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The^^^l New^wyer 

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• Ho^RRJ Singapore, 
The fS^Srabd. Marseille 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 16 

No. 31,804 - 


INTERNATIONAL 








Published With Hie New York Times and Hie Washington Post 

* ZURICH, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 



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ESTABLISHED 1887 


A Grievous Mistake, 




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By Thomas L Fncdman " print, 

Ww York Tunes Service ■ tween 

JERUSALEM — Many of Isra- 
ePs leading experts on terrorism ““s 1 
believe a lopsided prisoner ex- nc ^ 
Jiange this week was a blunder of , 
«e highest magnitude that' dealt ‘ 
long-lasting damag e to IsraeTs T 
counterterror strategy. ... wa& t3 
The everts argue that the dect- 
son by the government to trade t T 15 ' 
1.150 Palestinians for three Isradi 
soldiers has vnped out asy Isradi 
claims of never negotiating with ■ 
tenwists anA will, hi the kmg-itm, °“ an 
encourage Arabs to ride wtraHcing “9°y 
Isradi targets. • • “nee 

The first casualties of Monday’s t ^ osc 
exchange, say the experts^, were Is- Ca ?J c 


point, in the nature of the war be- 
tween. Israd and; the terrorists^ 
wrote Yod Marcos, a political af- 
fairs analyst for Ha'aieb, a daily 
senop^xr. “Until now h was ac- 
oepted that an Iacadx sottfier gong 
info battle knew, from the outset, 
and without any doubt, that if he 
was taken captive, Israd would do 
e ve r ythin g to bring him Tw* alive. 
This very knowledge was a source 
of strength to Isradi soldiers.” 

Now, con tinned Mr. Marcus, 


lid of 50 
Proposed 
For MX 

Reagan Offers 
Compromise to 
Foes in Congress 


M 




bt > “ By Steven V. Roberts 

ael WOtdddO New Yorli Tuna Service 

m bad: alive. WASHINGTON —The Reagan 

was a source administration has offered a com- 
promise on the MX missile that 
Mr. Marcus, would temporarily limit deploy- 


“the Arab teiorisi who embarks ment toXwesqxm. 


anon against Israd will 
same sense of confi- 


Thai offer Tuesday, in 
to a rising chorus of cc 


agay use seme jbkw ouaur jo a rising CttOTllS Of complaints 
^L, taa ^-^ 1C -n fc f W S.f al about thehuge missfle, would leave 
those who sent him win do ah they exactly half the administraiion’s 

4 lain aalam. *P * _ 




Bomb Kills 60 
And Injures 190 
In a Christian 
Beirut Suburb 



NEWS ANALYSIS 


rad's moral ar g um ents in the war 

! C £5Scd,” said Shkmo Aidysts ^ ca ii^’Se in to fu- 

Garit, the former chief of military - w^h ™ ^ 

intelligence and one of IsracTs “¥* tenaons 

chief counterterror strategists. Soviet Union nse. 

“Never again wffl Israd be able to ^ Vhal w’re trymg lossy is. let's 

®2gsasjg5 STjadiKSSK 

BSr’fifjitLsrrtH 


i*wi to ob tain his rdcaSC. " 

The terrorist who operates in Is- 
rad, Mr. Marcos said, no longer 
risks «mrfhw Ms days as a criminal 
in an Israeli prison. 

Why did Israel agree to pay such 


originally proposed number. 

Thus, the administration was 
conceding defeat, at least for now, 
in its efforts to fkld a full MX 
force. But the White House wants, 
to leave open the possibility of re- 


V; vi! 

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c .f‘’rl. tmugujjfp it is in France! Germany or En- 
■ •'“ vJ '' i r aimed hie gland. We can't -even say anymore 

»<uauie»tf that we are at Ac forefront of fight- 

>. »: • i:.’ ifo. [.os),- ing terrorism and that we will never 

-■ •' unc:i jgl; surrender to terrorism. That is all 
‘ TTfcfdfcnSL ; 

i-tr the famew t»k- -v Thedeat m IsraeTs moral armor 
-t.-;/' (he inj^'-^as the least of the damage;, the 
* iand.- Monel, n p'^ experts say. More serious, they sm^ 

,v.. !»ti cwitbleub “ rffcct swup 

■. u.uvtrrJb- * *4 have oh IsraeTs deterrent ability. 

: •>,. •’Sr^ i«ii tafliMr wI “ < * Was bn ^ 1 ^ lbrcal that 

........ ii... ‘"i -TT;. any terraria act committed against 

‘' [K P“«if kradis meani either sure death or 
life im prisonmen t. 

mmmhmhw Unluce past p risoner exchanges, 
RIAL FSTAH sbnrist all of which involved Arab 
ft) RENT.'Shl soldien; or Palestinian guerrillas 
— ■—■■' . — captured in battle, Monday’s trade 
wHl BBTlB was made layjy of 'Falestinums 
raunurrMMnr terrcaists convicted <rf murder and 
other crimes in Isradi cotrils.' 

At least 79 of the men freed were 
. '■ Vw £?§?' di^ptly temoosible for Idllmg Ia- 
•'.r -rivi'as. raelis and 380 of them w ere serving 
■_ J fe sentences NotonJylwere these 


the PalKrinimis. Not only did they Lef s see S wt need to go beyond 
meet with them once, they met that” 

them regularly over the Iasi three The administration’s suggestion 
yearaan&jrfingtoMr.Merari, was pronmted by a grow^Smo- 


Conqrileti by Our Shiff Fran Dispatthn 

BEIRUT — A parked cor 
packed with explosives blew up at 
au intersection in a Christian sub- 
urb Wednesday, killing 60 people 
and wounding more than 190. the 
police said. 

The blast, caused by a lime 
bomb containing up to 440 pounds 
of explosives (200 kilograms), oc- 
curred in the Sin d-Fil neighbor- 
hood in East Beirut. Several chil- 
dren were among the victims. 

None of Lebanon's armed fac- 
tions immediately claimed respon- 
sibility, and the target of the bomb- 
ing was not immediately dear. 
There are no militia offices in the 
area. 

The explosion gouged a crater in 
the street 10 feet deep and 26 feet 
wide (two meters by eight meters). 

■ ... I [he police said. It damaged the 

; a«Mn wa ]i s of multistory apartment 

A rescue worker bore a child’s body from a buOdmg in Beirut after Wednesday’s bombing, buildings along both sides of the 


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RaiESTAIi 


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ath unurnui.iaar 

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became too emotkmafly involved ^on to the ^icriiP on CapftdHfl] 
in Hurt cases and lost sight al the ^ a dear possibility that Con- 
wider issues at stake. . gress would inroose a much stricter 

“It created a direct emotional i^t on its droloymenL 
piwaire/on the decision-makers The Senate, winch is considering 
and deprived them of the necessary a y$± authorizing numerous nrili- 
narional petspecuve needed for tary programs, took up Tuesday an 
-con du cting pol ic i e s, Mr. Msari amendment that would rest ri ct to- 
^ tal deployment to 40 weapons, and 

• • Gmi sealed flns. assess- most vole counters gave the pro- 
mieoti Took, we nave already lost prtcai a good to na« 

650 boys in the Lebanon war. I Senator Sam Nmm, who spon- 
nnd ns tand the fedings of the fam- sored the 40-mtssfle limit, said of 
ffies of the captured soldiers. But the administratiem: Tm sure they 
we would have been doing a lot most fed the possibility that their 
more for the families, all the fam- portion would be defeated, or they 
Dies of Israel, if tee had told Ahmed wouldn’t be negotiating.” 
fibril: *NO bargain. 5 ” . Thp r?«wrin nnmvnil whn it fl 


Bonn Baclis European Technology Push 


uiua ouuraui laiocuunau. • -■* u r r BK l {i kAm>i Con«n. The Getfigia Democrat, who is a 

At least 79 of the men freed were . V r, J ¥ h ? d ” , t s 3™~ leader m the Senate on military 

directly responsible for «llmg I»- ba<±ed Popular Front for the Lib- issues, said he had a “negative" 
raSand^ofthemworeMTOig eration of Palestine-General Com- reaction to the administration pro- 
3fe sentences: Not only! were these • posal but was willmg to consider 

& exr*anged, but:aIXH^-fiO0'(rf - V*? 1 ?*™? re8SOa xmght .fortberoffas. 
them woeaDowed tb fcfieemSie^*'*™ 111 ** juice pmdbjrto^ SenatorNmn^ 

Israd and the occupied#anittn5es; r* ? r l Be “ s 0111 ® experts, is the ef- tratitm offer to bunt deployment to 
“Uisatmlesume,if notatmning (CouttnnedouPage2,CoL4) 50 missies was not really signifi- 
cant, because the bffl under debate 
contained only enough moaxy to 
place 50 (d the weapons in the udd. 

Earlier IMesdmr the Saute re- 
jected a proposal to eliminate all 
the S2.14 billion for procuring the 
MX missile. But the 56-42 vote in- 
dicated how strongly sentiment 
was running against the missile. 

Supporters of the MX, which is 
designed to cany 10 warheads on 
an intercontinental mission, say it 
is necessary to upgrade the land- 
based leg of the U.S. strategic force 
and to pressure the Soviet Union to 
bargain seriously on arms cuts. 

Opponents say it would not per- 
form either function because the 
fixed missiles would be vulnerable 
to attack and could even destabilize 
the delicate balance of tenor. 

In Tuesday’s debate Senator 
Gary Hart, Democrat of Colorado, 
argued for eEmmation of the weap- 
on and said, “It's not too late to 


CAS". J 


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By Axel Krause 

International Herald Thbune 
PARIS — Hans-Dietrict 
Genscher, the West German for- 
eign minis ter, pledged Wednesday 
in the strongest terms he has usee 


lhat their views now were “identi- 
cal" 

Mr. Genscher, speaking after a 
meeting with Roland Dumas. 
France's minister of external rela- 
tions. also said that France and 


vet his country's support for Eure- West Germany would intensify co- 
in, a French-led praect to develop operation on military planning and 
European cooperation in high tech- that their foreign and defense min- 
nology isters would meet soon. 

Mr. Geuschor’s support for Eo- 

reka followed a statement Tuesday ^^thattheGenscher-Dumas 
hv the British foreign secretary. Sn n»=Ung was auned at preparing a 


by the British foreign secretary, Sn 
Geoffrey Howe, that Britain wai 


meeting planned in 


UMIlUiil IlvnWf lllfll AAIIUUU nib' -m ■ — , _ _ / 

dropping its initial reservations ■„ bctw e f° J^ den I, F S n ,9 ms 
about the praecL Mittarand and Chancellor Helmut 

w . . . . . , . .a . Kohl with a view to improving 

Mr. Genscher amazed the U.S w hat Mr. Genscher termed the 
approach to en hsun g Eimopean Special relationship" between Par- 


partidpation in President Ronald 
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive. He described it as “Americans 
going through Europe with that 
checkbooks." He added thai 


is and Bonn. 


street and set more than 50 car> on 
fire, according to witnes.se. and po- 
lice officers. 

No one was in the bomb-laden 
car when ii exploded ai 2 P.M. .u 
an imciseciion crowded with ihc 
traffic of hiuneward-lvund stu- 
dems and workers, the police said. 

At the same time. Palestinian 
guerrillas deployed in the moun- 
tains fired volleys of rockets and 
artillery into Beirut's southern sub- 
urbs to reliew the pressure on three 
Palestinian camps that were under 
attack by Shiite fighters. 

The rockets hit several areas 
around the Sabra. Chatila and 
Boige Barajni camps in a further 
escalation of ihe violence that had 
gripped the Moslem part »>f the 
Lebanese capital for four Jay*. 
There was no immediate word of 
any casualties from the shelling. 

All efforts to arrange a truce hod 
failed. A cease-fire arranged Tues- 
day night through the good offices 
of a prominent Shiite cleric. Sheikh 
Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah, 
lasted for only a couple of hours, 
after which the combatants re- 
sumed their exchanges or artillery, 
rocket and machine-gun fire. 

Moslem leaders, meeting under 
the grand mufti, or supreme reli- 
gious judge, issued an urgent ap- 
peal to President Hafez al-Assad to 
intervene personally to end the 
conflict. 

A Syrian government statement 
issued early Wednesday accused 
Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization, 
and his supporters among the Pal- 
estinians of provoking die Beirut 
dashes. 

The statement said Mr. Arafat's 
opponents in the PLO should take 
over the Pales tinian leadership in 
the camps in Lebanon. 

This suggested that the Syrians 
were bringing pressure to bear on 
the Shiite fighters to renounce their 


The two mlnisiers and thdr aides declared intention to keep the 
denied reports of tension between camps under thdr own control. 


B r™f. r~~rf7, France and West Germany follow- The Shiite aim is to keep the Pales- 

rS 1 vJ ^ *** seven-nation axAornc in tinhns from re-aubUshing their 
dnlrtfe 30011 at which ^ Mitterrand nrilitary instaltatioos, which were 
blocked the setting of a date for destroyed by the Israd Army when 
cannot * osu ’ c global trade negotiations sought by it invaded Lebanon ihree years ago. 
our best Drams. Mr. Reagan and which Mr. Kohl The bombing in East Beirut was 


71» Aoodeted Pin* 

Caspar W. Weinberger of die United States, right, and 
Michael Heseftine of Britain at NATO’s meeting of de- 
fense ministers in Brussels. NATO ministers agreed on 
measures to improve nonnuclear defenses. Page 2. 


I n,,. &IUL-01 U HOC HCKUuauuus sougni uy 

our best brains. Mr. Reagan and which Mr. Kohl 

On Monday. Chancellor Hdmui suppewted. France also rejected 
Kohl toned down his previous en- participation in the Reagan re- 
dorsemeot of the Rea^n proposal search proposal in it current form. 

French offidals have said recent- 
based defenses agauwt missiles. He i y that Mr. Mitteiiand was deeply 
called it a risk as well as an oppor- _^ lh Mr v«hr c ciTo^m 

.ornty for to W«en, affiant ^ 

Mr. Genscher, who had ques- a senior West German official 
timed the chancellor's support fra said Wednesday, however, “AO is 
the U.S. proposal, said Wednesday friendliness." 


it invaded Lebanon three years ago. 

The bombing in East Beirut was 
the worst in (he capital since a car 
carrying explosives exploded 
March 8 outside the home of 
Sheikh Fadlallah. That blast, in the 


search proposal in it current form. March 8 outside the home of 
French officials have said recent- Fadhllah. That blast, in the 

ly that Mr. Mitterrand was deeply SU ^£ 

annoyed with Mr. Kohl’s suppSn of B f "bad. killed a least 80 
of the trade initiative. P“P le and wounded up to 260. 

A senior West German official Hospitals in East Beirut were ap- 


Fense ministers in Brussels. NATO ministers agreed on timra) the chancellor 's support fra said Wednesday however “AD is for blood donors to help 

measures to improve nonnuclear defenses. Plage 2. the U.S. proposal, said Wednesday friendliness." * cope with what the Christian Voice 

- of Lebanon radio called a “cata- 
strophic massacre." - 

In Japan, Taxes Take Their Toll in Public SSS 

. ' M. ■ twisted metaLThe street filled with 


v:\Vi* 


By Susan Chira 

New York Times Service 


much total incrane a certain tax gles of most Japanese in the post- 


TOKYO— To the 


stop this foDy, and foDy is the right wealthy and the delight 


«■ payment indicates. 

in of the But one thing is 
the curi- “>8 affluence of so 
asl week ct y- 


thing is clear: the grow- 
ce of some in this soci- 


Unul last year, the agency print- 
ed the names of every individual in 


word for the MX.” ous^ Japan’s tax last week «y- fered definifo/e proof, that Inc 

Barry Gddwater, an Arizona published its annual hst of the na- Until last year, the agency print- differentials are widening to 
Republican, retorted that the MX bon s largest taxpayers. ed the names of every individual in point that it no longer makes si 

“is all we have in tins decade” to The list, issued by the National Japan with a taxable income erf 10 for the nation to define itself as 
counter a continued buildup in So- Tax Administration Agency, offers milli on yen or more, whidi at cur- large middle class , Last year, 
viet strategic forces. He said that all a rantaHring giimrw nr 4n» my rent exchange rates is about agency reported, 564 people ot 
the arguments had been beard be- private world of the very wealthy $40,000. In 1972, for example, a nation of nearly 120 mini on 


the arguments had been beard be- private world of the very wealthy. $40,000. In 1972, for example, 
fore, when Congress approved the Some of the names are familiar, 30,000 made that list. In 1983, 
MX. such as Japan’s leading industrial- 520,000 qualified, and the tax agen- 

“I don’t know what’s changed,” ists. and some are new, and perhaps ^ changed the system to record 
be added. fleeting — the authors of a doduSt only (hose who paid more than 


strophic massacre.” - 

■ # i i # Scores of people were trapped in 

I -af-w a the mangled wrecks of their cars. 

L 111 B II If 111 , y Charred bodies lay among the 

twisted metaL Hie street filled with 
compared with 67 percent in the choking black smoke, hampering 
war years. United States. Are fighters and rescue teams. 

But times are changing . Many Aside from Matsushita, the list As the rescue operation began, 
economists and sociologists sus- of large taxpayers contained many ttie artillery shells fired from M as- 
pect, although they have not of- names familiar to the Japanese, lem-bdd areas east of the ritv be* 
fered definitive proof, that income High on the Dst were Sae and Shqji p” “i nearby neigh bor- 

differaitiflls are widening to the Uehara. widow and son of the for- hoods. People who had jammed the 
point that it no longer makes sense mer owner of the Taisho Pharma- stttets around the bombing site 
for the nation to define itself as one conical Co„ who each paid more for cover, 
large middle ^?>gg t ag year, the S3 millio n in mtpy Christian militiamen, pistols 

agency reported, 564 people out of Although some critics contend sticking from their waistbands, ran 
a nation of neariy 120 million re- that the new form of listing taxes through the smoke, dragging 
ported incomes of more than rather than income dims the spot- charrai bodies. Wounded people 
$400,000. light on politicians, 67 nevertheless cried from the smoky darkness for 

Every year, the list’s publication made the roll of 68.000. Prominent help. ... 

sparks complaints about national nmnng them was Prime Minister Distraught relatives stumbled 

t. lit. _ .t * l •* - j v/-. _ w.t ^t ...L ■ j itifmiah ?K** mrvinric nf 


cy changed the system to record 
only (hose who paid more than 


Congress has so far authorized cartoon series, television personal- $40,000 in taxes. This year that 


than S3 million in taxes. 


Christian militiamen, pistols 


Although some critics con I end sticking from their waistbands, ran 
that the new form of listing taxes through the smoke, dragging 
rather than income dims the spot- chmrcd bodies. Wounded people 
lieht on Dnlirianns. 67 npverrhrirss cried from the smoky darkness for 


. TV* Asoatfad Proa 

a Palestinian mother in Sidon, southern Lebanon, bugging 
her two sons freed in toe Israeli- Arab prisoner exchange. 


the construction of 42 missfles; un- 
der current law, 41 could be de- 
ployed and one would be used asa 
test vehicle. The military bin as it 
(Continued on Ptige 2, CdL 7) 


tax policies. Japan, like the United 
States, requires people with more 




Pressure Is on Pentagon to Be Businesslike 9 


£r*5a 




il' 


By Jeff Gerch . ' sona programs and that only a few companies 

Agtf* . C New York T,ma Senke can meet sperificatkms called for in Pentagon 

... - WASHI>KjroN--TbePfeat^on s^sitis t ^ 

1*.- bannin g to mo r e like a priv a t e h romwat a< Tne Pentagon also said that S500 million was 

-'.■'y record sums to buy mods and services, saved last year through more efficient acquist- 

. Nevertbdess, its critics m Cwipcss are draft- ^ of spare parts, that contract changes are 

ing legislation to force it to move further and nndergcaiig closer review ami that mere is wider 
uy - ® ,--'7.-. v faster toward suc h standard cotnmerdal prao- * nse-or nwcpendent oost estimates. 

« .'fj; tics as competitive bidding .and mpm fmj n p . The critics say the cost of weapons can be cat 
• ..how much labor a particular weapon needs. One asmucb as one-tinni by increased competition, 

’■ l. ‘jwch measure.was approved unanimously Meat- . . . ■ ■■ 

nitX^ve.to^,^ BHUONS FOR DEFENSE 

.!< imoorlani than ever. Of President Ronald Real . TT c 


ities and aihlerw totaled 68JXX) people. States, requires people with more 

Because the list is based only on Traditionally, wealthy Japanese 
declared taxable income, and tax have shunned conspicuous con- rates range from 10 5 percent to 70 

rates vary, it is difficult in some sumption, not only as vulgar but as pe ?£r }c .h,. r,«t in 

cascs » — W tar <0 ta — * 

lively considering lax changes. 

both as a way of increasing govera- 

• > INSroE I mem revenue and encouraging do- 

fiTYIDfifi/flPf) 7 — “ mcstic consumption. 

Off MyUoM'/lC/ The most dramatic plea for lower 

■ President Reagan pledged to taxes came from ibe hospital bed of 

e mffitaiv mdiKtrv Hun in other defend Honduras in case Of Kooosuie Matsushita, ihe 90-year- 


light on politicians, 67 nevertheless from the smoky darkness for 
made the roU of 68.000. Prominent help. 

among them was Prime Minister Distraught relatives stumbled 
Yasuhiro Nakasone. who paid through the mounds of metal, seek- 
S 100,000 in taxes on an unspecified “8 k5ved 0IKS - Children were car- 
ried out in the aims of rescuers and 


total income. 


But the prime minister was not put into private cars to be rushed to 
the politician with the highest tax the hospital, 
bill Eitaro Itoyama, the deputy The devastated street looked like 


ilL Eitaro Itoyama, the deputy 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


The devastated street looked like 
a smoldering junkyard. (AP. SYT) 


From a fiscal perspective, the debate is more .-*• ®MJONS FDR DEFENSE 

spending. S19I billion, or more, than half, has . • . . v Second of four articles 

gone to research and development or baying — — 

weapons. Those accounts now represent 47 per- higher productivity, better managemeot and 
cent or the miHtary budget, the highest such more effective incentives for economy. They 
proportion since World War JI. aigue that high costs stem from excessive labor 

The cost of obtaining the goods and services and management costs that the Pentagon know- 
may be so high partly because the Defense ingly aBows and sometimes even initiates. 
Department buys in a way nobody else does, Ibe largest part of the procurement budget is 

tolerating laiger payrolls, using more stringent the cost of labor, and executives and employees 

. Tam avi i*A f wn #n tiv» hirL ■ — r j * 


V " -.• ? V 

• -v 


<■' jjoeafications, relying less on competitive -bid- of military contractors are often paid more tl 

: .tj • ’ ^fng and providing special financial incentives, their counterparts in other industries. Profits 


ties quent in the mditaiy industry than in other 
gon private business. 

Tbe Pemagou often tolerates more employees 
was on a program than private industry would use 
risi- because it cares more about a product's perfor- 
ate mance and reliability than it does about costs, 
der according to Pentagon and industry officials. 

Pentagon planners arc re^xammmg the^ value 
cat of cost-cuttmg incentives that have produced 
ion, disappointing results and arc loolting fra ways 
_ to apply labor productivity standards. 

Qucstioas have been raised about some of the 
best-managed contractors and the longest-run- 
ning programs. One involves die Wichita opera- 
tions of the Boeing Co n a highly regarded air- 
— craft manufacturer that is the -uth-largesi 

military contractor. Boeing has invested £500 

minion to increase productivity in Wichita, yet 
jj“ the Air Force, which has reimbursed ttaecompa- 
ny for much of that outlay, concedes that no net 
saving has resulted. 

^ “We're subsidizing waste," declared Senator 
Charles E Grassley, an Iowa Republican and a 
tt is leading conservative critic of Pentagon spend- 
rees ing practices. 

ban “The secretary of defense is uying to fix the 
are system," said Derek J. Vender Schaaf, tbe Pen- 
dt’s logon's deputy inspector general He added that 


The Defense Department, says it has made ’calculated largely on the basis of a contraaor*s lagpn's deputy inspector general 
progress on sotvingmany of the problems cited costs; and critics say the practice encourages his office had received strong 
by the critics. For example, top officials say the - higher prices. Defense Secretaiy Caspar W. Wan 

1 , ■-■ l: . Z. - • • thK. Urn oc it HolnMwl imfavnnhJv nnm 


.-•*r .Hiy . oy uie cnucs.ror example, lopouiaaissiy u* , T v*u 

• T dfr number of competitively-awarded contracts in- Military contractors try to find ways to in- as tt aetiverea unfavorable reports. 

S . 1 creased 12 percent last year. The Pentagon says,' dude tbor labor costs in Pentagon contracts. In pinpointing the caaseof the pr 
however, that competition ismot practicable, for the ^cities say, adding lhat layoffs are tess fre- (Continued on Paae 3. Oil 


In pinpointing the caaseof the problems, Mr. 
(Continued oaP^s 3, Cot 2) 


INSroE 

■ President Reagan pledged to 
defend Honduras in case of 
Communist aggression. Page 2. 

■ Greek canrfkfafes avoid con- 

frontation in the campaign for 
dec lions June 1 Irage 5. 

■ Troops have reportedly or- 

dered 20.000 people to leave 
Tamil villages in northern Sri 
Lanka. PageS, 

■ The red hat of a cardmal has 
remained a symbol erf power 
and worldly prestige. Rage 6. 

SCIENCE 

■Dr. Carlo Rubtua, the Nobd 
Prize-winning physidsti nur- 
tures plans for ah ambitious 
new particle accelerator J*age 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Orders to U.S. factories for 
durable manufactured goods 
rose I percent in April, tbe first 
rise in three months. Page 9. 

■Royal Dutch/ SbeD Group, re- 
ported a 10-percent rise in first 
quarter net income. Page 9. 


mem revenue and encouraging do- t»t rw -m 19 W 7 

New Zealand s Leader 

taxes came from ihe hospital bed of 

Cancels Shulls Meeting 

trie Industrial Co. and the man 


ister David l-m ge said Wednesday 
he had abandoned plans to meet 


Mr. Lange said he did noi believe 
that the meeting, which had a 


trie Industrial Co. and the man CJ 

who paid the most taxes last year. Compiled by Om Staff Fnm Dispanba east Asian Nations, or ASEAN, in 

He paid the government 13.7 mil- WELLINGTON — Prime Min- Kuala Lumpur on July 8-9. 

mE? l ° isUT David s** Wednesda v Mr. Lange said he did noi believe 

SI mSSSk would have ^ abandoned P lans 10 that the mxting. which had a 
rripS wth Secretaty of Slate George P. mainly ASEAN theme, was the ap- 
!riSlS State of the United States and prupnate venue to discuss the AN- 

SJ JSse^o^ taS^is MiaiSUX - Bi ?. Ha ? den . ,,f ZUS dispute. .ASEAN comprises 

^TSbS^^Sshte Australia at a regjona^ foreign mm- Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the 
^r^MS ist^ meeting m Malaysia in July. Mppittcs, Singapore ahd Thai- 
where be now lives. TTbebospital is The parocipanis were to have land. 

close to the Osaka headquarters of d KC * lsse ti New Zealantfs ban on in Washington, Bernard Kalb, 
his company, a diversified maker of nuc >rapp°wrcred °r mid ear-armed the State Department spokesman, 
electrical and dectrouic equipment warship®- The ban has led to a said the United States continued 
that sells under such brand names 5? “ lo ** 10 ^ »** ^e gm-- 

as Panasonic and Quasar. Washington and nailed tripartite eminent of New Zealand, particu- 

Most Jananese. however, anoear c W ra S°? *?. AN?J S P? 01 ’ !arl y with regard lo restoration of 


with Secretaty of Slate George P. mainly ASEAN theme, was the ap- 
Shultz of the United Slates and prupnate venue to discuss the AN- 
Foreign Minister Bill Hayden -.f ZUS dispute. ASEAN comprises 
Australia at a regional foreign mm- Brunei. Indonesia, Malaysia the 
isters' meeting in Malaysia in July. Philippines, Singapore and Thai- 
The participants were lo have land. 


. .r ■ 1... " wuiwu iuwiuuw nusuoufl, p 

to sarve Inar tyn^athr not for and the United Stales, 

wealthy industrialists but for the “ auuiu ^ UK JUUK> - 

average salaried employee, who is Mr. Lange said: “There is 


close to the Osaka headquarters of dismissed New Zealand s ban on In Washington, Bernard Kalb, 
his company, a diversified maker of nuelarpowered or nud ear-armed the State Department spokesman, 
electrical and dectrouic equipment «*rahil»- The ban has led to a said the United States continued 
that sells under such brand names nuBt 5p: “ lo ^ 10 ^ «i* the go%-- 

as Panasonic and Quarar. Washin^on and nailed tnpartite eminent of New Zealand, particu- 

Most Japanese, however appear m the ANZUS pact, lariy with regard lo restoration of 

to save Sympathy noK jl'SLjSfS fiSfci feBr P ort _f CKS of all U.S. ships” in 
wealthy industrialirts but for the Zcaland ^ ^ United Stales. accordance with the US. policy of 
average salaried employee, who is Mr. Lange said: “There is no con ^ nn ^ n 8 nor denying 

blocked from the same range of evidence that a meeting in Kuala whether ships were carrying nude- 
deductions permitted executives of Lumpur would be a way of resol v- ar weapons, 
small businesses and fanners. ing this issue." Mr. Shultz. Mr. Lange and Mr 

A poll conducted in Japan and Mr. Lange, who is also foreign Hayden had originally teen sched- 
the United States by a Japanese minister, said domestic commit- uled to meet in Can Berra, Austra- 
newspaper, The Yommri Shimbun, men is and a crowded foreign travel tia, in July at the annual ANZUS 
and the Gallup Organization indi- schedule would prevent hun from meeting. That meeting was called 
cates that even more Japanese be- attending the regional meeting. The off after the dispute between the 
Keve that taxes are too high than do meeting follows the annual confer- United Stales and New Zealand 
A m e ri ca ns —83 percent in Japan, eoce of the Association of South- developed. (Reuters. AP 


schedule would prevent hun from meeting. That meeting was called 
attending the regional meeting. The off after the dispute between the 
meeting follows the annual confer- United Stales and New Zealand 
atce of the Association of South- developed. (Reuters, AP ItiTt 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Reagan Pledges to Defend Honduras 
in Case of ^Co mmunis t Aggression’ 


By Gerald M. Boyd 

New York Times Service 

Washington — President 

Ronald Reagan, reaffirming treaty 
commitments, has pledged that the 
United States would take “appro- 
priate measures'’ to defend the sov- 
ereignty and territorial integrity of 
Honduras “against Communist ag- 
gression.” 

The pledge came Tuesday in a 
joint communique issued after a 
White House meeting between 
President Reagan and President 
Robert Suazo Cordova erf Hondu- 



Mean while. President Reagan 
pounded his fist on a table and 
voiced anger and impatience Tues- 
day over congressional obstacles to 
his Nicaraguan policy as he con- 
ferred with Republican legislators. . " 

“We have got to get where we Robert Suazo Cordova 
can run a foreign policy without a 

committee of 535 idling us what we by members is sanctioned in the 


can do,” Mr. Reagan said. He was case of self-defense. 


alluding to the rejection last month “In the case of an aimed attack 


dora group of Latin American 
countries, which have been trying 
to reach a settlement of regional 
conflicts. 

U.S. and Honduran officials 
have been involved in discussions 
since August in which the Central 
American countiy has argued for a 
separate security agreement be- 
tween the two countries. Such an 
agreement had been_ sought as a 
guarantee of U.S- assistance in the 
event that Honduras was attacked, 
whether President Reagan was in 
office or not. 

U.S. officials opposed such a 
measure because it would have 
mandated assistance under any cir- 
cumstances. One American con- 
cern was that the United Stares 
would be obligated under such an 
agreement to aid Honduras in a 
conflict that did not involve Nica- 
ragua, such as the 1969 “soccer 
war” with El Salvador. 

The brief White House talks be- 
tween the two leaders came amid 


by Congress of aid to the Nicara- against Honduras, the United 
giiflq rebels. The House has 43S States will take appropriate mea- 

_ ~1 _ _ _ J .. _ O fl S .1 


attempts by the Honduran Army to 
relocate Nicaraguan rebels to sites 


members and the Senate 100. 


the communique said, “to 


His comments came despite op- consult with and support in a time- 
timism expressed Tuesday within ly and effective manner the govern- 


tbe administration and among Re- mem of Honduras in its efforts to 
publican legislative leaders that the defend its sovereignty and tenitori- 


mood on Capitol HID had shifted in al integrity against Com m u n ist ag- 
Cavor of some aid to the rebels. The gression." 


Senate was expected to take up a 
bipartisan aid proposal this week. 


President Reagan said the two 
nations shared “serious concern 


Presidents Reagan and Suazo, In over the threat to the entire region 
issuing their statement, cited the posed by the Communist, Sandin’ 

U nl it ■ ** n j il u itn rmm immft film* 1 rlln/iHil ir# Mimmn Wl/VIMmi'l TtC !•_ 


“close” and “cooperative” relation- ist regime in Nicaragua and its Cu- 
shrp of the countries as well as the ban and Soviet supporters.” 


“serious security threats that exist 
in Central America.” 


Administration officials said the nist 
commitment provided to Hondu- said 


“Honduras is a friendly nation, 
facing a serious threat of Commu- 
nist aggression and subversion,” be 
said. “There should be no doubt 


ras was in fact a reaffirmation of that we will fulfill our mutual de- 


obligations that are already found feose obligation under the Rio 
under the Inter-American Treaty Treaty and the OA$ Charter.” 


of Reciprocal Assistance, known as President Suazo. who spoke after 
the Rio Treaty, and the charter of Mr. Reagan ata White House cere- 


the Organization of American mony, said the two countries “mil 


not fail to provide assistance to 


Under the Rio Treaty, the Unit- each other.” He added that Hondu- 
ed States and other "signatories ras had “received security guaran- 


agreed that “an armed attack by tees from the United States. 


any state against an American state He said Honduras did not have 


shall be considered as an attack “aggressive designs on any coun- 
against all the American slates.” In uy.” Both he and President Reagan 


the OAS Charter, the use of force said that they supported the Conta- 


away from the Nicaraguan border. 

While administration officials 
have said that this move would im- 
pede the rebels' fight against the 
Sandinists, President Reagan did 
not voice this concent in the talks, a 
senior aide said later. 

President Suazo would not com- 
ment on the issue. He also avoided 
a direct response to a statement 
Monday by a senior administration 
official who said that the relocation 
effort had been related to the rejec- 
tion last month of the S14-miQion 
aid request for the rebels. 

The view presented Monday by 
the senior American official, who 
declined to be identified, contra- 
dicted statements Chat have been 
made by senior diplomatic and mil- 
itary officials in tne U.S. Embassy 
in Honduras. 

The embassy officials said last 
week that the derision to remove 
the rebels had come after the San- 
dinists had mounted an attack into 
Honduran territory, using artillery 
and 200 troops. Other sources said 
Honduran authorities fell the pres- 
ence of the rebels along the border 
was destabilizing. 



WORLD BRIEFS 


West Warns UNESCO on Media Issue 

PARIS (AP) — Several Western nations wanted al a UNESCO 
meeting Wednesday against a reopening of the debate on the potitiafiy 
charged issue of a new world information and communication order. The 
was one of the issues that led to the U.S. withdrawal from the organiza- 
tion. 

Some Third World and Soviet bloc delegates in New Yo tk sty 
UNESCO gave up important ideological ground by agreeing in 19© feat A 
the order should be seen as a “continuing and evolving” concept to be * 


.UV* ' 

HitM’* 


established over an undetermined period of lime. 

This qualifying phrase, which the Western nations and Japa have 
insisted on including in previous resolutions, was missing from a dorn- 
ment the UNESCO secretariat prepared lor the board meeting, France, 
supported by Britain and Canada, proposed that it be reinserted sh 
resolution. ’ ” 

“Let's not rehash old discussions,” said the French dekgaut.GiHtfe 
Hatimi. “Let’s concentrate on what is important. The text is-eebdkm 
provided those words are inserted," 




Aide Sees Reagan-Gori>achev Talks 

HELSINKI (Reuters) — The U.S. commerce secretary. Malcolm 
Baidrige. said Wednesday he frit quite certain President Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, would meet Bur be added 
that a place and time had not been derided upon. - 

Speaking during a stopover on his way home from trade- talks ic 
Moscow, where he met with Mr. Gorbachev, Mr. Baidrige da m med r 
report in The Washington Post on Tuesday that the Soviet leader was too 
busy with domestic matters to attend a meeting. “I feel quire sure there 
will be a meeting.” Mr. Baidrige said. 

He declined to comment on the contents of a letter he delivered to Mr. 
Gorbachev from Mr. Reagan and would not say whether there had been 
any Soviet response. 


Mffitary agents backed by soldiers assault a suburban Manila apartment holding after a 
five-hoar siege of an alleged “safebonse” of the New People’s Army, the mifitnry wing 
of the Co mm unist Party. A soldier and an occupant of the building died in the siege. 


Israeli Experts Condemn Exchange 
Of Prisoners as Grievous Blunder 


Republicans Denounce House Budget 

WASHINGTON (.AP) — Republicans in the House erf Represent*, 
lives denounced Wednesday as “smokescreens, magic and weight of 
hand” a 1986 budget plan 'cutting S56 billion in spending next year 
without touching Social Security retirement benefits, but joined with . 
Democrats in predicting its easy passage. 

-Ur. u>k m iLd hum in> ** .-(vu-wVii RmrevnUhve lMW ( 


We know where the votes are,” conceded Representative. Defter* JL. 
tn of Ohio, senior Republican on the Budget Committee, as the Hesse 


L to WlAU vI 1 1 ■ I UAUI 1 tl 1 1 fijV LaUa or Ohio, senior Republican on the Budget Committee, as the Howe 

° began debating tire S%7-billion spending outline drafted by Democrats. 

, nc , Final approval of the deficit-reduction package, which would. Hi* 

5 03 \jI 1 CyUU 8 Diimaer spending by $259 billion over the next three years, was expected Thors- 

day. Republican leaders, acknowledging that they lacked the votes Input 

er former duri of tmlitary mteQi- that Urael has, engaged. in store it 


(Continued from Page 1) er former chief of military mteQi- that Israel has engaged in since it r 

■feci on the country's sdf-confi- gence, was that it was only the bargained for the return from Alge- House ^ 

dence inflicted by the Lebanon natural extension of a creeping po- ria of an El Al airliner and ns yr g j 

war, and the deep desire by Israeli licy of negotiating with terrorists' passengers who were hijacked by U.9* ixflVY JUUIKS uollOi IO LSplUHagC 

... WASHINGTON (UPt) — U.S. Navv investigators aboard the aim 


decision-makers to be rid of ail 

vestiges of the Lebanon conflict, WT . . . , 

indoding remaining Israeli prison- W IVCS Ask F ardoil 
ers of war, at almost any price. 

For Israeli Settlers 


^ w>h allied espionage activities of his father. who has been nccaaed of 

£ spj ™8 S the SmiclUaion. the nosy said Wedrwday. 

S' iSk'nf ^nt Seaman Walker. 72. is being held aboard the warship, now docket at 

JSJsISIl' w KIwSawR Haifa. Israel. His father. John Anthony Walker, is u jaO m. BaWmore 

Cha ^ ed uith ntilitary SCL T ets 10 ** Soviet UrnS. The Federal# 
long tune ago and tins case only B IIWII . ^ i n vKiio>ihnn hat oirl rvifienct fmml eidsr imSatad thit Ok 


etz, “is another layer in the process 

of Israel's psychological enfeeble- tfditoat cm r rt n~,w_„ ,u_ *«og umc ago uua wise umy 

-S^JffSTiSfSSS tnkes il “n maemeni further." 

SiT.S is? foTihrS Israeli war prisrJners. the Asked if he ihoughi this latest 
win be terminated when the with- 0 f jg ,,^ 5 ^ 0 f a Jewish exchange would encourage terror 
drawal from Lebanon is complet- group awaiting a verdict in attacks against Israel in the future, 

t- imn m. I. : . , their trial for terrorist crimes Mr. Yariv said that he doubted it 


t inted Press Intenuinonul 


NATO Ministers Agree on Strategy 
To Strengthen Nonnuclear Defenses 


nrltnf S w ^f Arabs on the occupied since the Palestinians hare known 
negotiated with Yasser Arafat, West Bank went on a hunger strike for a long time that the Israelis 

S^nhLta, teTr pard0 “ ” 8C ” ia “ “ !hcy “ “■ 

t ^ for their husbands. “n«¥ie urfto MTU in mmmit !«- 


JJr® Ton inrrpm^n t n,rih 77 " ' Bureau 01 Investigation has said evidence found earlier in&ated that the 
takes it an increment further. ^ might have £en the source of some of the secret documents. • 

Asked if he thought this latest An FBI official. Bill Baker, asserted that the elder Mr. Walker’s spying 
exchange would encourage terror “could have been going on for as long as 15 years or longer," m& wore 
attacks against Israel in the future, he retired in 1976 from active duty in the navy as a chic warrant officer 
Mr. Yariv said that he doubted it who, with a top-secret clearance, handled coded material 


The Associated Press 
BRUSSELS — Defense minis- 
ters of lie North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, ending their spring 
strategy session, agreed Wednes- 
day to a “plan of action” for im- 
proving the alliance's nonnuclear 
defenses. 

A statement issued al the close of 


the t alks said the 14 ministers da lions which we have adopted 
agreed that NATO had fallen be- constitute a plan of action for the 

i_V_ il. o j nf ... n . — 11: wi __:j 


cure the release of a single Israeli 
night watchman abducted by guer- 
rillas from Metulla. In the end Isra- 


Two rightist legislators i 
the homecoming Israelis. 


hud the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact in alliance,” (he declaration said. 


el traded one Palestinian, who had they were hardly heroes, having re- 
not even killed anyone, for one portedly had been captured while 


watchman. 

“Now look where we are today,” 


military strength. Among the measures approved , . , „ 

To try to dose the gap, the alii- by the ministers was a plan for . J “5* . loda ^'’ 

ance must remedy several major authorizing the construction by f 11 * 1 ™ r - MeraiL ^nere is no mar- 
deficiencies in its conventional 1990 of 665 shelters for aircraft that ket price for trading pnsoners.it all 
forces, the statement said. would be flown in from the United de P cn ?? 9° “P* y°? MfE 3 ™- 


said Mr. Merari. “There is no mar- 


asleep. The legislators said the 
POWs should be put on trial - 
The Israel military, in a rare 
move, itself criticized'' the behavior 
of two of the three POWs, Yosef 


^SthS : l f l ih I =y t tad 1 ir Us Sudan-Egypt Pacts Reported Brdken 

“Those who want to commit ter- JIDDA Saudi .Arabia (AP) — The Sudanese prime miusiec, Gaanfi 
ror will do it regardless of what we Dafaa Allah, was quoted Wednesday as saying that his country would 
say,” he said. abrogate accords signed with Egypt under the previous government 

Mr.GaziL the other former army In on interview published in the English-language newspaper. Saadi 

intelligence chief, disagreed. Gazette, Mr. Dafaa Allah said that Sudan and Egypt cqjoyod a “rocoal 
“No one takes Soviet citizen relationship," but that accords signed during the presidency of Hgor 
hos^toi^eSevk^-SS General Gaafar Nimriri “did not reflect the will otthe people." . ‘ 
!TJS "We consider them null and void,” Mr. Dafaa Allah said. He fidnot 
Uni™ if " end Mr fi.-iTii WPOf ,hc 10 ^ he was referring, but the mqfor 


s rebuked ror will do it regardless of what we Dafaa Allah, was quoted Wednesday as saying tha 
is. saying say,” he said. abrogate accords signed with Egypt under the previ 

having re- Mr.GaziL the other former army In on interview published in the English-languaj 


Mr. GaziL the other former army 
intelligence chief, disagreed, 

“No Me lakes Soviet citizens 


In Japan, High Income Taxes 

■g-g- g-g gg j |, • Improve coordination of plan- 

nave Become a nutlic Matter ^^^“ rsus “ s ' for 

(Continued from Page 1) A writer of popular mysteries •Strengthen Uie emphasis on 
minister for construction, paid S 1 .4 slipped from the latest taxpayer in long-term pla nnin g in NATO to 
million in taxes last year. 1983 to eighth this year, with $1.6 coincide with the long-term plan- 

Oth ers were catapulted toward million in tax payments. Jiro ““B under way in national capi- 
the top of the list by windfall prof- Akagawa worked hard for his mou- la * s - 

its resulting from land sales, or by ey; he published 19 novels last year. • Provide more aid to Greece, 

the vagaries of popular taste. The Traditional arts, too, bring wraith. Portugal and Turkey to help them 
fifth-iargest taxpayer in Japan was Soshitsu Sen, the head of one of the improve their armed forces. 
Kenji Hirano, the 35-year-old pres- popular tea ceremony schools, paid The ministers also reaffirmed, as 
ident of a real estate company. He $12 million in taxes last year. expected, their long-standing goal 


would be flown in from the United depends on bow yon bargain." of two of the three POWs, Yosef 
“The comprehensive recommen- States tn an emergency to reinforce A ti “ rd .explanation for die ex- Gross and Nissim ShaJem. as “be- 

NATO's air strength. The ministers change, said Aharon Yanv. anoth- low standard, 
also agreed to: ‘ 


Uninn if vrm An ” cairl Mr r.-irii specify the accords to wluch he was refemng, nut toe mqor agreoaesM 
-oS EZ2S M * confinnauon of Sudan* suppotTor Ite Gunp D&mff 
nniv JL nfnhZh. between Egypt and Israel and a treaty calling for greater integration 

er vou rive uo five or 5 000 ” between Sudan and Egypt. Major General Niraeiri was overthrown April 

J y v 1 6 in a coup. ... • 


(Continued from Page 1) 


A writer of popular mysteries 


Gorbachev and Gandhi Sign Accord 
For $1.5 Billion in Soviet Assistance 


For the Record 


minister for construction, paid SI. 4 slipped from the largest taxpayer in 


million in taxes last year. 1983 to eighth th 

Others were catapulted toward million in tax 
the top of the list by windfall prof- Akagawa worked 


1983 to eighth this year, with $1.6 
million in tax payments, Jiro 
Akagawa worked hard for his mou- 


The Associated Press The other pact covers general as- Mr. Gandhi was honored Tues- Francisco Guerrero, in what the ruling Christian Democratic Party ssd 

MOSCOW — Prime Minister peels of Soviet-Indian trade for the day night at a Kremlin banquet was a move to reinvestigate political assassinations. A party spofeesau 
Rajiv Gandhi of India said next 15 years, Mr. Gandhi said. It during which Mr. Gorbachev pro- said many cases had been dropped by Mr. Guerrero. Santiago Mehtas 
Wednesday that be and Mikhail S. provides for Soviet participation in posed that the nations of Asia es- Aguilar will replace him. ~ (AFP) 

Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, had Indian projects in the power, coal, xablish a forum on security pat- The United States and Rnstia beg un scutiana a ri g rai n t^ aWedaaday 

signed agree me nts providing India oil, gas, metals and mach i n e-build- lerned after the the 1975 Helsinki under their long-term grain agreement of 1983. The Russian^ hare 
with $1 J bi Hum in credits for in- ing industries, as well as Indian agreements on European security, purchased a record 18.6 million metric tons of US. grain, mostly bora, 
dustrial p'qjKttMd oudhu-g m^. e mm t i n ^«sinte Sovi - Th , fc * Ihlier-ldtatn- . V @1 


The other pact covers general as- 


wadfires burned in 18 Florida counties Wednesday, but a break in (he 
weather with some rain helped keep them from spreading. ..- (UP1) 
M3ton Batfia. 42, convicted with an anti-Castro activist, Eftmrio 
Aroccna. in a weapons conspiracy trial in Miami has been sentenced to 
three years in prison. Mr. Arocena has been sentenced to 20 years. ( AP) 
El Salvador's par&nieBt has Ssnsssed the geaeal proseoaor,.Jp« 
Francisco Guerrero, in what the ruling Christian Democratic Party stid 
was a move to reinvestigate political assassinations. A party spokesaan 


its resulting from land sales, or by ey; he published 19 novels last year, 
the vagaries of popular taste. The Traditional arts, too, bring wealth. 


Kenji Hirano, the 35-year-old pres- 
ident of a roil estate company. He 
sold land in the chic Harajuku 
neighborhood, and paid $2.7 mil- 
lion in taxes. 


kojimj aeu, uie ueaa or one oi me improve mar annea icrces. 
Jpular tea ceremony schools, paid The ministers also reaffirmed, as 

1 - 2 . million in taxes last year. expected, their long-s tanding goal 

. of increasing each member coun- 

Pcrhaj temosl mtoalmg ao- ^ mfliiaryspoidine by ai least 3 
airers of sudden wealth were two 


hon in taxes. quirere oi suooen weaun were two percent a year, after inflation. 

Entertainers, writers and athletes 24-year-old cartoonists, creators of ^ ^ they wri- 

also ranked high on the IisL Tat- Muscleman, a masked wrestler resumption in March of 

sunori Hara, a third baseman for whose adventures appear m a com- anns ia ^ s between the 

the nonular Yrtmiuri Giants, nnirf 1C book- ilnitarl Ci.tM th. 


ular Yomiuri Giants, paid 

the highest taxes among athletes — The books have sold more than Union. 

$240,000 — but did not earn the 30 million copies, and the character “These negotiations w£U be diffi- 
most money. That honor went to appears on erasers, records, paja- cult, long and complex, and contin- 
the shortstop for last year’s Cham- mas and T-shirts. Their creators ued close consultation among the 
pionship team, the Hiroshima each paid a little more than $1 alliance partners will be essential," 
Carp. million in taxes last year. the statement said 


United States and the Soviet 
Union. 

“These negotiations will be diffi- 


signed agree me nts providing India oil, gas, metals and mach i n e-build- lerned after the the 1975 Helsinki under their long-term grain agreement of 1983. The Russia^ hare 
with $1 J billion in credits for in- ing industries, as well as Indian agreements on European security, purchased a record 18.6 million metric tons trf US grain, raostiybqsi, 
dustrial projects and outlining involvement in projects in the Sovi- Thr "-mrirt Irjirin- uM th-n tv -j during this fiscal year. ' UP) 

trade relations until the year 2000. et Union and other countries. General Jean Sairfnier, was named Wednesday as the dud of staff'd 

India signed agreements last The Indian leader landed eco- ** French armed forces. The air force officer, 54 SStopSat- 

week with the United States to ob- nomic and political relations be- vdSMTaSSSleSS. would Fran f^ Mitterrand’s chief military aide. He will replace General Jean- 
tam advanced nommhtary tedmol- tween his country and the Soviet firiSK? I IS 1100 Lacaze ' 61 - wI » « retiring. ■ Matter) 

ogy. Prime Minister Gandhi will Union. But he stressed that his gov- SSSw^tcS^siSnfto A new appeal fm$l&4 miffiMffl Sudra«a aid fedrou^vkSSi 
viHt Washington next month. frnmeni would continue to seek fi . t ^^Yimaer and oihCTsocial «» >ssued Wednesday by the League of Red Cross Sooedei 

Speaking at a news conference friendly ties with Washington and p^iems. ^ They warned that the situation might worsen dramatically. notes food 


India signed agreements last The Indian leat 
week with the United States to ob- nomic and politic 
tain advanced non mili tary technol- tween his country 
ogy. Prime Minis ter Gandhi will Union. But he stres 


ig, dt a. uewa uumucuwc umuuij uw mm nmhL’mc 

si g nin g ceremony in the looked to the United States for the * 

Mr. Gandhi said one of most up-to-date technology. Mr. Ga 


after the signing ceremony in the 
Kremlin, Mr. Gandhi said one of 
ibe new accords provided a billion 


Mr. Gandhi urged greater efforts 


arrived. 

President Li Xian man of China, 76, who failed to i refr e two 


Mr. Gandhi criticized U.S. re- throughout the world to end the ances during the past week, is suffering ftom a sprained bade, tbb 


alliance partners will be essential,' 
the statement said 


rubles in credit for power, ofl, coal search into a space-based missile nuclear threat. 

»nd machine -b uilding projects. He defense system and President Ron- 

gave no details about the nature of aid Reagan's recently imposed 

the prraects. trade embargo against Nicaragua. D . , 

He stressed India's desire for mjTwQXM 

doser economic ties with the Soviet 

Moscow Raises Transit Fares 5? ^ ToWer 

MOSCOW — City authorities a ceremony was scheduled dur- ]Lf* • 


Ministry, announced Wednesday. 


Moscow Babes Transit Fares 
MOSCOW — City authorities 


In Hong Kong 

we are in the Central Business District. 
And yet just minutes from Kowloon. 
You should be, too. 


announced Wednesday they would ujg gfj-, Gandhi’s visit to rename a 
raise trolleybus and streetcar fares square in Moscow’s Lenin Hills 


Britain Rejects 
Tower Block 
Of Mies Design 


Reagan Offers 50-MX Limit 
As Compromise With Foes 


Monday to 5 kopecks (about 6 U.S. 
cents) to match bus and subway 


fares. A trolleybus ride cost 4 ko- 
pecks and a streetcar 3 kopecks. 


district for his mother, Indira Gan- 
dhi Mr. Gandhi is on his first state 
visit since be succeeded his mother, 
who was assassinated Oct. 31. 


HOTEL FURAMA 
INTER* CONTINENTAL 


La ligne de cceur 
deFred. 





The Fred’s heart lines, 
one nouvelle ligne 
de bijoux en or jaune et 
caeurs pavfes de bnHants. 
Fred adore 
les histares de cceur. 


Hew err 

LONDON — The govern- 
ment rejected a plan Wednes- 
day for a glass tower block in 
central London that would have 
been a posthumous memorial to 
the modernist architect Mies 
van der Rohe. 

Patrick Jenkin. secretary of 
state for the environment, 
called the plan bold and imagi- 
native but said he had turned it 
down because it would domi- 
nate its surroundings near St. 
Paul's .Cathedral in the heart of 
London's financial district. 

Peter Palumbo, a British 
property developer, commis- 
sioned Mies to design the 22- 
story office buQding in 1962. 
He proposed spending J75 mil- 
lion pounds ($220 milbotri on 
its construction. 

The project encountered op- 
position from conservationists 
and from Prince Charles, who 
described it as “a giant glass 
stump better suited to down- 
town Chicago.” 

Mies, a German-bom leader 
of the Bauhaus movement, dial 
in the United States in 1969. 


(Continued from Page 1) urging a U^. -Soviet s nmmi t meet- 


came to the floor calls for 21 more ing an arms reduction. 


missiles, less than half the 48 new 
ones requested by the administra- 
tion. 

In other actions on the military 


• It heard titgectiqns from the 
White House to any amendment 
dealing with the treaty oh Emwffi 
strategic arms. One such proposal 


Nil Tuesday, the Senate took these would urge the administration to 


steps: 

• It adopted an amendment that 
would create a new military squad- 
ron to intercept drug traffickers. 
Sixteen surveillance aircraft would 
be flown in support of customs 
officers and other civilian law-en- 
forcement agencies. 

• It passed, 89-10. a resolution 


adhere to treaty pmnsioas, and an- 
other would bar the White House 
from doing so. The admixijstratiou 
must report to Congress by. June 1 
on how it will deal wiih certain 
treaty provisions limiting hew stra- 
tegic weapons, and it wmlsnooOBr 
gressionaf action until then, csx 
administration official said. ■ 


Ties 


2 

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■*i’ rv .*. . 
• . 




- 

.... 


i i> r 
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S--.VV- 

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■vSj 


in the Trib. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THl'RSDAY, MAY 23. 1985 


Page 3 




JVavy Stops 
Contracts 


With General 




V 


V L t. ‘ .V 

.. . '< ST. 


X . -’Ci v 


* ’ Tfc'l il. , ‘A* 

a I >4 

" ’’ “}'■ I ‘ llJl J ThK-. "t' ■ m J’ “ ‘ •“ '“" S VHIMM ^Jllflliura 

u Cor P- “brazen” and “improper 

D Si busincs s condoct, has slotted the 
•'h.n ; ,,u ' * rr a*.t, j. processing of up to SI billion in 

1 1 ' Ihf , contrac ts pending rafonns in 

ln,R &; company's dealings with the 
** 11 ! / ' k Pentagon. 

• *“ M Tt Navy Secretary John F. Trimwn 

IK ■ n *"> 14 Jr. also announced Tuesday that he 

'c;i l ; " l,,- v ^ “^5 would cancel rwoexisting contracts 

\. ... „ ; -V, ; i,! * ‘ tc 'iJnIi P • L worth a total of $225 million and 
■: • ... '■/ ? nvvT^t would fine General Dynamics 

r. . T.'ts “H. 5676,283 for giving gratuities to rc- 

y i • . . . ‘ ‘ bred Admiral Hyman G. Rickover. 

'» vGencral Dynamics, the nation's 

: ll,cS *iciu?^ mird- largest defense contractor. 
. ... r,lll > ' ! fnH/ n „ ^ had $6 Wlion worth of Pentagon 

• r.-» ( . r; . t business in fiscaI1984. 

‘ I ’’ J Mr- I^mum rgected a recom- 

' *- ,v ""tiviha [W? 1 “Mdation by the Pentagon's tn- 
^ spec tor general that the top officers 
of General Dynamics be barred 
HlHlIK^ IlOiicn D i from doing work with the Defense 
■i AJUfk Department because of evidence 

" Hie Min* ,-j they lacked “business integrity and 

.... tn 'pcnJaj ^ The company s condua did not 

M '^diu. hm L? 1 warrant such stiff action against 
. .... \\ the executives, Mr. Lehman said. 

. . ... uu- v*: .' ^^ Te,eniJ uvclk “I do not see sufficient grounds 
. v , *- ^whiik. ^ that would make debarment of in- 

f . ,t ' %j: ‘ i:i 1 r ^ rj hedh\!w dividuals an appropriate re- 

, -.lajec which spons^”hesaid.“Wiatwefind!sa 
.'..".i «a» eufcj corporate attitude that 

i / : i: ‘- U Led w® find inappropriate to the public 

■ , ; L . tnisL" 

Mr. f^hman also sent a formal 
^ .. letter of censme to Admiral Rkico- 

^ ‘'ill I or to Rsninm. ver for accepting the gratuities 
^pionai from 1961 to 1977. many “at the 
' ’’ ' :,c ‘ :! ^ u,r > A>ardik‘ “istigation of the admiral,” and 

' 1 ' " : '"' L:r -~ Sr.inun Mi^t said receiving the gifts were “dear- 
: »h.- iu* betssj, ly unethical and posably iUegaL" 

" r *‘rixh\ Democratic critics of the Pesua- 

i ■ *’ u ' :,i '* ar ‘ h, p.0' 1 »4st 8°n and General Dynamics said 

' ‘ i‘ in jail tn 8i Wednesday that the navy’s ded- 
■' '* v*ii« InuntTiufe Jon 10 freeze contract negotiations 

;j{i| ?t 1 ;d L3 tt j | T > was not lough enough p unishment 

. J. ^ :ri But they attacked as too harsh 

v . r - ■ -Ja-cutr Mi. VjJkfa Mr. Lehman’s decision to seed tire 

'■'i'..: 'wTder'ujj formal letter of cdtsore — tire 
•:v ::n -. j^hiriianat toughest action posable — to Ad- 
- u j rrjird miral Rickover, who has been 

called the architect of the U3. nu- 

** Reported Broh ^rU ch^ or 

ffSDtat General ITynamics. David S. Lew- 
u'gart is. announced that he would retire 
f p jiiaas by the end of tire year. Mr. Lewis 
. r said his decision was not sudden 

: ...... ! and that be had planned to retire 

• i'li- since ,983 - 

;l;c In the announoenrent Tuesday. 

’ 4 :. • :.i \ 'lj ttrte Mr. Lehman said tbe navy would 
il.t-TjT^a^Jold-off further procesang" of 
• . .in i caff pending contracts with General 
... ; .- CMS Dynamics’ Electric Boat Division, 

.- \ •.irji'nt indnding a planned contract to 
build the nation’s next half-bilhon- 
dollar Trident submarine, and with 
the Pomona Division, which makes 
missiles for the navy. 

r...' Mr. Lehman said the total 

. I-. ; r amount of new contracts being 

n-ii. t: ‘ aths.^ processed was between S6CK) mO.- 

* . T. . .. >, rcT&a lion and SI billion. None of the 
;-.ifc*5" cs ’ contracts has yet been signed. 

-xme. To get the process started again, 
... \\ iiAtracfs* he saM, General Dyiainics TOtdd 

\ have to establish “a rigmous code 

. .... viivu’t of ethics for ah General Dynamics 

- officers and employees with man- 
1 B j! - am I**® datoiy sanctions for violations;” 
x# ‘isasi-siu*-' ^ u^g; rework and resubunt millions of 

< dollars in requests for overhead 

• ‘ *" ‘ payments that have been ques- 

,. ;i . .^xf. turned, and settle those disputes. 

’ \\ ^‘/paslb He charged that General Dy- 

"* .[■ . i-tX- namics has an attitude “that is 


I(1 ^ ' ,j CoH&hdbp OirSt^f Fmn DIspatha 

WASHINGTON - The U^. 
Navy, accusing General Dynamks 


. - , - i :Su-} rr . 


^r H «**T* 

:£■;* . . ■ " “‘•Ts.C ^ 

:. . . * ' I.,.. .^C|3h 






Sail«»r toEs 


pionaj 



Later School Start Is Advised for Some 


By Nicole Simmons 

. Vort Times Serrict 

NEW YORK — Ata time when 
many Americans have been send- 


begin almost four months before 
they reach their fifth birthday. 
Children can attend kindergarten 
in many states if their fifth birthdav 


Like many parents interviewed, grades. Hie cUssa arc usually 
she believes that haring the extra small, and the teachers try to dse 
year to mature made the difference (he children indiv iduul attention 


for her daughter. 


ing their children to school at an falls on or before Dec. 31 of the 
earlier age. a growing number of year they begin. 


Rather than complain when their 
children arc placed m such pro* 


parents are deciding to have their 
children start school a year later. 

They have been following the ad- 
vice of a group of educators who 
say that many children who have 
academic problems in later years 


Critics of such state laws say that 
many children — especially "boy s. 


Some districts ask parents to ™ , " ren arc . P uaM m R 
h»vc .heir children repTa. ™nd “ J,C 

zanen d Ihej- are fomd nm in he '*2¥‘ ^ 11,4 iim m 


garten if they are found not to he 
ready for first grade or to keep the 


Eighty-three percent of the par- 


-ta'-wtar f, 7 

nNomdinaud onip » begm for tindergenen. ' ' 


writing at that age. 

Manv school dtstricts around the 


,ur ununfi-i opmental tests last year agreed to 

Transitional programs, usually place them in pre-first grade. Dr 
called “prc-kinder§anen M and Coffey said. The rot went on to j 
“ pre-first’ classes, arc gaining in regular first-grade classroom. A 






Tha Naw VMl Tms 


A B-52 bomber undergoes mo^icatioa at die Boeing Mffitaiy Air plan e Co.’s plant at 
Widnta, Kansas, ffie Imgest aerospace complex in the warkL The Air Force says a $500- 
mUfion investment to increase the plant’s productivity failed to result in a net saving. 

Congress Insists That Pentagon Adopt 
Businesslike Practices of Industry 


Led by Louise Bates Ames, asso- be ‘J es J t 
date director of the GeseD Institute sc “ 00 '- 
of Human Development, a private Such 
research center in New Haven, andRc 
ConncciicuL these educators say rahwaj 
that children should be placed in ’ 
school based on what Dr. Ames a 8f.?*‘ 
calls their behavioral rather than 
chronologicaj age. Dr. Ames, a 
child psychologist, and other pro- wT ° n B ’ 
ponents of tire idea say that be- Bu > 
cause children mature at different wbo ,s 
rales, how old they act should be garten. 
more important than bow did they 
are. ohe 

“Little bodies are not geared for Mrs. Ri 
academic tasks,” which, more and 


dergarten and fim-grade pupils to favor - ,n lhese Plants the child yat later, she said, the children 
be tested to see if th«- are ready for lakes lhree » complete the whose parents had chosen the pre- 
sehopj first two years of school, generally first program scored higher on acj- 

Such tests showed that Claire entering second grade at the age of denuc tests than those who were 
and Robert Rewald’s daughter Sa- s - but no ‘ actually repeating raw in the program. 


rah was not quite reads 1 for kinder- 
garten when she took the lest at the 
age of 4 in Rochester. Michigan. 

“My first reaction." Mrs. 
Rewald said, “was, ‘Oh. no. what’s 
wrong with my kidT ” 

Bul Mrs. Rewald said. Sarah, 
who is now 6 and f inish ing kinder- 
garten. has become more sure of 
herself. 

“She is a different kid this year." 
Mrs. Rewald said. 


(Continued from Page 1) menu, which lead to increased pro- tire investment of 5500 million 
Vander Scfaaaf rated “government- doctivity and lower costs. since 1977 in the Boeing Military 

forced regulations or require- For the last five yean the incen- Airplane Co. in Wichita, a division 
menu” and “niceties laid on” by lives have helped increase mDitary of the corporation that owns and 
the contractors. contractors’ profits, which have operates the largest aerospace com- 


Industry S'e.’jSS Geologists Predict 

•*' with the school system of Fairfax _ _ ° 

the investment of 5500 million County. Virginia. No matter how MOUIlt St. nPl PlIS 
1977 in the Boeing Military bright, she said, some 4- and 5- 


menu and td 
the contractors. 


Contractors, echoing Mr. Van- been wefl in excess of tire average 
der SchaaFs statement about execs- for large manufacturers, but there 
sive reg ulation, say they want less are questions about whether the 
interference. aerated mvNtmMft find cnvin.c 


of the corporation that owns and 
operates the largest aerospace com- 
plex in the world. 

Tbe air force will reimburse 
much of the $500 million. Accord- 


axxta Wffl Erupt Soon 

e com- enough to handle the paper work or United Press tmernamikii 



\ \ .W 


enough to handle the paper work or 
patient enough to st still at their 


One opponent of the concept is 


The Pentagon and contractors have resulted. 


expected inwstnrenU and savings to a Boeing statement provided Sa ?\ c " c ¥ ,i Ye d “?£ or 

have rented. m response to questions, the “pri- of the Nauonal Asrooauon of Ele- 

Tfto Pmraonii anil rtntmw aw 1 t __ nwriTJirv .vh/Vil PnnntY> c a/bn 


, Thc P ? tagon “ d C . 0a ^ ss m maryrasais” for tire investment SchoolPrincipaJs. who 

extent tfi WMl trPJMIrArlfW COH- nlcn chiAvnno nmilnntnNtir f/v ma ^ i ■ mniPnnc f n9t HlflVino niinilc rmmf 


extent to winch frewnaricet con- also studying productivity to see SzSL lo —w thmuph in- ““tends that making pu^ls repeat 
txpU can be apphral, m part be- whether companies need so many orodnetivity and expan- a Sra dc “is the easy way oul” 

empha_ employees to make their products, sion to enable tire company loteke The movement to hold back 
szes reuaduny and penomance in the private sector, companies OT additional wort" some young children comes at a 

over savings. - — — 


acquis i tion empha- employees to make their p roduc ts 
r and performance in the private sector, companies 
eager to maintain profit margins 


The movement to hold back 


VANCOUVER. Washington — 
Scientists predicted Wednesday 
that an eruption, possibly an explo- 
sive one. will reoccur soon at 
Mount St. Helens in southwest 
Washington. 

Tbe scientists, who have predict- 
ed 15 of the volcano’s 17 eruptive 
episodes since the devastating 1 980 


X - 


Mr. Grassiey has complained of are quicker to lay off employees A substantial portion of this 
inefficiency on thc F-16 lighter, a when business dedines. investment has benefited military 

long-running, 550-billion weapons There are some similarities be- A* statonent said. But 

program of General Dynamics tween chriHan and military mar- “* “■ force * 4150 1Q a statement 
Corp. Mr. Grassky, rating compa- kets. For example, commercial and prepared in response to questions, 
ny data received by tire Senate military aircraft use «*™iar design a ddferem perspective. 
Budget Committee, said tire F-16 features and components. Bui Pen- “The benefits to the government 


“A substantial portion of this m AmYnrh Z vE* q3c 

investment has benefited military A “~ Ncw - York Sla «j 
,VVrX..r.r7.^Tn . education commissioner, would 


some young children comes at a blast that left 57 people dead or 
time when educators like Gordon missing, expect a “dome-building" 
M. Am bach. New York Slate’s eruption within two weeks, possi- 
prmtrtMc - iiw* cmtnnmi catii Rut education commissioner, would bly in the next few days. 

iht air ta^also in a su£nS cMdr “ OT1CT schoo) 31 Scien . lists « 

to 8,1 “riter age. continuing to swell at increased 

aawa^ffeiSDeisDecln^^ Ambach says that research rates, a few* inches a day. 

gave a auierem perspective. an formal classes for 4-year-olds, Small shallow earthquakes are 

“The benefits to the government which have been available on an occurring regularly beneath the 
from this type of investment are experimental basis in New York 8365-foot (about L550-meier) vol- 


if:.. 


f actory* s efficiency dropped to 33 tagon officials say differences in from this type of investment are experimental basis in New York 
percent from 70 percent m the last the two markets make it infeasible not reflected in lower costs, but state, “shows that these programs 


’ 1 ‘i“: v. :rt di^unot 

” r ‘ ’ '-‘■•-•'In Mi.Wjliff'.f 


net- Reported Brob 


20 months. 

Many in Congress, Hke Repre- 


to use compebtum in many areas. 
Mr. Courier and others have in* 


senrative James A. Courter, Re- trodneed l^slation in tire House adding that “any net savings" from He conceded, however, that dif- 
pobhean of New Jersey, are push- to require the ratio erf competitive the investments “will not be real- ferent children are ready to start 

niff fnr TnmKMl rrwnrv* f i Ii ai i n n l. -■ - w ■ ■ j-n* . J 


rather in improved performance or are very effective and that me re- 

reliability,” the statement said, salts last.” 

adding that “any net savings" from He conceded, however, that dif- 


ing for increased competition. 

“In a society where people recog- 
nize the importance of competi- 
tion, it seems strange thai the Pen- 


contracts to rise gradually to 70 ized in the near term. 

percent, a move opposed by the 

Pentagon. Next: The conflict 

On Monday, the Senate voted. Congress. 


tagon uses a different model,” said 89-0, to adopt an amendment re- 
Mr. Courier, a member of the quiring the secretary to use 
Horae Armed Services Committee, at least two sources of production 
The committee has called for com- for major m nlrart^ rinlw; tw npp ld 
petition between tbe F-16 and a prove that competitive bidding 
plane called the F-20 made by Nor- would cost more or endanger na- 
throp Corp., another major mui- Qonal security, 
laiy contractor. The amendment, attached to a 

Richard Stubbing, who was a $232-bfllion miljiary spending biD, 
military expert with the Office of ■ also would require the Pentagon to 
Man a gem ent and Budget, said-tire order a study erf &Q noncompetitive 
lack erf competitive bidding al- contracts, estimating what each 


lowed contractors to keep large project would cosL ~ 
payrolls. „■ Mr. Coulter has applauded some 

Ha said contractors were also Pentagon efforts, such as the Air 
able to maintain their labor base Force’s saving of biffians of dollars 
even without new governmentpro- by buying aircraft en gines fmm 
duction contracts, under which two sources anf i increases in cora- 


id m the near terra. school at different ages. 

One reason manytmdergartners 

Next: The conflicting forces in lack the maturity of a 5-year-old is 
ongress. that some stales permit them lo 


cano, they said. “Earthquake rates 
are generally the same and we’re 
holding to the forecast." a \JS. 
Forest Service spokesman said 
Until the recent activity, the vol- 
cano had been calm for eight 
months, the longest period of quiet 
since Mount Sl Helens revived five 
years ago. 


The Centurion Executive. IK karat gold, l^uartz. 
Water-resistant. With sweep-second hand; da> and date. 
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CHAUMET 

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[I 


new weapons are built. Mr. Stub- petitivety awarded Navy contracts 
bmg rat ed Grumman Corp., which to 36J7 percent from 26.7 percent 
has not won a new aircraft produc- over the last three years, 
lion contract since 1970, although Mr. Grassiey, »«ng a stria defi- 


L’.-ii'.nm! 


it has received contracts to mod- nition of competition, puts the I 


enure existing aircraft. oven 

According to company reports, perce 
Grumman employed 30, W0 people gnn’s 
attheendof 1984, up from 28,100 a Th 
decade earlier, most of them work- year 
ing on military projects. In tire last its 51 


overall Pentagon rate al about 5 
percent, compared with the Penta- 
gon's own figure of 43 percent. 

The Defease Department last 
year spent just over 50 percent of 
its $133 bilfioa in procurement dol- 


Ftom trading to textiles, from shipbuilding to auto 
making, from heavy machinery to high finance; from 
electronics to telecommunications, Korea's Daewoo 
has proved its expertise in many areas, and finds itself 


a trusted partner of many of the world's top businesses. 

So, the next time your company asks, "Who can 
get the job done?" You'l know who. 


• H.- 

f> j. MC- Ik 




S:- ?' '± 


... *••• • » , 

• r 


fc \jased on maximizing profits witb- 
;> odt regard for the public trust” 

£ - Tuesday’s move was the govern- 
f meat’s latest aetkm against Gener- 
al Dynamics. For several memths, 
- the cotxqjany has beep under fire 
from the Pentagon and Congress 
for improper tamng practices, gift- 
-- giving and other irregniarities. 

, The Pentagon is withholding 
_ f 5308 mi Hi on in payments to Gener- 

| k \] \ al Dynamics for expenses tied to 

»)’' ■*' weapons contracts until tbe daims 

- • • I 0811 ** au<b te d- Previous claims in- 

• Vk .111 f Uk 7 duded charges for kemreKng a cor- 
■ 11^0 " 111 porate officer’s dog and other ex- 

1 peases found to be ftivtrious. 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
' Weinberger in March suspended 
"liment of overhead claims by die 
r company and Mr. Txhman said 

* “otMi improper practices of the 
f company" required “adtfiuonal ao- 
■ tion on my part.” 

’ Among the practices he cited 
' were that “in 1981 General Dy- 

• namics Electric Boat IMviskm put 
: forward brazen insurance claims 


three years, 81 percent of the com- lars with the top 25 companies, up 
party’s sales have been to the U.S. from 43B percent in 1981. 
government _ The Pentagon is concerned 

Joseph Vranich. a spokesman for about tbe increasing vulnerability 
Gnunman’s Washington office, of its largest contractors to redno- 
said that decile tire lack of recent tious in mflitary spending. On tire 
new production contracts, a large aver age, die top 10 companies, ac- 
staff was needed for the company's cording to their annual reports, do 
work in integrating complicated morethan 50 percent of their bua- 


dectrouics systems into militar y ness with the U S government, 
aircraft ‘The employment effect Forty-two percent of Boeing’s 
of modification work, he said, “is caW, for example, are to tbe gov- 
almost as \A& as building from eminent- Most of the rest of its 
Scratch." business is sales Of rmnmBfrial air - 

In contrast to companies like craft to airtines in tbe United States 
Boeing, he noted, Grumman bad and abroad. General Dynamics 
avoided a lot of layoffs. Over the does 86 percent of its business with 
last 10- years, Gnuum art’s net the gover nment. 
worth, on a per-share, baas, has Concern about the financial 
doubled. health of contractors has led to 

Later this month tire P entag on increased incentives to improve 
wiD complete its first study in a productivity, bat studies in 1982 
decade into finan cial incentives and 1983 by the Air Force and the 
and contractor profits, and the House Ap pr opriations Committee. 
General Accounting Office is mon- found that the incentives were not 
fari ng tin t study for Congress, effective and had cost the govern- 
The Pentagon’s rationale for the ment bflBons of dollars, 
incentives is that increased con- One case that illustrates the role 
tractor pnrfits lead to mare invest- of such Pentagon incentives was 


DAEWOO. THAT'S WHO I 


Every piece of jewerly has a story to tell. 




xes 


IV' 


vlM- 


ligencc and faulty workmanship. 

Last week. General Electric Co, 
tbe fourtb-iargest mohair contrac- 
tor, pleaded guilty to defranding 
the government on a contract for a 
Minuteman nuclear warhead sys- 
tem. (AP, UPI) 


*y.S. Coirvicts Man 
In Abortion Blasts 

The A meuaed Press 

BALTIMORE — An American 
Lutheran lay minister has been 
convicted of conspiring to bomb. 10 
abortion dmics in three states- and 
the District erf Columbia. 

A U.S. District Court jury also 
found Michad D. Bray, 32, of Bow- 
ie, Maryland, guilty Tuesday on 
one count of obtaining destructive 
devices but acquitted nim on two 
counts. . . 

- pit. Bray was charged vnth two 
other men in connection with 
bombings, burnings or attempts to 
rta may dinicx jn Maryland. Dela- 
ware, Virginia and Washington 
from January 1984 through Janu- 
ary 1985. He faces a possible 20- j 
year prison term. . - 


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- Page 4 


THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Jteralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Pobfehed WUh The New York Time* ind Tbr WaAingtoo Port 


Defense Scandals: A Cure 


tribune A Far-Reaching Loss for Kohl 

By Philip Geyelin 


W' 


"I'm tired of reading about the scandals, 
and Fm tired of going home and apologizing 
for them,” fumed Senator Dale Bumpers of 
Arkansas, referring to the way the Pentagon 
buys weapons. But he and 88 colleagues then 
voted for a remedy that will change little. The 
only cure for the disease still seems too radical 
for Congress. It is called capitalism. 

Martin Marietta Corp. bills the Pentagon 
for golf course fees. The coffee maker designed 
by the air force for its C-SA cargo plane costs 
$7,622. Hughes Aircraft Co. makes missiles so 
flawed that the air force shut down its produc- 
tion lines last year. All are different symptoms 
of the same disease — the Pentagon's self- 
exemption from market forces. 

The system endures, however, because of its 
benefits for the interested parties. Free from 
the rigors of open competition. Pentagon offi- 
cials can “gold-plate" and modify weapons 
regardless of cost. Contractors paid on a cost- 
plus basis find that profits rise, not fall as 
costs increase. Each year hundreds of officers 
leave through a revolving door to work for the 
contractors they cosseted while in office. Con- 
gress is the third side of the triangle, submit- 
ting to pressure from contractors who promise 
to create or withhold jobs in states whore they 
need the congressmen's votes. 

Congress has tried piecemeal reform, with 


.more oversight or reporting requirements. But 
that only in tensifies the bureaucratic bind- 
weed in the Pentagon's swamp of socialism. 
The true solution is competition, both when a 
weapon is designed and produced. 

The Pentagon says 70 percent of its procure- 
ment is competitive. But this is mostly compe- 
tition in which the Pentagon negotiates with a 
few favored contractors, then chooses a winner 
who becomes the sole source of the product. 
The Pentagon also counts as competitive the 
perpetual renewal of such contracts. 

The new reforms just adopted by the Senate 
do little to touch the system They advocate' 
dual sourcing — having at least two contrac- 
tors for each weapon and dividing production 
between them according to annual bids. But 
the Senate bill permits so many exceptions 
that dual sourcing is uncertain to increase. 

A belter approach is the “creeping capital- 
ism'’ bill that Senator Charles Grassley lowa 
was to reintroduce ihis week. It would have the 
Pentagon raise the dollar share of its contracts 
let competitively, through advertising and 
sealed bids, by just 5 percent a year, from the 
present 5 percent on up to 70 percent That is a 
prudent approach. Capitalism is strong medi- 
cine, and too large a dose could paralyze a 
patient so little used to it 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Accounting for Inflation 


Anyone who knows how much inflation 
there will be in military equipment costs be- 
tween now and 1988 is urged to get in touch 
with Congress, so it will not keep giving the 
Pentagon more money than it needs. Chair- 
man Us Aspin of the House Armed Services 
Committee calculates (hat in four years, the 
Defense Department has received at least 
518 billion, perhaps $50 billion, extra by over- 
estimating inflation. 

Some error was inevitable; the moderation 
of price increases surprised everyone. But 
some was also the result of Pentagon padding 
and congressional negligence. Mr. Aspin has 
flagged a procedure that needs lightening. 

When Congress authorizes any procurement 
it includes a cushion for possible price in- 
creases. The Pentagon claims it needs a special 
price index, and it has been consistently high.. 
The miscalculations are not always in the Pen- 
tagon's favor. In the 1970s, like everyone else. 
Defense underestimated the price of oil and 
had to scratch foT funds. What happens when 
extra cash turns up in a military program? On 
a request from the Pentagon, it can be redirect- 


ed to another program where there is a short- 
fall with the approval of congressional com- 
mittees. Otherwise; it is canceled or Pentagon 
accountants sit on it. No accounting system 
keeps track of which excess dollars are the 
result of wrong forecasts. 

The Pentagon does not deny a windfall but 
portrays it as good news. The transferred 
bucks, defense officials say. have been put to 
productive use. buying more bang than origi- 
nally planned. Many in Congress, however, are 
understandably annoyed when, as last week, 
the Pentagon suddenly “discovers” a S 1.6- 
billion inflation surplus it can use to rescue a 
program that is about to be cut 

These are expensive games. The responsible 
congressional committees need to scrutinize 
reprogramming more closely. Mr. Aspin, 
meanwhile, offers another idea. Rather than 
fixing the inflation factor when the defense 
contract is negotiated, he suggests making ad- 
justments after the fact, when the goods are 
delivered. Why should bad forecasts become a 
special bonanza for defense? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Castro Loses His Cool 


Radio Marti went on the air broadcasting to 
Cuba on Monday. It is a perfectly legal form of 
international communication. It addresses 
what is always the favorite American audience 
in a communist country, the people who make 
their own decisions on whether to tune in. It 
offers them a range of programming, including 
news about Cuba, that the controlled media do 
not provide: Congressmen who had earlier 
feared that this station would be too indepen- 
dent, provocative and strident had largely 
been reassured by changes made to bring Ra- 
dio Marti under the umbrella of the long- 
established Voice of America. 

Fidel Castro, himself a leading international 
broadcaster, lost his cool when Radio Marti 
opened. Withoui waiting to listen, he suspend- 
ed a December agreement under which immi- 
gration to the United States was to resume, 
and Cuba was to take back the misfits it 
shipped to the United States in 1980; he also 
halted Cuban-Anterican travel to Cuba. Plain- 
ly, Mr. Castro could not abide that the station 
might break part of the monopoly be has tried 
to impose on the news fare available to his 
citizens. He knew how to react in a way that 
would cut at the limited personal choice that 
remains in Cuba and that would, therefore, 
pain Americans and build pressure in the U.S. 
democratic system to kill Radio Marti. 

With the Cuban sanctions — and they may 


not be the end — there mil be an argument 
between Washington and Havana and be- 
tween the administration and its critics over 
whether President Reagan should have started 
up Radio Marti. Wedo not see how the United 
States can leave it to Fidel Castro to determine 
whether the United States conducts a broad- 
casting activity that Cuba conducts and that is 
legal open and politically valid. As a result of 
Mr. Castro's rage, some individuals mil be 
hurt That puts upon Washington a responsi- 
bility to do what it can politically to bring 
them relief. The fact is that the arbitrariness of 
the Castro response and its cruel impact on 
helpless individuals illustrate precisely the 
condition Radio Marti is meant to treat. 

How? Notwithstanding some foolish early 
statements by the Reagan ad ministra tion 
about going “to the source,” the United States 
put aside the notion of unseating Fidel Castro 
decades ago. The Reagan administration’s 
agreement on immigration last year illustrated 
its acceptance of the consensus — to live with 
Mr. Castro — that has prevailed since the 
Cuban missile crisis. Over the long haul, how- 
ever, it is dearly in the American interest to see 
Cuba become governed in a more democratic 
way. This is more likely to happen if the public 
debate in Cuba is kept fresh by a project such 
as Radio Marti. No one has to listen. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Opinion 

A Straw in the German Wind 


Elections in North Rhine-Wesiphalia have 
often acted as an indicator of political swings 
in West Germany, for more than a third of (he 
country's people live in that state. Chancellor 
Kofil can therefore draw little comfort from 
the debacle of his Christian Democratic Party 
in the recent polls there, especially as the 
Social Democratic victor, the charismatic Jo- 
hannes Rau. Ls showing signs of becoming a 
serious rival to Mr. Kohl at the national level. 


The Social Democrats will certainly do all they 
can to exploit the situation. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich). 

India's New Anti-Terror Law 

Criticism of the [anti-terrorism] measure on 
the ground that it may be used to curb political 
opponents is misplaced. But the government 
wjU be beguiling itself if it thinks it can stop 
extremists merely bv tightening the law. 

— The Times of India ( New Delhi). 


FROM OUR MAY 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Nicaragua Defies U.S. Protest 
NEW YORK — Despatches from Nicaragua 
show that the situation is becoming more seri- 
ous. General Mena, commanding the forces of 
the revolutionary party, says that he has sur- 
rounded the Government forces near Rama. 
He says that they may surrender at any mo- 
ment. The intimation recently made by the. 
American Government that it would not per- 
mit the bombardment of Bluefields has called 
forth a protest from President Jose Madriz, 
who contests the right of the United States to 
nuke any such prohibition, in spite of the 
notification made by commanders of Ameri- 
can warships at Bluefidds that they will op- 
pose the bombardments, orders have been 
given by President Madriz that it shall begin. 


1935: Britain to Treble Its Air Force 

LONDON — A vast expansion of Great Brit- 
ain’s Air Force, involving the trebling of the 
number of first-line war planes for home de- 
fense, at a cost estimated at £30.000,000, with- 
in the next two years, was announced simulta- 
neously to both Houses of Parliament [on May 
22] as the British Government's reply to Ger- 
many's intention to build up her own air 
strength in defiance of the Treaty of Versailles. 
The British announcement was coupled with a 
stem repetition of the wanting that this coun- 
try will not accept the position of inferiority to 
Germany in air strength, and a pledge that if 
the expansion program proves insufficient to 
match that of the Germans, neither money nor 
effort would be spared to increase h. 


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Executive Editor REN£ BONDY 

Ed:, or ALAIN LECOUR 

Depute Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

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■ I W. Inicmiuiimal Herald Tribune All rights ntentii 


KU*. 


r ASHINGTON — A West German with a 
» . long background in German-American rela- 
tions passed through Washington the other day 
with a postmortem on West Germany's eventful 
month of May: Bitburg, Bergen-Bdsen and the 
rest of the V-E Day remembrances, the Bonn 
summit of seven industrialized nations — and the 
election in the state or North Rhine- Westphalia. 

For foreigners, the latter was all but lost in the 
shuffle of ceremony and acrimony at the time. But 
from what the visitor had to say, it is likely to have 
the most enduring repercussions on the Western 
alliance and German-American relations. 

It was a “crushing defeat” for Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl the worst ever for his Christian Demo- 
cratic Party in West Gennany’s biggest state. It 
was also the third such setback in a row. And his 
own party is beginning to turn against him. 

The question is not whether this spells victory 
for the Social Democrats in the general elections 
two years from now (though that would be an 
unsettling upheaval, given the Social Democrats’ 
leftist, neutralist turn since they were voted out of 
power in 1982). It is too early to measure the forces 
that will then be at work. * 

But it is not too early to measure the forces that 
will now be at work on Mr. Kohl to reverse the 
electoral tide. No sooner was the vote in than the 
chancellor let it be known that farmers, social- 
welfare beneficiaries and the unemployed would 
have to be given a higher priority —at the expense 
of military spending. . . 

As the political imperatives are translated into 
government policies, this would almost certainly 
wean an inward turning away from m a t t e rs the 
Reagan administration professes to care deeply 
about. One is “burden sharing” in the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization. The United States 
wants the Europeans to do more in the common 
defense, in part for the weight this would add to 
tiif Ar^er i r -in fowgainnig position on arms con troL 
The administration is pushing for a new round of 


trade negotiations, with special emphasis on the 
European Community's agricultural subsidies. It 
speaks of a need for monetary reform (withoui of 
course, conceding that die US. budget deficit and 
the U.S. dollar are a large part of the problem). 

On every count. Mr. Kohl's weakness works 
against these American purposes. The effect could 
be catalytic, when you consider what else is going 
on. Mr. Kohl will be under heavier pressure to bow 
to public-opinion polls showing about 80 percent 
of the West Ge rman public in favor of a freeze on 
military spending. But the United States will be in 
a poor position to cajole when tire US Congress is 
slashing away at defense-spending increases. The 
U-S.-Gemian example is unlikely to be lost on 
other NATO members. And the almost inevitable 
drag cm the overall NATO defense effort is unlike- 
ly to be lost on the Russians 

An outbreak of wide-open trade warfare among 
the Western industrialized nations is never more 
than a tit-for-tat away. Protectionist fever is al- 
ready running high in the Congress. Not to be 
outdone, the administration has rationalized the 
right to launch a new subsidy program for UJS. 
agricultural exports that flies m the face of princi- 
pled opposition to the lavish subsidies offered by 
the European Community. Secretary of Agricul- 
ture John Block has a debating point: By “sending 
a message,” he argues, the United States is increas- 
ing the chances that “well all come to our senses.” 

But will the Europeans be sweetly reasonable? 
The German visitor, who spoke on the understand- 
ing he would not be named, suggests that die 
consequence of the new U.S. subsidies is at least as 
likely to be a European response in kind: “Any 
protectionism from the United States would get a 
strong reaction from West Germany 

This is all the more likdy to be the case since the 
Bonn gove rnmen t was already busy, before North 
RhinoWestphalia, blocking efforts within the 
European Community to scale down the European 
farm subsidies planned for next year. 



Drawing by DovM. 


The danger of a more generalized [fade war 
must be seen in the light of what the Bonn summit 
faded to da Seemingly as a result of French 
adamancy, the Seven could not even fix a daw for a 
new round of trade talks . But appearances deceive. 
The French insist the problem is procedural; the 
subject of talks should be agreed to before a date is 
set. And the agenda, the French contend, must go 
well beyond agricultural trade. Chancell or K ohl 
laid low at the summit, letting French President 
Francois Mitterrand be the spoiler. But Mr. Kohl 
“will DC just as difficult as France” on the question 
of new trade talks, the West German visitor pre- 
dicts. That would put a crimp in movement toward 
monetary reform, as welL 
The Europeans never tire of telling America that 
the aUiarw* canno t operate when its heavyweight, 
the United States, is always changing governments 
— and policies. The likely reverberations from 
North Rhme-Westphalia suggst that discontinu- 
ity of policy is hardly an American phenomenon. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Radio Marti: Telling Cubans What They Already Know 


W ASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration is stuck with so 
many unavoidable problems thee 
days — budget deficits, trade deficits 
and so on — that it is a puzzle why it 
insis ts mi p unishing itself with addi- 
tional avoidable problems. 

Its latest example of sdf-inflicied 
wounds, after the president’s tour of 
the West German cemetery, was its 
decision to set up an official radio 
service to left the Cuban people four- 
teen and a half hours every day how 
wonderful life is in the United States 
and how dreary it is in Cuba. 

As if they didn’t know. They have 
been hearing this news from their 
families who have escaped to Florida 
and from the commercial radio sta- 
tions on the mainland that come in 
loud and clear to Havana. 

Also, the official Voice of America, 
with its relay stations in the Caribbe- 
an, is, with the possible exception of 
the BBC the most reliable and de- 
tailed source of electronic news in the 
world, and can be heard from one 
end of Cuba to the other. (Too bad it 
is ignored at home.) 

Nevertheless, the Reagan adminis- 
tration is spending a bucket to run 
Radio Marti named for one of Cu- 
ba's greatest heroes of independence. 
If it had been named Radio Mon- 


roe to emphasize that the United 
States would not permit foreign na- 
tions to threaten the freedom and 
security of the Western Hemisphere, 
that might have made sense. But call- 
ing it Radio Marti was as offensive to 
Fidel Castro as it would have been to 
President Reagan if Mr. Castro had 
started broadcasting to the United 
States on Radio Jefferson. 

The predictable result was that as 
soon as Radio Marti proclaimed 
“Buenos dias, Cuba," Mr. Castro — 
who has the capacity to jam aQ U.S. 
broadcasts with the flick of a switch 
— announced that be had suspended 
his agreement with Mr. Reagan to 
release 3,000 political prisoners and 
up to 20,000 Cuban immigrants a 
year. And be canceled his commit- 
ment to take back to Cuba the 2,746 
Cuban criminals and mental patien ts 
now languishing in UJL prisons. 

Well, obviously this is self-serving 
Cuban propaganda and no doubt Mr.. 
Castro mil reconsider after a wink. 
But why. with all the more important 
things it has to handle at home and 
abroad, would the Reagan adminis- 
tration get into this sflly controversy? 

Mr. Castro’s so-called revolution 
has been a spectacular failure. He has 


By James Heston 

been surviving by borrowing from 
the Soviet Union and stealing mod- 
ern technology from the United 
States or elsewhere as best he can and 
shipping his unemployed as military 
mercenaries to fight Moscow’s “wars 
of liberation" in Africa when he can- 
not even liberate himself or his peo- 
ple from Moscow's subsidies. 

Lately, in bis declining years, Mr. 
Castro has begun to wonder about his 
dreams erf leading a communist revo- 
lution in the hemisphere. He is still 
fiddling with it in Nicaragua and the 
rest of Central America, but recently 
he has been trying to re-establish dip- 
lomatic relations with the major na- 
tions of South America in the hope 
they wiD lend him the money they do 
not have themselves. 

Mr. Castro is no dummy, despite 
all his heroic pride and bloated rheto- 
ric. He knows that Cuba is only 90 
miles ( 145 kilometers) from Florida 
and a long way from Moscow, whose 
political and economic philosophy is 
rejected by every Communist Tarty 
that ever heard of the computer. 

So why not lei him deal with the 
consequences or his failures and the 
failures of the Communist system? 
Why badger turn with broadcasts tell- 


TheTFGQ: 

Banking on 
Blind Trust 


By George Will 

W ASHINGTON — Remember 
the reaction to the writing on 
the wall at Belshazzar’s feast? Old- 
fashioned Old Testament fear took 
the fun out of the feast In Ohio and 
in Maryland there have been epi- 
sodes like that involving savings 
and loan institutions. 

There has been a spun of panic, 
some of it reasonably related to the 
condition of some mismanaged and 
underinsured institutions. 

But there is another and remark- 
ably simple explanation for the kind 
of panic that can produce nuts on 
thrift institutions. The simple expla- 
nation is complexity. 

Do you know how your bank 
works? Sure, you know you rent 
your money to it. The bank does 
stuff with it, and makes money, and 
gives some of it to you in interest 
and services, such as checks deco- 
rated with scenes of Cape Cod. 

But that is a pretty sketchy 
knowledge of something as crucial 
— if you think about u — as the 
whereabouts and activities of your 
money. But then, you rarely have to 
think about it, which is something 
to think abouL 

Thrift institutions are examples 
of this facet of modern life: We are 
surrounded by things we cannot do 
withoui and do not unders ign.! 
Banks are not incomprehensible. 
Bankers understand them — at least 
some da somewhat, some of the 
time. But the rest of us have to take 
it on faith that the b anking system 
works swimmingly. 

We must take much on trust. If 
we took time to understand every- 
thing, we would never get the lawn 





mower sharpened or the screen door 
repaired. When that trust begins to 
crude, it can crumble quickly, pro- 
ducing panic. 

A century ago, transportation — 
say, a horse and buggy — was com- 
prehensible, in the sense that all the 
moving parts were visible and un- 
complicated. Well all right, the 
horse was complicated, but you 
know what I mean. Today we go to 
an airport, step into a tube of alumi- 
num, are hurled 35,000 feel up and 
3,000 miles along, and few of us 
have the foggiest notion of how a jet 
engine works or why a plane flies. 

In the 19th century, when doctors 
were loved, they could not do much 
for patients, other than make them 
somewhat comfortable while wait- 
ing for nature to heal or kill them. 
Today doctors are vastly more po- 
tent They also are proportionately 
less intelligible — and less revered. 

In the 19th century, when, of an 
ev ening , a family wanted entertain- 


ment it could try conversation (ask 
grandmother, she can tell you what 
that was) or books. There was noth- 
ing mysteriously technical Today 
families stare at devices that bring 
sights and sounds into their living 
rooms. Although we are sure there 
is a reasonable explanation (for the 
physics of television, not Lord 
knows, for the sights and sounds 
emitted by ill not one person in 
10,000 can do justice to a child who 
asks, “How does that work?" 

A flourishing economy, indeed a 
functioning society, depends cm the 
mass erf men and women not think- 
ing about a large and growing num- 
ber of things they depend on in 
daily Ufa One measurement of the 
modernity of the modern world is 
the TFGQ — the Take-for-Gramed 
Quotient A crucial (though often 
mundane) task of modem govern- 
ment is to enlarge the TFGQ. 

Government does this by inspect- 
ing restaurants, so customers need 


not calculate the risk before decid- 
ing to trust an unfamili ar kitchen. It 
certifies the safety of elevators so we 
never need to make a prudential 
calcula t ion before inserting our- 
selves inabox hauled aloft by a am 
g ue ssing ) pullies and cables. 

Of course government, as is its 
wont, often gets carried away and 
tries to reduce life’s risks to zero. 
Nevertheless, to keep modern soci- 
ety flowing, government must act in 
many small ways to take large 
amounts of hesitancy out of life. It 
does this, for example, when it pro- 
vides insurance for deposits in thrift 
institutions. Such insurance re- 
moves tire drag of anxiety from a 
crucial social activity — saving. 

“We may fling ourselves into a 
hammock, wrote G.K. Chesterton, 
“in a fit of divine carelessness. But 
we are glad that the net-maker did 
not make the hammock in a fit of 

divine carelessness." 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


ITiatcherism? 

And Other 
Malfunctions 

By William Pfaif 

P ARIS — The scornful say it 
dass rebellion that is under wfri 
in Britain’s Conservative Party —th^r 
cavalier Francis Pyra. Margaret 
Thatcher’s ex-foreign minister, stag- 
ing an uprising against Mrs, Thatcher/ . 
and her supporters. Mr. Pynvhasop 
ganized a group of about 30 Toy 
members of Parliament — most (tf 
them from the belter-heeled and befc 
ter-schooled wing of the party —to 
cot lest the policies of Mrs. Thatcher, 
the Puritan grocer's daughter with 
middle- and lower-middle-' 


ing the Cubans that his system is not 
working, when they know that better 
than anybody else? 

All Radio Marti will do is to revive 
the old bogey of Yankee domination 
— which may be Mr. Castro’s last 
chance of survival. 

But that is not the way Mr. Reagan 
sees it Four years ago, being more 
interested in propaganda than in po- 
licy, he decided the United Stales 
should have a radio transmitter in 
Florida to educate the Cubans. Now, 
i hanks to Congress, he has got 1 L 

Maybe he has a point. Radio Marti 
will come into Cuba louder and 
stronger than Florida’s commercial 
stations or the Voice of America: 
more news, more jazz, more informa- 
tion about how pathetic they are un- 
der Mr. Castro, and how wonderful it 
would be if they tossed him to the 
sharks. Maybe this will work, but the 
guess here is that the louder Washing- 
ton shouts the less Havana will listen. 

My own ally view is that the only 
things we Americans have in com- 
mon with Cuba are geography and 
baseball, and that, if we could get a 
Latin American into the big 
leagues, as we did with Canada, we 
might make more progress than tell- 
ing Cuba what bums they are. 

The New York Times. 


rlnss 

There is something to this. "Tile 
traditional leadership of the Caoaeri -. 
vative Partv, upper-doss and pater- 
nalistic in "social policy, has ajwtoflT 
disliked the aggressive and abrashr- . 
Mrs. Thatcher. But there is more 
This affair merits reflection in the ., 
light of what has happmed in Franc* 

In both countries radical policy hri- 
tiarives have been attempted, and in 
both countries they have failed.- . 

The Torv rebellion is possible be- 
cause Mrs* Thatcher has in crucial 
respects failed to deliver what she . 
promised. Similarly, the French So- 
cialists in 1981 promised to “change 
the lives" of the French. They have ' ' 
not, could not — and have admowt- 7 
edged their failure, changed course*, 
and changed prime ministers. Thc^ 
win go into next year’s legislative 
elections with a platform that to ma- - 
jor respects will be no different fin*:' 
that of the conservative opposition. . 

Is it a good tiring for radicalism to 
fail? Many would sav yes. t think ft 
not a good thing that the range of . 
political possibility and experiment 
be so reduced. Two major social and 
economic experiments, one to the 
democratic right, and one to the dem- 
ocratic left, have gone aground. Both 
were meant to lead the Western to: 
dus trial nations out of their present 
plight of serious and growing unem- . 
ployment, at major human cost 

Mrs. Thatcher’s government has' 
done much to wring waste and toeff^l 
deucy out of a lackluster Brit&i 
economy still dangerously dependent 
on North Sea oil income, in major 
respects uncompetitive, grievously 
afflicted by class hostilities that be- 
long in the 19th century. Mrs. ' 
Thatcher, though, had promised that 
austerity, monetary discipline mid 
privatization of industry would bring * 
reflation down, create jobs, and im- 
prove Britain’s productivity. 

Alas, unemployment has more 
than doubled since she took office. It 
is now over three million, in a popula- 
tion of 56 million. One and a quarter 
million of these are classified as tong- 
term unemployed, and that figure is 


rising. The latest monthly figure Wv 
registers a 2.¥*r 
42-percent rife 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Proper Education 

Regarding the opinion column 
“When Maturity Comes Late. Put Off 
College Study" ( May 15) by Kenneth 
L Woodward and Arthur Komaber: 

Too often colleges and universities 
see themselves as institutions that 
merely provide desired services. This 
would be fine if entering freshmen, 
like the returning veterans of World 
War II. were mature and knew what 
they wanted. They do not, and as a 
result often fall into (racks that do 
not interest them and do not call 
forth their full abilities. Education 
becomes a means to a job. 

If colleges and universities are to 
fulfill ihcir ropnnsihi lities thev must 
shape, motiijk- .ind inspire their stu- 


dents. Maturity does noth 
— it comes when people are 
lenged and provided with an oppor- 
tunity to see the world in new and 
different ways. By bringing students 
into dose contact with faculty and 
st ressing that education is not train- 
ing, but learning to work indepen- 
dently, colleges can prevent the wast- 
age of adolescent minds. 

GORDON WHITMAN. 

London. 

Morality and Mortality 

Regarding the editorial "The Chib 
Jrcn’s Children" (April 12): 

The American infant mortality 
rate ha* been the highest of any de- 
veloped omnirv for mure than half a 


century now — an ironic fact to view 
of the Reagan administration's loud- 
ly professed pro-life policies. 

In 1921, the problem of infant 
mortality led to the passage of the 
Sheppard-Towner Act, the first na- 
tionally funded health care program 
aimed at reducing infant ana mater- 
nal mortality. The act remained in 
force fm 10 years and brought health 
services to mothers and children who 
otherwise would have gone without. 
Can we expect such innovation from 
the Reagan administration? 

MARION HUNT. 

Paris. 

When Taxpayers Don’t 

Perhaps it would he useful to >end 
Senator Daniel Patrick NKnmhan a 


copy of your recent front-page report 
(May 9) on the 1 J million Americans 
abroad who have never even filed a 
1040 tax form. Rather than lower the 

boom yet again on the small minority 

who regularly pay their taxes, Mr. 
Moyoihan should turn his attention 
to m ore pressing matters and leave 
the productive few to get on with U. 
CHARLES W. FRIEND. 

London. 

When a law has only 39 percent 
compliance, there is something 
wrong with it. What is wrong with 
making Americans abroad pay taxes 
is that it smacks or taxation without 
representation — and invites Boston 
lea parties on a global scale. 

BB. BISHOP. 

Tlie Hague 


inflation, for April, 
percent gain, for a 
since the year began — an annual 
rate erf over 12 percent 
There has been a gain to productiv- 
ity. but according to a survey of Brit- 
ain issued in January by the Organi- 
zation for Economic Cooperation 
and Development, this was due most- 
ly to labor shakeout rather than real 
gains in efficiency. The mam prob- . 
fan, the OECD says, is The ineffi- 
cient use of capital or poor quality of 
investment." In manufacturing, U.S. 
output per employee is three times 
that of Britain, with less investment 
per unit of output. 

Mrs. Thatcher's defenders can 
plausibly say that she needs more 
time. Unfortunately, she has already • 
had more time than most politicians 
are given to carry out their programs. 
She has led Britain longer than Ron- 
ald Reagan has led the United Stales, 
or Francois Mitterrand France. Fair 
or unfair, the public is impatient, j Lr. 

Tbe Pym revolt was chiefly iff; 
spired by the social costs of Thatcher- 
ism. High levels of unemp loyment 
are tolerable if policies are getting 
results and the outlook for future - 
jobs is hrighL If policies are not visi- 
bly working, the doctorate rebels. 
The latest electoral polls in Britain 
put Labor ahead of the Conserva- 
tives, and one of them, a Gallup Poll 
published May 16, had the Liberal- 
Social Democratic alliance ahead as 
well, with the Conservatives in' third 
place. News like that made it inevita- 
ble that important figures in the] 
should grow restless, brew rebel 
and plot for the succession. 

Tbe serious consideration, howev- 
er. is that in both Britain and Fran 
these major experiments in how, 
run the modem industrial econor 
and society have failed. We are -.l 
with the dull, gray, uni deo logical, 

pragmatic economic and social poli- 
cies of the center, which, since the 
first ofl shock to 1972, have at least 
kept the Western ship afloat 
Worse, across the Atlantic, Euro- 
peans now see the Reagan Miracle— 
which the Thatcherile would-be mir- 
acle anticipated, and to which the 
French conservative opposition 
would dearly like to rally — now. 
begin to loci less than miracukfflS- 
Poihaps that was not a rabbit after 
all, that they were sure they saw in' 
the president's hat 
The economic indicators have j 

off in the United States. 

from Washington now are asking tipt- 
West Germans and Japanese to tak^P/ 
the lead — two nations that do nor 
practice Reaganism, Thatcherism, 
supply-side orthodoxy, or, mostcer-' 
tarnly, socialism. Both these, in their 
idiosyncratic ways, are nations of the 
centrist consensus, doing thing s the 
old way, skeptical of miracles. Can it, . 
after all, really be true that there is no 
free lunch? What will be the political 
cost, throughout the industrial West, 
for broken hopes? : * >. 

© 1985 Wilhan Pfaff. - 


Letters intended for publicarh\w£- 
should be addressed “ Letters to the 1 a 
Editor " and must contain the writ- . 
er's signature, name and full ad-, 
dress. Letters should be brief and , 
are subject in editing. We cannot 
he responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Page 5 



P ... S* 


Greek Candidates 
Shun Confrontation 
In Election Drive 


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By Henry Kamm 
.VffH- font 7 iimo Serrit e 
SALONIKA, Greece — A -drive 
along the main roads and byways 
between Athens and Salonika, 
Greece's second city, finds candi- 
dates for next month's national 
elections and their supporters in 
■full cry from speaker’s platforms 
on town squares, storefront dec- 
tion headquarters and local coffee- 
houses. 

Yet unlike what happens in most 
other democratic countries, the 
Greek campaign Tor the June 2 
election between Prime Minister 
Andreas Papandreou and the op- 
position leader, Constantine Mit- 
sotakis, does: not seem to be a de- 
bate in which issues, candidates or 
rival supporters confront one an- 
other. 


Speakers for Mr. Papandreou's 
Mr. Miisotakis's 


Socialists and 
New Democracy Party are ardently 
critical of the opposing side, but 
usually in frdnt of crowds that are 
committed to their cause. No one 
heckles or asks unfriendly ques- 
tions, nor do the candidates meet 
voters at random- 


With rare exceptions, newspa- 
the other 




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pers are so partisan that the 
party’s views are nearly excluded 
from their pages- 

Mr. Papandreou has rejected Mr. 
Miisotakis's challenge to meet in a 
televised debate, suggesting in his 
reply that each already knows the 
other's views. State television does 
broadcast their major speeches, as 
well as those of Harflaos Floraitis, 
leader of the pro-Moscow Commu- 
nist Party. Minority parties get al- 
most no exposure. 

When Mr. Papandreou spoke 
Saturday night at a huge rally on 


the enduring rupture of the civil 
war. The war raged from 1944 until 
1949 and ended with defeat for the 
Co mmunists and their allies. 

It was followed by a long period 
of rightist repression of those sus- 
pected of having supported the los- 
ing side. That was diminished with 
the restoration of democracy in 
1974 and formally ended with Mr. 
Papandreou's ejection in 1981. 

But the scars remain, along with 
an unwillingness to consider the 
other sde worthy of talking. 

**We remember the bad right- 
wing past, with exile, jail, the need 
for loyalty certificates to get a job 
or to enter a hospital." one of a 
group of Socialists said in party 
headquarters in Kalambaka. “The 
right stiH has the police-state men- 
tality." ‘ 

His comrades agreed, and cited 
examples. 

- The opposition dismisses the So- 
cialist etami to have brought about 
reconciliation. 

“The memories of the civil war 
stiU divide people," said one of a 
group in a New Democracy coffee- 
house in Risomilos, on the road 
between Volos and Larissa. “Be- 
fore, the right would not give jobs 
to the left. The Socialists continue 
this in reverse. Reconciliation? 
That's for the newspapers." 



New Roles Alter U.S. Diplomats’ Old Boy Syste 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Before the 


era of the Vietnam War, the impor- 
State 


Andreas Papandreou 


licy was a main theme 
of the 1981 campaign, with Mr. 
Papandreou malting pledges, since 
dropped, to withdraw from the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion and the European Communi- 
ty. Foreign policy issues are now 
rarely mentioned by either party. 


Economic issues predominate, 
with the Socialists claiming credit 
for reducing inflation, distributing 
wealth more evenly and providing 
better health and soda! services. 


New Democracy says that Mr. 
Papandreou has inhibited growth 
by excessive state interference in 
Tiscal matters. The party has 
achieved its most evident appeal by 
pledging to lift heavy import duties 
on automobiles. 


rant relationships inside the State 
Department and its Foreign Ser- 
vice flowed principally from family 
background and Ivy League school 
connections. Then, in the mid- 
1960s and early 1970s, working on 
Vietnam or in Vietnam became the 
central link for the inside power 
brokers. 

Now,: there is no single network 
pervading the State Department 
building, no single set of friends 
and allies, bonded by common ex- 
perience, who help one another rise 

to key posts and who telephone one 
another on an old-boy basis to iron 
out, behind the scenes, their bosses' 
differences. 

At present, there are at least four 
networks, often overlapping: Aria 
hands, former Vietnam policy peo- 
ple. special assistants and former 
aides of Henry A. Kissinger, who 
dominate European issues. 

As with most networks, the 
bonding of these groups occurred 
early in the members’ Foreign Ser- 
vice careers. Unlike most networks, 
the bonding in the State Depart- 
ment is not based on ideological 
goals. Most of these officials are 
demonstrably apolitical and some 
tend, for professional diplomats, to 
lean somewhat to the conservative 
ride of policy. 

Many of the officials can be 
found either in jobs on the seventh 
floor that involve dealing directly 
with Secretary of Slate George P. 
Shultz; or in the No. 2, “principal- 


Troops Reported to Order 20,000 
From Tamil Villages in Sri Tnnka 


Reuters 




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iiaJ of Thessaly, it was as if 
Socialists were the only party in 
town. Their grten banners were ev- 
erywhere. and jothing but enthusi- 
asm was evidenf. Those planning to 
vote for New Democracy apparent- 
ly stayed home' 

In that agricultural region, the 
prime minister concentrated on his 
administration's! assertion that it 
had. raised the rural standard of 
living. He also made reassurances 
that under a receipt law on agricul- 
tural cooperatives private property 
still would be respected and made a 
promise without Specifics to dis- 
tribute the lands! of monasteries 
and other big landowners. 

If Greek partia campaign Kke 
feuding members qf a family who 
no longer speak Of . listen to one 
another, the reason may stem from 


COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — 
Troops plan to move about 2QJJ00 
minority Tamils out of villages in 
northern Sri Lanka for security Tea- 
sons, a local community leader said 
Wednesday. 

N.M. Sornabala, president of the 
citizens’ committee in Vavumya, a 
town IK) miles (290 kilometers) 
north of Colombo, said by tele- 
phone that soldiers went to Chend- 
dikulam district Tuesday and told 
the official who administers the 
district that everyone should leave 
their homes in two weeks. 


up a search for guerrillas fighting I 
set up a separate stale in the non 


jto 

. up a separate stale in the north 
for Sri Lanka’s 22) million Tamils. 


A spokesman for the Home Min- 
istry in Colombo said be was aware 
of the issue, but declined comment: 


ience. including a massacre by 
guerrillas of about 145 people in 
the sacred Buddhist city of Anora- 
dhapura and nearby areas on May 
14. 


Mr. Sornabala said that about 
5,000 families, or 20.000 people. 
Dorn the island 's T amil community 
live in sevoal villages in the area, 
which is dominated by T amils. Sin- 
halese are dominant on the island. 

Troops and police have stepped 


A Vavuniya resident said, 
"There are some guerrilla camps in 
the area and we think the security 
forces want to flush them out." 

Meanwhile, President Junius R. 
Jayawardene told a meeting of reli- 
gious leaders in Colombo that 
dashes between security forces and 
separatist guerrillas were more 
than an ethnic problem. 

“It is part of various internation- 
al events that show a Marxist-or- 
iented plan to destabilize demo- 
cratic countries," he said. 

The meeting with Buddhist, 
Christian, Hindu and Moslem cler- 
gy followed an escalation' of -vio- 


Yngoslavia and Albania 
Move to Open Rail link 

BELGRADE — Yugoslavia and 
Albania are holding talks on the 
final phase of a railroad, scheduled 
for completion next month, that 
will give Albania its first rail link 
with the outside world. . . 

Tanjug^the Y ugoslav new agen- 
cy, said an Albanian delegation 
headed by Deputy Transport Min- 
ister Fernand Taka met Tuesday 
with Transport Minister Mustafa 
Pijakic. Construction of the link 
berween Titograd, in southern Yu- 
goslavia, and Shkoder has been inn 
der way for years. 


deputy" slots directly under assis- 
tant secretaries of state. 

If it can be said that the state 
department is controllable at all. 
these arc the pivotal controlling po- 
sitions. 

According to a number of offi- 
cials. the two men at the core of the 
networks, or those with the most 
links, are M. Charles HilL whose 
post as executive assistant to the 
secretary gives him an office with a 
private door to the office of Mr. 
Shultz, and Frank G. Wisner, prin- 
cipal deputy assistant secretary of 
stare Tor Africa. 

Mr. Wisner has links to all four 
networks: Mr. Hill to all except the 
Asia hands. 

Nicholas Platt, the department's 
executive secretary', is without any 
links except Asia, out he is right up 
there and has direct dealings with 
Mr. Shultz and others throughout 
die stale department. From his 
glass-enclosed command post in 
ihe middle of the seventh floor Mr 
Platt decides who will handle what 
issues and he controls all format 
communications into and out ol 
the department. 

An official who is close to all 
three commented: “We're not talk- 
ing about a conspiracy here. These 
are guys, along with a lot of other 
guvs, who have worked together 
over the years and trust each other 
and try to help each other." 

The old Asia hands, whose ca- 
reers have mainly involved that 
area of the world, include Mr 
Wisner and Mr. Halt, along with 
Morton I. Abramowiiz, director of 
the bureau or intelligence and re- 
search; Kenneth Quinn, a deputy 
to Mr. Platt: and Michael H. Ar- 
macost. who was ambassador to 
the Philippines a year ago when 
Mr. Shultz chose him for the No. 3 
job and be leapfrogged over his 
colleagues. 

The special assistants’ club in- 
cludes Mr. Hill, Mr. Quinn, Mr. 
Wisner and John H. Kelly, now 
principal deputy assistant secretary 
of state for Europe. 

Both Mr. Wisner and Mr. Kelly 
were deputies to the executive sec- 
retary in the recent past. Also in 
this dub were Arnold Raphel. the 
No. 2 man m the bureau of Near 


Eastern and South Asian affairs, 
who used to be an aide to Joseph J. 
Sisco when he was under secretary 
for policy in the Kissinger era. Lat- 
er. he was an aide to Secretary of 
State Cyrus R. Vance. 

The Vietnam group has dwin- 
dled over the years. But some of 
those whose ties go back to the 
years of U.S. involvement in the 
Vietnam conflict are Mr. HilL Mr. 
Wisner and Mr. Quinn, as well as 
L Craig Johnstone, who is now 
deputy assistant secretary of state 
for inter-American affairs handling 
Central America, and John D. Neg- 
roponte. at present ambassador to 
Honduras but slated to be assistant 
secretary for oceans and interna- 
tional and scientific affairs. 

Of the four networks, the most 
insular is the European one. The 


group look form when Mr. Kissin- 
ger was secretary of state in the 
mid-1970s. Unlike the other net- 
works. the Kissinger hands stuck 
almost exclusively to the European 
area, particularly Soviet-American 

relations. 

Almost all the members were 
linked to two key Kissinger aides. 
Helmut Sonnenfeldt. non at Ihe 
Brookings Institution, and Law- 
rence S. E3gleburger. now presi- 
dent of Kissinger Associates, a con- 
sulting group in New York. 

Three in this group arc now dep- 
uty assistant secretaries of slate in 
the European affairs bureau: John 

Kelly, an authority on Western Eu- 
rope; Robie M. Palmer, an expert 
on Ihe Soviet Union; and Janies F. 
Dobbins, an arms control special- 
ist. 


In the Kissinger years. Mr. Palm- 
er jnd Charles Hill were the prime 
speech writers for the secretary 
while Mr. Wisner handled negotia- 
tions on what was then called Rho- 
desia and is now Zimbabwe 
There are. of course, other net 
works throughout the building. by 
none has such influence on Secre- 
tary of State StiiiliJ and on person- 
nel and policy issues. 


Talks oil Gulf Set in Soviet 

KUWAIT — An Arab Leacuc 
committee I hat includes men tor- 

eign ministers will mme Mov.v.» 

next week for talks on »j\« to e:ti' 
the Iran-lr.u) war. the Kuwait: to>- 
eign minister. Sheikh Sabah al- Ah- 
mad ai-Sahali. slid Wedr.e'Jj\ 


EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 
NON-RESIDENTIAL 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 

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snod. OaBid lor wfenp ptoloiaonofc. 
Pioaom aurora ed by the Cmrorno Depafl- 
mn ct Educefton. Shidnrti wafMmda. 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY 
for ADVANCED STUDIES 

School of 
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Before we go out to dinner, we go out to eat 


- We eat a little here, a Bole there. 

The here and there 1 are “tascas”, special bars that 
serve small portions of appetizers called “tapas". 

A tapa might be as shn^e as paper-thin slices of 
rosy senano ham, ot just— warmed pieces of fragrant 
chorizo sausage. Or it might be an elegant conipoation 


of cold raussles on the half shell, sprinkled with finely 
chopped fresh tomatoes, scalons and herbs in a light 
vinaigrette. 

The variety of tapas is truly tmguessable, for there 
are untold thousands of tascas in Spain, and each has 
at least one unique tapa of the house. 


Join us 'at sunset , Thai, in the long hours of 
twilight, go with us from one tasca to another, lake a 
tahlp outside in the square and watch the people-show. 
Or stand at a bar in the noisy intimacy of a popular 
gathering place. 

Should you have a few shrimp? Some Med fresh 



sardines? Or that interesting picketed gherkin stuffed , 
with smoked fish? Be careful if it’s past nine o'clock; a 
big dinner’s planned for eleven. 

That’s right, eleven. We always eat late. To enjoy 
all the good things of&fe in Spain, our longest Summer 

day is too short. Spain. Everything under the sun. 


csrtHii 




I 






Page 6 


INTERNATIONA! HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


From Operating Room to the Capital, 
Red Hat of Cardinal Signals Power 


By Samuel Koo 


Times have changed since cardi- 


The Associated Pros 


VATICAN CITY — When Car- 
dinal Jaime L Sin of the Philip- 
pines underwent a major operation 
to remove a tumor, he was treated 
by 1 1 top specialists. But none of 
the doctors sent a bill which his 
spokesman said could have reached 
about $50,000. 


nals enjoyed princely temporal 
powers, but many of the regal irap- 


Whcn news reached Nicaragua 
lust month that Archbishop Miguel 
Obando y Bravo had been named a 
cardinal by Pope John Paul H. one 
of the first to pay respects was the 
prelate's most powerful adversary, 
the Marxist president, Daniel Orte- 
ga Saavedra. 


pings and much of the prestige re- 
main, In some countries, a cardi- 
nal’s red hat often brings power 
that transcends religious bound- 
aries. 

Mr. Ortega's call at the archbish- 
op's residence was seen as a sign of 
Archbishop Obando's key political 
role in the Central American coun- 
try where the church hierarchy has 
opposed major policies of the San- 
dinist government. 

Archbishop Obando is one of the 


cardinal Saturday by Pope John 
Paul II in a Vatican consistory. 

They will join 124 others who 
serve as the pope's top advisers on 
policy and help govern the world 
church as ranking members of vari- 
ous Vatican offices, including a 
new council of cardinals on Vati- 
can finances. 


They also elect the pope, but 



mm 


life ‘ 

• •%" 




beyond that they have few other 
special powers. Gone are die rich 
territories granted to cardinals — 
treasures that sometimes caused 
bloody feuding among the leading 
families of Italy and Europe who 
pushed their sons to seek their for- 
tunes in the church. 

However, the cardinal’s red hat. 
a symbol of the crowning success of 
a long, distinguished service to the 
church, means enhanced prestige 
and authority. 

For that reason, the cardinals 
become targets of surveillance and 
persecution in countries ruled by 
Communist and authoritarian re- 
gimes. Fearing reprisals, the pope 
sometimes names a cardinal “in 
peaore” or “in his heart,” meaning 
his appointment will not be known 
until the situation in his country 
improves. 

In Czechoslovakia. Cardinal 
Frantisek Tomasek. 85, is regarded 
as a strong and influential oppo- 
nent of the Prague regime. 

Cardinal Tomasek, whose nomi- 
nation in 1975 to cardinal was kept 
secret for a year, has sLrongly de- 


28 churchmen, including the arch- 
bishops of Boston and New York, 
who will be formally elevated to 


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Envoy Urges 
US. Jews 
To Reconcile 
With Bonn 


By Alliscer Sparks 

U Pi VI S*TlhY 


Miguel Obando y Bravo 


Frantisek Tomasek 


fended the church despite a persis- 
tent government crackdown. 

Unlike many of his colleagues in 
Western countries, he leads an aus- 
tere life Yvith few privileges, often 
answering his own telephone and 
the front door. 


ence in politics and other facets of 
social life. They have only to ask to 


Cardinal Joseph-Marie Trinh 
Van Can of Hanoi needs govern- 
ment permission whenever he 
wants to travel abroad. At least 
twice during the past five years, the 
Communist authorities denied per- 
mission for trips to Rome. 

By contrast, in Catholic Argenti- 
na. the cardinals are paid by the 
state, and have tremendous influ- 


sodal life. They have only to ask to 
get private meetings with the presi- 
dent or other top officials of the 
government. 

In the United Slates, the influ- 
ence of cardinals has generally de- 
clined since the Second Vatican 
Council and the formation of the 
National Conference of Catholic 
Bishops in 1966. 

“Before Vatican II, the opinions 
of cardinals were given greater 
weight by their fellow bishops and 


clergy members than they are 
now,” said the Reverend Rohm 
Trisco, a church historian. 



Which airline’s 


been most punctual 


within Europe 
for nearly three years 

f? 


i la 


Time’s up. 


SPT/M 


By Sara Rimer 

Set. York Times Sente 

WASHINGTON — In an ap- 
pearance before the B’nai B’rith 
International board of governors, 
the West German ambassador said 
that he hoped the dispute over 
President Reagan's visit to the Ger- 
man military cemetery at Bitburg 
might inspire renewed efforts to 
strengthen tics between his country 
and American Jews. 

The address Tuesday was the 
first by a West German official to 
B’nai B’rith International, its exec- 
utive vice president. Danid Thursz. 
said. He added that it would not 
have occurred without Bitburg. 

The ambassador, Gunther van 
Well, was given a cordial reception 
by the 150 delegates to the meeting 
of B'nai B'ritb governors, who on 
Wednesday ended their semiannu- 
al meeting in Washington. 

Declaring that the establishment 
of German-Jewish relations after 
World War II had been more inten- 
sive in Israel than in the United 
States. Mr. van Well said. “We 
would wish that the troubling, 
painful discussion of the Last few 
weeks leads American Jews to join 
us in new determined efforts to 
establish closer links also between 
the Federal Republic of Germany 
and American Jewish comm uni- 
j ties.” 

Mr. Thursz said ibe decision to 
invite Mr. van Well was a step 
toward a process of reconciliation 
between American Jews and West 
Germans that had been damaged 
by the president's visit to the Bit- 
burg cemetery. Among the graves 
of 2.000 German war dead m the 
cemetery are those of 49 soldiers of 
the Waffen SS, Hitler’s elite troops. 

“Bitburg became a focal point in 
illustrating the fact that reconcilia- 
tion has never taken place here,” 
said Mr. Thursz, who is American. 
“Israel made peace with present- 
day Germany 30 years ago. In 
America, the issue has never been 
addressed. It has never been a pri- 
ority. It didn't have to be” 

Mr. Thursz said after the mat- 
ing. “Everybody in the Jewish 
world was furious at the Bitburg 
thing. That was an attempt to for- 
give and forgeL And that we will 
never do and cannot do. 

“Israel has not made peace with 
the SS and Nazi Germany or with 
others who committed crimes of 
the Holocaust.” he continued. 
“They have begun the process of 
reconciliation with the new state of 
Germany.” 

The ambassador made repeated 
references to the Holocaust and 
quoted the speech given by Presi- 
dent Richard von Weizsacker of 
West Germany in Bonn on May 8. 

“German-Jewish relations will 
retain the mark of the Holocaust,” 
Mr. van Well said. “But let’s not 
forget the times when German- 
Jewish relations were close and 
fruitful." 


W 'cu/fwt;r/Mj Pits/ Stfnn* 

JOHANNESBURG. South Af- 
rica — A series of actions by South 
African security forces against 
members of the newly emergent 
black labor movement has causal 
leaders of the movement to identify 
more closely with black political 
activists. • 

Until a few months ago the ma- 
jor unions had resisted efforts by 
black political movements to in- 
volve them in their campaigns 
against apartheid. They had rea- 
soned that building up their ship- 
floor strength was a priority task. 

But attempts bv the government 
to quell unrest in segregated town- 
ships is changing the attitude of the 
black labor leaders. 

Evidence of this change was ap- 
parent at the funeral last week of a 
union official who died shortly af- 
ter being arrested by the police in 
the township of Tsakane. 50 miles 
(80 kilometers) east of Johannes-- 
burg. 

Black colleagues of the union of- 
ficial. Andries Raditsda. say they 
saw a police officer strike him on 
the head when he was arrested May 
4. Later that day relatives found 
Mr. Raditsela in a disoriented 
state, lying on the floor of a govern- 
ment building. He was taken to a 
hospital where he died May b. 

Mr. Raditsela. 29. belonged to 
one of the most determinedly non- 
political union groups, but the fu- 
neral it organized for him turned 
into a political rally attended by 
more than 25.000 people. 

Leaders of the Federation of 
South African Trade Unions deliv- 
ered impassioned speeches in sup- 
port of the black demand for politi- 
cal rights. Their union songs 
mingled with those of the under- 


Thc two men were detained 
without charges for a rhomb before 
pressure, apparently from the Rea- 
gan administration, led: to their re- 
lease. By that time the (wo organi- 
zations, with a combined 
membership of nearly 3Q0.OOO, had 
drawn closer to the maiji black na- 
tionalist organization that is stiD 
allowed lo operate legally, the 
United Democratic Front. 


ground African National Congress 
and its guerrilla wing. Spear of the 
Nation. 


DOONESBURY 


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Hunk Re-Elected in Prague 

■ United Press Intemanonu I 

PRAGUE — President Gustav 
Husak, 71 was re-elected by parlia- 
ment Wednesday to a third five- 
year term in office. Mr. Husak was 


also relumed unopposed as general 
secretary of the Communist Party. 



F. V P/V ^ 

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L*JW*?L*I*r*! 


. ill*— 4 '• 


South Africa’s Actions t 

Pushing Black Unions 

Toward More Activism 


The federation’s president, Chris 
Dlamini. said in an interview that 
Mr Raditsefa's death had been a 
watershed event for the orgtmza- 


“l think we have reached a new 
stage now." he said, adding that 
unrest and bloody clashes with the 
police thai have resulted in more 
than 300 deaths and 10.000 arrays 
in eight months were "pushing ev- 
eryone into becoming involved, in 
political issues outside the working 
place.” 

However, the federation's, call 
for a one-dav general strike to mark 
the occasion was observed only 
partially, indicating That although 
the unions arc becoming; politi- 
cized. South Africa's economic re- 
cession and rising black unemploy- 
ment rate are limiting their ability 
to take effective action. 


After armv raids ret black town- 
ships last fall, the unions culled for 
a two-day protest strike. The gov- 
ernment responded b> arresting 
Mr. Dlamini and PiroShaw Camay, 
president of another j big alliance, 
ihe Council of Unions -of South 
Africa. i 


Mr. Raditscla’s death has given 
the federation anotlpr shove in 
that direction. The next step could 
be taken June 8 and 9. when the 
federation, the council and other 
major unions will nieet to discus; 
the possibility of forming a single 
black labor federation. - - • • 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Page 


SCIENCE 


'Stu 


IN BRIEF 


Italian Physicist Pursues Challenges of Particle Accelerators 


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Evidence of Oil Found in Antarctica 


By William J. Broad 

New York Times Service 


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LONDON (NYT) — An analysis of sediment from the Door of 
Bransfield Strait, north of the Antarctic peninsula, has yielded dear 
evidence of ofl deposits, ’according to researchers on the West German 
ship Polarsiem. . 

The authors of the report noted that the area's abradant oceanic life 
continuously enriches the sea flora with organic Presumably, 

the organic matter is then baked by the upward flow of heal in this 
volcanic area, accelerating its conversion to oil and gas. 

~nrg sediment provides the first “nnambigiious gcorWrica] evidence of 
active petroleum source rocks along the Antatctic continent,” the authors 
reported in the journal Nature. 


^^.ENEVA — Fresh from win- 


“The proposal is absolutely fan- 
tastic,” concedes Dr. Rubbia, a big. 
energetic man of burning ambition. 
He was bom in Gorizia, Italy, on 
March 31, 1934, studied at the 
University of Piss and Columbia 
University in New York, and to- 
day, as wed as working at CERK 
teaches at Harvard University. 

In February Dr. Rubbia was 
Dr. Rubbia, 51, recently paused named head of a comm ittee to 
to outline some of his ideas tor new chan the future of CERN, a 13- 
partide accelerators — complex country Bmwwiiiim based outside 


ity that could record the presence 
oft 


ning last year’s Nobel Prize in 
physics, Dr. Carlo Rubbia has 
turned to one of the biggest chal- 
lenges of his careen creating a new 
atom smasher for CERN, the 
63X)0-peisOT European Laboratory 
for Particle Physics. 


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Mysterions Disease Strikes in Brazil 

ATLANTA (NYT) — A new and pczpk?dng disorder that affects 
children up to the age of 10 and is fatal in about 7D percent of cases has 
been identified in Brazil A task force of specialists, including some from 
the Centos for Disease Control hoe, has been formed to investigate it. 

The disease does not appear to be transmitted directly between 
individuals. Although its symptoms resemble those of meningitis, no 
suspicious bacteria or other dues have been identified. 

Ten children in a amaB town in the state of S2o Paolo contracted die 
disease last fan. It began with an acute onset of high fever, ’ 
abdominal pain. Within two days the dtikhen 
hemcffrhagingofblood vessels that turns the dtm pnrple.” All j 
died. 

Investigators who interviewed the families learned that in many cases 
the children’s eyes were infected a week or two beforehand with a 
contagious form of conjunctivitis. Whether this was related to rite 
mysterious disease is not known. . 


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Alcohol Galled a Prime Killer of Aged 


■■ t., 

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INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) — Death among the dderfy is often attribut- 
ed to “old age," but statistics show that alcoholism is the third leadi ng 
cause of death in that age group, says a spokeswoman for the Visiting 
Nurses Service in Indianapolis. 

The National Council rat Alcoholism estimates that more than 20 
percent of the United States’s population aged 61 and older are alcohol- 
ics. A large number of them torn to alcohol as an escape from problems 
associated with growing okL ■ 

Symptoms such as “falling and breaking of the hip,” confutiaxt, 
forgetfulness, chang es in behavior, and failing health among the elderly 
are often passed off as senility or as the “natural aging process,” said 
Maroene Blakcy* Royster. But these signs might in tat 
that an elderly person is dependent on alcohol, she said. 


machines that probe both the infi- 
nitely small and the infinitely lar ge, 
both the atom and the forces that 
hold the universe together. 

His work wiD have ramifications 
not only for CERN but also fra the 
future of physics in the United 
States. One of his imposed mar 
chines would, as he pul it, “cut a lot 
of grass” from a planned 
U. SumaltibSlkm-ddOar accelera- 
tor. 

To some observers, Dr. Robbia's 
atom smasher is a gamble that, if 
powerful enough and built quickly 
enough, might stop the American 
proposal dead in its trades. 

Toothers, Dr. Rubbia's machine 
is less threatening. “Rubbia's tech- 
nique is to make outrageous states 
meats and then see what gives,” 
said Leon M. Lederman. director 
of the Fenni National Laboratory 
in Batavia, Illinois. Fennilab is raw 
of the mam contenders for the 
American mariiine, the Supercon- 
ducting Soper Collider, whose cir- 
cular tunnel would stretch up to 
100 miles (160 kilometers) and cost 
S3 billion to $6 billion. 


Geneva. He has two years to fc 
a solid blueprint, and it Is widely 
believed that if he is successful he 
will win the directorship of the 
CERN laboratory. 

The roots of his most recall tech- 
nical triumph go back to the 1970s, 

when he persuaded Simon van der 
Meer, a CERN physicist, to resur- 
rect a discarded theory for the pro- 
duction and storage of antiprotons. 


the ghostly particles- It was built 
in three years, with S20 million and 
the efforts of 1% physicists from 
eight countries. 

The detector and accelerator 
were switched on in 1982. In 1983, 
Dr. Rubbia announced the discov- 
ery of the W and Z particles, rem- 
nants of the cosmic big bang that 
convey two of the fundamental 
forces of nature, electromagnetic 
and the so-called weak force, which 
accounts for some forms of radia- 
tion. It was for this discovery and 
his role in developing the machine 
that he won the Nobd Prize with 
Dr. van der Meer. In 1984 be an- 
nounced the discovery of the top 
quark, another elementary building 

block of nature. 


pushed to increasingly high 
gies, they increase their rests 


ener- 
gies, mey increase their resistance 
to bring turned in a ancle, in the 
way that turning an automobile 
around a comer is easy' at 6 raph 
and more difficult at 60 mph. 

To build an atom smasher more 
powerful than LEP. a designer has 
two basic options: increasing the 
size of the accelerator circle, thus 


straightening out the particle patb- 
; possible (the option 


particles that are identical to pro- 
have 


tons in mass and spin but that I 
the opposite electric charge. 

His dream was to adapt a 4-nrik- 
long circular proton accelerator at 
CERN to speed antiprotons along 
with the protons, making it the 
world’s most powerful atom 
smasher. The protons and antipro- 
tons, when poshed in opposite di- 
rections arid smashed together, 
would annihilate each other in a 
flash of energy and, perhaps reveal 
new particles. 

In 1978, as work on the accelera- 
tor got under way. Dr. Rubbia took 
up another technical challenge — a 
detector of unprecedented sensiuv- 


Dr. Rubbia has now set his sights 
on an accelerator that outperform 
not only his proton-antiproton col- 
lider but another atom smas her un- 
der construction at CERN, the 
LEP, or large dectron-positrou col- 
lider. (Positrons are the antimatter 
cousins of dectrons.) With a circu- 
lar mnn«»i 16 mil es in circumfer- 
ence, LEP is due to be switched on 
in 198S. 


One of Dr. Rubbia's main ideas 
is to put a new accelerator in that 
tunnel atop the LEP machine, giv- 
en that the expensive tunnels would 
already have beat dug. The prob- 
lem would be bow to make the 
accelerator more powerful than 
LEP. 


As subatomic particles are 


•‘:i! 1. [ - 


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’5 


Single TB-Leprosy Vaccine Is Sought 

BOSTON (AP) — Scientists have used a new technique to isolate genes 
from the bacteria that cause tnboculoris and leprosy, and they say this 
may enable them to develop a shi gle . fnHy effective vaccine against th ese 
major diseases. 

Leprosy and tuberculosis are caused by similar bacteria. Vaccines now 
exist for both diseases, but they have major shortcomings. 

The researchers' idea is to isolate the bacterial genes that produce 
proteins that the human immtme system recognizes as foreign. Then these 
genes would be spliced into the genetic material of a harmless bacterium. 


Scientists Try to Explain 1984 Qoud 


way as much as. 
being pursued in the United 
States), or employing more power- 
ful magnets to keep a tight grip on 
increasingly energetic particles. 

“The United Stales has Texas 
and other large areas so they can 
talk about 100-kilometer ma- 
chines," said Dr. Rubbia. But in 
Europe real estate is expensive, and 
so the CERN team is focusing on 
the creation of ma gn ets more pow- 
erful than any ever before used in 
particle accelerators. 

Magnetic power is measured in 
units known as tesla. A few years 
ago at the Brookhaven National 
Laboratory on Long Island, mag- 
net designers tried and failed to 
mass produce accelerator magnets 
of five tesla, at the rime the stron- 
gest ever for an atom smasher. 

CERN. however, is looking into 
the construction of magnets of 
right tesla. “It's something that will 
require a lot of effon,” Dr. Rubbia 
said. “It's rate thing to build a few 
at home, and quite another to do it 
oommerciaiBy. 

The construction of such mag- 
nets would severely test Dr. Rub- 
bia, his colleagues say. Physicists 
have speculated about putting an- 
other accelerator in the LEP tun- 
nel, but it would require great skill 
to build one as ambitious. 


The resulting machine. Dr. Rub- 
bia said, might be able to collide 
protons with a force of 16 trillion 
electron volts or TEV, In contrast, 
the U. S. proposal is to build a 
machine of 40 TEV with magnets 
of anywhere from 3 to 6.5 tesla. 
“Our machine would make sense 
only if it came earlier than the U. S. 
project," said Dr. Rubbia. 

The CERN machine might be 
built by 1992 or 1993. while the 
American machine would be built 
in the mid-1990s, he said. He added 
that the CERN accelerator would 
be much less expensive, costing 
about S300 million, a tenth of the 
price of the Superconducting Super 
Collider. 

With less than half the American 
machine’s power, it might nonethe- 
less walk away with the lion’s shore 
of the discoveries, according to Dr. 
Rubbia. 

Similar optimism was expressed 
by John Ems. a CERN theoretical 
physicist. “We’d like a machine 
twice as powerful ” he said, “but I 
can't convince myself it’s worth the 
extra cost.” Dr. Bits is a leading 
theorist of supersymmetry, which 
posts the existence of a group of 
panicles (with names like squarks. 
gluinos, gravitinos, zinos and win- 
osj that might be revealed in the 
energy range of Dr. Rubbia's pro- 
posed machine. 

At Fennilab. Dr. Lederman dis- 
paraged the European proposal, 
saying a more powerful machine 
was needed. “I think ours is a 
sounder idea because we can get to 
a higher energy.” he said. “You 
have to get to a place where you can 
derisively resolve some of the un- 
certainties we are facing in phys- 
ics." 



Th« taoHMd 


Physicist Rubbia: An “ab- 
solutely fantastic" project. 


Dr. Rubbia was not deaf to such 
arguments. He said Europeans 
would even be interested in partici- 
pating in the U.S. machine and 
forgoing the challenge of creating a 
rival if the terms of the cooperation 
could be made alluring enough. 


Having broached the idea ot 
such cooperation, he started to dis- 
cuss other machines CERN would 
then be free to build. “We could do 
something completely new. com- 
pledy different, completely origi- 
nal." he said. “There are fantastic 
new possibilities." 


By Walter Sullivan 

New York Times Service 


OT since the great Siberian 


which could be used as a vaccine. The research was conducted at the 
Whitehead Institute fra Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. 


.ISKK5'" 


Raw Seafood: Some Should Abstain 


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SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (UPI) —-People with liver disease or with a 
weakened immune system should not eat raw seafood, because it oould 
give them fatal blood prisoning, according to a medical researcher. 

Infec tions by a common saltwater bacterium from eating contammai- 
ed raw oysters ra from wounds inflicted while handling seafood can also 
cause arthritis, seizures, low Mood pressure, confusion, anorexia and 
vomiting in vulnerable people, said Jeffrey Jdhnstoa,.of the University of 
Utah School of Medicine. The bacterium, Vibrio vulnificus, is common in 
coastal waters, especially in the Gulf of Mqaca 
“Pfcnole who 


blast of 1908 or the flash re- 
corded over the South Atlantic by a 
U. S. Defense Department satellite 
in 1979 has there been an event as 
stubbornly mysterious as the mush- 
room riraid that appeared over the 
sea 200 miles east of Japan shortly 
before midnight April 9, 1984. 

It was so dose to a Japan Air- 
lines* cargo flight. No. 36, that the 
plane's commander. Captain 
Charles H. McDade, swerved away 
from it, began a rapid descent, or- 
dered his crew to put on 
masks and radioed a “1 ' 
distress cafl. 


“Locks like a midear explosion, 
only there was no fireball,'' he told 
fli ght controllers in Alaska. His 


plane was slightly jostled. “I turned 
tail and ra n ,, he said later. 


r __ The crews of KLM and 

abmxmai immune function are ferritic fra the- Tiger aniinos, also headed 


des, they say, generated enough 
heat to evaporate the doud parti- 
des and cause a rising plume of air 
Hke that above a nuclear explosion. 

According to Dr. Daniel A. 
Walker of the Hawaii Institute of 
Geophysics, who has spent several 
months studying flight crew inter- 
views and available data, the mete- 
or hypothesis does not explain the 
mushroom shape nor the energy 
needed to force a doud upward at 
500 mph. 

In an analysis published in the 
journal Science, he and his col- 
leagues said, The only known nat- 
ural phenomenon capable of pro- 
ducing' such rapid arid extensive 
vertical motions are volcanic erup- 
tions at their source.” 

The meteor hypothesis. Dr. 
Walker said in a telephone inter- 
view, must stlH be spelled out in 
terms of “good, hard mathematics 
and meteorological physics." 

Co-authors of his report in Sci- 
ence were Charles S. McCreery and 


sphere, but moving so fast it ex- 
ploded from the read ting heat 

The 1979 flash was recorded by 
one of the Vela satellites placed in 
orbit to watch for nudear explo- 
sions. Their sensors record hun- 
dreds of thousands of flashes from 
lightning bolts, meteors, ground- 
based lasers, direct or reflected 
sunlight. Most are very brief. The 
South Atlantic flash was more like 
the prolonged sequence from a nu- 
dear blast 

As a result, the Defense Intelli- 
gence Agency was reported to have 
decided that a nuclear explosion 
was the most likdy explanation. A 


panel of experts convened by the 
r, concluded 



White House, however, 
that the absence of otter support- 
ing evidence, such as fallout and 
atmospheric pressure waves, 
seemed to rule that out 
More plausible, it found, was 
sunlight reflected from’ debris 
knocked off the satellite by a small 
meteoroid. 


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Marne Lobsters Said to Travel 
As Muchas 100 MUes a Year 

By Jeffrey J, 

United Press fw 


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Simek 

ftuavaiumal 

A UGUSTA, Maine — Some 
/v lobsters, often thought of as 
sluggish creatures of the deep, nay 
cover 100 miles (160 Itilometera) or 
more each yean 

Many appear to complete a long- 
distance circuit and return to their 
starting print, according to Mary 
^ Criullo of the University of Maine 
.■ Sea Grant College Program, who is 
at the midway print of a three- 1 
project on movements of large 
sters in the Gulf of Maine. 

“Evidently some lobsters under- 
take long-distance seasonal jour- 
neys comparable, fra their size, to 
those of other Maine natives who 
go to Florida fra the winter” dm 
said. 

In October 1983, researchers 
dumped into the ocean 1,996 large 
lobsters specially tagged and 
marked with a “V" notched into 
their tails. Cooperating lobstermen 
report when and where they. trap 
such lobster, and toss the speci- 
men baric into the water. 

^ Halfway through the project, 379 
flobstere have been captured and 
released — some as many as four 
times. „ 

Although most of the. lobsters 
moved 2 to 7 mfles from where they 
w ere released, II percent were 
tracked an average of 60 miles, in- 
cluding several mat later returned 
to their original release area. 

“One lobster released from Sto- 
nington, Connecticut, in October 
1983, was caught 74 miles south-, 
east the next May ” Dr. CeruIIo 
said. “Then it traveled 81 miles 
north to within a few. miles .of Sto- 
nington before it was recaptured in 
August IW4:* . 

Some lobsters were found as for 
south as Nantucket Island and as 
. K far east as Georges Bank, which is 
> bdieved to be im important breed- 
1 ingground. As a rule, the larger the 
lobster, the more distance it cov- 
ered. 

The research seems to confirm. 


what lobstermen have known for 
decades — that lobsters tend to 
minute farther off shore in search 
of deeper and wanner waters in the 
winter, then return in the spring- 
time. 

The study corid also tiled light 
on the rrie that larger lobsters puty 
on brood node, and how the move- 
ments affect 'the lobster popnla- 
tion. 

Dr. Cerrito stressed researchers 
need more inf omatian before they 
cunxcnfidentiy project trends for 
movements of lobsters. 

The information could also aid 
in detei mitimgi whether increasing 
die mhmmHn legal size for keeping 
trapped lobster would hdp pre- 
serve the lobster population. 


bulb appeared, soaring at an esti- 
mated 500 midi (800 kph). The 
bulb rapidly expanded to a diame- 
ter of 200 miles — the distance 
between New York and Washing- 
ton — then thinned and disap- 
peared above 65,000 feet. . . . . . , 

The Soviet Union had warned of botMtognearthal ate. 

impending weapons tests, but far to Arty volcanic plume from Kai- 
the northTsaMhe planes, and oth- Seamotml should have been 


Manoa. Among the records that 
they examined were those from an 
array of 11 hydrophones near 
Wake Island They apparently re- 
corded volcanic rumbling from un- 
derwater eruptions at Kanoku Sea- 
mount 9 10 rales south of the cloud 


to 


era pasting the area on thar wa; 
Alaska, were diverted to 
Air Force Base near Anchorage to 
be examined for radioactivity. 
None was found There was no 
disrtmtion of aircraft electronics, 
nor md any of the pOots spe a flash, 
and other irihale effects of a nude- 
ar blast were lacking. 

Last year's event has been an ar 
lyzed Ity a number of scientists, 
most recently in the British journal 
Nature by Andrt C. Chang and 
James A Burnetii qf Teledyne 
Geo tech in Alexandria, Virginia. 
They propose that it occurred when 
a meteor hit the doud deck and 
disintegrated, producing a multi- 
tude of fragments. 

The kinetic energy of these parti- 


blowninlhe 
group 

“It is important for (he mystery 
to be solved," Walker recently 
wrote to a Dutch colleague. “One 
should consider whether a nudear 
war would have been started if the 
doud had been observed in a more 
populated area." 

Similar fears have been ex- 
pressed should there be a recur- 
rence of the 1908 explosion, which 
leveled forests over a large part of 
Siberia, starting fires and 
numerous reindeer. Presumably it 
ocean ed high in the air. Tor no 
ante was formed. 

The favored explanation is that it 
was a COmet tOO insnhc»»nt«l to 
survive passage through the atmo- 


Carthagmian Tombs 
Found Near Sardinia 


Thr A&odated Press 

ROME — Archaeologists have 
.found more than 1,500 Carthagin- 
ian tombstones dating from the 6th 
■“" .to 1st centuries B. C cm an island 
off Sardinia, researchers said. . .. 

Images of gods and priests, and 
inscriptions,' are carved an the 
tombstones found on the island of 
Sani’Antioco, Professor Sabatino 
Moscati of ite University of Rome 
said last week • • 





In Jakarta 

there's a superb hotel 
that is more like a 
luxurious country dub. 


HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
INTER* COMTNENTAL 



THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL* 



•>. INTER- CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

. Jalan Lapangan Banteng Selatan, (P.O. Box 329). 37U108, Telex: 44156 • 
For reservations call: Hong Kong: 5-8440311/3, 

Tokyo: 2150777 Singapore: 2202476,. Osaka: 2640666, 
learest inter* 


or call your nearest Inter*Continental sales office. 



Our longest 
running season 


The starter’s gun hasn't sounded yet, but we 
know we have a winner. 

After all, the cast consists of the finest 
runners, jumpers, vaulters, and throwers in 
international athletics— many of them world- 
record holders and medalists at the 1984 
Los Angeles Olympics. 

And for the first time, these athletes will 
be competing against each other over a 
16-meet season that runs from 25 May 
in San Jose, California, to 7 Septem- 
ber in Rome, Italy. 

Sponsored by Mobil and organ- 
ized by the International Amateur 
Athletic Federation, the IAAF 
Mobil Grand Prix is a new 
concept in athletics. 

In the past, though sports 
fans dreamt of great con- 
frontations, the best athletes 
rarely met each other when the 
chips were down. Then everything 
rode on one meet and too often chance 
victimized talent. Chance— and politics. 

But this season, the athletes will be put 
to the truest test of excellence: consistency 
at the highest levels of competition. 

Grand Prix points are awarded to athletes 
on the basis of their performances and 
times. World records gain extra points. At 
the conclusion of the season, overall Grand 
Prix titles will be awarded to the outstanding 
mate and female athletes and to the out- 
standing performers in each event. 

It’s a programme that will help sustain 
interest in athletics— among athletes and 
among fans. Which is one good reason 
why Mobil is supporting our longest running 
season. 


il 

t IAAF i 
& Mobil \ 


Here's the 1985 IAAF Mobil Grand Prix schedule' 



BfuceJennef's 

San Jose 


Bsieli Games 

Oslo 

Bud LtgM Classic 

Caiitomia 

25 May 

■tAC 

London 

The Prefonta'me Classic 

Eugene. Oregon 

1 June 

Budapest Grand Prix 

Budapest 

Znamensky Memorial 

Moscow 

8 June 

Wellklasse 

Zurich 

Rcsrcky Memorial 

Piague 

22 June 

ISTAf 

West Berlin 

DN-febn 

Stockholm 

2 July 

Wellklasse 

Cologne 

World Games 

Helsinki 

4 July 

Ivo Van Damme Memorial 

Brussels 

Nikaa 

Nice 

IB Jutv 

IAAF Mobil 


Peugew Tatoo! Games 

Lnndrai 

19 Jury 

Giand Prix Final 

Home 


27 July 
2 August 
4 August 
21 August 
23 August 
25 August 
30 August 


7 SeuiemtM 




i 






Pane tt 


1 >TKK> ATI ON A L HERALD TRIBINE. THURSDAY. MAY 23, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Wednesdays 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index, 


amex Most Actives, 


Hhh Low Lost Chg. 


Unocl <Md 

HevrIPk 

SterlDa 

AT&T 

NlndPS 

wwsut 

Mob! 

PPL Go 

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Pfizer 

TWA 

IBM 

Eck*rt 

LTV 

Am Exp 


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UMI 142.96 15167 14030 141.98 — IW 

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170 34 17 999 33* 33 33*—* 

70 17 599 161% 16* 16* 


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140* 98* AHespf 340 24 1 127 127 127 42* 

2* 1% AmAsr 255 1* 1* 1* „ 

21* 15* ABakr 9 122 21* 21 21 — W 

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56* 43* AC von 170 34 13 1393 SSW 54V. 55* + * 

27* 18* ADT 42 37 25 m 24* 34* 24* 


20* 18* AMI 72 24 13 1298 26* 25* 25*— * 
5* 2* AmMot 2097 3 2* 2*— W 

43* 23* APnaU 24 3 336 26* 25* 25*— * 

13* 5 ASLFia 5 48 6 5* 6 

10* 12V, ASLFI Pt 119 167 19 13* 13* 13*—* 

16 10* AShlP nut 65 11* 11* 11*— * 

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57* 26* AmSror M 1.1 10 612 S7* 56* 56*— 1* 


69 46* AStr pf A 478 64 46 67* 67 

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24* IS AT&T 170 LI 1713541 23* 23 

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69 50* Amoco 370 11 9 1668 65* 64* 65 — * 

38* 26* AMP 72 LI 20 1274 34 33* 33*— * 

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31* 19 AmSln 140 44 I 2? 31* 30* 30*— * 

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39* 23 A vary 40 18 13 134 33* 33V. 33W — 14 

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1 87 2.1 
680 77 9 
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180 14 II 
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1.90 43 10 
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170X44* 
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70 54* 
519 43* 

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6466 a* 
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2 72* 
113 15* 
104 31* 

201? 73 

3 2SV» 
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356 31* 

6 21V. 
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15 38* 
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543 31* 

2561 15* 
19 a 
37 33 
49 35* 
2538 33* 
15 59* 
75 14 
251 52* 
118 5* 

266 9* 
37 15 
335 32* 
IS 32* 
1407 89* 
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8 22* 
2636 39* 

71 56* 
45 29* 

337 41* 
I 37* 
100x154 
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86 5* 
116 6* 
1357 14* 
1256 16* 
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396 &W 
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215 S3* 
1757 43* 
15 43 
1299 44 
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10* 10*— H 
32* 32* 

18* 18*— W 
20 * 20 *— * 
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9* 5*— * 
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10 10* 

44* 44*—* 
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31* 32 — * 
9*— V. 
3*— V% 
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19 — * 
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77*— I* 
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a -* 
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30*- * 
15*-* 
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35 — * 
77* 

59 — * 
14 + * 

51*— * 
5*— * 
9*— * 
145% — 1% 

a —i* 
31 *- * 
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31 - * 

a 

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42*— * 
43*— * 
56*— * . 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
ap to Hie dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late tradoc elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


indusfriafa 21L1B Wi' 2WJ2 208.17 

Tranp. 16194 16381 16173 1ftM» 

u mi tin 8581 ewn lu? bus 

Flninn 081 23L2S 2131 2287 

CmSo 18M1 1SL7I 10984 187.84 


3 PAL volume 
Pr*v. 3 PJL volume 
Prw. com. volume 


AMEX Stock Index 




p * w * oBi 

LOW CI0W 


3J2J5 m.9S 23287 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK ~ Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange showed a broad loss in early 
trading Wednesday as some traders took profits 
after the market’s recent rise to record highs. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
dropped 10J0 to J. 299.40 an hour before the 
dose. 

T„ jre in g stocks outnumbered gaining ones by 
about S to 2. 

Volume came to 84.91 million shares. ^ 

The Dow Jones industrial average's rise 


Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York , for time reckons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 


‘The slowing of the economy, which was 
most pronounced in the first quarter, is about 
over, Mr. Kaufman said. “As money market 
rates end their fall within the next month or so, 
the ebullience in the long-term bond market win 
abate." 

Rank slocks, which have been especially 
strong of late, ran into selling. J.P. Morgan 
dropped 1% to 50%; Chase Manhattan ¥t to 
59%- Bankamerica Vi to 21%, and Citicorp ft to 
48%. 

The NYSE’s composite index lost .99 to 
108.66. On the American Stock Exchange, the 
market value index fell 1-59 to 230.88. 


through the 1,300 level earlier in the week 
caused a great deal of exdtemenL 
But analysts noted that the average, repre- 
senting a relatively narrow sample of stocks. 


was just catching up with other, broader indica- 
tors that had already readied new peaks. 

“The market has come a long way in a short 
period of time.” observed Newton Z mri er at 
' E.F. Hutton & Co. 

Brokers also noted that interest rates, whose 


■ Kaufman Sees 4% Growth Bate 

The Federal Reserve’s actions to boost the 
U.S. economy will produce a growth rate of 4 
percent and that wifi result in higher short-term 
interest rates b eginning in about a month, Hen- 
ry Kaufman said Wednesday, United Press In- 
ternationa] reported from New York. 

Ihe Salomon Brothers economist said the 
Fed's recent accommodative posture, most evi- 
denced in its reduction in the discount rate to 
7.5 percent last week, will spur an “economic 

I." ,L_, J,, _w,.. 


sharp decline helped fuel the recent rally in 
stock prices, had stopped falling. 

Prices of long-term government bonds, which 
move in the opposite direction from interest 
rates, were generally lower in the credit markets 
today. 

Henry Kaufman, chief economist at Salomon 
Brothers, said in a speech prepared for delivery 
Wednesday that he believed interest rates 
would Uim upward as the pace of economic 
activity picks up. 


snapback" chat already is under way. 

“It would seem that the Federal Reserve win 


17 Month 
High LOW Stock 


Dtv.VM.PE IB* HI* Low 


Close 

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“It would seem that the Federal Reserve win 
feed a sufficient volume of reserves into the 
system to eventually ensure an economic re- 
bound that [temporarily] will produce real 
growth of 4 percent or more.” Mr. Kaufman 
said in a speech to the National Council of 
Savings Institutions in New Orleans. 

But that rebound also ensures that the Fed 
will begin a tightening action to lift interest 
rates when the growth becomes, unsustainable, 
he said. 


, 11 Month 
HtehLew Stock 


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Growing with the 
solid-state 
control market 

Ametek’s U.S. Gauge. Controls 
and Microelectronics Divisions 
provide measurement and 
control capability that’s inte- 
grated from silicon to systems. 

Write for latest reports to: 


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(ContuHKd an Page 10) 


















-*>>SSi55 


ft*"?; 7?:, 

**->•5-7.! >*: 

JLL’*-.’ ■'*» 

■Vra*. -a» 

nts ; *. 

*:•*■“• n •*■> 

?* T -«e ■?'*• 

$ 

»T.’l[*l f«“ 

V »1 a' 1 

n * 


. sf> 


Statistics Index 


$ I* I - * 


AMEX prices p.14 
AMEX HshsAmsP.la 
MYtt prices P. • 
■ . NYSE tUglB/HMS P.1D 
j Ctnnflon stocks P.16 
Currency raw . p. 9 
CommedIHas P.W 
KvW*n* P.10 


Eonrinss renorfs p.it 
FB no rote notes PJ3 
Gold moftefs p. f 
uueres rates P. 9 
Mortal summary p. I 
Ootlans p.w 

OTC (tack P.12 
Ottwr raorkets PJ6 


THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


WALL STREET WATCH 


■ ■ - s >^. 


With Dow Flying at 1 , 300 , 
Some Are Wary of Hypoxia 



Growing with £ 
SOlld-stafo ^ 


aoiia-state 
control market 


A**-*-*, -i. 


Vs T !i 


1985 and “protected on the 
downside by the massive in- 
jection of liquidity from the 
Fed.” It has been this action 


With rates faffing, 
investors are now 
Vethinkmg’attitndes 
toward stocks. 


>metek 




"■'‘"w. * "« Flo® 

’ V* ■-i'VVi 


•£ ISs 2 - 

'tCC? 

i: 


Fed.” It has been this action 

• G**.-p e i- ^ I ? dCTal Rescn £ **? p ^ednIlk^lg , attitudes 

'-ontr^ ignited the current rally, he ” ® 

added, because “a lot of inves- toward Stocks. 

‘ •■■•>»Mnem a ^ tors who shouldn't have been • 

1L) . anc in cash decided to move ouL” 

,.h- - . Slf % Richard Schmaltz, director erf portfolio strategy ax Kidder 
° r svaenj 'a Peabody, thinks that the “biggest suiprise produced by this rally 
reports u could be an awakening of the over-the-counter market.” He 
*■ pointed out that both the Nasdaq index and American Stock 
Exchange have failed to match the record highs set on the New 
I Elf York Stock Exchange. 

^I\ With returns from money-market funds and Treasury bills 
melting as interest rates work lower, he sees retail investors 
Flo® “rethinking” their attitudes toward common stocks. “The move is 

'2 only modest so far, but picking up” he said, noting that it is 

— — individuals who tend to buy the smaller stocks. 

Kidder has raised its target on the S&P-500 stock index to 210, 

about 10 percent higher than it is now, and up some 10 points 
' J from the firsL week of May when it recommended that equity 
?4 , accounts go from 75 percent to 90 percent invested. Mr. Schmaltz 

li v' i; > cited the recent “meaningful and credible” action by the adminis- 
* * tratiou and Congress an cutting the federal budget for boosting 
'■ ;i; !;■ Wall Street prospects, plus the Feds “obvious restimulation.” 

;> j, %. Favorite stocks he mentioned are Digital Eqnipmenl, Minne- 
sota Mining, Squibb, Schering-Plough. Celanese and Great Lakes 
■ ChemicaL 

- 

T F Wall Street does continue to surge higher, Philip Roth, 
r, flit I iwrfinieal analyst at EP. Hutton, commented that energy 

iji, JL stocks will probably lose their momentum. Snce 1983, he 

i pointed out, these issues have tended to outperform only “when- 

^ 1 ever the market has bem in a flat or down pattern.” 
y :> A. Marshall Acuff Jr„ Smith Barney portfolio strategist, noted 
'• 'Z that energy stocks have been a source of “amazement and 

— - frustration” this year to investors. “Probably voted least likely to 

r succeed in 1985, they have deariy outdistanced the market,” he 
I'f said, pointing out mat the group has topped the total-return 
• ’•* r ," * charts among major stock groups.with an 18-percent gain. 

' ■ I*. i?|’; Charles Maxwell, senior oil strat^st at Cyrus J. Lawrence, 
thinks it is time to take prerfits in the group. He warns about 
“substantial risk of oil surpluses swamping the market,” IBs 
. ■« associate, Frederick Leoffcr, added: “The stocks are not cheap on 

• .y. t y a statistical basis and cany a premium-, because, of takeover 
- - 7 activity." . .*.--. - -••••.- 

Barry Good, dl analyst at Morgan Stanley, shares this view 
about weak fundamentals. ‘Trading-oriented investors should 
. sell into strength,” be said. 

- : , However, Russell Miller, who follows the industry for Alex. 

Brown & Sons, accepts that enegy stocks may slip near term, but 
, ;; -1 likes the long-range outlook. u lhe risk of continuing to severely 
1 -.i ^ underweight energy sectors of the portfolio in face « this major 
■*. T restructuring (by companies) exceeds the potential reward of 
5 waiting fev a posable pullback in thee stocks," he said. 

• Oil stock investments have also been considered unattractive 

;V r .: (Combined on Page 15, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


CranRatea 



hw.l • f 

. j. * • 

* 

K 

DA 

F.F. 

NA. 

OMr. 

■J=. 

S JF. 

Yen 

"* * 


1 . Amsterdam 

117 

as 

11X93* 

37295* 

XI W* 

■ 

Sill* 

154295 • 

13X60y 

,1 ' 

mi ‘ . f: 

’ RnraeUta} 

<1*5 

XX 

2X137 

1595 

XU* 

T7J29 

mm— 

219425 

24*9* 

^ _ 


i*J*' nratot 

U» 

UR 


7X77* 

MUk 

MS * 

4W* 

11997* 

1227 * 

1.., 


* 7. London (b) 

\2U 

— 

U93S 

1UMS 

UMX 

*m 

TUB 

32743 

317.10 

n '■ 

M * 

» Milan 

wax 

349MB 

43X73 

36923 

— 

5*5*7 

71253 

73921 

7252 

1 ' 

^ 

. - « i New YarkCO- 

— 

QJW> 

IDO 

Mi 

LM2A6 

um 

ttU 

25*15 

25X97 

* 1 - 


, . I - i\ . ParU 

MX 

115025 

10119 

. 

4-774* 

27917 

tSJSt* 

3*299 

1743* 

i”n 

ft-- • 

- (r Tokyo 

259J25 

31X57 

•M7 

2475 

win. 

7ZB 

40572 ■ 

9X96 

mm— 


• ; J ." 

2*US 

32791 

94.14 * 

27J59* 

X13T7* 

74*95 • 

41775 • 


UB23 ■ 

tiAl 

«v 


. - . i ecu 

173 

UM 

2242J 

6*422 

143113 

un 

4XOI1 

MM* 

19X7*1 

rS 


1 5DR 

019451 

X7B347 

ueu 

942391 

USU3 

14537 

ium 

2357* 

349253 


-V C Sferiinv: 1 JUS Irtsti s 
", ‘ sources: Banaue au Benelux ( Brussels J; i 
■ Bank INew York): Banaue Natlanale de 

, * - MrtiamJ. outer Bate tram Reuters and AP. 




Interest Bales 


Depvdla 


ft 

- a . , ’j 

‘ i« •*." 


OaHar 

P Merle 

Serfss 

Fraac 

StertUw . 

II 

ecu 

j — 

SDR 

( 7 mo ^ ! , 

- 

1 monte 

7tw-7«, 

5*- 51* 

5 Hr5Hi 

m-ra* 

lOHrlO*. 

9*451 

79ft 

c ” 1 

1 • j • 

2 months 

70tr7% 

5Mft 

51 MW 


10hr-H«. 

*Ve4% 

r* 

9% * 

. 1 • “ ,«■ 

3 months 

7?M 

59*4 «ti 

SMVl 

nvo* 

194-10* 

99W4* 

7* 

^ " " * J 

• • j . 

4 SMMItM 

SIMW 

£Vj-SWi 

5'V5Vi 

riwr-ntH 

ID *.10* 

*14-9* 

0 

t 

• i ■ • i 

1 veer 

IMY. 

Hx rxr. . 

Ml* 

12 Hr 12 tl, 

WVS-T0* 


IPA 


Key Money Rales May 22 


• unurt State 

1 - .• Dtscoval Rats 

Fedm Feeds 
, ’ prim Rote 

gnker Lom tone 
Com Pww IHW 
Smooth TnotorY WM 
_a\ Hwmrt Traasorr Bills 
... L. rWcmimdow 
" ; * cot iMf dors 

' ■ wruGenntwr 

1* Lombard Rate 

O miUgM Rote 
On Moafli laterticnk 
3-BBmtt MirbiMt 
' J. MmttMorbnfe 


Ckac Prey. 

TVS 71b 

TV* ?% 

IB 10 

B»-t • 

7 JO 7 Ji 

12* IDS 

7 Ji 1JB 

7 JO 7 JO 

7JS 7JS 


«M 100 
US SB 
STS &7J 
5J6 SB0 

sis s a 


Aefam MlarPepeilto 

M*r 22 

1 meant 7%-7» 

lmoatbs 7tk-7^ 

emoaWi 7*-B 

• naatts IW-pik 

ivaar 

Source: Retden. 


V2&. M—ey Market Fawfa 

May 22 

Momu LYMb Rooar Adtn 
MMyanragaytaM: BJ7 

TMntainmnRataiadu: TIM 
Source: MerrlHLm&AP 


interveattao Rate 1M MV* 

Cal! Moan 1M KM 

OiwmnHi lalntaab 101/U IB 1/14 

I m a Mt* imtrbaBh IBtt UVB 

Hnaft l u l ir ba o t IB 10 



RrBnUi 

•• • Rank Rom Ran TO m 

. Manor ' l» Wa 

“ »da*TraoarrRi» ' 121/1* 12 

. . - frmoaih iBtartaak 1211/U mb 


DiscwiatIWa 

CaNMOMY 


9 S 

sis/u.su/u 

m 


Sources: Reuters. C oewne nbenk. OredU 
LvvmoR. Liam Bank. Boat at Tola* 


: May 22 

. .AJH. PJR. CRIW 
Ham tom 31U9 . 31731 +10* 

Lmbaboin. J173S ' — -HUS 

ParisnUkBaJ 3160* 3T7XS +10* 

Zartdi • J1B25 3t7JB +135 

LaaRte 1174} ■ 7U2S +135 

Mm» Y ork _ - jujd —US 

UNMBMiwriL Parts and London offlriol fix- 
•na v Hona Koap ana Zuritfi opontnp and 
deed v orient New York Cemex current 
contract JUT Drlac'h US I per ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


JtcmljQSjmjnmc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


l-.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Even with stock prices soaring to new highs this 
week, many market analysts are not letting themsdves be 
overly affected by the ratified tar around 1,300 on the 
Dow. Goldman Sadis, for example, which refused to get 
heady in the updraft of sharp rallies last August and January mid 
was proven right when most gains deflated over ensuing months, 
maintains a sober, sea-levd attitude. 

“it's a mature stock market, still providing some ppportunity 
for an advance.” said Steven Emham, co-chairman erf the firm’s 
Y investment policy committee. “But even if that occurs, we think it 
-7 will be followed by a lengthy topping-out process at levels not too 
much higher than where We are now ” 

He sees stocks “constrained on the upside” by rising interest 
rates in the second half of 



Osman Ahmed Osman 


Orders Up 

a Controversial Contractor 

In U.S. for Built a Business Empire in Egypt 

Durables ■ 

4/UIUI/1U) CAIRO -When Anwar Sa- 

T dal was president of Egypt, Os- 

TlTSt Increase nran Ahmed Osman, Egypt's 

T n if i richest businessman, was never 

In 3 Months 'F'™ n ,™»5- 

Osman — entrepreneur, banker, 

The Associated Frets self -proclaimed builder of the 

WASHINGTON — Orders to Aswan Dam — who accompa* 

U.S. factories for durable masufac- nied Sadat cm his historic trip to 

tured goods rose 1 percent in April, Jerusalem in 1977. It was Mr. 

the Erst increase in three months, Osman who watched videotaped 
the government reported Wednes- movies with him late into the 
day. night. And it was Mr. Osman 

The Commerce Department said who helped Sadat promote 
orders for durable goods, items ex- Egypt's reopening to pnvale en- 
pected to last more than three terprise ana to the West 

years, totaled $100.7 billion in So when Hosni Mubarak be- 

April, a gain of $1 biUion from the came president after Sadat’s as- 

March level sassinaiion in 1981. many Egyp- 

In March orders had fallen 2.7 tians predicted Mr. Osman’sfall 
percent following a IB-percent from grace. 

February decline. While orders But that has not happened, 
rose 4.1 percent in January to a Although he is no longer minis- 

record high of S105.4 billion, this ter of construction or a confidant 

was only a 1 -percent advance from of Egypt's leader, Osman Ahmed 

the level reached in March 1984 Osman remains powerful and 

because orders have generally been probably the most famous Egyp- 

weak the past year. lian entrepreneur. 

The setbacks underscore the He still effectively controls, as 

weak performance in the industrial “life honorary chairman," the kh 

sector. US. industry has been bat- Arab Contractors Group, a Osman Ahmed Osman 

tered by foreign competition both sprawling network of private and 

at home and abroad with sales public-sector companies, the of Parliament, serving on the in- vate sector,” Mr. Osman said in 

slumping because of the strong val- most important of which he fluential housing committee, one of his infrequent interviews. 

ue ot the dollar. founded 36 years ago. Arab Con- And he is chairman of the ruling “Only through competition bc- 

The government on Tuesday re- tractors Cou, as it is still called. National Democratic Party's tween the private and public sec- 

ported U.S. economic growth for achieved renown as one of the popular development commit- lor will Egypt’s interests be 

the first three months of the year builders of Aswan Dam. tee, at the same time he main- served.” 

reached as annual rate of only 0.7 _ Last year, the entire Arab tains dose ties with Egypt's ma- Now employing 60.000 Egyp- 

percent, the slowest pace since Lhe Contractors Group secured $684 jor opposition party, the Wafd. tians, Arab Contractors Co„ the 

end of the last recession. million worth of construction Indeed, the 66-year-old Mr. group's major concern, was na- 

Many economists have ex- projects, one- third of all projects Osman has been agile enough to ikmalized by Nasser in 1961. To- 

pressed concent that the United awarded here. Some or the con- prosper throughout Nasser’s so- gether with the network, it has 

States could be in danger of turn- tracts were subcontracted to pri- ciaiism, Sadat’s capitalism and built dozens hospitals, airports, 

bbng into another recession. How- vate companies owned or con- Mr. Mubarak’s policy of moder- apartments and roads through- 

ever, interest rates have been drop- trolled by Mr. Osman. That ation. It is a durability the busi- out the Arab world over the past 

{ting in recent weeks and some business practice — allowing ness community attributes to his 75 years. And today it is very 

analysts think these declines will be Mr. Osman, (he public servant, political and business acu me n, much a catalyst for Egypt's pri- 

enough to spur further growth in to funnel business to Mr. Osman. But it also reflects the extent to vate sector. Mr. Osman said he 

lhe economy. the private subcontractor — is which Egypt — with its under- has established more than 200 

The Commerce Department re- controversial but legal in Egypt, paid, unmotivated government companies and 26 hanks, 

port said the 1-percem April in- where the public sector still ac- bureaucracy — must rely on pri- Mr. Osman's business prac- 
crease came from .gains in orders counts for at least 70 percent of vate concerns to cany out na- tices do not go unchallenged in 

for transportation ‘equipment and domestic production. tional projects. Egypt. Mohammed Heikal, for 

primary metals such as steel that Mr. Osman is also a member “Egypt needs a vigorous pri- (Continued on Page It, CoL 1) 

offset a large decline in machinery 

orders. 

Fallout From Pickens-Unocal Fight ] 

gain Hie increase put April orders ^ 

at $6ii HAH™ By Mark Potts wave of hostile takeover raids on ing by the Delaware Supreme 

Orders for nonrmliiary capital Washington Po*i Service oil companies and other corpora- Court last Friday. The ruling 

goods declined 6.9 percent follow- WASHINGTON — T. Boone- bo? s led by Mr. Pickens and other stepped Mr. Pickens^ efforts cold 
ing an even sharper 7.8-percent Pickens's days.as the scourge of the financiers by rewriting some of the and may have established a prece- 
dropm March. This category is oil patch may be over .analysts say. rities.' doit for a powerful new kind of 

considered to be a good indicator Legal fallout from Unocal-’ The most crucial efemenfehang- ^eover defense based on treating 
of business plans to expand and Corp.’s battle against Mr. Pickens ing the environment for takeovers, r aw ^ rs an r* rccn ??| u l5 rs dlffCTem_ 
modernize production facilities. may significantly slow the recent the analysts said Tuesday, is a nil- x ™ an 9“^ stockholders — espe- 

1 cially raiders making two-tiered 

offers that pay cash to half a com- 

EC Issuing $1.8-BMion, 5-Year FRN sa Mijsg ise 

*«««* TV. : „.v:„v „*i H*ht« inmrr^H hv erw temonic The decision allowed Unocal to 


By Judith Miller 

New York Times Service 

CAIRO — When Anwar Sa- 
dat was president of Egypt, Os- 
man Ahmed Osman, Egypt’s 
richest businessman, was never 
far from his ride. It was Mr. 
Osman — entrepreneur, banker, 
self -prod aimed builder of the 
Aswan Dam — who accompa- 
nied Sadat cm his historic trip to 
Jerusalem in 1977. It was Mr. 
Osman who watched videotaped 
movies with him late into the 
night. And it was Mr. Osman 
who helped Sadat promote 
Egypt's reopening to private en- 
terprise and to the West 

So when Hosni Mubarak be- 
came president after Sadat’s as- 
sassination in 1981. many Egyp- 
tians predicted Mr. Osman’sfall 
from grace. 

But (hat has noi happened. 
Although he is no longer minis- 
ter of construction or a confidant 
of Egypt's leader, Osman Ahmed 
Osman remains powerful and 
probably the most famous Egyp- 
tian entrepreneur. 

He still effectively controls, as 
“life honorary chairman,” the 
Arab Contractors Group, a 
sprawling network erf private and 
public-sector companies, the 
most important of which he 
founded 36 years ago. Arab Con- 
tractors Co, as it is still called, 
achieved renown as one of the 
builders of Aswan Dam. 

Last year, the attire Arab 
Contractors Group secured $684 
million worth of construction 
projects, one- third of all projects 
awarded here. Some or the con- 
tracts were subcontracted to pri- 
vate companies owned or con- 
trolled by Mr. Osman. That 
business practice — allowing 
Mr. Osman, (he public servant, 
to funnel business to Mr. Osman, 
the private subcontractor — is 
controversial but legal in Egypt, 
where the public sector still ac- 
counts for at least 70 percent of 
domestic production. 

Mr. Osman is also a member 


Shell Reports 
10% Increase in 


lst-Quarter Net 


of Parliament, serving on the in- 
fluential housing committee. 
And he is chairman of the ruling 
National Democratic Party’s 
popular development commit- 
tee, at the same time he main- 
tains dose ties with Egypt's ma- 
jor opposition party, the Wafd. 

Indeed, the 66-year-old Mr. 
Osman has been agile enough to 
prosper throughout Nasser’s so- 
cialism, Sadat’s capitalism and 
Mr. Mubarak’s policy of moder- 
ation. It is a durability the busi- 
ness community attributes to his 
political and business acumen. 
But ii also reflects the extent to 
which Egypt — with its under- 
paid, unmotivated government 
bureaucracy — must rely on pri- 
vate concerns to cany out na- 
tional projects. 

“Egypt needs a vigorous pri- 


vate sector,” Mr. Osman said in 
one of his infrequent interviews. 
“Only through competition be- 
tween the private and public sec- 
tor will Egypt’s interests be 
served." 

Now employing 60,000 Egyp- 
tians, Arab Contractors Co„ the 
group's major concern, was na- 
tionalized by Nasser in 1961. To- 
gether with the network, it has 
built dozens hospitals, airports, 
apartments and roads through- 
out the Arab world over the past 
25 years. And today it is veiy 
much a catalyst for Egypt's pri- 
vate sector. Mr. Osman said he 
has established more than 200 
companies and 26 hanks. 

Mr. Osman's business prac- 
tices do not go unchallenged in 
Egypt. Mohammed Heikal, for 
(Cbatimedon Page 11, Col 1) 


By Bob Hageny 

Intmutamal HerjJj Tnbvnf 

LONDON —The Royal Dutch- 
/ Shell Group, citing buoyant gas 
sales and the strong dollar, report- 
ed Wednesday a 10-percent in- 
crease in first quarter net income. 

But the British-Duich group, the 
world's second-largest oil compa- 
ny, warned that oil prices are vul- 
nerable to a further decline in com- 
ing months. 

Net rose to £1.08 bQlion ($1.3S 
billion) from £982 million in 1984’s 
first quarter, when net soared 93 
percent from a year before. Sales 
grew IS percent to £17.51 biUion 
from £15.28 billion. 

The results were in line with fore- 
casts. Shares of Shell Transport & 
Trading, the British arm. closed on 
(he London Stock Exchange at 716 
pence, down from 720 pence Tues- 
day. On the Amsterdam Stock Ex- 
change, shares of Royal Dutch Pe- 
troleum closed at 206.10 guilders 
($60 L up 1 JO guilders. 

Because oil is priced in dollars, 
the rise of that currency from ycar- 
earlier levels bloated the value or 
inventories in pound terras. Strip- 
ping out this distortion, the group 
showed an underlying profit de- 
cline of 1.6 percent. 

But David Gray, an analyst at 
the London brokerage of James 
Capel A Co, said that figure was “a 
lot better than it looks.” He point- 
ed to two big exceptional items: a 
£50- million provision to cover the 
cost of restructuring unprofitable 
metal operations and a currency- 
translation loss of £75 million. That 
loss reflected the decline of Lhe dol- 
lar from the end of last year, which 
lowered the pound value of the 
group's dollar reserves. 

Baa use the dollar remained wdl 
above year-earlier levels, however, 
the pound value of the group’s oil 


f induction increased from I984's 
irst quarter. In addition, crude oil 
production rose 2 percent to nearly 
1.66 million barrels a day. 

Natural-gas sales surged 12 per- 
cent to 8.04 billion cubic feet a dav 
as cold weather boosted demand in 
Western Europe. 

Net income at Shell Oil Co., the 
U.S. unit, fell 9 percent in dollar 
terms. The contribution to the 
group’s profit in pound terms, h on - 
ever, grew- to £219 million from 
£156 million. Aside from the cur- 
rency benefit, the increase reflected 
the rise in (he group's stale in Shell 
Oil to 94.6 percent Trom 6*».4 per- 
cent. 

Sir Peter Baxendell. chairman of 
Shell Transport, said at that com- 
pany's annual meeting Wednesday 
that the group appeared close to 
success in its effort to raise its shar- 
eholding in Shell Oil to 100 per- 
cent. Litigation by minority share- 
holders has delayed the move. 

Sir Peter also said the glut of 
crude oil could depress prices fur- 
ther this summer unless tne Organi- 
ze ion of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries again reduced output. 
The price of North Sea Brent blend 
already has declined to about 
$26.50 a band from nearlv S29 in 
late January. 

Many oil analysts expect world- 
wide demand this year to show only 
a slight rise from 1984. “At besl 
prices will stay where they are." 
said David Johnson, an analyst at 
Wood. Mackenzie & Co., “and 
there is a downside risk.” Even so, 
he added. “I wouldn’t have said 
they were about to collapse.” 

For the full year. Wood Macken- 
zie forecast that Royal Dutch/Shdl 
would report net income of £3.66 
billion, up from £3.65 billion in 
1984. Capel'5 Mr. Gray predicted 
net of £3 . 75 billion. 


Fallout From Pickens-Unocal Fight Is Clouding Other Bids 


By Mark Pons wave of hostile takeover raids cm 

Washington Put Service oil companies and other corpora- 

WASHINGTON — T. Boone- tians led by Mr. Pickens and other 


ing by the Delaware Supreme still likely slow' down the raiders. 

r*n,irt loet Fri/ia,, Tll> mil., n -I, attm. 


Court last Friday. The ruling 
stopped Mr. Pickens’s efforts cold 
and may have established a orece- 


afier a big company becomes very, 
very difficult, if not impossible. I 


“It certainly has a chilling effect very difficult, u not impossible. I 
on Pickens." said A. Gilchrist think, this means some change.” 
Sparks 3d, a Wilmington-based Even David Baichelder. vice 


corporate lawyer who argued the president for finance of Mr. Pick- 
case on behalf of Unocal. “Where ens's Mesa Petroleum Co„ suggest- 


modertuze production facilities. 


EC Issuing $ 1 8-Billion , 5-Year FRN Basis stag 

„ a _. siss - *’— -■ ■ 

Community will issue a $1.8-bil- igg3 and was due to mature in July Banking sources said the rarity from a S72-a-shure offer by 
lion, five-year floating-rate note j 999, Market sources added that value of the new issue and West ctMnpany to buv back ns own 
ravine 1/16 nercent over the Lon- i ' stock from shareholders. The court 


ed the Delaware ruling would slow 
the takeover tide. “You're going to 
see people wait until that thing is 
resolved,” Mr. Batchdder said. 

Mr. Pickens, in any case, has 
been slowed by his Unocal defeat. 


paying 1/16 percent over the Loo- ^ proC eeds were reloaned to European euphoria for everything ^ 

don mietank bid rate wztb a mim- Fnm Jl Chinese hdped brush away any pd Mr. Pickras could be excluded 

mum counon of 5 oercenL the lead _ ... ... rMMMMviAftr omnno inuMf/vre oVvmK bCCSUSC HlS OfaCT hfid bCCQ iD&dC” 


France. 


France announced last week that resemtions. among investms ,about 
it was gang to make an early re- *** repudiation of pre-1949 debt. 9 • 

paymemof he 4-billion European The issue has been underwritten t^nhSfniiSiS 

Currency Unit loan raised on its by a consortium oT 10 international 

KaUmIF id. .1— ■Cf' J- lOfil hnnlrc I oA Uu TVincrhe Rant West Uon anc L 111 UW View Of SOnK CTlt- 


Ctosinos In London and Zurich, fbetnos Pi other European centers. Mete York rotes at 2 PM. 
fa) Commerddl franc tb) Amounts ne ed e d fa buy one pound (cl Amounts need ed to buy one 
dollar (V Units at too tx) UnHsoflMOtr i UntteoflBMINA: oat quoted: HA.: net oraUMfe 
(*) To Our one pound: SUS.135K ' 

Other Dollar Value* 

Currency oar ILU Carrmcv per IU* Cammr ear lUi currency per U.SJ 
Arem.peao 530A5 F1n.mnrt*o *353 Molov.rtao. 14M- S.Kw’.wn 17100 

AiotraLS MW7 OreeR dnt 13&30 Mhnb 33200 Sean.peieta 171*0 

AMtr.KftH. 2170 Hang Karat 7.778 NarKkroM LM75 twed.kranp US! 

0ot9.ttn.tr. & 2* imBennnme UC PMLhsd T7*S toNmbS 39*1 

Brazil erta. &Z7ILOO I ndo. rapbOi 1,11100 PorLesatfo ram TM boat VMS 

Caeatflaal IJM Irish C 0.777 BaacR rtyg) Idas ' .ThrfeUDra bum 

Den lib krone HJC25 mrtifaak. 1JHRM - Sira, s 22M UAiatmm 3*725 

Egypt. pound 07519 KumSKBpot 03037 XM-.rnM 1,970 VpmbaUw. 12*5 


France announced last week that reservations among investors ,about 
" il was gomg to make an early re- the repudiation of pre-1949 debL 
ton said Wednesday. pa^Wthc^SnSSJeS The issue has been underwritten 

Meanwhile, China on Wednes- Currency Unit loan raised cm its by a consortium oflO international 
day made its first foray into the behalf by the EC in 1983. banks led by Deutsche Bank, West 

Eurobond naik ets npce lhe Co m- Trader, later spid tlui the iuue. Gctraany'i largest. 

ES * 99.88/90 percent on The sources said it was extremely 

the gray market, which & just bdow difficult to set the bond s interest 
the 99.925 percent price at which it rate, which signals a borrowers 
sevoi-year, 150 ntirnon Dwitsche ^ co-managers, credit rating, since there was noth- 

issue had been traS “S comparable on the market to 
quickly snappedup. wuh mvestors alarou HdToO. measure it against 

n- China bond, offered by the The bonds, offered at par. have 
prior to the establish- statixnroedBmikof China,pays7 
ment of the Pole's Rqmblic. JSftJC 


group irom a d/*-a-snore otter oy may cause some people to tninx 
the company to buy back its own twice, structure tneir offer in a 
stock from shareholders. The court more fair way or pay more.” Mr. 
said Mr. Pickens could be excluded Gilchrist said, 
because' his offer had been inade- “You've got a different ballgame 
quaie and coercive. than you did before,” said Rosario 

Experts said that while the deci- Ilocqud, an analyst at L. F. Roth- 
sion was open to further interprets- schtld. Umerberg. Towbin. “I think 
lion and, in the view of some oil- realistically the Delaware court de- 
its, narrow and confusing, it would cision certainly means that going 


you've got an offer, such as this ed the Delaware ruling would slow- 
one. that is grossly inadequate and the takeover tide. “You're going to 
coercive in its structure, a board see people wait until that thing is 
acting carefully and honestly can resolved,” Mr. Batchdder said, 
use this technique to halt the raider. Mr. Pickens, in any case, has 

“Somebody contemplating mak- been slowed by his Unocal defeat, 
ing one of these offers [now) hns to The outcome of his attempts to 
factor in. ‘Am I going to get a take over the oil company has been 
Unocal type or response?* And that quite different from his highly 
may cause some people to think profitable raids in recent years on 
twice, structure tneir offer in a other oil firms such as Gulf Coro., 
more fair way or pav more." Mr. Cities Service Co. and Phillips re- 
Gilchrist said. iroleum Co. Mr. Pickens broke 

“You’ve got a different ballgame «*■*• al best, on his Unocal invest- 
than you did before." said Rosario meni. and analysis say he more 
Ilacaui an analyst at L. F. Roth- likcl y ^t S100 million or more. 


The issue, which was called nal debts incurred by governments Unocal , to [ ac,or in - ' Al ? 1 

lsiinrhed in June, prior to 1949. “ c,ud . e Mr A ck “ s s ■«» UnocaI l >’P e of response.' And that 


schtld. Umerberg. Towbin. “I think , lhe psychological effects 
realistically the Delaware court de- of the outcome of the Unocal bat- 
cision certainly means that going (Continued on Page 15, CoL 1) 


quickly snapped up, with investors 
apparently unperturbed bv Beij- 
ing’s refusal to redeem Chinese 
bonds issued prior to the establish- 
ment of the People’s Republic. 


ing comparable on the market to 
measure it against. 

The bonds, offered at par. have 


life, lhe bank reiterated in its pro- fees are 2*4 percent, with IK for 
spectus that the Chinese govern- selling, ft for underwriting and ft 


t a ernnetnakt ttattm IMBoai: Otsmtcot 
(Parts): IMF (SDR); BAD (dinar. riyaL 


Sources: Moreen GvorvDv Motor, DM. BP. Pound. FP); Uoyrts Bank (CCU); Reuters 
(SCR). Galea atvtkxble to toterficrtt domOs of St mftttoa nrtrdauim (or ooufvalont). 


date for the European Community 
issue is July 8. The issue is callable 
after six months at par and at every 

g yment date thereafter. The reof- 
price to the co-managers is 
99.925 percent. 

The issue mil be listed in Luxem- 
bourg. Size of denominations was 
left open but will be large. Credit 
Suisse said. 

. The new issue is a refinancing of 
an early redemption at its principal 
amount of a S1.8-biflian FRN 
which paid 1/8 point over the Lon- 
don interbank offered rate. 


Dollar Is Mixed 
In Europe Trade 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — The dollar turned 
in a mixed performance Wednes- 
day in quiet, treadless European 
trading amid indications that U.S. 
economic growth was slowing. 
Gold prices were also mixed. 

Foreign exchange dealers said 
remarks by Henry WaHkh, a U.S. 
Federal Reserve Board member, 
that the economy was sluggish 
rather than beading for a recession 
strengthened market belief that in- 
terest rates may fafi, malting the 
dollar less attractive to investors. 

In London, the pound was 
quoted at SI .265, down from 
SI .2722 Tuesday. In Tokyo, the 
dollar closed at 250.525 yen, up 
from 250.15 yen the day before: 
Other late dollar rates compared 
with Tuesday: 3.072 Deutsche 
marks, up from 3.053; 25865 Swiss 
francs, down from 2J975; 9375 
French francs, up from 9312; and 
i. 962.90 Italian lire, up froiq 
1,951.50. In Zurich, gold was 
quoted at a late bid prior of $316.75 
an ounce, up from $31330 Tues- 
day. In London, it fell to $31630 
from $316.75. . 


spectus that the Chinese govern- seumg, * tor unc 
ment did not recognize any exter- for manageme nt. 


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Republic National Bank of New Ybrk 

London Branch — Licensed Deposit Taker 
and 

Republic New York (UK) Ltd. 

are pleased to announce the relocation of their 
offices, with effect from 28th May, to: 

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Delivery of Bankers Payments will continue 
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_ Telephone: 01-6232595 








Ki3?EEtlC£iJ] 


Wednesdays 

mse 

Closing 

Tables Include IHe nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


(Confinned from Page 8) 




M 2 J 13 
\M 4.1 9 
M US 
150 u 
I M no 
1J4 9A a 
152 7 A IS 
1.20 A 6 15 

rvtr $ jg 

ZOO 1 ft 4 

41 UU 
U1 M f 
JO 13 W 
U2 U I 
407 124 

1 (tWb 40 13 54 

“IB* 


JO 13 21 
130 19 11 
22 

JO O IS 
52 
10 

.14 24 
1.12 U IB 
32 28 39 
4 

40 44 12 

.16 J T 9 
JO 13 21 


#s& 

"i 32 

6 14 
3tS IWr 
201 45 * 

212 ^ 
19 
V 
100 
3 

441 29 
31 52 V. 
854 39 * 

SI ££ 

170 36 * 
as ,m 
700 * T* 
490 3 * 
207 17 
359 39 * 
3045 Ok 
132 IS* 

32 V, 
IB* 




22 13 * Roylnf ■ V 

SO 33 * fruarmd a u 17 

» 14 * bn 8 r 1 * 

TO* IS* RusTofl J* 43 ■ 

28 * 17 * RvanH 140 15 15 

SB* 19 Ryders J 1 U f 

2 H 6 12 * RvkM 40 24 1 * 

IS* 6 * Rvw S 



246 40 ■ 
156 94 6 
„» 440 114 
.pt 430 12.1 
.«* 160 111 
Aotua 122 

nrllOO 117 
H-B40 1ZS 
IT 130 124 
2211 64 12 
140 78 
230 43 24 
640 94 
130 47 7 
40 J 18 
1.76 33 23 
36 S 3 11 
131*111 
31 14 IS 
140 IS 15 
372*153 
137 97 


21* 
SO SO 
41 * 42 * 

« if* 

33 33 

53 51 

68 43 

10 * 10 * 
7* K) 
56 * 57 

4*682 

»* H? 

54 * 54 * 
38 38* 

22* 22* 
81 * 

33* 

TO* 


45 * 26 * OuakOs StSiSiS „ 

22 * 15 QucfcSO * U » » 20 * 5 m*— » 

11 * 4 * Quana 31 49 7 * 7 * 7 * + * 

34 * 23 Quota 140 49 10 136 32 * D* 32 *—* 

25 * 14 QkRetl 34 a 13 17 59 23 * 23 23 — * 





Season Saason 
HI oh Low 


Open High Low Ctase CUB- 


Season 

Season 





a*. 

High 

Low 

Open 

HKrii 

LOW 

Close 

MOOD 

14 X 75 

jai 14300 

14325 

74050 

14200 

—440 

177 J 0 

14 X 25 

Mar 14880 

14380 

14300 

14250 

— 2.15 

16250 

16080 

May 



14280 

— 2.15 

15750 

15750 

Jul 



14280 

— Z 15 

18050 

179 J 5 

5 «p 



14200 

-415 

EsL Sales SM Prev.Salea 

447 




Prev. Day Open InL 5566 off 214 





WHEAT (CBT) 

5800 bu minimum. dollars per busIM 
190 116 Jul 116 * 118 ! 

176 * 117 Sep 117 * 120 * 3 

163 * 11 B Dec 129 IS 

174 * 331 Hat 1 35 137 3 

172 * 165 * Jul 110 110 3 

EoL Sates Prey. Sales 5748 

Pretf. Day o pe n lnt. 39406 up*» 

CORN (CBT) 

5400 bu minimum- del lan per budM 
131 273 Jul 274 * 175 

121 * 20 IU Sep 240 * 241 * i 

195 156 * Dec 256 * 157 * 2 

118 165 * Mar 165 * 266 * 2 

106 172 * Jul 272 172 * 2 

ZJM* 162 * Sea 230 270 2 

Est.Saies P rev. Sole* 21355 

Prev. oav Open lnt. 101 .B 76 off 1457 
SOYBEANS (CBT 7 
5800 bu mWmum-dollarsper bushel 
739 549 * Jul 569 * 571 i 

756 570 * Aua 570 * 570 * i 

671 569 * Sep 569 549 * • 

666 575 * Nov 577 377 * ! 

679 566 * Jon 586 * 587 * i 

742 596 * Mar 597 590 

668 511 Jul 511 * 512 I 

Est.Saies Prev.SalesKgB 

Prev. Day Open int. 62446 off UTS 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 tons- dollars per ton 
19640 12140 Jul 12160 12240 ' 

18070 12460 Aua 12560 12570 

17 V 60 12740 Sep UB 40 17860 

18040 13050 Oct 131-00 13140 

16440 1 3570 Dec 13570 13640 

14500 13940 Jan 139 JO 139 JO 

2 DXM 14400 Mar 14470 14470 

14760 15400 Jul 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 9 J 91 

Prev. Day Open Ini, 51 .HH up 138 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

65090 lbs- dollars per 100 lb*. __ 

3272 2270 Jul 3045 3140 

31.95 22 JD AUB 2945 2970 

31.10 2150 5 ep 2645 2870 

3077 22-10 Oct 1745 2775 

79-55 2190 Dec 2665 2580 

2947 2368 Jan 2435 244 S 

TOen 2440 Mar 2 SSB 2565 

Est. Sates Prev. Sales 20 A 5 D 

Prev. Day Open in 5 57412 atUAl 

OATS [CBT) 

5400 Bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
ITBtb 163 * jul 164 164 * 

1.79 163 SeP 163 * 163 * 

142 * 168 * Dec 166 * 168 * 

147 * 143 * Mar 143 * 143 * 

Est Oates Prev. Sates 234 

Prev. Dav Oaenim. 2462 up 43 


115 * 3.18 +42 

116 * 320 * + 42 * 
3 J 7 * 131 * + 43 * 
134 366 +43 

102 344 


174 * 275 
240 241 + 40 * 

266 267 + 40 * 

245 246 * + 46 * 

271 * 273 * + 46 * 
165 * 246 * 


S 65 STD + 41 * 
565 570 +41 

543 * 548 -^ 00 * 

571 576 —JO* 

541 * 546 - 40 * 

592 556 * — 46 * 

505 * 510 * 


13050 12040 —140 
12340 12340 —158 
T 2540 12660 — 149 
129.10 12940 —170 
13440 13540 —140 
137 70 137 JO —340 

14150 123 


3841 3048 +48 

29 JO 2946 +69 

2665 2840 +65 

2765 3742 +62 

2546 2673 +68 

2515 2465 +65 

2579 3598 +65 


162 142* —62* 

162 162 —01* 
147 167 —41* 

142 143 —00* 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMC) 

4 QJ 00 Tbs.- Cents per lb. „ 

6960 59.05 Jun 4 X 17 4 X 45 4342 4 X 15 —43 

6747 6845 AM *465 6467 64.15 6440 +.10 

6590 6810 Oct 6 X 95 4 X 30 6241 6325 +60 

4765 4160 Dec 4440 44.12 4285 44.70 +.» 

6745 03.10 Feb 6470 4590 *440 *447 +65 

•767 4343 Apr 6570 6560 65.70 6560 +.10 

E si. Sales 13.936 Prev. Sales 1 X 903 
Prev. Oar Open Ini. 52766 up 487 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

♦cOOOtbe-- cents Per lb. „ 
te.JD 4447 Aua 48 JS 4462 4881 4862 

n.90 600 Sep 4 X 10 4865 4762 4860 —AS 

7132 6465 Oct 6760 6800 6745 * 7.75 —65 

7120 4 S 2 S Nov 4875 4860 4 X 50 4 X 45 —05 

7943 4*40 Jan 7 X 00 7065 4962 7 X 05 +65 

49.10 6 X 10 Mar 7810 7810 7810 7810 —20 

Est.Saies 742 Prev. Sates 1687 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 7.150 uo 6 i 

HOC 5 (CME) 

30 JWI lbs,- cents Per lb. 

5540 4440 Jun 47.70 4840 4762 4860 +65 

5577 47 JK Jul 5823 5067 5817 5092 +70 

5437 4767 Aua 5060 5870 5815 5645 +60 

51.75 4560 Oct 4460 4760 4 X 90 47 .T 7 +.15 

506 S 4 X 30 Dec 4815 4 X 50 4762 4 X 40 +65 

5060 4465 Feb AH 4960 49.15 4965 +60 

4765 4460 APT 4 S 60 4 X 10 4560 4 X 97 +65 

4963 4 X 90 Jun 4815 4840 4815 4 X 45 +.15 

49.73 47.75 JUl 4 X 50 4980 4 X 50 4060 +.10 

Est. Sales U 17 Prev. Soles 7785 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 24630 off 152 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

39330 (tTX-centi Per (8 

GUO 5965 May 8460 6545 84 J 0 8 X 50 +165 

8147 41.12 Jul 4 X 30 6760 4573 4 X 7 S +68 

KL 65 6820 Aua 6 X 80 4 X 45 4550 4 X 37 + 1.15 

7670 4115 Feb 7345 7460 7130 7192 +47 

75.40 6460 Mar 7150 7175 7150 7185 +66 

7540 73.10 MOV 7 X 20 74 J 0 7155 7465 +65 

76 ® 8970 Jul 7460 700 7460 7467 +.17 

Est Sates 5896 Prev. Sales X 159 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 11474 up 219 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37600 lbs.- cents Per 18 

10920 121 JO Jul 145 J 0 14*40 14 X 35 14*40 

14760 1 Z 7 J 0 SOP 14 X 25 14 X 90 14577 14*81 

14665 12975 Dec 14 X 90 14 X 35 14 X 50 14 X 35 

14150 12 X 50 Mar 14475 14579 MA 2 S 14 X 00 

14560 131.00 May 14363 

143 00 11 X 50 Jul Ml JO 

UU 3 13175 Sea 14060 

Est.Saies Prev. Solas 1115 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 12427 oft 175 

SUOARWORLD II [NYCSCG) 

1 1 loco lbs.- cents Per 18 

9.95 192 Jul 3 JI 189 191 104 

9 75 386 Sen 111 122 115 1 Z 1 

935 117 Oct 3 J 2 136 37 B 164 

7.75 160 Jun ITT 17 V 175 377 

963 3 . 9 B Mar 08 4 JS 05 424 

7,5 420 MOV 466 443 46 S 443 

649 44 i Jul 469 441 4*5 441 

XTO 474 Sep 4 IS 

04 470 Oct 4 JA 486 485 4 J 2 

Eat. sain 13650 Prev. Sales 1 X 529 
Prev. Dav Open Int vijw up 1665 

COCOA (NY CSCE) 

10 metric Ions - 1 per Tan 

:«0 1998 Jul 3080 2)53 2081 TORS 

2415 1967 Sea 2075 2010 20 B 2061 

2337 1945 Dec TOO 2045 20 M 2021 

219 Q 1955 Mar 2043 204 ] Sit 1023 

2133 I 960 May 20 X 1 

_ 3119 I 960 Jul 2636 

Etf. Sales Prev. sales 1165 

Prev. DovOacnlnl. 20874 afffQ 

OflANCE JUICE INYOD 

1 iCOO lbs.- cents nor lb. 

1(445 14850 Jul 14X30 14830 14430 14S0B 

18280 14X19 Sat 14X50 14*36 14375 JON 

18180 14580 Nov 14*25 144J0 14200 MUD 




. KRUGERRAND 

s Money you can trust 

Please now that Inu-rneCional GoM Gtepors dan 
does no* provide a buying or sctlim: 



protection against currency 

instability. , , 

Can vou think of a better refuge 

when the dollar is in doubt. 

Ask your bank or broker about 
Krugerrand gold bullion coins. 

International Gold Corporation _ 
Coin Division - 1. rue de la Rotissene 
CH - 1204 Geneva - Switzerland 


SO* 33* Xerox 380 XI 21 3379 49* Ob 49*— * 
S4M 4S* Xerox PfSAS 181 19M*S»5»-* 


Industrials 


St 27 * 28 * 36 *— 86 


30 2i ZatoCb 1J2 48 9 20 23* 27* 27* + * 

34* n ZtmaftJ 84 89 24 TM 12* 12* 12*— * 

73* 32 Zavre Mb A 17 HU 71* 30*— 1 

S6 24 Lavra wf l 53* bh 2* 

30 iswzemme .. * ixio 22* 21* am +) 

21* 14* Zeros 72 18 15 30 16 17* 17*— * 


9 

260 35* 

34* 

35*—* 


1155 10 

11* 

n* + * 


36 22* 

22* 

22* + * 


64 2* 

7 Vi 

2* 

6 

49 22* 

im 

2T94— * 


31 3* 

3 

1 


9 * 

9 

9 + * 

IS 

360 31 

30* 

31 

13 

99 10* 

KM 

10*— * 

U 

194 20* 

20* 

50*- » 

146 

139 6 

286 

f 

TO 

44 10* 
156 45 

10* 

44* 

10* 

44*— * 


120s 46 

66 

46 +1 


160x 77* 

77* 

77* + * 


78 

77* 

77* + * 


SBr 60 

M 

80 


40X64* 

66* 

66* + * 

15 

40 22* 

22H 

23* 

11 

2 41* 

41* 

41*— * 

11 

36 72* 

71* 

72 


May 22 




22 WICOR 230 81 
21* Wcchvs 18D 27 
14* Woddit 80 3J 
6 * Wtdnoc 
34* WolMrt JO S 
78 WIMrtpf 
14* Wotprnx 


23* WaJCSv AS 17 
22 Wattjm 1 M 38 
7* WbttJ pt 180 114 
29* WaHJ pf 140 37 
T7U W om en 88 38 
17 WmCm 
20* WontrL 148 37 
W* WOShGs 144 78 
15* WBhNat 188 XI 


12 145 37* 
77 16* 

26 1993^3?- 
1 112 

If S71 2M6 
219 23 
18 75 37* 

■ 471 36* 
HOC 9* 
5 49 

12 1 6* 28* 
2181 27* 
14 42M 40* 
B 286 21* 
I 1H W 


26* 28* 

27* 17*—* 

16 16* + lb 

8* 8* + * 

50* 51 + * 

112 112 +1* 
27* 28* + * 
22* »- * 
36* 36*—* 
36* 36* 

6* BH— * 
49 49 + * 

23* 23*— * 
27* 27*— U 
39* 40* + * 
21 21 * + * 
26* 26*— * 



Asian Commodities 
May 22 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMMJ 
SI million. ptsaOOOPCt. 

9240 87.14 Jun 9161 9277 

*140 1894 SOP 9137 9139 

9288 8577 Dec 9103 9104 

9179 9X40 Mar *1.73 9173 

91-57 6781 Jut *147 9147 

9 LOS 8X00 Sae *184 91J4 

91 JO 89 AS D*e 9102 91 JH 

90.15 8948 Mar 9X85 9605 

Est.Satas 8328 Prev.Salea 5409 
Prev. Dor Open ML 40822 up KM 

ID TIL TREASURY (CBT) 

5101800 MIINMSSaidS Of 100 Pet 
65-19 JM Jun 8X3 854 

•4-1 B 75-16 Sen 8+1 8X5 

83-20 75-U Ok 6 M7 32 

82-24 75-14 Mr 83-6 82-10 

|M 7X3B Jun 

Est. Salas _ Prrv. Sales &82B 

Prev. Oar Open Int. SU41 up 1,166 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 pct-SlOMOOptaASMsof 100 pd| 
77-15 57-90 Jun 7>10 75-14 

76-2 57-10 SOP 7X12 7X14 

7X6 536 Doc 73-13 73-16 

73 57-2 Mar 72-21 72-21 

72-7 5X29 Jun 71-2? 71-29 

71- 18 5X29 S*P 71-8 71-8 

71 5X25 Dec 7X9 7X12 

7X13 56-37 Mar 

69-16 63-12 Jun 6X13 69-13 

•9-20 624 SM 6X2 494 

69 63-24 Dec 6XZ4 6X24 

EsL Sales PfeV.S(U« 97847 

Prev. Day Open IHU2X918 aflXI79 

ohm i trim 

ninooo prt x pts A XMe at MO pd 

72- 30 57-17 Jun 72-23 72-26 

72-9 59-13 Sep 7X3 72-6 

72-3 SM Dec _ , 

71-2 5X20 Mar 7V6 7W 

7X29 5X2S Jun 7X27 70-27 

6X71 61 SOP 

Est Sales Ptev.Saies 169 

Prev. Dav Doan int 444* off 60 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

61 Million. Ml of too Pd 
9129 8SJ0 Jun 9225 9329 

917? 8580 SOP 9149 9171 

9UB 85134 DOC 9180 9186 

9185 8X56 Mar 

MAS 8X43 Jipi 

9054 8786 Sep 

1X99 6X34 MC 

Est.Saies 5ii Prev. sales 463 

Prev. Dav Oaen InL MB up®7 

EURO DOLLARS (IMM) 
SlmltUoiyptsaflWPcL __ ■ 

91-96 8240 Jun 9173 9176 

9189 8453 SOP 9182 9L37 

"79 6400 Dee 9071 9096 

*044 0X10 Mar mSS 9041 


(Indexes compiled itarflv before marttel ck») 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
do mrsond cents 

19180 156.10 Jun 16775 W97S 18640 1B9JS —M 

T9LB 14080 Sep 19135 193J35 19200 19275 —S5 

1970a 17X70 Dec 19X35 19X25 1 9570 19S0O —.95 

Est.Saies Piev. Sales WK 

Prev. DavOoen Int. 49882 up USB 
VALUE UNE (KCBT) 
points aid cents 

119 Jfa 1 7100 Jun 28256 20270 28(85 20I7S —185 

21130 16575 Sen 207.10 207.10 20575 30X30 -1A5 

E5I- Seles Prev. Solo* -UJS7 

Prev. Day Open Hit. XlTO up63o 
NYSe COMP. INDEX (NYFEI 
pobrts and cents 

1M.90 9080 Jun 10975 1KLOO W9J0 10970 -AO 

mao 9175 SOP 11205 11205 1T1J0 11(75 —A0 

115.15 10180 Dec 1H80 11480 1U75 11145 -75 

Est.Saies Prev. Sales 10518 

Prw. Day Oaenim. 13848 upB81 


Previous 
914.90 f 
i JW* Bn 
121J7 
23410 


Commodify Indexes 


□ox 

Moody'S 916.90 I 

Reuters 1,827.90 

DJ. Futures — na 

Cam. Research Bureau. NA 

Moodv's : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 

P • preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec 31, 1774. 


Market Guide 


CMcoeo Heard of Trade 
Cfiiccao Met uu rtf* Exchanae 
International Monetary Market 
Of ctucDoo Mereanffle Exchanae 
New York Cocoa. Suasr. Caftb* Exchme 
New Vert Cotton E x chanoe 
Commodity Exthang* New York 
New vent M e r ctme Exchawe 
Knnjas dlv Boom of Trade 
New York Future* Exchanoe 



London Commodities 

May 22 


Owe Prev Km 
Wgb Low Bid AxX Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Sterling peraotrlc ton 
Aug 9780 9480 9X40 9640 9X80 9780 

Oct 9970 9746 99AD 9986 9980 10(180 

DOC 104AO WKO 10100 16400 1058Q 10X00 

Mar 11X60 11680 11X20 11840 118JQ 11X40 

May 12280 120A0 12200 12300 12180 12280 

Ana 127 A0 12X00 12780 176-00 12740 12600 

Oct 73080 MOOD 13180 1X80 131 A0 13100 

Votume: 1861 lots also torn. 

COCOA . _ 

Starling per metric ton 
Mot 1745 ITS 1756 1760 T73S 1748 

Jly 1804 178S 1JBS 1787 1781 1782 

Sep 1786 1789 1769 1 770 1773 1773 

Dec 1757 1740 1740 1743 1746 1747 

Mar 1745 1750 1.7S0 1751 1755 1757 

May 1770 1770 1762 1764 1767 1770 

Jly K.T. N.T. 1765 1785 1771 1785 

Volume: 1183 krisano Inns. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric too 
May 2J3S 2822 1$32 2840 UQ6 2827 

Jlr 286 S ZJTO 2882 2883 2876 2877 

SOP 2,131 1116 1129 1130 1116 1119 

Not 2,176 1160 1171 1174 1158 1163 

Jen 1210 1190 2707 1209 119) 1195 

Mar N-T. N.T. 1185 1196 2.16S 1180 

May N.T. N.T. 2.165 *190 2.U5 2450 

volume: 1473 lots of 5 tanx 


Dividends 


Cash Prices May 22 


GemmodHyeod Unit 
Coffee 4 SmtbxB) 

Print clo th 64/30 38 *, vd _ 

Steel bffletx tPItt.l.ianlZ 

lran2Fdrv.Plilhi.lan 

Steel kxop No 1 hw Pitt. 
Lead Spot, lb 

Cnpppr Meet.. n> 

Tin (Straits), lb I 
gncE.SI.l_ Bax* Jb _ 

PaUadHtnueR 

Sftver N.Y. ae 

Source; A P. 


DM Futures Options 

May 22 

K Geniai Akrt-ffiOBrntoa* per mat 


Mvacat 

NYCE: 

comex: 

MY ME: 


Wb-Lfld PriURl 

jir AM S» J" Jb M * 

— — 1/16 — — 

{5 I«- - - 1/I»uu3n4- 
Ut 15 I5X — 1JV» 1/14 371# B 7/ 1» 
m m (14. RW WI 2 S* 

im SB 7Vi I'm A) * H* I* 7 

i£ 77 /ups n h ? J* s* S w 

IN ivul V. 38X 8JM Xlfir** — 

Hi S - - - 1«_- - 

tbM cell eetae 17424 
nwcoB am M. 4^233 
TOW90l«NW *u» 
nMpat gektliui 

WWBL97 imUUI CtaeUUS-ta 

Secrx* ' caoc. 


GASOIL 

US. dollar* per metric tan 
Jun 21X25 31X56 21675 21785 214J0 21675 
Jly 21480 31505 21S7S 21580 21A50 215J5 
Aue 21780 71680 216JD 21 7 JO 21675 71 7 JO 
SCO 21980 71X75 21X50 21980 71X73 21980 
Od N.T. N.T. 219-50 22280 22X7S 22280 

N«v N.T. N.T. 22200 225J30 22Z0O 22SJ0 

doc n.t. n.t. maf moo am am 
Jan N.T. N.T. 22280 230 JO BU Z29.7S 
Feb N.T. N.T. 23000 23100 22200 22975 
vatipne: SI lots oflQO tons. 

Saunas: ttavtarsotul London Petroleum Ex- 
change toasoti). 


Paris Commodities 

May 22 


High Low Bid AA Ofge 

SUGAR 

French trgnes per metric tm 
Aufl 1861 1855 189 I860 —17 

Od 1785 1870 1876 1878 —21 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1896 170$ -19 

Mar I860 I J4S 18S7 I JH — 16 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1J9S 1A05 -IB 

Aua 1A60 1A60 IASS 1A49 -13 

Est. vel.r 1860 ton of 50 torn. Prev. actual 
10 In: 1784 krix Open Interest; 17745 
COCOA 

Franc* francs per 166 kg 
MOV M.T. N.T. - 2.IS0 - 70 

Jly N.T. N.T. 28B0 1130 +5 

Sen 2876 1070 2871 2875 —6 

DeC 2850 2845 HUB 1047 —4 

Mar 1060 1060 2850 2860 —2 

MOV N.T. N-T. 24B5 - UnetL 

Jly N.T. N.T. lOH — UndL 

Est. vd.; 74 tots of 10 tans. Prev, actual 
■ales; 107 **. Open interest: 679 
COFFEE 

French frana per Mi kg 

May 2750 1350 1335 13" UndL 

Jty N.T. N.T. 2A30 2A7D Uncfe. 

SeP 15D5 1500 2A9S 1520 +3 

Nov XT. H.T, 152S 1555 —4 

Jan N.T. N.T. 1SS0 1580 +13 

AAOT NT. N.T. 155D 2^5 +18 

May N.T. N.T. 1550 15B0 +20 

Est. vaL: tlatsel 5tonx Prev. odual sites: 8 
to*. Open Interest: 274 


London Metals 

May 22 


Bid AMt 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ton 
**?* B7XSQ 67780 

toneard 89X80 999 JO 


Previous 

BM Aik 


ton "ard 89X80 699 JO 69580 
^PPERfATlIODES (HM Grade! 
alerting nr metric ton 


57X00 67480 
B9SJW 89X50 


. 181080 1711 JO 1,17380 1.17380 

fc"WW» I.W7JB 1,19X80 1.17780 tj2xS 

CATHODES (Standard) 

Stertiqg per metric tee 

yot 1.18780 1.1908Q 1.16280 1,16480 

forward 1.1BX80 1.16880 L1M8D lIlWJO 

LEAD 

Marling per metric ton 

2&S wwo 

forwaiil 25X80 29980 297 JO J9M0 
NICKEL 

Sfortlw Per metric ton 


4AU80 4A65JB <A ^lW I 4A53J0 

forum 4A1LQ0 4A2080 489280 09380 

Pence per fray eunee 

?f°l _ 4B680 48786 48180 49SJ0 

h>rvrard 50180 SHOO 49X50 fflj 

TlNtStanflewn 

Sforimg per metric «Hi 

9J3580 983980 X49&J0 *80000 J 

2INC i 

Sprung nr metric ten 
g— * ■ 637 JO 639 JO atm 0X90 

fo’^fonf 64580 64680 4 +M7 I xi&50 

KMU.'AP, 


U3- Treasury BUI Rales 
May 21 



-r~— T- + r — 





































































Vjh h\ 

I i ' Oil 

l: 'f Tk 

•sirthi •*? 

‘•i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Page 


11 


Olivetti, Forges a Bold New Tie With Japan’s Toshiba 

Analysts F oresee Emergence of a Powerful 3-W ay Alliance, Brin ging in AT &T 





$1 

■>x 


** 

a 


!-(. 


1 «■« ft. 
A;, 

?*■< 


By John Tagliabue 

Mtv York Tima Sorter 

BONN — An accord announced 
last week between Olivetti SpA, the 
leading European office automa- 
tion group, and Toshiba, one of 
Japan's largest electrical and elec- 
tronic companies, has sparked 
speculation of an emerg in g ar- 
rangement that some experts say 
could produce a powerful new alli- 
ance in world electronics. 

Under the agreement, Toshiba 
Corp. win get a 20-percem stake in 
Olivcui's Japanese subsidiaries. 
The companies also said that they 
would “consider cooperative busi- 
ness activities in broader fields in 
both Japan and Europe. 1 ? 

Olivetti began weaving a net- of 
international ties in 1983. when 
American Telephone & Telegraph 
-Co. invested $260 million for a 25- 
percent stake in the company in an 
accord in tended to open European 
markets to AT&T products. 

Only recently, however, AT&T 
has been holding intpiw discus- 
sions with Japanese companies, in- 
cluding Toshiba, in an effort to sefl 
its tekpbone-swiichin]’ equipment 
and office computers m Japan. 

Analysts noted numerous bene- 
fits that a triumvirate of American, 
European and Japanese partners 
would produce: 

Toshiba, with its huge Far East- 
ern sales force, would help Olivetti 
attain the volume it would need to 
keep unit manufacturing costs 
down. Olivetti's leadership in the 
office, in turn, would ease Toshi- 
ba’s efforts at expanding its tradi- 
tional line of industrial and con- 
sumer electronics into office 
automation. 

Both companies, by this line of 
thinking, would profit from 
AT&T’s excellence m networking 
the systems that link a company’s 
computers and commimications. 

“It makes sense to pool your re- 
sources,’' said Philip de MaicQlac, 
a London-based analyst at IDC 
Europa Ltd. “This is certainly the 
direction the industry is taking.” 


Officials at all three companies 
deny the recent accord is related 
directly to three-way cooperation. 
Jut Kobayashi, Toshiba’s senior 
managing director in charge of in- 
dustrial relations, insisted the 
agreement had “nothing to do with 
AT&T." But the officials acknowl- 
edge the potential for wider-reach- 
ing airaraements. • 

“AT&T was informed in every 
single step,” said Etserino Piol Oli- 
veuTs executive vioe president for 
strategy. Richard Gundlach. a 
spokesman Tor AT&T Internation- 
al asked about the potential for 
cooperation, replied: “I don’t want 
to speculate, but 1 would not write 
that off." 

Mr: Piol gave several reasons for 
Olivetti's latest stab at the Japanese 
market. . 

“Basically the . reasons were to 
gain .a channd of distribution that 


gains us credibility.” he said. “The 
capital share signals that it's a long- 
term relationship.” 

Both companies, he said, would 
explore possibilities for greater 
sales of Olivetti products, such as 
personal computers, in Japan, and 
for increased shipments of Toshiba 
products, such as facsimile equip- 
ment and computer peripherals, to 
Olivetti's European markets and 
East Asian markets outside Japan. 

Olivetti’s Japanese unit, with an- 
nual sales of about 583 million, is 
no blockbuster operation. But Ja- 
pan has become the company’s 
most important overseas market af- 
ter the united Slates as a source of 
revenue and a listening post for 
new product developments. 

Under the agreement with 
AT&T, according to Vittorio Levi,, 
an Olivetti vice president, the Ital- 
ians wdl ship personal computers 


Japan Industrial Output Jumps 9.9% 

Return 

TOKYO — Japan’s unadjusted industrial -production index rose 
9.9 percent in the fiscal year ended March 32, compared with a 6.4- 
percent gain in the previous year, the Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry said Wednesday. 

Hie producers' shipment index rose 7.4 percent following a 6- 
pcroeaL increase (he previous year, while the index of producers’ 
inventories increased 6.4 percent after a 5.2-perceni fall in 1983-84. 

Hie revised March index was down 1.4 percent from February, 
which followed a 0.1 -percent decline from January. The ministry said 
it had made an annual supplementary revision for all the earlier 11 
months in 1984-85 ended March 31. 

The March figure is measured against re-revised February. 

Before the usual year-through revision, the adjusted February 
index was tip 0.8 percent from January, it said. Unadjusted, the 
revised'March index was up 52 percent from a year earlier after a 
revised 5.9-percent February year-on-year gain. 

The revised and adjusted March producers’ shipment index fell 1.8 
percent from February and 0.8 percent from January. 

Unadjusted, the revised shipment index was op 2.7 percent from a 
year earner following a 3 .8-percent year-on-year February gam. 

The adjusted March index of producers' inventories of finished 
goods rose 1.6 percent from February, following a 1.7-percent rise 
from Januaiy. 

The revised and unadjusted inventories index was up 0.8 percent 
from a year earlier after a 9.9-percent year-to-year rise m February. 


worth about S30O million to the 
United States this year, about half 
of total production, and will buy 
$70 million worth of AT&Ts 3B 
minicomputers in return. 

In 1984. largely as a result of 
sales to AT&T; net income erf Oli- 
vetti’s parent company jumped 69 
percent, to the equivalent of $110 
million, on a 362-percent sales in- 
crease, to $1.18 billion. Group sales 
rose 22.4 percent to 52.13 billion, 
and Olivetti stud it expected a “no- 
table improvement” over 1983 net 
group earnings of S137 million. 

Still, the Olivetti computers 
AT&T sells have ban also-rans in 
the hard-fought U.S. . market 
prompting Olivetti officials to 
grumble about AT&T’s lade of 
marketing aggressiveness. • ■ 

To increase deliveries. Olivetti 
signed an accord earlier this year 
with Xerox Coip- to supply word 
processors as part of Xerox's range 
of new office products. Analysts 
doubt, however, that Xerox will 
fare much better with the product 

For its part, Olivetti has been no 
slouch in searching out fresh out- 
lets. In February, Olivetti put up 
SUJ million for a 493-percent 
stake in Acorn, the British micro- 
computer maker, in as effort to 
become a global player in the world 
microcomputer market, and thick- 
ened its already dense European 
distributor network by snatching 
up Exxon Corp.’s office systems 
business and Start Computer Cen- 
ter GmbH, a Munich-based chain 
of retail computer shops. 

Olivetti already holds a control- 
ling stake in Italy’s Bit Shop com- 
puter ehain, and minori ty snares in 

Britain’s Tab computer shops and 
Microage in the United States. 

That sales clout, some analysts 
say. plus Toshiba’s components 
and the switching systems AT&T 
can supply, may be the formula 
Olivetti pursues to keep ahead of 
giants such as International Busi- 
ness Machines Crxp.. which is de- 
veloping similar office hookups 
with Rblm Corp., a subsidiary. 


■V-O. 


I 

Business and Politics Mix for Egyptian Contractor 


i- 

• ■ i. 
* 




i - % 


(Cootinned from Page 9) 
example, a prominent Egyptian 
journalist, dikusses them m his 
book. “Autumn of Fury." Mr. Ho- 
kal contends that Arab Contractors 
.secured a $40 million contract in 
the 1970s to build a t umid under 
the Suez Canal and subcontracted 
the job to one of Mr. Osman’s pri- 
vate companies, the Anglo-Egyp- 
tian Consortium, known as Osmac. 
When the tumid was finishe d in 
1980, Osmac collected a payment 
that was three times the original, 
price: 

Ismail Osman, a nephew of Ml 
O sman and a* senior executive at 
the Arab Contractors Co, dismiss- 
es any implication erf wrongdoing 
‘ on the part of his uncle: “That’s so 
much that’s wrong in that book, it's 
impossible to take it seriously." he 
said. 

Mr. Osman's nephew is not the 
only family member at Arab Con- 
tractors. Eight of the company's 15 




Agency to Offer 
Han to Protect 
U.S. Shoemakers 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON —The In- 
ternational Trade Commission 
voted unanimously Wednesday 
to recommend that measures be 
adopted to save the U.S. shoe 
industry from imports that now 
account for more than 80 per- 
cent of the U.S. market. 

The commission said that by 
June 9 it would recommend a 
specific program of protection- 
ist measures to President Ron- 
ald Reagan. He would have 60 
days to accept, amend or reject 
the proposal. 

Major exporters of footwear 
include Taiwan, Korea, Brazil, 
Italy, and Spain. In recent 
years, imports have led to mas- 
sive layoffs and hundreds of 
plant closings in the United 
States. 

The Commerce Department 
reported earlier this week that 
domestic shoe production in 
March was down by 25.7 per- 
cent from levels for the same 
month in 1984. 


top executives arc related to Mr. 
Osman by blood or marriage — a 
situation that draws charges of 
nepotism from Mr. Osman’s de- 
tractors. 

But despite the criticism, Mr. Os- 
man is a national figure who enjoys 
the sort of public spotlight reserved 
for a Rockefeller in the United 
States. In Egyplas in other Arab 
countries, posters, billboards, and 
cars bear the yellow and black in- 
signia of Arab Contractors, and 
proclaim the. achievements of the 
man who ytms it: Mr. Osman, 
“builder of Egypt’s Aswan High 
Dam/* - constructor of bridges, 
highways, hospitals, schools, and 
the stadium in which his company’s 
first-class soccer team plays. 

Mr. O sman is also a self-made 
man, still a rare phenomenon in 
Egypt, where wealth and status are 
determined by birth in a class 
structure so entrenched that even 
Nasser’s vast reforms could not 
shake it 

Only Sadat’s opening to the 
West in the 1970s and his emphasis 
on free enterprise enabled private 
business to nourish. Sadat's eco- 
nomic programs created a class of 
nouveau nche Egyptians, some- 
what in the mold of the pioneering 
Mr. Osman, who founded his Arab 
Contractors Co. in 1949. “I started 
with an office in Isroaiha, my home 
town,” Mr. Osman said. “1 used to 
make my own. coffee, because we 
didn't have enough money to pay a 
coffee boy," he said, referring to 
the one employee considered uidis- 
pensible in Egyptian offices. 

Today, Mr. Osman is spared 
such humble tasks. He would not 
give an estimate of Ms personal 
wealth, but nephew Ismau said it 
does not surpass “the $10 million 
figure,” an assertion viewed as far 
loo low in Egypt, where the Os- 
mans — inducting wife Sarnia, four 
sons and a daughter — are publicly 
described as tiro nation’s richest 

f amily 

But it was not in Egypt that Mr. 
Osman first made substantial sums 
of money. That came about 
through construction projects in 
Saudi Arabia. Later, amen Nasser 
decided to build the Aswan High 
Dam along the Nile in 1960, Mr. 
Osman underbid bigger and better- 
established companies to win a big 
part of the prestigious contract, 
bolstering his company’s reputa- 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In mH Hons, ore In focal currencies 

unless otherwise indicated 


si ✓ 


Britain 

Whitbread 

Yew to* .wo 

Revenue U90. 

Pretax Net _ mi 95.1 

Per snore UWS &UO 



Per 5hore_ 3US 


United States 

Affiad Stores 

1*1 tt»w. ms 

Revenue NU MJJft 

Net inc 17.22 VW3 

P*r Start— . 177 ua 

Caesars World 

3rd Quar. IMS TO* 

Revenue 15873 14123 

Net inC. — . 579 122 

Per Shore— ' O20 ail 
m im 
Revenue — . 474.91 4SL43 
Net ln& — 1925 10J* 

r* Per Share US 0J7 

Datapoint 
arttOuo r. ms to* 
Revenue — l»J 1552 

Net inc. <01210 7SI 

Per Shore — . 039 

t NiMtttt im in* 

Revenue — 395.1 OSS 

Net inc. 10)414 . 7Z6f 

Per Share — 1.10 

a : usx MS nets Include 
toinoISl.tnmea ■ 


Fad. Dept Stores 
WQ«r. TO? TO* 
Revenue — Z18L m 
Oner we* — 4X4 ■ 3SJ 

Oner Snore— (LS9 074 
MS aet excludes onto of 
SUmHdon. 

Hmkma Tire 

ndQMT. INS TO* 
Revenue— tttO TOO 
Oner Hef — IM 1U 
Oner Share— JUS 022 
WHOM ms TO* 
Revenue— 1230 USB. 
Oner Net — 22jB 

Oner Share— M4 04$ 
Note exetude pohf of Sl 
million to ifKourloraad at 
SI million w Si mlttkm h i 6 
moatttt. M* ert_og*> ex- 

SStfSSIXSE 

neK 7M5 mjs inetoeM psAi of 

S4 million. 

Long Mmd Light. 

1st pew, iw jm 

Revenue SWTS 547 J* 

Net inc. — 141 J* m.ra 
per snare — iaf Off 

MocyfRR) 

MQveT. ms 1)04 

Revenue HU 

Net inc. — 31.92 3*53 

Per Shore — 0*2 072. 

♦ hWta TO* TO* 

Net inc. — 1*M* WX* 
Per snore—. 12J - iso 

May Dept. Slones 

WQ v«r. ,TOS TO* 

Revenue 1090 «92 

Net Inc. 3M • -J72. 


Per Shore 07* Off 

Per snare results adhrstoa 
for Mont motto Oct. . 

Tidewater 
TOQaor. ms to* 

Revenue — »Jfl Jit 

Net Ldm 302 1U 

Year ms im 

Revenue— 319.9 335.1 

Meitnc. (n)474 lil 

Ptr Stare — <L09 

q: loos. Hets Indude irrite- 
dooms of SSPmiaon vs Site 
mmantouuortor o ndofsni 
mutton vo SI 0.9 million In 


Whmaloar 

9pOQwr. UK TO* 

Rnenun 30*2 «X1 

Net lac. 0*0 112 

Per Stare— Off 021 

WHoM TO* TO* 
Revenue— 5*0* 7519 

Net Inc. — lii 201 
Per Stare— US 123 

Whku 

IM Quar. TOS TO* 
Revenue— 70*2 7050 

Her Lues ■ 12* 007 

Melt Inclot to gains ot 
mUBOntfSUOQ. 


West Germany 
KHD 

Year TO* TOS 

SKEzr x Sj 

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lion and putting him in the political 
limelight. 

In mid-project, however, Nasser 
nationalized Egypt's banks and 
major industries, including Mr. Os- 
man’s company. “I said OK," Mr. 
Osman recounted. “But I told him I 
wanted to complete the dam on 
time ami not get tied up in govern- 
ment red tape." So Nasser ap- 
proved a law enabling Arab Con- 
tractors to operate more like a 
private company, the only stale 
concern in Egypt to enjoy such sta- 
tus. “We completed the dam in 
nine years, instead of the scheduled 
10,” said Mr. Osman, flipping an 
ash from his giant cigar. 

Nasser may have helped make 
Mr. Osman what he is today, but 
apparently there was little love be- 
tween the two. In his autobiogra- 
phy, “My Experience," published 
m 1980, in Arabic, Mr. Osman 
writes that Nasser frequently ha- 
rassed him, and even nzgustiy jaded 
him for a few days on charges of 
spying for Israel 

Mr. Osman was more compati- 
ble with Sadat, under whose presi- 
dency he built up his empire. In 
fact, one of his sons is mamed to a 
daughter of Sadat. As minister of 
construction for four years in the 
1970s, Mr. Osman canceled a law 
from the Nasser era that barred a 
private firm from receiving more 
than $100,000 annually in govern- 
ment contracts. Using the basic 
statute of Sadat's “open door” pip- 
gram. Mr. Osman created private 
companies through joint ventures 
between Arab Contractors and pri- 
vate concerns. 

Thus. Mr. Osman now has hold- 
ings in food production, industry, 
construcUop, banking and insur- 
ance, hotel services, medical care, 
and engineering services — many 
of them doing business with state 
entities. These companies, together 
with Arab Contractors, employ 
more than 200,000 people, says Is- 
mail Osman, who estimates the 
group’s combined assets to be 
about 52 billion. 

Perhaps the most impressive part 
of Mr. Osman’s operation is the 
almost fanatical loyalty he com- 
mands from employees, the result 
of what Ismail Osman calls “sound 
managem ent.” The Arab'Con trac- 
tors Co. employees are public sec- 
tor workers, and hence underpaid, 
bat lemnil Osman says they earn 
three to four times their salaries in 
bonuses. “Ten percent of whatever 
is saved on a project is distributed 
to workers," Mr. Osman said. And 
all companies in the Arab Contrac- 
tors’ network offer extensive bene- 
fits: A well-endowed pension fund, 
scholarships for employee children, 
athletic programs, a company hos- 
pital and free training for engi- 
neers. “This is how we keep the best 
people.” be said. “We’re private 
sector in spirit" 

Perhaps a bit too private, say 
many of Mr. Osman’s detractors. 
They argue that he has used his 
public sector affiliation to subcon- 
tract work to his private concerns 
that in turn make healthy profits, 
sometimes leaving Arab Contrac- 
tors with cost overruns. Such over- 
runs, they add, are usually subsi- 
dized by the government, since 


Arab Contractors is a public sector 
company. Thus, Egyptian busi- 
nessmen say, a common charge is 
that Mr. Osman has priv at ized his 
profits and socialized his debts. 

Ismail Osman dismisses this 
characterization of his unde’s busi- 
ness practices as “niter nonsense. 
S imilar charg e s , be s R id, have al- 
ways been leveled by thoge he 
• termed “jealous competitors." He 
insists that Arab Contractors has 
subcontracted only about 20 to 25 
percent of its jobs and that Mr. 
Osman has received less than 1 per- 
cent of the revenues. 

Despite the debate surrounding 
Mr. Osman, there are few signs that 
his influence is waning. In March, 
he was re-elected chairman of the 
powerful Engineers Syndicate. And 
two years ago, his second son mar- 
ried the daughter of Abdel Azim 
Loukma, a prominent leader of the 
Moslem Brotherhood, a fundamen- 
talist religious group. 

His longstanding- financial sup- 
port for the Moslem Brotherhood 
and other ldamie fundamentalist 
groups has stirred debate within 
establishment dudes. Mr. Osman 
insists that he gives money to fun- 
damentalist groups only indirectly, 
for example, through contributions 
to mosques. But both Arab and 
Western diplomats say the Osmans 
have long provided considerable 
economic support for the Moslem 
Brothers ana other fundamentalist 
groups in Egypt to help counter the 
growth of Co mmunist and leftist 
groups here. 

Such support is deeply resented 
by many in the Tilling National 
Democratic Party, who see the 
Moslem Brothers and other Islamic 
groups as potential threats to Mr. 
Mubarak’s regime. 

“Mr. Osman is still playing with 
religious fire, just as Sadat did," a 
senior NDP member •warped. But 
neither Mr. Osman nor his nephew, 
Ismail appear troubled by these 
affiliations. After all said Mr. Os- 
man, his faith was partly responsi- 
ble for his success. “I succeeded 
because I believe in God,” Mr. Os- 
man said. “All my life I have be- 
lieved in God, my country and the 
Egyptian man." 


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TO* TOS 

19.1 • 057 




Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on May 20, 1985: U.S. $131.55. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, Hefcking* PtertonlUK, 

HerengrocM 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


Private Placement 


Muv 1985 



REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA 

DM202,000,000 

Zero Coupon Bearer Bonds 


DM 100,000,000 Bonds of 1985/1995 
Redemption amount DM 200,000,000 

DM 102,000,000 Bonds of 1985/2000 
Redemption amount DM 300,000,000 


Commerzbank 

Alctiengesellschaft ’ 


Bayerische Vereinsbank 

Aktiengeselischufi 

Deutsche Bank ' 

Aktiengescllschuft 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Dresdner Bank 

A kiicncescllsch.ili 


Creditanstalt-Bankverein 

Girozentrale und Bank 
der osterreichischen Spaikassen 

Alctiengesellschaft 

Morgan Stanley International 


Genossenschaftliche Zentralbank AG 
Vienna 

Indnstriebank von Japan (Deutschland) 

AkliengesellschaJl 

Osterreichische Landerbank 

Akiiengesdlschaft 


Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) 

Limited 


This announcement appears as s matter of record only. The Bonds have not been registered for offer or sale in the 
United States of America and may not be offered or sold in the United Slates of America or to nationals or residents thereof or 10 other U.S. persons. 



Manufacturers Hanover 

is pleased to announce the opening of 
our new subsidiary in 

Oslo 

Manufacturers Hanover Norge A/S 

The addition of this subsidiary expands and strengthens our 
worldwide network of over 100 offices in 42 countries. It 
indicates our continued commitment to the international 
corporate and financial communities. A commitment which 
provides you access to the global expertise, state-of-the-art 
electronic technology and the creative financing solutions 
needed to manage your business. 

Building on 78 years of support for the growing Norwegian 
marketplace. Manufacturers Hanover Norge A S can provide 
you with a full array of financial services, including: 

• Kroner lending 

• Ship and offshore financing 

• Foreign exchange 

• Corporate finance 

• Trade services 

’ • Cash management services 

• Merchant banking services 

To discuss our specialized banking services in Norway, contact: 


DArcy H. LeClair 
Managing Director 

Manufacturers Hanover Norge A S 
Karl Johans gate 39-41 
0162 Oslo I 
Norway 


Erik A. Lind 
Deputy Managing Director 

Telephone: {02 J 412500. 

(021 428500 
Telex: 19950, 19992 
Facsimile: (02) 425861 


International Division 


MANUFACTURERS HANOVER 

The Financial Source."' 1 Worldwide. 






tsr, L‘ 


Over-the-Counter 

May 22 

nasoao Notional Market Prices 



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IMS HMI LOW aPJSLCtl'90 


Sam In mt 

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BbHC 53 7* 7* W 

BofcrFn IJOalfl 34 J* 

BoiMt 3 Mi SUi Mi — Vi 

BoltBCP -10 b A 1*423* mti 23V6— 56 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


EUROPE • MIDDLE EAST • AFRICA • FAR EAST 


ITiFn 


c 


I 

FIIMEXCO 


High tax-free incomes 
are being earned by 

- British and other 

expatriates in many parts of the 
world. Most of them are been for 
advice on how best to invest and 
maximise these assets, and they 
naturally prefer to seek it from people 
they can trust and respect 

People such as Ftnexco's 
Financial Consultants. Their expertise, 
allied to total integrity and profession- 
alism has enabled us to grow to 
become one of the world leaders in 
this fast expanding specialist market 
in less than Eve years. 

Such is the demand for our 
services that we now need to add to 
our elite team of International 
Consultants. - 

We are looking for people 
whose background of consistent 
professional achievement has won 


them respect in the business 
community’; people with plenty oFself- 
confidence, imagination, a streak of 
independence and a constant desire 
for fresh challenge. Probably not less 
than 30, your acumen, authority and 
ability to negotiate are more 
important than specific experience 
of international finance, although this 
would of course be a considerable 
asset, as would a second language. 
Our specialist training is 
acknowledged to be one or the best in 
the profession. 

It will prepare you to go 
wherever the market is (and that 
could be anywhere in Europe, the 
Middle East, Africa or the Far East) 
and reap very high rewards com- 
mensurate with your success. This is 
without doubt an exceptional opport- 
unity with a true Blue Chip company. 

Please write, enclosing a full CV 
to H E Gane, (Ref: 318), Whites Bull 
Holmes Ltd, 63-66 St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2N4JX. 


.“’Hi 


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30 256 

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» * • « 


Senior Sub Editor 


The Reuter News Pictures . 
Service requires a senior 
sub-editor to work on Its 
European News Pictures 
Desk in Brussels. 

The Desk is a major co- 
ordinating centre in the 
Company’s worldwide 
pictures network and 
applicants must have at least 
two and-a-half years of 
newspaper and/or news 
agency experience and a 
sound knowledge of 
international affairs. 

Film editing experience 
would be an advantage, as 
would some knowledge of 
film processing techniques 
and language ability. 
Applicants should also be 


familiar with video editing 
terminals and prepared to do 
shiftwork. 

The post is Brussels-based 
and offers a salary of up to 
1 .2m Belgian Francs a year 
according to experience. 

Please apply by telephoning 
01-353 7329 (24 hour 
answering service) for an 
application form, or write with 
full career details to Kim 
Bonqal, Recruitment 
Executive: 


REl’TEHS. 
iV.5 Ehrt Street. 

London EC.4P4AJ. 

M rare an equal opportunities employer 


UT 


. >•••• • *4* , 


Administrative Director, 

Ago Khan Program for Islamic Architecture 

MIT and Harvard's Aga Khan Program seeks an individual who writ 
report to the Chairman of the Executive Council and win be responsible 
for managing in conjunction with MIT and Harvard, the Aga Khan 
Program (or Islamic architecture. Primary responsibilities include 
management of activities and events, direction of administrative 
staff, communications, preparation of long-range budgets, accounts 
supervision and financial reporting; coordination of logistics for AKP 
public seminars in USA and abroad: acting as secretary of Executive 
Council: aiding m establishment of cooperative contractual arrange- 
mails and programs m the Muslim world. 

Position requires an individual who wNl administer and represent the 
program on behalf of its Executive Council and Chairman. Strong 
managerial, financial and communications skills required. Need for 
experience in the Muslim world and sensitivity to architectural and 
planning issues Willingness to travel up to 10% of the time. 
Demonstrated success at tactfully managing a complex organization 
with varied focuses and diverse individuals Familiarity with other 
cultures and experience as a program ambassator/spokesperson. 
Send two copies of resume (totScote U.S. dtizen or currenf visa 
status) to: Job #R85-C99. Ms. Sony Hansen, MIT Personnel 
Office, 77 Massachusetts Am., Cambridge. MA 021 39. DeaiBine 
for receipt of resumes: Jane 21, 1985. 


aflbmallw action/ 
eqoat apponaMv 

employer. 


MIT 



CW COMMUNICATIONS/INC. 

The wottfe leoonQ ouWahei cf 
comouier relate a newspaper* and rroganrei 


seeks a 

PLANNING & BUDGETING 
ASSISTANT 

for ifs Southern European Headquarters 

Based in Pans (NewliyJ. this newly created position will indude the 

following responsibilities: 

• Organization and fbtiow-up of timely planning, budgeting and reporting 
procedures. 

• Checking the consistency of anuud budgets prepared by CWCl subsid- 
iaries for 20 weekly or monthly publications in Southern Europe. 

• Checking and analyzing monthly reports sent by subsidiaries. 

• Consolidation of the monthly results in coordination with CWCl U.S. 
headquarters. 

■ Preparing and updating models to simulate the financial impact of 
market trends and product life cydes on company’ s results. 

These duties wiD necessitate extensive use of Lotus 1, 2. 3, Electronic Moil, 

word processing and graphics on IBM PC 

Working language will be exclusively English. Spanish. Italian or French 

would be a plus. 

To hold this very demanding position, CWCl seeks a U.5. or English woman. 

» Aged 38 to 45. Experience in budgeting and finandoi antdysis manda- 
tory. Knowledge of computers and electronic spread sheets would be on 
advantage. 

■ The candidate will have to work independently end should demonstrate 
strong organizational skills. 

• Ability to communicate with various nationalities in necessary. 

Phase send resume with handwritten letter toe 

Axel UEBLOIS 

COMPUTERWORLD COMMUNICATIONS 

1 85, Avenue Charfes-de-Gaufle, 

92200 NEUILLY-sur-SQNE, FRANCE. 



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MAJOR U.S. CORPORATION 

SEEKS 

FOR PARIS BASED INTERNAL AUDIT DEPT. 
CAREER MINDED ACHIEVERS 
WHO WELL FIT INTO OUR TEAM 
PERFORMING OPERATIONAL AND FINANCIAL 
AUDITS THROUGHOUT EUROPE 

You ore: Aged 22 or over, fluent in English, French and a third 
European language, a 'qualified accountant or busi- 
ness graduate, prepared to relocate to Paris, interest- 
ed by extensive travel. 

You have: Experience in public accounting, internal audit or 
other related financial fields, developed human rela- 
tions, skills, personal drive. 

We offer: Competitive salaries, faifored training programs in 
Europe and the U.S., a stimulating environment, 
career development. 

IF YOUR PROFILE FITS MAIL YOUR CV. TO: 


: 3 J »]► Mil 


5 RllE KEPPLBL 75116 PARIS, FRANCE 



AVAILABLE 



SALES VICE PRESIDENT 

Discussions on terms and conditions for this post have led to 
nothing. Further interviews will be equally unproductive - 
our offer terminates June 5th in writing. No other dates will 
be considered. This is our final position and only interested 
candidates should contact us toarrange final administrative 
procedures. 

Annette HALE, 

P.O. Box 164041, Miami, FLORIDA. 


REQUIRED BY THE FOOD AND 
AGRICULTURAL ORGANIZATION OF THE 
UNITED NATIONS, 

Rome, Italy 

PERSONNEL SPECIALISTS 

At junior and middle levels. Candidates should have a university 
degree and experience in personnel administration with emphasis oh 
position classification/ salary administration or staff benefits adminis- 
tration. 

English. French and Spanish are the languages of [bcorgaaocaitoit ttnd 
multilinguality Ls an advantage. 

Salary S16425 to $24,93 1 net tax free, home le»e and other benefits. 
Send Jctiiled airrimium litre quoria^ *Tfl 990-AFF' not later don Jane 20. 
1965 hv 

FAO, Central Recruitment, Via delie Tenue di ramralls, 
OGIOO Rome, Italy. 


Young, experienced in- 
ternational "in house** 
company lawyer. 

International corporate 
transactions and litigations: 
doing business with develop- 
ing countries, etc. Fluenl in 
main European languages. 
Willing to re locate/ travel. 
Write to Casdla S.P.J. 
T. 112 via Mansoni 43 
20121 Milano. 


"nraraiNATioNAL 

POSITIONS” 




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C:~ : t 


s ' *> * 


Over-the^Counter 

NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Saws m ner 

ibm Hten low 3PJM.aroe 

(Continued from Page 12) 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Pane 13 


May 22 


■« Onyx 
OrtlcC 

• OnitcR 
V Optrtcs 
. • Orbanc 

Orbll 

OrwMt UOb 

• OrtaCo 
•I- Orton R 

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“*■ OWOHM AO 24) 


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2M 


New Issue 
May 23. 1985 


This advertisement appears 
as a matter of record only 


Floating Rate Notes 


May 22 


Dollar 


iiyjasiiiaawa! 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
22 May 1985 

The net asset value quotations mowBbeloer are supplied by Me Fanis ihtedwUti Hie 


morainal symbols hidlcata -frequency of qaotatleas supplied lor the IHT: 
(d) dotty; (wl - weekly; (b) - b*- monthly; c r) - regularly; (Q - imtulaty 

AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(wl Al-Mol Trust, SJ*_ *156.93 



EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK 

Luxembourg (g m JSi 


id 5 " 


DM 200,000,000 

7%% Deutsche Mark Bearer Bonds of 1985/1997 


Offering Price: 99%% 

Interest: 7%% p.a., payable annually on May 24 

Maturity: May 24. 1997 

Listing: Frankfurt am Main. Berlin, Dusseldorf, Hamburg and Munch en 



Deutsche Bank 

AktiengeseHschaft 

Commerzbank 

AktiengeseUsehaft 


Dresdner Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Arab Banking Corporation - 
Daus&Co. GmbH 
Bank fOr Gemeinwirtschaft 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Bayerische Vereinsbank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 
' Deutsche Girozentrale 

- Deutsche Kommunalbank- 
Hamburgisctie Landesbank 

- Girozentrale - 
Bankhaus Hermann Lampe 
Kommanditgesellschaft 
Merck. Finck&Co. 

SaL Oppenheim jr.&Cie. 

Irinka us & Burfchardt 


Baden-WQrttembergische Bank 

Aktiengeseilschaft 

Bayerische Hypotheken- und 

Wbchsel-Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Joh. Berenberg. Gossler&Co. 

Bankhaus Gebrfidar Bethmann 
DG Bank 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 
Georg Hauck&Sohn Bankiers 
Kommanditgesellschaft auf Aktien 
Landesbank Rheinland -Pfalz 
- Girozentrale - 
B. Metzler seel. Sohn 4 Co. 

Simonbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Vr reins- und West bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Westfalenbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 


Badische Kommunale Landesbank 

- Girozentrale - 
Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 

Berliner Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

DelbrOck&Co. 

Effectenbank-Warburg 
Aktiengeseilschaft 
Hessbche Landesbank 

- Girozentrale - 
Landesbank Saar Girozentrale 

Norddeutsche Landesbank 

Girozentrale 

J.H. Stein 

M.M. Warburg -Brinckmann. WirtzSCo. 


More like floating when 


Non Dollar 




INVEST1SSEMENTS ATLANTIQUES 

Sod^Anonyme 

Registered Office; Luxembourg, 14 rue AMringen 
Connnrrrfcil RrgEwr. Laxunboarg Stdfan B No 8722 

DIVIDEND ANNOl I NCEME.\T 

Imivtfcornirab .\lbnimur> S.A. will pi a l 5 . SO. 10 ditidend per slare 
mi or after May I 7 lh. 1985 to holdm on rcrord no Mar 17 th. R 85 , 
Shores htD be traded ex-dividend after Mav lTth 1935. 

TV dii idmd L- praUr lo hnldt>iv nf bmiw shan» apiml pmmuiiun id 
cnujKMi number fit 

BANQllE GENERATE Dl UrXEMBOr«G s^\. 

27, Avenue Monterey 
Luxe mbour g 

Tbe Board of Directors. 



en you tilt back - 
the seat cushion tilts up. 

yourfeet up- 
grade for it. 


TWA's new Ambassador 


Mm 


No other business das has seals like 
these They're newThe widest business 
dassseate-TheyVe ezdusivetoTWAs 747 
Ambassadordass. 

To sit in them is to float Perfectiy relaxed 
They curve Id support every part of your 
bodyTherei!s even a special legand foot nei. 


Flyipgto and from America will never 
be the same again. VDu can really relax on 
the flight Work incomfortSleep serenely 
Of course these seatsare only six 
across Therefc plenty of leg room and 
plenty of space all round. 

try the new experience of floalir^ across 


seats are a new experience. 

yica will never theAtfantic Fly TV\Ws 747 Ambassador 

eaHy relax on ClasiTheyteDeirg fitted 

leep serenely 747 fleet wiH have mem by mid June 


the Atlantic FJyTVWs 747 Ambassador 
Class.Theyne being fitted now most of our 
747 fleet wiU have mem by mid June 
But you can always enjoy ^across 
seating on atfour transatlantic aircraft. 
■VburTWAAAainAgentywIltell 
youallaboutit 1 X 


Leading the way to the USA. 








































ihjumtt 


VVfednesdars 

AMEX 

Closing 

Tables include Hie nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


UMontn Sis. Oox 

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8 24* 24* 

13 9% 91% 

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22 21 * 


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121 ft— M 
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Opening for Taii> 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1985 


Page 15 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 




Chemical Bank Signs 

C7 

Takeover Pact in Ohio 


Untied Pna International 

COLUMBUS — The state of 
Ohio signed an agreement Wednes- 
day for Chemical New York Cop. 
to take over the failed Home State 
*< Savings Bank of Gacmnati in re- 
turn for Ohio banking privileges 
and a S125-mfllimi state contribu- 
tion. 

Robot L Iipp, Chemical presi- 
dent, said the Chemical Bank of 
Ohio hopes to open for business at 
old Home State sites on Jane 14. 

The signing will enable Chemical 
to operate in Ohio as a cammerdal 
bank and also will permit Chase 
Manhattan BanV to enter the state 
with the purchase of four of die 
savings ranks dosed by Governor 
Richard R Celeste to stop a run 
.. sparked by Home State’s faflure. 
'■? Chase and New York's Citibank 

reportedly were negotiating for the 
same son of agreement in Mary- 
land, which was hit by a ran on 
state-insured savings and loans 
when problems surfaced at one of 
that state’s large thrift institutions. 

Robert B. McAlister, stale super- 
intendent of savings and loans, said' 
Ohio institutions had seven days to 
meet or exceed the Chemical offer 
before the contract became bind- 


ing. Bat he said the Chemical ar- 
rangement was ahead by “eight 
lengths in ihebackstretch-” 

W illiam M. Duncan, a Toledo 
native who was named presdent of 
Chpwiirai Ohio, said interim short- 
term loans would be offered to 
Home State customers at the prime 
interest rate starting May 29 
through SunAmerica Financial 
Gap- a Cbemcal subsidiary oper- 
ating in Ohia ' 


Swedish Banks Lower 
Their Lending Rates 

Return 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden’s 
commercial banks said Wednesday 
that they had cut their average 
leading rates to 15# percent from 
36V4 percent- •• 

A spokesman for the Swedish 
Bankers’ Association said the cut 
was made in response to a request 
by the country’s central bank. On 
May 13, the banks had raised aver- 
age interest rales 4 percent to 16# 
percent after the government abol- 
ished its recommended lending rate 

railing . 


Pacific Tdesis WUl Extend Reach 
With Purchase of Dallas Company 

Los Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANQELES — In a move that will extend its corporate reach 
across the United States, Pacific Tdesis Group of San Francisco 
announced Tuesday that it would buy Communications Industries, a 
Dallas-based nidio-triephone company, in a cash merger valued at 
$431 million. 

Co mmunicatio ns Industries holds Federal Communications Com- 
mission licenses to operate ceOnlar radio- telephone networks in its 
bane market of Dallas as wdl as in Atlanta, St. Louis and Tampa-St 

San 


Petersburg, Florida. Its licenses also indude San Diego 
Francisco in PacTd’s home territory. 

In a cellular network, a service area is divided into broadcast cells, 
each with its own low-powered radio transmitter and each connected 
by computer to the otto- ceUs aud to the regular telephone network. 
As a user drives through, the computer switches the call from cell to 
cdL Thai allows several callers to use the same radio frequencies 
simultaneously, greatly increasing the system’s message volume be- 
yond that of a single- transmitter mobile-phone system. 

A Pacific Tdesis subsidiary, PacTd Mobile Access of Costa Mesa, 
California, last January bought a 235-percent interest in a cdttular 
network to serve the San Franasco-San Jose area — a system in which 
Cl also holds a 235-percent stake. The acquisition, if approved, 
would double Pacific’s interest However, the FCC has ruled that each 
market must be served by two cdlular radio-tdephone systems — me 
run by phone companies, the other by any otto company or combi- 
nation of companies (the so-called non- wire-line network). 

Because PacTd Mobfle Access is principal partner in apartnership 
that built Los Angeles’ tdephone-company network ana is building 
another to serve San Diego, Pacific Tdesis may have to divest itsdf of 
the competing, non-wire-line license also saving the San Diegp 
market. PacTd’s interest m San Francisco is only in the non- wire-line 
license: 


Volvo Profit Down 15% in Quarter 


By Juris Kaza 

Inienuutwal HmM Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — AB Volvo, 
the Swedish automotive, energy 
and food group, said Wednesday 
that its firet-quarter pretax profit 
fell IS percent from a year earlier, 
to 2.212 biQm kronor (about $251 
million), from 2.6 billion faunor. 

634 Iheftnuth 

quarter of 1984. 

Pehr G. GyHenhammar, Volvo’s 
board chair man and chief execu- 
tive officer, said the first-quarter 
results compared with an unusually 
Strong first quarter a year ago. At 
that time. Volvo officials ex- 
plained, earnings were boosted by 
large truck deliveries to customers 
in the Middle East. 

Mr. GyHenhammar fid not pro- 
ject Volvo’s .earnings for all of 
1985. But Michael SjOwall, an ana- 
lyst who follows the company, said 
the lower fust-quarter result had 
been expected in light of last year’s 
unusual cncnmstances- 

He predicted that Volvo’s earn- 
ings in the second and thud quar- 
ters would be significantly higher 
than in 1984, when Volvo was af- 
fected by strikes at suppliers in 
West Germany. 

Volvo said sales in the first quar- 
ter edged up to 21509 bfflion kro- 


nor from 21.687 kronor a year ear- 
lier. Car sales rose 8 percent, to 
8.971 billion kronor, from 8.287 
billion kronor in the 1984 quarter. 
Truck sales rose 6 percent, to 3.771 
billion kronor. 

Sales in the energy group de- 
clined 12 percent, to 6.043 billion 
kronor, the company reported. 

The company said its European 
car sales had ban weak in the first 
quarter, but that this bad been off- 
set by high sales of trucks in Eu- 
rope and the United States. 

The company’s manag in g direc- 
tor, Hakan Fri singer, said that 
sharply higher automobile excise 
taxes and payment restrictions in 
Sweden would probably reduce do- 
mestic Volvo sales by several thou- 
sand cars in 1985. The loss would 
not be offset by increases on for- 
eign markets, he said. 

Higher excise charges and rules 
requiring a 50-percent down pay- 
ment cm new cars were pan of a 
fiscal package announced by the 
Swedish govemmeni on May 13 to 
slow domestic consumption and re- 
verse private capita] outflows that 
were weakening the krona. 

Presenting first-quarter results 
ahead of Volvo's annual meeting at 
an amusement park in Gothen- 
burg, Volvo officials also an- 
nounced that they had decided in 


principle to build a new car plant in 
Uddevala, Sweden, an the site of a 
shipyard. The plant, which will cost 
2.5 billion kroner and have a capac- 
ity of 80,000 cars per year, will 
open in 1987. 

Company officials said that 
Volvo Had allocated an initial 100 
minion kronor for she and otto 
p reliminary studies for the new 
planL 

Volvo also announced that it was 
setting up a program with the 
Swedish post office and PKBan- 
ken, the state-owned commercial 
bank, to allow Swedes to buy Volvo 
shares at their local post offices or 
from rural mail earners. 


Lowered in Venezuela 

Reuters 

CARACAS — Venezuela low- 
ered commercial bank lending 
rates Wednesday by one point to 14 
percent as pan of a restructuring of 
interest rates across the board, the 
central bank said. 

Tbe move was in line with a 
flexible monetary poKcy reflecting 
international interest rate tr ends 
and the need to stimulate credit 
demand, it said. 


2 Aircraft Firms 
Plan Merger 

United Press imenvuoml 

LONDON —Australia’s two 
largest aerospace companies, 
Hawker de Havilland Ltd. and 
Commonwealth Aircraft Corp.. 
plan to merge, it was an- 
nounced Wednesday. 

Britain's Hawker Siddeley 
Group PLC. which owns 70 
percent of Hawker de Havil- 
land. said De Havilland would 
pay cash for the entire issue 
capital of Commonwealth. The 
amount of the payment was not 
disclosed. It said De Havilland 
would finance the purchase 
from its own resources and that 
the merger would become effec- 
tive June 30, subject to Austra- 
lian government approval. 

Hanker de Havilland is in- 
volved primarily in aircraft and 
aircraft engine overhaul and 
aerospace component manufac- 
ture for a number of Australian. 
British and U.S. military cus- 
tomers. Commonwealth has 
broadly similar activities. The 
merged organization will have 
about 3,300 employees, the an- 
nouncement said. 


Ju 


< 


Burton Makes Bid 
ForDebenhams 

Reuters 

LONDON — Burton Group, 
the British dothing retailer, an- 
nounced Wednesday a £455- 
millioo (5582-million) takeover 
bid for the Deb enhams depart- 
ment store chain and premised 
a new shopping concept if suc- 
cessful 

The Debenhams board said 
the bid was inadequate far the 
67-store group, which includes 
Haraky toy shops and Harvey 
Nichols stores. 

The Burton chairman, Ralph 
Halpern, said the group intend- 
ed to develop a new ^galena” 
format for debenhams involv- 
ing groups of specialty stores 
under the same roof. Mr. Bur- 
ton said it was joining forces 
with the Habitat Mothercare re- 
tailing and furniture group in 
its bid to redevelop Deben- 
hams. Habitat Mothercare 
would be given an option on 20 
percent of Debenhams, with 
use of floor space as wdl as a 
contract to refurbish the stores. 
Debenham5’schainnan, Robert 
Thornton, said last wed: that 
the group would fight any hos- 
tile bids. 


WestLB Operating Profit 
Rose 10% inFirst Quarter 


Reuters 

DUSSELDORF — West- 
deutsche Laudesbank Girozen- 
tralc’s group operating profit rose 
10 percent from a year earlier to 
314 nrilh'on DM (about SI03 mil- 
lion) in 1985’s first quarter, Friedel 
Neuber, management board chair- 
man. said Wednesday- The bank is 
West' Germany’s third largest 

He added that full 1985 results 
should not be hampered by farther 
provisions against the troubled 
Deutsche- Anlagen Leasing GmbH. 

DAL, which had losses in the 
early 1980s, has cost WeslLB more 
than 600 million DM in loss provi- 
sions, he said. WestLB had report- 
ed earlier that it had to use the bulk 
of its 1984 record operating profit 
of more than 1 billion DM for ride 
provisions and would not pay a 
dividend. 

WestLB is DAL’s leading share- 
holder, with a 30-percrU stake, and 
agreed with four other banks earli- 
er this year to cover 1983 losses of 
1.18 bmion DM as part of a rescue 

plan. 


As earlier reported, WestLB had 
a partial operating profit of 940 
minion DM in 1984, down slightly 
from 949 million DM in 1983. 
When trading results are taken into 
account, total operating prefit fell 
6 percent, to 152 trillion DM from 
1.41 billion. But of this, 1.1 billion 
had to be set aside as risk provi- 
sions, rally slightly less than 15 
billion in 1983. 

Mr. Neuber said 1984 total oper- 
ating profit, although apparently 
lower, was, in fact, a record because 
1983’s figures were inflated by a 
224-nnliion-DM transfer out of a 
no-Ionger-reqnired reserve posi- 
tion. 

The W)stLB group reported net 
1984 profit of 19.1 mflhou marks, 
up sharply from 566,000 DM in 
1983, while the parent bank de- 
clared an unchanged 30-million- 
DM profit 

He cautioned that foreign credit 
risks will continue to be high. 

Mr. Neuber declined to specu- 
late if the end cm provisions on 
DAL would enable WestLB to re- 
sume a dividend cm 1985 earnings. 


Brammer Rejects 
OSerbjBnnzl 

Reuters 

LONDON — Brammer PLC 
said Wednesday that it has rejected 
a £1 19. 6-mIHion (S153-miIlion) bid 
fra the company by Bunzl PLC. 

A company said it had not been 
informed of the takeover bid as 
required by law and that h had 
complained to the panel that over- 
sees British mergers. 

'This bid is unwelcome, unsolic- 
ited and unattractive and, in partic- 
ular, lacks industrial logic. We in- 
tend to defend it vigorously and are 

urging shar eholders to do noth- 
ing,” tbe statement said. 

The terms of the Bunzl offer con- 
sisted of 60 Bunzl ordinary dares 
and £1 15 nominal of B unzl 7-per- 
cent convertible loan stock dated 
1997 for every 100 Brammer ordi- 
nary shares. Tbe cash alternative 
was 370 pence per Brammer share. 

Brammer shareholders who ac- 
cepted the offer would receive 
about 145 pence per share in gross 
anmmi income, based on BunzTs 
1984 dividends and the coupon to 
be paid on the Bunzl convertible 
stock. 

Brammer manufactures industri- 
al machinery, among other equip- 
ment. Bunzl is primarily in' 
in making paper products. 


Boeing Co. has signed a contract 
with China’s state airline, tbe Gv3 
Aviation Administration of China 
to sell eight planes, including rate 
747, two 767s and five 737-200s. 
They are to be delivered between 
September and December this 
year. 

Crocker National Corp. share- 
holders have approved a merger 
with Midland Bank PLC, it was 
announced at the company’s annu- 
al meeting in San Francisco. The 
London-based bank currently 
holds a 57-percent ownership inter- 
est in the company, tbe parent of 
Crocker National Bank. 

Dncrsif bods Inc-’s directors have 
accepted a S360^njllion offer for 
the flBnras restaurant management 
concern made by the PtDsbury Co. 
They rqected an earlier offer from 
Horn and Haitian, a food service 
and mail order company. Pifisl 
said it offered $1 150 a share for ; 
of Diversifood's outstanding com- 
mon shares. 

Eagle Computer, of Garden 
Grove, California, which has been 


struggling to survive the shakeout 
among personal computer makers, 
said that it has readied a tentative 
agreement to refinance all its re- 
maining $75 million in debt. Tbe 
deal is subject to approval from the 
company ’s creditors and the stale 
corporations commissioner. 

Gannett Co. stockholders ap- 
proved a set of anti-takeover mea- 
sures at an annual meeting in 
Rochester. New York, despite ob- 
jections from one of the media con- 
glomerate’s largest shareholders, 
the Cincinnati financier Carl 
Lindner. Mr. Lindner owns 5 per- 
cent of the company. 

G3 A Dnffas Group PLC, a 
London-based commodity group 
with interests in insurance broking, 
said talks were taking place that 
might lead to a ted for the compa- 
ny. Tbe group’s pretax profit in 
1984 amounted to £17.1 million 
($21.75 million at current rates), 
down from £20.4 million in 1983. 

International Business Machines 
CoipL, has been allowed by the U5. 
Justice Department to sell the mili- 


tary-computer division of its Rolm 
Corp. unit to Loral Corp., a defense 
electronics concern. In approving 
IBM’s purchase of Rolm last year, 
the department required IBM to 
sell the division, Mil-Spec 

Kldckner-Hianbokh-Deotz AG’s 
profits and sales rose in the first 
four months of 1985, its managing 
board chairman said. Parent com- 
pany turnover rose 6 percent in 
January to April, and a 1-percent 
drop in domestic sales was more 
than compensated for by a 10-per- 
cent increase in foreign sales. 

Messina Ltd, the restructured 
South African group, posted a loss 
ofl 21 .04 million rand ($60 million) 
in 1984 against a 356 million profit 
in 1983. The group said in March 
that it would sell its motor interests 
to its controlling company, the 
South African Life Assurance Co. 

Sim Alliance and Loudon Insur- 
ance PLCs chairman. Lord Ald- 
ington, told tbe annual meeting in 
London the company incurred a 
first-quarter loss in 1985. He gave 
no figures. Home underwriting 


losses were higher than in 1984, 
with results badly affected by 
losses from severe winter weather! 

Wickes Cos^ based in Santa 
Monica, California, announced 
that it will spend as much as SI 
biUicm on a major acquisition with- 
in the next year, less than four 
months after emerging from reor- 
ganization under U. S. bankruptcy 
laws. 

Woodside Petroleum Ltd. of 
Australia said that a 13-bank lead 
management group has agreed to 
underwrite a $ 1 .65-billion credit fa- 
cility. Tbe fadlily will be used to 
refinance existing loans and to help 
fund its stake in the liquefied natu- 
ral gas export phase of tbe North 
West Shelf natural gas projects 

Upjohn Co. shareholders have 
approved two “poison pill” mea- 
sures aimed at protecting the Mich- 
igan-based drag and agricultural 
company from hostile takeover at- 
tempts. The company is now 
owned by Upjohn corporate offi- 
cers and Upjohn family heirs. 


Pickens-U noeal May Affect Other Takeover Bids 


(Continued from Page 9) 
tie, Mr. Pickens’s settlement with 
Unocal left the oilman somewhat 
hamstrung financially, according 
to analysts. Although be still- wu- 
have $1.1 tenkm worth of Unocal 
stock and notes as a result of his 
settlement with the company, the 
stock will be tied up by the agree- 
ment, so that Mr. Pickens will be 
virtually unable to sdl it or act on it 
in otto ways without Unocal's 
p ermiss ion. 

While Mr. Batchdder suggested 
that Mesa would be able to borrow 
against the stock and notes to fund 
any future takeover attempts, other 
experts said getting baokera to loan 
money against the $550 mOBon 
worth of stock, at least, would be 
difficult as long as Unocal can con- 
trol its disposition. 

The aftermath of the Unocal im- 
broglio does more than hamper Mr. 


Pickens’s future takeover plans. 
Analysts say dial the trend of 
mergers and restructurings in the 
ail industry touched off by Mr. 
Pickens is all but aided, in part 
simply because there aren't many 
big cu companies that haven't been 
affected in some way. 

Beyond that, analysts Mid the 
Delaware derision might put a 
damper on reant flare-ups of hos- 
tile takeover activities in the metha, 
airline and other industries by giv- 
ing corporate managements a new 
way to defend themselves against a 
raid. 

Mr. Batchdder even suggested 
the Delaware ruling might prove 
handy as an offensive tactic for the 
raiders themselves, who could aim 
their stock-purchase offers just at 
certain dements of a company's 
shareholders, such as institutional 
investors, while excluding other 
stockholders. 


Although the Delaware court 
said its ruling did not give corpo- 
rate managers “unbridled discre- 
tion to defeat any perceived threat 
to corporate control by any draco- 
nian means available,” some ex- 
perts said Tuesday h may be up to 
the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission to define the limits of the 
new rule or to propose new laws 
controlling managers* rights 
against hostile raiders. 

But for the time bein& Mr. 
Gilchrist said, “the bloom may be 
off the rose. 

“If you view Pickens as the pre- 
eminent and most successful {raid- 
er] with his success in Gulf, Gties 
Service and Pbfllipseven by his own 
admission, the best he has done [in 
tbe Unocal fight] is come out even. 
To the extent that he attracts fi- 
nancing by having an aura of infal- 
libility. he may have lost some- 
thing.” 



y ' dph'p 

+ 

■ ■ ? •• / 


T. Boone Pickens 


Posts Changed At Eastern 


United Press International 

MIAMI — A senior vice presi- 
dent of Eastern Airlines took 
charge Wednesday of day-to-day 
control of the airline so that its 
chairman, Frank Borman, can de- 
vote mare time to “strategic is- 
sues,” the carrier said. 

„ The new executive via president 
find general mnnwgw of airline op- 
erations is Joe Leonard, 41, an 18- 
year airime veteran whom Eastern 
hired 13 months ago from Ameri- 
can Airlines. Previously, Mr. Leon- 
ard was with Northwest. 

The promotion puls Mr. Leon- 
ard in the slot of heir apparent at 
Eastern, which is growing interna- 
tionally and is unaergoing a finan- 
cial turnaround that resalted in a 
net profit of $245 milli on in the 


first quarter of this year. The Mi- 
ami-based Eastern has not made a 
year-end profit since 1979. 

Mr. Borman, who has been 
chairman ance 1976, is 57 and has 
no thoughts of retiring, an Eastern 
spokesmansaid. 

“The exclusive purpose of these 
changes is to improve om efficien- 
cy and to capitalize cm our momen- 
tum to maintain long-term profit- 
ability,” Mr. B orman said. 

Eastern also created a new “of- 
fice of the chairman ” which, in ad- 
dition to Mr. Borman and Mr. 
Leonard, includes Mort Ehrlich, 
senior vice president of planning; 

i n n- • : — * 


Russell L. Ray Jr^ senior via presi 
dent of marlffting- and Wayne 
Yeoman, senior via president of 
finance 


The Perils of Flying at 1,300 


(Continued from P&ge 9) 
this year by Aetna Life & Casualty, 
though some have been held -as 
f takeover possibilities, according to 
’ Robert B. Nicholas, via president 
of finance and planning, Aetna, the 
largest publicly owned insurance 
company in the U5, manages $25 
billion specifically earmarked for 
stocks while other investment 
funds totaling $40 billion support 
its insurance operations. 

“With energy’s strong relative 
performance so far in 1985, 1 view 
the sector as even less attractive 
now,” Mr. Nicholas added, who 
admitted that by avoiding the 
j. * stocks, the insurer’s fund portfolio. 
Performance has been hurt 
‘ He said Aetna's outlook toward 
Wall Street is “largely colored by 
the interest rate picture." If rates 
are higher -by year^ad, be said, 
stocks “hot appear fully priced.” 
But if tbe reverse occurs, he sees 
- room for price-earnings multiples - 


to expand and for a 10- percent 
gain for the overall market 

Mr. Nicholas said that Aetna's 
fixed-income dep artm ent is fore- 
casting the first scenario while, 
conversely, managers of the stock 
fund see rates contimmig to decline 
as the year unfolds. Thai seems to 
be a wishful-flanking Isas of thdi's 
because it would Se. bullish for 
slocks,” he noted. “The fixed-in- 
come people are probably more ob- 
jective about interest rates.” 

Incidentally, Mr. Acuff at Smith 
Barney this writ called Aetna “our 
-favorite bigh-yidd multi-line insur- 
ance play. ' 

But Mr. Nicholas, currently in 
Europe presenting Aetna to inves- 
tors, observed; “rm finding that 
Europeans generally sold insurance 
stocks last year on Wall Street, 
m issi n g the 50-percem gam since 
then by the group, so sow they’re 
-wondering- if they’re not reaching- 
to buy the stocks now.” 





A Conference on 
Trade and Investment 
Opportunities 

Budapest, june 13 - 14 , 1985 . 

The International Herdd Tribune 
conference on 'Trade and Investment 
Opportunities in Hungary” will be of 
keen interest to any executive concerned 
about future economic relations between 
East and West. 

Speakers at this landmark confer- 
ence will indude Hungarian government 
ministers, business leaders, bankers and 
economists. 

For further information, please 
contact the International Herald Tribune 
conference office, 181, avenue Charles 
de Gaulle, 92521 Neuiliy Gedex, Fr anae. 
Telephone: 747 1265. Telex: 613 595 F. 


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ESCORT SBVKE 
84 NEW YORK 
TUi 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

B&GRAyiA 

tawt Same*. 

Ttk 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Portmisi Escort Agency 


iSkMt, 

» 456 3724ar4iA 1158 
Afl i 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SERVICE 
TH: 200 8585 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 

SERVICES 

CHARia A YAOtt MGRBS. Di- 
rect From owner of target fleet 
American imaoentent Baxter* 
crew*, govt bmed. VUef Yadte, 
AMTSeebtaMtow 22C, Pvaew, 
Greece. Tot 4529571, 4529486. Ik 
21-3000. USA afficee: Hr Rood, Are- 
bier. PA 19002. Tet 215 601(04. 

** PAMS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL V.LP. YOUNG IADY 
Dattaguishad, Begot, MtiAnguoL 


SHOTPING 

ANblUCUAM 182 it 7 
raUSIIIR. IADY COMFAMON 

Owuing, educated, traveL 

LADBWEAR. mode to meature fro« 
war awn notarial or on Near 
Baker Sheet Phone London 724 4999 

VW IADY GIRDE , 
Youiia eduetted, eleyit & trilngud 
tor day*, eveninat & tavel 

PABS 530 02 84 

SERVICES 

YOUNG LADY 

PA/btarpreter & Tourin Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 

TOKYO 475 54 80 

bropoon Young lady Companion. 

YOUNG HESANT LADY 
PA. PAMS 525 81 01 

PAMS: 520 97 95 

■UNGUAL YOUNG IADY PA 

- PAHS 704 SO 27 

W PA YOUNG IADY 
Md*vaL 

* PAMS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY lOTNUAL VRLRA 

PARK VIP SOPHBnCAiro YOONS 
lody companion Why don't you 
phone 277-01-69 far yaw days, eve- 
ranat & weekends! An alegwit h5n- 
9irt pide, even for your dropping. 

WTERNAIIOItU KAUTVUL Peqrie 
UNLID. USA A WOHDWDETtS 
2137657793 / 7657794 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON 

KBttlNGTON 

ESCORT SBVKZ 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GR4GHPS ESCORT SBKVKL 

IBr 01/363 08 64 -022/34 41 86 

10 xBes«ncM oukh sr, ws 

IBLc 9379136 OR 9379133 

Al mafer aedB conk aerepted. 

★ MADRID ★ 

TASIE BCORT SBMCE 

TEL 411 72 57-259 61 96 

London Class 

BCORTSMCE 

LONDON. FEATHRCW 6 GATVACK 
TterOI 8900373 

* ELECTRA * 

MADRID BCORT SHtVKE 
CTHXT CARDS. 250 80 19 

AMSTOCAT 5 

leaden Ewart Sendee 

128 Wipnoru 5f, London W.l. 

A4 napr Cxmft Cardt Accepted 

Tet 437 47 41 / 47<T 

12 naan ■ nvidnigt* 

* GBffVAHRST * 

DAR.Y ESCORT SBWKE 

Teb 022/32 34 18 
+ Weekend A Timed 

JASMINE 

AMSiaDAM BCORT SERVICE. 
Ill 020-866655 

LA VENTURA 

l«R YORK BCORT SBMCE 
313-888-1666 

PtBTIGE 

London Escort Service 

Tet 9® 3163 / 06833 3163 

TIFFANY 

UXDON ESCORT SBMCE 

1Hi 38S 6390 A 385 1602 

LONDON TOPS 

• ESCORT SRVKE 381 1950 

MADRID 1NFL 

ESCORT SBMCE 

TH: 3456348. CHBIT CARDS 

LONDON LADY 

EhotI Service. Tab 402 5228 

^Madrid Stars* 

Service 250 34 96 

MAYFAIR CUJB 

GUBESEVKX hum 5jw 
KjnODAM {0110-254155 

TIC HAGUE (0) 7040 79 96 

* AMSTERDAM* 

5HF Ewart Sendee, 227837 

ZURICH 

CARQltE ESCORT SBtVKZ. 

Teb 01/252 61 74 

•maBflnnne 

1U6 (bum 4 fnto 10 pn4 

8* 

ZURICH 

SenariWi Ewart 4 Gride Swire 
Teb 01/57 75 96 

GBCVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Teb 46 11 58 

LONDON 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SBMCE 
01-329 4794 

QGUEA BCORT SERVICE 

51 Baourtmp EVare, London SW3. 

Tet 01 584 6513^49 (6-12 pn) 

MADRID SBECI10N5 ESCORT Ser- 
vice Tet 4011507. Crert) Cor*. 

MAMRI IMPACT escort end glide 
wrvice. Mubtegad. 261 4142 

UMDON ZOE WBT Beorf Agency 
Teb 01.579 7556. 


SERVICES 


AN MISSING GSEBt LADY <mB 
Mp you how an unfam eB uU e vwt 
to London. Ptoe. prfy tenots a 
Fteace cal London 373 1427 


PAMS LADY GUIDES 224 01 32. 

adntod, uiAt- 
cSmn & trwefc 
Anpork 


SOOBE DIANE PARIS 260 87 43 
Men & women guides, security & rwd- 
ey gyie»viete8api-12pw. 


LONDON. ELEGANT mtAwduated 
French lady oomanon,wefi trowled 
&vantefc.TrtPl 0364 {Dll 


PASS NOTE IMS PHOW AT ONCE 

757 62 48. Trustful VIP. lody, trend 
cpmpMion. 


RAM0FURT. Young bdy gMapanto n 
Enafah. French, German spoken. Free 
to travel 069/44 77 75. 


tflUBON LADY COMPANION. A 
wc*y jervim far viatoo to London 
Kmb tnL PI) 821 Q2B3 


S WITZERLA ND- Young ebgcrt Jody 
mrnovbn. 5iddl -1- Gftnvn BO. 


747 59 58 TOUKST GUBJE. Ptrh, 
airports. Young, elegant, qtir ucfrb, 
educated. 7 ow / 12 pm. fall travel 


SMGAPOK INTI GUjDELCafcSn- 
■ oopore 734%2B. M 


PUNCH RIVIERA, btoraratar Travel 
companion (93) 61 78 69 


SERVICES 


LONDON SOPKST1CATH) German/ 
French tody cMwia i MulSnaud 
A ertertoinmg. TeL 01-381 $852. 


PARS YOU4G LADY 341 21 71. 

W PA 5 bfcigud interpreter. 


TOKYO 645 2741. Touring & shap- 
pTfl flurfm e to rpeto n , etc. 


YOUNG OCEANK LADY m london 
01-245 9002 Arpora/Troeel 


PARS MUNGUAl ASSISTANT to 
business execatives. 500 58 17 


HONG KONG {K-31 723 12 37 

Omnino . etegert PA. 


PARS YOUNG SOMSIKATH) VP 

lady, trifaiquol PA- 500 89 72. 


FRANKRIItr YOUNG LADY caann. 
ion & travel guidk 069 / 62 84 32 


FRAMOFUET 069/23338Q. Young 
tody VJLP. PA. coraporvon 


PARIS YOUNG IADY, tourist guide. 
Teb Pars 807 84 95. 


WEST MEXAN IADY Gompanan Tet 
london 381 9847. 


HONG KONG IC471267 VIP tody 
(Oriental/ EuropesH componan. 
LONDON: EDUCATED IADY Conv 
ponbn/GuKteTW- 961 0154. 


TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 
Rmonal Assistant 03-4565539 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 Yauig 
bdy lAaon/Weaeml oowpawon 


HONG KONG 5-7954823. Europe- 
■ cm young lody coapaeon. m 


PAHS, YOUNG HUNOI EDUCATED 
lody companion, guide. 574 71 41, 

ATHENS. I .... 

d mutant. Tet 8086194. 


G8CVA • BEAUTY* 
ESCORT SERVICE. 

I lit 29 51 30 


G0CVA - BEST 
E5COKT SERVICE 
TEL 022/86 15 95 


MAAN ESCORT 

SBVK£ 02/683035 


GMEVA WELCOME 
Mkanl Escort Serf 
Teb 22/35 93 68 


MBS SCAMNNAVTA 
■t Send.. 
CradR arris 


Copenhagen Escort Service 
U til-5417 06. 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SBMCE. 020-9S4344 


OIARUNE GENEVA 

Guide Service. Tel 283397 


WNNA-E5C08T-AGBKY. 
Teb Verna 37 52 39 


RANKRJ8T 4- SURROUMXNQS. 

rt S travel service En- 
Genuun tpofan TeL 


Teb 36 29 32 


0211-745056 Dwoeldarf - Cdbgne 
. Bonn - &»n. □arisn t bsrt Agerv 
cy. Credt conk occepted. 


HtANKRJRT AREA - ANGfUQUFS 
bSnguai Escort + travel service. Teb 
069^62 88 OS. Credt Cards occepMd- 


DUSSSLDORF -COOQW - ZURICH 
Eslwive Escort + Trawl Service. 
Tel 0211 ’ 


AN5BBAM. kusMk. Aitwcfe The 
Hocm. ftutanua. r n t UqN amet 
SSce. Aimte^nPffillf 2612D2 


DUSSBD08F - COLOGNE - BONN 
+ area An's Escort & trawl ser- 
vice. Al aeSccrck 0211-395066 


LONDON HCOfT AGENCY. 

Tet 935 559- 


LONDON ESCORT SBVKL Tet 937 
657 4. 


VKNNA OEQMTIA Escort Service. 
Tet 52 73 88 W 70 35. 


NBV YORK Rm* & Gafarnfc Escort 
213-223OTQ. 


Teh 56 78 55. 


■ KiWM »r du, 

IViwmii 6541 38 


EnpMt Escort 5erwcc 0211/ 3B 31 41 


Tet 213581-1948. 


’» Escort Service. 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Semes. 
Hearivow/Gahwdc. Tet 834 7945. 


HEA1HKW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 994 6682. 


IOMX3N LUCY ESCORT & Gude 

“ ' Tet 01-373 0211 


LONDON GABRS1A ESCORT Ser- 
>ka. Tet 01-2296541. 


MUMOt - BU3M7Y 4 TANJA Escort 
Sena. Tet 31 1 79 00 or 31 1 79 36 


LONDON BAY5WATB.ETOORT Ser- 

vice. Tel. 01 229 0776. 


RANKFURT SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vo. Tet 06968 34 42. 


MUMOi SUPREME BCORT Service. 
Tet 009/4486038 


Baussas. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
vicer Tet 02/520 23 65. 


GENEVArAMA ESCORT SHWKE. 
■ MuMnfludLTet3*29 55 ■ 


VBMA'5 mesr ESCORT am Tet 
022444191 y 722-432, ffl eMt/tt. 

AM5THSMM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Service 101 20-964376 


DOMNA, AMSTERDAM ESCORT 

Guide Service. Tet |02t8 762B42 

EXECUTIVE BCORT SSMC& Tet 
Monhalton 212-99S7726i 


HUMCRJRT- AMPS Escort Servn. 
Tet 069 / 2881-03. 


HAMBURG BCORT 4- GUUC Ser- 
wa. Tet 040/54 17 41 


POIAIB ESCORT SERVICE Frankfurt 
T* 069/6341 59. 


N.Eo- 


DOHUNA JADE GB4EVA Escort Ser- 
mu. Tet 022/ 31 26 73. 


FRANKFURT + SURROUMMQS 
aQwtewtEscort Service. 0W/3646S& 


RANKFURT/MIMCH Mole Escort 
Swvice, 069/386441 & 089/3518226. 

ioMION EMMANUEUE Escorl Seri 
vine. Tet 01730 1540 


MADOD BECntA ESCORT and 
Swde Service. CbA 2509603. 


s 000 ® ft®**-’ 

7241107 otter 6 tun. 


AMSTBtDAM JEANET Euort Service 
TeL (0301 326420 or 34011ft. 

■ROTS Miami BCORT ard 
Rfliede lemce. Tet 733 07 98 


Escort Ser- 

wm. Tet 040/58 65 B. 


MUM04 - PRIVATE BCORT + 
Gud. Service. Td. 91 2314 

^ggRW6D»KAi ESCORT 


«ANWWT"W7B4"&t 
Mte0£9/»40-51 


™BU»T«gJY BCORT 
el lervKB. Tet 069/5572-10 


HOlLANDdi BCORT SHEW 
■ 322785. aawBjuaww 

LONDON TRUDE ESCORTl 

It-, 


LomoN cam ** rm ' 
Tet 370 71 5^ 





- I - — 


Page 16 


I NTliK NATION \l. H KH ALI) TRIBI NE. THURSDAY. MAY 23. 1983 


5 

6 

7 

8 















23 

■ 

27 

28 


32 



□ 




J 




■ 



■ 

45 


r 


SO 

51 






J 




□ 


PLAN ITS 


I CAN SEE MYSELF 
IN MY WATER PISH 


IF I PRANK ALL THE 
WATER, I COULDN'T 
SEE MY5ELF... 


im Very thirsty, too 


BUT i'p RATHER LOOK 
AT MYSELF ! 


BOOKS 





THE RISE AND FALL OF NEW 
YORK CITY 


By Roger Starr. 258pp. $17.95. 

Basic Books, JO East 53d Street. New York, 
N. Y. 10022. 




BLONDIE 


LET’S SEE,: WANT AlP 
THIS BRAND r~ 


e AND THIS OTHB3 )"■ 

« 0HAND IS ON ) — ■ 

■ SPECIAL n 


ear r have a 
coupon for % 

THAT J 


TH E S E CAVS \OU SPEND 
WORE TIME DEOOINS } — * 
THAN 
VOUOO 

SHOPPING lujaffiBBSH 


Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

S URELY there are few sadder phenomena 
in U. S. history after World War II than the 


ACROSS 

1 Luke follower 

5" Little 

Acre” 

9 Withered 

13” saw 

Elba” 

M “Olympia” 
palmer 

1.5 Family of sorts 

16 Places far dust 

17 How some go it 

18 Audience 
approval 

19 Writer's 

' middleman 

22 Diamond stats. 

23 “The word" 

24 Thriller 
feature 

27 Peaches and 
; cream, e.g. 

31 Sandbar 

32 In (notin 

vitro) 

33 Berlin's " 

a Rag Picker” 

35 Admonition to 
a professor 

39 Marie or 
Jeanne: Abbr. 

40 Heart 

41 Spanish inn 

42 Writers' 
overseers 

45 Put more 
powder in a 
musket 

0 JVeie York 


46 Skiff item 

47 Skirt type 

48 Another name 
for 19 Across 
et a!. 

54 See 47 Across 

55 Fur pieces 

56 Part of 
R.S.V.P. 

58 Nev. neighbor 

59 Idolize 

60 It, in Italy 

61 Kind of board 

62 Bird that went 
bye-bve 

63 College V.l.P. 

DOWN 


21 Astronaut 
Grissom 

24 Vipers 

25 Rapids 

26 “Early 


BEETLE BAILEY 


27 Some stylish 
garments 

28 To be. in Paris 

29 Large beast, 
for short 


ZERO, X 
CONSIDER THAT 
ATTIRE MOST > 
UNSUITABLE y 


UH... YES, SIR 


HE WANTS YOU TO 

PUT SUITS OM 
THE TIRES?/ 


&\ 


deterioration, physical and psychological, of 
New York. At wars end it was. as Rogn Starr 
writes in this fine book, “certainly the world's 
strongest surviving rity.” one not merely un- 
scathed by combat but possessed of energy, 
ebullience, self-assurance and confidence; to. 
residents and outriders alike, its p respects 
seemed limitless. Now. only four decades later, 
it is in decline; its infrastructure is wasting 
away, its manufacturing base has shrunk, its 
crime is pervasive, its gap between rich and 
poor is wider than ever, its housing market is 
chaotic. 

How it got that way is Starr's subject, in a 
pungent book distinguished by bluntness and a 
willingness to face unpleasant truths. Starr, a 
former city housing commissioner and busi- 
nessman who now writes editorials for The 
New York Times. loves his city and is dis- 
mayed by its' decay, but his feelings do not 
prevent him from looking at matters with a 


Tar optimism; on the evidence, in none of them 
would he be justified in dang so. 

Starr's analysis of the subway system is typ 
cal of his carefuL unsentimental approach, ine 
subway was in substantial measure respo ns 
for creating New York as it existed I 40 years 
ago: It bound the an togpher.i « ““£*3 
from one part of the city to another speed) 
cheap (and safe), it brought m the worker* who 
made Wall Street and mid town thnve. But 
political commitments to unrealistically low 
fares eroded its financial base and left tne 
Metropolitan Transit Authority without the 
funds for repairs and modernization. Riuer- 
ship is sharply down because people can no 


longer trust the subways to rim reliably, be- 
cause they are afraid of widespread and ran- 


at matters with a 


cool eye. What he sees wflTseem pfetty only to 
connoisseurs of self-destruction and hubris. 


1 Network 

2 Seed covering 

3 Painter Guido: 
1575-1642 

4 Judge’s 
judgment, 
sometimes 

5 Fetes 

6 about 

(approxi- 

mately) 

7 Contradict 

8 Gels angry 

9 Plot 

10 Verve 

11 Rave's partner 

12 Book part 
14 Calif, county 
20 “Christ 

Stopped 
at ” 


30 Episperm 

32 Memorable 
restaurateur 
Toots 

34 Roe source 

38 Game 
accessory 

37 Happening 

38 Unburdened 

43 Become 
electrically 
charged 

44 Dance, ina 
way 

45 Washer setting 

47 Paris subway 

48 Eiephant's-ear 

49 Wayout 

50 Renovate 

51 Dolt 

52 Stein's flower 

53 Elam's capita] 

54 Frame inside a 
frame 

57 Charles, to 
Elizabeth 


Starr begins with Lincoln's Birthday 1946, 
when Mayor William O’Dwyer asked the peo- 
ple of the city to suspend their ordinary buri- 


ANDY CAPP 


.^AND/ LOCKS 1 MEGOT BROUGHT DOWN, TOM. 

UN30NSC1OUS. HE WAS- J 


THEY BROUGHT 
r HIM ROLBMD < 
WITH BRANCH 1 


BUT MIND 
volj.tt 

( TOUCH ) 
[ AND GO -y 


f IN A MINUTE OR SO HE \ V 
[MIGHT HAVE RECOVERED/ 

WTTHCUTlT > 


I tflMSDatlyMN 
Oil hNM«i 


pie of the city to suspend their ordinary busi- 
ness in response to a strike by tugboat workers 
— an request that was cheerfully obeyed and 
that helped bring the strikers to terms. This, 
Starr argues, was a high moment in the dor’s 
history, a demonstration of urban spirit and 
manners that has subsequently gone virtually 
nnmatphed Since then. Starr writes, there has 
been a “decline in New York’s civility, the 
custom of treating other citizens with the mini- 
mal courtesy to which shared status as New 
Yorkers entitles them.” 

But basic human decency is scarcely the only 
area in which New York has deteriorated. One 
by one. Starr examines those aspects of city life 
in which New York was healthy in 1946 and is 
ailing in 1985: its harbor, its mass transit, its 
manufacturing economy, its schools, its hous- 
ing supply, its lawfulness, its hospitals and 
sanitation, its local government, its cultural 
life. In none of these areas can Starr find cause 


0 New York Times, edited by Eugene Malesha. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


WIZARD of ID 

Iff mL.'/ntG&zftom,' 

|lf 

ffi about wwupL 




r I WANT n 

T0l£Ave/«Y 

/MY 

\zw y 


IN P W50HM 

W 

i oemPtTj 


ill 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 



ip 


i i ipM-m 

- m 






15-23 


f'M, 


REX MORGAN 


-s TWO 

HOW LONG WILL YOU NIGHTS f 

BE STAYING WITH US, L ^ 

MS. BISHOP? BlAi 


BY THE WA Y, THERE'S 1 THERE 
A MESSAGE HERE / IS* 
^ FOR YOU / r 


OCGK3 □□□□□ □□□□ 

deed nnaaa nana 

DDDD QdSflQ QCinn 

□EaaasaaQQanas 

dqoq Hnaaaaci 
□□□□an □□□ anna 
□ED □□□□□□□ □□□ 
□EBB □□□ □□□□□□ 

□□□□□□□ aaan 
□□□□ aanaa 
Qanaaaaanaaaata 
dehe aaaaa aaaa 
□edci naana aaaa 
□eob naaao aaaa 


cause they are afraid cm widespread and ran- 
dom crime, because there are fewer manufac- 
turing jobs in the city to which to. commute. 

The result is that subway revenue is down as 
well, and there is an increasingly likely pros- 
pect “that the entire system wfll come, bit by 
bit, to a slop.” 

Starr is every bit as forthright in his exami- 
nation of rent control, which he identifies as a 
critical influence on New York's inability to 
construct sufficient housing or to maintain its pf 
“ouce-good apartment houses and apartment- 
house neighborhoods"; of conflicting attitudes 
toward crime, which demand stem enforce^ 
roent of laws on the one hand and “humane” 
treatment of prisoners on the other; of the 
balkanization of the city school system into a 
loose federation of wamng districts; of the nse 
in dependency and the subsequent institution- 
alization of the welfare culture. 

On this last subject, as on several others. 
Starr argues that the city’s liberal elite is largely 
at fault; he writes that “a society that fails to 
draw a clear line between the ethic of depen- 
dency and the ethic of self-support is doomed 
to an increase — a continuing Increase — of m 
dependency. A society that rewards young * 
women for producing illegitimate children is a 
society thathas failed to draw a line dearly at a 
vital juncture. Such a line cannot be drawn by 
government, nor should iL But a society whose 
elites, black and white, fail to understand that 
a line should be drawn between moral and 
immoral conduct is failing in its duty to the 
dependent and to their offspring, generation 
after generation.” 

This is not a view likely to win Starr much 
popularity among the fashionable of Manhat- 
tan, who are too busy in the pursuit of sdf- 
gratification to contemplate the many ways in 
which they have permitted their city to crum- 
ble around them. But there is much truth to his 
contention that New York is the victim of 
nothing so much as its own hubris, and that its . 
failures of sdf -discipline have the potential to # 
be fataL If that indeed proves to be the case i! 
will be lamentable, but it will be no one's fault 
except New York’s. 


Jonathan Yardfy is on the staff of The Wash- 
ington Post. 


English Doll Auctioned for £15,400 

Tire Associated Press 

LONDON — A rare English wooden doll 
made in about 1740 was auctioned Tuesday for 
£1S,400 ($19,600), Sotheby's, the. auction 
bouse; said. The 24-incb f6 1 -centimeter) figure 
in its original green dress, quilted underskirt 
and corset was sold by Maiy Hiflier, a doll 
expert, and bought by an identified buyer. 


4® 

t 




rc *l2 Ml ,' 

at h °toe « 
ar ^\ aL 


Totnpki 


BRIDGE 


°«Vce , 


By Alan Truscott 


We're on of cookies, the So i hbbed a little.* 

REFRIGERATOR IS BROKEN A NO 

/ltR5.lfUl(S0N isnY home/ 


“fcOdiS&'l 
' — .S-J3/— 

I I I 


O N the diagramed deal, 
Soutb ventured four 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
e by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


PO YOU KNOW WHAT 1 LIKE 
ABOUT YOOR PLACE, IRMA? 

. VOU’RE OPEN 24 HOURS j 


I'M GIVING SERIOUS 
CONSIDERATION TO 
TAKING ON AN 
L ASSISTANT y 


Unscram bte these four JumUes, 
one taller to each square, to lorm 
kw ordinary words. 


GIMED 






V-/ Soutb ventured four 
spades after North had used a 
Drury two-club bid to show 
that, as a passed hand, he held 
a strong raise in spades. - 

When a diamond was led 
and the eight was played from 
dummy. East had a crucial de- 
cision to make. Tbe right play 
was to take the ace ana shift to 
a club, thereby defeating tbe 
contract in tbe long run. 

It is often right to keep the 
ace poised over dummy’s king. 


□one before the lead and me 
after iL 

South won and returned a 
diamond, finessing the nine 
and driving out the ace. His life 
became simple when East 
shifted to the oeart ace, but the 
defense was not easy. 

If East bad shifted toa dub. 
South would have won with 


entry before tbe hearts are un- 
blocked. Or ho could have re- 
turned a diamond after firing 
thediamond ace. forcing a pre- 
mature discard by the declarer. 


the kins, finesed the spadejack 
and led a heart. That would 


so East routinely played the 
ten. With the nine in tne dum- 
my, however, this play is an 
error as the sequel showed. It 
gave the declarer two diamond 
tricks when be was entitled to 


and lea a heart That would 
have given East tbe Morton’s 
Fork choice: Save the ace and 
lose it permanently, or spend it 
and give South two discards 
for his dub losers. 

However, there were two ef- 
fective defenses after tbe error 
at the first trick. In the Mor- 
ton’s Fork position. East can 
take his heart ace and lead the 
spade ten. removing dummy's 


- NORTH (B) 

VQC3 
Oku 
' *1714 

WEST. iiiitiii EAST 

1 

OQ7SS2 OAU3 

*Q3 *J52 

SOUTH 
4 Q >742 
VK1 
• »J4 

■ * AJCWB 

North anA Sontfa ware vulnerable. 




Wbrid Stock Markets 


sod ctu an 

Solnsbunr jig 

Soar* Holdlnss 9 Wj 



Via Agence France-Presse May 22 

Online prices in tool currencies unless othencise unhealed. 


Hochtief 

Hoecftst 

Hansen 

Horlen 

Hinsai 

1WKA 

Kali + Salz 

Kmlodl 

Kaufhal 

Kloeckner H-O 

Kloackrter Werkr 

KnipaStaN 

Linda 

Lullfiansa 

M AN 

WaniVSIlHJMII 
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PKI 

Porsche 

Pransag 

PWA 

RWE 

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Siemens 

Thvssen 

Vote 

Volfcsnavenwvrk 

vreiia 


490 AST 
227 72b 

ita»i0BJ0 
172 173 

W 2W 
32250 r>.i ai 
:«2*Tjo 

213 as 
341 23630 
1*9 J£3S0 
60.10 6 ISIS 
:04 104 SO 
451 449 

194 191 

, 156 15330 
154J0 ISOJB 
133S 1350 

59250 591 JO 
63 426 

. 1201 1187 
taut 201 
i3a.io 134.10 

<6050 14153 
320 320 

464 465 

359 36250 
S51.SC 55150 
10435) 10520 
IE5J0 IBS 
241 JO 244.70 
STB 586 



Chile Prev 

Drietontcm 

520 a 

5750 

Elands 

1800 

1750 

GFSA 

3700 

3700 

Hormonv 

3000 

3075 

Hi veld 5 (eel 

435 

420 

Moot 

8150 

B100 

NcdbanA 

1435 

140Q 

Pres Slevn 

5950 

5825 

Rusolal 

1710 

1430 

SA Brews 

830 

825 

51 Helena 

3825 

3300 

5asol 

498 

680 

Wesi Held ina 

4050 

<4 9(1 

Composite Slack Index : 1I55L3B 
Previous ; 1141 Jl 


Shell 

STC 

SM Chartered 
sun Alliance 
tale and Lvie 
TOSCO 
Them EMI 
T.l. Croup 
Trafalaar Hi! 
THF 

Ullromar 
Unilever t 


United Bisculls 
Vickers 
Woo I worth 


F.T. 30 index : iraus 
Previous : 1B2IUS 
P-TAJB. 100 Index : ISM 
Prevlows .- 1334.10 


i Cold Storage 

253 

254 

6 DBS 

AJ5 

*80 

2 Fraser Heave 

5J0 

530 

Haw Par 

240 

241 

Inchcope 

243 

240 

Mai Banking 

*35 

*35 

OCBC 

9 JO 

9 JO 

OUB 

3il 

343 

DUE 

289 

291 

9wngrl -la 

224 

234 

Slme Darby 

204 

210 

Shore Land 

295 

292 

Shore Pm* 

5.10 

AJ15 

S Steamship 

1.09 

1.11 

SI Trading 

4J6 

451 

United Overseas 

213 

214 

UOB 

4A4 

440 

Straus Timas ind index : 82245 
Previous : 82558 


33 


11680 115 

1247 1243 
360 357 

713 71110 
234 2J4J0 
J4J 343 
3*9 344 

31150 -213 

301 303 

38280 380 

188 185 

139.40 131 

74SJ0 731 

348J0 350 

1*1 140 

499 JO 487 JO 
22750 224 

15OJ0 150 

339 ns 


Bk East Asia 



Cheung Kong 
China Gas 

I8 60 
ituo 

)6J0 

low 

China Light 

1550 

16.10 

Green Island 



Hang Sma San* 



Henderson 



HK Electric 



HK Realty A 


n.40 

HK Hotels 

3735 


HK Land 



HK Snang Sony 



hit Telephone 



HK Whorl 



Huleh Whampoa 



Hyson 



Infl Cnv 

033 

0J9 

Jar dine 

H30 


Jar dine Sec 

1250 





Miramar Hotel 



New world 






SHK Proas 



SIoIuj 



5*lrc Pacific A 



Tal Cheung 

1 SA 


Woh Knng 

1J3 

136 

wheeiock a 



IVIng On Co 



Wlnsar 



World Inti 

710 

3.10 

Hang Seng Index 
Previous : 141232 

159944 





AECI ecu 785 

Anala American »io 2890 

Anglo Am Gold HUB 1EC05 

Barlows 1253 122C 

Olv.oor 1J9S 1430 

BullelS B6C0 £450 

De Beers 1015 :0S5 































. cLUi 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY. MAY 23. 1985 


Page 1' 


SPORTS 



Flyers Shackle Oilers, 4-1, in Cup Opener 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

PHILADELPHIA — The. Ed- 
monton Oilers scored a record 44 
goals in their ax-game Campbell 
Conference playoff victory over 
Chicago. In Tuesday's opening 
game of the Stanley Cup finals, 


they found that gnalc cany a higher 
the Philadelphia Ffy- 


pnce against 
ers. 

The Flyers, who have allowed 
only 34 goals during the National 
Hockey League playoffs, stunned 
the (Hers, 4-1. They did it with 
tight checking that never allowed 
Edmonton — which was averaging 


just under six goals a game — to get 
rolling. The Oilers beat goalie rale 


Lindbergh only once, at 16:52 of 
the third peril 


period. 

"They outwalked us, they out- 
musded us,” said Paul Coffey, the 
Oder defenseman “They beat ns to 
event loose puck. They outmanned 
us ah nighL 

Qkka Sinisalo, Ron Sutter. Tim 
Kerr and Dave Poulin scored for 
the Flyers, who extended their re- 
markable unbeaten streak against 


ons to nine games. The last time I 
(Hers beat me Flyers was Nov. 13, 
1982; Philadelphia is 8-0-1 against 
Edmonton since. 

Lindbergh kept the Oilers at bay 
until Tuesday’s outcome was as- 


sured, then was beaten by Willy 
streak 


Flyer goalie Pefle Lindbergh- keeping the ODers at bay until the outcome was assured. 


Lindstrom to end a shutout 
>h«t had readied 149 minutes and 
50 seconds. The last previous 
Lindbergh hadallowed was to 
bee's Jean-Frangois Sauve in the 
second period of Game 5 in the 
Wales Conference finals. 

Sutter continued a remarkable 
playoff checking performance that 
he started against the likes of Bryan 
Trot tier and Peter Stastny by hold- 
ing superstar Wayne Gretzky with- 
out a shoL It is a rare sight when 
Gretzky does not score; for him to 
go without a shot on goal borders 
on the unthinkable. 

"I’m a Little more aware when 
he's on the ice, but I didn’t try to 
shadow him, " said Sutter, "kwas a 
total effort th« shut him 
down. I don't think we gave him a 
chance to get going, if it wasn’t me 


on him, someone was always close 
to him. You have to make him 
watch you as much as you watch 
him. No matter how great you are, 
you’re going to have one of those 
games some time or other.” 

“I can’t remember a game when I 
didn’t get a shot,” said Gretzky, 
who has won the NHL regular- 
season scoring title five straight 
times. "They didn’t give us a whole 
k>t of chances — give them credit, 
they came to play. You know 
you’re going to play a good team in 
the final, but I played a bad game.” 

Said Edmonton’s coach, Glen 
Sather “Wayne stopped himself 
It's not very often you see him 
playing like thaL He’s had a cold, 
out that's no excuse. We’re in the 
Stanley Cup finals and guys have 
played with broken legs." 

□ 

Game 2 will be played here 
Thursday before the scene shifts to 
Edmonton for the middle three 
games of the best-of-seven series. 
Sather. while grousing about the 
: trim's ice (unprintable) and 
pucks (“they must be using 
those cheap pocks the NHL bought 

— take a shot, and they wobble — 
they must have got a real deal on 
them”), still admitted his team had 
been outplayed. 

“We didn't play the way we can 

— it was like we were skating in 
sand," Sather said. “Kit a lot of it 


had to do with the way Philly was 
playing. Philly worked very hard 
and didn't make manv mistakes.” 
The Flyers hdd a 41-56 margin in 
shots. 29-12 over the first two peri- 
ods 


Gram Fuhr. who was sensational 
in die Edmonton net tiaiil he made 
a costly third-period error, blocked 


both a close-range drive by Kerr 
and Sinisalo’s rebound * 


“We played exactly the game wc 
tnc Flyei 


warned ’to." said Poulin, the Flyer 
captain. "It was a case of a perfect- 
ly executed game plan and five 
guys going all out on every shift.” 

**! think our system is simple.” 
said Rick Tocchet. the right wing 
on the line with Sutter, "But it's 
hard sometimes. You have to be so 
disciplined. The risk is. if one man 
miscues on his checking assign- 
menu then they rush down on a 
three-on-two break. 

"And the Oilers, they’re like ma- 
gicians sometimes with the puck," 
he continued. "You can get faked 
out, sucked in so easily. It just 
didn't happen tonight — but that’s 
not to say it couldn't happen next 

time,” 

“Forecheckmg was the key," 
said right wing Sinisalo. whose 
first-period goal gave the Flyers a 
lead they would keep all night 
“They didn't have much room to 
skate. " 


id before the 
Finn lifted the second rebound into 
the net 

"I hesitated because I thought 
Tim Kerr was going to shoot" : 


salo said. "The goalie was poking at 
he didn't control it 


Sinisalo scored the only goal of 
lilethe 


the first 45 minutes while the Flyers 
had a two-man advantage, Charlie 
Huddy having hooked Kerr 14 sec- 
onds after Lindstrom went off for 
cross-checking. 


the puck but 
and I was able to put it in. They can 
score so easily, you know one goal 
won't stand up." 

□ 

But it did stand up, until an un- 
assisted goal by Sutter eased much 
of the pressure. 

Each team was a man short when 
Sutter made a quick move to de- 
flect a Coffey pass intended for Jari 
Karri along the Edmonton blue 
line. Poking the puck ahead. Sutter 
went in chi a breakaway and beat 
Fuhr with a back-hander high on 
the glove side at 5:56 of the final 
period. 

“Maybe I anticipated it a little 
biL" Sutter said. “I was lucky the 
way it worked out” 

The Flyers certainly were a little 
lucky on their third goal. Fuhr 
tossed thepuck to his left and Pou- 
lin skated in quickly to bang it right 
back into the goalie’s skates. Before 
Fuhr could control it a second time. 
Poulin knocked it behind him, and 
Kerr had an easy tap-in at 8:07. It 


was the ninth goal in 10 playoff 
games for Kerr, nuking his first 
appearance since he strained his 
right knee in Quebec May 5. 

The Oilers avoided a shutout 
when Lindstrom slipped behind 
defenseman Brad Marsh, took a 
pass from Mark Messier and 
lucked the puck inside the post ai 
Lindbergh's left. Poulin completed 
the scoring into an empty net al 
19:39. 

The game was not without con? 
iroversy. 

The Oilers were unhappy be- 
cause the Flyers had six power 
plays — to Edmonton’s one — in 
the first 30 minute. The Flyers ob- 
jected when defenseman Kevin 
Lowe crashed into the net with 
Sinisalo in scoring position, dis- 
lodging it without a penalty calL 

“We spent the first two'periods 
hying to kill penalties." Sather 
said 

“For the first half of the game, 
they had seven and a half power 
plays to our half a one. That hurt' 
our hockey club." 

“We felt the net was dislodged; 
intentionally, but our team has a- 
great deal of discipline and we' 
didn’t let it upset us." said the win-' 
rung coach. Mike Keenan. "We* 
have a young team, but everybody 
was relaxed and ready to' play.; 
We'd been looking forward to this, 
game." [WP. AP. S'YT}‘ 


Reuschel, Recalled , Recalls Reuschel of Old 


Compiled tv Oar Staff Fran Dapanka 

PITTSBURGH — Rick Reus- 
chel is back, and so is bis fastbalL 
The 36-year-old right-hander, re- 
called from the minors the day be- 
fore, gave up only one run and 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


VANTAGE POINT/Tony Komheiser 


’• •' '."ti* i’. 


Holmes: The Roger Maris of Boxing? 


i,i 


Washington Past Same 

WASHINGTON — We're told 
how Larry Holmes is intent on bet- 
tering Rocky Marciano's perfect 
49-0 record and how he won’t retire 
. until he does. We’re also told how 
.‘Holmes, who has now won 48 
straight, prefers not to fight any 
more big, strong nun — an origi- 
nal. if slightly setf-incrimmatiiig 
position Tor a heavyweight champi- 
on to take. 

So who’s next for Holmes Eddie 
A rear o? Then who — Candice Ber- 
gen? 


It doesn’t matter how many 
successive victories he ultimately 
racks up, in the court of public 
opinion Larry Holmes is not, was 
not and will not ever be compared, 
favorably to Marciano. All the 


Rockys — from Cdavito to Add to 
Road tol 


to Raccoon —are within his 
reach, except Marciano. 

Holmes ts a man under a shadow 
chasing a ghost 

There are a lot of reasons — 
most ol diem irrelevant to skill — 
that Holmes will never sit in his 
rightful chair on the boxing dais, 


>ng them is 
who preceded Holmes to the title, 
the most glamorous man in (he 
sport for nearly two decades: Mu- 
hammad AIL Even after he bat Mi. 
in 1980, Holmes remained trapped 
in tbe larger man’s wake. 

As worthy a boxer as Hoboes 
was, and he was surely as fast and 
nearly as rough as the greats. 
Holmes never had the full cosmetic 
for achieving parity with 
contemporary, AIL let alone 
with such historical legends as 
Marciano or Joe Louis. Comparing 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


him only to dominant heavy- 
lOtl 


Pincay to Take Over on Spend a Buck 




NEW YORK (AP) — Laffit Pincay will replace Angel Cordero aboard 
Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck in Monday's Jersey Derby. 
Cordero is to ride Trade Barron in Monday’s Metropolitan MUe at Bel- 
mont Park in New York. Cordero has a year-long contract to ride Track 
Barron that reportedly indudes a share of the breeding rights to the horse. 

Spend a Buck will be seeking thoroughbred racing's biggest payday 
ever — S2.6 million. The Jersey Derby winner will get 5600,000; if Spend 
a Buck triumphs, he will also win a S2 million Garden State Pad: bonus to 
colt who sweeps the Cherry Hill MBe, Garden State Stakes and 
.Kentucky and Jersey Derbies. 


weights of the last 25 years. Holmes 
hasn't the heart of Joe Frazier, the 
strength of George Foreman, the 
forebodingness of Sonny Liston or, 
certainly, the tongue of Ali. 

And the camera never flattered 
him. With his soft-sided build. 
Holmes never looked Eke a 


weight champ; so, 
public 


public never truly loved him. In 
turn, his tenure has been marked by 
statements reflecting a defensive- 


ness toward a public thaL he feds,. 
him ril 


Cash, Ailing, Will Skip French Open 


PARIS (AP) — Pat Cash of Australia, the No. 7 seed, withdrew 
Wednesday from the French Open tennis tournament because of bade 
problems. Cash, a semifinalist at Wimbledon last year; has been ordered 
to rest for two weeks. The French tournament begms Monday. With die 
withdrawal, American Jimmy Arias joined the seeded group as No. 16. 
John McEnroe of the United States is the top seed. 


has maligned him either by ignor- 
ing him or by casting him as merely 
the best of an inferior bunch. 

"Whatever people want to say 
about Larry Holmes — that’s then 
hard luck," he said Monday on TV 
before his fight with Carl Williams. 

In continuing, at 35, to fight loog 
after his skills began to erode, in 
trying to add to the number of 
consecutive victories so as to claim 


tiou. Holmes is not unlike the mis- 
guided Ozymandias, buOding mon- 
uments to himself that he assumes 
will stand forever. 

But the cause, however doomed, 
is particularly fll served by fights 
such as Monday's tea dance. 

Who is Carl Williams? And why, 
excepting greed and obsession, was 
Holmes fighting him? (Similarly, 
consider previous Holmes bouts 
with such wind-up toys as Bone- 
crusher Smith, Tex Cobb, Scou 
Frank, David Bey and Marvis Fra- 
zier.) 

Williams, who came in with few- 
er fights (16) than Holmes had title 
defenses (18), was so unknown he 
couldn’t even sdl advertising space 
an his trunks the way recognizable 
fighters da 

That the International Boring 
Federation bout lasted the full 15 
rounds said more about Holmes's 
inabilities than about the challeng- 
er's skills. Only once did Holmes 
clearly hurt Williams — with a giz- 
zards- imploding shot late in the 
ninth round. Other than that, whal 
both men did a lot of was rest in 
place like oxen. 


Although Holmes took die fight 
‘ five 


a greatness by achievement that he 
might not be awarded by acclama- 


by winning most of the final 
rounds, he won them by doing little 
while Williams was doing nothing. 

In any event. Holmes marches 
on inexorably toward Marciano's 
numbers, if not his grandeur. 

Holmes’s fare, 1 suspect, is to be 
the Roger Maris of boxing, with an 
asterisk as prominent as £s record 
beside it. 


three hits over 7% innings in his 
first major-league start since last 
Aug. 10 as Pittsburgh beat Hous- 
ton, 3-2, here Tuesday night 

Reuschel a major-league veteran 
of 12 years (almost all with the 
Chicago Cubs), retired 15 of the 
first 16 batters before needing help 
from John Candelaria in the eighth 

inning 

“I’m just glad to be here," said 
Reuschel who has battled through 
four years of shoulder problems 
and signed a minor-league contract 
with the Pirates after bang released 
by the Cubs last November. 

Reuschel was 6-2 with a league- 
best 2,50 eamed-run average with 
Hawaii of the Pacific Coast League 
until j caning Pittsburgh. "1 wasn’t 
disappointed when I didn’t make 
“ther Pirates in roring trasring.” he 
sakL“They told me craning in that 
1 couldn’t make their staff unless 
somebody gpt hurt. It was the 
healthiest spring I ever saw." 

Pittsburgh took a 2-0 lead in the 
first on Bill Madlodds single, a 
walk to Jason Thompson ana run- 
scoring angles by George Hendrick 
and Tony Pena. They made it 3-1 in 
the fifth when Mike Scott walked 
the bases full and then walked 
Steve Kemp. 

In the Houston third, Craig 
Reynolds tripled off the right-field 
wall and scored on Scott’s fly to 
left. Jerry Mumphrey delivered a 
ninth-inning sacrifice fly to drive in 
the other Astro run. 

Reuschel needed only 40 pitches 
through his first five innings, and 
Manager Chuck Tanner said: “I’ve 
seen mm throw pitches this year be 
hasn't thrown in years." 

Astro Manager Bob LOlis con- 
curred. "He pitched a beautiful 
game. He’s a very knowledgeable 
pitcher. He uses the comers and 
makes you hit the balL His ball was 
moving. He kept it down. He hit 
the corners. He changed speeds, 
and he kept the hitters off bal- 
ance" 



baseman Joel Youngblood and. 
shortstop Jose Uribe. Wilson's 
double gave the Phils a 4-3 lead., 
and they added two runs in the 
seventh on Juan Samuel's double, a 
sacrifice, an intentional walk ta 
Mike Schmidt, catcher Bob Brol- 
ly's passed ball and Ozzie Virgil’s 
double. 

Red Sox 9, Twins 1 
In the American League, in Min- 
neapolis. Dwight Evans and Tony, 
Annas broke out of batting slumps 
with home runs and Marty Barrett 
drove in three runs with four hits as 
Boston swamped Minnesota. Ev- 
ans, who entered the game on a 1- 
for-26 streak, and Anitas (3-for-23) 
both singled in the first and each 
homered in a three-run third. 

A’s 3, Orioles 2 

In Oakland, California, Mike 
Bod dicker threw four straight high 


pitches to Dwayne Muiphy with 
h, forcing ii 


Rookie White Sox shortstop Ozzie GtriDen bat 
way past Damasco Garda in completing a 
double play Tuesday in Toronto. Hie Blue Jays won, 4-37 


Reds 5, Cabs 2 

In Chicago. Dave Parker’s tie- 


breaking double keyed a three-run 
eighth that beat the Cubs for Cin- 
cinnati. Eddie Milner started the 
inning by drawing a walk off 
George Frazier. One out later, 
Dave Concepcion singled to center 
and Parker, extending his hitting 
streak to 13 games, doubled off the 
center-field walL 

Expos 6, Dodgers 1 
In Montreal Tim Wallach drove 
in three runs with a home run and a 
sacrifice fly and winning pitcher 
BID GuHickson added a two-run 
double to pace the Expos. 

Cardinals 6, Braves 3 
In Sl Louis, Vince Coleman's 
first major-league homer, an in- 
si de-the-p&rk shot, and a 3-for-4 


performance by Ozzie Smith 
helped Sl Louis withstand two 
mammoth home runs by Atlanta's 
Bob Horner. Coleman* third-in- 
ning drive hit the right-field wall 
and caromed back toward the in- 
field. and the rookie base-stealing 
whiz scored easily. 


PUDks 6, Giants 5 
In Philadelphia. Glenn Wilson 
drove in two runs with a angle and 
a double and the Phillies took ad- 
vantage of three errors in edging 
San Francisco. The Giams took a 
3-0 lead in the first inning, but 
Philadelphia bepan its comeback in 
the fourth on Wilson’s RBI single 
and scored three unearned runs in 
the fifth thanks to errors by third 


bases loaded in the 10th, forcing in 
the run that gave the A’s their vic- 
tory over Baltimore. 

Indians 6, Brewers 4 
In Cleveland, Brook Jacoby’s 
two-run home run in the fifth put 
the Indians ahead, 5-4, and reliev- 
ers Bryan Clark and Rich Thomp- 
son held off Milwaukee the rest of 
the way. 

Blue Jays 4, White Sox 3 
In Toronto, Jeff Burroughs sin- 
gled home George Bell with one out 
in the ninth to lift the Blue Jays 
past Chicago. 

Royals 5, Rangers 0 
In Arlington, Texas, George 
Brett drove in four runs with a pair . 
of two-run homers and Bud Black 
stifled Texas on three hits as Kan- 
sas City ended a three-game losing 
streak. 

Angels 2, Tigers 1 
In Anaheim, California. Ruppert 
Jones’s one-out 1 1 tb-inning double 
scored Juan Beniquez from second 
to give California its derision over 

DetroiL 

Yankees 1), Mariners I 
In Seattle. Rickey Henderson 
drove in four runs on a single, dou- 
ble and three- run homer, and Dave ^ 
Winfield contributed three hits as ’ 
New York scuttled the Mariners. 1 
Ron Guidry, scattered three hits in , 
his eight innings of work as the ■ 
Yankees registered their seventh . 
victory in right games. [AP. UPI) • 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 

Hocke 1 

• 

f 

Football 


Tuesday’s Major League line Scores 


Stanley Cup Champio nship Series 


United Stales Football League Leaders 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
T — > Offense 


•V AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Milwaukee OB m MB— I II 1 

Cleveland Ht •» N 1 

Hleuera. Kern Ml. Ladd (8) end C Moore; 
Creel, B.CtarV (3). Thonwon (4) and Benda. 
W— a.Oart. La L— H teuera. l J. Sv— ' Thomp- 
son (11. HR— Cleveland, JocoOv (3). 

HO 180 Mt— 3 7 • 
2ne MO m— 4 7 B 
F .Bannister, G.Nelsan (6). AaosTo (BJ, 
B James (I) and FWu Lent. Lome til. Lo- 
vett* m and aJAorttaex. Whitt wt. w-Lo- 
wile, 1-0. L— BJamat. VI. HRS— Olktta. 

Gamble 13). Tomato. Barfield (II. 

Kansas Cltr 288 111 IBM S I 

Tens *M M BM — B 3 i 

Stock tmd Svndtwrv; Tanono, D-Stewgrt 
(II and animator. W— Slack. 44. L— 1 Tama. 
0-5. HRs— Kansas Citr. Bran 3 (7)i Sandberg 
i«l. 


Major League Standings 


in fu S0B-9 It 3 
818 MB MO — 1 7 1 
. KtooiOiedalflandGedman; ScJirom.Lv- 
sondar m, Ktowftter («j. Eufemfa M> and 

SotoAEnMUI-W— Kiien.l4.L- Scftrem,*- 

X HRs— Boston, Evans (4), Armas (U). Min- 
nesota. Bush U). 

Detroit BBB BBB’IBB B0— 1 4 B 

Catttomta • BOB BBB BIB Sl— 3 7 B 

Morris, Hernandti (01 and Parrish; McCas- 
kl IL DAtaet* (9) and Beatw. W-OMnam. 3-1. 
h- HB WdBLM. HRs— OetrotLGtbecn (6). 
Cal Horn la Schofield (5). 

BaWssem - lie BIB BM B-2 7 2 

Oakland 188 810808 1-3 6 I 

Boddtcfcerond Dempsey, Krueger, Howell 
(10) aal HenA. W Hawe d. M. L-Bad- 
dfcker. tA. HR— Battimort. Ripken (I). 
Nnr YBrk 489 013 10-11 IS 1 

Seattle bob im mb— 14 1 

Goldrv. Cooper (9) and Wrnegar; Lang- 
s*k Barelas m.Stantontt) van* Beni (7). 
Nwwz (9) and Kearney. W— Guldrv. M. L— 
Langston. S-4. HR— Yankece, Henderson (3). 


GAME 1 

B B 1—1 

Philadelp hi a 1 0 3-4 

FN Period— 1, pm (ode Mila Salscds 4 
(Kerr, Bergen). 15:05 Cpp). Peaoltles Pug - . 
tin. Phtt. (ffe0wine),5:OB; Cotter. Edm. (In- 
terference). 5:40: Ho w o Ju r. PML, molar 
IHghttna). 11:15; McClelland, Edm. malar 
(fighting). 11:15; Lindstrom, Edm. I erase- 
cheetUng), u:59; Huddy, Eftn. I hooking], 
14*13; Lumtev. Edm. (hooktng). 17:42. 


S-.S4.3. PMtadatahia. Karr 9 (Poufinl. 8:07.4, 
E dmonto n . Unddran 3 (Messier, Gregs). 
16:52.5, Philadelphia, Paella 3 (Careen. Ron 
Sutter ).Hdt (en). Penalties— Jackson. Edm. 
(roughing), 4:29; Tocchet. PUL (stashing). 
4:29; Jackson. Edm. ( hooking}, 13H7. 

Shot* oe goal; E dmon ton (an Lindbergh) 6- 
4-14—36; PtdkxteWila (on Fuhr) 17-13-12— a. 
Attendance 17.191. 

Refer ee Andy van Hettemond. 


Edm. minor-major (etaowtng-ttgMlng). 
1-J9: Hot no dor, pml. malar fflgtittng). 1:59; 
McCMlond, Edm. malar (flgMh»), 1:97; 
Paterson. PML, malar (flshHPS). 1 :59; Crass- 
man, Phil (romhtiiBl.6:23; Andersen. Edm. 
(holding), 6:23 j Gragg, Edm. (hekflngl.ttSl; 
Monti. PMI. (holding], 12:13; NosMdar, PML 
(Ngtt-sticfclna), 16:30. 

Third Period — 8, Philadelphia, Ron Setter* 


SCHEDULE 

(PtmadrifSHa leads series, i-n 
May 33: Edmaatan at PMlndelpHa 
Mar 25: PHtadetoWa <d Edmonton 
May 21: Philadelphia gt Edmonton 
s-MOv 30: PhUodetahia at Ed m onton 
x-Jone 21 Edmonton at Phltodetotda 
e-June 4: Edmonton at Philadelphia 
(x-H necessary) 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dhrtsteo 






Toronto 

w 

L 

PCt 

OB 

23 

14 

422 


BolHmor* 

21 

15 

SB 

lVi 

Detroit 

20 

U 

St 

m 

New York 

19 

16 

M 3 

3 

Boston 

• 17 

20 

459 

A 

Cleveland 

15 

22 

405 

8 

Milwaukee 

14 21 

W«fl DtvUtaH 

400 

8 

Calliomto 

23 

15 

405 

— 

Minnesota 

21 

17 

JS 

2 

Chicago 

19 

16 

543 


Kansas a tv 

19 

18 

J14 

3» 

Oafctond 

IB 

19 

486 

4W 

Seattle 

>6 

21 

432 

6to 

Texas 

11 

26 

am 

ins 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Bast DfvlsieB 



W 

L 

PeL 

GB 

. New York 

23 

12 

457 

— 

, . rteeage 

21 

14 

MB 

2 • 

Jpiraal 

• 23 

16 

J79 

2 VS 

J Louts 

IB 

19 

486 

6 

. PniiadetpMa 

15 

22 

409 

9 

Pittsburgh 

12 

M 

-333 

11W 

1 

wen Ptvteton 



San Dteeo 

21 

14 

400 

— . 

Clnchinan 

21 

17 

453 

ita 

Houston 

20 

18 

426 

2A 

Las Angetos 

18 

21 

462 

5 

Attonto 

16 

21 

jm 

6 

San Prunctsca 

14 

23 

J7|- 

8 

J 





r . - .— j-: 

■ . _:v" 





NATIONAL LEAGUE 
CtodeoaH an IBB BIB— d i 2 

Chicago BM BM 20B— 2 6 0 

Stupor. Hume (7). Power W and Kirfcdv; 

• r ~~‘ — * - — *T~fii iteraiiii 

Lake (V); Moreland (VI. W-Hume. \-Z L- 
f rvhr. t-L Sr- Power (*). HR— Cincinnati, 
Pena Q). 

Heaton- HI BBB Ml— 2 5 T 

«•**«*» 3B* BIB I0X-3 « 0 

ALSadteaftow (5), Roes (6). Mmlth »> 
BMtov; ReucheL Condetaria <B) and 
PWto. w-Ruachri, Lft L— NLScatr. 2-2. &*- 
Condetaria Mi. 

LaeAaefcs - MB HI MB— 1 5 2. 
Montreal BM 3B3 BIX— 6 12 0 

Honeycutt, cute tt) and Sctoscla; Girt- 
acfcnaRemWMTOQndFftsaenMLW— Gtit- 
UOuon. M. L-Horwveutt U. S«— Reardon 
(9). H R Mo n ti eaL tool loch I2L 
Atlanta BIB BM BBB— 3 » 1 

HI 1H 1B>— 4 9 B 
Barker, Garber (6), Fanter (7) and Bern- 
diet; Com, talon U) and Nieto, w— Cox. 4-t. 
L Barker. W. Sw-Harton (1). HR*— Ation- 
M. Homer 2 (31. St. Lnuls. Coleman (1). 

5oo FmndSM ’ MS BM 02B— 4 11 3 
FtU adBiBh i a BM m Mx-6 6 1 

Hamokar. Minton |6), Gorratti (*) ond 
Breniv: Rnwtev, Andersen ML Conran (B), 
Tekutva MJ and virgiL W— Rgwtoy, *-! L— 
Homafenr. 8-4, Se— ■ TekutoB (2). HR— Son 
Francisco. Uribe (17. 

(Sen Diane at New Tor*, end. rale} 


Golf 


PGA Leaders 


statistical leaden oa the Prefesstanal Got* 
•n Association Tour thrsuab the Coloaiol No- 
nontn lnvnmiao. which ended Man U: 
EARNINGS 


L Curt* Strange 

$398,160 

2. Calvin Peete 

S2B9J30 

X Bernhard Longer 

5267435 

A Mark ffMesrs 

S264J11 

5. Crate Stadler 

S2S2J4B 

A Lormv WOdklns 

5231 Jll 

7. Ray Ftovd 

S23079D 

A Carey Pnvln 

S28WBS 

9, Yam WateM 

8(76463 

16. Fuzzy Zaeftor 

. 5166,156 


SCORING LEADERS 
1, Dan PaolBV and Craig Stadlor. 7aUL X 
Larry Mira. 7029. 4. Carey Pavia 7043. S.Cai- 
vta Peete. 7A53. l Tom Watson, 71159. 7, Ray 
Fioyd. 7075. s. Mar* CTMeora and Baddy 
Gardner, tojb. la Two lied with 7051. 

AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
I. Fred Couples. 27M-£ Andy-Boon. 27UL3, 
Crep NormML2745. 4. BIN GJaaean and Mac 
OCmdY. 274.1. 4, Sandy Lvle. 2710 7. Jim 
Dent. 27U. 8. Gres TwIbbs. 2725. 9, Booby 
WoAFnfc 273.1. TO. Dan Pohl. 271A 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1, Calvin Peete. JOB. 2. Hato Irwin, jn. X 
Oorid Edwanss. JV2. 4. Tom KlhL 3«L & Thn 


Norris, 760, 6, M&i RM J54.7.Larrv Nebon. 
■733.8, Jack Rcanar, J309,Scott ShnPMn. J49. 
10 Wayne Levi JtX 

ORUNS m REGULATION 
1 , Jack WdUouk.J36.ZQflmn P BM B.j ail 
John Mohoflev and Al GNberatr, 7K. i 
BrwwLleWte.Jt8.LCoravPovln.Jtt7.Dan 
PaM,jM.aMocO‘Grady,JTZV.DaueTewelL 

JW. WL Tze-Chuag Chen, JOT. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
l Loren Roberts. 2SA2. X Morris HstaMcv. 
207LXNiCk PriataUZLOil CM RedrfSWZ, 
287SL S, Dan Poolev, 2BJ0 L Frank Conner. 
20l07,BatibyaampBlLaJLLItexCaldwalL 
28.RLV, Craig Stodtor.2W4.ia Two lied with 
2WL 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1, Craia Stadler. 3SS. Z Thin Watson. J2t L 
Tze-ChunsOien.J1f.LPhLnp81ackmar.Ji2. 
S. Hoi Sutton and Fred Couples, ail. 7. Loony 
wodwns. Jin. a. Curtis Stranoa. 309. 9, Lorry 
Min. JOE 10. Den Psetoy, JOT. 

CAGLES 

1. lesYV R inker. 9. i, Cdrito Stronso. Fred 
Couples. Buddy Gardner and Phtlto Btacfc- 
nwr.B. 

BIRDIES 

L Fred CowtsG'OTL i Crata Stadler,m3. 
Hoi Sattan. 2S&. 4. Jaev Stadetar, 2B2. L Cart to 
StranDA ITS A Bernhard Longer, 192, 7. Baddy 
Gantoer, 1B. LTbb Watson. 184. 9. Scott 
Shnason ana Rav Ftoyri, l|L 


EASTS RN CONFERENCE 
Team Offense 

Yards Rush Pass 
Tampa Bay 4B67 1522 3345 

New Jersey 4494 2732 17 62 

Memphis 4315 1900 3415 

Birmingham 4229 1725 23D4 

Baltimore 4125 1448 2477 

Jacksonville 4099 1544 2555 

Orlando 32S9 1353 1*08 

Team Defense 

B k mtoiham 3465 13M 3094 

BoMmore 3949 1649 2300 

Memphis 4025 1435 2590 

Tampa Bay 4006 1558 2528 

New Jersey 4700 1410 2490 

Jacksonville 4440 1694 2746 

Orlando 4765 3408 2357 

Oonrterbada 

Alt Com Yds TD litf 
Lewis. Memo 173 92 14B6 IS S 

Kelley. Memp 133 84 1216 6 5 

Stood!, Blrm 337 201 2564 36 M 

Reaves, TB 4U 232 3150 19 18 

Fuslna Balt 356 211 2497 11 12 

Luther, jack 280 169 1870 » 16 

Flulle. NJ 361 122 193$ 13 13 

Comer, Orl 278 MS 1689 6 13 

Rushers 

AH Yds AV0 LB TD 
Walker, NJ 300 1592 A3 88 13 

Raster, Jack 234 UQ8 4A 23 8 

Anderson G, TB 202 864 4J 68 U 

CrtbbB Blrm 214 854 40 19 7 

Bryant. Bait US 296 47 82 7 

Bledsoe, ort 173 662 XB 20 2 

Carttwn, NJ 134 579 *3 55 5 

Lewis, Memo 56 467 U 43 3 

Soencer. Memp 130 442 U 18 2 


NO Yds AVB Fc L» TO 
McFodden, Blrm 25 305 122 9 48 0 

Jackson V, Oli 34 234 9 J 8 71 D 

Lane. Bait 35 341 9J 3 20 0 

wilttoms H, Memp 23 172 7S 0 47 0 

DanlaLNJ 13 71 5J 3 15 0 


Klcutt 


Parrish, Orl 
Peguee. NJ 
Karnp, Jack 
McCante. Balt 
Matthews, Jack 
Camihi, Blrm 
willlamsi. TB 
Butts. Jack 
williams H. Memo 


Retarners 

No Yds Avfl L0 TD 
44 967 22B95 2 
21 426 20J 38 0 
13 264 203 28 0 

20 401 20.1 37 0 

15 SOT 193 46 0 
IB 9« 185 » 0 

16 303 1X9 35 0 

21 395 188 33 0 
31 570 184 49 0 



Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Houston 

SMI 

71D 

OB 

Denver 

4647 

1681 

2966 

Oakland 

4417 

1692 

2725 

Arizona 

4100 

1583 

2517 

Portland 

3539 

1573 

I960 

Lo4 Angetos 

3364 

1477 

1887 

Son Antonio 

3262 

1210 

2032 


Team Defease 


Denver 

3823 

1506 

2316 

Oakland 

3859 

1266 

2593 

Sro Antonio 

3866 

14» 

2436 

Arizona 

3971 

1661 

2310 

Pomona 

4399 

1B2S 

2574 

Las Angeles 

4497 

1510 

3957 

Houeton 

45B8 

1612 

2896 


Heoert. Oak 
Goaiiano, Dan 
Williams D, Arli 
MeuhetoV. SA 
Evans, Den 
Young. LA 
Wbodward. Pert 
Seurer, LA 


341 178 2646 
179 103 1283 
339 180 2335 
2*3 156 2MB 
301 145 1969 
174 88 1217 
155 62 831 
183 94 1191 


22 14 
9 7 

13 12 
16 19' 
12 15 

4 9 

3 6 

5 15 


Kelty. Hou 


Q uu t l e t b ocks 

Att cam Yds TD i nt 
519 347 4365 36 19 


Johnson B, Den 
Brown R. Arlz 
Bentley A. OoK 
Jordan, Port 
Williams J. Oak 
Gray, LA 
Nelson. LA 
Works, SA 
williams V. Pari 


Rushers 

Alt Yds A vs La TD 
163 1D63 65 56 13 
159 112 5.1 44 8 i 

IM TV 47 57 l - . 

114 MS 5X41 3; 

118 508 0 26 4 ,1 

102 435 O 26 1 

103 35S 14 32 1 i 

45 310 4AM 


73 298 4.1 17 0-' 



BASEBALL 
American League 

boston— A ctivated Steve Crawford, 
pitcher, tram tasabied list. OoHoned MUu: 
Brown, ultcher. to Pawtucket of the unemo- 
tional League. 

CALIFORNIA— Recalled Daryl Sean tor*, 
first baseman, tram Midland at the Texas 
League. 

TEXAS— Named Art Howe, batting coach. 


Fired Merv Rettonmund. batting coach. 
Stoned David Roitand. third baseman. 
National League 

CHICAGO— Coiled up Chico walker, out- 
fielder. from Iowa of (he American Anocto- 
Man. 

NEWYORK—ShHtodBrveoBerenvLPHeh- 

er.iroiwihe21-th»totan6Bdayd»«a AcdHBl . 

optioned Ronn Reynolds, ditcher, to Tkfcwnt- 


JaienafL Hou 
Verdin, Hou 
Harris L Den 
Lewii Den 
White. Den 
Carter A, Oak 
McNeil. Kao 
Banks. Oak 
HarreiL Hou 


No Yds Avg Lg TD :‘ 
76 938 123 S3 11 - 
72 806 HJ 74 6' 
69 892 129 46 7 : 
54 788 144 30 & 
49 606 124 49 5 " 
48 9D0 1&8 62 10 ? 
45 882 193 69 6 ’ 
44 731 116 43 4 • 
41 391 95 55 V* 


Soccer 


No 


Smith J, Blrm 
Fltzkee, Baft 
Alexis. Jack 
Brodsky, TB 
CrowfoRL Memp 
Moser, Memo 
Anderson Cl. TB 
KeeL Jack 
Kemo. Jaek 


Yds Avg Lg TD 
63 1061 1A5 56 12 
12.1 37 2 
125 51 
15A 47 
17J46 


57 690 
55 706 
51 787 
49 847 


48 960 20B 99 
47 415 U 32 
45 480 107 40 
44 622 14.1 *43 


Cater. Ort 
Loodefa, Baft 
Swider, jgck 
POrtridg*, NJ 
Crum Metro 
AndnievNiyiV TB 
, Blrm 


No YdS AvR TP I2B La 
M2BJ7 43J0 6 1964 
. 53 2162 427 14 12 60 
45 1871 41.6 6 8 57 
49 1997 40J 7 11 61 
26 1056 48 a 1 3 35 
38 1478 38.9 1 11 59 
Sl 1972 3E7 4 W 52 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
European Grew 3 
Finland 1, England l 
Palais standings; England X Northern Ire- 
land 6. Flutes* 5k Romania X Turkey 0. 

WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Katoerstoutom S. Bochum 2 
Kartendie 0. Bayern Munich 4 
Paints Standings: Bayern Munich 46; 
warder Bremen 42; Colpgne 39; Ber. Mecn- 
ehengiadhech. Baver Uerdingen 36; Ham- 
burg Sv, WaWvrf Mannheim 35; Schalka 31: 
5tuttgar|< Bochum 30; Kaiserslautern 39; 
Baver Laver kUBNb Elntroriit Frankfurt Bor- 
usBto Dortmund 28; Fortune Dunetdort, Ar- 
mlnto BtoleteM 25; Kortoruhe 19; Elntr. 
Braunschweig ifc 

FRIENDLY INTERNATIONAL 
Chile X Brazil 1 


FOOTBALL 

NOUbmI Foettoll Lenguo 
NEW ENGLAND — Signed Jen Atkinson 
wMGehadYousset.fcteers; RlckeStonrwafl 
«md Mare while. running bocks; Troy Badlne. 
q uor teftwdi) Rodney Moore aid Howard 
Lewd, detenslve bocks, and Fred Richards, 
offensive lineman. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Stoned Ltovd Muiroh- 
rev. Car) VC sever. Marvin Jactonon and 
James Dunkln, linebackers; Eric Jenklnb 
fullback; Joe Btonell and Anthaay Kenuh 
light ends; Dan Huev. wide receiver; Robert 
BlnteJc, center, ond John Berry, strong safe- 
ty. 

United States Football League 
ARIZON A — s igned Tony Lata, offensive 
line man. and Michael McDode. wide receiver, 
to one- v cor contracts. 


laUey.Ook 
deBndln, Art* 
Gossett. Part 
Partridge, LA 
waiters. Hou 
SaeetmaL Den 
Mtke-Mayer. SA 


Punters ’ 

No Yd* Avg Tb 120 v* j 
50 7322 4<4 4 20 76 n 
49 3091 427 4 15 79 . 
56 2381 425 6 12 56 • 
59 2393 406 1 1557 - 
38 1499 394 4 8 56 ' 
31 1179 384 1 3 58 
33 1250 37.9 3 9 55 . 


No Yds Avg Fc Lg TD ' s 
McNefL Hou 32 371 \U 3 79 1 •- 

Guro. LA 15 160 187 10 45 1 1 

Martin. Den/Aric 19 192 10.1 5 38 0 1 

Hall. Port 2D IM BJ 6 32 l)i 

Horn*. Lo Arix/Oen 31 is LI 3 23 g ' 

Faulkner. Oak 1 15 98 65 5 19 fl J 


Kickoff Reterner* 


Verdin. Hou 
Minor. Oafc 
Harris. La Ariz/Otn 


NO 


HOCKEY 

H at t o n ai Hockey League 
EDMONTON — Shined Eao Tiktorav ten 
wing, ta a mult iy ear cu n t r od . 


Turner L. D*n 
Rite*, Port 
Boddto. la 
B anner. 8A 
Brawn O. Arlz 


Yds Avg Lg TD 
2S 677 27.1 MD 3 

21 527 2&.1 57 0 

M «U1 » 1 
17 380 224 53 0 

22 449 204 30 « 

23 463 20.1 «1 g 

W 351 193 29 0 

n 325 19.1 

W 267 19.1 


31 

33 8 


I 






Page 18 


Pa 




E 


i 

e 

i 


f 



I 

I 

L 

I 

c 




ART BUCHWAin 


The Bitburg Backlash 


X\T ASH INGTON — r ^ 

▼ V get much play in ihe Unilco 
State, but after all the trouble 
Ronald Reagan wem lo in helping 
his buddy Helmut Kohl with the 
West German election, the chan- 
cellor got clobbered in the state 
election in North Rhine-Westpba- 
Ua. 

For those of you who can re- 
member that far back, the reason 
the president took his famous walk 

through the Bit- 

burg cemetery 
was because 
Kohl's Christian 
Democrats were 
being threatened 
by Willy 
Brandt's hated 
Social Demo- 
crats. Reagan 
was led to be- 
lieve that if he 
stopped by Bit- Buchwald 
burg for a photo opportunity Kohl 
would beat the Socialists in a land- 
slide. 

As soon as 1 heard on the radio 
that Reagan's graveyard visit was 
for naught, I called Klaus Berger, 
my stringer in North Rhine-West- 
phalia, and demanded an explana- 
tion. 


so much trouble was because he 
wasn’t allowed to participate in the 
anniversary of the D-Day landings 
at Normandy last year. Kohl made 


a very convincing argument that if 
i*t been for the Germans 



it hadn’ 

there would not have been a World 
War II in the first place. 

"So Reagan, who considers Kohl 
a team player, said he would be 
happy to help beat Willy Brandt's 
Socialists in any way he could. To 
which Kohl suggested that they 
stroll through a German military 
cemetery together to show the 
world that bygones can be by- 
gones." 

"So far so good," I said. 

“Not necessarily,” Klaus said. 
“Kohl should have known you 
can't go into a German military 
cemetery without running into a 
Nazi tombstone. After the visit was 
announced the press found 49 of 
them. Instead of Kohl canceling, he 
insisted lhaL the ceremonv still take 


place. It was the worst political 
decision of his life." 


Klaus said. “It was a question of 
Teflon failure. Reagan tried to give 
some of his Teflon lo KohL but it 
wouldn’t stick.” 

“How could that be? Reagan's 
Teflon is considered the lop of the 
line in America.” 


“But it’s not transferable." Klaus 
said. “Kohl's mistake was believing 
that all he had to do was rub shoul- 
ders in a German military cemetery 
with the president of the United 
States and he’d have Reagan’s char 
risma. It obviously didn’t work." 

□ 

"How could Kohl have been so 
far off the mark?" 

“Let ; s start at the beginning. 
Kohl came to Washington and in- 
sisted that Reagan include him in 
on the 40th anniversary of the end 
or World War U. The chancellor 
said that the reason his party was in 


“Why?" 

“Because everyone had forgotten 
what the Nazi regime had done 
until the chancellor announced he 
and Lhe president were going to 
Bitburg to forget iL Suddenly TV 
screens in every corner of the globe 
showed films of Nazi atrocities, 
and newspapers headlined lengthy 
stories on war crimes committed by 
the Germans. Instead of reconcilia- 
tion, Kohl opened up every wound 
from the Second World War. 
That's why he’s considered a 
Dummkopf " 

□ 


Divers Find Armada Wreck 

The Associated Press 

SLIGO. Ireland — A British div- 
ing team has round a 397-year-old 
shipwreck from the Spanish Arma- 
da off Ireland's northwest coast. 


“But according lo the polls," 1 
said, “the West Germans support- 
ed the Bitburg visit.” 

“What else could the German 
people say to the pollsters?" Klaus 
replied. “But once it was over they 
decided to send Kohl a message." 

“Which was?" 

“They don't want any more rec- 
onciliation ceremonies over World 
War II." 

“It seems such a waste,” I said. 
“If Kohl failed to benefit by iL 
Reagan surely didn't either." 

“How’s that?” Klaus asked. 

“Well, when the president left 
for Europe his Teflon suit was all 
shiny and glittery. But when he 
came back from Bitburg it was 
scratched and tarnished. I guess the 
one thing everyone has learned 
from all this is that only in Chicago 
does the cemeteiy vote still coudl” 


Katharine Hepburn 


T Think Pm Very Irritating to Some People 
, . . I'm So Sweet Really ' 


By Dolores A. Barclay 

The Associated Press 

N EW YORK — Age has not 
rounded Lhe angles, nor time 
withered the arrogance. She is 
bony and bossy, still. Her Bryn 
Mawr voice may quaver a bit, bin 
her viperish wit is steady. 

“I think I’m very irritating to 
some people; it fascinates me. 
though, because Fm so sweet 
really." Katharine Hepburn said 
with a bright smile. 


I'm basically shy. As my fa- 
ther once said. 'Children 


who are 

very shy are afraid they won’t be 
the bride or the corpse.’ I hope he 
was wrong." 

She has seen 75 winters and 
springs, frets about the tulips and 
hyacinths in her backyard, rails at 
youthful sex, supports abortion 
and champions euthanasia for 
the elderly. 

“My values come from my 
mother and father. They were 
real left-of-center reformers," she 
said recently at her brownstone in 
Turtle Bay. They were her great- 
est influences. And others? “I 
guess life and the people I knew. 
By the rime you’re 20. you're a 
pretty solid piece of work.” 

Hepburn’s latest movie, 
“Grace Quigley.” is an odd story 
about an old woman who teams 
with a professional hit man (Nick 
Nolle) to provide a service for old 
people who would rather die than 
live. 

“I think there’s sort of a terri- 
ble fear of death in this country, 
and I just don’t think you should 
fear something that is absolutely 
inevitable." she said briskly. 

“If you think you're in the way 
and you’re getting nothing out of 
life and certainly nobody wants 
you. and you’re using up what 
little money you have and you 
feel right to say. ‘Bye-bye,’ I don't 
see why you can't do it 

"I think it’s everyone’s own 
business. You’ve been tossed out 


of your job. you're deaf, blind 
itaUj 


and totally dependent on this, 
that and lire other thing, I think 
it’s common sense. I’ve been ex- 
tremely lucky. I’ve got money and 
1 can decide to wort: or not work. 
I’ve been terriblv lucky all my 
life.” 


She said her onlv real difficulty 
these days was “this fool ankle" 
that gives her a tad of trouble 
from time to rime. It turned com- 
pletely around when she ran her 
car into a telephone Dole about 
1 Vi years ago while admiring an 
old shipyard. Doctors fused iL 

“I have to make this foot work 
as well as it can work," she said. 
“And if it defeats me someday, I 
have to say. Tve had many years 
of very good use of iL' " 

Call it common sense. Or per- 
haps Yankee tenacity, which she 
inherited from her parents. Her 
father. Dr. Thomas Norval Hep- 
bum, was a urologist who cam- 
paigned for public awareness of 
venereal disease. Her mother. 
Katharine Houghton, was a suf- 
fragist and a crusader in the birth 
control movement. 

Their tenacity, she said, freed 
her from fear. “I wasn't afraid to 
pay the price of saying what I 
thought. 1 wasn't cautious." 

The Hepburn house was often 
filled with the social reformers of 
the day, including the British suf- 
fragist Emmeline Pankhurst. 
Katharine was a willing partici- 
pant in the Suffrage Movement 

“1 used to carry a ballot box 
with my aunt who was 5-fooi-10 
and very proper. She carried a 
sign; ‘Women, idiots and crimi- 
nals vote here:' " She laughed in 
that voice Tallulah Bankhead 
once likened to “nickels dropping 
in a slot machine." For Hepburn, 
it was never tough being a wom- 
an. At Bryn Mawr College, she 
almost flunked out but buckled 
down to work so she could act in 
school plays. 

After graduating, she landed a 
bit role in a Broadway flop. 
“These Days.” Then came a lit- 
any of firings until she was re- 
hired in “The Warrior’s Hus- 
band." 

She wore an abbreviated tunic 
in her role as the Amazon queen, 
and RKO. captivated by the leg- 
gy unknown, gave her a screen 
test Her First movie, "A Bill of 
Divorcement" with John Barry- 
more, was a success. Her next was 
a dud. The third “Morning Glo- 
ry" in 1933, won her Fust Oscar, 



“You have to do things that affect yon.' 


three others came in 1967, 1968 
and 1981. for “Guess Who’s 


Coming to Dinner,” “The Lion in 
Winter and “On Golden Pond” 


In the 1930s there were years of 
bring “box-office poison." “Tve 
been the joke of New York City 
and deseiWly so. But I was at an 
age then that for some reason it 
really didn't depress tne too 
much." 

She rose from the Hollywood 
graveyard in 1940 with "The Phil- 
adelphia Story." Philip Barry 
wrote it for her and it became a 
smash on Broadway. “1 bought 
the movie rights. They wanted to 
buy it for aO of my rivals, but I 
already owned iL Very clever,” 
she smiled 

“Then I stayed at Metro 


successful You have to do things 
that affect you.” 

Spencer Tracy was her closest 
friend for 27 years. She was 
linked romantically with the bil- 
lionaire industrialist Howard 
Hughes and the producer Ldaod 
Hayward and was married once 
— m 1928 to a Philadelphia so- 


cialite. Ludlow Ogden Smith, 
in 1934. 



You can’t do things just to be 


They divorced 

Hepburn spends much of her 
rime on the Connecticut shore 
with her brother, Dick, in the old 
family home. She looks for the 
right movie projects, plays tennis 
andgardens 

“The theater is terrifying. I 
think selling yourself is terrify- 
ing; you can’t assume that you're 
fascinating. 1 saw someone on the 
street the other day and she called 
to me: ‘You’re shorter than 1 
thoughL* 1 called back, Tm 
shrinking.' " 


PEOPLE 


Social Outing 



Raisa Gorbacheva, wife of the 

Soviet leader, toured Moscow an 

Tuesday with Socm Gandhi, wife of 

the visiting Prime Muster Rajiv 
narufci of India, and visited two 
Moscow galleries displaying Rus- 
sian icons and Western art, accord- 
ing to the Tass news age nc y. It is 
ltrmqial for wives of G iimmimis r 
Patty general secretaries to engage 
in public activities and a break, with 
recent tradition for them to be- 
mentioned in the official press. 
Since MOthaB S. Gorbachev was 
elected party chief in March, Ins 
wife has become a fanahar face in 
the West but no pictures of her 
have appeared in the Soviet Union. 

□ 

Dorothy Hamfll Martin, the 1976 
Olympic 
was told 

peals court 

she could not collect 5366,000 in 
insurance for stolen jewelry that 
she failed to put in a hotel safe. 
Hamill and her husband, the actor 
Dean Paid Martin, sued the under- 
writers Lloyds of London, who re- 
fused to pay the value of the jewels 
that were stolen from a San Fran- 
cisco hotel room in December 
1982. The insurance policy exclud- 
ed coverage for jewelry stolen from 
a hotel unless it was locked in a safe 
or “attended by” the policy-holder. 
Hamill left the jewels in a suitcase 
that she hid under a bureau in her 
room. 

O 

Pierre Cardin opened a bakery in 
his Maxim’s French restaurant in 
Beijing on Wednesday, and orga- 
nized a two-day fashion show, his 
fourth in Beijing. The bakery wifi 
produce French bread, croissants 
and pastries for a mainly Chinese 
clientele, the French master baker 
Eric Ontenay said. A tea room is to 
be added in the next few wedcs. 
Cardin said that be hoped to open 
new ready-to-wear do thing work- 
shops in Beijing and Shanghai, with 
part of their production for export 
His fashion show coincides with a 
two-month retrospective of cre- 
ations by another French designer. 
Yves Saint Lament. 

□ 

Leftist students in Sunderland, 
England, booed the visiting Prince 
Charles and his wife, Diana, waving 
placards Tuesday saying “Go 
Home Parasites” and “Hello Big 
Ears." Meanwhile, Geoff Dodds, a 
former Labor Party councilman. 


id police held 
ter he refused 1 


said 

after 


held him for 2* how* 
used to take down a pair 
of giani wooden cars measuring 

feefby 3 feet 

meters), that he had erected on lhe 

roof of his borne. He 
released without bong charged af 
ter the royal couple had left the $ 
city. Police confirmed they confis- 
cated a pair of large wooden ears 
together with posters and arrested 
Dodds and another demonstrator. 

Prince Charles, with a grow- 
ing family and his wife s wardrobe 
to suppon. has given i hnnseU zj- 
percent pay rise and boosted b» 
annual income to more than 5LJ 
million. The prince is enutled to the 
profits from ihe Duchy of Corn- 
wall, a rich 125,000-acre (50,000- 
hectare) estate scattered across 
Britain, which was established m 
1337 to provide money for the heir 
to the throne. Unlike his moiMr. 
Queen Bab eth IL and other? 
members of the royal family. 
Charles receives no money for his 
ceremonial duties and for his wife. 
Princess Diana, and their children, 
princes WBfiam and Henry. 

□ 


When the author Julie Borasso 
wnitf on stage before the third act 


of her plav “Angdo’s Wedding" in 
York she didn't thank the 


New — — 

audience — she told them to go 
home. Her outburst climaxed an 
artistic dispute with the manage- 
ment of the Gide Repertory Corny* 
pany over cuts in the script and the 
raging that has caused the off- 
lo cancel Boa vas- 


ra sting 

Broadway troupe i 

so’s play,, which was to have been 
its fmai production of lhe season. 


wright remain unresolved, 

-Rep conaderc potential risks to ac- 
tors and audience too great to haz- 
ard resumption of the prqjecL” 
Man&aQ W. Mason, Grde Rep’s 
artistic director, said. The cancel: 
lation will cost the company in ex- 
cess of S100JXX), Mason said. He 
said die May 11 incident occurred 
when Bovasso attacked a theater 
intern and the house manager when 
they tried to remove her from they 
theater during a performance. She 
then appeared on stage at the be- 
ginning of the play’s third act and 
urged ihe audience to leave. No one 
walked out, and. the play contin- 
ued. The 'following day, the actor 
Scott Gam resigned and Circle 
Rep suspended performances of 
theplay. 






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cont&cc Coabug« 5 'JM? 
ytfprtdwide An/Sea Ccfl OtarLe 
281 IB 81 Penis (near Opera] Car* too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH provinces 


CAM4E5 CAUFORNK. Enw£anal_4 

bedroo 

er f«! 




REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

CLOSE TO MONACO 

CAP MARTM: Mognficent 4 bedroom 
dfa, far ide, eluded m a quet reri- 
rienod area with easy occess lo the 
sea; a beautiful fving room with marble 
Hoar and fireplace offers impressive 
seauews. 

For further deleft please contact: 

AGGDI 

26 be Bd Princess Chariatte 
Menie-Crtlo. MC 98000 Monaco 
Tel (93) 50 66 00 Ext. T55 
Telex 479417 MC 

or Agence StRoch, Menton, RANG 

CARRY l£ ROUET. 25 Km Marse4le. 
on sea beactemorim, aadno, noth- 
mg opposite. 50 sqjiL apartmoRb 2 
rooms + large kitchen with eating 
corner, sunny tteracs. Price F350.CXXI 
Cal mornings Paris 273 24 63 or write 
Mne Sicanne. IB square Thebaud, 
75015 Pttas. 

MONACO 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 

IE VESINET 

near RK, center. New rife, beautiful 
carat ruction, qudty, tarrfsenped gar- 
den. bang, offices, 4 beduatm, 3 
batra, bosemert. garage. 

AGeraMAME 

Tek (3) 976 52 52. 

Rue CHARDON LAG ACHE 

Old. 3rd Roar, very pleasant, 2 room 
apartment, about 42 sq.m., bring + 
bedroom. Cohn, open new on garden 
Td 22564 54 


pliipsi 




VILLA RS 

WINTS&SUMMB 
PARADISE, 20 MINUTES 
FROM LAKE G0CVA 

Apratmente. ranging from shades 
to 4 roans. Avomh Far Sale To 
roraianen. Fantartc view, high quafc- 
ly, sjected rasderted areas, moes 
From SF195JXXJ lo SF635flU. Mort- 
gages avedade at ody 63% interest. 
Far informman: 

GLOBE PLAN SA- 
Av. Aton-Rerxn 24, 

CH-10Q5 LAUSANNE, Swinertand 
T* (21 J 22 35 1 Z Tlx 251 85 MEUS OL 
Eriddnfred Sfnce 1970 

< t'. j w 1 1 1 M 

MANHATTAN. NYC 

TW ULTIMATE M 
CONDOM&RUM LIVING 
TRUMP TCWB! ■ on Fifth Avenue 
MA7HATTAN PLACE - 1st Av & 38 Si 
New. olegrait, (xeshgous units feawre 
distinctive, secure ara private 2. 4, 5, 
bedrooms. (1500 to 3000 tq. ft) Aval- 
able efiredfy from owners. 

Contact: Mr. M. Parnass 

Em-Esj Managemeni Carp. 

1)8-35 QueeraBvd. 

Forest Hih. NY 11375 USA 

Tek 718897-4848 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


mortis lo 2 y« 
ooemnnl Ltd. 
Sec 299185 


LOMX3N. For the bed furnished flats 
and houses. Constit (he Speaafate, 
PWkps, Kay and Lewis. Tet London 
south of Pvk 352 BT 11. north af Park 
722 5135. Telex 27846 RESDE G. 

. HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Deluxe rentals. VdernrssJt. 174. 
Airaterdcna 028621234 or 623222. 

ITALY 

When *i Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VHABRO 
Luxury apartment house with furmshed 
flab, ovafeUe far 1 week and mare 

Phone: 6794325. 6793450. 

Write: Via dd Vetabro 16, 
00186 Rome. 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

Bnbassy Service 

8 Avn da mtaat 

75008 Paris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 

AGB4T IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 

Habitat Int'l 

Has rha pleasure la inform you ihd 
its uctivities have been taken over by 
ABP B.Y5KS-CONCORDC 

9. nie Royde. 75008 Paris 

Tefc (1)265 11 99. Tbs: 640793 F 

FACING HOia 
CONCORDE LAFAYETTE 

luxurious duplex studios, bath, phone 
No agency ma. F6000 net by month. 
Short term lease. Veit today: 95 Bd 
Gouvian St Cyr. Pans 17ift 5/4 35 67. 

AGB4CE DE L’ETOILE 

REAL E5TATE A GBTT 

764 03 17 

74 CHAMPS-EYSKS 8th 

Stedkt. 2 or 3-room ciportment. 
One month or more 

IE GA1TOGE 359 67 97. 

LARGE APARTMENTS 

PLVBMX3ME. AV FOCH. INVAUDB 
ABP H.Y5EE5 CONCORDE 

Td: (1] 265 11 99. 

PLACE DES TBMES. Angus. Ideal far 

hofcdayi in Pam. outstnncfaig 180 
tqxn. i 4 urtnwnt 3 bedroorra, taoie 
kvmahch das tarralure. S2J00 Tefc 
622 37 Softer 8 pm. 

Pgjpppl 



FBiTHOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE, 
mar Chcxnps Sysera. 120 avn- + 
logs lerroos, high don. 723 43 28. 

SHORT IBM in Lotei Quarter. 
No agerts. Tek 329 38 83. 

PCLHU.Y hfcgh dan 2-room, on gaidm. 
boh. btdtsa FA500 Tefc 6247675. 



PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

NEAR MADBHNE High dots, chre- 
arter, 2 roams. 6th floor. 80 sqja 
equipped American kndwi. both, H 

Twain 90 dBI9 “ bduded m 

ST G81MAIN B* LATE Apratmenf 
fori year, lQ5aq.nL.3bedrooRB.bg 
Evino-dinina, and garden, suny, 
charm. qtxaqtL Tefc 976 66 6S. 

7TH AVE DUQUDS. bvtna 1 bed 
room. F5000. Poston: 052 92 29 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

LARGE INTI COMPANY web far 
oneaf its drectors transferred to Paris 
apartment vrith frvmg, dfei>KL4-5 bed- 
rooms. near Etoile. Tefc 2B7 03 47 
office how 

CAP D'ANIfeU. Engfishmoi seeks 
qudSty vflo with sea mew. Maxmum 
naoaojioa Tei (93) 99 44 14 

THE ENGUSH LANGUAGE LBRAKY 
far the Blind seeks 2 rooms + record- 
ing studio preferddy Paris 7^ 734 561 0 

EMPLOYMENT 

FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDER 

“INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS" 
PAGE 12 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

u 

1 EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE j 


BOUGIVAL 1 78), 31 rue du Chera* 

de Fei in manor house (fended "to 

Mter f m enB with PARK & POOL, beau- 

tiful 3*oom jw tmont. about 103 
tarn ■+■ unae balcony lit Mo>r 

F4.3D0 + F20W advance chreges 

Veil today. 1 1 30 an 12.30 pm. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


AMERICAN MANAGS 1 Consultant 
42. based in Pans. 19 yean experi- 
ence in HJ?; hardware & software 
sales, _ ma nage me nt, consulting. 16 
yean in Europe; o u t standn g contacts 
with tenge IBM accounts u Frtnw, 


Genttan^UK, Benda*. Sanfrario, 


eduenhen m US, per- 


b&ngud Eng&h/French. 
sent stutaort much autonomy + 
high remuneration Seeking esceflerrt 


Neufly Cede*. Fringe 


EXECUTIVE AVAILABLE Dyroiw es- 
resutt Granted 


SHIPPING EXECUTIVE seeks estab- 
lished > new venture position. WHra 
to travel / relocate. Tefc 022 '61 79 76 


fenuvefy traveled & 

executive with 7 yean Guff experi- 
ence, dso honng vast experience m 
banking/ shaping & mil trade with 
absolute nfluentid contacts wori* 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


RJ51NESS EXECUTIVE 45, Bntidi with 
key position - profit experience mam 
European count tie, smm a French, UK 
or US group mter e sted in good ma r- 
ketma sales & growth rfd h Person- 
dtle & hod waning. Ruent French, 
naml.i 


Reply Bax 410H 
London, WOT $JH. 


,63 Lang Acre, 


MAMET RESEARCH speooSst, man- 
agement level, eeitaid/asmuitMr 
produds, seeks portion wtb USnajb- 
nrtionol or Dutch finn n Amsterdam 
after Aug 1. Write to S. Van Roaii. 
Vai Weeidenporinniaan 10, lira 
ABadveen. HoUand. 


GENEBAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


wide, otpreiert based inMiddte Emt. 
' tie to h 


would ue to hear from 
interring to devek^j or 
business espededy with MicUle East, 
iron, Asia, SE Ana & Africa Please 


write Box 40963, LH.T., 63 Lang Acre, 
London, WC3E frjH. UJC. 


SHOVING EXECUTIVE 43, Dutch. U- 
feigual, good per s ondtty. hefci key 
pacAonmMdcte East, Germany. UK 
USA, Subginiinert. 23 yrs broad ex- 

— : in transportation & freight 

" specx Js t in eartamer 
„ mer chief executive in 
Saudi Arcfaa. seeks challenging posi- 
tion &/ar business opportunity. Bax 
4^1X1, 63 Long Acre, London. 


ACT ON 7H6 TODAY PLEASE. Two 

decades menam experience as are- 


man staff in odytis ing ides /^prj 


motion & touradam activities 


bmed business press. I seek new evec- 
whidt enables me to mare 


utive past 
fuSy uriae 


e my effective i 

px xn o honal S writing Ideate. Sda 
from USSlOjOOO. Box 41001 . LH.T, ( 
long Acre. London WC2E 9JH. 


US. anzsi rated in Europe, fluent m 
aD but 2 languages of the newfy 
em ond ed EC. plus good knowledge 
of Huston, seeking p o rt ion in sales 


Ueting with responsibSty lor Eu- 
rope. Would n ‘ 


I relocate to Europe. En- 
tire career in fed. sales with major US 
corponabon, 10 yertscmoumer 
goods, 6 years feed. Box 2322 Herdd 
Tribune. 92521 Neufly Cedex. Ficmce 


AIBXCAL DOCTOR ARADfO Opera- 

tor reoiied for expedi ti on to M kjf 
bca. Hunxxi Context mMBud. 21 

morths imafmeert, low wooes, but 

potantid for unique & lewuiSng ex- 
perience. Age between 25 & 35. Ap- 
dkxmts mild be single, fluent m 
Engfidt & experienced m tner fiekfe. 
Please send Ml CV to Bax 409% 
1HT, 63 long Acre, London, UK. 


EMPLOYMENT 


‘GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


MECKAMCAL MAMTBNMKX 

tra i nee. Age 17-34. High school grad. 
No eqsenerxe required, wi trdn. 


enistmenL Cafl 
13188 Ertdtad 001 


06221 


free i 

pariunities far dl 
drtmb. Overseas 
vices. Dept. HT, P.O. I . 
of Mount Royal, Quebec; 
H3P3C7. 


INTERNATIONAL EMFLOVMM: 
rmfniiinniii. nxmagws and doled 


workers oe dways needed tf world 
■ds. We 


can contact 

126.000 rams in 133 counties and 

4.0 00 Ame rica! M u a feu t i a xj s. Write 
for nfomxAon btvnaliond Career 

.Suite 


Consultants, 2730 San Pedro bt Suit! 
H. Abuquerque. NM B7110 LBV 


ADMM5TRATTVE TRADBE/derk 
typist. Age 17-34. rtgh school grpd. 
No experience required, wR traia 
Good pay, excelent bene fits . If you 


qudify^ecid education fund. 3 or 4 


onfstment. Ccd HeideA- 

06221-13188. England 001-494- 


RHD SURVEYOR TRADS. Age 17- 

34. Kgh sdtod grad. No experien ce 


required, wil It an. Good pay, ewoL 
lent bonefite If you qualify, up to 
S2^00 bonus. 3 or 4 year ARMY 


.... year 
enbtment Caff Heidebera 06221- 
13188. England 001-<94-2 aB8. 


MISSILE SYSTEMS speooSst Age 17- 
34. rtgh sdxwt grad. No e xp erience 
requred. wil trim Good pay, exteL 
tert benefits. If you qualify, up to 
SMJOO bonus. 3 or 4 year ARMY 
erdatment. CJ Hexiefixrg 06221- 
13188. En^and 001-494-24OT8. 


BECTROMCS TRAITS. Age 17-34 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


BBVAH SECRETARY POSITION 
sought by Frenchman, flaeat 

- widSy bwdled, fiedble.'Kea 

ed,wilh high-level cortoc&AtBC ridh 
be>t, 80 Aw du Suffrea 75015 Porit 
Tet (1)306 2040 


benefits. If you 
ftonfund onduplo 


BRMGUAL TRANSLATOR / news 

, oto agency. ExoeHert 

lame use ten. Send CV to 

II, Hereto Tribune, 92521 
Neufty Cedex, France 


■8TW 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


ARAB SreOAUST M export. 29, ft>- 


6 years in sdes & mat e lfe g of ndus- 
trto prodods, equipmenls & services 
with mubnotiana bi Africa & Mdde 
East, vmfl o cq uoirte d wiffi top level 


position or CDnsu*- 

tart oortrad wrtt rtl conxxmy. Baa 

2300, Hereto Tribune, 92521 Nu9y 
Cedex, Fremce 


DflBMADGNAL LADY hderted, at- 


in Pin, US, Middk Srst. Seeks new 
chdlerge in Wcufv DC with inti legh 

lewd contacts & traveL (305) 274- 

3224/947-8900 USA. 


AMERICAN MALE 5TUDYMG Ac- 

countina at too UK. Utxvwrty. MA 
I«T Amin. Good French/Sponeh. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBOIQN EXECUTIVES 


in the tvt m inSiMHj Hurtdd Tri- 

fene where mar* Aon a third 

of e irnKwn Wn d nr s wortd- 
wvda. mot* of wham are in 
Imjxriuu aid industry, w3J 

road it Jut* to/ox ue (Porit 


613595) before 79am. an- 

that wo can Wnr you 

nd your massage wtit 

withai 48 - 


amng 

haric. aid 

hours. The 
rata it US. 59.80 nr load 
o tfuhndont pa Bne. You must 
Btdado ean y ii e ta atd vareff- 

tAta bdSng address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNTITES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


Incorporation end mcnagecneni in UK. 
ble of Man, Turks. An^ila. Gomel 
tstanrb, Paramo, libenc, Gtrobnr and 
most other offshore araas. 

• Conrtiertiai advice 

• Immeddr ff XXCT nY 

• Nominee ^vicus 

• Bearei shares 

• Boat regisT-anonj 

• Accounting & adn u rapiotior 

• Mai, tdearico e & tde* 

Fm uplanetanr booklet from: 

SELECT CORPORATE 
S81VICE5 LTD 
Hoad Office 


NU Pluaarrt, Doughs, trie af Mw 
Tai: Doughs 10624 


(66241 23718 
Telex 628554 SBICT G 


London Rep esemve 
2 5 OW Bond 5t. Lsrdcn WI 
Tel 01-493 4244. Tl« M2J7 SC5LDN G 


TEXTILE IMCHDer 
Tampon Production Machine 
Cotton Swob Forming Machine 
Cotton Pad Machine 

K. FASSBIND4.U0W1G 1 Co »G 
CH-8646 Wap?" - 
S-nrsetlcwt 

IH (55)2831 41 71. «3P fax CM 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 


YBI I rarest m one of America': meal 
exot>ng technological breakthroughs in 
a bri-oo daBor inantry. We hove pkmt- 
ed more nur frees in 1984 rhan ony 
other developer in ow State, 
rtgh mod u ansiiHpi a ssur ed for 


many, many years cri4 we gum>- 
tue to repu ros ma invw 


ttoien t 

940UHQE5 INVTTH1. 
Matend ovoBcUe in Endidi, French, 
Gennan. Bov 1992, Herdd Tribune. 
9252' Nedly Cedex, Frence 


OFFSHORE TAX SHB.TBI 

, COMPANIES 

UK. hie af Mon. Tub. Chonnel I ske xfa. 
Puinma. Liter* and moH offshore ar- 
ete. Compiere support fcabies. Very 
Stria oonfiderJidrty. 

Fie* consiitsotKtn. 

Roger Gr-ffin LLi, F.CA 


B'oritar^qrpa^Monagemenl Ud 


, Victoria Street, 


Dougfci hi e d Man. (06M 2230J/4. 
' CORMAT4 G 


Tefcu 627389 i 


MACHINE 

GOU>- SILVER PRINT 
Posd^e profit between £1000 to 2500. 

No firtor per month, roll or pan nine 

machines. Oerah £I9& 

Write Box 275. IHT. Pedro Texeira & 
6D, Madrid 28020 


AG8J1TS WANTS) FOR SSUNG 

world-known nave Ipreririve) 

m USa 6 other countries. 
Prom 35 erduvva are sis. low invest- 
J h, 9hp , ohn. PSwdar, Grate 


NOTAX 

Your ccvrifL*m> in r orurra rg Hcrtg 
Kong taho good Cn,r 3 mcLtfl low 
ec T J? 5 t "222 f ond Fi-rvh >s 

CR.G.. 77204 CBINA (SPAIN) 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PANAMA U8BUA. CORPORATIONS 

from US$400 auoktoe now. Td 

20240. Telex: 628352 ISLAND 
(yta mg 




US BUSDCS5 INVESTMSffS- Honda 

Red Estate. Mason/ Mann Inc. 790 E. 

Broward fflwJ, Ste. 202. Fort Louder- 
dde. H. 3330f USA. 


DEALBSW OR UCENSS agree- 

ment available ofl Hd4y oeitheec4 
other worldwide ixjuatuiui hi-tedi 
product. 818-240317 j15a. 


COMMBtOAL AGBKT Betaum. trov. 

cw York. Your 


els every 2 months to New 1 . 
contact m Europe, telex 11419 8 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HYDROPONIC FARMMG • hvest- 
mert opportunity & licensing. Carod- 
m leai. Sa4as o u tamased farge- 
sede growfeg Facffties. {480,000 jq. 
ft) Encnraus potertd in MdEas! & 
uidtMh. Comb [416). 858-1037. 
VMS be m Paris first week in June. 


ARBITRAGE. COUATKAL for art*- 

trage tiaeachom provided. Eapd. 
RcfaWe Reasonable fees. London 
based. Tet 01 244 9592/01 385 

5492/01 930 8926. Telex 8951622 

TABRCO G. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


NTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UMJMITB} MC 
U5-A- 6 WORLDWIDE 


A aynpiete sooal & busmen sennas 
providng a unique coHecran of 
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212-765-7793 

211745-7794 
330 W. 56th Sr, N.Y.C 10019 


Service Bepresi 
Needed Wor 


Idwide 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 

Cepo-i • 12 countries anatyzod 

Dctalk WM4. 45 Lndvn 1C6. 
S'.-V 508 Cenfrd Hora Kong 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


COUBB SBMCE from Ui to Eu- 

rope. Send reply to Mr. Aftmt Mar- 


P.O. Bax8^ Qoecraide. CA USA 


taP.o. 

92054-0 


H45. T* 619-439-4885. 


TAX SERVICES 


USA MCOME TAX ADVICE & Re- 

turns. Para based US CPA 359 63 01 


OFFICE SERVICES 


BRAM TRUST - MADRID 
HJLL INTEGRATED 

OFHCE SBTVKES 

/ phone / refax 

Routof mfomabon system 
My offices 

md etmknact rooms 

■ * - I — I ■>, ..fa J -j-.IX 

- immaRXX] ono prorossionai sron 


dam cifioJion / contaany 
ices for c 


marketing services 

- phone equipped o_ 

- Ml confidence mid diaetion 


ha du Colon 2^ Madrid 28046 


Tefc 419 10 l 


-Tba 44893 


Geneva Fiance Border 

UDA M1CHB. HUUTEAU 

AG94CE SBCVKES 
Your fitly uquppod office in fima. 
~ ’ mod, phone), trade 


Domidcohan . .. 

talas, fr oi dnfions, o d mim s froao n and 
tacretand services, lagd and oucktar 
advners. Short ar long term MJLA. 86 
Ste du Geneve. 7434ITGoflard, France. 

Tel: (SO) 92-13-4] Tk MBA 309078 F 


YOUR SWISS BUSINESS 
IN LUGANO 


Filly intacted business sarwees phone 
/ telex : mc3 services l Irarriatiora l 


admnatrdion / 

091/231 161 - Tb. 79544 


MRS PLACE ETOOE 
I EQUtPPS OFFICES 


MM. telex, seaetary. OERNS , 

.6279698 Thr64fiS0I. 


rati on. td- Pans i 


IMPETUS • ZURICH • 252 76 21. 
Phone • leku nxxftxn 


EXPATRIATE MASTER mdianic con- 
aracticn eqiipatert seelangchdfcng- 
mg portion in a third world crrrirorv 
ment Reply: 8 MocDondd, Ayfcrar, 
Quebec. Ccnada J9H 3R4. 

reBKHMAH EX-CHARTS Sight 
ottendartf, 29. tral educated, reSafife, 

R®on prwuon r pctkti bi naav- 

East. Cdl Roman. Paris 274 40 75. 

ATTRACTIVE YOUNG LADY (tad ver- 
satfe young man, fraNaa model are 
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Tefc 0f385 9476 

AABDCAN REGC1BED NW5E wilh 
10 years hoiaftal experience, seria 
entafayineaL Ml Waring, let Paris 
36094 10. * 

YOUNG GBUHAN fashion raxH 
highiy educated faoks for at Hterafr 
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SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


MIMFDVF S®3 far AMSDCAN 

mintxve frms fe pahs 

EngSsh, Belgian, Dutch or German 
legetorin. noMedge of French re- 
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Irttuli, Write or phone 138 Avenue 
Vktor Hugo, 7511a fard Prase. Tefc 
727 6) W 

Don't arte 
NTHNATKMAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in fee IHT GacaBed Section. 


mm 




4 FAMRES Modafabia PA need au 
pare. Serf mxuiintay ar.Aureet. 
Send phone nuntoer & ri»to to Bax 
47. Soaffwottenr. PA 19W9 USA 







HIM 

babymtnden. 1st f l os s da4y mads & 

dxwffeurs. Soone Bureau, 730 8122 

/ 5142. bcennd umploymeffl agency 


Place Tour Oasriffed Ad Quiddy aid Easily 


MTBNATIONAL HBAID TUBUNE 


By P tiene: GoH your bed HT npmMM mth your text You 
wiB be i nfe r m ed of fee east euaecfirtdy, and one* prepay w en t ts 
mode your ad wB oppear wrihm 48 hour 
Cad: Thu bode nan is S9-80 per fine par day + bed taxes. There an 
25 letter*, syscybspoagta fi e f it s tfrcmxl 36 in frwfnfai' rin fl fees. 
Minin aj mspocy is28oei.No rfc b r ei oti o nt oscnited. 

Cresfit Conk: Amman Express. Diner s Oub, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Aeon and Vaa 


W r 


HEADOmCE 


LATIN 4LMBOCA 


(For doaffied onfyj: 
747-46-00. 


BIROPE 


: 2636-15. 
Atfserm: 361-8397/360-2421 . 
1 343-1899. 

I fll] 329440. 
Frankfort: (069) 72-67-55. ' 
l«mma« 29J094. 

Lteban: 67-27-93766-25-44. 
(01)836-002. 

: 455-2891 7455-3306. 
(02)7531445. - 
f. (03) 845545. 

: 679-3437. 

: (08)7569229.- 
TdAvrir 03455 559. 

Vterma: Contact Frankfurt. 


•mm* Abate 41 40 31 
Pept312) 

Com: 33 14 54 
Gwyuyl, 51 45 05 
Uwte4l7ffiZ ' 

: 690511 
: 22-1055 
_ .61555 
Soo Mm 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 246303. 
Jarek» 2S2I4. 

Kuwafe 5614485. 
fefcrevev 341 45778/9. 
Odan 416535.. 

Sand Arabia 
Jedddt 667-1500. 
ILAAjDvM 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNITS STATS 


Bangkok: 390-06-57. 
Hang Kang: 5-213671. 
Mania: 817 07 49. 
Saout: 735 B7 73. 
SfctgcqMrue 222-2725. . 
Tahaon: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


(212)7523890.- 
(415) 362-8339. 


AUSTRALIA 


690 8233. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


EATON BUREAU NAfMEf . & dl 


7309566. 136 Soane St. SW1 
UeancedUK 6nptoymenf Agency. 


AUTOMOBILES 


LJNCOIN CONTMNTAL 1983. 

■loaded, 17 m da. NeiTM 
plates. 513j»aCdPtyis 758 49 00 


RCMDSTBt MBCBRB 220 

rim 1 QW tet IZftfl 


to Adua S_ 2 

W, to repdr. 86000. T« 
08 72 teiereag after 8 pm. 


AUTO SHOPPING 


TRAN SCAR 


TICXARSMm 

snoAiisrs 

PARIS 

ONNES/NCE . 
HtAMffURT 
BOW/CCXOGfC 
STUTTGART 



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PS mnutas from London Airport) 

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OF BMW (GR) LTD 


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tew 




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BTC«IMIR.Se.aer«|n 


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