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oi»uT^ 

^ The Global Newspaper 

W|ljL » t Edited in P&ris 

^”*1* Printed Smulfanepnaly 

* M jj/K in Pam, London, Zurich, 

a/ Singapore, 

,vr . '•'•■L.v. > [ " ,i . I f Marseille 

*tti ’ ; ' ’ i 1 [Ct WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON RAGE 18 

t: i '' . *• •i'.< a 

£ : «;.T;.. a v -I No. 31,797 


INTERNATIONAL 






= v-. ' l V X l/l/IA/O XJUIJ 

- 

• By Bill Peterson 

, P/es&Mgtou /Vwf Sow 

.. i , PHILADELPHIA — The forti- 

fiedheadqu^ers<rfMOVE,urad- 
. ' , ' S( :*». s^ v - ical back-to*uaiurc group, and 60 
' ‘ ‘ \ ‘i oAer lwoses were deitiic^ byfire 
after pc^ dropped a bomb from a 
‘:r helicopter to end an all-day siege. 

; : (Police found two bodies in the 

.. . • . •' ;l i. ashes erf the building on Tuesday, 

• . ‘ . *Zu 'r but nether body codd be immctfi- 

!, -S: uL ately identified and the search was 
comminn* The Associated Press 
reported. 

. . [Mayor W_ Wilson Goode de- 

- inded the decision by police to 
V* . .. ■■ *’!h dr^ an exploave to destroy 

ker atop the house; “You can al- 
, . ‘ ” 1 >;:• ways second guess any dearicon," 

... ■ Mr. GoOde said. *The one thing we 

- nr (fid that went wrong was when the 
percusskm grenade was dropped/it 
caused a fire. Thai was an accident. 

: - v ^ I was as saddened by that as any- 
one else.’' 

vi , , . ‘ [Although the mayor referred to 

\ , " " ■N.ti.^jj.apacussiongreaade.theRuladd- 

phia Daily News quoted police 
s-, \i ! 1 : i t stances as saying the bomb comnst- 

. _ 1 *«•»« ed of two pounds (about a Jdlp- 

' /y • w'--. , .^ram) of C-4 plastic explosive.} • 

.? 4 1 i..;\ Two ago. neighbors com- 

• ! ’ .'!.*** plaining of assaults, robberies and 
. v ‘ : a stench m the house asked the dty 

t ‘, :: ' ,,, Vfcto evict the group. Polioe obtained 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

^ PARIS, WEDNESDAyTmAY 15, 1985 

ittadelphia Siege ' U.S. Navy ' M^|J 

Pestpones _ 
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explosives, disorderly conduct and 
rioting 

;*'• : lh: r; . MOVE members said that they 
1 were prepared to die rather than 
leave the honse, winch had been 
; *>c? fortified with sandbags and a inof- 
teq) bunker. 

, ' Late Sunday, police began evac- 

: 1 - nating the neighborhood around 

Mhe house. 

* Shortly before 6 A^L Monday, 

• V :* police Commissioner Gregore 
- ' Sambor used a loudspeaker to or- 
' - "• i“ ’ : der MOVE members to leave the 

~ house. They refused, with wbat .a 
cj^ official called “vitridBc talk” 

‘ ‘ over their own loudspeaker, and . 

• ..-a then fired shots .at police. 

_ A few urinates latex, police besan 

R , . , ™ a deafening barrage of gunfire that 
* continued for 80 nrinuies. Authon- 

. ties said that between 7,000 aml : 

10,000 rounds of ammunition were 
■ fired into the house. 

■ _ Later police used tear gas and a 

zmbess) s* powerful water cannon m an at- 
r tempt to rout the members. The 
tyrant of thebuOdmg was tom open 
“ -t" /under thepremureof the detogc. •' •_ 

^ Theiif bllowtitLhoms ctf inactiott 

’“X^r.v and siege by hundreds af Jreatrily 
-- anned police. Daring this time, 
.. .u dergymen and relatives of MOVE 
c>r]i members tried to contact those in 
1 "“'la- the house. 

'* " “ -v “We told them Aw couldn’t 
^ wm,” said Stanley Vauglm, a mem- 
ber of the ne g otia tin g team. “We 
j- ‘,t^ (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 

: . ii'iv •'* _ 


US. Legisksttm 
Warn of Rise in 
Protectionism. 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan tdd con- 
gressional leaders on Tuesday 
of his disappointment with 
France's rejection of a starting 
dare for a new round of world 
trade talks, and Ae lawmakers 
warned that a new mood of pro- 
tectionism was rising in Con- 
gress. 

Mr. Reagan met for about an 
hour with the Republican and 
Democratic leadership to re- 
view his trip to Europe, the Sen- 
ate Republican leader, Robert 
J. Dole of Kansas, sakL 

Mr. Dole said the lawmakers 
gave Mr. Reagan M a fairly dear 
message” for the French that “it 
would probably be in Adr in- 
terest” to agree to talks before 





Tha Assodcted Prw 


Ruins of about 60 booses smoldering in a PMladelpma naghboriiood Tuesday alter a Domo 
dropped by police caused afire. The pofice had laid siege to a radial back-to-natnre group. 

Gandhi WUl Proceed With U.S. Visit 
Despite FBI Charge of a Slaying Plot 


By William Claiborne 

WasJmgton Port Seance 

NEW DELHI — The Indian 
government said Tuesday Aat 
Prime Minis ter Rajiv Gandhi’s 


planne d vkfttn the united States 
next mopih would not be- canceled 
as a remit of an assassination plot 
alleged by . the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. Alt it said that spe- 
cial steps would be taken for his 
protection. 

Responding to demands by 
members of both houses of Parlia- 
ment that the prime mbristeri s state 
visit of-JunoS to' 1ST* ^reooaadr 
ered, government officials said that 

Ac :“fullest measures” for Ml 
. Gandta’s safety would be taken in 
collaboration with officials of the 
United States and the Soviet 
Union, France, Egypt and. Algeria, 
Ae four oAer countries to which be 
will be traveling. 

Officials said that Mr. Gandhi 


had been briefed by U-S. officials 
on a purported conspiracy by Sikhs 
living in the United States to assas- 
sinate the prime minister to cause a 

A SQA bombing suspect dies in 
police custody hi India. Page 7. 

“rev olutionar y overthrow” of the 
Indian government. 

‘ Three persons have bem charged 
inNewyorkm the allied conspir- 
acy and a reported plot to assassi- 
nate the chief minister Of Ae stale 
of Hajyana,,Bhajan LaL whfle he 
was undergoing treatment recently 
at the Louisiana State University 
eye center in New Orleans. 

■ Military Plot Is Alleged 

Loretta Tofam of The Washing- 
ton Post reported earlier from Wash- 


The plot against Mr. Gandhi’s 
life was also to inctode a military 
attack against India after first 


“softening up" the country by 
bombing such strategic facilities as 
a nuclear power plant, bridges and 
government buildings, according to 
papers filed in federal court in New 

Yak. 

Affidavits filed by the FBI said 
the plot was discovered bv an oper- 
ative who was identified only as 
“A" arid asa winner of the Medal 
erf Honor for service as a UJS. Navy 
commando ip Vietnam, 

According to the affidavits, “A” 
uncovered theplot in January at a 
meeting wiACnnpartap Singh Birk 
and JLalSnghrtwoof thrireemen 
charged in the assassination ploL 
Lai Singh and the third man 
charged, Ammand Singh, remain at 
large, while Mr. Bilk is in custody 
in New Orleans. 

In the January meeting in a New 
York bold room, “A” told Mr. 
Birk and Lai Singh that he had 

(Coathmed on Page 2, CoL 5) 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — A sched- 
uled visit by UR. Navy ships to 
O tin a has been postponed, the 
Slate Department has announced. 

. State Department officials said 
Monday that a visit was still under 
consideration and that overall 
UR. ^Chinese relations were still 
moving forward. 

“Obviously, we’ve hit a snag," an 
official said, answering queries 
about the visit to Shanghai. 

Edward F. Djerejian, a State De- 
partment spokesman, said both 
sides were toll discus sing “a num- 
ber of issues" through diplomatic 

rfianni»lg 

Other officials said that one of 
the principal issues was the U.S. 
refusal to confirm or deny Ae pres- 
ence of nuclear weapons aboard 
American ships. This became an 
embarrassment to Beijing and 
Washington after Hu Yaobang, the 
Chinese Communist Party leader, 
and a high Chinese Foreign Minis- 
try official made remarks last 
month to Australian and New Zea- 
land journalists that seemed to rule 
out any nudear-anned U.S. ships 
participating in port calls. 

Beijing and Washington appar- 
ently had difficulty agreeing on a 
way to describe Ae port call so that 
side could maintain that it was 
not deviating from its previous 
public positions. 

“The whole problem has been to 
agree on langnagp that would get 
Hu’s foot out of ms mouth," said a 
diplomat involved in the case. 

Mr. Djergian repeated that lire 
United States would maintain its 
worldwide policy of neither con- 
finning nor denying whether U.S. 
ships carry nuclear weapons. 

“We hope that after a bit of time 
passes, we can arrange a port visit,” 
a State Department official said. 

Other Western countries have 
sent ships -to China on. goodwill 
visits in recent years, and the idea 
of Ae United States doing so goes 
back several years. Bui because the 
United Stales is a superpower, its 
port call takes on considerable 
symbolic significance for China. 
The visit was also regarded by some 
officials on bo A sides as one more 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


H» Asscdmd hw* 


George P. Shultz, the U.S. secretary of state, left, talked 
with Andre! A. Gromyko, the Soviet foreign minister, as 
they entered the Soviet Embassy in Vienna on Tuesday. 

Polish Security Official 
Resigns From Politburo 


By Bogdan Turek 

United Press International 

WARSAW — A Communist 
Party official who was in charge of 
slate security at Ae time of Ae 
murder of a pro-Solidarity priest 
has resigned from the Politburo, it 
was disclosed Tuesday. 

The tovernment also released 
details of a plot to kill Lech Walesa, 
the leader of the outlawed union. 

The government spokesman, 
Jerzy Urban, said that police had 
arrested a convicted killer on 
charges Of main taining contacts 
with an underground organization 
and of agreeing to assassinate Mr. 
Walesa. 

The official news agency PAP 
said that Miroslaw Muewski, 57, 
who untiTlast October was Ae par- 
ty official in charge of statfrsecuri- 
ty, resigned from the Politburo. His 
resignation was approved by Ae 
200-member Central Committee 
meeting that began Monday. 

No reason was given for his res- 
ignation, but independent sources 
linked it wiA the assassination of 
the Reverend Jerzy Popieluszko 
who was kidnapped, beaten and 


Parties Clash Bitterly in Bundestag 

Kohl Is Jeered for Defending Handling of Reagan Visit 


...£. 


FAC-E! ; 

res •" cS 

CL.aS-' 1 -' 15 




uonist measures. 

Asked if Congress were again 
threatening to impose import 
quotas and take other action to 
keep foreign goods out of Ae 

United States, Mr. Dole said, “1 
don’t say it’s a threat It came 
from Democrats and Republi- 
cans who are in positi o ns to 
make things happen.” . 


"By John Tagliabue 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
( Kohl sought Tuesday to fend off 
bitter criticism of his handling of 
President Ronald Reagan’s recent 
visit,' contending that it “further 
streng thened Ae relationship be- 
tween both nations Aat has 
emerged over many years." 

Tim occasion was a statement by 
the chancellor to the Bundestag, or 
parliamenl, on the visit and’ the 
recent economic summit. It opened 
an uproarious four-hour parlia- 
mentary debate wi A uncharacteris- 
tic bitterness. Daring the debate, 
Mr. Kohl; whose Christian Demo- 
cratic Party is stfll smarting from a 
severe election setback Sunday in 
die populous North Rbine-West- 
phaha. state, was often pushed on 
Ae defensve.- 

“Tbe over w helmi ng majority of 
the German people,” Mr. Kohl m- 

surfed m-a 40-rmnutt speech punc- 
tuated by catcalls. and hec klin g, 
“were demfy impressed by Ae atti- 
tude of Ac American president/ 
. and by the fact Aat he did not 
waver” in Ae face erf pressure to 
caned his controversial vigt to Ae 


Bitbmg cemetery for German war 
dead. 

“Neither the German people," 
Ae chancellor said, “nor I wflf for- 
get thaL" 

American veterans’ groups, Jew- 
ish organizations and majorities of 
boA houses of Congress asked Mr. 
Reagan to ranmi the ceremony at 
Bitburg, where 49 members of Hit- 
ler’s Waffen S$ elite force are bur- 
ied. 

But the speaker for the opposi- 
tion Soda] Democrats, Hans-Jo- 
cben Vogel, said Mr. Kohl’s han- 
dling of tne state visit, including his 
insistence an the wreath-laying cer- 
emony at Bitbuig, “did more to 
harm than tn help German- Amer- 
ican ties. 

“We will fed the consequences,” 
Mr/ Vogel said, to strong applause 
from the opposition beaches, “for a 
long time to come.” 

Mr, Vogd accused the chancdlOT 
of subservience to UB. wishes at 
the summit meeting by risking a 
serious split with. France to endorse 
President Reagan’s plan for a 
space-based defense system, and 
by faffing to chide Ae U.S. admin- 
istration for announcing Ae trade 


embargo gainst Nicaragua from 
West German scriL 

Cataloguing examples of post- 
war U.S. beneficence toward Ger- 
many,. mclurimg the 1949 Berlin 
airlift. Mr. Vogd said the Social 
Democrats owed the United States 
“not obliging obedience or zealous 
acclamation, but honesty.” 

Mr. Vogel's uncharacteristic ag- 
gressiveness reflected the Social 
Democrats’ strong victory in North 
Rhine-WestpbaBa, West Genna- 


the Christian Democratic share 
slumped to less than 37 percent, 
from 43 percent four years ago. 

A measure erf the acrimony be- 
tween the parties came Sunday eve- 
ning in a television debate follow- 
ing the North Rhine-Westphalia 
vole. 

The Social Democratic chair- 
man, Willy Brandi, responded to 
charges of anti-Americanism from 
Mr. .Kohl by attacking Heaner 
Gmslex, the sharp-tongued Chris- 
tian Democratic party manager. 
He compared him to the Nazi pro- 
paganda chief, calling Mr. Gassier 
“the waist agitator in this country 
since Josef Goebbds.” 



murdered by three secret police of- 
ficers last October. 

But Jerzy Majka, Ae Communist 
Party press spokesman, strongly 
denied the suggestion. “MtiewskTs 
resignation was not connected wiA 
the Reverend Popiduszko’s mur- 
der,” he said Tuesday. 

General Wqriech Janizdslti, the 
Polish leader, took personal control 
of Ae Interior Mimstry, which 
oversees the secret police, following 
the priest’s murder. 

Mr. MDewski, who represented a 
faction of party hard-liners, has not 
appeared in public since then and 
government . sources said he had 
been placed under house arrest. 

Three secret police officers were 
convicted of lolling the priest in 
February and were sentenced to 
jail terms ranging from 14 to 25 
years. A police colonel was convict- 
ed of instigating the murder and 
was sentenced to 25 years in prison. 
His superior, a police general, was 
suroended from duly. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Urban identi- 
fied the man charged wiA Ae at- 
tempt on Mr. Walesa as Jozef 
Szczepanski. He said be was arrest- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 9 


Massacre 


Hans-Jocben Vogel, leader of the Social Democratic oppo- 
sition, addressed the Bundestag Tuesday during a debate 
on U*S. relations. Chancellor Helmut Kohl, right, and the 
foreign minister, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, listened. 


Put at 1,000 

The Associated Press 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — So- 
viet troqps lolled about 1,000 men. 
women and children and burned 
and looted a dozen villages in Af- 
ghanistan in reprisal raids against 
civilians supporting Islamic guer- 
rillas, Western diplomatic sources 
said Tuesday. 

The sources in Islamabad, speak- 
ing on condition that they not be 
further identified, said that they 
had confirmed reports of wide- 
spread atrocities in Kharagha’i dis- 
trict of Laghman Province in 
northeastern Afghanistan. The in- 
cidents look place between March 
11 and 18, but details had only 
recently been received from survi- 
vors, the sources said. 

It was impossible to indepen- 
dently verify Ae reports because 
the Afghan government does not 
permit Western reporters to visit 
the battle zones. 

The sources said that Soviet 
forces, supported by tanks and ar- 
mored personnel carriers, attacked 

(Continued on Page % CoL 4) 


¥ 





Ri 



Capital or Not , Rio Reigns as f the Rome of Brazil 9 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 



try’s cultural capital larady because most art- who n ^ conld a F ce ? 1 » ae ,.V an< 
Irk. Tsritanc mmn/wix smd cinwrc nfefertolive fame. The people mat Pauhstas 


beaches on wed&ays are otter Pmdfito,” Mr. would Istan meeting on a beach reachable only 

many are not Aemsdves native Gtrioeos, as Ae Riborosaid Canocos are at wo y ^ r * ... , , 

city’s natives are known. But no matter how much Cartoons deny u, the But the new beach crowd was oeughtea. ns 

• There are oAer reasons too. As the former rity’s famous beaches— Copacabana, Ipanema marvelous.” said Rogmo Squrira, a house 
capital the city has many of the country’s prm- and Leblon among them — have an irresistible painter from the distant suburb of Nova Iguacu. 
dpal museums and theaters, althoug h most are pull. “The buses stop right on the beach. 


ESTABLISHED 1887 

Shultz, 

Gromyko 

Confer 

Soviet Repeats 
Space Issue Is 
Key in Geneva 

The Associated Press 

VIENNA — Andrei. A. Gromy- 
ko, Ae Soviet foreign minister, 
warned Tuesday in a six-hour 
meeting wiA Ac UB. secretary of 
state, George P. Shultz, that an 
agreement to discuss offensive nu- 
clear weapons in tandem wiA the 
U.S. space defense systems must be 
respected if the Geneva arms talks 
are to progress. 

A Soviet Foreign Ministry 
spokesman outlined Mr. Gromy- 
ko's position after a meeting in the 
Soviet Embassy that lasted twice as 
long as scheduled. 

The spokesman said “the deci- 
sion agreed to in Geneva between 
Shultz and Gromyko must be 
strictly respected." 

“Only tne stria respect for these 
goals allows any progress," the 
spokesman added. 

When Mr. Shultz and Mr. Gro- 
myko met in Geneva in January, 
they decided to reopen arms-con- 
trol negotiations on Ae basis that 
bo A offensive weapons and space- 
based defenses would be discussed. 

When the talks began in March, 
Aere was immediate disagreement 
over President Ronald Reagan's 
Strategic Defense Initiative, a re- 
search program on an anti-missile 
defense based in space. 

The Soviet Union accused the 
United States of refusing to bar- 
gain on Ae issue. UB. officials de- 
nied the allegation but also empha- 
sized the administration’s 
determination to proceed wiA the 
research. 

Mr. Gromyko, in an apparent 
thrust at the Reagan administra- 
tion, also criticuMd “certain circles 
acting to force . . . other people to 
do their will," according to the 
spokesman's account of Ae ses- 
sion. He cited this as a reason for 
turmoil in Central America and 
elsewhere. 

Mr. Shultz, in a brief statement, 
said: 

“Our discussions were useful and 
..they were detailed. They ranged 
over the issues that we normally 
discuss. We spent the major pro- 
portion of our time cm Ae subject 
of arms control, in particular the 
Gareva negotiations. 

“We also discussed bilateral is- 
sues where some progress can be 
made and we discussed many mat- 
ters of mutual interest in various 
regions of the world. I discussed the 
problem of human rights, as I al- 
ways do.” 

Mr. Shultz made no mention of a 
possible meeting between Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, Ae Soviet leader, 
when Mr. Gorbachev visits the 
United Nations in September. 

A senior U.S. official said later 
that Mr. Shultz brought up a set of 
“confidence-bidding" measures 
that Mr. Reagan proposal last 
week to reduce East-West mistrust. 

The steps include an exchange of 
observers at mdiiary exercises, reg- 
ular high-level contacts between 
Soviet and U-S. military leaders 
and a direct communications link 
between Soviet and U.S. com- 
manders. 

The official refused to character- 
ize the Soviet position. But the So- 
viet spokesman said, “BoA sides 
emphasized their intention to do all 
possible to strengthen the structure 
of bilateral relations." 

Mr. Shultz also raised the issue 
of the fatal shooting in East Ger- 
many in March of Major Arthur D. 
Nicnolson Jr„ a U.S. reconnais- 
sance officer, by a Soviet sentry. 

The senior official said that Mr. 
Shultz reiterated the UB. demand 
for an apology and compensation, 
while expressing hope there would 
be no outer such incidents. 

Moscow contends Major Nichol- 
son was spying in a restricted area; 
Washington says he was engaged in 
permissible observation of Soviet 

military installations. 


desperately short of nsourccs. Brazil's two main More than anything the beaches are soda] 
television corporations also have headquarters gathering places, wiA different stretches of sand 
in Rio de Janeiro, providing work for many drawing different groups wiA such precision 
orjArs- directors, designers and writers. Aai Meads and acquaintances can always be 


actors, directors, designers arid writers. Aai friends and a^maintances can always be 

title and left to live off its grace andlSSauty- Yet “There is a sense of loss," a lifelong resident “ d 

a secret yearning to be BrariTs capital lives on conceded, recalling that the former capital first beautiful, gays and surfers all have their sec- 
here. became a state and was then downgraded to a uons - 

Although government decisions now emanate municipality. “But once a king, you never lose But this past summer the social harmony of 
from Ae desolate, modernistic plains of Brasilia your majesty. Rio is still where people want to Ipanema was disrupted by a new bus route. No. 
and the economy is moved by the industrial be; it’s where the big decisions are made." 461, which for the first time brought poor fam- 

3 t of SSo Paiqo, Rio de Janeiro stffl views OAer Brazilians see things differently, stereo- dies directly from the city's overerowdrononn- 

as Ae zeal heart and mind of Ae country, typing Carwcas as samba-, soccer- and beach- cm slums and nrighborhoods and poured _Aem 
“Rio continues to be Ae intdlectual and loving hedonists who view life through a prism 2P 10 ** beaches of Ae more affluent South 
cultural center erf Brazil," said Darcy Ribeiro, of insure and pleasure rather than of hard work Zone * 

deputy governor of Rio de Janeiro state. “Rio is reward. Cariocas know bow to have a good This egalitarian gesture by Ae state’s left- 

the home of Brazilians, it is Ae home where time, it is said, bat they are not "serious." leaning governor. Leonel Brizola. was received 
pcoptelive.it is the Rome of BrariL" . . ^ wiA undisguised hostility. . 

<rfmilitaiy mle,v^uch on — those from S5o Panic — “They bring all their children and food and 

who never accept Rio de Janeiro’s greater make an awful mess," a beach regular ix>m- 
fame. “The peoplTthai PauUstas see on our plained, announcing Aat he and his friends 
beaches on wededays are otter Pmdfito,” Mr. ^ Stan meeting on a beach reachable only 

many are not AemseJves native Cdrioaa, as Ae Riborosaid- Canocos arc at wo y ^ r * . .. . H . , 

city’s natives are knowre But no matter how much Cariocas deny u, the But the new beach crown was oeugmea. its 


TtttagcMhK 


Rioshmi family, the beneficiary of 'a. new ^bt^ng” policy, enjoys Ip an e ma Be ach , dpal museums and theaters, although most are 


INSIDE 

■ The pope told the Dutch that 

moral standards would not be 
relaxed. Page! 

■ US. poScy-makers and intel- 
ligence operatives have long 
disagreed over what tactics to 
use against terrorists. Page 3. 

■ Yasser Arafat seemed to have 
come doser to accepting Isra- 
el’s right to exist Page 5. 

■ Tama guerrillas, disguised as 
soldiers, killed at least 86 civil- 
ians in Sri Lanka. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ US. retail sales improved 0.V 
percent in April Ae seventh 
rise in eight months. Page ]]. 

■ A second savings and loan 

association in Maryland has 
been placed under conservator- 
ship, and Ae state governor has 
appealed to depositors in state- 
regulated associations to re- 
main calm. Page ij. 






Page 2 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


** 


Craxi’s Coalition Wins 58% of Vote; 
Communists Suffer Setbacks in Cities 


The Associated Press 


ROME — The ruling coalition of 
Prime Minister Bettino Craxi, a So- 
cialist, emerged strengthened Tues- 
day from regional elections, win- 
ning 58 percent of the vote to 30 
percent for the Communist Party. 

Nearly complete returns showed 
the Co mmunis ts losing heavily in 
municipal elections in Rome, 
where they have beaded the city 
government since 1976. 

Returns from regional, munici- 
pal and provincial elections Sun- 
day and Monday indicated the 
Communists trailed the Christian 
Democrats by about 4 percentage 
points, with the Christian Demo- 


Stone Named to USIA Post 

The Associated Press 


WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan announced Tues- 
day he woulH nominate Marvin L. 
Stone, 61, former editor of U-S. 
News and World Report, as deputy 
director of the United States Infor- 
mation Agency. The post, under 
Charles Z. Wick, has been vacant 
for nearly a year. 


crats gening nearly 35 percent of 
the vote. 

The Communist Party had 
mounted a strong campaign with 
hopes of forcing early parliamenta- 
ry elections that would earn them a 
place in the national government 
for the fust time since 1947. 

Flaminio Piccoli, president of 
the Christian Democrats, said the 
Communists' emphasis on gaining 
a share of national power had ap- 
parently frightened Italian voters 
who, be said, wanted stability. 

The Communists had hoped to 
repeat their impressive perfor- 
mance in die European Par liamen t 
election last year, when they out- 
poDed the Christian Democrats for 
the first time. 

A strong showing by the Chris- 
tian Democrats, coupled with gains 
by the Socialists ana Republicans, 
gave Mr. Gnat's five-party coali- 
tion 58.1 percent of the vote in 
races for 15 regional governments. 

Even in major Communist 
strongholds such as Bologna, Ven- 
ice, Milan, Turin and Florence, the 
Communists lost 2 to 8 percentage 
points in municipal races. But they 
remained the largest party in those 
cities. 


In Rome, the Christian Demo- 
crats outpolled the Communists, 
33.2 percent to 30.7 percent. 

In response to the Communist 
setback, Italian stock prices 
jumped to highs for the year while 
the lira strengthened against the 
d ollar F inanc ial markets had fall- 
en In recent weeks because of fears 
of a Communist victory. 

Die Christian Democrats* suc- 
cess U likely to strengthen their 
position next month when the legis- 
lature elects a successor to Presi- 
dent Sandro Pertini, a Socialist, 

whose seven-year term is expiring. 

The Christian Democrats hope 
to take at least one of the two top 
posts — the prime ministership or 
the presidency — from the Social- 
ists. 

It is widely expected that Mr. 
Gan, to keep his job, will offer 
Socialist support for a Christian 
Democratic president, possibly Ar- 
naldo Foriani, a former prime min- 
ister who is now deputy prime min- 
ister. 


The Greens, a small party of 
ecologists and pacifists, won scat- 
tered seats throughout the country 
in their first election. 



Pontiff Bars 
A Relaxing 
Of Catholic 
Moral Rules 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Ortega Gtes French, Italian^^dkmg 


The Associated Press 

AMERSFOORT, The Nether- 
lands — Pope John Paul II deliv- 
ered two stem lectures on sexual 
morals oo Tuesday, declaring that 
church opposition to promiscuity. 


Dutch policemen arrested a 
as Pope John II passed by in Maastricht, the Nc 




\ 


In Hong Kong 

we are in the Central Business District. 
And yet just minutes from Kowloon. 
You should be, too. 


HOTEL FURAMA 
INTER* CONTINENTAL 



THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL® 




O c INTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 


Singapore: 



, or call your nearest 
Inter- Continental sales office. 


/ 


1,000 Afghan Villagers Die 
In Soviet Raids, Sources Say 


would not let women become 
priests, represented a ringing 
rejection of demands made by 
Dutch church’s large liberal wing 
for a relaxation of Catholic doc- 
trine. (John Paul has proved to be a 
pope determined to lead. Page 10.) 

Opposition to the pontiffs con- 
servative views has prompted re- 
pealed protests during bis five-day 
Dutch visit, including incidents 
Tuesday in which youths jeered 
and made obscene gestures at him 

Speaking at an open-air Mass in 
the southeastern dry of Maastrich 
— the only outdoor service of his 
visit — John Paul defended the 
Vatican’s 1968 ban on artificial 
birth control and refusal to sanc- 
tion divorce. 


BEIRUT (NYT) — A Moslem cleric. Sheikh Mohammed Hussein 
Fadiallah, said Tuesday that he had “accurate information" that an 
attempt March 8 to kill him with a car-bomb was the work of the US. 
Central Intelligence Agency. 

Another Moslem leader. Salim al-Hoss, the Lebanese education minis- 
ter, called for an official inquiry into U.S. newspaper reports about 
alleged CIA involvement in the bombing attempt in a Beirut suburb mi 
the sheikh, which killed more than 80 people. The reports said the 
bombing was carried out by a CIA-trained Lebanese team acting wither 
the agency's knowledge or approval. 

We have in oar possession accurate information about tire involve- 
ment of American. Israeli , and Lebanese intelligence organs in this 
matter," Sheikh Fadiallah said. He did not say what the inlonuarion was. 


France Accepts UNESCO Budget Plan 


PARIS (Reuters) — France broke ranks with other Western countries 
ou Tuesday and accepted a UNESCO plan to make up a loss m the 


He then traveled by train to this 


agamy’s 1985 budget 

an Britain, 


12 

bdii 


(Continued from Page 1) 

whose inhabitants were 
have aided Islami c 
ting the 


to 


couni 


government and 
Soviet forces supporting it 
Soviet troops surrounded the vil- 
lages and shot civilians Who tried 
to flee as the soldiers and tanks 
moved in, setting fire to houses, 
looting and destroying property, 
the sources said. 

More than 100 persons were 
killed in each of several villages, 
Kas Aziz Khan, Chariiag h, Bala 
Bagh, Sabzabad, Mandrawer, 


Haider Khan and Pul-i-joghi, and 
the sot 


sources 


in other communities, 
said. 

Soviet troops have been in Af- 
ghanistan since the end of 1979 
supporting the Communist govern- 
ment against a Moslem in s u rgency. 

Guerrilla leaders have reported PnllUfl AjnA 
in recent weeks that Soviet forces X tMlflli A1UC 


zax-i-Sharif on April 26. Fifteen 
persons were killed in the attack, 
including the senior officer for the 
region, the sources said. 

■ Prisoner Deaths Protested 

The Soviet Union has formally 
protested the deaths of 12 Soviet 
prisoners who tried to escape from 
an Afghan guerrilla camp m Paki- 
stan, The Associated Press report- 
ed Tuesday, quoting officials m Is- 
lamabad. 

The Soviet ambassador, V.S. 
Smirnov, issued the protest to Paki- 
stan's president. General Moham- 
med Zxa ol-Haq, in a meeting Sun- 
day. embassy officials The 
Soviet protest accused the Paki- 
stani nsHtary of complicity in the 
inradwir and demanded that the 
bodies be returned, they said. 


were trying to thwart support for 


e trying to ur 

the guerrillas by stepping up at- 
tacks on civilians. 

In another incident, the sources 
reported that 30 to 70 persons were 
killed when a Soviet tank hit a 
crowded bus in the Afghan capital 
of Kabul on May 10. 

The tank left the area immedi- 
ately after hitting the bus. 

In other reports, guerrilla forces 
launched a rocket attack on tire 
government air base oatside the 
southern city of Jalalabad on April 
25. The missiles fell amid a group 
of Soviet helicopter crewmen who 
were watching movies, killing eight 
and wounding 17, the sources said. 

Guerrillas also attacked the 
headquarters of the Afghan secret 
police in the southern town of Ma- 


Resigns Post 


More like floating when 




(Continued from Page 1) 
ed Saturday. Mr. Urban said that 
Mr. Sxcgqpamlri had admitted to 
police that unknown individuals 
had tried to recruit him to kill Mr. 
Walesa. 

However, in a letter to the state 
prosecutor in the northern seaport 
of Gdansk, Mr. Walesa’s lawyer, 
Jacek Taylor, disclosed that Mr. 
Szczepanski had disclosed the mur- 
der plot to Mr. Walesa because he 
was a supporter of Solidarity. 

He said that Mr. Szczepanski 
was convicted of the unintentional 
killing of a police officer in 1981 
and sentenced to 11 years impris- 
onment. But he was offered the 
chance of having his sentence re- 
duced if he carried out a plan to kill 
Mr. Walesa and subsequently 
daim the murder was backed by 
the United States. 

Mr. Szczepanski said in a state- 
ment that the killing was scheduled 
for a railroad station in die town of 
Stara Jani in northern Poland and 
that it was planned that he would 
be caught and arrested. 


city in the central Netherlands to 
participate in a scripted questioo- 
and- answer session with youths. 

The pontiff, 64, was to spend the 
night in Amersfoort, that fly on 
Wednesday to Luxembourg for a 
two-day visit. The pontiff wm also 
writ Belgium before ending the 
tour. 

In Amersfoort, several hundred 
young people gathered on the lawn 
of a Catholic secondary school to 
hear the pontiff in the land of in- 
formal atmosphere the he rcfishea 

The pontiff was first read a series 
of searching questions by young- 
sters, one of whom observed that 
many teen-agers “fed that the 
church does not understand con- 
temporary problems, certainly is- 
sues such as homosexuality, abor- 
tion, the position of women in die 
church, questions connected with 
living together and sex before mar- 
riage.” 

Delivering what he acknowl- 
edged would be an unpopular an- 
swer. John Paul said lire Bible 
“shows US a demanding Christ” 

“Would it be realistic to imagine 
a Jesus who is indulgent on marital 
love, abortion, sexual relations be- 
fore or outside marriage, or homo- 
sexual relations?” he asked. He was 


Delegates from Britain, Japan, Canada, Bdgmm and West Germany 
spoke against the proposal by Dircctm-Gencnu Amadou Mahtar M’Bow 
erf the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cu lt ural Organization 
to use money from an anti-inflation fond to fill the gap caused by (he 
withdrawal of the United States. * 

With the U.S. pullout, UNESCO lost a quarter of its budget, or abouT 
547 million, for 1985. 


BeateKPIantDBi^MkEqiected: 

WASHINGTON (UFI) — Reuters, the British international news 


to buy that wire service, which is operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy 
protection, UPI sources say. 

Ray Wechder, president of UPL said Monday that several reputable 
prospective buyers, inducting at least one Fortune S00 c o m pany, toe 
' in serious di<m«inn« with UN's management 


“The next 10 days will tefl to what depth they will go,” Mr. Wechskx 
said. He said UPI management hopes to find a buyer “which can support 


and preserve UPI as a going concern and as an iirteraatinmi] news 
service.” 


interrupted twice by applause. 

of the apostles 


“The words of the apostles are 
dear and strict," the pope said. 
“They are words inspired by God. 
They remain the standard for the 
church for all time.” ' 

The pontiff added, “If the 
church makes unpalatable pro- 
nouncements, it does so because it 
feels obliged to do so." 

In marked contrast to Sunday in 
Utrecht, where hundreds of youths 
fought violent battles with police, 
the reception in Maastricht as John 
Paul began his day . was generally 
warm. There were several incidents 
of heckling, however, and four ar- 
rests. 


Singapore Ends School Admission Plai^ 

SINGAPORE (Reusers) — Singapore said Tuesday that it would 
discontinue a policy giving priority school admission to driMren of 
mothers with university degrees as part of a (dan to increase the island's 
talent pod. 

The minister of education, Tray Tan, told parliament that the cabinet 
had accepted his recommendation to drop the poficy, which had created a 
public uproar. 

The policy, initiated by Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew, was generally 
blamed tor a drastic reduction in the share of votes of dm rating Peopfers 
Action Party in elections in December. Mr. Lee had w&ntod the plan as an 
incentive to womm with university degrees to produce mare childraL He 
said less-educated Singapore womm were producing double the number 
erf children of university graduates. 


For the Record 


U.S. Navy 
Delays Visit 


A sdf-stykd “mountain man,** Daniel Nichols, 20. was convicted 
Monday in Virginia Gty, Montana, of kidnapping and 
Swenson, a female athlete, but was acquitted of kwmg Alan 1 
who tried to rescue her. ; (AP) 

Of all VS. f amilies with children, more than one-quarter have only erne 
parent present, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday. (AP) 

The five-yem tom of Zimbabwe's first paribonem ended Tuesday, with 
general elections expected in June or July. (Ream) 

The Ph jE ppmes Supreme Court stroped into the trial of the alleged 
assassins of Benigno 5. Aquino Jr. cm Tuesday, ordering a lower court to 
explain its recall of a prosecution witness it had discharged. (AP) 
Three Soviet FenteoosCaSsts were arrested as they were trying to enter 
the U5. Embassy in Moscow on Monday, sources said Tuesday. A fourth 
managed to get inside hut left two hours later, they added. (AFP) 
Bradford police revised the death toB in Saturday’s soccer stadium fire 
in northern England from 53 to 52 after remains thought to be a body 
turned out to be a large lump of plastic. (Ream) 


“I was supposed to testify that a 
l Eznl 


man from the American Embassy 
was the instigator of the kill ing ," he 
said. 

“The people that wanted to use 
I me did not know that I hate com- 
munism and support Solidarity," 
Mr, Szczepanski said. 


Gandhi Trip 
Still Planned 


I Most 
comfortable 
place to rest your 
head 


(Contmned Cram Page 1) 
become an expert in the use of 
explosives and automatic weapons 
while in Vietnam, according to the 
affidavit 

Mr. BLrk and Mr. Singh then told 
'A" that they were planning to 
ancfl-«inate In dian political figures, 
including Mr. Gandhi, and to over- 
throw the Indian government, ac- 
cording to the affidavit 

The two said they also intended 
to create a loss of confidence in the 
Indian government by bombing 
strategic locations in India. 

The affidavit said they aske d 
“A" to train a group of men in the 
United States in the use of explo- 
sives and weapons so they could 


(Continued from Page 1) *• 
sign that U-S. -Chinese relations 
were moving forward. 

Bm State Department officials 
said it was not surprising that the 
Chinese would be particularly sen- 
sitive about signals, symbols and 
appearances as they approach a 
special Communist Party confer- 
ence, now scheduled for 
ber. The Chinese have consistently 
tried in recent years to show that 
tbeir foreign policy is independent 
of both the United States and the 
Soviet Union. 

A State Department official also 
said the Chinese might be con- 
cerned about the impact on their 
North Korean allies of having 
armed U-S- warships eater a Chi- 
nese port at a time when the North 
Koreans seem to be increasing their 
contacts with the Soviet Union. 
Chinese troops fought against the 
Americans in the Korean war. 

Another official suggested that a 
failure of coordination and consul- 
tation between the Chinese De- 
fense and Foreign ministries mig ht 
be involved, much along tire Una* 
of some of the U.S. government’s 
interagency differences. 

The UB. and Chinese navies 
seemed clearly to be in favor erf the 
visit, which had been tentatively set 
for May 18. 

New Zealand has banned U.S. 


Correction 

Because of a technical error in Paris, an artidcTn the May 8 Business/ 



Police Bomb in Philadelphia ' 4 
Se ptero Ends Siege, Burns 60 Bbmes 


(Continued from Page 1) “This is a travesty,” said 

pointed out that there were cfcfl- Waters, one. af those who 
dren involved, and they could be urged city officials to evict MOVE 
sent out.” There was no response. “This isn’t what we expected. .We 
In mid-afternoon, Mr. Goode expected people 


said that the city was determined to 
evict the group. “We intend to seize 
control of the house by any means 
necessary. I am totally 


bombs, guns and 1 
Burton Caine, president of.tbe 


i£ orgamz 
violent confrontation,” he added. 

“What we have out there is war,” 
Mr. Goode said. 

At 5:30 PAL, a police helicopter 
pasted over the house. A load ex- 
plosion was heard and the fire 
started. 

Mr. Sam bor described the device 
dropped by the helicopter as an 
“explosive entry charge.” Fire 
Commissk»er William Richmond 
said authorities had hoped to ignite 
the rooftop bunker and then extin- 
guish the fire as it burned down to 
the top floor of the two-story 
bouse. 

But shots were fired at tire ap- 
proaching firefighters, Mr. Rich- 
mond said. When the firefighters 
look cover, he said, the fire spread 
before a brisk wind through the 
largely block neighborhood. 

A city councilman, Lucien 
Blackwell, said the blaze destroyed 
more buildings and displaced more 
people than any other fire in Phila- 
delphia's history. Officials said 
about 250 people were left home- 
less and estimated damage ^ more 
than S5 million. 

On Tuesday, Mayor Goode, who 
is blade, met with a crowd erf the 
homeless taking temporary shelter 
in the basement erf a church. “We 
believe we owe it to you to make 
you whole again," be said. “We will 
rebuild those blocks with dty 
funds. I dunk there is no question 
in my mind that the dty has to 
assume responsibility." 

As the rue raged late Monday 
night, some area residents and by- 


ly convinced 


cushion tiHs up. 


2 Contoured suppprt for 


the small of your back 


4 Put your feet up - 
itfs made for it 


i? >1 Navy visits unless Washington can 

They ago asked him for small provide assurances that the ships 
aims, machine guns and explosives ^ carrying nuclear weapons. 


i a large bridge 
according 


TWA's new Ambassador Class seats are a new experience: 

No other ct, nrui fn -i nel A * til _ _ ■ ■ • 


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or a multistory b 

to the affidavit. 

The source said be could 
die material. The FBI said 
that no arms or explosives had been 
supplied. 

The FBI has videotapes of sever- 
al of tire meetings, according to tire 
affidavit, and used electronic sur- 
veillance in connection with Mr. 
Birk and Mr. Singh. 


This action created a crisis within 
the U.&, Australian and New Zea- 
land alliance. 

“I think the Chinese got tied up 
in knots" with their statement on 
nuclear ships, a senior Stale De- 
partment official said at the end of 
last week. “So ii*s easier if they 
backoff." 


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Bomb in Botswana Kills 
South African Refugee 


United Press international 

GABORONE, Botswana — A 
South African political refugee was 
killed Tuesday when a bomb ex- 
ploded in his car in a suburb of 
Gaborone, a spokesman for Presi- 
dent Quett Masire of Botswana 
said. 

The authorities did not release 
the identity of the victim, who had 
lived in Botswana for several years. 


can Civil liberties Union, sas£the 
bombing was “a reckless 'action 
representing the Worslkindof ’ex- 
cessive use of pofice force." ,. * 

“Trained public safety Giiabt| 
should have known that the drop 
ping of a bomb onto a row heme 
fall of ammunition other ex- 
plosives m a tigh tty compassed area 

is like li ghting a in a roOm 
frill of gas.” he said. 7 

MOVE is a group of about 100 
members founded in 1972 by Vin- 
cent Leaphart, a black hand yman 
with a third-grade education, and 
Donald Glassy, a 'white college 
instructor and antiwar activist The 
initials MOVE do not stand for 
anything. 

Mr. Leaphart, who dunged his 
name to John Africa, contended 
that modem technology was de- 
society and led several 
c-to-nature demonstrations. : 


are blade, adopted Africa as 
surname and said they ate 
natural foods, often uncooked, 
avoided contact with any bureau- 
cracy. Neighbors complained that 
MOVE members violated housing 
and health codes, fed dog meat to 
their children ami left babies un- 
clothed. r 


They also complained that *^ 
group had installed powerful dee- 
trie bullhorns and began whaf SO&Q 
became daily lectures ‘that oft? 
lasted through the night. v> ! 

In 1978, MOVE iwnfowy 
involved in a shootout with 
at the group’s origin: 
ters, about three m5a(4.$ kOStifr 


slanders becanre irate, and police ters) from Monday’s w> - ;6he 
were taunted with chants of a Mur- police officer was killed aed sever*! 


der! Murder!” 


were wounded in that encounter*- 


-4 


t',l< 


t:i' s ■ 


ROME (Combined Dispatches) — President Daxrid Ortega Saavedra 
of Nicaragua said Tuesday that Prime Minister Bettino Craxi and 
PreridentSaudro Pertini but assured him that Ital i a n relations with his 
country would not chang e because of the Ui trade enbarco. 

The Nicaraguan leader arrived Tuesday from Paris, where be said 
Monday that President Francois Mitterrand had made dear “that he is 
pnqjared to make new efforts in favor of economic cooperation." He did 
not specify the type or extent of aid his cotux&y might 'receive fnxm 
France, although Ire excluded military aid. 

In Washington on Monday, Harry W. Shlaudcman. President Ronajy 
Reagan’s special envoy for Central America, said that the United States 
was willing to resume its “postponed” direct talks with Nicaragua, but 
homosexuality, birth control and only if the Sandinist government demonstrated that it was “redly 
abortion would r emain “the stan- serious” about a Central American peace settlement. (Roam, AP. UPI) 
dard . . . for afl tune.” 

Cleric Claims Proof of (3A-Bomb link 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


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AMERICAN TOPICS 


ILS. Officials Split on Anti-Terror Tactics il pJ^qy 


It’s Vfoabigtes : 

In a California Town 

The dtras-growing town of 
Fillmore, California,. has adopt- 
ed a resolution staling that 
p olish language is The official 
language of tfie Qiy of. F31- 
more,” thus mating it the first 
dty in the United States to mate 
such an endorsement of English. 

Five states —Illinois, Indiana, 
Kentucky, Nebraska and Virgin- 
ia — have adopted similar reso- 
lutions, but their foreign-bom or 


dons are relatively small Of RD- 
more’s 10,000 people, SI percent 
are “Latinos/ of Latin Ameri- 
can origin. 

The city cotmril is dominated 

by “Anglos.” Though the one- 
sentence resolution they passed 
has no provision for enforce- 
ment, uty Coonohnan Gary 
Creagle said that people wanted 
to “vent their frustration about, 
bilingual education,” which is 
more the rule than the exception, 
in Fillmore schools. 

Ernie Morales, the former La- 
tino mayor of FUbnorc, is mov- 
ing to get the resolution revoked. 
He said, “It’s obvious that to 
read, write and comprehend En- 
glish is of the utmost importance 
to succeed in our society. No one 
needs to be told that; no one 
needs to legislate that.” . T 


Sic Transit 
Gloria Mundi 

New York’s private Collegiate 
School for boys has changed the 
dale of its beginnings from 1638 
to 1628, based on a fetter by 
Jonas Michadins, a nriniatw of 
the Dutch Reformed Church, 
about teaching catechism to In- 
dian children in New Amster- 
dam, the city's former name. . 

This antedates the 1635 
founding -of the Boston 
School, which calls itself the old- 
est U5. school A heated dispute 
has arisen, with no end m sight. 
Boston Latin, however, which 
has been celebrating its 350th 
anniversary, remains the oldest 
public schooLin the country. - - 


Short Takes 

In a presidential nee in 1988, 
Senator Edward M. Kennedy of. 
Massachusetts would uarrbMy 
defeat Vice President George 
Bush, according to two recent 
national polls. The Gallup Foil 
showed 47 percent of adults for 
the Democratic senator, 41 per- 
cent for the Republican vice 



By Leslie H. Gdb 

New York Times Service 

■ WASHINGTON — A year ago, 
senior adminis tration officials 
agreed unanimously to set up 
groups to take pre-emptive and pu- 
nitive action against terrorists. In- 
telligence operatives, however, said 
the groups were unlikely to woit. 
and were likely to get the United 
States into trouble. 

There was no question about the 
seriousness of the problem of com- 
bating terrorism. And officials said 
the' administration was united on 
the need to do so by nn^roving the 
gathering of information about 
planned terrorist actions. But there 
was doubt that any kind of secret 
action could be taken effectively, 
particularly in Lebanon. 

The split between the policy- 
makers, who felt the seed to be 
tough on terrorism, and the profes- 
sionals, charged with carrying out 
the policy, has plagued the admin- 
istration from the outset. 

On March 8, at feast 80 people 
were killed in a Berrut car bombing 
that hart beGXL at killing a 

militant Shiite leader suspected of 
being a terrorist It was carried oat 
try a group with ties to Lebanese 
j ptelligpniy which, in turn, had 
worked with the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency, according to con- 
. gressioual and administration 
sources. 

The CIA issued a statement 
Monday saying that it had not had 


advance knowledge of the bomb- 
ing. In addition, intelligence 
sources said that the agency had 
had no connection with the Leba- 
nese counterterrorism group that 

reportedly hired the bombers. 

But that was disputed by some 
administration and congressional 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

officials, who said the agency was 
working with the group at the time 
of the bombing. 

The CIA statement did not seem 
to go to the core issue. For exam- 
ple, it said that the CIA had not 
trained those who carried out the 
bombing. Bui the statement includ- 
ed no specific denial that the agen- 
cy had 1^ working with Lebanese 
intelligence. The White House de- 
clined comment altogether. 

Administration officials said 
Th a *, within a day or two after the 
March 8 bombing. President Ron- 
ald Reagan his order di- 

recting cooperation between the 
CIA and Lebanese intelligence on 
ooumertemaism. But by then the 
damag e had been done and the 
p«if< run, ffuttcmg administration 
officials to evaluate what 

they realistically could and should 
• do to combat terrorism. 

An administration official in- 
volved in 'intelligence said that, a 
year ago, there was agreement on 
the need to pre-empt terrorists but 
that concern about the risk to inno- 


ftwkjrsAWkd l*i bis hfc n tfwid 


A CAPITOL IDEA — Kevin Darcey, left, and Joe 
Nelson, two entrepreneurial young Washingtonians, 
have devised what may be die ultimate photo opportuni- 
ty — a chance for tourists to have their picture taken 
with a cardboard fikeness of President Ronald Reagan. 


SDI Chief Says Report 
On Lasers Is Misleading 


cent civilians was voiced. He also 
said that retaliation by terrorists 
had also been reared. 

“The best we can do to counter 
terrorism is to improve counterin- 
telligence, not counterterrorist ca- 
pabilities." he added. “That way, 
we can get our people out of harm's 
way." 

But this was not the thinking that 
prevailed cm April 3. 1984, when, 
officials said, Mr. Reagan signed a 
directive calling for pre-emptive, 
preventive and retaliatory action 
against terrorists and against coun- 
tries sponsoring terrorism. 

Officials said the policy was sup- 
ported by George P- Shultz, the 
secretary of state: Robert C. 
McFariane, the national security 
adviser, and William J. Casey, di- 
rector of central intelligence. 

Many American intelligence op- 
eratives had doubts about their 
ability to control the foreign coun- 
terterrorists. They were concerned 
about the United States’ taking re- 
sponsibility for the program with- 
out being able to control it espe- 
cially in Lebanon, where the 
government and the intelligence or- 
ganization are divided. 

In Lebanon, the officials said, 
U.S. intelligence was hot on the 
beds of Mohammed Hussein Fad- 
laUah, a Shiite leader, who has been 
finked to arrac ks on American in- 
stallations throughout the Middle 
East Lebanese intelligence opera- 
tives were on his tracks, too, but for 
other reasons, the officials said 

Administration officials said 




that the CIA had not decided what 
it wanted to do about Mr. Fadlal- 
lah but that some Lebanese intelli- 
gence officials had their own scores 
to settle with him. The Lebanese 
could not move against him as a 
government unit, because Shiites 
were now pan of the Lebanese gov- 
ernment. so according to the ac- 
counts offered by administration 
officials, the Lebanese intelligence 
organization hired outsiders. 

Even after the attempt to kill Mr. 
FadlaDah on March 8, the officials 
said, administration leaders were 
oot ready to abandon the policy. 
On March 25, Mr. McFariane said 
in a speech. “We cannot and will . 
not abstain from forcible action to 
prevent, pre-empt or respond to I 
terrorist acts where conditions trier- ; 
it the use of force." 

According to a number of ad- 
ministration officials cm Monday, . 
the United States is unlikely to al- 
ter this approach or to disband the 
roumenerrorist training and sup- 
port operations. 

But senior officials are said to be 
looking at specific cases of cooper- 
ation between the CIA and foreign 
intelligence agencies to see whether 
the policy can be realistically car- 
ried out 

And congressional committees 
charged with overseeing intelli- 
gence will be looking at both the 
practical problems and the policy 
itself. 


^ JlL 

OV B avast a 



Ladv'twaidi. 

ultra-ltiin. 

quartz, watar-minanr. 
M»i Hack t roared iteol 
ond gold plated. 

Tax-frM for export 


^ViageL) s 

iyiionie-Carlo s* 
3, avenue des Beaux- Arts 
MONTE-CARLO / 


president and 12 
cfcfeiL The Harris 
48-2. 


ent unde- 
bad it 50- 


An ornate, centmy-dd dock 
—banished from the chamber of 
the House of Representatives in 
favor of’ a new one in 1950, 
“when anything new seemed bet- 
ter.” as Elman Tbayn of the 
Capitol Architect’s Office put it 
~ has been restored to a place of 

below the Rotunda^ Itno^onger 
keens time, but may get sew 
woks later. , 

A team headed by Roger Tory 
Petersen, a veteran nature writer, 
raced around Texas this month 
by airplane, van and marsh bug- 
gy and set a North American 
record for the largest number Of 
bird species sighted, or at least 
heard, in one calendar day: 244. 
That is one more than a Califor- 
nia team counted last year. The i 


world record, however, remains 
in Peru, where two Americans, 
without benefit of vehicles, 
logged 331 bird species in 24 
hours last year. 

A surrey conducted for the In- 
ternal Revenue Service by Yan- 
kelovich,- Skelly and White 
showed that of those people who 
have an opinion about informing 
on income tax cheaters, 63 per- 
cent' are against informing and 
37 percent are in favor. 

■ A study by two public health 
groups in Boston said that 20 
percent of teen-agers who watch 
more than five horns a day of 
television are obese, compared 
with only 10 percent of those 
who watdiless than an hour. The 
researchers theorize that those 
who watch more television eat 
more and exerdse less. 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBER 


Woslnngton Poor Service 

WASHINGTON — A sugges- 
tion in an article by The Washing- 
ton Post that space-based lasers are 
beyond UJS. techni cal reach for the 
foreseeable future was “a misrepre- 
sentation of both fact and opin- 
ion," according to lieutenant Gen- 
eral James A. Abrahamson, 
director of the Pentagon’s Strategic 
Defense Initiative Organization. 

The report, which appeared in 
Tuesday ed itio n s of the Interna- - 
tional Herald Tribune, said that 
General Abrahamson’s office was 
concentrating on use of kinetic-en- 
ergy weapons, such as projectiles, 
rather than directed -energy weap- 
ons, such as lasers, to build a space- 
based, missil e defense system. 

He said that the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative Organization was 
“optimistic about many of the ad- 
vanced technology systems." 

“All of the explanations” of what 
a strategic defense system might be 
like “have stressed that different 
systems would be used — for exam- 


ple, a mixture of smart prqjectDes 
and directed-energy [laser- type] 
weapons — to ensure that an ad- 
versary cannot find an effective 
countermeasure," General Abra- 
hamson said. 

The Post quoted Dr. Louis Mar- 
quet, bead of the Strategic Defense 
Initiative Organization’s directed- 
energy research office, as saying 
that laser-like weapons are “not a 
competitor” to kinetic-energy 
weapons. 

■ VS. Reassures Affies 

The Reagan ad mini strati on 
sought Tuesday to dispel concern 
among its European alhes that they 
would be barred from working on 
the most sensitive parts of space 
defense research, Tne Associated 
Press reported from Brussels. 

Responding to published reports 
that General Abrahamson had said 
that the allies would be excluded 
from secret research, the U.S. mis- 
sion to the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization staled that the allies 



* v - • W. 



James A. Abrahamson 

would work on the secret as well as 
the nonsecret portions. 

The UJS. statement said, “In ar- 
eas of research that are classified 
there will of course be security ar- 
rangements to protect critical in- 
formation. In most cases our allies 
are already familiar with similar 
arrangements which apply to ex- 
changes of militarily sensitive tech- 
nologies. They have considerable 
experience in working successfully 
with these." 




>ubigant -Paris * 


K 
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provided by a Philips DP6000 digital paging system, also interfaced with 
the EBX,thus allowing paging to be initiated from any extension. 

The world s tallest hotel, the 73-storey Westin Stamford, will be 
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covers 3 hectares and includes another hotel, the 28-storey twin-core 
Westin Plaza, a 42-storey office tower, and a 7-storey podium housing 
Singapore’s largest convention centre and a shopping centre. 



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The world s best hotels often have our sign in common 



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In addition. Philips will be supplying a specially designed system 
for transmitting TV programmes, in-house movies, piped-in music 
and information channels through a single coaxial cable to all rooms and 
the office building; over 2,000 colour TVs plus video recorders and 
LaserVision players and an independent public address system for back- 
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For more information about Philips expertise world-wide, write to 
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Philips. The sure sign of expertise world-wide. 


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Wk Couldn't Make It Any Bigger 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


Page 5. 


1*« | 


Arafat Seems 
^0 Be Closer 




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Israel’s Rights 

By Christopher Dickey- 

Washington Past Service ~ 

\ AMMAN Yasser .Arafat, 
Vchainnan of tbe Palestirc- libera- 
tion Organization, said Tuesday 
Ota t he was read y to accept cxpfidt- 
ly a key United Nations Sedirity. 
Council resolution recognizing & 
rad’s right to exist if the Untied 
States cxphritly endorsed tbe right 
of the Palestinian people to “sdf- 
dete namati oo.” 

Western diplomats here say they 
do not recall Mr. Arafat malting 
such a staiemenismcethe faQnre of 
attempts to eater talks with the 
Carter adntinistratioii in 1977. Bui 
in the slippery course of Middle 
Bast peacemaking, they caution, 
apparent opening may be less 
than it seems. > 

One senior American, o fficial in 
the region, commenting on. tbe idea 
of a ^package deaT suggested by 
other Palestinians and Jordanians, 
said last week: “May be if we had a 
tape receding of Arafat saying, 1 
accept UN Seonity Council Reso- 
lution 242,' l ocked in a vault in 
New York, then maybe, maybe, we 
would see some room to move. But ; 
no, there's just no trust there” 

In a pre-dawn interview Tues- 
day, Mr. Arafat said that despite 
-/{Secretary of State George P. 
^Shultz’s Weekend talks , with King 
Hussein of Jordan, “nothing has 
changed” to push ahead a JonJan- 
PLO peace rmtiari vr: launched in 
February. 

Mr. Arafat periodically spen off 
into rhetorical circles around the 
issues blocking progress toward 
peace between Israel, its Arab 

1 neighbors and the Palestinians it 
displaced. But his frustration with, 
the mi native’s Jade Of ranmentnm - 
seemed genuine. . 

As the current initiative devel- 
oped, a first step toward negotia- 
tions with Israel was supposed to 
be talks involving ajoroLddegation 
;$of Jordanians and Palestmians. 

■ The diplomatic face-off ctf-the last 
several weeks has been over, tbe 
question Of which Pales tinians 
would be involved. 

The PLO is recognized in the 
Arab worid as tbe sole legitimate 
representative of the Palestinian 
people. 

But the United Stales has com-. . 
mined itself not to talk directly to 
the PLO, even as part of a joint 
delegation with Jordan, unless. the. 
PLO recognizes Security Council ' 
Resolution 242. Passed in 1967, the 
resolution calls for Israel to with- 
draw from lands it occupied in the - 



4 Aliens Reported to Be Killed in Nigeria : 



Tin fMorWrd ft in 

Prime Monster Shimon Peres of brad, left, and Yisrad Kessar, head of the Histadrat 
labor federation, eddarate the Labor Party's victory m nationwide trade mrion elections. 

Union Vote Buoys Israeli Labor Parly 


The Associated Prat 

SEME, Nigeria — Aliens trying 
to' leave Nigeria said police shot 
and killed four of other aliens after 
baiting a 400-truck convoy carry- 
ing thousands trying to force their 
way across the border into Benin. 

The aliens who reported the 
shooting Monday refused to identi- 
fy themselves. There was no inde- 
pendent or official confirmation of 
the shootings. Police at the Seme 
border post refused to answer ques- 
tions, escorted foreign reporters 
from the area and ordered diem to 
go to Lagos without talking to any- 
one. 

The front ranks of the tracks, in 
a convoy that stretched more than 
a mil e, had flat tires and smashed 
windows. The aliens said police 
smashed the windows and shot out 
the tires after or derin g the occu- 
pants to leave.. 


I After the deadline expired, tbe ing plastic b 

mali / j government said the aliens should represented 

. -r-J wger / go to the camp outside the airport sons and bj 

V to wait for ships to take them home, would take 

bubxiW- / — -Ah? On Sunday and earlier Monday, gioas. 

Jl aliens rioted at. the camp outside But their i 
Vs j Lagos's international airport, bum- craning, bu 

t )g\i/ lflGEraA ing billboards, stoning vehicles and remain inti 

jfjSfa Lnoo f \ setting up barricades blocking the iag them to 

/v / entrance lo the airport. Police re- “My broi 

■jfSHSI \ / cameroonI sp°°ded with by firing tear gas can- what has hai 

««***'■ \ Bayour said 

o : ;gp p Sw * j v On Monday, residems of the j^ r b„ vo 

L - 3Eg ‘ ‘ " 7-1 camp shouting. “We don’t want 20s, drived 

m food. Tear gas is owr food, started the Last of th 

of its dl boom in ihc 1970s. which J£ "S 


ing plastic bags and mattresses that 
represented their worldly posses- 
sions and by rickety minibuses that 
would take them to their home re- 
gions. 

But their talk was not of a home- 
craning, but of compatriots who 
remain in the country that is forc- 
ing them to leave. 

“My brothers — l do not know 
what has happened to Lhem,” Seph 
Bayour said Sunday. 

Mr. Bayour, who is in his early 
20s, arrived in Ghana from Togo, 
the last of tbe international barriers 


“Krowo Jim brings,- re To 8° 

rvTi-d abrtnTtnnnnn between Nigeria and Ghana. 


mor mn* m «a w wmn the Ghanaians have had to cross, in 
drive to the border and force their a truck brimming with people. 


peHed, about 300,000 are believed 
to be from Ghana, 100,000 from 

Niger and the rest from Chad and saw hundreds of young men bang 

marched toward buildings on the 


Cameroon. 


. •. By Edward Walsh - 

fVoshfngnm Post Service ■■ _ 

JERUSALEM — Israel’s fragile 1980s. Yitzhak Shamir of the 

p/y fft fnrrjent -natwYoai nnjiy m - The Histadiut is the foundation September 1986. 
tsed a new phase Tuesday after oo whidi the Labor Party stands ... 7 - 

trade nnion dcctknK gave a dear and through which it dominated ■ Israeli AW u) 4aire 
boost to the Labor Party half of the Israel's politics from 1948 until President Mobutu Sc; 
eoveriuneoL ‘ 1 1977, when the Likud bloc Gist Zaire sig ned a cooperat 

In final returns from Monday's control 'of the nationai matwiftU^Tti 

balloting tbe Labor Party, headed . . VuwT| ncxnmm A W states would renew ties 


reversed the decline if 'suffered elections before he is due to turn 

ring much of the 1970s and eariy over the post of prime minister to m the allied police shoot- 

80s. Yitzhak Shamir of the Likud in . . , , 


ouuuuw uib muyvw uuuhwm, J, „ ,L • u “ J- 

the tires after ordering the occn- Thegpvenmientraderedthemto border, hands on their heads, 
pants to leave.. -leave by May ID, mid opened its ■ Fear For Those Left Behind 

Tbe four foreigners reported to borders for eight days u> permit Sheila Rule o} The New York 
have been shot were among about their exit. The borders had been Times reported earlier from Aflao, 
25,000 who had fled about 100 closed for 13 months to combat Ghana: 
miles (160 kilometers) to the from- smuggling Hundreds of Ghanaians who 

tier with Benin from a transit camp But thousands were stranded at were expelled from Nigeria sat in 

near Lagos's international airport, the bender when the deadline ex- the withering heat at Aflao, near 
An unspecifi ed number of other pued. Many said they had waited ihe dusty border crossing n 
aliens were reported to have been for days, but had been unable to Togo. 

ininred in the alleged nnlice shoot- cross. Thev were surrounded bv bi 


-We thou g fat there would be no 
tween Nigeria and Ghana. violence this time." be said, com- 

u/^hnriH !rd P arin S the current exodus lethal of 
w bimdrtds of ymmg men being years ago wben Nigeria ex- 
irched toward buildmgs on the ^ abouttwo miUionSs in 
rfer.lmdsontheffheads. S operation marked by chaos and 


e dusty border crossing with 
ygo. 

They were surrounded by bulg- 


an operation marked by chaos and 
violence. “But we are nearing the 
stories and I am afraid for my 
brothers.” 

Thus far, more than 60,000 Gha- 
naians have crossed into this fron- 
tier post on the Atlantic coast on 
their way home. Some officials be- 
lieve many others may have also 
crossed back into Ghana without 
the knowledge of ihe authorities. 


The 25,000 traveled to the dosed 
border because they said they 
feared that ships assigned to take 
them out of Nigeria would drop 
them far Cram-their homes. Most 


IsraeTs politics from 1948 until President Mobutu Scse Seko of them out of Nigeria wool 
1977, whm the t flmd bloc Gist Zaire signed a cooperation agree- them far from- their homo 
captured control - of the national meat with Israel on Tuesday and arc G h a n a ians , 
government. said he believed that other African The rnDjury government 

It has been widely Hgawnwd here states would renew ties in the fu- dered 700,000 ffegaT aliens i 


Japan Modifies Fingerprint Bide for Aliens : 

. The Associated Press July i, allows a colorless fluid to They need certificates to sign" 

TOKYO — The government replace black ink in the fingerprint- business contracts and obtain busi- .. 


, n ■ ~ cn-ivn Dm, » IUUS DtXU WU03Y MMSUniCH HOC “ " 

that Mr. Peres and other Labor tine, a senior Israeli official told Nigeria, accusing them of ti 
wrar almost 67 p^mn « tnc vote 1wt ^ . ddihcratdy played Reuters in Jerusalem. The agree- scarce jobs from Nigerians 


homes. Most . ra* Associated Press July j, allows a colorless fluid to They need certificates to sign; 

TOKYO — The government replace black ink in the fingerprint- business contracts and obtain busi- . 
■pTTumt has or- modified its nries on Tuesday for ing required under Japan’s alien ness licenses, marriage certificates * 
altwK to leave Ihe m anda to ry fingerprinting of registration law. and other official papers. ; 

iem of taking resident aliens, but toe apparent All foreigners over the age of 16 A total of 233 foreigners, indud- * 


kud bloc in the government to pre- creased investments and air links, in the cities. Most the 
IsraeTSj paitt. trade union team- wnt gn Xmtnrr- that could the official said. were attracted to N1 


tr^wrata are men^era. ^ A Labor Party official 
Hie Lind Woe, which shares predicted before Monday’s voting 
power with tbe Labor Party m the that Mr Peres would immediaidy 
nationa l unity government, won 21 begin pressing the cabinet to im- 
pacenL pose more stringent economic aus- 

Laboralsowoncraitrolofallbut terity measures, 
onobf the 72 local labra councils. With the trade ration elections 


were attracted to Nigeria because 


i of i«lH tig r esiden t aliens, but the apparent All foreigners over the age of 16 
Brians and attempt at calming protests drew wbo live in Japan for one year or 
crime rales criticisni from foreigners and their more must have their left index 
ten workers Japanese sympathizers. fingers printed when they apply for 

da because The revision, to be enforced after registration cards. 


registration law. and other official papers. „ 

All foreigners over the age of 16 A total of 233 foreigners, indud- • 
who live in Japan for one y tar or ing seven Americans, have joined “ 
more must have their left index what began as isolated protests by » 
fingers printed when they apply for a few Koreans who refused to be 


fingerprinted in 


The Labor Party was never in over and the Labor 


danger of losingits solid majority of the Histadrat solidified, Mr. 
controTof the Histadrat, but the Fores was see n by analysis as en- 
vote was the strongest showing by joying increased freedom of action 


of the Histadrat 


s control 
ted, Mr. 


Peres was seen by analysis as en- 
i ovine increased freedom of action 


•with theother nations of theregkm. 
v The PLO, however, refuses to 
accept the. resolution, .because 
while the resolution recognizes Is- 
rael's right to exist in peace, it does 
not recognize tbe Palestinians ex- 
cept as refugees, essentially without 
a country. 

What the PLO wants is "seff- 
deternrination’’ for the Palestinian 
people. But tins is usually taken to 
mean establishment of a Palestin- 
ian state. The United States op- 
poses this and consequently rejects 
u sdf -delerminatkra” as wdL 
When Mr. Arafat was asked j 
Tuesday if be would explicitly ac- ! 
cept Resolution. 242 if the United 
States explicitly endorsed Pfttestin - 1 
tan “self-detenninatiotC be said, 
“yes" and “absolutely." ' 

In that case, Mr, Arafat was 
asked, would he accept Brad’s J 
right to exist? 

At this, be slipped into the : 
opaque language of Middle East : 
■^diplomacy. “I would accept all the. 

‘ interaational legality” he raid. “It 
is very dear what I am raying." 


...em 


Labor in the last five Histadrat m both domestic and foreign pol- 
dections, winch are held every four icy, including the possahmty of 
years, and it was seen by some as an forcing a breakup of the rarity gov- 
the party had final- wwment and new p arliament ary 

Ferenc Molnar, Violinist, Dies at 89; 
Directed Music Programs inEurope 

WALNUT CREEK, California Iranian Tudeh Communist Par^, 
— Fexenc Motaar, 89, who served in Berirn Afail 30 after a long iS- 
for. 20 years as. the principal violin- . ness. 

ist with the San Fiahdsco Sympho- . 

ny,- died Friday. As . a mteoner in obouk Jv* Ghampassm, 57, a 
Siberia in Worm War L he revived former Laotian defense minister 
the spirits of fellow captives hy . ***> W an exiled resistance mow- 
playing mn«c on a vioSao carved mai * zdter.tlte Communist yictoiy 
fromms wooden bunk. ■ ” .'m 1975^ of a hwt attack Friday m 

Mt Molnar, a . native of Buda- Saata Ana^Catifomia. 
jjest, was once miBical&iEctor of. ; ■* -Joseplriae MBes, 73, apoel and 
the Rcncoolzes Ctuturdte Interna-. . loog-time'professor at the Umver- 
tidhates in Ennta Ala, Italy, and of . ^ df CWnmin, Berkeley, Sun- 
the American Cdh^e in Switzer- day of pneumonia. Hex “Collected 
land’s Smnmer.Musto.Bragrani. ' poems, 1930-1983,"" won the Na- 
■ 'Other Deaths: tion mazarine’s Leroore Marxian 

Inq Eskndari.76, founderof the PoetryfrSein 1983. 



9'tord 

tics 


*» 9 5a*a s » s _. 


C H A N N E L 


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Page 6 


INTERI^ATIOISAL HERALD TREBU1VE, WEDNESDAY, MAY IS, 1985 


* 


High-Tech Ban Called Costly to Soviet 


By Smart Auerbach 

Washington Pm Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S. resnic- 
. lions on the sale of high technology 
.co Eastern Woe countries couW 
have cost the Sonet military from 
$6.6 billion to $133 WUion in re- 
search expenses in 79 instances 
_ where license requests were reject- 
‘ed, according to a Pentagon study. 

The study, released Monday, 
also estimated that military spend- 
ing by the United States and its 
allies would have had to increase 
spending by $73 billion to $14.6 
billion to match the Soviet techno- 
logical advances had the licenses 
bon granted. 

“The Soviets can make very ef- 
fective use of technology to im- 
prove their military at our ex- 
pense,” said Richard N. Pole; 
assistant secretary of defense for 
international security policy, who 


has led the move in the Reagan 
administration to impose strict 
curbs on sales to the Eastern Woe. 

“You can be sure they have tried 
to obtain this technology from oth- 
er countries and by other means” 
after the request to buy it legally 


merce Secretary Malcolm Bal- 
drige’s visit this month to Moscow 
to im pr oving U.S. trade re- 
lations wiihthe Soviet Union. De- 
fense Secretary Caspar W. Wein- 
berger had appealed directly to 
President Reagan to block the Bal- 


from the United States wm tamed 


down. Mr. Perie said. 

Other methods usually indude 
illegally evading export controls by 


buying the equipment from a sup- 
l-Communist 


country 
from the United 


plier in a non-C 
who can gd it 
States. 

Last month, the Paris 
Le Monde published Soviet docu- 
ments that indicated the Soviet 
Union had stolen industrial tech- 
nology in 1979 that was worth $65 

miTlio n 

Mr. Perie denied that the release 
of the $1 -million study, completed 
in February, was linked to Com- 


UonstOiL 
The Baldrige tiip to Moscow wflj 
be die occasion of the first cabinet- 
level trade talks between the two 

superpowers in six years and is part 

of the Ragan administration's sec- 


ond-term policy to ease tensions 

loviet Umo 


with the Soviet Union. 

The study, conducted by B-K 
Dynamics of Rockville, Maryland, 
under contract to the Pentagon, 
found patterns of Eastern bloc at- 
tempts to buy technology that ap- 
peared to be seared to the Soviet 
snfitary*5] — 



? v 

Swiss Reassess Role During World War II f I 


Richard N. Perie 




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.Ve* York Tima Service 

GENEVA — As their neighbors 
haw been mariring the 40th anoi* 
vetsaiy of theead of Wodd War n, 
the neutral Swiss have been quietly 
re ass es sin g their role during the 
conflict. 

In recent months, several issues 
that were once considered taboo or ■ 
tardy discussed have gained sew 
a tt e nt i on , including the political' 
leaning of the .wartime military 
chief. General Henri Guisan, the 
Swiss trea tm ent of Jewish refugees, 
and even tbe Tuning bank’s pur- 
chase of gold seized during tbe war 

by the Nazis. 

Photographs of a house de- 
stroyed by an accidental Allied 
bombing of Schaffhansen, the ooly 
Swiss town to be bombed during 
the war, have appeared in newspa- 
pers and on teknson. Other publi- 
cations have reviewed the rede of 
the Swiss Army and tbe conditions 
of Jews in Switzerland. 


Professor Hans Ulrich Jost of the 
University of Lausanne, writing in 
the Zurich newspaper Tages Au- 
zegerZQridi last Wednesday, said, 
“actually, the bells foiling May 8, 
1945. also rang in dm tough ques- 
tion of. whether Switzerland, de- 
spite escaping physically undam- 
aged, survived i the war and the tune 
of fascism morally unscathed." 

The question, he said, has yet to 
be answered. 


Modi of the attention has fo- 
cused on General Guisan who, like 

the mythical William Tdl, has be- 
come a symbol of tbe nation's neu- 
tral but sturdy stand amid sur- 
rounding aggression. 

Recently published documents, 
reviewed in the press and oo televi- 
sion. have raised questions among 
historians over General Guisan s 
position on the ‘'corpora testate.” a 
code word for fascism, and 
prompted Tages Anzriger Zurich 


Arms Sales to Third World Declining 


New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The dollar 
value of arms delivered last year 
from industrial nations to the de- 
veloping world was the lowest in 
neany .a decade, according to a 
study by the Congressional Re- 
search Service. 

The developing countries appear 
to have curtailed their arms pur- 
chases because of the increasingly 
heavy burden of meeting foreign 
debt payments, according to the 
study, winch was released Monday. 

In 1984, the value of weapons 
provided by the United Stales and 
the Soviet Union to nooindustrial 
countries was the lowest for both 
since 1977, the study said. 

The value of U3. arms sales 
agreements was $73 billion in 
1984, down from $103 bflhon the 
previous year. Tbe United States 
had 223 percent of the Third 
World arms market in 1984, adrop 
from 34.1 percent in 1983, the 
study said. 

But while the U3. share of nrili- 
tary sales agreements with aouin- 
dustrial nations fell from first place 
in 1983, both the Soviet Union and 


Drought in Delaware Basin 

New York Tima Service 


Commission has declared 
drought emergency in j 
York, New Jersey, I 
Delaware. The 


and 


region. 


Ilcralb^EEribune 

LET THE TRIB BE YOUR GUIDE. 


LHI GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVEL & 
ENTERTAINMENT: 
EUROPE. 



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Tnb business readers cfl 
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GUIDE TO MftlS. 



As restaurant critic 
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has explored the 
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shopping and ecring h 
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The gastronomic 
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NAfels indudes critical commentay, anecdotes, 
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France increased their arms sales to 
Third World countries, the study 
said The Soviet Umati nuked 
is 1984 with SI 0.4 biffioii, and 
France followed wiihS9.1 bODonin 
sales agreements. 

The tmal value of a& sadt agree- 
ments last year between inrfiKtrwii 
and ncomdustrial rynrntri^ 

532 bJHon. was tbe second lowest 
for any year since 1977. Sales 
agreements generally precede de- 
liveries of weapous- 

“Tfac three principa l suppliers of 
arms to the (ess developed world 
are doser to parity than at any 
other time in history," Senator 
Mark O. Hatfield of Qr^m, die 
chiwrman of tbe Senate Appropria- 
tions Cammuee. who made the 
report public Monday. 

Mr. Hatfield, a Republican, 


called on President Ronald Reagan 
to seize “a golden opportunity” to 
reduce the level of arms transfers 

through 

emments oT the Soviet Union and 
France. 

Tbe Congressional Research. Ser- 
vice. a nonpartisan division of the 
Library of Congress, found drat the 
value of all non- C onna m n st na- 
tions* arms sales a gffwwnt^ and 
deliveries to tbe developing world 
has exceeded that of 
nations fa- every year since 1977, 
in 1979, when Communist 


except 


debveries were slightly higher. 

In 1984, the study found, non - 
Communist suppliers collectively 
made $173 billion in arms deitver- 
ies to the Third World, compared 
with S 13-2 InUioa for all Commu- 
nist governments. 




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to question whether he had lean- 
ings toward fascism. 

The questions center on an ad- 
dress by General Guisan, never 
published in full and made from 
sketchy notes, to the Swiss officer 
corps.oaJuly25, 1 940, in which he 
outlined his plan for the defense of 
Switzerland. The Alpine meadow 
where he made the address, the 
Rfltli, has enormous significance in 
Switzerland. 


UrL Scbwyz and Unterwalden. 
swore an oath in 1307 on which 
Swiss freedom was founded. 

General Guisan reportedly 
lashed can at defeatism after tbe 
fall of France. 

Based on notes, some historians 
have said that passages, such as 
“Wc haw to evolve m enter to 
adapt to the conditions of the new 

r. L-.* .hH “! «n mnvinxd the 




th* 


”"lt was there, according to legend, 
that repre se ntatives of the states of 


qiWilHViU vwpQ — ^ B* — 

ward the “corooratfi*’ government 
style identified with fascist regimes 


U.S. to Sell Switzerland 
Anti-Tank Weapons 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON —The R«®m 
administration has notified Con- 
gress that it plans to seB Switzer- 
land 12^000 modern anti-tank tms- 
ales for $209 trillion. 

The TOW-2 (tube-launtihed, qp- 
tically-tracked, wire-grided) mis- 
siles would replace outdated weap- 
ons now in the Swiss military 
inventory, the Pentagon an- 
nounced Monday. The sale is to be 
nimde unless it is disapproved by 


in Italy and Portugal. 

But General Guisan has been de- 
fended as a realist. Historians have 
repeatedly said that there is no evi- 
dence that he sympathized with 
Nazi Germany’s concentration 
camps or anti-Semitism. 

A recent exhibition reining the 
country also raised the issue of 
Swiss treatment of Jewish refugees 
before and during World War n, 
citing fascist publications and or- . 
ganiza lioas that appeared befoerfi' 
the war. 

Although Switzerland provided 
a haven for many Jews, it restricted 
Jewish immigration after tbe Nazi 
occupation of Austria in 1938. 


BUSINESS OPPOBTIWmES 


IVORY COAST 


Ministry of Public Works, Construction, 
Posts and Telecommunications 


National Office of Tefacommunications Ivory Coast 


INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
No 3290/84/ONT/DFB/FM/Q3V 
I -OBJECTIVE 


The National Office of Tekcomommcatima (ONT) invites 
tniftmntiniml tenders for the supply, installation and connection 
to the telephone network of an SPC digital local/ transit ex- 
change of 10,000 tines, extendable to 60,000 tinea, in ABIDJAN 
and such other optional exchanges or equipment as may be 
required by the ONT. 


2-RNANCE 


Finance for the 
Development 


the project is assured jointly by tire African 
Bank (ADB) and tbe Ivorian Government 


3 - TENDERING CONDITIONS 


The tender is open to manufacturers and 
wlianp systems in member countries of the 

• 2 • *- Tflk„ 


iera of 
B and 


equipment s produced in these countries. The digital exchanges 
offered must have been already 


proven in service. 

4 - TENDER DOCUMENT COIIECTION 

The tender documents will he available to be collected from the 

20th May 1985 at the folkwing address: 

Service dea Marches 
Bureau des Appels doffres 
4 C aage, Porte 0401 
PostriSOOl ABIDJAN 

on payment of 200,000 F CFA by cheque or bank order, signed 
by the manedheturer or supplier, nude payable to: 

"'Office National des Tfltcoinmunieations de G&U; d'Ivoire". 


5 - RETURN OF TBOERS 


The tenders must be delivered not later than 17:30 on the 20th 
August 1985 to: . ^ . 

Direction de f Office National des Ttltconmm m ca tio ns 
Service des Miirdib 
Bureau des Appels d’offrea 
4 e etage, Porte 04-01 
Postal 20 


fllV 


U li 


2001 ABIDJAN 


6-B4CMJIRIES 


All enquiries during the preparation of tenders must be made in 
writing or by telex to the "Service des Marches" for administra- 
tive information and to the "Departement de la Production, 
Projet Plateau d, Postel 2001". concerning all other matters. 


Director National Office of Telecomm u nications 
Postal 2001 ABIDJAN 
01 B.P. 7838 COIE DTVOOS 
TOEXt 23790 or 23758 


i.- • 


A ^ • 


On behalf of ROBIN SHIPYARD (PTE) LIMITED 
for their surplus Stock & Equipment 

FOUR DAY SALE BY AUCTION 

commenting TUESDAY, JUNE 25TH, 1985 at 10:00 ojji. (loco) lime) 
at ROBIN SHIPYARD 

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A BPSD BSS ^ 
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. Appearweocf lj 










** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


Page 


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** 

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nr 

a 

Hi* 

til 


• k, . 




.. * : -*>Kr 


86 Are Killed in Attacks 


hi 

<s?$ 



m 




. ;h,>* 

,un< In 


-ini 


Northern Sri Lanka 


Reuters. 

\ -COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — At 
.‘least 86 dvifians werelriHed and 
Mi- oI» h a: . r j fi,a i ^ 100 woe injured Tuesday what 

*»»j ,1^*5 1 Tamil guenfflas. disguised as arf- 






^1. Jnj\ ,‘diCTS* began tbe heaviest attack cf apinstthem. . 

fn. » s “* .Lll. — — ^ <1 — . ‘ ‘ ‘ ' 


Tajails, who account forZ5 mil- 
lion of the island’s 15 million peo- 
ple, are damndrog an independent 
state. They accose die Sinhalese-led 

government of discriminating 




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_th«r separatist, campaign, the gov- .The government imposed a 
•jenmimt said. 16-boor curfewon areas where 

. Offiaal sources said that at least there had been viokoce and said 
25 woiO£ii and ax children were security forces had begun a scan* 
among those killed wheathe gner- to capture -the guerrillas- “dead or 
riUas sprayed buUetsmlhfc'sireets ' " 

' of Annradhapnry a sacred Bod- 
‘didst city and ancient Sinhalese 


' capital.' 

The guerrillas drove into the dty 


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T in a fine for a ims, ft was the first 
major raid into . North-Central 

- province, most of whose popola- 

tion-bdougs to the Smhafee ma- 

Ajority. 

Police said the separatists then 
drove td the Sri Mahabodfca; a sa- 

- credtreethatis visited by hundreds 
of Buddhists every day, and shot at 
the crowd. 

Residents sad dle death toll was 
-probably more than 100. They said 
"the gnemlas shouted “70 for- 70,* 

■ indicating they were retaliating 
' against the alleged lolling of about 

70 Tamils by security forces in 

■ northern Jafma district last week. 

A government broadcast ^ ap- 
pealed to people to remain calm 
and not to believe rumors: “The 


'aEvt 

A government spokesman said 

that the guerrillas, after tin: massa- 
. ere at Anorndhapara, drove to Pul- 
talam on the northwest coast and 
fired at fljpripce station, wounding 
an officer. - \ 

The shooting continued at a 

wtereti^d^OTdwoa^^sev- 
eral avifians, the spokesman said. 

- Teams tf doctors and nurses and 
. emergency medical supplies were 

flown, from Colombo to Aonradhs- 
para hospitals: 

Amnadh apura, 125 miles (200 
kilometers) north of Colombo, the 
capital, wasdedared a sacred Bud- 
dhist dty 30 ydus-ago. It hat a 
-population of 38,000, most <rf them 
SwiimlMe ft was the island’s capi- 
tal in the 5th century B.C 
. Dozens of Buddhist shrines, 
bu3t by ancient Sri Imikan kings, 
are near tbe Sri MahabodhL Offi- 



Kartar Singh Narsxffi, a Sikh lawyer and a suspect in tbe 
bombings, was brought to coiat in New Delhi on Tuesday. 

Key Sikh Suspect Dies ; 
Press Alleges Torture 


-J > maip elective of this brutal massa- cials said it had ndt been damaged 
; ere of rivOians by the terrorists was in the attack. 

! to provoke people m other parts of 
- the country,' ".the broadcast said. - 


The sources said that President 
- Junius R. Jayawardoae summoned 
■ an emergency iw Mti ng of serum 
. cabinetministeratodisciissthekin- 
• ings and that three oppositicHi par- 
; ties asked for an emergency meet- 
. ing of Paifiamqit to fistmss the 
’ issue. ‘ . - . ■ 


The guerrillas have stepped up 

atwrfa ^ Bqinty pffff^ iwn mih- 

taxy personnd in- me.nmth «««« 
thf begraningof Awmwir^ kSfing 
at least three sailors, two soldiers 
and two poficemen in different in- 
cadents. 

Seamty farces have killed at 
least SO gnerriflas tMs month, ac- 
cording to official figures. - 


/tenters 

NEW DELED — A key suspect 
in the Sikh extremist bombing of- 
fensive has died in police custody, 
leading to ehaiys in several Tmtinn 
newspapers cm Tuesday that he was 
tortured. 

The Press Trust of .India said 
Mahinder Singh Khalsa died Mon- 
day in a New Delhi hospital after 
being injured in a scuffle with tbe 
police who arrested him Sunday. 


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Blacks Bury S. Africa Union Leader 


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By Alan Gwdl .. 

jVcw York Tima Service 

TSAKANE, Sooth Africa — 
With the army and the police 
standing guard, more titan 25,000 
blacks attended the funeral Tues- 
day of a union leader vriio died 
after being held in 
The union leader,’ Andries 
sda, 29. died in a hospital on May 6 
afto being detained two drrys eaiii- 
er by poliee in” this towumip just 
west of JtAauncsburg. A patholo- 
gist hired by his family said he died 
of brain danwgp that could have 
been caused by a blow or a falL 
Labor leados asked workers to 
stay home Taesday to mart the 
buriaLbotcnlyahmdfulofpeople 
seemed to heed the. calL 
Early Tuesday; three bomb ex- 
plosioos rocked government offices 
in the. nearby white town at Brak- 
pan, but there were no reports of 
injuries and no one umnediaidy 
claimed responsibility for the 
Masts. . ■’ 

Funerals marked by political 
protest have become a_ common- 
place since unrest began in many of 
the nation’s s^r^ated townships 
last September. Since then, almost 
3SQ people have (tied, many of 
them shot by policemen, others 
slain in clashes among rival black 

factions. 

Bui Sooth African commenta- 
tors sad that the death of Mr. Ra- 
dtsda, a senior shop stewaril in the 
Chemical Workers Union and an 
executive member of a mqor labor 
federation, securing to draw orga- 
nized labor denermto the pdiimal 
fight against smite minority rule. 

Chri s Dtemittt, a semar labor 
leader from tire Federation, erf 
South African Trade Unions, said 
that . he attributed the poor re- 
sponse to the stay-at-home appeal 
to employers who had not been 
prepared to condemn tire circum- 
stances suaounding Mr.- Raditse- 
la’s death. “It is. dear that tire gov- 



Modhos jammed the streets of Tsaknne on Tuesday as 
the coffin of Andries Raditsela was taken to a cemetery. 


eminent is supported by the 
HDpJoy*8s."hesaid. _ 

Tire mourners at Mr. Raditsda’s 
funeral at first numbered no more 
than 2,000. On the outskirts of the 
towndi^>, authorities had deployed 
troops in combat gear with auto- 
matic rifics/ and both blade and 
white pofice officers, in armored 
vehicles, carried shotguns and tear- 
gas launchers. 


Bui the crowd seemed to swell as 
Mr. Radilsda’s coffin was borne 
along to the cemetery on streets 
between modest homes. “An injury 
to tme is an injury to aD,” said one 
banner, hdd aloft in the 
As mourners dispersed, 
and army units in armored 
moved into tbe township. But by 
nightfall, no trouble had been re- 
peated from the township. 


The agency tfid not give any oth- 
er details but said a magistrate had 
been ordered to conduct an inquest 
into his death. 

Mr. Singh was one of three lead- 
ing suspects arrested by police after 
bomb attacks on Friday and Satur- 
day in which alleast 86 people were 
killed. 

The Indian Express newspaper 
said that Mr. Singh suffered only 
minor injuries in foe scuffle during 
his arresL He was able to walk after 
treatment at the city’s Lohia Hos- 
pital on the day of his arrest, it said. 

“The subject was apparently tor- 
tured to death," tire newspaper 


said. It added that the two o 
suspects arrested with him came to 
court in “an apparently critical 
condition.” 

The Statesman newspaper said, 
“Most doctors at Lohia Hospital 
were convinced that Mohinder 
Singh had died due to police tor- 
ture." 

Meanwhile, police said they re- 
covered enough explosives to make 
400 bombs from tire home of one of 
the suspects, Karlar Singh Narang, 
a Sikh lawyer. 

They also found lead casin 
wires and batteries needed to 
booby trap bombs in the house. 

“This land of ammunition in the 
bands of tbe terrorists could have 
made a Beirut out of Delhi,” the 
Indian Express quoted a police of- 
ficer as saying. 

The weekend bomb attacks in 
New Delhi were mostly booby- 
- trapped portable radios that ex- 
ploded when picked up by passers- 
by. 

■ Zia Denies Involvement 

President Mohammed Zia ul- 
-Haq of Pakistan said Tuesday that 
his country was not involved m any 
way in the Sikh extremist bomb 
campaign in neighboring India, 
Reuters reported from Islamabad. 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of 
India referred obliquely in Parlia- 
ment Monday in New Delhi to 
charges of Pakistani involvement, 
saying: “The fact is that foreign 
involvement is there. You know it, 
we know it" 

The Pakistani government news 
agency quoted General Zia as say- 
ing Tuesday: “There are also other 
nagboring countries of India." Pa- 
kistan, be said, was “not involved 
in foe matter in any f ashio n ” 


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Le Monde Plans 
1 10% Salary Cots, 
'Loss of 250 Jobs 

Reuurt 

•*i PARIS — Andrt Fontaine, afi- 
T tor in dtief of the financially trou- 
bled French newspaper Le Monde, 
.has presooted his long-awaited res- 
I'eneplan involving 10-percent wage 
•-cuts and the loss of 250 jobs, jour- 
'■ ;safists said. 

They said Monday foat Mr. Foo- 

• tame also intended to raise mosey 
c.by setting thenewspqxs’sbuildmg,, 
; a move which angered staff wheu 
i ted by Ms predecessor An- 
Laurens. The d^y.has been 



<. '1982 aid has dd)ts of 90 nrilUrin 
1 francs ($9.4 million). 

U Mr. Fon taine told Staff (hat up 
'To 35 rmffioa francs cf outside oq»- 
vtal would be injected and 330 more 
tishares created, with 75 petcoit-of 
) j'ihe shares isa new coa^nnystruo- 
’ v ..tnre r beingoffered to outsideinves- 
o’tOTs. 

t The editmial staff wilUkM 30 
'' percent of the riures* congared 
ll'with 40 percent at sresrnL Mr. 
c.^Foatairae wfll hold o pace 


•against II 
Tial staff 






. percent, as 

:now.Theefoto- 

LtinoTose their m^or- 

--ity. Thirty pet cent will go to a few 
‘ traditional shareholders, the most 
. [prominent of whom is Hubert Beu- 
‘-ve-Mfay, founder of the newspaper 
;;in 1944 

Executives and office workers 
. have agreed to salary cuts. EdiKHi- 
>,al staff haw until Wednesday to 
ame or be prepared to be laid off. 
l.AIl shareholders will iheet at the 
•.end of the month to vote m the 
‘measures. '- •••. 


“Canon are to be congratulated, 
first and foremost for taking 
what must be one of the most 


simplicity that literally has to be 
seen to be believed.” 


‘3501111 Photography ’expressed their amazement 
when faced with 
thehrilliant T70. 



F. i i ropeii r i Cam era o f t h c 


Mexican Land Reform: Violent to the End 


By William A. Orme Jr. 

(Vashinglon Post Sereict 

TEQUIXQUIAC, Mexico — 
Emiliano Zlata's revolutionaty 
army rode into this town in 1914 
and aunounced that villagers 
would at last be given the nearby 
lands they had been claiming for 
generations. More than seven de- 
cades later, the peasants here are 
still fighting for full possession of 
those farmlands. 

In a dash with riot police of 
Mexico state on April 19, about 
300 peasant protesters were forc- 
ibly dislodged from a colonial-era 
estate they had occupied here. Doz- 
ens of police and peasants woe 
wounded, and one 75-year-old 
tester died from his injuries 10 
later. 

The Tequixqmac confrontation 
was the most recent violent mo- 
dem provoked by the problem of 
an expanding rural population cov- 
eting a shrinin’ ng arable land sup- 

piy- 

Sucb conflicts are becoming 
more freouent officials and peas- 
ant organizations concur, as Mexi- 
co concludes what is probably the 
world’s oldest continuing land re- 
form program. These unresolved 
land disputes are an increasingly 
acute political and economic prob- 
lem for a govenunent that has long 
relied on strong peasant support 

Since tbe 1910-20 revolution. 
Agrarian Reform Minister Luis 
Martinez VtHicana informed Con- 
gress last year, the Mexican govern- 
ment has distributed 253 million 
acres (100 million hectares) to 
about 23 million small farmers. 
Despite this effort, demographers 
calculate, there are still about four 
mill i nn Iq nrilftts peasants in Mexi- 
co. 

The Agrarian Reform Ministry 
ruled (m about 7,000 land claims in 
the past year, but more than 6,000 
cases remain to be settled, Mr. 
Martinez VHbcana said. 

Yet he reports that with isolated 
exceptions, the government expects 
to conclude its distribution pro- 
gram in 1987. “The land is not 
elastic," he said in an interview. 
Peasants who faD to get land “will 
be disappointed, but we are not 
going to mislead them by pretend- 
ingrnal there is enough land for 
everyone.” 

The Tequixqiriac situation has 
parallels in semes of similar poor 
farming communities throughout 
Mexico. Residents in Teqttixquiac 
contend that the 460-acre estate 
was stolen from villagers by Span- 
ish colonialists and that its sale to 
private dairy farmers 30 years ago 
was illegal. 

Embarrassed by the outbreak of 
violence, Mexican officials prom- 
ised to re-examine tbe dispute. But 
the protesters are unlikely to suc- 
ceed, the officials acknowledge. 

“As govenunent authorities, we 
can only act in accord with the 
law," Mr. Martinez Villicana said. 


noting that tbe claim was studied 
and rejected by government ex- 
perts in 1972. 

Independent experts have long 
urged a halt to Mexico’s land give- 
away. “Bv continuing to hand out 
poor land to thousands of peasants, 
they are dooming” the agricultural 
system to failure, said Kenneth 
Shwedel. chief agricultural econo- 
mist at the Banco National de 
Mexico. 

More than 90 percent of Mexi- 
co’s territory is classified as arid or 
semiarid, a percentage increased 
steadily by erosion and encroach- 
ment of deserts. Rather than con- 
tinuing to subdivide “a land base 
that simply cannot support six mil- 
lion rural families,'’ the govern- 
ment should aid the development 
of efficient, modern “production- 
orientetT farms, Mr. Shwedel said. 

Tequixquiac, which was conven- 
ed in the 1950s into an efficient 
commercial dairy faint, is a micro- 
cosm of the conflict between Mexi- 
co’s economic need to modernize 
agriculture and its social commit- 
ment to the peasantry- Tbe dairy 
produces milk that Mexico would 
otherwise have to import. Yet it 
employs fewer than 20 full-time 
workers, whereas tbe lands, if redis- 
tributed, could support perhaps 40 


farmers growing com and beans for 

sustenance: 

Although welcomed by many ag- 
ricultural specialists, foe forthright 
admission that tbe land distribu- 
tion program is ending poses a po- 
litical duemma. 

Frustrated land claimants are in- 
creasingly willing to throw in their 
lot with leftist opposition groups, 
eroding the once monolithic rural 
base of Mexico's ruling party, the 
Revolutionary Institutional Party. 

Opposition organizers create 
further difficulties by advocating 
dramatic protest demonstrations, 
which can quickly turn violent. 

Lost year. 69 peasants were 
killed in confrontations with local 
authorities or with gunmen appar- 
ently protected by village political 
bosses, according to two leftist-led 
agrarian organizations, tbe Inde- 


pendent Campesino and Workers 
Confederation and the Nan de 
Ayala National Coordinator, an 
anti-government peasant organiza- 
tion linked to Mexico's two biggest 
leftist opposition parties. 

Flan de Ayala has successfully 
coordinated dozens of peasant pro- 
tests throughout central and south- 
ern Mexico in recent years. The 
appeal of these opposition organiz- 
ers. some officials acknowledge, 
stems from mourning peasant bit- 
terness at tbe unfulfilled promises 
of government land offices. 

A week rarely passes in Mexico 
Gly without at least one demon- 
stration from the provinces. Last 
month, about 10.000 peasants affil- 
iated with Plan de Ayala chapters 
converged on the capital to publi- 
cize land complaints. 


Gonaalez Sets Policy for Vote onNATO 


Return 

MADRID — Prime Minister Fe- 
lipe Gonzalez of Spain will not ac- 
cept a referendum vote to quit the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion if the turnout is low, according 
to Madrid newspaper reports Tues- 
day. 

Mr. Gonz&lez cited constitution- 
al requirements of a minimum of 


50 percent plus one of the elector- 
ate needed to establish an autono- 
mous regional government. 

“If we achieve what is considered 
an acceptable turnout I will feel 
morally bound." Mr. Gonzalez 
said. Otherwise, he said, he would 
follow a policy that “foresees stav- 
ing in NATO.” 


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Name 


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Grindlays 

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An Invitation 
to Oxford. 

The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytica 
present a Special Conference on 
The International Business Outlook 
Christ Church, Oxford, September 19-21, 1985. 















Page 8 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


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PuLW*«f CTJth The IVw York Thor* tod The Wjwfcingtafl Torn 


Joining in the Slaughter 


h is important to be dear about the Wash* 
ingtoa Post report (IHT, May 131 that a coun- 
tertenor program set up by the United States 
in Lebanon got out of hand and spawned an 
unauthorised car- bomb mission in which more 
than 80 persons were killed; the ostensible 
target was spared. This event was an act of 
terrorism no less horrendous and reprehensi- 
ble than any America intended to counter. 

Fixed from the start on the perils of terror- 
ism. the Reagan administration found its dark- 
est fears confirmed by attacks on Americans in 
Beirut. Ii responded — in the doctrine that 
finally prevailed after a strenuous internal ar- 
gument — with repeated public warnings of its 
in tent to pre-empt and punish the attackers 
even if the evidence was not of courtroom 
quality and even if innocents were endangered.' 

The administration also responded, it now 
turns out, with a CIA program to set up several 
foreign-manned countertenor teams in Leba- 
non. The members of one such team blew up a 
car bomb on March S outside the Beirut house 
of Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah. leader of a 
fundamentalist Shiite group called Hezbollah. 
It was reportedly an unauthorized mission, 
but one wonders whether the killers felt that 
they were unauthorized. The hit squads were 
then reportedly disbanded. 

What remains so distressing is the utter 
predictability of the whole sequence. It took 


no crystal ball to imagine that the operation 
made the United States hostage to people with 
their own ways and priorities. Nor is it a 
surprise that word of a calamity of these 
dimensions eventually leaked. 

. The United States has lost a major part of 
the moral advantage it claimed as a victim and 
enemy of terrorism. It is exposed now to the 
consequences of being seen to have had some 
of its chosen associates attempt an assassina- 
tion and kill many people. U.S. officials link 
the intended victim, with a good deal less than 
courtroom evidence, to a senes of terrible 
attacks, but he is known to many Lebanese as 
their spiritual leader. His help has been sought 
to trace Americans kidnapped in Lebanon. 

Disclosure of the Beirut bombing finds the 
CIA’s congressional overseas caught — not 
for the first time — between sharing responsi- 
bility for a fiasco and acknowledging that their 
oversight was casual. They should have known 
better. The principal responsibility, none- 
theless, falls on a president captivated by 
thoughts of fighting fire with fire. Terrorism is 
a menace, but, even in its extreme Lebanese 
form, it is not the ultimate menace, and a 
democracy must be prepared to accept re- 
straints on its fight against it- To think that the 
United Stales carelessly contributed to the 
genera] slaughter is a source of shame. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Fairer Pay for Women 


In what is billed as a victory for the concept 
of ‘■comparable worth," the city of Los Ange- 
les has agreed to raise the pay of workers in 
municipal jobs traditionally held ty women. 
That probably is a victory for social justice and 
surely is one for common sense. But it is quite 
possible to be pleased by what happened in 
Los Angeles while resisting a far more expan- 
sive definition of comparable worth — a defi- 
nition that has become a divisive distraction 
from the goal of ending job discrimination 
against women sensibly and soon. 

Los Angeles pays clerks and librarians, who 
are mostly women, 10 to 15 percenL less than 
workers in a variety of positions mostly filled 
by men. City officials and the employees' 
union agreed' that the pay gap was unfair to 
women workers. The union might have con- 
vinced a court that the city was illegally dis- 
criminating against women, but. happily, the 
matter has now been settled without litigation 
and at modest cost to the city's taxpayers. 

What does all this have to do with compara- 
ble worth? On average, American women in 
f uU-rime jobs earn about a third less than men. 
Pan of the difference is due to the fact that 
working women tend to be Jess experienced, 
but part is certainly due to discrimination. 

One way some employers discriminate is to 
distinguish between different job categories 
.that demand similar skills, and then channel 
women into the lower-paying category. For 


example, the slate of Washington paid beauti- 
cians who worked in state institutions less than 
barbers. To some people, that kind of discrimi- 
nation is reason enough to demand that em- 
ployers assess all jobs according to skills and 
provide equal pay according to comparable 
worth. But that is just not possible. How would 
one decide whether plumbers should be paid 
more th.™ fire fighters, male or female? Or 
carpenters? Or office managers? 

Yet the underlying problem of discrimina- 
tion linked to job classification endures. The 
best remedy is the one tried in Los Angeles: 
negotiators using common sense to decide that 
there is discrimination and to figure out reme- 
dies. It is an example other unions and enlight- 
ened employers would do well to follow. 

Negotiation is vastly preferable to litigation. 
Courts are ill-equipped to reshape society’s 
entire wage structure according to some vague 
standard of comparable worth. But if negotia- 
tion fails, pay-classification differences have 
to play an important part as courts try to sort 
out inherently messy evidence of discrimina- 
tion on a case-by-case basis. 

As a caricature issue, comparable pay may 
be fodder for entertaining arguments on talk 
shows. But job discrimination against women 
is no caricature. It is time for people of good 
will to get past distracting labels for disenmi- 
nation and get on with correcting it 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A Critical Moment for IFAD 

A quibble over burden-sharing jeopardizes 
the future of the International Fund for Agri- 
cultural Development. Survival of this innova- 
tive fund is important for two reasons. With its 
establishment in 1977, IFAD provided an in- 
ternational foreign aid organization that at- 
tracted for the first time substantial support 
from OPEC. And the fund has filled an impor- 
tant aid gap by targeting its assistance on the 
poorest fanners of the Third World. 

The controversy now centers on OPECs 
declining support. Another effort to resolve it 
will be made at the end of this week at IFAD 
headquarters in Rome. The project may col- 
lapse because of a failure of OPEC to promise 
an adequate level of funds. The OPEC com- 
mitment is still a secret but it is expected to be 
adequate to assure continuation of the pro- 
gram. The real risk is that the United States 
will remain rigid on burden-sharing, and in 
this way kill the organization at the very mo- 
ment when it could play an increasingly im- 
portant role, particularly in Africa. 

— 77ie Los Angeles Times. 

Catholics Heckle the Pope 

It is not Calvinists who are throwing the 
Coke bottles ( metaphorically and perhaps lit- 
erally] at the Popcmobile. but card-carrying 
Roman Catholics. It is evident in Holland that 
the religious and the secular intertwine and 
that a large proportion of the pope's flock (60 
percent in a recent poll) cannot accept all the 
secular implications of his leaching. 

The pope's defenders would say that in 


public matters he is himself a liberation theo- 
logian giving a high priority, many times ex- 
pressed, to the equality of people and their 
emancipation from oppressive systems, wheth- 
er communist or capitalist. It is in matters of 
personal conduct, especially sexual ones, that 
be applies the emphatic veto of the Holy See. 

John Paul is a very centrist pope. Witness 
his imposition of conservative bishops on 
Dutch dioceses which would prefer more radi- 
cal ones. Witness the summonses to errant 
priests and theologians to attend the Vatican 
and explain themselves. The effect of this close 
central direction is that (be scope for move- 
ment is blocked. The Catholic Church allows 
little room for what in political parlance would 
be constitutional change or legislative reform. 

— The Guardian (London). 

A Disastrous Soccer Season 

A huge, black shadow was cast over the final 
full program of the {soccer} season by the 
appalling tragedy at Bradford City and by 
incidents that took place elsewhere. The gov- 
ernment's so-called war cabinet must take ur- 
gent action to remove the curtain of ugliness 
that has been draped across the season and fell 
with sickening finality on the last official day. 

— Stuart Jones in The Times (London). 

The tragic fire at Bradford Gry football 
dub on Saturday is a sad final chapter in a 
disastrous season publicity-wise for English 
football Throughout the season, violence by 
soccer hooligans on the terraces and the streets 
has been occurring at an unprecedented level. 

— The Bangkok Post. 


FROM OUR MAY 15 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1910: Uprisings in the Hats of Spring 
PARIS — While every day sees the birth of 
delightful creations in ihe domain of Fashion, 
it is among the hats that the greatest ingenuity 
is displayed. Black straws have hardly made 
their appearance, and they are already rovered 
with light colon. Can anything prettier be 
seen than this little cloche in light and satiny 
black straw, almost covered with soft uncurled 
feathers of a delicate pink uprising from a 
nest of poppies of the same tender shade? 

Every sort of fantaisie, and every mixture of 
flowers, ribbon and lace is now accepted, pro- 
dded that the result be harmonious. Naturally, 
at this time of the year, flowers inspire the 
happiest combinations. Thus, Fashion offers 
us green roses and black geraniums. 


1935: Filipinos Favor Independence 
MANILA — An overwhelming independence 
vote is recorded in early returns in the plebi- 
scite by which Filipino voters [on May I4J will 
decide whether they favor the constitution for 
the proposed semi-autonomous "Common- 
wealth of the Philippines." Out of the 29 dis- 
tricts in Manila alone, the vole stood at 5,403 
to 106 For the constitution. Independence will 
follow in ten years. The plebiscite was held in 
accordance with the terms laid down by Con- 
gress in approving the Tydings- McDuffie Acu 
which became a law when President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt signed it on March 24, 1934. and 
was accepted by the Philippine Legislature on 
May 1, 1934. Political leaders predict an over- 
whelming vote in favor of the constitution. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, gunma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM 3 PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Depun Pvbiuher 
Associate PMahtr 
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LEE W. HUEBNER, PubBshtr 
Eieaune Editor RENE BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Ethior RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY ...... 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAlSONS Director of Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Duvcstr of Adrertting Sales 
International Herald Tribune. fSl Avenue Giaries-de-Gaullc. 92200 NcmOy-sur-Srine, 

France. TeL: (1)747-1265. Telex: 611718 (HeraW). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Dirraeur de la puNieatien; Water N. Thayer. 

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U.S subscription: 5322 yearly. Second-doss postage paid at Lang Island Oty, N.Y. II 101. 

° 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 



Europe’s Place: Second Rank or Parallel l? 


B RUSSELS — West European 
governments are in a desperate 
muddle over whether to participate 
in President Reagan’s Strategic De- 
fense initiative. As Europeans hem 
and haw over the rival claims of the 
“star wars" research program and 
the French-backed “Eu r eka" plan 
for a wholly European research ef- 
fort, the United States is showing 
signs of impatience. 

Yet for the Europeans there is 
much more at stake than member- 
ship in the newest NATO venture, 
and Americans would do well to 
r emem ber that, Europe's chances of 
dosing the famous technology gap 
that now separates it from the Unit- 
ed States and Japan rely to a large 
extent on the choices that will be 
made over “star wars." 

The Reagan a dminis tration must 
remind itself, throughout the com- 
ing months and perhaps years of 
SDI discussion, that a strong and 
united Europe is much more impor- 
tant to U.S. security than any new 
missile defense system. 

So it is in America’s interest, too, 
that the SDI be tailored to ensure 
that European participants do not 
become US. companies' “subcon- 
tractors" — the word France’s Pres- 
ident Francois Mitterrand swears 
Ronald Reagan uttered to him at 
the recent Bonn economic summit. 

This affair sums up all the accu- 
mulated European resentment over 
the various ways in which the 
NATO alliance has served to enrich 
U.S. defense contractors. 

The “two-way street” policy to 
which Washington has long paid Up 
service, under which US. forces 
were to redprocate by baying Euro- 
pean equipment, has never been 
much more than a joke. The imbal- 
ance on trans-Atlantic arms pur- 
chases is 7-to-l in favor of Ameri- 
can industry, while the justification 

If the SDFs real cost 
turned out to be not 
pist $100- $200 billion 
but a rift in NATO, 
then the price would 
havebeen too high. 


taxpaye 

an unfair share of NATO costs is 
less true now than ever. 

In 1971 the United States con- 
tributed 71 percent of the cost of 
NATO, but lately, with the Europe- 
ans spending more than $19 billion 
a yea.- on maintaining their 85 to 90 
percent of the alliance’s peacetime 
conventional forces, the balance has 
improved so that the United Slates 
pays for 66 percent and the Europe- 
ans for 34 percenL That 2-to-I rela- 
tionship scarcely justifies the one- 
way street in arms procurement, 
while in military research and devel- 
opment the unbalance is about 3-to- 
1 in favor of the United States. 

But these purely military figures 
are not the Europeans' real wony. 
What most concerns them is the 
market dominance in key industries 
that a lead in defense technology so 
often affords. American mastery in 
the civil aviation and computer in- 
dustries, for instance, is widely as- 
cribed by Europeans to NATO pro- 
curement policies of 25 years ago. 

The French are the first to make 
that point, having built up Europe's 
strongest arms industry as a direct 
result of Genera] de Gaulle's with- 
drawal from the NATO military 
framework. Speaking of France’s 
solo development of its nuclear de- 
terrent, Bertrand Goldschmidt of 
the French atomic energy commis- 
sion has commented: “We had to 
learn how to bnild a pressurized 
water reactor ourselves — and one 


By Giles Merritt 


of the results is that 55 percent 
of France's dcctririw is now pro- 
duced from nuclear power.” 

It is precisely the ovfl appheatioa 
of SDl-related research that is 
preoccupying European experts in 
fields far removed from the popular 
concept of “star wars" and its 
space-borne warfare. Computer, la- 
ser and particle beam technologies 
w3L of course, be given a major 
boost, but by-products may also in- 
clude early cancer detection, genetic 
defects screening, an end to add 
rain and parasite control that could 
bdp beat Third World famine. 

Small wonder that most Eort 
an governments do not know if i 
can best avoid becoming second- 
class citizens in this new era of re- 

Welcome 
Into This 
Complex! 

By Richard Reeves 

P ARIS — Ji is almost 25 years 
since Dwight D. Eisenhower 
left thep residency with this warn- 
ing: “This conjunction of an im- 
mense military establishment 9n r l 
a large aims industry is new in 
American experience. In the coun- 
cils of government, we must guard 
against the acquisition of unwar- 
ranted influence, whether sought or 
unsought, by the military-industrial 
complex . . . We should rak«* noth- 
ing for granted.” 

We have let our guard down. The 
councils of government have been 
compromised. Elected politicians 
haw been “bought" during those 25 
years. Military bases and arms fac- 
tories have been deliberately dis- 
tributed across America to provide 
payrolls in important political dis- 
tricts. Congressmen have found 
themselves in the position of voting 
not for or against dubious weapons 
but for or against jobs back home. 

Having won in ihe United States, 
the generals and the chairmen and 
their current chief representative. 
President Reagan, are going inter- 
national with the same old pork- 
barrel strategy. The president came 


search by negotiating a good deal 
with the Uni red States or by joining 
in the still rather vague European 
Research Coordination Agency, or 
Eureka, that France’s Foreign Min- 
ister Roland Dumas has described 
as “a vast long-range civilian pro- 
gram with nrihtary projections. 

The Reagan administration did 
nothing to woo the Europeans when 
Secretary of Defense Caspar Wein- 
berger appeared to issue a 60-day 
ultimatum in nrid-Aprti. 

While the Europeans vacillate, 
Washington has failed to reassure 
them on two other SDI worries. 

The first is the Europeans’ fear 
that present U-S. technology em- 
bargoes may be just the thin edge of 
the wedge. Washington's preoccu- 


pation with alleged Soviet pirating 
of defense secrets via European sup- 
pliers is beginning to touch some 
very raw political nerves here. Not 
long ago, CIA Director William Ca- 
sey reportedly told a conference of 
British computer executives. “We 
have got enough on you all to clap 
most of you in irons. 

The second problem is that the 
French and British nuclear arsenals 
risk being made obsolete. 

The ambiguous noises that the 
main NATO allies have been mak- 
ing about the SDI should be taken 
seriously by Washington. There is 
much to be said for a parallel Euro- 
pean effort If the SDFs real cost 
turned out to be not just $100-5200 
billion but a rift in NATO, then the 
price would have been too high. 

International Herald Tribune. 




pan and Israel That is the essence 
of his administration's proposal to 
subcontract SDI research in 18 oth- 
er countries. Those countries are 
bang pulled into the American mil- 
itary-industrial complex. 

ft is a brilliant strategy' to drain 
more and more of U.S. GNP into 
the Pentagon and the great defense 
corporations, beginning with Gen- 
eral Dynamics and General Elec- 
tric, LTV and TRW, by using $26 
billion in “star wars" research to 
expand the defense jobs constituen- 
cy into whole new countries. Some- 
time in the future a congressman 
tempted to vote against some mili- 
tary expenditure wiD have to answer 
not only to the management and 
unions of his local ammunition fac- 
tory but also to groups interested in 
Israel or Britain or the Netherlands. 

On “star wars" itself, that timid 
congressman already mil be faced 
with the fait accompli that voting 
against the program will be voting 
against allies that have agreed to 
take American research dollars. 
Many of America's allies — starling 
with Britain, the Netherlands and 
West Germany — already seem pre- 
pared to sign on ihe dotted line, 
Leaders of those countries and 
others, many of them skeptical 


about the practicality or wisdom of 
“star wars." are under pressure 
from their industrialists and from 
the local representatives of Ameri- 
can defense multinationals. “Star 
wars'* is taking on a life and mo- 
mentum of its own in Europe — 
momentum less and less related to 
the military merits of the thing. 

Mr. Reagan, in fact, has done a 
better selling job on “star wars" 
overseas than at home. The two 
campaigns are related- Foreign de- 
fense research is hardly essential to 
the United States, but the commit- 
ment of foreign leaders will be an 
extremely useful tool to pry dollars 
loose from the big domestic market 

Congress will have to vote to 
spend hundreds of billions of dol- 
lars that Americans will be paying 
in taxes just to see whether space 
defense is even feasible. 

The chief salesman in Europe has 
been James A. Abrahamson, an air 
force general and director of the 
Pentagon's SDI office, who has 
been crisscrossing the continent 
talking to politicians and business- 
men. He learned his business on a 
smaller scale by delivering $2.5 bil- 
lion to the Netherlands, Belgium, 
Denmark and Norway to manufac- 
ture components for the F-16 fight- 
er plane. It should come as no sur- 


OCK. 


prise that those four countries are 
increasingly interested in the wel- 
fare of U.S. defense contractors. 
They are now paid members of the 
military-industrial constituency. 

This time General Abrahamson’s 
mission is much more significant, 
and be has been using the addition- 
al argument that if the Europeans 
do not go along with Pentagon 
plans, they 1 risk falling ever farther 
behind in the high-tech worlds of 
fifth-generation computers, artifi- 
cial intelligence, lasers, optics and 
new metals. The theory being ped- 
dled is that military activity ts pri- 
marily responsible for technological 
advance — an idea that seems con- 
tradictory to both Japanese experi- 
ence and Mr. Reagan's conviction 
that government contributes noth- 
ing to human progress. 

But now it is being said that such 
progress depends on what would 
almost certainly become the largest 
government-driven project of all 
time. Thai is ironic in more ways 
than one, because no one, including 
Mr. Reagan, has the vaguest idea of 
whether “star wars" can work — 
work as a defense, that is. It already 
seems to be working quite well for 
the people President Eisenhower 
warned us about 25 years ago. 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


When Maturity Comes Late, Put Off College Study 


N EW YORK — This is a pivotal 
time in the lives of millions ol 
American adolescents and their 
enis. It is that time of year when tig 
school seniors find out where 
have been accepted for college anc 
parents discover what it will cost 
to send them there. In most cases 
the four-year bill will ran between 
520,000 for the cheapest state col- 
leges and nearly 570,000 at the most 
expensive private ones. Faced with 
such burdens, parents have every rea- 
son to ask: Is it worth it? 

It is. most parents would probably 
agree, if their children are willing to 
study. But learning requires motiva- 
tion, self-discipline, enthusiasm for 
learning and a capacity for sustained 
attention — in a word, maturity. And 
today’s parents have sound reasons 
to suspect that their 18-year-old, no 
matter how bright, torts the maturity 
for serious college study. 

Unfortunately there are no Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Tests for measuring 
maturity. Physically today’s adoles- 
cents mature faster than theii parents 
did. They also exhibit a superficial 
knowledge of sex a nd other “adult" 
experiences. But in matters of emo- 
tional development — the ability to 
set one's own goals, to tolerate frus- 
tration, to postpone gratification, to 
take responsibility for others, to be 
curious about people, events or ideas 
that are older than yesterday — to- 
day’s students are significantly less 
mature than their parents and grand- 
parents were at the same age. 

The reasons are not difficult to 
discover. As the life expectancy of 
Americans has increased, so has 
preparation for adulthood. In a soci- 
ety that is taking longer to grow old, 
the young are taking longer to grow 
up. Therapists and learners today- 
find that 18-year-olds experience 
problems of independence, motiva- 
tion and social adaptation once en- 
countered at an earlier age. 

College students are adolescents. 
Like ail adolescents, they live body 
and soul in the presenL They are 
preoccupied with what makes them 
feel good — like music *— and with 
how they get along with peers. Given 


By Kenneth L Woodward and Arthur Kornaber world outside the youth culture. One 

^ wav fA armw/P Inis wnnlri ifimrioh 


the option, they tend to choose col- 
leges that they think wiD satisfy those 
emotional and social needs. 

Education begins to happen only 
after they learn to transcend those 
concerns — to postpone pleasure, 
step outside the self, imagine an adult 
future, set goals and go after them. 
Many undergraduates never do. 

Some merely drift. Often enough it 
is the wisest students who drop out of 
college for a time in order to “find” 
or catch up with themselves. 

We should not blame adolescents 
for not being adults. To become 
adults the young need to be arcumd 
adults, but today’s adolescents have 
Tew adnlts in their lives. Our research 
shows that few adolescents enjoy reg- 
ular and intimate contact with grand- 
parents or annts and uncles. And 
with more and more mothers taking 


jobs — often to pay for college ex- 
penses- — adolescents see a great deal 
less of their parents as welL 
In a society that is profoundly seg- 
regated by age, an isolated youth cul- 
ture now Tills the gap between puber- 
ty and postponed adulthood. 

It is not surprising, therefore, that 
the first two years of college have 
come to resemble the last two years of 
. school minus parents or rules, 
lescents are expected to go to 
college, if at all possible, and college 
of some kind is available to almost 
any high school graduate. Bold are 
the parents who refuse to send their 
children to college until they are ma- 
ture enough to do the work. 

It is time to change that system 
to fit the real needs of the young. 
America’s young have great vitality, 
idealism and a need to discover the 


way to achieve this woald be through 
a year or two of mandatory public 
service — in the military, domestic 
volunteer programs or overseas pro- 
grams like the Peace Corps. 

The purpose would be to provide 
adolescents with opportunities to 
work cooperatively tor others, learn 
self-management, become involved 
with people of other classes, ages and 
backgrounds, develop forms of self- 
esteem that are not tied to classroom 
performance. In short, grow up. 

It is time America adjusted its sys- 
tem of higher education to match the 
facts of prolonged maturation. Col- 
leges should be places of intellectual 
excitement and growth, not expen- 
sive preserves for the young. 

The writers are the authors of 
'‘Grandparents/ Grandchildren: The 
Vitai Connection . " They contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


Once Again 
'The Jews’ 

Are Blamed ■ 

* 

By Marvin Kalb 

W ashington — The cuniw* 

versy over the Reagan visit to 1.’ 
Bitburg is rec edin g, no longer a front- ^ . 
page embarrassment. But do you \ . 
hear on echo from the post? ! 

1 visited the cemetery the morning 
after President Reagan and Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl placed wreaths of ■ 
reconciliation in front of its chapel. 

For vears the cemetery had been 
largely ignored; now it was an instant • 
shnne. a focus of political debate. 

Small flower pots marked many flat 
graves. 49 of them honoring Waffen 
SS troops. By the end of my visit 
many hundreds of Germans and oc- .■ * 

casional Americans from the nearby * 

U.S. Air Force base paused before 
Lhe wreaths. Some took pictures. ; 1 
Mothers hushed children. A religious,^ 
air seemed to saturate the scene. , 

Bui look and listen*. All around 
there were the rights and sounds of -• 
the new Gennanv — and the old. Six 




We Germans and 
Americans had been 
cooperating very wed 
until thejeics began 
to make trouble.' 


feet to the left of Mr. Reagan's ( 
wreath stood an equally impressive 
one. Across its banner; “To the Waf- 
fen SS who fell at Leningrad." No 
more than a fool to the right of Mr. 
Kohl's was another wreath; “For the 
fallen comrades of the Waffen SS." 

These two wreaths had been placed 
in thechapeL out of sight, a few hours 
before President Reagan arrived. 
They were restored to their original 
places of honor only hours after he 
lefL In the ensuing tranquillity, the 
Waffen SS could again be honored in 
the springtime sun. 

A middle-aged visitor from Nu- 
remberg said ttuu the Waffen SS were 
simply soldiers, young conscripts do- < 
ing their duty, “Let them rest in 
peace. For us, a dead soldier is a dead 
soldier, not a hero." 

A native of Bilburg, who looked to 
be in his 20s, expressed a view I was 
to hear with disturbing regularity. 
**We Germans and Americans had 
been cooperating very well" — - he 
lowered ms voice — “until the Jews 
to make trouble." 

>th« Bitburger zeroed in on 
Elie WieseL “Imagine the nerve of 
a Jew lecturing President Reagan. . 

I saw him on television, making trou- - 
He the way they all do." 

An old woman complained that 
President Reagan bad spent only 
eight minutes at the cemetery. “You ^ 
know why the visit had to be cuff 
back? Because of the Jews." She 
stalked away to join a group of 
friends nodding in agreement 

A man with a cane stopped and 
said: “If they don’t like it here, the 
Jews, let them go away. We were 
better off without them in Germany." 
There are only 28,000 left, he was 
reminded. “Too many," he repfted 

The people of Bitinxrg are pleased 
that Mr. Reagan came to visit, that be 
did not yield to pressure. But it is 
clear that they resent their new noto- 
riety — and clear whom they consid- 
er responsible for the unwelcome 
change: the Jews and the media. 

Jews are seen as a group separate 
from Germans and Americans —an 
indigestible lump, a foreign body. , 
The media are seen as intrusive and ; 
irresponsible and, somehow, con- 
trolled by the Jews. 

So it went A few days later a j 
Munich newspaper editor explained ; 
that anti-Semitism is an “antitropo- , i 
logical phenomenon" in Gennaoy^l (j 
The controversy scans wily to have ; | 

uncorked the venom once agpin. 

There is a sad irony. Bitburgen.' ’ 
regard themselves as enligfatnied. In 
1933, when Hitler won a critical elec- 
tion, this conservative Catholic town ■ 
voted overwhelmingly against him. 

Is Bitbuig an aberration? ft is inn.- 
possible to judge and dangerous to 
generalize. But a n umb er of leading 
West German politicians and profesi 
sots — several dose to Mr. Kohl fr.', 
think anti-Semitism was on the rise ; 
before Bilburg. “The Jews were get- - 
ting too impertinent," a potiticiaa’ 
said, citing, among other things, op-, 
position to West German tank sales 
to Saudi Arabia. “We’ve listened to 
them much loo long, ft’s enough." Jf 

The pursuit of recondliariop by- 
way of Bilburg has been a faQnre.'; 
Reconciliation is a long process, not a 
photo opportunity. Bilburg tilled the 
scab on dark corners of recent Gtf-' 
man history. There is a time to know 
when to leave well enough alone. '' 

The writer is an NBC News corre- 
spondent He contributed this comnent 
to The New York Tunes. 


11,'--- 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nicaragua Like Cuba 

It is difficult to determine who be- 
gan the dispute between the United 
Slates and Nicaragua, but now any 
possibilities of agreement have been 
disrupted by the trade embargo im- 
posed by Was 


l/ashington. As in Cuba 25 
years ago, the intransigence of the 
U.S. government wiD push the San- 
dinists into Russian bands. 

J.M. del CANO BARBON. 

Pamplona, Spain. 

Haven’t we seen this somewhere 
before? In 1959 a new Cuba emerged 
from revolution and was not pro- 
Soviet. But a poor and war-tom 
country needs help, and when they 
could not get it from the United 
States the Cubans took it from Rus- 
sia. Could it really be argued that the 
hard-line U.S. pidicy against Cuba 
lessened Soviet influence on that is- 
land? The opposite proved true. 

If the United States wishes to end 
Soviet expansion in its “backyard" ir 
must wake up to the reality that the 


if-not-for-us-tben-against-us logic is 
too simplistic a basis for policy-mak- 
ing. The Nicaraguans are not Com- 
munist pawns of the Soviets. They 
have expressed a desire for coopera- 
tion ancf trade with the United States. 
Their crime is to demand dignity and 
sovereignty in these relations. 

The lesson of Cuba is the real dom- 
ino theory; Countries will turn to the 
Soviets when the alternative is drop- 
ping to their knees and facing Wash- 
ington. If this domino falls, let (here 
be no question as to who pushed it. 

CARYNATHENSON. 

Vienna. 

Tlie Boys’ Own Fault 

Regarding “ Centra l Issues for Los- 
ers in Life’s Uneven Lottery” (April 
30) by George F. Will: 

For a decade I was privileged to 
contribute time to an outstanding in- 
stitution, Bethcsda Lutheran Home 
in Watertown, Wisconsin, in which 
persons handicapped by brain injury 
are treated as individuals with dig- 


nity. It is natural that George Will 
is angered when officials make state- 
ments that place his child outside ihe 
community — in effect blaming the 
handicapped for their condition 

However, for five years Mr. Will has 

been a major Reagan supporter. IT he 
is honest with himself, fie wilj find it 
difficult to see where ihe Reagan ad- 
ministration has ever shown empathy 
for the disadvantaged. 

OWEN MILLER, M.D. 
Waukesha, Wisconsin. 

It too, have a son boro on his 
father’s birthday. Unlike Mr. Will’s 
boy, Michael was born without any 
viable defects. The horrible blow 

came last year, when he was 10 , in the 

form of a brain tumor, ft turned out 
that Michad was fortunate. The tu- 
mor was benign and was successfully 
removed during a 614-hour operation 
But his suffering was intense and I 
am wondering what awful thinpc jj e 
did to bring it on himself . . . 

No further comment wflT be made 
on the two Education Department 


officials' sickening ideas. You could J 
not print the words I would use. -j ; f 

HARRY PRYPLESH. - 
Malaga, Spain, j"- 1 

Other Gorman Registers ; . ] 

In “German Resisters Should B* 5, I 
Honored. Too” (May 2). Franc ir j 
ktewfitiheiffi omits a brave grot?* •• 
called the White Rose. Sophie and; j 
Hans Scheij, Alexander Schmortf ■ ; 
and six other Munich University sto;-- ; 
dents were seized in 1943 and 
cd for distributing anti-Nazi leaflet ! 

T. VARSAVSKY. 7 j 

Femey- Voltaire, France-..- 1 


Letters intended for pvbticaiion 
should be addressed “Letters to did 
Editor" and must contain the writ-. 
efs signature, name and fid! tdfi ; 
“ ri3S - Tetters should be biief and 
ore subject to editing, We cannot - 
be responsive for the return of . 
unsolicited manuscripts. 





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' INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 

ARTS /LEISURE 

The Musical Legacy of Django Reinhardt 

By Michael Zwcrin himself "Wa mo’s ambassador to after having heard the melody ofljy play the guitar all over again while 
imematonoi Herald Tribune ttoNejheriaius.” once,or improvise a reasonable busking m the cafte. He dragged 


Page 9 


By Michael Zwcrin himself “Pjacgtfs ambassador to 
International Herald Tribme the Netherlands" 

A MSTERDAM — Jos Linssep Celebrating Django has brcome 
Ends h difficult to explain why a year-roraid event. A manddmist, 
he spends so much .■mare tinw. nm- David Gnsmaa, brought the 

■gjgagggga 

in Django, ms flambovant sm&r- Ranhardt led atong with the vio- 


■ aMMTEuwHmu&mtB 
BURK? WKMW&! REALLY? 
n^mimtep* ubll.you 
. / COULPPOA 

ior-ior~ ■. 


aljcr, - 

ELMON& 

VBWHSm. 

/ 


sfsvemnE 
im.wc&euT 
fMGermemx) 
QW-fORim 
- STREET. 


Django ReinhardL considered by mass aumence m me ivbul jazza 
many critics the only non-Ameri- * string group in I the style 

can in the pantheon of. jazz greats, of the qirinte^ was fonnedm New 
was bom 75years ago Jersey ^st November A band 

1910. and died on May 16, 1953. 

Modeled after an association actiw ^ around Yori ^ A ? 
in Holland for three years, a fisa ? ,e . J 

Django Reinhardt Sotietyis being &rdh ia^reae, has 

inaugurated in New Yoric this week ^ .wummg. rave reviews from 


substitute if he had never heard it the two crippled fingers along the 
at alL He had an instinctive swing strings, invented unorthodox voic- 
and was playing jazz before he ever ings, including octaves with the 
heard the word. He switched to thumb, developing a style that is 
guitar, turned professional at the still copied today, 
age of 14, and accompanied accor- But if he did not fed like playing 
dkmists and xylophone wizards in music he would play cards or fish, 
dubs and theaters. contract or no contract Towards 

At the age of 18, resembling an the end of his life, he won the 
oriental prince, he fed in love with departmental billiard champion- 
fcnnusmes and convinced chauf- dnp for Samois. Although be was a 
feurs to rent them to him on crediL champi o n billiard player, he tost 
He practiced walking like George heavily betting on himself because 
Raft He would disappear for days preferred to play champions to 


^Tneriean rririra Last 


□ Q 


to c&bnue these occasions. ^aam catt * Oast wart Kod 

Lmssen, 46, the secretary of the Fesoval mcluded * ~»n to 
Netheriands brant* of the Hot Django” mOmuffleHaR. And Sa- 
aub de France, is snpemsor for moiwnr-SaneCn^JFtmtMe- 
the postal system in t£e soutton *“*“2 

Dutch province of Gdderiand. He honore the master with a 

owns 750 Remhaith recordings, in- y“riyfestxval m bis name (June 22- 
dnding private acetates and air . j. . 


shoLs. Tbe dub has 275 members, Rdnhardt began busking with a 
publishes a quarterly newsletter bamomPansranmarimtsalthe age 
and organizes conceits. He calls of 10. Soon he could ptey a request 


Raft He would disappear for days be preferred to play champions to 
with his Gypsy “brothers." He uy and prove be was the very best, 
spent a tot of time in billiard par- In the mid-1930s he grew from a 
tors. Just before leaving for Lon- cult hero to a star when he formed 
don to work with Jack Hylton, a the quin id with Grappelli. Soon 
popular British bandleader who man y other European countries 

i u_ J , ■ 


mois-sur-Sedne (near Fontaine- 
bleau), where Reinhardt finished 
bis life, honors the master with a 


played 1 
style of 


jnic jazz," in the bad a chamber jazz string group 
Whiteman, Rein- like theirs. As his star grew 


baxdi's caravan burned and the brighter, his price went up. Bui 
pinky and ring-finger of his fret- money came so effortlessly, be 
board hand were permanently par- could not lake it seriously, ft was 
alyzed. almost like stealing, playing the 

After a year’s convalescence, he guitar was so easy. lie kept his 
went to the Riviera and learned to cash in a wad, had no bank ac- 



r- 


Fading snapshot of Django Reinhardt at age 14. 


streets and his posters were on the lucrative time surviving while play- 

count, signed no checks. He could walls of Paris. The Occupation was ing ihe music the enemy hated, 

barely write his name and could the apex of his career. Charles De- R . uttowA from wmM 

we. ^ri u. ur_ U.4 J. H ?L2? irends. After the liberation, when 


Hopkins as Evil Newspaper OumerRuns Away With ' Pravda 9 


ti >nd*t n >uhL' 

T ONDON — Sina 

::vs j., iij- Wf , -A-' with large casts; 

- .... Mr. t Jb themes are an ir 

. 1 -/ v r ! 1 . J u* °Nb if species, we oorfit to 

T> V. h khhw i, T iKp XT OlnnM 


j t>n ^ r ' ■wticr “Tdi, me iNanonai s xmvier siagc wna open antis, maa mem uuo one iwo-aci piay unougn 
; cK Jt LouiQj.' David Hare as director and co-anthor has winch a coherent pattern of political and 
■j- • i:: ' i .“.'i ivuiit^. come up with a blazrngjythea&ical event, in social awfulness will be seen to emerge, the 

i a U UT ok i wi “ cb Anthony Hopkins gives* the scenery- authors have taken on rather more than even 

, 1 ‘* ,!K *■'*'' >>< ihc Vi'vk; chewing pafonnanoe af hxs career. their broad canvas can encompass. More- 

*" Cv !u -’‘*!Cai!tvtu J j(y l ^ As a production, “Pravda” works wander- : \ovra; Le Roux occupdesso much of their time 

^j f5i • , v.jvj.out 1 ,f s , g j u _,> fully; I am not so sore about it as a play. On and attention that Ins various opponents. 


By Sheridan Modcy • . 

. . International If mid Tribune 

J ONDON — Since broad-scale new {days 
* with large casts and about cointempor- 
th ernes are an increasingly endangered 
species, we onrfit to welcome “Pravda” on 
the NathmaTs Ofirier stage with qjen arms. 


this character, Lambert Le Roux, runs away 
with “Pravda." 

1 In recalling most of the major Fleet Street 
events of the past decade (the takeovers by 
fbreigh proprietors, dismissals of editors, 
.wars over bmgo, ration chaos) and trying to 
meld them into cate two-act play through 


not disgrace a vintage Hollywood thriller, musical production than this in the rest of 
Jennifer Piercey as the t«*m doctor, Ptity ’85, we snail be more than lucky. 

James as the sponsor and Josette Simon as □ 

the star remner give three of the best female It is tmlikdy that Hampstead wm ever get 
performances m town and if the play often ^oser to community tt reti pr than in its pro- instrument playing, the instrument (by raising his price), and there was senes of concerts with Duke El ling- 
appears to have been not so much written as production, “Gertrude Stan mid a Coin- no longer exists, Django swallowed never a smidgeon of suspicion of ton. he was not well received by the 

overheard in the locker rooms this in no way ^ two-character show by the ha long lime ago .” 1 The poet Jean collaboration. Jazz was theoretical- critics. He never learned to be com- 

de tracts from its admittedly soap-operatic ^te Win Wells, Stein and the redoubtable Cocteau called him a “proud hunt- ly banned and he was a Gypsy at a f unable with either bebop or the 

but still strong narrative Kite. Alice B. Toklas reflect cm their remarkable ed beast." nme when Gypsies were bring electric guitar. His career deierio- 

□ Parisian °ni At the be ginning of the Nazi Oe- killed in the camps by the Nazis, rated until he died of a cerebral 

rv n-nAir a . t w AliMst flH the TOwdients for a Fe*mle cupation, people were humming Reinhardt became a folk hero by hemorrhage while fishing in ihe 

Lon don and New Yoric over the last five Oliver Hardy of the partnership, a moon- 

years, the chamber version at the New Half tainously framy dragon who apjrars to be -r -« <r • t j 1 * im Tb • 

Moon Theatre in Stepney Green is far and lira dominant partner until you realize mid- * | C| I Jl" la WlnVUlO' In^RMPfl I 

away the most exciting and best conceived. If way through the ewaung that the waspish J.O -IS iTAllYlllgj lUCOlUiCU J. CAOO llGYViiG 

is directed by Christopher Bond, whose orig- Toklas was her publisher, agent and puppet- 

inal stage wia ptatirm erf the melodrama was mistress for nearly half a century. p APSULE reviews of movies recently released in ancient, overcrowded cities but in a well-ordered, 

what Sondheim based his musical on. Bond in Soma Fraser’s production the casting is V-/ the United States; American cleanliness that is supposed to be n«t to 

has now pulled “Sweeney” away from the as perfect as you could hope: Miriam Mar- Horton Foote’s “1918," directed by Ken Harrison, Godliness. But Foote s characters absorb its , effots 
^^ 3 ^rfDnpL^.»*ayftom s .„*. ™u cmier sage se^Tl«^«Ssl ifSSlt film end) one ' 9 ' 8 n ' 

the operatic excesses of Lincoln Center, and uririle Natasha Morcan buzzes around her as its- rTnrthm arhra it n*w*ic in be a movrnp. Hallie Foote, the daughter of Horton, in her first 


Mfetro all his life because he bad de France at the lime, rnnem- x e heard Cha rtie Parker and D^v 
trouble identifying ihe stations. bered: “He was as popular as Mau- 

One crilic desenbed his playing: rice ClKvalier." He l£d lop billing 
“a disembodied spirit, bounding, ra lavish cabaret reviews, ate in the J * JSi^ihrtSr ^ * 

going wherever it pleases without best restaurants, staved at the best can kecp up W1U1 uiera " 

. J. . _*r_* -1 A 1.1 T. t_ . _1 J r-_ v__ 141 U ...U — L . — .L. 


ever finding the slightest obstacle bolds. Although he played for Ger- 
to its fantasy. ... It is not the mans, he avoided touring Germany 


j for Ger- In 1946. when he went to the 
Germany United States for the first time for a 
there was series of concerts with Duke Elling- 


•*111:4 . iv.r-.-j ,v. .if sidiLih: fully: I am not so sure about it as a play. On 
' «ai Rnca > 0116 lcvB ^ ^ wonld appear to be ihe tmrfoad 

' " !r r “ A «‘!ic 


THE LONDON STAGE 


-pskte vettion of Tom 


■l v'.,|||V 


Day," another look at 


anTs “Nr 
curious wi 


even in such strong performances as those of 
Tim Mchmemy as the young editor on the 
make and Basil Henson as the old one ot the 
way out, become mere shadows for Hopkins 
to box out of existence. There is just no 
contest here; nor is there much debate on. 
why the British press is so often inclined to 


■•1 i( l UlUvU VMUW iVA. 

. i .. 'E r -But where Stoppard was f 
s ' w “ r - a reasoned Shavian debate a: 


co-wnter, 


bitchy and orten wildly tunny evening that 
red to stage should be shown to anyone planning to buy a 
Fleet Street paper; whether from anewsstand or from the 
ress, it’sjust proprietor. . 
fare and Ms ^ 


Of the four productions I have seen of Almost all the ingredients for a female 
Stephen Sondheim’s “Sweeney Todd” in literary “odd couple" are here. Stein is the 
Lon don and New Yoric over the last five Oliver Hardy of the partnership, a moun- 
years, the chamber version at the New Half tainously funny dragon who appeara to be 
Moon Theatre in Stepney Green is far »md the dominant partner until you realize mid- 
away the most exdtmgandbestcoobetved.lt way through the evening that the waspish 
is derated by Qriistopher Bond, whose orig- Toklas was her publisher, agent and poppet- 
mal stage «wiaptatirtn of the mrin d ffmin was mistress for nearly half a century, 
what Sondheim based his musical on. Bond In Swnia Fraw’t pm dnrfinm the rasring is 

has now pufled “Sweeney” away from the as perfect as you could hope: Miriain Mar- 
vast open spaces of Drury Une, away from goyles, vast gn *i tented, sits center stage 
the operatic excesses of Lincoln Center, and while Natasha Morgan buzzes around her as 
back to where it belongs as an East London the infini tely bitchier Alice, forever com- 


C APSULE reviews of movies recently released in 
the United States: 


cat-throat caper. The more I see of scaled- plairnn 
-down Sondheim, the more I begin to thmk saintly 


about Hemingway or biting the 
m ds that aided her last years in a 


his original producer, Hal Prince, was per- convent (“The trouble with the Sisters of the 
baps unwise to surround Mm with huge sets Precious Blood is that there is prerions little 
and Broadway budgets. to do”). Though it was Stein who wrote 


finds its rhythm, when it reveals itself to be a moving, name rooie ' uie 
KSlS. says Vincent Canby ofThe n5 

York Times. In the early autumn of 1918, the citizens performarice ' smmg bu 1 “ ntained 
of Harrison, Texas, are doing their patriotic best to 

protect the home front from the Kaiser's fiendish George Stevens (1904-1975) came up through the 

Hollywood ranks, worked as a gag writer for Laurel 

MfVVTF MAROlfFF, and Hardy, and later directed westerns, comedies, 

U musicals, comedies, romantic dramas, even a biblical 

hordes 5,000 miles to the northeast. Horace Robedaux epic. “George Stevens: A Film Maker's Journey” is a 
(William Convetse-Roberts) has committed his $4,000 splendid, nearly two-bour documentary produced, 
fortune to the latest Liberty Bond drive. Having a written and directed by George Stevens Jr., writes 
wife, Elizabeth (Hallie Foote), and a 3-year-old Vincent Canby of The New York Tunes. He calls this 
daughter, Horace has not felt free to sign up. Brother “one of the best studies of the work of a single director 
(Matthew Broderick). Elizabeth’s 17-year-old brother, that exists on film." Stevens uses extensive dips from 


• - Louise Page's “Golden Girls," about Broadway budgets. _ to do}. Though il was Stein who wrwe 

*' 1 v - te- rapid-fire sketches from Fleet Street life are which I raved when it opened at Stratford “Sweeney” wmks wonderfully here pre- TokWs antotnognmhy for to, it was Tok- 
r*' .ir'-.f. presumably meant to wede toward anindkt- last summer, is now in the London repertoire dsdy because nobody in the andknee is jas who moutlivnig Stem by 20 yea rs had the 

meat of modem journalism; : of the Baittcan Pit. It sedns to have lost more than a few feet away from the barber’s last word on ahnosi evCTythin&, from the 

'■'•v’v About halfway through an inventive but somethingm thcxransfer, thoagh it may only chair or the stench of Mrs. Lovetts human awful Stem family to the aollaness ftcas- 
“c: diffuse evening, however, the authors seem be that we no longer get the athletes running ' jaes. And never has the great score been sung 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


to have realized that their central character, arotmd.us, which at Stratford gave theamh- with such intelligence, clarity and love as by 
1 ! ^ the wonderfully evil proprietor, is more in- ence the marvelous feeling of being in the this cast of ten and orchestra of five. The tafe 

• i uiguing, more d ramatic and more fun than center of their tra±. But this Is not just a of blood and murder and fire comes up 


• !- • 1 anything they have to say about the people 

• : and papers be has bought. Just as Richard III 

t. K 'j. ce overshadows and obhtexates the history that 
■■■>■’ < :!u his supposed to lx going on around him, so 


play about Olympic running; Page can hold 
together half a dozen character studies of 


pies. And never has the neat score been sung sosshewas eventually forced to sell in order 
with such intelligence, clarity and love as by 10 P*y ^ OT Stein’s books, 
this cast of ten and orchestra of five. The tale In another existence they could have taken 

of blood and minder and fire comes up to the mnac-hahs as Got and Alice and 
looking fresh and stnnningly powerful, no- made their fortunes; as it is, this is a two- 
wbere more than m the ending, which Bond character cabaret of their lives, put together 


daughter, Horace has not felt free to sign up. Brother “one of the best studies of the work of a single director 
(Matthew Broderick). Elizabeth’s 17-year-old brother, that exists on film." Stevens uses extensive clips from 
has flunked out of college and spends most of his time films including “Alice Adams” (1935); “Swing Time” 
at the movies. Striking with an awful, sudden random- (1936). possibly the best of the Fred Asiaire-Gmger 
TTp<t« is the influenza epidemic that in a Few months Rogers musicals; "Gunga Din" (1939); “Woman of 

— • J 5 t j .1 J t.». III— rho MQ17V “CK-tn*" HQtlV nn/t “Thi» fiimlMt 


girls running for the gold while poshing has slightly reshaped to return it to its Vic- with a wonderful and unmissable mix of love carried off 20 million people around the world. It’s like the Year" (1942); “Shane” (1953); and “The Greatest 


along a story of dings and defeat that would torian theatrical origins. If we get a better and cynicism. 


a medieval plague that breeds not in the squalor of Story Ever Told" (1965). 




.. ,■ .*-• *:*: 
-hr: : .Vs 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TWBUNE 
sraciAL REPraos 
1965 

One sure- way c£ getting your message International Herald Tribune Special Re- 
across to a third ofamlllion dedaoQ-makers ports. Ibe following Rqpoats are scheduled 
in government, business and finance in 164- for 1985, with topics and dales, of course, 
countries around the wodd is to advertise in subject to modification. 


MAY - 

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United Arab Emirates 
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Aviation . . 
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Thricey 
Portugal 
Travel in France 


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Bmking&Hnance 
in Luxembourg 
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-Sweden 

Banking & Rnance 

inBmam 

JULY 

Korea 

Venezuela 

TravdinAria 


Banking & Rnance 
in Nordic Countries 
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in Anth. Countries 
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Hong Kong 
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SmnTl Computers 




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Real Estate 
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Tbirnmaritoie 
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Convention ; 
Farihtks 




Caribbean/ Central 
American 
Devdcpment 




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Page 10 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAX 15, 1985 


insights 


John Paul II: a Pope 
Determined to Lead 


By EJ. Dionne Jr. 


Tfac- York Tima Service 


R OME — Pope John Paul II is fond of the 
word “contradictions.” It is a useful 
word to describe not only the church he 
leads, but who he is, bow he thinks and what he 
does. 

One cannot understand the pope apart from 
his native Poland. Yet nothing rankles the pope 
or his supporters more than the tendency la 
reduce him to his Polishncss. 

Although be rejects the dialectical material- 
ism of Marxtem, John Paul himself might be 
called a dialectical spiritualist. He is relentless in 
his attacks on Marxism, seeing in it not only a 
rebellion against God but a violence against the 
dignity of the individual, which comes directly 
from God. But he also makes fiery speeches 
against “imperialistic monopoly," uncontrolled 
capitalism and the “luxurious egoism” of the 
rich. 

John Paul is an intellectual. But he is dedicat- 
ed to the intellectually unfashionable symbols 
of popular Christianity: relics and statues, devo- 
tions to the saints arid, above all, the Blessed 
Virgin. 

He consistently subordinates the political to 
the spiritual, but he has vastly increased the 
political influence of the church. 

He always and everywhere calls himself a 
pope of the Second Vatican Council. Yet his 
adversaries contend that he wants to roll back 
the reforms of Vatican IL 
He is the most universal of popes, sensitive to 
cultural diversity inside the church. Yet he has 

done more to centralize authority in the Vatican 
than any pope since the council. 

The pope’s supporters argue that the “contra- 
dictions" are more apparent than real In fact, 
they say, if be has any single goal for his papacy, 
it is to overcome what he once called the "signs 
of contradiction” that have grown up in the 
Catholic Church. 

He referred to these in a sermon in 1976, 
when he was Cardinal Karol Wojtyia. The ser- 
mon presaged the papacy of a man not afraid of 
battles, not worried about taking on enemies. 
“It is the task of the church, of the Holy See, of 
all pastors, to fight on the side of man,” he 
declared, “often against men themselves!" 


Church audits 800 million faithfulthemost 
powerful moral force in the world- Paul John- 
son, a British writer, said he is the pope of the 
“Catholic Restoration.” . 

Yet what sort of Catholicism is the pope 
restoring? Is his strategy working? And towhat 
extent do the tasks of restoration and reform 

collide? . « 

Evaluations of John Paul’s papacy droend a 
good deal on politics, for the Catholic aum*, 

especially under this pope; is constantly called 

n ^taf'StholS t a5w , Sat his style oftead- 
ership, or his idims, are what the church needs as 
it approaches the year 2000. There, is unrest 
among Catholics in Latin America, the U ntied 
fratpg and large parts of Western Europe . 

Many church figures, inc ludin g some sympa- 
thetic to the pope, worry that John Paul s ap- 
proach could divide the church, drive believers 
away and impede free inquiry by theologians. In 
the West, and in the United Stales tn particular, 
large numbers of Catholic women a re opposed 

to the pope's stance against birth control and ms 

insistence on an all- male priesthood. 

Yet even among his critics, there is an ac- 
knowledgment that this pope knows exactly 
where he wants to take his flock; that he thi n k s 
not in the short term but of the third nriDenm- 
iim John Paul is many things to many people, 
bur to all he is a leader determined to lead. 

His papacy must be understood in two parts. 
The more complex part has to do with his vison 
of the Catholic Church and its relation to the 
outside world. The simpler, but in many ways 
more important, part involves the effect within 
the church of his restoration of authority to the 


papacy. 

“When this man came into office, there was a 


kind of collective sigh of relief," said Father 
Navone, the theologian. “With great respect for 
Pope Pani be was frail at the end of bis life, and 
people saw him as a bookish sort who often 
ywnwi uncomfortable with others.” John Paul 


T HE visit of John Paul to the Netherlands 
was doubtless made in that spirit The 
Netherlands, with its famously liberal 
church, is one of the few places in the world 
where his popularity is genuinely in question. In 
March, a poll by a respected mngaVfnp found 
that only 3 percent of Dutch Catholics wel- 
comed bos visit 

The story that unfolded this week in the 
Netherlands is, in many ways, the stay of John 
PauTs papacy. Where he found dtesideacc. he 
has enforced orthodoxy. Where there was uncer- 
tainty, he has sought clarity. Where the political 
power of the church had declined, he has sought 
new avenues of influence. In the Vatican, where 
the very power of the pontiff seemed in question 
when he was elected pope in 1978, he has dearly 
established a new, vigorous leadership. 

Archbishop John P. Foley, the brad of the 
Vatican's Commission on Social Communica- 
tions, summarized the pope's objectives neatly 
in two simple words: clarification and evangeli- 
zation. 

“It is essentially a matter of being clear on 
what your message is, and then preaching it, 
selling it, if you mil, to the faithful and those 
you hope will become the faithful,” the arch- 
bishop said. 

The pope has been unusually successful in 
evangelization. He is also universalizing the 
:hurch in a way that perhaps only a non-Italian 
pope could do. 

“What pope on the day of his coronation 
declared, Tm going to learn Spanish,’ because 
Spanish is the language of toe hugest single 
group in the church?” asked the Reverend Jo&n 
Navone, a Jesuit theologian ai Rome’s Gregori- 
an University. “This pope was revolutionary 
because he didn't say, *You have to learn my 
language.' He said: Til learn your language;’ " 

Of the 26 trips abroad John Paul has made 
thus far during nis papacy, about a dozen have 
been to developing countries. Not surprisingly, 
the church is prospering in these areas, notably 
in Asia and Africa. Last month, John Paul 
further internationalized the Sacred College of 

/-.•Jn.l. Ik. .k..«L<. k:.l ■ 


L who succeeded Pope Paul, died after only 33 
days in office. Then “came this robust, healthy, 
yotmg, athletic, self-assured John Wayne type," 
said Father Navone. “He had true gm.” 

In contrast to previous popes, John Paul H is 
relatively young — he will be 65 Saturday — 
handso me, forceful, effective with crowds. Sim- 
ply to ate who the pope is, and has been, is to 
suggest a rich and complex human being: a 
factory worker, a poet, a playwright, a philoso- 
pher, a gregarious, outgoing man, a sportsman 
who loves siding , canoeing and swimming. 

He is a jovial man who loves to sing; a stern 
man who can meet resistance with an icy stare 
and who is said to have a fierce temper; a gentle 
man who is viably and remarkably transformed 
at the sight of children; a former acta — like 
the Amairan president — who has always re- 
tained the knack of playing to an audience; 

A f ar-f rom-conven tionai religious leader, 
John Paul II is baying a profound effect on the 
papacy. By mastering at least seven languages, 
and learning the rudiments of many others, 
including pidgin and Japanese, and making fre- 
quent voyages to the far reaches of his church, 
he is turning his papacy into one that is less and 
less anchored in Rome. He himself has said that 
the Vatican could easily be in Manila; what 
makes the church Roman are clear lines of 
authority, not the city where the authority lies. 

And much like Ronald Reagan, who has used 
his mastery of television and other communica- 
tions techniques to help effect a social revolu- 
tion, John raid’s superb use of mass media is 
part of his “Catholic Restoration.” 

One of the pope’s preoccupations is with the 
growing distance between Christianity and 
modem culture. Fa him, one central objective 
is to make Christianity an integral part of the 
modern age without succumbing to the secular 
understandings of modernity. 



(Caribbean Immigrants 

In U.S.: Mixed Success 



L° 


By Edward J. Boyer 

Las Angela Tima Sendee 
OS ANGELES —Foe Roland Yoke, the 


many of his countrymen still consider 

"the land of milk and honey” began with Sugar 

Ray Robinson, Joe Louis and Adam Clayton 
Powell staring at him from the pages of Ebony 
magazine. - 

Growing up in Bcifcc (then British Hondo- 
rasLMrTodee, who is now 42, said poor people 
who could not afford to buy wallpaper covered 
their walls- with pages from Ebony. 

“Yon could look on the walls and see all of 
these pictures,” Mr. Yoke sakL “I was tremen- 
dously influenced by being able to identify with 
blade Americans. I wanted to leave bone and 
make it in the real world.” 

Mr. Yoke made ft to the “real world" in 1961 


when he was 18, landing in Harlem with a friend 

rkiSedinvu 


(who was later killed in Vietnam) and becoming, 
as he put it, “a very good dishwasher.” 

Twelve yean of struggle later, with a sociolo- 
gy degree from Syracuse University, Mr. Yorke 
headed for Los Angeles, where he helped orga- 
nize the Concerned Association and 

now works as director of the county’s Wflkw- 
brook Senior Citizens Center. 

His odyssey duplicates one that tens of thou- 
sands of mmngrants from the English-speaking 


Driving a battered Ford pand truck with a 
crackedwin^hidd, Nod Stone, i tenner ma-^ 
rine who speaks in a beavy Jami^ MccntiP 
polled mtothetiny tot ontade bu baker? and 
market in Los Angeles on a recent Saturday. 

Pmpi/w»»s busily set about unloading cassa- 
vas. yams. Red Stripe Beer. goal meal — thread- 
ing their way through knots of shoppers who 
cone from as far away as San Diego. 

Caribbean immigrant spend bouts at the 
market, swapping news, analyzing cricket and 
soccer matches, unabashedly agoytag the op- 
portunity to converse in the patois or creole 
of their native countries. 

“We have people from all over, not juu- the 
Caribbean." aid Mr. Stone, 42. "We get Samo- 
ans, Tongans, Hawsiians and Africans because 
the food T& so similar." j®. 

Mr. Stone is a prosperous entrepreneur wtw 
owns a construction company, a real estate 
company aid & full city block. 

The list of Caribbean immigrants who have 
prominent in the United States, or 
whose children have done so; is tong. It indndes 
the Jamaican Marcus Garvey, who arrived in 
New York in 1916 and eventually attracted two 
milli on members worldwide to his Umvnsal 
Negro Improvement Association. 

Malcolm X, who became the most articulate 


V 


i ’ ■ i 

,„iK 


■h 


spokesman fa EHjah MuhammadT Nation of 

folflm, i 


making their way to U.S. cities from island 
nations stretching east from Jamaica and sweep- 
ing south to Trinidad and Tbbago, from Guy- 
ana on the South American mainland, Belize m 
Central America, to Bermuda and the Bahamas 
in the Atlantic. 


.amaly wl 

Garveyite and whose mother was bom in Gro-, w 
nada. i ** 

Other prominent Americans with Caribbean 
backgrounds include Shirley Chisholm, a far- 
mer member of Congress from New Yak who 
once sought the Democratic presidential nonn- 

- . A. - T V P ’ .L mm 4MIIV1 nftSlfk 


JtaAarv 


Pope John Paul D during services at St Jan's Cathedral in s’ Hertogenbosch. 


Cardinals, the church’s highest governing body, 

of the 28 new nirrimaU 


by selecting one-fourth 
from the Third World. 
John Paul intends to 


make the Catholic 


A recent symbol of tins was his agreement 
to say Mass fa the crew of NBC’s “To- 
day” show and to allow portions of it to 
be televised. In the pope’s view, television exists 
as part of modem culture. It is inherently nei- 
ther good nor evfl. The task of the chord! is to 
integrate Christianity into this cultural form. 

The pope’s success with the mass media is 
especially important because one of the mam 
problems that the Catholic Church has con- 
fronted over the last few decades is the loss oi 
control over its own means of co mmunications 
Once, the church communicated to the faithful 
almost exclusively through its own channels; its 
ch u rch e s, schools, universities, publications and 
(he like. 


However, such means have declined ini 
lance. But the pope, by malting himself and the 
papacy newsworthy events fa the print and 
electronic news media, and by getting the Vati- 
can into such fields as video cassettes and satel- 
lite transmission, has again established contact 
with the masses. 

The news media have also helped the pope in 
his fights with his opponents. Despite the fact 
that secular reports on the church emphasize 
conflict — over liberation theology, the ordina- 
tion of women, birth control — they almost 
always portray the pqpe and his Vatican as 
facing scanned adversaries around the world. 

It was once common fa opponents of a given 
pope to lament him as “a prisoner of the Curia,” 
the Vatican’s administra tive body. John Paul 
has m many ways enhanced the power of the 
Vatican and has delegated much responsibility 
fa a dminis tration. Yet, he is almost always 
criticized in his own name. He is hiigdy seen as 
the man in charge, and this is no small achieve- 
ment 

Ultimately, the pope’s politics are anti-politi- 
cal since he insists on personal redemption 
above all else. This can be seen perhaps most 
dearly in his analysis of tin. Leftist Christians 
have introduced the idea of “sinful structure," 
that is, economic and soda! institutions which, 
by their nature, perpetrate evfl. 

John Paul accepts the idea of tinful struc- 
tures. but he nevertheless insists that sin “is 
always a personal act.” 

The issues of sexuality and equality between 
the genders, including the ordination of women 
as priests, are issues that severely test the pope’s 
ability to lead. American Catholics show no 
signs of following the pope on birth control On 
abortion, many Catholics agree with the moral 
position the church upholds, yet they cannot 
bring themselves to favor outright prohibition. 

Whatever the disagreements, there can be no 
donbt that the pope's voice has become one of 
the strongest and loudest in the world What 
does he plan to do with this new-found influ- 
ence? 

In the first place, be sees his very presence in 
Rome as a symbol of the integration of Eastern 
Europe with Europe as a whole. He has long 
argued that the division of Europe along pro- 
Western and pro-Soviet lines is artificial ana has 
tended to cut off the East-bloc countries, espe- 
cially the Slavs, from the cultural patrimony 
they share with Western Europe. 

This goal of a unified Europe explains his new 


emphasis on the ecumenical movement John 
Paul is less conc er ned with ecumenical ap- 
proaches to Protestant churches and sees his 
first task as bringing the Fj»«tem Orthodox 
churches back into sane form of communion 
with Rome; 

In Latin America, the pope has moved to 
stem the influence of Marxism within Catholic 
movements fa social change. This has had at 
least some effect, if only became events in the 
region, most notably in Nicaragua, are moving 
in directions the pope might have predicted 

At a rhetorical lard, leaders of the Catholic 
left have begun to play down their explicit ties to 
Marxist thought. But it is not yet dear how hard 
the Vatican will push the Catholic left in Latin 
America a the extent to which the pope wants a 
confrontation. 


In the meantime, the pope has given his 
blessing to Latin America's new democracies, 
hoping that they wiU find a way around the 
polarization that has affected the church as it 
has so many other institutions in Latin America. 

With regard lo the West, those seeming “con- 
tradictions” crop up again. A pope who looks to 
the West to contain Communist power does not 
embrace the West’s dominant secular values. He 
is manifestly worried about libertarian altitudes 
on sexual morality, and arming back two de- 
cades of change will not be easy. 

But, taking the longer view, he seems to be- 
lieve that societies have passed through periods 
of decadence before, and that the church's task 
is to keep alive and spread tire traditional values, 
in preparation fa a time when society will 
embrace them again. 

This idea in many ways epitomizes John 
Paul's entire approach to tire papacy. Fa all the 
“contradictions” that the worid might see in his 
message, it is a remarkably dear and coherent 
world view. 

It is a view that annoys, even angers, a large 
number of Catholics who believe the church is 

course 


N EW Yak, winch'has the United States’ 
largest concentration of Caribbean im- 
migrants, was often their first stop. 
Since the 1960s, however, increasing numbers 
have been fleeing the harsh Northeastern win- 
ters fa California 

With no laq g na g e barrier to overcome, and 
driven by a work ethic characteristic of many 
immigrant groups, they have seized educational 
and economic opportunities often unavailable 
to them in their underdeveloped native coun- 
tries. 

“Distinctions in the West Indies are based on 
dass rather titan race,” said Judge Alban I. 
Niles of Los Angeles Municipal Court He is a 
native of Sl Lucia, a tiny island in the eastern 
Caribbean with a population of 100,000. 

“If you went to school, you could be any- 
thing,” Mr. Niles said. “That was drilled into 
you. Consequently, West Indians who come 
here tend to be hard-driving, ambitious, and 
they go out to achieve something." 

The success of established Caribbean immi- 
grants, however, has left some caught to what 
they call “in-betweenity” — pulled by compet- 
ing tugs from their countries of origin and their 
country of residence. And the promise of pros- 


nation; Stokdy Canmchad, a dvfl rights activ- 
stber Roue and 


Sinclair , both ac- 
ey Poitier, Harry 


ist; Esther 

tresses, and the film stars, ! 

Bdaf crate and Gcdy Tyson. 

Once to the United States, some Caribbean 
immigrants initially had strained rotations with 
their Yellow Waring the result of what Derrick 
Boo, & lawyer of Jamaican and Chinese ances- 
try, called “mistaken perceptions.” 

Many Caribbean immigrants say Americans 
have a superficial travd-poster image of their 
native countries, at else what they say is an 


r; 


headlines about 
and repression to the 'Caribbean. 

Those images irritate sane Caribbean immi- 
grants, but not enough to make many of them 
leave. 

“People may knock this country, but they 
don’t knock tire opportunities,” said Mr. Hoa 
He worked at menial jobs to put himself 
through college and law schooL 

“I just went one step at a time," he said. “The 
next thing I kaow,Tm a lawyer.! said to myself, 
‘My God, it woks.’” 

Belize, a country of 140JXIO, is one of the least 
developed Caribbean nations* and is connected 
to the United States by a land bridge across 


perity, some Caribbean immigrants say, is lur- Guatemala and Merica 


-- - 


mg increasing numbers to enter tire country 
illegally, sometimes to their (fisappointmenL 

“People see all these things on idemaan and 
think that all Americans are really wealthy," 
said Sylvia Flowers, an urban planner who was 
bom m Belize. “But when they get here, they 
find that life in this country is very hard, locating 
fa a job is hard —just adjusting to life in a city 
like Los Angeles is a completely new experience 
fa them." 

But once the adjustment period is behind 
them, Caribbean immigrants often pursue tire 
American dream more aggressively than their 
American neighbors da 


E 


ENNOX Miller, a dentist in Altadena, Cal- 
ifornia, estimated that there are hun- 


dreds of physicians and dentists from the 
the Los Aru 


“People who are lucky to eon $600 a year 
spend their last dime to get to that corartty,** said* 
one Belizean woman who reaisested anonymity^ 
•'They spend hundreds of dollars to through 
Memca a tiiey wdk hundreds cf xmks just to 
get to the barder." 

Belizeans say that illegal immigrants from 
other parts of the Caribbean increuiagly use 
tire same route to the United States. 

Once the immigrants reach tire border, there 
is no shortage of “coyotes” wflSng to bring tbcjn 
illegally into tire United States— fora charge of 
uptofeDOO. 

In Los Angdes, they become “invisible Hie- 
gals” who disappear into the dry’s black com- 
munity. If Borneans are stopped and quest- 
ned, they usually explain their 


it.:?.-..,. 



turned, they usually explain their accents ty **• 


in 


fa other (Catholics, the pope 
church’s cc 


is correcting 
abuses, clarifying the church's cause and pre- 
paring it for the third millennimn. 

He is a pope who deariy takes seriously the 
warning in Sl PauTs first letter to the Connthi- 
ans: “For if the trumpet give an uncertain 
sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle?” 

(This article has been excerpted from The New 
York Tones Magazine.) 


Caribbean in the Los Angeles area. A former 
track man, he won medals fa Jamaica in the 
100-meter dash at the 1968 and 1972 Olympics. 

Caribbean imndgranla are preponderantly 
black, but they point out that their countries are 
malting pots and that the estimated 7CUW0 of 
them m Southern Calif atria indnde blades, 
whites, East Indians and Asians. 

Theirs is a richly diverse culture bound to- 

and ca- 
cassava, 
ten; a passion fa domi- 
noes, and an addiction to cricket (five teams in 
the 21 -team Stm them California Cricket Associ- 
ation are made up primarily of Caribbean play- 
era). 


saying they are from New Orleans, 
e of 




Some 



the new arrivals drift into crime, 
^ trafficking, community leaden 
said. “There 5 a growing concent aboot drag 
activity,” said Defiane Pascasrio,^ mine who 
heads the Concerned Belizean Association. ‘ 
“Most Belizeans involved in drugs are unable 
to compete here,” she said. “They become fras- 
trated and took fa opportunities to make mon- 
ey in different ways. One way is fllkit activity. 1 

Caribbean canmunity organizations 
iriz£ that illegal immigration is a growing 
tan, especially, among younger irimrigrwits.Bui 
neither they nor the Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service could offer a firm estimate of thc 
size of the illegal population. 


4 





iF 


Joblessness Comes to America’s Middle Class , Shattering Stereotypes About Welfare 


By Milton Coleman 

Washington Post Service 


E UCLID. Ohio — Timothy Sipes was 
bora in nearby Cleveland 33 years ago 
amid a promise of prosperity as endless 
as the smoke gushing from the steel-mill stacks 
of the Cuyahoga River valley. His father drove 
trains in the freight yards of the New York 
Central Railroad, and his mother operated a 
punch press at Ace Metal Stamping Co. When 
Mr. Sipes grew up, jobs, and the pride that went 
wiih them, were there fa the asking — [or a 
.while. 


Youngstown or an autoworker in Cleveland 
who’s exhausted his unemployment benefits,” 
Mr. Real said. “These are white people. These 
are all-American families.” 

From 197 9 (o 1984, the number of people in 
traditional two-parent households receiving Aid 
to Families with Dependent Children, the larg- 
est federal-state welfare program of cash grants, 
more than doubled in the United States. In 
Ohio, it more than tripled to 167,782 from 
50,929. 


than take a minimum-wage job unless it offered unemployment benefits run out. Younger un- 
medical benefits that would provide care on a married people with no work experience go on 
par with Medicaid, the federal-stale program the Ohio General Relief program, whose rqfls 
Tor which most recipients of Aid to Families grew 284 percent from 1980 to 1984. Families 
With Dependent Children auto maticall y quafi- turn to Aid to Families with Dependent Chil- 
fy. drcn. 

Some, like Louis Kalnasy of suburban Far- Federal unemployment insurance normally 
ma, who pays $350 or his $360 monthly cash lasts for 26 weeks. After that, many hard-hit 
grant for rent, say they refuse to move into areas have supplemental benefits that last an- 
neighborfaoods where bousing might cast Jess, other 12 menus, and in a few cases the benefits 


A state plan perntiteiow-mcone househ ol ds, 
including all those cm welfare, to pay no more 
than 5 percent of their monthly cash income for 
dectriaty and 10 percent fa gas during the cold 


under that aid program decreased 


Now Mr. Sipes is the man of the house in the 
yellow, wood-frame bungalow on Shoreview 
Avenue that was his boyhood home in this 
lakefront suburb northeast of Cleveland. The 
plentiful jobs are gone, and so is much of his 
- pride. With his wife and two children, Mr. Sipes 
is on wd/are and sees slim prospects of getting 
off or it. 

! “To be truthful,' 1 Mr. Sipes said, he thought 
only “blacks and hillbillies were on welfare. 

“I threw a lot of stereotypes around about 
welfare." be said “Now that I’m on it, my view 
has changed. I find myself in the same boat I no 
longer consider people on welfare white trash. 
They’re people trying to survive." 

Mr. Sipes was paid about S 1,120 a month at a 


'Now that Pm on it,’ one 
recipient said, f my view has 
changed. I find myself in the 
same boat* I no longer 
consider people on welfare 
white trash. 9 


"The only place I know is down in the ghet- 
tos, and I ain’t gong down there,” said Mr. 
Kalnasy, who grew up on Cleveland’s impover- 
ished east side. “I came from there, and I ain't 
gonna let my kids down there;” 


can be extended to two years. 

In some Ohio households, the fear of second- 
generation dependency is a strong deterrent to 
welfare even in the face of chronic unemploy- 
ment. Margaret Biacsi of Parma said her two 
childr en, aged 20 and 18 and no longer eligible 
fa assistan ce through her Aid to Families With 
Dependent Children grant, refused to go on 
general relief. 

"They see how it affected me, and they don’t 
want to get into that same rut,” Mrs. Biacsi said. 
“They want to be independent. 


The balance is held until the warmer months, 
when monthly bills must be paid in full, along 
with some of tins pasKfcie amounts. Recipients 
sometimes avoid having service cm off through 
once-a-yeax emergency grants. 

In Cuyahoga County, a family of four on Aid 
to Famines With Dependent Children receives 
$214 a month in food stamps, and rations often 


percent had applied fa at least 20 jobs in the 
last year and 30 percent had waked ax yeare jff 
more on their last job. V- 

The spread of welfare to the suburbs Ins 
improved the image of welfare recipients. 

“You used to be considered just, "That oUt 
welfare,’ ” said Mabel Whatley, 53, presidenttjf 
the Greater Cleveland Welfare Righ ts Organi- 
zation. “Now they’re canine you,. The NtJw 
Poor.’ They've even changwi the nuiw of tin 
welfare department now to Human Services; So 
thatmeans you’re getting a little bit more digai* 




HESE newcomers to Aid to Families 
With Dependent Children primarily are 
refugees from the last national recession, 
which came early to Ohio, hit harder and left 
later than it did in much of the rest of the Uni led 
States. Ohio unemploynieu, 5.9 percent in 
1979, peaked at 12J percent to 1982 before 
failing to 9.4 percent last year. Since 1982, it has 
hovered at 1 J points above the U.S. average. 

The Reagan ad minis tration frequently notes young and they just started^ out and they don’t 
that more people arc working now than ever wan* 1° start out that way. Both found jobs a 
before. But that does not apply in Ohio. few weeks ago. 

In 1979, there were 298,400 Ohioans looking Thousands of other people, however, have 
for work but unable to find it. Last mot 1 *! 1 , dial stepped into the welfare lines in Ohio s 88 coun- 


“They don’t want to have money mailed to 
them and not wok for it," she said. “They’re 


Ohio’s economy is recovering, 
but not for many former bine- 
collar workers. Last month, 
475,000 Ohioans were 
looking for work, up 59 
percent from 1979. 


T IMOTHY Barton, 24, of Parma, was laid 
off in 1981 and did not obtain another 
job until last month. During much cf 
that tune, Mr. Barton, his wife Margaret fltd 
thar child received welfare, Tbe couple said that 
being on the rolls made them more compassoo- 
aie toward welfare recipients. ■ 


But Margaret Barton said she was somewhat 
xed (Torino 


U*N 


perplexed during visits to tfaejudfaic office., 

“You see all these people there you know, an 
they have apathy. You can just teU," she 


apamy. iou can just tdl, sue saw- , k * ; 
iou feel sony fa them. But ywnetmia yoaift\S 


wonder. they’re not really trying to hrijp tbdb- . 

Dandthey*0 haw five lrids» 


&“‘ ,47s -o“ o -“ in c — ' 

hSf^thai much in foaTstamre^and welfare Many of the new, two-parent-famflv redoi- Ohio’s economy is recovering, but not fa ^ristana dmaoa of the Ohio Department of 


half that much in rood stamps and welfare 
grants. 

“it’s hard to learn to survive when you really 
never had to." Mr. Sipes said “But we learned 
pretty fast." 

So have thousands of otters like him who 
have emerged as the fastest growing group of 
new welfare recipients. 

“The stereotype that welfare rolls are com- 
prised of black, single women is not borne out in 
the statistics." said Mark Real, director of the 
Children's Defense Fund office in Columbus. It 
is principally a phenomenon of white suburbs. 

“You're talking about a steelworker in 


Many of the new, two-parent-famfly ; 

ents describe the welfare experience wi 

same dissatisfaction and despair expressed by 
the unmarried black women who are the most 
commonly cited beneficiaries of Aid to Families 
With Dependent Children. 

This new dass of recipients say the cash 
grants — a maximum of $360 a month fa a 
family of four in Ohio — are unpractically low. 
Some of them volunteer that they have become 
welfare “cheats." earning unreported money at 
the side. Otters say they postpone paying some 
bills and get financial help from friends and 
relatives. 

Some say they would rather stay on welfare 


economy is recovering, 
many former blue-collar workers such as Mr. 
Sipes and Mr. Kalnasy, both of whom complain 
that their age, the miodle-30s, is an impediment 
to employment in the remaining well-paying, 
low-ski!l«i jobs. 

“Everybody said go to a service economy," 
said Stephen Wcrtheim of the Interchurob 
Council of Greater Cleveland. “But this is a 
union town. People were receiving $11 an hour 
and benefits. All of a sudden they’re told to 
work for McDonald's." 

Officials in Ohio say that wdfare is becoming 
a mainstay fa many of those unable to enter the 
job market a to tend another jab before thaf 


Human Services. 

“Thar expectation is far different from what 
reality is” Ms. Benson said. “When you explain 
that a maiimum benefit fa a family of four is 
three hundred-and-something dollars, they look 
at you and say, ‘Who pays the rest?’ You look at 
them and say, ‘Nobody pays the rest’ ” 

Fa most welfare families, especially those in 
the suburbs who had lived on $7- to Slo-an-hour 
salaries, rent is the largest portion of “the rest” 


ran out before the end of the mauh. At least 10 
centers fa needy families regularly dispense 
free groceries to them in the Cleveland suburbs. 

Some suburban centers initially were met 
with muted hostility. The sentiment was “if you 
can’t afford to live in Eucli d , get out,” recalled 
Joe Drew, who runs the Euclid center. 


selves. You see them _ 
you know, and they're pi 
wonder, why do they keep liaving these 
and putting themadves into itr 


ant 




a: 


Maijone Hall-Ellis, directa of the Depart- 
ment of Human Services in Cuyahoga Ownff- 
sajd that the coating of the ‘new poo* to me 
welfare roster has further blurred a once 
“toed line between recipients, many of than 






Now, food lines arc an accepted, if not ex- just out of the middle class! and casewofk- . ^ ‘‘ 

peered, fact of life; “If s surprising to every- ““y of titan now just barely in it '■ : y 


Another large portion is devoted to utility 
bills, which often exceed $200 a mouth during 
Ohio’s fang winters. 


body” in the suburbs, said Jim Minard, director 
of a center fa the needy at Parma Lutheran 
Church, which served twice as many families in 
1984 as it did in 1983. “They really realize that 
it's not just Those people over there.’ " 

A 1984 Inioduirch Council survey erf people 
who used the food colters found that 70 percent 
said that they were high school graduates, 40 


A*® to be polite aid 'i\>. 
deal with the person’s problems — that art 
similar to the mm* - r 
they go home at ni,___ . 
away from welfare themsd 1 




same problem theyh&vtas soon# /■-, - 

- •Vj_' i ’4_ - 1 ' s. 





fcw*. % ^N. HYSC 

1& UC(W 

f* ■» fc*isci f j , ^ 

h> -t*.*, t ^ WS A 

ifttu ‘h^ v... ; Jwavx i ■ , .^ A 

•ra^?5s!5 ’*• 


1 Statistics Index 

AMEX Men JM4 Bmuncfc-nwort* — 
AMEX MutaAwP.U Rtnp ntMiotn P.15 
MYSE Pftm MS GoM M Uriah . P.U 
(MeMnta/famP.14 Intmot ndu P.lt 
Omdfoa tacks P.lt Market aranmttfv P.Q 
Camacr rates ,P.» CWton* P.rr 

T»osmmodin» ' RT7 . OTC stock p.m 
i PMtata P-17 Ottw mortal PJ# 


Hcralb^fefcribunc. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, May 15,1985 

INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 

A Lonely Childhood Can Be 
Good Executive ExDerience 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 12 

Page 11 


bVan •«tt SWl ‘ atl ^ N * , V^ 

‘ h»« ..... . l,,B «LnR 
^.u.» ■!, ' 


P 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN' 

fnternatimal Herald Tribune - 

ARIS — East year; Portune, iheTLS. binwiitJtfy business 


^U«H. r L . . 




I in the United States. The 2984 Fortune nominees wore 
nasty, abusive and “toertilesa." The prototype was an 
“ intimidaloT who tired loyal employees at whim. He (no womez^ 
were nominated) lacked sensitivity and ww n ™m«mon« skills, 

’ ruled through fear and used h ummating tactics to crush rebel- 
lious managers. 

11 Bemgto^is.considerednecessaiyforachkf executive of a 
major ELS. multinational company, bm the Fortune nommee was 
^tough beyond the call of duty. 

Y “I was wondering if this was a myth or true,” says Cary L. 


„ M ,. ... i, u *T!Cvi « SUHK OI OUCIKC tfHU ICul' 

h < i.irv n jf-fc: - nerfogy and co-anthor of The 

n IM ,i '‘ :, “ cl cniiuiK fe ~ change Makers." “To get to 
k I ' Un, c, ‘ -"the top do you have to be a. 

n hilj •- back-stabhing, manipulative 

u , »isr. \ f ^ ‘ bastard motivated by greed : — 

w*»4ii !. | I <Sl Wcinaj^ andpower?" " 

■ *iitiw : r.‘,|. f - • Toe answer is no. at least according to Mr. 
.■iife* aiv * ; v . ■■■; " a*; . author, Peter Hingley, director of studies ait 

: Nmsmg Health and Social Stndks at . Bdj 


'Yoa huve tobe a 
loner, 9 said one 
manager. 'Being a 


.1 «»: taSi :v m..u, n ^ 

SKTMar, 

ttrrtibn .v i l 1 




The authors interviewed 17 British chief executives and top 
trade iwArm officials, including Sir Michael Edwardes, former 

, • • • .r, . _ 7T7’ i “ „ i .i i ict_i 


4 * ■ , l : n,i SmdML -> currently chairman of the British.lnstitute of. Management, and 
1 : ,,:M '■Ufv SiJnnpz_. • Lord Arnold Weinstock, manag in g director and chief executive 
^ -.of General Electric Ca .- ■’ 

m j.k t :••■»{• j suicv. siQe “I found -that the senioir exeqnives interviewed were not. the 
bjJyianeai^ : rmhless cutthroat ^/pe. at 'all," saws Mr. Cooper. “They were 
u “; ,va :br retail rf •• open^wiHiiig to admit weakness ana anxious to have control over 

.* iaw \r: .•! i. ;ra Jn j ^ their own dotiny.” Tl^y were not, he said, anxious “to dominate 

* ;M : - peqpte.” ' - ■ * . • ‘ . 


W'l 1 

* '• X7IROM the interviews, the autlKMs identify certain pcrsonal- 

r cv'ii .. .... rp -.r W by factors that conttibute to smress..Axbong them; A 
A diiv.nv ‘ 0 l ■ JL . Itmdy chfldbood that leads to self-sufficiency and indepen- 

j»v - deuce and an opportunity early in the career. Mr. Harvey-Jones, 

*T* . .-.rV,^ J ^ for instance, says being “dumbed” in boarding sduxd at the age 
...w ^ - ,,, of 6 led to a “con tinning need to provei” Mnadf. 

. ; k..: .. .. ..’ 7 . •; Sir Peter told the anthors: “You have to be a loner. Being an 

.- outsider helps. 1 came as a refugee to this comniy in my early 

years. This was an enormous advantage to me as 1 was able to 
i;:.u t L ,:» . ignore the dass systan and to makK my own way.” Sir Peter was 

' •/“I * * ■' born in Fiance in 1924 ofBritish parents. At flic age of 7, he went 

m \'., '..V f • to Qnna for six yean, and at the outbreak of the China-Japan 

ijs; • war in 1937, he moved to Britain . . 

‘7* • w /' ' ‘ ' ' 5 ■ ; - : •'* '• "s ‘ ‘ic As mi^it be expected, successful executives need tremendous 

5 * ■ '!• .i _■ energy, motivation and drive. 

But, theydonot have to be uncaring setf-soryingegotistsout to 
'*‘ f ■'* ■’ ,l t'cfa = satiirfy some inner power craving. They can have a conscience and 

;<f*v ; careabouthowbuaness.mflucncespecq>leand society. “Allthose 

* i -.>:c ; % .- •.-,%■ h?s ■. interviewed looked for how consistent their dedsions are-wilh 

t.T.-vj..- \l'-. their own intonaliAilosc^hy,” says Mr. Cooper otftheMancbes- 

V- ;..,a, f.- .. ter Institnlei ' • 

: .- r; i..; . .r'Aj a ls° do not have to crush, imderiings under their.boot 

!v: •• .■* They can be opea, wairm and friendly. Iird Wdnstodc, for 


r^-rpiuins.’ 

i, V' S:3 :' ,r!! «?asUfflte 

i! 

• •• • •> a , Ji n 


. \v 


4«V. 

•• »rui 
/.* 

If. ■ 

!!*■». Y* " 1 t 

th-.:- Ll- 


v xt.it 

*• 'ji; ?ct; 

5 ^ ,u .:' 

• n, in.;*, • ^!f'. 

. *- 

> ■ '!■ .1 .A\r 1^-j; 


{.- r”h»:< 


2d Thrift 
Put Under 
Overseer 

Bank Examiners 
Sent to Maryland 

The Associated Press 

ANNAPOLIS, Maryland — A 
second savings and loan associa- 
tion in Maryland has been placed 
under conservatorship, and Gover- 
nor Harry Hughes has appealed to 
depositors in state-regulated asso- 
ciations to remain caho- 

Aboul 330 fedecd bank examin- 
ers arrived in the state on Monday 
to examine the bodes of the other 
100 associations. 

• “Fear is the worst thing that can 
happen hare,” Mr. Hughes said late 
Monday after almost 12 hours of 
discussions about prbblems within 
the industry. 

He said that except for the two 
associations that went into conser- 
vatorship Monday, there were no 
that any of th em are in 

trouble. 

1 Those two associations, Old 
Court Savings & Loan and Merritt 
Commercial Savings ft Loan, 
opened for business Tuesday with 
depositors allowed to withdraw 
only $1,000 from each account 
each month. 

Mr. Hughes said the federal ex- 
aminers, coming in at the request of 
the state, would “assist in getting 
.Maryland savings and loans eligi- 
ble for federal insurance into the 
federal program.” 

Public concern about the state 
institutions began to develop after 
news reports that the Maryland 
Savings-Share Insurance Coip^ a 
private company that insures de- 
posits in state associations, had 
found serioos management prob- 
lems at Old Court. 

A run on the institution began 
Thursday. Shorter lines were re- 
ported at Old Court and Mmitt on 


McDonald -s: A Symbol of Service 

West Germany 






y.ta® “respect” and “ctanpasskm . .. 

One measure of executive rntMesspess is how fast and how 
.--jyV r often chief executives Bre part of^ thtarmanageniiRnt staff. No one 
- .yep; -- (Couthmed ouFage 13, Cot 1) . 


Currency Sates 


; v"x." • '■ 

... - \:A- ; 


Welfare 


Lois brtarlxsk rates On Nioy 14 , exdudmB fast. .. 

Offiod fixings fer Anwterdoni, Bmae^fronkhirt, MSarv Paris. New York rc*es erf 

4PM • _ 

^ I B DJA. VJF. Itx. BMr. fcF. SuF. . YB1 

Amxtantom MS75 U7 mSSS* M* 0177* SAB* 134.135 713BA0 y 

BnKMtstO) (HAZ 77 JO KlTSS UUO MS3- T7JOS — «JK *0*5* 

Fraflkfwt USB U» 3U»* MMx 0SJ39* W IIMT'UIK* 

tAMlaa CO) 1J74I JJ7W tUM 3AMJ» 4J7ST 78 MS UtU 3I7AB 

MUan TJS4J0 TATUiS 431.10 209.12 SUM MM* 757A0 7421 

■ rmnrw«(o — um uut »jo T4bm xm*s sun rsa vm 

Parts *JJ5 1U1 ' SIW* .'UMi JJ005 TM7« UnWH* 

Tokyo - 2J8J3 31543 H41 24J3 UBS- 71C 406J4- TIM — - 

Zwrtcn 2J72S J4M4 BUSS- .2745-. ^BU* 74A4S- CITS- UU13- 

T ECU , 0731 asm 27X8 UM2 142M2 24307 454688 14857 U2451 

. 1 SDR 0J95226 07B474 3448W *49043 MA. • *441- fl4» 246<a 2WJ354 

Dollar Values - 

Eta*. ° mxmet - VJ4 Sta*. C * rn " Cf VXi Eta*. CUn " CT U44 
Vum AtandtaoS MSS - 14M .rrtrtf . •. UUJ MSU a n n ul 24U 

" tuu AnMMnMM 2US 0JM - tanta taksl mSS' IMS {.MtaolWt USB 

OUMl MMM<fc.ftW>C 4224 SXMfKoonlHfita UBM • BSBT2 V Koran sms MMB 

. 0724 Coomfiool V377S 8JBV Motor. rlMta " - SAH ~UB57 Sm. ponto >7430 

MWDoMlDW UAH Bin Hans. knot BBS; B.112S SMAJrao B4B 
H1SS4 ntaOMMOB • MM B4SCI PM.0W0 1M» BABI .Tahoe B MJ1 

04072 eracktaKtHM 13BJ0 MOST Part. Mods “ - T7546 . <UD« TMM) 27735 

0.12B7 Hooa K0MS 77705 0377 SotaiM 3JW5 03m UAJLAkoni 34725 

tSMrtta:U37S Irish C 

(al ComranM franc (b) Amount* nooiM la bur ont 00004 (d moms mtacd to Buy era doner r» 
Unlla ol HO W UnHs 0114DO M IWH ofllMa 
HA: not quota; MJ4; taavuMda. -•• 

Sauraa*.- Bomaue Hu Benelux {Brussels); Sanaa Qxa m ervlale ttottdna (Milan): Banque 
national Oe Parte (Parts); IMF fSDR); Bottom Anoeet Interna t ionale dTmaetliaenMnt 
(<Bnar, rival, dtrttomi. Ottm data from neuters and AP. . 


The state went to court over the 
weekend to pul Old Court under a 
conservator, and a judge signed an 
order early Monday naming 
MSSIC conservator. 

Late Monday, Merritt filed pa- 
pers seeking vohmtacy conserva- 
torship, and a judge signed them 
shortly before midnight. 

Depositors fined up outride Mer- 
ritt brandies Monday after reports 
that MSSIC had asked the compa- 
ny to sell a 39-stmy office building 
under, construction in J&thnore 
The^pipere 'filed by Attorney 
Cfenaral Stephen Sachs concerning 
Old Court alleged numerous violar 
tions of law and regulations, in- 
cluding unsecured loans to officers 
and directors and '$5.8 nriDion in 
overdrafts on checking accounts 
hdd by officers, thraxors and thrif 
family members. 

Mr. Hughes said the state insur- 
ance association did not find any 
problems at Merritt excrot the in- 
vestment in the office building now 
under construction. 


Debates Ways 
Of Job Creation 

By 'Warren Geder 

ImematUmol Herald Tribune 

MUNICH — McDonald’s of 
West Germany, since its opening 
here in 1971, has often meant 
more than just hamburgers and 
french fries. 

From the start, the American 
fast-food conglomerate was seen 
by many as an affront to the 
traditional European culinary 
establishment. During the peace 
demonstrations of the early 
1980s, it was made a symbol erf 
alleged U.S. cdturaLpotitical 
imperialism, and today it has 
moved to the center erf an intBD- 
sfying debate about whether ser- 
vice industries can provide the 
Irinrf of { jitrflhif 1 jdos that the 
country desperately needs. 

West German economists, 
politicians and leaden of indns- 
tiy and labor are increasingly at 
odds about finding ways to re- 
duce continuing high levels erf 
unemployment, which reached 
23 mflfion jobless, or 93 percent 
of the work farce, in ApaL 

A refrain repeatedly heard 
during debate about the coun- 
try’s unemployment problem is 
that the United States has creat- 
ed more than 20 million jobs in 
the past 15 years, mostly through 
a rapidly expanding service sec- 
tor — from low-tech restaurants 
to high-tech software companies. 
In contrast, Europe has seen no 
net job creation since 1975. 

But in some quarters, notably 
die powerful trade unions, the 
US. example of generating jobs 
through services coqnres up an 
image of housewives and youth 
flocking to McDonald's to work 
for su bstandar d wages on a part- 
time basis — with no real hope of 
making a livin g . 

“In the short term, unions 
have to realize they need to look 
for new models to generate 
jobs,” said Rolf Kroner, rice 
president of McDonald's System 


•» > > . «. 



U.S. Retail Sales 
Increased 0.9% 
During April 


A 4 .4 * . 


Compiled bt Our Staff Frm Dispacbts 
WASHINGTON — US. retail- 
ers saw sales improve 0.9 percent in 


1 J-peroent annual rate in the first 
quarter, far below the previous 
three-month period, raising specu- 


April, the seventh increase in right lation that the U.S. economy was 
months, while the big drop that had slowing down. Many economists 


Y. Dor.aioS 


months, while the big drop that had 
beet reported for March turned 
out to be less than originally 
thought, the Commerce Depart- 
ment said Tuesday. 

The report showed retail sales 
last month up 4.5 percent over the 
year-eariier level. 


and financial analysis had forecast 
an April retail- safes rise of about 

1.5 percent. 

Auto sales for the month were up 

1.6 percent after falling 23 percent 
in March. But building materials 
sales slipped back 1.2 percent, a 


The March revision and the reverse from the 4-percent increase 
April increase were enough lo re- in March and the advances for sev- 
pair what economists viewed as an eral previous months. 


A McDonald’s restaurant in Coburg, West Germany. 


of Germany, a subsidiary of the 
McDonald’s Co., with 208 stores 
in West Germany. 

“Beyond full-time and part- 
time employment within our res- 
taurants, we also provide jobs for 
a host of suppliers: bakeries, 
meat processors and the like,” 
Mr. Kroner said. 

He said critics of McDonald's 
approach of offering kitchen-ser- 
vice employment at modest 
hourly wages should note that 
“90 percent of our management 
has come out of the kitchen 
crew.” Managers at McDonald’s 
with two years' experience typi- 
cally earn between 36,000 and 
40,000 Deutsche marks (SI 1,700 


to S 13,000) a year, Mr. Kroner 


important negative trend. It made AD sales would have been up 0.6 
April's SI 122 billion in sales larger percent if the automobile category 
than the first-quarter average of were excluded. 

Sill J billion and so started the The figures also showed a more 
second quarter with an advance. balanced increase with durables 
However, one economist said the sales gaining 0.6 percent and non- 
numbers still show some funds- durables up~ 1 percent In several 
mental weaknesses in the consumer previous months the heavy duty 
sector and that the flood of late items that require financing fdl bo-' 
income-tax refunds now being do- hind the non-durables that are pur- 
livened across the country will chased for immediate use. 
boost sales only temporarily. Department stores reported a 

“This report itself really makes 15-percent improvement in April 
the consumer sector look very lack- over March although last week the 
luster," Sandra Shaber, of Chase major retail chains reported only 
Econometrics Inc., said. modest improvements over their 

But Larry Speak es, a White sales figures for a year earlier. Gro- 
House press spokesman, said, “The coy sales climbed 1J percent in 
economy, as a whole, is stiD strong April. 

— J ° /HPT ffoilHTT) 


The Food and Hold Workers 
Union, basal in Hamburg, has 
led a camp aign against McDon- 
ald’s in recent months, accusing 
the company of failing to pay 
workers according to specific 
tasks rather than as generic 
“kitchen help." In Germany the 
kitchen-help category is at the 
lower end of wage scales agreed 
upon in regional industry-labor 
settlements. McDonald’s, which 
lias no contract with the union, 
does not differentiate in pay for 
cashiers, griDers and table atten- 
dants, in spite of the union's in- 
sistence that some jobs require 
(Continued on Page 13, Cm. 1) 


and healthy.” 

March sales were originally re- 
ported to have plummeted 1.9 per- 
cent but later data changed that to 
only a 0.7-percent decline. 

Retail rales figures, covering 
both domestic and imported mer- 
chandise, are a key indicator of 
consumer sentiment 

Despite the confidence ex- 
pressed by the White House, Rob- 
ert Ortner, chief economist at the 
Commerce Department, said, “The 
second quarter is off to a relatively 
modest start At this point 1 would 
guess it would be better than the 
first quarter but still sluggish.” 

The U.S. economy grew al only a 


BASF Agrees to Acquire Inmont for $1 Billion 


(UPI, Reiners) 


Boiko- Declines 
In U.S., Europe 
On U.S. Data 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
fdl in New York after losing 
ground in Europe because erf 
lower-than-expccted US. retail 
sales figures. 

“It was a confusing day, with 
the dollar first slipping, recov- 
ering on news that March retail 
sales growth was revised, then 
promptly dropping bade,” said 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — BASF AG. 


finishes, particularly in the United man said the transaction could be States. Hus provided the German 
States where the company had vir- completed by the fall of this year, concern with a foothold as a major 
tually no presence in the paint and BASF board members con- supplier of specialty plastics and 

" med privately last week that the carbon fibers to the US. aviation 


West Germany's largest lacquer market. finned privately last week that the carbon fibers to tbe U 

company, sakL Tuesday, that it had inmont, represented in 54 coun- ctemmal gjam was stoiymg It* and aerospace industry, 
nprrrvf tn rim nine tar SI billion in <1.. moot as a takeover candidate. In addition to these a 


agreed to acquire for Jl Mlion in tries, is also one of the world's Iarg- 
casfa Inmont Co., an automotive ggt producers of printing inks , an 
Mint-making subsidiary of United area where BASF is active as wril. 
Technologies Crap, of the United Hans Vorcrihr, BASF s pokesman 


as a takeover cancfi 


In addition to these acquisitions, 


States. 

One of Europe’s leading produo- 
era of automotive finishes, BASF 


Tuesday’s takeover announce- BASF has earmarked some 500 
meat marks one of the largest bo- million Deutsche marks ($1622 
quisi tions of a U.S. company by a million) fra investment in U2. op- 
West German concern this year. orations for tbe current year, ac- 
The Ludwigshafen-based chemi- cording to company officials, 
cal group has been moving fast to Brisk sales in the United States, 


^ * West German concern tins year. 

The Ludwieshafen-based cfaemi- 
Mr.Vorreihr said the company’s <»] group has been moving fast to 
rw JwrsRV-hased subsidiary. f. t 


had been consideang the acquisi- New Jersey-oasea subsidiary, m position in tbe United which accounted for 16 

_ r t . - RASP Amenra Ca . will make the -t inoj u_i j 


tion of Inmont fra some time, in- 
dustry sources say. 

A BASF spokesman said tbe 


BASF America Co., Mil make the g^ le&t miring advantage of the 1984 revenue, helped boost 
Inmont purchrae, wmdi must be yrong dollar, which has made Ger- profit to a record 895 nriDion 
cleared by the Federal Trade Coro- man unpons more competitive. from 517 nrillion DM in 1983. 
mission and by the West Goman Earlier this year, BASF acquired BASF posted 1984 woridt 


1984 revenue, helped 


takeover of Inmau, which had mission and by the West Goman 

1984 sales of nearly $1 baHon, will cartel an thorn** 

bolster BASF’s activities in paint A United Technologies spokes- 


Eariier this year, BASF acquired BASF posted 1984 worldwide 
net an tnon tics. for $135 mflbon three subsidiaries sales erf 432 billion DM, up from 

A United Technologies spokes- of Cdanese Ca of the United 37.85 billion DM a year earner. 


j James McGroarty, vice presi- 
dent al Discount Crap, of New 
York. Dealers said analysts had 
anticipated a 12-percent rise in 
April retail sales, rather than 
the reported 0.9-percent in- 
crease. 

In New York, the British 
pound closed at $12685, up 
from $12605 on Monday. The 
dollar ended at 3.0460 DM, 
down from 3 JD560 DM; at 
92000 French francs, down 
from 92250 francs; and at 
22670 Swiss francs, down from 
22760 francs. 

Earlier in London, the pound 
ended at SI2748, up from 
$1254 on Monday, while the 
doDar dosed in Frankfurt at 
3.0613 DM, down from 32)84 
DM. 


AEG Reports Increase 
In 1984 World Profit 

Reuters Together with operating eara- 

FRANKFURT — AEG-Telc- ings, that gave AEG about 630 mO- 
funken AGhad an operating profit Bon DM, of which 395 nriDion was 
from its worldwide operations of ploughed back into reserves. The 
100 nriDion Deutsche marics ($322 remainder was used to strengthen 
nriDion) in 1984, a 150-percenl in- the company’s pension plan and to 
crease from 40 million in 1983, the farm a general risk reserve. 
Mwinany’g nhatnmm said Tuesday. ~ AEG’s household appliance sec- 


company’s chairman said Tuesday. AEG’s household appliance sec- 
Heinz Dflrc said at the annoai tor returned to proniabfiity last 
news conference, however, that year for the first time since the 
AEG had decided to use the profits early 1970s, Mr. DOrr said. But 


Interest Rates 


in the 1984-1986 period to 
strengthen its structure rather than 
to pay dividends. 

Because of extraordinary items. 


Olympia’s worldwide losses rose to 
70 raulioii DM from 50 miTfir m in 
1983. 

AEG hvi a loss of 110 mDEon 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


May 14 


1 .V. v_ Donor D-Mark Franc ' Starttoa Franc - ECU SDK 

* ' ■ jem. in. - in sw -m 4w-sfc nVirit iBft-Mw * w. -*»s m 

ML m - BK . 5» - M 5 - SSfc Htt - 1» VBk - W. Wi - W*. 8 

'V 3M. IK -IK SVj - SH 5 Hi -Slk- T2Jh- I21li IBh- WH> f»w - fK I 

m. mu -a* 5w.-5M. 5vk - s* uw - tm ibh.- ism. m - *» in. 

J — • iy. 9w -vw m .<■ -sh .sA iM-ira th -m sn. 

' Rates wtnlleoble la Mertank aepoelis a! 57 mOMon mtatmom foreouMenri. . 

•t Source*: Maroon Guaranty (aottar, OAt sf. Pound. PP); Uayds Bank (ECU): Reuters 

1 •<: ... 


the wraid group showed a large DM on an electrical contract at a 
increase in 1984 net profit to 3972 univeeshy in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 
mflfion DM from 37 nriDion in Half was accounted fra in 1983 
1983. Revenue in 1984 was 11.01 earnings and- the rest in 1984. 
billion DM, down 5 percent from Losses were also recorded on two 

«■ FA 1 *ir> 1-vk f .| _ I - * 1 - - ’^-1 1 _ » A— J! A L!- 


Asian Dollar Rates 


M«y 14 


lh -lh 
Source: Reuters. 


Inm. 

SW-1W 


United States 

.iDMawot Roto 
Federal. Pumto 
Prime Rate 
Broker loan Rate 
. Comm. Paper. 30-T7f dan 
. ,v j, "4-montti Traarary BfUs 
■. - ^ -Kenniitt) Treanrv W* 

‘ - OTfc 30-57 days 
CD's 40# dan 


..Lomoord Rota 
Oventad Rate 
One Manta interbank 
3-maaNt Interttak 
Amonffl Intortta fc 


:4AtorvntlM Rate. 

' con Money 
Onnmoalb Interban k 
3-month intoibaM. 
nwwn i nt er ba nk • 


8 t 'Baak Bate. Rate 
TH turn' Call Money - 

iov» inti Wdmr Tnonv b» 

9 f S-roonJtl l u te , book 

M0. WS J<— fl ", 

1ST 7M ““ ■— v. ••••• 

13 1 -7JS OtoOtotaRote- 
740 ..Til. Cnt| Momy 
' 7M '74a ibrtav lutertmk ^ • 


. 9V4 -Wi 


72V, J » 
72, 

12 1/U 12 in* 

t» raw 


S S 
iiiini 
SW Ml 


U23 bflfion DM the year before, hospital contract 
First-quarter 1985 business and school prqj 
roughly met expectations, Mr. they were modi 
Dorr said, with incoming orders, AEG reduced 
rising 7 percent to 2.75 bflhon DM. 1984 by 1.8 bxllii 
AEG staved off collapse in 1982 Bon. Credits of 1 
through a court supervised debt tended by its be 
settlement which was completed the. debt restnx 
last year. The company has since back in M. Its 
cut its work force sharply. It last have offered a 1 
declared a dividend in 1973, when 1.04 bflfion DM 
it paid 5 DM. been used by the 

Two major sources of losses Dttrrsaid. 
proved a drain -on 1984 operating Tbe parent con 
profits; the office equipment sab- its name at the 
ndiaiy Olympia Wetke AG, of meeting to AS 


hospital contracts in Sandi Arabia 
and school projects in Iraq, but 
they were much smaller. 

AEG reduced its debt during 


1984 by 1.8 billion DM to 12 bfl- 
fion. Credits of 22 bflfion DM ex- 
tended by its boose banks during 
the debt restrnctming were prod 
back in ML Its consortium banks 
have offered a new credit line of 
1.04 bflfion DM, bat this had not 
been used Ire the end of 1984, Mr. 


its name at the Jane 27 annual 
meeting to AEG Aktiengesdlfr- 


wbich it owns 51 percent, and a chaft. Mr. DOrr said the company 
number of contracts to the Middle has derided to drop the Tdefunkea 
East centering on Saudi Arabia and name, in use since 1967. During its 
Iraa. ' debt restructuring AEG disposed 


Japan Is to Set 
Curbs on Steel 
Exports to U.S. 

Reuter* 

TOKYO — Japan, bowing to 
pressure from Washington, 
agreed Tuesday 10 set voluntary 
limits to its steel exports to the 
United Slates for the next five 
years. 

Under the agreement Japan 
will restrict its steel shipments 
to 5.8 percent of U-S. consump- 
tion in each of the five years 
starting last Oct 1, Internation- 
al Trade ami Industry Ministry 
officials said. Japan accounted 
for 6.7 percent of U2. steel con- 
sumption last year, making it 
tbe biggest foreign supplier to 
the United States. 

The United States has al- 
ready reached similar accords 
with about 10 other countries as 
part of President Ronald Rea- 
gan's efforts to head off pres- 
sure from the U2. steel indus- 
try for mandatory import 
quotas. The agreements wiB 
limit total imports to 182 per- 
cent of U2. steel consumption 
in the five-year period. 

A Japanese toinistiy official 
said Japan wfll limit exports of 
six sted categories —-shea; and 
strip, [date, structural, bar, pipe 
and tube, and wire in the latest 
pact 

The latest accord comes 


U.S., China Agree on Factory Repairs 

United Press International year’s 14-perceQL industrial growth $22 billion in 1979 to $6.1 billion 
BEUING —The U2. commerce rate. Mr. Baldrige said. Iastyear. 

secretary, Malcolm Baldrige, and He signed tbe pact with Mr. The value of US. technology 
his Chinese counterpart. 7hma Zheng, China’s economics minis- transferred to China last year was 
Tuobin, signed an accord Tuesday ter, at a ceremony in Bqpng. six times ihai of 1982, Mr. Baldrige 
paving the way for American com- The U.S. official, on a four-day jaid. He stressed, however, that 
parries to help refurbish outmoded visit to Beijing for the third meeting U2 companies are unlikely to sdl 
factories in Qrina. of the U.s!-China Joint Commis- “the best” technology to China 


factories in China- of the U.S. -Qrina Joint Commis- the best technology to L hm a 

Mr. Baldrige said the agreement si on on Commerce a nd Tra de, also without further legal protection, 
is “designed to bring U.S. suppliers approved a project in which U2. He said be told Chinese leaders 
imo direct contact with Chinese computer companies wiD set np a the lack erf an effective system of 
project managers and industrial training center in the northeastern parent and trademark laws “can 
planners at the highest leveL” - port city of Dalian to instruct tech- only result in a reluctance by U2. 

Machine shops, foundries, tex- nicians in computer maintenance firms to transfer their technology.” 
tile nulls and Eber-opticsplants are and repair. ‘The commercial, legal and reg- 


tile prills and Eber-optics plants are and repair. ^ ‘The commercial, legal and reg- 

among the 400,000 Chinese fac- The United States is China’s ulatory environment is still uncer- 
lories m need of technological up- third largest trading partner. Trade tain," be said, adding that a team of 
grading if China is to sustain Iasi between the two nations grew from American legal experts will visit 

— — China this year to investigate prob- 

Ions facingU2. concerns that seek 

Morgan Stanley Group Bids - 

$1 .8 Billion for Conrail Stake SlSS 

" nrier Zhao Zyang was me need for 

Reuter* Morgan Stanley said the majority a comprehensive bilateral invest- 

WASHINGTON — An inves- of the stock would be resold to the meat treaty, 
tors group headed by Morgan Stan- public over a period not exceeding c 


Morgan Stanley Group Bids 
$ 1.8 Billion for Conrail Stake 


ley ft Co. announced Tuesday a nve 
$l.&-biHion offer to bay the U2. A 
government's 85-percent share of sale 
Consolidated Rafl Crap. ‘ won 


public over a period not exceeding 
five years. 

At the conclusion of the stock 
sale process, the investor group 
would bold no more than 40 per- ; 


r l. bauMImm a. cent of the stock and no single 

The groupsaid u wouldjgive ibt investor would hold more than 10 


government $12 billion in rash, the 


Tne world group net profit for of its television subsidiary Tdefnn- 
1984 was heavily distorted. AEG ken Rundfunk und Femsdi GmbH 


xoo un 
SS S . SM 
5M SM 
530 1M 
599 fcOO' 


Wtfc UM- 
. 1BV% TOW 

U t/lk W l/M 
- Wtfc WV% 

» W 


Cold Prices 


between the two countries over 
Japan’s huge trade surplus with 
the United States, which rose to 
a record $37 billion in 1984. 


saa« M offered ly Norfo^Lfr P ^an Stanley aho add ite of- 

Transportation Depanmmt, ^ ^ STmpreaation in tbe 
but the government would also Jr tiu . 


AM. PM. cm 
hmKm ■ mo5. 32S9S +7JJ0 

Urantaiira '■ . 3308 . ' — + 7JB 

pqrti nzs uto) ma mas +sat 

Zwidi sxus mas + A* 

Loncton 3209 32550 + JUO 

Hta.Y Wk ’ — 32UO —030 

OfikM BhIhh ftr untavJwsww unwn- 
lwor«iBp tan >tta data fl>i1ce» tor Mono IW> 
and bxkdu Now Y«* Conn enrranr omtnxs. 
ad pita In Uii nt tna, 

Source; Reuters; ‘ 


showed 4372 mflfion marks as ex- to France’s Tbomscm SA. 
tfanr dinar y eaming B, with 395 nal- 

lion from the sale of the high-tech 

subsidiaiy AEG-Tdefunken Nach- 
richtentechnik GmbH. A further • . 

37 mflfion DM came from eanrings JetAviatfon -the tnfe 

on fixed assets and 50 miffion from a 

interest-rate rdief under the debt 
restructuring proceedings. ’ 


able in the Norfolk Southern bid. 

The investors grow added that it 
planned to sell Conrail stock 
through a series of pnblic offerings. 


million shares of Conrail stock. 


JetAvfatfon - the international leading organization for business aviation with 
a charter fleet of 45 aircraft and worktwide nine maintenance bases offers you 


^ emott Uoyct* Bml Boai of Tokyo. Source; Reuters: 

V 'Markets dosed 

*; n Financial markets in Madrid wfll bedpsed.^ Wednesday because of a 
' “ holiday. Banks ur France wdfl be dosed Wednesday, afremoon also 
because of a hdbd^r;'. . 


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! J25fc j2pci?ctagoaw**a«, 

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service of professional perfection. ^ 

Our Air-Taxi service is aval table to you around-the-clock: 

1 Beech King Air 200 - 1 Mitsubishi 2 - S Citation H-2Lss«jet3B - 
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COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDH 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yetted the Mowing 


IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983:— 24% 

IN 1984s— 34% 

MAY 9, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U2. $82S18r40 

CaB or wrte Ftoyal Frazier at 
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■fet«8M1667173UW 


tr 









Page 12 


mTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 



NYSE AAQSf Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Tuesdays 


AMEX Diorles 


NASDAQ index 


km low Lot cam. 


zn mu 
rank rm 
at* 97Vj 

60* SM 
41 60* 

25* 25* 
5S% 94 
48 44 

388k 38* 
21% 31 
SI , 90 
8414 83 
404% 
28% 2744 
20% 22% 


22Vk + % 
128 — «% 
im -4-2% 

am —114 
<1 + % 
BU 44 
54ft + ft 
64% —1 
38V4 —ft 
31ft + ft 
90% . 

84ft +ft 
41 — 1 

27ft 

Z3Va + % 


I OWl HIM LOW CUM CVM 
Indin I3B1X7 128845 12gX7 127370 — *20 


417J6 621.35 407-51 40972 —7*4 
159X1 1WA7 157*7 153XS — 835 


I Corn D 534*7 527*2 518*4 520X9 —387 


Cwmuslft 

indusrrMa 

tug*. 

Utilities 

Finance 


HWi Law CUM CM 
107.11 104*9 144*8—1127 
131*0 12104 171-15 —0.52 
9* JO 99X1 99*1 —0*1 
57*4 54J93 .57*0 +0*1 
11848 115*1 118*0 —0.18 




Mvoncad 

cwaiMd 


340 282 

360 274 

344 30 

7£ 7" 

*2 


Composite 

lndp*trkdi 

Finance 

lawrwct 

UttUtlM 


cm *ao 

—042 280*9 
—0*8 29tM 


+ 0.U 34*47 

+ 1J1 Otfl 

— 149 270*2 

+ lE mu 

— 345 253.15 


3R& 


NYSE Diaries 


odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total taw 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


Close QH 

74*1 +0*5 

7350 + 054 

78*2 +0.16 


Total tarn 
New Highs 
New laws 


731 872 

■40 an 

457 484 

2028 2027 

140 133 

I 9 


volume up 
volume down 


ttSHR 


Buy sow *sim 

MOV 13 <£•]« £“2 

jSffi 0 - — «am3 '418749 1X41 

8*=W** A 

‘Included tot the sales Hawes 


VoLoMpjH 9734UQ0 I 

Prev.4PJA.voL — MUM I 

PrevcomofifcMrfos* .102*20*48 


Grooms 

■BBS 

OtaCOO 

SS&i 


£3 t« = * 

in ^ m T% ♦* 

IP I >:§ 

II S > P 

us uu i. 

3 s ^ " -* 


L io‘ 


JP 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEXSaies 


TaMcs ioctodt the netioawMft price* 
op to the tiktslnii an Wall Street and 
da nof redact late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Finance 

GompaUto 


mm low dose one* 
205*3 23X22 30349—0*0 
140X7 19852 UBL5B— 1.11 
13*3 13X2 8397— 0.13 
was nn 22*4— QJW 
188.17 113*5 113*7—0*4 


AM EXStodcjndex. 


4P.M. volume 
Prev. 4 P.M. votoflM 

Prev. eons, volume 


HKk L« 
227*9 


Clam cm 
227.74 -M» 


UMOQffl 
High Law Stock 


oc ruwi 

Oto. via. PE WOSHW Low Quot.Oi'ae 


45% ITU AolnLI 2*4 5* 33 2151 «* 44ft 44* 


SBft 52ft Aeti.pt 5*3*105 


15 55ft 55ft 55ft 


35% 15ft Ahrmts 1*0 34 14 945 WJ 35 


3ft 2ft Altoon 


38ft AlrPrd 1*0 2* 11 857 51ft 51 


2ft 3ft 2ft 


24ft 13 AJrbFrt *0 2* 12 

2 1 AIMOOS 23 

32 Ui 2M> AUPpIA 3*2 12* 

S 8 ' AlaPdof X7 1U 
75ft 61Vb AtoPpf 9X0 12-8 
103% B5% AtaPpf 11*0 107 
15 11 AlOMCS 1*4 7.1 0 

22ft 9V. AlSkAIr .14 4 9 


17V* 10ft Albrto* JB 24 IS 3 18ft 14 14 

31ft 22ft Albfsns J6 2* 13 ,793 33 31 32ft +1* 

31ft 23% Akan 1*0 4* 12 1188 25H 25 25ft— ft 

34ft 27* AlSsM 1*0 3 12 3S*Mft S« Mft + ft 

32 17 AlexAIx 1*0 34 309 29% 29 V 


28 ft 20ft AlMKlr If 

89ft 70ft Alio Co 2*41 14 24 
28ft 18ft Alfllnl 140 5* 

20 15% Alglnpf ZI9 117 
m* art aj»jp>ci>* 5 izo 


31ft 24ft AOePw 230 I* 9 1077 31ft 31 U 31ft + ft 

2»h IS* AJtenG 40b 3* W 72 1ft Wft 18%-% 

44ft 28ft AlldCp 1*0 4.1 9 2543 44ft 43ft <»- * 

64 53ft AJdCt.pl *J4 105 77 44ft 84ft 44ft— ft 

ii3ft yy A(dcppn2*0 li.i >«** «* ’£ 

107% 100ft AHC Pf 1131011* 307 105 104ft 105 + ft 

ZtVi 13ft AlWPri 17 30 10ft 10ft IBft — ft 

39ft 30 AlldStr il2 X9 8 530 55 54ft 54ft — ft 

13ft 5ft AllbCh ?! J£S JSb 2 

34ft 24 A bC pf 40 29ft 29ft 27ft + ft 

27ft 20 ALLTL 1*4 4* 8 40 26ft 28ft 28ft- ft 

39ft 29ft A km 1*0 3* 16 1748 33ft 33 33 —ft 

28ft 15ft Amo *0 1* 1234 189% WM 18ft— ft 

41 VS 32ft AmOX Pf 100 9.1 1 33% 33ft Mft— % 

34 22ft Am Ha 1.10 3* 22 3784 2396 31ft 30ft + ft 

2ft 1ft AmAnr 217 2 1ft 1* 

20 15ft ABOUT 8 88 19ft 199% 1990 + ft 

70 53 A Brand 3*0 8* 9 842 45ft 45 45ft— ft 

27ft 241% ABrd Pt 275 99 11 27% 27* 27% + * 

W* S3 ABrd Pf 2*7 4* 1 67 87 87 +18% 

115 55ft ABdat U0 1* 17 1527 109* 100% 109* — ft 

28ft 19ft ABMM *63* 13 4 24 2 4 28 

ZTft 20ft ABusPr M 2* 14 72 25ft 25ft 25ft — ft 

raft 40ft Am Can 2*0 5J 11 865 54ft 53ft 54ft + ft 

2Jft 21ft ACOnpf 2*0 11.1 11 25ft Mft 

43 36 ACOnpf 3.00 4* I 47ft 47ft 47ft— ft 

112ft 103 ACan pf 13*5 12* I 112ft 112ft 112ft 

19ft 18ft ACaaBd 2*0 1X1 90 19ft 199% 19ft 

31ft 251% A CapC v Ule S3 22 29 289% 29 + ft 


2ft 1ft ArnAar 
20 15th A Bust 

70 53 A Brand 3*0 4* 

27ft 241% ABrd Pf 225 9* 


11 251* 25ft 251% 

1 47ft 47ft 47ft— ft 

I 112ft 112ft 112ft 

50 19ft 199% 1 9ft 

22 29 2Sft 29 + ft 

13 Sft 81% Bft + 1% 


541& 43ft ACvan 1*0 17 12 1443 52 51ft 51ft— ft 


2«ft lflft AOT *2 3* 25 155 2551 Mft 24ft- ft 

21ft 15ft AElPw 2*4aW5 8 1804 2118 21ft 21ft— ft 

44 25 Am Exp 1*0 2* 15 5934 45ft 44V. 45 — ft 

30ft 14ft AFamll 64b XI 13 365 30ft 29ft 30 — 1% 

34 191% AGnCp 1*0 10 10 47543393 33 33 — ft 

Mf% 6 AGnlWt 144 14ft 14ft 14ft— Vb 

57 511% AGnlPfA6*4ell* 145 55 55 55 + ft 

91ft 58ft ACmpfBS*7e 4* 41 90ft 89ft B9ft + ft 

8016 40ft AGnpfD 284 40 1627 47% 48ft 84ft— ft 

32ft 25ft A Horlt 1*0 3* 9 1 314% 311% 31ft— ft 

12ft 7ft AHolst 108 Oft Oft fit 

83ft 48ft AHame 290 47 U 2885 62 61ft 61ft + ft 

30 26ft A Hasp 1.12 3* 10 2904 31ft 31ft 3H%- ft 

87ft 621% Amrich 640 7* 8 1951 Mk 86ft 86ft + ft 

83ft 52 AlnGrp M S 24 13H 84ft 83ft 84ft +Tft 

U0 112ft AIGPPf US <2 12 148 U8ft 140 

2Bt% IBM AMI 72 2* 13 1988 26ft 259% 25ft— ft 
5ft 3 AmMat 906 3ft 2ft 3 —ft 

45ft 27ft A Nat fiK 222 3L4 12 82 65 84% 84ft 

43ft 24ft APrastd 2J9 3 388 26ft 25ft 25ft— 1ft 

13ft 5 ASLFta 5 £5 4ft 5ft 6 — ft 

18ft 12ft ASt-Rpfllf IS* 43 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
16 101% ASMP *0 4* 9 87 12 lift lift— ft 

35ft 22ft AmSM 1*0 57 9 600 28ft 28ft 28ft 

56ft 26ft AfflStor *4 1* 9 508 53ft 53 53ft + ft 

68ft 481% AStrpfA 4*8 6* 115 84 63ft 84 + ft 


58ft 51 AStrpfB 6*0 127 35 Sft 55ft 

22ft 15 AT&T 1*0 53 1720470 22ft 27V. 

38ft 30ft AT&Tpf 3*4 9* 506 38ft 38ft 

39ft 31ft AT&T Pf 174 9* 13 39ft 39ft 

Tift 14ft AWatrs 1*0 M 9 96 284% 26ft 


39ft 31ft AT&Tpf 174 9* 
Tift 14ft AWatrs 1*0 3* 
13 10 A Wot pt 1*5 ILl 

12ft 10 AVHOSPf 1*5 1X1 
28ft IfftAfTlHati 2*0 9* 
70ft 53ft ATrPr 5*4 8.1 
111% 41% ATrSc 
~ 58ft ATrUn 5*4 7* 
26ft Ameren 1*0 47 
20 AmesOs *0 * 

Zlft Ametefc *0 3* 
18ft Amfac 


13 39ft 
94 364% 
40* lift 
lOOt lift 
111 »» 


39ft + ft 
24ft 

lift— ft 


irrMSSiB 

” 81 80ft 80ft + ft 
_ . 53 34ft 3316 34ft + ft 

* 23 135 451% 45 45ft— ft 

- 142 2S1% 25 25ft— ft 

78 2tft 25ft 25ft + ft 
38 10ft 10ft 10ft 
12 64ft 84ft 64ft— ft 
02 32ft 31ft 32 
E73 121% 12 12 —ft 

S3 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
191 30 29ft 2fft + ft 
26*41 40 40ft— ft 

no Sft Sft 3ft + ft 
144 22 21ft 21ft 
W 23ft 22ft 23ft + ft 
74 371% 34ft 37 —ft 
1 10ft UBh 10ft— ft 


*0 37 11 342 2Sft 
70 24ft 


Amfnsc 4 38 1' 

Amoco 3*0 5.1 9 2712 6 


12 Am pen 
12ft Amreos 


Amsm 1*0 47 


72 23 19 1702 32ft 
*0 25 14 273 131% 
8 53 17ft 


TSft Airatmf 1*0 37 14 224X41 
1ft Anacmp 1818 3ft 

15ft An logs 19 484 22 

19ft Anchor 1*8 4* 793 23ft 

24ft AnOay 1*2 3* 19 74 371k 


42ft 24ft AnOay 1*2 3* 19 
12ft Oft AndrGr JO 1* 14 


12ft n. — .. . 

23ft 16ft Angelic *6 2* 13 387 _ 

84ft 59ft Anheus 2*0 2* 11 *58 84 

40 45ft Anheupt3*0 40 *05 40 

19ft 13ft Anlxtr J8 17 17 2BS 

14ft Bft Anthem *4 * 15 145 

15ft 10ft Anttuv *4b 3* 8 5 


2* 13 3B7 23ft27ft23 + ft 
2* 11 *58 84 831% 831%— ft 


2ft ft AnehPwt 
19ft 151% ApchPuttt.10 11.1 
61ft 50 ApPwrPf 7*0 T2J 
32ft 27ft ApPwPf 4.18 1X1 
30 24 ApPwpf 3*0 12* 


78 2* 12 252 12ft 13 


831% 831%— ft 
59M 59ft +ft 
14ft 141% + ft 
12ft lift + ft 
12ft 12ft + ft 


Sft 12M + ft 
lft lft 


470 19ft 18ft 19 — ft 

290**0% 60 *0 — ft 

* 32ft 32 32 —ft 

12 29ft 291* 29ft 


39ft I7ft AptOfa 3.139 3*18 234 33ft 32?%33 — ft 


14ft 14ft— ft 


15ft ArchDn ,14b 7 M 1334 31ft 301% 20ft— ft 

23 ArlPpI 3*0 137 21 25ft Si 281% + ft 

79 ArtPpi MJ7D 10B M0z99ft 99ft 99ft— ft 


79 ArlPpI MjL7B 10* 
Uft ArtcBst *0 2* 8 
16 ArMa 1*8 4* 22 
ft ArtnRt 

lift Armada 25 

4ft Armco 

15ft Armc at 2.10 117 
15ft ArmjBJj *8 3* 0 


11 25ft 28 281% + ft 

94ta 99% 99ft 99ft— ft 
34 20ft 194% 1 9ft— ft 
3W6 24JJ S31% 2^%— 1% 

V4 lift lift lift — ft 
1485 74% 7ft 7ft 

50 18 17ft 17ft— ft 
30 101% I Bft 18ft— ft 


23ft ArmWIn 1*0 37579 217 351% 341* 3414— ft 
19 AfoCP 1*0 4.1 7 34 29W ZS« 29» +1 


13ft ArewtE jo 1* 
16 Artra 72 * 

14ft Arvlns JU 19 
171% Asarco 
20%. MiKMI 1*0 5* 
3SH AshlOpf 4*0 10.1 
31ft AaMOpt 19* 9* 


137 13H 13ft 13ft 

32 271* 271% 27ft- ft 

*6 20ft 201% 20ft— ft 

3*0 24ft 331* 23ft + ft 

3S2 301% 29ft 29ft + ft 

134 441* 44ft 44ft + ft 

33 40ft 40 40ft — ft 


451% AsdDG 2*0 47 10 382 61M 61ft 61ft + ft 

73 AsdD Pf 475 4* 3 «B* 9Sft Wft + ft 

15ft AJhlene 1*0 7* 9 11 201% SOM 20ft + ft 

19ft AtCvEI 2*0 8* 9 158 28ft 27ft 38ft + ft 

40ft All Rich 4X0 88 2510395 40% 60M 604* 

32Vi AliRcpf 175 10.4 210x 37 38 34 

97 AHRCPf 3X0 17 13 145ftl45 143 — ft 

lift AllbSCP 273 13ft 121% 12ft— 1% 

15ft Alioat *0 17 20 09 23 221% 23ft— ft 

33 AutaOl 82 I* 19 2410 45ft 444* 491* + ft 

4M A union n 84 41% 4ft 4M— ft 


lift AllbSCP 

15ft Aiioat *0 17 20 

33 AutoOt 82 I* 19 

4M Aualonn 

151% AVEMC 80 11 14 

23 Avery xo I* 13 

10 Avlall n 7 

27 Avne! 70 17 13 

19ft Avon 2*0 10.1 9 

18 Avdhi 10 


80 11 14 1 3 2M 20ft 20ft + ft 
80 I* 13 824 33M 331* 33ft— ft 
7 182 14ft 14ft 14ft— M 

70 17 13 793 30ft 28ft 29ft— 1ft 

2*0 10.1 9 2004 20 194% 19ft 

10 43 19ft 18ft 18ft— 1* 


im Balmcs 70 18 12 


IS Bkrlntl 
184% BaWor 
1% wIBaMU 
3 BldUpt 
294* BallCP 178 14 13 
lift BalhrMf 70 1* 

74% BaHyPk II 

301* Bailee 370 7* 0 

21 aaeOna MO U II 
Bft BacCIrn 72* 5* I 
3V* BWlTsx 

39th BanOtU 170 11 12 
IV Bkfias 2*0 47 5 
43 BkBaa pf 471* 9* 

4* BfcNE dPB88eU8 
261* BkNY 2*4 4* 7 
15ft BnkVas 1*0 3* 10 
141% BnkAm 172 77 11 
40 BKAmpf 5.13ellJ 
11W BKAmpf 378 
23ft BkARtv 2*0 78 11 
374* BankTr 170 17 7 
19U BkTrpt 150 107 
7t% Sommer X3e J 14 
19 Bard *4 1* 13 
15 SamGe 70 37 9 
33ft Barnet 1*6 2* 10 

22 BarratM 

19ft BorVWr *0 37 15 
51* BASIX .12b 1.1 10 
17M Bausch 78 It 17 
114* OaxITr 77 2* 64 
171% Boy Fin JO .9 40 
SIM BOYSfG 180 7* 10 
294* Bearlne 1*0 37 11 
24ft Beaten 170 57 4 


101 10ft 
41 30ft 
SOS 151* 
25 21ft 
139 11% 
3 * 

119 481* 
834 15 

30 91* 
7*7 431* 
137 J3ft 

21 91* 

137 34% 

39 97ft 
3302 49ft 
1 53ft 
70 54ft 

229 42ft 
3*4 30 
7992 Sift 
14 451% 
93 15ft 

31 33 
7758 73ft 

5 24ft 
7 11 
105 31ft 
44 21ft 
914 54ft 


Wft— ft 
301% + ft 
IBM — ft I 
21ft— ft 
lft 

6 — ft 
48ft 

14ft— M 
9ft 

43ft + ft 
33 — ft 
946 

344— ft 
57 - ft 
494% 

52ft + ft 
53ft— ft 
42ft— ft 
291% 

31ft +4% 


46 Vi Beal Of 378 6* 


30ft BednO 170 2* 14 
41% Beter 


fft Bekerpf uo 177 
12V% Bakin H *0 18 10 
32ft BefHwt St 17 10 
22 BetHwpf 87 27 
68ft BeUAH 670 77 9 
324% BCEo 378 
194% Batllnd 72 I* 15 
27ft BellSeu 270 77 9 
40ft BelOAH 70 17 26 
214% Bends 1*0 X* 11 
33 BwrtCp 2*0 5* 10 
30ft Berwfpf 470 1X1 
33 Belief pf 470 118 
17 Benefpf ISO 11* 

Sft BenofB *7| 


71% BergEn 14 

Sft Berkey 33 

IMS BestPd 74 U 28 
14ft Bams 11 *0 2* 

37ft BethStptSTO 12J 
IBM BamS t pf 270 12* 
23v> Beverly 72 .9 20 

19ft BloThr 70 3* 17 
13ft Btocfln 

17ft Blocks 84 XI 13 
2! BlekHP 1.93 &0 9 
14ft Biok-Jn 76 17 W4 
37 BI«tcHR 2*8 47 14 
37 Boeing 182 28 14 
24ft tumnl 
32W BalseC 1.90 *J 17 
48 BolieCntSJOO 92 
1 5ft BeHBer .10 7 30 
52 Borneo 3*1 4* 10 
26 Bordn wl 


105 21ft 
376 lift 
>05 29ft 
4075 151% 
21 21ft 

27 34 

1 33ft 
1711 31 
4 57 
.88 14ft 
199 51 
81 Sft 

33 101% 
120 18 
468 30ft 
12 301% 
545 871% 
140 3944 

28 231% 
8018 381% 

117 544* 
12 391% 
1041 401ft 
4 344% 
3001384% 
10k 22 
99 Sift 
6 234* 
154 4 
700 141% 
1830 l«ft 
54 

41 20ft 
MS 36 
1191 231% 
512 21V% 

704 311% 
39 33ft 
313 204% 
175 531% 
2124 42ft 
3 41ft 
427 401% 
95 54ft 
72 29ft 
324 494* 
3 391% 


15M 

31ft— ft 
72*%— IV. 
241% 

11 + ft 

31—4% 
21 — ft 
9644 + 1% 
30 + ft 

sin— n 
10M— ft 
294% 

154% 

211 % 

34 + ft 

33ft + 1% 
30ft— 1% 
541% — ft 
141% — ft 


5ft 51% 

9ft 9ft— ft 
15V* ISM— ft 
30ft 3044— ft 
30ft 30ft— ft 
86ft 07M + ft 
29ft 3944 + ft 
33ft 23ft— A 
38A 38ft— ft 
531* 54ft +1A 
29ft 29ft 
40 4Dft— ft 
36 364% + ft 

3X4 384* +lft 
22 22 
Sft Sft— ft 
23ft 23ft 
51% 6 + ft 
)» I4A + ft 
14M 14M— A 
40ft 40ft— ft 
191% 20A + Hi 
39ft 354k— ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
20ft 21ft + ft 
204* 20ft— ft 
32 32 — M 

194% 2044 + ft 
53ft 52ft— A 
6144 62 
41ft +)ft 
40ft 40ft— ft 
54ft 541% 1 

28ft 38ft + ft | 
49 89M + ft 

39 35ft + ft 


NYSE Share Prices Decline 


23V% M AAR *8 27 13 45 17 16ft Mft— ft 

If 91% AG5 12 31 15 14*% 14ft— ft 

171%' 9AAMCA 2 111* lift lift _ 

211%' 13ft AMF JO U 55 3450 2Dft 19M 19ft— ft 
45 24ft AMR 10 3558 44M 431% 5*%— ft 

211% 181% AMR pf 2.18 105 258 2«% 204% »«.— Jk 

Mft 7ft APL 43 33 1M% 9ft «*— * 

65ft 441% ASA 2X0 37 532 53ft 52ft S2ft — 1 

27 MM AVX 72 2* 13 17Blfl*16 1«* + V% 

24ft 16 AZP £»1L£ 7 77D23ftzn*23M 
54 36ft AbtXUj 1*0 27 15 1928 S3ft 52A S»— * 

251% 17 AcooWd B At 27 12 91 22 311% 32 + ft 

Z1M 12V% AcroaC *0 21 2+1 ’4ft 13M 

10M 71% Acme E 72b +1 10 22 7ft 7ft W— A 

17ft 15 Ado Ex 173*1X5 56 16ft 16ft lgj-— A 

30 lift AdmMI 73 3* 6 515*151% J5ft + £ 

19M Bft AdvSys SX SB 17 B* 10ft Wft 10ft— A 

4IA 25A AMO J7 <®93 If Zn* 27*— » 

12ft 4ft Advni .19 17 148 9ft 9 9 — ft 

14ft Bft Aerflex 11 13 13M 12V* 12ft 


Compiled be Otff Staff From Duporcha 
NEW YORK — Prices sagged Tuesday on 
the New York Stock Exchange after the rally of 
the past three sessions faded. 

Auto and technology issues led the retreat in 


a session of moderate activity. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, up 
27.72 points in the last three trading days, 
slipped back 420 to 1,273.30. Volume totaled 
97.7 milli nn shares; up from 83.8 million on 
Monday. Declines led advances by an 8-7 mar- 
gin. 

Before the .market opened, the Commerce 
Department reported that U.S. retail sales rose 
0.9 percent last month. At the same time, it 
revised the drop originally reported for March 
from 1.9 percent io 0.7 percenL 

Analysts said those figures were taken as 
evidence that consumer spending was continu- 
ing to grow at a moderate and apparently sus- 
tainable pace. 

Some observers said the retail sales figures, 
upbeat as they were, did not look strong enough 
to deter the Federal Reserve from considering 
moves such as a discount rate reduction to relax 
its credit policy. 

However, brokers said the market apparently 
yielded as the session progressed to sellers look- 
ing to each in on the recent rise in stock prices. 

Among leading computer and technology 
stocks. International Business Machines 
dropped 2'A to 128; Digital Equipment to 
103%; Texas Instruments 216 to 92; Data Gen- 
eral 1 to 3816. and Hewlett-Packard ft to 34. 

In the anto sector. General Motors fell 1 to 
66 Vi\ Ford Motor lost 1 to 41; American Motors 
was down ft at 3, and Chrysler was unchanged 
at 34ft. 


68 21ft 201% 2IA + ft 

90 lft 11% lft 

3 32M 32ft 32ft 
36 7ft 7M 7ft + A 

3b 75 75 73 

20QKI02A USA 1IOM— ft 
143 141% 14ft T4U + ft 

830 33M 21ft 211k— ft 

23 18ft 18 16 


309 29ft 29 29 

19 356 23ft 32M 2ZM— A 

24 55 79ft 79 79 + ft 

359 25 24ft 25 + A 

14 20 m% 20 + A 

8 ISft 93 93A + ft, 


GM. Ford and AMC reported lower domes- 
tic car caW for early May, while Chrysler past- 
ed an increase. Overall, the industry showed an 
8.8-percent decline in sales. 

General Electric dropped PA to 58%. The 
company pleaded guilty Monday to charges 
thm it defrauded the U.S. government of more 
than ssnnnoo on an Air Force missile contract. 

Minnesot a Mining & Manufacturing, which 
forecast record sales and e ar n in gs for the year, 
despite a decline in fust-quarter profits, rose i 
to 78. 

Telerate fell 1 Vz 10,20*4. The company report- 


ed higher quarterly profits, but the increase 
evidently feQ short of expectations on Wall 


12 Month 
HtailMf Stud, 


249% 181% 
Bft 4ft 
39ft 23ft 
10ft 9 
ra% ioA 
351% 14ft 
31ft 35A 
80 43 

30 21ft 
20ft 9A 
5ft Tft 
22A ISA 
39ft 28 
23ft 19A 
3Z» 7S 
26ft 13 
29ft 22ft 
45M 24A 
40ft 23ft 
40ft 271* 
19ft 13ft 
181% ISM 
21M lift 
28ft 23 
58ft 35 
7ft 6M 
Sift 44M 
IBM 1214 
65A 48A 
301% 12A 
91% 2M 
U 814 


72 43 io am 

30 

3J4 87 8 409 
1.17 11* 19 

1*6 117 43 

73 11 I STS 

140 &5 12 28 

MS 12 17 4114 
143* SX 9 749 

134] 

245 

172 87 21 219 
3.12 77 7 43 

2*7 107 4 

375 127 13 

^ U I 18 
1J4 5.1 15 45 

1*6 25 15 1288 
1*0 27 8 1472 
-48 X5 IS 679 
*0 46 8 24 

116 117 5Q 
13 88 

174 65 70 434 
1*0 IS • 1387 
-55 60 . 1 

554*11.1 190 

74 6.1 14 68 

240 61 12 5538 

52 27604 11 

510 38* m 


Zlft 21 
7 6M 
39ft 391% 
10M 10ft 
12ft 12H 
23 22ft 
29 2Mk 
J9t% 58?% 
2BM 271% 
31 A 20ft 
31% 2A 
22A 22 
391% 39ft 
23 22ft 
32A 321% 
301% 201% 
36ft 26ft 
43ft 43ft 
351% 341% 
33ft 33 
17ft 171% 
lift 18ft 
18% 184% 
2SA 25 
56ft 5SM 
4ft M 
50 49ft 
Ml* 13ft 
64M 63ft 
lift 18ft 
3 2ft 
71% 7 


33ft 24 CBI In 1*00 55 
122 6814 CBS 3*0 73 

8A 4ft CCX 
12 8ft CCXpf ITS 137 


31ft 231% ClGpf 
7ft 4ft OjC 
47ft 21ft CNAFn 
10ft 0ft CNAI 


271% 10ft CSX 1.16 45 
40ft 24 CTS 170 X0 
12M 7ft C 3 Inc _ 30 

33ft 221% Cabot 72 35 9 
14ft 0ft Caesar 
20ft llftCalFed *8 27 
47ft 3214 ColFdpf 475 97 
21Vk 13M Callhn 75b 17 
1B« lift Control .12 7 
8 15ft CRLk g *0 
BA 7ft OnpRg .181 


HA 10ft CoRpfO £50 7 lift lift lift + A 

73ft 54ft GomSe 250 u 11 301 85A 85 45ft— M 


451% 3SA CdPaco 1*0 
2JM 14ft CanPEfl 70 
223 141 CapdtS 70 


25ft 15 CaoHds 77 J.1 11 S23 25ft 241% 25 — A 


fOM 34 Ccfai pf 4J0 108 


7M Cangyn 74 * 27 424 10 9ft 10 + ft 


25 H 9* n t a l 338 58 9 191 42ft 41ft 42V% + ft I 

2M% 17 Centex n 10 140 22ft 21 23 — ft ; 

34ft 17 CenSOW 2*0 &5 7 1005 Z4 231* 23ft 

I7V% CenHud 274 108 4 145 26ft 24ft 261% 

36 CnIUPf 4JQ 10* 200Z43M 42A 42A 


14ft COOPS 1X4 69 9 3024 181% 18 


“P 1 CA 42A 42A + A 


251* 17ft Cilia El 2X8 63 
3SA 29V% CL0EIPf4.il 125 
11 A Bft C*MPw 1*0 147 
19. 13 CVTPS 170 107 
T2M 21b CantrDT 

7ft CntrvTI 70 7* 


10ft CanvM 3*0 127 


59 25A 24ft 25 - 1% 
9 34 33A 33M— ft 

44? WttlO + k 
27 171% 171% 171%— ft 
240 4M 4 4U — A 
58 10ft 104% IBM 

” 19ft 20 + A 


27A 15ft CrMeed JO 27 12 132 24ft 24ft 24A— 1% 
If* 16A CwBAjr *0 2* 17 294 20A wZ 19ft + ft 


24> l*ft Ctunpin *0 ix 

zn% 19 dimlpf 170 47 

5$ 43ft ami pf 4*0 9.1 


8 OiamSa *0 45 12 193 


1530 231% 22ft 22ft — ft 
3 34A 2£% 244% — A 
404 SI 901% 50ft + A 


4M 1 vlCbrtC 
11% ft VICW wt 
«% 1A vlCfrtPf 


8ft Bit— ft 


57ft lift Chase 370 8* 6 4537 SBft 


203 2ft Tft ZAj+H 
1 «% 31% » 


Wt OMKPl US 114 25 451* 45A 45ft + ft 

f® 4} *^JeH-9 151 55ft 55 55 

57A 51 Oiesepfl2*0e2U 13 52ft 521% 52A + A 

211% 141% OmIhd 21 U I 11 m% m* Ifft 

34ft 244% Chained 152 5J 13 421 2BV% 27ft 27ft _ ft 

43 23A ChmHY 2*8 6* 6 200 « 41 41ft — ft 

«A 22ft ChNYPt 177 '45 4 42 41 ft 41ft + ft 

98ft 48 ChNVpf A73el1* 34 54ft ]«% ui% + u 

Mft 46 OlNYpf 5.95K11.1 1 Oft Sft Sft— ft 

39M 31ft Ctiank 174 35 10 29 351% 3SA 3SA 

VS. 4 10 1004 SS ss ^5- A 

3?% 29’X Cnevm 2*0 67 8 2832 3SA 3Sft 35ft — ft 

71ft 16A CNWSI 45 601 171% 17ft 171* — v. 

'V. ChlMiw_ » 16 143M 143 * 143 * 


4 42 411* 41ft + ft 

*4 56ft 96ft 56ft + ft 

1 531* 5»* sft— ft 

» 351% 3SA 3SA 


200 127 ChIMiw 

00ft 53A CMMlPf 
?6ft 161% ChIPnT .lift * 


8 2832 2SA 3Sft 35ft — 1% 
« “1 >7A, 171% 17ft- ft 
70 16 143M 143 Ml 

_ 20 7S 74ft 75 

22A Z3 + A 


HL 9* FuM -33f 4.1 90 42 81% 8ft «%— ft 

^A 241% QtrftCr *BT 1* 102 484% j% a _ u 

Kl 215 aieffpf 1*0 * 1 367 367 Js7 +16 

2S L.SS22. 41 uw 12 « In 

JT-rSra ,w *85 

38A 201% aimlr 1*0 27 3 5641 351% 34ft 34ft ” 

71ft 34ft Chubb a 230 XI 14 198 TOft 70 7DM— ft 

61ft 50ft Qwbbpf 475 77 ISO Mft ™ 


10ft— ft 
SOM— ft 


19M lift ChUTChS *4 27 14 834 IN* T_ 


SA 18ft Dlcorp Z22 87 
47A 3SA CkiBell XU 66 
151% 91% OnGE X16 14* 
— 24 ClnO Pf 4X0 UX 

25 ClnGpf 4JS lax 
70 SO CkiO Pi 950 137! 
551* 39 ClnGpf 7M 1X7 
68 48 ClnO Pf 978 138 

70 50 dilGPl 972 1X8 

27 20 CinMfl 37 34 

221% arclK J4 27 

16ft aratv 78 2 

Z#ft MW Circus 


70M— ft 
60ft— 1% 
If* — I* 


U 9 1U »V* Z4ft Z5V* + ft 
.12 68 S 8 47ft 471% 471% + ft 

-16 14* 6 710 151% 141* 15 

*0 UX into 301* Wft 30ft + ft 

JS 1X8 38Z 36 3S M — 1 

■30 137! &£&i 70 6W1 Mft +i 

HJ 137 ^MV% Mft 54U-1 

•3B 138 170X 68 88 68 

-52 116 3 50r 7DA 70 70ft + ft 

J? 3* 24 98 22 21ft Slftl ft 

J4 23 14 1045 33ft 33ft Sft + ft 

M 3 13 242 251% Sft »*- ft 

" '■ »ft 23?%— ft 


*?V. 27ft CHIcrp 278 4J 7 4505 49ft 
43ft 35A atylnv 9 2076 361* 


«A 58 Oylnrt 270 35 
2SA Zlft Ctylnpf 277 115 
ID 6Vk dotUr 37 105 


7 4505 49ft 4%ft 48ft — ft 
9 2076 3W Sft 36ft 


2» QorfcE XM 35 31 139 281% 


18 5W 56ft 5614 + ft 

278 25 341% 25 

a 7 » 7 + A 


14 4ft ClovHm 
aw 17 aval 


21ft 1414 CtavEJ 253 125 6 1097 2Bft 30 


__ WL i» 

so lift iTvi lift + S 

46 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 


89 13ft T 
S 171% T 


3A 1M- 1% 
1711 + A 


181% 10 gmk . 80 48 89 13ft 13V% 13ft— ft 

ITU. 141% SvpkDf 174 5 171% 17ft 17ft + ft 

34U 22M do raw M4 SB 11 348 36M 3SM 2SYt— M 

71ft 141* OufeMn Mo S 10 315 21ft 21A 211% + ft 

32ft 24 aueffP 170 X3 12 590 30M 30 30ft 

21ft 12ft Coochm *0 27 14 344 14 13ft IM- ft 

55ft Sft Cm$M *0 7 11 2456 50ft 48ft SOU. +1A 

40M 24ft Call pf 1.19 23 1 53ft S3M S3M— Vk 

40 24A Cstlpl 173 35 1 53 33 53 —J 


55ft 23ft C60*M 
40ft 24ft Call pl 
40 Mft Catl pi 


72ft 5SM eaCACI 274 4* 14 2390 67ft 461* <7 + ft 


19ft 99% CoUCD 1234 l«ft 14 14ft— ft 

34 Sft Catalan IS 47 18 4M 2W* 29ft 291* 

Mft 30ft CoWPol 178b 52 33 1223 3*1% 2*1% 241% 


231% 14M COUUk* 84 29 8 
23 mt Co U=dtt .14 3 16 


181 32 211% 21ft + ft 

81 21* 21ft TIM— ft 


311% 201% Col Pen 1*0 50 9 1404 28ft 271% 28 + ft 


43ft 39ft Cottind 250 45 
241% CoKtel 3-1B 107 
48 CoKftPt 5*8 11 J 
0ft 22 CSOpf 3*5 
30 159k CSOpf 2*3 127 

ran* 97 csoornisjs 145 
48V. 27ft CoMblp 2.I6 45 


731 96ft 55ft 54 +1% 
5M 291% 291% 29ft + ft 
51 481% «ft 4fft + 1k 
20 27ft 27A 27A + A 
2 19 19 19 

120x196 MS IS —1 
232 4SM 471% 48 + ft 


37ft 25ft CmbEn 174 4 B 11 318 30ft SOM 30ft + ft 

17ft 8 Comdb 58 X4 10 IS 14ft 141% Mft— ft 

a 15ft CemMtt 76 27 1* 41 18ft U 18 

34M 8ft comfra 3 771 IOA 


3Mk 27A CmwE XH 107 7 2825 30ft 


4i lift ia ta 

772 IOA 10 IM + ft 


301% 2ZA CwEof 1*2 47 
left 13 CwEpf 1.90 H5 
17 13ft CwEpf 270 117 
W2M 80 CwEpf 1170 II* 


3 30 30 30 + ft 
24 Mft Wft 14 


27 Mft 141* Mft + ft 
4772OZI02M 102M W2M + ft 


Street 

Crane Co. gained lft to 37%. The company 
said shareholders approved a plan to spin off 
the company's CF&I Steel subsidiary. 

Atlantic Richfield eased ft to 60 H while 
Texaco gained 1 to 38. 

In media and broadcast stocks, McGraw-Hill 
advanced 1% to 49H. Taft Broadcasting lost 1% 
to 72 and CBS feU lft to 109%. 

Johnson & Johnson gained ft to 46ft. Merck 
tacked on lft to 61ft. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Ex chang e issues. BAT Industries led 
the actives, slipping 1/16 to 4 1/16. Wang 
Laboratories class B followed, losing ft to 175k. 
TIE. Communications was third, dosing un- 
changed at 6fi. 

The American Stock Exchange index lost 
0.63 to 227.76. The price of an average share 
decreased four cents. Declines led advances 
298-238 among the 775 issues traded. Volume 
totaled 7 million shares, up from 6 million 
Monday. 


SIS. OC3C I 

Ofv. YM. PE W05 HMl Low QnDl.OiHe | 


12 Month 
HtgflLow Stock 


51%. 

.PE lOSS HW 


21 W— W 
6M — M 
391* + ft 
10ft 

17ft + ft 
72ft + A 

am + ft 

59ft 

20ft 4- 1% 
21A + M 
2ft— M 

22 — A 
39ft + A 

23 +1% 
32M + A 
201% + M 
28ft + A 
43M + ft 
39—1% 
33 — M 
171% — 1% 
18ft— A 
181* + A 
251% + 1% 
55ft— * 

8ft— A 
50 + A 


Uft— ft 
43ft— ft 
IBM I 
3’ 

7 -ft, 


l*0o£5 12 246 2SM 25 2SA + ft 
UO 27 19 1009 111 A 109ft 10914— lft 
10 24 4A 8ft 8M 

ITS 127 20z 9ft Tft 91* 


CIGNA 2*0 47 88 1370 54ft 53ft 54 — A 


17 30ft 30ft 301% + ft 
180 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
S3 47M 47 47M + ft 

41 10ft WM 10ft + A 


9A 4M 
24 18 


10ft M CNAI 17001X3 41 10ft 10A 10ft + A 

44ft 34ft CPC lilt 270 57 11 849 42A 411b 42M + ft 

23ft 14ft CP Nil 1*0 87 9 116 22ft 22ft 22A— ft 

20ft WM CRIIMI 277*10.1 T71 TOM 20ft 2BM 


1.16 44 9 9548 251% 2SA 25ft + A 


70 X0 22 34ft 33ft 23ft— ft 
30 28 81* Sft 81% 

72 15 9 61 24ft 24 26 — ft 

15 356 13A 121* 12ft— A 
*8 25 8 1495 21 20ft 20ft + ft 
•75 97 7 4716 47M 471* + A 

25b 17 149 19M 18A 19M + ft 

.12 7 484 13ft I3M J3M 

*0 618 21ft 20ft 21 - A 

.141 122 Sft 31* 31* 

LSI 7 11A lift lift + A 


782 43M 47A 43A + M 
7 TOY. 20ft TOM + ft 
21 719 Z19M217M 219 —1 


14ft 10 Carl rig g M 14 11M 11A 11M 

«ft 24ft Carttsl* 1X2 37 10 42x 34Vk 34A 34M + ft 

26ft 15ft Cara Ft *0 17 10 311 23ft 22 22ft — ft 

19ft CorPw 2*0 9* 7 2500 27» 27ft 27ft + ft 

19ft CarPpf 2*7 n* 4 23ft 23A 22M— ft 

48 35ft CurTae 2.10 55 10 85 39M 38ft 38ft— IM 

lift 7ft Carrol .07 7 14 161 10ft 10 10ft + ft 

36ft CaraPIr 170 XB 8 58 43 4214 43 

in* Carttfw 172 43 10 398 281% 281% 281% — ft 

34M 19ft CarWn 52 15 12 383 3416 34ft 34ft 

17A 9ft CascNG 1JD 7.1 8 71 17 18ft Mft 

Mft 9A CaatfCk 2048 11M 11 lift + ft 

» 1» CsflCpf 127 7 20M 2B» 20ft— A 

46 2n% CatrpT 50 15 1578 33A 32M 32ft— A 

»ft 16 Ota 76 27 11 71 23A 23ft TSft + lb 

m >xm C«tanM 4.40 45 9 999 90ft 97ft 98 


38ft 34ft 
333% 23ft 
3ft 1 
34M 24ft 
371% 30 
27 12M 

201% 12ft 
25A 15 
20ft lift 
27ft 17M 

i5ft urn 
40 30 

48 22ft 
77% 441b 
10 41A 

37 32 

79 391% 

241% 16ft 
23A Iffft 
58ft 341* 
44ft 271% 
50M 43 
45ft 50 
27ft 20ft 
33ft 14% 
B8A 80ft 
Wft Sft 
30% 30ft 
521* Z7M 


CwEpf 277 104 
CwEpf 840 124 
COfnES 232 95 
CooiESpVTO 107 
Comsat 170 U 
CPsycs 74 3 

Comppr *0 27 
CompSc 
Cpfvsn 

CenAgi 77 21 
Canalr M IX 
ConnE 1*0 87 
CnnNG 240 I* 
Conroe *0 U 
Coined 2*0 77 
ConEPf 8X0 19 
CODE Pf 4*5 107 
ConEPf 5X0 11* 
CnoFrt* 1.10 37 
CmNG 272 5.1 
COntPw 

CnPpfB 450 14* 
OiPnfD 7*5 M7 
CnP pfC 774 147 
CnPprV 4*0 147 
CnPprU 3*0 18.9 
CnPPtT 178 187 
CnPpfH 7*8 147 
CnPprR470 14* 
CnPprP X9S 177 
CnP orN 275 14* 
CnPpfM X50 187 
CnPprL 273 15* 
CnPprS 4X2 147 
CnP or K 2*3 14.1 
CptlCp 2*0 57 
ConMfl 
Canlfin 
Cnflllpf 
CttlHdn 
Cntlnfo 

CoatTiri 170 77 
CiOato .72 27 
Canwd 1.10 18 
vlCookU 

152 47 
270 &Q 


62BI 

amt 
Xx 
m 
48 
28 221% 
200x48 
31 34A 

53 25J5& 

54 23M 

2 15 
11 14ft 

3 23ft 
17 ISA 

22 883 45ft 
638 8ft 
1322 
67 ._ 
2S23 ft 


1X0 2* 
4*3 9* 
MJD 77 
70 27 


77 17 18ft 18ft 

2048 11M 11 lift +1% 
7 20M 20ft 20A- A 
1576 33A 32A 32ft— A 
91 2JM 23ft 23M + A 
999 98ft 97A 98 
13 41A 41 41ft +1 


*8 37 9 
70 17 
178 4* I 
M 

■lib l* 
4*8 47 10 
12 


70 U 10 
a 14 i 
74 17 15 
270 117 7 
770 127 
7J7 US 
54 X7 16 
170 . 35 28 
172 77 9 
70 X8 7 


.92 2* 17 
170 57 12 
1*0 &1 11 
1*8 1X1 7 
972 1X3 
7*8 127 
7*5 127 
7J6 125 
275 117 
X24 1X4 
125 
12* 

11.1 

3 

127 
4b » 


94 II 
184 
2 * 10 
13 

170 14 92 
2*0 87 6 


.12 

X72 97 * 
*4 27 ■ 
1.1* XI 15 

l-SD 4.1 u 
72 24 13 
170 57 11 
78 17 21 


71 17 21 

jg *? 1S 

270 104 
*0 17 13 
xao 57 12 
340 94 
450 107 
2*8 7* 8 

070 117 
070 117 
770 114 
2*9 103 
3X5 11* 
1170 MLS 
8X4 113 
270 27 21 
2X8 1X0 7 
X10 1X4 
177 127 
2X0 1X0 
:v.rs 137 
XIO 127 
241 1X0 
275 113 
*g 44 10 
■20 7 13 


17 — M 
5SA 

29 + ft 

35% + ft 
31 —ft 
41ft— ft 
lift + ft 
Wft— ft 
19ft 

50ft— A 
571% +1A 
35% + A 
44A 

321b— A 
77ft— ft 
73A— V. 
49ft +1% 
24 + A 
33ft + A 
108% + ft 
79 — 1 
74ft + ft 
15ft— A 
17 

1436 + 1% 
15ft + ft 
15% 

14ft +1 
17% 

23M— ft 
Oft + .A 
26M— A 


I 12 Month 

HVahUw Stack 


9t cin » | 

WbHMilBw OdOtOTwl 


Oft 4ft EMM 
Wft 7% EMM Of 170 94 
2n% 15 Eklva 70 7 20 
171b lift EMta 70 M M 
16 Sft Ehdnt 
7» SMEmaEI UO U B 

Mft Sft Em Rod Mt 7* M 
20ft 11% EmrvA 40 U 12 
32ft 24ft Emharf 1*06 57 9 
39ft 15 Envoi UI U 7 
5 31% Eraopf *7 11* 

9 * Enrnpf J0 ru 

ft EnEnc 

32% 220% Enotrp 72 24 9 
30ft 18ft EntoBa 54 15 U 
29ft 17ft Eu m it i 1*0 47 It 
Zlft 20ft EmExn 
3 lft Emm 28 

19ft 9A Entara 
20 ISA EntxEn 17HI01 
21% U Entmcln 170 77 » 
28M 17A Eon fees 1.14 47 15 
Sft 3A Eaufmk 
17ft lift Owmhpf 241 127 
« 2BM Eqlllns 132 27 • 
MA 9ft Eaoftcn .12 7 U 

» tft Erbaml 70 2* 15 
22ft 12ft EMBPB *4 22 12 
27ft 10ft EswcC 70b 27 14 
31ft 17 Estrtm 32 X0 9 
Zlft 10 Ethyls 46 27 H 
257 104 Ethyl Pf 2*0 U 

7A 1% vlEvaaP 
9M 2ft yfSvanpi 
41% 30 ExCM> uo an 

18% 13ft Exrafar 176*11* 

54ft 31 Exxon 3*0 47 > 


_ 8ft Bft— % 

29 Wft »A Wft— A 
9 23M 25V. 2Hb 
3 IS Mft 14ft— A 
50 6% Oft CM— ft 
MM 89ft 41ft 4Mb- ft 
430 T3A 13ft 13ft— % 
472 Uft ISA 14ft 
128 W% mh 38ft +% 
7 28ft 20ft 20A + ft 
ISOBr 41% 4A 4ft— ft 

23b 4A 4ft 4ft— M 

52 A A 

2744 2tft 25 2SA— % 
49 3CW 3SA 38% +1A 
1M7 27 M% 26%— A 
H7 21 20% 20%— % 

392 2% 2ft 2ft 

41 Wft WM Wft 
48 17% 17ft 17ft 
338 WU 18 Mft— A 

21 am 2M6 SOk 

330 5A 5% Sft— A 

9 Mft Mft Mft— % 
94 47 46% 46ft 

98 14 13% M 

139 n% lift 11% + A 
45 20 Wft W*+ A 
a 27A 27V. ZTft + ft 
a 19% 18% Wft— M 
1304 2M% 20ft 21 — % 
1 215 215 215 +11 

22 2% 2ft 2ft— ft 

20 2ft ZA 2A 

44 37% 36ft Mft— % 
IS Mft M% Mft 
7319 51 50 50ft 


o a o 


ana 
o o O 
DB0C 


: ’ <:v 


• - 1 



O o 


Minim* 
l n m i 1 1 1 
iiini" 

a G O O 


Ctorf 

Low QuotOiM 


11 fft PH bid 35* 1* 2 5 

87% 44% FMC 270 X5 31 357 
24% 17A FPLGP 176 77 8 1103 
T»% tft FAdr 78 25 M 54 
Mft fft Fan* 7 111 

2tn% ISA Falrchd JO 5J 1376 

39A 33ft Ftarcpf X40 97 15 

U% 9ft Frfrfd .a 17 10 730* 
24ft Wft FamDt* 70 7 25 1426 

Wft Mft FOR3>*1 *0 U 13 1 

22ft T4ft FanXl 78 47 8 5 

13 Sft Fayora 70 2-1 14 m 

6% 4ft Fmlart X2 p 7 8 120 

37ft 29ft P«HCo 174 57 1 S3 
45% 29ft FadEXP 31 3740 

48A 32% FdHmpf 20 

39 29A FdMDO 152 47 11 236 

190% Wft FgdNM -M 7 SIM 

27 lift PadPBo 70+1 * 123 

FPttspf 231 97 934 

F«<1 Rif 1*4 48 14 90 

FdSool 70 45 15 43 

FgODSt XS4 47 9 573 

Ftrra 170 45 12 m 

FUcrf 2X0 7* 12 48 

HnCoA XH 951 

PlnCPPf 873*217 44 

FnSBar 89 

Flrasfn JO 37 TO 1137 

FtAfl % *8 XI 8 98 

FtAHpf 8.17*11.1 7 

nshey 1*0 4J > aso 

FBkFta 170 37 11 5 

FBott 170 13 II 555 

FstChfc 172 57 28 1187 


fft 

83ft + M 
34% — A 

ILzS 

15ft— ft 
36ft— ft 
Mft 
22ft 
ISA 

Wft— A 
9%— A 


T2A + A 
a — im 


a — im 

241b + ft 
95A— ft 
32 — ft 
35% + ft 
T7A— ft 
15 —ft 
15A 

31ft + ft 

23ft 

18 

27ft + ft 
13ft 
32 
206 

43 + A 

43ft 

29ft— ft 
45M— ft 
8%— A 
27ft— ft 
45% 

48 — ft 

s& + * 

2** 3S 

tf+ss 


FoupfSBAsynj 
PIBTOX 170 io* 9 
FtBTx pf 576*157 
F1CHY 9 

FFadAz 70* 15 6 
FFB 278 Si > 
FtFMpffilTftlU 
FIOWC 274 47 I 
F Intnt Of 277 73 
FIMtai 74 27 I 
FtNatnn 12 

FsfPB 

FstPOPf 2*2 9.1 
FtUnRJ 172 6* M 
FtVaBk 74 3* 10 
FIWUc 170 47 0 
FVfllCPf 475 117 _ 


Ftschb 1X0 27425 315 


FWlFU X5* 5 61 

FlfFnGi 172 X* 9 757 
FttFof 456*97 4 2 

FMeiEfi 78 17 0 1111 
Flcamo 1X0 27 M T7M 
FtalV 70 XS 13 119 

Ftrxfpf 1*1 127 13 

FllatSf 70 * 18 24 

FloatPt 15 44 

FtoEC 440 * 14 IS 


34ft + ft 
34ft 

ISA + ft 
Mft— A 
25% 

21 % 

17ft— A 
59 —1 
24ft— ft 
V + A 
CM + A 
31 —ft 
4ft + ft 
30ft 4- ft 
22M — ft 
55ft— ft 
37 — ft 
32% — ft 
73ft + % 

34% 

78 + A 

12ft — ft 
39ft— ft 
fft + ft 
19A— ft 
53ft— ft 
103ft 
491% + ft 
30% + ft 
9 —ft 
17A— ft 
lft— ft 
2Hk— ft 
30ft— ft 
23ft— ft 
27ft— ft 

S2tt +1 

•M 

_9ft + ft n Manta 





“ Find out how many tight years it will take before 
the entire universe knows about Grow Group V 



For our 1984 Annual Report, write: 

Grow Chemical Europe N.V., Oudestraat 8 
B-2fi30 .\artsclaar, Belgium. DepL G 


Grow Group 

me. Amnntnnn. thret? of our Wf? - -knoftn brand ■ nan 


AwJgrip, Devoe, Ameritone, three ot our weB-known brand ■ names. 


34ft 

47% + ft 
19% — ft 
37 + ft 
31ft + ft 


Sta. Odm 

WtHHALn QuotCbt* 


12 Month 
MtabLow Stack 


oiv. Vkx F£ aattwiLnw aSxt»n« 


FloPro 2J4 8X 


35 

24ft + A 
44ft + ft 
27A- A 


JO 17 12 444 
1*0 3* 13 905 

Sa i 
74 I* 25 291 

to 


22ft 22A + A 
47A 47% + ft 
Mft Mft— A 


13ft lift HMUHC 709 75 5 

37% 27% Horn*; 1*0 47 W 737 
18ft Ml* HbrltCs 23 43*9 


23M + A 


|4A + % 
23% 

ISA + A 
44ft 

6ft + ft 

ftTSTfc 

8ft lft + % 
23 23ft + % 
31% 31ft— ft 
28% 28ft + lb 
1% lft— ft 
33 32ft + ft 
34ft 36*% + % 
14ft M%— % 
18ft lift 
21% 24ft— % 
lift H 
24ft 24ft 
12% 12% 

39ft 39ft 
45ft 45ft— % 
75% 75% + ft 

34Vb 37ft +lft 
741b 75ft— % 
24ft 24A 
Wft 1914— % 
58 58V% + ft 

41% 41ft— ft 
48% 49 
61% lift— ft 
a 2ift + % 
28% 29 —ft 
<8% 48% —1% 
10% lo% 

32% 32ft + ft 
51 51 


Ftowrs *2 27 II 
Fluor At 23 
FOOtaC 270 37 U 
FordM 2*0 57 3 
FtOoor 174 IM 
FTHowd 1*4 2* 14 
PotaWb X 13 U 
FOXSIP *8 77 11 
Fcxbro 1X4 37 W 
Rwnvr 17 


18ft + ft 
41 —1 

s%=a 


21% 21A— % 
4A 4ft- ft 

Mft Sft— ft 

Mft 14ft + ft 
29 29ft +1 
14A Mft 
40ft 41% + ft 

3?*— ft I 
2S%— ft 


FMOG 2X9K22X U4 
FrafMe *0 Xt 15 2353 

Frtefrn *0 24 W 124 

FnitMl *0 27 5 1241 

Fnjbfpf 2X0 77 19 

Furno *0 U 9 94 



35ft 17 GAF 70* * 13 3*1 34ft 33ft 33ft— ft 

37ft 25% GATX 170 47 13 29 29ft 29% 291* 

47% 33% GATX Pf 250 4* _ 4 38ft 38. , X + A 

34ft Wft GCA 12 337 25 2«ft 24ft— ft 

77% 48AGE1CO 1X0 1* 11 413 72ft 71% 71ft— % 
Tft 4 GEO 4t 4% 4ft 4% 

Uft 5% GFCp _ . » 7% 7% 7%— ft 



441b 39ft GTE 3X8 7* 8 5816 41M 40% 40% 


391b 31% GTEpf 250 47 3 34 , 34 36 

2S4% 23% GTE Pf 200 77 7 34%% 2®— S 

23% 19ft GTEpf 2*0 10* 65 34 73£ SMfc + A 

9% 4% GalHMi 87 5 4% 41% — A 

82ft 36% GanatT 1*8 25 20 2342 5«b SMk 5«S-1A 

25% 18% Gapstr 50 2A 17 182 24A 2ft 2«— ft 

27 Wft Gcarht *0 XI M 234 Wt Mft 1®* 

Wft 13ft Galea 44 37 M M OTk 17% 17%— ft 

10ft tft GaniltC 158 Wft IOA m/s 

Tift 10 Gantll l JOo 17 _ M IW 1?A J 


47ft 30% GnCorp U0bUM9 136 4M 44 


171b Mft GAIiw 1*3* 97 
48% 29% OnBab 1X0 2* 8 

34% 19ft Gdnmt *0 IX W 


31 17 18% lift + ft 

161 42ft 42ft 2*i + % 
53 30ft 30ft 30% 



HOritC Pf 150 5.1 42 

Harnmn M M3 

NMiy 1*0 X4 12 3S 

Htmfon ‘ 3 7A 

HawfFk 72 * M 4387 34ft 

Hmort *0 14 M 93 25% 
HIShaar JO 27 M 30 22% 
l-HVatt 77 14 9 TO lift 

HDnbrd 54 25 12 «9 22 

Hlltan 1X0 21 14 «Q 85% 

HltocM J3* U 11 S26 31ft 

Holiday 1X0 17 13 9« 54 

HaHvS 1X0 15 M SO 79 

HocitaD 33 49i 18% 

HmFSD 8 768 38 

HlMGpfl.lO J3U 57 0ft 
Hmsffc* 70 J 58 923 25ft 
HnnCFfi *0X3 5 W 17ft 
Honda J|3B Wft 
llonwll 1J0 32 11 024 59% 
HnnBn 1.12 47 9 80 3Wft 

HrtBnpf 2M«1U 20 36% 

Hortzoa 83 4% 

HnpCp *0 1* 12 2891 43A 
HoMln 2*0 JO 14 V »ft 
HouahM 78 25 IS 289 39 
HDUFob *8 37 9 317 U 
Howl of 155 XT » 785 36 
Holntpf X5D 47 3 SI% 

Holnfpf 875 XI 154 77 
Hoolpd 2*4 18* * 1149 2SM 
HOUNG X13 XI 3954 80% 
HogOR 178*18* 46 

Huffy *8 17 9 41 

H0SIO1 *8 3* 375 __ 

HughSp 72 15 It 154 73 
Human *8 23 M 202 29ft 
HuntMt JS IS 76 _7I 30% 
HuttEF JB 25 13 HU 32A 
Hydra! 2X0 6* 9 74 29ft 


38% 28ft KonPLf 278 7J 8 
zm n KaPLbfXBU* 

22 17% KaPLOf 273 W* 

45 li Kofyin 
115 49 Kolypf 1*4 I* . 

30 Mft KaulBr *0 35 3 

Mft 12ft Knufpf 158 94 

51% 39ft KM tom 174 25 14 

34% 23 KbUwcT IM 37 7 
3ft 8fc Kanai 

» Wft Kanmf 


223 38% 37ft 38ft + ft 
1-32% 22% 21% + A 


an +m 


4X8 at 7 g 31* 

26 Wft Kanmt JO U U in . 

27ft 3PM JCylTHI 7*4 87 10 146 Dft 

14% fft KorrGf *4 45 M lft 


diarr* 

6 15% 15ft 15%r+ ft 


ft n-. + A 
ft znb + lfc 


*4%— ft 
31ft + ft 


m 


26ft 17ft KorGPf 
33ft 24% KonMC 
zm Mft KarBfc 
S 2ft Kmrcw 
Wft M Kowlnt 
36% 24ft KMd* 

84 44ft Hdara 4X8 a* 


*4 45 84 9ft 9ft |j» . . 

H-S. 

^ 178 *8-8 ^ + 

sir ifis 1 ! 

■ 4X0 5* 2 77% 73% 7»— % 


•ft + ft 
Mft— ft 
!»- ft 
Sift— ft 
soot— ft 


S3ft 29ft Kfmba 2J2 4* 18 1U8 Mft 52A 53% — ft 

38ft 23ft KnoWRd 74 27 M *88 Mft 33ft 38ft + ft 

28ft 17ft Kbaar 238 XI ST ua 2Mk 31% 38% + A 

PA W., w —.ft. 


39% 15% Kohnor M U u Jt WA D 17 —ft 
32ft 17 K opera 70 4* 24 331 lift flft V + ft 
M 11% Korean — 


i* me iuniH lit 13ft' OMf lift— ft 

44 29ft Kiaaar 2X0 *8 11 4W «JA 4jft 43A fft 


38ft + ft I 39* IT S5J2B 
2M+ft[ W 7% Kuban wl 


•C%— ft 

38ft + A 


67V» 34ft Kyoear 
23% 11 Knar 


Kiahlms *0 11 18 1» 2*ft 20A 29 
KuMmwt _ I Wft Wft WM 


38 20% 28% 21% 42ft 
» 29* 28A » + * 


A 1 8 143 37* 38ft 37 +1% 
70 4* 6 a 18 17% II + A 


15 +* 
3J»— A 
53% — % 
78% +1% 
2SA+ A 
88A + A 
HW + ft 
18*— ft 
31ft— A 
13% 

14% — % 
21*—* 
29% + A 
26ft— A 


31*— ft 
29ft— ft 


28% 22* LN Ho 227MX4 18 
18* 7* LFE 
12% 8% LFE Ft 58 4A 
17ft 12* LLERV XWoMJ 
4% 2 U-CCP 
15ft 8ft LTV . 

35 45M LTV pf 

27ft U% LTVBf 3X4 147 

88 SDM LTV pf 575 11,1 

18% 13 LTVpf 175 9* 

17 Wft LOuint W 

29* 14% LodGe 170 77 7 

Tift 8% Loftvoo 70 27 
30% 73 . Lnfrapf 2*4 1X2 


1 21% 26% 36*'+ A 
143 18% W* 18% 

3 Wft 12ft 12ft 
IB M* 14* 14% 

107 2% 2 2A 
1841 tft fft 7* 

9 49 48* 49 — % - 

1W 8* Z1M 2Hb . ■ • • 
HW STA 47ft «*-» - 
18W 13* 12ft 13% 

I s -.- 

12 24 331b 34 + ft . 




5a; w . lT . 1 


16 813 15ft Mft MH— * 


U — % 
Wft + % 
26% + ft 
7* 

lift + * 
MM— ft 
38ft — 1 
13% — % 
9A— ft 
17A— ft 
40A + ft 
18% 

60* +T* 
67* + * 
33% 

28 *— ft 
24%— ft 
43% —1* 
5% 

35% — ft 
24 — % 
33ft— % 
18*— ft 
76 +1 

801b +1 
5SA— ft 
59 
24ft 

26A + % 
73 + % 
25% + * 
24% + % 
27 + % 

27% + % I 
30% 

31% + 16 
10% I 
30 + * 

15 — % | 
Oft + A 
ISA + % 1 
88 + * 1 
41* + * 

no*— 3% 
78*— I* 

42% + % 
5% + A 
9% — A 


84 44% GnOim 1X0 1* 8 870 TIM* 70% 71 + * 

65% 48% GenEJ 250 27 1212810 60ft 5B* 58ft— 1% 

65% 50 GaFda 230 U M 629x 6^64ft84A + ft 
7 5% GG*n Mo 9.1 T38 flb 6* 64% — ft 

9% 5% GnHma 13 38 8% 6ft 8* 

MM m GriaSri 50 27 3 OS Wft 13 Wlb + * 


+ * 35% 21ft IClnda 1*4 4* 12 

— 1141 19% lift iCMn 52a U 


7 5% GGtbn *00 9J 

7% 5% GnHma 

14M 8% OHaet > 70 27 


T30 8* 8* 64% — % 
38 8% 6ft 8* 


11* 8ft I CN 


33ft 32ft 32% — % 
17% 18% 17. 


!8A fft GnHaa 34 33 
27% 15ft Gnlnat 55 15 


439 13ft 13 
19 9* 9 


13ft + * 264% 23 


X 22ft ICN pf 270 9* 
17% M IHAhi 172 115 


103 133 10* 10 


20% 14* IRTPrs 170 9.1 


799 17% 18* 17ft— ft 38% 20* ITT 


_ ... .. . 38% 20M ITT Cp 1X0 3X 

60* 47% GaMllls 2544X38 »I B% 55A 5H6 + % 0% 40 ]TTpftC 4X0 &8 


■5 41 GHtol 5^8? 73 

73% 33 GM Ea 54a * 
40 34ft GMBfPf 375 97 
52ft 44* GMotpf 5X0 97 


5X0r 75 5 0233 68 


441b ITT pfO 5X0 87 


1438 78* 88* 88ft— 2ft I 48% 20 ITT pm Z25 47 


3 38% 3BA W% 


170 9.1 7 13 

1X0 Xfl 11 20* 

4X0 4* « 

5X0 87 U 

275 47 20 


4 51% 51% 51% + lb 21% 13% lUInt 


42A ITTpR 450 73 


9 3ft GNC 
13% 8* GPU 


.16 25 30 147 6ft Sft 4ft— Ml 43A 31* IdahoP 378 75 8 


6 1592 !»]»!» 


Genua 158 17 52 1193 14% 83% 83M— ft 20M 13ft IdoalB 


14% 5 GnMfr 7 58 13 

53ft 39* Gnaanl 170 4X IS OT 0 
T2 9% GTFlpf 175 107 400i 111 

CM 10 GTFlpf 1J0 11 J ^ni 

71* 82 GTFlpf 8J6 115 200*71 

8ft 4 Gareeo 11 136 41 

3B% 13ft Grttad .10 A 33 m 171 

Zlft 15 OeratB 1X0 

22ft 18ft Gatpf 1*8 u .. 


12% 12% 
44ft 44% 


9 30 27% 30 + Vi 

8 14ft MM 18% + * 
21* 2CM 26A + ft 

Q IM IM MM— % 

20* 34ft 31% 33ft— ft 

< 82 81 81 — M 

g 40% 80% Mf’& 

45ft 45 45M + ft 

6 82 . 82 82 

U9tx 15ft Mft 15 + % 

141 42% 42 4ZA + ft 

3 21ft Zl* 21ft + % 

134 15A 15 15ft + ft 


25M 17* I II Ponr 2*4 1X4 7 11W 2SA 25% 25* + ft 


. 35ft 27% IlFWpf 4.12 12.1 

400z lift Tift Tift + % 32ft 23% IIPQwpf 378 11J 

Stellft lift lift— ft 53% 4SM KPowPf 573 1X» 

000.71 W% 71 —Mi 37 28ft HPOWPf 4*7 127 

33ft 25ft IIFawpf 4X0 12X 


34 34 

31M 32 + % 


Mft 9% Unura 74 27 13 ST lift Wft WA— % ■ 

4ft 1% LomSn M9 33 3M 3M Sft— A 

Mft 10% LawllM 58 4* 18 57 Wft 12% W»— ft 

25% 13ft LaarPt 70 U U 207 WM 17% 17% — A . 

m 20ft LaarPpf 2X7 1L7 22 20% 24ft 24ft— ft 

52% 37ft LaatSs Z00 42 9 727X40* 47% 4BA+1A 

131ft 98 Lam'S Pf 225 17 2*121 121 121 +5M- 

21 M Unfed ■ *0 2X 15 54 19% Ifft WM + A 

34* 24A LoiwTr 150 47 U 79 31 

40ft 22 LaoEnf 72 27 19 179 4|% _ 

ISA 9 LogMoa 78 1* 20 49 14ft 14 MA + ft 

Zlft 15ft LngPlot *8 X3 9 41 Zlft 

4% 2MURV0I 88 ft 

UW I3A Utbfim 158*115 326 14ft 

ink fft Lonnor 70 15 21 23 14 
24% im LnucNfa 4 n 22 21 

3g% M LiivJSt 155 XI 81 1» 34A 3M 

50* 42% LOP 172 27 8 496 4436 43% 44% + M , 

8BM LOPpf S 45 *7 .. 1 70ft 70ft 70ft + ft 

n% 221b LJMyCp 72 2* 16 12 20% 30% 30%—^* - 

80% S3 * ' ““ 


Uft + ft : . 
% + £.. 

r is 

».. + 1 . . 


15 20«71 70% 71 —ft 

11 135 4M 4* 4ft 
A 33 121 17* 17ft 17% + ft 
349 26ft »* 28% + % 
5 20ft 20% 20%— ft 


MS STM 53A 53%— % 
4614lte 36% 36% 36% +1% 
2* 33% 33% 33% — % 


36% 21% ITW At 3JB 13 5BS 31* 31ft 31ft— * 

40% 27% IranChm 2X9a 5* I 4*7 38 27ft 27%— % 


24* GcnuPt IJ8 17 15 445 Mft 32% ft 


27* IS GaPac X0 X5 28 
37ft 33 GaPepf 2X4 42 
37 32% GaPpfB 278 &2 

TO 25% GaPwpf 72* 34 
28% 22ft GaPwpf 3*4 12* 

M 25ft GaPwpf X7V IZ7 
21% T7A GaPwpf 254 12* 
21% 17 GaPwpf 252 123 
2SA 21% GaPwpf X75 11X 
86A 52 GaPwpf 7X0 122 
63ft 51% GaPwpf 772 12* 


27* IS Gap®; 70 25 14 907 Z£J 2W* 23^- ft 

115 35* 35* 35* 

3 77 27 27 — ft 

147 27* Z7A 27% 

M 29% 29A 89% + U 
29 20* 20* 20* 

15 20% 20* 20ft + % 
10 25 25 25 * 

OO 1 64 63 64 +2 , 

.... 50x 42M 82A 82A— A 

32 20ft GerbPl 172 47 Tl 692x32% 31ft 31ft 

Oft 12% GarbSs .12 3 12 279 17* 16* 18*- lb 

12ft SA GfcmtP 112 lift 11% lift + % 

IT* 5% Gllx-Fn 5 439 11* 11* 11% + A 

27 16% GlffHM 52 Zl 22 «1 24ft 24 24% + % 

6ZA 42* Gil lotto 2*0 42 12 4OT *2 6!* 62 + M 

2^ ^SSSTpfi^ «S .3ft m 3*iJ! 

13ft SA GldHUO 17 336 11% 11* 11A— 

4 1% GfdNwt 210 3A 2* 3 

32% 11 GHWF 20 A ■ 7W S2ft 32 . UA + ft 


40% 27% IranChm 2X9o SA I 

tft 5* ImMCp , 7 

14* 0% IN CO 30 U 

57ft 45 IndlMPf 7X0 12 3> 
8fA 54ft IndlMPf X88 125 
17% 14 IndlMPf X15 125 
IBM 14ft ln«Mpf 225 1U 

28M 17ft lm«Gss 1X8 73 7 

14* 5ft Mama J7I 

28% 12% Inflate » 


I 647 30 37ft 37* — % 
7 23* * 6* 9 + A 

2T3S MA 14 14 +A 

151 to SB 57ft 53 +1 


10ta 89% 89% 89% + % 
* 17ft 17% 17% — K 
5 18ft lift lift 
MS 28A 25* 24H + » 
716 7 8* 6»— * . 

719 26 25ft 3A + ft 


35ft InserR 2*0 18 15 204 46* 48* 48% + A 


m% 11* OWWF* 70 * I 7» Mft M MJ + ft 

31* 24M GdrJd! 156 43 15 170 Xg Mft mfc 

29* 23 Goodyr 1*0 57 I 8880 2BA 27% 27* 

n% 13% GardnJ 52 37 10 66S 16% 15% MA + % 

32% 19 GooM *8 37 58 1858 21% 20* 20*— % 

4fft 36ft orara 2J0 67 11 202 40% 40* 40*— % 

69 47 Grolnsr 176 2213 197 60ft 59% 60ft +! 
17% BA GtAFsl X 2J * W J} iSf iSt * * 
nu 13* OlAtPc 8 65 17 16% 18* 

Sft 27ft GtLkln 1X01X15 15 52% 52% K% + ft 

21ft 15ft GHIrn 175*117 1 169 16* 15V, is*- % 


37ft 27% InoRpf 335 73 11 32ft 32 32 — A 

15ft lift InorTec 54 45 22 5 12 11* 11*— A 

25* TV* laktStf JO 27 433 23 22* 22* +1 

40% 3M InMSI Pf 475 HU 124 44 43% 43*— A 

21% M InetlcD IXOb Si 10 345 IS* ISA U* + % 

TO 3ft InreRs 127 5* 5V. 5*— A 

26% 11* IntgRac 7 174 W% Wft 19ft— A 

3ft T9 IntBRpf X03 725 10 Mb 24% 38% 

37 25% IntgRpt 475 1X1 4 321b 32% 32ft + A 

13% 7% IfltRFn 14 30 12* Wft 13% 

19 15* rtcnSa Z.10O1 L4 57 WM UVi MM- 

70ft 35 intarco 3X8 47 12 33ft 65* 86ft 65* 

51A 120 Infer pf 775 55 3 M2 1« T42 • 

13% 91b lidrfst ifl 57 6 W lift Uft 11%. 

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(Cotrturoed 00 Page 14) 


... 


•• •• / 



35KSps 







■•••*: . 



**. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


Page 13 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 



Rose 10% in First Period 


. Reuters 

DUSSELDORF * — Deutsche 
Bank AO said Tuesday that partial 
operating profit in the first quarter 
of tins year rose 10 percent ■ 

>< The joint management board 
spokesman, F. Wilhelm QirjsrfaTK. 
told the ann ua l shareholders' meet- 


ing that in 1984 partial operating 

excludes trading on 


profit, which 



the bank's own account, rose 3i 
percent to L8 billion Deutsche 
marks ($600 million). 

Business volume of the parent 
bank in the first three months -of 


Hit 


Hill 

'III 

1 i \ \ i 

III 

cv Q 

tt o 

© 


c cW 

> 

fe c\ 

{"/ 


\/ 

, tV 

a 


Icahn Increases 
His Stake in TW A 



Reuters 

■ WASHINGTON — The New 
York investor, Carl Icahn, told the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
si oo on Tuesday that be has raised 
his stake in Trans World Airlines 
Inc. common stock to 7,560,400 
shares, or 23 percent of the total 
outstanding. 

Mr. Icahn said a group of com- 
panies be controls bought 815,300- 
shares between last Friday and 
Monday on the Pacific Stock Ex- 
change and in the over-the-counter 
market . . 


j Last Thursday, Mr. Icahn <£s- 
N&tosed in an SEC filing that be held 


a 2QJ>-perceni stake TWA He said 
be was “disappointed” by TWA’s 
comment that.his stock purchase 
was “uninvited and undesrable” 
and reiterated that he may seek 
control of TWA. 


1983, however, declined by 23 per- 
cent to about 140.0 bafion DM 
compared with its level at the end 
ofl9M, Mr. Christians saicL 

Parent bank credit volume in the 
three' months np .till die end of 
March remained roughly at the 
end-1984 fcrvd ofWSMkm DM, 
hesaid. 

Compared with, (me quarter of 
the previous year’s tola,, parent 
bank credit business rose by 7 per- 
cent, Mr. Christians said, without 
giving Inures. 

The tendency seen m the final 
weeks of last year has continued 
into the first quarter of 1985” he 
added. Credit business rose by a 
total 42 trillion DM in November 
and December. 

Deutsche Bank reported last 
month that group net rose to 67337 
mflBon DM in 1984 from 653.60 
million DM the previous year. 

Mr. Christians said that trading 
on the bank’s own account in the 
first three months of 1985 showed 
earnings below the high compara- 
tive figure of one quarter of the 
1984 totaL He gave no figures. 

Mr. (TiristianR said results from 
the first quarter were not enough to 
allow a forecast for the entire year’s 
.business, development, but added 
that the economi c outlook justified 
confidence. 

Mr. Christians also said Deut- 
sche Bank is to make a private 
placement of 49- percent of die 
share capital of the Hamburg based 
Axel Sfemrigex Veriag AG pubtisb- 
ing group. 


Pkken&Thinks 
He Lost Vote 


Las Angela TimaSerrice 

.LOS ANGELES — T. Boone 
Pickens says bis investor group 
probably has lost a vote to 
block election of Unocal Corp. 
directors, but he vowed not to 
abandon his takeover bid. 

“We probably do not have 
the vote” of enough sharehold- 
ers to approve defraying the an- 
nual meeting until June 28, he 
said. The results were not an- 
nounced at Monday's anmml 
meeting, which was adjourned 
until May 20. ^ 

Meanwhile, a Delaware 
Chancery Court judge ruled 
Monday that Unocal must in- 
clude the group in its offer to 
buy SO minion Unocal shares 
for $72 each. 


Texaco to Sell More Assets Airbus Alters 
It Acquired Through Getty Its Senior 


United Press International 

ATLANTA — Texaco Inc. ex- 
pects to seQ $300 mini on to $400 
milHoa more of the assets it ac- 
quired through Getty 00 Co, 
b ringing total sales to around 5 25 
billion, rite company’s chief execu- 
tive officer said Tuesday. 

Texaco has reduced the number 
of its refineries and sold several 
businesses to meet competition in 
the oil and gas industry, the chair- 
man, John K. McKinley, told 
shareholders at their annual meet- 
ing. 

‘ The cal company, headquartered 
in White Plains, New York, also 
has cut personnel through tile sale 
of companies that do not fit into its 
business strategy and by attrition. 


In 1984 Texaco purchased Los 
Angeles- based Getty for 510.1 bil- 
lion in the second largest merger in 
U3. history. But in the past year, 
Texaco has sold off more than S2 
b u llio n in Getty properties and ex- 
pects to sell an additional S300 mDr 
lion to $400 million of Getiy assets, 
Mr. McKinley said. 


Management 


named chief representative of the 
Tokyo office, which the bank plans 
to open in early July. Named depu- 
ty representative was Erkki Kyla- 
koskx, who currently is based in 
Fostipankld’s Helsinki head office, 
where he is responsible for south- 
east Asian countries. 


Reuters 


“When this amount is deducted 
from Getty’s purchase price, it be- 
comes apparent that Texaco has 
acquired an enormous amount of 
proven petroleum reserves around 
at the world at a very attractive 
price," he said. 


In the United States, Europe, 
and Canada Texaco has closed or 
disposed of 12 of 29 refineries, Mr. 
McKinley 


American Broadcasting Cos. and 
Capital Cities Communications 
Inc. have announced plans to sell 
four television stations and 15 ra- 
dio stations to satisfy U3. regula- 
tory requirements of their pro- 
posed $3 -5-bflfian merger. Analysts 
said the planned sales could raise as 
much as SI billion. 

Bay erische Landesbank Girozeo- 
tnde said that first-quarter operat- 
ing profit rose 25 percent to 1393 
minio n Deutsche marts (545 mil- 
lion) from 136.0 milli on DM- The 
figures exclude trading operations. 


ea permission by the At 
government to raise its stake m 
Amotts Ltd. to 25.1 percent from 
149 percent. Analysts said the in- 


creased Share would cost Campbell 
approximately 32 minion Austra- 
lian dollars (£22.19 mflfion). 

CBS Inc. has told the U-S. Secu- 
rities and Exchange Commission 
that it bdieies it paid too much for 
Ziff-Davis Publishing Co.’s special 
interest nra ffmnn division because 
the company overstated the divi- 
sion’s earnings. CBS bought the di- 
vision in February for S3625 mil- 
lion. Analysts estimated CBS 
overpaid by $40 million. 

Crown Zeller bach Corp. has 
failed in its attempt to have SSr 
James Goldsmith barred from pur- 
chasing additional shares as part of 
his hostile takeover bid for Crown. 
Judge John M. Gumefla in Man- 
hattan federal court refused to en- 


join Sr James’s additional pur- 
chases. 


Digital Eqri pnae nt Corp. intro- 
duced a new desktop computer, the 
Micro vax n, that can perform 
more than one mi? B on instructi on s 
per second. Its base price is about 
520,000. 


PARIS — Airbus Industrie, the 
European aircraft ccmsorntnn, an- 
nounced Tuesday a reorganization 
of its senior management that in- 
dustry sources said was aimed at 
bringing more non-French officials 
into top posts. 

Htt changes, which the sources 
said were approved at a meeting of 
the French, British, Spanish and 
West German partners in Bona in 
February, put a Briton, Robert 
Whitfield, and a West German, 
Jurgen Thomas, into newly created 
senior vice-president posts for fi- 
nance, and production coonlma- 
tion and planning. Bernard Ziegler 
of France t* kffy the «me title in 
charge of engineering and technical 
mattes. 

The nnminwtinng followed the 
retirement in F e bru ary of chair- 
man, Bernard Lathihre, and his re- 


Tbc opening of the Tokyo office, 
which will oversee Posupsmkld's 
operations in the Far East, is part 
of the bank’s overseas expansion 
plan. 


Sumitomo Trust & Banking Co. 
of Osaka has opened a subsidiary 
in Luxembourg, Sumitomo Trust & 
Banking (Luxembourg) S A. Masai- 
said Esaki is managing director and 
general manager of the new unit. 
He previously was deputy general 
manager of Sumitomo Trust Inter- 
national Ltd. in London. 


Pierson. 


Du Pont Canada Inc. said it 
would dose an aDtyi lead manufac- 
turing plan in Maitland, Ontario, 
on June 30, and lake a charge of 
10.5 million Canadian dollars 
($7.62 million) against second- 
quarter earnings. 

Frontier Ahfines’ directors have 
authorized the sale of IS Boeing 
737-200 aircraft to United Airlines 
for 5265 million. 


Bank in Finland 
Names Tokyo Staff 


CBC Bank of Lausanne has 
named Eric S. Schumann genera) 
manager, succeeding Otto Alts- 
chuler, who has been elected to the 
board of directors. Mr. Schumann 
formerly was regional general man- 
ager at Barclays Bank Internation- 
al Lid. in London. CBC, which 
until recently was known as Com- 
pagnie de Banque et de Credit SA, 
is owned by the Tradition Group in 
Lausanne and specializes in invest- 
ment management 


Ta Dm faidtn at 

FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMP AMY 
Hflriag Rata Notaa 
ftn NwMfear tSSt 


Ptpwa ta to fiio* kguxt Agnamt Md 
a of Nowftxr 1. 1984 (ft* "A gm fwT) 
tatwmFoM Moftr Cwfr Coo*** ad Th* 
On Manhmaa Baft (ttdnft huo a da n] , 
a Fool AfM, Rotai d hmbr swn M ft* 
ft** at team afteftfe ft ft* Won How 
hr (he Inina Mod Mftr IS to Mmnbft 15, 
1985. *s d m * a »ccorftnri wfti ft* 
preaiioB at ft* Avaotn. a Wfk fa 
mo ml Th mat ft aln 
toped ft gift USSSO.OOO pnfori 
ft Maw ft USSi235.11. taptik M 
15. 1965. 


THE CHASE UUUUTIM BARK 

(MfthMl AmdOka). 
a* Kccal Afatt 
Dftaft May 15. 1985 


Richardson Savings & Loan 
Bank and "Rust Company 

Cayman islands, ws Inches 
offering 


11 % 


180 Day 

Eurodeposit 
amounts over 
5100,000 U.S. 

Member 


nwm — e bw H ng* e lm 
P an Com b. Ln* am a 

KTOO PM* Cana* o>m. Sum 1500 
Dates. tem 75231 
GcAM RtcK* Banting Dfv 
Wok B83?n FuchaHOSQn su. 
W (2t4) SOO-M4I *308 


By Brenda. Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Postmankkd, one 

rtf thft Target TwnW ip Kmlnryt^ lux 

recruited a senior official from Fin- 
land's Ministry of Finance to he pd 
its new representative office in To- 
kyo. 

Annflrlri Snarria t a financial 
counselor at the ministry, has been 


NOTICE TO THE HOLDERS OF BONDS OF THE ISSDE 
9% 1977/95 OF JUS 50,000,000 MADE BY THE 
EUROPEAN COAL AND STEEL COMMUNITY. 


The Commission of the European Communities announces dial the annual 
instalment of bonds amounting to SUS 1 , 750.000 has been purchased for 
redemption on June 15 . 1985 .. 

Amount in circulation after June 15. 1985. 

•US 36,000,000. — 


McDonald’s of West Germany: Symbol of the Service Industry 


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(Cootmaed from Page 11) 

more skill and should be compen- 
sated better. 

“A grifier typically earns 1130 
■DM per hour at restaurants in Ger- 
many. Why should be only earn 
7i0 DM at McDonald’s^ said 
Manfred HOmg, a onion spokes- 
man. 

Bemd MfiHer, personnel director 
of McDonald’s Germany, said 
kitchen help starts at 8 DM per 
hour wage, on-par or hi^ier than 
the gang union rates for kitchen 
staff. But, be said, that cannot be 
compared with labor costs at Mc- 
Donald’s in the United Stales be- 
cause,, under West German law, 
employees are (pven numerous “so- 
cial benefits,” including paid long- 
term sick leave and pad vacations, 
the en d result bring that labor costs 
2 a.*; v *jn West Germany are considerably 




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entitled to all of the social benefits, 
particularly pension plans, of most 
foil-time employees m Germany. 

McDonalds has recently em- 
barited m a publicity campaign to 
promote an image of afastgrowing 
enterprise.. With. 1984 sales of 593 
million DM and a work force of 
about 10,000, it is the lamest res- 
taurant organization in West Ger- 
many. And, according to Mr. 
Kreiner, who oversees marketing, it 
expects to expand daring the next 
few years at an annual rate of 25 
new shops, each employing an av- 
erag&of 60 to 70 workers. At peak 
hours about 65 percent of those 
working as kitchen hdp are part- 
time workers who earn 400 DM or 
lessamoulh. 

Hans-Jflrgen Knqrp, president 
of the DIW economic research in- 
stitute in Berlin, titinVs that equal- 


• >. - 

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vice sector here,” Mr. Krupp said, 
“What tannot be overlooked is that 
the esmanskai of jobs in (he United 
States has not been solely in low, or 
substandard, wage areas, as same 
voices assert” 

In 1982, 69 percent of U5. work- 
ers woe engaged in the service sec- 
tor, compared with 55 percent in 
West Germany, Mr. Krupp said. 

“Even in areas where marry here 
thought West Germany might have 
been more advanced, such as in 
medical care, our comparative 
analysis shows that 7 percent of the 
U.S. work force was involved in the 
medical sector in 1982, while only 5 
percent were involved in West Ger- 
many,” me said. 

The service sector in West Ger- 
many has nonetheless grown in im- 
portance, having accounted for 
only 41.4 at the active labor force 
in 1960. But the traditional heavy- 
industry, export-oriented structure 




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ing service industries with McDon- 
ahTsHstyie work is misleading and _ 

The tmixm fears, not only ibatxhe - gets in thewayof what hefeosisa of the West Germany economy is 
pay differentials in the food indus- - presring need to expand West Ger- not going to disappear overnight or 
~ many’s service sector- probably ever, Mr. Krupp said. 

“The disc r e pa ncy in job creation “West Germany will always have 

between West Germany and the a larger industrial sector than tire 
United States, or Japan, is one that UX* he said, citing the country’s 
is largely traceable to the compare- heavier reliance on production of 
tivrityweakdevdqpmentrf theser- cartel goods, automobiles, deo- 
-■ . . tranks and home appliances. 


try could be threatened by MdJon- 
akTs exarrqde but also that the in- 
dustry could adopt McDonald’s 
practice of hiring part-time work- 
ers wbo earn up tb 400 DM a 
month mid are not, at that levd, 


»*■ 
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Some Bosses are Nice Guys 


• 


(Centhmed from Page II) 





.. > 


- 1 : 




who had been fired by these ami- 
able British chief executives was 
interviewed by the authors. 

Psychologists, psychiatrists, re- 
searchers and academics tong have 
wondered whether these is a per- 
sonality type that predictably 
would make it to the top. A recent 
five-year study at the Umversity.of 
~ icago of 120 artists and scholars 
the United States suggests that 
drive arid determination, not, great 
natural talent, is what it takes. 

But, according tb British psycho- 
logists, there have beat no ctmdn- 
sjve psychological studies done of 
British industry .leaders. 

“It depends on the oiganiza- 
tion,” says Ken Miller, prestocnl of 
IndepeDdent Assessment and Re- 
search Carter Ltd, a Londton- 


based company of occtqpatkBial 
psychdopsts. “Certain companies 


does not subscribe to either a Dr. 
Jekyll or Mr. Hyde pereonality type 
for the corporate achiever. 

“There arc a lot of ruthless peo- 
ple at all levels, in case you hadn’t 
noticed,” he says. “And there are 
also a lot of nice people around.” 

According to ML Jacques, the. 
only measurable characteristic 
common to chief executives is (heir 
ability to think ahead as far as the 
next quarter century. According to 
Mr. Jacques’s statistical findings, 
most people~are never capable of 

thinking mor e, than three months 
flht »a ti r ' 

These same statistics found that 
middle manag ers think from tWO tO 
five years ahead, presidents of 
small business units drink from five 
to 10 years ahead. and corporate 
vice presidents think ahead lu to 20 
years. ... 


The task then, as smokestack in- 
dustries such as steel, shipbuildmg 
and coal continue to rind jobs by 
the thousands each year, is to pin- 
point die impediments preventing 
the service sector from taking up 
more of the slack. 

Klaus Luft, deputy chairman of 
Nixdorf Computer AG, West Ger- 
many’s most successful computer 
company and the nation’s largest 
software house, said the chief ob- 
stacle is the public’s perception of 
the service sector. 

“After the war, when the Germa- 
ny manufacturing economy got 
back on its feet, the sense emerged 
that service jobs were for others to 
do — low levd, unskilled work with 
low-paying wages. This image re- 
mains and has created a negative 
backdrop to fostering a stronger 
service orientation today,” he sard. 

A significant factor behind the 
slower development of services in 
West Germany is the late start that 


West German industry has had in 
data-processing and information 
technology, Mr. Krupp said. 

“While the market for software 
and computer ormnilting; etc., has 
been unaerdevetoped compared to 
the UJ>. and Japan, I think Ger- 
man firms have done njyrh in the 
ga stfc w years to narrow the gap,” 

Traditionally, West German 
companies have resorted to in- 
house marketing and research ad- 
vice, but now there is trend toward 
seeking outside, independent 
groups for those services. 

Government pdky could also be 
more supportive of a healthier ser- 
vice sector, Mr. Krupp and other 
economists say. 

“The problem with the current 
government posture is that it is not 
likely to expand pnbDo-sector Jobs, 
given the austerity plan in force, 
nor is it making much progress in 
transferring public protects to the 
private sector. The post office mo- 

rcfonn could botmSvity in the 
private service industry,” Mr. 
Krupp said. 

■ Legal factors are restrictive in 
the large public-supported educa- 


tion system. Law requires that 
teachers be regarded as permanent 
state appointees and be paid ac- 
cording to a statedetenmned wage 
scale, which, Mr. Krupp said, has 
left thousands of would-be teachers 
fresh out of college without jobs. 
More flexibility in hiring and pay 
ices offers the only hope of 
the vast oversupply of 
in line with demand, he 

said. 


Trade Journal 
Closes in U.K. 


Reuters 

LIVERPOOL, England — One 
of Britain’s oldest trade newspa- 
pers, the Journal of Commerce, an- 
nounced Tuesday that it was dos- 
ing after 159 years of publication. 

“It’s a sad reflection of the de- 
cline in the British shipping indus- 
try ” the journal's director, Keith 
Cade said. The demise of the jour- 
nal Wednesday leaves Lloyd’s List 
as the only daily paper serving 
shipping and transportation in 
Britain. 

Mr. Cade said the journal had a 
loss of £70,000 (584,000) last year 
and drcnlation supped to 3,000. He 
said 32 staff members would lore 
their jobs. 


- 

fl- ■ 1 


need a driving, dominant, extrovert 
breed of managers. Others would 
never touch that type of person and 
would want somebody low-key," 
Elliott Jacques, a psychologist 
; psychoanalyst, who is director 
: •• rff (he Institute of Organization and 
;*• Social Studies at Brunei University 
■; in England and a founder fellow ca 
S’ lb* RoN College of Psydnacy, 


Gold Options udMuvw). 


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ADVERTISEMENT 


► '* I*-: ... 

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CANJUEHAH PACIFIC 
ENTERPRISES UNTflB 

(GDffs) 


11 * 

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■ 

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The unfetskned anawaaw dtl aa tram 23* 
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1 ^ 72, Amtnfaa. dbtjnujia. 21 rf dw CDKV 
OiMftim Pvffie Emennfocfl Uaiwt 




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Dflb. 4 J 9 iKt. ( 4 v. peri»? 4 aic-w — ~~-3 
gnus Cmk -JO uA.f ftleriWuctwool 19 S 
Cm. tax » Cnsf^ll “ DOs . -.77 Wf CHR. 
undrrsansderftM "AffiftmT. sanMwtd the 
offiee el the undsnned. satin thft thr be«£- 
dft owner Is i icndm d the axmav w® whjdi 
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«ialiwof(kdn bo. ndubnonficaw 
rfk . 1 efivufend wffl be mnlTnKfcrl 
2 Sft f>n. W wdi d£^r 7 m. 


?W 


AMSTCSDiAM DBtoSlTAKV 
COMPANY KV. 


AiwiMiftn, 7Ui Mar, JQ8& 


1=.' — ' 


Change of Name 


CBCIbsiinife 

formerly Compagnle de Banque et de CnScfft SA 


Investment Management 


Member of the Tradition Group 


; Rue de Langallerie 1 1 , Lausanne . 
TOlOphone: 021/2067 4V - 
TOlex: 25 366. banc ch 




degrees^ 

22S&Z— 



We are pleased to announce that 

Norbert K. Siegel 

of our London Office 
has been elected a Managing Director. 



Oppenheimer & Cojnc. 

Uncommon Sense® 

Afr A member company of the Mercantile House Groupt 


Another year 
on course. 


For Helaba Frankfurt, one 
of Germany’s leading financial 
institutions, 1984 was another 
year of progress toward reaching 
two principal longer term ob- 
jectives: quality growth and 
ccoisistently high earnings. 


Tbtal assets rose by 5.4% to 
DM 66.4 billion, while business 
volume advanced by 5.1% to . 
some DM 68.6 bilKon. 


Operating profits were again 
strong and only slightly below 
the exceptionally high 1985 
figure. The Bank used its solid 
earnings perfomance to step up 
its loan-toss provisions, to 
strengthen its equity base . to 
DM 1J16 billion, and to main- 
tain its 5% dividend to share- 
holders. 


Helaba Frankfurt is a govern- 
ment-backed regional universal 
bank concentrating on whole- 
sale banking and medium to 
long-term lending. It also acts 
as banker to the State of Hesse 
and performs clearing and 
other centralized functions for 
Hesse’s 52Sparkassen - regional 
universal bmks. Refinancing is 
facilitated through issuing own 
bearer bonds whose volume 
outstanding at year-end 1984 
was DM 213 biffon. 



Head Office: 

Junghofstrasse 18 -26. 

D-6000 Frankfim/Main 
TeL(069) 132-01, Dl 415 291-0 


New York Brandi: 

499 Park Avenue 

New York, New York.10022 

TfcL (212) 3712500, Tx. 234426 


LojUggn Brandi; 

8, Moorgate, London EC2R6DD 
TeL(01) 7264554, Tx. 887511 


Lnxeanbw wy Strifes 
Helaba Luxembourg, Hessische 
Landesbank International S. A. 
4, Race de Paris 
TeL(52) 499 40 11, Tk. 3295 beklu 


Financial Highlights DM million Dcc.31 

1982 

1983 

1984 

Business volume 

Balance sheet total 

Total credit volume 

oo Ov 

III 

65315 

62^99 

49^90 

68,622 

66391 

50,150 

Short-term assets 

Due from banks 

Due from customers 

16,707 

9,668 

7,039 

16^64 

10,884 

6,080 

18324 

12,631 

5393 

Long-tens loam 

Loans to banks 

Loans to customers 

28,252 

4,192 

24,060 

28,013 

4383 

23,630 

28378 

4,425 

24353 

Short-term liabilities 

Long-term liabilities 

Beads issued 

18,593 

5,459 

24,994 

17,080 

5325 

26,720 

18353 

4376 

27317 

Capital and reserves 

1,241 

.1391 

1316 

Net income 

45 

75 

SO 


Helaba 

Hessische Landesbank -Girozentrale- 





I 

















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 



Ov er-the-Counter ' 

NASDAQ National Market Pricas 


May 14 


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— n> 1 J.F Japon T«chnntosY — YZtj 

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N! MAR SEN 
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ADVERTISEMENT 


SEKISin HOUSE, LTD. 

(CPRb) 

The undenigncd anoouncn thlt as from 
22nd MnlWS at Ka* .Wciatic N.V.. 
SfWKtml 172. Amsterdam. 43 

{■eeannsnied by on ** Affidavit") ol ihr CDR* 
Seldam Howe. Ud. will be payahlr wilh 
DOa. 4^53 net. per CDR. repr. 50 aha 
>n<l with DUm. 90JO'ixi per CDR. repr. 
1.000 aha. (ifiv. pcrimmUilcOIJl.lWS; 
eras Yeti 7.5Q pah.) alter dedwiian ol IS"* 
Japanese In m Ym 5625 “ DfLt. -.80 prr 
CDR. 50 uln.. Ym 1.1 25.- - DIU. lb.- per 
CDR. 1.000 Jk. Biihiai an Affidavit 
Jap. tax - Yen 75.- - DO*. l.ObnrrCDR.50 
ahk. Yen 1-500.- - Dll*. 21 JO per CDR. 
1.000 aha., will be deducted. After 
31.08.1985 the div. will onlv be paid under 
deduction of 20*r Jap. lax nap. DO*. 427; 
__ — - -fland 


1000 ah*., each id amudOnee wilh ihr Japa- 
nese tax rcfpibtions. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam. 8th Mar 1965. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 

(CDR’s) 

The andenienrd announces iful as fium 
21 at May 1985 ai K»A»ocuue N.V, 

K raal 172, Amsterdam, divjpjio, 48 
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Div.rpa. beloneinc to non-residents of The 
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an additional 15% USA-tax (- S .15 - 
Dfis. -53) with Dfb. 2,42 nrL 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam. 7th Mar. 1985. 




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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, ’WEDNESDAY, .MAY 15, 1985 


Tu esdays 

AMEX 


nMontn 
HWlto* Sort 


Closing 


Tobtea include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
fta The Associated Press 


nMorati 
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19* 11* 
16 9 

9* 5 

4* 1* 

10* 13* 
19* 9* 
816 410 

1310 10 
25 IB* 
4 * 3 * 
1* * 
10* 7* 

1716 9* 
22 10 13'* 


CHS JOb 1J 38 

CMI Cn 17 

CMXCp 

CRS M 13 IS 

CaaNj IS 

CooleA S 

CaIRE IJfl 93 11 
Calmtn 30 15 30 
Colton n 
Caimwt 

cmproo 301103 4 
Cameo J2 13 11 
CMorca J> 


2 19* 
2 15* 
35 B* 
19 2* 

64 IS* 
35 12* 
6 5* 
119 13* 
169 2416 

\ % 

10 7* 

63 17* 
25 13* 


4* 4* j 

14* 14* 

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3* 4 + * 

BO* 10* + * 
10* 10*— 16 
11 * 11 *— * 

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2 2* + * 
39 29-16 

17* IB* + % 
5* 5*- * 
43* 44* + * 
616 6*- U 
8* 916 + * 

11 IPO + * 
1* 1*— * 
95* 95* + * 
7* 7M 
6* 6*— * 
11 * 11 *— * 

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25 25 — * 

13* W»— * 
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no no 

7* 7* 

34 35 — 1 

6* 6* + * 
5* 5*— 1A 

10* 10* 

14* 14*— * 

i* r* + to 

3* 3* + * 
59 59 + * 

13* 13* + * 
14* 15* + 16 
3* 3*— * 

2 * 2 *— * 
5* 5* 

4 4-10 

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2* 2* 

5* 5* 

6* 6*— M 
6* 6* 

9* 9*— * 

B* 816 + 16 
20* 20* 

8* B* 

11* 11*— * 
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43* 43*— * 
14 14 + 16 


4*- 10 
40*— * 
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316—16 
24* + 16 
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116 

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19* 19* + * 
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2 2 

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12 * 12 *- * 
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13 13* 

24 24 + * 

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14* 1C*— * 
13* 13*— * 


17 

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14 

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350 T2J 

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13 

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22 

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1JDO60 U 
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200 5y& 

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18 

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12 

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1.92 BJ 
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20 32* 

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31 2* 

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41 21* 

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6 4* 

53 1* 

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22 4* 

249 2* 

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152 

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9* 5* 
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3016 IB 
24* 19* 
21* 11* 
9<6 3* 

8* 3* 

4* 4* 
34* 2316 
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916 2* 

7 4 

10* 7* 

14 950 

1016 5* 

10 5* 

15* B 
7* 2 

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62* 23* 
616 316 

V* 6 
10 5V6 

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27* 22* 
13* 6* 
13* 8* 

39 25* 

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31* 22* 
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14* 9* 
23* 18* 


16* 13* 
7* 3* 

3* 2* 
23* 17* 
12* 6* 
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9* 5* 

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02 1-3 B 


9 

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02 10 10 
100 11J 9 

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23 
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02 20 11 
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507 216 

6 25* 
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136 4* 

19 20 

2 21to 
454 12* 

20 5 

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354 3* 
12 5 

37 BVb 
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234 17* 
16 2* 
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575 59* 
40 4* 

23 7* 
102 9* 
1373 2fc 
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75 13* 
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21 31* 
68 15* 

377 14* 

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5* 5*— * 

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31* 31*— * 
14* 14*— * 
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816 Bft + ft 
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15 15 

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22* 11* FpreotL 32 

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26 14 PreaEi 18 

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9* 5 FrtesE n _ 

19 10* Frfonn JO V 11 

22* 12* Frisch a J2 10 19 

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mo Iff* FurVltn 20 


9 3 

7* 416 
4* 2* 
14* 9* 
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33 24* 

IB* 7* 
10* 7 
13* 9* 
4* 2* 

17* 12* 
17* 11* 
7* 2* 
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11* 816 
39* 21* 
19* 10* 
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34* 17 
37 23* 

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24* 15* 
T2 8* 
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40* V 
28to 6* 
12 4* 

13* 8* 

15* 10* 
32* 22* 


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613 23* 22* 
222 1* 1* 
4 3B* 38* 
1 6 * 6 * 
30 52W 2EV. 
6 7* 7* 

161 6* 8* 
151 IB* IB* 
II 22* 22*6 
1123 15* 14* 
74 6to 6* 
B22 19* 19* 


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14* M* 
13* 17* 
4* 4* 
12* 12 
12* 12* 
3* 3* 
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34* 36W 
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33* 33* 
33 32* 

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B* B* 
12 12 
34* 3«* 
37* 36* 
28 2714 

II* 11 
121s 73 
14* 1M 
31 29* 


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3 — * 
11* 

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13*— to 
4* — * , 
12 — * 
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10* 

33*— * ! 

33 + to 1 

20*— to 
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12 I 

34* to to : 
37 — to 
28 + to 

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22 7* 7* 7* to to 

12 14* 14* 14* 

17 4* 4 4to + to , 

13 2* 2* 2* 1 

3 23 23 23 + Vb 

lisa izto 12* i2to + to 
a 1* ivo 1* 

7 4* 4* 4* 

163 7* 7* 7*— to 

5 12* 17* 1316 + 16 
37 4* 4* 4to „ 

612 * to 16—10 

16 12 11* 11*— * 
40 3 7* 2 to— VO 

4 llto II* 1116 + 16 

8 19* 19* 19* — to 


14* llto 
11(6 Hto 
28* 14* 
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33 13 

37 22* 

46* 2SV4 
22 IS 

no s* 
19 * a* 
15* 10* 
9* 4* 

17* 7* 

5 5? 

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216 * 
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5 2* 

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6* 2to 
13 6* 

3416 25to 
1716 B* 
7* 2to 
17* fl* 
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41* 30(6 
42* 29 
54 3S* 

71* 16* 
10 716 


111 29* 

9 434 

4* 2Vb 
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2* 1 * 
2* I* 
4016 25* 
10 * 6 * 
27* 14* 
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3* 2* 

10 * 6 * 
16 llto 
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llto 8* 
6* 3* 
3to 1* 
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10* 7* 

5* I 
30* 17* 
36* IB* 
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00 5.1 

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08 20 13 


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17 
71 

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53 


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108 3-3 12 
711 63 16 
1271 9J3 
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JOe 10 8 
1-52 30 11 
1-52 u 11 

206 3.9 
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JS 3 11 
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15 

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400 


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08 20 31 


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23 20* 
46 B 
143 9Vi 
109 TOO 
7 9* 

23 16 

5 2* 
276 no 

62 1 
71 Sto 

2 3 
12 14* 

3 2* 

6 10lb 
64 33* 

105 Hto 
14 3 

46 ITU 

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576 4 

lb 16* 
5 11U 
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32 39* 
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4 19 

47 B 


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to 1 + to 

32* 32 + * 

36 37* + to 

31 31 

2D* 20* + to 

7to B +10 

9 SU— U : 
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Sto 9* + to 
15* 14 + to 

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14* 14* + >6 
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32to 33to— * 
11* llto 

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11 11 - to 

38* 39 — * 
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19 19 

7* 7ta 


91 91 

6* 6* 
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2* 2* 
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37* 371b 
10* 10* 
26 r s 26* 
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3*0 2to 
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7 6to 
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17* 12 Joclvn 


2 14V, 14* 1410 




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1 

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J2» XI 

70 

2 

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34* 

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40 

5 

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31% 

31% 




76 

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7 B 


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17 

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10 

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3 

54 

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7% 

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5 

a 

4 

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4 


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9* FtConn 100a 90 
11 FWvmB 00 61 

2116 Fstcrpn 
11* FlSCtiP 081 50 B 
7 FTfcGC 3 

23* FttGE P< 400 160 
B* Flan Bn 
25* FtaRck 7D 17 
22* Fluke 1J8> 5J 
6to Faodrm 
716 FaaleM 
4* FIM1IG 
68* FardCnd+OOe 


9 11* 
37 4* 
1 10* 
3 II* 

3 22* 

4 12* 

37 716 

3 25 

5 9* 
15 4200 
65 26* 
10 10* 

3 8* 

213 8* 

680x 95* 


llto 11* 

4* 4* 

10* 10* + VO 
13* 13*— * 
22* 22* + to 
12 * 12 *— * 

7 7* + to 

25 25 + to 

9* 9to—* 
41* 42* +1 
26* 26*—* 
9* 10* + to 
B* B%— * 

8 Bto + * 

94 94 — 16 


3716 30 
3* I* 
1616 10 
16* «* 
17* 10* 
9* 5* 
IT* 8 
13* 5 

9* 7 

4* 2to 
4* 3* 
5* 3* 
5* 3 
5* 3* 

3* 2 


KnGapf 400 123 
KaPOfcC 7 

KoyCo -20 13 20 
KearNn 00 11 14 
Kerchm 0Bt 15 
KevCe JO 23 
KayPfi JO 21 15 
KevCa 8 

kevcatm 
Ktflcv- wt 

Kllem 34 

Klnark 

Kirby 

KltMta IZ 

KleerV 02r 0 


1002 36p 
3 2* 

ID 16* 
5 13 
3 16* 
35 Bto 
993 913 

30 6 

3 r- 
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41 4<6 

20 4* 
61 3>. 

1 4ft 
16 }’- 


36* 36* + Vi 
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16* 16* + * 
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37* 21 
7* 1* 
3* 2* 
7* 2* 

J® 11* 

17* 11 
M* 9* 

13 •* 
t* 490 

27* 23* 

no 2* 
31* 13 
6* JU. 
7* 

3* 1* 
3* 21b 
3* 1*6 
99* 21* 

14* 8* 

14 6* 

14 10* 

22* ra 
35* M* 
10* t* 
14* 12 

3* 1* 
9* 7* 
2* 1 
Wfc 7* 
FA 3 

I Sto 6*6 

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2* to 
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Tito M 
9* 4* 
13* 3* 
22* 21* 
26* 15* 
30to lb 
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8* 5 

22* 12* 
19* 8 to 
29* IB 
17* 12* 
4Sto 15* 

II B 
7* 4to 
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11* 7* 
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91* 5* 

mo o* 

20* llto 
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BVb 4* 
8* 
13* 
48* 38* 
9* 7* 
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10* Bto 
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17* 10* 
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21 13* 

9* 4 to 

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13* 7ft 
~ 15* 

5* 
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27 12* 

tto to 
mo n* 
14* 11 
20* 13 
46* 76 
«to 4* 
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6* 6(6 
12* 5* 
3* lto 
3* 2to 
3* io 
IT* 13* 
35 29* 

Sto 2* 
llto 7(6 
13to 9 
2416 1616 
22ft 14* 
n 4 
16* 4* 

UEO lOto 
20* 17* 
20* 10* 
7* 3* 
7* Jto 
41 27* 

13* 6* 
11 7* 

13(6 10* 
12* Bft 
11 8* 
U 8* 
10* 816 
34* 29 
32U 26* 
28ft >1* 
22’6 17* 
20 15* 

22 17 
22* 17* 
20* 15* 
Isu. 13* 
T7U 13U 
16to Uto 
19V. UTO 
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19to 15 
Vto 7* 

2416 W* 
43to 34 
6y- S3* 
lto * 
19* 29* 
8* 5* 

24* 15* 
!4to 7* 
ITU 7*6 
45* 31* 
21* 15* 
2* I 
38ft 26* 


Knaoa t« a 13to 

KMB 15 w a 

KMerc 2J2 17157 155 Stto 

UB 4 1* 

LaSofa B 2* 

LnPm 6 13 4* 

LakoSs .iso 95 43* 

iJoasnn m u i 6 w* 

Wn*i A 10 12 no 17 

Laser 53 29 13 

Lnnin u 6 9* 

UBKta 10 4to 

LearPR 10 23* 

UWPb 12 S3 6U 

LAMSbi 11 13 2B* 

UburT 19 S3 6* 

LMl>Ptt jo LS • 71 20* 

UfcRs 202 2* 

UNW 

Lodge 22 _ 

UWmr 18 548 35 

Lumas; 08 0 38 M2 14* 
U 45 M 
9 137 71* 
4 83 W 

JO 0 15 B4 35 

JO 3.1 16 » no 

7 74 13* 

MCORi O U 216 

MBA* JSe 70 29 9* 

MMtaf M I* 

M0JOT 
M5R 

MOCGrs 13 12 12* 

MacSea M U 23 397 12* 

Moered 47 1* 

MePS 28 21 1 38 12* 

MakaiB JOe 43 19* 

MBRM U 14* 

MTfWW 14 15 5 

MrttrVi 12 40 12* 

Mermpf X35 U0 S 21* 

Mrtfun • f ii* 

MertPr 15 6 29* 

Mound jo o I J a 5 Wb 

Mctec 17 1 6* 

MoIRjb .12 3 16 52 17* 

MtnScn 8 164 IS* 

MotTbcs 22 228 24* 

May Eng 200 120 38 48 16* 

MayRw 00b 23 n 62 3SU 

MaCOG 2DHZ19 95 9U 

MCOow XT 2 4to 

MCRae A ,10e 40 5 2»6 

McRae B 4 2* 

Aledcrist JOe 20 8 60 10* 

Media 1.14 10 15 B7 81 

Med* JO 1-2 14 34 17* 

MmrSL JTt SJ 11 15 6* 

MefPrrr ,U 0 27 437 77* 

Mete* 10 9 12 19* 

MetrnC 31 18 21 

MchGn 21 95 6* 

MIdAm 04 AS 12 4 9to 

Mid lad 00 10 B 5 25% 

MM> ef 500 110 25z AS* 

MteanW J4e 3J 12 ID 7* 

MkME J4 1 4 20 64 14% 

MenMo 00 50 7 1 10(6 

MonPpJ 400 1X3 KXtr 35% 

MoooB JO 1J 16 1 IS* 

MoooA JB 1J 16 1 15* 

MlgRtwl ■ 3* 

MtoGttl L56 80 7 248 11*0 

MIAUd 19 W 5* 

MouStr .151 8 2 14* 

MowleL 
Murpin 
MusoAr 
Mosewt 
Mverin ja 20 10 5 11* 

NRMn 
Nentdt 

NtGoO 0OD JJD ? 1 DO 

NtPofttf .10 3 14 220 14* 

NetSLB 47 to 

NMkAr J9t 40 11 15 18 

T4PlnRf 102 60 15 80 15(0 

NPrac 1 JOB 70 f 96 If 

NYTbne 03 LI T7 1389 46* 

NewbE J5e 53 4 114 4% 

Newenr J2 Z7 M 10 11% 

NwnEI UO 10.1 9 J 15 

Nldian 
Md»b 
NoeUnd 
NaUae 
Nonm 

NaCdOa 36 15* 

MIPS pt 4J5 120 120c 33 

Nnttrzn ' ' *” 

NuctDt 
Numac 
OEA 
Oakmd 
OdetAn 
Odema 

OhArt _ - _ 

OUalnd 00 2.1 15 7 19* 

OUteni J4 1J 17 81 TOO 

OOUep 23 5* 

Openhn 05a 0 22 72 6* 

OSDUvn J2 10 15 16 40 

OxfrdF 021 3J 12 96 12* 

OzsrkH JO 20 9 133 9* 

PGEpfA 1JO 11 a 12 13* 

PGeplB 1J7 T10 3 12 

PGEjrfO 1J5 1L5 9 II 

PCEP4E 1JS 110 46 11* 

PGEgfC 1J0 110 25 10* 

PGEnfF 04 124 29 34 

PGEpfZ 40b 1X7 95 31* 

PGEcfY 3J0 11 J 151 28 

PGEpfW257 110 44 llto 

P«pn/ 232 11J 537 20* 

PGEpTT 154 110 14 21to 

PGEeQ 203 12.1 5 73V, 

PGEofR 137 II J 48 20* 

PGEpfP XOS 1IJ 159 II* 

POEpfO 200 110 33 171V 

PGEntM 106 110 94 17 

PGEldL X2S 110 23 19* 

PGEgfK X04 11J 42 17* 

PGEtrfJ 132 111 2 TOO 

PGEpff 109 114 10 9* 

PGTm 10* 5V 7 36 21* 

POCLIpt 4J5 110 imfe 42* 

PocLtot 704 110 lODx 65(6 

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202 2* 2 2* 

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Plants have fed the world 
and cured its ills since life began. 

Now weVe destroying their principal habitat 
at the rate of 50 acres every minute. 


W ; live on this planet by courtesy 
dF the earth’s green cover. Plants 
protect fragile soils from erosion, 
regulate the atmosphere, maintain 
water supplies for agriculture and 
prevent Formation of deserts. Without 
plants man could not survive. 

Yet, knowing this, we axe destroying 



a crisis - a crisis for ourselves and an 
even bigger one for our children. 

The figures alone should tell the story 
- we destroy a tropical rain forest three 
times the size of Switzerland every year, 
within 25 years only fragments of the 
vast Malaysian ana Indonesian forests 
wiD remain. 


. * ' 


Si-.i-c- . 

r*> 




Pboio: Mnric-J. PloUcio 


What can be done about it? 

The problem seems so vast that there is- 
a tendency to shrug and say “What can 
Ido?” But there is an answer; There is ij* 
something that each and every one of ® 
us can do. 

The WWF Plant 

Conservation Prosnunme - r -‘. 
The World Conservation Strategy, I ^ 
published in 1980, is a programme for - ; ■ 

conserving the world's natural resources 
whilst managing them for human , 

needs. A practical, international plant , 
conservation programme has been pre*' 




Photo: Caorteey of Richard Evans Schultes 


Botanical Museum at Harvard University, has 
Spent 13 years in the Amazon jungle collecting 
the 'magic* plants of myth and legend and 
making than available to Western medicine 
and soma. lt The drugs of the future? he says, 
grow in the primeval jungle." 

What we are destroying 
Much of the food, medicines and 
materials we use every day of our lives 
is derived from the wild species which 
grow in the tropics. Yet only a tiny 
fraction of the world's flowering plants 
have been studied for possible use. 
Horrifyingly, some 25,000 of all 
flowering species are on the verge of 
extinction. 

Once the plants go, they are gone 
forever. Once the forests go only 
wastelands remain. 


now alive due to die properties discovered in 
the rosy periwinkle, which originated in 
Madagascar where 90% of the forests are 
already destroyed. 

Who is the villain? 

There is no villain - except ignorance 
and short-sightedness. The desperately 
poor people who live in the forests have 
to clear areas for crops and fuel, but 
they are doing this in such a way that 
they are destroying their veiy livelihood. 

Add to this the way in which the 
heart is being ripped out of the forests 
to meet the demand for tropical 
timbers and we have a recipe for 
disaster. 


*. • ' - Ye 


'well under way 



The Vavilov Centres. 'Named after the Russian* 
scientist who identified than. These are the £ 
regions in which our major crop plants nt rt • 
first domesticated. Many of these regions 
contain wild or semi^vnesticatcd relatives 
commercial species which can Be erus-ireo trtg 
crop plants to increase yield and mistanev 
pests and diseases. j 

• ^ 

You cun become part of it 
The WWF Plant Conservation 
Programme is a plan for survival Which 
you can help make a reality. Join the - ' 
World Wilalife Fund now. we need -la- 
yout voice and your financial support- 
Get in touch with your local WWF; 
office for membership details, or send * 
your contribution direct to the World 
Wildlife Fund at: WWF Intemationsft. 


k.,i ls 


Phola W WtYH.Jiiopui 


domestic varieties, ensure that Ireland will 
never again experience the blight disease which 
wiped out its entire crop, leaving a million 
people to die af starvation. 


f try Save the plants 

Jlgf that save us. ^ 

WWF FOR WORLD CONSERVATION 


V ' > nV . 

■ -> 1 -.*9 - 


Photo: (Forest) BruoeCoteauH/Bfian OmUb 







** 


3 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


JU.S. Futures 


May 14 


HU - LOW 

_ 2TW IN 


Own Wish Low Clan Cha. 

2087 


Ona High Low Got* Q>p. 




OTfl 1N0 -JuL 2087 

OMHNJUlckniyCD 
1*000 It*,- CM per H* 

lasno uuo Moy isu# u*2s uun uui 
1MU UU 3 JUI ISL50 15*J0 tt&50 1S34S 


1MU KJJS JUl mJB IStHJ 15350 1S34S -MO 

mOQ MM3 Sap 151 Jl UMI 151 AS VIA# +JS 

UU9. M8J9' NSV HM MMS MUD HMD +A0 

H8M -WH Jan . MUD WMS MMO U?XS +Jfl 

177 JO 14K7D Mar MMO T49J* 149XJB 149JS +30 

1*25# 14180 MOV 149J5 +JD 

1S7JO .157 Ji XU WAS +X 

HUB 17R75 flap 149.15 -MB 

Cat Sates JW PravJMai ; an 
Prw.pByOMOlnt 4M#9i »* 


, !'• irlMjinB 





luMI 




f" IK. 










spa 


ri'- r u^ 


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a 0- _ _ . .1 


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Tefc M/35 35 31 
Tele* 456 213 GESE 



Auj* +J2tt 
U» +47 
Ut 


USA GENERAL 


CAUFORMA niME FARMlAfO 

With oB die bad i»hi tint America? 
farerera. farm bnd prices hove 
pkeigedlharecrBirwettinertoppofto- 
nrfces os never before, ct fries* below 
marker value. 

* 607 Acme. Tote County, Cvorria 

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22f IS 23 25 25 

3337 1845 Dec 3##S 2111 280 IBS 

2180 W5E Mar urn IW7 aou »w 

zi3o ifflo Mnv urn 


UST. BILLS (IMMI 

H maflorv r^oT yzJS 823# 8242 

W MM . Sep 8L90 92X0 81M 92X0 

*154 «S37 DK 81-53 91X7 FU3 91 A* 

9105 8*49 Otar 905 901 905 90* 

90J9 87Xn JWl 81.14 8U4 8144 8141 

tCa - BUS Sep fOM 98J0 9010 9092 

MUD 88X8 Dec 8277 8277 8277 9075 

1214 8932 Mar 8258 

EetSoMa Prev.SMes 4X04 ' 

Prev. Day Open life. <1447 upTM 

W y*. TUASUK Y (C*n 
S30ft000prtn-p4*2iand»ofie0pcr 
1248 TV) Jan 83-27 83-23 8248 #341 

r-X 7S-TS Sep M1-7T *243 *7-29 32-20 

iM - - 75-11 Dec *3-5 SV25 *3-1 13-21 

fit ' 75-14 Mar ##-10 II 80-M 8D-38 

784* 74-30 Jwn. 80-8 

EatSafM Prwv.SnSee STM 

Prev.Oav Open life 44JU UP731 

us tmasuky 80NM (CVT) 

CIpc«WM02prn«ab*o<10Dpcf} _ 

77-15 57-2#. Jun 73-29 73-27 7347 7M3 

7*-2 57-1# SOP 71-27 72-35 7VM 72-21 

74-5 572 DK 7049 7Mi 70-38 73-34 

7230 57-2 Mar TOO 71-1 70-3 70-31 

70-1* 56-29 J«1 *9-11 70-8 *9-17 7D-* 

703 5*49 Sea 4034 49-19 Ml 49-M 

6846 56-23 Dec 027 6*40 6*41 6*40 

19-12 5*47 Mar <04 6S-14 404 4B-U 

*9-2 43-12 Jun 67-18 47-3# 67-19 *7-2* 

60-26 604 Sa> 4449 *7-U *448 67-14 

M 43JM DOC W 47-9 47-) M 

EM.Selea Prav.5n4— 91*22 

Prwr. Day Open intaZTMS op 0*1 

pum a tom „ 

SUftWprU-ptsoa&idaoflNpct _ _ 

7V* 59-17 Jim 71 71-17 71 71-11 

70-15 SMI Sen 70-8 70-23 704 70-19 

*9-2* 5M DOC' JM W » 2 

■ M4 SM* .MVor 49-15 

2*4. *25 Jua 49-1 49« 49 49 

47-3# 45 SOP *9-19 

c*.3ql8* Prav.Scrie* 132 

Prav.Dnv Open let ua off 28 
CBTT. DEPOSIT (IMMI 
51 mOnDn-pteatlOOpct 

8LM *5.30 Jon *t#8 8UM 81 J2 9}J2 

9U2 *5-00 Sen 9U2 8L» 8L21 9U< 

90J4 BSM Dec 9077 9ftS5 8077 908* 

KL37 165* Mar 8051 

9002 8fe*3 JWl 8020 8030 8930 9022 

MM 17 JW Jen 89JB 

mtf a m Dec : mjs 

Est.Sate* Prey. Sate* - 14# 

Prev. Day Open hfe %ta oHn 


Lit*.!’. ii',.. I,, i * n.~*. 


Stock 


IP COMP. INDEX (CM» 
points and cent* __ 

ts9.m 156.10 Jun nus mm 

192J0 16009 Sep W9J5 190.10 

19*40 1757# Dec 18335 

19575 1801# Mar 19000 18000 

Estsnle* Pnjy.Sate* <7479 

Prav. Day Open Int 57,117 up 842 
VAUIIUNNXCBT) 
points and cents 

21949 17300 Jun 198 JB 300.15 

2T2J0 1*575 Sep 2000 5008 

3)85 20000 Dec MM* 307X8 

Eet.Sales Prev.Solat 33M 

Prev- Day Open int 7X02 efim 
NYSE COMP. INDEX {NYFNJ 
Mints and cants 

1KLOO 9BXD Jun 18845 10BJ0 

lruo 8135 Sep 11055 11055 

TOJ5 3 01 JO Dec 11240 11245 

114.10 109JB Mar 11448 11448 

Bet Sates 10,890 Prev.Sole* iiM4 
Prev. Day Open Int 9428 up 300 


UM 

**50 

-vO 

i OM 

SU7 

— %53 

*405 

4S.U 


—09 

—09 

*S95 

9558 

—07 

UAD 

9*A2 

-03 


935# 

—AS 

MAS 

7QJ0 

—XI 

4AIS 

9fe*7 

-05 

49 J# 

7U9 

—OB 

7BJO 

710# 

—OB 

72.15 

7U0 

—.10 

74JB 

as 

—.10 

—JO 


708 

—30 


-TO# 

—JO 


7170 

—OB 


7130 

—JO 


M 


27 J8 

UM 

+XB 

atn 

UM 

—on 

H# 

2*65 

—SB 

34JB 

2*59 

—JJ2 

2*49 

2*99 

—05 

2*99 

2*99 

— xn 

2*37 

2*99 

-os 


1*445 18100 
11803 1BBJ5 
19140 18171 
194J0 195J0 


18740 18775 

anjo 202.1# 

29450 29440 


10830 10835 
11240 nt<0 
11440 11345 


Commodity Indexes 



MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOI PARK 

PARADtS FOR TK HAPPY FEW 

An eedurive MadO noa ai vilage is 
baing buD right by the sea on (be moE 
bcaaifuf soe an Mofiwca Ideal laco- 
lion, 20 nsmoss from Pakna. Spacious 
mxsrtmcnB, 1 to 3 bednxvn^al with 
large terraces. Vary high quaCtycon- 
eoudien tmdfti Any ji aaOii 

VBrr AMBASSADOR PA0C AM> 
K OONVMCB) 

For mfortreOiart 

GIOBEFUNSJA 
A*. Mon-Renal 24 
OH-1005 LAUSAhi^SMterland 
Tet p!| 22 35 12 Th MB5 MBS CK 


Close 

MootfV* 921.90 f 

Reuters 

DJ. Futures 12Z62 

Com. Research Bureau- 23AS0 

Moody's : base TOO : Dec. 31, T93T. 
p - preliminary; * - final 
Reuters : base TOO : Sep. 18,1931. 
Dow Jones : base TOO : Dec 31, T97A 




U1 Stodc brdmrage firm. 
amstbbsaX 

Seefa BT»j«dk#Biy 

ap enem ad Secretary end Gel Freby. 
Miat hev» stock, axrmutoy, brotarmi- 
perience and LBJA system 36. 

high paid + benefits. 

Send evTpGo to far 2)4* Hwdd 
Tribune, 9201 NaeOy Cedn, France 


London Commodities 
May 14 


Paris Commodities 

- May 14 


1 


Asian Commodities 
May 14 


If U \1 

m 1 in— 

i V* 8-f 




Niefe Law Bid Ask M AM 


stertiao ear metric Ma 
Abb 8840 8540 8*50 97J» 97 JO 9748 
Oct 102X10 99.40 100JM m« 10060 101X10 
Dec 107 J)0 106X10 10AM 10640 10fiJ» 107X10 
riNtar 11940 11X30 1UL30 11*40 mx» 11*30 
Jby 13<X» 72240 J22J0 72240 I22XO 12260 
Maa 12840 128X50 127 JO 12*40 12730 13U0 
OQ 13440 13440 133JQ 13440 13200 13*00 
Volume: 2.1*7 tots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

sterOM ear osetrtc tea 

May 1X08 1310 1413 1415 1A8 UCB 



\h- 

< ftVV ”■ ' 


. . 01 in.' rr" '-sra uno uu 

«« ■’%--& ISffiiS 
.tiii-ii K asgSffl 

. - .■ sr vs vast 


1415 1438 1437 
1443 IXB5 1436 
1XD6 1X08 1® 
L7S2 L7B7 1JW 
1.783 1790 U92 
1405 1400 1465 
1438 1401 1415 


,■ Jty N.T. M.TT 1790 1420 1401 1415 
vatamii2JRMaef 18 torn. 

. v COPPER 

JtemnaaaraiaMctaa 
May 2XJ7B 2451 2054 2058 2481 2495, 

■ J*T 2)2# 2JM 2185 ZW 20* 21« 

... - May 2180 21*7 2180 2185 2198 2301 

, Volume: 2404 lots at $ ton*. 

BASOIL 

U4. Mian ear metric Ian 
Am 21*75 31*75 21775 21*X» 21575 21*40 
Xly 21BJ5 21*25 21740 21725 21SX» 21S35 
- *a 2J9JD 2I1XV 21*25 21*50 21675 2)725 
SbP 221X90 21975 21975 220J0 21«X» 21925 

a* N.T. N.T. 22140 23100 aOXB 222J0 

, N.T. N.T. 22200 ™m 221X90 mOO 

. J* N.T. N.T. 32S40 228X90 22100 2Z740 
: fet. N.T. 225X10 23040 22440 230X0 

•i F« N.T. -N.T. 22200 230X10 220X10 23040 
■ Volume: 14» leta of )M tons, 
sources: AacMra md London PMnwtrm £»- 
change (aatoH k 



NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW. EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for MMB2MIE defivenr 


RUIEINC 


commo«ty and Unit 

GaMee 4 Santas. Oj 

Prfcrtdoffi *<^D 3* rt. yfl _ 

SterH billets IPtttJ.tan 

iron 2 Fdry. Phiin. ten 

Statl ktod Ma 1 hw Pitt _ 

Lead Spot, lb 

Capper elect- a 

Tin (Strolls), b 

Zinc, E. SI. 1_ Basis, R) 

Palladium, OX - 

SOver N.Y-OZ 

Source: A P. 


HAtOPOET TAX HKE CARS 

Cal for free catcdoa. 
8 okT 2DT1, toherrimn ^ortjfoltad 
ret 010 <23077. 7bc 2SH7TffC« NL 


HOUDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE MAGNIFKBH 
STELLA 


r AND 14 DAY CXUIS5 

To the Greek Warn*. Turkey, 
Snfag from Pram 

THE YAOff-UCE 


OCEANIS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUSES 

To the Greek Uands & Turkey. SoZng 
every Monday & Friday from Proem 

Please apply feyjOWjTravel Agent an 

2, Kar. Saves Si- Athens 10562 
Telex 215621. Phone 3228881 


3NGAP0RE INTL GU1DB. Cal Sin- 
gapore 734 96 28. 


HONG KONG IK-3J 723 12 37 


FtaiiCH I0VIHIA. Interpreter Travel 
companion (93 61 78 63 



LONDON - YOUNG CAHBKAN 

Ledy 01-724 TB» Ahwws / Trowel 


LONDON: HXtCATH) LADY Coro- 
panion/ Guide. Tefc 889 1694. 


TOKYO MS 2741. Touring & stap- 



HAMBURG -YOUNG LADY anpon- 
ion. mubikngud. Tel: 27 04 570. 


PAHS HUMGUAL ASSISTANT to 
tunas executives. 500 58 17 


ESCC»TS A. GUIDES 

1 ESCORTS & GUIDES 1 

1 ESCORTS & GUIDES 

I ESCORTS & GUIDES 

I ESCORTS & 


Mob Law Settle Settle 

Jun 325J0 32570 32540 31020 

Auo M.T. N.T. 329 JO 37770 

Set> — N.T. N.T. 33U0 -32430 

Votume: W2 lots ollOOoz. 
MMULUMPIIB RUBBER 

Previous 


Per AM Pay Rtc 


Fst Com Small Bus _ JO 7-36 6-38 
INCREASED 


Oxatal C orp 
Meriaioa Beuorp 


.10 7-1 Ml 
M 7-1 6-15 


SAP 100 Index Options 
May 14 . 


London Metals 

May 14 


■jb-a*-. ar-s* 

ALUMINUM 
Sterile# per metric tm 
spot 874X90 »M0 M940- MMO 

tenaord 19940 »9J0 WKM 91M0 

COPPER CATHODES IHM Graft) 

SSt"” °* r TsSoTzCUB 1-88*4 # 1^3740 

farwonl lffiS lSun 1410M UtU» 

. std L20240 140749 10PM L2O40 

.<■ torvrartl ' UELDO 1JB340 1.18749 LI 8940 

UOAD 

Steriiaeoar metric (on _ .. • • 

- 1 . !"* W-® 29*a auo »» 

, “Vtonaora . 30QXU 3EUB 3040 30*40 

Anckel - 

■ ; ^”3felS3iS£S 

¥ SILVER 

P«« ear mvawiea ^ „„ 

St™ SS S8 SJS §§ 

TIN ISt umtm Bl 

«NC 

A' • ' ■ 2***" rm ?8S£ m mm 6*3X0 »*40 
HWwor# *6440 6M4D 66340 6*400 

»• Seurae.-AP, 


- }tl> *’*■ 



SwissTrade Deficit 
Narrowed in April 

• . Seutm 

BERN' — Switzerland bad a 
trade defidt uf 9ZL& mSSoa Swiss 
francs (S356J2 anffion) in April, 
with994-6tmIBon francs 




Mtr . 


ViaM 

TM# 

>mentti 

74# 

758 

7A6 

7.9* 

Odnontn 

7JS 

7J5 

All 

A X 

Onevaar 

m - 

7.W 

851 

._»4» 

Sourer. Sakxnca Brothers 







in April of. last year, d « federal 
customs office said Tuesday. 

The office said- imparts m April 
were 6 J4 bUHoa francs, omnpared 
with 6*83 Wtfon in March and 5A9 
trillion in Anrfl 3984. AorilexDOrtS 


we?c 5.61 bflhon francs, as against 
5.84 billion in March and 4.85 bil- 
lion in April last year. 

In the ihst four months of 198£ 
the trade deficit totaled 331 billion 
francs, compared -with 333 trillion 
in the like pttiod of 1984. the office 


DM Futures Options 

May 24 

Tt6wwltaH2niMfcirtwnicrt 


Strike CaHKWlN _ Pri«artfe 

g SS fl S & 

a IU U! W W 04 w 

33 IS W W £147 US — 

M S w Ul !5 HS Ta 

35 W W l« u> lii 

3* UH 14 us - a - 

MmM#MMiun u ' 

CORK Man. voLA2B earn laLMAM 

Pen Hn hLSNF*P#b #fe3a» 

SBAKCHE 


2 More French Banks 

To Lower Base Rate 

Return 

PARIS —The siaie-owncd Ban- 
que Narionale de Paris and Credit 
Commercial de France announced 
Tuesday that they will lower their 


HMil 


Credit AHXXrie, winch is not 
state owned, had earlier announced 
a cut in its base rale to 1 1 H percent, 
effective Tuesday. 


INITIAL 

Pt Component* . 4* 7-1 6-11 

• omitted 

Man 

STOCK SPLITS 
Coastal Corp — 3-4or-2 
Meridian Bancorp— Mor-2 
USUAL 

§ S « ^7 

Q M MB 6-13 

Q 25 7-26 6-28 

Q 47 7-15 600 

O .10 7-1 6-14 

a 35 6-15 HA 

3 .18 6-27 6-13 
75 6-21 5-31 
O .16 6-1* 7-26 

Q JO Vi 7-2D 7-# 

Q AS 6W 534 

. Q 41 7-10 6-25 

0 a 7-1 Ml 

Q 43 7-1 M 

A - Annual* M wioatBtyt O-Ouortortv; um* 


Crane to Spin Off 
Sted Subsidiary 

7V Astocimed Press 

NEW YORK — Crane Co. said 
1 Tuesday that its stockholders have 
voted to spin off the company's 
CF&I Steel Corp. subsidiary as 
part of a restructuring plan. 

Shareholders also approved 
Crane's idncorporatkm m Dela- 
ware whose laws will improve the 
company's ability to thwart unso- 
licited takeover bids, according to 
Crane, winch currently is incorpo- 
rated in Hinds. 


CARROLLTON, Texas — Aj>- 
pfe Computer Coup, said Tuesday 
that it will lay off 100 employees at 
its manufacturing plantm Dallas 
beginning June 1, following a deri- 
aon to step prodnetion of the Mac- 
intosh XL huaness computer, for- 
merly known as lisa. 




LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SRYKZ 
THj 20 d 8585 


ZURICH 

CASOUNE ESCORT SBMCE 
Tab 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH 

$adMntfMT > !i Emrf 6 Grid* Swvfea 
IMa A fareta Tafc 01/57 75 96 


LONDON 


REGENCY 

WDRUMflOG MUUUiGUAL 


NEW YORK OFFICE 

Tab 212-838-9027 
6 212753-1164 


* USA ft TRANSWORLD 

A-AMBUCAN 


EVBEYW»«S YOU ARE OR GOL- 

1-813-921-7946 

Col fr» from U5 j 1-800-^0^2 
OA tree h» Roritfc 1-80M82O892. 
LouoS fijsjam a d o amu you bodd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SSV1CE 

N NEW YORK 
TEL: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

bnfSanire 

Tab 736 5877. 



CLASS 


1OND0H.HEUMUW2 GATWKX 
Tafc 01 *90 0373 


ARBTOCAT5 

londM End SarWca 

128 Wipwra 5 l London W.L 
Al maior Craft Cordt Accnted 
IS <37 a 4! / 0W~ 

13 noon - mdraght 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SStYIQ 
212-888*1666 


TIFFANY 


TB.-3S 62906 38$ 7602 


A1EXB ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL: 01/47 55 82 - 69 SS 04 


★ELECTRA* 

MADRH3 ESCORT SERVICE. 
CRBXT CARDS. 250 M 19 


JASMINE 

AMSIBDAM ESCORT SBEVKE 
TH: 020-366655 


DUSSSDO&COlOGNE-&aei>4onn 
Engfcsh boon Swvin 021 W 38 31 <1 


NEW YORKi Bffl bcort Sannae. 
Tet 212-581-1948. 


LONDON ZOE WEST Escort Agency 
Tat 0I-S7V 7556 


FRANKFURT AKA - Feme*? -I- Mote 
escort -I- Irovel service. Tel: 62 84 32. 


MADRID IMPACT escort oral guide 
serviee. Mul&xniaL 261 4143 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Senice. 
Heartvow/GatVMcL Tat 834 7945. 


MUNKH SUPREME BCORT Service. 

Tet 009/4486038 


HtANKFUKT SONJA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 06948 34 42 


BRUSSELS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Escort Service. Tet 02/73176.41. 


HEATHROW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
ve*. Tefc 994 6682. 


HKfSSHS. CKANTAL ESCORT Ser- 

wce: Tat 02/520 33 65. 


LONDON LUCY ESCORT & Guide 

Seme#. Tefc 01-373 0211 


VSMA ESCORT AGENCY. Tet Vien- 
na 37 £7 3? 


AMSTBSAM SYLVIA ESCORT Ser- 
viee w 20-255191 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

GMGBTS BCORT SSYtCE. 

TBs 01/363 08 64 -022/34 41 86 


* AMSTERDAM* 

5NE Escort Service. 227837 


.London Etcort Serviee 
Tot 988 3163/ 08833 3163 


TH: 29 51 30 


MADRID EUROPA 

ESCORT SBIVtCE. 241 2641 


G8CVA-BST 
BCORT SERVICE 

TH: 022/86 75 95 


CHHSEA ESCORT SBW1CT. 

51 Baauchamp Hare, London SW3. 
Tafc 01 584 6513/2*49 (4-12 pn) 


MEAN ESCORT 


•-!« < LI 


G84EVA FKST BCORT ffltVKE 

For W aMan J + Travel, Pleat* 
Reaerva. Tefc 022/32 34 18 


ESCORT SBVXE 385 3573. 


Guide Service. Tab 283397 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Etooit Service. 
I Tel: 0711 / 262 11 50. 

GB * VA "t£ 36»M TSBV,CE «ANHWr- PETRA heart & Trawl 
T * 36 29 32 | s«vioe.Td.06l?/6834B 


U3N0 ^^S^ BC0ffTSef ' 

wca. Tot 01-339 6541, 


MONTREAL CANADA. CLAIRE Et 
_ lulra _ aB _. eon 6 Swta SnrviCB. 514-rd84SK. 

FWNKRJnT A Bi A ■ ANUU i QU y S uihhoj —* *»* ** * ■_ m 

bSnoxd Ettort + trove) Jervica Tefc I 



8805. CflBdR Owlt aaeated. 


Senate, Tefc 3] 1 79 00 or 31 1 7936 



r a nt i i "" ’ if i T l r B B 



INTL 


TO: 2456548. QBXT CARDS 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

CUM g RWg ban 5am 
■OTTBOAM rOJltMS4l5S 
TIC HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


* KITTY * 

MADRID SERVICE 254234.96 


ROME CUB EUROPE ESCORT 
8 Gads Service Tefc OV58P 25W- 589 
1146 (front 4 pm to 10 pm] 


GBCVA ESCORT 

samcz.M46ii 58 


l> U,ltU Mi l, ■ H B R q li l ■ 6 -1 ra 

j - 1! » F -i^ ; 


HAMBURG - SABRMA Escort Ssr. 
vice. Teb 040/58 65 35. 


R3LAM7E5CORT SERVMX FraOM. 
T* 069/63 41 59. 


FRANXRST “TOP TBI" Ettsrt Ser- 
vice. 069/59^0-52. 


MADMD BECTCA ESCORT rad 
Gtode Service. Cnrdt. 25P9MEL 



HOUANDJB ESCORT SERVICE OM- 
222785, 030-944530. 02997^685. 


■HSMT 






















































































































m 

z 

2» 

■ 

t- 

O. 


IS 

If 

s 

M 


19 

3S 

31 

34 

3 

31 

33 

13 


33 

W> 


53 

55 

431 

29i 

21' 

531 

Ml 

331 

72 

24* 

421 

nt 

331 

241 

sn 

37V 

33* 

ID 

38* 

W 

25V 

34 

3» 

31* 

5H 

15h 

an 


ii 

I7H 

30fl 

SDK 


30 

27U 

3Mi 

55 

SMI 

41?* 

SAW 

»ft 

an 

7ft 

31 

M 


22ft 

sa 

341* 

MM 

WH 

an* 

mi 

« 

54 Vs 
AM 


57 

3Wfc 

77V. 

3tM 

21*1 


-Page 18 



PEANUTS 



THIS 15 MV REPORT ON 
YE5TEKR0Y5 flELP TRIP 
WHICH THEV'TOOK OS OH 
BECAU5E IT WP6 H7UCAH0NAL I 



WE WERE ALL eVBM 
SACXLUNCHE5..TH0i IT 
RAINS? ANP THE SACK 
60T WET AND MV LUNCH 
FELL ON THE GROUND.. 


s-/f 





books 


ki 


WITH ALL DISRESPECT; 
More Uncivil Eberties 


BLONDBE 



rVEGOT A M ATH 
PROBLEM TH«ns. 
REALLY tricky, 
DAD 


5‘ 15/B5 


ACROSS 


58 Famed 

legendary ship 

06 Battle of Lake 
: 1813 

61 Like Wilde's 
wit 

63 Comical 
transposition 

65 Crude craft 

66 Captain or 
Michael 

67 Summary, for 
short 

68 Femme fatale 
of yore 

69 Freshwater 
fish 

70 Allan of 
Sherwood 
Forest 


DOWN 


. 1 Musician Shaw 
. 6 Like fake fruit 
16 Fret 

14 Not a soul 

15 Think-tank 
product 

16 Bee's 
residence 

17 Deliverer of a 
perfect pitch 

19 Billfold items 
26 New romance. 
toRona 
Barren 

21 Prefix with 
plane or sol 

22 Makeshift seat 

23 Vivid red 
25 Shone 
29 Popular drink 

- 31 Analyzes 

metal 

32 Not quite shut 
l 34 Vetoing votes 
> 37 Sleuth, for 
short 

. 38 Tweedy color 

42 One of Snow 
White's seven 

43 Words of 
understanding 

44 Singer Diana 

- 45 Walked, in 

street parlance 
. 48 N. C. college 
. 50 Pug-nosed dog 
53 Most 
mystifying 
1 57 “Network” 
star Beatty 

*3 jVeic York Times, edited by Eugene Maledm. . 


1 Ludicrous 

2 Postman’s 
rounds 

3 Copy-machine 
chemical 

4 Hostile 

5 Dusk, to Donne 

6 Maggie, to 
Jiggs 

7 Put on a 
pedestal 

8 Duplicate 

9 Have a rap 
session 

10 Treacherous 
spots for tars 

11 Coats with a 
metal 

12 Christmas 


13 Jazz guitarist 
Montgomery 

18 Gourmet 
Greene 

22“ Girls" 

24 Make sense of, 
with “oui” 

26 Legal job 

27 Flirty fellows 

28 Brave G.I.’s 
award 

30 Miller and 
Rutledge 

32 Together 

33 Kind of dive 

35 Poet's paean 

36 A fencing art 

39 Staff member 

4# Nags do it 

41 Mused 

42 Sfcipa stone, 
across water 

46 Led astray, in 
away 

47 Finish 

49 Fish-eating 
bird 

51 Good tasting 

52 Cause to 
vanish 

54 Author Jong 

55 Hemp source 

50 Enchanting 
locale 

59 Omniscient 
beings 

61 Curve 

62 Presidential 
nickname 

63 Go schussing 

64 Augustan, e.g. 




4 A^fPr* !!? F 



I THINK I HEAR THE Til' 
PHQNE caM-kNS — 



BEETLE BAILEY 


MISS buxlev£ 
EVES ARB SO 
PRETTY 




ANDY CAPP 





5-15. 





By Calvin TjMul 230 pp. 314.95. 

Ticknor A Fields, 52 Vanderbilt Avenue , 
New York, N. Y 10017. 

Reviewed by Dennis Drabdle 

I F THIS werethe bead all possible worlds, 
a review of Calvin Triflin’s frolicsome new 
humor collection would be superfluous. _ In 
such a world, the mat mention of Trillin's 
nam*- would def qnate chuckles, every literate 
person would count himse lf a Calvinist, and 
“With All Disrespect” would o’erieap every 
other entry on the best-sellei list with no assis- 
tance from me. 

In as much as this world falls a ante shy of 
the Best Possible hatch-mark, however, a re- 
view there must be. Now, faced with a writer as 
clever and qnippy as Trillin, most reviewers 
would try to get by with stringing together 
scads of quotes, letting the author himself do 
most of the work. I inlaid to run with the pack. 

Before we get to the scads, though, a little 
background maybe in order. Calvin TriQin is a 
staff writer for The New Yaks who writes a 
column for The Nation tilled “Unrivfl Liber- 
ties.” This is his second collection of these 
minmns — a fine example of 100 percent 
literary recydxng. The first was called, reason- 
ably enough, “Oririvil Liberties." 

Now let’s let the quotes fly. Here is our 
humorist talking with his wife about the gout, 
from which he suffers and whose image he 
would like to refurbish. 

“ *We need to cane up with a new name,’ I 
told Alice. ‘Maybe something that sounds 
breezy, like the names they use these days for 
new brands of cigarettes.* 

“‘How about Glutton’s Syndrome?’ Alice 
said." . 

Here is the humorist's response to iris friend 
Harold the Committed, “our neighborhood 
causemdster,” who has been chiding him for 
caring more about palate than politics, with 
particular reference to the Vietnam War. 

“I watched the war. I was tuned in for the 
entire conflict. ! was concerned. I was reacting. 
When Saigon fell and American helicopters 
hovered above the ' 


The Nation. As 

vasky'a tightfistedness has become tegenowy- 
SmeSSer collection, he was s*jd » * 
paying Trillin a per-cohunn fee m the 
KoSuna." Although *ai amwat bte jww 
swelled to "a full hundred I 
to think of as a century. Train has 


no 


means aoiurw prawn*!** 

^■••^SSSwSSSSS 

l describe it as apinko maga- 
r.lt’s 


of magazine: If you mate a phe*o«Jpyo? youj 

piece, the comp is atot better than the 

to duos 


There is a wealth of superlatives W dwo« 
from, but let’s leave it at tLs: CalvmT^nB 
the funniest fellow alive writing incessantly 
about Victor S. Navasky. 


Dermis DrabeUe, a W* 
lawyer, wrote this review far 
Post 


writer and 


WIZARD of ID 


L won Ulv VIA. wuv Ml U1 liUUl Ul U1V uawvuiuu 

set and shouted, ‘Get the chefs! Get the 
chefs!’" 





Besides 

cupadons 


S political noshing, Txiflm’s preoc- 
ude Victor S. Navasky, editor of 


Sobdioii to Previous Puzzle 


ClHlAlD 


HlAlRlE 


REX MORGAN 


IllHiiU 

I 7 M A UTILE S HOfZT OF CASH, 
PRESTOU' CAN I GIVE YOUR 
MESSENGER A CHECK*. 



Y I'Ll SEND FIVE GRAMS OVER— AND 
ITIL COME TO *300! GIVE My 
MESSENGER WHATEVER YOU HAVE AND 
YOU CAN PAY ME THE BALANCE ON 
YOUR NEXT TRIP IN TOWN > 




IEPSm&M 
•n.S/5^-' 



THANKS SO MUCH/ I'LL 
GIVE HIMSI50/ 



□□□□□ aaaQ 
□a anno 
□□HE3 aaaa scran 
□□□ □naEunnciQaQQ 
EBEQaa aaaa 
QaauiaaQ ancicin 
bdqe □□□ □□□ana 
nna aaaaB ana 
dqddqq aaa saaa 
ooa aannaaa 
□nsa Eaatasa 
aa □□□ 


Kfliu 


N 


anna 


T»P|L IQIVD 


5/1 S/85 


BEST SELLERS 

onracutive. 

fiction ^ 

M W«k.M 

1 THINNER, by Ridwni Barman ■■■ I 15 

2 CHAPTERHOUSE; DUNE, by F«*k 

Hfrttffl „ - 5 ^ 

i : ■ 

Shekkm .... - 16 

5 THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by ^ g 

6 F^S^liuM ta Dwaidte SKd — T 10 

; " * 

a MacDonald ° ” 

V QUEEN IE, bj Michael Konla * ;2 

ID GLITZ, by Hnwrc Lewnrd ~ — ‘i 'JX, 

11 PROOF. by Dick Fraud* * ** 

12 MEN AND ANGELS, by Mary OontoB 12 2^ 

13 ACREEDFORTKETtORD MILLEN- ] 

- 23 

Godwin — 11 

NONFICTION 

1 IACOCCA: An AiMobiograpby, by Lee la- . 

ooeca with Wiffiam Novak 1 - 8 

2 SMART WOMEN, FOOLISH CHOICES. 

by Camdl Cowan and Mchyn Kinder J “ 

3 BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by At- 

kady N. Shevchenko 2 H 

A LOVDIG EACH OTHER, by Leo Busagr 

Ua • ■ S 37 

5 ONCE UPON A TIME, by Gloria Vaodcr- 

6 THE COURAGE TO CHANgC ^ D«^ 

nis Whokv - 4 13 

7 THE^SOONG DYNASTY, by Swims & ^ 

8 T^^C»DOFA5RiSAMlEvlSmay , , . 

Cuter 7 iJr 

0 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by „ 

Rkhaid Bach — 9 

10 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Aden and Nancv Austm — — > 

U -SURELY YOITRE JOKING, MR. 

FEYNMANK" by Rfchatd P. Fmmuvo 10 9 

12 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Sbd Stiver- 

sjein - — Nig 

13 MQ5ES THE KITTEN, by June* Harriot . — 30 

14 SON OF THE MORNING STAR. By 

Evan S. GooacD IS 22 

15 NO MORE VIETNAMS, by Rkhud Nix- 
on - — 1 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 NOTHING DOWN, bv Robert G. Altai 1 23 

2 DR ARRAVANEVS BODY TYPE PRO- 

GRAM FOR HEALTH. FITNESS AND 
NUTRITION, by Elliot D .Abound, and 
Elizabeth A. Risk 3 3 

3 WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START - 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by Jean Ni- 

detch — ; 2 17 

4 WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT /%- 

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by {*<■ 
Mark R McCormack - 4 34 

5 THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 

Snath ««««.« — ,Mwiai — »■■■ 5 6 


BRIDGE 


’ ’ Phew ! Margaret was playin' HARD-To-eer- 

; AWAY- PROW ALL DAY." 


GARFIELD 


By Alan Truscorr 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
■ 9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to feim 
(our ordinary words. 


TACCH 


n 




GLI 

NY 


^ s 

JO 

JU 


SIGUNE 


J UP 



VISNAH 

i±n 




two no-trump hid was Ja- 
coby, showing a fit and asking 
ihe opener to diow a singleton.- 
When this proved to be in 
dubs. North took an optimis- 
tic shot at a slam. 

Since most of the strength 
for South represented duplica- 
tion in the riiniTKmri suit, the 
contract was a bad one. But the 

fates were mi his side after the 
normal diamond lead. South 
took his two diamond winners, 
discarding hearts from the 


dummy, and led a 'dub to the 
queen. 

East won and shifted to the 
heart queen, but it was too late. 
South won in dummy, ruffed a 
dub. ruffed a diamond and 
raffed another dub. This es- 
tablished two dub winners, 
and after trumps had been 
drawn the dubs took care of 
the heart losers in the dosed 
hand tO repkp the ^mn- 

North-South would have 
lost the match, if the distribu- 
tion had been slightly different 
or if West had selected an im- 
probable heart opening lead. 


WEST 
♦ W3 
S4J 


NORTH 

♦ A.I7 4 
9A885 . 

4 — 

+ QJ7B4 

BAST 

ass 

OQJlBie I ft 7*4 V 

4b U 8 32 *AKS 

SOOTH (D) 

♦ QJftSJ 
V J 107 

O AK 92 
*5 

NMtbar >Mq m wbnsble. The 
-fafcftUdg: 

W«‘ North East 

If PU» 2 N.T. Pot 

3* Pan fl* Pm 

P*B Pm 

West tod the ilhiimul 




□ 


Now arrange Ihe circled letters to 
form ihe surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Ansmrheie: Q IT] tlllYlh 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 
Jumbles. DOUBT KNOWN EXCITE JOVIAL 
Answer What the bus driver said— 

"JACK" IN THE BOX! 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH LOW 


ASIA 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Algarve 

16 

61 

11 

52 

a 

Amsterdoni 

16 

61 

12 

54 

a 

MIMM 

23 

73 

15 

5? 

fr 

Boredom 

IS 

64 

10 

50 

fr 

Belgrade 

29 

84 

15 

59 

fr 

Benin 

20 

82 

16 

61 

tr 

Brussels 

13 

55 

12 

54 

r 

BuCbarest 

38 

82 

14 

57 

el 

Budapest 

26 

79 

16 

61 

cl 

Caaenhagee 

31 

70 

10 

50 

Ir 

Casta Del Sal 

30 

68 

11 

52 

cl 

Dublin 

11 

52 

> 

46 

e 

Edinburgh 

9 

48 

a 

46 

r 

- FlarMice 

21 

70 

14 

57 

cl 

Frankfort 

18 

64 

14 

57 

cl 

Geneva 

17 

63 

S 

46 

tr 

. Helsinki 

19 

66 

6 

43 

cl 

Istanbul 

22 

72 

14 

57 

fr 

Las Palmas 

21 

70 

16 

61 

CJ 

Lisbon 

16 

61 

11 

52 

a 

* London 

II 

52 

8 

46 

r 

. Madrid 

16 

61 

B 

46 

d 

Milan 

19 

6* 

9 

48 

tr 

. MOSCOW 

23 

73 

9 

48 

d 

Moatck 

20 

6S 

11 

52 

tr 

- Nice 

17 

63 

10 

50 

It 

Oak) 

21 

70 

7 

45 

fr 

‘ Porto 

15 

S« 

IT 

53 

a 

». Prague 

26 

79 

15 

59 

d 

. Reykjavik 

13 

55 

6 

43 

tr 

Rome 

20 

68 

14 

57 

tr 

StockliMm 

19 

66 

7 

45 

Ir 

Simheuro 

19 

66 

12 

54 

d 

1 Venice 

a 

72 

15 

59 

fr 

Vienna 

25 

77 

16 

61 

a 

Warsaw 

28 

82 

IS 

59 

fr 

Zurich U 64 

i MIDDLE EAST 

11 

52 

d 

1 Ankara 

17 

63 

ID 

50 

St 


Bansknk 

Beilina 

hma Kong 

Mon ITo 

NewOefW 

Seoul 

ShonaM 

Singapore 

To! pel 
Tokyo 


HIGH 
C F 

27 81 
36 7V 

31 a 

32 90 
38 HU 
25 77 

28 82 
29 84 
» 84 
21 70 


LOW 
C F 

24 75 
17 8] 

26 79 

27 It 
27 81 

13 53 

17 63 

25 77 

14 75 

18 64 


AFRICA 


Maters 

Coin 

Cepe Town 


21 70 12 54 
28 82 18 64 


Harare 

Lagos 

Nelrabl 

Tonis 


20 « 10 50 


— — — — no 


— — — — na 


— — — — no 


21 70 14 57 fr 


LAT1N AMERICA 


Sues os Aims 22 73 10 

Urn 20 68 15 

Mexico CHy 30 86 12 

Made Janeiro 26 75 18 

Soo Paulo — — — 


NORTH AMERICA 


Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Avl* 

OCEANIA 


21 70 
a 73 


— — no 

— —.no 
14 57 cl 

W 66 o 


Micuaafl 10 50 9 48 r 

. Sydney » to 13 55 o 

. fr !* r * b-fwir.* 

i slwhowors: M-wow, si^iormy. 


Andbaraae 
Atlanta 
Boston 
Chicago 
Da n ger 
Detroit 
Honolulu 
HOaHwi 
Los Anodes 
Miami 
Mianeanolls 
Moanoal 
Nassau 
Hew York 
Son Frandcco 
Seattle 
Toronto 

waHUaaton , 

o<iv«rcosf,' pcvartfY elauAr: r*abi; 


10 

50 

2 

36 

BC 

30 

Bi 

19 

00 

PC 

19 

66 

12 

54 

PC 

27 

01 

13 

55 

St 

18 

64 

2 

36 

tr 

25 

77 

10 

so 

PC 

30 

86 

21 

70 

tr 

30 

86 

21 

m 

d 

27 

81 

15 

59 

fr 

32 

90 

21 

70 

Ir 

17 

63 

12 

54 

St 

27 

11 

10 

50 

d 

20 

82 

20 

79 

PC 

29 

14 

17 

03 

fr 

20 

68 

10 

SO 

fr 

15 

59 

7 

45 

d 

24 

75 

16 

£1 

ir 

33 

90 

M 

01 

fr 


Wirfld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- F x resse May 14 

dosing prices in local aimndei unless otherwise indicated. 


dose 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aaoon 

AKZ0 

Ahold 

AMEV 

AT»am Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buriirmom T 
Co land Hide 
Elsnvler-NDU 
Fokker 
Gis t Brocades 
Helneken 
Hoooowens 
KLM 
Naarden 


Nodllavd 
Oe* Vender G 
Pakhond 
PhUips 


Rodamco 
Rollnco 
Rarmki 
RovaJ Dutch 
Unllavnr 
Van Ommeren 
VMF Slork 
VNU 


429 
206 
190 
107 JO 
221 JO 
241 JO 
LSD 
7i40 
185 
95 
.37.20 
121JU 
127 
1&OJ0 
1A70 
Minn 
6028 
51 JO 
88JQ 

- >« 
317JD 
45J0 

SJ-40 

7130 
139 JO 


45 
199.10 
34® JO 
2880 
18980 
216 


429 JO 
204 
190 
100 
W7 70 
24220 
840 
7U0 
199-50 
9530 
3730 
12440 
124 
18380 
1SJJHI 
82 
40J0 
51 JO 
66J0 
177 JO 
318 
65 
54.90 
7250 
13850 
6820 

20080 


2880 

193 

214 


ANP;CBS General Index i 
Prevlaas : 289.18 


Brnmets 


Arbed 

Bekaen 

CodierfM 

Cobeoa 

EBES 

GB-limo-BM 

GBL 

Gevoert 

Hobofcan 

Intercom 

Kredtottaik 
PWroflno 
Soc Generate 
Soflna 
Solway 

Traction Etee 

UCB 

Unaro 

VIeilto Mantoane 


1735 

3500 

225 

3170 

2795 

3115 

1935 

3620 

500 

2250 

8310 


1730 

5400 

221 

3100 

2800 

3095 

1935 

9695 

5490 

22401 


1910 

0910 

4300 

3895 

4920 

1710 

6650 


6870 

18451 

6910 

4290 


4905 

1705 

6590 


Currant Stock Index : 
Previous : 222177 


Frankfcat 


¥^. K S?°t , tS R, J5. e 5^i? nr - CHANNEL: Smooth. FRANKFURT: Oggtfv. 
- !5 no _ a0 ” , fS , *^ a ?!- L0H£X >": Cloudy. T«rr». 14— B fS7-46l. Madrid: 
. Wlf. - Tll gP--.. ia T * .1 W - 431. NEW YORK: Mr. Temo. 27 -14 (81— 57). 
1 £- A B : 5 teud V. Tamp. 20 — 10 (48—501. ROME: Portly deudy. Terrm, 
, 77— 15 (73 — 50k TEL AVIV- Fair. Tomp. 94 — 18 ( 75^ 641. ZURICH: OMtV. 

srormv. Temo. S3 — 25 (91— 77k HON© 
KONG: Fair. Temo. 31 — 16 (88 — 61). MANILA: Cloudv. Temo. 34 — 27 
* <W %5Vi n SE ®“ 1 L L£5lSJ' JemRja— 12(79— 54I.5INGAFQRE: Fair. Temo. 
37 - 16 (90 - 19). TOKYO: Shows. Temp, 18- 17 (M - 63k 


AEG-Teletunun 

Allianz Vers 

Altana 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bay Hypo Gw* 
Bav vorolnibank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

ChimmoM 
Cent Gumml 
Daimler. Benz 
D60WS50 

Deutsche Babco ck 
Deutsche Bank 
Draedner Bank 
GHH 
Haraanor 
HaetiNef 

HOOCtlSt 

Hoeoch 


11840 11730 
1256 12S2 
356 359 JO 
209206.10 
21820 216.10 
348 361 

319 335 


raja 


391 287. . 
m&> 372J0 
18280 18020 
139 JO 1 39 JO 
704 699 

351 350 JO 
161 163 

493 479 
223J0221AO 
151.10 1 47 JO 
324 321 

476 476 

219.90 716J0 
W JO 10850 


Horton 
Husacl 
IWKA 

Kail + SOU ■ 

Korsladt 
Kauftiof 
Klocckner H-D 
Kloeckner Werke 7220 
KruOTSkdil 
Linde 
Luflhansa 
MAN 

Manrwsmann 
Munnch Rundc 
Nixdorf 
PKI 
Porsche 
Preuseaa 

PWA 
RWE 

Rhein meiall 
SdierhiD 
SEL 
Siemens 
Thyssen 
Vetoa 

VolksnwwBRwerfc 
Welle 


Clew Prev 
170 169 

292 292 

297 312 

2“ 268- 
227 227. 

228J0 229 

250.20 24850 
220 72 

110 106 
435 427 

1 89 JO 189 JO 
14370 14150 
15850 158 

1350 1368 


629 JO 635 
im lino 
,.275 272 

126J0U6J0 
■SB 157 JO 
320 319 

448 442 

361 360 

547 544 

. 104 102.90 
10SJO183JO 
229 226J8 
573 574 


Cammerzbaak Index : 126X60 
Pro* too, : 1251 JO 




Bk East Asia 
Oieuna Kong 

Oik»a Gas 
China Ltaht 
Green Island 
Kano Sena Bank 
Henderson 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 


HK Shorn Bank 
Telephone 


HK ‘ 

HK Wharf 
Hutch whempgg 
Hvsan 

Inn atv 
Jardlne 
JanJine Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Hotel 
New world 

sHK^ssr*" 

SWux 

Swire Pad flc A 

Tel Cheung 

Wah Kwang 
Whoetock A 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsor 
WOrld Inti 


„27 2870 
17.10 17J0 
1810 9.95 
. 15J0 15J0 
9 JO 860 
„ 51 52 

2325 2J75 

sues mo 
-.1! 

36J5 37 

6A5 6J5 

US 835 
8850 91 

6J5 LAO 
24.70 2440 
842 863 

891 0J3 

11.90 11J0 

030 1120 
11J0 I1J0 

31 JO 32 

730 7 JO 

2.175 UD 
12 JO 17 JO 
160 2J2 
24 208 
1J0 1J5 

IJ3 1J7 
7JS 7JS 
2J0 2.M 
4J5 4725 
Z.15 120 


Haag Seep Index 

Preview : 1^39 


1 M15JD 


Job 


*gS-.l 


AEC1 

Anglo American 

AnelaAmGeid 

Barlows 

Bhrweor 

Buftels 

be Been 

DMetanteln 

E una 

CFSA 

Harmony 

Hiveid Steal 

Kloat 

Ned bonk 

PraStem 

Rusetat 


Close Prev 
SA Brews 810 _78j 

St Helena 3050 3SBG 

Sasal 650 Q3S 

.west Holding 6875 6550 


Compasm stock Index : NA 
Prev Ion : NA 


514*. S14U. 

ISA 109 


AACorp 
AinecH-yons 
Anglo Am Geld 03W S91W 
AssBrtt Foods 
Ass Dairtes 
Barclays 


BAT. 

Beediom 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 

BaMtar Indus 

Brit Home St 
Bril Telecom 
Bril Aerospace 
Brttoll 
BTR 
Burmah 
CabteWlretew 
Codbury Scfnv 
Charter Cons 
Commercial U 

Cons Cold 
CourtouMs 
Dates ty 
De B eers 4 
Distillers 
Drtefanteln 
Flsons 
Freest aw 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
Glaxo L 

Grand Met 
GRE 
Gvlntms 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

imperial Group 
Jaguar 

LandSecurilfes 
Legal General 
Uovds Bank 
Lonrho 
Luan 

Marks and Sp 
M etal Bax 
Midland B«k 
Not west Bonk 
PandO 

PiHdnaten 

Pieesev 
Prudential 
Raeoi Elect 
RancHonteln 


234 

■54 

387 

552 

308 

360 


39 

as 

193 

2B2 

551 

m 


543 

307 


163 U4W 
416 436 


463 


m 

S3B*k 
192 
616 
236 
1161/64 
309 


713 

m 

635 

227 

433 

751 

194 

594 

177 

284 

141 

3 

677 

10 


194 

613 

240 

12 

380 

708 

271 

as 

23® 

439 

764 

190 




S114VS 51 12ft 


82S 

875 

Rank 

3S3 

340 

2930 

2800 

Rsedlntl 

S3 

334 

18150 177S0 

Kao tors 

380 

379 

1215 

1200 

Royal Dutch C 

45 JI/0445 63/64 

1490 

1460 

RTZ 

619 

*24 

8550 

829 

EaoteM 

*30 

*20 

1005 

HMD 

Salmbury 

346 

340 

5325 

5300 


93ft 

»*ft 

1800 

1800 

Shell 

700 

703 


3525 

STC 


192 

3180 

309 

SMChorterfeS 

477 

472 

400 

390 

Sun Alikin ca 

471 

461 

8475 

8300 

Taft and Lyle 

441 

443 

1375 

1340 

Tesca 

243 

248 

6050 

5900 

Them EMI 

44* 

439 

1/26 

1710 

T.l. Gratis 

238 

243 


Trafalgar Hse 351 

THF 153 

Ultramar 230 

Unilever £ 11 29/6411 45/64 

United Biscuits T78 177 

Vickery 324 338 

Woohwtti 013 >13 


F.T. 38 Index : I012J8 
Previous : lOMJO 


Banco Comm 
Centroie 
Cteohotels 
Crvd llal 
ErUania 

Farmllalla 

Flat 

Finslder 

Gcneroll 

IFI 

Italcementi 


18500 18000 


3130 3060 


italmotHllaH 

MadlabanCB 

Mtxitedlson 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rinoscente 

SIP 

SME 

Snki 

Sfanda 

Slit 


0400 
2200 2121 
9850 9690 
12900 12S5D 
313A 3031 
84 84 

4 CTS0 44900 
7903 7710 
91450 91200 
172D 1720 
79B30 76870 
88900 87MD 
1658 1633 
6510 62B0 

760 707, 

207D 20114 
1330 1284* 
2990 28*1 


1 4930 14499 
2703 


2640 


NUB Current index : 13M 


Shawl- la 
Slme Darby 
Share Land 
Spore Press 
S Steamship 
3t Trading 
United 
UOB 


Close Prev. 
tLQ. 2.18 
199 
2J2 2J4 

815 815 
1.10 1j09 

4J2 4J2 

2J07 1 

4J6 4J2 


Straits Times lad Index :8MJM 
Previous 1 891.64 


AGA 

AMo Laval 


Astra 

Atlas Copco 


Sandvik 


SKF 
SwadishMatch 


605 405 

W 192 
330 348 

450 460 

iee in 
210 NA 
306 314 

284 
410 
146 151 

IM 1__ 
NA , — 
m 4w 

91 91 JO 
215 221 

210 ZI2 
239 235 


Previovs : 39080 





Outo Med 
Dartv 
DuiW 
Etf-AcHiimifle 
Europe 1 
Gan Ecsnc 

Hochette 
Lafarge Cap 

Leorend 

Lesleur 

roreai 
AtorfetJ 
Matra 
Merlin 
MUMlin 
Meet Hennessv 
Moulinex 
Occhfentaie 
■Ric 
Perrier , 
Petrol es (fse) 
Peugeot 


RadMachn 

"^Udat 
Sanofl , 
skis Raulgnol 


Thomson CSF 
Aart index :«M» 

PradoH:2UJB 
CACiadexjauo 
Pravtav* : 22828 


641 634 

309 JO 3OSJ0 
15W 1549 

416 
Sll 527 
1912 1V10 

755 755 

2599 2575 

2150 2160 
S49 539 

534 534 

1326 1378 

■ms® 230.10 
892 891 

639 634 

1896 1895 

540 516 

aws- mo 

687 656 

2530 2500 

1765 1770 

1840 ISOS 
2ms 1*85 
934 935 

1845 1855 
77 99 JO 
713 711 

W 737 
S<3 537 

Z70 269 

345 345 

2*0 231.90 
294 295 

1399 1371 

1770 1779 
738 794 

1560 1560 

2390 2365 

541 541 




Cold Storage 
□BS 

Eraser Meow 

Haw Par 

Incftoooe 

Mol Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

DUE 


NA 248 
6J8 6JD 

5.10 SlOS 
2,14 2.13 
236 2JB 
A3S 620 

9.10 9 
356 3J8 
100 279 


ACI 

223 

223 

ANI 

288 

287 

ANZ 


4VU 

BMP 

664 

4*0 

Boro! 


332 


736 

230 

Brambles 

390 

395 

Cotes 


toil 

Coma lea 

'M 

II 

CRA 

462 

660 

CSR 

IBB 

tl/l 

Dtciteo 

2 M 

m* j 

Elders ixl 

' i ■ 

»~iVl 

Hooker 


H * 1 1 

Magellan 



MIM 

340 

l-vj 

Mm 


IB5 

Oakbrldge 

S'J 

99 



448 

Poseidon 

435 

g-'| 



M ' A ' 1 

SanfcW! 

616 




^ i ^ 

Southland 



Wood* tee 

161 

160 

Wormaid 

357 

367 


All OrsHnorles Index MM 
Previous 187270 
Source: Reuter s. 


Tohya 


Aft cl 

AsohlChem 
Asohl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Brtdgaslana 
Canon 
Casio 
Cl tan 

Dal Nippon Print 
Datwa House 
Dahsa Securttfes 
Fanue 
Fall Bank 
Full Photo 
Pul Hsu 
Hitachi 
Mitaetu cable 
Hanna 

Japan Air Lines 


430 435 

918 930 

893 e® 
BOD 819 
518 513 

1230 1240 
1679 1650 
347 310 

1030 1030 
606 687 

im MX 
8990 8979 
1590 1560 
1710 1720 
1170 1148 
791 785 

710 7M 
1340 1350 


Knllma 
Karaal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kfrtn Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kyocera 

Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Worics 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi EJac 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mltsubtehl Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
MltsukasM 
MffsamI 
NBC 

NGK Insulators 
NUduSac 
Nippon Kouaku 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Olympus 


Ctsse Prev. 
309 38! 

1520 1490 

141 1« 

645 476 

427 424 

345 341 

4708 4100 
1470 1490 
740 771 

ISO 1550 
454 441 

394 303 

244 264 

518 .521 
337 340 

530 530 

975 990 

1060 HOT 


711 716 

1400 1400 

(74 844 

144 144 

252 253 

616 617 

ion noo 

1180 1150 

2070 2MA 

mend 910 926 

Sharp 973 973 

Shimazu 775 - 773 

Shinetsu Chemlcai 1010 HOT 

Sony 4100 4140 

Sumitomo Bank 1760 1790 

Sumitomo Chern 229 229 

Sum Homo Marine 615 <20 

Sumaomo Motel US 144 

TMseiCorp 226 239 

Talsha Marine 444 444 

Takeda Chem 870 870 

TDK 5330 5338 

TWHII 434 434 

Tokyo glee. P ow er un dw 

Tokyo Marine >48 845 

Toppan Print in g 870 

Toray Ind 49a 

Toshiba 382 378 

Toyota 1288 1290 

YomalcMSec 720 711 


May 14 


Canadian, stoda tea AP 


1830 AMI Free 

, AeWamte 
15000 Aon loo E 
1B7D Agra Ind A 
ibis AHI Energy 
1308 Alta Nat 
600 Algo Cent 
latPAMnoSt 
650 Andre WA I 
2176 Argosn 
200 Aico If 
192 BP Canada 
8712 Bank BC 


HSgh LawacneCh^e 


184298 Bonk NS 
■ROarrlckl 


190400 

100 Baton A f 
12112 Bonanza R 
2100 Bra tome 
WOOB^hphw 

2707 BCFP 


NUktl/nj. index : 12504 JS 
Prevteas : 125*153 
New index : 90136 


Adki 

Alusulsae 


Brawn 


Credit!. 

ElectnnMztt 
Georg Fischer. 
HoMerbonk 


2960 2940 
800 804 

3680 3620 

1625 1630 

3090 . 3095 
2545 2335 
2190 2790 
770 780 

730 740 

2073 20501 
5825 5700 

mm 1990 

USD 1650 
4HS 4B7S 
6615 6708 
1460 1445 
6500 MH 


Intent beount 
Jacob Suchard 
Jetmaii 
Landis Gyr 
Meevenptcfc 
Nestle 
Oerllkan-ft 
torteBaay 

'MW* 

Sdrindtor 
Sutler 

£&rtr 
Swiss Reinsurance lUM.lino 
SwtsVaflcsbank 1510 15BQ 

Union Bank 3790 3775 

Winterthur moo 4875 

Zurich Ini 25700 2S589 


4125 4250 
380 380 

396 396 

1115 IMS 


SIC Index ; 45178 


MjOj net auafM; HA.: net 
available; xd: ex-dtvtdena. 


KBPUPTQDAflWTTH 

BUSMBSPEOnE 

«WWNGE^WEDNeSDW 

ANDREW IN THE HT 


16865 BC Phone 
2100Brunsmk 

900 BoddCan 
50150 CAE 
TCO CDWbBI 
38200 cad Fry 
2M £ Nor West 
2000 C Pockre 
16709 Can Trasi 

me Tung 
5M22CI BkCom 
733169 CTlre A 1 
4700 C UNI B 
600 Cora 
633*c*tone*a 
WOCmtan tTSo 
mCDWbA 
imCDWbBf 
aOMCTLBmk 
1200ConwestA 
3200 Caseka R 
1700 Conran A 
22650 crawnx 
11700 Czar Res 
39729 Dcxm Dev 
5670 Denison A 


S18W II II 
S16 16 16 

«7 lMk 16*h-Hfc 
S7«k 7M 7**— U 
531 V. 20th 21 + Vk 

ns 15 15 + to 

S21 2D H 21 — «■ 
S71M 21 Vl 21to 
52SU 23V. 25V. 

S30WI 2016 2Dfe+ lk 
59W 9 9 

53416 34V. 34U— to 
55Vi 5V. 5W+ V. 

sum 1216 im+ to 

140 133 136 + 5 

51716 T7to 17V. + Vi 
425 420 425 +5 

480 475 480 +S 

S17to 17to 171% — to 
SOM 9to 9to 
230 22S 225 — 7 

S21« 21to 214b— 18 
SI 5 15 IS 

S23V. 23 23 —to 

non 16M 1646— to 
SSto 516 516— to 

*14* 14* 14* 

S2246 2Zto 2246+46 
S29MI 29 291%+ 4k 

*36*% 364S 3640-M 
*1346 1346 04-+ lk 
*31Jk 314b 31*6 + to 
Wto ,*to 9V, + to 
Sll 18 18 

Sink .3*6 I3to — to 

sS* 

5to fto— to 
SlOVa 1QV. 1016 

373 370 370—5 

SI 146 1146 1146— to 
n»M 1916 1916 
192 191 W 

SWO PenUan Aa J14JJ < Uto 

'SKSlSJS! 9 ! ,a * 1346+ to 

4410D!ckntnAr S6M 6to 64b + to 
_S6to 6to 6to 
240 230 235 —5 

nsih 25M 2546— to 

«M6 1W 1m 5— to 

8$ $ 

SIS \L. 

”Qto. 1946 _anu+ to 
Z75 275 275 —1 

gift 21 21 -ft 

& §S +14 

s* na 

295 2SS 285 — J 

»M Mb W6_to 

»» »» V? 

S s $11 

Ml'™'#*-* 
"3a ’sa 

sa as 

IM 14VJ 14^+ to 
*1544 1344 1546 + 2 
SIS 174J 17#+ E 

I® If 1 I Sta 

Sato S 25V* + to 
53516 - 34V* S 

gwi ra* im 

•19ft 1214 124k 
SU 4716 52 +4ft 


32500 MICC 
373SMertandE 


•a 


Matson B 

'"“nSEESl 

jl2S0S* Naranda 
35537 Morten 
180713 NvQAItAf 
1755 Noyraco W 
87WN0WsfepA 


lOshawaAf 


lSsPhtePoSI 
14100 Place GO a 




2MDkda*MtB 
<ni DamanA 

31472 Dofaico 

1450 Du Pont A 
49478 DytexA 
2005 Elctham X 
40 Emco 
48425 Eoutty Svr 
880 FCA Inti 
IT50CFSlaonC 
163199 Ffcnbrdoo 

200FardvRes 
560 Fed l/id a- 
240 Fed Plan 

4700 P atv Fin 

279«s Fraser 
SOaFrurtumf 
2166 GenaisA 
9574 Geac Comp 
30442 Geacnme 
2800 Gibraltar 
lSmcetdcarpt 
lOOGaadVear 
6000 Grandma 
4500 Grandue 
4271 GL Forest 
2729Grevhnd 
2883 H Group A 
1200 HrdlniAl 

M08 Hawker 
3*54 Haves O 
2940 K Bav Ca 
29423 Invmo 
000 Intel 

290 inolht 
7710 inland Gas 
*500 toff Thom 
2800 Inter Pipe 
132WJannodc . 

200KOO1 Katia 
82335 Kerr Ada 
7*57 Labatt 


^M«A 

4i90RteiSaraf 
4250 RaenA 


Roman 
540 Rothman 
7100 sceptre 
474 5catt3t 
26523 Sean Can 

i asasr 

jSgSb' 

3100 Sauttwn 

iwsrsredcst 
HtoShtaA 
I^Svrfptn) 
2W0 Steep R 
S25Suncarpr 
MgO Sydney? 


32B 300 31ft +30 

SUM CM into 
SZZto 2216 22M 
390 3S5 390 

*W 6 1616 UM + to 
*M» 1616 UM+M 
S4to 2416 2416— H 
Sto 25 2Sto+ W 
816 1 » 1396.+ Ik 

81516 ISM .1516+ 16 
«A A A 

S20ft m 3Mfr-to 
41 46 . 46 +M 

S9to 9to 9to 
S25to 25 25to+1* 

W Bib Bib • 
S3316 3316 33H+ to 
*1816.18 IBli+to 
S7M 716 Hfc— to 
*31 30 31 +1V6 

t«l 138 131+1 
*2616 IM 3616+ to 
SWto IM IM+to 
440 . 42ft 440 ■ +15- 
S616 616 4V, 

SP Mb 891 „• 

81116 11 - 1M+ toe 
H2 21ft 21 to— 'd 
295 - 291 292 + CB 

*9to 9W 916 

sum ion ioto+N 


Kf 


cl 





F' 

r 


iOREBOi 


ii 


P'L hit*' 




Ins. 


■» ^ mr 


616 

*2S1*« 2516 2516 

BV* 89k + to 


2000 Tara 

Itch Cor A 


I68D1 

7*80 Tack B I 
238 Teledyne 
15810 Tex Can 
3965UTnotnNA 
92U79 Tor Dm B* 
41900 Taruor B t 
WlTrWeraAf 
2£DTrnaMl 
5900 Trinity Pa 
<S4UTrnAHaUA 
15998 TrCan pl 
4148Trbnoc 
550 TrlJflcA t 

60850 Turtlo f 1 


nhk 7to 716 + 
SM Bto SVr . 
sio-. w , w . + to 
U94k 491k 4VM + M 
*19M 19 19to— to 

81916 T9to 1J» • 
US 2-2 7/3 +» 

225 ZB 225 —5 
S34to 2416 «V*+ W 
29 27 29 +J-- 

83416 2416 3416 + to 

SUlfc Uto 1M+ to 
SISto mb 1316— to. 
SlMk lift. 10M+to 
S354k .2816 2516 — J6 
Sll 2016 2016— 9* 
520to. SDto Sffto + to- 
SWk 21to a»+to 
*21 2016 2M>— £ 

SUM 1016 18M+ to 
430 425 425 —3 

SSS.^SSStS 

430 425 430 +5 


u . ■>»., 


P+, . 


M0 Untaorp At 
iCarbM 


+ 1 


■TOOOn— P 
WMUEntariH 
raOl/Keno ■ 
lOOUSktcue 
BOO Van Ocr 

is 

^Wteetan J 

YkBeorl 


SI- 49 
S7to 7to 7ft 
112 1* 12 - • 

Sllto 1116 lift ‘ 

sum ion ran- « 

100 ISO 100—2 
310 3» 910 +3. 

8616 i - 616+ ft . 
*1016 10ft Wft— to 
*!3ft u n 
ift n u +i . 

%S15ta Mft 13 +ft 
*57 57 57 —2 

SS3 Sift 82 '+ to 
15ft 5ft 5ft 





Total sole* 12^21 LUO OhOPH 


TSE 309 hMex: 


OoM 

1660.70 


warn 


1\,‘+ 
*, T + 


Moiterel Mar H 


gjgra LocMnrte 


■ UOLOntm 

213H>LacafM 
3410 LL LOC 




U10f 


§ii . i7ft S 

SI6U 16ft Wft— ft 


BTSIlBankMon. 

87*0 Cons _ 

4542 OorriT 
52SMntTr*t 
26897 Nat Bk CdO 
5450 Power Com 
WtoOwdA^ 
«3S«wwBank 
2»0RoyT/stge 


High Low Cleae cats 
S36M acftTfito . 


S2B16 W6 28ft 


non 1616 mo— ft 
siiB.:iifl'iii6-+ 
513ft. IM TS6 >' 


Vl ' ■ 


total Sates UOBJttstHVK 


820ft 20 20 


Industrials index: 


«0JM; 


WfJ 


SVC*- 

" 


■■ 


.-.-.j 




TTj/CTBVJ+.ri > j./T:ros!Tv^ •” “V" 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


oik >i „ .-"V 

i- . «u. ^ * " ■ . 

LONDON 

M.x,, ^ nonruiMhres 


at a Triple 



Umpires Agree to Drug Testing 


• n ^ dd Triblmf coo its way to success despite pos- gland, as well as to Everton, all 

. LONDON — Once in a blue sessing so deKcale an aging flower things on the right flank extra de- 
moon a dob reaches «it beyond as, the Czech Antonin Panenka, fender, - nridfldd prompt, winger, 
nornirit. t tosacM s to ftggc ft shoe whose leftfoot can stillwm' any finisher. His balance and integrity 
pf hstoy.Eyoton, already the Eo- roatdu demonstrate the faflaev of lhmkhiE 


as wdl as to Everton, all 
on the right extra de- 


’ u ’p». 

"I* ’■■ ■* a 
“ Wit >: , 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Sercict 


evaluate their position only if the three-doctor joint 
review committee, which under the present agreement 


of hiflflry. : Eraton, a 
gtijdi rfiamfHon, fins 


will re- 


aldL demonstrate the fallacy of 

Manchester United’s hard streak a graduate from a rugtn 


NEW YORK — Major-league baseball umpires examines players thought to have drug problems, 
have agreed to the mandatory drug-testing program recommended mandatory testing, 
announced last wed: by ComntissioaeT Peter Ucbcr- The umpires' decision to accost Ueberroth’s testing 
roth, leaving the players as the only group in baseball program did not surprise Fehr. Nor did it please him. 
not covered by the plan. "How anyone can vote on a collective bargaining 

Donald Fehr, acting executive director erf the Play- proposal that hasn't been made, to the extent the)- 
ere Association, criricgod the umpires’ action, saying don’t know what’s going to happen, is very irrespensi- 


'‘tyinT^ art ®ccer recently demonstrated Welsh goat-scorer .Marie Hughes, emerge backward in the rotmdball 
* ^ J>y HongKong and Cnma, Everton whose pungent agg rass re eness jg game, 
can complete the final two legs of best described as getting his relnfia- 
— ■ — ' . I lion in firsth and ioNorman White- 

* v ¥; Rob Hughes 2§£33BSSS3SS 


Graeme Sharp, being Glaswe- 
an, would have trouble remem- 
ziug days he wasn’t putting the 


kkst s 


Rob HUGHES a^^m^PI^tunisric^optog Bering days he wasn’t 

isafoflto.h»Klfest street fighter's teHm the neL Some ol 

. . ‘ . , . . s P itc - . . this season rate amoi 

Don’t botfaerwith though* of spectacnlar on record 
toEnghs^FAQro and the Euro- Everton as a shy physical s p eci m en. Vienna’s wanrinz ti 


this season rate among the most 


"^AJl^needs is twosS 
at (he end of a marathon. 


** erpoolas Britain's most 


Evcrion as a sny p aysicaispeainen. Vicuna’s warnuK to Everton is 

soccer champs are; never that Panenka, naaT36, pqtiRapid 

. : . • into the final with a goal from oul- 

Earher.flnsjeason. Everton did side the penalty box — and out of 

nothing: a gentle swsyback, no 
£700,000 (5860,000) pimpernel, to backlift. . . a shot that fryv/fa flTitrff 


iTs record pomts tally and taken jSl* aarerator who has 0811 “® “ttamed tan, was 

bemSro^afuscexacted — — 



ere Association, criticized the umpires’ action, saymg don t know what s going to happen, is very irrespensi- 
it was “astounding because they don’t know any We,” Fehr said. 

details” of the program. Last week. Ueberroth said he would disclose details 

Richie Phillips, lawyer for the Major League Um- of his plan in the “very near future.” Phillips said that 
piles Association, said the seven-man board of direc- based on his discussions with the commissioner, he 
tors voted unanimously Saturday to subscribe to the knew the testing would be confidential 
program. He said he discussed it with the board after “If Richie has been told details,” Fehr said, “we 
talking to Ueberroth several times last week have circumstances where privileged information is 

"While mandatory testing is an invasion of privacy going to certain individuals because it’s my infonna- 
and an infring ement on certain fundamental prina- non that the details aren't known yet” 
pies of civil liberties,” Phillips said in a statement, “the Fehr met with Lee MacPhafl, the owners' chief 

umpires balanced (bat infringement against the need negotiator, Monday in a negotiating session* for the 


pies of civil libaties,” Phillips said in a statement, “the Fehr met with Lee MacPhail, the owners' chief 
umpires balanced that infringement against the need negotiator, Monday in a negotiating session* for the 
that all of baseball remain above reproach and suspt- first time since April 17, when the players asked for 
cion. It was determined that the program is not ptmi- financial information from the dubs regarding the 


five, intends no publication or sanctions but rather is a owners' contention that baseball has severe financial 


problems. 

The owners’ representatives discussed what they 

w n .DL.:i : j i -i__ • ~ 


ih.i.-.- >1 . • I. g ;,| , - * - *vou, * ^uaauA wuu iud 

f 

• ■■ , „ ' : the FA Craxfinal at Wemhtey <S • :Ce “g*' y rf??’ 

1 " *‘^' s .Saturdayirast Raptd vSffem 

rui . ; vV. : V «•-. Manchester United will test every 

: .;nofve and sinew. Like a sumo mas- . 

* - L V' ' ' ••• ‘ Ms V't ' ter taking on a saccesshn of up- 

startTEverton must stand its 

crmimrf with rmh/ traup}in» ttrrv«K*. CSmCOOt SCCOQO-bCSt m a Xldang 

.. ... , monS^ ^dmotohotaMsira*™! 

•• D^kMon*. 

;l!i V: ‘*•.**>.*** ."*• 9 * 

graassattst CSS!S5SS5KS 

v ‘Mi,-n.,N - Sri- nwtthes mast be won m beadinalatei^MhimFACup 
; _ style. ;k„o1 LuJ-j i , — w* 


•1 •" . . 1 , ,sV ' 




of the cask, I hope — and I also 
think — that Evencin can do h. * 


semifinal that looked long lost to 
Luton. . . 

Over six feet (1B2 metes) tall. 


The n SdSBsrsE*.- "Srs! 

n«s to tattle through when'ihytinn 


BMSSirSSfJd 

■ ■ ihA ^l- IQb .iiM qw._md » idimy goal 

-K - U 2S? ta m fcSSa5*3S 

: v. SimmMiMmtliM G^ySlevaB m d&mtf fidd 
not, so far, ran down Evertrarian 

■ batteries. “The pressure was too ii2SSL’ij'iS&SSI2SSS!E 

1": much for us," a£ritted Udo Lat- ^ te ^®^S :vi ? c | 0 ?SS 1, sp ?S y 
tek, coach rf West German cham- fmter tad:KevmRa^ffe 
- ^ trim Ttovern Mirnirf, after thr.Om ^gy, Bdgjanhom Pat Van Den 


leaped three feet off the -ground 
ana hovered a fraction of a second 
before volleying a go al aston- 
ished Luis Anxmada, the best gpal- 
ie Spain has ever produced. The 
boll will take some hnkfing, but 
remember how Everton put a ring 
in his nose? This season Everton 
has »hr«<Hwt Manchester by 5-0, 
drawn (M) and, in the M3k Cup, 
cfimxnatcd United, 2 - 1 , in Man- 
chester’s own den. 

. I stuped United’s erratic nature 
can also be phmdered at Wembley. 

Although England’s No. 2, Man- 
chester goalie Gary Bailey offers a 
chance a g»mt» — infinitely mere 
generous iSmi Everton’s Soutbal 
Jesper Olsen and Gordon Stra- 
chan. United’s expensive crowd- 
pleasers, would waltz raito any Eu- 
ropean side, chosen purely on slriH. 

Yet CMsen wifl enthrall far 20 min- 
utes and then wane, and although 
Strachan is more durable, trust 
Everton to punish any hint of frail- 
ty. ' • . 

Derek Motzntfield, ondeaping Watford’s Geor\ 

had lie bT^EvirtTicammate TVevor 


confidential procedure aimed at nhabOitatita.” problems. 

Some petyle in baseball said last week they thought The owners’ representatives discussed what they 
Ueberroth had atmonneed the program hoping to saw as a need, MacPhail said, to “level off the increas- 
tsduce the players to go along with it. “My perception iag player compensation." 
is that he feels if everybody else subscribes to it, that "They gave us no specifics," Fehr said, “but they 
would make h more palatable to the players," Phillips told us the level of compensation and pension for 1985 


announced the program hoping to saw as a need, MacPhail said, to “level off the increas- 
rs to go along with it. “My perception iag player compensation." 

1 everybody else subscribes to it, that "They gave us no specifics." Fehr said, “but they 


The players have an agreement with the owners 
under which mandatory drug testing of all players is 
not permitted. Fehr has said (he players would re- 


nth the owners MacPhail said the owners’ negotiators would pre- 
of all players is sent a concept covering their ideas at a meeting next 
ayers would re- Monday. 


New Jersey Tracks Spawn New Series 


By Steven Crist Kentucky, Maryland -*w>d f’nmria 

New York Times Sendee The bonuses, which are included 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New in a horse's official earning^ have 
Jersey — Officials of New Jersey’s upset the usual scale and meaning 
five race tracks anounced Monday of racing earnings. They are ai<p 
that they are banding together to threatening other traditional races 
offer a rich new series of thorough- and series, and affecting the way 
bred and harness races. The plan thm horses are wmpaynwt Spend 
seems designed to challenge New a Buck’s owner. Drams Diaz, de- 
York for the leadership of horse tided to pass op Saturday's Preak- 
radng in the EasL ness Stakes, foregoing a chance ai 

Officials of Atlantic City Race 'racing’s Triple Crown in favor of a 
Course, Freehold Raceway, Gar- -shot at Garden State's riches, 
dm State Park, Meadowlands Race Br ennan said the formation of 

Trade and Monmouth Park an- the council and the new bonus se- 
nounced here that they had formed ries were not “necessarily" a direct 
a New Jersey Council on Racing to challenge to New York or to other 
create the new series and to weak existing races, but he added: “New 
for other common goals. York does not have claim to being 

The ccnmdTs first act was to an- the No. 1 racing state as a birth- 


bred and harness races. The plan thm horses are ratnpownri Spend 
seems designed to challenge New a Buck’s owner. Drams Diaz, de- 
York for the leadership of horse tided to pass op Saturday's Preak- 


£:j| 






the Romanian coach, NGrcea neaa me oau uwara iLveram leamnnue irevw ^ven 00 ^ what ii calls the New Jersey 

Incesco, observed a fortnight ago: Million Dollar Challenge, a SI mil- 

“I think at the nKiment Bryan Rob- Liverpool ... Yet if Lucescu is And if it is to be the triple, watch Hon bonus to be offered any 3-year- 
son hasn’t fully recovered. He’s not halt-right, Peter Reid & Co. win the faces of the Everton players old thoroughbred vrtio wins the Jex- 


righL Thai's something that has to 
be earned each and every year." 

New York racing officials said 
Monday they did not expect this 
year's 51 million bonus series to 
affect the quality of its racing. The 
Travers, New York's major sum- 
mer race for 3-year-olds, is sched- 
uled for Aug. 17 at Saratoga 
Springs, three weeks after the Has- 
kell and almost six weeks before 
the Pegasus. The races that might, 
however, be hurt are the Marlboro 
Cup Sept. 14 and the Jockey Club 
Gold Cup Ocl 6 . 

A 3-year-old eligible for the SI 
million bonus might go to the Pega- 
sus instead of taking on older hors- 
es in one of those New York races. 


the way he was before his injury.” 

leggy. Belgian-born Pat Van Den After a dislocated shoulder and ■ If not, most of the soccer world booed off 'their own pitch by a the Haskell Invitational Handicap 
Hanwe, whose conversion to Wales severely wrenched ankle, Robson (with the exception of the United crowd that thought them character- atMbnmouth July 27 and the P^»- 
™ Fwimn pT the purposes of international was rushed back to the United States, which has decided pro soo- less. “Character," says Manager sus Handicap at the Meadowlands 

im, tvHton zs me oesi m tai- xxou h^uaidtherediristenmg to cause. He surged ferociously from cer is a no-no) will sec a stirring Howard Kendall, “has been what Sept- 26. 

PC. n.<«. -- . 0 . -JC.U r .L- f. ^—1 ■■ . 1 . ^ 1 , -n.. T\»u.r ii. A* 


overrun Manchester 


who, barely 18 mnnths « gn , were sey Derby at Garden State May 27, 


Richardson’s NBA Comeback Cited 


I :« •» >■' 


form, Everton is the best in Eu- 

■ soccer induoed the rechristenmg to 

j Liverpool and inventus, prepar- D^D^ Htawe, 

ing for their May 29 contest to : Teamwork being Everton’s es- 
d crude Europe's champion of scace » 1,01 lo® awug)i to ig- 
champions, probably wouldn’t a 9^ ^ P 13 )^ capable 
. . agree. Their tom wffl come. But 01 s 00011 * a affinal winnet 
within four days, Vknna and Man- * . Paul Braccwdl, a neat linking 
wtlj try pntr pu, Tofager between midfidd and at- 

. possiWy outbnuse and evtn oiti- tadc, roanB unnoticed at great cost 
* crash Everton. when ta sndden^ pops up in scot- 

Make no mistake, these finals are mg p osi ti on s. . 

. not child’s play. Rmadr Vienna, as Trevor Steven tes a minim dn^ 


NEW YORK (AP) — Mi- 
cheal Ray Richardson of the 
New Jersey Nets, who over- 
came drug problems to average 


tnvifirid to. score the 
phidted the FA Cup sen 


(hat physical confrontation to the last our season at Everton has been all 
from drop of sweat about” 


Halting Two Skids, Braves Beat Mels 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispadia 
ATLANTA — A single up the 


BASEBALL BOUNDUP 


our season at Everton has been aD The Jersey Derby is already the 
about” final leg of a new bonus series for 

races at Garden State. Spend a 

Buck will be shooting for a $2 mfl- 
■n „ "m r M lion bonus in that race, having al- 

s Beat Mels 

tucky Derby. Were taend a Buck 
laughed Whitaker, who weighs 160 to win the Jersey Derby and the S2 
pounds (72-5 kilograms). “It’s million beams, and then take die 
. amazing - 1 was s u rprised then, ITn 


we learned against G 
^is prepared to punch 


^rT; - ... .-v- ,- jnnddleended3LconaeaitiW!SCOTOr,^ k tUm tn „ n ^ amanng- 1 was surprised then^rm Haskell and the Pegasus, and the 

Kamazs Trevor Stevenhasa snfilar da- lesshums for the Atlanta Brave twT sor P I ? icd ' acm 1 al^yswfll be additional $1 million, his earnings 


ow Celtic, siveness, but achieves it time 
dust and industry. He is to 


<;i; 


bcfonSS touched Curt Warfle Rnyab S, Onoles 2 

^awSSheNtw for anotffimmer. In Baltimore, derignate 




Baseball 


York Mets, Gknn Hubbard's two- Tigers 7, Rangers 4 

out second-inning finer to center In Detroit, the Tigera triumphed 
field scored Dale Murphy with At- over Texas in a homo-run dud. 
hnta's only run in their last five While power hitters Kirk Gibson 


surprised. for this year would top 55 million. 

Royals 5, Orioles 2 That would bring Mm dose to be- 

in Baltimore; designated-hhter the leading money-earner in 
Jotge Orta drove in four runs and radng history. . 


bnta's only run in 

games 


five While power hitters Kirit Gibson 
and Lance Parrish also connected 


scored the fifth as Kansas City 
downed the Orioles. 

White Sox 8 , Indues 0 


The new series for 3-year-olds is 
only the first of several amOar ar- 
rangements, council members said. 
Atlantic Gty and Freehold would 


In Chicago, the White Sat blew be the host tracks in other series. 


Monday’s line Scores ££? SSSw!.' 

MATK) UAL’ LEAGUE ' Hk * bMv Kotwne {». Rn ui d u n (10) and 

VUttatli WMk |nwiH k ■ JhmenMi Ryaa Ulptna (V). Smith (») and 
mifinnH in m L— RfoirlorvT-LHRi— 

Dennv. Rucker UJ^Andran O) and Daut- 


MATNIML' LEAOUB 


tan; Stupor. Franco m. Paw [» and Van- 
Gordw. W-atapor. M. L-Ommv, W. H R»- 
PtttodotPhte ScftniMt 02. dncrrvntL Pm 
CD- 

NHYtril ' ON OM WO— • 4 1 

m am a VW M Hs-1 J I 

Lvnch, Canfewr (U and Carter; Barker, 
Sutter (M and Cnuna. W Bart u w. 1-1 L— 
Lynch, 2-3L Ste-Suttar (5>. 


4MUUCAN LEAGUE 

n w m-4 i > er pitched seven Timing! 
. ni tat w-tn i four l»tf , .wiKng out 


Tennis 


Italian (^en 


JUEMSSIN0LES 
First Roond 


PMnir in tat ■»-» n i 

Haatan, Horrts (5), Murray (7)> StWMBi (1) 
and5lauatit; PWrv, Lnpaz OkHamndai (» 
and Parrish. W— PWry, 4-1 L— Hootoa M. 
Sii' HsmunUi III. HRs— T earn. Johnsoa 
(4), Harrah (3). Datrafti Whttaksr (4), 

Otbsan (4», Parrish (5). 

Kansas CBv IN MS 411-4 ■ • 

■wU ft ncwi MMHM f I 

jaefcaaa. QubsabarrY (7) and Sundtara: 
Oavts. S ts wort (« and Dsmpsey. W-jacX- 
son,2-L L— Davla, VL Su-Outtsnbarry (4). 
HR— SaStmara. Roankto (4). 

Min—ratn w tss tet—t n l 

Haw Yaric AM US NM f I 

. SfflHtisHV FUsan 14), Davts (7) and Sedas; 
WHRsmvCaoasr ( 2 ), County (a andWvneodr. 


Lea Barker and Bruce Sutter for the winners, it was Lou Whi- past Cleveland on Britt Bnms^s 10- “New Jersey will have series with 
combined oil a six-hitter to end taker’s leadoff homer that had the stnkeonL walk-free rour-nittci. Oz.- bonuses in every division — for 3- 
New Yoii’s winning streak at six crowd buzzing. zie Guillen had three hits, along year-olds, 3-year-old Allies, older 

games. In becoming the only At- Whitaker put a Burt Boo ton j^th a successful anode-squeeze horses of both gender, in both thor- 
ianta starter other than Rick Mah- pitch over the right-field roof — bwit, and scored twice. oughbred and standardbrcd rac- 
ier with a victory tins seasmi. Bade- only the 20th time a fair ball has r ,Jy irm |. a / 0 lir j m ?f^?f ing," said Robert Brennan, chair- 

er pitched seven wnrijig^ riving up been hit completely out of Tiger Carlton risk stole the luOtn base of man ^ j principal owner of 
four hits, striking out three and Stadium since it was remodeled in “S' career, maki n g mm only the Garden State, 
walking none. 1938. Others who have accom- Win camber m major-league msto- Bonuses have accelerated 

The only Met to get as far as plished the feat include Ted Wfl- ^ ™ 0, ^ s T ? ie T throughout throughbred racing in 



lex with a victory this seasmi. Bade- only the 20th time a fair ball has 
er pitched seven tarings , riving up been hit completely out of Tigpr 
four bi t !? , striking out three and Stadium sinceit was remodeled in 


wanting none. 


1938. Others who have accotn- 


The only Met to get as far as jriidaed the feat indude Ted WB- 


Micbeal Ray Richardson 


a career-high. 20.1 points per 
game and lead the National 
Basketball Association iu 
steals, on Monday was named 
the league’s comeback player 
for 1984-85. 

A two-time all-star during 
four seasons with the New York 
Kxricks, the 6-foot-5 (1.95-me- 
ter) gnard played only 48 games 
with Golden State arid the Nets 
in 1983-84. He missed the early 
part of the season while under- 
going drug rehabilitation before 
being sidelined by usuries. But 
Iasi season he played in all 82 
games for the Nets. 

“It's something I really 
worked hard to get,” said Rich- 
ardson. “I set three goals for 
myself this season: Do the best 
I could every night, lead the 
Ica gi n* in steals and make the 
all-star team. 1 never doubted 
myself,” he said. 

In addition to his scoring* 
Richardson averaged 2JJ6 steals 
per game to become the only 
player ever to lead the NBA 
three times in that category. He 
also averaged 82 assists, sixth 
best in the league. 

With the Nets beset by inju- 
ries this season, Richardson av- 
eraged more than 38 minutes of 
action per game. 


Jon Guonaragon. Swedon. deL Andros Go- W lV 4 - HR * r*‘**‘ 

ITWH, Ecuodor.t-X Dtek»0«VU-5. ^.B^CM.K^Yoilt.WVTiWIorUJ.Mot. 

«* MoriM Jolta, ArawHoa *3, .JA, SMoa MvO). . . 

SknomMtu Smom. ML Pater Ell*-. VM ??**** ••• . * 

Garmanv. 1*3, ML AWandro Ganxcdaal, Ar- •*.•*•^5-* 11 • 

aantliMudaLPaatoCoMb itatv.6^L44.Jbnmv Ttoooaw ISI.Voo Ohtoo O) and 


Murphy ted off the second with 
an infield hit on a disputed call at 
firsL AfterMoolrie Wilson made a 
m nirinp over-the-shouldfr catch of 
Bob Horneris drive to deqp right- 
center, Morphy went to second on 
Gerald Pony’s groundnut. Rkk 
Cercne walked baore Hubbard de- 
livered the drought-coder. The jna- 


Aging Rookie Gets His Shot 


By Irvin Molorsky 

New York Times Sendee 

BALTIMORE — By the time he 




NATHAMELSVFH 
(M«e) 

^Ssysasr- 


jor-league record for consecutive tuniod 32, Ton Seaver had ap- 




Brown. U^.dsl.Tr««or Alton. AusfraUo, 4-4. B«nfon; Boms and Ftefc W— Bums. S-Z L— 
t^^JoiuiLlora. Britain, clot PabtoArroya 
. Peru M. Sorts BadMr.wm Ganaaav,. 

., deL Tartt BenfcaMes, Rram 4rX 44. Kent T , __ 

tl' Dtamungs 

. south Africa, fra, r-m ravel S-ESuJl. r w w 

Czechoslovakia deL6leanteMaain,ltalT,S. “ AMBSTCAH LEASUE 

X 44. Juan Aguilera, Saabb deL Gianni Eos) DMskm 

. Octeana ltaiv.4-1,4.2. Ctaadks Mezzodri. no- V -W L Pet OB 

iv,0*LHorc*ctoD« La Pena. Argentina, Teraata T9 n MSS — 

■ M nHI). Pavel Mean. Ca rtw fcwa M a. det BeMnore ' . ,’U 11 AZi Yt 

i Edoordo Mazsv Italy, 44, 44.. Oefraff T7 11 MB 1 

It GulUernw VUn, ArawtHna det Roberta Boston 15 15 SOO 4 

ArawBo, Ara«Jttna?-5,WLRJt*y OUtrtlUTV New Ybrt; 13 15 Mi 5 

. west a*nw, <M. W uHa ano Popo. Was! Mitwnukae . . 12 17 JU M 

tmntxm'^a,9+i+JJberPiHMk,C2BClwa)e- Oewric sad 72 1* .400 7 

voUcvtM. Joaolonrei.BnHU,7a,<MLMI- - r WWJNvMga 
chael WesHcd, West Genmnv. deL Gra» CaUfonMa »12^13 — 

Holms*. UXM tM), 44. Francesco Cncel- Cbkaaa 15 11 S54 2 

. (afri, IMtVMMi HtalfvAtoiw^AosfraBcfcM^a Minneeafa U U J33 2tt 

. JimmvArtaaU^<letJrtmPraw*Pi'^Aurfro- KaneasCKv 14 tl ^40 4 

na. 40,6-2. Mai* 1 WRanWeSeMNadst Cassia Oakland • 14. 17 JSi 5 

. Malta, BratU 74 (7^7, 40. MMr Leach. UJL Snfte .. .. H U I 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DMskff 

■VL Nt 
19 11 M3 
. ,'M 11 A 21 

■17 11 407 

15 15 SOO 
13 15 .444 

. 12 17 ^14 

12 II .400 


-633 — 
AZ1 Hi 
MB 1 
500 4 

-464 5 

AU M 
JO) 7 


in nin gs shut out by the opposition peared in 354 major-league wnwy 
is48,setby thePmladelpI&A’sm and won 1 82 of them. By 32, Steve 
1906 and the Chicago Cobs m Carlton had pitched in. 382 games 
1W8- and won 168- Nate Snell is 32ncw, 

Reds 7, Phiffies 3 and he evened the 1985 season with 

In Cincinnati, Tony Perez pinch- five major-league games to his 
hh a grand-slam heme mo off re- “wht and just one victory to go 
Hever Dave Rucker in the sixth to altag with aangtel^. 

Nrfp tfrA v lwmri Phfladdphia its But Sndl, with the likes of Seaver 
seventh consecutive loss. It was the “d Carlton, finall y is also a major- 
firet homer cf the season and the lea © ie ptchex, having made the 
sixth grand slam lifetime for Perez, nch staff of the Baltimore Orioles 
who *im *a 43 Tuesday. “W prtdmig four years at Teanes- 


tcst dob 
1977-mjto,^ 


%e*war tt ' tarwu^j 

Texas 




s 2 

jg^-ffPPbeaer - Soniier* g S 

“g-aoeAfsto-rr Inrbswna] i< f? 

-= 5KS3S_ g P 

®^as==E~- sss- j % 

***** Lensat Totai*__. Ameriom _j J* 






— Pm. H. 
.J ■*» W» 

JM *14) 

l - 7, 4 O 
7 JSl 72 

1 MO 77 

2 JOS 32 

J -2S0 M 
| « 83 

» 1-068 is 
7 ISO 71 
* BOO 13 
« »2 « 


R- ER 
« X 
tl 7B 
* 27 

44 37 

J» a 
J4 11 
>« 12 

J 33 

2 * 

" 22 


wn - 

15 12 .554 2 

u u sa 2 » 
M 15 MS A 
14. 17 45S 5 

a n in i 
» a jw 9 


Astn»3,Expos2 
In Houston, pinch-hitler Jerry 
Mumphrey suited home the win- 
ning run in the 10th to lift the 


. dM. CHsso Pens. UnivuaY, 4ft 4-4. Tsxo* . ■ • a JM 9 

. Massimo CteTa Italy. d«f- Horn Schwoter, NAtlONAL league 

- v*MtO«rtnaay.4-M-&40LBIaiMWtMabarg. ' MMvMh 

UA, Omt. MlctwM sown HoftBSL 6-V 7-4 W L PCL GB 

. (M ). Tomc«5mKt CzechaNovakkulCtSteVf M*w Yortt, 19 » £79 — 

Mslatsr,UJS,a4L4a*APaJMtJ<amss.A»»- Monfa-Std ' - W 11 JKO-- 1 . 

. India, dst. Aaron KrleksMn, ILS. 14), 4-4,74 CMooao 17 H MB 2 

.. a-ZL Ytmnkk Moah,Rwio*,ds£.FIorJc*iS*- St-Laois.- -MU -447 4 

- mrcaawa,Ramopla.ML4^ Emilio Saadws-, PM I nrt il rM a TO 19 J45 m 

Saolaitef. Hons GHdorn>e*stw r CWta. «,«. nttstwrMi • 9 3B J10 W» 

.*4L IWrtilov Nedr, C3Mfiotkm*ki, <ie1, ■ ?• HMtSMMaa 

AV»SfnoKarctu«LrtaVy,7-4n^4-LStol»- 3on 17 12 - 

don ZtvoUnovIc. YugadOVtO, 4aL Picnando HaoUan • it M JD3 TO 

Luna, SMln. ** M. M. ThUrrv Tulana. Lm Ahnm ■ 17. 15 -SI 114 

. Fnsnet ML VKos Oarvtottts. UA.4rXtn2. . Ontinnaff - - ■■ 15 15 JBO 7Vi 


see Stale University and tight years 

TT T— t file mmor leagak. 

Jmy . “He’s the oJ3est rookie we’ve 
wsr had," said Ride Vaughn, the 
, Jr 1 , team’s assistant director of pablic 
naL Bill Doran s relations. 

e run bwdee a “He’s pitched his way onto the 
EOtiivc Scoreless team,” said the Oridepitdringcoa- 


SsSSSSSIsassaiaff-* - 


^ M. Era 
S *3 1.70 

» « 3A4 

s »»1 

** 22 us 

s s a 
J ; ? » 
i ■ -’s 

J 7 8*2 

? » 2 « 

- — Jj) 

1 r la 


jw 9 Astros ovor MontreaL Bill Doran’s icfafiona, 

third-imung home run broke a “He’s pitched his \ 
gb fl*mg of 41 consecutive scoreless team,” said the Oriole 


In tbe lOlh, Teny Pnhl smgted BatenSre 
and stole second- Mumphrey. ^ began iM’s hometown of 
pmAhmmg for MadeBaOraf, then Vance, South Carolina, and has 


odyssey 


singed off Jeff Reardon to drive in taken the ririit-hander to cote in 
im In his eight rnnings of work, Nashville and to mruor-lrague 
Houston starter Nolan Ryan struck teams in Miami; Chariotte, North 
om seven, raiang he aD-traem^or Carolina; Rochester, New York, 


Transition 


AMonta * 

Son Prancbico 


It U JO) lVt 
17. 15 JSl lVi 
15 15 JW 2» 
73. .17 414 5 


OTha Offlod BottbcA Repair TITc Sponiaa New 
Dm Nh York Tina 

Nate Snefl of the Orioles: The 32-year-old 
pitcher, whose age was fisted on the team 
roster as 29, spent eight years in the minors. 


ummu. Football 

Amricoa Leone ... 

• BALTIATORE— Adlvtrfed Lm lOOfi hlr ' 

AMdeoemaatr. and MJarwted M* IlSliT.fihiwUnua 
*L9**n4Mv.4vtfMWf. (or raasalaaineiiL LOt amUTl g H 

MILWAUKHB— PuvtwMd ttw coftfrad of gamma' mam 

BeUBt Oartt, ouKtoUef, from Vnan* o( 

’Ilia Podflc Cnait U wttwfc [ Tampa Bay ; 9 '-'3 

. .SAN FRANCtsra^^wd Erie Prim, rite !'• '* 

«Wtv4t»e>« Stew SmWv eJtemlv* fockla; . ■ * 

SItwVllla.aoarlBrtacaiJSiwwnRolWri.nM- * 

. nlngUicfe; Brian Moors. noNr; RaesePrae- _ | * 

nwifc cMmshv toeMa. at Kl Howw ««4- oramfe . : % 5 
L-V ftthr; ttH, tKnnoM Mi W«J» nmr . .. . , J 

.. nn*aai u »f v GwMUrit»uruprilooboduQMl» . . . ' . - ' lv 

. ' Qbmbm, QHmfNa niutman. and riaaalBart Artwaa- 1 ' j •- 

- DuBoh-joycM Pa w jim tMtfKaiiwWIlHanM. ^ .'•> ' j~ t ‘ 

PorfanU. ; '.2 -9 . 

.■■.wLLRwh don AnlMfo*" 3 * 1 

TULANe-MamM Ran WWson oWnlpti- w „ * J _ 

‘VnilveamlstaBftehiMoacnxi*^ Oriando TL tai Antenb » 

director Htadiamm. . ranm « 




EASTERN COttPCKeNCB 

. ,-W L T Pet PF PA 
Tampa Bay. . .9 3 9 350 X1 iX 

. BlrmlnWwm ? I ,4 0 iff 30211 

No Wiiw I 4 0 AQ an 214 

MwwMi'. ■ . 7_ SO- '483 259 244 
■ 6 -4 B JBD 2N 29S 

BoWmorr r S . 4 - 1 49 203 m 

Orlando .. . 3 •*' ft 29 1» 310 

■•■ wmSTSKN CONFERENCE 

t I I Jtt 2N 33* 
O tetter . ; ■ 4 «-• 447 323 236 

Hourtw . |V J 4 . fl 467 376 251 


17 414 5 league-leadmg total to 3^29. and Shreveport, Louikana. Hehas 
u 49 sue Yankees 9, Twins S ' gone back and forth so many times 
' . In the American League, in New t h at hk record looks like the sehed- 

I York, Don Mattingly s twtKmt . ole of a commuter airline. 

1 . . ' three-run homer inthc ninth crab- • The loser of one game so far this 

— ^ pkted the Yankees’ rally from an year, Snefl in 23% innings has yield- 
early 8-0 deficit- New York had °fi21 hits, has an eamed-nm aver- 
pufied lo within 8-6 with a fiw-nm age of 33!‘ and has impressed maa- 
** CB _ c _ sixth, when consocative singles by agement- with his pitching in 
5-w a# : Bobby Meacham, Omar Moreno i^dle rdiril “He throws strikes," 
467 29 zis and Ken Griffey loaded the bases. Miller said, “and everything sinks, 
.-** *1 Meacham scored on MattingiyV 50 he grtsatot of ground balls. And 
a m 293 fincont to center and Dave wm- he doesn’t give np any walks.” 

4* » » field anded home Moreno before “Where have Ibeenr’Sndl said 
UeJ 9 Butdi wynegarMt his timd home the other day as he sat in thedug- 
-jw.aMSH nmof theyeaL out and, with a lawb, echoed a 

4w 323 w Martmriy’s homer made rtfiever cwstion put to him.'Tve been in 
•i£ S m Ron Davis alcserfar the third time the minor ka»ies.*Fve been dviae 


didn’t spend a lot of money,” he him with them on their winter trip —Eddie Murray, 29, and Cal Rip- Bn 
said. “I was able to gpt by. if I had to Japan, where he was the victor in ken, 24 — but younger than the keep 
bear married and had kids, it four of the eight games won by the recently acquired Fred Lynn (33) than 
would have been very tough. Orioles. and Lee Lacy (36). team 

watching every penny. The pay is It was during the trip that the “My teammates are always jok- yond 


every penny, 
that good/ 


It was during the trip that the “My teammates are always jok- 
Orioles discovered Sndl had per- ing about my age," Snell said, *but 


Rip- But the Oriole system tends to 
the keep players like Smell far longer 
(33) than other teaim, and the parent 
team tends to keep aging stars be- 
iok- yond the point when they might 
W have been cut elsewhere. It is this 


Sndl fid not get married until haps been shaving a few years off rmjusxhappytobehere,no matter system that Sndl has been trying to 

ecember 1983, and he and Ms his age. what they say” break into. 

fe, Shdla, have no tihildren. She “He had to produce a birth cer- The Orioles have had the best “Physically, he's much younger 

a guidance counselor in HoBy- tificate,” Vaughn said, “and we record in the major leagues over the than 32 because he doesn't abuse 

L&mhOuolma, where the con- found out that he was 32 years okL last 30 years; according to Miller, Mmse4L H Milter said. 

i make their off-season home. The records said he was 29, but he good pitching has kept them at Lean and muscular at 6-foot-4 


° pie makp- their off-season home. The records sard he was 29, but he 

SnelFs minor-league record is had to produce Ms birth certificate 
not impressive —- 49 victories and to get his paswort and vre looked at 


52 losses — hot last year be was 9-4 it and said, ney, wait a minute.’ ” 
with Charlotte of QassAA after a Sndl professes not to know bow 


good pitching has kepi them at Lean and muscular at 6-foot-4 
top. Bat it also means that they and 190 pounds (153 meters, 86.1 
draft players after many other kilograms), SneO shappyrto agree, 
teams. He does not smoke or drink. *Tve 

Those weaker teams picking never liked them,” he said. “TTiar 
first, Mflltx says, tend to pick the may have helped the body.” 


slow 0-2 start with Triple- A Rodh- the mistake occurred and the On- first, MUkr says, tend to jpdc the may have helped the body.” 
ester. What really caught the BaJti- oJesTOnotoveriyconcanedaboat players at the “drill" positions ^ — Sndl said that he had set a goal 

more management’s attenewn was it Said Bob Brown, the team's pub- up the middle — who can help forhrmsd^afmakmgthemairasin 
his 17 saves at Charlotte, the most lie rdatious director: “Obviously, than the quickest By the time the five years, but he added: “The 


4 l~ O JB 3 236 an liMr uuiu twv uium 1 VC Deen nywig 

s '#' 0 jed its tss in four days. In the ninth imring ^wayyear” 
l - ! 2 » S-S Friday -WBht .Daws gave ro n There were times in the minors 


-■ 3-90 SS 0 154 271 

'j - 9 i - as* m m 

M—dW i Rwatf 


his 17 saves at Chariotte, tire meet be rdations director: “Obviously, 
for airy pitcher in the Baltimore this is an age-old baseball custom, 
organization. to fib a little bit about your age.” 

That earned Sndl another look Sndl can laugh about his age on 


home ran to Baltir when Snefl was earning 51 ,000 or ai theend of the season, and he did a team what 

vrm- ah xnftmtav «i ■ „ . .. U ■ . , 


Orioles get to pick, he says, the best years went by so fastthaifii 
remainingplaYers tend to be pilch- didn't seem long. The next 
era, ana they have to try to earn a know. a®ht vears pa 


more’s Fred Lynn; oa Saturday, Sl^OO a month. “I was angle and 1 wdl enough that the Orioles took than some of the established stars ready has good pitchers. 


bout ms age on era, and they have to try to earn a know, eight years so by "ait 
rookie is older spot with an organization that al- oow it’s the ninth year iid its a 
stablished stars ready has good pitchers. little different. ’ 


,-r 







INTERNATIONAL 


- — e 


BUS 


OBSERVER 


Knocking Opportunities 

By Russell Raker So I skipped the visit to the land 

N EW YORK — Ten yeare in lofd ’ s , grave, and weni to the the 
New York is like 40 veare any- aiordislnet instead. , 


IN New York is like 40 years any- 
where else, and having just passed 
that milestone, I have been busy 
posing ah over town for photo op- 
portunities. 

The fust stop was in front of the 
dilapidated brick row house on the 
East Side where in 1974 you could 
rent a triplex — three whole floors, 
front and back — for $1,100 a 
month. 

There I planned io make a major 
address on the absurdity of New 
York economics, but the TV cam- 
eras were cm a European outing 
jam-packed with presidential pho- 
to opportunities and were obvious- 
ly reluctant to abandon the schnit- 
zel- and -beer territory. 

What's the point of a major 
speech if you can't get 10 seconds 
on the networks? 

For the record, what I would 
have said was that a lot of people in 
1974 — namely, my brother-in-law 
In Baltimore — thought I was crazy 
paying S1.100 to live in a ruin. 

“Little did these sneering rela- 
tives realize then — " I am quoting 
now from the text of my prepared 
speech “ — yes, my friends, little 
did they realize that in just Gve 
short years the landlord of this di- 
lapidation, a ruin for which no Bal- 
timorean would pay more than 
SIS^OOO — little did they realize 
that the owner of this very ruin 
would offer it to me forSl million.'' 


I offered NBC an exclusive on 
my visit to the cemetery where the 
landlord who made that historic 
offer is now buried — dead not of 
incredible gall but of natural 
causes. NBC, however, did not 
show up. 

My cousin who works in televi- 
sion says I could have got all three 
networks if I'd told them the land-' 
lord was related to Her mann GOr- 
ing, but that is not my way. 

President Reagan can make it up 
when be quotes a letter from a 
young gui, and the girl can an- 
nounce in the papers that the presi- 
dent was making it up, and nobody 
gets cross at the president for mak- 
ing it up. When I make it up. people 
get cross. 

“Only the president has the right 
to make it up,” I told my co usin. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


So 1 skipped the visit to the land- 
lord's grave, and went to the the- 
ater district instead. 

There I planned to make a semi- 
major speech wanting that S45 was 
too much to charge for a theater 
seat behind an immense female 
man e freshly released from the 
beauty parlor. No photo opportu- 
nity, unfortunately, as the theater 
bosses refused to let me be photo- 
graphed weeping behind 30 pounds 
of well-fluffed hair while the most 
expensive musical in history could 
be dimly heard on the other side. 

So I offered to rexnact a historic 
“Fust," the moment in 1982 when 1 
succeeded in getting a taxi in the 
theater district on a rainy night. It 
was my eighth year in New York 
and. though friends insisted only 
moderate violence was necessary to 
urn the trick, I had given up. 

The elements seemed to mock 
my surrender, for they invariably 
produced a downpour whenever 
they saw me entering the theater. I 
was resigned to a thorough soaking 
whenever I paid S45 to at behind a 
screen of hair. 

During that eighth year in New 
York, 1 must have become tougher. 
Perhaps it was all that time in the 
subways that had hardened me. 
The dungs one sees down there — 
but let's not talk about the subways 
in a family paper. 

□ 

Still, something had once 
been tender in me must have be- 
come solid callous, for on the his- 
toric night of rain when I finally got 
a taxi, 1 recall saying to the woman 
of whom it was necessary to dis- 
pose. “Forgive me, madam, but I 
am determined not to die without 
once getting a taxi on a rainy night 
in the theater district." 

Perhaps it was the sight of this 
woman's immense cone of freshly 
fluffed hair that made me do what I 
did. In my defense let it be noted 
that she was neither blind nor con- 
fined to a wheelchair. 

Naturally, the cab driver an- 
nounced that he was off duty, but 

rhangpH his min d after lnntring me 
in the eye and realizing that a false 
move might be his last 

That was a great New York 
night What a fine photo opportu- 
nity a re-enactment would have 
provided. The TV people though i 
not Maybe my smile isn’t charm- 
ing enough. 

New York Tima Service 


MOVING 


Latest Stockhausen Work: 

A Musical f Book of the Dead" 


ME 


o/, > £i}i< 


By Mark Hunter 

P ) ARIS — There was a row erf 
empty seats at the back of the 
Espace de Projection concert hall 
at the Institut pour la Recherche 
et Coordination Acoustique-Mu- 
aque (IRCAM) when Karlheinz 
Stockhausen, 57, presided over 
the world premiere of his “Ka- 
tbinka's Gesang." One onlooker 
commented that it was like seeing 
an empty pew in the church when 
Johann Sebastian Bach first per- 
formed what his Lutheran em- 
ployers uneasily called “won- 
drous variations and strange 
sounds" on the organ in 1703. 

The comparison was bold, but 
perhaps apt. Like Bach's, Stock- 
hausen's career has been one of 
defining new musical languages 
with new kinds of instruments. 
But while the great musical inven- 
tion of Bach’s lifetime was the 
piano, Stockhausen — along with 
IRCAM’s founder, Pierre Boulez 
— is considered the leading com- 
poser of a generation that uses 
electronic studio effects, comput- 
ers and unconventional ways of 
playing traditional instruments to 


make what many listeners still 
consider strange sounds. 

When Stockhausen and Boulez 
were students of Olivier Messaien 
at the Conservatoire de Paris in 
1951, new sounds were a priority 
for young composers. Tne y were 
looking for ways to enlarge the 
composer's palate;*' said David 
Wessd director of pedagogy ai 
the research institute for contem- 
porary music and acoustics that 
Boulez went on to establish. 

Stockhausen tells an anecdote 
that shows how hard he and Bou- 
lez looked for new sounds. After 
moving to Cologne in 1952, 
Stockhausen began the solitary 
research in sound synthesis that 
would result in his “Electronic 
Study I" (1953), trying a tech- 
nique that involved recording 
sounds made by a g e ner ator, one 
by one. on tape machines, then 
synchronizing the results on 
hand-glued tape fragments. After 
three months, said Stockhausen, 
“I wrote a letter to Pierre, and 
said I'd found a new method for 
creating timbres,” or tone cotore. 
“He came to Cologne by car, right 



i 


Eolph A. ftacnyfltCAM 

Katinnka Pasveer in “Kathmka’s Gesang.” 


away, and listened to what I'd 
done.” 

Stockhausen continued, laugh- 
ing, “Pierre said. These are 
chords, not timbres.’" In other 
words, not what they were after. 

For Stock hausen, “if there’s 
not a problem, it’s necessary to 
create one.” He solved that early 
problem. refining Ins method un- 
til Ire became a sdf-described 
“virtuoso erf potentiometers." and 
found his timbres. Some of his 
sounds have since bcomne widely 
familiar. The oncc-sfaodxog dec- 
ironic bass tones of “Kontaktc” 
(1959) have their descendants in 
current popular muse, as does 
Stoddiansen's trademark “spatial 
harmony,” the shifting of sound 
among different stances that one 
hears on a stereo recording. 

Stockhausen remains deter- 
minedly avant-garde: Discussing 
the orchestra! effects in “Kathrn- 
ka’s Gesang,” which were com- 
posed on IRCAM’s computer, he 
declared, “One most use new 
mean* to find effects and sounds 
one hastft known, to enlarge our 
sensibilities — or it’s not worth 
the trouble." 

Since the early 1970s. Stock- 
hausen has combined that philos- 
ophy with an increasingly evident 
spiritualistic impulse, to create a 
kind of ritual performance art He 
unabashedly des cri bes the 33- 
minute “Kaxhinka’s Gesang" as 
“a musical ‘Book of the Dead,’ a 
series of 24 exercises to guide a 
soul departing the physical body, 
toward the white light, away from 
the temptations of the senses.” 

The work itself, however, is 
hardly austere: The flutist Kath- 
inlca Pasveer, the longtime Stock- 
hausen collaborator for whom the 
piece is named, appears onstage 
in a black leotard, and dartres — 
no easy matter, given her de- 
manding instrumental parts, 
which involve unusual fin g erin g 

and blowing techniques — 
around a stage set composed of 
two mods: docks on which the 
hours are excerpts from the score. 
Lighting effects designed by 
Sto ckhausen announce the “en- 
trances" of each of six loudspeak- 
ers placed around the halL Bass 
and treble tones circulate in op- 
posite directions, suggesting what 
Stockhausen, recalling the dreu- 



De&Mmce$$mithAfrictt t 

Stevie Wonder brought a revival- 








' itTTTTTiTTl rTTi,, ii,Y., 


The publisher JUaqonlhkes has 
received the Golden F» of Free- 
dom from tire International Feder- 


t - frr 


GtraAl LamVKAM 

Stockhausen; “The past joined to the present” 


lar meditation aids used in East- 
ern mysticism, calls a musical 
nmnd fl l ft 

The overall impression is 
sumptuous, and surreal — not 
surprisingly, since Stockhausen 
has often expressed admiration 
for Surrealist painters. 

Before the premiere Thursday 
night, Stockhausen remarked, 
“It’s very important to have the 
world of the past joined to the 
present When one recognizes 
something in a work, one sees 
more forcefully the new." There 
is, in fact a strong undercurrent 
of classic form in “Kathinka’s 
Gesang.” Tire piece resembles a 
concerto, the dialogue of a soloist 
and an orchestra. But Stockhau- 
sen’s orchestra was a tape of com- 
puter-generated sounds, which be 
monitored from a muting board in 
the center of the hall 

“The principle of the future, at 
least for me, is to have a few 
soloists onstage, while the mass 
effects are made by loudspeak- 
ers." he said. 

Not every composer would 
agree. Boulez’s “Rfcpons," for ex- 
ample, goes in exactly the oppo- 
site direction, contrasting com- 
puter-treated sounds with the 
background of an orchestral en- 


semble. Stockhausen’s approach 
reflects tire fact, as he noted, that 
“for tire past eight years I’ve bad 
20 musicians; dancers and mimes 
who work with me. They inspire 
me, and I compose for them." 

"Often. I've made the compari- 
son between a composer and a 
hunter," he said. As a boy, he 
noted, be considered becoming a 
professional hunter until one day 
in 1948 a deer “looked at me like a 
man" and be put away his guns 
far good. The hunter has a nose, 
a kind of sixth sense, that tells 
him where he can find game,” 
said Stockhausen. “After 30 years 
in the studio, you develop (hat 
same kind of sense erf where you 
can find something musically in- 
teresting. The tape rods 

and records; then I stop, soffit 
bad; and listen. Always, when 
I’ve found something interesting, 
it's through this kind of accident 

“Kathinka’s Gesang" closed 
Tuesday m Paris and will be given 
Thursday in SaarbrOcken at the 
Grosser SendersaaL 


Mark Hunter ; an American 
journalist, writes about cultural 
events from Europe for a number of 
publications. 




his services to the ZMdpme news 
media. Rocks, whose Mamta Thre& 
newspaper was banned under matfV 
tial law in 1972, told the opening 
session of the federation’s 38Ut 
■congress in Tokyo that many jour- 
nalists taking part id a erasure to 
restore press' freedom id the ftilip. 
pines had been “brutally snatched, 
tortured and ihm-Hled." Roces 
has been jailed and placed under 
bouse arrest fax attempts to &iW*w 
him, the congress was told. . 
Stella Kramriscfc, curator of 
artworks from India for the FhtV 
ddphia Museum, has received the 
Diaries Lug Freer Medal of the 
Smithsonian Institution’s Freadfc 
Gallery of . Art ia Washington for 
her co n trib u tio n s to “knowledge 
and understanding of Orient*} cm- 
Kzatioos as reflected in their arts.” 
The medal was presented at the 
eve of an exhibit oT Indian and 

P akistani painting * and wnjpftffej 

■: •_ . 

Laura Haring, a 21-vear-old 
Texan who studies in Switzerland 
and has worked m Indht has been 
named Miss USA ax the 34th aonu* 
ai pageant is Lakeland, Florida. 
She wfll represent tire United States 
in the Miss Univcrae pageant July 
15 in Miami. - : ' . 

Josephine - Humphreys of - 
Charleston, South Carolina, haste* 
ceived the $7,560 Ernest Heming- 
way Foundation Award from the 
writers’ group , PEN for her 
“Dreams of Sleep," chosen as the 
best fust novel published m 1984. 


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