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The Global News 

Edited m Fktjafy?*. ^ 
Printed Sjmuhanfcjfeglf 
in Paris, London, T 
Hone Kfing, Singapore, 
Hie Hague and Marseille 



INTERNATIONAL 


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WEATHER DMA APPEAR ON PAGE 18 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,802 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Israel Swaps 1,150 Prisoners, 
Terrorists for 3 oi Its Soldiers 


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‘‘ annJ' yvnsozi rnmi uapm ma ismrf fey the United States for a the occupied West Bank and Gaza 

L*a2; GENEVA — Israel exchanged 1981 bombing that kffled two per- scrip. 

2*’^ L^pns^^^WhKfii^sCHDeno- sons in the Israeli-occupied West • One hundred fifty prisoners 
' . torious convicted terrorists, for Bank. Red Cross officials cod- who woe brocght to Israel 

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the Red Gross. for release at the airport and the 

Ik exchange between Israel and return home to I srael. 


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torious convicted terrorists, for Bank. Red Cross officials can- 
three captured Israeli soldiers on firmed Mr. Okamoto’s release, 
f'id ' ‘ w v 01 20 operation supervised * The three Israeli soldiers were 

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The Red Cross identified the 
three Israeli soldiers in the ex- 
change as Heti Shai, 'Yosef Gross 
and NisrimShalem, all in their ear- 
ly 20s. They were captured during 
the Israeli invasion Of Lebanon in 
1982 and were held in Damascus 
by the Popular Front. 

The Israrff rmHtaiy command 
announced in Td Aviv that the 

_ prisoners were released in three 

at td Aviv’s Lod groups totaling 1,150: 

• Eight hundred seventy- nine 
“security prisoners" bdd in Israel 


the Popular Front for Liberation of 

a 

_ ,was 

arranged by the Red Cross and 
involved daylong transcontinental 
shuttles spanmng-three continents 
A Palestinian spokesman said 

that 394 prisoners flown to Geneva 
from Israel for the exchange in- 
cluded Kozo Okamoto, 37, one oT 
three p?Hiiwn responsible for kill- 




mg 2b cj 

Airport in 1972. and 23ad Abu 
Eian, a Palestinian extradited to 


after the closure of the 
Army’s Ansar camp in southern 
Ijchanon. 

• One hundred twenty-one pris- 
oners who remained ' in ' Israeli 
hands after previous prisoner ex- 
changes with the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization and Syria in 
1983 and 1984. 

- The prisoner exchange ran into 
long delays because of lack of space 
on the aircraft and distrust between 
the two sides. Red Cross officials 
said. 

Alain Modoox. a Red Cross 
spokesman, said Red Cross offi- 
cials were forced to wait for long 
periods before bong allowed to 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


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LM — Thousands of 
civil servants returned to 
work Monday after an 18-day 
strike rhaf could damage the ruling 
■>>ii *uv Social Democrats' election pros- 
L\7 oj.- r‘ pects. . 

After the country’s worst pay 
dispute with public workers, the 
civil servants’ union reached agree- 
ment with state employers early 
Monday on a 2-percent raise in. 
addition to a 1985 increase already 
agreed on. 

Commercial flights resumed as 
air traffic controllers reported for 
duty for the first time since the 
strike began. More than 100 gov- 
ernment agencies reopened and 
customs officers started clearing 


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Union leaders said the settle- 
ment owed much to intervention by 
_ Prime Minister Olof Palme, who 
^llfij^yhad helped to get the negotiations 
restarted. . ‘ 

Tte- strike ptffihe govenmjeot. 
which faces an dection in 'Septem- 
ber, in the postion of choosing 
between the necessity of curbing 
inflation and the need to maintain 
good relations with the trade union 
movement, where its power base 
lies. 


Tbe ihree Isradi sohfiers, in t(» photo, who were freed m the prisoner 
exchange waited Monday in Damascus for their idease. From left, 
they are Yosef Gross, Heri Shai and Nissan Shatem. At Ben-Gorion 
anportrnear Tel-Awr, so m e- o f fee- prisoner s released fry- Isra el, (h e ir 


hands manacled with plastic bands, boarded a plane for Geneva. Among 
those freed were Kozo Okampto, a Japanese terrorist, at left above. 



Kohl Tempers 
His Support 
Of SDI Research 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Past Service 

BONN — Chancellor Helmul 
Kohl toned down Monday his ear- 
lier endorsement of President Ron- 
ald Reagan's Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative. calling it a risk as well as an 
opportunity for the Western alli- 
ance. 

In a speech to North Atlantic 


Treaty Organization legislators in 
in. Mr. Kohl stud he could 


Stuttgart, 
not predict whether the program 
would prove to be “an alternative 
means of preventing war and a way 
to reduce dependence on nuclear 
weapons." 

“SDI means opportunity and 
risk for the North Atlantic alliance 
at the same time," he said. 

During President Reagan's visit 
to West Germany this month. Mr. 
Kohl expressed strong support for 
research on the space-based de- 
fense project and indicated that his 
government was favorably inclined 
to participate in the five-year, $26- 
biliion program. 

Mr. Kohl's ambivalence ap- 
peared to reflect a desire not to 
distance West Germany from its 
European partners, particularly 
President Francois Mitterrand of 
France. Mr. Mitterrand has reject- 
ed participation in research in the 
Reagan project as currently de- 
fined and is promoting a European 
project, known as Eureka, to accel- 
erate space and high-technology re- 
search for civ ilian purposes. 

The West German government 
has continued to advocate a joint 
European approach to the Reagan 
program, but different reactions in 
various capitals have made a uni- 
fied European position increasing- 
ly unlikely. 

The chancellor sought to deny 
(hat Bonn was torn between alle- 
giance to Paris and Washington. 

“The of tenanted dilemma of 
choosing between Paris and Wash- 
ington does not exist for us," Mr. 
Kohl said in his speech to the 
North Atlantic Assembly. “My re- 
lationship with President Mitter- 
rand and our contacts with Fiance 
are dose and full of Uusl" 

He contended that West Germa- 
ny “accepts and sup ports" the 
Frcnchmca oT pooling European 
resources in a research program. 

But Mr. Kohl added that “the 



Helmut Kohl 


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Moscow ’s 380,000 Troops in East Germany: An Unloved, Unseen Presence 


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mined the Soda! 
to be: the only party that could 
handle the unions. 

Mr. JRabne said on radio that he 
believed the electorate still had 
confidence in his government. 
‘The government has shown that it 
is not afraid to govern," hesakt 

Opposition leaders criticized die 
government for its handling of the 
dispute and for agreeing last year 
to an inflation compensation 
clause that allowed the rivil ser- 
vants to seek extra money in 1985. 

Lars Tbtnsson, deputy chairman 
'of the Gmservative Party, said, 
"First the government spirited a 
conflict through clumsy behavior 
and now it is trying to claim credit 
for settling it." 

The dispute began with selective, 
strikes by 20,000 workers on May 
2, which halted air traffic and 
closed customs offices at ail but a 
Tew ports. 

Stale employers, rgecting the 
strikers' demands for a 3.1-percent 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Past Service 

BERLIN —In East Germany, they are everywhere 
and nowhere. 

The 3801,000 Soviet troops basedLin East Germany 
foqn the highest txmcentralkm of foreign soldiers in 
any European countiy. ’ 

Posted on the front line of the East-West divide, 
they serve in the vanguard of Moscow’s extension of 
iriflitaiy power, as well as offer insurance for the 
political legitimacy of local Communist authorities. 

.Yet jhe Guards of the-Regirocat, as JSpviet troops in 
East bloc nations are known, aregeberaHy regarded by 
their allies as an unloved occupation force tamer than 
brothers in arms. They are held in scarcely concealed 
contempt by many East Gormans, but discussion of 
their presence remains taboo. 

They are rarefy seen in public, but occaaoaalfyj 
dusters of Soviet soldiers, conspicuous in their brown 
uniforms and with Slavic or Asian faces, -venture out 
to visit war memorials. Fraternization with the local 
population, however, is scrupulously avoided. 

Harald Rneddenklau, a Soviet mflitaiy authority at 


the German Sodely for Foreign Policy, said: “The 
typical Soviet soldier in East Germany lives as if he 
were in a cage. He makes no contact with the East 
German population, nor do the Germans want any." 
The German Society for Foreign Policy is a West 
German tlrink lank. • V " ' " • ’ 

In terms of the military calculus of East-West rela- 
tions, the 20 Soviet divisions in East Germany also 
presait one of the more critical yet enigmatic factors 
in the amorphous equation known as the European 
balance of power. 


- Western intelligence officials said the move was 
largely cosmetic and that the number of troops and 


weapons deployed by foe Russians in Eart Germany 
sd foe com bin 


The Gamp of Soviet Farces in . Germany, fodr 
Official title, fornr foe Sovk( Union’s largest and best- 




East 


contingent abroad. The troops in 
are supposedly better educated than 


most Soviet soldiers, and they are armed with the 
latest models of tanks, fighter-bombers and helicop- 
ters in the Soviet arsenal, according to Western intelli- 
gence sources and other experts. . 

In a purported good-will gesture .five years ago (Hi 
the 30fo anniversary of the German Democratic Re- 
public, Soviet ground forces in East Germany were cut 
by up 


up to 20,000 troops and 1,000 tanks. 


still exceed the combined forces of Britain* France and 
the United States in West Germany. 

Despite the sensitive nature of Soviet faces in East 
Germany, the three Western allies have been able to 
conduct daily patrols, tantamount to legally sanc- 
tioned espionage, by their 14-member military liaison 
missions based in Potsdam, outside East Berlin. 

Under 1947 accords regulating occupied Germany, 
the Soviet Union is aBowed.to maintain three similar 
missioiis accredited to the fonner'U^, French and 
British sectors in what is now West Germany. 

As they roam across foe German countryside in cars 
crammed with sophisticated listening devices and in- 
frared cameras, foe liaison teams are said to accumu- 
late what is considered the best on-site intelKgeDce 
available in central Europe. 

' The Soviet and Western commands declare some 
areas off-limits to the liaison nusaons. 

Such restrictions are not necessarily obeyed. Both 
Soviet and Western units are known to bend foe rules 


to get a closer look at maneuvers, missile rites or 
ultramodern weaponry. 

In March, Major Arthur D. Nicholson Jr., 37, a 
Russian-speaking member of the US. liaison team, 
was shot and killed by a Soviet sentry while photo- 
graphing Soviet mflitaiy equipment through the win- 
dow of a shed near Ludwjgslust. 

UJS. officials contend that Major Nicholson was at 
least 300 yards (274 meters) away from a restricted 
zone, but the Soviet Union insists that he was within a 
forbidden zone and (hat the sentry who shot him 
followed acceptable procedures. 

Despite the uproar that ensued, both U.S. and 
Soviet military commanders have made known their 
desire to prevent the shooting from jeopardizing the 
liaison missions, whose espionage work offers unique 
early-warning notice erf unusual troop movements that 
would otherwise trigger alarm about an invasion. 

The mflitaiy liaison teams also have been able to 
develop a good personality profile of the Soviet sol- 
diers stationed there, and foe assessment of them is 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


search remains on the table as well, 
and Europe will have to dal w ith 
this technological, political and 
strategic challenge from the U S." 

West Germany's final decision 
on whether to join the Reagan re- 
search project "will be guided by 
West German, European and alli- 
ance interests" along with “careful 
consideration of the state of East- 
West relations." Mr. Kohl said. 

The chancellor's careful com- 
ments seemed to reflect disparate 
opinions within his government. 
His senior advisers are known to 
favor participation in the U.S. pro- 
gram. while the foreign and defense 
ministries have raised occasional 
doubts. 

Foreign Minister Hans- Dietrich 
Genscher has voiced support for 
Eureka and warned that space- 
based defense plans were incom- 
patible with detente and were 
blocking hope for progress at the 
Geneva arms talks. 

Bonn [dans to send government 
and industry specialists to Wash- 
ington soon to ascertain what kind 
of role in the Reagan project could 
be played by West German compa- 
nies. 

More than 30 companies have 
been identified by the West Ger- 
man Defense Ministry as possible 
'contributors to' foe program. Two 
optical companies, Zeiss and Leitz, 
are said to be world leaders in foe 
field of optic sensors, while the 
aeronautics company Messer- 
schmilt-Bolkow-Blohm is one of 
the top manufacturers of space 
sub-systems. 

Mr. Kohl intends to meet with 
President Mitterrand in Bonn on 
May 28 in an attempt to reconcile 
their views on the UiL and Europe- 
an ventures. 

A senior policymaker in Bonn 
said that foe Kohl government was 
concerned about the projected ex- 
pense of foe Eureka program be- 
cause West Germany probably 
would be asked to assume foe ma- 
jor burden. The appeal of the Rea- 
gan project, he said, is that “the 
Americans seem prepared to foot 
foe entire bill." 

In a gentle admonition to U.S. 
delegates at the session, Mr. Kohl 
said that any demand by Congress 
to withdraw troops from Europe if 
the allies did not increase their de- 
fense spending would be “inconsis- 
tent with American security inter- 
ests and would send the wrong 
signals to foe East." 


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additional raise, retaliated on Mag ~|^ JFollOWS 


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public employees, indndmg more 

than 20,000 teachers. O TB K B 

Union officials said the settle- 

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raises from white-collar 
ers in private business and in- 
dustry and m local government and 
lead to a surge in inflation. 

The government has conceded 
that it will not achieve its target of 
cutting the rate erf inflation to 3 
percent in 1985 from 82 percent 
last year. It came under fire last 
week when it was forced to put into 
effect an austerity package to hah a 



worsening in foe balance of pay- 
tflow 


meats and to stem allege ou 
of money. 


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INSIDE 


■ Black Americana are increas- 
ingly moving from inner dries 
to the suburbs. P*ge5, 


■ The Israeli cabinet an- 
nounced steps aimed at stem- 
ming the country’s economic 
slide. - Paged. 


■ fat Thai camps, the hopes of. 
many Vietnamese and Cambo- 
dian refugees fade. ' Pag® 7. 



BUSINESS/FINANCE 
■ U5. disposable personal in- 
come rose a record 19 percent 
last month. - Page 1L 


TOMORROW 


Has foe United States been get- 
ting its money's worth inpeace- 
time mflitaiy speeding? First of 
a tom-part series examining 
Pentagon policies -and military 
contractors’ practices, ' 


Reuter* 

BEIJING — Rioters in 
attacked foreigners and i 
linemen after China’s World 
soccer defeat Sunday, and foe Ber- 
ing Evening News said city leaden 
Monday for dire punish- 
ment. . ;• 

Communist' Party and govem- 
ment. officials ^hdd an emergency 
meeting as ’glass was cleared from 
the streets - where sc reamin g fans 
had surrounded foreigners in their 
care and smashed foe windows with 
bricks and bottiesi 

The youths attacked at least 10 
fortagnert as their cars left the sta- 
dium. Hong Kong won foe game, 

2-1, and eftnhuM China fmrn the 

cop. No fareignas were badly hurt. 

The rioters stopped three bnses, 
forcing Chinese passengers to flee, 
overturned a taxi and toppled a 



U.S. Starts Broadcasts; Cuba Suspends 2 Accords 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Radio 
Marti, foe UR government station 
designed to broadcast to Cuba, 
went on foe air Monday. Cuba 
promptly retaliated by canceling an 
immigration accord, trymg to jam 


station for Jas£ Marti, a Cuban 
patriot, was a “gross insult" 

The Cuban broadcast said that 
“relations with the United States 
would be more difficult for a long 
lime " and that the introduction of 
Radio Marti would “impede the 


and Cuba," but did not specify 
what that meant 


foe radio signal and threatening possibility of progress in bilateral 
that relations between Havana and matters.” 


Washington would worsen. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes. said that the Caban 
government also had suspended an 
agreement to return to foe United 
States any hijackers who divert air- 
linen to Cuba. 

W illiam A. RusseD J a spokes- 
man for the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission, said foal within 
hours of the first broadcast from 
Radio Martfs Washington studio, 
U-S. monitoring stations detected a 
tone being transmitted from Cuba 


It also said that foe Cuban gov- 
ernment would “adopt additional 
measures relating to foe communi- 
cations between foe United States 


In December, in the first major 
diplomatic accord between Cuba 
and foe United States in seven 
years, the two countries agreed that 
2.746 people who the US. authori- 
ties said were not acceptable as 
immigrants would be returned to 
Cuba. 


grants can enter foe United States 
each year in return for th? repatria- 
tion io Cuba of the "undesirable" 
Cubans in U.S. prisons and mental 
health facilities. As many as 3,000 
Cuban political prisoners were ex- 
pected to arrive in the United 
States this year. 


The agreement stipulates that a 
maximum of 20,000 Cuban imrai- 


The unacceptable immigrants, 
most of whom arrived during the 
so-called Marie! bootlifi of 1980, 


(Continued on P age 2, CoL 5) 


Aspin Says Pentagon 
Got 'Unplanned’ Billions 


on foe same frequency. 
It was sot known if t 


the tone had 


A Beijing taxi damaged by rioting soccer fans. 


prevented any Cubans from Hsten- 
fio Marti. 


police traffic box. 

The paper quoted city officials as 
saying that foe not “blots the image 
of foe Chinese people. Such things 
absolutely- cannot be allowed to 
happen infoe capital.” 

It quoted foe officials as adding, 
“We must use grave measures to 
deal with this small number of 
trpublemakmg hooligans." 


er publicized incidents of soccer 
violence. 

The Beijing paper said a number 
of police had been hit and injured 
Sunday as they cleared the crowds. 
A wedge of police with batons . 


were jeering, spitting or throwing 
stones. ■ 

The mood of foe crowd, some of 
whom shouted “Foreigners! For- 
eigners!" before stoning the pass- 
ing cats, evoked the 19o6-76 


_ j oiuticn, which China's leaders now 

Police said Sunday foc^had tenn a disaster. 


no 


Sunday was not the first time 
hinesetensl 


Chinese fans have run wild after ah 
international ^sports event. Police 


made a number of arrests, 
details were available. 

Although foe dly government 
said daly a small number of the 
80,000 fans at foe game caused the 
Hgmagp thousands of young peo- 


airested50 fan? after? 1980 soccer ' pie remained in two main streets 
match . against Britain's Norwich outride the stadium when the riot 
Oty and there have rince-beenozh- broke out, and several- hundred 


Since 1983 Hum has been ap- 
ng severe penalties h deal with 
it the leadership sees as a crime 
wave, especially among young pco- 

. Foreign junsts estimate that sav- 


ing to Radio 

Radio Havana, monitored in Mi- 
ami, re por ted that the Cuban gov- 
ernment was terminating a Dec. 14 
immigratiou agreement with foe 
United States in response to the 
start of foe new station. 

“The Cuban government has de- 
cided to suspend all kinds of pro- 
ceedings relating to foe execution 
of immigration?’ Radio Havana 
sakL In addition,, the broadcast 
said, Cuban- Americans would be 
barred from traveling to Cuba. 

Radio Havana called foe debut 
of Radio Marti “cynical and pro- 
vocative" because it began trans- 


By Charles Mohr 

Nck York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Because the 
Reagan administration Overesti- 
mated inflation. Congress appro- 
priated $18 billion to $50 trillion 
more than needed for Defense De- 
partment programs in foe last four 
years, according to Representative 
Les Aspin. chairman of foe House 
Aimed Services Committee. 


eral tho usand people have been emitting on the anniversary of Ca- 
sbot tor hooliganism, rape, robbery ban indepen d e n ce from Spain, It 
and murder. also Mid that foe naming of foe 


Mr. Aspin described the funds as 
an “unplanned" and “secret" divi- 
dend for the Pentagon. 

The Wisconsin Democrat said he 
did not suggest any wrongdoing on 
foe part erf foe Defense Depart- 
ment- In a letter, be asked the secre- 
tary of defease, Caspar W. Wein- 
berger, to cooperate in seeking “a 

more rational and fair system 9 to 
deal with theatuation. 

William H. Taft 4th, foe deputy 


secretary of defense; said in a writ- 
ten statement Sunday foal Mr. As- 
pin was correct in saying foal bil- 
lions of dollars were involved. 
However, he said that the Pentagon 
had made a "remarkable achieve- 
ment" in spending less money than 
expected, which he attributed to 
belter management and to Reagan 
administration success in control- 
ling inflation. 

Mr. Aspin said that Congress did 
not have enough information to 
calculate predsdy the extra money 
that the Pentagon had received be- 
cause of faulty inflation predic- 
tions. However, he used Pentagon 
statistics to argue that fra the por- 
tion of annual military budgets de- 
voted to such items as operations, 
maintenance and mflitaiy con- 
struction, $18.2 billkm had bees 



Les Aspin 


He t ook t his figure as his mini- 
mum es tim a te . Saying inflation 
also had been overestimated for 
appropriated to meet inflation lev- such functions as buying weapons 
ds that did not materialize: . (Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


I 




Page 2 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Pfl _ 

r Soviet Asks the U.S., at Talks, 
l For Most-Favored Trade Status 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW —The Soviet foreign 
trade minister, Nikolai S. Patoli- 
chev. said Monday at the first top- 
level trade meeting with the Untied 
States in seven years that the Soviet 
Union would like most-favored- na- 
tion status to help balance com- 
merce between the two nations. 

The meeting of the U.S.- 
U.S.S.R- Joint Commerce Com- 
mission was opened by Mr. Patoli- 
chev and Commerce Secretary 
Malcolm Baldrige, wbo later met 
*for more than two hours in the 
Kremlin with the Soviet leader, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 


Mr. Baldrige's spokesman, BJ. 
Cooper, and the U.S. Embassy 
spokesman, Jaroslav Vemer, said 
that no details of the talks between 
Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Baldrige 
would be released, at least until 
Tuesday. 

Asked about the focus of their 
talks. Mr. Vemer said. “I cannot 
characterize them.” 

In an opening address to the 
commission. Mr. Patolichev com- 
plained that U.S.-Soviet trade 
heavily favors the United States 
and that denial of most-favored- 
patioii status was a major factor in 
the imbalance. Such a status "pro- 


Europe Must Unify, End 
East- West Rift , Pope Says 


United Press International 

BRUSSELS — Pope John Paul 
II appealed Monday to Europeans 
to intensify their search for unity 
and to work toward the elimination 
of Easi-West divisions. 

In two speeches Monday, the 
pontiff also demanded greater re- 
spect for Human life; which he said 
ruled out experimentation on hu- 
man embryos, and said terrorism 
“must absolutely be banned.” 

The pope also said that conflict 
loomed because of the “enormous 
discrepancy between rich and poor 
countries and the increasing invest- 
ment in weapons of mass extermi- 
nation. 

Europeans cannot submit to the 
division of their continent, be told 
representatives of the European 
Community, including several for- 
eign ministers. “The countries 
which for different reasons do not 
belong to your institutions should 
be included in the fundamental de- 
sire for unity. 

In a speech earlier to King Bau- 
douin of Belgium and 120 members 


of the diplomatic corps, the pope 
ruled out interference with the hu- 
man embryo. 

“It must not be subjected to ex- 
periments as if it were an object,” 
be said. 

The pope told the EC representa- 
tives that “the ease with which sci- 
ence Interferes with biological pro- 
cesses may lead to fatal 
aberrations.” 

Nearing the end of an ll-day 
tour of the Benelux nations, the 
pope called in bis speech to the EC 
diplomats for “a great human 
plan” to combat injustice and in- 
still respect for human dignity, 
which be said presupposes the 
eliminat ion of torture and political 
imprisonment. 

“Dignity is also the refusal of 
any compromise whatsoever with 
terrorism, which uses the lives and 
possessions of innocent men as 
means,” he said. 

“Terrorism, for whatever mo- 
tives, must absolutely be banned by 
humanity, thanks to a true agree- 
ment between a II nations," he said. 


vides that a nation does not have a 
tariff disadvantage. 

The Jackson- Vanik amendment 
to the U.S. Trade Reform Act of 
1974 prohibits the Soviet Union 
from receiving the special designa- 
tion. U.S. officials have said the 
amendment is unlikely to be re* 
sanded until the Soviet Union lib- 
eralizes its policy on Jewish emigra- 
tion. 

“There is a sharp imbalance in 
bilateral trade as die Soviet Union 
has run up a large deficit,” Mr. 
Patolichev was quoted by the offi- 
cial news agency Tass as idling the 
commission. 

“It has been caused in large mea- 
sure by tbe fact that the ILSjSJR. 
does not enjoy a most -favored-na- 
tion treatment in trade with the 
U.SkA. The agrarian and raw mate- 
rials baas of trade does not accord 
to the potentialities of the two 
countries, other.” 

Trade volume between the Unit- 
ed States and the Soviet Union in 
1984 was about $3-3 bfllion, with 
Soviet imports accounting for most 
of the total, according to U.S. and 
Soviet figures. Grain and other ag- 
ricultural imports constituted most 
of the Soviet purchases. 

Mr. Patolichev also alluded to 
U.S. embargoes imposed to protest 
the 1979 Soviet intervention in Af- 
ghanistan and Poland’s crackdown 
on the Solidarity independent trade 
union. 

“What we need is confidence 
that tbe signed contracts wiD be 
fulfilled in their entirety,” he said. 

The Tass account did not give 
d etails of Mr. Baldrige's address to 
the commission. 

The trade talks continue Tues- 
day and are expected to focus on 
opportunities for broader trade in 
manufactured items, including 
food-processing equipment, con- 
sumer goods, petrochemicals, pulp 
and paper and pollution-control 
equipment. 


'Unplanned’ Billions for Pentagon 


(Continued from Page 1) 
and paying for fuel, Mr. Aspin said 
the total surplus might be $50 bil- 
lion. 

The largely unnoticed inflation 
cushion probably will be an issue 
when the full House of Representa- 
tives debates its budget resolution. 
The House Budget Committee vot- 
ed last week to hold tbe military 
budget for the Fiscal year 1986 to 
the same level as this year, with no 
allowance for inflation. 

Administration officials asserted 
this was irresponsible and damag- 
ing to national security. The Sen- 


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ate’s budget resolution permits mil- 
itary spending to rise by the 
administrations estimate of infla- 
tion. 

Mr. Taft’s statement said. “We 
have already returned to tbe tax- 
payer billions of dollars we have 
not spent” 

Mr. Weinberger used somewhat 
different phrasing in an appear- 
ance on a television interview pro- 
gram when asked about such sur- 
plus funds. “We give it back and 
ask that it be applied 4onext year ” 
he said. 

A staff member from the House 
Armed Services Committee, who 
spoke on tbe condition that he not 
be identified, said that, in fact, very 
little unspent money was returned 
to tbe Treasury. In some cases, he 
said. Congress is made aware of 
some of the inflation overestimates 
and then is able to reduce future 
military appropriations according- 
ly- 

The staff member said that this 
amounted to “only a fraction” of 
the total money involved. He esti- 
mated that tbe total surplus from 
lower inflation reported to Con- 
gress annually varied from $1 bil- 

EC Signing in Madrid, Lisbon 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — The treaty ad- 
mitting Spain and Portugal into the 
European Community will be 
signed at formal ceremonies June 
12 in Madrid and Lisbon, an EC 
spokesman said Monday. 


TVE INTERNATIONAL 
MANAGER 

A WEEKLY GUIDE BY SHERRY BUCHANAN 
WBDNESOAY INTt-EIHT 


lion to S2 billion, a figure much 
lower than those put forth by Mr. 
Aspin. 

Several members of ihe Senate 
Armed Services Committee ex- 
pressed anger last week when Mr. 
Weinberger, in an attempt to stave 
off reductions in or dinunation of 
any major weapon-buying pro- 
grams. reported that tbe Pentagon 
had found $1.7 billion in inflation- 
caused surpluses in the current fis- 
cal year and $35 billion in unspent 
contingency funds and other cate- 
gories. 

The senators, including some 
conservative backers of high mili- 
tary spending, said that Mr. Wein- 
berger had damaged his credibility, 
if only by the timing of his disclo- 
sure. 

Mr. Aspin suggested that to 
make inflation predictions more 
accurate, each appropriation 
should be calculated on the infla- 
tion that occurred in tbe previous 
year. 

In his speech, Mr. Aspin noted 
that the Pentagon used four differ- 
ent inflation estimates each budget 
year, including operations, fuel and 
pay. 

For developing and buying 
weapons and equipment, the Rea- 
gan administration has applied a 
special inflation prediction which 
is 30 percent higher than the gener- 
al prediction used for tbe rest of the 
gpvernmenL This factor is meant to 
reflect historically high costs for 
weapons. 

Using presidential budget statis- 
tics, Mr. Aspin said, “Tbe adminis- 
tration has consistently overesti- 
mated inflation by a substantial 
amount averaging’ about 1.7 per- 
centage points a year.” 


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A Shiite Moslem mili tiaman firing Monday at Palestinian positions in tbe ChatOa camp. 


WORLD BRIEFS 1 

Europe Struves to Revive Assembly 

Paris {Reuters) Attempts w revive the lodg-donnani Wwacq 

European Union after 30 wars resume this week with the W raoataier 
tiSSbVyTthe seven-nation pact presting gptTTO«nei.tsio&»e fl p K , 

*t££!£tot opening Monday of a four-day mcrnbly soatm s* 
mlSbera were uriujnv about the lack of 

plan to reactivate the Weston European Union as the European ptiltro^ 

N The union. whose membefsare France. Bri 
Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg, was effflrtwiy tiORMm 
until October when foreign and defense MiM ***** 
«ve it a new lease of life, But since then information gw« totfe 
assembly h> the ministerial council to £? 2ZS* 

auate.” according to a draft iwommcndanon » be dewwa mm, 
q A committee report asked whether the refusal to appoint a M ag 
political figure to tread the secretariat "is not in fad tantamount to 
renouncing the wish to make the WEU really active. 

* 4 Police Officers Killed in Ulster Blast 

* BELFAST (AP) — Four police officers were kilted Monday in ia& 
explosion when their bullet-proof patrol ar ran 

Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility for the explosion, outside 

tbe town of Newry on the Irish bonier. . . . . JJ 

The three policemen and one policewoman were escorting a swtnty 
truck bringing cash from Ireland, a police spokesman s*™. ^ *** 

one of twothat had been waiting at Killeen customs post to take wer the 
L escort duty. The officers in the second car were not injured, ponce whL 


Around 3 Refugee Camps in Beirut 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — Shiite Moslem nrili - 

|jHHCB Pales tinian guer rillas 

fought fierce street battles, often 
hand-to-hand, on Monday around 
the three refugee camps in the west- 
ern sector of Beirut. Police said that 
at least SO people had been killed 
and more than 250 bad been 
wounded. 

Hospitals issued urgent radio ap- 
peals for blood donations. 

Scores of ambulances drove 
through shellfire in the Moslem 
sector of the Lebanese capital to 
move casualties from the battle 
zones. At least two hospitals were 
reported hit by shellfire. 

Police described the fighting, 
which erupted on the first day of 
Islam’s holy month of fasting, 
Ramadan, as the “heaviest aimed 
collision” between AmaL Leba- 
non’s dominant Shiite militia, and 
the Palestinians. 

The violence was centered on 


was taken from tbe camp and beat- 
en. When he was taken back to the 
camp, they did , another Palestin- 
ian shot one of the Amal mere Then 
shooting reportedly broke out 
throughout the camp. 

The drone of high-flying jets was 
repeatedly heard over Beirut as tbe 
battles raged. Radio stations said 
they were Israeli planes flying re- 
connaissance missions to film tbe 
clashes. 

In Amman, Jordan. Y laser Ara- 
fat. the chairman of the Palestine 
liberation Organization, met with 


13 Arab diplomats on Monday and 
urged their countries to help stop 
the fighting around the Palestinian 
camps in Beirut, a spokesman for 
Mr. Arafat said. 

The fighting, with rocket-pro- 
pelled grenades, recoilless rifles 
and heavy machine guns, closed the 
main highway to Beirut's interna- 
tional airport, fordfig passengers to 
detour to the waterfront. 

Officials of Middle East Airlines 
said the airport had not been hit in 
the fighting in the nearby camps, 
but some flights were canceled. 


Israel Swaps Prisoners , 
Terrorists for 3 Soldiers 


non s dominant Mine nuwia. ana { Coa&med fromF w n were put on a plane bound for the 
the Palestinians. l.—^ holdtiufthe Paj. Libyan capital of Tripoli. Complc- 

The violence |jasowog« caimans STkrili? to «- that exchange Lhad to await 

Beirut s three Palestinian refugee r ,„ np . confirmation from Red Cross dde- 

..haw nvVM^mrvlIni otp- j a.. n.Ui:.:.., 


camps, when; rocket-propelled etc- . 

nades and mortar rounds exploded. JQ aaduian, 1 

During a letup in the fighting. 
sco«s of people fled the camps. plancs . bn 

nn nS prisoners ii 

uon of 120.000. 


, . . , _ gates in Israel that 600 Palestinians the union had called tne wort stoppage over man^ 

he said, the three had been freed there. extend a oae^driver system that does away with the pan 

: to fly out the Pal- a second Israeli was to be re- person— known in Britain as a guard— in trains. Tneux 


estinia ns we re too smalLThe lcased when the plane carrying the 
planes, wtach brought die three Is- ^ Palestinians P floni oXefa to 


Deputy to Soares Offers to Resign 

LISBON (Reuters) — Rui Machete. Portugal's deputy prime : minister 
and defense minister, offered his resignation Monday after being re- 
placed as leader of the Social Democratic Party, officials .said. _ 

But Mario Soares, the Socialist prime minister, who beads the two- 
-party coalition government, asked Mr. Machete, 44. to stay on until the 
new snrini Democratic leadership made clear its intentions about the 
coalition. 

A former Finance minister, Anibal Cnvaco Silva, 45, was narrowly ^ 
elected Sunday to head the Social Democrats. Mr. Machete did not sect-*! 
re-election. He had headed the party for only three months. 

India Passes Anti-Terrorism Law 

NEW DELHI (AP) — Lawmakers overwhelmingly approved an _ 
terrorism bw Monday to combat Sikh separaustvHolence. The opposition : 
charged that die measure could undermine Indian democracy. j 

After more than seven hours of debate, the lower house of Pariaraew 
approved the bill. It provides the death penalty for terrorist acts restating 
in death or injury, and gives police power to arrest suspects, detain then 
without trial and bold closed trials. 

The law was introduced following bombings by Sikh separatists that 
kilted 85 people in New Ddhi and three other states May 10 and 11. - 

Subway Strike in London Collapses 

LONDON (UPI)— Astrikconthe London Underground, tide of die 
world's busiest subway systems, collapsed Monday after, moat of 16,000 4 
workers ignored their union’s call to stop work. 

“We’re decided to take a step back.” the union chicr. Jimmy Knapp, 
said in announcing an end to the strike only 12 hours after, h begin. 
London Regional Transport reported that most members of Mr. Knapp'S 
National Union of Raiiwaymen turned up for work and that about 70 
percent of subway service was provided Monday morning and 80 pereeu 
in the afternoon. 

The union had called the work stoppage over management plans to • 
extend a one-driver system that does away with the position ct a second 
oerson — known in Britain asaauaxd — in trains. Tne union bad poshed 


They don’t hare shelters,” a salists and political sympathizers 
Palestinian at Sabra camp said by on board.” Mr. Modoux said. 


* ■ • • mm fs a tUUHUIIOUJ IIUIII VVilVta UT 

Da - Tripoli anivcd in l be Libyan capi- 
mascus, qko had around lOOjour- 


telephone. “We're taking heavy 


K yssrzzi w*™™ 5 The third Israeli soldier was to 
, board. Mr. Modern said. be freed upon confirmation of Isra- 

Shmaei Tamir. a former Isnfefi eTs release of the 150 Lebanese 


1 It- « | I t . — - — MM M • Q 3 1 UU1X U1 U l t, I JXJ • -M/ilIlvy, 

pe0p ^ e 3re - ingm i 1 * 1 * 1 * ndnister “d a negotiator in prisoners at Kuneiira. in the Israe- 
mar nomes. the exchange; said Israel paid a li^xxupicd Golan Heights near the 

“The fighting's very dirty insde “rery heavy and oppressive price" Syrian border, 
the camps.” he said. “It’s v^iy bad for the release of the three soldiers. Jean-Jacques Kurtz, a spokes- 


ahead with its strike (dan despite a court ruling Friday that, under new 
legislation, it had to ballot its members on the work stoppage. 

Yugoslav Gets Cannes Festival Award 

CANNES (AP) — The 38th Cannes Film Festival presented Emir 
Kusturica. a Yugoslav director, with its highest honor Monday, Ac 
Golden Palm award. Tor his film “Papa Is on a Business Trip." ; ( 
The award for best actress was shared by Nonna Aleand roof Argenti- 
na for her rote in Luis Poenzo’s “La Historia Official" mdtischseacxn 
actress-singer. Cher, for her part in Peter Bogdanovich's movie, "Mask.” 


He said in a television interview man for the Red Cross, said tbe The award for tile best actor went to William Hun. an American, for Ins 


The Palestinian said the fighting that four Israelis were still listed as swap, called “Operation Galike.” 
started at about 6:30 P.M. on Sun- missing since the invasion of Leba- was mediated by Austrian diplo- 
day when five Amal gunmen en- non. He said they were assumed to mats, including former Chancellor 
tered Sabra and arrested a Pales tin- be alive “until we team otherwise." Bruno Kreisky. between Israel and 
ian youth. One of the Israeli soldiers was the Popular Front. 

Some militiamen said the youth swapped for 230 Palestinians who 


Moscow’s 380,000 Troops: 
An Unloved, Unseen Force 

(Continued from Page 1) among troops in East Germany by 
decidedly mixed, according to homesekness and isolation. 


Mr. Tamir said the Palestinian 
prisoners to be returned included 
Murad Busbnak. a nephew of Ah- 
med Jebril, commander of the Pop- 
ular Front. 


rote in “Kiss of the Spider Woman.” directed by a Brazilian, Hector 
Babenco. 

An American entr> r , Alan Parker's “Birdy,” a story of friendship and 
broken dreams epitomized by a boy who tries to become a bird, won the 
festival's Special Grand Prix du Jury. 

For the Record 

Iran Air has resumed domestic and international (fights after atwC- 
month suspension in response to threats by Iraq, a statement*? the 


He said he thought that this com P an >' said Iran Air, as well as foreign airlines, suspended 


Western intelligence sources. 


East Germany's National Peo 


While some Soviet officers and Pje’s Army, although ournumboed 
soldiers are said to be crack fight- ^ tnor Sonet allies 2- to- 1 on their 
mg men, a large number or soldiers, 0 ^? ( so ^’ m described by Western 
especially in the rank and infantry notary expois as much more un- 


“played a part in speeding up of ibe 
negotiations.” Mr. Busbnak was 
among the guerrillas captured by 
Israel during tbe Lebanon war. 

Israel has swapped prisoners 
with Syria and Palestinian organi- 
zations several times since its 1982 


Fthe Iran on March 20 after Iraq, its adversary in the Gulf war, 
wa5 considered Iranian air mace a war zone. 

I bv A Genera hanker, Robert Lederc, was sentenced to five' 


A Genera hanker. Robot Lederc, was sentenced to five yean in prison 
Monday following his conviction on multiple counts of embezzwBe&t 
and forgery. HU private bank, Leclercft Co., was ordered closed by Sms 
authorities in 1977 with a loss of more than 394 million Swiss frafcCsflta 
worth about $156 million). (AP) 

Libyan Air Force planes have started an airfift of food and equipment 


invasion of Lebanon. The exchange iJnyan ait rorce planes have started an airfift of food and equipment 
Monday of 1,150 prisoners for for 'amine areas of southern Sudan, where the government says oOpeopk 
three Israelis was the second larges- ^ starving to death each day. . (Reutm) 


divisions, are judged to be medio- Passive in terms of morale and 
ere. command structure. 

* i c .u vvj.j A Western diplomat in East Ber- 
A week after the Nicholson ^ said that ihe East German soi- 
shooung, Soviet infantry units in diers “are a highly disciplined force 
East Gamany were criticized [ m. with a lot of pride, and that is a key 
Moscou^s army newspaper Red reason why East German soldiers 
Star for being badly trained, poorly do n’i respect or get along with the 
commanded and sloppy in field ex- Soviets.” 

erases. 

The vast majority of Soviet 

troops are housed in decrepit bar- -y t O O Tl 

racks and isolated from the local f / W Sf/lrffi r i 
population. They are paid far less R-J tjLLW w JJ 

than their East German counter- 

^^arestid tobesconifu] of (Continued from Page 1) 

• uij ■ 

Alcoholism is said to be an acute . Radio Havana’s announcement 
problem, one that is exacerbated was made only hours after the first 


L (UPI, AP) — : 4 

■ Saudi Diplomat Released Clarififatlon 

Hussein Farrash, a Saudi Arabi- . - 

an diplomat kidnapped in Beirut . A headline on a Page 1 news article from Washington on May 13 
!6 months ago, was released and unplied that there was direct Central Intelligence Agency mvotvementin . 
flown home Monday in a medal a car bombing outside the residence of a militant Shii te leader in BeiraL 
Syrian plane, the official Saudi Information in the article, attributed to unidentified but infonned. 


Syrian plane, the official Saudi information in tbe article, atuibuted to unidentified but -infonnod. 
Press Agency said, Reuters report- sources, made clear that the attack had been carried out without GA 


ed from Bahrain. 


authorization. 


U.S. Starts Broadcasts ; Cuba Suspends 2 Accords 



Charles MACKiNLAVi. co ltd. 

L6ITH SCOTLAND 

-:vc cc-irpJTic>i5C-r,;r.=' L McC J:*CC •'.•'V 


(Cootinoed from Page 1) 
began returning to Cuba in Febru- 
ary. 

Radio Havana’s announcement 
was made only hours after the first 
II Cuban political prisoners and 
their relatives arrived at Miami In- 
ternational Airport under tbe terms 
of the agreement 

The Cuban announcement was 
Radio MartTs lead news item as it 
went on the air at 5:30 AJM 

At the White House, Mr. 
Speakes said that the Cuban gov- 
ernment was infonned Sunday that 
Radio Marti would go on the air 
Monday. 

“At that time," he said, “ihey 
informed us of their actions, which 
were obviously well prepared in ad- 
vance.” 

“We’re not exactly dear what 
they mean by ’suspension’ of these 
agreements.’ Mr. Speakes added of 
the immigration and hijacking 
pacts. “If that is their reaction to 
the lawful presentation of accurate. 


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balanced and objective news re- 
ports. then that speaks volumes for 
the Cuban government.” 

Mr. Speakes said be was not 
aware of any Cuban jamming or 
US. broadcasts in retaliation. 

Commercial broadcasters in the 
United Slates have long feared that 
once Radio Marti began beaming 
news, music, religion and sports to 
Cuba, Cuba would retaliate by in- 
terfering with their signals. 

■ ‘Normal Lives’ for Refugees 

Joseph B. Treaster of The New 
York Times reported earlier from 
Havana: 

A number of Cuban refugees 
who have been returned to Cuba 
from the United States because of 
histories of criminal offenses or 
mental illness are “back at home 
and living completely normal 
lives,” according to a senior Cuban 
official. 

Others among about 200 refu- 
gees wbo began returning to Cuba 
in February still are in medical 
quarantine, tbe official, tbe deputy 
minister of foreign affairs, Ricardo 
Alarcon, said. Still others, who 
were accused of committing crimes 
in the United States, have been sent 
to prison, he said. 


U.S. officials in Havana said that 
they had not been physically moni- 
toring the return of the refugees. 
However, they said that they had 
no reason to suspect that (he refu- 
gees were being mistreated. 

Tbe refugees were among 
125.000 Cubans who left Cuba for 
the United Slates from the port of 
Marie! in 3980. Some of the Cu- 
bans were identified by the U.S. 
authorities soon after they arrived 
in Florida as criminals or mental 
patients and were taken into custo- 
dy. Others were charged with 
crimes in tbe United States. 

As tbe refugees in the group of 
2,746 have been returned. Cuban 
officials said, they have been quar- 


antined for about 30 days.at the 
Melena del Sur Hospital 36 nates 
(58 kilometers) south erf Havana. 
There, the officials said, thqf 
dergo thorough malkad examina- 
tions to determine whether 
have communicable diseases. 

Mr. Alarc6n said the cases of the 
Cubans charged with crimes in (he 
United States were being reviewed 
with regard to Cuban law. 

“According to the information I . 
have gathered.” Mr. Alareto-said, 
"these people are gang back to 
their homes and air people .are- 
receiving them in a mature and . 
normal way. It is going very, voj ■ 
wdL We are hel p in g them to fiad 
jobs.” .. 


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South Africa Treason Trial Is Delayed 

i WETERMARTTZBURG. South Africa (Reuters) — ■ The trial of M 4 
tending dissidents m SouthAfrica was postponed by the Supreme Court _ 
on Monday until July 1 1. The 16 accused, all nonw4ites,remaMf«* bn 

vuS? h®?*?! a revolutionary alliance aimed at the 

violent overthrow of South Africa’s white- minority government. The 

trial* ** bl8SCSt 156 P®* 0118 were acquitted in 1961 afw a 

Meanwhite the government introduced a bill in Pariiamwl under 
which whites. Indians and people of mixed race wfflTkte^ - 
permits to enter South Africa's black townships. The legSSon also 
changes influx-control laws to make it easier for blades to MVeftcni6 ne ■ 

AUTHORS WANTED ~ 

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A career in Kilobytes. 




64KB • You’re fresh from university, full 
of bright ideas and ready to take your 
natural place among the great leaders of 
modern business. 


Unfortunately, the boss doesn’t think you 
are quite ready for his chair, and starts 
you off as an office clerk. You soon get your 
first assistant - the 64KB IBM Personal 
Computer. 

It helps you take care of all the tedious 
tasks, like chasing overdue invoices and 
filing reports, leaving you more free time to 
search around for the ladder upwards. 



128KB . You’ve found the ladder, even 

moved up a rung. Had a small pay rise too ! 
More importantly, your IBM PC now has 
twice as much user memory. You need it. 
As Project Manager you have thousands of 
facts to keep straight. 



256KB. Your PC XT stores 5,000 pages 
of information and helps set up, revise 
and meet all those tight schedules - like 
promotion before the end of the year. 

Now the pace is really beginning to hot 
up. As Sales Manager, you’ve got to keep one 
step ahead of the boss and two steps ahead 
of the competition. 

No wonder you rarely leave the office 
without your trusty Portable Personal 
Computer. It packs all the power, of an 


IBM PC in a case that you can take along 
with you. 

Th anks to the Portable PC, your family is 
beginning to recognise you again. 



512KB. Marketing Director. 

This is no time to relax, there is much 
to be done. You need information 
faster than ever before, and it must be 
up-to-date. 

It was a smart move connecting your 
PC AT to a database. You’re getting 
stock prices, Gurrency rates and endless 
Other items immediately at your fingertips - 
■leaving time for lunch with the boss. 



128KB. The boss, bless his heart, has 

finally decided to give up the throne. 

Now you are making all the big decisions. 
One of the biggest and best was to set up an 
IBM Personal Computer Network. 

A PC on every desk, a song in every heart, 
and profit in every sector. The staff seem to 
be using the system wisely. 

Particularly that new clerk. The lad might 
just have a future in the company. 

You put an arm around your life-long 
friend, the IBM PC. To succeed in 
business it’s not what you know, it’s who 
you know. 

For further information write to IBM 
United Kingdom International Products 
Limited, West Cross House, 2 West 
Cross Way, Brentford, Middlesex TW8 9DY, 
England (Telex 27748). 



LITTLI TlMFCKiMCnil UCIN1CB IV IVltLU INC ■ * GQK 


-Page 4 


TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 


i'-l. • : 

r < 


PuHtlifd Thh TTie Xew York Tmh utd The Vwtlbiftofi Port 


Oil Remains a Problem 


Is the ] 2-year-old fud crisis ending? Sig- 
nals from the oil market are mixed. 

Optimists point to the remarkable fall in 
the oil price in five years, from S40 a band 

10 under $26 today despite the Iran- Iraq war 
and intense cold early this year. The past 
decade’s huge increase in the price of OPEC 

011 stimulated supplies from other sources: 
The North Sea now produces as much as 
Saudi Arabia. And as prices for gasoline and 

. h eat ing rose, consumers became thriftier. 

The price mechanism works when govern- 
ments allow it to. The non-Communist 
wcoW used less energy in 1984 than when the 
second oil shock hit it in 1979 even though, 
in the meanwhile, activity in industrialized 
countries had grown by some 10 percent. 
Less of the world's energy consumption now 
depends on oiL OPECs share of the market 
has meanwhile fallen substantially. 

OPEC seeks to put a floor under its crude 
oil prices by restricting supply. The prob- 
lent, as A] Capone said after Mussolini's 
march on Rome, is to keep the boys in line.' 
Some OPEC suppliers exceed their agreed 
production quotas. And bartering oil against 
industrial products breaches the price floor. 

The Saudi oil minister. Sheikh Ahmed 
Zaki Y amani, says the present price struc- 
ture can be defended without a further low- 
ering of output The industrialized world's 
International Energy Agency thinks he may 
be right at least in the very short term. The 
running down of stocks by importing coun- 
tries, which has weakened their demand for 
OPEC oil recently, cannot continue for long. 
Still, the Oxford Energy Institute thinks od 
prices will stay weak until die mid-1990s. 

Up to a pant weaker prices benefit im- 
porters, just as the rise in the 1970s helped 


push them into stagflation: lower oil prices 
momentarily lift economic constraints in 
many countries. But it is misleading to look 
ai the near term. The Oxford expens do not 
find the prospects reassuring, and the IEA 
hammers home the point Weak oil prices 
discourage development of alternative 
sources of energy, which are costly and will 
not be pursued unless the prospects of profit 
are adequate. And a low oil price reduces the 
incentive to use energy more efficiently. 

Hie need to move forward in both direc- 
tions in the next two decades — a short time 
in the energy calendar — is as urgent as ever, 
with non-OPEC oil output likely to peak 
and decline. One hopes that world recession 
will not keep demand for energy low. 

Unless the price of oO can be kept rela- 
tively high, the oil-importing world risks 
■finding itself back at square one, with rising 
demand and uncertain supply making it 
impossible to fuel all the people all the time 
without sudden and disastrous price shocks. 

Few have gained from the gyrations of the 
oil price. Go-stop development is socially 
disturbing in OPEC countries and hurts eco- 
nomic and financial stability elsewhere. This 
could almost validate Marx's thesis abort 
the internal contradictions of capital. Ex- 
ceptionally, energy may be a field in which 
governments have to intervene to limit the 
fluctuation of prices. It might best be done 
through worldwide cooperation, including 
OPEC, but this is unlikely. Second best 
would be agremoit among oD importers to 
keep the price high to consumers through 
variable taxes. This would be difficult and 
unpopular. But the alternative — a third oil 
crisis — could be a real disaster. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Critical Times for Africa 


Rains soaking southern and eastern Africa 
promise some relief from the worst drought in 
a century. But better weather will not help 
farmers who have consumed their seed and 
. cattle, nor fertilize exhausted soil, nor atone 
for policies that foolishly drove farmers off the 
land. Perversely, better weather may yield just 
enough food to relax the world's concern. 

Africa's most desperate time will occur 
when the pathetic faces of starving children 
vanish from the evening television news. 
Moved by those images. Americans have 
opened their hearts and purses. More than 
SI billion has been donated this year to 40 
African nations, a fourth of it to Ethiopia. Yet 
without a sustained commitment to develop- 
ment — and better political management — 
that relief may well be squandered. 

The best news from sub-Saharan Africa is 
not the change in weather but the one in 
governmental attitudes. On becoming inde- 
pendent 20 years ago most of these nations 
tried to speed development by making the 
state the sole buyer of farm produce. And to 
help infant industries with cheaper imports 
they simultaneously overvalued their curren- 
cies. The result was a calamitous decline in 
rood production — one- fifth over two decades, 
while the population nearly doubled. 

Food prices were kept low to help the cities, 
which were overrun as farmers went broke. 
Overpriced exports suffered, while imported 
luxuries became an addiction. The more rest- 


less the urban centers became, the greater was 
the governments' fear of reform. 

These errors are now widely acknowledged. 
More than a dozen countries have begun to 
adjust exchange rates and some have raised 
farm income. After Somalia decontrolled farm 
prices, sorghum and banana production 
leaped 40 percent in 1984. The rains now 
falling in Zim babwe promise a bumper corn 
crop, wisely encouraged by higher pnees. Ev- 
ery such success stimulates emulation. 

But wider progress also requires a more 
sustained commitment to long-term develop- 
ment. The richer nations should use bargain- 
priced food to stimulate reform and to help 
precarious regimes through difficult times. 
The private agencies that have been feeding 
the starving fear a loss of interest. They yearn 
for an imaginative shove from President Rea- 
gan. starting with a special representative for 
African development with the stature to co- 
ordinate the entire effort An emissary of sut- 
ure is especially needed in haid-hit Ethiopia, 
where food is now rotting on the docks. 

Ethiopia's Marxist regime has played poli- 
tics with relief, impeding foreigners' access to 
insurgent areas and brutally dispersing tens of 
thousands of hungry people from the relief 
centers. If Ethiopia is to participate in a sus- 
tained development effort, its government will 
have to show greater humanity and reach a 
more mature relationship with America. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Refiners Have It Wrong 


The world is awash in crude oil, but the 
American Independent Refiners Association 
warns of a new era of foreign bl ackmail if its 
members are not protected a gains t foreign 
competitors. The trade association, which rep- 
resents only small refiners, is pressing Con- 
gress for an import quota to guarantee domes- 
tic refiners a market for a fixed percentage 
of their production capacity. 

Smaller refiners are hurting. Reduced world 
demand has squeezed every penny of profit 
out. of the refining business. But gasoline im- 
ports pose no threat to U.S. security. The 
proposed protection for domestic refiners 
would cost consumers billions and slow the 
much needed rationalization of the industry. 

Refineries take a long time to plan and 
build. Refining capacity kept growing through 
the 1970s even as demand for their oil de- 
clined. A shakeout did not begin in earnest 
until a few years ago. Not surprisingly, the 
hardest-hit companies were those with smaller, 
less efficient facilities. Last year alone saw the 
closing of 28 of the 131 refineries owned by 


FROM OUR MAY 21 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Bill Divides U.S. Physicians 
WASHINGTON — The opposition to the 
Owen bill creating a Cabinet officer to be 
known as the Secretary of Health can be de- 
scribed as a popular uprising. The bill, now 
before the Senate Committee on Public 
Health, is the latest step in a movement which 
the American Medical Association has been 
pushing to obtain control of Government 
functions relating to the practice of medicine 
and to the care of public health for the school 
of allopathic physicians. The bill would estab- 
lish a bureau of biology, which, opponents 
declare, will engage the Federal Government 
in the practice of vivisection. Members of the 
National League for Medical Freedom assert 
that the measure would in effect create a 
doctors' trust. Among its opponents are practi- 
tioners of the homeopathic and other schools. 


1935: Marconi's f Beam’ Is Criticized 
PARIS — Reginald Gouraud, radio and tele- 
vision expert, was inclined to say “What of it?" 
when told of Guglielmo Marco rtfs method of 
stopping automobiles by directional beams. 
“It very often happens," he said [on May 20], 
“that when research workers are working on a 
problem the popular imagina tion takes a fancy 
to an unimportant manifestation of that prob- 
lem and never takes the trouble to get at the 
real thing. Marconi's beam can be explained 
this way: When a radio station sends out its 
programs conveyed on electrical waves these 
waves spread in a circle. But for every ten feet 
that the length of the beam is increased the 
energy at the transmitter must be trebled if the 
beam's strength is lo remain constant. For (his 
reason I can't forsee any great future for the 
beam as a destructive force in time of war ” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM & PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

PHILIP M. FOISIE Extern™ Editor RENfe BONDY Deputy Publisher 

WALTER WELLS fii<» ALAIN LECOUR Assndtde Publisher 

SAMUEL AST Deputy B&lar RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Opemwa - 

CARLGEWIRTZ Assoaale Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adeeming Sales 
Intemadooa] Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauHe. 92200 NemUy-sur-Seute, 

Fiance. Td.: (1)747-1263. Telex: 61 2718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 029*8052. > , 

Director de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Herman RtL. Hong Kong. Tel 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

Motoring Dir. UK.: Rabin MacKtdttm. 63 Long Acre. London WCL TeL 836-4S02. Telex 262009. law] 


Gen Mgr. W. Genwoty W. Laaerbxh, Fnedrkkstr. IS. CQOOFnrtjm/M. TL fOty7267S5. TU 416721. 
Sjt. m capital de 1 . 200.000 F. RCS Ntmterre B 732021126 ■ Commission Paritaire No. 61337. 
U.S. subacrtptiOK $322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Island Cay. N.Y. I HOI. 
O /«85. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved 


w -._y | 

^ 








‘XN 

1 




1 WMtiMRK/ 
CWjgTb 

Warns. 

Uiofmoor 

m 

arms'. j 


Thinking 

'Small and 
Medium’ 

By Flora Lewis 




9^ 



When Allies Fall Out Over Technology Trade 

B RUSSELS — Congress will soon rubber- By Richard Grant and David Hobbs transte- The group, led by Senati 

stamp legislation ihnt crucially affects Ameri- J Earl Hastings of Canada, has discovered a grc 

•- i .2 : . L VT a TA „n:.„ Tu:. Til. .L. ./ WmI thit nnlfPV.mslrMT nnrilrt ovll In/vnKirir 


ca’s relations with its NATO allies. This legisla- 
tion, a new Enron Administration Act, lays down 
the guidelines tor exporting goods to the East bloc 
Unfortunately, the new act is virtually identical to 
die legislation already in force and this will un- 
doubtedly disappoint the allies. 

Why are the allies concerned? The reasons are 
complex. The new act does not specifically impose 
restrictions on exports to them, but the U.S. ad- 
ministration does in enforcing the act. This is 
because the administration — particularly the Pen- 
tagon — believes that the allies tend to “leak” 
more than the United States. 

The allies agree that sales of military technology 
to the East bloc should be prohibited, but they do 
not agree on whai military technology actually is. 
The problem area is technology that has both 
civ ilian and military applications — the so-called 
“dual-use” technology such as powerful comput- 
ers, microchips and telecommunications. Here the 
United Stales tends to be far more suspicious, and 
therefore restrictive, about exports. 

The net effect of ah this is that the United States 
places restrictions on technology exports to its 
allies. The forms of restriction vary. Some com- 
modities simply cannot be purchased; others are 
difficult to obtain and are sold with strings at- 
tached. For instance, goods manufactured abroad 
but which contain one or more American compo- 
nents cannot be exported without an export license 


By Richard Grant and David Hobbs 

This is the first of two articles. The writers are 
members of the international staff of the North 
Atlantic Assembly. NATO's interparliamentary 
organization The views expressed are their ami 

from the U.S. Department of Commerce. This has 
also applied to goods manufactured using Ameri- 
can iftinnirai data, or manufactured under license . 
In addition, scientific conferences are sometimes 
restricted to American citizens only. 

Not surprisingly, the business and scientific 
communities in the United States and elsewhere 
have complained about these restrictions. 

It is difficult, frustrating and tune - erai-vnming 
to buy and sell certain components and techno- 
logies. American companies nave complained that 
orders are lost through denial of export licenses 
when similar items are available elsewhere, and 
European companies are unhappy about disclos- 
ing orders to the U.S. Department of Commerce.- 
Accusations have been made suggesting that re- 
strictions are imposed on European companies 
more vigorously than on American ones. 


technology transfer. The group, led by Senator 
Earl Hastings of Canada, has discovered a great 
deal that poucy-makers would do wen to consider. 

The international business communi ty abounds 
with complaints about export regulations. 

A Canadian subsidiary of aUJ>. firm called U.S. 
export control “a disaster.” Obtaining licenses and 


S is stffla certain tension in fee East . 
m Veteran European diplomats, 

■ gathered here for a private meeting, 

■ say that the Russians are getting 
9 ready for serious negotiations with 

the United States. Moscow always 
S " righo ra up, they say, when it is pie- 
4BP paring for difficult talks. 

For nearly a year now the V-E Day 
U5 celebrations were the big coming 

09? event in the East Hoc. It was not just 

a t" at>ar of commemoration- Tnc 
1 pant was fully current and political: 

to "wike clear that 40 jyeais after the 
war Soviet dominion in Eastern Eu- f 
rope remains firmly in place and 
f Twil it be acknowledged by all as a fact 

of the modem world. 

V There have been many changes m 

' that time. Eastern Europe is by no 

mpam the monolith that Stalin tried 

to impose. Each country is different 

^ in hs own traditional and historical 
way. But Moscow sets the limits. . 

That is why there is particular irri- 
tation in the Kremlin when Presdeot 
Reagan speaks of refusing to accept 
Senator Y alta. The Russians know that the 
a great West is not going to do anything 
insider, about the East-West division of Eu- „ 
[bounds pope, but they are determined to * * 
, i . c show people on both sides of the line 
led u A that they are in charge here. 


tiomsm rather than security, since Canada is not uosrwar period, recently recalled be- 
judged any “leakier” than the United States. Moscow w&en the Iron 

A European computer manufacturer is experi - rwam danged shut, “We will try to 
earing increasing problems buying U.S. compo- make trouble on your side, and you 
nents as orders are delayed longer and denied more win try to make trouble on ours, out 
frequently. Yet this is not seen as a major setback, you will have a much harder time." 
since alternative supplies are readily ob tained ^ any case, when the Russians 
from Japan or elsewhere. In some cases the compa- appr pnrh what they foori dwr a many 
ny is simply building components itself. important bargain, allies are expect- 

A military aerospace company is bring denied ^ to stiffen up and stay out of the 
access to technology even on cooperative projects, as not to complica te matters, 

so that almost invariably a U.S. company can The search for a new Soviet-Amer- 
produce a superior product The situation is so ^ agreement is most welcome to 
bad, according to this company, that in new ay East Europeans. They were tbe prime 


make trouble on your ride, and you 
win try to malm trouble on ours, out 
you wul have a much harder time.” 

In any case, when the Russians 
approach what they consider a really 


way so as not to complicate matters. 

The search for a new Soviet-Amer- 
ican agreement is most welcome to 
East Europeans. They were tbe prime *' 


lot of attention, but they are always present, quiet- 
ly gnawing away at alliance relations. Because of 
that, the North Atlantic Assembly, NATO's inter- 
parliamentary consultative organization, set up a 
multiparty working group of alliance legislators lo 
investigate the causes and effects of this dispute cm 


operative ventures or de s ign studies the European beneficiaries of dfctente, which 
ore vigorously than on American ones. partners often meet informally to decide “what to opened opport unities to th»m for 

Only occasionally do these problems attract a ' do when the United States pulls out” And Europe- bade, development and contacts that 


How Do You Fight Terror 
Without Risk of Accident? 


By Charles Krauthammer 


companies processing fewer than 200.000 bar- 
rels a day. By the industry’s reckoning, the 
worst is yet to come: Saudi Arabia, Kuwait 
and Libya will all be opening larger and more 
efficient facilities in the next few years. 

Does this threaten America with dangerous 
dependence on the governments that imposed 
the 1974 oil embargo? Not a chance. America's 
functioning refineries are operating at only 75 
percent of capacity: refineries in Europe are 
down to 70 percent. There is no risk that the 
developed world's refining capacity will con- 
tract below its consumption. 

Congress could normally be expected to 
dismiss a call for protectionism that is so 
poorly justified. But the few dozen wealthy 
Americans who dominate independent refin- 
ing have been unusually skillful at getting what 
they want In the 1970s they persuaded Con- 
gress to guarantee them a supply of crude at S3 
a barrel less than the price paid by big. inte- 
grated ofl companies. The sooner this lobby is 
sent packing, the safer the consumer will be. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON — Congress 
seems very shock-prone these 
days. Only a few weeks ago House 
Democrats were shocked to find Nic- 
aragua's President Onega in Mos- 
cow. Why is it that Democrats cannot 
figure out where a Mantist-Leninist 
— which Mr- Ortega has declared 
himself to be — is headed, until pre- 
sented with his travel schedule? 

' Last week, more unsportsmanlike 
conduct and another round of indig- 
nation. It seems that not only Ameri- 
ca's enemies disappoint it. Some of 
its associates around the world are 
bad actors, too. One group, trained in 
Beirut by the CIA as a counterterror- 
ist forced hired its own free-lance ter- 
rorists. who tried to kfll yet another 
terrorist with a car bomb' that lulled 
80 bystanders instead. 

Terror is tenor, and the bombing 
was both a crime and a tragedy. Yet 
when the event happened months 
ago, before it acquired a third-hand 
connection with the United States, it 
was accorded a few 30-second bites 
on the evening news and then dis- 
missed as more of the Lebanese same. 

Tbe fuss now is not about the act 
but about the American connection. 
What exactly is the charge? Reports 
indicate that the CIA neither autho- 
rized nor knew about the bombing, 
and that when it found out it can- 
celed the whole Beirut operation. 
Tbe ClA can be criticized for the 


way it carried out this mission, and 
for its lousy choice of participants •— 
although the netherworld of Beirut 
terror is hardly a recruiter's dream. 

But, beyond general indignation, 
what exactly is it that so upsets critics 
about the original countertenor idea? 

Everyone is against terrorism. Ev- 
eryone wants to do something about 
it Everyone, even tbe biggest dove, is 
in favor of gathering intelligence. 

What to do with that intelligence? 

If you find out that certain groups 
are trying to kill Americans — and in 
Beirut they most certainly are — you 
can use the intelligence to prevent 
auack-and-run. This response is as 

futile as it is dangerous. Lebanon's was meant to defend American lives 
terrorists are people of proven sen- against terrorists. Of all the ratio- 
ousness. They will try again soon. nates for the use of force abroad, that 

If the United States does not want narrow purpose is perhaps the most 
to let itself be driven from the Middle widely accepted. Many who opposed 
East — if it wants to maintain embas- the Grenada invasion said they 
sics, not marines — and if it wants to would have supported it had they 
protect American nationals and dip- thought it was really meant to rescue 
lomats, it must be prepared to act on American medical students, 
information, not just gather it. Who is to carry out such covert 

What kind of action? Oven action action? Much of the indignation on 
is of proven uselessness. Battleships Capitol HO has beat directed al the 



and bombers either kill Lebanese in- 
discriminately or risk producing 
American prisoners. That leaves co- 
vert action, not a terribly popular 
item these days on Capitol Hal. 


use of proxies. The problem with us- 
ing foreigners is that they are harder 
to control than Americans. 

But using Americans is highl y dan- 
gerous. It is not easy to keep a group 


item these days on Capitol Hill. gerous. It is not easy to keep a group 
Covert action to overthrow govern- of American commandos hanging ca- 
mems is one thing, but the purpose of suaQy around Beirut or to ferry them 
this operation was quite different. It ‘ * ** "’ *’ ” ' 


inconspicuously from tbe Sixth FleeL 


j mtfiti states puns out ’ And Europe- trade, development and contacts that 
am now do not put their latest technology into cannot be had any other way. But 
cooperative ventures, so that such projects “could there may be a difficult period now 
only result in second-rate weapons.” for a new leader in the Kremlin, and 

Clearly, technology transfer problems are cans- new unceitainlirs. A phrase has come 
mg both economic and political problems. into wide diplomatic usage in these 

International Herald Tribune. parts that represents current hopes: 

“small and medium countries.” 

That sounds anodyne, but it is 
a code with intense if ambiguous 
undertones. It means die recognition, 
of certain superpower absolutes in 
world affairs, but an effort to carve 
out elbow room within that frame lor 
tiie lesser bat no less vital national 
interests of other states. iLisprimari- if 
ly an appeal to Weston Europe, but 
also to the United States, to provide 
flexibility for engagements that do 

- not necessarily involve the Russians - 
but will not provoke them either. 

This is likefy to -be the theme of 
developments m Europe for the rest 
of the century, despite recurrent 
strains and upheavals. It is the conti- 
nuity underlying rapid changes that 
are coming through technology, in 
nefitaty systems and in dvffianTife. 

The fear of being left behind teeb- 

- nbtogically, of lagging in the new in- 
dustrial age the way some countries 
floundered in the 19th century while 

. others raced ahead, has spread across 
the whole of Europe: There is no way 
- fra “small and medium countries" to 
Besides, bow do you penetrate the cope with the chang e alone, so it is 
worid of Lebanese terror without for- becoming the new drivmg force for 
eign proxies? I, too, would be happier political connections that transcend 
if America could infiltrate the Smite ideology and custom. 

Party of God with a Yale PhD. in The centerpiece of Soviet-U.S. re-~ 
intemational law. Bui no matter how latioos now is the Geneva arms talks, 
well cut his kaffiyeh, I doubt be But While they are fimited to three jtz 
would make it past the front door, specific issues — intercontinental no- * 

The re mainin g alternative to doing dear weapons, medium-range nude- 
nothing is to risk working with for- ar weapons in Europe and weapons 
dgnera whose aims coincide with in space — the talks focos the whole 
America's. That they may turn, out .range of questions that detennine the 
not to be paragons of virtue should international political dimaia. 
hardly surprise us. And yet we are Almost by happenstance, Presi- 
shocked every time friend or foe fails dent Reagans Strategic Defense Ini- 
to measure up. I am not arguing tiativehas become the critical point, 
against keeping standards high, only It shoold not seem as important to 
against amadous fits of outrage • either side at this early stage of re- 
when it is discovered, monthly, that search as it is being marie to wan 
not everyone lives op to them. Bat h is turning into the ghost that " 

It is 40 yeara since America became haunts the technological fntnre. 
the pre-eminent power in the worid The-concenis of amaH and medi- 


dgn proxies? I, too, would be happier 
if America could infiltrate the Shiite 
Party of God with a Yale PhD. in 


Don’t Expect a Ministate to Cry Unde 


and. as a consequence, was charged um countries” everywhere in Europe 
with dealing with foreigners even to should not be drowned out by (he 
the murkiest comer: of the Earth, specter's shrieks. These are people 


D ES MOINES. Iowa — If Nic- 
aragua is “an unusual and ex- 
traordinary threat to the national 
security and foreign policy of the 
United States," wnat is Iowa? 

Although Iowa is a ministate, 
with about the same area and popu- 
lation as Nicaragua, beware. It is a 
dagger pointed at America’s mid- 
section. Iowa is within commuting 
distance of the Strategic Air Com- 
mand’s headquarters near Omaha, 
and it controls vital Mississippi and 
Missouri shipping passages and in- 
terstate highway lanes. The nation- 
al security of the United States 
depends on air. sea and truck pow- 
er. and Iowa is positioned to cut 
off. at the knees, one or more legs 
of this strategic triad. 

Washington's meddling in Iowa 
has put the two at loggerheads. Re- 
lations are at a low point. Tbe grim 
farm economy, blamed on Wash- 
ington. is turning even merchants 
and bankers against the Reagan 
administration. The loti includes 
widespread farm liquidations and 
seven banks shut since Jan. 1 . (Iowa 
ranks No. 1 in bank dosings.) A 
poll found two-thirds of Iowa's 
farmers ansy at President Reagan. 
His knee-slap per “Keep the grain, 
export the farmers” fueled outrage. 

As the rift widens. Iowa is turn- 
ing increasingly to the Kremlin. 
John ChrystaL a prominent banker- 
farmer. will visit Moscow in June 
to hand Mikhail Gorbachev (they 
have met before) an invitation. The 
Voice of Iowa — The Des Moines 
Register — urges Mr. Gorbachev to 
visit and offers lo “share farm tech- 


By Gilbert Cranberg 

oology” to strengthen Soviet agri- 
culture. Iowa depends on the Soviet 
Union as a com customer. It wants 
increased Soviet economic aid. 

Iowa can be a destabilizing force. 
It fights with its neighbors over 
boundaries and water flow. Its refu- 
gees strain the economies of other 

The administration 
fears louxms. How else 
can you explain its 
assaults on Iowa? 


states. Its legalized gambling will 
weaken those economies. 

Iowa's seal, dominated by a sol- 
dier clutching a rifle, speaks a thou- 
sand threatening words. The state's 
military might exceeds its defense 
needs. More than 10,000 National 
Guardsmen and military reservists 
are supported by tens of thousands 
of irregulars with rifles and hand- 
guns. The National Guard’s 42 A-7 
attack planes put at risk missiles 
and military bases throughout the 
continent. Iowa possesses a nuclear 
reactor, atomic laboratories and 
nuclear know-how. 

Iowa does not hesitate to fight 
White House military strategy. The 
House delegation in 1984 unani- 
mously supported a freeze on the 

le&iing, production and deploy- 
ment of nuclear weapons — a move 


that tbe administration considers 
Soviet-orchestrated. 

All Nit one of Iowa's congress- 
men voted this year against the MX 
missile. And tbe senior senator, 
Charles Grassley, a Republican, isa 
leading critic or the Pentagon. 

Mr. Grass! ey ridicules the de- 
fense industry as “a new generation 
of welfare queens," and recently 
convinced the Senate to adopt his 
plan to cut SI 7.7 billion from Presi- 
dent Reagan's proposed increase in 
military spending. Defense Secre- 
tary Caspar Weinberger called the 
cut “a prescription for weakening 
the United States.” The president 
called it “irresponsible.” 

All this adds up to “an unusual 
and extraordinary threat to tbe na- 
tional security and foreign policy 
of the United States.” Tbe adminis- 
tration fears Icwans. How else can 
you explain its assaults on Iowa — 
budget director David Stockman's 
comments about getting rid of 
fanners, the president’s gibes, his 
veto of emergency credit Tor farm- 
ers, his plan to cut farm supports? 

in reprisal the administration 
seeks to bring Iowa to its knees. 

Washington’s success in devas- 
tating Iowa’s ec o nomy unquestion- 
ably encouraged it to invoke eco- 
nomic sanctions against Nicaragua. 
Will Iowa cry unde? Will Nicara- 
gua? Don’t bet on iL 

The writer, a former editorial page 
editor of The Des Moines Register, is 
professor of journalism at the Univer- 
sity of Iowa. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Tones. 


One might have thought that 40 years who are obi 
of Old World work would make a are trying as 
dent in New World naivete. everyday wo 

' Washington Past Writers Group. The . 


who are obliged to stay earthy and 
are trying as best they can to keep the f** 
everyday wodd on a steady course. 

The New York Tones. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Harvard and Reagan 


In response to “At Harvard, Dm-- 
sum on a Reagpn Honor*' (May 9): . 


southern Africa — where be can wit- 
ness ithesoondness of his administra- 
tion's approach — to make a relevant 
and decisive contribution to the po- 


With respect to the appropriate- ^ deb ate that others, who are only 
ness of Harvard UniYecsiiy awarding c onc e rn e d about their domestic potit- 
Preadent Reagan 'an honorary de- ical standing, are unable to make? 
gree. I submit that tbe president is r_a. jdu PLOOY 

more than eligible under Harvard's ' Ambassador of South Africa.’ 
own standard: “Eater to grow in^ wis- • 
dam. Dqiatt to serve better thy coon- __ _ 

try ana thy Jand.” Intellectual Many Gentle Chizenfi 


try andthy Jand.” Intellectual Many Gentle fjtiwna 
achievement is but one of the values ' . „ 

held high by the Harvard community.' Margaret J 

Service to mankind is another. Ron-' Leber ’s “rmpe noosness . . . is al- P 
aid Reagan is second only to Frank- a temperament which m many 

tin D. Roosevdt as the outstanding- 1 f*ys i* VCI 7 masemfine" (People, May 
president of the past 50 years. ■ A^ ajP Mcannm , I beg to point 

D. MARSHALL BTUgOg. ^ 

Policy for Sooth Africa . vinayak saw ant. 

fn m/tins llw iMvwf in umr i«nr Pans. 


Policy for Sooth Africa . vinayak saw ant. 

In reading the report inyour issue Paris. 

Continued 

House Policy on Apartheid," I was A Pan s redder, Marilyn Tomlins, 
strodt by the reproach made by Sena- bas wntteo to you (Letters, Jan. 30) 
tor Paul Sarbanes to the UjS. asas- McmL t te de rivation of the word 
tant secretary of state lor Africa, “scoff” from the Dutch schaften, j 
Chester Crocker, for exhibiting “al- meaning, “t o tak e a noon meal 
most an ivory tower mentality” — in tsay be interested to know that the 
other wards, for not being attuned to ■ word is still used by working people 
U.S. domestic political c u rrents. m Po tchrspcaknig BdgianFlHnders, 
Bitt is it not precisely the function where I come from, as meaning “to 
of Assistant Secretary . Crocker, . stop, wmk for lunch.” . - 
• through his firsthand contacts with ‘ JJL PAUWELS. 

the situation and his frequent visttsto Brantford, Ontario 


people 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Page 5 


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Philadelphia 
Pray s for Itself 

Worshipers, Homeless 
Meet After Police Siege 

By Roberr Hanley ■ 

Aw York Tima Service 

PHILADELPHIA — Just before II AJtf, a 
single bell began tolling in the tower of St 
Carthage Roman Catholic Church, Which has 
been weltering refugees from the devastation of 
Osage Avenue and Hue Street, three blocks 
away. 

Evoy 10 seconds it Tang softly, a hushed, 
almost bumble bell -qrmmnnnig the neighbor- 
hood to what the pastor, tic Reverend Charles 
H. Diamond^ called a “Mass of hope' and sup- 
pon.” 

As Father Diamond and two other priests 
celebrating the Mass approached the altar, the 
bell stopped and the organ and choir began a 
rousing rendition of “Amazing Grace.” The 200 
or so people in the congregation joined in, and 
music fDled the 75-year-old chinch to almost 
deafening levels. 

Thus was Sl Carthage transformed Sunday 
from a haven for the anguished and bewildered 
homeless of Osage and Pine into a place of 
robust worship. 

In churches across Fhfladdpbia, .from the 
modest to the mighty, there were prayers of 
brotherhood, remembrance, meditation and 
reconciliation on a day the mayor, W. Wilson 
Goode; had asked the city to pray for itself. 

Twenty blocks from Sl Carthage, Mr. Goode 
took the pulpit at his own church, the Fust 
Baptist Church of Paschal, at a service celebrat- 
ing its 50th anniversary, fk has been a member 
for 35 years. 

Mr. Goode asked the 200 congregants to pray 
for the 11 persons rated and the 270 left home- 
less by the police siege and bombing last Mon- 
day at the fortified bouse of the radical group 
MOVE on Osage Avenue. 

Mr. Goode wants the 53 homes that were 
destroyed and the eight damaged in the assault 
to be rebuilt by Chmmas. He put the cost of 
construction and fu rnishin g at 58 milti nn. The 
U.S. government has pledged $1 million, with 
the city, stale and private business apparently to 
meet the balance. Their shares have not been 
determined. . • 

Car dinal John Krol, head of the Archdiocese 
of Philadelphia, asked the 300 Roman Catholic 
churches in his jurisdiction to offer “special 
remembrance** at all .Masses Sunday for the 
“serious tragedy.” There are about 1.3 million 
Catholics in the archdiocese. 

At Sl Carthage, Father Diamond mentioned 
a newspaper h eadlin e about the devastation that 
said, “A neighborhood has vanished.’* 

Father Diamond paused and then said firmly, 
“This neighborhood has not vanished This 
neighborhood is not houses. It is iis. We are 
together.” 

After Maas, Mattie Coles, whose home of 30 
years at 6231 Osage was destroyed, said: “If it 
weren't for St Carthage, Td be nowhere. It’s 
been my home all week.” 

Betty Mapp, who lost her home at No. 6241, 
was grateful for the shelter provided at the 
church: “We wouldn’t have made it without iL” 

Ai Holy Trinity, an- Episcopal church on 
Rittenh erase Square in central Philadelphia, the 
assistant rector, the Reverend Cad E. Metzger, 



More U.S. Blacks Are Moving to Suburbs 

They Seek Homes in Safe Communities and Better Schools for Their Children 




Aibv-,, 
-?• - , 'if - u- a 



Black ministers in Philadelphia hold a prayer vigil in front of burned-out homes. 


said, “How could a movement started only 10 
years ago as nonviolent become so violent? 
Where does one draw the line between the rights 
of-an individual and the rights of a communi- 
ty?" 

■ Threat by Group Is Alleged 

Lindsey Gneson of The Mew York reported: 

Mayor Goode said Sunday that the radical 
group MOVE had threatened to destroy its 
neighborhood with “gas, fire and bullets” u the 
police attacked the group's barricaded house. 

Mr. Goode said be had allowed the police to 
take action to evict the group from its headquar- 
ters “as a last resort.” 

Tbe action, he said Sunday on a CBS televi- 
sion news program, was the only way to end 
nearly four years of “psychological warfare” by 
MOVE members, whom he called “urban guer- 
rillas.” against their neighborhood. 

Representative John Conyers, a Michigan 
Democrat, who also appeared on “Face the 
Nation,” said his House subcommittee on crimi- 
nal justice would investigate the tactics used by 
tlM Philadelphia police in the siege; 

“This is the most violent eviction notice that’s 
ever been given in history,” he said. He added 
that the black community was “totally out- 


hindsight can say if in fan we had to proceed the 
same way again we would not do that.” 

Mr. Goode said the threats from MOVE were 
contained in a letter that the police received two 
days before they attacked the MOVE headquar- 
ters. The letter was signed by Ramona Africa, 
the only adult resident of Lbe house to survive 
the assault. 


But another guest on the program, Darryl 
Gates, chief of the Los Angeles Police Depart- 
ment, defended Mr. Goode and the Philadel- 
phia Police Department's tactics. 

“That man is an inspiration to the nation.” 
Mr. Gales said. “I hope he runs for national 
office.” 

Asked if there had been “serious errors of 
judgment” in deciding to bomb the bouse, Mr. 
Goode said, “1 think that those of us that have 


letter public to support the city’s argument that 
MOVE may have started the devastating fire. 
He said the tity had received at least two other 
similar letters. 

The letter wanted that MOVE had fortified 
its headquarters and stockpiled weapons. The 
group was prepared for police use of chemical 
weapons and explosives, according to the letter. 

“The raid w3J not be swift and it will not be 
dean,” Ramona Africa said in the letter. “It's 
gone to be a mess. If MOVE go down, not only 
will everybody in this block go down, the knee 
joints ef America will break and the body of 
America will soon fall” 

“We going to burn them with smoke, gas, fire 
and buffets,* the letter said. “We wBl bum this 
house down and bum you up with ns.” 

In an interview that CBS said was taped 
Saturday, but broadcast during the news pro- 
gram Sunday, a MOVE spokesman, Jerry Afri- 
ca, wanted that the group expected more vio- 
lence. 

“We are going to put more heat on the city,” 
he said. “If it comes down to a situation where, 
people have to put their lives on the line, MOVE 
people are committed to do that.” 

The group is demanding the release of nine 
members convicted of murder for tbeir role in a 
1978 shootout in which a Philadelphia police 
officer was killed. 


By Lena Williams 

A'eu- York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — In significant 
and increasing numbers, U.S. 
blacks have been moving from old- 
er central cities to the suburban 
areas. 

Their motivations, they say, have 
been the same ones that prompted 
whites to move cart decades before: 
the desire to own a borne, to obtain 
a better education for thrir children 
and to raise a family in a safer 
setting. 

Across the country, the black 
population of the suburbs more 
than doubled between I960 and 
1980, going to nearly 6 2 million 
from 18 million, according to U.S. 
census figures. In 1980, there were 
265 million blacks nationwide, ac- 
cording to the census. 

During the last five years of the 
1970s. the average yearly net mi- 
gration of blades from dues to sub- 
urbs nationwide was 88,000, ac- 
cording to census figures. So far in 
the 1980s, census officials said, 
blacks have been moving to the 
suburbs at an even faster rate. In 
1981 for example, the figure was 
220,000. 

For the most pan, black families 
in New York, New Jersey and Con- 
necticut said in a series of inter- 
views. they have found the way of 
life they were seeking. But they also 
talked of a life that is sometimes 
lonely and troubled. 

Many said they had uneasy rela- 
tionships with their white neigh- 
bors, causing si rains that can some- 
times lead to conflict And they 
said they were concerned about the 
impact on their children of growing 
up in predominantly white neigh- 
borhoods. 

Nearly all said they had tried to 
keep ties to the diy, either through 
work, family, friends or favorite 
hangouts in the old neighbor hood. 
When they moved out of a central 
city, most selected a suburban area 
within an hour’s drive of that aft, 
whether it was in the suburbs 
around New York City and New- 
ark, New Jersey, or in the Hartford 
area or outside New Haven in Con- 
necticut 

When they socialize in the sub- 
urbs, they said, it is almost always 
with other blades, a finding similar 
to one reported recently in a New 
York Times- WCBS-TV poll of resi- 
dents of New York Gty. More than 
half the blacks and whiles polled 
said they had not spent a social 
evening with anyone of the other 
race in the past few months. 

Some said they were worried 
about changes that had occurred in 
tbeir new neighborhood as blacks 
moved in and whites moved to the 
new. suburban areas that were far- 
ther away. In some neighborhoods. 


particularly in the communities 
closest to the central city, blacks 
said, services and the quality of life 
have started to decline. 

Despite the problem the blacks 
who have moved to the suburbs 
said they believed they bad done 
the right thing for themselves and 
their families. 

“New York suburbs can provide 
the best of both worlds.” said An- 
gela Shaw DeCock. a Brooklyn na- 
tive who now lives in Roslyn, on 
Long Island, with her husband and 
two young children. “They can be 
cosmopolitan and ethnically and 
politically diverse, while still pro- 
viding that serene, rustic, safe envi- 
ronment that’s so important to 
families like mine.” 

The migration, which began 
slowly in the 1950s. gained momen- 
tum in the 1960s and 1970s and 
shows signs of even greater accel- 
eration in the first few vears of the 
1980s. 

A s imilar migration has been go- 
ing on in many cities across the 
country, but the movement has 
been particularly striking in the 
suburbs around New York City. 

In the suburbs around New York 
Gty. the average yearly net migra- 
tion of blacks has gone to 285.000 
in 1980 from 77.000 in 1960. 

In Westchester County, while 
the white population declined — to 
729,831 from 802.722 — between 
1970 and 1980, the black popula- 
tion rase to 104,815 from 85.041. 

Sociologists and urban affairs 
specialists said the figures repre- 


sented another chapter in the histo- 
ry of U.S. blacks who, faced with 
racial barriers, have remained one 
step behind whites in their migra- 
tions and pursuit of opportunity. 

Typically, the blacks who have 
moved to die suburbs are the sons 
and daughters of civil servants and 
laborers who worked hard to pro- 
vide a better life for their children. 
Now. the children are trying to as- 
sure an even better future for their 
offspring. 

Thomas and Marie Rouses and 
Richard and Gene Odoms have be- 
come best friends since moving 
from Hartford to Bloomfield, Con- 
necticut, an integrated middle-class 
suburb northwest of that city. 

They said the reason they be- 
came friends was simple: When 
you are one of a handful of blacks 
in the neighborhood, vou lend to 
seek each other out. The Rouses 
and the Odoms said they had sever- 
al white friends in Bloomfield, but 
when it came to socializing, they 
usually did so with each other. 

Although a number of black 
families have moved to predomi- 
nantly white areas, the majorit> 
have chosen racially mixed subur- 
ban communities near central cit- 
ies. 

“There is a caution on the part of 
many middle-class blacks not to 
move too far out and only to mow 
to areas that will accommodate 
some racial difference,” said Clem- 
ent A. Price, a professor of history 
at Rutgers University in New Jer- 
sey. Seven years ago he bought a 



f 

r 





,>i — 


— * ^ 


Thu Auoorted P-eu 


Mam Bowman looking over the remains of her home in 
Palm Coast, Florida, after it was destroyed by a fire. 


house in East Orange. New Jersey, 
on integrated, economically mixed 
city northwest of Newark 

He said many of his friends had 

moved toother towns that were le.v 
integrated and were happy, hu: 
that they still attended church m 
their old neighborhood or went to 
clubs in New York City. 

For many blacks, integration 
come easily. The hostility that 
greeted blac ks who mov ed into pre- 
dominantly white suburbs in the 
late 1950s and early 14 m)* ha- 

eased, some said, because the ma- 
jority of blacks who moved to the 
suburbs during the 1 970s u ere mid- 
dle class Lnd were no longer viewed 
by whiter as a threat to property 
values. 

Nonetheless, some blacks spoke 
of a more subtle form of racial 
tension. 

It can come in the way Macks 
fed they are being watched when 
shopping in certain store*, or iv. 
being questioned by the police 
while jogging or walking auouuh 
certain neighborhoods. 

For some, tension i> created bv 
the insensitivity of some of thei: 
white neighbors. Mrs. Shaw De- 
Cock, a lawyer, said she had en- 
countered such insensitivity in 
Roslyn. a predominantly white up- 
per-middle-class community. 

“People will come to my house 
and say, 'could you get the' lads of 
the house?* *' she said. “I went to 
my son's nursery school one dav. 
and one of the kids in his class 
asked if I were his housekeeper.” 

Florida Fighting 
40 Fires but Rain 
Prevents Spread 

CnttoiPnm /ntemnniLu 

PALM COAST. Florida — For- 
ty major wildfires burned out of 
control Monday in two dozen Flor- 
ida counties, but officials said 
widespread rainfall helped prevent 
the spread of the forest fires, the 
worst in the state's history. 

“These are all leftovers from 
what we had last Friday.” said Paul 
Wills, a Forestry Division spokes- 
man. “They are still out of control, 
but they're not spreading.” 

He said the 40 fires consumed 

144.000 acres 158,277 hectares) of 
brush and timber .tince Friday and 
that 109 fires burned an estimated 

170.000 acres since Thursday, de- 
stroying 200 home* and damaging 
400. 

Two firefighte- . luve been killed 
and seven fire: - , ..|. u - r „ and rangers 
have been injur- l - is-»c the fires 
erupted ThursJ .. . • turned into 
a major prohl.-J • >ter. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


'Tonight fcould 

the night 



Sri Lanka Asks Israel, 
Pakistan and China for 
Aid in Fighting Rebels 


Spielcasino 

Aachen 

| (ntr, -gaing international' atmos- 
pnere Avantgarde interiors 
J with rnore than ICO works by 
leading contemporary artists 
First class Gala Restaurant 
(MtCheltn star) | Dancing ;n 
I Club aero. A 

/. ^ A 


By Barbara Gosscttc 

New York Times Service 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — The 
Sri Lankan government, faced with 
increasingly violent, mobile and 
well-armed guerrilla groups, is 
turning to Israel. China and Paki- 
stan for new weapons, supplies and 
expertise to meet the threat, offi- 
cials here said. 

Six fast naval patrol boats have 
been ordered from Israel, they said. 
One of the boats is reportedly al- 
ready in service in the waters sepa- 
rating Sri Lanka from southeastern 
India, where ethnic Tamil separat- 
ists are thought to be taking refuge. 
Two more boats have been bought 
second-hand from Singapore, ac- 
cording to the officials. 

They also said small arms were 
being bought from Pakistan and 
China. Sri Lanka is planning io buy 
more helicopters, possibly from 
Europe, for surveillance and for the 
more rapid deployment of troops. 

Speaking Saturday at the dedica- 
tion of a new police station, and in 


in speeches — since atrocities com- 
mitted by troops in the largely eth- 
nic Sinhalese armed forces have, 
the government has acknowledged, 
been gaming supporters for the 
separatists among Tamils. 

When Israel began to help the 
government here, that country was 
allowed to establish an interests 
section in Colombo. The Israeli 
mission still operates under the 
auspices of the U.S. Embassy, al- 
though the Israeli's offices are in a 
separate building. 

Government officials and diplo- 
mats in Sri Lanka said the Israeli 
experts have gone, and have been 
replaced by a private British securi- 
ty company under contract to Sri 
Lanka for ami-terrorism training. 

Officials have not said how much 
the new weapons cost or where the 
money came from. But publicly, 
officials at the regional and nation- 
al level have been warning people 
in speeches that some badly needed 
development projects may have to 
be shelved if the government is to 



Honduras Puts Controls 0 
On Nicaraguan Rebels 

In QncJdngDoum, Tegucigalpa Cites 
Cnoss-Border Raids by Sandinist Army 


Tht fnnmwri Pna 

President Jos£ Napoledn Duarte of El Salvador gestured to like graduating class at the 
University of Notre Dame, in South Bend, Indiana. Mr. Duarte, who addressed the class , 
was accompanied by the Reverend Theodore M. Hesburgh, president of the university. 

Israeli Cabinet Announces Steps 
Aimed at Stemming Economic Slide 


IIVSfSiK 

Spielcasino 

[Oeynhausen 

; Germany s latest.. Tasteful ■ 
gaming salons in. the midst of 
the lovely Kurpark. Sophisti- 
cated ambience created by 
fnnovativdarchltecture. lighting, 
color and art. Gourmet dining. 
Slot machines. Rou'ette. Slack 
Sack daily f r on 3 pm. r ~ 


; n n n ! (i f (i f (I [ | 

[Spielcasino 
1( iremen 

E&fe rm ^py jfino'ml u b atmosphere 
: cgnjspateg.BQttc herstrasse. 
in the Rett ' 
lurantyd rinks in the' 
iu^bs^ear;.;' ; 

§>$fette ; Blackjack 

jBaccara -idAi x- 1 &;c h a p e 1 1 e ) 

‘Jjl^ifynfrQm 3 D.m. ' 

Jpessieurs, Mesdames - 
gfjfaites vdsfeux. 


the wake of last Tuesday's terrorist stop the guerrilla forces from gain- 
attack in Anuradhapura. President mg an unbeatable military advan- 
J uni us R. Jayawardene said, with- tage. 

out giving details, that the govern- Local authorities were stunned 
meot had decided “in the last few by the quality and number of wean- 
months" to step up arms purchases ons carried by the terrorists who 
and the training of anti-terrorist raided the town of Anuradhapura. 
units. Military officials said drat boats 

A decision last year by Mr. used by the rebels were faster than 
Jayawardene's government to call anything the Sri Lanka Navy had 
in Israeli counterinsurgency and in- until it ordered the Israeli patrol 
telligence experts brought sharp craft 

criticism from some Moslems in Sri The ethnic Tamil separatists, of- 


By Edward Walsh government, will require paijia- 

Woshmrron Pas' Semce meauuy approval and would not 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli take full effect for three years, 
cabinet, after meeting for 12 hours. u passed by the KnesseL or j»r- 
has announced a series of steps b li ? ment : Ration wfll gradu- 
response to evidence that the coun- eventually ehmi- 


government, will require padia- economic policy, resulted from 
memary approval and would not concern over the signs of resurgent 


feci for three years. 

1 by the Knesset, or par- 


tly s economy is continuing to de- 
teriorate. 


nate the 
order the 


he government s power to 
the Bank of Israd to prim 


Lanka, where they form about 7.6 ffcials asserted, were able to buy 
percent of the population, and the arras with money from relative- 


from Islamic countries with embas- 
sies in Colombo. There was an ex- 
plosion in a hotel where Israelis 
were staying. 


ly affluent Tamils firing in the 
West 

In addition, militant separatists 
operating in Sri T-anfca have been 


The measures included a pro- eDau ^ 1 money io covct the annual 
posed I™* from ,5 -J to has 

mtvSm (Ua4nn,n 0 inns* i Q legislation as pan of an economic 


The president held out against accumulating gold through robber- 
the criticism, saying he would lake ies of banks and pawning opera- 
help from any quarter to restore lions. 

peace ‘in the country. He said Brit- Finally, ethnic Tamil separatists 


jab and the United States had have been charged with narcotics 
turned down his earlier requests for dealing. A group of 23 separatists 
help. were arrested recently in Italy on 


help. were arrested recently in Italy on 

The president also wants to ere- drug trafficking charges and were 
ate a more disciplined anti~guenil~ deported to Sri Lanka, where they 
la force — a theme he still refers to are in custody. 


“ — “ “““ ^ el with an additional SI.5 billion in 

However, despite the renewed emergency aid over the next two 
concern over Israel s economic po- years 

sition, none of the steps announced J This would be b addition to 
Sunday night involved a funda- more than $6 billion m regular U.S 
menial change in the economy or economic and military Issistance 
drastic austerity measures. mat ^ due lo during 

The most far-reaching of the a c- the same period, 
lions, proposed legislation to make The long cabinet meetin g, which 
the Bonk of Israel, the country’s indicated the depth of disagree- 
central bank, independent of the ment wi thin the government over 


Paraguay Leader Assailed on Mengele 


Reuren Friday from her Paris base to fol- Mengele. whose Paraguayan cili- 

ASUNCION. Paraguay — Beate low up on a visit last November, zenship was revoked in 1979 , could 
KJarsfeld, a Nazi hunter, has ac- said Saturday that she would try to not have found the higbrlevd pra- 
ctised President Alfredo Stroessner obtain statements from opposition lection he needed b any other 
of Paraguay of sheltering Dr. Josef* groups condemning General country and must still be b Para- 
Mengele, the war criminal, and has Stroessner' s official visit to Bonn guay despite repeated official deni- 
pledged to organize opposition to on July 2 and 3. als. 

General Stroessner's planned trip ^r. Mengele is wanted by the She said, referring to General 
to West Germany. United States, West Germany and Stroessner, “We would like to 

Mrs. Klaraeld, who arrived here f or 21^ lies committed as a prove that he lies, that be know; 

physician at the Auschwitz concen- full well where Mengele is.” Mrs. 
WMAT without rr?^ UK£ nation camp in Poland during KJarsfeld added. “It's up to the 

wratND World War II. government to prove that he is not 

each fbday in iw ht Mrs. KJarsfeld said that Dr. here." 


She said, referring to General 
Stroessner, “We would like to 
prove that he lies, that be know; 
full well where Mengele is.” Mrs. 
KJarsfeld added. “It's up to the 
government to prove that he is not 
here." 



Beate Klarsfeld 


inflation and other indications that 
earlier measures have not stemmed 
the economic slide 

After the cabinet meeting, Fi- 
nance Minister Yitzhak Modai 
conceded that “there isn't much 
additional revenue” for the govern- 
ment b the new economic steps. 

He acknowledged that for the 
last two months the government 
had been “printing money way be- 
yond the volumes we had 
planned,” indicating that earlier at- 
tempts to curb government spend- 
ing and public consumption had 
been ineffective. 

The government's budget deficit 
and the steady decline m Israel's 
foreign currency reserves were 
among the signs that alarmed offi- 
cials. But thekey factor b bringing 
about the lengthy cabinet meeting 
was the announcement Wednesday 
that the consumer price bdex rose 
by 19.4 percent in April, an infla- 
tion rate dose to the record levels 
reached in Israd last year. 

Mr. Modai said he did not expect 
an immediate impact on inflation 
from the measures adopted Sun- 
day. 

Several of the new measures were 
temporary. The doubling of the 
trawl tax, which is designed to 
stem the drab on foreign currency 
reserves by Israelis who travel 
abroad, will be effective only until 
Sept. 15, the end of the peak travel 
season. 

The cabinet also announced a 
limit on new government contracts 
and a freeze on public wages, bat 
only until the end of August. 


By Edward Cody 

. Washington Past Service 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
Upset by a series of border attacks 
by the Nicaraguan Army, the Hon- 
duran Army lias, imposed tough 
new controls on anti-San dimst 
guerrillas operating from bases 
along the increasingly tense fron- 
tier with Nicaragua. 

The Honduran moves, carried 
out over the last two weeks; indude 
army occupation of the headquar- 
ters camp at Las Vegas in El Par- 
aiso province, about four miles 
(roughly 6.3 kilometers) north of 
the border, diplomatic sources said. 

A spokesman for the U.S.- 
backed rebel organization, die Nic- 
araguan Democratic Force, do- 
dined to comment on how the 
Honduran Army actions would af- 
fect the guerrinas’ four-year strug- 
gle to overthrow the Sandinist gow- 
eminent b Managua. 

Diplomatic observers here not- 
ed, however, that logistics help 
from the Honduran Array and use 
of the border bases for rest and 
resupply have been vital to the re- 
bel force since the U.S. Central 
Intelligence Agency expanded it 
into an irregular army of more than 
12,000 men m 1982 and 1983. 

The Honduran Armv acted, the 
government said, after Nicaragua’s 
regular army shelled and rocketed 
areas near several rebel installa- 
tions this month and , on one occa- 
sion, sent a small unit across the 
border b pursuit of rebel forces. 

Shelling and rocketing of rebel 
camps in Honduras has occurred 
sporadically before. But the recent 
attacks were described in Teguci- 
galpa as larger and more intense. 

Nicaragua has denied sending 
any units across the border. 

Humberto Ortega Saavedra, the 
Nicaraguan minister, re- 

newed on Saturday Ms counttYs 
call for talks with Honduran offi- 
cials to relieve tensions. 

Mr. Ortega also rnsisiaH that Ms 
troops would continue to fire into 
Honduran territory as long as Nic- 
araguan rebels were permitted to 
operate from there. 

Some Hondurans have said pri- 
vately that the border situation has 
received more publicity than usual 
because of President Roberto 
Suazo Cdrdova's writ to Washing- 
ton, scheduled to begin Monday. 

Fmphaqywig the risks incurred 
by Honduras in what essentially 
remains a U.S. effort will give the 
president and die aimed forces 
co mmander . General Walter L6- 
pez, increased leverage in conversa- 
tions with. Reagan adminis tration 
officials and congressmen, these 
Hondurans said. 


Honduras has asked for a major 
increase in UJS. economic 3fld nun- 
taiy aid as well as a security trea ty 
g uaran te eing U.S. support in the 
event of hostilities with Nicaragua. 

Some Honduran Army officers 
have expressed concern in recent 
months that their support for me 
insurgents has increased the likeli- 
hood of such hostilities. 

The new controls did not appear 
to mark an end to Honduran coop- 
eration with the rebels. Rather, 
they seemed aimed at reducing the 
rrf fij find dang ers along the border, 
and demonstrating the army’s abil- 
ity to control and protect the fron- 
tier area's coffee plantations and 
farm hamlets. 

Frank Arana, a rebel spokesman, 

said that insurgent forces bad 
about 80 dashes with Sandinist 
troops in the first half of May, up 
sharply from the relative low num- 
ber earlier this year. 

The Nicaraguan government 
said last week that Sandinist forces 
in the same period recorded about 
60 clashes in what it described as a 
broad offensive to push the insur- 
gents bade into Honduras and pre- 
vent than from penetrating deeply 
bio Nicaragua as they had last 
year. 

. Up to 4,000 guerrillas have been 
driven back across the border in 
recent weeks, it said. 

■ Duarte at Notre Dame U. 

President Jos6 Napoledn Duarte 
of H Salvador invoked the memory 
of George Gipp, the University of 
Notre Dame football legend, and 
promised the university’s 1985 
graduates that he would “score a 
victory for peace” in his country. 
United Press International report- 
ed from South Bend, Indiana. 

Mr. Duarte is a 1948 engineering 
graduate of the university and 
played football in Ms first year. 

He said in a commencement ad- 
dress Sunday that his Noire Dame 
education and long association 
with the Reverend Theodore M. 
Hesburgh, the university president, 
had turned him from a tivQ engi- 
neer into “an engineer to serve hu- 
manity.” 

“I will return to my borne stadi- 
um, £1 Salvador, where l will have 
to imitate George Gipp and score a 
victory for peace,” he told more 
than 2,000 graduates. 

Gipp was the dying Notre Dame 
football fubbadc who asked his 
coach. Knots Rocknc, to have the 
team “win one for the Gipper.” In 
the fihn “Kncte Rocknc — AH 
American,” Gipp was portrayed by 
Ronald Reagan, who as president 
delivered the 1981 Notre Dame 
commencement addres s; 



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^ IUl1 He |)^ Hopes of ' Land People 9 End in Thai Camps 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Page 7 


F or Vietnamese and Cambodians Alike, Refugee Sites Are Becoming Home 




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By William Btahigm 

H arA/np ftw P«f Semcr 

EVACUATION SITE 2. Thai- 
land — Six monlhsago Danh Man, 
42. left Vietnam cm a hazardous 
journey across Cambodia with his 
wife and 13-year-old daughter. In 
addition to the risks, the trip cost 
him about $333, a small fortune in 
Vietnam. 

Fen- Mr. Man, an interpreter for 


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the U.S. Army Speda] Forces dur- 
tn War, die cost and 




Log the Vietnam 
the risks were worth his hope .of 
reaching the Thai border and enter- 


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ment in the United States. 

Today that hope looks forlorn. 
Like about 3,500 other Vietnamese 
“land people” here who have’ Bed 
their country overland across Cam- 
bodia, Mr. Man is in limbo. 

In a move to deter further arriv- 
als, the Thai government has de- 
clared them ineligible for resettle- 
ment, and there is nowhere else to 
go. . 

Just across the border, in western 
Cambodia, are occupation troops 
of the Hanoi government, and bat 
the refugees are jammed among po- 
tentially hostile Cambodians 
forced to flee their homes by the 
Vietnamese troops. 

“The future looks quite grim for 
(hem," said a Western refief offi- 
cial. 

It hardly looks brighter for about 
225,000 Cambodian refugees who 
also are in a kind of limbo. Faced 
to flee a Vietnamese dry-season of- 
fensive against their border settle- 
ments, they are assembled in a doz- 
en supposedly temporary 
“evacuation rites” on die Thai ride 
of the 450-mile (725-kilometer) 
Thai -Cam bodian border. 

[United Press International re- 
ported Sunday from Ban g kok that 
the United Slates would stop inter- 
viewing Cambodian refugees for 
resettlement next month a move 
that wifi virtually halt the resettle- 
ment of Cambodians in the U nited 
States.] 

The Thai evacuation rites appear 



At Evacuation Site 8 in eastern Thailand, about 36,000 
Khmer Rouge followers are buOdtng durable structures. 


to be evolving into semt-pennanenl 
camps. Elsewhere at Sue 2, about 
40 rinks north of the ton® of Aran- 
yapralhel and a couple of teaks 
west of the Cambodian border, 
about 65,000 non-Communist 


Cambodian refugees are fixing 
their bamboo and thatched homes 
and trying to improve drainage and 
sanitation facilities with the help of 
UN and other relief agencies. 

About 30 miles south of Aranya- 
praihet, about 36.000 followers of 
the C ommunis t Khmer Rouge are 
bnfiding more durable str uct ures at 
a camp called Evacuation Site 8, 
about a mile horn the Khao Ta 
Ngok mountains *h»« mark the 
border opposite tbeir former 
stronghold of the Phnom Malai re- 
gion. 

For the most part, the Khmer 
Rouge population remains en- 
camped unoer makeshift shelters of 
blue plastic sheeting supplied by 
the United Nations; they provide 
poor protection from the monsoon 

rain* that aim sm miig to ^ rwirfi tli* 

area. 

According to Western refief offi- 
cials, Khmer Rouge leaders have 


been refoctam to give their she an 
air oT permanence and are dearly 
unhappy to be on Thai soiL 

However, some of their followers 
apparently do not share their feel- 
ing. Relief officials report that a 
loosening of Khmer Rouge control 
over the population since the move 
to Thai territory in February has 
led to rigos of more relaxed social 
conditions, including an upsur ge of 
wedding ceremonies and more 
openness toward foreigners. 

While the refugees at Site 8 may 
yet move to another location on 
higher ground, most of the Cambo- 
dian refugee population is expected 
to remain in die present she until 
the end of the year. 

' At Site 2, officials of the Khmer 
People's National Liberation 
Front, the main non-Co mnmms t 
Cambodian resistance group, have 
already set up crude hospitals. 


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ties. 

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Minister Tells U.S. to Halt Meddling in Philippines 


■■ cTv.n r»; 


Ream. 

MANILA — A senior 
official said Monday that the Unit- 
ed States should stop meddling in 
Manila's internal affairs. 

Leonardo B. Perez, the political 
affairs minis ter, referred specifical- 
ly to a U.S. Senate resolution last 
week linking mili tary mid econom- 
ic aid to domestic reforms. 

There is widespread belief that' 
the government is also upset by 1 
apparent Washington pressure on 
1 32 President Ferdinand £. Marcos to 
call an dec don before his term ex- 
■ pircs in 1987. 




W3Esm J. Casey, director of the 
U.S. Central Intrifitynce Agency, 
was reported to have tcM Mr. Mar- 
cos during a visit two weeks ago 
that the While House wanted to see 
a presidential election before 1987. 

[Mr. Marcos later denied the re- 
pot, published in Newsweek mag- 
azine, that Mr. Casey had suggest- 
ed earlier elections, Inc Associated 
Press reported from Manila.] 

Mr. Perez raid the Philip p ines 
could conduct hs affairs and enact 
laws “without the intervention of 
-any forriga official or goveni- 
weaLT 1 ‘ . '• 


“Drisis! 

ence or meddling in our domestic 
affairs by foreign, government offi- 
cials,” he said. Mr. Perez is a close 
confidant and adviser to Mr. Mar- 


cos. 


The nonbin ding Senate resolu- 
tion called for signs of pr o gre ss in 
several domestic issues, including 
assurances of free and fair elec- 
tions. release of political prisoners 
and prosecution of those accused in 
the murder of Benigno S. Aquino 
Jr, a leading opposition figure. 

'■ Meanwhile, a witness emerged 


from a year in hiding and told a 
court that Mr. Aquino, killed at 
Manila airport mAugnst 1983. was 
still on an aircraft stairway when 
she heard gunfire. 

Olivia Reyes, 21, said she did not 
see the actual shooting and was 
talking to a security guard when 
she heard the shot But she said she 
saw two uniformed sok fiers hold- 
ing Mr; Aquino on the aircraft 
steps. 

Her testimony conflicted with 
the military version that the former 
senator was lolled on the airport 
tarmac. -* * -# • 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. MAY 21, 1985 





U 

Abe Burrows, Broadway Author, Directories 

By Robert D. McFaddcn 

wwYflffcTTnuaSerWdr JSSifW S™* fl965V He was also Morn* 1927 umfl his 


^ er-tyricist FraHfc Low mi the 'id ft. 

NEW YORK — Abe Burrows, Lnuithorof 

74, the Kbremst, director. author ^ for and od«. UiecMutorf^J?" Encjtiopedia sad of fas 

and comic who wrote a score of SL^SslWO musical fable of production of* B Stockings. on dance, “He fought fas 

ehnnrt fnr RrfifldwaV. including _ ’ ,_i hnetW Dun Mwitii 80. Aininci an analheuc Dublic 


and comic wno wioie a »« u* «"»£. 195 o musical fable of proaucuou u. J^ritings on dance, “He fought fas 

shows for Broadway. mdudinB Runyonescrue gamblers, hustlers penn North, 80, taules against an roatheuc pubhc 

“Guys and Dolls" JjdTiow » ^ Army saviors ran Cambotfian Ex-Leader and almost smridiandedly sue- 

W?S5BwSS™: 2S£fi2? C “ ,w 

SsteSa SSSSS 5 ^ w.wwje 

IgUpK ES 53 SS ilSS SSsSsa 

Iss ffi=fS52 skssf^” s-ssii 

to faa>Xl^mSc view of life Other fats wn«®midiwW A^can Dance Cnfac Danish Ballet fromytach 

aunetoge^rmaseriesofhitsthat SARATOGA SPRINGS, New ^graduated in 1943- She 

critics bailed for some of the the- tear's vSr M964) and York CAP) — John Martm, 91, the- promoted to the tank of sdtoSlia 

a^s purest moments of comic joy. Makes Sammy Run ann _* |i*S^teSrESS? * ^ 


SALT LAAi w 1 1 . w w*. \ w* 
_ To ni Lander Marts, 54, a for- 
mer dancer with the Royal Danish 
Ballet Company and a teacher for 
Ballet West, died Sunday of lung 

cancer. . . 

Born in Copenhagen, she re- 
ceived her dance tnunmg andj gen- 
eral education at the school oMbe 
Roval Danish Ballet, from wtacfc 

J . j liug Ch* wu 


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there's one superlative hotel 
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Cuomo Says N.Y. 
Should Cut links 
To South Africa 


Sew York Times Service 


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ALBANY. New Yort — The 
state of New York should el imin ate 
billions of dollars of investments m 
companies that do business in 
SoumAfrica, Governor Mario M- 
Cuomo said Sunday, and should 
sharply limit all d e al in gs with such 

concerns. 

“I have concluded,” Mr. Cuomo 
said, “that New York state should 
adopt a comprehensive and respon- 
sible strategy to demonstrate the 
abhorrence of oar residents to the 
pernicious system of apartheid. 

Mr. Cuomo said he would pro- 
pose legislation to require the di- 
vestiture, over the next five years, 
of billions of dollars in state funds. 
These indude about S4.4 billion m 
employees’ mid teachers’ pension 
funds. 

Under the envisioned legislation, 
the governor said, the state comp- 
troller and the trustees of the pen- 
sion funds would be obliged to di- 
vest holdings in a series of steps. 

By 1986, the stale would begin to 
divest holdings in concerns doing 
business directly with the govern- 
ment of South Africa or South- 
West Africa, with some exceptions, 
and with companies that have not 
signed a code that commits mem to 
work for better lives for their Mack 

Cn &y?988, divestment would begin 
for those companies found to be 
making only minimal or moderate 
progress toward compliance with 
the code. By 1990, divestment 
would begin for all the remaining 
companies doing miriness in Smith 
j Africa- 


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FRHKH COMPANY HANDBOOK 1985 
Publtshed fay 


Published by 

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with the 

International HeraM Tribune 



I Int er national Herald Tribwie, Book Division 
. 181 avenue Oxrte&de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuifiy Cedex, France. 


□ Endased is my payment. (Payment nxay be made in 


convertible Braecn cjurrency of your choke at curent 
exchange rates.) 

□ Please dierge to my ere* cardVBAD DINGS □ AMEXD 


CARD NUMBER. 


SIGNATURE. 

InnyKrcM 


NAME Fife* IBM- 


posmoN. 


COMPANY. 


ADDRESS. 


21-5-85 


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Please send me .copies of French Conpany Hcucfcook 1985. 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Page 9 


ARTS /LEISURE 



300 Barbie Gowns 




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Ivemanotwl HmUThtme 

> T> ARIS — BiHy Boy stands 6 feet 
X4(L 94 meters). but somehow he 
looms considerably larger by the 
time you take in the psychedelic 
suit, canary 'hair brushed up in a 
Brillo-pad hairdo, green-rimmed 
glasses, four gaudy rings and black- 
painted fin arnraik • 

This 25-year-old gangly bird of 
paradise is, in fact, a serious artist 
well known in underground fash- 
ion aides for his surrealist cos* 
tume jewelry, his coQectioh of 

Hebe Dorsey; 

-^Sdriapardli memorabilia and Ms 
passion for Barbie dolls. The latter 
passion is w mj n g ipln fan lirfit 
with an iiiwwn»t exhibition miM 
“Le Nouveau Tbdfttre de la Mode,” 
opening Wednesday at the lardin 
(TAcdmaautido, a children’s play- 
ground in the Bate de Boulogne. 

There, in a train decorated by die 
minimalist AEdrie Putman, - 300 
Barbie dolls, dressed by top Paris 
designers, will be on dirolsy. 

The designers responded enthu- 
siastically, most of all Yves Saint 
Laurent, who so loved the idea that 
£ he sent 16 costumes, a retrospective 
of his career, mrlntting Ins famed 
pantewi t Saint Lament also con- 
tributed to the catalog; recalling, 
that he started his fasnwm career 
designing clothes for Ms sisters’ 
dolls in Oran, Algeria, where he 
was born. . ■ • 

Sixty-one designers contributed 
to the project, including almost all. 
of the major Paris couturiers, pins 
ready-to-wear stars such as Claude 
Montana and Thierry Mugler. A 
handful of foreigners pitched in 
too, such as Kenzo, a Japanese who 
works in Paris; Koos Van der 


Acker from New York; and Enrico 
Coved from MDan. Jean Bardlet, 
trim nsnaUy coifs Sophia Loren, 
mark the h*t$ The American cos- 
tome jewelry designer Kenneth J. 
Lane, whose fakes are famous, pro- 
vided beads and bangles. 

The French sculptor Claude La- 
lanne accessorized a gown by the 
new New ; York designer Chris- 
tophs de Menfl, of art collecting 
fame. The hairdressers Alexandre 
and M a iufcg Franck did the hair- 
dos. The iDustrator Rene Groan, 
who !**?£"* the Dior ads, contrib- 
uted the catalog cover. 

The dotbes fear die 1 Hi-inch 
plastic don were exquisitely made 
— a study in miniature wort All 
garments come and off, even the 


zippers unzip, and but- 
tons unbutton. Each garment bears 
the couturier’s label ' 

Louis Fecaud’s bode is outfitted 
with cascades of white tnQn. Lan- 
vin’s contribution includes a pink 
satin evening gown, its bodice em- 
broidered by the famous house of 
Lesage. Jacqueline de Ribes, whose 
evening domes arc beginning to 
make a mark; gave Barbie a green 
faille gown with' a lot of froufrou in 
the back. Diet's furrier, Frederic 
Castet, dressed the aB- American 
doD with a very Parisian itjd minlr 
outfit, including . red- mink- 
trimmed boots. . 

Jean-Pad Gaultier’s outrageous 
Barbie wears a green velvet dress 
finished with ice-cream-cone 
breasts, a replica of what he 
showed on'lris runway a few sear 
sous back. Then there is a little 

hladr /trwa that Witty Bny fteri gnert 

originally for Bettina d rama nt, a 
weft-known model in the 1950s and 
a Paris society figure. A year ago, 
Benina and Boy met and became 



Sting 9 s Monster Bond 9 : No Labels , Please 


By Michael Zwerin 

IntemeUHtral NemJd Tribune 

jfONTREUX, Switzerland — 
-JLV1 Stin§, the voice of The Po- 
lice, combines touches of David 


was plucking the double bass in a 
dixieland band. .The other musi- 
cians were all over 50. He was 
known as “the kid.” In Ms early 20s 
he taught music and football in a 



Cairo Bans 'Arabian Nights’ 



New York Times Serriix ■ 

C AIRO — An Egyptian .court 
has ordered the confiscation 
of an txnexpnrgaled edition of ?A 
Thousand and One Nights” on the 
ground that the thousand-year-old 
Arabic classic posed a threat to the 
country’s morals. The court also 
fined three booiksdteis 500 pounds 
each (about $600) for {fistnbutmg 
the book. 

The tmeensonod version of the 
book, which is a collection of such 
stories as “All Baba and the 40 
Thieves,” “Aladdin and His Magic 
Lamp,” and “Snbad the Sailor, 
was ruled obscene because of sec- 
tions, among the more than 100: 
stories containing explicit descrip- 
tions of sexual acts. ; 

Several .critics of the decision 
said die ruling reflected growing 
Islamic fundamentalist sentiment 
here. Conservative Islamic forces 
havebeen demanding a crackdown 
on what they see as pornography 
and other “un-Islamnc* influences 
on Egypfs culture. . . 

“My fear is that if we continue to 


confiscate obscene wards from our 
literature, things wfll not stop 
than,” warned Anis Mansonr, a 
retired magazine editor and promi- 
nent writer. 

■ Song Banned in TfaaOand 

“One Night in Bangkok,” a Brit- 
ish pop sang about sex and wild 
tiroes in the Thai ca pital, has beat 
bairn ed from a television channel 
and-a radio station nm by a govern- 
ment agency, The Associated Press 
reported. 

A circular from the Mass Com- 
'm i miration Organization of Thai- 
land said the song’s lyrics could 
“cause misunderstanding: about 
Thai aociety”_ and that they 
“showed Jhsrespect towards Bud- 
dhism.” 

- Daranee Maneedit, a (fisc jock- 
ey, said the British hit appeared in 
Bangkok at the begriming of die 
year and has since been widely 
played, especially at discotheques 
and nightclubs. The lyrics revolve 
arouna the freely available sex in 


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Billy Boy and friend. 

friends, with Benina now acting as 
Bey’s muse for this project. 

The Manhattan-born. Montmar- 
tre-baaed Boy said he had been 
collecting the Monde, blue- eyed 
mid pony-tailed plastic Barbies 
since he was a child and that be 
owned tho usands of them. His fas- 
cination comes from the fact that 
Barbie “is a symbol, not iust a ddL 
She represents many thing s, the 
communication and attraction peo- 
ple have for one another and the 
evolution of the culture and time 
we live in. She is a pop icon, a camp 
cult figure; who, since her introduc- 
tion in 1959 has mirrored all the 
Mealwwl values and aspirations of 
Western culture as well as every 
important fashion trend.” 

WeD, maybe. What is sure is that 
Barbie was the first adult fashion 
doll, complete with breasts and 
sexy long legs, to come on the toy 
market,' and she created qnite a 
furor at the time. What also made 
the doll memorable was the fact 
that it was sold with an extensive 
wardrobe, indnding costumes for 
an astronaut, beauty queen and 
cafeteria waitress. 

AD this may explain why the ex- 
hibition captured the imagination 
of Paris couturiers. Another reason 
is that this exercise in doD dressing 
is not new to French fashion. It is a 
a tradition that gpes hack to the 
Renaissance and continued until 
the 18th century and Marie- Antoi- 
nette, the trend setter of those 
times. Her hatmaker. Rose Bertjn, 
used to dress wooden dolls in the 
latest Paris styles and send them to 
European courts to spread Paris 
styles. 

There are no doDs left from this 
period, but after World War H, the 
-French Chambre Syndicate de la 
Couture Puriaaroe revived the tra- 
dition by commissioning a number 
of artists and. couturiers to create 
what they called “Un Petit Theatre 
de la Mode.” B esides leading cou- 
turiers, artists such as Jean Cocteau 
and the decorator Christian B6rard 
contributed. 

The Billy Boy exhibition will not 
only serve to iDustrale French fash- 
ion. It is also a neat promotional 
tod for its sponsor, Mattel France, 
a subsidiary of Mattel, the Ameri- 
can toy company that created Bar- 
bie. 

After Paris, the Barbies wffl trav- 
el in France and abroad. 


gance, Arid his new bandcombines ured 1 was_ 
the musicians of Miles Davis the rest of my 
(Daryl Jones, 
bass). Weather 
Report (Omar 
Hakim, drums) 
and Wynton 
Marsalis (Bran- 
ford Marsalis, 
saxophones, 

Kenny Kirk- 
land, piano). 

He describes 
the group as a 
“monster band, 
some of the best 
jazz musicians in 
America. But it's 
not a jazz band. 

The main phi- 
losophy behind 
it is to defy the 
labeling process. 

The lines of de- 
marcation that 
separate styles 
of music come 
from a reaction- 
ary frame of 
mind, from the 
press and busi- 
ness executives, 
not the musi- 
cians. Some of 
our first album 
[‘Blue Turtles,’ 

A&M, out next 
.week] isn’t going 
to be easy to get 
played on the ra- 
dio. Soane of it 
will be. Deliber- 
ately. I believe in 
seduction rather 
than revolu- 
tion.” 

On the other 
hand, he is per- 
sonally waxy of the seduction by 
greed and egocenlridty that often 
follows fame. There have been fa- 
vorahte reviews of Sting, the actor, 
for bis roles in The Who's film 



Sting oo stage. 


to be a teacher for 
e,” be says. Didn't 

see anything else 

I could do to 
make money. I 
was a home4ov- 
ing. average hus- 
band, a dneks- 
on- the- wall 
middle-class 
caricature.” 

Then he met 
Stewart Cope- 
land and Andy 
Summers, 
moved to Lon- 
don with his 
wife and child 
and switched to 
electric bass. 
The Police was 
formed. The trio 
began with what 
musicians call 
“ ham sandw ich” 

tours. Then 
there was a hit 
single, and one 
album after an- 
other began to 
sell in the mil- 
lions. 

•The Police 
achieved every- 
thing we set out 
to do a hundred- 
fold, more than 

our wildest 
dreams. We 
played for a 
quarter of a mil- 
lion people rare 
night. The 
choice at that 
stage is. do yon 
cany on regurgi- 
tating the same 
formula again 
and again just for the money or 
look Tor something different? 
There's all these nmxxs flying 
around about T be Police breaking 
np. We haven't had a falling out. 


“Quadrophenia” and, last year, we*U play together again, but we’re 
“Dime.” T keep my sanity” he not joined at the hip either. I had to 


says, “by trying to balance the 
equation of being a contemporary 
Western rationalist white remain- 
ing open to my unconsciousness — 
they call it the Spirit in the East.” 

There was not much spirituality 
showing when Sting (bom Gordon 
Sumner in WaDsend, England, Oct 
2. 1951) stormed through the crowd 
of journalists, press attaches, auto- 
graph collectors and groupies in the 


step back and start a gain ” 

In concert The Police had a sec- 
tion in the middle of most tunes 
that was “carte blanche — we'd just 
go for it,” until the signal to return 
to the bead. Si gnals consisted of 
“body movements, threats or the 
evil eye.” 

Miles Davis was once asked to 
describe the signals be used to di- 
rect his complex aleatoric forms. 


botd lobby as he arrived for tte, Jjfcftaoswcr was typically enjgmat- 
Rose (fOr Rod: Festival earlier ic: “What signals?” 


I met Miles. 
I [Jones] took me to the studio 


Daiy! 

in New York last month. I was very 
nervous, you know, this white kid 


this mnnth He was Steeling himself 
for “that dreaded lip-synch. Fra 
awful at it. I always forget the 
words." nervous, you k 

Lip-synching musicians mime to from England. Miles has been my 
a playback of their own recording, hero for a long time He said Hi 

Sting, can you speak French?* I 
said ‘As a matter of fact I can.' He 
asked me to translate a copy of the 
Miranda rights, you know, ‘Any- 
thing yon say wifi be taken down 
At the age of 17, in Newcastle, he and used agamst you.' I wrote it out 


wmen rffmi na tes the need for road 
crews, sound balance and rehears- 
als. Sting calls this made-for-TV 
cost saver (the entire festival was 
taped) a “terrible sham.’ 


$1 Million in Jewish Art Is Auctioned 


The Associated Press 

J ERUSALEM — More than SI 
million worth of Jewish art went 
under the gavel in toad’s first in- 
ternational art auction, which end- 
ed Sunday. 

The 257 items in the sate includ- 
ed Torah scrolls, silver jewelry and 
synagogue decorations, paintings 
and books. The oldest piece was a 
Byzantine glass pendant dating to 
the 4th or 5th century A D. The 
newest items incJndea silver syna- 
gogue' decorations trade in Israel. 
The highest price at the three- 


day sale was $75,000 for a portrait 
of Rabbi Isidore Kaufmann. a 
19th-century Hungarian artist who 
specialized in Jewish subjects. It 
was bought by a private collector 
from South America. 


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BROADCASTING TO CABLE GOMMNflES 
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and then screamed the Miranda 
rights in French over this track into 
a microphone. Then M3es said, 
*Glad to meet you. man, see you 
around.’ and 1 was shown oul So I 
don’t know whether or not I'm on 
the new Mites Davis record.” 
(“You're Under Arrest," CBS — he 
is, credited as a “French police- 
man.”) 

h took Sting “ages” to program 
the first two movements of 
Vaughan Williams's Sixth Sym- 
phony on a Synclavier (a sophisti- 
cated musical computer). ”1 did it 

note by note, instrument by instru- 
ment, from the score; eight ban at 
a time. It probably sounds very 

C snuous, but I wanted to learn 
the mechanics of an orchestra 
work." 

He is currently living “in a 
Sampsomte suitcase,” breaking in 
the new band. “With The Police 


there was, let’s say. a semblance of 
democracy," be says. “The lines of 
function were not always dear, 
which often led to conflict. Democ- 
racy is a verv inefficient way to 
make music. In this band 1 write 
the songs, sing them and play some 
guitar, since my bass player is 
much better than me. But here it’s 
clear the concept is mine. I’m the 
leader. 

“That’s not to say we'nr not 
stretched. 1 have to team to play up 
to their level. And from their point 
of view, they were not experienced 
in dealing with song concepts. For 
me the song is all imponanL 
There’s no point in playing an 
amazing solo if it’s not part of idl- 
ing a story that’s appropriate to the 
music. So both sides are stretched 
in different directions. It works.” 

Sling: Paris (Theatre Mogadorl. 
May 22-25. Mav 28-June /. 



The collection of the JioJion 
designer “Rocco Barocco" 
and the Knap label with its 
creations in silk, suede and 
leather. 

KNAP - 34, FAUBOURG 
SAINT-HONOR^ 





The Director & English speaking staff of 

Mappin & Webb 

INTERNATIONAL 

warmly invite you to their salon to view 
their prestigious collection of fine jewelry and watches. 

We are the # 1 of the rue de la Paix .75002 PARIS . Tel: 261.50.13 

# w T <D 

Featuring; ROLEX- Mappin & Webb (TAGEl Baume & Mercier 

r * X 

tHXNDRD corum CBGL 

Highest Export Discount. 

Our Cannes showroom is at 32-35 La Croisettc. 

By Appoint m ent to Her Majesty The Queen. 

PARIS . CANNES . LONDON . DOSSELDORF . TOKYO . NEW- YORK 



. t - U • . : '>•' 


JL 






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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


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Interest Rates Boosts NYSE 


Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange rallied late Monday in very 
active trading tnat pushed the Dow above 1300. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
20.22 to 1305.00 an hour before closing. Ad- 
vances led declines by a 3-1 ratio. Volume 
amounted to about 1283 million shares, com- 
pared to 923 million in the same period Friday. 

The market pushed through the 1,300 mark in 
heavy trading early Monday afternoon, chal- 


higher levels and will soon move to “consolidate 
and digest** its gains. 

The Federal Reserve's announcement of a 
lowered discount rate whetted the appetite for 
sinrtfc said Charles Jensen, of MKI Securities. 

He said that the market, which was trading 


□ear record levels at midday, was shaping up for 

Mr. Jensen 


Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. dose in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based cm the market at 3 P.M. 


a pretty good attack on new highs, 
said that he expected the market to dose above 
the 1300 level 

“There's no real justification for a sell -off,” 
he said, adding that some traders may take 
profits. 

Mr. Jensen said that the market was well-led, 
with such stocks as IBM giving strong perfor- 


mances. 


lenging key psychological and technical resis- 
tance at that level 

Declining interest rates buoyed the market 
early as investors became convinced that the 
Federal Reserve was trying to rquvenate an 
aging business cycle. 

Analysts said the Federal Reserve Board's 
reduction of the discount rate Friday to 7^ 
percent from S percent and cuts in banks* prime 
rates to 10 percent from 103 percent gave the 
market early strength. 

“The market is responding to a return to 
lower interest rates.” said Newton Zander of 
E.F. Hutton. “The market opened very strong 
that encountered some profit-taking but re- 
fused to give up its gains. It's now fighting with 
the 1,300 level on trie Dow.” 

Mr. Zmder noted that most other market 
averages had already made new highs. He said 
Lhe market will “work bard” to maintain the 


“Upcoming reports on consumer prices and 
leading economic indicators should point to 
moderate growth in the economy and low levels 


of inflation,** said Anne Gregory, publisher of 

r. Stronger see- 


the Merrill Lynch Market Letter, 
mid quarter corporate profits also should sup- 
port a breakout to the upside, she said. 

Ms. Gregory said that momentum appeared 
to be building for final action on the federal 
budget deficit by midsummer, which would 
improve the chances for further easing in inter- 
est rates. These trends should lead to better 
market performance by publishing and insur- 
ance stocks, among others, she said. 

Before the market opened, the government 
reported that U.S. personal income rose 0.6 
percent in April. 

Crown Zdlerbach was near the top of the 
actives and higher. _ 

Ohio Edison Company, AT&T. Loews Corp. 
and IBM were also higher in heavy trading. 


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(Continued on Page 12) 









Statistics Index 


iicralbSTeribimc. 


; a?- 

; *:***».' 

: -,^0 

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maex «*« ' P.16 Earnings rrnom P i3 
amex inaiMuKsaaPJA Fima rote notes P.U 
NYSE prices P.10 GaW markets p.ii 
LmySE Ughs/kma P.n interest rales P.II 
C Canadian stocks P.W Market soRPnary P.10 
Currency rotes Ml Options P.I3 


ConunodlUes 

DivUenas 


PJ2 OTC Stack 
P.12 Oitwr markets 


TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


£ * 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 

Comex Digs Out After 
Broker’s Sudden Collapse 


By MICHAEL A HELTZIK 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

N EW YORK.— Call it two days that shook the options 
markets, a debacle that exposed a way of losing money 
in commodities that not even the most senior veterans 
of the trading pits knew existed. 

The two days were March 18 and 19, and the brief run-up of 
536 in the price of goW in that period started a chain of events 
that officials of Comex, the New York futures exchange where 
options on gold futures are traded, are still working 10-hour days 
lo untangle.' 

1 It all started when Jeffrey Westheuner, a gold options trader 
who held with his wife and a partner what by all accounts was a 
grotesquely overextended po- 




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otion, default^ on a Kfi-mil- „ « 

uon margin rei ) — a demand A -wtawvc uoa 

fromhisbretorfOTmoreca* bfemish Mllhe 

his options. bidiislry and Comex 

The Westhemasrs’ failure,- ■ 
according to court papers and to A large extent. 

interviews with participants, Z. 

provoked the subsequent de- 
fault and collapse of nis broker. Volume Investors Corp~, a firm 
owned by one of Comex’s board members. Volume was suspend- 
. ed from trading and placed in receivership March 21, by which 
3» lime its 100 customers had discovered that their roughly S18 
million in accounts were frozen. • 

The Comex Clearing Association, the independent body that 
acts as a financial intermediary in all Comex trades, paid out $9 
million of its own cash and seized S10 milli on of Vohnne 
customer funds on deposit because of the firm’s default Then, to 
recover its own costs, the clearing house liquidated the options 
and futures holdings of Volume’s customers m what some traders 
say was a chaotic fire sale that oast innocent customers milli ons. 

The commodity world’s most senior experts say that the 
Volume collapse and its aftermath are unique in demonstrating, 

. much to everyone’s surprise, that one customer's default can cost 
a firm’s other customers their money. 

The debacle comes at a sensitive moment for the options 
business and for Comex. formally known as Commodity Ex- 
change Inc. Commodity options were reluctantly legalized by the 
Commodity Futures T rading Commission, the federal watchdog 
. of the futures industry, for a two-year pilot period that ends this 
Y y ear. If the Volume fiasco is not satisfactorily resolved by 
October, wh en hear ings open on an extension, the case may loom 
large in the CFTCs deliberations. 

The collapse may. also give renewed life to proposals for an 
insurance fund for commodity customers like the Securities 
Investor Protection Coip., which insures traditional securities 
accounts. “This is an example of what happens when you don’t 
have insur ance explicitly aimed at protecting the customer s,*’ said 
Andrea Corcoran, director of trading and markets at the CFTC 

T HE device designed to protect. customers from losing 
money in the event of a commodity firm’s failure is known 
as segregation. In the futures business, each firm must keep 
its customers' money segregated from its own, so that a failing 
firm does not face the temptation of misappropriating its clients’ 
funds. 

But each customer’s money is not segregated from that of any 

> other customer. So when me Comex clearing house moved 
against Volume 1 , to cover lie Westhrimers’' nrissed'ipaipn caljrit 
seized assets thatbdoagedloaHybluhie’scustomers, not just tile 1 

Westhdmers. v . ■ ~ t . , i -i 

“To that extent, there's an AdriDes heel exposed hierc,~ says 
Philip M. Johnson, a Ncw York commodities lawyer and former 
chairman -of the Commodity -Futures Trading Commission. 
“We’ve all thought of the system as protecting customers from (a 
failing) firm, not from each other. I don’t know that there’s any 
precedent for- this." 

For now, Comae officials argue that the damage is slight. “I 
believe it’s a blemish on the industry and Comae to a large 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 1) 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


Currency Rates 


Unocal, 
Pickens 
Hold Talks 

Stock Buyback 

Seen as Possible 


The Associated Pats 

LOS ANGELES — Unocal 
Coip. said Monday that it has re- 
sumed negotiations with T. Boone 
Pickens, the chairman erf’ Mesa Pe- 
troleum Co., about a posable set- 
tlement of a bitter three-month-dd 
takeover fight. 

The two sides held about six 
hours of settlement talks last week 
but failed to reach an agreeement 

Unocal, the 13tb-largest U.S. cil 
company and parent of Union Oil 
Co. of California, also said h will 
proceed with its offer lo repurchase 
29 percent erf its shares regardless 
of whether it readies an agreement 
with Mr. Pickens. 

It had been uncertain whether 
Unocal would complete the costly 
stock buyback or cancel it if the 
threat of a takeover by Mr. Pickens’ 
group was removed. 

Mr. Pickens leads Mesa Partners 
D, an investment group that owns 
13.6 percent of UnocaTs slock and 
is offering to buy another 64 mil- 
lion shares in an attempi to raise its 
stake to 50.1 percent. 

To counter the offer, Unocal of- 
fered to buy back 50 million shares 
of its stock with securities valued at 
$72 a share, in creasing its long- 
term debt by S3.6 billion. The offer 
so far has excluded Mr. Pickens 
and his partners from cashing in 
their shares, a derision that was 
upheld last Friday by the Delaware 
Supreme Court 

Unocal said that as of midnight 
last Friday. 153.7 million shares 
had been tendered under the com- 
pany’s offer, including the 23.7 mil- 
lion controlled by the Pickens 
group. , 

In Monday's announcement, 
Unocal said it “is in negotiations 
with Mesa Petroleum Co. with re- 
spect to the termination of Mesa's 
offer for Unocal and the accep- 
tance of Mesa’s Unocal shares into 
the Unocal exchange offer.” A Un- 
ocal spokesman, Barry Lane, de- 
clined to elaborate. 

Mesa officials were in meetings 
and could not immediately be 
reached for comment. Meanwhile, 
Unocal asked the New York Stock 
Exchange to delay the opening in 
trading of its stodc, which closed 
Friday at S46 a share. In early trad- 
ing Monday, Mesa slipped 12VS 
cents, to $16.50 a share. 

The resumption of talks followed 
the Delaware Supreme Court rul- 
ing, which was viewed as a severe 
blow to Mr. Pickens. 

The stock buyback was the cor- 
nerstone of Unocal's defensive ma- 
neuvers, but Mr. Pickens had chal- 
lenged his exclusion from it as 
discriminatory. 


A French Face in U.S. Cosmetics 

Cosmair Grows Battle for the Beauty Dollar 

T* • i| «"t • U S. cosmetic, fraorance and toiletry sal&s. m rtnjkms o* dollars 

Kapidly Using a 

L’Oreal Lines I R I 


By William Meyers • 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Two years 

ago, a li tile- known U.S. cosmet- 
ics company called Cosmair qui- 
etly began buying up the supply 
of customized aerosol cans in 
Europe, where they were used to 
package a hair styling foam 
called mousse. It was a product 
that bad not yet reached U-S. 
shores and when Cosmair intro- 
duced its Free Hold mousse here 
ax months later, its can strategy 
paid off: Cosmair got a running 
start in the market, preventing 
rivals from posing a challenge for 
months until the can supply 
could be replenished. 

When competitors started sell- 
ing their own products. Cosmair 
had a commanding lead. Today 
it controls about 40 percent of 
the lucrative SI 50- million U.S. 
mousse market. It far outpaces 
its rivals who have patterned 
their own products on the 
mousse developed by L’Oreal, 
one of Cosmair’s European own- 
ers. 

Cos maids aggressiveness in 
shaping the mousse market, and 
its move last year past the vener- 
able Estee Lauder into the No. 3 


■ Eat** Louder Q Revlon Inc.-* 

D Cotmcfr ■ Avon Product a Inc. 

'Cosmair 1 984 sates mciuCe »«|utsitlOii Di Warn** Cosmetics 
■ Includes Canada ana Puano Rteo 


Source Manus t 
NTT 


Lynch. “Not loo many compa- 
nies could come in like they have 
and take significant business 
away from such tough players as 
Revlon and Lauder, The people I 
talk to say they haven’t seen any- 
thing like this since Charles Rev- 
son first appeared on the scene 
with Revlon 40 or 50 years ago." 

Analysts say that Franqois 
Dalle, who recently stepped 
down as chairman erf L'Oreal 
and now heads L’Orfeal’s strate- 
gic planning, is Cosmair’s equiv- 
alent of Charles Raison, work- 
ing with Cosmair officials in 
New York, he helped engineer a 


spot in the 57-billion U.S. cos- strategy that is a 


me tics and fragrance industry, 
has confirmed for analysts and 
competitors that Cosmair is a 
force to be reckoned with. Until 
recently, the products of this pri- 
vately held company — which 
include Lancdme and L’Or&ti 
cosmetics, as well as Vanderbilt, 
Chaps and Lauren fragrances — 
have been belter known than its 
corporate name. 

“Cosmair is clearly the most 
successful cosmetics firm in the 
United States today," says Dee- 
pak Raj. an analyst at Merrill 


department stores. It has bought 
itself a strong presence in the 
lucrative fragrance market with 
its 5146-million purchase of 
Warner Cosmetics a year and a 
half ago. 

“This is a ruthlessly competi- 
tive enteiprise and it has a killer 
instinct that’s pan of its corpo- 
rate culture." said Allan Moitus. 
a cosmetics consultant “Its exec- 
utives target an opponent, 
whether it’s Lauder or Revlon, 
and then go after it with a ven- 
geance.*’ 

Another reason cited for the 
effectiveness of Cosmair's as- 
sault on the U-S. market is the 


of money, muscle and marketing strong financial backing of Nes- 


sawy. 

Cosmair’s research spending 
exceeds the industry average by 
far. It has demonstrated an abili- 
ty to find potentially profitable 
niches In a maturing U.S. cos- 
metics market and to back those 
findings with hefty budgets for 
advertising and promotion. Its 
aggressive sales force has under- 
taken a two-pronged assault on 
the marketplace, pursuing con- 
sumers in such mass outlets as 
drug chains as well as in tonier 


tie SA. the Switzerland-based 
rood conglomerate that owns 62 
percent of Cosmair. 

“Nestle is Cosmair's Swiss 
godfather," said Mr. Mottus. 
“They’ve got awfully deep pock- 
ets and are pumping a lot of 
money into the company." 

The dollar's strength and the 
stability of the U.S. economy are 
behind Nestle’s commitment to 
Cosmair. which posted sales of 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL I) 


Page 11 


Rate Reduction 
Pushes Dollar 
Down in Europe 


The AssodoinJ Pms j n London, the British pound 

LONDON — The dollar look a was quoted at 51.2830. up from 
tailspin Monday in European mar- S 1 .2648 on Friday, 
kets on the first full trading day Other laie dollar rates Mondav. 
since the United Stales cut its dis- compared with late Friday: 3.0328 
count rate. Gold prices dipped only Deutsche marks, down from 
slightly. 3.0815: 2.5455 Swiss francs, down 

The dollar’s drop knocked more from 2.5905; 9,241 French francs, 
than 4 pfennigs off its value against down from 9.415; 3.4235 Dutch 
ihe Deutsche mark and more than guilders, down from 3.4840. and 
17 centimes against the French 1,939.40 Italian lire, down from 
franc. The British pound gained 1,986.75. 

more than 2 cents against the dollar Gold prices were little changed 
in London trading. in spite of the big dollar drop. 

The selloff erf dollars actually be- In London, gold finished at 
gan late Friday, when the U.S. Fed- 5323.30 a troy ounce, up SO cents 
eral Reserve reduced its discount from Friday, 
rate, the interest rate it charges 
member banks for loans, by 4 TT C* T 

point to 7.5 percent. It was the first Ml \ fn/Vk7H/} 

such cut this year. X# tUUf/lU^ 

Adding to the dollar’s decline 0 

Monday were uncertainties over SnAn/iinn' 

the economic recovery in the Unit- kJi/C/f MAW (c 
ed States, dealers said. The Nation- ° 

a 1 Association of Business Econo- T 7L~ A n *1 

mists forecast a mild recession in LtL £ 

the United States by next year. J -I 

And after a siring of worrying The Anucuned Pms 

figures on the U.S. gross national WASHINGTON —VS. dispos- 
producti traders said that many m aHe personal income, buoyed bv a 
ti}f ^market expected first-quarter suj-ge of overdue income-tax re- 


GNP figures due out Tuesday lo funds< ^ami a record 2.9 percent 
show continued sluggish growth. ]asl moiuh . the Commerce Depan- 
In essence, dealers said the drop men t reported Mondav. 
m the discount rate cut and weak- Consumers also spent more in 
ness in the U.5. economy were al- April, boosting personal consump- 
ready built into the dollar. tion spending by a strong 0.7 per- 

“The market is relieved that the cenu the department said, 
discount rale cut is out of the way The changes put personal con- 
but it s not quite sure what to do sumption spending at on annual 
now," said one chief dealer at a level of $1466 trillion in April 
major foreign bank in New York, while disposable personal income 
The dollar opened sharply lower was at an annual level of $1717 
Monday in New York, but through trillion 
the trading day it recovered some- The gain in disposable income. 


but it s not quite sure what to do sumption spending at an annual 
now," said one chief dealer at a level of $1466 trillion in April 
major foreign bank in New York, while disposable personal income 
The dollar opened sharply lower was at an annual level of $1717 
Monday in New York, but through trillion 
the trading day it recovered some- The gain in disposable income, 
what on a powerful short-covering the amount left over after paying 


In Argentina, Optimism Amid a Financial Crisis 


By Lydia Chavez \ closed a large bank on the vet 
New Tor* Tima Service ^ failure, the aighth private bai 
BUENOS AIRES —A high-lev- be shut down in two months, 
d government official sat in his .-The move was greeted by 1 


dosed a large bank on the verge of stick to it, a condition it has failed regulators in the United States will 
failure, the aighth private bank to before. meet lo reconsider Argentina's 

be shut down in two months. Government sources said Mario credit rating. A lower rating could 

The move wjk erected hv hank- Brodersohn. the chief negotiator significantly reduce the country’s 


taxes, compared with a 0.4-percent 
decline in March. The drop was 
caused by computer foul-ups at the 
Internal Revenue Service that de- 
layed the processing of refund 
checks this year. 

The delay proved to be a drag on 


d government onictal sat in ins .. The move was areeted bv bank- oroaersomi. uic coin negotiator signuieanuy rcuuce me country s -- — 

dfiiMHttv.MiaMi 


gentina would again reader from a ; additional bank closings.: . 

financial crisis. ' , , . 

“It is at a very critical point,” he £? 


•NoW.. government officials are nhminan IMF 
^pressing optimism that another While Mr. Br 


country’s most practical financial U.S. lenders. 

expert is planning to travel to “Right sow it has three strikes 

Washington this week in a bid to against it," said one banker. He 


said. “ButT.beUewc me. wc tranl US— 

nothing more than lo settle every- 

thing, and so ware going to.” S,!lfJfI 2 rf 5 S 2 SS 2 i?lS! 


was referring to the lack of an IMF 


first quarter this year. 

.Die economy, as measured by 
the gross nation ol product, grew by 
only 13 percent in the first three 


_ . ihn is abroad, agreement, Argentina's breach last ° wn tk* yc®r* ihe slowest 

immediate problem - the posabfl- ot her government officials will at- SreeTof the 180-day deadline on pace rince the end of the 1981-82 

tty of a lower international credit financial payment of a portion of its $900 recession. The government is due to 

ih ih*» Hollar million in nvnniu* intmu nnH ihi> revise that figure Tuesday and 


UV/hIIUm SUVIV UilUl IVJ auiuv IsTM J ■ I 1 I ■ I j » . \rmvi O mw — » - - — ■■■■■ - - — — - — II— — — « 

thixifc and so we are going to." Ity . a 5j wr international credit tempt to keep the local financial payment of a portion of its $900 
Late that night the government ratul £ ^ lossoi new foreign loans ^isis in control. With the dollar million in overdue interest and the 

tried to resolve — at least tempo- 0811 wp 0 he solved by an agree- !ia:oa[ u S frozen, the peso lending country’s unstable financial sys- 

rarily — one of the central prob- ““ lnternall0Dai Moae ‘ rate set by the country's central tem. Argentina owes $48 billion in 

lems of the latest crisis when it ^ 1 " uncL bank will be lowered to prevent foreign debt, the third largest 

announced that it had frozen all International bankers said that cash shortages dial might result amount for a developing country. 


million in overdue interest and the t* v * se dial figure Tuesday and 
country's unstable financial sys- 5 ° 1 ?® analysts are looking for the 


foreign-currency accounts for 120 whether this takes place depends from a run on the pesos. after Mexico and Brazil, 

days. The freezing of assets was an oa the government's will, some- The new do-or-die deadline on If the country gets an agreement, 
attempt to end a flood of h-mt thing that has been lacking in the an agreement with the IMF ap- bankers and government officials 
withdrawals that began about 10 past. And. even after an agreement pears to be June 10, bankers said. said, the Argentines would be likely 
days ago when rh^ gove rnmen t is signed, the government must On that date, federal interagency to get a bridge loan. 


revision to send growth below 1 
percent 

Such a sluggish performance 
would raise concerns about wheth- 
er the economy is about to fall into 
a recession. In a report issued Mon- 
day in Washington, the National 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 2) 
















I- 

5* ■* 

Crm« Rates 







May 20 

** 

r ;t\ § 

«‘l 

* a 


0 

B 

DAL 

F.F- 

r?J_ - 

OMr. 

BJF. 

SB. 

Yaa 


m * 

. 


Amsterdam 

uss 

4402 

IUW* 

17415 ■ 

NX* 

— . 

5411 • 

D4.M5- 

13745 k 

“ 

1 . 


.. j* 

r , ^ 

Btvuelxm 

4144 

7U6 

AUU 

-6JK 

ai«* 

17435 

— 

nm 

2LO ■ 



V 

Frankfurt 

143 

040 

• 

3277* 

1J4HK 

8X52* 

*447 ‘ 

11U6* 

12145 ■ 


** 


a.r 

London (b) 

IJU 

, — — 

3493 

I1454S 

2AMJ0 

*4955 

71295 

32775 

319.945 



Milan 

147940 

24WJ0 

09 JB 

70948 

— — 

54*77 

■313*4 

7»J« 

7371 

•• 


■V 

k\ 

Maw York (c) 

— 

OJM 

344*5 

9J*5 

141040 

144* 

*131 

9-OW 

2SUS 





.-.Parts 

9341 

U4«3 

14511 

— — 

*7&Zk 

un 

15.140 • 

3427 

33080* 



t - 

Mm 


-^Tefevo 

MV.*5 

mn 

KL17 

2*43 

1298 • 

7270 

40U9* 

9734 

— 


■ ’$■ 

, s/' 

•are 

St 

Zurich 

U6S 

34774 

. HA.* 

HA. 1 

NA.» 

HA* 

HA* 

— 

- HA* 


• * 4 

* * 

UJ ► 

1 ECU 

MA. 

H5744 

23413 

UK 

U3L72 

25311 

4S.12M 

UEI 

10*544 



•* 

.. 1 

ISO* 

MMB 

(177051 

UDM 

943310 

143U4 . 

3428* 

■14014 

1205 

249252 


BIS Challenges Theories 
About Dollar’s Strength 


AQ these Bonds hove been sold. This announcement appears as x natter of record onljt 


Cfesftm In London and ZurtcK Rxbm to other European center*. New York ram at 2 PM 
fa) Commercial ironc ID> Amounts nemM to Dvy an# Pound <c) Amount* ntvOed to buy one 
dollar C) Unit! of IBO M Units of UlOOlyJ Units of mOBS N.O.: nol quoted: NJL: oat available. 

Other Dollar Vaiaea 


Currency per 

II AS ' 

CurTtdCV oar Uil 

Curraacy par UAS 

Currency per UAS 

AnNBLPMO 

51040 

Fka-mondu 6451 

Maknr. rloa. 

24595 

Alter, wan 

07040 

AustraLf 

04047 

omKdrac. 13740 

MK.NN 

3SS40 

SaofL MMta 

17340 

Auftr.uML 

2145 

HomICmbS 737 

Horw.kroa* 

0.74 

Swad. krona 

8404 

IMfB.fln.h-. 

4340 

todlaannwa 1245' 

PMLMM 

1038 

Tmwans . 

394* 

■razUcnn. 5.10040 

Inda. mnlab 1.11540 

Port, cicada 

17340 

Thai haul 

37335 

CanadkmS 

067 

IrtehK 0-9ST8 

Sao*HrfyaI 

341 

TUrttWiHra 

51945 

DaaWikriM 104875 

MraollstwlL 90030 

State.! 

23015 

UAE dirham 

34729 

EavoLMuad 

0.7519 

Kuwaiti (floor 03019 

AAfr.raMl 

- 1.9001 

.VuMUbolv. 

1240 


cstaniMK i.wa mm t 

Source*: Banaue do Benelux /Brussels); Banco Comnerdme IMkma /MUaal; CBemfcal 
Bank (Mew York); Banaue NoManale de Paris (Paris): IMF (SDR); BAil (dinar, rival, 
mmam). Other dolo tram Rxolen and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Ear eei UTCwc y Btfritt 



■' r * 


Donor 

D-Mark 

Franc 

SterUna 

Franc 

ECU 

SDR 


- a . J 

2 moth 

7*6-7* 

5*4* 

4*4 

' i2*-mt 

lOKrtO^ 

9*4* 

7* 


« '* f 

1 months 

7*4 

5*4*. 

5-5*' 

72WT2* 

IDHrlOfV 

9*4* 

7* 

|f 

-r •:>" 

3 months 

7 9W-8 fW 

5im% 

- 54* 

KM-12*' 

mHrlO* 

. 9*41* 

7* 


. ■ ot : * 

tiiwnflu 

8*4* 

5*4* 

5 Mr 5* 

12W-B* 

raiteio* 

9*4* 

BfW 

t 

1 tm II 

' '1,3 

1 roar 

mv* 

5*4* 

4Wr5* 

13-12* 

lDKrIO* 

9fc4* 

0* 


Key Mowy Bates JUn-ao 


AnhaMlarPepMltR 


Unfed SWta 
UMMOtRota 
RNkrriFmOS 
prune Rota 
Broker Loan Belt 
Cam Paper f*-I7T don 
IMtuaHl Trwsarv BBS 
Y, ImvM TraawrvROb 
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*• I 
I • 

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'•r?' S- 


ipfervanliM Hate 
CoUMbhv 
(we-owth I riBi Hanfc 
j-flMotttatertw* 

> miwitti infiiiwr 




■ * • ■*! 

X - • •• V. 

v*. • ?•; ■ 


gcflUMmtv 

.tl-dar Ttwnrr Ml 
Smart* Iilcrtaaii 


DtocnaalRae 

Can Meaty 

MMHnr Interbank 


dm P re*. 
Vh 7Yi 
7H 7 liTM 
ID-IDfe UM«S 
‘ fl - 9 

7J2 7.» 

7* 7J» 

7J3 7JB 
7 JO ' 7 AS 

7J5 7 JO 


AOO SO0 
SJS £45 
SM i*> 
5JBS £85 
SJO SM 


era to* 
l(M IM 
Mim 101/16 ■ 
im m 
10 10 


IM r» 
17* t» 
12 1/16 Ul/U 
■ 13* T2* 


S 5 
i tin* 
-«* M 


1 manOi 

Smooths 

SlHMlbt 


74W-7VW 
7>*-SH. 
. 0 - 8 * 
0*-#* 
em'-s* 



. By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — A study published 
Monday challenge the popular 
view that worldwide demand for 
dollar-denominated assets has 
made the currency a superstar on 
the foreign exchange marie cl 

The study argues that the deter- 
mining factor for setting values in 
the foreign exchange market is 
where money is flowing, rather 
than the actual choice of currency. 

The study goes on to say that 
international banks — through re- 
duced lending to developing coun- 
tries, weak demand for credit inter- 
nationally and very substantial 
credit demand in the United States 
— have played a key role in driving 
the dollar to highs not seen since 
the early 1970s. 

The 48- page technical analysis 
entitled “Interaction between the 
Euro-Currency Markets and the 
Exchange Markets." was written 
by Helmut W. Mayer, one of the 
senior economists at the Bank for 
Intonational Settlements in Basle, 
Switzerland. 


Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFJi.Uardn Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR). Hated applicable to Interbank dmattsafSl mHUm mkdmmr (or eautvcHerrt). 


Source; Reuter* 

IIX Meiwy Market Fn** 

May 30 

Morrill LyndJ Ready Aiwtt 

Joaerravaneoinefefr. ua 

TtKitd* [ntensMtota Index: 7 JOT 
Sh*W; Merritt Lynch. AP 


Source*: Raders. Coammamu*. Crudb 
Li«nfM4 UovdsBonk. Boniol Ibtrtt 


May 20 

AM. . PM. . OiV« 

hobokom . mss xtus *aa 

uumhi, nuo — +4J0 

Pori* nuidlol 3033 mss ■ . +£® 

XBrttt - 32175 XQ.10 40AS 

-LuariM ■ muj ht'b +U0 
Mew York — _ SOM ' -4JC 

Luxembourg. Paris and lobOm omoai (U- 
. bm; Hang Km ana Zurich o oenkta and 
Ckulog orian; Mew York Comex current 
eontroeL Attrerkes tn lUlnroM* 

Source: Reuters. . - 


UK GDP Rises 
On Output Basis 

Reuien 

LONDON — British gross 
domestic product on an output 
basis rose an inflation and sea- 
sonally adjusted 0.7 percent in 
the first quarter, after a 0.8- 
percent increase, in 1984's 
fourth quarter, according to 
preliminary figures released 
Monday from the Central Sta- 
tistical Office. 

GDP on the output basis was 
23 percent above the level of a 
year earlier. The year-lo-year 
rise in GDP on this basis in the 
fourth quarter of 1984 was 1.9 
percent GDP is a total measure 
of a Ration's goods and services, 
excluding income from foreign 
investments. 

The coal- miners’ .dispute is 
estimated to have reduced GDP 
on the output basis by about I 
percent in the first quarter, the 
office said. 


“Contrary to what is implied by 
some currently fashionable theo- 
ries of exchange rate behavior, the 
prime determinant of exchange 
rate movements is not currency 
preferences but geographical pref- 
erences," he wrote. ‘ I Baore the ad- 
vent of the Euromarkets, currency 
and geographical asset preferences 
largely overlapped ana. . .confus- 
ing the two was not only under- 
standable, but also not too seri- 
ous." 

Mr. Myer’s analysis divided the 
Euromarket's business between 
those that represent a capital in- 
flow for the United States, 
strengthening the dollar’s value on 
the foreign exchange market, and 
those tha: represent an outflow, 
which would tend to weaken the 
exchange rain. 

In his analysis, an excess supply 
of Eurodollars would result in a 
drop of Eurodollar interest rates 
relative to domestic UJL interest 
levels and prompt a reflow of capi- 
tal to the United States, which 
would push up the dollar’s ex- 
change rate. 

By contrast, the current theory 
espoused by monetarists is that the 
dollar’s strength on the exchange 
market is a function of an insuffi- 
cient international supply of the 
currency. 

“Since H is geographical asset 
preferences that are of significance 
in exchange rate determination,” 
Mr, Myer’s analysis said, “this 
means that the growing importance 
of the Euromarket has very much 
reduced the relevance erf exchange- 
rate theories inspired by concepts 
of asset-market equilibrium for 
money .balances in a given curren- 
cy- 

“Moreover, owing to the Euro- 
market, these geographical asset 
preferences are to a large extent 
exercised not by the ultimate eco- 
nomic agents, but by financial in- 
termediaries," he wrote. 

Mr. Myer said that “the external 
net lending or .borrowing by U.S. 
banks suggests that they must have 
been a major, and at times even 
dominant, influence in the dollar’s 
exchange-market performance." 

“la the last nine months of 1983 
and the first nine months of 1984."- 
he wrote, “the international bank- 

(Cootimed on Page 17, CoL 2) 



Inter-American Development Bank 

ECU 100,000,000 
10 per cent Bonds dne 1993 

Socidtd Gdndiale de Banqoe SJL/Generale Banka aatschappij lOf. 

Bank Brussel Lambert ITV. 

Banqoe Rationale de Pans 

Crddit Commercial de Ranoe 

AlgemcneBankSederkndlTV; Amro TntematinTal Limite d 

Tbmra Rn mm mMlft Italians. Bajoqne Gdndrale da Luxembourg SJL 

Banqne Internationale i Luxembourg SjL Basque Paribas Capital Marfcete 

fl u miner ghanlr A ft flrpiti ta n^taTt- Rmih mmin 

TW mterhg Ttanlr AkfaTiPMrilsKhjift Kiedietbank International Group 

Lazard&eresetCie Morgan Guaranty Ltd 
Nanmra. International Limited Orion Royal Bank Limited 

Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited ’ S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 


atm n»«w fin i fug in rtipinT Al Sndi Bi«pM ASB BoaddGottardo BucalliiBsar£&.C. Bean BUriocak del Lnmro 

BawofiBm BxakABeTicaiatexBXtmiul Group Biak GntxwiDci; Kmz, Rimgmrr lOveraus) Limited BwkJppa Bank Lea latcraHkiul Ltd, 

Bn&lbaABopclIV BaakaflblyolBtenatuulIiiiBted Bxnk of Yokahuu fEntqic) SA Bariscrtlhat IntenialioM] Lmritrd 

>r»h> int»rnatina»V iflwiMliBMMant JRA-LL1 Banqne Bdgc Ljanted Boaqae da BenmsSA. Banqm: CoB tmrfft a V dn I jgrwl>o » ir g SA 

BuoittCMiBtCttflwmal Baonie Denoaf SjClS. Bgnqgc Ftam^tbe dn C uaiumro c Exteriaa* Baaqpebutomez BvajaedeLaxoBbaaiTSJt, 

BetnatHalmadun BoaMePlnaOTBapqaeSJL/ParihM Baric BripftlTV. BaMraPr^cfeGestOTRnaoae'BLP.GJT BaBpKderthiioBEBrmniiiK 

BaragBrethem&Cfc, Limited Ui y»rwh* n imM w irj ta BjycxndieVbanhaiikAktieiigesdQi^uA 

BerijagHaod^ and ft^nkfarter Bank CaisaeOeotraledaBiamiPqidairea Cakae teDtptortOro ipti t io ia 

lM^ atbarjMfcl%tatAiGnnBd-DadiddeLaiaBboiag(BaaBiiedel*Etatl Caissc G6itiak ffEputot et de Retnite/Ateoetiue Spi«- « Li:»^ 

rou wnh BalMamltg Ct-Bdriia Dum MnnimHn Tjptai Martote ftmnp Cticarp Cnrital Markets Gram 

r «— ttwiiMj ff.T'h ropqij™* rm Caapa gmf; An GrxHtui rt rip Rjnm e Ronet SA. Copenhagen Hiwhtthnk A/S Umnty Bank United 

fn—wni s * / O wn^nf trm idr Crfdil Karopeea SA. Laxmlrtcrs: &e<fit Gte&il SA. <te Banqae 

Ft *** inii»rfriri iraiMtgrfdeLa mri a f T . i i iffW H Wi g Cridhladaatridct towwaei al de Paris Crtdil Lyonnais Qn£dftdaS«d Credit Sdsse First Bostoc Linrital 
C nfcflm h»k— n ltahn Europe United DnlknBkeBaflklBtinatknalSA DaROnketkvfiUMBkOAiieadHiinjSA. SADewfiaST. 

D6BaASe8txdaGeao«ca*dBdlsba^ DtHamkMSeraritie&Rtfirid Limited Duadner B i mk Xktie a mril o di i ft p “‘TiW! I ‘jrmnnn Iftimtei n iilii Tail Mi 1 in* il 
F''<whitinr"nfl Rn»p*a«i Banfci»c QwipMiy t JmtM Fiat intestate Limited GrinuLUrtmatinaal limited Goldman Sacks Istenutumal Cup. 

IT i mil li rial I imiti it Hypobaak IntcraatunalSA. IBJInlmiational Laaited Eddex Peabody Intenatmaal Limited Kflger Ctschen A Ca, VXLS. 

t i~**A Kymn Bank Acddiiod ICV. tSwjM hmnk tornirfimai limHri UCBbtendHMal Limited Mflnat a rtiii 't i* Bmmeer TJmfW 
Merrill Urn* Capital Martatt lBmitaahi Fimaee hrtwiMtticpal Lmited SaarndMomaRaA. Col Limited MiaxanGreaMA Co. Limited 

■tin iTiii r tut) niirinimT BedcriaHdOdtfMjihfettdaadobaakgr il edrri a iidM C nd i rtfa a ak im Tketrak0SeearitiesCai,fEmme)Ltri. 

KMM(kc£tUinatHmat(HK)Lld. TEopwEiirimeanBankSA.'U'CBGnaa iterddaitadie I anwlralimk Cmanok Owriiadlhitt Bones 

mferi aac ck . Van Cawptabout &CieS.CS. Pieiwm.HeUxiBg&PieisonlCT'. PK Chroliflna Bank (TIKJ Ltd. Priralbankea A/S Babobankltederiaad 
TbcBifalBaakafCaaada(BdsiBm{SA. SafawaBnUasslaiBniatmat limited Sanwa Mi inMtiiwil limited SamhlnteraatiatialSeciiritiea Limited 


Skearstm Lehman Bratkcralateniatioaal Saatti Barney. Hama Dplwn &. Co. tacorpoiiled Soridttfinroptaiiiqde Banqne SA. SaadteGdadnk 

SaddteGdnfafcAl»aciMaedeBagqne. iaa g M bta B K Soca^Nabooakde Credit 4rhida8trie/BalMaide]UatsdijnqTO(i:Xte£etuBdeNDveiiieid 

SmfilkOcxae?) Limited Spaedassen SDS Standaril Chartend Merchant Bank Iwritonio Finance Intruirtiwaal Soatfriwn Ttirf t *.**a 

He Tnyo Kobe Bank (LmasbomtjSA. Taknpo latenatkaat BaakrEmwlSA 

Ubiob Bank o!Smilxc(laul(SicaritKS] Limited Uniieil Ovtrseat Bank {LMtemhooreJ S A. ■aMoerSaiterre&.Co 

Wertand StAwmerttchitr Kanftm«n»anhm J. Hxrfubd&Ca WatdoBtsctw I dad rc b ae kGiroBeaWile UfadGoadj Inc. fkaaieiBlBtenmtewal ra-mp.j 


ihfari TMtwrnatiwmi f Ubkhi Bank a! Svitieriiml (Sttarittts) Lathed Dinted Ovtrwaa Rank pjawnlm 

UMunutCri —ite+iu.bmT- ranfuaafliMil ieB J. tfaafabel&Ca. W ^rtdtf Bt s cl’w Ualftftafll c G iwgeo t ri te UbodQaadjhtc. 

Hew tunc - April 3 , 14 S 5 






Mondays 

MSE 

Cosing 

Tables EncUfOi 11 m nationw i de prices 
op to ft* dostap on Wan Street 
and do Mf reflect loft tiwta efnwtere. 


(OnlintKdfiaai Page 10) 


Kr. 


: 




-; lti 


347 

440Z 

162 


18% 

K 

43 

42% 

M 

Sflfe 

26% 

25% 

8% 

• 

! 20% 

17% 

40% 

19% 

38% 

27% 

16% 

16% 

4% 

4 

49% 

32% 

51 

48% 

21% 

51 

43% 

15% 

42% 

15% 

39 

2f% 

31 

36 

32% 

36% 

59% 

52% 

64% 

a 

11% 

IM 


73S 11b 
02 S3 U 




W, 


34 
371 » 
740 SO 
1471 am 
m wt 
443 4» 

uv> 
12 % 
M 
9* 
21% 
IBM 




im 
15 
15Vi 

13 7% 

14 7ft 
am tm 
33% OTb 
T4 M 
MU 21 
3» znb 

44 33U 
45<Hi 38% 
174k 15 
31* 14% 

M 
M 53 
«m 55 
a 55 
44M S1U 

45 51 

41b 2* 

13* 8% 

9% 

15 
214k 
MU 


71M 48% 
5SU S1U 
25* MM 
a 7* 
13% 6* 
4% 3 

i* n% 

34U M 
IM Bit 
«U 41% 

a TJV 

50 33% 

at u% 

18% 15* 
28% 17% 
38% If 
26% 12% 
15% 8% 


smr 

au au 
n% ti% 

,2W 2% 
13% 13% 
3M 30% 
8% 7% 
51% 57% 
15% MU 
48% 48% 
S% 24 

ssa 

3 S£ 


am n 
40 24% 

am is 
2M6 13% 
13% »% 
19% 13 
45 30% 

29 21% 

7% S% 
17 13% 

17% 11% 
71% 54 
13 7% 

27% zr% 

33% 27% 
43% S 
34% 28% 
M 27 

a 8% 28% 

5 4 

3% 1% 
a 13% 
4i% a 
8 3 

17% 12% 
18% 10% 
21 % 12 % 
11% 5% 
37% 25% 
17% 13 
3 % 1 % 
17% 11% 
a 13% 
10 % 8 % 
life 

58% 41% 
55% 44% 
27% 20% 
38% 30% 
37% 30 
38% 23% 
24% 20 
S7% 58% 

2m 22% 

30% 25% 
70 85% 

9SH 01% 
TO 74% 
*5 54% 

70 58% 

40% 31% 
25% a 
54% 30% 
B7 72 


JN 

38 

140 

4.1 

40 

3.: 

MO 

9J 

144 

111 

184 

9.1 

132 

74 

1/D 

44 

85r 

.5 

280 

105 

40 

24 

5 32 

73 

JO 

33 

2-33 

88 

487 

37 

40 

15 

2/S 

7.1 

1/0 

3 3 

JD 

05 

3D 

1/ 

2 30 

58 


45% 28% QuokOs 134 28 12 1123 45% 44% 44% — % 

100 90% QuoOpf 754 94 342008101*101 Wl* -W% 

22% 15 QuolcSO JO 31 24 156 21% 21 21 — % 

llVk 6% Quann S 1 i 7% 7 ®j 

34% 23 Qumtar IM 48 II tWxJKfe 33% 33% + % 

25% 14 Oft Ml /4a 18 IS 290 34% 23% 24 + % 


as 



•m 




56 

1/ 

1.94 

■8 

1 80 

35 

(44 

34 

140 

44 

30 

IJ 

140 

74 

1/4 

58 

1/8 

118 




150 
1721 
78 

U 11 571 
5L0 35 265 
27 7 532 
3/11 17 

53 5 2002 

21 6 724 
24 U 1083 
268 


41% 

10 % 

27% 

17 

W% 

14 — % 
7 + % 

33% + % 
31% + K 
20 +* 
% 

+ % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 


mi 








248 

B4 7% 7% 
50 8% 8% 
2000 37 34% 

247 33% 32% 
M83 17% 14% 
HV» 


rH 




S* 3* xtra « W» »*»»»♦ 




34% 

21% 

13% 

5% 

23% 

14 

4% 

3% 

2TA 

19 

5% 

3% 

14% 

5% 

46% 

27% 

13% 

9% 

25% 

UH 

Mb 

3% 

18% 

8% 

46 

25% 

77% 

68% 

78% 

67% 

85% 

68% 

68 

52% 

63% 

49% 

66 

51% 

22 

11% 

61% 

28 

78 

60% 


35% 

3*% 

35 


11Vk 

n% 

22% 

22% 

23% 

2% 

2% 

2% 

22% 22% 

32% 

3% 

3% 

2% 

9 

■% 


31% 

31% 

31% 

10% 

Wh 

U>% 

30% 

20% 

20% 

6% 

7% 

8% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

45% 44% 45 

77% J7V. 

7716 


77 


81 

15% 

86 

47% 

67% 

67% 

6416 

64% 

64% 

66 

64 

46 

2M 

21% 

22% 

4116 

4Mh 

41% 

71% 

71 

71% 


§ a 




32% UAL 
24% UA'-pt 
7% UCCEL 
18% UCI 
T7% UGlof 
4% CNCRtt 
» UBS 
17% USFG 
22% USD* 
4CVS USGf* 
n uniFm 
75 Un'.NV 
3C% UCcaa 


1 JO* 2.1 7 

UC. 7A 

II 

2J4 85 ID 
2JS t*.l 

40 U II 
730 5*223 
148 <8 8 

uo u 
30 1 S 11 
3JS* 17 10 
!*i O It 


3554 47% 48'* 41 
■15 31% 31% 

136 14% 14% 

210 24 23% 

mb 24% m% 

212 10 7% 

II 11 10 % 

3055 37* 38% 
2100 38% 35% 

2 44% 64% 

21 13% 13% 

520 100% 77 
1575 31% 37% 



26 2* 38% 2B% + % 

10x 41 41 41 

301 304k 37% 38% + % 

30 18% 18% 10% 

257 7 ■* B% 

3113 51% 90% 5Mb + % 
2118 1W !U 4-1 
1108 27% 28% 27% + % 
158 23% 22% 33% + % 
256 37% 36% 37% + % 
IS? 36% 35% 33* + % 
lOQx Mb Ift SH—% 
4 48 47% 47% + % 

306 2J» a 23% + % 

2270 21% 27% 27*— % 

5221 40% 37% 4QU +1 

334 31% 20% 21% + % 

206 24% 34 MM + % 

SIS 33% 22% 22%— % 

25* 57% 55% 57% +1% 

377 38U> 34% 36 +1% 

1 » 30 30 

» ** a% Ub 

2 12 11% IS + % 

mm 2i% 2i% 2i% + % 

1$ 3t% 38% 3|% + «b 


ifcr 


H-r-+ 


as 






X 


U.S. Futures m«t 2 o 


Sman Season 
hmi Law < 


Oaan Hhrti Law CIom CMl. 






5014 35% TDK 
33% 24 TECO 
13% 7% TGIF 

17 11% TNP 

25% 17 TRE 
81% 58% TRW 


London Metals 

May 20 


London Commodities 

May 20 


I 952080 952580 



_Obk Previous 

W AsK BM AS* 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per mrtric toti 
WH WfiJO B66J0 577 JD 57800 

Mnwirtt 887 JD nun B99J00 90000 

COPPER CATHODE IKKA Grade) 
neriiao per metric tan 
SIMi 1.16&S0 1,169 JO 1,18680 1.1 8780 

torwow 1.178J0 1,17980 1,19080 1,19030 
COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

StarHaa p«r metric too 
9BB* 1.18380 l.USJtt r. 17980 1,18180 

forward 1,16880 1.16V80 1,17980 1.11180 

LEAD 

SterUaa w metric ton 
mat 29080 29180 27380 29980 

29680 29850 29980 29950 

NICKEL 

Sfrll— Mr metric ton 
mat 446080 444580 488080 449080 

torword 487080 4/7280 40080 

SILVER 

Pwtca per tray ounce 

S2* _ S? 100 S* 1 " S17J0 51380 

•orword 51680 51780 «e , ff SOM 

TIN < Standard) 

5terffno per metric too 

mat f A55JM 9A6OQ0 986080 787080 

forward vatsm 9/3080 783080 782580 

ZINC 

SterlMo per metric Ion 
mot 63380 8MJB 64780 64880 

forward 64580 64680 65380 65480 

Source: AP. 


U.S. Treasury Bill Rates 

May 17 


Pnv 

Offer BU YUM Yield 
3-fnontti 741 7J9 745 743 

Unonlti 789 787 (L80 888 

Dm year 7J4 7JO 145 041 

Sourat: Solomon Brothers 


Now offering 

CBOT 

BOND 

FUTURES 

EHZ3 & lit:] 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Future*, ond 
Futures Oplititv. oil 
COMEX-tlOLD & SILVER 
I MM -CURRENCIES 
Low Commssim Rata . 

C T £ * ROUND TLiRN 
i> / ^ DAY AND 
XL/ OVERNIGHT 
* Affim eah to trodn 
ettttdwg 3S0 contracts per 
taindar month. Rnt 2SO 
inw r a t O i’5 round turn. 


sugar"™ ^ ^ru SIT'S 

Stern no per metric tan 

52? ££2 77 - tM 9740 9680 7680 

Oct 10180 9980 10CL2D 100.<a 99 M 9980 
Dec 10680 10440 10540 10680 1M40 w S 
JJ" Kg* mag iibjo iiSS iibjo iwSS 
5*2' J5>5 J2I-32 mM ,22JB 13280 12380 
n?? IS— IS 12740 12flJM 12740 12880 

Oct 13280 13280 13280 13280 131 JD l-dm 

Volume: 1865 Whs of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Stertag per metric tea 

Sr im lilo !■% 3*3S l Jta ,J47 

a?. JJJS 1-772 1J74 1JB5 1.786 

52* JW I -757 1/64 1/66 1/75 1/76 

i^ ij2 I to 1*58 I*3£ ,J52 

l*/55 Wfl 1JS2 1JS3 1J*A ij Ml 
"*v 1/66 1/64 1/65 1/67 1/fS 1^1 

■to 1/75 1/73 1/70 1/77 1/78 ]/8fl 

volume: 2885 tots of IB Ions. 

COFFEE 

StefllM per metric ton 
Mar 2813 1.997 3806 2810 2840 2845 

Jlr 2860 2847 2853 2857 7803 2805 

Sep 2.105 2889 2899 2JB2 7/22 

2,141 2.128 zm ZW ZTSB Zl« 
Job 2.170 also 2.163 1172 2.1B5 2.190 

MOT 2.T65 1135 1MB 1160 SlS ZIW 

Mor 1155 119 1110 1140 U60 1200 

Volume: 1419 km of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

ua. dollars per metric ton 

71680 21*.« 21530 215/5 2U75 21580 


9640 9680 
9940 9980 
10540 MJ640 
11880 11680 
laxo 12380 
12740 12080 
131 3D 13280 


1/60 1/67 
1/05 1/M 
1/73 1/76 
1/SH 1/52 
1^9 1/60 
1.770 1/71 
1/7B 1/80 


xvn ai23 
%75B a 764 
2-105 2.190 
2.180 1195 
2.160 2/00 


2 

1380 


m 

1+71 

til 


Gtli one of oar profas/aw 

212-221-7138 


4S2 Fifth Avenue. NY. NY lOOlB 
Ao AfTiluK of 

lenfeSc Ifaltaal Btmfe of Am %dt 

An $1 1.7 BilUaa Cammcraial Beak 


S&P 100 Index Options 

May 17 


Strike cam-urn Mt-Lort 

met Mot Jn Jlr Aw Mm Jet jtr Aes 

a a- - - - - i/ii - 

146 I) U 19b » - 1/16 18* ft 

17B 11% IN HVj 14ft 1716 1/11 ft ft 

ra 6ft 1 9ft lift 1/U ft ft 1ft 

BO 17/163A 5ft Mk 1/M 17/162 3ft 
115 Dll Ik a » 3ft 4ft 4ft 4ft 

m inn n/Mm - n i tm 

m — % — — — - - — 

Tilal Cril v«fwii« J59/U 
TDUaAiogcnU.fSUN 
Total nit volume 12Un 
Total out opmlnL<92A3i 
lnde*: 

HWHU1 Low 179 JU Oo»lBl39 + Lll 

Source: CBOE. 


DM Futures Options 

Msy 20 

■.Ghibbo iWMSBf uahanbper not 


S2? m °f rfen tL. — ******* 

met Jun Sap Dec Jan Sep Dec 

31 UO 13B J89 B8B OJS D» 

31 L4Q 1/5 137 B3B 0/2 1/3 

33 IU8 la 1/6 076 148 147 

34 0.14 Ul 1/7 132 241 230 

35 085 060 186 242 24B 116 

3i am 04) am — i4s - 

Estimated total voL 10/73 
Calls: Fii.mL2J420BM UL 49/37 
Pets : Frt. *eL 1,174 aeon ML 34jn 
Source: CUB 


To Our Readers 

Stockbdm closing stocks were 
not available in this edition be- 
cause of technical problems. 


Paris Commodities 

May 20 


5UGAR HWl Low Bkl *** CH 1 *® 

FrrncJ? franc i per metric ton 
Aug 1^5 1/37 1/52 1/55 + 16 

OCt 1/75 1/60 1/68 1/72 + 20 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1/U 1ZH +17 

•Jar 1/45 1/30 1/35 1/45 + 15 

Wav *LT. N.T. 1Z6S hWtt +0 

AUP 1440 1440 14*0 1.410 +13 

Est. vpl.: 644 lots of SO tons. Prev. actual 
mfes: 2457 lets. Owm Interest: 17/13 

COCOA 

French francs per 100 kv 
W°> N.T. N.T. NA N.a +3 

Jh> N.T. N.T. — 1140 +15 

5®° 2845 2849 2899 2860 — 11 

Dec 2835 2830 3830 2838 —11 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2840 - -J 

MOV H.T. N.T. 2840 — — 5 

JJV N.T. N.T. 2846 — _5 

A«sjSitSm , * v - 

COFFEE 

French francs per TO kg 
Moy H.T. N.T. 2/60 2 400 —50 

jl* «-T N/T 2415 2440 —40 

Sap 2/10 2475 2484 3485 —49 

Nov N.T. N.T. — 2J30 —35 

Jon N.T. N.T. — yew —38 

War 2/15 2/15 — 7, 475 — 43 

Wav 2/00 £508 — 7. 578 43 

JEb'.vpL: <2 tetepfs taruL Prev. actual sales: 
■** lots, oaen interest: 271 
Source; Bourse Ou Commerce. 


Asian Commodities 

May 20 


KOHG-KONG gold futures 
U/J per ounce 


274 4 U 74 43% 42% 42% +1’A 

2/6 7/ 9 7W 33 32% 33%— Vfe 

16 15 11 10% 10% 

1/5 78 9 23 18% 17% I7%— % 

180 4/ 14 207 22% 21% 22% + % 

180 4/ W 891 71% 7D% 71% +1% 


Cash Prices May 20 


Commodity orw unit 

Coffee 4 5amas.ib_ 

Prfritclafti MOB 38 %. »d - 
Steel on lets IPirt.l, ton_ 
iran2 Fdry.PHIIo»ton — 

Steel scroo Mol hwPML. 
Lead Spot, lb — . 

Caponr elect- lb 

Tin (Straits!. lb 

Zinc E. 51. L. Basis, to — 

Palladium, az — 

Silver N.Y. ok 

Source: AP. 


Dividends 


Company 4 Per Amt 

-* STOCK 

Jodvn Inc - 6% 

STOCK SPLITS 
Amer RecreaNai — Mor-4 
Flbronics Inti — 3-tor-2 
Limited Inc — 2-4or-t 

USUAL 

O 84 

a 35 

a /a 

O -IB 
Q 37% 
Q J7 
O 85% 
M .1519 
a .13% 
a .12% 

Q .25 
Q 44 
Q 85 
W .138 

Q -44% 

OJ2% 
- Z2 % 
M 877 

a 35 

. -C7 

Q 44 
Q 8* 
Q JO 
Q 82% 
Q .15 


Grains 


ORANGE JUICE (NYCU 
15800 «%.. cent* aer to. 

IMIS 14V JO Jut 15080 15080 1058 14865 

182.00 147 JB Sep 14880 1*880 1*4/5 146/S 

11180 14*83 Nov MS/S 14688 MUM U4J0 

10080 148.15 Jan 144.45 

17789 14L70 Mor U445 

M2/0 16080 Vjv 14445 

157/0 157/D JUi 14445 

INL50 179/S Sep 14441 

EsL Sates 37S Prev. Sates 540 

Prev. Oav Often in>. S.TCJ off 83 


Metals 


COPPER (COME» 

25800 tos.- c ents per Ms. 

9150 56m MOV 6880 64.10 

6SJS5 4185 Jun 

SBJ5 5780 JUI 6440 65.15 

*£10 57/0 3*0 6SJ05 6190 

84/5 5858 DSC 6680 66/0 

84/0 5940 Jon 66.95 06.95 

BL00 5040 Mar 6780 6740 

7480 61.10 May 67/0 *7 JO 

7440 61/0 Jut 67/0 67/0 

7090 MJO Sen 

70/0 *480 OWC 

Torn *5/0 Jan 

&&JfQ 44JI0 Mar 

EstScteS 11800 Prev. Sales 7.139 
Prev. Day Open I nL 84/15 up 934 

ALUMINUM(COMEX) 

4a®S8 Sbs.- cents per Rs 


6280 62/5 
UK 
6130 *3/5 
6480 *4.10 
64JO 64.90 
4AM 65.11 
65.90 6545 
67/5 6A8S 
67/0 6645 


Hlqti LOW open High Low CtfeM 

89/4 8786 Alar 1947 8947 8946 894* 

Esi.Satea 38/17 Prev. Solve SU87 
Prev. Oav Open Wt.TM032 oft S3 

BRITISH POUNCk tlMMl 

Spot pound- 1 peMoeuatoEMMl 
I /MB unto J«m 1/830 1/840 U« UM 

14430 ItoS Sea 1/710 1/730 t/w uts*s 

1/800 18300 Dec L36SD 1/690 L/OD MSS 

tmoa UMM Mar I/OS I/62S 1J62C 1/425 

M25D UM Jim -IMS 

EK. Sates VU04 Prev. Sates KLN7 

Prev. Day Oaen ML 4UU wUn . . 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Spot dh -1 Point env ois 80 0 00 1 
Jess jau Jun /an Z3» .an Jw 

JSBS 3m 5*P -7273 .7287 JM3 Jm 

.7546 JD0* DM JM MS JM JMI 

J5M AMI MOT J35D /2M /348 J»7 

J350 JVM Jim .7290 -7ZJ0 /390 JSt 

Ear. Soles 1/63 Prev. Sate* 1439 ........ 

Prev. OatrOnen tnt. 12492 eft 216 
FRENCH FRANC (1MM) 
l P erwvne-1 petoteeMete 3080081, , 

.tins 8MM Jim .18700 J07M JflM .WMO 

.l«m 89680 Sep MB* 

Mm 8%» DM JDOM 

WWR. I Jrw.M*i it M 
Prev. Dov Open nd. 1494 off It 
ORKMAN MARK (IMM) 

tpermark-l PObrtVftMitoSftJOOi 

3333 JPM Jun 3303 3217 J2D . JM 

/MS JfX Sep X 136 33« JSW 8B 

J4W 39 71 Dec J356 33*1 JS0? J3W 
J41S JDM Alar 33V 33V XSU MOB 
EH. Salai 32410 Prev.Sdtee 1746* 

Prev. Day Open Inf. SUM4 up 471 

JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Spe r ve w t goto ) e qu a te 9 0 lEO I O l - 

00*450 8B3836 Jun 80401 5 404W7 803995 804BB2 
004150 803870 Sep J048M 8041)87 8040 1 3 80 TO P 
DOOM J03MB Dec J060M . W HOM 804045 8P*« 
HM140 804090 MOT 804080 

EatSates A3S4 Prev. Sales S8B3 
Prev. Day Open inf. 19814 npMS 
SWISS FRANC (MM) _ 

Sper franc- 1 potet equals *88081 _ • - 

4900 J439 Jun J933 M4 2 Z858 /B59 

8M 3m SeP - 3W? 4973 JBBD /EBB 
4tea JSJl Dec 4800 40M JT20 J9» 
40B /*» Mar -3970 

Est. Sales 27/85 Prev. Sales 12/03 
Prev. Day Open ltd. 3&42B up US 


Industrials 


Livestock 


7-9 6-12 
6-17 6-3 

t-11 5-29 

6-14 5-31 
6-12 5-30 
6-15 5-29 

6- M 5-31 

7- 10 5-31 
7-3 6-25 

8- 15 7-15 
6-25 5-29 

6- 14 6ft 
7-8 6-14 

7- 31 Ml 
7-1 6-1B 

6-30 6-14 
6-30 6-14 
6-14 5-31 
7-1 6-7 

6-14 5-31 
7-1 6-6 

6-15 5-31 
7-1 5-30 

6- 15 s-m 

7- 31 7-17 


6382 +.15 

64S7 +45 

63m +.17 

64m +.15 

5 


46L97 +87 

69.12 +45 

6840 +J0 

6&3Q +.15 

69/0 +/0 

70/0 +.16 

7088 +ZB 



m 


Financial 


Dutch Production 
Up 1.9% inMardi 

Reuters 

THE HAGUE — The seasonally 
adjusted index of industrial pro- 
duction in the Netherlands rose 1 .9 
percent in March to a preliminary. 
107 from 105 in Febraary. accord- 
ing to official statistics published 
Monday. 

The base year is 1980.' 

The index was 3.9 percent higher 
in March than a year earlier. The , 
February index was 1 percent 
down on January 1985 and 2.9 per- 
cent up on February 1934, 


Metma^dia-Murdodj Accord 

Rtfuien 

SECAUCUS. New Jersey — 
Metromedia Inc, said Monday that 
iL had signed a definitive agreement 
with Twentieth Holdings Corp.. a 
newly formed corporation owned 
by Rupert Murdoch and Marvin 
Davis, to sell Metromedia’s seven 
television stations to Twentieth Tor 
approximately 52 billion. 




85-6 +1U 

iff +, » 

+na 

Sii- * m 

81-35 +113 


7S-M +IM 

S - .’? «■ 
VtH *]»■ 

»3 +m 

2-31 4418 

71-» +117 

»■? +117 

SI t«tr 
<mi +m 

g-7 +117 

«M6 +H7 


Market feu 


or 

NYFG; 


WkyVjrit OPton BxSmtr 

WMSlE" 1 


































































































3 


J , 'Ti. I i ' 

"I w» . * 

■* *«■. HI 

, «v~i „,. 

4 S- H ‘ ■"• 
•s 3U“-r£ 

2 **— * 

** M 


« '* v* IT 1 < 

•' ! ;-J M 

j sil 


8 Maryland S&Ls Move 
Toward U.S. Insurance 


Great Western 1 Sale of Chevron-Italy 

To Arab Firm Collapses 


- MS 

•gSK 

<? J. H 


. While many thrifts already were 

BALTIMORE — Eghl privately experiencing heavy withdrawals 
insured saving; and loans nave won Wang of the saving and loan 
conditional approval for federal in- crisis in Ohio, the Old Court an- 


** «'rv-.i- v •; ji» r -jL 

*■* — - jS'fi 

»*• 1 . 1 * i?.. r 


■ ■ " «. *■■- 

••• ft...., 


' l A-u» „ 

*■ + ua. 


r .?§M 

: si?s| 

■r 

'tu 


»• \ ■ «« 


£ ^ V sorance that would allow deposi- 
■ tors to withdraw money whhoul 
<t‘ e regard to Omits imposed in an ef- 
|f ■ ^ fort to stop runs, officials said. 

Once the appl ic a tio ns arc for- 
l ^ mally approved by the Federal 
^ } Home Loan Bank Board, the ac- 
£ £ counts of depositors at the thrifts 
*4; will be insured up to 5100,000 by 
?*. the Federal Savings & Loan Insur- 
er £ ance Corp. 

That final approval should be 
Z_ granted in the next few days, a 
board sp<d«sman. Bob Moore, said 
Sunday. 

a *- The debt institutions have been 
v& insured by the Maryland Savings- 
Uisf ® Share Insurance Corp., which in-’ 
sures 102 state-chartered savings 
and loans. The privately insured 
Sj. S&Ls have assets cf about $9 bil- 
Hon. 


Id allow deposi- nouncement set off a highly visible 
money without run on deposits that quickly spread 
nposed in an cf- to other institutions, 
offidals said. ■ Meanwhile, in Annapolis, state 
nations arc for- Senator Howard Denis tngpd that 
by the Federal i&e General Assembly meet in spe- 
c Board, the ac- dal session, with subpoena powers 
dts at the thrifts given to legislators, to sort out how 
) to 5100,000 by me Maryland crisis started. 

*s & Loan Insur- Lawmakers allege that top offi- 
cials of both, the state Division of 
roval should be Savings and Loan Associations and 
ext few days, a the Maryland Saving-Share Insur- 
Bob Moore, said ance Corp. led them to believe that 
the industry was in good shape 
itions have been when a number of serious problems 
Hyland Savings-, had developed. 

- or P-» which in-’ ' The chairman of the Federal De- 
lartered savings poatlssarance Corp, William M. 
rivately insured ■ icmr, said Friday th at tire prob- 
of about $9 bil- Jems that led to the threatened de- 
mise of Maryland’s private insur- 


' 

,rt ^ 'sue < "I - ** 

. |V. »!»tk ai,^ 

> »7H 

.j — 



■ Wl u. ... 

-T- 

r.£z&S:zr % -*'*'*, 
-.1 , t .. , 

*»■-' v-.r.-P.:,. 


The Maryland General Assent- ance fund were well known among 
hly, meeting in special session Fri- industry leaders. 


BEVERLY H IT T S, Califor- 
nia — Great Western F inancial 
Corp. said Monday that it has 
agreed to purchase Citadel 
Holding Corp. in a stock swap 
valued at about $109 millio n. 

Great Western, parent com- 
pany of Great Western Savings 
& Loan Association, is the 
state's third-Jargest thrift G fa- 
de! is the parent of the state’s 
1 9th- larges i thrift. Fidelity 
Federal Savings & Loans Asso- 
ciation. 

Great Western said it had ex- 
ercised an option to purchase 
up to $400 million of Fidelity 
redcraTs adjustable rate mort- 
gages for cash. The acquisition 
plan calls for 12 shares of 
Great Western to be exchanged 
for each share of Cita- 

del has nearly 3_2 milli on shares 

outstanding. Great Western 
stock dosed Friday on the New 
York Stock Exchange at 
$28.2216. Citadel traded on the 
American Stock Exchange for 
$29.50 a share. 


By Bob Haeerty First Arabian had assumed that 

International Herald Tribune ESSO would exercise 8 tight Of first 

LONDON — Chevron Corp. refusal and buy Chevron’s 23J- 
said Monday that an agreement to percent stake in the Milan refinery 
sell its Italian oil-refining and mar- for around 5100 million, halving 
kfiting operations to First Arabian the cost of the transaction lor First 
Corp. had fallen through. Arabian. Mr. Sicckel said. 

The San Francisco-based oil But Esso declined to increase its 
company said it no longer expected interest in the unprofitable refin- 
to complete the sale because a ery. In San Francisco, a Chevron 
deadline for First Arabian to make finance official said his company 
necessary arrangements bad had expected First Arabian to com- 
pared. The planned transaction, plete the transaction whether or 
announced in February, would not Esso exercised its right on the 
have been worth roughly $200 mil- refinery, 
lion, according to Matthew Steeled, Mr. Stedel said the Milan rcfin- 
a director of First Arabian, which is g™ would have been surplus to the 
an Arab-owned holding company needs of Ftm Arabian's Tamoil 


registered in Luxembourg. Xtaiia 

The proposal had called for Fust ^ss i 
Arabian to acquire 1,700 gasoline Italy 
stations, a lube-blending plant in ' 
Savona and stakes in refineries ■ . 


Italia unit, which already owns ex- 
lor Fust cess refining capacity in northern 


day, passed a package of seven bills 
to keep privately insured savings 
and loans from financial collapse. 

Under the package of legislation 
that went into effect Saturday, larg- 


. Tamoil operates an Italian refin- 

near Milan and Rome. Mr. Steckel 
said in a telephone interview that 

the sticking point was the Milan frora S ^5, £ 4 rd ™ fa^ianii)- 
refinery, paniyowned by Esso Jta- no F *** «> Corp- That ac- 
Ka, a^iiSExxon Corp. S!SS “ CSUnWted 

i Fi/si Arabian officials bad said 

the Chevron acquisition would 
have left Tamoil with about 8 per- 

record S4.98 billion. K mart credit- £? ‘ fe T 

«rfiicowntammsitinnnfWaMm- makm S 11 No. 3 behind the 


that went into effect Saturday, larg- Affied Stores Corp^ a large U5. own more than 95 percent of Cox record $4.98 billion. K mart credit- t;, ^ 

er savings and loans with assets retailer, is expected this week to Communications Inc. of Atlanta, edits recent acquisition erf Walden- f/rr- TTG® “ 
over $40 milfion will have to make announce the consolidation of its Cox Enterprises also extended until books. Builders Square and Pay • «r C cvl 1 !^ 

V application for federal insurance three Joske’s department store May 24 it $75-per-share offer for Less Drug Stores. rSn ^ 1 “ txxon 

* by June I, and will be required in croups in Texas. The move is in- stock in Cox Communications, cHmwtm Ada im said n wndi- .... 


>UUr... 

->,a - . . .. 

« . a.,. . 

•*-1 

in-4 , 
•w-V r>. 




application lor teaerat insura nce three Joske s department store May 24 it $75- per-share offer for 
by June 1, and- will be required in groups in Texas. The move is in- stock in Cox Communications, 
most cases to have the insurance by tended to cut expenses, riinrinatg which owns several U.S. radio and 
the end erf the year. duplication of jobs and centralize television stations. 

Smaller thrift institutions will functions. Henry Ansbacher Hobfings PLC, 

have up to four years to change Bayerische Motoren Werfce AG a London merchant bank, is ex- 
over to the FSLIG plans to hire approximately 1,000 peered to announce funding ar- 

One of the bills also created a new workers because of demand rangements to raise abont £35 nul- 
Maryland Deposit Insurance Fund foritsf a r s*"^ » T gAurtuwi in wnrt. lion ($44.1 million), more than 
Coro, to insure existmg accounts in log hours at its plants. Hie new double the rights issue announced 
aQ S&Ls op to 5100,000. The state- employees trill bring BMW’s total in January, according to market 
backed insurance fund will tempo- work force to 46,100 by the end of sources, 
rarily replace private insurance. the -year, 1,400 more than on Dec. interNorth Inc. and Houston 


Coro, to insure existing accounts m mg hours at its pla 
all a&Ls up to $100,000. The state- employees will bring 
backed insurance fund will tempo- work force to 46,100 
rarily replace private insurance. the year, 1,400 more 
The legislature also authorized a 31.-1984. 
SlOO-million bond issue to fund the rhanarral Reson 




rvmy» il unu iui ixab i/iug ounra. Com 

stock in Cox Communications, qHimitm Ada Lid. said a svndi- '"V?" , , ■ 

SS^ti^ IU ' S ‘ radi0 311,3 careoflumks^Marer^. “ 

^S^SSrHohfinesPLC. 2B a S™^i“ | P n 7^o 7 ^?°^ Christian^h Scial backing 

iEsiZESftsrrz saasss S2SS ^ w-«kr.AniSf 

peered to nmonoe fundng ar- jESS^cRfilSSSS SdeSd^^^SS 
rangements to raise about £35 mil- ltd. noto« dropped out noweva-. and 

lion ($44.1 miffionX more than ^ ^ . ... , v by 1982 nearly 60 Mroent <rf Fust 

doable the rights issue announced SpiecUm, a subadiaiy of the Arabian was owned by Edouard 
in January according to market Frcnch construction group Spie- Tararaz, Roger Tararaz’s father, ac- 
sources. Babgnolles SA, said il has won a cording to a filing with the U.S. 

interNorth Inc. and Houston 50-million-franc ($5.31 -million) Federal Reserve. 

Natural Gas Corp. have received a contract to bufld a plant in China Fust Arabian acquired major 
request for more information from 10 produce ethanol from maize, shareholdings in a Detroit com- 
the VS. Federal Trade Cammz- The plant is to produce 20 million mercial bank and a small London 


SlOO-million bond issue to fund the Qtaparral Resources Inc. of request for more Wonnation from t° produce ethanol from maize, shareholdings in a Detroit corn- 

new slate insurance agency and to Denver said it has signed an agree- the UA Federal Trade C ommix - Theplant is to produce 20 milhon mercial bank and a small London 

help savings and loans meet the 5 ment to sdl 17,000 gross acres of oD sion on their proposed merger. In- hlers (5.28 milhon gallons^ erf ahar merchant bank in the mid-1970s. 


Wyoming to Sap- 
PLC of London 


percent net worth standard for leases in central Wyoming to Sap- 
^ membership in the FSEJC That Petroleum PLC of London 
-f standard requires assets to exceed f or $ 1.6 million in «»gh $1 million 
liabilities by 5 percent. in stock and the cost of drilling four 

The Maryland thrift crisis devri- wdls on the properties over the 
oped following an announcement next two years. 

• that Old Court Savings & Loan, the CoxEitierprisesInc^an Atianta- 


sion oil their proposed merger. In- emuun gimuosj or ema- mercnani Dank m the mid- IV /us. 

terNorth, based in Omaha, Nebras- pol a year for use in the chemicals Both shareholdings eventually were 


second-largest privately insured based new: 
thrift, had serious management pany, said 
problems. 


in stock and the cost of drilling four on markets effected by both 
wdls on the properties over the parties. 

□ext two years. K mart Corp., the world 

Gax Enterprises Inc, an Atlanta- on d -largest retailer, said Mi 
based newspaper publishing com- that fust-quarter tamings n 
pany, Monday that it and 558-5 ntinion, or 46 cents per 


ka. said the FTC is seeking industry. 

information under antitrust laws Tandem Computers Inc. of Cu- 


sold at a substantial loss. 

But Mr. Tamraz’s defenders say 


com- pertino, California, has introduced he made huge profits by buying 
improvements to its Guardian op- and selling Paris hotels during the 
> see- era ting system that it said wm same period. 


K mart Corp., the world’s see- era ting system that it said wfll 
ond-iargest retailer, said Monday boost the performance of its com- 
that first-quarter fwming s rose to p liter systems. The new software 
558G5 ntinion. or 46 cents per share, version mil be provided free of 


members of the Cox famil y now and sales increased 19 percent to a charge to existing owners. 


:»*• : Ills 2* 
-i* ’if 
' *.V iUt .u-> 
:m .X- 

* 


In US., Cosmetics Firm Succeeds a la Frangaise 


(Continued from Page 11) ton, 2 
$665 minimi - last year, analysis bode, 
said. ■ \ Aft 

Cosmair, which is the U.SL Ii- hook, 


ton, a French historical reference royalties last year to L’Ortal for the Mr. Levy says Cosmair’s growth 

bode. use of L’OrtaTs brand name and is financed, for the most part, by 

After the war, according to the research data. And Cosmair’s ad- what he calls the company’s “cash 
book, Mr. Confee fled France be- war rising and promotion budgets, cows” — Lanctrmc, Vanderbilt and 
Fore he could, be arrested. He analysis say, total about $230 mil- Polo fragrances and L’Ortel hair 
turned, .up in Spain dnring .the lion, or 35 percent of sales, higher coloring products, windL together 
1950s, when he was . working for than the industry norm of about 25 account tor about 45 percent, or 


. • , ~,j -j. - uosmair, wmen is me u.a. n- **<»****■ uw * ^ “-^“ 6 yiwmuuvu » 

F-; ^ Z incensing agent and distributor for fore he could . be arrested. He analysts say. total about $2 
.. L’Or^demes that ti is gettingany .. turned .iro in Spain dnring .the lion, or 35 percent of sales, 

" r ' Bnurunrip from Nestlfc. But U IS ■ 19S0s*. wnen;he wasworidng for than the industry norm of a! 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

RICES AT ISAB5c 
A: US. DOLLAR CASH SI 044 

B: MutnajssENcr cash sio25 

Cz DOUAR BONDS S11.15 

O-. MULHGURKNCV BONDS $1068 

Ei STBOING ASSET DO60 

FORBGN & GOIONM. 
MANAGBMBifr (JB5EV) UMflH) 

14 MUCASTH SqgTSTjajBUBSEY^L 
ia> 053427351 TH5MT920&- 

FOK CtJHBl F & C FINDS, 5EF 
MONATtONAl FUNDS UST 


, i, fr“«U. -.«,v 
. 1 -. »». 

«* 1 • '• * 


.14 IM1> 


financing from Nestlfe. But' it is ltowA.wnen.lie was working ior man meinausoynormot aoomzn 
dear that a major battle is under UQrfeal and Mr. Schneller, who re- percent, 
way in cosmetics — and that Cos- mained in France. In 1953. Cos- Maintaining strong growth rates 
mair wants to win it • mair was founded. could prove mcxcasingly difficult 

“The establishment must under- 1“ the 1970s, Cosmair entered because of the sluggish growth that 


than the industry norm of about 25 account for abouL 45 percent, or 
percent $310 million, of the company’s to- 

Maintaining strong growth rates tal sales. In all, hair care products 
could prove increasingly difficult account for 34 percent of sales; 



Nedlloyd 


Worldwide Transport & Energy 

Nedlloyd Group, Houtlaan 21. 301 6 DA Rotterdam, The Netherlands 

Telephone number ( 01 0 ) 1 7791 1 . Telex number: 27087 ndgr nl 


The New Classics 



V, makeup, 25 


stand that they can’t be winners by the consumer market with L’Or- the cosmetics business is now expe- percent and skin care. 8 percent, 
right” says -toe 52-year-old Jean Preference hair coloring and riendng. Cosmetics unit sales rose Cosmair, with its L’Ortal line of 


Lancdme skin treatment and bean- only 2 percent in 1984. and they are cosmetics, is now fighting one of its 
ty products, all of which were al- expected to flatten over the next toughest battles to take a bigger 
ready being sold in Europe by L’O- few years. share of sales from mass-market 

rtaL In 1974, Mr. Dalle helped 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


, . ,, ,S V 
■ HI 




IlKW*h‘»*l s — 


Levy, who has been Cosmair’s 
president since December 1983 and 
a L'Orfcal executive for about 25 
years. ‘They’re going to have to 
fight every day for tins.” 

Stories are rife about what Mr. 
Mottus called Cosmair’s “ferocious 
jockeying” for position in maga- 
zine advertising and department 
store counter location. For exam- 
ple, analysts and publishing 
sources say that when Cosmair de- 
manded better placement for its 
ads in Architectural Digest, the 
magazine would not accommodate 
that change and Cosmair promptly 
[ ■withdrew its considerable advextis- 


. ... .. ** -withdrew its considerable advertis- 

'rf _ ;;; 7-Z “F3 53 * T|ng patnmage. Now, two years lat- 
- il er, Cosmair still does not advertise 

-J - fc 1'* ‘‘X '• * in themaeazine. 

■ : : - > “■ lE‘‘ I Kb In ICKt or a 


Cosmair started life in 1953 as a 
wholesale distributor of L’Ortal 
hair-care products to U.S. beauty 
salons. It was founded as a joint 
venture by L’Ortal and Jacques 
Correze, who is Cosmair’s chair- 
man and a shareholder. . . 

Mr. Corrtze, now 73, and L’Or- 
eal's founder, the late Eug&ne 
Schudler, helped found . an organi- 
zation in France during World War 


II tiiat was known for collaborating mg on research, advertising and 
with the Vichy government under promotion has kept it From turning 


the German occupation, according 
to the Dictionnaire de Henri Cos- 


ready beingsoid in Europe by L’O- few years. share of sales from mass-market 

rtaL In 1974, Mr. Dalle helped Cosmair claims that its spending omiets, where 60 percent of all 
attract the interest of Nestlfc, which levels are in line with the competi- beauty aids arc now sold in the 
now owns 62 percent of Cosmair tion and that its profit margins are United States. In snch outlets as . 
and an indirect 27-percent share of healthy. drugstore it Has gone head- 

L’Ortal. The remaining 38 percent to-head with Revlon, which now 

of Cosmair is closely held by L’O- outsells L’Ortal by about a 3-to-I 

real; Mr. Dalle; Liliane Betten- # margin — and C osmair manag ed 

court, the daughter of L’OrtaTs AM (Tnirfn/' tit TTnjor to trim that margin from about 5 to 

founder, and Mr. Corrtze. nxujM^uww wig j ^ l9Sl ^ 

Cosmair’s results, so far, have fhitmit Off 2 4PIfl Cosmair is catering to the high 
been impressive. Although Avon /v end of the market, selling L’Ortal 

Products Inc, is the biggest U.S. t C mmmnrt) cosmetics in drug chains at higher, 

beauty company, analysts say that Aft uMlgupt/i © department store prices. Fy -h unit 

if Cosmair’s sales momentum con- Remen pnee is about 20 to 30 percent higfa- 

tinuest it could push Revlon out of ctnigapokf rnutnut in cr than the competition, 

States Singapore's manufacturing sec- Meantime, Revlon seems to have 

befw thedoaA: « OTL torTdil4 percent in the first lost some of its once-vaunted prod- 

quarter of this year compared uct innovation and marketing 

KS with growth of 11.8 peremt in drive, buyers and analysts say. . 

Revlon, which had $798 milhon in ^ } as [w ar> the Revlon’s sales of cosmetics, fra- 

North Amencan sales last vear, goveramem said Monday. grances, toiletries and treatment 

The Trade and Industry Min- products m the United States, Can- 

Lauder, a private company that sajj jjj jts quarterly eco- a da and Puerto Rico, increased by 

Sc ^ tST^slow- just 1 percent in 1984 after a flat 
about 12 percent, according to ana- ^ ^ ^ 1983. 

Iys ^ r ■ . areas. - To get back on track, Revlon 

performance Gross domestic product, recently introduced Custom Eyes 
notwithstanding, its heayy spend- • wbicb measures a nation’s total — an economical eye shadow com- 

™ S output of goods and services pact witii replaceable powder pans 

the exception of invest- toathas been a hit, recording sales 

ment incomTincreased only 3 of $20 milhon mils first year. 


in blockbuster profits. Cosmair 
said it paid about $25 million in 


Company Earnings 

Revenue land profits, in millions ore In local currencies 
. unless otherwise Indicated 


Australia 


HU I9H 
MUM 135J6 


ms in* 
i2?a m 
3iD 21-4 
(L47 (M2 


Britain 

Ass. British Foods 

’Mr TH4 TWJ 


YMT 

Revenue 

Pretax Net- 
Per Share 


Dayco Ludcv Stores 

2nd Quar. W IN* ’ utOvar ? MSS 1*M 

25T2?-“ ^ ^ *££»: L 3^ 2-m 

Net Inc 21-4 

Per Stares- (US 0M ptrS»xm_ (L47 (M2 

in Ban ww ism 

Revenue- 4tue am fftnrrrmtilo Stores 

Net Inc. SL01 7Jt nwiM Bllue jrona 

PtrStare- MS 1.B ^ ££ 

Firet Executive ns 

1st Quar. HB5 ISM 


Manufacturing 
Output Off 2.4% 
hi Singapore 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Output in 
Singapore's manufacturing sec- 
tor fell 2.4 percent in the first 
quarter of this year compared 
with growth of 1 1.8 percent in 
the like period of last year, the 
government sad Monday. 

The Trade and Industry Min- 
istry said in its quarterly eco- 
nomic survey that the slow- 
down was frit in almost all 
areas. 

Gross domestic product, 
which measures a nation’s total 
output of goods and services 
with the exception of invest- 
ment income, increased only 3 
percent, compared with 10.1 
percent in the same period last 
year and 5.5 percent in the 
fourth quarter. 

The manufacturing sector 
was hit hardest because erf low- 
er worldwide demand for petro- 
leum and transport equipment, 
toe ministry said. SSngipore is a 
major manufacturer m both 
categories. 



Arab Banking Corporation (B.S.C.) 

(Incorporated with limited liability in the State of Bahrain) 

HK$360,000,000 
Floating Rate Notes Due 1990 


SSiEKfwicrawrt ' 

degrees k*- 

SSKSKt— 


BANK OF CHINA, HONG KONG 

CITICORP CAPITAL MARKETS GROUP 

* SUN HUNG KAI INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 


BANQUE PA RIBAS CAPITAL MARKETS BARCLAYS BANK PLC 

PARIBAS ASIA LIMITED 

CCIC FINANCE LIMITED LLOYDS BANK INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS HANOVER ASIA LIMITED ORION ROYAL PACIFIC LIMITED 


Net Inc. _ 
Per Shore 


UQ Oo*r H*t „ 


Canada 


St Lawrence Cent. 
Id aw. IKS TW 

Revenue 4U 3U 


Htf* ****** poftjj; at SSJ Revenue 
mmtan vsSZJtrdiBan. Net me. . 


flu tin g Cos 

uftaar. MtS 


Na ti onal Can 

Uttar. IKS 1) 


- j Net Lass 


745 Revenue __ 2AM. Ijm 

Net inc 1 M 7 an 


US Uttar. IKS im 
SSJ Revenue __ 40U 3RU 

Net me. (oust L03 

a.- loss. Mata exclude 
. etHroesa/stiJmHtbn ys< 5 
million- im net also **- 
tcm eludes tax credit of 326 mil- 
om Ban. 


U.S. $1,000,000,000 

Kingdom of Sweden 


United States 

Amur, ftw n d d 


Handy 1 Hcvnum — 


motor. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

pw Shore 


ig Pa-Shore__ 


Blount 


ah Qnar. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Share 

Veer 

Revenue 

Net Inc. — 
Per Shore 


Honnol (Geo) 

JW l»» 2MQeer. IRS TIM 

22059 289 Jt Revenue 5su 304 

441 *J7 Net UK, 444 143 

<LU 157 Per Share QJ2 ns» 

mSB ^WHolf IMS im 

14745 1WJ» Revenue 7104 4H4 

202 .2144 Net inc 1115 lfij 

9J» 143 Per Shore __ lsb . 


OW Republic . 
_ Uttar. IKS 1984 

Oper Net UBS 13JW 

Ocer Shar«_ 847 047 




CarMr Hawley u 

uttar. ms jw mti rurvurer . 

Revenue— 8314 744-4 BOQaor. -IKS IM 

.-rigfir Net 114 7J1 Revenue 9154 8574 

yar Share- 031 0.17 Net me 594 [oiu 

« 19M net eaetodos aoUt of Per Short — (M2 — 

tfJ m/ajon from dkcantb* . WNoff m l«M 

utd operations. Revenue— Wft 

Qty Inverting . "•■JJJ— 

I* * owir. nc • nee . . - 

Net inc __(o1t074 X0 vu—i 

Per Shore—. — SIX K WlOrt 

or tas tUSnot tactudet. lapuar. im 
oetnafS3Mmnnon.axzro.at Revenue— «W 
S170 million ana wwirtw of N* 1 !"C- — »» 

saomiaien . perShore — om 


WdfrBmw 

^ aniQuor. wo 1M4 
Revenue 394 380? 

zz’ Net inc 314 13.9 

rnj Per 5hor«__ 049 041 

* Moott* ms 1WJ 

JSJ Revenue 9SL4 0423 

Net Irtc. S74 274 

. Per Star* 130 043 

f NBS Powtffi net Includes 
. ' uebi of Pants oof snare. 



ASIAN OCEANIC LIMITED CHINA DEVELOPMENT FINANCE COMPANY (HK) LIMITED 

THE CHINA & SOUTH SEA BANK LIMITED EAST ASIA WARBURG LIMITED 

MITSUBISHI FINANCE (HONG KONG) LIMITED SANWA INTERNATIONAL FINANCE LIMITED 

SIN HUA TRUST SAVINGS & COMMERCIAL BANK LIMITED 
SUN HUNG KAI BANK LIMITED YAMAICHI INTERNATIONAL (HK) LIMITED 

YOKOHAMA ASIA LIMITED 


-uttar. 
Iff R«venue_ 


52^22 EK ' 43% Net Inc. 449 (a) 


fMiance Group 

Qear. IMS 198* 

BS.* , SI44 

XL 449 (a) 499 

an, nos net before ere- 


vs R«n 

B43 tHI lot 


Floating Rate Notes Due 2003 

In accordance unto toe provisions of toe Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six month Interest Period from 
20th May 1985 to 20th November 1985 the Notes wfll 
• cany an Interest Rate of 83jt% per annum The interest 
amount payable on the relevant Interest Payment Date 
which will be 20th November, 1985 is U^. $44722 for 
each Note of UK $10,000. 

Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 
Agent Bank 


May, 1985 


"* ' '-T ' .7 ’ 

T -.1 ■' ■*!,** 






















































































:*v' 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Page 15 


Oyer-the-Coimter 

NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


May 20 


£ Z 


Mfk M 

UH 13?, 

4H Wit 
llh IM 

am m 
am am 

5Vi 5% 
aaK am 
am 2S% 
7Vk 4H 

459b 45% 

m vk 

m m 

15% 15 
U16 17% 
6V, Mi 

T2VS mb 
SVi 3M 
15 14% 

7% 
5% 

2716 27 
2114 21% 
*7115% IS 
5356% 55% 

21 6% 6iS 

6416 13% 

mam a* 

37765% iW 
140 5% 5% 
46 M 6 
7% 7Vb 
14% 14% 


Wtt +* 

14% — % 
46% + % 
1»6 — 16 
20% +1 
24% + % 
5% 

3> 4-16 

26% + % 
7% ♦ Vt 
45% + % 
116 + 16 
S% — Vi 
TJ% + % 
1716 

6% + * 
13M + U 
BA— % 
Mi- 16 
7%— * 
514 

27 +1 

2116 + 16 
15% — 16 

24 —16 
651 6 

5%— 16 
4% 

7% — M 
14% + % 


42614% 1514 16 +16 

43919% 19% 1«% + 16 


7% 

13% 

35% M% + % 


Republic Holding S.A. Luxembouig 

(formerly Trade Development Bank Holding S A.) 

Dividend Payment 

Amendment of Articles of Incorporation 

At the Annual Meeting of Shareholders held in Luxembourg on May 14, 1985, the shareholders voted 
unanimously in favour of all matters appearing on the Agenda published together with the notice 
convening tne Meeting. 

With regard to Item 4 of such Agenda, it was resolved that a dividend of US$ 1.00 per share be 
payable tor the year ended December 31, 1984. In respect of registered shares, this dividend will be 
payable as ofjune 3, 1985 to registered shareholders appearing on the shareholders’ register as of the 
dose of business of May U 1985 at their address mentioned in the register of the transfer agent and 
registrar of the Company, Banque Internationale i Luxembourg, Luxembourg. In regard to bearer 
shares, the dividend will be payable as ofjune 3, 1985 against surrender of Coupon No. 16 to any one 
of the offices of the Company’s paying agents listed below.: 


Manufacturers Hanover Limited 
8 Princes Street. London £C2P 2EN 
Banque Internationale a Luxembourg S.A. 
2, boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 
Manufacturers Hanover Bank Belgium 
13. rue de Li gnu, 1000 Brussels 
Manufacturers Hanover Banque Nordique 
20, rue de la ViUe-TEvfque, 75008 Paris 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 
*0 Wall Street, New York, N.Y. 10015 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 
Bockenheimer Landstr. 51/53, Frankfurt 


Republic National Bank of New York 
452 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 

Republic National Bank of New York. 
London Branch 

55 Basinghall Street, London EC2V 5DU 
and 46 Berkeley Square, London Wl 

Trade Development Bank 
30 Monument Street, London EC3R 8LH 
Trade Development Bank (Luxembourg) SA. 
36. avenue de b Poite-Neuve, Luxembourg 


Under Items 8 and 9 of the Agenda, it was resolved to amend the Articles of Incorporation of the 
Company, in order to reflect recent changes in the company law of the Grand Duchy of Luxem- 
bourg regarding the payment of interim dividends and the repurchase by the Company of its issued 
shares. ‘ 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only 

CAPITAL TRUST SA 

Luxembourg 
has acquired 

CAPITAL GUIDANCE LTD 

London 


a licensed security dealer and a 
wholly-owned subsidiary of 


CAPITAL GUIDANCE HOLDING SA 

Luxembourg 
and changed its name to 

CAPITAL TRUST LTD 

Its activities will continue to be asset 
management and investment services 

The management team consists of: 


Bassam Aburdene 
Abdul-Rahman Al-Sa'i 
Faisal N. Kudsi 


Walid Niazy 
David C. Schultz 












iL i it J $ 





’RR-JS&i — - 


• " ^ •- .VlU 

-•■’•A. V 











A 




-> * 





*, . .-'Ai -tU ' 

'Hh < , 







OCUMfNTS. PACKAGES, CARGO. ELECTRONIC IMAGE ERANShErt MO 


THE TOTAL -EXPRESS -NETWORK 

XrtRifLNOw. <V.CR£ OFFICES ??C ‘46 Cv : JN fK!l!S VVORLDW'.DI. 


; TP'S E' v-\ 


F.-'-J- 


++ + * +++I++II ++! II+I+++I+ 















Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Mondays 

AM1A 

GoStllg 


ToUbs include ffw nationwide prices 
up to the dasltts an Wall Street 
ara do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I’ia Th £ Aumrititad 


ft Colin wl 



25 


k 

T»— ft 

74* 

Aft FrdHlv 

9*a Cornea 

J2 

1.9 11 


17k 

17ft 

17*6 + 4* 

2* 

14 FrenEI 

Ik Camnnl 



« 


Ik 

7 —Vu 

10ft 

7ft FrlMm 

13ft CMarc a 

JO 


75xMk 

14k 

14ft + k 

*k 

5 FrlesE n 

259B CWtnt 


10 

25 

32k 

33k 

32k + ft 

19 

in* Frtona 

4k COrtlH 



s 

9k 

9k 

9k— (6 

34k 

12k Frlidis 

2 Caruii 



42 

m 

lk 

IS*— k 

151* 

9 rmtWd 

tv« Game 


IS 


1.1ft 

13k 

I3ft + 4* 

7ft 

4k FrfA wt 

7VS CflfBA 

.10 

J 18 

X 

13k 

13 

13 

21ft 

I Oft Furvitn 

Sft CareEn 


17 

B 

10k 

18k 

lDk + ft 




9 6(6 4U, 0|i + 1% . 

19 44 Z3W 224* 23 + ft 

jk> U n 3 1 n » + k 1 

I0» 9ft 9k 9ft 

jo v h lot im im in*— v* 

J2 3 21 41 2St* 244* an 

150 IS 14ft 144* — W 
.171 13 13 <16 «* Mi — V, 

21 88 22 21>i 214* — 4* 


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HWl Low Slock 


CMv. VTd PE lOteHWi Low OuoL 01*00 


*«■ 31* AOIn -n 

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224, 12 AJMCn ,T2 J U 

ST* 2»* AM InH J 14 

§3*1 58 ATT Pa <jn fl 

IS? Kf -® 12 19 


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I8lu Oft Action 
J 1 * 3. Acton 

2 H Actn Hrt 
I 1 * l»; Admet$ 

JO'. I7'j AdRvS 
234* 15 Aaote 
84* 41; 

46ft 774* 

V- Si- 
ll's Sk 
12 *4 2 


1B'-j 9 V, 

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10 44* 

'ft 4 
Wa 33 
J7 13% 

, ^ 

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jg 

.2* ^ 
43 53-.1 

S'* 4* 

“ in* 

,8V* 6>4 

16k 114* 
<k 3 


, 23 100 5k 5(6 M + VSm 

'-3 <4 100 16 15ft 1< + U. 

■ n 2 14 12 ib’a IB 18V*— V* 

, — 518 4V* 4 44* + V* 

*2" M ,» 08 B4 83ft 04 + k 

■» 12 19 13 104- 1044 104* 

31 152 1144 104* 10**— 4* 

112 3?V 34* 34* 

IB t* 4* 4* + Vfe 

, . 3 16 2V* 24* 24* + 4* 

■14 5 30 73 79V. 2844 29 + ft 

■38 1-5 12 20 IBft 104* 18'4 + I* 

13 66 5k Sft Sft — ft 

U U9 1 «Sft 6544 65 ft 4- ft 

35 6ft *V* 644—44 

14 252 94* 96* 9ft + 4* 

397 13 111* IKb 

31 318 14* 14* IV*— 4k 

10 25 96V* 954* 9*44 + 4* 

35 37 74* 744 74* 

17 64* 6** 64* 

05 4 24 136 11V* 104* 114* — 4* 

671 V V* ft + SC 

3.73 107 IlOOz 35 35 35 

44 153 34ft 23k 24—4* 

JO 1.4 IB 1329 144- 14 144V + ft 

M 1.1 115 7Vj 4ft TV* + ft 

■15 IJ 6 217 104* 9«h 104* + ft 

16 80 7V. 7 7V. + Mi 

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Wk s% amt- /'. kTu si' ck <k tk— u 


HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


'e* 41 ' 






SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
Budapest, June 13-1 4, 1 985 

The International Herald Tribune conference on "Trade and Investment Opportunities in Hungary " 
will be of keen interest to any executive concerned about future economic relations between East and West. 

The conference provides an extraordinary opportunity for business leaders to examine 
how the Hungarian government is approaching questions of domestic and international economic relations 
and offers Western executives an unusual occasion for direct contact with business leaders from Eastern Europe. 
Senior executives wishing to register for the conference should complete and return the coupon below. 


'f 




JUNE 13 

Keynote Address: 

Mr. Jozsef Ma rjes. Deputy Fnme Minster 

The Economic Outlook 

Professor Jozsef Bognar, Director. Institute of World Economics 
of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences 

Foreign Trade 

Mr. Istvan Tor ok, Secretory of State for Foreign Trade 

The Five Year Plan 

Dr. Jan 06 Hocft, Secretary of State. National Pkmrmg Board 

Afternoon Address 

Dr. Armand Hammer, Charrman and Chef Executive Officer, 
Ocadentd Petroleum Corporation 
Investme n t Incentives and Tax Free Zones 
Dr. Peter Medgyessy, Deputy Minister af Faience 

Barter 

Mr. Sandor Demadk, Genera! Manager. Hungarian Foreign 
Trading Bank 


JUNE 14 

The Balking System 

Mr. Janos Fekete, First Deputy President. National Bank of 
Hungary 

Western Balking and Hungary 

Mr. Gabriel Bchler, Vice President and General Manager. 

Sank of America N.T.. Vienna 

Industrid Outlook 

Mr. Ferenc Horvath, Secretary of State for Industry 

Panel of Hungarian Indust7xiists 
Afternoon Address 

Professor Richcrd Portes, Director. Centre for Economic Pokey 
Research, London 

Joint Ventures 

Mr. Laszlo Borbely, Director General. Department for 
International Monetary Affairs, Ministry of Finance 

Panel of Foreign Companies 

Moderator: Mr. Tomas Beck, President. Hungarian Chamber of 
Commerce 



/ i o f 


* -v 


■it - me 

m 


rm;y. 


ms 






REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

The conference vwfl be held at the Atrium Hyatt Hofei 
on June 13 and 14. A bkxk of rooms has been reserved far 
poriiapartb at preferential rates. For details please contact the 
hotel directly. 

Atnum Hyatt Hand, Mr. T. Tajthy, Roosevelt Sq. 2 
Budapest 1051. Tel: (36-1] 187836. Telex; 22-4954. 

The fee for the conference is 5595 or the equivalent in 
a convertible currency. This indudes dinner June 12 cocktails, 
lunches, documentation and sunutoaneous HwTgcriCBvEngBsh- 
FrendvGemnan translation. Fees are payable in a dvanc e of the 
conference end wiH be returned in fid for any oanceBarion 
postmarked on or before May 30. Canceflatians after that date 
will be charged the Wl fee. 

The conference was organized in cssodofton with 
Interpress in Budapest and G. Arnold Teeang B.V. m Amsterdam. 

Mdev, The Hungarian airline, is the official carrier for 
the conference. 


T 


If you still believe in me, save me. 


REGISTRATION FORM 

Return to: 

Infemcdiond Herald Trfoune, Conference Office, 
181, avenue Gicrfes-deGcuBe, 9ffi21 NeuMy Cedex, Franca 
Or telephone: 747 1265. Telex: 613595. 

Please enrol the foffasving partidpont for the 
conference to be held in Budapest. 

E3 Check enclosed □ Please invoice 


COMPANY ACTMTl'. 


21-5-85 


For nearly a hundred years, the Statue of 
Liberty lias been America's must powerful sym- 
bol of freedom and hope. Today the corrosive 
action of almost a century of weather and pollu- 
tion has eaten away at the iron framework, 
etched In lies in the copper exterior. 

Less than a mile away, on Ellis Island where 
the ancestors of nearly half of all Americans first 
stepped unto American soil, the Great Hall of . 
the Inanimation Center is a hollow ruin. Rooms 
are vandalised, walls crumbling in decay, 

Inspiring plans have been developed to 
restore the Statue and to create at Ellis Island a 
living monument to the ethnic diversity of this 
country of immigrants. But unless restoration is 
begun now. these two national treasures could 
be closed at the very time we celebrate their hun- 
dredth anniversaries. Tiie 230 million dollars 
needed to carry out the work is needed now. 


All of the money must come from private 
donations: the federal goyerhnjeht rs not raising 
the funds. The Statue of Libeityf Ellis Island 
Centennial Commission appointed by President 
Reagan fa asking every American to contribute.. 
The torch of liberty iseyeryoriesto cherish. 
Could we hold up our ' 

heads ns Americans - 

we allowed the time ' WHETD 

to come when she VuCvi 

no longer hold 'TUIT ' 

. lalCi 

You can keep ‘TYlDfHJ 

toridiofliberiy burning 
brighti Send your tax- - IT"* 

deductible contribution B 

to Tire Lady Box 1986. 

N’.YC. 10Q18. Or call. ' 
toll free. 1-800- USArLADV. - 


* I 


01984 The Statue of Liberty-EIKs Island Foundation. *' 

' - - 






3 V 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Pagel 



a ^AT&T’s Rivals Catting 
Washington for Help 

They Complain of Bias in Transition 
To Competitive Long-Distance System 


By Elizabeth Tucker 

iVaskinpon Peat Senior 

WASHINGTON — The transi- 
tion to a competitive long-distance 
telephone system in the United 


fairs at AT&T Communications 
Corn., the toog-disance arm of 
AT&T, MG and other competitors- 
are getting exactly wbflt they asked 
for — the chance to compete on an 


States — a primary rationale for equal footing with AT&T 
the breakup of American Tele- *The proceB t^t is currentN m 
phone & Telegraph Co. — is not place is precisely the way MCI 
working, rivals of AT&T assert. 

They say that if the federal govern- « «. s?id Me. Farm noxutg to 
mem does not step in, compctititm HyoWR Vlbi*!!* 11 ? 1 

may be dead before it takes its first judge ^preaded over the 
real breath. up of the Bell System. 

MCI Communications Corp-, The FCC thinks it IS high time 



GTE Sprint, Satellite Bnsiness Sys- 
tems Inc. and other companies are 
£ ■. 1; lining up to redte a litany of com- 
plaints to the Federal ConnBtmica- 
;• i*; likms Commission and to Congress. 
■*' *■ 5l ' AT&Ts competitors wiD have to 

spend an addiuonal S6 billion over 


AT&Ts competitors face facts. 
“TTiis is a process of competition, 
business winners and business los- 
er*,” said one high-ranking FCC 
official, who dedinod to be identi- 
fied. 

Ax the heart of the dispute is a 


the next five years to create long- complex issae mvolymg toe cen- 
distance networks of sufficient size muons between long-distance 
to compete with AT&T, accorcfing con^axues and local pbOTecompa- 
to a recent study from Booa Allen mes tog penmt long-distance calls 

& Hamilton Inc, commissioiied by 10 Jg tiuou ^ 1 - , . . _ _ „ 

GTE SprinL - Poor to the breakup of the Bell 

But (he costs of building the net- System, MG and the other small 
works under the rules prescribed by competitors had complained be- 
the FCC are squeezing profit ma£ FCC and the courts Jhat 

gins so tightly that some companies -ctee t} °^ n bctwoai AT&Ts 

Say not srnvive. AT&TVrivals. long-distance ai«l local ramparues 


CONSUMER COSTS FOR PHONE SERVICE 

BASED ON CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 1977-100 



170-4- 


160-4- 


150 -f 


1404- 


130 


120-4" 


110 + 


ioo4- 


•80 '81 

SOURCE Svmtu at Lmiiar Szxraxx 


MARCH ’85 


protest 

K . “You have the cost pressure 
.! ^i^comirig up underneath you at a 
very substantial rate, phis the bur- 
den of expanding immature net- 
works," said William D. English, 
general counsel of Satellite Busi- 
ness Systems. “The government has 
got to give you certain advantages 
and incentives as to why you axe 
spending all that money ; he add- 
ed. 

“The ground rules that have 
been established make it question- 
able whether that competition can 
prosper,*’ said Theodore F. 
Bropny. chairman of GTE Corp. 
“If not, the breakup of AT&T was 
an unnecessary act” 

“Companies are going to go bel- 
ly-up ” one MG official said. 



js 

ifi » 




was an nnfair and anticompetitive 
advantage. 

Customers of AT&Ts competi- 
tors had to dial lengthy access 
codes to make lonfrxfistence calls, a 
handicap AT&Ts longdistance 
customers didn’t face. To offset 
that disadvantage, the FCC permit- 
ted the competitor to pay less to 
the local companies for the connec- 
tion than AT&T paid. This dis- 
count gave AT&T’s rivals their 
foothold in the longdistance mar- 
ket 

With the breakup, in January 
1984, AT&Ts local companies 
were broken' away. AT&T kept the 
long-distance business, and the 
FCC established a plan to give 
AT&T and its rivals equal access to 
the load mmpflnies at an equal 


L 

i.i 


Industry souras say many tong- p 051 - access would be phased 
distance companies — among them “by 1987. 

United StalK Transmission Sys- , But trow the nvah say tot? can t 
terns Ino, Lexitd Ino. ADnet Com- handle the rapid phaw-m of equal 
munkations Service Inc. and TDX access tmdff roles that they say 


iS 


favor AT&T. 

Sprint, SBS, MCI and other 
long-dislance competitors are ap~ 
ig to Congress, which vnll 
exploratory bearings on the 


Systems Inc. — would not mind 
finding buyers. Many regional 
companies may be merging m the 
■ i near future, they say. 

*: Some policy-makers are wemder- . . 

r ing whether the breakup of AT&T issue m June 
• V. was a fruitless experiment, long- 4 partiaikr rules that gneve 
: .. : distance companies say. AT&Ts nvab center on the con- 

' “I see no indication the govern- veis ' 00 °* individual telephone ex- 
ment is ready to unscramble the changes to equal access, which re- 
egg, but that is wbal government is -quires a change in^ local 

. banning to conclude," contends telephone-company switching 

jEdward C. ScfimuIt^Eenera] coun- equipment. 

for GTE Corp. “Tftere aiepto- '-. When 






pie at policy levels who . - . said to 
us maybe this is a natural monopo- 
ly after all.” 

AT&T sees a different picture. 
According to Alfred Partoll, execu- 
tive vice president for external af- 


conversiOn Is accom- 
plished, customers can choose their 
long-distance company. At that 
point, AT&Ts rivals lose the bene- 
fit of a discount on payments to the 
local companies. 

One-third of all telephone lines 


are expected to be converted, to the 
service by the end of 1985 and all 
lines by the end of 1986, so costs 
are rising rapidly. 

Adding to the pressure, AT&T 
will drop its long-cfislance rates an- 
other 5 A percent in June. 

AT&Ts competitors need fur- 
ther discounts, they say, even 
where equal access has been at-. 
tjrinwt “Maybe an additional dis- 
count or phased-in discount is the 
best way to go,” said Donald G. 
Prigmore, president of SprinL “We 
should pay like amount for like 
services, hot we are not getting like 
services.” 

The equal-access process is not 
merely the technical provision of 
convenient “Dial 1” service to cus- 
tomers, according to V. Orville 
Wright, president of MG. 

Rather, he said, the FCC must 
make sure competition takes hold, 
and that no predatoiy pricing is 
allowed on AT&Ts part so compe- 
tition is nurtured. AT&T must be 
closely watched, because it still 
dominates the S5 1 -6-biIIion long- 
distance market, be said. 

The' list of problems indudes a 
process in which virtually all cus- 
tomers who don’t chose a long- 
distance company when equal ac- 
cess is offered are automatically 
««ign «t to AT&T. “That is a trav- 
esty; it’s totally unfair," Mr. 
Wright said. 

Marketing efforts, of long-dis- 
tance companies are seriously im- 
peded, because they cannot get cus- 
tomer lists from local telephone 
companies, while AT&T has the 
lists, he said. 

Analysis say the long-distance 
future is not a cheery one. 

“Our general outlook is that it is 
not that attractive a business,” said 
Marianne G. Bye. a telecommuni- 
cations analyst with Prudential 
Bacfae Securities Inc. “We don’t 
think the regulatory environment is 


The WnhByjmi PtsJ 

that supportive for the competitors 
of AT&T. 

“Sprint wiD lose money this year, 
and MCl’s earnings are still going 
to be crippled by the shift in costs 
as they continue to pay-high access 
charges.” she predicted. 

Both Sprint and MG invested S 1 
billion each in expanding their net- 
works last year and likely will 
spend the same amounts next year, 
despite the squeeze. 

MCI’s profits plummeted last 
year to $59.2 million from 5155.7 
million in 1983 because of in- 
creased competition and rising 
costs for connections to the local 
networks. 

In the first quarter of this year 
MCI reported income of $40.45 
million, which includes an out-of- 
court settlement with U.S. West for 
an antitrust case against the Bell 
operating companies. 

GTE lost $27 million in the first 
quarter of 1985 in its communica- 
tions services group because of in- 
creased costs associated with equal 
access, according to a company 
spokesman. Profits sank from $82 
millio n in 1983 to $67 milli on in 
1984, with revenue more than 
halved from $1.3 billion to $578 
million in 1984. 

AT&T, on the other hand, has 
started turning around. While in 
1984 AT&T earned $1.4 billion, 
trailing its predictions of S2.I bil- 
lion.- its long-distance business is 
going strong, analysts said. 

In the first quarter of 1985 the 
long-distance giant enjoyed a 34- 
percent increase in first-quarter 
earnings of $354 million, compared 
with $226 million for the first quar- 
ter of 1984. 

The natural consequence of com- 
petition is a shakeout in the form of 
mergers, acquisitions and outright 
deaths. FCC officials say. 




Dutch Gm Firm 
Arranges Facility 
Of $300 Million, 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Nederiandse Ga- 
sunie is arranging a $200- mil- 
lion. short-term Euronote and 
advances facility, with a $100- 
mOlkm back-up line of credit, 
the lead manager, Gticorp In- 
ternational Bank, said Monday. 

This is the first such facility 
to be arranged in the Eurocredit 
market for the borrower, a nat- 
ural-gas concern that is 50-per- 
cent owned by the Netherlands 
and 25 percent each by Exxon 
Corp- and Shell Oil Co. 

The charge for the five-year 
standby facility will be 1/16 
percent, or 6.25 basis points, 
whether or not the line is used. 
The charge to draw will be at a 
margin of 625 basis points over 
the London interbank offered 
rale, rising another 1-5 basis 
points if more than half of the 
facility is drawn in any one 
year. A basis point is a hun- 
dredth of a percentage point. 

A tender panel wul arrange 
the sales of Euronotes, which 
f^may be denominated in dollars 
or European currency units, 
and of acceptances which can 
be denominated in dollars or 
British pounds. 


French Study Backs Commercial TV 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 
'PARIS — A government-spon- 
sored report issned on Monday 
urged the establishment of two na- 
tional commercial television chan- 
nels in France, as well as local sta- 
tions, to compete with the three 
stair-controlled channels. 

The report, commissioned by 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabios in 
January, was designed to guide the 
government in allowing private 
groups to establish television oper- 
ations, -a step that would end the 
state monopoly over French televi- 
sion established after World War 
IL 

“Oar recommendations are pru- 
dent. open and designed to avoid 
the land of anarchy [in television] 
we have see a in certain foreign 
countries,” said Jean-Denis Bredin, 


a lawyer and consultant who bead- 
ed the group that prepared the re- 
port. 

Government officials declined to 
comment, but indicated that Mr. 
Fabius might announce some con- 
crete steps based on the report 
within several weeks. 

“The new liberty must respect 
the actual balance among objec- 
tives [for national television] al- 
ready defined, television stations 
already established, and large gov- 
ernment projects being. devel- 
oped,” the report said. 

The last reference was to the 
building of a four-channel televi- 
sion satellite to be launched in July 
1986, and to the government’s 60- 
billion-franc ($6.38 bQlionj plan to 
provide cable service to at least 
four million homes, hotels, banks 
and other outlets in the 1990s. 


The report said the two national 
channels, which would be financed 
by advertising, would have a poten- 
tial audience of about 17 million 

S le. With the launching of the 
ile, known as TDF-1, all of 
France and neighboring countries 
could be covered. 

A licensing procedure would be 
established for the national chan- 
nels, as well as for local stations, 
which also would be financed by 
advertising. Mr. Bredin told report- 
ers that it was too early to deter- 
mine bow man]/ new local televi- 
sion stations might eventually be 
established. 

The report also recommended 
that there be no change in the sta- 
tus of Canal Plus, the government- 
backed pay television channel that 
was established last November as a 
fourth channel. 


BIS Challenges Theories on Dollar Strength 



Comex Probes 
Broker’s Fall 

(Continued from Page 11} 
extent,” said Alan J. Brody, the 
Comex president. “On the other 
band, ! think the event has been 

blown into something larger than H 
is.” 

There are hints that Volume's 
customers will be made whole in a 
settlement in which the firm’s own- 
ers and Comex will participate, al- 
though the exchange does not ad- 
mit liability. 

But estimates of the real losses 
from the Volume collapse vary 
widely. One customer with a thriv- 
ing options trade has been put en- 
tirely out of business. 

“We had one 'account, only at 
Volume.” said Ronny Apfei. 24, a 
trader who, with a partner, had 
made $1.3 million in six months 
.lading gpld options. The account 

is seized by the clearing assoda- 
uion and liquidated so haphazardly. 
Mr. Apfet said, that be lost all that 
money and faces an additional 
$1.7-miUion deficit ^They took ev- 
erything. They put us out’ of busi- 
ness. All our trading capital is 
gone." 


(Continued from Page 11) 
ing sector’s irinctance to play a 
major intermediary role in Third 
World financing, in conjunction 
with sagging demand for interna- 
tional bank credit in the major in- 
dustrial countries other than the 
United States, meant that there 
were more funds available in the 
Euromarket than there were attrac- 
tive lending outlets outside the 
United States. : 

“This exerted downward pres- 
sure on Eurodollar interest rates 
and led to a large reflux of funds 
from the Enromarkct via the U.S. 
banking sector to the United 
States." Mr. Mver said. 


“This massive mm in the flow of 
bank-related funds helped to offset 
the simultaneous sharp deteriora- 
tion in the UB. current- account 
balance and a slowdown in ‘other 
capital flows' to the United States. 
As a result, the dollar continued to 
appreciate despite the severe dete- 
rioration in the underlying U.S. 
balanee-of-paymenrs position,” be 
wrote. 

“In other words, the behavior of 
banking flows during 1983 and the 
first nine months of 1984 was a key 
dement in the unusual strength of 
the dollar.” the analysis said. 

“Contrary to widely held beliefs, 
the main offset to the deterioration' 


in the U.S. current-account balance 
was not a shift in nonbank inves- 
tors’ asset preferences in favor of 
the dollar and the United States — 
this preference was already very 
marked before 1983 when the UiL 
current account was still in surplus 
or in near-balance — but a shift iu 
the banks’ international lending 
away from new credits to the devel- 
oping countries to credits to the 
U.S. economy,” Mr. Myer wrote. 

In short, he concluded, the re- 
cent strength of Ihe dollar “had 
little to do with the safe-haven role 
of the United States or with 
strengthening confidence in the 

dollar.” 


U.S. Income, Spending Up Sharply in April 


(Contmaed from Page 11) 

Association of Business Econo- 
mists predicted (hat growing feder- 
al budget deficits and a soaring 
U.S. trade imhaTanr*. will trigger a 
mild recession next year. 

The group said 58 percent of 
those responding to a survey be- 
lieved that the United States would 
- suffer a mild recession next year. 

However, economists contacted 
Monday said the big April gains in 
spending and income should pro- 
wde needed momentum to keep the 


Following suit, most of the na- payments on debt, foDowed a 0.2- 
tlon's biggest banks on Monday percent March decline, which was 
lowered their prime lending rates, revised from the original estimate 
the benchmark from which all oth- of a sharper 03-percent decline. 


. -_2Riserve Board, wor- 
ried about - they weak January- 
March performance, announced 
Friday a hatf-point cut in its dis- 
count rate. A reduction in the Fed’s 
discount rale. Its charge on loans to 
member, commercial banks, is the 
most dramatic move the centra] 
bank can make to signal its inten- 
tionsio push interest rates lower as 
a y to spur a .flagging economy. , 


er loans are scaled up or down, to 
10 percent from 10.5 percenL 

The record 29-percent gain in 
after-tax income in April followed 
declines of 0 A percent in March 
and an even steeper 0.7 percent in 
February. 

Both declines were caused by 
IRS computer troubles, which re- 
duced refunds by $24 billion in 
February and $4.1 billion in 
March, the absence of the refunds 
reduced Americans' after-tax in- 
come by ■similar amounts. 

The Commerce report showed 
that personal income before taxes 
rose 0.6 percent in April following 
gains of 0.5 percent in March ana 
0.4 percent in February. 

The big gain in personal con- 
sumption spending, winch includes 
virtually everything but interest 


The big gam in consumer spend- 
ing came -in. both the purchase of 
durable goods, items expected to 
last three or. more yean, and non- 
durable goods. Sales of durable 
goods jumped by S4 billion in April 
following a decline of $4J billion 
in March. 

Purchase of nondurable goods 
climbed by $7 billion in April fol- 
lowing a $3- billion March decline. 

On the income side, private 
wages and salaries increased $6.7 
■billion in April compared with a 
gain of $128 billion in March. 
However, government wages and 
salaries advanced S4.8 bmion in 
April compared with S1.7 billion 
in March, The bigger increase was 
due io a retroactive .payment to 
Postal Service employees in settle- 
ment of a wage conlriicL 


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Page 18 


INTER-NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


1 

|2 

3 

4 


5 

6 

7 

18 

9 


10 

14 





IS 






16 

17 




1 

18 





1 

19 

20 




21 






22 



23 





24 



29 

28 

27 




■ 

28 

29 



1 

39 






34 





35 

36 




P 

37 





P 

38 

39 




40 





P 

41 


42 



u 

43 




P 

44 




48 




48 




47 

48 

49 




50 

51 





B9 




| 

98 





i 

S7 

98 





99 






BO 

81 





62 






B3 


10 fit T12 M3 


PEANUTS 

WHAT DID VOU PUT DOWN i 
FOR THE FIRST QUESTION? j 
T PUT DOWN “ELEVEN" I 


I PUT DOWN 
“POTATOES 7 ’. 


m I ft 




HMM.- 




i'll MAKE IT 

/eleven potatoes "> 


BOOKS 


BLONDIE 

I’M BAJONS A CAKE 

for -roorsE*s 
aRTHOAV 


:| f BUT I'O LIKE TO 
> DO SOViETHff^G 
( 3lSE PCR kCR 


IS2 |M 154 


ACROSS 
1 Sea greenery 
5 Used oars 
10 Rummage 

14 Klutz 

15 Expensive 
violin 

16 Ready for use 

17 Harbor or wine 
18Hagler’s 

weapons 
19 Sacred image 
26 Unplanned 

23 “...and 

weDT’ 

24 Branch 

25 Strength 
21 Andersen 

portrayer in 
1952 

30 Meek 

lamb 

33 Loos or Louise 

34 Glow below the 
mantel 

38 Floor unit 
37 Firm 

36 Fingertip Item 

39 A mushroom 

41 Suburb of 
Minneapolis 

42 Naval off. 


46 Secular 

47 Unplanned 

55 Touch upon 

56 Northern deer 

57Nastaseof the 

courts 

58 Warning to 
Nanette 

59 Churchman 

60 Mrs. Charles 

61 Pitcher 

62 Shies 

63 Impersonator 

DOWN 

1 European 
vacation area 

2 Noose 

3 Indian mentor 

4 Lured 

5 Type of lottery. 

6 Neglects to 
include 

7 Word with 
cloth or basin 

8 Luncheon 
follower 

9 Shocked 

10 Fairy-tale 
creator 

11 Aquatic cereal 
grass 

12 “Once 


42 Naval off. 12 “Once 50 Fish di 

43 Partnerof . . 51 Musics 

crafts 13 Inclination 52 Hoof s< 

44 Hags 21 Earthen 53 Rivers 

45 Enzyme suffix container 54 Gose 

© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


22 Soviet grain 
colter 

25 Photo finish 

26 Marriage 

27“ Marner” 

28 Weight units, 
for short 

29 Seed covering 

30 Once more 

31 Polish 

32 Map collection 

34 Yard segment 

35 Asian 
peninsula 

37 Newspaper 
headline 

40 Obi, e.g. 

41 Scandinavian 
navigator 

44 Prepares food 
for an affair 

45 Thespian 

46 Beneficial 
beam 

47 Rattan 

48 "Baby, Take 

,”1934 

song 

49 TV’s "Name 

That " 

50 Fish dish 

51 Musical ending 

52 Hoof sound 

53 River at Leeds 

54 Gose 



■ IF ANY SUGGESTIONS ( WHO SAYS l DON'T)* 
UNDB3&WNMD1 * 

PUT TEN LESS] Ml 7 WOMEN ? J 
CANDLES CM X J — 

cake J 


BEETLE BAILEY 

GIVE ME MORE \ / 
OP THAT I 
CASSEROLE, J \ 
COOKIE 




there's 

NO ROOM 
ON YOUR 
■^TRAV 


IT'S FLATTER IN© THE 
WAV hfoU SAVOR 
EVERY BITE OF MY 
/vjaOCOOKIN© 






ANDY CAPP 


[□rat by Nan Anunu SpubCMU 


s’ x ^isheaK 

t CHAUC1E' 1 GENTLEMAN? 
A4AKEUPA-< . * 

Jffl 

^TandyTu A 


Z SUPPOSE HE/&RE4LC/ 1 
— BUT HE’S ALL RX^rr 
\ WHEN MBS HAD AFEW 1 


MOUNTBATTEN 

By Philip Ziegler. 784 pp. 824.95 
Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 40th Street, New 
York. N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by John Kenneth Galbraith 

I N THE early paragraphs of this excellent, 
fascinating, but not flawless biography. 
Philip Ziegler tells of die favorite leisure-time 
occupation of Lord Louis Moumbanen, Earl 
Mountbatten of Burma. It was tracing out his 
genealogy — no slight task, involving connec- 
tions extending through an intricate German 
maze back to Charlemagne or beyond and, in 
more recent times, establishing him as a great- 
grandson of Queen Victoria, a nephew of a czar 
and czarina and an uncle of the husband of 
Queen Elizabeth II. No one was ever better 
served by the accident or birth, or put royal 
connection to greater use 
Family background led to his choice of a 
naval career. Hu father, Prince Louis of Bat- 
tenberg, was at the beginning of World War I 
the First Sea Lord, effectively the uniformed 
head, of the Royal Navy but in the violent 
chauvinism of the day was expelled from office 
for having an unwholesome German name 
(later an g li c ized by the family). 

Louis Moumbatten's early navy service was 
less than routine. It involved such tasks as 
accompanying the Prince of Wales, later Ed- 
ward VIII, on journeys of state to Australia 
and India. He became fully involved with ships 
at the outbreak of Worm War U, when, as a 
destroyer commander, be began to compile 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


qbqb □□an ceatan 
deod oanno □□□□ 
□□an HaoHD □□□□ 
□!!□□□□□□ □□□□HQ 

□naa Htsaaa 
noncio aanaaasa 
□□□□□a anna □□□ 
□□□□ annao □□□□ 
□□□ aaaa □□□□□□ 
□□□Danaa □□□□□ 
□□□□a hhbq 
□□□□□ a □□□□□□hh 
□□□□ aaanti aaaa 
□□□□ aaaaa □□□□ 
□□□□ _ □□□□ □□□□ 


one of the war's roost remarkable records ^ 

of »>•<« - 

enemies, be might cwountff. 

Mountbatten « J55f5i!SJEl 


; 5 5iSM TWs led to iMfe 
of further pwnotion. to the “ *•* 

aircraft carrier, from which. -*55J2S2SlrS£^ 
crew, he was diverted to head L CttOT 

ations. He planned and directed 
Dieppe, widely hefiered the most MvfauA. ■ 
coedyand disastrous operation of & W 
Accordingly. he was 
Commander. Southeast Asia C ommutf. 

There is tittle doubt that, throughout. Lord 
Lewis was saved and helped by his roy al con- 
nections. Bui he aLso had greai pcrMwaU^OT. 
<,nn.idnns wlf-confkicnce and an overwoum- 


WUuniiuiKu ww- . f _ j 

wanted less thought and more action, bow or 
which he could provide. • 

At the end of the war yet another persona * 
quality became evident: With gmdanceand'Jr 
encouragement from Edwina. his ran, tUfflteu 
and unquestionably difficult wife, he OjwM see 
that the age of imperialism was over. He tntw 
iWs apparent in word and action, extending to 
association with those seeking independence m 
Burma, Indonesia and India. He showed m 
friendship and sympathy for Mohandas K. 
Gandhi and Nehru, becoming, as eves wore . 
did Edwina, a devoted friend of Nehru s. This 
led to the greatest of his assignments, as we e* 
my over the partition of India and the procla- 
mation of Indian and Pakistani independence. 

Then, still a relatively young man, he went 
back to a navy command, rose lo be First Sea 
Lard and eventually was head of all the more a 

or less unified armed services. In these yews bo - 

became deeply aware of the way nuclear wins 
were robbing war of its old relevanc e and 
enjoyments; judgment was, for him. increas- 
ingly an attribute of age. Mountbatten was 
killed in 1979 at the age of 79 hy IRA terrorist! 

Mounthatten’s career was certainly one of 
the most diverse and interesting of the time. If 
Ziegler does it slightly more than justice, that is 
disunctiy better ihaii doing it less. 

John Kenneth Galbraith, whose most recent 
book is "The Anatomy of Power," wrote this . 
review for The Wushimyon Posl 





WIZARD of ID 


/Pft Y0U > 
/ n/mA 
WPSTtm 

&UTdzrmM\v, 

Mk msm?F ‘ 


REX MORGAN 


AS YOU KNOW, MY WIFE ■* 
HAS BEEN TRAVELING FOR OVER A WEEK 5 
BECAUSE OF HER JOB/ WHEW SHE DIDHT RETURN * 
MV CALL LAST NIGHT, ri UPSET ME — EVEN 3 

THOUGH I LEFT A MESSAGE THAT SHE NEEDWT , 



CALL IF GHE GOT IN LATE 



[ 

m _ j 

r 

“i . 

at 


•If I WERE TOU GUTS, ID S1AY 0UTA THW YARD- 

Pets are Mr. Wilson's peeve/ 


ia\ 




AS ! TCLD YOU BEFORE . 

I FEEL SHFS HAD A 
PERSONALITY change IN 
THE LAST FEW MONTHS' 
A FEW DAYS AGO, 1 - 

DISCOVERED THAT SHE 1 
WAS THREE MONTHS | 
BEHIND IN HER CAR 0 
payments/ yesterday fi 

A CHECK SHE WROTE B 
, WAS RETURNED FOR [ 
INSUFFICIENT FUNDS/ t 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
« by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, lo form 
four ordinary words. 


mam 


WHO'S THE MANAGER 
HERE ANVWAV?/ 


JABON 


By Robert Byrne 

T HE Windy City Interna- 
tional Tournament held at 
the University of Chicago was 
won by James Rizzitano of 
Sharon, Massachusetts, and 
Vincent McCambridge, a Los 
Angeles international master. 
Each scored 8 H-2 16. 

This was sufficient to give 
the 24-year-old Rizzitano his 
final norm for international 
master rank. He will be formal- 
ly awarded the tide at the Inter- 
nationa! Chess Federation 
meeting in August 
Brian Hanman of Canada 
tallied 8-3 (0 take third place 
and achieve his first interna- 
tional master norm. 

The British grandmaster 
Raymond Keene scored 7-4 to 
capture fourth place. 

Rizzitano needed a good 
memory and three previously 
unplayed moves to defeat Al- 
bert Chow of Chicago. 

The offbeat 5 Pxp attempts 
to keep the game open Tor piece 
play without concern for pawn 
structure. This variation has 
surprisingly elicited gaffes 
from some of the game’s most 
famous players. For example, 
Alexander Alekhine, in Stutt- 
gart 1937, tried to attack the 
white center with 5 . . . N-. 
QB3; 6N-B3, P-B3?!, thus al- 
lowing Yefim Bogolyubov to 
take the upper hand with 7 B- 
QN5, BxP; 8 O-O, R-Q2; 9 R- 
Kl. 

Moroever, in the AVRO 
Tournament, the Netherlands 
1983, Reuben Fine played the 


CHESS 


weak 1 1 B-NSch?! against the 
great connoisseur of the French 
— Mikhail Botvinnik — who 
promptly erred with 
11... N-B3?. conceding 
White positional superiority af- 
ter 12 BxNch. PxB; 13 R-R4! 
Instead. Black could have come 
out on top with H . . . B-Q2; 
12 QxP. BxNch: 13 QxB, BxB. 

The strongest move. 1 1 O-O. 
leads, alter. 11 . . . BxN; 12 
R-Nl to a gambit in which 
White's lead in development 
compensates for the hist pawn. 

After 13 N-Q2, Black is pret- 
ty much forced to exchange 
whh 13 . . . BxN: 14 BxB. for 
otherwise he would have to 
contend with 14 N-K4 followed 
hy 15 N-Q6. 

On 14 . . . B-Q2, capturing 
with 15 RxP would yield Blade 
a comfortable game after 
15 . . . Q-BI; 16 R-N4 QxP. 
White should continue to at- 
tack with 15 Q-N4. but after 
IS . . . B-B3. it would be a* 
blunder to play !6 QxNP? 
which allows 16 . . . R-KN1. 

After 18 R-KI. Black's only 
correct defense would have 
been 18 . . . Q-B3. when it is 
unclear whether White has 
enough for his gambit pawn. 
With IS . . . QxP?, Chow fell 
into the same errors as in. the 
Karoty Honfi-Ivan Farago * 
game m the Hungarian Team 
Championship 1973. H is cap- 
ture permitted the devastating 
rook sacrifice with 19 RxP! 

The point was that 
19 . . . PxR; 20 B-Ndch. K- 
B1 (20 . . . NxB; 21 QxNch, 
K-K2; 22 B-N4 wins the 



KtltMOiMn HIM 
Hdtka wlur U ... Mp 

queen); 21 R-B4ch. Q-B4; 22 
B-N4!. K-Nl: 23 BxQ, PxB; 24 
Q-K2 wins easily for White.^. 1 
TWs was how the Hcnft-Far-“ - 
ago game went 
Chow must have seen this 
coming, since he diverged with 

19 . . . B-Q2. but this was of 
no avail. Rozitano's first new 
move of the game, 20 RxB!, 
dared Black to play ' 

20 . . . KxR: 21 R-K5ch, ^ 

B4; 22 BxPch, winning the 
queen. 

Chow desperately tried 
20 . . . PxR, but after 21 
QxKP, there was no defense 
against 22 B-N6ck 
On 21 . . . K-BL22B-N6!, 
there was no way for Chow 10 
ward off a quick checkmate, so 
he gave up. 


^ *^1 U wu AJOO 

» £5i EJ 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


Page 19 






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SPORTS 


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76ers Win, Stave Off 
Elimination; Lakers 
Lead by 3-1 in West 


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Compiled by Ota- Stott From Dhpatches 

PHILADELPHIA — The Phila- 
delphia 76ers, leading from start to 
finish, beat the Boston Celtics, 1 15- 
104, Sunday to stave off elimina- 
tion in their best-of-seven National 
Basketball Association s emifinal. 
But they still are bucking history. 

The Sixers trail the Celtics, 3-1, 
with the fifth game in Boston Gar- 
den Wednesday night. No team has 
overcome a 3-0 deficit in a seven- 
series and only fair return 
ive come bade from 3-1. 


NBA PLAYOFFS 


f 


1 A* l;| i l 

■' 1 ' • 'oiu u ? ^c-J* hi Denver, the Los Angeles Lak- 
• " c feo era beat the Nuggets, 120-1 16, Sun- 
- •««.! hi day and took a 3-1 lead in thdr 
. ■iikir.. 1 " n semifmaL The Lakers can win the 
•- 1 r-di' '"** Western Conference tide Wednes- 
,• J 'V day night in Los Angeles. 

1 , ' 1 ' V.i. ■ . I. 


t - il„ 


, ■•“Ml.l* “ 

. 1 -‘^tjrj njj 

'' ' 


The 76ers got 26 points from 
Andrew Toney, 22 from Maurice 
Cheeks, 21 from Moses Malone 
and 15 from Julius Erving as they 
avoided being swept for die Gist 
time in 38 playoff series since the 
team moved from Syracuse in 1964. 

The Celtics rallied three times in 
the final period, twice reducing the 


“Charles is unbelievable,” Er- 
ving sadist's nice to watch a ris- 
ing star, especially when he's in 
your comer. 

In Denver, cotter Kareem Abd- 
ui-Jabbar. who scored a game-high 
29 points, and forward James Wor- 
thy led a fourth-quarter flurry that 
gave the Lakere victory. 

With AbduWabbar dominating 
die rebounding and feeding team- 
mates for four baskets underneath, 
tbe Lakers built a 1 10-102 lead with 
five minutes to play. 

Denver — playing without lead- 
ing scorer Alex FngHsh the last 17 
minutes, because be had injured his 
shooting hand — battled back be- 
hind forward Calvin “Natt, who 
scored, eight straight points. 

Back-to-back three-poiQl bas- 
kets by Elston Tomer and Mike 
Evans gave the Nuggets a tie at 1 16 
with 1:01 left But Worthy, re- 
bounding from first-half fouls to 
get 11 of his 19 points the last 


: -.! ., n , > t , 1 j# c- period, scored on a tip-in — the 

fifth shot at the badeet- 


throws with 42 seconds left and ^VShour' 
. "hnj Erving scored a lay-up on a break- 

• '■ - v r ttjv . 0 . 1 ^ awav to end the Celtics’ hones. 1 


coach, Doug. Moe, 
the ball was 


icrtui, 

■ !i kn 


. hf; . u Bh; 

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a 


away to end the Celtics’ hopes. 

For the first time in the series, 
the 76ers stopped Boston’s star, 
Larry Bird, who got 14 points after 
averaging 24.3 the first three 
games. He made only four shots in 
the game. 

The 76ers also got the fast break 
going that carried them to earlier 
' playoff victories over W ashington 
and Milwaukee. It was the first 
gftme of the series in which Phila- 
. .'delphia has scored 100 points. 

The 76ers' coach, Billy Cunning- 
ham, said that “the big key was we 


gotten that offen- 
sive rebound, Denver would have 
had a lay-up at the other end be- 
cause we had everyone under- 
neath,” said die Lakers’ coach, Pat 
Riley. 

Los Angeles continued its hot 
shooting, making 65 percent in the 
first half, but still trailed by 70-68. 
The Nuggets shot only 46 percent 
that half, but got 16 more shots off 


a 30-21 rebounding edgea nd^ only 


went *<> Moses a couple of times 








down the stretch when they were 
mounting a rally and be got some 
' big baskets for us.” 

The 76eis‘ 265-pound rookie; 
| Charles Barkley, got seven points 
and 10 rebounds in the first period, 
finishing with 20 rebounds. 


five turnovers to the 

En glish hari 26 points that half, 
gpt a basket eariy in the third quar- 
ter, then was hurt and did not re- 
turn. 

“That has to rank with one of the 
most courageous performances I 
have ever seen,” said Abdul- Jabbar 
of the Nuggets’ fourth-quarter ral- 
ly. “You can’t lose a player tike 
Alex and not be in some kind of 
trouble.” (AP.LAT) 



Cubs Lose Ace Sutcliffe 
To Severe Muscle Injury 


Complied by Oar Staff Fran Dispaidta 

ATLANTA — The Chicago 
Cubs lost Cy Young Award win- 
ning pitcher Rid: Sutcliffe for pos- 
sibly three weeks Sunday when be 


Plate nmpire Hairy We-nriekteHt i n terr upt ed Srniday’g pma m P hilaiMphia fnAnanwy 

a bird that had landed on the field. It was no lark for PhOlies, wbo lost to tbe Dodgers, 3-1 


J. 


PmCIjsi aRrr 


^By Bird’s Standards It Was a Bad Loss, but Not a Bad Injury 


K •.*> 


K V 


By George Vecsey 

New York Tines Sorrier . 

PHILADELPHIA — The right index finger was swollen 
' " to double tbe size at the first knuckle and it did not bend. 
..Those familiar with Larry Bird’s medical history said ti& 
finger has been somewhat disfigured since a college softball 
/ game many years ago, but sometime on Saturday afternoon 
' \ the finger was sprained again. 

It would help a right-handed shooter to be able to flex his 

• index fing er, but Bud said it was bis fault, not Ms finger’s, 
.. A that he made only 4 of 15 shots and finished, with only 14 

points Sunday afternoon. 

^ “It is not a major ixqury." he said. “I don’t get major 
injuries.” 

• By his own standards, he should have made three or four 
- more shots, which would have made the game a whole lot 
• closer than the 1 15-104 victory by the 76ers. 

■ - . . Bird’s standards extend beyond his expectations for him- 

s t - self. He has expectations of how his team is supposed to be 
~ i ' : - (intense) and how the Philadelphia crowd should respond to 
Julius Erring (loyally). He did not mind sitting in the sauna 
of a dressing room to explain why just about everything fell 
— short of standards Sunday. 

. C i«ni<n* ”1 can’t use it as an excuse,” Bird said, shielding the 
#v _ „. jj' swollen finger with a lowd. “I have to play as well as I can. If 

ITL ^ 1 « ; 1 put on a uniform, I don’t like to think of it at aH 

• - I;- ! “It hurts, but it’s just another thing you have to accept I 

' • ,‘H can accept it. Pve been ahle to overcane pain.” 

,‘r - j 1 ’ ;> Bird is probably the best player in the National Basketball 


Association at the moment and one of tbe best ever. He does 
not always talk easily, but the values be nourishes during his 
summers in Terre Haute, Indiana, surge oat at select mo- 
ments. Like afterSunday’s sometimes half-baked game. : 

“If I bad a regular job as a construction worker, I wouldn’t 
stay home with an injury like this,” he volunteered. “So Tm 
not staying home from this job.” 

Mare than Bird’s finger was sensitive. His pride in bring a 


> •. v 


TTT had a regular job as a 
construction worker, I wouldn’t stay 
home with an injury like this. So I’m 
not staying home from this job.’ 


star basketball player was pierced by Saturday’s boos in tbe 
Spectrum aimed at Erving, who in that game made only I of 
10 shots for 5 points in 29 minutes. 

“I felt sony lor him. 1 was disappointed in tbe way people, 
treated him/ Bird virtually spat out. “An individual tike that 
— tasteless. You won’t fold a better person in tbe league 
than him ” 

This professional respect did not stop Erving and Bird 


from muscling each other. Erving made only 4 of 21 shots for 
15 points, with 6 rebounds and 6 assists. 

But the Critics were 15 points behind after one quarter 
and never could get dose. BmdsakHie conld see it coming in 
the locker room before tbe game. 

“Our intensity wasn't like it was” Saturday, he said. “I had 
a slow start ana everybody sort at followed my lead Tm the 
sort of guy who’s supposed to have a good start" 

The Critics’ first few minutes of the fourth period will 
make a bloopers film dip. It started with them sending only 
four players onto the court CCdric Maxwell was supposed to 
be out there, but he saw Scott Wedman, a swingman, and he 
assumed Wedman was in at forward rather than guard. The 
Celtics did not notice; but then again, it .took referees Jake 
O’Donnell and Jess Kersey 21 seconds to count that high 
and call a technical foul on the Celtics. 

Bird was hardly absolving himself. His half-court bomb to 
Robert Parish flew out of the end zone and caused Parish to 
stumble into the seats, not exactly what you want for a tired 
center hobbling on a sprained ankle. And after Quinn 
Buckner was called for a technical Bird called, “Wait a 
minute, Tm not ready” id the officials while Andrew Toney 
was missing the foul shot. That gave Toney another chance 
because of Bird’s “obstruction” as the officials called it. 

It was the kind of game any athlete and any team would 
tike to forget. The Critics will be home Wednesday nigbt 
with a 3-1 advantage in the series, and Bird ejects to play. 

“If I can walk and talk, it’s not a major injury,” he said. 
“TD play.” 


Reds 7. Pirates 1 
Cincinnati's Mario Soto contin- 
ued his success in Pittsburgh by 
pitching a six-hitter and driving in 
two runs with a triple and single. 
He is 8-0 at Three Rivers Stadium. 
11-3 lifetime against the Pirates. 
Soto lost his shutout with two outs 
in the ninth, walking pinch-hitter 
Lee Mazrilli with the bases loaded. 



SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Basketball 


Aoto Racing 


Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



- 

G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pd. 


. . Harr SIL 

35 

13S 

25 

50 

MB 

* 

- waning Hta 

31 

97 

U 

34 

-351 


Porker an 

.36 

141 

15 

49 

34B 


• - . • VHaycs Phi 

35 

130 

U 

45 

J46 


, Cruz Htn 

36 

145 

22 

50 

J45 

to 

•• Murnhv All 

35 

133 

27 

45 

J38 


Garvey SO 

34 

147 

23 

47 

MB 

_ 

‘ vonShrke SIL 

33 

94 

14 

30 

319 


-• I J.Ctart 5fL 

35 

126 

22 

40 

317 


1 iitami pw 

31 

181 

13 

32 

317 


San Franebcn, Sj MUMlaon. Naw York. 3; 
Mc&nh St. Louis. 3; SomurtiYittadBtahfa. 1 
Homo Boas: Morphy. Atlanta, 11; J.Ctaric. 
StLouts,!; Marshal L Los Anpelos. 7. -Parker. 
Cincinnati, 7; Dawson. Montreal. 6: Garvay, 
San Oiesa, b; Straw berry. New York. d. 

UoMm Bates; Coleman, SLLoobw 36: Dcr- 
nler,aiiceoa,U; Gladden 5an Froncttca. 13; 
LASmin, SLLouta, 13; NLWUsan. New York, 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


NBA Playoffs 


Monaco Grand Prix 


1Z 


Murph*. Atlanta. 37; Herr, Si, Louts. 
25iGwynn.SanDleso.34; Garvey, San OEesa, 
23; Sandbars. CWcaoo, 21 
RBI : Murphy, Atlante.34; J.aark.StXoulA 
, 30: Porter, Cincinnati, 2?; Herr, StLouis. 27; 
G. Wilson, PhitadrfaHa. 2& 

Hits: Cruz. Houston. 2D; Herr.SLLouiskSO: 
Pnrker, C Inc Innati, *9 ; Garvey.San □ Icon, 47; 
Murphy, Atlanta, 45; V.HOVM. PhltadeiaWa 
41 

Doubles: Gwynn. San Dieaa, 12; Porker. 
Cincinnati. 13; v .Hayes. PhftaeetoMc. 11; 
WaHach. Montreal. 11; J.CIork. StiourtHtt: 
Ray, PIHsburBfbUL 

Tripies: Rai nes. Montreal. S; Gwynn, Sail 
Dieao.4; G.vwtem. PtdiacMMita3; Gladden. 


PITCHING 

Wow-UM/WMus PcL/ERA: Hawkins. 
San Dleso,fr4L1iMb2a7; Knenper^laustarv*- 
G 1J00.U5; Annular, st Louis. 4-1, .857,144; 
Gooden. New YorM-1, JS7. 141; H-Smlfb. 
Montreal. M, J31 24K; Trout, Chtanso. 5-1. 
*3X101 

strtkeoets; J .DeLeon, PKtsburgh,U; Rvan. 
Houston. 61; vwenmeln. Los Anoeles. 60; 
Gooden, New York. 57; Soto. OndnnatL 56. 

Savts; Gofisaae. Sen Otesa W; Le^mHh. 
Chkoso,V; Recrdon. Montreal, I; Sutter, At- 
tanhi. »; Power, anetnmH. 7. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

000 Ml MO— 1 4 • 

w an m— a 10 2 
Boyd md Gedman; Ruble. Thompson (*) 
and Banda. W— Thompson. 1-1. l — B ovd. 4-1 
HR — Cleveland. Oern az ar d (4). 

Toronto 010 0M BOV-3 5 0 

Minnesota 211 003 BIX— 8 13 B 

Alexander. Lamp <61, Mussel man (7) ond 
Martinez; Ktawttter. Fnson <21 and Salas. 
W— Pi Bon, >4. L— Alexander. 3-1 HRs— To- 
ronto. BorfMd <71. Summons (2). Minnesota. 
Teufel <31. Brunansky (ill. 


Transition 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Mvtstoa 



G 

AB 

a 

H 

Pet 

Beetito Oak 

33 

n 

12 

34 

370 

Salas Min 

28 

u 

11 

32 

340 

Whitaker Oat 

31 

122 

37 

43 

352 

Brunancky Min 

36 

132 

24 

M 

J48 

MDevtoOak 

36 

126 

37 

43 

341 

R token Bit 

35 

134 

28 

44 

324 

Puckett Min 

34 

145 

23 

S3 

321 

Caaaer Mh 

31 

134 

T1 

49 

317 

DJtaOson See 

. 31 

IV 

» 

38 

317 

PAraOtor.Sea . 

.34 

M2 

19 

45 

317 



- . 

W L 

PeL 

G8 


! - " Baltimore 

21 14 

400 

— 


' ‘ Taranto 

21 U 

ADD 

— 


"• Detroit 

VI 14 

388 

to 


.'tern York 

18 14 

MS 

2te 

- 

. • > rton K 
“ MUwauma 

14 19 
M 20 

357 

JU 

5 

4VJ 


Ctovetand 

14 22 

389 

m 



g»xt DtvlUan 




' CaUtonWa 

21 15 

JB3 

— 


Oitonga 

19 14 

J76 

vs 


: .Mtal«4Mo 

20 16 

356 

1 


Kansas a tv 

18 17 

314 

w> 


Oakland 

17 I* 

A72 

4 


“ 'Seattle 

16 20 

444 

5 


Texas 

10 25 

386 

tow 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
End Division 


’ ^ 


w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

_ 

’ “.Now York 

23 

n 

JJt 

— 


Chicago 

20 

13 

Mi 

Vh 

*■ 

Montreal 

20 

16 

356 

4 

7 

-yifluio 

U 

19 

<457 

7V5 


c- tadetohla 

13 

22 

371 

10VJ 


J . ittx&urgn 

10 

24 

39U 

13 



WM* Dtalitaa 




son Diego 

20 

14 

388 

— 


Cincinnati 

» 

16 

356 

1 


■ '’Koutton 

20 

16 

-554 

1 ' 

a 

Ln Angeles 

18 

19 

Mi 

JVj 


'j Atlanta 

16 

19 

AST 

4Vj 


!•• - ■ Sun Franctaca 

14. 

21.. 

ABB 

4ta 

u 

‘ i-- v : 

■ * •- 





Rmm: MDav&O0ktQfrt,3?; RWwa BolM- 
more^sa; Hotdicr. Minnesota, 27; Whltoksr. 
Detroit. 27; Brunanskv. Minnesota 26: Mur- 
phy, Oakland, &, 

RBI: MJSavto. Oakland, 33; Brunanskv. 
Mbmasaro. 31; Rlpkoiv Baltimore, 31; Hrbek, 
Minnesota 70: MaNbwtr, New York. 28. 

HR« Puckett. MlnnesotaJS; Hatcher, MJr- 
nesoiaNli Bnmanakv^Mi»esota,46; Wilson. 
Kanaao GHv, 46; P Bradley. Soattto, 45. 

DoaMes: Matltnoiy, New York. 12; Buck- 
ner. Boston. 11 Gaem, iwnnenta 1 1 : Hatoh- 
er. Minnesota, 11; 4 an tied with 1BL 
Triples; wBsoa Kansas Otv. 8; Butler, 
Cleveland. 4; PAradley, Seattle. 4; Petits. 
California, 4; Puckett. Minnesota. 4. 

Home Runs; BUtavN. OpUanL 13; Brw 
ansky. Mmecota. 11; Armas, Boston, to; 
Presley, Seattle, 10: G-Thomas, Seattle. 9: 
Kinaman, Oakland, 9, 

Stolen Bases: Pettis, California, 23; Cotlbts. 
Oakland, 1 & MMby. Toronto, 11; Garcia. 
Toronto, Hi. RJtendoraen. New York. 10. 


- ■ PITCHING 

Wou-Lart/Whadne PcL/ERA: TerreiL De- 
tiutT.*4.1JlftLU6; BoOdlcker.6alllmore.A-l. 
a$7^25B;'Ca(SreH. Oakland. 5-1, JOXISJ; Sore 
lied udlti joa 

Strikeouts: demons. Boston. SB; Boyd. Bov 
tan. S3: Morris. Detroit, ST; P bannister. CM- 
caBa.40; Alexander. Torarta 43.HouetL Tex- 
as. £L 

Saves; Menwdee. Detroit. 9: J-HoneU, 
Oakland. 9; R^hettL New York. 9; D Moore. 
Caiitamip, gj B-hxne*. Otlcago, 7; CaudiiL 
Toroafq, 7.- WpddeU. OevMand, 7. 


BASEBALL 
Aawricoa Loop PS 

CLEVELAND— Recalled Jett Barkley, 
pIMisr. tram Maine of the international 
Loagua. Optioned Carmen Casl I Do, autftrider, 
to Maine. 

KANSAS CITY—WalvedLanvGarOiPtiriy 
or, far the purpose of pfvtao Mm Ms uxm£- 
t Iona 1 1 uHioirt 

MILWAUKEE— Acttvetod Rick Mannina 
out field er, 

Hotiooal Lvqms 

HOUSTON— Placed Dickie TboaBhertetoN 
an me ISday disabled iw. Activated Bert 
Pena. Inlletaer. 

MONTREAL— Ad ivotOd GflfY LVCOB 
pttctier. Outtaned Ed Giym. pUdier, to lndta- 
napolis a( the American As sociat i on. 

NEW YORK— Named Writ Miller m anager 
of OMumbia of tte South Atlantic Laaooe. 
Placed Colvin SeMrtridl.pttctier^mNie ISdav 
eflsabled lisL Activated Ron GordwiMre. In- 
Hetder. Moved Domrl strawbenrr.outftekter. 
frixn the ISUov AsaUed list to ttw 21-day UeL 
Named Gtam Abbott pttcNna coach lor their 
LHtie Falls affiliate ot the New York Penn 
Leaaue. 

PITTSBURGH— Sent Rptata Milord, 
shortstop, to Hawaii of the Pacific Coast 
League. Recalled Ray Kranczvk. Pitcher, 
trum HawalL 

ST. LOUIS— Called up Tom Lawless, to- 
ReWer.tram Louisville ol tbe American Amo- 

ctollon. 

. FOOTBALL 

Cpifiw FtaMBan 1 engrra 

TORONTO-SlanM Lee Miller, defensive 

Itottanta Foottoil Uom 

san P RAN Cl SCO — Signed John Mazur, 
auorierbadu Stephen Jordan, kicker; Theo 
Wtndna m and Den nleMor eBeoA w ide reegiv- 
ers; Derek Batch. Itnetxxktr, ana Lvtmden 
Brown, defensive bock. 

- united states Football League 

SAN ANTONIO— Announced the restora- 
tion of Jim BaM, coach. Named Gil Stetnke 
head conch . 

HOCKEY 

Bottom*! Mocker l e a gu e 

MINNESOTA — Signed Karl Takko, goal- 
render. 


ON 101 NO— 1 3 0. 
Chicago MO 181 03 % — 5 7 • 

Howuti and SloupM, Brvmmtr (4 )«■ LoHoe. 
Nc4son(7).Jamei(9)andn$k.W—Ne<son.3- 
1. L—Houah. 30. H Ro—Chlooaa, FUk (8). Ba- 
ton (1), wuilcer 15). 

Detroit 3M M8 WV — 7 12 1 

Oakland 1M Ml Mx-9 12 I 

Wilcox, Bair (4), Sctwrrer (7) and Parrish; 
-QxflrotL Howell (t) and Heath, w— Coal roll. 
5-1. L— Wilcox. 1-2. HR— Detroit, Parrish C6>. 
Baltimore DM HO 010-2 S 1 

Seattle mo in an— 1 7 0 

DJMortlnez and Dempsey ; Moore ond Scott. 
W-OJMortlnez, 3-1 L— Moon. 4-4. H Rs— BcJ- 
Itmore. Dwyer {4). Seattle. Photos («). 

New York 0M in MO-1 4 • 

Cantons la DM Ml *2x— 4 7 3 

wnttson, Bardi (7) and Master; Staton. 
Moore' ID) and Boon*. W— Staton, 44. L— 
Whitson, vs. Sv—Moom 191. HRs-Ca! Horn ks. 
Downing (3], Jones (4). 

Cfhr 134 620 2M— IB 77 3 

*12 no Mtv-ll II 1 
Gubica Janes (3). LaCoss (il.OuEsenberrv 
(*) otxl Wataan; Barrio. McClure (3). Gibson 
(7) ant Moore. W-CibtoiL 4-1. L-Oulsen- 
bemr.3-3.HRs — Kansas Otv. Motley (4). MV 
waufcee, Yount (4). 


SUNDAYS RESULTS 
16 B 3 

PhltadotoWti 31 39 25 30—115 

Toner B-TS 9-18 24. Cheeks 10-13 3-2 22; 
McHale 10-22 5-4 25. D-tahnson 8-14 3-1 19. 
Reboeads: Boston 58 (McHole 17); Phltodel- 
phta 57 (Barkley 20). Assists: Boston 36 
(Alnge I); PhUadeipWo 24 (Erving 6). 

35 33 25 27—120 
M 34 23 II — 114 
Abduklabbar 1346 3-3 29. Scott 10-n S-5 36; 
Enollsh 8-20 12-132E Natt 1V23 4-428. Turner 8- 
II 08 17. Rebounds: Los Angeles 60 (Worthy 
13); Denver SO I English, Notts). Assists: Los 
Angeles 34 (Johnson 13); Denver 27 (Turner. 
Hi. 


CONFERENCE FINALS 
EASTERN 

(Boston leads series 3-1) 
mov 22: Phliadotohta ot Boston 
x-May 24: Boston at Philadelphia 
X-Mav 26; Philadelphia ot Boston 
WESTERN 

(LA. Lakers Mod series 3-1) 
Mov 32: Denver at Los Angeles 
x-Moy 34: Las Arse let ot Denver 
x-May 27: Denver at Los Angeles 
(x-ll necessary) 


R exalts ot SaodaYS <3rd Mo n aco Grand 
Prix. toortb roead of the 198S warid chant Pkm- 
sbto: 

1. A tain Pros). France. McLaren-TAG- 
Pooche MP4.2B, 1 hour, 51 minutes. SBA34 
seconds, ov: 8402 mph. 

2. WUcheto Attoreta Italy, Ferrari 154-85. 
1:52:05^75. 

3. El lode Anoells. i miy. Lotas-Renautt 97T. 
1:53:25^05. 

4. Anareo do Cesorts. llahr. LWer-Renoull 
J535, 1 tap behind. 

5. Oerek Warwick. Britain. Renault RE6a 1 
top. 

6. Jocaues Lotfl te. France, Llgler-Renault 
JS2S. one tap 

7. Nigel Monsell. Britain. WHlioms-Hondo 
FW 18b 1 too. 

8. Keke Roebora Finland WHIIomo-Honda 
FW10.2 taps. 

9. Thierry Boutsen. Belgium. Arrows- BMW 
A8. 2 kgs. 

ta Martin Brundie, Britain, Tvrretl-Ford 
012. 4 lops. 

11. Jonathon Palmer. BrlioiaZoksPeed8<l- 
81. 4 tost. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
LOS Ang el es IM 181 880—1 4 0 

PhitadttaMa M8 IN M)-S 4 0 

Vcrfenxweta. Howell (81 and ScJosGa; Hud- 
son. Rucker 19) aad VlrglL W— VOIonzueia.4- 
*- L— Hudson. VI Sv— Howell (5). HRs— Lot 
Angetas. Brock 13). Marshall (7). PtiltadN- 
ohio. Sehmldi (5). 

Clnctaoatl 882 288 DO-7 ID D 

Plttsbon* MB 000 801—1 6 ■ 

Solo and Knlcolv; Tunned . Guonie (4L Cam 
detain (9) and Orth. W— Sato. 4-1 L— Tun- 
neiL 0-5. HRs-ClmdnnatL CencePdoa (3), 
Davis (S). 

Mo PfOKfcCe 280 089 MS— 2 4 1 

New York DM H3 Mx-0 5 D 

Gatt, MDovts (4), GorrMts (6). Minton (7) 
tmd Trevino; Gormon. McDowell (7) and Hur- 
dle. W — O am kiL 3-1. L-MDOvt*. 3-1 Sv— 
McDowell (21. HR— Son FrottaUco, Leonord 
P). 

SLLogts Ml 801 ODD— 1 7 0 

Mooston 2H 812 2Cx— 7 12 0 

Tudor. Lonil (7). Alton (fl| and Porter: Mo- 
IM& Dnwtry (7) raid Ashby. w_ Marais. 3-L 
L — t L xlar. 14. 5w— Dawtov 12). HRs— St 
Louis, van STvko (2). Hovstvi, Cabell 111, 
Ashby (27. Pankoiftts 111. 

Chkaga DM ON 006—0 7 • 

AltoMS 210 8)0 Mx — 1 9 8 

SutCOfto, RuHwtn (3),Brusstar(6).Frazier 
(8) and Davis; BedrorianDedman 16). Sutter 
IH and Benedict. W— Bedrostan. 7-2. L — SuT- 
riifie, SW. Sv— Suitor (8). HRs-Atlanla Mur- 
Phy 111), Woantaataa (3). 

Son Mono - Ml W S O » 17 ■ 

Montreal 001 HI bbb-s 12 I 

Hawkins. DeLeon (81 ana Kamudv; Rog- 
ers, Lucas IS). Burke (7) ond Fitzgerald, w— 
Hawk bis. 80. L— Rogers. 3-4. 5v—ooL*en (1). 
HRS— son Diego. Kennedy (5). Montreal, 
Roines (1) 


Football 


USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



W 

L 

T 

Pet 

PF 

Pa 

Blrmbwhom 

9 

4 

0 

M2 

324 

225 

Tomaa Bay 

9 

4 

8 

392 

323 

276 

Memphis 

8 

5 

0 

315 

297 

258 

New Juraoy 

8 

& 

0 

■615 

305 

274 

Berillmore 

4 

6 

1 

300 

2X7 

20* 

Jaekaanvllto- 

4 

6 

0 

300 

288 

293 

Orimto 

3 

18 

0 

231 

218 

344 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


DMikind 

9 

3 

1 

331 

218 

245 

Denver 

9 

4 

0 

392 

351 

2*0 

Houston 

8 

4 

0 

347 

374 

251 

Arizona 

5 

8 

0 

285 

244 

292 

Las Anodes 

3 

H> 

0 

211 

192 

239 

Part tang 

3 

10 

0 

231 

175 

308 

San Antonia 

3 

10 

0 

231 

210 

304 


Staedtags to tbe tm World Drivers' Cftoin- 
ptoasMa otter Sunday^ Mneaco Grand Prix. 
fourth al U races; 

1. Elio do Angel Is. Italy, 20 polntv 
1 2. (tte) Alain Prosl. France, aid Michele 
Albania Italy, IS. 

4. Patrick Tambov. France. 10 

i Avrton SonrtO da Silva BrozIL 9 

6. Thierry Boutsen Betotum. 6. 

7. Ntaei MonselL Britain. 4 

8. (tie) Rena Amouz. Pronca Andrea de 
CnorK Itatv. ond Ntkl Lauda Austria X 

11, (tie) Derek Warwick, Britain, and Joc- 
aues Lafffie, France, 1 
ix (lie) stetwi JohonMun. Sweden raidSie- 
hei Belial, west Germany, 1. 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


severdypufied a hamstring muscle, 
club officials said He was to be 


examined Monday in Chicago by 
the team doctor. 

Sutcliffe was bun in the second 
inning of a 3-0 loss to tbe Braves as 
be dashed to first base to avoid 
being doubled up on a ground ball. 

“I felt the burning halfway down 
the tine,” he said. “The next step. I 
fdt like I’d been shot I just col- 
lapsed.” 

The Cubs’ trainer, Tony Garo- 
falo, said, “Ride has got a severe 
pull to tbe hamstring and we’ll let 
tbe doctor re-evaluate him. He was 
in a lot of pain. Because of the 
trauma of the injury, we couldn’t 
evaluate him now, with all (he 
blood and swelling inside the leg. 

“The minimum on a hamstring 
pull is usually 10 days, but it could 
increase depending on tbe severity. 
If it's a tear, it could possibly go 
three weeks or longer.” 

Before the injury. Sutcliffe had 
given up a two-run home run to 
Atlanta's Dale Murphy. 

Sutcliffe, whose arrival in June 
of last season proved to be the 
crucial piece m the Cubs' 39-year 
search lor post-season inclusion, is 
the ace of the staff. A prolonged 
injury would seriously hinder the 
Cubs’ chances of repeating as NL 
East champs, especially with the 
team’s unexpected poor hitting 

Sutcliffe. 28, entered Sunday’s 
game with a 2.1 1 eamed-nm aver- 
age and a 5-4 record. Last year, the 
6-foot-7, 215-pounder went 16-1 
with a 169 ERA after Gevdand 
traded him to Chicago on June 1 3. 

Chicago entered the weekend se- 
ries with tbe league’s best ERA, 
148. Atlanta’s 3.73 was next to last, 
but Steve Bedrosian and two reliev- 
ers gave up only seven hits. 


Golf 



Thompson and lost the sixth of its 
last seven games in an unlikely 
manner. The Indians’ Joe Carter, in 
manager Pal Cornties' doghouse 
most of ihe season, drove a one-out 
single down (he kft-fidd tine to 
score the winning run in the ninth. 

Carter said be "vouched and 

prayed” for a moment before run- 
ning to first. “When you come into 
the game batting only 205. vou 
can’t take anything for granted. \fy 
first reaction was to Tall on my 


knees, but ] didn't want to get 
thrown out at first.” 


Rid: Sutcliffe 


Padres 8, Expos 3 

Kevin McReynolds and Terry 
Kennedy each drove in two runs in 
Montreal to help San Diego’s Andy 
Hawkins improve to 8-0 and join 
Atlanta’s Rick Mahler as the major 
league's only eight-game winners. 

“Basically, a lot of things are 
going right for me,” said Hawkins, 
wbo spent the 1984 season shut- 
tling between the starting rotation 
and the bullpen. “I’ve never had a 
streak tike it, and I hope it lasts a 
little Longer." 

The Padres supported Hawkins 
with 17 hits, four each by Kennedy 
and Graig Nettles. Nettles got his 
2.000th in the majors. 


Mets 3, Giants 2 
In New York, a angle by How- 
ard Johnson, who was batting .135. 
and an error helped the Mets rally 
for three runs in the sixth, beat Sail 
Francisco and raise their record to 
23-1 1. best in the majors. 

After the Giants’ catcher. Alex 
Trevino, allowed a passed ball that 
made tbe score 2-1, Johnson, who 
was hitless in his previous 13 al- 
ba is, fouled off Tour 3-2 pitches 
before singling home the tying and 
go-ahead runs. 

Astros 7, Cardinals 3 
In Houston, Enos Cabell, Alan 
Ashby and Jim Pankovits homeied 
to help beat St. Louis. The Astros 
have 18 home runs in their last 18 
games, and have hit three in a game 
three times in the last week. 

Indians 2, Red Soot 1 
In the American League, in 
Gevdand. Boston was held to four 
hits by Vera Ruhle and Rich 


Tvrins 8, Btne Jays 2 
Plete Filson supplied three-hit re- 
lief for 7*4 innings in Minneapolis 
while Tom Brunansky and Tun 
Teufel homered to help beat To- 
ronto. 

White Sox 5, Rangers 1 
In Chicago, rookie Daryl Boston 
broke an Q-foM7 slump and a 1-1 
tie with his first major-league 
homer, supporting the three-hit 
pitching of Tim LoUar and two 
relievers against Texas. 

Brewers II, Royals 10 
Charlie Moore singled and Kan- 
sas City center fidder Willie Wil- 
son's error on the play in Milwau- 
kee allowed Paul Meritor to score 
the winning run from first base in 
(he ninth. 

Angels 4, Yankees 1 
In Anaheim. California. Brian 
Downing and Ruppen Jones each 
hit two-run homers to support the 
six-hit pitching of Jim Slaton and 
Donnie Moon; that ended New 
York's six-game winning streak. 

A’s9, Tigers 7 

Alfredo Griffin had three hits 
and drove in two runs and Dave 
Kingman got two RBI against De- 
troit in Oakland. 

Orioles 2, Mariners 1 
Cal Ripken's sacrifice fly with 
one out in the dgbth in Seattle 
ended the 1-1 tie and Dennis Mar- 
tinez pitched a seven-hitter for Bal- 
timore. ~7rlP, UPIi 


Dodgen 3, PhOfies 2 
Greg Brock homered in the 
fourth inning in Philadelphia and 
teammate Make Marshall in the 
sixth as Los Angel* won behind 
the four-hit pitching of Fernando 
Valenzuela and Ken HowdL 
Howell gave up Mike Schmidt’s 
leadoff homer in the ninth, then 
walked Ozzie Virgil before striking 
out Glam Wilson, Jeff Stone and 
pinch- hitter Greg Gross. 



Two other Cubs in pain: catcher Jody Davis and first 
baseman Richie Hebner collided while chasing a foul balL 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Pavin Wins Easily on Colonial Record 


FORT WORTH. Texas (AP) — Corey Pavin, who led or shared the 
lead all the way. shot a 2-under-par 68 for a record-breaking, four-shot 
victory Sunday in the Colonial National Invitation golf tournament. 

Pavin, who led by at least three shots throughout the final round, got 
his second victory of his two-year PGA Tour career with a 266 total, the 
best posted on the Colonial Country Gub course. That broke by two 
shots the course and tournament record set by Lee Trevino in 1978. 


Another Nicklaus Is a Golf Winner 


PINEHURST, North Carolina 1 AP) — Jack Nicklaus 11 won the 
North and South Amateur golf championship Sunday with a 2-up victory 
over Tom McKmght of Galax. Virginia, as fus father. Jack, watched from 
the gallery. 

Nicklaus, a member of the University of North Carolina golf team, 
won the 36-hole match with birdies on the 16th and 17th holes. It was his 
best showing in amateur play: his father won the tournament in 1959. 


Gomez Defeats Lockridge for 3d Tide 


SAN JTUAN, Puerto Rico (UP1) — Former world superbantam and 
featherweight champion Wilfredo Gomez of Puerto Rico won his third 
world title Sunday, defeating World Boxing Association junior light- 
weight champion Rocky Lockridge of (he United States with a 15-round 
split decison. 

Gomez, 28, raised his record to 42-2-1 with 40 knockouts, becoming the 
first boxer in the lower weight categories to von three world tides. 
Lockridge. 26. of Tacoma. Washington, dropped to 36-4 with 30 knock- 
outs: it was his third defense of the title he won in February 1984. 


Rutherford Regains Spot in Indy 500 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Dottw, JW Dm Jersey 21 
Artznno 30. Fernand 31 
Birmingham 44. las Anastas 7 


Soccer 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
CMWSiOlWl 
IScand Round) 

United -Status 1. Trinidad and TobOOO O 
Points 5tenateas: United States 4; Casta 
Rieo X Yrlnidod ana Tobago 1. 

ttemo i n tag Morons: moy 24. Casio Rtoa vs. 
Ui; May 31. UA vs. Costa Rica. 


Teg fintoMrt and tamings hi ttt Colonial 
Manned tovtteffaa Mf Tu ura aweeb wbk* 
mob enawleted Suadav an Ihe 74M yard< gar 
38 c olo n ia l C o unt y ctab axing at Fart 
Wurik, Texas (o-omotwr): 

Corey Povln, S7ZM0 
Bob Mureity, S5480Q 
Scott Hoch. S34JJB0 
Nk* Price. S33M0 
Mart own. $22400 
Lorry Mbe, SIWOO 
jam Mabottev. mOK 
wnito wood. 514063 
Buddy Gardner. MAI® 

Joer Stadetar. SIU42 
MlU Smith. SI 1000 
OA Wutorlna. B1JMO 
Tim Norrta. S11J» 

Mike Donald. «V0M 
Mart PfetLSMSO 
Larry Nelson. SB25D 
Lee Trevino. SK25S 
Hoi Sutton. 58099 


INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Three-time winner Johnny Rutherford was 
one of four drivers late Sunday who bumped their way back into the field 
for the 69th Indianapolis 500 after having been bumped out themselves. 

Rutherford, 47. who qualified for his 21st Indy start, finished a 
dramatic four-lap qualification run in a Cosworth-powcred March race 
car during the final oour of time trials. He joined Kevin Cogan, Ireland's 
Derek Daly and Indy rookie Rich Vogler. afi in March-Cosworths. Indy 
rookie Michael Roe of Ireland was one of those who lost thdr spots. 


44 64 4868-244 
48-7M5-67-2H 
49486649 272 
4970-7844-273 
684871-68 — 273 
714D0548-Z74 
70*6-71-68—273 
6647-77-66—273 
48704849 -275 
71-72-62*70—275 
67-69-7866—276 
7847-6868—276 
6946-70-71 — 27* 
484848-73—274 
71-67-7248—278 

78-68-7149— Z7« 
70-6946-71—278 
704847-73— Z7I 


Grand Slam Tennis Bonus Ending 

LONDON (UPI) — The SI million bonus, introduced three years ago. 
for winning the Grand Slam will be scrapped Mien the present contract 
expires at the end of this year’s U.S. Open, Tbe International Tennis 
Federation announced Monday. 

The ITF president. Philippe Chattier, said that “while we were aQ 
thrilled” when Martina Navratilova collected a $1 millio n bogus at the 
French Open last year, already having won the Wimbledon, VS. Open 
and Australian Open titles, the money “could be put to much more 
valuable use in developing the grass roots of the international game,” 

The bonus still could be won by Mats Wflander and Chris Evm Lloyd, 
who won the Australian Open in December. J 


1 







• 1 • 


1 


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I 


i 

i 

I 


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I 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1985 


h 


4 


ART BUCHWALD 


Historical Revisionism 


WASHINGTON -There is a 
▼ T great deal of rewriting of his- 
tory in the United States these 
days. One of the most outstanding 
scholars in the field is Professor 
Hemnoi Applebann, who chairs 
the President's Commission for 
Historical Revisio nism 

I found Applebaum in a tiny 
government office off Lafayette 
Park, lapping 
away on his 
word processor. 

He seemed to be 
Stateful for the 
interruption. 

“What are 
yon working 
on?” I asked 
him 

He replied. 

“ i Was a Teen- _ „ 

age SS Colonel’ BucbwaM 
It is the diaiy of a child who serves 
for 14 years as a storm trooper, 
only to become one of the milli on*; 
of victims of World War IL” 




dent Reagan's speecL 

u How do you explain the sudden 
interest in historical revisionism?" 
Applebaum said, “You can’t 


leant from hisioiy unless yoa re- 
e job of the revisionist is 


write iL The job i 

to make people forget the past The 
neo-historian looks at what has 
been printed so far and then asks 
himself, ‘Will this hurl or help our 
present alliances?' If it hurts, then 
be must reconcile the facts with 
what is in the nation's best inter- 
est." 


“Can you give me an example?” 
“When the revisionists saw that 
the 40th anniversary of the end of 
World War II was coming up, we 
realized that the German people 


Goya Painting Is Stolen 
From Abbey in Spain 


United Press International 

GRANADA. Spain — Thieves 
broke into an isolated abbey and 
stole a painting attributed to Goya 
that is valued at neatly 52 million 
and scores of other an treasures. 

The Sacromontc Abbey contains 
nearly 4.(100 works of art and 
24.000 rare books and manuscripts. 
The thieves fled before completing 
the burglary, leaving dozens of an 
objects scattered on the floor. 


would be very sensitive if they were 
shown in a bad light. So we as- 
signed a evade team of neo-histori- 
ans to make their role in the un- 
pleasantness more palatable. This 
book was the result” He handed 
me a volume entitled “We Were All 
Guilty." 

As I leafed through it, be told 
me: “It proves that Hitler started 
World war II against the express 
wishes of the German people. As a 
matter of fact, we discovered the 
entire population rose up to stop 
him from invading Czechoslovakia. 
Poland and France.” 

“That’s quite a scoop,” I said. 
“You must have dime a lot of re- 
search." 

“We interviewed hundreds of 
people who lived through those 
days and couldn’t find one who 
admitted to supporting Hitler’s 
mad ambition to take over the 
world. This confirmed our earlier 
suspicions that Hitler worked 
alone." 

□ 

“It sounds as if you’ve got a 
Pulitzer Prize winner here,” I said. 
“What’s this other manuscript?” 

"That’s toy revisionist history of 
the war in the Pacific. It sheds a 
whole new light on how we got 
involved." 

“In what way?" 

“I discovered the Russians 
bombed Pearl Harbor." 

“That's one I hadn't heard be- 
fore.” 

“They wanted us to think the 
Japanese had done it so we would 
declare war on the Axis powers. 
Roosevelt fell for it book, line and 
sinker.” 

“I always thought there was 
more to Pad Harbor than any of 
us had been led to believe. But if 
the Russians sank our fleet why 
did the Japanese capture the Phil- 
ippines?” 

“Who says the Japanese cap- 
tured the Philippines? They were 
Cubans dressed as Japanese." 

I looked over the manuscript and 
was impressed with what I had 
read. “U the United States had 
known who really bombed Pearl 
Harbor. I'll bet we would never 
hare dropped the atom bomb on 
Hiroshima.” 

"Who said the United Stales 


dropped the bomb on Hiroshima?” 
“Don’t tell me. If we didn't do it. 


who did?” 

Applebaum said tersely, “Hie 
Nicaraguans.” 


Mesopotamia: Cradle of Haute Cuisine? 


By ErikEckholm 

New York Tana Serna 


I MAGINE a cuisine offering 100 styles of 
soup and 18 kinds of cheese. A place 
where 300 types of bread are made with 
different flours, spices or fruit fillings and can 
be ordered in shapes ranging from a heart to a 
woman’s breasL A place where truffle-like 
fungi are harvested for the table and pickled 
grasshoppers are served for snacks. 

It may sound like latter-day California, or 
perhaps a three-star in France. But new find- 
ings reveal that these varied delights and 
more were enjoyed at least 4,000 years ago in 
the Middle East. The princes and priests of 
ancient Mesopotamia, it turns out, woe gas- 
es of the 


: first order; their chefs were 


tronomes 
masters. 

Mesopotamia, the strip of land between 
the rivers Tigris and Euphrates that is now 
part of Iraq, has long been called the cradle of 
civilization. Now it may also become known 
as the birthplace of home cuisine. 


Deciphering cuneiform symbols on_ stone 
tablets housed a 


fat Yale University, the French 
scholar Jean Bottero has discovered what are 
by far the oldest extant recipe books. Written 
m Akkadian, an ancient Babylonian lan- 
guage, the recipes were apparently carved 
onto stone around 1700 B. C. Previously the 
tablets had been thought to contain pharma- 
ceutical formulas. 

Bottero, an eminent Assyriologist and a 
good cook himself, wrote in the current issue 
of Biblical Archeology magazine that the tab- 
lets revealed “a cuisine of striking richness, 
refinement, sophistication and artistry, which 
is surprising from such an early period. Previ- 
ously we would col have dared to think a 
cuisine 4,000 years old was so advanced." 

The best-preserved of the tablets features 
25 recipes, with a heavy emphasis on aromat- 
ic meat stews. Stag, gazelle, kid, lamb, mut- 
ton. and pigeon ana other birds are to be 
prepared in, among other concoctions, a red 
stew, a clear stew, a tart stew and a stew with 
bread crumbs sprinkled on top. 

Garlic, onions and leeks are favored flavor- 
ings, but min t, juniper berries and what ap- 
pear to be mustard, coriander and cumin are 
also called for. along with some unfamiliar 
herbs and spices. 

These redoes are not for the culinary ama- 
teur. Often Just a few lines long, they list 
essential ingredients laconically, leaving 
quantities and cooking times to the discretion 
of the cook. In this they resemble modem 
cookbooks written for the use of professional 
chefs such as Auguste Escoffier’s “Guide Cu- 
tinaire." 

Up to now. the earliest preserved cook- 
book worthy of the name had been that of 
Apicius. a Roman gourmet whose "On Culi- 
nary An” was probably compiled in the 
fourth century A. D. Some Greeks are known 
to have collected recipes, but only tantaliz- 
ingly brief references, by one Aihenaeus of 



From "Stated Afd mdutf g." pobfahe d by the Anran Schoob of Oriertd Bewodi 

Noblemen drinking toasts at banquet in ancient times. 


Naucratis in his second-century work “The 
Lear ned Banquet,” have survived. 

To the unending frustration of culinary 
historians, cooking technique is ignored in 
the Bible. Archaeologists can surmise what 
basic foods the Egyptians ate, but nary a 
hieroglyphic recipe has been found to tell 
how they prepared them. 

In addition to the newly dedphered tab- 
lets, other written records, artistic depictions 
and archaeological remains indicate the wide 
range of foods enjoyed by the Babylonians 
and their predecessors in Mesopotamia, the 
Sumerians. One lexL a sort or Sumerian- 
Akkadian, Akkadian -Sumerian dictionary on 
24 stone tablets, provides terms in the two 
languages for 800 different foods and bever- 
ages. Other artifacts suggest that a complete 
menu of available consumables would be 
twice that long. 

The choices, at least for the elite, included 
meats both domestic and wild, fish, turtles 
and shellfish, and a host of grains, vegetables, 
tubers, fruits, mushrooms and herbs. One 
text even describes meat-stuffed intestinal 
casings, the world's first sausages. A has-' 
relief portrays a servant carrying a plate of 
pomegranates and pickled grasshoppers. 

In another pattern that may sound famil- 
iar, the Mesopotamian master chefs were all 


mm whereas in ordinary households the 
women invariably did the cooking. The mas- 
ters prepared feasts for the upper classes in 
spacious, well-equipped kitchens and with 
aoress to costly ingredients. 

Would-be experimenters with the ancient 
recipes should beware, Bottfeo warned. 

Recreating the Mesopotamian dishes 
would be practically impossible, and not jnst 
because of the difficulty of matching ingredi- 
ents precisely. Every cuisine, he observed, “is 
made up primarily of tricks of the trade.” 
Without a chance to watch a Babylonian 
James Beard demonstrate proper technique, 
one could not hope to reproduce the gustato- 
ry magic encapsulated in the cuneiform sym- 
bols. 

Just how tasty today’s epicures would find 
the dishes is uncer tain in any case. 

“It appears that thor concept of good food 
and ours are worids apart,” said Bottfra 
“For instance, they adored their food soaked 
in fats and oils, they seem obsessed with every 
member ol the onion family, and, in contrast 
to our tastes, salt played a rather minor role 
in their diet.” 

He nominated modem T British-, Arabic cui- 
sine as the likely evolutionary descendant of 
the cooking traditions created by the master 
chefs of Babylon. 


PEOPLE 


U *- 


.A 


Ml! 


Honoring T. E, Eawrence 


r'J 

IV 


Hundreds of adnriios 
tiny country church at 
England, to commemorate Law- 
rence of Arabia, one of the greatest 
and most mysterious of English 
war heroes, who died 50 years agp 
in a motorcycle accident A hand- 
ful of his surviving comrades-in- 
arms joined young men and women 
to honor the hero of the World War 
I Arab revolt against the Turks, 
who won fame and glory and then 
threw it up to live in obscurity as 
T. E. Lawrence in Moretcnu 130 
mites (208 km) southwest of Lon- 


don. Lawrence’s motorcycle acd- 
occurred a few antes from 


dent — 

there an May 13, 1935, and he died 
six days later, aged 46. A week of 
film snows, exhibitions and con- 
certs in his honor were efimaxed. 
with Sunday’s service. 

□ 

Rules have been agreed on for a 
rematch for the world chess cham- 
pionship. The match will be staged 
in September at a site stiD to be 
picked. The match will be between 
the reigning champion, Anatoli 
Karpov, and his challenger. Gary 
Kasparov. The International Chess 
Federation’s president, FJoreodo 
Compo manes, halted the first 
match Feb. 15 in Moscow after 160 
days, rulingthat it appozed to be a 
stalemate. The federation's execu- 
tive council, r nre tin g in T unis, has 
now decided that the champiffli will 
be the player who wins six consecu- 
tive games in the rematch. If nei- 
ther Karpov. 33, nor Kasparov, 21. 
nonages that feat, the winner win 
be the player who has the highest 
score at the end of 24 games. La the 
past the winner took five-eighths of 
the winnings and loser thre^eights. 
In the rematch each will receive 5 
percent of the winnings per victory. 
A draw wiH give each player 1 per- 
cent of the total winnings, and 1 
percent will go to the Commission 
for Assistance of Chess in Develop- 
ing Countries. What is left at the 
end of the match wiD be divided, 
with the winner getting 62J per- 
cent and the loser 37 5 percent. 

□ 

The Italian wOTtmfarn dtmh er 
RoahoH Measner, moving closer 
to his goal of scaling all 14 of the 
world’s 26,000-foot (7,900-meter) 
peaks, has conquered Dhaulagiri, 
leaving him two short, government 
officials said in* Katmandu, NepaL 
The 40-year-old ad venturer, ac- 
companied by Hans Kammer- 


bmder, 29. of Taufers. Italy, .spent 
three days on die northeast ade of 
the 2^95 1-foot mountain before 
reaching the summit May 15. 
Messner, of VUlinos. Italy, the only 
man to climb Everest solo, has now 
scaled 12 of the tafl .peals, m Mo- _. 
stan, Nepal and China, m 15 years* 
To reach his goal he must now 
climb Lhotse and Makalu. 

□ 

An American psychologist has 
fwrr appointed Britain s first pro - 
Lessor of parapsychology, a post 
endowed by the estate of the late 
writer Arthur Koesder and his wife* 
Cynthia. Edinburgh University an- 
nounced that Robert Moms, 42, a 
senior research scientist i n th e 
School of C o m p uter and Informa- 
tion Science at Syracuse Universi- 
ty, had been chosen from 30 appli- 
cants for the Arthur Koestier c ha ir 
of parapsychology. The £18,000"aT 
year (S22,700-a-year) chair was sef 
up with a £500,000 endowment 
from the wills Koestier and his 
wife, who died in a suicide pact in 
March 1983. 

□ 


H 

m: 

•a 


A Kuwaiti princess who admit- 
ted that site beat her two maids 
with metal wires and a riding crop 
was given a six-month suspended 
sentence, fined the equivalent of 
5630, and ordered to pay the wom- 
en a total of $3,456. Judge John 
Haymsn told Princess Sindya Aba- - 
bah, 30, before sentencing her n£- 
T .PndO P that die had inflicted “har- 
baric” beatings on the two maids, 
Samsd Ariffa, 26. from Shi Lanka, 
and Lend Swand, 45, from India. 
In February her sister, Princess 
Faria Ababoh, received a similar 
sentence for bearing the same 
women. 

O 


Mayor Teddy KoOek. 73-, of Jeru- 
salem has been selected as the 1985 
winner of the peace prize awarded 
by the West German Organization 
of Book Dealers, the group said in 


Frankfurt. KoOek was cited by (he 
of tr 


organization for his “years of tire- 
less effort in speaking out for Israe-jft 
li-Arab reconciliation — and his 
courage in making unconventional 
decisions,” the book dealers said. 
The 25,000-Deutsche mark 
(SJL333) prize, established in 1950, 
is a wanted annually by the West 
German organization at its autumn 
bode fair. KoOek mil receive the 
prize Oct. 13. 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO ELSE FOB YOUR 
NEXT INTERNATIONAL MOVE 


FOR A RE ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATH96: 

BARCaONA: 


CADIZ: 

RANKRMT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHESTER: 

MUMCH: 

NAPLES: 

PAMS: 


VIENNA: 

ZURICH: 


071JB9.93J4 
011961. 


1X12 
6523111 


0421 




06190 


11)1705' 

720l95.i 


956)363144 


70591 
H63 


__SP0)200lR 


Oil' 

01' 

061 


■4141 
671.245 0 
■70/2016 
11415036 

7801622 


061 707201 
089 141503 

081 780163 

3)0249000 


06)52693421 

ti222]9SM38 


01)363.2000 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES IN TL 


OVK 1000 AGENTS 
IN U^A. - CANADA 
350 WORLD-WHS 
FZE ESTIMATES 


PARIS Docbordei Il d tnoH o nd 
<01 ) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT sJSJSZ 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH LMJS. 

1089) 142344 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

USA ABM Von Umi lufl Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


CONTMX Costbustor; to 300 dim 
worldwide - Ar/Sea. Cal Chcri* 
281 1 081 fans [near Opera) Ctn too 


MOVING 


DEMEXPORT 


PAMS • LYON • MABSBUf 
IH1E6MCE 


Ml roving by spgdriisf. from major 


cities in Frcmoe la (A titles in the 
nance 16 
ESTIMA 


TaU free from From 16 j05) 24 10 82 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
fo Hie 

NTEKNATIONAL 


HERALD 


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AND SAVE. 


As a new subscriber to ihe 
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you can saw up to hdf 
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on your courtly of r es id en c e . 


For deft* 

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write to. 


Off 


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Or tafc Paris 747-07-29 
W ASIA AND PACffiC 
contact our load dafributor on 


rcM Tribune 


HONG l 

let IK 5-286726 


“ H e uBh Care Romotom in Reels * 
A comprehensive eosy-towe gude ir 
Engfidi from prenoftd to oeriotnc 
scad seam- 

ove Banter 

, 73.AvdW* 

at Brerttmos, American College. W- 
tage Voice, wH Smith, bookstores. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


DIVORCE M 24 HOURS 


Atofual or contested actions, low cost 
Haiti or Dormscan Bepubtic- For s4br- 
m otion, send 5175 for 24-page bodde 
/ homing to Or- F. Gonzales, ODA 
1835 A St MW, Washington D C 
20006, USA. tet 202-4528331 


A PBCE OF ENGtAID. Dane! Memo- 


rc±*o Package & plot in Hardy Courv 
try. LESSxTlax-awm 


try. US$400. fme-awere. Comae} Na- 
ry rtf. Owscon4» Farm. BandfartL 
Dorset. UK. Gci +44 258 880 295. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 


Engfch^ftrK {dariy/ 634 59 <4i Come 


HAVE A NICE DAY1 BoW. Kora a 
nice doyt BoW 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In Iho churning mountain resort 

IEYS1N: 

RESIDENCE LB FREhES 


Orarioofcmg a splendki Alpine panora- 
ma 30 min. from Mortreux and Lake 
Geneva by a». 

• you oai oral queity residences 


'rath indoor ; swinening j»ol cmd 


fitness fodrfies m on 
enwwnmert for leoure od sports 

F&J^ ArSF. ra tes 
up to 90% mortgages. 


Bari ri e nre la s Ratio s. 1854 taysn 
SWTTZH1AND 

TeL (025) 34 11 55 IK- 456 120S1AJ 04 


LAKE GENEVA - MONTKEUX. For 


sate to forrignen, 4 Hats, lake view, 
etfv from builder. 


-■ — w , no scries coruna- 

J uly 19fc. Eariert in* 

wdud finaiong ovakile. Contocf- JB 
IMMOBHJER SX. rue de Boura 17. 
1 003 Lausanne, Sratzerland. TB: (021 ) 
20 91 (F. Tib 24453 SAIL CH. 


Canadian Club. 

Lighter than Scotch, smoother 
than Bourbon. 


The smooth Jrtd distinctive tJsle of 
_ Canadian Club is appreciated all over 
‘ the world. Enjoy Canadian Club, neat 
on Hie rocks or mixed Jo your taste 


Since 18 - 58 . 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


VBLLARS 

WINTER & SUMMER 
PARADISE, 20 MINUTES 
FROM LAKE GENEVA 


to 4 rooms. A 1 
Foreigners. Forttshc view, f»gh guaB- 

K , selected residential areas. Prices 
sm sn 95,000 to 5F635ma Mort- 
owdable ol only 65% interest. 


gag es orasqac 
For riilih irictfiort 

GLOBE PLAN SA 
A*. MorvEepoS 24. 


01-1005 LAUSANbt Switzerland 
1 35 12 Us 3lB5 mEUS Ot 


Tel: p i] 22 35 12 T 


Sinca 1970 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FRANCE near CANNES Cota d'Azur 
310 ha, pcasib feyol tw o 1 B-hol egori 
comes, outfwriznhons being stucsed 
for hotel, hoiday anajeisvre octjy- 
rties. beta** AGENCY FRANCOIS 
GPOS L£ SOURETJ36&50 L£ ROUCT, 
FRANCE. (93) 77 20 *1 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


LISA GENERAL 


NOTH. IN AMBUCA’S newest fbg 
territory. Heavy Japanese kxirut con- 
centration. 46 rooms with cB fadfrties. 
3 fIijs acres of laid fronting on ocean. 
Room to expand Plan to add anoth- 
er 71 rooms. Suit to mr'l standerdi 
U5S3.9 nri Son. Far detofe tefci 
784715 or 783711 (Scrpon 
write » Mr. K. Jotroscn, PO 
2370. Saipan CNMI 96950 


MONACO 


MONTE CAUO 
PRMGPAUTY OF MONACO 


SaSto^very a xc e pHo rtal i 4 Me t i ira d 


sqjn. private Borden, ra 
dentid tno. center of town, colrj\ 300 
upm. Swi g snaae, la rge ent rence, 
reospGon, forory, aring room. 


ram, 4 bedrooms. 3 baths, 1 roomfa- 


staff with bath, large modem , 

equip ped ki tchen. I large Jpcre room, 
smal crfrice, large dresnrvj ilxxti gp. 
'agr, f»gh dess service: or condtion- 
mg, electric bSnds etc. 

cicusiYny 

AG94CE INTTSMHXA 
BJ 1 . 54 

MC 98001 Monaco Codas 
Tot (93) 50 66 84. Tb 469477. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


Center of MONIE CARLO 
PARK PALACE 

SPlBOD 4 BOOM APARTMENT 

For side, with fufy equipped kitdien, 
cellar, parfang space arid view of 

il- _. ,1 |t| | J ilnni-irn 

jncujiLJT unean ijiq run or nnonocu 

A.G.E.D.I. 

26 bis BU Pan e— Chcrlrjite, 
Monta Codas MC 98000 MONACO 
TeL (93) 506680. H* 479417 MC 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


Embassy Service 

8 Aw- de M e mwie 
75008 Paris 
Total 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1640 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


MARNE RIV9BANK 

LA VAU 8 C ST HRABE 
VILLA ‘ANGlO-NORMAfdE’ 
27Dsqjn. + mil guetf house + out- 
buiSngs. indoor pod, gomes roam. 
850 sqjn. garden GorogTra.200,000. 
m= 283 2002 


MARAIS ST PAUL 

in beautiful restored IBth century 
bufcfog, 2 rooms, newly redone; 

F675,000 negotiable 
763 92 45 


AGBfCE DE L'ETOILE 

SEAL STATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


AVMJE GRANDE ARMS (now). 

I, 30 sqjn 


beautiful studio, comfort, r 
eqwpped kitchen, beth, beautifrjRyr 
doreaF410fl00i (1) 200 00 38. 


International Easiness Message Center 


ATHNnON EXECUTIVES 


Mdbh, 
m tho IniamaSontU Hmdd TH- 
. wham morn Utann And 


of a mttBen roadon urarfd- 
wida. mast of wham two fa 
busmoss aid industry, w® 
rood h. Just Mur us (Ptwri I 


61359SI before IOoji i* an- 
that wo am tola* you 


wring 
bock , and 


wtt 


ml your m 

within 48 boas. Thu 
rata is US. 59.80 or fa ad 
ut yu va lont par fine. You must 
indudm e omplutu twtd verfff- 
ablo bSSng ad dr ess. 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MAY 27th ISSUE 


ON SALE MAY 20th 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


• Small b Beautiful: 
America's Hof Growth 
Companies 

• China: Beijing Is 
Coding Its Import Fever 

® Italy: Investors Cheer 
Craxfs Victory 
O Britain’s Labor Party 
Edges Right 

NOWON SALE 
AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


ONSHORE & UX 
LTD COMPANIES 


Inavparcftan and ma rjyem ent ft UK. 
Man. Turks. AnpiLTo. G um bw 


Uc ot „. .. . 

Uandi. Paramo, Liberia. Gibraticr and 
matf other offshore areas. 

• Ccnfideimd edvtae 

• I mm e di ate avaJabAry 


• Bearer shares 

• 3oc: irosriancr^ 

o j ae— 

a rAs: i •--■ 

Freo e uA-n tcnr booalor fr o m. 

sascr crsapozATE 

SatVtCES LTD 
Hood Office 

Mt Ptaramd, Deedo, tale of Mat 
Tuk Dous^s lS&24] M7I8 
Telex 628554 SSKT G 
Lurdon Pewesenh.e 
2-; 0« Bond 5: . LM9I Wl 
Td 01 -*«3 424!. Tl. ’A2V 5CSLDN G 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


Moiling - Telephone - Telex 
Full seer « and services 
Isle of Men, Jersey, Guemesy. 
Gibraha. ftancma. Ubena, 
Luxemtoorg, AnhUes. UK. 


Ready made or 


Free e x^J ci natarr 
Boat reflJtrctions 
London represenfatrve 


Aston Company Formations 


Dept 77. 8 VKtoaaJf s D^3s. 


hie of Man. Tel: 0624 _ 
Tetax 627601 SPIVA G 


MONEY TREES ? 


YES) Invest in one of America j mast 
eerihng technolo^cnJ hredrtfrooghs in 
a bGon dollar maupry. We have plnnt- 
ed mc>e nut trees m 1934 than ony 


other developer r cur Store. 

Kgb amd e tewn gt assured far 


tm,Mgi)ain- 


04OUIBB INVT1H). 

Matand naWe m En^th, French. 
German. Box 1993, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuBy Cndex, France 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTER 

COMPANIES 

UK. We of Mat, Tirks, Chcrrnel Islands. 
Fauna. Ubena and most offshore ar- 
eas. Conptate sLR»rt Focitoes. Very 

Staa eonfktertmfily. 

Free cartsultaSat 
Roger Grafts LLB„ F.CA 


Brochure: Corporate Matogetaent Ltd. 
Western House. ‘ *" — 


Victono Street. 

Douglas. Ue d Man. 106241 23X& 
Telex 627389 CORMAN G 


CCM. LTD 


Compones formed UX 6 worldwide 
ndurtng Ide of Man. Tirks & Cmcos. 
Angufla. Pancmo and Ubem. 


For further mformarion, please c onloct 
us cl. - 5 Upper Giurch St . Oourfas. We 
of Men, <na Greet Bman. ret; Doudas 
(0624) 73733. He: 6279W CCM Wo! 


MAJOR US HEALTH A BEAUTY ad 
as. wishes » ejptote twsness appa- 
tumties in S ra ta eH m d. Pnmanly irter- 
Bled m health and beauty ad prod- 
ucts that eon be e r pext e d to USA 
market and'ar m Zwrzr'hni 
vtcnjOTt-r. r-n c-r i-j- ,y -,r. 

:t«sm. Iice—.irc a 0 »h*. ir. 
tram. Star USA Healifi nd decuty 
Aid Co 7j44 Indcn Peak Ed. fating 

hfflt. CafifortM USA 90274 Aitentnr* 

Ml Werner. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

JAPAFM5E COMPANY wf» oad you 
m Jopan to hands your tnmixjmre 
or an art re ^our ogsri in import / 
export / raimadng, etc faose con- 
tad tbt J78699 iopan. 

PANAMA LB8BA. CORPORATIONS 
from USS4C0 avafabta now. Tel 
(D624) 20240. Telex: 628352 BLAND 
GirraUKl 

COMflASCIAL AGBIT Bdaum, Inm 

eh every 2 morths to New YoHl Your 
contort m Europe, telex 1)419 8 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

NTT 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 

ILSJL A WOUDWDE 

A ojmptate foaal & buaness service 
(xaveting a uman atttachor of 
nJented. vaTarte & mufrtingud 
ini«auah for al ocoaions. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 W. 56th Sl, N.Y.C 10019 
Service fanresertativei 

tel _k 1 IlfnHrli.erle 

TNecoco woogvtc*. 

OFFSHORE SBIVKZ5 

UJL non repdent axnpvees with 
nomtaee drertort, bearer ihaies end 
carfidereid batik accounts. Ful bock -up 
& mppu.1 senices. fanama & Liberian 
campons*. First rate oatiden&ol 
prafessiorvti services. 

XP.CB, 17 Wdegate St, London 
EI7HP. TeL 01 377 rt747Hx:k93911 G 

MVST 2 WfflCS in Better Health. 
Erter CanSactek Prevention & 
Health Rscontituiuy Fraonxn now. 
Bcgaat mevrsion, poocfffu Surrey 
(DUniry«te f rvghlv ouosnec nvtBU-i 
supervom. VisJ Enlon Mrcfai Ccn< 
be. Enton near Gudchning. Surrey 
GU85AL 45 min. LondwL Bna 
(042| 8792233. 

HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPOTT. 
Report - 12 countries ancdyzecL 
Derails- WMA. 45 Lyncfun] 7CE. 
Sutfe 508. Certeol. Hong Kang. 

tax services 

TSS. FO8MS0LY WITH LU USA 
mcome tax retime & advice. Service 
b» meal Tel P0) 383Z26 France 

USA INCOME TAX ADVICE & fa- 
tw m fare based US CPA 3SP 63 01 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


FCW YORK AKHTECT in Pans until 
25th is »‘la ntsd in btintj ygur New 

York connection jdt pffinei ,31 teal 

«iate kertiKes Conus a Our .-an. 

rtwel e>mi«ief. 10 ; 6.e VKjjr 

Hugo. Pans 16 Tel: 553 <* 65. 


EARN 30% - 35%. INVEST m short 
term ccmmeraal paper notes. AIM 
t:4. eo- Sil, Hornsonburg, Vir- 
9T.a ^jai. Ui-A. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR OFFICE M PAMS: THfX, 
ANSWBBNG SBMCE. seartmy. 
errand, ii Kjbcu . fnnj 24H.'day. 
Tet P*T 


609 9505 


IMPTTU5 • ZURICH > 3S2 76 21. 
Phone t telex 1 mix. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CENTRB 


run d rii e J Cx e cu th re Offices 

Tetax 


Cony l e ta erifa Saaatoid, Te 
AdnWrirotiitak Corporal# 
P e j xeieii tollu ii A Other FodBtas 


AMSTERDAM Eure ftdness Center 
taww. 99, 1015 CH Arntferdam 
TaH023j 2276 s. Tefet 16183 
AIHBB Executive Service^ Athens 
Totter B, Suta 506, Athens 610. 
Tel OOIJ 7796 232 Telex: 21630 
BOMBAY: BdmfQ Orabm 213 
Nan men Romt, Bombay 400 021, 
Tel 244949. Telex: 01 <6897. 
BBUSSBS: 4 be de la Presse 
1000 Bnasek Tel 2)7 83 60 
Telex: 2532/ 


DUBAI: P.Q. Box 1515, DNAtA 
xjLUAL 


Airfcm Centre Duba. 

Tel 214565 Telex; 48911 
LONDOhri MO The Stead. 
London WC28 CVAA, 
MSTthn 


Tel PU 836 8918, Tbr 24973 

MADfikh O Oreree N* 684, 
Mo*id 28020. Tel 270 56 00 


270 66 04. Tetax: 46642 

MttAN: Via Bocaxbo 2 

20123 M3an. Td 86 75 89/80 59 279 
Telex; 320343 

NEW YORK 575 Mbdaon Avenue 


New York, NY 10022. M g!2) 605- 


020a Telex: 125864 / 237i 
PASTS. BOS. 15 Avenue Vtdor Hugo 
75116 Pare. Tcfe 502 18 00 
Tetax.- 620893F. 


ROME: Via Savon 7BJJ0I9B fame. 
' 4 80 70 . 


Td: 85 32 41 - 844 
Telex: 6134S . . 

SINGAPORE; 111 North Bridge iRd. 
#11-04/05 Peninsula PI 
0617. Td 3366577, Ibt 


ZURICH: Renown 32 8001. Zurich 
n4 6in 


Tet 01/214 l 
T elex: 812656/812981. 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 


RJU.Y INTEGRATED 

BtSNBS SSMCS 

CLOSE TO FINANCIAL GNTS 
Rrmshed Offices / Cormwence teams 
Telephone / Tetax / Ma4 Serwces 
Word Pi 


Pnxerarw / Trcxdcrion 
Cannany Fmmrtion 

wtbbn£at»nal ofhce 


32 RemmcL CH800I Zorich 
Tet 0T / 214fini. Tb: 812656 DOF 

MDWltH WOBD-WD 6 


DIAMONDS 




Your best buy. 

Fine ai ary price raige 

at taxes whcfable pnees 
drect from Antwerp 
center of Shu demand Mcrid 


M guarantee. . 
Far free price S a wrte 


E bte fe S faed 1928 
PeEkaareteaar 62, B-2010 A n twer p 
Bdgnxn - Tet (fe 3]” 234 07 51 
Tb- 71779 tyl b. At theXhomeeri Ckfa. 
Heart cf Antwerp Diamond ndustry 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS 4 SUBUBBS 


BOULOGNE 16fh FLOOR 


Facing south, view, 2/3 rooms, about 
BD kui, 130 squn. filled lenucB. 


SOsoa. 130 squn. fitted 1 
TefcZ5 64 54. 


FRONT DE SBNE. Double living + 3 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, equipped 


Seine & garden. Teh ‘ 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBOBBS 


WHY, Owner seb bgh daa mod- 
em 103 sqjn. ryqrt un + 12 iqjn 
terrace. Lame avion 2 bedrooms, 2 
baihs,2 Wu,fufaKupped btchea, 
sunny, jxtrbag. FOOOJJOO- Tefc frtr. 

_Napp_(e«feJ 3W ^ 


PARIS 10m. 2-STAR W3T& 
Tab 723 91 89 - 723 75 19 


17 TH BORE Otartnog 3 roam, 65 
sqjn. fwmhad, 2 bedrooms, irege 25 
gnv balcony. Price FlflOQJOOi Tel: 


REAL ESTATE 
FORSALE 


PAHXS* SUBURBS 


RUE DE 1A MIX in attntag bulrf- 





International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


COSMEnc COMPANY 
leader In Rs Grid, wefts 


SECRETARY 

BUNGUAL INGUSH 


For its tedtnkd service staatad in 
BOONS 


We rapm 


• VerifxAfc references 

■ Termi mmdodma 

We offer: 
-Stabfapb 
- Hours: S/4J6 days 

■ 5*Aii"y and mutivuhnQ sooo 


Address hand written tatter. CV to ref 
to MecSa PA, 9 Bd des IttAare, 
Park, wfto wfll forward 


1EONCON 


Woridvrata leader 
automation retd 
_ r __ . rectum for Us 
NTL DMSK3N m SMNT-W05 
(mar potion] a 


PART-TIME 
BiGUSH SPEAKING 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 


fitr a 6 rexifh 

newcil^. _ 

wl assst one of our 
Good typing mxj ee p etisne e . 
HaGdayi in August potable. F ta sMe 
'sna hours, goad salary, restaunak. 
te aM Nt. COUSIRti 
991 92 12 or oppf y to TEOfrRCON, 
BP 10, 9OT0 DOMONT 


NTLEOUPMOfTMANUFftCTUB 
Stabm, (Norft Pvta] 
seeb for stofcJe pot Start 

BIUNGUAL 

SECRETARY 

(EXPORT DBAKTMBtT) 
GngUi mother tongue preferred. 


good French 


Send CV. Ir o ndwr 'ma n tatter, 
•rimy stashed to Cortene 
10793 •’ 

Cede* 


20, Av da r opera 75D40 
01 who wS furavd 


TEMP AGBKY 

BILINGUAL SKRETABES 


A adJ^*** 


H BipatkJ d y far 1 . w 

e ortradS & fu 8 me p ositions 

WORD PROCBSOR 


rue Coumadin, 75009 Ftaris. 
Tri. 742 11 50 


MTL NON-GOVBtNMB4TAL 
itaation based in flans is toota . 

vnomer kiw* cno wonang •okpwp 
edge of French & Germw. Uud 


secretored sfctk required,. WordPro- 


moo r mgeri en cb i^pre dcted. 
of Pers o m ri , tatemational OOTber. 


of Commerce, 38, Cours Albert lor. 
75008 Paris. 


MINBIVE 

Enofah, 

le oefar . 


Vkrjnr HuaOb 

ttj tftSfr 


SEBCS for AMSOCAN 
- FIRMS xr PASS: 
Dutch or German 
of French re- 
Btnaucd 
138 Avenue 


/STlfftrS FronaL trir 


URGENT WE l«D PHFEOIY bfti- 
I Engfoh; French SKWanH. 
rrhand, ward-aocenar. Tef PR: 
233 19 04 Am. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


DCECUT1VE ASSSTANt/sKntanr re- 
qu and for tafl b usmessmon fa fifaate 
■■ FrendyEngtah, abfal 


to frovri, ofggmhitap wttay^tfr 


ceptioos, tfc Age 25-30. i 




lira sdrey if abtal Send rasm and 
■ ' i to box 2189, Herald Trixmc, 
Neuflfy Cedcx. From 


SBCRETARXES AVAILABLE 


RBIAME SEOBFTARY, mature., rant 

farboords. trarefatwre. tow wd 


•asarSnsFSI&B: 


buna, 92521 


farce 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


EXECUUVE SECRETARY/ Asastore, 

jxxmg French woman, fluent Engfadv 
umeSptndL U 2 tx p B Tnnae , rad- 
* ' seeks rewording position. 

nilh Anglo-Saxon Exeat- 

Serious refermaa. Free now. 




RANDSTAD 

BUNGUAL AGBKY faly Btagid 
T enporory Otfioe 
tab: 758 12 40 Pereonnef 


Sped J xed in 

rtrtiy Quakhod 
Y Fuly Bfawial 


9 

} 


t-LACR Biff DElACRBWEt 

ary hefoiH 


K 


rary fvdp pea pta in fans. 758 82 : 


Top level secretary 
for our 

general secretary 


The aaneral .secretary of our company, a fast 
vtng branch of an- International Group is 


growing 

looWi 


king for an efficient and autonomous secre- 
tary /assistant. 

After 2 or 3 years in such a job, she ideally should 
be bilingual m French and have a good pratice of 
law in fields of human and consumer relationships. 


She would master shorthand and typing in both £j}| 


languages and be able to deal at a high level 
contacts. 


Her sparkling youth and professionalism will allow 2 j 1 
her to integrate our staff based at Paris-8*. 


f» picti 

reman ts under Ref. fHT/50-20to our Consultant 
or communicate with C.V. PLUS, dialing ^ 
(1) 828.40.25. on your MiniteL ^ 




Ressouraes. 

& Devefoppemenf 

*. nv cetakflrtiv ■ Tootm nuus 




BIL-IN- 6 U E 


ANGLAIS 


Fflfato (Tune socMtA amfaicaane 
' r * j n_?^Qa * CHATOU 


une SECRETAIRE BiLfNGUE 
LAJS. Ce posts 8 vocation 
commercials e adrssse 8 une 
yortitaire c o n fir me e excefieme 
dactyU» L Ble doit toe apta A utifiser 
desr machines a traftament da texts. 
Uns sxpdrisnce dans I 'animation et la 
coordination d'un petit secretariat 
asrait appreuvds. 

Celts .cpHaborstrice doit possdder la 
mmmW d'une vtotabte ire 7 

rtej do« done toe organtoto. discrete, 
officace et surtmjt fafre preuve da 
quaSttis d’kMathre at d'autonomie. La 
rtmmtiration annuelle ears fMemoa 
100 000 w 115 OOO F/an aSon 
oxpkneiKe. 

Adraesar'una lettra manusente 
a ccom pagotie d'un C.V. et d'una 

JSE&S? J88T “ r renvetoppa fa 


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Primed by gdz in Zurich (Switzerland)