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Th ejGlo bal Newspaper 

• The Hague and Marseille 


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INTERNATIONAL 




WEATHBt DATA -APPEAR ON PAGE Iff 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,799 


PARIS, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


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^Progress Is Seen in El Salvador 

5j vDnarte’s Support Grows as Human Rights Violations Drop 


»i4„ H » . By James LeMoyne 

•' t, ' , . I L. -Vew York Tima Service 

SAN SALVADOR — For the 

; i : !. '“..■"'A-iTmi time in five years of conflict, 

Vii.ii : Tumanv Salvadorans and foramers 


'L^Tfcmay have halted its slide into a 
\ \ ^worsening dial war and that a do- 

’ I'r^^gree of recovery is now possible. 


L! t 4 . things may be getting better rather 
than worse always is framed with 
J strong caveats and a recognition 
that recovery will he long and diffi- 
1 ;> in- * ^tcuh. Bnt given H Salvador's recent, 
1 *«s:iict", ‘^history, the appearance of even 
!:;• h ; : ^ ^guarded optimism is a new devel- 

' * r =i:K “1 wouldn't say that EL Salvador 

■ *. •.% ' " “'khas tamed the corner,” a West Eu- 
n .is ir.i, vropean diplomat said. “Pot I would 

• 1 . ‘ "_T ^ O'.nAu «li«t it mAir fnrntKr rtnrtavl 



Jps£ Napoledn Duarte 


army officers os most major deci- 
sions. He must further consider the 
reaction of the U.S. Embassy, 
which provides most of the govern- 
ment's funds, and of the powerful 
private sector. An estimated 5#X) 
aimed guerillas also limit his space 
for action. 

But Mr. Duarte is seen as haring 
won three years before he has to 
bee new elections to prove that El 
Salvadorean be governed. 

“He has gained the jespect of the 
armed forces,** said the «wir>i<«w of 
defengg . General Fn wnin Vides 
Casanova, “and we Save under- 
stood his conviction for human 
rights.” 

In interviews, more than 20 peo- 
ple in and out of government, some 
of whom oppose Mr. Duarte and 
U.S. policy m EL Salvador, noted 
these changes in the last 18 
months: 


■ ", •The Salvadoran Army, com- 

j :i '/ r i au** last w^k oted majOT hurdles m the ra^ doubts about dw and the extreme right. ThS- 

• '" ■" '-Nn wogpsz. The economyis ^ Evident Josfe Napdlete Sy has reorganized 3 b three po- 

; M'..' »r 'tbanknipi and denends on exoort. Duarte, who is two weeks away f. J. L.. «... , LL. 


^ t ‘ ' ttenknroi and d^mds_oncq>ort Duarte, who^g two weeks away BoB J fBCUI M r SSand has lai^r 

• , S V ' ■ f “ f ' ‘ ^ oonqtietmg te first yw m ^ wigg 

• v ; \ ^^Thepopolatkmislflcdytod^ crffice, appears to haveconsohdat- w death sauads. & 

*.^'‘J b]e within 18years. oeatmgeven ed Ms aatborityl beyond ta^eeb, , Hun^ rights violations are at 
• > » ; -^sgongg social pressures. Deep po- cons, gmn^the of the a five-year l^TThere has been no 

• o ' : 1 -.! >=r la ™ lloI, i-^“ r PS?* by the fresh army command and wmnmg Kport^of a massacre by govem- 

• sv- ,,.:^^ryof tte ldlhMrfcnihaiis an unfoeseen victory m recent na- ^^oops for , 0 montiufwhfle 

; ■ ■- ■ ’ • w _ IrillmJ^righiists have declined, 

i ? hotter ^ 5cra ^ zafi ^ Mr. Duarte flew to W^hmgt^ assas g ia 4S^ Irftisl 

■ * » • i .>! 1116 nuhtary high command is on Wednraday for a waMpngyat pear to be on the rise. ^ 

:•■ ’ i ' , '_nistaij ee n as toaccqrttheprMe- ^^t mnsday with Preset ^^to^fficandyim- 

" ^ of nwre than i | W token ^ ^ k _ -proved iSonZon the ibat- 

r • i- officers, for past h uman rights The Salvadoran leader still is re- Knr»i,a Krct «inw. m th»«. 

UcLmig gS. jx^ to tav. .<> ransdt satfor 


^‘^1 Mr 


Wl M.f,'!; 


lafliugs by rightists have decHned, 
assassoanons by leftist rd>ds ap- 
pear to be on the rise. 

• The army has significantly im- 
proved its performance on the bat- 

abuses The bontimring guerrilla ported L . to ^ have to oonsnlt senior Workers using a crane sift through tbe rubble of MO VET’S PkHadeJplaa headquarters, 

j- • • • • to mount a dry season offensive 

U.S. Senate Backs Aid S5SSI Following Assault on MOVE , Mayor 
To Cambodia Guerrillas Of Philadelphia Is Assailed, Praised 


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U.S. to Bolster 
Farm Exports 
In Subsidy Plan 


By Ward Sinclair 

JVasUnptm Post Service 


The secretary said that the pro- 
gram, which is expected to begin by 


TJ» Aaocotad ft»* 


By Sara Fritz 

Los Angela Times Service 
WASHINGTON — The US 


aWy on tins ' omoal point?” he 
adrerf “We got far out in front in 


political deadlock with his rightist 
opponents that would have ob- 
structed important programs such 


The Associated Press 

PHILADELPHIA —The police 


UBS AltvetCS lima jemce , nv gyv MU Wfc AM man . ,, . | rf 1 t * X AAxn * uv yuuv^ 

ilSSrS 23SZZS&* md M 

Mi.ln&r mat^ged to Mode a 


w. M td Quicklf 1 986 fecal yraithattolhe first 

^ tune would give SS milH on m assis- 

mmrm 'SF’SS 

r - . . f. t .-rt : Communist countries m Southeast 

— • »- • do the same. :V •“ 

- .. ,f The bifl was: adc^fti, '75-19. 

" * ; J * w ' * ‘^Wednesday mgfit after two days of 

• ,ri debate. 


people were in the bouse belonging bombing aid and fire. 
to the organization, which espouses v«r 


number of amendments from being 

introduced by prosnisng other sen- 
ators that the Foreign Relations 
Gannmttee wmld -hoki hearings 
later on the issues involved 


d“Sr v 'i — >1 ~ % tbe radical MU vt group nas come to the organization, which espouses “He caused the bombine of a mt. moatsanainaiamamiaigpi 

bei omaais. undo- official attack and is at the an anti-establishment philosophy, in Phiiadplnbifl " Mr Wfl- °f *be program was the European 

• Internationally. Mr. Duarte center of lawsuits. But Mayor W. Mr. Goode faced criticism from ijams said, “and thafs forrim to Comnratrfy- which, despite seme The Associated press 

has won growing support for El Wilson Goode staunchly defends estate legislator and the mayor of Americans.’' efforts to reform its farm-subsidy LONDON — Prime Minister 

Salvador. Additionally, he has the raid. An opinion poll indicates New YorkCity. He received-strong policies, has “stolen” sales of meal, Margaret Thatcher's ruling Con- 

weakened the s tandm gof the rebel foe hrre strong support in Phil ad el- stqspart in a poll of 300 residents, .Mr. Goode replied that “there poaltiy, flour and grains in tradi- servative Party has fallen to third 


*He caused the bmnbmg of a 


bouse in PlnbddpKi,' Mf. WB- ^ ^ ™ 5= E f 0 P™ 


WASHINGTON— The Reagan June 1, "is destined to be a more 
administration plans to give away concerted effort” than earlier al- 
as much as $2 billion in govern- tempts to “send a message” that the 
mem-owned surplus farm com- United States intends to defend its 
modi ties in an unusual new subsidy traditional farm markets, 
program to bolster farm exports. Since taking office in 1981, Mr. 
according to Agriculture Secretary Block and the administration have 
John R. Block. cajoled other farm-exporting na- 

Mr. Block said Wednesday that dons, mostly unsuccessfully, to ra- 
the program, partly a response to duce their agricultural subsidies to 
growing trade-protectionist pres- assure a freer flow of farm goods 
sure from Congress, was intended into world markets. The United 
to show thatthe United States was States has made several large subsi- 
“not going to stand idly by” while dized sales of flour and dairy prod- 
other producing nations subsidized ucis to emphasize the point, 
agricultural exports. But pressure on the administra- 

AJ though details of the three- jj 0Q jq aci more forcefully has 
year program are not final, he said, mounted in recent months as ex- 
it wifl be crafted to expand exports pons continue a slide that began in 
and “concentrate on challenging |ggi and as a strong dollar has 
markets” where other countries made American farm products 
have displaced or undermined U.S. more costly on the world market. 

“ibe secretary conceded that the ^ ^ link the fullering 

i«h American farm economy to the 
«osion of exports, which account 

adtera.ee «. h^™ u1 40 pmxnt 01 vs 
free trade. But, he sa id, the United aucuon * 

States has “no other alternative*’ in Aiihou^i the Agriculture De- 

the face of a continuing loss of P arlmcnl estimates that U.S. ex- 
markets to foreign competitors. P° n volmne wfli inoease this year 
The surplus oommodities will be for ^ hme since 1980. the 
given to VS. exportets as a “bo- y ah,c 1 wlU ^ abmit S35 billion 
mis” to permit them to sell their from last yeafs $38 billion and the 
products, bought from UR farm- 1981 high of S43.8 billion. 

era at the going rate, at cut rates 

overseas. In theory, the American 

products wfll be more competitive T Thwvm 

at the discounted lower rates. A C/fTc& U nitJ 
The administration agreed to the AT 

subsidy plan last week during nego- fW 1 
nations with Senate Republicans J[ 0 MTUmJEC 

firm farm states over a budget 

compromise. A variety of simflar r T T 17 ~M~k fl 

ln ^ >jK - 

ale Agriculture ommmttees, which ^ 4~\ • 

have begun writing a new farm bxR f ffWT77TC 

Mr. Block said that a main target AJXMJW 


Mr. Goode faced . criticism from ]iaats ^ “and that’s foreign to Community, which, despite some 


a state 
NewYi 


stator and the nmyor of Americans.” 
Oty. He received strong 


efforts to reform its f aim-subsidy 
policies, has “stolen” sales of meal. 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Prime Minis ter 
Margaret Thatcher's ruling Con- 


Faiabundo Marti Nasonal Libera- phia 


which showed a 71 -percent favor- win not be any scapegoats*’ and tionrf American markets, 
able rating for (ns handling of the* sarf that there would be no cha ng e s “'This is penny ante con 

’ Jj vrfial the 


in his adminisiratioiL 


JD OfTX't 




ftP 


- ■ • Although the measure, was 
amended 34 times, the chairman of 
i iriN u&rhe Senate Foreign Rdatious Com- 

Trainee. Rkhaxd 6. Lugar, R^nrbh- 

ft “r“. , *T‘ , '3an of Indiana, mana g ed to dta* 
r '2 ' L i- setfltade his cdleagoes from adding a 
. variety of items that might have 

IW. jeopardized its passage, 

v-w Eight amendments were with- 
;■ drawn; three were defeated .and 
v—***'-- dozens of others that were amad- 
id^L^ered never were offered. 

. ■ Among tiie proposals that Mr. 
IJuu *". k ' l successfully bkx±ed were 

^ *• amendments that would have pro- 
m ***•**" vided aid to the Nicaraguan reods, 
imposed sanctions cm Sooth Africa 
w ,*^ v 0 and further restricted the expeodj- 
j » i »*<•'• rare erf U.S. funds for population 
its control in other nations. 

The measure seeks to alter the 
v - r :- Reagan adminis tration's foreign 
•*o f, f lc * / policy id Horens of ways, however. 

ror example, as a result of an 
J^e*-** : amendment offered by ScnatOT 
John F. Kerry, Democrat of Mas- 
“ ' sachusetts, it threatens to withhold 
Aj^^aid from the Philippines if that 
country fails to take specified stqis 
'to revive the democratic process. 

Mr. I-ii gaf said that the bffl ap- 


• r Edward Hi Kennedy, Democrat non Front and its pditical mm, the - able rating for fiis handHng of the sai d that there would be 

<rf Massattos^irad Alan CraiH Diautkxatte RevotanoaaryFronL . fire mvestigators. as- - m his administration. 

start. Democrat .of California, Li Soch have come in a j*t©d ^ f L edc ^ w ^ xm5 L ■ “1 stand full-square behind all Mayor Edward I. Ko 

agreed not to offer an amendment bloody sod often uncenam process fomid gms, armpumuon. a mortal ^ p^jg - m ^ field who made York said Tuesday that 
sanctions asainst South of ™6ated in 1979 by a^abas^btmteWedncadmr dcd SL“ Uie mayor said at a SZTI,! 


an markets. (dace in popmariiy in Britain for 

any ante compared to the first time since the Falklands 
C does.” Mr. Block conflict in 1982, according to an 


to-impose sanctions against South of change initialed m 1979 by fiSTSfH decisions.” the mayor said at a 
Africa; Jesse Hdms, a Republican ^ragan^ffic^ «*— Wednesday aficr- 


I. Koch of New **id of the U.S. program. “1 don’t opinion poll published Thursday. 
r that “if I had a know if this will change their ao- The Gallup Poll, published in the 

i* tv t *n _n — - - v> ~ *i-_ vwv^i _ _ — 1_ -i — i «l a t 


an amendment harming US. aid «gua into mass inramection and a 
for pofntlatkm craitrol, ami several victory^ leftist rebds. 
oiha senators Mieed to wait until The changes have been financed 
later to revive their battk over aid and encouraged, sometimes falter- 


to the Nkaragaan rebds. 


(Continued on Page 2, Coh 6) 


buildings after the police bombed 
the residence's rooftop bunker on 
Monday. 

The police also found the re- 
mains of five bodies Wednesday, 


noon. 

State Senator Hardy Williams, 
whose district includes the devas- 
tated area, called for the resigna- 
tion of the city’s managing director, 
Leo Brooks. Mr. Brooks, a forma 


police comnnssiooer that was so lions. Tm hopeful weU afl come to Daily Telegraph, showed the Labor 
stupid to allow a bomb to be our senses and figure out some dis- Party, Britain’s main opposition 
thrown into a house. I would re- ciplines and bring sane order to group, in first place with 34 per- 
move him before he allowed that to agricultural trading.” cenL This compares with 37.5 last 

go through.” Protectionist sentiment in Con- month. 

,, _ . . , . grass “has reached a fever pitch,” The centrist alliance of the Lib- 

Mr. Goode sard at the press con- ^ Block said. “There’s no deny- eral and Social Democratic parties 
(Contimied on Page 2, CoL 2) ingiL" was in second place with 33 .5 per- 


the administration, even 
State Department officials 


- have expressed dissatisfaction that 

. . f 1 *i t e ’ the measure provides J190 miTliai 


less m nnhtary assurance tnan iney 
* ' bad soughL The bin indudes $63 
v ^'; bQhoa in nriHiary aid. 

. The legistation now goes to the 
; Hqose, which is not egqiected to 
"Hk final action until early June. 
.. Tub House has not yet considered a 
$13-bflhon proposal completed re- 
cently by its Foreign Affairs Com- 
mittee. 

The only amendment passed 
L Wednesday without Ml Lugar's 
a$ ' expressed support was one-pro- 
...ifposed by Senator KR Bradley. 


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Soviet Orders Measures 
To Combat Alcoholism 


By Cclestine Bohicn 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 


The Soviet slate is 
for the manufacture of 


ccnL This compares with 37.5 last 
Con- month. 

itch,” The centrist alliance of the Lib- 
deny- eral and Social Democratic parties 
was in second place whh 33 J per- 

cent, up from 263. The third- 

placed Tories had 303 percent 
compared with 34 percent. 

|§ “It makes the next general elec- 
tion wide open,” said the Liberal 
Party leader, David Steel 
I In local government elections 
L earlier this month, the alliance 

made sweeping advances at the ex- 
lQs jbIe pense of the Tories and improved 
>1, and its but to a lesser degree, 


it profits from the salts. Recent a ? a i nsl Labor. 

estimates put government earnings The Labor Party and the alliance 


began its expected crackdown on estimates put government earnings 1 De *-aoor rany ana me alliance 
alcoholism Thursday by annouoc- from alcohol at 40 billion rabies, or have attacked the government ic- 
ing tough measures that indude 10 percent of the national budget P®£ te “y wa its anti-inflation and 
raising the drinking age from 18, to Statistics on alcoholism in the bgh t-mon ^policies, which they 
21, cutting vodka production and Soviet Union are incomplete, but “ flV ? been partly responsible 
instituting penalties for d rinking at the volume of liquor consumed per lOT -~ °* “uemploymeni. 
wort capita is about two gallons {eight ,e government is also under 

The measures, as reported by the titers). For those older than 15. the now from dissident Tories. 
Tass news agency, also will delay volume is an average four and a m Political Fissures Appear 

the opening of liquor stores on half gallons. Because most alcohol — _ r/T*.., i 

working days by three hours, and consumed in the Soviet Unionist ■ 
ban swlet Lid potent fruit-based percent or 80 percent proof, this 
alcohol by 1988 Juts the coumSy ahead of other 

Stiff pend ties wiD be given to nations in the consumption of 
those airested “in a drunken state strong alcoholic beverages. Reuters reported Thursday, 

in public places,” and dr unken The number of deaths from Less than 48 hours after begm- 
drivers will be liable to higher fines acute alcohol poisoning has risen tttng the Conservative Center For- 
— 100 rabies ($85 at official rates) from 12300 in the mid-1960s to ward group, its 32 manbera were 
— as well as the loss of thdr driving 5 1,000 in 1978. according to studies embroiled m a public dispute about 
iifwic/* from one to three years, done is die West. tactics, and two members of Parita- 


The first fissures hare appeared 
in a new group formed within the 
Conservative Tarty to challenge 
Mrs. Thatcher’s economic polkas, 
Reuters reported Thursday. 

Less than 48 hours after begin- 
ning the Conservative Center For- 


Tass said. 


one in the West. tactics, and two members of Padia- 

Studies also have shown that So- ment said they had quit rather than 


Further measures, Tass said,- viet drinkers, in desperation, will risk party disunity. . 
would be aimed at causes and coo- turn not only to samogon, or home- “How the bell can we preach one 
sequences of alcoholism, improv- made liquor, but to lotions, shd- nation if we are not trying to 
ing recreation facilities for the lacs, brake fluid and other substi- achieve one pony” said Tony 
young and increasing aid for the rates. Baldry, who with his colleague, Jer- 


achieve one party,” said Tony 

Baldly, who with his colleague, Jer- 


Tm> members of a Moslem ntiEtfn fired rocket-propelled grenades Wednesday against Christian opponents in Beirut 


5?s52 §S£ Lebanese Army Denies Link to Bombing of Sheikh 

bring down the value of the UA . . _ ■ •/ . C7 v 

d °g»- By ffisan A. Hijazi — said. “I suggest the suspension o: 

The Senate voted, 56-39, ag^t ^jork Times Service T • t ¥THT AW. .-1 r j • o • ^ constitution and new partia 


r*t' 

& 


I The Senate voted, 56-39, against 
Mr. Lugar's motion to set aside Mr. 
Bradley's proposal ” ■ “ . ' J™ 

The Cambodian aid proposal, 
ipffcred by Senator Frank HLmhe- 
[iowski. Republican of JVtaska, was 
I adopted on a vdee ve«e. - 

f Unlike a snrular measme adopt- 


BEIRUT — The high command 
of the LcbamKC-Anny categorcatiy 
denied Thursday that its rntelh- 
gence mans had been involved in 
setting m a car-bomb explosion in 
Beirut's somherosuburbs in Maxdi 
that killed at least 8Q people and 


ed several weeks ago by the House wounded 200 other* 
Foreign Affairs Conamttee, the n» 


The camnazKl saidin a commu- 


Saiate ;vendon would provide no 

rid unless inembers of the ^socaa- foreign and local media ot ibe sub- 
uon of Southeast Asan > Nations iea were “an outriaht tie.” 

ilrn malfB a miUIm* m wwin»rtm nt lf> J Z. v . _ m 




also make a public conarntment to 
arovide aid. 


The statement was issued a few 
hours after the Lebanese justice 


Although Thailand, - Singapore minister, Nabjb Bwri l announced 

md other ASEAN natiws have ex- that he had ordered an inquiry into , 

N.w pressed support for theCambodian stories in American newspapers „ . . . 

1 \ ■esistance. they have dedined thus th y Mr. Bern, who is a S2uite, said he the coas&ration to be suspended The communique referred to a 

> ‘*t to say pubhdy whether they wiD vice and die UlS..Central Inidli- had discussed the matter at a meet- and a new order drawn up for Leb- story in tbe Beirut press Wedncs- 

“'s rovidefmanciai aid. geoce Asmcy bad-ties with mem- ing with the country’s mflitaiy anon after 10 years ofrivil warfare, day that said that officers from the 

' \ r ‘ \. ^ ' Mr. Muriowski indicated te was bers of a -group that set the prosecutor, Canrillc Gc ag e a . United Press Inte rn at i o n al report- * Dontifane Bureau were sent to the 

‘ earful that the aid might otherwise tarnksion, wfe was designed to - [Fighting between rival militia- ed. United States earlier this year to 

ead to deeper U3. involvemenf in •. murder a mffitant Shiite scholar, men continited for the 1 9th day [The committees set up to draw receive training an. counterterrorist 
be region, 3 S it did in Yietnam. shakb MohainhKd Hussein Fad- Thursday and with no end in sight, up ihe necessary reforms have pro- operations and to coordinate 3ctiv- 

•Why should tbeUrnced Staies be latiah. ' * ; and Mr. Ben said it was time for duoed absohndy no results,^ he ities whh the CIA. 


Irish LIS Official Freed in Beirut 

The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — Aidan Walsh, the Irish deputy director of the United 
Nations Relief and Works Agency, was freed unharmed Thursday 
night, 36 hours after gunmen kidnapped Mm in Beirut, diplomatic 
sources said. 

They said Mi. Walsh, 49, was released in a suburb of Beirut by his 
captors. - • • 

“He’s physically all right but tract by his ordeal," said an frish 
source, who asked not to be identified. 

A caller dahning to represent Islamic Jihad, a pro-Iranian klamir 
fundamentalist group, said the group had kidnapped Mr. Wahh. But 
John Rowan, first secretary at the Irish Embassy, discounted that 
The motives for the abduction were nm known. 


said. “I suggest the suspension of 
the constitution and new parlia- 
mentary elections with the objec- 
tive erf creating a founding commit- 
tee to draw up a new constitution 
for the new Lebanon.”} 

The CIA denied earlier this week 
that it had trained the those who 
planted.xhe car carrying explosives, 
without CIA permissioa, near the 
residence of Sheikh Fadlaltah on 
March 8. 

Hie army command controls all 
Lebanon’s military sections, in- 
cluding the intelligence depart- 
ment, popularly known as tbe 
Deux&ne Bureau, or G-2. 



was designed to 


Mr. Bern, who is a Shiite, said he the constitution to be suspended The communique referred to a 
had discussed the matter at a me«- and a new order drawn up for Leb- story in ibe Beirut press Wednes- 
ing with the country’s mflitaiy anon after 10 years erf rivu warfare, day that end that officers from the 
prosecutor, Camille Geagea. United Press International report- ' Deux&ne Bureau were sent to tbe 
■ [Fighting between rival mflitta- ed. United States earlier this year to 


he ities with the CIA. 


treatment of alcoholics. According to Vladimir Trend of ry Hayes, resigned from the group. 

This approach is needed to com- Duke University, in North Caroli- The new group, launched by the 
bat tbe “great social harm of alco- na, an expert on Soviet alcohol can- formes: foreign secretary, Francis 
holism,” according to an accompa- sumption, 200 people died in 1976 Pym, in a speech in Oxford, was the 
nying resolution by the Central from drinking antifreeze, 1,000 first open expression of growing 
Committee of the Communist Par- from various cleaning fluids and Conservative anxiety that the 


nying resolution by tbe Central from drinking antifreeze, 1,000 first open expression of growing 
Committee of the Communist Par- from various cleaning fluids and Conservative anxiety that the 
ty. It did not say when the measures 5,000 from a vinegar concentrate Thatcher government might have 
would go into effect. held to be a remedy for hangovers. lost its direction. 

“The abuse of alcohol is, so far, 

quite often not regarded as an im* ~| 

moral, antipodal conduct,” the I 

resolution said. ‘The force of the 
law and of public opinion is not 
applied to drunkards in full vol- 
ume.” 

The measures follow a two-week 
campaign in the press and on tele- 
vision focusing on the problem, as 
well as tbe ruling Politburos ap- 
peal last month for a “struggle 

acinar alcoholism ** 

The campaign is part of an at- 
tempt by the Soviet leader, Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, to impose greater 
discipline and accountability in the 
workplace, Tbe new laws represent 
his first concrete steps to put ibe 
program into effect. 

Visting Leningrad on Thursday, 

Mr. Gorbachev told a group erf 
people he encountered on tbe street 

that drunkenness was a critical 

problem for the country and that Pope John Paul H wears ■ British Petrotetan reported a. 

“more severe” steps were needed. safety Mar on Ms tour of 51 -percent surge in fusKmart \ 

He said that these would be pub- Luxembourg. Page 2. net profit. Pa«_U 

fished Friday. ^ ’ 



filing 



INSIDE 

■ A VS. official linked Mos- 

cow’s human rights attitude to 
Washington’s disposition for an 
arms accord. Page 2. 

■ AIDS carriers can infect oth- 

ers before symptoms appear, a 
U.S. study round. Page 3. 

■ U.S. policy cm South Africa is 

the next hot foreign policy issue 
racing Congress. Page 5. 

WEEKEND 

■ David Byrne, of the rock 

group Talking Heads, straddles 
two worlds: pop music and the 
avant-garde. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ British Petrolean repotted a, 

5 1 -percent surge m first-quart \ 

net profit. Pa p. A 


i 











I n 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17,1985 


U.S. Delegate Links 
Arms-Control Talks, 
Human Rights in Russia 



jifpistr 



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EC Farm Aides Agree on Some Prices 


By Christopher S. Wren 

flfm Yarb Tunes Service 

OTTAWA — A U.S. delegate to 
a human rights conference here has 
warned the Sonet Union that the 
conclusion of an arms-contro! 
agreement and other improve- 
ments in relations were “inextrica- 
bly linked" w Moscow’s parlor- 
nwnCE On tinman rights. 

The linkage was emphasized in a 
speech Wednesday to a 35-nation 
conference by the head of the U.S. 
delegation, Richard Schifter. 

- The conference is mating for six 
weeks in Ottawa to review the pro- 
gress made QQ h uman rights Since 
33 European countries, the United 
States and fanaHa signed the Final 
Act of the Conference on Security 
and Cooperation in Europe in Hel- 
sinki 10 years ago. 

The agreement in Helsinki in- 
cluded a joint pledge to respect 
human rights and fundamental 
freedoms. 

In the toughest speech delivered 
at the Ottawa conference, Mr. 
Schifter raised h uman rights abuses 
fay the Soviet Union, Czechoslova- 
kia and Poland. The American del- 
egation also distributed a 35-page 
annex with specific cases of 170 
Soviet, Czechoslovak and Polish 
citizens who have been arrested, 
imprisoned, exiled or pul in psychi- 
atric hospitals for their political or 
rebgious beliefs. 

Mr. Schifter summed up by say- 
ing that “the government of the 
United States has made dear to the 
government of the Soviet Union 
our interest in improvement of our 
bilateral relations, our interest in 
concluding a genuine arms-reduc- 
tion agreement." 

“But for the reasons already stat- 
ed," he said, “we believe that per- 
formance in the Add of human 
rights is inextricably United to all 
aspects of improved bilateral rcla- 


Sakharov 


Is Reported 
Force-Fed 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Andrei D. Sakha- 
rov, the Soviet physicist and politi- 
cal dissident, went on a hunger 
strike last month in Gorki, but au- 
thorities put him in a hospital after 
five days and force-fed him, 
sources in Moscow said Thursday. 

Mr. Sakharov, 63, who has a 
heart condition, remained in exile 
in Gorki, where he was sent in 
1980, said the sources, who asked 
not to be identified. 

There was no word on whether 
Mr. Sakharov, who was awarded 
the Nobel Peace Prize in 1975, car- 
ried out a threat to resign from the 
prestigious Academy of! Sdences to 
protest what he said was his col- 
leagues' failure to help him or his 
wife, Yelena G. Bonner, the 
sources said. She had sought per- 
mission (o go abroad for treatment 
of a heart condition. 

Mrs. Bonner, 62, who once acted 
as her husband's conduit to the 
West, was sentenced last summer 
to five years’ exile in Goriri after 
bang convicted of anti-Soviet slan- 
der. Gorki, 250 miles (404 kilome- 
ters) east of Moscow, is dosed to 
foreigners. 

News of the hunger strike came 
in a letter written in Mr. Sakharov’s 
handwriting, dated May 3 and de- 
livered to Moscow, the sources 
said. 

They reported that Mr. Sakharov 
said hie began the hunger strike 
April 16, but was taken to a hospi- 
tal April 21 and force-fed. It was 
not clear when be was released 
from the hospital. 


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tious. If we failed to make that 
point dear at a meeting of this 
kind, we would be sending a false 

si gnal. " 

It was not dear if the statement 
Wednesday suggesting linkage be- 
tween Momovrs respect for human 
rights ami Washington’s disposi- 
tion to reach an arms accord repre- 
sented any change in U.S. policy. 
In Washington, a State Depart- 
ment official said that the stances 
adopted by the United States in the 
Ottawa forum did not necessarily 
follow set policy. 

As laid out by Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz in October 1984, 
the American policy has been not 
to tie progress on aims control to 
Soviet good behavior either at 
home or abroad. 

Mr. Schifter’s warning followed 
fimilar comments here last Friday 
by a group of members of Congress 
who visited the conference. Senator 
Alfonse M_ D’Amaio, Republican 
of New York, and others indicated 
that they would consider Moscow’s 
compliance with the human rights 
provisions of the Helsinki accord 
before voting on legislation con- 
cerning the Soviet Union. 

The session at which Mr. Schifter 


*** ~?r4*u*:*x 

>. ''•*.** 






BRUSSELS (Reuters) — European Community agriculture nrimsteq 
agreed “nmisday on a price package for (he I9S536 year. However, the 
crucial area erf cereals, still blocked by West Germany’s refusal to accept 
price cuts, was exdnded. spokesmen said. 

They said the ministers would attempt to reach an agreement on canals 
at & special meeting June 11. 

Italy's agriculture minister, Filippo Pandolfi, whose country carrently 
holds the EC presidency, said the ministers had set prices for s range eg 
produce indimihg milk, beef, mutton and sugtf. But he said grew 
problems with one member state, a ref erence to West Germany, had 
prevented a full agreement after this sixth attempt to fix prices for the' 
coming farm year. - • - j 


Sum Fan Could Reach Election Goal 


BELFAST (Renters) — Sinn . Fern, the political wing of the Irish 
Republican Army, has won 26 seats in elections for local councils in! 
Northern Ireland with just over half the votes coasted, officials said; 
Thursday. It appeared Rdy to wmifcgoakf 35 seats, of a total of 566, -, 
Snn Ftin, whose objective is an independent socialist Ireland, was, 
contesting akxal election in theprovince for the first time. It appeared to 
be collecting between 50 and 60 seats, or about 13 percent of the total; 
vote; comparable to its showing in recent general and European dectwas.; 
Most of its gains were at the expense of the small Irish lmtapendenK 
Party, which lost almost aB its seats. ■ * ; 

The party wQI be remesencedon more than half of the 26 districts in the 




Priests p»«g"g through a .metal detector Thursday before Pope John Paul U said an outdoor mass in Luxembomg. 


Tne party will be represented on more than half of the 26 districts in the i 
province, m mm district, Omagh, it won five scats, in another, London- 1 
deny, it had four. The two mam Protestan t-loyahst parties, the Official : 
Unionists awl the Democratic Unionists, which bad won a total of nearly 
ISO seats, announced they would refuse to cooperate with Sinn Fdn on 
local councils. The Democratic Unionist leader, the Reverend Ian fcds- 
ley, declared: “Local councils in Northern Ireland will never be the same 


spoke was dosed to the press. The 
text of his speech was made avail- 
able by the American delegation. 

In his speech, Mr. Sdufter re- 
called the case of Andrei D. Sakha- 
rov, a Soviet physicist and dissi- 
dent, and his wife, Yelena G. 
Bonner, who were exiled in 1980 to 
Goriri. which is off-limits to for- 
eigners, and have since been kept 
undo - virtual bouse arrest 

Mr. Schifter also mentioned two 
other well-known Soviet dissidents, 
Anatoli B. Shcharansky and Yuri 
F. Orlov, who were jailed after 
bringing human rights violations to 
the attention of Western corre- 
spondents in Moscow. Mr. Shdiar- 


Pope Decries the Da&sle of Prosperity, Progress 


The Associated Pros 

LUXEMBOURG — Pope John 
Paul II told an audience of nearly 
40,000 Roman Catholics at an out- 
door Mass on Thursday that too 
many people were “dazzled by pro- 
gress mid prosperity," leaving them 
slaves of work or entertainment 
and prone to dreiflnsi onmenL 

After the Mass, attended by 
Grand Duke Jean and Grand 
Duchess Josephine-Chariotte, the 
pope ended his 32-hour stop in 
Luxembourg and flew to Brussels 
to b egin a six-day visit to Bdguun. 

In Luxembourg, the pope said 
Mass on a raised altar at a city 


parking lot on Ascension Thurs- 
day, the feast marking Christ's re- 
turn to heaven. 

In his homily, delivered in 
French and German, the pope said, 
“Open up your working week to 
God by keeping the Sabbath holy 
and partairing regularly of the Eu- 
charist." 

“Respect the Lead's Day as a 
precious gift," he added. *Tn this 
way we can avoid becoming the 
slaves of work or entertainment.” 

He also decried the trend away 
from religion in many countries. 

“People today have bom dazzled 
by pro g re ss and prosperity and of- 


ten look only to Earth," John Paul 
said. ‘They look no further than 
the world in which they are en- 
closed, they accept secularization.” 


“Man’s bSndncss leads him to 
cherish iDnsi/ms and to make idols 
of earthlyrealitics, which results in 

deep ftigllnrinnmejft and miririal 
behavior,” he said. 


Police estimated the crowd at al- 
most 40,000 people. Church offi- 
cials said that 73 percent of Lux- 
embourg's 366,000 people were 
Roman Catholic- Grand Duke Jean 
was among those attending the 
Mass, as were the mayors of most 


of the country’s 313 towns and cit- 
ies. 

During an earlier meeting with 
priests and nuns, the pontiff de- 
fended the church's ban on married 
priests, saying celibacy provides 
“greater freedom for undivided ser- 
vice" to the church. 

Meanwhile, Vatican Radio ac- 
cused journalists of exaggerating 

visit to the Netherlands The 


broadcast Wednesday said the me- 
dia had played up the “demented 


dia had played up the “demented 
gestures’* of those who “exploited 
the papal trip as a pretext for stag- 
ing their tiresome demonstrations.” 


WASHINGTON (NYT) — Democraticleadeis hawarmounoed that a 
policy commission will gjnde the party’s search for a new message and 
image as it struggles to regain voters lost to the Republican Party hr toot. 
election years. . 

At a news conference Wednesday to announce the panel's membership 
and plan*, Paul G. Kirk Jr„ chairman of the Democratic National 
Committee, predicted that the new Democratic Policy Conumssion 
would be abfeto wodt in harmony with an independent pahcy coustil 
formed this year by disenchanted Democratic officeholders, - ■ 

• Mr. Kirk said the commission, which is headed by fonmer Governor 
Scott M. Mathesoo of Utah and filled with elected officials, would 
attempt to “set a tone" for the national party that wooltf he an asset to 
Democratic candida tes in the 1986 and 1988 elections, Sk. Matheson 


said the commission, winch is to operate for one year, wotikLpnmdethe 
party with a “definitive set of proposals" on many pohcy qnestioax. 


ansky is in his ninth year of con- 
finement, and Mr. Orlov is in 


finement, and Mr. Orlov is in 
internal exile in Siberia. 

The American delegate recalled 
the death of three members of dissi- 
dent monitoring groups — Oieksa 
Tychiy, Yuri Lytyyn and Eduard 
Arutyunyan — in Soviet labor 
camps last year. And he referred to 
41 others, among them Oksana 
"Meshko, 80, who remained in pris- 
on or internal exile for having tried 
to monitor Soviet compliance with 
tiie Helsinki accord. 

“These individuals did not plot 
to overthrow the government of the 
Soviet Union," Mr. Schifter said. 
“They did not even engage in what 
we would consider normal political 
activity in the West, that is, orga- 
nize to make changes in the govern- 
ment by peaceful means. They did 
nothing other than ‘receive and im- 



\ 


part information,' a right explicitly 
guaranteed through the Final Act" 

In an apparent allusion to the 
Soviet-U.S, arms-control talks in 
Geneva, Mr. Schifter said that “our 
people have a right to wonder 
whether a country that fails to keep 
its word in matters unrelated to 
considerations of its security will 
do so when its security is at stake." 

The chief Soviet delegate, Vsevo- 
lod N. Sofmsky, offered a lengthy 
rebuttal to Mr. Schifteds speech, 
arguing that there were widespread 
human rights abuses in the united 
States. 



Progress 
Is Seen in 


U.S. Indictment for Exports to Israel 

LOS ANGELES (UPI)— A California businessman was iwfictedbra 
U.S. grand jury on Thursday for illegally exporting to Israel 800 tmy 
triggering devices that can be used to control the tinting of nucki&i 


El Salvador 


(Continued from Page 1) 

ingly, by the United States. Ac- 
cording to State Department fig- 
ures, the United States has sent 
over $1.7 billion in economic and 
mOitaiv aid to H Salvador since 
1980. A senior American official in 
San Salvador said be expected that 
the United States would continue 
to give up to 5500 million in annual 
assistance for at least the next few 


explosions. - 

Richard Smyth, 55, charged with 15 violations of the Anns Export 
Control Act for exporting the switches, called krytrora, and 15 counts of 
making false statements to government officials: If convicted of >8 
charges, he faces up to SI.65 million in fines and IQS years in prison. 

U.S. Attorney Robert Bonner said that Mr. Smyth^ rf Huntington 
Beach, began exporting the devices to Israel in January 1980 and that he 
shipped 800 of them in 15 separate shipments in the next two yean. Mr. 
Smyth is president of Mflco International, which engages primarily in 
aviation consulting on government defense contracts and subcontracts, a 
company representative said. 


HwAhociMmJ Prow 

WEST MEETS EAST — George D. Nelson, left, an American astronaut, on 
Wednesday joined with Anatoli N. Berezovoy, a cosmonaut from rite Soviet Union, to 
help inaugurate a United Nations-sponsored system to monitor the environment 


years. 

The economy and the needs of 
over a half a million refugees from 
the war appear to be the toughest 
problems taring the government in 
the Immediate future. General 
Vides Casanova said he considered 
hunger and unemployment greater 
enemies in the next five years than 
the guerrillas. 

The average Salvadoran is esti- 
mated to have endured a decline erf 
more than 30 percent in the stan- 


Israel, Egypt Report Progress in Talks 

CAIRO (UPI) —Egypt and Israel 
the tanuwuWMnSaue untfl^^^^ng issues were resolved, 

“We made a great deal of progress this mooting, but we stffl ham alo^ 

of work to do," David Kimche. firector-generalof the IsraeRFarc%f 
Ministry, said after a three-hour morning session at a hotel near the Great 
Pyramids of Giza. • ; • ' 

Sources dose to the conference said the talks focused on warn 
Hwnwnrk for greater trade and cultural exchanges between the two 
countries and fra 1 a halt of Egyptian press attacks against b ract T k 
Egyptian response was not known. The sources said Egypt appearedto 
attach greater importance to the resolution of the border dispute at Tabu, 
which is a 250-acre (100-hectare) atrip of beach on the Gulf of A^ba at 
the southern end of the border between the two natiais. 


Gains Made in United Airline Talks 


dard of living in the last five years. 
Strikes and demands for salary in- 


After MOVE Assault, Mayor Is Assailed, Praised 


(Cou tinned from Page I) 
f Greece: “Ed Koch should run his 
city and leave mine alone." 

The mayor was asked about 
bombing die house with the knowl- 
edge that children were inside. 

“We did in fact talk a great deal 
about a way to have them send the 
children out," Mr. Goode said. 
“And that was a tremendous 
amount of concern for us.” 

“If, in fact, we had known that 
there was a hostage in the house,” 
he said, “we would have not pro- 
. ceeded the way we proceeded.* 

Asked the difference between a 
child and a hostage, he said: “Their 
parents were in the house. It means 
that they were there with their par- 
ents." 

Two lawsuits were filed on be- 
half of the homeless. One, Bed in 
U-S. District Court, alleged that the 
d a ma ge was twice thea(y estimate 
of S5 million and named Mr. 
Goode, Mr. Brooks and Police 
Commissioner Gregore Sambor. 

The second suit, filed in Com- 
mon Pleas Court, seeks $10 minio n 
in damages. It names Mr. Goode, 
Mr. Sambor, Governor Dick 
Thornburgh of Pennsylvania and 
the unidentified helicopter crew 
that dropped the bomb. 

■ Focus cm Police Again 

Earlier, William K. Stevens of 
The New York Times reported: 

The Philadelphia police have 
gained much notoriety in recent 
years from allegations of brutality, 
civil rights violations and extortion. 
But perhaps nothing has reflected 
on the police force quite as spectac- 
ularly as the aerial bombing of a 
residential neighborhood, an ac- 
tion for which the law enforcement 
authorities know of no precedent. 

Some authorities fear that the 


episode wiB re-ignite latent com- 
munity hostility against the police. 


All of this is ironic to some of the dence of that. 


Other officials, including the fire as the result of a continuing federal 
commissioner, said they had no evi- investigation. 


Last year, reports came to light 


experts, who say that the Philadri- Whatever the inquiry shows, oth- of police misuse of K-9 units to 


pttia police have recently gone er authorities said, the police brutalize citizens. 


some distance toward improving should have etplored other tactical afl this was the memory 

fhflir nPJTfWfflflnrf 1 nwtlwlc on/I eh/wtl/l nov# onti/o. _ ■ _ _ . ■' 


their performance. methods and Should have antiri- 

^/sMyttgtodduasterm pated and pbmn^againj the con- i960s and^Ek. mT fLc, fan m 
nans of police functioning, said sequences of bombing a house sus- p^. ^ ^ rh £Tre mayor, 

portedofcOTteiningtergeainounts a police department Jted 


James Fife, a former New York poked of containing Laigeamounts 

Gty police officer, now a professor 1 of ammunition. 

at the American University School “Like most police botches," Mr. 


stmhedto Phaaddphia pohee. failureof Pl™n&- The poho, he had one shotgun whenhe 

Excqitfor tire deaths, be said, snd. “should have anticipated the took it over, but thatShen be left, it 
it was certainly a success for fire, and they should have antra- w -.nn-v, r lfmowa . fn invade 
40VE One of their goals is to paled that they couldn’t put the fire Cuba and wun^ 0 


who has 


for its gun-toting, gun-using ap- 
proach to law enforcement. Mr. 


a to law enforcement. Mr. 
mice boasted that thedepart- 


“it was certainly a success for 
MOVE One of their goals is to 
embattle bureaucracy, and they’ve 
certainly done that.” 


out if there were armed people 
around. The derision was made in 


Cuba and win. 

In 1979, the Philadelphia police 


Fife said. “It's the first time I’ve 
ever heard of the police dropping a 


Before Monday night, the police “> be sued 
department bad seemed to be mov- ®™nent over 


dented police action, but then 
MOVE is an unprecedented sort of 
group.” 


“This really perplexes me," Mr. the heat of the moment.” became the firstforce m the ootm- 

Fife said. “It’s the first time I’ve Before Monday night, the police try to be sued by the f ederal gov- 
ever heard of the police dropping a department bad seemed lo be mov- enunent avrr^lcgea cml rights 
bomb on anyone. It’s an unprece- ing away from the practices that VK * atl0Ils , although the ant was 
dented police action, but then- had given it such a tarnished image, subsequsmy dismissed onjurisdic- 
MOVE is an unprecedented sort of Philadelphia newspapers still tmnal grounds, 
group.” carry frequent headlines about But since then, Mr. File said, the 

Some other authorities were prosecutions and convictions of department has curtailed excesses, 
more restrained. Explosive charges police officers on extortion Shootings of citizens by the police 
have been used baore to enter charges. Twenty-two officers, in- have dropped sharply. More black 
planes, trains and em b assies in hos- dudmg some m high rank, have and Hispanic police officers have 
tage situations, said Frank Bolz, been convicted of corruption so far been put on the face. 


subsequently dismissed on jurisdic- 
tional grounds. 

But since then, Mr. Fife said, the 


who founded New York QtVs hos- 
tage negotiating team in 1472 and 
is now a consultant. “It is not total- 
ly inappropriate,” he said of the use 


Soviet Aircraft May- Have Vanished 


TwSdhave liked to see them ^ot Sakhalin Island, Japanese Say 

wait a Httle longer" before forcing The Associated Press * J 

the issue, Mr. Bolz said of the po- Toirvri tv,, tween Primorskiy and Sakhalin,” 

bee. . ^ “ The J»E««se gov- said a Foreign Ministry spokes- 

In time, “we may find they were cnunc ®t said that an aircraft that man Yoshio Haiano. He empha- 
deficient," he said, adding: “On the i W eaf y_ belong to the Soviet sized (hat his information that the 
other hand, we may find that they 0 J Ja P^ plane belonged to the Soviet airline 

aoai appropriately" Jsufle "° tt fmttoconfmmuoiL" 

Mr. Goode a nno u nc ed Wedncs- -tl I Mr, Haiano and other Japanese 

day that a special commission sam& J* whmTSvS fioh ^ gave no further details on 

would be appointed to investigate :T~„ 5 Soviet fighter aircraft crashed, or 


Strikes and demands fix salary in- 
creases are growing even with un- 
employment of over 40 percenL 

Faced with a diminishing mili- 
tary capacity, the rebel command - 
car, Joaquin Villalobos, announced 
last month that guerrilla forces 
would concentrate on a war of at- 
trition against the Salvadoran 
economy. 

The UJS. Embassy estimates that 
the rebels inflicted $263.9 million 
in damag e on the economy last 
year, almost $10 million more than 
m 1983. The total estimated cost of 
sabotage to the economy in five 
years of war is estimated at S1.214 
bilHon. 

While most people in £3 Salva- 
dor doubt that past human rights 
abuses by the security forces will be 
punished, they do expect Mr. 
Duarte to press prosecutions in a 
few notorious cases, such as the 
assassination of Archbishop Oscar 
Amulfo Romero in 1980. 

The army as an institution is 
larger and stronger than ever. A 
Salvadoran human rights investiga- 
tor said it remained an open ques- 
tion whether the army would again 
resort to mass killing if it again felt ■ 
its survival threatened by the re- 
bda. 

A broader question raised by 
government officials and by a 
Western diplomat is whether the 
country has dote more than win 
breathing space before faring a re- 
newed crisis in the future, Bur even 
some longtime pessimists say they 
have a degree of hope. 

“The preconditions are in place 
for real change to occur," said an 
academic researcher who has beat 
highly critical of the government in 
the pasL “Never have we had this 

. L. Cl " 


WASHINGTON (WF) — A federal mediator has reported progress in 
contract negotiations between United Airiines and its pilots' union, 
the primary issue in the dispute, pay rates f or new ralots, remaned 
unresolved. The pilots said they would strike at 12:01 A.M. Friday if 
there was no settlement. 

United, the largest U.S. airime, with more than 1,500 flights daily, saul 

iCwoqldkeepCyingwithaoomlanarionofimmafflmentf^?ts,abcct5flP 
trained but not-yei-hircd crew members and members of the Air Line 
Pilot Association who were expected to cross their own picket fines. 
United has about 4,900 wadding pilots. 

It was dear, however, that in case of a strike United would not be able 
to operate its full schedule and that many travelers would have to Bap 
other airlines. ' * 

■ • -r 

For the Record , 

Defuse Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger has assets of at least $L5 
million, a financial disclosure statement fa last year revealed. (w*J 
The revised tax overhaul pbn win not be presented by msda* 
Ronald Reagan until May 28. more than a week later than had 1 neffl 
expected, the White House said Wednesday. . . .. 

Ahe Chinese deputy prime minister, Li Peng, beading. Beging^sMW 

senior detqzatiuon to Eastern Europe in 20 years, agreed toinerrase trace 
in with East German officials in Benin Thmsday^the ADNpress 
said. 4 % . . ; (fiodcisy 

The Italian parliament will meet June 24 to elect tiie ooantr £ s J??^ 
dent, it was announced Thursday in Rome: The mandate of PrcsKltfu 
Sandro Perrini, 88, expires July 8. - ..f* 1 */ 


ill S alk 
4 Labor 


a ' u- » . . 




... 


- ■ 

. .. 


■5<|. *• 


- - 


^Wicked Witch,’ Dies 


•>,. 1 li- 


•J*. 


chance before in El Salvador." 





UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


wuwu mxai uiai uk iuc sprdag iuu all 269 nmimc ahnari aoviel OnKMiS m 

from flammable material in the ^ persons aboard. they had no information 

MOVE headquarters, not from the “It appeals that an Aeroflot report. 

bomb itself. plane was missing somewhere be- A spokesman for Jai 


■ Reagan Hails ‘Progress’ 

Mr. Reagan, after meeting with 
Mr. Duane, praised the “heart- 
wanning progress" that El Salva- 
dor has made in consolidating 
democratic rule and in improving 
the human rights situation in the 
country. The Associated Press re- 
potted from Washington. 

With Mr. Duarte at bis side, Mr. 


BAoaoK.MAsrars • doctoraie 

Nr WbA, At«Umk. Ub EuMrianca. 


Sand data IKd resume 
for fra* evaluation. 


PACIFIC WESTBN UMVBHTY 


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•5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Falkenturm So. 9, MUNICH 

• M/S ASTOR at* sea 


A spokesman for Japan’s De- 
fease Agency declined to say how it 
had detennined that itwas a Soviet 
plane, and would not offer details 
on the type of plane, altitude and 
course. “We do not know " the 


Reagan said that the progress 
would doi have been posable witb- 


Kyodo News Service, quoting 
unidentified Foreign Ministry 
sources, said there were uncon- 
firmed reports that tiie aircraft was 


a cargo pi 


would doi have been possible with- 
out U.S. assistance, and he suggest- 
ed that U.S. goals in Nicaragua 
would not be achieved if Congress 
continues to deny aid to the Nica- 
raguan rebels. 

“If there is to be peace and de- 
mocracy in the region, if our neigh- 
bor* can be spared the tragedy that 
comes from every Gjnmunist dic- 
tatorship,” Mr. Reagan said, “we 
must have the courage to help all 
our friends in Central America.” - 


The Associated Press 

SALISBURY, Connecticut — 
Margaret Hamilton, 82, who 
played the conniving, green - 
skinned Wicked Witch of the West 
in the classic film “The Wizard of 
Oz,” died Thursday, apparently of 
a heart attack. 

A former kindergarten teacher. 
Miss Hamilton's rale in the 1939 
version of the L Frank Baum clas- 
sic has frightened generations erf 
children who thrilled as she melted 
at the feet of Dorothy, played by 
Judy Garland. 

Of (he lead stars of the film — 
Miss Garland, Miss Hamilton, 
Jack Haley os the Tin Man, Bert 
Lahx as the Cowardly Lion and 
Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow — 
only Mr. Bolger survives. 

In 1973, Miss Hamilton said she 
had turned down countless offers 
to recreate the role, “I suppose I've 
turned down a fortune too, but I 
just don't want to spoil the magic,” 
she said. “Little children’s minds 
can’t cope with seringa mean witch 
alive again." 

Miss Hamilton came to film via 
the stage, appearing first at the 
Cleveland Playhouse, which now 
sponsors a scholarship fond in her 
name, and then appeared on 
Broadway in 1932, in “Another 
Language.” 

She went to Hollywood to re- 
create that role in 1933. and went 




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“Guest in the House."- , 

In 1971, she appeared ® 
movies — “Brewster -IffcQi 
and “The Anderson T^u"^ 
9» abb appeared bn teiffl 


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Page 3 



** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


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AIDS Garners luleet Others 
Years Before Symptoms Arise 






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By Cri stinc Russell 

JVtn/rfng/on Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — The vires 

^haf rangers acquired inwmiM dc5- 

rieocy syndrome, or AIDS, can re- 
main in a person’s body for five or 
more years without cauang the dis- 
v ease, but the carrier can sSl infea 
“. others through blood tnmsfusons. 
according to researchers from the 
UR Centers for Disease Control 


Dr. Paul M. Feorino said 11100(1 since early March with a new 
Wednesday that studies strongly test, has decided it will notify do- 
snpporled programs to screen do- nors when it finds that their blood 
noted blood for sign 5 of the AIDS contains the vires, 
virus. The studies involved blood Dr. S. Gerald Sandler, the Red 
dooms who inadvaientfy passed Cross associate vice president for 
on AIDS through transfusions. medical affairs, said that b« ’ “ ~ 
No carehas been found for the July 1 die agency would 


fatal disease. 

Meanwhile, the American Red 

Cross, winch has been screening 


K 


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•U- 


-Ill . 


Von Bulow Judge Fears 
Reversal of Murder Case 


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U ‘ U 1‘olievP; 


U for f'A|MirMolit 


By Jonathan Friendly 

Mew Yark-Tima Service 

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island 
' ■' by ’ * 7 - Judge Corinne P. Grande has 

: "tEoId the lawyers prosecuting Clans 


von Bulow that she was 
this case together with bailing 
wire" and risked being reversed on 
appeal by denying a defense re- 
quest for a nnstrm. 

The Providence County Superior 
Court judge m«He the Mwwiimt 
at a session April 26 in her cham- 
bers. Although only the judge and 
the lawyers were present, the ses- 
sion is part of thepubfic record of 
the trial A transcript of the session 
was obtained Wednesday. 

. . Mr. Von Bulow is charged with 
■ I twice trying to kill his weauby wife^ 
Martha, with insulin injections so 
that he could inherit her fortune 
and marry bis mistress. He was 
convicted m 1982, but the verdict 
was overturned on appeal by die 
Rhode Island Supreme Court, 
which ruled that some evidence was 
withheld from the defense and oth- 
er evidence was i mp r op erl y admit- 
ted at the trial. 

The stale’s first witness was Ma- 
ria Schrallhammer, Mrs. von Bo- 
low’s personal maid, who 
build the case by discovering in ! 
von Billow’s doset a black bag con-. 
raining drugs, a syringe and what 
the prosecution says was ah insu- 


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On Arad 26, the maid’s second 
day on the stand, she described an 
inddenl in which Mrs. von Bulow 
apparently took too mazqraspirius, 
fell and cot her head. The descrip- 
tion included numerous references 
to blood an the carpet of the bed- 
room in the Park Avenue apart- 
ment, but none on the furniture. 

At a conference held in the 
courtroom but out of earshot of the 
and spectators, the defense 


Dans von Bulow 


instructed to ignore what the maid 
said. 

“Your honor ” he said, “I think 
this has to be exposed for exactly 
what it is; it is dearly an attempt by 
the prosecution to prejudice Mr. 
von Bulow and to charge a crime 
ih»t has not been charged in the 
indictment.”' ' 

Mrs. von Bulow went into a 
coma at her Newport, Rhode Is- 
land, mansion in December 1979 
and again in December 1980. Doc- 
tors do not expect her to recover. 

Mr. Pucdo said the other de- 
fense lawyers hod watched the ju- 
rors during Miss !Mirallhmini« ) < 


!> . • T: jury and spectators, the defense 

I JNUi * H JJjXTVb? HI li asked for a mistrial, saying dial the 
. testimony about lie bkxw unfairly 


shocked by this testimony, wtnch in 
detail describes what's commonly 
called a crime scene; loaded with 
Wood.” 

Judge Grande said die, too, was 
bothered by the testimony about an 
absence of blood on the furniture. 
Using lmignagp- that differed greal- 
II encouraged the jury to Dm* that ty from her usnaHy restrained 
. Mr. von Bulow had struck his wife, bench statements, she told the 

Judge Grande denied the motion prosecutors: 

\..:,vand refused a request that die tell “I just think you have raised the 
‘ ‘ .T..,v the jurors that the prosecution was issue of tins guy popped her one 
not alleging that Mr. von Bulow plain and simple.”' ■ 

.l had caused his wife's injury. “WeS, yon can see I'm holding 

But Thomas P. Pucdo, the chief this case together with bailing wire 
“ defense lawyer, re-opened the issue 
in the session in the judge’s c faam- 
" “ bers later that day, askin g that the 
testimony be stricken ana the jury 


is what it amounts loT she contin- 
ued, adding that she though* “some 
prejudice has occurred” and that 
riie could declare a nristriaL 


l ?!t \V 


.fviriiwT* El A1 Walkout Strains 
U.S. Labor-Israel Ties 


uueai win 
jV dial it hai 

V\ iU'ii-' i 1 "- 



By Michael Orcskes 

Mew York Times Service 

• NEW YORK — A small strike 
has created a severe strain in the 
long relatknship between Israel 
and the American labor movement, 
to the point that the Israeli prime 
minister has intervened to force a 

^settlement 

The strike by the Machinists 

the Isrw^ M^emhn^artered its 
15th month Thursday. The airline 
has continued operating at Kenne- 
dy International Airport and at its 
Manhattan office despite the walk- 
out 

* The confrontation has triggered 
bitter charges of strikebreaking 
against the airline and threats that 
the labor movement will sell off 
mfltto ns of dollars in Israel Bonds 
unless the strike is settled. 

While there is debate among la- 
bor leaders over whether such a 
threat will be carried out, the fact 
it has been raised has been 
bed by seme labor officials as 
_ i of the strain that the strike 
has created. 

The strike began with demands 
by El Al a money-losing company 
that is in receivership in Israel, for a 
wage freeze and work-rule conces- 
sions- When the workers walked 
out, the' aktine brought in new 
workers and continned operating. 

Prime Minister Shimon Pots 
has intervened to force s settkroeni 
in the strike, viewing the deadlock 


vote cm the resolution has been 
hdd off twice, however, after the 
labor leaders received assurances 
from Mr. Peres that he would seek 
to end the strike. 

“It's still being hdd off, 
th em every chance to have 
faith negotiations.'’ said the 
federation's spokesman, Murray 
Seeger. 

While the walkout, even at its 
peak, involved only about 220 
workers, it has drawn the attention 
of the highest levels of both the 
Israeli government arid the Ameri- 
can labor movement 

Mr. Penes and Lane Kirkland, 
the president of the AFL-CIO, 
have discussed the strike in at least 
one trans-Atlantic telephone call in 
which Mr. Peres assured Mr. Kirk- 
land that he would seek to settle the 
strike, according to Mr. Seeger. 

The aide to Mr. Pars, who spoke 
on the condition that be not be 
identified, said that American 
unions halt maiB wi T<nwi political- 
ly and economically in many ways 
over the years, including investing 
in Israel bonds. It would be mis- 
leading, the aide said, to attribute 
the government's intervention in 
the H Al strike primarily to con- 
cern about the saie of bonds. 

Mr. Seege r said that El ATs 
tough altitude toward its strikers 
had angered many labor leaders. 

“The labor movement supported 
the foundation of Israel,” be said, 
adding: “So here’s the Israeli state 


in the dispute as damagjnglq Isra- airline bringing in strikebreakers 
d’s image, according to an aide in 
Israel 

A resolution calling oo unions to 
sell their bond holdings and to take 
other actions against Israel has 
‘beat before the executive council 
.‘of the AFL-CIO since February. A 


from Israel 

of the strikers have given 
retained to work, leaving 
90 workers still out 
A negotiating session is sched- 
uled for Monday at the offices of 
the National Mediation Board. 


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blood that the test indicated con- 
tained the AIDS virus. He said that 
donors would be notified, only 
when a second test confirmed that 
antibodies to the AIDS virus were 
present. 

The presence of antibodies sug- 
gests that a person has been infect- 
ed in the past, bnt docs not indicate 
whether the person will contract 
the disease. 

Dr. Sandier said the policy 
sought to protect “transfusion re- 
ripients from the possibility that a 
unit of blood might be infected." 

"On the other band," he said, 
“donors must be protected from 
notification of a positive test unless 
that test has been co nfi r med lobe a 
one positive test.” 

There is concern about the possi- 
bility that the screening test alone 
might give an incorrect positive 
reading, he said. 

Pr eliminary Red Cross studies 
show that about two nmts of blood 
in each 1,000 are being withdrawn 
after being tested. Dr. Sandler esti- 
mated that about 25 percent of do- 
nors whose blood has been rejected 
will be notified in the initial phase 
of the program. 

The agency will advise those peo- 
ple to seek a evaluation 

and their nam es win be kept on a 
confidential national “deferral" 
registry, he said. 

But if the positive results are not 
confirmed and there is no notifica- 
tion, the information would still be 
kept in a confidential file at the 
local blood bank. Dr. Sandler said. 

. Should such a person donate 
again, the blood would not be used 
for transfusions and would be 
“carefully evaluated." 

From 1981 through May 13, the 
Centers for Disease Control report- 
ed 10,226 victims of AIDS in the 
United States, about half of whom 
have died. The cases of 138 adults, 
or more than 1 percent of adult 
cases, and 17 children, or about 14 
percent of pediatric cases, are 
thought to have been caused by 
blood transfusions. 

The new study, reported in the 
New England Journal of Medicine, 
investigated 25 male donors 
thought to be at high risk of AIDS 
who were later linked with transfu- 
sion-associated cases of the disease. 

People in high-risk categories, 
who have been urged not to donate 
blood, indude homosexual men, 
intravenous drug abusers and their 
sexual contacts. 



Robert Long, a California researcher, examines two 
pieces of ankle bone from a skeleton fotmd in Arizona 
and believed to be that of die earliest known dmosanr. 

Skeleton Discovered in US. 
May Be of Oldest Dinosaur 

By John Noble Wilford 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The skeleton of what is believed to be tiie earliest 
known dinosaur, a creature the size of a small ostrich, has been 
discovered in Arizona's Painted Desen by scientists from the Univer- 
sityof California at Berkeley. 

The discovery of the 225 - million -y ear-old skeleton is expected to 
open to paleontologists an incomparable view of conditions at the 
dawn of the dinosaur age, when the more primitive reptiles were dying 
oat, mammals and birds and flowering plants had yet to appear and 
the di nosaur s themselves had not begun to dominate life on Earth. 
The bones were fotmd in a setting rich in fossils of ancient trees, 
plants and other extinct animals 

In an announcement Wednesday by the University of California, 
scientists said that the skeleton might represent an entirely new family 
of plEnt- ^^gdiiiftcaiir g thai could be related to the later plaieosauis 
and perhaps were very early ancestors of the giant brontosaurs. 

The skeleton was estimated to be three milli on to four million years 
older than any din os aur ever found in North America ami probably 
older than the staurikosanrids, which previously were thought to be 
the oldest dinosaurs. 

"This is the first definite evidence that dinosaurs lived as long ago 
as 225 million years or more," Robert Long, a research associate at the 
tmivasity’s Museum of Paleontology, said by telephone. 

Mr. l^nng , who led the team of scientists that made the discovery, 
said that the completeness and excellent condition of the skeleton 
were expected to provide important new dues about the origins of the 
giant reptiles that became extinct 65 million years ago. 

Among the fossils dug up at the foot of a cliff in Painted Desert, 
which is part of the Petrified Forest National Park, were ankle bones, 
thigh bones, ribs, vertebrae and a virtually complete hind leg, daws 
and aH 

The animal, which has not been given a name, was seven to eight 
feet long (2.1 to 2.4 meters), stood less than three feet tall at the hips 
and weighed about 200 pounds (90 kilograms). 


U.S. Weeklies Changing With Readers 

Rooted in ’60s Radicalism, Many Have Turned 'Yuppie' 


By Thomas B. Rosensriel 

Los Angela Tima Serrice 

LOS ANGELES — The first is- 
sue of Washington’s new alterna- 
tive newspaper, the Washington 
Weekly, last fall threw new light on 
the changing audience of the alter- 
native press in United States. 

The cover story was on choosing 
“The Right Church." or “ecclesias- 
tical ladder-climbing." 

It advised: “Working the aisles 
on Sunday as a way of getting a 1% 
up on the competition or finding a 
suitable mate is acknowledged by 
churchgoers. In Washington’s 

more status-conscious circles, dog- 
ma takes a back seat to more earth- 
ly pursuits." 

Although the Washington Week- 
ly ma y pursue its brand of journal- 
ism witn rare abandon, the theory 
behind such articles is indicative of 
changes faring alternative weekly 
papers throughout the United 
States. 

Today, the audience that read 
the radical weekly press in the 
1960s and the culture and enter- 
tainment weeklies of the late 1970s 
is getting older, moving to the sub- 
urbs ana becoming more con- 
cerned with children, taxes and 
zoning ordinances. 

The change is posing special 
problems for an industry that has 
carved a niche in the last decade 
catering to just this group. In reac- 
tion. some older papers are trying 
to find ways to Keep their present 
readers wink attracting a new gen- 
eration of younger urban readers. 

Many of the liveliest new week- 
lies are locating in suburbs, hybrids 
of the hip urban weeklies of the ’70s 
and the traditional suburban week- 
lies dominated by news of local city 
councils. Rotary dabs and Boy 
Scout troops. 

Some new papers, such as the 
Washington Weekly, are pursuing 
the baby boom audience as "Yup- 
pies.” as young urban professionals 
have come to be called, turning 
their journals into something far 
from the radical politics which 
spawned the alternative weeklies of 
the ’60s. 

"Most of you have been through 
a divisive war. campus rebellion 


and sexual revolution,” Washing- 
ton Weekly's editor. Jeff Stein, 
wrote in the paper's first issue. To- 
day, “we sweat for a good job." 

Most of the weeklies had their 
roots in the radical press of the 
1960s. The most profitable of (hose 
papers, the Boston Phoenix, was 
founded in 1966, but by the early 
70s it was one of the first weeklies 
to emphasize lifestyle and enter- 
tainment reporting. By the late 
1970s. it overcame and eventually 
acquired its competition. The Real 
Paper- 

Similar weeklies began in Chica- 
go. Minn eapolis. Denver, San Die- 
go and elsewhere. Although all re- 
flected the idiosyncrasies of their 
towns and owners, all emphasized 

similar ingredients: entertainment 

listings, classified advertising, ads 
from small merchants and cultural, 
local and sometimes investigative 
reporting. 

“Because the duly papers have 
become so regional.' serving large 
geographic areas," said James 
VowdI editor of the Pasadena 
Weekly in California, "they wind 
up losing touch with a lot of smaller 
advertisers and smaller interest 
groups." 

One publisher who is planning 


put 

Out 


As Adweek magazine 
“LA. Weekly Reaching 
Y upscale Advertisers." 

Rather than changing their pa- 
pers to aim at Yuppies, editors and 
publishers of alternative weeklies 
say they will seek to strike a bal- 
ance between retaining older read- 
ers and still attracting a new gener- 
ation of younger people 

Stephen Cummings, publisher of 
the Tab Newspapers, a chain of 
five weeklies near Boston, says he 
believes that suburban “hybrids." 
which combine characteristics of 
the urban weeklies and the tradi- 
tional community' paper, threaten 
urban weeklies because they have a 
more stable and affluent audience. 

In Boston, for example, the Tab 
papers together carry 600 percent 
more advertising for Blooming- 
dale's department stores than even 
The Boston Globe, in large part 
because the primary Blooming- 
dale’s store is situated in the Tab 
circulation area. 

"In weeklies, if you get too far 
ahead, too avant-garde, you lose 
your audience," said Steven Min- 
dich. publisher of the Boston Phoe- 
nix. "And if you get too Far behind, 
you can also lose." 


editorial changes is Jay Levin of the 
Los Angeles Weekly, southern Cal- 
ifornia’s most suixessfnl alterna- 
tive paper. 

In 1977. Mr. Levin left the once- 
radical Los Angeles Free Press, 
found investors and started the 
Weekly as a cross between “High 
Times and Newsweek.” High 
Times is a drug-oriented magazine. 

“In some ways, 1 haven’t kept up 
with my audience, my peer group,” 
said Mr. Levin, who noted that his 
own interests have kept such issues 
as American involvement in Latin 
America a major subject in the 
Weekly. "I'm not interested in real 
estate.' rm not a Yuppie." 

Mr. Levin tfid not detail his 
plans but said that the national and 
foreign political issues that the left- 
leaning weekly has followed on its 
cover wiD be done "with shorter 
pieces inside." There will be more 
coverage of local politics and the 
paper’s tone wiH become less stri- 
dent, be said. 


Burger Urges Reform of U.S. Courts 


Los Angeles Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Warren E. 
Burger, chief justice of the United 
States, says that the American legal 
system may require major reforms, 
including the eliminati on of jury 
trials for complex financial dis- 
putes, multiple-disaster claims and 
even routine auto accident cases. 

“For some disputes, trials will 
always be the only means, but for 
many claims, we do not need trials 


by the adversary contest.” Justice 
Burger declared Tuesday to the 
American Law Institute. "As we 
now practice iL that system is too 
costly, too painful, too destructive 
and too inefficient." He urged the 
institute, a group of judges, lawyers 
and law professors, to conduct a 
study of toe “whole litigation pro- 
cess" to see whether there was a 
“better way” to resolve many of the 
legal battles in the nation’s courts. 


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Problems Delay Tests , Increase Costs 
Of New U.S. Anti-Satellite Weapon 


By Wayne Biddle 

New Yak Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Technical 
problems with the air force’s new 
anti-satellite weapon have caused a 
steep rise in its cost and delays in 
its testing, according to a Pentagon 
official. 

In testimony before the Senate 
Military Appropriations Subcom- 
mittee last week, Edward G Al- 
dridge, undersecretary of the air 
force, said S92 million requested to 
pay for three of the weapons would 
cover the purchase of only two. 

Mr. Aldridge told the subcom- 
mittee that the third flight test of 
the anti-satellite weapon, or ASAT, 
has been delayed until July. It was 
scheduled far late last year. 


velop a space-based missile de- 
fense, the anti-satdlite program is 
closely related in both technology 
and military strategy. Problems in 
proving the performance of ASAT 
weapons, which are designed to de- 
stroy by impact rather than explo- 
sion, could undermine confidence 
in developing other, more ad- 
vanced projectiles for destroying 
nuclear missiles. 

John Pike, associate director for 
space policy studies at the Federa- 
tion of American Scientists, said 
“the generic problem has been to 
make it small," adding that weap- 
ons for the anti-misale program 
would have to be far smaller than 
even ASAT. 

The anti-satdlite weapon is a 
two-stage rocket about 15 feel long 


While not a direct part of Presi- (4.5 meters) that is carried by an F- 
dent Ronald Reagans plan to de- IS warplane. 


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international 


{tribune 


Tilfa Tht >ev Yartt Thac. «nd The WafthWoc Port 



happened in an especially dark and violent 
penod of the country's history. 

There is an important parallel here to the 
service performed by the allied governments’ 
{?*“; of Nazi war criminals after World War 
“•The Nazis' offenses were of an altogether 
different order of magnitude from those of the 
Argentine generals and admirals, but in both 
cases the process of assessing guilt serves the 
“‘dispensable purpose of establishing a his- 
torical record. In Buenos Aires as in Nurem- 
oers* the record is being laid out under the 
-rigorous conditions of the courtroom, with 
sworn testimony by identified witnesses, sub- 
ject to challenges by the defendants. 

The Nuremberg trials foreclosed the success 
of attempts by demagogues and neo-Nazis to 
claim that the accounts of genocide and the 
death camps were lies and calumny invented 


In Weinberger’s Barrel 


In America, General Electric is a household 
word. I t is the nation's largest maker of electri- 
cal appliances. Its management techniques are 
studied worldwide. Its automated factories are 
models of advanced design. Yet this week it 
pleaded guilty to defrauding (he air force of 
S800.000 by forging workers’ time cards on a 
contract for upgrading the warheads on Min- 
uteman missiles. What made a superb compa- 
ny stoop to picking the public's pocket, and 
for so petty a gain? i 

Seeking the causes of crime outside the 
criminal may not be fashionable, but it is 
somehow hard to envisage a group of GE 
managers deriding out of the blue that it was a 
good day to rob the air force. They surdy 
operated in a culture of borderline morality in 
which such behavior is deemed acceptable. 

That is not the culture of General Electric, 
bat it is coming more and more to look like the 
pattern of acceptable behavior among certain 
defense contractors. Though GE is the sixth- 
iaxgesl U.S. defense contractor, military work 
counts for only 18 percent of its business. 

Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger be- 
lieves that ove rcharg in g by contractors is con- 
fined to isolated cases. “I don’t think a few bad 
apples should cause you to judge the whole 
band,” he said in March. A few weeks later his 
inspector-general told Congress that 45 of the 
.100 largest U.S. military contractors were un- 
der c riminal investigation by the Defense De- 
partment Evidently something is rotten with 


the barrel loo, and that is because of the 
Defense Department's unhealthy relationship 
with its contractors. 

Despite recent attempts at reform, the Pen- 
tagon has destroyed competition, preferring 
sole-source contracts in which officials are free 
to alter and “gold-phte” weapons regardless 
of cost. The same offi cials then go to work for 
the contractors (hey cosset. Through contrac- 
tor lobbying. Congress is made a party to a 
system greased by vast sums of money, in 
which weapons are procured by favors and 
influence, not by open competition. 

The viable outgrowths of such a system — 
overpriced spare parts, improper charges and 
c riminal conduct by contractors — are the 
least of its failing s. The unseen problems are 
shoddy, undertested and overpriced products. 
Weapons shielded from the forces of the mar- 
ketplace are all the less likely to endure the 
rigors of the battlefield. 

The Pentagon is responsible for its procure- 
ment Sys tran That does not diminish the cul- 
pability of contractors who become corrupted 
by it The Justice Department is continuing its 
investigation to see which specific GE manag- 
ers were responsible for the fraud on the air 
force. With the aim of deterring other white- 
collar criminals, it wifi rightly demand jail 
sentences. That even a company like General 
Electric can slip shows how fetid is the atmo- 
sphere inside Mr. Weinberger's barrel 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Through Whose Eyes? 


The task is a challeng e, and a wonderful one 
—to show visitors at the Moscow Internation- 
al Book Fair “America Through American 
Eyes.” And because America's publishers did 
not want to be pushing their own books, they 
formed an eight-member committee of writers 
and members of the New York and Philadel- 
phia public libraries and asked it to come up 
with a list. Then, having explained the project, 
the publishers applied to the National Endow- 
ment for Democracy, a bipartisan organiza- 
tion financed by Congress, for some hdp. 

They gpt it all right, S50.000 worth, but they 
also got a censor. The committee's list of about 
300 books, the endowment complains, is ideo- 
logically unbalanced. 

Ideologically unbalanced? Is that another 
way to say “politically incorrect"? Is the en- 


dowment afraid to let the world, and the Rus- 
sians in particular, see that the United States is 
a country of many strengths, some weaknesses 
and more than a little dissent? Is it so distrust- 
ful of the judgment of a committee of indepen- 
dent citizens? If so, the endowment sounds 
exactly like the Book Fairs Moscow hosts. 

Unless there is an end to what the publishers 
characterize correctly as this “campaign of 
intimidation," they will return that grant and 
look for funding elsewhere. That means they 
are going to respect the choices of the commit- 
tee they asked to make them, even though, 
surely, they do not agree with all of them. That 
is the right message for Americans confident in 
their country to send to a Moscow Book Fair, 
and it is more important than any book list. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

GandhTsToughestTest 


What the bombers in India have achieved is 
the capture of the main Sikh party, the Akali 
Dal, by [a] violent separatist faction. They 
have also raised the temperature among mid- 
dle-class intellectuals in Delhi who should be 
the voice of moderation and decency. Instead 
the demand is all for “ruthless crackdowns” 
and “iron fists." So it will be harder now for 
[Prime Minister Rajiv] Gandhi to come to 
terms as he must, eventually, with legitimate 
demands for regional autonomy and an end to 
the central government manipulation his 
mother so enjoyed. It wifi, equally, be hard for 
moderate Sikh leaders, denied a place in the 
Akali Dal and in fear of their lives, to settle for 
such concessions rather than for separatism. 


Mr. Gandhi is facing the most serious crisis of 
his short public career, and India is entering 
upon a testing of its will to survive as a multi- 
communal nation. 

— The Guardian (London). 

Terrorism and the CIA 

The foolishness and futility of the Reagan 
administration's comportment in Lebanon at- 
tained a zenith when it was revealed that an 
undercover unit, trained by the CIA, contract- 
ed with other Lebanese elements to set off the 
March 8 Beirut car bomb that killed SO per- 
sons. The shame of this latest debacle is that 
U.S. officials, acting Like Mafia dons, have 
portrayed Americans to the world as people 
willing to pay the salaries of terrorists. 

— The Boston Globe. 


FROM OUR MAY 17 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Tail of Halley’s Comet Nears 
PARIS — [May 18] will count in the annals of 
science. According to the previsions of the 
astronomical world the Earth will pass 
through tire tail of Halley's comeL Every as- 
tronomer will be at his post. But if the scientif- 
ic world regards the advenL of the wandering 
star with mere scientific interest, the same does 
not hold good of the masses of the populations 
in various countries. Thousands of peasants 
have sold off possessions in the belief that the 
end of the world is at hand. For weeks they 
have refused to cultivate their fields, so that 
after the supposed danger is past they will be 
face to face with famine. Chemists' shops are 
driving a roaring trade selling oxygen to those 
who fear the emanations of poisonous gasses. 


1935: Illinois Fails to Pass Relief Bill 
SPRINGFIELD, Illinois — With Governor 
Henry Horner’s sales tax bill to provide relief 
being turned down a second time by the State 
Assembly, thousands of destitute f amili es 
throughout Illinois face hunger and immediate 
eviction from their homes. Authorities state 
that the majority of the 1.200,000 people on 
the relief rolls will be without food within the 
next few days, since the Assembly is still dead- 
locked on relief measures, and the funds of 
private charities and local communities, after 
being strained to the bursting point in the past 
two weeks, are now exhausted. The state’s 
problem is to raise 53.000,000 a month as its 
share of relief, whereupon it will again receive 
SI 1,000,000 from the Federal relief funds. 


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Nicaragua : Necessary Distinctions 

ASHINGTON — Two days By Philip Geyelin ist, in this sense, means non 

iFiot ik, Un.ir, Rifnllv unlwl ■* a J niu*1»” MfiHpr nrKOit*. lUtrtil 


would not have to live through a repetition of 
that savagery. That is a good reason. Govern- 
ment rests on a foundation of national tradi- 
tion, and good government requires a dear 
and unsentimental understanding or the pasL 
The Nuremberg trials have occasionally 
been described as an act of vengeance inflicted 
on the defeated by the victors. That is wrong. 
The Nuremberg record — vastly amplified by 
the work of a generation of German historians 
— has been a crucial contribution to the integ- 
rity of postwar politics. Similarly, the Buenos 
Aires trial is establishing certain truths that 
will enable the country to pass judgment not 
only on the nine defendants but on their whole 
style of rale and its consequences. In that sense 
it is a political trial and it strengthens the 
prospect for democracy in Argentina. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


WASHINGTON — Two days 

W after the House fitfully voted 
down all aid to the Nicaraguan 
“contras,” Alfonso Robdo Cafie- 
jas, a contra leader, threw down the 
gauntlet to the opposition, specifi- 
cally to the chairman of the HOUSC 
Foreign Affairs subcommittee re- 
sponsible for Latin American mat- 
ters, Representative Michael 
Barnes. House leaders now have a 
“challenge" to bring the Sandinists 
to the bargaining table, Mr. Robdo 
told a news conference. 

But Mr. Baines bad already tak- 
en up the challenge. Right after the 
vote, the Maryland Democrat bad 
set up a meeting in his office with 
the Nicaraguan ambassador to 
Washington. Mr. Barnes laid down 
three demands: lift censorship; 
aunt Mr. Robelo and Arturo Jos6 
Cruz, a political opposition leader, 
safe passage back to Nicaragua and 
the right to state their case; an- 
nounce a r eadiness to negotiate re- 
gional safeguards with the Conta- 
dora group made up of Colombia, 
Mexico, P anama and Venezuela. 

The ambassador would see what 
he could do. But there were rumors 
of a U.S. economic embargo on 
Nicaragua. If that happened, be 
icld Mr. Barnes, “we can't do any- 
thing.” Sure enough. President 
Reagan slapped on the embargo as 
his way of replacing the pressure 
the House vote had removed- In so 
doing, Mr. Barnes insists, the ad- 
ministration “undermined every 
hope there was." 

There lies the real issue dividing 
the administration and its critics in 
Congress — the issue that will have 
to be resolved if realistic purpose is 
to be given to U.S. policy. 

Mr. Barnes makes no brief Tor 
the performance of the House and 
still less Tor President Daniel Orte- 
ga Saavedra's arrival in Moscow 
two days after the House vole — “It 
was a slap in the face:” But he and 
others of like mind would argue 
that the Nicaraguan president went 
to Moscow for money and almost 
certainly not on two days' notice. 
Whatever, Mr. Ortega's untimely 
trip gives wobbly “moderate” Dem- 
ocrats in the House a handy excuse 
— with an eye to next year’s con- 
gressional elections — to rid them- 
selves of the political onus of un- 
dercutting the president 

Mr. Baines and other dissidents 
concede that if the question of re- 
leasing $14 million for nonlethal 
aid were to come up again anytime 
soon, it would cany by 20 to 40 
votes (it was defeated by only two}. 
But the White House has long since 
walked away from its demand that 
the money be available for military 
aid. A reversal of last month's vote 
would do little to settle the real 
issue, which turns on realizable 
ends and realistic means. 


The administration thinks & 
says it thinks, that the pressures of 
aid to the contras and an economic 
embargo wifi cause the Sandinists 
to put their rule on the line in free 
elections; abandon their Marxist- 
Leninist beliefs; stop being a Sovi- 
et-Cuban surrogate; forgo external 
adventures. All this and more Mr. 
Shultz laid down as the administra- 
tion's terms in a speech on the eve 
of the House vote. 

Yet Mr. Shultz also pointedly 
questioned whether “the Sandinis- 
I 2 s lean] be trusted to abide by what 
they agreed to” — yet one more 
suggestion that the administration 
does not see a future for Nicaragua 
with the Sandinists in charge: 

The other side of the argument 
begins with the assumption that the 


ist, in this sense, means not to “say 
uncle” under pressure, particularly 
when the unde is Uncle Sam. It 
means a stiffening of resolve. 

Witness the history of U.S. rela- 
tions with Ftdd Castro's Cuba. The 
United States damped an econom- 
ic embargo on Cuba 25 years ago. 
True, there were no anti-Castro 
“freedom fighters” for the United 
States to rally around. But two 
years later, the Kennedy adminis- 
tration persuaded most of the hemi- 
sphere to apply economic and dip- 
lomatic constraints. 

One result was economic hard- 
ship for Cuba, and increased up- 
keep costs for the Russians. Bui 
Cuba’s role in Nicaragua and Gre- 
nada, not to mention its extensive 
troop deployments in Africa, hard- 
ly suggests a loss of influence. This 
past April alone; according to a 
dispatch from Havana by free- 


SALT’S Importance f 
To American Security 


By Eugene J- Carroll Jr. 


W ashington — At last the 
question is squarely before 
Congress: Wifi the United States de- 


ting tbe Emits, the United States has 
about 1 1 ,500 deliverable strategy nu- 
clear weapons, the Soviet Union 


Until last week Congress had been 
concentrating on how much money 
to spend on defense in 1986. It had 
paid less attention to how tbe money 
should be spenL Yet arguments 
about a difference of 1 percent or 2 
percent in tbe military growth rate 
pale beside the question of whether 
the country should break one of the 
Last remaining bars to an ancon- 


U.S. numerical advantage wifi re- 
main nearly constant for tbe foresee- 
able future. 

It is difficult to find any wisdom m 

breaking rules that are working to the 
benefit of tbe United Stales. Never- 
theless; the president's 1986 budget 
requests money to do exactly that. 

Tbe Erst breakout will occur if the 

USS Alaska, the seventh Trident sob- 


strained arms race. USS Alaska, the seventn i naem kib- 

Tbe Reagan administration has marine, goes on sea trials in late Sta>- 
brought this far more important issue tember as scheduled, putting the 
to the fore in dramatic fashion. In United States 14 over the agrees lnp- 
Senate testimony May 7, Richard N. its on multiple-warhead mi gales . An 
Perle, an assistant secretary of de- eighth Trident submarine, the USS 
fense, stated his strong “personal Nevada, would raise the total by 24 
view” that the United States should more missiles in 1986. Anothe^P- 
break those limits. And three days breakout wffl occur late this year if 26 
later, in Lisbon, President Reagan B-52H bombers are modified to carry 
said, “It is posable, in regard to one 12 air-launched cruise mi s sil e s , an 
system of weapons, that we might action that would exceed the limit of 
come to such a point." 1,320 multiple- warhead systems. 

These strong intimations of an im- Budget mans for 1986 would put 
pending SALT breakout axe even the United States over agreed ceilings 
more significant because the 1986 by 38 missiles and 42 multiple- war- 
budget requests funds to operate on- head systems. Compensatory cuts in 
dear offensive forces that would be existing weapons could be made, but 




9..1 r* > 


w 


w 



in excess of tbe Emits set in SALT-2. 

SALT-2, the second Strategic 
Arms limitatio n Treaty, establishes 
several n<w«rin il limi ts on offensive 
systems. One is a ceiling of 1,200 
multiple- warhead strategic misriles. 
Another establishes a ceding of 1,320 
multiple-warhead systems— -missies 
phis Long-range bombers configured 
to cany air-launched cruise missiles. 

The United States now has 1,190 
multiple-warhead missiles and 98 
miise-equipped bombers, putting it 
very dose to both cdfings. Tbe fig- 
ures for the Soviet Union are 1,102 


early retirement 


s no plar 
of Mini 


uieman-3 


his difficult to find any ^ 
wisdom in breaking 
ndes that are working 
to the benefit of 
the United States. 


leverage the administration has at lance writer Tad Szulc flHT, May 
band or is willing to use is not going 6) saw enough diplomatic overtures 
to topple the Sandinist re gime — * to Mr. Castro from democratic, 
or, more to the point, cause it to centrist and right-of-center govern- 


and 25, respectively, according to the ways such cuts could be mad 
latest Pentagon re po rt “Soviet MDi- Tbe administration's offici 
tary Power, 1985. - tion remains that “no dedson 


missil es or Poseidon submarines, two 
ways such cuts oottld be made. 

The administration’s official por- 
tion remains that “no decision has yet 


change its ideological spots. 

Tbe congressional opponents do 
not delude themselves with the no- 
tion that Mr. Robelo has attributed 
to them that “Co mmunis ts would 
become democrats if only they were 
more generously treated.” For the 
most part, they find it hard to be- 
lieve tne Sandinists would “become 
democrats," no matter whaL 

Their point is that the Sandinists 
are nationalists as well as Maotist- 
Leninists. If that squares oddly 
with their heavy Cuban-Soviet de- 
pendence, there is less contradic- 
tion than meets the eye. National- 


meats in Tntin Amer ica to justify 
Mr. Szuk’s conclusion that Cuba 
has broken oat of hemispheric iso- 
lation in a spectacular shift. 

No, tins is not an argument that 
“another Cuba,” on tne mainlan d, 
holds no threat What Mr. fames 
and company are saying is that, in 
firing objectives, hardheaded dis- 
tinctions need to be marie between 
an intolerable external threat and 
what is reprehensible internally, 
but beyond U^l teach. 

That is the blur in the Reagan 
policy that blocks sensible debate. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Although the United States has been made on whether to continue 
neva ratified SALT-2, both super- the pohcytrf not undercutting SALT- 
powers have pledged not to undercut 2 limits.” But Mr. Perie’s statement 
these limits. While the White House to Congress, reinforced by the presi- 
has complaints about Soviet arms- deni’s comments in Lisbon, suggests . 
control violations, it does not allege that the decision has been made: f 

violations with respect to the nnmeri- The administration appears to be 
cal SALT limits on strategic nodear opening an active campaign to per- 
wessons systems. suade Americans that the United 


■■ 


Sven Soviet compliance cm no- States has no choice but to violate 
m*rifal limits, it is astonishing that agreed Hmhs cm midear weqxms. 
tbe United States apparently is pre- Yet a unilateral UiL .breakout study 
paring to go through the cemng. would trigger a rapid expansion of 
There is general agreement that Soviet strategic systems. 

SALT-2 limits are too high, but at That such a disaster should be pre- 

least they are limits. Most unbiased cipitaied by deliberate U.S. decisions 
observers also conclude that the and actions is incredible. A breakout 
SALT-2 Emits do provide «wne ad- from SALT-2 limits is whoDy incom- 
vantage to die United Sates. patible with the stated objectives of 

Today, with neither side undercut- the president's Strategic Defense Ini- 

' — ■ — — dative, whi ch requues-raductioiu in 

o ffensiv e systems if it is to have any 


Through Common Resolve, Terror Can Be Defeated 

^ y 


hope of success. 
It is also a to 


L-an oe ueieatea 

American negotiators are calling for 
support an ally victimized by terrorists for fear of major reductions in offensive sys- 
provoking their wrath upon oneself. Still another is terns. The United States seeks cffcc- 
a paralyzing preoccupation with the sovereignty of five defeases against reduced num- 
even those regimes that routinely violate the sever- here of nuclear weapons, yet R is 
eign rights of others. None of these obstacles will pr ep aring to provoke an uncon- 
easfly disappear. But once a common policy began strained anus buildup against which 
to emerge, it would in itself encourage, and shame, there can be no defense: 
many democracies tocomply. If sanity is to prevail, it mnst be 

Over a long, dark decade, Israelis were the presoribed/by Congress. It does no 
primary target of terrorism, and we bore much of good for Congress to control how 
the buraen of resistingiL fit case after painful case, much is spent an mflitaiy programs if 
Israel showed that it was possible to fight bade, ihe money is spent on weapons that 
Italy, West Germany, Britain and others soon did promote an arms race and increase 
the same but almost always limited their responses the risk of undear war. 
to cases involving their citizens on their soil. Last year an amendment to tbe 

For sane time now, the United States has been Defense Authorization Act con- 
seeking to mount a broader effort, a truly interna- tained wisewurds: “It is tbe sense of 
tional response. It has itself forfeited hundreds of the Congress that the United States 
millions of dollars in trade with Libya 'and has should continue ... to observe . . 
interceded with other democracies to prevent nriE- existing strategic arms agreements so 
taiy sales to Syria. It has also promoted intenut- longasthe Sonet Union continues to 
tional accords on terrorism. observe those provisions.” 

But if this effort is to succeed, it must have the This year, in the interest of nation- 
determined and sustained cooperation of other al security. Congress most refuse to j. 
democratic governments. Confusion, vacillation authorize binds to operate forces in tC m 
and disunity facilitated the rise erf terrorism. Com- excess of SALT ceilings. - 

mou resolve will ensure its ultimate defeat 

The writer, a retired rear admiral in 

The writer is IsraeTs chief detegats to the United ihe U.S. Navy, is deputy director of the 
Nations and editor cf the forthcoming book “ Terror - Center far Defense Information, a pri- 
ism: How ihe West Can Win.” He contributed this vale organization. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Tunes. comment to die Los Anodes Times. 


N EW YORK — The controversy over the al- 
leged U.S. involvement with anti-terrorist 
fighters in Lebanon has revived the question of 
how best to combat international terrorism. It is a 
sobering reminder of the West’s failure to act in 
concert against terrorists. 

Most of tbe democracies still vacillate in the face 
of terrorism, and they have been unable to arrive at 
a collective response. It has even been suggested 
that terrorism, like poverty, is a fact of life. The 
most we can hope, some say, is to keep it within 
“manageable" proportions. 

But the truth is that much can be done to thwart 
and even eliminate international terrorism. To 
begin with, we must recognize that it is seldom the 
work of individuals or groups, but rather, mainly, a 
form of warfare used by anti-democratic states, 
particularly of the Soviet bloc and the Middle East 
In a sense this aggravates the problem, but it also 
makes it easier to attack it, for governments, unlike 
criminal bands, are generally susceptible to a sober 
calculation of costs and benefits. 

Once this is understood, the democracies can 
join to act effectively in three broad areas: 

• Diplomacy. The abuse of diplomatic privi- 
leges him turned Western Europe and other parts 
of the world into a playing field for terrorists. 
Weapons, passports, money and safe houses are 
made available to terrorists by people hiding be- 
hind the diplomatic immunity of Syria, Iran. Libya 
and several Soviet-bloc states, among others. 
When irrefutable proof links particular embassies 


By Benjamin Netanyahu 

to acts of terrorism, these fortresses of terror 
should simply be shut down. 

• Economic measures. Most of the states re- 
sponsible for terrorism desperately need Western 
goods, weapons and credit Such benefits should 
be denied. The democracies should neither buy oil 
from Libya nor sell weapons to South Yemen. 
Planes used to feny terrorists and their weapons 
must not be allowed to land in the West. If the 
democracies were to use but a fraction of then- 
economic clout, states sponsoring terrorism would 
have to rethink their activities, and quickly. 

• The military option. Coordination among the 
democracies for military and intelligence purposes 
is both possible and necessaiy, especially in emer- 
gencies involving hostages. The rescue operation at 
Entebbe, Uganda, would, for example, have been 
impossible if Israeli planes had been unable to 
refuel in a friendly African country. Arrangements 
for such coordination should be formalized in 
advance among any democracies wishing to join. 
In concert, they could deny terrorists the certain 
military immunity they now so often enjoy. Of 
course, military action is not always feasible or 
appropriate, but the more credible it wean, the less 
often it would have to be considered. 

What has inhibited tbe collective action required 
for these ami-terrorist efforts? One impedunent 
has been avarice. Another is timidity — refusing to 


terns. The United States seeks effec- 
tive defenses against reduced num- 
ben-df nuclear weapons, yet k is 
pre p aring to provoke an uncon- 
strained anus b uildup wpwist which 
there can be no defense. 


fight back, the money is spent on weapons that 
rs soon did promote an arms race and increase 
r responses the risk of undear war. 
r soil. Last year an amendment to the 

es has been Defense Authorization Act con- 
lly interna- tained wisewurds: “It is tbe sense of 
undreds of the Congress that the United States 
4 and has should continue ... to observe .. 
neventmffi- existing strategic arms agreements so 
ed in tecna- long as the Sonet Union cantinnes to 
observe those provisions.” 
st have the- This year, inthe interest of nation- 
a of other al security. Congress must refuse to A 
vadQation authorize funds to operate forces in tC" 
asm. Com- excess of SALT ceilings. - 


1 *» • 

j 

j C& * 

• - . 
J i 

Tdl .: 

.A? 


Center far Defense Irformatkm, a pri- 
vate organization. He contributed dlls 
comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


Citizen Murdoch: To Pledge Allegiance 


L ONDON — Rupert Murdoch, the 
/ multimedia baron from Austra- 
lia, became an establishment figure 
here when he bought The Times of 
London. Earlier, he created a stir by 
buying The New York PosL founded 
in 1801 by Alexander Hamilton. 

Now he will be forced to sefl The 
Post, along with the Chicago Sun- 
Times, to pursue his dream of a 
fourth television network in the Unit- 
ed States (and ultimately production 
and broadcasting facilities circling 
the globe). This is because U.S. law 
prohibits anyone who owns a news- 
paper in any city from acquiring a 
television station there. 

Thai is a good law. preventing the 
creation or new local media monopo- 
lies, and Mr. Murdoch wisely has said 
he will not try to circumvent it. But 
another insignificant impe dime nt ex- 
ists: To assure national control of 
U.S. airwaves, federal law prohibits 
an alien from owning more than a 
fifth of a television station. 

That is no real problem for Mr. 
Murdoch, who has been a resident 
alien in the United States Tor 10 years 
and is more than eligible for citizen- 
ship. To meet the legal requirements 
for station ownership — and appar- 
ently for no other reason — he in- 
tends to become an American. 

.Anything wrong with ihat? From 
America's point of view, not a bit: 

The country naturalizes 225.000 im- 
migrants every year, and Rupert 
Murdoch is just the sort of entrepre- 
neurial type America wants to attract 
— one who wiL generate jobs and pav 
taxes and challenge the powerful. 

Bui what about his motives — is it 
right for anybody to become a citizen 
just to get around a law blocking 
foreigners from media control? 

Is it not true that Mr. Murdoch's 
main reason for becoming a citizen is 


By William Safire 

simple greed and lust for power? 

That is laigdy true, but I do not 
have any trouble with it Although 
some immigrants have come to 
America as idealists, or to escape per- 
secution or famine, most newcomers 
over the years have been drawn main- 
ly by economic promise. America's 
streets may not have been paved with 
gold, but 'opportunity has been the 

Is simple greed his main 
reason/or becoming 
a US. citizen? 

main raagneL Like George Washing- 
ton Plunkin, Mr. Murdoch “seen his 
opportunity and took it,” 
what is niggling, then, about the 
offhand way this Aust ralian immi- 
grant approaches his oath of alle- 
giance to the United States — a mo- 
ment that can be so moving and 
uplifting to the many who approach 
it with reverence? 

FirsL it is the way be is detaching 
himself from his native land. He says 
he loves Australia, and we believe 
him, because that country is the 
source of his cultural heritage and 
was the scene of his initial publishing 
stake. He makes it appear that only 
Australia's unfortunate unwilling- 
ness to permit dual citizenship makes 
it necessary Tor him to decouple. 

That is just not so. To become an 
American citizen he will have to say 
these words: “I hereby declare on 
oath, that I absolutely and entirely 
renounce and abjure all allegiance 
and fiddity to any foreign prince, 
potentate, state or sovereignty of 


whom or which I have heretofore 
been a subject or a citizen." 

Only Switzerland and Greece ig- 
nore that oath and claim anyone bora 
in those countries to be a citizen for- 
ever; most nations have a national 
pride that takes an oath of allegiance 
with utmost seriousness. 

But Mr. Murdoch’s embarrass- 
ment about rejecting bis national 
roots is his private concern, not ours; 
my problem is with the treatment of 
citizenship as a convenience or ac- 
commodation. There should be much 
more to it than that. 

I am a nationalist, tending toward 
jingoism even in the Olympics, when 
we are not supposed to, I root for 
“our side." “America the Beautiful" 
gets to such sentimentalists, and the 
country’s foreign policy beliefs assert 
the U.S. national interest rather than 
international interdependence. 

Rupert Murdoch's eyes may grow 
misty at “Waltzing Matilda." but his 
outlook is the opposite of uationahsL 
He is the Multinational Man, a true 
“citizen of the world," or at least of 
the free world. He is at home in 
London. New York and Sydney, and 
he pays liege to no political prince.- 
His allegiance. I suspect, is more to 
universal concepts (nan to any mere 
political entity. 

He is, by choice, a man without a 
country. Racing through an airport 
Ik mil fill out the space for “nation- 
ality” with a scribbled “U.S.” but It 
will have tittle meaning for him. In 
greeting Rupert Murdoch, Multina- 
tional Man. as a new fellow citizen,’ 
Americans should remind him that 
allegiance means loyalty, sometimes 
passionate loyalty. Perhaps his proud 
and brisk “I am a station owner” win 
one day be replaced by a more pro- 
found “I am an American ” 

The New York Times. 



NCNoteiwe 

OT2EARW 

OFJE 16 HT& 





UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Women in Sand’s House On 'Poi^gy and Bess’ j & 


Regarding M Saadis Affirm Rub on 
Women Visitors” (ApriTl6): 

It is mind-boggling to read that 
“Saudi Arabia has toTd airlines that, 
all female passmgers must be accom- 
panied or received by a male relative 
or they will not be admitted to the 
country” — this on the heels of an 
announcement that Saudi women 
cannot study abroad — this from a 
country that was one of the founders 
of the United Nations. Apparently, 
the Saudi rulers never read the Uni- 
versal Declaration of H uman Rights. 

It is great to see U.S. students dem- 

they could^Lso protesMhe deg^a^- 
tion of Saudi women. 

ILONA ERDOGAN. 

- - Tazia. 


With regard to Donal Henahan’s 
article (Weekend. April 19) on the 
racial restrictions ■ surrounding 
Georae Gershwin's “Porgy and 
Bess,- I do not find it hard “to com- 
prehend that only 30 years ago [there 
was] an unspoken rale against admit- 
ting blades’ to the Metropolitan Op- 
era. I do findR outrageous, insulting 
and frightening.- 

Mr. Gershwin's family has stipu- 
lated that Wades nrnst be used in any 
production of Torgy and Bess.” This 

should remind us of the tiM-so-riori-i 
°“ ’ We have not progressed* 

Toich in 30 years, but the only way to 

move forward is to remember the 
past, lest we repeat mi st a ke s. : 

. JOHN P. SHEPPARD. -. 

• : Paris. 









"ProtiJ 

S54 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


Page 5 


I Jr. ; 

*Hr 

S?S 


JVetf Battleground in the Congress: White House Policy on Apartheid 


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By David B. Ottaway 

H'cstogrMJ Fou Serrite? 

WASHINOTOy — It was 4c 

second tense appearance by rhelia- 
rassed assistant secretajy of state 
for Afdca, Chester. A. Crocker, bo- 
fere tbe Senate Foreign Relations 
Comnuttee to defoid tbe tKhxmiis' 
nation, s much-maHgaed policy of 
"grasttoettve engagonent" toward 
South Africa. . 

Senator Paul S. Sarbanes, a 
Maryiand Dqnpcrat, was proceed- 
ing is lawytx^&c faction to. cross: 
examine the professorial Mr. 
Crockec, wuldy r^arded as the 
pofic/s .chief architect - aud its 
stannehest remainmg drfendcr. 

Why, the senator asked, was Mr. 
Crocker sriR defesjdmg the policy 
at a nine when so many Americans 
of all pohdcal rasuafflcHis bad 
come to the conclusion that it had 
failed? W^n’t it dear to tlKadtnrn- 
istration that something more was 
needed to boxK abent znemingEnS 
change in South Africa's systemof 
aparthod? 

"The issues are complicated, but. 
yon better start cammg to grips 
with them because you are sitting 
there . in total jsdaricn. from 
whal is going an around yob,** bel- 
lowed a dttiiy irritated Senator 


Us Nicaraguan policy, the Reagan 
administration is aton to engage 
Congress is aitolher K^Iy contro- 
versial one. This rime & battle wHl 
be . over why ccoaoanc saocrions 
against South Africa would be tad 
policy when they were good policy 
with regard to Nicaragua. 

Tbe healed exchange before the 
early May hearing of the Senate 
Foreign Rdaiions Comimtiee, if it 
did no thing else, WgTiHghtwt die 
ertent to wScfa the Reagan admirh 
istra&iahas been-thrown;(mto 4e 
defensive as it seeks to cope with 
the ground swell of public demand 
— even amc^manyccauervatives 
within the R^bhcan Party — for 
the mqxisition of some kind of pu- 
mtive measmes against Preuraa. 

. In fact, the administration’s 
whole southern Africa policy — 
aimed at getting the Cubans trooro 
out erf. Jsgsia, indtpcndencc m 
South-West Africa and orderly 
chsin^. tmtkx way made South Af- . 


der attack in various quarters, 
Repubhcah and -Democratic. 
-• One rcsc& is that many Rep 


Fresh ifrosn a bruising battle over 


cans, paracalany m the senate, 
where 3a of them face re-dection in 
1986, are taking their public dis- 
■ tflWy - f r o m tiv ndcpipisttali oD and 
staking bat their own independent 
positions oo South Africa. 


“For most Republicans, the ad- 
uunistration’s policy prorides no 
political cover, remarked a Senate 
staff aide. “The administration 
isn’t even mrituhing the right 
words. Mr. Crocker’s approach to 
reform just doesn't selL" 

For the first rime, there is every 
indication that both the House and 
the Senate wfll pass legislation this 
session, even over the opposition of 
the admmi«ratipt) aimari at Step- 
ping up U.S. p re s atr e on the Pre- 
toria government to accelerate the 
pace of change and scrap its apart-- 
had system. 

la tbe administration ’s struggle 
to head off sanctions against South 
Africa, President Ronald Reagan’s 
decision to impose a trade embargo 
on Nicaragua has come at an ex- 
Cnanefy awkward roomoiL The em- 
bargo has served to complicate 
greatly its own argument that such 
measures imposed cm white-ruled 
Sooth Africa would be counterpro- 
ductive and, as Mr. Crocker told 
the Senate, “simply bad public pol- 
icy" setting important precedents 
“with worldwide nnpEcatioris.” 

“Can anyone seriously doubt 
that it is far worse to live today as a 
black man or woman in South Afri- 
ca than as an opponent of the San- 
dimstas in Nicaragua?* asked Rep- 
resentative Stephen J. Solarz, 


Democrat of New York, at a House 
Foreign Affairs Comnuttee session 
just after Mr. Reagan had an- 
nounced his trade embargo. 

“If total sanctions are justified 
against Nicaragua, can we really 
ssy that partial sanctions ... are 
not justified against South Africa?" 
be added. 

Mr. Crocker’s answer is that the 
two cases are entirely different and 
must be derided partly on tbe basis 
of whether U.S. sanctions will 
plain* any difference. South Afri- 
ca’s economy is 30 times larger 
than Nicaragua’s and much less 
vulnerable to the impact of sanc- 
tions, he argues. 

One gauge of the surprising 
breath and depth that tbe South 
African issue has taken on is the 
shifting attitude among main - 
stream and even conservative Re- 
publicans, many of whom are 

openly disgruntled with the admin- 
istration's constructive engagement 
poBcy. 

Two conservative Republican 
senators — William V. Roth Jr. of 
Delaware and Mitch McConnell erf 
Kentucky — haw introduced a biD 
that calls for the banning of all U.S. 
loans to the Sooth African govern- 
ment and all flights by South Afri- 
can Airways to the United States. 





Paul S. Sarbanes 

Licenses of goods and technology 
for South African nuclear develop- 
ment would be blocked. Tbe bill 
would also reduce the number of 
South African consulates allowed 
to operate in the United States. 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy, a 
Massachusetts Democrat, and Sen- 
ator Lowell P. W acker Jr_ a Con- 
necticut Republican, have intro- 
duced probably the strongest bill to 


Cn rocr a f*rs 

Chester A. Crocker 

date, but even their proposals do 
not differ that radically — except 
in the eyes of the administration — 
from many others being put forth 
by conservative Republicans. 

Known as tbe Anti-Apartheid 
A ci of 1985 and haring 10 Demo- 
cratic co- sponsors, the measure 
would prohibit all new U.S. loans 
to South Africa, restrict new invest- 
ment. prohibit computer sates to 


the government there and ban the 
sale erf South African gold kruger- 
rands in the United States. 

An identical bill has been intro- 
duced in the House by Representa- 
tive William H. Gray 3d, a Demo- 
crat from Pennsylvania, with 145 
co-sponsors, seven of them Repub- 
licans. 

An alternative approach, far 
more to the administration's liking, 
is that bring proposed by the Sen- 
ate Foreign Relations Committee 
chairman, Richard G. Lugar of In- 
diana, and co-sponsored by 
Charles McC. Mathias of Mary- 
land and Robert J. Dole of Kansas. 

Tbe thrust of this bill is to in- 
crease U.S. aid for the economic 
and social promotion of the black 
population m South Africa and put 

off any consideration of economic 

sanctions for at least two years to 
give the South African government 
more time to make reforms. 

But it would make the so-called 
Sullivan principles mandatory, 
rather than voluntary, for U.S. 
companies operating in South Afri- 
ca. The principles, named after the 
Reverend Leon Sullivan of Phila- 
delphia. seek to assure equal treat- 
men l for blacks and improve their 
general conditions both m and out- 
side the work place. 

But Mr. Crocker said in testimo- 


ny before the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee on May 2 that the 
administration was opposed to 
making the Sullivan principles 
mandatory because of the (c$ai dif- 
ficulties involved in the application 
and monitoring of a U.S. law in a 
foreign country. 

The administration’s position, os 
presented by Mr. Crocker, is that 
its policy of constructive engage- 
ment is working successfully and is 
tbe best alternative. He argues that 
more change for the better than 
ever before is lairing place today in 
South Africa and that U.S. sanc- 
tions would be sending the '‘wrong 
signal at the wrong time.’’ 

Mr. Crocker, in uving ip sdi! this 
approach, has clcariy angered 
many on Capitol Hill by his han- 
dling of its critics and those favor- 
ing doing something more. He has 
accused many of them of using 
South Africa as “the moral equiva- 
lent of a free lunch" and has said 
that their proposals for economic 
sanctions are “misguided." 

Senator Sarbanes, in turn, has 
charged that Mr. Crocker exhibits 
“almost an ivory tower mentality" 
in handling the Senate, while a Sen- 
ate staff aide called the assistant 
secretary “a loner” and "on intel- 
lectual who is politically mal- 
adroit” 


Sri Lanka Increases Security- 
After 220 Diemlfflutic Strife 


Compiled by Our Staff Fn*n Dispatches 

COLOMBO — The government 
stepped np security Thursday 
throughout Sri Lanka, hoping to 


from mounting mare reprisal at- 
tacks after two days of violence in 
which mdie than 220 people were 
kffled. 

Official sources said that securi- 
ty forces had been put on alert and 
that patrols had beat intensified at 
placet considered vulnerable to at- 
tack in Colombo and other areas. 

The sources, said the; security 
forces would try to prevent a repe- 
tition of tbe violence in i 983, when 


‘ ists led to army reprisals and fur- 
ther outbreaks of violence. More 
than 400 people were killed. 

Buddhist monks and Catholic 
priests joined the government 

AnstialinnP^piilation Trend 

United Pros Inuhiatunal ■ 

SYDNEY — Women outnum- 
ber men in Australia, a report pub- 


lished Wednesday said. For every 
100 adult females, there are 97 
males in tire population of 15J 
million. 


Thursday in appealing to the peo- 
ple to maintain peace. 

Goveanoent. and news, reports 
said thai Tamfi-speakers were 
hacked and bunted to death 
Wednesday by attackers seeking 
revenge for the lrilliug of about 145 
people in raids Tuesday by Tamil 
separatists on Sinhalese towns, 

. Thcpdice that said sailors from. 
the Sii Lankan Navy attacked a 
coastal ferry- off northern Jaffna 
Peninsula, and hacked about 40 
people to death. 

: But a senior crfficLal in Colombo, 
the capital, said the navy had de- 
nied that h was involved. He said 
31 people died in the ferry attack 
ana many more were hospitalized 
in Jaffna, the major dty of north- 
cra Sri Lanka, whereTmmls arc the 
majority. 

A Defense Ministry spokesman 
said Thursday the government was 
investigating the incident and the 
attackers had not been identified. 

In Easton province, security 
forces killed 18 guerrillas Wednes- 
day in a raid on a rebel training 
camp at Akkaraipatm. Several 
^guemDas escaped whea comman- 
dos raided the camp, Defense Min- 
istry sources said. (Rollers, Af) 





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Discontent Threatening to Shake Saudi Stability 


TH* AnoaowdiVen 

NIGERIAN EXODUS — A truckload of Ghanaians 
.left Lagos last week for the bonier. About 5^X)0 Ghana- 
ians returned home Wednesday in line with Nigeria's 
order for thousands of illegal immigrants to leave. 


By Elaine Sdolino 

New York Tunes Service 

RIYADH — When Saudi offi- 
cials are asked if their kingdom is 
stable, they answer that Saudi Ara- 
bia has tittle violent crime, no sui- 
cide bombers and a royal family 
dose to the people. 

“Whenever I come here, I feel a 
total sense erf peace and security” 
said Samir S. Shihabi, the Saudi 
delegate to the United Nations, on 
a recent visit home. “I feel as if I'm 
protected from the world outside.” 

By all indications the desert 
kingdom is stable, according to 
Saudi officials. Western and Asian 
diplomats and foreign business- 
men. But there are tensions that 
threaten to disrupt the tranquillity 
in the years to come. 

Saudi officials enjoy Idling visi- 
tors that the 4,000 members of the 
royal family permeate all levels of 
business, agriculture, the civil ser- 
vice, the provincial administrations 
and the military. They insist that 
the government's stability is not, 
therefore, dependent on theperson 
of the king, and were King Fahd to 
die, he would probably be succeed- 
ed by Prince Abdallak one of his 
brothers, who is first deputy prime 
minister and commander of the 
National Guard. 

But because of the nature of the 


government, it is difficult to gauge 
its stability. 

Open criticism of the royal fam- 
ily is forbidden. Saudi television 
and radio are state-owned and op- 
erated; the privately owned press is 
prevented from publishing any- 
thing that might embarrass the gov- 
ernment, the ruling family or the 
religious leadership. 

Political parties are banned, and 
repeated promises by the royal 
family to set up a consultative as- 
sembly have not been fulfilled. 

Internal security has been tight- 
ened considerably since 1979, when 
armed Islamic fundamentalists, 
charging that the government was 
corrupt, seized the Grand Mosque 
at Mecca. 

Shiite Moslems number about 
300,000, compared with about five 
million Saudi Sunnis. The royal 
family has pumped money into the 
Eastern province, where the Shiites 
live. But while there has been no 
recurrence of the riots that rocked 
the province in 1979, the Sunnis 
and Shiites are still not well inte- 
grated. and there are few Shiite 
officials in the government. 

The Islamic fundamentalism of 
Iran no longer seems to find much 
support here, but there is sympathy. 
with the Moslems of southern Leb- 
anon. 

“In the beginning the Iranian 


revolution was supported by Mos- 


secretary general of the Saudi-fi- 
nanced World Assembly of Muslim 
Youth. “Today there is definitely 
sympathy and support for southern 
Lebanon. The youth here see this 
situation as Islam under attack.” 

In Saudi Arabia, as in many oth- 
er parts of the Moslem world, Islam 
provides an acceptable outlet for 
dissatisfaction with tbe govern- 
ment. Despite King FaJxTs efforts 
to placate the religious leaders, 
some university professors and stu- 
dents hope to make the country 
even more Islamic. 

They criticize embassies, includ- 
ing that of the United States, that 
serve alcohol at receptions. Al- 
though many of them have studied 
at American universities, they want 
to ban, or at least limit, study in the 
West. 

U-S- policy in the Middle East, 
especially its support of Brad, con- 
tinues tomake some Saudis wary of 
the reliability of the United Stales 
and the wisdom of reliance on 
American military equipment and 
training. 

Fundamentalists resent the fact 
that non-Moslems are in the coun- 
try at all 

“We should help our Moslem 


brothers by nor hiring joy non- 
Moslems here." an official said. 
“We should drive away the nonbe- 
lievers from the .Arabian peninsu- 
la.” 

There is growing criticism of 
members of the royal family for 
squandering the country's wealth 
abroad, especially when others arc 
suffering in the’ country's three- 
year recession. 

For many. King Fahd. who has 
lavish residences on the Costa del 
Sol in Spain and in Geneva and 
who keeps a yacht the size of a 
luxury liner off Jeddah, has not 
lived up to the Saudi ideal of a 
leader chosen by his people for his 
piety, generosity and courage. 

An Asian Moslem scholar said; 
“The sermons at Friday prayers in 
Mecca and Medina are filial with 
parables of Omar, the second Ca- 
liph. who was known for simple 
living and humility. They should be 
a dear message for the royal fam- 
ily." 

Recently a group of university 
professors in Jeddah watched tele- 
vision in disgust as one of the coun- 
try's young princes, Abduiaziz. was 
shown touring Disneyland. 

“They're cutting my salary 30 
percent, and I'm forced to watch 
tins kid in Disneyland.” one of 
them said. 


m 


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Page 6 


CSTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


** 


NYSE Most Actives 


Stonaf 

VOL HMi Low 
87302 41% 38% 

Lot 

40ft 

Oft. 

+1* 

AlldCP 

28^ 41% 

40 

41 

+1 

AT&T 

20064 23ft 

Bft 

23ft 

+ * 

HawfPfc 

HUS 33% 

37ft 

32% 

—1ft 

IBM 

9818 129ft 

128ft 

129 


MAPCO 

9773 35ft 

34ft 

35* 

+1 

FerdM 

9169 41ft 

41 

41% 

+ % 

Kmart 

Bft5t 37ft 

36ft 

37ft 

+ift 

Ail Rich 
GTE 

8379 41 
S388 40% 

60* 

40ft 

60% 

40* 

+ ft 

MMSUt 

8254 M 

U* 

M 

+ % 

Exxon 

8Z« 51ft 

30% 

51ft 

+ * 

Goodvr 

8138 28* 

28% 

28ft 

+ % 


8128 30ft 

29% 

30ft 

+ ft 

Stars 

7896 36 

33 

36 

+1% 


Dow Jones Averages 


Om KM LOW W* cm 


Indus 127672 I2SS.11 mat* 1218X3 + 

Tran* 611JB 401.12 40*72 4T7-5B + Lg 

Util 1942 162X1 1»X6 16103 + U2 

comp 52277 5U7 52071 S2554 + 19 


NYSE Index 


commJio 
industrials 
Tramp, 
utmtia# 
Fin 


KM Low Claso CUM 
10750 107.12 10750 + 043 
122.12 121S3 122.12 +09 
9951 9950 9971 +047 
SS54 5551 57.74 +046 
11777 117 A 1I7J7 +054 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


CM* OHM 

7674 +047 

7400 +QJ8 

79jJ8 +056 


NYSE Diaries 


Advamd 

Declined 


Total 

New Hfaft* 
New Lews 
Volume up 
V o fume down 



Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


MOV 15 
MOV 14 
MOV 13 
Mavis 
Mav9 


Bov Salt* 
183.960 443857 
191844 433512 

man ur.m 

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Thursday 


nise 


VoLot4 PJVL. 


Tonies Indode the notloawlde prices 
up to ttw dosing on well Street and 
do Mt reflect toft trades elsrwtwre. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
High Lew snck 


as. 

MBs High LOW 


dose 
OMoree 


; NYSE Higher in Broad Advance 



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C7 

The AsseOaud Press 

NEW YORK — The stock market recorded a 
broad gain Thursday, renewing its recent rally 
with a push from falling interest rates. _ 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 
4.53 points to 1 , 278 - 05 , bringing its gain since 


U.S. M-l Up $2.1 Billion 


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past L 

Volume on the New York Stock Exchange 

m 106.12 


23 


slowed to 99.^2 million shares from 
million Wednesday. . . 

Advancing issues outnumbered declining 
.ones by nearly 2 to I. 

On Wednesday, Bankas Trust of New York 
lowered its prime lending rate from 10V4 parent 


to 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK —M-l, the narrowest measure I 
of the U.S money supply, shot up $2.1 b2Ikm.m 
early May, the Feaenri Reserve Board said 
Thursday. 

The Fed said M-l rose to a seasonally adjust- 
ed 5577.6 billion in the week ended May 6 from 
a revised $575.5 billion the previous week. The 
previous week's figure originally was reported 
as 5575.2 billion. 

M-l includes cash in circulation, checkmg- 
type deposits in banking institutions and non- 
bank travelers checks. 


ecause no other 

banks joined in the move, fiut analysts said the 
lower rate probably would spread in Lhe bank- 


to the news at first, partly 
love. Bi 


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Expectations persist cm Wall Street that the 
Federal Reserve might. soon relax its credit 
policy, through actions such as a reduction of its 
discount rate — the charge it imposes on loans 


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The hope on Wall Street is that lower rates 
will stimulate a revival of economic growth, 
which has been sluggish lately. 

Optimism on that score gpt a boost Thursday 
morning from the Commerce Department’s re- 
port that housing starts rose 1.6 percent in April 
to their highest level in a year. 

Signal Cos. rose 1ft to 40ft and Allied Corp. 
picked up 1 to 41. The two companies plan a 55- 
billion merger. 

Among other actively traded blue chips, In- 
ternationa) Business Machin es gained ft to 129; 


American Telephone & Telegraph ft to 23ft, 
and Exxon % to 51ft. 

Exxon said it will continue a stock repurchase 
program under which it has bought back more 
than 100 milli on of its shares since July 1983. 

Tokhtim fell 3ft to 1 7ft. The company, which 
manufactures equipment for gasoline stations, 
said it expects Iowa earnings for the current 
quarter and fiscal year. It cited mergers and 
restructuring strategies among some of the ener- 
gy companies that are its largest customers. 

Hewlett-Packard, which reported lower quar- 
terly profits, dropped I ft to 32ft. 

Standard & Poor’s index of 400 industrials 
rose 1.07 to 205.27, and SAP’s 500-stock com- 
posite index was up 1.12 at 185.66. 

The Nasdaq composite index for the over- 
the-counter market gained 1.42 to 289.75. At 
the American Stock Exchange, the market value 
index closed at 229.43, up .70. 


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HOW HUGE PROFITS WERE MADE 

onaNew York Stock Exchange “short” 


When COMMODORE was sailing in euphonc seas, semng above STO(beioroa2 
1 split), our researchers sent out distress signals urging rattonalMHite “jo 
flouting the 45 or more “Funds' that had scrambled up the gang-ptankol prevafling 
opinion. The law of contrary reason triumphed: CBUcapsized _ below 

Wie are not purveyors of pessimism. Since late 1981, approximately 90%OTStocks 
recommended as “buys" subsequently advanced. 

categorfassd as “shorts" buckled, among them APPLE, COUECO AND TANDY, each of 

which we dissected during their ersatz glory. _ . . .. . 

As contrarians, we urge readers to buy into weakness, to sen into strengm, to 
invest in bona-fide emerging shares with the duality of assets and ramanw, 
corporations such as a recently recommended energy stock that gushed 600 % in a 

brief time span despite the “oil glut". . . 

It may be illuminating to note that In 1982, when the DOW was temg rrrauMatttre 
790 level, we stunned the "Street", prophecizing that the "DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000 
BEFORE HITTING 750", updating our target to 2.000 after the magical 1.000 became a 

reality. The past Is prologue, the epilogue has yet to be written. 

Our forthcoming letter reviews the “Big Board" equities that appear to be classic 
“shorts". Asa piece de resistance, C.GlR. focuses upon a low-priced Venture Capital 

corporation with the dynamics to vault, having introduced a "working concept trial 
could revolutionize the merchandising of wine. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to or telephone... 



GVjC. Capital Venture Consultants 
Amsterdam BY. 

Katvers*raatTl2 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Tetax: 18538 


"1 


Name: 


Address: 


I 



ftntporfonnance does not Quorantae future resuta 


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38% 23 Hatoln 260 9.1 14 


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15* 9* DomonC JO IJ 53 11* 10* 11 — % 

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95* 71% DartKr 468 48 11 492 97 95% 96% +1% 

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103 7566 DPLpf 1£50 133 70* 96% 96% 96% 

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130 


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V 4M 4H <T4 

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76 37 14 30 171* 17% 17U 

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Ijn £3 8 509 43* 42 43% + % 

JO 17 10 199 30% 30* 30*— % 

. „ .16 2*4 15* 15 15% + % 

UM 16 I 670 30* WS& WHs 

2JB 37 12 7566 59* 51* 97 — * 

250 If 10 1603 6*% 63% 64 +V6 

60a 87 829 7% 6* 7% + * 


35* 21% ICIndS 1J4 46 12 1M7 32% 32% 32% 

19* 16% iCMn J2e U 61 17 U* 17 

11% 6% ICN 101 47 im W M* . 

30 22ft ICN pf £70 96 16 2B 27* 28 + % 

17% 14 I MAI a 152 115 22 Wk 16% 16*— % 

27 23 IPnmn 159 27* 26* 27% +46 

20% 14% IRTPrs 170 89 7 52 19 10% » 


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27* U% MVSk 1 JO 47 8 85 27* 27% 27% + % 

5 2% KeyOon 9 2* 2* 2* + % 

19% 64 Kevelnt Jl 23 17 TO 17 H* >7 +%, 

36% 26% Kkta* UB 85 9 215 34 33* 34 + % 

»t 641k KMprfl 458 81 TO 79 71* 79 +6% 

53* 39* Khnba £32 43 TO 490 SJ% 53% 52* 

36* 29% KnahtRd 76 £2 16 USD 35 34 34% + %• 

29 17% ICooer 270 87 56 55 28% 38% 5%— -ft. 

29* 15* Kotow OS 13 16 S3 14* 14% 16* 

22% 17 Kopora 30 46 M 214 W* 18% 18% 

36* 30ft Kapr Of 430 1U 48x34 34 34 —1 ■ 
14 13% Korean 17 13% 13% IM + ft 

44 29% Kroner £M 47 11 6*2 <1% 43 43 
29% 11 KMMmi 60- 17 17 179 30* 29% 30* *1 . 
19ft 7% KuhHnwl 48 20ft If* TO* +1 

47% 36* K racer J2e 3 21 M mum* m+* 

21% 13 KVMT 30 46 6 3718 17% IS +% 


£77*185 


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11% 7% LFE 
17% tZTOLfJERV £IBel5J 
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15% 8% LTV 
21% UM LTVA 
55 45% LTV pf 

27% 18% LTVpf 
59 45* LTVPf 

W% 12 LTVpf 
17 lift Utonl 
29% 15% LocMa 
11% 6% Lotoraa 
38% » LofniPf 264 
14% 9% Lomurs 31 
4ft I* Lomaaa 
u% u% Lnwflnf 36 
25% Oft Leorpr jo ... 
28% 20% LaarFpf 237 115 
S3* »% LnrSp 330 43 V 
31 14 Lea Roll JB £1 15 

34ft 34% LlwVTr 138 89 13 
40% 22 LaaElrf 32 £1 20 
15% 9 L ap M oe JO LI 28 
21% |5ft LepPtat JS £2 9 


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41 44ft ITT PfO 530 12 2 41 61 61 + 

44% 28 ITTpfN £25 49 1 45* 45* 45*— 

45 42ft ITT pf) 440 7.1 4 43 *2 63 +1 

21% 13* IU UK U0 77 2432 15* 15% 15* — 

41% 31% IdnteP £28 77 8 79 42% 42 4Zft + 

21% 21 Motif* wl 12 21% Zl% 21% + 

20ft 13ft Idertfl 314 15* 15% 15% + 

25% 17% SHiPowr £64 HJ 7 2588 36 25% 25* + 

18 Uft llPoerpf 2X4 UJ 2B0x 11 18 11 + 

25% 27% 1 1 Paw pf 412 1U 400x 34* 34 34* * 

32% 25% (IPawpf 3J1 114 9700x33 31* 31 +1% 

53* 48% llPowpf 575 U7 98 53% 53% 51% + _ 
37 28* llPowpf 467 116 7610x38% 37% 38% +]ft 

33% 25% IIPowpf400 1U 1 34 34 34 + 

36% 21% ITW 64 £0 U 203 32% 31% 32 + 

40% 27* impCbm 2498 55 • 2764 38* 37* 38ft 


3 28 

71 6* 6% 6M— % 

464 19* 13* 13% 

9% Sft 3* — * 
377 17% 17 17* + % 

647 55* 55* 55%— % 


24% 14% arcue 
49ft 27% OTlOP £26 47 
86 tt% aneppf £19eUL2 
97 75% dtcpptA974a1U 

43 % 3s% atvmv 
66% 56 Ctyinwf 230 36 
25% 21* Ctvlnpf 237 113 
10 6% ClaWr 72 M3 . 

32 29* CtarkE l.W £f 21 

16 6% OavHm 11 

22 Ki 17 CtvCIf 130 12 
21% 14* ClevEI £53 113 
60 46% avEIPl 768 125 

60 47 CIvEI pf 746 127 

16* 10 Ctownk 60 46 
17ft 15% Ovpfcpf 223 127 
19% 14% Owpkpf 134 106 
36% 22% Cfana ~ 

21% 14* QtrbM 


16 22* 22* 22ft— ft 
40 8 7* 7ft 

U? 49% 48ft 49% + * 
74 12ft 12ft 1216— ft 
414 18% 10 10 —ft 

3743 35* 15% 35* + % 
105 70% 69% 70 — M 

30 60ft 59ft 59ft— 1 

522 19 18* 18*— % 

266 261k 25% 26% + ft 

39 48 47% 47*— * 

1064 15% 14ft 15% + * 
1«b 31 21 31 + % 

50x 26 36 36 

150x54ft 54% 54%—* 
70x 67% 67ft 67% — 1 
124 21% 21% 21ft 

tie 34* 34* 34* 

533 25 34* 24*—% 

_ 184 21 23* 23*— % 

7 3961 48* 47% 47*— ft 

240 80% 80 80 +% 

1 95 95 95 + % 

8 88*3 36% 55 35*— 1% 

9 55 55 55 —1% 

77# 25 23 25 

6 69 7 Ok 7 

89 28ft 28% 28ft 

31 12 lift 12 +% 

8 16 19* 19% 19% 

* 1898 21% 2Bft 21ft + % 

10ta 59 59 59 +1 

TOOlSfft 59ft 59ft 
22 13* 13% lift— ft 
27 17% 17% 17% + % 

It 17* 17% 17* + % 

1A 83 11 299 3516 34* 35 
J0e 6 21 HOS 23ft 21ft 23ft +2 


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21% 12% C nochm JO U 14 430 TO* 13% 13%- ft 

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60% 24* CrtlRf 1.19 £1 1 58 5B 58 +4% 

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72% 33% COcaCl 296 43 14 1315 62* 68% 68* + % 

19% 9% Cotace 1412 M* 14* 14% + % 

34 25% Cotanrn T JO 4.1 17 20 29% 29* 29% 

26* 20% CatoPof 1 Jib SI 32 2566 25* 25 25 — % 

23* 14ft COIAlkt 6423 8 519 22% 21% 22 +% 

. M — - 

9 


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64 54* 54* 54ft + % 
56 28* 27% 27% 

30 72 71% 72 +1% 

8 35* 35* 35* + ft, 
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6% 8% 6ft— " 


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31* 20% Cal Pan L48 43 
63ft 39* Crttlnd 250 46 
33 26* CofGes £18 106 

52 48 CaKMof 5J8 11.1 

48% 45* CoKSspf 5.12 IU 
27% 22 CSOpf £45 

CSOpf al5JS U3 
C5Q Pf nlSJS 14J 


48% 27% Combln £16 45 9 
37% 25* CmbEn 134 63 11 
17% 8 Comdta JB IJ TO 
20 15% ComMfl J6 £0 15 

34ft 8* Comdra 3 

20% 22ft CmwE 330 93 7 
, Uft 13 CwEpf 130 11J 
130 40% 39* 39* 17 13% CwEpf 2X0 11J 

20 10% 10% 10* + % 103 80 CwepfUJOlU 


29 21* 21% 71%—% 
898 28ft 23 28* + % 

1150 57% 55* 57 +1% 

1454 30ft 29% 38 +% 

3 49% 49* 49* + % 
50 45% 45% 45%—% 
S 47* g* 27* + * 
10x107 107 107 +1 

502705* IDS m 
203 47% 47* 47ft + % 
464 31% £0% 38*— % 
198 U* U* Uft + % 
2 17* 17* 17* 

TOM TO* 9* TO 
1128 30ft 29* 30ft + % 
83 Uft 15% 16% -V % 
2 16* 16* 16*— ft 
810x103% inftKBft + % 


43% 47ft DetEpf 768 126 
60* 46 DetEpf 765 T£3 
60 45* DetEpf 7J6 122 

25 19* DEP# £75 11 J 

26% 20* DEprR £24 122 
2»fc 19* De PfO 2.13 126 
25% 19% DEpfP £12 1ZI 
MJk 20 De pm £75 1L1 
m, ZIV* DEpfO £40 126 
27* 20* DEPfM S62 126 
31ft 24V* DE prL 430 129 
32* 24* DEpfK 4.12 126 
W 86 DEjfl 1230 122 
91 72% DrtEpf 9.72 106 

19 13% DetEnr 228 IU 

34 17* Dexter 30 43 11 

1» 9* DM? tar 64 A3 
28* 21* QSGtapf 225 U 
25 IS? “S» s 1M M M 7428 
X* 3f% Dtaghpf 4X0 106 33 


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125% 77% Digital 
81* 45% Dtsnev 
43 20 DEI 

6% 3% Dlvrrtn 

MVk «* Damns 
31 21% DamRs 

21* 16 DanaW 
57* 35* Dan tor 
34 23% DDTUT 

43% 32% Dower 
32% 25* DawCh 
51* 36% DawJn 
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22% 15* ' 

19% 

51* 

59% 

44% 


130 £3 11 


IMx 62 60ft 62 +lft 
14MB 68ft 59 60ft +1% 
73BX 60ft M 40% +1% 
4 Mt Mt 24ft—* 
21 26% 26 26ft + ft 
183 21% 35* 25% 

17 25* 25 25* + * 

6 24* 24M 34* 

12 27* 27% 27* + * 
150 27* 27% 27ft + % 
40 81% 81 31 

14 32* 32* 32* + * 
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4TO8x 92 92 92 +1 , 

12 19ft 18ft 19ft + ft 
329 20% 20% 20ft 
84 15* 15 15 

1 28 21 S + ft 

19 18% 10*—% 

3Bft 37* 37*—* 
411 43 42% 42* + % 


106 18* 12* 18 + M 

523 44% 44% 44%—* 

2008 x 11% lift lift 

720x 12% lift 11% +1 
55 4* 4ft 4* + % 

134 17ft Tfl* 17 + % 

791 23 21% 21% + * 

2 20ft 20ft 20ft + ft 
259 32ft 3Mk 31*— % 


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16% 8% OrcoPt 60 43 18 

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55 4 42 44 43 44 +lft 

4 70 5* 5* 5* 

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87 9 TO# 31ft 30% 31ft + * 
£9 8 73 17 16ft Uft— ft 

1.14 £1 1# 436 55* 55* 55* + ft 

130 43 13 59 a 28ft 28ft— ft 

33 £3 13 570 34* 35* 3t* + ft 

130 56 12 7480 33* 81* 32* + * 
3 14 H 798 43% 42% 43* +Tft 
30 43 115 11% lift lift 

4X 15 1022 20* TO 20ft + ft | 
10J 14 19* 19% mt 

13 12 £32 51* 50% 51ft +1% 

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10.1 54 44* 43* 44% + * 

73 8 1382 33 3Z% 22* + * 

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113 380x 73 73 73 — ft 

113 30*71 71 71 +1% 

113 38 33* 33* 33*— ft 

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5BBZ 17ft 17ft 17ft + M 

31b 15ft 15% 15ft + ft 

10b 17* 17* 17* 

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31 25* 25* 25* 


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73% 33 GMEn J4a J 1154 71* 70% 71* +1% 

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a 24% GanuPf 1.11 £7 14 . ._ 

27% 18 GaPOC 30 £4 25 1637 24ft 28ft 21% + ft 

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28 25% aaPwpf 92* 36 560 27* 27ft 27% + ft 

20% 22* GaPwpf 344 IU 75 a Z7% 73 + Vk 

30 25% GaPwpf £76 1£7 47 29% 29% 29% + % 

21% 17% GaPwpf £5# 113 13 21% 21ft 21% + % 

21% 17 GaPwpf £52 12J TO 20* 2M 2R6 + ft 

25ft 21% GaPwpf £75 WJ 2 35ft 25ft 2SH _ 

32% 20% GerbPB 1J2 4J II 255 32% 71ft 3196— % 

23% 12% G#rb8# .12 3 13 662 17% 16% 17ft + * 

12% Sft GtantP 187 11% lift IT* + ft 

It* 5* GfisrFO 5 U64 12ft 11% 11% + * 

27 1«% GtHHUI 32 33 37 140 24% 24 24 — % 

62ta 42% Gif lotto £40 4J TO 466 #2 61% 61* _ 

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SS 6M GtanFO 3 I6TO 12ft 11% 11% + ft 

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32% 19 GouM 68 £2 55 

44% 36% Groce 2X0 63 11 

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18ft 13% GtAtPc 8 

52% 27% GfLkln 130 U 15 

— — ‘ 131*123 6 

132 43 9 
38 £1 10 
172 96 9 
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69% 54% InrBMpf 868.124 
102% 91ft UtoMpfBXO 113 
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18% 14% fndUlpf 225 12.1 
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21* 14 Insllco 138b 5J 10 
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29% 18ft GfWh 
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13* Bft GrawGi 30 


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24% lift GulfRs 
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1517 19 18 18M + * 

72 17 16* 1#*— ft 

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936 38% 27* 28ft + % 
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29* 33 InTMUtt 1J4 6X 11 

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54* 32* Inttir-m 268 SJ 9 

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17% 10 Infeata- 

20* 15* IrtrtPw 130 93 9 

20% M* InPwpf 2J8 113 

TO 14* hmoEl 1J0 96 9 

38M 21* loedlG £74 83 7 

20* 17 lewlllpf £81 IU 

34ft 35 lowaRi 3X8 83 9 

36* 36 Ipalra £04 86 9 

U* 9* IpcoCp £4 £9 12 

40ft 22ft IrvBJCS 136 43 8 


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36 24* 22* 23*—% 
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II 12ft 12* TOW + ft 
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120 9* 9ft 9% + ft 

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55 160%160 160* 

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294 35 34% 34* + ft 

487 UU 35* 36* + % 
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47ft 28 JafmJn 
46% 37% JahnCn 
41 48* JtwiCnwl 

29* 21ft Jaraen 1X0 45 17 
26* 15* Jertans J U 11 
27ft 21* JayMHl UO 53 14 


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93 11 10* VO* 

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_ 27 23* 23* 231k 

5X 77 772 22* 2% 22* 


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17* lAtk EQKn 
31% Bft ESwt 

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37* Eaton 1 JO £6 7 103# 53ft S3 S3ft + * 
334 164ft Eaton pfMXO A3 I M SB to -H 

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li 1P° - 2 U 11 81 Uft 16* 15 — % 

ex 15 >ISBS- V 

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U 19* 19ft 19* + ft 
167K 18% 18ft 18% — ft 
218 56 55% 55ft— % 

TO 29* 28% 29% + ft 
■40 TOft 1W% + ft 


35 2BM 


28* 23* EPGpr 


27ft 19ft HallFB 1X0 4X 400 25ft 25 2SM 

39ft 26% H attain 1X0 5J 11 1181 30* 30ft 30* + ft 

1% * Hallwd X6 5X 17 176 1» 1% .Tft' ^ 

11* 5* Halwdpf -56 5.1 ISO 11 10* 11 + ft 

35* 25* HamPs 1J6 3J 11 MSB 35ft 34* 25 — % 

13* Uft HCdUS 1670117 *1 

20 Iff* HanJI 1X40 96 31 19* 19* 19%— ft 

28* 13% Hanots J6 £1 17 299 27% 24ft 27% +1ft 
£0* 15ft HandH 66 23 20 
Sft 16* Ham 60 23 23 
53* 25ft HarflrJ 1X0 U U 
31 17% Harfnds J U if 

12* 7% Hambfa 27 

33% Mft HrpRw XS £8 13 
23 22* Harris JB £3 12 — -- — - 

)V* 10% HarGrn 7 40 TO* TOft 15ft- 

n 19 hSSb 1J8 AS 11 263 29, »ft V* + % 

33% 23ft Hartmx Uf £8 TO 455 33%3H6Uft + * 

16* 13* HaHS# UB TO! 11 19 16% WJ lg6— g 

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TOft 7ft KD1 JO 25 TO TO 8% 8 8— % 

lift 9% KLMi 12 387 17% 17ft 17% 

89% 33 KM1 pf 4X0 12J 4 37ft 36* 37% + ft 

41ft 21ft Kmart UB 3X IB 8659 37ft 34% 37% +1% 

40* 28 KNEna UB 17 18 £i 39M 39 39ft + ft 


536 27% 24% 2«4— JA 1 


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ITU 16* KaisCe JO L2 
20 If* KaKrt U7 E2 
15* Bft Kawb JO 46 
24 , 14ft KCtvPL £36 105 
31% » KCPL pf 3X0 111 
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INTERNATIONAL 


\ May 17,1585 


WEEKEND 


... ; , ' '"'• ' ' ' ' 

^j David Byrne: Jaywalker Between High Art and Low 


Page 7 


The following is excerpted frtmum article in 
The New York Times Magazine. . 


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~V^\ EROX3DE and. black leather. The 
1 ft J elevator at Manhattan's Hard Boric 
N ft^ Cafe is crammed with mambas of 
V< rock groups tircopn^thefr odors. A 

0} Jive radio broadcast 1ms just ended, and 
muricaans are descending — Cheap Trick, 

’ Joan Jett's BIaddieaits,jiHl passed against 
aoa, 1 bade of the car, a rafl- thtn man whose . 
test.' Sort,. dad: hair makes him look, at once 
■<vy adolescent and ascetic. His semberdedgner 
• suit may be high fashion, but die ballpoint 
».!; pen protrndiM from its- breast poefejt is 
fcj* definitely high-school nerd. Clearly, he 
^■rr e doesn’t belong in tins gaggle of pop notori- 
eties. But, out on the street, two young wom-. 
en squeal and one asks for ins autograph. 
'3$ Nonplussed bat polite, he scribbles “David 
ant. Byrne” and hastens into the night ■— ' 

A few weeks later, on a. bright March 


* 1 y ; in* bt ^ no one at the Brooklyn Museum 

K-:,o c ’in ,6C ?^ appears to recognize the 32ryear-dld lead 


singer. 


Z^T tu,VCa ^ 

taunt? 

The Mcmm^ 


Ke HV singer, songwriter and guitarist of the rock 
v it* ir;. ; ^ronp -Taffing Heads, even though he is 
„ . . %aangupat a life-size cutout of hiiMdf. The - 

- — — withe silhouette ispart of a construction, 

Consurtn-iT % entitled “Headswifl Ron,” ;by Robert 
v Lango, one of the young, artists lumped (o- 

***■*‘12 gether as Nea-Expresskraists. . : 

Amahpfflam The . ,! A museum is as fikety a placelor Byrne to 

(0205 ?7 £! et T etertavK beiound asiiK Hard Rock C^e, because he 
straddles two worlds: pop music .and the 
avant-garde. 

Over the course of 10 years and seven 

J albums (an eighth, as yet untitled, is sched- 

* uled for release early this summer), the Tdk- 
ing Heads have evolved from austere mim- - 
malists into exuberant eclecticists, la the 
•«■•■.; process, they have established themselves as 
-L the most consistently tmanmtive white rock 

- band in America^ whose mghly styfizedpres 

sentatioii owes more to the visnal arts thm. to 

-Abe gaudy theatrics of pop performance. Ifs 

s’t.-j,-; a Ttiinlcing nwn\ b«md that mny^ rodC-and~ 

-* ** ■«. roll inteflectoaHy mtriming in a way ithas 

” ISlTi- 1 *’ s seldom been since thekte 1960s. 

• v’ 3) Byrne’s lyrics have^ from the beginning, 
;; r At shutdedbetivemtheccRb^aiidaesnrre- 
. ** j 5-2» ahwithadetri^mtothesdut^r.Intteyeiy 

^ JT?L ' *[ * t h*'£ first song he wrote, “Psycho KtH a^ th e 

‘ i ,1 :1 protagonist talks tohimsdf in formal Frendi 

^ ,a ! because Byrne thoudit, “it seemed a natural 

tx 'V dehisitmtW a psychotic Idllerwtxild in^g- 

r- ’* inehhnsdf as very refined and use a foragn 

i"* ; ,Z‘' ^ A c *; ? r*->- language to talk to himself." 

- ll Hie inctmgnrity of introducing^ Frcndi 

- - ~y into what otherwise might seem.B-movie 

t% V '*“■ : material is .typical erf the Talking Heads. 

;'•* ’ *• Because their work is so oonmlextmdquizl^, 

h*.'- r h i: i‘ they are not superstars. Although one of 

'r i , f ,A Vr Jthtar albums, “Speaking m Tongue^” has . 

r.>-^>5oJd sl^tb' more than ionezmSldncpnies.'in 
• r ’-i the tinned States, they usually sell half that 

' j "1 ' ’p hi many. (Compare those figures to 95 nriHion 


rn 

n 1 * fr 

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r -. * ■**! 

*> ' V - « 
*** • -n. 

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far Ponce’s, album, “Purple RahO But 
TwTVbw Beads’ audience has steadily ex> 
paqdc^ «id, recently, still more converts 
We bcen won by “Sop Making Sense,” a 
Talking Heads concert mm. dirraned by Jon- 
athan Demme, vdndi recrived tk: Narianal 
■ Society of Him Critics award for best doca- 
meataxy <rf 1984. It has disseminated an 
• indeEbfe image :of Byrne, his eyes popping 
bds Adam’s apple bobbing to the beat as 
he perforii^an-^phantme yet agQe dance 
in-an immense white suit 

Byrne, mdependmriy of Talking Heads, 
has anotiier andicpce as wefl. In 1981, the 
cfaoreogcapher Twyla Iharp presented an 
■- 80-mnmte dance, “Tbs Catherine Wbed,” 
art to an original scare he composed and 
ipeafortried. with, a variety of muadans. 

In January, at New York’s Public Theater, 
. Byrne* pot on a performance piece, “The 
TomsstWay of Knowledge)'* at a benefit for 
Mabon Mmes, the avant-garde theater 
troape- Wearing a carcBgan right out of “Fa- 
ffier Knows B^t,” Byrne narrated a slide 
show; depicting a cross-country vacation, 
with a deadpan reading drawn, in part, from 
a jfiaiy he had written as a 10-year-bkL 

Byme has also jnst released an album, 
“Music for the Knee Plays,” music and texts 
he hasxomposed for Robert WHsom’s epic 
opera, "the CIVIL warS.” Called “Knee 
Hays” becanse tbey function as “joints’* be- 
tween the opera’s longer scenes — Wilson 
mwT annlar devices- m “Einstein on the 
Beach," his celebrated collaboration with tbc 
oonqjoser EhiHp Glass — these brief pieces 
arc scored for brass ensemble and owe far 
more to contemporary avant-garde “serious 
mane* * than they do to rock ’n' roIL 
■ “We are watching someone realize a very 
deep talent,* says Glass. “It’s highly uncon- 
ventional, »nid tfiBi malffts it interesting. I 
think he wlH be writing musk that everyone 
is going to have to think of as concert music, 
and not just .the" Talking Heads.” (Byrne, as 
will re the pop songwriter Paid Simon and 
the pef onnance artist Laurie Anderson, is 
currently writing lyrics that Glass intends to 
set to music for an album of songs.) 

“I think there’s no contradiction between 
my doing The Knee Plays’ and doing pop 
songs with Talking Heads,” says Byrne. In- 
deed, has ability to work' both sides erf the 
street, to jaywalk, as h were, across the Hnes 
dividing fti gft and low art, artistic integrity 
arid commercial popularity, makes Byrne 
emblemati c of a new generation of creative 
talent weN^ grown used to labeling, for want 
of a better tag, post-modernist. 


Q N a add afternoon in a small, clut- 
tered Greenwich Village rehearsal 
studio, the Talking Heads are prac- 
ticing songs for their nest album. 

■ “It’s so much fan to be able to relax and 
. just play/*, says Una Weymouth, 34, putting 
" down bier bassgnitar during a break, “withr 
oot feeling you have to be avant-garde all the 


time. We spent so many years trying to be 
o riginal that we don’t Jen ow what original is 
anymore.” 

Indeed, the songs the band has just run 

through, occasionally consulting notebooks 

and soatch pads for the chord changes and 
lyrics, .do sound surprisingly straightforward 
and. at rimes, even dd-fashioned. One has 
the merry jingle of late 1950s rock 'n* roll 
— even if its disconcerting lyrks are about a 
woman who literally levitates out of her 
suburban backyard. Another sons slips in a 


fTl HE Talking Heads have sounded Hke 
I nobody dse from the very beginning, 
JL when they started playing together at 
the Rhode Island School of Design. 

Bam in Scotland, Byme was reared, from 
the second grade, in Baltimore. 

like most teen-agers in the 1960s, Byrne 
fell under the sped, of rock ’n’ roll. For the 
fun cf it, he began playing gmtar in a local 
college coffeehouse, performing rode songs 
in a folk-musk: style and “comedy things — 
I'd day aggressive songs on the ukulele.” 

When it came time for college, Byme 
hesitated between art and technical school, 
“because I was interested in the ideas of 
science and math and I saw no difference 
between that and art” Byme settled on 
RISD in 1970, but transferred after a year to 
a Baltimore art school before dropping out 
of college altogether. 

He returned to the school of design to visit 
Iris friend Chris Frantz, stiD enrolled there. 
Together, they formed the Artistics (aka the 
Autistics), “a ragged, loud rock band,” in 
Byrne’s words, to play school dances. 

. By 1975, they were sharing an apartment 


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! ',*i* aim Fred?* In it he intends to expose 

*■ world of tdevision-in his free-ceding man- 

•«•*£? nor as he pictured fife along the Via Venrto 
’;C in“I^ I>3k»Vita”andmovi«Jandin“8%." 
*/ ^ r*t He has installed himself in a penthouse 
*. ' above Stage Five at Onatittri the enormous 

» * Roman stri^bufltat the command of Mns- 

.* solini in the 1930S. 

jj Here are his offioes and living quartets, to 

« r* which he retires during breaks m fbeshoot- 
* 'Z--' ing in an a<§acent bunding. That vast boild- 
V — ing contains a series of sets for the nroduc-. 
-m ^ V : ; tioo, inehidmg an immense antntorium 
.■* •> ■*" where the Chnstmas Day TV spectade, the 
; Z film’s chmax, will be staged. Thoe is also the 

-. *- Z -■ atrtier in which the Oscar-vranring costume 
< -designer Damlo Donari oversees the waxd- 
rt ^robe that dothes the large company: 

Frtfini has made most of ms Bhns in 
CinedttL The inventive dirbetor never went 
;' c •.* j near the sea in filming Iris oceanic qnc “Ela 

» • . V Nave Va,” substituting decor for real waves 
and sky. The vision in “Amarcord” of the 
Italian lawny finer dqartinaori its nudden 
l *, t'v voyage in the summer twilight was another 
^ of the studio’s tromperoeil feats. 

4 ’■<» 1 ‘ “Ginger andFretr grcw.fiom a piwosal 
to do something for trteviaou. Instead Fc^- 
.. •* > J lini is dmug SOTBethmg about trieviskm far 

c )*■'■ ibednana. . ■ 

\ P ” > IBs scenario relates the reunion of a pair 
- ■“ p , of former music-hall performers when they 
are engaged to provide a flash of nostalgia in 
7 -; : Canistmas trievisioiiievue by revivumtheir 

’* _ number, popular in yesteryear, in wbkm. 

— inritate toe sledc dariemg arid interplay ot. 


FeUini and Masina on the set 

his script, that Iris screenplay is unfinished 

“Fhnslied?” he laughed. “Finished with, 
producer*? We have had three and now the 
production is the hands of Alberto Gri- 
maldi,” he explained, nimbly dodgmg the 
question. “The fibs will be finished in eariy 
.June. We had an interinisrioa as Ginlietta 
-feB and cracked a rib. She’s recovered and 
.. all’s wefl arid running smoothly.” 

- “My film is not an attack on television, ” 
ytid Fdfim at huwh in his penthouse flat. 
“Xhat^ would be as ridjcaJous as lannchnig an 
attack on the force erf gravity. WeKye today 
in a tetewfflonized world. It is evaywhae 
and for many millinns it is everything; a 
substitute for Bteratnr^art,Hfe- 

“in its oommeraal aspect it it is a witch’s 
caldron. . Everything is cast into it: quiz 


Both vaudeville , artists quit the boards; 


and raised a family and hefMaioeflaMas-. 
t miatiiti) is bawkmg encydopedias in his 
seedy middle age. The^strange ways of this 
uqw farm erf riww business bewilders than 
and its nish mid bustle sweeps them aside.; 
They are allotted no dressing room,.bnt tibdr 

« fltil) stmiwtn rtwrv 


ruthless ^dvardsng, ente rtainmen t of aB va- 
rieties; junk and once in a great while a 
flicker of creative rasa It has flooded con- 
temporary society. It has conquered a worid- 
wide^aumeQce, but it is a jumble without 
<fistinctive aim or purpose.” 

- -‘tAn optxnnrtT he said later. “Y«, of 


rehearse their act in a public washroom. 
Even there a TV set flickers and growk * 
The other morning found Fdfim supervis- 
ing the scene of the lavatory- rehearsal; in. 
which his stars, in cramped ana steturiy quiff-; 
tea, rb«bg e from cheap street clothes into. 

\ evening finery and try out some fancy dano; 

ing stqps. . £ . . ' _■? 

The movie maestro, more than SKfeetum 
and erf stout figure, wrapped in an overcoat 
and muffler and with a checkered har posed 
jauntily an hisbead, had theappearance erf a. 
eeneral about to order a charge. Romms nm 
Sailte has not decided on thecdndnsiotftrf 


.• mnStpartictoate in tbc happenings ot oners 
. times. Indmitafly, working in i television 
Vgprea (me a sense <rf freedom. It is^ as ^ though 
one were writing not under one's signature 
but ancarymoosly. One is fiboated from be- 
ir»g called toaccoemtpascaudly, bring lost in 
1 die multitude. My film is an affectionate 
- critique of ^ tdevisicin which I bc^e wiH rid it 
. bf m Tnfpmftl «pn fu<ao o ‘and lead it to SIMM 
sense of taste and order.” 

JFdfini b^an Ins .career as a newspaper 
caricaturist. At the end of World War u he 
was employed in a ftex shopin JEbome where 
-be drew cartoons and most of his customers 
' were Gls. 

. “We^ weregjveu set cartoons. Foie qtanqile, 
-there was otie of a GI fishing and catching a 
■ mermaid on his Irpa. We artists drew in me 


trice of the GI custcaner. The price was four 
bocks. Probably four bucks was more then 
than now. 

“One day a GI wearing dark glasses, iris 
coat collar hiding his face and. wrth iris cap 
down to the bridge of his nose came in and 
said ‘Draw- me.* I told him to feting see his 
face. ‘No, draw me like tins.* So I did and 
when I was finished he threw off Ms cap and 
coat and took off Ms glasses. He was the 
cartoonist Saul Sternberg. We had worked 
far the same magazine before the war.” 

GznbettaMasma and Fcffixd recently cele- 
brated rite 42d year of their marriage. They 
met during the war wfam she was acting on 
radio programs and he was writing radio 
sketches. She has been the heroine of several 
of his other films — ‘jLaStrada,”“Ni^itsof 
Cabiria” and “Juliet erf the Spirits” — but 
before that she had made a reputation as a 
stage actress and since has played in film*; 
under other directors. 

Mastnrfamn is other veteran "«soriafe of 
Feflmfs. He had a, tong stage career before 
entering films and was an .assistant of Ld- 
chino Visconti, ^ under whom be acted in the 
Iiafian productions of “A Streetcar Named 
Desiier and “Death cf a Salesman." It was 
his performance as zbe^ worid-weatypnWkast 
in “La Dolce Vita” that brought htm imw - 
national fame and he was suSsoquenfiy in 
Feffirif s “8V4” and “Ow of WbSt” 

Over the last two decades Ameri can pro- 
ducers have been mpagFeSim to m y i m » to 
HaBywoodand make a Sm in Fn pKch tin * 
He has resisted thdr offers and betrays no 


But he is to wait New York next month, 
wteen the Lincoln. Center is presenting him 
with its “spring tribute” with an.w wr^g nf 
ceremonies and the showing of excerpts 
from Ms wrat He wfll be ihefiist director of 
European films to be so horexed. 

In Venice another tribute awmts him. 
During the film festival therein late summer 
heis to bepreseated with the Golden Lion of 
Sl Mask for Ms ernema tic adnevemmts. ■ 


little co imtry^iid- western sentimen tality. 

“The drugs cf the ’80s,” jokes Chris 
Frantz, 33, from behind Ms Mack -drum kit. 
“Sex and com.” He punctuates the wise- 
crack with a drum roll. In addition to being 
the drummer and offotwy - comedian of the 
group, Frantz is Tina Weymouth’s husband 
and the father of their 2-year-old son, Robin. 

The Talking Heads seem, intent but re- 
laxed as they pat mnsfc«i flesh on the bare 
bones of the demonstration opes Byrne has 
recorded at home. Byme, who reads music 
“only with extreme difficulty,” usually 
roughs out these tapes with Ms voice and 
guitar and a rhythm box, an electronic de- 
vice that can be set to repeat any desired 
drum beat Byme originates nearly all erf 
Talking Beads’ songs, but their arrangement 
and execution are definitely collaborative. 

“I know what the chords are,” says Jerzy 
Harrison, 36, as he hesitates among several 
electric keyboards. “But I’ve got to change 
the end, where it vamps oat” 

“Did you like that when I held one note?” 
Byme asks after improvising a guitar part. 

“Sounded Hke DeBaigc,” Frantz volun- 
teers, refer ring to a popular blade band. 

“But if it sounds like someone dse — ” 
Byme trails off dubiously. 


in New York with Frantz’s girlfriend, Tina 
Weymouth, another student from the school 
of design, and walking as a trio under the 
name Talking Heads. Tina Weymouth had 
performed in a hand-bell group at the 1964 
New York World’s Fair ana had taught 
herself the guitar, but she had never played 
bass. “The whole idea of an unaccomplished 
bass player,” she explains, “was that David 
and Chns could mold me. I already shared 
many of die same concepts, intellectually." 

Some of those concepts were pretty rar- 
efied. Byme explains that he became “fasci- 
nated by conceptual art. In particular, there 
was some that just used langnay They’d 
just write a statement on the wall, and other 
ones would put out little pamphlets. There 
was a group called Art & Language that just 
talked all the time in print And I thought 
that was pretty much toe ultimate in refining 
and eliminating all the superfluous stuff in 
art and bring left with nothing but the idea. 
Which seemed to me an extension of the 
notion of art that established itself in the 
early part of the century — the whole notion 
of something bring modem, of modem art, 
of the Rantmne and all those kinds of thing s 
That seemed to be fairing it to its logical 
extreme, which made perfect sense to roe." 

In the beginning, recalls Frantz, their New 
York audiences “werejMintos and writers, 
ahnost exclusively.” When, in 1977, they 
added a musician with more professional 
experience on keyboards and guitar, Jeny 
Harrison, he was an architecture maj or from 
Harvard. 

But the Talking Heads did not necessarily 
consider their music art, as opposed to rock- 
and-roll. “We mossed that lme a long time 
ago,” Tina Weymouth says. “We said, ‘Lock, 
we know wrfre in a sleazy business. We’re 
not going to call ourselves artists.’ ” 

StiD, as Harrison explains, “because ev- 
eryone in the band had studied visual arts, I 
think there was a certain applying of the way 
you make decisions about painting s to 
songs.” 

In the beginning, Talking Heads con- 
formed to no one’s idea erf a rock V roll 
band. “When we were playing dubs,” Byme 
says, “the typical rode stance was aggressive 
— black learner and shades and afl uaL We 
were dcfiberatdy going against that” 

Talking Heads also dispensed with that 
old standby, sex appeal “l must say I think 
it’s just not inme,” Byrne says, “to flaunt sex 
an stage. Ifs probably my upbringing, but 
it’s something Tvc never been able to bring 
myrelf to do. 

Indeed, the group rejected all the conven- 
tional wisdom — and razzle-dazzle ■— about 
rock ’n’ roll stagecraft and just stood there, 
stock-still, wearing unprepossessing T-shirts 
or alligator shins. “We threw out the idea of 
costumes, of lighting, of any kind of move- 
ment or gestures an stage,” Byme says. 

The uncompromising severity of Talking 


Continued on page 8 David Byme. 



Chm Wt*et. Ratno Lid. 



Making Music Can Hurt 


by Bernard Holland 


N EW YORK — Creating musical 
pleasure is causing musicians a lot 
of pain. Music may grant cathar- 
tic satisfactions few other tinman 
occupations match, but from many it is also 
exacting a heavy price — in chronic afflic- 
tions of mmicles ftnti tendons ; a heavy inci- 
dence of coronary heart disease; and per- 
haps most worrisome of all in the 
debilitating burdens of mental stress, stage 
fright and the unrelenting pressures to excel 
The problems are not new, and there has 
been good reason to hide them. A recent 
Australian study by Dr. Hunter Fry of 900 
professional mnrioaps indicated that ha lf 
admitted playing with same kind of job- 
related hurt. It may be fair to estimate that 
many more of that 900 are keeping quirt. 
Jobs are relatively few, applicants many and 
competitive. A musician perceived as having 
problems doesn’t weak, and many seeking 
bdp are going out of town for it — to places 
whire they are not known. 

But is the past few years, physical and 
mental trauma among musicians is being 
talked about Injuries to two highly viable 
concert pianists, Gary Graffman and Leon 
Fleischer, were widdy publicized, and both 
cases have helped less iuustaous, but equally 
afflicted, players to openly acknowledge 
their problems. 

The medical and other scientific profes- 
sions are becoming interested. Two confer- 
ences were held in Colorado last year, and 
das summer, performers, teachers, psycholo- 
gists, doctors and physical therapists will 
gather at New York University to compare 
their findings. One of the organizers of the 
event. Dr. John Jake Kdla, who has degrees 
in music and psychology and also plays the 
viola at the Metropolitan Opera, hopes the 
conference win be a dealing house for infor- 
mation now scattered around the wodd. It is 
called “Mind, Body and the Performing 
Arts” and runs from July IS to 19. 

So vague and complex is the revolving 
wheel of mental and bodily stress that deda- 
ing which causes winch may never bs estab- 
lished. Some harm to the body seems the 


“plugs in” or “plugs out” or simply a warn- 
ing to bend down in Older to escape the 
blast. One Metropolitan Opera brass player 
jokes about the huh’s, the en's, and thewfaat- 


S OME orchestras have experimented 
with an effective but obtrusive solu- 
tion — plastic motorcycle shields 
placed on the hacks of chairs to deflect 
sound. There has been little or no nriHlancy 
on noise problems from the American Fed- 
eration erf Muadans. however. John GlaseL 
president of New Yolk’s Local 802, says that 
Icsom, the orchestral offshoot of the AFM, 
is doing studies on workplace conditions, 
but that finding jobs is the union’s primary 
interest at the moment 
Frederick Zen one, Icsom's chairman and 
a musician in the National Symphony, is 
very tactful about the resistance of some 
music directors and managements toward 
shields. “It’s unfair to say they are insensi- 
tive,” he says, “but they are very concerned 
about the visual messages that these shields 
might, convey to an audience." Zenone says 
the union wul be more militan t when it has 
done more research. 

Whether it is stress or the general hazards 
of the occupation, musicians don’t seem to 
live as long as other people. One study based 
on death records kept between 1959 and 
1967 by a national musicians* union, showed 
that toe average age of death was a shocking 
54 years old as opposed to 69 nationwide. 
The study covered all fields of music; dassi- - 
cal and popular. 

The veay act of playing some instruments 
puis great burdens on the heart. A study of 
45 brass players showed young hearts work- 
ing much harder to produce the necessary air 
pressure. Cardiac arhythmias were particu- 
larly frequent among horn players. Dr. 
Leonard Essman, who is physician on tour 
both to, the New York PhShaxmomc and the 
National Symphony, notices heavier ina- 
deoce of high blood pressure, rapid heart 
action and coronary attacks than in other 
professions. Studies have shown that noise 
adversely affects blood pressure and can 
induce anger and aggression. 

Scientists are also becoming interested in 
the peculiar mental stresses of a symphonic 
player’s life. Orchestras are by nature un- 
democratic, and musicians spend much of 
their lives adapting week to week to the 
changing and artea contrary instructions of 
via ting conductors. Rehearsals, says Dr. Ed- 
gar Coons, one of the organizers of this 
summer’s NYU conference, require unre- 
lenting vigilance in matters of ensemble and- 
inflict the frustrations of following orders. 
Both elements are thought to be major fac- 
tors in creating abnormal stress. 

Thai conductors and certain star perform- 
ers are noted for thdr longevity may have to 
do with the psychological health enjoyed by 
those in command. Conductors also profit 
from the constant exercising of the upper 
body. 

Principal players entrusted with solos. Stu- 
dents preparing for examinations, and most 
especially playos auditioning for orchestra 
jobs battle unusual pressure, and some are 
seeking pharmaceutical relief. Euphoric or 


relaxing drugs usually raise the spirits but 
depress performance skills. But the so-called 
beta blockers — used normally in the treat- 
ment of cardiac problems — Have shown an 
amazing ability to calm the nerves without 
affecting motor function. 

One young woman, who recently quit 


tifms, also the baric upnaturalness erf herfd- 

Sstrumenls. Senza Sordino, the official pub- 
lication of the International Conference of 
Symphony and Opera Musicians (Icsom), 
catalogs such complaints as fiddler's neck, 
flutist’s neck, bassoonist's left index finger, 
violinist's jaw displacement, horn player’s 
palsy, cymbal player’s shoul der, tu ba lips, 
guitar nipplen anti harpist’s cramp. Dental 
problems mean big troubles for brass and 
wind players. The bagpiper is threateoed by 
a certain fungus often found growing made 
hfc instrument. 


tea murioaxts, not to mention rode players 
Close puuiiuily in orchestra pits and ampli- 
fication me onwre of and string 

players, seated often a foot or two from brass 
and percussion instruments behind them, 
A-fff nd themselves, as best they Ear 
plugs have become normal equipment fear 
many, and in their scores one finds cues fix 
brass entrances. A familiar added notation is 


playing the viola after seven years in a West 
Coast orchestra, remembers her early audi- 
tions for orcbestrajobs as disasters. “1 would 
play at about 10 percent of my ability. I had 
shakes, high pulse, memory loss. Then I took 
Indexol, a beta blocker, two and a half hours 
beforehand. I picked up the viola and waited 
for the old symptoms, but they never came.” 

Taking beta blockers steadily for a period 
of 40 weeks (roughly the length of many 
symphony seasons) and then stopping sud- 
denly can induce heart attacks and may even 
kill asthmatics. Indeed, for low-blood-pres- 
sure sufferers, beta-blockers can be very 
dangerous. Small doses judiciously taken 
seem to cause little damage, but doctors are 
worried about the uncontrolled use. Users of 
beta blockers usually get the drug from oth- 
ers, not by prescription. Washington Square 
may sell its marijuana, Rivington Street its 
heroin, but the prevalent street pill being 
■ peddled across from Lincoln Center is the 
beta blocker — indeed, this writer saw a 
bottle of it in a JuDliard professor’s class- 
room cabineL 

T HE medical approach to physical 
problems is attracting a new field of 
research and treatment. Dr. Fred 
Hocbbeig belongs 10 a team of orthopedic 
surgeons, rheumatologists, neuro-physiolo- 
gists, physical therapists and musicians at 
Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. 
The unit has treated 500 musicians in the last 
four and a half years and is concerned not 
only with practical treatment but in finding 
out exactly what happens physiologically 
when tendons and joints become inflamed. 

“The largest group of the musicians we see 
have been pianists, although violinists are 
catching up,” says Hoc* bag. “Most often 
there is pain in the right aims of pianists and 

the left arms of violinists. Pianists, moreover, 
are experiencing pain in the fourth and fifth 
fingers of the right hand, while with violin- 
ists and guitarists, it is the same fingers in the 
left hand.” 

The exacerbating culprit is overuse of the 
body, he says: “We had a young man who 
watched the Van Oibum competition on 
television and was so impressed by bow one 
contestant played trills with his fourth and 
fifth fingers that he tried to leant how to do it 
lumsdf —in one : night. Disorders seem also 
10 result from shifting to a new instrument, 
changes in technique, having to play, for 
example, on a dead piano or a new size 
guitar. Then there is music which asks much 
— perhaps too much of the player. “The 
Barber Piano Sonata,” says rfochberg, 
“ought to bear a wanting from the surgeon 
general” 

The problems fie often in the small mu$- 
des that spread the hands, says Hochbetg. 


Continued on page 9 


f 1 4 H -r 


,*>' -- 



fiVVtuwguVMiuvni 


(Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAT 17, 1985 



TRAVEL 


* 


David Byrae 


Continued from page 7 


Heads’ early performances created an racruoati 
intellectual tension without providing the emotion— 
release traditionally associated with rode V roll You 
left a concert Feeling high, all right, but it was not the 
High of catharsis; it was the hyperventilating rush of 
an anxiety attack. 

Hie Talking Heads’ musical sophistication, as well 
as the way they created songs, began to undergo a 
transformation when, on their second album, they 
started working with Brian Goo as producer. Brian 
» Peter George St. John de Baptiste dc La Salle Eno is an 
;■ eccentric Englishman who was a founding member in 
, the early 1970’s of the British band Roxy 


miiwl “when 1 was coming to accept the idea that 
rational thinking has its limits.’' 

As the songs became denser and ever more dance- 
abk they burst out of artists' lofts and college dormi- 
tories and onto the blaring Turtboxe^ ofri^rstrrets. 


not a musician per se; ideas are his instrument, and 

those are far-ran ging . To Him, the whole world, from 
Third World folksongs to the clangor of modep 
industry, is mnsique concrete, raw material to be dis- 
sected, distorted, juxtaposed and reassembled in the 
recording studio. “It was like taking the songwriting 
process/ Byrne says, “and exploding it into its differ- 
ent components.” 


Li buiupuuuiu. 

Gradually, over the course of three albums, Talking 
.Eno 


more and more components 

went as far afield as Africa and 


Heads and 

into the music. — — 

i the Middle East, incorporating exotic percussion and 
poiyrtiythmic interplay. Closer to home, they adapted 
the synthesizer squiggles and heavy-bottomed bass 
lines of contemporary American black funk. 

The words as well as the music seemed to dart in all 
directions. Some songs were improvised; others were 
cryptic collages. “It was a period,” Byrne says, be- 


The music eventually became so compter — --- 
musicians could not play all the parts on stage, and the 
group recruited as marry as half a dozen other musi- 
cians — guitarists, keyboard and percussion players 
and back-up singers, black as wed as white — to 
accompany them on tour. 

“In a sort rtf sociological way,” Jerry Harrison says, 
“I felt there was a growing racism in the United Stales 
and that, in a very quiet way, we made this big point. 
We were both malt- and female, blade and white, on 
having fun, no one in a particularly subservient- 
role, no one drawing atlaitioa to h. 

The results were liberating. When the expanded 
group performed live, says Byrne, “the excitement or 
wjqiB* fl iat T thonghr was posable from music became 
a reali ty, It became impossible not to dance around to 
it on very hard not to haw: some son of good 

time. Here was the way out of a dilemma dial we’d put 

ourselves in, where the songs were perceived as bong 
more and more about personal ang st. Here was music 
that was proposing a solution to t hi n g s like that.” 

“But, of course,” Byrne says self-deprecatingly, “I 
didn’t notice that until we were doing it Looking 
back, ifsfike we rediscovered the wheel" ■ 


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Barcelona’s Sin gular Style 


by Edward Schumacher 


B ARCELONA — Barcelona has al- 
ways marched to its own drummer. 
It 5s the dty identified whb such 
individualistic spirits as Picasso, 
Mir6, Gaudi and Columbus. 

Spreading back from the Mediterranean 
cm a small plain cradled by Mount TTbidabo 
and Moffljuich, the city has been anepicen- 


ter of countless uprisings by anarchists, Re-' 
’ .lti< 


pu blicans and separatists. It is t he capita l of 
Qtjiinnia- a region (or com ay, accord ing to 
some of its residents) with a distinctive lan- 
guage, bistory and traditions. Ca t a lan s , die 
people of Catalonia, are Spaniards who call 
themselves European. But they arc cot like 
the rest of Europe either. 

It is cut of that schizophrenia, and om of a 
stubborn assertiveness fed by more than 
2,000 years of defending what is its own, that 
Barcelona has developed that angular, inef- 
fable quality— style. _ . 

Barcelona’s style is seen m its Gotha: 
Quarter and its Art Nouveau boulevards, in 
its passion for the high arts a nd for the 
flirtations promenade and in its superb an- 
sine. Rich with invention. Catalan cookery is 
based on a vast array of seafoods, game, 
garlic and the greenest of first-press ofive ofl. 

But to understand Barcelona is to begin 
with something very base — money. In a 
nation that until recently was largely con- 
cerned with being pious and decorous; Bar- 
celona was, and is, brazenly mercantile. The 
city has long had its nouveau riche, a dass 
that, for all the Castilian disdain heaped 
upon it, has often financed innovation. Until 
the recent rise of Madrid, flourishing in 
Spain’s young democracy, Barce l ona, now 
with three million people, was undeniably 
die natio n's most important generator of 
money, ideas and art 

Barcelona as a city began to take shape 
under the Romans, though popular myth — 
historically unconfirmed — credits a Cartha- 
ginian gpn a-il , Hamilcar Batca^ with its 
founding. With the decline of Rome, Barce- 
lona became the Visigoth capital of Gaul and 
S pain; Moors and Franks later occupied iL 
Remnants of ^vh civilizatiaa can be found 
today, amnng them patches of stiB-standmg 


and hxww! .spiriting fatal** TH» lag g in g 

and a scmtamonomocs Cad*™ state, have 
Qourishedsnwhis death in 1975; it is taught 
equally with Spanish in the schools. (For die 
tourist, the re st oration of Catalan street 
names k often c onfining ; it brfpntn. mff!m. 
ber tint ootw in fjibibm k ttw; samp 
in Spam^ passer? mf-ans paseo and avig- 

JUUkl rawing fflBMg ) 

The mdependem Catalan spirit, and the 
architecture that grew with it, are dearly 
seen in ibe Ayuntastieoto, or Gty HalL The 
facade on the Plaza San Jaime is & Inter 
addition, but once made, you climb a broad 
staircase to the earfier part of die 1 


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of the One Hundred is named for the occa- 
sion, in 1373, when r e presenta tives of the 
city’s 100 g o ad s met to form a city coanriL 
Across & plaza, in the central patio of the 
Provincial franni the seat of the regional 
government, denArr rrktmtpc cranri in deli- 
cate counterpoint atop thick walls. The 15th- 
caaaxy Catalan architect Marc Safont do- 
signed w^rh of th** braiding, the 

Flamboyant Gothic chapd. The wall over- 
looking the CaBe del Obispo Irurita is orna- 
men te d whh ganpyies, latticework and a 
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near the Plaza Ramon Berenguer d 
has an excellent collection of rdics. 

But it was in the 13th and 14th centuries 
that Barcelona, capital of the kingdom of 
Catalonia and Aragon, came into its own as 
an Iberian and Mediterranean power. The 
marriage in 1469 of Queen Isabella of Castile 
and King Ferdinand of Aragon — the Cath- 
olic kings — largely ended Catalan indepen- 
dence, but the Catalan aesthetic, already 
manifest, remained entrenched. 

The first distinctive form was faiaigq 
Gothic. The Church of Santa Maria dd Mar, 
a seamen’s church built in the 1300s; is the 
style at its purest — structurally functional 
and ornamentally austere. 

But the showcase is the nearby Barrio 
Gotico. This old quarter is a maze of stone 
alleyways that wind among weathered stone 
buildings pockmarked by histon. The latest 
scars date from the 1936-1939 Civil War. 

During the Franco regime; the generalissi- 
mo followed in the footsteps of centuries of 
Spanish ndeis in trying to subdue Catatonia 


the Gfeneralitat, the Provincial 
Coundlbmldiiig,thel5th-oentnrySantaEu- 
IaEa Door opens onto the ood. hah cloisters 
of the fxnwfwi Wandering through the 
ckasters and efanrefa, you cose upon such 
treasures as the Paerta de Piedad, its fintd 
carved with a moving depiction of the dead 
Jesus in the arms of Mary. 

The cathedral, whose dramatic open 
towers and spircarc modem reconstructions, 
is flanked on one side by the dd Jewish 
Quarter and on the other by the bnfldm^ 
surrounding the Plaza dd Rev. It was in the 
I4th-cenmry Throne Room that Columbus 
reported to Ferdinand and Isabella his find- 
ing of a New Worid. 

Barcdona has adopted, as & symbol of 
itself, a of Columbus pointing dot to 
sea. Set atop a high pedestal overlooking the 
ship-filled port, the statue embodies the 
city’s histone tie to the sea. Nearby are the 
Royal Passages, die only surviving medi- 
eval shipyards in Europe and now the Mari- 

f i ith* 

A second emblem of the dor stands i 



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In the Barrio Gdtico. 


any t* Owwcl b aa — 


A second emdem of the dty stands atop a 
fatu tain, amid the shady nodes of Cintadala 
Park. This symbol is a Victorian, almost 
Impressionist, statue of a lady walking and 
hiding a n Trnihn-na J and she recalls the time. 

in the second half of die 19th century, when 
Barcelona «*"»w g ed as an foHnghTai power. 
In 1888, the city played host to a world's fair, 
and dm Triumphal Arch that marked the 
entrance to die «h»Wtinn still stands at the 
ftead <tf the park. 

The rambling park, which embraces lakes 
and a zoo, stands on die ste of a fort bust by 
Philip V in the early 1700s to control the 
region. Its arsenal now bouses the Modem 
Art Museum. 

In 1907 the dry fathers approved the cre- 
ation of two broad, leafy boulevards that 
give the city much of its elegance today. One, 
the Diagonal is lined with fashionable bou- 
tiques. The other, the Ramblas, is as much a 
way of life as an address. Stretching for 
about a dozen blocks between die port and 


the Plaza de Catalufia. its broad, central 
walkway is lined with shady trees, immense 
newsstands, flower stalls and slacked rages 
of parrots, dudes, canaries and other birds, 
each adding to the general cacophony. 

The liceo is about halfway along the 
Ramblas. The gilded, seven-tiered opera 
bouse, which was built in 1847, has seen 
some of Europe’s finest opera. 

But no styleis as characteristic of Barcelo- 
na as its modemisme, its own version of Art 
Nouveau. It can be seen in the curves of shop 
windows, in the srnnous street lamps and in 
die organic designs of the wrought-irou bal- 
conies and stained-glass windows of the old 
townhouses. It was Antonio Gaudi who took 
the style to its extreme, creating an entirely 
percanal idiom and it is impasable to imag- 
ine Barcelona without his major buBdmgs. 

But Gandi was part of a longer tradition of 
Catalan creativity, even genius. Its beginning 
can be found in die naive 12th-century altars 
and statues in the Museum of Catalan Art on 
Monljuich. It can be seen in the huge, dy- 
namic Victorian canvases of Maria Fortuny, 
the evocative Impressionist paintings by Ra- 
mon Casas and the forceful worts by last 

Modem 


An in Cutadelln Park. And it is unquestion- 
ably demonstrated in the work of twogumts, 
Picasso and Mir6. 


! it* 

• .i 4 

■ 

. - \t:.i 

■ -.A -!*» 


Picasso was bora in M&frga, but studied 
and made bis first paintings in Bftrcekma. 
During Franco’s rogn, however, he' atom- 
domed Spain altogether. But the painter out- JR 
lived the dictator and be and Us estate gave 
Barcelona more than 900 wads, now housed 

centuries-old stonTmansioM tuctaftnmy 
on Momcada. among some of the almost 
distinguished Gothic, Rcnansaee and Ba- 
roque mansions. 

Joan Mird was a Catalan by birth. His 
monument is due Mxr6 museum and study 
center on Moatjuich. Designed by Ski. a 
Catalan who was dean of Harvarcrs School 
trf Architecture, the budding, withitsscu^>- 
tural ramps, off era a superb view of die aty. 

But peihuis what most reflects theimqpal 
part art plays in the hfe of Barcelona ts a 
woik by Mud dud is, apprcy ia tdy, on die 
Ramblas. It is a tone mosaic of Kue; rod and . 
ydlow abstract and geometric designs node f 


t *■ 

• • 

‘rihi 
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if? 

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Maria Serf — all in the Museum of 


of bocks on (be gronocL ftopte 

01985 The New York Tine* 


on it 


INTERNATIONAL D ATEBOOK 




Hr* 

.... I 
- 

w 

•- -«l 

1 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA, Konzerthausftd: 72.1111). 
CONCERTS — May 19 :1bc Soviet 
Suie Symphouy Ordiestra, Jewgenq 
Swetlanow conductor. Vakrij Klenov 
violin (C^nka, Tchaikovsky). 

May 20 and 21: Alan Berg QnarteU 
fRavd. Schubert). 

May 22: Royal Phflhannonic Oixies- 
tra. Yehudi Menuhin conductor and 
violmiBajch, Elgar, Brahms). 
RECITAL — May 18: Peter Schrrier 
tenor, Hans-Joaaam Erhard organ 
(Bach). 


To September 15: “Louis Virioon: A 
Journey through Time.” 

To October 22: ‘Textiles from the 
Wellcome Coflecnan: ana cm and 
modem textiles from the Near East 
and Peru." 

•Wqmore Hall (tel: 93521.41). 
RECITAL— May 22: SunjdavHdler 
baraicbord(Bach). 

NOTTINGHAM, Royal Concert HaB 
(tel 4137.42). 

CONCERT— May 23: Orchestra of 
SL John’s Smith Square, John Lub- 
bock cooductor, Katia and MarieQe 
Labeque piano (Mozart). 


DANCE— May 21-25: Francois Raf- May 24: “Petite Mcsse Snlmnefte" EXHIBITION —To July 4: “WaHam 
finoc Dance Gonmaoy. (Gioacchino Rosstat). Hogarth, 

•Th6itre du Rond Point (tel: MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (tel: OASGOW, MitcheQ Theater (tel: 
704.74B7). 8091J6). SSL59J&1). 

CONCERT— May 20: Ensemble Or- OPERA — May 21: “Macbeth" (Ver- DANCE — May 16*18: The Jodi Hall 
chestral de P aris, Jc an-Piate Wallez di). Dancers. 

coadn etra, Geo rges P biderm a dMT p- TURffi. Royal Palace(td: 839^02). 

aoo(Stavmsky). EXHIBITION— 1 To May 22: “Court- 


Mioiarure Paintings from the 
XVII to XIX Centuries." 




MADRID, BibSoteca Naooual (tel: 


A't j.i 

te , 


BERLIN, Dentsche Oper (tel: 
341j44.49). 

OPERA — May 22; “La BohKne” 
Pnooni). 

May 23: “Boris Godunov" 


JAPAN 


EXHIBITION — Through May: 
“Frida Kahlo, Manuel Alvarez Bravo 

and Vkwur Rrrin " 




COPENHAGEN, Tivoli Hall (td; 
14.17.65). 

CONCERT — Mot 23: Tivoli Sym- 
(bony Orchestra, Per Eacvold con- 
Joctor (Handel). 

JAZZ — May 22: P^>a Bues Vfldng 
Jazz Band. 


Chariotten 


EXHIBITIONS — ToJune9: Ameri- 
ca Looks at France: TIME 1923- 
1983, "“Artists from Nice." 

To June 25: “Baie des Arts." 

PARIS, American Center (tel: 
335.21-50). 

EXHIBmON —To Jane 25: “Mar- 
tine AbaB6a.OGrierde Boochony, Da- 
vid Ryan, AnneSanssos." 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
277,1223). 


EXHIBITION— To 
tcineWanean." 



y co nducto r, Iwy GMif viefti piano(Badt,IfcndeD. j*r 

•Paseo de la Caxtdliua (a&- 419: V 


'-Ju : , 




COLOGNE, StateOperafteL 2076-1). •IdenritsuAftGafleiy(teI:213J128). T™ 3 
OPERA— May 19 aod22:“Di»Gio- EXHIBITION — To June 2: “Turkey: ^ v j, 

vanm"(Marart> Landof Civilisations.” “ J hron * 11 ****'■ 


RANKnjKT. Alte Oper Frankfurt 


May 23 and 24: EXHIBITION — To May 26: ‘The Z7A7T751 ' ,* 

- - - - Plastic Years." EXHIBITION— To May 3 t“Span- 

“ T — " Fdk Craft Museum (td: iah Sculpture: 1900-1936.^ 


i*'**'-' 


1 M: 


LONDON, Barbican Art GaBeiy — 
" iaces"Pho- 


To June 30:“Ameocan Images 
tography 1945- 1 980,". Lee Fried- 
' r, Diane . 


EXHIBITIONS — To May 27: “Fcr- 
88-19: 


lander. 


: Arbus and Robot Ad- 


nandoPessos, poet 1888-1935.’' 
•Gakrie Gandc-Bernard (td: 326. 
97J 

IITION— ToMay25: “Draw- 

A " . ■ .n^’ *» 


972m. 

EXfflBI 


Fnmkfon Racfio Syuybony Ordxa- 

•^ttodelaZamielaftd: 429. 1286). 
EXHIBrnON— To June23: “Crafts OPERA— May2I and 24: “Don Co- 
*• ^ of Nortb-Easton Districts.” k>" (Verdi). - 

OPERETTA — Micy 1 

Student” (MiDCcier}. frvtmjrrrnNr_Xo May 26: “Pom- 


Barbican Hall— May 18: Dallas Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Eonardo Mala con- 
ductor (Ponce. Mahler). 

May 19 and 23: London Symphony 
Orchestra, Myting Whim Cmmg ohi- 


, v. v— — , Myung Vrtnm Cbung i 
ductor (Beethoven, Prtiofev). 
'JAZZ— May 24: Preservation Hall 
Jazz Band. 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Sbake- 
ly — May 18 and 24: 


May 20 and 21:“ 
q>eai 
May 


1 nr (Shako- 


spea re). 

" ■ 22 and 23: “Henry V” (Shako- 


TheaierfteL 38756^9). 
1 : Mima Tseng 


DANCE —To June - 

ssassgoSQb. 

OPERA —May 22: "The Marriage of 
Rgaro"(MazanX . 

May 23: “Madama Buttefly” (Puco- 

A 


May 

“Raymcode Godin." 

•Galerie Karl-Flinker (tel: 325. 
18 .73). 

EXHIBrnON — To May 31: “Paul 
Kite: The Last Ten Years.* 

•U VakneteL 249.77.22). 
EXHIBITION— To May 21: “Bien- 
nale dc Paris." 

•Le Petit Journal (td: 326^8 J9). 
JAZZ — May 21: Memphis SUm. 
May 22: Watergate Seven + One. 

•Le Pigeon Bku (tel: 633J24J9). 
JAZZ — May 24: Jean Mkhd Bernard 
Quartet. 

•Maisonde Victor Hugo (272.16^5). 
EXHIBITION— ToJtme 29 “Le Voy- 
age duRhin.” 

•Musdc d’Art 


in -n_. tl •Nariooal Moseum of Western Art 

•Nationaltheater (tdl- 22.13.16). K ra °N- 

OPOA — May 18: TaimMuser" . NKHHa n( te i ; 465. I U 1 ). 

CONCERT — Mot 18: NHK Sym- 
■' ‘phony O rc h es tra , Wolfgang Sawal- 
May2l aodTA. "Doarasqtuae^fDco- ^^oodudor (Brahms). 

Q '- •Okuxa Shukokan Museum (td: - 

LWGANO, Palazzo del Congressi (tefc 
5851^3). W l 

CONCERTS— May 20*. Royal PhB- 
Aarmomc (fcv&estraof London, Yehu- 

HONG KONG. Qty Hall Concert 2500511). ' ^Menuhin conductor (Elgar, Bcciho- 

OPERA— May 18: *Ynaira" (Kino- Y^a)- 


?5?Ki,Nuite des Beaux-Arts 
79.44). 

rnON — To Mot 19: “Ca- 


583JD7J81). 

EXHIBrnON —To June 23: “Paint- 
ingsoo FokBitts Screens." 

xujnku Bn aka Center (tel: 


EXHIBITION — To Mot 19: “i 
ntille Oaudd and Augiate Rodin." 


18: Houg Kong shita). 

Phaharmonic Orchestra, Maxim Sho- 

stakovidt coodocn^ Fou Tseng pi- 
ano (Chopin. T 


May23: Vienna Symphony Orchestra, 
Oragn Prfttre con du ctor (Brahms, 
Strauss). 






ITALY 


Tooh ^ 


ational Portrait Gallery (tel: 


930.1532). 

” irrioN— 


Modern e (tel: 

72331.27). 

EXHIBITION —To July 8: “Marc 
Riboud.” 

•Marie de Montmartre (tel: 


EXHIBITION — To Ocl 13: “Charlie 
Chaplin 1889-1977." _ 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 

ECraB^lON — To July 14: “Ed- 
ward Lear, 1812-1888.” 


606.61.11). 
EXHIBITION — 


•Royal Festival Hall (td: 9283 1 31). 
CONI 


TWO FANTASTIC WEEKS CRUISING IN GREECE 
FROM ONLY S24I 
14 days sun drenched i 
ofthe 

inexpensive cuisine 

this the best holiday ever. Neptune Cruising 
(A Yachtours Fleet) 309 Brompton Rd, London SW3 




WORSAILIN 


BING 225 1508/9/0 ANYTIME FOR A BROCHURE 


%.vn-JCERT— May 21 : Phahanuonia 
Orchestra, Andrew Davis conductor, 
Shlomo Mintz violin (Copland, Rach- 

•R^^xas^td: 240.1066). 


Through June: 
“Moutmartre its arigms, its famous 

residents." 

•Musdc du Grand Palais (td: 
26134. 10). 

EXfflBlTION — To Sept 2: “Re- 
noir.*’ 


de ma. 

EXHIBITIONS —To May 20: “Tul- 
lio PericoH," “Roberto Barm." 

•Teatro Comunale di Bologna (td: 

22,2939), Henk Sekreve cdlo (Bach' 

OPERA — May 19,21,24: “FausT May 23: Bob 

^^.HteojdDUnantf^ 

SCHuSmON — To June IS: “Joan “NianandsJHnd" 


7133 j 45X Xli. . « fway^r-ca: jonnaue 

CONCEIT — Eighteenth Century Eachcnb “ ch 

BOLOCWA^GaDeoa «TArte Mo- ^njictor. M^SScS&er Orchestra. 

REO^S^May l9pSS^her 


Tchaikovsky). 


Vivaldi). 


wnDirim 


»Mus6eduPetitPalais(ieL 265.12.73). 
-J— ToJu 


■To June 15: “Joan 

Mho.” 

FLORENCE, Piccolo Teatro dd Co 




togSmit). 


NEW YORK.; 


June 30: “James 


BALLET — May 18: "Swan Lake" 


lila” (Saint Sates). 
>24: “La Boh* 


May 


•Tate Gallery (td: 821.13.13). 

BmONS — To Jane 2: The 


EXHIBITK — 

Political Printings of Mcrfyn Evans 
(1910-1973). 

May 22*Aognst 18; “Pamtiiira by 
Francis Bacon: 1944 to Present.* 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 


1589-63.71). 

imONS — To Jura 9: The 


F XHTfi 



schOd: paintings lor labels. 


EXHIBmON 
Tissot 1836-1902.' 
•Mns6eMannottan(td: 224.07B2). 
EXHIBrnON —To June 2: "Dun- 
oyer deSegouzac." 

•Salle Gavtau(td: 563 20 JO). 
CONCERT — Mot 21: Ocmcstiede 
l’Ecole Marcel Doprt, Christian 
Goumguera conductor, Jean Mlcault ■ 
piano fcfaJpin), 

£&SePkyd(td: 563.07.4Q>. 
CONCERT — May 21: Orchestra de 
Paris, Danid Barenboim oandactar- 
/ phtnrt , Frank Peter Zn nniQUiann vio- 
Lon piano (Mozart> 

RECITAL — Danid Barenboim pi- 
nno. Radn Lupqtsaoo (Mozart). 
•Theatre de la V23e(td: 27422.77). 
DANCE — To may 25: Nedcriands 

dans theater. , , , 

•Thfefitre de Pans Blanche (tel: 
874,10.751 


nmnale(td: 2775236). 

CONCERT— P “ 


May 18: Brandis 
tet, Bruno Canino piano 


alArtftti: 535.77.lt 

TIBITIONS — To Jane 9: 




EXH1 

“George Inm^«(i825-1894>‘ 

To Scpc 5: “Revivals Explora- 
tions in Eiumnn - 


Tv 


TON — To June ! "Wmk- 


CHAVES, Tourist Board (td: 21029). 

RECTTAl.— May 19: CecffiaGasdea EXHIBITI ON— ToMay2Z: “Aldno 
soprano, Bita» Candno piano (Mo- Roung^s, uspirao Santo Esteves and 

zarL Rossini). ^ ; WOiSi - 

•Xegro Comimmaie d-Ftame (id. f0r 

CmSc^'re-May20and21:Gty CONCERT - May 22a^ 23: Gul- 
of Birmingham Symptom? Orchestra, benkim Char, Golpetilaan Orcbes- 
^monttartt«YYn flncfnr NfthakoIiBri Fe«anao EJdoro conductor 

riola. Yo-Yo_ Ma ceho (Dd**sy. ^gS^SSiut 


WALKS 



«SdSStawda(id:27752J6). OTERA— May24:“ManoD”(J^se- CARDIFF. SL David’s Hall (id: M 

BALLET— May24T“Ustrwia"(PSs- «). 37.I2J6). - ^ 

UHti, RotaV Tl carnevulc deril mti- , -- ' 

E"(Antr - - - 


maH” (Araiz, Samt-Saftns> 
GENOA. Teatio Cmmmrii 


19: Welsh Na- 
boim Opera Orchestra. RkfaartlAnD- 


dett’O- 

• • ‘ " • The Orchesna oTSt John’s 

— May23:**Pinocchio"(Lin- EWNBURGH, National Gallery (td: Lubbock coodoo- 

daBruratta). 5518521V to^Kata— J *' ■* 

(Mozart). 


wmkooi* Tkaim 


l5oMr-c*?C«e- 


j computer problems. 


7 edai ie beghmisg of the year. *[perceni.. 








A- 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 




oman: 



by Kogpr OolBs 



SIWI 

ij. 

J-'T v, -- : "n i". l. 
A 1 ;_i~ '»"•*& 15 


. 'WilBioa 
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' n: '. :v * " •> ; ‘Vj:V: Hci'Vt^Jw ■■««« 


woman executive was running a press 
k ~ conference one evening in a sazte 
at&Tnajor hotel in London* The 
press information hadn’t arrived 
sojbe weal to check at the front desk. She 
7 was not allowed to go back upstair, even' 

■ after she taut taerfamed the situation. The 

•- Krtte t staff mastiff^ on raffing W nfient yah n 

- pome to iden tify hw 
. ;This tdeis told by GaU Brewer, director df 
^specialty markets at Ramada Tnns to make 
; her point that die main problems women 
yfacewfcen traveling on business are those uf 
--atfatnfles rather man amenities. "Women 
. k don’t want special treatment like pastd gnest 
V rooms and exclusive women's flotHS,” Brew- 
*:ersByv*1iitt equal service to that provided 
; fcff tndx mate counterparts. We try to make 
them fed. Eke business people.” .. 

£ v Most frequent women travelers have sunt- 

jar anecdotes of demeaning experiences. A 

. dassic is when a. woman checks into a hotel, 
with r ; a male. ooDeaghe. . The receptionist 
smites and says “Yes, sat V to tie man, 

■ assuming that they are travding together 
and want a double room. Another is when* 

woman is asked to prove die is a registered 

guest when trying to get in the lounge for a 
. drink, especially if it has an intimate atmo- 
sphere. 

But sucfa incidents are becoming rarer as 
hotels recognize the growing Importance to 
their business of thp ‘h nwiws lu riman^ phe- 
nomenmthwcanimloo^t^onimostia- 
•' dm. According. to the U. S. Travd Data 
Service in Washington, vromoiMW account 
for 34percem of all business travelers, com-- 
'.pared with IS percent in 197$ and their 

• number is increasing at a rate three times 

•' that of men. By the end of the cranny, 

women ate expected to comprise 50 percent 

of the ~ Kn<ni«pe travel marke t 
, a Maty hotels are new (alafrm for the sim- 

* pier and more obvious needs 011 die traveling 
woman, snch as providmg full-length nrir- 

ly rare and closets,- skirt hangers, shower caps^ 
bath gels, irons and ironing boards, hair 
driers, coding tongs, sewing kits and bath- 


read a paper, have a gjass of wine and be a 
Btttepart of wbaf s going on. It’s very diffi- 
cult in a darkened lounge to fed you’re not 
wearing a ago that says, ‘please pick me up.’ 
And yem don’t have to drink is your room 
■alone,” Brewer says. 

Other hotel chains, such as Best Western, 
Hyatt and. Marriott, have put thdr staff 
through similar awareness progr am s to help 
them bettor serve women travelers. Sheraton 


has introduced* credit card “exdnszvdy for 
ladies” fra use in their hotels and introduce 
women guests to the barman, head waiter 


and other key staff in order to make them 
lathome. 


t eel more : 


Bm many experienced women travelers 
are skeptical about “positi 


“positive tUsprirmna. 


Problems relate 
more to attitudes 
amenities 


lion.” They find it patronizing and are not 

ccuvinced that they have many more prob- 

lems than men when they’re on the road. “I 
think the less successful women are, the 
more problems they have,” says Serena Al- 
ton, travel editor of Working Woman maga- 
zine. “Yon’re treated as you behave yourself. 
If s very much a question of attitude. I’ve 
never had a problem in any hoteL” 

Barbara Scott, managing director oflnter- 
natiooal Graphic Press in Loudon, agrees. 
“If 2 go to the Savoy and I'm sal behind the 
jaDai; I just assume if s a mistake and ask to 

move somewhere else. I never assume it was 


done on purpose, because that would really 

make it my problem, wouldn’t it? It's 


»?sj«. - 
IV I’:... 

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u- 

s.a-.drt'.’- ' 
T.?F »- 

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If. £ 
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Women need a fast and reliable laundry 
' service that does not press blouses as tity 
“ would a man’s shirt and charge three times 
as much. 

Security is a mayor concern for the woman 
1 traveler. Tins, means good lighting in hall- 
ways Rod parking lots, and dead-bolt locks, 
chain* and peepholes in doors. Ifs a good 

idcafor a solo woman to ask for aroom dose 

- to an elevator with easy access to the lobby, 
so as to avoid running the gantlet of long 
corridors and elevator rides at night. (It also 
maker sense to avoid places with discos and 

* late-night entertaimnenl, and if you attend a 

business c on f erence to stay in a different 

hotel). . 

Hotds are becammgincrearingly aware of 

-the danger of giving out room numbers to 
7 u i ' " A A *0 " stran^rs. But mac arc still egn^kjos exain- 

’ pies of a dedc dak bawling crat^ room, 
1 number when a gpest anrres; People Esten 

and ifs an invitation for uawetoqnie caDers. 
mv + mmm , — x Computer generated plastic lews that bear 

no numbers are replacing the da variety that 

you Iiave to ask feir at &e desk. Bat all this is 
of no avail if security is lax on the switch- 
1 --.:. • ; r. :>-s ! : board. • 

Gail Brewer recalls that when she stayed 
recently at the Berkshire Place in New^ York, 
she rally discovered the hotel was giving out 
“ her room number when told by a woman 
caller. “I had no idea. A lot of the elegant 
~ hotels fed that they treat aE their guests the 
c» n« and so don't need to do any staff 

- training. But you never know whal those 
employees are saying unless the manage- 
ment has made an effort to tell them what is 

important.” 

Ramada undertook a training program for 
the staff of its U. S. properties in 1982 and its 
17 European hotels the following year. Says 
Brewer ”We have trained our restaurant 






:t -r I 


V.; - . 




SPAIN 


"The more Third World’ the country; the 
says. ‘There 


J • ■! . 


■ •'A- fc*- 


r. . \ 


I.i>- 


^ . # ! 


_ - 1 


*wira«** 


lOytXa W JOVE UK Wiuc iu tut ouuuu 

u aria for it and make sure she tastes the 
wine. If they areunsure who is the host, they 
n mtt place the check in the middle of the 
table. We have found that single diners axe. 
mare comfortable if they are placed around 

■ the edge of tie room.” 

According to Brewer, the rule at Ramada 
. u neves' to set a drink in front of a_ single 
woman guest unless she has ordered it The 
'procedure is to tell the woman that a man 
would Eke to buy hear a drink. Then ifs up to 
her whether she accepts or would rather be 
"left atone. “A tot of holds are now serving 
drinks out in tire lobby area where a woman 

■ feds more comfortable: You can sit there, 


better 3*m accepted,” Heraty says, 
are more problems with people from your 
own cul tu re . Tor example, a client or a 
colleague who is perfectly well behaved in 
the office vrill suddenly become a raying 
lecher when you take him off a plane with a 
couple of gin and tonics and show him a 
palm tree.” 

But according to Altoti, "Not evay man 
you meet is desperate to get you into bed. 
There are women also looking for a fling. ” 
An observation that seems to be confirmed 
by a recent survey by Executive Travel, a 
Bri tish magimne, winch finds that women 
fly bolder than men when it comes 


are 


to casual flirtations en route. 

Top hotels can of ten be the most stuffy. A 
smartly dressed business woman went in to 
the Ritz in Loudon on her way to the bar.. 
She was accosted by the h&fl. porter who was 
reluctant to let her through. Finally, she 
tiling at him- “I’ve come to see Mario.” 
"Madame, you should have told me yon 
wanted the barman and not the bar, be 
replied with ineffable disdain. ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


Page 9 


own attitude: Things that make me mad are 
txaedy the same things that would make a 

man mad, Hke having your hand baggage 

weighed and bring bumped off a flight” 
According to Margaret Heraty, an inde- 
pendent transport consultant and adviser to 
the World Bank, "Women’s problems in 
travel are simply an intensification of daily 
problems, the things you And every day of 
the week permuted It used to be the case 
that one was always overlooked for drinks 
on a plane. I think 1 get slightly better service 

from stewards. Things have improved enor- 

mously. But women traveling for the first 
time are experiencing problems, but maybe 

the problems that men have always had 

They just make more of a meal about it” 
Sara Barrett, a feature writer on the Daily 
Mail in London, who started travding on 
business about nine months ago, says: Tf s 
better than I expected, but there are stiE 

improve ments to be made.” She finds En- 

glish hotels are "more chauvinistic” than 
those in New York and the Far East, where 
t- service 'is much the same HcrparticalaF; 
gripes -'are male ' chambermaids m Bring ■ 

Kong who pat out her nightdress, not being - 

able to get a hot breakfast in her roam, and 
not bring taken seriously by hotd staff ^ when 
she wants to file copy by telex 
Serena Alloa is impressed with the treat- 
ment die gets in tie Far East “Fve always 
been treated withinimaciitete cointesy. Even 
in the Middle East, if you maintain the 
standards of dress — if you are seen to be a 
burinesswoman— they treat 
other women, a kind of third sex. 1 


Chicago: A Spectator’s Dreai 


by Andrew H. Malcolm 


C HICAGO — My favorite place in 
rtiiragn is, technically, not within 
the city Ennis. But Chicago' bring 
Chicago, being outside the normal 
boundaries of the law a few feet, or even a 
couple of yards, becomes a minor technical- 
ity. The favored place is where the Kennedy 
Expressway crosses the Tristate Toliway 
which crosses the Des Flames River which 
crosses U. S. 12 and 45 which cross the 
railroad tracks which cross the final glide 
path of so many jets thundering toward the 
runways of O’Hare International Airport, 
tie world’s busiest. 

Every day all day, every night all night, 
cars, planes, trucks, trains, motorcycles and 
even pedestrians flow through that sprawl- 
ing intersection Eke blood coursing through 
the arteries of the heartland, of^ which Chica- 
go still reigns as the square-shouldered capi- 
tal It is an awesome, noisy, smelly spectacle 
of jrmvement that is a symbd for tic many 
rights that wrairft the nation’s third-largest 

^OtheTdties are larger; may be mare re- 
fined at times, offer a larger array of better 
restaurants, mare culture, perhaps, or more 
obvious sites that attract tourists. But none 
present the same brawny mix of extraordi- 
nary ordinary rights — weather, politics, 

" races, imagination, corruption and athletics. 
They dash and mingle here where the broad 
prairies that are the world’s most fertile 
collecticn oT farm fields meet the vast Great 
Lakes that are the world’s largest collection 
of fresh water. 

It is the same 228 square mites that has 
given tie world A1 Capone, tie first name in 
American gangsterdom, and Mother Cabri- 
ru, the first name in American sainthood; 
bomb-throwing anarchists and bomb making 
scientists', Cracker Jack and deep-dish pizza; 
Saul Alinsky and Jane Addams; Jesse Jack- 
son and Richard J. Daley; the utopian first 
suburb and tie riotous 1968 Democratic 
Convention; Ebony magazine and Playboy; 
the Ferns Wheel and the zipper. 

nricaofj — the name comes Bom tie Indi- 
an wordfor a smelly swamp onion once 
found hereabouts — is fascinating just bring 
itself. The city was invented in 1833 /or 
reasons of transport — boat, train and, later, 
plane. And it hasn’t lost that prominence. 

The seven steaming' railroad stations of 
yesteryear, where countless celebrities were 
photographed boarding and debarking for 
mfnirarc of presumably eager readers else- 
where, have dwindled now to two cavernous 
hoiks. But in their place is O’Hare, named 


ORcharD (hence the ORD stiE on Chicago- 
bound luggage tags), is actually a self-con- 
tained city in a buufing complex with a 
shifting daily population as big as Syracuse- 
Just an average day at O’Hale will see 400 
more planes come and go than there are 
minutes. 

The city is also the cradle of modem 
architecture, having produced or nurtured 
such innovative architects as Frank Lloyd 
Wright, Louis H. Sullivan, Ludwig Mies van 
der Rohe and William LeBarron Jenney. 
Jenney fibred there must be a way to baud 
b uildings so that they used amounts 
of expensive ground space and sure of the 
free vertical space. And so he invented the 
skyscrapcx- 

Al though Jertncy’s first product here, the 
Home Insurance Budding, is gone now, 
many other architectural examples, new and 
old, remain mixed throughout Chicago’s 
bustling downtown Loop area. The sights 
range mm the Monadnock Building of 1891 
to the twin corncobs of Marina City of 1964, 
both along Dearborn Street To took down 
on it all, there is tie 94th-floor observatory 
of the John Hancock Braiding cm North 
Michigan Avenue or the 1 03d- floor skydeck 
of the Sears Tower, both of which on some 
days are literally lost in the clouds. 






J v "-\ 




. • . . V' • •'•■••■••V 

1 /: " :=■>■ • - A - - ■. 1. 



for Lieutenant Commander Edward (Butch) 

edal of 


O’Hare, a local Congressional Medal 
Honor winner who was, appropriately 
enough, a flier. One day daring ^ Wood War 
nhesmgkbandedly took on a wing of Japa- 
nese bombers attacking an American ship. 
Today, Japanese planes land at O'Hare ev- 
ery day. 

Calling O’Hare an airport is Eke calling 
the Queen Elizabeth II aboaL Every year the 
10- square-mile aviation maelstrom of 
Q*Hare, whose confines were annexed into 
the city by Mayor Daley despite being in the 
midst of suburbs, is tempor ar y home to 
nearly 700,000 flights ana more than 43 
nuEion travelers from all over tie world. 

The airfield, winch is on the ate of an old 


R IDING among the towering struc- 
tures is easily accomplished with the 
return of summer by boarding a rush- 
hour c ommuter foriy at the Michigan Ave- 
nue bridge over the Chicago River. It runs 
down the narrow waterway past under- 
ground cafes to the Chicago & North West- 
ern Railroad station. 

Pedestrians can spend days exploring the 
city beneath the Loop, tie relatively square 
system of elevated subway tracks that once 
defined downtown. They can also take (me 
of the walking toms that the Chicago Archi- 
tecture Foundation organizes deity around 
downtown architectural highlights. Or visit 
one of tie battalions of famed museums — 
the Art Institute, the Field Museum of Natu- 
ral History, die Adler Planetarium, the 
Sbedd Aquarium or, slightly farther away, 
the Museum of Science and Industry, with a 
submarine, 'a spacecraft and 2J00 puih-andr 
touch exhibits. 

Or they can stroll North Michigan Ave- 
nue; a magnificent mile of stores, hotels and 
shops. On the river at one end of the walk is 
the huge Wrigley Budding, an flhnnmated 
white tribute to tne chewing gum nickels that 
built it At the other end is the grand old 
Drake Hotd and the Oak Street bach, a 
popular summertime hmch-hour, people- 
watching place. 

In be tw een is the old Water Tower, a 
sandstone rdic that made it through Chica- 



Chicago’s lakefront and styline. 


fan* Bum, Magna 


go’s devastating 19th-century fire, and the 
. a 74-story marble 


newer Water Tower Place, i 
mausoleum with a seven-story atrium man, 
11 restaurants, 4 movies and 111 stores. 

The indoor faculties protea 
from all of Chicago’s many weathers. ' 
dash here so often that most local weather 
reports give several area temperatures and it 
is not uncommon for them to differ by 20 or 
30 degrees as various weather tystems vie for 
meteorological dominance over a metropoli- 
tan area that contains same seven million 
souls sprawled over parts of three states. At 
the same time tic same city can be experi- 



encing rain in one part, bright sun in another 
and snow in a third. 

The -visible impact can vary so much that 
in one storm test winter the snow ranged 
from two inches on Chicago’s South Side to 
19 indies to the northwest, which taxed even 
OHare’s vaunted snow-removal crews and, 
true to Chicago's rote as transport hub, crip- 
pled much of the nation’s air traffic else- 
where^ 

The winds play a mayor rote in Chicago’s 
dimate (me radio station is called WIND). 
The gusty air movements free Chicago from 
the land of uranmulated pollution that regu- 
larly turns Los Angeles brown, even if some- 
times the winds prompt Chicago pedestrians 
to straggle closer to me horizontal than the 
vertical. And Lake Michigan has its strong 
meteorological effects too. A vast, deep body 
of water, it helps cool downtown in summer 
and provides moisture for snow come winter 
and an obstade-free natural highway for 
Canada’s Arctic air masses to fall south 
mare forcefully. 

Sport fishing is coming bade on tie lake: 
And boating never left Few cities can rival 
Chicago’s view 00 summer Sundays when 
the ydlow sun burns brightly cm the azure 
lake; dotted by hundreds of brightly colored 
sails and pleasure craft on comfortable 
cruises and in regular regattas. 


single dty than a vast collection of disparate 
neighborhoods with their own languages, 
traditions, signs, foods and needs conve- 
niently arrayed on Chicago's arid map by 
numbers. In locating places in Chicago, resi- 
dents will sty, for example, something is 
thirty-two hundred north and eight hundred 
west With about 800 street numbers to the 
mile, this means a place roughly four mfles 


north of the Loop and a mite from the lake, 
ns who 


F OR marine-minded viators, tie same 
ferries that haul commuters bound for 
the railroad station at rush hour turn 
themselves into lakefront cruise ships at oth- 
er hours. This proves most spectacular for 
the spectator on the water on clear summer 
evenings when the bright orange and blue 
prairie sunsets fade to star-speckled black- 


Oticago, thanks to a series of turn-of-tie- 


The mayors who have succeeded in man- 
aging this conglomeration of centrifugal 
forces — and only Democrats held the office 
during the last half-century — have done so 
tty acting as power brokers among the shift- 
ing alliances and the frequently feuding po- 
litical princes of Chicago's SO wards. 

Ibis brand of takc-no-prisoners politics 
produces a tough -kneed of politician. A Chi- 
cago alderman once confessed he needed 
physical exercise but didn’t Eke jogging be- 
cause in that sport you couldn’t nit anyone. 
The columnist Mike Royko, Eke many dty 
residents mured to tie corruption that tradi- 
tionally greases Chicago’s wheels — and 
p alms — once suggested that the city’s mu- 
nicipal motto, tubs inherto (dty in a garden) 
be changed l oubiest mea? (where's mine?). 

Chicago’s professional teams have en- 
joyed some luck in recent seasons, the Bears 
(football). Cubs (baseball). White Sox (base- 

berths. And Je Cnbs’^Wrigl pfdd/smack 
in the middle of a residential neighborhood 
on Addison Street (3600 North and 1060 
West), is the lone remaining big league ball 
park without lights for night baseball 
There actually have been lawsuits filed 
and legislative debates heard on the issue, so 
strongly are emotions held on dther side in 
Chicago. These dashes are certain to be 
renewed frrauently as the new baseball com- 
ff, Peter Uc 


nussioner. 


Ward, a conservationist who also turned his 
attention to commercial pursuits, does not 


have to reclaim its priedess waterfront from 
and warebo 


[ Urn N*m Y<xV T«"w 


■ wharves and warehouses. It has pre- 
served the area as practically a 20-some- 
mite-long park lined with smooth, paved 
bicycle and jogging paths, ma ri n as , athletic 
fields, parks, picnic grounds, barbecue pits 
and beadles whose fair-weather scenes, 
smells and patrons provide revealing insights 
into the ethnic mix of the Midwest's capital. 

Chicago, a dty of three million where 
minorities are now a majority, is really less a 


Ueberroth, and television 
network officials from New York City open 
their annual offensives against a neighbor- 
hood of bleacher fans over the lightless ven- 
ue of Wrigley Field, pitting themsdves 
agains t bands of local tans ballpark 
neighbors, who include Governor James R. 
Thompson. It should be a wonderful, mara- 
thon punch-in-the-nose struggle, mixing 
politics, television, power, money and a little 
blood. It's just the kind of sport that specta- 
tors in Chicago love to watch, certainly bet- 
ter than jogging. ■ 


O I9SS The New York Times 


Y i'Z 
if'*' * 





81C Continued from page 7 


rT 


;■ lowed by physical therapy” Bfofeedback— 
whereby response-m e asu ri n g devtees hdp 

• retrain patiaits to control thdr botityacuvH 
ties — has been “incredibly effective thera- 
py,” says Julie Buffington, a psychiatric so- 

■ dal weaker for Local 802. 

* - Dorothy Taubman, a piano *ho 
•at success in treating injured nm- 

lsicians,is<. i ’ * 

cures. Bad 

: Taubman approach — which aims to etimt* 
‘ nate pain through th proper_tJse <« move- 


not overuse, are the ene- . 


roc, come to her from doctors who have 

wmc “No medical institutions can prove 
any lusting results,” due says. “A flutist saw 
me after an orthopedist had wanted to break 

aD the bones m her hand and put it in a cast” 

TTiA irHuariirn. Cynthia Ferris, says Ta u bma n 
rid her of the pam in an honr and a half and 
that it has not recurred over three years. 


and attitude toward marie. ” Joseph Fuchs, 
tie violinist, and Zubin Mehta, the conduc- 
tor, are cited as ransirams for whom surgery 
has succeeded. 


The geopte who meet this summer at 
will be c onsidering danrr and drama 




JlA^ 


.UNK LFOUA — r - -■ 

mmt Musicians with pam, says Taubman* 

wmirttfit — often m a matter mimnutos— 
'through the proper adjustments oE hand, 
arm and finger. 

' Many of her pupils, she reports with hras 


- KdOa offers a conciliatory viewpoint: 
“Medical intervention — cortisone sec- 
tions or even surgery — is appropriate in a 
minority of cases,” he says, M but the medical 
profession — which has often been so com- 
partmentalized — is beginning to see the 
need for teams 1 also made up of physical 


therapists, to change posture and movement 
and psychologists, to examine self-image 


NYU 

as well as mnac, but all tie disciplines will 
probably agree with Dorothy Taubman that 
prevention is the answer, not cure on a 
piecemeal baas. Prevention comes a little 
late for the large numbers of professionals 
who are both bewildered and fright«i*fi fay 
career-threatening disorders. These are tie 
people who make dealing with the present a 
necessity. The other — and perhaps more 
pressing — pntilem is how in tie future we 
can educate tie best kind of performer under 
the least amount distress. ■ 


*1965 The New York Ttma 




DOONESBURY 






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B8Q&TRADGR 

kcs mem ay 



Dropping Out on Buang’s Beach 


by Christine Chapman 


I A UNION, Philippines — For travelers 
to the Philippines who want a re- 
spite from frenetic Manila, tie 
-/ beaches along tie northwest coast 
ttf tie m fflMbiTn province La Union lure the 
South Sea-lovers. From tie southern- 
most comer of tie province and the Mack- 



boats, the colorful canoe-like bancor fitted 

: sea. Native 
mango and 
baskets bal- 
anced on thdr heads. Portable stands selling 
beads, shells and straw hats are set up in 
front of the holds. The approach is usually 
soft-sdl unless a relentless businesswoman 
harps on the bargains she’s offering. 


to the golden beaches of Bauang are several 
seaside resorts. Living is cheap, tie FBqanos 
gracious, tie sunsets glorious, tie night life, 
according to taste, rowdy or quid 

There’s a Somerset Maugham feefing to 
tie place of slightly seedy, easygoing com- 
fort A handful of esepatriatedrepodts, man*- 
fy Americans, has chosen to settle here, at 
hast during tie dry season. A former Cali- 
fornia computer engineer said: “After 23 
years in components, I wanted out.” He has 
business interests on the beach and fumes 
that the minister of tourism recently rerout- 
ed fifgbt!; from Manila into nearby San Fer- 
nando, diverting tourist trade to Agoa The 
flight to San Fernando from Manila took 45 
minutes; a bus or car trip tabes five hours, 
but from the mountain summer capital of 
Baguta, it is only an 90 minutes by bus to the 

mnqn taiS^ vri^ views of rice terraces, fertile 
valleys, and hidden villages, is me breath- 
taking surprise after another. 

Although bad for business, its inaccessi- 
bility is part of the chann erf the long sweep 
of beach. During tie week it a 

empty. Only a few children play on inner 
tubes in tie sea. An occa s i on al m a la d r oi t 
windsurfer becomes tie focus of attention if 
there are no bigger sails to watch. Pomp- 


ja 15 -minute 
trip by jeepney into' the pleasant pro- 
vincial capital of San Fernando is a 
diversion. There is a crowded public market 
where the array of fruits, vegetables and fish 
creates a riot of color. Near tie market are 
shops specializing in brand-name sports 
equipment and sports shirts, made in the 
Philippines for outlets abroad, at very low 
prices. 

The questions that plague tourists else- 
where, what to sec, what to buy, where to eat, 
narrow into a few basics at Buuang: how 
pften to leave tie shade of pabn trees to 
swim in even-dearer waters, which hotel is 
serving the barbecue that evening, where is 
tie best music. For a short walk along the 
b each in either direction brings tie wanderer 
to the Albatross Inn, Bali Hai or Crest Ola 
for food and entertainment. There are sever- 
al places to stay along tie beach, but a 
specific list is impossible as hotels dose or 
Aqtrf gp hands frequently. 

Foar hundred pesos a night, or $20, will 
get a very comfortable air-conditioned room 
tor two persons in the Albatross bra. Rates 
at other hotels are similar, perhaps some- 
what cheaper, depending on amenities like 
air-conditioning. There is a government tax 
tint may or may sot be included in tie hotel 
rate. Ask when reserving. 


On tie beach the Albatross Inn is tie class 
hoteL The management believes in mainte- 
nance. In late March the bold was building a 
new palm- thatched bar and adding protec- 
tive overhead thatching to the seafront bal- 
cony, the vantage point for observing beach 
life. Built about 10 years ago in the J 
style encxriding a courtyard, the A! 
has only 20 rooms, some facing the beach, 
others the garden. 

Rates may be somewhat higher during 
Easter Week when accommodations must be 
booked ahead at all of the holds. Call the 
Philippine Tourism Authority in Manila fra 
current information on what holds are open 
(tel: 588191, 502809), or make arrangements 
through a travel agent in Manila, weekends 
can be busy as American servicemen from 
dark Air Base come to tie beach with 
friends or families. The best season for 
Bauang, say tie expatriates, is December to 
June. A typhoon season begins in June and 
lasts into November. At other times tie 
weather is consistently good. 

MacArtbur Highway, the road to La 
Union province, also leads north to moun- 
tainous Hocos, childhood home of tie 
“Great fiocano ” President Ferdinand Mar- 
cos. But his summer mansion is in popular 
Baguio, which can be reached in a one-hour 
flight from Manila. (If you have flown into 
the country on Philippine Air Lines, a 
round-trip flight within the country is dis- 
counted at 50 percent.) After visiting Baguio, 
take the 26-peso bus trip down the moun- 
tains to tie sea and tie beach at 

(The Albatross Inn, BaumtL La Union. 
Philippines, td: 2666/68.) g 


Christine Chapman is a Tokyo-based writer 
who specializes in the arts and education. 




i 










•ev attaint 


U.S. Futures M*yi6 


Open HWi Low Oom Os. 


Grains 


Open High Low Gn aw. 


5 hS?’ lSJ" Open Htoti Law Oom Om. 

■699 8U4 Oac . ■*» +J# 

em. Solas mo piw.«m 

nnDoirOmU. UJl WW 


TOO I960 May 

EslSos 4JK7 PW-Sata* Mil 

Prev. Oav Open lot. SI 8*7 off WT 

OAANM JUICE P*TCEI 

'toSo 6 *" I 51« p * r i Mav igNJ uSm law 

1MJB 151-75 Jul 154-00 15400 ?f» 

i4M5 am i5uw isi-M jswb 

WXO W64Q Nev W MS W9JM 14630 

I8U» 141.15 Jan 

177J0 MOJO Mar 

MOW May 

15750 15780 Jul 

m «» wot sn* . 

BaLSaM 150 Prav.Sotae HO 
KSSoSoaeninL W» off 5? 


Metals 


■lb. 
May 
Jun 
57 in jui 

5750 Sop 
Doc 
Jan 


MITOK POUND flMNU 

Sperpound-l print eagBtaWJnn — 

1J3SD 1JB35 Jun 18440 MHO U« OTI0 —33 

1J4SD UQB0 SOP 18330 1J48S UH 1301 —30 

ljm um mu iao um i» -« 

laaa uuo mot **2 — • 

1-J250 mqj Jun „„„ law — ® 

Ett. Solas W8S4 Prev. Sato* M812 
Prev. Day Open InL 37874 u»7H 


Thursdays 


i c 


TafatK tadoM ft* aattonwfrfe price* 
cm to Kw dostaB or wc« Sfreef 
and do not reflbct fate trades dsewhora. 


(Cbn&ned from Page 6) 


2 PiwibnOpMlnl. 289S oH47 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEJ 

«&000 tbs^ canto par lb. 

0950 59JJ9 Jun Mg 6425 

6757 4045 AM 65-05 65.10 

6590 40.10 OM 63-15 C320 

4755 <150 Dec 6435 6435 

Sms 40.10 Fab 6450 4490 

<757 6150 APT 45JO *598 

EaL Sates W14 Prav.Sgtae 29907 
Prev. Day Open irrf. 5X027 up400 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

44000 canto par ID. 

J2JS 51 JO May 4570 4575 

73-70 4447 AlIU 6687 6090 

7100 6440 Sep 48+5 

7282 4435 OM 4127 4030 

7120 45J3 NOV 69JJ0 WM 

7940 4640 Jan 71100 7060 

49.10 44.10 Mar 

Est-Satos 1831 Prav. Sotos t+47 
Pm. Day Open It*. 7,074 off 57 

HOGS (CM E) 

30000 1 bL- canto perm. 

SS+0 4440 Jun <7-25 47.27 

9177 4705 Jul 4 9+5 49 JO 

5437 4737 Alio 4935 49J5 

51.75 45LD0 Oct 4600 47j02 

5035 4630 Dec 4750 47J2 

SUM 4635 Feb 4170 4BJ8 

4735 4450 APT 45JB 4570 

49JH 4690 Jun 4MX1 4100 

4975 4775 Jul 

Est. Soles 5327 Prav. Sotos 1325 
Pm. Day Open InL 23798 off 2 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3U00 KM.- cento per lb. 

83W 5935 May <2+0 4290 

8247 61.12 Jtll MM 4450 

HUS 6030 AMS 4235 <330 

7630 6115 Feb 71JB 7207 

7&« «00 MOT 7130 7138 

7530 70.10 Altov 7245 7250 

7600 69JB Jal 72S0 7200 

Est Sales 4770 Prev. Soles 1729 
Prsv. Day Open InL 11+63 up 208 


31 + * 

42V. — 1 
9Mb +116 
20 *—* 

Ettfc 

Wl 

5214 + to 
U4h IM 
WH 3* —Mr 
21M MM + 46 

mb im + u 
746 m— V* 
71b 346+46 
7% ^JW+* 

5046 5046—46 
34* 5416 
J 

* — 16 
VtV 1316— lb 
1146 1146 
n tt —ib 
U 1*% + 66 
— lb 
+ 16 
+ 16 


Industrials. 


Financial 


coffee canrcscE) 

37300 RMr cents per lb. 

15200 12201 Altov 14375 14400 

14930 12100 Jul M335 14430 

14730 12700 SeP 14400 14450 

14630 12935 Dec 14370 14410 

14550 12850 Mar 14300 14330 

14593 131J33 May 

14XK1 13330 Jul 

14200 1 3275 Sap 

Est. Salas i.iso Pm.Satae 2024 
Pm. Day Open InL 12002 off 45 
SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

112000 lbs*- cento per Bl 

995 292 Jul 304 3JK 

933 » Sb. 122 UJ 

9JB 3.17 OM 332 335 

775 140 Jon 370 370 

933 398 Altar +12 414 

7.15 430 May 432 435 

609 445 Jul 457 457 

.43® 474 SW9 

494 470 Oct 484 4JM 

EsL Sales 6+10 Prev. Sotos 4J34 
Prsv. Dav Open Int. HUH up 334 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tans- Spar ton 

2C20 1998 May 2200 2200 

3400 1998 Jul 2005 268S 

3415 1987 Sep 2DfiQ 2040 

2337 ms Dec 2030 2034 

2190 1955 Mar 2085 2043 


14305 14333 
14330 14331 
14390 14394 
14340 14240 

tan 14150 

14250 

14231 


loo an 

120 113 

125 125 

3JB 143 
404 407 

430 430 

453 451 

443 


3050 2065 
2029 2038 
2070 2032 
2005 2012 


US T. BILLS (IMMJ 
SI million- pto of 180 pq*. 

9244 87.14 Jun 9146 9141 

9232 8494 Sep 9203 92.15 

9183 9577 Ok 9L47 9179 

9154 8640 AAor 91+3 9152 

JUS 8771 Jun 9137 9L25 

9088 Sana Sep 9095 909B 

9080 B9JB Dk 9085 9085 

90.15 8958 Star 

EsL Soles 11431 Prev. Soles 14.142 
Pm. Day Open InL 40+30 off 311 
10 YR. TREASURY (CTO 
3IOOLOOO Prtn- Pts A 32nds of 100 pet 
8+3 70+ Jun 82-12 8+3 

>11 75-18 Sep 82-11 832 

822 75-13 Dk 81-14 82-3 

81 75-14 Mar 80-27 81-8 

79-26 7+30 Jun 

EsL Salas Pm.Solas 22JM3 

Prev. Day Opan InL 47JS5 up 1341 
US TREASURY BONDS (CUT) 
ff PcMiaUHBtoto 632nda Of 10D ectl 
77-15 57-20 Jun 73-15 7+8 

7+2 57-10 Sap 72-12 734 

74-5 538 Dk 71-14 738 

72-30 57-2 AAor 7MB 71-13 

JM1 5+29 Jon 7117 70-20 

733 5+29 Sap IM 49-30 

*0-26 5+25 Ok <8-24 <311 

49-12 5+27 AAor 4+14 48-25 

<32 6312 Jun 484 <8-9 

6+24 41-4 Sap 4318 47-27 

<38 62-24 Dec 

Est. Sotos Prev.Satos217.180 

Prev- Day Open lnL228+9B oil 331 
OMMACCETl 

SiaonOprin-ptsA32ndaonaopct 
71-20 5317 Jun 737 71-25 

7328 5313 Sep 7314 71-3 

7311 534 Dk 7315 7318 

4324 5820 Mar <328 732 

435 5325 Jun 4322 <39 

4331 <5 Sap 

Est. Salas Pm.Sataa 437 

PmDavOPWilnL 4297 up 12 
CERT. DEPOSITCIMM) 

SI million- ptsof 100 pet 
92JJ2 BSJ0 Jim 9TJ4 9240 

91-48 3390 Sap 9184 9L44 

9OT 8534 Ok 9097 9097 

9087 865* filter 

9020 8642 Jun 

9008 87 JM 3k 


9244 9258 
V2JU 92.13 
9154 9179 

9153 9L52 

91.17 9L25 
9095 9UJ4 
9085 9085 
9046 


8312 8331 
8310 82-30 
81-14 81-31 
0837 81+ 
8317 


7312 7+4 
7311 73-3 
71-13 72-5 
7831 71-10 
737 7318 

<8-8 <939 

<324 <310 
<315 <+« 
484 <38 

4317 47-24 
4313 


71-7 71-25 

7314 71-1 
7311 7318 
<9-26 783 
4313 4321 
639 


9186 9280 
9U9 9151 
9097 9180 
9055 
9037 
9014 


Prev. Day Open InL 16+28 upiv 




CRUDE OILtNYME) 
1808 t*L- dailan per haL 



2782 

2783 

+.14 


2480 


2782 

3U1 

2984 

3410 

Jul 

27.12 

2781 

27 JM 

27.10 



2425 

Aoa 

2682 

3677 

2685 

2658 

— jn 




2650 

3656 

2640 

26+2 

— JS 

2980 

2665 

OCt 

26+3 

26+4 

2622 

2685 

-81 




2687 

2640 

2630 

2632 

— JJ1 

2980 

2190 

Dk 

2627 

26+0 

2627 

2180 


29 JO 

2685 

Jan 




2628 

2621 


29+4 

2650 

Fetr 





2985 

2692 

Mar 




2688 


29+5 

2692 

apt 




r . 1 


37J6 

2692 

May 






2670 

3670 

Jun 




1 L s 


27 80 

2650 

AUB 




Kr| 


27JJO 

2673 

Sec 





Ext. Sates 


Prov. Sotos 6921 




Prev. Day Open InL 54561 Up 929 





Stock Indexes - 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMS) 
points and canto 

189.10 15610 Jun 18580 18735 1*530 187.15 

T92J0 16080 Sap 18980 19188 189 JS 19090 

19480 17530 DK 19285 19X50 19285 19435 

19650 190.10 Mar 19780 

Est.Satos 41807 Prev. Sales 73312 
Prey. Day Open Inf. 56747 up 617 
VALUE LINE OCCBT) 
points and cents 

21980 17300 Jun 19830 19980 1*880 19980 

21280 18535 Sop 20280 20250 19400 20290 

21080 20080 ■ DK 20780 28880 20780 20888 

Est.Satos Prev. Sales 5.124 

Prev. Day Opan InL 6771 off 42 
NYSE COMP. INDEX WYFR) 
p oints and ca ul s 

11080 9000 Jun 10735 TOUO 10730 10885 

11130 9135 Sap 10980 11080 10980 11080 

11335 WUO Dk 11245 11285 11280 11300 

11480 10980 Mar 114J0 IUJ0 1)400 1)530 

bL Salas 13866 Prev. Sotos l&UB 
Prev. Day Open InL 1Q8B2 up 381 




12 
ITVb 
15 

isn 
u 
u 

2796 
30 
3sn 

34 

18M 
2816 1M6 
toita 94 

m a 

a a 

45 51 

416 2H 
13H 8M 
fib <Vi 
IS 96b 
TUk mb 


jm QuafeOS 134 28 12 >194 4416 8316 Mb + 16 
TO fOlb QuaOpt 984 93 40*97 97 W u -I, 

2» IS auaMO JB 38 24 149 2596 21 21ib + «• 

im Abaumx 31 75 796 76b 79b— lb 

M9b 23 Qnasfcr 180 47 TI 10 3416 339h Utk 

2516 14 QkRBU JUU H 79 2316 2116 2346 + 16 


M6 RBIaa JM! 8 102 79b 766 746— 16 

2916 RCA UM 24 12 2BS9 4316 4146 an +116 

Mb RCAPf ZB 68 347 3UI 31 nta + Ml 

299b RCApI 345 108 107 344b 3146 3M 

<16 RLC JB 34 11 ■ 74b 746 74b 

3 RPCo 17 * * 4 

12M RTE 86 12 9 13 1716 1716 17Vt 

7 Rome* 8 1S5 1016 1016 1016 

2546 RatoPnr 180 Z4 13 2257 411* 411b 4146 + 16 

516 Roman OS IM 746 7 7 —46 

16V6 Ronco M 43 II 13 B 174* 18 +16 

2» RonarO - 359 346 346 34b— 16 

4716 Rayon M J 32 10 4* *416 U +146 

10 Raymk 34 946 94b 94b— 16 

3W Raytha 180 38 15 SM 4*1* 45V. 4FW— 4* 
.746 ReadBt 88 48 148 99b 916 916 

1«* RdBUp(2J2.1U 22 1916 19 19 

916 Rttttof L3NH8 18 1 Bib 1316 13U>— 16 

* RaOlEa 12 m 12 l!4b 114b— 16 




7116 
irv. 

30V. 

ISM 
5116 
144b 
Mb 
2M 4516 
<3* 14* 

7577 1Mb If* 
28(3216 2716 
30* 29% 2916 
Mt 33 31 

34 15U. 151b 
» 134* 1316 
57* 3746 32% 
1305 14 1546 

US* *416 <346 

a *1* 4ii6 

175 47% 47 
10 1546 154b 
53 S3 
40% 40 
19 1846 

14% 1** 
IT* n% 
JO 
274b 
27 
4346 
71* 

a 

37% 


32 
38 

nj iv 

118 309 

41 T 487 
69 71 

18 23 TO 
U Q 07 
0 




4846- 16 
21% + 16 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody’s 91580 f 

Reuters— TJQ680 

Dj. Futures—. 

Com. Research Bureau- 23680 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Previous 
925X0 f 
1,84440 
122J8 
23830 


40 5016 2016 2816 
2S1 5246 5216 52% + 
IS 118*118% 1189b + 
7 107* 107% 107% 

97 24% 2* 24% 

3M6 38* — 
14% 15 + 

31% 33% + 


London Commodities 

M*y 16 


Close Previous 
H%6 Low Bid ASk BM Aik 

SUGAR 

Startlm) par manic too 
Aim 9580 9380 9380 9380 9380 9580 

OCt 9980 9680 9080 97J0D 9880 9980 

DK 10440 102J0 10240 10120 10460 10580 
AAor 11720 11SJ0 115J9 11580 11780 11780 
May 12080 11980 11980 12L00 T21JM 171 JO 
Aug N.T. N.T. 12580 12680 13«8 12780 
Oct 130J0 13080 12980 13080 130J0 13280 
Votome: 972 loti of SO ton*. 

COCOA 

Sfertl no per metric too 
Mov 1J84 1 JM 1J60 U75 1JH 1J9B 

Jly 1818 1J80 3 .781 1JB2 1825 1827 

Sap 1800 U67 WTO U72 1814 1813 

DK 1JW 1J4S 1J47 1.750 I J7< 1J77 

Mar 1J76 1J99 1JM 1J63 UB! 1J82 

May. 1JM UBO U74 UTS 1J93 1,794 

Jty - 1.787 1JU L780 1J90 1J99 1800 

Volwma: 6227 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Start top per metric ton 
May 2865 2050 2X58 2062 2055 HUB 

MV 2722 zm 2110 2111 2715 2117 

SOP 2163 2145 2155 21M 2156 2160 

Nov 2193 21B1 2193 2195 2187 21» 

Jon 2221 2210 2215 2223 2215 2218 

Mar 2195 2195 2205 221D 2200 2202 

AUv N.T. N.T. 2180 2210 2155 2290 

Volume: 1844 lots of 5 tom. 

GASOIL 

US. donors Par metric tun 
Jan 21780 21650 21675 31780 21685 21650 
Jly 1 215.75 21475 71580 215J5 21523 215SS 
Aim 21780 21780 71625 21650 21+50 21+75 
SCP 219.15 218.75 21425 21980 21875 21475 
OCI N.T N_T. 219J5 221 SO 21925 731.75 

NO* N.T. N.T. 22180 22580 22180 22580 

Dec N.T. N.T. 22380 23080 22280 23280 

Jan N.T. N.T. 22300 23380 22480 23280 

Feb N.T. N.T. 22180 23580 22280 23280 

Volume: 242 lots at 100 tons. 

Sources.- Reuters and London PmtroUum Ee 
eftanao [aaaoMJ. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Mav 16 


Plt*4ad 

Mar An 8r Am 


TaW can wfumt OM 
ToM «aU oem M.M7JE 
ToW eel volume W7JM3 
Total eul seen art. mu** 

Hip 1BU? urn 179 ji data HUB +*« 

sovran case 


STOCK IS® US 

DeVoe-Hotbdn 

IntcmaticBial bv 5V6 6V4 

Gry -Clock 

'Internationa] mr 2 94 3% 

Quotes as ofc May 15, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
nore and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
wiD be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht 483 

1017 BT Amsterdam 

The Netherlands 
Telephone; (0)3120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 


London Metals 

May 16 


ALUMINUM 
Starting per metric ton 

Wat 88686 38780 88980 89180 

forward 90380 90350 91280 91100 

COPPER CATHODES (Htgb Grade) 

Starling per metric too 
neat 185050 1J8680 1JO08Q 1,23280 

forward 180450 1.20580 1JT780 1^1 7 JO 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Staling pot metric tan 
8P0t 1,19180 1,19580 U108Q 1J1580 

forward 1,19080 1,19680 WQ58Q 1 80980 

LEAD 

Sterttou per metric too 
Vat 29A80 29980 30080 30180 

forward 30280 3C2JD 30280 30250 

NICKEL 

Steritog per metric ton 


DM Futures Options 

May 16 

VtGormMai M ZMOatilscBtfatarTHrt 


Cash Prices May 16 


SMh 

CaUs-Settlfl 


PutsMHe 

Price Jen 

SN> 

DK 

Jw 

Sep 

DK 

30 2+4 

297 

385 

UB 

042 

045 

a L54 

234 

20 

au 

646 

093 

32 Ml 

145 

IM 

0+1 

MU 

183 

a 035 

1.16 

UV 


14* 

147 

34 614 

614 

186 

in 


36 605 

057 

0J8 

244 

287 

287 

EMmatad Mol wM8U 




Cam: Wed. veL472 
Pets: Wed. vaL 233 

l open let 4»J4fl 
) open 10134403 


Sourer: CMP. 






Commodity and Untt 

Tbu 

ABO 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb 

188 

1+8 

PrkTtOOttl 44AB3B %, WJ — . 

043 

BM 

Steel Wltats ( Pitt J. tan 

473^1 

45380 

iran2Fdrv.Ptilla.tan — — 

21X00 

21380 

Steel scrap No 1 trvy Pitt. - 

79-00 

im-ioi 

Lead Spat, lb 

»-2i 

25-20 

Copper elect. A 

0-72 

0*72 

Tin CSIraltol,* 

SJ573 

68426 

Zinc. 6. St l_ Basis, lb 

0+++7 

0L32-J3 

Palladium, az . . — 

110 

152% 

Silver N.Y.a 

651 

98B 

Source: AP. 




<5 

Mb 19% 
34% 2616 
26* 5% 

19% 14 
33% 244b 
a<% 19% 
13* 7% 

36 19% 
13% Mb 

31% a* 

am im 

33% 174b 
19 13 

37 25% 
46% 3116 
15% 10% 


NYSE High-Lows May 16 


Asian Commodities 

May 16 


forward 9.51580 9.51980 

ZINC 

Start hm per m* hie too 

APOt 64600 64980 66080 4*9 an 

forward 65380 65480 66480 *6580 

Sourer: AP. 


UJS. Treasury Bill Rales 

May 16 


Offer 8M Yield YlaU 
SHUWnrti T a» 787 743 7+7 

+frantti 7J9 757 181 606 

One year 780 7JS 641 650 

Sourer: Soforxn Brothm 


Dividends May 16 


m 


volume: im lota of 100 «. 

KUALA, LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mnlny iln cent* par Mta 
Oom 

BM Aik 

Jun 191.25 19280 

JIV 192J5 19380 

At* — 19580 19685 

Sop- 197 JB 19650 

Volwiw: 23 Veto. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Slnoaparn cents per Mlo 
Ctoae 

BM *+ 

RS5 1 Jun— 169 JO imoO 

RSS 1 Jly 17180 17L50 

RS5 2 Jun— 16650 169J0 

RSS 3 Jun— 16433 167 JO 

RSS 4 Jun— 1*250 164JD 

RSS 5 Jun- 157 JO 1 59 JO 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Makmlan rlnnglto par 25 tons 


Previous 
BM A* 
19025 J90.75 

192JD 19275 

19150 19680 

19780 19680 


Prwvloa* 
BM Aik 

16600 16650 

USJ5 17625 
167 JO 16650 
165J0 M6J0 
16)80 14150 

15680 15650 


02 47% 

23 UU 

» 28 % 

42 17* 

MS U* 

375 UM 
U 8% 

20 1 * 
no 32% 

31 

1232 27% 

IS 91% 

H 11 tt* 
31 5% 5% 

421 29% 29* 
521 36% 36 
MS 9% 9% 

10% W* 
32% 31* 
25% 34* 
37% 27 
40% 39* 
30% 38% 
17 

n% 

d* 

178 2*% 

1433 45% 

*634 m 
802 II* 

334 30* 

47 59% 

104 34* 

70 14% 


34 91% 

19% 5% 
23* M 
4* 9% 
38% 19 
5 % 2 % 
44% 27* 
13% 9% 
25* 18* 
8* 3* 
W* 8% 
49% 35% 

47 a. 

75* <0% 
•<% < 8 % 
66% 52% 
62% 4M 
0 51% 

21 % 11 * 
41% 2B 
78 40% 


NEW LOWS It 

S==E57 GOhnttiau LTVCpJM 

ColGaiPfC HSftS Zn ili jcL 

KarrGkBB ZwaMCp 

LTV12SM “3™^ OtVtoY PfB 

MtwiZEn ggvlnvgf laartaTTK 

ButtaGspf OIHwIiv LTV829M 

vtManvdto 


Won White WeM&A 

U Qml At Wen! Inc 

UII Gckn LSMbaM 
TcL 31S25I - Tdn 38315 


g 1 29 19 XTRA jM 24 W UB 

1 % 

Jk 

% I 30 94 bltCp 182 47 e 84 

% 23% 19% zSSnb s 07 1 

» Zapata 84 6+ 25 14s 

a ” zSEZ*, ** * “ 

* jnb ZenlttiE t 3082 

21% 14% Zeros 82 14 15 21 


ia 9i 

9 1316 
14 25 

9 44 

U 235 
10 557 70% 
- 41 3% 

ass* 

14 M SS 
14 1986 29* 
a - tar 57% 
6 13% 

9. 197 
19 a* 

12 45* 

8 1151 
U 1142 
50 


82 18 15 


M 90 27% 28 + % 

1 IM aiW 81% + * 

gs%i+"‘at« u 

W St BM 50 +9 

a zi% aa% 2i% + * 
n ii% i7* mo + % 


13* 

52% 

ITU 

12% 

to 

16% 

9 

0 

Ml 

ReatEa 

Redmn 

12 

80 13 17 

194 

0 

■mr' 

n 

8* 

im 

8* 

s 

8% 

9% 

77> 

Reece 

20 

IS 

8* 

8% 

8% 


cent in the B£c 
Inflation in aH i 
percent 





























































































1 ,v_ 1 -i . • 


;.* £ a 
*'*j i; IN 

.. 4*- 


Statistics Index 


MHEX Micas' . PJO . Eonrfnos mjarts pj— 
amex W9h*fl9**Pj— ptnu one wa p.u- 
NVse Micas' P. & CMd mortals . p.n 

■ ■ ■ P.11 

Uorkst summary p. 4 

. . fc» 

MB. OTC Hock P.12 

OlvUndi P.10 Oflwr nwriets p,l* 


Jieralb^^Sribimc. 


*+; 5 S' nvse Micas. . r. a wu ••»»—'- 
H ’ T* i’ «W»fl«we.W - nrtas 

2" V y,4(M>n«" *■** - W* *“***«««> 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 6 


s.^ 


-silk- 


FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


** 


Page 11 




■»-. ,f» ^ $•, 

i: 

•* > ' s S’ 

>; s* -i 


TECHNOLOGY 





i § IPIn D.S. Securities Markets 




SK 


8*«S 

• 


It- b 



By NANCY L. ROSS 

IterftmgtoJ Post Sente 

ASHINGTON — Lika the golden spite ih« joined 
the transcontinental railway more than a century a go, 
r . tSe technological fink that wfll permit tntaily ap fQmflf- - 
ed securities trading is about to be forged. In the near 


* 3 is* 

*ii • vJJ 

’■« 3s IN 5f*n Y :•;■▼ ed securities trading is atx 

■P 55 $C £$ ..future, FideKiy Investments Group, the second-largest VS. dis- 
: : w count broker, plans to inaugurate a computer program to per- 
foon automated verification and apmoval of customers' orders. 




Charles Schwab & Co_ the largest U. .S . discount broker, plans 
to start its own automated order-entry service during the first half 
of noil year. 

Nigh the two systems are some w hat different, they both 
software that will forge . : 


a connection between a cus- 
tomer’s persona] computer 
and one of the various com- 
puterized systems already 
used by .fie industry to exe- 
cute ciders electronically. 

The systems wiQ make it 
possible for a customer to 
trade . soubs securities from 


The systems w31 
enable investors 
to trade from 
home or the office. 


^4 ^ n 

3> 




home af office without a broker’s help. For custcraiers,' computer- 
ized investing wfll mean a slightly faster execution of buy and sell 
orders. For me securities industry, it could mean significant cuts 
in costs and personnel. 

“It’s the wave of the future,” said John Wall, executive vice 
' president of the National Association of Securities Dealers. 

Tins final Knle — providing computerized jprocesring of cus- 
tomers’ buy and sell orders — follows other advances in comput- 
er technology fiat have made a fully automated system] 



USTOMERS using personal computers are able to tde- 
pbone computerized information servioes to do their re- 
search on stodts. The personal computers then initiate bny 
and sdl orders. 

At the other end, there has been a steady automation of stodc 
exchanges and over-the-counter markets in recent years, permit- 
ting faster trading and, increasingly, trading without brokers, 
Horn: traders or other specialists. 

One such program, NASZYs final Order Execution System 
(SOES), is scheduled to make its debut Dec. 14. 

The New York Stock Exchange recently announced that its 
Soper Dot 250 system, providing instantaneous trades, is now 
” “ over 400 million shares a day. 

-, who passed the 
a wire operator, who transmitted it to the 
execution oy a specialist, who sought a buyer 
or seller on the crowded trading floor. 

. FnHy antomated systems such as Investors Express, as Fidelity 
calls its new service, offer a dramatic change. It works Hke this: 

A customer uses a personal computer to get quotes on the 
desired security, then sends an .order to the broker’s termmaL 
Instead of the broker’s calling np the order on his or her screen 
and personally verifying it. Fidelity’s computer automatically 
evaluates the order by matching it against parameters set for the 
investor; 

H» machine verifies the customer’s identity through several 
levels of passwords; checks to see that there is enough money in 
the account to cover the purchase; checks to see that the size of 
the order is within the fcnfo permitted the customer, and, if 
necessary, makes sure that the customer is authorized to trade 
options, buy on margin or sell short 


not seudttori for' execution but alerts abrokeT to review fie order 
and determine whether fie customer should.be contacted. Once 


approved, the order is sent for execution. 
The Sec 


Securities and Exchange C ommissio n has supported de- 
(Contianed on Page 15, CoL 8) 


Currency Rates 


OwsBatm 


1 DM. PJF. Itl. BMT. 

OH TOW J7J1 ’ AH71* 

7114 slots uan i»* rtsm 

3m JU7* Udl* 

— im nra 24 hh ons 



mu — 56S34 

M2S IMUO 


May IS! May 16 
■A SJF. TM 
U07* 13U>* Ur 

HH Mzn* 

oh* m»* uu- 
mu uss aura 
aua 79us iso 
an isn asus 


- -■ V. S-) jb 
: 

i- *' i.i 


W7W urm am 

MMYorklO UW1 UW 

mm anaer aus7 na am wa*' mi ms a* wjs — 

Zarich 15775 M5B3 81525* 77 JH* D.73U* 7UZ5* 4.U5* Un*1 • 

1 ECU JU2B U3M 12401 U3B5 1X2U6 1014 4UBB UW 1057 

I SDR 055U15 UMI Ml Kfl. NA. KM. HA HA *U«B 

Ctatftw* m London aM ZUrleft. fbdaos m t&mr Eunmn anm Hn* Ya/t rum at* PM. 
(a) Commardathnne flW Amounts AmMMsattOmtiolofvm 

dtMar ft UnHsefltO ixi Until ot 1000 (ri Units of 1&OOONA: not quoted,- N^- not wWMMl 

OOwrBalkrVahm 

CMrmcr wr UAs Cwtmct ptr uss onwr woe uss camner pw u»j 

5ML00 FhbmarMBJ M» Mntar.rMv.- 1474 S,Kar.MB CTUB 

Muani.% BJU OlMfc4lrec. 13501 MK.MW 25UP S*ga.nH«*a 17115 

AMir.KW. 214? H«Kwi rm _un MhW IH 

Bda.fla.fr. 42.10 WHmm 1247 MMLmm 184405 TdWMI . 89.90 

■nanavz. 5.1KUU iMto.rn*A 1.111J# PcrLtwwlo TOM Mild 27J« 

CanaSuil 13715 WWiC (0809 Sowflrivd XiKU TMMM SW58 

DMHOkiaM 1U4 M«M 90020 H»« MW5 IMEttW 34J3 

nnn>- rwnirt USN KHmWOw 03873 tAfr.nwl UW VMkMk 1245 


^ #■ » 
i- 

M • C '’| 


Interest Rates 




i ‘ V 

r * ■' 




i' 


m 

IMh 

•MhOU 

mm 


D-Mark 

jft-m 

5J6-598 

5VM(U 

5W4 


May 15/ May 16 


4<th-5fc 

HM 

5«r5fl* 

SMA 

5W»i 


StarllM Franc ECU SnR 
12U-12U I01W10U 9Vb4h 7fk 

T2M-SW TO hr IB H. flfrfU 7flfc • 

12M-12H lOhrlSH. 9flr«hi 8 

12 hr12lh 10 hr TON 9%-fVi M 

T290-12U 1090-18 W. »V« 8» 


1 >1 


auras: Maroon Guaranty (donor. DM. Sfi Pound, m SM'M (Ban: Kmdan 

(SOX,. d«**ft* ottlaMan mtomm (orooutuotodh 




* 4»rz 

^ *- 
t T — 

* i-'*-"" 

or-*"*- ■ 

* v-*» 

^ «i- ‘ 


-- •* , 
■» « , 


Key Matey Bates May 16 

umn4 not— Close w- 

8 I 

837U 8* 

W-lOTi W-ttft 

9 9 
UB TM 

734 740 

735 743 

745 740 

7 JO. 745 


DtaountRoie 
FMoml Fowls 
WmeRole - 
Broker Leon Solo 
On Paoer 98-179 Oovs 

HnonttiTjoaeory Bute 

4moatt< Trwwrr BHSfi 
CD's 30-59 (ton 
CDS <Hf nays 


ri -wa--' 


* -T. " 


. &;■ 


Weddr—nr 
UMnrdRm 
OMfntgMRM 
OneMgdk intortwnk 
3monki Ifthrtank 
8amtti baeftank 


800 

CM 


408 

540 

548 

550 

515 






■MerantignRgtt 
Call Money . 
Oae-aaidti Wertxn* 
8man8i intartank 
4flwMk iMtrfeenk 


im m 

OBf 10th 

- wine 

— 1M 
_ 18 


Hank Bose me 
Can Meaty 
n-OpyTnawryMB 
taatfbtaUrtaanit 


i» r» 
W i» 

urn* mra 
numin* 


UsaemiRaH 
Can Money * 


5 

4 

flk 


4 

l 

*» 


. . ^ , Sources; A n*r& CommwBanfc Crtdtt 

. V.< H Lw&KAzjoiidf Saak. Bt/Otirt Tatra. 

* S . 


I-M 
M-IU 

Ifl-Th 
Source: Rmdan. 


l 

2maflUa 

smoMto 

CnWBNB 


May 16 


CSMMeyNarketVMs 

Hay U 

IMfrW Lyach Beai* A*s«H 

SBOayaveroMTleM: 949 

Trim* M l tfd Rate laOn: . 74W 


Saune: Martin Lynch. AP 


L 


Gold 


Hum tana 
Lmembaani 
perl* {725 KHo) 
Xarttk 


32155 


—335 


JSy.ifi 

PA 
33025 
rioi 
CM . 

CM 

330.18 -KB 
Mew York - BU" 

twwMwfwii 

ims,- Horn Kona and Zttrka onenti v ana 
5SW prim Now York am w a/rrent 
ZZ^A«arica6hUS.si*r ounce. 
Source: fletffars. 


32040 


* * 


Markets Closed ; 

and W«t Germany. 




Eurobond 
Houses Set 
New Rules 


Pricing Abuses 
Cited by Group 


By Bob 

Interttmkmai He 

LONDON — The banks and se- 
curities finm tTiat arr ange Euro- 
bond is sues annoosced guidefioes 
Thursday rimed at imposing £sd- 
pHne on their freewheding market 

The guiddines are fie first devel- 
oped by the International Primary 
Market Association, fanned last 
autumn by 44 band dealers that 
regulariy act as lead managers of 
Eurobond issues. 

To discourage lead managers 
from bringjna braids' to the market 
low trams, one of 


on 


the G^yrrrrM^da ri o m sets stan- 
dards for the QSe Of «a>wl iration 

accounts. Such accounts hold 
funds used to buy or sell newly 
offered bonds in an attempt to 
steady price movements in the 
open market 

The association said such ac- 
counts should be used oily to pro- 
mote orderly distribution of the 
hoods. Hans-Joerg RadloS, co- 
chairman of the association's mar- 
ket practices committee, said the 
accounts should not be used to help 
hold a bond’s price at as artificially 
hi gh level and fins create the ap- 
pearance fi&t the initial p ricing 
was in bne with demand. 

The nwiwiflwifhlifi n sets limi ts 
on how much of any losses sus- 
tained by the accounts should be 
passed cm to members of the syndi- 
cate of houses managing an issue. 

Thna , the lead manag er wnnlri hear 

the bulk, of any losses from sup- 
porting mispriced bonds. 

“The intern is to have the bond 
; at natural levels,” said Mr. 
, who is deputy chairman of 
Credit Suisse First Boston Ltd., the 
iaigest lead manager of finobood 
issues. In order to obtain mandates 
to arrange issues, he noted, Euro- 
bond houses sometimes offer bor- 
rowers terms bdow the Level inves- 
tors are willing to accept 

The other recommendations in- 
volve timely payment of coamnis- 
skms to syndicate members and 
delivety of prospectuses. 

The pg^vffw^ndatiems are not 
binding but die association said h 


Airlines Jostle for Pacific Routes 

U.S. Carriers Seek Share of an Expanding Market 


By Agis Salpultas 

Yew York Times Senior 

NEW YORK — Tie Pacific 
stifl has a magical allure for the 
airline industry. It is the market 
that has grown the fastest in re- 
cent years and it is expected to 
continue to outpace other parts 


of the world for the next decade. 

There are “cnermoas opportu- 
nities” in the region, said Steven 
G. Rotiunrier, president and 
chief executive of Northwest, the 
largest U.S. earner in fie Pacific. 
“And this docs not address what 

is happening in Qnrm- As it be- 
comes more capitalistic you win 
get additional business and tour- 


ist traveL" 

Northwest and such other ma- 
jor carriers in the region as Japan 
Air Lines have ambitious pans 


Shrinking U.S. Carrier Shares 
Of U.S.-North Central Pacific Traffic 


Bawd on total pMaanqafa flown; irtefa (tea ct w wr t ra ffic; IBS* period is from 

January-October 


70% 



Sourer; StaMt HtOkMon d Bebnor. no. 


for the next few years. 

The annual growth rate in air 
traffic is expected to rise to 8 or 9 
percent in fie next five years, 
compared with an annual rate of 
7 percent in the last five, accord- 
ing to Cari T. Norris, the system 
rinwrtor for planning and fore- 
casting for Fan American World 
Airways. 

That is a major reason why 
Richard J. Ferris, the chairman, 
president and chief executive of 
UAL Tnc., the parent company 
of United, is seeking to acquire 
Pan Am’s Pacific routes. 

“The Pacific is the prime eco- 
nomic growth area,” he said in a 
recent interview. “We dunk it 
vrill reap more benefit than try- 
ing to carve out mare territory m 
oar domestic market” United’s 
US. route Systran carries more 


than 120,000 passengers a day. 

Meanwhile, such other major 
afriiiwi as American and Delta 
are hoping they will be given 
routes m the Pacific from fie 
current round of bilateral talks 
between the United States and 
Japan. 

There are pitfalls, however. 
The Pacific can be a frustrating, 
restrictive and highly competi- 
tive arena. Requests for new 
routes or added flights are sub- 
ject to comphcaled negotiations 
between governments. Gains 
one airline must often 


made 


be 


by gains for the ofi- 


*78 *80 

MarKet Shares 


Bawd on tottlpmaMnROra Bcmm. 
Jwwary-OCtgtMr, 1084 


Unft8(ryiw CUte ■ 

■ 44% 

»*****■■■_ 

17% 

PmZAnmkm. . • 

14% 

tinted 

3% 

Amiga Canton 

56% 

Japite^wino* • -• " 

28% 

' ■- - 

S% 

i-*. • 

8% 

StagifemAMna? 

7% 

Othor . 

8% 

-Atonn U&ciHimw. HMOii «WJM« 
fcr4Mkltete9d—a«29k—80ted 
&». ol DaUA^lMik C**m PacMctntte 

Senate: tls. Cap unmoral* Tfapoportoflon 


Competition from local carri- 
ers is growing. Singapore Air- 
lines alone nas ordered 19 
Boring 747-200s and 14 
747000s jumbo jets, eight 


wfakh have been delivered, and it 
owns one of fie world’s most 
modem fleets, the average air- 
plane bring 39 months old. 

Moreover, official and tmoffi- 
ICoutiarad an Page 13, CoL 1) 


BP Net Up 51% 
In First Quarter 
On Dollar Gains 


By Bob Hagerty 

Internal lortat Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British Petroleum 
Co. reported Thursday a 5 1 -per- 
cent surge in first-quarter net prof- 
it, but the bulk of the increase came 

from currency-translation gains. 

The company, which is 31-per- 
cent owned by the British govern- 
ment. said net profit rose to £313 
millio n (about 3644 million), or 
28.2 pence a share, from £342 mil- 
lion, or 18.7 pence a share, a year 
earlier. Sales increased 32 percent, 
to £1 1.48 billion from £8.71 billion. 

Because oil is priced in dollars, 
the rise of the dollar increased the 
value in pound terms of BFs oil 
output and inventories. After strip- 
ping out gains in inventory values, 
BFs profit showed an increase of 
24 percent. 

Although the figures were broad- 
ly in line wifi expectations, BP 
shares slipped 10 pence, to dose on 
fie London Stock Exchange at 533 
pence. 

BP earns the vast majority of its 
profit from oil and gas production. 
In the latest quarter, however, ana- 
lysts said they were impressed wifi 
BFs results from refining and mar- 
keting oppations. 

Operating profit for these down- 
stream operations outride the Unit- 
ed States totaled £61 million in the 
quarter, more than half of the £1 1 3 
million for all of 1984. Good results 


from Australia, Southeast Aria and 
Africa helped overcome weakness 
in the intensely competitive Euro- 
pean markets. 

BP benefited late in fie quarter 
as the dollar began to slump, lower- 
ing the raw material cost for refin- 
ers. At fie same time, prices for 
gasoline and other oil products 
hdd, widening BFs profit margins. 

“It’s an indication of what they 
can do when they get a chance 
downstream,'’ said David Gray, an 
oil analyst at fie London stockbro- 
kerage of Janies Cape! & Co. 

In fie past four years, BP has cut 
costs by dosing 40 percent of its 
refining capacity outside of the 
United States. 

Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), in 
which BP bolds a 55-percent inter- 
est, contributed 44 percent of the 
first-quarter profit Sohio benefited 
from higher oil output in Alaska. 
and the Gulf of Mexico, but its 
operating loss on metal mining 
widened to the equivalent of £36 
million from £31 million. The com- 
pany recently suspended opera- 
tions at its Bingham copper wfm in 
Utah, which was suffenng losses of 
around 3160 million a year. 

Operating profit at BFs chemi- 
cal division plunged to £4 million 
from £26 milli on. BP died higher 
raw material costs and harsh 
weather. 


Allied to Begin Cash Offer for Stock in Signal 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Affied Coip. 
said Thursday that it planned to 
begin its cash offer for 20 percent 
of the stock in Signal Cos. on Fri- 
day, formally launching a merger 
that mil create the 16th largest U.S. 
industrial company. 

The agreement, valued at $4 J 
bflBon to $4.9 bOhoii, mil form a 
leading company in the aerospace, 
electronics, automotive and chemi- 
cals fields. 

Edward Hennessy Jr n the chair- 
man of Allied, who will hold fie 
same title in the new company, said 
Thursday that Allied will start its 
22 million shares of 


Wednesday, gained SI, to S41 a 
share, on Thursday. Signal, down 
31.25 on Wednesday as the most 
active stock on the New York Stock 
Exchange, gained 31.625, to 340.50 
a share. 

After the purchase of 20 percent 
of Signal’s stock, cadi r emaining 
share would be traded in a tax-free 
transaction for a share of the new 
company, to be called Allied Sig- 
nal. Each Allied share also would 
be swapped for a share in fie new 
company. 

The idea to merge AlSed and 
Signal came about when the two 
companies first discussed a joint 


tad for Hughes Aircraft Co. But 
Mr. Hennessy said after the merger 
agreement that there would be no 
bid for Hughes, a leading military 
contractor. 

”1 think it would be foolhardy to 
take on two major acquisitions at 
the same time,” he said. 

The new company win be left 
with huge cash tradings, which Mr. 
Hennessy estimated at$2J billion. 
But he said there are no plans now 
fra- further expansions. 

Based on 1984 results, the com- 
bined company would have reve- 
nue of 316.7 billion, earnings of 
3773 million and assets of about 


$15 billion, Mr. Hennessy said. 

He also said no layoffs or trans- 
fers are planned as a result of fie 
combination. 

As for the prospect of moving 
ahead of United Technologies 
Corp. to 16th place on the Fortune 
500 ranking of industrial compa- 
nies on fie basis of sales, Mr. Hen- 
nessy stud, “1 don’t care where we 
stand on the Fortune 500 list I 
want to be associated with a com- 
pany fiat has good products, is 
growing and makes a decent return 
for its shareholdras. And I think by 
putting these two companies to- 
gether we’ve done just that” 


TV Station Sold 
For $510 Million 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Tribune 
Co., the Chicago-based media 
concern, said Thursday that ic 
has agreed to buy KTLA-TV in 
Los Angeles for S510 million in 
cash, which would be fie largest 
amount ever paid for a angle 
U.S. broadcast station. 

The price surpasses fie previ- 
ous high of $450 million that 


Hcarst Corp. agreed to pay for 
-TV in Boston last week. 


WCVB-' 

The purchase was made from 
Golden West Televirion Hold- 
ing Co. 


expects" members to- inform othcxi^a to Jwy M ^million soaresor 

tatHnahagras of any intent to de- Sigwl stock for $45 a fiare m cSi 
viale from them. The implicit on May morning. 


threat is that fin™ flouting the 
guiddines would be shunned and 
miss out on lucrative issues. 

The association is working cm 
fnrthtt gmdefines. 'Vs time to re- 
view all of our procedures becanse 
the market has changed totally,” 
Mr. Rndloff said. 

Many Eurobond practices dale 
from the 1960s ana 1970s, when 
Eurobond issues were arranged 
over several wedcs and pricing was 
left flexible until market reaction 
could be gauged. Today, huge is- 
sues are arranged and priced in a 
matter of horns, and mare and 
more banks are competing far 
mandates. 

“The risks arc much, much 
ger than they used to be,” Mr 
loff said. 


The merger, approved Wednes- 
day by the directors of both compa- 
nies, still requires shareholder ap- 
proval at special meetings tins 
summer ana antitrust clearance 
from fie federal government. Mr. 
Hennessy said lawyers for both 
companies see no antitrust prob- 
lem “that isn’t solvable,” but he did 
not elaborate. 


If all of Signal’s stock is valued at 
345 a share, the agreement would 
be worth $4j? billion. But Sidney J. 
Heller, first vice president of Shear- 
son Lehman Brothers Intx, estimat- 
ed the transaction to be worth 
about S4-5 billion. 

The stock of both companies 
rose in heavy trading Thursday af- 
ter art initial decline Wednesday. 

Allied, which fell 53.871* on 


B'.ucairhfll 

Sources: Banquo do Btmefut (Bruuots).' Banco a m murck* ttattaaa (MOon): Banaue no- 
Hanoi* do Paris (Parti}: MFCSORJf BAft (dfnar.rtfotdbdamt.Olhirthfeiavm'/lmitersatd 
AP. 


Jacobs Presents Plan 
For Breaking Up ITT 


Untied Press IruematkmaJ 

NEW YORK — Irwin Jacobs, 
an investor, presented a proposed 
an Thursday to break up ITT 
Corp., forming three or four pub- 

Edy held companies. 

The proposal was made at the 
company's annual meeting in Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. 

Mr. Jacobs sad ITTs “cumber- 
some management structure" and 
its strategy of selling assets and 
redeploying funds in its domestic 
telecommunications business had 
caused undervaluation of ihe stock, 
which dosed Thursday at $34375. 
“The maria place has not re- 
ly to this strategy 
, _ said. 

reprated on Thursday high- 
er ft»nttng« and revenues for fie 
first quarter. Net income was 
51 133 oufiian for the quarter, or 75 
cents a share, 43 percent higher 
than fie S793 million, or 52 cents a 
share, in the comparable period of 
the previous year. Sales and reve- 
nues forfie quarter were $4.7 bfl- 
Ken, np slightly from $4.6 button in 
the year-agp quarter. 

In recent months, HT has sold 
12 industrial and technology oam- 
pames to Forstmann Little for 3370 . 
miffion and its publishing business 
to MacMillan Inc. fra: about $80 
wiiTKrtrt. Other sales included Con- 
tinental Baking and Eason Oil 


Crap. The company is also plan- 
ning to sell a nanority interest m its 
wholly owned Abbey Life, an in- 
surer hased in Britain. 

By separating into a number of 
companies, Mr. Jacobs said, “we 
will nave isolated fie risk of fut- 
ure” in fie company’s ielecom- 
momcations strategy. 

ITTs holdings include such 
companies as Sheraton Hotel Crap, 
and the Hartford Insurance Co. 



-Mn Jacobs 
into three or four or more" smaller 
divisions, each with a single busi- 
ness, such as an insurance compa- 
ny, ahotd company and atdeoom- 

“I rage 11T to give this proposal 
careful and full consideration,” he 
said. 

Rand V. Araskog, FITs chair- 
man, said that, wink the board of 
directors continues to evaluate 
business strategy, a spin-off sow 
would not be appropriate, citing 
the company’s debt structure. 

Mr. Jacobs argued that the 
breakup of AT&T involved very 
complicated debt structures, but 
was still accomplished. 

“ITT is a com plicated struc- 
ture,” Mr. Ataskog said. “We fur- 


fiat we’re confident is correct" 


To Our Readers 


Today we introduce a 

fra fie first business page. It includes the addition of the dollar values 
of the Argentine peso, Brazilian cruzeiro, Egyptian pound, Tndwn 
mpee, Indonesian rupiah, Mexican peso. Tnriosh lira and Vawflwiri^ 
bolivar. We are also adding fie 30-day average yield of the Merrill 
Lynch Ready Assets Trust, the largest U.S- money-market fund, and 
fie Telerate Interest Rate Index, a weighted average of oderest rates 
in- a package of fie type of short-term debt bought by all mooey- 
markef funds. This debt mdudes bankers’ acceptances. Treasmy Twtft , 
repurchase agreements, commercial paper, Eurodollar ^ deposit rates 
and certificates of deposit-. 



What makes TDB exceptional? 
Above all, our personal service. 


P ersonal service is more than 
just a tradition at TDB — it's 
one of the basic reasons for our 
success over the years. And it 
makes an important difference 
to our clients, in a number of 
ways. 

In fast decisions, for exam- 
ple. At TDB you don’t have to 
waste time going through 
endless “channeLs.” The execu- 
tive you talk to makes sure that 
your requirements are brought 
directly to the people who 
decide. We make it a point to 
avoid red tape and bottlenecks. 
We assign an experienced 


bank officer to your account and 
he is personally responsible for 
seeing that things get done on 
your behalf whatever the ser- 
vice. So you can be sure your 
instructions are carried out 
promptly, intelligently and to 
the letter. 

Whether your business 
requires trade and export financ- 
ing, foreign exchange, precious 
metals or any of our foil range 
of banking services, you’ll find 
that TDB has something a bit 
special to offer. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust with 


your business, get in touch with 
us. Now that we have joined 
American Express International 
Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, we are 
even better placed to serve your 
individual banking needs. 


IDB banb in Geneva, London, 
Paris, Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte 
Carlo, Nassau. Zurich. 


TDB is a member of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 62.S oillion and shareholders' 
equity ofUS$ 4.4 billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


Shown az left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank, Geneva. 


. An American Express Company 



■ * 


i 



























































































Lss : 





"** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


Page 13 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


em 


The Ataodaed Press 


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ANNAPOLIS. Maryland — 
Staielegts&tors met on Thursday 
in committee to begin work an a 
fcajMSHge solution to problems 
fafeang Maryland' s 102 privately in- 
r*stfrca savings and loan institutions. 

MdmwbUe,- Circuit Court Judge 
Joseph HU Kaplan told the state 
govcnnncnt to prepose exemptions 
to Governor Harr y Hughes’s order 
Hunting withdrawafe. He had been 
asked by three of tbe affected sav- 
ings and loans to relax the Emits 
that -Mr. Hu ghes had m qvwfl to 
stem "withdrawals touched off by 
reports of management problems' 
at Old Court Savings & Lcncn. 

; Mr. Hobbes’s order Tuesday af- 
ternoon freze most deposits in the 
institutions. Only $1,000 a month 
day be withdrawn from each ac- 
4puni, and the governor said that 
would be no exceptions. Funds de- 
posited after Tuesday afternoon 
are not affected. 

The three institutions — Chesa- 
peake Savings & Loan Association - 

Dm^sc^iion and Sccond^a- 
t jnnfll Building & Loan — wanted 
Judge Kaplan to exempt business., 
and charitable accounts Cram the 
limits because many are nnaWn to : 
meet payrolls without the funds. 
The thrifts also wanted Judge Ka- 
plan to increase the withdra wa l 
feat to $5,000 for other accounts. 

Two institutions, Old Coart and 
Merritt Co mm ercial Savings & 
.Loan Association, have been 
placed under conservators. 

Mr. Hushes said Wednesday, 
that his outer had reduced tines at 
the thrifts, but that "withdrawals 
were still numing above average 
He predicted tbe situation would 
stabilize within a few days. . 


He also said same major out-of- 
state mstitutiooshave opeoedne- 
gotiations to Imy or mage with Old 
Court and other Maryland thrifts, 
buthedidtmcidteatijy them. - 

Mr. Hughes called a special sea- 
son of the General Assembly for 
Friday to consider a legislative 
package that could fiidnde up to 10 
taSs. He will asklegislators to give 
him what he'caBed .“very, very 
broad, sweating powers” to regu- 
late thrif ts, niriwlfng anthnrity to 

control investment policies and 
management practices - of any 
deemed to be in financial trouble. 

The mqor goal of tire legislation, 
Mr. Hngjbes said, will be 10 require 
about One-tlmd of the thrifts that 
have deposits of more than $25 
million to seek federal in ^ i ranc*- ' 
He also wants to create a state 
mawnw fnnd for thrifts with as- 
sets of . Less than $25 md&m. 


2 More Foreign Companies to Buy 
Stakes in British Securities firms 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Two more foreign companies announced moves 
Thursday to take advantage of the opening of Britain's securities 
industry to outside ownership. 

Prndential-Bache Securities Inc, a nnfcof Prudential IhsuranceCO. 
of America, said il had agreed to acquire a stake in Give Discount 
Holdings PLC, a small r ^ndp n money market brokerage. 

Gircamtrak Vienna, which acts as a central bank for Austrian 
sayings banks, said it had agreed to acquire 29.9 percent of Gilbert 
Eliott ft Co, a small T .radon stockbrokcrage that specializes in 
debentures and -preference shares. When Stock Exchange rales per- 
mit, Girozmtrak said, it (dans to inercaseits stake to 100 percent in 
two stages. The terms were not disclosed. 

Prudentkl-Badje is to acquire an option to buy as much as 33.4 
percemof the enlarged equity of CHvefar £7.5 mflfion ($9.4 million). 
It also agreed to laid Give £7.5 million through the purchase of 
debentures, which would be redeemed-to the extent that the option is 
exercised. 

As a so-called discount house; Give deals in Treasury and trade 
bills, certificates of deposit and other short-term securities. Under the 
plan, it would provide staff and expertise for the gjlt-deafingyenture. 

For the year ended March 31, Give reported a loss of £810,099, 
compared with a profit of £13 mQHou a year earlier. 

Earlier, Gticorp ami Gfaidxale de Banque SA of Belgium (formerly 
Sodeto Gtaftrale de Banqne) acquired small discount houses. 


Computer Ills Halt Rapid Rise of Adas Industries 


AMR Corps th c.par c n t company 
of American Amines, plans to 
spend $6 bOfioin in thenext five 
years ra an. attempt to become a 
co mpeti ti v e toMoa aufioc. Rob- 
ert Crandall, its. chairman, said the 
cagtital spending plan induded 
$900 jnflfim.a year for planes. 


fident of matching 1 984 results- this 
year and main raining a 3-Deot- 
sefae-raark (97 U.S. cents) dividend 
after increasing first-quarter, sales 
and profits, its managing board 
c hairma n, Helmut ’Werner, said. 


percent at the end of 1984, its chair- 
man, Simon Keswick, said. 


Cathay] 


llhatCd’s 
, said in 

_ a that foreign banks have in- 
fused to accept certificates' of de- 
posit issued by the Cathay industri- 
al group.winch was taken over by 
the government afta a ran on de- 
posas hdd by its subsidiaries. 

Co i rtnriita i Gramra-Woke AG, 

theWestGennantiremaker.iscra- 


Grand Metropofifan FLCs UiL 
earnings fefi in 1984 to 1985 be- 
cause of the absence of ragnrntte 
profits, the company said in its re- 
sults statemenL Group trading 
profit for the year ended March 31 
fell to £187.7 jmffian ($236.8 mil- 
lion) from £199.1 milKoa 


Hongkong Co. announced 
an occupancy rate for buikfings it 
owns at slightly above 80 percent, 
as compared with, more than 95 


a I-for~l0stot±sp& to increase the 
marketability of ns shares to small 
investors, a company spokeswom- 
an said. The company reported a 
profit of 623.7 nrimon Hong Kong 
dollars ($79 millian) for the 15 
months ended March 31. 

Mootetfisoc Sf» said its fertilizer 
subsidiary, Ferthnont SpA, had 
caoduded a technical cooperation 
agreement widi Norsk Hydro. A 
company spokesman said there was 
no question of the agreement lead- 
ing to the state-owned Norwegian 
co m p any ralrfng control of Ferti 
moot. 


By Dinah Lee 

Irucnumaryrf Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Eighteen 
months ago, it scented that Atlas 
Industries could do no wrong. 

The envy of other electronics 
companies in Southeast Asia and 
the darling of securities brokers, 
Atlas had grown in only three years 
from a flramdmnp assembler of 
simple consumer electronics prod- 
ucts to an international maker of 
sophisticated computer parts. 

But Atlas 1 m been hit hard by 
the slowdown in the worldwide 
computer industry, and h is learn- 
ing about the dangers of being 
overly optimistic. 

Tire energy for the company’s 
transformation came from Albert 
J. Miller, a Silicon Valley entrepre- 
neur, who in 19% bought control 
of Allas Industries. He rapidly 
brought his technology company. 
Al pha nrfira Group, under control 
of Atlas. The Alpbanetics side of 
the restructured company gave At- 
las the technology to "wife magnet- 
ic ht-ft dS ; flqppy iffsfrs unit disk 
drives for computers- 

Ailas also acquired tbe know- 
how to make computer peripherals 
— attachments such as printers and 
telephone modems. 

Mr. NfiHer also brought to Atlas 


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(Caufinoed from Page 11) -. 

\ ‘ : \tial ticket brokers in Japan. Hong 
• ■' 1 1 {; -I'TKong and other countries offer un- 
■ ■* ! der-Lhc- table fare discounts ot tip 

to 45 percent Fares for most earn- 
ers are set in negotiations by the 
Intematianal Air Transport Asso- 
ciation, an industry group, and ap- 
proved by govanmenls. 

But discounting is so widespread 
that even such major members of 
the transport assodathm as Pari 
Am, Normwest and JAL ignore the 
set fares when they have to be com- 
petitive. Some carriers also offer 
higher commissions to travel 
agents toboost their market share. 
Caniers such as Korean Airiines, 

- not a member of the trade aasoda- 
1 tion,may not onfy cut fares, botfly 


' i 
■-.> 


"■a. 
—ir • 
«- 


passengers backward from Tokyo 
to Seoul, tofiD its jumbo jets to the 
UmtolStatea 

A major concern for. UJS. carn- 
ets phnrmrw expanded service in 
the Pacific is tut labor rates are 
.substantially Iowa for most Asian 
Hufines. A recent study for ftm Am 
found that fligh t Attendants could 
be lared m^mgapore for $600 a 
month, in Hong Kong for $550 a 
month and in Bangkok for $725 a 
month. That study played a part in 
he^imgFariAmreimcethestErticg 
salaries of its flig ht attendants to' 
$784 a month, from $1,236 a 
month, in its recent round of era- 
tract negotiations. 

Mr. Nonis of Pan Am noted that 
given the cheaper salaries such car- 


riers offer more personal service, 
with 18 to 19 flight attendants ra a 
flight, rather than Pan Am’s 13. 

In 1960, U3. carriers hdd a 67- 
percent share of Pacific traffic, 
with the growth of such existing 
carriers as JAL, PMhppine Air- 
lines, Qantas and CP Art and the 
creation of .Singapore, Thai Inter- 
national, Cathay Pacific and main- 
land China’ s airline, CAAC, that 
share dropped to .44 percent in 
1975. . 

• Since then, the U.S. share has 
remained roughly stable, in a rap- 
idly expanding marke r Annual 

gereinl9§}to2J6 million mWQ, 
5.7 nrifikm in 1980 and 6.2 miTKnn 
last year. 


If United acquires the routes, 
equipment and personnel of Pan 
AmforS720 nrimon, other carriers 
are expected to expand. 

Yasmnoto Takas, president of 
JAL, noted recently that United 
would have a huge advantage with 
its UJS. network of 159 dries in 50 
stales to feed' traffic to such major 
gateways as San Frandsco and Los 
Angeles. 

Between 1979 and 1984 North- 
west Airlines added nonstop 
flights to Tokyo from New York, 
Chicago, Seattle, San Frandsco, 
Los Aiigeles and Honolulu. It also 
took its old 747s. which had 362 
seats, reconfigured them to hdd 
400 passengers, and bought new 
planes; including five 747-200s. 


jeci unrelated to the computer busi- 
ness, the HIlEker Welded Wire Re- 
taining Wall System. 

His aggressive vision far the 
company m a territory where the 
computer industry is sriQ young 
earned him points with some finan- 
ciers and rubbed others the wrong 
way. 

“In the Hong Kong context, 
where most electronics companies 
nmkp only irv ywnffntnl addi ti ons to 
capadty and major new invest- 
ments are rare; Alias's expansion 
was a bold and s triking move," 
commented Carlton Poon, a 
Vickers da Costa analyst. 

Mr. Miller’s ambitions for Allas 
seemed justified in the light of the 
booming international demand for 
computer pmts and peripherals. 
Hong Kong industrialists exulted 
in the arrival of a first-class elec- 


tronics company with its own re- 
search and development capabili- 
ties in Silicon Valley. 

Atlas’s roster of overseas cus- 
tomers — Olivetti. Hewlett-Pack- 
ard, General Electric, Memorex 
and Texas Instruments — im- 
pressed local brokers who spoke 
confidently of Atlas's long-term 
potential De Zoete & Bevan re- 
ferred to Atlas as a “star performer 
in 2983,” and investor enthusiasm 
peaked with a major sales coup that 
same yean the capture of a con- 
tract for International Business 
Machines Coup- to simply comput- 
er heads and floppy disk drives for 
use in IBM's personal computers. 

The new contract meant that At- 
las would be expected to produce 
about 4,000 disk drives a day for 
IBM almm Es timatin g that capaci- 
ty in Hong Kong was too small to 
meet increasing international de- 
mand, Mr. Mmer launched a $51- 
urillion (400 milli on Hong Kong 
dollars) expansion of Atlas's facili- 
ties in an industrial zone in Penang 
Malaysia, to take advantage of low 
wages, government tax breaks and 
other official Malaysian incentives 
for high-technology investment. 

Disillusionment with Atlas first 
crept into the local market in the 
second half of last year, with the 
announcement of the 1983-1984 re- 
sults. Although the company did 
meet hs predicted net earnings of 
65.1 miltioa dollars — double the 
previous year’s — shareholders 
were dismayed to discover ihm 
nearly a third of that amount came 
from a nonrecurrent source, a pay- 
ment to Atlas far a sublicense for 
the HUfiker system. 


Analysis noted that the company 
did not specify how much of hs 
income came from interest earn- 
ings, nor did it give a breakdown of 
revenue or prouts. 


The disproportionate contribu- 
tion from the Hilfiker sublicense 
surfaced in September 1984. when 
the full accounts for 1983-1984 
were published- Shares that had hit 
a high of 9 dollars earlier in 1984 
dropped 42 cents overnight to 315 
dollars at the disclosure. 


The bubble truly burst in Janu- 
ary. when IBM aavised Atlas that 
its sales in the home computer mar- 
ket were significantly bdow projec- 
tions. IBM agreed to take disk 
drives at a rate of only 1,850 a day 
through July, at which time all pro- 
duction would cease; 


“We’ve tried to reorganize and 
cm back in a sensible way.” said 
CJC. Yam, joint managing, director 
of Atlas. “1 think everybody has 
had a bad time in this business.” 


According to a chairman's state- 
ment in the company’s third quar- 
ter results for 1984-1985, “the IBM 
cancellation has resulted in large 
material inventory and excess la- 
bor charge losses. 

About 400 of the 3.200 staff 
members have bom laid off. 

Production of disk drives will 
continue at about 1.500 a day for a 
small contract with Olivetti, but 
Mr. Yam said that so far there are 
no orders to fill the IBM gap. 

Although Atlas claims to have 
the technology to advance from its 
current type of magnetic head to 
the latest technology in “thin film" 
magnetic heads, Mr. Yam said this 
technology had not been fully ac- 
cepted by manufacturers and so far 
has not led to any orders for Atlas. 

Atlas has some hope for produc- 
tion of whole personal computers, 
rather than just peripherals, and 
expects that continuing negotia- 
tions with IBM may lead to new 
orders later this year. 


DEGREES^!! 

kii ic flFPT. OF EO. AUWOWEO I 


ft 

-natae! 




Investing in the oil and gas industry through 

WONG RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL. N.V. 

Curasao, Netherlands Antilles. 


The Annual Report as of 31st December, 
1 984. has been published and may be 
obtained from 


Pierson, Heldring & Pierson N.V., 
Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 



FRANKOBAIL 


KUWAm-FRENCH BANK 
CREATES FRANKOBAIL 


Tbe French Ministry of Finance has just eram its sgnscmmt to a new 
Simmi. created under the name at FRANKOBAIL by the Kuwaiti-French 
Bank, a hank established m 1980 with a capital subscribed for 80% b* a 
Kuwaiti bolding company. Pearl w«I«U"p (L u xe m bo u rg) SA. and for 2b% 
by Crftc£i Induatrid et Commercial. A Stcomi is a special type of real estate 
KDTCBtmaif 

Tbe capita] at this new Sconri will be FF 200 miDioe, fully subscribed by 
Kuwait Real Estate Investment and Management Company for 50%. bv 
Kuwait Real Estate Investment Consortium for 27.5% and, cm tbe French 
aid^ by MutneDe CteAmle Fmcaise-\^ Cr&fit Industrie) et Commercial, 
Cridh' Fonder at ImmobiEer (an affiliate of Compasgiie La Rtnia), an 
industrial company. Sodfitft dea Preduita Qumiqnes dTlarhonni^res, and 
Kuwaiti-French Bank, for 22J>%. 


The creation of FRANKOBAIL ia a major event. It demonstrates the 
strength of the interest shown by Kuwaiti investors in this kind of 
investments in France. Hist dans partners, aH experienced and well-known 
companies or institutional investors, am associated in this project. The 

I . nnrhinn q£ tfaiif — j &um i twM n a tfci industrial, inminwiil and 

financial links betwen France mud Kuwait, and reinforces the cooperation 
between the two countries which has been considerably advocated by their 
respect iv e authorities. 

Tins jwmwii will in vest primarily in rifi w , a«d other commercial budd- 
ings, and favour prime locations in France. 

Mr. Fahad Al Rajaan mil be tbe Qa rirman of FRANKOBAIL. 

Two Deputy rtbaiyumn have been Awngnam* Mr. Robert Bcrtaux. as 
Oh aiim sn of MutneDe Gfeifaale Fmncaise-Vie, and Mr. Hamad Al Hamad. 
Qainnm at the Commercial Bank of Kuwait and a Director of the Kuwaiti- 
French Bank 


The Drredan are 

Mr. Fahad Al Rajaan. 

KJAJLM.CO. represented by Mr. Faisal Al Shayaa. 

K. RT-I.fl r ep resented by Mr. Awwad Al Khaim. 

M-G-F.-Vie rep res ent ed by Mr. Robert Bertamc. 

Kmraiti-Fromm represented by Mr. H»mmt Al Hamad. 

CXC Group rcjmaotrdby Mr. Patrick ThuriUicr. 

Crfdit Fond er el ItmaobiKer represented 
by Mr. Wiffiam SAnCehaL 
Mr. Ernst Jaafsr. 

Mr. Mated Al Ajari. 

Dr. Mohammed Kouia. 

Mr. PhQippe Dujanmn. 

Mf, FfimwTTr TVpity Mvnfrwr pf tfae Kuwaiti-French 

Bank, has been nrxmnaud General Ma nager el FRANKOBAIL. 



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This adwrtssmset appears ass manor at record orty 


New Issue May 15, 1985 


o 


Dresdner Finance B.V. 

Amsterdam, Netherlands 


DM500,000,000 

Floating Rate Notes 1985/1990 


Issue Price: 100% 

Secured by a Deposit with 


Dresdner Bank 

1 Akfiengesellschaft 


Dresdner Bank 

WiflnnDSiWnrhsTr 


Credit Suisse First Boston 


Swiss Bank Corporation 
International 

UtnJted 


Union Bank off Swftzertand 


(Securities) 

LknBsd 


Algemene Bonk Nederland Kit 


BankAmerica Capital Markets 
Group 


Bank of China 


Bartkoflokyo Inttmrationai 

Limited ‘ 


Banque . Internationale 
iLuxeinbouigSA 


Banque Bruxelles Lambert SA 
j Banque Nafionale de Paris ' 


Banque Hranqalse du 
Commerce Exttirieur. 


Banque Paribas 


Barclays Merchant Bank 

Limbed 


Bayarische Hypotheken- 
undWechsei-Bank 

'Akttanotneflschsft ■ 


Bayerische Veretnsbank 

AMtanoeMbBchaft . 


Beifmer Handete- 
und Frankfurter Bank 


Catsse Nationale de 
CnkfftAgricofe 


CISC Limited 


Commerzbank 

Aktfengeealischafl 


Compagnie Luxembourgeoise 
de la Dresdneir Bank AG 

-■ Draadrier Bank Intemadorwl - 


Credit Commercial de France 


DaMctu Kangyo International 

Undtad 


Dresdner Bank (SchawhO AG 


Dan norsfce CredHbank ' 
Finance 


Deutsche Bank 

AMIengesribchafl 


Goldman Sachs International 
Corp. 


The (nduatrial Bank of Japan 
(Luxembourg) SA 


Lloyds Bank Internationa] 

Ewed. ■ ■ 


Merrffl Lynch Capital Markets 


Ifftsubishi Finance In ter na tional 

Limited 


Morgan Guaranty Ltd 


Morgan Stanley Intematianal 


Osterrefchische Landerbank 

IMmito— if-- 1 — n 

AWIMlfli WlBCnM 


Orion Royal Bank 

Lbidted 


PK Christtenca Bank (UK) 

UrtBad . 


Salomon Brothers International 


Sheeraon Lehman Broihers ' 
International 


Standard Chartered 
Merchant Bank 

United 


Sumitomo Finance In te rnational Swiss VoOcsbank 


S.G. Warburg &CaUeL 



Anno nnrei n g nt by a South African organization 


SOUTH AFRICA 

SAFE AND FASCINATING AS EVER 

FOR TOURISTS 


Afr. Dome Hough , Chairman of the South African Tourism Board, talks to David Carte , 
Editor of the “ Sunday Times Business Times." 



Mr. Dame Hough, 
Chairman of the South African 
Tourism Board. 


Falls in Zimbabwe to tbe Kruger 
National Park, tbe Garden Routo and the 
Cape in South Africa, are now on the 
drawing boards of several tour com- 
panies. 

The SA Tourism Board expects foreign 
tourism to grow ax 10% to 12% a year for 
tbe foreseeable future. 


R eading the paper these days, 
one might have tbe impres- 
sion that South Africa is 
negative as far as tourism Is 

cancenoed. 

Ironically, more and more international 


“It’s die safest tourist destination in 
Africa and probably as safe as any in tbe 
world," says SA Tourism Board Chair- 
man, Mr. DanfeHougb. 

“If it were not, I doubt that 23% more 
Amoicans and 13% more foreign tourists 
of all nationalities would have visited us 
last year. SimOariy I would have to doubt 
that 32% of those who paid one visit 
-would make a return visit as is consis- 
tently the case. And this in spite of 
kniarwl incidents and occasional tmrest, 
a factor found in common with most 

countries of the world.” 

Tourism is worth at least U^900 million 

a year to South Africa. As the counny 
inregrares its tourist drive with those of 
neighbouring Southern African coun- 
tries, the sub-continent is fast becoming 
the mtw sought after des tin at i o n in 
Africa. 

More than 300 foreign tour operators 
attended this month's *Tndaba” - the 
arnniai i^ wy win dow of Southern African 
t nn ri sm in Johannesburg- Indications 
are rhar tourist traffic will increase. 

Package tours taking in all the delights of 

the sub-continent, from the Victoria 


Sun International and Southern Sun, two 
companies which have fast become 
international gianra in tourism, foresee 
foreign tourism doubling in tbe next four 
years. They have erected four and five 
star hotels -veritable palaces -all over the 
sub-continent. Tb carer for all pockets, 
many companies are making a huge drive 
in economy hotels. 

Mr. Hough cites some attractions mak- 
ing for strong growth in such a far-flung 
tourist destination: “We have one of the 
finest climates in the world, where 
summer temperatures seldom go higher 
than 35°C and winter days are nearly 
always sunny and wanner than 2CFG 
“We have the greatest variety of animals 
and plants a nywher e in the world set off 
against spectacularly varied scenery. 
Significantly most species of African 
gmmal fr om the aardvark and the 
elephant to the lion, the leopard and the 
white rhino occur in South Africa. There 
are 2,600 different indigenous plants in 
the Cape Peninsula alone, in an area of 
just 500 square kilometres. (There are 
22,000 species in South Africa). 

. “The familiar vistas of Africa are there - 
thousands of kilometres of thorny 
bushvdd, grasslands and desen, spec- 
tacular mountains thar plunge straight 
into the sea at a point where two oceans 
meet, 3,000 kilometres of idyllic 
beaches, some developed, most serenely 
tranquil. 

“And it is all fantastically accessible, safe 
and comfortable. There are easy air con- 
nections, good roads to all pats of the 
counny, first class hotels and game 
parks. You can get away fast from av3- 
isatian into the wild places, yet have all 
the comforts of contemporary life as well. 
“South Africa has been part of the west- 
ern world for more than 300 years and has 
a fascinating history, much of it clearly 
visible in a highly distinctive style of 
architecture, in museums and heritage 
collections and in the carefully p reser v ed 
relics of worked our diamond and gold 

mtnpg 


“There are few dries anywhere in the 
world to compare with the beauty of Cape 
Town, tbe exotic profile that Durban 
presents, the vitality of Johannesburg. 
There is a vibrant economy with trading 
links all over dx world. People come to 
South Africa in the full knowledge that 
they will be able to combine business 
with pleasure most effectively. 

“Because of the decline in the currency, 
the Rand, South Africa is one of the 
cheapest destinations in the world. 
“Five-star HoDywood-style hotel 
accommodation costs US$18 a day, a 
good meal for two in a restaurant US$20, 
an excellent bottle of Cape wine US$2.” 
Mr. Hough does not mention a corrollary 
of the dwrap currency is that South Africa 
is becoming an interesting investment 
area as well. 


Another unspoken advantage is that a 
tourist in South Africa is unlikely to meet 
hostile officialdom or demands for 
bribes. The country’s hospitality is 
legendary. 

The tourism industry is highly developed 
and the South African Tourism Board is 
equipped to organise special interest 
tours for groups keen on anything from 
bird watching or mountaineering to 
steam locomotives, surfing, mining or 
even stamp collecting. The Board has 15 
in various countries overseas and 
12 offices within South Africa - “eager", 
Mr. Hough says, ‘To handle tourists' 
enquiries and give them the holiday of 
their lives.” 


South African Tourism Board 







SuidAfrikaanseTberismeraad 


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i;ta;rA*ilni;un 


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS ]97 * 

IN THE SUPREME COURT No.3n 

Equity Side 

IN THE MATTER OF BAHAMAS COMMONWEALTH BANK LIMITED 
(IN LIQUIDATION] 

AND 

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT (CHAPTER 1 84) 

NOTICE CREDITORS OF INTENTION 
TO DECLARE DIVIDEND 

Rule *8 of Tha Compcadu (WhAng-Up) IWte. 1975 
NOTICE is hereby given that a second interim dividend fs intended lo be 

dedared in the above matter. The Supreme Court of the Common wedth c* 
the Bahamas hqs ordered the# the publication of this Nofice staff constitute 
compliance with the sad Rule 68. 


Over-the-Granter 

NASDAQ National /market Prices 


May 16 


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(Continued from Page 12) 

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DATE) this 29lti day of Aprfl, 1985. 


D. A JONES and P. R- KINGSTON 
OfiWJ Uqoidatart 
P. O. BOX N.123. 

Nanas, NJ 1 .# 


PROVINCE OF QUEBEC 

Emprunt de FF 125. 000.000 - TVfe % - 1972/1987 

?r 

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tuage au sort ea presence de Madame Jeanne Housae, Huissier de Justice, a 

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S3?. .sess 


amorties. scront rembouraabks au pair, coupons au IS jinn I960 et suivants 
attaches, a partir du 15 join 1985, date i laqueUe dies ceweronl de porter 

intfc-ct. . , , 

Le tembonrsement et le paiement des indicts se reranl are giucheta dea 
banques suhaates: 

CRtOlT LYONNAIS, Luxembourg; 

CREDIT LYONNAIS, Pariw 

ALGEMENE BANK NEDERLAND N.V„ Amsterdam; 
BANCO DI ROMA, Rome; 

BANQUE DE PARIS ET DES PAYS-BAS, Parw 
COMMERZBANK A.G-, Franefort/Main; 
KREDTETBANK N.V., Bruxelles; 

LLOYDS BANK INTERNATIONAL LTD, Londrea. 

Mordant reaunt eo circulation a I'bsue de ce huideme amortisaeujent 
FF 32400.000. 

L’ Agent Financier 
CREDIT LYONNAIS, Luxembourg. 













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GIMP Seen to Rise 
In West Germany 

Return 

BERLIN — West Germany's 
gross national product will grow a 
real 3 to 4 percent this quarter 
compared with the 1984 second 
quarter, when a metalworkers* 
strike cot output, the Deutsche In- 
stitut fttr Wimchaftsforschung 
said Thursday. 

The economic research institute 
said it expected first-quarter fig- 
ures for the GNP, which measures 
the total value of a nation's goods 
and services, including income 
from foreign investments, to show 
a real seasonally adjusted drop of 
1 .5 percent against the 1984 fourth 
quarter and a real rise of only (IS 
percent against the first quarter erf 
1984. The new GNP figures are due 
in the first week of June. 

The return of normal weather 
would allow the construction in- 
dustry to increase production after 
an extremely cold winter, the re- 
port said. It added that West Ger- 
man exports should remain strong 
■ despite a recent slight strengtheu- 
?££ am ££- w ing of the Deutsche mark against 
»»» + » IK dollar. 


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FORTHEtATSTWODON 
. EUROBONDS 
READOH.GEWWZ 
ecHMOrcvwfqTHEHr 


I.\TI!R\AT1«\AL REAL ESTATE 


Your own 
golf apartment 
in Mallorca. 
Play it or let it... 
can pay for itself. 


.-€v 


Mallorca has become a golfer’s paradise and 
now you can become one of the first owners 
of Bendinat’s Golf Apartments and admire 
the fairways from your own terrace or take 
a short stroll to the first tee. We are offering 
one, two or three bedroom apartments with 
fully fitted kitchens and gracious Mallorcan 
architecture with extravagant landscapmg 
at prices that will delight you. 

/ Bendinat is Mallorca’s most exclusive resort 
with tennis, squash, water sports and the 
excitement of Prince Alfonso 
•k « Hohenlohe’s Anchorage Club. With all 
y, y* of this, the private golf course is hardly 
*$ a handicap. 



Wh 


"1 \ /■ 1 ^ 1 ■ , — 

k A ) 

Please write or t dephone: Sales Director, Bendinat, , 

Passeig des Bom, 15 - 7» C - 07012 Pdma de MaUorea. Spain, Tel: 71/ 22 16 5 1 

UJC Sales Manager, The Bendinat Estate, - 53, Upper Brook Street, 

London W.lTEngand. Tel: 01 - 629 0883 


f apartments 


OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Youi own vacation land on the fabulous Lake ol the Oaarks m Central 
Masourt Righi I n the hcardand at America. Away hem cities, noise. 
paKu&on and the rat-racc of the workaday world 
Forbes Inc. pubfesbers of Forbes Magazine, through Us oAodkary, 
Satire de Cristo Ranches Inc. b offering the opportunity of a Hetimekrf 
you to acquire one or more acres of our choice Missouri lakeland. 

There's no better time than nglu now to find out If Forbes Lake of the 
Qzarfcs is ihe place for you AD our bonwsttes. metotfing Jake front and lake 
view, will be a minimum size of one acre— ranging to over three acres. 
Cash prices start at $6,000. One or more acres of this incredibly beautiful 
lakeland can be yours for the modest payment of S60 per month, with 
easy credit terms available. 

For complete Information, Including pictures, maps and faj| details 
on our Bberaf money-back and exchange proteges, please write to.- 
Forbes Europe Inc.. Dept H. P.O. Box 86. London SW1 1 3UT England 

Ottan the Property Report required tiy Federal law and read < bflfcxe 
agnug anything No Federal agency has pdfled me marts or va ms a any. 
ol the property Equal Cred* and Mous-ng Opportunity 









VI J^ar • 

** "»*». — - 


FOR SALE 

6fi HOTEL BELA VISTA” 

PRAIA DA ROCHA, ALGARVE, PORTUGAL 

16 bedrooms & annex with 6 more rooms; reception; 2 living- 
rooms; game room; breakfast room St big terrace over the 
beache. Surrounding area 6,688 sq.m. 

Contact: TQRRALTA- Chtb International de F£rias SARL 
Av. Dune de LouM 24 
1098 LISBOA CODEX, PORTUGAL. 

TELEX: TORRAL- 16465. 


IfM^^AUTYof^ACO 

ForbuY«n 9 ,se»^g esTATE 

CONSULT_ 

P&32} 


Wast Indies 

Beachfront Lot 


for sale (3,000 m2) with 
buHding permit and plans for 
a 3 bedrooms villa. 

I nfo r ma tions: 

JJL GERBER 
22 Tame Buck RdL 
Wolcott CT 0671 6 U.SJL 


Caribbean homes 
iand/buflbesses 




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ita, —p — wy , hrahrra, gadh y atWo 
fc iti 

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pert PIUS mw UMIm "8 IMi. 

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Idand Properties Report 

Boa 58 KT42 Route 4, 
Vlfeadttodv Vemaot 050FI 


Mantretix-Geneva Lake 
APARTHOTEL BOWVARD 

For sale luxurious apartments, 
from 1 to 5 rooms, overlooking the 
prettiest part of Geneva Lake. 
Prices: SJFr. 123.000 bid. equip- 
ment and furniture. 

60% mortgage available et 
6M>% interest. 

Phase contact the Builder: 

REGIE DE LA RIVIERA SJL 
32 aveoM du Castee 
1120 Mantreux-SwRzeriand 
TeL: 021/635251 


\!Z/[EQS®m 

Let jroar 8US Dollar Iwjr niora fri Cerwcfa 

170 Apartment Complex 

• Very well maintained complex 

• Price $£310000. CON or $2412,000. US 

• Excel lent low, long term financing until 2007 

• True 12% return on Investment 

Downtown Toronto 

First class commercial property in the heart of Toronto with 
good future for appreciation. Price $4.75 M CON. or KM6 M US. 

For further information and brochures please contact 

W1NZEN REAL ESTATE UMTTBO WIN2EN CORPORATION: 
Attn. Marketing Manager A Leading Oe wrf cpnrarn. 

B7Yonge Street Suite 700 $•>**, Property Management 

Toronto, Ontario. Canada M5E 148 and Marketing 

r BU (416) B63O0M - TokK 06924301 Organization! 


SWITZERLAND 

WENGEN 


We sell in 
Bernese Oberland 


near railway station, 

CHALETS, 3-5 rooms. 

Condominium, Pergola, very comfortable 
Mortgage available 

BLUMBERG AG SRW 1 *- 


IMTEMATlOm 

BEAL ESTATE 

appears every 

FRIDAY 


To place an adverfoement 
contact our office in your country 
(fisted in Classified Section) on 

Dominique Bouvet, 
181 An. Gfaries-dfrGaalle, 
92521 NanDy Cedes, France. 
Tdmlwae: 747.12*65. 
TdeE 613595, 


* 


SJFr. 177,000 

Vercorin, Central Valais, 
Switzerland. 

Summer and winter resort 
Sold directly by owner. 

3-room apartment: 2 bedrooms, 
living-room with fireplace, 
kitchen, bathroom, balcony 
view cm the Alps. 

A CORVASCE . 

CH - 3961 Vercorin , 
Phone: 0041/27/55^82. 


>' v i ^ i C Z 3 


1 — II 




- NORTH WILTSHIRE ===== 

Luxury ApnrtiBOHts 

m (Junction 17)6n&s. Heathrow 1 houri drine, Malmesbury Uimiles 

SEVERAL APABTMENrS IN THIS IMAGIN ATIV E CONVER SION 
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The apartments ate well appointed, spadoiw and retain many period 
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Reception rooms of fine proportions with good views, cloakroom, 
competehr fined kitchen. ...... r 

Two or three bedrooms, l or 2 bathrooms, individual gas CH. Garages, 
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19 apartments. Lift- _ . . 

Private gardens and/or common use of wcB-tunbered grounds. 

Prices from around X62L000 to £135,000 leasehold. * 

is. 




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credits' worth Sl^Mlian in 1985, [ cent in ihe like period 

Inflation in aU of i98< 




ed at the banning of the year »| percent. 


1984 was 8J2 





































” a a * f fifty 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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iSCCEUENT opportunity to fS¥ 


I ; < Ik *.!I » !Mrm‘ v£ * ! I' . ■ 1 


(Continued From Back Page) 




REAL ESTATE 

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BUSINESS PCOPLE 

President 1 
Is Elected 
At AT&T . 


Heinz Appoints 
New Top Officers 


The Associated Priss 

NEW YORK — James E. Olson 
has been elected president and 
chief operating officer of AT&T 
Co., the company announced 



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Mr. Olson will keep, his job as 
chairman of the subsidiary AT&T 
Technologies Inc. 

The president’s chair has been 
g mp ty since the retirement of Wil- 
liam M. Ftlinghmis CHI April 1. 

The chief operating officer con- 
cept is a new one for AT&T. 

CL. Brown, the chairman, said 
the corporation had three objec- 
tives in creating the position; “We 
intend to drive research, applica- 
tions development, investment de- 
cisions ana service 1 capabilities 
straight at customer requirements 
as defined by the marketplace. We 
intend to improve overall effective' 
ness by improving the cohesiveaess 
of the enterprise as a whole. We 
intend to dearly define account- 
ability within our lines of bna- 


By Brenda Hagcrty 

Imenunknal HemldTribane 

LONDON — HJ. Heinz. Co. has 
announced chang es in the senior 
management of its European Oper- 
ations. 

The Pittsburgh-based food con- 
cern said it bad appointed J.W. 
Connolly, 51, as senior vice presir 
dent, Europe, to succeed John A. 
Connell, who is retiring. 

As one of four area senior vice 
presidents, Mr. Connolly will re- 
port to Anthony J-F. O’Reilly, 
Heinz’s president and chief execu- 
tive. Mr. Connolly, who wDl be 
based in London, will be responsi- 
ble for overseeing Heinz units m 
England, the Netherlands, Bel- 
gium, France; West Germany, Italy 

and Portugal. 

ftinrawtiTig him as president of 
Heinz USA. win be David W. 
Sculley, who currently is executive 
vice president of ibe division. 

The appointments are effective 
SepL 1. 

Novo Indostri A/S, the Danish 
pharmaceuticals group, has ap- 
pointed Jcspcr Drqet executive 
vice president. He will be responsi- 


ble for the newly created ventures 
area, activities aimed at broadening 
Novo's business base. Since 1982; 
Mr. Drejet has been managing di- 
rector of Dampa A/S. which is part 
of the FL Snndth Group. He win 
take up ins post at Novo before 
Nov. !. 

ASEA Robotics has appointed 
Stelio Demark deputy general 
manager, a post the company said 
was created because of the 'rapid 
growth of its business worldwide. 
Succeeding Mr. Demark as presi- 
dent of ASEA Robotics Inc. in Mil- 
waukee is Tore Undgren, formerly 
general manager of ASEA Tooling 
The Swedish parent, ASEA AB, is 
an electrical and electronic engi- 
neering concem. 

Totitl Petroleum (North Ameri- 
ca) Ltd. has appointed Pierre V ail- 
laud a director. Mr. Vaillaud is se- 
nior vice president, exploration and 
production, for (he Paris-based 
parent Corapagnie Franjaise des 
Pfctroles. Raymond Leeks, formerly 
director of finance for Total Ou 
Great Britain Ltd. in London, has 
joined Total Petroleum (North 
America) as rice president, finance, 
and treasurer. He moves to Denver 
from London and succeeds Rich- 
ard F. Dana, who is joining CFP in 
Paris. 


Automated 

StodiTrading 

(Continued from Page 11) 
vclopment of automated systems. 
However, it has expressed concern 
about posable fraud, suitability of 
orders and disclosure or tape-de- 
layed quotations. 

For instance, the agency is wor- 
ried that an unsophisticated cus- 
tomer might be persuaded bv a 
broker or adviser to place a con> 

S ilerized order for an esoteric. 

gh-risk transaction such as oil op- 
tions. 

The chairman of the SEC John 
SJL Shad indicated that t hes e con- 
cerns probably could be satisfied 
by after-thc-fact monitoring of 
trades. 

Eric Jvobren. Fidelity's group 
marketing director, estimates that 
five years from now 75 percent of 
the orders placed by personal com- 
puter will be fully automated, and 
that 25 percent of the company’s 
total volume also will be handled 
without human intervention. 

Mr. Kobren and others believe 
that buying and selling stocks 
through a machine will become as 
popular as getting money out of an 
automated teller machine. 




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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


** 


13 



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28 

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52 

03 

54 


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07 





ACROSS 


1 Festive 
redhead? 
Slthasapeal 
9 Tare's partner 

13 Site of Bowie’s 
fate 

15 Toast lopping 

16 Ridge. 

racehorse 

17 "...Country 
Roads” singer 

19 He gave 
England a lift 

29 Springtime 
abbr. 

21 Borge. for one 

22 Kansas City 
team 

24 Hades 

25 He’s a Dahl 

27 Will matters 

31 Went back to 

square one 

35 Item under a 
vase 



BOOKS 


NEW AND SELECTED POEMS 

1923-1985 


By Robert Pern Warren. 322 pp- Goth, 
$19.95. Piper,. SMS. 

Random Souse, 201 East 50th Streep 
New York. N. Y. M2Z 


Aimoupt he ally 

and 3y poetic terms 7 
daccous," “tnarawreaT and ^racrnp 
be more distracting to ibe 
rive— Warren possesses a jroadcrfw ab^yu. 
smoothly transtthegap between tj*dwwj- 
home, just-folks vemarailar of 

pd *. ■«. fiaaassss 


By Michiko Kakutani 


SHALL come back, no doubt, to 


watt down the Row and watch ; 
people cm the tenths courts by the dump 


May.’ 


mimosas and walk down the' beach by the 
Robert Peon Warren wrote in “All 


the 


36 Calvados’s 
capital 

38 ElBahr 

39 Russian 
waterway 

46RobRoy,e.g. . 

41 Tel 

42 Spanish wax 

43 Elvis’s middle 
name 

44 Berate mildly 

45 Proof a 
mistake was 
made 


47 Fruit-filled • 
pastry 

49 Daly’s TV 
co-star 

51 Sturgeon 
product 

52 Ponta 
Delgada's 
locale 

55 Suffix for 
axiom 

57 Pleased 
producer's 
placard 

60 lie de La 

61 Victor at San 
Jacinto 

64 bag 

(carryall) 

65 Allies' goal in 
1945 

66 Fissile rock 

67 Prolific auth. 

68 He's making a 
list 

69 Features in a 
Texas song 


3/17/8$ 
1933 film 

11 Malicious 

12 Scottish goblet 

14 Item for 

Ripley 

18 Riley's lot 

23 Long in the 
tooth 

24 Cubs bigwig 

26 Music balls 

27 Infer from 
data 

28 More sensitive 

29 Wonder 
Woman's 
headdress 

30 Gives the 
willies to 

32 Intense 

33 Gloss over 

34 Go partying 

37 Doce Dieses 

40 Fondled 

44 Spring bloom 

46 Rubber source 

48 The Stooges, 
e.g. 

50 Brazilian 
dance 

59 "Fin” 

62 Kin of kvass 

63 Haggard book 


j's Men.” “But that win be a long time 

from now, and soon now we shall go out of the 
house and go into the convulsion of the worid, 
out of history into history and the awful re- 
sponsibility of Tiroc.” 


ANOLP \TW\S 
CORROPEPiCOULP 
POT / HAVE 
BEEN A 



Published back in 1946, those beautifully 
resonant final words, with their delicate echoes 
of Mflion’s “Paradise Lost,” would not only 
sum up the pret jeeupations of Warren’s most 
famous novel, but they would also delineate 
the ongoing concerns of his poetry, both early 
and late: man’s exile Tram Edemc innocence; 
Ins groping search for knowledge and love; and 
his attempts, as a creature caught in history 
and the particular excesses of mis “maniacal 
century, to connect time present with time 
past. 


As this splendid new selection — which 
indudes such early classics as “Bearded Oaks’* 
and “Original Sin: A Short Stoiy,” as well as a 
generous helping of recent work — so vigor- 
ously demonstrates, Warren remains one of 
our pre-eminent poets, a poet blessed with a 
passionate moral intelligence and a huge abun- 
dance of verbal gifts. 


Whatever form or historical ihe> 

happen to employ. Warren s poo® 1 
ahvftvs return to that central myth of 
expulsion from the Garden, hts gD t igo a 
waldsubject to death and the 
of rime. It is a violent dangerous worid War 
ren's characters inhabit: 
wail, for the helpless infant, on die tovdyfera 
lawn; a pheasant flies. 

car. spattering the windshield with 
Wood; a gunshot rings out. and someone, am- 
mal or human. Hes dying in the dark. Sum^ 
limgy. the evil is momentous - 7 - a bomb. wcw> 
ing to be dropped over Hiroshima —but more 
often, the loss of innocence is ordinary, mun- 
dane: A chad speaks a harsh word to us 
mother and realizes the terrible ambigmtiesitf 
love, or two old friends meet and discover that 
lima has whirled them, forever, aparL 

Mostly, the terror Warren’s poems mv«ii- 
an<# has to do with our exist enc e in the vwiu 
of nature, a world that often feds “God-aban- 
doned” or at least indifferent to our tilde 
problems, and in the end, ] 
able — inaccessible to 


“The heart cries out for coherence, Warren 

writes in “Tale Ttme,** but white man spentUR 

to discover the secret logic ff 


By torus lyrical and plain-spoken, earthy 
and cerebral, warren writes with the fluency qf 

s equally at 
i(“TheBal- 


a great, instinctive talker he seems 1 
home with the narrative! 
lad of Billie Potts,” “Rattlesnake 'Country” 
and “New Dawn,” to name a few, are as dense 
with incident, character and landscape as any 
naturalistic novel), and more abstract, philo- 
sophical verse. He can use the sound and 
pacing of words to achieve sensuous, musical 
effects — “in the AiBUMim, in plaza, piazza, 
place, platz, and square, Boot heels, like histo- 
ry being ban, on cobbles bang” — and he can 
turn the reader's heart with a sudden, starf ,: -“ 
image, reworking familiar motifs (a flying 1 


a starry sky, an abrupt sunset) into a new 
/oft 


geometry of meaning. 


Solution to Previous Puzzte 

iSlcUlT 


qoedeq □□□□ 

□BED □□□BH □□□□ 

nnnn □□□□□□□ana 


|wl 1 UN E LM C A IN A R I S 


seeks ana 
□osoa atss □□□as 
dod □□□ nnaaQO 
DEtnoaaaannnaaQa 
□BCIDSS BDG 000 
DQQQQ 3QH OlEltllOQ 
□00 ana a 
BCQonQuaan^naQ 
□BQHanaaam □□□□ 
OEDn SSC3SG O 000 
□E0Q 


his „ 

the world. He is granted, at best, l 

— moments “non-sequendal and , 

of God's master blueprint. Like half-remem- 
bered fragments from a dream, reality gleams, 
glittere and is gone, duding the grasp afimagi- 
narictn, and leaving us unsure of our pkme m 
“nature’s flow and perfection.” 

Warren’s characters often seem amazed by 
the speed with which their lives unspool Urey 
have difficulty connecting the child they were 
with the person they are today . and ibey labor 
to come to terms with the loses — of friends, 
of children, of physical vigor — that the pass- 
ing years have brought. 

In the later poems, particularly, there arc 
recurrent images of « g m g and death — the. 
word “dark” is used so many times it become £ 
a kind of refrain — and a sense of regret 
expressed over “nameless promises unkept, in 
undefinabte despair.” Still, the poet's faith in 
the world's “tangled and hieroglyphic beauty” 
never diminishes, and he can era by embracing 
the limitations of man's condition, the fullness 
of our nature “for good and for evil,” the fact 
we are “only ourselves," “only human.” 

Just as his hero in “Audubon: A Vision" — 
the famous naturalist, portrayed as a sort of 
American Adam, who exchanges radical inno- 
cence for knowledge of love and evil — earns a 


to achieve a sense of 
won acceptance of 


a wondrous, 
“human bumble and 


grind." “I love tire worid even in 
writes in “American Portrait: 
“And that's a hard thing to outgrow. 


he 

te 


# 


TIRIEIEISMSINIAIPI 

3/17/85 


Miduka Kakutani is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscotr 


’ Dennis ! Wwoo ioo mean J WHAT sitter \ 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
| a by Hanrl Arnold and Bob Lee 


[WERE GOING- TO THE VET. 

garfielp 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one tetter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


GEWIH 



zn 



* I REGRET THAT I HAVE WT 


NUBEG 



□ 

_L 


TYLPEN 


-LI u 




O N the diagramed deal. 
South had to play six dia- 
monds after his partner as- 
sumed, wrongly, that East- 
West held at least nine spades 
between them. West, who had 
provoked this contract with his 
eccentric weak jump overcafl, 
now made the standard — but 
fatal — lead of the spade ace. 
When Ire continued the suit. 
South still had a playing prob- 
lem after winning the king: He 
could play West for the dub 


jade, or be could try for a 
squeeze in hearts and dubs. 


When he drew tramps and 
raffed dummy’s spade be knew 
what to da West was now 
known to have begun with five 
spades and two diamonds so 
he was sure to have a guard in 
either hearts or dubs. 


NORTH 
♦ »S4 
OA979 
«AKQI 
*K»- 


WEST 
♦ AQSB2 
04 
« ttl 
*19332 


EAST 


The squeeze was impossible, 
90 Sooth hdd'his breath and 
finessed tire dub ten. This 
won, and he had 12 tricks and 
a notable victory. Had it failed 
his team would have lost the 
match by exactly one point. 


* 3 M3 
Q J 10 9 5 
O J93 
' *37 
SOUTH CD) 

♦ Ki 

9K92 

♦ 7542 

♦ AQ64 

Norti and Sooth wore vnbwnHe 
The bidding: 


5outb 

West 

Norti 

East 

l 0 

Z* 

DM. 

3 ft- 

Pm 

Pan 

4RT. 

Pass 

5 0 

Pen 

Pass 

Pan 

60 

Pass 


West led dxqwdeoee. 



AURBUE 

X3 


□ 


HOW SOME FRANK 
PEOPLE MAKE 
THE1K POJKTT. 


□ 


Now arrange the circled tetters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




Yesterday's 


Jumbles: WOMEN PECAN 


(Answers tomorrow) 
HALVED GUTTER 


Answer What those talkative moths did— 
CHEWED THE RAG 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Anuterriam 
A ik mi 


Benin 

Bnmeb 


CMto Del Sal 

DeMMi 

Etflnbantt 


Hrtd n fcJ 

(ttaitbaf 
Un Palmas 


MHm 


Montcfc 

NIC* 

Oita 

Paris 


HUSH 

C F 
17 U 
21 70 

25 77 
14 41 
24 79 

14 57 

21 70 
39 B4 
28 82 

15 

23 73 
W 57 
17 63 

22 72 

22 72 
15 99 

12 54 

26 79 

23 73 
15 59 
20 68 

15 59 
21 70 

16 41 
21 70 
U 64 

13 5S 

23 73 


LOW 
C F 


ASIA 


48 
48 
IS 59 
13 55 
15 59 
11 52 

8 44 
15 59 
13 55 

9 48 

13 55 

1 44 

10 SO 

11 52 
t 44 
9 48 

2 34 
IS 59 

14 41 

11 52 
4 43 
2 34 

12 54 
4 39 


Benina 

Haag Keaa 

Manila 

MewOaUU 

5mmI 

Shanghai 


Taipei 

Tokyo 


HIGH 
C F 
32 90 
27 81 
32 90 
35 95 
41 104 

31 88 
18 44 
29 84 

32 90 

21 70 


LOW 
C F 

24 79 si 

15 99 0 

25 77 el 

27 81 d 

21 70 fT 

15 59 fr 

15 S9 o 

25 77 a 

24 75 d 

16 41 fr 


AFRICA 


Aielen 

Cam 

Cana To«n 


24 75 10 50 
33 91 18 44 


Lonot 
Nat raw 
TOOK 


20 48 12 54 el 

— — — — no 

32 90 25 77 a 

25 77- 14 57 d 

21 70 13 55 d 


o LATIN AMERICA 


BoMosAIrni 24 75 13 

Lima 21 70 16 

Mextcoatv 30 86 12 

Rlede Jaaetrn 26 79 20 

Soo Panto — — — 


55 d 
61' d 
54 DC 
68 fr 
— no 


Prague 

Reyklovfk 

21 

12 

70 

51 

9 

4 

48 

43 

fr 

d 

NORTH AMERICA 

Rome 

23 

73 

11 

52 

tr 


13 

55 


Stocxiwlra 

“ ■ 

— 

— 


no 

Atlanta 

29 

84 

15 

Strasbourg 

31 

73 

ID 

SO 

Cl 


21 

70 


Venice 

25 

77 

13 

64 

fr 


14 

61 

9 

Vtama 

24 

73 

18 

44 

d 


20 



Warsaw 

28 

83 

14 

57 

tr 

Detroit 

19 

46 

12 

ZUrtcb 

19 

44 

10 

50 

cl 

Hanoi ufu 

29 

04 

22 

MIDDLE EAST 




Heuitea 

Los Anodes 

29 

24 

W 

75 

18 

15 

Ankara 

19 

64 

12 

54 

d 

iwami 

32 

91) 

22 

teJret 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

MlsssjaewRi 

15 

59 

17 

Damascut 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Maafreai 

22 

n 

« 

jsmmiam 

23 

73 

11 

52 

cl 

Hassaa 

29 

04 

24 

Tel Aviv 

25 

77 

U 

29 

tr 

ksw Tork 

23 

72 

17 

OCEANIA 






tan Francisco 
Seattle 

25 

25 

77 

77 

10 

9 


13 

S3 

9 

48 

d 

Torosio 

16 

61 

to 


22 

72 

10 

50 

d 

waintaotoe 

23 

a 

13 

et-douav: Mom: tr-|alr; Mull; cKwercast: pc-oarflv dauctv 


39 OC 
59 fr 
52 d 
48 ei 

43 fr 
54 r 
72 nc 

44 ft 
59 DC 
72 Jr 
34 cl 
43 pc 
75 If 

54 d 
SO fr 
48 fr 
50 d 

55 pe 
r-rabi; 


FRIDAY'S FORK CAST — CHANNEL: Very dMPOV. FRANKFURT: OMTCHI. 
Terns. 18 - 7 (44 - 45). LONDON: Ctaudv. Tests. 15-5 (59- 411. MAORI D: 
Partly rtoudv. Temp. 16—1 (61—34). NEW YORK: Ctoudy. Tams. 21 — 13 
170—55). PARIS: Overcost. Temp. 19—8 (64—441. ROME: Cloudy. Temp. 


186 — 79). TOKYO: FPlr. Temp 22— 15 ( 72 — 59). 


WbrM Stock Markets 

Via Agence Frunce-Presse May 16 

Cbsinig pruo in local aurmda mlets otherwise wEcated, 


Bkensf Aalo 
Chmma Kong 
CW no Gas 
China Light 
Grroi Island 
HanaSanaSonk 


HK Electric 
hk Realty A 
HK Hotels 
hk Land 
hk Shanp Bank 
hk Telephone 
hk Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 
Inn env 
-Janflna 
JmninaSec 
Kowloon Motor 
Mlramr Hofei 
New World 

SMlM 

Sartre. Pacific A 
Tal Chasms 
WdiKwona 

Whoa lock A 
Wing On Co 
Wlmar 
warw Inn 


27 JO 27 JO 
TJM 17 
1048 HLlfl 
15J0 1SJ0 
8.95 9 

S3 51%}' 
2225 2.10 

040 025 

11 J 0 II 
37 3450 
- 4 599 

035 030 

91 90 

445 OSD 
2060 24J0 
063 062 

0j92 090 

12 1130 
1150 13 

HAS 1130 
31 3D 3130 
73S 7.10 

2.1 50 2150 
1240 1230 
2575 250 

2420 24.10 
1.M LB9 
L44 IAS 
735 735 

2.10 110 
5.10 475 

2300 1125 


Hong Pang iwfl—i 

Frwrtawi : 1 C 12 A 1 


AACorp 

Alllao-Lyens 


Anglo Am Gold S89V& 

Ass Brit Foods 236 

Alt Da kies 15f 

Barclay* 384 


BAT. 

Beachcnn 

BICC 

BL 

Shworde 

HOC Group 

Bools 

Bowler Indus 
BP 

BrttHoma Si 
Brif Telecom 
BrH Aeroxpoc* 
BrIMI 
BTR 


CaMe Wireless 

Cadbury Setrai 
Charier Cons 
CDmmorckrt U 
Cana Gold 
Courftiufds 
Datoety 
De Boers* 
□Istniars 
Drletantaln 
Flsan* 

Free 5f Ged 
GEC 

Gen Acci de n t 
GKN 

GkuoC 

Grand Mat 

GRE 

Guinness 

GU5 

Hanson 

Haitker 

iCi 

imperial Group 


1219/M 


277 277 

Land Securities 300 300 

Legal General 706 7D8 

Lloyds Bank 592 597 

Lcnrtw 17* 177 

Lucas 289 285 

Marks and Sp 140 143 

Mew Box 390 398 

MkflandBaafc 357 362 

Ned West Bank 479 684 

PandO 355 348 

FUktoiplon 303 303 

Ptassay 1M 170 

Prudential. 493 481 

190 190 

move sira* 

363 360 

full 550 


Reuters S79 381 

Royal Dutch t 47 15/6446 15/64 


R7Z 


611 
635 
344 
94 Vj 
718 
180 
474 
470 
443 
2 a 


Salnsbury 
Soars Hofdlngi 
Shall 
STC 

Std Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tale and Lyle 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
TJ. Group 
Trufatoar Hsa 
THF 

Ultramar ZK 

Unilever c 1131/M 
United Biscuits 193 
Vickers 320 

Wool north 8T3 


617 

400 

346 

98 

THE 

116 

477 


240 

357 

Ml 


443 

348 

449 

m 

355 

148 

213 

I1W 

IBB 


818 


F.T.J8 Index : DRUM 

Previous : IBUI 


Banco Comm 

Central 

daoboteis 

Cred Hal 

ErkJanla 

Farm Hallo 

Flaf 

FinsMer 

Generali 

IFI 

IMcmMirtl 

IMgas 

Hofmablllarl 


19900 19350 


Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rbxxscente 

SIP 

SME 

Srta 

Btanda 

Stef 


3099 7841 
2280 2260 
10500 TODS 
13650 13600 
3236 3190 
100 103 

47818 47050 
BI 20 flBBV 
90000 92000 
1803 1780 
81500 81730 
97490 949SB 
MSB 16*0 
657D 6600 
2490 2438 
70450 69500 
797 765 

2155 2100 
1410 1438 
3UB 3010 
16200 16300 
2830 2760 


MIB Current index : NJL 
■ ■ s 137S 




Odd Storage 

Frasar Neavt 

how Par 

Inctieape 

Mol Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

Shangrf-la 
Stme Darby 
Spore Land 
SPore Press 
ssMaimnip 
Sf Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


260 25Z 
4JO 6 JS 
525 521 

233 234 

244 241 
645 448 
93S 9.15 

162 3JS 
2J1 248 

NJO. — 
2137 201 

298 3 

6.10 510 
L12 1.11 

454 4J2 

2.12 2.12 
45B 436 


Strotfs TU tut tnd index : t2X72 
Prevlaes : 0M42 


[ 

Close 

*rev._ 

!! 1 

AO 

238 

•m 

ANI 

288 

285 

ANZ 

509 

4*3 

BHP 

658 

648 

Borel 

322 

322 

Bougainville 

237 

236 

Brambles 

390 

390 

Galas 

385 

382 

Comalco 

242 

240 

CRA 

442 

662 

CSR 

389 

285 


219 

220 

ETdereixt 

302 

300 


142 

163 


240 

a sc 

MIM 

344 

338 


195 

195 

Odkbrldge 

100 

98 

Peko 

465 

465 

Pftailiinw 

445 

435 

ROC 

550 



624 

630 

Sleigh 

177 

25 

.178 

25 

Woodskle 

160 

160 

WDrmakt 

356 

357 


PrevloasjOtSJO 






II TdfcpB f| 


422 

407 


960 


Aiabi Glass 

875. 

575 


115 


Bridgestone 

517 

524 


1210 


Casks 

. 1630 

1440 

CJ tats 

362 

996 

1& 


622 

404 

Doom Securities 

V; l 

hSS 



1560 



1700 


Kl .9 



770 

772 


708 


Honda 

ns 



Japan Air Unas 
Kalhna . 

Kamal W ear 
Kawasaki Steal 
KJrtn Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec IMs 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bonk 
Mitsubishi Chant 
Mitsubishi Else 
Mitsubishi Heavy 


Mitsubishi gam 


Mlhulondi 
MltsukosM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NRdwSaa . 
Nippon Kagalai 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
N isian 
NafnaraSac 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Rieoti. 

Sharp 

Shfamau 

ShfctotM Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Son llomo Marina 
Sumitomo Metal 
TofeeiCorp 
Tabho Marina 
TafctdaChem 
TDK 
Tdlln 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Toppon Printing 
ind 


Toyota 

YamolcMSec 


6900 <700 
304 305 
1510 1510 
139 140 

451 650 

437 N.T. 
341 342 

4740 4640 
1440 1440 
755 759 

1560 1540 
450 448 

390 392 

243 268 

518 530 

340 
530 
950 
1000 
■70 
705 
1350 
■66 
143 
266 
*07 

1070 , 
ran l 
1990 l 1 
895 
953 
730 MS 
970 1000 
4010 4030 

1780 1780 
223 224 

625 625 

-143 
228 

430 

803 

5240 

431 
1800 

835 
855 
450 
360 
1270 
715 




2490 AMI Free 
205AcMands 
2905D Agnico E 
1500 Agra intfA 
32183 Alt Energy 
3180 ABO Not 
900 Algo Cent 
2998 Aloomo St 
Ida Andre WAf 
ISSQArtcai 



143 

227 

435 

870 

5140 

433 

1800 

844 

865 


Nlkkal/DJ. index: 
Prevteas : 12HBA3 


VOUM 


Prevteus : V0J7 


H.O.: not auoled; HA: not 
avoUabto; xd: 9x dividend. 


U.S. Housing Starts Up Sharply; Factory Use Falls 


The Assoeuoed Prat 

NEW YORK — New U.S. housing contraction 
was started at the highest rate in a year during 
April, the Commerce Department said Thursday, 
and declining interest rates have raised hopes for 
further gains. 

Bui m a separate report, the Federal Reserve 
Board said that the operating rate at U.S. factories 
dropped sharply in April, the fourth decline in the 
last five monthi 

The Fed reported that operating rates at the 
nation’s factories, mines and utilities declined 0.5 
of a percentage point last month, the steepest drop 
since a 0 . 6 -paten tage-poim fall last September. 

The Commerce Department said housing starts 
were up 1.6 .percent in April to an nmuml rate of 
1.91 million units, the strongest performance since 
the annual rate of 1.95 million units r e p or ted in 
April 1984. 

However, a key indicator erf future construction 


activity, issuance erf new building permits, fell 4.9 
percent. 

But hopes for further declines in interest rates on 
home-mortgage loans have bolstered expectations 
of further housing gains. 

While the 1.6-percent increase was far below the 
big l4J-perceoi rise posted in March, it still was 


enough to push houang activity to hs strongest 
pace since an an annual rate of 1.95 m 


million units in 

April 1984. 

Analysts had been expecting housing construc- 
tion to continue to improve, bolstered by declining 
mortgage rates for most of the period since last 
j uiy. ; 

The Commerce report said oonstroction of sin- 
gle-family homes slipped [ percent in April to an 
annual rate of 1.16 milli on units. The decline fol- 
lowed a 3.2-percent March increase. 

The weakness in angle-family construction was 
offset by a 6.4-percent increase in consoudkm of 


apartments with five or more units. The April gain 
followed a 45.7-percent surge in construction of 
apartmoit buildings in March. 

■ Construction of apartments with four or fewer 
units rose a more modest 2.8 percent in April 
following a 10.4-peibent March pin. 

. While current construction rose in April, issu- 

future bmlding^mw^declined $9 pertenffol- 
lowing a 72-peroem March increase. 

Construction was the strongest in the western 
states, which enjoyed an 82-percent increase in' 


2000 CD Mb Bt 
4275 Cod Fry 
72175 C Nor West 
1100 C Pockrs 
5144 Con Trust 
200CTuna 



174625 Dataseo 
3200 Du Font A 
30100 OylkM A 
4200 ElcWtom X 
2200 Emea 

7850 c ratoon C 
■ *975 Ficnbrdn 
1000 Forty R« 
5060 Fed tnd A 


TOO Fed Plan 
” 'City Flit 


in the Northeast and 2.6 percent in the South. 

The big decline in capacity otflaatfon last month 
/oUowed a 0 . 1 -perccmige point increase in March 
and three straight declines in December, January 
and February, ft left the total operating rate at 80.6 
percent of caparity in April, the lowest level since 
January 1984. 


22500FI 
5475 Fr 
4M Quel l s A 
51834 GOOC Comp 

'SSi SSSS 

4S90GaldCOfT>f 
SOMGfOOduC 
353971} GL Forest 
100 Ot Pacific 
4051 Grwytmd 
2002 Hawker 


115708 Hayes D 
■■HBOfl 


Co 


2944 1 
67527 1 

17300 1 

100 Instil 
<096 1 mood Gas 
40i00infl Thom 
3M0 Infer Pteo 
BOO 1 voce B 
J13SD jawmek 
300 Katsev H 
mu Karr Add 
9024Labatt 
B990S Lae Marts 
7900 Locana 


KMi Law Close CbgC 
S18M 17* 181* 
SIM IM 14M 
814* 16VS 161b— W 
ST* 7* 7* 

J21fc 20* 21*+ ft 
SIS* U H 
^ 21* 22 -t- ft 

S22 Zlft 21*+ * 
SHft 25ft 25Vb — * 
S2B* 'CM + * 

S9M 9 9 

S34* 34ft 34*+* 
S5* 5* 5*— ft 

11211 12 * 12 * + ft 
M3 136 142 +4 

430 425 425 

480 475 <55 + 5 

577ft 17ft 17ft 
S9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
S9W lb 9ft + * 
235 22S 235 +10 

S32ft 21ft 22ft + v. 
SI4* 14ft 14ft + ft 
S24* Zlft 24*+.* 
16* 1«4-Vk 
S27ft 27ft TJVz 
*5* 5* 5*+ ft 

SUM 14* ,14* 

S 32* 22 ft m 
09* 29* Sfc-ft 
*37 36* 37 + * 

Hi* M* 14*+* 
S45ft 66 65ft +lft 
»Mft mft nft+1* 
39 30 

SJ* 9ft 9*+ft 

25.. 3L w — » 

*13* 13ft 13*+* 
S7 6ft 7 
ST7* 17* 17* 

55* 5ft 5ft 
Mft 5ft 5ft + ft 
SlOft m 10ft + * 

SB* 8 ft 8 ft + * 

- 37S 3JB 370 

215 ”* it*+* 

H9ft 19* 19*+ ft 
200 19* 200 + 4 

440 410 435 +25 

raj 13* rat-* 

S4ft 4ft 6ft 
ZM 240 250 +5 

S25ft 25 25ft+ * 

SI ** 14* 14*+ ft 
*«ft 39* 40*+ ft 

.SS .** 7*+ ft 
*S£ ’Sf ’2S +Vi| 
J5HS * 

OOft 2 Dft 20 ft— * 
SI7 14* 14ft— * 
» 0 ft a fflft+ft 
279 279 279 + 4 

ram 21 ft »ft+i 

WJ 2Zft 23 +lft 
US WHi 1A+* 
*23* 33ft 23ft 

% %r* 

40 ■ SI 

^ ik 

m 

Sfik iT* 


41620 Metal HX 
80555 MrerkmcJ E 
34294 MofeonAf 
730MotsanB 
■ SWMurohy 
1675 Nob tan L 


13725 Norcen 
70U03 Nva AltA 1 
500 Nawsea W 
J5601 NuWsIipA 

1 3450B Ookwood 
lanOshawa Af 
M»Pomour 
SiSDPanCanP. 
, 400 Pembina 
15103 Ptuvtlx Oil 
1175 Pina Point 
4500 Place GOo 
ISBOOPtaaer 
lOOProvtoo 


SIS* 12* 12* + ft 
410 MO 410 +15 
117* 17* 17*— ft 
SI 7ft 17* 17* + ft 
S«*-ai* 24ft— ft 


«5* 14* 13 — ft 
514* IS* 14* + * 
J4. 5*. 6 + ft 

S20ft 20* 20*- ft 
50 47ft 50 
WW «* 9 

5 * *16 37 

S36 34ft 

578* Uft 

M* JM 

S30ft 30ft 30ft 
138 . IM 138 


+ 1 
— ft 
_ + * 
8 *+ * 
34 +' 2 
18*+*ft 
_ -.ft 


*8 


'flSW p 


SU* 18* 

411 




limiiLM 
■ MOLabklw 


... Co 

IMMMKA 

9000MICC 


S -2 
3M3+ ft 
Wk+.ft 
25ft— U> 
19* 
Mk+* 

sft JSStlS 

3* 2 E 
^ 3P> 

.*J5ft M* lift- Vi 
2^4 25ft 34*+ * 
33* 32*— Oft 

sss ^ 

JFJsjka- 

338 3QS 330 +20 


lOORcvrockf 
19393 Redtoalb 
10015 RdShinbsA 
3774 Revn Prp A 
1500 Rogers A 

SOB Ramon 


54* 4* 

■_»* 8 * 


it ssassa 


lUScaatre 

Bouttsf 

Sears Cm 


lO^S S 


snv ti n* 

522ft 21* _ 
7» ISO ISO 
ST0 10 
511* lift 
540* 40 
54ft 6ft 


+15 


in -fEi 


n*+ * 

40 


r *«■! » 1*1 


1SKUL.— 

J3TO Sigma 
MOO Slater Bt 
3868 5outtun 
4610 St Brodcst 
Sn06StelcoA 
22571 Sutptnj 
U00 Steen R 


— u 

Ui 

we 
28*—* 
7* - 

m+ * 

1014+** 




5000'. 

900 Tara 
noTeckCorA 

^tRS^A 

45751 TorDmBk 

^STor^orai 

800 Trodera a r 

t jnOTra»Mf 


&tJS& 

ffift M 

SUM ft . _ 

551ft 51* 51* +9U 
SlOft >9* 19* . 

™ im jift+j 

373 288 MO 

224 2» 224 

e is s 

sat* 34* 

« 

S11 11 


. ..ft 

— 10 
+ 4 
33+1 
95. + 1 

13ft 4-14 

' +* 


11 




WttITiiimio u 
So^TrcanPL 
46882 Trlwioc 
IBOO Trtiec At 
2WW Turbo I 
mufttamiAi 
60OUnCart*1 

’SbKSSE?* 

SgSOVeriMAi 

ftftWestmln 
CTO Weston 

4900 Yk Boar 


3S1 20 ft 21 +** 
Pi - mb 31 
SOft 22 ft 22 ft— * 

»ift »5 21 * + * 

re 

a. S* * 

57ft 7ft 
Sll* lift 
Ml* 11* 

UB W5 

510* 18ft IQft 
HS 12 * 121 *. * 

W2ft «1* 82ft +lft 

S4ft 6 + 


x\ 
+1 
7ft - 

31 + 11 + •*. 


TRMOT SAM A A mm lift 

ToM safes 19.934.192 Hiwet * 14 


TSB 301 Index: 


caose 

Z7UL60 


2A7S30 


M — fttni 


^aankMgat 

1400 Con Both 
2ai DornTxiA 
fMMniTm 
»«aNai»caa 
•9490 Power CQrp 

U50 RoUaudA 
MS44 Royal Baft 


TfeSP^esi^asi ShiTO. 


W* Low apse cnitm 

I 

sts p JE- 
SS star- 

S Wf^fc.+ ; ft 
agft agjgft+.u 


WU9 


fturtm 

U&66 


. 1 . 


pBOAR 


jr .,1 .i 

r: i *. • • r 

41 B ’ 


15 , 




sv : -• 

.’4: 9 


rt:. u.. < - 

** D * . . 


'-I «> :a 

or w 




91 = w- 


« 0 »•> 


• m,. 

•L. . 


1 • 

He--- 


1**" ‘iL t 
Sft . 


I 

I *Ca— . . 

SJ;.--'* • : 

■ 

i “•I* , 
i . 

s 

- 


i .. 


■ t»c *** i L-r 


V 




"ft. 


S'*-. 


.5S5|ssssr” 'sssiti, *bhi 


iS 5 EBS=SES»— - I I IriflidcSffi- ^ 

,. cme. | computer problems. | ed at the beginning of d» year, ‘[peroeni. . • TT-^I 


^4 


m . 


.-«l, 


beginning i 


: year. • peroeni. 


1 




T 


~ _ ■ 1 * ,,v T-S' ' r ,<■. " ‘ if ■ 




Ks 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


Page 1' 




SPORTS 


^^^EviKrlaii Has 2 Titles 

Vienna - 

■ - 

;»• * -.■••=. .. . Winners Cup 

ta»-. • t ,(•. ,i* - r 

-‘SlkvV T^Awcwterffw 
" L,,f • •-: V ROTTERDAM — Everton, die 

ir 15 ‘‘ ‘ , ' jS'riiii i oew English soccer league ctea- ■ 

* ; ■ ; .,• v 'jrr^%w^hasTOnil5fii«EmOTeaaca4) 

V^ ; ; i '*^ li.c' 1 ! .‘^rai ** QffWmng/ Cop, but 


in Hand, 1 to Go 


•■ir. . *. ' c Varjjjr ]%tas put the cefebratioa on ice. 

;; ’. To mnnuarx Howard Ked 



Davis’s 2 Homers, 
6 RBI Help the A’s 
Rout Brewers, 19-3 


Fl --U. . di^Mfebeiti 

Ki - :h.- ' iT'^VWcdr 

* fc ■» «o..r r 


>rj To mana g er Howard KeadaE, 
in,iT%he«txBg Rapid Vienna, 3-1, 
!. b^v" Wednesday sight at the Feymoord 
to. T^'Stadhxm was only the second leg of 
pri^^* triple test that would be unique to 

*T8a»«j^ ... _____ 


• : 




-VjjDn Saturday, the Merseyside 
^leam, winch has emerged from the 


v.: ... ,V; V‘" tfcc | ta shadow of its neighbor Liverpool, 
v„- i. iiibi States on Manchester United in the 
- • :.V 7*1 a Csm final at W«nWwr 







Wembky,” said KendalL 
He said his players were “abso- 
lutely magnifktmt”m the way t^ 


v< t-c ' •*- 


^ id side seeking to become the first 
! '/■‘'“frtm*; Austrian team to win a major Emo- 
^ '‘Mto.'pean competition. ••• 


• ■ I. |AOU MUUIbUUUU. 

After a goalless first half in 
,rt 7 .... :_ dl h fii m ,H»hich Everton pressured but failed 

; l ^lial to break down an overworked Rap- 

-‘ 0 .: ... . { _‘ Tn ( nL UieiaCid defense, the English side 

• .,-i.i ■ . •. ‘ J stormed to victory. •. 

J ; : ’.v.'..,;. 1 Udin 5ilitjiaX Graeme Sharp danced around 
'- J ” *.“\“n.Mue dJ;Rapiir,s goalkeeper, hfichad Xour 
'sd, to set iq> Andy Grey for the 
> • •• ■::i, .it,-. 58th-mnmte oocnme aoaL and Tre- 


Heribert Weber (above left) tried Ins best to hold back Everton’s 
Peter Reid while Rapid Vienna teammate Karl Bnmneder and 
Everton’s Trevor Steven were up for a ballet in Rotterdam. Steven 
scored Ins team’s second goal as it won die Cap Winners’ Cup, 3-1. 


• NV.\: 
t!i \h- •.- 


• ■*» ^ 58thrminpte opennKgoal, and Toe- and Ihe smpcnsiop of Ectar Brae, 

" :te r Steven netted & second from he aehmtt*d after (he game that 

• • nit [hj* m?* a oomo' in the. 71st mhmte. ^ “Everton earned the cop." 

•Vw/f^vJa Ijj 1 Deqrite the arrival of die iqury- Baric, praised his gqalkeqter, 

•> -.'i -j. ; u kT;.' 1 stricken Czechoslovak iDtemaricmr Konsd, tor two omnring saves 
r ‘ ‘ Vi-, ^al Antonin Fianenka as asecond- against Shecdy and Stewa and 
. .. ' half snhstitnte; Rqrid was unable praised his 


Aldjongb Rapid’s coach, Otto 
Baric, pcmled to a reshaped nud- 
fidd caused by Fanenka's injiay 

he (he game tint 

“Evnrton earned the cop.” 

Baric, pimsed his goalkeeper, 


^haJf snhstitnle, Rapid was unable praised his defense fin- keeping 
to strike back until the veteran Evertoo.at bay for so long. 
c Hans Krankl broke away to scare. Bnt his own team’s shortcomings 

• ■ • .Ilf 4 * Bar as if to eambadm Everton’s were dearly exposed in the second 
- V Jr^-^pcriarity; Kevin. Sheedy scored half as the Evcrton mfdficid contin- 
.... ■, V' a left-foot shot withm a min- naUy broke through Rapid’s soft 

v l |“A SKk| ^ute later. canet 

■ ■■ ■ ■■■ — 

■■ • '•'■..Pcdhg; 


Everton rJtnrihfld the T*n gB«h 
league title mm days agp, with five 
games to spare. Saturday, Everton 
will ramble toward Wembley with 
Manchester United in its way. 

■ Cigarette Blamed for Fire 
A survivor of the soccer stadium 
fire that titled 52 people has said 
that the blaze was started by a 
cigarette dropped in a plastic cop 
and not a smnke bomb, The Asso- 
ciated Pros reported from Brad- 
ford, England. 

Czes Pachda, 29, who escaped 
with Ins 5-year-old daughter, Jo- 


anne, said he had told police he saw 
the “pure accident” that led to the 
fire. 

Pachek said be was sitting in the 
Valley Parade grandstand Satur- 
day and noticed three men nearby 
drinking from plastic cops. He be- 
lieved one of mem dropped a dm- 
rette butt in a cup and then he 

ym4M hnrmwg platrtTC- 

“One of the men said. 'My mate 
>mw set MMri t ing ali ght _ * Then one 
of them got down and was crawling 
about on his hands and knees as if 
be was looking for something,” Pa- 
cbd&said. 


”1 saw flames undo 1 the floor- 
boards. They had spread quickly 
before the smoke became visible. 
Then an orange flame app e al e d 
and it flared very quickly,” he said. 

Another person has said he saw 
the fire started by a smoke bomb. 

Police said they bad pinpointed 
the seal where the fire began and 
destroyed the 79-year-old wooden 
grandstand in four minutes. Police 
said they had idf-ntifjwi almost all 
the victims and an inquest wfll be 
opened Friday. 

Pachda told reporters that the 
three men at first joked about the 


incident, but then it became appar- 
ent the fire was getting out of hand. 

He said police first tried to pot 
oat the flames and then began 
evacuating the immediate area, tell- 
ing people to go to the back of the 
g randstand 

Police have said that most of the 
victims were found dead at the 
bade of the grandstand where exit 
gates were looted to prevent people 
getting in without paying. 

“I got to the back of the grand- 
stand and saw the crowd was very 
congested, with kids screaming and 
people getting crushed,’' he said. 


la Angela Tima Service 

MILWAUKEE — In his first 
nine seasons as a professional base- 
ball player, Mike Davis gave no 
indication that he would develop 
into a power Utter. 

But, in bis 10th season, his fifth 
with the Oakland A’s, Davis is sud- 
denly the major league home run 
leader and leads the American 
League in runs batted in. 

He hit two home runs, drove in a 
career-high six runs and scored 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

four Wednesday night as the A’s 
wop, 19-3, in banding the Brewers 
their worst loss ever. 

Davis, 25, already has 12 home 
runs this season. In his previous 
354 major league games, he had hit 
19. In 100 games as a minor leaguer 
in 1982, he Mi 12. 

Davis has amazing statistics. He 
is batting 325, has scored 33 runs 
and driwn in 31. Last season, in 
135 games and 382 at-bais, he bat- 
ted 330, had nine home runs, 
scored 47 runs and drove in 46. 

Oakland's manager, Jackie 
Moore, believes Davis can keep up 
his hot streak “Sure he can keep it 
up,” Moore said. “1 don't know 
how good he might be. He’s made a 
major adjustment that is paying 
off. He’s staying back” in the bat- 
ter’s box “belter this year.” 

Davis, who gives much of the 
credit for his improvement to the 
hitting coach, BOly Williams, is not 
as optimistic as his manager. 

“I'm not a home rtm Muer," he 
said. “I’m a line drive hitter. 
They're just coming right now ” 
Twins 5, Tigeis 4 

In Minneapolis, Bundy Bush sin- 
gled with two out and the bases 
loaded in the 11th to beat Detroit. 
The Twins, who had lost four of 
their last five mi home runs late in 


;;.v a 



‘■—ihL 
‘‘ • r .*nl'c 

' ■ej'iacf 
Wi. 




Baseball 


Saturday’s Preakness h a Race Running Into Trouble 


Wednesday’s Major League line Scores 


UE 


i . AMERICAN LEAGUE 

tt"' V * OaMMf - niNIB-WH C 

!l ' 1 - l«— fcH IHMM-in 1 

J.liTV Kruratr, Vftimn (9) ond H«Vh, TtftMon 

* , . CW; Ht9uara,Hwm BJ.McCIiiw ULLocM 

" ' If). Korn (7), Samoa HU 'and Moont w— 

. *r ■; ztffi Kru^.4*i^*flwiwn,l-aHIM-0aktan«t, 
i::yOovN2n».MuiWiy M.MHwauka«Bn»- 
■ eanuri. 

■ n ■wmt Mtt«a»-v f,« 

Jwon MSHM-1 4 1 

— YUnotfon. Nunn ta), vunda Bwv <W aid 

ri^«mtn^cbtt(M;Nl»MKStadn(7T.OWda- 
III and SulDvon. W— LanasSon. S« Lr-NIp- 
pa,1-a.HT*»— SaaW*,Thama« ttl. Dewto C3>, 
Frothy cm). Bottom, Stdlbm flJ. 
r w—iirin m 411 VM— * II .1. 

Torarta M m m-t IS 1 

ftomo nk *. OMnonti (4), Maara (7) and 
Boone; Kay. Lanf>(5),Lava8*(7LC«idPim. 
aid Whitt W Mo w n , M. L— CauffllU 44. 

HR»— CoWorrdo. Narron t». TorordiuMuOliv 

... NQ). 

Kaancnr OSMOns— «n # 

* amhad . Ml SSI — I 4 1 

LolbimR and Sundborv; Sdwlza, Tbwn»- 
“ • : ion in, Clark Cl) and BaMa. w— .LNbrondt 

* 1 : 4-7. L_Sciiotrb34.HR— Knot City. Babml 

if Ok 

• T nan Nl»MMn 1 

. Mew York WMMM 4 2 

Mason, OHarrts (4), SchmWI QQ amt 
»■' Shunt; Guidry, Bard m, nahaltl (fi and 
. Wynsaar. W — RWwiti, M. L — Schmidt V2. 
. : . ' BOttnare M4 Ml n*-4 S t 

, . ODOM Ml 4M DM 7 1 

DJMarttnsz, Am V) and Damnaay; 

' Saavar, AMtO W. Jama (V) aid KliL FMi 

* _ r- (W. W4m*t L A m *■!. svMjaBia 
’ ' (4). HRn— Bammort. Rlnkso (4), Dwyer Of 
. ^ b ancoao, Hutrit <11, Waflar (4). 

„ DOrolT 4M M2 HUM 1] 1 

• r . ■. Ml— ofa wmiHIHM T 

1 , TarraiL Bair (B). Lome (W) and ParMu 

(Mw. VtartOm nii and Saba. W—WardiO. 
-J L — Lop«a. 04. HRs — Dstrolt Evans (3), 
dwon (5)1 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

^-NPWrtan* M4HSS11-4 • • 

* .£aa Frcmdaco 1MMI1M-4 • • 

^ Rhodsn, Rablnion <n ood Pm; Han- 

. ^ meteor, MJJonri* 18}. Gonutti [f) and BimOv. 
' /. w— RabiMan. ML L-Garrata, M. . 

i andnMU MMHM 7 • 

•• -Moorasl MS Ml MS— 1 3 t 

l.- PrlOB. Pour (9) and VO* Gonfcr; &5mHb, 
* i, •• Ratwras tfl and Pltzmrald. vMPncs, Ml 
-m ’ L— BSmHh, $■ t Sv — Power (4).' 

V - ~ PWlodsirMn Ml Ml TW 1-4 I '• 

w ;. ?? AMsnfs MMIttM 7 1 

' Carttan. Oannsn OLAndassn 17), Rucksr 
• %. • . (fl.Ttkutm m one VbvB; BsWnstob Dad- 
* u . • man cn.Gortar tl). rw»T (M.Suttsr C1M 

t ond Carons. W-SutMr, Ml L-Tskotvn, 2-1. 

> i ' r HRs — Atlanta. Parry O). Haresr CU. 

■y <- • Now 1M ns Mi IW-5TI I 

llps N ss MtH W-4 I I 

’ T Coodao.Oraicq (7) aid Carton NMcra of- 

I ’ 1 , * 

/■ League Standings 

' ■ AMERICAN LEAOUE 


- Pinol4),Dawlsy (ll.Catbeai (PiandANiby. 
W-Goodoa d-L L— Hltitro, Z-L Sv— Oratco 
BL HR — Naw York, Hasp <11. 

ILL— N 4M HI Ml— M IS 1 

■m Dism ‘ HI 111 MI-4 M t 

Anduio r, Dovlav <71 and ParWr, Kioto W; 
Hoyt, DsLsan U). Baoksr (*), Ufhito <71, 
Stoddard (I) aid Katmdy, Bochy ML w— 
AackOar. 4-L U-Hovt M HR— St UuOo, 
CJart (7J. . , 

CMcso* IMUB-I I % 

I n ftnsalar MS MS m— 4 l a 

S—aSnavsmHh mandlMONifUMrain; 
Nlodantoar <M and Sdoacki. W— Sandsrson, 
2-1. L-Honsvcutt 24. Sw— Smith t9U HR- 
Odcaas^ Cay 15). 


Tennis 


ItalkaOpen 



Bust DlvWaa . 



- W L 

Pet GO 

i Toronto 

- » 17 

JH - 

*■! r outran 

18 12.- 

M0 1 

JT r BOttmors 

W 13 

J81 lto 

, NOW YWfc 

U 15 

J00 4 

-• “Bmton 

15 17 

MS 5 

■\! . .-'MJhHOlfcOS 

U 18 

J87 7Vi 

' .* --Cfevstand 

12 30 

MS. 4 . 

, i- . . • ; 

toUDMAs 


> ' . . -California 

to 

** - 

- • Chknao 

17 « 

484 1 

' .Minnama 

17 15 

J31. TVs 

i Kansas City 

14 15 

-SU 3 

>- ’ - •Nations 

14 17 

AK 1 

i 1 , 'EamMIs 

MINN 

' 15 » 

JO 5- 

' ..r.rsxas 

* 22 

J».1B 

. NATIONAL LEAGUE 


East NvMia 


S - . ' ,1 ' ' 

W L 

Pci. Gfl 

‘ , :tow Yarn 

21 f 

JM - 

f Moaoo 

19 IT 

i3J 1 

*• ' * Aonfmaf 

19 U 

m a 

V, #. Louis 

15 17 

AM 7 

4 . •‘itilafctoMa 

k • .I’nsbunto 

11 a 

ID 21 

X5 10V, 
ma- u vt 

-■ v r 

Wsst DMsisa 


Dtoao 

U U 

541 — ■ 

-'louston 

17 15 

SSi 1M 

■‘V .IndnnaW 

14 14 

job a» 

* :; • as Anaetos 

17 17 

J® 2 Vt 

; : . Itanta 

13 11 

Jit S 

• ‘‘an FraneHes 

13 » 

jm> sw 

l 1 - • ■ ‘ 




- MEm UNBLEI 
Sacond Rooad 

Tranccacs Cancaitoffl, Italy rm,dst Mat 
mchfaa. U5. M, ML Romm Aamar, Hoffl. 
MUoadn NvatTdsmrSwsdsn. 7-4 C74), 34, 6- 
Z Adam Amot Mantdarf. hrad dot HoH 
Gohrtno. Wsst Gsnnaiy, 4-1, M, 

TMnl Raand 

MdtoWltandar^widtn (1 )^NL EmMoSon-i 
dwXr5Ma4a2-L44. YOnlek Mpoh, Francs 
t*L dst Andhra JorvdrRMdM (3), fc-b 7S. 
Jan Oas—uivB w sd Mv dot Jimmy Arias. 
UA- *A- M. W. Jm Luis Clare TtimnKna 
(Ul.dsL Tomas Smld, Cssdiasiavakla (4),4- 
4^LMliastovMBdr,CsscboNovakla I7),daf. 
Kmd Carfsmu Smden, 74 [7-5), 44. . 


Transition 


Cleveland— O dlsd up Bryan dot, 
pHcfMEf, (Tam Mains'. of the H d smananal 
Loam-Sti* Jsny WMcmLcalcbar.toMiilM. . 

DETROIT— Sant Dim Barvrom. Inflaidar. 
toNosiM— dHhaAmwtl a »aAMOclBHontorn 
Tdttav rshoMtltation psrtod. 

MILWAUKEE— Ptocad , Bin Scliraodsr, 
catcMr^Ki its 1S4ov dkablsd Qstemd mowed 
Rmidy Randy, MMder, (ram itwttialSdavto 
M-dav MsaMad ML 

NEW YORK— Plocsd John - MonMuscn, 
pldsr, on tbs 15-doy Mtoblsd list Rsoattod 
Dan Cmpst, pBdtar, from COumbas of the 
liitsmo M onat Lsams Acttvatsd Meh Bonn 
pttahsr. 

LOS ANGELES— Sard Bob Wekfc pltdw, 
toVsru Baoch at iha Rortdo Stole Lame. 
Sant Dove. Andsnon, itoentom to AJbwuar- 
owa ot tim Pncffic CHsr LaaouB. 

PHILADELPHIA— Purchcnad Dorrol 
Thomas. InflaWar, from MicmlofUia FlDrtdo 
Stats Lsobus for on wdliiJmsd amours of 
eaNL RataOMd KBw Garda, JnfMdsr. 

■ FOOTBALL . 

Ncdtosal Forttwa L oams 
CHI C A G O Sl a n adKsn O w , sn hrt wt t 
and Anmony Thomas, rMring bock. 
CINCINNATI— Stonsd Barnard IQnd, ft*- 

bock*r. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Monad Trncy Groans 
Biwd. 

PITTSBURGH— M onad 'monk Pofcorev. 
ttoMon i j Oanvt BraafcL Pronfc Goods ond 
Russali Hotmos; ilnoboctsra; Rgtosrt Wolko 
ond KovInPoweUdafanstvaHnamcn; Woody - 

PtoMMond Rodarfckitoora, rwnlfls bockt; 

TanUnabaraavnosstockla, and Mike Mas- 
sell, esntar. ■ T' 

SAN PRANOSCOHnanM Danon Rood. 

saMvj SMdan Aadnsje. drNnctoelocUa, 
and Andrew Ompbefl, offensive suard. 
imnsa wirtw ■ — — 

AlMZOM A P l a ced OH* Brawn, nmnlna 
bKto an woNsirs. Annaaiesd ma ntframaat 
of John Mistior, wide mcs l vsr. 

- LOS ANGELES-Namod Hart Vtoemt 
ouMc rstaSam dMctor. 

, ;• HOCKEY - •• ■ 


By Andrew Beyer 

Washington Part Soviet 

BALTIMORE — Marylanders who revere 
the Preakneu Ihoroughbred horse race 
might choose to believe that the absence of 
the Kentucky Derby winner from Saturday’s 
race is a freak event After all. Spend a Buck 
was hired away by the chance to win S2ti 
ntinkm in the Jersey Derby, and such cir- 
cumstances might never arise again. 

- -But^peod-a Bock is'cmly a small part of 
thePreakness’ problems. Bis absence is but a 
symptom of the ill health of this race. 

If Garden State Park had offered a mnlti- 
mDliari-dollflr purse for the Jersey Derby an 
the first Saturday in May, the track wouldn't 
have taken Ihe best horses away from the 
Kentucky Doty. Nor could Garoen State’s 
dollars meet the Bdmont Stakes. 

But Garden Stale’s owner, Robert Bren- 
nan, knew he could challenge the Preakness, 
because the race's prestige and importance 
already had begun to decline shaipify in the 
. eyes of breeders and owners. In some rirdes, 
PhnHeo’s lag attraction invites out-and-out 
{tension. 

- “The Preakness,” said BOl Oppenhrim, 
editor of the Kentncky-basod newsletter. 
Racing Update, “doesn’t belong in the Triple* 
Crown, ft's the wrong distance, the wrong 
track, the wrong kind of race. It shouldn't be 
considered a classic race. It should be just 
what the Jersey Deity is: a prep toe the 
BdmonL” 

This view might be dismissed as pennies, 
but John Hmxy, president of the company 



. %r 


Tto tenanted Prat 

I Am the Time, right, wanted a look at Preakness rival Hajjfs Treasure. 1 


that conducts the Smatoga Yearling Sales, is 
no polemicist. He is a Marylander and a 
friend of Pimlico's management. Yet last 


week, when he was asked what the impact of 
a Preakness victory would be on the value of 
Spend a Buck, compared with a viclcaym the 
Jeoey Derby, he had to answer cantfimy that 
there would be no difference at alL That is 
what 110 years of tradition have come ta 
There are plenty of factors that make a 
race important: its longevity, itsjmrsc mon- 
ey, its public popularity, its position on the 
racing calendar. Bnt for horsemen, the most 
import an t factor is a race’s value as a true 
measure of horses’ quality. Does a victory in 
the race almost automatically certify ahorse 
as an outstanding runn er, a significant and 
potentially valuable stud prospect? 


Many great horses have won this race on 
the way to a sweep of the Triple Crown, of 
course. But what does a victory in the Preak- 
ness mean by itself? Since 1970, eight hore« 
have won toe “middle jewd” alone among 
tbe Triple Crown races: Gate Dancer, De- 
puted Testamony, Aloma’s Ruler, Codex, 
Bocutionist, Master Derby, Bee Bee Bee and 
Personality. It hardly is an iDnstrious list 
Any racing fan who frequents Pimlico can 
understand why the Preakness has not been a 
definitive test of horses’ ability; races there 
rarely are. The racing strip habitually favors 
horses with early speed, and sometimes this 

an insuperable edge to horses on the nuL^ 
In recent years, more and more trainers 
have become convinced that tbe Preakness is 


not a fair, tnte race and they have bypassed 
it, even after their horses ran wdl m the 
Kentucky Derby. Tbe 19S2 Derby winner, 
Gato del Sol, was kept away from Pimlico 
because his trainer, Eddie Gre^on, knew his 
stretch-runner would have little chance. 

Caveat skipped tbe 1983 Preakness after 
his third-place finish in the Derby and await- 
ed the Belmont, which he won. His trainer, 
Woodbr Stephens, did the same tins year after 
Strahan’s -Odyssey finished second at Chur- 
chill Downs. Even with the Preakness field 
shaping up as a weak one, Stmhens gave 
little thought to running in it. ‘The Weak- 
ness isn’t his type of race,” he said. 

Bui maybe the defection of Spend a Buck 
and Stephan’s Odyssey and the widespread 
sentiment that a victory in the Preakness 
does not confer everlasting prestige will jolt 
Pimlico's general manager. Chick Lang, into 
an awareness that his beloved race is in big 
trouble. 

■ Roo Art Ont of Preakness 

An injmy apparently received in the 
Preakness Prep has caused the withdrawal of 
Roo Art, the roaming line fourth choice, 
from the Preakness, United Press Interna- 
tional reported from Baltimore. 

Butch Lcnznri, the trainer of Eternal 
Prince, also revealed that a routine change of 
shoes Tuesday uncovered a pus pocket in tbe 
soft part of bis colt’s left front hoof. Eternal 
Prince, second choice at 5-2 in the morning 
line, received a special packing in tbe hoof, 
and a new shoe was put on. 


When West Meets East, 
It’s a New Ball Game 


The Associated Prea 
NEW YORK — Halfway 
through his efforts at picking tm 
pieces of sweet and pungent pork, 
almond chicken and broccoli with 
chopsticks, right-hander Rick 
Womroacber of GW. Post realized 
that his fingers were tired. 

“Be sure to bring dong plastic 
folks,” Wohlmachcr said to a team 
aide. 

The GW. Post baseball team is 
leaving May 31 on a 10-day, five- 
game trip to flhwiB , and Wohl- 
macher may have wondered if tbe 
chopsticks were a way the Chinese 
had devised of reducing the effeo 
tiveness of American pitcheis- 
“They have nothing modi to 


years. ‘Tbe same holds true for the 
caliber of competition we will have. 
I don’t know what to expect 
“Winning is not going to be as 
important as the trip itseO,” Vming 


Voting said his instruction will 
be based on what he finds when be 
gets ta Ghina. “B depends on what 
their attributes are. If it’s speed, 
weU show them about base rtm- 


People to People has arranged 
for a stock of baseballs, gloves, 
bats, spikes and uniforms to be left 
behind when VImng departs. 

The GW. Post players were giv- 
en an introduction to the type of 



NEW JERSEY-SMnsd Dew CWPontsr. 
coo*, to o hwovsor contract ana <Mwn 
Rsscb, booHs, to. sona-vwr contract 
N.Y, HANGERS— Hamad Anders Hodbsru 
naWaii amoral manna. 

.. . COLLNOR . . 

UNIV. OP CALIFORNIA— Nansd EmN 
K«^cwistoKWmDiltortaMtttortb«wtal- 
boll coodns. • 


iireer Hit Leaders 


I Hsssteiri rnrrnr hMorisra 


Soccer 



y L Tv Catto 

4191 

l “ l 1 

. ‘ , t Psto Raw 

4121 

a 

. ' 

-j L Monk Aaron 

jr** ■' tStanMasW 

f t Trf» Spsalcsr 

3771 

300 


3515 


* Honus winner 

3430 


-.‘j - (tart YastmniUd 

3419 


.• - - bkfle CaUlni . . 

• '• J? Willis Mays 

‘T . Nap LnhMs . 

33M 

3283. 

• ' ' 

•am 


i Lou Brock 
. Al KqUm 
. Roberto C hm s nto 


. WORLD CUR^UALIFinNO 
CONCACAF. Group 2 : 

(Sscsnd jtounO 

uaSstf afotof z -TdMobd ood Ttobooo I 
Mtos Steadies: Costa Mas ti Undid 
States 2i TtUUatC and Tobaoo L 
RnaMsB Matcdst; May l^TrWdaa and 
Taboos u*. UfVted State; MaV M. C«to Rleo 
vs.-Undsd Matos; Msnr 71, Undid Stetss vs. 
Caste atom ■ -. • V . 


300 . CONCACAF Grave 4 . 

»W .... ' (Secsod Round) 

30M Gu teo unl a it HotM d 

: dsteansunisi; Cawao7; Gaotamotaa; 
«M HoBIO. . 


baseball for only ft couple of 
years,” said Chen Bacsbu, consul 
for cultural affairs at the Consulate 
General of the People’s Rqniblic of 
China inNew Yonc. 

Baseball, though it comes under 
the heading of cnltwal affair^ is 
not big in China, and since it may 
be an medal sport at the 1988 
Olympics, Chinese officials are 
anxious to start improvmgr 

So when the People to People 
Sports Committee suggested the 
visit by GW. Post, die idea was 
enthns^sticaQy received 

The college, located m suburban 
Greenvale, New Yodc,. is malting 
the first tnp by a umwasity base- 
ball team to China under the ans- 
pices of the People to People orga- 
niratiim. 

When die five games in Bming. 
andTiaapn are ova. Coach Dick 
Vicing noil remain in Ghina for a 
month to icach the fundamentals 
of the game. 

“I haven’t tiie slightest idea what 
to expect, whether it wfil be fifce . 
teaching little Leaguers, high 
school playas, orwhat,” said Vm- 
in^ who has been coadnng for 30 


inghmeh ala Chinese restauranL 
Jimmy Sung, the owner, also gave 
them ft qtnek 1fli*ghMg e lnypn — 

howto say in Qmesenharik you," 
“how are youT and “goodbye" — 
and, “So you won’t go hungry,” a 
lesson on how to handle the diop- 


~ ! . J* 



.■•a. 

-«• - *?■■■ 


* * 



“It’s ft challenge,” Wohlmadber 
said, passing up thefods that were 
available for those who' needed 
more work with the chopsticks. ' 

Wahhnaeher, a senior, has rwyw- 
ered from a pulled muscle and has a 
3-1 record fra GW. Post which 
finish ed first in the Metropolitan 
Conference with a 28-9 record.- 

“Ifs going to he really srane- 
thing,” he said of thefrip, “ftnit 
will be nerve wradting for me be- 
cause tbe basebaG cdkgc player 
draft w£Q be bdd white were -in 
China.” 

Wohlmachec, who used afastbaOL 
and dider to post a 12-2 record in 
the twoycars since bring converted 
from hd outfidder, said he has been 
watched by several scouts and has 
bad some inquiries from a scooting 
system. 

To the Chinese, he will be the 
best they have ever seen. 



V._,r <■ a »■ < tr • 


■ • . "C. -I 


Chicago’s Rudy Law (fid not see tag by Baltimore’s Eddie Murray, bnt felt he was safe 


| Mike Davis 

: the game, saw Kirk Gibson hit a 
; two-run homer in tbe ninth to send 
i tins game into extra innings. 

Yankees 6, Rangers 5 
In New York, with runners on 
, first and third, one out in the 10th 
' and the infield playing in. Butch 
' Wyneg&r bounced a ball toward 
• first. Texas first baseman Pete 
' O’Brien, who had handled 311 
chances without an error this sea- 
> son, charged in and had a play at 
the plate. But he fumbled the ball 
and Dave Winfield score, tbe Yan- 
kees winning their third straight. 

Mariners 7, Red Sox I 
In Boston, Mark Langston 
: walked seven batters in seven in- 
nings but the only hit he gave up 
was the first mri or league home run 
for rookie causer Marc Sullivan, 
while Gorman Thomas. Alvin Da- 
vis and Jim Presley homered for 
Seattle. 

WMte Sox 5, Orioles 2 
In Chicago, Greg Walker hit a 
three-rim homer with one out in tbe 
eighth to beat Baltimore and give 
pitcher Tom Seaver his 292d vic- 
tory in the majors. 

Despite a 33-minute rain delay 
in the fourth, Seaver, 40, gave up 
only four hits in right innings. 

Royals 5, Indians 1 
In Cleveland, the Indians gladly 
would have settled for their first 
postponement this season, but the 
43-minute rain rally delayed their 
third consecutive loss after Kansas 
City’s Steve Balboni hit a two-nm 
homer in the second inning . 

Angels 9, Bine Jays 6 
__ In Toronto, Jerry Narron hit a 
ranch-hit grand slam homer off re- 
hef ace Bill Caudill with two out in 
the ninth during a six-run rally that 
gave California its victory. 

Reds 2, Expos 1 

In the National League, in Mon- 
treal, Cincinnati’s Joe Price came 
out of the bullpen for his first start 
this season and held the Expos to 
three hits in eight inning s striking 
out eight, while Eddie Milner ana 
Dave Parker hit two-out, run-scor- 
ing singles in the fifth and player- 
manager Pete Rose went 2-for-4. 

Cardinals 14, Padres 4 
In San Diego. Jack Clark ho- 
mered and doubled, driving in four 
runs, as Sl Louis won easfly behind 
IS hits. The Cardinals opened the 
game with four consecutive bits 
and took a 6-0 l e a d that timing 

Braves 3, PhDBes 2 
Going into the ninth inning hi 
Atlanta, the Braves were abont to 
be shut out for the fifth time in 
their last seven games. But pinch- 
hitter Ken OberkfeU singled and 
Gerald Perry homered lo make it 2- 
2, and in the I Oth Terry Harper 
homered on the first pitch from 
Kent Tekulve. 

Pirates 3, Giants 2 
In San Francisco, Scott Garrdts, 
picked as the league’s player of the 
week for the previous wear, walked 
Pittsburgh’s Jason Thompson on a 
3-and-2 pilch with the bases loaded 
in the ninth to force in the winning 
run. 

Mets 5, Astros 3 
In Houston, Danny Heep, who 
proved again to be a capable re- 
placement for the injured star Dar- 

S 1 Strawberry, homered to help 
ew York win fra the eighth time 
in its last nine games. Sunday, 

Heep's two hits helped win a game. 

Cubs 3, Dodgers 2 
In Los Angeles, Scott Sanderaon 
and Lee Smith pitched a five-hitter 
and Ron Cey homered, singled and 
scored twice as Chicago won. 

■ Rader May Lose Job 
Doug Rader is apparently about 
to be fired as manager of (he Texas 
Rangers, The Associated Press re- 
ported. 

Rumors that his job was in jeop- 
ardy were confirmed Wednesday 
night when the New York Mets’ 
third base coach, Bobby Valentine, 
said he had been offered the Texas 
post. Valentine was vo meet Thurs- 
day with ihe Rangers’ manage- 
ment. whose team is 9-22, worst in 
the major leagues. 


Commissioner Sends Teams Drug Test Guidelines 


The Astodtaed Press 

NEW YORK — The commis- 
s oner of major league baseball, Pe- 
ter Ueberroth, has told tbe teams 
that persons caught using drugs un- 
der a mandatory testing program 
will not be punished fra the first, 
offense, the New York /Times re- 
ported in Thursday’s editions. 

Uebexxrah did not say what pen- 
alties he would impose forsny sub- 
sequent positive tests. 


The ne w s pap er said Ueberroth 
sent the 26 major league a 
memo con taining guid rinw* fnr hit 
drug-testing program that will ap- 
ply to ah bas&aU personnel except 
major league players. 

The Times said it obtained the 
guidelines from an nffirial of an 
unnamed team. The guidelines 
contained three baric provisions: 

• “The privacy concerns of all 
individuals will be respected and 


protected. Tbe actual testing, test- 
ing procedures and any needed 
counseling or other follow-up will 
be handled by competent profes- 
sionals. 

• ‘There win be no penalties im- 
posed for an initial positive test 
result. Our concern is to hdp the 
individuals who need help. 

• ‘‘Counseling and, if necessary, 
treatment will be provided on an 


immediate and steady basis fra 
anyone who may require iL” 

Tbe players' union has strongly 
opposed mandatory urine testing 
fra drugs, saying it presumes gum 
until innocence is proven and that, 
it invades a players privacy. 

Ueberroth said he formulated’ 
the drug policy in part because of 
his concern that “illegal drug use 
inevitably involves contact with 
criminals” and “gambling.” 





Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1985 


OBSERVER 

Drifting and Dreaming 


The Hinckleys: Going Public 


By Russell Baker of a menace lurking in a piich-dark With Book, Nonprofit Fund They Wage War on Mental IUneu 


"VT EW YORK — After a layoff computer 

? recently re- Note i 


pun«I dreaming. I didn't p lan to It 

If 1 , happened. If there had been a 
cnoice, I would have said, “No, I 
did dreaming a long time ago and 
didn timichQkeiL.ihankS-rd rath- 
er just sleep on through.” 

blow that ft has started again it 
seems, tf anything, duller than ever, 
with the usual characters, places, 
situations: 

Recalled to Navy flight duty I 
am taking off from a carrier deck 
when it occurs to me that I haven’t 

flown a plane for 4n VMrV Hoira 


Note that I am capable of 
dreaming of menaces lurking in at- 
tics and cellars. This is because I 
have lived in cultures rich in attics 
and cellars. I doubt that New York- 
ers who have lived all their lives in 
apartments can dream of attic or 
cellar menaces. 

The most unlikely dreamer is the 
person who experiences life's most 
delightful moments in dreams long 
before coming in contact with the 
real thing. This person, common- 


completdy forgotten how to do it, 
and, as a matter of fact, never did 
know how to take off from a carri- 
er. 


As this is written, I am still de- 
pressed about the old menace-in- 
the-attic dream (sometimes it's the 
rad menace-in- the-cdlar dream) of 
bst night, it &xs like this: 

While wandering through an un- 
familiar hou& in dead of night, the 
hero discovers that not a single 
light in the house can be turned on, 
then realizes this is the work of an 
evil menace whose job is to terror- 
ize people wandering at night 

through unfamiliar houses by t urn - 

ing off the electricity. 


as a weekend in Puerto Rico or a 
dale with Debbie Reynolds, “1 
have always dreamed of this mo- 
mem.” 

What a lucky person to be able to 
dream in such style. Or is he just 

milting fbrpugh his hat? If instin ct 
tells me be is, it’s because my 
dreams are never about anything 
magically ddighifuL Oh, one may 
start that way now and then. 

O 

For example, there’s one in 
which 1 have just boarded a mag- 
nificent ocean liner — the France, 
the United States, the Queen Mary 
— for one of those luxury trans- 
Atlantic voyages that I dimly recall 


Having done so, the menace is Atlantic voyages that I dimly recall 
now lurking in the attic (sometimes from youth, but which present and 
the cellar!, cacklina about the swell all future generations or world trav- 


tho cellar), cackling about the swell 
trick he has played on the hero. 

These dreams probably explain 
why I gave up dreaming. These 
dreams had worn out their wel- 
come. Now their return mak es me 
fear I am too dull to rank with the 
great dreamers who charm Freud- 
ians. 

I heard recently of such a wom- 
an. She dreamed she was in Heav- 
en. Learning she lives in Queens, 1 
said, “Til bet the Heaven she saw in 


all future generations of world trav- 
elers win never experience. Stew- 
ards are groveling and lackeys are 
bringing me champagne when — — 

What is this? My passport for- 
gotten? Left at borne in the desk? 
And the ship sailing in just seven 
minutes? “Just time to nip back 
home, retrieve your passport and 
get batik on board before we sail," 
says the ca ptain Homeward I fly, 
but why didn't I think of the diffi- 
culty posed by my home being in 


her dream looked a lot like Chicago? And impossible to get a 


Queens.” taxi anywhere. 

□ You know the end of this dream. 

1 have never had any luck getting I return with my passport just in 
a dream staged in a setting totally time to see the great ship steaming 
aliwi to my experience. I have never outward past the Statue of Liberty, 
had a dream take place on the And all my tans of luggage sailing 


moon, for example, and doubt that 
it's possible except for astronauts 
who have beat to the moon. 

1 wouldn’t be surprised, though, 
if those astronauts dream about re- 
entering their moon- landing vehi- 
cle and finding that not a single 
. light bulb can be turned on because 


with her. 

This. I suspect, is the true pur- 
pose of dreaming: not to set you up 
for a waking moment when you can 
happily cry, “1 have always 
d ream ed of this moment!" but only 
to spoil a good night’s sleep. 

New York Tunes Service 


By Glenn Collins 

New York Tima Service 

C HICAGO — It has been a 
while since the name John 
W. Hinckley Jr. was news. His 
father. John Sr_ who is more 
comfortable being called Jack, 
very much liked it that way. So 
did Jack’s wife, Jo Ann. They 
abhorred the notoriety that 
dogged them, linking “the very 
name Hinckley with unpleasant- 
ness,” Mr. Hinckley said. 

But now both of them are go- 
ing public in a big way. “There is 
no way we can undo what hap- 
pened," Mr. Hinckley said of the 
day in March 1981 when his son 
shot President Ronald Reagan 
and three other men. “So,” his 
wife said, “we’re trying to do the 
next best thing, to make some- 
thing good come of it” 

The Hinckleys have derided to 
raise money for research on men- 
tal illness, to increase public 
awareness about the effect of the 
disease on its victims and to 
speak publicly for the families of 
the mentally ilL They have found- 
ed a nonprofit organization, the 
American Mental Health Fund, 
and they are begmning a publici- 
ty tour for a book, “Breaking 
Points” on which they collabo- 
rated with the writer Elizabeth 
SherrOL 

“This is our future.’’ Mrs. 
Hinckley said. “We've co mmi tted 
our lives to iL” 

Mr. Hinckley has retired as an 
oil-business entrepreneur and 
they are trying to sell their house 
in Ever gr ee n , Colorado, so they 
can move to Washington, where 
the mental health fund is based. 

Their book describes warning 
signs of mental illness and gives 
advice to families seeking help. It 
also provides a harrowing ac- 
count of their experiences with 
their son before and after the 
shooting ft recounts their partici- 
pation in the subsequent trial 
and the angry aftermath when 
their son was found not guilty by 
reason of insanity. He has beat in 
maximum security at Sl Eliza- 
beth’s Hospital in Washington 
since June 1982. 

Although most of the hate mail 
has stopped, Mr. Hinckley said, 
some people have used the publi- 
cation of the book to accuse them 



their teen-age years and beyond 

“Only a very small percentage 
of the mentally ill bectmie violent 
or dangerous,” Mr. Hinckley 
said. He added that he believes 
that those found not guilty by 
reason of insanity “should not be 
set loose on the streets, and not 
released until wdL” He said “the 
mum weakness” of the insanity 
defense was “the lack of uniform 
sentencing." 

Mr. Hinckley said he under- 
stood that many might fear die 
release of his son. who wounded 
Reagan; James S. Brady, the 
presidential press secretary; 
Timothy J. McCarthy, a Secret 
Service agem; and Thomas DeU- 


PEOPLE 


Family, Not Profit, Split 


Jo Ann and Jack Hinckley in Washington Airing the triaL 


of capitalizing on their son’s no- 
toriety. “That’s a twisted thought, 
that we would take unfair advan- 
tage of the situation,” he said. 
“All of the proceeds from the 
book are going to our work.” 

“We’re trying to inform people 
about the prevalence of mental 
illness.” Mrs. Hinckley said. 
“Otter f amilies have tried to 
speak out and no one seems to 
listen. But perhaps people will 
listen to us. 

Virtually every aspect of their 
lives has been altered. Hinckleys 
said. “We didn't see how any one 
of us would survive,” Mrs. Hinck- 
ley said of their experiences since 
1981. There was not only the huge 
debt from the trial but also the 
stress, which came dose to unrav- 
eling their marriage, now in its 
39th year. 

The toll they said was also 
severe on the other Hinckley chil- 
dren: Scott, 35, who heads Van- 


derbilt Energy Corp., the ral com- 
pany his father founded in 
Denver; and Diane, 33, who lives 
near Dallas with her husband and 
two children. 

In May 1982. Jack tfinckley 
took the witness stand in his son's 
trial and said “I am the cause of 
John's tragedy” for telling his son 
that he could not live at home. He 
had done so, he said, following a 
treatment plan devised by his 
son’s psychiatrist 

“Yes, 1 still fed I am the cause 
of what happened” Mr. Hmckley 
said “because I told John he'd 
have to fend for himself. And he 
couldn't cope. 1 still think ft was 
the greatest mtaalrg of my life.” 

He added **If mental illness is 
involved hough love’ is the worst 
thing you can do.” He was refer- 

Lhat demands responab^^nd 
self-reliance from children in 


hanty. a Washington police offi- 
cer. The Hinckleys hope John Jr. 
will ultimately be released- “Of 
course, it should not happen until 
he is ready,” Mrs. Hinckley said 
Would they take him into then- 
home? “Sure/’ Mr. Hmddcy said 
“No question,” said his wife. 

They have participated in 
weekly f amity therapy sessions 
with John Jr. for two years during 
the many months they have spent 
in Washington, Mis. Hinckley 
said They fed there has been a 
“noticeable i m p r ov em ent” in 
their son's condition, she said 
The couple strongly denied 
that the motivation for their cur- 
rent efforts, and their book, was 
guilt about their son. “We did 
make mistakes, but we wentto 
doctors and followed their ad- 
vice,” Mr. Hmckley said “We 
haven't tried to place ourselves 
on a gufll trip. We made every 
effort we could” 

Asked about reports in March 
that their son was cooperating 
with a writer in return for 25 
percent of the royalties from a 
book about the assassination at- 
tempt, Mr. Hinckley said, “You 
know as modi about it as we da” 
“If there ever is such a book, 
he'll never receive any money for 
it,” he added referring to the dhtil 
suits filed against John Jr. by 
three of the men he shot Mr. 
Hmckley said the suits, fill 
in litigation, could not succeed 
“because my son doesn’t have 
any assets.” He said reports that 
he was an “oil tycoon" had great- 
ly exaggerated his wealth. 

The book is published by Zon- 
dervan. a house that specializes in 
religious books, and it mentions 
the Hinckleys* strong Christian 
convictions, but it does not em- 
phasize that aspect of their lives. 
“We tried not to make die book 

lock lilfi* swinffiar Ktirn -again ex- 
perience,” Mr. Hmckley said 


A painting that was once passed 
up for $5 at a garage sale has 
caused a rift between two asters: 
One of them sold it for $600,000 
after she learned it was a 17th- 

century wtnk. “The tragedy behind 
the case is that two families were 
tran apart by this,” said Amkuw 
Wiemego, attorney for Isaura Vela 
of Muskegon, Michigan. “This was 
a dose family” but “now they 
don't speak." In January 1984, 
Vda ted the painting “Madonna 
and Child with John the Baptist in 
an Interior” by Gmdo Rod sold at 
a New York auction. It brought 
$600,000 from an unidentified 
London dealer. Last week a county 
jury ruled that Vela’s sister and 
brother-in-law. Francesca and Ce- 
lestmo Alvarado, had no daim to 
the money. The Alvarados, who 
live in a suburb of Grand Rapids, 
Michigan, bad sued Vda, saying 
that they gave hex the painting sev- 


m eat that, if ft wee sold, both 
fanatics would share in the profit 
Vela, who got $370,000 from the 
sale, said there was no such agree- 
ment The Alvarados acq uir ed the 
parting when a religious center in 
Grand Rapids dosed. 

□ 

Process Yasmfn Aly Khan, 35, 
married Bod Emhiricos, 36, heir to 
a Greek shipping fortune, in a pri- 
vate ceremony Wednesday at W 
apartment in New York. A spokes- 
woman said the wedding was earli- 
er than expected because of the 
dadwiing health of Princess Yas- 
min ’s mother, the actress Rita 
Hayworth, who has Alzheimer’s 
disease. Hayworth was too 31 to 
attend but was in her apartment 
next door, where she has lived un- 
der the care of her daughter for 
some years. The spokeswoman said 
Moslem and Greek Orthodox wed- 

in^faris at tte’end of June, when 
the Moslem princess’ half-brother, 
the Aga Khan, will host a reception 
in their honor. 


Leonard Bernste in and Robert 
Pom Warren were given gold med- 
als Wednesday by die American 
Academy and Institute of Arts and 
T-fttprc for tfistingimhftri achieve- 
ment in music and poetry, respec- 
tively, and CUbome PeD was Laud- 
ed for his work on behalf of the arts 
in his 25 years in the U. S. Senate. 
W ifliaw Shawn, editor of The New 


Yorker magazine, received a sp®* J 
dal citation for service in the arts. ; 
Ml. Democrat of Rhode island,-, 
was the principal Senate sponsor of | 

the Iot establishing the National ■ 
Endowments for the Arts and Hu- ; 
inanities in 1966 Bernstein. 1 

65. who has been working on a new 

composition and has not appeareV 
in concert for nearly six months, 
will conduct two Wagner concerts 
May 21 and 23 at the Vienna State 
Opera during the Vienna music fes- 
tival . . . The soprano Leontyne 
Price, who retired from the Metro- 
politan Opera earlier this year, was 
presented with New York’s highest 
cultural award, the Handel Medal- 
lion, and broke into a few bara of “1 
Love New York" after receivi ng 
the award from Mayor Edward L 
Koch. . . . Benny Goodman sur- 
prised guests at a (tinner in his 
honor by picking up a clarinet to 
join in a rendition of “Body jafJ 
SouL" Goodman, 75, went to Chi- 
cago rat Tuesday sight to receive a 
Hull House Association Distin- 
guished Service Award for his work 
with the social service organization. 
Goodman, who grew up on Chica- 
go's West Side, received his first 
clarinet lessons at the original Hull 
House. . . . CSty officials in New- 
port News, Vir ginia, where Peart 
Bailey was born, have decided to 
name a new public library after the 
singer. 

□ 

In appearances together on tfle 
three major U. S. television net- 
works, Gary Dotson and CatWeeu 
Webb repeated Wednesday that he 
(fid not rape her in 1977. “I hold no 
bitterness toward ha,” Dotson 
said of Webb, whose charge that he 
abducted and raped her in 1977 
seal him to prison for six years. On 
Sunday, Governor James R. 
Thompson of RHnnis commuted 
Dotson’s prison sentence to time 
served after Webb recanted the 
rape charge last month. Mean- 
while, Dotson’s attorney. Warren 
Lupd, said Dotson had received 41 
offers from producers interested in 
making a television movie based cri 
his story. Dotson and Webb, wB 
sai^ they ted not met in public 
before a meeting Tuesday night at a 
Manhattan hold, shook hands on 
, camera at the urging of Pbytfis 
George of CBS's ’Today” show. 
The two also appeared on the 
“Good Morning America” show 
and “The CBS Morning News.” 


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