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The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 
_ Printed Simultaneously 
in Pari<, London, Zurich, 
t * Hong Kong. Singapore. 

\ Hague and Marseille JL ^ 0 

WEAtH® DATA APPEAR ON PA%£» *■'' 

No. 31,809 


INTERNATIONAL 



ribunc 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 




PARIS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 



Reagan’s Tax Reform Plan: 
Richest and Poorest Pay Less 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 

Washington — The uat-re- 

fonn proposal that President Ron- 
aid Reagan was scheduled to an- 
nounce Tuesday night would 
reduce taxes most for the very rich- 
est and the very poorest Ameri cans, 
according to administration 
sources and documents. 

if the Reagan plan passes Con- 
‘ aP' ss an d enacted, individuals 
-would pay 52 percent less on the 
average in federal taxes than they 
do under current law, and corpora- 
tions would pay 22.5 percent more. 
That is a smaller shir t of tax bur- 
dens from individuals to business 
than was proposed in the U.S. 
Treasury Department’s original tax 
revision plan. 

- Under the new proposal, taxpay- 
ers earning more than £200,000 a 
year would pay 18.7 percent of 
their income in taxes instead of the 
current 21 percent, a tax reduction 
• v of 10.7 percent. On the low end, 
■j&iose earning less than 510,000 
'would pay 0.9 percent of their in- 
come in taxes rather than the cur- 
rent 1.4 percent, and those making 
between 510,000 and 520,000 a 
year would pay 2 J percent instead 
of 3 2 percent. 

The hypothetical tax reduction 
would be 35.5 percent for the low- 
est income bracket, 22.8 percent for 
the next-lowest and ll5 percent 
for taxpayers earning from $15,000 
to 520,000 a year. 

People in the four income brack- 
ets up to 5200,000 would get larger 
tax cuts than tinder the first Trea- 
sury plan, while those earning 
•above 5200,000 would get a smaller 
-jSfsduction. 


TWA Seeks 
A Buyer to 
Thwart Bid 
By Financier 

Compiled bv Our Stuff From biqmtdta 

NEW YORK — The board of 
^jjrectors of Trans World Airlines 
voted Tuesday 10 put the company 
up for sale after a U.S. federal 
judge cleared the way for a hostile 
$600- million takeover hid by a 
New York financier, Carl C. Icahn. 

The airline, the Rfth-largest U.S. 
air carrier and a major force in 
trans-Atlantic service, said it would 
seek a friendly merger to block the 
unwanted $18-a-share bid, which it 
views as inadequate. 

The airline declined to elaborate 
on possible buyers. 

The company's decision fol- 
lowed a court" ruling Tuesday 
morning that cleared the way for 
Mr. Icahn to continue his quest for 
the airline, denying TWA's request 
for an injunction agains t the Finan- 
cier. 

TWA which alleged violations 
of securities laws in Mr. Icahn’s 
accumulation of the stock, had also 
asked the court to require that the 
. investor and the group he leads sell 
SSJe shares they now own. 

Analysts said the ruling gave Mr. 
Icahn an edge in his bid for the 
airline. TWA has charged that Mr. 
Icahn’s bid laid open the possibility 
of liquidation. 

“Right now, it looks like the 
odds are in his favor," Louis 
Marckesano, senior transportation 
analyst at Janney Montgomery 
Scott, Philadelphia, said of Mr. 
Icahn. 

“It looks 10 me like he's going to 
win no matter what," he added. 

Announcing the defensive plan, 

TWA’s board said Tuesday that 
Mr. Icahn’s offer “does not reflea 
full value for the company" and 
said it would submit to a share- 

Continued on Page 14, CoL 3) 


For example, middle-class tax- 
payers earning 530,000 to 550.000 a 
year who now pay an average of 7.S 
percent of their earnings 10 the 
Treasury would pay 13 percent un- 
der the Reagan plan — a tax reduc- 
tion of 6.6 percent In the first 
Treasury plan, these taxpayers 
would nave gotten a 9.3-percent 
reduction. 

The White House was withhold- 
ing details like these about the pres- 
ident’s plan until Wednesday, the 
day after his speech to the nation to 
stan a campaign for tax simplifica- 

Presjdenr Reagan accuses the 
Democrats of ignoring the dan- 
gers of Communism. Page 3. 

don. White House strategists want- 
ed the president to gel the first 
opportunity to characterize bis tax 
program before its details were re- 
leased to the public. 

The new package would have 
three personal rates of 15, 25 and 
35 percent and a top corporate rate 
of 33 percent, with lower rates for 
smaller companies. Interest on a 
mortgage for a principal home 
would remain fully deductible. 

Like theTreasufys first plan, the 
president's proposal would restrict 
deductions for interest payments 
on second homes, auto, consumer 
and bank loans to the total amount 
of each taxpayer’s income from in- 
vestments, plus $5,000. However. 
these limitations would be phased 
in over a period of up to 10 years. 

Under the new proposal, deduc- 
tions for business meals would be 
mere generous than in the first 
Treasury plan, which suggested 
that $25 be the maximum deduct- 


ible cost of any meal. The new plan 
would allow deducting half the cost 
of meals above $25. 

Half of capital gains would be 
subject to taxation, rather than the 
current 40 percent, and the defini- 
tion of capital asset would be nar- 
rowed somewhat- Treasury One, as 
the first plan is called, proposed 
taxing capital sains as ordinary in- 
come and indexing the value of 
assets to inflation, a version that 
would have raised considerably 
more revenue. 

As in the first plan, state and 
local taxes would no longer be de- 
ductible from federal income tax. 
Income averaging, allowing tax- 
payers to average years with unusu- 
ally hi gh ^imingc with those before 
and after them, would be repealed 
under the new plan. 

Contributions to charitable or- 
ganizations would be fully deduct- 
ible, and contributions of stocks or 
property could be deducted at fair 
market value. Both of those are 
changes from limitations proposed 
in the earlier plan that were strong- 
ly opposed by private universities, 
museums and others. The presi- 
dent’s proposal, like its predeces- 
sor. would repeal the provision let- 
ting taxpayers who use the 
standard deduction deduct charita- 
ble contributions. 

Hie tax cut for the lower-income 
taxpayers is large partly because 
President Reagan’s plan calls for a 
bigger-than-antidpated increase in 
the zero-bracket amount, also 
called the standard deduction, used 
now by two-thirds of all taxpayers 
— those who do not itemize de- 

(Cootmued on Page 2, CoL 5) 




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ESTABLISHED 1887 



and Paris 
to Resolve 
Dispute on SDI 

By James M. Markham 

Hew York Times Serna 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl and President Francois Mitterrand 
of France were unable Tuesday to bridge their diff erences over the U-S. 
research program on space-based weapons but agreed to discuss pooling 
West European high technology. 

The two met for about five hours in the southern town of Constance, on 
the shores of Lake Constance, in an effort to resolve disagreements that 
emerged during the -meeting of industrial democracies in Bonn 

earlier this month. 

At -the Bonn meetings Mr. Mitterrand announced that Fiance would 
not participate in President Ronald Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive. . _ 

He said that the American project would reduce Emopean participants 

to the role of “subcontractors^ and — 

spark an exodus of talent to the - 
United States. 

Grateful to Mr. Reagan for go- 
ing through with the visit to the 
German military cemetery at Bit- 
burg, Mr. Kohl embraced the Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative, although 
in recent days he has sounded mare 
ticaL 

uring a break in their conversa- 
tions, Mr. Kohl and Mr. Mitter- 
rand suggested that they bad not 
overcome their fundamental diffa- 


Ths Aanodad fm 

A man comforted a Bangladeshi woman as they awaited medical attention. 



Wave Tike a Wall 9 
Left Death Behind 


A Bangladeshi gets a typhoid shot 


Th« AuoocMd 


By Steven R. Weisman 

Nett York Times Sender 

CHAIR PIR BUX. Bangladesh 
— Four days after a cyclone devas- 
tated the lowlands of southeastern 
Bangladesh, thousands of peasant 
families were burying their dead 
Tuesday and struggling for food 
and shelter in a landscape strewn 
•vi tf. human torpses and carcasses 
cf sheep and cattle. 

Here on the any island of Urir 
Char, an armed forces helicopter 
arrived for the third day in a row, 
bearing coconuts, bananas and 
plastic sheets for the peasants to 
use for temporary shelter. 

“The wave came like a big wall," 
said Mohammed Ibrahim, 50. He 
said it had been 15 to 20 feet high 
(4J5 to 6 meters) and that families 
had held on to the rooftops and 
bamboo poles of their thatched 
huts in desperate efforts to keep 
from being swept away. 


are Afferent," 
said Mr. Mitterrand, “but that 
should not lead to excessive condn- 

Si pns. 

He stressed the fundamental im- 
portance of the French-West Ger- 
man axis for Europe. 

“We are going to cany on and 
deepen this relationship, he said. 

Asked about a French proposal 
for the creation of a Western Euro- 
pean “community of technology,” 
Mr. Kohl said that it was vital for 
Europeans to meet the inventive 
challenges of the United Stales and 
Japan % strengthening their own 
resources. 

He said that dm West German 
and French research ministers 
would meet within two weeks on 
the project, known as Eureka, and 
“All of us thought wc were being that lateral expert commissions 
pushed into the river,” said Ohidur would be formed to discuss iL 
Raiman, an dderly man wearing Mr. Kohl also said that a Wot 
onlyaiwBorslort.Ihatwasraled 

wub mud. would visit Washington soon “to 

“Everyone was clinging to the verify the various p reliminar y con- 
rooftops," he said, adding that the ditions" for possible participation 
wind then shifted direction and in research on space-based ‘drfease 

blew rbacy people. off. ^ .. ■. rystepK. . ■ ' 1 ". 

The only structures that re- ■ "Ibere is a whole series of quest 
mained standing in this area Tues- tions open," he said , 
day were a few government-built The chancellor's brief remarks 
three-story cement buildings of the undersc or ed what is emerging as 
National Forestry Service, built in his government’s tactic, for avoid- - 
the last few years as part of a pro- ing bong split between Washing- 
gram to put up something that ion and Paris on Mr. Reagan’s 
could be used as shelter during space-based defense project 
storms - . West German officials have in 

Although there have been ran- recent days expressed support for 
dom estimates and messes that the Eureka pregea envisaged as ah 
tens of thousands may have died in essentially civilian undertaking, - 
the storm, government officials re- while stressing that it is not a sub- 

(Continned on Page 2, CoL 5) (Continued an Page 2, CoL 3) 



Argentine Witnesses TeU of Life Under State Terror 


By Lydia Chavez 

New York Tima Service 

BUENOS AIRES — Every day 
in a small courtroom here, witness- 
es describe the horror of living in a 
country where the government ac- 
cording to a presidential commis- 
sion, carried out a systematic cam- 
paign of murder in which more 
than 9,000 people disappeared in 
the late 1970s. 

Piece by piece, the prosecution's 
case has been brought against nine 
former Argentine military leaders, 
among them General Jorge Videia, 
who led the 1976 coup that brought 
the rmlitaiy to power. 

The testimony in the trial, which 
began April 22, shows how institu- 
tional repression quickly out- 
stripped the violence of leftist ex- 
tremists who at the time of the coup 


were taking responsibility for 

bombings and kidnappings 

Reports of people who simply 
“disappeared" during wfaal was 
known as “the dirty war” jumped 
to 3,850 during the first year of the 
military government, from 359 in 
1975, according to testimony. 

Many of those who take the wit- 
ness stand, or are mentioned in 
testimony, tried in small, some- 
times very brave ways to fight the 
war. 

What follows are the accounts of 
some of them as described in conn 
testimony. 

Maria Lusia Martinez de Gonza- 
lez, a midwife at the Quilmes Hos- 
pital, was working the night shift 
on April 3, 1977, when the police 
checked in a young woman in la- 
bor. according to court testimony. 
As part of her job. she assisted In 


the delivery. The next day, the po- 
lice returned to the hospital and 
drove off with the patient in the 
back of a small truck, witnesses 
testified. 

That might have been the end or 
the incident, but Mis. Martinez be- 
gan to ask questions about the pa- 
tient. who had been registered as 
Silvia Mabel Valenzi In an act of 
decency that probably cost her her 
life, she sent me woman's parents a 
postcard telling them that their 
daughter bad given birth to a 
daughter. 

The postcard prompted inquiries 
by the woman's parents, but the 
hospital director denied that such a 
person had ever been a patient at 
his clinic, witnesses testified. The 
baby was left behind when her 
mother was seized and is presumed 
to have died. 


INSIDE 

■ Some expats warn that Mos- 
cow might gain a advantage if 
SALT pact expires. Page 4. 

■ China has deckled to aid free 
tuition in higher education and 
to reform system. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ MG Communications Corp. 
was awarded 5113 million in an 
antitrust case against AT&T. 
MCI said it will appeal Page 9. 

SPORTS 

; ■ Spend a Buck earned 52.6 
' million, thoroughbred racing's 
biggest payday ever, by winning 
the Jersey Derby. Page 17. 

TOMORROW 

Part 1 of a two-part special re- 
port focuses on the internation- 
al aerospace industry. 

□ 

Concern about ■ — ■ 1 ■_ 
jobs — includ- Lli \ JM 
ing concern 
about the im- 
nfiact of techno- 
logy on employment — is 
among the key findings of an 
eight-country poll sponsored in 
pan by the Herald Tribune, 


Papandreou Foresees 
'Calmer Seas’ if He Wins 


By Henry Kamm 

New York Tima Service 

IO ANNIN A Greece — Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou has 
said that Greece's relations wiih 
the United States and the Europe- 
an allies will enter “calmer seas" if 
his party wins in parliamentary 
elections on Sunday. 

The Greek leader, relaxing in a 
hotel suite in this town near the 
Albanian border, after one rally 
and before another in a grueling 
election campaign, said Monday he 
was confident that his Socialist 
Party would win an absolute ma- 
jority in the 300-seat parliament. 

Less partial analysts say the race 
against the New Democracy Party 
is closer, but they do tend to give an 
edge to the Socialists. 

Mr. Papandreou, speaking in 
what he said was the first interview 
he had granted daring the cam- 
paign. said that lack of public inter- 
est in foreign relations, as evi- 
denced by a campaign centered 
almost exclusively on domestic is- 
sues, showed that Greeks wanted 


above all “responsible handling" of 
foreign policy. 

“They don’t want adventures," 
he said. “Our allies can expect 
calmer seas, but on fundamental 
questions that require solution they 
will find our position remains un- 
changed.’’ 

The prime minuter did not speci- 
fy the issues, but the tenor of the 
45-minute interview suggested that 
be meant Greek objections to 
Western policies toward the Turk- 
ish-Greefc dispute, which have 
sharply limited Greek participation 
in die military activities of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion. 

He agreed that the change be- 
tween his victorious 1981 campaign 
and 1985 is deep. In 1981. he put 
himself at odds with Greece’s allies 
by indicating that he would leave 
NATO and the European Commu- 
nity and expel .American military 
bases. Greek membership in the 
two organizations is no longer put 
in question. 

“The voters have shown disinter- 
est in die Common Market, N ATO 



Co***a Prm 

Andreas Papandreou 

as issues." Mr. Papandreou said. 
“They are not gready interested in 
foreign policy. The immediate issue 
is their daily lives." 

He offered no disagreement 
when asked whether the aim of his 
first term had been to make 
Greece's partners pay greater at- 
tention to the views of Athens, and 
haring obtained this, he would, if 
re-elected, sail a -more even course. 
Mr. Papandreou refused to say 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL 5) 


The woman never reappeared, 
but somehow the police got wind of 
Mrs. Martinez's concern. Four 
days after she assisted in the birth, 
security forces arrested her at her 
home. Her daughter testified that 
as the agents left with her mother, 
one turned and said, “You will nev- 
er see her again." She never did. 

Robert Cox, former editor of 
The Buenos Aires Herald, an En- 
glish-language newspaper, was one 
of the few local journalists who 
reported on the disappeared. In 
court, he compared his realization 
of the government's involvement in 
the killings to piecing together a 
“diabolical jigsaw puzzle." 

“I bad long ago realized that if I 
could publish reports rapidly and if 
the report contained something 
that suggested there would be an 
outcry abroad, those people would 
appear," Mr. Cox said. 

Mr. Videia dismissed the report- 
er's concerns soon after raking of- 
fice in 1976. saying, “There are 
some things that cannot be talked 
about." 

la a more candid discussion, Mr. 
Cox recalled. Admiral Emilio Mas- 
sera, a former navy commander 
who is also mi trial told hhn, “If 
you mention my nam e once again 
in your newspaper, I’ll put you 
away far good." 

The trial reveals the cowage of 
the families of the disappeared. 
Parents who had always lived with- 
in the law- were forced to search for 
children who disappeared. The 
mere act of looking for them or 
asking questions put their own lives 
in danger, since they too could be 
picked up as suspected “subver- 
sives." 

As some of them testify in court, 
it sometimes seems they are stiD 
looking for the final piece of proof. 

Maria Kubrik Marcoff de Lef- 
icroff was jailed for several months , 
during a search for her daughter, 
who disappeared in January 1977. 
The last she beard of her daughter, 1 
she said in court, was her screams ; 
and moans while they tortured her 1 
at a suburban police station. i 

.After Mrs. Lefteroff testified, the | 
judge asked if she had anything else i 
to add. " I 

“1 want to know if my daughter ! 
is alive or dead." die said. ! 





HataedcMd fas 

Severino Santraptchi: No granger tn political cases. 

Judge in Papal Trial: 
Part of a New Breed 

By ET. Dionne Tr. 

New York Timer Serna 

ROME — Severino Santiapichi, rite judge in the trial of right 
persons accused of conspiring to wgMsritint* pope John Paid n, is 
presiding over a trial that he himself did much to hrmp about 
On Sept. 24, 1981, four months after the pope was shot, rite court 

iLal — — ^ ^ h r -1- ■ — _ *■ All A N.. — . _ *«-— -1- ■ j a . * 


“Agca was only the visible point of a conspiracy which, rtwwgh 
impossible to define, was widespread and menacing and devised by 
shadowy forces which not even the Turkish authorities were able to 
render inrriligibJe," die report said. 

The effort to kill the pope was “a complex machination" of 
unknown figures, it went on. 

Mr. Santiapichi presided at Mr. Agca’s trial, and the staianent 
drafted by his longtime associate, Judge Antonio Abate, represented 

what then seemed to be his last word on the matter. Instead, if set in 

morion a series of events and investigations that led the judge back to 
the bench Monday. 

The trial’s first day was not an easy one for the taU. stately justice. 
He alternated between a meditative slouch and vigorous parries 
designed to bring order to his courtroom. ' - 

At one point, he infuriated reporters and television crews who had 
crushed forward to hear the proceedings, ordering them to be seated i 
or leave the courtroom. Despite the poor acoustics, they sat down. "•! 

And when Mr. Agca, who is the prosecution’s lead witness, sough t 
to interiect irrelevant remarks, the judge rose slightly from hisdiair' 
(Continued 00 Fage 2. CoL 6) 


. David P. Jacobsen 

6tb American 
Kidnapped in 
Beirut; Camp 
Battles Mount 

- . ' The Associated Press 
1 BEIRUT— Gunmen kidnapped 
. the American director of theAxser- 
. ican University Hospital on Tues- 
; day as he walked to work in Mos- 
lem.* Wqu Beirut, ^ university 
. spokesman said.- ’ ’• r > V : 

David P. Jaecibseii, 54, of Huri- 
tington Beach, California, became 
the sixth American kidnapped in 
Beirut sinoeMarchl984. 

Tberewasnridaimafrespansi- 
-faility /or the abduction. Islamic fi- 
had, bdfcved to be an extremist 
Sbfite Moslem group with links to 
Iran, has daimed respensibiixty for 
rim other abductions. 

Meanwhile, ea aided Palestin- . 
ian gnemflasrtscaptnrrd key posi- 
tions from Shiite Moslem forces 
around West Beirut’s Sabra refugee 
camp, :but tfaey wen: later podwd 
out after a fierce four-hour bom- 
bardment, Spokesmen for both 
side* said. - 

Palestinian : gunners in the hills 
east of 'Beirut unleashed a rocket- 
barrage on Shiite strongholds to 
support their Comrades at the Sa- 
bra and Chatila camps. 

The police said that 20 pe rsons 

Sbfite Moslem mflffl a me n m 
southern Lebanon oppose the 
return of the FLO. Pnge S. 

were killed and 62 were wounded 
About 300 people have been lolled ' 
and more than. . 1,006. have been 
wounded in nine days of fighting. 

Mr. Jacobsen, who. was kid- 
napped Tuesday, was walking from 
the campus of the American' Uni- 
versity of Beinit to. the hospital 
complex a block away when be.was 
abducted at gunpoint, according to. ■ 
the umversi^ spokesman, who de- ' 
cBned to be identified-' ... 

A witness, nfcoaiso refusied^ to be 
ide n t ifi ed, said thafsix persons car- 
ried out the kidnapping, uane a 


- blue van. They fired one pistol mot 
al the feet ci an unidentified doctor 
who was walking with Mr. Jacob- 
sen, the witness said. 

He said that Mr. Jacobsen told 
the gunmen: “Gk^rDgo, Tflgb.^* 

The other Americans still miss- 
ing in Beinaare: William Buckley, 
56, the UA Embassy political offi- 
cer; the Reverend Benjamin Weir, 
y, n Pr esbyterian ministex; Peter - 
Kfibimi, 60, .a librarian at the 
American University of Beirut; the 
Reverend Lawrence Martin Jenoo, 
50, a Roman CathoEc priest;" and 
Tory A. Anderson, 37, a corre- 
spondcatforThe Associated Press. 

Islamic Jihad also has said that it 

» holding two of four Frenchmen 
gowned is Ldainon — Mated 
Fontaine, 4S r vice consul of the 
■ French Embassy, and Mated Car- • 
ton, 62, the 

The polk* say two other Fseac^' 
awvftfichd Seurat, a researcier, 
and Jean-Paul KauffinamtaJ^- r 
na&t, were abducted aa Miy 18 /-• 
wnne traveling tn lyim ^ jjjflema- fa ' 
tional Airport. No onclOTflainie^- 


mentspubfiriiedby^put 
pets anlMay J6. swjpde a 
AmeriCans,.excqPBpr Mr. ] 
as wdl as McJjpntaine 1 
Carton. for. IjaTcflleni « 
inprisoned, jsjPKuwait- id 
attacks 'oaSai U.S. - anfl 




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EC Farm Officials Agree 
On Need for Reforms 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 'WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


The Associated Press 

SIENA. Italy — Agricultural 
ministers from the European Com- 
munity agreed Tuesday to seek ma- 
jor, long-term reforms in their cost- 
ly farm support policy. In recent 
years the policy has created huge 
food surpluses and has set the EC 
on a collision course with the Unit- 
ed States over subsidized food ex- 
ports. 

The tmnisierc said after an infor- 
mal two-day meeting that they 
backed a all by Frans Andriessen, 
the EC agricultural minister, for 
refor ming the farm program, which 
eats up more than two-thirds of the 
community's *""»«! budget. 

In a 10-page report, Mr. An- 
driessen suggested several ways to 
change thcTarm policy, including 
price controls to balance supply 
and demand and to do away with 
the ECs food surpluses. He also 
suggested that farmers, rather than 
taxpayers, subsidize sales of farm 
goods on world markets. 

Officials said that the ministers 
supported Mr. Andricssen's call for 
reforms but did not act upon the 
specific proposals. 

V« n l., , n rvfrri/*il1h I 


lippo 


Italy’s agriculture minister, Fi- 
randolfi, the meeting’s chair- 


man, said that the ministers “ex- 
pressed the common will to make a 
great effort” to institute agricultur- 
al reforms, have got a lot of 
tough work in the months ahead," 
Mr. Pandolfi added. 

He said there would he “a vety 
thorough discussion” for the re- 
mainder of the year between the 
European Commission, the farm 
ministers and farm union groups. 

Apart from the costs of paying 

farmers for goods that arc placed in 

storage, the EC’s surplus food 
stocks have become politically em- 
barrassing at a time when many in 
the world go hungry. 

Current surplus stocks contain 
millions of tons of cereals and daily 
products. 

After the United States, the EC 
is the world’s largest exporter of 
agricultural products. As such it is 
increasingly seeking markets for 
these products but is meeting grow- 
ing competition from not only the 
United States but also such export- 
ing cations as India. China, Argen- 
tina and Canada, 

Currently. EC farmers are guar- 
anteed a pnee for their products at 
the outset of each marketing year, 
regardless of output in most cases. 



A BERRY. A SEED AND A ROOT 
STEEPED IN HISTORY 


Juniper berries from Northern Italy, coriander seeds 

from England and angelica root from Flanders. 

These are what impart such delicate characteristics to 

Beefeater gin. ,. 

Macerated in pure grain alcohol and then distilled in 
accordance with the original recipe ofjames Burrough, the 
company's founder. 

We haven'tchanged athing. Not in 1 70 years. 

We’re a company steeped in history. We like 
it that way. 

And every time you taste our London Dry 
Gin, with its fleeting essence of juniper, 
coriander and angelica - you'll 
\Hke itthatwaytoo. 






IK 


THE GIN OF ENGLAND 


General Hussain Mohammed Ershad, the president of 
Bangladesh, points to the body of a woman on one of the 
islands in the Bay of Bengal that was hit by a tidal wave. 


Paris , Bonn Fail to Resolve 
Differences on SDI Research 


(Continued from Page 1) 
salute for the Strategic Defense 
Initiative. 

In Paris last week. Foreign Min- 
ister Hans- Dietrich Genscher, who 
has been more skeptical about the 
space defease plan than the chan- 
cellor, urged a common European 
response to the U.S. project. 

But an official close Lo Mr. 
Genscher cautioned that verbal 
support for Eureka was noi the 
same as backing it with money. 


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ADDRESS- 


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29-5-85 


Victims in Bangladesh 
Are Fighting to Survive 


He said, “The question now is: 
‘Will there be enough political will 
in Bonn far the kind of funds we 
need for tins?”' 

A senior adviser to the chancel- 
lor added that Bonn would be mis- 
taken to regard Mr. Mitterrand’s 
rejection of the U.S. space defense 
program at the summit conference 
as France’s final answer rat the 
question. 

In both Paris and Bonn, remarks 
last week by the U.S. defense secre- 
tary. Caspar W. Weinberger, as he 
was returning from a North Atlan- 
tic Treaty Organization meeting in 
Brussels have drawn attention. Mr. 
Weinberger suggested that Europe- 
an companies could participate in 
space defense research without the 
approval of their governments. 

Some commentators have taken 
the Weinberger comments to mean 
tha t Washington was fundamental- 
ly not interested in West European 
governmental involvement in the 
space-weapons research. 

But a well-placed Bonn official 
interpreted Mr. Weinberger's com- 
ments as freeing Bonn from having 
to choose between Washington and 
Paris on the issue. 


u iywgowwiiiie"«f*4" l ”" 1 ’ ' 


/*■ 


l 


WORLD BRIEFS 


T 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tnained cautions about the actual 
ton 

The government announced that 
it bad officially counted only 1.400 
dead, hut others handling relief ef- 
forts said they continued to believe 
that ihemimbcr missing was 10,000 
or more. Lieutenant General Hus- 
sain Mohammed Ershad. the mar- 
tial law leader of Banglades h , told 
reporters that he fdt the death toll 
was between 5,000 and 10,000. 

In addition, the government said 
that neatly 17,000 houses bad been 
destroyed and 123,000 damaged. 
Neatly half a million acres of crops, 
mostly jute and rice, were de- 
stroyed, officials said. 

The cydonc struck several places 
in the islands and lowlands of one 
of the world's biggest deltas, where 
the Ganges and Brahmaputra river 
systems Empty into the Bay of Ben- 
gal A cyclone that struck the same 
area in 1970 is believed bv some to 
have killed 300.000 people.^ 


do wiih some government assis- 
tance, including rice; tins of food 
awrt cannisters of drinking water. 
The villagers said that the govern- 
ment was helping in the construc- 
tion of new wells but that marry 
were bong forced to drink the sa- 
line water that was left in the Adds 
because their existing wells had 
been destroyed. 

“We don't even have doth to 
wear or a shed to live under,” said 
Mr. Rahman. “AH our bouses have 
washed away.” 

General Ershad visited here on 


IT S Blames Anns Stalemate on Soviet 

s "" * 

VS. insistence on continuing work "We now Mr. 
Larry Speaker tite round. wtoch> 

lArtvir-hev s comment over titc weeKcno 1 <n a o it u n wi t 


sr u&w in 


wtihthis characterization, owing to So™, backtracking Item 
they took in previous negotiations. 


Kuwait Stops Issuing Entry Visas 

KUWAIT (RfltBB) 


UOIHS1 UMUU TUUCU UCIG wu - . -, nirrr a ,onmM lo WDf* 

Monday and handed out 100 rate, ance of entry visas and residence permits for foraff^ 

or a Bttie more than S3 In cash, to in the Gulf state as pan of lighter security measures following w ys 


each person, but residents said car bomb attack on its ruler. w flwa r 

Tuesday that they still had the Announcing the decision Tuesday. 1°“™* **2 JJJJL -unnj mtzin 
money. al-Ahmed al-Sabah said that the halt would be tempos “uotu cenam 

“We wouldn't know where to brakes are applied on laws related to visas. 

spend it,” said one, s tanding in an parliamentary sources said that Kuwait was prepanngto 

empty muddy field. existing security regulations, especially thoserdatw to ^d^eporoi 

■ Dav of Moamlue Observed for not Kuwaitis, who account for more than half (rf 
" 01 M ® amn 8 u v erT “ 1.7 million people. Security sources said that 

Millions of people thronged ' lcA f 0 flowng the attack on the emir. Sheikh Jabet al-Ahm^ 

l. um— ) niiA tmtrhM Fmrti fhhnf (flflSL FOUT 


MBiieojuuuuupcq.B. mMques in Bangladesh lo obsem wh o esaped wi± soatclw fioft flying gUss. Fo« peno« 

including the driverof the car uttd in the bombing, were killed. . 

there was no failure of its ean> , 1 ,.’— « ; „i 

wanting system in predicting the 
aom. Rimer. ofDdnls Mid, .die 

survivors of the cydonc. about 100 
miles (160 kilometers) inland, thou- 


storm developed quickly on Friday. 
Radio warnings were sent out that 
afternoon, and there is some evi- 
dence that the warnings were heed- 
ed where they were heard. 

Reporters were brought to Urir 
Char by the armed forces helicop- 
ter. 

Families here were angitisbed be- 
cause Islamic law requires that 
bodies be buried as quickly as pos- 
able Instead, the government has 
had to assist in diggi n g mass 
graves; such burials are a violation 
of Islamic law. 

Peasants said they were too poor 
to own radios and that the storm 
and subsequent gigantic waves bad 
caught them by surprise. 

The peasants were were making 


Dhaka, the capital. _ 

S-rMSTS Yon Billow’s Ex-Mistress Testifies 


sands of people were fleeing Iran 
overflowing rivers. 

The worst-hit new areas were the 
eastern districts of Sylhet and Co- 
mills The deputy' commissioners 
of both areas said about 200,000 
people were moving to higher 
ground, loving their belongings 
behind. 

Chief Rear Admiral Sultan Ah- 
med of the Bangladeshi Navy was 
put in charge of overall relief oper- 
ations, involving all available 
armed forces mobilized on a war 
footing. . . 

His first priority was drinkmg 
water for the island survivors. 


Reagi 



PROVIDENCE. Rhode Island 
(APT — A judge denied defense 
requests Tuesday to limit the testi- 
mony of Claus von Bulow's former 
mistress, who returned from Eu- 
rope to appear al his retrial and 
add to testimony that oner helped 
convict him of attempting to mur- 
der Ws wife. ' f 

Judge Cbrinne P. Grande sw 


that the previous testimony of Al- 
i Isles was 


Alexandra Isles as she ar- 
rived at co art Tuesday- 


exandra isles was relevant and that 
any new testimony should be al- 
lowed bccause the witness, not the 
prosecution, tad withheld it. 

On the stand, Mrs. Isks said that 
she had given prosecutors new in- 
formation. She dad hot discuss it, 
but sakl that when Mr. von Bulow 
told her of his wife's first coma, 
“there was behavior that troubled 
me" and "T didn’t want to recog- 
nize what it might have implied.” 


;an’s Tax Reform Plan; 

Richest and Poorest Pay Less Bomb Injures 16 in Johaimesburg 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ductible expenditures. It would rise 
by 5520 up to 52,900 for single 
s. bv 5330 to $4,000 for 


taxpayers, by 5330 to $4,000 
joint returns and by SI. 120 to 


provisions have deferred billions in 
taxes for payment later if general 
rates are now reduced, they will 
have to pay much less later than 


JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A bomb exploded Tuesday at an arnrV 
medical center in an office buOdiog in central Johannesburg, injuring at 


originally anticipated. To recapture 
S3 ,600 for tingle heads erf house- those “windfall” gains 


least 16 people, officials said. 
A soldier said 


hold. 


As previously reported, the per- 
sonal exemption would be raised to 
SZOOO immediately under the new 
Reagan plan. 

To pay for those and other 
changes in the Treasury plan, Mr. 
Reagan wiQ propose a stiff new tax 
on companies that have been mak- 
ing heavy use of ihe depredation 
deductions enacted in the 1981 tax 
cul Companies exploiting those 


i- mosc wuuuau gauu, uk ik* escape. 

plan would impose special levies chi The soldier said the bomb appeared to be a cylinder-shaped mine, 

- those firms that would raise almost hidden in a cardboard box in a hafiway leading to a fire escape m the 25- 


“windfall" gains, the new 
rial levies cm 

those firms that 
$60 billion over three years. 

The repeal ol income averaging 
also would raise billions erf dollars 
more than the earlier proposal 

The new plan would repeal the 
investment tax credit, which pays 
for up to 10 percent of the cost of 
new investments in equipment and 
machinery. 

Among other hightifthts of the 


said he and a friend spotted the bomb and shouted an alarm 
about 10 minutes before it went off, aflowingtime for most people to 


story building. The blast occurred in arid-afternoon when the second- 
floor medical office was filled with medics and patients. 


Brazil Sugar Workers’ Strike Ends 


Papandreou 
Sees a Thaw 
With Allies 


SAO PAULO (WP) — Representatives of the Brazilian sugar cane 
industry and rural workers have ended their strike after signing an 
agreement mediated by tire labor minister, Almir Paoianotta 
The accord, signed Monday, signaled an important shift toward free 

^ collective haigaining between labor and employers as the new civilian 

plan, as explained by the sourres government struggles to. restore industrial democracy. . & 

and documents are the following; Since the military left power in March, .airime employees, postaf 

• m xnMemA workcis, teachers, subway and bus drivers, CM assembly workers and 

• Contributions to tax-deferred d ^ ^ ^ in ^ effort u> restore 

living standards cut by a rwo-year recession that has been deepened by an 
austerity program. 


(Continued bom Page I) 
whether the four major US. bases, 
well as smaller installations. 


Individual Retirement Accounts 
on behalf of nonworking spouses 
would be raised from 5250 to 
$2,000. The first Treasury proposal 
would have raised that to S2.500. 

• Health-insurance premiums 
paid by employers on behalf of 
their workers would be taxed up to 
$10 a month for individuals and 
$25 a month for families. Those 


For the Record 

An explosion in i 


a bomlC seriously injured a passerby in front of the Indian 
Commission budding on Tuesday. (Raders) 

The International Corandssian of Jurists charged the Philippines on 


“ L 3 ! premiums are not now taxed. Em- Wednesday with ignoring a court order to release three human rights 

would be dosed at me end | or i whl p [ 0 yer-provided group term life in- lawyera detained without charge earlier (his month in the southern island 
when this becomes an option to be «i b ^i,.L ecnnnn - tRrutm 1 


option 

exercised by either party under an 
agreement signed in 1983. 

He referred instead to his public 
statements. The latest, the Socialist 
platform, set as a goal “removal of 
the UJS. bases, in accordance with 
the timetable of the agreement" It 
contains no fixed timetable. 

The prime minister said that the 
greatest objections to his foreign 
policy views came from the pro- 
Moscow Communist Party. “Of 
course, the C.P. feels betrayed.” be 
said. 

Mr. Papandreou said that the 
Communists, who are conducting a 
vigorous campaign against both 
major parties, were hostile to him 
also because he denied Socialist 
support for the re-election of for- 
mer President Constantine Cara- 
manlis. When the surprise decision 


surance valued below $50,000 
would remain untaxed, as under 
current law. 

• Unemployment benefits 
would be fully taxable, as would 
workers' compensation, black-lung 
benefits and employer-provided 
death benefits. The new plan would 
eliminate deductions for country 
club dues, tickets to sporting 
events, seminars on cruise ships 
and ocean-liner travel. 


of Mindanao. • (Raders) 

In Belfast, masked gunmen shot to death a I9-year-oW man, believed to 
be a Protestant, as he was getting out of his car in the center of the aw, 
the pohcc said Tuesday. • (AFP) 

The death toH in Algedras, Span, rose to 21 oo Tuesday as the body of . 
another victim of Sunday^ explosion of two ofltankezs was rcoovetei A . 
dozen persons are still missing. (AFP) 

A grand jury in Fort Worth, Texas, indicted eight high school students 
Tuesday who allegedly belonged to the Legion of Doran, a vigilante . 
group accused of violence against other students. Police raid the g 
mostly honor students and athletes, made a misguided attack on < 
and drugs. 


Judge in Rome: One ol a New Breed 


(Continued from Page 1) 

and backed, Tm the one who runs 
this triaL” Mr. Agca fell silent. 


has also been a university profes- 
sor, has traveled widely and speaks 
several languages. 


was announced in March, analysts The judge is no stranger to con- ,_?* £ J k5S ?i b ? d ty lhose who 
that the conser- trovers] al political cases. He pr 


said they believed 

vative president had been aban- “ over the trial of the kidnappers 
doned by Mr. Papandreou to ap- and killers of Aldo Mora the for- 


presidr faow.hhn as being strong-willed, 
but with a good sense of humor. 


pease voters to the left of his party. 

Id his first public comment on 
toe issue, which caused a furor and 
led to early elections, Mr. Papan- 
dreou said that the analysts had 
been wrong. 

“The dogmatic left, the Commu- 


mcr Italian prime minis ter. Mr. 
Moro’s kidnapping was perhaps 
the most jarring experience of Ital- 
ian civil fife since World War IL 


Because Mr. Santiapichi long 
harbored suspicions that a conspir- 
acy was behind the shooting of the 
pope, his selection as trial judge 
was considered as having the effect 
of shielding the Italian legal system 

from charges that the case would be 
politically slanted against convic- 
tion. 


Mr. Santiapichi presided over 
other terrorist trials as well and his 
role won him respect both as a 
nists, wished desperately that we jurist and as a man of personal 
support Cara mantis he said. In courage, 
that case, he added, there would . . , 

have been a mass desertion from The terrorist penod was central 
his party because “the base” was creating a new spirit among Ital- 
., CT ,nst il magistrates, a solidarity born erf 

Fto described the nomination of a s ^ ise of mission and of self-pro- 
another candidate. President tecuon. 

Christos Sartze iakis , as “the only Italian judges were among the 
political solution that would not twwting victims of terrorism, and 
have led to political suidde”' for the they were increasingly forced to 

Socialists. five lives defined by me constant . _ 

The prime minister also said that presence erf armed guards and the over the course the trial wifi ra frff 
foreign investment, including that priority of security measures. But For example, he is described as 
by multinational companies, was in fighting back against terrorism, being concerned over the extent to 
welcome in Greece and that he did and more recently the Mafia, the which other West European gov- 
not plan to “statify." or national- judges developed’a sense of their eraments will cooperate with Italy 
ize, m the private sector. own collective influence and won, by extraditing various suspects 

“The thine that transcends ev- both new power and new respect now in their jails who could cast 

Mr. Samiapichi is a represents- ^ on ^ case - 


The case has posed serious prob- 
lems for Italy in its relations with 
the Soviet Union and the rest of the 
East bloc, and there have been 
widespread but unconfirmed re- 
ports of diplomatic pressure on the 
Italian government to acquit the 
three Bulgarians on trial. 


The judge is known to have ex- 
pressed 


grave worries in private 


exything is productivity," Mr. Pa- 
pandreou said. “It is very low.” 



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tive or this new breed of judge. His One of the first moves Monday 
house is heavily guarded, and be- by the prosecutor, Antonio Marini. 


cause of his role in the terrorist was to ask for the extradition of 


trials be is viewed as one of the 
most endangered magistrates. 


Mr. Santiapichi who is 60, has 
been a magistrate since 1952. He 


DOCTORATE 

EAAN A HOKE. U« ffn-ftti totariMA n 

■i «K»tw «— if* swats mhw 

ytttr<uMriMKS.50!f-ME«d.- Seri Rohm 

cm cm hi uw 

■ 213-276-1094 
■1 9iBfir 
[Wsrie Brt. | 

Mjfcjgaagg 


aispected Turkish terrorists and 
drug merchants who are believed to 
have links with the men on trial. 

Mr. Santiapichi has been ada- 
mant in insisting that the case will 
oe tried on its merits, resardless nf 
u* political and <ft33n£ 
sures. 1 dont care what thev’re 

saj^g out there,” he told aSw 

to his office recently. 


Asked about possible plea bar- 

ihyudge cut off the conver- 
sation. Not m my court,” he said 


Agca Outbursts 
Weaken Case, 
A Counsel Says 


Room 

ROME — The defense coutf* 
sel for two Bulgarian diploma yg) 
accused of involvement in i, 
plot to kill Pope John Paul IL 
asserted Tuesday that the pros- 4 
edition had lost credibffir ' ~ 
two days of outbursts 
key prosecution witness, 
met Ali Agca. 

Mr. Agra, a 27-year-old Turk 
who is serving a life sentence fof 
shooting the pope on May 13,' 
1981, refused to answer ques- 
tions by Judge Scvetino Santia-„ 
pjehi. He again prodaimed. 
himself to beresus Christ. 

Three Bulgarians and fiv< 
Turks are accused of involve^ 
ment in a plot to murder the 1 

m*. 

The prosecution contends 
that the Bulgarian intelligence 
service hiraT rightist TuriasfiJ 
gunmen to kill the Polish-bony 
pope. Its case rests largely orf 
past statements by Mr. Agca. ! 


u 


u in s it 


-r“ 


i 

S 


t 


ih 




> 


< 


i 


Asked by toe court president' i 
how he obtained the ; Sr 


F 

V- 



carnated.' 

. He made similar prodatna-’ 
tions Monday. 

Giusqjpe Consolo, lawyer 
fra Sergo Antonov, a Bulgarian' 
Airline employee, told journal- 
ists later: “I am glad that finally 




>ze from what a source cranes i 
the accusation against my cli- 


ent. 


■»> 


'TVs 







■V'Tf 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Page3 


*M. ; u . al, ‘ «»n SL.' 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


»■ ‘ '-iW 


.' *.<• I K ••ft.. ■ . \ 

■'•T4 : - : *- •. ; ' 

j. 


•C^ 1 V-... V 


Capital Monstrosity 
To Open to the Public 

The Executive Office Building’ 
next door to the White House, 
which Harry S. Truman once 
fondly called “the greatest mon- 
strosity in America,” will be 
opened to public tours next 
month. Designed by Alfred B. 
Mullen in French Second Empire 
style, the edifice resembles a bat- 
tleship in the rain and a raiding 
cake in the sun. It was finished in 
1888 at a cost of S10 million 




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demolition andff the Eisenhower 
admuristrationl Now safely clas- 
. sified on tbe National Register of 
Historic Places, it has beep fresh- 
ly restored to its Gilded Age 
. splendor. • 

Short Takes 

- Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, 
who retired in 1974 as chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs erf Staff, says 
that the current proposal to reor- 
ganize the JCS is only the latest of 
a score of plans -submitted since 
the system began in 1947. Hie 
new plan would strengthen the 
chairman's role by placing him in 
die chain of cnwirnlmd and ma k- 
ing him a member of the. National 
Security Council. Admiral 
Moorer says that "‘‘the chairman 
already has all tbe power” be 
needs and the proposal “will not 
eliminate ‘interservice rivalry* but 
will expand iL” The admiral 
adds, “Like the country boy said, 
‘If it ain’t broke, don’t fixh.' ” 

New York state is issuing new 
automobile license plates for the 
first time in 13 years; many of the 
old ones are rusty and unread- 
able. The new plates have the 
same blue-oorgoul color scheme, 
phis a decal of the Statue of Lib- 
erty, whose cent«mifi! arrives 
next year. 

The Reagan a rtmiiBS tr ati on is 
pushing for relaxation, of a con- 
gressional mandate of lOyeazS 
ago that automobile fud efficien- 
cy be doubled fay this year, to an 
average 27 J mdes a gallon (11.6 
kilometers a filer). Such a step 
would be a boon to General Mo- 
tors and Ford, winch face mil- 
lions of dollars in fines for fading 
to meet the mandate for Ore past 
two yean. The tWO com panies 
attribute their failure to me in- 


Laey iron balconies 
ring ihc former War 
Department Library, 

. right, in the Old 
Executive Office 
Building, below. Harry 
S. Truman once called 
it “the greatest 
monstrosity in 
America. r Now listed 
on the National 
. Register of Historic 
Places, it has been 
: freshly restored. 


//£> 


b 





creasing popularity of bigger 
cars. - 

West Poem’s first pair of boy- 
giri twins were among its 1,010 
graduates last wedc Sbyfla and 
Curd JfiigenMeme, grandchil- 
dren of refugees from East Ger- 
many and children of a U.S. 
Ar my w ar rant officer, Tbe Wash- 
ington Post reported. Sibylla was 
one of 107 women in tbe U.S. 
Military Academy’s sixth coedn- 


Georgia O’Keeffe, a recent re- 
cipient erf tire new national arts 
award, is scarcely known to her 
fellow townspeople of Santa Fe, 
New Merica Now 97, she takes 
no part in the local arts communi- 
ty and sees no one but old friends. 
The story is told of a visitor who 
arriv ed unannounced at her de- 
sert bome» When she appeared at 
tbe door, he said he wanted to see 
Georgia O’Keeffe. She turned 
around, turned bade, said, “Now 
you’ve seen the from, and the 


bad;** and quietly dosed the 
door in his face. 


A Measure of Worth 
For Vice Presidency 

John Nance Gamer, who was 
rice president during Franklin D. 
Roosevelt’s first two toms, said 
something to the effect that the 
job “isn’t worth a pitcher of warm 
spit,” and has been frequently 
quoted mm 

The New York Times, noting 
efforts dnrjng the Carter and 
Reagan admin is tr a tions to Up- 
grade the vice presidency, said, 
“Now there’s a guide to now far 
the job has come.” Noting that 
the White House published a fist 
this month of the gifts, official 

and otherwise, made to President 
Ronald Reagan and Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush, The Tunes 

also qpfpd That the lis t “ sho wed 
that the chain saw went to the 
president. The vice president got 
the 29-vohune History of Ecua- 
dor.” 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


wkrr** Strike Eni 


GuldreninSniaUFamilms Are Said to Be Brighter 


■■ •• O 


: • !'•; T-J. 


. . . —■ f 

tic: 


By Crisrine JRussdl 

11 ' Wcahxngian Post Serrtcc 

LOS ANGELES — Studies sug- 
gest that children bom into smaiTw 
famifies, regardless ot income and 
other factors, tend td attain higher 
-intellectual achievement than . do 
children in lo^er^f amifies, actxsd- 
ihg to several social scientists. 

V Dr. Robert IL Zaj one of the Um-. 

verity of MicfaigSn said that new 
research indicates that children 
with one brother or sister perform 
better in sc h oo l and on standard- 


ized tests than do children with 
more than one rihting . The first- 
born has the intellectual advantage 
in die two-dnld family, be said 
“If you ask me the question, 
£ Wbai is tbe family configuration 
that rewards the highest scores and 
intellectual , performance,* it’s a 
two-child family riith a sparing erf 
more than two yeas,” he said- 
Dr. Zajanc cautioned parents 
against “making derisio ns on this 
atone,” however. He noted that 
“we know very little about how 


family size affects personality fac- 
tors,” such as sociability, resilience 
or the absence of anxiety. 

“If we rally pay attention to IQ,” 
be added, “we may have people 
who have somewhat higher IQ but 
at the same time are very selfish or 
very unsociable." . 

Dr. Zajanc spoke Monday at a 
panel and news conference at die 
annual meeting here of die Ameri- 
can Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, the nation's larg- 
est general scientific organization. 




Harold Hecht, Film Producer, Dies 




Hi \ i- * r* 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Harold 
'Hecht, 77, whose film production 
‘ company made such Academy 
Award-winning movies as 
“Marty” “Cat Ballou” and “Sepa- 
rate Tables,” has died of cancer at 
'lus Beverly HiTLs, California, home. 

Mr. Hecht died Saturday. Many 
of his films, such as The Qimson 

■ Pirate” in 1952 and the critically 

■ acclaimed “Sweet Smell of Suo- 
^cess" in 1957, starred Ins longtime 
Vriend Burt Lancaster, a partner in 


nry Awards' in 1956, including best 
picture. In 1965, “Cat Ballou” won 
a best-actor Oscar far Lee Marvin 
«nH wrtnKKshfri farm M a film star 

Robert Nathan, 91, 

Poet and Novelist ‘ 

NEW YORK 9^7) — Robert 
Nathan, 91, who. wrote the 1940 
novel “Portrait of Jemrie” and 
more than 50 other bocks of poetry 
and prose, much erf it fantasy, died 
of kidney faOrire on Saturday at his 
home in Los Angeles. 




Harold Hecht 


V» Br* 

Oixtbur- 1 


- “Marty” the story of a Brooklyn 

butcher who felt he was too ugly to 
find love, brought Mr. Hecht his 
greatest success. Tbe film, starring - 
Ernest Boigninc, won four Acad©- 


CV MEMORIAM 

EJVL “Mack” HEMUCH ” 
October 4, 1923 toMay2S, 1981. 

. Family andfrimds. 


The home 
of Burbenys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near tke Madeleine) 


“...ein Spitzengerat besonderer 
Art, das alle Wunsche erfullt, 
die man heute an eine Kamera 
stellen konnte . . .” 


Germany’s ‘Foto-Magazin’ leaves 
us with nothing else to say. 



ivmmoounjL 



European ^camera of^ the year *84. 


ruassical 
'Burbenys 
: rainwear 
fnm 
1.730 fF 




The fill! range of 
traditional Burbenys Mens, 
Ladies & Children clothing. 

Burberrys 

8, bd Malesherbes - 
Paris 8 C - 266.13.01 ' 


Reagan Calls Democrats 
Weak on Co mmunism 
And Divisive at Home 


PiageT 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

MIAMI — President Ronald 
Reagan, in a Memorial Day politi- 
cal speech, has sharply accused 
Democrats (rf ignoring the dangers 
of Communism abroad and of “pit- 
ting white against black, women 
against men, young against old” at 
home. 

Speaking Monday to 1.600 con- 
tributors to Senator Paula Haw- 
kins. a Florida Republican, Mr. 
Reagan combined an appeal for 
continued Republican control of 
the Senate with pointed criticism of 
Democrats on tee issue of mOhary 
spending. 

“The opposition often acts like a 
weaker America is a safer Ameri- 
ca,” he said. “Like it or not, that’s 
the kind of bizarre logic that will 
cany the day if the other party 
regains control of the Senate. 

Mr. Reagan also accused politi- 
cal opponents of ignoring Commu- 
nist dangers in Nicaragua. 

“Many of those opposing our 
efforts nave steadfastly refused to 
acknowledge that die rulers of the 
regime in Manama are, by their 
own admission,” Mr. Reagan said, 
“hard-core Co mmunis ts and con- 
sider themselves part of the inter- 
national Communist movement.” 

The president departed from his 
prepared text to comment that citi- 
zens were confused about Lhe Nica- 
raguan conflic t and declared, to 
applause, “It's the freedom fighters 
against the Communists.” 


“Closing our eyes and making a 
wish, whirii seems about the only 
course of action our opponents wifi 
support, won’t make this threat gp 
away,” Mr. Reagan said. “We need 
tourist those governments target- 
ed by the Communists, and it is 
imperative that we support those 
brave individuals wbo are putting 
their lives on the line to bring de- 
mocracy to Nicaragua.” 

In opening his speech, Mr. Rea- 
gan said that Republicans “have 
been blessed with grass-roots sup- 
porters who are committed to the 
iHmIs of individual freedom, fam- 
ily values, free enterprise and a 
strong America.” 

“While tbe other party has tried 
to build a coalition by segmenting 
America into waning factions — 
over the past years pitting white 
against black, .women against men, 
young against old — we’ve taken a 
more positive path,” he said. 

The remark was almost identical 
to one that former President Jimmy 
Carter made in the 1 980 campaign, 
touching off a furor. Mr. Carter 
said that if he lost the election, 
“Americans might be separated 
Mack from white. Jew from Chris- 


Other scientists participating in 
the symposium agreed that family 
we is important in intellectual and 
educational performance, but they 
disagreed on the causes and impli- 
cations of research results. 

A Michigan State University bl-_ 
ologist, James Higgins, countered 
that heredity is far more important 
in a child’s inteflectnal achievement 
than the number, order or sparing 
between children. 

Dr. Judith Blake of the Universi- 
ty of California at Los Angeles said 
that the differences between small 
and large families are significant 
enough to affect derisions about 
how many children to have. 

“The data I have indicate the 
advantages of coming from a small 
family are gigantic," Dr. Blake 
said. “By that, I mean two or 
three." 

•The disadvantages of coming 
from a six- or seven-child family 
are enormous,” she added. “They 
are a great dragon a person’s edu- 
cational advancement” 

The greatest hazard for children 
in large families is dropping out of 
school, according to Dt Blake. 


lian. North from South, rural From 
urban.” 

After Mr. Reagan called on Mr. 
Caner to apologize. Mr. Carter 
said the stridency of his remark bad 
been a mistake.' 

Larry Speakes. the White House 
spokesman, declined to elaborate 
oo the president’s remark Monday. 

Mr. Reagan's criticism follows a 
series of congressional defeats in 
recent weeks for his military build- 
up and for his effort to provide aid 
to the rebels fighting me govern- 
ment of Nicaragua. 

He has run into opposition on 
both fronts from Republicans as 
well as Democrats. For example, 
tbe Republican-controlled Senate, 
where 22 Republican members face 
re-dection next year, voted to hold 
Pentagon sending increases to the 
level of inflation for next year. 

Mr. Reagan renewed the admin- 
istration’s assertion that Cuba bad 
been engaged in illicit drug trading. 

“I have a message for Fidel Cas- 
tro about tbe drug trade," Mr. Rea- 
gan said. “He can tell American 
television networks anything be 
wants, but nobody in his regime is 
gong to get away with this dirty 
drug business.” 

Mr. Reagan paid tribute to Mrs. 
Hawkins by noting that the Demo- 
crats had no women in the Senate, 
whereas the Republicans had two, 
and and by saying that she had 
compiled an “amazmg” record. 


Efforts to Pursue 

Hiilftan Airlmp. in 


Cent's naich 
in ISurai gold, 

water -fairs tmt. 

with esirj-Hai 
quart/ movement 
Instant lime zone change 


Letelier Case Fail 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court blocked on Tuesday 
an attempt to force the Chilean 
government and its national airline 
to pay more than 55 milli on in 
riamsgw for the 1976 assassina- 
tions of Orlando Letelier, the for- 
mer Chilean ambassador to the 
United States, and an assistant. 

The court, without comment, re- 
jected an appeal by the families of 
Mr. Letelier and his assistant. 
Room MoffitL 

Michael V. Townley, a US. citi- 
zen who worked for Chilean in telli- 

uTmurder in tte*deaths n crf”Mn 
Letelier and Mrs. MoffitL 

In 1978, the Letelier and Moffitt 
f amili es sued the Chilean govern- 
ment and won damages of more 
than 55 millin n_ The family mem- 
bers then attempted to collect the 
money from LAN-ChQe, the coun- 
try’s airline. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Experts See Risks if U.S. Quits SALT Pact 



Soine Fear Soviet Can Putt Ahead Quickly in Deploying New Nuclear Missiles 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Peat Service 

WASHINGTON — Mowing 
Ihe SALT-2 limits on nuclear 
weapons to expire would provoke 
new Soviet and US. weapons de- 
ployments that would shift the stra- 
tegic balance to the advantage Of 
the Soviet Union, according to a 
senes of studies made inside and 
outside the government 

The Soviet Union’s programs for 
budding new weapons would allow 
them to field more new missiles 
faster than the United States, these 
studies conclude. 

However, some Reagan adminis- 
tration officials who favor ending 
the SALT limits contend that the 
Soviet Union is already so far 
ahead that additional weapons it 
might may build would have no 
measurable impact on U.S. securi- 
ty. . J 

The administration is required 
by law to report to Congnss by 
Saturday on its plans for comply- 


ated since the late 1960s. to the 
detriment of U.S. national security. 
Critics of the treaty say letting it 
lapse would force the Soviet Union 
to bargain seriously on new fimita- 
tions. 

One study done by a Pentagon 
consultant showed that even if the 
United Stales responded by build- 
ing 200 MX ICBMsfno more than 
50 have been authorized by Con- 
gress). the Soviet advantage in 


mg with the limits in the SALT-2 
treaty, which would have elapsed a! 
the end of this year had it ever been 
legally ratified. Since 1981, both 
superpowers have said tbqr would 
continue respecting the main provi- 
sions. even without formal ratifica- 
tion. 

The administration must also de- 
cide in practice whether to stay 
within the SALT limits next fall, 

US. targets — principally Ameri- 
can missiles in their 


Recently, individual members, 
such as General John A_ Wi dth am 
have publidy said they favor con- 
tinuing the limits. 

General Bennie L Davis, head 
of the Strategic Air Command, has 
said the same thing to congressio- 
nal committees. 

Last year. Lieutenant General 
James A. Abrahamson, director of 
the Strategic Defense Initiative Of- 
fice, told Congress that negotiated 


try over the limits, 
service. 

Officials and experts on both 
of the issue acknowledge that 
the decision on how to deal with 
the SALT-2 limits will mark an 
important turning point in the his- 
tory of the strategic arms Competi- 
tion- 


Man 

SALT firm tssay that allowing them 
to lapse would begin the unraveling 
of the arms control system negoti- 


Gorbachev 
Expectedto 
Press Craxi 


Reuters 

MOSCOW —The Soviet leader, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, is expected 
to maintain the momentum of a 
Soviet drive against US. space de- 
fense plans when he meets Prime 
Minister Bettino Craxi of Italy in 
Moscow on Wednesday, Weston 
diplomats said. 

Mr. Craxi, accompanied by For- 
eign Minister GiulioAndreotti, left 
Rome on Tuesday for Moscow for 
what will be Mr. Gorbachev’s first 
official talks with a NATO leader 
since he took office in March. 

The Socialist prime minis ter ar- 
rives in the middle of an intense 
Kremlin campaign against the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, the 
U.S. research program for a missile 
defense system that Moscow said 
represents a grave threat to world 
peace. 



Bettino Craxi 


gan 


The Kremlin said that the Rea- 
adtmnistrath 


itration is breaking a 
to negotiate on the plan at 
the Geneva arms talks, the second 
round of which began on Thurs- 
day. 

. On Monday, Mr. Gorbachev 
used the occasion of long talks with 
the former West German chancel- 
lor, Willy Brandt, to deliver farther 
public criticism of tbe space weap- 
ons plan. 

Western diplomats said there are 
signs that Moscow is seeking to 
cultivate a closer relationship with 


Italy as pan of an effort to place 
more stress cm ties with Europe and 
promote potential divirions within 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation. 

Mr. Craxi's government has 
adopted a nonco mmi ttal stance to- 
ward the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive, while expressing support for 
France’s Eureka project to develop 
European High technology. 

Issues likely to add a sour note to 
Mr. Craxi's two-day visit include 
the trial of three Bulgarians in 
Rome who are charged with com- 
plicity in the 1981 assassination at- 
tempt against Pope John Paul II. 

Moscow has denounced the case 
as a U.S. -inspired plot to slander 
Bulgaria and the Soviet Union. 

■ Craxi Stops in Warsaw 

Mr. Craxi stopped in Poland on 
Tuesday for talks with General 
Wqjriech Jaruzdski. United Press 
International reported from War- 
saw. 


_ concrete alos 

— would grow at an even faster 
rate. 

The consultant also projected 
that today’s arsenals, estimated at 
about 18,000 strategic warheads on 
both sides, could increase to 30,000 
each by 1988. 

In addition, several counting and 
verification provisions of the 1979 
SALT-2 agreement would also be 
lost, creating additional problems 
for the United States in keeping 
track of Soviet nuclear forces, 
which increasingly will become 
mobile, according to experts. 

On the other hand, some key 
present and former Reagan admin- 
istration officials, including Assis- 
tant Secretary of Defense Richard 
N. Perle and a former director of 
the Anns Control and Disarma- 
ment Agency, Eugene V. Rostow, 
say that the SALT-2 limits have 
helped Moscow achieve strategic 
dominance, and that letting them 
lapse will create a real incentive for 
Moscow to negotiate meaningful, 
deep reductions. 

Mr. Rostow and Mr. Perle insist 
that Moscow is already so far 
ahead of the United States that an 
additional 1,000 or 2,000 warheads 
will not make a significant differ- 
ence. Mr. Perle has also said that 
even if the SALT-2 limits remain in 
force, the Soviet lead over the US. 
will continue to grow, as it has since 
tbe beginning of the Reagan ad- 
ministration. 

The Federation of American Sci- 
entists has called it "strategic luna- 
cy to let SALT-2 limits lapse if it 
could possibly be avoided.” add- 
ing, "it is especially foolish to do it 
while threatening to build a defense 
against Soviet strategic weapons.” 

Though a strong critic of SALT- 
2 before taking office. President 
Reagan has not yet indicated what 
he plans to do about its limits. 

One group that reportedly has 
not yet taken a position on the 
treaty limit extension is the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff. In 1979. the chiefs 
supported tbe SALT-2 treaty and 
its limiis on the ground that the 
provisions put a ceiling, although a 
high one, on the growth of Soviet 
nuclear forces and thus permitted 
future U.S. p lanning to take place 


needed if space-based defensive 
systems were to have a ch»rw. of 


Members of Congress, Pentagon 
analysts and some Reagan admin- 
istration officials, however, recog- 
nize that the chiefs are concerned 
with present Soviet capabilities to 
build up military forces rapidly if 
the treaty lapses. 

Production lines are already go- 
ing on two new mobile Soviet mis- 
siles. the single-warhead, truck- 
transported SSX-25, and the modi 


larger, possibly 10-warhead, rail- 
nied SSX-24. 


road-carried 

Deployment has already 
with the SSX-25s, and the 
SSX-24s are expected to become 
operational next year. The Soviet 
Union also has new versions of two 
of its other large ICBMs in the final 
stages of development. 

By the end of 1 986, when the Brat 
10 US. MX missiles are sch«tnl«i 
to become operational the Soviet 
forces could have 50 to 100 of thrir 
new mobile missiles already de- 
ployed and the other two missiles 
in testing. Meanwhile, both sides 
would be turning out new subma- 
rines wi ‘ 



Inmates Conduct 
'Death lottery’ 
In Brazil Protest 


Tnmflte-g protesting overcrowded conditions in a 
Brazil Several days after tbe photograph was t 

en by lottery 


from left at die top was chosen 


on in Belo Horizonte, 
l , tbe prisoner second 
and killed by other convicts. 


H'dsJiuqpoa Pas Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Pristw inmates in the 
central Brazilian state of Minas Genus, maprwoi 
aeainst what they caB inhuman living QMwmotg, 
Acting fdtow convicts by lottery and kflhpg 

^ Inmates in two state prisons in Bdo Horizomc. 
200 miles (325 kilometers) from Rio dc Janeiro, 
have killed five of their number in this way in the 

Iasi two months. , . , 

"This death pact isthe onlyway to denounce 
this ML- declared Wlerspn Maunlo Sero-4. 
who is serving seven years in the Ugornha Prison 

for assault. , 

Inmates there and in a detention center called 
the Prednct for Theft and Larceny have pledged to 
continue their “lottery of death" as tong as over- 
crowded conditions remain. . , . _ f#k 

At dawn on May 22, the toiicty claimed its fifth 
victim, as Roberto Carlos de Oliveira, [9, was 
strangled with a rag and pummded to death by wt 

^ Penitentiaries in the state arc full, and 18,000 
convicted felons are waiting to tagin prison terms, 
an aide io Governor Hcho Garcia said. As a result, 
new prisoners arc jammed into precinct jaus and 
holding centers, where they may spend months 
awaiting trial. ... , 

Condemned murderers mingle with the newly 
arrested, and up io 20 inmates occupy built 
for four. Hunger strikes and prisoner rebellions 
have occurred. 

Governor Garda has deplored the "lamentable" 
events in the two prisons arid has called for judicial 
reform and increased federal aid. A human rights 
group in Bdo Horizonte has called for the immedi- 
ate withdrawal of all prisoners. 

On Thursday. President Jose Sarney of Brazil 
and Justice Minister Fernando Lyra annomued 
more than $60 milhon in emerg e nc y funds to 
alleviate overcrowding of the country's prisons. 


U.S. Efforts to Promote Changes in Chile Called Ineffective 


to counteract such forces. 


By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Past Service 

SANTIAGO — Efforts by the 
Reagan administration to promote 
a gradual liberalization by Chile's 
military rulers are proving ineffec- 
tive and have increased concern 
among South America's new demo- 
cratic governments, diplomats and 
politicians here say. 

During the last two years, the 
Reagan administration has sought 
to pressure both the government of 
President Augusio Pinochet and its 
democratic opposition to negotiate 
a consensus move toward democra- 
cy, using a military-backed consti- 
tution as a starting point 

Progress under this formula, 
however, now appears even more 
remote than when mass protests 
against General Pinochet's rule be- 
gan in May 1983. They were fol- 
lowed initially by a loosening of the 
absolute military control, including 


permission for hundreds of opposi- 
tion politicians to return from ri- 
fle General Pinochet then reversed 
the trend, however, and. citing an 
outbreak of political violence nine 
months ago. imposed a state of 
siege. 

Since then, democratic opposi- 


tion political parties, largely muz- 
. have rejected U.S. proposals 


tied, 

for accepting' military guidelines as 
unrealistic and anti-democratic. 

US. officials have responded to 
the impasse by stepping up both 
public and private pressure on 
General Pinochet to lift the state of 
siege and respect his own commit- 
ments to change. At the same time, 
the United States has consistently 
disdained the opposition's alterna- 
tive plans for democracy . 

This position has led to increas- 
ing tension in US. relations with 
both Genera] Pinochet and the par- 
ties and helped to make Washing- 


ton's policy in Chile important to 
other Latin American governments 
concerned about the implications 
for survival of democracv general- 
ly. 

"There has been a change of U.S. 
tactics with Pinochet, but not a 
jo Bi- 
iecade 
military coup of 
1973. “The United States govern- 
ment continues to believe that the 
most reasonable solution lies in a 
transition with Pinochet until 1989. 
What they don’t understand is that 
this is simply not viable." 

In recent months. President Raul 



and more support for his democrat- 
ic opposition, according to local 
political sources. 

While US. officials argue that 
their proposals are motivated by 
pragmatism, many democratic 
leaders both in and out of Qrite 
argue that the Reagan administra- 
tion’s approach has been twisted by 
its interest in political gains. 

"The United States is afraid of 
an open democratic system in 
Chile, said Ricardo Lagos, a lead- 
er of the Socialist Party, “They 
think that their kind of fanxmla wifi 
result in the left being excluded 
from the system. Thau and not dc- 


Alfonsin of Argentine, President mocracy. is their most important 
Jaime Lusinchi of Venezuela and objective here.” 


the late president-elect of Brazil, 
Tancredo Neves, separately raised 
concerns about Chile in personal 
meetings with Mr. Reagan, officials 
here said. Each urged a tougher 
approach toward General Pinochet 


Pointing to increasing support 
for violence by sectors of die illegal. 


iQcnal, 

but large. Communist Party. US. 
officials frequently have e xp re s s ed 
concern that anti-govemment mo- 
bilization. even if nominally led by 


moderate groups, could hove the 
effect of larifiiating a return to 
power by the tefu 

Noo- Marxist leaders, however, 
argue that these US. concerns are 
greatiy exaggerated and ignore the 
traditional role of leftist parties- 

VS. officials maintain that the 
Reagan administration does not fa-*, 
vor a particular political formula in 
Onto. Rather, as a deputy assistant 
secretary of state, James Michel, 

recently told a congressional sub- 
committee, “the primary objective 
of the administration” is to “en- 
courage pro-transition forces in the 
government and pro-negotiation 
Forces in the opposition to reach a 
consensus on a democratic transi- 
tion timetable.” 

In practice, however, top U.S. 
officials have consistently urged 
Chilean apposition leaders to ac- 
cept the military's 1980 constitu- 
tion as a basis for any negotiations. 


> r 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Page 5 


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■* «a t . *< 
^ fey 
*'ITfc 


Southern Lebanese 
Oppose PLO Return 

Shiite Militianien Find Themselves 
In Unspoken Alliance With Israelis 


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t " " 

" at.l : 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Post Service 

ABBASSIYE, Lebanon The 
men and boys of the village, their 
faces grim and their voices low, 
moved slowly away from the ceme- 
tery along the hot, dusty main vil- 
lage road 

inside the cemetery, (he immedi- 
ate family remained huddled 
around the freshly dug gravesite, 
the final resting place of H assail 
SayL At the age of 24, Mr. Sayi was 
tilled in Beirut, fighting, his neigh- 
bors here saidMooday, for the con- 
trol of this and the other dues and 
villages of southern Lebanon that 
recently saw an end to almost three 
years of Israeli military occupation. 

Mr. Sayi was a fighter in the 
Shiite Moslem miHria Amal th at is 
fighting for control of the Palestin- 
ian refugee camps of Sabra and 
Chatila in Beirut. The Lebanese 
capital is far from this viBagfe sta*- 
ated just northeast of the port city 
of Tyre, but to his friends here Mr. 
Sayi died in a defense of his own 
home. 

“We thmlf fi ghting in Beirut is 
the same as fighting in southern 
Lebanon," .said Hussein Fawaz, a 
local Amal leader hoe. “We fight 
in Beirut to protect the South." . 

Amal went into the Beirut refu- 
gee camps to disarm the Palestine 
Liberation Organization guerrillas 
who have returaedthere. The- mili- 
tia, the strongest force-in southern 
Lebanon now that the Israeli army 
has almost completed its withdraw- 
al is determined that the Palestin- 
ians wfl] never again use southern 
Lebanon as a base to attack -Israel 

At best, the return of the PLO to 
its former strongholds would mean 
more suffering for the residents of 
southern Lebanon when the Israe- 
lis mounted their inevitable coun- 
terstrike. At worst, it could mean 
another Israeli invasion and per-: 

this 

area on ApriT 29. To the residents, 
it was the first rime that Israel had 
been forced to abandon Arab land 
that was taken by force. 

“We conquered (he Israelis;"' 
said Dr. Aly Jaber, a key Amal 
political figure in southern Leba- 
non. 

Buoyed by that experience, 
Amal which was in the forrfrant of 
the resistance to the Israeli occupa- 
tion, appeals to have taken firm 
control of this area and is riding a 
wave of public support in its effort 
to seal off southern Lebanon from 
the PLO guerrillas further north. 

One .resnlt of the militia's 
strength aad-lack-of- serious «nned 
rivals has been to spare this region 
much of the agony that other parts 
of Lebanon experienced as the Is- 
raelis withdrew; Each pullback by 
the Israeli Army opened up a vacu- 
um, into which rival Lebanese urili- 
tias rushed to fight for control 

In 1983. Christian and Dxuze mi- 
litias fought bitterly for control of 
the Chuf mountains. Earlier this 
year, the Israeli withdrawal from 
Skkm and the surrounding area 
was followed quickly by clashes be- 
tween the Christians and their 
Moslem and Palestinian rivals. 

But this has not happened in 
Tyre, or here or in any erf the other, 
villages of the area. Amal is unchal- 
lenged here for the moment, with 
the result that places that resem- 
bled ghost (owns in the last days of 


the Israeli occupation have sprung 
bade to life. . J . • 

“Life is basically normal, said 
Nasib Basina, a merchant in Tyre, 
With the Israelis finally gone, the 
jor threat io this sense of nbr- 
Jcy is noifr . seen as the PLO: 
“Amal is saying that the days or 
warm southern Lebanon are over.” 
said a long-time observer of the 
region’s politics and conflicts. “The 

Palestinians" can fight their wars 
somewhere else. Palestine is an 
Arab cause, and if .they all fight 
together, that is okay, but it should 
sot be-Jought illegally from south- 
ern Lebanon.” 

But for Yasser Arafat, the PLO 
chamnaxl there is no better place 
from which to continue the “armed 
struggle" against Israel 
“The only hope that Arafat has 
left te southern Lebanon,” an offi- 
cial in the area said. “Shouting 
from Beirut is Me shouting from 
Tunis.” 

This view the PLO as a threat 

has placed Amal in a curious if 



TEHRAN BOMBED — Residents of file northern district of Iran’s capital watch 
rescue workers searching for victims in bomb rubble, bran’s official news agency said 
that eight persons (bed and three buiUfings were destroyed in raids by Iraq on Sunday. 


China Ends Free University Tuition 


Rewtcn 

BEIJING — China has abol- 
ished free higher education and 
linked the amount erf scholarship 
money to students’ academic per- 
formance. 

In a broad educational ref cam 
announced Tuesday, the ruling 
Communist Party also gave Chi- 
nese universities' greater freedom 
from government control and 
promised graduates more voice in 
cboosingjobs. 

The move contrasts sharply with 
educational policies under Mao, 


when intellectuals were treated 
with deep suspicion and all aspects 
of university life were strictly su- 
pervised. 



of free 
Central 

Educational Reform" said that al- 
most all students in higher educa- 
tion henceforth would have to pay 
for tuition, living accommodation 
and other expenses. 

The decision is aimed at increas- 
ing incentives for academic excel- 
lence as China seeks to groom a 


generation of experts to cany out 
its ambitious economic moderniza- 
tion plans. 

The document also set a goal of 
providing nationwide junior sec- 
ondary school education within 10 
years. 

The only students who will be 
exempted from fees will be those 
studying to be teachers, those from 
very poor families and those who 
face particularly difficult job as- 
signment s after graduation, ac- 
cording to the document. 


sSSs^si U.S. Sends Diplomatic Aide to Sudan 

mg the Palestinian guerrillas as far i 

For Talks With New Military Regime 


from' its borders as possible. 

- This could, in the view of some, 
evolve into a' tacit understanding 
between the Shffte militia and Isra- 
el both woiimg against the Pales- 
tinians for tbeir own purposes. 

But if it does, Amal leaden made 
dear Monday, it will only be be- 
cause of a rare convergence of in- 


By Bernard Gwertzman 
Nr* York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — The United 
States has sent a high-level official 

_ . w to Sudan for (he first time since a . 

sr co,,I, -* '“ l km areas 

Israelis with fondness. Chester A Crocker, assistant 


The poGdes of the new Sudanese 
military leadership have raised 
questions in Washington. Sudan 
has restored diplomatic relations 
with Libya and has also stressed 
ties with the Soviet 


Mr. Jaber, the Amal political of- 
ficial odd that the Amal militia 
would continue hs resistance until 
thelsraebsand the 
ed South Lebanon Army also 
don their so-called “security zone” 
along the Isradi-Lebanese border. 

Burthen Amal will stop, accord- 
ing to Mr. Jaber. Despite fears in 
Israel that the kmg occupation of 
southern Lebanon had turned the 


secretary of slate for African af- 
fairs. arrived Tuesday in Khartoum 
for meeting s with senior Sudanese 
leaders under General Abdul Rah- 
man Swareddahab. 

A ranking department official 
said Mr. Crocker, who broke off a 
visit to Europe to make the un- 
scheduled visit to Sudan, wanted to 
discuss with the Sudanese “the 
enormous number of decisions thai 


majority Shiit e population of the they have to make" on economic 
region into committed enemies of and political matters. 


Israel who would carry tbeir attack 
across the border, the lessons of the 
recent paffl are too vivid to encour- 
age Amal to do anything that 
would lead to Israeli retaliation. 


General Swareddahab replaced 
President Gaafar Nimeiii, a strong 
pro-Western leader who was on his 
way back to Sudan from Ws 
ton when he was deposed April 


Major Offensive by Russians 
Is Reported in Afghanistan 


• The Associated Press 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
Thousands! Soviet troops backed 
by tanks and aircraft have 
launched one of the biggest offen- 
sives of the five-year war in Af- 
ghanistan to. try to seal the bender 
with Pakistan, Western diplomats 
said Tuesday. 

The diplomats said that a major 
Soviet military force supported by 
scores of jet fighters and helicopter 
gnnships was attacking in the 
Kimar Valley, near the border. 

The offensive apparently is in- 
tended to cut the flow of aims and 
supplies aaoss the border and pre- 
vent major attacks by Afghan guer- 
rillas this siminer. the sources said. 
They were speaking on condition 
that they not be identified. 

Western journalists are tanned 
from Afg ha ni stan, and it is impos- 


sible to independently verify re- 
ports of what is happening in the 
country. . . 

Guerrilla officials confirmed in 
an interview that major fighting 
was ragiag in the Kunar region and 
said that large Soviet armored col- 
umns were hying to punch their 
way through rebel defenses. 

Part of the Russians’ aim is to 
relieve a besieged garrison at the 
border town of Barikot, the guerril- 
las said. 

The diplomats reported that 
large Soviet and Afghan govern- 
ment milit ary formations had been 
moving out of Kabul since mid- 
May, headed for the border. 

The guerrillas are fighting to 
overthrow Afghanistan’s govern- 
ment, which is supported by the 
Soviet Union. There are an estimat- 
ed 115,000 Soviet troops in Af- 
ghanistan. 



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the Libyan leader, visited Sudan on 
May 18. 

American officials apparently 
hoped to keep the visit quiet, but 
they confirmed it after it was re- 
ported in Cairo. 

The United States has said little 
publicly about the situation in Su- 
dan since the first days after the 
coup, when it stated a desire for 
continued good relations with Su- 
dan, whose location is of strategic 
importance to the United States 
and Egypt 

A U.S. official said Mr. Crocker 
would reaffirm the Reagan admin- 
istration's interest in good relations 
with Sudan and would discuss Su- 
dan’s economic problems and large 
foreign debt. He will also be talking 
to the Sudanese about their politi- 
cal orientation, the official said. 


“The Sudan is a very big ac- 
count," the US. official said, “and 
we have to have a good idea where 
they are going." 

(After meeting with General 
Swa reddahab . Mr. Crocker said he 
had relayed a message from Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan underlining 
the need for maintaining close co- 
operation between the Uoited 
States and Sudan, The Associated 
Press reported from Khartoum. 

[Prime Minister el-Gazouly Da- 
faallah said that Sudan wants to 
maintain “friendly" relations with 
the Urn led States but was also will- 
ing to “stretch a hand of friendship 
to all other countries."] 

The new Sudanese leaders have 
also sought to improve relations 
with Ethiopia to end the civil con- 
flict in southern Sudan. Southern 
Sudanese, operating from Ethiopia, 
have been fighting for greater au- 
tonomy for the non-Moslem re- 
gion. The proposals of the new Su- 
danese leaders for ending the 
fighting have not been accepted by 
the southern movement 


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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL 


With Hm New York Tunes and The WatfaLghw Port 

Lebanon Is a Memory 


tribune 1 1040 


»9jUrer< «f IheTnaStoy- INTfcfttaL fWeKeaaRVktt 

Individual Income Tax fetum 


RAW®. 




Lebanon is less a country than a heanbreak. 

When last we read of Christian militiamen 
slaughtering Palestinians there in 1981 Israel’s 
occup jing anny was held responsible, even by 
tsraei is. N ow Shiite Moslem mfiiriampn are 
butchering Palestinians in the same camps, 
oabra and ChaiHa. and the world just shrugs, 
ine Christian -led government ha< all but 
evaporated. Lebanon’s Syrian protectors ac- 
ensea Fonnerally, Yasser Arafat, of provoking 
the slaughter to get back at rival Palestinians. 

Lebanon is being cut bv a hundred knives, 
rent by a thousand vendettas. Terror is ran- 
dom. Last week 50 people were killed and 175 
wounded by a car bomb in Christian East 
Beirut. No one is sure who did iu or why. 
By any plausible definition, Lebanon has 
ceased to be a nation. 

Until 1982, Mr. Arafat’s PLO provided a 
shadowy government, in tense competition 
with Syrian forces and Israeli-aided Lebanese. 
Israel smashed this order, but Moslems and 
Syrians combined to block the Christians it 
sponsored. French and American troops, too. 
were chased out by the terror. The Syrians 
remain, but they are plainly not in command. 

These ghastly divisions were inherent in 
Lebanon's origins. France shaped its borders 
after tbe the collapse of tbe Ottoman empire 
in 1920. Thrown together in the new state were 
Marouite Christians on Mount Lebanon, the 
Moslem and Druse communities of the coastal 
regions and the Moslems of the Bekaa, the 
eastern valley, who probably would have pre- 


A Good Year for NATO 


NATO may be one of the few measurable 
national security successes of the Reagan peri- 
od. Final results aren't in, but enough progress 
has been recorded for the man who counts 
most in NATO affairs these days. Senator Sam 
Nunn of Georgia, to let the alliance slip a key 
deadline that he and Senator William Roth of 
Delaware set for it last year. 

At that time they put in an amendment 
requiring NATO's European members to im- 
prove promptly the alliance's capacity to meet 
a conventional attack: otherwise America 
would stan reducing its troop levels. Hie 
amendment lost, barely, but NATO got tbe 
message. Its new secretary-general Lad Car- 
rington, helped convince members that what 
they first saw as a threatening and intrusive 
American diktat was actually a great policy 
opportunity. The alliance went on to make the 
requisite commitments regarding munitions 
stocks (“sustainability^} and reinforcement fa- 
cilities (“infrastructure”). As a result. Senator 
Nunn says it has earned another year to show 
it can deliver on those commitments. 

Look closely here. Senator Nunn and his 
policy comrades Bernard Rogers, NATO’s 
military commander, and David Abshire, the 
U. S. ambassador to NATO, are not talking 
just about hardware. Nor are they calking just 
about the famili ar grinding NATO argument 
oyer “burden sharing" — whether the allies are 
pulling their weight They are talking about the 


readiness of the alliance to perform its prime 
function of deterring a conventional Soviet 
attack without having to threaten implicitly to 
go nuclear at a relatively early stage. 

So last year's Nunn amendment is on bold 
There is, however, a new Nunn amendment, 
addressing an alarming disparity in bow much 
NATO and the Warsaw Pact are getting for 
what they spend. The Europeans have been 
meeting the goal of a 3 percent annual increase 
in defense outlays; the United States has ex- 
ceeded it in the last four years by $120 billion. 
Even before these increases, however, NATO 
was spending more than the Pact countries, 
and producing less. In 1984 it was outpro- 
duced by ratios of 2-to-l to 5-to-l in major 
systems: 3.650 to 1.760 in tanks, for instance. 
The conspicuous exception was, as you would 
expect of Atlantic allies, in big surface ships. 

The trouble, Mr. Nunn says, is that NATO 
countries was reful} y develop and build com- 
peting systems. His new amendment fences off 
5200 million for development projects con- 
ducted with allies, requires the Pentagon to 
consider arms cooperation possibilities at an 
early procurement stage, and makes the Penta- 
gon test competing U.S. and European sys- 
tems against each other. This is nuts and bolts 
stuff. Inciting in the drama of the earlier 
NATO initiative but promising immense re- 
wards for the common defense. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Opinion 


A Small Cyclone in Bangladesh 

It was a small cyclone, but it was a killer 
because die Third World is vulnerable. 

Cyclones are predictable, and with modest 
means you can limit the damage. Satellite 
photographs detect hurricanes several days in 
advance. Meteorologists witness their birth, 
foresee and (rack their movements. The au- 
thorities in the countries concerned have time 
to organize evacuation of the threatened re- 
gions. In the United States, disaster alerts are 
legally binding; the population has to obey. 

; Bangladesh authorities were most probably 
warned by American or Indian meteorologists. 
But how do you evacuate without a routing 
plan, without an authority capable of canaliz- 
ing the refugees, without roads, without boats'? 

Cyclones serve as safety valves for the at- 
mosphere's thermal balance. They benefit the 
environment. But the nameless forces that bal- 
ance the world suike sometimes in destitute 
lands, and there they kill by the thousands. 

— Liberation (Paris). 

Assad Exposes an Old Nonsense 

Whatever the scale of the pogrom taking 
place in Beirut, President Assad of Syria has 
had the power to stop it, or at least to show 
some willingness to do so. He has done neither. 
What is Mr. Assad trying to tell the Palestin- 
ians? The first message is ihaubere is no place 
for them as an armed presence in Lebanon. 


The second message seems to say: Palestinians 
cannot count on Syria to give them the slight- 
est practical assistance. They are on their own. 
They must reach what terms they can with 
Israel. Although that may prove very sensible 
advice, it is contrary to eveiything Mr. Assad 
has told them in the past 
It looks as though the gaping hole at the 
center of the rejectionist argument all these 
years has finally been exposed. In it there is no 
policy for Palestine, only tbe senseless lip ser- 
vice to a totally unrealistic ambition: the dis- 
memberment or destruction of Israel, h is lime 
the rqectionists’ bluff was called. It was not 
expected to be Mr. Assad who called iu 
Tbe logical outcome is for the weakened 
PLO formally to accept UN Resolutions 242 
and 338, which recognize the stale of Israel. 

— The Guardian (London). 

Fingerprinting Will Have to Go 

The recent arrest of a Korean resident for 
refusing to be fingerprinted under the Alien 
Regisira lion Law has revived die fingerprint- 
ing controversy at a time when the registration 
cards of some 370.000 people are due for 
renewal this summer. The Japanese public is 
growing sympathetic toward the complaints of 
Koreans and other foreign residents. The gov- 
ernment has already initiated a review of the 
law. Eventually the fingerprinting system 
needs to be replaced by some other method. 

— The Japan Times (T okyof 


FROM OUR MAY 29 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Prince Denies Yellow PeriT 
LONDON: Prince Tokugawa Iyesato, presi- 
dent of tbe Japanese House of Peers, has 
arrived in London. Speaking of his recent visit 
to the United Slates, the prince said that it 
would remain in bis memory forever. “I was 
charmed by the American people," he said. 
“There never has been any real serious trouble 
between the American nation and my own — 
and I don’t think there ever will tie. Japan 
warns peace, and wants it badly — although, 
of course, not at an unreasonable price. The 
talk of a ‘Yellow Foil’ is absurd," the prince 
continued. “The Japanese nation, although 
ever expanding, has no idea of sweeping the 
world This ambition — which people have 
credited Japan with possessing -— is no pan of 
the Japanese policy, and never will be." 


1935: A Luxury Liner Goes to Sea 
PARIS — Imagine a modem, efficient city of 
44 blocks in which have been compactly in- 
stalled with exquisite taste the most luxurious 
conveniences known to this age for the living 
and comfort, amusement and health of more 
than 2,000 persons. Imagine this super city 
gathered together and placed within a riveted 
steel shell and then driven through the water at 
38 miles an hour, and one will have some 
conception or the Normandie, greatest of ships 
to go down to the sea in maritime history. 
Within this great hull 1,029 feet long, 1 19 feet 
wide and 127 feet from keel to bridge, 2,170 
passengers may cross the 3,100 miles of the 
North Atlantic in awe-inspiring, sweeping and 
unprecendemed luxury, while a crew of 1.387 
will operate this wonderful floating city. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

PHILIP M. FOISIE Executive Editor RENE BONDY Depun Publisher 

WALTER WELLS Edner ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

SAMUEL ABT Dtpvtv Ethw RJ C HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

ROBERT K, McCABE Deputy Edlwr STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Duector of Openmua ■ 

CARL GEWIRTZ Assocside EOsor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dotctor of Ciradaavi 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sides 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-de-GaulIc, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine. 

France. TeL: (l J 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

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f erred to join the then new Syria. Under for- 
eign tutelage in the 1930s. a constitutional 
republic evolved with a tradition of power 
sharing. The president had to be a Maranite 
Christian, the prime minister a Sunni Moslem, 
tbe chairman of Parliament a Shiite Moslem, 
tbe defense minister a Druse. But demograph- 
ics gradually unsettled this arrangement. The 
Moslem populations grew, yet Christians tena- 
ciously dominated commerce and government. 
The rival factions formed their own. private 
armies and progressively challenged the center 
in BeiniL A full-scale civil war erupted in 
the 1970s, magnified by the influx of Pales- 
tinians expelled from Jordan. 

Syria intervened in 1976. with the Arab 
League’s blessing, but it could only play the 
factions against each other. Israel intervened 
in 1982. allegedly to disarm the Palestinians 
but actually to try to restore the Christian 
dominance. In the shadows there arose yet 
another army, the Islamic Jihad terrorists, in- 
spired and perhaps directed from Iran. 

Sectarian and family feuds engendered by 
all this violence have made even simple cease- 
fires impossible. A once thriving economy has 
been destroyed. Tbe wealthiest and ablest Leb- 
anese have long since fled. Tbe United Nations 
and a few other agencies dispense humanitar- 
ian aid and medical help, but no law now 
governs in that unhappy land. It has swal- 
lowed all foreign illusions, most recently the 
strategic interests that a series of American 
presidents proclaimed until just two years ago. 
Lebanon is more a memory’ than a society. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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Four Criteria for Judging Reform of Income Tax 


W ASHINGTON — Now that 
President Reagan has sounded 
the trumpets for a charge against the 
Internal Revenue code, the hard 
work of tax simplification and reform 
begins. How are we going to judge the 
merits and demerits of what all these 
different people and groups are pro- 
posing? It helps at the start of a 
prolonged process like this to jot 
down me criteria by which you want 
to judge the final product. When it's 
over, you can look back at the list and 
decide how well they have done. My 
checklist consists of four Ps. 

The first is productivity. This is a 
practical imperative. We live in an 
increasingly competitive internation- 
al economic environment. American 
workers are competing for jobs not 
just with each other but also with the 
workers of Japan, Western Europe 
and the Third World. American com- 
panies are competing with their com- 
panies for markets and for profits. 

This is a fact of life; maybe the 
most important reality we face. No 
theoretical or ideological or emotion- 
al argument for “socking it" to this 
group or that can be given greater 
weight than that practical reality. 
Many reformers want to make busi- 
ness In general or a particular indus- 
try. “pay up.” That’s fine, but not if 


By David S. Broder 


the cost is to make them noncompeti- 
tive in the world market 

This criterion should be of help in 
deciding which business tax prefer- 
races are defensible and which are 
not. There is a difference between 
service industries like restaurants, for 
example, and international business- 
es like steel or computers. Diners 
don't fly lo London to get a better tax 
break on a meal but they can do their 
resource buying or investing over- 
seas. The tax code has to reflect those 
realities, and emphasize incentives to 
investment over consumption. 

Tbe second criterion is progressi- 
vity. The income tax system is pro- 
gressive; it is based on ability to pay. 
The rates increase as the tax bracket 
rises. All the major proposals reduce 
the number of brackets, and that 
automatically reduces the progressi- 
vity of the system. You can offset that 
by closing down some of the deduc- 
tions or exemptions that benefit 
mainly upper-income taxpayers. It 
lakes a sharp pencil to calculate who 
the winners and losers will be. 

But' the criterion has to be that 
progressivity is maintained in the in- 
come tax system. That is particularly 
critical as' payroll taxes for Social 


Security continue to climb and as 
state and local taxes (generally less 
progressive than federal taxes) rise to 
meet the growing responsibilities of 
those levels of government. 

The third criterion is principle. 
When you tackle something as com- 
plex as tbe Internal Revenue code, 
there are constant temptations to cut 
deals to take care or this or that 
constituency. Any reform will obvi- 
ously require compromise, and there 
is nothing dishonorable about thaL 
But compromise becomes dangerous 
when those who are not party to the 
deals cann ot see any principle that is 
employed to guide the choice. Then 
cynicism undermines the product 

Since the whole purpose of reform 
is to restore confidence in the fairness 
of the system, visible principle has to 
be maintained. Do we give tax breaks 
to real estate? Then let's debate the 
principle of home ownership that lies 
behind these breaks, and see if we 
want to apply it to commercial build- 
ings and to resort properties. 

Are we going to repeal the deduct- 


ibility, and see if it is a principle we 


are prepared to abandon or compro- 
mise for the billions of revenues the 
federal government wQl gain. 

In every case, let's put the principle 
front and center, and measure the tax 
code changes by that principle. 

My final criterion would be pover- 
ty, and maybe it belongs at the top of 
the checklist. The poor and near-poor 
will have fewer lobbyists and advo- 
cates outside the doors of the Ways 
and Means and the Finance commit- 
tees than anyone else — and they 
have a large stake in the outcome. 

Just how large is demonstrated in 
a study last week from the Coalition 
on Block Grants and Human Needs 
called “Untax the Poor.” Using data 
from the House Ways and Means 
Committee, it showed that a family of 
four at the poverty level paid 10.5 
percent of its income in federal taxes 
this year — two and a half times as 
much as it did in 1978. 

Many families just beyond did 
poverty line are bang taxed back into 
poverty by the existing code. Thai is 
probably not so mething anyone in- 
tended to see happen in tire last big 
round of tax revision, but h shows the 
lade of attention the poor characteris- 
tically receive in this process. It will 
sham e us aD if it happens again. 

The Washington Past. 


From the Price of Bagels to the Meaning of Eternity 


N EW YORK — Nations, tike people, have 
public and private selves. To foreigner of 
my political persuasion, the United States offers 
a public image less than beguiling — a gigantic 
militarist state, led by an aged neo-monarch, 
guided frequently by advisers of dubious intel- 
lectual or even moral quality, directed offstage 
by coven interests of finance and ideology, pur- 
suing Foreign policies of terrifying unreliability. 

All the happier then to be able to declare my 
thanks for the American private self — for the 

Fashed the waitress for a 
Giant, rather than a Jumbo, 
and she said, IVhichisthat 
now, die big one or the small ?’ 

nature of this society and the run of its people, 
for the organic style of it. for its usually generous 
virtues and its generally ati-toohuman faults. 

Of coarse the Americans’ private persona has 


By Jan Morris 

seem to have just the same effect on newcomers 
now as they did upon me when I first disembark- 
ed at Pier 90 from the SS Mauretania. 

There is, for instance, the popular sense of 
earnestness. I love this old quality. I love the slow 
steady cadences of American talk, which make 
more mercurial conversationists, like us Wdsh, 
feel tike sheepdogs yapping around methodical 


plain greed, not least upon my own, yet I enjoyed 
every minute of II Tne stupendous vulgarity! - 
The preposterous grandeur! The meticulously 
calculated bat stiff persuasive courtesy! 


gin. even in la ng uage. Mr. and Mrs. J. Doe are 
very different from their predecessors in the 
1950s, just as the everyday quality of American 
life has mutated startlingly. It used to astonish 
me with its infallible efficiency: gow it more 
often amuses me by its old-fashioned charm. For 
the fust time in my life, it is sometimes possible 
these days for a visitor From Asia or Europe to be 


things that gave me most pleasure when I first 
came to America give me most pleasure still and 


feeling, still more common in America than in 
most countries, that grand issues of good and evil 
preoccupy so many minds, at office desk or 
restaurant table, ana that at any moment, with- 
out awkwardness, one may shift the chat from 
the price or bagels to Ibe Meaning of Eternity. 

Now as always, 1 relish tbe tirdesAigenuity of 
the people. American cars may be pass6 these 
days. American telephones are not what they 
were, but in everyday small devices, wrinkles and 
innovations, your American remains peerless. 

Every time I visit, some passing new fancy 
enthralls me, whether it be a new posture erf 
roller-skating, a new hat craze, a new bit of d-mg. 
yet another gastronomic fashion (Thai Noo- 
veile?), a nonsmokers' motel in Dallas, a gadget 
for starting the car while you are still in bed, or 
just another of those inexhaustible ideas of ad- 
vertisement and ingratiation that give life and 
fantasy to any commercial midway, anywhere in 
the country — always something aew, for better 
or for worse, for fortune or for bankruptcy. 

■And the fun of it all — still incomparable, 
whoever is president, still bubbling irrepressibly 
out or tbe national psyche! When I visited tbe 
casinos of Atlantic City, f knew foil well that 
almost eveiything around me was founded upon . 


I laughed with all the dd ddight when, asking 
a doorman if Tramp Plazahad any rooms left, I 
beard the request translated into “Hey, Joe, what 
<Tya know about the avaflabffity status?" My 
hrart sang when I asked die waitress for a Giant, 
rather than a Jumbo, Margnrita, and she said, 
“Which is that now, the big one or the small?” 

I stand gratefully amazed, as ever, at the con- 
tagious stamina of everyday America. I am more ■ 
than myself when 1 am here, because I catch 
some oi the irresistible energy of the place, which 
expresses itself not just in an infinite capacity lor 
staying ip late but also in a tireless readiness to 
take an interest in thing s, perform small kind- 
nesses, remember unnecessary allusions and -, 
master given names- It took stamina for Ameri- 
cans to become Americans in the first place; on 
those lonely seashore settlements long ago, and a 
sense of personal diligence and resolution re- 
mains the most admirable private quality of tile 
Americans today, whatever its ends or motives. 

Which is the truer self, the public or the 
private, it is beyond my conqpeieace to speculate. 
In any case, you may think it as much an irrele- 
vance as an impertinence for a ffibberty-gibbet - ! 
alien like me, never settling in America formare : 
than a few months, to express opinions on these j 
matters at aD. What need Americans care, out erf i 
the majesty of their s u p c ipowcrness, for the 
views of a wandering Wdsh essayist? 

You're probably nght, but thanks anyway. 

Jan Morris is author of “The Mailer of Wales: 
Epic Views of a Small Country,” and, mad recent- 
ly, of “ Last Letters from Has” She contributed 
this comment to The New Yak Times. ’ 


Defense: 
How Much * 
For What? 

By Tom Wicker 

N ew YORK — On Monday. 

Memorial Day tribute waspatJ 
to Americans who died in 
War and on the battlefields of Cuba.- f 
the Philippines. Europe. Siberia, the 
Pacific Korea. Vietnam. Lebanon 
and Grenada. This is a good time to 
think about the vitally important de- 
bate on the 1986 military; budget- The 
costly Reagan buildup will be slowed, 
but how and by how much? 

Thar buildup has focused primari- 
ly- (Hi new weapons and hardware, not 
all of it necessary or effective, rather 
than on the efficiency and readiness 
of the armed forces. These facts from 
the Center for Defense Information 
in Washington offer a vivid picture of 
what has been happening: 

• Congress hasapprored 95.7 per- - 
cent (if we adjust the figures for infla- r 
lion) of the Reagan administration’s • 
requests for the military in fiscal' 
years 1981 through 1985. 

• In the last six years, starting m 
the Carter administration, the nuli- ' 
i ary budget more than doubled; 
weapons procurement has nearly tri- 
plea from the S35 j bBlion that Con- 
gress approved in 1980. Spending for 
new weapons is the fastest growing 
part of the federal budget, outstrip- 
ping even (he growth in debt service. 

• The cost of preparing for nucle- 
ar war will the Soviet Union — even 
under Mr. Reagan’s sensible dictum /• 
that such a war cannot be won and r 
must never be fought — has grown 
from S29.8 billion in 1980 to the 
$77.5 billion be requested for 1986. 

By his estimates, tne costs erf U.S. 
nuclear war-fighting forces will reach 
$400 to $500 billion by 1990. 

• For eight major weapons sys- 
tems — the MX irii«i> e ana the Tri- 
dent n. the Pershing-2 and the Mid-' 
getman ballistic missiles, sea- and' 
ground-launched cruise missiles, the 
B-IB bomber and Mr. Reagan’s Stra- 
tegic Defense Intiative — costs have 
expanded from $12 biUkm in 1980 to 
a requested SS) biOion in 1986. 

• Navy shipbuilding costs are up 
from $8.6 h3lkm in 1980 to $11.6 * 
billion in 1985. with £25.1 billion / 
more projected for 1986 and 1987. ' 

To keep these figures in perspec- - 
tive, it is necessary to understand • 
what, tbe Center for Defense Inf or- * 
matron, calk the “funding wedge" 
pattern. That is, “costs are relatively - 
small in tbe beginningwhile weapons 
arein tbe early stage of development, 
but climb very rapidly once prodne- 
; tion begins." So when Congress ap- ' 

: proved a number of new weapons 
systems requested by Mr. Reagan in 
1981 and 1982, it kt. itself and the - 
taxpayers in for greatly increased . 
spending three to eight years later. 

Oncebegtm. moreover^ even as fis- ! 
cal and mtaoaational circumstances 
ttonge. the momentum of weapons w 
- 'devefopflient programs mates them * 
•hard to stop, or evesslow —witness 
the many- fives of t&e MX missile, 
even though it has no secure basing ' 
mode and no real misriofL ; . - : - 

Not only is Congress rdisctaat to ; 
cut off 8 new weapon and sacrifice 
the huge arms already spent on h, but - 
most such weapons develop powerful 
constituencies m tbe Pentagon and . 
among military contractors and de- j 
faue workers nummerous states and ■ \ 
congressional districts. , 

Partially for these reasons; the Pen- 4 
tagon,when proposing new weapons, \ 
often underestimates their long-term « 
costs. GDI figures show that on aver* .“ 
age during tne 1970s “weapons price * 
estimates grew 50 percent between • 

. Snrilaify, tire General^Accotteting J 
Office estimates that, if average Ins- • 
torical trends continue, the Penta- -j 
gpn’s 1984-1988 military spending ! 
..wifi be at least $173 bfflkm. higher 
tiu g i originally es tima ted. ’ * 

- These realities suggest that' what r 


A Triangular Frame for Peace in Southern Africa? 


O J 985, International Herald Tribune. All rigfus reserved 


L ISBON — The United Stales is 
/ pouring military and economic 
aid into Mozambique to underpin a 
Marxist government seriously threat- 
ened by rightist rebels who until re- 
cently were supported by South Afri- 
ca with tacit U.S. approval. Such are 
the ironies of politics in an area 
where, until the mid-1970s, conserva- 
tive Portuguese and South African 
governments wielded firm control. 

Portugal's unceremonious depar- 
ture in 1975 from its African colonies 
— Mozambique. Angola. Sao Tome. 
Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau — 
left them in the hands of Marxist- 
inspired liberation movements heavi- 
ly indebted, after decades of moral 
and military support, to the Soviet 
bloc. Today those countries, with the 
possible exception of Angola, are re- 
assessing allegiances, offering politi- 
cal nonaJignmeni and economic safe- 
guards in exchange for badly needed 
Western aid and investment". 

In a bid to encourage this change, 
the United States and Portugal are 
involved in a tripartite cooperation 
experiment coupling U.S. financial 
resources with Portuguese technical 
and cultural know-how for projects 
suggested by Portuguese-speaking 
African countries. The idea was re- 
cently subjected to close scrutiny at a 
triangular seminar in Lisbon. 

Emerging as a priority or. the Afri- 
can side was a strong plea for an rad 


By Ken PottSnger 


to the debilitating civil wars in Mo- 
zambique. Angola and Namibia as a 
prerequisite to the development of 
the area. Implicit in the plea was a 
demand for Washington to pressure 
Pretoria on Lhree points: Deliver an 
internationally acceptable solution in 
Namibia, respect your solemn under- 
takings toward Mozambique and end 
your attacks on Angola. 

The Africans, while not demand- 
ing white South African suicide, 
made clear their view that the West 
had not acted decisively enough to 
achieve peace in southern .Africa and 
that the United States had frequently 
sent confused signals to Pretoria and 
others in the area. In moderated lan- 
guage. they left no doubt that for 
them the "United States had been 
equivocal and contradictory in its 
policy toward Mozambique." 

Washington currently seeks to 
channel 560 million worth of aid, 
including some S3 million earmarked 
for nonlethal military assistance, to 
President Samora Machel's hard- 
pressed regime, but there is opposi- 
tion from a conservative lobby in 
Congress sympathetic to the Mozam- 
bican guerrilla movement. Reoamo. 

In reply, the U.S. deputy assistant 
secretary "of stale for .African affairs. 
Frank Wisner, said here that the 
United States and its allies want 


peace in Mozambique. He con- 
demned the anguish of continuing 
violence and aggression there, which 
he said served no one’s interests. 

Mr. Wisner’s words mesh with 
converging opinion in Pretoria and 
Lisbon about the importance of suc- 
cess for the Nkoraati peace and secu- 
rity accord signed 14 months ago 
between Maputo and Pretoria. Ine 
two neighbors agreed then to cease 
support for rebel movements based 
in their territories, but so far the re- 
sults have disappointed Maputo. 

Nevertheless the United States be- 
lieves the accord must be seen to be 
working so as to ease tbe complexities 
of solutions in Namibia and Angola. 

A notable feature of the Lisbon 
seminar was the fact that five years 
ago the radicalism and anti-Ameri- 
canism of most of the African partici- 
pants would have invalidated it. To- 
day, judging by many of tbe views 


TJ.S- investments, like Gulf OS's Ca- . 
binda installations, but refusing dip- 
lomatic recognition until the: Cuban 
troops go home. The United States 
also insists cm a political settlement 
of the govemmenfs 10-year-old guer- 
rilla war against the Western-backed 
UNITA rebels, a view vigorously re- 
stated by Mr. Wisner in Lisbon. • 
Whatever the rights or wrongs of 
America's policy toward Angola, its 
whole approach to the region is under 
dose domestic scrutiny. . with the 
Chester Crocker-Frank Wisher doc- 
trine of “constructive engagement" 
increasingly questioned. A historic 
moment may be nearing iu southern 
Africa. It remams to be seen whether 
trilateral politics can weak belter 
than bilateral bargaining. 

International Herald Tribune-. 


ey for is as important as how much it 
spends. The Ct)I notes that last year 
\ Congress cut Mr. Reagan’s military 
requests by £203 bflfion but took no 
big “funding wedges” permanently 
omof the budgeLit is easier to cut 
personnel costs and a ppropriations 
for routine itemslike spare parts and 
amtimnittofl dura it is to dumbatebig 
tickets — the useless MX program 
, ($10.4 billion already, spent) or the 
faulty Sergeant York Air Defease 
Gun ($2.4 billion already spent). 

The CDI estimates that $12.6 bil- 
1km could be saved in 1986 alone by 
canceling or slowing these and other 
questi onable p rocnremait programs. 
But it recommends mcrearing admin - 1 
istration proposals by $1 bflBdn to ■ 
el imi n ate a proposed civilian, person- 
nel pay cut, and by $600 nuflion to 
expandarmy ammunition stnrbt 


resohztum, setting only the Penta- ^ 
.Boa's overall spending fimit, is a vital "t 
first step. If restrictive ennng h~ t it ; . 
might even force the Armed Services « 
and Appropriations co mmitt ees, lat- * 

er this year, to make hard dedsioos to - 

cancel expensive; unnecessary wrap- •' 
cm and hardware mid focus instead ^ 
oamQxtaiy effectiveness. > 

The Nan York Times.- - - 


Editor mid must contain the writ- 
eris ripuuwe, name arid fiiff ad- 

/nwpp I a tMurnmm . m 


V* wrtc/ area 

are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 

unjenlir.it/vt 


expressed at the gathering the mine 
field of post-colonial complexes is 
well on its way to being cleared. 

But there was a vital missing link. 
Angola, beset by internal rifts, politi- 
cal equivocations and a giant grudge 
a gains t Portugal, stayed away from 
the conference. Its attitude was a crit- 
icism not only of Lisbon but also of. 
Washington, which persists in. a two- 
track policy — supportive of major 


^ ^JLTTEK TOTHEEDITOR ; 

As s a ss i n a ti ons Matter . • wtim on. his list The destabflizma 

Regarding "La, America's PrvA- rbteSSSS * *%■ 

dem Krns lnto a King" (May 20): torsion 

WHKam Pfnfr into* ™«caiastro- 


Wdham Pfaff seems to trivialize. phe, wfaidi paved theway fcrxnSS- 
assasanauqu. He grves an impressive tbehorrors of this century 
Ust of assasanahon be- tightly the past donremuici^S 

tween 1890 and 1914, asrf the world this evil, and then 

had gone on pmty much the same arianganeirts of^ ^pSdenf 

precipitated by the death of tbe la* ' 


I 1% 

* 


V ribr 

• 


ci^KujV' 




° r ^lig^For French, Hugo 
j " 'y Is f th<e Tops’ in ’85 


By Stanley Mrisler 

Los Angela TJma Service 


P I ARIS — For France, 1985 is 
officially “ih e year of Victor 
* s f Hugo.” The romantic novelist, 
poet, playwright and polemicist 
died 100 years ago, and the French 
are celebrating the anniversary 


iapmes, exmomons, lectures, a new 
1 etfitkm of his complete works and a 

.... " commemorative stamp. 

TljeAfimstiyof Qrnnre has even 
: 'V 1 ' commissioned a T-shirt that carries 

■ t.,''' the design of a youth. <m his knees 
looking upward and. crying out, 
' r ':. “Hugo, you’re the tops." 

Such excitement reflects the awe 
' and reverence of the French for 
V' : '- great authors, and the. orient to 
v --..iwMch Hugo, the most popular 
Trench writer of the 19th centrity, 

m»He hmwrif ihft wriol fwwriftnf» 

of his people. EBs tirades against 
iigustic^ Hbe cbose in iris famous 
novel “Les Msfeabtes,” st31 strike 
a chord. 

The designation of 1985 as the 
;X-: ; year of Victor Hugo by a Socialist, 
- 1 j 1 fi government strikes some French 
^ c conservatives as sdf-serwnf They 
^ t suspect that the Spdafists intend to- 

t^mselves 

^c. “Victor Hugo was & great man 
* »•-: - • who opposed the empire for many 
~ years,’* a conservative woman h 
■**i ber 70s said. “The left has prit him. 

mils pockeLfintif he came, back 
h today and saw what the feft audits 
government have done, he would 
■*' ' be completely upset” 


V v 


Leningrad Museum Loans 
Dutch Masters to Holland 


By Barbara Walton 

The Associated Press 

ROTTERDAM, the Nether- 
XV lands —Peter die Great and 
Catherine the Great had an eye for 
art, and stocked up' on Data and 
Flemish Old Masters. Many, of 
those paintings haven’t been seen 
outride the Soviet Union for more 
than two centuries — until now. 

After a decade of negotiations, 
the Soviet Union is giving the 
Netherlands a lode at a few works 
from the Hermitage’s extensive col- 
lection of Dutch and Flemish art 
On show at the Boymans-yan 
Beunxngen Museum, the 4! paint- 
ings on loan from the Leningrad 
museum indude works by the 17th- 
century masters Rembrandt, Ru- 
bens, Ruisdael and van-Dyek. 

J Highlights of the. exhibition in- 
clude Rembrandt’s "Flora,” a 
painting in which Rembrandt's 
wife, Saklria, is depicted as the Rem- 
and Rubens’s “Roman Charity,” 
based on a classical myth in which 


DOONESBURY 


a daughter suckles bar imprisoned 
‘ starving father. - ■ 

When Leningrad was Sl Peters- 
burg, the Hermitage was the Win- 
ter Palace of the czars. It has a 
major section devoted to Dutch 
and Flemish art — a passion of 
contemporary Soviet art lovers, ac- 
cording to one of the museum’s art 
historians, Pad Danker Duyvis. 

Duyvis visited tire Hermitage in 
preparation for the loan exmhiL 
£ When 1 saw the 24 Rembrandts 
together, the Russian curators saw 
me looking and smiling and asked, 
T30 you regret they are allhere, and 
not m Honand? ” he readied. 


ings at a very early period, and have 
a real interest in Dutch art,” he 
continued. “They didn’t steal the 
paintings tike Napoleon did or the 
English with the statues in tire Par- 
thenon.” r : 

. “Masterpieces From die Hermit- 
age, Leningrad” was arranged as 
part of a cultural exchange pro- 
gram between Leningrad and Rot- 
terdam. It ends July 14. 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


ARTS / LEISURE 


Even cat tire Mt, there is some 
Tmft»aiii«K with the celebrations. 
“A hundred yens filter has death, 

what are weeddnating?” the critic 
Jam-Pi erre Ttrihandat asked in tire 
letonewqrqrerlibfiratioaL “Nd- 
iher a man nor bis work, but an 
icon. We azeedebratinga mytholo- 
gy-" . ■ 

■ Thibaudat insisted that the 
French know Hugo less these days 

. by reading hs.worics than by seeing 
them adapted far the stage or the 
movies or songs. “We read Gustave 
Flaubert,” he sad, “but we adapt 
Hugo.” 

It is hard, however, far the 
■French to find, any fanlt with cele- 
brating Vidor’ Hugo. From their 
earliest school days, French chil- 
dren learn to recognize the portrait 
of the thidt-beardai, whiteTmired, 
Ol ymp ian writer, a hand slipped 

beneath his vest m a Napoleonic 
; Gesture, a fi nfl ff thouehtfuIlY tap- 
pioghis headTne is the grandfather 
ofFrance, the conscience of 
France,' the literary genius of 
France, m a single image. 

On May 22, tfaeday that marked 
the' 100& ananrasary of Hugo’s 
death, several' ibotisi^ admirers 
p aid homagp to him at & ceremony 
jxi the auditorium of the University 
of the Sarixamein Paris. Actors 
read poems and essays and pieces 

■ of plays in which be ralafl wgarrret 

punuhmoit, tire evils of tire 
pnsan system, tire treatment of for- 
mer grhmnaig, the su p pre ss ion of 
women. "There is a slave in our 


Victor. Hugo: Better dead (ban read. 


society — woman,” Hugo was 
quoted as saying. 

The orchestra of the Garde Rfc- 
publicaine, the mili tary unit that 
protects the president of France, 
played various classical selections, 
including the “Hymn to Victor 
Hugo” by CanriDe Saint-Safins. 

An official of tire Victor Hugo 
Commemoration Committee then 
introduced the mam speaker, Rob- 
ert Badinter. tire civil rights lawyer 
appointed minis ter of justice by 
President Francois Mitterrand af- 
ter the electoral victory of the So- 
cialist Party in 1981. 

The choree of speaker was sym- 
bolic. Badinter personifies the So- 
cialist go ver nm ent, which abol- 
ished capital punishment «md thus 
ended the use of the gtriHotine. To 
many conservatives, Badinter is tire 
image of a fuzzy-thinking, soft- 
hearted, liberal Socialist attitude 
toward social problems. 

But, for many others, and Social- 
ists in particular, Badinter has a 
different image — that of a coura- 
geous battler against injustice in 
me tradition of Victor Hugo. 

“Victor Hugo fought all his life 
for the abolition of capital punish- 
ment,” the woman who introduced 
Badinter said. “Our next speaker is 
the man who introduced tire legis- 
lation dial finally brought it to an 
end.” 

The audience of Hugo admirers 
rose and applauded. 

Badinter described Hugo as “the 
battler against the violent injustice 
of our justice." 

“He, more than any other public 
figure of his century, was the hero 
of a justice that would be more 
humane, more fraternal than that 
of Ms time,” he said. 

Badinter, who had announced 
only horns earlier that he would 
soon introduce legislation to re- 
form French prisons, told tire audi- 
ence that although capital punish- 
ment has now- bren abolished in 
France, many of Hugo’s battles 
were still not won. 


“The 
he said. 


i are not chans 
are stiUmiseral 


Hugo, who fived 83 years, wrote 
nine novels, 10 plays, 20 volumes of 
poetry and scares of books, pam- 
phlets and articles on political, Gt- 
eraiy and sociological subjects. He 
is best known outride France for 
."Les Misirables” and “The 
Hunchback of Notre Dame,” two 
of tire most popular novels ever 
written. In France he is probably 
most highly regarded for his poet- 
ry- 

literary fame made Hugo into a 
public figure, and he fought 
throughout Ms life against injustice 
and dictatorship. His bitter opposi- 
tion to Napoleon IH farced Mm 
into exQe m 1851, and he Jived 
outride France, meetly on the- is- 
land of Guernsey in the English 
Channel, for almost 20 years, re- 






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turning to Paris in 1870 after the 
emperor's overthrow. 

“Gtizens,” Hugo shouted to a 
crowd warring at the Gare du Nord 
station in Paris, “I said that 1 would 
return the day that tire republic 
returned. Here I am.” 

He wait on to enjoy the status of 
symbolic boo and elder statesman 
of the Third Republic, and when he 
Med, on May 22, 1885, Ms funeral 
an Outpouring of affec- 
tion and reverence for him and for 
the republic he symbolized- It was a 
moment erf gloiy for French rcpub-, 
liraing 

Hugo’s body lay in state under 
the Arc de Triarriphe. and about 
two miffim people then followed 
the cortkge more than seven hours 
across town. 

“We did not go to a funeral," the 
playwright Enme Augier said later. 
“It.was a coronation.” 

PntTvJire and monarchists were 
furious that the republican govern- 
ment had decided to bury the writ- 
er in tire Pantheon, for Hugo had 
refused tire last rites. 

The Pantheon had originally 
been a church, but in 1791, during 
tire French Revolution, the Con- 
stituent Assembly declared it 
would be used as a tomb for 
France’s heroes. Napoleon ID, 
however; had reconsecrated it, and 
in order to bury Hugo within its 
walls, the government felt con- 
strained to take its crucifix down. 

The Catholic and monarchist 
press were outraged, denouncing 
the funeral as “a shameful baccha- 
nal," “a danse macabre” and “a 
holiday of madmen." 




'Henry V 9 With Less Fanfare, More Doubts 


By Sheridan Morley 

Inlemaiional Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — At the Barbican, 
' this is proving to be a remark- 
able season for at last exorcising 
the ghosts of Lawrence Oliviers 
greatest hits: after Antony Sher’s 
“Richard HI" comes Kenneth 
Branagh's “Henry V," again a radi- 
cal rethinking of a play that for 


Gams revival. ‘TTie Glass Meoager* poetic fate, fighting all that South- young people. But “Susan's 
ie" was the play that first era Comfort rather than drowning Breasts" is no latter-day “Design 
established W illiams on Broadway in it. Toria Fuller as the blanched for Living." and indeed no progress 
40 years ago, but it has seldom been daughter and Michael J. Shannon on "Progress": just a rough assem- 
given major revivals over here and as the gentleman caller complete a bty of faintly intriguing characters 
comes up now as a fascinating ex- cast that deserves to slay together in search of a plot, 

plana lion of where he came from and prey together in a four-hander q 

both as a writer and as a man. His of raentiess emotional power for a London theatergoers might like 
mother was always keen to deny West End run after the present \ 0 note that for the first lime since 
that she was the aging, over-blown Greenwich season ends tn June. 1939 the Lyceum has ban restored 
Southern bdle wire has crippled □ to drama from dance: Bill Brvden's 

her son emotionally as surely as her if you can imagine John Fowles’s three “Mystery Plays" have moved 
daughter has been crippled phya- Collector" rewritten by Doug til ere from their original home on 
cally. but in giving the narrator his Luc i e on a thin day you will have die other end of Waterloo Bridge at 

initials and many of his own escap- sonx w ha t 10 ^rect at the the National and can be seen on all 

ist aspirations, there’s not too much Roya j coon Upstairs: Jonathan die Saturdays of this summer as 
doubt that the author wanted us q^q'j “Susan’s Breasts” is a curi- 006 davlong treat from 11 A.M. to 
planted deep in old Tennessee. ous little fable of media folk in l0P - NL 
Yet what Strachan has brilliantly trouble that seems in some need of The only difficulty with these 
recognized is that this is not just a a last act and a stronger central marathons is that of course they 
fey slice of deep- Southern autobi- narrative. conjure up memories of such others 

ography. It is also a resolutely True we have Susan herself, de- " Jhe Greeks.’ “Nicholas Nick- 

black comedy about a dragon nied breasts or babies as a result of e ‘hy and Ware of the Roses all 
mother draining the blood of her going on the mil at 14. suddenly at the Aldwych over the last J5 


nearly half a century has been 
trapped within the memory of the 
stage and screen presence of our 
greatest living actor. Sher used the 
•cacodemon’s crutches to propel 
himself out of Olivier's shadow as 
Richard; as Heauy, Branagh simply 
uses the changing patriotic percep- 
tions of modern British history. 

The Olivier “Henry V” on film, 
came in 1944, when Britain needed 
all the jingoism it could get: the 
Branagh “Henry V” comes at a 
post-Falkland time when Britain 
has the luxury of no immediately 
discernible threat of invasion. 

Adrian Noble’s rain-soaked pro- 
duction (water actually pours down 
an it from the grid in the height of 
battle) therefore takes an altogeth- 
er soggier view of the call 10 arms. 
What wil] it actually mean for men 
in the field? Is the prize in fact 
worth fighting for, ana if so up to 
what exact cost? 

Until that final and literally mi- 
raculous discovery on the battle- 
field that God has indeed been 
fighting on Ms side and saved virtu- 
ally all his lives, Branagh’s Henry 
in some doubt about the wisdom of 
going race more into that bloody 
breach, and his doubts are what 
inform much of the rest of an intd- 
Hgentiy low-keyed reconsideration 
of a play that is in fact a great deal 
darker than Olivier’s Technicolor 
allowed. 

With lan McDiarmid's unusual- 
ly mocking, cynical, intelligent 
chorus to set the tone, we follow 
Henry’s education in violent death 
from Scroop to BardMph, so that 
by the time he coaxes his "poor 
starved band" into battle against 
the gold-dad French he seems to 
have aged even faster than Falstaff. 
This is not a “Henry V" of easy 
patriotism, but it is as careful and 
finely balanced a Shakespearean 
production as I have ever seen. 

□ 

At Greenwich, following on 
from his Sheila Gish “Streetcar,” 
Alan Strachan has another im- 
mensely powerful Tennessee WD- 


THE LONDON STAGE !r *?" C T l T al l y “ SU Sf V If you can imagine John Fowles’s 


isi aspirations, mere 5 nor 100 muen Roya j Qxin Upstairs: Jonathan aaruroays 01 uus summer as 

doubt that the author wanted us “Susan's Breasts” is a curi- me davlong treat from 11 A.M. to 

planted deep in old Tennessee. ous tittle fable of media folk in l0P - NL 

Yet what Strachan has brilliantly trouble that seems in some need of The only difficulty - with these 

recognized is that this is not just a a last act and a stronger central marathons is that of course they 
fey slice of deep- Southern autobi- narrative. conjure up memories of such others 

ography. It is also a resolutely True we have Susan herself, de- “ "P 36 Greeks.' “Nicholas Nick- 
black comedy about a dragon nied breasts or babies as a result of e ‘ty “d Ware of the Roses” all 
mother draining the blood of her going on the pill at 14, suddenly at “* e Aldwych over the last IS 
offspring, and Constance Cum- achieving pregnancy after a brief years or so. And bv those exacting 
nrings gives one of the most haunt- affair with an apocalyptic musi- standards, this is a little thin: Tony 
ing performances of her career as dan, and around them a group of Hamson's version of the street the- 
the dread Amanda. fringe characters from that up- aIer *Mu started out in 1453 Covcn- 

Gerard Murphy’s Tom is also the wardly mobile world of urban writ- “Y does not have any of ihe subtle 
best I’ve seen: still with tricks in his ers and moviemakers and restau- that he brought to 

pocket and things up his sleeve, but rani proprietors who have taken "Phaedra Bn ianmca. ' and de- 
resilient rather than resigned to his the place of Noel Coward's bright pnved of much depth of character 

: or plot, the cast are often reduced 

to those helpless grins you see on 

-■-) • -m t 1 -M-* • the faces of Moms dancers, grins 

Pentecost Site Needs Repan* rsaSta’SjSS 

the traditionalism involved in (he 

Umied Prat international hostility among Christians, Jews proceedings. 

J ERUSALEM — The Upper and Moslems over the centuries. Yet these “Mysteries" are an 
Room, believed to be the site “The Cenacle, the Upper Room event, and one that should tie 


standards, this is a little thin: Tony 
Harrison's version of the street the- 
ater that started out in 1453 Coven- 
try does not have any of iJk subtle 
commentary that he brought to 
“Phaedra Britannica." and de- 


Pentecost Site Needs Repair 


United Press Itaemtatohal 


J ERUSALEM — The Upper and Moslems over the centuries. 
Room, believed to be the site “The Cenacle, the Uddct Roc 


mJ Koran, believed to be the sue “The Cenacle, the Upper Room event, and one that should tie 
where the Bible says Jesus ate Ms where Jesus instituted the eucha- shown 10 thousands of schoolchil- 
last meal and the Holy Spirit came rise, where the Holy Spirit descend- dren: they offer a potted history of 
seven weeks later, is deteriorating ed on the Apostles and where lha the Bible from the creation through 
badly. Roman Catholics want Isra- Church was boro, today is the to the damnation by way of Adam, 
d to repair it. worst treated evangelical place in Eve, Noah, Lucifer. Herod and son 

Christian pilgrims who climb the the Holy Land,” lamented La Terra and all the regulars in the first great 


winding, outside staircase to the Santa, a Franciscan magazine. 

Upper Room see two broken 

stained-glass windows. A third 
window was plastered over and 
converted into a Moslem prayer 

niche dnring the 400 years of Turk- 

ish rule. 

Tbe Upper Room, or Caucl^ is |c H A N N E L 
on the second floor of a Crusader ■ 

bwldmg on Mount Zionjust above | program. Wednesday aatn may 
D avurs Tomb. Jesus is believed to ■ 
have eaten the Last Supper in the I 1335 movin' on 
room on the eve of Ms crucifixion, I hoo wayne & Shuster 
and seven weeks later, as recorded I \ 

in the Book of Acts, the Holy Spirit I i 63 o sky trax a 
descended on the disciples, giving I 17-30 MR ED 
them the gift of tongues. I 

A locked door in an inside stair- I SKY FORam^iNFORMA 
way and a crude cement wall on the I audience data cot 
first fiooar block passage between ■ swan house. 17-19 stra 

the Upper Room and David’s I TEL: London (01 

Tomb. It seems symptomatic of the 


theatrical soap-opera of all time. 


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Pane 6 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 29,1985 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


- Pasteur Institute, Again in 


INSIGHTS 

the Forefront of Medicine, Battles AID 


' >*• 


^ ****** 


B j Amiei Komel 

International Herald Tribute 


40 American victims have arrived at his office 
unann ounced. Although sensitive to their fears, 

T HE scientists at the Pasteur Institute the young French doctor persuades most of 
de rid ed a few weeks ago to control the them to return home for treatment 
numherof American 'dctiim to* ^ French scientists say that, for both hu- 
will accept, according to a source who requested man ; tflri!in anft scientific reasons, they prefer to 
anonymity. dissuade foreigners from coming. Transferring 

to France for treatment is rarely justifiable, they u w , a ^ acui uosclJi ^ ^ . . r- 

adding that the spetSfic dings us£d are less has permitted him and h* Ammon aflou 
medical journal The Lancet They described When faced with a grave disease evolving jit importantjhan the means for evaluating them to be more productive than they might m 


pr eliminar y success in inhibiti 

to AIDS virus in four patient. „ „ r F - # - — „ 

called HPA 23. significant part of patients’ treatment, the 

Since the appearance of that article. Dr. Ro- French specialists stress. In France, they cau- 
senbaum has received about 100 letters and 300 tion, American patients would be cut off from 
to 400 telephone calls from Americans. About friends, family and a familiar culture. The con- 


U.S. Anti-Leftist Aid: 


A Lack of Consistency 


T1 TT ASHINGTON — In October 1982. 

W/ rebels fighting the Soviet-backed re- 
"f gime in Ethiopia asked the Central In- 
telligence Agency to support their struggle. The 
answer was no. 

That reply was unexpected. Major Yosef Ya- 
-zew, one of the dissident leaders, said in an 
.interview that he had been encouraged by the 
U.S. Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, to go to 


P ARIS — In Louis Pasteur’s apartment at 
25 Rue du Docteur Roux, women care- 
fully tend to the scientist’s personal be- 
ings, misting the quartz-filled vials in the 
ly and regularly rep lacing mothballs in the 
in the closes. 

^o^.y-nine years after Pasteur’s death, they 
continue to preserve the personal effects of the 
man, and, in the surrounding buildings of the 
Pasteur Institute, nearly 500 researchers cany 
on the scientific tradition that Pasteur initiated. 

Prime Minister Laurent Fabius is to inaugu- 
rate a national celebration Monday at the insti- 
tute to commemorate Pasteur’s successful in- 
oculation, in July 1885, of the first human 
recipient of anti-rabies vaccine. This was the 
breakthrough that led to the creation of the 
medical research center. . 

In Pasteur’s basement crypt, mosaics tdl the 
story of his discoveries. Scenes of the brewing of 

beer, pasteu rising of milk and inoculation 

against rabies, as well as pictures depicting his 
other achievements, adorn the walls of a sm al l , 
ornate chapel that was commissioned in a neo- 
Byzantine style by Pasteur’s ascetic devotee, 

Finit e RjOUX. 

Devoted to the memory of (he institutes 
founder, its directors and chief scientists pay 
their respects at Pasteur’s tomb each year on the 
anniversary of his d e at h . 

In addition to his discoveries, Pasteur en- 
dowed the institute with a formula for excel- 
lence a century ago that continues to serve it 
today. The latest evidence is the growing num- 
ber of AIDS victims coming to the Pasteur 
Institute from the United States in the hope of 
treatment and a cure. 

But the French medical researchers, con- 
cerned by the rising demand, are becoming 
reluctant to accept foreign cases. AIDS, or ac- 
quired immune deficiency syndrome, is an of- 
ten- fatal viral disease for which there is no cure 

yet. 

“It's crazy,” said Dr. Wily Rosenbaum, a 
researcher at the University of Paris VI who is 
responsible for the Pasteur Institute's AIDS- 
related clinical tests. “They imagine that they 
will come here for two weeks, take somet h i n g, 
and leave.” People are investing their hopes, he 
warned, in “a mythical treatment that is com- 
pletely hypothetical” 



such as friends or family nearby, and that they 
remain in France for six months subsequently. 
“I don't accept patients for a short period,” he 
said. 

These criteria, in addition to a six-week wait- 
ing fist, apparently have been enough to dis- 
courage most applicants. At present. Dr. Rosen- 
baum has only three American patients. Hie 
Pasteur Hospital has several dozen Ame ri c ans 
with AIDS mid a French military hospital near 
Clamart is treating about !0 Anmricans. 

Health officials acknowledge that they are 
concerned about the consequences a major in- 
flux of Americans ermld have on the ami ted 
medical resources available for AIDS-related 
care in France. Some French patients are al- 
ready showing an “aggressive reaction” to the 
presence of Americans in French hospital beds 
reserved for AIDS victims, said Dr. Rosen- 
banm- 

“So, ethically, what Is the rotation?” he asked. 
“If s the limited capacity of resources that will 

rhinos * 

“If s hard; iis hard for tom,” he added. “But 
what can we do?” 

In addition to the HPA 23 results, the Pasteur 
Institute has achieved other significant success- 
es in AIDS research. Scientists there were the 
first to de tec t one of the viral causes of the 
riisftaa* Further, in conjunction with a French 
pharmaceutical company, Sanofi, they an- 
nounced in April the development of a kir for 
rtiagnftdng the presence of AIDS virus in bot- 
tled blood destined fen transfusions. 

A hundred years after its creation, the insti- 
tute continues to make major scientific contri- 
butions. Many scientists say that the AIDS- 
related successes exemplify the nature of 
Pasteur’s legacy. 


R ESEARCHERS interviewed recently 
riled independence, continuity, an inter- 



■M w ~* 


.. \«*« 




3 


Tiwk Pasteur, the French medical pioneer 


Dr. Francois Jacob, president of the Pasteur Institute 


sequent sense of isolation would severely dimin- 
ish their quality of life. 

In the case of patients with AIDS, said Dr. 
Rosenbaum, “It’s not so much death that is 
difficult but rather the management of life.” He 
added: “An American who comes here stops 
living." 

The unpredictability of the disease makes it 
critical to follow a patient closely, he said. 


ine Lancet, iney aesenoeu wqcu iai.cu wiui a oumug ai . , " — — . 

ss in inhibiting replication of an unpredictable rate, the assurance of a sup- rapidly. “The quality of treatment today is not 
four patients By using a drug portive psychological environment should be a the drug, it’s the follow-up. Dr. Rosenbaum 
cianrfirunt nart nf natients’ treatment, the said. 


national research structure and a multi- 

disciplinar y approach as critical to the insti- 
tute's success. . 

“I don’t think that we found the AIDS virus 
here by accident,” said Patrice Courvalin, a 
French bacteriologist at the institute. “We have 
a whole past, a whole culture of traditional 
techniques that is crucial for the elucidation of a 

new illness.” This “capital of culture,” he said, is 

part of Pasteur’s legacy. 

^ ansi srasMtt “kmmes *. m ss;'s i E3,ee&-. - - — ■ 

SjtfSMnS^-'SrtS ^ iiceitanlyt lM derire the PwlaiflMti-j 

SttfSSXajftJSS 

Mr. Mariuzza added that the institute’s anno- contribution to the budget has crept up to 50 
sphere of mteDccraal rigor and independence percent 

- — « — — in a 1973 radio interview. Dr. Jacques 

Monod, then president of the institute, saw 


Although he does not refuse foreign patients, 
isr. Rosenbaum insists ihat they must have 
good psychological conditions for their stay. 


United States. 

Pasteur, adamant that research should be free 
from 
assure 


problems in the financin; 
Monod, who won the Y 


ig arrangements. Dr. 
965 Nobel Prize for 


need to keep basic research “ sheltered from 
social pressures, particularly those coming from 
industrialists.'* 

Most scientific research in France opa- 
formed in government-financed laboratories. 
The only interesting part erf research a the 


rteur, aoamani mat rescarcn snouio oc ira: mouuu. mm jus ***•? «« «*•* fftJwtt**’ Dr Jacob said, 

social and political pressures, sought to Medicine along with Francois Jacob and Aadrt P»n that we cant rorraec. ur. jooto raw. 
SScSTof its Lwreff. wawd that if thestflic’s participation "Ttatu whilwctmistllkw to flourish -ffld 

TT- .-J r I— mlu mu nhnw UrtWlI “oif will liw HQ On email- tmu S W! 


s. assure the independence ot his institute irom us lwoii. warm uui u u*c sum. a -™’ "v:ri: ZZ nnliti. 

Dr **ROTrabaum~inrisis thi they “must haw inception. Heereared it with funds coming only mata25pcM^£loKM<£M tod s what is » cfafficuU to explain ip 
3 * ■ — y. fro^ private donations. He set up a vaccine- ty and independence that Pasteur himself had cans. ■ 


By David B. Ottaway 
and Joanne Omang 

Washington Port Service 


In Ethiopia, half a dozen Marxist and non- 


Marxist opposition groups have been fighting 
jtopplel 


Washington to ask for the help. 
But the CIA “told us the U.S. i 


government has 
no policy and doesn't want to be involved in a 
program assisting military operations inside 
Ethiopia,” he said “They just wanted informa- 
tion-collection and propaganda activities.” 

Rhetorically, the Reagan administration's 
support for “freedom fighters” battling Com- 
munist and Communist-backed regimes around 
the world has been steadfast 
“Our party has been unstinting in its support 
of democratic development in the struggle 
a gains t to talitarianism, " Mr. Reagan said in a 
May 17 speech to the National Republican 
Heritage Groups Council. This period is “a 
critical turning point in the struggle between 
totalitarianism and freedom," he said. 

But administration behavior toward anti- 
communist insurgencies has generally been a 
mishmash of ad hoc decisions, or nondecisions. 


about who gets aid, with no apparent consisten- 
cy or strategy. 

Of course, some aspects of the administra- 
tion's covert assistance to various insurgencies 
are probably not publicly known. 


Of right an ri -Co mmunis t insurgencies active 
in the Third 


World, the United States is provid- 
ing military aid to two. in Nicaragua and Af- 
ghanistan. 

In Mozambique the Reagan administration 
has decided to support the Marxist government, 
amfwing Congress by proposing “nonlethal" 
military aid to help defeat a non-Marxist armed 
insurrection. This category of aid precludes the 
supplying of weapons and amm u n ition. 


O THER anti-Communist resistance 
groups, in Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, 
Angola and Ethiopia, get no overt mili- 
tary aid, although food aid is going, directly or 
indirectly, to those in Cambodia and Etoopia. 

Now, however, there is a dnve within the 
administration and Congress to establish a pol- 
icy and a strategy for helping armed anti-Com- 
numist insurgencies, to show, as a top official 
put it, that “socialism is not ureversible and 
“the Brezhnev doctrine is dead." 

That “doctrine.” never labeled « such by 
Moscow, was named by U.S. officials for Leo- 
rtjd I Brezhnev, who declared in 1968 after his 
troops invaded Czechoslovakia tot the Soviet 
Union and other members of the socialist com- 
monwealth” could send “military aid to a frater- 
nal country to thwart the threat to the socialist 

0I Many in the West interpreted tins asjneaning 
that once a counts ted jpmed tot sociitoi 
commonwealth,” the Russians would takeany 
action, including military invasion, to Keep a 


for 10 years either to topple the Marxist govern- 
ment or to set up independent states. 

Despite many opportunities to aid these re- 
bels and avenge to loss to Moscow of an dd 
U.S. ally in Africa, the Reagan administration is 
sot known to have provided, arms to any of the 
factions. 

A 28-page memorandum submitted to the 
CIA by the Ethiopian People’s Democratic Alli- 
ance in October 1982 spelled out — down to the 
cost erf stationery — a plan for training a first 
batch of 350 guerrilla leaders who would go into 
western Ethiopia to organize and spread the 
resistance under way there. The group requested 
$547,000 for the first six months. 

After the CIA said no, the alliance, a coalition 
of non-Marxist factions formed from other radi- 
cal groups, ceased to function. It was a victim of 
harsh mili tary repression and internal squab- 
bling as well as a lack of outride support . 

Less than a year later the U.S. government, 
alarmed by reports of pending famine in north- 
ern Ethiopia, began a secret cross-border feed- 
ing operation tot bypassed non-Marxist fac- 
tions and sent food to (he victims through the 
civilian aims of two Marxist-oriented guerrilla 
groups. 

At the same lime, the United States sent more 
than 325,000 tons of food, worth 5178 million, 
to the Marxist government in Addis Ababa and 
to private voluntary relief organizations work- 
ing with it to stem the famine. 

These inconsistencies illustrate the swings of 
a policy caught between conservative hard-lin- 
ers in the administration and Congress who are 
implacably hostile to the central government 
there and pragmatists still hoping to win Ethio- 
pia back Irom the Russians with inducements. 

In Mozambique the same U.S. factions are 
clashing over administration proposals for $15 
milli on in economic support ana $3 million in 
military assistance to the Marxist regime for 

fiscal 1986. 

Last year, conservatives in Congress killed the 
administration’s SI -million military aid request 
for tot southern African nation. 

This year Senator Jesse Helms, Republican of 
North Carolina, has attached an amendment to 
the 1 986 foreign aid bill that links military aid to 
free elections, an improved human rights record 
and a cut in the estimated 1,5 00 to 2,000 Cuban 
and East bloc military advisers to 55 —the same 
conditions and same limit on U.S advisers at- 
tached by liberals to aid to B Salvador. • 

Because none of these demands is likely to be 
met, the amendment probably kills the military 

aid request. 

For years the administration has turned its 
back on the opposition movement, the Mozam- 
bican National Resistance, and sought instead 
to woo the government under President Samora 
Machel away from its Marxist domestic and 
pro-Communist foreign policies. 

The rationale has been, first, to promote de- 
tente between white- ruled South Africa and its 
black-ruled neighbors and, then, to take advan- 
tage of Mozambique's show of interest in great- 
er ties to the West in hopes of changing its 
Marxist orientation. 


CIA Has Record of 'Failure 
In Backing Foes of Soviet 


By David B. Ottaway 
and Joanne Omang 

Washington Past Service 


~W%TT ASHINGTON — The United 
\\/ Stares has a long and checkered re- 
▼ t cord of attempts to aid anti-Commu- 
□ist movements, dating from the onset of the 
Cold War. Most of them have failed. 

The most ambitious efforts of this kind, 
mounted by the Central Intelligence Agency, 
at Soviet-backed governments or 


But when the shah of Iran negotiated a 
settlement to an old border dispute with Iraq 
in March 1975, Iran and the United States 
abruptly cut off their support for him. 

The derision sent 200,000 to 300,000 
Kurds fleeing into Iran, and General Barzani 
accused Washington and Tehran of betrayal 
He went into exile and died in Washington in 
1978, a Utter and broken man. 


were 



movements in Cuba, Iraq and Angola. None 
was successful 

The CIA did succeed in engineering coups 
that installed friendly governments in Iran 
(1953) and Gtzatemala (1954), and its rid 
helped to pave the way for the present gov- 
ernment of Chile (1973). 

It also backed the winning side in the 
Chadian civil war of 1981-82. Other interven- 
tions have been alleged but not documented. 

It was characteristic of past efforts to begin 


among nationalist . 
former Portuguese colony’s independence in 
1975. 



changing 

Washington helped organize Cuban exiles 
after Fidd Castro came to power in 1959 and 
launched them with feeble backing on the 
Bay of Pigs invasion in April 1961. Cuban 
exiles still blame that fiasco on inadequate 
support from the CIA. 

In the first Nixon administration, the Unit- 
ed Slates gave extensive covert rid to General 
Mullah Mustafa Barzani. leader of rebel 
Kurds fighting for autonomy against the So- 
viet-backed Iraqi government in Baghdad. 

With the help of tens of millions of dollars 
in U.S. assistance channeled through Iran, 
General Barzani marshaled an army he 
claimed included 100,000 troops. 


The United States gave pnnac 
to Holden Roberto, leader of the Natk 
Front for the Liberation of Angola, and some 
rid to the National Union for the Total 
Independence of Angola, hoping to block a 
third faction, backed by Cuba, the Popular 
Movement for the Liberation of Angola. 

But the the Popular Movement took the 
capital When the extent of U.S. secret in- 
volvement in the war became known. Con- 
gress voted overwhelmingly in late 1975 to 
ban further military rid to the two pro-West- 
ern Angolan factions. 

The National Front quickly collapsed, but 
the National Union has survived, thanks 
partly to aid from Sooth Africa. 

Now a move is afoot in both houses of 
Congress to repeal the aid ban in order to 
a jyrin help the National Union. 

In Ghfld the CIA scored its only recent 
public success. The agency worked with the 
intelligence services of Sudan and Egypt to 
back Hissfcne Habrfe in his 1981-82 struggle 
for power against a Libyan-backed govern- 
ment beaded by Goukrami Oueddo. With 
French help, Mr. Habrfc has remained in 
power. 



By Robert Lindsey 


New York Times Service 


B ERKELEY, California — One by one 
recently, names that recall to social tur- 
bulence of the 1960s have appeared, as if 
from the back pages of history, on the arrest logs 


from the back pages of histoiy, on the arrest logs 
of Berkeley's Police Department 
Angela Davis, the black mili tant who was the 


Communist Pany candidate for nee president 

■ t Ann i AO A - — -- nMfinNip 


in 1980 and 1984; Daniel EDsberg. to antiwar 
vho Ted strikes by 


activist; and Cesar Chavez, who — — - — , 
the United Farm Workers, have been among the 
650 people arrested since April 16 in protests 
against the University of California's invest- 
ments in corporations and banks doing business 
in South Africa. 

Raidish and a bit paimchy, Mario Savio, the 
student firebrand who led the University of 
California's Free Speech Movement 20 years 
poke against Sooth Africa, bringing the 
1 in the university’s Sproul Plaza alive once 


The demonstrations are part of the opposi- 
tion to Sooth Africa's policy, of racial separation 
that has occurred at college campuses around 
the country this spring. 

Bui in Berkeley, community leaders, includ- 
ing the mayor, Eugene (Gus) Newport, one of 
those arrested, arc helping to lead the protests. 
For at least some of Berkeley's residents, the 
1960s never died. 

“We've just had the 20th anniversary of the 
Free Speech Movement, and some things go 
on," said Vice Mayor Veronika Fukson. While 
pursuing a doctoral degree in German at the 
university, to spent much of her time demon- 
strating against the U.S. bombing of Cambodia. 

“The issues may change," to said, “but the 
principle remains the same: You don't brutalize 
other people.” 

Craig Sddin, 32, a former student at the 
university who said he had returned to Berkeley 
help ‘rekindle the movement” after becom- 



Angela Davis 


, 1 


to 


organization and another group, the National 
Front for the Liberation of Angola, in a bid to 
prevent the Cuban-backed Marxists now in 
fiower from winning. The national front subse- 
quently collapsed, but the Savimbi group is 
stronger than ever. 

Again, the administration’s rhetorical back- 
ing for anti-Communist insurgencies has been 
overshadowed by the dictates of its policy of 
detente in southern Africa. This policy seeks to 
gain the Angolan government's cooperation for 
a regional settlement that would send 25,000 
Cuban troops home and gain independence to 
neighboring South-West Africa. 

In Asia, Congress has taken the lead away 
from the administration in proposing oven hu- 
manitarian aid to rebels in Cambodia and Af- 


B Afghanistan, Congress is con- 

that coven rid may not be reaching Us 
intended recipients and is conadering S15 mil- 
lion in overt nonlethal rid. 


there. 


Until now, the United States has followeda 
patchwork policy composed of a 
combination of old Carter administration dea- 

sions (Afghanist^conpi^nri 975.76 civil war in Angola, the 

CiA channeled about $32 million lo ihe Savimbi 


I N Angola the adminis tration is prohibited 
by a 1975 law from giving assistance to 
Jonas Savimbfs anti-Communist National 
Union to the Total Independence of Angola. 
The administration has made no push to reverse 
this legislation, 

T-N . _ |L> II 


for the Afghans, and the House Foreign Affairs 
Committee has approved $5 million for two 
non-Communist rebel groups in Cambodia. 

Representative Stephen J. Solarz, a New York 
Democrat who is sponsor of the Cambodian aid 
provision, argues tot the United States must 
help build an effective non-Communist resis- 
tance movement as an alternative to the brutal 
Khmer Rouge, the main rebel force fighting the 
regime in Cambodia. 

The United States was reported earlier to 
have funnel ed some food aid to the Khmer 
Rouge through the Thai Army as part of its 
overall humanitarian assistance program to 
Cambodian refugees camped just inside Thai- 
land. Congress cut off tot aid in 1980. 


Congress has appropriated from S380 mMon 
to $400 mill i nn for covert aid through the CIA 
to the Afghan rebels since the Soviet interven- 
tion in 1979, according to the Federation for 
American Afghan Action, a support group. 

At least $250 million more is expected this 
year, to federation says. 

The Reagan administration took over and 
vastly expanded a Democratic policy of riding 
the Afghan rebels. But Emits apparently have 
jvxm placed on the sophistication of arms tot 
may be provided, with anti-aircraft m issiles ca- 
pable of dealing with Soviet gunships and air- 
craft in short supply. 

The State Department opposes cte ngm gtbe 
ui. military aid program to the Afghan rebels 
into an overt operation, a stand that Senator 
Alfonse M. D’Amato, a New York Republican, 
has attacked as “incredibly convoluted.” 

“The Soviets know what we're doing” covert- 
ly, and it is “ridiculous, absohitdy ridiculous” 
to pretend they do not, Mr. D'Amato said ai a 
May 8 hearing of the Senate appropriations 
subcommittee on foreign operations. 

He summed up the status of UJ5. efforts to 
aid insurgent groups worldwide: “We have sndi 
a piecemeal theory. We hop from crisis to costs 
. . . like tittle kids." 


mg bored with life as a criminal lawyer in 
Houston, stood near Sproul Plaza wearing 
shorts and a tom T-shirt and handing out leaf- 
lets to students urging them to join to protests 
against South Africa. 

“Some of us have been working all year 
around to break through to bubbletfiat bottled 
up to movement,” he said. “We were really 
looking to create a movement without the raw 
material of the ’60s, to draft, civil rights, ami 
we needed an issue. Nobody knew whether it 
would be Nicaragua, South Africa, El Salvador, 
or what 

“To me, South Africa is just a convenient 
issue that helps expose the system. By tot I 
mean the whole system of corporate capital- 
ism." 

At least half to passing students ignored to 
leaflets extended to them by Mr. Sddin. 

Among many students, the emotions that led 
to to protests appear to run deep. Pedro No- 
gnera, the student president, told the Board of 
Regents that to protests were not a passing 
“springtime activity” 

Todd Gitlin, an associate professor of sociol- 
ogy, said the protests ted drawn widespread 
support and extended much beyond an affec- 
tionate look back at the past 

“What to same people may be nostalgic,” he 
said, “to others is a resumption of tradition.” 

Bat other students said that while they object 
ed to South Africa’* racist policies, they hat 
greater concerns on Aar mind, especially final 
examinations, grades and finding jobs. 

This dty across to bay from San Francisco, 
with many of its 103,000 residents employed at 


the university, has long been considered politi- 
cally- liberal 

Eight of nine current members of the City 
Council belong to Berkeley Citizens Action, a 
political group, and describe themselves as 
“progressive," “socialist” or “radical,” 

Since November to council among other 
things, has declared the dty a sanctuary for 
Central American refugees; passed an ordi- 
nance guaranteeing full benefits to to unmar- 
ried “domestic partners" of dty employees, het- 
oosexnal or homosexual; applied rent control* 
to commercial properties in an effort to prcserv|F 
a colorful slumping district near to campus; 
agreed to binding arbitration for all dty aar 
ploye* unions; banned conversion of apartment 
buildings to condominiums; and eata Wished a 
commission to devdop policies on foreign rela- 
tions issues for to dty. 

The actions have exacerbated already tense 
idanons between, on the one hand, students 
and low mope i residents, who now have politi- 
cal control of the aty and on the other, more 
afflurat residents who hve in to green hOls that 
rise above to aty. v 

As the South /Urica protests were underway. 

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BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


** 


Page 9 


INTHNMTIONAL MANAGER 


Expense-Account Cheating 
^ Thrives Despite New Steps 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 


P 


■IiaerneakMd Herald Tribune 


AMS- 
cm the 
c r edi t card; 


Treat personal friends to caviar and champagne 



draw op phony tells; 
draw large long-term cash advances, and poll 
collect interest 


a nice nest-egg.. OneUiL tdeidsKm network salesman's cteim to 
fame is that Spot his f our chfldren throagh coDege by che ati n g 
onhisejgjeiiseaccoimls. . J ; - ; . 

r But the golden days of some innovzdive paddeis keep getting 
'dimmer. Credit-card compa- 
-4" mes in Enropesnch as Ameri- 
vcan Express Europe Ltd^ Dm- 
? v ers Club Ltd. and 
- Bardaycard, a subsidiary -of 



a taxable bonus 
to their income. 


to make it tougher for execu- 
tives to cheat on expense ac- 
K counts. 

But many executives 
/a good job for the _ 

- means. 1 * A manager ' in aNew-York based 
■“ motivate his sales force, gjves them $1,000 bonnses 
l in 20 new accounts. 


t rrf !tte' IV.M«-ur Institute 


*! 




i.l 




firm, to 
they bring 
' H,000 

- in expenses. So far the scheme has gone undetected by top 
. ^management 

The salesmen, prefer putting in fear expenses over adding a 

tflTaHw ' hrmna to The* mwiap f Wdrn good because 

1 Ms sales force is nxeracnlotisly dotsdfiMfothcr departments. And 
Tor the company, expenses are tax-demxcttMe. lt would have to 
?pay social seoimty tmabemns. v v ‘ . ' 

* Ttnt the riimia larjr frf ftyuiwafll control in the' 

* company. It also raises a question: No mgTt * r how tight official 
^ company contrcfls, if the boss is doing it, who is going to tdl him 

not to? • • . . : . • • 

.. “Why doesn’t management crack down?,” asks one UJ5. media 
executive. “Because they can't throw any stones. They do it 
themselves.” 

“It’s far too rinwsjmr nimrhg in anriit everyone, there has to be 
a tolerance level,” says a tax accountant withCoopeis & Lybrand 
. Associates in T e n don , the U S accx ymring firm, “It’s Win* i ' 
Stores realize that 5 percent of their merchandise will 
ftecL” 


C 


fc«w 


;kj 
:t u 


"■zs: 


’V « 


V 


Protest 

Id Lead® 



KEDrT-CAMD companies are offering companies more 
effective ways to control executive use of corporate cards. 
According to the 1985 American Express survey on man- 
■' agement control of travel and entertainment expenses in Britain 
released May 17, 62 percent of the 463 British companies inter- 
viewed worry about how to monitor employee expenses to check 
for occasional abuse. 

Business Decisions LtdL, the market-research firm that con- 
1 ducted the survey, says the figure may underestimate the extent 
‘ of abuse. The market-research firm only interviewed financial 
- directors, not commercial d ir ectors. Financial directors may have 
been rdnetant to admit to the survey interviewers that inadequate 
control systems led to occasional abuse: 

Many European companies that stOl operate on a cash system 
worry they do not have the internal controls necessary to monitor 
a corporate-card system should they want to switch from cash to 
credit cards.- . ' j. ■' 

American Express is offering a set of new biffing alternatives 
devised to increase company contrbl over travel and entertain-' 
ment expenses. Introdnce^-m the United StateiBve yees ago, 
these nw n*g^TK- nt -inform»finn services are now available in 
Britain and the Netfaedanda, Theywfll be introduced in Switzer- 
land next month, in France this laB, in Italy at the end of the year 
and in West Germany in 1986. 

The alternatives include the Cash Advance Accounting Sys- 
tem: American Express estimates dial a corporate card-holder 
still takes out 20 percent of expenses as a cash advance “Trying 
to monitor how much executives spend in cadi is a nightmare,” 
says Sue Nixon, maflasting manager for American Express Travel 
(Continued m Page II, Cot 1) • - 


Tightening Up on Tardy 
Check Clearing 


Average daily value of checks in the 
Federal Reserve clearing system that 
has been credited to the depositor's 
bank, but not yet debited from the bank 
on which the check was drawn, 
commonly called 'Fed Float', 
in billions of dollars 


$6.5 



1978 1980 1981 1984 

Source: Federal Rbsstvb Bank of New York 



Checks are processed by a Mj 
checking system helped EJF. 


nwrMwVteklban 

machine at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Inefficiencies in the Fed's 
& Co., which has pleaded godly to fraud, to MEk banks without their knowledge. 


Float , or How to Juggle Cash for Profit 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — B was a dull Memorial 
Day three years ago for the skeletal staff on 
duty at the f3w»tmcal Bank worii the arrival, 
by courier from overseas, of S100 million in 
checks drawn on a small bank is TTKnnfa. 

The staff was supposed to rash the process- 
ing of sudi large chttks, to art an extra day's 
tise of the funds. Bui the omy way to do that 
in the case of this Hfinois bank would be for 
someone to grab a flight to Chicago that 
evening and personally hand over the checks. 

“We asked rate of our supervisors if die 
had ever been to Chicago," recalled Allen M. 
Sflverstem, a senior vice president at Chemi- 
cal. “She hadn't I bought her a ticket on my 
American Express card. A day’s worth of 
interest on 5100 mfllion was 523,000. The 
plane ticket, hold room and meals were 
about $500." 

Flying checks around to get an extra day’s 
interest income is just rate of the ways that 
banks and corporations tty to maximize their 
interest income. In the quest fra “float” — in 
its broadest sense, the money in checks that 
have not yet cleared — companies have de- 
veloped all kinds Of ways to manag e their 
cash. 

One of the most imaginative methods was 


by EJr. Hutton & Gx, and it 
resulted in a guilty plea by Hutton eaifier this 
month to 2,000 counts of wire and mad fraud, 
as well as a 52 millio n fine. Such illegal 
operations do not seem to be common, nit 
almost all large corporations busily seek to 
bolster their interest income in legal ways. 

Amid the enrnperirimn for float, ea«h man- 
agement has become big business. Ranh* ad- 
vise cheats how to mirmniwt the balances in 
checking accounts that do not bear interest 
Consultants advise corporations how to 
speed op receipts and delay paying expenses. 
Bodes, articles and conferences report the 
latest techniques. 

AJ. King, a smafl-dly banker in Montana, 
said he was stunned a few years ago when a 
major ml company called him and asked if it 
could write all its checks on an account on his 
bank. 

“They were going to clear all checks 
around the world through KahspeD, Mon- 
tana — and you can’t get more remote than 
we are,*’ recalled Mr. Jung, who is chairman 
of the Valley Bank of KalispeD. KalispeH, in 
the northwestern comer of the state near 
Glacier National Pali, has a population of 
about 11,000. 

If the company wrote checks on Mr. Kingfs 
remote bank, the checks would take an extra 


day or two after being deposited in banks 
elsewhere to wend their way through the 
banking system and be debited .ram the 
corporation’s Kalispell account. On as much 
as $30 maBon of checks a day , the extra days’ 
interest adds up to millions of doDars during 
a year. 

That idea — which did not work out, 
largely because the parties could not agree on 
an appropriate fee — illustrates one erf the 


most common ways that corporations try to 

e. The 


get the most interest income possible, 
practice, known as “remote disbursement,” is 
legal because it does not cross the line as EJ\ 
Hutton did when it got interest income from 
money belonging to others. 

Hutton succeeded in Miring banks — 
managing to use miffitm a erf dollars a day in 
bank funds withoat the banks* knowledge — 
largely became of three factors. 

Fast, the banks’ account records did not 
rfigtin gnish between, on the one hand, cash 
and cherts that hnd already cleared and, on 
the other hand, checks that had not yet 
cleared. So a bank might allow Hutton to 
withdraw 54 mil Ho n from an account that 
had a $4-miIHon check deposit in it, even 
though the bank would not get the funds 

(Coatmned on Page 11, CoL 3) 


MCI Is Awarded 
$113 Million in 
Suit Against ATT 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

CHICAGO — A federal VS. 
jury Tuesday awarded MCI Com- 
munications Corp. $37.7 million 
from American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. for being denied access 
to long distance telephone lines in 
the mid-1970s. 

Under federal antitrust law, the 
award will be tripled, to SI 13.1 
million. 

MCI had 3sked for S5.8 billion in 


damages, while AT&T said the jury 
" consider 


in the civil case should consider a 
figure between $7.5 million and 
$36.4 million. 

After the ruling, MCI said it 
would appeal the award. 

“We're obviously disappointed. 
We will appeal ana we expect our 
arguments will be upheld by the 
appeals court,” John Houser, an 
MCI spokesman, said. 

The jury returned its verdict in 
the third day of deliberations. 

The award does not include any 
compensation for losses associated 
with Execunet, MCTs regular long- 
distance service. 

A jury in 1980 had awarded MCI 
$600 mfllion, which was tripled un- 
der antitrust law. 

The total 51B-bfllk>n judgment 
— the largest such award in UJS. 
history — was voided by an appeals 
court, but the court upheld the 
antitrust violation. 

In the retrial, the two companies 
presented 18 witnesses over 17 
days. 

MG lawyers displayed a finan- 
cial study showing projected losses 
based on efaJms that AT&T’s ac- 
tions blocked the company's ex- 
pansion and investment plans. 

But AT&T lawyers said the com- 
munications giant should be held 
liable only for actual losses, not 
hypothetical ones. 

The determination of whether 
MC2 should be compensated for 
losses associated with Execunet 
had beat a major issue in the case. 

AT&T attorneys had argued Ex- 
ecunet was not in operation at the 
time of the antitrust violations and 
there should not be any compensa- 


tion for losses resulting from a de- 
lay of that service. 

The 1 1 jurors were asked by U.S. 
District Judge John Grady to'breok 
down their verdict into two catego- 
ries: damages for Execunet losses 
and damages Tor losses from pri- 
vate lines, MCTs original point-to- 
point service. 

The appeals court threw out 15 
of the 21 charges against AT&T. 

The six remaining charges in- 
volved AT &Ts refusal to provide 
MCI access to its long-distance 
network, interfering with MCI cus- 
tomers, providing MCI with inferi- 
or service and negotiating with 

MCI in bad faith. 


AT&T would be responsible for 
of the damages, 


about 30 parent 


with the rest shared by the regional 
lied after 


companies that were creat 
the breakup of AT&T last year. 

AT&T said it was “pleased” with 
the verdict, adding that it is consid- 
ering “whether further steps are ap- 
propriate.*' f AP. Reuters) 


SEC Establishes International Office for Law Enforcement 


Rftae is 


WASHINGTON —The Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission an- 
nounced Tuesday that it has 
formed an office' of inte r national 
legal assistance within its enforce- 
ment division. 


The office was created to hdp 
the comnrisskm gather evidence 
and seek international cooperation 
when its efforts to enforce federal 


securities laws trice ft outride the 
United States, said Michael Mann, 
SBC attorney, who will be the of- 
fice's first chief. 

“With internationalization of the 
securities markets comes interna- 
tional fraud,” Mr. Mann said. 
“We’re looking for cooperative 
means to obtain evidence” m these 
types of cases. 

Mr. Mann said the office would 
pursue evidence located in other 


nations on' a casc-by-case basis, 
help formulate commission policy 
on international enforcement mat- 
ters and seek agreements with other 
countries aimed at facilitating evi- 


Mr. Mann, who joined the SEC 
staff in 1981, played a major role in 


the Santa Fe Inte rnat ional Crap. 

of the 


The SECs creation of the office, 
Mr. Mann said. Is a recognition of 
the fact that, as the markets in- 
creasingly internationalize, we 
need to devdop better mechanisms 
to obtain evidence overseas.” 


insider-trading case, one 
SECs most complex and time-con- 
suming overseas investigations. 

In mat case, SEC investigators 
discovered that the U.S. brokerage 
arms of several Swiss banks had 
traded heavily on behalf of clients 
in Santa Fe International common 
stock and options just before the 


company announced that it was to 
be taken over by Kuwaiti Petro- 
leum Corp. 

A federal judge later froze the 
accounts of several of the traders, 


It took the SEC three years to 
obtain certain names, and the case 
has still not been closed. But the 
investigation led to a new law-en- 
forcement assistance agreement 
and other cooperative efforts 





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Source: ftorrBl UmcfrAP 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Sinclair Research 
LltL, the financially strained home 
computer tnaVer controlled by Sr 
CEw Sinclair, said Tuesday that it 
was seeking to raise £10 million to 
£15 nriHinn (SI 2.5 million to 518J8 
millirai) from outride investors. 

The Sinclair statement comes 
just four months after Italy’s Ing. 
C. Olivetti & Co. rescued another 
British home computer maker, 
Acora Compute? Group PLC, by 
paying £10.4 million for a 49-per- 
cent stake: 

As reported, Sinclair acknowl- 
edged daring the weekend that a 
recent sales slump had Traced it to 
obtain a two-month extension an 
payments due to two major suppli- 
ers, Timex Coro- and Thom EMI 
PLC 

Sir Give that he had miked 
to Thom about the need to raise 
funds but that the company did not 
seem inriined to participate. 

“We have no {flans to invest” in 
Smdair, a Thom spokesman said. 

Analysts speculated that Gener- 
al EEecroc Go. of Britain or ICL, a 
unit of Standard Telephones & Ca- 
bles PLC might be interested. 
GEC last year bad talks with a 
smaller British home comparer 
company, but those discussions (fid 
not lead to any investment. 

Fra its new One Per Desk com- 
puter as d telephone set, ICL uses 
Sinclair technology. ICL’s chair- 
man, Robb Wflmot, recently be- 
came a director of Sinclair and 
agreed to head a mkrocfcjp venture 
planned by Sir Give. 

In early 1983, Sinclair sold 
400,000 or its shares, 10 percent of 
those outstanding, to British insti- 
tutions for £34 each. On the Lon- 
don Stock Exchange, the latest re- 
corded trade in those shares was at 
about £525 in mid-May. 


Renault Flam 
June Disclosure 
Of Restructuring 


Reutov 


PARIS — Renault, the 
French state-owned antnmaker, 
said Tuesday that it win present 
its long-awaited restructuring 
plan to its labor force on June 
17. 


The plan, which follows mas- 
sive loses last year, was drawn 
up fay Renault's recently ap- 
pointed chairman, Georges 
Besse. They were pul to a board 
meeting Tuesday. 

Renault, which lost 1L55 bil- 
Iton francs ($03 bflfiaa) last 
year, has already agreed on 
measures with the unions to lay 
off at least 9,000 of its 98,000 
workers in Fiance this year. 

“The board has examined the 
evolution of the work Trace in 
1985 and the level of the adjust- 
ment to be made,” the company 
said in a statement “The 
scheme and procedures for the 
odjosturatinUbepresented to 
a special works committee 
meeting on June 17.” 

The board also discussed ac- 
tion to improve Renault’s pro- 
ductivity and competitive edge, 
and possible ways to refinance 
the grotto over the next few 
years, incradmg fresh capital in- 
jections by the stare, debt cut- 
ting measures and “comple- 

thi* «anfgmw>t m ntrniW^ ^ 


United Pilots Ready to Resume Talks 


Dollar Higher 
In European 
And U.S. Trade 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose broadly Tuesday in the 
United States and Europe, 
helped by expectations erf stron- 
ger economic growth in the 
Urn ted States. 

With many senior traders 
gathering in Toronto for a for- 
eign-exchange dealers' conven- 
tion, activity was quiet. But Eu- 
ropean currency dealers said 
dollars were in strong demand 
Tuesday because of the usual 
month-end buying by corpora- 
tions that must settle tbor ac- 
counts. 

Traders also said they expect 
U.S. economic growth to im- 
prove in the secondquarter and 
were awaiting Thursday’s 
scheduled release of the U.S. 
index of leading indicators for 
further clues. 

In New York, the pound 
closed at $12535, down from 
$1.2550 on the previous trading 
day. The dollar ended at 3.112 
Deutsche marks, up from 3.097 
DM; at 9.485 French francs, up 
from 9.440 francs; at 2.6140 
Swiss francs, up from 2.6080 
francs; 

In London, the pound ended 


at $1.2515, down slightly from 
ious close. In 


$ 1-2595 at the previous ■ 
Frankfurt, the dollar ended at 
3.1127 DM, up from 3.0805 
DM, while in Paris, the UJ3. 
currency finished at 9.49 
French francs, up from 9.4025 
francs. 


Ccaqtiied bj> Oar Staff From Disptacka 

NEW YORK — Pilots at United 
Airiines say they are ready to re- 
sume negotiations to end their 12- 
day walkout, but vowed they would 
not return to work unless they re- 
ceived job-protection guarantees. 

Roger Hall, chairman of the pi- 
lot’s Master Executive Council, 


said Tuesday, “We are ready, wiD- 
rith urih 


ing and able to meet with United, 
with or without a mediator, to try 
to end this strike.” 

However, Uztited’s chief execu- 
tive officer, Richard Ferris, said 
United had not received a request 
from the union to resume negotia- 
tions and no meetings were 
planned. 

Talks between United and its pi- 
lots broke off over the weekend. 

Meanwhile, industry analysts 
said that, if necessary, the giant 
carrier could endure a prolonged 
strike without serious harm. 

“When you have hal/-a- billion 
dollars in cash and in short-term 
securities and a strong line of cred- 
it, you can go for a long, long time," 
Robert J. Joedkke, an analyst with 
Shearaon Lehman Brothers Inc, 
said Monday. “Certainly, the union 
doesn’t have a strike fund that 
could compare with that” 


The strike, which began May 17, 
is not without cost to the airline. It 
would not comment on the strike’s 
financial impact but analysts esti- 
mated the airline’s losses to be $5 
mflUrai to S7 million fra every day 
of the strike. 

Management and labor have 
been deadlocked over details of a 
two-tier wage scale under which 
newly hired pilots would be paid 


less than pilots on staff with the 
level erf e 


same level ra experience. Sources 
dose to the negotiations said that 
while the two sides had essentially 
agreed to the two-tier system, they 
remained at an impasse over how 
striking pilots should be treated in 
that system. 

Untied is still managing to oper- 
ate some flights, even though the 
union represents 95 percent of Un- 
ited’s pilots. Some union pilots, 
however, have crossed the picket 
tines. 

Alfred H. Netting, an analyst 
with Kidder, Peabody & Co^ said: 
“When you consider that they had 
$1.4 bilhon in expenses in the first 
quarter of last year, and that 
they’re losing about 85 percent of 
their revenue, you’ve got to con- 
clude that their losses have to be in 
the low nuflioDS. But Td say United 


has the financial strength to take a 
strike of weeks and weeks in dura- 
tion." 

United faces other problems be- 
sides the strike by members of the 
Air line Pilots Association. 

“It’s not a good time fra a strike 
^faen you consider that the summer 
travel push will begin in about two 
weeks/ said Hans Plickers, an ana- 
lyst with ILF. Hunan & Co. 

United’s rivals say they have en- 
joyed an increase in travelers since 
the strike began. Officials at Amer- 
ican Airlines, United's major com- 
petitor, said their recent load factor 
— the percentage of seats filled — 
had climbed to around 85 percent, 
from a pre-strike level of about 65 
percent 

Continental Airiines, which is 
second to United in the number erf 
flights out of Denver, said its traffic 
had soared 25 percent since the 

Strike be gan. 

Before the strike; United carried 
about 120,000 passengers a day, 
about 15 pe rcen t of the nation's 
total to all 50 states and nine for- 
eign cities. But as erf Monday, the 
amine was conducting 209 depar- 
tures, to4! airports, compared with 
its norma] 1,550 daily departures, 
to 139 airports. (AP, NYT) 


SIptapman 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 


PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDII 


BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 


i yielded the toUowmg 
' after afl chargor. 


IN 1980: -1-165% 
IN 1981: +137% 
IN 1982: +32% 
IN 1983:— 24% 
IN 1984:— 34% 

MAY 23, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $86,018.06 


Cafl or wnte FtoyaH Frazier at 
TAPMAN, Trend Analysts and 
RotKoho Management, Inc., 
Wal Street Plaza. New MwK 

New %rk 10005 212469-1041 
Tblac BMI 687173 UW 


erw 

-in 

—iso 

— iSB 

-2JS 

—MS 


AM. ML 
SUSS SUSS 
suss. _ 

pmti mskm mso ‘ mxt 
*«ta . : . '31*® " atur 
tan dfla . . MUM - 31125 
TteW.Yte* . ; . _ : -—t 31M0 

CumrntNxm PDrtf and London official ft*> 
kma/ Menu- Km end Zurich ooenkta and 
Mating Priam; Hew Ybr* Coawx current 
AH prices tn VS. S nrniKf. 
Source; Reuters. . 


= CHARTER =ii 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE” 


125 ft. 12 _ . 

We arc die best in Greek Idantfc. 

lVfedtienanean Creases Ltd. 

3 Stadfou Sl, Athens. 
TeL: 3236494. TU-- 222288. 


□ 


11m- 

Carlyle 

Hotel 


atTRliStmat 

■ HowVartctOOat 
Coble -nwCariyfe New Vtafc 

taiMmotkinariWra 020698 

iwtpiHHwxaMiaoo 


A mombor of tha Sharp Group 



Kingdom of Spain 


U.S. $500,000,000 


Floating Rate Notes due 1999 


in accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six months interest period from 
28th May. 1985 to 29th November. 1985 the Notes will carry 
an Interest Rate of per annum. 

Interest payable on 29th November. 1985 will amount io 
U.S. S436.81 per U.S. S10JXJ0 Note and U.S. $10520.14 
per U.S. 5250,000 Note. 


Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York 

London 
Agent Bank 



Kingdom of Sweden 


U.S. $500,000,000 
Floating Rate Notes doe 1999 

In accordance with the provisions of the Notes, notice is 


hereby given that for the six months interest period from 
li May, " ,OP *’ ‘ ' " 


28th May, 1985 to 29th November, 1935 the Notes will 
cany an Interest Rate of 8 ( A% per annum. 

Interest payable on 29th November, 1985 will amount to 
US- 5423.96 per U.S. SI 0X00 Note. 


Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York 

London 
Agent Bank 




I 












WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 



age 10 


11 NYSE Most Actives ]| 

• 

VSL 

Hlgb Low 

LSSt 

CM. 


26012 

2fi% 

28* 

28V. 

+ % 

Litton 

218*0 

B3% 

79* 

83* 


AT&T 

20078 

34* 

22% 

24 


EdKod* 

905 

45 

44 




9219 131% 

129% 

130% 

— * 



6% 

6K 

6% 


PSvCoi 

8123 

22% 

21% 

22* 

+ * 

Mobil 

7903 

31* 

30% 

30* 

— A 


7864 

60% 

40* 

60% 



7737 

65% 

66* 

45* 

+i% 


7482 

36% 

35* 

36% 

+ % 


7615 

17% 

15% 

17% 

+i% 

FotilM 

7385 

63* 

43* 

43% 

+1 


7189 

31 

30* 

30* 

+ % 

HmriPk 

7154 

33% 

33* 

33* 

+ ik 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open HIM LOW LOW CM. 
India 1M&3S 1S1284 129033 1301.52- MS 

Trans <3&H eaja u&io + 055 

im uw iSS i*5o ws | + «i 

C «nv 53487 537.99 52977 53174 + (Lit 


NYSE index 


Hlth LOW ai '** 

CanposHo 1D9.15 JKB 1007* “Ml 

ESS 1 " 1 * 101 OT 10157 Wlp +|« 

Transp. 'H-ii 'SSoi 5034 +0,13 

HUSK tffS 11 sS 1833 + 0 J 2 


\ 

Tuesdays 

N 

i 

US 

Hosing 

E 


AMEX Diaries 



masdaQ index 



Composite 

Industrials 

F Inane* 

insurant* 

UlHIttM 

Banns 

Tramo. 


dote CBW* 

5S5=g 

SiSSrS 

ssr-’S 

20145 +0.n 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bondi 

utiimas 

Industrials 


Advanced 

Dodtrnd 

Unehanaod 
Total issues 
New HWa 
Now Laws 

Volume up 
V olume down 


£ £ 

"8 TS 


37345830 

393M700 


BUT Solos 

i 6 i 8 ?a SB 

K3 ' " - 2 S 1 S »» 

• included In itie soles ftflurss 


Vol at 4 PJ* flUOOMO 

Prev.4PJM.voL. IW7MM 

Prev consolidated due 9MHBB 


Tobies InOvd* the nationwide price* 
up to ttae closing on Wall Street end 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Press 



Standard & Poor's index 


indastrtats 

Trarao. 

UfflMH 

Ptoonea 

Composite 



NYSE Closes With Fractional loss 

- I ^.nnrAAte f t VW fl PtWCl^ATlf 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK —The stock market showed no 
dear trend Tuesday after an early advance on 
the New Yo A Stock Exchange faltered. 

Issues involved in takeover and buybacK 
news drew most of the attention in a rehmveiy 
quiet post-holiday session. _ r in ; 


met UUBI-1IVUUAJ 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrial^ , up 

from boying any more.' 

Volume on the S York Stock Exchange ute in the day, the company aidnws 
came to 90.60 million shares, compared with Peking a friendly merger partner to ware otr 
85.97 million last Friday. Mr. Icahn’s Sl^a-sbare bld . t °, ta ^ / J t ^ r ' ^ 

Declining interest rates have been a ted as a International Controls gained 3 to 28%. Inc 
primary force behind the rally in stock prices ^,—ny said it received an unsobated offer 
since May 1, and they kept dropping Tuesday, ^ investor group to acquire it for 527 a 

Prices of long-term government bond s, which s ^ iare _ 
move in the opposite direction from inter«t p [gd die active list, up Vfc al 28%. A 

rales, rose more than $10 for every $ 1,000 in r nri jj ion .*share block of the utility, coal and 
face value. . . ^communications compands stock changed 

Though rates are well below their recent . ^ ^ Tgii 

peks, analysts noted, they ^ overa n tally on the Big Board, about 

Shin companson M six Usues declined & price foTevery Eve that 

inflation gained ground. The exchange’s composite index 

there is room for further declines in me cost oi tQ 10a 73 

toervs has apparently given the Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 

TV' percent, it announced a week ago Fnday. totaled 106.34 mfflion snares. 

. nnflIv _,- -m traders anpeared Standard & Poors index of 400 industrials 
totereKtt^&aftef’s^at^SS lost .60 to 208 J^S&Ps SC^stock compos- 
tevds they have reached. Rather, they seemed «e index was down .43 at 187.86. 
inclined to cash in on some of the markets The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 
recent gains. the-counter market fell 126 to 290.88. At the 


J* Y 


day night's message from President Ronald 
Reagan on his plans for tax reform. 

Litton Industries, which plans to buy bade as 
much as 35.8 percent of its stock, climbed 6 to 
83fe 

Trans World Airlines was up $125 at S 17 JO 
in active trading. A federal judge denied a TWA 
request that financier Carl C. Icahn, who owns 
about 25 percent of the company’s stock, be 
restrained temporarily from buying anymore. 

Late in the day, the company said it was 
seeking a friendly merger partnrx to ward off 
^ Icahn’s SlS-a-sbare bid to take it over. 

International Controls gained 3 to 28%. The 
company said it received an unsolicited offer 
[roman investor group to acquire it for 527 a 
share. 



Hh* Low awe one 

£5? gg SStSE 

IBLM 1B7J* 1873* —043 


33 20% 

U a* 

M* 43% 

tm 

» im 

w* an 
m m 

4M 26% 

am 22 
39 ai% 
IW IM 
37% 24* 
78 <1 

27ft m 


irjcMlah Low OuoL QlVe > 


390 49 
ITS 9J 
140 14 
JBi 33 
84 24 
290 SI 
2X0 11.1 
300 40 
1375 12.1 
230 109 
2514 88 




X19 

T45 

JO 

47 

L60 

58 

M 

LI 

4J8 

43 

480 

122 

1J0 

50 

384 

9J 

374 

92 

LOO 

18 

1JS 

1IM 

1J5 

VU 

280 

11? 

586 

XO 


3 LA D9UW uvwii*.w — r - " — j — , — 

gain ed ground. The exchange s composite index 
slipped .14 to 108.73. 

Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those stocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 
totaled 106.34 million shares. 

Standard & Poor's index of 400 industrials 
lost .60 to 208.14, and SAP’s 500-stock compos- 
ite index was down .43 at 187.86. 

The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 
the-counter market fell 126 to 290.88. At the 


recent gains. ine-couiucr uidiaci icu i mi uj ^tu-dd. m luc 

Brokers also said it was natural for investors American Stock Exchange, the market value 
to be proceeding warily as they awaited Tues- index closed at 23027. up 20. 


m 

DU 

34M 

£ 

ns 

3% 

u 

UM 
15 30M 
150 4ZA 
052 3* 

9SJ 22 
2S5 2M 
48 3W* 
44 11* 
42 22* 
1025 ens 
37 291* 
425 61* 
89 15W. 
M 12* 
r 12* 
11 * 
1 * 
19* 
440170% 
23 3216 


$ 


888 

112 

1.17 

10.9 

184 

107 

72 

12 

180 

50 

188 

11 

1808 

48 

132 

58 

X12 

BO 

287 

103 

US 

117 

20 

13 

136 

47 

108 

X« 

lOG 

27 

88 

13 

30 

47 

X16 

113 


lOL 

MVS 13* 
21* 21 
29* 29VS 
20* 20 

K 




140 

54 

680 103 

196 102 

280 

33 

475 

48 

180 

78 

188 

U 

430 

68 

330 

7 

375 

97 

238 

17 


17 12 740 24% 
17 19 2157112*1 

9 106 5% 

1X0 500Z 9% 

44 49 920 57* 
U 110 31* 
44 « 

IS 153 50% 
09 38 11 

S9 11 339 42% 

64 9 55 21* 

0.1 291 2116 

44 9 1343 26* 
U 192 33* 
29 55 8% 

n 34 9 171 26* 
14 326 13* 
23 7 197 21 
99 6 48% 

U 39 II* 
3 3690x13* 

546 JO* 

u n m «* 

1284 44* 
11 14* 
59 22 

20 291 214* 
11 11 443 25* 

99 135 106* 

6 II* 
MW 19 34* 
1J 11 141 23* 


Sill US M 

a 12 no a* 

28 S 111 43* 
4.1 11 133 29% 

14 12 03 34* 

48 ■ 143 17* 

2055 11* 
124 303 21* 

14 1549 35 

34 12 4 24 . 


124 303 21* 

40 14 1549 35 

M 34 12 4 34 

40 43 10 352 103* 

40 114 1 40* 

JM 4 26 204 9% 

!43 17 9 41 42% 

11 344 24* 

JH 84 7 1920 24* 


740 22 
372 46* 
364 4* 

43 28 
340 33 
25 12* 
381 29% 
2262 38 
18% 


184 184 6 164 27* 

1498114 .68 26 

LS0 104 2O0e 44 
144 17 n 466 18* 
LOS 14 7 448 ZFH 

LIB 128 8 34* 

140 144 5 270 10 
190 UM 6 149 II* 

41 W 
40 74 8 84 ID* 

140 114 9 10 20* 

90 24 13 98 26* 

40 28 17 306 19* 
40 19 2442 24 

1 40 48 31 2M 


18* W 
35* IV* 
21 * IS 
24% 18% 
2* * 
9 3 

52% 29% 
23* 11* 
13* 7% 

45* 30% 
34* 21 
10* 8* 
5* 3* 

62 «* 
51* 39 
55 49 

43* 26* 
30* W* 
22 % M* 

49* 40 
16* 11* 
B* 23* 
73* 38 
25* \m 
13 7* 

32* 19 
W» II 
39* 22 
31% 1JW 
13% 3% 
31* 17* 
IB* 11* 
25V* 17% 
is n* 

38% 29* 
32* 24* 
59* 46W 

53* 30* 

,r a 

as* n 
90* 44* 
31* 2ZW 
27* 19* 
40* 

57 40* 

30 21* 

41* 23 
40 32 

184* 104* 
19* 17% 
7* 3* 
6% 3* 
15* 10 * 
21* 14* 
49* 37* 
34* 18* 
37 23* 

24* IV* 
23 13* 

24* 1716 
33* 21* 
40 14* 

54* 37W 
66* 37 
44* 24% 
44* 32* 
57* 44 
29* «% 
74* 52 
37 24 

24* 14* 
8% 4* 
40% 25* 


At 19 2442 24 

190 45 31 24* 

140 88 30 52V. 

A0 49 12 156 ■* 

]g * 

19 » 
65 6 1422 59* 
115 1 4H 

119 22 54V 

228 15 SPK 

92 38 8 30 20 

1-52 59 13 21 29 

M M 4 1703 42V 
194 39 V 159 34V 
UM 58 10 780 Ml 

240 49 3 4243 35V 

45 293 17* 
70 IB M3V 
24 74V 

» J I 22 25 
931 39 93 n n 
481 1-0 20 49V 

133 111 * 

166 40 10 

5 50V 

160 U 1 4464 S6M 
290 39 16 472 CVU 

«5 7J CT 59V 
M U 17 576 19» 
222 9-0 9 117 24V 

112 45 8 35 48V 

2.16 145 6 1290 15V 
480 138 My 30V 

9J0 138 785Dy 70 

952 134 WJy 71 

92 3.1 24 485 23V 
94 2.1 IS 124 34V 
88 J 12 221 23V 

IS 290 25V 

286 49 7 

792* 98 
7506 9 

280 14 

287 114 
92 M 7 

1.10 38 22 
13 

18 U I 
252 121 4 
754 122 
40 65 
pf 186 118 
ii 1 JA 39 12 
In .Wa 4 20 
Ip 180 21 13 
pf 180 5.1 
40 M 14 

40 8 13 

183 39 
294 65 14 


190 68 18 
188b U 33 
44 21 7 

.14 9 16 

140 49 9 
250 62 10 
218 104 
242 123 

142 

148 

214 45 9 
184 59 11 
JS 15 10 
84 20 15 

200 108 7 
190 115 
280 114 
287 108 
287 11.1 . 

232 84 5 
150 38 W 
58 8 27 

40 22 9 


TtV 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sts. dose 

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20% 

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39*— % 
24 + % 

33% + * 
20*— * 
29 — % 
45* 

34*— * 
31 — 1* 

17 
19* 

18* + * 
24*- * 
54* 

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24% 13* Conoir 54b 18 13 
18* 13% ConnE 140 88 9 

29 19* CraNG 240 88 9 
15* 18% Conroe 40 38 4 
35* 24% ConsEd 240 49 ■ 
44% a ConEpf 580 108 

36 20* CraFrll 1.10 35 11 

47* 31 CnsNG 282 il 9 
8* 4* ConsPw 15 

27 13 CnPnfA 4.16 149 

29* 13% CnPpfB 450 161 
39* 26 CnPpfC 452 135 
48 23% CnPpfD 745 155 

48% 25% CnPpfE 792 162 
48* 25 CnPpfG 796 141 
24* 11* CnPOTV 640 145 
22* 9% Oaf* PrU 340 M9 
23 10% CnP prT 390 144 

48 25% CnPpfH 746 142 
34* 11* CnPprR 480 149 
znc. 10* CnP prP 198 148 
23% 10% CnPprN 385 144 

14 7% CnP or M 250 159 

15 7 CnP orL 293 159 
24% 11 CnP orS 682 148 
14 VU CnP OfK 243 159 
47% 23* CntlCn 240 58 22 
10* 4* Conti II 

4% * Confllrt 

49 12 Cut III pf 

4* % Clliwnn 

9* 4* Cntlnfo _ 7 

24% 18 ContTf 180 79 9 
38% 24% CtOaJO 92 14 
33* 23% ConwO 1.10 35 12 
3% 1 vICookU 

36* 27 Coopt 152 65 14 
38 30 COOPlPf 290 M 

W% IMS CWTT AO 2.1 8 
24* 15 Coopyfcl 40 14 19 
19* 11% CaPwM 44 07 
27% 17* Centura 84 35 17 
15% 10% CoTBln 56 67 11 
40% 30* CornGs 188 38 17 
68 23 CorBIk 180 25 

77% 66* CoxCm M 5 23 
10 6% CrnlO ^ _ „ 

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83* «m CrnyR* 17 

19% 15% QrefcNpfAlt 114 
CrcfcMpf 

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58* 36% CrarnOc __ 13 

66* 27% CrwZol 180 25 14 
50* 43% CrZal Pf 643 94 
65% 50 CrZMpfC6A 74 

30 20% Cutbra 80 29 10 

33% 15* Cut hats 39 

08* 60* CWnEn 250 11 6 
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SOU 27* Cyclops 1.10 22 10 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Page 11 


N '.*■ *• ■l'lM’ 


Allianz Net Slips 5.6%, 
Premium Income Rises 




" ''It'll ! 
1 ’ ! 

‘ * 1 - < i ' 



■KKUiHRRAND 

Mutcyyuicantns 


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•" c If n. 


Reuters 

MUNICH — Allianz Versicher- 
‘ ‘ • nugs-AG, West Germany's largest 

insurer, on Tuesday reported a de- 
v dine in domestic poop net profit 

• of 17.9 million Deutsche marts 

V ($5.8 million) in 1984u 
.. Net prefit for the group dipped 

5.6 percent, to 302iQnriIncai DM, 
. , > from 320.44 iraffion a year earlier, 

1 ■ kfte - despite a 63-percent rise in premi- 

uoiJ nm income, to 9 billion DM from 
‘ : 8.45 billian. 

- The domestic group is made op 

-■ ' of . the parent company and major 

■''■v .West German subsidiaries, except 

„ * Allianz Lebcn. AIEanz.does not re- 

’ port its wold groop net profit • 

- Die group’s managing board 
” chamnan, Wolfgang Scmeren, said 

• ' ' . that Allianz is still wlrinp take- 

i ' overs in the United Stales, fie add- 
" V >4 - dial the time might be right for a 

-J - ? • \ - takeover since the. marke t was 

^ starting to recover and p r e miu ms 
^werensing. 

‘ Mr. Scmeren said a restructuring 

" of Allianz, which was announced in 
Lr^, - October and began taking effect in 

- Jamiaiy, would allow it moreftad- 
' bility m reacting to competition. 

, -He said the company had decided 
' 1 "to restructure because its function 

„ as a holding company hadrisen 

- considerably due to acquisitions 
r\ ' abroad over the last 15 years. 

JA p Mr. Sdneren rqected sugges- 
,.-S ’A j ' tions that Allianz’s main reason far 
- ‘ re or g ani zing was to chcmsvent su- 

: Proft Rises 12% 
AND : AtAUiedrfyom . 

iTltTUK. ’ Ram* 

: LONDON — Allied-Lyons 

- PLC on Tuesday reported pre-tax 

^ ; profit for 19844983 of £219 nril- 

— ^ . lion ($276 mflfionl a 12-penxat 
. . increase from £194.9 million in 

- ^ 1983-1984. . 

••• Revenues increased II percent, 
to £3.17 bfflkm, from £185 baBon. 
•V . The group said it was increasingly 
■> r * ? -seeing the fruits of major long-term 

£■*' ■-* investments, hdpedby a decentral- 
.;•! ;.vl nation policy and a prograoir'of 
•• acquisitions. 

'.i* ■’ Tifre food division was again, the 

best paframa, while the beer dhn- 
£ * i ' son cantinned to make ntisfactoiy 


paYismy authorities who nrigbt 
otherwise' block expansion plans. 

While the new holding company 
would be subject to les^stringicnt 
superviaon tl^ primary iiisurance 
underwriters because it would 
fiifin rifli fl as a rrinjairimce company, 
supervision would be unchanged 
.for non-life <md life insurance ac- 
tivities of its subsidiaries, he said. 

Da pansrt conuKsy recorded a 
256.19 million DM imt profit in 
1984, Hole chan ged from 254.93 
miffion in* 1983. Premium income 
increased to 7.82 billion DM from 
734 tnffiah DNL Ibis cut parent 
company profit-iricome ratio to 2.1 
peccant from 3.6 peicent in 1983, 
Mr. Scfaieren said,- adding that 
there woe no signs that this 
TTwAed the start a trend that 
would push AlSanz. into the red. 

The results reflect lower under- 
writing profits and highe r profits 
on non-underwiitmg business, he 




S..i M-.-. 

-r- - 

V*. L-. . ^ 
• V 
** »- n. 

i » 

.'Tlw « 9 


and soft drinks saw higior vc 
but squeezed margins. 


Padding Is 
Still Thriving 

' ' (Gonthned from Page 9) 

^Management Services m London. ; 
In admtkm, «»npames3osc &e in- 
terest they ccaddie eammg on <Bd- 
" standing cash advances. 

• Under the Cash Advance Ac- 
counting Syston, the company can 

.charge the execotivo* cash ad- 

• vances on tfvar American Groress . 
corporate ends. Because cash ad- 
vances show up on the American 
Express monthly hills, a cco u nti n g 
departments bin easily doubfc- 

! check outstandmtfeash advances. 

• Another alternative's Consofr 
‘ dated 'Biffing: AmerKaaTEspses^s 

biffing system in Europe now pro- 
vides aggregate statements for up 
:to 99 coporate cards. “The prob- 
lem was that someone had to add 
cost centers’ and dreiriens’ state- 
ments, w says Mrsu Tfixon. "Now we 
. do that for them and can organize 
the data according to how much 
.was spent by what drawn on ho? 
trfCj restaurants, atdines car 
^ ' rentals. w By providing a senior fi- 
litmcial w»th 

picture of what ffifioeot mvistons 
are spending, ^ ^ American Express 
.says any spending anomalies are 
more May to show op. 

But for American Express to ef- 
fectively control a company’s total 
.travel and entertainment costs, a 
large percentage of executives in 
the company would have to have 
. the corporate card. 

• Some companies befieve their 
.control mechanisms are tight 
- enough as it is. “We don’t believe 

the Cot Advance Accounting Sys- 
tem win increase control, we.have 
so much control already," says Roy 
.Weekly, manager of accomlspay- 
¥ aide at rod Motor Co. Ltd. What ■ 
■ Ford is hoping is that the Cadi 
; Advance Accounting System will 
reduce the company’s long-term 
;and shmt-termcaai advances by SO 
"percent 


Underwriting profits in both the 
parent the domestic gxoop 
were reduced by around I 30nm- 
Jjon DM by a hailstorm in the Mu- 
nich area last July that cost Allianz 
315 miTK fm DM in Mr. 

Schiereasaid. " 

In additiop, the domestic group 
was burdened by high losses on 
North American reinsurance busi- 
ness, while a hoped-for improve- 
ment in earnings on foreign nonlife 
- b usiness did not materiaSyg. 

Mr. Sdneren said the reorganiza- 
tion was designed to give Allianz 
closer control of die performance 
of each of its profit centers. 

• It calls for divisions between do- 
mestic and foreign business; be- 
tween primary insurance under- 
writing and reinsurance, and 
between those operations and Al- 
lianz’s financial activities. 

As previously announced, Al- 
lianz Verachenxngs-AG mil be- 
come a holding company. 

P&W, RoOftRo^De Venture 

The Associated Press 

EAST HARTFORD, Connecti- 
cut— Pratt ftWhitney has signed a 
licensing agreement with RoDs- 
Royce Tnrbom£ca Ltd. to build a 
new, advanced-technology military 
helicopter engine, the company an- 
nounced Tuesday. The engine is 
designed by Britain’s Rolls-Royce 
Ltd. and France’s Tmbomfca S A. 


TnamooddSays 
It May Sell Its 
Century 21 Unit 

■ The Associated Press 

• NEW YORK — Transworid 
■' ^C^.sadTudriaymlwardof 
directors have authorized man- 
agement to explore the . sale of 
the company’s Century 21 Real 
i Estate Corp. subsidiary. 

Transworid also said its 
board has approved a plan for 
the company to repurchase cm 
the open market ova the next 

its 3^i»nriILmn sbaresmmand- 

able sale of Century 
21 would benefit Transworid’s 
shareholders, the cha i rman , L. 
Edwin Smart, said. 

“It would simplify our busi- 
ness mix. and allow us to con- 
centrate on opportunities in our 
food and lodging businesses,” 
he said. The company is consid- 
ering acquiring other food and 
lodging operations, Mr. Smart 
added. 

Last year, Transworid spun 
off its anfine, Trans World Air- 
lines, to its shareholders. The 
ahfiae is currently the target of 
a. hostile, $600-miHioii bid. fra: 
control by New York financier 
CadC Icahn. ‘ 

Century 21 is one of the larg- . 
est franchised real estate sales 
t H g an jz a tions.in the world. It 
has more than 1 6,400 franchised 
lookers and 75,000 sales asso- 
ciates in the United Stales, 
Canada , and Japan. It earned 
S20 nnffirat pretax profit on rev- 
enue of $64.1 million last year. 


Ajinomoto Co. Sees Drugs 
AsPronusingGixnvthArea 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Ajinomoto Co., best known for its flavor-enhancer 
monoxxtium glutamate, expects drugs and biotechnology products to 
be its biggest growth areas in the next 15 years, its vice president, 
Tadao Suzuki, said Tuesday. 

The company is diversifying from cancer research into research on 
hypertension and antibiotics, he said. 

Ajinomoto holds the for the potential anti-cancer agent 
interieukm-2 and has. applied for approval from the Health and 
Welfare Ministry to market an anti-cancer drug, Lentman, which was 
jointly developed with Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co., he srid. 

Mr. Suzuki also said that Ajinomoto plans to enlarge its amino acid 
plant in North Ca ntina and may build one in Europe, thong h it has 
not decided where or when. It will complete other amino arid plants 
in Thailand and the United States this year, he said. 

Ajinomoto’s sales of amino adds, including the low-calorie sweet- 
ener aspartame, show a 20-percent annual growth rate compared with : 
a3- to-.5-pCTOTl growth rate for prepared foods and other products, 

Aspartame alone showed a 100-peroou increase in sales in the fiscal 1 
year ended March 31, he said. 

At present, only Ajinomoto and GJD. ScarleA Co. of the United- 
States produce and market aspartame through iwfrniraT and supply 
agreements mriiirtmg a joint venture in Europe. 

Toyo Soda Manufacturing Co. announced plans last month to start 
European production of aspartame in 1987, when Searie’s sales patent i 
expires everywhere except m the United Stares. Toyo Soda said it may 
start selling its aspartame from Japanese plants before then in 
countries where Scarte has no patent. 

Mr. Suzuki said Ajinomoto was confident about tmrint* wring hs 
lead because it will have larger plants and better technology. 

Ajinomoto last week announced parent-company net profit of 
11.87 billion yen ($47.4 million) in the year ended March 31 against 
1039 billion m the previous year on sales of 44737 ffiffion yen against ; 
423.40 bOHon. 

It forecast net profit of 1230 billion in 1985-86 rat sales cf 465 
billion. 


COMPANY NOTES 

ANZ Banking Group (New Zea- 
land) Tirf- said it bas bid for 50 
percent of Metropolitan Life As- 
surance Co. ANZ has offered 3.45 
New Zealand dollars ($235) per 
share for the stake, valuing the 
company at about 28 million dol- 
lars. 

Gwunttzbonk AG will announce 
on Wednesday details of its 
planned offering of dividend right 
certificates. Commerzbank won 
approval at the awwnal meeting to. 
raise capital through the issue of a 
maximum 500 nmhon Deutsche 
marks ($162 million) in certificates. 

CSR Ltd. is expected to report 
sHghtly lower or unchanged profit 
when it reports earmpgs Wednes- 
day for the year ended March 31, 
share analysts said. The diversified 


How Big Finns Juggle Cash 


(Continued from Page 9) 
fro an the check-clearing system for 
another day. 

Next, the banks were willing to 
overlook overdrafts bya prominent 
customer, ' not realizing that there 
was a pattern to them. 

Finally, Hutton relied on “Fed 
float” — inefficiencies in the 
check-dealing system that resulted 
in the Federal Reserve’s crediting 
the bank in winch a check was 
deposited a day or more before the 
bank on which the check was writ- 
ten was debited by the same 
amount. 

Today these factors are no longer 
so prone to abuse, and bankers and 
corporate treamen say Hutton’s 
methods would be far less Kkdy to 
succeed now than a few years ago. ; 

Even *m«ll banks, for example, 
have computers that teD 

them instantly how mod money in 
an account has cleared. And banks 


say they are more vigilant today.. 

“We bounce checks when we 
need to,” said Boyd McDowell, 
president of the Chemung Canal 
Trust Co. in Elmira. New York. 

Mr. McDowell's bank "was 
among those that EJF. Hutton de- 
frauded. Since December 1982, 
Chemung Canal Trust has had 
computers that show what deposits 
have cleared. 

Check riearing has speeded up as 
well, and Fed Boat has dropped 
dimply. In 1979 an average of $63 
b2Han a day in checks was credited 
to one hank but not yet debited 
from another Last year the average 
was down to $400 million a day. 


Bank and Thjst Company 

Cayman Island,. West indies 
oftetwg 


11 % 


Paris Boone to Let Allied 

Rams 

■ PARIS — Allied Corn, will soon 
be listed on the Paris Bourse, the 
exchange announced Tuesday. The 
company wfll launch 83.07 mSEon 
shares, priced at a nominal $1 
apiece. 


180 Day 
Eurodeposit 
amounts over 
$100,000 u.s. 

Member 



INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


Wegtpacto Lift Prime 

Reuters 

SYDNEY — Westpac Banking 
Crap, of AnstrgBa said Tuesday it 
will lift its prime' lending rate to 
1725 percent from 16.75 percent, 
effective next Monday. 


TENDER NOTICE 

The oompume Milieu nc poor le D&vdoppeneut ties Textiles (CMJD.T.) 
BJP. 487- BAMAKO (Mau) Hereto gma notice «t invitation to tender for 
the supply of fcrtilaca in two indmaMe lots » fbDofcs: 

Lot No. 1. 22.000 tons fota«er NPKSB (142334-6.2 or 1). 

Lot No. 2. Jxl50 tons urea {46 nuts of nftrQgei^. 

.PLACE OF DEUYERY 

CAP co truck at CMDT warehouses MALI. : 

or Free on trade or Free on rail ABIDJAN DAKAR ' ' 

or Free on nil, carriage paid to BOBO-X«OU$LA5SO (BURKINA FASO). 

' DELIVERY DEADLINE . 

F^rtlw Gist place trfdeKvt^inmAoMBi IS, 196StoFdKuary 28, 1986 
For tlx second and the (laid places « ddrrarf from August 15, 1965 io 
1965 to Jwnsij 31..1906. 

' PARTICIPATION 

Qpni tp «n from LRRJ). member coantries. from Smttciand or 

from Taiwan. 


Bids written In French, mmt be send to tlMJD.T. B.P. 487 BAMAKO 
(Mali) or handed in at their office in BAMAKO by. July 6, 1985 2 p.m. 


TENDER NOTICE FILE 


thy be obtained front: 

• FSA«CK-« 9 , rie * ChodKJOA 75006 PA 1 B. 

• WEST GERMANY -Lnh mima w 54.53 BOWt BAD GODESBBRG. 



EO 
CASSETTES 
- DEALERS, AGEN TS 
. PRIVATE USERS 
Hi^h quality. 
Unbeatable p ri ces 
From U3.119.90 
per casGeoe 

Sahsuntul quality diKonnls. 
L000V of titk&i 

European & American standards. 
AB Arpmotu ionredonr expense. 


For catalog and infarmatbx, contact: 

VIDEO,. P-O. Box 3299 
Limassol, Cyprus. 
Telex 3392 PRC CY. 


INTERNATIONAL 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Appears every 

WEDNESDAY 


Upjohn Benefits From Hair Drug 


By John Crinkle 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Upjohn Co. 
may be several years away from 
receiving U.&. government approv- 
al to sell what could be a revolu- 
tionary hair-growth ointment, but 
thousands of balding men are said 
to be already using a homemade 
version of (he product. 

And while toe U.S. company is 
still a long way from «eing the full 
financial impact of its drug, called 
minoxidil, Upjohn may already be 
realizing considerable benefits 
from the cottage industry that has 
grown up around the compound. 

Minoxidil has tie approval of 
the U3. Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration, but as a (ablet taken to 
treat hypenemdon. Years ago. how- 
ever, Upjohn scientists found that 
the drug promoted hair growth as a 
side effect More recently, doctors 
have been putting patients on min- 
oxidil not to fight hypertension, 
but to grow hair. 

Dr. Michael Larin Reed, assis- 
tant clinical professor of dermatol- 
ogy at the New York University 
Medical Center, said be had “at 
least several hundred people on the 
drug right now.' 1 He said there were 
a “zillion people prescribing" min- 
oxidil for hair growth. 

While such use by doctors is le- 
gal, the FDA said, people might 
not get the desired reailts. Upjohn, 
meanwhile, has been contending 
that some sellers of the homemade 
product may be infrin gi n g on com- 
pany patents. 

A question re maining about the 


resources group earned a net 
$9139 mini on in 1983-84. 

Dow nwnifti Co. said it will 
acquire FQmTec Corp. in a $75- 
xmllirai transaction. Dow vrillpay 
$21.75 a share in cash farHlmTec s 
3.45 millio n shares. The takeover, 
approved by directors of both com- 
panies, wifi require approval by 
HhnTec shareholders. 

HeuM KGAA said it has bought 
just under 25 percent of the out- 

manufactura°^om 
the founding family. The stake re- 
portedly cost $79 million. 

EEeson’s Brewery PLC agreed 
with Boddington’s Breweries PLC 
on an offer for all of Higson’s is- 
sued share capital not already 
owned by Boddington’s. Bodding- 
ton’s holds a Z 8-percent stake. 


IBM Japan Ltd. and Computer 
Service Crap, have agreed to set up 
a joint systems engineering compa- 
ny to be capitalized at 300 million 
yen $1 2 mmion), 65 percent owned 
by CSK and 35 percent by IBM. 

International Controls Corp. said 
it has received an unsolicited offer 
from Arthur M. Goldberg, forma’ 
president of Triangle Industries, to 
acquire the company for $27 a 
share. The indicated value of the 
offer is $85 million. 

K mart Cora, plans to open 200 
new retail outlets this year. Only 21 
will be K man stores, and the oth- 
ers will be outlets for Walden 
Bodes and other retailing divisions. 

Prarigo Inc. grocery chain has 
appointed Pierre Lortie, president 
of the Montreal Exchange, to chair- 
man and chid - executive officer. 


drug’s use in combating baldness is 
whether it will be absorbed through 
the skin and produce unusually low 
blood pressure. 

While a debate exists ova how 
effective the drug mil be against 
receding hairlines. Wall Street is 
unanimous in behoving the product 
will be important fra Upjohn. 

“Topical minoxidil fra male pat- 
tern baldness could become one of 
the largest selling drugs in the 
world and transform Upjohn into 
one of the fastest growing major 
domestic ding companies,” raid 
Ronald M. Nordmarm. an analyst 
at Oppenhdmer & Co. 

The investment community’s ex- 
citement ova the hair ointment 
v as obvious last week when the 
mention of min oxidil in a routine 
report by another Wall Street ana- 
lyst, Paul Brooke of Morgan Stan- 
ley & Co., sent Upjohn’s stock 
soaring 513375 a share for the 
week to a final price of $11025 on 
Friday. 

Mr. Nordmarm believes minoxi- 
dil, if approved by the FDA for 
external use, could generate about 

Henblein, Mitsubishi in Pact 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Heublem Inc., a 
subsidiary of RJ. Reynolds Indus- 
tries, said Tuesday it had reached 
an agreement with Mitsubishi 
Corp. to form a joint venture to 
expand the distribution in Japan of 
Smirnoff vodka, Inglenook wines. 
Wild Turkey bourbon. Grand Mar- 
nier liqueur and other products. 


replacing Antoine Tunnel, who 
hoped start the company in 1969. 

Thorn EMI PLC, a mqor suppli- 
er to Smriair Research LtcL, said it 
has no plans to take a major stake 
in the troubled computer company 
as was reported in the British press. 

TVansrAnstrafia Airlines is seek- 
ing government approval to buy 12 
Boeing 737-300 jets. 

United Industrial Corp- has 
framed a joint- venture company 
with China International Trust & 
Investment Corp. and China Shan- 
dong International Economic & 
Technical Corp. to promote tour- , 
ism, invest in agriculture and mod- ! 
cruize and improve industries. 


Gold Options cpricnbs/aa 


$500 million in annual sales for 
Ugiohn and net income of $204 
mmiotL Upjohn’s total sales in 
1984 were $118 billion and net 
c ammg s woe $1733 million. 

But Upjohn may already be see- 
ing some benefits of minoxidil's 
popularity fra hair growth. While 
Upjohn will not disclose sales fig- 
ures fra any (tf its drugs, Nord- 
miwn estimated that sales of mm- 
oxidfl tablets, under the brand 
name Loniten, wonld grow to 
about $30 million this year, from 
only $7 million in 1983. “The 
growth is dearly not coming from 

the hypertension market," hie said. 

It was in the early 1970s that 
Upjohn, a pharmaceutical compa- 
ny based in Kalamazoo, Michigan, 
noticed that minoxidil tablets were 
causing hair growth in patients. In 
1977 it began investigating whether 

the drug, when applied externally 
as a liquid, could arrest the balding 
process. 

An Upjohn spokeswoman said 
the results oT the studies were not 
complete, but she added that the 
company expected to file for FDA 
approval of the hair ointment lata 
this year, beginning a licensing pro- 
cess that usually takes about two 
years. 

But thousands of men apparent- 
ly have sidestepped the barrios to 
using this drug, with the help of 
medical doctors. 

To convert minoxidil, the hyper- 
tension drug, into minoxidil, the 
hair treatment, 180 tablets are 
crushed and mixed with water, al- 
cohol and propylene glycoL 


Courtaulds 
Profit Up 
8% in Year 

Raders 

LONDON — Courtaulds 
PLC, the fiber and textile man- 
ufacturer, said Tuesday that 
pretax earnings fra the year 
ended March 31 rose 8 percent, 
to £1283 million, from £117.8 
milli on the previous year. 

Sales increased 5.4 percent, to 
£115 billion from £2.04 billion. 

Capital spending in the year 
rose to £126 million from £84 
million the previous year, the 

company said. 

It said that CourteDe Fiber 
bad reinforced its leading mar- 
ket position in Europe with the 
acquisition of Cyanenka SA, a 

Spanish acrylic-fiber producer. 

In South Africa, a new plant 
at Saiccor Parity Lad. is en- 
hancing its competitiveness as 
an international supplier of dis- 
solving woodpulp. Internation- 
al Paint PLC continued to pro- 
gress in the expanding 
powder-coating market, it said. 

Courtaulds said its BCL Ltd. 
packaging unit increased its ca- 
pacity for polypropylene pack- 
aging film during the year and 
that a further production line 
would be added in 1985-86. Na- 
tional Plastics Ltd. opened a 
bottle-cap and laminated-cube 
plant in the United States. 



DEGREES- 

KENNEDY -WESTERN 


90 451 550 18503000 

SO 0001450 

330 >75-1023 

30 STS- 725 

250 250 SO) 

350 200-350 

SO 


CM53M35-3M73 

VakmWUteWcM&A. 

1. Q— I *■ Mom Sh oe 
1211 Gown L Switnxtn* 

TcL 3IOZ51 - Tdn »3«5 



TENDER NOTICE 

The coopuiite JVtdienne pour If Dcveloppenunt des Textiles (CM.D.T.) 
BJ*. 467 - BAMAKO (Mali} hereby gives notice of invitation to tender for 
the supply of fertilizers in two indivisible lots as follows; 

Lot No. 1. 22.000 ions fertilizer NPKSB (14-23-14-6-2 or 1). 

Lot No. 2. 5.150 tow urea (46 units of nitrogen). 

PLACE OF DELIVERY 
CAF on truck at CMDT warehouses MALI, 
or Free on truck or Free on nil ABIDJAN DAKAR 
or Free on raiL carriage paid to BOBO-DIOUSLASSO (BURKINA FASO). 

DELIVERY DEADLINE 

For the first place of delivery from August 15, 196S to February 28, 1986 
For the second ami the third places at delivery from August 15, 1965 to 
1985 to January 31. 1966. 

PARTICIPATION 

Open to all suppliers from LB.RD. member countries, from Switzerland or 
from Taiwan. 

BIDS 

Bids written in French, must be send to GM.D.T. B.P. 487 BAMAKO 
(Mali) or handed in at their office in BAMAKO by July 6, 1965 2 pan. 


TENDER NOTICE FILE 


May be obtained from: 
CMDT- BJ*. 487 BAD 


CMDT- BJP-487 BAMAKO (Mali). 

CFPT - 13 Rne dc M oaeea a . 75008 PARIS (France). 

MALI Embassies 

• USA >213 R Street Washington D.C. 

• BELGIUM- 487, none Molitee 1060 BRUXELLES. 

• FRANCE -89, me dn Clierrhr Midi 75006 PARIS. 

• WEST GERMANY -LmsensnraMc 54, S3 BONN BAD GODESBERG. 


Modern Banking 

IN THE FINEST 

Royal Tradition 


Hypo-Bank 

Strong Earnings 
in1984 


TJayerische Hypotbeken- 
JJ und Wechs el - Bank , Mu- 
nich, recorded another good year in 1984. 
Group assets rose by &2% to over DM 105 
billion with net profit increasing by more than 
50%. Total assets of the parent bank grew 
by 9-8% to DM 70.2 billion. Earnings were up 
by some 45%. 


T T ypo-Bank’s international 
JOt business continued to 
develop favorably in 1984, with the accent 
on foreign commercial transactions and fee- 
related activities. Considerable progress was 
also made toward strengthening the Bank's 

correspondent banking network. 


T he London and New York 
branches were able to meet 
the high performance levels set for them. In its 
13th year of activity, HYPO BANK INTER- 
NATIONAL S. A. in Luxembourg increased 
its total assets by 5% to Lfrs. 146 billion and 
continued to broaden its Euromarket and private 
banking facilities. 


G ermany’s oldest joint- 
stock bank; Hypo-Bank 
is celebrating its 150th anniversary in 1985. 
With Southern Germany’s largest branch net- 
work, offices in key foreign markets, and 
membership in ABECOR, Hypo-Bank’s ser- 
vices span the globe. For your copy of our 1984 
Annual Report, contact our Internationa) 
Department, A/PK, Theatinerstrasse II, 
D-8000 Munich 2, TeL: (89) 2366-1, Telex: 
5-286535, S.WJJ.T.: HYPO DE MM. 


Highlights of our consolidated 
Balance Sheet for 1984 


Total assets consolidated 
(Total assets parent company) 


Total loans 

General banking 

Mortgage banking 


Total deposits 

and long-term liabilities 

General banking 
Mortgage banking 


Shareholder’s equity 


32,790 

53,304 


46,647 

54,153 


105,137 

70,236 


86,094 


100,800 



f> n »W fti g i «>poOiwwi i -iinflulgc9ia»ew* 













Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Pai 


Tiiesdayfe 


MSE 


Closing 


Tatties Include toe nationwide prices 
VP to tin dosing on Wall Street 
and do not refleet late trades etsewbere. 


T 


12 Month 
Hhfti Lw 


Stock 


Sis- Ckgy 

Dtw. YB. PE lOtetUtfi Low Quot. Wee 


PiJ 


-was 


day. 

chan 

In 

BaU 



(Continued from Page 10 ) 


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24% UM UG1 ZS4 87 
25 19*+ UGI Pf 775 11J 

1196 7 UNCRn 


2190 48% 47*6 47% —1% 
589 33% 31% 31*.— 

TO U U*4 14 

0 23% 23V. 23% + 

180x 24 23% 24 + 

37S 9% 9% * 


Ss. SSmCh'pn HwfSt- ! 

mu wt pe i nftn L ‘ t r t> 1 "w Quot. eng 


» Si 3*4- 


— *6 


s* srS-s'B a “a; ss v 


KSffiSU! S 


H% 25% »** . 

42 42 *?.. + - 


1396 

4« 

1% 

20*6 
21*4 
WM 

’5*4 wun»" 

™ 24% Wnunet 

8% 3 U wnue« 


32 

753 

40* 


12% >22 
«A 49, 


*9* 

im 


9WCNA 

WPOCI 


0* JS? aou * 2 

i 


IUM 82 UnPCPf 7 OS 6J •££? ,n 30 

20% 9*4 untroyi -w J 13 raft am w* % 

3* m Ji ,a r-s I IT gams 3 S ■' ■* 


M* 18% “* ‘1 



£ « >i ■jg S» I" 



W6 19% UlltalDf 3J7 Mi 
28%r 21% UlltUPf 40 H5 
14% W UllhiPf V0M2 
22% U% Unifind 0 1ft 1 
43 33 Unltlnn 0 8 35 

0 S UJarBk Ui U 1 

UM 9*6 UMMM W 

2% 2V6 UPWl . I 

38% 22 UUlrO .12 A 7 

8*6 SM USHom _ „ , 

42% 29% USLAP8 M 23 ft 

37t 73 USShee 0 U 14 

2?** 22 USStafl 10 38 3D 

58V6 *9*4 USSHuf A4lem 
135% 11596 U5S«prOJS JJ 
9 2216 USS11 Pf 725 78 

a I 

a . w " 

at as aar “ a 3 

21 14% UWRB 

33% 2196 UnltnM 
21% 14*4 Unlvor 
24 7% linvDev 

27*4 IBM UfllvPd _ — 
23*6 15% UnLeef WO \ 
S3 30 Unocal L20 75 8 
34% 32% UnOCf wd 


10 68 12 

0 .9 15 

JO 42 7 
.15 8 17 

10 48 11 


jrr ■ lea 

21 11% 12% WM— » 
MN ^ *2? 3 2S + 

2405 8% •% JM 

"giS 5 S-«. 

471 Tnt 74% 7MJ— *6 

3feSB:; 

£ S. SK S 5 :™ 

5M 3rt6 34 3fl6 = J* 


«% 14% Whtttok AO +T ^ 2 WM gg; S 


.10 L4 

10 41 




’5 m !! 


43 


83 9W*W<11 ■" |2 

&■&!*« 7 

5 2 WltmEI 

n% «% WHaiirO 

50*6 7% WeinOO 

n% s% winner. 

i 

mm at SSS 5 m? l i 

SS 2396 WWCPS 2* ^ 

28 


4 tS + V. 


ft* » 

ig 

iflfes 

* 1 S oSt oK 

00x8* >4 5 

NBOr 73, 55 MW- ‘1 


0 

20 


SS Z7*i wtido 10 
9594 9% WoIvt W & 
25% 18*6 WOodPt 
44% 32 VVaMHl 
4% 2*6 WrtaAr 

A wrwv 

3% Wurlfzr 

10*4 wvmup 
17 wvnns 


3591 »»»- J 

S MM + % 

J?* 


_ 3 
38 M 
44 » 


90a 30 13 


1 8S* - 2T-« 

4T7 J*. 

a 

a Ra sSS " 11 

Mil* 

g \\* Ik ik- % 


4953 34% W .3*6 ■ 


«- BBS B K S STEFS 


fia, SS H 3 HTJS iS i 53 ” 1 ssm sba jtm 

EESSJot-wS* fc-* 

27 2194 UIPLef 20 107 

2796 21*6 UtPLP* 20 IM 


5096 3396 Xerox _ J2S W»1 


4ft*6 4W6- 'h 


i5 


22*6 17*6 UtPLpf 1J4 1U 
lf*6 15*6 UfPLPf 28* 10J 
2(% 1596 untice lJ2b 55 

2?i 17% U1flCppfX*J l J 
23% 18% U1U CO PT Ml 118 
S 2996 UtllCOPf 432 171 


7 «iL 24 2696 + *6 

10 27 24*6 34*6- M 

175 S*6 21% 2296 + M 

S 19% WM 1»% ^ 

M 34 23% 24 — % 

3 21% 21% 29% — M 

423 2ZM 22% 0% 

3 34 3* 34 


+ 96 


X 34 ZBMCP 10 *8 * 

am 19M TOlaplA 0 38 

2396 13 ZOPOfa ■•* *8 ** 

73% 32 zavre. ., 80b 8 W 

56 2* Zavrryd 

a WM zenHhS 

21% 14*6 Zero* 


’isri 

UB 12% 12*“ W% 


+lik 
+ u 


9 

IJ U 


j 5JV> 55% SJ” - % 
HH n*6 23 n%— M 

8 18% 18*6 


71 10 


34*6 21*6 VF Com 1.12 
12*6 5% Valero 

23*6 M Valer pf 384 158 
4Vt 296 Votoyln 
38% If VenDrt JO 42 * 
*% 7* vans 
139* 5% Varcopt 

46* 27% Vartan 06 J IS 

^ ir^S- 5 3 SS 

,r s« «-»“ 

37% 40% VaEPpf 884 113 
84 48% VaEP Pf 9^ I ) O 

MV6 519. VaEPPf 7 AS 1X5 
■a 11% VWiave 
41% 2ft VPmod 
78 40% VolaiM 20 


829 34% 3496 M% + % 
2475 12% 11*6 5% + % 


17 9% 3*6 J% + S 


IW8 


14 
11 
71 11 


401 31 3»* »% + M 

44 W 9*6 10. 

TO 2096 20 »6+ g 

137 7*6 7% 7*6— % 

U W% WJ6 »% 

?&£ S*0 + % 

2om 79 79 79 +3% 

I0ta 83% 83% 83% , 

T?sasas*a 

a at as & +* 


NSW HIGHS 


AmElP" 
AnhexmerB 
AtlRhSTSP* 
BooEMBerf 
COnPoe wt. 


w 


4* 38% 73 28 — 96 

W 34% 34% 34%— M 
0 18*6 189, 1Mb- M 
49 8*6 8*6 8*6— V. 

794 S3*. 51*6 59*6- g 
739 3M6 76* 0*6 + M 
91 22% 2296 77* + * 
75 3596 35*6 35% 

381 37*6 37*6 37*6 + M 
3 UL S09L 50% + M 

jakatat+M 

¥ irsw aig \ g at % 

SB? si 

mt 8*6 way Go* 0 73 9 35 996 

12% 4 WecmU — ... 333 

™ nu Jfta .9 M 


2996 22 W1COR TOO 42 7 
38*6 21% W0N» L» 77 II 
25*6 16% wacknr JO 72 
10*6 4% Welnoc 
52% 3596 WaIMn 0 5 26 

2896 14V. wotarn s 19 

23% l»VftHra»»4J „ 
38% 24 waicsv M LS 17 
37*6 22 WalUm 10 77 8 
» H% WelUB# 10 M 
25% 17*6 women 0 U 13 
30% 17 wmCm 


41H 2896 Wamrt- 10 M U 
21*6 14*6 mdlOl 184 7,9 8 
nil. ISM WiBNOt 10 4.1 ■ 


Cnpw4l4e< 

DavtPLPfF 

DunBrod 

Ethyl* 

FtHaMwdn 

GnMetrEjn 

GHSuaaoaf 

Houalnt*25 

InlCWItaM 

JerCnlTSPt 

UNonlnd 

wood Coro 

WMtceaw 

Nawbaii 

PactHCRao 

pseoeupf 

RaknCImm 
SuprMkl 
USLIFE IK 
VaEPM4p( 
WaitJ 140pf 
wutCa 


jummnrwt 

SaiiGMa . 

BkivnUOiFf 

CanPEnta 

CIBU430* 

CroenCn 

SSS’SJU 

aagr 

FtHawPan , 
Gnanatr S wt 
Hnrlondjna 


Ir *g rer,f 

mmmi* cm 
«?« 

OuafeorOdlB 


AmStarea 

■klvnUGpfA 

SS sx 

Dartrcrnri 

tSSA 

Mebu 

HwrairtCa 

iSfflSk 

sarass* 



TWA 
UttPLXUPf 
IMMOri . 
worn Lamb 
zumind 


wfiriisi 

ajr-* 

wc “» TSSm 


Wotpraan* 


53*6— M 
24—96 
9 916 + 96 

5*6 * — % 

32% n*6 32*6 + ** 


NCW LOWS 


PtdWPreP BMft.cjjj* 



U.S. Futures m »28 


HW» 


Ooen High Law Claw CtM. 


1770 14t0 Mar 1390 1390 U90 m« ^ 

U10 1*00 May WD 

1570 1420 J9.I 

1100 179J5 SOP 

Eil Satoi 209 Prav.SOtat 20 
Prow. Day OPanint. 7792 up » 


Grains 


40 

18 It 
7J> 9 


10% in 1 - ion 

t'hL 


+ % 


10 

10 


18 13 
66 11 
4.1 16 

19 8 
U W 
14 10 
BJ 15 


0 5 
0e 71 
0 48 X 


WHEAT (CBT7 , 

*». m -*% 

174% 114*6 Sea 1» l«g; 7W 

3L4T.6 1W Dee 128% 10»» 124% 30% — 0% 

JJT% 131 MOT 133% 3J3% 72FL U0 — 

Ha X22% May II* 11*6 717 

172% 101 Jltl 30 M0 

Etr.Sale* Pnex.Salai 17*7 
P%^OmGMnint. 4101 off 45 


COPPER (COMVX) 


717 —85% 

7«t% 7*4% —JU* 


CORN can 

500 be mlnimunutaitarsper bratwf 
UI 3J3 
131% UO 


Jui ZJ4 174 173 172 —82% 

Sap 2J**i 20% 2J7 157* —0 

D*C 754% 254% 153 753% — 03 

Mar 24596 £45*6 142*6 242*6 —88+ 

mar 10% up* 70% ut% —0 

hj in UI 247*6 20 —8596 

Cm in 353 25396 25396 -JHW 

Prxv.ScJei 11498 

Prev. Day Open tm.10201 i»*i 

SOYBEANS tem 
S0Qbu mini mum* dollars per biatiai 

70 S0 

75* 555 


2*5 

710 

3J1VJ 

284 

20% 


Esl Salas 


254 
245 
27096 
2 JIM 
257% 


10 

A3 


14 12 
O 10 


0 

A2 

.90 

10 


47 
U 12 



oct 

DOC 

Mar 

May 

Am 

Oct 


Cfoie Pravlwrt 
High LOW Bid Ask BM ASX 

SUGAR 

Starling nor metric ton 
AM 9640 940 9S0 960 950 9680 

- - «90 tiksa WM 990 raso 99M 

1050 1040 1040 18540 1040 1050 
1110 1170 1180 1180 1170 1180 
1210 1210 1310 1210 1210 1220 
1280 1270 1280 1280 1240 1270 
N.T. N.T. 1320 1330 1310 1310 
Volume : BOS lets of 0 tans. 

COCOA 

Starling per mettle ten 
May 1076 1J73 1J75 1.70 1J47 1J74 

Jhr 108 1J91 1J9A 1J97 1J96 1J9B 

Sep 1J90 103 US4 1787 UH4 107 

Dec L7S5 1J44 10*6 100 1J46 1J*8 

Mar 1.7W 1.750 1J58 1.7W 1.7S3 1.7S5 

May 1JU 1JH 1 J68 1J7* 1.740 I.T7S 

Jh> N.T. N.T. Ua6 1.783 UM U75 

Volume: 2XD0 lets of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric tan 
May 203 3JK0 1052 7055 705* 1054 
2OT7 204 10*0 205 203 2JPa 
Zl« 713* 7135 7138 7137 71M 
7190 7183 7182 7190 7182 J98S 
7342 7228 2J35 7240 7220 .. 
7310 7210 7320 7223 7205 7313 
N.T. N.T. Z1B5 7215 IIM 7218 


Jhi 

Sea 


Jan 


May 


Volume: 109 Iota of 5 tons. 


Jiv 


GASOIL 

U-S. donors per metric Ion 
Jua 2710 2180 3180 218J5 3190 21*0 
3190 7170 2170 2170 2180 2160 
2200 2180 21U50 218-75 21775 219-00 
2210 HOW 2J9.W m0 W3 mi» 
3230 3230 2310 22750 010 2230 
2220 2220 2230 2250 2230 2260 

BS 

_ N.T. N.T. 2200 2310 2220 2310 
volume: IMS lata of 10 tarn. 

Sources: Returns and London Petroleum Ex- 
ehanae (easoH). 


Od 


Jan 

Fab 


Haw offering 

CBOT 


BOND 

futures 


3 & 


FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

AJsoFunirL-sjnil 
Fuair«4 0ptici!i'«ii 
COMEX-OO ld & SILVER 
JMM-CL’RRENCIES 
Iok OuTOtassiGn Raid 


*25 


* ROUND TURN 
DAY AND 
OVERNIGHT 


• Afftn eo/j u trad* 
txretdmg "? w dOUnxa per 
SS5CT month. FM JW 
untmos 3L s t nend tm_ 


C*ii me of aar profaSTonals: 

2 1 2-22 1-7 1 58 


REPUBLIC CLEARING 
COBP0BATI0N 

452 Fifth Avenue. ^ 10018 
AnAIBWerf 

IgpaUk Ratfeoal B8Bh oi^ **• »** 

AnSI IJ BiOimiCmaiiicioil Bant 


Aslan Commodities 

May 28 


t 


HO NO-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJLS ear ounce 

dose Previous 
Hlab Law Bid Ask BM Aik 
MOV . N.T. N.T. 3130 3150 3140 3160 
Jun _ 3140 3140 3130 3150 3140 3160 
Jly — N.T. N.T. 3150 3170 3140 31B0 
AM _ N.T. N.T. 3160 3160 317.08 3190 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 3200 3370 3210 3230 
Dec - 3260 3240 3240 3260 3250 3270 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 3290 3310 3300 3320 
Apt _ N.T. N.T. 3330 3350 33*0 3340 
Volume: 22 lets of max. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
USIl 


>700 

8720 


Jun, 
Auo . 


See . 
Oct . 


High 

3150 

3190 

N.T. 

N.T. 


volume: 121 iota of IK ax. 


Low Settle 
31450 31*0 

31640 316*0 

N.T. 320 JO 

N.T. 3220 


Settle 

31SJ0 

319.70 

3210 

323-70 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MatayWan cent* per kilo 
dose 

Bid Ask 

Jun 19*0 1950 

JIV 1930 19X75 

Auo 19450 1950 

Sep 19650 1980 


Volume: 27 lot*. 


Prev lo os 
Bid Ask 
19150 19*0 

19750 1930 

1940 l»30 

1960 1970 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
Ciosa 


RSS I Jun_ 
RSS1 Jlv_ 
RS52 Jun_ 
RSS 3 Jun— 
RSS 4 Jun— 
R5S 5 Jun_ 


Bid 

16950 

14625 

1470 

16525 

16125 

I562S 


17050 

16675 

16625 

16625 

16X3S 

15625 


Previous 

BM AX 

17025 770.75 

1690 169.50 

1660 1690 

1640 1470 

1420 16*0 

1570 1590 


CiOH 

Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Starting per metric tan 
Spot 8700 B710 860® 

forward 8930 8940 8930 

COPPER CATHODES (Higfa Grade) 

^^ PW U9o!oD ,O r.1920 1.18*0 1.1850 
tarward 1.100 1,1900 1.1860 1.1890 
COPPER CATHODES (Slmtardl 
Start lag pot metric ton 

mot 1.1790 1,1800 U770 1.1790 

forward 1.1790 1.1800 1.1780 1.1790 

LEAD 

Storting per metric ion __ 

mot 2940 2950 2940 2940 

forward 3000 010 300 3010 

NICKEL 

Starting per metric tan 
mot 4*450 44500 44500 4*550 

art 44350 44*00 4*00 4010 

SILVER 

Pence per trey ounce .. . 

SPOt 47650 4790 4860 *840 

forward 4940 49S0 5000 010 

TIN CStaadtad) 

Starting per metric ton 
mat 9.4*50 gjuxoo 9000 9050 

forward 9000 94100 95500 95510 

ZINC 

Starling par metric tan 
mol <050 <060 

forward 6140 6150 

Source: AP. 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rtnoeHi par 25 teas 



BW 

Ask 

130 

1370 

Jly 

— 1.180 


— 1.10 

1.10 

Seo — 

— 100 

1.10 





_ UM0 

100 


100 

1*70 




MOV 

- 1iG20 

100 

Volume 

fl Iota of 25 Iona. 

Source: Reuters. 



1280 

1.180 

1,110 

UNO 

1JJ70 

120 

1240 

12*0 

1230 


1230 

1230 

1.1W 

1,140 

1,110 

UNO 

1280 

1280 

1270 


Dividends May 28 


Per Amt Pay dec 


INCREASED 


Brush Wellman 
Mletilgan Erov Res 


+28 

+17 


STOCK SPLITS 


Eldon Indus — 5-f«r + 


ssrs'wW** wd 


USUAL 


Bectan OkklMM 
Blount CLA 
Blount Ci-B 
CamerFra 
Eldon Indus 
GapSioros 
Merck 4 Co _ 

Putnant Fd Boston 
Putnam HO tnc Gv 
a- A nnual.' M-Manfhlv; O^uoritarlv: S-Stmi- 
Aanuol. 

Source: tIPI. 


0 

0 

+28 

Q.! 

11 'A 

7-1 

Q 

.10 

7-1 

q J 

n% 

7-2 

a 

A* 

7-1 

Q .11% 

6-17 

Q 

0 

7.1 

Q 

2t 

+10 

M 

.10 

+17 


66 


US. Treasury BiD Bales 

May 28 


Otter BM YMd 


Pm 

YMd 


j-mantn 
6-month 
One nor 
Souraj: Salomon Brothers 


723 

757 

70 


721 
725 
7 57 


7.46 

7JS 

616 


743 

7J7 


618 


London Metals 

May 28 


Prevtooi . 
BM Ask 


6310 

4430 


6320 


S&P 100 Index Options 

May 28 


»** Caib-um 
Prict Jna At Aog Sen 


- 3*6. - - 


13% W - 16 

H MW 1116 13 
A i m k 

1W 3 4W 5W 
5A6 1W » 1W 
ivw w w lit 


Pids-Losi 
Jhr Aug 


- 1116 W 

l/ift in* 
int « 

11/16 I’*, 
in n 
TM 7U 
12 - 


lint i 
is 7in< 
*6 * 

8V. I 


TtMcdiveimi UUU 
TtadeeBoaealet.iNJl* 
TbM pot mean! 7L177 
TMalNtapaiaL*07.SU 


MO* 18424 


>18351 0«KI8Ul-ai8 


Source: CBOE. 


Japan Doubles Assets 
Invested Externally 


The Associated Press 


TOKYO — Japan Iasi year dou- 
bled its net assets abroad to a re- 
cord high and joined Britain as a 
leading creditor among industrial- 
ized, democratic nations, Tokyo's 
Finance Ministry announced Tues- 
day. 

Attracted by high U.S. interest 
rates, Japan invested heavily in 
portfolio investments in the United 
States for the major part of its 
£74 J billion in net overseas assets, 
according to the ministry. 


ratTHElATESTWOfiDON 

EUROBONDS 

READ CAR. GEW1RTZ 
EACHMONOWMIHEIHr 


Cash Prices May 28 


ComnwBty and Unit 

Coffee* Santov lb 

Prlntdotti 44/30 38 %. vd __ 

Steel billets IPHt.l.ton 

ran 2 Fcfarv. Philo, ton 
Steel scrap No 1 hw PIN. _ 
Lead SaaL lb 


Coaeer elect, lb . 
Tin (Straits), lb. 


Zinc. E. SI. L. Basis, lb , 

Palladium, az 

Sliver N.Y. az 

5puroe: 4P. 


Tue 

Year 

Age 

10 

1*Z% 

0*3 

X7I 

4730 

4530 

2130 

2130 

760 

100-101 

20-21 

25-28 

71-73 

491+73 

S.98 

Osd 

0*+*7 

X52-J3 

104 

154% 

602 

Clad 


Paris Commodities 

May 28 


Clese 

- HJgb Lew BM Ask Chtae 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric ton 
Aug 1JBS 1270 120 1282 +* 

Oct 1303 1290 1300 1305 +2 

Dec 1230 1J30 1320 1330 +2 

Mar 1385 1370 1377 130 +4 

May N.T. N.T. 1422 1JX +4 

Aua 100 100 1295 100 +9 

Ext. voL: 740 Ms el 0 tans. Prev. actual 
soles: 1,10 lots. Open Interest: 17.905 


COCOA 


Freadi francs per TOO ks 

Mav N.T. N.T. — 

2*95 

+ 20 

Jiv 




7130 

+ B 

Sep 

205 

2*75 

2*75 

205 

— 5 

3ec 

2*45 

205 

7033 

7040 


Wor 

2*45 

204 


2*50 


Wav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2*45 



Jhr 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2*50 

— 

— 


67T 
60 
609 
7 M 
109 
60 


Ext Seles 


5012 

671 

661% 

5.92 

683 

605% 


Jut 50 40% 554% §2M» — -JJM 

AUB 50 6*5 60 JS8%— 

Sep 5+1% 50% 653 50M ->.12% 

Nav 50% 671 50% 50% 


Jaa 678% 57* 
Mar 50 589 

Mery 699 699 

Jcl 603 _633 
Prev. Safes 17*3* 


— u 

520% 571 U. 

581% 682 — .UL. 

589 689 —1* 

595 695 —.13% 


Prev. Day Open I nL 41318 up 4*5 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTJ 
10 ions- donors ear too 
19650 11990 Jui 

12290 
1250 
12770 
1340 
13*0 
1420 
1470 
1540 


IKU» 

1790 

100 

1840 

1*30 

20650 

14750 

IiumH 

E8t. Salts 


Prev. Dav Open InL 5307 off 4 


... 1180 1190 1170 1W.M — 710 
Aug »w« 12190 12090 12I.W -8.JW 
Sep 1250 12650 12X90 £H0 — 720 

oS moo moo as nuo -sxo 

DK 1330 T»0 13230 m0 —710 
Jaa T340 13650 1350 13610 —LTD 
SS- S?0 UJ0 1400 M0.10 —280 
MOV 1460 1440 1*50 1460 —730 
JVl 1500 1500 1500 1490 
Prev. Soles 7113 


SOYBEAN OILtCWn 
mm lbs- dollar* per W0 

3273 2270 JM j»70 

3195 £0 

31.10 220 Sep 2L15 

3037 2290 Od 2735 

290 2290 Dec 2435 

29JJ7 2X40 Jan 260 

■m*n 2440 Mar 250 

SS 2440 May 2630 

2S3S 250 Jui 2448 


3055 

2970 

■non 

2735 

2644 

2605 

250 

250 

240 


300 

260 

2789 

27 J)5 
?*i»* 
2572 


3009 

2894 

2797 

270 

3613 

2575 


— AS 


era c«le« Prav.SataS ,8934 

^OwOpealnL 39306 up *49 


2491 

340 


3493 


OATStCBTI 
S0O bu mhUmum-dplIare 
171% J9 
179 191% 

182% U*% 

tOTi 10 Mar 


Jill LSI 66 LSI* 18W4 10 

Sap LSI 191 I-** L4W* — 

Dec UB I9SV. 194 TJJtt 

mot IJffW — 

ZmiJ* v* '*** 


^DwOpanliAWM UP1U39 


Livestock 


CATTLE ME) . 

*000 Ito^ cents par to. 

*535 S»0 Jun 

ala 40*5 Auo 

^90 4X10 Oct 

aAS *10 

Oja 47W Feb 

aS *30 *«■ 

4425 4625 Jun , % w Jf" 

E^Sies wjH?. £r®SsttL2?^ 

Prev. Dav Open lot. BEf «»454 
FEEDER CATTLE CCME3 
44JWR».-centaeerJt. ajz 

MAO 490 


4393 

6655 

430 

4458 

450 

44*5 


4X40 

450 

4395 

4485 

450 

64*5 


420 


410 

4455 

450 

AKAD 


4227 —10 
449S 


4X55 

440 


450 


=s 


6447 Aug 


Eel. vaL: 36 lots of 10 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: tl lota. Open Inieresi: 674 


4XIFFEE 

French francs per TO kg 
MOy N.T. N.T. 200 

JIV N.T. N.T. 2*30 

Sep 2925 2925 15m 

Nav N.T. N.T. 2940 

Jan N.T. N.T. 3970 

Mar 29B5 2985 2970 

MOV 2978 2978 2963 


200 — 30 

2*80 unen. 


2927 

2985 

2*00 

S0O 

2993 


— 14 
+ 10 
+ 10 
+ 15 
+ 13 


Esi.vcri.: 13 tata of 5 tens. Prev. actual sales: 
11 lots. Open Merest: 243 
Source: Bourse du Com m erce. 


DM Futures Options 

May 28 

W. Germ® MoMEflD mora oris oer mort 


Strike CatU-SdHa 


Price Jan 

sop 

Dec 

JOB 

tap 

Pcc 

38 

2.15 

2*1 

3J& 

0*1 

an 

fm 

J1 

1.17 

131 

237 

XO 

X59 

0.8s 

32 

X38 

10 

1*2 

824 

0*7 

1*4 

33 

ftJH 

XB4 

10 

091 

1*9 

1^ 

U 

MS. 

X56 

1*2 

10 

117 

244 

IS 

X01 

X34 

X75 

784 

193 

104 


ENfmetad total vaL 1954 
04to: Fri. woL ljmoeM tot*4*7S 
Puts : Fit yol, UH spu InL S7JW 
Source: CAflE. 


New Zealand Ends Trade Pact 

United Press International 

SINGAPORE — New Zealand 
is revoking trade preferences for 
Singapore and Brunei because of 
their economic progress, the acting 
New Z ea lan d high commissioner, 
George Hors burgh, said Tuesday. 
The move was immediately criti- 
cized by Singapore’s Department 
of Trade. 


7370 

55 52 S 65 480 sxw 

5S NOV 4**5 490 

7M0 6&S9 J*®! 7075 700 

nsn 6610 _ Mar 

EsS. Sales 1*11 Prev.SotaX 


£90 

490 

4895 

490 

700 


490 

4*0 

4873 

490 

700 

700 


—.IB 

+0 

—.10 

+.10 


_ 1933 

open InL 709 up«7 

SSSiSStaP-rO, 


Jul 

Aue 

Oct 

DaC 


4870 

SITS 

580 

470 


%% %% 

5T75 4U0 

5005 *470 

MB'S 4625 

SS *650 


Apr 


eras 

450 


480 

510 

510 

470 

4870 

490 

440 

480 

49.10 


4885 

SCL95 

5745 

47JJ2 


51-52 

510 

47*5 


*9-07 

450 

*80 

490 


4575 


—85 

+sn 

+0 

+.13 

—.14 

—.15 

+.15 




PORK BELLIES tCBMD 


■ 8095 

7420 

750 

750 


SPSS'S 

402DHB 

4X15 

H 

TWO 


Feb 

Mar 

MOV 


470 

4680 

7355 


00 450 


740 72*5 


— 1 '-H 

4650 —77 

7255 S3 

In 

7X75 — 0 

7*0 -0 




Food 


JoT 14*0 M6M 1**40 14*0 -^0 


Ub U6*0 M640 V45X5 145^ -X 
Se 14575 14679 MS.10 '«a -9J 

JjE W*75 U475 1440 M40 -f| 


01 


W M 

100 1»90 

14670 1290 

i*59n 1280 

!hs w 

FbLScI** FVcv.SatMLOM 
pra^Dm’ Open Inf. 13955 aff7B991 

SUGARWORLDlt tNYCSCEJ 
^U^rentoperlb. ^ 

1 i SS S si 

3 K£y S 

US Ml *65 40 


1*2.13 

14198 


+.13 


90 

7.15 

*74 5eP 
AM 


298 

XU 

339 

370 

*14 

*0 

*55 


jto) Qgf 419 4£9 

5958 Prev. Sales 6 121 

ESt.SqTO^SPtar^ OH110O 


*87 


203 

119 

330 

371 

*U 

*31 

*58 

*70 

*87 


+M 

+JB 

—JO 


+81 
+0 
— JQ 


Prev. Day Open ■ 


a*»£«*SSE hM 


3059 


2082 

20*0 


2021 3047 


300 

3025 

017 

3017 


3073 

2059 

3040 

3044 

2056 

3061 


-12 


40 

+12 

+n 

+12 


Sts iei7 scp 

fig ms Dec 

5 S SS sss 

JsL aSS’p^.M- MR 

Qjmiwe JUICE CIO'CEI 

ISMOtoB-cCTtaWWj 14iM t*aiS 14L20 -30 

U*« !^2 si 1410 1410 mjo 1»0 -30 

uL 1*835 1400 138.10 1380 —30 
jS 1400 1400 1»0 U80 -745 


Metals 


9S0 

6595 


•710 

8*0 

8*30 

■00 

7*00 

7*0 

70.90 

NUO 

700 


560 

•10 

570 

570 

510 

190 

00 

61.10 

•10 

420 


rib. 

May 

4795 

43.9S 

Jun 

Jul 

4X50 

4X55 

Sea 

*425 

4*30 

Dec 

44.90 

•50 

Jan 

Mar 

4S-90 

45.ro 

MOV 

45*5 

65.45 

JM 

430 

till! 

30P 

4640 

4648 

Dee 

Jan 




4V70 


410 

<30 

630 


**» 

680 

410 

610 


460 _ . 

44J10 Mar 

E st. Sales 1100 Prey.SjNe* 6»* 
Prev. Day Open int 84*13 up450 

ALUMINUM CCOMBX7 
40 «M lu.- cents ear . lb. 


•uo —10 
•LTS —US 
420 -J0 
aua — UO 
•INI —10 
<xn —10 
440 — »*3 
x*ao —10 
4SJ0 -10 
*50 -Ui 
4470 —US 
4635 -10 
4670 —10 


470 

480 


4790 


May 
Jun 

Jut 
Sep 
Ok 
J an 
Mar 
Mav 
JM 
Sep 
Dec 
Jan 

Mar _ 
EB. Salex 3* Prey - ,, 331 
Prev. Dav Open int. 100 up 13 

SILVER (CQMBX) 

500 troy ox.- cents per trov er. 


00 
MM 
59 40 
7*30 
70*0 
760 
730 
4675 
430 
5710 


47*0 

00 

470 

4670 

00 

5L73 

510 

5X95 

5*0 

510 


00 

480 


47.15 

00 

00 


4*33 

49*8 

500 

sum 

510 

52*0 

530 

SXB5 

540 


-0 


— 0 
—JS 


-05 

-as 


151X0 
409 
146UD 
11810 
1230JO 
12160 
117X0 
104X0 
9460 
940JD 
799-0 
789 JB 
77X0 


May 

Jun 

JM 

Sep 

DOC 

Jan 

Mar 


Jul 


Dec 

Jan 


4128 

08O 

4150 

4310 

<360 

4390 

000 

040 

<720 

<750 

4950 


6130 

5980 

61*0 

4359 

•360 

4290 

•510 

0X5 

4730 

4750 

4960 


5530 
•120 
5420 
5730 
5900 
5960 
4070 
•310 
400 
•410 
4470 

7188 Mar 7BM 7WO 

EsLSatax MO00,ltagv.Mrt 1M3I 
Prev. Day Open In*. 76*12 up ZB 
PLATINUM (NYME1 
0troy ax.- OM lore per troy 
24X00 2SQ0 — 

2870 2510 

4490 2*10 

39X00 2500 

37X0 2400 


5M8 
S98J 
9990 
in* 9 
41X0 
4299 
6350 


<770 

<730 

*)WJ> 


7070 


5963 -17J 
999* -179 
6075 
099 

030 — MS 
6366 — JM 
4Z50 —111 
64*3 —190 
65*3 —193 
64*7 —199 
480* -9X1 
4856 — 2X2 
6870 


s? sss ass ass s&s =ss 

” WE OTJO HUP -W 

Ed. Sales 2044 Prev.Sahtt 1911 
pSflDSoSnlaL 11,757 off 115 

PALLADIUM IN YME) 

TOO troy asr dollars per ax 

1140 1I1O0 May 

1590 TOOTS Jun 1000 *010 

141.75 1BU5 Sop 1000 1«M 

1410 10025 Dec 990 1080 

T270 UQ0 MOT 1000 WO0 

11*00 n*O0 Jun 9675 9X75 

Ext. Sales 105. Prev.Satae 1037 

Prev. Day Open I M- 708 up 1 ft 
Ext. Sales 1065 Prev. Salta 1037 
Prev. Dav Open ink 7008 upM2 

COLDfCOMEJO 
TOO troy ax.- dollareper frov a*. 

3270 2930 May 

5100 2870 


9600 

9575 


970 

980 


9630 

9670 

9610 

9610 

9610 

97.10 


3810 

2970 

3010 


4960 

43SJ0 


39530 

3930 


3310 

3350 

3420 


Elt.SalM *000, Prev- 5u>« 20-153 

Prev. Day Open inLTJSOTS affiom 


WLH 

31*0 31*0 30X40 3W0 

Aue 3170 3170 3120 3TX40 -*» 
Oct 3200 TOW 316JO 317.10 —40 
Dec 3250 31*0 3210 — 50 

r.h i w ei 3290 32*0 T9C3C li Til 
Apr TO0 3300 3300 329*0 —50 
Jun 3390 3390 33X0 D*0 ^0 
AUO 3450 3450 3450 TOW 

PK 35*50 35*50 >5*50 3490 -670 


Rnnncial 


9787 

9749 

9711 

91*1 

910 


9791 

920 

920 

910 

91*0 


7+16 

75-15 

7+17 

73-21 

7738 

72+ 

71-18 

71-1 

70-17 

703 


mw 

w-g 

1800 


14X40 

1410 

141.10 

14X70 


US T. BILLS (U4M) 

SI ml men- Ptao* 1 00 pci. 

9787 87.1* Jun 

97*3 84.9* Srt 

92J01 6577 Dec 

9709 84*0 MOT 

910 E-5I J** 1 

0191 A8JJ0 Smo 

Via* »je Dec n.u 91-15 

900 890 MOT 9B87 »J» 

Eul-Sale* *0O,PW.SM« 
prev. Day Open InL 3708 offSM 
TO YR- TREA5URYCCBTT 
SUaon prfn-ptaX32ndsaf IQOPCf 
- 8+19 70+ Jun J5G* 666 

8+18 75-18 Sea 84-23 W-2 

8300 75-13 Dec 83-27 g-30 

82-24 7+14 MOT g 0^ 

62-3 74-30 Jun JW Jg"l* 

Ext Sales Prev. Sales 7J74 

Prav.DayOBenML 5X635 up 525 
US TREASURY BONDS ICBT3 .. 

(8 pcHMO0»M> 6 32nds MW# oMI 
77-15 57-28 Jun 75« «- 

7+2 57-10 Sep 

7+S 57-8 DOC n-30 

73 S74 Iffar raj 

7>7 5+29 Jun. 72*8 

71- 11 54-® Sep 71^21 

71 5+25 Dec 7M 

70-13 5+27 Mar 70-15 

%% 4W 2 s£ TO® 

EeLSalw 42-24 Solis 9705 

Prev. DavOpen inL233J95 off 207 

6 32nd8 of TOOocf 

72 - 30 57-17 Jim 7J31 73-19 

S3 1 St? & SK 

70-27 M 3wf 

effsilw 45 Prev.Sotas 189 
Prev. Dav Open Int 4J71 »38 
CERT. DEWITfIMMJ 
Si mlllkm- PtaM 180 Pd 
9234 &U0 Juh 

S3 &5 SS 

US £3 5ST ox** 

9X54 870 SOP 

mm 8X34 D«._, 

Est. Sales 573 prev. totes 
Prev. Day Open inf. 5^« 
eURODOLLATOfIMMI 
81 mlllton-ptiaf TOOpcL 

9103 13*9 Jun «0 

*10 6*53 Srt 9Lg 

9X99 8*00 DM 9X88 

MM SS KS JXfl 

9X34 8673 Jun 

90.13 870 5rt «.n 

0939 870 Doc 09J8 

89*7 87*4 Mar 89*4 


770 

-920 

9718 

91*1 

910 


91.15 

90*7 


9711 

9748 

9713 

9L81 

91*5 

9X32 

91.13 

9X94 


+0 

+0 

■kW 

+19 

+0 

+19 


8+20 

84-22 

83-34 

82-31 

82-7 


84 

8+30 

83-27 

S3 

82-18 


■VS6 

+34 

+34 

-M3 

-M2 


7+37 

7+34 

7249 

7+3 

72-6 

7141 

71-4 

70-15 

70-3 

4944 


7+13 

75-13 

7+15 

73-18 

72-26 

72-3 

7+14 

7831 

70-15 

70-1 

69-32 


+11 

+13 

+li 

+1 

+11 

+1 

+1 

+1 

-H 

+1 

+12 


73-5 

72-16 


72-31 

72-17 

72-14 


73-13 

73 

72-14 

71-30 

71-14 

71-4 


+21 

+40 


+90 

-WO 

+90 


9738 

910 


92*5 

91J» 


9237 

9L79 


90*4 90*6 


92*0 

910 

9135 

9X90 

90*7 

90*1 

9X16 


+0 

*.10 

+.11 

+.11 

+.11 

+.11 

+>H 


92.13 

9151 

V& 

9030 

9X38 

9X13 

89*8 

190 


92*5 

91*1 

9X97 

90*0 

9030 


0939 

00 


920 

91*3 

9X98 

90*1 

9X30 

900 

3909 

890 


+0 

+0 

+.10 

+31 

+.11 

+.11 

+.11 

+.11 


EM. Sote» VAO , £*»-***» 5 Sf 1 
Prev. Dav Ooen Int 139*76 iip114 


BRITISH POUND (IMIAJ 

S SS « ?S5 J; 

ue» l ow Mr v»n iam 

a& 0 .SfiSM 4 r- 



Prev. Dav Oee* m*. 0373 e« 


CANADIAN OOLUUk j W MI 


-9 



» ear dir- 1 pom ewMP 
.7915 .7084 JMI 

.1985 0*0 Mm 

JJM .MCI Mar 

em^etM 53 fYiji. Se6ee 108 
prev. Dav Qnen mt MAN uaM8 

FRENCH FRANCCUftMl 

M*f WM" I mWNWI i RE R'.. — - 

:!5S JSB ffi 38:33 :£S:gg 

.10415 .0t*7* _OiC . , „ ■••*** 

fs^sso-n^^a- " 

OMJUAW MAKKI1MM 

» rn aj rif 
1 SS3ll| 

015 30*0 MW 0M -17 


-S 

=S 






Prev, Day Open <nf. 




5 MTVM - 1 point eauMsl 
C0MS9 0 M» Jun 

mam 0*7» 

00*250 03*05 Dec 0*832 J 

80*140 0470 Mar 

Ext. saw W1IJ» s«0« 7381 
Prev. Oay Open lot 17.193 019999 

SWISS FRANC («MM> , 


JOS 


000 JM» 

. ASM ■ 3SS 
*340 3531 

*025 3835 , — • _ . — . 

EstSatae 004 Prev.Sotas MEM 
Prev. Day Open lot XXEE w8*i 




Dec 0*5 0*5 09 




58 


— n 


Industrlois 


4XS5 

4X50 


4X5S 

<20 


LUMBER (CME1 

TOBWIHttV-tyr uu, 

^55 M M30 100 U*w 15530 —40 
mLia mjo Nw 14X0 MX30 15*10 15*90 —10 

ass JS 5 S J 83 S ^ 

S S ^ ^ mo* w* 

EsL Safes *M5 Prev.Sotas 7417 
Prev. Day Open let M14 upSOI 
COTTON KEYCEl 

“wr-cggF-a 
g gSSa* 

7675 6X74 MOT 4X50 

TOM 4*10 MOV 4*10 

mas 4*40 JM 430 

■ksi 410 OCt 410 <10 

EASoW 300 Jhrev. Soles *749 
prev- Dav Open ml 1600 up 104 
HEATII W OIL CNYMB 

42 %3?r^rS& 71.10 710 

7530 4535 JM 300 710 

750 4X25 Aug 710 7135 

76*5 490 5PP 72*5 7755 

77.10 710 Oct 7X05 7305 

7*35 720 Nav 7X70 7X70 

7X25 720 Dec 7535 7575 

7690 7*70 Jan 


820 

4*10 


073 

•10 

•711 

•715 

•745 

•STB 

407S 


•718 — .54 

400 —0 

4233 —AA 
4X35 —AO 
43JC —0 
4432 —-53 

4X87 —35 


7X40 

7X10 

7X7S 

710 

720 

7X0 

750 


760 


740 Apt 


EeL Sales _ . Prey.Sales 1U56 


7X61 —M 
7X19 — LTO 
TOJD —10 
710 —0 

720 —10 
730 —JO 
7*65 —10 
75*5 —05 

75J5 —83 

7*95 —36 

7799 —85 


V l!t . 


Prev. Day Open hit. 18*78 up 3 


Z70 

27.12 

2484 

36*6 


27.76 

270 

2705 

3687 

3649 


CRUDE Ol L CHYME) 
una bbL- donors per bM. 

2M4 2610 JM 

79S7 2435 AUB 

290 340 Sep 

29.38 24*5 OM 

290 24*0 NOV 

2t0 2X90 Dec 

290 2485 Jan 

29*6 360 Feb 

29*5 ' 2*92 Mar 

29*5 2452 APT 

2754 3452 May 

3670 340 Jun 

JU1 

370 360 AW 

270 7505 Sep 

Jun 2607 2607 

Esf-Saiee Prev. Salee Ki-c 

Prev. Dav Open InL 4*82 off 43*52 


2627 

26*2 


3637 

36*2 


2642 

3612 


24*2 

3613 


370 

27.11 

2681 

26*4 

3649 

2432 

3627 

26*2 

2627 

24*2 

3612 


270 —13 

27.19 —14 

2694 —08 

360 —87 


2434 


3687 


2625 —.13 

3639 —13 

3638 —13 

3635 
03 
33 

3625 —13 

3435 —.13 


3 t 


Stock Indexes 


— 1.10 

-,9a 


SP COMP. INDEX tCMJEl 
points mid cents 

WUM 15610 Jun 189.90 19X25 ID*] 1IX.1S 

I960 1400 Sea 100 1930 19133 191J5 

19735 T75JB Dec 196M 1M50 19690 1K0 

^wKp^scSS^i# 5 ’*«• 

Prev. Dav Oaen Int <7393 up 10* 

VALUE LINE fKCBT) 
poMsand cents 

2190 17X00 Jun 20155 3020 1980 1990 jn 

Sep 3050 2063O 2U5S 203ji —130 
moo 3000 Doe Ifiiio 

Est. Sales Prev. Seles 103 

Prev. Day Open InL 7515 up 188 

N YSE COMP. INDEX (NYFH) 
points and cents 

11X90 900 Jvn 11X80 11X15 106*5 1090 

1 UO 9735 S» 1120 112*5 iixk ™ 

D8C 11*50 11*50 1130 1130 

Mar 11130 1)630 1150 ii|S 


—10 


115.15 10130 

1170 W90 

Esl. Soles 10J93 Prev. SaW *382 
Prev. Day Open Int. 13*35 up 101 


—56 

—59 

-AS 

—AO 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's* 


Routers. 


DJ. Futures 


Com. Resaardi Bureau - 


Close 

, f 

ljna.90 

119« 

23120 


Mooay-s : base 100 : Doc. 31, lwi. 
d • preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jams : base 100 ; Dec. 31. 197* 


Previous 
919.90 f 
1AHL4Q i 
121*3 
234 JO 


CBT; 

CME: 

IMM: 


Market Guldp 


BJCSCE: 

HYCE: 
com EX; 

JS£S»I 

KCBTs 

NYFH: 


Odcano Beard of Trade 
Chkago Me re onti l o Excfvanoe 
■ntanianmal Monetary Muf Kii 
StCW^^jorcantllo Enehanp, 

St* Xjri* Ceaa. Sugar. Coffee ExctvmM 
NjwYare Cbttan&^honao “«ktaoe 

srar^saig-,— a? 


p- 


i 



« e-i\ ’ * ♦ 





r 










-r : 


s'S * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Page 13 





Tuesdays 


m i v 


Closing 

ToMet include tfw nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do no* reflect kite trade* etowbere. 
fTa The Associated Press . 


37VS 30 

z* i* 
mu n 

vttk lift 
20* UK 
17ft 1»1 
m su 

T7* S 
lift 5M 
2* 
4* 3* 
5* 3H 
5ft 3 
5ft 3* 
3ft 2 
15ft *St 
«* 8* 
28* 21 


KnGspf (JD t 
KcwafcC - 
Kayo JD 
KayJfl 

Kanafet JOa 

Ketctim JBt 

Kayo 39* 

Kaypn 3D 

KavCa 

KttCtowt 

Kllern 

KbiMfc 

KbWy 

KHMfs 

KtoarV an 

Knoaii 

Knoll 

KanrC 332 l 


UQz 35 Vj 

110 3* 
9 M 
275 11* 

3 17* 
2 16% 

4 BVl 

484 101* 

1 EM 
.33 . an 
7 4* 
84 4* 
219 3H 

5 4* 

4 2* 

31 UH 
£48 13* 
138 38ft 


as* as* 

3* 3ft + * 

15* 14 + ft 

11* 11*—* 
17* 17* + * 
M* 16ft + * 
8 * ■* + •* 
10 MM— M 
9ft m 
3* 3*— W 
4* 4* 

4* 4* 

3* 3*—* 

4* 4* 

2* 2* 

14* 14*—* 

12ft 13 + * 

a j a* + ft 


W* 8* PreaRB 32 f.l 4 
4 m pimu n 

S?S £5* gracra 132 73 M 
£** 3L. PrwEa iJ4 u 7 
20 Wft PWafC 234 113 
P0tP« 437 115 
»* 2ft PbnJa® 


2f» ID Ousts 38 


18 ID* » W* 

IS 3* 3* 3*4-* 
22 21 * 21 * 21 * 

7 31* 21* M* + * 
Cl Wft 19* W» + ft 
47 32* 32* 32*—* 
13 M 3 3* + * 


1 


45 25* 25* 23* + * 



39 

SS 

.12 

J 

72 

U 

42 

35 

Mb 

44 


120 

ft* 

CM 

6* 

U 

J* 

3* 

3ft 

2 

2* 

2* 

2* 

2 

1C* 

U* 

14* 

39 

15* 

15* 

15* 

1 

12* 

12* 

12* 

4 

K 

8* 

Mb 

26 

18* 

17* 

18* 

4ft 

3* 

3* 

3* 

2 

13* 

13ft 

13* 

54 

4f* 

4ft* 

4ft* 

153 

I* 

7ft 

8ft 

5 

4* 

4 

4 

43 

19* 

n 

H* 

15 

* 

ft 

ft 

89 

7TVi 

27 

27* 

38 

27* 

27* 

27* 

4ft 

2* 

2ft 

2ft 

9 

5* 

S* 

5* 

14 

24* 

3** 

Mft 

<7 

«H 

ft* 

5ft 

75 

16* 

U* 

16 ' 

14 

22* 

22* 

23ft 


ID* SCEdpt IjB 107 
2M SCEdsi 1JD 32 
lCft SCEdpt 230 107 
1ft SCEdPf 221 M7 
S3* SCEdPf 7J0 W 
•4* SCEdPf 09* YU 
ft Sprtpf UD 132 
9ft Spcfcaa 09 J 17 
3* SMOOP 

7* Spencer 34 U 3 
M Sendtnn 
1* SMI art 
4* StHovn 28 13 34 
is* sum JO 40 ft 
SNk StdShr UD0sl42 11 
7* s&md an 

4* StrtCop 

1* StorlEf 17 

5* SlerlSft .13a U 2S 
1* Stnrfw 

11* SumtEpflJO 1X1 
4* SunSLn 

li* SunJr M XI 11 
lft* SucrRJ ME L5 12 
* SuoCra 

CM Suplnd JOB U 12 

11* SuorSr M 22 IT 
4* Sonutfi C 

1* SwOCn 12 

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May 28 


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1D8JT0(L» 
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*14510040 




Backing the process of economic 
growth, promoting and funding 
business ventures, financing innova- 
tion -these, fundamentally, have al- 
ways been the objectives of our work. 

And again in 1984, when we 
increased our business volume to 
more than DM 184 billion. We financed 
investments and exports of industry 
and commerce. 

We emphasized our position in 
the Eurobond market by lead or 
co- managing 175 bond issues 
denominated in Deutschmarks and 
other international currencies. And 


WestLB Group 

in DM million 1984 

Business Volume 184,834 


141,494 


3,997 

940 


1983 

(177,432) 

(135,737) 

(3,952) 

(949) 


Total Assets 
Capital 

and Reserves 
Operating Result 
Allocation to 
Declared Reserves 
Group Profit 


we also invested in our staff, in new 
technologies, and in further develop- 
ment of our products. In this way we 
maintain the high standard of our 


■ : . I 

. ■ : * * -v iA 


services which, after all, are those 
assets which can also work for your 
business initiatives. 

WestLB 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 
Head Office: Dusseldorf 
Branches: Hong Kong. London, 

New York, Tokyo 
Representative Offices; Rio de 
Janeiro. Tokyo, Toronto, Melbourne 
Subsidiaries: WestLB International S. A. 
Luxembourg 

Banque Franco-Ailemande S. A. Paris 


Non Dollar 




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A Conference on Trade and Investment Opportunities 

Budapest, June 13-k 1985. 

The International Herald Tribune con- business leaders, bankers and economists. 

ferenae on ‘Trade ard Investn^nt Opportunities ; 

in Hungary" wiD be of keen interest to any execu- . For further information please contact 
five concerned cixxrt future economic reicrfions be- the Inter na tional Herald Tribune conference 
tween East and West. office, 181, avenue Charies de Gaufle, 92521 

. - * Speakers at this landmark conference Neuifly Cedex, France. Telephone: 747 1265. 
wffl indude Hungarian government minsters. Telex: 613 595 F. 




















































till ai<a 2 *ai*oi 3 oiuu.i 4 ux 2 


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Opening for Talk* 
fc Sero in &miiw 




2 FORI 

Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
we’ll give you an extra month of Tribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Totd savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
price in most European countries! 


g «» 


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Ratrf Europe, Norfi Wnon former Freni 
Afrkn, USA, Frendi Rohnea* Mkfck Etta 




shareholders — bui only if Mr. 
Icahn agrees not to vote the 25 
percent of TWA stock that bis 
group already holds. 

In addition, tbe company said, it 
will put Mr. Icahn’s bid to a vote 
only if he succeeds in lining op 
financing, if the federal Depart- 
ment of Transportation "raises no 
objections to Mr. Icahn's fitness to 
control and operate an internation- 
al airline," and if there are no other 
legal restrictions. 

In Tuesday's court ruling, Judge 
John CsnncHa said the court found 
no material violation of securities 
laws in Mr. Icahn’s bid. 

The financier has said bis pro- 
posal does not constitute a formal 
offer, bat insists that Ik will seek 
shareholder action to remove cur- 
rent directors if they do not allow 
shareholders to vote on his offer. 

Shortly before the announce- 
ment of TWA’s merger plan, the 
airline's stock closed $125 up on 
the New York Stock Exchange at 
$17.50 a share. 


Mr. Icahn said he was “grati- 
fied” by Tuesday’s ruling. 

In order to enlist (be support of 
stockholders, Mr. Icahn would 
have to show that he was not going 
to increase debt, or sdl aircraft just 
for the sake of selling aircraft, Mr. 
Maickesano said. 

Although TWA has tremendous 
earnings potential, he said, its 
problems with its unions are a 
drawback. TWA needs to gam con- 
cessions from its unions, “just to 
make them comparable with otto: 
airlines," he said, 

He noted TWA would make an 
excellent fit with other airlines, 
such as Eastern, if it were not far 
the labor problems that could po- 
tentially arise from such an ar- 
rangement. 

TWA, which was spun off from 
Trans World Corp. in 1984, derives 
about 58 percent of its revenue 
from domestic air service and 42 
percent from its routes to Europe. 
It earned $29.9 million on revenue 
of $3.7 billion in 1984. (AP, UPIl 






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in the Trib. 


News hot from the 
trading floor in 




RdiroadK's 
V\yi Street 


Bolivia Will Seek Cot 
In Fordgn-Debt Costa 

Roam 

LA PAZ — Bolivia will seek 
lower interest rates on its foreign 
bank debt of S825 million at- a 
meeting with bank creditors in 
NewYork this week, the Planning 
Minuter, Freddy Justmiano Flo- 
res, said Monday. 

Central Bank sources said Boliv- 
ia wanted interest rates reduced to 
6 percent from a current 1QJ5 to II 
percent with a rescheduling over 20 
years with eight years’ §race. 
■Thte^uaitos of the debt is just 
accumulated interest," Mr. Justin - 
iano said. 


Abu Dhabi Plans 
(HI Investments 
hi US., Europe 

Ream 

ABU DHABI — Abu Dha- 
bi’s International Petroleum In- 
vestment Corp. is studying the 
potential for oil investments in 
Europe and the United States, a 
senior official was quoted as 

^RLhalifa Muhammad al- 
shamsi, IPICs director, told 
ai-Ittihad newspaper that the 
corporation had completed 
studies on 10 possible invest- 
ments and retained four for fur- 
ther consideration. They in- 
cluded gasoline stations, 
refineries and distribution and 
storage facilities in West Gear- 
many, Belgium, Italy and the 
United States, be said. 

Mh. al-Shamsi estimated pos- , 
sible investment in each coun- 
try at $40 million to.S20O mil- 
lion and said EPIC would took 
at other possible investments in 
Europe, the United Slates and 
theFar East 

IPIC. a joint venture between 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 


Page 15 




REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA 




INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


1;; By Brenda Hagerty . , 

i [' 7 Tnimatiomf HeroU Tribune 

LONDON — Apple Computer 
•.Cn’ic. has given a Frenchman the 
y«\tsk of boosting the sagging sales of 
^ •!. s Macintosh petsrai^comptrter. 
^ Apple said it has appointed 
J^n-Loras Gasste, 41, as head of 
; i . viarkctmg and development wmH- 
■;j ^ . fide for Macintosh, a key product 
£uits effort to become a major 
%S : ‘Syer in the office-automation 
jii'i.jaaet 

Gassfe moves to Apple's 
■ i^'-upertino, California, head trace 
.jTMn Paris, where since 1982, he 
U’as served: as presdawEredor 


.. ji eneral of Apple FranceL Hejt 

s';* ^pple in 1981 as director of sales 
jk,' • od marketing for Europe. No one 
i J' j-'ai yet been named to succeed him 
:*£ »s head of the Paris-based unit 
: ^ Citicorp has appointed David 

. Conner country corporate officer 
: ^&3r BnmeL He succedis Docjdas 
r --P .‘ lardy, who was transferred to Oti- 
! :1 i ' Vs consumer cre dit subsidiary 
^r5apan, Gtkorp Credit KK, as 
::Ii readenL In addition. Citibank 
-as appointed A. Mkfaad de Graf- 
,1 1 'l^amed remonal senior officer Lor 
r i? ;.iahrain, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, 
uL.'Oatar, Pakistan, and North and 
Kouth Yemen. Mr. de Graffenned 
^ j.pn also be the bank’s country coc-. 
~,;'orate officer for Bahrain, Saadi 
: >rabia and Kuwait He previously 
> f as with the bank in New York. ' 

‘'■‘•5. First Interstate Ltd. in London 
r^aid David J. Brennan, who-previ- 
was with Lloyds Bank lnter- 
• ig; j‘: * 2 fonal Ltd’s merchant banking 
•* ;;fbbpmHoMKong, wfflbejoin- 
its new first Interstate Asa 
» id. unit as an associate di re ctor. . 


; { > ri-lr. Br ennan will be based in Hong 
j 5- £; jlong and will be involved with the 
' evelopmenL of First Interstate’s 


capita] markets activities- in' the 
Asia-Pacific repot • ? 

Rank Xerox SA in Paris has 
named Lotris-Marie Huanlt direc- 
tor general. He has served as direc- 
tor general adjoint of die company 
since 1984 

J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. 
has nwwiwt Michael Wellman a di- 
rector with responsibiEiy for Euro- 
pean and Noth American market- 
ing and business -dcvdcpmoit in 
the credh and capHal-manccts divi- 
sion. Me Weflman joins the Lon- 
■ don-based merchant bank -from 
Bank of America International 
Lid, where fie was; an esteentive 

director. Schroder Wagg said that 
with Mr. Wdhnan’s appo m troent, 
fhe' marketing and . business devd- 
opment efforts of the credit and 
capital maricets division: will be di- 
vided. into two groups. Stephen 
Brisby, a .director, of Schroder 
Wagg, wffltakcrihargp of the Far 
Pjk>, Austzalariairand UJC teams 

and Mr: Wdlman lhe European 
and North American teams. ■ 

National Camhcrad Bank of 
SM Arabia, has named Rodney 
0. Bath deputy representative of its 
London office, succeeding Patrick 
J. Bradley, who hdd the rifle of 
assistant rq u e s en tativ e. Mr. Bath 
p revio u s l y was in the . corporate 
banking group in Riyadh. Mr. 
Bradley moves to the rank’s head 
office m Jeddah, where he will be in 
the axporambarikmg group. 

Petro-Canada, the Canadian 
state-owned off company, has ap- 
pointed Ai. (Lyn) Evans interna- 
tional exploration -vice president, 
■with responsibility for China, 
Span, Norway and Britain.. 

Essdte AB; tho Swedish maker 
of office equipment, has appointed 
Gerhard lindbdm to its board. 


Bengt Strandbag was a 

deputy member. 

; Dow C h e mica l Co. said Yves Bo- 
. biffier was named president of Dow 
C h e m ical Latin America, based in 
Coral Gables, Florida. He is suc- 
ceeded by Fernand Kairfmarm as 
commercial director fra: the agri- 
cultural chemicals department of 
Dow Chemical Europe in Zurich. 
Mr. Kanfmann formerly was re- 
gional general sales manager far. 
Dow in West Germany, based in 
Frankfurt 

Bof Hansson, a Gothenburg 
trading house active in trade with 
China since the mid-1950s, has 
opened a representative office in 
Bering. Rune Svensson, who heads 
the company's subsidiary in Hong 
Koofe twll also be m charge of the 
new Beging office. 

BiogmNV has named Charles J. 
Ca s ame nto lo the new post of vice 
president, responsible for market- 
ing and licensing worldwide. Mr. 
Casa men to joins Biogen from 
American flntiml Care, a division 
of American Hospital Supply 
Coip. 

- Bank of New Zealand said 
Graeme S. Pentecost, its London- 
based regional manager (IT TC and 
Europe), will be returning to the 
head office in Wellington in June to 

take np the post of relief manager, 

New Zealand branch twmirfnp fes 
successor will be John CHiukDes- 
ton, currently a chief manager in 
the banks corporate interna- 
tional division m Wellington. 

Total Ofl Great Britain lid. said 
Ian Howiti, its director of corporate 
p lanning , the addi- 

tional post of director of 
He succeeds Raymond Leeks, who, 
as previously reported, has joined 
Total Petroleum (North America) 




REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


AUTO SHIPPING 


ALTOS TAX 


:■<:>*■ VO 


HOW TO IMPOST A BIROFEAN -FROM STOCK: NEW *85 MODBS 
cS IWOTHEUSJL^ 500 SB. Sue Slock tneloBk 'Boct 
500 SLBad/PolomiiB 

LAKE GENEVA/ LUGANO ui 

■ ■ ■ - - lefltft- » mdudB.rw* & 


HOTELS 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON. GUEST HOUSE SI 5 pw 

dov. 455 37M .« 202 7325 


COLLECTORS 


ports - Be ^ : 

tTsBablX 

Tour Grita 6. CH-1007 Ltuone. 7000 Shrt^Jrt 1. Ww German* 
Tel 2I/2S 26 11. 11« 24298 5SO CH 


Aho Range Rover, PorsCie. 

Joouar. BMW. 

IS SWAB'S, 1 Benirco, 
2018 Antwerp, Bdmm. 
Trt 323/2315653. The 32093 


TAX RS CARS 
P.CT. 

Ad mdta, oB medeb, brand new 
boMei. 147. 2018 Annweip. BHaun 


Ltd, in Denver. 


Timothy Boyd Wilson 


Morgan Guaranty Dust Co. 
of New Ycik has named Timo- 
thy Boyd Wilson president of 
Morgan Guaranty Intecnatioo- ! 
al Bank, a unit that provides 
inter national finanrial SCTViCCS. 

In addition, Mr. Boyd Wil- 
son, who will be based in Los 
Angeles, wiIL oversee the devel- 
opment Of intemafvmaV |HTvate 
Tvmfrfng services in the Asia- 
- Pacific, Canada, the western 
United States, Bermuda and the 
Bahamas. ‘ 

He was vice president and 
g e neral' mawag w of Morgan 
Guaranty's Hong Kong office, 
a post in which he was succeed- 
ed by Thomas B. Ketchom. 


. Banqoe Arabs A latemafionafe 
fh rau — at of Paris has ap- 
pointed Michael F. Goetschmann 
to its management team, with re- 
^xmatnlityTo 1 rite commodity and 
international trade fiiwuw divi- 
sion. He jeans BAH from Banqoe 
Paribas (Suisse) SA in Geneva. 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 




Td: 3/231 59 00. Tl* 35546 PHC 
Send U5S5 ter mining 






SHOPPING 


IAMB WEAK, mode W nwaure from 
own mound or oun. Near 




SERVICES 


4th, 11 VMIa du Tempi* 
Superb Ifth century restorahan. 


Lage 2 roam, Character! AUTO CONVERSION 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BELGIUM 


For pries vad today 
U0 to 3J0 



FRENCH PROVINCES 


1Mb HBMBS MARTIN, 210 * am. 
sumptuous, port ing , an 503 4752. 


EMPLOYMENT 





EMISSION 

ENGINEERING 


CARS N GOOD RUNNING 
CONDITION. MOST: 

MERCEDES $4,000 

BMW $4,000 

PORSCHE $4,000 

JAGUAR $4,500 

FERRARI 308 $5,500 

TE5TA ROS5A $6,000 


BMW, JAGUAR, AUSTM ROVK 

land Ravei. ABLHD WO. Bee Pncw YOUNG LADY 

iim»<5ate defivery. Coil Hdlond PA/ Interpreter & Tounim Guide 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 

POBax 2178, 5600 CD Mum PARIS 562 0587 

40-424055, fa 51213 HB1A NL 


aiROPORT TAX REE CARS 
Cdl lor free cotdog. 

Bex 12011, Rotterdam Anport, Holand 
Tot 01 0623077. Tlx: 25071 EPCAR NL 


****« 

YOUNG BfGANT LADY PA 
ZURICH 830.58.88. 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 



** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

fat d dn-ones. EPA & DOT FOR A REAL V.l.P. YOUNG LADY 
Daw (London) 01 402 9697/2. Dsnngimhed. Elegcn, MuMngucA 


TOKYO 475 54 80 

Europoan Young lady Campanian 


Iri H mr 3 bedrooms, 2 beta, dress- 
ing roam, 

Inanadant caretakers howe Q 

. (in , IX4in,, 1 r 

imam*, irenw\ srowaj 

kidopenderf jtucfc^ WC, dower. 
French gerden, fa trees, ertet 's stodo. 


YOUNG GOMAN fahion node*, 
hbhly educated, lads far an inierest- 
ing cotition. London 245-0080. 


MVBTIGATTVE Joumdist seeks coat- 
bwom. Noaazfa. Tet fSG(04 8334 


Japan Bank Issues Bonds 


1'ifllion of HWi-pcnxnt Eurobonds 
; > - .ne 1995 and priced ai 100H, flte 
•. !| ad manager, Salomo n Bro tbeo 
^ ?} ^onatksul, said Ihesday. 

; , 'ibe bonds are noucallable, and 


nanng BV is rauzog 70 miTHon Eu- 
ropean Currency Dnits through a 
9% -percent coupon Eurobond 
priced at 100)6, lead' manager 
Dresdner Bank AG said Tuesday. 

The issue, doe OcL 30, 1993, is 
available in denominations of 
1,000 and 10,000 ECUs. Interest is 






• r, : - — -~rr . , ^zr* r i.wu ana iu,uuu ncus. interest is 

payaWe. annually firan Oct 30. 

i' m6 ’ bonds must be paid 

. ■. on, with fees totaJme 2 percent w i * - . 


vpn, with fees totaling 2 
;• pay date is June 27. 
f * . Iredit Bank Ltd. is co-ma 


for by July 1 . - ' 

v * . iredit Bank Ltd. is co-manager. m APB Beni b Launched 

MANILA — The Asian DctcI- 
^ !•! TOKYO —MarnbemC^i. said opment Bank said Tuesday it 
i . £;nesday it {dans to floatSIOO mil- launched a 150 Swiss franc lx»d 
- •- ^v 00 zflto-coiqKwi bonds when issu-. isiae in Switzerland in two 
; 2 g mried conditions me favor- trandtes. with Credit Suisse as lead 

. -,ble. The bands, will be floated underwriter. 

:• : Trough its overseas fin a n cia l arm ^ inA 

, : ; ;1 Curacao, Marubeni Finance f ^ ^ 

’ ^.-IV.ItwffltethefimKnKoqioii 

. sod issued by a Japanese coma- gMdatparand bea rs a ce^ ioa of 

, ■■ ■ -y outside Japan, seomlies iX- 




launched a 150 Swiss franc braid 


• *'yxnces said. 


underwriter. 

The first tranche of 100 nriDian 
francs has a 20-year maturity, is 
priced atparand bears a coupon of 
&A percent, payable annually. The 
.tecond tranche of 50 mfflirai francs 


I’l^tie finance Jmnistry saidjast 
’ rf[ *“ 

o verseas units can issue non-ym, 
: ero bonds presided the proceeds 




SPSXXCSE 


mM ' rwy 








‘ % ^ — aMe every sir months and sulgcct 

, .roMtteoughimtoJijnnL to a mmirum interest of 3% per- 


f , ^ w v j b w uumiuu suimuoi vm wvi 

* 4 Dresdner Raises PUDaS emt and a m a r imum interest of RV5 

■ a FRANKFURT — Dresdner Fi- pereeat .. 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits,' In millions, are. In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated . . 


United States , 
Gelco 

Mfar. SB lit* 

8moH 34U) 236 J 

Net Inc. 52 13 

PerSMm— 038 034 

t ume ■ ims mm 

teven ■ 74SJ> 57&0 

Net Inc. U3 184 

Iter Stare— 1.18 023 






iSSS 


UNION INVESTMENT FranHurl 

— [diunfanta : DM*M0 

FAC MGMT. LTD. IN V. ADVISERS — Id J UnHond* OM23JO 

1, Laurence Paunty HOI, ECAOT-42M480 -id) Unirafc_ : DM7Sfl5 

— <w) F&CAtkmttc S1231 — <d) UNIZ1NS DM1 TUB 

^FACoSSSKzzzrr: ISti Oflier Funds 


Wastvoco 


— (d 

— W 

WM — (d 

**A9 -_(d 

Net lac. 2225 2S23 — «i 

Per Shane— 080. UP —46 

'. tet IMF ' IMS 1JJN —id 

Revenue— tt&7 8CM — (0 

Net Inc. 45J0 ,a» 

PerStarv— U0 130 






Over-the-Coiiiiter 


May 28 


NASDAQ National Market Prices . 


GEFINORFUNDS. 

—tw) EwniwetfntefU Find S34335 

— <w! Scottish Wortd FUnd rilSJH 

— tw) Stale SLAmerfcxto — SlMJf 

CapfLG«dd.IJdLL iu xAflefiUn-4yiC30 


VledeFr A 12 

VtUne - • ■ 

Vtratak 

Vnflech M 17 
vmwi 


HHrt Lew IPACVn 

UD 1 .W.l 
-MM M8 M 
4218 » vn— w 

. -elite Tite lite 
. • 2jra uvh rm— vx 
a* c% m o/*— te 
Ml te to + to 
15 M Mk 414 + te 
. WSMte 1M 1»- Mi 
MM 4Vi 4te + te 
377Mte l«te Mte— Mi 
212M Hte 24Kt 
MtUMr Tlte nte—te 



* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TOUNGUAL VIM A 



PARIS 704 80 27 
VH> PA YOUNG LADY 
MuMmgual 


** ZURICH 558720 ** 

Your Sopta fca wd V LP. indy PA 


PARIS IN CLASS GUIDES 22401 32 
Young lady, efegen*. educated, at- 
*e. mumlngual, fa days & eve- 
& hawb ei Pont & Airporti. 



LONDON. BfGANT muliwduaMd 
Frendc lady companiofL well travefled 
& vemdfa TetPI 0364 fOU. 


LONDON LADY COMPAMON. A 

quafity iwict fa visiton 10 London. 
Please lei (DTI 821 0283 



PARIS NOTE THIS PHONE At ONCE 
757 62 48. Trustful VIP. lady, travel 

COHIPOMA. 


RAMCRIRT. Young lady cocnpcnon. 



LONDON samsnCATB) Gennw/ 

Bench lady campanian. Mufeingud 
' Tefc 01-381 6852 


SINGAPORE INTI GUIDES. Cat Sb- 
734 96 2a 


Interpreter Travel 

61 78 63 



TOKYO 645 2741. Taumg & shop 
ping gmtfa. mtemrafen, etc- 


(K-3^723 12 37 


uuwt esnnan- 

ion & travel guide. 069 / 62 84 32 


FRANKFURT 069/233380. Young 
lody Vtf. PA companion 


HONG KONG K-6712A7 VIP lody 


TOKYO LADY COMPAMON, PA 
CHOICE OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY J Peaonol Awetort 03^56^539 

CBRSES out of Athene (Flraeu) I HOW. KONG. - 3-620000 Young 


HONG KONG 5-79S4S23. Europe- 
bdy companion. 


TOKOYO 586 4674; TeL now fa the 

best Guide, In terpreter etc. 


PARIS YOUNG LADY, tourist guide. 
TeL Paris 807 84 95. 


MAraaiAW ORBITAL bdy com- 
panion and traveling. TeL 771o84 


A Amu 

New Yesk — 

Lae An ni e s - 


2660324 

443032 

7340805 

4757806 

-4526647 6 9 
1212) 5991750 
(213) 8551736 


PAWS LADY MILRMUJUL Travel 
aunpatuon. fait 633 68 09. 






ESCORTS & GUIDES [ ESCORTS & GUIDl 

INTERNATIONAL 
BCORT 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & 


CAPRICE 

BCORTSBtVK£ 


USA l WORLDWIDE 

Head office n New Yat 
330 W. 56th SL, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR OBMT CARDS AND 



* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 


EVSYWHBE YOU ARE OR GOL 

1-813-921-7946 

Cd fae from Ui 1-80O-237-0B92 
Gd free from Horitfc: 1-800-282-0892. 
kneel Etatarn welcomes you bodd 


LONDON 

BOGRAV1A 


T ik 736 5877. 


UMDON 

tortmm Escort Agency ZURICH 

° Scsaoifai't Escort & Garde Service 

T«b 486 3724 or 486 1158 Tefc 01/57 75 96 

AH mofer ovdt card* accepted 


LONDON 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SHtVICE 
01-229 4794 


. ZURICH-GENEVA 

LA VENTURA raioi/Msb^6ua^M^ 86 


m NEW YORK 
TH-- 212-737 3291 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SBLV1CE 
TEL: 200 8585 


TIFFANY 


TEk 385 6290 6 385 1602 


MADRID INTL 

escort saws 

THU 2456548. CRBXT CARDS 


MAYFARCLUB 

GURX SBVICE from Spa 
BOTTODAM {0|T 0-25^55 
Tiff HAGUE (0) 7M0 79 96 


ZURICH 

CAKOUNE ESCORT SBMCL 
Tefc 01/252 61 74 



Al irnjer credB «k acc epte d. 


JASMINE 


* MADRID * 

TASTE ESCORT SERVICE 
IB: 411 72 57 VISA 


_ .London Escort Service 
TeL 988 3163 / 03833 3163 


LONDON TOPS 

ESCORT SERVICE 381 1950 


* AMSTERDAM* 

SHE Escort Stevfa. 227837 


LONDON LADY 

Eeeeit Servfa. Tefc 385 3573 


LONDON E5CORT SHtVtCE. Tdfc 937 
6574. 



MISS SCANDMAV1A 
Cnr e nl i nif ii Emt Service 
Td : 61-54 17 06. OadR cadi 


GBCVA-BE5T 


TB_- 022/86 15 95 


Tel: Vienna 37 52 39 




vraiNA CLEOPATRA Escort Service. 
Tefc S2 73 88 or 47 70 35 


ICW YORK Renee & Gafanefie Escort 
Servfa. 212-2230870. 


VBMA ETOCLE ESCORT SERVICE 

Tefc 56 78 55. 


VBMA VIP ESCORT SERVICE Tefc 
{Vienna! 65 41 58 


NEW YORK: R Bffi Ehwt Service. 
Td: 212-581-1948. 


MADRID IMPACT ararl ad guide 
lervfa. MuUnauaL 261 4142 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Seneca. 

Heofaow/Gataek. Tefc 834 7945. 


LONDON UICY ESCORT & Guide 
Service. Tefc 01-3/3 0211 


MUNCH - BLONDY 6 TANIA Boon 
■Seneca. Tefc 31 1 79 00 or 311 79 36 


MUNCH SUPREME ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 089/4486038 


BRUSSELS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Escort Service- Tat 02/73176.41. 


HAMBURG ESCORT + GUBE Ser- 
vice. Tefc Offi/54 17 42. 


FRANKFURT 4 SURROUNDMGS 
Ofatino'i Escort Service. 089/364656 


AMST30AM RIO ESCORT twice 
020-274074 / 070470154. 


ntANXRJRT “TOP THT* Etaxt Ser- 
vice. 069/S9-6G51 


fRANKR«r JBW4Y ESCORT 4 trxw- 
d service. Tefc Qg/5572-10 


BRUSSBS. CHANTAL E5C0RT Ser- 
vice: Tefc 02/520 23 65. 


^5 V T^34»H 5C °* r ‘ MuHn ‘ 


STUTTGART —lADYEtcat Servfa. 
Tefc 0711/64 98 415 


212488-1666 


Guide Servfa Tefc 283357 


* GB4EVA-FRST * REGENCY 


DAB.Y ESCORT SBMCT 
Telr 022/32 34 18 
4 Weekend A Travel 





212-838-8027 or 753-1864 


FRANKFURT SONIA BCORT Sh 
wfa Tefc 069683442.^” 























































































































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 



PEANUTS 


/ FORGIVE ME, SAY YOU FORGIVE ME 
MANAGER, POR 50 I CAN HAVE PEACE 
L MI55IN6 THAT AGAIN i JUST SAT YOU 
\>LY BAUJ^ -£Z^ F0K6[V E ME! 


r THE GAME 
HASN'T STARTED 
-\ YET„ y 


HOW EMBARRASSING ! 


BLONDIE 


I'LL, have the 

T S^CHILAOAS 
\ RANCHB30S 


ACROSS 53 Food for a pop 19 ' ‘Maverick” 

_ rr ~ . singer? brother 

1 Serbo-Cirauan ^ waste 23 Fencing 

»— so good allowance maneuver 

® V?™,?* opera 57 0m it a syllable 24 Askew 


AND I'LL HAVE 
THE CHIU ^ 
COLORADO ) 


Iff? 






5 so good 

10 Kind of opera 

14 Air: Comb, 
form 

15 Ship of fiction 

16 Facility 

17 Food for an 
essayist? 

20 Meanings 

21 Essence 

22 Practices 

23 Card game 

24 Come 

(meet by 
chance) 

27 Pan of C. I. A. 

30 Partner of Tast 

31 Court order 

32 Headland 

34 Food fora 

comedian? 

38 Philologist 

Mario 

39 Wild talk 

40 Aptly named 
author 

41 State 

44 Plant disease 

45 Hose hazards 

46 Feast 

47 Far (way 

off) 

50 Given an 


BEETLE BAILEY 


58 Gael’s land 

59 Withered 

60 Deep 

(discarded) 

61 Kind of check 
or light 


DOWN 


25 Prepared 
apples 

26 W.W. II riveter 

27 Derrick 

28 “I like 

that leads 
away. . 

Towne 

29 Simunacum 


THE PENTAGON 
(5 CALLING 
SIR y 


I REALLY? 

ARE YOU 
SURE IT© 
FOR ME?/ 


POSITIVE 




1 Pouch ' 

2 Where Samson 


slew 

Philistines 


3 Islands, 

off Galway 


33 Pottage 

35 Armagnac and 
cognac 

36 Albert or 
Charles 


4 Highly skilled 
musician 42 Causdtobe 


ANDY CAPP 


5 Panoramas 

6 Kilns 

7 A Dumas 

8 Miscellany 

9 Items for a 
rummage sale 

10 District 

11 Diamond Head 
is here 

12 Hebrew lyre 


13Casbah 
character 
leMoko 


unsuitable role 18 Wane 


43 Calm 

44 Deceived 

46 Electron tube 

47 Formicary 
dwellers 

48 Diet 

49 Road to Roma 

50 Year in Henry 
I’s reign 

51 Ship's berth 

52 Hawaiian 
staple 

54 Actor Wallach 

55 Like a mad hen 


/THANKS FOR 
r GIVING HUM 
THE LECTURE. 

. VCAR. LET'S. 
V HOPE IT -<| 
( DOES HIM V 
LSOVIEGOOD J 



ICH.'ICW.' 
JUST RELAX 
AND THINK 
OVER WHAT 
l HE Said j 

f TRY NOT \ 
TO SNORE ) 


WIZARD of ID 


9? New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


VWM-rfe YOUP AU.-DM 5 - FAYoP\T& 

STOW, 9P£_P 


C^VIP 

,.4NP 

&MtU 


.~oea\G& \ 
-rue write <6UW | 
nzllMlPHEP (3VEP J 

the &&/m p , i 


NG_eeouse his 

EHTlPE PEf=EHS^ 

mxSer'H/GA 




REX MORGAN 


3 


1 without having \ 

EXAMINED CLAUDIA AND TALKED WITH 
HER, I COULD NOT MAKE A DIAGNOSIS — 
BUT PROM YOUR DESCRIPTION OF HER BEHAVIOR 
Sm COCAINE MUST BE CONSIDERED' 


MEANWHILE. CLAUDIA HAS BEEN TOLD TO 
RETURN TO THE HOME C^FiCE . 


H DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE , 
MR. TOMPKINS f I'M HERE IN LOS 
ANGELES- "AND 1 HAVE AW 
APPOINTMENT SET UP WITH MR. 
?EKl ROMNEY HIMSELF— 


I NO' I'LL 
P CANCEL 
IT.' I WANT 
YOU HERE 
IN THE 




Where can i set hold tt I ■ootfT know. She's 

OF YOUR /VOTERS TICKUSH ALL OVER." 






GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAIE 
• by Herat Arnold and Bob Lee 


LET'S TALK ABOUT THE 

responsibilities AN OWNEi 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to torm 
four ordinary words. 


IMECH 


responsibilities an owner 

ASSUMES WHEN HE OBTAINS 
A CAT. THE FIRST . 
a RESPONSIBILITV IS TO rafe 
FEEP THAT CAT -fig 


I GUE55 WE'LL WAIT TO PI9CUSS 
THE SECONP RESPONSIBILITV 
WHEN WE'RE IN A LITTLE 
v-w BETTER MOOV ^ 


mmft i 




DANGL 






FLANEL 


REVABE 


IN WITH THE 
ARRIVAL OF THIS 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise an sw e r, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


World Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse May 28 

Qosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


cm* h»*. 
Trafalgar K»e 164 aw 

THF 143 139 

Ultromor 231 231 

Unlever c 11 11/3211 11/32 
United Biscuits m m 

Vickers 318 322 

Wool worth BOS 813 


Print answer here: 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: SNOWY EMERY DETAIN GOITER 


Answer What Ihe globe-trotter had— 
A "ROAMIN'" NOSE 


WEATHER 


20 

68 

IS 

64 

26 

79 

23 

73 

30 

86 

21 

to 

21 

70 

26 

79 

26 

79 

23 

73 

23 

73 

U 

57 

15 

59 

30 

06 

22 

72 

20 

61 

25 

77 

2J 

73 

23 

73 

21 

70 

18 

64 

21 

70 

28 

82 

26 

79 

22 

72 

24 

73 

23 

73 

22 

72 

25 

77 

18 

50 

29 

84 

26 

79 

18 

64 

26 

79 

27 

81 

26 

79 


39 

0 

43 

nil 

59 

fr 

57 

0 

54 

e 

46 

fr 

S9 

Cl 

99 

tr 

a 

0 

43 

fr 

45 

0 

43 

fr 

48 

fr 

57 

fr 

64 

to- 

SS 

ft- 

57 

0 

51 

fr 

37 

r 


C 

F 

C 

F 


31 

■8 

25 

77 

si 

19 

46 

14 

57 


31 

88 

34 

75 

o 

35 

95 

27 

n 

0 

43 109 

29 

•4 

fr 

30 

86 

16 

61 

fr 

22 

72 

18 

44 

o 

31 

n 

27 



32 

90 

25 

77 

r 

25 

77 

If 

44 

sn 

23 

73 

15 

59 

0 

40 \W 

20 

46 

ft 1 

IS 

99 

10 

50 

fr 

72 

72 

M 

57 

0 

19 

M 

12 

M 

0 

29 

84 

21 

70 


23 

73 

12 

54 

el 

25 

77 

13 

55 

0 


1 



25 

D 

13 

55 

to- 

27 

81 

Zl 

70 

d 

21 

70 

W 

57 

ft- 

27 

m 

14 

57 

tr 

9 

81 15 

IICA 

59 

fr 

17 

42 

7 

45 

d 

30 

86 

17 

63 

PC 

19 

64 

13 

55 

St 

W 

M 

9 

.48 

fr 

27 

81 

8 '46 

tr 

M 

44 

M 

50 


30 

06 

17 

63 

fr 

32 

W 

20 

68 

ne 

22 

73 

14 

61 

PC 

30 

86 

22 

72 

fr 

21 

70 

IB 

SO 


21 

70 

M 

57 

r 

30 

86 

3 

68 

fr 

21 

70 

14 

57 

r 

18 

64 

12 

54 

PC 

14 

61 

11 

52 

r 

14 

57 

11 

57 

r 

27 

81 

16 

61 

d 


F.T.30 Index : 100638 
Previous : H0140 
F.TU IN Index : 131740 
Prevtafs : MJL 


OUB 

OUE 

ShonorMa 
SlmoDarbv 
Slpore LwkJ 
SHom Pm 
S Sleomdilo 
Si Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


Close Pro*. 
15S 33B 

18? 2 XI 

226 N.Q. 
2JM 205 
MjQ. 3 
6.15 6 l 1D 
107 106 

MQ. 4^48 
206 207 

4JB 400 


yP^BS Ceneroi index : 218J8 

previous : n.n 


Bn wmb 


Conwnt Sleek Index ; HKM 
Pravtoes : mus 


SA Brews 
Si Helena 


West Holding 


Crete Pr** 
820 820 
3700 3800 
695 685 

6650 6650 


Mfltam 


giro its Times Ind I 
Previeasimsi 




Kona 5m Index : ISAM 
Previses: 155778 


Blue Circle 
BOC Group 


Banco Comm 
Central# 
Ovahotete 
CTBd Hal 
Erldanla 

Fsrmitaiia 

Fkrt 

F insider 
Generali 

l FI 

Italeemenil 

ItoHns 

Italmoblllorl 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

W"— '■ 

SME 

Snta 

SnndQ 

srri 


20000 19900 
3331 3330 
BS50 8740 
2300 2300 
9950 9900 
13S?B 14150 
3172 3200 
N.a — 
47200 47700 
8130 mm 
94200 93700 
1440 1479 
86050 87200 
98050 99400 
1705 1719 
6560 6565 
2474 2480 
70500 71610 
002 799.73 
2201 2180 
N.Q. — 
3290 3255 
15950 1578B 
3000 2940 


StecfcMm 


AGA 

AHa Laval 

Asea 

Astro 

Atlas Copco 

BolMeii 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esselte 

Handelibanken 

Pharmacia 

Saab-Scanla 

Sandvfk 

6kuioka 

SKF 

SwedhftMatcJi 

Votva 


365 372 

180 180 
327 329 

435 N.Q. 
113 115 

190 190 

271 271 

297 297 

380 NA 

140 U2 

194 195 

NjQ. — 


365 N.Q. 
89.50 90 

200 205 

215 218 


Previous : 27X70 


MIB Carrent Index : IMS 
Previous : 1350 


TtlOrn EMI 
T.l. Group 


BOOKS 


THE CIDER HOUSE RULES 


By John Irving. 560 pages. $18.95. 
William Morrow, J05 Madison Avenue. 
New York, N. Y. 10016. 


«»*»* AUgxytfVAs— 


„ J«U_ HM/E THEiAND I'LL 
* 0AVaMSSDC».^HAYETHE 
| - ^ — A ANTOBClD 


THEY Y/AWT *THAT WIMPY 
IMBECILE WHORUKlS ■ 
THAT HALF-BAKEP EXCUSE 
\ FOR A CAMP" .tt-n ! 


Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 

T HE RULES referred io in ihc title of John 

Irving’s new novel are the rules that are 
posted by the light switch in the cid«ar house oi 
Ocon view apple- orchard on_ the wast oT 
Maine, where aboul half the action of lrvmg s 
story is set "Please don't operate the gnnda or 
ihe press if you've been dnnking, one of them 

are more or less ignored. An 
altogether different set is followed by the m»* 
grant workers who stay in the ddw towt A 
epical one hdds that if you get in a tanTe BghL 
you cot your opponent just enough to end the 
fighL not enough to hospitalize him and attract 
ite authorities. Naturally, there is a good deal 
of cutting in “The Gder House Rules. 

Similarly, wo sets of rules vie with one 
another at the locale where the rest of Irvings 
novel is seu The law of early 2Qtb-century 
United States says that doctors should not 
commit abortions. But at Sl doncTs orphan- 
age. which is inland from Ocean View and is a 
different sort of orchard. Dr. Wilbur Larch 
follows his own rules. 

“No one.** he believes, “should ever make ft 
woman have a baby she didn't wont to have.” 
Therefore he “was an obstetrician, but when he 
was asked — and when it was safe — he was an 
abortionist too." 

The point — which is driven home with the 
sledgehammer effect that Irving usually uses — 
is that there are always multiple sets of rules 


tinker blows himsdf and his 
dcce* while building 

homer’s and so refers to « * MiHgmg 
disease. An interfering trustee 
Cloud’s orphanage wants to acci»T B Lard» c? 
being "a nonpracticing homewatw- 
And yet the familiar dements M tte niftCft* 
bre. the viotent and the cute aB sem inert, 
controlled and pointed, more dedtwmd tojt- 
ad of advancing Irving’s «oni teward 
nite and coherent xwduuon. ft aas rf h c.&a^ 
made up his mind to stop pretending to be 
anything but s realist wntrng n B QiMH y Ok 
and to devote an bis strengths and ytt i w s a d 
to dial particular end. 



The New York Times, 


BESTSELLERS 



neMraYwkTIan <- 

TtolMt u twtd daioDm boo anc dknZOOO hooteans 
ihioi«h0bi tix Umttd Sim. Wcerioa lai «c bm aaxnxnly & 


ncnoN 


t \ 

Ln 

WnImUs 


1 IF TOKKHtROW COMES, bv SMuev 

SbeMto a — 

2 HOLD THE DREAM, by Barium Taylor 

Bradford 

3 JUBAL SACKETT. by Laois L'Amdar .. 


4 FAMILY ALBUM, bv DaraeSe S»d 

5 INSDE, OUTSIDE, hv KcfUMfl Wook . 

6 THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by 

TomQxDcy 

7 THINNER, by RjchinJ Bachman 

B CHAPTERHOUSE: DUNE. t»y FhuA 

Herbert — ■■■•• 

9 THE CLASS, by Erich Sr**l 


for a given society. Heroism lies in discovering 
.the right ones, whether thev arc posted on the 


.the right ones, whether thev arc posted on the 
wall or carved with scalpels, and committing 
yourself to follow them no matter wtaax. 
Actually, this is a sharper point than Irving 


HOUSE RULES, by Join 


has made in any of his previous five novels, the 
best-known of which nave been “The World 
According to Gup” (1978) and The Hold 
New Hampshire" (198 IV His novels have tend- 
ed to sprawl both in tone and focus, but in 
"The Cider House Rules’* he has positively 
streamlined his form. 

Even living’s excesses seem a tittle less ex- 
cessive. It’s true that the novel is full of the 
mixture of comedy and violence that by now 
has become almost the author's trademark. An 
excessively outdoorsy couple goes swimming- 
in some rapids and gets swept away and killed 
by a log drive. A lobsterman who loves to 


12 A CREED FOR THE THIRD MILLEN- 
IUM, byCoHeen McCuBougJi 

13 THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John 

D. MacDoaild — 

14 PROOF, by Dick Frauds 


IS CUJ7Z. by Elmane Lcenwd 12 16 

NONFICTION 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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□nonn aapo ansa 
□nann arano anna 
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□□□□ E3SI01S 

□nnnnna niniiiEiaBQ 

□E3HE9Q anas bhbs 

□naan □□□□□□ 
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□□□□ □□□□ □sianss 
□bob □□□□ ainaQQ 
DBS E3H3E9 SSOOIOfS 


1 IACOCCA: An AuiohaJpajAy. by Lot I»- 

coocs with WnUsm Nmu — 

2 SMART WOMEN. FOOUSH CWKCES. 
bv Catmefl Cowan ant Mehryn Kinder _ 

3 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

Tom Peters and Naan Austin 

4 WCE UPON A TIME, by Gloria Vender* 

bib 

5 MY MOTHER’S KEEPER, by KJD. Hy- 
man — 

6 LOVING EACH OTHER, by LeoBttscag- 

7 BREAXiNcTwiTH' MO&OwTby ‘Ar- 

kadv N. Sbmbrako — .. 

8 THt S OONG DYNASTY, by Sterirng 

9 T^COUSSTOOtANCTTbyDete 

ab Wbolcv 

10 THE BLOOD OF ABRAHAM. ^ ham 

11 ■TSUR&Y ^YOUTtE^JOKlNGr ~SoC 


FEYNMANN." bv Ricbaid P. Fcyimumt II U 
A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC by Sbri Slwr- 


12 A UGHT IN THE ATTIC by Shd Silver- 

13 CONFESSWS OF A HOOKER,^ Bob 

Hope with Dwawes Nethad 

14 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Rktuud Bach 

15 NO MORE VtETNANB. by Richard Nia- 


ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MtSCEtLANEOl'S 


THE FRUGAL GOURMET, bv Jeff 

Sna& — 

WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, b* Jean Ni* 
detch 


NOTHING DOWN. Ira Robert G. AOn 
WEBSTER’S NINTH NEW COLLE- 

GIATE DICTIONARY 

WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscotc 


O N the diagramed deal 
West defended three no- 


smoothly played low, jutting 
correctly that South would not 
commit himsdf in this fashion 
unless his king was supported 
by the queen. 

Sooth now played hearts, 
and when that suit failed to 
break, be led a club to die jack. 
This held and persevered with 
dubs. Finally another dia- 
mond was led in the hope that 
East held the ace. but West 
took the last four tricks to de- 
feat the game. 

East-West gained 10 inter- .. 
national match points, for in' 
the replay the same contract 
succeeded against less inspired 
defense. 


West defended three no- 
trump that had been readied 
by an artificial route. One chib 
was Precision, promising 16 or 
more points, and two dubs 
was quasi-Stayman. Two 
hearts promised spades, giving 
a transfer effect, and the re- 
maining bids were natural. 

After a spade lead. South 
tried the ten from dummy. 
East won with the queen and 
returned the suit to remove 
dummy’s ace. The heart ace 
was cashed, and South led a 
diamond to his king. West 


NORTH (D) 

♦ AM 
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9>3 

• XN3X 


WEST 

♦ *taa4 

VJ7 

«AJ74 

♦ 75 


SOUTH 

♦ J532 
053 
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east 

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East and Weal w«. vulnerable. 
Hi* bidding: 


Nwtft 

East 

Sotoh 

1* 

Pus 

1 N.T. 

!♦. 

PUS 

2 G 

39 

PM 

PM» 

Pus 

3 N.T. 


West led the sped? xts. 


238 23S 
289 287 
459 458 


174 

Gold Storage 

U9 

250 

447 

DBS 

■ 6.15 

6.10 

468 

Fraser Neave 

i2S 

ia 

450 

Haw Par 


233 

m 

inctrope 

241 

241 

439 

Mai Banning 

470 

625 

254 

OCBC 

935 

930 


Altai 

Asani Chen 
AsaN Stoss 
Bank of Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Cnulft 

CJfOfl 


Dchwa Securities 
Fomie 


414 418 
1060 102D 
873 878 

m bos 

538 533 

1190 1230 
1670 1640 
406 390 

MOD 10X 
620 599 

830 830 
8590 8640 
1550 I m 
1800 1820 


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TO* Power Car® 

2" RoHandA 
FS 9 PwalBank 

Total 


XXusMali index; 


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?Iv, !£-.'« 

S5S 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 , 1985 


Page 1 


SPORTS 


* l - «.i v. vi-^hw 




11**^333 


W 


Celtics Demolish 
Lakers,\ 148-1 14 

Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches their running game with their abili- 

BOSTON — Die Bosun Critics ty to con LtoT fietifensive boards" 
unleashed a blistering . miming (Boston had a 48-35 ed gp in re- 


sbooting 




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BIG BUCKS — Spend a Bade earned $2.6 mfllion, die three 1985 stakes races at Garden State and the Kentucky 
biggest payday ever in thoroughbred racing, by beating Derby. Running the ltf miles in 2:02-3/5 under jockey 
Creme Freche by a long nedf (fi fiasco was anotber head Laf fit Pincay, the 3-year-old colt virtually tripled his career 


game and added torrid shooting bounds). “You can't run when you 
and outstanding defense to rout the don't have the ball and they didn’t 
Los Angeles Lake s, 148-114, in sec much of the ball, did they?” 
Monday's opening gamr of the Na- The lakers had only two leads, 


tional Basketball Association at 2-0 and again at 9-8 on an 18- 
championship series. footer by Earvin Johnson. It was 

Game 2 in tbe best-of-seven sc- the last held goal the Lakers scored 
— for almost three minutes as the 

NBA prv AT ^ Celtics took over the boards and 

: — ruxAig gotthor running game going. 

ries will be played here Thursday. Danny Ainge scored 15 of his 19 

It was a humiliating defeat lor points hi the first quarter to pave 
the Lakers, who swept to their the way to a 38-24 advantage. He 
fourth straight Weston Confer- made seven iof his first nine shots, 
mce title by averaging 131 1 points tocl u c i in g six in a row. “I thought 
a game- Said thelasers' Bob Me- the key was stopping their first 
Adoo: “I don't th.’nV the Celtics break," Ainge said. “It set the tone 
can play any better. If they can, I fortbc entire game." 


fiasco was another 


Laffit Pincay, the 3-year-old colt virtually tripled ins career 


back) to win Monday ’s Jersey Derby at Garden State Park earnings to $3,998^09 and jumped from 20th place to 9e- 
in New Jersey. Along with the winner's pursexrf $600,000, cond on the career earning; fist He trails only Jolm Henry, 
Spend a Buck collected a $2 miffioniKHiasfm'lHving swept a 10-year-oM gelding who has won 39 races and $6,597,947. 


don’t want to see it" The winners’ running game was 

Ahead by 79-49 at intermission, at its best in tbe 41-point second 
Boston set tide-series records for quarter, when they shot 16 for 24, 
most first-half points, biggest half- including two 3- pointers by Wed- 
time lead and total points. The pro- man and one by Ainge. Boston's 
vioos marks were 76 points (the first half included 20-5 and 18-3 
Critics in the first half against St scoring runs. 

¥ - in/nv. _ . . _ _ _ _ . _ 


Evert, Navratilova Gain in French Tennis 

V The Astedaud Pro* Navratilova, meanwhile, cruised ing Claudio Pan&ua of Italy, 7-6, 6- Another West German, B 

’PARIS — Chris Evert Lloyd, into ttetfariroundbv crushing 3,6-3. Better, successfully adapted 


N *»\n<nov 

WJ. . .... , 


toaatsdPrax Navratilova, meanwhile, cruised ingCJandioPanauaof Italy. 7-6,6- 

Chris Evert Lloyd, into ttethnriiOTndby crashing 3,6-3. Becker, successfully 

e Australian Open yiigmia Wade of Britain, 6-3, 6-0. American Jimmy Arias, seeded big-serving, attacking 
last December,' be- ' Jimn^GoiuibtsefiimnaledWest 16th among the men, fdl to quaHfi- 


I'- ta 'l' r 

W.-V.-V » , N is. 


winner of the Australian . Open yii ginia Ws 
championship last December,' be- ' Jimmy Cc 
gan the second leg of the grand German W< 
slam of women’s tennis Tuesday 7-5, but the 


Louis m 196U); a 27-pomt halftime 

_ (New York over the Lakers in 

1* 1970) and a 142 total (Boston 

fl 16TU11S against tbe Lakers in 1965). 

^ w W B/a/ ° Boston's 62 field goals were a 

record for a championship-series 
Another West German. Boris game, and its 60.8 percent floor 
xker. successfully adapted his shooting percentage erased the 


There was no letup. In the third 
period, said center Kareem Abdol- 
Jabbar, “we were just wondering 
how bad it could get And it got 
worse.” The Celtics made 68 per- 
cent of their fourth-quarter shots. 

“You could see their egos crum- 


e to the mark 


area west 16th among the men, fell to quaKG- slow day courts and ousted Ameri- against the Kmcks in 1970. and I suddenlv slanned wi v«rti 

■ « Vi<£ Gentfft. M, WH . Tte Critic, Wtfmd the ,Uter 


bling," said Boston’s 
of 60.6,_set by the Lakers JSpw ^ „ 


wdL “It’s like Fm talking to you 


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ii SV : : ' 

i 

: t< ; 


; l '-> v Helen 


with a 6-1, 6-4 victory over 18-year- was viably annoyed unthhimielf as 
‘old Australian JanmeTbonqtsoa in he made a string of unftntxd ims- 


lo. 3 seed 64. 7-5. 

imsdf as Frenchman Yannick Noah de- 



6-1 in 2Vi horns. GemlaWs showed inside and outside. Kevin McHale, ^ „ r . , . _ * 

glimpses of his old f exm, but gener- Larry Bird and Robert Parish, the jjSSiL?? 1 * ^ AbtU-Jabban *We were just woodoing how bad it could get... 


the French 
Because 


en. tournament, 
her. Australian tri- 


takes during die earl y «t n gp« 
Two seeded players from 


looked like.” 
The game got 


in tbe third 


umph. Evert, seeded No. 2 here, is den advanced into the men’s seo- mck of Czechoslovakia. The toast man star, was forced to pull out of with 26 points, tying McHale for 
the only woman player ebgihle to and round. No. 7 Joalam Nystrom of the country two yean ago when die tournament because of a leg scoring honors. Wedman did not 


shooting period. With 7:58 left, Ainge 
u.i,T; nicked up a lerfimeal foul for 


. the only woman player eligible to 
.. win a SI milli on beams offered by 
"tw: the International Tennis Federa- 
- don to the dayer who wins the 
Australian, French, Wimbledon 
v -*s: and United States titles. 


picked up a ret 
throwing a ball at 


dumped a set enrOTte to an easy 6- he became the first Frenchman injury. His spot in the draw was 
2, 4-6, 6-1, 6-0 victory over Hans- since 1946 to win this tournament, taken by “hidry loser" Emilio San- 

Vh* . rn L J1 J ! rt ■_ -V- ^ L__» 


to the player who wins the Dieter Bwmrf a qualifier from 
ralian, French, Wimbledon West Gennany.. And Stefan Ed- 


berg, the 14tii seed, was taken to a 


Noah stormed bade after dropping cfaez of 
the opening set on a 74 tiebreaker. Prpic of 


i rooL in the draw was miss a shot in 11 tries that induded McHale and Kurt Rambis got into 
lucky loser" Emilio San- four 3-point baskets. a shovmg m atc h , 

pain, who beat Goran Said Ray Williams, who made 6 “Byron got me with a forearm to 
ngoslavia, 6-3, 5-7, 2-d, points ana had 5 assists in 14 min- the back of the head, and 1 lost my 


Defending champion Martina first-set tiebreaker before eliminat- 


and Tm playing well,” he 6-1, 6-0, to advance to the second utes: “Robert, Larry and Kevin cod," said Ainge of the technical, 
round. just took them completely out of which cost him S100. “I thought it 


was a cheap thing , There was a lot 
of that going on — pushing and 
shoving — because they were really 
frustrated. It was that type of 
game." (NYT. WP. LAT) 

Cnsmnghaa Quits as 76er Coach 
Billy Cunningham, who helped 
the Philadelphia 76ers to an NBA 
titleas a player in 1967 and as head 


coach in 1983, announced his resig- 
nation Tuesday. The Associated 
Press reported. During his coach- 
ing tenure, Cunningham. 41. won 
454 gam pc and lost 196 and tool, 
the 76ers to the finals twice. 

His resignation came a week d 
ter the 76ers lost to Boston, h t:r 
games to one, in the Eastern Con- 
ference finals of the playoffs. 


i ■ ' Juventus and Liverpool Square Off for Europe’s Grand Prize 


i w • .h • 

, ll... :. 


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it there win 
Azarili on 


k 1 H S K ' InUroationai Herald Tribute 

LONDON— The godfather has 
n , i - been wmting long enc^i. His fam- 

.*\i Qy tias paid out bflDons upon bil- 
lions of lire; for 25 yeas they pay, 

1 V ' L * for 25 years they wait La Vecdda 
1 ^ Signora — the old lady — had 
. .. , better deSver this time or her bene- 

. . *.^V factor, Gianni Agnelli, maty deride 

she is never going to be worthy of 
, :v ' v -“- hini- 

' ” Agnelli is. the big boss at Fiat 

'•'X r The old lady, otherwise called the 
erf Italy, is Joventus of Tb- 

Rob Hughes ? 

rin. And tbe favor she has failed to 

Vl t ^9 provide in a quarter of a century is 

• *.> the biggest prize in European dub 
' soccer. 

4 *. jf..; On Wednesday mght tiiere will 
3 again be room beside Agnelli on 
. . « * the bade seat of his bullet-proof 

limraimie- He wants to take home 
/ the European Cup from. Heysd 
,-.r 3 Stadium in Brussels; be wants ki 

* • • rignora’s 11 boys to Md (heir 
" ... nerve, play to their expensive po- 

A \.:' ten rial and dethnme Liverpool as 

xhampkHL 

And it is mainly a matter of 
. x* herve. Were both teams at full 
!" ; : s: strength, I would say Juventus had 

>-»- the mer drills. But then again Iiv- 
1 erpooL riddled vritii iiguries and 
' potentially ripe for the plu ckin g , 

v ba_3 the cousiderahle psydxdogjcal 
_^ntage of haring won the cup 
—fonrtimes. 

JT. . Two years ago, favored Juvmms 
lost in the final to Hamburg. Bght 
‘ : -. members of that, team can now 
J. ■’ i make amends, Juventus tabes the 
field a di^itly more youthfhl but 
y,-. less sophisticated force than in 
i- ' ;• : 1983. Goalie Dino Zoff finally re- 
; ;« 1 tired to let in his patient under- 
v ; v study, 30-year-old Luano Bodirti. 

V But depute making the save of his 
-y hfe to k^Bordeaus from winning 

’ . -A ] in tbe ctq> semifinal, Bodini; has 
V ■ • ! 4 lately been left out in favor of Ste- 
v V ’ T : fano Tacconi, a 28-year-old who 
,• V i had faited to settle on six previous 
dubs. 

: / j‘ ^d^m^toan^^^Gentfle, 
... »:■ ’ i * Ludano Favero is a compact stop- 
per, purchased from Avdlino, one 
; -T ' of the dd lady’s favorite domestic 
marketplaces. 

Massuno Briftgchi, the third new 

V recruit, provides pace and direct- 
. v ; i; ness in attack, where (he grey fox 
' ; u >' Roberto Bettega once dneaded Ha- 
s'-- ” 1/s silkiest lines. But at least there 

has been no wholesale disband- 
ment; Coach Giovanni Trapatttmi: 
t , - has kept his head and allows eight 

• A - others to try a second time around. 

> At (he center of the defense, Ser- 

v * =. gio Brio, 6-foot-3 and 185 pounds 
s i.« (1 90 meters, 83.9 kflognms), is 3m- 
; ; movable and sanetimes immobile. 

\ . He and Gaetano Sdrea are the an- 

<; chor, leaving left bade Antonio Ca- 
A ^ii to his cavalier nms.. 

.. ». MkLfiddisruledbytlwprmceof 

! ■■ - soccer. Midid Flami languid in 
J \ the art of creation, took the brant 
; ‘ -of AgndS’s displeasure after the 
■ aip-faial loss two years a^>, bat we 
, ’ " have learned in ins three consecu- 

; 1 .. ;■ tive top Italian scoring seasons^ that 
' a relaxed Platini is more exciting, 

. •* ^ , more daring, than others gcangfau- 

■' . Vteam. 

. ' ... “A superstar, not just a great 
. player" Zoff calls Platini Ottos 
, . do his running. Massimo ftnnhn, 
blond and tigerish, is fw sure a 
*V •" ,jjfcfteer, but Marco Tarddli and 
' 5niew Boniek interlace dfort 

[ ; -with exquisite timing and invot- 

tiveoess rf their own.. • 

■ Briaschi darts between attack 
L / and midfidd, and if there is more 


to say about Ratio Rossi the spar- 
rowlike Fagio of World Cup fame, 
it is dm* he owes his team, his 
COadL Ws pi wadmt hk n atron imd 

even his old lady a full 90nnnutes 
— plus toe goal touch he reserves 
for important games. 

I suspect nothing already in writ- 
ing could equal Agndlfs generosity 
to his men if they win him the cup. 
And not modi comes dose to an 
Italiaa’s wrath, unless it is tbe neu- 
rosis that often- transmits itself 
from tire top down. “If we finish 
. Qirentacenhove relegation but win 
the European -aq>,- Boniek had 
suggested before the season start- 
ed, “it will have been a greaiyear." 
Agnelli has grumbled that Boniek 
“can play only at night.” a refer- 
ence to hlS mrniqiii wfl ^ig form. 
Bm in reserving his best for Eu- 
rope, Boniek reads his master bet- 
ter than most: What is a 22d Italian 
laigftf. title, awipiwl to B first 
European Cup? 


No one at either dub sees any- 
thing in tire Italians* 2-0 victory 
over Liverpool in last winter’s so- 
-called Super Cop. It was played in 
Turin in foul conditions and with a 
somewhat partial referee.' Yet after- 
ward OsvsudoBagnofi, who astute- 
ly guided Verona to the Italian 
championship, observed, “Against 
teams that play a zonal game" — 
and Liverpool does, marking terri- 
torially rather than man-to-man — 
“Juve gpes on honeymoon." 

Maybe sire does, but honey- 
moons can be stanny. Says Ray 
Wilkins, an - Englishman well 
adapted at ACMuan:“I find my- 
self shouting at playen to stay coti, 
not to get emotionaL Dris is where 
Italians are so different from the 
English. If you get on top of your 
marker, you’ll crucify him because 
his temperament wfll coHapse." 

Butrasfwfao is to crucify whom? 

Uncharacteristically, Liverpool 
arrived m Brussels laie Tuesday un- 
certain of its Erreup and of the 
fitness of several key players. Man- 
ager Joe Fagan announced the fol- 
lowing team (which contradicted 
stories in die earfy-evenmg papers 
that queued players as saying- they 
bad “no chance erf being fit"): goal- 
ie Brace Grobbdaar; defenders 
Phfi Neal Marie L&wrenson, Alan 
Hansen, Jim B egKn- midfielders 
Jim Nichol Kenny Dalglish, John' 
Waik and Komne Whdan; for- 
wards Ian Rush and Paul Walsh. 

The injury doubts begin at the 
best ti the defense, Ireland inter- 
national Lawrensonplays precisely 
two weeks after dislocating a sboul- 
der blade, tile kind ti Injury that 
lingers in the mind BVgH 
In midfidd, omitting sp ecialist s 
Sammy Lee^ Jan Mobiyund Kevin 
MacDonald, Liverpool opts for 
Dalglish. In so doing it disturbs its 
finest attacking duet, which had 
overcome the scalpd and the a ging 
process. 

Rush, whose; eariy-season ab- 
sence might exense the dub’s mere 
second place in England's 92-dub 
league tdrl^. returned prematurely 
after a .cartilage operation and 
promptly knocked Benfica out of 
tbe Eorope Cbp . with three ti his 
five goals in the competition Stifle 
the goalmouth as they wilL the Ital- 
ians may find that Rush was born 
to flourish in. confhud spaces — as 
tire youngest of TO t*5dren, he 
shared a bed with five brothers. 

And ahberagh Italians would 
gladly toak ti re bank imd the im- 
pot endnrgo.io'xdieve Liverpool 
ti Rush, Juventus will' have to be 
just as careful around Dalglish, his 


partner. Dalglish, X simply knows 
where Rush will be at any moment, 
and he can make the telling pass or 
score his own maldrwinner. 

But with Dalglish now drawn 
back to midfidd, Walsh, an injury- 
prone lightweight, has surpised 
even himself by overcoming a 
strained stnmarh muscle; Monday 
night he daimed it didn’t “look too 
good — I can’t see another day 
making a difference." But Walsh, a 
slippery 22-year-old, is a proven 
goal-scorer and quite capable of 

w inning the match. 

Juventus, however, rightly re- 
spects LivEjpool’s teamwork more 
titan its individuals. Italians always 
have had a phobia about British 
muscle. “You have the physique to 
both attack and defend," Giam- 
piero Boniperti, president of Inven- 
tus, once said. “You’re stronger 
than us. There’s nothing to be done 
— you’re a different race.” 

Trapattoni will preach some- 
thing different in tbe dressing room 
Wednesday. But his president, 
Bomperti, wasn't a bad prophet: 
His comment came just before En- 
gland’s domination ti the Europe- 
an Cup. Eight of the last nine finals 
— which have yielded few goals 
indeed — will have featured an 
En glish champ ion. Nottingham 
Forest wot the trophy twice, Aston 

Villa once, and — in 1977, 1978, 
1981 and 1984 — Liverpool I 
doubt the men in red will show 
much British chivalry toward Ita- 
ly’s old lady this time other. 



Basketball 

NBA Tide Series 


LOS ANGELES 
tgfooflfta rapfpts 
worthy I IS 4 6 8 5 1 20 

Rombfa 4 6000021 

Abdut-Jbbr 6 11 0 0 3 1 3 12 

EJohnoon I 14 3 4 1 T2 2 10 

Scott 51400 202 10 

Cooper 1 5 2 2 2 2 3 4 

McAdoo 6 1300 305 12 

McGee 4 7 4 5 2 2 1 14 

Serious 4 7 0 2 3 4 1 0 

Kuectek 3 3 1 2 2 1 3 7 

Tam Rbnct* 0 

Totals _ . M JN 14.21 35 2B 23.1)4 


Te nnis 


French Open 



to 

too fl fla 

r 

a el Pis 

tactiatc 

10 

16 

6 

9 

9 

0 

1 

24 

Bird 


U 

2 

2 

6 

9 

1 

19 

Parish 


11 

6 

7 

8 

1 

1 

IB 

D. Johnson 


14 

1 

0 

3 10 

1 

13 

Ainge 


15 

0 

0 

5 

6 

1 

19 

Buckner 


5 

0 

0 

4 

6 

4 

6 

WTTItams 


5 

0 

0 

0 

5 

2 

6 

Wodman 

11 

11 

0 

2 

5 

2 

4 

26 

Maxwell 


1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

0 

3 

Kile 


5 

1 

2 

3 

0 

1 

7 

Carr 


3 

0 

0 

1 

0 

1 

3 

Clark 


2 

0 

0 

1 

3 

0 

2 

Tam Rbncts 
Totals 

42 

128 17 25 

15 

4143 17 148 


fan Rush, sandwiched by Zbigniew Boniek, left, and Michel 
Pbtfini in tbe 1985 Soper Cup, flourishes in tight quarters. 


LM Anode* 34 25 30 35—114 

Boston 3t 41 27 40—141 

H wi w MI pools: Los Anoctos. McGoe 2-3, 
Cooper M. Boston. Wodman U Ataoo 1-1. 
Carr 1-1. Bird 1-2 D. Johnson 0-1. Techs lads: 
Alnpo. 

A l to n P uu ce: 14JM 

SCHEDULE 
(Boston toads, VO) 

(Way X: Los Anoefes at Boston 
Juno 2: Boston at Las Anodes 
June 5: Boston at Las Anodes 
K-Juno 7: Boston at Las Anodes 
x-June f: Los Anastas at Boston 
x-June 11: Los Anodes at Boston 
tx-H necessary) 


MEM’S SINGLES 
First Round 

John McEnroe, l, U.S.def. Ronald Aoanar, 
Haiti. 6-0 6-2 7-5: Andrei Oimekov. Soviet 
Union. 4oL Eean Adams, 115, 62, 62, 61; 
Eliot Toitsdwr, A U5. dcL Dodo Campos, 
BrmlL62.63.63: Roberto AroudlaArwntl- 
na. dd. Marty Davis. Ui. 64.64, 7^ (7-3); 
AMandro GttnabaL Arpanlina. dot Russell 
Slmoson, Naur Zealand, 6Z 62. 62; Bods 
Becker. Wad Germany, del. Vital GerutaltK 
ui. 63. s-7 o*i. 6-1. 61; Stefan Ed bent 14. 
S i oodoMlot Claudio Panatla. Italy. 7-A <7-41, 
63,63; Kent Corisson. Sweden, dd. Michael 
WostphaL West Germany, 61 61. 63; Jose 
Luis Clare. ArmnHna. del. Jay Lapidus, UA. 
4-66161 ; jaremo Potior. Franobdd.Zoltan 
Kuherskv. 61. 64, 6L 

Boris D ec k er, West Germany, det. Vitas 
Genoa Ills. U5. 61 67 (7-4). 61. 61; Kent 
Cartoon. Sweden, del. Michael WestphaL 
West Germany, 61 61. 63; HuUb Van 
Boeckd. Motherlands, dot. Eric Whw- 
srodsky. France. U M. 66 67; Jaoklm 
Nystrom (7). Sweden, del. Hans-Dleter Beu- 
td. Wad Germany. 61 64. 61. 60; Marian 
vwda,CactoMlovokladef.vlncofltVBnPo1- 
1en.UA. 64. 3-6 44, 63. 63; Juan AouUera 


Transition 


TEXAS— Ootlaned GoarpoWrtoM, outfield- 
er, lo OUohoma City of the Amor knnAssockr- 
lion. Purchased tbe contract of Chris Welsh. 
pH cher. from Oklahoma City. 

Motional Leaoue 

PHILADELPHIA— Optioned John RusmIL 

tins baseman, to Portland at the Pacific Coast 

Leaoue; recalled third baseman Ride Schu 
from Portland. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Leaoue 
NEW ENGLAND— Slonod Stephone Darby 
and Randall Seoiby. Unebacker*: Nicholas 
Mullahpy. Frank Sutton and Jeff Hoffman, 
offensive linemen; Darvl HML cnrnerback, 
and Charles Lewis, fulttxx*. 


Baseball 


Rookie Lyons Powers Red Sox Victory Monday’s Major League line Scores 


Compiled by Our Staff Firm Dapatdus 

BOSTON — In his first start in 
the mqor leagues, Steve Lyons fait 
the first two nome runs of his ca- 
reer and drove in four runs to lead 
the Red Sox. past Minnesota, 9-2, 
here Monday. 

Lyons also had a angle in five al- 
ba ts while starting in place of ceo- 

B ASEBALL ROUNDUP 

ter fielder Tony Armas, who leads 
the majors in homere with 13 but 
was out with a sprained wrist 

“The other rays on the bench 
probably are happy to see me 
start,” said Lyons, who spent four 
years m tbe minors. “They get irri- 
tated became I bounce around on 
tbe bench. They tell me to sit down 
and be quiet It’s tough to sit and 

watch.” 

Lyons broke a 1-1 tie in the third 
inning with a towering home run 
into the Minnesota bullpen off Ken 
Schront Lyons drilled a three-run 
homer into the Boston buHpen, 
near the 420-fool mark, off Ron 
Davis during a five- run eighth. 

The loss was the sixth straight for 

tbe Twins, while Boston ended a 
four-game losing skid. Bill Buckner 
and Wade Boggs had four hits 
apiece as the Red Sox broke loose 
for 16 hits- 

Lyons, who had 14 at-bals prior 
to Monday, knows he’ll return to 
the bench once Armas is ready to 
play again. “Fm a utility player 
because the nine guys we ham 
startingdesovelo," said Lyons, 25. 
“It’s rare for a. rookie to step in and 
be handed a job." 

Indians 8, Brewers 0 

In Milwaukee, Bert Blyleven 
pitched a three-hitter to win his 
third gtrcie this season — all shut- 
outs. Hestrock art 10 and walked 
none in recording his 49th career 


shutout, tying him for 20th place 
on the all-time list with Don Drys- 
dale, Luis Turnt, Ferguson Jenkins 
and Early Wynn. 

Orioles 6s Angels 4 
'In Anaheim, California, Scott 
McGregor, who dropped four of 
bis first five decisions tins season 
and also lost a turn in the starting 
rotation, followed a three-hit shut- 
out against Oakland last week with 
a ax-hitter that helped Baltimore 
defeat California. Rick Dempsey 
drove in the winning run on a sev- 
enth-uuniK sacrifice fly. McGregor 
has won 10 of his last II decisions 
in Anaheim. 

Maimers 5, Tigers 2 
fa Seattle, tour Detroit errors set 
up three unearned runs that al- 
lowed the Manners to end a three-, 
game losing streak. 

Royak 4, Rangers 2 
In Kansas Ciiy, Missouri, 
George Brett drove in three runs cm 
a doable and a single to back a 
combined four-hitter by Bret Sa- 
botages and Dan Qdsenbeny 
that ended Texas’s four-game win- 
ning streak. Brett has dmea in 15 
runs In his last seven games. 

A's 2, Yankees 1 
fa Oakland, California, Dwayne 
Murphy led off the 10th by hitting 
a 3-1 ratdi from Dave Righetti over 
the 390 agn in center field to put 
the A’s. past New York. Murphy’s 
sixth homer of the year was the first 
off Righetti this season. 

Pfafifies 10, Pafces 9 
In the National League, in Phila- 
delphia. Mike Schmidt and John 
Rnssefl hit three run homers that 
allowed the Phillies to get past San 
Diego, stopping the Padres’ win- 
ning streak at seven games and 
Halting a four-game stiH of their 
own. After the game it was an- 


nounced that Schmidt, 35 and a 
nine-rime Gold Glove winner and 
All-Star, would be moved from 
third base to first Rick Schu was 
recalled from Portland ti the Tri- 
ple-A Pacific Coast League to play 
third. RnsseQ, a part-time urst 
baseman, was sent to Portland. 
Schmidt’s home ran was fas sixth 
ti the season and his firstthis year 
with runners on base. 

Mets 8, Dodgers 1 
fa New York, Ray Knight had a 
homer and four RBIs and Mookk 
Wilson had four hits as tbe Mets 
drubbed Los Angeles. Knight, fill- 
ing in for the injured Kelvin Chap- 
man, had started 11 games lifetime 
at second base — the last one being 
in 1978. Two errors ran the Dodg- 
ers’ major league-leading total to 
56; they have led to 42 unearned 
runs. Said Manager Tom Lasorda: 
“I really believe the next game we 
play, well play well defectively. I 
really bdieve that." 

(Sants ti, Expos 1 
fa Montreal, Chris Brown drove 
in two runs and Jeff Leonard added 
a bases4oaded double to give San 
Francisco its first triumph in four 
games. A dee Hammaker wot for 
the first time since last Sept 1. 

Astros 4, Pirates 2 
In Houston, the Astros scored all 
their runs in the second, on a triple 
by Phil Garner, Terry Puhl’s two- 
run double and a single by Craig 
Reynolds. Loser Jose DeLeon (0-7) 
is on a 1-16 streak. Said Pirate 
catcher Tony Pena: Tie’s stiD 
throwing hard — he’s just throwing 
the ball all over the place:" 

Cubs 4, Reds 3 

fa Cincinnati, Bob Dernier’s 
bases-loaded double in the fifth 
started Chicago toward its victory 
over the Reds. (AP, UP!) 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
SOB Dlooo ON 011 300— t 17 1 

PWtadetoWo Ml 031 Blx — TO 10 ■ 

THurmand, Stoddard (4), Booker 16). Lef- 
forts (7) end Konoady. Rowley, Zochry (2). 
Oindross (3). Ruckor (5). Andersen (4). To- 
kulve (I) and VlnriL W— TetaifwA W. L— Let- 
forts. 1-1. hr»— P hi lotW onto. Russoi! (1). 
Scfxnlttt U). 

Los AosetaS 000 OR 000—1 * 2 

Now York 004 010 38X-4 U 0 

Reus* Castilla (5). Diaz (6), Brennan (7) 
and Sdoocto; Darting and Gortar. W— Dar- 
ling. 4-1. L — Rous* 34. HRs— New York. Her- 
nandos 141, Knltoit (2). 
son FraadscD soo boo 2«o-4 9 1 

MD O t iOBl 000 M 010—1 7 0 

HnnmaMr, Garretts (8). MJTavts (0) and 
Trevino: Palmar. Lucas (8), Burke 18), St. 
CMrw (f) and FHzgorokL W— Hammokor, 1- 
A. L— Palmer. 3-5. 

Ottawa 080 «J1 010—4 18 1 

Ctodman 080 888 IB-3 7 8 

Eckeratey.SinHti 19) and Davit,- Brown In* 
Robinson (8) end Knkwty. W — Eek m tser.frT. 
L— Bramble. 64. Sv— Smith 02). HR— On- 
chmatl, Knlcoly ( 2 ). 

Ptttsborgta 001 000 m-9 8 1 

Hoastoa 040 OH Ota— 4 5 0 

DeLeon Scurry (ZJ. Holland f7) ond P»na; 
Knoppor. smHti (VI aid Bdlov. w— Knoppor. 
54. L— DeLeon 0-7. Sv— Smith (7). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Mtooesoto 010 MO 100-2 i 1 

Boston 182 800 13 k— 9 74 1 

Schrom, Lysander (3). Wkintte (6). Davis 
(7), Eufemto <01 and Salas; Clemen* Crow- 
ford (7) and Gedman w— Clemens. 64. L— 


World Cup Soccer 


OOHMEBOL ZONe 
GROUP 1 
CotamMa 1. Peru 0 
voneaiela Z Argentina 3 

Patots ttoBOogs; AtbonNm l Cotombto t 
Venezuela C, Peru 0. 

Next mattftes: June 2, Colombia vs. Argen- 
tina; June Z Peru vs. Venezuela 

GROUP 2 

PoMs NfAit: Urueoay (auaflfiesi 6 
dine S. Ecuador 1. 

GROUP 3 

Petals stood togs; Bolivia L Paraewnr l, 
(Brazil yet to play). 

Next mows : Jim Z Bolivia vs. Brazil.- 
june 9. Parosuav vs. Bolivia 

COMCACAF ZONE 
GROUPS 

Ceota Rica L Unitod Stain i 

Pottos s ta nd i ngs: Untied States 5, Carta 
Rica 4, TrtaEdod Oxl Tobago 1. 

Re mrlmn t «sotcb; May JL Untied Stole* 
v* Costa Rica 


Schrom, U Su— Crawford 11). HRs— Minne- 
sota Bush (4). Boston Lyons 2 (2). 
C l avoto o d K3 881 093—8 7 B 

MRwaukee oh eae seo— o s 1 

Blyleven and Benton; Darwin. Searooa (7) 
and Moor* W— Blyleven, 3-5. L— Darwin. 34. 
HRs — Clevetond, Carter (2), Jacoby (4). 
Bom atom 003 0*1 708 — & t 2 

COttfornlo SM 770 BOS— « 6 1 

McGroaor and Dempsev; Witt, John [•>, 
Citourn (7) and Boone. W— McGregor, 3-L L— 
John. W. HRs — California, Brawn (1), Benl- 
auoz (4). 

Detroit 080 000200-4 8 4 

Seattle 221 eel Ota— 5 7 a 

Patry. Berenouer (6). Hernandez (9) and 
Melvin; Youn* Bast (7) and Scott. Keamev 
1*1. W— Youn* 45. L — Potrv, 8-3. Sv— Best 
12 ). 

Texas BOO OB 8BO-a 4 0 

Kansas city an ibb oex— < W l 

Holes, welsh Ol. Stewart U) and SJaught; 
SaborhaooaQulsenberrv (7) end Sundbera. 
W— Sabertamv 54 L— Hole* 26, Sv— Oul- 
senberry (9). 

New York 000 Ml 080 0-1 5 ■ 

Otodaod BOB 100 BOO 1—3 5 0 

RasmvBoefb Righetti (9) and Tettteton. 
Heath OO); Sutton. Howell (8) and Wynaaar. 
W— Howell, 62. L— Righetti. 6A HR-Oafc- 
towt Murohv (4). 

(Toronto at CUcaa* pad. rain) 


M^or League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 



w 

L 

Pel. 

GB 

Toronto 

28 

14 

667 

— 

Detroit 

24 

17 

JB5 

3fe 

Baltimore 

24 

18 

J71 

4 

New York 

21 

20 

sn 

6fe 

Milwaukee 

18 

22 

A9t 

9 

Boston 

19 

24 

<442 

9fe 

Cleveland 

16 

27 

J72 

T2fe 


West OivKIaa 



California 

25 

18 

JB1 

— 

KmotCHv 

24 

18 

571 

fe 

Minnesota 

21 

22 

JB 

4 

Oakland 

21 

22 

m 

4 

Otlcogo 

17 

20 

A 87 

4 

Seattle 

19 

24 

ML 

4 

Texas 

15 

28 

347 

10 


Saoia del. Victor Pood. Paraauay. 62. 64. i- 
5; Heinz GunttwdL Switzerland, del. Damii 
Keratta West Germany. ML 6X64: Eduardo 
Bongoachoa Argentina, del. Marcelo Inoor- 
amaArBonttna7-5b26,6-L67 1741,64; Mike 
OePalmer.U&deL Jimmy Brawn. U.&. 5-7,6 
X 67 (2-7). 74 O 04). 63; Paul McNamc<;. 
Austral to. dcL Cart Llmbetgor.Australto.6-3. 
64, 6-4; Anders Jarryd. Sweden, def. Seal) 
McCain. U5~ 60 63 7-5; Jan Gwmarssaib 
Sweden, dof. Patrice Kuchn* France. 7-6 7-6 
7-5; Roberto Saad, Argentina, del. Jimmy 
Aria* U4 61 64 7-5: Michael Schaoer* 
Netlwriana* del. Bnxn Berlin. New Zealand. 
64 60 64. 

Tomas SmM. Czechoslovakia, del. Alberto 
You* Spain. 7-4. 64 64; JoM Lopez-Macm 
Seain. det Woitok Flbak. Poland. 50, 6L 61 : 
Bltone wiuentaorg. U& dot aulstopne Ro- 
aor-Vassolia Franco. 6-4, 1-4.2*646-4; John 
Frowfoy, Australia, d et Stolon Shnonssan, 
Sweden. 6461, 63; Ivan Lendl. LCzcctw Slo- 
vakia, del. Eddie Edward* South Africa, 61. 
6461; Oanie Vlsoer. Sautti Africa, def. Stow 
Meister, U5.6Z 6Z 63; Jakob Htasek, Swit- 
zerkotiL det Pater Eller, West Germany. 6Z 
64 62; Jimmy Connors (3), U5. def. WM(- 
gang Pupa, West Germany. 64, 61.74; Yan- 
nick Noah (9). France, def. Libor Plmck, 
Czechoslovak!* 67 (4-7), 61, 74 6-4; Greg 
Holma*U3.dof.OleaoPereLUruguay,6Z7. 
S. 4* 64; Raul Vlvar. Ecuador. deL John 
fltzgerald. Australia. 57,64 6Z 61; Emilio 
Sancha*Spalfvdef.Goran Prato. Yugortovto. 
6457.2461.64); MUaslavAllecIrXzechasto- 
vokta.dri.Jaro NavratlL Czechoslovakia, 6-1 
62 64; Jose Htouera* Spain, def. Peter Mc- 
Namara. Austral la. 7-5 61 63; Lawson Dun- 
can.U A,deL Jean-PhUloue Flourioa Franco. 
636464; Aaron Krtdcototo.UA.dH. Fernan- 
do Luna Spain, 61 46 64 63; Chris Lews. 
New Zealand, def. Shtomo Gllckstein. Israel 
61 3-4 62 7-5. 

WOMEN'S SINGLES 
First Round 

Grace Kim, U.S. def. Elena Ellseenka Sovi- 
et union. 61. 64- Terry Phelps. UA. dri. Rene 
Uy* South Africa 64. 64; Nathalie Herre- 
man. France. deL Federico Bon rt on or l Italy, 
7464; Nathalie Touztot, France, det. wendv 
While. UJL.64 67 (6-81.62; Caterbia Undo- 
vtst, 9, Sweden, def. Larissa Savchenko, Soviet 
Union. 6463; Jennifer MunaeL South Africa 
det Gretctwn Rush, Ui, 61, 63; Emanueile 
Dertv. Franc* del. Jo Durto, Britain. 7-5.6L6 
4; Zina Garrison, 6 U-S. deL Jamie Golffer, 
U* 64 63; Gabrlela Dim. West Germonv. 
deLMaeve Quinlan. Ui. 7-S. 7-5; Anne Mlnter, 
Austral UMtol.MvrtamSchreop, West Gerrm- 
nv, 6Z 63; Marie-Chrlstine Callela Franc* 
dri. Laura Bernstein. UA. 44 63, 64; Pam 
Casa i* I6.u-S.dri. Kathleen Cummings. US. 
6461; Catherine Sutra, France. def. Joaiwc 
R wSSriL US, 74 (7-4). 6Z 
Andrea Joeger, U4. OH. Shawn Foltz, U.S. 
64 7-S: Lisa Bonder, U-5.ttof-Gorinne Vanier. 
Franc* 7-6 (7-5). 24 60; Petra Deinees- 
Jauch, Switzerland, det, Pasco le Eiche- 
mendv. Franc* 75. 6-3; KaiNeen Horvcuh. 
U5. del. Virginia Ruzlcl Romani* 64 24 6 
3: Tine SCheur-Lonen, Denmark, dri. Barba- 
ra Potter (12). Ui, 64 61: Camille Benlo- 
mto.UA.dri. Cairto JosriLSwilserlamL** 
64 60; Vtofcl Nelson. LLL def. Isabella De- 
mongeot, France. 646Z' Helena Sokova IS). 
Czechoslovakl*dri. Eva Pfatf, West Germa- 
ny, 61. 62; Elite Sural* U.S. det. Jenny 
KHtch. UJS. 74 60 (ratJ; Carina Kartsso* 
Sweden, del. Terra Hdl today. 114. 44 6461; 
Manuela Maleeva (4). Bulgaria det. Sandy 
Collin* UA. 64 63; Laura Glldemrislcr. 
Peru. deL Andrea Leand. U J.6162; Sylvia 
Hani k* West Germcviv. dri. Ama Smith. U4. 
74 61; Lori McNeil, US, det. Glnnv Purgy, 
U4 61, 60; Betrtna Bung* West German ». 
def. Pilar Vomucz. Peru, 61, 61; Steffi Graf, 
west Germany, del. Emlka Ofcagaw* Japan. 
7-6 64; AngelLkl Konellopaula* Greece, del. 
Betsy Nags ben, UA. 7-5, 34 64. 

Second Rowed 

Martina Navratilova, I, U5. del. Virginia 
wade, Britain. 6X 60; Laura Garrano, u A. 
deL Emlbe Rapenl-Long* Argentina 7-5 62; 
Susan Moscarln, U-S. def. Pascoto Paradl* 
Franc* 64162; Chris Evert Lloyd, ZU 5. del. 
Jeanlne Thompson Audrolia6Z6I; Bcnnio 
Gaausek. Ui.de*. Niege Diaz. Brat)L64 62; 
Raffoetkj Regal, Italy, dot. Mima Jausovec, 
Yugostovto. 62 7-4; Kathy RlnaldL Ui, dri. 
Katerina Skronska Czertiaslorakla, 64 60; 
Debbie Scene* UJL, deL Catarina Undqula, 
Sweden. 7-5 62; Adriano vuiegran, Argenti- 
na dri. Ann Henricksson. U.5. 3-6 61 64; 
CtaMSa Kohde-KIIdi. Wert Germany, del. Pal 
Medrad* Brazil, 64 64; Katerina Malcev* 
Bulgaria deL usa Saoln-Short, U^. 61 61. 


Football 
USFL Standings 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Dhrtslan 

W L PCI. GB 

Chicago 35 15 JB - 

New York 25 15 A25 — 

Montreal 25 IB .581 lib 

SI. Lou* 21 20 J12 4» 

Philadelphia 16 26 .381 IB 

Pittsburgh 14 27 J41 life 

won DMsfoa 

Son Dtoao 25 15 ^25 — 

Houston 23 20 53S TV, 

□netonotl 22 21 J12 4fe 

Lot Angeles ii S J77 i 

Atlanta 17 21 A15 Bfe 

San Frandsce 16 26 Ml 10 


Birmingham 

New Jersey 

Tam oa Boy 

Jacksonville 

Memphis 

Baltimore 

Ortando 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T PCI. PF PA 


0 -714 345 242 

0 -643 335 278 

0 443 346 306 

0 J73 329 317 

0 -571 311 275 

1 -536 265 214 

0 JI4 2J7 385 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Omiond 18 3 1 349 2« 

SSSL * 5 » AO 367 291 

l ™ S,w ' * * fl 643 434 291 

"*»»* S 9 8 J57 286 333 

Portland 4 10 0 286 192 322 

3 « « 214 197 260 
Son Antonio an 0 JO* 22D 
MONDAY'S RESULT 
Birmingham 41, Ortondo 17 








Page IS 


OBSERVER 


Truly Awful Things 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YOWC — Il*s my conten- 
tion that there have sever been 
so many Truly Awful Things as 
there are today. Then: is a profes- 
sional football league that plays 
football all simmer long, for exam- 
ple. That is a Truly Awful Thing. 

I doubt that the Assyrians, the 
Babylonians, the Medes or the Per- 
sians, who thrived in a thoroughly 
unattractive era and put up with 
some pretty awful stuff, would 
have tolerated summer football 
J imagine word reaching the As- 
syrian Inng that a cabal of capital- 
ists is gathered at the Nineveh Pla- 
za Hold drawing up a plot. “A 
plot?" (This is the king talking, and 
you know how kings feel about 
plots.) 

“Yes, Majesty. The spies say 
these rogues hope to milk the view- 
ing audience of more millions of 
piasters by starting a su mmer foot- 
ball league.” 

Do you ihink the king is going to 
sit still for that? Hah! 

I hear him hissing, “Football 
right on through the baseball sea- 
son? That is one Truly Awful 
Thing." (All right, you can't hiss 
that m English, but the king isn’t 
speaking English, is he? He’s 
speaking Assyrian.) 

Next day at the Plaza the Assyr- 
ian comes down like a wolf on the 
fold, cohorts gleaming in purple 
and gold, and it's curtains for one 
group of capitalists so greedy they 
were ready to inflict a Truly Awful 
Thing on humanity. 

Here is another Truly Awful 
Thing: 

Some very decent people, Ameri- 
cans of modern Syrian heritage, are 
going to read this and send angry 
letters. 

“Where do you get off abusing 
Syrians as wolves, you bigot?” 
those letters will say. 

Note that in choosing ancient 
Assyria to show how a more mus- 
cular culture than ours would cope 
with a Truly Awful Thing like sum- 
mer football, I make no connection 
between that extinct nation and 
modem Syria. 

We have all heard that modem 
I talian s and Greeks are unrelated 
to the ancients of Rome and Ath- 
ens, who thrived long after Assyria 
had vanished; surely nobody living 
today can fed kin to people who 
worshipped Ashur 3,000 years ago 
on land now part of Iraq? 


And yet, some very decent 
American of modem Syrian hen- 
tag; will send a letter — “rick and 
tired of seeing our people stereo- 
typed as wolves because of that 
idiotic Lord Byron with his purple- 
and-gold-cohort verse." 

Why so sure? Because I received 
such letters three years ago after 
writing about those antique Assyr- 
ians in “wolf-on-the-folcr termin- 
ology. 

□ 

Knowing all this, why not forget 
Assyrians and die Babylonians or 
Medes as tough cookies who would 
have known now to stamp out a 
summer-football pestilence? Be- 
cause it would make no difference. 
Choose Medes and there will be 
Angr y mail from Americans who 
remember family tales of their 
Mede blood (“Fm sick and tired of 
these Mede stereotypes . . .*) 

Babylonians? It’s hard to be- 
lieve. but there are people out there 
somewhere whose sensitivities are 
bruised every rime Babylonians are 
criticized. It is a certainty, because 
the land is swarming with people 
willing to spend their lives being 
offenaed. 

Spending a life in quest of of- 
fense in order to enjoy a righteous 
outrage is a Truly Awful Thing 
which did not exist, except among 
hopeless neurotics, until the 1960s. 

It was a byproduct of the black 
civil rights movement, which pro- 
vided such a heroic spectacle of 
abused people fighting for their 
rights that Wore long very few 
Americans, including those already 
possessed of all rights guaranteed 
by the Constitution plus many oth- 
ers provided by wealth, could resist 
the pleasure of struggling heroical- 
ly for their own rights. 

□ 

Now, another Truly Awful 
Thing: Would you believe vile and 
dis gusting greed has infected the 
curators of baseball, with the result 
that starting this year baseball will 
be played right up to almost No- 
vember? This year, almost Novem- 
ber; next year — who knows — all 
the way into the basketball. season. 

This is a Truly Awful Thing, and 
I doubt that the ancient Chinese 
would have tolerated it. Scrub “an- 
cient Chine se.” please, and make it 
— oh, let's say aborigine prin- 
cesses. Can't be many of them itch- 
ing to throw their weight around. 

Sew York Times Sernr* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1985 

'Hope for the Best, Expect the Worst’ 

f Miracles of Courage’ at a dude for Gravely III Children in Boston 


people 


The Route to the East 


* 


By Dudley Gendinen 

Vew York Times Service 

B OSTON — Andrea Caley, 
who is considered a trouper, 
rami> in a white knit cap in hex 
brother Daniel's stroller — the 
cap hwiinM riie had lost her hair, 
the stroller because she was tired. 
Her mother, Kristin, had Daniel, 
a package of homemade cereal 
candy for the staff, and a smile. 
Her 4-year-old sister Roberta 
pushed the stroller. 

“Too tired to walk today, An- 
drea?” Sue Thompson, a nurse, 
sang out. 

“Tooooo tired," said Andrea, 
who is 5. Her bone marrow trans- 
plant had failed. 

April, 4, who is considered dra- 
matic, came prepared to yell 
when they put in the needle for 
her chemotherapy transfusion. 
She did. 


“I hear more fussing and 
moaning a nd groaning in here!" 
said Jason Vitale, 6. “Now 1 know 
I'm the bravest one.” His mother, 
Martha, smiled at her sturdy, 
brown-haired boy. 

The pain, the bravery of chil- 
dren, is always affecting, but it is 
the bravery of parents of critical- 
ly (Q children that drew Monica 
Dickens here to write a book, 
“Miracles of Courage.” 

The sudden hospitalization of 
her grandchild for a rare disease 
awakened her writer’s instincts to 
the plight of parents of children 
who might die: uncertain of the 
outcome, with no opportunity for 
heroics, they simply have to cope, 
day after day. 

For Dickens, a great-grand- 
daughter of Charles Dickens and 
a Cape Cod resident who has 
written novels and autobiograph- 
ical accounts, it became her 35th 
book. 

“I was afraid,” Jason said of 
his first visit to the Pediatric He- 
matology-Oncology Unit at Mas- 
sachusetts General Hospital for 
treatments two years ago. “Now 
that I've been here awhile, it’s all 
right.” 

He is used to what they do 
here, to the insertion of needles in 
his hip, the spinal taps for inject- 
ing chemotherapy drugs. “Yeah. 



ba W y m onTHn New Yort Tm 

Dr. Truman with Jason Vitale, 6, a leu kemi a patient. 


real used to them,” he said. “I just 
don’t look at them.” 

pin«s has not cramped bis 
style. “No," Jason said with satis- 
faction, “I do everything the reg- 
ular way." 

Well, perhaps with one differ- 
ence. “He looks forward to bong 
8,” his mother said. “Because he 
knows. That’s what you say, 
‘When Fm 8, my leukemia will be 

all done.’ ” 

That is the hope these parents 
carry, that after three years of 
treatment and two, three or four 
years of checking, the cancer will 
be all done. 

They are years of uncertainty’. 
“You take it one day at a time, 
and go through it, and hope for 

The best,” Mrs. Caley said, sitting 
in the peace of an empty treat- 
ment room. Then, recallin g the 
advice Dr. John Truman gave her 
when Andrea was diagnosed 
three years ago, she said, “You 
hope for the best, and expect the 
worst." 

As she spoke, Andrea was 
down the hall, watching a video 
caseue of “Annie” on television 


before it it was her time for the 
needle. 

“I think yon get used to it, and 
you do what you have to do," 
Mis. Caley said. The parents here 
fryrT F to speak that way of them- 
selves, as simply adjuncts of their 
children, doing the obvious, the 
necessary things. 

“You holding me. Daddy?” 
sobbed Kenny, who is 4 years old. 
He was held motionless, his small 
back exposed to the needle, and 
he could not see his father, Scon 
Bailey, who said, “I'm holding 
you." 

“He’s the tower of strength,” 
Bailey said quietly afterward, ruf- 
fling his son’s blond hair. “We 
just want to be here for him.” 

Dickens, a rail lean, lightn i n g 
rod of a woman, was struck by 
the reputation of Truman, a Bos- 
ton institution. If anyone would 
know what a parent goes through- 
people said, Truman would. He 
came here as a young doctor from 
Toronto 25 years ago, founded 
this clinic for the treatment of 
children with cancer 18 years ago. 


and has never left. He sees every 
i-iiiiH and takes any call at home, 
from any parent, at any tune. 

Dickens to see him, won 
Ins approval and immersed her- 
self in the families of this dime 
“for what turned out to be three 
years, without asking myself what 
the purpose was, what the market 
for the book world be," she said 
the other day, adding, “I ^was 
writing a testimony to them." 

For these leukemia patients. 

.the odds have inmroved. Truman 

said that when he began “there 
r eall y was no such thing as a 
cure." 

“It was a very sad moment to 
meet with the family of the child 
for the first time." be added, “be- 
cause you knew he was going to 
die.” 

Bui they have learned how to 
cluster the drug treatments and to 
use than in the central nervous 
system and the blood. Usually, 
now, Lhey can knock the leukemia 
into remission and hold it there 
for years. In about two out of 
three cases the children live. 

But they don’t know which two 
out of three. “It’s like the sword 
of Damocles —it’s always there," 
Truman said The leukemia can 
recur at any time in the three-year 
treatment. And if bone marrow 
transplant fails, Truman has no 
weapons left 

“Hope for the best, and expect 
the worst, that’s what we did," 
said Andrea's mother. “And we 
didn't expea the worst. But when 
she relapsed, that’s what we had 
to accept” 

Her manner was quiet and 
strong. She went into the examin- 
ing room where her daughter was 
waiting for the bone marrow nee- 
dle, nT»d as it went in she dabbed 
at the tears popping from An- 
drea’s eyes. 

“Ow-Ow-Ow-Ow-Ow!" An- 
drea yelled from underneath the 
many hands holding her steady 
on the table. “Ow-Ow-Ow-Ow- 
Ow!" 

Her mother dabbed calmly, ef- 
ficiently, as the noise went on. 
And at the foot of the table, her 
tittle sister Roberta scrunched up 
her face and jammed a pink toy 
bear on her ear. 


Five Italians have arri’-'oJ inBei- 

jingdiw a 11400-ntik (20-W^f 

lomctcr) drive from ' 

ing the route once fatowed b) 

Led bv Bepp* Tend 49, of Milan- 

the group set 01,1 
Marat 31 in three Fial-Panda urs 
and one mick, andcovered up W 
600 miles a day. Thar route W 
through Yugoslavia, Greece. Tur- 
key. Iran. Pakistan. India and Ne- 
pal. and into Tibet, with the per- 
mission of the Chinese Moun- 
taineering Association. 

Henry Weston was set hack w an 
S^dfied illness in 
his attempt totem 
to ran around the world, a Bnus« 
Embassy official in Bangkok sad 
Tuesday. Western. 23. who started 
from London on April 1. 1984. Ml 
ill on his 435 -mile ran from the 
northern city of Chiang Mat to 
Bangkok and finished thejouinev 
b>Tcar. His sponsors m Thailand 
withdrew support. Weston has 
jogged through 22 countries, com- 
pleting 5.000 miles of a planned 

15 , 000 -mile run aimed partly at 

helping the Swiss-based World 
Wildlife Fund. 

□ 

Georgetown University’s Class 
of *85 included Pearl Bailey, 67. 
who received a bachelor 5 degree m 
theology. After hugging the univer- 
sity president, the Reverend *” n ?" 
thy S. Healey, she told the audi- 
ence. ’’Obey the Fifth 
Commandment. Honor ihv father 
and mother who suffered, who 
paid, who loved. Nothing in Plato, 
nothing in Socrates, nothing in Ar* 
istotie will tell you what to do when 
you get out there and hit the 
bricks." Bailey, who had been 
working on her degrer for seven 
years, then sang a cappdla. “No- 
bodv can do it for you bui you. 

' The comedian Bill Cosby of- 
fered a bit of homespun wisdom in 
accepting an honorary degree from 
Brown University in Providence. 
Rhode Island. “In the words or my 
grandfather, who never read a book 
other than the Bible. ‘First comes 
reality, then comes philosophy. We 
start with the rent.’ . - ■ 
Lewis Ellis, who graduates from the 
Los Angeles Potics Academy on 
Friday, is no ordinary rookie cop. 
and not just because he outran 
roost of his classmates. Ellis, 53, 
will become the oldest police acad- 


emv graduate in 
sailed through hi* month* of phvw; 
«l tests, weapons naming and 
jMtfethan a [ram m- 

nuitcs voting enough to he Ito chil- 
dren. Ellis, a superowr « the 

Southern California Rapid Transit 

srxSMiss 

KSIfSMSSS 

£dkd “1 vui ’Don’t »«rv 
STfor me.’ But ‘It 

wouldn't surprise tw 
There’s no age limit 
The U. S 9th Circuit t oun rt Ap- 
peal had ruled the county sage «d- 
Sg for sheriffs deputes wa 
cnmuiatorv. fotong both the 
sheriffs and police department to 
drop their 3?-vcar*old utmu. Ini- 
tially. department superior were 
skeptical, but Oh* the phystci! 

• • (utk- n ttv rtffl 1 1 » 




I Vli'J t' F ■■■ V 

mates. After his graduation. EHft 

a college graduate and 3 reserve 

officer for eight yean — witt be 
assigned to a >taf « patriH doe 
like anv other rookie cop. 

D 

Janet Keizer rubbed home near 
Ihc cod or her European concert 
tour in plenty of lime to win the 
World Championship OW-Timc 
Piano Playing Contest in MOfluetb 
k>, Illinois. For the second craws* 
tivc war. the Peoria woman t** 
first place in the fund-raism* 
rest held hv the Monwdto Rariwar 
Museum. Lost year, her husband, 
Ed. also a music teacher at Bradta 
University - in Peoria, finished sec- 
ond. This" year, he stayed behind to 
perform in the 10th and final cun- 
cen on the couple's annual Europe- 
an tour, a 2 1 -dav tour of West Ger- 
many and Switzerland featuring 
ragtime and jazz piano music, 

D 

The 200.000-guihkr 1*63.000} 
Hdneken prize will be shared by 
iwo scientists for their wok m the 
field of visual perception research 
The> are Bda Jutese, Hungarian- 
hom head or the department^ 
visual perception research at 
Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, 
and Werner Rekhank. director of 
the Max Planck institute is Tu- 
bingen. West Germans, according 
to the Royal Netherlands Academy 
of arts arid scientist* 


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PAGE 15 
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