKIE/ 

MEPICAL 

STUDIES 

prove that 
smoking 

KILLS 


IT MOT ONLY 
KILLS THE 
SMOKER BUT 
THOSE AROUHC? 
HIM 


Ne it York Tima, edited by Eugene Melaka. 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 



ALSQ ITfe V SO WHY 
EXPENSIVE/ PlP’VOLl EVER 
MESSY AMD k START? 
UGLY 




DOWN 


1 Spotless 

’ 2 Psychologist 
MAY 

3 Kin of Calliope 
•4 Cape MAY 
seascapes, e.g. 
5 Remnants 
-6 Place of 
oblivion 
7 Dodge 
■ 8 Deux or valet 
9 Set 

19 Tangent’s 
relative 
11 Quake and 


12 MAYarf 
mazuma 


DOWN 

13 Olympian once 
imprisoned in 

ajar 

14 Guitarist from 
Madrid 

15 What Shelley 
railed himself 

WHyrrha” 

composer 

17 Off. worker 

18 Female 
lobsters 

21 MAYo 
23 MAYonnaise, 
e.g. 

34 Maureen 
O’Sullivan 
daughter 


DOWN 

36 City on the 
Allegheny 

38 Trattoria 
offering 

40" Girls,” 

1957 Gene 
Kelly film 

41 Bond rating 

42W.W. II 
weapons 

43 Whistlers 
outside hotels 

44 A concern of a 
seamstress 

45 Within: Comb, 
form 

46 Coups for 
Connors 


47 Relative of 
krypton 

48 A 1984 movie 

49 Askew 


69 Hangings 

70 Private lines 


51 Blackmailer's 
weapon 

52 Flaw 

53 Pash 

56 Cactus fruit 

57 General 
LeMAY 

59 Bridge bid 

62 Rosa in 
"David 
Copperfieid” 

64 Dramatist of 
Shakespeare’s 
day 

65 Encloses 
tightly 

66 Craggy hill 

68 C ryot disbelief 


73 Peloponnesian 
native 

74 These may be 
dangerous 

75 Character- 
istics 

76 MAY 

77 Gray matters? 

78 Muscular 
contraction 

79 Cashmere or 
kersey 

87 Word on a 
galley proof 

88 Ending for 
macro or 
micro 


89 Steatite, e.g. 

90 Field 


91 Actor in “Quo 
Vadis” 

93 Natives of 
Nyborg 

94 So much, to 
Verdi 

95 Hostel 
96DisMAYs 

100 Luther’s 

" feste 

Burg . . 

101 Fernando V. 
e.g. 

102 Whackswork? 

104 Queen's 
attendant 

105 Most pallid 

106 Father of 
PhinehaS 

110 Statue in 

Rockefeller 

Center 

111 Circle parts 


112 One of the 
Joliot-Cmies 


ANDY CAPP 


113 Lock 

114 Mature 


115 Site of games 
honoring Zens 

116 It has its tricks 

118 Wall 
decoration 

119 Dewy-eyed 

120 Jehu’s delight 

121 “Star Wars” 
pilot 

123 Great Lakes 
port 

125 llmemteand 
cuprite 

126 Soprano 

Gamma 

127 Pete’s follower 




WE CAN'T 



■ THAN! 
ME BARK 



Cub^miwh upiw uwI Y 

Dm ti «f> mm,, twiM, 



VIZARD ol ID 


IMAGINING HITLER 

J3y Alvin H. Rosenfeld 121 pp. $15. 

Indiana University Press, 10th and Morton 
Streets, Bloomington, Ind 47405. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by John Gross 

T HE first important book about Hitler to appear 
after World War II was Hugh Trevor-Roper’s 
. “Last Days of Hitler,** published in 1947. It is easy 
-to forget quite how important it was at the time, 
when far more of a question mark hung over Hitler's 
late. The author's aim was to discourage the growth 
of a malign myth based on the idea that Hitler might 
still be alive — the once and future FQhrcr — and be 
succeeded as well as anyone could in laying to rest 
such a belief. 

That some 35 years later he should have been 
briefly but spectacularly caught up in myth- making 


about the bogus Hitler diaries is an irony that hardly 
need be labored. But then in “Imaonins Hiller' 


mg. is likely to stop such a career from exerting a 
horrid fascination. 

A thriving branch of the Hitler industry includes 
works of fiction, ranging from books by established 
authors — George Steiner, Beryl Bainbridge — to 


Imagining 

Alvin H. Rosenfeld argues that “The Last Days of 
Hitler* itself was a bora calculated to excite myths 
as well as dampen them. Through its heightened 
language, the magnetism with which it invested its 
subject and the skill with which it conveyed a sense 
of demonic power, it gave “the dearest indication 
(hat Hitler would survive his own death." 

Yet could it have been otherwise? A Hiller with- 


pulp thrillers and curiosities such as Richard Gray- 


out his demonic aspects — Chaplin's Great Dicta- 
‘Ji — would si 


tor, Brecht's Arturo Ui — would simply not have 

si fax 


been Hitler. He played on the deepest fantasies of' 
power and cruelty and fulfilled them to an unparal- 
leled degree: No amount of scholarship, or debunk- 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 




□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
□□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□□□ 
□□[!□□□□□□□ □□□□□EJEIDnU 
U LI LI LI (!□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□ □ □□□□ □□□□ 


son’s “With Hiller in New York" “ imagining 
ler” is a forceful survey of this material, by an 
author who has written an admirable study of 1 
caust literature, “A Double Dying" ; few of. the 
writers he considers here emerge with much credit. 

The mildest offenders are those novelists such as 
Richard Hughes who have at temp ted a reconstruc- 
tion of passible episodes in Hitlers life but who, by 
concentrating on his early years, have contrived to 
draw the sting from the subject — to present “a 
Hiller without victims," as Rasenfdd puts iL At the 
other extreme are numerous examples of porno- 
kitsch, most disturbing in their implications. 

The twisted sexuality that is a feature of this 
subliterature can also be found in more respectable 
books — “Sophie’s Choke,” for instance, and “The 
WhiLe Hotel" — although “respectable” hardly 
seems the word for them in light of RosenfekTs 
restrained but devastating dissection. Strictly 
speaking, neither William Styran nor DJvL Thomas 
belongs in “Imagining Hitler,” since they deal with 
more general Holocaust themes, buL it would be 
pedantic to complain of their indusion; and the 
only novel to which Rosenfeld devotes an entire 
chapter. George Steiner’s “Portage to San Cristobal 
of A.R,” is one in which Hiller makes a vociferous 
appearance. 

Or perhaps one should say “Hiller,” since Rosen- 
fdd makes it dear how much of an unhistorical 
construct the character bearing Hitler's name in this 
novel is. And while he recognizes the book’s literary 
merits, he also points out its parallels with cheap 
thrillers about hunting down Nazis — or worse. 






r&c&troFOfe 
HlGHsaSHCDU 

I UATmr&l 




4 




it. 




WH4tP 


i *i vs / i 

r? 1 . J. 



REX MORGAN 

fP 




YOU DON'T MAMS TO GO UP TO 
! MY RO Cm WITH ME.TESS/ I'M 
OKAY.' 



MEANWHILE / AWC- BISHOF& ROOM 


AT THE 
® HOTEL 
f SWITCHBOARD 


DOES NOT ANSWER f 
WOULD YOU LIKE TO 
LEAVE A MESSAGE, SIK* 



* 


GARFIELD 


IT WAS NICE 
SEEING YOU 
AGAIN, JOPV 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York Times. 



WE MUST 
DO THIS 
AGAIN/ 



c 




iif 


“Bur IT& FUM.MDM I >bu 0UGHTA TRY fT SOMETIME 1 * 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

P 

C 

F 

Algarve 

38 

83 

16 

59 


12 

54 

8 

48 

Athens 

26 

79 

IS 

84 

Barcelona 

13 

55 

B 

48 

Ovfwrado 

21 

70 

9 

48 

Berlin 

19 

88 

8 

48 

Brussels 

12 

54 

9 

48 

Bucharest 

31 

70 

15 

59 

Badopest 

20 

68 

12 

54 


19 

68 

4 

43 

Cotta Oel Sol 

U 

n 

13 

55 

DoW in 

14 

SI 

6 

43 

Edlahorah 

11 

a 

7 

45 

Florence 

18 

84 

12 

5* 

Frankfurt 

17 

63 

10 

50 

Geneva 

10 

so 

3 

37 

Helsinki 

11 

52 

6 

43 

Istanbul 

24 

75 

12 

54 

Las Palmas 

22 

72 

17 

83 

UdMHi 

20 

88 

11 

S2 

London 

IS 

59 

4 

39 

Madrid 

19 

68 

8 

48 

Milan 

16 

61 

11 

52 


21 

70 

5 

41 

Munich 

16 

61 

6 

43 

HMe 

IS 

64 

lit 

6* 

Oslo 

14 

St 

7 

45 

Paris 

15 

S9 

7 

45 


17 

66 

6 

4.1 

Reykjavik 

10 

50 

2 

38 

-Rome 

18 

64 

12 

64 

Slock halm 

— 

— 

— 

— 

■Strasbourg 

is 

84 

9 

48 

Venice 

15 

» 

12 

54 

Vienna 

20 

68 

11 

tt 

Warsaw 

21 

70 

9 

48 

Zurich 

16 

61 

5 

41 

MIDDLE EAST 



Ankara 

27 

81 

9 

48 

Beirut 

— 

— 


— 

Damascus 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Jerusalem 

39 

84 

18 

66 

TO Aviv 

36 

97 

19 

66 

OCEANIA 





SwOtael 

20 

68 

13 

55 

Sydney 

21 

70 

8 

46 


ASIA 


Bangkok 

Beilina 

Haas Kuna 

Manila 

NnrtMDI 

Seoul 


»i . 

Talael 

Tokyo 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
33 91 25 77 
M 79 13 SS 

33 90 24 7S 
30 tt 27 SI 
37 99 23 77 

28 03 It tl 
19 46 14 57 

29 84 IS 99 

34 73 24 75 
22 72 17 S3 


AFRICA 


Molars 

Cairo 

Cane Team 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Logos 


Toots 


24 75 9 48 

37 99 20 88 

21 70 13 55 

22 72 11 52 
28 82 12 54 
30 S6 25 77 

24 73 It tl 
21 70 8 44 


d LATIN AMERICA 


Boenos Aires 17 43 6 

Lima 2D 48 15 

Mexico City 25 77 9 

Mode Janeiro 27 81 — 

Saa Paolo — — — 


NORTH AMERICA 


Qicaeo 


a -l 

tt 13 
79 10 


— — — — no 


— — — — no 


Detroit 
Hanot ala 

Houston 

Los Aiiao les 

Miami 

MhaMsmoUs 

MOafroal 

Nassau 

New York 

Son Francisco 

Seattle 

Taranto 

Washington 


9 
19 
24 
30 

28 82 13 

n m iq 

29 84 21 
29 84 17 
23 73 12 
29 84 28 
29 84 U 
IB 64 


a oc 
50 tr 


28 82 21 


28 79 
1o tl 
13 55 
23 73 

38 13 


d-efoudv; fo-foggv: Fr-falr; h-hall: oovarcast: oc -partly ctoudv; r-iufn; 
ih-stwwcrs; sn-snaw; si-swrmy. 


SATURDAYS FORECAST — CHANNEL: Sllonny chappy. FRANKFURT: 
Haiti. Terns. 15—7 (59—45). LONDON: Showers. Terns. It— 9 (61—481. 
MADRID: Cloudy. Temp. 21 —6 (70 — 43). NEW YORK: Portly cloud v. Terns. 
27-lt (81 -tl). PARIS: WMIl Temp. 16—8 (81-48). ROME: Cloudy. 
Jems. IV — 11(88 - 52). TEL AVIV: CMudV. Temn. 34 -17 (93 — 63). ZURICH! 
Showers. Temp. 15 — 7 (59— 45). BANGKOK: Thunderstor m s. Temp. 34—25 


193 — 77). HONG KONG: Fair. Toms. 38 - 28 (86— 82). MANILA: Cloudy. 

,POR6; Thunderstorms, terns. 


Terns. 33 — 27 191—811. SEOUL: NA. SING A 
31-28 (tt- 79). TOKYO: NA. 


WmtW Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Mary 10 

Closing prices in locai currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 


AKZO 

AhMd 

AMEV 

A 'Dam Rubber 

Amra&onk 

BVG 

Boetumorm T 

Cakmd Hkm 

Elvrvler-NDU 

Fokker 

G«i Brocodes 

Heine ken 

Hooaovens 

KLM 

Noarden 

Hat Nadaer 

Nedjiovd 

Oce Vender G 

Pakhoed 

Philip? 

Reaeco 

Rodamco 

Rollnco 

Roremo 
Ravel Dutch 
Unilever 
Von Ommeren 
VMF stork 
VNU 


42850 427 

209 310 

189 18SJ0 

10740 loa^o 
22080 220 
24Z50 243 

845 845 

7L3D 75.10 
199 193 

93 91 

37 3440 

120 11SJ0 
1M.1Q 12850 
18350 182 

15040 14070 
4050 5950 
60 5940 

5150 5149 
67. ID 66.90 
171 170 

31850 319 

64.10 6240 

54J0 53JD 
7333 73 

139 179.70 
6*30 6*20 

45 45 

30X10 201 SC 
15050 349 

2880 29 

190 187 

21150 309 


AMPjBS Cenornl mdes : 209.li 
Previous : 2SA70 


Bnisatb 


Arbed 

Bokcerf 

Cackertll 

Cobesa 

EBES 

GB-lnoo-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

Inter com 

Kredielbank 

Petrafino 

Soc Generate 

Satina 

Sohrav 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

Vlellle Mont ogn e 


1740 1710 
5400 5300 
Z2B 230 
3135 3140 
2810 2885 
3050 3030 
1910 1935 
3780 3720 
5490 5380 
2235 2235 
8200 *110 
*mn 0 *jn 
1850 1865 
6900 6830 
4290 4245 
3800 3095 
4895 4870 
1740 1745 
6S20 6420 


Currant Stock Index : 222048 
Previous : 221858 


Franhfnrt 


AEG-Teiefunken 

AlUanzVers 

Altana 

BASF 

Qauu 

oorer 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Bay Vtrebubank 
BBC 

BHF-Banfc 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

CaniGumm! 

Daltnler^enz 

Deoussa 

Deutsche BaMKk 
Deutsche Bank 
Dreyjner Bank 
GHH 
Harsaner 
Hochtief 
Hoechst 
Hoesch 


11* in BP 
1242 1233 
36250 383 

204.70 204 

21180 21170 
338 337 

33250 348 

211 AO 713 
204 294 

373 373 

178 17670 
139 140 

694 889.10 
34950 350 

16250 183 

472*7150 
2228022150 
147 14720 
322 322 

47550 473 

213 213 

1BL40 10650 


Close Pre* 

HOTIm 170 18950 

Hioid 290 271 

IWKA 314 31SJ0 

Kali + Sail 388 118 

Korstodl 22850 22650 

Kaufhot 2Z7 226 

Kkwcluier H-O 24950 SO 

Kkxxkner Werko 7150 71 

Kruno Siam 
Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

MONestiUiin 
Muenen Rueck 
Nlxdart 
PKI 

Porsche 
Preusooo 
PWA 
RWE 

Rhein me roll 
Scherlna 
SEL 
Siemens 
Thrssan 

vote 

Volkswogenw* 

Weila 


109 108 

424 425 

187 119 

145 14450 
15750 160.70 
1350 1379 


635 63450 
1200 1203 
272 27450 
12550 72550 
158 157 

322 325 

442 43950 
35950 35920 
544^0 50 

10050 10080 
18050 18150 
225^® 22550 
57150 574 


Commerzbank index : 124450 
Previous : 134458 




Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Gao 
Chino Light 
Grean Island 
Hong Seng Bank 
Henderson 
hk Electric 
HK Realty A 
HKHalel* 

HK Land 
HK Shano Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch whanwoa 
Hyson 
Inn City 
-larding 
Jaraine Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New Warfd 
Orion! Overseas 
SHK Props 
Sielux 

Swire Pacific a 

TolOmina 

Wah Kwang 
WheelackA 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsor 
World Inti 


25.40 
17 JO 
9J0 
1550 
US 
50 
125 
855 
1159 
36.75 
595 


2140 
17.40 
«J80 
1X90 
850 
4875 
2525 
*25 
1120 
3750 
6 « 


89 

6j60 

2450 
083 
0.92 
1150 
13J0 
1050 
3150 
7J0 
220 
1250 
2J5 
24 JO 
1.92 
150 
7 JO 
Z10 
450 
250 


8.70 
2450 
053 
0.92 
1150 
13J0 
1850 
33 
7 AS 
2JD 
1240 
280 
2440 
150 
158 
7 JO 
210 
450 
2Z 


Hang Sena Index : 
Previous ; U10J9 


141U8 


AECI 

Anglo American 

Anglo Am Gold 

Barlows 

Blyvaar 

Bui lets 

De Beers 

Drtefometn 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Mueid Steel 

KlOOf 

NcdbanK 

Pres Siam 

Ruoslol 


775 800 

,3725 MB 
17300 17500 
1200 12HI 
1425 143* 
8125 SXC 
1050 1080 
5200 5125 
1775 1775 
3425 3450 
2938 2950 
395 J9S 
TWO 7825 
1320 1350 
5900 61D0 
1685 1880 


SA Brews 770 785 

SI Helena 3875 3700 

Sam I 625 815 

West Holding 6*50 t 


composite Stack Index : litue 


*avioet:iMt60 

j Leaden 

AA Carp 

S13tt 

S13tt 

ATI ied-L yens 

IBS 

184 


SSEVi 

S87 

Ass Bftr Poods 

238 

234 

ASS Dairies 

150 

154 

Barclays 

382 

377 

Bass 

544 

542 

BA.T. 

321 

315 

ooecham 

363 

353 

BICC 

225. 

223 

BL 

38 

36 

Blue Crete 

538 

528 

BOC Group 

384 

277 

Boats 

185 

180 

Bowater Indus 

281 

380 


540 


BrW Home SI 

302 

298 







BrttaJI 

218 

215 





29 

268 

Cable Wlretess 

SB0 

565 


183 

161 

Charter Cons 

206 

208 




Cons Gold 

544 

544 

Courtauids 

145 

137 

Datgety 


478 


537 

540 

Distillers 

291 

290 

Drlefontein 

S24tt 

S2 Stt 





S2Stt 

STS <6 

GEC 

192. 

194 




GKN 

.232. 

332 


Glaxo t 
Grand Mef 
GRE 
GuinneU 
GU5 


718 

283 

845 

222 


787 

190 

280. 

301 

893 

*4 

180 

272 

140 

391 

359 


Hawker 
ICI 

Imperial Group 

jogvor 

Lord Securities 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lonrho 
Lucas 

Marks add Sd 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
Panao 
Pllkhatan 
Pieesey 
Prudential 
Re cal Elect 
R e nai onieln 
Rank 
Reed mn 
Reuters 
RavalDutchC 4625/324617/32 


290 

ITS 

673 

182 


S108W SIMM 

338 341 

£56 554 

377 176 


RTZ 

834 

832 


615 

620 


316 

344 

Sears Haldlnas 

B7V9 

&6» 

Shell 

711 

710 

STC 

192 

200 

SM Chartered 

469 

469 

Sun Alliance 

4*1 

451 

Tate and Lyle 

440 

440 


245 

240 

Thorn EMI 

434 

431 

TJ.Groua 

242 

244 



aete 

!*•¥. 

Trafalgar Hse 

352 

348 

THF 

149 

U5 

Ultramar 

223 

215 

1 Unilever I 11 35/8411 T7/37 

United Biscuits 

177 

173 

Vickers 

- 340 

320 

wuuinvi 111 

810 

■11 

1 P.T.38 Index : 1881.98 


| Previous : 991.18 



If SHm D 

Banco Comm 

17400 

17250 


3001 

298) 

Cteohoteto 

7580 

7473 

Cradltal 

2085 

3851 

Eridorcka 

9515 

9410 


12375 

12250 

Flat 

2985 

2979 


80 

75 

Generali 

44300 441 BO 

IFI 

7580 

7501 

itotcementl 

B7900 

87390 

llalgas 

1659 

1845 

Italmobflkxrl 

75808 75600 


M93D 84995 

Montedison 

1610 

180S 

Olivetti 

8285 

8270 

Pirelli 

2352 

2290 

HAS 

65300 *5000 

Rinescente 

891 

686 

SIP 



SMC 

1388 

1280 

Snta 


2843 

Skoda 

1427S 14295 , 

Stel 

3617 

3(08 

MIB Correal index : 1387 


] previews : 1M* 



H _vm* 

Air Uoulde 

829 

as 

Aisthom Alt 

299 

297 


1530 

1549 


583 

573 

BIC 

517 

519 

Banoraki 

1900 

1895 


721 

2550 

708 

2531 


2155 

2144 

Chcroeurs 

520 

503 

OubMad 

575 

578 


1329 

1318 


as 

618 

EH-Aoul talne 

231 230.10 


878 

884 


826 

630 


1891 

1091 


509 

508 


2081 

2060 

Losteur 

880 

705 

fOreal 

2478 

W- Tl 1 

Martell 

1770 

jwTj 1 

Metro 

1801 

p | ' 1 1 

Merlin 

1970 


MJchetin 

929 

979 





101 JO 

I0J 

Ooetaentaie 

707 

TBS 


TOt 

787 


533 

526 

Petreles Itse) 

36650 28650 


3*5 

349 1 

Priofernta 

227 JO 22&J0 ^ 

RodWetSm 

288 280.10 1 

Redouts 

1385 

1380 

Bewsil Udaf 

'S 

1730 

714 

Sib Rosstenoi 

1530 

I5IS 


2430 

2480 

Thomson CSF 

543 

535 

Aaefl index : 21 x 2 * 


Pravtoax : 38M7 
CAC Index : 21838 



Previous : 217A0 



1 ShflttWTO II 


Cold Storm 
DBS 

Fraser Naave 
Haw Par 
nchc n ac 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
DUB 
DUE 

Shanarhio 


245 245 

6.10 £» 
5.05 5 

2.11 Z09- 

2.40 238 

8.15 6 

855 SJ0 
134 252 
279 278 

2J2 NA. 


w ujr 
274 272 
6.15 8.10 

1j 08 IJi 
432 450 

2 1J8 
4J2 . 4J0 


SiretHTIiaes lad. Index : 798.12 
Pravloes : 79178 


AGA 

AHoLovol 


Astro 

Atlas Copco 


Electrolux 


Sanb-Sconla 

SandvFk 

SVanska 

SKF 

SwsflshAtatch 

Volvo 


NA 


1H 

203 

NA 

444 

485 

465 

115 

115 

238 

NA 

318 

3Ht 

38/ 

285 

385 

345 

153 

ISB 

194 

192 

NA 

455 

NA 

400 

NA 

94J0 

228 

229 

218 

219 

244 

NA 


AM 


: 39949 




ACI 
AN I 
AN2 
BHP 


224 225 

283 275 


Bougainville 

Brambles 


Comal co 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Elders lid 

Hooker 

Mogeftan 

MIM 

Myer 

Oakbrtdge 


848 652 

318 321 

226 225 

390 401 

372 375 

235 235 

848 854 

37 285 

225 222 

301 364 

165 185 

260 270 

318 343 

184 182 

98 96 


Poraldon 

RGC 

s«tes 

Sleigh 

Southland 

Woooside 

Wormold 


425 425 


628 824 
ISO ISO 
25 25 
159 159 
357 357 


AUMMM 

Previou s ; 888 JSl 

Source: Reuters. 


Tofcy 


Akai 

448 

441 

AsahlOtem 

934 

175 

4*Xli Glass 

880 

875 

Sank at Tokyo 

810 

823 


524 


Ion on 

1240 

1260 


1620 

1670 

Utah 

381 

270 

3al Nippon Print 

1000 

1000 


585 



B3S 

826 

=cnue 

8970 

9110 

=ull Bank 

1560 

1560 

-ull Photo 

1720 

1729 

“uiltsu 

1150 

1170 

ittodii 

790 

796 

-OtacM Cable 

711 

712 


U« 

1380 

Japan Air Linas 

6930 

6*58 


KoHmo 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kvooera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Etac 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsukastll 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulato r s 
NhkaSec 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Stool 
Nippon Ytsen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shlirumi 

Shinefsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 

Sumitomo Murine 
Sum (tamo Metal 
TaMCorv 

Tataho Marine 

Takeda Chem 

TDK 

Tallin 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Toppan PrlnHna 
Toray ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YomakSilSec 


.305 


MarlO 


CaziMEan stocks via AP 


hnaui/DJ .1 

previous : b 


Index : 1 
nN5i 
New Index :979A9 
Pravleas : 981 J7 


Adla 
Aktsulsse 
Bank Lou 
Brown Boverl 


Oba Gctoy 
MMISulsU 


Credit J 

Electrowatt 

Georg Fischer 

Hotderbank 

IntercOscount 

Jacob SucnoTd 

jebnoll 

Landis Gyr 

MoeveraXck 

Nestle 

OerRkan-B 

Roche Baby 


Schindler 

sotzar 

SBC 

SwtssnJr 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss volksbank 
union Bank 
Wlnterlhur 

Zurich Ins 


SBC index :454jo 
Previses : esaji 


NA: not Quoted; ha: not 
aval table; ed: ex^UvldSxL 


FORTItlATESTWQRDON 

BJRO0OWK 

readcmlcemuz 

EAdOH MONDAY N THE HT 


42S5 Abfl Prce 
15000 AgnlcaE 
2100 Aora Ind A 
33900 Ait Energy 
5J» Atoa cent 
341 Atgoma St 
140OAlXhS WAf 
2643 ATgCen 

200 Aafaesioe 
2000 ATO0 1 1 
5900 BP Canodo 
8272 Bank BC 

T 326Q5 Bank N S 
13000 Barrlcke 
2700 Bortonm r 
2900 Brolonw 
18280 Bramaiea 
30100 Brenda M 
10739 BCFP 
68365 BC Res 
18874 9C Phone 
2T80Brunswk 

3050 Budd Con 

6550 CAE 
100CCLA 
2320CDtstbBI 
5143 Cod Frv 
6790 C Mar West 
socPadcr* 
3600 Can Trust 
110261 Cl Bk Com 
1000 Cckl Nat Res 
81290 CT ire A f 
IBM C Util B 
5800 Cara 
(737Celmae 
M7Crton175p 

201 CHUM 
5*60 C Dlsfb A 
2320 CDIstb B f 
1*00 CTL Bank 

600 Conwest A 
MOOCosekaR 
20733 Conran A 
21830 Crown* 
10900 Czor Res 
49161 DoonDev 
6020 Denison A p 
6570 Dm Ison B I 
3600 Develcon 
720B Dlcknsn A f 
MDWuonB 

4804 Daman A 
32560 Dofaeoo 
750 Du Pont A 
1540 DvtexA 
7900 Eldhom X 
8^5 Esully Svr 

95QQCFotamC 
1152 F| cnbrdae 
4170 Fed ind A 
.0100 F City Fin 
18870 Fraser 
200 Fruehauf 
800 Gerxlls A 
-SSGeocCamp 
14129 Geocrude 
2800 Gibraltar 
6)22Galdcorp I 
8200 Goodveor 
3M0 Grandma 
^0 GL Forest 
TDBOGrevhnd 
•88 H Group A 
1000 Hiding A I 
200 Hawker 
4100 Haves D 
WgHBavCo 
50042 imasco 
600indal 
3400 Inland Gas 
5*230 Inti Thom 
4373 inter Pipe 
Aiqo ivacoB 
eOfiJannock 
SOOKetwH 
7700 Ker r Ado 
40233 LabaH 
21890 Lae Mnrts 
MOLOntCam 
48400 L/teana 
1373 LL Lac 
55 Lab law Co 
315 Mice 
9800 Melon H X 

5074 Mertand E 

9233 Motion A f 


High Low Close Char 
518% 1BH 18W 
S18H 1616 76VS+ tt 
%m 746 79k + tt 

5?* » 

521 21 ZT 

gl* Z1 '* 2146+ Vk 
52516 2444 25tt+ tt 
52014 20W 2016 

58 6 4 — tt 

JBtt ,9tt 91%+ Vk 
5341k 34V5 34W— tt 
55W 5*6 Stk 

S12W 12tt 12V. + Vk 
130 128 130 

» « « +5 

480 480 480 

S17tt T7 T7tt+ Ik 
» 9 9 — Vi 

W 8tt 9 + tt 
239 232 232 —3 

522 2114 21tt— Ik 
ST4tt Utt 14VS+ tt 
523tt 23 23tt 
S18tt IfiVt 16W+ tt 
52715 TJVi 27W 

5SW 5tt SVi+ Ik 
5J4A. 1416 1416+ M 

snvi 21 ta ziik 

ngtt 2816 2814— tt 
-537 3Mk 3698+ Vk 
Bltt 31tt • 319k + Ik 
30 30 30 +3W 

tt «tt 816 — tt 
SI8 179k 18 +tt 
513M 13 IJtt-t-tt 
16tt 816 6tt+ Ik 
ST7tt 17tt I7tt+tt 
141 41 41—1 

KEta Stt 5tt 
*5Jk 5tt 51b + Ik 
SIOV. lOtt 1016+ Vk 
tttt 81* 8tt+ tt 
375_ 375 375 —5 

flljk lltt lTtt 
51914 19V. 199k— Vk 
19J 191 191 

405 395 400 

Vi% ^ lists 

Is a sm 

^ 230^ 240^ ^ 
*« 25*4 25ft 

SISH 1616 1616— tt 
539 39 39 

84k 89k— tt 

»J6 7tt 7W— tt 
Hitt 21 tt 21*6 

i§tt + 35 

g S« 

S r 

»BW »0+8 

H? W4 998+ tt 

JB3? J* 7tt+ tt 

*3816 38 38 — tt 

SJS7& 

HIS 21 ai -tt 

Wk 2598+ tt 
*7*9 7tt 799 
125 125 125 — 5 

19tt 19tt— tt 
9J 9fk 

Ste 15tt 159k— tt 
H7tt 36* 27tt+9k 

JJSS i^ 4 Utt +16 
SISVk 18 II 

>> «tt 

SS XTVt 37V.+ (k 
*1998 l9tt 194k + 2 
Ig* 12tt 139* 

3Att 36tt— tt 
Mtt 149k— Ik 
2Uk 249k + tt 

Oft 3414 TJLV 4. S 

WMk 159k ^tt + 4k 


3748 Mohan B 
6100 Nabisco L 
87012 Nor ondo 
31319 Moreen 
57852 Nva AKA I 
8500 Nowsco W 
26960 NuWstsp A 
2500 Oak wood 
3SJO>OshowaA§ 
UOOPamour 
11881 panCanP 
2300 Pine Point 
4000 Place GO o 
4*935 Ptooer 
9sor__.:_ 

1500 Out sF 



I Proviso 

IQoeSfurac 

iRayrackt 


132400 Redoath H 
U33SO Rd Slenhs A 
121*62 ResServ f 
2433 Revnpra A 
I 1900 Ro geri A 


2BO Rothnwi 
85450 Sceptre 
100 Scatts 1 
noa7 sears Can 
38328 Shell Can 
19427 Sherri tt 
M0O5laina 
m Slater Bf 
24933 Sauthm 
17220 Si Brodcst 
58954 SMctA 
IQSOSuMra - 
.1600 steeo R 
18250 Sydney o 
2500 Tol corn 
1700 Taro 
?2B reck CnrA 
NTOTeekB f 
4463 Tex Con 
8066 Thorn N A 
49828 Tor Pm Bft 
512r/ 1 orator Bt 
1555 Traders A f 
UOTTrusMt 
9500 Trtnlty Res 
96415 TmAlfo UA 
37106 Trcon PL 
*386 Trtmoc 
30700Trb»CAf 
SHOO Turbo f 
ion Un Carted 
12331 U Entprbe 
itoou Kano 
2568 Verstl A I 
2200 Vestaran 
NJWtMwM 
983 Westmln 
120 Weston 
2260 Waodwa A 
15200 Yk Boor 


S* Itti 

mjt- 

SO 44 

8916 9 

*88 

Sgtt 33W 33tt+W 

*30 3! 30 +tt: 

138 130 138 + 3- 

^ vr?: 

410 410 410 • : rj 

WVr -8tt 

siitt .11 11 

S ■£, 32 ■w*' 

289 389 288 

17H 160 140 — (8 

■Vtt 9tt 916+ tt 
SWtt lOtt ‘ lOtt— tt 

S48 40 40 

Stt 8tt+ M 
25tt 2Stt+M 
■tt «K- 

r w«- 

■I* 

*4«tt 48tt . 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY MAY 11-12, 1985 


Black Hawks Gain On Oilers, 
Flyers Take Lead With Victory 


Page 15 


.'tf 


{ 1C* Sr. 

V 


R ! 





■*\ letowvUniud Pm Mennaond 

The Flyers’ Brad McCrimiiMMi, left, trips up Brest Asbton and sends bun flying. 


I \ i 


C c 1 he Great latent of shawon Uunston 
. It’s a Question of Refining the Power 


' m . United Prat international 

CHICAGO —Jack CyOOkhan 
’f scored one goal and sei op another 
"* Mie - Thursday night, hoping the 
Chicago Black Hawks snap the Ed- 
monton Cans’ playoff winning 
streak with a 5-2 decision. 

^ - Edmonton bads 2-1 m the best- 
ip of-seven Campbell Conference fr- 

STANLEY CUP PUYOFTS 


m Sunday at Chicago Stacfinm. Tbc 
Oxkrshad won 12 straight games in 
Stanley Cup competition, includ- 
ing nine straight this season. 

In the' other National Hockey 
League playoff gn™*, the Philadel- 
phia Flyers downed the Quebec 
Nordiqnes, 4-2, to take a 2-1 lead in 
the Wales Cooferenoe finals. 

After the Black Hawks’ victory 
in Chicago, O’Callahan said, “we 
deserve to be here. There still are 
~ four teams left in this league. We 
' didn’t get here by any fluke." 

Before Thursdays game, that 
was questionable. The Hawks Lost 
the first two games by a total of 18- 
5, including an opening 11-2 de- 
feat. Bat back in Chicago, the 
Hawks used tight defense and crisp 


pass from Darryl Sutler to score 
one minute later. 

“I thiijk they got a lot of breaks,” 
Edmonton Coach Glen Saiher said. 
“They were playbg the first game 
in front of their fans. Perhaps we 
were a little uptight when the game 
started. Then we made a ample of 
mistakes and we were down, 2-0." 

Edmonton pulled within 2-1 
what Jarosfcv Ponzar scored his 
first goal of the playoffs at 11:14 of 




with his ninth of the playoffs at 
14:20 to give Chicago a 3-1 lead. 
Mark Messier of the Oilers made 
the score 3-2 with a goal at 3:07 of 
(he final period before Savard’s 
score at 7:07 ended the threat. 

Black Hawks goalie Murray 
Bannerman stopped 33 shots to 
earn his first victory over Edmon- 
ton. He also got an assist on the 


s iv - T - f - , rs 


‘SSpSsRS 



"-Lis 


^ - r By Zca Beikow 

t New York Tima Service ... 

XJy CHICAGO —Last week at IQ o’clock tmenmcaii^ 
^ under a gray sfcy and with the flags an the Wrigtey 
^ Field center-field scoreboard crackling in. the sharp, 
M ;widced wind off LakeMkAagan, the Cobs* embr rookie 
£•- practiced turning the .double .play at second base 
J before 37^75 empty seats. ... 

£ ! It was still more than three hours before game time, 

ff • And only the rookie and the mfidd coach, Ruben 
» [Amaro, and a few other early birds were an the fidd. 
Il ! He is a highly prized freshman, one who has been 
[ 'thnzst,overa«^e^mtoaJc£y ) 5tartszgposiiioaoria 

' [team that is counting on him to hdp win a National 
^ Jj^ue pennant, hs first in 40 years. 

<1 * Shawon Dramao, the 22-year-old shortstop, was 

working bn his double-play pivot “Otherwise/’ said 
■-* Manager Jim Frey, watdring fromthe dngovrt steps, 

"he might get killed out there:” 

\ . ! Dunston has also nm into the third baseman who 
was about to catch a pop-up that Dunston mistakenly 


J 

• v,r j i 

' ' a 
* 
•• tit 

. V 



Ajr- P-.sHO’j px* 
(ant-. ►*- Av.AEf 

«&»:• v '-‘-m i ke 

* V? 5 n 




AtVJ" » 
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a ir 

, .. 'HI!* 


■* t fr/wght ms «ropr m fmr inning s m 

rue game, taken unnecessary chances nmning the 
bases, and been overeageratbaL After one O-for-5 
[day, he lay awake all night wondering what it took to 
^etahilin the big leagues. 

- But none of the miscues in tee field has cost the 
[team a game so far, and spine spectacular plays — 
making that beautiful, difficult pay of going into the 
bole aL shortstop, and another of flyingbehind second 
base to koare a shot and getting the runner at first — 
haw saved runs. 

His during on the base paths has also opened 
scoring opportunities for the Cubs, and a. few of his 
bits have been timely aids on the path to a victory. 

_ , Tie shows flashes,” said Frey. Tf he learns to be 
consistent^ he could become one oTthe greatest short- 
stops in the. game and one .of the most exciting 
,i . piwtts// ■■ ■ 

< j Loa^MiStsatK^Hallnffajnc^iOrtstttpmdpow 
* jrf!alHfa4fcUn^ said^T^uastoahas theatom- 
gest arm of a shortstop Tveever seen— -Tm not saying 
the mottaccuraie, Tm saying the strongest" . 

Professional baseball people seem to agree that 
Dunston has knmensc latent — speed (he runs the 90 
feet ftpmhbmc to first base in the remarkable time of 
3.7 seconds), aggressiveness, neat range and the pow- 
erful throwing arm in the fido, and an ability to make 
contact-at the plate. Said fiey, “He’s got some pop in 
his bat. I say ‘some' right now. Down the' road, be 
could hit 15 to 20 homos a season.” He is a great 
tereat as a base stealer. 

. Professional bascball people also agree that all this 
talent must be harnessed. 

[ Frey porated out that -Dancy! Stnawhory, with 


to Dunston, “Shawns, if the first pilch is in there, 
swing” ' 

Shflwon did, and douWed. 

- Bowa was one of Dnnston’s idols when Shawon was 
growmig up in Brooklyn. Bowa grumbled; and though 
he said, T know 1 can’t play in the middle of the 
diamond forever ” he is used to playing. 

T had a scrapbook and I kept a lot of the FhflBes 
pictures mh/* said Dunston. “Moved the Phillies, and 
I loved Larry, He was such a great defensive player. 
When f first saw him in spring trailing, 1 was awed.” 

Dunston wasn't happy to see Bowa's nose om (tf 
joint, but Dunston understood that he still had his job. 
to pursue. 

ifc is pleasant, polite and eager to say the right 
thing." .He credits his teammates for bri ning him in bis 
early going and credits Us parents— “Tm crazy about 
’em” — with establishing a foundation for him to 
nmmtnhi confidence and a sure sense of himself. 

■ His parents. Jack and Brdtda Dunston, raised three 
children — the other two are Bryant, 25. who is in the 
Army, and Kindra, 21, a secretary in a law office in 
Manhattan. 

“When I signed with the Cubs,” aid Dunston, T 


O’Caflahan’s assist in the third 
period illustrated his point. Stand- 
ing in his own end, O’Callahan 
flipped the puck to Denis Savard at 
center ice, and Savard scored on a 
breakaway with a backhand shot 
past goalie Grant Fuhr. The goal 
gave Chicago a 4-2 lead, and was 
followed byTroy Murray’s empty- 
net goal. 

The Hawks took a 2-0 lead in the 
first period, and both goals came 
on brilliam assists. O’Callahan 
scared at 5:01 cm a pass from Rick 
Paterson that went past three Oil- 
ers. Steve Lflnner took a pinpoint 


Chicago center Bill Gardner in- 
jured his right Vnett in the first 
period. 

Flyers 4, Nonfiqnes 2 
In Philadelphia, the defense was 
the key to the Flyers’ victory. 

“I just wanted to survive the 
night." said Doug Crossman, who 
with his compatriots on the back 
line was a tower of strength after 
Brad McCrimmon, the team's best 
defenseman this season, separated 
his shoulder in the first five min- 
utes. “We knew we couldn't be car- 
rying the puck down the ice all the 
time, not that our defense crverhan- 
dles the pock anyway. We let the 
forwards take it and get most (tf the 
offensive play going" 

“With Brad out,” said Brad 
Marsh, “a lot of the forwards took 
over more of the defensive load. All 
we bad to do was protect tee mid- 
dle and in front of the net, not rush 
the puck or go into the corners. 
They took care of all that." 


The Flyers grabbed a 1-0 lead on 
a power-play goal by Murray Cra- 
ven at 12:13 of the first period. But 
they already had lost McCrimmon, 
who was checked into the boards 
from behind by WHf PaiemenL He 
will be out for the rest of the play- 
offs. 

Only 21 seconds after Craven 
scored, Peter Stastny passed from 
behind the net to Aiain Cote in (he 
slot. He gpt only a piece of the puck 


UUl 11 WiT* UlUk^U LU UUUV 5UOUV 

PeDe Lindbergh to make it 1-1. 
With 66 seconds remaining in the 
session. Quebec’s Pal Price passed 
off the sideboards and the puck 
eluded Todd Bergen, who was 
manning the right point on a Phila- 
delphia power play. Dak Hunter 
picked up the pass and fed Brent 
Ashton, who put in a 25-foot wrist 
shot. 

The i Flyers shut down Quebec 
the resi of the way. They tied it only 
1:41 into the second period when 
Joe Paterson connected on a short 
wrist shot. 

nWa Sinisalo got the winner 
when he took a cross-ice feed from 
Peter Zezd and put a wrist shot 
home to the shon side. That power- 
play goal, at 11:39 of the second 
period, was followed by Brian 
Propp's score with 7:14 left in the 
game, also on a power play. 

“We were a link tired out there 
after taking all those penalties in 
the first period," noted Flyers de- 
fenseman Pat Price, referring to 
nine first-period infractions. “We 
took a couple of shortcuts in the 
second penod and it cost us. The 
penalties took their tdL 

Game 4 is Sunday in Philadel- 
phia, where the Flyers have not lost 
since Feb. 2, a span of 20 games. 
The Nordiques have not won there 
since 1981. 


Giants Edge Past Cubs in 12th Inning 






struggled early in his rookie year, and so did WDEe 
Mays. . 

Wearing a turtle-nedc sweatshirt under his blue 
, Cubs’ jersey to ward off the morning duQ, Dunston, 
lean and quick at 6 feet, 1 inch and 275 pounds (1.85 
meters, 79 kilos), took toss after toss after toss from 
Amaro, whostood near the second-base position. 

The day before, in the first of a two-game series 
against tee Giants, Dunston was involved in several 
**) double plays and double-play possibilities, and he 
i again had frightened the Cub teass by the way he 
confronted the bard-sliding base runners. 

"They’ve been knockin’ him off his feeC said Frey. 
“He’s throwing right into the runner. See; Ruben s 
now trying to get him to slide toward right fidd, get set 
and throw hard.” 

This is part of the hard-ball education of Shawon 
Dunston, who is out of Thomas Jefferson l fi gh School 
in Brooklyn, and the No. 1 pick in the 1982 amatenr 
free-agency draft. That was a tribute to his abShyand 
potential, especially considering that the No. 5 selec- 
tion in that draft was Dwight Gooden, who throws 
strikes. " 

Dunston had spent the last three years in the minor 
leagues, tn 1982/ at Sarasota in the rookie league, he 
batted J21, fourth in the league; and side 32 bases; 
best in the league. The next year he moved up to Quad 
Cities, the Class A team, where he bit J10 and siole58 
'j bases. In 1984, he fas up with Midland in Double A,, 
and batting .329 with 38 stolen bases -whorfie was 
assigned to lowa. the Cubs' top farm team. He did not. 
bum up theleaguei hitting .233 with 9 stolen bases m 

61 gftrttftft- 

And so in the spring-of 1 985, an important decision 
had to be made by Cubs officials: ShouldDnnston bc 
elevated to the Gibs* regular shortstop position, or 
should he be consigned to Iowa in Tripe. A for more 
seasoning? . ' "••••. 

. About a week before this season was to bqjn, a 
decision was reached. “Shawon,” Jim Frey told him, 
"you're our starting shortstop.” ; . > y : ■ 

Last season's starter at shortstop, Larry Bowa, who 
is 39 and in his 1 5th season in the mqozs, hit .223^ with 
just 1 7 runs batted in and only two RBI after the AB- 
Star break. 

“In the minors,'” said Bowa. who has watched and 
assisted Dunston, "they let the fundamentals s&de & 
linie with Shawon. He was so talented that they let 
him play in the minors and didn’t want to tinker with 
hira much/’ - . . • - ; 

Amaro watches Dunston now and tries to cahn him 
down.- “I teH him he’s always on the three coimt,” 
Amaro says. "You field in three counts. Count one is 
to catch the balL-Coum two is to plant your feet and 
position, yourself to throw. And count three is throw- 
ing Sometimes Shawon forgets about cotmts'one and; 
two.” 

Sometimes Dunston forgets to bring Ins bare hand 
dose to the -glove on a ground ball, and thus, has to. 
hurry to puBit but Of die glove, and throws bumetfly,. 
Amaro reminds him, . ' ' - * 

At bat, Dunston has been. more concerned about.' 
“not embarrassing Hmsdt” said Frey, and thus not 
-^taking confident cuts.- In Pittsburgh recently, Frty 
" looted that Dunston. a right-handed hitler, was taking 

P_-— _S— J. .1 L TV. ii n ■ hiVaW - - 



United Pros International 

SAN FRANCISCO — The San 
Francisco Giants have scored only 
one run in their last 25 innings, but 
they made it stand up for a victory 

BASEBAIXROUNDUP 


Cubs, 1-0, in 12 innings at Candfe- 
srickPark. 

Manny Trillo hit a run-scoring 
single with two out in the 12th, 
enabling the Giants to snap their 
string of 24 scoreless huungs. 

Pinch hitter Rob Deer hit a two- 
out single to center off reliever 
WanenJBrusstar and Brusstar then 
bit Dan Gladden with a pitch to 
pul runners on first and second. 
Trillo followed with a single that 


just cleared the glove of shortstop 
Larry Bowa. 

Bowa, who entered the game in 
the ninth inning, appeared in his 
2,153d game at shortstop, tying the 
National League record of Rabbit 
Maranville. 

The victory went to Scott Gar- 
relis, who pitched four inning s and 
gave up just one hit. 

The Giants, frustrated twice ear- 
lier when a botched squeeze bunt 
attempt and some foolhardy base 

nWe^foaded the S ba^S3j°one 

out in the 11th but failed to score 
when Chris Brown hit into a double 
play. 

Scott Sanderson went the first 
nine innings for the Cubs, scatter- 
ing eight hits, walking one and 
striking out nine. Hanunaker 


ARP 

Baseball 

Major League Leaders Thursday’s Line Scores 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


NATIONAL LEAOUE 


Transition 


AiaericaB VtftPft 

TORONTO— Plocad Willie a) kens, first 



Q 

AB 

R 

H 

pa. 

Pittsburgh HO M 006—0 3 2 

basomaa on Mdvcrs far the purposes of glv 

Herr »L 

27 

107 

H 

37 

-3M 

Sm Diego ■MMBIte-? 4 • 

loe Mm his unaandlMonal release. 

Murphy AN 

25 

96 

22 

35 

■365 

BtotockL Holland (8) and Pona; Thurmona 

FOOTBALL 

Cruz Hta 

26 

1(0 

16 

37 

-346 

and KamMtv. w— ' Thurmond. 1-2. L— Bto- 

Gotv*y SD 

34 

113 

IB 

39 

Jts 

toefa. VI 

National Football Lcoow 

VJfBVMPflf 

25 

93 

H 

32 

J44 

CMcaga MMWNM 4 I 

Chicago— S toned Who Tomczak. auor- 

Virgil PM 

23 

74 

10 

25 

an 

Sag Francisco MMM BIV-1 11 1 

trrback. and Kevin Poltw. safety. 

wuiach Man 

26 

93 

11 

31 

333 

Samtonon. Smith (10). Brunt Or (12) and 

DETROIT— Stoned Tom Morris. Duane 

MCGm SfL 

21 

70 

12 

23 

-329 

Lata, Davis 1101; Homnatar. Garralta (9) 

GaUmway, and Mark Rovsfer, cornerbocks; 

Woukta Hln 

24 

23 

n 

24 

.329 

end Travtoa Branfv 1721. W— Gtoratfs, 1-7. 

Ron Crm%, sc frty; Scot? Barrows, guard; 

BJ^uscaii LA 

23 

■44 . 

9 ■ 

21 

-328 

L— Brusstar, 0-1. 

jack Kostar, offensive tackle; Ken Groatar, 


Th.Nw.Yo* Tins 

Shawon Dunston: Still needs renanders. 


. icldmy mother that she had worked long enough. She 
' didn’t have to work any longer." 

! His signing bonus was about $100,000, a tidy sum 
. for anl 8-year-old. He is now earning about $40,000, 
dose to the big-league mmhnnm. 

Jack Dunston drives a limousine. After the 1983 
season, he drove Danyi Strawberry to a dinner in New 
York, where he was to receive a rookie of the year 
award. 

Shawon went along for 'the ride, string in the back 
seat with Strawberry. “Is it hard up there?" Shawon 
asked him about playingin the majors. He recalled 
that Strawbeny said: “The good ones are always 
consistent. Most of the time, anyway. Everybody’s not 
perfect" 

And Duoston remembered that when Frey told him 
. in spring training that he was going to be the starting 
shortstop, he thought two thoughts: first, “Here’s ray 
chance, go relax and play,” ana second, “How would 
it fed to make a mistake in front of 40,000 people?" 

. It didn’t take him long to find out 
- In the Cribs’ first game of the season ou April 9, the 


Nmbk Murphy, AfloMa.22; Sandbars, Chi- 
caao, 19; Garv*v. San Dina M; Harr, Si. 
Loot*, U; tarr tied wMt 77. 

RBI; Mvrnby, Atlanta, 33; C-WUlon. Ptifio- 
deMila. If; -L Clark, St Louis. If; Mortiand. 
Chteooa. if; 4 arc tied with tt. 

Hit*r Garvey, Sen DJaoa.3?; Crux, Houston, 
37; Herr, St Louts. 37: Murphy. Atlanta 33; 
Panccr.anctooaH.33; VHavu. Philadelphia 
32. 

OouMik: GwymvScn Dicpaf; Roy, PMs- 
■ bumh, 9; WQDodb MOnhwd. 9; Parker. Qn- 
ctanatL*: TempMhm.Scn Dlesat; VHaya, 
PhUwMphia. B. 

Trtotai: Gwnrn. San Diana 3; McGee. SI. 
Leals, 3j 14 arc IM wtth Z 

Home Row. Mucphy, Atlanta 10; Downa 
MOnmeLAl MarsbolL Los Anodes, t; S*ro»y 
benv. Hew "York, 4; Carter. New York. 5; 
Garvev, San Dieea Sj JjOark, st Louts, s. 

Stole# Bases: Coleman, SLLovla 71; UlS- 
mim. SL Lotrta n ; Dernier, CMowa lO; Sam- 
aH. PhUadelphlalO: GtoddeaSan Frandsca 
9. 

prrcHma 

VHmiest/Wtonln* PcL/ERA: BAmlih. 
MnnlreoLA— (L1JMB.Z0Z; HanHnaSdn Ole- 
<**.6-0. tmXJSi Hersfttotr, Lac AnodesJ- 
0. UmL US; Kncpper. Houston, 3—0, uioft 
2SD: Mahler, Attonto. 7-0. UN. 109. 

SMkeorts: JDeLeoa. Pmsbanm 51; Va- 
>«Hue>a,Las Anode*. 57.- Ryan, Houston 41; 
Soto. CtodnocrtL «; Sutcliffe. Chlcaoa 44. 

Saves: Reardon. MontrccL 8; GassonaSan 
Dlcoa 7; LaSmHh, CMcaoa 7: Candelaria, 
PRtabwroh. 5; 4 am tied with 4. 


St Lae Is OIMWH1I 2 

Los Aanctos Oil M MB 0-4 7 3 

KeoaMra Horton tn. Alien 19). Oarltv tW 
andftorlcr;VaiannNla.Niedtothier(f).How- 
ell U0J and Sctosda. W-AHon.1 -Z L— Howel L 
2-2. Sv — Dovtey 111. HR — Los Anodes. Whit- 
field (27. 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


Salas Mia 
BoeMaOak 
Puckett Mia 
WMtofcer Dot 
F ran co Or 
Atone* CM 
Ripken Bit 
Cooper MU 
P-Brwflev Sea 
GuBell Tor 


G AB R H PcL 
18 50 I II SO 

a » n ii ai 

3* 120 15 42 J50 

22 M 17 30 349 

35 90 17 31 J44 

23 97 IS 32 JOT 

as n 19 32 427 

aa 9S 7 31 J26 

a ra ii m j3i 

27 103 17 33 J20 



W 

L 

Pet. 

G8 

Baltimore 

16 

9 

a*o 

— 

Detroit 

15 

9 

JOS 

to 

Toronto 

16 

11 

J93 

i 

Boston 

14 

13 

J19 

3 

M/lvouta* 

11 

15 

A23 

5to 

Hew York 

10 

14 

ATT 

5to 

Cleveland 

10 

14 

JB5 

6to 


West Division 



Cofffemta 

17 

11 

Ml 

— 

Minnesota 

15 

11 

-577 

1 

ailcooo 

12 

11 

sa 

3to 

Kansan city 

12 

13 

AM 

3to 

Seam* 

11 

U 

AM 

4 

Oakland 

12 

14 

J09 

5 

Texas 

8 

17 

JOT 

7ta 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Dtvbtaa 




W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Now York 

16 

B 

Aa 

— 

Qitcoao 

16 

9 

mo 

to 

Montreal 

16 

10 

AW 

i 

St. Louis 

12 

15 

AAA 

5to 

PHtadeMila 

10 

15 

AM 

6to 

Pittsburgh 

S 

10 

JOB 

9 


diKhmoil 
Houston 
Atlanta 
Sen Frandsca 


west Division 

15 11 577 — 

15 14 517 HA 

13 n JD0 2 
13 13 JH 2 
11 14 ,440 31* 
11 14 JOT 41* 


1 + 


plate oi>e day apiusfdttPitestensh Piratcs,Frcy said 


error, in the fifth riming. He batted in the next inning, 
-and when he walked to tee plate he received applanse. 
“I was surprised,” he sakL d Ii was a good fedmg.” He 
reloaded with a single to right field off Ride Rhoden, 
his fkst in the major leagues. 

■ In the following days he found it unbelievable rim 
be where be was. “Imagine.” he said, “throwing 
'out Andre Dawson on a ground bafl. God, I used to 
watch Inin all the thne m television. And Pena, and 
Pete Rose, and Schmidt.’* 

And sometimes, around second base, when there’s a 
break in the action, they say hello to him. Do they call 
him “Rook"? “No," said Dunston, “They tespectyou 
for bong up there And they're human beings. They 
know I have a name. They rail me Shawon." 


Ram: NlOavta Oakland. 54; Rka Batten, 
22; Corcw.CatHanVa.2fl; Gacrtl, Minnesota 
20; Muratiy. Oakland, 2D: Pettts. CnlttnrWa 
*L 

RM: MOavbi. Oakland, 24; Rlpkea Bani- 
™m,3*i Armas, Boston, 73; Goetfi, Minneso- 
ta- »; Packed. Minnwola 2ft; Rica Boston, 
20 . 

HltK Pn«k«ltMlnnKDto,42; Htrtctwr.Wn- 
nmaafi; PJJrtsflcy.SeatttoJi; Boms. Bat- 
1oa,S5; Rice, Boston. 34. 

P oo tots : GaettL Mlnncsatn. 10,- Hatdwr. 
MtonesotaV; Matflnoly, Now York. 9; Lamm. 
Detroit. B; To arc Hod wWt 7. 

rTtoH*; Wttm Kamea aty, it Bemr, 
Omtao* 3; PJUwBey, Seattle, 3: Petti*. 
Cottfomta.j; Puckett, Minnesota, -3; Tram- 
maO. Detroit, a. 

. H um Wmj AUJovte. Domond. 3D.- Arroog. 
B«Noa,l; GJWL Toronto. 7; G.Thuroas, Scat- 
«*, 7 i Pradcv, Scattfe, 7; Rica, Bastofl, 7. 

Stoha Room; Pettto.Callfanda.14; Cantos, 
Oakland, 12: Ato wb y, T Urorrtn, 4; Sheridan 
Kanaaa aty. 7; 4. ore tied wlto t 

PITCHING 

Woo-LostA W d ito e Pck/RRA; Atm. BCUV 
more. 3-8. UC6,4jn ; Dtxon. Baltimore. 3-fl. 
UR lJIi Scenrar, GWoobd. 3-0. TJD0, UO; 
Terrefl. Detroit, 1JH0, 125; Alexander. 
Toronto, < "1,300347; BoddEcker, Baltimore. 
4— L Aoa 143; Bard. Bosun. 4— 1. JOB 239. 

StrBuaufa: Bavd. BQsfaaJt; Oemeas. Bos- 
ton. 40; MnKDdrdLfli A lexan der. Toron- 
fa. 36; Houotv Tows, 31 
. Sores: -LHowctl, Oakland.*; RtohtHl. New 
York. 7; CoodDL Toronto.*; Hernanaes. De- 
troit. 4; CNvclona, a 


Hockey 

NHL Playoffs 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Quebec 2 0 6-2 

PbUodeMto 12 1-4 

crowen{3l.Pater9ont2].Slalstfolsi,proap 
IS); cate a). Athlon It). Stetson pool: Que- 
bec (on Lindbergh) 11-44—23; PtilladdpMa' 
Ian Gawd la) 1313 *-®. 

Rdnoatoa • 1 M 

Ctocnaa 2 1 3 — S 

OTMiabon ill. Lamer (41, Sutter (9), 5a- 
vora (7), TMunxnr (41; Pauzar (11, Messier 
(5). Stele ea pool: Edmonton Ion Bamer- 
man) Mfl-S-35; CMcaoa (on Fuhr) 10 - 1 OA- 
31 


CONFERENCE FINALS 
WALES 

(PtaUHMoMo faade eerlee 2 - 1 ) 

May tx- Quebec at PNIadetohfa 
May m: PMkHatoMa at Quebec 
*-Mov 16; Quebec ai Phliaaeldiio 
x-May 19: PMiadefaMa at Ouebec 

. CAMPBELL 
(Edmonton Modi eerie % 2-1) 
mov i2; Edmonton at CMeovo 
May M; Chleago at Edmonton 
x>Mav 16! Edmonton at OiIcmo 
x-Mov to; Cblcoao at Edmonton 
IxJt necenaryt 


nose auard. and Jell PlerzynGkl. Itoebackar. 

Indianapolis— S toned jefl Tootle, line- 
boduv, 

KANSAS CITY— Stoned Andv HI1L wkta re- 
ceiver; William Puna, Willie Green, Charles 
Man-In and Scon Polk, linebackers; Bennie 
Thompson, Jett Williams and Bernard Yawn®, 
defensive backs; Kevin Russell, Quarter- 
back; Frank Robinson, rural too back; 
Charles Robinson, offensive tackle; David 
Pryor, punter, and Steve Tobin. piace-Mckor. 

MIAMI— Amouncod the retirement o( Bob 
Kuafchenbora. offensive word. 

NEW ENGLAND— Sinned Bob MocankL 
offensive tackle, and Metvto Robinson, wide 
receiver. 

TAMPA BAY— Signed Ludous Deleeal, 
Bryant Giuiard, Dave Burke. Doua Pritchett 
and Kan Cotooun, defensive backs; Allen 
Dale CamebelL Willie Moore and Paul VMeL 
llnabacfcers; Mike Sommorfleld, defensive 
lineman; Del Wilkes. Brad Emerson, John 
Harrell and Rick Sdiuiie, offensive linemen; 
Corwvn Akfredpe. Calvin Maaee and Sim Mel- 
san. iieht ends; Kelvin epos. Ed Scott and 
Gort WWInme. wide i ecatvers; Freddie Miles. 
rumUna bock; Alan Rtehor. q uortor back. raid 
Stove Rows, punter. Re-signed Irvin PMIIlOk 
defensive back. 

TRACK 

US. WORLD CUP TRACK TEAM— Named 
Russ Rogers men's track coach. 

COLLEGE 

ALF R ED— Named David l_ Lvon assistant 
football and basketball cooeb. 

ARIZONA STATE— Homed Charles Harris 
athletic director. 

CREIGHTON— Announced lt» reeignattan 
gf Dan Oflerttorgor, oBUellc director. 

ILLINOIS— Dismissed Brad Childress, as. 
sMam football epoch. 

Montana STATE— Homed XCkAegertor, 
Bill Dledrlck. Mike Kramer and Dan Davies 
assistant football coaches. 

NAZARETH — Named Scott Nelson la- 
crosse coach; Annette Shapiro men's and 
women's lennks coach, aid Sandy Schencfce 
women's uonevball coach. 

OHIO STATE— Announced the resignation 
of Tara van Dervear, women* basketball 
coach, to take a similar post at Stanford. 

SEATTLE Anweimrrd the resignation of 
Lm Nnrdatw. basketball coach. 

TULSA Mam ed Kevin O'Neill and Jbn 
Rosboreuah assistant basketball coaches. 

VASSAR— Homed Denis Gallagher men's 
bas k etball coach. 

WASHINGTON — Named Joe Cravens ana 
Jeff Price assistant men's basketball eoodv 




Alain Cote, left, is cos 
Anton Stastoy after his 


xdated by Nonfique teammate 
-period goal against the Flyers. 


Mancixd Denies Report 
That He Plans to Retire 


pitched the fust eight inning s for 
the Giants, allowing only three hits. 

Padres 1, Pirates 0 
In San Diego, Mark Thurmond 
tossed a three-hitter and Tun Flan- 
nery singled home the game’s only 
run in the seventh inning to lift the 
Padres to victory. Thurmond went 
the distance and allowed just three 
singles, one by Marvell Wynne and 
two by BO] Almou- Mike Bielecki 
gave up six bits and took the loss. 

Cardinals 5, Dodgers 4 
In Los Angeles, first baseman 
Greg Brock committed two errors 
in the 10th. enabling Sl Louis to 
defeat the Dodgers. Ned Allen was 
the winner after blowing a save 
opportunity in the ninth. Ken Day- 
ley pitched the 30th for his first 


The Associated Prc& 

NEW YORK — Ray (Boom 
Boom) Manrini. a former World 
Boxing Association lightweight 
champion, on Friday denied a pub- 
lished report that he was retiring 
from boxing. 

“As erf now Fm not retired,” 
Manind said. “When I make the 
announcement. I'll do il the right 
way." 

The retirement story appeared in 
Friday's editions of the Daily 
News. 

Manrini told The Associated 
Press before tearing for his home- 
town of Youngstown. Ohio, that he 
was being interviewed for a ‘'Cos- 
mopolitan” magazine story by the 
co-author of the Daily News story. 

The fighter said that while he 
was posing for pictures on Wednes- 
day for the magazine story he re- 
marked to the writer “If I can do 
things like this for Cosmo, I'll re- 
tire.” 

“I was joking," he said Friday. 

Manrini said he had spoken to 
his manager. Dave Wolf, about of- 
fers for fights. 

“1 told hum he had offers for 
three different title fights,” Wolf 
said. 

Manrini hasn't fought since he 
lost a 15-round decision to Living- 
stone Bramble on Feb. 16 at Reno, 
Nevada, in a bid to regain the share 


ctf the 135-pound class champion- 
ship he lost to Bramble when he 
was stopped in the 14th round at 
Buffalo, New York, on June 1, 
1984. 

Manrini, 24, who has a record of 
29-3, with 23 knockouts, won the 
title on a first-round knockout of 
Art Frias on May S, 1982, and 
defended it four times before losing 
to Bramble. 

One of Mandni's title defenses 
ended in tragedy. Duk Koo Kim of 
Korea lapsed into a coma after be- 
ing knocked out by Manrini in the 
14th round on Nov. 13, 1982, and 
died several days later. 

The second loss to Bramble is 
still bring appealed to the WBA by 
Wolf berause a trace of an illegal 
substance in Bramble’s system was 
revealed by a post-fight urinalysis. 

Manrinfs retirement has been 
anticipated since the second loss to 
Bramble. 

“I ain’t coming bade. Tm almost 
sure of it now,” be said then. “But I 
just want to know if I can still 
practice the self-denial a fighter 
must have." 

The Dally News story quoted 
Manrini as saying, “I don't want to 
train anymore. I don’t want to get 
banged around at this stage of the 
game. I have used boxing. Don't 
worry, Tm not going to let boxing 
use me.” 


Tear of the Big Man 
In the NBA 9 s Draft 


Tennis 


MS ITS TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS 
IA» Fore* Hills, New York) 
fttli J RtHJfHl 

Ivan Lerefl nLCsKtastomkta, del. Victor 
PKCf nil, Paraguay, 4-2. 4-1. 

Aaron KrtcksMn (3). UA.0eL Marty Dovb 
(14), UA- 24, 7-4 (Ml, 44. 

Lawson Duncan, US. dot. Guillermo Rivas. 
AroanNna, 6-3, 6-4. 

John McEnroe (1), (Ji, Martin Jolt* 

113), Argentina, 6-Z 4-1, 

Ctaueto Ptratta, inty.doL David Pate (5), 
UJL 6*7 (4-71, fr-l, aa 
Terry Moor tf), OS. doL Yonntck Noah, 
Franc*. 4-6, 44. 4-L 

Brad GHtert (7). UJL. dot Peter Dootm. 
Australia. 6-4. 6-2. 

Honrlk sunastrom (4), Sweden, aef. Mane 
□lek»n 021- UJL 4-2. 6-4. 


By Sam Goldaper 

New York Timet Sernce 

NEW YORK — General man- 
agers have estimated that the sixth 
choice in last year's National Bas- 
ketball Association draft could 
have been purchased by another 
team for $250,000. 

This year, Scotty Stirling, the 
league's vice president for opera- 
tions. once a general manager oim- 
sdf, estimated that each of the first 
seven choices has become “virtual- 
ly priceless." 

Stirling’s evaluation of the in- 
creased worth of the selections was 
based on the league's first-ever lot- 
tery Sunday that will involve the 
seven t eams that failed to make the 
playoffs and tbc June 18 draft that 
wfll include Patrick Ewing, Way- 
man Tisdale and Benoit Benjamin. 

“Afl three have the potential ctf 
creating a great impact on those 
teams,” Stirling said “Also, there 
are now seven (earns rather than 
two involved in deriding which 
team will get the first draft choice. 
The value of the top picks have 
increased in value each year by the 
continued entry of top underclass- 
men, who have virtually assured 
top drafts in recent years.” 

After Tisdale ana Benjamin de- 
cided to foigo their final year of 
college eligibility and join Ewing as 
eligible for the draft. Jack McGos- 
key. the Detroit Pistons' general 
manager, said smilingly, “I hope aQ 
three wind up with western Con- 
ference teams.” 

Sunday's lottery for the seven 
teams that Tailed to make the play- 
offs wfll determine the first seven 
draft choices. 

What can the teams that are not 
in the totiay do? 

“I’m sure every general manager 
has been doing the same thing I 
have,” McCtaskey said. “We’re all 
trying to buy or trade ourselves 
into the lottery, but nothing is hap- 
pening. No one is listening to any- 
thing until after the order of the 
seven top picks is determined.” 

The Kmcks, the Atlanta Hawks, 
the Indiana Pacers, the Golden 
State Warriors, the Sacra men to 
Kings, the Los Angeles Clippers 
and the Seattle SuperSonics will be 
the participants m Sunday’s lot- 
tery. 

There is no doubt that Ewing will 
be the first player chosen. Whether 
Tisdale goes ahead of Benjamin 
will be determined by the needs of 
the teams with the second and third 
choices. 

Who will follow them? 

“Color litis draft the ‘Year of the 
Big Mao,‘ " said Marty Blake, who 
operates the NBA's scouting ser- 
vice. “With the fluke happening 
that the Houston Rockets won the 
coin toss two straight years and got 


to pick Ralph Sampson and Akeem 
Oliyuwon, our records show that 
most teams get a chance to draft a 
center on the first round about ev- 
ery 15 years. 

“You’re lucky when you get one 
or two top centers in one draft But 
this is the year of the center. At 
least six centers will go an the first 
round in the upcoming draft” 

Besides Ewing, the 7-foot 
Georgetown all- American, there 
are Benjamin, the Creighton 7- 


footer, Joe Kldne, 7-0, <rf Arkan- 
sas, Jan Koacak, 7-0, of Southern 
Methodist, Uwe Blab, 7-2, of Indi- 
ana and Terry Catledge, 6-8, Smith 
Alabama, and Bill Wennington, 7- 
0, of St. John’s. 

“There a a lot ttf likely first- 
roundejs who might have been cen- 
ters in college who will wind up 
playing the big forward,” Blake 
said. 

Blake, after months of scooting, 
said it was too early for him to list 
his top 10 choices. But the consen- 
sus of general managers and coach- 
es was that after Ewing, Tisdale 
and Benjamin, such a fist would 
indude Koncak. Kldne. Ed Pinck- 
ney, 6-9 Vi,V31anova; Keith Lee, 6- 
10, Memphis State: Karl Malone, 
6-9, Louisiana Tech; Detlef 
Schempf, 6-9 Vu Washington, and 
Xavier McDaniel, 6-7. of Wichita 
State. Depending on the needs (tf 
the first 10 teams, Chris Mnllin of 
Sl John's might sneak in as the first 
guard. 


O’Grady Takes 
First-Round Lead 
In PGA Tourney 

The Associated Prru 

IRVING, Texas — Mac 
O’Grady shot an 8-tmder-par 63 to 
take a one-shot lead Thursday after 
the first round of the Byron Nelson 
Classic. 

O’Grady, 34, now in his third 
season of PGA Tour activity, 
matched his best performance ear- 
lier this year with a third-place fin- 
ish in the Las Vegas Invi tational 
He has failed to finish in his last 
four starts, missing the cat twice 
and withdrawing from two other 
events. 

Andrew Magee one-putted II 
times and had a share of the lead 
until he bogeyed the 17th hole and 
finished with a 64. one stroke back. 
He was followed by Mike Holland, 
with a career-best 65. 

The group at 66. five under par, 
included Mike Nicolettc, Jodie 
Mudd. Bob Wrenn. John Cook and 
Peter Oosterintis. 










Page 16 


ART BUCHWALD 

Which Side Are You On? 


TT7-ASHINGT0N — People are 

YV constantly a siring me if the 
Reagan administration ever comes 
to me for personal advice. Up until 
last week ihe answer was “no.” 

Bat, )o and behold, the other day 
I received a letter that was in the 
form of a polL It said the president 
wanted to know where I stood on 
the controversial 
issues of the day. 

I was urged to 
answer the list of 
unbiased ques- 
tions that were 
enclosed. 

Some of them 
weren't easy, 
such as, “In the 
1970s funds 

were cut off for , 

development of Bodiwald 
the MX missile, causing our strate- 
gic defenses to become dangerously 
obsolete while the Soviets escalated 
their weapons buildup. Do you 
support continued LLS. efforts to 
modernize our strategic defenses 
by funding this weapons system 7 ” I 
was instructed to check off one of 
three boxes: “yes," “no" or “unde- 
cided." 

1 had no problem with that one. 
But the next one was a mind-bend- 
er. “Should the U.S. continue re- 
search and development of a space- 
based missile defense system to 
give the United States protection 
we do not now have against a Sovi- 
et nuclear attack?" 

I took a gamble, and entered 
“yes.” 

□ 

The question that followed also 
required tremendous concentra- 
tion. It said: “Do you agree with 
the Democrats who say the Soviet- 
/ Cuban efforts to topple pro-West 
governments in Central America 
pose no direct threat to U.S. securi- 
ty?" 

I tried to figure out what answer 
the president would want to hear, 
and on a hunch said “no.” 

By this time I was perspiring. 
Ideological tests always get me ner- 
vous. 

“Should the United States con- 
tinue providing support to people 
in Central America who are fight- 
ing for their independence from 
Soviet-backed Marxists?" 

I put a big black X in the “yes" 
box so the president wouldn't imss 
iL Then came the question that 
made me think the president might 


be considering me for thejob as his 
Secretary ol the Navy. “The Sorias 
have amassed the largest naval 
force in the world and have in- 
creased the number of submarines 
patrolling the U.S. coast Should 
the U.S- Navy receive more fund- 
ing to replace our aging sea force 
and build more Trident nuclear 
submarines?" 

□ 

I called up a friend who works at 
the Pentagon fra advice on bow to 
answer the question. 

“Oh," he said. “You got one of 
those Republican fund-raising let- 
ters too. 

“What do you mean fund-rais- 
ing? It says the president wants to 
personally know where I stand on 
the issues of the day. He probably 
wants to make me the new US. 
ambassador to Germany." 

“If you read the letter closely 
you’ll see it was seat out by the 
Republican Party and you’re sup- 
posed to enclose your check with 
the answers." 

□ 

“Are you trying to tell me the 
president isn’t interested in my 
opinion?" 

“He probably doesn’t even know 
you were sent the letter. And he 
may never know unless you said 
the Republicans a whopping 
check." 

“I was hoping he was consider- 
ing me for his new budget direc- 
tor," I admitted, “and the ques- 
tions werejnst to see if I was a team 
player. Why did they write to me?” 

“The Republicans probably 
bought your name for 5 cents from 
a credit card company.” 

“It's not fair to make someone 
answer a bunch of tough questions 
on national defense and then ask 
for money for the party.” 

He said. “It was either P.T. Bar- 
num or Richard Viguerie who said. 
There's a sucker bora every min- 
ute.'" 

“Just in case you're wrong and 
the president wants me to be Na- 
tional Security Adviser after Pat 
Buchanan pushes Robert McFar- 
tane out the window, what should I 
answer to the question on our need 
to replace aging subs with Trident 
nuclear submarines?” 

He said, “The answer is 'yes' but 
that's still a secret So for haven’s 
sake don't tell anyone you spoke to 
me." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY MAY 11-12, 1985 

/ 

Confessions of an Albino Terrorist 

By Kathleen Hendrix 

Las Angela Tuna Service 

L OS ANGELES — Breyten 
4 Breytenbach, South Africa's 
leading Afrikaans poet, was 
found guilty of terrorism in 1975 
and served seven years of a nine- 
year sentence, much of it in soli- 
tary confinement, in Pretoria and 
Capetown maximum-security 
prisons, before bring released in 
1983. 

Earlier in 1975, he had entered 
South Africa under a false identi- 
ty from Fiance (where he had 
been living as an expatriate), 
bearing with trim a manifesto 
crafted by aoti-aparthdd mili- 
tants in Europe. 

Once in South Africa, he at- 
tempted to connect with under- 
ground contacts, realized he was 

under surveillance and tried to Breytenbach; “I consider myself an African of South African origin.” 

leave; he was then arrested. After 
his release from prison, be re- 
turned to France and immediate- Mm where his own humanity Africa's Immo rali ty Act. For about I had the Strang 

ly recorded his prison m e m oirs. **has been burnt off, where the years, along with his public rience of suddenly t 
or “confessions, in English, his grass mil not grow," that makes stance against aparthwd. it was a around and saying to myst 
second language, dictating them trim nam gnm- the humani ty “ n f reason why hb country would not who the hdl do you think 
into a tape recorder, partly, he the other guy." permit his return. to be so concerned about 

said later of that method, out of He is an Afrikaner, one of that He was an grile th<-n t a word happening to yon T 1 ret 
an obsessive need to talk. white ethnic eroun that created that to him connotes a lamenta- had a very bloated ooir 



Vftnhngton tat 


Breytenbach, 45, is soft-spo- 
ken, sad-faced, the gentlest of 

men His manner is COUTtCOUS 

and unpretentious. Compassion, 
patience and tolerance seem built 
into his demeanor. They are not 
the attributes of a weak man. If 
he is anything, he is hard, truly 
tough. 

Breytenbach is harsh in his 
judgments, often delivered with 
mordant wit, and dire in bis pre- 
dictions about South Africa, “a 
world of madness" that wQl prob- 
ably not change without blood- 
shed. In Los Angeles recently, he 
came down hard and relentlessly 
loving, when he talked about 
South Africa's people, his people. 
He was no less hard on himself, 
but unapologetic. 

He has been burned, he says: 
Any guilt he had about being a 
white South African was “burnt" 
out of him in prison; any contra- 
dictions about whether his poli- 
tics stemmed from ideology or 
personal friendship were likewise 
“burnt off"; his private self was 
“burnt away," destroyed, so that 
he makes no distinction any long- 
er between the private and public 
self; there is a “zone of death" in 


him where his own humanity 
“has been burnt off, where the 
grass will not grow," that makes 
him recognize the humanity “of 
the other guy." 

He is an Afrikaner, one of that 
white ethnic group that created 
the modern, fundamentally racist 
state. His use of the Afrikaans 
language, with which that state is 
so intimately associated, is a 
source of both pride and humilia- 
tion to many of his white coun- 
trymen, it bis often been said. He 
has turned wbat is uniquely theirs 
against them 

If he is a traitor to this people, 
his elder brother, whom Breyten- 
bach has called “my brother John 
Wayne," is a hero, a general in the 
South African army, commander 
of its anti-guerrilla unit. They see 
other as dangerous enemies, 
Breytenbach said, but be spoke of 
the “cement of affection” that 
persisted for a long time in his 

f amil y despite the tensi ons. And 
yes, he he thinks he and his 
brother still love each other. 

“I thinlt so. yes. Love is like 
l anguage . . You love some peo- 
ple no matter how horrible they 
may be. the way you love a lan- 
guage, however much it’s been 
misused." 

Breytenbach went to France in 
1961 with the expectation of re- 
turning soon to South Africa. In- 
stead, he met and married Yo- 
lande Ngo Thi Hoang Lien, a 
Vietnamese-born French citizen. 


Africa's Immorality Act. For 
years, along with his public 
stance against apartheid, it was a 
reason why his country would not 
permit his return. 

He was an g*i1e th<-n t a word 
that to Him ran nows a lamenta- 
ble state of self-pity, backward- 
harking, suspension. He does not 
call hrmsrif an exile now. T hat 
period, be said, ended when he 
went back in 1975. 

“I consider myself an African 
of South African origin, using Af- 
rikaans as my first langnay and 
continuing my life elsewhere in 
Europe, accaling that that pecu- 
liar South African experience will 
always be there in my mind, col- 
oring my way of life, coloring my 
perceptions." 

He has not come easily to that 
sense of himself. He concludes 
now that the anti-apartheid polit- 
ical militant!* who rffCTUiten him 
in Paris also exploited and ma- 
nipulated him He will dismiss it 
only in general ter im. 

Beyond the suffering, prison 
was a maiming tainting experi- 
ence, he said. 

He hallucinated, he despaired, 
he broke. He was left with what 
he sometimes refers to as “the 
nuns of my mind," but he held 
on to his sanity. 

“What is central is the fear of 
bang the sense of T or of the 
self. That is what sanity is 
Because she is non- white, their 
marriage was a violation of South 


about.. . . I had the strange expe- 
rience of suddenly turning 
around and saying to myself, 'But 
who the hell do you think you are 
to be so concerned about what's 
happening to you? 1 1 realized I 
had a very bloated opinion of 
myself. I think once you can turn 
around and see yourself in that 
<jn«, realize that it’s not all that 
important and let go of yourself 
. . . you survive in prison." 

If he has a function now, he 
said, it is to “try to raise the tone 
of reflection about matters such 
as tins — wbat is the real nature 
of politics, of expcadabiHty, the 
real ethics of a person wadring 
within that system?" 

If he is not optimistic about 
South Africa’s future, it is the 
near future that he is talking 
about He seems certain that 
apartheid will be overthrown, 
saying, “Time, you may say, is 
black/ 1 

Whites, despite the fast they 
hold the power, are in a sense on 
the sidelines, irrelevant to South 
Africa’s future, he said. It will be 
determined by blacks. 

“You can't blame a white 
South African for being entirely 
contfitioned by what he grows up 
in. He's blind. One thing Fd tike 
to get across to white people,” he 
said, “is that we don't realize to 
what extent we ourselves are be- 
ing Minded, diminish ed by the 
privileges that have been have 
foisted upon us, as it were.” 


PEOPLE 


Springsteen to Marry * 


Brace Springsteen. 35. the tire- 
less rock performer and author erf 
the hit sang “Bran to Run," is to 
many Jrfnnne Ptriffips, 25, a native 
of Lake Oswego. Oregon. It will be 
the first marriage for Doth. WflHam 
and Aim Ftifllps said their daugh- 
ter. a model and actress, met 
Springsteen backstage at one of his 
Los Angeles concerts ax months 
ago. They were introduced by their 
agents. “We’re very proud to have 
Bruce Springsteen in our family, ” 
Mrs. Phillips said. “He's just gentle 
and down to earth and loyabk." 

□ 

Betty Ford followed her husband 
to the White House, but her life 
story is coming to television first. 
The ABC television network says 
her autobiofiraohY. “Times of Mv 


LeRoy arranged die meeting, Rea- 


movie. David L. Wober, executive 
producer of “Roots" and “The 
Thorn Birds," has acquired the 
rights to the book, which describes 
Mis. Ford's battles with breast can- 
cer and alcoholism and her early 
romance with the football star Ger- 
ald Ford. 


Empress Zita, widow of Charles 
L the last emperor of the Austro- 
Hungarian empire, celebrated her 
93d Birthday inis week She trav- 
eled from Zizers, Switzerland, 
where she lives in a hone for the 
elderly run by Franciscan nuns, to 
Belgium for a private celebration 
with relatives. 

□ 

A book by BfHAiBer titled “Ron- 
nie and Nancy; A Love Stray,” 
excerpted in the June issue of Good 
Housekeeping, tells the story of 
how President Ronald Reagan and 
his wife met The bode, to he pub- 
lished this s umm er by Crown Pub- 
lishers, recounts how, in 1949, the 
Hollywood Reporter printed a list 
of “known Communist sympathiz- 
ers in the movie business," includ- 
ing Nancy Davis. It was a mistake 
and probably referred to one of the 
four other actresses «sing the name 
Nancy Davis, but the future Mrs. 
Reagan was worried. The director 
Mervyn LeRoy said he would talk 
to Reagan, toot president of the 
Screen Actor's Guild, and reported 
bade that Reagan promised that 
the guild would defend Davis. “I 
think it would be better if he ex- 
plained it to me himself,” said Da- 
vis. who had never met Reagan. 


date. The rest is history. 

□ ‘ “ 

The actor Jack Mchobou was set 
to begin shooting a f3m sequel u> 
“Chinatown," in which he played 



the Los Angdes private eye Jake 
Gittea, when Ruriunotmt Pictures 
stopped the project The company - 
had already spent ration- 
p reproduction costs on the. fU®, . 
“Two Jakes.” with a screenpteyby 
Robert Tonne, who won an Acad* 
my Award for his script fw "Chi- 
natown."- Bat Towne reportedly - 
thought Robert Evaas,whopro. . 
duced “Chinatown," wasnrisctat 
as Nicholson's costar and told the 

studio about his feeling. 

woman fra’ Paramount 
the movie had been shriwd. 

□ 

Jean-Lac Godard, the French 
film director, has asked his Italian 
distributors to stop showing hi*, 
controversial film "Je vous said** 
Marie" (Hail Mary) in Rome, a 
French Catholic organization, 
Chritien-Medias, said. Godard, 
whose new fihn “Detective” was 
shown Friday at the Cannes film 
festival, announced his decision in 
a letter to Father JeaU-Mkhd dr - 
Fafco, bead of the organization. \ 
Chrctien-Medias quoted Godartf 
as saying he wanted screrttiQgs , 
stopped “m and around the.hepas I 
of the Holy Father." Fope Join ] 
Paul n has deplored the fDnvwhfch a 
has provoked protests from Catbo- .A 
tics in Italy, France and SwiizeriJL 
land. The fum, a modern vctskhi of ‘ 
the stray of the virgin birth, par- 
trays Mary as the teen-age daugh- 
ter of a petrol station manager. ■ 

□ ' 

Robert PoUak. 30, -a Czech-born 
artist, has finally received pemmy 
aon to float 1,000. bikini under- - ’• 
pants on The Serpentine-in Lett 
don's Hyde Park. The Royal Part* 
Authority originally rejoined the - 
project, out the British arts mints- v 
ter, Lord Cowrie, intervened and 
urged that it be given the green, 
tight. “He considered it an accept- 
able form of art, although an uo- 
usual form," Gowrte’s assistant, jL 
John Derating said Fbtt^ whtr h 
hoping the floating brftfs will re- 
semble Claude Monefs watefHy 
paintings, hopes to launch tre - 
briefs on May 20 or 21-rfor oft 
half a day. 1- > - 


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