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Hie Global Newspaper 
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INTERNATIONAL 


Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London. Zurich, 
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WEATHER DAtA APPEAR ON PAGE 20 




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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,796 


ZURICH, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Critics Assail Kohl 
For Ballot Showing 


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% Henry Tanner 

International Herald Tribune 

BONN — The disastrous show- 
ing by the Christian Democrats m 
elections in North Rhine- Westpha- 
lia is threatening to become the 
worst political setback Chance&or 
Helmut Kohl has suffered since 
taking office in 1982. 

Editorialists and politicians 
across the political spectrum fo- 
„■ cased on the chancellors personal 

'* “ ' responsibility for the battering his 
party took from the Social Demo- 
crats in the ballot Sunday. 

Several newspapers predicted 
that his authority would be increas- 
ingly challenged within his own 


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party on issues ranging from baric 
economic and foreign policy to ini' 
nor tactical questions and personal 
style. 

Franz Josef Strauss, the Bavar- 
ian state premier, a coalition part- 
ner and a rival of Mr. KohLimme- 
■tC' diatety panted out that Mr. Kohl 


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had been unable to make his influ- 
; 


eocc as cbanceflor fell in the elec- 
tion. Mr. -Strauss and other critics 
noted that the defeated head of the 
Christian -Democratic fist, Bern- 
hard Warns, had been selected fay 
Mr.KohL 

.The Social Democrats, led by Jo- 
hannes Rau, the state premier in 
North Rhino-Wcstphalia, won 52.1 
percent of the vote and 125 seats in 
the 227-seat state assembly, a gain 
of 1 9. Die Christian Democrats ob- 
tained 36-5 percent of the vote and 
88 seats, a loss of seven. The Free 
Democrats, unrepresented in the 
outgoing assembly, won 14 seats. 

The leftist Greens won 4.6 per- 
cent of the popular vote; short of 
the 5-percenr minimum required 
for representation. 

Die Frankfurter Rxmd Schau, a 
liberal newspaper, called the results 
“a catastrophic collapse’’ far the 
Christian Democrats and “a re- 
sounding slap for Mr. Kohl” 

Many newspapers, including 
conservative ones, warned the 



Cause of 
U.K. Fire 
Unknown 


Smoke Bombs 


Thrown Before 
Blase, Police Say 


Reuters 


Chancellor Helmut Kohl 


chancellor not to treat the defeat as 
a local affair bat to recognize its 
nationwide implications. 

Several commentators noted that 
Mr. Kohl had requested that the 
summit n w. ring in Bonn of seven 
industrial nations be held in early 
May instead of June and had «dtad 
fa a stale visit from President 
Ronald Reagan to improve his par- 

(Cmtiaued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


BRADFORD, England — 
Smoke bombs were thrown at a 
soccer stadium here Saturday 
shortly before fire engulfed a spec- 
tator stand and killed at least 53 
people, police sad Monday. 

A spokesman said police still bad 
not determined the cause of the 
blaze, which broke out in the main 
wooden grandstand of the Brad- 
ford Gty stadium midway through 
a professional league match. 

John Domain e, assistant chief 
constable, confirmed reports by 
witnesses of smoke bombs bring 
thrown. Bui, he said, “I am still not 
certain as to (he rq u$e*ud I will not 



faM 


GANDHI TRIAL OPENS — Tarlok Singh, colter, father of the man accused of 
kmmg Indira Gandhi, talks with his son's lawyers, PA Lekhi, left, and R~S. Sondhi, 
before the start of Satwant Singh’s trial, which was delayed because die judge and 
prosecutor were not on time. The trial was quickly adjourned until Thursday. Page 2. 


GE Pleads 
Guilty to 
Fraud 


Overcharged 
Pentagon for 
Warhead Work 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

PHILADELPHIA — General 
Electric Co., the fourth- largest U.S. 
military contractor, pleaded guilty 
Monday to defrauding the federal 
government of $ 800,000 on a con- 
tram for a Minuieman nuclear war- 
bead system and was fined the 
maximum of SI. 040. 000. 

U.S. Attorney Edward- Dennis 
aid in Washington that General 
Electric had falsified costs by alter- 
ing time cards for employees with- 


out their knowledge. 

: work involved retro- 


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Shultz Sees 


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Progress in 
Mideast Trip 


Early Returns in Italy 
Show Communist Losses 


The Associated Press 




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AQABA, Jordan —Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz said Mon- 
day that he made some progress on 
his weekend tour of the Middle 
East on arranging a meeting with a* 
Jordairian-Palesmiian delegation, 
but he said that “many difficulties” 
stood in the way of peace in the 
region. 

Mr. Shultz said that his discus- 
sions Sunday and Monday with 
King Hussein did not involve the 
names of Palestinians who might 
be able to meet with the United 
States and Israel, a key sticking 
point in the process. 

“At sane print, there will be a 
Jordanian-Palestinian group” to 
meet with the United States, he 

“We made some headway in 
solving” the deadlock, Mr. Shultz 
FROM", said. ' \ . 

“There arejjrarty many diffical- 
or: I'Ses between the present sftuatfcb 

"TT 1 think people mvrivwiwaUt mthe 
‘ . Middle East,” Mr. Shultz said. 

, The secretary of state then flew 

to Vienna, where he was to meet 
- " with Forrign Minister Andrei A 
,* Gromyko of the Soviet Union and 
\ attend celebrations marking the 
rt * ‘ 30th anniversary of modern Austii- 
TRANs» an statehood. 

The United States refuses to deal 
' •> with the PLO unless thatoganiza- 
-> tion recognizes brad’s right to ex- 
‘ • isL Israelconridera the PLO a tm- 

1 rorist organization and has refused 
to negotiate directly with an Arab 
delegation containing members of 
the group. * 

. -t ■ - H But Jordan, which has agreed to 
"* v - seek peace with brad alongside the 
• f PLO, insists that the PLO approve 
• ■ Palestinian negotiators. The PLO 

. „ insists they be PLO members. 

idt- 1 Foreign Minister Taber ai-Masri 
;,said before Mr. Shultz arrived that 
j. the Americans had beat given the 
namra of PLXVapproved Pakstm- 
*crviO ians for such a delegation and that 
be hoped Mr. Shultz would bring a 
reply. 

“We didn't discuss a list a imfi- 


7he Associated Press 

ROME — The opposition Com- 
mnwisw, Italy’s seccmd-largest po- 
litical party, appeared to have suf- 
fered a sharp setback in nationwide 
regional elections, according to 
prdimmary results Monday. 

Projections based on returns in 
499 districts considered representa- 
tive of the country also indicated a 
strong showing by the five parties 
of the center-left coalition of the 
Socialist prime minister, Bettino 
CraxL 

Doxa, considered Italy’s most 
authoritative polling organization, 
made , the projections three hours 
after ^oQs daed at 2 PJVL Mon- 

l>oxafcffe^ n thai the govern- 
ment parties- — the Chrintiim Dem- 
ocrats, Socialists. Republicans, So- 
cial- Democrats and Liberals — 
would get 58.4 percent of the vote, 
up from 53.9 jjeroem in the 1984 
European Parliament election and 
56 l 2 percent in the IS»3pai5araen- 
taiy election. Bat it would be down 
from 60^ percent in tbe previous 
r^onal dections, in 1980. 

The Communists were expected 
to get 29.9 percent, down from 33.3 
percent in the European Parlia- 
ment election, 3L2 percent in the 
parliamentary election, and 31.5 
percent in the last regional election. 

A separate tabulation by' the 
Communists showed the party fall- 


ing behind by margin c arrilar to 
those forecast by Doxa. 

Many observers attributed the 
strong showing by the C ommunis ts 
in the previous election to sympa- 
thy fa Enrico Beriinguer, the 
Communist Arty leader, who died 


a few days before the balloting. 

; Qtud had said before the 


Mr. 

H frion that , his government ™nlH 
not .withstand a defeat — presum- 
ably meaning a serious drop from 
the percentages won by the five 
parties in genera] ejections in 1983. 

Although the results of the re- 
gional dections do not affect the 
malfwip of the national legislatur e, 

die voting has been seen as a test of 
strength fa (he governing parties 
and for the Communists. 

A poor showing by the Commu- 
nists would further damage their 
daim to a share in (he government, 
and would strengthen Mr. Craxfs 
coalition, which has supported the 
'policies of the North Atlantic Trea- 
ty Organization. 

On Sunday, 73.6 percent of- the 
44.4 million eligible voters voted, 
the Interior Ministry said. 

In the last round of local and 
regional dections in 1980, the turn- 
out was 70.8 percent. 

Newspapers had predicted a low 
turnout, citing widespread apathy. 

Voting is mandatory in Italy, but 
there is no direct penalty fa failing 
to vote. 


speculate.” 

Government sources said that 
Home Secretary Leon Brit tan 
would nnnnimee an official inquiry 
imp the fire in this town in north- 
ern England. 

The souiy** said that the inquiry 
would encompass safety at soccer 
grounds and investigate how disas- 
ters such as the Bradford blaze 
could be avoided. 

A hospital spokesman said one 
of 58 persons bring treated fa 
burns died Monday. Four other 
persons were in serious condition. 

Many of the victims were be- 
lieved to have been children or el- 
derly people. The grandstand was 
consumed by fire in approximately 
four minutes. 


Pope, Visiting World Court, Assails 
Apartheid ; Dutch Protests Continue 


Fans tried to escape the flames 
by jumping onto tbe playing field. 
Exits opening onto the street at the 
rear of the grandstand had been 
locked to prevent lato-camers from - 
entering without paying. Many vic- 
tims stumbled from the grandstand 
with their clothes on fire. 

Mr. Dn rnaille y»jd that three 
people were sriD missing and that 
than was a chance that same vic- 
tims bad been burned without' 
trace. 

“In. do case is visual identifica- 
tion possible,” he said. “We are. 
•taring to deal with this byjewds, 
t rinket!, clothing and dental evi- 
dence.” - 0* 

Two dnbs in southern England, 
Aldershot and Reading, said (hat 
they were d o si n g wooden grand- 
stands similar to those destroyed in 
the Bradford fire. ■ 

In Wea Germany, the national 
foottafi federation ordered safety 
checks on all soccer stadinms. 


By Kevin Costelloe 

The Associated Press 

■' THE HAGUE — Pope John 
Paul U. speaking at tbe Interna- 
tional Court of Justice on Monday, 
denounced South Africa's sparl- 
ing, ^Cries continuTtoring out in 
.many parts of the work! of the 
imprisoned and the oppressed.” 

The pontiff addressed the 15- 
member court, the judicial branch 
of the United Nations, at The 
Hague on the third day of his em- 
battled visit to the Netherlands. On 
'Sunday, protesters throwing stones 
in Utrecht dashed repeatedly with 
police. 

Scattered demonstrations con- 
tinued during the pope's tour Mon- 
day in The Hague, seat of the 
t Dutch government 
' Police arrested a youth who, 
from a tree, threw a full bottle of 
liquor at John Paul's bulletproof 
vehicle near the gates of the Peace 
Bpiaoe, the world court’s ornate 
A police spokesman said the 
bottle hit the pavement and broke 
just brimd the vehicle. A man car- 
rying a smoke bomb was arrested 
ak mga^ apal motorcade route, po- 

In front of the palace, about 
1,000 people joined in a rally orga- 
nized by Pax Christi, a liberal Ro- 
man catholic group. They carried 
signs reading. “Joan Paul II stand 


aside, we can't see Jesus” and op- 
poring cruise missiles. Protesters 
hung inflated condoms on the pal- 
ace gates, symbolizing widespread 
Dutch dissent from the pope's con- 
servative strictures concerning 
birth control abortion, divorce and 
priestly celibacy. 

Hundreds of police were de- 
ployed in The Hague, in one of the 
country’s largest security opera- 
tions. 


John Paul speaking before court 
jurists in the Peace Palace, de- 
nounced as unacceptable all “dis- 
crimination — in law a in fact — 
on the basis of race, origin, cola, 
cul lure, sex or religion. 


INSIDE 


■ Legal files were destroyed in 
Beirut after a rocket tat tbe 
Lebanese Justice Ministry and 
started a fire. Page 2. 


■ The House Budget Commit- 
tee dwirmim pledged that his 
panel would cut the U.S. deficit 
without a tax raise. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ Sweden rased interest rales 
and put curbs on consumer 
credit in an attempt to cod the 
country’s economy. Page 13. 


SPECIAL REPORT 


■ Space failures, competition 
and politics hit the satellite 
market Page 9. 


“Hence, no system of apartheid 
or separate development will ever 
be acceptable as a model fa the 
relations between peoples or 
races.” the pontiff said, speaking in 
English. 

“The cries continue to ring out in 
many parts of the world of the 
imprisoned and the oppressed,” he 
said, “the cries of people who are 
bring exterminated, the cries of 
people whose cultural and spiritual 
freedom is being shackled, whose 
personal liberty is being denied.” 

The pope has previously de- 
nounced apartheid. In June 1984, 
after a meeting with Prime Minister 
Pieter W. Botha of South Africa at 
the Vatican, the pope’s office is- 
sued a statement saying that the 
Holy See considered apartheid 
“contrary to the Christian principle 
of the equal dignity of all men.” 

Crowds in The Hague were sur- 
prisingly small and scattered as 
John Paul 64. read Mass for the 
ride, then met with Prime Minister 
Ruud Lubbers at his official resi- 
dence. Three thousand to 4,000 


He said the ’ 
fitting re-entry vehicles for tbe 
Minuieman warhead. 

Mr. Dermis said an investigation 
was continuing to find which GE 
managers were criminally responsi- 
ble. 

GFs guilty plea came on what 
was to have oom the opening day 
of jury selection for trial on the 
charges. 

Mr. Dennis said the plea meant 
that GE could be barred for up to 
three years from bidding on any 
new military contracts. But he said 
he had received no indication of 
what the Pentagon would do in this 

regard. 

Judge Louis C. Bechtle of US. 
District Court in Philadelphia, in 
fining GE, said the manimnm pen- 
alty was “fully and dearly appro- 
priate here” because the United 
States was dependent on GEs 
work fa the military “just like a 
newborn baby is dependent on its 
mother." 

GE pleaded guilty to 108 counts 
of making false statements and 

making and pr esenting false c laims 

fa payment to the U.S. Air Force 
to recover cost overruns on a con- 
tract worth $47 million to refurbish 
the Mtnuteman Mark-I2A inter- 
continental ballistic missile. 

The wok, according to a grand 
jury indictmen t returned a gains t 
GE on March 26, involved re- 
search, development, engineering 
and other services fa the Minute- 
man re-entry systems done at GE 
plants in Philadelphia and subur- 
ban King of Prussia between June 
22. 1980, and April 19, 1983. 

After the indictment was issued, 
the U.S. Air Force suspended GE 
-from bidding on any new miltary 
contracts. Three weeks later, how- 


(Continned on Page 2, CoL 4) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


4 - 


r • vidua! names QT any thing of that 
' kind,” Mr. Shultz said. “But I think 


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1 it is dear (hat direct negotiations 

- between Israel and a joint Jordan}- 
". r \ an- Palestinian ddf gfttinn must in- 
**'/ chide Palestinians. 

rC- U A officials have in d icated that 

memb ers of the Palestine National 
7 - Councfl, the body which sets PLO 
• ■ policy, arc not necessarily PLO 
- members and might be mchided in. 
talks. 

■ ,~S Mr. Shnltz also talked with Presi- 
" Sent Hosm Mubarak in £0pt and 
• . Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 

- Israel and other Israeli leaders. 

. ' ' Yasser Arafat, chairman of the 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



BANK RUN IN BALTIMORE — Depositors fined iqi 

Monday to withdraw money from Old Court Sayings 


ttw*w»U« 8 d ft— l umn i u iB t 

and Loan in Baltimore. A jndge named a conservator to 

oversee the bank while a purchaser is sought. Page 13. 


'Private’ Justice for U.S. Gvil Cases 


Neic Companies Rise to Counter (burtliaddogs and Costs 


By Martin Tolchin 

New York Times Service 

PHILADELPHIA — A student 
who was raped on a college campus 


The 

phia. 


sought compensatory damages 
lege and the 


from the college and the company 
that ran its security system. Law- 
yers produced witnesses, who took 
oaths. A robed judge, sitting at a 
bend) in front of a large American 
flag, decided the case on the basis 
of Pennsylvania law. 

But the case was not heard in the 
Pennsylvania Court of Common 
Pleas, with its backlog of 76,000 
civil cases. Tbe parties took the 
case to Judicate. “the National Pri- 
vate Cant System.” 

Judi cate’s jndge heard the case 
eight weeks later and handed down 
a verdict the same day. 

Judicate is one of several con- 
cerns created in recent years to of- 
fer alternatives to legal systems 
that are often costly and over- 
crowded. Nationally, tbe average 
time to bring civil cases to trial is 42 
months. 

Since it was Founded last year. 
Judicate has heard 174 cases, in 
which the parties agreed that the 


decision would be bintii 
corporation, based in 
i> publicly held. 

Similar companies include 
EnDispute, based in Washington, 
and the Center for Public Re- 


sources in New Yak. They operate 
le’s Court,” 


much like “The People’s Court," a 
television program in which small - 
claims disputes are decided in a 
private judicial setting. 

The new companies, however, 
usually hfear cases involving larger 
sums. Judicate has handled a case 
that involved dividing $300,000 
among six people hint in an auto- 
mobile accident. 

Judicate and the similar compa- 
nies are not licensed or regulate? in 
any state. 

Gvil cases are bean! by former 
judges, among them Marvin P. 
Frankel who is retired from the 
US. Court of Appeals fa the Sec- 
ond Circuit. Parties may appeal to 
a three-judge panel 

Evidence in the case of tbe rape 
victim was presented in three ses- 
sions. The judge awarded damages 
that a Judicate official called “sub- 
stantial" 


Unlike arbitrators, who hear 
cases under ground rules estab- 
lished by the parties. Judicate fol- 
lows state laws and procedures, but 
the public is excluded from its de- 
liberations. All parties sign an 
agreement that they will be bound 
by Indicate s decision. 

Alan Epstein, president of Judi- 
cate, saitl “We are basically no 
different than the public courts in 
our process, except we are faster, 
cheaper and confidential” 

Ira Glasses executive directa of 
the American Civil Liberties 
Union, expressed concern over 
such private courts. 

“These systems shortcut proce- 
dural guarantees that make up oar 
concept of fairness,” Mr. Glasser 
said. “These courts are thriving be- 
cause people don't have access to 
the congested public courts.” 

The right to public trial is central 
to the U.S. concept of justice, Mr. 
Glasser said. 

“Privacy seems to offer a short- 
term advantage in protecting peo- 
ple from having their troubles ex- 
posed.” he said. “ Shielding the 
(C o n tin u ed on Page 2, COL 3) 


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Consensus Grows Among Europeans That SDI Will Leave Them Vulnerable to Attack 


9 /OrfUM'- 


By William J. Brood 

/ New York Tima Service 

. - v ' BONN “Allies in Western Europe seem itKieasm^y 
•V l ;-'' worried by miHtary and political dangers they see fartbor 
countries in President Ronald Reagan's Strategic Defense 
.£^‘ Initiative. 


reject outright the a dminis t ra tion's offer for the allies to 
join in the research. 


So far no country in Weston Europe has. f ormally 
to take part, althoug h Prime Minister 


l & In public, many European leaders land the project, 

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popularly known as “star wars,” as a potent force that 
~ t tbe Russians back to the negotiating table, and 
its five-year, $26-bfDi«i research program as a 
against Soviet efforts in developing space-based 
defensive weapons. . ; 

But dozens of interviews with European nnhtaiy ex- 
. . pens and government officials and a review of govttn- 
^ - -i*' meat documents and official statements show dap and 
widespread apprehenaon about the plan as it .relates to 
Weston Europe. 






- 1 


Some strategists do find value fa Europe in Mr. Rea- 

..V M in 1 /r.nJ. 1 AM- 


^ gan’s concept first set forth m a speech m Marrii 1983, 


• when he 




shie ld to render all xmdear 
obsolete." 


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dL weapons "impotent 

. But the prevailing view is that US. defensive 
£1^5“ Weapons would fail to protect Western 



Weapons would fail to protect We 
Soviet missile attack, would probably 
! mg conventional-arms race and coofdwefl split the North 

tberis 


bring on a threaten- ’ 


Atlantic Treaty Organization and increase the risk of war: 

At (be recent Bom summit meeting, reservations came 
to the surface as France became the first major power to 


, _ Margaret 

Ltcher of Britain has not rated it out and Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of West Germany has spoken favorably of 
joining. 

One of the attractions fa Europe, mart from the merits 
a demerits of the defense plan itself, is the prospect of 
taihstnnriiil nomnfliiaiy applications of the high-technol- 
ogy research. 

Government leaders may be apprehensive about their 
prinfcal fortunes if they tie themselves too closely to the 
American project, a ccor di ng to some analysts. Opposition 
political parties, especially m Britain and West Germany, 
nave nmA*. a point of publicly denouncing the Strategic 
Defense Initiative as dangerous for Europe. 

Election campai gns is the next two years vail probably 
test the resolve of governing parties to publicly support 
tbe UE. program. 

At die heart of European concern lies a key technical 
consideration — the short time in which Soviet warheads 
can reach Europe — and the military judgment that many 
of these weapons would slip underneath the most elabo- 
rate shield that the United States could place in space. 

Dr. Lawrence Freedman, head of war studies at King's 
College of the University of London and a leading British 
strategist, said: “Tbe fright rime fa missiles traveling from 
the Soviet Union to Western Europe is less than half the 


time it takes to reach the United States. Fa missiles 
launched from Eastern Europe, the flight time is even 
shorter. The task of intercepting the missiles is, therefore, 
correspondingly grealar.” 

An official in the French Ministry fa External Rela- 
tions asserted that this showed the futility of space-based 


'In Enrope we will always be 
vulnerable,’ said a French 
researcher. 'We may get the bomber, 
bat the airplane, die artillery and the 
tactical missile will get through.’ 


as potentially effective in defending the United States, 
essentially because of increases in available response time 
that might be provided by new technologies. 

Ground-based defenses in the past had only seconds in 
which to work and thus could eaaly be overwhelmed. But 
in space, a ’layered” system of defensive arms would 
theoretically have many chances to destroy enemy missi es 
and warheads, even to attack ones slipping through the 
first a second lines erf defense. 


airplane, the artillery and the tactiEal missile will get 


In the months after Mr. Reagan's “star wan” speech, a 
panel headed by Fred S. Hoffman; an American strategist, 
said such research “should reduce allied anxieties that our 
increased emphasis on defenses might indicate a weaken- 
ing in our commitment to the defense of Europe.” 

European responses have tended to be skeptical One 


defense. “The military gain fa Europ e is almost zero,” he 
said. “We don't believe Tor a moment that it is useful” 

» that view, Colonel Jonathan Alford, deputy 
the London-based International .Institute fa 
Strategic Studies, said, “No matter how good the system, 
we will be more exposed.” The institute is a private 
organization known fa its annual assessment of the 
global military balance. 

The Reagan administration sees space-based weapons 


For the United States, space weapons would be intend- 
ed particularly to counts Soviet SS-18 missiles, which 
have a range of about 7,000 miles (1 1,200 kilometers) and 
can carry 10 nudear warheads. According to Reagan 
administration officials, space defenses might also destroy 
SS-20s» winch have a range of about 3,000 miles and 
present a threat to Western Europe. 

But West European strategists, because of the proximity 
of rite countries of the Warsaw Pact, are primarily worried 
about a (fifferentset of Soviet weapons — nuclear-armed 
bombers and smaller aircraft, cruise misales. artillery 
shells and a variety of taw-flying missiles. r 

The missiles include SS-2ls, with a range of about 7u 
miles: SS-22s, with a range of 550 miles, and SS-23s. with a 
range of 300 miles. As distinct from strategic missiles, 
which travel many thousands of miles, these are known as 
tactical missiles. 


fear is that ground-based anti-tactical misales could easily 

while 


Yves Boyer, a researcher at the French Institute of 
International Relations in Paris, said. “In Europe we will 
always be vulnerable. We may get the bomber, bui the 


be overwhelmed. Another is that “leaky” defenses, 

theoretically worthwhile fa Nath America, would have 
few advantages fa Europe. 

“Airfields, storage farih^^^tr o^^c^m tratiops 

said Dr. Dietrich Schroeer, a physicist at the Intemationd 
Institute for Strategic Studies. “There are problems even 
for the Postings, which are out in the open, if a bomb 
goes off miles away. Eunmean targets are intrinsically soft 
and therefore hard to defend.” 

In contrast, some administration officials have said that 
a “leaky” defense of the United States would be worth- 
while because it would protect many missile sDos, if not 
cities, thus discouraging Soviet planners from launching a 
pre-emptive raid. 

To some Europeans, the technical difficulties of trying 
to protect Europe in no way lessen the allure of spaa 
defenses for the destruction or Soviet long-range 
The protection of North America alone, they say, would 
(Continued on Page 7, CoL 1) 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


India Considering New Laws 
Following Bombings by Sikhs 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Post SeMa 

NEW DELHI — • Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi said Monday rhar the 
government was considering the 
enactment of special anti-terrorism 
laws following the weekend bomb- 
ings by Sikh separatists. 

While Mr. Gandhi did not speci- 
fy what provisions he was consider- 
ing, he told the Indian parliament 
that the government faced restric- 


tions in apprehending terrorists, 
sled that amen 


He suggested that amendments to 
the law would be proposed in the 
neat day or two. 

Mr. Gandhi said that the govern- 
ment would be flexible in seeking a 
political solution to Sikh demands 
for increased autonomy but that it 
was determined to be “tough” in 
combating terrorism. 

Mr. Gandhi delivered a 30-min- 
ute speech during a parliamentary 
discussion of the weekend wave of 
about 30 booby-trap bombings, in 
which at least 80 persons died and 
more than 100 injured. He cau- 
tioned non- Sikhs against reacting 
“in a way they want us to react” 

“The extremists want a backlash 
and the whole community to be 
alienated,” Mr. Gandhi said, refer- 


stani involvement in the Skh 
ratist movement, saying: “The fact 
is that foreign involvement is there. 
You know it We know it It does 
not help ignoring it But there is no 
use giving too much importance to 
it" 

It appeared unlikely that Mr. 
Gandhi would propose legislation 
approaching the severity of the 
“emerg e ncy measures adopted in 
1975 by his mother, Indira Gandhi, 
who suspended civil rights and 
jailed thousands of political oppo- 
nents. 

But provisions of the Anti-Ter- 
rorism Act that is in force in Pun- 
jab and in the turbulent region of 
Tar northeast India could be ex- 
tended to other states not yet offi- 
cially declared as 
eas.” 


Those provisions, amended last 
year, give police and paramilitary 
security forces broad powers in 


pinking preventive arrests, restrict' 
lubiic movers 


mg pumic movement, restraining 
public assembly and controlling 


the press. More than 1,000 Sikhs 
have beat arrested in northern In- 
dia because of the bombings. 


FBI Foils SBth Plot 


ar- 


GE Is Guilty 
In Missile Case 


(Confhmed from Page 1) 


ring to the community of Sikhs. 
“This is 


what we should avoid.” 

In his speech, Mr. Gandhi re- 
ferred obliquely to charges of Paid- 


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the company’s space systems divi- 
sion. the unit involved in the al- 
leged misebarges. 

GE is the hugest military con- 
tractor ever suspended from doing 
business with the U.S. government 
and the largest charged in a crimi- 
nal indictment with defrauding the 
military. The company did $4.5 bil- 
lion worth of business with the 
Pentagon in fiscal 1983. 

After the indictment, several 
panels of the House Armed Ser- 
vices Committee began investigat- 
ing billing practices of seven major 
military contractors. So far, con- 
gressional auditors have ques- 
tioned claim* totaling SI 10 million 
out of total billings of about $3.7 
billiorL 

An attorney for GE Henry S. 
Ruth, told Judge Bechtle on Mon- 
day that GE, which had originally 
pleaded innocent, changed its posi- 
tion after a former unit manager 
admitted he had been involved in 
intentional mischarging and had 
agreed to testify for the govern- 
ment. 


William R Webster, the director 

of the FBI, said Monday that the 
bureau has foiled a plot by Indian 
S ikhs to assassinate Mr. Gandhi 
during his visit to the United States 
□ext month. The Associated Press 
reported from Washington. 

Mr. Webster said the alleged plot 
included plans to assassinate Bha- 
jan Lai, chief minister of the Indian 
state of Haryana. 

He said that an investigation of a 
group of Sikhs resulted in seven 
individuals bring charged with a 
variety of offenses, including con- 
spiracy to possess and receive ex- 
plosives, conspiracy to possess and 
receive a machine gun not regis- 
tered to them and conspiracy to 
assassinate a foreign official. 

■ Murder Trial Starts Late 


The trial of Satwant Singh, ac- 
cused of murdering Mrs. Gandhi in 
October, and two other Sikhs 
charged with conspiracy to murder, 
started five hours late Monday be- 
cause the judge did not know he 
was meant to be there, Reuters re- 
ported from New Delhi. 

Mr. Singh's defense lawyer, P.N. 
Lekhi, arrived on time at 10 AM 
but left angrily when the judge and 
prosecution did not appear. At 
2:4S PAL the three accused men 
appeared before Judge Mahesh 
Chandra, who said be heard only at 
1 1 :30 AAL that he was meant to be 
at the trial. Mr. Lekhi did not re- 
turn for the hearing, which was 
held in a makeshift courtroom in 
theTiharjaiL 

After a 30-minute hearing in 
which the presence of the three ac- 
cused men was recorded. Judge 
Chandra adjourned the court until 
Thursday. 



Legal Files 
Destroyed as 
Rocket Hits 
Beirut Courts 


WORLDJBRIEFS 



4 


Brink’s Robber^^tive Arraigned 

NEW YORK (AP) —A small arsenal that included bomb pans and a 
machine gnn was found in the Baltimore apartment of a worn® ar- 
raigned Monday on charges stemming from a Brink s robbery in 1981 m 
whicbthrec persons woe Wiled, an FBI spokesman said. 

Marilyn Jean Buck, 37, who had been a fugitive since 1977, went before 
U.S. District Judge Kevin T. Duffy on fugitive, conspiracy and rmketeer- 
ing charges. In addition to the bomb-making paraphernalia and an Uzi 
machine gun, a . 22 -caliber automatic with a silencer and a .38-cahber 
pistol were found in the apartment, the spokesman saw. 

She also faces murder charges in the deaths of twopohee officers and a 
guard during the $1. 6-million robbery in Nyadk NcwYoit. and other 
char ges in connection with two robberies in New Jersey m 1978 and 1979. 
Five people were convicted in the Brink's case on charges of robbery and 
the slayings of the three men. 


Reuen . 

BEIRUT — A rocket hit the 
Lebanese Justice Ministry on Mon- 
day and started a fire in the fourth- 
floor law courts that destroyed le- 
gal records and files, security 
sources said. 

Amin Nassar, president of the 

ruuradio: “All files without excep^ Soviet Press Carries Israeli Message 

tioo have been burned. Citizens MOSCOW (WF) —The Soviet Union’s two most authoritative news- 
papers have prominently featured messages from Israel, raising specula- 
tion in diplomatic circles that the Kremlin may be interested in mending 
fences with the Jewish state. . 

The government newspaper Lrvestia gave unusual [prominence Sunday 
to a from President Chaim Herzog of Israel to Mikhail S. 

fiahtine between Gorbachev commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Alhcd victory 
E "5ES over Nazi Germany. It was the first ume that a cranmumcanon by an J 

Moslem raiuuas, -^Wished in the Soviet media since Moscow broke 

during the 1967 Middle East war. 
ty daily Pravda on Monday gave an unusually 
good display to.an article on a manifesto of an Israeli committee “For 
celebrations or the victory over fascist Germany” signed by a numb er of 
Israeli intellectuals, including nine non -Communist Knesset members. 


rights have become ashes.’ 

He described the attack, fol- 
lowed by heavy shelling of Chris- 
tian areas just to the east of the 
ministry, as the biggest disaster of 
the civil war. 

In earlier 

Chris tian and 

three civilians were killed and 
wounded, police said. 

The courts, used for dvD and 
c riminal cases, are in an area held 


17 


Israeli leader was 
relations with l 
The Communist 


by Christian forces. They face Syr- 

1 militiame n at 


ian-backed Moslem 


A Dutch policeman throws a demonstrator to the ground 
during Pope John Paul ITs visit to Utrecht. Incidents 
continued during the pope's visit Monday to The Hague. 


the main Museum Crossing point - ^ . 

on the Green Line, separating the PravHn Afififlllfi IfrmikPJmeSS aS UlUie 
city's Christian and Moslem sec- „ . , 

3 MOSCOW (AFP) — In the latest contribution w an official press 

. • _«„■ — iw.Ji. ilia Csnritfhft fYummiinicf P.'irtv n a i w 


Pope Denounces Apartheid 


(Continued from Page 1) 

people lined the one-mile rente to 
cheer. 

Later, the pope went to meet 
Queen Beatrix and her husband. 
Prince Ham , at their palace cm the 
city's northern outskirts. A crowd 
of about 1.500 cheered John Paul 
as he emerged from the one-hour 
meeting, but a small group of pro- 
testers, wearing ski masks and wav- 
ing black anarchist flags, whistled 
derisively. 

Mr. Lubbers, a Catholic, wel- 
comed the pope but also acknowl- 
edged the widespread opposition 


among Dutch Caiholks, who make 
up 40 percent of the population of 
14 million, to John Paul's conserva- 
tive policies. 

“Sometimes Rome seems a very 
long way away from here,” Mr. 
Lubbers, a Christian Democrat, 
told the pontiff. “Indeed, to be 
quite frank, simply the won! Rome 
makes some people uneasy if not 
downright suspicious.” 

John Paul's five-day trip, to be 
followed by a tour of Belgium and 
Luxembourg, has caused deep divi- 
sions within the fiercely ii 
dent Dutch church. 


tors. 

With five other crossings, it has 
been dosed for most of the past 
two weeks by the shelling, winch 
press reports say has killed more 
than 80 people and wounded about 
450. 

Minister of Justice Nabih Beni 
who heads the Shiite Moslem Amal 
movement, condemned the attack 
an the courts, calling it the biggest 
catastrophe of the recent fighting 
in the city. 

“It was a direct hit,” he said at a 
news conference, adding that the 
rocket came from an unknown 
source. 

■ Jomblat Rides Out Accord 

The attack cm the Justice Minis- 
try and the renewed fighting came a 
day after Walid Jumblat, the leader 
of the Druze Moslem leftists, ruled 
out any chance of a settlement with 
Hie Hobeika, the newly elected 


cam 


"riiyp Venn css Monday as a crime and said that 
should be isolated. ... . . . 

The report said that alcoholics “bring harm to society, but above all to 
their family and friends" and argued that “punishment is important to 
safeguard and prolong" the lives of alcoholics, who it said often die 15 to 
20 years before retirement. 

The Politburo said in April that it would take a senes of social, 
political, economic, medical and administrative measurra" to deal with 
the problem of drunkenness. No details were given at the time, but the 
forthcoming measures were expected to be extremely repressive, accord- 
ing to Soviet sources. 


French Socialists Reject '86 Alliance 


Private Finn Trims U.S. Gvil Case Backlog 


(AP, UPI ) 


(Continued from Page 1) 



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•system can institutionalize a lack of 
fairness, which is exactly what hap- 
pened in the juvenile justice sys- 
tem.” 

Among Judicate's clients are 
unions and casinos in Atlantic 
City, New Jersey. 


Mr. Epstein said: “If an employ- 
ee sues and waits four or five years 
to get into court, he can win rein- 
statement with four or five years’ 
bade pay.. If the case is heard in 
eight weeks, he gets only right 
weeks’ back pay, and is reinstated 
while his knowledge of the compa- 
ny is current" 


A plumber who had hurt his 
hand when he put it through the 
glass of a church's swinging doer, 
took his case to Judicate, which 
then won from the insurance com- 
pany an agreement to abide by its 
derision. 

Jack Brian, a former judge in 
Philadelphia's Court of Common 
Pleas, found for the church. The 
case was deckled in a single session, 
for which Judicate charges 5600. 
The parties share the cost. .The 
plumber filed an appeal, howevti; 
and the appellate panel affirmed 
Mr. Brian's derision. The appeal 
cost the plumber an additinnal 
$1,800. 


Insurance companies use private 
procedures fora variety of reasons. 


Stephen B. Middlebrook, vice pres- 
of the 


ident and general counsel 
Aetna Life and Casualty Co. of 
Hartford, Connecticut, said it was 
not unusual to spend more on liti- 
gation than on 


He said Aetna, which has used 
Fn D ispute, the Washington com- 
pany, often turned to private sys- 
tems to avoid the adversarial atmo- 
sphere of courtrooms, especially 
when a dispute involved another 
company “that we would like to 
maintain a continuing relationship 

with.” 


PARIS (Reuters) — France's governing Socialists have rejected the 
idea of seeking an allian ce vrith the center to stay in power after elections 
in 1986. 

No formal derisions were made at the weekend meeting of the party’s 
management committee, but party sources said there was nearly unani- 
mous opposition to the idea of forming a center-left coalition if the 
Socialists lost their absolute majority in the National Assembly. 

The party's first secretary, Lionel Jospin, said after the meeting that he 

president of the Lebanese Forces, expected the Socialists to win no more than 30 percent of the vote in the 
The Associated Press reported 1986 elections. The Socialists' uneasy alliance with the Communist Parry 
from Beirut. collapsed last year. 

Mr. Jumblat called Mr. Hobeika. 

Baldrige to Encourage China on Trade 

camps in September 1982. a “crime beIJING (UPI) — Malcolm Baldrige, the U.S. commerce secretary, 

said Monday that he would urge China to lower barriers that hinder the 
marketing efforts of U.S, companies. He also promised to expedite the 
export of U.S. high technology to China. 

In a speech to American businessmen, Mr. Baldrige said that Ameri- 
cans faced several obstacles in their attempts to reach the Chinese 
market: the high cost erf doing business in China, difficulties in securing 
H# ^bor ^ supplies. erratically applied customs rules and tariffs and 

coSdT^^tSS uSSf Wk restrictive poliSes on the repatriation of profits. 

A^m* Mr. Baldrige, on a four-day visit to Beijing for a meeting of the US.- 
thfr^SStiC^S CWnese Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade, aid the two 
- — J ^ r* countries would sign an agreement on industrial renovation mined u 

enabling US. companies to participate “on the ground Door" in refur- 
bishing and upgrading hundreds of outmoded Chinese factories, many 
built with Soviet aid and expertise in the 1950s, he said. 


and terrorism" 


specialist 

“There won’t be any agreement 


or reconciliation with the Lebanese 
Forces* current or former leaders” 
to end the war, Mr. Jumblat said at 
his Chuf mountain headquarters in 
Moukhtara southeast of Beirut. 



You feel good sharing your trip with the 
folks back home. They feel good 
knowing you’re okay. And everybody feels 
good because an international call 
costs less than anyone imagined. 




<£) 1985 AT&T Communications 


the Christians. He raid “this might 
be GemayeTs last chance." 

Mr. Hobeika was elected presi- 
dent of the Lebanese Forces last 
Thursday to take over from Samir 
Geagea, who had seized control of 
the militia in March in a revolt 
against Mr. Gemayd’s pro-Syrian 
stance. 




Illinoisan’s Rape Sentence Commuted 


CHICAGO (UPI) — Governor James R. Thompson has commuted 
the prison sentence of Gary Dotson fora rape the accuser has said never 
occurred, but the governor refused to grant a pardon. 


Shultz Ends 
Mideast Trip 


After the commutation Sunday, Mr. Dotson, who has served six years 
ited a new trial to clear his name. 


Pm 


(Contmaed from Page 1) 
Palestine Liberation Organization, 
arrived Monday in Amman, saying 
that he had won Chinese backing 
for the Jordanian- Palestinian peace 
initiative on his recent visit to Beij- 
ing. 

Confederation Discussed 
A senior PLO official said Mon- 
day that King Hussein was ready to 
declare a Jordanian -Palestinian 
confederation whose government 
woald negotiate an Israeli with- 
drawal from occupied Arab territo- 
ry, Reuters reported from Tunis. 

Salah Khalaf, who is second-in- 
command to Mr. Arafat in the larg- 
est PLO grouping, Fatah, said that 
it would be wrong for the PLO to 
accept such a move. 

King Hussein is ready to an- 
nounce the setting up of a confed- 
he said. 


in prison, said be still warn 

disappointed that Tm not considered innocent but I’ve got to be 
Fin free. I will pursue it in court more,” Mr. Dotson said Sunday 
hearing that Us 25-to-50-year sentence had been commuted to the time 
already served. 

The chief judge of the Cook Country Criminal Court Richaid J. 
Fitzgerald, has scheduled a hearing Tuesday on a motion for a new trial 
Mr. Dotson also has an appeal pending before the Duois Appellate 
Court 


For the Record 


United Airihws pilots and management sat down at the bargaining table 
Monday in Boston for the first time in a month in an effort to resolve a £ 
pay dispate and head off a strike set for Friday. (AP) 

Edward Joseph Peririns, a career diplomat was nominated Monday by 
President Ronald Reagan to be ambassador to Liberia. (UPI) 

of 


-Two 84-year-old man died of Legionnaires' disease Monday in a 
geriatric hospital in Stafford, England; where II other persons have died 
erf the pulmonary virus, officials said. They wore the 35th and 36th 
persons to die in the recent outbreak. (AP) 

Soviet authorities deported an American tourist Monday, U.S. Embassy 
officials said. The woman, from Salt Lake City, Utah, told the embassy 
she was detained, ordered to undress and was searched by KGB officers 
for carrying Russian and English copies of “The Sermon on the Moant," 
intended as gifts. (AP) 


moon now," he said, adding that /*'■ • rji 1 a T7 - -m -* 

Cities Sharply Assail Kohl 
After His Party Loses Vote 


dL 


The PLO official, Abu Iyad, said 
that the announcement of a con- 
federation would mean the forma- 
tion Of a Tnr rianian -Palcs riniaii 
government. 

“I am convinced that it is this 
confederal government which wifi 
ry out negotiations over the 
id of the PLO,” he said in Tunis, 
where- the PLO has its headquar- 
ters. 


(Con t in n ed from Page I) 


Sunday night, named unemployed 


ty's chances in North Rhine- West- workers, pensioners and farmers as 
phalia. “Even that hope was vain,” die three main groups of voters that 


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an editorial mid. 

Post-dection polls by West Ger- 
man television identified unem- 
ployment as the issue given the 
highest priority by the voters. The 
poll found that the majority be- 
lieved that the Soda] Democrats 
were better equipped to deal with 
this issue. 

Even more ominous for Mr. 
Kohl's coalition was that nearly 50 
percent of tire voters said that un- 
employment in North Rhine- Wes t- 


ine tnree mam groups of voters um 
had turned against nis party. Bui be 
declared that the haste eamoaoc 
course of the government was cor- 
rect and would be continued. 

But at the first post-election 
meeting of the Christian Demo- 
crats’ national party committee 
Monday, the chancellor's pledge to 
continue his econo m ic policy was 
reported to have come under fire 
from other members. 

Mr. Kohl and Willy Brandt, the 
head of the Social Democrats. 


phalia was the responsibility of the clashed with unusual personal am- 
federal government. While the na- mosity Sunday night during a live 
rate of unooplpjntneot is television debate. 


about 10 percent, it is as high as 16 
percent in some areas of the Ruhr, 
the industrial heartland of North 
Rhine-Westphalia. 

The Stadt Anzeiger of Cologne 
called the election a “protest vote" 
and reminded Mr. Kohl that he had 
come to power with the promise of 
reducing unemployment but had 
faded to do so. 

In the 1983 national election, an 
estimated two million wage earn- 
ers, including industrial workers 
from North Rhine-Westphalia, 
switched allegiance from the Sivaai 
Democrats to Mr. Kohl's party. 

On Sunday, these voters re- 
turned solidly to tire Social Demo- 
crau, according to post-election 
polls. 

Mr. Kohl, in a television debate 


The dispute convinced foreign 
diplomats and others that foreign 
policy — especially Mr. Kohl’s re* 
lationship with the United States 
— would be one of the most divi- 
sive issues before the 1987 national 
elections. 

The clash started when Mr. Kohl 
accused Mr. Brandt of “systematic 
anti-Americanistn" in ccjonectioo 
with Mr. Reagan’s visit. Flushed 
with anger. Mr. Brandt broke in to 
deny the charge. “Mr. Chancellor, 
you should be ashamed of your# 
self," he shouted ‘several tunes 
“You’re telling lies to our people- 

Mr. Kohl retorted that Mn 
Brandt had “banned the Federal 
Republic” by his stand on the Rea* 
gan visit and that it was he who waf 
telling lies. 


I 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 3 



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gear. So can your IBM PC. (Provided 
you have a screwdriver handy.) 

You might need more sophisticated 
software. Which probably means 
more user memory. 


Your PC can grow all the way up 
to 640KB. More than enough to 
handle the most popular PC 
software available today. 

In the same way you can add 
another diskette drive, or a fixed 
*disk that can put 5,000 pages of 
facts and figures at your fingertips. 

If you still thirst for more power, 
the PC is far from finished. 

To help you anticipate the curves 
that he ahead in your business, 
open up your IBM PC and slip in a 
communications adapter. 

It will connect you to other PCs 
or compatible systems. 

though every IBM PC contains 
very advanced, up-to-date 
technology, it works on good 
old-fashioned logic: 

The more power you give it, the 
more power it will give you. 

For further information write to 
IBM United Kingdom International 
Products Limited, West Cross House, 
2 West Cross Way, Brentford, 
Middlesex TW8 9DY, ======= 

England (Telex 27748). 





LITTCI TRAMP CH*K4CTEIl UCBN1BD BY ■UBBLIS INC 1« GGK 



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Page 4 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribitnc, 


P nUMwd With The No York 1W and The Wtahinpum P».i 


The Cambodia Question 


The nagging question of American foreign 
policy since World War n has been whether 
and how to intervene to defeat, diminish or 
head off local Communist regimes. Nowhere 
has this question been posed with more poig- 
nancy than in Cambodia. There a harsh and 
aggressive foreign Communist state. Vietnam, 
now rules. The principal resistance, the Khmer 
Rouge, is not only Communist but is also the 
very group that in the 1970s committed geno- 
cide against the Cambodian people and [nil 
itself forever beyond acceptance. There is a 
small non -Communist resistance. Should the 
United Stales offer it modest military aid? 

The question is so difficult beta use the 
slightest and most hedged support of military 
action anywhere in Indochina awakens afl tbe 
ghosts of the former American intervention. 
These ghosts haunt both the argument against 
aid and the argument in favor. The argument 
against stresses the need for a firm, informed 
American Consensus supporting _ the likely 
risks and costs of a new intervention. Such a 
consensus does not now exist. The argument in 
favor of aid makes the case for conducting an 
active policy wi thin the constraints of the 
cautionary lessons of Vietnam. 

We do not think the advocates of aid have 
overcome the natural hesitation that many 
Americans have about even a token involve- 
ment in Indochina. What counts most for us is 
a consideration a rising from the excruciati n gly 


flimsy prospects for the anti -Co mm u nis t resis- 
tance's success and from the likelihood that 
the vile and powerful Khmer Rouge, support- 
ed by China, whose interest in the outcome is 
Tar greater than Washington’s, mil dominate 
the anti-Vietnam struggle indefinitely. How 
can a deeply ambivalent United States make, 
with a small aid initiative, what the recipients 
are bound to take as a commitment to see them 

through to the end? There is no honor in 
standing by, but, given the history, there is 
even less in stirring false hope. 

Those of us who see the world as a place of 
grays, not of blacks and whites, most accept a 
tricky issue of consistency. Why aid the Af- 
ghan resistance —an Asian cause that Ameri- 
9 a supports —and not the resistance in Cam- 
bodia? The Afghan rebels are also fighting a 
foreign occupation, also (and directly) fighting 
Soviet power, also fighting an uphill battle. 

The telling difference is not simply that 
Af ghan istan is not Vietnam. It is that the 
Afghans have a serious chance, if not to van- 
quish the Soviet invaders in bailie, at least to 
force them in time to the negotiating table. 

The political appeal of a cause is one reason 
to consider supporting it- But support must be 
serious. It is not serious if it is able to achieve 
alm ost nothing and falsely encourages its ben- 
eficiaries to believe in a commitment and a 
chance of success that do not exisL 

— THE WA SHINGTON POST. 


Progress on the Deficit 


President Reagan has taken two giant, steps 
toward a responsible budget by accepting the 
defense and Social Security cutbacks in the 
Senate budget resolution- His retreat on both 
should surprise no one, given his pattern of 
asserting rigid stances and then backing away. 
Bui his new steps are impressive nonetheless. 
Do they mean that be is ready to lake the third 
step? Adding taxes to this deficit-reduction 
package would make it even stronger. 

It took Vice President George Bush's tie- 
breaking vote to give the majority leader, Rob- 
ert Dole, a painstakingly built victory for a 
resolution that would reduce the prospective 
budget deficit by an estimated £56 billion next 
year and cut it in half by 1988. The compro- 
mise is a flimsy edifice in other respects, too. It 
rests on shaky assumptions of growth and 
revenue. And it is a Republican plan that the 
Democratic House will shape further. 

Yet the Senate blueprint moves matters in 
the right direction. Cutting defense spending 
growth to the rate of inflation is safe and 
sound. Mr. Reagan said recently that doing 
this would be irresponsible. But his buildnp 
remains massive. The Senate would still allow 
4-percent military growth — the presumed 
inflation rate — while virtually all nonmilitary 
programs would be frozen, reduced or cut 


The most notable freeze is the one that the 
Senate would impose on cost-of-living raises 
for Social Security and other pensioners. Some 
such curb may be accessary so that all pro- 
grams share the burden. But there may be 
more equitable ways to do it than by s i n gl in g 
out pensioners. In any case, equity requires 
that a Social Security freeze not push low- 
income beneficiaries into poverty. 

The Senate resolution's best feature is its 
acknowledgment that some government pro- 
grams can be terminated. The major element 
missing is new revenue. Cowed by the presi- 
dent's threat to veto any tax measure, and 
knowing that tax increases are unpopular, the 
Senate refused even to put off the scheduled 
cut in cigarette taxes next fall Just because 
massive deficit reduction can be achieved by 
spending cuts alone does not diminish the 
importance of added revenues. 

Besides, the House will surely not go along 
with all the Senate's proposed spending reduc- 
tions. Retaining the existing cigarette tax and 
raising the tax on gasoline would be merited in 
any case. Meanwhile, the Senate resolution 
finally demonstrates that the deficit problem is 
serious and that the president and Congress 
are serious about a remedy. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The World Waits for Reagan 

For the first time since 1981, when the U.S. 
government launched the ambitious experi- 
ment in deficit-financing now universally 
known as Reaganomics, Mr. Reagan himself 
has sensed the dangers of the economic course 
which he has charted for America and the 
world. The president’s sudden surrender on 
Friday to the Senate's demand for a freeze on 
military spending is the most hopeful sign to 
date that the U.S. budget deficit may be 
brought under control before it precipitates 
a serious financial crisis. 

The basic cause of the growth of the deficit 
since 1983 has not been the increase in defense 
spending, rapid though this was. Over $130 
billion of the S 160-billion structural deficit can 
be directly attributed to huge tax cuts which 
were the cornerstone of the Reaganomics pro- 
gram. After four years of Reaganomics it is 
becoming dear that a sufficient political con- 
sensus does not exist in America for the sweep- 
ing reductions in government activity which 
Mr. Reagan would have needed to make his 
budget sums odd up. It is now accepted even 
by the Republican leadership in Congress that 
a spending squeeze alone will not resolve the 
underlying imbalance created by Mr. Reagan's 
tax cuts. Sooner or inter the president will 
probably be forced to compromise with Con- 
gress on tax reforms and higher revenues, as 
well os on cuts in spending. The big question is 
whether, while waiting for Mr. Reagan, to 
make his mind up, the world can avoid a 
serious recession or financial crisis. 

— The Financial Times (London). 

Toward a Worldwide Network? 

Fantasies have existed for some time of the 
power of a worldwide television network. The 


$2-bfllion agreement by Rupert Murdoch and 
Marvin Davis to buy six major independent 
television stations from Metromedia Incorpo- 
rated brings that fantasy nearer. Messrs. Mur- 
doch and Davis already own Twentieth Centu- 
ry Fox Film Corporation, producers of movies 
and television shows. Mr. Murdoch controls 
an Australian network, an Australian film 
company, satellite communications capability 
and a European cable television group. What 
if they integrated it all? 

This deal is just one more example of turbu- 
lence in the industry, which has seen the 
friendly acquisition of ABC by the smaller 
Capital Cities Communications, and hostile 
takeover attempts at CBS. It occurs while the 
older television technologies appear stronger 
(and the newer ones weaker) than previously 
forecast. Rupert Murdoch's creed is never to 
be boring. At a time when business power 
struggles are prime fodder for his television 
companies' shows, he never is. In the long run, 
the shrinking of the world by the global read] 
of his media signals is likely to be the least 
boring aspect of his ventures. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 

More Irish Support Neutrality 

The Irish Republic's neutrality has always 
been vague and pragmatic. It was a result of 
the end of depoidsnce on Britain and was 
regarded from the first by many Irishmen as 
more a symbol of independence than anything 
else. It has often been seen as a mere bargain- 
ing counter in a process designed to achieve 
unification with Ulster. But Irish belief in true 
neutrality is becoming more widespread. Al- 
ways a major plank in the platform of the 
small Labor Party, it is gainmg considerable 
adherence in both the major political parties. 

— Neue Ziircher Zeitwtg (Zurich). 


FROM OUR MAY 14 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Mine Fire Kills 136 in England 
LONDON — No one in the sorrowing town of 
Whitehaven now doubts that death in one of 
its most tragic forms has come to the 136 men 
down in the workings of the Wellington mine. 
The main way of the mine, about two miles 
from the bottom of the shaft and out under the 
Irish Sea. was walled up with bricks [on May 
13] and the fire behind it left to burn itsdf oul 
The 136 men on the other side of the fire must 
have been dead already, so great was the heat. 
The last rescue party to go down recorded the 
temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit. The 
three Government inspectors of mines agreed 
that the only course left to extinguish the fire 
was to wall it in. Whitehaven is like one great 
family stricken by the hand of death. 


1935: A Call to Stabilize Currencies 
BASEL — Calling for the stabilization of 
currencies, the annual report of the Bank for 
International Settlements says that the tariff, 
quota, clearing and compensation agreements 
throttling international trade are “the inevita- 
ble concomitants or the chaotic money condi- 
tions which prevail.'’ During the past year, 
says the report approved by the European 
central bank governors, “disorder has become 
intensified through the fall measured in gold, 
of sterling and the currencies responsive to 
it . . . the silver policy of the United States 
and the abnormal attraction of gold to the 
American market. No durable recovery can be 
hoped for unless and until stabilization of the 
leading currencies has been brought about." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
carl gewirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

Executive Editor RENE BONDY Deputy PMuhr 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Depun Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Publish* 

Dtpuiy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Qpmakm 

Associate EJucr FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dinetar of CimJatim 

ROLF D. I 


, KRANEPUHL Director of Attending Seda 

International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauIle. 92200 NcrnDv-sur-Sdne, 

France. TeL (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN:' G294-80SL 
Director de la piMaaim: Walter N. Huger. 

Asia Headgumm, 24-34 Hennasy Rd, Hang Kang TeL 5-285618 Telex 61170. 

-«•-«-■ Telex 262009. 

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So. 61337. 

U.S. subscription; S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid a Long Island City. N.Y. 1 1101. 

® 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



TUESDAY MAY 14. 1983 



r We appreciate the $100-nultton offer, but tell Mr. Murdoch toe ain't for sale . 5 


* iil^ 1 

■■jji * 1 

The Killers ^ ' 


Might Be 
Forestalled 

Bv Jonathan Power 


Reagan and Gorbachev: A Meeting of Minds Soon? 


L ONDON — While President Rea- 
# gan had his hands full dealing <** 
with the aftermath of the Nazi exter- 
mination machine, the U.S. Senate 
has bam preparing to decide whether 
to ratify UK united Nations Conven- 
tion on Genocide. And an organiza- 
tion called International Alert has 
been founded to campaign against 
mass killings, ll is to be headed by 
Martin Enrols, the former director- 
general of Amnesty International. 

The killing goes on. Since 1945, 
genocide has cost more lives than the 
millions of Jews exterminated by the 
Nazis. There have been massacres in 
Bangladesh, Cambodia. East Timor 
and several African countries. 

International Alert has decided to ' 
make Uganda its first country of fo- 
cus. With reason. Lust year Elliott 
Abrams, U.S. assistant secretary of 
state for human rights, called the 
situation there “horrendous." Since 
1981 between 100.000 and 200,000 
people have been killed. 

When Idi Amin was overthrown in 


'ASHINGTON — There is an interesting 
paradox in the brief two-month relatio n s h ip 
between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev. 

an ae letters, both stress the things 


W 


Bv James Reston 


When they exchange I . 

they have in common. But when they talk in public 
they emphasize the things that divide their coun- 
tries and blame one another for the dilemma. 

In his letter to Mr. Gorbachev for the 40th 
anni versary of the U.S.-Soviet victory over Nazi 
Germany, Mr. Reagan called for “renewed pro- 
gress toward the goals of making peace more 
stable, and rimwiatmg nuclear weapons from 
the face of the Earth." In response, the new 
Soviet leader recalled “the spirit of coopera- 
tion which united us all” against the Nazis, and 
be pledged Moscow’s willingness to accomplish 
“the task of preventing a nuclear catastrophe and 
fully e liminating nuclear weapons." 

But within a few days they were bashing one 
another in public. In his address to the European 
Par liam ent in Strasbourg Mr. Reagan described 
the Soviet government as a corrupt system whose 
military policies were disrupting the world, and 
later on he mocked it as an economic and political 
failure at home and abroad. Meanwhile, Mr. Gor- 
bachev in Moscow was condemning the United 
States as “the forward edge of the war menace to 
mankind," although he added that a world without 
wars and weapons was attainable. 

“The course of events.” Mr. Gorbachev added. 


“can be chang ed sharply if tangible success is 
achieved at the Soviet -American talks on space 
and nuclear arms . . . Such Is our conviction. We 
firmly believe that the process of detente should be 
revived. This does not mean, however, a simple 
return to what was achieved in the 70s . . . From 
our point of view, detente is not the ultimate aim of 
policy. It is needed, but only as a transitional stage 
front's world cluttered with arms to a reliable and 


all-embracing system of international security." 

T-Sovi- 


Here is the fundamental challenge to U.S.- 
ei diplomacy: Do the superpowers concentrate on 
mutual fears and insults, or explore stated objec- 
tives of establishing a new system of international 
security and gradually eliminating nuclear weap- 
ons? For the lime being both are obviously concen- 
trating on their fears and distrust. Washington is 
worried about the development of a new Soviet 
missile with multi-warheads and Moscow about 
Mr. Reagan's “star wars" research program. 

What has not been explored in the two months 
since Mr. Gorbachev emerged at the top of the 
Kremlin is what he thinks and whether u makes 
anv difference. It is important to find oul 
if both Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev keep 
saying they want to find a secure compromise in 
this nuclear power crisis, is it unreasonable to 


suppose that they should arrange private talks, not 
only about the means of nuclear war but about the 
philosophy and process of how to reach their 
proclaimed objective of a nonnuclear world? 

“Today," said Mr. Goriachev, “on the anniver- 
sary memorable to all of us, 1 should like to repeat 
once more: The Soviet Union resolutely comes out 
for a world without wars, for a world without 
weapons. We state again and again that the out- 
come of the historical competition between the two 
systems cannot be solved by military means." 

All this may be smoke and flimflam, bat nobody 
in Washington knows. Mr. Gorbachev is a stranger 
who may or may not have power, but it would oe 
interesting to gel some people together to discuss 
quietly whether he and Mr. Reagan really agree on 
reducing tensions and nudear weapons and finally 


on the abolition of same. It probably would not 
bring these iwo fundamentally 


different philo- 
sophic and political views of life to compromise, 
but nobody in Washington or Moscow knows. 

All the superpowers know is that they are getti ng 
into a dangerous, expensive and potentially disas- 
trous confrontation, and that they should begin to 


discuss it this summer or at a personal meeting 
Mr. Gorbache 


between Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorbachev in the 
foil. This will not mean much, however, unless they 
g pi their philosophers and not merely their weap- 
ons technicians together. 

The New York Timex 


1979. there was hope that Uganda 
would return to normality. But mass 
murder has continued under Milton 
Obate. Some indicators, like the exo- 
dus of refugees, suggest that the situ- 
ation is getting worse. In Marshal 
Amin's time there were only about 
25,000. Today there are 300,000. 

British officials and the Common- 
wealth secretarial argue privately 
that the U.S. estimate of deaths is loo 
high. In any case, the land that Win- 
ston Churchill called “the pearl of 
Africa” and “an island of gentle man- 
ners" seems to be bleeding to death. 

President Obotc made the mistake 
of using uncompromising tactics 
against what at first was only a rela- 
tively small number of dissidents. 
And when he transferred large num- 
bers of underfed, underpaid troops to 
parts of the country unsympathetic to 
nis administration, excesses became 
the order of the day. The govern- 
ment’s troops often nave sought re- 
venge for past suffering that they 
endured at the hands of Amin forces. 

All this enlarged the numbers and 
heightened the militancy of the oppo- 
sition. International Alert proposes 






re 


The Gorbachevs Might Give the Reagans a Contest 


that outside organizations that 
some influence on the Ugandan 
eminent, like the World Bonk and the 
International Monetary Fund, urge 
the government to initiate a process 
of conciliation. For a start, it should 


L ONDON -From the talk of Lon- 
/ don, Mikhail and Raisa Gorba- 


By Flora Lewis 


chev are going to give Ronald and 
Nancy Reagan, the great masters of 
TV-manship, some racy competition 
if they go to New York in the fall as 
expected. In fact, word has filtered 
through from Moscow that the Soviet 
leader wants to include a visit to the 
Reagan ranch at Santa Barbara. That 
would turn the “informal summit" 
into a grand-tour performance. 

Mr. Gorbachev showed in his V-E 
Day speech in Moscow that he can be 
as tough and aggressive as any of his 
Kremlin predecessors when it comes 
to denouncing the West and blaming 
it for ail of the world's present and 
past woes, including Hitler's war. 

But he and his wife also showed 
during their week in London last year 
that they are susceptible to Western 
luxury and glitter, regardless or the 
call for more austerity and discipline 
at home in the Soviet Union. 

Three anecdotes widely repeated 


here, among high officials and people 
with Access to Margaret Thatcher's 
office make the poinL The anecdotes 
have not been directly confirmed, so 
they cannot be offered as assured 
fact, but they do give the flavor still 
lingering after the Gorbachev visiL 
Enough people were in a position to 
know the details, if not to acknow- 
ledge them publicly, to give the sto- 
ries more weight than idle gossip. 

The visit was in December, before 
Mr. Gorbachev became the top lead- 
er but, it seems, doubtless after he 
was sure of the succession. One item 
on the program was a pilgrimage to 
the cemetery in Highgate where Karl 
Marx is buned. The Gorbachevs did 
not go. It was a blustery day- The 
word is that Mrs. Gorbachev told 
their escorts to deposit the obligatory 
wreath because she was determined 
to see something else — the crown 
jewels in the Tower of London. 


Toward the end of the trip, after 
Mrs. Thatcher had left for a visit to 
China, they ordered their motorcade 
to stop at the blocked entrance to 
Downing Street. Mr. Gorbachev said 
he wanted to see the prime minister’s 
residence again. He got out of the car 
and tried to argue his way past the 
barricades. At first the guards sarcas- 
tically refused to believe who he was. 
but then, flustered, they accepted the 
evidence. The Gorbachevs were thus 
given another private look around the 
house to examine the decor. 

The best story starts at the formal 
dinner that Mis. Thatcher gave for 
her Soviet guests early in the visiL 
Mrs. Gorbachev admired the dia- 
mond and sapphire earrings Mrs. 
Thatcher was wearing. Impatient 
with that kind of small talk, the prime 
minister accepted the compliment 
stiffly. But Mis. Gorbachev insisted 
on knowing where they were from. 


Finally. Mrs. Thatcher called over 
her husband. Denis, who had bought 
the jewels as an anniversary gift some 
years before, and asked him to tdl 
"Mrs. Gorbachev the name of the 
shop. It was Cartier. 


convene a round-table conference 
outside the country and invite repre- 
sentatives of the opposition. 

A sense of defeatism brought on by 
the scale of the horrors is one reason 
why so few. manage to summon up 
enthusiasm for the campaign now be- * 
ing waged to persuade the U.S. Sen- $ 
ate to ratify the UN Convention on 
Genocide. When there arc such large- 
scale atrocities, what does inter- 


He ■: 


V. 


A couple of days taler the director i national law or international protest 
of Cartier called Downing Street in mean? Who listens? The genocide 


some embarrassment Mrs. Gorba- 
chev and her cohorts were there de- 
manding to see a pair of the same 
earrings. They were still in stock, but 
he wanted to know if the prime min- 
ister would have any objection to 
showing them in the surprising cir- 
cumstances. She did not. Mrs. Gor- 
bachev bought the earrings and paid 
with an American credit card. 

Efforts to check the story drew a 
blank. At first Cartier was evasive; 
after a number of people called, it 
said it had reviewed its charge slips 
and found no record of a purchase by 
Raisa Gorbachev. The press office at 
Downing Street denied even hearing 
of the incident M I don't even know u 


convention has been in existence 
since 1948 but has never been used, 
even when there have been well docu- 
mented cases of mass killings. 

A basic weakness of the conven- 
tion is that in the debates in Ac 
mid- 1940s on the original draft the 
Soviets got their way on a key para- 
graph. They demanded the removal 
of the clause prohibiting genocide 
against political groups, on the theo- 
retical ground that genocide was 
bound up with Nazi race theories. 
Race was the issue, they argued, not 
politics. Consequently the slaughter 
of political groups such as the Com- 
munists in Indonesia in 1965 or the 
ilitical opponents of Pol Pot in 


Crime: The Color of the Cottar Counts 


W ASHINGTON — When G- 
men nabbed the late “Willie 
the Actor" Sutton after he had sto- 
len some S 2 million in bank depos- 
its during his lifetime, the disguise 
artist wound up spending 33 of his 
last 43 years in prison. 

The Reagan Justice Department 
— made up of stem-faced law V 
order types who sneer at the cod- 
dlers of criminals — has rounded 
up a gang at- EF. Hutton & Compa- 
ny that systematically bilked tens of 
millions of dollars out of 400 banks 
through a sophisticated swindle 
that made new breakthroughs in 
the state of the an of check kiting. 

The perpetrators of the crime ad- 
mitted their guOt in more than 
2,000 instances of mail and wire 
fraud. “The object of the defen- 
dant's scheme and artifice to de- 
fraud was to obtain interest-free 
funds by means of intentional over- 
drafting," said Justice prosecutors 
triumphantly, demonstrating how 
the illegal “drawing against uncol- 
lected funds totaled more than SI 
billion, with daily overdrafts some- 
times exceeding $250 mini on." 

Thai certainly makes the depre- 
dations of “Slick Willie" look like 
small change. Imagine: For more 
than two years a ring of at least a 
dozen ana perhaps 50 stockbrokers, 
following a scheme concocted by a 
few modem criminal masterminds. 


By W illiam Satire 


regularly shuffled rubber checks in 
and out of hanks, bamboozling 
most bankers .and intimidating a 
few who got wise. 

What do you suppose is going to 
happen to the gang that enriched 
itself at the expense of the banks, 
which are owned mainly by small 
shareholders? Will the criminals be 
brought into court, to be photo- 
graphed and shamed? Are the ring- 
leaders going to jail? 

No. The corporation for which 
the perpetrators of the crime work 
merely nas to give back the money 
it stole, and reimburse the Justice 
Department 5750,000 to cover the 
cost of its low-paid lawyers and 
accountants who broke the case. 
The court has imposed a criminal, 
fine of $2 milli on, the legal limit 

No personal disgrace for the per- 
petrators: no jail terms; not a slap 
on one individual wrist. Putting on 
his most severe look. Attorney i 
eral Edwin Meese had the chut 
to announce: “This makes it 
to the business world that white- 
collar crime will not be tolerated." 

On the contrary, the pretense 
that no human beings operate EF. 
Hutton makes it clear to the busi- 
ness world that if your company is 
shot through with managers in- 


volved in a huge swindle, not to 
worry — the Meese Justice Depart- 
ment will limit the liability to the 
corporation. And none of the guilty 
officers will have to pay. 

What excuse does the Justice De- 
partment's Criminal Division have 
to offer for this deal that was never 
offered to such bank-robbing entre- 
preneurs as “Slick Willie"? 

Albert Murray, the prosecutor in 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, who spent 
18 months on die case, claims that 
naming and prosecuting individ- 
uals “could have taken us two to 
three years." That's a dandy reason 
for coddling while-collar criminals. 

Justice officials in Washington 
have assured reporters that nobody 
in senior management was involved 
in Lhe two-year, 510- billion opera- 
tion. That suggests a degree of 
hands-off management that 
stretches credulity. But even if this 


oi me incidenL 1 aon t even know if political opponents of Pol rot m 
the prime minister wore earrings the Cambodia does not come within the 
night of the dinner," a spokesman 
said. Discretion was to be expected. 

It has not stopped continuing chuck- 
les in London's upper social set 
The incidents tell nothing about 


operation had been run by a stock 
clerk and ; 


a messenger boy, should 
they not be brought to justice? 
WelL um, goes a further expla 



WelLum, goes a further explana- 
tion, some witnesses were given im- 
munity from prosecution in return 
for tbeir testimony to the grand 
juiy, and it would not be fair to 
prosecute a few when all the other 
immunized wrongdoers in EF Hut- 
ton offices got oft 

What kind of abuse of immunity 
is that? Prosecutors are often re- 
quired to let small fry off in order to 
get evidence against bigwigs, but 
the notion that immunity for some 
makes prosecution of others “un- 
fair” is ludicrous. Says Mr. Meese: 
“We are as aggressive in the investi- 
gation and prosecution of so-called 
white-collar crime as [against] nar- 
cotics-and organized crime." Based 
on the immunity whitewash and 
cosy plea bargain in this case, that 
is great news Tor Lbc Mafia. 

A far-reaching misjudgment was 
made here, which deserves a close 
look by the Senate Judiciary Com- 
mittee. Faceless companies do not 
filch money from banks; people in 
those companies do. There is a Sut- 
ton in Hutton who beat the rap. 

The New York Times. 


Mr. Gorbachev’s policies and the po- 
sitions he is likely to lake in a meeting 
with Mr. Reagan. But they do give 
some clues to his personality and to 
his supreme self-confidence despite a 
minimum of contact with the West. 

Mrs. Thatcher has said she was 
charmed by him. Instead of sticking 
rigidly to reading prepared papers 
during their official talks, in the usu- 
al Kremlin fashion, Mr. Gorbachev 
spoke to her from brief notes and 
responded to questions. 

This is a new kind of Kremlin lead- 
er, neither wooden like the three of 


terms of reference of the convention. 

Another flaw is that provision forjj 
an international court to try perpe- . 
era tore of genocide, modeled on the 
Nuremberg tribunal, was dropped. 

In an ideal world the Senate would 
make its delayed ratification of the 
convention contingent on a strength- 
ening of the terms of reference. At the 
very least it should consider mandat- 
ing dhe US- administration to argue 
for the appointment of a UN high 
commissioner for human rights who 
would visit threatened areas in any 
early state of genotidal conflict ana 
ring the alarm bells. 

Forty years on, the lessons of the 
Holocaust are easily forgotten. Con- 
stant reaffirmation of our principles 
crengthenr 


is needed. Ratifying and streng 

recent years nor impetuously earthy ing the genocide convention would be£ 
like Nikita Khrushchev. He is cer- one way. Supporting InternationS? 
tainly Russian, but a departure from Alert would be another. 

Mass kilting will not be s 
a voluntary organization or by an 
international legal convention. But at 
least they could raise the flag for 
civilization and make it more diffi- 
cult for those who practice murder to 
escape the scrutiny of public opinion. 
International Herald Tribune. 

All rights reserved. 


the stereotypes. He can deal with 
Western ways, despite the profound 
difference in ideas and attitudes. 

It will take some adjustment by 
Americans, once he appears on the 
U.S. scene, to recognize that looking 
and acting familiar does not mean 
thinking along American lines. 


The New York Tunes. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 
Look Who’s Back in Hay About a Portland Paster 


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In response to "In the Skadans at 
Summits, Farmer Leaders Find a Spot- 
light'’ ( April 26) by Joseph Fiichac 

I am appalled that sidelined ex- 
leaders. having been voted out of of- 
fice, should set themselves up as an 
“Inter Action CounriL" By what right 
do these private citizens try to influ- 
ence government decisions? They 
should be reminded that they were 
voted out because the people of then- 
respective countries did not agree 
with their decisions. 

Let me assure your readers that 
any statement by former Prime Min- 
ister Malcolm Fraser, for example, 
would have little credibility in Aus- 
tralia. He was swept from office in 
1 983 by an enormous majority and he 
left the country with the largest un- 
employment figure in its fu'story. 

These men should not be allowed 
to strut and posture. If they have so 
much to offer, they should return to 
their countries and seek re-election. 

KEITH R. HARJD fE. 

Caringbah. Australia. 


Regarding ‘‘Mayor in Oregon . 
Makes Offbeat a Virtue " (May 8)r 

The poster “This Bud's for You? 
referred to Bud Clark's decision injf 
discontinue sale of Budweiser beer v 
because of Anheuser Busch’s opposi- 
tion to the California bottle biO re- 
quiring deposit on bottles and cans. 
The Goose Hollow Inn had been 
famous for selling more Budweiser 
per square foot than any other tavern. 
The poster shows a smiling Bud . 
Clark serving a heer clearly labeled 
Blitz Wdnhaid, the hometown brew.- 
EHRICKS. WHEELER. 
Portland, Oregon. . 


iNF- 


x 


Letters intended for publication m 
s bmdd be addressed ‘‘Letters to the 
Editor ■" and mun canton the wrtt- 
a-'f signature, none and full od- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject la editing. We aautot 
r&PWlible far die return ef 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 5 


Deficit Gut Without Tax Rise 



By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Tuna Same . 

WASHINGTON — Represen- 
tative William H. Gray 3d, chair - 
man of the House Bod|*et Commit- 
lee, has pledged that his panel wQl 
write a speeding plan that will cot 


the U.S. deficit by more than J50 
vitbour; 


[raising tax- 


biHion in 1986 wit 
es. • 

The Pennsylvania DcnKJcrat did 
not rule orn a reduction in the cost- 
of-hving increase in payments of 
the Social Security recrement pro- 
gram. Bat he said Sunday the com- 


mittee would not cut so deeply into 
'astheSen- 







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W 




programs for the elderly as 1 
aie did in the budget outline it 
Friday. 

Senate's 1986 plan, which 
1 only with (he tie-tealring 
vote of Vice President George 
Bush, cuts SS6 billion from the 
’5 ^1986 deficit that would result if no 
government programs were 

rhmyri an it if the r H FT W rt mil it m y 

buildup proceeded as planned. 

Mr. dray and his committee wfll 
begin to write their version of the 
budget this week. Members said 

rhaf based OH informal Hiwiwinns 
so far, their plan would hold mili- 
tary spending to a lower level than 
the Senate did, to offset some of the 
billions they want to restore for the 
elderly and other domestic pro- 


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M That would set up a m^or con- 
frontation with the While House 
, 1J -^ and the Republican-controlled 

. ..Jk 1 ■: Senate, which have already agreed 
.?’& ' to hold military spending to 198S 
levels pins an allowance for infla- 
tion. They have said that any al- 


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* 


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* * T . 


tempt to make farther cuts would 
mean there would be no budget 
Both houses mnst approve a an- 
gle overall budget resolution that 
sets general targets far spending 
and taxation in me fiscal year that 
begins in Oct I . The budget is then 
used as a guide to legation (hat 
actually appropriates funds for 
government activities. 

Mr. Gray said on a television 
news program, “What I am pre- 
pared to pledge Sunday is that we 
will come out with a spentfing-re- 
duetkm plaD^thfli will be over S50 
biffion. We are not going to raise 
taxes at aH* 

. On Social Security, be made no 
promise to reject the changes in- 
cluded in the Senate plan. “1 can't 
say. what the Budget Committee or 
the' House is going to do. But I can 
tefi you one thing, we're probably 
not going to do wnat the Senate did 
to senior citizens” 

The Senate proposes to eliminate 
the cost-of-living adjustment for 
one year and to cut projected 
spending on Medicare, tie health 
insurance for the dderiy, by S163 
billion over three years. 

Opinion on lax increases and So- 
cial Security is divided in the 
House. The Democratic leader. Jim 
Wright of Tens, supports the idea 
of a arinhmnn tax on corporations 
while other leaders, including 
House Speaker Thomas P. CTNafl 
Jr. of Massachusetts, mil not con- 
sider (me unless President Ronald 
Reagan proposes iL 
Mr. O'Neill is also opposed to 
any limit on the cost-of-uving in- 
crease for Social Security, while 


other Democrats, including Mr.. 
Gray, will not rule that out 

Representative Charles. E. 
Schumer, a New York Democrat 
on the Budget Committee, said the 
House faced a difficult task in 
matching the Senate’s $56 billion of, 
savings m 1986 and nearly $300 
billion over three years. 

“We’ll be lower than the Senate 
an defense,” he said. “But I can’t 
see the votes for a Social Security 
cosi-oMiving freeze and I don't 
think well terminate these 12 pro- 
grams.” 

The Senate’s plan holds military 
spending to the 1985 levri, increas- 
ing the budget only enough to 
make up for inflation. That is far 
less than the 6-percent increase, in 
addition to one to make up for 
inflation, that the president initial- 
ly requested. 

Assuming even lower military 
spending than the Senate ap- 
proved, but not the Social Security 
freeze., members said the House 
committee appeared to have infer-, 
mally agreed on about $45 billion 
of savings in 1986. 

■ Reagan to Fight for Budget 

President Reagan will fight for 
the Senate-passed budget “man by 
man and woman by woman” as it 
comes up for a vote in the House, 
his spokesman, Larry Speak es. said 
Monday in Washington, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported. 

“T A I.U. ^.n 


“I don't see him giving at all cm 
, I don’t see hun giving at all 


taxes, I don t see hun giving 
cm defense,” Mr. Speakes said. 
“We’d like to bold it as is. That's 
really for us the bottom tine.” 


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CIA Denies Link to Bombing in Beirut 

Agency Also Rejects Charge It Trained Counterterrorists 




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... ’12 Tke Associated Press 

- VC, WASHINGTON — Tbe Central 
... . \ ’ Intelligence Agency denied Mbn- 
ir day reports mat a QA-trained 
i group in Lebanon was responsible 
U for a car bombing in Beirut in 
. ~ which more than so persons were 
killed. 

’ - ; The CIA “never conducted any 
training of Lebanese security forces 
• . ". related to the events described” in 
„ an artide in Sunday's editions of 
The Washington Post, aocording to 
.a CIA spokeswoman, Patti Vo£ 

“It also had no foreknowledge of 
. : the Lebanese counterterrorist ac- 

dan mentioned in the article,” she 
said. . 

The Post, quoting unidentified 
' sources, reported mat President 
Ronald Reagan approved , a plan 
late last year directing the CIA to 
" s train foreign teams to make pre- 
, ;tfemptive strikes against terrorists* 
_ The plan was rescinded after mem- 
; bers of tte unit hired others to set 
off, without CIA approval, the car 
bomb that killed more than 80 peo- 
ple March 8, the sonrees said. The 
target, a suspected terrorist leader, 
escaped unharmed. 

Responding to complaints from 
some members of Congress that 
they had not been informed about 
.the alleged operation, Mrs. Volz 
’ said the agency “scrupnlqusly ob- 
L serves” its camnritme&t to keep . 
* congressional oversight -connnit- 

- tees informed of agency activities. 

The White House add State De- 
partment refused to discuss the 
substance of the story. . 

“That’s our policy, of not cqm- 

’• meeting P" Eny pfleyd in telligence ' 

matter," the White House spokes- 

- man, Larry Speakes, said Monday. 



Patrick J. Leahy 


“We point out that we do not on- 
dertake any activities — have not 
— that are inconsistent with the 
law and we meet our obhgations 
under the law to report to Con- 
gress." 

Lebanon’s ambassador to the 
United States, Abdallah Bonhatab, 
said he had not been told of any 
UX involvement in the attack. He 
said he had assumed that the 
bombing was tbe work of a dissi- 
dent Shiite faction. 


Sunday that he had begun an inde- 
pendent inquiry into a half-dozen 
CIA operations, including the 
counterterrorism program in the 
Middle East that was canceled af- 
ter the unauthorized car-bomb ex- 
plosion. 

Mr. Leahy, a Vermont Demo- 
crat, said he wanted to know more 
about several sensitive operations 
and that he was seeking more de- 
tails on others about which he felt 
the committee was not fully in- 
formed. 

“We’re going to review six to 
seven operations on our own," he 
said!. 

Tbe senator said he did not know 
of the counterterrorism plan in 
Lebanon. But when he was asked 
about it last month, he said, he 
made inquiries “and found out 
about it an my own." He refused to 
give further details. 

- By law and by agreement with 
the Reagan administration, the 


chairmen and deputy chairmen of 
d Housei 


■ Senate Probe Is Began 

Bob Woodward and Charles R. 
Babcock of The Washington Past 
reporiedearUer. 

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, deputy 
chairman of the Senate Select 
Committee on Intelligence, said 


the Senate and House intelligence 
committees are to be informed of 
all covert CIA activities. An admin- 
istration source insisted that the 
'committees had been fully in- 
formed, both orally and in writing, 
of all covert or otherwise sensitive 
operations. 

Things have fallen between the 
cracks,” Mr. Leahy said. T do not 
want my ode to get caught on a 
Nicaraguan-mining type problem.” 

Senator Leahy said he Idt that 
the CIA chief, William J. Casey, 
and other agency officials were 
willing to answer the committees 
questions about any matter, but 
that nothing was volunteered if the 
questions were not framed exactly. 


>Ex-Chief of QA Assails 




Bureaucratic Infighting 


■'•• • $,* 




•t - ’ 
J 'a 


By Charles R. Babcock 

Washington Pat Service 

WASHINGTON — Admiral 
Stansfidd Turner, director of the 
CIA during the Carter adminis tra- 
tion, describes the U.S, intelligence 
agencies in a new bode as being 
plapiwt by bureaucratic infighting 
that banned the country. 

In the book, “Secrecy and Do- 
y, the CIA in Iransitionr” 
Turner is also critical of 
administration for its 
use of covert action 
around the worid. 


rector, worked during World War 
IL 

“Almost any covert action to 
help Twin the war was considered 
acceptable, and the more the bet- 
ter,” he wrote, but he said this atti- 


. ' < : 
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tnde in peacetime “was a serious 
mistake.* 


Admiral Turner saved ins har- 
shest words for what he called the 


' Reagan «< l i ni nis ti atinn* s arbitrary 
‘ He said 


efforts to censor his book, 
it made more than 100 deletions of 
material it tamed classified: 


In One instanre of infi ghting , 
Admiral Turner wrote. Vice Admi- 


ral Bobte Ray Imnan, while head 
of the Natk 



,r 


* 5 . 


atraual Security 
withheld from the Central 
geoce Agency important informa- 
tion about the Soviet Navy. . 

“The loser was the United 
States," Admiral Turner wrote. 

A dmira l Turner said that .De- 
fense Intelligence Agency officials 
. pere pressured to produce reports 
that supported defense programs. 
The tu£of-war extended to the 
White House, he said, where offi- 
cials put pressure on the QA to 
produce reports that would bdp 
the president politically. 

President Jimmy Carter’s White 
House was “repeatedly insensitive" 
to the “importance of protects^ 
the apolitical credibility of intdh- 
- g ence," he wrote, He said that 
Zbigniew Brzerinski, Mr. Carter's 
national security affairs adviser, 
«« asked Admiral Toner to de- 
^sstfy information on the Middle. 
. East that would bdp Mr. Carter. 

Of. the Rfra ffirt mhviirtist r atifm, 
.Admiral Turner said its model of 
in teffigence seemed to be the Office 
of Strategic Services, where W3- 
liam I Casey, tbe current CIA. dfc 


The book calls the mw»mg of 
Nicaraguan ports by the CIA under 
Mr. Reagan a violation of princi- 
ples govendng the agency and of a 
law reqniringcongrttsional control 
of the UXmtdtigeiioe services. 

Adntiral Thzncr acknowledged 
♦hat the Carter administration used 
covert action, too. By the end of 
Mr. Carter’s term, he said, a “wide 
variew of covert operations were in 
place” hiy angfl of the administra- 
tion's “cumulative frustration" 
about Sovieradvtetunsm in Africa 
and Afghanistan, the fall of ■ the 
shah of Iran and the taking of 
American hostages there. 

- Admiral Turner Hrfmdwi his 
emphasis on technical collection 



Admiral Stansfiekl Turner 


to cuf 830 positions from tbe CIA’s 
clandestine service in 1977. 

. “We most never allow the. Sovi- 
ets to counter our technical coD co- 
don capabilities,” he said. “We 
have grown utterly dependent on 


them, and in many applications no 
amount of human spying can possi- 
bly be a substitute.” 

Admiral Turner said the intelli- 
gence agencies' mishandling of a 
report that there was a Soviet com- 
bat brigade in Cuba was more dam- 
agingi than thwr failure to predict 

the fall of the shah of Iran. 

Earlier warning of the Is lamic 
revolution would not have saved 
the shah, be said, but negative pub- 
licity over the Soviet brigade 
played a direct role in blocking 
ratification of the second strategic 
arms control treaty. It turned out 
that the “brigade*’ had been in 
Cuba for nearly 20 years. 


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PHILADELPHIA SIEGE — Two men work on a 
banker atop a rowhouse occupied by a radical, back-to- 
natnre groop, MOVE. Police used water cannon Mon- 
day to try to enforce an eviction order. Shots wore fired 
from a bufldmg but no one was hurt. A policeman was 
killed in a 1978 sbootout between tbe groiq> and police. 


Soviet Exports Tripled 
To Nicaragua in 1984 


By Theodore Shabad 

Nets York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Nicaraguan im- 
ports from tbe Soviet Union tripled 
last year as the Sandinists' relations 
with the United Stales deteriorat- 
ed, recent Soviet foreign trade sta- 
tistics show. 

. As a result, Nicaragua has sow 
emerged as the second most impor- 
tant Latin American recipient of 
Soviet goods, after Cuba. Previous- 
ly, Brazil was Moscow’s second- 
best customer in the region. 

The Reagan administration im- 
posed a trade embargo on Nicara- 
gua on May I, calling the leftist 
Sandmisi government a security 
threaL 

The embargo and the subsequent 
visit to Moscow and other Soviet- 
bloc capitals by President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra has raised expec- 
tations that the Sandinists will 
move even closer to Moscow eco- 
nomically. 

According to the Soviet monthly 
nt«e«7n?e Foreign Trade, 1984 ex- 
ports to Nicaragua were 138 mil- 
lion rubles, thro: times the 1983 
level of 42 million rubles. 

Ruble-doflar conversions are dif- 
ficult because of fluctuating ex- 
change rates, but the Soviet exports 
to Nicaragua last year had about 
twice the value of shipments from 
the United Slates to Nicaragua. 

There were virtually no Soviet 
imports from Nicaragua. 

The Soviet Union appears to 
have surpassed the United States as 
a supplier of chemical fertilizer, 
machinery, motor vehicles and oth- 
er capital goods to Nicaragua. 
These commodities predominated 
UJ5. shipments to Nicaragua un- 


traditional Nicaraguan exports — 
coffee, cotton and cane sugar. 

Moscow reported virtually no 
trade with the Somoza government. 
In 1980. the first year of trade, 
Moscow’s exports were limited to 
about S1OO.0OO worth of publica- 
tions. 

The U.S. embargo against Nica- 
ragua has evoked parallels with an 
embargo against Cuba in 1960 and 
Cuba's subsequent drift into (he 
Soviet orbit. ' 


■ Caribbean ‘Concern’ 

Foreign ministers from 13 Carib- 
bean countries have expressed 
“deep concern" over tbe embargo 
by the United States on trade with 
Nicaragua and have urged a return 
to dialogue between the two na- 
tions, The Associated Press report- 
ed. 

Their concern was expressed in a 
communique Issued at the conclu- 
sion Saturday of the 11th annual 
meeting of foreign ministers of the 
Caribbean Community and Com- 
mon Market, or CAJUCOM, in 
Basseterre, St Kitts and Nevis. 

■ Ortega Arrives in France 

President Ortega arrived Mon- 
day in France to seek support 
against the U.S. trade embargo. 
Reuters reported from Paris. Mr. 
Ortega has just visited Spain after 
completing a tour of Eastern Eu- 
rope aimed at securing economic 
aid and credit. 


The home 
of Burberry’s Paris,' 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeiei 



The full range l »: 
traditional Burberry > Me 1 
Ladies & Children elosiw. . 


Burberrvs 


8, bd Male.sherbes 
Paris S -26b. !?.'!! 


in 


Bitbnrg Visit Hurts German Tourism 

pron 
here 


Reuters 

HAMBURG — Thousands of 
^nwricang have canceled vacations 
in West Germany following Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s controver- 
sial visit to the Goman war ceme- 
tery at Bitbiun on May 5, Knul 
Blattomann of the German tourist 


romotion center in New York said 
Monday. 


He said that the cancellations, 
mainly by Jews and Worid War U 
veterans, resulted in hotels losing at 
least 200,000 overnight stays from 
Americans. 


der the dictatorship of Anastario 
Somoza and in the first yearn after 
the Sandmisi takeover in 1979. 

Last year, according to the Com- 
merce Department, than was no 
machinery in the six leading cate- 
gories of UJS. exports to Nicara- 
gua, which ranged from insecti- 
cides to paper and oil products. 

. The Soviet Union has yet to pub- 
lish a detailed breakdown of 1984 
trade. In 1983, it sent aircraft, road- 
building machines and motor vehi- 
cles to Nicaragua. In return, it took 


Among the riches of Beverly Hlilf 
a little gem of a hotel. 


The Beverly Ravlllon Is one of two 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels 
that are run in the European style, 

. under the direct supervision of the 
proprietor himself. And we offer our 
guests the ultimate Beverly Hills 
experience: free limo service to 
glorious Rodeo Drive. 



Beverly Pavilion 


a Max Brail I u «. •; 

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A Falcon 900 demonstration flight. January 15.1935. 


The Falcon 900 demonstrates leadership qua- 
lities in every important respect. First, it offers an 
extraordinary level of passenger comfort. All 
passengers who flew in it are unanimous to praise 
the quietness and comfort amenities of a very 
large cabin (234 *m wide overlO m long and 
1.87 m headroom). 

Tbe Falcon 900 is a Leader In performance, 
too. With in effective range of 7,000 km (carr- 
ying 8 passengers and NBAA IFR reserves). It can 
easily fly from Paris to New York, from London 
to Abu Dhabi, from Tokyo to Jakarta. And the 
Falcon 900 can climb directly to 39,000 ft which 
uts it above international commercial air traffic, 
he Falcon 900 can cruise at up to Mach .85 
(904 km/h) and has been flown at 94% of the 
speed of sound In test flights. 

The Falcon 900 is mso the Leader in effi- 
ciency. For long range operatlon, take-off weight 
is 20 tons, 10 tons less than its closest competitor 
under the same conditions and with the same 


payload. Thanks to its latest-generation Garrett 
engines, its excellent aerodynamics and lighter 


wdght, the Falcon 900’s fuel consumption is 

" “ than the 


record-breakingiy low: some 1/3 less 
above competitor, whose engine consumes 
almost as much fuel when idling on the runway as 
that of the Falcon 900 when cruising at Mach. 80. 


Falcon 900, please contact us forfull information, 
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The naicon 900 also scores first for safety. In 
the unlikely event that one engine should fail, the 
remaining two can easily supply the requisite 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


For Now, Sp ace Defense Planners Say, Their Reach Exceeds Technology’s Grasp 

T "‘ ‘ ’ ~ Abrahamson says the SDI organi- 

zation's has to mind **10 make it 


By David B. Otrawav 

Washington Peal Semite ' 

Washington -The Reagan 

administration's office in chanted 
j xsearc * 1 for the space-based de- 
f «“J Project has concluded that 
we dream of exotic. orbiting battle 
stations firing powerfuf laser 
teams to knock out Soviet missiles 
and warheads is beyond America’s 


neuc-energy weapons like “smart of space defense against Soviet rois- 
rocks," or projectiles that home in sites. 


on the heat produced by warheads. 

and “rafleunsT devices that use 


The “first generation'’ of weap- 


and “railguns," devices that use oils for the space-based defense 
electromagnets to accelerate a pro- system, according to the officials in 
jectile along a rail to thousands of the SDI office, would be on exten- 


miles an hour. 


sion basically of the technology 


sLduons tiring powerful laser The imnlicatinns rhr nfiw* u*«d in a successful experiment in 
teams to knock out Soviet missiles thinkine^- thai two senarati* oen Junc ^ ^ ann y a 

Shn V S^^i^f OIld f , A ? ,erica ' s of Sround-based maneuverabtenon- 

tccnnological reach for the foresee- defense svsmninav be neasare nuclear missile at an incoming 
able future, according to scientists — are likely m fudW areuments dumm >' warhead and succeeded in 
directing the research effort. of Sti«X hSe qSSwe hitting it more than 100 miles (160 

The Pentagon’s Strategic De- huge cost and the technological , s P dCtf - 

fense Imtiatlve Organization. the possibility of meeting the goals A J J *^ ,WDanl ® enerid A - 

formal name for the office conduct- originally' enunciated by President Abra hamsoii , duector of the pro- 
mg the research, has all but exclud- Donald Reagan for the program, ST an1 ' ^d^ted in a recent mter- 
ed use of lasers. X-rays and parti- popularly known as “star wars." 1,531 ^ ve ™f ■ bre akthrough5 
de-beam weaponry, at least for the Those goals are to “render nuclear had been actueved m research on a 
“first generation*'" of any space- weapons obsolete" and provide a ?P ace * bas * d . 4 ktaetw^kiU vehicle, 
based missile defense system the shield for U.S. population centers. railgun. which would 

administration may decide to The first generation of the space- d«uov Soviet missiles' ufthe^firel 
^^spendstssay. defense system “doesn't necesSSy SrfErSrfram 

Instead, it inte nds to nHy on ki- m^n big battle stations in space," £r * “kill" warteLb liter ufntid- 

— said Dr. Loins Marquet, director of oiurse flight. 

' -- - the prtwnm’s duecied-energy re- Despite much uncertainly re- 

search. It may Ik something more garding ^ practicality and cost of 
prosaic than that. the project. General Abr aham s on 

Interviews with five loip officials expressed confidence that research 
in the SDI organization su gg est would be far enough advanced by 
that pressures of time and political the early 1990s for the next admin- 
necessity are pushing proponents isirauon to make an initial decision 
of the space-based defense system at least on whether to go ahead 
to resort to the most immediately with the development pfrw of a 


Kill 

Verification 


Interceptor 

Unfurls \ ^ 


Warhead 

^ 


</ 

Smart 


irp r~f K.M 


Interceptor 
Homes In 



to resort to the most immediately with ihe development pm 
available “off-the-shelf" technol- first-generation system, 
ogy. This is a tactic first proposed But he also said that one of the 
I by High Frontier, a private group Lhree key factors in making that 
that was one of the early advocates judgment would have to be wtiat he 


called the “political dimension." 

This, he said, is where “people look 
at the world situation as a whole 
and see that, yes, this is the first of a 
series of steps that we're al] confi- 
dent now will indeed lead to greater 
stability." 

The other two. he said, were the 
technical feasibility and cost of the 
project. He made no mention of the 
Issue of “survivabflily." whether 
the components of a space-based 
defense would be vulnerable to at- 
tack themselves. This has been cen- 
tral to the arguments of many crit- 
ics of the project. 

The growing conviction among 
top officials in the project that the 
use of lasers will remain beyond 
U.S. technological reach for many 
years was most dearly reflected in _ ... 

the comments of Dr. Marquet, the » clCiifC 
project's directed-energy beam ex- Oc©afI 
pert. 

“1 don't support directed energy 
for interception of boosters,'' he 
said, referring to the initial boost- 

phase of a rocket. “We've got a .. . 

simpler way to do it with kinetic- . VanG©nD@t'Q A.F.B. 

energy weapons. 

“Right now, if you throw a 10 „ . . tt» n 

ki l ometer-per- second smart rock at This diagram illustrates bow one kind of kinetic energy weapon would work. A lei 
a booster you are going to kill it I Himbrella” enlarging the missile's diameter unfurls just before im part In a success 
don’t believe directed energy is a experiment held last June, a nonnuclear missile hit an incoming dummy warhead in sm 
competitor" ^ 

Kmetic energy is the energy re- 
leased when one mov ing object is a combination or the electromag- trical current needed to fire the thing at these current levels' 
crashes into another. Directed -en- netic railgun firing some version of weapon. He said switches on ex- electrical power generation, 
ergy weapons are those that employ the “smart rock.” pcrixnental railguns were operating General Abrahamson m 


Booster 


Separation 


\\u 


Hawaii 


Radars 


Kwajalein Atoll 



Missle Launch at 
Vandenberg A.F.B. 


TTw Nm York TiaM . 

This diagram illustrates bow one kind of kinetic energy weapon would work. A lethal 
“umbreBa" enlarging the missile's diameter anfurfts just before im part In a successful 
experiment held last June, a nonnuclear missile hit an incoming dummy warhead in space. 


tightly focused and precisely di 
xied beam of intense energy ii 


at employ the “smart rock.” pcrixnental railguns were operating General Abrahamson makes 

erisely di- General Abrahamson, in ill us- at two million amperes and, he dear that ge n erating fnnngh dec- 

energy in trating the SDI plan, turned on a said, “we have to able to demon- tridry to fixe such a space-based 


the form of light or atomic parti- slide projection of the railgun. R is s irate that we can get just about gjun is not the only problem to be 


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cies. a cylindrical object ISO feet (about double” that. resolved. 

James lonson, director of the 45 meters) long, consisting mainly “Some of our betters have to The Homing Overlay Experi- 

SDI's science and technology of- of electrical coils used to generate understand that’s the issue," Gen- ment of Last June fired an intercep- 





THE BEST OF ALL P'OSSIBLE WORLDS 

DOLDER GRAND HOTEL, 

ZURICH 

Raoul de Gentke, Dir. Kurhauutraue 65, CH-8032 Zurich 
Telephone: 07/251 62 31. Telex: 53449 grand di 


whether “smart rocks" could be to 30 kilometers per second. 


practical” would have to weigh sev- 
en to eight pounds. The general has 
a model of such a “smart rock” on 
his riwtk tp show visitors. 

The Pentagon is planning 15 ma- 
jor experiments of various possible 
components of a space-based mis- 
sile defense system. 

These experiments are being de- « 
signed, the Pentagon says, so they 
w3l not violate the 1972 Anti-Bal- 
listic Missile Treaty with, the Soviet 
Union, which forbids tests of any 
components of an anti-missile sys- 
tem. Critics of the administration's 
plans say that these plans violate 
the treaty, and that the Soviet 
Union will certainly consider them 
violations. 

Another unresolved issue is the 
cost-effectiveness of a defensive 
system. Dr. Marquet estimates that 
the United States would need 
about 20 defensive rockets for each 
of the 1,400 Soviet long-range., 
land-based offensive missiles, o} 
roughly 28,000 “smart rocks.” 

This advantage is needed largely 
because the satellites, or railguns. 
would be constantly rotating 
around the Earth, each one passing 
over the targeted Soviet sOo for 
only a few minutes on each orbit. 

High Frontier has argued that 
432 satellites would be required to 
keep the Soviet missiles constantly 
under survdllance- 

Dr. Marquet, unlike General 
Abrahamson, talks less of railguns 
firing the “smart rocks" than 
cheap, light orbiting space “plat-f* 
forms," which he described as “a ■ 
little rocket launcher with a tele- 
phone on iL" The “telephone" 
would be a processor of informa- 
tion to guide the smart rock. 


used against a rocket taking off The 
because it is unkn own whether the protoi 
high- velocity projectiles could be been 


The air force officer said that 10 
oio types of the weapon have 
«n built for experiments in the 


Guam Is Pressing U.S. for Autonomy 


shot downward through the atmo- United Stales and that a “world O 

sphere without burning up. breakthrough" in railgun technol- _ mT * . ™r > , ^ „ r 

-My guess is ifs lechnicaUy pos- ogy was achieved m November Manders FedNemected, Frozen m World War If image 

si me. Mr. lonson said. We ll when one of them fired multiple C3 ™ CJ 


sible." Mr. lonson said. “We’ll 

know in a couple of years." shots of tiny projectiles. By Bill Peterson er than independence or statehood, in Washington but that it was diffi- 

The focus of hopes in the pro- The main technological problem, Washington Pan Service and it began writing a “common- cull to lobby hoe for a Pacific 

ject’s office for .coming up with a he said, was building switches ca- WASHINGTON — While Pres- wealth acr last year. Mr. Bordallo island 9,000 miles away. He said 

workable “first -gen era lion" system pable of handling huge jolts of elec- p^, gan was in West circulated the fourth draft of the some members of Congress had 

Germany last week commemorat- act among' congressional leaden asked him. “Where is Guam, any- Jt : 

ing the 40th anniversary of the md last week. The act would ■ rive way?” 

of World War □ in Europe, Ricar- Guam, flooded with refugees after Mr. Bordallo said that he be- 


wben one of them fired multiple 
shots of tiny projectiles. 

The main technological problem. 


jeefs office for craning up with a he said, was building switches ca- 

-.f! '■ ■" i_i r L it: i .r ~i — 


We’ve done our 


do J. Bordallo, the Democratic gov- the Vietnam War, control over im- lieved that Guam, the site of a ma- 
emor of Guam, was com plaining migration and commercial air traf- jor World War D battle, had con- 
that Washington had nevdr given fie and a veto over establishing any tributed more than its share to U.S. 
his island the attention it deserves, new security zones or basing for- defense. Of the island's 1 10.000 res- 


his island the attention it deserves, new security zones or ba 
“There's been a tremendous ne- rign troops on the island, 
gleet," Mr. Bordallo said. “We see It would return about h 
the economies of the enemy — Ja- land controlled by the Dd 


pan and Germany — restored and 
m robust health. Yet we are part of 
the American family, and there’s 
never been a plan, never a program 
for our people. 

“When V-J came, they forgot all 


rign troops on the island. idenis, 10,000 are U.S. military vet- 

U would return about half of the erans. 
land controlled by the Defense De- “Very few people know about 
partment, which maintains naval our history," Mr. Bordallo com- 
and air force bases there, to the plained. “We're stuck in a time 


local government. 

It also would establish a pay- 
ment plan similar to the District of 


warp, a World War II image. Ev- 
eryone remembers us as the place 
where the marines landed and the 


about us and packed up and went tain U.S. benefits to which recipi- 
home," he said. “Much of our in- enls have a legal right, such as So- 


Columbia and would provide cer- bombers flew off to bomb theJapa- 
tain U.S. benefits to which reripi- .nese.” 


frastructure is still what was left by rial Security pensions. Eighty-five percent of tourists vis 

the military in World War II." The act must' be_approved first jngChiam are Japanese. 

Mr. Bordallo was in Washington' briririug U.S: dollars’ 

to lobby for a change in static for Mr - Bordallo said that he has en- through the bade door, and nobra 
Guam. Except forthree years of countered no outright opposition realizes it," he said. 

Japanese occupation in World War • - ^ - - 

II. the island has been under U.S TT 0 ni m m o : ww ' ▼ i 

control since the Spanish- Amen- u.D. Fhysician bays Heart Implaiits 

can War in 1898. It is the largest J J A 

Have Not Yet Been That Successful* 


Times have changed, however. 
Eighty-five percent of tourists visit- 


Mr. Bordallo said that he has en-' through the bade Joe 
countered no outright opposition realizes it,” be said. 


Islands, 32 miles (about 51 kilome- 
ters) long and about 4 to 10 mQes 
wide. 


The Associated Pnss 

NEW YORK — The bead of the 


Since 1950, Guam has been an world’s leading artificial heart im- 
“unincorponued territory," and its plant program says that the un- 
people are American dtizens. Now plants have “certainly not bear 
it wants to become the Common- that successful” and will be a fail- 
wealth of Guahan and be granted ure if they prolong but do not im- 
some autonomy. prove recipients' fives. 

Guam, controlled by outside “We hope that eventually, me- 
powers for 300 yean, voted in 1982 chanical heart disease, will be much 
to seek commonwealth status rath- less severe than human heart dis- 


ease," Dr Allan lansing. medical 
director of Humana Heart Institute 
International in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, said Sunday on .ABC-TV. 
“But at this pointy it has certainly 
not been that successful." 

But, Dr. Lansing said, “if I have 
something to live for and the me- 
chanical heart is the rally possibili- 
ty of my achieving it, then I would 
certainly take a mechanical heart." 
















Grasp 

■Vh- a i, *■ 

t--j. s»^.- ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 7 


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Gromyko, 

By Dusko Doder • 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — Foreign Minister 
Andrei A. Gromyko was expected 
to leave Moscow on Monday for 
Vienna and talks with George P. 
Shultz, the U.S. secretary of state, 
on isazes that are continuing to 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

frustrate i m prov ement in Soviet- 
American relations. 

The talks Tuesday are expected 
to deal with two mam and interre- 
lated issues. One is. the agreement 
the two men readied at their last 
n i Mt i ng in January that opened the 
way for a resumption of unclear 
arms talks. The other is a prospec- 
tive meeting in September between . 

President Ronald Reagan and the 
Soviet leader. Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. 


to Clarify Earlier Talks 


George P. Shultz 


*«* ..1...., ■■■■ 

tX'. •■‘••I : ,r, 

■■v, •••->• ■**;''*• 

::: 

,k.’- *i..‘ ^ 


Sources in Moscow say that bar- 
ring unforeseen developments, Mr. 

•.Gorbachev is certain to travel to 
^New York for the United Nations 
General Assembly session in Sep- 
tember and that he is hkdy to meet 
with Mr. Reagan. But the sub- 
stance of the meeting, according to 
political observers, will be deter- 
mined at the next round of the 


Geneva aims talks, which is to be- 
gin latex this month. 

Mr. Gorbachev has expressed 
strong disappointment with the 
first round of the Geneva talks. He 
has raised donbts about Washing- 
ton's interest in reaching an agree- 
ment and has the Reagan 

w | n> i i»L Q lr ah‘fwi nf “vi olatin g" the 

' Shultz-Gromyko agreement pro- 
wling far an ‘‘interconnection’' be- 
tween the talks on space weapons 


and those dealing with strategic 
and medium-range nuclear arms. 

In his latest speed], Mr. Gorba- 
chev staled that a rijn^firam im- 
provement in Soviet-Ameac&n re- 
lations could be achieved “if 
tangible success is achieved" at Ge- 
neva. 

As a result. Ml Gromyko and 
Mr. Shultz are expected to try to 
further define their January accord. 
Soviet officials convey the impres- 
sion that failure to ad^uatety clar- 
ify the interrelationship between 
the three sets of talks would render 

them mwmmrifxg 

The SovietUmon’s concerns ap- 
peared Sunday in Pravda, which 
renewed allegations of UJ3. viola- 
tions of arms agreements that had a 
negative impact on “the whole 
spectrum" of relations. 

Specifically, the authoritative 
daily charged that the Reagan ad- 
ministration was floating the 1972 
anti-ballistic missile treaty by go- 
ing ahead with the president’s Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative, popularly 
known as “star wars." The com- 
mentary seemed to be a response u> 
similar charges made by Mr. Rea- 
gan Friday in Lisboa at the end of 
Ms European tour. 

- The two sides have also traded 
charges on other issues in recent 


Andrei A Gromyko 

weeks, particularly in connection 
with' celebrations of the 40th anni- 
versary of allied victory over Nazi 
Germany. 

But the main question remains 
whether the two sides are prepared 
to make concessions an tangible 
issues for the sake of a constructive 
dialogue in Geneva and the pros- 
pect of improving relations. 

It will be up to Mr. Shultz ami 
Mr. Gromyko to look for ways of 


avoiding a deadlock- Sources -in 
Moscow are unwilling to predict 
the outcome of the Vienna session. 
An exchange of messages between 
Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Reagan 
earlier this week engendered some 
optimism, however. 

The Soviet position in Geneva is 
still somewhat ambiguous It could 
not be determined, for instance, 
whether the Russians had proposed 
a 25-perceal cut in strategic mis- 
siles during the Hist round of talks 
or whether Mr. Gorbachev’s state- 
ment to that effect refereed to an 
earlier Soviet offer. 

But itis widely accepted that Mr. 
Gorbachev's mam preoccupation is 
to modernize the Soviet Union's 
economy, which leaves him with 
little dunce but the pursuit of bet- 
ter East-West relations. 

If Mr. Gromyko and Mr. Shultz 
manage to find a wmHitinw of com- 
mon language on the arms ques- 
tion, the prospective September 
meeting could mark a turning point 
in Soviet-Amerkan relations. 

F ail ure of the in Vi enna 

could lead Mr. Gorbachev and his 
entourage to scuttle the prospective 
meeting and instead use tire New 
York visit to exert pressure on the 
Reagan administration by begin- 
ning a spectacular peace offensive. 


VIETNAMESE RESETTLEMENT URGED — Potd HartBng, the UN High Com- 
missioner for Refugees, on Monday visited the Bowling camp for Vietnamese refugees 
in Hong Kong. He later urged Britain to aid Hong Kong by resettling more refugees. 


Consensus Is Growing Among European Allies That SDI Will Leave Them Vulnerable to Soviet Attack 




(Continued from Page !) 

, : suffice to increase European securi- 

v ty because the United States would 




la. 




or Autonoijj 

'odd Kuril Img 


tiir- 
iir- 
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be more willing to aid its allies in. a 
war. 

In this view, the current U.S. 
“nuclear guarantee" is . a poor 
promise at best. The belief is that 
no American president would or- 
der a midear nrike to defend Bonn 
or Paris when to do so would mean 
the destruction of American cities. 

Gerald Frost, director of the In- 
stitute for European Defense and 
Strategic Studies in London, said: 
“With the risks to America reduced 
by a system of defense, the policy 
would become more credible." 

The counterpoint to tins view is 
that a space-based defense might 
£ foster isolationism in that the Unit- 
ed States. According to some ana- 
lysts, this fear, whether real or 
i might be enough to split 
rhe allian ce. 

Beyond the technical question of 
whether their land can be defended 
lies another contentions issue for 
Europeans: whether US. and Sovi-' 
et space shields would raider “im- 
potent and obsolete” not only 
American and Soviet nuclear mis- 
siles but Europe's as wdL The 
question is of special moment for 
Bri tain and France, which have 
their own nndear arsenals. 

Here raw numbers are viewed as 
criticaL The Soviet Union, with its 
V* large number of missiles and war- 


or power,’ 
in his view 


beads, might easily overwhelm Eu- 
ropean ground defenses, while the 
more limited arms of the F mneh 
and British might pose a weak 
threat in return. 

Pride and prestige are at stake as 
wdl as militar y might. One fear of 
the French B ritish is *Hst their 
status as world powers would be 
lost by a switch to expensive sys- 
tems of space-based defense be- 
yond tire means of their budgets. 

“The nnd ear game , is the Inst 

opportunity for France to bea ma- 
rt said a French official, 
[is view, nndear deterrence has 
worked, France has played a role in 
that strategy and it, in turn, has 
enhanced trance's status. 

• fiplpnel Alford, of tire Interna- 
tional Institute for Strategic Stud- 
ies, said: “Europeans actually tend 
to like nndear weapons. They don’t 
«say we want more and more of 
them, bat they say ir is nuclear 
weapons on tire whole, their exis- 
tence, the fear they induce, which 
has made it impossible to contem- 
plate war.” 

Over the years, Europe has 
stockpiled nudear weapons mainly 
to counter tire numerical superior- 
ity of conventional forces in tire 
Warsaw Pact, although a. recent 
gpal has also been to ratty to de- 
ployment of Soviet SS-205. 

Most recently, NATO countries 
have started to deploy cruise and 
assies, while 


Pershing-2 missies, 


the Brit- 


ish and French have embarked on 
expensive programs to upgrade nu- 
dear migeiW on their submarines. 

Skeptical of space-based de- 
fenses. European leaders have 
tended to cautiously bade the re- 
search while objecting to testing 
and deployment of defensive arms. 

In October. 1983, the North At- 
lantic Assembly, which is com- 
posed of legislators from NATO 
countries, refoctendy endorsed Mr. 
Reagan's research proposal. - 

“However undesirable some fed 
an American ballistic missiles de- 
fense system would be,” the state- 
ment said, “the presence of solely a 
Soviet system would be still less 
desirable. Thus, while Soviet mis- 
sile defense research continues, 
there is every reason for American 
research to coatmne also 

But last spring France publicly 
disparaged both the strategic goals 
and the research. At the Geneva 
disarmament conference of the 
United Nations, its ambassador, 
Francois de La Gone, said defen- 
sive weapons in space “could 
threaten the stability, and thus the 
peace, that has resulted so far from 
the invulnerability of the means of 
nndear response.” 

He added that Mr. Reagan's an- 
nouncement alone of the intention 
to go forward with the research 
“constitutes in itself a spur to re- 
double the effort to build offensive 


systems” as a way to tiy to defeat 
anypossible defense. 

The British reaction was cod 
and legalistic. In a quid pro quo, 

Mrs. Thatcher agreed to support 
the research in exchange for Mr. Minister 
Reagan’s agreement to four points: strategic goals 
tire Western aim must not be to stability, but j 


was criticized tty Reagan adminis- 
tration officials and others. 

In West Germany, initial reac- 
tion to the Strategic Defense Initia- 


tive was negative. In April, Defense 
- Manfred W&ruer said the 
oals “would lead not to 


t just the opposite." 


f The military gain for Europe is almost zero,’ 
said a French official* 'We don’t believe for a 
moment that it is useful.’ 


achieve stmeriority; deployment of 
a space-based defense system 


Id be a matter for negotiation; 
the overall aim must be to enhance, 
not nrnfemi^ dftte rr M w*. and East- 
West negotiations should aim to 
reduce levels of offensive aims. 

In March, Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
tire British foreign secretary, raised 
tire level of tacil criticism by cau- 
tioning that “we must make sure we 
are not developing what might 
prove to be tally a limited defease 
against weapons of devastating de- 
structive force.” In a major speech, 
be listed a host of questions and 
implied that answers to them might 
prove disappointing. 



States and the Soviet Unio^and it 


But Mr. Kohl in a speech to the 
West German parliament, gave a 
warm endorsement to space de- 
fense research. He said his govern- 
ment would “not let itself be 
rushed” into a derision but general- 
ly favored taking part in the pro- 
gram. 

On March 26. Defease Secretary 
Caspar W. Weinberger formally in- 
vited the allies to join in the re- 
search. He set a deadline for re- 
sponse of 60 days. Hie offer was 
widely characterized by West Euro- 
pean officials as an ul timatum and 
viewed as a loyalty test 
A West German official said, 
“Your country can do the job ex- 
actly by itself. So what it is really 
looking for is political support” 
Mr. Weinberger eventually 
backed down on the deadline, but 


debate on the cooperation issue has 
heated up. 

The mam reason is that Europe 
feds it lags badly b high technol- 
ogy and sees the space defense re- 
search as one way to catch up. 
Areas of application of the $26 bil- 
lion research program are likely to 
include computers, optics, dec- 
tronics, metallurgy, materi als sci- 
ence and space transportation. 

The beau of the research pro- 
gram, Lieutenant General James A 
Abrahamson of the air force, told a 
group of U.S. military contractors 
m April that he was “fully confi- 
dent our allies will be able to par- 




le added, “They will be bidding, 
in some cases, against you.” 

Although intrigued, many West 
European companies have voiced 
reservations. Fears indude a scien- 
tific “brain drab” to tire United 
States and Pentagon controls on 
the flow of technologies. According 
to company officials, the Pentagon 
might want to limi t the exchange of 
techniques between American and 
European researchers and to inhib- 
it the export of nnbtaiy technol- 
ogies by Europeans. 

According to Francois Heis- 
bourg, a former international secu- 
rity adviser to the French defense 
minister, one way for European 
countries to overcome the barriers 
they fear is to form a consortium. 

Banded together, European 


companies might be able to work 
on such Pentagon projects as the 
quest for high-speed btegratod cir- 
cuits. he said. “These are going to 
be used in SDT and everywhere 
else,” Mr. Hrisbourg said. “They 
have tremendous promise, but the 
program is completely closed to tire 
ailra. There’s no access.” 

Partly b response to such con- 
cerns, the French government b 
April proposed the founding of a 
European Research Coordination 
Agency, or Eureka. The agency 
would conduct peaceful scientific 
research in areas similar to those of 
the U.S. research. 

So far the French proposal has 
not gained much European sup- 
port. 

A European alternative to the 
U.S. space defense plan is the last 
thing desired by American offi- 
cials. Originally, they hoped for a 
firm endorsement of the research 
plan at the Bonn summit meeting. 
Besieged by questions and hesita- 
tion, especially from the British 
and French, administration offi- 
cials then said they would settle for 
a vague supporting paragraph b 
tire final communique. 

But there was no such para- 
graph, and President Francois Mit- 
terrand look the occasion to reject 
the U.S. invitation to take part in 
the research. 

The immediate issue for coun- 
tries other than France is whether 


to accept the U.S. invitation. West 
Germany is widely considered like- 
ly to take part. Mr. Kohl said that 
joining in the research could in- 
crease Bonn’s influence on ques- 
tions of deployment and strategy. 

But Kars ten Voigt, the foreign 
policy spokesman for the opposi- 
tion Social Democrats, dismissed 
Mr. Kohl's position as naive. “To 
participate b the research is to en- 
dorse tire politics,” he said. 

By all indications. European of- 
ficials want nothing to do with the 
actual deployment of space- based 
defenses. Governments fear that — 
for Europe —space arms would be 
useless and costly. 

Argentina Assails 
Falklands Airport 

Reuters 

BUENOS AIRES —The Argen- 
tine Foreign Ministry has warned it 
will take “pertinent international 
action" against the opening of an 
airfield opened Sunday by Britain 
on tire disputed Falkland Islands. 

Argentina, which has main- 
tained a state of hostility with Brit- 
ab since the end of the war ova the 
islands b 1982, said Sunday the 
construction of the airport was an 
act of aggression. It has said it will 
use peaceful diplomatic efforts to 
recover the islands. 


lli ;irl Impl* 
, i li Thai 









INTERNA TIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14. 1985 

ARTS /LEISURE 


Designers New and Not-So-New Discover Marais, Exotic tare, Godard Work Open Cannes 

Putting Slick Boutiques j 


By Thomas Quinn-Curass 

FnUnumonoJ Herald Tribune 


By Anne-Marie Schiro 

Ne*r York Times Service 

P ) AR1S— The Marais, the area 
of Paris that includes the old 
Jewish quarter with its kosher 
butchers and delicatessens, has be- 
come a f ashi onable place to live as 
its fine 17th- ana 
buildings are 


more and more, it is becoming a 
place to buy fashion, 

Azzedine Alala’s new showroom 
there is designed by Andite Put- 
man. AlaXa is the most famous 
name to go to the Marais; most 
designers who have opened bou- 
tiques there are young and new. 


ANNES — Jean- Lee Godard, 


_ long a pa of the avam- 
criticai fraternity, has lost 



An 

dm 

dm 

dm 



ever on the alert for new labels, 

make a point of visiting this pan of 

the Marais, which many tourists do 
not know abouL . 

“Parisians are just discovering 
it," said Patrick Bertaux of Miller 
& Bertaux, a new boutique at 17 
rue Ferdinand-DuvaL He and his 


Italian 


The collection of the 
designer “Roceo B ar oceo” 
and the Knap label with its 
creations in silk, suede and 
leather. 

KNAP - 34, FAUBOURG 
SAINT-HONORS 


Philadelphia. 

"I am known for my jerseys 
mixed with leather, 
said, bolding up a plet- _ 

leather strips crisscrossing the mp 

BS£aS.-A-fc- 

ffiSAdjLkSdfifu blocks of odor;.*™ amply tore 


and beautiful colors. Many have 


Detective’s" cxnilcnts briefly: “A 
woman, two men, a love story, a 
murder, a boxing g am e, the Ma- 
fia." There is a boxer in training, 
but no boxing match. There ap- 


SS-Sul-An SJiCSa.*-.**,* 

do thing, rugs, collages “Tl'd^kiiown for oversize in bacL One simpk buued d^in {SltaeT" ■ - • 


blazers for men or women in a 
variety of fabrics and colors, at 
prices ranging from about 1.700 
francs to 2,000 francs. The rest of 
his collection ranges from about 
900 francs to 3,000 francs. 


wall of black-framed 


_ glass panes. 

Gean-lbed black and white 


bold linens that are artful! 
played in the shop. They se 
the modern-looking jewelry while 
traveling in Indonesia. 

The women's clothing in their 
shop is essentially sportswear with 
wide elastic waistbands and their 
signature design of four pockets, 
two fore and two aft; prices range 
from about 450 francs ($47) to 800 
francs. The pair have also done a 
collection of oversize T-shirts, all in 
white with interesting graphics of 
black and white mesh, bold stripes 
or colorful paint strokes, ranging 
from 150 francs to 220 francs, and 
wQ] soon 
able” man 

Another new boutique ia u«- , , . 

□aid Malbruoot al 3 bis rue des 

Hosiers, across from the SL-Paul the door. Webked the Manus. he 
steam baths. “A lot of famous peo- said. “First we found a workshop 
pie come to the baths here.” Mai- here, then we found tire shop, 
brunot said. “Turkish baLhs are LoUta Lempicka s clothes are in 


u* i — - - — r - ... ... story. There is murder and a shoot- 

azure, black or white has brightly Q ^ Mafia is mentioned; it 
colored slmulder pads that peek ma ^ ^ by an older man of 

out of the boat neddme. Pullovers manners and an air pi- 

stan a* a*™ 1 lot may be one of its employees. 
When Benoit Durand and Eha- approach to his dubi- 

n r«nn«"m Vnoif francs kim (he uses only one name) material is uie thing, and he has 

MnSoi deigned his ‘spacious ddivered a film of tmeonunpn ipio- 

hiSJramra, bfck aid while } £ ^Sm?SSSS ^We »“ To ; >* if f 

SKflooraandamovahle 

with our own designs, Lnnami ‘*D ctcct i vt; ’’ ^ a masterpiece of cin- 
said. “But they havebeen the most H«dg n- Godard employs 

P°P uIar ’ music Tor mounting tension as the 

others and wQl bring in more of our aid. The general kn- 

own thrnas. Ehakim is known for vns ^ ati ^ ^ leaves is that of 


spaces seem to be favored by most 
of the new shops. One is Lob la 
Lemjicka’s boutique, also at 3 bis 


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PRESENTATION OF THE OUTSTANDING 
NEW CREATIONS BY DAUM' 


cnstal 

FRANCE 


«H*L~ 


COUPE ■■ RIVIERA - F 3250 

AU VASE ETRUSQUE 

11, place da la Madeleine - PARIS 8* 






m 


The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 


INTERNATIONAL 

. warmly invite you to their salon to view 
their prestigious collection of fine jewelry and watches. 

We are the # 1 of the rue de la Paix. 75002 PARIS .Teh 261.50 J3 


featuring: 


ROLEX 


Mappin & Webb PlAGET 
VlUWniD co&UM €B€L 


J &_ 

Baume & Mercier 


Highest Export Discount. 


Our Cannes showroom is at 32-33 La Croisette. 

By Appoinnnem ro Her Majesty The Queen. 

CANNES . LONDON . DOSSELDORF . TOKYO ■ NEW- YORK 


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TRUSSARDI 


Paris 77, Faubourg St. Honore 


B*I»»-«L*TO-«WI- mnr- I -«OK*B«^UKHW4-U» 

wymcMD - ptuci - supra* fjnti i wtftM - - snuiTuiu - m*w- hb**€ 


Ul wux 

painted silk shirt 
The garment itself is Durand’s 
design. It has deep armholes and a 
collar that comes off to convert it to 
a band neck. When painted, it 
looks rather like tie-dying. Un- 
painted it is a wonderful basic shirt 
for men or women. 

The shop also specializes in 
broad-shouldered jackets that 
come in several fabrics. 

“The idea of the shop," Durand 
said, “is not to make collections 


spring a trailer in which excerpts of 
the forthcoming feature are thrown 
before us without rhyme or reason. 
One is mystified but one wants to 
see more. In its weirdly assorted 
cast are Johnny Hallyday, Nathalie 
Baye, Claude Brasseur, Laurent 
Terzieff, Alain Cuny and Jean- 
Pierre Leaud. 

Some of the early showings at the 
film festival bring odd information 
from exotic places. 

“Visages de Femmes" by Desirfc 
Ecare is a homemade comedy 
about women’s rights in Ivory 

Hung JUT 



ypnruuivww "’"r r, . , 

surprisingly so. under tire direction 
of Nicholas Roeg. Its characters -- 
or rather caricatures — are readily 
identifiable. Theresa Russell plays 
a flibbertigibbet blonde mowe star 
married to a ball player. Nfichad 
Emil is a professor, a tow-conuc m 
an Einstein wig. and Tony Curtis 
plays a brutal senator. This strange 
aew is thrown together for one 
ridiculous scene after another. 
There is much talk but no sense. 

Two celebrated directors who 
died recently have been given post- 


humous honors with Ae|reimCTes 


of their final films. Jl . 
“Steaming" is an adaptation of 
Nell Dram’s popular comedy about 
women of different social standing 
meeting in a bath-house and dis- 
cussing their problems. Van essa 
Redgrave, Sarah Miles, the late Di- 
anaDors, and Patti Love amusing- 
ly impersonate the loquacious 
bathos. Losey, with customary ex- 
pertise, managed the transposition 
from stage w screen neatly. This 
film, however, can scarcely lake its 
place with his major contributions 
and one regrets that his farewell 
work was not of stronger sub- 
stance." , , 

Shun Terayama, the Japanese 
playwright, pod, novelist, essayist 
and dneaste, completed Farewell 
to the Aik" shortly before his 
death. Terayama’ s swan song It is 
filled with startling images, such 

stuff as nightmares are made of. Its 
narrative is allusive, a sort of surre- 
alistic case history. In a seaside 



i 


lf« AmobCkI Ron a US™ 7 KU® uuunj. m — 

Jean-Luc Godard was hit with a custard pie at the Grows village, a man hveswih hisfemale 
film festival, in protest of bis “Je vous salue Marie.” cousin. Carnal relations between 


ble. then rdates a conflict brewing banned by a local mamifacturer. A 
between two farmhands who have professional American trouble- 
eyes on the same woman. The more shooter ts engaged by Coca-koia 
favored of the duo takes the maid- and after much comic-suip ano 
enfor aswim in the nude and some Coke wins the day. The Yugoslav 
amoro us dalliance, and that matter Dusan Makavejev, often beset t>y 
is settled. After another folk dance, the censors m his homeland forms 


_ ncr IU1& UiUULC, — r 

we meet a woman who is training j ugglin g of Ihe party lme, has a frre 
i of her sex for hand here and applies a slap-stick 




COU 5 U 1 . voiuiu i v mmv-u - — 

cousins being forbidden, her father 
has fastened on her a chastity bdt 
that nothing can remove. Mocked 
for his powerlessness, the man 
stabs one of his tormentors to 
ffcath , then, with his cousin, de- 
parts to live in isolation, shunned 
by all Haunted by the ghost of his 
victim, he goes mad. Make what 
you will of this and its eerie time- 
complex, it casts a hypnotic spelL 
Francois Truffaut, who died ear- 
lier this year, was accorded a tac- 


tile young members m uu a»> »«< «—« — — -rf- * , 

better jobs and higher wages. After style in which isoaal “irawmtand 
more amnting and mild sex-play, sex are combined. This formula 

,l. fii— mj, brought him mternatKmal reputa- — y— • - , . 

the film ends. his 1971 film. “WR: The morial program, which crowded 

•~r* — .y r -* _ihpr rhm Tfl tv song-ano-aance nimiDcis, soii-wiie “The Coca-Cola Kid^ transports ^ of the Organism,’ Lhe anema palace s main auditon- 

^andalectraeonso^irefonn. us to Australia, where m . .ton umtocapa&y. 

l^iri.hatoive.toaimsem- the Anunc- sof. dimt is jn-UltoJMrdjp ■ Godsrd Request Rtfused 


to wear those. 

Solid silk shirts are about 750 
francs, painted shirts about 1.000 
francs. Silk T-shirts are about 450 
francs. Jackets start at about 1,350 
francs. . 

^frntinigniale. at 14 rue du Roi- 
de-Sidle. is one of the old-timers in 
the Marais: It has been there a year 
and a half. Unlike most of the 
newer shops, it sells the clothes of a 
l variety of designers. Several have 
been discovered by American re- 
tailers. 

Loua Dyn’s silk jumpsuits and 
dresses, which have huge buttons, 
broad shoulders and cutout collars 
that serve as necklaces, are avail- 
able at Looia and La Rue des 
Reves in New York. Prices in Paris 
range from about 650 to 3,200 
francs. 

Pier Jena’s Gist collection of 


ed by the Australian Peter Weir, 
and already widely freviewed since 
its opening in the United States, is 
set lar ge ly in a rural Amish com- 
munity of Pennsylvania. Its rou- 
tine plot concerns corrupt police 
officials who resort to murder to 


U. S. Poll Shows Majority 

Don’t Care for Abstract Art 

By AfpfiiaSSSSS SW5 ES S 

N EWTOtK^ A ™of asss 

IN Americans dislike abstract art remaioSeLiiDe. Onein tcn tective is a bully actor — m the 

said it should be a higher priority. 

Forty-five percent of those who 
make less than S20.000 a year said 

•hone they never visited art museums. "~" f - Hass is not in 

the runnmg for lhe acting award he 


and rarely visit art museums, and 
half oppose government subsidies 
lo artists, a Media General-Assod- 


’ ated Press poll indicates. 
The U. S. nati 


Italian distributors of “Je vous 
salue Marie" have refused Go- 
dard’s request that they withdraw 
the film from the Italian market, 
Agence France-Press reported 
from Rome. 

A representative of the distribu- 
tors, Aldo Addobbati, said he had 
veVeA President Sandro Fertini to 
view the film. “Only if the chief of 
state, who is our supreme magis- 
trate, tells us not to schedule the 
film will we obey," he said. 


wool jerseys has been sold to SoHo 
Zoo and W< 


,/cst Side Zoo in New 

York as well as to Sentimentale, 
where his loose tops cost about 500 
francs and narrow skirts about 550 
| francs. 

The Marais runs roughly be- 
tween the Bastille, where the new 
opera is being built, and Les Halles. 
The closest Mfetro stop is SL- 
Paul/ Le Manus. 


nationwide tel 

survey of 1,532 adults four 
57 percent did not like abstract art 

and 70 percent visited art museums 
less than once a year. Thirty-five 
percent said they never visited an 
museums, 27 percent said they nev- 
er attended music concerts and 39 
percent said they never attended 
theater. 

The poll said 50 percent of 
Americans opposed government 
subsidies to artists while 35 percent 
supported such subsidies and 15 
percent were unsure. When asked 
specifically, “Do you favor or ap- 
pose the purchase of art by local 
staig or rtario"*! governments for 
use in public buildings?” 60 per- 
cent favored of such purchases. 


tective is a bully actor — in the 
Theodore Roosevelt sense — and 
there is an appealing performance 
by 8-year-old Lukas Haas as the 
hunt^ boy. As to showing was qOONESBURY 


* 


more than 535,000 said they never 
wenL Of respondents who did not 
finish high school 60 percent said 
they never visited art mu seum s. 


uales said they never did, while 20 
of colic 


percent of college graduates said 
they never went 
Wealthier and better educated 
respondents were more likely to 
support government subsidies. 
Education also made a difference 
on whether someone liked abstract 
art, but rich and poor disliked it 
equally. 

Four in ten Democrats favored 
government subsidies, compared 
with 30 percent of Republicans, 
of UberaJsf 


deserves. 

The Hungarian Istvan Szabo, 
who made the memorable “Me- 
phisto." is represented by “Cok»d 
RedT (in German), a fanciful revi- 
sion of an espionage scandal that 
shook the Austrian- Hungarian, em- 
pire on the eve of Work! War L 

Redl, chief of Austrian military 
intelligence, committed suicide in 
1913 after being exposed as a Rus- 
sian spy. The Russians, having dis- 
covered that he was homosexual 
blackmail ed Iran into service. He 
received payment in letters sent ur 
the general post office in V i e nn a. 
The police had intercepted the cor- 
respondence and watched the 


sum 

AUKS.. 

M surprbe, 

ALICE 


ZGOTANBM 
BB6KCNErF06. 
GUESSMDbGET- 
VN6KnCH&* 
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cent favored ot suen purenases. wim pcrcmi w respondence and watched the post 

Government support ofthe arts andi neariy half oMiteaJs favored ^ unlocked the box, 

i j el dr c tjl *_« i* »“ der d®* scrutiny. President subsidies compared with ju per- taken under arrestto a hotel 

London Show of U. a. rtaotofl R 0n ald Reagan has proposed cent of conservatives. and left alone with a revolver. 



The Associated Press 

LONDON — “American Im- 
_ges: Photography 1945-80," the 
largest show of post-Worid War n 
American photographs ever exhib- 
ited in Britain — 400 pictures by 82 
photographers — has opened at the 
Barbican Center here. 


proposed 
slashing the 1986 funding for the 
National Endowment for the Arts 
from $163.7 million to $144.5 mil- 
lion. The endowment, an indepen- 
dent federal agency, awarded 
about 5,000 grants totaling $149 
min i nn to artists and arts organiza- 
tions last year. 


Seventeen percent of those sur- 
veyed said they visited art mose- 


and left alone with a revolver. 
Szabo has tampered with the 

• ~ J r : facts, insinuating that Redl was the 

■UMS regularly, aboalc^ ta*L> ^ th, c!am 

The alteration causes the 

the dramatic post office 

?2 said they attended the- scene, but the film has commmd- 



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HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
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able qualities. The background of 
Austrian society and RedTs boy- 
hood and rapid rise in the army are 
depicted with verve and style. 
There is a magnificent performance 
by Klaus Maria Brandauer as Redl 
Lois Puenzo’s “La EBstocia Ofi- 
dal" (The Official Version), from 
Argentina, recounts a frightening 
chapter of recent history when the 
now-deposed military regime re- 
sorted tO kidnapping to maintain 
its power. A conventional middle- 
class schoolteach e r begins to har- 
bor doubts about the origins of her 
adopted daughter, obtained by her 
husband; she comes on evidence 
that the child's mother is among 
those who have “disappeared!" 
Norma Aleandro as the con- 
science-stricken wife. Hector Al- 
terio as her rascal husband and 
Chela Ruiz as a bereaved grand- 
mother spark the stray with a chill- 
ing reality. The film develops slow- 
ly but with swelling force 




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TELEGOMMUMCATIONS 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


»u -r-x 


TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 9 


, * « ■Mill., . "‘U [ 

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« <•• •» 


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By Amiel Kamel 


•"'Mr.*.' 

-b 


I - 

•v:-: i 


PARIS — European govern- 
ments* iron _grip on tdeconmninj- 
cations services was loosened re- 
cently by the Enrqpean Court of 
Justice. The court’s decision joins 

twbn o log jra l wwiwnir and prJtri- 

calforcm that arc already EberaBz- 




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tele communications 
worldwide. 

' The March ruling might serve as 
a precedent for denying the Enro- 
pean postal and tdeo canmu mca- 
tions aiithnririei, the PTT5, the 
right to extend their monopolistic 
domhtetiontofutnretdecomnnra^ 
cations services, according to offi- 
cials wefl acquainted with the case: 

“We are now-studying the atna- 
tion in other member states,** said 
an official of the.Enropean Com- 
munity Commission, who request- 
ed anonymity. “We will idee action 
in aS puces where they try to ex- 
tend their monopoly to new tech- 
nologies, especially value-added 
services." 

“This is the first time that a court, 
ruled against monopoly control of 
new services," said Ernst Weiss, 
president of the Inte rnational Tele- 
communications User Group. 

Although not widely reported, 
the court's decis ion i s causing 
“havoc” within the PTTs, said Har- 
ry Collier, chairman of the telecom- 
munications group of the European 
Association of Information Ser- 
vices. “It is bound to have an effect 
on all lucrative forms of traffic. It is 
for cing co mmu nications carders to 

sit down and rethink their poli- 
cies." 

The history of the case starts in 
1982. A number of private agencies 
in London, encouraged by the Kb- . 
eralizadon of telecommunications 
competition is Britain, began of- 
fering trans-Atlantic trier services ‘ 
to companies from throughout Eu- 
rope for as little as ane-fiou rth th e 

rate charged by the national PTTs. 

Concerned by the unpticasans 
for their prewousJy 'unoantested 
control of tangs, the Con fedem - 
don of European PTTi, or CEPT, 



Problems Bring 
Satellite Market 


Down to Earth 


By Jonathan Miller 


An earfier Intelsat, left, and drawing of Intelsat VI, right. 


Drawing the line 


ITU a MI XU 


i ( Communications and Computers 


By Arthur Brodsky 


WASHINGTON— At a confer- 
ence on international telecom- 
munications held recently in New 
York, the discussion touched brief- 
ly on whether there is a difference 

between mmmnnicatinns and enm- 

puten. One participant rose and 
took an informal poll. . 

“How many of you have com- 
puter terminals on your desks?" he 
asked. Lhtlemore than half the 100 
or so persons in the room raised a 
hand.. How many of you have tele- 
phones on your deskrf" he contin- 
ued. Everyone raised a hand. 
“That’s the difference," he stated 
emphatically and sat down. 


in a main computer hundreds of 
miles away. The data travels batik 
ami forth, often through regular 
telephone wires. Is that communi- 
cations or computing? The changes 
in the telecommunications industry 


have been more startling. Since the 
1970s, the technology has begun to 
alter radically how the telephone 
hues can be used. 

Information sent over telephone 
wires is now bring transformed 


into data bits, indistinguishable 
from data bits generated by a com- 
puter. In bit form, all sorts of infor- 
mation can be sect over the tele- 
phone. Voices can be broken down 
and reassembled. Data can be 


transmitted. Even pictures and 
sound, in videotex or videoconfer- 
encing, «»n all be transmitted in 
data-tat form. The switching ma- 
chines that handle the voice and 
' (Continued on Next Page) 


Anthony Oettinger, director' of 
[avard University’s Project on It 
formation Resources Policy, di 


ieet on In- 
dis- 
agreed. From an engineering 
of view, he said, (hoc is no.differ- 
ence. Mr. Oettingn - , who uses the 
term “campunicatious" to desaibe 
the convergence between comput- 
ers and communications, said that- 
the only way the two technologies 
are kept apart is through “electro- 
political engineering” 


pressured Bntish Telecom ttv pre- 
vent the private companies from 



s private 

the telex-forwarding ser- 


TTV-Sjug 

1 V -' _1L 



offering the i 

vicesTBritish Triecom, itsrif eager 
to reap the fruits erf market liberal- 
ization, only reluctantly agreed to 
intervene, according to ■ ‘ 

“We found the 
probably,'’ said the 
“We should have condemned the 
PTTs for ranting pressure on their 
British colleagues. 

Nonetheless, the EC Commis- 
sion condemned British Telecom 
on Dec. 10, 1982, for abusing its 
dominant business position, in the 
community under the anti- trust 
provision of Treaty of Rome legis- 
lation. 

But the battle was not yet wot. 
The Italian governm ent, a gain 
upon the- urging erf the CEPT, ap- 
(Contnmed on Next Page) 


In 1956, the Justice Department 
and American Telephone A Trie- 
'graph agreedio -settle an antitrust 
suit by stipulating that AT&T 
could not participate in the com- 
puter business. Twice since then, 
the Federal Communications Com- 
mission has tried topiy communi- 
cations away from computers, the 
latest attempt in 1980. The ques- 
tion of what constitutes communi- 
cations and what constitutes com- 
puting has never been satisfactorily 
answered, and this summer the 
FCC is expected to tiy again. 

Most telecommunications tech- 
nical experts agree there is no dif- 
ference between the two fidds. Per- 
haps there was, at one time, when 
computers woe big and bulky and 
confined to their locations, and 
when eommnuicaiions over tele- 
phone lines were confined to anar 
log transmissions, which could only 
voice and very erode data 


cany v 
traffic. 

But times have changed. A user 
sitting at a computer terminal in 
one city can perform computations 



A New Industry: 
Piracy of Signals 


By, Wilson P. Dizard 


WASHINGTON — Tonight more than a mfl- 
lion U.S- and Canadian families can switch on 
their televison sets and watch a newly released 
Hollywood movie without paying anyone. They 
are the so-called “space pirates," equipped with 
small backyard earth stations designed to receive 
satellite pay-TV programs. 

Satellite-signal piracy is spreading fast in North 
America and in the Caribbean region. Easy access 
to a dozen or more satellite entertainment net- 
works has spawned a new earth-station industry — 


and new problems for the Hollywood film studios 


and 


pay- 

ole. 


distributors whose products are vul- 


Reacting to this development. Congress last year 
passed legislation rtMlring protection of propri- 
etary rights a key objective in UB. trade negotia- 
tions. 

Controlling satellite piracy presents special 
problems. To begin with, it is amass phenomenon. 
By the end of this year in the United States, there 
could be almost 15 millicm backyard “dishes" 
designed to puck up entertainment programs in- 


tended primarily for cable-TV systems. 
Satellite pirac 


: piracy was practically unknown in the 
United States until the late seventies. Earth sta- 
tions before then were big and expensive. 

There were, moreover, few satellite transmis- 
sions worth looking aL Now there are a dozen 
major UR satellite providers of new films, sports 
and other entertainment features. 

More than 500 manufacturers and distributors 
make up an expanding home-satellite industry, 
complete with its own trade association and annu- 
al convention. 

Typically, their dishes measure 3 or 4 meters (9.9 
to 13.2 feet) in diameter. The trend, however, is 
toward 2-meter dishes, capable of picking up pop- 


(Contmned on Next Page) 


teMCutMeuM/HT 


The writer is a research fellow in international 
communications at the Georgetown University Cen- 
ter for Strategic & International Studies. 


WASHINGTON — Recent fail- 
ures in space, the development of 
earthbound competition and politi- 
cal problems have unsettled the 
satellite tgt «y»mmnnicaii nTis mar- 
ket 

The loss of the Hughes Syncom- 
4 satellite (also called Leasai) on 
the April flight of the space shuttle 
Disccnrery was the Fourth multi- 
mfllion-dollar loss to hit the satel- 
lite industry since early last year. In 
February 1984, Western Union's 
Westar-6 and Indonesia's Palapa 
B-2 were stranded in a useless orbit 
after their on-board rockets had 
failed to propel them from low- 
earth orbit, where they had been 
taken by the shuttle, to geostation- 

meters) above the equator, where 
they were to have provided tele- 
communications services. 

Although the two satellites were 
later picked rrp oa another shuttle 
flight, they remain in a warehouse 
in California, unsold and unwant- 
ed, having cost the insurance un- 
derwriters 5180 million in pay- 
ments to Western Union and 
Indonesia. 

In June 1984, a $102-m31ion sat- 
ellite owned by the International 
Telecommunications Satellite Or- 
ganization (Intelsat) was lost in 
space after being launched on an 
Atlas-Centaur rocket from the 
Kennedy Space Center in Florida. 
No rescue erf the satellite was possi- 
ble. 

In March this year, the Canadian 
satellite Anik D-2 lost stability in 
space: Canadian ground control- 
lers manag ed to regain control of 
the satellite, but the operation re- 
quired the use of a 14-month sup- 
ply of its fueL This has reduced the 
operational life of the Anik and is 
npected to lead to a SI 5-million 
insurance Haim 

Then, in April, NASA suffered 
the embarrassment of losing the 
Syncom satellite on a flight that 
was receiving unusual publicity be- 
came Senator Jake Gam, a Utah 
Republican, was a passenger. An 
effort by the shuttle’s crew to revive 
the sateQite did not succeed. 

The string of American failures 
to get satellites into space has been 
offset by Europe's Ariane space 
program, which has been chalking 
up a series of textbook launches. 
But the industry stiD is gloomy. 
Not only have the insurance premi- 
ums on satellites tripled (from 
about 6 percent of insured value to 
close to 20 percent) but the busi- 
ness itself is encountering unex- 
pected commercial difficulties. 

Intelsat, (he global satellite net- 
work, has been fading to achieve 
predicted levels of use, causing 
shortfalls in revenue of tens of mil- 
lions erf dollars. After years in 
which it appeared that Intelsat 
could expect to expand continually 
while reducing its charges, the plan 


to upgrade the network now looks 
commercially risky, and the basic 
charges have remained unchanged. 

Domestic satellite companies in 
the United States also have attract- 
ed fewer customers than predicted. 
As a result, some new companies 
that had been hoping to get into the 
business have dropped out because 
(hay have been unable to get fi- 
nancing 

All over the world, the new gen- 
eration of high-powered satellites 
capable of broadcasting television 
directly to tiny antennas is being 
held up amid mounting doubts 
about the reliability of the technol- 
ogy and the feasibility of the eco- 
nomics. 

Moreover, the satellite commu- 
nicators are 
that they may be i 
rapidly developing technology of 
fiber-optic cable conmumicauons. 
For two decades, satellites have 
represented the ultimate in tele- 
communications sophistication. 
But the latest development in com- 
munications is not in space, but on 
earth. 

Extraordinary advances in the 
technology of fiber-optic systems 
are threatening to make conven- 
tional, terrestrial co mmunicati ons 
less expensive and more reliable 
than satellite links, especially for 


increasingly worried 
/ be outflanked bv the 


telephone connections. 
Fui 


tinher uncertainty has been in- 
jected into the satellite industry by 
political considerations. This sum- 
mer, in Geneva, members of the 
International Telecommunications 
Union wfll gather for a conference 
to decide on rules to govern the 
future utilization of the geostation- 
ary orbit. The debate could turn 
out to be acrimonious, pitting de- 
veloping countries against the de- 
veloped world. 

The poorer nations want guaran- 
teed access to the sateDite orbit; the 
rich are resisting any procedure 
that might restrict future launches. 
On a regional level, poUtics is also a 
factor. In Europe, political squab- 
bles threaten to upset the plans of 
Luxembourg to launch Europe's 
first private satellite company. 

And in the councils of Intelsat, 
there is another danger to global 
harmony. The Reagan administra- 
tion, in a major policy departure, 
has indicated that it is prepared to 
authorize private satellites as an 
alternative to Intelsat for transcon- 
tinental sateDite Knks. While the 
new policy is in accord with a long- 
standing desire to deregulate com- 
munications and open the field to 
expand competition, it threatens to 
tear apart the historical consensus 
that has made Intelsat a prime ex- 
ample of successful international 
cooperation. Almost without ex- 
ception, America's partners in In- 
telsat are bitterly opposed to the 
policy. 

There are some bright spots in 


(Continued on Plage 11) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


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A SPECIAL REPORT ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


Piracy of Satellite 
Signals Widening 


(Continued From Previous Page) 

ular programs on the more power-' 
ful new Hughes Communications' 
Galaxy I satellite. 

Although there have been legal 
attempts to curb alleged skoal 
stealing, the chances For relief from 
the courts or legislatures appear 
slim. 

Last year. Congress passed .legis- 
lation, which, in effect, permits sig- 
nal piracy in the absence of plans 
by satellite program distributors to 
sell their services to the backyard- 
dish market. 

The Federal Communications 
Commission had earlier given up 
on attempts to control the prolifer- 
ation of dishes. 

The most promising means of 
overcoming signal stealing is to 


The free-for-all has 
•been in the Caribbean 
and Central America. 


scramble the signal. Regular cable 
subscribers would get the programs 
since the descrambling 
would be controlled by the' k 
; cable company. 


Signal pirates would get “snow” 
sir TV 


on their TV screens. Last month. 
Home Box Office, the largest U.S. 
pay-TV distributor, began national 
testing of its scrambler system to 
6.900 cable systems. The firm ex- 
pects that a full-time scrambling 
system will be operating by the end 
of the year. Showtime and other 
large pav-TV companies are mak- 


ing similar plans, 
rite these 


Despite these efforts, there will 
still be enough unscrambled pro- 
grams — and cheaper dishes — to 
encourage signal stealing. 

The United Stales will remain 
the signal-piracy leader, with Cana- 
da in second place because so many 
U.S. programs can be picked up 
there. The Canadian government 
has followed the American lead in 
giving up efforts to control the 
backyard pirates. 

The greatest free-for-all in signal 
pirating has taken place in the Ca- 
ribbean and Central America. As 
with Canada, U.S. pay-TV trans- 
missions are readily available. The 
entire region is dotted with earth 
stations designed to pick them up. 
At one point, the Jamaican televi- 
sion network was broadcasting pi- 
rated films over its stations. 

The Motion Picture Association 
of America and the pay-TV compa- 


nies complained loudly. Their pro- 
tests led to congressional legisla- 
tion which, in effect, required 
governments in the area to come to 
terms with the American program 
providers before they would be eli- 
gible for trade concessions under 

the Reagan adminis tration's Carib- 
bean Basin Initiative. 

Some early 1984, the arrange- 
ment has resulted in a cutback in 
the more flagrant satellite-signs! 
abuses in the region. 

Signal piracy has been a rdative- 
(y cun or factor in Europe so far. 
This is only because of a still unde- 
veloped infrastructure of satellite 
and cable systems there. Until that 
infrastructure is in place; large pay* 
TV systems — the primary objec- 
tive of the signal pirates— wfll not 
develop. 

Europe's slow start results large- 
ly from stalling tactics by conserva- 
tive postal, telephone and telegraph 
agencies against commercial entre- 
preneurs who would upset their 
broadcasting and telecommunica- 
tions monopolies. 

Last year, the European Eco- 
nomic Commission came out in far 
vor or a “common market for 
broadcasting,” a concept that will 
remain largely theoretical (along 
with signal piracy) until this politi- 
cal and economic impasse is set- 
tled. 

The most intriguing prospect for 
signal piracy involves the Soviet 
Union and East European coun- 
tries. Eventually, West European 
satellites will broadcast attractive 
entertainment and sports programs 
over an area that includes Eastern 
Europe and western parts of the 
Soviet Union. 

Although local Communist lead- 
ers will do what they can do to 
discourage signal piracy, the lure of 
“Dallas,” “Dynasty” and HoUy- 



Left, traditional telephone cable; fiber optics, right. 


GTE 


SCfTT 


Fiber optics used by the French PIT. 


Japanese Compete With U.S . in Global Fiber Optics Market 


By Jack Burton 


TOKYO — The showpiece of Japan’s fiber-optics 
is the Information Network System (INS), 


industry , , ■ 

the country’s next-generation telecommunications 

grid. 

Once it becomes fully operational within the next 
decade, anyone in the country will be able to plug into 
a full range of telecommunications services, including 


high-speed digital telephone connections, facsimile 
and data communications, video-conferencing and 


wood films will be strong. 

tat could happen 


A preview of what < 
occurs nightly in a small control 
room at Columbia University's In- 
stitute for Advanced Study of the 
Soviet Union. For the past year, 
students have been monitoring 
Moscow television programs 
picked up from a Soviet satellite 
passing over the United Stales. Re- 
cently, the students have noticed 
something new. 

Once the Moscow transmissions 
are finish ed. Hollywood films and 
MTV -style video programs show 
up on the screen. They are appar- 
ently picked up from American sat- 
ellites by technicians at Soviet 
earth stations who want to give 
their comrades a pirated look at 
Western-style enter tainmen t. 


videotex, teleshopping and telebanking. 

Although the United States remains the 1< 
market for fiber-optic equipment, Japan has en _ 
as the leader in applying the technology to a wider 
variety of uses, contributing to greater expertise and 
advancing research. 

Fiber optics has made INS possible and the tele- 
communications system demonstrates the advantages 
of the technology, the ability to iransmii vast amounts 
of both audio and visual information rapidly along 
easily installed hair-thin fiber cables that are 
immune to electromagnetic interference. 

INS was instrumental in propelling Japan into the 
front ranks of the fiber-optic field. It provided the 
rati on ale for Nippon Telegraph and Telephone 
(NTH, operator of the system, to engage in a decade- 
long research elf on on fiber-optic technology that has 
scored a number of firsts in the field and made Japan a 
formidable rival to the United States. 


Feburaiy with the laying of the main fiber-optic trunk 
line through the length of the Japanese archipelago, 
Japanese fiber-optic producers can look forward to 
several other big projects. 

Following the deregulation of die Japanese telecom- 
munications market an April 1. several consor tiums, 
including ones led by Japan National Rail roa ds and 
the Ministry of Construction, are planning to erect 
fiber-optic telecommunications networks within the 
next several years to compete with Nippon Tele- 
graph's INS. 

A more technically demanding challenge is the 
laying of a submarine fiber-optic cable by Kokusai 
Denshin Denwa. Japan’s international telecommuni- 
cations company, between Japan and Ha wan by 198$ 
to improve trans-Parific telephone service. 

The Ministry of International Trade and Industry 
plans to establish more than a draen “new media” 
communities throughout Japan that will use its Hi-O- 
V1S system, a two-way interactive cable TV service 
that relies heavily on fiber optics. 


k Japan's biggest contribution so far to the 
fiber-optic field fu 


! has been a new method of 
fiber-optic cables, called VAD, for vapor 


Developed by Nippon Telegraph in cooperation 
with its three major fiber-optic suppliers — Sumitomo 
Electric Industries, Fujikura Ltd. and Furukawa Elec- 
tric — VAD is more suitable for mass production of 
optical fibers than the earlier so-called MCVD meth- 
od pioneered in the United States. 

The larger production volume offered by the VAD 


Research is focusing on several ways to improve the 
light-transmission capability of fiber-optic systems, 
Nippon Telegraph Is developing a new type of fiber 
optics that has a high-density germanium additive to 
carty tight signals up to 300 kilometers (186 miks) 
before a rdaycr is needed. 


method means cheaper fiber-optic costs. Improve- 
id wfll likely result in makers 


These projects underscore that Japan, with its com- 
pact area, concentrated pockets of population and 
crowded urban landscape, make a suitable environ- 
ment for fiberoptic systems, probably more so than 
the United Slates, where satellite communications can 
more conveniently bridge the large land mass. 


meats in tfae VAD method wfll 
of filra cable being able to attain NTT’s price target of 
4 cents per meter (3 J feet) of fiber cable, a level 
competitive with the cost of conventional copper 
cables. 

The advantage of VAD ties in the Tact that it can 
produce longer continuous lengths of fiber cable than 
the MCVD method. Sumitomo Electric has already 
produced a single fiber cable, 300 kilometers in length, 
oo an experimental basis, although cables of 100 
kilometers long will likely become the VAD produc- 
tion standard in the future. This compares with 20- 
kilometer cables now produced with VAD and 5- 
kilomeier ones with MCVD. 


Another way to improve transmission focuses on 
the lasers that fire the tight signals along the fiber- 
optic cables after they are converted from electric 
impulses at the source. Nippon Electric and Kokusai 
Denshin Denwa have developed lasers for single- 
-mode optical fibers, which have a low light-loss rate 
and wide bandwidth* that shoot signals on a wave- 
length of I J microns, considered toe optimum level 
for long-distance optical transmissions. 


Nippon Telegraph is also working on improving 
relayer technology. Relayers now depend on a cum- 
bersome and inefficient system of converting tight 
signals into electrical signals and then back again 
before passing them down the line. Nippon Tele- 
graph's method consists of a semiconductor that di- 
rectly amplifies the tight rignal without (he need for 
electrical conversion. 


It also provided the necessary market support to get 
the fiber-optic industry on its feet at a time when the 
technology was both expensive and uncertain. NTT 
accounted for 63 parent of fiber-optic sales in Japan 
last year and its contracts have been lucrative enough 
to help make Sumitomo Electric Industries, for exam- 
ple, the third-largest maker of fiber optics in the world. 

While the first major phase of INS was completed in 


Japanese makers of fiber optics are also expected to 
tap ibei 


industrial and office markets. Fiber optics can 
be used to automate assembly lines and wire comput- 
erized offices. 

With demand booming at home. Japanese fiber- 
optic companies are also advancing into the United 
States, with Sumitomo beg innin g mass production of 
fiber-optic cables in the United States this year and 
NEC Corp. manufacturing optical communications 
equipment. 


But the longer length of die new fiber cables can not 
be Jully utilized unless a way is found to reduce the 
□umber of relayers inserted along fiber-optic tines to 
boost signals. Light signals continually lose strength as 
they travel down fiber-optic lines, resulting in the need 
for relayers to amplify the light signals at regular 
intervals. 

The main trunk line for INS, for example, has 
relayers even* 30 miks (48 kilometers), fewer relayers 
would mean lower construction costs and easier instal- 
lation for long-range telecommunications systems. 


The company says that such a method could trans- 
mit a tight signal another 140-280 kflometers before 
another relayer is needed. Its rdaycr research touches 
on the next major goal in fiber-optic research, devel- 
oping an optoelectronic chip that can process tight 
signals in the same way that an integrated-circuit chip 
distributes electronic signals in a computer. 


Electronic-circuit chips are unsuitable for fiber- 
optic systems since they cannot process light, so re- 
search is under way to develop new semiconductor 
materials that can handle both eketrietty and tight, 



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Monopolies of European PTTs Are Questioned 


(Continued From Previous Page) 


on 


pealed the commission's ruling to 
the European Court of Justice in 
Luxembourg. The case finally end- 
ed on March 20, when the court 
confirmed the commission’s appli- 
cation of the law. 

The ruling’s implications for the 
liberalization of the European tele- 
communications market could be 
significan t. The development of 
new technology is constantly ex- 
panding the range of telecommuni- 
cations services. The UJS. telecom- 
munications market alone will be 


worth about 5250 billion by 1990, 
en & Hamfl- 


according to Book Allen 
theU.S, 


ton, the U .S .-headquartered inter- 
national management consultancy. 

So-called enhanced, or value- 
added, services will be the most 
lucrative portion of information- 
age business. Such services modify 
dectronically transported informa- 
tion, using computer processing 
techniques, to better tailor the 
product to user needs. They will 
become more widespread as broad- 
band digital tr ansmissi on tech- 
niques begin to enable the trans- 
port of high volumes of video, 
sound, text and data over telecom- 
munications networks. 


“There is a __ _ „ 

at the moment about what 

new enhanced services are and who 
should provide them," said Hans 
Peter Gassmann, head of the infor- 
mation. computer and communica- 
tions policy division of the Paris- 
based Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development. 

Struggle is new to telecommuni- 
cations providers. For as much as a 
hundred years, services throughout 
the world have been the domain of 
government-regulated monopolies. 
In the United States, privately 
owned AT&T was regulated by the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion. In Europe and Japan, state- 
owned telecommunications and 
postal services have been run di- 
rectly by government ministries. 

These monopolies, considered as 
public utilities, generated little in- 
terest among users or even govern- 
ment officials until recently. Their 
traditional task, to pul into place a 
telecommunications infrastructure 
for telephone and telegraph trans- 
mission, kept them busy and out of 
sight. As international communicai 
cions grew, tire engineers generally 
were left to work out their deals 
behind closed doors. 

But the explosive growth of in- 


formation technologies over the 
last decade has blown those doors 
open. “Suddenly, everyone is tak- 
ing an interest in what these techni- 
cians arrange among themselves," 
said Mr. Collier. “A lot of legisla- 
tion and tariff structure is restric- 
tive and out-of-date.' 


on their own, anymore. That means 
that they have to open up the mar- 
ket." 


Liberalization in tdecommuni- - . . 
cations so far has involved vmying 
mixtures of deregulation, danono* . •- • , 


Some industry and government 
officials now argue that the rapid 
growth in technology and services 
makes monopolistic control of tele- 
communications impracticable and 
economically undesirable. 


“The PTTs will see. or already 
see, that the world is chang i ng , 
said Theodor Inner, director of toe 
International Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Consultative Committee, 
and formerly a directorat the West 
German Bundespost “No longer 
will there be only one network pro- 
vider or one provider of terminals." 
The committee is the standards- 
setting body of the International 
Telecommunications Union in Ge- 


neva. 


“PTTs will hold on to the infra- 
structure,” said Harms Schwimann, 
Paris-based vice-president for Booz 
Allen & Hamil ton “On the other 
hand, they must understand that 
they cannot develop these services 


enunent-owned agencies. The situ- 
ation varies from country to - ' 
country. Many observers now talk ... . 
about re-regulation instead of de- 
regulation . [ ~ 

The provision of basic telephone ^ 
services was demonopolized m the 
United States with the divestiture •' 
of AT&Ts 22 regional operating i ” 
companies on Jan. 1, 1984 The >?. 
government has begun slowly re- 
Iaxrng its regulatory control of 
AT&T since divestiture. Market 4 
forces will slowly replace govern- 
ment decrees in detenmmng com- 
petitive practices, tariff policies 
and technical norms. 

Britain and Japan have followed 
the UJS. lead in telecomm un cations 
liberalization. Government-owned 
British Telecom and Nippon Tele- 
phone and Telegraph have been 
privatized , but both continue to be 
strictly regulated by their govern- 
ments and competition for services 

re mains minimal 


'-i: 


The Line Between Communications, Computers %,0r U 


(Continued From Preview Page) 

data traffic for the telephone com- 
pany are, telephone engineers wfll 
argue, computers. 

In addition to normal telephone 
networks there are special net- 
works built to handle high-speed 
data. These can handle voice, data 
and pictures all at the same time. A 
businessman can talk to a colleague 
in another place while looting at 
his office terminal. They can dis- 
cuss plans and alter data simulta- 
neously. Some networks are now 
being configured to build in com- 
puting capabilities. The data that 
go in one end come out in different 
form at the destination. 

At that point, crying to distin- 
guish between communications 
and computing becomes a meta- 
physical, rather than an engineer- 
ing, question. 

This convergence, or “compuni- 
cations," is happening afl over the 
world. Pacific Bdi, the telephone 
company that serves most of Cali- 
fornia, said recently that it had dis- 
covered a method of convening a 
si ngb» telephone line into two voice 
and one medium-speed data chan- 
nel and four low-speed data chan- 
nels. 


Convergence, from an engineer- 
ing standpoint, will continue. But 
what Mr. Oettinger called the 
“electro-political engineering,” 
continues also. Unfortunately Tor 
many businessmen and homeown- 
ers waiting for the golden age of 
instantly accessible information 
and mol tif calmed telephone ser- 


vice, politics in man^Mueas of the 


world are stopping the technology 
from taking its logical course. 

Many of the barriers exist in Eu- 
rope, where, in most countries, the 
postal and telecommunications au- 
thorities, or PTTS, control commu- 
nications networks and, in many 
cases, the equipment connected to 
those networks, much as AT&T did 
in the United S tates for about 100 
years. For the PTTs, the merging 
technologies pose the question of 
where their monopoly begins or 
ends. Many have found at least a 
temporary answer by expanding 
their control to include all new in- 
formation services, i ncl u ding vi- 
deotex and high-speed data sys- 
tems. 


data to send the information aver 
the govmunent-provided network. 

Ironically, many multinational 
companies have found the most 
convenient method of communica- 
tions is to lease telephone tines in 
several countries and construct 
their own networks. That works 
well enough for the company in 
question, according to a represen- 
tative of one multinational firm, 
but does not help expand commu- 
nications for companies unable to 
put together a similar project. 
Technical standards for transmis- 
sion and networks differ from 
country to country, particularly in 
data communications, making 
complete, transborder traffic cir- 
cuits over public networks virtually 
impossible. 


to be rules, as with the Bundespost; 
that only German-made or Ger- 
man-approved equipment may be 
connected to the telephone system. 
In another example, a report by the 
Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development found 
that Brazil is “the most severe «x-. 
'ample” of patting restrictions on 
equipment and allowing only alba- 
iteJ range of systems, but “long 
and complex approval procedures 
were reported to be a widespread 
problem, especially in Europe." 

International telecommunica- 
tions experts cite otter problems 
that hamper the natural techno* 


or 


company, said it had launched a 
field trial of an integrated services 
digital network that will provide, 
over die same system, digital tele- 
phones. facsimile service, simulta- 
neous voice and data transmission, 
and access to a special high-speed 
data network. 


A recent survey of international 
data-processing firms conducted 
by the U.S. D epart ment of Com- 
merce found “rIT discrimination 
against fordgn-owned firms" the 
most frequently encountered prob- 
lem around the world. The second 
most frequent problem was “trans- 
border data flow restrictions." 
Problems include restrictions on 
useof drcuils that companies want 
to use and policies that force com- 
puter users wanting to transmit 


In the United States, one facet of 
the convergence of communica- 
tions and computing in the PBX, or 
private switchboard, that many 
companies purchase to switch calls 
and messages around a building. 
Advances in PBX technology are 
rapid; a two-year-old system can 
easily be outmoded. But the West 
German Bund espost is one exam- 
ple of a PIT that controls all the 
equipment connected to iL 


wuis for services ordered by far-, 
sign companies and countries not j; 
accepting the equipment-testing 
standards of others. 

Convergence of telccommunaa* 
bons and computers is happening 
as a natural course of events. In the 
engineering world, there is no stoP" . 
ping the progress. 


According to a representative of 
one equipment manufacturer the 
company wanted to sell a PBX in 
West Germany, but had to take out 
afl the advanced features because 
Siemens, a leading German compa- 
ny, had not developed those capa- 
bilities. It is not unusual for there 


The European Community h** ■ 
recognized the n gpd for a unified 
effort in telecommunications, nx#* 
recently through the RACE (R? / 
search and development in w.; 
va P“d Commiihicatirai^tedu^ 
O&es in Europe) and ESPWJL 
(European Strategic Program far . . . 
Research and Development in 
Formation Techgnofogies) pt°r 
grants, but those are long-tam V 

jects that some analysts! 

not Km. muL u r_. . 


mg technological changes. 


• * -3 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 11 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON TEUECOMMUNICATIONS 



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WASHINGTON —.In London, 
earlier this year, the International 
Maritime Satellite Organization 
(Inmarsat) was about to select a 
contractor to provide-it with a new 
range of satellites to handle com- 
munications with ships, offshore 
platforms and aircraft 
..Negotiations with teams Jed by 

British Aerospace and. Marconi 
Space Systems had been conducted 
in secrecy. But a few days before 
the final decision was to be made, 
^mrpwlf pd envelopes be gan landing 
co .the di ftV, of journalists andgov- 
enuneni nffWai< ran rattling de- 
tails of the.cou tract talks and sug- 
gesting that one of the 'bidding 
companies had offered a superior 
proposal. 

The anonymous comnunticaiion 
was promptly denounced by all 
concerned. Inmarsat went on to 
award the contract to the British 
Aerospace team. But what was in- 
teresting was the length to which 
someone was prepared to go to try 
to influence the contract negotia- 
tions. 

Interesting, but hardly surpris- 
ing. Inmarsat could end up mend- 
ing half a mill i nn dollars building, 
lanndring and insuring its satellites 
over the next several years. And 
Inmarsat is one erf the smaller sald- 
lile organizations. Around the 
world, probably some $200 billion 
will be invested in civilian commu- 
nications satellites and associated 
paraphernalia between now and 
the aid of the century. 

The rich commercial rewards to 
be reaped in the satellite business 
have spawned intense and some- 
times brutal competition among 
suppliers. More than profits are at 
stake. Governments see satellite 
prime contracts as a matter of pres- 
tige and a manifestation of national 
technological competence. As a rt^ 
suit, they have been willing to 
spend minions and sometimes bD- 
Kons of tax dollan to sufaritfize 
research and development that of- 
ten ends up getting transferred to 
the private sector at concessionary 
prices. 

Hie satellite business meets none 
of the criteria for a fine market, 
according to economists snch as 
Michael Tyler, a former British Te- 
lecom executive now chairman of 
CS&P International, a telecom- 
munications consultancy with of-, 
fices in New York ana London. 
The market is characterized by sub- 
adies, systems of preference, secre- 
tiveness, monopolies and restric- 
tions on the transferor technology.— 

Launch services are a prime ex- 
ample of how this system affects 
pricing. There are essentially only 
two ways to launch ’ a satellite to- 
day: via the American shuttle or 
atop the European Amae. NASA 
and Arianespace, which operate 
these launch systems, charge satel- 
lite owners a price for launch ser- 
vices that does not allow for the 
recovery of a single penny invested 
by American ana European (main- 
ly French) taxpayers m their devel- 
opment. 

The trade in the satellites them- 
selves is equally distorted. The Eu- 
11 not buy American sat- 
al though these have , until 
recently been in most respects less 
expensive and more capable than 
Europe's own models. This is a 
function of blatant protectionism. 
Europe has wanted to encourage a 
satdute-manaf acturing industry of 
its own. 

But while keeping out American 
satellites, Europe has been aggres- 
rive in selling Ariane launches to 
U.S. satellite operators. 

A lack of evenhandedness also is 
evident in the market for earth sta- 
tions. The United States is the 
world's largest producer of satel- 
lite- television reception equipment, 
producing some 60,000 units per 
month and having the ability to 
rapidly expand production. The 


Europeans keep out all but a trickle 
by applying -a brutally effective 
nontanff barrier In many 
an countries, the private 
of a satellite earth station is simply 
illegal; in others, it requires a hr 
cense' that is, for aE practical pur- 
poses, almost impossible to get 

The genuine competition that ex- 
ists in the world is within the Unit- 
ed States and in Third Worid coun- 
tries that have no satellite industry 
of their own. The Brazilians, Indo- 
nesians and ntinese can get good 
prices on their satellites because 
they can play off the European and 
North American suppliers against 
each other. Within the United 
States, the laissez-faire regulatory 
poficy of the Federal Cammnmca- 
li rmc Commission has meant no 
restrictions on the ownership of 
earth st atio ns and an abundance of 
satellite capacity, creating the con- 
ditions for. vigorous bargaining 
among users and suppliers of satel- 
lite services. 

While the launch-services mar- 
ket is essentially restricted to two 
suppliers, the market far satellites 
and earth stations is competitive. 
In the United States, the leading 
manufac turers of satellites are the 
Hughes Aircraft Co. and the Astro- 
Ekctronics Division of the RCA 
Corp. A second tier of suppliers 
includes subsidiaries of the Ford 
Motor Co. and General Electric. 
Lockheed, Boeing and TRW also 
manufacture satellites, but almost 
all of these are exclusively for mili- 
tary and government uses. 



rial* and 

and 

Systems, Italy’s Sdenia and West 
Germany’s Messerschmitt-Bol- 
kow-Blohm are all trying to win a 
piece of the satellite business. In 
Japan, .Mitsubishi Electric and To- 
shiba are prominenL 

There seems little doubt that 
there are too many companies seek- 
ing prime contracts for satellites, 
but governments are reluctant to 
let their national suppliers fail, and 
they keep some of thou afloat with 
taxpayer-subsidized research and 
development contracts that lead to 
the production of expeimental sat- 
ellites with little commercial value. 

Even more competitiveness 
marks the earth-station business. 
The dish-shaped antennas of satel- 
lite earth stations are a far mare 
prosaic product than - the enor- 
mously complicated and expensive 
space satellites, but over time the 
manufactnriag-of- the dishes is go- 
ing to be a much bigger business. 
The United States already has 
more than a million satellite earth 
stations in use. The value of these is 
at least $5 billion, oc probably dou- 
ble die value of the 20 American 
domestic satellites now in service. 

The major manufacturers of 
earth stations have been small to 
medium-sized companies. In the 
United States, hundreds of thou- 
sands of earth stations are bring 
churned out by entrepreneurs 
equipped with little more than a 
few fiberglass molds and largely 
unautomated electronics 
lines. This is likely to change as 
Asian production increases. One of 
the most formidable future suppli- 
ers, of earth stations is Hkdy to be 
Ghmn J ap an, Korea and 
also are Ukdy to emerge as signifi- 
cant supplier. - • - 

In the end, the aunpctilkm to 
build the hardware of the satellite 
age is only a prefiminaiy to the real 
battleground. Satellites exist to 
transmit information: television, 
computer data, human voices. To 
the extent that satellites serve to 
extend communications options 
and open up access to high-capaci- 
ty transmission pathways, the busi- 
ness of fining up the new channels 
is a game that any number can 

Pky ‘ — JONATHAN MILLER 


( ;omp l,tef 


Investor Climate Held Key 
-Jo 3d-Worid Development 


LONDON — The worid needs 

to spend $12 bflhon a year until the 
- end of the century U) give the Third 

World the telecommunications it 
needs, according to the Maitland 
Commission, set up by the Interna- 
tional Telecommunications Union 
to assess how to meet developing 
countries' needs. 

Sr Donald Maitland, the British 
diplomat named by the ITU to 
. chair the commission, said the most 
important decision of its 17 mem- 
bers, 10 of which are from develop- 
ing countries, was to urge upon • 
Third World nations the impor- 
tance of creating the right condi- 
tions Tor ‘investors. 

The commission proposed an in- 
■ ternational center for telecom- 
munications, comprising a policy 
group, a development service ana 
an operations support group, to 
give impartial advice to Third. 
World nations. 

The ITU Administrative Council 
will discuss the creation of the cen- 
ter when h meets in July, but Sir 
Donald made it dear that the West 
wanted the United Nations body 
just to provide legal cover. Tele- 
couroiunicatious operators will 
contribute to the center so tongas 
_^they have this assurance, be added, 
v The unbalance today between 
. . the industrialized countries and the 
test of the worid is stark: A handful 
of nations have 90 percent of the 
world's 600 million tclcphoneS-The 
Washington metropolitan area has 
more telephones than all of black 


Africa. Bangladesh has 13 trie- 
phones for every 10,000 inhabit- 
ants, Sweden more than 8,500. 

Most of the aid for telecommuni- 
cations development comes today 
-from inter national organizations 
and Western governments. In 1 983, 
the total from all sources was esti- 
mated at S8 billion. 

The Maitland Commission sees 
mvohrementof the private sector as 
the only way to boost the level of 
investment: hence the proposed in- 
ternational center, to provide' a 
Tl give con- 
: to developing countries and 
investors alike. 

' Up to now, the tdecommnmea- 
tions industry has often been seen 
as just another sector to be built up 
as a country devriopa. But there isa 
growing feeling today that it actu- 
ally fosters development and -must 
be 'considered as a vital pan of 
other projects. 

The commission suggested two 
mechanisms lot long-term funding, 
revolving funds and teJecomroum- 
cations investment trusts, winch 
utight be put into effect by the next 
ITU plenipotentiary conference. 

The revolving fund could be 
built up with contributions over a 
10-year period from tdecommum- 
catioDs operators, equipment man- 
ufacturers, system houses and us- 
ers, to pay for equipment purchase, 
training or interest relief. Eventual- 
ly, interest repayments would re- 
plenish the fund’s resources. 

• —ANDREW WALLER 



sc-m- 


Det&O of a French telecommunications satellite. 

Satellite Market Problems 


(Continued From Page 9) 
the salrilite industry. Brazil and 
the Arab League recently joined 
Indonesia ami India in space, 
launching satellites far domes- 
tic and regional telecommuni- 
cations sendees in areas of the 
worid that have been deprived 
of a modem telecommunica- 
tions infrastructure. China, 
which has already launched an 
experimental tywmwnni«iHnng 
satellite, intends soon to boy a 
more powerful satellite in the 
West to allow for the expansion 
of television service to its rural 
population. 

Other new applications for 
satellites show an equally prom- 
ising future. 

The European Telecommuni- 
cations Satdlite Organization is 
experiencing a boom in the 
buaness of ■ distributing televi- 
sion signals to cable-TV sys- 
tems. Among the customers of 
the Entdsat service are Rupert 
Murdoch’s Sky Channel, which 
is beaming programs from Lon- 


don to miTlwins of. cable sub- 
’scribers and hotel rooms across 
publishers, 
The' Economist and 
the Financial Tunes, are awak- 
ening to the possibifitres that 
allow them to simultaneously 
print newspapers in many loca- 
tions around the worid. The 
technique is already used by the 
International Herald Tribune, 
the Wall Street Journal and 
USA Today. 

The outlook for satellites, do- 
spite the difficulties of recent 
months, is hardly grim. As earth 
stations become less expensive 
and new applications are devel- 
oped. future growth looks as- 
sured. But the gloom of the pre- 
sent is palpable. Twenty years 
after Tristar demonstrated the 
feasibility oT satdlite communi- 
cations, the industry has 
emerged from its adolescent 
growth spurL In its new maturi- 
ty, the industry is finding that 
its exotic technology is not im- 
mune tram misfortune and the 
rigors of competition. 


Standardizing the Integrated Services Networks 


By Andrew Waller 

LONDON — Like the highway, the telecom- 
munications industry needs roles, but much 
more complex ones. Without regulations, the 
instantaneous Hnka we used to send voice, data 
or pictures across the globejust would not work. 

In most countries the business of making the 
roles about what equipment can be used, how it 
talks to other parts of the network and what 
kind of traffic can be se nt ov er it has always 
been the preserve of the PITs, the state post, 
telegraph and triephnne monopolies. 

So long as they keep that monopoly, PTTs 
enforce the- rules, too. If the user does not 
y, they can just unplug his equipment. 
United States has always been the big 
exception. The Federal Omnnonicatioiis Com- 
mission sets the regulatory network. Under the 
Reagan administration, it advocates more 
strongly than ever that the marketplace must do 
the re gulating . 

But the argument for leaving it up to the 
market is not just ideological; teem 
so swiftly today ti 


t ideological; technology moves 
that an administration hn ggfri 
down in regulatory activity will be overtaken by 
'events before it has time to weigh the facts and 
reach a decision. 

In the past year, two countries have followed 
the United States in privatizing their state tele- 
communications corporations, Britain and Ja- 
pan. In Britain, a new Office of Telecommuni- 
cations (Oriel) was set up to see that operators 
■stick to the free-market role. 

These moves will pm pressure ou other West 
European countries to deregulate, as rival tele- 
communications agencies in B ritain — thoug h 
there are still only two — exploit the new 
environment to grab a lion's share of the lucra- 
tive trans-Atlantic traffic. 

The world’s PTTs come together under the 
auspices of the International Tdeconnmmi ca- 
tions Union. The task of the union's Interna- 
tional Telegraph a Telephone Consultative 
Committee is to harmnnim tariinioal , opera- 
tional and tariff aspects Of cnmmiw»f«tinflis. 

Its work has grown increasingly complex. 
Where once the only suppliers interested m its 


activities were capital-equipment manufactur- 
ers, now large parts erf the semiconductor indus- 
try have joined in. 

Theodor Inner, the director of the committee, 
fears that unless bis group fulfills its role as 
arbiter of world tdcxnmmuaicaticms standards, 
tag manufacturers and regional PTT organiza- 
tions will step in with their own solutions. 

The major c ur rent effort of the committee is 
to complete international standards for the 
world's biggest machine, the integrated services 
digital network. Beginning with national. net- 
works and building up to a global web of com- 
munications, it wall cany every kind of traffic. 


An administration bogged 
down in regulatory activity will 
be overtaken by events before 
it has tune to reach a decision. 


from ordinary telephone conversations to high- 
speed data and moving images. 

By handling every signal in digital form, it can 
make much more efficient use of equipment, it 
does not have to know whether the traffic it 
handies is voice, data or images, so long as it can 
be interpreted correctly by the equipment at the 
receiving end. 

For all that to work, all the interfaces, or 
“gateways,” through which the torrent of digital 
data pours must conform to common s tandar ds. 

Twdve organizations, only half of them tradi- 
tional telecommunications operators, have com- 
missioned a study worth more than $300,000 to 
establish how each of right countries (haws 
these distinctions and how they regulate for 
them. 

Robert Bruce, a Washington lawyer and for- 
mer general counsel of the FCC, is directing the 
study, which was commissioned through the 
International Institute of Communications, a 
London-based independent research body. 

His brief is to establish how each country 


defines what data-service suppliers may and 
may not offer, how their services are distin- 
guished from pure tdccommunications and 
what roles are needed for each of them. He is 
also exa mi n in g the effect of national regulation, 
or deregulation, on international business. 

The International Telecommunications Satel- 
lite Organization (Intelsat), a PTT-based group- 
ing, already faces the threat of competition, 
following U.S. satdlite operators' applications 
to the FCC to cany international traffic. 

Mr. Brace, addressing a U.S. congressional 
committee in March, pointed out that Intelsat 
will face competition from fiber-optic cable 
anyway and that national satellite systems, like 
the French Telecom- 1, were also capable of 
carrying international traffic. 

Technological advances mean that there are 
many things a PTT can do now that were 
previously the preserve of private enterprise, 
and vice versa. In the cose of cable tele visio n, for 
instance, in most countries it was not PTTs that 
provided the cable for local distribution net- 
works for broadcast TV. Today, it often is. 

Then there are value-added n etwor k services, 
known as VANS, Traditionally, PTTs provided 
the means of communication and did nothing 
else with the information communicated. That 
was up to the “user.” 

What happens if one wants to store one’s 
information and forward it later? Is this an 
added-value service? Britain has decided it is, 
but no other European country has ma de up its 
mind on VANS yet It is up to the PTTs to 
deride. 

What happens if one has a leased or privately 
owned channel with spare capacity, s o one 
wants to sell it on to other organizations? PTTs 
take the line that ihird-partv traffic is illegal. 

But how much does one nave to add to it to 
argue that one is providing a different service? 
How will any PTT be able to monitor whether 
hundreds of providers of VANS are really add- 
ing value? 

Soon, there will be a forest of private satdlite 
dishes. PTTs will not be able to monitor effec- 
tively what all their owners are doing with them. 






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Page 12 


N ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


Programming Diversity 


Of U.S. Cable Television Systems 

. -t Ciiik. serv 


By John Wolfe 

WASHINGTON — There is 
dearly a diversity among the com- 
panies that operate the more than 
6,400 separate cable systems in 
communities across the United 
States. On the most advanced sys- 
tems, viewers can choose from up 
to 100 channels, consisting of re- 


Dooley, wee president of public 
affaire for the Washington-based 
National Cable Television Associa- 
tion, which represents U.S. cable 
openilons. 

Other industry observers note 
that European postal administra- 
tions are often hesitant to encour- 
age competition to goyeminrai- 
rcgulated broadcast stations. That 


United States, serving nearly 90 
percent of all subscribes. 

Cable operators arc certainly not 
the onlv companies hoping to cash 
* on tKSy’s bullish future. 
The growth of cable hasabo ^o 

ania^onintbenumbCTofwbte 

programming services * the i Unw- 
ed Stales. From °aep l0Q «W*L 
vice (Home Box Office, which be- 


ingion Communications Consul- 

Cable service is currenuy The U.S. government has go?® 

able to 57 percent of television- cable television many of the ng 
equipped ulTha^eholds. accord- usually 

Sv Sdaia from the A.C. Nielsen last year. Congress pM«aj«W 
da research firm that trades ble Commumcaupns ‘JPpligr Act« 


irung services, iuumy mi gim* .... 
programs and public, educational 
and governmental stations. 

Cable service is cunently avail 


cabte 


1984, a compromise among the ca- 
ble industry and dty rep resen ta- 
lives that was designed to provide a 
unified federal policy concerning 
cable television, which had previ- 


viewing habits. Nielsen figures for 
the end of February indicated that 
38 million American households 
(44.6 percent of homes With TV 
seLrt subscribed to a cable system, cable television, 

Thai figure is currently growing by ously been regulated primarily 

sheet also reflects the industry's however, will likely be to d eregu- 
maturityin the United States. In uue a 

1 982, cable operators lost an aggro- vision. As pan of theMWj-ongress. 
gate $200 million: in 1983, they manda 


realized a profit of $400 milLon, 


which doubled to nearly $800 mil- 
lion last year. 

Many industry officials believe 
that continued deregulation of ca- 
ble television by the government 
has helped foster diversity and 
profitability. Observers are guide 
to point out that cable in Europe 
does not benefit from the same lais- 
sez-faire approach. 

“I think the primary reason for 
the success of cable in this country 
is the withdrawal from the regula- 
tory marketplace by the govern- 
ment; that is still a problem m 
Europe. They are afflictoi by the 
overregulation of media,* said Ed 


Vision. | 

mandated that the Federal 

muni cations Commission deter- 
mine what constitutes effective 
competition for cable teJevuaon- 
Those systems operating in mar- 
kets where such competition exists 
would be permitted to establish 
their own rates Tor basic cable ser- 
vice. Systems operating m areas 
where no effective competition ex- 
ists would have their rates regula - 

ed by dty authorities. 

The commission, on Apnl lb 
ruled that effective competition tc 
cable exists if three broadcast sig- 
nals are available in a given market 
According to its estimates, that ae- 


networlrehashadaniniT^nre^ 
broadcast television in the United 
States. The success of video muse 
slices has helped to change the 
face of television commercials, 
some cable observers claim. 

Industry observers also wart 
that the proliferation of competi- 
E£ such as video cassette reord- 
ers. direct- to-bome saldbie broad- 
casts to backyard earth stauons 
and microwave multicktnnel- d^ 
tribuuon sennas, could slow the 
development of cable. 

Moreover, the cable industry; is 

faced with the task of explaining 
the limitations of the technology to 
consumers and local governments, 
which in many casm expect a sys- 
tem that can provide video pro- 
gramming and interactive services 
such as videotex. 

“The big hurdle will be trying to 
get people to realize the Umns of 
cable," Mr. Dooley said. 

“There’s a tendency for some 
people to get fixated on a rertiun 
technology and forget w ask d 
there will ever be a marked for that 
technology," Mi- Wheeler raid. 
-Bob cable operators local 



.sJjMHmp — 

cent of all cable systems in the question. 


In Europe, Visionary Cable Projects 
Contrast With Modest Achievements 

.. . than hist nine television to their success, experts say. T! 


to do more than just pipe television 
and radio into homes. Optical-fiber 
cable is made of hair-thin strands 
of glass that can transmit massive 
volumes of information as pulses of 
light Services such as home bank- 
ing. teleshopping and electronic 
publishing will be possible by link- 
ine home computers with distant 
SFjirSta h?T3iS corporate compute* vie Ute new 

Bmffot the moment, the picture 
looker Meek for Europem. 


PARIS — France's stalled cable 
project got a boost recently when 
the mayor of Paris announced his 
readiness to begin wiring the capi- 
tal. . . 

After 14 months of negotiations, 
Mayor Jacques Chirac and the 
state-run telecommunications au- 
thority signed an agreement on 


to their success, experts say. They 
use inexpensive copper wiring and 
have no qualms about transmitting 


for r distribution of television 
programs and interactive services, 
such as home banking. 


The negotiations between the 
conservative mayor and the Social- 

_ _ 1 <u«i4 nWIII- 


cable plans. Only modest projects 
have succeeded so far, while more 
ambitious plans continue to fioun- 

dC ^Everyone set off with a vision of 

■ < t " miiD aitrAfll 


siVS.'UfiSjs 


ous. "We thought - ------- - 

gone faster." acknowledged Ber- 
nard Schreiner, president of Mis- 
sion Cable, the government delega- 
tion overseeing France s ambitious 
plan, “bat there were certain con- 
straints." . .. . 

The difficulties and continuing 
uncertainties confronting the 
French project exemplify the prob- 


French project exemplify the prob- 
lems faced .by other Europan 
countries that are developing cable 
networks. 


UK UUW — — - - — r- 

number of potential clients for 
electronic home services was over- 
estimated, while financing costs 
were underestimated, be said. 

“Home information systems are 
not booming," said Haims Schwi- 
mann, Paris-based vice-president 
at Boaz Allen and Hamilton, a UJ5. 
anagement consultancy. 

In fact, the countries with the 


“Holland and Belgium had no 
technical or cultural ambitions, 
explained Mr. Biin. 

On the other hand, France. West 
Germany and Britain chose ad- 
vanced Ethnical solutions that, 
while offering great possibilities for 
new applications, also pose a num- 
ber of problems. Cable penetration 
in those countries is still less than 
10 percent 
By usne optical fiber instead of 
traditional copper wire, the costs of 
their plans were significantly 
.The French government will 
spend 6 to 12 billL — — ; . . 
wiring Paris, according to initial 
estimates. Mr. Chirac forced the 
government to pick up most of the 
tab before committing Paris to the 


France’s card-operated public telephone. 

Avoiding the Half-Second 
Trip to Outer Space 


By Tim Smart 
BOSTON — Satellite tech- 


nology, the primary m eans by 
whim teli 


.Jephone calls are rout- 
ed over long distances, is slowly 
becoming outdated in a world 
where instantaneous communi- 
cation is a minimum require- 
ment and a premium is placed 
on the rapid delivery of both 
speech and data. In its place 
will be a world linked by hair- 
thin fibers made of glass. 

“You can go anyplace with a 
satellite, unlik e a microwave, 
which only goes where towers 
can go," said Robert Lucky, 
head of basic research at 
AT&T’s Bell Labs division. 
“But the big disadvantage is the 
half-second delay with the 
trip." 

Because it takes a quarter- 
second in each direction from 

earth to outer space at the speed 
of light, there is a noticeable 
delay in conversations that lake 
place on telephones linked by 


unlimited capacity to 
both speech and data 
great with little or no 

distortion. Over long di s t anc es, 
fiber has proven to be economi- 
cally viable, although its practi- 
cal application in snort-haul sit- 
uations remains to be seen. 

The use of fiber is becoming 
increasingly important as inter- 
national telecommunications 
equipment manufacturers move 

. _ J J Kir <4 *ato 


Use of Satellites for Data Delivery 
v . i • n A k«i Tul atiIi one Linton 




WASHINGTON — Maritime Mr. Terragno said, Pergsmon wtlj Hiti^uition^cxcliisivelv. Equatorial 
DamNetwo&Udl a shipjring in- 

formation comoanv. must over- the next few years. ~ u^-ufoast distribution to carin sta- 


v- 


1 1 1 * - 

i *•' 


formation company, must over- 
come a unique logistical hurdle in 

■ , m ss a liniw 


•■sasss— fc->- A 


j'*i 


Sl^S«a= ^.Curren^rg^a^ SEEK*®* 

— pit of its installed customer dlites to traiOTU^u ore^s sciisro^ ^ wlndi then 

base is floating around in the mid- from its ^central c0 ^ u j piiroDe market the service to individual 
Erf tteS. according to Mar- don. North Am™ 


die of the ocean, 

data's president, Larry 

For Mardaia and a growing 

ipnh w of information companies 

that must deliver data to remote 
sites, communications satellites are 

• » - - 1 finM nc fllP 


don. North America and Europe 

are Pergamon’s primary markets. 
• . 1 in Vomnninff 


market the service 
subscribers. 


bis * M y— — - 1 r*. ■ | "“Wa can nrovide our service at a 

athougb the company is teummg ^ nri ^,KJc r cost than by us- 
u> market its service in Japan, he Equator- 


overtaking telephone lines as the 
most retiable cost-eJ 


most rauunc cost-effective method 
of point-to-point data distribution. 

By the end of 1 985, there may be 
as many as 100 commercial satel- 
lite equipped for international 
telecommunications in earth orbit, 
the Communications Satellite 
Corp. estimates. Although these 
sateili 


Information providers are not 
the only ones anxious to capitalize 

on the advantages of satellite trans- 
mission. Dala-deliverry network 
vendors are also looking to profit 
from direct distribution. 


£^S*oZe lines." said Emutor- 
Sfs pSenL. Ed Parte. *<• J* 
niaitved that his clients could save 
from 30 percent to 50 percent by 
Jsirig satellite distribution. Eguato- 
Slses satcUitcs to mrnsmit con- 
tinuously updated information to 


N 


om direct dismouoon. . . J^TraTromnuters End 

-Hudi-speed data transmission on-stte personal comput^. 

according to Raymond Marshall, data locally, Mr. Parker said, 
sertiorvice presitfcnt of technology A host of other raoovntive ser- 
t for Genaal Bectric In- vices is also being developed for 


Com. estimates. Although rnese —gjadons for General Bectric In- vices is also being developed 
satellites are primarily used for in- Services Ccu, which op- satellite distribution, Mernj Lyncn 

uanational and domestic voice and a data-deUvt ' ^ ' 


into a world dominated by data 


rather than words alone. 
Growth in data traffic is four 
times that of speech as business 
finds more and more ways to 
communicate electronically. 
But data needs are not the 
whole story. 

Technology has moved to- 
ward a world dominated by the 
digit, either a zero or one, that 
represents the binary system 
language of the modern-day 
computer. Where once comput- 
er talk was changed into words, 
speech is now being made to 


video transmissions, industry ob- 
servers expect data-ddivery ser- 
vices to continue to account for a 
growing portion of satellite use. 

Proponents of the tedmotogy 
note that by using satellite distribu- 
tion, an information provider can 
bypass telephone switching net- 
works, essentially reducing the 
links in the data-delhrery chain 
and, therefore, minimizing the 
of error. They also claim 


formation Services Co, which op- satellite tustnDuuon. 
erates a data-ddiveiy network that and IBM haved formed 1 menu- 
reaches 750 cities worldwide, using tional Marketneu a joint venture 
three trans-Atlantic and two irons- that will use portions of lire public 


Pacific satellites. 

“Satellites shrink the world for 
us," according to Roger Summit, 
president of Dialog Information 
Services, a subsidiary of Lockheed 
Corp. Dialog's data-ddivery net- 
work provides more than 250 data 
bases to 50,000 subscribers m 71 
countries, Mr. Summit said. 


■;nim in the Unit- 
:Uver stock-market 


ed States to . 

data to personal computers. Televt- 
sion stations in the United Slates 
and Europe use satellites to deliver 
one-way teletext services. And Dig- 

. . ■ »- r „-~T cal aJIiIPC 


tad Equipment Corp- uses satellites 
distribute its priv 


FIUIU tfoS l>M. mip »— ■■ ■ — - 

A anw . of error. They also claim Equatorial Commumcations 
that the inenased data capacity of Services is one of a growing num- 

satellites enables companies to dc- — 

liver a greater quantity of informa- 
tion at a much faster rate. 


to distribute us private videotex 
service to clients in Europe and the 

Far East. __j 0H m WOLFE 


ite bigM«d, error-free Conference Seeks to Define 

J> T11:.- rm'M it nit 


1UC UIWTJpww, . , 

tore of satellite delivery gives it an 


Sharing 

ll liW | >*“ ■ ■ r ■% r ^ w " — ^ — ■ C/ 

U^.-based partnership of Marine * . . 

Managemen t Systems, Lloyds of LONDON — A World Adminis- equator, does not want orbital slots 

London Press and Lloyds Register ^ve Radio Conference is usually allocated in advance to every coun- 
of Ships, uses an Inmarsat satellite a technical affair that few be- try. whether or not they are luceiy 

to deliver port information, techni- ^ specialists are even aware to put any satellites into space, 

cal specifications of vessels and ar- it ^ D \ace. But this year's « Devek^ed countries arjpie Uuit 

■ i,T in chm« 


rivsJd^arture schedules to drips different, for North and South will suSMrS^anmng woffbef ar 
and ports worldwide. Mr. Pfister compete for a fair share of space — too wasteful of the orbit/frequency 
estimates that erf about 20, 000 ships ^ they do not agree on what resource, 
that are candidates for satellite constitutes a fair share. Developing countries are afraid 

communications, about 3,000 are International that unless they are assigned places 


piaoe on reiephemes hiuuri by ^d like computerized “bits 
satellite. The caller dialing New iafonnatiorL “If people want 
York from Geneva, for m- - - ~ - * 


stance, will notice a delay be- 
tween the time he speaks and 
the person at the other end of 
the line hears and responds. 

By 1988. though, that conld 
all change. AT&T is currently 
laying fiber-optic cable under- 
neath the Atlantic Ocean to link 
the United States with France 
and Britain. It is the first trans- 


to talk to each other in the fu- 
ture, well have to make them 
sound like computers," said 
Mr. Lucky. 


oceanic hookup using the glass 
‘ ‘ *i is rapidly becotn- 


fibers, which r — .. - 

ing the preferred long-distance 
t ransmiss ion link in the United 
Slates. Fiber provides nearly 


Digital systems have taken 
over m interoffice communica- 
tions networks and in tire trans- 
mission of both data and voice 
at tire central switching offices 
of the major international tele- 
phone companies. But it has yet 
to replace the conventional ana- 
log technology between central 
switching stations and tire indi- 
vidual telephone handset 


bUUUUIUUWHiwiMf, , . .... 

currently equipped with satellite 

terminals. 


Ulilbuiuiw • **“ ■" *■ L/C VUU]J — 

In the jargon of tire International that unless they are aw?' 
Tdeconummications Union (ITU), in advance, they vnll miss out in 

■ - , - 4 Wo C«inn ennn* communications. 


In addition to data delivery, the 
high capacity of satellites enables 
Mardata to transmit computer pro- 

. . a! *1 .. Ljm. Xln#a4ni<i 


which ^"organizing tire Geneva space communications, becaure 
confeence mAu^^, the purpose when they dojjnttojomthe 

of the talks is to agree on equitable game, there will be no ro °™ 

01 toe uuiu a Twill on y he oossible with more 



Mardata currently has “several 
hundred" corporate clients, who 
pay from $500 to $4,000 per year, 
depending on which data bases are 
chosen and the number of sites that 
can receive the data. 


that use iL 

The industrialized world, which 
already has plenty of communica- 
tions satellites spinning 36,000 ki- 
lometers 122.320 miles) above the 


like the first-come-first- served 
principle on which orbital slots and 
frequencies have been assigned so 


far. 


ANDREW WALLER 


cable project. 
Offidalsj 


raiais justify the high costs by 
citing the added s 


W44U6 services that will 

be available to clients. They see 
optical-fiber cable as the neoessaiy 
infrastructure for the modem in- 


you risk having a flop," Mr. Biin 
said. 

"Everything depends on what 
subscribers want to pay," said 
Frank Aerts, a sales representative 
at Integen, a private cable operat- 
ing company in Antwerp, Belgium. 
More than 90 percent of the homes 
in the Antwerp region are cabled. 


France’s project, adopted Noy. 
3, 1982, is a cornerstone of Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand’s effort 
to shore up the country’s troubled 
electronics industry and launch a 
new era of communications. Brit- 


“TT.I tt»> infrastructure ;or me mouau u*- m me Antwerp rcgjuu 

S U C.bE society. And Eu- pcrtopsttehigtetdeMigofabl; 

most homes JP 1S ropean postal and telecommumca- penetration u Europe. Begun 14 

to doSauthoridg, die PTTs. tiope » yeMW.b' AJitwop od.14 o«- 


“6''- j m ~ tr— — — r 

distribute television aim radio 
grams over copper wire and 
not changed strategies since. 


penetration in Europe. Begun 

uvua — , — r years ago, the Antwerp cable n 

£ capitalize on the increased use of K Sera 16 channels of tetevi- 
^ telecommunications sennas that sion and radio programs, transmit- - m Wcs?Ger. 

thev exsect on the networks. ted over copper wire. Ien v-*™ 5 3 

many. 


West Germany and Sweden, are 
fearful about being inundated with 
foreign programming and advertis- 
ing. Several would Eke to restrict 
foreign programs or adveniang or 
both. But experts warn that »ch 
measures would limit the quality, 
and consequently the success, of 
pay-TV. . . 

“One must argue against politi- 
cal obstacles. . .that worry about 

said Helmut Bauer, bead of 


ted over copper wire. 

“We don t know if our sub- 


they expect on the networks. 

,, ^ss,raS’f5p a «o f fa-fas ^ ^ ^ 

K^ssssftSt KMsss-i--- - 

mSw. the goveraioiB plan don. Modest ambitions are the key, about which no one is qmlc sure, many countries, mcloflmg rrena. 


As with most companies using 
satellite delivery, Mardata has not 
completely forsaken the use of tele- 
phone lines. “We do use land lines 
within a continent," Mr. Pfister 
noted. “For example, all of our 
subscribers in the united States get 
our service through a local tele- 
phone call," using the General 
Electric Information Services 
Corp, data transport network. 

Pergamon Infoline is another in- 
formation company that is gradu- 
ally shifting from telephone to sat- 
ellite delivery. 'Pergamon, which 
provides access to 35 data bases 
housed in a computer in London, is 
the U.S. subsidiary of the Perga- 
mon-BPAA-Mirror Corp., an in- 
ternational information and pub- 
lishing company based in Britain. 
Pergamon specializes in scientific 
data and patent information but it 
plans to add several business data 
bases to its service, accordinj 
Pergamon’ s president, James 
regno. . 

Most of Pergamon s traffic is 
currently over leased telephone 
lines (through networks such as 
Tymnet and Telenet), although. 


CONTRIBIJTORS 


ARTHUR BRODSKY is an associate editor of Commmuiuations 
Daily, a telecommunications newsletter published in Washington 
D.C. by Television DigesL 




JACK BURTON is a Tokyo-based journalist 


WILSON P. DGARD is a research fellow in international commu- 
nications at the Georgetown University Center for Strategic & inter- 
national Studies. 


AMIEL KORNEL is a Paris-based technology writer. 

JONATHAN MULLER is man aging editor of Communicauoas 
. ... i o/^b it. ; c ilia iht> Washington-- based co-editor 



TIM SMART is a Boston-based associate editor of Inc The 
Magazine for Growing Co mp a n i es . 


ANDREW WALLER is an it*™.™-*. 
eminent affairs consultant based in London. He also edits — 
dia. the International Institute of Cammunicatioos magazine 


JOHN WOLFE is associate editor for Cable Vision magazine, a 
news weekly which covers the cable and broadcast television industry. 


E 






.- 0 / 














CO 

Cl 


Electronic telephone exchanges. 
Cable transmission and radio links. 
Undersea cable and satellite 
communicationlinks. 
Micro-electronics. 

Office data communications. 

Data processing services. 

Private telecommunications. 

Mail handling. 

Automation and information systems. 


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Alcatel Thomson 33, rue Emeriau 
75725 Paris Cedex 15 (France) 
T61. (1) 571.10.10 
T61ex 250.927 Paris 

Alcatel Thomson is a 
subsidiary of the CGE group. 


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Statistics Index 

AMEX price* P.u contim rtwat* M» 
AMEX Ww/tewP.lB FIWb rate notes P.T*. 
NYSE erica PM Saw markets P.13 
NYSE hWttflows P.M Interest ram PJ3 
Canadian soda P7o Martms u mmor v P.M 
Cuntocv rain P.13 DptklH P.1S 

Commodities P.U OTC stock . p.17 

Dlvtdsmte PJ6 Other mofketi PTfl 

TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


FUTURES AM OPTIONS 


New Eurodollar Options 
Will Be Settled in Cash 


** rt«: ..... ■ mi < 

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t 

t, \ !m, ; lf| ^Pjsi- 

it u ••.*.: -it '•"• 

* V.«kr:-_. '“^w 

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t r *-L',K .«• 

LllJI, ^c-f . ... V ^ V 

«Ulari.,i P|iM . 

»XW ®4v , P :- : P „ 

111 I.* rtr.. . 

. :£>' 

I -i-.i 

eeks to D e fin ( 

^paee Sharif 

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v “*!- 

:* -.i* 


those traded in Europe; that is, t tey cannot be exercised before 

the contract's expiration date. As Nicolas A. Giordano, president 

of the parent exchange, ex- 

plained: “We chose a Europe- __ p j n 
an-style EnrodoQar option be- iQ6 cOTOaOilAT 
cause 60 percent of our r -*™ D 

volume in foreign exchange M8rket W38 

options comes from overseas inadvertently 

hedgers and traders. Given the * 

huge amounts of Eurodollars * created by MOSCOW. 

now being traded overseas, we 

expect a similar large percent- 
age of our options business to nrigin«ie there as wdOT* 

While, technically speaking. Eurodollars are dollars held by 
foreigners, they axe basically bookkeeping transactions between 
leaders and borrowers all over the world. Thus few, if any, of 
these funds, which are estimated to total at least $2 trillion, ever 
actually change hands 

E SSENTIALLY, there are three kinds of Eurodollars. One 
is a form of “call money" that has no fixed maturity and 
which the lender can withdraw on one day's notice. Anoth- 
er consists of negotiable certificates of deposit that are issied in 
bearer farm, normally in units with a face value of SI n-nHinn 
“What we are trading are options on the thud form, $1 million 
90-day time deposits placed in the Eurodollar market by lenders 
around the globe," said Arnold F. Staloff, president of the 
Philadelphia- Hoard rtf Trade 

Despite the huge amounts involved, the buyer of these Euro- 
dollar options will still caily pay a relatively small premi um for 
the right, without any obligation, to buy or sell the value repre- 
sented by the option at a fixed price for a specified period of time. 

Because no Eurodollars actually change hands, the options 
that are exercised are settled in cash, with the buyer holding a 
profitable contract getting the -difference between the agreed 
“strike price" at the time of purchase and its value at expiration. 

“The Philadelphia options add a new dimension not only to the 
enormous global cash market in Eurodollars, but also to the 


t WV--T :.V, 

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Wi'KM'UiiijJ 


wnm> 




W.-.V. v 


Currency Rates 


•*r~: - 

• u . 


Late interbank rales on May 13 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Bnjssds, Frankfurt, WScri, Pam. New York rates at 
2P.M. 


Amsterdam 

Brunei* (a> 
PrmHwt 
Lowfoa (JM 


7AOJS 

\ 0775* 

9MU 11J7 
2S1JS 31M9 
15Y15 12518 

a.7742 a m ? 

*mw amst 


OJA. F JF. 

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20.m 6JW5 

J278 ■ 

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C3M4 209.12 
XB73 9J773 
*iw* — 
BUZ 2071 
84.17 • 27J4" 

11MK U2? 

3X0663 tJZIU 


ILL. GMT. BJ=. 

W77» SAT 

3.1535* 17X295 

U<7 k Basis* 4MB 1 
343U5- 42313 77445 

56&4B 3L7S6 

34725 4UB 

47795 X trees 15.147* 
TIBI* 7129 48548* 
0.OT4* 74425* 4J743* 
14215B 2J2U 410431 

LKS14D 34S4B 4LDSI 


5J=. Yen 
134-13 -13040 r 
218925 2472* 
UK7D* IJB>* 
315X0 
75771 7X25 

Z5BE 25135 
34237455* 

9S95 

TX299* 

1X841 182S42 
ism 269334 


- *, coneoci 

Eauiv. 

0J937 AHtraeoel 


0736 CaaodtaaS 
0JB91 DaeMlraie 


Par 

Dollar Values 

< Pm- 

i 

Per 

US* 


UJ&5 

Btete. CBm * CV 

U77 

. IMIS 

LOOTS trims 

asm 

04502 Stagoportl 

2721 

I 2U0 

8*01 MrsaflllMM. 

M1J0 

ISO* k African rood 1.MZ7 

: *2*0 

uoa KuwaBI (floor 

03025 

00012 S. Korean «a 

B3U3 

urn 

MOW Matev.riMBtt 

2X285 

OJffiS* SMLNHM 

17VJ5 

11725 

0,1134 Nww.kn» 

sms 

(Lim SteMLItroaa 

VJJ42S 

US! 

0JB« PWLpan 

VJU3 

DJBS1 Tatvraal 


1345V 

MOM PartascaSD 

inn 

00372 TM bate 

2SJ8I 

778 

0777 Mttelrivd 

XSKD 

03723 UJLE. Aiten 14728 


.IV * ' 


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> Ui.N-’- 


Aim HMgKMi 778 0777 UaAriVtf X6KQ 4U733 IULE.OrtaM 14728 

* Start tag: 1715 Irish E 

(a> commercial tninc lb) Amount* aeecM to bav ontaoani (cj Amamts needefl la binr am dollar (*) 
Unit* of 100 (kl UnHs oi 1X00 M Units of 18X08 
NJL: net quoM; NA: not avaliam. 

Source*: Banautr a u Bmrmtvx (Bnamtsi; Boiko Commorcblo ItaBaaa (MBant; Chemical 
Bank (Mow Yorki: Bourn* National Or Ports t Parts},- IMF (SDR); Banooo Arobe ot 
international d'lweoHssoment (dinar, rlytH. cOritan). Other data from Reuters oodAP. 


Interest Rates 


'^Eurocurrency Deposits 


May 13 


o Mark Franc 


SMM9 F ran c 


1M. 

8h 

- IV. 

Sto 

-Ste 

4 Hi 

-4% 

12 ft- 12 W 

IBft-TOft 

m 

- w 

2M. 

SVfc 

- BU. 

svs 

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4*W 

- tVi 

T2>ft- 12 Vk 

Wft - 10ft 

Vft 

- V ft 

ML 

Ih 

- 115 

Ste 

- M 

4 V. 

-3ft 

12ft - 12ft 

ie» - wft 

Vft 

- Vft 

4NL 

BHi 

•M 

5 IS. 


3 

•9k 

121W- 12ft 

10ft- 10 ft 

m 

- 9Vi 

1Y. 

W* 

- fV. 

5V. 

- 5 VS. 

3 

-5ft 

lift- ra*. 

10 ft- 10ft 

Vft 

- Vft 


Rates a^tJaMe to Mfertan* frptotts of Si million mtatmum tor woutYOtent). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF, PaunA FFJ; Uords Bonk (ECU); Beaten 
(SDR). 


Asian Dollar Rates » 


2 not. 
IK -ah 


4HM& 
Sh -B’h 




Source: Beaten. 


Key Money Rates 

r ^ United Sbrtes a 

• ^ bbcoum Rale 
rueral Fundi 

Frlma Rota I 

Broker Loan Rate 
Comm. Potter, 3D-T79 dm - 
aknonth Treasury Bills 
O^nonlti Treasury Bflli 
COY 3049 day* 

Cm 40*9 davs 




Lombard Rot* 
OnnM Rote 
One Moniti Interbank 
NnHli Interbank 
ft-montn interbank 

France 

^Naervention Rote 

i '-<44111 Money 
! One men W i Interbank 
34 WMH H Interbank 


- Sources: Reuters, Commerzbank, CnkffiLY- 

- ah note. Uoyds Bank. Batik Of TMm 


Clast 

Pro*. 

0 

8 

Bft 

Oft 

Wft 

10ft 

9 

f 

• too 

SJOS 

7 JO 

772 

7M 

737 

1JA 

745 

743 

770 

UK 

630 

wo 

340 

SJ0 

340 

SM 

570 

6M 

6H 

10ft 

tow 

Wft 

10 

TO 1/16 10 1/H 

TOM 

- 18ft 

W 

10 


BritsiB 

Bank Base Rate 
Call Money- 
01-day Treasury BKt 
3-monlh Interbank 

Japan 

Discount Rate 
Call Money . 

«Xlav interbank 


GtJdPrices 


Heralh^t^^ribunc. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 14 

Page 13r 


By HJ. MAIDENBEBG 

New York Tima Senice 

N EW YORK— Another dimenrion has just been added 
to the booming Eurodollar marketby the Philadelphia 
Board of Trade, a new unil of the Philadelphia Stock 
Exchange, which begian trading its version of Eurodol- 
lar options. Unlike the Eurodollar options traded mi the Chfcfl gp 
Mercantile Exchange , the HiHaddphda contracts that ramw*. into 
being last Friday will be settled in rath, rather than through the 
delivery of a corresponding futures contract. 

Perhaps more important, the new options are fashioned after 

|L... 1 1 - T— — ‘ _ - . I J < ■ 


dons at Lasser Marshall IncL, a unit of Mercantile House Group 
of London, the leading international broker in foreign exchange 
and Eurodollars. 

Mr. BUn, when he was a professor of economics at Northwest- 
ern University, in. Evanston, Illinois, desi gne d Chicago’s Euro- 
dollar futures contract,, which is now second only to Treasury 
bonds in financial futures trading volume. 

“The expansion of the various exchange-traded Eurodollar 
instruments will also help the far much larger and rapidly 
expanding ‘upstairs’ market in these funds," Mr. Blm added. “As 
the upstairs cash market grows, the banks and other big institu- 
tions will need to lay of? increasing amounts of risk they are 
assuming each day. The Eurodollar futures and options can help 
in this respect" ‘ ’ 

By “upstairs;” Mr: Blunfts inferring- to the huge amounts of ! 
Eurodollars that are lent borrowed' and 'traded each day in 
financial centers around the world. These transactions are for 
cash, with the funds exchanged electronically among the trading 
institutions. 

What is actually being trading in the upstairs rash Eurodollar 
(Continued on Page 19, CoL 4) 


Overseer 
Is Named 
For Thrift 

Talks Don’t Stop 
Run in Maryland 

United Press International 

BALTIMORE — A judge 
named a conservator on Monday to 
take over Maryland's second-larg- 
est savings and Iran association af- 
ter lengthy negotiations failed to 
stem a ran on deposits. 

For .the fifth day in a row on 
Monday, hundreds of depositees 
lined up to retrieve their money at 
the Ola Court Savings & Loan, 
despite a 51,000 withdrawal limit 
per month on rv’t’ account under 
the conservatorship plan. 

Reports of a management shake- 
up prompted the run of S 1 5 million 
in withdrawals at the privately in- 
sured savings and loan, which ini- 
tially honored up to 51,000 in cash 
withdrawals ana provided the bal- 
ance in cashier’s checks. 

Old Court executives held exten- 
sive negotiations on the weekend 
with Maryland Savings-Sbare In- 
surance Corp„ other thrifts and the 
governor’s lop aides to avert a take- 
over by a conservator. 

Bui after a private rescue at- 
tempt faded, the state filed a peti- 
tion Sunday to allow MSS1C to 
oversee Old Court while, the thrift 
reviews offers to sell or merge. 

MSSIC is a private corporation 
that oversees Maryland’s state- 
chartered savings and loans. 

Late Sunday. Attorney General 
Stqihen Sadis went to the home of 
Baltimore Circuit Judge Martin 
Greenfeld, who signed the court 
order early Monday. 

Aides to Governor Harry 
Hngbes said he knew of the diffi- 
culties at Old Court, which lists 
assets of 5839 milium , before he ' 
left Saturday for the Middle East 
Mr. Hughes approved the papas 
needed for a possible takeover of 
Old Court ana gave Mr. Sadis the 
nod fra a criminal investigation in- 
volving the thrift’s lop officers be- 
fore he left, rides said 
When ihe thrift crisis showed no 
sign erf abatement, the governor de- 
rided to Oy home Monday. 

Reports of a management shake- 
up at Old Court first circulated 
Thursday, and -one day later cus- 
tomers learned that the attorney 
general's office planned to investi- 
gate passible conflicts of interest 
involving top officers. 

On Friday, Oid Court borrowed 
funds from the Federal Reserve- 
State and federal officials are ex- 
amining all 102 Maryland state- 
chartered savings and loans. 

Dollar Declines 
In Europe on 
InterestFears 

The Associated Press 

LONDON —The dollar fell 
Monday against most major 
currencies m moderately active 
foreign exchange trading in Eu- 
rope. 

Currency dealers said the 
dollar’s decline was abetted by 
expectations that U.S. interest 
rates may be headed lower. 
Rates have general^ fallen in 
the past month, and recent re- 
ports in d i ct* tmg that UB. eco- 
nomic growth may be slowing 
have been interpreted by some 
as a sign that rales have room to 
falL 

Dealers said, however, that 
there appeared to be little lin- 
gering effect in the currency 
markets from the Senate ap- 
proval last Friday of a defiat- 
rednetion package. 

In late trading in London on 
Monday, Lhe pound gained 
against the dollar. It was at 
$1,254, compared with SI .2353 
in late trading Friday. 

In other late trading in Eu- 
rope, the dollar was at 3.084 
Deutsche marks, down from 
3.1286 Friday; at 9.404 French 
francs, down from 9521, and at 
2J915 Swiss francs, down from 
2.6255. 


An Industry Aumh: Oil Producers Sweden RlUSCS 

Aren’t Yet in the Cl ear, Experts Say Interest Rates, 

York Tima Sorta Average WcM i ead Price -n • p j# 

LOS ANGELES -One after another, the big for IMted Stale* ClUCfe OH K PfilllPTfi V iTV^fll ■ 

U.S. oil companies have been farced to react to IaR. iV/l/O V*l- V\AJH» 


By Thomas C Hayes 

New York Tima Safi ce 

LOS ANGELES — One after another, the tig 
U.S. til companies have been forced to react to 
cheaper ofl. 

Their moves have included desperate mergers by 
Gulf Oil Corp. with Qwvron Corp. and by Getty 
Oil Co. with Texaco Inc. to escape takeovers; stock 
repurchase programs by Exxon Corp. and Amoco, 
and major restructuring by Atlantic Richfield Co_ 
which will dose some businesses and ' pare back 
others. 

The recent an nouncement by Mobil Corp. that 
it would jettison its troubled retailing nmt, Mont- 
gomery ward, by transferring ownership directly 
to its stockholder, madeMobu one of the latest of 
tbe oil gran ts to embark on a significant rearrange- 
ment of its assets. 

Although the responses have varied, they all 
represent efforts by an industry hobbled by too 
much oil, too much refining capacity, too many 
people and too little current promise in its basic 
business — the search for ofl. As far-reaching as 
the restructuring moves appear to be, experts say 
there will be more. 

“Tbe downturn in prices that began in 1983 
looks IHff. the be ginning of a decade-long process,” 
said Thomas A. Petrie, a managing director and 
senior til analyst with Fust Boston Carp- in 
Denver. “That leaves managers to conclude that 
there are profound differences in the way they 
jh ^m iH run their business." 

Many in the industry poiut to T. Boone Pickens, 
chairman of Mesa Petroleum Ctx, as the ubiqui- 
tous agent behind the change that are jarring the 
industry. He battled Gulf, was an early agitator at 


Price in 1 967 constant 


dollars; per 


42-gallon 
barrel 



*73 *73 *77 *73 *31 -’S3 ’34" 

* American Petroleum Institute estimate 
Sources: U.S . Energy Information 
Administration, American Petroleum 
Institute 

Getty, and pursued Great American, Superior Oil 
Co. and Cities Service into the arms of friendly 
acquirers. 

He also initiated the original bid that forced the 
restructuring erf Phillips Petroleum, a bid later 
pursued by Carl C I calm, the financier. But while 
Mr. Pickens appears to have played a key role in 
the industry’s restructuring, some analysis main- 
tain that the drama probably would have occurred 
sooner or later, even without him. 

“Tbe til industry is maturing, and it needs 
(Coofinaed on Page 19, CoL 1) 


By Juris Kaza 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Tbe Swedish 
government raised interest rates 
sharply on Monday and imposed 
stiff consumer credit restrictions in 
an attempt to cool the economy 
and reduce currency outflows that 
have been weakening the krona. 

The Bank of Sweden boosted its 
discount rate to 11.5 percent from 
95 percent and raised tbe penalty 
lending rate charged on discount 
borrowing above certain quotas to 
16 percent from 13 5 percent. 

The credit restrictions an- 
nounced by Finance Minister 
Kjdl-CXof Fddi make it considera- 
bly more difficult and costly to buy 
new cars and to purchase consumer 
goods on credit or installment 
plans, and they will increase 
monthly home mortgage payments 
for many Swales. 

Government and central bank 
officials said the measures were 
necessary to stem large currency 
outflows in recent weeks that may 
have resulted from a decline of in- 
ternational confidence in the Swed- 


Foreign Cigarette Firms Seek More Sales in Japan 

Tokyo Monopoly Ends in Theory, But Outsiders Remain Cautious on New Moves 


By Susan Chira 

New York Tima Service 

TOKYO — The president of Ja- 
pan’s fanner tobacco monopoly 
trooped over to tbe Ministry of 
Finance the other day bearing two 
blown-up stock certificates. He 
bowed, handed over the two mil- 
ium shares that represent his com- 
pany’s capital, and Japan Tobacco 
Inc. was officiall y dedared a pri- 
vate company. 

The mief ceremony told much 
about the company bom from the 
81-year-old monopoly — and 
about the challeng es facing foreign 
manufacturers in a newly liberal- 
ized tobacco market. 

Although Japan Tobacco is in 
theory a private company capital- 
ized at $40(1 million, the govern- 
ment still holds its shares, and no 
dale for pubHc sale has been set. hs 
monopoly has ended in theory but 
it continues to prodnoe, sell and 
distribute ail domestic tobacco 
products. 

For yean, tobacco has been a 
potent trade issue, with foreign 
makers contending that they were 


all but shut out of Japan's nearly 
512-billion tobacco market Until 
1981. foreign cigarette manufactur- 
ers could only advertise in English- 
language publications. Until 1980, 
only 20,000 of Japan’s 260,000 re- 
tail tobacco outlets were allowed to 
sell foreign cigarettes. And until 
last month, foreign makers could 
distribute their products only 
through the tobacbo monopoly. 

As of April 1, foreign makers 
were free to distribute and sell their 
products independently, even if in 
the domestic market a monopoly 
still exists in all but name. 

Although U.S. trade officials and 
foreign makers welcome the easing 
of restrictions, it is still not dear 
Just how much things have 
changed, or the extent to which 
foreign companies can expand 
their 2-percent share of the market 
- iThe feding in the United Slates 
may be that we’ve establis h ed a 
beachhead — let’s send in the Mar 
lines and dean up” said Guy R. 
Advoet, vice president of Philip 
Morris Asia Iixx, which has about 
75 percent of the foreign cigarette 


market in Japan. “WeD, we're still 
pinned down on the beaches." 

To get further inland, foreign 
companies must overcome several 
obstacles. They mil have to com- 
pete for a dwindling market — the 
number of Japanese smokers 
dropped to 32.9 million last year, 
from 35 million in 1974. 

Japan is no longer the paradise 

Japan’s trade surplus with die 
United States was a record 
S3 j 46 bilfion in April Page 19. 

for smokers that it race was — (he 
result of a vigorous nonsmokers' 
rights campaign. It is still true that 
the amount of smoke in the average 
bullet train car would choke some- 
one in an oxygen mask, bnt pres- 
sure recently produced a second 
nonsmoking car for the trains. 

Foreign cigarettes also cost more 
here than Japanese cigarettes — in 
part, foreign makers say; because 
local taxes make it difficult for 
them to reduce prices, although tar- 
iffs are the same here as in the 


United States. Japanese cigarettes, 
with the delightful nam es of Peace, 
Cherry and Caster range from 68 
cents to 96 cents in voiding ma- 
chines; foreign dgarettes from 
$1.12 to $1.20. Moreover, prices 
must be approved by the Ministry 
of Finance, although such approval 
has been automatic so far. 

Japanese preference for char- 
coal-filter, as opposed to menthol 
dgarettes also increases manufac- 
turing costs and helps keep prices 
high. 

American officials and foreran 
makers had urged that Japan To- 
bacco be stripped of its monopoly 
over domestic manufacturing and 
sales, arguing that such control al- 
lowed the company considerable 
price advantages. But their pleas 
were blocked by a formidable lob- 
by, the 80,000-strong tobacco 
farmers of Japan. 

Although their numbers are few, 
the tobacco fanners are backed by 
various agricultural groups that 

( C o ntinue d on Page 15, CoL 1) 


ish economy and the Datum’s cur- 
rency. 

Swedish businesses will be rfer 
q aired to deposit excess liquidity in 
blocked accounts with the Bank of 
Sweden in two payments in August 
and in January 1986 to cool the 
high pace of corporate investment 
that is pumping money into the 
Swedish economy and abroad, as 
companies repay foreign debts. 

The credit restrictions are ex- 
pected to virtually halt new-car 
sales by requiring a 50-percem cash 
deposit ana a maximum 12-month 
installment payment. In addition, 
excise taxes on new cars will double 
to 3,000 to 4,000 kronor ($330 to 
$440). The hardest hit will be auto- 
mobile importers, because domes- 
tic sales account for a relatively 
small proportion of Volvo's and 
Saab's profits from auto sales. 

Economists said Prime Minister 
Olof Palme’s government was tak- 
ing an election-year risk by hitting 
at voters’ pocket books at a time 
when the Social Democrats were 
running just about even with oppo: 
si tion parties in opinion polls. 

Nils Lundgren, chief economist 
of PKbanken. the state-owned 
commercial bank, predicted that 
the increases in the interest rate 
would drive consumer prices up 
about 1 percent, passing the gov- 
ernment target of 3-percent infla- 
tion in all of 1985 by the end of 
May.- 

Lars Vinefl, chief economist of 
the Federation of Swedish Indus- 
tries, said the government measures 
would probably succeed in the 
short term but stressed, “Our prob- 
lems are everything but short 
term." 

As long as Sweden does not take 
measures to reduce the size of its 
public sector and to relieve tax 
pressure on individual incomes,; 
“this carries the risk that we will get. 
into a new vicious cycle" of dang- 
wages and declining competitive 1 -, 
ness, he said. 

Mr. Feldt said a continuing 
strike by about 20,000 white-collar 
government employees “played a 
major role" in the measures an- 
nounced by the Bank of Sweden 
and the government. He asserted 
that reserve outflows had acceler- 
ated sharply on May 2, the day the 
strike began. The action cut off air 
traffic to Sweden and slowed cus- 
toms clearance. 

The government workers are 
striking to get compensation this 
year for wage raises obtained in the. 
private sector in 1984. 


Unilever Increased Profit 13% in First Quarter 

By Bob Hagerty ever PLC, the British arm, dhnbed cut $20 million from Unilever's Brooke acquisition increased inter- 

Iraernatianai HcraS Tribune 15 pence to close at £11.70 apiece profit in the quarter. est costs to £60 million from £41 


LONDON — Unilever PLCs on the Loadon Stock Exchange. 


a downturn in the Unhed States, don-based tea and food company market 
the British-Dutch food and soap bought last October for £389 mQ- In Europe, 


giant reported Monday. 


lion. Analysts estimated that 14 percent. 


Pretax profit totaled £218 mil- Brooke; net of interests costs asso- Brooke Bond and a strong perfor- But the outlook is clouded by 
lion ($273 mOHonX,^ from £193 dated with the acquisition, kicked mance from chemicals. But profit exchange-rate gyrations, a recoil 


ofit m the quarter. . est costs to £60 million from £41 

At the same time, Unflever faced million. 

avy costs to promote its new For the full year, Richard Work- 

luggle fabric softener and Sun- man of Wood, Mackenzie & Co. 

ht dishwasher soap in tbe UJS. predicted pretax profit of £1 .03 bil- 

irkeL lion, up from 1984's £924 milium. 

In Europe, operating profit rose which represented a 20-percent in- 

i percent. Unilever credited crease from 1983. 

ooke Bond and a strong perfor- But the outlook is clouded by 


- millio n a year earlier. Net profit m £20 millkm at the j 
increased 12 percent to £105 m3- Aside from Brooke 
lkm from £94 million, and sales lookiagamuchgrowi] 
grew 24 percent to £4J3 bfflum said John Parker, an z 
from £3.82 bOIko. Loudon stockbrokers 

In line with its usual practice, mg, Newson-Smith ft 
Unflever computed the latest re- In North America, l 
stilts and the year-carher compari- operating profit was ‘ 


in £20 rmHion at the pretax leveL from margarine declined in the face fall in tea 


Aside from Brooke, “We’re not of the European Community’s dis- that Unilever wili incur heavy pro- 


much growth here at all," count sales of surplus butter. Oil motional costs by launchii 
Parker, an analyst at tbe mining profit also shrank in Eu- detergent powder in the 


REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL UJS. $ BONDS 

MS 

BONOS NOMINAT1VOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries to: 
CH -1003 LAUSANNE 

2 JRoe de In Paix, 
Telex: 25869 . 

TeL: 021/20 1741 - 


SOUS using exchange rates prevail- lower" 
ing last Dec. 31. Based on March 31 profit squeeze reflects a fierce mar- business in such markets as India 
rate*, net profit totaled £98 nuffion, keting contest between Unilever’s and Pakistan. Analysts said the im- 
or 26. 11 pence a share, up 4 percent Lever Brothers unit and its bluest proved performance also reflected 
from £94 minimi , or 25.04 pence a rival, Procter & Gamble Co. Uml- economic recovery in the Third 
share. ever is spending heavily on promo- World. 

The results were broadly in Kne tion to defend its Whisk Squid In addition, Unilever said it ben- 
with expectations. Shares of linn- laundry detergent against P&G’s efiied From the sale of a “trade 

— new liquid version of Tide. One investment” in a French company, 

— - analyst estimated that this skirmish which was not identified. The 


Loudon stockbrokerage erf Field- rope. 

mg, Newson-Smith ft U). Outside of Europe and North 

In North America, Unilever said, America, sales and profit rose sub- 
operating profit was “significantly stantially. The gain was partly due 
lower" despite higher sales. The to Brooke, which has a sizable tea 
prefit squeeze reflects a fierce mar- business in such markets as India 


States later this year. 


or 26. 11 pence a share, u 
from £94 million, or 25 
share. 


The Daily 
Source for 
International 
Investors. 






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COMPAGNEE FINANClCRE DE CR&DXT 
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Tbe COMFAGIE FINANCT&RE DE CREDIT INDUSTRIE!. ET 
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The coupon paid for the "tifresp«ticipari& w is based on the Annual Monqr 
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their equity beae. The finds collected on tin occamon and those which ware 
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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


Own High Low Lot dig. 
<ndui 1277*1 120XS7 124IL77 127750 + 1X2 

Tram eia.47 62223 612.93 a 1756 * ox3 

util 159 >7 1605-1 1JBJ53 15355 — (L33 

comp 52£M 527.12 520 JV 5ZUU + 0 41 




NYSE Jndey 


Previous Tadav 

High Low Close 3 PJW. 
10*53 10*56 106*4 10*70 

121.03 120.77 121*0 NA 

10055 98 95 99 JO NA 

54X7 5457 J&W NA 

114.12 1 15.0* 115.98 N-A. 



Close 

Pro*. 

Advanced 

074 

1233 

Declined 

674 

393 

Unchanged 

479 

,382 

Tetoi Issues 

2027 

2008 

New Hiatts 

122 

194 

New lows 

9 

11 




Buy Soles *Sh*rt 

Aav 10 207.699 488+59 ZJOSO 

Aav 9 180J013 4I4J69 1.741 

Karl Ifl4.«8 30.104 4« 

*CV 7 795504 411501 2-753 

toy 6 183603 437,983 4654 

Included In the sain floures 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up lo Hie dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I Li The Associated Press 


MW l* AAR O U 13 341 17W 16 s ! 17 — lb 
n 9% AGS 13 29 IS 14% IS + % 

17JS Mb AMCA 7 IIU 11W Il'A + V 

21 W 13V AMF JSO 25 57 939 JO 19% 20 

51% 9. A tt£ Dt 4 - , S" 50 50% 50% 50% 

4470 24V AMR 10 3857 45 44% 44% — Ik 

3% lBH AMR pi 2.10 1M 247 20% 20 ZO^l + »b 

25% 22% ANRpf 2*7 108 2 34% 24% J4% — W 

l*!* tie APL 45 70 igw 10 10% + % 

55U. 4440 ASA 200 U 873x 53% 52’- 53V +1% 
27 14% AVX 33 2D H 10*5 16V MW J4% — % 

24% 1* AZP 272 11* 7 799 J3% 23V 23W 4- % 

54 36% AbtLab 1*0 2* 1$ 1032 53% S3 53 Hi 

25% 17 Accawd 9 *4 20 17 141 21% 21% 21% 

21% 12% AcmeC *0 28 II 14% 14V» 14ta — Vl 

10W 7% AcmoE 32b 4.1 TO 51 7% 7% 7% 


NYSE Stocks Edge Upward 


low 7% ACfTWE 212b 4.1 TO 
J7% 15 AdoEk l.»2oll* 

70 1179 AdmMl 32 11 i 

19W 8% AdvSVS sa 4.9 IS 

41% 2S% AMD 12 

12% 6% Advnst .13 IJ 

MW 5% Aerfkw II 


11 14% 14 % 141b — Vl 
» 51 Ik 7H 7<i 

61 16% 16% 16% 

* 5* 15% 15W 15W — lb 

18 29 IB** 10W ItPb + % 

12 3993 Mtb 28% 30% —IV 

149 9% 96b 9*5 

II 87 12% 12% 12% + % 


45% 37% APtnLI 264 5.9 33 2518 45W 44% 44% — W 


SBIh 53% AetL Pf SJOolQJ 


18 55% 55% 55% + % 


35 1$% Ahmra 130 3* 14 803 35% 34% 35% 4- % 

3% 3W AJIeen 22 23 2% 2% 2% 

52 38% AlrPrcl 130 23 11 407 52 51% 51%— % 

24% 1] Alr&Frl 40 29 12 49 20% TOW 20% — W 

2 1 AiMoas 23 300 1% 1% 1% + Vi 

32% 28% a: pi A 192 12 J 7 32% 31% 32% 4- % 

8 6 AloPdpf 4J7 11* 23 7% 7W 7%— % 

79W 63W AloPpf 9*4 T1X A20z 81 79W 79% + W 

71 S3 AlaPnt 816 11 J 11310x70 ** *9W +1 

15 11 Atones 144 7* 8 *3 14% 14 14W 

22% 9% AlskAIr .14 4 9 331 23% 22% 22% — lb 

I7W I0W Atbrtoi J8 2* 18 28 16% 16 16 

31% 22% AfMsns .74 25 13 90 31% 30% 31 — % 

31% 23% Alcan 140 4J 13 747 25% 25% 26% + % 

36 Mi 27% AlcoStd 140 35 12 12 34% 34 34% + % 

32 17 AlexAU Ifl M 88 29% 29 79 — % 

7*W 29% Atexdr 19 47 23% 23 23 

89W 78% AtleCp 2461 24 24 53 79% 78% 78% — % 

26% 23 AleCppI 24* 108 17 26% 26% 2Mb 

28% IBV AlBlnl 1*0 54 35 741* 24 24% 

20 15% Attlnpt 2.19 11.1 14 19% 19% 19% + lb 

94% 81 Alol PtClIJS 17.1 14 93 92% 92% + % 

31% 244b AllflPw 27D 85 9 452 31% 31% 31% + % 

20% 1S% AltaiG XOb 12 14 3* 19 18% 18% 


12 49 20% TOW 20% — W 

23 308 1% 1% 1% + % 

7 321* 31% 32% +• % 
a 7% 7W 74b — 6b 
620z 81 79W 79% + W 

11319i 70 6* *9W 4-1 

8 *3 141m 14 14% 

9 331 22% 224b 22% — lb 

IB 26 1613 16 16 

13 90 31V IB*, 31 — V 

13 747 25% 25% 26% + Ui 

12 12 34% 34 34% + % 

88 29% 29 79 — % 

19 47 23% M 23 

24 S3 79% 78% 78*. — 4b 

17 76% 26% 2Mb 

35 24% 24 24% 

14 19% 19% 19% 4- % 

14 93 92% 92% + % 

9 452 31% 31% 31% + % 

14 3* 19 18% 18% 


44*. 2BV AlldCP Ui- 40 9 1 258 444b 44U. 44%— % 

*6 53% AldCp p! 6J4 10.4 *7 64% 644b *4% + % 

113% 99 AMCp PI12X0 1U B 109 1084b 1C8V + % 

107W10IH* AldCpf 1241*1 1J 1 1044b 104% 104% 4- % 

Z3% 12% AlldPd 17 99 19 1B4* 18%— % 

59% IB AlfdSAr 2.12 19 8 403 S5 54% 55 + H 

12% 5% AllbOi 34 7 6% 6% 

34% 24 AlhCrt 11 30 79% 29*. 

27% 70 ALLTL 1*4 49 9 104 26% 26% 264b + % 

39% 2941 Alcoa 1J0 3* 17 1198 33% 33 33U. + % 

23% 15% Amax 3D 1.2 1747 1AW 16% 14% + % 


*6 53% AldCp pi A74 10.4 67 64% 64% *4% + lb 

113% 99 AMCp PF12X0 11J B 109 108%1C8% + % 

07% 100% AldC pf I2J1911J J 1044b 1044b 104% + % 

Z3% 12% AlldPd 17 99 19 1S4* 18%— W 

S9W 3B AlfdSAr 112 19 8 403 55 54% 55 + V, 

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41% 32% Amax pf 100 9P 2 33% 33% 33% 

34 22% AmHea 1.10 3* 22 3491 30% 29% 30% + % 

44 R3% A Has p/ 150 24 1 114 134 734 


1B7 2 1% 17b— % 

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2% lVi Am Aar 1B7 2 1% 1% 

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to 53 ABrand 3.90 5.9 9 422 *5% *5% 65% 

27% 24% ABrd pf 2J5 1O0 3 27% 27% 27% 

115 55% ABdeH 1*0 15 17 5OS>a09%lO9 109 

2616 19% ABIdM 3* JJ 13 23 26 2* 26 

55% 40% AmCan iro 5* 11 227 53% 53% S3% 

2*41 21% ACanpf 2L80 11.1 17 25% 24W 25% 

48 36 ACanpf M 63 4 47% 47% 47% 

111% 103 AConnl 13J5 12J 599 112% 111% 113U. 

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31% 25% ACanCv 251 b BJ 18 29 28% 28% 


CcmpihJ hi- Our 5iu// From Ptspaicha 

NEW YORK — Prices on ihe New York 
Stock Exchange edged upward Monday, build- 
ing on last week’s rally. 

The Dow Jones average or 30 industrials, up 
3o.94 Iasi week, rose another .55 to 1.274.73 an 
hour before the close. 

Gainers held a 5-4 lead over losers among 
New York Stock Exchange-listed issues. 

Analysis said investors were still optimistic 

Although prices in (tiNes on these pages are 
from the 4 PM. close in iVew York, for rime 
reasons this article is based on the market ai J 
PM. 

about the chances for paigress toward shrinking 
the federal budget deficit. 

Late last week the Senate passed a Republi- 
can-sponsored budget plan containing many 
spending reductions. 

Wall Streeters will be watching closely this 
week as the House of Representatives, where 
Democrats have some very different ideas, goes 
to work on its version of a budget proposal. 

If some significant action is taken on that 
front, analysts reason, the Federal Reserve will 
be more inclined to relax its credit policy, en- 
couraging interest rates to decline. One move in 
that direction might be a cut in the Fed's dis- 
count rate, the charge it sets on loans to private 
financial institutions. 

But some cautious observers warn that the 
market might be vulnerable to selling by disap- 
pointed traders should events not follow that 
script. 

Brokers also said the temptation was strong 


for some traders to take profits after the rise of 
such broad market indicators as the Standard & 
Poor’s 500-slock composite index to record 
highs at the end of last week. 

The NYSE’s composite index rose .06 to 
106.70. At the American Stock Exchange, the 
market value index was up .02 at 228.19. 

Volume on the Big Board came to 71.79 
million shares with an hour to go. 

Pan American World Airways was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue unchanged at 5 H. 

IBM was second, up to to 130V*. 

Arco (ex-dividend) was third, off H to 60%. 

In other petroleums. Unocal was off to 
4554. Exxon was up to to 50to. Mobil was ofr to 
tom. 

National Semiconductor was off Vi to 11H 
and AT&T was unchanged at 22to, both in 
active trading. 

General Sectric was off '■« to 601* after 
pleading guilty in Philadelphia Monday to 108 
counts of cheating the government out of 
S800.000 in costs For the Minuteman missile. 

Jack Eckerd was unchanged at 22?s. 

Digital Equipment was up % to 106. The 
company is expected lo announce Tuesday a 
computer line, the Micro VAX II. aimed at the 
engineering market. 

Data General was up to jo 39--s while Cray 
Research was off 1 to 77. 

Pharmaceuticals were gaining. Syntex (ex- 
dividend) was up to to 60 to. Pfizer was up V* to 
47to. Merck & Co. 7« to 102to. Bristol Myers to 


56% 43% ACvon 1 JO V 12 1389 . 52 
29% 18% ADT .92 37 25 75 25 


17 25% 24% 25% * % 

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599 112% 111% 113% 4- % 

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29% 18% ADT .92 37 25 75 75 24% 25 

21% 15% AElPw 2JUGKL5 8 1980 21% 214b 21% 

46 25 Am EXP 138 Z8 16 2914 45% 45% 4$%— % 

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12 Month 

HICiiLOW 5:oc.l 


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27% 14% AWatrs 1X0 38 


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21% 15% ArdiDn ,|4b 7 14 949 21 


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102 79 ArfPPl 10J9 107 

23% 13% A/kBsf M 50 


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30V Bvnefnf 480 118 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, TI ESDAY MAY 1-k 1985 


Page 15 


rv v 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 







»ll t- -A 


Asuag Has Tumarouiid 
To $ 10.2-Million Profit 




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Reuters 

BIENNE. Switzerland — Swit- 
zerland’s largest watch group said 
Monday that it is back in profit less 
than two years after its banks saved 
the company from bankruptcy in 
the most expensive industrial bai- 
lout in Swiss history. 

Asuag Socifctfe G6n£rale de 
rHorlogcrie Suisse SA, the makers 
of Omega, Longines and Rado and 
the fashionable plastic “Swatch.” 
reported 1984 group net profit of 
265 million Swiss francs ($10.2 
million). 

In 1983, Asuag had a loss dr 173 
million Swiss francs, and in 1982, a 
loss of 340 million Swiss francs. 

Sales rose only 8 percent to 1,58 
billion Swiss francs from 1.45 fail-. 
Hon Swiss francs in 1983, despite 
almost doubled sales of the 
priced Swatch. 


The group's chief executive, 
Pierre Arnold, said at a news con- 
ference that the turnaround in the 
company’s results was the resuh of 
the sale of unprofitable units, staff 
and production cots, lower organi- 
zation costs and the creation of a 
new and less fragmented product 
line. 

The. popular Swatch, introduced 
in 1983, was also a factor, Mr. Ar- 
nold added. 


But costs from dosing factories 

and liquidating unsold watches fell 

in 1984 and win fall further this 
year, he said. 

The 1983 rescue of the i 
cost Asuag’s banks 
francs. 

Asuag is the world's third largest 
watch producer after Japan's Seiko 
and Gtizen Watch. 


Heron Bid Approach Bolsters 
Burmah OiTs Share Price 




Roam 

LONDON — The price of 
shares in Britain's Bunnah Oil 
PLC, one of the world's oldest ofl 
companies, jumped more than 10 
percent in value Monday after it 
was confirmed that Heron Carp., a 
privately owned property, gasoline 
station and insurance group., had 
made a takeover approach. 

Bunnah shares hit a 1985 high of 
£193 ($3.66) on the London Stock 
Exchange up from £158 at Fri- 
day’s dose, before earing back to 
£186 on profit-taking. 

In a statement Sunday, Burmah. 
confirmed reports that Harm, a 
British concern, had sought agree- 
ment in principle to a takeover bid 
at a meeting an April 30. 


Terms were not discussed. Bur- 
mah mM' , adding that it could not 
see any benefit in an amalgam- 
ation. 


A Heroin spokesman declined 
Monday to comment, saying the 
Heron’s owner, Gerald Ronson, 
was in Arizona for a week and not 
immediately available. 


BAe Readjusts 
Allocation of 
Issued Shares 


Reuters 

LONDON — British Aero- 
space PLC said Monday that 
allocations for its £550-million 
(S660-million) issue of 146 £5 
motion shares have been scaled 
down because the issue was 
heavily oversubscribed. 

Private investors applied for 
about 790 million shares in the 
British government's sale of its 
48.4-pexceut holding in the 
company. But a high propor- 
tion of those issued was already 
destined for financial institu- 
tions, existing shareholders and 
employees of BAe. 

Now, private applicants for 
100 to 200 shares will get 100; 
those wanting 300 to 500 shares 
get 125, with progressive scaling 
down to 200 shares far appli- 
cants for 1,000 to 1,900 and 275 
for those wanting 10,000 to 
20,000. 


The shares were priced at 375 
20Dpeno 


pence each, with 200 pence pay- 
able on application and 175 
pence by Sept. 10. On the Lon- 
don Stock Exdbange, British 
Aerospace shares were last 


quoted at 435 peace, up 17 
Friday. 


pence since late Friday. 


U.S. Navy, IBM Dispute Progress on Submarine Contract 


W«’ York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The U.S, Navy 
and International Business Ma- 
chines Coip. are locked in a dispute 
over IBM's performance on a 51.7- 
bfllion contract to build an ad- 
vanced computer system for sub- 
marines. 

IBM insists that work on the 
project is on schedule and meets 
the Pentagon's technical -spetifica- 
tious and that it wifi run less than 


contends that the weak is behim 
schedule and falls short of specifi- 
cations and that it could run as 
much as $800 millkra over budget. 

Last week, navy officials raid 
that future phases of the contract, 
which seemed assured for IBM, 
would be reopened for bidding 

At issue is IBM's role as prime 
contractor for the Submarine Ad- 
vanced Combat System, or Subacs. 


The system is intended to greatly 
improve the sonar, navigation and 
weapons control operations of 
about 20 Los Angeles-class subma- 
rines now used by the navy. 

A follow-on system, with further 
improvements, vs expected to be- 
come (he core of the navy's forth- 
coming fleet of SSN-21 subma- 
rines, the next generation of ships 
that will be lgnnnhari beginning in 
the 1990s. 

Navy officials call the classified 
project one of the key elements of 
their effort to improve the nuclear 
submarine fleet and detect a new 
generation of “quiet” Soviet subs. 
Thus, they have expressed concern 
about alleged delays and cost over- 
runs in the project, which appar- 
ently is being restructured. A wue- 
ribbon navy panel is expected to 
complete an investigation of the 
Subacs program within a mouth. 


and the General Accounting Office 
confirmed last week that it was 
preparing a separate report, expect- 
ed in July. 

Navy officials, despite repeated 
requests last week, declined to talk 
about the project. 

“It's a mess on all sides,” a navy 
source said, “and no one wants to 
touch it with a 1 0-foot pole.” 

IBM said its executives were ea- 
ger to discuss the project 

“The navy believes it is inappro- 
priate for us to talk." said Norm 
Koestiine, a spokesman for IBM's 
Federal Systems division, which 
handles government contracts. The 
navy's concern, he said, was that 
the blue-ribbon panel was still in- 
vestigating and that Congress was 
taking testimony on the future of 
the SSN-21 program, including the 
computer system. 


In public testimony last month, 
Everett PyatL, assistant secretary ol 
the navy for shipbuilding and logis- 
tics. said the navy was dissatisfied 
with IBM’s progress on the con- 
tract, which was awarded in De- 
cember 1983. 

The navy, citing security con- 
cerns, has yet to describe publicly 
what has gone wrong. But navy 
sources maintain that the system 
neither has sufficient memory nor 
combines all of the ship’s critical 
computer functions in a “distribut- 
ed system,” a network of indepen- 
dent processors and disk drives. 

“Part of the problem may be that 
our expectations were too high,” 


one navy official said. “But these 
days, SSOO-million cost overrun-, 
don’t look good." 

IBM denied all the major points 
of the navy's charges. The SSOO- 
million figure is a projected cost 
overran for all of the SSN-21 pro- 
gram, not just the computer sys- 
tem. IBM contends. Navy officials, 
when asked about the IBM re- 
sponse, repeated their assertions 
that it applies only to the computer 
portion. 

Moreover. IBM insists that the 
project is proceeding satisfactorily. 


Bad Debt Provisions 
At JMB Is £245 Million 


Burmah nearly collapsed in 1974 
under heavy debts. It was forced to 
died assets worth more than $1 
bOlion to pay off some of them. 


The assets sold included a 23- 
percent stake in British Petroleum 
PLC, one of the world’s biggest dl 
companies, and subsequently most 
of. its rat-tanka fleet 


Reuters 

LONDON — Bad debt provi- 
sions at Johnson Matthey Bankers 
Ltd, now owned by the Bank of 
England, are estimated at £245 mil- 
Hou ($303.8 rnfflianX a Bank at 
England statement said Monday. 

Ine review of the bullion dealer's 
troubled loan portfolio has been 
largely completed. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Casio Computer Col’s plants in 
China are expected to double their 
combined output, to lOtmlfiou cal- 
culators, in the year ending March 
1986. There are 52 plants in China 
owned by regional governments 
that produce calculators under li- 
cense from Casio. 


Degusa AG is forming a jrant- 
Korea 


« BtKfl 


venture company in South 
with the Seoul-based Oriental 
Chemical Industry Co. to produce 
catalytic converters. A new plant 
will have the capacity to produce 
one million converters a year, with 
production to begin in spring 1987. 
The converters will be sold on the 
South Korean market and export- 
ed. ; 

Glaxo Hofcfings PLC has formed 
a joint-venture company with Tan- 
abe Seiyaku Co. to direct the devd- 
opment and marketing of Tanabe’s 
cephalasporin antibiotic outride 
Japan. The drag. TA 5901, will be 
launched through the world net- 


work of Glaxo companies and by 
T anabe in certain countries. 

GTE Carp said its third commu- 
nications satellite was placed in or- 
bit 22J00 mOes above the equator, 
on Saturday by the Ariane 3 launch 
vehicle. 

Mobil Ofl Crap- said subsidiaries 
of its Soperior OD Ca have reached 
agreement with British Gas Crap, 
to sell their shares of gas from the 
Thames fields in the southern Brit- 
ish sector of the North Sea. The 
Superior units' combined total of 
recoverable reserves from the three 
Thames Adds is estimated at about 
1 17 bilBon cubic feet 

Prime Compter Inc. has entered 
into an a gr eem e nt with Eastman 
Kodak Co. -that calls for Kodak to 
market Prime's 2550 mim-compui- 
er as put of Kodak's Kar-8800 
information management system. 


mg interest The company said Mc- 
Donnell would acquire preferred 
stock from Republic and exercise 
options it bas obtained from Re- 
public shareholders to acquire 
about 1.7 millio n common shares. 

Sfamuzn Construction Ca was 
awarded a contract for 389-million 
Hong Kong dollars ($50 million) 
for work on the second stage of a 
three-stage program to renovate 
the Queen Mjary Hospital The 
overall project is valncd at 864 mil- 
lion dollars. The second si 
chides construction of two 


stage in- 
o ootid- 


KqmbBc Health Corj is negoti- 
innell Douglas 


mgs. . 

Woranld International Ltd. of 
Australia has received legal advice 
that a formal partial bid from Ade- 
laide Steamship Co. contravenes 
the New South Wales takeover 
code. Wonnald previously rejected 
inadequate Adsteam's offer of 


as 


ating for McDonnel 
Coip. to acquire a 20-percent vol- 


355 Australian dollars ($145) a 
share aimed at lifting its stake to 44 
percent of Wi 


,.M- r 


Cigarette Firms Seek Sales in Japan 


(Coutinued from Page 13) 
form the mainstay of Japan’s ruling 
party. 

“These are just the first steps to 
liberalization of the tobacco mar- 
ket," Mr. Advoet said. “They are a 
far cry from a free market, for-ihe 
•simple reasons that wc strongly be- 
lieve if you have a monopoly on 
manufacturing, you should not 
need an import duty to protect 
your products.” 

_ But Japan Tobacco has prob- 
lems of its own, ones that may give 
foreign makers competitive advan- 
tages. Japanese tobacco costs about 
twice as much as foreign tobacco, 
said Mitsuo Futaggmi, a spokes- 
man for the company, and Japan 
Tobacco is obligated by law to buy 
all the tobacco that fanners pro- 
duce every year. 

Because sales have slowed, how- 
ever, some of this tobacco is not 
used, Mr. Futagami said. Until the 
fiscal year 1975, which ended 
March 31, 1976, Mr. Fut agam i 
said, the company’s sales rose by 


about 45 percent a year. In fiscal 
1975, cigarette prices woe raised 
48 percent, and since then, annual 
tobacco sales have increased by less 
than 1 percent. Last year, the com- 
pany’s sales were $112 billion; net 
income is still bring calculated, Mr. 


distributing their cigarettes 
of Jai 


Many foreign makers maintain 
that their tobacco is superior in 
taste and quality to Japanese to- 
bacco Ken Fukuoka, director of a 
joint venture between RJ. Reyn- 
olds and Mitsubishi Carp, to mar- 
ket Reynolds cigarettes in Japan, 
said that one reason Japanese ciga- 
rettes use charcoal filters is to com- 
pensate for the harsber taste of Jap- 
anese tobacco. 

This difference can. also work 
against foreign brands, however, 
because the Japanese have grown 
used to the taste of domestic ciga- 
rettes. 

Foreign makers are. going slowly 
in their efforts to expand market 
share. Both Reynolds and Philip 
Morris have chosen to continue 


through a subsidiary of Japan To- 
bacco because the unit has the best 
relationships with the tiny tobacco 
stands that are Japan's main ciga- 
rette outlets. 

“In Japan, retaken have bora 
accustomed to dealing with the 


Mr. Advoet said. 

Philip Morris will try to increase 
its sales through more advertising 
and test-marketing, Mr. Advoet 


said. The Reynolds-Mitsubishi 
I take a different tack. 


venture will 
Because the market is limited, Mr. 
Fukuoka said, the company win 
target its advertisements to young 
smokers. The company wifi also 
continue to seO only menthol ciga- 
rette, a market Mr. Fukuoka be- 
lieves will expand, although now 
less than 1 percent of Japan’s 
smokers buy menthol. 

To succeed, he said, foreign mak- 
ers must act like “guerrilla f%hters M 
— fighting quietly, patiently, to 
achieve then goals. 



CAP GEMINI SOGETI 

Listing on the Paris Stock Exchange 


The shareholders of CAP GEMINI SOGETI &JV~, in an Extraordinary General Meeting 
held ou April 4th, 1985, approved the proposal made by the Board of Directors of a 
public offering of ordinary shares on the Second Marche of the Paris Stock Exchange. 
The offering will take place in June and 10 % of the share capital will be made available 
to the public. . 

hazard Fr&res will act as lead manager, with Credit Lyonnais, Lndosuez and Societe 
Lyonnaise de Banque as co- managers. 

The Extraordinary General Meeting also approved the 1984 financial statements of the 
CAP GEMINI SOGETI group as audited by Coopers and Lybrand. CAP GEMINI 
SOGETTs consolidated sales reached 1.8 billion French Francs (a 28.4 % increase over 
the previous year) ol which 43 % originated in France, 30 % in eight other European 
countries and 27 % in the United States. 


The net profit after tax reached 9S.8 million French Francs (a 32.5 % increase over 
1983), which represents 5.3 % ol sales, versus 5.1 % in the previous year. 

CAP GEMINI SOGETI, an independent group with 4,700 employees, is one of the 
leading computer services companies in the world and the largest in Europe. 



FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

FBCSAT&5S& 
As US. DOLLAR CASH STQ43 

B: MULTICURRENCY CASH SIOQ3 

G DOLLAR BONDS Sltitt 

Oz MXnaWfENCY BONDS SHM4 

E: STEKUNG ASSET £1069 

FORSGN & COLONIAL 
MANAGEABJT (J0JSEYJ UMITTO 
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FOR OTHER FAC FUNDS, SEE 
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International Herald tribune, Book Division. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 198b 


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and! do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


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29* 23* PoPLdpr+42 111 
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27 IT 298 21 2D* 20%— ft 

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9 71 17ft 14% 16%—% 

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3X 8 X 42* 42 42 

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94 13 114 19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 

373 a* 3% a%— ft 

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■ 15% 15% 15* 

333 18 T7ft 18 

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123 13* 13 13* + ft 

2104x61 60% 60* + ft 


20* 11% SwtFer 
17 10% SnrtGci 

78 55 SvrBoll 

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27ft 16% SeectP 
54ft 33% Seerr-v 
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43ft 31* ScuorD 
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71* 14* SIBPnt 
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18ft 6* SIPocCe 
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30% 19* 5h*iWk 
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333 28ft 19% 19lli + ft 

75 17% 17ft 17ft— ft 

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4 14 15ft 15ft— ft 
347 42* 41 42ft +1U 
122 53% 49* 51% +2* 


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S? JL I^SS pf ■****— w 6% 6% 4% 

36* 25* TayRUt 27 HOI 36 35* 3Sft— ft 

3S* tf* Tra ear J4 IX 15 361 33% 32ft X + ft 

1799 71k TWA if £72* im T7 T7U 

S «* IHh TWApf 2X ISA l£ 14% 14ft- ft 

* 1W TWAefB 2B5 BX 1093 28% 27* 28M + ft 

% arn Tranent Uf U 11 128 30* X X — * 

}£J Jfonlne 233 TW U 20% 20 20ft+tt 

IS? IS? I*5?Y WO v u 22 12ft 12 12 

ST? I2?® 00 . 5-l“» fO 11 315 53ft S3* Sft + ft 

*** «* Traec pf 187 6.1 12 63 62ft 61 

*5? Z rmEtt »3 322 21ft 21* 2T% 

IS? 12* T r ? r ?°] „ . 3 B4Tft7H9ft + U 

2T* — JSV A45 U 240*75% 75* 75*— 1* 
Sr. 5 IS - TO- 22 IT j TQz 93% 93% «% 

5S ; » Trap Of zjb MX 2 23% 23% am— * 

Hft 6ft TrraOft 10 44 lift lift lift 

Si UMM9 6* 33% 32ft 33 + % 

55? IH"* - M 14 *• 360 34% 34% 34ft— ft 

S? *5 JW«WtA X 17ft 17* 17*— ft 

Sfe .B- 7 1 29% 27% 29%— ft 

IS if? Tvfidpf 1X0 IV 4 17ft 17 17 

IS? Ttw ler 2X4 44 10 9TB 44* <5% 45ft— ft 

Si S? I®® 1 ■*•!* 7jL ra 56% St 56* 

SJ £5* 335?* XOel+0 271 25* M 25* 

25ft X* TrtCnpf ISO 93 3 27% 26ft 27ft + * 

5* JS Trtolnd 40 V T9 95 26% Xft 24* 

31* 20% TrioPc 1X0 17 8 147 27* 27 27*— ft 

4*% 24* Trfisone J4 V 17 1396 46% 45% 44 

g ‘ Yrtertr ^9 7X 72 X 4ft 4 6ft 

*ft % Trtco J U 17 9 7 6ft 7 + ft 

21* 12* Tilnty JO U T90 13ft T2% T3 — ft 

S? ^ Trttgng ,10b 4 43 263 23% 23% 23ft + ft 

V|* m TritC pf 1.10 73 53 14 13ft 13% 

40* 27% TuaEP 1» M » 163 40* 37X 40 + ft 

19 16 !**«>» * U 10 7 16* IM 16*— ft 

41 »* TrcoLb SO 2J 9 396 35* 35 35% + * 

17% fl* Tyler* X U 7 1U 14% 14 14*— ft 


49% mj UAL lBOe XT ■ 2849 47* 46* 47 — % 

34% 24* UAL pf 240 74 197 32ft 31* 31%— * 

15ft 7ft UCCEL 18 29 14* 14* 14*— U 

24* 16* UGi 2X4 84 TO m Oft 23* 23ft— U 

lft UGJPf 5j? 114 3SX SZ 21ft Sft- ft 

lift 4% UNCRe* 151 10 9% 7ft— ft 

14 “ «RS 40 34 U 12 11* lift lift- ft 

17ft USFG 220 44216 4327 35 3m 34ft + ft 




22* IZSGS 
..... 13 UnfPrtt _ 

T02* TS UofNV 3J5»U 
41* 30ft UComts IM 4A 
57ft 32% UnCrrt 140 8X 
7ft 4ft UMonC 
15ft 12 Use lee 1X2 74 
30 21 uncipf ISO TZ5 

33* 25* UnEl pf 4X0 US 
S3 39ft UnBpi +40 Til 
31% 24* Una ottMJja ELI 
45ft «* uei trfv. txo in 
25ft IB* unnipf 2X8 12.1 
15ft Oft llnElpf 2.13 12.1 
25% ?9ft UnQpi 2X2 104 

62 45ft Unapt 744 120 

63 47 UEIPfH +00 1Z8 


4 406 35% 34ft 35* + U 
11 39 O* UV. 13ft— ft 

W 565 102* 100% TC2* « 

1C 697 35% 34* 35ft + ft 

9 3982 38% X 38* 

.14 5ft 5* 5* 

6 3095 18% II 18ft + ft 
50ttt X 23 2t + ft 
2BQz 31 32 32 —1 

20QE53 52* 53 + ft 

58 37% 30* 30* 

140OZ 66 65 W +1* 

120 25ft 24ft 2m— ft 
4 17ft 17ft 17% — ft 
13 25% 25% 25ft— ft 
1040x 62 62 62 

15Qz 62* 62* 63* +1* 


5 42% 43ft 62ft + * 

253 33* 32% 33 

46 11* lift 31ft + ft 

220 18% tl IX —1 

90 21% 21* Xft 


X* 35% TDK J7e X 18 
24 TECC 236 72 9 
13ft 7ft TGIP 17 

19 lift TNP 1JS +* 9 

25% 17 TRE 1.00 +7 14 

81* 58% TRW 100 43 IB 1045 49ft 49* 69ft— ft 

177* 134 TRW pf 440 29 2 152* 152% 152% — lft 

Bft 3% Toe Boat IX 3% 3ft 3* — ft 

7W. 52* Taftfird 1.12 1 J 15 980 73* 71 73ft +3ft 

18% 12 Tolley SOe J 15 273 19 18ft 19 + ft 

21 14% Talley pf UX3 +7 23 21% 3C* 71% + ft 

74 4Aft Tonutrd 3JD +3 14 780 74ft 73* 74% + ft 

35% 23% Tandy 14 1284 30% 29% 

15% 12% Tndrcft 13 9 13* 13* 

68* 51ft Tektrne 1X0 V ( 266 99% 59 


51* 34% (JftPoc 1X0 15 » 1031 51% 5M 50%— ft 

113 87 UnPcpf 7JS +5 17 111% 110% 1MT%— 1* 

20ft 9% UMroyl .18 J 13 5U 17% 19ft 1 9ft— ft 

n S3 Unrvlpf 1X0 1+1 3S3X 53* 57* 53 + * 

6* 3* UfUTOr 138 X 4* 4ft 4W + ft 

IT 1 - 10* UnB rod 18 138 15* 14% 14%— * 

15 9ft UBrdpf 4 14ft U* 14*— ft 

40 20ft ucnrrv .14 4 41 206 37ft 39* 39*— ft 

Xft 22* UaEnru 248 +0 22 585 31* 30ft 31 + % 

17% 9 UIBum 2X0 110 3 135 15ft T5% 15% + ft 


17 n% UIDupf 2X1 133 
am Xft Ullhipf 4X0 U7 
14* 10 UlUupf L70 T4J 
23ft 14ft Unbind St U I 
41ft 39 Unm»te 27 i X 
42 26 UJerBk 1J6 +9 9 

16* 9% UtdMM 4 

3ft 2ft UPbMn 1 

38* 22 UnirG .13 J 8 

lft 5* uSHotn 
42* 29* USU08 JO 23 8 


lOOz 16* 16* 16* + * 
5 27* U 27* + ft 
41 13* 13 13* + U 

X 21% Xft XU— ft 
28 38% 38* 38ft + % 
25 «ft 39% 40* + ft 
55 12% 13* 12*— ft 
4 2ft 2ft 2* 

1536 35* 34ft X + ft 
1013 7ft 7 7ft + ft 
559X34% 34 34* 


isss 4 LB B & K 

■" S'fe'F'MS 


33 23 

38% 22 — 

5M 49% U»H Pi .A41el1J 
137ft115% USSHpr12J5 9J 
29ft 22ft USStipf 12$ 73 

39ft XU USToh 122 +6 13 

76% 35% USWesI » M ■ 

a 5* U5f0kn . „ ® 

<5 29ft UoTech 140 15 8 

39* SBft UTdtPf ISO 7.1 

34ft imuiHTai 1J2 B2 9 

35 36* UntTlpf IJQ 4J 

x uu uwri ui if n 

33ft 22 Unllrav JB 3 16 

22* 16% Untvar M 43 7 

27% 18ft UnhfM 1JM 42 11 

23% UU UnUaf 1X0 5.1 7 

51 30 Unocal 1JB U ] 

91 45 uplehn 236 V II 

4i a* usutra 11 

10ft 8ft UtffeF* 1X6O10J 
Zlft zm UtaPL ZB 94 13 

29ft Xft UtPLpf 2X0 HJ 

26* 2Hh UtPLpf 250 MX 

21% 17ft UIPLPf 136 11X 

19* 15ft UtPLpf 2J4 W . 

3<u u utmca lJ2b +8 8 
22% 18% U tOCO pr 251 111 

35 am utucopf 4.12 tii 


jS’S’Jk IS + » 

s| K SS ^ ” 

■ E*8=s 

karsts 

462 2g6 JBJ 3«.T g 

“ y, n 

2005 If " ” + 

4e 34 34 34 ♦ * 



6* y 


34 9 313 a 32* X + * 
27 29% 32 Xft— * 
IS 21* 22* + ft 

^ a a a.* 


33* 21% VF Coro 1.12 
Oft Sft Voter* 

33ft 14 Voter Pi 344 IM 
4ft 2* Voleytn 
am 19 VanDrs 32 4.1 
Sft 2U Uns 

46* OTk vSten"* M J 15 mo 31% at lift— ft 

13% 7ft VCWU 40 3X 13 74 10% W* JM— « 

25ft 18ft Veeao 40 2X M 101 30* 20* 20ft 

Bft 3ftVendO 
Hft 8% Vests# TJOallA 
45% 35* Viacom 42 IX 
45 38* VaEPpf 5X0 11.1 

84* 68* VaEPpf 9JS 11J 
42* 47ft VaEPpf 7X0 11X 

65 Xft VBEPpf 745 11X 

X% lift vttfwys 
41% 38 Vornod 
TO 60* VulcnM IM U 


X* 22 WICOR 3X8 +1 
4* 34* Wat) R p{ +58 11A 

37* Xft WOChVB 1X0 V 
»f 16* Wacktrt A0 3X 

ra% 6* Kofnoc 

m 34% WalMrt X8 A 
£% M* wofaras 
£% 15% WLHR»al40 
M* 2% WatCSv 45 IX 
37 22 Vtatum 143 40 

9 ft 7* WBU pf 1X0 107 
48ft 29* WbiUpf 1A8 15 

20* 5Soj \m +1 

38* IM WhbNaf 1X1 +1 
57% 38* WMNpf ISO +1 
Xft U WtftWt 348 1U 
54% 27* Waste AO V 
28% 38 WotUn X6 V 
17% BftWayGas JO 22 
96 28 WayGpf 1A0 8X 

12* f — 


170 

354 


1* 

1* + * 




nw 

10* + * 

19 

117 43* 

0 

45 

45 


20ZBSK 

B2U 

■?* .. 


61 



2140C 64 

64 




21% 

21 

21 + ft 



40ft 

TO 

40* + ft 

11 

15 

71% 

71ft 

7!*— % 

* — ■ 

8 

9 

28% 

2t* 

28* 





11 

S3 

37 

36% 

3*%— * 


13 

11* 

(lift 

Hft— % 


its 


UK 

9 — % 

25 2012 

49ft 

47% 

48ft— 1 

18 

1577 

27 

26ft 

26* + * 


3« 

21% 

21ft 

21% + % 

17 

137 

35* 

35ft 

35*— ft 

7 

40 

35* 

34% 

M%— % 


100) 

9% 

9% 

9% + ft 


1 

44 

46 

46 +1 

11 

92 

21ft 

71ft 

71ft + ft 

13771 

20% 

77ft 

20 — % 

14 

W96 

39% 

30% 

39ft— ft 

■ 

7» 

20* 

30ft 

20* + * 

• 

XII 

26% 

26ft 

26* + * 


2 

49 

49 

49 + % 

-8 

580 

2m 

21* 

21* + ft 

18 

1113 


53ft 

54 + % 

» 

54 

24ft 

23% 

23ft— ft 

9 

30 

9* 

9ft 

fft— ft 


5 

2D 

90 

20 


33 

9% 

9 

9 —ft 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits* in muttons, are In local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 


Britain 

BOC Grasp 

1st Half 1985 I9M 

Revenue 1X0. MUX 

Pretax Met— 7+7 5M 
Per Shore _ 0.KG4 +0853 

Britain/ NotharkaKb 
Unilever 


United Slates 

Colonial Penn Gp 

lit Bear. 1185 1984 

Revenue 3055 u+a 

Met Inc. 1X78 14.14 

Per Shore 08S 018 

TBfmvtftiMBhd 

Mormon Group 

litQvor. ms me 

Revenue 388J 4324 

Met Inc. 1034 1+81 

Wal-Mart Stores 


&.S5KS'S'«!S £ \ x 75 

u lij IM % ’12 

8* WABf* - ,4 1 * t:V6 *•» 

* Sc»AP* r * '*3 f jntoDlnlim 

WPpri IC'I 7ft BU ■%— .* 

WL'nwfi ? 3»w 3jrt 

■J1 W.-lUHP* 1 JBtl JU* 

:o Wrl'PlJ- *1 *% >* 

J'. WnUD7> '* m 

4% Wnuott ; 2 n tft 

i£ SniJ ;■» smBt 
« « ■■■; SS 5R 


17 

19ft 

10ft 

91 £ 
raw 7*. 

25 
60 
61 
9 

1ST-. 

5-s ii>L who: 

4! 31% weifvc 

34 .’J WBI mm ** 

64ft 34% pf ;S 
sift «Jft WPd« xjo 

U* 4ft Y«v>r'n 

«1 14ft v|WP»Bf0 

4N8 38* KWrW l * 

32VY 24* 

Sft Keg wnirehi 

25* 14* Wh'J*“t 
Tii , eft WMtvtH 

left 8 Wil’ran 

31ft 72*. WllHorn 

5 5 VVHmEi 

Bft 61* WltehrO 
3S% 25% WhiOle 
20ft 7% VWrtflbO 
13% • SI* Winner 
7ft 1% WMMtJ _ 

35% X* WIscEP r 4 * .. j 
81* 68% WUE pt J2 -3 
34ft 25% WWCPL -64 _■? 

35 25* WHcPS 
JO* 77ft wrtco 

25% !■% woodPt 
45% 3S Wdem =■ 



*» 


AO 


.V 

II 

2.5 IS 
4.9 


160 *• 


10 

IX 

.T0r 


IA 55 
t! 13 
7 12 


♦5! B 


ir* 4;^ 

kx 11* if* rniftt: . 

SSR-fcC^* 

*T J4* V* Sft-*? 

2ft 17% 17 gt 4 fi 

s «*■!«“ 

if% + 3 


25* 


2 9 
_ 4J 9 
J4 3J 3 

* ** U 

,jB n w 


180a TX II 


63% 46ft Wol* Pf iaj 
4ft 7% w.-ldAr 
**•., 48 Wtl»lv 
6ft 3ft Wurirsr 
M IM « wyigiD -2 r! 

23ft >T Wvrate 4® u 


Jf «♦ 

1*8 #* *■ 

1670 16% -- - 

ft TL I ft — 

» 6U A 6* ' 
ra bS Sb M .• 
^70» 79 19 fi «S 

% !£ S* 

-5aa&hS**- 

StSSJ -fth+m 

5 6ft 4H 4%—* 
•U lift lift lift* s 
20 11% 18 Uth- W 


3X0 20 2**i fWb 4» 


48ft 33' . wo* *»* — TftJ 82* pft 

J 4 ' ** ^ ^ 10 m 5% S* 


+ % 


30 24 zairCp 

23ft 19* ZaleofA 
24% lift laaata 
64% 12 Savre 
47 24 Zavte «*1 

X 18ft Zenith E 
21ft 14% Zero 9 




36 78 97* X9h— V* 

I 31 X 11 

lajajrir- 

I 1372 TOfts 30* M9h * * 
IX !J 62 (Bft 17% 18% + U 


1X3 47 I 
JO U 

X4 64 J6 
400 A 16 


Met 13 


. UfQaar. 

Revenue- 
pretax Net— 
Per Share A. 
Per Share B_ 


+730. 

31+0 

02611 

748 


1*1 

193L0 

0.2504 

641 


ItfQuar. 
R^rrtUQ — _ 

Mel Inc 

Per Share __ 


1985 

IA60. 

S1A9 

0X7 


19M 

U30. 


a.- UnUtw PLC to star- 
Hngi 0; Unilever NV. In guil- 
ders. All other results /» Ster- 
ling. 


West Germany 

Stand. Bek. Lomu 


AMR Coro 

AmCafi 1375a 

At) City El Pi 

BanfofVos 

BausctiLbs 

BeitSouth 

Brotkwtrv 

Coranese 

Comblnlnll 

ChPv* T43p7 

OMuxCh 5 

EAL W1A 

E»ex Ch 

PlHawPap 

Greyhound 

HeuaMMM 

KanPtvLt 

UmNFin 

Morions 

Minn PwLf 

MJ Rno 

PocGE 

PtiHxoSal 

Ponun Elec 

RoHJ mEny s 

5chervPteb 

SooNEnaTl 

SunBksinr 

TafiBrdcst 

Toalron 

Torenrnark 

UnEllpfL 

WnhWafP 


AcmsEtect 

Kvocero 


MEW NIOH+ U3 

Ataman HF AfaP M4Pf 
AmOrNlpJMJ AmTTPfB 
AVEMCO BancOra 
Bn+Tr NY Barnet BK 
Bcrcton DlcX BeHHOMeU 
BewrivEfif arltfMwri 
BMvn UGo» Bunker Hill 
CnHwJGos Pf ChubbCn * 
CwilhEncv pI EomP*vc 8 
CnP«* 440pr CnPwJSCPr 


AmerCon of 


Akl 


DctE 41JplK 
EstnAIr pfB 
EltiviS 
GAP Cora 
Hanjhti Sec 
irvnpBks 
KB7I099CO 

Lucky str 
Mgredift 
MoereMcpi 

NlaaMPew 
paviesiCash 
Pledml NGs 
PflmeAMM 
ScraLcv 
StenatCo 
5auMET ptA 
SunCTtem 
Taller Ind 
Te.tn SOBat 
Transm Inc 
US Steel 
WBcEP 


CetE 2280T 
El Tor llo 
FPL Grp* 
GdrltftPfA 
Homfimani 
JerC 936af 
Kuhlman ■ 
MDU Res 
MeiE Bian 
Morions 
OcclPptJ 
PepQovs 
PaoeToibf 
PlihS vc EG 
Sovonnh CP 
SlonalpfA 
Soerrv Co 
Svmev 
Tollev p»B 
Testn I40pf 
Travinaf 
ihMohn Co 
wisPubSv 


BettHwi *IA 

■rttrelpa 

CM A PM 
CtnaBeb 

CaanNO 

DovtenHud 


^ Frain 
GrtABftf 
H KW 8 


Limited 


MEW LOWS 


GenHOOlnc 
MS Ltd a 


SfoblMer pf 
MnotAsst 


Msf+dPti 

NwEnaSi 

Pdcaibcsa 

Pfieer 

PortG 460oi 

RoiKnCemn 

5CAMA 

ShiserCapf 

Stem com 

TECO 

Tam brand 

Toots Ron 

TrtbuiMCO 

Vends Co 
ZayreCp 


Kerr (Mass . 
MofnrtcOat 


7 
9 

14 32 
12 

A6 IX I 


2.92 

740 


22 3* 3* 

89 243* 241% 243* 

T2D 32% 22* 22* + * 
936 46 43% 43% + % 

77 35* 35* 35* + % 


*3 13 3130 43% 43 * 43* 

9.1 T tl |1 II : r 

II 166 34* 33% 24 + % 1 I 


5* 2% Teicora 

302% 191% Tefdyn 
34 13* Tr Irate 

48* X% Telex 
39* 25* Templn 
45* 32% Tna 
81 65 Tencpr 

33* 20 Tentyn 
19 9% Tejoro 

40* 31* Texaco 
41* X* TxABc 

46% X% TexCm 1X6 +1 6 484 31 32* 33%— % 

39 26 ft ToxEsf 220 +2 9 470 35% 34% 35% J 

57 52 TxETpf 6XSellJ 70 54* 56% 56% + * 

34* 25 TexTnd KDU 14 4 28* 38% 28% 

147% 90% Tex I nit 2X0 11 9 1515 98 94* 94* -3* 1 

3% 1 Taint 2467 2 2% 2* — * 

2* I 0 *®? 9 .18 IX 12 1920 T9 IS* IV% + % 

39 25* TxPae A0 1J 21 6 33% 33ft 32* + * 

29* 20% Tex Util 252 +7 7 116? 29 28% 29 + ft 

5 7 Text! In 137 4* 4 4* 

SI 26* Textron 1X0 16 12 1025 58* 49* 49% + * 


30 — * I ■ ~ 

C5S i I U.S* Futures i % 

xm +2* • I 


Utah 


Open Hlsn Low Clou Cbg. 


13 


ORAMGB JUKE (MYCE1 
75X00 Rft.- cents per lb. 


w 5 S n 


Ooen Hioh Low Clou Cho. 


AO II 195 TO* 10* 10%—* 
3X8 +1 35 2710 3TA 35% 37 
1J2 U 9 58 34* 34% 34% + % 

1X6 +0 6 
22) 62 9 


Grains 


WHEAT CCST} 


18500 

15100 

MOV 

155X0 

156X0 

15+40 

133XS 

+45 

18405 

15105 

Jul 

Uis 

153X0 

15+90 

15X45 

+05 

18+00 

149 83 

See 

15U* 

151X5 

150X5 

1*908 

15095 

+40 

18100 

14840 

Nov 

14900 

149XD 

149X0 

+30 

18800 

14+15 


14900 

14900 

14900 

148X5 

+.10 

177X0 

1*8.70 

Mar 

14900 

14900 

14900 

14+95 

162X0 

14000 

Mery 




148J5 

+.10 

157X0 

157X0 

Jul 




14+95 

+ 10 

110X0 

179.75 

Sep 




14+95 

+.10 

Es>- Sotos 

250 Prev.Sctes 

278 




1 London Metals 

I London Commodities 

« 

1 May 13 

1 May 13 

L 


Bid Att 


to&xo 
92+n 
1) 


901X01 

923X0 


Bid Aft 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ten 
mat 889X0 nan 

forward 909X0 910X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hint! 

Sterling per metric ten 
ftot 1X26.00 1X27X0 1X65X0 1X70X0 

forward 1X10X0 1X11X0 1X28X0 1X29X0 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

SterHna par metric tea 
spal 1X01X0 1X05X0 1X30X0 1X35X0 

forward 1,197X0 1.199X0 1X15X0 1X17X0 

■ PAfE 

Sterling per metric ton 
spat 300X0 30850 300X0 301X0 

forward 303X0 30+00 385X0 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tea 
spal +430X0 4A4OX0 +500X0 +SBSX8 

forward +420X0 4A2SX0 +470X0 +475X0 

SILVER 


spat 519X0 520X0 510X0 511X0 

forward 53+50 S3SJ0 526X0 327X0 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric tea 
spot 9.462X0 9-464X0 9.545X0 9X70X0 

forward 9+47X0 9/452X0 9X45X0 9J55X0 

ZINC 

Sterling per metric tea 
seal 663X0 664X0 600X0 681X0 

forward 663X0 664X0 <7+50 479X0 

Source: AP. 


UA Treasury Bill Rates 

May 10 


BM Ytefd 


3-mgntn 
6-moiitti 
One veor 


714 

7.90 

ax6 


171 

7X8 


+00 

+34 


Prer 

Yield 

750 

+36 


Source: Salomon Brotnen 


Gold Options 


(price* taSAs-L 



Mta 

*0. 

Nw 

3k) 

KL25-II05 

21753335 


IS) 

425- 530 

*25-17X1 

34502400 

DO 

105-250 

11X01300 

19X07100 

M 

025 00) 


USDS 

350 

aw-oa 

550 700 

12004350 

NO 

— 

as soo 

90D-M1XD 

SO 

— 

— — 

7S 830 


G061I73S 3tT» 


VatemWUteWcM&A 

I. Qwi dp Mbdf-Bbar 
[ 1211 Geneva I. "i ilriiil— I 
[Td. JI025I - Telex 28305 


Nwaffermg 

CBOT 


BOND 

FUTURES 


& 


FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Alsu Funircs jnd 
Funircs Optinns on 

COMHX-l;OLD & SILVtR 
IMM-CL’RRENCIES 

late Cmmmaaa Rata 

5 7 C * Round TURN 

/. ) DA V AND 

OVERNIGHT 
* A ppho Pnh o irjJtt 
i-crtaimf ,'V) uwfmth per 
*aitndar month Fint .'W 
ttmtrjiii 5,'s ratted /mol 

Coil one of our pnfessumah: 

212-221-7138 

REPUBLIC CLEARING 
CORPORATION 

432 Fifth Avenue. NY. NY 10018 
An Affiliate of 

inmMk Eafatal Bsafc affcw U 

AaSI I.Y BiDwn Commercial Bank 


Asian Commodities 

May 13 


i^s '& 

1X15 1X08 1, 


Close 

SUGAR* 1 '*' B« **» BW Aft 

SterRPD per metric tea 
*“• *260 77X0 97A0 95X0 9180 

101X0 96X0 100641 701X0 9960 99X0 
106JD 105X0 106X8 107X0 104x5 1^X0 
3JJ 20 11SB0 71+20 11460 716X0 
1&30 JIJXO 122X0 12260 121X0 722X0 
]J[40 125X0 127X0 12BX0 12400 1^X0 
132X0 131A0 132X0 134X0 131X0 131X0 
Volume: 1X20 lots of SO tens. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric tea 
MOV 1X34 1X20 1X20 1X77 TXT) *XX3 

& j£8 ^ ix« }%6 

SS -I5S ^ ^ 

volume: zoMiatsof 10 tons. 

COFFEE ' 

Sterling per metric ten 

5-J95 2X80 2X91 2X95 +102 +10 

2.15 +738 +740 +164 +167 

+301 +179 +176 +177 +2B3 2207 

+232 2201 +208 +210 +238 +240 

Jan +256 +225 +230 +235 a.ra 2260 

Mar +335 2330 +311 +215 +235 +240 

MOV +200 +200 +199 +201 +ZT0 +250 

Volume: 1X43 lots of 5 fans. 

GASOIL 

UX. (teflon per msfric foe 

2J625 212M 21i« 216X0 21525 21SJ5 
J1S2B 213X0 215X9 71525 JTA75 Z1SX0 
214X8 21 460 21675 2I72J 21423 21+75 
Sf 5 * 37935 

N.T. N.T. 220X0 222X0 218X0 221X0 
N-T. N.T. 221X0 225X0 21+50 224X0 
M.T. N.T. 223X0 227X0 222X0 mm 
„ *J-Y- N.T. 224X0 23000 218X0 Wwiq 

■S* N.T. N.T. 220X0 230X0 218X0 000 
Volume: 488 lots of 100 tons. 

Sou tt: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
lOraaJl/- 


oa 


oct 


& 


Jit 


Dec 

Job 


Paris Commodities 

May 13 


Ctafl 

ISUGAR n*** ^ B “ ** 

Freiteh trance per metric ten 
Aug 1.255 U22 1X35 Uffl —20 

Oct 1X70 1+40 1245 1X47 — 25 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1.280 1X90 —29 

MW 1J61 1X25 U20 ljtt —45 

May 1A11 1J82 1X70 IJ85 —40 

Aug N.T. N.T. TAX IA50 —40 

E* v*!-: IA5D late of 50 tens. Prey, actual 
sales: 01 lots. Open Interest: 17X21 
COCOA 

French fraves per 706 ks 
May +164 +10 +157 +164 1-7 

JlY N.T. N.T. +170 — +10 

Sep +140 1140 +139* +145 + 2* 

Dec N.T. N.T. 7X60 2X70 —5 

Mar N.T, N.T. 2X60 +075 -B 

Mav N.T. N.T. 1075 — Unch. 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1075 — Until. 

> W&fra*. actual sales: 
213 lots. Open Interest: 7V0 
COFFEE 

French francs per M0 ko 
May 
Jly 
Sen 
New 
Jan 
Mor 

May . . 

Esf.voL: 44 kite of S tans. Prev. actual sales: 
1? loti Open Interest: 231 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


+435 

2435 

__ 

+470 

— 8 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2X00 

— 12 

2X40 

+S5Q 

*545 

+530 

— 20 

2X90 

N.T. 

2X88 

N.T. 

UA 

2X85 

2X90 

— 3 
— 20 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X50 

2X90 

+ 10 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X50 

+590 

+ 3 


STOCK 

OeVoe-Holbdn 

International bv 
OtyCkck 
Internationa] mr 


OSJ 


5% 


2% 


US8 


6 Vx, 


%y* 


Quotes 0 ot May 13. 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 

1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3 1 20 26090 1 
Telex: 14507 fircodl 


NOHG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U-SXperoonee 

Clow Prev I oik 
fUgb Low BM Ask Bid Ask 
MOV 4 N.T. N.T. 3MX0 37BX0 312X0 314X0 
Jim _ N.T. N.T. 318X0 32+00 313X0 315X0 
Jly _ N.T. N.T. 320X0 32100 315X0 317X0 
Aug _ 32+00 322.00 321X0 32100 717X0 319X0 
Otf — Nff. N.T. 37600 32BX0 32+00 324 XC 
Doc _ NT. N.T. 330X0 33+00 327X0 329X0 
fteb - N.T. N.T, 335X0 337X0 331X0 333X0 
Apf _ 341 JO 341X0,3*000 36+00 334X0 338X0 
Valumo: 3f taW of 1 » at 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXXl 


Jon. 


Hteh LOW 
. 31+40 317X0 

AWO N.T. NX 

Sip — N.T. N.T. 

Volume: 104 lots of 100 az. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Moderates cents par kao 


Settle 
31BX0 
397 9 h 
324X0 


Settle 

314X0 

37BXD 

32U0 


Jim. 

Jlv- 


BM 

was 

19100 

195S0 

197,00 


See .... 

Volume: 17 loti 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore casts per Ulo 
Close 


192X0 

194X0 

197X0 

198X0 


RSST Jun_ 
RSS 1 Jlv_ 
R5S2j«n_ 
RSS 3 Jun_ 
RSS4 Jun_ 
R55 5 Jun_ 


170X0 
171X5 
16+50 
76450 
16+50 
157 JO 


Aft 

17050 
171 J5 

vnsa 

16760 

16460 

I59J0 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM Ol L 
Matorataa rtnoolteper 25 tons 


Prevtoas 
BM As 
19+22 19+75 
19425 19560 
17725 19660 

198X0 199X0 


Previous 
BM Aft 
1 6860 169X0 

17025 17075 

166X0 169X0 

166X0 167X0 

16+00 164X0 

157X0. 159X0 


Mav 
Jon _ 
JIV- 


Sep. 


Nov 

Jan — _ 

Mor — 

Volume: 0 tots of 25 tons. 
Source: Reuters. 


BM 

1/400 

KB 

i:IS 

1.1J0 

1.110 

1.110 


1.430 

1JM 

1X90 

1200 

1.190 

1.160 

1,150 

1.140 

1.140 


Prey loos 
Bid 


1460 

1290 

uoo 

ljoa 

1.190 

1.160 

1.150 

1.M0 

1.140 


1630 

1430 

1240 

IM 

1330 

1200 

1.190 

1.180 

1.180 


S&p 100 Index Options 

May 10 


Mai May Joe JN 

MO - 20 - - 

745 a - IS* 17* 

no 9* li* a* a 

m «K A I 9* 

HB 1 M 4* Sft 

TO M6 Ilk 2ft 3 

Tow CnX volume 479777 
ToW call open lot 669471 
Total M vaftme TRIP 
Total pet open W. 438779 
I Oder: 

HtohM032 Lee 17742 C 
Source: CBOE. 


PBfrtast 

Mn JM Jit Aot 
- I/M - - 

m 1716 1/16 ft 
1/16 ft 7/16 ft 
1/16 11/14 1 3/1*1* 
lft 77/141 lft 
Sft 5ft Sft - 


43% of Cox Shares 
Reported Tendered 

The Assocuaed Press 

ATLANTA — About 43 percent 
of the shares outstanding of Cox 
Communications Inc„ which owns 
several' radio and television sta- 
tions, have been tendered to Cox 
Enterprises, a newspaper publish- 
ing company, under an oner that 
expires Friday, Cox Enterprises 
said Monday. Both are based in 
Atlanta. 

Cox Enterprises said that, as of 
last Friday, it had accepted for pay- 
ment 12.1 million shares of Cox 
Communications, which was a sub- 
sidiary of Cox Enterprises until 
1964. Cox Enterprises is offering 
$73 per share for the 59 J percent 
of Cox Communications stock not 
owned by Cox Enterprises or mem- 
bers of the Cox family. 


Cash Prices May 33 


] 


Commotf fy and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos, lb. 


Print eta* 64/30 38 *. yd _ 

Stool billots (Pitt j. tan 

Iran 7 Fdry. Phlla. tan 

Steal scrap No 1 hvy Pin. _ 
Lead Scat, lb _____ 

Coooer sleet, lb 

Tin ISfralte), lb . 


Man 

128 

063 

<73X0 

213X0 

7W80 

20-71 


Abo 

1X0 

060 

4SU» 

213X0 

100-101 

25-28 


60S 

+32* 

May +47 

149* 

+45 

+41 

+02% 

+90 

+18% 

Jul 

3X4 

+2S* 

+22% 

+25 

+01 

178* 

119ft 

Sop 

+24% 

+26 

izm 

+25% -40% 

3XT* 

+30* 

Dec 

134% 

136 

+32* 

135ft 

+01 

+74* 

+36 

Mar 

+38 

140 

+38 

+40 

+00* 

402 

+32 

Mav +31 

+31* 

+31 

+31* 

—02 


PfOv.DovOponint AXB off 36 


Metals 


Zinc E. SI. I_ Basil, lb . 

PaJkjdluTTVtn 

Silver N.Y. a 

Source: AP. 


69-72 70%- 73 
5X909 him 
0.46-X7 062-63 
109 752* 

A51S +70 


j Dividends May 13 


Comraev Per Amt Par 

STOCK SPLIT 

Natl Comme r ce Bancorp— 3-for -2 
USUAL 

2 i 5 

§ ^ 

0X4* 

0 25 

a 35 
a X5 
O AC 

a X7 

O .17 
O .15 

a jm 


Bibb Co 

Colonial Penn Go 
Cullum Cnrr»oanto5 
Economics Lab 
Fairfield Comm 
Fischboch 
Goodyear Canada 
HecTa Minins 
Imperial Oil Lid 
Myers Indus 
Noll Commerce Bop 
Park Chemical 
Povless Cashways 
Pitney Bowes 
RonsalreCorp 
ReseortJi 
Satetv-Kleeii 
^foolccote 
SCOA industries 
Slate Mutual Sec 
Triton Energy 
Union Halt 
Washington Water 
Wtcoatf Transm 


§ 3C 6-12 
-06 6-6 


*■25 

7-10 

7-15 

7-15 

5- 31 

6- 3 

6- 28 
6-14 

7- 1 
7-1 
7-2 

6- 7 

7- 1 
6-12 


7-1 

6- 27 

7- 25 
6-17 
6-20 


6-14 

6-20 

6-28 

6-10 

5- 21 

5- ZJ 

6- 7 
5-24 

43 

6- 7 

6- 3 
5-24 
43 

5-28 

5-2] 

414 

413 

7- 4 
423 
411 


O X2 * 6-20 6-6 

Q 25* 6-10 5-24 
a 63 414 5-22 
Q 26 428 47 

A-Annyol; M-Moatfaly; (Wblartraly; S-5 «ttL 


Source: UPI. 


DM Futures Options 

May 13 

W. Gernon Noifc-nUB oaks Bits per mot 


*Wk* CaMb-SeHte 

nki inn 

n 

33 

33 

34 

35 
14 


Jan 

Seo 

Dec 

177 

7. *4 

187 

101 

1X6 

230 

049 

1J3 

101 

ITS 

<m 

140 

009 

6*3 

107 

004 

HAS 

008 


PnteSefHe 
Jon SCO Dec 

0.13 061 0X9 

+36 IXI 725 

145 — 

166 202 — 

+43 268 280 

- 3X7 - 


Etfbnated total ml +5J7 
£S?i Prt- A»1 onee M. 49.141 

Pvti : Frl. vet 1J79 open laL 3+311 

Source; CME- 


Est. Sales Prev.Sates +576 

Prev. Day Open In*. 37X42 up«08 
CORN (CST7 

U00 ba minimum- dal tors per (Mahel 
3-70 +6Ft MOV 211 +IZ* 2X0* +82 

UI 171 JM 2JW4 2JV* +78W +79 

121* 2X6* Sep 2 47% 2X9 2X7% 2X6* — J1 

+95 +40% Dec +64% 2XS 2X3* +64 

3J0 +69U Mar 273ft 273* 272 +72% 

321ft +74* May +77* +78 +77% +77* — X2 

+86 +78 ft Jill +79% 279ft 279 27V — v01% 

EsL Sates Prev. sates 14HQ 

Prev- Day Open laL103X74 aft 643 
SOYBEANS (CBTI 
5X00 tw minimum- dollars per btahel 

7 2L f * m f* saw 5J4% — xs* 

7.99 577 JUt 586* 5X7* 580* 583* — -06ft 

7J4 579 Aug 518 519 581% 5X1% -X7* 

HI HL. *5? 52., ** 411 SjOVt — sn ^ 

&4B 5X3* Nov i95* 3X7 586 5X9* — X9% 

6-79 594* Jan 6X5 603 377 6X0 — X9ft 

7X2 686* Mar 615* 615* 604* 610ft —UPC. 

779 675 May 6.78 618 615 617* —.10* 

034 JW JM 435 620* 623 -^W* 

Etf-Smes Prev. Solas 17,914 

Prev. Day Open lot 39.732 up 84 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CUT) 

1 cn tons- dal tors per ton 
205X0 11690 May 124X0 7+600 12+00 mxo —120 

Jul nt » ,Z7 -» — jjo 

13080 12650 Aug 131X0 731X0 129X0 130X0 — jjg 

JS-2 HJ-52 S"* 1300 0470 132AD 1IU0 —1-20 

I5S °C» 137-® U7J0 I36X 73620 —1X1 

86M DSC \42JBD 141X0 14030 141X0 —1X0 

16+00 140X0 Jot 745X0 145X0 U3JD 143X0 —1X0 

20650 14550 Mar 151X0 157X0 14530 1*70 

76+50 150JB May 133X0 

167X0 15650 J«| 189X0 159X0 I59XQ 759X0 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 17764 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 5+690 up 213 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTI 
60X00 R>s- doUare par 100 BM. 

34X0 22X0 MOV 3+00 32X0 

3172 2277) Ju) 3033 30X5 

3175 2138 Aug 2953 27X3 

31.10 2+58 Sap M75 2375 

30J7 2+70 Ocf 2770 27 S3 

7»a 2250 Dec 2730 27.W 

29X7 2X60 Jan 2670 S» ^ 

2660 3640 Mar 26X2 36SJ 2618 

27X5 3640 MOV 

EstSatee Prev. Sates 0278 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 5X431 off 644 
OATStCBTJ 

XOOOtej ml temum-dollors per bushel 
L91 IXOft May 1X3* 1X3% 1X3 

UI* 1X7% Jul 1X0 1X0 1X8 

179 1X6% Sap LSI 1X8% 1X6% 1X6* 

1X2* L60ft Dec 1X2% 1X2% 1X1 1X1 —XI* 

L67% 1X3* Mar , 1X4 — X1% 

Est Sates Prev.Sctes M 

Prev. Day Open fnt 1018 opM 


COPPER CCOJUEX) 
25000 lbs.- c e nt s p ei Bx 


Hlah 


Low 


Open High Low Close ctw. 


EURODOLLARS (I66M) 

Si mHHaa-Miaf too pet 
9L57 ■+« JuA 91 XS 

9019 84X3 Sep 9083 

TOXI B6JB Dec 9074 

90X1 8610 Mar 89.96 

■970 8673 JUT 19X4 

8642 87.08 Stf 8939 

89.27 8778 Dec 89.13 

09X0 S7A4 MOT 8B.99 


9+49 91X3 *1X5 
96B4 9071 9880 *34 

TOT* 90X2 9033 +02 

08X0 09.92 >9X5 +X3 

■966 19X4 09X9 +A4 

e*<2 0939 19X0 + J» 

WJ7 B,M 89.17 +JS 
■+99 88.96 BM +J4 


92X0 

56X0 

Mar 

6630 

6650 

6615 


—40 

65.10 

6UB 





8803 

5700 

Jul 

6130 

65X5 

6675 

6605 

—45 

8+10 

57X0 

Sep 

6505 

66X5 

6545 

65.45 

— J5 

8625 

5BX0 

Dec 

6640 


6605 



8620 

5960 





66X0 

8000 

5940 

Mar 

6700 

6700 

668$ 

6630 

—35 

7600 

61.10 

May 

87.10 

6700 

67.10 

67.10 


7440 

61X0 

Jul 

6+10 

6+10 

6+10 

67X0 

-^30 

7090 

62X0 

54P 

6065 

6865 

6+20 

6705 


7030 

6600 

Dec 




60X5 


7070 

65X0 





68X0 

-75 

6600 

6600 

Mar 




6805 

-XS 

Esf. Sates 

.+300 Prev. Sates +546 




EiLSOlee 2+440 Prav. Sates 3S779 
Prev. Day Open Inti 10AQ0 upl 
■RIT1SN POUND (IMM) 

5 per pound- 1 pafni eauatsTOOOBl 

UBO 10235 Jun L04B U59J 13*W 17S35 +190 

1.4450 10200 Sep 17325 13410 17295 17415 +190 

> 22° JJMM ‘ DM! 17260 17360 17350 17345 +200 

J2HJ , -H5? I * ar 17320 +300 

17250 1.1905 Jitf L2W5 

Est Safes 9J67 Prev. Sates 7044 
Pn-v. Day Open ini. J54S4 w6R 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

SPer dir- 1 PomreauaH (0.0081 


.7835 

.7054 

Jun 

7272 

jm 

320 

3754 

-7585 

.ncs 

Sep 

.770 

3340 

3725 

3239 

.7566 

JON 

Dec 

3m 

3236 

3230 

3300 

J504 

4981 

Mor 




Jill 

.7350 

.7070 

Jun 




71t0 

Etf.Satei 

1-242 Prav. Sates 4X23 




X 


ALUMINUM (COMEXJ 
40000 ft«s.- cento per lb. 
■2-90 
49X5 
99X0 
7630 
70X0 
76X0 
73M 
6675 
6345 
5+10 


r=mt ven _ 

Prev. Dav Open inf. +379 afro 
SILVER (COMEW 
sxae.tray ab- cento per troy at 


4740 


4805 

4805 

4+85 

48X0 

—45 

49.18 

Jot 




4900 

—45 

4+30 

Jul 

49X5 

49X5 

49 JO 

49X5 

—45 

49X5 

5eo 

5+60 

5040 

50X5 

5+18 

—JO 

5+45 

Dec 

31X5 

51X5 

51X0 

51X5 

—JO 

51X5 





jW r 

— xo 

5145 

Mar 




■ 

—35 

5195 

May 





—35 

54X0 

Jut 





—33 

5100 








Dm 





—35 







—35 


Mar 





—35 

300 Prav.Stfet 

257 





7235 

7259 

3395 

3370 


7060a +50 
.iws +50 
.10500 


7266 +35 

7288 +34 

7315 +37 

7344 +35 


+11 

+28 

+17 

+17 



15110 

55+0 

May 

63+0 

6620 

637X 

6603 

14610 

11810 

8620 

Jul 

6410 

64B0 

6600 

6670 

5730 

5ep 

65+0 

6780 

64+5 

67+1 

12300 

5900 


6600 

6910 

6600 

6904 

12150 

5950 





6950 

11910 

6070 

Mar 

tout 

6960 

6B10 

7019 

18480 

6710 


7110 

7110 

7110 

7160 

9430 

6350 

Jul 




7384 

9400 

6410 





74+8 

7990 

6670 

Dec 

7390 

7W0 

7490 

759X 

7890 

7250 

JOT 



7654 

2*5*>s 

7410 Mar 

36000 Prev. Sales 1+168 


77+5 




01 % 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEJ 
40000 1 bs^ cento per Bx 
69X0 5905 Jun *535 6372 

67X7 60X5 Aug 6475 6475 

6690 6010 Oct 62X5 62X0 

67X5 61X0 Dec 6370 6400 

67X5 6+TO Feb 6470 6470 
67X7 63X0 Apr 6+50 65X0 

Est. Sates 16066 Pnev.ScpM 2X135 
Prav. Day Open tot 5+953 Oft 865 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMQ 
44000 Tbs.- cento per Sl m _ 
7235 61X0 May 6573 4035 


7370 

7100 

7+33 

mo 

79X0 

69X0 


6447 Aup 


67XS 

67X0 


67XS 

6705 

6870 


66.10 MOT 

1X13 Prev. Sale# 1X70 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 7X16 oft 171 


63X0 

62X3 

6370 

6425 

6+10 


67X7 

67X0 

67J0 

6805 

6900 


4+6 2 — 

6+73 — 
62X2 —.10 

6SJ0 — L 
64X8 — 

6+50 


6570 

67X2 

67X5 

030 

4030 

•900 


+2S4 
+25X 
+25 J 
+3*3 
+2*3 
+26X 
+2*9 
+273 
+273 
+303 
+303 
+294 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7+359 cfT2S2 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 tray az^ dollars per fray az. 

26600 25800 MOV 284.10 +10X0 

28700 25100 Jun 27480 27400 27400 38500 +10X0 

£| S S gsaasMss 

.s&es iss P^ur ” ^ +i ^ 

Prev. Day Opan lot 11^07 up 215 
PALLADJ JM (NYA4W 
1 00 trav ciz- dottors per az 

114X0 11100 May 115X0 +1X5 

1»X8 10+50 Jun 11300 114X0 11+00 113X0 +L3S 

ML» U+» Sep 11+25 114X5 11+73 1UX0 +175 

>41-50 1K50 Dec 11+75 114J5 17+73 I1L75 +175 

12730 10*50 tear 11500 11S0B 11400 113X0 +1X5 

Jun 175 

EsLSates 498 Prev. Sales 492 
Prev. Day Open Int 7739 UP 52 
Etf-Sdto_498 Prev.S0te» 492 
Prev. Day Open inf. 7X29 upB 
GOLD (COMEW 
TO Iruv at- donors per Iroy ca. 

33700 3*300 May 316.10 33500 716.10 33490 +880 

Jun 319-00 3030 718X0 32630 -HUM 

Jul 3ZL5D 328X0 T7B qi iwe-vi +n«o 

48500 29100 Aus 32300 321X0 37170 33030 +8X0 

49200 29700 Otf 326J* mOO 32600 334X0 +900 

4 » 30 301-50 Dec 377-90 3006 33700 33900 +9.10 

«SXD 30608 Feb 33600 34500 33600 34400 +900 

49680 mjO Aar 34800 34800 34800 34900 +900 

<3+7* raiXD Jun 35+60 +9X8 

19500 gs 388 ^ 

^Stes^P^Sa^"^ “ ^ 

Prev. Day Open Int 134065 w>2X53 


prev. Dav Ooen lot. 12093 up I/ 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM! 

Sper banc- 1 petal equate 8008001 
.lion 094 H) Jun .moo .MM 

.J«« 0*680 Sea 

.70440 09670 Dec 

EM, Sates _ 1 Prev. Sides 1 

Prav. DavOaea bit L507 
GERMAN MARK (IMMI . •- 

Sperraork-1 petal equals (&80D1 
0733 0905 Jun 0251 0368 

0545 0930 Sep Jm 0290 

0610 0971 Dec 0300 03U 

JflS 3040 MOT -3330. 3330 

EmS. Sales 32007 Prev. sates 18X70 
Pr»v. Day Open tot. 49X82 up 342 
[ JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

1 *cvora >- 1 netateauais « 80 ooan 
004450 003826 Jan 003986 083998 0O3M1 JB3989 

S2f?S -SSSS D»C .004048 004048 0 0(048 J04045 

004160 004090 Mar £0*060 

EstSatee 4095 Pie* sates 4.141 
Prav. Day Open Inf. 17009 up 516 
] SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sp &jT noc - 1 1 PotatequaHSIUIOOl 
XTOO 0439 Jun 0865 J8R XBS2 JIM 445 

S is ^ 5S s £ S ^ 

sa^i+aoT 13 • 40 ' 2 -® 05 445 

Prev. Day Open mr. 24091 off 451 


Industrials 

LUMBER (CME1 

’SfS® "f.Jrar I0oobd. N. 

22508 131.10 May 14850 148X0 146/60 14700 —+10 

t* 'Stf* 15600 iSjo { 5j0 —130 

Sep 15700 15700 law 15400 1X0 

NOV 15600 15700 15*00 15440 ZjJQ 
SOU 161X0 I61XO 15940 MOJO =L» 




23050 

197X0 

186.10 

18700 

19500 


139 JO 
13SJ0 
13700 

1+LM . _ _ _ 

1M0O Mar 145x6 16+60 ifciiSC istS — arn 
.173*0 15300 May M9X0 T70JB M80O IMA 


2030 Prev. Sates +316 
Prev- Day Open Int. 8X96 oHac 
COTTON JtNYCS) 

SUM lbs- cents per lb. 

7935 6305 Jul 65X5 M P * 

77X0 6403 Ocf 64X0 

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s 

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6900 

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Apr 

Prev. Soles 4X42 


RN 

7+TO 


4679 

4890 


To Our Readers 

Floating Rates Notes were not 
available m this edition because of 
computer problems. 


Chrysler Subsidiary 
Names 4 Executives 

United Press Iniemoitonal 
TROY. Michigan — Chrysler 
Financial Corp. nampH four execu- 
tives on Monday to new positions 
in the credit and financing subsid- 
iary of Chrysler Corp. 

They are George V. Barmashi, 
vice president of Eastern U.S. 
Area; Luther A. Neeb. vice presi- 
dent of Central U.S. Area; Sidney 
A. Morien, vice president of West- 
ern U.S. Area; and Willan R. Brad- 
ley. lice president of Canada. 


Head of Ford Unit Named 

United Press ImmaiionaJ 

DETROIT— Donald B. Rassier 
has been named president of Ford 
Aerospace & Communications Co., 
the Sl.S'billion subsidiary of Ford 
Motor Co. Mr. Rassier, 55, served 
as executive vice president of Fair- 
child Industries Inc. and chief exec- 
utive officer of its aerospace group. 


HOOSfC ME) 

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308 

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229 

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US T. BILLS (IMM3 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Over-the-Coimter . 

NASDAQ Notlanol Mortal Prices ' 


May 13 


Sam In 

ISOs HWi Uum 


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JKU 


ADVERnSEMEVT 

INTT3RNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
13 May 1985 




AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
CwJ A I- Mol Trust, SA 




— (w 
—td 1 G.T. 
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UM 34 50331 3»3» + ' 

2ft 12 53 »V, f mb + 

4151k 151k 15* 

41 10ft M 10 — 



Arab Bank Limited 

The most experienced Arab banking institution in the world. 


Um. 


ARAB BANK LIMITED 

With 55 years of growth and 
experience we are the largest 
financial institution in the Arab 
World with more than 100 of our 
branches and affiliated offices 
concentrated in the Arab countries 
of the Middle East. We are also 
worldwide with offices in all the 
major financial centres creating 
a complete range of services, from 
the simplest funds transfer to the 
most complex trade and project 
financing. 

FOREIGN TRADE SERVICES 

Trade services at the Arab Bank 
reflect our unparalleled knowledge 
of business conditions in the Arab 
World. Each of the managers in our 
more than 100 Middle East offices 


is a specialist in his own region, 
with direct telecommunication 
links throughout the network. 

We understand the special require- 
ments of exporters and importers 
and we are accustomed to accom- 
modating those needs. We work 
with you to ensure the success of 
your foreign business. Your trans- 
actions are completed quickly, 
accurately and expertly. 

PRIVATE BANKING 

Private clients receive individual 



attention and meticulous service 
at the Arab Bank Limited. Strict 
confidentiality is our rule. We offer 
domestic banking services, and 
through our International Banking 
Facility the full range of inter- 
national banking services for the 
individual. 


WHO TO CONTACT 

If you are considering negotiating 
any business in the Middle East 
why not contact us first?— You 
will be pleasantly surprised by 
our expertise and advice. 

Arab Bank Ltd. Empire House 
8/14 St. Martins-le-Grand , 
London EC1P 1DR 
Telephone (01) 606 7801-5 

































Mondays 

AMEX. 

dosing 


TcWes Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBU1VE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 19 


Japan’s Trade Surplus With U.S. Widens 

pan s trade surplus with the United **-*- - - a&utuiumu 


United Press International 

boosted Ja- 

... 'cited States to a 

proviaonal record $3.46 billion last month, up 
from the previous monthly high of $131 billion. 
Finance Ministry officials said Monday, 
Pretinrinar/ customs figures showed exports to 
the Umted Serose 12.4 percent over Amil 1984 
loa record $5.78 billion, the officials said. The gain 
was largely the result of a record $109 bilHooin 
auto exports. 


imports were slow, the officials said. 
Japan’s 


Passenger car exports to the United Slates rose 
203 percent over the At 


theAprfl 1984 levd, tiny ra id. 


April marked the start of the 1985 fiscal year, in 
vrfuch a voluntary Japan-U-S. auto export ceiling 
was raised from an annual rate rrf 1.85 million cars 
to 2 J million. 

Imports from the United States during the 


Japan’s overall international trade s u rplus for 
. was $3.26 bfflion, short of the record $4.63 
n set in December 1984. they said. Overall 
“ports rose 2.9 percent to $14.86 billion whDe 
imports rose 23 percent to $1.6 billion. 

Exports to Chinn soared 1052 percent from the 
1984 level to $1.09 billion, whDe imports rose 26 
percent to $634 million, the officials said. 

But trade with the European Community de- 
clined. Exports fell 10.7 percent to $1.47 billion 
and imports fell 42 percent to $706 million, they 
said. 

Japan’s surpluses with China and the EC were 
$451 nolfion and $760 million, respectively,- in 
April. 


Japan Introduces 
Bank Guidelines 


Reuters 


TOKYO — The Japanese Fi- 
nance Ministry said Monday that it 
had introduced a series of new 
on overseas operations 
Japanese banks, including a 
risk-asset ratio system in their off- 
- balance-sheet transactions. 


It said that each Japanese bank’s 
total claims for nonresidents 
should not exceed 14 times — com- 
pared with 15 times now — its 
capital account, which is equivalent 
to the total of stockholders’ equity, 
reserves for possible loan kisses 
and two other types of special re- 
serve. 


New Troubles Seen for Oil Industry 


» j. * ** 
'■> £ 



>f-. 

■x |t • 


■V*!' 

Ar 


* 

• 


(Continued from Page 13) 

L\ restructuring,’' said Robert Sto- 
iL* St -A bangh, head of the Energy Project 
at the Harvard Business School, 
Pickens had not come along and 
done this, somebody else would 
havt” 

The results of the restructuring 
are still the subject of debate. 
Some, Hire PhiKp fC Verieger Jr„ an 
aO economist affiliated with the 
Charles River Associates, a con- 
sulting concern, argue that the in- 
dustry could be hampered by the 
> „ changes, particularly the big in- 
• ^ ^ creases in debL Because of the in- 

. ’ ** \ \ dus try’s rising debt, be said, “there 

■ 2»5vi will be less ml found.’’ 

* Others, including MA Add- 
man, an economics professoral the 
Massachusetts Institute at Tech- 
nology, contend that, for all the 
tunnoQ, the industry is healthy. 

The number of olwdls drilled in 
1984, for instance, was up nearly 1 1 
percent from, the previous year, to 
41,095. according to the American 
Petroleum Institute. 

“What the industry did in the 
early ’80s was overshoot, and ids 
come in for a surprisingly soft land- 
ing,” be said. “I don’t think these 
consolidations make much differ- 
ence.” 

For now, uncertainty about -oil 
prices and new tax laws; which 
would remove breaks for oO drill- 
ers, has pul a recent damper on ofl 
field activity. The number of active 
drilling rigs fell to 1,855 during the 
week of April 29, from 2,713 in the 
last week m December. It was' the 
lowest levd since drilling activity 
bottomed at 1,877 rigs in Apnl 
1983, according to the Hngbes Tool 
Co., which monitors drilling activi- 
ty-. 

Only a few years ago tire Ameri- 
can oil industry was drafting its 

1 future on the assumption of ever- 

777 rising oil prices. Although gasoline 
use picked up a little, overall de- 

. mand for crude oQ last year in the 

United States was aboat 15.6 m 1- 


eted this year and the company 
not pay off other debts. 

Arco also said it would abandon 


are stiH rising, have demonstrated, 
the industry’s woeful underestima- 
tion of oil’s price elasticity — bow 

much c on su m ers could and would the money- losing gaerdm* refining 
cut bade in the face of higher^ and marketing business east of the 

_ . * . _ Mississippi River. The idea of 

In 1973, the year of the Arab ofl 


The off-balance-sheet items in- 
clude note-issuance facilities and 
revolving underwriting facilities. 
Officials said Japan must decide on 
detailed weighting of those and 
other items before the risk-asset 
ratio system is adopted sometime 
next year. 


embargo, the United States con- 
sumed 60J000 British thermal units 
of energy for every doDar of gross 
national product. Last year, with a 
barrel of Saudi Light crude ofl av- 
eraging $28, compared with an av- 
erage of $3.89 a band in 1973,jhe 




“ • c t- 

«e 



a 

" it 

• Ti 

* 

j* 


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'• tt 




• ■ ‘i '» 

r- a 

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; • t *« 

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figure had fallen to 42J000 BTUs 
per dollar of GNP. A BTU is the 

amount <jf front nw«M tO increase 

the temperature of a pound of wa- 
ter by one degree FahrenheiL 
World ofl prices have been sur- 
prisingly steady spring, largely 
because of production cutbacks in 
ShikC Ar abia StiQ, many analysts 
predict that prices wfll fall by an- 
other few dollars if the Saudis in- 
crease their output, as expected, to 
between 4 mimm and 5 miHKm 
bands a day from 33 millio n bar- 
ids in the Inst quarter. 

. Gists for exploration and devel- 
opment of new reserves in the Unit- 
ed Stales havefaHemmce the wild- 
catting frenzy of 1980 and 1981. 
Yet drilling opportunities in the 
nation have waned after more than 
a century of prospecting. And for- 
activhy is regarded as pdhti- 
risky. 


% j; ’ 

t" a 


7 lion bands a day, or well bdow the 
peak average ofl 8.8 million bands 
in 1978. 

Gains from conservation, which 




many companies have cot 
back on spending for exploration 
and development This enables 
than to borrow more, since they 
have reduced risk in their oil opera- 
tions, but they still have big cash 
flows, accenting to Ronald M. 
Freeman, managing director and 
head of the energy group at Salo- 
mon Brothers, the investment 
bankers. 

Atlantic Richfield, which has 
large Alaskan oO reserves, raised its 

annual dividend by $ 1 , to $4, and 
inaugurated a plan to borrow 
heavily to raise the $4 billion it 
needed to buy back shares. Its debt 
as a percent of total capital would 
rise to 633 percent by the end of 
the year, from 323 percent al tire 
end of 1984, if the buyback is corn- 


coast- to-coast marketing networks, 
once the pride of companies such 
as Texaco. Exxon and Arco, be- 
came wasteful in part because of 
big inventories needed to supply 
the networks. 

“Arco looks very, very smart, 
and the stock market is saying 
that,” said Mr. Freeman of Salo- 
mon. Arco’s shares have jumped 
about $10 since the restructuring 
announcement on April 29. 

Exxon has taken a different 
route to raise its stock price. The 
largest U3. ail company has al- 
ready spent $43 billion to buy bade 
11.8 percent, or 102 miffi on, of its 
shares, in the last 18 months. It 
earlier wrote off $30 mflhon from 
its investment in office automation, 
but kept its debt as a percent of 
total capital at alow 17 percent, at 
the end of 1984. 

Amoco, fooneriy Standard 03 
Co. (Indiana), spent $1.7 billion 
from last May .through April 23 to 
buy back 27.4 million shares. The 
p ro g ram will end when it reaches 
30 million shares, or 10 percent of 
the company's totaL Amoco has 

alien handed ownership of its strug- 
gling minerals business to its share- 
hdaeis, and it has cut 3300 jobs 
and sold parts of its chemical busi- 
ness and its Australian operations. 

■S till nnlilre Atlantic Richfield 
and others cutting back on explora- 
tion, Amoco is plunging ahead. Its 
budget for capital spending is up 15 
percent this year, to $5.1 bflhon. 

Meanwhile, Chevron, which ac- 
quired Gulf Oil for $132 billion a 
year ago, and Texaco, which 
bought Getty 03 for S10.1 billion, 
are awash in the debt used to fi- 
nance the purchases. Both have 
struggled to cut costs. Thor stock- 
holders have seen little apprecia- 
tion in stock values in the year since 
the takeovers, which raised their 
domestic oil reserves but duplicat- 
ed many administrative functions. 


New Options 
In Eurobonds 
Paid in Cash 


(CoBtmned from Page 13) 


markets is the cost of money ex- 
pressed in interest rates. At last 
Friday’s close in New York, for 
example, call Eurodollars were 
trading at a hair below 8 percent on 
an annual basis, while one-year cer- 
tificates of deposit brought roughly 
8.75 percent. 


Until the explosion of ofl prices 
in. 1973 caused dollar deposits on 
the books of domestic and overseas 
money markets to burgeon, most of 
these funds were largely dollars, 
floating outside the United States. 
Oddly, (he Eurodollar market was 


inadvertently created by the Soviet 
st-wc 


Union during the post-world War 
II deterioration m relations be- 
tween Washington and Moscow. 


“Fearing that their funds might 
be frozen by oar government, as 
was U»tw the case with Iranian 
funds after the hostage crisis, Mos- 
cow asked London bankers to hold 
their dollars' in special accounts," 
Mr. Blin said. “Because the Mid- 
east oil exporters traditionally de- 
posited their funds with London 
and other European hanks their 
post-1973 inflow of dollars swelled 
these funds." 


Today, he continued, banks and 
corporations around the world 
lend, borrow and trade these funds. 
“Aside from today’s more than am- 
ple supply of three funds, the un- 
regulated transactions do not show 
up on balance sheets for a number 
of technical reasons, which is most 
convenient for many hanks and 
corporations,” he 


w 


* \ i- 


... 

•j J ' 

. P ' 


£S- 


:»*5\ 

v • 


THE BURMAH OIL PUBLIC LIMITED COMPANY 


7 % 1972/1987 
Lax.Fr. 500,000,000. 


informed that the annual 
1985 baa been effected 


2657-2716, 

29893106. 


Holders of the above mentioned Bonds are 
instalment of LuxFr. 50,000,000. — due June 
by drawing by lot in the presence of a notary. 

The fallowing bond numbers have been dra wn : 

2381-2487, 2563-2568, 2579, 2623-2631, 2636. 

2720-2762. 2780-2783, 2791-2967, 2971-2983, 

3113-3573. 

Bands so called will become due and payable on and after June 30, 1985. 
The principal amount of Bonds outstanding after the a mort inttion of 
June §0. 1985 will be Lux-Fr. 

Finally it is recalled that die fol 
in 1964 have not yet been presented for payment: 

65586567. 


BARQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
SoeUti Ananyme 
Paying Agent 

Luxembourg May 14% 1985. 


PRI/TECH 

PRIVATE AMERICAN TECHNOLOGY S.A. 


Societe anonyme d’Ertvesfissement 
Si Age rood: Luxembourg - 20 bo ub vad Emm anuel Servais 
R.C- Luxembourg EL 20S66 


Messieurs Its sctiooisnres soot infonnfcs du lint que l’assemblfe gfinerale 
extraordinaire de la sod&& qtri s'est tame le 29 anil 1965 i 15.-00 o’a pu 
delibfarer. faute de quorum. 

En consequence, une nouvdle assembJfie gfafcrale extraordinaire, avec le 
rotate orrira du jour, en aravoqnde poor le 18 jnm i 1500, qui dfclibbrcn, 
queique soil le nombre cT actions reprSsentfces. 

Lore de 1’aseemblfe gtaerak extraordinaire, route action donne droit 1 un 
vote. 


Tout actionnaire pent voter par mandahrire. 

AGn de paitiriper £ css assemblies, lea propriftaxres d 1 actions an porteur 
devront diposer leuis actions cinq joare ouvraWes avanl I’assemblie an 
eiige soda! de RU/TECH ou anpi^s d’une banqne acceptable par 
PRJ/TECR. 


Poor la i 
BANQUEPRIVEESA. 
Sacc nraa le de Luxembo urg 
20, Bd. E. Servais 

T^i^-jnbniirg 




' u * 


"S 





A Conference on 
Trade and Investment 

OPPORTUNmES 

BtDAPEST, JlME.13-14 1985. 


The International Herdd Tri- 
bune conference on 'Trade and Invest- 
ment Opportunities in Hungary” wjB be 
of keen ir#erest to any executive con- 
cerned about fuhxe eaxiornic relations 
between East end West 

Speakers at this landmark 
conference vM indude Hungaricn 


benkers and economists. 


For further information, 
please contact the Irdemariwnd HeroAd 
Triune conference office, 181, avenue 
Charles de GauHe, 92521 NeuiSyCedex, 
Franca TeL 747 1265l Teloc 613 595 F. . 


I 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SHORT TBtM STAY. Advaikm at a 
. noW withovt mcoovwoi orea, led at 
tone in ike rtudw, one bedoo ft 
and non in PereTSO^IM; 5 « » 
A(.-W t wdsfUwi».Rari«7th. 


(Con tinned From Back Page) 


EMPLOYMENT 


SHORT RB4TAL M HUOfc tfwfe I 

and 2 room*, beot*A*y d e ui i ul ed. 
Contact: Sofirfis*. 6 «*« Wcoue, 
75006 P air Tel flf 3S9 9g 50 


PBimOUS AVE AWNTAWt 
near Qtampt Byiera, 120 iqm. + 
large terrace, raw on Serie, hgh 
das furniture. 723 43 28. 


IS DAYS -3 MONTHS. 14th, 1 5th. 
Studio, 2. 1 & 4 roata, furnished tram 
F19S per ooy. Tat 30o 78 79 


5TH: UOOAY KNmOUSE 125 am 

2 bedroBw s , Svino, >iew, For June & 

July. SawTwWuW too? 28 


BCC9T10NAL WW on Seine;. 30 

*qjn. itudb, sofa bee 
new. Tel: $7 95 


MNUUSi LovWy 2 room on i 
comfort, potm. Mr. Auoj 
amTwnih. Tet 274/J 


SHORT TBtM n Latin Ouster. 

No operfc. Tefc 3293B81 


BOIAOONE MBKL Studo X nn, 
00 nrtTfeL 500 21 S. 


•errooe, F3300 1 


16* JASMM. Luanoa, 2/3 room, 

afl oomfort. RS300 netT!* 224 0030 


I2TH. By owner charming 2-room. 

6^ wwftu. F5000/monfrw2301 *0 


PARIS AREA UNFUKNXSHZD 


16th FOCH 

Superb Aiaam, F600Q. 

7th BAC, EXCEPTIONAL 

Newty redone Beoephory 2 be di oo BB , 
' naeTtroom. 

SA3 6S3S. 


7th NVAUXS. Law iuniriout W 

net. Tet 720 W 95. 


io, F45D0 r 


SPAIN 


SPAM, JAVEA 


Vila, beailifulacnien&fnered 
' w^h term 


itng pool van term 


gym, mn-gol Wc on the property 
Aim icing boordi in die Medterra-' 


uxxsh, uuna, 

the p 


■B. 

m i . 
Pans 


inducted in die SoBow 

DOOm 

.. in June 
Srussefs 322/51 


22/5TTTB85. 


SWITZERLAND 

G8CVA-C0UXMT BEAUTBU, 

auet, furnished, fuly otjuppei t- 
beciwn apertmmr. Tertx*, tie- 


> Od Tet 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


tOOKMGPOR4BB)ROOMHaU5£l 

mid p yden lo rent in RuaB Maimat-4 

■ German, VasnotonsafbrsJaff| 


son, s* German, Veen et area fa r den 

uiA inteiiutiund corporation. Phone 

Pari* 501 54 12 ext 3 m. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSmOPS 

AVAILABLE 


CHB ACCOUNTANT 

noun b 

to luperoiM genera) & cost account _ 
department or 7 persons, financial re- 
porting A ksradtvite tor the French 
Bihsicubry of a US mmpqny. CoSege 
degree in armurii(£ required expert- 
once in inia portion, fluent French & 
English. Send CV & e xpe cted compen- 
R*an toe 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 
GRACO FRANCE 
113 rue dn Solats 
94S23 Rwvi S#c LI 41, Fraxe 


the\vorld. 



GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


MADRD — -SPAM 

rasnotous once 

AND FUU. BUSHES SBVKE5 
needs wondwxk representatives with 
industrial contacts aid a huge 
com ma n sdng senrkzs 
BranTrnri, Pzn Uob % Mad 
28044 Tek 419 10ST -ftc 44893 


DOCTORS (MIL} WANT® to pro 
corauRDtion & endonemnt nr 


vide i 


for US ccgmetiacccnpony. L3*r- 
d remuneration far I (by / morrh. 
Contact: B. Buxton & M. Bremer, Zu- 


Parie May 1420 ■ George V, 


PUBUm OF vmieKsed EndeMon- 
hPwo re- 


Q UO jy ifr/Wy mogisnc i 
quires sub editor 


•n4h 10 yton or 
fport ytp enwoe in jaumiaa ond 


i n uguu i n e produchon. Good knowi- 


Kl^e of Frendi needed. Write with 


. to SAPS 7 . 11 rue de TthEran, 
75009 Paris. 


mte pmrf operane of our Monte Cato 
ph owr o otn w® be in June. Come ond 
ze the most spectacular automobile 
in the vfarid. 


IM STATION sub hum Jrfy 1985 
binaud Dll u>Uh rado 
Tefciratues DUCHB^E, 

13. Pork 542 13 11 


PABS RELOCATION service seeta 
part-tens dynamk, b£ngud housng 
resecech cruistuX. Wortang papers ft 
cor MMrdiaL Please cc& §066 14 


GENERAL 

POSTTIONS WANTED 


COMPUTER SPECIALIST, Monoge- 
wrrlevej data bows, office Quanta- 
t oy tr t ryn l, seeta pn a>pn ydh i nti 
oiuuK uU J fl or US mutrinutand in 
Gaieva or contact in USA cr Mdde- 

Eac. Write t* M. 18- 11 51 90, PUsid- 

te, CH-1211 GenevoL 


CONTRACTOR as new for pidc up 
auae. etc. Tile & roofing & kitchen 
Mr. Afcert Mor- 


ris 1906 Eoymond Lone. OraroidB, 
CA 92054 USA. 61 r 


. 619-439-4885. 


YOUNG COUPLE. aperien 
aim, May- Nov. seek jobs tasfess 
& mne enmv on 50 yacht, afi destino- 
ttonx. PadSty owraans. Tet Office 
OODO 00 00 France. 


EXPBODKED MOVER. Security exsn 
s cab p odtion with 6nbo ssy or enm - 
dada company. &ceBerfl refer- 
Cal >£**1456 51 15 


YOUNG GBtMAN fashion model, 
hiahty educated, bats fw cm interest- 
ing position. London 245-0080. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ACADEMIE DE AAJSQUE A RARE 
recherche prafeneun de piano. &v 
vover cm. avec photo a Bax 2047, 

Herald Tribune. 92521 1* 

Fr a nc e 


Newly Cedex, 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU WUR for 7 marth boy in Cdloroda 

• • ft /Mi " J ■ e. 


jneeiyieuang m D/CH during June. 

es bemre 31 


Send remme/ ra f er ences 

Moy fa P.O. Bax 4094, Englewood, 
CO 80155 USA 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVA1ABLE - AU PAII^ 


dildren s non^r, m ans Helpers & i 


Ev»in dcvnestic 

help.wnrtdwido. Ccd Scwne Bureau, 


London 730 B1 2 2/51 42 (24 hoard U- 
8950&&LOAhi G. 


CfMPAGY.TieE 


ALWAYS AVA8ABU LONDON onhr 

babyninden. 1st does defly reuiik ft 
chauffeurs. Sacne Bureau 730 8122 


1 5142. licenced eBnptoyraer* opency 


AUTOMOBILES 


1985 MERCEDES 230 E, al < 


fate. France area, tab {/A 90 23 98 


IQDOp honest bn. F130! 
ea. Ti 


. MONETS cop y cofcd ion 
for tap ar France (9^391 294 


AUTO RENTALS 


AUSTRIA A EAST E UROPE US51100 
por day. AiitehirBQ, FrcBixaribrueck- 
and r. & ArlQ20 VSema Tet 241694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


T» CAS SUPPING 
SPCOAUSTS 

PABS Q) 500 03 04 

CANNB/MCE 39 43 44 

FSANKFUCT {061 COTflO 51 

BOW / COLOGNE P22B) 212921 
STUTTGART 
MUNCH 
B89ABHAV04 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
UOSANGaB 
MONTREAL 
AGOiTS 
locate it to w to bring it to yon 


B80B1 
10 45 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


GBtMAN CARS 
FROM GERMANY 


6ritcrienced ea trader far Mercedes, 
Pend* or BM* . bnmtaato itobvery. 
Fufl service xnport/ export US. DOT * 
EPA far tourist tnd dealer. OCM. Tt 


itegenstr. 8. 4 Duestddorf, W. 

rryLTet 0^211^34646, tolex I 


8587374. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EXCAUBUR 

;v 


New far 1965 (far boose onto) s 
tors 5i7 lee VBi 


tpecHl 


b a 

Motors 517 hreVBerv 
300 HP. in its natural 
'or 425 dP. when sup erch arged 
foptand). 


The efav el the 158t 
CorKovwe fafamcttonM d W e g o ne e 
April 1985 


DcEvnry oppraanxXehr 8 weeks from 
u wn ad ute hr from howroon, 


order or mneddely . 
wMe cA o mt iun Icon. For mae mfor- 
metaon contact; 


EX CAUBUR MO TOR CAR 

DtSTERJUTOaS LUtUTHI 
Port Wont Avn de Is Coda 


Tefc 33 

Te 


93 - 25 AS 91 
449870 MCS 


TAKE THE PRORT 

|On your new &urogw onto purchcee 


lavaiUde 


Imake their buft buying prices cmA 
(or your inctoiduai purchase 
Printers Import 
* you take the profit 
» we do the work 
Worldwide tls pmer tt t to ynir 

tpaccfcotion. 

Send far a quotation toe 
MYCAI 
of Uxbridge 

(15 minutB from London Airport) 
SWtedtor Strew, Uxbridge. 
Middksex, fagtond UB8 1AB. 
TeL UK JG 8W71073/72103 
TT* IX 8813271 GECOMS G 


MYCAR 


COOPS ST JAMB 

OfflOAl AG84T 
OIF BMW (GB) LTD 


While you me in Europe- we cat offer 
anaderaUe ravings on brand new 
BMW an to most sp ea f tootions. Fufi 
factory vat airy. 


We can also . 
drew lax free 


or left had 


dive tax true BMm a tourer prices. 
We ri*> supply factory built buftei- 
proof BMWs and the ALpma BMW 


rixigB fax free. 

Can landea (01) 429 4499. 


NEW MERCEDES] 

PORSCHE, BMW. EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

far MMBMJEdefrvery 
BEST 5EKVICE 

^flssanakf 

RUTEINC 


TounuHtr. 52. £000 Fronkfot 
W Gernv, tel (ffi 69-232351. th 411559 
tefarmotion anty by 


' 10 YEARS 

W» Defiver Com la Bit 


TRANSCO 


Keeping a constant stock of more than 
300 brand new cot, 
lu c kin g 5000 happy dents every year. 
Send for Free mubioobr c atalog. 
Tnxnco SA. 95 NoordBkxti^ 
2030 AiXvverp, tolaum 
Tel 323/542 62 40. Tb 26XST TRANS B 


EUROPORT TAX 
HUE CARS 


Cal or unite far free ertriog. 
“ 12011 


Ti 

Telex 


HCAJINL 


TRANSMUMX BBGA1M, 21 GesteL 
sebexta. 8-2241 Zoervd, Anhverp. Tell 
03-384.1054 Tbt 3230i Trmwn 0 In 
stode Mercedes, BMW. ASOt 


LEGAL SERVICES 


US I MMKSRATlQNvriqs, Altys. Spttgs 
I33129J 


8, Kocteey, 1925 Briciefl'Av.'Mnn FL 
H29. Tet (305) 4439600. tx 441449. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ICELANDAIR 

30 Yecvs Anniveraary 

Spndd one way 
vaid May 7th • Is 


•New Yarik. 


•lee 




For Bound top^ cat 


fexej 
ne 7th 
— F 1,790 
— F 1^90 
— F 1,990 
F 1,990 
FL390 
F 2,990 
F 2,990 


KHAMMJR 

Tefc fl) 742 52 26 


NY ONEWAY $150. Everyday NY. 

SU5. Pore 225 92 90. 


Wert Const! 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE NEW WAY TO 
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GREEK I$IE5 

Luxury 7-day cruises aboard 
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• Weekly duurtures hem Vance 
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• Coffina on MyfcnoL Crete 
SaMom, KiKodaa i 

Dubrovni, ” 

Zadar. 




far ’ mmec ki tB reservations contact; 

OCEAN CRUISE LINES 

Venicm San Mar co 1497 
Tel: fill 709622 
Athens: 97 Synjyo u Ave. 

(0) 9020921 


CHAB7B A YACHT M G8SCE. Di- 

rect from owner of Imgest fleet. 


Greece. Tel: 4529571, 4529486. Tbc 

21-200a USA offices: Ft ftaai. Am- 

bler, PA 19002. Tefc 215641 1624. 


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Acxtdemiai 2B, Athens 10671, Greece. 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

FA/lnt e rpr efa r ft Tourism Guxle 


PARIS 562 0587 


■kUltlrk 

YOUNG ELEGANT LADY PA 
Represemctne services far VIPs 

ZURICH 830.58.S8. 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL VIP. YOUNG LADY 
Datmguahed. Began, MtMmgucl 


AMSTERDAM 182197 

I1USTHIL LADY COMPANION 
Charnuig, educated, travel. 


VIP LADY GUIDE 

Young, educated, elegoN & IriSngual 
far days, evenings A travel 
PAHS 533 SO 26 


YOUNG BEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 


PARIS: 520 97 95 

BttMGUAL YOUNG LADY PA 


SERVICES 


PARIS VIP SOPHBTICATBD YOUNG 
lady e cm p meoa Why danl you 
phone 277-01-69 far your doyv.ew- 

& weefcandst An eteomt bin- 

». even for your ! 


TOKYO 475 54 80 

European Yang lady Companion. 


PABS 704 10 27 
VW PA YOUNG LADY 
Uto utnuiw , muffibtguaL 


PARIS IA0Y GUIDES 224 01 32. 
Youna elegcnr. educatod. atl tar 
dayi ft rimers & travels potable n 
fare 8 Airport. ^ 


INTERNATIONAL BEAUTIRfl, 
UMTD. USA & WORLDWIDE 
212-7657793 / 765-7794 


SOOEre DIANE PARIS 240 87 43 
Men & women guides, worry & rare- 
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LONDON, REGANT mutoeducoted 
French lady compcmicn, wet travelled 
A vetaoNe. Tel: 821 0364 fll). 


747 59 51 TOURIST GUIDE. Fcra, 
mrport. Young, eleaart. t famna 
educuted. 7 om / 12 pm. Inrl troveT 


NOTR THS PHONE AT ONCE 
75 7 62 48. Trutfid V.LP. tody, novel 

compgrvon. 


WAMOiaT. Yung bdy emtonon. 
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LONDON SOMST1CATB Gerextn.' 
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ft entertanu.9. Tefc 01-381 6852 


SMGAPORE INTI GUIDES CoO. Sin- 
geyore 734 96 28. 


HONG KONG |IG3) 723 12 37 
Young sophnacried oomporeon. 


IBMCH RIVHA. Interpreter Travel 
61 78 63 


companion |93| j 


PARS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA 8. bftnguri rfarpretar. 


TOKYO LADY COMPAMON, PA 
Pereond Assatare (&456-S539 


RANKFURT YOUNG LADY contoan- 
Tel: 069/62802 


ion + travel guide. ' 


HONG KONG 3-471247 VIP lady 
pnereol/ European} axnDomon. 


LONDON: BUCATED LADY Com- 
panon/Gude. Tel: 889 1694 


TOKYO 645 2741. Touring ft thop- , 
png guides, mterpreterv. era. i 


PARIS Ml PERSONAL/BUSINESS 
Assistant. Tet 828-7932. 


PARIS YOUNG SOFHSnCAT EDVIP 
■ ladv. tritnguol PA. 256 05 95 ■ 


FRANKFURT 049/233380. Young 
tody V.I.P. PA. i 


[HAMBURG- YOUNG tADYcompon- 
■on, mubibtguri. TeL 27 04 575 


YOUNG OCEAMC LADY in London 
01-245 9002 AxportsTTrauL 


LOS ANGBES, Tom Guxle Service. 
213-713-2762 


[ATHENS, 
d uMtsta il. Tefc 


194. 


Pioca Your OanHiod Ad Quickly and Easfly 


tot*- 1 

INTSNATIONAL HERALD TRffiUNE j 

Bp Phono: CtM your toed IHT representative with your text You 
triH be informed of the oat immedideiy, and once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hows. 

Ceeh The basic rata is $9M) per Ene per day 4- toed taxes. There are 

25 leftore. Bps rod spaces in the lint fae aid 36 in toe faflatring tines. 

Mremum space s 2 fcnes. No abbrevidxm accepted. 

Credit Greek American Enron, Diner's dub. Eurocard, Mreler 

Gred, Aoces and Van. 


HEAD OFFICE 

LATTN AMERICA 

fain for densified onlyh 

Buenee AfrM:4! 4031 
p«pt.312) 

747-4600. 

Onayaqufl: 431 943/431 

Urea: 417852 

EUROPE 

Pretama. 644372 

Son Jeere 22-1055 

Amsterdam: 26-36-15. 

Soffiagre 69 61 555 

Athens 361-8397/360-2421. 

Sae Paolre 852 1893 

Bntreek: 343-1899. 

MIDDLE EAST 

rnprohagew (01) 32944L 

Bcdtrafa: 246303. 

Franlrforfc P69) 72-67-55. 

Jordrec 25214. 

Laname: 29-58-94. 

Kawnfa 5614485. 

Lkbem 67-27-93/66-2544. 

Lebmoa: 34 00 44. 

Oalret 416535. 

landon: (01) 836-4802. 

Soudi Arabia: 

Matt* 45*2891/4553306. 

Jeddeit: 667-1500. 

UJUE .1 Dubai 224161. 

M8ro: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03) B45545. 

FAR EAST 

Rome: 679-3437. 

Bangftoto 390-06-57. 

5vmdem 08 7569229. 

Haag Kang: 5213671. 

Mawlai 817 07 49. 

Tel Aviv: 03455 5W. 
Vitro Contact Frankfurt. 

Seoul; 7258771 

Singapore. 222-2721 

Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 

UNTm> STATES 

Tokyo: 504-1921 


AUSTRALIA 

New Yarfa [212) 752-3890. 

Sydney: 929 56 39- 

West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 

Mebaumar 690 8233. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES j ESCORTS A GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTSINATIONAL 
ESCORT 


USA 6 WORIDWDE 

Head office to New York 
330 W. 56th St, MYjC 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


MAXW OPir CARDS AND 
Met 

Ab BWi»d arbwito, 


bum faatered at 8w top ft amt 
axefadva Eeeert Srevtee by 
USA A brim “ 


rod IV. 


REGENCY 


WORLDWIDE MUUUNGUAL 
ESCORT SBVICE 


NEW YORK OFFICE 

Tab 212-838-8027 
ft 212-753-1844 


REGENCY 


WORIMMDE MULTBMGUAL 
BCORTSBVICE 


NEW YORK OFFICE 


Tab 212-838-8027 
ft 212-753-1844 


* USA A TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 


ESCORT BVKEi 
EVB nfWHBS YOU ABE OR GOL- 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal free from Ui= 1-900-237-0892 
04 free ban Bark* 1 - 800 - 282 - 0 ©! 
Loxal Eastern imlcnmor yao bald 


ZURICH 

Eenort Sendee. Td: 01/44 76 50 


AAMERMT + SURRGUNDMGS 
Onfrto s Escort Semen. 069/364656 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 


IN NEW YORK 
TEL- 212-737 329L 


LONDON 

BBGRAVIA 


Td: 736 5877. 




POftina n Escort .Agwicy 

67 Chitore Street; 
landun W1 

Tel: 484 3724 or 484 1158 
Afl reefer aaefit cards a cc ep te d 


LONDON 

|EST ESCORT SBtVICE 
TEL 200 8585 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 


ESCORT SHVKE 

10 KENSMGTON CHURCH STW8 
TEL: 9379134 OR 9379133 

All tremor credH crob a crepf ed. 


CLASS 

BcoRrsanncE 

LOiBONr tSAnaowftGATvnac 

Tefc 01 890 0373 


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Landea End Serein 

12B Wigmare 51. London W.l. 
Afl racier Crccfi Lards Accepted 


Tefc 437 47 41 /. 4742 

1 _ earaanU 

IM rmn • inap^TT 


LA VENTURA 


PHY YORK BGORT SSVKE 
212-888-1666 


VBMA- DBSS ESCORT Serece. 
Tab 52-30-355. 


MADRID INTL 


ESCORT SBIVICE 
1H: 2454548. CREDIT CARDS 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GI8DE saVKE from Son 
K3TTERDAM (01 10-254155 
THE HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


ZURICH 


CAIOWC BCOST SERVICE. 
Tefc 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH 


LONDON 


BCECUTIVE BGORT SERVICE 
01-229 4794 


ZURICH 


AIBOS ESCORT SBVKE 
TB.- 01/47 55 82 - 49 55 04 


★ELECTRA* 


MADRID BCORT SBMCE. 
CREDIT CARDS. 2S0 80 19 


JASMINE 


AMSIBBMM E5CORT SERVICE. 
IB.- 020-344655 


ZURICH-GENEVA 


■GMGBTS ESCORT SSnnCLH 
TEL 01/36308 64-022/3441 86 


*AMSTERDAM* 

SHE bere* 5 et*in. 227837 


* KITTY ★ 

MADRB SBVKX 250J4.96 


TIFFANY 


LONDON ESCORT SBVKX 
TEL 385 4290 ft 3ftS 1402 


ESCORTS & GUIDES { ESCORTS & GUIDES 


lESSii! 

GBCVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tefc 46 11 58 

GENEVA • BEAUTY » 

BCORT SBMCE. 

IBs 89 81 30 



GENEVA -BEST 

ESCORT SBMCE 

TB: 022/86 T5 95 


MILAN BCORT 

SBMC& 02/69762402 

CHAMBC G8CVA 

Gride Service. Td. 283-397 

CHABUNE GENEVA 

Gride Service. Tel 283397 

ca«VA - ISBC ESCORT SERVICE 

Tefc 36 29 22 





L‘- : i^-i*ln8MiiTihf 



L-^'kiV^^ronriJ^id 

L i J. oftr » i- 


(Vienna) 65 41 58 


LOMXJN JAPANESE ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 01 821 0627. 


DU5SELDORF-COLOGFS-E»e»-8ann 
Engfeh Escort Service 021 1/38 31 41 

NEW YORK; RENEE** Escort Service. 
Tefc 212-581-1948. 


MADR® SELECTIONS ESCORT Ser- 
vice Tefc 4011507. CrexSt Conk. 


LONDON Z08 WE5T Eecsrr Agency 
Tefc 01-99 7556. 


RANKFURT AREA - Femde + Me 

escort + travel service. Tefc 62 84 32. 


MADRD IMPACT escort mi guide 
- MuMfaBeal 261 4142 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Serves. 
Heathraw/GtfwKk. Tefc 834 7945 


MUNIQI 5UPREME BCORT Serwce. 
TeL 089'4486(B8 


RANKFURT SONIA BCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 069 -68 34 A 


HEATHROW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 994 6682. 


BRUSSH5- CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
vxe: Tefc 02/520 23 65. 


LONDON LUCY ESCORT & Guide 
Sravia. Tefc 01-373 0211 


VBNA BCORT AGENCY. Tel Vien- 
na 37 52 39 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Service 
Tefc |QZQ) 326420 or 340110. 


MUNICH WELCOME Escort Service. 
Tefc 91 Bt 39 \ 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Tefc 071 1 / 26211 50. 


RAMQFIIRT • PERA Escort & Travel 
Service. TaL 069 / 68 34 05 


AMSTERDAM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Service p) 2096076 


LONDON GABRRUA ESCORT Ser- 
wce. Tefc 01-229 6541. 


MUMGH - BtOPOY ft TANJA Escort 
Service. Tefc 311 29 00 or 311 79 36 


TOMKA. AMSTERDAM ESCORT 
Guide Service, Tefc IQZQI 762842 

RANKHMT JENNY ESCORT + bav- 
el service. Tefc 069/5572-10 


HAMBURG - SABRINA Escort Ser- 
vtoe. Tel. 040/58 65 35. 


POLAND ESCORT SERVICE Frankfurt 
Tefc 069/63 41 ». 


rape beort 


N.6e 


RANKFURT "TOP TW" Ewxt Scr- 

vire. 069/59^052. 


“WBOff »™«aESCOr Ser. 
wm-TeLOl 229Q77& 


MADRID H£CTRA 

Gride Setvia. Cortk 


mid 


MUNICH . PRIVATE BCORT + 
Gwde Service, Tel: 91 23 14 

H^ME^SERV^Oafc 
222785. 03G944S3D. 02997-3685. 


WPDONTWDtt BCORT Service. 
Tefc 01-3738849. 


■sfsftsr w 





























































Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 



2 

3 

4 

5 


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IS 





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IB 




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22 

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2B 





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01 




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10 111 112 |13 


PEANUTS 


LET'S HAVE A 
GRUDGE MATCH... 


AT WHAT? 


I don't care, 
anything... 


I JUST LIKE i\ 


BOOKS 




i JU3I UKfc \ J 

s 6g UP6E MATCHES / | 





CHILDREN OF THE CITY: 
At Work and at Play 


BLONDIE 




PACKAGE POO 

O. BLWvSTEAD 


SIGN MBS. 

PLEASE - 






J I HOPE *■> 
THAT WAS 
> AGUY r 




ACROSS 


l Ecstasy 
6 Ecclesiastical 
garment 
19 N'Djamena's 

nation 

14 Shade of 
1 purple 

15 Sentry's 
command 

16 Tortoise’s 
rival 

17 Residence 

18 Young's state 

19 The Emerald 
Isle 

20 N.T. finale 

21 Porter hit: 

1332 

24 Cricket team 

26 Bride of 
Geraint 

27 Christie’s 

“ of Fate" 

39 "The 
Metamor- 
phosis" authoi 
34 Diamond 
cutter’s 
concern 

36 “Some ' 

. bom great 

Shak. 

37 Midway’s big 
wheel 

38 Give vent to 

39 Hula hoops or 
pet rocks 

41 Kind 

42 Fireplace 
accessory 


45 One in the jug 
MMieiziner 
specialty 

47 Artist's 
purchase 

48 Roland’s ®ng 
50 Rib-tickling 
52 Chopin 

offerings 
55 Porter hit: 

1936 

69 Box-office sign 

61 Soft drink 

62 Dry 

63 Operetta 
composer 

65 Blade, to a 
bard 

66 Trilled 

67 Have reality 

68 Antonio’s 
worry 

69 Stratagem 
76 Ninnies 


1 Trumpet sound 

2 Cause fora 
lawsuit 

3 Porter hit: 

1953 

4 Despondent 

5 Act parts 

6 Iron-horse 
sound 

7 Word ol honor 

8 Pan of a 
typewriter 

9 Allen of 
Vermont 

19 Apple-pie 
topping 


s/14/es 

11 Puzzling 

12 Sills sok) 

13 Repudiate 

22 Unbroken 

23 Winged 
Victory 

25 Pledge 

28 Be human 

29 Arrive at 

31 Porterhit: 

1939 

32 Highlands 
garb 

33 Inquires 

34 Kismet 

35 Currency in 
Calabria 

37 Aromatic herb 
46 Animals: 
Comb, form 

43 Like Eden 

44 Author Wiesel 
46 Five centimes 
48 Arranged for 

voices 




mMlS 


By David Nasm\ 244 pp. SI 8.95. 

A nchor-Doubleday, 245 Park Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. I0I67. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 


D AVID NASAW is up I 0 a bit Of historical 
revisionism in “Children of the Gty ," 


BEETLE BAILEY 



U revisionism in “Children of the Gty," 
and he makes a persuasive job of it. His focus is 
the first two decades of the 20 th century, a 
period commonly believed to have been un- 
pleasant for the inhabitants of American cities 
and for their children, much of whose time was 
spent in ditty and dangerous streets. Nasaw's 
conclusion is quite to the contrary: that while 
life for city children in these years was far from 
easy, on the whole it was educational, produc- 
tive and enjoyable. 


of authority, law and order- . . The smtuwm 
not jungles and the children were 
Left largely to tiidr own resources b> parents 
who were busy scraping out 
ings. the children created a world in the streets 
that was remarkably safe, considering the po- 
tential threats it contained, and tnai ofierea 
them an instructive introduction to tne worm 
they would enter as adults: 

“The street was their playground, but h was 
also a marketplace, meeting pound, social 
dub. place of assignation, political ronim. 
sports arena, parade grounds. °pw-jjr 
coffeehouse and thoroughfare.. . . White the 
children played, the policemen walked their 
beat, prostitutes solicited Ijohns. peddle^ 
shouted their wares, delivery wagons squeewa 

down the block to neighborhood shops, and 


men and women clustered in small groups on 
the corners, in front of the shops, at tne thresh- 
old of the saloons, and oa their front steps. 

The children were a part of tbs clamorous 
scene, and they made their way in it with self- 
confidence. Thor play was unstructured, much 
to the dismay of settlement workers, but they 
fitted it into the life of the street in ways that 
minimal danger to them juid relatively 
little disr uption for others. Their work was a 
productive part of the urban economy: The 
slow decline of the sweatshops and the child- 
labor laws moved them out of abuave full-time 
labor and into part-time jobs for which they 
were ideally suited. 

These jobs permitted them to work for part 
of that daily period between the dose of school 
and ni ghtf all. Their work included street trad- 
ing. r unning as messengers and hawking after- 
noon newspapers. The newsboy, or “newsie," 
was a small but noisy and merge uc presence in 
every city, a cheap, remarkably effective sales 
agent, and newspapers needed him so badly 



WHEN X SEE 
PICTURES OF 
THE GUVS' 
GIRLFRIEHRS, 
X FEEL 
^FORGOTTEN 


UNCLE 

ISA* 



CUE 

1AM 


SOT- t 
GNOfZ i 


WANBlftN)l 




“Children of the City" concentrates on 
“children bom to working-class parents who 
owned little or no property, had received little 
or no formal education.wtnd worked for wages 
or piece rates at skilled or unskilled jobs” — 
precisely those children whose experiences we 
would expea to conform to the stereotyped 
view of the period. These were children whose 
parents were first- or second-generation immi- 
grants, who lived in cramped, malodorous 
quarters, -who. had little acquaintance with 
green spaces or fresh air, who were expected to 
work to help support their families, who had 
only the streets m which to play. 


Bui street life, Nasaw argues, was “on active, 
organized community with its own structures 


ANDY CAPP 


49 Modeled 

51 Fastener 

53 Wipe the slate 
dean 

54 Classifies 

55 Like some tea 

56 “The best is 

yet 

Browning 

57 Oscar 
Madison, e.g. - 

58 Asti product 

59 Nervous 

64 Outer: Comb, 
form 


HAS SHE GOT 
«UTONAME, 


NOUTDMAM 

r THEDAV - 
VET, PAUL? 



HE JUST ®LLEDV 
; UP HIS SLEEVES f ANDlVE 
iAN&TKREW_ > NEVER.- * 
(mEINTP IT J^RSggTTEP 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


J ls-ni 


WIZARD of ID 


& Neu York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


H(?Wfe-rtlE= WUBUrfJ 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


CM&/a 1 Wh-fr wu ten IfUUE PPGfisUtfe? 


eeob □□□□□ aatao 
□cob naanQ aaao 
EEHnanaciEEiQaaao 
□Bn E3Q3E3 annao 
□ana aaaa 
□□□□□□ aanamaa 
□eh b ansa beq 

□nciBQHaaaHacjnsa 
odd anaa aaaa 
EBEaaaa □□□□□□ 
□HD3 □ □□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□ aacD 

□□□□□HanHaanasa 
□ebb aanaB aaaa 
□bob naana aaaa 


boys forced both Hears! ana Pulitzer to capitu- 
late to them — a Dawd-besung-GoUath 
phenomenal that may be unique in American 
history. 

By the 1920s the era of the street children 
was over thw had been “pushed to the side by 
the automobile, which cut off their play ana 
work snace. bv loueher and better-enforced 


tougher and better- 


uws, and by adults who moved 

into tiie trades they had once monopolized." 
But for those who had lived in the street, th 


But for those who had lived in the street, the 
lessons they learned lasted through life: They 
became a generation of cocky, purposeful men 
and women who believed in the Horatio Alger 
vision, in the idea that America was “the land 
of opportunity." 


Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of The Wash- 
ington Past. 




/&s»l 


CHESS 




By Robert Bvme 


REX MORGAN 


T HIS year's Paul Keres Me- 
morial Tournament in Tal- 


COHS1DERIKIG THE REACTION 
CLAUDIA HAD. I7K A LITTLE WARY 
OF CONTINUING HER AS A 
custo/wer.tess ! 


IF SHE’S NOT e DON'T YOU KNOW 
HERE WHEN SHE ; THAT /KY CUSTOMERS' 
HAS A : HEALTH AND WELFARE 
REACTION, WHY I IS MY PRIMARY 
T7 WORRY? c- i INTEREST, DARLING ? . 

iraii'iiiM "Tfim 


NEVER LET rT BE SAID 
THAT I'VE EVER QUESTIONED 
YOUR MOTIVES, PRESTON/ 
ITS TUST THAT I LOVE OUR 
LIFESTYLE AND IT TAKES 
A LOT OF CLAUD1AS TO 
W-a MAINTAIN IT/ . ^ 




■MM 


iBR/gjEY 

la>XsbJ 


L00K i M^RSARET...I GOT a KIDD16ARTER TEACHER 
AMD A /WQM.SO QUIT TRflM’ TO LEAHS ME STUFF TOO » 


GARFIELD 


’l S' ™AT scrambled word game 
P>J hl!°ta by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


BUTOD 


KWONN 


TEECIX 




1 modal Tournament in Tal- 
linn. in the Soviet Estonian Re- 
public, was won by the 
26-year-old Russian gradmas- 
ter Sergey Dolmatov, who 
scored 9W-44. 

Another Soviet grandmaster, 
39-year-old Gennadi Kuzmin 
look second place with 9-5. 

Hoe is how Dolmatov wrest- 
ed a pant from Jouni Yijola, a 
25-year-old Finnish interna- 
tional master. 

Currently the most popular 
way for Blade to deal with the 
Rubinstein system (5 N-K2) 
against the Nimzo-Indian De- 
fense is 6 . . . P-Q4. 

Since it was evident after 9 
QxN that White would soon be 
working with the threat of mo- 
bilizing his queenside pawn 
majority. Black plays 
9 . . . P-QR4 so that after 10 
P-QR3, BxN; lINxB. he can 
cripple the intended phalanx 
with 11... P-R5. 

Accordingly, White has to 
change his strategy and Yijola 
did, mmsting 15 P-B4 with the 
idea of attacking the black king 
position with a timely P-B5. 


However, he lost patience in 
prematurely playing 20 P-BS? 
as showed clearly after 
20 . . . KPxP: 21 P-KN4. 
when he came up empty-hand- 
ed against 21 . . . N-B3!; 22 
PxP. N-K4. On 23 R/3-B1, 
NxB. maybe he overlooked that 
he could not inject 24 PxP? be- 
cause 24 . . . QxXNP! will re- 
fute 25 R-KN1 ! by 25 . . . N- 
B7 mate. 

After 24 QxN. BxP. it was 
scarcely appetizing to play 25 
N-Q4, B-K5ch; 26 K-Nl. Q- 
K4; 27 Q-K3, P-B4; 28 P-B 6 , 
R-KB2 when White would 
have no recourse against an at- 
tack starting with 29 ... P- 
B5. 

So, Yijola gave up the ex- 
change with 25 RxB, QxR; 26 
QxQ, PxQ, hoping to stick Dol- 
matov with technical problems 
after 27 N-Q4. 

However, the solution was 
not too hard to find: 
38 . . . R/2xP!; 39 NxR, 
Rxn; 40 R-N2 returned the ex- 
change to bring about a win- 
ning rook-and-pawn ending for 
Black. 

After 44 . . . R-K4, an ex- 
change of rooks would yield 
Black a won Iting-and-pawn 





WUOtA/wHA 

PMUta afur 31 P-BN« 


end game, while another rook 
move, such as 45 R-Q 8 . allows 
the foremost black KBP to 
queen after 45 . . . P-B 6 ; 46 
R-QB 8 . P-B7; 47 R-Bl, R-K 8 . 
Yijola gave up. 


iSSS. £S? 

U Kd MU 
U B-El M2 

SS3* 

S£si se 

3 f& £S 


9 a-H2 IUO.. 

» KJO KM 

n w u< • 

B UD MM. 


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21 PJBM N-BS 
» PXP HJU 

a *nai kx< 


M Mte ICO> 

a txn wK 

M R-B2 MO 
St MU 

a M3 SLittP 
a MtB u 
« MQ UH 
4i uas 
-a B.K7 MI 
« wa 
4t Kdtt MC4 
« B 


Wirid Stock Markets 


JAVILO 


WHAT THE BUS 
DRIVER SAIE?. 


Via Agence France- Presse May 13 

Qoiutp prices in local currencies unless otherwise i ndicated 


t££EJ?h- 2g 2S Shoowwo 

S™ wrH * 3S0 S3 SlmaDarbv 

J® . S-pore Land 
utmimar 225 223 S’oarm Prat 

S Steomstilp - 

vVU^2. Bte0jMl 12 SITroaJno 

JO umiad Ow*r*eoa 
| WoMwortli BU BIO JOB 


P.T.a Index : TCHJO 
Pmtovs : ion JO 


2 -IB la JaptmAfrUnM 
2 159 Kollma 
2 J* Z74 Kunsal Pawcr 
ft-15 6.15 

109 1M g irt" Br ewery 
CS2 452 Komatsu 
2 2 Kubota 

iy> t t? Kracora 

«otsu Eire IndJ 


Mar 10 


CanatBai stocks da AP 


StroltiTlninlnd.lwlCK:m44 | Matsu Eire Works 778 


Prevtoos : 79BJ2 


Answer. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 

i” in the rmt 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow! 

Jumbles. KITTY LEAVE BAKERY MAGNET 


Answer Where the opera singer’s time aria came 
Irrwn — A RIG "AREA" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


43< 

Algarve 

20 

4B 

10 

SO 

cl 

391 

Am iter bum 

20 

48 

8 

44 

a 

21 i 

Athens 

22 

72 

15 

59 

cl 

521 

Barcelona 

IB 

44 

■ 

44 

d 

l«t 

Beta rode 

25 

77 

13 

S 

cl 


Berlin 

23 

72 

14 

57 

a 

n 

Brussels 

IB 

44 

7 

45 

a 

2 p 

J 31 

Bucharest 

27 

81 

14 

57 

a 

12 ? 

Budapest 

27 

81 

14 

57 

a 

331 

Copenhagen 

14 

57 

9 

48 

a 

34V 

Casta Del Sal 

22 

72 

e 

44 

Cl 

55L 

Dublin 

9 

4S 

B 

46 

r 

37V 

Eainbareh . 

II 

52 

4 

43 

e 


Florence * 

25 

71 

14 

57 

Ci 


Frank turt 

21 

70 

11 

52 

Cl 

l|L 

Geneva 

15 

59 

7 

45 

a 

Ml* 

25V 

Helsinki 

19 

44 

3 

37 

fr 

34 

1 vtu n bat 

21 

70 

14 

57 

a 

38% 

Las Palmas 

31 

70 

14 

61 

Cl 

31% 

Lisbon 

17 

43 

11 

32 

ct 

58% 

London 

12 

54 

9 

48 

r 

15*1 

Madrid 

17 

43 

6 

43 

ct 

50* 

Milan 

IS 

59 

12 

54 

r 

n 

Moscow 

IB 

44 

9 

48 

fr 

IT 

Munich 

25 

77 

9 

48 

cl 

30t| 

Mice 

15 

so 

13 

55 

r 


Oslo 

20 

48 

6 

43 

a 

VB 

Paris 

18 

64 

B 

46 

lr 

3D 

Prague 

24 

75 

10 

SO 

Cl 

27%. 

Reykjavik 

9 

4B 

6 

43 

r 

38« 

Rome 

24 

77 

IS 

59 

d 

55 

Stock holm 

IB 

44 

5 

41 

fr 

7m 

Strasbourg 

20 

68 

10 

50 

d 

41%fc 

Venice 

22 

73 

15 

59 

d 

3flHl 

38^8 

Vlenea 

24 

79 

13 

54 

e 

2 VS 

Warsuw 

29 

84 

14 

57 

lr 

Vm 

Zorich 

19 

66 

S 

46 

cl 


Bangkok 

MIIm 
Nona Km 
Manila 
NewDoMI 
StMl 
Sba natal 


HIGH LOW 
C P C F 

31 a 25 77 si 

24 75 13 55 o 

29 84 26 79 d 

32 90 26 79 fr 

41 106 28 82 fr 

18 64 16 61 a 

27 81 21 70 st 

» 84 26 79 a 

32 90 24 75 Cl 

24 75 IS 59 Sh 


AFRICA 


Alalon » 6 B 11 52 d 

Cairo 22 72 17 63 fr 

Cam Town — — — — na 

r mnWa nca 19 66 11 53 a 

Harare — — — — na 

Loses 29 B4 16 61 St 

Nairobi — — — — rxj 

Twill 20 6 B 14 57 a 

LATIN AMERICA 
SWMSAirss 25 77 9 48 a 


ABN 

ACF How I TO 

Arson 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ATJam Rubber 
Amro Bank 

BVG 

Buetirmann T 
CaJand Hide 
EtaMlrr-NDU 
Fokker 
GUI Brocades 
Heine ken 
Haaaovens 
KLM 
Noorden 
Nat NedUar 
Nrdllovd 
Oce vandrrG 

Pc* hoed 

Phlllos 

Rotaco 

Rodomca 

Rolirtao 

Rorer.to 

Rwnl Dutch 

Unilever 

VanOmmeran 

VMF Stark 

VNU 


I Haedist 216JT ~ 

- Horsdi K)& 5 ( 

Prmr - Horten 

1 Huntl 373 

| <WKA 313 

« KaB + aili 26£ 

Karstadl 2 D 

K author 229 

Ktaeckner H-D 24850 

Kloackrtar Werke 72 
22B80 Krupp Stahl lot 

24250 Lhode 427 

lcf^? orua 12-S JB7] AACorp 

75J0 JJAN 1X350 145 1 AIIM.I v 

199 Manitesmann tsb 

93 Huel * 'W 

37 Nl*dorf Sgn 

120 PAI 635 

730.10 Porsche 179 s 

1B25D Preussoe rn 

15CL40 PV*A T26_7D 

4050 «W£ 1CT50 

60 Rhelnmetall 379 

5150 fgwrtro 442 

67.10 SEL 340 

171 swmens 544 

0650 T tiyw en 10290 

64.1G VCOQ lBi7TJ 

5420 ?g*jg w °9e , n w | i 1 fc 226JO 

7130 Welle 574 


Cirn Prr, | 2M 

PresStevn me 5900 1 

Ru»ioi 1710 1665 Boko Comm 

SA,B«m 7BS 770 Gentrade 

SI He lena 3800 3475 Oouhoteis 

wSf Holdlna 6^ 4850 

SS22^?.'Seo tad “ :,,A ' w nWo,l ° 

PierkMi . 1I05JB FlrakSer 

I 1 Generali 

‘ 1 Italcemantl 

AA Cora S14U S13M ikrteat 

Allied- Lyons 189 l£ IWnwblltart 


Prvviem : 1105JB 


BAT. 
Baecham 
BICC 
BL 

Blue Circle 
BOCGmup 

|®*ater Indus 

Brit Home St 
Brjt Telecom 
Commerawnk Index : MSI Ja |[^f ra * xx * 
Previous : 134458 EL 1 ™* 1 


Allted-Lvons 189 iac Itatmoblliari 

ArotoAmGoM sny, sasvj Medoboncn 

Ass Brit Foods 216 z£ Montedison 

Ass Ddrtes 754 icn Olivetti 

Barclays 394 383 Pint 1 1 

Boh Si RAS 

BA.T. 315 j,, Rtnaacente 

Baediom u i 5 1 P 

SL“ 1 | Sff 

Blue Circle 5(8 53 s Stando 

BOC Grow. 291 n SM 


r-u Montedison 
1 * Oltvettl 
w pjretll 

tii AA S 
32 , Rtarecente 

“ »So 

£38 


Bk East Asia 
Oieung Kona 
ANPXBS Generul Index : 2B9.1 2!~p“ 
Previous : 209.19 Chino Light 


Bwt MS Aires 25 77 V 

Lima — — — 

Mexico City 30 86 13 

Made Janeiro — — — 

saePaeio — — — 


NORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 


Aokara 

Beirut 

Damascas 

Jerusalem 

TetAvlv 


J4 75 13 55 cl 
— — — — no 


OCEANIA 


» 72 13 55 
33 73 17 63 


Auckland 

Sydney 


15 59 10 50 sh 


'Jr** . , . 18 64 14 57 d 

g<toirty. UMooby; fr-hjh-; fwiaii: 
sh- showers: suesnow: n-Efertny. 


Anchorage 

9 

4B 

0 

32 

r 

Atlanta 

31 

88 

18 

64 

K 

Hasten 

29 

84 

12 

54 

PC 

Chicago 

25 

77 

11 

52 

fr 

Denver 

13 

55 

4 

39 

pc 

Detroit 

26 

79 

14 

61 

PC 

Henekihi 

30 

B 6 

21 

70 

fr 

Houston 

31 

SB 

22 

72 

cl 

Los Angeles 

34 

75 

12 

54 

fr 

Miami 

31 

88 

19 

44 

fr 

Mfoncueeils 

21 

70 

9 

48 

pc 

Montreal 

25 

77 

ID 

50 

PC 

Masson 

2 B 

n 

19 

44 

PC 

Hear York 

29 

84 

19 

44 

cl 

San Frond sen 

21 

70 

10 

SO 

lr 

Seattle 

16 

61 

6 

43 

PC 

Toronto 

25 

77 

14 

57 

PC 


Artad 
Beicsert 
Cocker I II 
Co beaa 
EBE5 

GB-mna-BM 

GBL 

Gavaerf 

Hoboken 

intercom 

K red lei bank 

Prinrflno 

Soc Gene role 

Satina 

SolvOy 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unery 

Vlsii le Mon toone 


China Lieht 
Green Island 
Hang Sane Bank 
H enderson 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Ha lets 
HK Land 
HK Shane Bonk 
HK Tatanhone 
HK Wharf 


BTR 

I Burma h 

Cobje wireless 
Cad^rrvsuny 
2670 2SBD P’a'ter Cons 
1750 ifS CarnmercJolU 

isao liS 

850 S5S , 5®2* tv 
S3 SO 5? BHKi 
2275 22 s Sellers 
bv S 74 Drtefantein 
1190 1129 

W 34.73 f St Gta 
Afl 3 £.05 ■GfcC 
BJ5 125 ^* « Menl 
9i BO GKN 
650 Glaxo t 


291 2B4 S ** 1 

S IS MIB Current 

^ gj Prevteas : n« 

307 302 I 

IS 8 I P 

SS 1!# 1 - 

US AJrUaukJe 

«4 7» Atsthom AtL 

^ AvDassauft 

Bancalre 

i i 

S i 

VJJ 145 carretoar 

g £ Sszz? 

s™ saS gSSr 

“ 301 EH-Aquttoto* 


0.93 0.7? 

jUD Eg* 

’3 is jgrr 


FVnkfDl 


Huldi Whanwaa 2450 2450 SSP®**** 

Hyson oS «RE 

•ftnaw 193 Sv? 

Jordno 11 B 0 1150 

Jar dine See 1120 1120 n 81 ™ 

Kowloon Motor 1 1 JJJ 1050 tS**ker 

Miramar Halel 32 3150 i! cl 

New World 7 jn "im Imperial Gi 

Orient Overseas 120 220 b 1 "*?? 

SHK Props 1250 1250 }-®dS«cwr 

Steiux 250 175 hT ® 01 Gw* 

5 wire Pactllc A WJO sun UPVttsBai 

Tai Cheung 155 152 J- 01 ""* 

WUh Kweng 157 150 K?”” 

Whertock a 725 7 JO ****» « 

WjhOOnCo 210 210 ESIS’L 

Wlnonr 4.725 4JB AAWMwwJ Ba 

World inn 2JD 2 » S* B< 


7 M rx HiS£S? ,,Groop 

220 130 

liS I teatd Securities 


oarer ant; ooportty 


Orient Overseas 220 220 C?*?? 

SHK Progs 1250 lia j-yd Secvrffies 

Steiux 250 Z75 hffl General 

5 wire Pactllc A 2420 um UavOsBaik 

Tai Cheung 155 1 91 

I r - ■ itnrir ■— . rm n Wah Kweng 157 15 c kS 5 

■ tm - n wneeiock a 7 25 720 So 

| Previm» . UOM wino On Ca ZIO 7)n Metal Box 

I — ■ 1 Wlnonr 4225 42B {ftatapd Hank 

l World inn 220 220 ij°1 West Bank 

1 “ ana O 

AEC-Telefunkm 11720 IIS Haw Seng ladax ; 162129 Pilklnatan 
Alitara Vers 1253 13® Rrevlaes : 141326 • Pleseey 

Altana 5950 36220 Prudential 

BASF 206.10 204.70 I 1 Raeal Elect 

Barer 21k 10 71350 [ Jl 1 Randfontein 

Bay Hypo Bonk 341 336 — — * Rtak 

Bay Varehebank 335 31 2 50 *££1 ■ 775 Heed Inti 

BBC 21150 21150 ,&0 H25 Reuters 


Tem|^ITnfn HB «»? 5 si^SP^S ,ieL: fhahkpuht: cioudv. 

10 jj* L DNDON: OwercosJ. Tffmo. 13 7 (55 451. MADRID; 

TEL AVIV F^tI^; : T «"P 74—12 ITS -541. 

Tamu. 32- JH(90-82I. JUWMILAfFalr^errS 33 - ally, 5t' 


Allianz vers 1253 13® Prevkns : 141126 

AH ana S950 34250 

BASF 206.10 204.70 | 

Barer 21kl0 71160 I wWMP 

Bav Hypo Baik 341 336 

Bay varotnshank 335 JJ250 

BBC 21150 21150 5!2lS SjJCjS ? 1 

BHF-Bank M7« 2B4 

BMW 37250 373 gf™« 

Commerzbank 1U» in 

Coni Gwiwnl 13^» 139 

Do I m lor- Benz kW MJ 

Oeaussa 3S020 34950 ST*™ 1 ™ 1 " 

gSSi^ S^Hny 

Dwjsdncr Bank HivejdSlrot 

”*47^ 


g i ss&sssr 

\sss^ m 

^!° m Les Hur- 
ts} ™ VOraea 

g] 363 Morten 

HR ^ Mortra 

S ^ Merflh 

w 439 Mkhatm 

ion MeetHeniwssy 

s?S I2S Moulinex 

20 Occtdantale 

7 » Pwnod Rlc 

S2 ffi Perrier 

5 J 4 petrotes (fse) 

If? IS pouowt 

31 Printemps 

"g Rodtotechn 

pedeute _ 

a\ S SS B,Uctaf 

m SS SW 8 Rossi Bnoi 

® Tetemeawi 

Thomson CSF 


1BOOO 17400 AGA 
3060 3901 Alfa Leva I 
8400 75HJ S2S, 

2171 2085 Astro 
,£e 9 ,5^ Atlas COPCO 

Boikten h 

3031 2»3 Electro k« 

,84 SB Ericsson 
“WO 4®W EsMila 

Hondelsljahken 
91700 87900 Phormoda 
13 ’SJ Soob-Sconla N 

M2 7 J £ S Sandvlk 
57OT »49» Skaraka 91 

IS ISIS SKF 

££ ^ SwtalshAtatai 
v * h * 

65950 65300 

707 691 AffaersvaarWee tndai 

2010 1995 PrevieM : 399AB 
1284 1466 

iu99 left | Sythey 

2MQ 2617 I — 

■ : 12B7 A Cl 

1 * AN I 

«NZ 

: 1 bhp i 

8 | Boral 

— 1 Baasalnville ! 

634 629 Brambles 

ram 29f Coles 

1549 TS30 Cwnaka 

4211 582 CRA 1 

527 517 CSR, : 

19W 1900 OynlQP. 

75 i 73 t Elders Ixl 

2575 2550 gpofcer J 

2140 21 H K°S Jllon : 

5 39 520 MIM 

534 57 s Mver 1 

133S 1229 OokhrWoe 

430 423 Pako 4 

mio 7 H p^s 4 ** 1 ‘ 

m 578 «GC i 

634 626 Santee 6 

1895 1091 , 1 

514 509 Southland 

2060 3061 Woadslde 1 

656 480 WormaM 3 

2500 2470 


Mitsubishi Bank I5fi0 

- Mitsubishi Chem 443 

MHeubUhl Elec 393 

I Mitsubishi Heavy 264 

* Mitsubishi Carp 521 

4U NA Mitsui and Co 340 

12 Mltsukoshl — 

3« NIL Mitsumi 
440 445 NEC 

Til 115 NGK Insulators 
HX»- 720 NBtka Stc 
2J 211 Nippon Kooaku 
06 XT Nippon Oil 
3BS X£ • Nippon Steal 
’2 IS Nippon Yusen 
7M 19S Nissan 
N -Q- — . Nomura Sec 


8 W NA Olympus 
9150 NA Pioneer 
Zg Ricoh 
712 218 Sharp 

235 344 SNmazu 

. ___ SUnetsu Clwmtcel 
lax : nut 

Sumitomo Bank 

I Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TaiseiCoro 

223 236 Talsho Marine 

297 283 Tokeda Cham 

490 480 TDK 

660 646 Tallin 

322 316 Tokyo Elec Pewer 

330 226 Tokyo Marine 

395 390 Toppon Printing 

378 373 Tow Ind 

238 235 Toshiba 

660 640 Toyota 

292 287 Yomakhl Sec 

303 xi MUrt/DJ. Index :1U4153 
163 US PtWtaP « : 11527 Jl 
270 240 "am Index : 90124 

340 j}*, Previous : 979 AS 

J J I I 

431 42S AdkJ 7940 2950 

550 530 AWSUlSSe 904 BOS 

414 tan Bonk Leu 3670 3600 

180 IB3 Brown Bower) 1630 1430 

2S ,a* ObaGetoV 3095 3080 

J40 159 Creau Sutra ^5 2505 

357 357 Electrowott 555 2800 

Gears Fischer 7B> m 

• ■■eUJt Hotaerbonk 
Interdiscount 
Jacob Suritard 
—1 Jeimoli 
I LondhGvr 

1 I Moevetwlck 

TZ Nestle 
S3 OerUkon-B 

25 SJ Roche Bobv 

R “ ISSSer 

513 524 

1340 1240 |Sc 

>£> S^salr 

imn im 5w«® Reinsurance 


\m 1770 
1805 1801 
19B5 1970 

93S 939 

IBB 1833 
9920 10120 
711 707 

707 7W 


Previoes :884J0 
Source: Reuters. 


111 mi . t _i 

so S fSJfSE" 


IS"® Bonk ol Tokyo 


295 284 

1371 1365 


-B rid ge s tone 
Canon 
Casio • 
C-itoh 


7» ‘S RSiNJpp-tPrtnf lOD in 


r.L«Tinoi A&Q sH — 

btad 1 BSSLggjl _ '<* ^ A 9 M index : 2 T 2 J 1 

”* i i??f 0,,,e,n 5108 ft Previous : 211^ 

OS 775 RM Inti SS if 

.aop Z775 Reuters ^ g* Prevtaes . 21 B 2 B 

ES'ftS 45 63/6446 25^2 j — 


««Zn ini Dotwu House 
»» 2«0 ^^ Seojrmes 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 


Page 21 


SPORTS 


^ .w.i 

F’V !«.. !H. .. 

w ,, 

PLRJ;.;, 

■ »'Hiu 

3 Wi&.> 
tiL?. 




It. 

V’nX 


i.- 


•• • ,, V f 


• It, 


'Rp:-. » : 

G* a is,-.:... 
»' . •; 
‘Kp? 


-^5 
■; -'m 

,!l !].«,, S* 

H,'. 


Hawks and Nordiques Vidors, 
Tying NHL Playoff Series, 2-2 


•i' 


RtoWjton '«*&"** . goals in the period's Goal 2^5. Sa- mance. It was the Flyers’ first loss 

CHICAGO — Until last Thurs- vard netted a short slapshot at at borne in 22 games and Quebec’s 
day night, Edmonton lad a 12- 17:55, off -a great pass from ‘second victory In 15 visits (the oth- 
"-ul \ 8^ne National Hockey League LarmeT. Pouzar tied the game ® had been in Jannary 1981). 


V 


U,.;- 


tk 

t?l 


l*L>. 


'•By 

'i. I.. »M ■ ’ • 

■ " ir \ nf 


•■rn 




Ir-iTs.,* . 

• ‘-v-.. 


, . r ^u 

:u,M V ,l V; 
■ : ; 'vo * 


'from 

st year's Stanley Cup fmajs But 
thanks to the Black Hawks, the 
defending champions now have a 
two-game playoff losing steak. 

Chicago defeated the Oilers, 8-6, 
here Sunday night to tie the Camp- 
bell Conference final series at two 
games each. Meanwhile, Quebec 
was squaring the Wales Conference 
title series with a 5-3 victoay over 
Philadelphia. 


15 seconds -latex, pushing a 
between Bannerman’s skates. 
Cun Frasex, on a fine pass from 
Okzyk, put Chicago ahead 4-3 at 
18:17. and the Blade Hawks never 
nailed again. A1 Secord’s power- 
play goal, on a rebound on a shot 
by Sait®, eluded Fuhr with 25 sec- 
onds left in the period. 


“Sometimes when you beat such 
a good team as Edmonton, it be- 
. . • . , . ■ comes a confidence factor," said 

third penod with a Chicago’s coach. Bob PulfonL 
6-4 lead, the Black Hawks got goals “Wc’ve evened things up and it’s a 
from Steve Larmer, his second of whole new series" 


Quebec led, 3-2, going into, the 
final period, when Pnuaddphia 
tied it at 3:08 on Mark Howe's 40- 
foot power-play shot, which sBd 
under Gosselin’s right leg. But. 
Cote, who had scored in the first 
period, put the Nonfiques hack 
ahead 84 seconds later. Anton 
Stastn/s shot caromed off Lind- 
bergh’s pads, and Cote poked in 
the rebound from five feet, A de- 
fensive specialist who had just 13 
during the regular season, 
now has five in the playoffs. 


, the game, and Bob Murray to ice 
>*-.« '•■irn, ... V-qnaoen. Aft® Murray’s goal Coa- 

1t . ... V ch Glen Sather replaced CHkr gpal- 

■;*.. ! . ‘ ;, ‘ r ie Gram Fnhr with Andy Moog. 

Edmonton's Glenn Anderson, 


¥ 
a.; i 


■ »4i* - • 

r f 


. . . ‘'‘T*. 

SjuJ" 




assisted by Wayne Gretzky, scored 
take h 8-5. 


Quebec added an insurance 
"If there is such a thing as mo- at 12:37 on Maxwell’s shot 1 
men tam,' the Hawks had it,” said just inside the blue line during a 
Gretzky. power play. 

Referee Ron Hoggarth called 35 . _ With the series shifting to Quc- 


•ir. 


,r -- r h,. 


fW! r% ' 




“<*Y 

.• ... .. ‘ 

.V orC 


With 
led 


with 3:19 left to make 
2:15 remaining and 
for an extra skater, Mark 
got his second goal of the night, to 
cut the deficit to two. But it wasn’t 
enough. “Another five minutes,” 
said Gretzky, “and we would have 
been in control” 

Chicago started the g ame with- 
out three key players: Defensemen 


penalties for a total of 1 10 minutes. 
"We can't skate with them,” said 
Larmer. “We’ve got to play a physi- 
cal game.” 

O 


« so Doug Wilson was ont with a groin 

? *r- ,i . ; i . l ;^ir ? Pun “d Kath Brown with a hip „ 

uv.i Knj, } j ■ •’ »,'•"* 'tiij pointer, forward Bin Gardner, one Ah of Philadelphia s tames j 
v ~ ’ "j.;”* 1 1 “uas^e of the team's best penalty-killere, on pow® plays against rookie 

... : "“JO- Viii...,- rr i I— Mm i.. MnitKr'Mi'iin Rn«4^lin ' 


In Philadelphia, the Nordiqnes 
pried the home-ice advantage back 
from the Flyers as Alain Cote and 
Brad Maxwell put third-period 
goals past straggling Pdle Lind- 
bergh after the Flyers had erased a 


came 


fc'l' 1 


• 1; "Vj: ir. ^ 


v ;•>:= 


■a.* 


■Xlr 




“«C: 


suffered tom knee ligaments when 
he was checked by the Oilers' Jar- 
oslav Pouzar Thursday ni ght 
It <fidn r l take long for things to 
get rough in Game 4. The Hawks 
took, a 5-3 lead aft® a mid first 
period that featured 16 penalties 
and a brawl- 


tender Mario Gosselin, who 
stopped 34 shots in a strong perfor- 


bec Tuesday night, the injury-beset 
Flyers are at a distinct disadvan- 
tage. “Home ice is important,” said 
Quebec’s Michel B&geron. In a 
rare display of forthrightness for a 
coach, he added: “It wasn't impor- 
tant yesterday because we didn't 
have it, but today it's very impor- 
tant because we do." 

Of his de cimated team. Coach 
Mike Keenan said: “Brad 
McCrimmon was awarded our 
most valuable defenseman trophy, 
and yon mks a play® like that. 
And when you consider our lineup, 
without Tim Ken: and Dave Pou- 
lin, we’re scoring very wdL” 



Knicks Win 
NBA Draw 
For Ewing 




1984*s Top Ten 

fayra MM m hiM-i ounOiounaowfl Hdor 



Joe Fatenon timed his 
Sunday, bat Quebec's Mario 


cm a first-period screen 
stiB came np with the save. 


Royals Break Yankees 9 10-Game Hex, 6-5 


u 




1 k;r.'- 

•e ■: .- : 








at 2:52, while each team was down 
two men following the fight But 
Danyl Suit® tied it at 4:23, and 
rookie Ed OIczyk gave Chicago the 
lead with a short-handed goal at 
3:50, When he oul-musded de- 
fenseman Paul Coffey on a break- 
away. Mark Mesa® do! the game 
at 2-2 at 11:02, when he spun 
around and lifted the puck over 
fallen Chicago goalie Murray Ban- 
nennan. 

There was an explorion of four 


The Aaodated Pros 

KANSAS CITY, Missouri — 
Jim Sundberg’s ninth-inning, 
bases-Ioaded single off reliever 
Dave Righetii here Sunday scored 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


pinch-rann® Buddy Biancalana 
and lifted the Royals to a 6-5 vic- 
tory over New York. 

It was Kansas City’s first deci- 
sion over the Yankees in 11 games, 
dating from Aug. 18, 1983. 

Hal McRae walked to start the 


home ninth and went to second on 
Darryl Motley’s single. Frank 
White loaded the bases when he 
slapped a ground® back to the 
mound and Righetti’s throw pulled 
Willie Randolph off second base. 
AD runners were safe on the error. 

Sundberg then lifted a fly ball 
that bounced over the right-field 
wall for a long game-ending single. 

Blue Jays 9, Mariners 5 
In Toronto, Ranee M ullinib; 
drove in two runs and Damaso 
Garcia had three hits to pace a 


victory that gave the Bine Jays a 
three-game sweep of Seattle. 


Twins 7, Orioles 3 
In Baltimore, Randy Bush had a 
grand-slam home run and two dou- 
bles to support Frank Vida’s four- 
hilt® and put Minnesota, past the 
Orioles. 


Brewers 7, Angels 4 
In Milwaukee, Cedi Cooper’s 
first homer of the year, a three-run 
shot in a five-run fifth, propelled 
the Brewers past California. 




IX 


SCOREBOARD 


» 

n 

ii 

i 


Baseball 


Basketball 


Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAOUE 


. .*»- ‘ 
v\.‘ 


iri 


i.p ««»« : 


■ 

j , 

G 

Afl 

R 

« 

Pet 

V ■ f 

•ierr SLL - 

■ 38 

116 

3D 

42 

ja 


purvey SJX 

29 

-124 

21 

44 

J55 


Murvliv AM. 

28. 

108 

21 

31 

asi 

Q 

Cruz Hhv 

29 

119 

19 

41 

J45 


1/ -Haves Phi. 

28 

102 

12 

35 

343 

8 

walling Htrv 

26 

81 

14 

27 

333 

B.Rtnscll LA. 

25 

61 

9 

22 

324 

Wi 

Parker an. 

29 

115 

10 

J7 

322 

McGee St.U 

24 

81 

14 

26 

317 


van SI vice SLL. 

28 

76 

13 

24 

316 


Franco Cte. 

28 

in 

20 

34 

330 

GBcU Tar. 

» 

115 

21 

3 

338 

Cooper MIL 

26 

KM 

1 

35 

324 

GoefM'Mta. 

29 

109 

20 

» 

321 

Puckett Min. 

29 

134 

17 

43 

321 

Mofftor MIL 

2>’ 

'103- 

15 

33 

320 


; V- 


.V»« W 


■y 


; «.* ; 


iL: 


i if- 
i «' 


MurpfeY. AHanta, 22; Garvoy, San 
Dleao, 21; Ownn. San Dbtoo. Tl: Sandtwnk 
Chlaro. ai; Herr. w-UnfeZL 
RBIt: MWrphy. Allanto.32; Herr, StLoute, 
21 j J.CIarfc, StLouh. 23; COavta. Sai Fun- 
dsca. 29; CkWINan. PMIodelpMa 20 r 
J.nwnnwan, PlttUmroh. 2D; Porkar, Clnc*v 
nati, 30. 

HIH; Garvav.San Diego. 44; Har.SI . Lou ta . 
<2: Cnn, Howtaa 41; Murvtrv. Allan To. 38; 
PorXer, Cincinnati, 37. 

DovMh: Owvna San Diego. 10; Parker, 
Cincinnati, f j Rov, Pittsburgh. 9; VJHaves. 
Philadelphia, *; WdUadi. Montreal. 1 . 
TtWm-. Rohm. MsntreoL 4; Gwnv San 
n DleeaJj McGee. SU.au to. 3; 13 lied with Z 
jj Home Ran; Murphv. Attontai 10; Dawson, 
'i Montreal, 6; Gmvtv, San Dlesa, 6; J.CIark, 

K SLLouhb A; Marshall, Las Aneeies, A; Straw 
'■ Berry. New York.. 6. 

li Stolen Bates: Coleman. SLLouls. 21; Der- 
<i nler. Chicago, 12; u*5mtm, St. Louis. 12; 

Gladden, San Franctacn, 10; SamueL Phlla- 
S iMWila. 10. 

,i PITCHING 

n A^Wan-Laa/Wtmiino PcL/IRAr asmith. 
entreat M, UXM.2A1; Hawkins. Son Dleoa 
6-a Ij»a 163; HorehtaHV Los AnaMn. 34L . 
LOOa 2D6; Knepper. Houston. 44k UML 332; 
Mower, Atlanta, 7-1. JffS. TJX 
Strlknets: Gooden. New York. SA; J-De- 
Leon. Plltsburgh. 55: Valenzuela Los Ange- 
lea 51; SahuOndnoattSD; Aan.Houstan.48. 

Saves: Goasaae. Sen Dleoa 9; LaSmlth. 
CMcaea.8; Reardon,MontreaL8; Candetarta 
Ptrisbuntfu 5 ; Power, andmwtt, 5. 


ibK MGavts, Oakland, 2fl; Rica Boston. 
2U PtattaCamonda.22; Carew. CaHtarnlp. 
31; GAelLTaron1a21i AAurptw. Oakland. 21; 
Ripken, Batthnara 2L 
Mis: Annas, Boston. 25; Baylor. New 
York,24:NU3avlaOaUand,M; Ripken. Balti- 
more. 24; Brunanskv, Minnesota, 23; GaettL 
Ml w nes at o. 23; Rk*. Boston. 23. 

MU: Puckett.Minnetala.43; Hatcher, Min- 
nesota 3V; Boggs, Boston, 38; GLBell, Taranto. 
38. P Bradley, Seattle. 38. 

DeeMee: GaettL Minnesota, 11; Mattingtv. 
New York, 10: Buckner, Boston, 9; Franca 


Cleveland, 9; Hatcher. Minnesota. 9. 


A 


Triplet: Wilma Kansas a tv, 7; Butler, 
OevatancL4; Pettt*,Caittomla4; PjBradtey, 
Seattle,]; Puckett Minnesota 3; Trammell, 
DetroiL X 

Home Rons: Annas, Boston. ID; MJ3avl& 
Oakland. 10; Preslev. Seattle. 9; Brunaraky. 
MhmeeotaA;GuT1ianws.5eattta,8; Kingman. 

. Oakland, 8; Rice. BastaaB. 

Staten Bases: PeHIa California. 20; Coinns. 
Oakland. 14; Garcia Toronto. 9; Butter, 
Cleveland, B; Law, CMcogo, I; Mosebv, To- 
ronto, A 

PITCHING 

Woa-Lost/WIaaJes PcL/ERAi Aasa Baltl- 
tiwre.4-e,una.4JU: TenrelL Detroit, 44Llim 
ZK: Badd taker, Baltimore, 5-1. ASX X17; Al- 
exander, Toranta 4-1, JD0i347; BawL Boston. 
4-1, ADO, 259; Romani ck. Cal Horn la 4-1. MX 
3J9. 

Strllceaats: OMiwaBodgMI; Bovd.Bas- 
tan.48; Morris. Detroit, 45; PJBannlstar, CM- 
cwia 39: Baddtaker, Battimora. 38. 

Saves: JJtawelL Oakland, f; RlaheftL New 
York, 8; DJtoone, CaUfomia 7; Hemonduz, 
Detrail,7; CautfllL Toronto. 6; WOddell. Cleve- 
land, a. 


NBA Playoffs 


SUNDAY'S RESULT 

PhUmfetohfa 28 34 21 38— 91 

Boston 31 34 19 33—188 

McHale 9-14 10-18 28, PadSlI 11-23 4-4 24; 
Cheeks 8-14 11-11 27. Malone 7-18 54 19. Re- 
bauads: Philadelphia 45 (Barkley 12). Boston 
so (Parish U). Assists: Philadelphia is 
(Cheeks 7), Boston 26 (DJohnson 8). 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H 

Bochte Oak. 29 79 10 29 

WWtaker Oat 24 93 18 32 

Brunanskv Min. 39 106 20 36 

Baines ChL 26 107 17 36 



Hockey 


CONFERENCE FINALS 
EASTERN 

l Boston leads series, wn 
May 14: PWttutotPhlo at Boston 
Mav 18: Boston at PMIadalphla 
Mav 19: Boston al Phitadetphlo 
x-May 22: Philadelphia at Boston 
x-Mav 24: Boston at PhlladeliMa 
x-Mav 26: Phlkidetehki at Boston 
WESTERN 

(Los Anastas leads tenet. VO] 
May 14: Denver at Los Angela 
May 17: Los Angela at Denver 
May 19: Las Angela at Denver 
x-May 22: Denver at Los Angela 
x-Mav 24: Los Anastas at Denver 
x-May 27: Denver at Lae Angela 
(x-H necessary) 


NHL Standings 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Qeabec 2 h 3—5 

PMlodeMito « i 1— 3 

Hunter (4). Cots2 (5), Kumpef (31, Maxwell 
(23 ; Crossman (3).Proop (6). Howe (2).SIml9 
oa goal: Qutaec (on Lindhergh) 9-5-7—21; 
PMtadetohla (on GaKsHin) 14.13-10-37. 


Sutter (101, Otazyk (61, Savant (B), Prater 
(61, Secant (6), Larmer 2 (S>. & Murray (2): 
Gretzky (8L Mauler 2 (7). Pouzar (2), Und- 
strom (2), Anderson (8). Shots on goal: Ed- 
monton (on Bonner man) 12-9-14—35; Chlenao 
(on Fuhr, MoobI 13-7-5-25. 


Bnace Bochte of OaUbud 

At 367, die majors? tap fatter. 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


Seattle 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
■Ul 


7 2 
12 1 

tie. Getael (5). Nunez (7). Vanda Berg 
I Scott; Sttata. Acker (61. Love] to (7), 
^ocnii (9) and Whitt, Martkwz (81. w-Stteh, 
n rX L — Baattifcf 1-4. HRs— Seattle, Henderon 
■*‘,(41. Thomas (81. Prattev (9). 

I 218 888—7 15 • 
MO M3— 3 4 2 
•• , viola and Sates; Dbtsn, SneM (3), TMor- 
Inez (7) and Demasev. W— Viola 6-2. L— 
l m iivoaxi. HRs-M>msBta Bush (2). Bom- 
- - nor*. Lvrm (71. 

taktand (M oil m — a 12 8 

e jioftea 888 808 188-3 6 I 

■ Sutton. Howell in end Heath; Cteraens, 
. tontay (I) and Godmon. W-5utton. 3-3. b- 
temens.3-4.Sv — Howell (9). HRs— Oakland, 
. ' anstord (5). Boston. Armas 2 (TO), Gednwi 

I : •; w. 

■ oUfomla W 381 188-4 n 2 

:*'• UhMiAce 080 198 2ke-7 13 1 

McCaskliL Ctemenfs <51. Corbett Ul. al- 


burn W) and Boone; Haas, Glhton (61. Fin- 
gers (9) and Moore, Sdwoodor (81. W- Haas. 
3 - 1 L — McCoakllL 0 -X Sv— Fingers ( 1 ). HR*- 
CaWomta. Jehea (3). MJIwaukee. Cooaer (I), 
Youni (3). 

NOW York ' 818 488 888-5 H 1 

Kansas OHr M2 >11 181—6 13 8 

n Micro. Rtahsttl (71 and Haesey; sabarha- 
gsa Beckwtth W. Qutoenborrv (8) end 
WWtWlL W Qu l a en t wr ry . 3A L— RlpfieW, V 
X HR— Kansas CRy, Sheridan 2 (2). 
CteVOtend ■ 8M >18 MS-6 14 8 

Texas 888 888 888-0 6 8 

B Woven and Beaton; Natal, Schmidt (7), 
Mason (7). Razama (81. Slmart (9) and 
Stou9tU.W-aMeyra.ML H ol a xM.HR- 
CtawtemL Butler <11. 

DafriUt ' . BM 888 888-8 7 3 

Chtaoee 1B M81S-4 6 8 

Morris and Castillo; Bannister and Fisk, 
w— Bannister M L-Morrtt^*, H R— ad co- 
go, Plsk (6L . , 

- NATIONAL LEAGUE 
AHanta . - N» 888 888-8 6 > 

Montreal - 121 bm bcx— 4 f ■ 

McMurtry. Dedmen (2), Camp (61, Smith 


CONFERENCE FINALS 
WALES 

(Series Ned. VO 
Mav 14: Philadelphia at Quebec 
May 14: Gkiebac at Philadelphia 
x-Mav 19: PhltodeiaMa at Quebec 
CAMPBELL 
(Secies tied, WJ 
May 14: Chicago at Edmonton 
Mav 16; Ed m onton at Chicago 
x-Mav IB: CMoooo at Edmonton 
Cx-tf ne cess ary! 


NBA DRAFT ORDER 
Theflnt-round seieetton ordwtor the No- 
t tonal Basketball Aseacial Ian draft la be held 
June. 10 In New York (the first Mven selec- 
tions were determined Sunday by tottery): 

1. New York 

2. Indiana 

X Las Angelas Clippers 
A Seattle 
X Atlanta 

6. Sacramento 

7. Golden Slate 

X Dallas (from Cleveland) 

9. Cleveland 
IX Phoenix 
11. Chicago 
11 Washington 
IX Utah 
14. Sen Antonio 
IX Denver (from Portland] 

16. Danas (from New Jersey) 

17. Dallas 
IX Detroit 
19. Houston 

20- Boston (from Denver through Dallas) 

21. Philadelphia 

22. Milwaukee 

21 Lae Angelas uskers 

V. Portland [from Boston through DaDas) 



Golf 


BASEBALL 


Tea Hoisaers and eemtag* la the. Byron 
Nebuo GoU Classic, completed Sunday on ttw 
7JMB-vanL par-71 Let Coltoas Sports dull 
coarse at Inrlneh Texas (x-woa saddoa death 


fajor League Standings n «vi poimw, Reardon and 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


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Hume (6). WKUs (9) and Von'Garder. W— 


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x-Bnb Eoahmod SWUM 
Pavne Stewart, SUMO 
Tam Watnn, 12X000 
Mac OGrady, 09400 
ail on Rodrisux ¥ium 

Lee Trevino, 11X250 
Crtdo Stadler, SIX250 
Phil Btedunar, SU5D0 
Ron Struck, SIASBB 
Boh Ldhr, H45D0 
Ran Cochran, *14500 
John Cook, S10L580 
George Ardwr, 5SNUOO 
Tom StaCfcmann, *1X500 
Chris Perry, 1X500 
Baddy Gardner. SX500 
Joe Inman, nan 


69-4670-67-272 
67-71-6648—272 
67-69-73-66-775 
43-69-6974 — 275 

72- 70-49-66 — 277 
7071-69-47—277 
67-7T5-69-71 — Z77 
1973-7046—278 
7M7-71-69— 278 

73- 69-66-72—278 
71-67-71-69— 278 
66-78-73-70-279 
7348-48-TO— 279 
*948-49-73—279 
71-714946^—288 
47-68-73-72— 280 

aavnax-m 


Football 


USFL Standings 


■! 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 
W-L 

t York 19 fl 

Ureal 19 ID 

«HM 17 11 • 

'■Ms 14 16 

-,-lptag 10 U 

Avreh 9 It 

West DMstaa . 
Dtara 17 l* 

Angeles 17 U 

tan 15 14 

Innail 14 - IS ' 

Francisco 12 10 

no 11 17 


Pd. GB 
JIM — 
ASS 1 
A07 2M 
467 4 Vi: 

JtS 9M 
310 11 


Jta - . 
jn . 7to 

5U 2 
483 '3 
MB 5ft 
J93 SV», 


101 and Davis; Drawackv, Gcssoge (0) and 
Kemtodv. W-Oraasckv. VL L— R ut h vs n, 14. 
Sv a n al o g s (9). HR— Chicago. Lagos- (2L 
PUtUwrgh IM BM 808-4 S 1 

Lee Angelas 8W 881 Mh-2 6 2 

Tunned, Scurry (4) and Psna; Cosh (to. Nta- 
dsnfaer (7) ondSdMGtu. W— Castillo, 14. L— 
Tunnell.84 Sv— Nledsnlwnr «l. HR— LeeAn- 
gekrt. Brack ni. . 

SLLOnta IM 188 111 0-4 9 1 

lea Fmdsa - Ml SM MB w W 8 

Porxh. Lotal (7L Horton (9). Allan (9) and 
Parnr.Hteta 191: Go*L NLDovto VK.Qonem 
'( WJ pmrBrmjy.w^-Gorrells. W. L-4UMV 1- 
3. HRs— fit. LooU.CL5mlth (2). San PrandKO. 
Gan 2 (2), Brantv (41. 


Tampa Bov 
Birmingham 
New Jersey 
Memphis 
Jac kson ville 
Baltimore 
Ortando 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T PCt PF PA 
0 JS0 309 238 
0 A67 280 718 

0 457 281 246 

0 J83 259 244 

0 MO 288 293 

1 MSB 2(0 183 
0 .1® 1*8 298 


MILWAUKEE— Ptoced Pete Vucfcavtah, 
pitcher, on the 2Vdav disabled nsL- 
Hattond League 

new YORK— Placed Darryl strawberry, 
outfielder, on the 15day disabled HsL Re- 
called Terry Blocker, outfielder, from Tide- 
water of the In te rnational League. Moved 
Brace BeranyL pneher. from the 15-day M ttw 
21-day UsL 

FOOTBALL 

OnBQtfkHi Football I — v w 
TORONTO— Stoned Starling Hinds, water 
Bender, and AlvM Parker, ruwtna backs. 
M nthm ql Faathall Leaswe 

ATLANTA— cut Carl Buttw. ruaterta badL 

DALLAS— Stoned Jesse Pena linebacker, 
too mutttyeor contract, 

NEW ENGLAND— Sgned Rocky Bronv 
well, defensive back; Butch Button, wide re- 

celver: steraLans. italu end; William Saad- 

■rx offensive tackle, rad Michael Stinnett, 
Wace-Wduto-punlgr. 

HOCKEY 

ttafttens6 Hsdov Leanae 
VANCOUVER— Stoned Dove Lowry, for- 
ward, end Data Dunbar, dofem e nx s i 
COLLIDE 

JAMESMAOISON-Named John Thurston 
buekeftaO coach. 

MERCY COLLEG E A nnounced the resto- 
ration ot Rtafc Wodt, baseball coach. Homed 
Jim Durfina basebcdl coach, 

MONTANA STATE — Named Dan Brels, 
tor* sklteti coach. 

PITTSBURGH — Named Steve Lewis worn- 
eft's track coach. 

TAMPA— Named Fran Curd athleHedJrec- 

tar. 

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH— Named 
Mike Radio basfcelbaP coach. 


IwfaiK Rangers 0 

In Arlington, Texas, Tony Ber- 
nazard’s seventh-inning pinch sin- 
gle mroed out to be the only ran 
Bert Blyleven needed as he shill out 
the Rangers for the third straight 
time, dating from last^ear. 
WhHeSoK4,T]gmO 
In Chicago, Harold Baines and 
Qnde Guillen earfi angled in a ran 
to boost the White Sox past De- 
troit 

A's 5, Red Sox 3 
In Boston, Don Sutton with- 
stood three Red Sox hornets to earn 
Ins 283d major-league victory, ty- 
ing him with Tim Kaat for 21st 
place on the all- time winners’ lisL 

Expos 4, Braves 0 
In the National League, in Mon- 
treal, David Palmer and Jeff Rear- 
don combined on a six-hitter as the 
Expos posted their fourth consecu- 
tive shutout and handed Atlanta its 
fourth straight whitewash. Montre- 
al pitchers have a scoreless streak 
of 39 innings; the record is 56, set 
by Pittsburgh in 1903. 

Mets 3i, Pbflbes 2 
In New York, Danny Heep, 
playing for injured right field® 
Danyl Strawbory (who was to un- 
dergo surgery Monday fa torn 
thumb ligaments), had two hits and 
scored the game-winning run in the 
sixth on an error by second base- 
man Joan Samuel as the Mets wot 
their sixth in a row. 

Padres 5, Cubs 3 
In San Diego, the Padres won the 
rubber game of a three-game series 
when Chicago first basonan Keith 
Moreland’s two-run throwing error 
triggered a three-run sixth. 

(Sants 5, Canfinab 4 
In San Francisco, the Giants' 
Jim Gotl became the first pitcher in 
two years to hit two home runs in a 
game (the last to do it was Walt 
Terrefl, for the New York Mets 
against Chicago in 1983). Gott, 
who had bases-empty home runs to 
left-center in the third and right-, 
cent® in the fifth, span his first 
three big-league seasons with To- 
ronto. He had never batted in the 
majors before joining San Francis- 
co this year. 

Astros 10, Reds 5 
In Cincinali, unbeaten Bob 
Ksepp®, with home run help from 
Bill Doran, Mark Bailey and Den- 
ny Walling, straggled through five 
innings to record his fourth victory 
of (he season and his sixth in a row 
over the Reds. 

Dodgers 2, Pirates 0 
In Los Angeles, Greg Brock hit 
bis first homer erf the season and 
singled home a run to help the 
Dodgers and Bobby Castillo, mak- 
ing ms first start of the year, past 
Pittsburgh. 


By Sam Goldaper 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK —The New York 
Knicks won the grand prize in pro 
basketball's draft lottery here Sun- 
day and now have the rights to 
Patrick Ewing, the nation’s most 
renowned college basketball play- 
er. 

In a dramatic ceremony at the 
Waldorf Astoria, the National Bas- 
ketball Association conducted its 
first-ev® lottery to determine the 
first seven choices in the June 18 
college drafL 

The participants were the seven 
teams that did not make the current 
playoffs. 

The Lena on grew as the teams 
were announced in reverse order, 
from No. 7 to No. 1. When Com- 
missioner David J. Stern an- 
nounced that the Indiana Pac®S 
would have the No. 2 choice, thus 
m a king the Knicks No. 1. Dave 
DeBusschere, head of the Knicks’ 
basketball operations, leaped up 
from his seal, took a deep breath 
and raised his fist in triumph. 

His prize is Ewing, the 7-Foot 
(2. 1 3-meter) center from George- 
town University who is the most 
widely hailed college play® since 
Lew Akindor, now Kareem Abdul- 
Jabbar, in 1969. A three-tune all- 
American, Ewing led Georgetown 
to the national collegiate champi- 
onship game in three of his four 
years. Georgetown won the title in 
1984. 

Ewing is considered the kind of 
player who can turn a team around, 
and the prospect of haring him at 
cent® is parficnlariy important for 
the Knicks, who lost their top two 
centers to injuoy before the 1984-85 
season and. without a big man in 
the middle, struggled to a 24-58 
record, their worst since 1962. 

In the two to three hours follow- 
ing the nationally televised lottery, 
the Knicks said their offices re- 
ceived more than 1,000 phone calls 
from people offering congratula- 
tions and Miring for season-tick® 
applications. 

“I really didn’t get into the lot- 
tery until aft® the 7, 6, 5” DeBuss- 
chere sakL “But once we were one 
of the three, I started to get a little 
cocky and told myself. ‘Let’s win it 
aft' 

“I wasn't nervous at the start, 
but the tension began to grow,” 
DeBusschere acknowledged. “Pret- 
ty soon, I began to gel the feeling 
that I would rath® be taking the 
last shot in a game than waiting for 
Stem to open the envelope.” ' 

□ 

The college draft is designed to 
help balance the NBA by giving 
weak® teams the opportunity to 
draft bed® players. This year’s lot- 
toy replaced the previous system 
— a coin toss between the teams 
with the worst records in the East- 
ern and Western Conferences — 
and was instituted in part to re- 
move any incentive for a team to 
finish last. 

The oth® teams in Sunday’s lot- 
tery were the Pacers, Atlanta 


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CRuBoeuta 

SewtarMne 

020 

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Charte, Detain 

187 

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Leon Wood 

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Hawks, Los Angeles Clippers, 
Golden State Warriors, Sacramen- 
to Kings and Seattle SuperSonics. 
Each was represented by either a 
general manager or own®, who sai 
on the stage of the Waldorf's Star- 
light Room as Stem drew seven 
gray envelopes, each bearing the 
team logo of a participant, from a 
dear contain®. 

When he opened the first enve- 
lope and announced that Golden 
State would have the No. 7 pick. Al 
Allies, the Warrior general manag- 
er, moaned. 

Golden State had the wont re- 
cord in the Western Conference 
and, under the old system, would 
have been involved in the cob flip 
for the first pick. 

After the fourth envelope was 
opened and the Knicks were still 
alive. DeBusschere placed his 
clasped hands to his mouth. 

“When Stan was about to open 
the fourth envelope, I said to my- 




m 




self if only we can get post No. 4, 
of be 


we would be sure of getting one of 
-the three top big guys,” DeBuss- 
chere said, m a draft featuring a 
numb® of good big men, three are 
considered standouts — Wayman 
Tisdale, Oklahoma’s high-scoring 
forward; Benoit Benjamin, 
Creighton’s 7-foot center, and Ew- 
ing. They are part of an elite group 
that should fare as well as last 
year’s at contract time. 

When the Lot Annies Clippers 
got the third pick, DeBusschere's 
hands covered his eyes. “When it 
got down to the last two,” he said, 
“I couldn't look, couldn't listen.” 
Moments later, be was rising and 
denching his fist 

“I don't play the lottery or bet on 
the horses,” said DeBusschere. 
“The only thing I’ve ever won is 
some golf club bead covers.” 

□ 

Bom in Jamaica, Ewing came to 
the United States when he was 12 
and attended Rindge and Latin 
High School in Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. A physical, imposing 
play®, the 240-pound (108. 8- kilo- 
gram) Ewing immediately turned 
Georgetown mto a national basket- 
ball force. In four seasons he scored 
2, 184 points and pulled down 1,316 
rebounds. 

More than that, Ewing is a fierce 








NVTAou B miJ » 

Ewing; The pick of the crop. 


defensive play® who has intimidat- 
ed opposing teams, He and his 
teammates have often been viewed 
as aggressive bullies, and one of the 
ironies of his coming to New York 
is that he will be playing where he 
was often booed by followers of St. 
John’s, Georgetown’s Big East 
Conference rival 

DeBusschere spoke to Ewing by 
telephone aft® Sunday’s drawing. 
“Patrick told me he was glad the 
lottery was over,” DeBusschere 
said, “and he was looking forward 
to getting back to playing again.” 

Incidentally, the first numb® se- 
lected Saturday night in the. New 
York State Lottery was No. 33, the 
numb® Ewing wore at George- 
town and will wear with the 
Knicks. 


Celtics Down 76ers in Opener 


Cavpikd by Our Staff Ftvm Dispatches 


BOSTON — Boston got ready 

l -tougj; 


for a tough g am e by playing 
games. Pmladdphia got ready for it 
with six days off from any land of 
game. In beating the 76ers 108-93 
m Sunday’s open® of their Nation- 
al Basketball Association Eastern 


NBA PLAYOFFS 


Conference final playoff series, the 
Celtics , found out that rest can be 
overrated. 

“When these two teams meet, it’s 


an instant change pure and sim- 
ile,” said Boston Coach K.C. 


Of Boston’s busy schedule, 
be said: “As the game turned out, it 
wasn’t a factor.” 


The 76ers hadn’t played since the 
previous Sunday, when they com- 
pleted their conference semifinal 
sweep of Milwaukee. The Celtics 
had just one day off aft® eliminat- 
ing Detroit, but showed few signs 
of fatigue down the stretch when 
Robert Parish and Larry Bird 
sparked a game-deciding surge. 

The second game of the best-of- 
seven series between the teams that 


won the last two NBA titles will be 
played here Tuesday night. 

“Maybe the week off hurt us, but 
we needed the rest,” said Philadel- 
phia guard Dint Richardson. “The 
only way it hurt us was on instinc t 
[days, they were quick® on loose 
balls and things like that.” 

"They had a lot of time off with a 
chance to work on some things,” 
said Jones. “We just wait out there 
and played scared in the beginning, 
and (hat helped us.” 

Moses Malone’s jump shot pul 
the 76ers on top, 77-76, with 11:14 
left in the game. Kevin McHale 
then hit two free throws to start an 
8-2 Boston ran, until Malone sank 
two free throws and Andrew 
Toney, who scored 16 points on the 
night, hit on a loogjumper to make 
the score 84-83 wlh 8:08 remain- 
ing. 

But (be Celtics, who had led by 
1 1 late in the first half, outscored 
the 76®s by 24-10 the rest of the 
way — with Bird getting 10 points 
and Parish 8. 

Danny Ainge started the spurt 


with an 18-foot jump®, and Bird’s 
baskets 


two fast-break baskets eventually 
boosted the margin to 98-89. The 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Oakland 

Denver 

Houston 

Arizona 

San Antonio 

Lm Angola 

P or tl an d 


224 


JW 294 
J67 323 236 
AO 376 2S1 
333 236 271 
J3T 169 261 
J50 IBS 29S 
JSD 154 27H 


Davis Cup Tennis 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
NtanuMt 17, Houston IS 

New Jersey 1ft Baltimore 3 
Toma© Bov 21. JaetaonvUJo 10 . 
Denver 4X Arizona 28 


FIRST ROUND QUALIFYING 
Graeco 4. Norway i 
(AI Aitwnu 

George Katoraionft, Graeco, out. Audud 
JeuBMn, Norway 24. 4-Z 6J. 

M OOOCT 4. l OOiOBl 1 
(At Dakar, Samoan 

GnuaGonwnete.MOfiacGatt.How Kabaz, 
Sanesat, 62 6X 44 

Alb*n VManj, Atonoce. daL Mltaud Doum- 
bra, SvnegaL 62, 57, 64 



Eastwood Wins Golf Playoff 
After SteuxatMom Big Lead 


SmmnAWI 


Bob Eastwood 


The Associated Press 

IRVING, Texas - Bob 
Eastwood, given new life when 
Payne Stewart blew a two-shot lead 
on the final bole, won the Byron 
Nelson golf tournament here Sun- 
day when the shaken Stewart made 
a second consecutive double bogey 
. on the first hole of a sudden-death 
playoff. 

Eastwood, 39, bad labored 
through 13 seasons before w i nnin g 
his first PGA tour title a year ago, 
and he won this me with a two- 
pun bogey foQowing-a visit to a 
bunk® on the first playoff bole. It 
was all he needed against his oppo- 
nent's collapse. 

Stewart, who ted through most 
the day, held a three-stroke lead 
with one hole to go. Bui Eastwood, 
playing in from of him, ran in a 45- 
foot birdie putt on the 72d. 

On the rami hole of regulation, 
Stewart drove into a fairway ban- 
ka, hit his second shot mto a 
: bunk® and then skulled 
ball across the green and into 


another bunk®. When be failed to 
get op and down, he dropped bade 
into a tie at 272, 

Stewart — who didn’t mate a 
bogey over the first 17 holes— had 
a closing 68, 3-under par. 
Eastwood finished with a 67. 

On the first playoff bole, Stewart 
drove into a fairway bunk®, bandy 
got the ball out and put his third 
shot over the green. Eastwood, 
meanwhile, hit the sand in two and 
came out to within about 15 feet; 
Stewart ran his chip, his fourth shot 
cm the par-4 hole, a little further 
beyond the hole. 

Both men mijewd their putts, and 
Eastwood tapped in for a winning 
bogey. 

Stewart blew past Mac O'Grady, 
the lead® through the first three 
rounds, with three consecutive 
birdies beginning on the second 
hole. O’Grady didn’t make a birdie 
until the I7ih and, on a 74, he 
drifted back into a tie lor third at 
275 with Tom Watson at 275, who 
closed with a 66. 


lead never dipped below seven 
points in the final three minutes, 
and Boston scored the last eight 
points of the game, four of them by 

Boston led, 57-52, at halftime 
behind 22 points from McHale, 
who hit 7 of 8 field goal attempts 
and all 8 of his free throws. Mau- 
rice Cheeks had 19 points in the 
first two periods to keep Philadel- 
phia close. 

The 76en» jumped into a 14-8 
lead, but a 13-2 run gave Boston a 
21-16 edge with 4:28 left in the first 
quart®. The Celtics led by as many 
as 7 in the period and held a 33-28 
advantage going into the second. 
Philadelphia finally caught up at 
39-39 on a three-point play by 
Cheeks with 7:45 left in the half. 

Boston then built a 47-44 lead 
before exploding for 10 of the next 
12 points to make the score 57-46, 
its biggest lead of the half, with 
1:16 to go. But aft® Scott Wed- 
man's lo-foot jump® capped the 
spurt, Cheeks got the hairs final 6 
points, 4 on free throws, to reduce 
the 76ers' deficit to 5 points. 

McHale led Boston with a care® 
playoff high 28 points, but his scor- 
ing was overshadowed by the over- 
all play of Parish, who scored 24 
points, bad 13 rebounds and 4 
blocked shots. Bird finished with 
23 points. 

Of Parish's successful night, Bos- 
ton guard Dennis Johnson com- 
mented: “Robert's just like any- 


body else — you get him the 
let mm know W: 


’s part of the t« 
and he’ll come thro ug h ” 

The 76ers were paced by Chet 
with 27 points and Malone with ! 

“We nev® could get into 
groove.” said Philadelphia Con 
Billy Cunningham. “We had a ] 
of turnovers and we didn’t fk 
wefl to each oth® defensively, 
was not pleased with the way i 
played, but we had a chance. \ 
were able to fight back late in t 
game.” 

Boston’s bigg® starting froi 
court ouistored Philadelphia’s “ 
33. “We executed our game pi 
pretty much the way I want 
things to go," Jones said. 

It was the first playoff roceti 
between the two Atlantic Divisii 
rivals in three years and came afi 
Philadelphia breezed through j 
fim two series, while the Cdti 

Unbeaten at home in six playt 

games this year, Boston has won 

of its last 19 games here. (AJP, W, 


' — — . 


I 









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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MAY 14, 1985 



ART BUCHWALD 


w, 


The Pentagon’s TSF 


ASHINGTON — In last 
week's Senate budget vote, 


with a zero growth figure for 11 
which was quite a comedown from 
the 9-percent increase Secretary 
Weinberger had o riginall y y sired 
for. It came as no surprise, though, 
to Harold Simon, who keeps track 
oF Pentagon spending. 

"The secretary has nobody to 
blame but his toilet seats,” Harold 
said- 

I seemed puzzled, so he contin- 
ued. “Weinberger lost the battle for 
more funds the 
day the story 
broke that the 
Defense Depart- 
ment was paying 
$600 a seat. I 

call it the Toilet 

Seal Factor, or 
TSF. 

“For several 
years Charley 

ESSr.1* BocbwHW 

whole Pentagon Disneyland pack- 
age, MX missiles and afl. Charley 
assumed our defense brass woe 
handlin g his money as they would 
their own. The poor guy had no 
idea how much to pay for an F-16 
Tighter, M-l tank or Trident sub- 
marine, so he gave his proxy to 
Weinberger and his merry band of 
men. After all, when you start talk- 
ing millions and billions of dollars 
you are no longer talking Charley’s 
language. 

□ 



$7,900 coffeepot. Charley’s a good 
gny and laughed that off. But it was 
the toSet seat price that gotto Mm. 
That's why I call it the Pentagon's 
Toilet Seat Factor rather than the 
Screwdriver or Monkey Wrench 
Factor. 

"When Charley read about the 
commode be just opened his win- 
dow and shouted, Tm mad as heD 
and Tm not going to take it any- 
more!' The moment I beard him I 
knew Weinberger had blown his 
budget request.” 

“Poor Weinberger, 1 ’ I said. “He 
probably didn't know any more 
than Charley what it was costing 
the American people for an air- 
borne toilet seat.” 

That’s why the TSF is so impor- 
tant to the Pentagon. They can go 
to Charley and ask for a billion 
dollars for a “Star Wars’ laser gun, 
and bell write out a check without 
a whimper. But don't try to con him 
on an item that costs less than 
51,000.” 


“But then came the revelations 
about the $600 Lockheed com- 
mode cover and suddenly Charley 
said, ‘Hey, wail a minute. What 

kind of a d ummy do you rhink I 
am? I may not know the price of a 
B-l bomber but I sure as hell know 
what a toilet seat costs, and it ain't 
$600 — no way.* 

“For the want of a reasonably 
priced seat, the battle for the big 
toys was lost. Weinberger's people 


misread Charley’s patriotism as a 
Id l 


sign that they could throw around 
his money, particularly at a time 
when the government was cutting 
student aid for his kids and freezing 
his mother's Social Security pay- 
ments.” 


“Does the TSF only apply to 
hammers, screwdrivers' and toilet 
seats?” 

“No, it’s become synonymous 
with the hunting lodge weekends 
and the lobbying and public rela- 
tions fees that defense contractors 
have added on to their bills, private 
plane trips to the Super Bowl, and, 
of course, kennel bearding charges 
for executives* dogs. The contrac- 
tors were nickel and diming poor 
Charley Taxpayer to death, and he 
was getting sick of it” 

“Maybe when Weinberger coun- 
terattacks with announcements 
about all the new weapons the Rus- 
sians have built. Congress will re- 
lent and forget the TSF.” 

“I doubt it” 

“How can you be so sure?” 

“Charley has spoken, and the 
voice of the taxpayer has been 
heard in the land. The memory of 
the commode cover is still too fresh 
in everyone's mind. The Defense 
Department has to clean up its act 
before Charley will give it a' blank 
again.” 


“1 thought it was the news of the 
$400 hammer and $760 screwdriver 
that got Charley mad.” 

The price of the hammer and 
screwdriver made him more con- 
fused than angry. Then came the 


“What can Weinberger learn 
from all this?” 

The lesson is, if you want to 
avoid the Toilet Seat Factor in the 
Pentagon, don't ever overcharge 
the man in the street for something 
be can price in a hardware store.” 


Interview Film Documents Holocaust 


By. Richard Bernstein 

New York Times Service 

j ARIS — A mne-and-a-haff-hour docu- 
'mentaiy film on the destruction of Euro- 


this month to the acclaim of critics, who 
ratted ft “a masterpiece” and “a monument 
against forgetting. 

The documentary, produced over a 10-year 
period by Claude Lanzmann. is called. 
“Shoah,” a Hebrew word meaning annihila- 
tion. It is a series of interviews — one French' 
critic called it "a construction of hellish spi- 
rals around a central hole” — with diverse 
witnesses to the war against the Jews, includ- 
ing not only Jewish svrvjvois but also SS 
officers who served in the death camps, Po- 
lish villagers who lived near the camps, Ger- 
man colonizers of occupied Poland and 
Western scholars of the Holocaust. 

The documentary contains no historical 
footage. There are no scenes of the camps 
themselves or of the rise of Hitlerism in 
Germany, and in that sense “Shoah” is differ- 
ent from other records of the Holocaust. 

But fii firman r> shows in long sequences the 
places of annihil ation as they exist now, the 
peaceful rivers where the ashes of the dead 
were dumped, the green fields where mass 
graves were dug, the railroad platforms where 
the initial selections for the gas chambers 
were made. 

A visual leitmotif, a refrain, runs through 
the entire film, one of whose purposes, Lanz- 
mann has said, was to erase the dividing line 
between history and the present He recon- 
structs at numerous points in the narrative 
the arrival at Polish places called Auschwitz, 
Treblinka and Sobibor of the long, creaking 
trains that carried doomed Jews from all over 
Europe. 

He visits these places today and talks with 
their Polish inhabitants who remember how 
the Jews were taken away and murdered. 

“We read after the war numerous commen- 
taries on the ghettos, on the extermination 
camps, and we were shaken,” the critic and 
writer Simone de Beauvoir wrote of “Shoah” 
in a front-page article in the newspaper Le 
Monde. “But seeing today the extraordmary 
film of Claude l-angmann, we realize that we 
knew nothing.” 

“Despite all our knowledge,” die went on, 
“the awful experience remained at a distance 
from us. For the first time, we live it in our 
heads, in our hearts, and in our flesh.” 

Throughout the documentary, which is be- 
ing shown in two parts on consecutive days, 
i-mynmnn asks questions of his numerous 
witnesses, coaxing painful memories from 
survivors, some of whom fight against tears 
as they remember events they apparently 
would rather forget He interrogates camp 
officials. He brings survivors back to the rites 
of the camps and allows the camera to record 
their reactions and their comments. 

In a written explanation of the film, Lanzr 
mann said that he wanted to combat the 



A scene from “Shoah”: Henryk GawtiowskL a Polish train . 
took Jews to the death camp at Treblinka, Poland, is shown 


notion that the Holocaust was something that 
belonged to the past, that ft was only a 
memory. 

The film that I have trade is a counter- 
myth,” be said, “it is an inquiry on the 
present or the Holocaust or at the very least 
on a past whose scars are still so fresh and so 
inscribed in places and on minds that it 
appears with hallucinatory timelessness.” 

To produce the documentary, fanriirann 
said, he did about 350 hours of filmed inter- 
views in 14 countries, including Greece, Isra- 
el, the United States and Poland, where the 
major death camps were located. 

Lanzmann. a 59-year-ofal Frenchman who 
■fought in the Resistance during World War H 
and is a former dose associate of the philoso- 
pher Jean-Panl Sartre, has made one other 
documentary, “Why Israel,” which appeared 
in 1973. 

He worked as a journalist for man y years in 
association with Same on the magazine Lcs 
Temps Modemes before turning Ms attention 
to mmmakmg in 1970. He said he was partly 
motivated by the pro-Palestinian, anti-Israeli 
attitudes dial were fashionable in the leftist 
circles that he fxequemed. 

In one of the most gripping moments of 
“Shoah,” L anzmann interviews in Germany 
a former SS official at the Treblinka death 
camp, Franz Sucbomel who recounts in ex- 
acting detail every step of the process of 
extermination. 

Suchomd describes the arrival of depor- 
tees by train: he describes the tactics used by 
the Nazis to 


ramps to the rooms where they were ordered 
ro strm naked. He tells how thdr hair was cut, 
how they were pushed into the gas chambers, 
how that bodies were then pm into ovens 
and the ashes dumped into a nearby river — a 
process, be says, mat took about two hours 
for a train containing several thousand peo- 
ple. 

At each moment during SuchomeTs pains- 
taking account, images of the trains and of 
the various rites at Treblinka as they are 
today appear on the screen. 

lanzmann filmed Henryk Gawtiowslti, a 
Polish engineer. leaning out of his locomotive 
window as the train he was driving stopped 
□ext ro a sign marked Treblinka. For three 
years during the Nazi occupation, Gaw- 
liowrid drove trains up to die gates of the 


extermination camp, drinking vodka provid- 

1 Ms 


ed by the Germans and trying to shut his ears 
to the voices that he heard behind him. 


Poland Protests FQm 


move them quickly down die 


Poland has lodged a protest against the 
film “Shoah,” Reuters reported from Paris. 

The Polish government called for sched- 
uled television broadcasts of the film to be 
banned, saying that it “contained outrageous 
insinuations on the alleged collaboration of 
the Polish people in the Holocaust” 
France rejected the Polish appeal. Lanz- 
mann said he hoped that, despite its banning 
in Poland and appeals by Warsaw, the film 
would be shown in cinemas around the world. 
It will be featured at the next Venice film 
festival. 


Pavarotti's Sub: Mdhara 


4 


The Japanese tenor Thro fchi- 
hani will take the role of King Gus- 
tav III of Sweden for eight perfor- 
mances of Verdi’s “Un BaBo in 
MaschenT after Lacuna Pavarotti 
canceled his seven scheduled ap- 
pearances in the Paris Opto pro- 
duction under doctor's orders, the 
Opto press office announced 
Monday. IcMhara had been sched- 
uled for one performance, but Pa- 
varotti was ordered not to perform 
after being taken ill last week dur- 
ing rehearsals for a French televi- 
sion program. He returned to Italy 
to rest Jacques Chancel, host of the 
television show, said last week that 
Pavarotti “just had an enormous 
fatigue and the doctor asked him ro 
stop.” He said he did not know 
where stories originated that the 
singer had heart problems. The 
production starts Saturday. . . . 
Riccardo Muti conducted Verdi's 
Requiem in Philadelphia on Sun- 
day night in memory of Eugene 
Otrtandy, who died March 12 at 
age 85. At the time, he was conduc- 
tor laureate of the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra, which he led as conductor 
and music director for 44 years 
before retiring in 1980. Ormandy’s 
family had kept his funeral private 
but asked for a performance in his 
memory. . . . The pianist Van 
CEburn, who has not performed 
publicly since 1980. says he plans 
to end the hiatus in his career. Tve 


would stumble out some fatuous 
remark which she would thro dis- 
miss,” Critchky said. Denis Healey 
of tire Labor Fain said: "The strik- 
ing thing about her is her imperi- 
ousness. which reminds me very 
much of Catherine the Great or the 
Dragon Empress who presided 
over the terminal decline of (he 
Manchu dynasty in China. It is J* 
allied with a temperament which in - 
many ways is very masculine ” 

n ■ 


full 1 


The Mormon Church has made 
public an 1825 letter in which its 
founder. Joseph Smith, discusses 
the practice of folk magic, but (he 
church said the references did not 
undermine . Monnon doctrine on 
the faith's divine orgins. Historians 
said the letter, the earliest known 
writing by Smith, would force a re- 
evaluation of him. Smith estab- 
lished theehurch in 1830, under the 
tutelage, he said, of God, Jesus and, 
an «n yl named Moroni who w 
him where to find buried add 
plates inscribed with the Book of 
Mormon. In the letter to Josbh 
Stowed Sr., Smith described dig- 
ging for money and treasure. 
ffi-irrifri by “some clever spirit.” 
Last year reports of a letter oy an 
early Mormon drew attention ro 
Smith’s interest in the occult 


always said every concert needs on 
intermission. Tm not retired,” he 


said. The second half of my con- 
cert wifi commence soon. I’ve been 
trying to decide on a date.” 

□ 


Having lunch or dinner with 
Prime Munster Margaret Thatcher 
should be “avoided like the 
plague,” a Conservative Party law- 
maker said in a radio program Sun- 
day. A member of the opposition 
Labor Party also said that Thatcher 
presided over a dining table like the 
Dragon Empress over the fall of the 
Manchu Dynasty. The sharp re- 
marks came in a British Broadcast- 
ing Corp. radio program. The 
Thatcher Phenomenon.'' Julian 
Crifdriey, a Tory rebel against 
Thatcher, said the prime minister 
would join bint and other lawmak- 
ers at lunch, look at them in such a 
way as to discourage talking, and 
begin asking questions: “Julian, 
what are your views on the money 
supply?” for example. “All your 
gastric juices would begin to chum 
in the most frightful way, and you 


Shaw Divinity School in Raleigh, 
North Carolina, has awarded an 
honorary degree to the Reverend 
Sim Myung Moon, the Unification^ 
Church founder, who is in prison 
for tax evasion. Moon's wife, Hat 
Ja Han, accepted the degree for her 
husband. The Unification Church 
recently gave $30,000 to the school, 
but Joseph Paige, vice president of 
the school, said that had nothing to 
do with the honorary degree. 


Muhammad AG and his wire, Ve- 
ronica. are in China on an 11 -day 
visit, the former boxing champ's 
second trip to that country. Ah is 
scheduled to' give some ringside 
coaching to Chinese boxers in Bdj- 

ing and Shanghai, 


•hh t ’il 




vi ; 
jv* '• 


Bruce Springsteen, hoping to 
avoid a media “circus,” married 
JuUaime Phfflips, an actress, on 
Monday shortly after midnight in a 
private Catholic ceremony m Ore- 
gon. The rock siar* s plans to marry 
were revealed late Iasi week. 




.<'• 

,i,-_ : 

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PAMS a LYON • MARSEILLE 
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wHdwdi - Ar/Sea. CoS Ctairfe 
281 1881 Pons (near Operoj Can too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


BIARRITZ {neo-L Renovat e d form- 
h ome. 2 t mmh, 8 rooms, 2 baita, 2 
firapfctoes, modern conveniences, to- 
Feet oondtoL View. Quiet. 

FI ,500,000. Tefc |S9| 56 01 frl 


CANNE5. 25 sqjn. studja 40 sqjn. 

private garden, readenW, cdm. 10 
tin tea. F500800. Tefc 2^4 92 fz 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
PRMCIPAUTY OF MONACO 

t&isa, 

denlcJ raea, center of town, 
sqjn. Svmg space, large eftiranco, Iraue 
reception, library, lining room, TV 
room, 4 berhoarm, 3 baths, 1 roam for 
staff writ bath, urge modem fu#y 
1 k*ge spree room. 


rage, high dm 
deefne 


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binds etc 

|* j. jf -r ,r |w 

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BJ> 54 
MC 98001 Monaco Gedex 
Tefc {93} 50 66 S4. Tbc 469477. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


DOURDIN-DOR5SAY 


Realtar in 1st Class Pn^srties 
Tele* 6138D7F 


(1) 624 93 33 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


Embassy 

8 Am. am 


Service 


i Mantua 

75008 Pori* 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1640 


1ST HEART OF PARIS 
SPACE 160 SOM. 

BALCONES ON GARDB8 

UNIQUE VIEW 
STEUSTACHE 

JUSTHS HIGH PRICE 
SERGE KAYSBL Tel (1) 329 60 60 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


ST NOM LA BRETKHE 
SUPERB PROPERTY 


217 14m. Eng spoot, 
private indoor swunmr*: pool, Fvnsh 
sauna, ewde roam, 1/uOsg ju pork. 


VERY HIGH 1 
FUOOjOOO 
P. (3)954 S 


C.aj> (2) 954 92 00 


PARIS 6TH5t. German (near). Owner 

sefc in ntr xwu ted buAftng, smoB pied- 
o4erre with dreader, 3 rooms, 

kitchen, both, smote we. 

for private profosion. Bax 


2174, Herald fnbR 92521 NeuBy 


Cedex, France 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL STATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


NEUH1Y 


Luxary flat, vary quiet, large brag, 
2 br^ eqiwpped kitchen, 
parking. 


17TH PARC MONCEAU. Owner sefc 


rfredty 2 room s [46 My 

, bathroom, 3) 


equipped Ukhea, 

terrace, 

retwoa 


. sqm 

view over Sacre Coear. 

Cn8 27 pro 763 14 06 


AVENUE MONTAlGtC. Exceptional, 

upper floor, 160 mm, parking. Write 
to No 8061. Wrffep. 29 rue Seue. 
75009 Poris who wfl fonwd. 


VICTOR HUGO. I ter rue Poroereu. 


1HT RANK. Luxembourg. Townhouse 
' ' «. prrvati 

Para 504 


210 sa m, 7 roa ms. 
iwiBU conation. 


20 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


ROCQUENGOURT. Ugh das 5-room, 

new 2 bade, bedovne, 2 parkuiqs. 
F1.Q50.000. COP- PI 9ji 9200. 


VBNEUfL 266 5150. 5ft floor, ele- 
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baths, ht eu noue. 


DEFENSE DUPLEX I 
mg. 3 berkoams. Tel (11*776 1 


ft- 

08. 


MAOWT 

cfoptex. 


dais 241 sqm superb 
635370 


1 EH 76 


SPAIN 


DKZA OLD TOWN, 
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Metis pine floors 


bcShrodtns. man house, rarest weig, 
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snrtfia. Sun terraces . 

US$375,000. private sew, photograph 


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■ ' “51 3164 affiae hours. 


time. London 351 1 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


ATTENTION FOREIGhKSS 


New floeeti M tetd regeltriioa no 

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epwhtienfi in Mnetmnr, wax w 

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Fw information: 

GU3BEPIANSJL. 

Av Aten fepas 24, 

Switzerland. 
85A*USCH 
1970 


LAKE GENEVA - AAONTK8JX. For 


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dfy frombukfor. 


■ iw w ii Bi . B O I ofaDXTiro- 
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vidued fmrmdng araJaUe. Contact: JB 
THUS 5A, roe rfo 


lAWlOfllUB! . 
lira Lousanna. Switzerland. TH: 
2091 07. 71»24453 BAIL CH. 


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TAX SERVICES 


TJL5. FORMERLY WITH IJLS. USA 

name trac returns & advice. 5ereice 
by mt»L Td p0| 3BJ&J6 Frange 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Your host buy. 

fine ftranonds in any price renge 
d lowest whomalo prices 
direct foam Antwerp 
center of the diamond work! 
Fid guaraoee. 

For free priae fist write 


92S 

Petikaaratroat 62, 6.2018 Antwerp 
Belgium - Tefc P2 31 234 07 5? , 

Tbt 71779 tyi b. At the Biranond Qub. 
Herat of Antwerp Diamond industry 


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toil 


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YOUR Oma H PAH5i TELEX. 
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REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In fto chaining mountcun resort of 

LEYSM; 

RESIDB4CE l ES FRENIS 


Overiaokmg o iplent&f AJpme panora- 
ma. 30 mm. from Matdreux end Lake 
Genera by car. 

- you con w«i quality mdenca 
with in door sura xning pool and 
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jsL, geif, ek 

- nn on on g at low 5F. rotes 
up to 


mortgages. 

Please contact: 
Residence fo e Frenw . 1854 Leyrin 
SWITZHUAND 

Tefc (025) 34 II 55 TEuMofca 26629 CH 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SANTA BARBARA 
CALIFORNIA 


Srigant Spanbivstyle wfla for sole- This 
lOvoom reridra ^aced with arched 
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pool raid hottub Ody 85 mfcs away 
from Los Anodes. 

Far further detofc pfccse contact 


AGED! 


26 bis BdL Princess Chafotto 
Manla-Cvio MC 98000 Monaco 


Td. Q50B6 . 00 Ext. T55 


r 479417 MC 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANm Direct owner. Uecunoui 

apartmtra, resxSectol baking, view 

sea. ftmg, 2 bedrooms {deeps 4J, 2 

bam. equpped Udwn |mate 
den. pool Awtebie June 15 to 
torntter 30. Pcrabity rent 


(FISjOOW, August . . 

Motor. 37 Ara Jean de 
06400 Cnnnei. Tefc {931 47 95 EC. 


CANNES, f u nyfted studio, 

garden, luxurious, central 1 

MayJine_ MOD., 


F6500orycqrlyF3iXX).Td:224t 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON, OfBSEA. A«raf« set 

contained furnished flat, I doiftle 


bedroom, rifling 

ffod s 


roam, titdien & 

Lock-up go- 


battnocmv . - 

rage. Six months mnrtmxn ainxxmy 
L5JC175 par week Tefc 01-352 5015 


LONDON. For the best funxshed flats 

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rahed 2 backaam u p u rtevenL £29Q 
per week. 01-589 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO. LUXURIOUS filly 

centrrfy txr-condi- 


fixnohot top floor cenhdly 
B o n ed apartment, UO s qjn, ta -ge 
terrace ramriookHig serv uentenupl- 
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ma. fifty eqripped, al service mdurfc 
24 hour c o nderge, laundry. 
P«3!. 

oi snopj 3 nxnufln. 
May 15 through Grand Prix 
. 15. Indudma al charges, 


until 


SEAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


-• 


Embassy 

tAnrede 


Service « 


75008 IhiHk 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


4 ^ 


AQtNt M PARIS 

PHONE 562 71 99 . 


AT HOME M PAMS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR KBIT OR BMP 
25 Ave Hothn 5^5 25 60 


75008 Paris 


81 AVEFOCH 


(nxarious STwBee 

Phone, color TV, lotphen. ihort term 
krona No agency foes. MJOO/manft 
Vtt today Tefc 574 K 57. 


LUXURY AT BUDGET PBCE S Tty H» | 


toteT apartmrnh near the I 

er. Fran rate week upwards, nay 
equfapad stufios to 5 roam, with or 
wnhauttotol service. Contoch RA- 


14 rue do ThMfrt 750J5 
Tbc2W211F. 


Ports. Tefc 575 62 20. Tbc! 


cr- 




33K. 


74 CHAMP»YSSS 8th 

Sudto, 2 or 3-room apartwent. 

_ One month or more. 


!%Wti 

r m 4 Hi 


IE OARB3GE 359 67 97. 


PAGE 19 ‘ 
FOR MORE 
CLASSinEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


?.w - 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


M5JL 

Temporary agency seeks for 
int B TKiltond awnpcnK in foi 
E n g fa h mother tongue 

BILINGUAL 

SECRETARIES 


Word pooessmg experience an asset 
Apply. 156 rue Montmartre, Prah 2 
or cdl 233 17 54 


Ml Stack 


firm. 


seeks fcnmn Ju tahr 

Experienced Seaetory and Girl Friday. 


Must have itodc. commexity, broker or 
md LaM. system 


perience and 


Send CV 
Tribune, 


system 36. 

+ bereftti. 
to Box 2166, Heraid 
I Neuily Cedex, France 


EXECUTIVE SCRETARY to aaawtic 
surgery director. Wbrfc in new London 
dne, a ge 24-3tfc ewpJent oppear- 
ance & nmraig cbtitiu. Am Id 
travel to our dnia m San Frantisoo & 
Athens Ear initial iranna. Said yow 
resume vrilh references & recant |fto- 
to toe Dffl SA Monogina Director, 17 
Amerilas St Aihens, Greece. Tel: 
3525711 / 3603479. Telex: 225481 
DHI GR 


MIMTOT SfcfcXS for AMS9CAN 
WUNtKVt RRMS in PARK: 


Engksh. 
seaataries, 
quired, - 


Dutch or German 
of French re- 
BOmgucti 


Victor ^Hucp, 7511 


727 i 


phone: 138 Anew 
6 Pate, Fnonoe. Tefc 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/ adnrnstro- 

bve asassae waited far Paris office 
of NA finonricit eel i tminr i. Opera 
area ei Paris. Enfth mother tongue!, 


tiah/sharthand, speed writing no! oo 

ceftaUe. Soranm yeas experience 
drarafcfa, preferably in US, Canada 
or UX. EEC rstebnd or ware permit. 
Tefc 260 2399. 


BASED in 

■, French 


wn 

Paris seeks 

mother tongue. Must have 

ntaeUeni aramraid of Engfch. Short- 
fand & awfca typng required. Good 
ergtwoer. Cortrod of mtinte Are- 
tian ts offered. Apply Box 2179, Her- 
dd Trfcune, 92521 NmeDy Cedes. 
France. 



fVmft nwfter tonra^ aftradiw sala- 
ry if able. Write 8toi 2151. Hentid 
Trtoune, 92521 Newfly Cede*. Frraice 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY wanted for 


Eke Iravdtag a* over the work! Ex- 
eeflent saaratcrial skSa essonliaL 
Phase reply hk Bax 2146. LKT, 
15, 6000 Fmnfcfurt/Moin 


SECRETARY - BOMGUAL. exceflent 


processor 

but not necemray & M yeas experi- 
ence. Fund rasing office. Resumes & 


mqumi ta Amaribon HrMpital of Par- 
is, Director Gaerds Omii” 63 Bkt 


Victor Hugo, 92202 NcuMy six 5einn 


SECRETARY BOQKMBSI needed 

for rai Amerioan Uraveruty in bctiti 
Pons A Strasboorabanraiai French / 
- “ 'STPratefSl 

31 01 V. 


US LA W ARM seeks ameflem bSngoel 
seowtvy, French onto tongue, 
word proeessinp. Col Pons 265 re 01. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABUE 


RANDSTAD 


kJSTSSw. 


B8MGUAL AGB4CY FufrBfoOU* 
Office 


' Y-- , 


Paris: 758 12 40 






FRENCH LADY, 23 r .t£ngwL 

dxtitauftn snere to tal. 


uo tit ta n with American o«N»wy w * 
Pqrl Vn db 


Bex 2150, HmddTri- 

buna, 92521 NeiMy Gedex, France 


35-^' 


DYNAMIC 8 SEUFREUANTseerran, 
38. Francti/EnaUi/Soanft. tint- 


38. FrandVEnabh/Sparaft. T f 

iSSiffiSKnS'S'SiS' 


GR - THEGRBME DE LA OSMElhe 

ttote temporarv heb aeoote ■> m. 

CaRDraMk; 


A TOP LEVELl 
SECRETARY 
FOR OUR 
PRESIDENT 


I : 


The President of our company, European branch . 
of a CJ.S. corporation, is looking for his peraonal 
and professional secretary. 

She will organize his travels and, frequently assist 
him in some of his administrative tasks. • 
Perfectly bilingual Engiish/French, she show 
master shorthand and typing in both languages. . 
She should have an experience of several years In 
such a position and know IBM word-processing. 
She will integrate our staff, based in NetliSy i S ur 
Seine. 

Please, send resume with picture, and sdaiy 
requirements under reference 3634 to 
RSCG CARR1ERES 48. rue St Ferdinand 
75017 PARIS 


Printed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland) 


1