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The Global Newspaper 
Edited In Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris. London, Zurich. 
Hoag Kong, Singapore. 
The Hague and Marseille 


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WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 22 



INTERNATIONAL 



Published With The New York Tones and The Washington Post 



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No. 31,810 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


JReagan 




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President Ronald Reagan with Ws tax plan. 


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Plan Reflects Hh Vision 
Of a Restructured Society 


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By Peter T. Kilbom 

New York Tana Sendee 

WASHINGTON — Like all 
presidents, Ronald Reagan wants 
to use the federal income tax to 
prearrange the economy and the 
^structure of society to suit Ins own 
vision. Beyond all else, that Was the 
message of his speech Tuesday 
night 

Unlike the piecemeal changes 
that others pursued, such as Jhmmr 
Carter’s unsuccessful 1978 assault 
on the business lunch, or John F. 
Kennedy's sponsorship of the in- 
vestment tax credit to stimulate 
business, President Reagan would 
revamp, wholesale, the income tax 
system. 

His plan seeks a system that will 
fosters smaller government, free 


TAX FLAN INSIDE 


■ UJSl tax experts say Rear 
gan’s plan is less man a 
sweeping reform. Page 3. 


■ A chart explains how the 
proposal evolved. 


Page 3. 
■ The plan represents a sig- 
mficant increase in the cor- 
porate tax burden, business 
leaders say. - Page IS. 


NEWS' ANALYSIS 


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^naikets, entrepreneurship, the ac- 
cumidatioa of wealth and the fam- 
ily. - : 

Evem if the essentials of the pro- 
posal are adopted by Congress, an- 
alysts are widely divided over the 
effects on the economy and society. 
The White House beheves the plan 
will inspire a new burst of econom- 
ic growth, as taxpayers plow more 
of their higher, after-tax incomes 
into savings and investments. 

But many economists note that 
consumers spent far more than 
they saved after thepresidetu last 
cut taxes in 1981. They also note 
that industry, which would assume 
a greater share of the national tax 
burden under the president’s pro- 
posal, saves a far greater .propor- 
tion of its earnings than consumers. 

Mr. Reagan has seized a propi- 


tious moment The current tax sy^ 
tern is univ e rsally condemned as 
confusing, unfair , economically 
counterproductive and such a mon- 
ument to special interests that tax 
evasion has become a national pur- 
suit among the reffKnna who fed 
cheated. PartiaetniS ^) rwuhsagrec 
over whether to change the system 
— but how. 

: Nooue, not esestTreastey Secre- 
tary James A. Baker 3d, and Us 
f, Richard G. Darraan, who 


iled the plan, can offer any 
evidence 


convincing evidence that all the 
thousands of.dements of the plan 
will assure die healthier economy 
or the more equitable society that 
the president has set as his goal 

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It is in the House of Representa- 

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tfves that Mr. Reagan faces his 
toughest going. By granting detail- 
by-detml ooncesoons to various in- 
terest groups, he and his aides may 
have pre-empted the deal-making 
prerogatives of Congress and thus 
hurt t :i prospects for the overhauL 
Of the various components of 

- (Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 


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Boeing Wins Orders 
Totaling $1.5 Billion 






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New Yeek Them Sendee 
NEW YORK — Boring Co. of 
the United States has won aircraft 
orders totaling Sl3 biffipn- 
The conroany has agreed to sell 
about SI billion worth of planes to 
a tearing company. Boeing was also 
chosen by Australia’s stare-owned 
Trans- Australia Airlines for about 
$500 nriffion worth of aircraft. 

International -Lease Finance 
Crap, of Beverly HiBs, California, 
said Tuesday tha t it had reached a 
Vwdiminary agreement to buy 21 
^Boeing aircraft for ddiveiy in 1986, 
1987 and 1988. 

The company also said that it 

had the option to increase the order 

to 32 planes valued at $1.4 EhZUozi. 

Louis Gouda, the executive vice 
president of the leasing company, 
said the company had ordered iO 
737-300 aircraft in 1983 and that 
ihe planes had been so successful 
with its airline ' customers that it 

had decided to place another order. 




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INSIDE 


■ The ex-abtrass of Claus von 
Bulow said be told her of 
watching his wife gp into a 
coma. Page 3. 


SOENGE 

■ Vietnam’s ecology is severely, 
threatened by the legacy of war,' 
a study shows. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ F»fs net profits rose ^per- 
cent for 1984. Page 15.. 


■ Prices for heavy erode is 
OPEC are too high, Saudi Ara- 
bia’s ml minis ter said. Page 15- 


SPECIAL REPORT 


■ Aerospace’s ‘big-tech’ ten- 
sion: Will allied ventures sur- 
vive the poK tics? Part I of a two- 
part special repeal. Page 7. 


tip* 


By David E Rosenbaum 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, in a nationwide 
television address, has appealed to 
Americans to support the transfor- 
mation of an ‘un-American** in- 
come tax system into one that is 
“dear, ample and fair for a!” 

Opening his drive for overhaul- 
ing the federal tax code, cme of the 
most ambitious undertakings of his 
presidency, Mr. Reagan declared 
Tuesday night that his plan would 
“reduce the tax burdens on the 
working people of this country” 
and stop ‘‘the special interest raids 
of the few.” 

He was to make the details of bis 
plan public Wednesday and send it 
to Congress. 

It was dear from a White House 
summar y of the plan that if the 
proposal were enacted substantial- 
ly intact, it would amount to the 
most thorough revirion of the tax 
system since World War ff, when 
wage withholding began and most 
Americans became subject to in- 
come taxation for the first time. 

According to the. summary, un- 
do- Mr. Reagan’s proposals, 79 
percent of Americans would pay 
either a smaller tax bill or about the 
same as they pay now. 

Overall, individuals would owe 7 
percent less than they do now, and 
corporations would owe 9 percent 
more. 

Preadent Reagan proposed re- 
ducing the current. 14 tax brackets 
to three: 15 percent, 25 percent and 
35 percent. On joint returns, tax- 
payers in a family of four would 
pay nothing on the first $12,000 of 
taxable income, 15 percent cm the 
amount between $12,000 and 
$29.000, 25 percent on the amount 
between 529,000 and 570,000 and 
35 percent on taxable income 
above 570,000. 

The top tax rate would thus be 
reduced to 35 parent from 50 per- 
cent. 

Representative Dan Rostenkow- 
ski of minnls, the Democratic 
chairman of the House Ways and 
Means Committee,* responded on 
television immediately after Mr. 
Reagan's address and generally 
supported his tax principles. 

' . Mr. Rostenkowski said, howev- 
er, that ^Democrats will not give 
the presdent’s reform plan a rub- 
ber stamp. If anything, it’s-a start- 
ingporaL” 

Two leading congressional sup- 
porters of tax simplification said 
they would oppose Mr. Reagan’s 
plan. 

Representative Richard A. Gep- 
hardt of Missouri, co-sponsor of a 
Democratic tax-simplification 
plan, denounced the proposal as a 
“tax retreat” 

Representative Jack Kemp of 
New York, co-sponsor of a Repub- 
lican tax overhaul bill, said the top 
tax rate of 35 percent was too high. 

cannot support the plan as long 
as the top income tax rate remains 
at 35 'pecooDtr 

Mr. Kemp said: “Keeping the 

(COuthmed on Page 3, CoL 4) 




ABUSHED 188? 


ed 

As Soccer Fans 
Riot in Brussels 


Cimpikd by Our Staff Front Dispaiche 

BRUSSELS — Thirty-five per- 
sons woe killed and at least 100 
were injured Wednesday night 
when riots broke out at Heysd Sta- 
dium before the start of the Euro- 
pean Soccer Cup final between Liv- 
erpool and Juveotus of Turin, 
police said. 

Witnesses said that many of the 
dead were trampled when a section 
of the stands collapsed and pan- 
icked fans tried to flee to the play- 
ing field. 

Most of the dead appeared to be 
Italians, stadium officials said. 

The disturbances erupted an 
hour before the start of play. Soccer 
officials said that the match probn- 


bodies were lying on the ground 
(utride the stadium, some covered 
vrith tarpaulins and othera with the 
black-and-white flags of the Juven- 
tus team they had carried into the 

r stadium. 


bly would be played because fur- 
ls lean 


TtaAMaMPiM 


Police rushed to bold up a fence at the Brussels statfiion Wednesday as soccer fans rioted. 


ther rioting was feared if it were 

canceled. 

Witnesses said that saxes of 


Gemayel Unharmed as Palace Is Shelled 


A police officer in the stadium 
•laid that most of the dead were 
i trampled to death when fences 
'broke down under the pressure of 
-rioting fans. 

A Brussels fire department 
spokesman said. “It seems English 
supporters suddenly attacked Ital- 
ian fans who were standing in the 
neighboring section. The Italian 
supporters moved back and leaned 
against the brick wall. They were 
literally crushed. There was no es- 
cape possible.” 

He added that some Italian Tans 
in back rows tried to jump over the 
stadium wall but that the wall col- 
lapsed on them. 


The violence apparently started 
1 British fan: 


Corepikd by Oor Staff From Dispatches 

BEIRUT — The presidential 
palace was hit several times and 
h wntily damappd by artillery fire 
Wednesday, bit President Amin 
Gemayel “miraculously escaped 
unharmed,” Lebanon’s stale radio 
reported.. 

Two direct hits set the presi- 
dent's private wing and his office 
on fire as he ate lunch in the a<ba- 
cent timing room, the radio said. 

There was no immediate report 
of casualties, but damage was de- 
scribed as extensive. 

“Firemen, aril defense squads 
and the presidential guards are tiy- 
ing to put out the me and remove 
debris,’’ the broadcast said. 

The conference roam on the sec- 
ond floor of the two-story palace 
was wrecked by another shell, and 
several rounds landed around the 
hilltop building in suburban 
Baabda, five miles (eight kilome- 
ters) east of Beirut, the radio re- 
ported. 

‘ The source of. the artillery, 
rounds was not reported, and it was 
not clear whether the presidential 
palace had been targeted or hit by 
stray rounds. 

Preadent Gemayel left the pal- 
ace a half-hour later and flew to 
Damascus for a two-day meeting 
with Syria’s president, Hafez ai- 


ring between ShSle 
of the 


Moslem farces of the Amal militia 
and Palestinians continued at three 
refugee camps. 

Radio stations said Mr. Gemayel 
intended to ask Mr. Assad to send 
the Syrian Army back to Beirut to 
end the SMite-Palestinian fi ghting , 
the latest in Lebanoh’s 10-year 
MosknhQnistian civil ware. 

There has been intensive diplo- 
matic activity in Damascus during 


the past few days as efforts to end 

the fightin g gamw l mftmwitnm 

' -Police said the palace was sheQed 
by 120mm artillery and that two 

shells hit a few yards from the main 
entrance to the residence of the 
U.S. ambassador, Reginald Bar- 
tholomew, in neighboring Yarze. 
No casualties at damag e were re- 
ported. 

The p*l«e* was shelled almost 
two horns after Beirut’s airport, be- 
low the Baabda hills , was nit by 13 
dells as passengers were boarding 
an airliner bound for Europe. They 
sprinted back to the terminal as the 
snefling began Airport officials re- 
ported there had been no casualties 
or damage. The airtmer later took 
off. 

..In another development, a 
spokesman for the American Uni- 
versity of Beirut said that a British 
teacher at the university, Denis 
Hill , had been dot dead and his 
body discovered at the university 
-jjgjxtaFs morgue Wednesday. 

~ '' Colleagues said Mr. FEU. 53, had 
not been seen dice the weekend. 
The disclosure of his dead came 
one day after the kidnapping of the 
American, director of the universi- 
ty’s hospital, David P. Jacobsen. 

In the continuing fighting at the 
Palestinian ‘refugee camps, Shiite 
militiamen and armored units of 
the Lebanese. Army’s mainly State 
6th Brigade pounded the Borge 
Bangni camp on Beirut's southern 
edge with mortars and tanks. The 
Palestinians were trying to repulse 
the mmiiU with maaiine guns and 
annor-pieraxig rockets, police said. 

Police reported 19 people had 
been killed and 48 wounded over- 
night, raising the toll dice this 

(Controlled on Page 2, CoL (?) 



when Italian and British fans began 
throwing beverage cans over a 
three-meter (33-yard) fence divid- 
ing the two factions in the stands. 

Witnesses said that the British 
fans tore down a dividing fence in 
one section of the 70,000-seat stadi- 
um and broke into a section where 
Italians were waving sticks and 
cans and lighting fires. The Italians 
then fled to the playing field as the 
fighting spread, according to wit- 
nesses. 

“Most of the victims were tram- 
pled under foot,” said one witness 
quoted by Belgian television. “It 
was terrible. People were lying dy- 
ing on the stands before our eyes.” 

After about 20 minutes, Belgian 
police riot squads, including 
mounted horses and dogs, forced 
the Liverpool fans bade into their 
section and setup a security cordon 
between the two sections of the 
stands. 


The match organizers used loud- 
kpeakexs to urge the Italians to re- 
.tum to their positions but half an 
hour before the scheduled start of 
the game , thousands of people re- 
mained on the field. 


Italians in other sections of the 
stadium also invaded the field and 
marched toward the comer where 
the Liverpool fans were located to 
farce them back to the stands. 


The fighting became general, 
with police trying to hold back sup- 
porters from both rides. 


The riot followed brawls outside 
the stadium and a serious incident 
in the dry center when British fans 
looted a jewelry shop, police said. 


Some of the 105 Palestinian? released by the Amal mifitia 
Wednesday posed with their Shnte captors. The prisoners 
were taken dining fighting at Beirut's refugee camps. 


On May 11, 53 British soccer 
fans were ItiDed in a fire at the 
Bradford Gty soccer ground in 
northern England. 

(AP, UP1 , Reuters) 


He said that carriers were seek- 
ing the new planes because “the- 
industr y is going through a transi- 
tion period of wanting planes with 
new technology, more fuel efficien- 
cy and less noise.” He added that 
most of the jets would be leased to 
international air carriers for con- 
tracts ranging from five to 12 years. 

Carriers that have leased planes 
from the company, he said, include 
Britannia Airways, Dan-Air and 
Orion Airways, which are British 
earners that run both charter and 
scheduled service. Financing for 
the planes, Mr. Gonda added, 
would come from internal funds as 
well as public and private borrow- 
ing. _ . 

The order indudes eleven 737- 
300s, which carry 141 passengers; 
three 767-200 ERs, winch carry 
about 216 passengers; four 767- 
300s, wind* cany about 266 pas- 
sengers, and three 757-2Q0&, which 
cany 178 to 186 passengers- All the 
planes are more fud-effident and 
more technoloocaliv advanced 
than current. 



Job Loss to Computers 
A Wide Fear, Poll Finds 


By Nancy Beth Jackson 

Internationa! Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The flight reservation 


of a desktop computer, 
later the machine issues a detailed 
ticket and receipt, saving time and 
tedium fra both cleric 


and passen- 


ThB Associated Pres 


International Lease, winch said 
it expected to complete final con- 
tracts, with Boeing by early sum- 
mer, went public m 1983. It had 
sales of S61 mflKon' and profits of 
S13.4 million last year. 

Meanwhile, Trans Australia Air- 
lines said it would seek government 
lo buy 12 Boeing 737- 


BEST FOOT FORWARD — Anna Maria Craxi, in 
flowered dress, file wife of Italy’s prime minister, Bet- 
tiiio Craxi, visited a Moscow ballet school on Wednes- 


day. Mr. Craxi told Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
uA-Soviet talks on intennetfiate-range 
red the best chance for nroeress. Page Z 


missiles 


nni< may eliminate many routine 
chores, but an eight-country poll 
sponsored by the Intranational 
Herald Tribune, the Atlantic Insti- 
tute and Louis Harris International 
has found strong concern that they 
afro eliminate jobs. 

Only in the United Slates did the 
poll find a widespread belief — by 
50 percent of the respondents — 
that greater use of information- 
processing technology would mean 
new jobs. 

The poll, of 9,000 people, is the 
fifth by the same sponsors designed 
to sample public opinion in major 
industrial democracies on econom- 
ic and security issues. With the ex- 
ception of Japan, where only 3 per- 
cent of the population is out of 
work, unemployment outdistanced 
all other concerns about comput- 
ers. 



In to m aHo nol Harold Tribune 
AtkmHc In st i tute Survey 


Angolan Oil Plant Called Target of Pretoria Paid 


A spokesman for TAA said the 
737- 300 had been chosen because it 
was up to 30 percent more fnd- 
efficient than .-the .DC-9 and be- 
cause Boemg can supply it begin- 
ning in July 1986, several yekrs 
earner than competing aircraft 
cotdd.be shipped. 

The mirlme said it was also plan- 
ning to replaoeUsfieet of 21 Boring 
727s mui wanted to take an option 
cm a custom-stretched, 160- seat 
version cf the new Airbus A-320, 
made by Airbus Industrie. Airbus 
is a ; major competitor- erf Boeing. 


The Associated Press 

LUANDA, Angola —The cap- 
tured leader of a South African 
«M«mgnrin team says his unit en- 
tered Angola to blow op installa- 
tions of the Cabinda Gulf CXI Co. 
and disrupt the economy, not to 
round up rebels, as his government 


men were sent to place mines at an 
oil depot “with the aim of destroy- 
ing the storage tanks at Cabinda 
Gulf.” 


An golan officials presented the 
commando, Captain Winaa Petrus 
duToitirt a news conference Tues- 
day. He said South African special 
forces began planning the raid in 
January, hoping to create “conrid--. 
erable economic setback to the An- 
golan government.” 

Captain du Toit said he and his 


Angola’s government gets 90 
percent of its foreign exchange* 
from die oil operations in Cabinda 
province, where Cabinda Gulf, 
jointly owned by the Gulf Corp. of 
the united States and Angola's 
state ofl company, Sonangol is the 
largest operator. 

The UJS. State Department has 
said it voiced “deep displeasure” to 
the Sooth African government oyer 
the incursion, 'and UJS. 
have said it conld have sabotaged 
not only the UJL-operated oil in- 


stallation but also a peace initiative 

involving South Africa and Angola 
sponsored by Ihe United States. 

{The South African Defense 
Force denied Wednesday that the 
operation bad been aimed atsabo- 

focced a^S^^an from Ca ptain 
du Toit, Reuters reported from 
Cape Town. It said that Defense 
Munster Magnus Malan bad al- 
ready <3«ir that “the Marx- 
ists are well known fra their coer- 
ove methods of obtaining so-called 
admissions from persons under 
their control in order to accomplish 

their propaganda goals.”] 

Foreign Minister RJF. Botha of 


South Africa said after Angola an- 
nounced Captain du Toifs capture 
last week that the soldiers had been 
looking fra members of two rebel 
groups, the Sooth- West Africa Peo- 
ple’s Organization and the African 
National Congress. 

Asked Tuesday if Mr. Botha had 
been correct, Captain du Toit re- 
plied: “No. We were not looking 
for ANC or SWAPO. We were at- 
tacking Gulf OQ. Bui by that action 
we hoped to reduce Angolan gov- 
ernment aid to those groups.” 

[A spokesman for the African 
National Congress denied having 
any military rases in Angola and 

(Coathmed tm Page 2, CoL 7) 


Among the other findings are the 
following: 

• More than half those polled In 
Britain, France, Norway, Spain 
and the United States indicated a 
willingness to be retrained in the 
use of information-processing sys- 
tems. But opinion in West Germa- 
ny and Japan, which are generally 
viewed as technological leaders, re- 
flected not just less enthusiasm but 
outright resistance, with 36 percent 
of the Germans and 63 percent of 
the Japanese replying that they 
would oppose such training. 

• There was an emphatic general 
fear that databanks could be used 
to infringe on privacy. 

• Everywhere but in West Ger- 
many and Japan, there was an 
overall optimism that information- 
processing systems would reduce 
tedkms tasks. The notion that com- 


puters and word processors some- 
how make work less interesting was 
rejected except in Britain. 

The new information technology 
and its effects cm the economy arc 
clearly m&jor public concerns, but 
responses from the poll suggest 
that the views of the general public 
and those of policy-makers may 
not coincide. 

Recent back-to-badc ministerial 
level meetings Sponsored by Italy 
and the Organization Tor Economic 
Cooperation and Development 
equated economic growth with the 
introduction of new technologies. 

Participants reached general 
agreement on the following key 
points: 

• Historically, the introduction 
of new technology has been fol- 
lowed by new employment oppor- 
tunities, although temporary job 
dislocation takes place. 


• Society no longer has the eg 


. tion of accepting or rejecting 
new technology, already pervasive 
in the borne and work pace. The 
real question is how iq use the tech- 
nology effectively. 

Responses to the poll, however, 
suggest that by and large, the pub- 
lic sees advanced technology as a 
destroyer rather than a creator of 
jobs. 

A clear majority of the West 
Germans, British aid Spanish fdi 
that increa sed use of the informa- 
twn-proecsstra technology would 
mean fewer jobs. Nearly half of the 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


I 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


Soviet Insists on a U.S. Shift in SDI Plans 


United Press International 

GENEVA — The Soviet Union, 
on the eve of a new roand of super- 
power arms talks Thursday, has 
flatly rejected oils in cudear weap- 
ons unless Washington abandons 
research on the Strategic Defense 
Initiative. 

The chief Soviet aims delegate, 
Viktor P. Karpov, arriving 
Wednesday for the second round ttf 
talks, said progress depended on 
“necessary adjustments" in thie 
U.S. position. 


Mr. Karpov made dear that bis 
orders remained unchanged from 
the first round March 12 to April 
23. The Soviet position is that cuts 
in easting nod ear weapons must 
be finked to a ban on anti-missile 
space systems. 


The chid U.S. delegate. Max M. 
Kam pdman, similflrly stated on re- 
turning to Geneva 12 hours earlier 
that Ms instructions from President 
Ronald Reagan “axe not basically 
in any way altered.” 


Reagan May Delay SALT-2 Decision 


Waxhingtt « Post Service 

WASHINGTON — PresidenU Ronald Reagan is expected to in- 
form Congress soon that he has postponed until later this year a 
decision on whether the United States wfll exceed limits an nuclear 
missiles in the unnuified SALT-2 treaty, administration officials said 
Tuesday. . 

Mr. Reagan is required by law to submit a report to Congress py 

Saturday on plans for complying with the treaty. Oneofficial said the ... 

report would discuss options but not include a decision whether the I chances of reaching agr eemen t. 


dared that researSfontbe initia- 
tive will continue, although any 
eventual introduction of such sys- 
tems could he discussed. 

UJL arms control officials ar- 
gued that Moscow, besides having 
its own space arms program, 
agreed long ago that it was impossi- 
ble to verify a ban on research as 
such. 

The talks involve separate but 
related subgroups on long’ and me- 
dium-range nodear weapons as 
well as arms in space. 

Given the evidently unchanged 
positions, diplomats close to the 
friire said, it is unlikely that the 
deadlock can be broken at (he sec- 
ond round. This round of talks is 
expected to last about two months. 

Mr. Karpov said in his arrival 
statement mat the American pro- 
gram involved “space strike arms.” 
He said it increased the risk of 
nuclear war and reduced the 


US. side has made the necessary 

adjus tment s in its position and yfll 

be prepared to work out practical 
solutions on both space and nucle- 
ar arms issues,” he said. 


Mr. Kampdman called on the 
Soviet Union to match the “negoti- 
ating flexibility” of the UJS. delega- 
tion. 

His instructions, Mr, Kampd- 
man said, are “to achieve radical 
reductions in offensive nuclear 
weapons and to create a more sta- 
ble strategic environment on earth 
and in space.** 

“We were perhaps somewhat 
disappointed at the slow pace and I 
hope that we can enliven and 
quicken that pace during the sec- 
ond round of these negotiations,” 
he said. 


report would discuss options but not include a decision whether the 
United States intended to exceed the treaty limits on missies. 

Another official said Mr. Reagan was still considering whal to put 
in the report to Congress. This off irial said the report would probably 
be delayed beyond the June 1 deadline, in pail to allow tune for a 
National Security Council meeting on Lhe decision and in part 
because Congress would cot be in session. 


Only the rentuuaation by Wash- 
ington of “research, testing and de- 
ployment" of such systems can 
**open the way to radical reductions 
in audear aims,” Mr. Karpov said. 

“We would like to hope that the 


In Washington, the assistant sec- 
retary of stale for European affairs, 
Richard R. Burt, said Tuesday that 
the United States has not seen evi- 
dence that Moscow “is really pre- 
pared to negotiate" in Geneva. 

Mr. Bort accused the Soviet 
Union of a “strategy of holding 
arms canted negotiations hostage 
to a unilateral concession” by the 
United Stales on the initiative. 



WORLD BRIEFS* 


Three Mile lslarid^-PIant to Reopen 

^.15 NodMT Resuktwy ComoHM! 


I riree itjluc ^ * , » . . 

"* “* ” ck “ 

to restart its undamaged Unit accident at 




or rtppcius iu , - 

^ssssaas?^ 


U.S., Soviet Officials to Meet in Paris 

~ n. i/fin.1 Hhtl IIM 


Viktor P. Karpov making hzs statement. 


L/V r Jivw vr 

WASHINGTON lUPI) — A lop SteteDepartro^^idw^mttt 
Thuwdnv with his Soviet counterpart to discuss southern Afno. dtoaft. 
SStolKssaid Wednesday. A session on Afghanistan » expects! next 

^Chester A Crocker, the assistant secretary of *u« 
will meet Vladilen Vaetv. head of the Soviet F«W 
meat Tor eastern and southern Afacm affairs. « iPMJf 
The meetinK is the outgrowth of President Rooahl Reagan aciH wr 
SeptembSm an address at the United Nations, for < ‘JJjjfj’ 

tions at policy level about regio nal jny bons. JJc fiftt 
m Viennain February and concerned the Middle East. A State Depart- 
ment official said the Russians haw iu dteupri 
Afghanistan, but “the anangements are sull being made. He urf the 
meeting is expected next month. 



Reason and Hussein Discuss Mideast, BONN (Reuters) — Helmut Schmidt, the former Wat Gomes chan- 

O cdlar. has warned his successor, Helmut Kohl, against taking part m US. 

But Officials See Little Progress Now 

~ mu's joining in the Strategic Defense Initiative pngect. tte formal* 


research for a 
France in a tc 


with King Hussein of Jordan for climactic events in his W astrington Jrility of a major package- "Ya*his fiiii maiorMatowm iSnoe stepping down as chancellor m 1982, 

talks onaforts to promote Arab- via*. . . no ins**.* exited fromtbe M ; a schr5dt smd that France's propbS lor a h*h-t«bwk© dnve 

Israeli peace negotiations, but King Hussem and^ a&ser Arafat, admiration. whidi » not i pre- prospects for wSteraEurope than tteuTplin* 

aides dampened hopes for any leader or the Palestine Liberation pared to rake on a major figh m ****** ,ar DB, “ I v v v* 

breakthrough! Organization, agreed in February Congress over weapons to the Jor- « . » * » « 

Before the meetins- an adminis- w negotiate jointly, within the con- damans now. {CPI. Reuters. S YT.) Government ItRlSCS JrTlCBB ltt ISIM 


his first major Matenwm since stepping t 
Schmidt said that France's propcwnl fc 


breakthrough. 

Before the meeting, an adminis- 
tration official said, “We have a 


tration official said, “We have a text of an international conference, 
long way to go." He cautioned for recovering the ^est Bank of the 
against any expectation of a break- Jordan and the Gaza Strip from 


Government Raises Prices in Israel 


through in the Middle East stale- Israel in return for peace with Isra- 
mate. eL The Jordanians haw called for 


Mr. Reagan and Kin g Hussein the First step to be talks oetween a 
posed for pictures at the start of joint delegation and the United 


eL The Jordanians have called for effort with Jordan that culls for a 
the First step to be talks between a Palestinian stale confederated with 

■ - _ j i i .l. i j . .. . .... 


their private meeting The presi- States. 


7/ 7 


dent and the king declined to an- 
swer questions on the prospect of 
progress. 


The United Slates has said it 
would agree to such talks if two 
conditions were met: that the Jor- 


Both leaders said they would dan -Palestinian group contain no 
have a statement after lhe meeting “declared” PLO members and that 
--■* “ — there be some commitment that 


and “working luncheon 


■ PLO Endorses Joint Effort TEL AVIV t AP» — Prices Tor everything from bread to gasoline roe 

The FLO'S Comal Council eu- “ ?' <* * u¥OTmra,i * u “ mc 

Syrian in ihe W«u TOWnl*" Iiradii ol * doJ Hwemarta, to slock up 

ed from Tunis. The pnee of mam services went up t4 percent Prices of basic foods • 

«1 irom I unis. subsidized by the government increased 25 percent Gasoline costs 41 ♦ 

The . I -member counal oversees percent more. The new- prices wtf! remain in effect until the end of July, 
policies of ihe Palestine Liberation The increases were designed to cut gwernmenl spending te sladdta its 
Organization between the utire- subsidies budget and to absorb spare cash held by the puhot 


Organization the inTre- subsidies budget and to absorb spare cash held by 

quern meetings of the Palestine Na* 


fvJ 


DHAKA, Bangladesh — Ban- much less 
gladesh, reeling from a cyclone and suggested, 
tidal wave that killed thousands, Rescuer 


House. 

When asked about the Middle 
East, Mr. Reagan turned to Kang 
Hussein and talked about the 
weather. 

King Hussein commented to re- 
porters that he bad been visiting 
the White House since 1957. 

He was to have made a two-day 
trip to California, but a Jordanian 
Embassy spokesman said Wedups- 
ih* AuooaHd Pn» day that, in a change of plans, the 
king would fly back to Amman 
Survivors of die tidal wave in Bangladesh in a refugee center. from Washington on Friday. 

The spokesman, Mohammed Su- 

mn 1 ■» -Tin- n -M ^ ¥ leibL denied a press report suggest- 

1 Tidal Wave, Bangladesh 

' C7 senior UiL official’s cautioning 

Possible Second Cydorn 

has told Middle East countries that 

time Wednesday said damage was nntments for S1.6 million dollars, next phase in the process de- 
Ban- much less than some reports had Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of pends on those nations getting u> 
:and suggested. India was among the first interna- gether on a peace plan. They were 

“ris. Rescuers were still searching for honal leaders to respond. He said told that they should not look for 


family quarters of the White such talks would pave the way for 


direct negotiations with Israel. 

But even if the PLO did so. and 


tional Council, which serves as the 
organization's parliament. 

It was the first central council 


Sinn Fein Member Will Chair Council 


the United States met with such a session since the national council 
joint group, that would not mean met in November in Jordan and 


that Israel would sit down with a 
PLO group. 


beard King Hussein propose a joint 
search for peace. 


OMAGH. Northern Ireland (AF) — Protestants shouted abuse and 
some spectators walked out when a member of Sinn Fein, (he political 
arm of the Irish Republican Army, was darted chairman of the Onugfc 
District Council. 

The Tuesday night session was the first council meeting since Northern 
Ireland's municipal elections May 15, when Sinn Fein woo 59 of the &66 


In Moscow, Craxi Urges 
Medium Missile Accord 


(90 kilometers) west of Belfast, making it the largest party on the council. 
Councilman Seamus Kerr was elected omndl chairman by a vote of 7-6. 
Of the remaining eight council members, seven abstained and one was a 
absent. ’T 


Following Tidal Wave , Bangladesh 
Braces for Possible Second Cyclone 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — Prime Minister 
Bettino Craxi of Italy said Wednes- 
day that he had told Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, that 
a U-S.-Soviet accord on intermedi- 
ate-range missiles in Europe could 
be reached faster than agreement 
on space weapons or long-range 
missiles. 


Pershing-2 weapons, which have Iraq said its pUnes attacked Tehran and Trinta in northwestern Iran on 
been deployed since late I9S. . Wednesday while a West German cargo ship in the Gulf was strode by a 

The last U.S.-Sbviettdks on me- rocket in an apparent Iranian raid. ( Reuters! 

dium-range missiles broke down in Britain, racing a flood of Tamil refugees from Sri Lanka, moved 

i i’ d°- ™ 10 m ' Wednesday to curb the numbers by requiring visas of Sri Lankans 
dude Bnnsh and French weapons, planning to visit. f Reutenl 

On Monday, the Soviet daily Three persons In Karadn, Pakisian, wwe wounded when police fired on 

travaa sara mat me Kremlin a looting and bunting shops Tuesday in ethnic unrest among 
would be ready eventually to cut p^tim migrant wortes. witnesses said Wednesday. f Reuters} 

back its Emo^an raissues to the saihoctraidsts shot to death three Hindus in Punjab state as the Indian 

level of the French and British government sought to tighten security before the June 3 anniversary of 

"TS officials said that Mr. tbe Oolfc Temple, police Watoaday. iRemcn) 

Gorbachev stressed the importance Swwish inriaos and employers ? agreement Wednesday for a 
of Europe, saying that Moscow did increase of 3.6 percent for 350,000 white-collar workers in the 
not view the international scene pnvate sector. (Reuters) 


For the Record 


braced Wednesday for a posable about 12,000 people reported by he H wc ? ld ^ f h $SS ters ’ food any U 3.. contributions to salvage 


second c 
TheD! 


cyclone. 
Dhaka Vi 


Weather Bureau said 


residents to have been swept away. 
Dhaka newspapers said many of 


and other help if needed. 

The U.S. government has 


the situation. 

“This is very straightforward,' 


Mr. Craxi said that his talks with level of the French and British 
Mr. Gorbachev were dominated by weapons. 


the negotiations on space and nu- Italian officials said that Mr. 


“ rr "“■t rjwrvT state radio, iney said poor roads 
was moving north and could hit the ant ^ transport facilities discouraged 
coast m the next few days unless it 


coast in the next few days unless it 
dissipated, officials said. 

They also said two tropical dis- 


viDagers from fleeing. 

About 250,000 people in tbe dis- 


ine u. a. government nas inis is very straightforward, 
pledged $525,000. Britain $62,000, said an adntimstmion official for 
the European Commission whom tbe White House requested 
$375,000. the United Nations anonymity. “Our goals are mod- 
$525,000 and the West German esL” 

Red Cross $100,000. In an interview just before his 


clear weapons which resume Gorbachev stressed the importance 


Thursday in Geneva. of Europe, saying that Moscow did W ^B E mcrease 

The Kremlin says thai no pro- run view the international scene P nvaI e sector. 

gross is possible on European- only through the perspective of su- 

-based or long-range missiles until perpower relations. 

Washington drops its plans for a Mr. Gorbachev also said that 
space-based missile defense. Comecon, tbe Soviet bloc trading 


t'Ol 


back its European missiles to the 


Wl IVUg lUUgb »iu^ 

Washington drops its p 
space-based missile defer 


plans for a 
ense. 


turban ces that could develop into tricls Voraffla and Sylhet in east- 
cydones in the next two days were era Ban^adesh had moved to high- 


heading toward Bangladesh from o’ ground in the past 24 hours 
the Bay of Bengal diree nvers overflowed. 

- A tidal wave 45 feet (about 14 Lieutenant General Hussain 


meters) high swamped seven is- Mohammed Ershad, the country's 
lands in the Ganges-Brahmaputra martial law leader, said Tuesday he 
delta Friday. In addition to tbe expected the final death toll could 


deat hs. 250,000 people were be- go as high as 10,000. He has ap- 


lieved to have lost their homes. 

Officials of foreign aid agencies 
who inspected the area for the first 


pealed for millions of dollars in 
international aid. 

Bangladesh has received com- 


Agca Trial Defendant Says 
He Held Gun in Safekeeping 


Remcn him a package containing the pistol 

ROME — Omer Bagri, a Turk in April 1981, at Olten, Switzer- 
accused of involvement in a plot to land, where Mr. Bagri lived and 

t;i1 D nu Inkr. Dr.,,1 IT I 


kill Pope John Paul II, said organized a Turkish immig rants’ 

Wednesday be kepi a weapon for organization. 

the man who shot the pontiff “be- “I was 90-percent certain it was a 


the man who shot the pontiff “be- “I was 90-percent certain it was a 
cause I knew’ he was a terrorist and wedpon, but it was wrapped up iu 


I was afraid.' 


rags, and I did not open the pack- 

L- _ “ J F_ - J _ t _ 


Mr. Bagd, 39. told a Rome court age," he said. In earlier evidence he 
he assumed Mehmei Ali Agca had had admitted opening the package. 



Mr. Craxi said he told Mr. Gor- group, was drafting a document on 
bachev, “We are in favor of negoti- establishing direct relations with 


ations at different speeds on the tbe European Co mm u ni ty, 
three topics and we think the Euro- — ? — • 

pean one," a reference to in term e- 

diate-range nrissfles, “can more § ni 7 | 

easily give concrete results." jjL y * 

Mr. Craxi, tbe first leader of a J 

"s 11 

with Mr. Gorbachev, said he cau- ro V nd « began Mav 
tioned against allo wing the talks to at * eas * dead and 1,803 
break down through “hard pcsi- ed - 

tj,. l, ■ j i ■ i k iwr. .^.4; 


OariGcation 

An account in Monday’s paper on reports of the massacre of hundreds 
of Palestinians by Shiite militiamen in Beirut was based on several 
weekend dispatches and should have appeared under a Loaded dateline, 


Gemayel Palace Is Shelled 


tions." He said that he reminded ■ Isnufi Negotiations Reported Pa J cs tinian 
Mr. Gorbachev that the United in other dwinnonunn taJousa 


™" n S ,) , ni “P 0111 . <* M 50 Palestinians Meanwhile, 249 Lebanese and 

“i°^““^prownsm Pakstinian prisoners were freed 
and 1,803 wound- change for three Israelis cap- Wednesday £ part of bS's roS 

. • » a withdrawal from Lebanon 


Mr. iioroacnev mat me united i„ other ckvelopemencs, wire ser- ■ rTTT ^ ucssei VOIe ^ 

States bad said it was ready to vices reponeeL- ^^ wltl 16 abstentions, to accept 


The prisonere, mostly Shiite 
Moslems, were taken to south Leb- 


ne g otiate on all three issuofiT 


In its account of the talks, the cal Palestinian guerrilla ermin for LT •w wuiuu nana, 

Smriet news_agen (7 Tass_»id thai U* ret umof m SS,K 1 £ ^ SSSXZSSSJSZ!:!* 




rcKSTSS CMriSSSB; s—saSJjSS" fc 

Union's determination to find mlu- m raeire of convicted killers. smarmed the release. 


Union’s determination to find solu- in exchange an unspecified number ^ ^ 

tions in all three areas, addina. “It of ^ ir. parhamralanans from 


Mr. Craxi desaibed the lalks as ^SSSTSStTWIS 

u>n and ovron iwHifll coirl Ko T\— r - P-- ^ Still In iho /Tfnr n ° 


Tehiya 


and the militant an- 


^ security zone 


®K>ilrn 


open and even cordial. He said be the Democratic From for the Lib- 
told Mr. Gorbachev that the Euro- eraiion of Palestine fiaimt be was 


^:n • .1 ■ — ^ h mifiv iteiw 

still w the east WPJ.Retwn.AP) 


handed him tbe Browning 9mm Mr. Santiapichi told the court, 
pistol in 1981 "as part of some The judge asked Mr. Bagd why 
plan." but he said be knew nothing he did not hand over the weapon to 


pean missile issue was “just a ques- killed while in captivity on June 24 
tion of counting up the missiles.’’ 1984, during anlsraeh air raid on 
lortersif this indud- Rabbit Island off the coast of the 
British weapons, he Lebanese port of Tripoli. Nineteen 


plan." but he said be knew nothing he did not hand over the weapon to 
about a plot to kill the pope. Swiss police when be knew Mr. 


ed French: 


replied: “Well, they’re not de- people are believed to have been 


In answering questions from the Agca _ had been condemned to 
court president. Severino Samiapi- death in Turkey for the murder of a 
dri, Mr. Bagd twice contradicted Turkish journalist Abdi Ipekci, in 
evidence be had given during inves- 1979 and hod declared he wanted 
tiptions into the alleged plot to ldH to kill lhe pope. 


the pope in Sl Peter’s Square on 
May 13, 19SL 

Neither Mr. Agca nor Musa Ser- 
dar Celebi, another Turk on trial, 
were in court as Mr. Bagd testified. 


Mr. Bagd replied: “If I had giv- 
en up tbe weapon he would have 


KOREAN TALKS SUCCEED — Ii Cbong RyuL right, a 
North Korean negotiator, and Ins Sooth Korean counter- 
part, Lee Young Dob. walked in Seoul Wednesday after 
agreeing to allow visits between separated f amity members. 


South African Soldier Says 
Oil Depot Was His Target 


ployed on the moon." killed in that raid, p TT *** 

This suggested a shift from the The disclosure of these negolia- 
NATO position that British and lions, through the Geneva-based ^ 

French missiles should not be International Committee of the H* 6 ™ 0 Afncan claims that 
counted in the balance of Soviet Red Cross, came as controversy iq ™ mmando group was spying 
SS-20 missiles and U5. cruise and Israel continued over tbe exchange 

biaj 

-U Rifiht to Advertise Captain du Toil said he had been 


(Contiiuied from Page 1) 
rgected South African claim; iha ( 
the commando group was qiying 


ta fB eT was not and is not 
as Mozambique and Lesotho were 


SPKH 7 & “SSiaSS*. Strike-Bound United Plans to Rdmild Airline jgtffias-S'S ISlS&ifJZZr 

«ae» {KSSfisw msna-.*)-, -f-M«siss- CuUiasiszE 


but a Bulgarian defendant, Sergei it to Mr. Agca in Milan cm May 9, 
Ivanov Antonov, was present Five 1981, he said: “I do not know, it 


Nm York Tima Service 

CHICAGO — United Airlines 


Turks and three Bulgarians are cm was a thing'of the moment' 


not ready to return to the I 
mg table despite the stated 


has announced that it plans to re- ness of the puots’ union to resume 


Mr. Bagrii said Mr. Agca handed made to the investi gating magis- 
— i trace, flario Martella, Mr. Bagd de? 


Contradicting statement, he ^ 

anp fn thp invpcfiaaftno vnaaio. 


talks aimed at ending the strike. 
Further talks with the union “are 


ued to work, enabling (hem to seek 
more coveted flying assignments 
made vacant by striking pilots. 


*6SuTiErg£*g ^S^-^-thSTihe 

WASHINGTON - The Su- ^“^ustotage 




“Our intention is to rebuild this not 10 an y b °dy’s benefit,” he said. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


tried he sent money to Mi. Cdebi’s airline as rapidly as we can," Rich- , Spokesmen for both sides ac- However, John LeRi 
account in West Germany to buy a «»? Fems. United’s chairman, k«wledged that the strike's ea> Airlines’ captain and 


plot of land in Istanbul. 


i baobjORS- MASTER'S -DOCTORATE 

j For Walk, Acadank. LB* bpan*"*- 


Send datoiiad resume 
for free evaluotten. 


PACWC WBTHN UNWOSITY 

M0 N. Seoulveda BtaL 
Los Anoetos. CalHornlO 
90049, Dept- 23. UiA. 


Prague Aide to Yisi(3ima 

77ip Associated Press 

BELTING — China announced 
Wednesday that Svatopluk Potac, a 
deputy prime minister of Czecho- 
slovakia, would visit here early in 
June. He will be the highest Prague 
official to visit Beijing since 1959. 


said Tuesday at a news conference nom i c issues, mainly a two-tier for the Air Line Pilots Association, 
here as most of the airline’s pi«n^ wage structure for experienced and said that if the “superseniority" 
remained grounded in the 12th day oewly lured pilots, had been largely provision was left intact it would 
of the strike. worked out satisfactorily late last allow some nonstrOting pilots to 


advertisements are not false or de- 
ceptive. 

The decision Tuesday, which 


into groups of threTHU ^ Na ‘ i onal~ConKti 


decision Tuesday, which across a clearing, tie said. 


of the strike. 


struck down restrictions in Ohio The others “must have mad* it 

an si K ntliap - — - ■ - — - * K mIi «a a... v. m. llaUC A( 


allow some nansirflring pilots to and 15 other states, extends a trend back to our rubber raft and hart i« 

. - Hill, knjl 1A .MM.V tfwrarfl MnHO Iiiti not lk. n. ntL _L- n .. . IO 


wadi. However, a new sticking leap over others who had 10 years toward easing, butnot dimtnating. tbe mother ship" off the CahinH* 

niunt ka, J- ■ J I I “ __ uaimini m nKtainina ctnlp nrliwrlinna iK)rli<liAn< nn nuct Pm.,.!. J.. yWlOfll 


bamh«t _ c ■'.v :‘.“ ,orcesnaQ 
Sotilh™rii- l,berato “ * lr ,n .. 


to resiaff itself by the end 
March. 


Mr. Ferris also said United was 


rights for striking pilots and those The airUne is operating about Wntten by Justice Byron R. Mr. Malan rdterated that theroL S^ !ei ? entsen tfo'nte Assort- 
who have continued to work. 210 flights daily to 41 airports. This White, the decision does not apply (hers were gathering iotdlio^ « m Johannes burn that iu 

Since May 16, when the strike represents about 14 percent of ib w many state restrictions on televi- that Somh Africa nSds to had also shot a South 

began. United established a new normal daily schedule of U50 sion and radio advertising by law- pate the plans of the two hS ^ ncan Policemen to death Mon- 
semority list for pilots who conun- High 15 10 *39 airports. yers. rebel groups. Pretoria* ^ ^ 21160 n °rthweii of 




life, 

I w* 










at. . T.’ ~. -.jv- _ L. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TTUBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


Page 3 


,Von Bulow ExrMistress 
Says He Told of Stalling 
As Wife Sank Into Coma 


By Jonathan 'Friendly 

New York Tima Senior 

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island 


a society figure in. New Ycdt and 
Newport - • 

Her desarotian-af what Ml von 


’ l ' Atoraodia hies, Clans von Bu- Bulow told her. About having 

v ■ r, — i— x htc 






Stills l'| \1 

M' * A vyj ■■ 




'i.-n 


S‘ 

. . . * ” • * • 0 ... • 

0 

.. 


£*3-S.*! j-.i. 

•v.»p. 


i.. .?« 


p Knim on l s p.. 


jiWH 

i a-_r. ,71 , . 
?*"£» JVV:. 
^4T-. 

ji; pt-. . ... 


Uir ^. 


•a* Ms 


low’s farmer mistress, has testified 
that he told her 1 m spent hours m 
1979 watching his wire i 
mtn a coma but dff l f fe d 
couldn’t go through with if*- and 
called a doctor. 

The woman recounted that con- 
versation in a dramatic courtroom 
appearance Tuesday after arriving 
Monday from West Germany. 

It was the first time that she had 

publicly disclosed whal Mr. -von 
Bulow told her about the events of 
Dec. 27, 1979, the first of two dates 
on which he is accused of having 
jjried to loll his wife with an over- 
dose of inmlm. . 

Taking the stand at the last min- 
uic, as she did as a key witness at 
the first trial. Mis. Isles repeated 
ranch of the testimony. She said she 
had told Mr. voh Bulow that he had 
to leave his wife by Christmas 1979 
or die would break off with him 

Mrs. Isles did not end the rela- 
tionship then, however, and she 
said Tuesday that she was 
“ashamed" of not doing do. But, 
she explained, “I still loved him:*' 
Mrs. Isles left the country three 


watched his wife,. Martha, nearly 
die echoed a desciiptkHi of his be- 
havior offend by die first state wit- 
ness, Maria Schrallhammer, more 
than a month ago. ... 

Mrs. vonBalow, 52, who is heir 
to aJ75-nrilEbn fortune, recovered 
from the 1979 coma, but a- year 
later collapsed for a second time, 
again at her Newport mansion 
where she was spending the holi- 
days. She. is not expected to regain 

Mr. von Bulow is accused of try- 
ing twice to kiH her with inmlm 
injections, which the state says 
caused the comas. He was convict- 
ed three years ago and sentenced to 
30 years in prison, but the Rhode 
Tdand S up re me Court 1 overturned 
the verdict rating that some evi- 
dence had been improperly admit- 
ted. and that he snouM have had 
access to notes made by a lawyer 
hired by his sttpchfldren to xnvesti- 

The jury win not hear direct tes- 
timony about what the state says 
was, besides romance, another mo- 
tive: greed. TIk trial judge, Corinnc 
P. Grande, ruled, without giving an 



MAN WITH KNIFE — San Diego police officers try to 
stop a 21-year-old assailant running through the streets 
With a knife. The man, Wayne Douglas Holden, slashed 


at car tires and then hid in a house, where he was shot to 
death by two officers. The man’s father said he was 
distressed over a recent break-up with his girlfriend. 


Tax Experts Say Reagan Plan Is No Revolution 


V". '•>«.*' . 

■A - V * months ago. But she returned and . explanation, that Mis. vonBulcrw’.s 

’ ■ * ’‘Taa, -7; 7 took the stand as the state’s last investment adviser, Morris Guriey, 
1 witness against Mr. vnai Bulow, 58,. could not be called. 


Juris, 


1 C 


:L" - m 


Ebns Pric- 


es 


4 in hoi 


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The adviser testified in 1982 that 
Mr. von3ulcw would have inhmt- 
ed more than .|1 4 million if his wife 
died and he was prepared to say 
this time that a prenuptial 
meat might have barred 
in a divorce. 

In two hours on the stand, Mrs. 
Isles, 39, a former soap opera ac- 
tress, provided new explanations of 
her conduct and that of Mr. von 
Bulow. Chief among them was hex 
account of a phone conversation in 
January 1980, a month after Mis. 
^high this year and mart be frozen von Billow’s first coma. 

*next year to correct the prror. “He said that they had been hav- 

ing a Long argument about divorce 


U.S. Plans Freeze 
Of Medicare Bates 
For Hospital Care 

New Tort Timet Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration has concluded ™t 
Medicare payment rates for hospi- 
tals were set at least 6.1 percent too 


iber Mill Chair Cm 


yr.' • 
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*Ma> • 

T-S-'- 

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Medicare finances .health care 
for 27 milli on elderly and 3 milli on 
disabled people. The enra oc- 
curred partly because inflation in 
the health care industry was less 
than the government expected, ac- 
cording to rales announcing the 
new schedule of payments for 
treatments to be issued next week 

The adjustment for the next fis- 
cal year, which starts OcL 1, marks 
the first time the government has 
proposed adjusting Medicare pay- 
ments in one year to offset the 
effects of erroneous estimates in a 
previous year. . 

^ The Medicare program tins year 
is expected to cost $71.8 billion, of 
which $48 billion is for hospital 
services. 


anti it had gone on late into the 
ni gh t,” Mis. Isles said “She had 
drunk a great deal of egg nog. 
Then, he said, T saw her take toe 
Seconal.’ And then he said the next 
day when she was unconscious that 
he watched her, knowing that die 
was in a bad way, all day. And 
watched ho- and watched her. And 
finally, once die was at the point of 
dying, he said that he couldn't go 
through with it, and he called and 
saved her life." 

On the first day of testimony. 
Miss SchraHhammer, Mia. von Bil- 
low’s maid, described the same 
event, saying that Mr. von Billow 
bad sal on the bed beside his un- 
conscious wife, ignoring repeated 
{teas that he caDa doctor. 


By Dale RussaJcoff 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — American 
tax experts across the political 
spectrum are almost unanimous in 
calling President Ronald Reagan’s 
tax-overhaul plan a major improve- 
ment over the present Internal Rev- 
enue Code, but ray it is far less than 
its advance hilling as a sweeping 
reform or “Second American Rev- 
olution.’* 

They praised as “brave’’ his pro- 
posal to curb lucrative write-offs 
for capital investment, which have 
wiped out the tax bills of many 
corporations and wealthy individ- 
uals. Most applauded his plan to 
abolish deductions for state and 
local taxes, which favor the North- 
east and Midwest and upper-in- 
come taxpayers. 

They hailed his proposal to lower 
tax rates dramatically far individ- 
uals and corporations. 

But with almost the same unifor- 
mity, these former tax-policy mak- 
ers from the Nixon, Ford, Carter 
and Reagan administra tions said 
the president had missed what sev- 
eral called a “great opportunity” to 
fundamentally alter the way the tax 
system shapes American life. 

The Reagan proposal leaves in- 
tact certain lucrative tax advan- 
tages for oil and gas drilling, insur- 
ance, charities, investments in 
stocks and braids and tax shelters. 
The Treasury Department had pro- 
posed to riiminate these and other 
breaks in a sweeping blueprint re- 
leased. last November,, but the 
White House decided to restore 
them after heavy lobbying from 
myriad interest groups. 


4 

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Slu'lM 


EVOLUTION OF ADMINISTRATION’S 

TAX-REVISION PLAN 

TOMS 

CURRENT LA W FOR 1986 

NOVEMBER TREASURY 
PROPOSAL ' 

REMAN PLAN 

TsIWh 

14 rate bractafr tram 11% 
to 50% 

15,26,35% 

15.25.35% 

PBtsowd F*wii i |tfw, 

$1,090 

$£000 

$2JOOa Standard deduction 
'$3,000 dngl*, $43X10 joint. 

Mortgag. Marat Dwtuctlon 

FutyctoducUblfl 

Fufly deducSjle for prtnc^aJ 
residences 

Firily deductible far principal 
residences . 


FV6y deductible 


Deduction footed to $5,000 
abov« investeMrt income. 

— 11 uilir Lid IlninM 

on noqifiiapai nonm 

fcwadnw* Income pto 
45JXJ0 

Ch«tt^l. Contribution. 

Fu9y deductible 

Deductible atxwe 2% of 
adjusted gnosaJncome, gifts 
of property must be 
■■ deducted at or^nai price 
plus inflation 

Fully dedoctiU. for ftsmizen. 
Otfierwb. not deductible. 

State and ImiTann 

FoMy deductible 

Nondeductible 

'Nondeductible 

AmuI IRA TafrjMan.il 
CoHtrtbatkM Limit 

9tU 

SpOBM .. 

80* 

$2,900 

$2^00 

.*2.000 

$2,000 

Cmptejwr-paM IteaRfa lwun.no> 

Nottamd 

Taxed above $70 per month 
for stogies and $1/5 per 
month hr tanfies 

Texed below $10 per month 
tor singles end $20 per 
month for femSes 

Corporate Tax Rate 

4686 

33% . 

33% 

liwtnwnt lte Crot 

Up to 10% 

Repealed 

Repealed 

Capital Qataa 

6096 not tend, top rote of 
20% 

Indexed lor inflation, taxed 
st ordinary income 

5096 not taxed, top rata of 
17.5%, not indexed 

Of Tbn 

" PtacmtaBB depletion 
eftouuCinteng&le cHObig 
costs deducted in one year 

Depletion Bmftod, IntengMe 
drflBng costs repeated 

Depletion permitted for small 
web, intangbie doffing costs 
written off over 2 years 


Ttx Wnhn(poe Port 


Plan Reflects Reagan Vision of U.S. 


til 


if* 




Tar # 1 


(Continued from Page 1) ' 

the plan, none illustrates Mr. Rea- 
gans commitment to smaller gov- 
ernment ihan his insistence upon 
repealing the tax deduction for 
state and load taxes. Only a half- 
dozen states, foremost among them 
New York, objected to the provi- 
sion and those are big-goveniment, 
high-tax states. 

By repealing the deduction and 
forcing taxpayers of those states to 
pay somewhat higher federal taxes, 
Mr. Reagan forces upon the states 
the same choice he has fenced upon 
Congress — to cut spending and 
services and reduce the sire of gov- 
-enunexit, or to turn instead to pofit- 
~$icaDy unpalatable tax increases. 

The proposal also makes impor-. 
tnnt concessions to small boancss- 


his bade on the giants of industry, 
but he makes an important bow to 
the higjtHprid 'executives who ran 
them and all .other wealthy Ameri- 
cans. With iht exception of those 
who rdy heavily 00 the many tax 
shelters that "Mr. Reagan would 
now repeal, the ridb, like the work- 
ing poor,. stand IQ^ gain more per- 
sonally from the tax plan than ev- 
eryone else. 

• One conmtkrns .element of the 
jdan is a $5,000 Utah on the dedno- 
tion taxpayas are allowed an inter- 
est payments for loans other than 
home mortgages. But it applies to 
interest payments exceedmg a tax- 
payers mvestmmt income — the 
diviikody interest and rental in- 

coine from assets. 


es,m 
In effect. 


Thps, wealthy taxpapas with 
abundant unearned incoute from 
them town tax rates., sudi investments face no real con- 
. Reagan has turned strahu, wfafie middle-mcoine tax- 


payers who borrow to buy second 
hemes, automobiles and store pur- 
chases bat have no income-produc- 
ing investments could lose a part of 
their deduction. 

Also, Mr. Reagan would not 
only reduce the lax on capital gains 
from which the rich derive much of 
their income, he would also reduce 
the maximum income tax rate from 
50 percent to 35 percent, and from 
70 percent four years ago- It means 
that taxpayers with incomes of 
hundreds of thousands of dollars 
would end up with proportionately 
far more, afte taxes. 

“They have changed the progres- 
sivity of the system," said William 
A. Niskanen, a former member of 
Mr. Reagan’s Council of Economic 
Advisers. “It’s more progressive 
from [be poverty line up to incomes 
of about $50,000 and above that it’s 


“The November proposal would 
have been a landmark m U.S. eco- 
nomic history and it would indeed 
have been President Reagan's ‘Sec- 
ond American Revolution,' ~ said 
Aaron, a senior fellow at the 
Institution and co-au- 
thor of a recent book on tax reform. 
This proposal has a very different 
character. It promises significant 
improvements, not a revolution.” 

Greg BaUentme, a former Trea- 
sury Department official under Mr. 
Reagan, also called the plan a “sig- 
nificant improv ement." but from a 
perspective very diffaent from Mr. 
Aaron’s. 

Mr. BaUentme describes himself 
as a conservative interested in low- 
er tax rales; Mr. Aaron focuses 
more on the eHminatian of tax ad- 
vantages for special groups of tax- 
payers and corporations. 

Mr. Ballentine said, “My God, if 
you hadn’t heard of the November 
proposal and suddenly the presi- 
dent bad said we’ll have top rates of 
35 percent for individuals and 33 
percent fra corporations, we would 
all have said: This is tremendous .* 1 

Mr. BaHentinej who is now a 
Lte tax-policy consultant, 
“Call it change, call it over- 
haul, call it what you will, but it is 
truly dramati c." 

But other framer officials said 
Mr. Reagan's plan, once reviewed 
by Congress, might be no more 
dramatic than. the 1969 and 1976 
tax laws, which were billed as ma- 
jor reforms. Those measures dra- 
matically curbed tax shelters, in- 
creased taxes on capital gains and 
restricted numerous business de- 
ductions. 


Most explained their mthuriasm 
less as a testament to Mr. Reagan’s 
proposal than as a measure of their 
low regard for the present tax sys- 
tem, which Mr. Ballentine called “a 
relatively miserable standard.” 

Moreover, they said that Mr. 
Ragan appeared to have forfeited 
his goal of simplifying (he tax code 
by proposing 10 retain features that 
encourage tax shelters and favor 
certain industries and investments. 

“Any attempt to sell this as sim- 
plification is disingenuous,” said 
Frederic Hickman, assistant Trea- 
sury secretary for tax policy under 
President Richar d M. Nixon. “It 
would greatly increase the tax prac- 
tice of lawyers and accountants. By 
shifting the tax burden back to cor- 
porations, it creates more pressure 
to avoid taxes in that area, which is 
where most tax lawyers and ac- 
countants woik.” 

Still these former policy-makers 
emphasized that Mr. Reagan's plan 
would remove some important in- 
centives blamed for distorting 
choices. By curbing depredation 
write-offs and abolishing the in- 
vestment tax credit, Mr. Reagan’s 
plan would be less generous toward 
capital investment than was the tax 
code in the Carter administration, 
according to Emil Sunley, an econ- 
omist. He was President Jimmy 
Carter’s deputy assistant Treasury 
secretary. 

. Mr. Sunley added that lower tax 
rates would make up for some, if 
not all of the difference, but the 
oyefall effect would be to reduce 
the advantage of industries such as 
steel that invest heavily in machin- 
ery over those that do not, such as 


Reagan Urges Overhaul 
Of TJn-American’ Taxes 


(Confirmed from Page 1) 
rate at 35 percent would! unneces- 
sarily sacrifice jobs, investment, 
economic growth and revenues.” 

The mam theme of -the presi- 
dent’s speech was that ordinary 
people pay too much in taxes be- 
cause a few do not pay their fair 
share 

Calling his proposal “revolution- 
ary,” the president asserted, “I be- 
lieve that in both spirit and sub- 
stance our tax system has come to 
be un-American.” 

“Fra the sake of fairness, sim- 
plicity and growth,” he said, “we 
must radically change the structure 
of a tax system that still treats our 
earnings as the personal property 
of the IRS, radically change a sys- 
tem rtmf s till treats people earning 
amilar incomes much differently 
regarding the taxes they pay and, 
yes, radically change a system that 
still causes some to invest their 
money, not to make a better 
mousetrap, but simply to avoid a 
tax trap.* 

Congress is in recess this week, 
so its response to the president's 
address was more muted than it 
might otherwise have been. 

The debate in Congress is ex- 
pected to last at least the rest rtf the 
year. Mr. RostenkowskTs commit- 
tee and its counterpart in the Sen- 
ate, the Finance Committee, are 
planning hundreds of hours of 
bearings that are expected to last 
into n n t n mn 

Senator Bob Packwood of Ok- 
gon, chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee and a Republican, said he 
ex p ected a tax mil similar to the. 
presidenfs to be enacted by Christ- 
mas. But even Mr. Reagan’s most 
optimistic advisees before that the 
odds of that happenin g to be little 
better than even and that the bill 
mil cany over into 1986. 

The president made many 
ch a ng es in an original set of recom- 
mendations presented by the Trea- 
sury Department last November, 
but he followed the Treasury’s phi- 
losophy that tax rates could be re- 
duced ogmficantfy if many spedal 
deductions, exemptions and exchi- 


skms were ehmiiiated or restricted. 
Mr. Reagan did not mention the 
original Treasury plan. 

As the Treasury had recom- 
mended, Mr. Reagan proposed re- 
ducing the number of tax brackets 
for^lhidnal 5 to threerate& 

est ancf wealthiest taxpayers most. 
Overall it would bring to the Trea- 
sury approximately the same 
amount of revenue that the current 
system does. 

The proposal would mean a tax 
reduction fra virtually aO of the 
two-thhds of American taxpayers 
who do not itemize returns. 

The personal exemption taxpay- 
ers can take for themselves and 
their dependents would be raised to 
$2,000 from the current $1,040. 
The standard deduction, or zero 
bracket amount, would be lifted to 
52^00 from $2,480 for single tax- 
payers and to $4,000 from $3,600 
on joint returns. 

That mwinc that a family of four 
earning $25,000. approxi mately the 
median family income in the Unit- 
ed States, fairing the standard 
deduction would owe slighriy less 
than $2,000 of income tax. Such a 
family would owe more than $ 2,100 
undo - current law. 

According to the White House 
summary, people with taxable in- 
comes over $200, OCX) would have 
their taxes reduced 00 average by 
10.7 percent. Those with incomes 
below $ 20,000 would have an aver- 
age tax cut of between 13.5 percent 
and 35J percent. Taxpayers with 
incomes between $ 20,000 and 
$ 200,000 would get average reduc- 
tions between 4.1 percent and 8.7 
percent. 

More than 65 categories of de- 
ductions, exemp tions and exclu- 
sions in the present law would be 
limited ra abolished. 

Among major rfumges, the cor- 
tex rate would be reduced to 
percent from 46 percent. 

The wanimm «a pita 1 gains tax 

rate would be 17J percent. Tax- 
payer in the 25 percent tax bracket 
would owe only 123 percent on 
capital gains. The maximum rate is 
now 2 Qpercent- 


tbe high- technology and service in- 
dustries. 

The former officials said unani- 
mously that Mr. Reagan's plan ap- 
peared 10 be driven less by tax- 
policy considerations than by a 
need to accommodate certain inter- 
est groups ami to raise enough 
money to offset rate reduction. 


U.S. Navy Bought 
$659 Ashtrays 

Washi ng t o n Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — A naval air 
station in California has paid 
Grumman Aerospace Crap. $659 
each for aircraft ashtrays and $404 
apiece fra socket wrenches, while 
watching the price of landing-gear 
damps increase more than 2300 
percent over a 16-month period, 
according to the navy. 

Commander Tom Jurkowsky, 
spokesman fra the Pacific Fleet 
Naval Air Force, said Tuesday that 
the navy was investigating the case, 
which was turned up by congressio- 
nal in vestigatras. 

The officer said he did not know 
how man y ashtrays, wrenches and 
clamps had been purchased by the 
base, the Mi ramar Naval Air Sta- 
tion near San Diego, or why pro- 
curement officials had failed to 
challenge the bills. 



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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30. 1985 




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China Ordering Students 
To Take Army Training 


The Assodaed Pros 

BELTING — Compulsory mili- 
tary training for more than 50 mil- 
lion Chinese secondary school stu- 
dents and more than a milli on 
university students will begin in 
September at selected schools, the 
government announced Wednes- 
day. 

The official Xinhua press agen- 
cy. quoting the Liberation Army 
Daily, said 52 colleges and 102 sec- 
ondary schools would be chosen to 
gp first in rdntrodncmg military 
training throughout the nation. 

The Beijing and Qinghua univer- 
sities in the capital are among those 
selected, the report said. Lata, all 
university and secondary students 
will be required to take training. 

Besides the 50 millio n secondary 
students in China, there are \2 
million in universities and other 
institutions of higher learning. 

After completing the recruit 
t raining, university students will 

take courses to prepare them as 
junior officers in the reserves. 

A revised version of the 1955 
military service law. enacted a year 
ago by the National People's Con- 
gress, ordered a restoration of mili- 
tary training in schools. Such train- 
ing was phased out in the 1950s. 

The 1984 law retained conscrip- 
tion as the "base military system in 
China,” augmented by volunteers, 
civilian militia members and re- 
servists. The law also ordered resto- 
ration of military ranks, which 
were discarded in 1965. A delay in 


this has been laid to bureaucratic 
problems. 

The law states that all citizens 
have an obligation of military ser- 
vice. Men from 18 to 22 are subject 
to duty. Women of the same age 

group can be inducted *1f needed.” 

Sendee is three years in the army 
and four years in the air force ana 
navy. 

In another development, the 
Beijing city government announced 

a new policy for university gradu- 
ates sent to work in remote areas. A 
change to assure students the right 
to return to their home town came 
one month after a sit-in ai city hall 
here by exiles who had been away 
from Beijing since 1968. 

Henceforth, graduates who vol- 
unteer for eight years of work in 
Tibet and in the barren, western 
province of Qinghai will retain 
their Beijing residence permits and 
beable to return when their time is 
served, the caty government said. 

Graduates assigned to other re- 
mote areas may apply to come 
home but their remrn will require 
approval from the city’s higher 
education btmeau. 

The new regulations were report- 
ed Tuesday by Xinhua 

Previously, work units where 
volunteers were assigned had the 
power to decide whether and when 
members could go home. 

In Beijing and other cities, resi- 
dence permits are required to ob- 
tain housing, work and ration cou- 
pon s. 



Unemployment Is Still Primary Worry 

* W ,L. .n I'llNW L! S. i] 


• ■■ 

The Awnri oit t l Pwa 


Arcdy Cabales, right, and Sohair B a Do m dal L 


U.K. to Change Entry Laws 


By Charles D. Sherman 

Internadamd Herald Tnbane 

PARIS — Despite signs of international re- 
covery from the deepest recession since World 
War n, unemployment stands as the chief worry 
in the major industrialized democracies, accord- 
ing to a pdl conducted for the International 
Herald Tribune. 

As in four similar surveys since 1982. the issue 
of work dominates other public concerns, in- 
duding midear weapons, threat of war, crime, 
inflation and excessive government spending. 

Id the eight countries polled — France, Brit- 
ain, West Germany, Italy, Spain, Norway, Ja- 
pan and the United States — concern over jobs 
showed a dear increase over the previous sur- 
veys. with lire exception of Norway. 

Each survey has included the same broad 
question, a “barometer,” designed to test public 
opinion on national security and economic is- 
sues. The rest of the questions in this survey 
were focused on the impact of computers ana 
technology on society. 

The polls have been cosponsored by the At- 
lantic Institute for International Affairs, a pri- 
vate riesearefa group basedin Pscris; Louis Harris 
International, die polling organization; and 
newspapers and radio stations in the eight coun- 
tries. 


Jtaaerj 

LONDON — Britain plans to 
change its immigration laws be- 
cause the European Court of Hu- 
man Rights found it guilty of sexu- 
al discrimination. 

The court in Strasbourg ruled 
Tuesday in favor of three foreign- 
-bora women, Nargis Abdulaziz 
from Malawi, Arcdy Cabales from 
the Philippines and Snhair Balkan- 
dali from Egypt, permanently resi- 
dent in Britain. Their husbands, 
also Foreign-bom, were refused 
permission to join them. 


Current British immigration law 
allows only women with at least 
one British-born parent to bring 
their husbands in from abroad. No 
such restrictions apply to foreign- 
-bom men bringing in wives. 

The court ruled that this was a 
breach of the European Human 
Rights Convention. 

Following the decision. Home 
Secretary Leon Brittan promised 
changes. 

“We are signatories to the con- 
vention and have to abide by the 
convention," he said. 


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were the following: 

• Crime was the second great 
West Germany, Britain, Italy and the United 
Stales. 

In the United States, 42 percent of those 
polled expressed wony over crime, a jump of 12 
percentage points over a survey Iasi spring. The 
j«aou» «as htghiighniri in the United States in 
recent rprmtlw by an incident on the New York 
City subway in which a passenger, Bernard H. 
Goetz, shot four persons he believed were 

fhrwatpnrno Trim. 

• Anxiety over the possibility of war breaking 
out has detained steadily in a clima te of renewed 
arms control talks between the Soviet Union 
and the United States and the appearance of 
greater stabilit y in the Kremlin leadership. 


9,000 People Surveyed 
In 8 Countries for Poll 


This survey, the fifth in a series over the 
past three years, was designed to test senti- 
ment on questions related to national security 
and on economic concerns in seven Western 
nations and Japan. It focuses on aititiute 
toward the growing use of technology in the 
work place. . 

The poll, conducted by the International 
Herald Tribune, the Adamic Institute, Louis 
Harris International and an international 
media group, surveyed opinion among 9,000 
people. The interviews were conducted in 
April and May. 

Sponsors included Aftenpostcn in Nor- 
way, Asahi Shimbun of Japan, Le Figaro in 
France, the Financial Tunes of London, H 
Pais in Spain, 11 Sole 24 Ore in Italy. USA 
Today in the United States, and West- 
dcutscher Run df unk and Die Zeii in West 
Germany. . , ,, 

The Atlantic Institute for International Af- 
fairs is a private research center in Paris. 
Inquiries and or d ers for the data should be 
addressed to the Atlantic Institute at 9 Ave- 
nue Hoche, 75008 Paris. 


In Britain, the fear of war was listed by 25 
pcrcenL of the respondents, as contrasted with 
40 percent a year ago. Similar trends, though 
less pronounced, were found in France and 
Italy. West Germans remained the least fearful 
about the threat of war, with only 14 percent 
listing it as a concern, the same level as last 
spring. 

A third of the Americans polled said they 
feared a war. along with 36 percent of the 
respondents in Japan. Both levels were un- 
changed from the last survey. 

• West Germany appears to be undergoing a 
resurgence of concern about nudear weapons. 
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization is pur- 


Two of every three West Gomans jtojled 


listed unemployment as a critical issue, 
factory weaken showed strong concern over the 
future of the workplace, employers and profes- 
sional s responded even more strongly, with 74 
percent expressing concent 

In Spain, in the highest response recorded, 89 . 
percent Saul work was a major wwy. . . f* 

Only in the United States and Japan, where 
the improved economic outlook has been most 
pronounced, did fewer than 50 percent of those 
polled identify unemployment as a concern. 


Poll Finds Fear That Computers Cost Jobs 


(Continued from Page 1) 
French. Italians, Norwegians and 
Japanese agreed. 

Americans, regardless of sex. 
age, occupation and politics, voiced 
great optimism that jobs would be 
created; they also indicated far 
more experience with information- 
proccssmg systems — 37 percent as 
compared with 11 percent in West 


Gomany and 14 percent in Japan, 
difference between public 


The 


opinion and that of policy- makers 
may lie in sbon-ienn and long- 
term views. 

Policy-makers envision a post- 
industrial society in which infor- 
mation replaces land and factories 
as a measure of wealth and com- 
puters assume routine tasks - The 
general public sees and feels the 
immediate effect when two secre- 
taries in a four-women insurance 
office are replaced by a word pro- 
cessor. or traditional economic sec- 
tors such as steel or automobiles 
suffer mass layoffs because of in- 
creased automation. 

How to find new jobs for those 
lost is what causes public concern, 
said John Marcum, an American 
who hods the OECD's Depart- 
ment of Science and Technology 
Policy. 

“In the short-term, there are lay- 
offs in given seaore and short-term 
and painful dislocation of the work 
force," he said when asked to com- 
ment on the poll results. 

The substitution of computers 
for workers is “why we get this 
great bulge of unemployment 
among the young,” said Thomas T. 
Stonier, head of the Science and 
Society Department at Bradford 
University in Britain and author of 
a recent book on the new- informa- 
tion economy. 

Often unable to function in an 
information economy, young peo- 
ple pose a challenge to the econom- 
ic and social stability of the society, 
he said in a telephone interview. 
This challenge can be expressed as 
hooliganism, crime in the streets or 
extreme politics. 

Mr. Stonier predicted that the 
new information technology would 
create newjobs bat that they would 
be vastly anTerem from many jobs 
today. The new opportunities will 
not mean an increase in employ- 
ment, he said. 

In Francs, Jean-Marie PoutreL, 
research director at the Office of 
Economic Information and Fore- 
casts, a nonprofit group, said that 
without doubt the increased use of 
such information systems would al- 
ter jobs, especially in traditional 
fields like enginee r hiEi metallurgy 


QUESTION: Would you ogrM that it will b* 

increasingly possible to use information 
stored in computers to invade privacy? 


Britain 

France 

Holy 

Japan 

Norway 

Spain 

United States 
West Germany 


4» mmm 



information technology is more 
difficult to explain, s&idotie expert 
Fritz Yagoda. market research 
manager on technical questions 
with the Frankfurt branch of Dtc- 
bold-Germany, an international 
consulting company, said that Get- 1* 
mans were relatively conservative 
about accepting innovations. Be- 
fore agreeing to retraining, he said, 
Germans would want to know 
when it would lake place. Germans 


expect adult education on compa- 
re after 


MT* Nancy Whfcomb 


and textiles. Engineering drafts- 
men, for example, will be replaced 
by computers. A new demand will 
arise for specialists who create the 
drafting programs. But will it all 
even out? 

“The balance seems to be nega- 
tive," Mr. Pound said. “More jobs 
will disappear than will be creat- 
ed." 

An overriding concern in all 
countries except Italy was that the 
growing use or computerized infor- 
mation could also lead to greater 
intrusions into individual privacy. 

In the United States, where there 
is a monthly newsletter charting the 
impact of technology on the rights 
of Americans, over two-thirds of 
those polled said they believed it 
would be increasingly possible to 
invade personal privacy. 

In Britain, three-fourths of those 
interviewed believed that the threat 
of invasion of privacy was growing. 
In France, the figure was 71 per- 
cent. 

Only half erf the Japanese cited 
concern about the issue, and a 32 
percent had no opinion. The inva- 
sion of privacy by computer sys- 
tems is only be ginning to develop 
in Japan, said Ezra F. Vogd of 
Harvard University. 

“The Japanese in general toler- 
ate a lot more public use of infor- 
mation than we do," he said in a 
telephone interview. “They haven’t 
had the abuse of the use of infor- 
mation and fed that society is bet- 
ter ordered by the public havin g 
access to more information.'' 


With the increased ini 
of world market^ government 
business leaders fear that the inter- 
ruption of the free flow of inforna- 
tion across borders may bean even 
greater menace than the threat to 
privacy. 

Another issue explored by the 
poll was attitudes on retraining in 
the new technology. 

In France, where unemployment 
is now above 10 percent, M ppcent 
of those polled said they definitely 
or probably would be willing to be 
retrained if jobs were at stake. Well 
over half the respondents in Brit- 
ain, Norway, Spam and the United 
States and nearly half of the Ital- 
ians indicated the same willingness. 

Only 28 percent of the Japanese 
and 37 potent of the Germans 
were interested in retraining. Ex- 
perts speculated that these rehous- 
es might not mean that the popula- 
tions were fighting information 
systems but might reflect other fac- 
tors. 

Mr. Vogel pointed out that the 
technological leap to word proces- 
sors bad been greater for the Japa- 
nese. whose character-based writ- 
ten la nguage has made even a 
typewriter keyboard impracticaL 

Given Japanese tradition, re- 
training would not normally pose a 
problem, according to Mr. Vogd, 
who questioned that poD finding 

“If it is through the office, they 
will do what the office says," he 
said. 

The apparent West German re- 
luctance to become part of the new 


ny time, not weekends or 
work, he said. 

Nearly half the Germans doubt- 
ed that mformation processing sys- 
tems would help “people like me" 
simplify everyday problems. 

But most people polled were op- 
timistic about how computers 
would affect daily life and chores. 
Sixty-three percent of the Ameri- 
cans thought computers would _ 
make life easier, and 77 percent' 1 
said such systems would take the 
tedium out of work. 

The Spanish were almost as en- 
thusiastic as the Americans, with 
three-quarters expressing optimixm 
that tedious tasks could be elimi- 
nated. Like the Americans, they 
believed that people would become 
less interested in their work, but 64 
percent felt that use of the systems 
would simplify daily life. 

Perceptions of what is inhibiting 
the implementation of the new 
technology vary from country to 
country. 

In the United States, where 
schools have often been charged 
with adult education and job train- 
ing, 64 percent of the respondents 
faulted the schools. The French, 
whose government recently started 
a widespread program to equip 
schools with computers, found 
popular prejudices to be the great- 
est barrier (47 percent). Forty per-# 
can of the Japanese, 39 percent of 
the Norwegians and 38 percent of 
the Germans had no opinion or 
were not sure. 

Forty-three percent of the Brit- 
ish cited labor onions as an inhibi- 
tor. 

Thirty-five percent of Americans 
and 37 percent erf I talians — con- 
siderably above the other countries 
polled — believed that political 
leaders were holding up develop- 
ment of the new technologies. But 
more people cited “popular preju- 
dice” than any other barrier. 

Mr. Poutrd believes ttn» re- 
sponse may also reflect a popular 
ignorance about the information^ 
revolution. #- 


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surveyed aid they were turned >hwi w|dwr 
arms; a return to levels found in the 19S. put 
after a (hop last year. 

S paniar ds qqw dchxuogckiscf oiihurv Jinks 
with the Atlantic alliance, show shaipiy in- 
creased concern over nudear arms, 

• Only in the United States, where govern- 
mem deficits are large and growing larger, does 
concern over excessive government spending 
draw a strong response. 

• Few respondents believe that the military 
Strength and preparedness of their countries ft 
mad equate. In aU countries but the l niied 
States, 10 percent or fewer expressed concern 
over defense, the category drawing the H*c« 
response rate of the survey. 

U is the degree to which concern about uncm- 
plovmeni overshadows all other concerns that 
remain* the poll's most consistent result In 
France. West Germany and Spain, the response 
rare to the issue of joblessness was double that 
of any other concern. , 

French anxietv over employment hit 80 pei0t 
cent for the first 'time in the series of polls, with 
00 percent of Mue-coUar workers expressing 
fear of joblessness. Frame has been undergoing 
a stiff economic austerity program aimed at 
increasing productivity. Official figures show 
unemployment at 2.3 million people, about 10 
percent of the work force. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1983 


: 


SCIENCE 


Vietnam Threatened by Extensive Deforestation 


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By Thomas W. Netxcr 

Ww V«rk Tbbo Service 


G LAND, Switzerland — Viet- food production and economic 
nam faces an environmental progress, the Vietnamese govem- 
catastrophe brought on by three ®ent has joined forces with indo- 
les of warfare and continuing pendent international conservation 
i of the hand by a rapidly agencies tofigbt the enviromnental 
ing population, an in tana- destruction. . 

I conservation 0019 has con- Current treads could leave the 
d in a new study. nation nearly barren of forests by 


Concerned about the threat that the year 2000, unleashing a cycle of U. S. sources, the report says the cent for forestry, with 39 percent of I 

a degrading landscape poses to severe flooding of industrial and war cost Vietnam 26 milli on gihic the land capable of Htlle or no 



*” '^f^abuse of the land by a rapidly 
' growing population, an intema- 
; •!;.]] tional conservation croup has cenr 
J iU 1 * duded in a new study. 


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IN BRIEF 

Malaria Vaccine Ready for Testing 


ivity, the report says. u Cur- 


agricultural lands and causing food yards of commercial timber and productivity, the report says. “Cur- 
and energy shortages, according to rendered useless more than 365,000 rent agricultural area is inadequate 
the study by the International acres (150,000 hectares) of rubber to feed the papulation fully, and 
Union fra- Conservation of Nature plantations, either from bombing, large food imports must be pur- 
and Natural Resources, which is bulldozing or spraying of herbi- chased.” the report added. 


based in this village 20 mOes (32 tides, 
kiloineters) northeast of Geneva. “Tt 


Citing a general lade of large 


kilometers) northeast of Geneva. “The long-term effects are,, in wildlife because of war damag e, 
The study traces the destruction fact, far more serious,” the report MacKinnon indicated that short- 
to the constant conflicts in Viet- said. “For more than 12 years after ages of food and the wide avaflabil- 
nam since 1$45, in wars first with the spraying, the forests have never ity of firearms had led to the near 
France and then with the United recovered, fisheries remain reduced disappearance of small, edible 
Slates that ended when Communist in their variety and productivity birds in some villages, 
forces overran South Vietnam in even in coastal waters, wildlife has MacKinnon and two Vietnam- 




S/v&XVf:- 








mmmm 


forces overran South Vietnam in even in coastal waters, midlife has 
1975. not returned, cropland productivi- 

“During these wars, the popula- ty is stQl below former levels and 


WMM* 



WASHINGTON (AP) — A prototype malapa vaccine that wcdcs on 
mice and rabbits has beat developed ami could be- tested on humans as 
early as this snntner. 

AccordingtoW. Ripley Ballou, one of alcana at tte Walter Reed Army 

institute of Research hoe who developed the vaccme through genetic 
Engineering, the prototype coaid lead to the production of a vaccme for 
general release in three to five years. The quest for a malaria vaccine 


tion and the environment of 


not returned, cropland prodnetivi- ese officials, Dr. Vo Quy and Dr. 
ty is still below former levels and Le Thac Can of the government’s 


€m 


tryside was exposed to such levels ‘The cnhvaaii Hnmaff» from 25 “Restoring the envir onment and 
of deliberate destruction that it mOtion bomb crates, which caused impairing some of this war damage 
gave rise to a new word in the displacement of a billion cubic me- is now a major government pro- 

Bnattah -t -.1. I.- !_ I M. t T Z? l. _r .1 LI 


is a great increase m uma- 


Ttam suffered terribly and the coun- related ritseasfs and cancer. 


to such levels 


Committee an Environmental Re- 
search and Protection, concluded. 





•c. .-i.o... ... . general release m three to five years, me quest tor a maiana vaccme 

* '*■!*. j-.. ‘ ‘' r! ' develcqxd by conventiopal means has been blocked so far because there 

r-.,, ‘ ’ ."I 1 ■ 1 'ni.jj w * s no way to grow the parasite in the laboratory, but" progress is now 

&i«ti 1 u ‘ . ‘ Tl 1 : »»-i being made a synthetic vaccine. 

r-., Malaria, caused by a mte-cdled parasite, has been eradicated from the 

in.. . 1 . 1 - 1 - . 1 ... I IniiaJ xf_Un»^.<L. a IV«IWwM uhmllu 


ecocide,' ** said ters of earth, results in health haz- gram, but the scale of the probl 

>%n H (yy^gnTyarl t a*vLe «n#l nmla# fl/ini 5# mr T«mmw »h»« 


Sl'-’H* v «r r ^n i-i.,.,..' 

ii.V - 1 'ji • i -" : *' !!> ' “ r - ^ African tinklren die from the disease each jicai. 

Whh Onfy One Eye, Ants Get Lost 

j„ s 1 -rr. >’ ZURICH (NYT) — Testshave shown t±at an ant with one eye covered 

„ t ‘ , ‘ ir ,i; - >' v.n,., cannot memorize a route in terms of landmarks seen through the otter. 

'*■ • ‘ “•• : k k«.i- . !fc . And it caanot find its way when the covered eye is exposed mid the otter 

* j - r .,_ . v ‘ 1 jjne covered. However; when its navigation is based on polarization of 

sc tinp.' 1 't.M r„. > ' . ■’?.• »ght in the sky, such "interocolar trmrfer” otf information does mable H 

f *nt*Vi>M.d .- ,= j,.”; 1 ''.,' to keep track of its route. 

’■ - 'Tr^ Tests conducted on long-legged Saharan desert ants at the University 

_ _ of Zurich in Switzerland mstxwered thatan ant can find its way back to 

— its nndei^ronnd nest from a food source as mndb as 65 feet (20 meters) 

^ away, using only the polarization of light in the sky as a compass. Such 
jL rt _ tr[ > prrfarbation, or vihranaod orientation oi fi^ht waves, when seen at right 

If' | V ■ jflof I J angles to the {Erection of the sun, indicates the son’s position in the sky. 
^ Vtl/ol l/fl According to the authas of the nroort, in Nature, ants inay be unable 

v to transfa landmark memoiy from the visual system trf one eye to that of 
* i ... the otter because the insects depend on binocular vision to store such 

I ..T.“ ■ : information. 


„ - United States. It remains the leading kiBer in the Third World, where the 
there are an estimated 150 mi hu m new cases a year. More than a million 

Nil. Afrimn rhiMmi ilia fmn Rv. Jimasa aai4i uwn- 


Dr. John MacKinnon, a consnltant ards and disrupts water flow, 
to the conservation group who added, “and the partklsi of shi 
ma d e the study in a three-month cel embedded in living trees : 
visit to Vietnam that ended in Jan- das their wood less valuable.” 
nary- . . Officials of the wildlife fund : 

The joint study, stemming from U. S. statistics indicated that n 
a suggestion to the Vietnamese by than 19 miltw . o»iw of he 





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soliant aids .and disrupts water flow,” it is huger than Vietnam’s technical 
p who added, “and the partkks of shrap- and financial resources can solve 
month nd embedded in living trees ran- unaided.” 
in Jan- das their wood less valuable." MacKinnon noted, however. 

Officials of the wildlife fond said that even without war devastation, 
g from u. S. statistics indicated that more Vietnam would face problems of 




an official of the conservation orga- odes, known as Agents Orange, 
nization two years ago, calls for a White and Bine, were dumped on 
national conservation strategy to croplands and forests. The teria* 


than 19 million gafl/wg of hcrbi- poor soil and too much water, with 
tides, known as Agjents Orange, acidic ground, irregular water 
White and Bine, were dumped cm Dows, and floods and typhoons in 
croplands and forests. The hcrbi- its jnajor river deltas. 

elites rantaim-^ rUnrins thirt n-main “But this WHS made WOISe by 


Cbarts show bow Vietnam’s forest lands (black) are disappearing. 


Th« Nm Vefk Tai 


be inaugurated this summer. It rirtes rfwita'mf^i rUnrfns thirt T wrwiin “Bui this was made worse by 
would i nclude a massive reforests- at toxic levds today. The report war," be said. “There are tone sub- 
tion program, family pl ann in g and died Vietnamese figures that more stances still in the sofl in the south, 
a c ampaign to make the public than fommiOicm acres are affected, forest area was lost, communica- 


ters CostJd 


a campaign to make the public than four 1 
aware of the need to preserve the Further 
environment report saw 

The initial cost of the program tracts of 
has been estimated at about and “even 
$750,000, with reforestation and with giant 
otter elements expected to cost troops sea 
nuOians more, according to offi- the south, 
dais of the World Wildlife Fund, of larae 1 


Further damaga was cmraH, the 
report says, by the clearing of large 
tracts of forest, agricultural l«r*d 
«nH “even villages *wd cemeteries” 
with giant bnnaaeers used by U. S. 
troops rarriitep for guerrillas in 
the south, as wcD as by the burning 
of large forest areas by napalm 




Ice Shelf s Role in Sea Levels Studied 


which released the study. The fund bombing. 

is a sister organization of the con- repon ^ contends that 

^*l!®^^ and,SaISObaSBd U.S. fon£ destroyed dikes and 
on Lake Geneva. ot j ier “ flpT Tmi tnrnl nroductive svs- 

The 97-pagc document, stiD in twnc » bailed landslides in steep 
draft form^partrays a basically ni- areas by bombing and by spraS 

Si mJmSSSaeiiSSS 

by defiberate destruction of the attacked wildlife such as ek 
environment as annhtaiy tactic on and oxen with ©ms. boml 
a scale nevw before seen m the napdm to prevSTtheir 1 
?U * t 7 y and still suff a- SSSarUtGTSnci dm 

mg its after-effects. large areas of hmd with “sac 

Today less than 23 percent of the bombing.” 
nation is covered by forest, down AK -.„ ,, n , 

from 44 percent in 1943. wa th a 12 o 401 sqnS^mfles (3 
hu^e, barren area “croaefamg on idlers) ofland ; 

agncultural_ and forett land, ao- S fnr 3 “S; 


— ,*■ NEW YORK (NYT) — The world’s largest shdf of continental ke, envmmment as a rmhtaiy tactic on 
, ,71 roughly equal in area to France, is suspected sometimes to disintegrate, a scale never before seen in the 

unplugging the flow erf ice from West Antarctica and causing woddwide history of warfare," and still suff er- 
levels to rise about 30 feet (9 meters). * ing its after-effects. 

, 1.77 As part of an internatianal stnd|y of the Ross fceShdf, holes have been Today less than 23 percent of the 

melted through the 1,300-foot apron to the underlying ocean, at a site 300 nation is covered by forest, down 
' miles (490 knometers) from where the shdf disnlegrates into icdwrgs. from 44 percent in 1943, with a 
The first bole, produced by a “flame drill,” made it possible to examine huge, barren area encroaching on 
1 1 "*/ the underlying ocean and sea floor for does an the history of die shelf, agncnitural and forest laud, ac- 
"'yj -'- In 1978, a Soviet devicerndted a new hole, and core samples of the ice carding to the study. “One-third of 
" were extracted. The top 1,345 feet of ice was continental, having slipped the country is now considered 
off the continent and become waterborne five centuries agp. The bottom wasteland," it says. 

■.'tv. 33 feet, however, was frozen seawater, indicating that thesonthem part of Food is of primary concern to 

Tjc the Rtks Ice Shdf is gradually gaining ice from below. Found in this sea the report's authors, who say the 
; ice woe the remains of microscopic diatoms dependent on sunlight, population qf Vietnam is increas- 
- r--r. whh± must arigmafly have lived in the open ocean. ing by 2.7 percent a year and now, 


: 

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*<« 

? *«■ !•’ 


eet,howeva, was frozen seawater, indicating that thesonthem part of Food is of primary concern to 
Ross Ice Shdf is gradually gaining ice from below. Found in this sea the report's authors, who say the 
were the remains of microscopic diatoms dependent on sunlight, population of Vietnam is increas- 
± must originally have lived in the open ocean. ing by 2.7 percent a year and now, 

. __ _ ’ m a . at 60 mflH qn people, is donUe what 

. - Scanner Hems Diamose Bram Illness « was 40 years ago and among tte 

i O densest m tte world for an agricul- 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A brain scanner that can hdp differentiate tnral country. 

:: between Alzheimer's disease and similar farms of dementia might some “The country will no longer be 

be used to (fiagnase even the mildest forms of Alzheimer’s disease. ^ to fect j ^ p<»ulation3^wil] 
lie positron emission tomography, or PET, semper can- axx a little .dse to sdl in return far j 


• ► treatable form of dementia that is similar to Alzheimer's disease. It can ' 
■ t also diagnose Huntington’s disease in teen-agers years before symptoms 

„ - appear, according to afidiad Phelpsof the University of California at 
Los Angeles. 

Alzhetmer’s disease. prQgresgveseniliQF leading to loss (rf body control 
and death, is now diagaosed yith certainty only by examination of the 
brain after death. Dr. Phelps said, adding that the new scanner cm ' 
. , L V- distinguish between modenti^r advanced Alzheimer’s disease and two 
; 7' otter Alnesses: pseudo-dementia and mtrttqjUttnfarct dementia. A com- 

V pleted PET scan is a computer-processed series of pictures of tte 
' movement of nutrients through the brain, showing winch areas of tte 
' brain are active and which are dormant during a given activity. 

. : ; AIDS Virus Found in African Monkey 

NAIROBI (Renters) — Research wankers in Nairobi have found that 
„ tte vervet monkey, common in Kenya and other African countries, is a 
■_ 7 - carrier of tte virus thought to cause Acquired immune Deficiency 
Syndrome, or AIDS. . 

. '7. Dr. James Else, tte American director of tte Institute of Primate 
-' Research, said that research showed 30 percent of the vervet monkeys 
’■ tested at the institute carried the virus HTLV-3. He said Wood samples 
had been sail to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 
- . and to Britain’s Royal Cancer Institute for more detailed analysis. 

The institute, in tte 0\cdna forest in Ngong, a Nairobi suburb, uses 
Arakeys and baboons to researdi diseases which affect humans, fertility 
. . and the effects of contraceptive drugs. 

Y< California Vines Hireatened byPest 

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) — Phylloxera, a vine pest that devastated 
Cahforma’s wine-growing industry 100 years ago, is making a reappear- 
.. ance and has already forced some growers to turn to otha crops, officials 
said. 

The phylloxera, an aphidllke plant loose; is eating away al rootstocks in 
. . wine-growing areas of Northern California, particularly in Monterey 
“ " County, where tte emphasis is on white grapes. Tte pert damages the 
•’ - plant underground, malting it hard to distinguish if a plant is under attack 
- until the dying process has started. 

Officials of the state's wine industry say a quarantine— amflar to the 

one used in California’s Mediterranean fruit fly trembles several years agp 

V — may have to he imposed. Destruction- from the phylloxera takes 
between two and five years. 


food on an international market 
also facing food shortages," the re- 
port said. “Cities wiD be overcon- 
gested and heavily polluted. Inter- 
nal strife. wiD be precipitated and 
natural security weakened.” 

Citing figures provided both by 
the Vietnamese government ana 


tLoas disrupted, industry knocked 
right back. So they’re really basic 
farmers a g ain with hand tools and 
hard work, trying to get the country 
back together again?’ 


Colorado Fossil Tied 
To Herbivorous Dinosaur 

Tke Associated Press 


tons,” created landslides in steep GRAND JUNCTION, Colora- 
areas by bombing and by spraying do — A fossilized skull found in a 
an unidentified add on limestone, ravine west of here lay on a shdf 
attacked wildlife such as elephants for three years before a sdcntist 
and oxen with guns, bombs and determined that it was the first evi- 
na palm to prevent their use fra deuce of tte existence of an iguan- 
transporta don , and devastated odon in the Western Hemisphere, 
large areas of tend with “saturation scientists said, 
bombing.” The 135 mflUon-year-H^ld skull of 

About 21 patent of Vietnam’s the plant-eating dinosaur was dis- 
120,401 square miles (31 1,620 covoed in 1982 by a biker, a pale- 
square kilometers) of land remain omologirt at the Museum of west- 
usable fra agriculture and 36 pa- era Colorado said. 


THE 

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DON CARLOS RESORT- HOTEL 

The Golondrinas Estate ■ Marbetla' - Spain 
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INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc, 


PoUfafaed VitfalV Nor YoAHmnand The VmUapaa Pom 


Duped in Southern Africa 


Barely a year agp Sou* Africa agreed, in a 
deal brokered by the United States, to remove 
all its raiding forces from Angola in return for 
the closing by Angola of the bases from which 
SWAPO guerrillas operated in Namibia. Now, 
with some of its forces still in Angola, it is 
revealed to have sent a sabotage squad hun- 
dreds of miles farther north to attack an Amer- 
ican-run oO installation in Cabinda province. 
The squad, carrying incendiary shells, was 
intercepted 300 meters from the Gulf facility 
that earns Angola most of its foreign currency. 
An Angolan mission was reported in New 
York on that very day seeking expansion capi- 
tal. Evidently the South Africans meant to 
spoil Angola's day in a spectacular way. 

South Africa's policy is illuminated as by a 
midnight flare. It pummel cd Angola into an 
ag reem ent tha t much diminish ed the guerrilla 
challenge Pretoria faced in its illegal colony of 
Namibia, which, in the fifth year of the Reagan 
ad mini stration, seems still remote from inde- 
pendence. The same agreement left the Ango- 
lan government faring a strong Smith African- 
fortified guerrilla challenge of its own. Then, 
having made the agreement, Pretoria kept on 
selectively mounting the same destabilization 
tactics it had promised to abandon. 

The United States is left looking very fool- 
ish. A friendly government for which it did a 
great favor has duped iL Let us try to imagine 


the anti-communist nonsense that Pretoria 
would have pumped out if its commandos had 
secretly succeeded in blowing up Gulf OiL The 
Reagan policy of “constructive engagement** 
— treating South Africa in a respectful fashion 
to its moderation in foreign policy and 
domestic policy alike — is embarrassed on the 
very ground where its greatest triumph had 
beat proclaimed. Angola's Marxist govern- 
ment, meanwhile, has a new excuse to embrace 
the Cuban protectors whose removal is the 
administration's prime regional goal. 

. We were among those who a year ago felt 
cantiou5ly hopeful about the prospects of 
American diplomacy in southern Africa. Bnt 
thm g$ have not been going weH The other 
principal front where Smith Africa's policy of 
regio nal accommodation has been on display 
is in Mozambique. There rebels continue to 
assault the local government even as South 
African authorities insist that they do uot 
sponsor and cannot control the foreign de- 
ments that help keep the resistance going. 

This is the other face of apartheid. The 
system not only represses the blade majority at 
home; it also gives the white minority the 
power and the arrogance to torment South 
Africa’s neighbors. Others in the region need 
the abolition of apartheid scarcely less than do 
the people of South Africa. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Bigotry Cripples Sri Lanka 


Solomon Bandaranaike Is half-remembered 
as a lively. leftist prime minister of Ceylon, the 
tear-shaped island nation now called Sri Lan- 
ka. His sioiy is worth retelling, for it helps in 
understanding why Sri Lanka is squandering 
its prosperity in a bitter civil war between the 
Sinhalese majority and the Tamil minority. 

Mr. Bandaranaike belonged to a prominent 
Sinhalese Christian family with dose ties to 
the British. His father helped found the Co- 
lombo Turf Gub. When die son returned from 
Oxford in the 1930s he converted to Bud- 
dhism, adopted national dress and espoused 
leftist and nationalist causes. His party came 
to power in 1936, just as Ceylon was celebrat- 
ing the 2,500th anniversary of Buddha’s at- 
tainment of Nirv ana. Riding with this fervor, 
be endorsed promoting Buddhism and making 
Sinhalese the new nation's official language. 
Language became the explosive question. 

The Sinhalese, who make up three-fourths 
of the population, felt cheated of their share of 
good jobs and pay. They blamed the British for 
favoring the Tamils, a Hindu people with their 
own language. So the new prime minister ap- 
proved a “S inhal a only'* policy to handicap 
the more prosperous minority. 

He also proposed allowing “reasonable use” 
of Tamil —and was condemned by Sinhalese 
radicals. Communal riots cost hundreds of 


lives. In the Tamil north, the Sinhalese script 

monks 


was defaced; in the Buddhist south, 
organized angry sit-ins. The prime minister 
retreated, but not fast enough. On SepL 25, 
1959, he was murdered by a Buddhist priest 

The wheel has turned, but nothing has hap- 
pened to end the estrangement between two 
peoples who have shared the island for centu- 
ries. President Junius Jayewardene is a conser- 
vative whose free market policies have doubled 
per capita income. But it is prosperity without 
peace. Some Tamils, resorting to insurgency, 
agitate for independence. The military budget 
has swollen tenfold in five years, and 600 
people have been killed in six months. The 
government has turned bo Israel for military 
advisers. Tamils have turned to India, where 
50 milli on Tamils dominate a nearby state. 

Mr. Jayewardene wains that he may impose 
martial law and rejects negotiations with Tam- 
ils who even hint at separatism. Waylaid is the 
president’s cautious offer of greater autonomy. 
Faced with a backlash from Sinhalese extrem- 
ists, Mr. Jayewardene had to retreat- Nothing 
better can be expected from the opposition 
party, led, as it happens, by Prime Minister 
Ban daranaik e^ widow. SlrimavO. 

Bigotry has defeated left and right It is a 
fearful symmetry that beggars optimism. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Another Immigration Bill 


Major immigration reform legislation was 
reintroduced in Congress last week, and The 
New York Times promptly dubbed the pro- 
posal the “Simpson-Nobody bill.” Earlier ver- 
sions of the measure had been offered in the 
last two Congresses by the bipartisan, bicam- 
eral team of Senator Alan Simpson, a Wyo- 
ming Republican, and Representative Roma- 
no Mazzoli, a Kentucky Democrat. Senator 
Simpson is alone this year — temporarily, we 
hope — in offering the new proposal, a some- 
what modified version of the bill that has 
passed the Senate twice before. 

Has Mr. Mazzoli deserted the cause? That is 
doubtful but his party seems to be in disarray 
over how to proceed. House Judiciary Com- 
mittee Chairman Peter Rodino has long been a 
leader in immigration legislation, and it is 
possible he wants to take the lead in the House 
this year. There is also a rumor that Represen- 
tative Mazzoli who voted to seat Republican 
candidate Rick McIntyre in the bitter dispute 
over the vote in the 8th District of Indiana, has 
been warned by other Democrats that they will 
seek revenge by blocking legislation that bears 
his name. This is a deplorable tactic, but it 
might explain the Kentuckian’s reluctance to 


become the prime sponsor of the new bilL In 
any event. Home Democrats should get their 
act together in support of a proposal in this 
area of great national interest and importance. 

Mr. Simpson’s new bill makes some conces- 
sions to the business community, Much ob- 
jected to the record-keeping provisions of the 
earlier bills. It also pulls back on the generous 
amnesty offered before, by delaying imple- 
mentation until a commission certifies that 
illegal immigration is in fact reasonably under 
control In a concession to the Reagan admin- 
istration, it sets a cap on what tire federal 
government would have to pay to states, which 
will bear the heavy financial burden of provid- 
ing services to newly legalized immigrants. 

These changes in the biB should lock in the 
support of the Chamber of Commerce and the 
administration, and may win a few votes 
among those who opposed the original imme- 
diate amnesty. That is good strategy on Sena- 
tor Simpson's part But what about legislators 
who preferred the old bill with its more gener- 
ous amnesty? They have an obligation to enter 
the debate if they want to be part of the 
solution. What is the Democrats’ response? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

Just Waiting in the Middle East 


The forces of moderation are on the retreat. 
Beirut [is the scene of] some of the bloodiest 
fighting of the 10-year civil war. In Kuwait, the 
country's ruler was fortunate to escape assassi- 
nation. Iraq and Iran have resumed air ynri 
missile attacks on each other’s capital cities. In 
Cairo, security forces dosed off the area 
around the American and British embassies to 
ensure that the)’ had frustrated plans to ex- 


plode a car bomb. The answer to the perpetra- 
tors of violence would be a swift Arab summit, 
with majority voting and a plan of action [in] 
the political and economic spheres. That 
course would be, 1 ‘ ' ** 

and 
which 


ians under Israeli occupation. To continue 


waiting for something to turn up can only 
further surrender the initiative to the 


radicals. 

— The Financial Times (London). 


FROM OUR MAY 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: 'Atrocities’ Reported in Peru 
LONDON — ■ The secretary of the Anti-Slav- 
ery Society, having called attention to the 
atrocities on native Indian collectors of rubber 
by the agents of a British company in Peru, has' 
received the following reply from the Foreign 
Office: “I am directed by the Secretary to. 
inform you in reply that the question or the 
alleged iQ-treatmem of Indians in the Putuma- 
yo Valley is engaging the most serious atten- 
tion of His Majesty's Government.” A corre- 
spondent acquainted with the situation writes: 
“There is a strange similarity between the 
Congo system of exploitation and its resultant 
practices, and that of the Putumayo Valley." 


1935: Six KiDed in Rhodeaa Strike 
BULAWAYO, Rhodesia — The strike of na- 
tive miners in the Northern Rhodesian co pp er 
bell took an ugly turn when police were forced 
to fire upon a dangerous mob, and the Europe- 
ans of the region are now arming for their own 
protection. Six native rioters were killed when 
the polio: opened fire on a mob of 300 who 
were trying to rush the powerhouse in the 
m i n i ng town of Roantelope. It bad been 
thought that the trouble which rose in the 
copper belt a few days ago was over as the 
Royal Air Force planes Much transported 
native troops to the mining region for police 
duty had overawed the native trouble-makers. 


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J 


Managua Anns , Havana looms, Washington Trem&fes 

“ 7 ,n.t rtmvffiCiflft « *,"295 


ARIS — -A booklet called “Central Amer- 


ica as a European-American Issue,” just 
published is New York by the authoritative 
Cnunril on Foreign Relations, commas this 
■statement- “Cuba today is, after the United 
States, the largest and most powerful mDiiary 
face in the Western Hemisphere — much 
more powerful than Canada or Brazil for 
instance ... (Britain might have been able to 
wreak its will on Ar gentin a, but it would be 
hopelessly outclasses in a conflict with Cuba 
if it were not to nse its nuclear weapons.)" 

The writer is Irving KristoL a member of 


aicraft carrier, 10 destroyers, six fngaies. etc. 
The Brazilian air force has 215 combat mr- 

crafL Brazilian GNP is 15 times that of Cuba. 

As for Britain — do we really need ip go 

“ it possesses an all-professional military 
. _ ■ J J A,l«V. mv nf 


on? 


the faculty of New York University, an editor 
be influential journal The Public Interest, 


of the influentiajjc 

a columnist for The Wall Street Journal — in 
short, a major figure among those “netveon- 
servative" intellectuals who enthusiastically 
back the Reagan administration. 

Hie staiemsit, of course, is preposterous. 
But it is also significant 

The standard reference work on military 
forces is the yearbook of the International 
Institute for Strategic Studies, The MDitaiy 
Balanc e.” The current issue records Cuba as 
possessing total armed forces of 153,000 
members, nearly two-thirds conscripts, with 
19(1000 reservists. The navy (12,000) has four 
submarines, two frigates and various coastal 
patrol and auxiliary vessels. The air force 
(16.000) is substantial with 250 combat air- 
craft and some 38 armed helicopters. 

Canaria has small er forces Overall with 160 
combat aircraft plus helicopters, but a navy 
vastly outclassing C uba’s. Canada's industrial 
base — its GNP — is 20 times that of Cuba. 

Brazil has regular militar y forces nearly 
twice the size of Cuba's, paramilitary security' 
and militia services larger than the entire 
Cuban army, a navy of seven submarines, an 


service twice the size erf Cubas; one of the 
four principal navies in the world, with 56 
major surface combat units and 32 subma- 
rines, most of them nuclear, an air force of 
some 650 combat aircraft. This is one of the 
world’s serious military establishments, with 
rich combat experience, tradition, elan and a 
taste for trouble, as Argentina found out. 

What on earth is Mr. Kristol talking about? 


C B(I»PW >P 



By William P£aff 

What is the Council on Foreign 
doing that it would allow such a silly thing 
in one of its publications? . 

The answer, so far as Mr. Knstol is con 
cerned. is undoubtedly that he believes what 
he wrote. He believes it 
examining the matter because if it were tnie it 
would validate a larger hypothesis about tire 
nature of world affairs about tew 
no doubt This is a comprehensible uueUccni- 
al process but it often ends badly, B*™*- 
Consider the case of Nicaragua, which is. ot 
course, the preoccupation that lies behind 
what Mr. Kristol wrote. It is held in Washing- 
ton that Nicaragua poses a threat not only lo 
the Central American region but to iheUms- 
ed State itself. A joint State and Defense 
Department document on Nicaraguan mili- 
tary strength was issued in April It stated 
foai there has taken place in Nicaragua a 
military buildup without precedent in Central 
America . . . with massive assistance from 
Cuba and the Soviet Union." 

What has this “massive” effort produced? 
According to the Defense Departmen t s ow n 
figures, there is now a Nicaraguan regular 
array of 31X000. There is an ait force of 27 
aircraft, four of them 50-year-old DC-3 Da- 
kotas. and 36 helicopters, several of them a 
powerful new Soviet attack model to be used 
agftiixi the U-S.-sponsored “contra** guerril- 
las. The air force has 2,000 men in it. and the 
navy has a total complement of 1.000. The 
threatened United States has, today, more 
people on active duty in its armed services 
than the entire male population of Nicaragua. 

What is going on here, as in Mr. Krutoi's 
statement, is an attempt to make a tangible 


and convincing ihrtri 
one. The U.S. govcramrtl. ** fHSSr 2* 
Sial grounds. * CfflWintfd (ha Ibr 
of IMu 

” i, heheves. as Mr. KmiN pul' «. 
•‘St ton of »orid I "JWJS 

ideological conflict between ^1"^! 

^future." Mr. Knstoi adds « Cent* 
rLnuT-lj is perfectly ewuwvaWe that 
too tot future the Ragan 
Sdr^Sistrewn Will fed that « has no alterna- 
tive but to intervene ndipnV- 
This is not a position for vloA **“**£5 
finds much support m Uun Aram®*"" 
among US. allies m ®£ rLJ 

ition to which the wa&g 


be. it is a case which men' 


be. it is a case wmen menu attention and 
debate on its owe terms. To a ttempt to std»«- 
wtc another argumemB to Iw. 

Norman PoJhorep. the Nc * 
and editor who is also a prominent Reagan 
supporter, proposed last war that tf Gw« 
535 were aSve today he would ^be- 
come a neiKonscrvauvc inidieettial *nda , 
backer of the Reagan adiniiusuation. || 

have no privileged information on OrwcITv n 
pretcrietbal views on such a 
nonetheless think that the nun who W 


firmly on questions of language and truth, 
invented the concept of "Newspeak and***! 
that -political timniase — and win* ran* 
tionstbatis 


true 


[political parties, from 

Conservatives to Anarchists — is ' 


Vr Ons ervauTCs iu nuuiww — ■•* des igned to 

make lies sound truthful and murder respect- 
able. mid give an appearance irf MNMiiy w 
pure winT might talk at how the Central 
American issue is being discussed by the Rea- 
gan administration and its friends, 
n BVtfuwt PM- 


Middle East Prospects: Peres Could Stoke the Politics of Peace 


W ASHINGTON — Israelis are 
conducting a painful debate 
over whether, in order to get back 
three prisoners lost in Lebanon, they 
were right to free 1,150 Arab prison- 
ers. most of them Palestinians and 
many of them convicted terrorists. 
The release could hatch more terror, 
by some of those released or by oth- 
ers emboldened by the prospect of 
gaining liberty in another exchange. 

But, little as they care to hear iL 
Israelis need to be reminded that the 
Palestinian problem is only in the 
second instance terror. In the first 
instance it is politics. 

What can still be done to turn 
Palestinian energy from rage to con- 
ciliation? The prisoner exchange 
marked the failure of one Israeli an- 
swer. The previous Israeli govern- 
ment had invaded Lebanon primarily 
to solve the Palestinian question — 
by destroying the last adjacent PLO 
presence and by opening the way to 
absorb the occupied West Bank fully 
into IsraeL Only the first of these two 
goals was achieved. 

The new Israeli government has 
since accepted a requirement for a 


By Stephen S> Rosenfeld 


losses in Lebanon. Mr. Peres's effort 
to warm the “cold peace" with Egypt 
may be moving. Syria is intransigent 
but isolated. Iran and Iraq continue 
their mutual bleeding. An Esyptian- 
Jordanian-Saudi- Iraqi axis of moder- 
ates is holding. The *70s notion of an 
invincible Arab juggernaut faded as 
oil prices fell. The Arab countries 
smart at American favor for Israel 
but decline to put their bilateral rela- 
tions with Washington on the line. 

In Washington, Israel enjoys what 
the head of the Israel lobby tails its 
best relations ever. President Reagan 
is the soul of warmth, and the cold- 
ness Israel once feared from the 
Bechtel brothers. Caspar Weinberger 
and George Shultz, is gone. Annual 
aid is rising toward the (unadjusted) 


dollar level of the whole Marshall 
Plan. Political disruptions like the 
kryiraQ question are quickly eased. 
Israelis hope — here is the most diffi- 
cult current problem area — that 
American arms sales to friendly Ar- 
abs can at least be contained. 

All of this makes an appealing case 
for standing pal and wailing for King 
Hussein either to corral Yasser Ara- 
fat and make Israel an offer it cannot 
refuse, or. more likdy, to fall short. 

Politically it is turning out to be no 
strain for Mr. Peres to be open 
enough to negotiations and to calls 
for improving the “quality of life" on 
the West Bank, so as to satisfy the 
Reagan administration; Congress is 
even less demanding. Bilburg re- 
moved Washington’s residual incli- 


nation to demand major economic 
policy reform in return for extra aid. 
There is no expedient argument for 
Israel to do things differently. 

Everyone is tired of alarms of 
doom and crisis ahead in the Middle 
East. Let it simply be stated here that 
Israel's policy is tragically shortsight- 
ed. The considerations that allow Is- 
rael to relax on the peace front would 
be better used as cushions foe the 
risks it roust take sooner or later if it 
is to break the status qua 


Israelis arc always saying that pres* 
Wdl. they are 


sure only freezes them. V 
under no pressure at 
never be easier. And 
not have that much time left on his 


present. It will 
Mr. Peres does 


lease on the premiership. 

the United States is one 


Satisfying the 


thing, the routine business of kridf 
diplomacy, but that leads nowhere. 
Drawing King Hussein out of his 
crouch is what counts. Re frustrates 
Israelis, bat, with good reason, he 
entrances them with his promise of 
movement to come. Everybody in the 
Middle East knows what is neces- 
sary: for the Israelis to give King 
Hussein something he can work with. 

The Israelis have spent 18 years 
“creating facts," making it harder for 
King Hussein and thenproteatinu, 
that he does not deliver. They haw fr 
dozen ideas they could puB out of the 
drawer to get something started with- 
out undermining their security or 
their bargaining portion. 

More than almost anyone rise in 
Israel Shimon Hexes knows what to 
do. Destiny beckons. 

7V Washington Past 


For the Time Being , Arafat Is Otherwise Engaged 

By Joseph Kraft 


ASHINGTON — Like theriog 


political solution. So far. however, 
Prime 


: Minister Shimon Peres has ac- 
cepted it only in words. He has plead- 
ed preoccupation with leaving Leba- 
non and saving the economy. 

While warily accepting the latest 
U.S. bid to renew- the peace process, 
Mr. Peres has essentially sal on his 


hands. King Hussein of Jordan. Isra- 
xild-oe 


el’s would-t 


has in effect 


: partner, 

reinforced the Peres strategy by keep- 
ing his own steps toward accommo- 
dation wdl short of the point at 
which America would be honor- 
bound to insist that Israel respond. 

In the American view, the onus for 
continued stalemate remains oa King 
Hussein, and it is easy to see why 
Israel prefers it that way. Its plate is 
already fulL Mr. Peres cannot possi- 
bly want the coalition-busting West 
Bank issue to come up until he can 
show a skeptical electorate that there 
is something good in it for IsraeL 
Besides, much is going wdl for 
Israel in the area and m Washington. 
In the area, Israel is cutting its 


Lhat didn't bark in the Sher- 
lock Holmes story, the absence of 
Israel from the some provides the 
master due to the latest outbreak of 
violence in Lebanon. The fighting 
pits Arabs who want to come to terms 
with Israel against several groups of 
Arabs, including Syria, w ho don’L It 
is, literally, a war against peace. 

The continuing struggle shows 
that, despite favorable elements, the 
political climate in the Middle East 
remains unripe for an Arab- Israeli 
accord. So the .American policy of 
watchful waiting corresponds with 
the situation on the ground. 

Shiites cheered in 1982 when the 
Israelis liberated their territories in 
southern Lebanon from the yoke of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. Next the Shiites turned against 
the Israelis and used terror tactics to 
speed the occupying troops out of 
southern Lebanon. With their base 
there d eared, the Shiites do not want 
reoccupation by the PLO forces of 
Yasser Arafat So Shiite forces at- 
tacked the area still dominated by 


Palestinian refugees around Beirut. 

Resistance came from three fac- 
tions. PLO forces loyal to Mr. Arafat 
shot back from refugee camps trans- 
formed into fortresses. Medical aid to 
the besieged Palestinians was provid- 
ed by the Dnize, who are backed by 
Syria. Military aid to the Arafat 
forces came from a rump PLO fac- 
tion. originally set up by the Syrians 
as a PLO opposition to Mr. Arafat 

Why did the Syrians turn their 
proxy forces against the Suites? The 
obvious motive is to block any com- 
ing to terms along the Lebanese-Is- 
raeli border, where the Shiites seek 
acco mmod a ti on with the Israelis. Ac- 
commodation would foster trends fa- 
voring a wider peace that are making 
headway in Israel and Jordan. 

Under the terms of the coalition 
government Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres has to step down and let For- 
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir i»k 
over in the fall of 19S6. But if Likud 
voluntarily withdrew from the coali- 
tion, Mr. Feres could probably stay in 


power, with cither a ministerial shuf- 
fle or new elections. So Mr. Peres has 


ul 


Republicans Have a Reagan Problem 

By James Heston 


W ASHINGTON — Just one 
day before appealing to the 
Democrats on national television to 
support bis tax reform bill, which is 
probably the most important and 
innovative proposal of his second 
term. President Reagan accused 
them of being soft on communism 
abroad, ana of “pitting white 
against black, women against men 
and young against old" at home. 

Those are fighting words, not 
likdy to encourage the unity that 
Mr. Reagan needs and wants for 
tax reform in Congress. It was an 
odd introduction to bis latest act 
and chance on the stage. 

Mr. Reagan has been his own 
worst enemy lately. Why infuriate 
Tip O'Neill who has the votes to 
bra! him? Why, in die name of 
“reconciliation,’’ did be misunder- 
stand the history of the two world 
wars in his recent stroll through the 
cemeteries of Germany? Why, on 
the eve of the second phase of nu- 
clear arms talks with the Russians 
at Geneva, did he mock them as a 
declining force in the world? 

The answer, I think, is that he 


that he loves to make speeches but 
forgets that he is pres dan of the 
United States. He thinks he can say 
anything he likes, even if he doesn't 
think at all about the consequences. 

His personal performances have 
worked fairly welL Even when he 
rate here 


loses a vote here and there on the 
budget as he has been doing lately. 


sees no relationship between one 
tiling and another, between the 
words his immediate audience 
wants to bear and his politics. 

His performance on Memorial 
Day illustrates the point. He went 
to Arlington National Cemetery 
early in the morning, and with his 
usual grace celebrated the sacrifices 
and tragedies of human conflict 
and wiped the tears from his eyes. 

Then, in a totally different mood, 
he flew to Disneyland in Florida 
and hugged the downs, and went 
from there to Miami for a political 
rally and praised the “freedom 
fighters" of Nicaragua and con- 
demned the Democrats for acting 
as if “a weaker America was a safer 
America," seeing no difference be- 
tween his tears m the morning and 
his provocations in the evening. 

It would probably be wrong to 
conclude from this that he meant to 
pick a fight with the Democrats or 
the new guy in Moscow. It's juai 



By OswaftJo In Excelsior (Mexico city). 


he is still left with more money than 
he knows how to spend amid mili- 
tary contractors he cannot control. 

The president juggles his reverses 
with remarkable agility. Before the 
vote he says that cutting the defense 
budget by a dime would threaten 
the security of the republic. After 
the vote, when he loses by tens of 
millions of dollars, he proclaims it 
us a victory for austerity and dem- 
onstrates his gift for compromise. 

But things are changing now. 


Even with agreed cuts in the budget 
and with an Mi. Reagan's premises 
that his supply-siders would grow 
the budget into balance, the out- 
look today is that his contribution 
to history would be not a first or 
second “revohition,” as he calls it 
but a minor eco n om i c correction 
and the largest budget deficit in the 
history erf the nation. 

Congress is starting to take a new 
look at him, particularly the new 
leaders of the Republican-con- 
trolled Senate, led by Bob Dole. In 
last year’s election Mr. Reagan was 
their buddy. This year they have a 
problem, and they are beginning to 
think Mr. Reagan is part of it 
Twenty-two Republican senators 
are up for re-election in 1986, and 
most of them face dicey races. They 
are not sure that they can win by 
supporting Mr. Reagan's budget, or 
his public attacks on the Demo- 
crats. (he Russians and the farmers, 
or his cutbacks in Social Security 
benefits for the elderly. 

For the time bang the Republi- 
cans are riding high, against a lead- 
criess Democratic Party, but they 
have a problem. If Mr, Reagan in 
the next year cannot come to terms 
with the Democrats on tax reform 
and make some progress with the 
Soviets on the control erf nuclear 
weapons, chances are that the Dem- 
ocrats will control both the House 
and the Senate in the last two years 
of Mr. Reagan’s second term. 

This is why Senator Dole and 
other Republican leaders are won- 
dering if it is in the president’s own 
interest, or in the interest or the 
Republican Party or the nation, to 
attack the Democrats when the 
president needs their votes to put 
over important necessary and long- 
delayed tax reform. 

They are telling him —or at least 
idling Donald Regan in the White 
House. James Baker at the Treasury 
and George Shultz at State — to 
cool it at home and abroad and try 
to gel tax reform and arms control 
ore it’s too late. 

TTuNev \urk Tuna. 


an incentive to make 
lures to the Arabs that alienate 
but not the whole Israeli electorate. 

He has already ventured far down 
that road, pushing withdrawal from 
Lebanon at a rapid clip and negotiat- 
ing a lopsided prisoner exchange. He 
has opened negotiations for a summit 
meeting with President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt While refusing to talk 
directly with senior leaders of the 
PLO, he has expressed willingness to 
talk with a delegation headed by Jor- 
danians and including Palestinians 
who might have PLO nes. 

King Hussein has inched toward 
acceptance of an American proposal 
for Palestinian self-rule within the 
context of a Jordanian state. He has 
made up with Egypt which openly 
favors such an arrangement In long 
negotiations, he wrung from Mr. Ara- 
fat explicit willingness to trade land 
claims against political rights. 

But Mr. Arafat has refused to ac- 
knowledge Israel’s right to exist as 
asserted in UN Resolution 242. He 
has not abandoned hopes of creati 
an independent Palestinian state. ' 


has sun not explicitly accepted the 
concept of Pales tinian self-rule under 


Jordanian sovereignty. His refusal to 
accept these terms set the stage for 
the latest battle of Beinit 

Mr. Arafat tried to break out erf lh^ 
cage (o move his, forces bom the 
Benut camps to the Israeli border. To 
prevent that, Shiite forces strode the 
camps. Syria’s proxies hit back at the 
Shiites to make certain dal trouble 
would continue unabated. . 

The resulting stalemate puts the 
next step up to Mr. Arafat He can 
bow to the pressures, throw in (he 
towel on Resolution 242 and let King 
Hussein makepeace with lsrad along 
the lines advocated by Washington 
and Cairo. There is heme that this can 
occur soon, since the icing is now in 
Washington. But Mr. Arafat will 
probably have to be ground down 
still further by the force of events. 

In any case, until Mr. Arafat ac- 
cepts 242 publicly, the United States 
is well advised in maintaining the 
present resistance to dealing with se- 
nior PLO officials. A stiffisn attitude 
has already yielded dividends in Isra- 
el, Jordan and Egypt. Another dose 
will strengthen Kmg Hussein in his 
continuing talks with Mr. ArafaL st 

As Secretary of State George 
Shultz keeps saying, it is not Ameri- 
ca’s business to be raore in favor of 
peace than the parties on the ground. 

Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


LETTERS TO TEffi EDITOR 

Designs on Austria 


Fra nkl in D. Roosevelt as the out- 

Kenneth L Adelman and Charles Reagan has made every effort to cut 
Sorrels describe obstacles put in back the role of government in U.S. 

life that FDR initiated, espedally on 


A. oorreas aesenoe oostacies put _ 
the way erf die Austrian peace treaty 
by the Soviet side as an example of 
the difficulties of negotiating with the 
Soviet Union. On Feb. 4, the West 
German news magazine Der Spiegel 
recalled much of the same detaft, Imt 
also quoted American policy docu- 
ments of tiie time indicating that the 
United States had little interest in 
withd rawing its occupation troops 
from Austria. Washington had the 
same scenario in mind as the one it 
was carrying out in Germany — that 
is the establishment of two Austrias 
and a second capital in Salzburg. The 
rapidity with which the Soviets and 
Austrians finally settled in 1955 was 


behalf of the underprivileged. 

ALFRED E. DAVIDSON. 

Paris, gt 

I cannot imagine what has got into 
Harvard — unless, of course, they are 
snort on endowments. 

REBECCA ROMANI. 

Paris. 


Ship Them Overs eas? 


i Wfeff Maturity Carnes 

Late, Put (%f College Study” (May 15): 

w e agree with Kenneth L Wood- 

_ ward and Arthur Komaber that the 

accepted by many on the American * adc maturity among American 
nnht^y and diplomatic side with youth is a cause for concern. Howev- 
considerable chagrin. er. as former Peace Corps volunteSs 

.j! “ convraientiy forgotten m Sraegal and Mali we were cha- 
gesedays that m the earfy 1950s the by one of their proposSiah^ 

LEEWEJNGARTEN. U P- must the burden of 

gwfccmg mature u.S. ymA iZ 
fall on ^inderdevc!oped" y sode t je5? 
MARK WOODS HENDERSON 

THOMAS HOWELL MWU 
Ndjamena, Chad. 


Geneva. 


Regarding “ Harvard and Reagan 
(Letters, May 21): 


Biliikopfs daringly up Preferab, y in Wisconsin 

under Harvard’s mono “EnieT { ™” A c - * • - ■ 1 


grow in wisdom, deport to serve bet- 
ter thy country and thy kind" — 
provided that Mr. Reag^ agTOd w 
join the freshman elasT ^ W 


found Europe robTh.ic V ESdflSE 

phone art a. las, 25 vc^Tlito, 


GEORGE HELD. 
Vienna. 

Marshall Billitopf describe 
Mr. Reagan as “second 


D. 


SsteHHI# 

’ScSff.'ES'l 

v those who stayed in WisJSSn! . 


enw 


onlj to 


FRANK RICHARDSON. 
Freiburg, West Germany. 




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AVIATION 


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J Creative 
Financing 
« In Buyers’ 
^Market 

By Lew Townsend 

WASHINGTON — Aircraft 
manufacturers, striving to pomp 
life into a still-depressed world 
market, are turning more and more 
to “creative f inan cing" and untra- 
dhional arrangements to keq> pro- 
duction Uses moving. 

The benchmark for innovative 
methods employed by manufactur- 
ers to dose a sale was the barter 
transaction last August between 
Boeing Co, of Seattle, and Saudi 
^ Arabia, where the latter traded 
about SI billion worth of crude oQ 
to buy 10 Boeing 747-300s. 

Barter deals could become more 
commonplace, some industry exec- 
utives say, notably those associated 
with Mitsubishi, the Japanese con- 
glomerate whose operations in- 
clude a irmlri hininn- rt rinar ititwrm- 
Fiona 1 trading company and the 

manufacturing of Diamond corpo- 
rate jets. 

For the moment, though, barter- 
ing represents a relatively small 
weapon in the battling between 
manufacturers for aircraft sales. 


A SPECIAL REPORT— PART I 

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 




mwmi 





Aviation’s New Generation 

Above left, the McDonnell Douglas MD-Propfan 
project toe British- West German-Italian 
Tornado fighter, above right, a program that 
began in 1969. At right, the Dassault Rafale, 
which is the French demonstrator plane for the 
European Fighter Aircraft project 





awuci' 

DonwMragiwt 


Third World Holds Its Own With the West’s Majors 


: , Mo ™ unponant and growing is ^ Rnanrw,? strains endured by 

.rehance upon dtred financing. Western manufacturers can only 
askance from (he mamrfacturers hint at the problems faced by de- 

: - : vekiping countries in the limited 

. . ■ ~ models are leased with the lessee v-t iqtac 


.. By Robert Cbckbum 001196 sdf-rdiant in arms produc- of 500 aircraft in 26 coontries 
1 tion, buil ding equipment under li- where it has been bought by SO 

LONDON — It is a paradox cm« Entering the space race, operators. The new 30-seat Em- 
that some of the poorest nations pray-cring a nuclear capability or braer Braalia transport plant* is the 
have created some of the most ex- hmiHing one’s own air force ap- largest project and has so far won 
tzavagant aircraft industries. pearcdlar more dynamic than pro- orders nora the Brazilian and Chil- 


have created some of the most ex- 
travagant aircraft industries. 

The frmmrral strains endured by 


receiving an option to buy it later. 
In 1979, for inst« nr^ Boeing, the 
world’s largest producer of jet- 
liners, had $208 minim tied up in 
such investments. By the end oilast 

(Continued on Page 9) 


vekiping coontries in the limited 
aircraft market Yet, in the 1970s 
and 1980s there has been a growth 
in the number of home industries in 
Asa and Latin America. 

. Many of these opoafions were 
setup for reasons of national pride 
or a more practical desire to be- 


peared far more dynamic than pro- 
viding drinking water, drams and a 
decent diet- Money did not pome 
into it; status did. 

That was until Brazil nm* into 


type stage and is awaiting develop- 
ment The Aero Boero and Chincol 
companies maite light aircraft, and 
RACA produces Hughes helicop- 
ters nnritr license. 

Chile began assembling ll.S. 


own air force ap- largest project and has so far won lers under license, 
i dynamic than pro- orders from the Brazilian and Chil- Chile began assembling ll.S. 
water, drains and a can air forces. Brazil also has a Piper PA28 light aircraft in 1980 
mey did not pome helicopter assembling company with the formation of Enaer under 
id. and two small aircraft producers, the auspices of the air force. In the 


te into Argentina has four aircraft com- same year Piper and Enaer began 
the market (with the wodrfs big- panics, the largest of which is development of the T-35 military 
gest overdraft) and not only began FMA, the rmbtaiy manufacturer, trainer, while a deal was signed 


gest overdraft) and not only began FMA, the military manufacturer, trainer, while a deal was signed 
to make the industry pay but also established in 1927. Since the late with CASA of Spain to build the 


began to beat the Western manp- 1960s, it has produced the Pucaia Aviqjet advanced trainer, 
facturers at their own game. This counterinsurgency aircraft for the Egypt is the sole member of the 
year Britain’s Royal Air Force Argentine Air Force while a new Arab Organization for Industrial- 
cbose Brazil’s Embraer Tucano as advanced jet train a - is in the proto- ization, set up with Saudi Arabia. 


Tr/V Lng(i$ 


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UAUv* 


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its new-generalion advanced train- 
er after an acrimonious battle 
against an international field in- 
cluding British Aerospace. It was 
an unprecedented coup for a Third 
World state to win such a large 
order, £125 million, from arch a 
prestigious anti tough customer. 

For gs British partner in the 
deal Embraer collaborated with 
Shod Brothers, the Northern Irish 
aircraft manufacturer. Shod Broth- 


Part II Will Appear 
In Tomorrow's Editions 

Page 7 


f Big-Tech’ Tension: 
Will Allied Ventures 
Survive the Politics? 


Qatar and the United Arab Emir- 
ates in 1975. to provide a military 
industry. Its partners pulled out 
after the Camp David accord with 
Israel But the Egyptian factories 
today produce the French Aero- 
spatiale military Gazelle helicop- 
ter, Brazil's Embraer Tucano and 
(he French/West German Alpha 
Jet attack aircraft. The organiza- 
tion's factories also make rockets 
and missiles. 

India takes a nonaligned stance, 
producing high-technology mili- 
tary aircraft from the Soviet Union 
and Europe at its huge Hindustan 
(Continued on Next Page) 


By Axel Krause 

PARIS — McDonnell Douglas 
Corp. of the United States last 
week announced that it planned to 
expand its long-eslabusbed lies 
with state-controlled Aeritnlia of 
Italy to jointly develop propfan 
technology, which could lead to 
production of a new passenger air- 
plane. 

It was the latest example of how 
U.S. aerospace companies are ac- 
tively pursuing new cooperative 
ventures with their counterparts in 
Western Europe. 

But the announcement, and oth- 
ers planned for the Paris Air Show 
be ginning on Thursday, contrasted 
sharply with the political tensions 
between allied governments that 
have created uncertainties regard- 
ing development of far more ambi- 
tious prqjecis. 

Examples indude: French in- 
dustry opposition to the planned 
West European combat fighter. Eu- 
ropean involvement in the U.S. 
mann ed space station and in Presi- 
dent Ranald Reagan's Strategic 
Defense Initiative, 

Although the question of how to 
finance such raultibillion-dollar 
projects has been raised by some 
European leaders, most of their 
preoccupations stem from deeply 
rooted tears that their industries 
would.be denied full access to high 
technology being developed by the 
United Stales. 

President Francois Mitterrand 
of France is fond of recounting 
how. at the recent seven-nation 
economic summit in Bonn, he 
heard Mr. Reagan use the word 


“subcontractors" to describe Euro- 
pean involvement in the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, which the 
French leader said “confirmed m> 
intuitions." Mr. Mitterrand told 
Mr. Reagan at tire summit meeting 
that France would not participate 
in the initiative in its current form, 
and he has repeated the statement 
on several subsequent occasions to 
reporters. 

Speaking more bluntly. Hans- 
Dietrich Genscher. foreign minis- 
ter of West Germany, told report- 
ers in Paris last Wednesday that the 
U.S. effort to enlist European sup- 
port for the program amounted to 
“Americans going through Europe 
with their checkbooks." 

He added: “We cannot risk los- 
ing our best brains.** 

Meanwhile, U.S.. British, French 
and other West German officials, 
in separate statements last week, 
emphasized that the U.S. program 
was compatible with Eureka, a 
French-led effort to develop high 
technology in such sectors as optic 
electronics, new metals, laser and 
particle-beam technology and 
fifth-generation computers. But 
most officials on both rides of the 
Atlantic still believe that Eureka is 
Europe's response to Strategic De- 
fense Initiative research, even 
though no details have yet been 
disclosed by France, including the 
costs. 

Both the U.S. program and Eure- 
ka were important subjects of con- 
versation between Mr. Mitterrand 
and West German Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl during a meeting Tues- 

(Contumed on Page 10) 


Spaceplane: Picking Up 
Where the Shuttle Stops 


By Theresa Foley 
WASHINGTON — By the end 


epnot^^thfit^r^ybot of the century, UA military pilots 
aj» the nght political doutwnh be able to bop into space* 


t * 1 ]t B ?sril*S II 3k I Diost)ect of pla * ies ^ S ? ti0 £2i al Force Magazine last year. ‘The 
Hrto JL , n a around the globe and fly mto orbit aerospace ^Sde could take off, 

diXU of the atmosphere m d 

aggs.* 

Briddi Aerospace ponded SESfcff&KSSdll 

out that its own offer was more ren di- 7 vnns with saieffifcs alraadv u 7““ rwaner me at 
than £5 rmllicn cbeaDer. renoarous with saieuiKs already mospbere and attack a ground- 


to destroy enemy satellites. Air 
Force Systems Commander Gen. 
Robert T. Marsh provided a due to 
why advanced spaceplanes are de- 
sired in an article be wrote for Air 
Force Magazine last year. “The 




•• Concept drawing of 
. one of NASA's 


jjfc. • 


than £5 million cheaper. br space. 

For the Brazilians, die psycholo- Although < 
gjeal barriers of being a Third stagenow.st 
World producer are down. They ^ tec 
possess die fifth-largest defense in- bmM transa 


based target, and leave the 


Although only in ^conceptual atmosphere and orbit to re- 
stage now, st ass arc bepg taken to turn to its borne base." he said, 
ready the technology necessary to The Air Force now uses the shut- 

build transatmosphepc vehicles, ,i e traditional “emends hie” 


. one of NASA's 
advanced mffitary 
.spaceplanes. 








Vf v^-,. 






i t j wuiQ transatmospneuc vemaes, ji e ^a traditicmal “emendable” 

dustry -,^ J th !, W0rid ^ s P ace c™ 8 ® 8 orbital aircraft / OT ihrowawav) l aunch ^ for ac- 

countos wuh hi the coming decades These new Las to sparS^Bm the shuttle is not 
aircraft mdustnes. aoospace plane wouW add con- ideal for many militaiy rmsrions. It 

sderabty to U5. Air Face space « too big, Jfi verfSaneuverable 

asiatssisisr ... 


TOMORROW 


dustry. Besides the Tucano trainer, 
winch has been sold in Us original 


winch has been sold in Us o rig i na l 
form in South America ana the 
Middle East, the companyhas suc- 
ceeded in the cavil sector. The twin- 
prop Banddrante is nearing sales 


What missions codd these new beroflaunch and landing rites. For 
yemete accom plish/ TOC Air force mi \j iary f«<Vg mang the shut- 


is trying to answer that question ^ wou j d ^ ^ u^g a Mack 
now wnh misaon studies and user ^ ^ a lwhscal ^ 

surveys, but at least one posable - 

(Confirmed op Page 12) 


survey is to achieve the capability 


■ Profit-taking; Four U.S. carriers posted two- 
thirds of total industry profits in 1984. Has deregu- 
lation helped the industry prosper? 

■ Plugged in: Two airlines dominate electronic 
marketing for U.S. reservations and sales. But are 
the systems biased? 


■ Class acts; Does class make all the difference? A 
look at leg room, food and drink, and other perks 
in first, business and tourist classes. 

■ Top flight Which airlines — and which airports 
— do frequent travelers like most. A survey of 
consumer preferences. 


Ttimfnw 


How to fly a big airplane with the tips of your fingers ? 


■■ ■"' > 


‘ Shin l^ ,lh ^ 

rf* •' i , • — 




•v % t . .. - 1 

’i • r -''WL* ^ 


-ir 




Fifteen years ago. we designed and 
built Concorde, using technologies never 
previously seen in a commercial aircraft 
Today, the Airbus remains at the 
cutting edge of technology. The proof : 
shortly we’ll be introducing the 
Airbus A320. The first of a new 
generation of safer, more efficient aircraft 
In the new Airbus A320, “flying by 
wire" will replace the conventional aircraft 
controls, making life much easier for the 
pilot In terms of comfort safety, and 
flight monitoring 

By means of a mini-stick, the pilot can 
transmit extremely precise commands 
and check they’ve been carried out on a 
visual display - part of an entirely new 
concept in cockpit instrument panels 
designed to make all flight data easily and 
immediately available to the pilot 
At Aerospatiale, high technology is 
our stock-in-trade That’s how we meet 
both the interests of the passengers and 
the economic requirements of the airlines. 
And that’s what makes Aerospatiale 
special. 




aerospafiale 


, ; > V 

,, . ;:»>!* * ■ ■■ 
V'l (' ■ 1 


that's special that's aerospafiale. 





Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON AVIATION 


The Chinese Market: Vast, Untapped and Difficult 


LONDON — Nothing will do 
more to concentrate the minds of 
rival aircraft manufacturers at the 
Paris Air Show at Le Bourget than 
the approach of a delegation from 
China. 

A combination of economic and 
political factors has turned the Peo- 
ple’s Republic into a vast — and 
for the most part, untapped —air- 
craft market, the likes of which wiD 
not be seen again. For the hard- 
pressed European and American 
industries, the potential for creat- 
ing a modem airline system on 
such a large scale is awesome. 

Yet, while the Chinese have al- 
lowed a Dumber erf them to make 
modest inroads into its least-devel- 
oped transport sector, no single 
manufacturer has emerged as a 
dominant force. It is just not the 
way things are done in Beijing. 

For the Chinese are being most 


careful about bow and with whom 
they spend their money. And none 
of the companies wfll claim to 
know what long-term intentions lie 
behind the scrutinizing minds of 
the three major delegations from 
the Ministry of Aviation, China’s 
own considerable manufacturing 
industry and the national airline, 
when they window shop in Paris. 


will not become an automatic alter- 
native Tor the Chinese. The recent 
wanning of relations between Ber- 
ing and Moscow has also brought 
the Soviet manufacturers bade into 
the picture. 


146s. But with British airliners op- 
erating in China since the 1960s, 


In the short term, China’s poten- 
tial is seen not so much in moving 
its own masses as in transporting 
the rising numbers of tourists seek- 
ing out a nation that dosed its 
doors in the Mao era. The same 
political relaxation that makes 
tourism possible has created eco- 
nomic reforms and far greater op- 
portunities for doing business with 
the West after years of Soviet influ- 
ence. But it is pointed out by regu- 
lar visitors that Western products 


Contemplating the infinite vari- 
eties of hardware, the Chinese are 
picking up small portions here and 
(here to get a taste from several 
sources on both sides of the Atlan- 
tic without malting a large tingle 
order. 


So far Boeing has been success- 
ful in selling 10 B-737s, of which 
five have been delivered. British 
Aerospace says that the order was 
made before the Chinese had the 
chance to evaluate its brand new 
BAe 146 commuterjet last summer. 
It is designed specifically for nig- 


ged locations and efficiency. So the 

Chinese agreed to buy 10 of the 




Tha WcaMn^on Pott 

The Tucano T-27 attack trainer from Embraer erf Brazil, which is to be built in Egypt 

under license. 


British Aerospace feels that its new 
product mixed with its established 
rooLS will lead them to more sub- 
stantial orders. 

Equally hopeful is Britain's 
Short Brothers, which earlio- this 
year sold eight of its regional S360 
airliners to China, ft is reported 
that a deal to purchase Soviet prop- 
jets has been agreed. And in Swe- 
den there is confident talk of a deal 
this year for the purchase of Saab- 
Fairchild SF340s with delivery of 
as many as 50 aircraft starting iater 
this year. At the big end of the 
market the European Airbus In- 
dustrie has secured an order for 
three of its wide-bodied A-310s. 

But perhaps the biggest break- 
through has come from McDonnell 
Douglas for landing a contract to 
supply 26 MD80s worth up to SI 
billion. The twin-jet airliners will 
be built under license in Sh anghai , 
providing China with its first 
home-assembled modem airliner. 
The Americans will train part of 
the factories’ 10,000 workers (an 
important factor for the Chinese) 
and whl establish a joint task force 
to study fuilher projects. 

Taking an active role in produc- 
tion — importing new technology 
and manufacturing techniques — is 
highly significant for a country 
with a large but outdated aviation 
industry. China has more than 10 
aircraft factories daring back to the 
days of Japanese occupation in the 
1930s. WiLh. Soviet assistance, these 
were re-established under Commu- 
nist rule in 1949. 

Their products, mainl y military, 
are copies erf Soviet types, again 



In Soviet Aircraft, It s 

What Is Not Seen That 


4 ; hi t 

• jt'jli' 4 

■ i ' ' i (h 




Makes die Difference 


By Christy Oimphcl! 

LONDON — “I ha\e 
future and it's the nineteen -fifties. 


their ■succcv't‘f ’1 vtilS w m a 1 ugh* 

jv air-minded eimMUOnti, 
aircraft doing fa Siberia the 
MilriutU did fa Wh-ccnttjry 


lutUlw lUIV II f UM I I41M % I r -■ 

said the man coming home off the i \mcru'J But the bad newv fee the 
Aeroflot flight. That used to be the Soviet designer . l hen and now, a 


joke about Soviet aerospace lech- ,hat the male is h«» only ratatter 
nolqgy — that it was earnest but he is working t:r>l 
cumbersome, impressive on the im ut for the miiittrj tout**- 
outside but antiquated under the ruenL 

skin. Military aircraft, incrfforc^ll 

How true is that today, when the ^ ,hc >pcvlcr of the ram teat 
Paris Air Show will be dominated The mishtv An- 1:4 » the fin* tog 


must for the milium f>uwo* 
meat. 

Military aircraft, therefore, will 


Paris Air Show will be dominated The mighty An- 1-4 » me nrw mg 
by the massive bulk erf the world’s transport prototype fw a long time 
hugest aircraft, the Antonov An- (alllKHigh it also na.' sigurf- 


Completed F/A-18 shipsets are moved off the assem- 


bly fine at Northrop in El Segundo, Calif. The plane 
has been chosen by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps 
and the Canadian, Australian and Spanish air forces. 


built under license. The political 
break with the Soviet Union posed 
the challenge of developing its air- 
craft unaided. This was achieved 
rather slowly, providing the legacy 
today of an air force that looks at 
least 20 yeais out of date. Similar 
efforts to produce a domestic air- 
liner brought forth the prototype 
Shanghai Y-1D, which looks much 


which looks much 


like the Boeing 707 erf 1950’s vin- 
tage. 

But will the day come when 
Western frontline fighters and 
bombers wiD be rolling off the Chi- 
nese production lines? No one rules 
out any possibility in the optimism 
that companies like to beueve ex- 
ists in China . 

— ROBERT COCKBURN 




5$*: I# 




?Sf Am X. U. 


y A 


space 





IS THERE: 


.ourMex 




it’s an 10 


For more information on this and other IC Industries opportunities, please writ: 
Alex Lehmann, IC Industries, Suite 4403, 200 Park At, New Vbrk, New Vbrk 1016b. 

<01985 IC Industries, Inc IC Industries is a registered trademark of IC Industries, Inc 


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124 Condor, dramatically showing 
off to the world iust wh at Sovi et 
engineering and Soviet aerospace 
technology arc capable of? 

Paris is the Soviet aviation indus- 
try’s window on the West The Rus- 
sians do not set up shop at any of 
the other world aviation jamborees 
and withdrew from the Paris show- 
two years ago after a diplomatic 
row. This year they' will be beating 
the drum for Soviet products (civil 
aircraft only, they bring no military 
aircraft for open display to the 
West), while they try to find out as 
much as possible about what the 
West is offering. But what does the 
West know of their aircraft? 

On the wall of a design office in 
Moscow there is a ample exhorta- 
tion: “Make it simple, make it pro- 
ducible, moke it work.” That sums 
up a 70-year tradition of Soviet 
aviation in war and peace, where 
quantity mains more than quality 
and durability means more than 
sophistication. This has meant in 
turn that a number of developing 
nations, such os Indio, have found 
it easier to license-build from Sovi- 
et prototypes than from Western 
equivalents. 

Meanwhile, the West has taken 
comfort in its perceived technologi- 
cal advantage. Thai confidence is 
eroding fast 

The noted design chiefs such as 
Andrei Tupolev. Oleg Antonov and 
Alexander Yakovlev pursued Sovi- 
et strictures with almost complete 
continuity of purpose from the 
1930s to the 1970s. and where they 
abandoned them, as in the case of 
the ill-fated Tu-144 supersonic 
transport, the result was disaster. 
Today, the old giants are gone but 


KIKCI hui tlwuush tta to.H) 
years a mighty investment has been r 

made in military jeruspa* Ksb* 

According to the Pentagon. "The 
major research and design facilities 
engaged in the dcvcK*pment of So- 
viet military aircraft, missile and 
space systems have grown by u 
least 30 percent in the last 10 yean 


producing 20 new types of air- 
St vince 1970 and 35 new types 


craft trace 1970 and 35 new types 
irf missiles. The Tupolev design bu- 
reau. responsible fa the develop- 
ment of such aircraft as the 
(NATO- designated! Blackjack 
strategic bomber has doubled in 0 
size during the past decode." 

While Soviet research and devel- 
opment mav take up to four times 
as long as Western equivalents, the 
Soviets get there in the end aad 
deploy, in large quantities, aircraft 
that are the combat equivalents erf 
anything in the U.S. arsenal — -air- 
craft like the lightweight, dog-fight- 
ing MiG-29 Fulcrum, which is very 
close to the F-tS, and the kmget- 
range Su-27 Flanker, plus some 
formidable helicopter*. 

Already, the U.S. Air Force is 
postulating a "MiG 2000.” which 
would feature an airframe of com- 
posite materials and an advanced 
computerized test-flight control 
system. Computing is where the ^ 
West holds a key had in miliuzy 
aerospace technology and why 
high-tech transfer is such a sensi- 
tive issue 

Paris will fill (be shop window 
with high-tech displays, which the 
Russians wiD be scruttauitt from 
every angle — but. no donut, the 
nine days of the Condor m Paris 
win have a lotto teach the West 




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The AMX subsonic attack jet, a joint ventllre*betweo| M, 
Embraer, Aeromacd and Aeritalia. 


Vi. v 


Third W orld Holds Its 
Own With the Majors 


(Continued From Previous Page) 

Aeronautics Co. The industry goes 
back to 1940 and today employs 
40,000 people making planes and 
equipment for the air force. The 
Bangalore Comp lex turns out un- 
der fionse SEPECAT Jaguar com- 
bat aircraft and the Adour engine. 
Airframes and engines for the Sovi- 
et MiG-21 are made at Nasflc and 
Korapui and construction of the 
MiG-27M was due to go ahead at 
the end of 1984. Avionics and ac- 
cessories are made at the Lucknow 
division. Home designs include the 
Kiran jet trainer andHPT-32 prop 
trainer. * F 

Indonesia is gaining recognition 
for its Nurtanio aircraft company, 
which was formed in 1976 and hi 
suwe won expen orders after sup- 
plying several home customers. 
Tne Aviocar twin-turboprop pas- 
senger and cargo plane is still built 
under license from CASA Now 
Nurtanio and the Spanish compa- 
ny arc developing a new 39-seat 
plane. The company also manufac- 
turers under license French Super 

MSEE*."* *“5 


Italian MB 339A trainer followed 
by a deal to manufacturer this and 

another ivno iid/Im. r..n 




, an £? er ¥ 5T« under fitil license. 

I The Philippines Aerospace De- 
. wtopment Corp. has assembled 
mOTe than 40 West German BO- 

ufcFvV 1 * 60 BriUsh BN- n* 

2B Islander tight transport aircraft. 

j cocn ,P an y has a maintenance 
and overhaul operation. 

Singapore Aircraft Industries 
was formed m 1982 for the mainte- 
nance of aircraft from the local air 
force and the U.S. Navy and Ma- 
rine Corps. Plans are under way to 
assemble the Marchelte S- 211 jtt 
kits and Super Puma 

coastructing air- 
tfaftrn the late 1960s and h^C. 
geed large numbers of Amenam 
Bd! tehcppiera and Northrop tac- 
tical fighters for the Chinese Nh- 
bonalist Air Force. By the 197 oT 
DevdopnS 

Center was designing and devekirv 
jug ns own aircraft — die T-CH? -a 

STfn^. AB have been 

““aft. ihMnvvjv? 

fir ? fUgh,taS dUel0matc ' ! ‘ . 

“■ l i6 S n3,S? i SSS af 


Mexico, in a partnership with 
America s Rockwell International. 

Ss ■ 0U ! ^ Commander 
and die agricultural Sparrow Com- 
fflMder smee the earijTl970s. 

ftJosan AeroruuSo^f ,° f ^ 

asaapsfe 


susasast 

first task win hJ' - us 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


Page 9 


■ Urcr„f t v 

Worldwide Operating Prof its 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON AVIATION 



World Aircraft Market 


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Boost Orders for Aircraft 


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By Michael Vinanen 

WASHINGTON. — Worldwide 
deliveries of new commercial jet- 
liners fell in 1984, but aircraft or- 
ders increased substantially due to 
improved airline operating profits. 

Most of the renewed interest was 
in smaller jets with passenger seat- 
ing capacities of about 100 to ISO. 
The demand for new wi de-body 
jets lagged. 

Orders dropped off in the early 
1980s due to the recession and air- 
line losses. Since the typical lag 
time between orders and deliveries, 
meaning actual sales, is about two 
years, the impact was still felt in 
1984. 

- The makers of large commercial 
passenger jets — Boeing. Airbus, 
McDonnell Douglas, Fokker and 
British Aerospace — reported com- 
bined deliveries in 1984 of 259 such 
planes, a drop of 18 percent in sales 
from the previous year. 

According to one market ana- 
lyst, that meant the manufacturers’ 
revenues shrank by more than Sl_5 
billion to about $9 billion last year, 
with ftnwng taking in more 
half of the money, Airbus about a 
quarter, McDonnell Douglas 12 
percent, and the others about 6 


largest increase in orders of the five 
manufacturers last year with finn 
orders fori lOjetlinars, up from 44. 

“It was a good year in 1984.” 
said a spokeswoman for Douglas 
Aircraft m Long Beach, California, 
a division of McDonnell Douglas. 
“We expect a good year in 1985." 

The balk of McDonnell Doug- 
las’s good fortune came from 
A ipgpcpn Awtines, which ordered 
67 MD-8Qs early in the year, plus 
options on 100. more of the twin- 


year, a marked decline from 196 the 
year before. 

However, Boeing reported firm 
new orders for 169 passenger 
planes, up from 136. Despite 12 
cancellations of previous orders, 
the company stBi reported a net 
gain in orders, and said in its annu- 
al report that it wiH deliver 201 
commercial jetliners in 1985, as 
well as a few military sales. 

“When airlines make money 
they buy planes," a Boring spokes- 


‘Lv. 


The U«S. scheduled airlines recorded 
$2.3 billion of operating profits, 
while international airlines collected net 
profits of some $500 million. 



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However, the five also reported a 
42-percent jump in firm orders in 
1984 for a total of 338 commercial 
jets. Thai should translate into im- 
proved sales starting this year. 

The main catalyst for the turn- 
around was renewed airline operat- 
ing profits last year, according to 
most observers. The UiL scheduled 
airlines recorded $23 billion of op- 
era ling profits, while international 
airlines collected net profits of 
some $500 millio n. 

McDonnell Douglas enjoyed the 


that normally seat 

140 to 

■ The company expects to deliver 
TO aircraft this year, up from 46 last 
year and 54 deliveries in 1983. The 
new deliveries wiD include the start 
of American’s order. If the airline 
pidcs up its options, McDonnell 
Douglas wiH -be producing planes 
through 1991- the spokeswoman 
said. 

Only seven of McDonnell Doug- 
las orders last year were for its 
widebody DC- 10, normally a 280- 
passenger jeL That also represents 
an increase from a single 1983 or- 
der and two 1984 deliveries, but six 
of the new orders came from Feder- 
al Express, a UJS. package delivery 
service, for the tri- engme planes 
configured for cargo. 

Boeing Company of Seattle, 
Washington, still the biggest mann- 
facturra- of large passenger jets, de- 
livered 138 commercial aircraft last 


man said, adding that the i 
projects new 1985 orders to 
pace. He also cited reasonably low 
interest rates as one positive facto', 
but said the still strong U.S. dollar 
is an impediment to sales overseas. 

Like McDonnell Douglas, the 
large majority of Boeing’s new or- 
ders were for smaller planes, 135 of 
its twin-engine 737s, up from 69 
orders last year. Most were for the 
new stretched version of the air- 
craft, the 737-300s that were sold 
for the first time in 1984 and seat 
approximately 130 passengers. 

Boring received orders for 1 10 of 
the 737- 300s, including 24 from 
Texas Air Corp_ the parent of Con- 
tinental Airlines and New York 
Air. 


Boeing 767-ER under construction, above; at right, a McDonnell Douglas MD-80. 


Concerning widebody sales, 
Boeing delivered 16 of its 747s last 
year, down from 23. It received 
orders for 22 of the 300-plus pas- 


senger, four-engine jets, down 
slightly from 24. 

The largest order was from Saudi 
Arabian Airlines for 10 of the 747- 
300s with the extended upper deck 
in a potential $1 -billion deal 
Orders far Boring’s twin- aisle 
767s, two-engine jets that seat 
about 220 passengers in a mixed- 
class configuration, dropped from 
16 to 10, while deliveries fell from 
55 in 1983 to 29 last year. 

Boring’s 747s, the single-aisle 
jets that seal about 185 passengers, 
also declined in deliveries from 25 
to 18, and dropped sharply in or- 
ders from 26 to 2. 

Airbus Industrie, the European 
consortium and Boring's chief rival 
in the widebody market, had 35 
firm orders in 1984 with increases 
in demand for all three of its air- 


craft models. including the new, 
1 50-seat A320, a narrowbody plane 
scheduled for deliveries starting in 
1988. 

Airbus orders included 1 1 for its 
widebody A300s, which normally 
caiTy 250 passengers; 10 orders for 
A3 10s, also twin-engine and seat- 
ing about 220 passengers; and 14 
orders Cor A320s. Comparable 
1983 orders totaled 18, including 
12 for the narrowbody jet and six 
for the twin-aisle A3 10. 


Airbus spokeswoman said. In addi- 
tion to the 35 firm orders, she said 
there were 23 accompanying op- 
tions on planes, plus so-called com- 
mitments for another 100 aircraft. 

Most of those commitments 
came from Pan American World 
Airways, which signed a letter of 
intent with the consortium to ac- 
quire 28 planes with options for 47 
and leases for 16. They include a 
mix of A320s and A3 10- 300s. 


production of the tri-engine jet but 
delivered four planes in i 984, down 
from six in 1983, the analyst report- 
ed. 


In other words. Airbus’s small 


Airbus last year developed a to- 


tal of 48 aircraft, including 29 of 
to 12 airlines and 19 of 


portion of its orders, similar to 1 
Donnell Douglas and Boeing. 


“We're 


beginning to 
lrnaround in 


see a very 


ability of air carriers that are! 
ring to make capital decisions,” an 


the A3 IQs 
the A300s. The consortium sold 
some 38 planes the year before, so 
h showed a net gain in 1984. all 
from A3 10 sales. 


Among the smaller jets. Fokker 
Aircraft of the Netherlands last 
year delivered 16 of its twin-engine 
F-28s, a slight decline from 19 sales 
of the 6S-to~85-seat aircraft in 
1983. The firm reported orders for 
seven of the planes last year, 
matching 1983. 

However, Fokker late last year 
received the launch order from 
Swissair for its new Fokker 100, the 
twin- 


in 1986. Swissair ordered eight 
planes with options for six more, a 
Fokker official said. 


Lockheed Corp„ US. maker of 
widebody L-1011 TriStar, halted 


British Aerospace, which in 1983 
began selling its four-engine BAe 


146 models, delivered 10 that year 
and 1 1 last year. 

Orders for the BAe 146-100 and 
the 146-200, which seat S6 and 100 
passengers, respectively, totaled 
nine last year, down from 32. 

The main reason for the sharp 
statistical drop was a large order in 
late 1983 from Pacific Southwest 
Airlines, a UB regional carrier. 
PSA ordered 20 BAe 146-200$ with 
options for 25 more, a British Aero- 
space spokesman said. 

The widespread interest in new 
smaller jets is partly a result of 
continuing carrier emphasis on hub 
and feeder operations, a U.S. air- 
line representative said. He said the 
soft demand for new wi debodies 
may be the result of a strong de- 
mand for used big jets and the high 
price of new ones. 


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Creative Financing Is Child 
Of a Global Buyers’ Market 


... — 






{Continued From Page 7) 


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* 


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year, that figure had grown to $541 

Trntlinn 

Less known are some of the in- 
novative arrangements engineered 
by the airlines, such as one that 
allows them to gel new models they 
need from the manufacturers and, 
at the same time, provides them 
with a major cash wmdfalL 

In these cases, an airline orders, 
say, a Boeing 747-200 that cost $80 
milli on when ordered. Since it gen- 
erally takes a minimum of 18 
months to two years to gpi delivery, 
the price of the model when deliv- 
ered might be $84 millioa. Instead 
of merefypaying off what is owed 
on the 747 and putting H in their 
fleet as a company-owned model, 
some airlines today seD the model 
to a third party at the then-going 
of $84 million and lease it 


• • 


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jitjWb T 4 ' s - 


Seattle fiaenp: At bottom, the 727-100. The next three are 
models of the 737-360 twin-jet afrfiner. At^ the far end of the 
field are a 737-200 and a 757. 


But for buyers in general, the 
widest variety of creative financing 

general aviation area^fhe tight- 
plane industry is in its worst slump 
since the early 1950s, based on unit 
sales, and buyers can almost dictate 
terms. 

Inducements hi dude hefty dis- 
counts (“List prices are virtually 
meaningless,” one industry re- 
searcher said); greater dollar allow- 
ances for trade-ms; cut-rate financ- 
ing coupled with long terms, 10 to 
15 years on some modds, as op- 


posed to a traditional five or seven 
years; cash rebates; extra options, 
and free training for pilots and me- 
chanics. 

More original is the growing 
w illingness by some manufacturers 
to lease their models with options 
to buy. Some also push straight 
leasing arrangements, with the 
manufacturer guaranteeing to take 
the model back at the end of the 
lease period at a fixed price. The 
length and terms of such agree- 
ments are as varied as the more 
than 100 different modds offered 
by these manufacturers. ; 

Quantity purchases, the dream 
of every manufacturer, are' hotly 
contested and marked by un tradi- 
tional sweeteners for the prospec- 
tive buyer. Fra instance, irra battle 
to sell a fleet of 10 aircraft to Unit- 
ed Pared Service, Fairchild Air- 
craft Crap, also agreed td establish- 
and man anew subsidiary to oper- 
ate the aircraft for UPS. More 
modds also can now pe bought 
direct from the factory^ bypassing 
dealer markups, and some manu- 
facturers even guarantee that the 
operating costs of some of their 
modds wiQ not exceed a certain 
level If they do, the manufacturer 
pays the difference. 

In one form or another, most of 
die inducements and. ■B peawl 
Hralg are made available to the mil- 
itary, with the manufacturers tout- 
ing “off-the-shelf 1 ’ versions of their 
models for training, transportation. 


surveillance and rescue work. U.S. 
military procurements of general 
aviation aircraft have helped keep 
some companies on both sides of 
the Atlantic alive in the .last couple 
of years. The U.S. Air Force cur- 
rently is the biggest military cus- 
tomer of off-the-shelf, or slightly 
modified, general aviation aircraft 
Like their civilian counterparts, 
military procuring agencies are not 
passing rip creative financing to get 
what they need, including the los- 
ing of aircraft, an almost unheard- 
of practice in the past 
In 1983, the Air Force signed 
long-tom lease agreements with 
Beech Aircraft Crap, and Gates 
Lcaijet Corp. for a combined total 
of 120 aircraft. As part of the pack- 
age, the modds are maintained by 
subsidiaries of each manufacturer. 
The U.S. military also is acquiring 
11 Gutistream corporate jets from 
Gulf stream Aerospace Crap, plus 
15 specially modified Citation jets 
from Cessna Aircraft Co. 
FraEmggean-^^ oggntion^ 

has ordered 18 military versions erf 
the Short 330 that is buflt in North- 
ern Ireland by Short Brothers. It 
also has options for 48 more. 



GiAlraii 

Gulf stream SRA-1 survetDance and reconnaissance plane, above, and its fuselage plan, 

below. 


Maraimr SumriOmM 

HllUr r Fading T«M« 


■LMiloty 


Hopes by the light-plane manu- 
facturers for new military work in- 
clude a joint effort to modify the 
European-built Fokker F-27 to 
fight forest fires. Teamed in this 


„ (Continued on Page 12) 



ri bcplPI 


Long Rang* 
Optical Cmati 


Conhnmt, Tabla 


- Communicitlar 

CoPa c ikm 


>rld Hoick ft 
i the Majotf 


Are you getting optimal mileage out of space age technologies? 


! i. 1 


, : hi. 
t 



If not, Aerospatiale can probably help. 
Because slaying on the cutting edge of 
late-breaking technologies is our most 
exciting challenge. 

In fields like robotics, holography, 
micromechanics and CAD. In sted 
manufacturing where we’ve pioneered 
innovative applications for plasma 
technologies or composite materials. 
Aerospatiale’s put kevlar and carbon fibers 
to work in oil drilling equipment ships 
masts and - just recently - an artificial 
heart 

We think it would be a shame to keep 
so much useful expertise exclusively to 
ourselves. Whatever your sector, we think 
you'll agree. 

At Aerospatiale, innovating means 
sharing, And that’s what makes us special 



id 


aerospatiale. 


I 







Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON AVIATION 

Northrop Steps Up 
F-20 Competition 
Against the F-16 

By Richard S Tuttle The plan has been to bmld over 
7 V1 _ . , 1,000 of these lo replace the Jag- 

WASHTNGTON — The fatal , IWW Phantoms and Starfighters of 
crash on May 14 In Labrador of a [hose countries* air forces, slated 
Northrop F-20 Tigerchadc fighter for retirement in the 1990s. But 
bound for the Pans Air Show has over operational re- 

not deterred the California compa- quirements, the amount of work lo 
ny from stepping np its bid to com- he done by each partner and who 
peie with the General Dynamics F- will be in charge of the design have 
16 Falcon for a U.S. Air Force stalled the program, 
purchase. The British are proceeding with 

Northrop has another F-20 in ^ Experimental Aircraft Pro- 
flight test, but it will remain in the lAirfi could lead to the Agile 
United States and not come to Par- Combat Aircraft. And the French 


Northrop, meanwhile, says the F- 
20 can perform any mission as- 
signed to the F-16. 

Northrop is baring its pitch on 
the Air Force’s acknowledgment of 
the importance of competition, as 
reflected, for instance, in the alter- 
nate fighter engine program, in 
which General Electric has been 
brought in to compete each year 
with Pratt & Whitney to supply 
engines for the F-15 and F-16 fight- 
era. The upshot of the program nas 
been a better deal for the taxpayer. 

If the Air Force buys F-20S, the 
same would also probably be true. 
Another result for Northrop might 
be to jprompt orders from other 
countries, something it has been 
trying to achieve since it started 
work on the program, competing 
with a version of the F-16, under 
former President Jimmy Carter. 

Meanwhile, five European coun- 
tries — Britain, France, West Ger- 
many, Italy and Spain — continue 
to debate how they will proceed on 
a new fighter of their own, the pro- 
jected European Fighter Aircraft. 


Treaty Organization allies have 
1,960. 

And, while the quality of Soviet 
aircraft has not been up to that of 
their Western counterparts, this is 
chang ing For example, the new 
MiG-29 fighter, which NATO has 
code-named Fulcrum, “reflects the 
U.SJSJL's continuing drive to pro- 
duce new generations of tactical, 
strategic and transport aircraft," 
according to the Pentagon. 

The Soviet Union, as usual will 
not be showing any combat aircraft 
at the Plans show, but it will show 
for the first time the new heavy-lift 
Condor transport plane. The Pen- 
tagon said the Condor, which is 
about the same size as the Ameri- 
can C-5 Galaxy, will “significantly 
upgrade” the Soviet heavy-airlift 
capability. 

But while Soviet aircraft are be- 
coming more capable, there is also 
evidence that higher quality is as 
costly to the Soviet Union as it is to 
the West 

One way around the problem — 


■ - 

F 5 '' ^ 



is; a third is under construction. are developing the Rafale, which 
Ibe crash, at Goose Bay during a would replace the Mirage 2000. 
practice demonstration, is the sec- in the United States, the Ad- 
ond for the F-20. The first, which yanced Tactical Fighter is being 
was also fatal and which also bap- planned by the Air Force as a such 
pened during a demonstration, oc- to the current F-15s and F- 

cuiTed last October in South Ko- the Navy is planning de- 

rea. It was anributed to jrilot error. ve i 0 p m ent of the Advanced 
The F-16 is already in the U-S. Tamai Aircraft as a follow-on to 
Air Force inventory, and General preset fighters and fighter-bomb- 
Dynamics expects continued pur- ^ 

chases. But Northrop, which has ^ conside ration in both pro- 
spent $800 million of its own mon- grams is cost The Air Force, for 
ey on the Tigershark in what has so jp^an re will be lucky to hold de- 
far been an unsuccessful effort to ve iopment cost of the Advanced 
sell the plane to other countries, Tactical Fighter to SO percent 
proposed last month to sell about .jbo ve of the F-15. To help 
400 lo the Air Force for 51 5 million fceep costs down, a committee of 
apiece, more than $4 million under coao^ has suggested that the 
the unit cost of the F-16. avionics of the Tactical Fighter and 

The proposal has sparked inter- Tactical Aircraft be 90 percent 
est in Congress and the Air Force CMTUPOn 
and if it goes through, there could One of the big problems of ex- 
be a cut in the number of F-16s aircraft, is that fewer can 

now planned he bought, malringfor a disad vau- 

lt has thus gained the attention , a pp wartime. The trend is al- 
of General Dynamics. But General ^ady against the West; The War- 
Dynamics also said it welcomes saw pStcoun tries have 2050 



/ 

* ' v - 


Bafl HdhopNr Todnn 


a way that is not new to the Soviet 
Union and that is finding renewed 
interest in the increasingly budget- 
conscious West and in Japan — is 
modifying aircraft already in ser- 
vice. 

West Germany’s Luftwaffe, for 
instance, is upgrading its F-4F 
Phantoms to keep them effective 
until the arrival of the European 
Fighter Aircraft or a comparable 
plane. And Japan's Air Self-De- 
fense Force wants to improve its 
current F-l fighters and keep them 
operational until the advent of the 
planned SFX fighter in the early 
1990s. 

In addition, the U.S. Navy is 
upgrading its A-6 attack planes and 
F-14 fighters. 

The job of F-14s is to defend the 
fleet against attack by manned air- 
craft and cruise missies. Lessons 
learned over the past few years dur- 
ing U.S. aircraft carrier operations 
in the Indian Ocean and in the Gulf 
of Sidra, off Libya, where F-I4s 
shot down a pair of Soviet-made 
Sukhoi-22s Libyan fightos in 1981, 
may find new application to air 
defense of the continental United 



< • 


Helicopters: An Array of Tasks 


Above, a U& Marine Corps CH-53E Soper Stat- 
Bon from Sikorsky lifts a nrefrock. At left top to 
bottom: A Sikorsky S-76 designed for executives, 
Britain’s Westland Lynx 3 designed for military 
use, and a Befl Helicopter Textron Model 412 
lands at London’s Battersey heliport 


Stares and Western Europe. The 
reason is that if the US. Strategic 
Defense Initiative actually leads to 
systems that can defend against at- 
tack by ballistic missiles, air de- 
fenses will probably also have to be 
upgraded. 

To detea low-flying “stealthy” 
aircraft, the United States may 
eventually use satellite-borne infra- 
red sensors. The “Teal Ruby" 
spacecraft, intended to evaluate the 
feasibility of such a plan, is to be 
launched next spring on a military 
mission of the space shuttle. The 
“Hi Camp" infrared sensor, 
mounted in a U-2, has already 
shown that infrared devices can de- 
tea small aircraft against a variety 
of backgrounds. 

To intercept an intruder once it 
is detected, U.S. officials envision a 
ramjet-powered vehicle that could 
fly twice the distance of current 
interceptors in half the tim& British 
Aerospace and other European 
companies are studying similar 
craft, as weD as transaunospheric 
vehicles, which would fly from run- 
ways, change to orbital flight, de- 


orbit. perform a mission, go back 
into orbit and return to a runway 
landing. A typical mission might 
take less than two hours. 

While the West is studying new 
ways of detecting enemy' aircraft, 
attention is also bring focused by 
both sides on ways to avoid detec- 
tion. Not much is known about 
Soviet efforts here, but the US. 

Navy's chief of intelligence has said 
that' Soviet “stealth” technology 
may first appear in the form of 
modifications to aircraft already in 
service. 

In Europe, the Experimental 
Aircraft Program, the Agile Com- 
bat Aircraft, the European Fighter 
Aircraft and the Rafale fighters are 
expected to feature some “stealth” 
technology. 

And in the United States, the 
same is assumed for the Advanced 
Tactical Fighter and die Advanced 
Tactical Aircraft. Northrop, mean- 
while, continues development of 
the stealth-based Advance Tech- 
nology Bomber, which will comple- 
ment Rockwell International s B- 


Civil Helicopters: 
Sales Are Caught 
In a Downdraft 


IB, itself the beneficiary of some 
stealth technology. 

Lockheed, developer of the U-2 
and SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft 
and, therefore, no stranger to the 
world of detection avoidance, will 
show its C-130 High Technology 
Test Bed aircraft at Le BourgcL 
While the Test Bed itself is not 
specifically a “stealthy" airplane — 
its basic purpose is to demonstrate 
the C-130's capability of getting in 
and out of small fields — it does 
reflect new interest in special oper- 
ations and anti- terrorism, an inter- 
est that has some of its roots in the 
failed attempt in 1980 to rescue 
U-S. hostages from Tehran. 

Thai mission involved aflight of 
C-130s from Egypt to the north- 
central Iranian desert, and a flight 
of Sikorsky RH-53D helicopters to 
that location from the aircraft car- 
rier Nimitz in the Arabian Sea. 

“It’s no coincidence.” one indus- 
try official said, that the new Amer- 
ican V-22 Osprey vertical lift-air- 
craft, formerly designated JVX, is 
being designed to performjust such 
a mission with greater efficiency. 


Bv Srcphan Wilkinson 

STRATFORD, Connectiaa - 
Helicopters have won the he# is 
andmmds of Hollywood, but their 
success on the civil side of we air- 
craft business is far more limited 
than their manufacturers would 
wish. First came “Blue Thutwwr. 
then the TV-serics spinoff of that 

cop-in -chopper movie, and now the 
even more successful television se- 
ries “Airwrif," about a fantasy 
fling-wing faster than a spewing 
bullet- 

“Audiences love 'em, just as they 
do the copters featured in such [net- 
work favorites as “Magnum P.I., 
but they are apparently not yet 
ready for real-life heliports. 

“There’s a ciying need for the 
infrastructure, the downtown heli- 
port, to be in place before helicop- 
ters are heavily accepted," said 
Robert Stangarone of Sikorsky 
Aircraft, the world's largest heli- 
copter manufacturer. “We’re work- 
ing hard to make it happen. When 
we go in and brief an intelligent 
community, they realize helicop- 
ters are a lot safer than they bad 
though l It's usually a small but 
vocal minority that is opposed to 
heliports, with both safety and 
□rise fears.” 

“People have to understand the 
sound of a helicopter,” insisted the 
Bell Helicopter spokesman. Martin 
Reach. “In many cases, it isn't as 
noisy as a motorcycle or a truck, 
but it's perceived as a different type 
of sound.” 

So while the rest of the economy 
climbs strongly, the cavil segment 
of the U.S. hehcopier business 
seems caught in the worst down- 
draft in the 40-year history of (he 
business. 

Sikorsky reportedly has yet to 
recover the cost of developing its 
executive S-76, a sleek turbine twin 
that has been in production 10 
years and that as yet has accrued 
only slightly more than 200 unit 
sales. Bell Helicopters has done no 
better with its smaller Model 222, 
the only other U.S.-rnade executive 
starship. It has had about 150 sales 
since 1980, and, as Mr. Rrisch put 
iu “I don’t think anybody would 
make back their development costs 
on ISO aircraft” 

The search for offshore nil, a 
hotbed of activity in the 1970s, 
when the industry was building 
hundreds of helicopters solely to 
carry commuting roustabouts, has 
collapsed just as oil costs have. Nor 
has the UJi business community 
flocked to expensive rotary-wing 
aircraft. 

“There's a tremendous tendency 
in business to enhance productivity 


and cut omT Mr 
said, and apT : ‘ tTO | l > 
are viewed an cwtiy ra.hct tiurn 

productive. He notol *£!! 

SJ W * legivlaiion jvndmK that 
could change how the Internal Rev- 
Sue Sow* Uwks.it 

aircraft uiiltMiion. Huh could 
to fringe-benefit taxation «n certain 
Uscngers aboard corporate an- 
SafL a* well as discussion of the 
investment tax credit being 

as a result of domestic 
stagnation, Sikor.skv and other p 
manufacturers are lookmgmwcas 
for sales and are paving nwrawag 
attention to the development Of 
lower-cost miUtanzed vorunn of 
such civil helic*>p!ef>» a' (he S- ‘6, 
for export to countries that cannot 
afford bigger craft. 

Last August. Sikorsky an- 
nounced a sale of quasi-military 
helicopters to China, a marketing 
victory important not only because 
it was China's first major purchase 
of U.S. military equipment but also 
because it showed the long-estab- 
lished New England cwrapanvs ^ 
newly aggressive interest in the in- 
ternational helicopter market. 

I Sikorsky was awarded a SI 40- 
million contract to supply China 
with 24 civil ionized S-”0C-2 Black- 
hawk utility-assault transports cos- 
ily convertible to troop carriers and 
with uprated engines for use in the 
hi gh elevations of the Tibetan bor- 
der.) 

Still, Sikorsky is something of a 
latecomer to the international are- 
na, having been preoccupied 
throughout the 1970s with the es- 
labtisnmetit of two of its three cur- 
rent production programs, the U.S 
Army S-70 Bbekhawfc and the ci- 
vilian S-76. (Its third prime product 
is the behemoth CH-5JE Super ™ 
Stallion military heavy-lift helicop- 
ter. the biggest rotary-wing aircraft 
in the non-Commumst world.) 

Ever since Bell licensed Japanese 
and Italian production of us classic 
bubble-domed Modri 47 in 1952. 

US. helicopter companies have 
tended to abet foreign competition 
by agreeing to overseas manufac- 
ture of their products. 

“That’s been the simple formu- 
la.” said Robert Mack, director of 
public relations for Hughes Heli- 
copters. “Creating jobs, technology 
transfer, giving foreign companies 
the practice in doing it themselves, 
it’s been (he standard request by , 
any country as a condition of any 'T i 
significant military sale.” 

Sikorsky long licensed manufac- 
ture of its own large military heli- 
copters, most notably to Mitsubi- 
(Gortfaped on Page 13) 




The Grumman X-29. No X-series 
aircraft has ever pushed the frontiers 
of aeronautics as far. 

It’s a unique product of today’s most 
advanced thinking : Aeroelastically 
Tailored Composite Forward Swept 
Wing. Thin Supercritical Wing. 
Relaxed Static Stability. Variable 
Incidence Close-Coupled Canard. 
Advanced Digital Flight Controls. 
Discrete Variable Camber. Three 
Control Surface Configuration. 

Come see this multi-technology 
demonstrator for tomorrow's tactical 
aircraft. Paris Air Show. Grumman 
Chalet B-01. 


Only GRUMMAN. 


m ‘-m 


V i V. ” ’ 











r • • . t* 




ft ' & 





XV 

V 







GRUMMAN* 



" A rBQfcrared rnrtxiiiiiiTr of Grunnzmii Cotpoitflon. 



... “ — 




. *'.■ 


. . 



... - ~ 4 






New Airbus: The single-aisie A320 twin-engined aircraft wfll seat 150 passengers. 

Tensions Threatening Allied Ventures 


{Coutfamed Fran Page 7) 

I day in Constance, West Germany. 
The programs also were expected 
lo be what a U.S. executive termed 
a “very upfront subject” at the Par- 
j is Show. Many European and U5. 
aerospace companies have indicat- 
ed strong interest in both projects. 

| Mr. Mitterrand recently told re- 
porters dial French companies 
could become involved in Strategic 
Defense Initiative research pro- 
grams, if they felt it was in their 
interest to do so. 

Several French military contrac- 
tors have already held exploratory 
talks with U-S. officials, as have 
Italian, British and West German 
I companies, and most of them will 
attend the air show. 

General James Abrahamson, di- 
rector of the U.S. defense depart- 
ment’s Strategic Defense Initiative 
organization, told reporters in 
Washington last Thursday that 
“this subcontractor business” re- 
flected “a misunderstanding.'' 
What will probably emerge, he 
said, will involve “associate con- 
tract relationships” between UJ5. 
and European companies. “In 
some cases, it may well be that a 
European contractor would be a 
subcontractor to a US. one.” Gen- 
eral Abrahamson said. But he 
dearly indicated that tile United 


States fully intended to maintain 
leadership in the initiative, and he 
did not elaborate on what he meant 
by “associate contract” arrange- 
ments. - 

This is not to say that European 
governments are dropping their ef- 
forts to attain greater indepen- 
dence from the United States in 
higb-tedmedogy areas with cWflian 
and military applications. In fact, 
there still is a decidedly upbear 
consensus in Western Europe that, 
when it comes to aerospace, Euro- 
peans can stand up to Americans 
— and succeed. 

Some examples: the euphoria in 
Paris, London and Bonn when Pan 
American Airways last autumn an- 
nounced that it planned to buy Air- 
bus planes for about SI billion; 
every launch of Ariane, the Euro- 
pean Space Agency's project, 
draws heavy media coverage in Eu- 
rope. Articles and editorials on 
launches regularly mention the 
heated competition between 
Ariane and launch sendees of the 
U.S. National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, even though 
the European Space Agency, which 
sponsored Ariane, ana NASA plan 
cooperating in the manned U.S. 
s^ace station planned for the 

Another example drawing con- 


siderable attention is the European 
Fighter Aircraft project, which 
would be the largest European ven- 
ture since the Tornado fighter- 
bomber project was established by 
Britain, West Germany and Italy in 
1969. It could lead to the building 
of 1,000 aircraft, representing or- 
ders of about $30 bOlioiL 

M EFA is one project, among oth- 
ers, we watch most closely and take 
very seriously," commented a se- 
nior VS diplomatic official in Par- 
is. Most diplomats and industry 
observers consider the project a 
major test of Europe's aerospace 
industries to cooperate on a mili- 
tary project with a record number 
of potential partners. 

Currently, however, the project 
is clouded % controversy between 
the British and French aerospace 
industries, which could cause nto 
unraveL Defense ministers of five 
participating governments, meet- 
ing m Rome on. May 17, agreed on 
the weight and engine requirements 
for the European Fighter Aircraft 
project, but left unresolved such 
crucial and highly-controvendal 
questions as design leadership and 
woric sharing. In fact, the European 
project .illustrates how the current, 
contradictory conflicts cut across 
governmental and industry' lines in 


Europe and how, in the end, some 
kind of “U5. solution" may yet 
emerge, particularly if France with- 
draws. 

The immediate controversy 
stems from the insistence on design 

leadership that has been made re- 
peatedly by Avions Marcel Das- 
sault-Breguet Aviation, a leading 
participant in the project British 
Aerospace PLC has insisted on 
equal work-sharing among the par- 
ticipants. which will a Iso include d* 
West Germany, Italy and Spain. ** 
Jne Netherlands also is expected to 
loin the venture. 

Both Dassault and B Ac plan fly- 
ing their demonstrator planes next 
ye» to test the latest technology 
and matoials that could be incor- 
porated into the European Fighter 
Aircraft project 

British and West German gov- 
wnment officials have recently in- 
dicated that they are counting on 
tne French government to pressure 
Dassault into cooperating in what 

European solution. ” 
rfi,«'i!, scnior * ?reiKb “tospoce in- 

S2LSf a P!5’ j™ever, said 
that they doubted that the govern- 
mroti mduding the Elysfe Palace, 
would press hard, even though the 
stale with a 46-percenl ini crest, is 
(Continued on Page 14) 





^5 w;. 




. - 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


Page 11 



Vision 

• Tlic perception of something not previously existing, such as 
Rockwell Imenkmoihils imitations in the design ml electrical {fewer 
svstem far the NASA permanently manned Space Station. 

• An anticipation; e.&, of customer needs, like that which led io 
Rockwell's successful bias for design anil huildino. of the NAVSTAR 
GPS satellites and to our winning of the initial O.S. Air Force contract 
for GPS User Eijuipmcnt. 

• A mode of seeing or conceiving; c.g.. in our design, development ami 
production of the t \ S. Air Force B-lB. 



The sharpness of Rockwell International’s 
vision is apparent at the Paris Air Show. And 


in our 




aerospace 

worldwide: The" Space Shuttle orbiters and their 
ocketdyne main engines. Concepts for Advanced Fighter 



and advanced avionics for air transport, 
government and general ayiation. 

Rockwell International’s leadership: It's 
apparent at the Paris Air Show. And in 
everything we do in aerospace. 



Rockwell International 

...where science gets down to business 


Aerospace / Electronics / Automotive 
General Industries /A-B Industrial Automation 









• — 


ss 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 




Hermes, the European competition to the U.S. shuttle. 


Drawing of one of NASA’s projected transatmospheric hypersonic airitaers. 


The Spaceplane: Picking Up Where NASA’s Shuttle Stops 


Ariane on its launching pad. 


Sypwj 


(Continued From Page 7) 

would do. in case of war, the shut- 
tle might be too vulnerable to be 
used at ail. Not only is it subject to 
attack when it is on the launch pad, 
but ail an enemy has to do is take 
out the three launching pads — two 
in Florida and one in California — 
and the shuttle would be grounded 
for a long time. 

The transatmospheric vehicle, 
known as TAV. could skip in and 
out of the atmosphere, providing 
the pilot a chance to photograph 
ground targets, deliver weapons or 
approach enemy satellites in orbit, 
then quickly maneuver away. TAV 
could fly around the world in 90 
minutes! taking off in any weaLher. 
It is been described by one Air 
Force aeronautics official as “a 
killer Air Force weapon system 
that can go out and get the enemy.*' 

An early definition of the Lran- 
satmospheric vehicle was provided 
by Bat telle Memorial Institute, 
with assistance from aerospace 
companies that included Boeing. 


General Dynamics, Lockheed, Mc- 
Donnell Douglas and Rockwell, 
under a 1983 contract from the Air 
Force. Science Applications, Inc, 
of Dayton. Ohio, is continuing the 
work under “Phase 2" of the con- 
tract. which will be completed this 
summer. The Air Force would like 
to move more quickly and spend 
more money on die project, but has 
been held up by Congress, which 
would allow only concept and mis- 
sion studies. 

In early 1985. the transaun as- 
pheric vehicle was brought under 
ihe wing of a new Air Force space- 
plane program, called Advance 
Aerospace Vehicles, that consoli- 
dated work on advanced military 
spaceplanes. 

An orbital aircraft that could 
carry 20,000 pounds (to any orbital 
plane and accelerate directly from 
a runaway to orbit also has been 
studied by the Air Force. Recent 
technology advances in propulsion, 
thermal-protection systems and 
materials and structures have 
changed the attitudes of some mili- 


tary airplane experts, who used to 
think such a plane was not feasible. 
This spaceplane, with a two-man 
crew, might make as many as two 
flights a day into space with high- 
priority cargo on board. 

Another vehicle, dubbed the 
space cruiser, has been studied by 
the Defense Advances Research 
Projects Agency. The cruiser might 
be carried into space in the shuttle 
cargo bay, then released to perform 
a mission and re-enter earth's at- 
mosphere and land on its own. The 
cruiser would be a research craft, 
following in the path or the X- 
aircraft series thaL began more than 
35 years ago. The cruiser would 
have a crew of one or two, wfaa 
would wear pressurized spacesuits. 
That way, the cruiser would not 
have to be pressurized or have a 
life-support system, thereby keep- 
ing costs down. 

The Air Force’s desire to contin- 
ue work in transatmospheric vehi- 
cle technology was given a boost in 
March when the White House is- 
sued a new policy endorsing tran- 


satmospberic research as the third 
LLS. aeronautics goal for the fu- 
ture. The policy directed U.S. aero- 
nautics researchers to work toward 
capability “to routinely cruise and 
maneuver into and out of the atmo- 
sphere with takeoff and landing 
from conventional runways." 

The National Aeronautics and 
Space Adminis tration plays a role 
in demonstrating the feasibility of 
programs like the transatmospheric 
vehicle. Jack Suddreth, NASA as- 
sistant director for aeronautics — 
high-performance aircraft — said 
the agency will spend S5 million 
this year on hypersonic research, 
more than half of which will go 
toward propulsion that will help 
build a research base for future 
aerospace planes. 

The United States is not alone in 
working on new advanced space- 
planes that may be Down by the 
end of the century. The Soviet 
Union has tested its unmanned 
spaceplane four times already. 
Western analysts of the Soviet 
space program disagree on what 


the Russians' ultimate purpose in 
testing the subscale vehicle is, but 
one theory is that it is a small ver- 
sion of a manned vehicle that will 
be launched later. 

Three European nations are ad- 
vancing concepts for new space ve- 
hicles, although they most likely 
will have to narrow the ideas down 
to one and jointly fund a 
live program to get the v 
the drawing boards and into devel- 
opment. The French concept, 
called Hermfe, has received the 
most publicity and probably is the 
most developed. Hermfes, a mini- 
shuule. would transport cargo and 
a crew of up to six to space or the 
space station in the late 1990s. 
France has funded research and 
development for the program to 
date; the European Space Agency 
ministers council said in February 
that it would welcome the invita- 
tion to participate in Hermes. Aer- 
ospatiale and Dassault are compet- 
ing to become the prime contractor 
for Hermfcs, and an announcement 
of the winner is expected soon. 


The West German firm 
MBB/Emo has proposed an un- 
manned vehicle called HORUS 
(Horizontal Reusable Utilization 
System) that would be launched on 
top of Ariane 5. HORUS would 
return to Earth after accomplishing 
Its payload delivery and land auto- 
matically. In the United Kingdom, j*. 
British Aerospace has proposed an ' 
unmann ed spaceplane called HO- 
TOL (Horizontal Take Off and 
Landing). HOTOL could take off 
and land automatically on conven- 
tional airport runways. 

How much will these space- 
planes of tomorrow cost? Solid cost 
estimates for most of the systems 
are not available, but one Air Force 
officer summed it up by saying; “A 
TAV-likc system will be a very, 
very expensive way to opera- 
te. . AffordabOity is a prime driv- 
er." 

Because of the high costs, U.S. 
and European officials will have to 
study the concepts very closely be- v. 
fore making any commitments to ** 
build them. 


f 


is 

Vt 

* ;?»i* 




ftv-i ' 


i" 4“ 


As Avionics Advance , the All-Digital Airplane and Its 'Glass Cockpit 9 Near Reality 


By George C. Larson 

HENDERSONVILLE North 
Carolina — Manufacturers of elec- 
tronics are adapting the newest 
generation of avionics equipment 
to meet the requirements of aircraft 
users, ranging from defense cus- 
tomers to airline and business-fleet 
operators. Customers are becoming 
more selective as they gain experi- 
ence with all-digital avionics sys- 


tems. which introduce an entirely 
new set of operating principles. 

Traditionally, avionics systems 
consisted of radio receivers’ wired 
to individual displays in the cock- 
pit. When the proliferating number 
of displays began to exceed the 
ability of a pilot to scan and act 
upon the information, a movement 
to integrate displays and create a 
pictorial representation of the air- 
plane's position in space got under 


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way. Complex mechanical arrange- 
ments to provide these "pictures” 
brought problems of iheir own. 

The gradual introduction of digi- 
tal computers in navigation and 
flight-control systems increased the 
information flow by an order of 
magnitude. Today, a single twisted 
pair of wires, a "databus," handles 
all the informational traffic that 
used to be carried by enormous 
bundles of individual wires. 

The all-digital airplane is a reali- 
ty: Boeing and Airbus build airlin- 
ers that depend upon central digital 
processors to integrate the signals 
received from navigation “sensors" 
(the new term for the radio receiv- 
er) and to display the navigation 
situation on a cathode-ray tube. 
Military aircraft are already em- 
barking on a second and third gen- 
eration of such digital electronics. 
And in December 1984, the world's 
first all-digital business airplane, a 
British Aerospace 800, entered ser- 
vice. 

How has the customer respond- 
ed? With enthusiasm, largely, but 
with some misgivings as well. For 
one thing, sophisticated end users 
such as airline companies were ini- 
tially bewildered by avionics sys- 
tems driven by software (computer 
codes embedded within memory 
devices) rather than circuits ana 
wires, which formerly defined elec- 
tronic f unctions. 

Airlines that had been accus- 
tomed to supporting their own 
electronics found a strange new 
world inside the new black box. But 
they learned fast. And some initial 
problems in protecting the comput- 
ers and their software codes, the 
heart of digital avionics, from the 
intrusions of power interruptions 
were solved. 

As they have gained experience, 
the airlines have been feeding back 
suggestions to the industry, and the 
next generation of avionics is cur- 
rently being defined, but with some 
of the suggested changes designed 
into them. New systems for the 
next generation of airliners include 
the so-called “all-electric airplane,” 



developing laser-gyro applications 
for military systems. The laser 
gyro, with virtually no moving; 
parts, replaces a complex mechani- 
cal set of ultra-precise, high-speed 
metal gyroscope sensor platforms. 

The laser offers immense gains in 
reliability, offering many thou- 
sands of hours of trouble-free ser- 
vice instead of hundreds of hours 
for the old “iron” wheels. Comput- 
er-based navigation management 
systems are also maintaining the 
pace, but here, the contenders are 
not so dearly set: Scandinavian 
Airlines System recently ordered 
King Radio's KNS-660 long-range 
navigation computer, a system con- 
caved and configured primarily far 
business airplanes, for use on its 
European routes. 

Ratal recently announced a new 
navigation computer and hopes to 
make headway among European 


gradually being introduced as a re- 
placement approach and landing 
aid, offering significant improve- 
ments in the accuracy of the radio 
beam that provides the guiding 
path to the airplane. Satellite-based 
navigation, currently being intro- 
duced to miHtaiy customers, is be- 
ing readied for the dvfl fleet as 
wdL ' 

The 1983 Paris Air Show wit-£ 
nessed the arrival of the first trans- 
Atiantic flight using tire global-po- 
sitioning system satellites as the 
sole means of navigation. A Rock- 
well Co ffins Sabrdmer arrived at 
Le Bourget Airport and taxied to 
vrithin a few feet of a target marker 
as a demonstration of the system's 


AH the major suppliers of elec- 
tronic flight instrument systems, 
sometimes called tire “glass cock- 
pit" because of the use of cathode- 


New systems for die next generation of 
airliners include die so-called w afl-electric 
airplane,” using high-voltage DC current and 
combining inertial navigation and air data 
sensors into a single system. 


■A 


British Aerospace’s Linescan 214 airborne infrared reconnaissance system. 


■rifch AanapoM 


using high-voltage DC oirrent and 
combining inertial navigation and 
air data sensors into a single sys- 
tem. 

In the past year, electronics man- 
ufacturers have encountered stiff- 
ening resistance to the high price of 
the first-generation aQ-digital air- 
line radio systems: the Arinc 700 
family. Since many of these same 


manufacturers also offer lower- 
priced systems for business air- 
planes (smaller turboprops and 
bidets jets), they have responded 
by offering these lower-cost sys- 
tems to the more sophisticated air- 
line and military buyers. 


Complicating the picture is the 
astonish 
airliners 


astonishing popularity of smaller 
airliners such as the Boeing 737 


Creative Financing in a Buyers’ Market 


l Con tin ued From Page 9) 

effort are France's Societe d'Ex- 
ploi ration ei de Constructions Aer- 
onautiques (a subsidiary of Aero- 
spatiale). Fokker B.V. of the 
Netherlands and Canada's Cana- 
dair Ltd. 

Not all the wheeling and dealing 
is limited to new machine. By 
mosl accounts, some of the most 
interesting cases occur in the used- 
ai rcrafi rnarkcu especially among 
the airlines. 

A few of these were described 
during a financial conference last 
month in New York City spon- 
sored by Britain's Airfinance Jour- 
nal. Juan O' Call ah an. founder and 
president of Connecticut-based 
TAl inc.. a transportation analysis 
firm, and a former assistant to'the 
sales chief of Boeing's commercial 
aircraft division, provided most or 
the derails. 

in one case, he said. People Ex- 
press capitalized on confusion in 
ihe aircraft market in late 1982 and 
1983 that stemmed from the bank- 
ruptcy of Bramff Airways. People 
Express. Mr. O’Callahan said, 
“made several superb acquisi- 
tions." One involved an estimated 
53i)-million profit on the purchase 

of 2u Braniff Boeing 727-2005. 
which were built in the mid- 1970s. 


People Express paid an average of 
$4.6 million for each aircraft, which 
was “about 51.5 million below the 
fair market value at subsequent re- 
covery market conditions a year or 
so later,” he said. 

In April 1983. People Express 
also leased a 1979 Boeing 747-200B 
from RranifC “at an extraordinary 
lease rate for this model of only 
S250.000 per month." Mr. O'Callj- 
han said. The leasing agreement 
also gave People Express the option 
to buy the 747 and a spare engine 
for about S25 million. Within a 
year. “Northwest and several other 
international airlines” were search- 
ing for similar models. Mr. O'Cal- 
laiian said. People Express exer- 
cised its option to buy the Braniff 
model at the S 25- million price, then 
“sold the aircraft to Northwest for 
about S39 million late last year." 

Northwest, last year, engineered 
a deal of its own. The Minneapolis- 
based airline struck a deal witb 
Boeing to buy two 747-200s that 
originally were ordered and built 
for Braniff. which never took deliv- 
ery because of its financial prob- 
lems. Northwest, according to Mr. 
O'Callahan, paid S61.4 million for 
each of the 747s. “These essentially 
brand-new airplanes, with an 
equivalent 1954 delivery price of 


S7S milli on, would have had a cur- 
rent ‘used’ fair market value of S66 
million, according to our analytical 
model, 1 ' be said. 

European airlines have their own 
success stories, according to Mr. 
O'Callahan. 

He recounted how Italy's Alita- 
lia sold to Federal Express three 
DC-10-30s that were built in the 
early 1970s. The price was “over 
S25 million each, which we would 
have determined to be about 25 
percent over the fair market value 
at the time of the transaction." 

United and Scandinavian Air- 
lines also “pulled off a strategic 
buying coup” Iasi year, when they 
acquired five former Laker DC-HV 
30s. He said they paid S25 million 
for each of ihe aircraft. “We place 
the fair market value of these 
young, low-time aircraft at $31.6 
million each at the time of the 
transaction, and their value will be 
moving up to 539 million as the 
larger widebody market continues 
lo firm up further in 1986 to 1987." 
be said. 

As long as such deals are avail- 
able in the used-aircraft market, 
manufacturers will be forced to 
continue developing innovative 
ways to attract buyers for their new 
models, according to industrv ob- 


family, McDonncll-Douglas MD- 
80, and tire Fokker F-28 deriva- 
tives. Hailing from an older tech- 
nology that discourages 
“all-digital" avionics, these air- 
planes are natural targets for mote 
flexible electronic suites designed 
for business airplanes that have a 
mix of digital and older analog cir- 
cuits. 

One new system finding wide ac- 
ceptance is the ring-laser gyro. 
Honeywell and Litton are the ma- 
jor contenders in the highly com- 
petitive airline market, while a 
number of technology bouses are 


customers. Expansion of Loran-C 
navigation, particularly in North 
America ana the Middle East, has 
at least partly blunted the more 
expensive Omega navigation sys- 
tem; Omega's trump card is its vir- 
tual global coverage, compared, 
with the regional Loran-C 
“chains," which blanket an area 
closer to their transmitter. 

The next step in navigation will 
be complete “flight management," 
or computer direction of the navi- 
gation situation in all axes of flight 
A computer can even equip the 
pilot to handle the fourth dimen- 
sion: time. With such advanced 
systems, currently in tire p lanning 
stages, an airplane can come within 
moments of touching down at its 
destination at a precise time set in 
advance of tire flight. This develop- 
ment is eagerly anti ci pated as one 
possible solution to current capaci- 
ty problems at the world’s congest- 
ed terminal airports. 


- Microwave landing systems are 
ray tubes in place d 1 mechanical 
instruments, say they have been ap- 
proached by amipe manufacturers 
and operators who are interested in 
the smaller, lower-cost systems in- 
tended for business airplanes. The 
■ smalle r sets give up very little in 
features and performance while of- 
fering a significantly lower pur- 
chase price. At the same ti me , a 
number of manufacturers are intro- 
ducing replacement digital naviga- 
tion system that are “plug-com- 
patible’’ in the Boeing 727, which is 
still the dominant auplane in the 
wadd fleet. 

Right now, the toughest sell for 
th e avio nics houses arc fud-saving^ 
computers developed when the cost 
d fuel was on an upward spiral 
Airline customers are having trou- 
ble justifying their purchase in a 
period of relatively stable jet fuel 
prices, and with no threat of price 
increases in sigh t 


Make an appointment 
to see where the future of 
executive jets is headed. 

The new Gulfstream IV is at Le Bourget for the Paris Air Show 
through June 9. And if you want to see what the next generation 
of the world’s most experienced executive jet aircraft offers, make 
sure you see the Gulfstream IV. 

You’ll step into the full-size, fully outfitted mockup of the largest 
longest cabin of any corporate jet, and sit in a cockpit more advanced 
than a commercial airliner. 

To arrange your visit, contact Joseph E. Anckner, Vice President 
Gulfstream International Marketing, at 83-68-560 (Paris) * 

between 0930-1630 hours. By appointment only, please. 


May 3& through June 9j,19&5. At Le Bourse! Airport during 

Salons htematiofiaux.de rAeronautiqueetdeL’Espacer 


a: 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 3D, 1985 


Page 13 



A SPECIAL REPORT ON AVIATION 


Smaller-Aircraft Industry Takes a Nose Dive 


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HENDERSONVILLE, North 
Carolina — General aviation, a cat- 
egory of smaller airplanes far per- 
sonal and commercial use, is in the 
middle of a severe downturn. The 
casualties include everything from 
perennial classics to new entries: 
the Commander turboprop twin, 
once a big seller, the Aerostar, at 

one time the fastest piston-powered 
light airplane in the world; the Per- 
egrine, which was to have been the 
world’s first single-engine business 
jet. 

In its first quarter of 1985, gener- 
al aviation experienced the worst 
decline in deliveries since 1946 . 
One manufacturer now offers only 
half the product line it had a few 
years ago. And forecasts for the 
coming year promise Htti* im- 
provement. 

The smallest general aviation air- 
planes are trainers powered by jus- 
ton en gines and the largest are ' 
heavy jets capable of spanning con- 
tinents and «»ww And although 
the airplanes powered by turtxrfans 
and turboprops have managed to 
sell at a rate sufficient for survival, 
the global downturn in sales of gen- - 
eral aviation aircraft that has now 
dragged on for almost five years 
has even nude its impact felt in the 
heavy ranks. The sales of used 
planes now overshadow the once 
brisk activity in sales of new ma- 
chines. 

The chairman of (Tawna, Russell 
Meyer, recently told financial ana- 
lysts that turbine aixoafu mice re- 
sponsible for 35 percent of his corn- 


’s business, now account far 
percent. Turbine-powered 
planes bring higher prices, which 
has enab led Cessna to amrimne its 
drop in revenues despite the drastic 
reduction in units delivered. 

In the' early 1970s, despite the 
“oil shock” and recessionary forces 
that struck almost every other seg- 
ment of aerospace^ general aviation 
remained buoyant, setting ales re- 
cords year after year and gaming a 
reputation as a business that was 
truly “recesson-proof” Regarded 
as a cyclic industry, general avia- 
tion has weathered periodic slow- 
downs before and bounced back cm 
schedule. What happened this time 
to create such gloom? 

Most experts befieve the causes 
center on economics. Some cite the 
rise in price of new airplanes at the 
same time that tax allowances, 
vdrich had eased aircraft purchases, 
were threatened, creating a climate 
of uncertainty. In the early stages 
of the current downturn, the manu- 
facturers pointed to psychological 
factors, primarily the feared effects 
of the recession. But as recently as 
mid-April, Janies Walsh, president 
of Beech Aircraft in Kansas, noted 
ib«t uncertainty, tins time over 
changes in lax regulations, had cost 
his company orders for 45 business 
airplanes with an estimated value 
of $81 miHio n. 

Others note that the massive pro- 
duction of the boom times, when 
sales of 1QJJ00 airplanes by mem- 
bers of the U-S.-based General Avi- 


ation Manufacturers Association 
was considered a slow year, may 
have created a pool of relatively 
young airframes that could theoret- 
ically satisfy the buyers for many 
years. The association* current 
forecast calls for production this 
year of only 2,438 units worth be- 
tween $1.8 billion and $1.9 billion 
— and that may not be enough to 
sustain the entire industry in its 
present form. 

Hardest hit of all are the person- 
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Helicopter Sales in Downdraft 


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(Contiaaed From Page 10) 

chi, the Italian Agusta firm and 
Britain’s Westland Helicopters, 
and many have commented that 
the company established its own 
toughest competitors. 

“Yes, we really got the world 
- helicopter market going with our 
original licensing agreements,” said 
the former Sikorsky director of 
public relations, Robert G JEL Car- 
roll 3d, “but with what are now 20- 
year-old designs. Helicopter tech- 
nology is a very complex thing , and 
in a market mat already has too 
many people in it, you want to pair 
up with somebody rather than 
competing with them." 

Today, Sikorsky is fanning inter- 
national research-and-devdop- 
ment partnerships with 





Wit 


of 


'tided 


techno- 

, center of each project yet at 
the same time allies itself with over- 
_ seas companies that can both con- 
tribute to Sikorsky’s objectives 
'And, in return for jobs, aid m the 
opening of their own domestic 
markets. 

“There are some revolutions 
rrwiwng in helicopter desig n , main- 
ly in the areas of speed, ifight-coa- 
trol i mpr ovements and craqxste 
structures, and what we’re saying 
overseas is, This is a two-way 
street; get with us and you can 
sharein this market and these revo- 
lutions’,” Mr. Carroll said. 

Sikorsky’s most important high- 
technology project is the prepara- 
tion of its prototype Tor the US. 
Army LHX competition, which 
could provide the winner with a' 
contract for 5,000 to more than 
6.000 oew-generatian utility scout 
■g and attack aircraft and could wdl 
T be the biggest single aircraft buy 
ever made by the military. 


has flight-tested a heli- 
copter with an airframe made en- 
tirety of Kevlar and carbon-fiber 
c omposit es, and the company feds 
it is the industry leader in tins vital 
field. It is likety that the LHX win 
be largely made of composites. 

A rough LHX competitor will be 
Hughes Helicopters, which is allied 
with McDonndl Douglas and has a 
lucrative contract to manufacture 
the U A Army’s AH-64 Apache at- 
tack hdicopter. “That’s a big pro- 
gram with a lot of international 
possibilities," said Mr. Mack of 
Hug hes. “A number of countries 

beficopter, and tSercb’keen inter- 
est in the Apache, especially in Is- 
rad and Saudi Arabia.” 

Mr. Made said that largely be- 
cause Hughes is pan of a militaiy- 
airimer company with a voy strong 
overseas marketing organization, 
“we are moving from bong a neo- 
phyte to being a very effective in- 
ternational marketer.” 

Bell Helicopters has been finding 
it difficult to sell overseas in the 
face of astrongUR. dollar. “It’s a 
very competitive market,” Mr. 
Bosch sain, “and if s getting to the 
point where everyone is looking for 
coprodnction or offsets, some kind 
of deal where they get a piece of the 
action in return lor the dollars they 
have to spend over here.” 

Bdlhas also been put slightly off 
balance, by die recent announce- 
ment that its parent conglomerate, 
Textron, has put the profitable he- 
Kcopter company up for sale, in 
order to help raise the SI bfllkm h 
needs to cover its purchase of a 
fellow conglomerate, Avon, last 
December. .. 

Bell lost out cmhe China sale to 
Sikorsky, bat the company is de- 
lighted to be setting up a coopera- 


tive program with the government 
of Canada, which wants to estab- 
lish a domestic hehcbpte industry. 
A Canadian Bell manufacturing 
and office facility is scheduled to 
open this October in Quebec. 

“We’re providing a new family 
of light-twin betimptos that w 31 
be manufactured in Canada," Mr. 
Rcisch said, “and there will be fd- 
bw-on models with increasing Ca- 
nadian content, eventually to be 
completely designed as well as 
manufactured in Canada." The 
third in that line, the Bell Model 
440, “will be virtually an all-com- 
posite aircraft," he said. 

Bell, with a Hue of somewhat 
tmaflgr helicopters than SkOTSlty 
can offer, seems to be having slight- 
ly better feck in the civil mmfr et. 
“The executive market is good," 
Mr. Reisch said. “It’s coming bade 
quite wed, and so is the govern- 
ment-agency market, anything 
from feral police up to federal reg- 
ulatory agencies, which accounted 
for about 20 percent of our com- 
mercial sales in the U.S. last 
year. . . It’s the dedicated petro- 
leum-support aircraft that haven’t 
gotten back to where they should 
be." 

Nor has Bell ignored foreign 
markets, having recently complet- 
ed delivery of two draen Cobra 
gunships to Pakistan with another 
batch currently being built for Jor- 
dan. Still, sales are soft “Fd say 
anything over four or five bdicop- 
tere is a petty large sale. The ability 
of people to get financing, the 
strength of the dollar ... money 
just isn’t available," Mr. Rriscn 
said. “Helicopters are pretty expen- 
sive, and it’s the same dd stray: 
They’re buying four or five when 
they might have been buying 10 or 
20 under different circumstances.” 




m 0 



buyers. With fewer new plots in 
training, their fixture rnarfref ap- 
pears bleak. And their prices have 
risen to the point where buyers per- 
ceive them as out of reach, with 
volume so low, manufacturers 
point to the rising cost of product 
liability insurants premiums — 
some have doubled in a single year 
— as the force behind price in- 
creases, which, in turn, lead to few- 
er sales. Thus, fewer numbers of 
airplanes must bear an iner**cing 
share of a growing burden. One 
proposal currently bang offered 
would limit the manufacturers’ li- 
ability on airplanes older 
some agreed-upon age. 

U.S. manufacturers, for years 
confident of seOing about a third of 
their output in export markets, 
have watched tins business slow to 
a trickle as high prices, combined 
with the strength of the ddlar, have 
priced the light airplane too high 
fra- offshore buyers. Cessna, with 
its own affiliate m France and mar- 


ket strength in areas such as South- 
east Asia, said its exports are half 
of what they once were. (The com- 
pany is currently in talks with Chi- 
na concerning possible joint pro- 
duction of some of us utility 
airplanes.) 

Some limited sales to military 
and government customers have 
bdpedto bridge the loss d oviHan 
sales at Learjct, which leased a ver- 
sion of its Model-35 to the U.S. Air 

Force, and Cessna, which delivered 

a framer version of its Citation jet 
to the navy and supplied sensor 
planes to the Customs Service. 
Gulfstream Aerospace also dipped 
into government markets, with a 
VIP transport for the air force. 

The Canadian and West German 
governments recently bought Can- 
adair Challenger business jets, and 
the French maritime patrol has 
new Dassault Gentian jets. The 
United States manufactures most 
of die world’s supply of general 
aviation airplanes, with a single ex- 
ception: the business jcl Aircraft 
designed for executive transport 
are built by Canada, Britain, 
France, Israel and Japan, making 
this business truly international. 

The U.S. airframe manufactur- 
ers complain that their overseas 


tumble, and Beech has slowed 
down some of its development pro- 
grams, In February 1984, Lear 
Siegler acquired Piper Aircraft and 
almost immediately b eg an to con- 
solidate its farifiues to meet a dra- 
matically reduced forecast of only 
600 units for 1985, basically un- 
changed from 1984. 

. In announcing the figure, Robert 
Wyma, Lear Service president 
in charge of Piper, said, “it doesn't 
appear that the market is going to 
come back as quickly as everyone 
would tike it to, and it will probably 
never comeback as strong as it did 
in the past" 

Most industry managers are now 
beginning to think the change may 
be per mane nt ^ that general aviatitm 
manufacturers face a future erf 
slow, essentially flat, growth. All 
the companies have scaled back in 
cutting plant, equipment and 
manpower. The p 


port* that is denial to them, but 
makers of engines , electronics and 
systems are more cautious: Their 
products are installed on most air- 
craft manufactured oulide the 
United States. 

A downturn of such unprece- 
dented depth and duration has had 
profound effects on the manufac- 
turing companies and the execu- 
tives who lead them. Beech Aircraft 
was acquired by Raytheon just be- 
fore the sales of airplanes began to 


process of inven- 
tory redaction < finally began to 
work by midyear. In March, Lear- 
jet resumed umrted production of 
its rivfl Model 35/36 after a total 
shutdown of civil-aircraft produc- 
tion that began in September 1984. 
In May, It resumed production erf 
the larger Model 55. But both pro- 
duction rales are low. 

One theory says that buyers are 
waiting for next-generation air- 
planes: Beech’s Starship and the 
Gates-Piaggjo GP-180 — both 
high-performance turboprops. An- 
other theory says “pent-up de- 
mand” wiD rescue the industry in 
the near future. But the general- 
aviation manufacturers, burned in 
the past by such predictions, ap- 
pear ready to stay lean and concen- 
trate on surviving over the long 

haul. 

— GEORGE C LARSON 



The Diamond IA 
from Mitsubishi, top, 
and the firm's 
Solitaire model, at 
bottom. 


General Aviation Growth 


SALES 

69 


1985 

S 

batons 


42 








22 




12 

1 1 



1976-85 1986-95 

Aircraft 


1976 85 1986-95 

Enginoa and parts 

Pion & Wtonftv 


Highlights of High Technology. 

MBB, German Partner in International Programs 
at the 36th Paris Air Show. 



MBB proudly presents state-of-the-art technology and products 
at the Paris Air Show - our contributions to aerospace and 
defense engineering progress, safety, and operational economy. 
The MBB twin-jet helicopter family reveals progress through 
excellence in rotor technology. One member of this family, the 
BK 117, earns world-wide renown in rescue missions under the 

most difficult operational conditions. 

Our intimate involvement in the future of 
the Airbus - and the future of the TA 11, 
the European long-range aircraft of the 
90’s incorporating maximum comfort, 
performance, and economy - is legendary. 
An example is our weight- arid fuel-saving 
CFRP vertical tail unit. A glance into the near future is provided by reconnaissance 
drones and by the JF-90 fighter plane. 

The competence of the European space industry is demonstrated by MBB’s 
contributions to the Ariane V launcher; by the free^flying, retrievable space carrier 
Eureca; by the first reusable satellite SPAS-Q1, and by Columbus, the European • 
contribution to the American space station project. 

MSB's state-of-the-art ’High-Tech' for today - and tomorrow - is close enough to 
touch at the Paris Air Show, building 1 A. 



MBB 




Aerospatiale’s SA-365NA Dauphin 2. 


Partner 

in international 
programs 

Messerschmitl-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH B.R 801109 8000 Munich 80 
Telephone 089 / 60 00-0 Telex 52370 mt>bd 









Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERAID TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON AVIATION 


Eurocontrol Data Bank to Keep an Eye on the Sky 


By Michael Metcalfe 

PARIS —For air-traffic control- 
lers, the sky has its limits. 

Airline operators, pilots and pas- 
sengers all know the kind of prob- 
lems associated with air- traffic 
congestion and restrictions: dis- 
ruptions, delays, inconvenience 
and frustration. 

As the age of mass air uavd 
dawned in the early 1970s, best 
characterized as the “charter 
boom," so the problems became 
more acute and required speedy 
resolution. Over the past decades, 
several international organizations 
have sprung up to deal with these 
headaches, assess and engineer im- 
provements in airspace organca- 
tiou, coordinate ana define traffic 
flow. These include the Interna- 
tional Air Transport Association 
and the International Civil Avia- 
tion Organization. 

“In recent years, air-traffic 
movements over Europe have expe- 
rienced serious delays and disorga- 
nization. particularly as a result of 
an imbalance between air-traffic 
demand and the traffic-handling 
capacity of different parts of the 
air-uaffic control system," said 
Brian Martin, who heads ihe opera- 
tion bureau of Eurocontrol's cen- 
tral data bank in Brussels. Euro- 
control is the nickname given to the 
European Organization for the 
Safety of Air Navigation. 

Set up in 1960 as an intergovem- 


ment organization, Eurocontrol 
has seven member states: Belgium, 
France, West Germany, Ireland, 
Britain, the Netherlands and Lux- 
embourg. Its 10 cooperating states 
include the United States, Canada 
and most of the Nordic and South- 
ern European countries. . 

Eurocontrol was entrusted with 


a total of 200 aircraft operators, 
Mr. Martin said. 

Evaluation of the system’s oper- 
ationals trial is contmumg through- 
out this vear but, as Mr. Martin 
noted, “While itis too early to draw 
conclusions as to the operational 
value of the CDB [central data 
bank] output, there is every mdica- 


personnel were able to assess, in aa 
international forum, their day-to- 
day problems and to devise solu- 
tions for them that could restore 
orderly traffic flow, reduce eco- 
nomic penalties and improve pub- 
lic service." 

Since that date, a series of infor- 
mal nwwring s have taken place and 


TTie area encompasses Western Europe, part of the East Hoc and 
the southern Mediterranean. 


the creation and testing of a central 

data hnnk in coordination with Eu- 
ropean office of the International 
Civil Aviation Organization 
(ICAO). The data bank, which is 
expected to become fully opera- 
tional in 1986, collects and coordi- 
nate air- traffic data to smooth the 
management of traffic flow and 
provide information about capaci- 
ty and expected demand for air 
routes through Europe. 

The area scheduled to come un- 
der the data bank's scrutiny en- 
compasses all of Western Europe, 
part of the East bloc and the south- 
ern Mediterranean. Data will be 
derived from a multitude of 
sources, including international 
aviation authorities, tour operators 
and charter operators. 

Currently, the data bank in- 
cludes 38,000 pages of information 
on scheduled flights and 29,000 
pages on nonscfaeduled flights from 


don that it will achieve the objec- 
tives sought." 

Civil aviation authorities in Eu- 
rope are also stepping up tiwr ad- 
mmistrative efforts to avoid over- 
loading of the air-traffic control 

^"Itwas at the initiative of France 
that ICAO convened the first infor- 
mal flow-control meeting in its Eu- 
ropean offioein Paris in 1970," said 
rhrigtian Eigl, a technician officer 
at the organization. 

The group was set up in 1944, as 
an agency of the United Nations, to 
promote safe and orderly develop- 
ment of the world’s civil aviation 
sphere. It sets international stan- 
dards and regulations and serves as 
a of communication and co- 
operation in all aspects of avfl avi- 
ation among its 155 member states. 

p- ^menring on the first meeting 
, Mr. Eigl said: “This was the Fust 
time that ATC [air-traffic control] 


they now embrace representatives 
covering the entire European re- 
gion from France to the Soviet 
Union and from Scandinavia to the 
Mediterranean. 

The organization views the 
forthcoming Seventh European 
Regional Air Navigation Meeting 
in Malaga, Spain, tom Nov. 12 to 
23, as an important stepping stone 
in efforts by its member stales to 
develop air- navigation systems in 
an orderly manner. 

On the MAlaga agenda will be a 
review of efforts so far to solve 
European air-traffic congestion 
and disruption, an assessment of 
improvements in airspace organi- 
zation and traffic flow in the re- 
gion. 

As the organization said: “With 
its airspace controlled by some 30 
states, Europe has had particular 
problems in coordinating the air- 


traffic How, leading, in past yeara, 
to congestion and restrictions on 
traffic to maintain safety. It was, in 
fact, not exceptional for passengers 
to experience departure delays of 
six hoars or more in London or 
Stockholm, for flights to Barcelo- 
na, Rome or Athens and rice 
versa." 

Overall, the agency assesses from 
the evidence of data it has received 
that air-traffic flow in Europe has 
significantly improved over the 
past several years, although much 
remains to be done. 

The Malaga meeting as well as 
reviewing the curreni situation, wfll 
also allow civil aviation officials 
participating in the forum to dis- 
cuss longer-term trends to ensure 
that advanced technologies are in- 
troduced progressively in Europe 
to the international aviation com- 
munity’s benefit- 

participants will also examine 
the step-by-step implementation of 
an integrated service dubbed Air 
Traffic Flow Management, aimed 
at eliminating, through early plan- 
ning and coordination, the need for 

imposing restrictions on flow. 

“These activities fall into a time- 
frame of between several months 
and some 24 hours before the com- 
mencement of a fligjht,” Mr. Eigl 
said. As part of the service’s objec- 
tives, close cooperation with air- 



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Brussels-based central dam bank of 


uves, UUJC UJUJKJOUUU nun on- 1 _ — --- ;; 

craft operators is maintained to en- Eurocontrol helps significantly 
sure that operational flight with its steady scream of rnfonna- 
pl ar ming continues efficiently. The tion. All these efforts, all of which 


hetoi Cu>*-UquM 'IHT 

: high on the agenda of l^gtoeaaCTU^forEui^es ^ 
a meeting, are amtribul- airline operators, pilo . . „ J0 

improved air navigation controllers and. ultimately the p 


IfHC arc umumut ouiu«v 

mg to an improved air navigation oontro 
system gwefimpaiBBTig Europe and sengpr 


Tensions Threatening ABed Ventures 


■ ' 


rK v- 

•- 


CONTRIBUTORS 


CHRISTY CAMPBELL, managing editor of Janes Publishing 
lompany from 1978-82, now runs Campbell Rawkins ut Lcradon, 


(Continued From Page 10} 
Dassault’s largest angle sharehold- 
er in terms of voting rights. 

“The French government cannot 
and, in my view, will not, force 
Marcel Dassault to cooperate on 
this project if he doesn't want 
to. . .and he doesn't, except on his 
terms.” said an executive with close 
ties to the company. Mr. Dassault, 
who is 93, founded the company 
and was desi g nin g and selling his 
aircraft before World War U. With 
his family, Mr. Dassault owns 50 
percent of the company but more 
important, as a wealthy publisher, 
member of the National Assembly, 
with dose ties to the Socialist gov- 
ernment, Mr. Dassault is one of 
France's most influential business 
leaders. A 1983 biography written 
by Pierre Assouline, a French jour- 
nalist, noted that since the end of 
the 1950s, Mr. Dassault has been 
“the real minister of French avia- 
tion." 

Nevertheless, British and West 
Goman officials, speaking private- 
ly, said last week that the govern- 


ments and companies in the Torna- 
do project — plus Spain — might 
proceed if France pulled out “It 
would be a shame, but not a trage- 
dy, if that happened; and it may." a 
West German industry executive 
said on Friday. 

Meanwhile, Domier GmbH of 


West Germany and Northrop 
Coro, of the United States have 


Corp. of the United States have 
continual joint study of a new tac- 
tical fighter for the 1990s for West 
German military requirements. Ac- 
cording to Italian sources quoted at 
the Rone meeting, Bonn officials 
said that they would move toward 
“an American solution" if the Eu- 
ropean Fighter Aircraft project did 
not materialize soon. 


West German industry sources 
on Friday said that that could in- 
volve McDonnell Douglas devel- 
oping a fighter jointly with Messer- 
schmitt-Balkow-Blohm, West 
Germany’s largest aerospace com- 
pany, which the two companies 
have already discussed. Or it could 
involve an outright purchase by the 

riA frt nn Air hnmi rtf ft I I Q 


fighter, such as the McDonnell 
Douglas-Northrop F-1S, which 
could be fitted with European or 
US. engines. 

“There are so many projects be- 
ing talked about, and not enough 
money to do them all," a German 
executive based in Munich said. 
“And 1 think you will hear more 
talk before you see action." 

Meanwhile, trans-Atlantic ven- 
tures that were planned previously 
will dominate some of the news at 
the air show. For example. James 
Beggs, NASA’s administrator, and 
Reimar LQst, the European Space 
Agency’s director general, were 
scheduled to sign a memorandum 
of understanding on June 3. That 
will establish exchange of informa- 
tion and technical research cover- 
ing the agency's participation in the 
U.S. manned space station, a $12- 
billion project due for launching in 
1994. 

SNECMA, France’s state-owned 
engine maker, and General Electric 
Co. of the United States, were plan- 

nino in atm ram ra a inint develop- 


ment of GE's verson of the prop- 
fan, which it caffs UDF, for 
“unducted fan." GE and Boeing 
Co. of the United States have al- 
ready tested the UDF for possible 
use in Boeing's new, 1 50-sea ter pas- 
senger plane that the company 
might build in the early 1990s. 

Hamilton Standard, a division of 
United Technologies Corp„ and 
Rolls-Royce Ltd. of Britain, also 
have propfan projects under way, 
claiming that the new engines 
could result in fuel savings of be- 
tween 30 and 50 percent 

The Boring aircraft project de- 
tails of which are expected to be 
outlined by the company at its 
news conference at the air show on 
Thursday, would compete directly 
with McDonnell Douglas^ project 
being developed with Acrifalia, as 
well as with the Airbus A320, a 
similar-sized aircraft But the A- 
320 is already being built and the 
first deliveries to Air France are 
scheduled for 1988. It however, 
will be powered by turbofan en- 
gines- 




3 


VAJUliAUiy UUU1 I7MTUL, m _ u l 

which publishes books on aerospace and on popular culture. He nas 
written a number of books on defense and broadcasts on defense 
topics on the BBC Today program. Panorama, File on Four and 
Channel Four News. 

ROBERT COCKBURN is a journalist based in London who 
specializes in the Middle East and aviation. 




fr 


THERESA FOLEY, based in Washington, is managing editor or 
Space Commerce Bulletin, a newsletter about commercial space 
activities. 


I t, •' -,v 

tv Vi 

% * 


AXEL KRAUSE is the International Herakl Tribune’s staff eco- 
nomic correspondent 


» ' 



GEORGE G LARSON, who is based in North Carolina, is techni- 
cal <rd i Tn r for Business A Commercial Aviation Magazine. 


MICH AEL METCALFE is a Paris-based financial journalist. 




mi 


LEW TOWNSEND is financial editor of Aviation Daily m Wash- 
ington. 

RICHARD S. TUTTLE is managing editor of Aerospace Daily and 
Aerospace ONLINE in Washington. 


MICHAEL L. VIRTANEN, who is based in Washington, is asso- 
ciate editor of Travel Weekly. 


The 535E4 Rolls-Royce engine for die Boeing 757. 


STEPHAN WnJONSON is a New York-based magazine and film 
writer. . 


r - ,' -*>’ * V -*• i ' • - . 




Uinvr*iA 






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H, 













W - * : 


mm 




IS 



ii: : ; ii. 




Statistics Index 


AMEX prteff P-21 
AMEX M9WW4P21 
NYSE Defeat p.14 
.ftYSE bfeWlnw P.1S 
* Cono dto n stocks P 22 
Currency rates P.1S 
ComnotailM P.79 
DMdmoc P.18 


Eorntntn marts P.lfl . 
FltM iota notes P .19 
Safe! m orta ls PJ5 
Interest rates P.7S 
Mortal summary P.16 
Options P.18 

OTC stack p *0 
other momm PJ 2 


fleralt«Sribunc. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 16. 


THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


* 


Page 15 


A 





'• h- 


WALL STREET WATCH 

Stocks Avoid Stampede, 
Keeping Market Bullish 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribme 

P ARIS — When Charles O. Finley was trying to sefl the 
Oakland A’s some years bade he complained that too 
many potential buyers of the baseball team were coming 
by who “wore big hats but didn’t own any cattle. 
Bunkhousc bragging is also a feature of Wall Street, and with the 
averages hitting” aS-time highs lately, you’d think die stock 
market would be talking big now and baying drinks for every- 
body. But Wall Street stepped across L300 cm the Dow with 
hardly a swagger. 

“The main reason for the lack of excitement on both sides of 
the Atlantic is the way it sort of crept up on us,” commented Alex 
Harnmond-Chainbas, deputy - . 

chairman of Ivory & Snooe, ran- u . • 

Scotland's largest investment WaD SttCCl tops are 

management firm with $2L5 
billion in assets, half of which 
are invested on Wall Street 
“But it's healthier this 
way,” he added. “A nickd- 
and-dime advance is better 
than a megabock explosion 
that blows off.” 

He also said that fear of a v 
firm expects will occur — continues to 
siasm toward U.S. stocks. 

Mr. HammondrOunribers is optimistic toward Wall Street 
But he thinks the two “key” dements for strong stock market 
performance in the longer term — substantial reduction of the 
federal budget and true tax reform — will be difficult to corral. 

“Vested interests always seem to override the national interest 
in Washington," be said. “But if you think these two things are 
going to work out, you can get very bullish about Wall Street” 


generated. We’re a 
long way from that.’ 


dollar. — something the 
enthn- 


H 


IS favored stock groups are regional banks, property- 
casualty i ngnranry companies and the “big, strong flrr - 
fines: AMR, UAL andLtelia." 

“You have to be very clever to make money in technology 
stocks, so avoid them,” he added. “There’s excessive capacity in 
. .. the U.S. to produce black boxes." 

John Meaddson, head of Dean Winer’s market analysis group, 
describes Wall Street’s mood as “neutral or normal — and that’s 
bullish." 

In early May, just before the 60-point climb by the Dow 
beyond 1300, hie found sentiment “cautious.” It prompted him to 
predict the rally because be observes that, at least eventually, the 
' market moves against prevailing opinion. 

“Wall Street tops are emotionally generated, when people are 
saying ‘get me in' as prices surge,” he said. “We’re a long way 
from that now.” 

Lee H. Idleman of Newberger & Berman concurred, noting: 
“The market has benn making new highs bat doing so very 
reluctantly." His weft-known “greed index,” which gets high at 
stock peaks, still shows the market is not “overheated,” he said. 

Michael Sherman, chief investment strategist at Shearson Leh- 
man/ American Express, also detects a general lack of euphoria 
about Wall Street’s high plains drifting . “People are saying the 
'stock market is too high and cash is too low,” he said in a 
reference to the apparently meager level of funds available to 
institutions for additional investment in stocks, . 

But while Wall Street now “lades a vision of what the future 
c* will be," he thinks the bullish perception will grow that tax 
~^Z reform wfll-be -enacted and ^rove “very stimulative” to the 
economy. “It would move revenue from corporate cash fknrinto 
individual cash flow and individuals will spend it,”. he said. 
“Then corporations will get it bade in the form of increased sales 
and profits." 

Mr. Sherman also believes investors are “confused” about 
what stocks thuey want to buy because of the uncertainties they see 
ahead Issues that have risen substantially, such as interest- 
sensitive and food stocks, ^ear overextended to them, he noted 
“Then you mention a stock tike Ford that’s selling at three times 
earnings and they say, ‘It’s cheap for a reason.’ ” 

William LeFervre of Purcdl Graham raised the elevating ques- 
(Comtaued on Ptage 19, CoL 6) 


E ££* • 

fficicncy 

Factor Off 

InlLS. 

Productivity Fell 
At a 2.5% Rate 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — VS. busi- 
ness productivity declined at a 15- 
percenl annual rate in the first 
quarter of 1985, the biggest drop in 
more Lhan three years, the Labor 
Department reported Wednesday. 

The report also showed that unit 
labor costs soared to an 8.1 -percent 
annual rale, the largest iiKT ease 
since the fourth quarter of 1981. 

The decline in productivity, 
meanwhile, was the biggest since a 
4.4-percent decline in the fourth 
quarter of 1981. It represented a 
sharp downward revision from the 
originally reported ate of 1 2 per- 
cent in the first quarter. 

Wednesday’s figures reflect a 
general slowing down in the econo- 
my, but also some obsolescence in 
industrial plants and equipment, 
said Michael Evans, an analyst who 
runs his own economic forecasting 
firm in Washington. Investment in 
new technology has been strong in 
computers and the auto industry, 
bat la gging in some other areas. 

Poor productivity suggests lower 
profits or higher inflation and 
“what we have seen in the first 
quarter so far is that profits took a 
real hit,” said Mr. Evans. Many 
companies were unable to pass 
along cost increases in the face of 
weak demand, he said, but suggest- 
ed that wtH change. 

Productivity measures produc- 
tion efficiency in terms of the vol- 
ume of goods and services the econ- 
omy puts out in an hour of paid 
working time. 

The seasonally adjusted figures 
represented a worse showing than 
last month's preliminary data, 
which concluded that first-quarter 
productivity fell .1 2 percent while 
unit labor costs rose 73 percent 


An Industry Down at the Heels 

Imports Take Toll 
Of U.S. Shoemakers 


By Pamela G. Hollie 
New York Tima Senda 

NEW YORK -In the 1920s, nearly 250 shoe 
factories dotted the landscape of Lynn, Massachu- 
setts, which called itself the “shoe capital” of the 
region just north of Boston. 

“My dad used to tell me that at hmch time he'd 


come pouring out of the factories like ants," said 
Richard Rothbard, president of Barry Manufac- 
turing Inc., Lynn's only surviving shoe factory. 

These days Lynn’s largest employer is General 
Electric Co., and the city has shrunk to about 
78,000 people from its peak of more than 100,000. 
In an industry that is rapidly contracting, Barry 
has survived because it is small, specialized and 
highly automated. It makes baby shoes, about 
7,000 pairs a day, using 14 computerized stitching 
machines. All of Bally’s shoes are produced in the 
United States. 

The International Trade Commission ruled last 
Wednesday that U-S. shoe manufacturers face “se- 
rious injury” from imports. The domestic produc- 
ers are seeking quotas to reduce imports and guar- 
antee them 50 percent of the market The industry 
is expected to get some relief when the agency 
meets next month. 

The footwear troubles parallel those of other 
labor-intensive industries, such as textiles and ap- 
parel Unlike those products, however, shoes do 
not have import quotas. As a result, the 
dollar has hdped lift shoe imports to 72 percent 
U.S. consumption, up from 50 percent in 1980, 

Although the nation's total footwear sales rose 
7.7 percent last year, “imports look all «^T tJbe 
increase and sane of the base too,” said Michael 
Brent, manager of footwear services for Kurt 
Salmon Associates, a consultant to the textile, 
apparel and footwear industries. 

The latest foreign onslaught is nothing new for 
shoe manufacturers. In the face of competition 
from imported shoes, the American industry has 


years ago there were 1,100 plants nationwide. Last 
year 105 of the remaining 600 dosed, eliminating 


The Beleaguered U.S. 
Shoe Industry 


U.S. imports and domestic 
production of shoes in 
millions of pairs 


Imports 


U.S. production 


7 SO 


650 


550 


450 


350 


250 


1981 1983 

’ Annual rale as of April 


1985 ' 


Kurt Salmon Associates, profits declined 32 per- 
cent at the 22 publicly rented companies that gel 
more than half of their volume from footwear 
manufacturing or retailing. 

“We are going down fast,” said George Lang- 
staff, president <rf Footwear Industries of America. 


The New Vofk Tinw 

“The industry is shrinking at a rate of 10, 12, 13 
percent a year.” 

The industry, according to Mr. Langslaff, can- 
not survive under conditions that allow unrestrict- 
ed imports of shoes. Domestic producers are ex- 
pected lo make only 255 millioa pairs of shoes this 
year, down from 640 million pairs annually in the 
late 1960s. Americans purchased 1 billion pairs of 
shoes last year — about four pairs per person. 

Barry Manufacturing has remained alive in the 
thriving baby shoe market. Bui the company has 
had to sacrifice its profit margins, Mr. Rothbard 
said, to compete against imports. The company 
cannot raise prices because some of its customers, 
especially dircouni chains such as K mart, are big 
enough lo import baby shoes from Taiwan or 
South Korea. So Barry must keep its prices in line 
with those of imports, despite rising costs. 

Barry Manufacturing could reduce its produc- 
tion costs by making shoes outside the United 
States. Instead, it has invested in automation to 
increase its efficiency. 

As a member of the Footwear Industries Associ- 
ation, Mr. Rothbard said, he is committed to a 
five-year industry plan that calls for the nse of high 
technology to dose the price gap between U.S. and 
foreign footwear production. But if imports coo- 
(Continuedon Page 19, CoL 7) 


Reagan Plan Would Raise Corporate Tax Burden 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The admin- 
istration’s tax plan, if adopted by 
Congress, would result in a signifi- 
cant increase in the tax burden on 
corporate America even as the top 
business rate is reduced to 33 per- 
cent, from 46 percent 
Heavy lobbying, however, pre- 
vented corporate taxes from rising 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

as much in President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s proposal as they would have 
under the initial Treasury proposal. 
The difference is that many breaks 
the Treasury sought to remove, in- 




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MhrwMi 1,114*9 

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172*1 

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meats would rise by an estimated 9 
percent from ibe levels under cur- 
rent law, with the real-estate indus- 
try and other heavy users of depre- 
ciation deductions among the 
hugest loserx Many service and 
other labor-intensive industries 
seem Hkdy to gain if the overhaul 
as outlined Tuesday becomes law. 

Special tax rates of less than 33 
percent are preserved for small 
businesses and the plan contains 
incentives for starting up new com- 
panies, one of the major sources of 
fob growth. 


Various industry groups were 
quick to denounce specific de- 
ments of the plan, but most busi- 
ness executives expressed support 
f or the main goal of broadening the 
tax base while reducing tax rates. 

“It's moving in the direction of 
efficiency," commented James F. 
Smith, chief economist of Union 
Carbide Carp. J 

Few business executives, howev- 
er, saw great simplification in ihe 
plan fa them and some; in fact, 
said the complexity of thq tax code 
would increase. Corporations 
would be objected to a minimum 
tax on their naming^ } 

Among the induaries/whose tax 
preferences are limited i under the 
plan are banking, insurance, min- 
ing, timber and oil and gas. 

Although hondes of lobbyists for 
business will be strenuously seek- 
ing in caning months to have the 

plan amandad to Hghtf u corporate 

tax burdens, souk economists are 
idling Congress that corporations 
do not redly pay taxes at all and 
that when it votes to raise taxes on 
corporations it really is levying 
them on individuals. 

According to this line of analy- 
sis, the burden of any tax on a 
corporation is actually shouldered 
by some combination of customers 
(through higher prices), stodtiudd- 
ers (through reduced profits and 
dividends) or employees (through 


lower pay). In other wads, it is 
said, “corporations don’t pay taxes, 
people do*,” with companies acting 
only as collection agents. 

_ The administration, in effect, re- 
flector that thin king by dwJaring 
that the distribution of the tax. bur- 
den between corporations and indi- 
viduals “is not a particularly rele- 
vant economic measure." 

Nonetheless, the tax overhaul 
plan makes proposals that appear 
fikdy to have important effects on 
various industries, including their 
profitability and their ability to at- 
tract capital If enacted, the plan 
would have far-reaching effects in 
reallocating the nation's resources. 

For example, the proposal to in- 
crease substantially the depreda- 
tion period for real estate would 
result in less money being attracted 
to investments in shopping centers 
or office braidings. 

One of the main lobbying battle- 
grounds in the past six months has 
been the long-standing tax prefer- 
ences for the oil and gas industry. 
Rfprasentatiw Dan Rastaikowski, 
the Blinds Democrat who heads 
the House Ways and Means Com- 
mittee, has called this the “litmus 
test?" of the administration's seri- 
ousness in proposing a revamping 
of the tax law. 

The plan announced Tuesday 
night maintain ^ the ability of com- 
panies to write off their so-called 


intangible drilling costs as expenses 
in the year in which they are in- 
curred. They would have beat de- 
nied under the Treasury plan. 

However; the percentage deple- 
tion allowance would be phased 
out except for snipper wells, ones 
producing less than 10 barrels a 
day. This provision mainly affects 
thousands of independent produc- 
ers; the major oil companies lost 
the depletion allowance in 1975. 

Among the other provisions af- 
fecting business are these: 

• Repeal of the investment tax 
credit a 6 percent to ID percent for 
companies buying new plant and 
eqiupmenL 

• Introduction of a corporate de- 
duction of 10 percent of the 
amount paid as dividends to stock- 
holders. 

• Preservation of the current 
complete deductibility of interest 
costs. 

• Abolition of deductions for 
bad debt reserves. 

• Retention of the ability to flow 

through losses to limited in vest- 
ment partners. 

• No general deferral of tax li- 
ability on installment sales if the 
receivables are pledged as collater- 
al. 

Many details of the revision of 
the aceaeraled depreciation system 
were act yet available. 


(Stardom ijmvs irtsht 

Sources: Benue au Benelux (Brussels); Banco Omnarctato rtaHana (MHanJ; OmrUoaS 
Bee* (New York); Bmmue NaDeaale He Paris (Ports); IMF (SDR): BAH (dinar, rtvaL 
tOrUatn). Other data (ram Reuters oadAP. 


U.K. Trade Gap Shrank 
To $ 346 Million in April 


I 


Interest Rates 




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Mar 29 




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(SDR). Ratos osnMcabie to Interbank *POsi *5 of SI million optimum (or mjutvatent). 


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n 

■ Ah 


Sources; Rmdm Cemmdamk. Q*df 
Lnmxds.Uorat Beat 8«*ct Toem. 


AH— Hrilw Pepaita 

May 29 

imam 7%-7K 

Xiaontta. 7*>'-7*e 
I marks . 7% - 7ft 

dnaatks •" l-Ok 

iwnr IV*. m 

Source: Reuters. - • 


P-S. Mmm ey Market ftnwfa 

May29 

MenrfB Lync filteo dT assets 
Mdkrmenm rWd: 199 

Telerale Merest Itate Index: 7MS 

.Source: Merritt Lynch. AP 



May 29 

am. pm. ana 

iwmkim; inus rius — 1» 

l OTem k wrt — -us 

Mraftuum MU7 31 LH -2.tt 

awmk ;.*»» nan +ua 

London ni». ram +« 
Krn York ■ — ns M +530 

Ltaemnaurs. pals and London oWal fix- 
tsau Mem Kane and Zortctt ocaitna am 
dotting nUc Nw Ynrtt Come* anTCitf 
atntrocL AH prices In US. I per ounce. 

Source: fit inert. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Britain registered 
a deficit on its merchandise trade 
of £277 miTH on ($3462 million) in 
April after a revised March deficit 
of a record £999 raflfton, the Trade 
and Industry Department said 
Wednesday. 

The current account, which mea- 
sures trade in goods and services as 
well as interest, dividends and cer- 
tain transfers, was estimated to be 
in surplus b^£123 million in April 
compared with March’s upward re- 
vised £555-milljon dafiriL 

In the three months ended . 
the current account showed a 
rit of £295 million, compared with 
a surplus of £771 million in the 
previous three months, the depart- 
mentsaid. 

Government sources said they 
saw no reason to doubt the Trea- 
sury’s forecast of a £3- billion cur- 
rent account surplus for 1985. 

Merchandise exports rose to £6.9 
billion in April roam £6.83 trillion 
in March, while imports dropped 
to £7.17 billion, from March’s re- 
cod £7.83 billion. 

The new figures were lower than 
analysts had predicted. They 
thought the current account would 
show a surplus of between £150 
million and £250 grilling. 

The improvement in the April 
trade figures was partly due to an 
increased op surplus of £684 mil- 
lion, £423 nriBinn more lhan in 
March, department figures 
showed. 


The surplus had been reduced 
sharply in March by heavy oil im- 

long^nrioers’ strike. 

The upward revision in the 
Mardi trade deficit was due to an 
increase in the estimate of oil im- 
ports during the month, following 
receipt of later information. 

The deficit on trade in manufac- 
tured goods narrowed to £307 mil- 
lion in April from £489 million in 
March, the department reported. 

Excluding erratic items such as 
ships and diam ond^ the deficit on 
marmfaemred mods totaled £312 
mffioQ in April, c om p are d with 
£389 million m March. 

The underlying level of non-oil 
opart volume, modi has been ris- 
ing since the middle of last year, 
remains high, the department said. 


1LS. 820,000,000 

WA % Noim do* 1985 
imron«ti « i»ly mmaMui hr 
dST-BHOCAMS tt-V„ 
Drift, Ho&nd. 

For bolder* of Noto In tbc mboTMaeo- 
tuood US. t ku of Ac ukoJ 
report aod the renortuf the ntMBB of dm 

aaamj amsr mo jeez 19&L win be 
m&Ueas torn tin* day h tfa Bum 
Gfe&rie da Itatsabotsg 'LL, 14Kie 


Aostttdm. Hey 22nd, 1985. 
Tfiwnm Zntb Vo uilmif l MfiJgft 

The Trustee: . 
KEDERLANDSOBE TRUST- 
MAT9CHAP1TJ B.Y. 



The famous Comm Coin Wiateh. A preaous ultra- 
thin quartz movement Inserted between the two 
halves of a genuine $20 gold coin. Water-resistant 
In lades' versions too. A subtle touch: each Corum Coin 
Wbtch has a pure diamond set in die crown. 

Corum wsiches are on view at Ibe finest jewcUeis. For the 
address of the one nearest you or Tor a brochure, wnlc 
or phone lo: Fiance. SA. Michel Niarquin, 177. Bd de 
CrettiL 94100 Saini-Maur, id. 1/889.36.36 - Germany, 
Austria, Holland. Helmut Tenet GmbH. Heinrich-Heine- 
ADee4. D-4000 Dussddorf, id. 0211.320.446 - Great Britain, Saunders 
A Shepherd Lid.. I. Bleeding Hean Yard, Grevilte Street. London 
EC IN SSJ, Id. 01-405.2666 - Italy, Comm Julia di Amedeo Mrda- 
Fote, Via Tito Vignoli 44, 20146 Milan, id. 243.77.93 - Otter countries 
CORUM. 2300 La Chaim-de-Fonds. Switzerland, id. 39/2866.66. 



Fiat Reports 
Profits Rose 
148% for 1984 


CcrxpMM 1 Our Staff From Dhponha 

TURIN, Italy — Fiat SpA re- 
ported Wednesday that net con- 
solidated profits rose 148 percent, 
to 627 billion lire (S3I6 million) in 

1984, from 253 billion lire in the 
previous year. 

Group sales rose 8J percent, to 
23.81 trillion lire, from 21.98 tril- 
lion lire in 1983, Cesare Romiti, the 
company’s managing director an- 
nounced at the board meeting. 

The company will pay a dividend 
of 110 lire for each common and 
preferred share, compared with 180 
lire at last year. Company officials 
said that despite the reduction in 
the per-share dividend, the overall 
dividend payout will rise 22 percent 
because of a greater number of 
shares in circulation. 

Mr. Romiti. speaking after the 
board meeting at a news confer- 
ence, said that Fiat, Italy's auto 
giani, is likely to sign a collabora- 
tion agreement with the European 
division of Ford Motor Co. He said 
the Fiat- Ford talks had “passed the 
stage of feasibility studies" and are 
now “in the negotiating stage.” 

He held out the possibility that 
agreement could cone before the 
end of this year, although last week 
Fiat's chairman, Giovanni A gnelli. 
had ruled out an agreement in 

1985. 

Mr. Romiti said, however, he ex- 
pected negotiations between the 
two companies to be lengthy. 

He did not confirm recent stock 
market rumors that the agree m ent 
might indude the acquistion of a 
minority stake in Fiat by the U.S. 
company. 

“A deal is not imminent and it is 
hard to say at this stage whether 
negotiations will be completed be- 


Dollar Drifts 
Lmcer in Europe 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON — A 2-5-percent 
drop in U.S. business produc- 
tivity in the first quarter poshed 
rim dollar down against most 
European currencies Wednes- 
day. Dealers said the statistic 
indicated a weakening of U.S. 
economic growth. 

In London, the British pound 
ended at $1.2668, up from 
$1-2515 on Tuesday. In Frank- 
furt, the dollar dosed at 3.109 
Deutsche marks, down from 
3.1127 DM, while in Paris, the 
U.S. currency finished at 9.475 
French francs, down from 9.49. 

In Zurich, the doOar ended 
the day at 2.6025 Swiss francs, 
down from 26165 francs, while 
in earlier trading in Tokyo, the 
currency dosed at 251.725 yen, 
up from 251.625 yen. 


fore the end of the year or whether 
they will continue into next year" 
he said. “Of course, we all hope 
that a favorable condusiou will be 
reached." 

The two companies announced, 
earlier this year they were discuss-' 
ing an industrial agreement in the 
automotive sector. 

Fiat has chosen Ford as a poten- 
tial partner, Mr. Romiti said, main- 
ly because the U.S. company's pro- 
duction complements rial's and. 
both have a strong presence in Eu- 
ropean markets. (Hauers, AP) 

YamaniAsks 
Price Cut on 
Heavy Crude 

By Bob Hagerry 

International Herald Trthune 

LONDON — Sheikh Ahmed 
Zaki Yamani, Saudi Arabia's oil 
minister, was quoted Wednesday as 
saying that the Organization of 'Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries 
should reduce its official prices for 
heavy crudes but maintain those 
for light crudes. 

Such a move would help boost 
the sagging sales of such large pro- 
ducers of heavy crude as Saudi 
Arabia and KuwaiL But the idea 
appears certain to rouse protests 
from such OPEC members as Alge- 
ria and Libya, which produce light 
crudes and would lose some of their 
current pricing advantage. 

The remark was attributed to 
Sheikh Yamani by al-Sharq al-Aw- 
sat, an Arabic-language daily, ac- 
cording to a Reuters report from 
Jeddah. 

“Tune has come to reduce the 
price of heavy dl because of the 
reduction in demand for fuel al- 
and its lower price," Sheikh Yama- 
ni was quoted as saying. 

Such discussion could begin next ' 
Tuesday, when OPEC’s market- 
monitoring committee is to meet in 
Riyadh. The next full meeting of 
OPEC ministers is scheduled for 
July 22 in Geneva. 

Refining of heavy crude yields" 
large amounts of fuel ofl, and de- 
mand for that product has plunged 
in recent months, mainly because 
rite end of Britain’s 12-month coal 
strike in March reduced the coun- 
try’s unusually high need for fuel 
oil imports. 

Hie price of Saudi heavy on the 
spot, or noncon tract, market was 
quoted Wednesday at about $25.15 
a band, down abort 5130 since 
late January and wdl below the 
official price of $2630. During the 
same period, Saudi light has fallen 
only about 80 cents, to $2630, ver- 
sus the official price of $28. 


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IHT30/5 


■ 





Page 16 


1 WTEKNATIOIVAL HERALD TMBI7IVE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 

vol Hlnb Lam Lon Ota. 


AT&T 

20254 UK 

23 

93 

—Ito 

TWA 

15496 Wft 

ITT* 

18* 

+IV 

PanAm 

13948 Aft 

4V 

696 

+ to 

Limn 

13075 Sift 

on* 

8396 

— V 

AftRiai 

S#ara 

12002 60ft 
11222 371% 

60(6 

M 

6 IHB 

37ft 

+ ft 

Am Exn 

10891 4*V 

45ft 

46 

+ M 

SaaLnd 

1059* 29ft 

llto 

209* 

+lft 

IBM 

9397 130ft 

129ft 

12994 

— to 

TrmxM 

8491 39 

37V 

38 

+1M 

Bansau 

8037 39ft 

3896 

39V 

+ to 

FonJM 

7*64 44ft 

IM 

44(6 

+ ft 

Ftapro 

7281 28ft 

27* 

Mft 

+ ft 

CuHncts 

TIM 29V* 

259# 

Uto 

— 2 V 

WhAIrL 

7073 7 

69* 

to 

Ato 

+ 9* 


f Dow Jones Averages | 

Om Hf*a low Uh* caw. 

I non MOOTS 1XU6 1292J9 »3aT8 + J-* 

Trrjrta OU3 fiUl 422 J4 09 SO + UJ 

urn wri Si Mi.n law- g.w 

Ounp SHJ3 SU55 52900 5MT + US 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


1 Dow Jones Bond Averages j 

Pro*. Tartar 
date Moon 


, Advanced 
I Declined 
un tfi— a 
' Total issues 
: New HtaW 


795 m 

749 S33 

47V 509 

3Q23 2023 

137 111 

16 B 


Bwias 

Ulll11.CS 

Industrials 


Piarkxu Today 
Mob Lew OoM 3PJ£ 
Composite 109.15 10852 HSJ3 10846 

Industrials 1743(1 12159 12179 12 £S 

Trnnso. 10 U 2 10157 ll&n I 02 T 2 

Utmttw sue 57.94 5824 58.10 

Finance 11727 11482 11723 11436 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Bar Sam ■SBTt 

.MOT2B 181827 487432 21JT3 

Mby 34 1*1473 379245 1850 

MOV 23 211993 <77470 889 

Mora 201592 500833 I 2 M 

MerZI — — - 242792 559 JD9 £548 

■Included In ttw sales Hawes 


Wfednesdays 

MV® 

Closing 


vokotjpx Tsxnm 

Pm.3PM.nL 71961601 

Prerccuondated dose UUtiJtt 


Tobies kidiida ttw nationwide prices 
up to ftie closing on wall Street and 
do oat reflect late trades e tea where. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index. 


Drcitord 
Ondw ne e rt 
Total im 


& S 

1 1 

i » 


Standard & Poor's Index 1 

PTWtaN TOJMV 

HU U» Oast 3 P-M. 

"SS** ®8 S3 S3 

SKi ^5 m m ss 

Finance 2U7 2Z JS 2284 E4« 

fcSSSlte 18194 WM 11786 1*782 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

insufance 

Lmuite 

Banks 


CHH Keen — — - 

J&K _ 3UJ3 25404 

Hr 93 39 


AMEX Sales 


3 pjM.uahime 
Prav.3 PM. valunie 
Prey. cans, veto"* 


j AMEX * **** Actives 

ZZ NM l#w w- o* 

s& g £ Ir II H 

5 £ 35 fe 

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23021 3298$ 


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231.10 2S9" 1 * 


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Sia. Clw „ 

01*. Ytd. PE MfeHiflllLBn OWt.CBOj 


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S^Siis S v re i7i is i«s IS -7 to 

» . SSL « W .2 IS IS 1 SL 1 S 


JO 11 AOmMI 
l*' 1 ; t 9 * AdvSrs 

411* 35V AMD 
1-4. A'* AOvnt 
14*1 sft Aerflev 


36 154. Annins 

3*i ail Alleen 
531“ 33*» Air PrO 
24H 13 AlrOFrt 
2 I AlMoa s 


t I AlMoa 1 

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339* 36ft AlaP pfA£92 122 

B A AloPODl 87 114 

7B'. *11-! AlnPpf MO 115 

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B1 431-1 AlaP pi 9M 121 

71 57 AlaP Bl 8.14 1.1 

to 54 AlaP at 228 12t 

14M, 11 A la0X 3 14M 7JB 

23~> *W AlskAlr .14 J 


!SW TF% AfllSM 189 12 10 264 29* 

5m 34V5 AmSIor 84 l.l 10 854 59 SH 


70 461% ASlTPCA 43B 42 75 19 

JM 51 A5tr PfB 480 122 10 55 

24U. 15 AT&T 120 £2 1720245 2X 

<0 30W AT&T Pf 384 «J U 39 

4044 31 Vj AT&T Of 274 9J 30 40> 

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10 AWOtpf 1J2S 102 20QE12V. 12 

121% ID AWaSpf 1JS 102 10011214 1214 

2»% TO% AmHnfl 280 11.9 0 98 20W| 20 

719* 53* ATrPr £84 81 33 7W. 

14 4H ATrSc 79 14 1M% 

BSV% 5 V* ATrUn £84 kj 5V 84 8394 

48 20 AmesDs 30 A 22 W «1 4A 

29*% 21%. Ametok 80 3.1 13 2JB 28, 25*4 

271% 1BV* Amfac 133 26V. 2614 

16 09* Arnfesc _ * 17 W » 


£ SuifS 

10 S&k 559* 


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100Z86U A6U MU— 1 
20ftc 1214 12 12U + V 


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49* ATrSc 79 14 1M* 139*— 1% 

SBU ATrUn 584 67 59 84 8394 83*4 

30 AmesDs 30 8 22 390 «% 4414 4«4— U 

21%. Ametok 80 3.1 13 2JB 26, 25*4 2S4 

18V* AmtaC 133 2614 2g* + U 

89* Ante 6 17 91% 9** »U— V* 

SOU Amoco 330 £4 4 1858 621% 61** 619*— 9* 

26V* AMP 72 23 19 3403 32U 32 32U 


581% 26V* AMP 72 23 

24 111* Amoco JO 28 

2BV* 129* Amiens 
3194 19 AmSttl 180 48 


IV 3403 32U 32 3214 

16 30 12U 12** 129*— U 

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0 6 30*k 3014 30** 


43V* 259* Aimtod 180 37 14 474 4314 42 


414 19* 

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S4Vi 1694 
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1C7V3 73U AsdOpf 475 45 
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a*» 19?* AtCvEI 18 19 9 


«4U 43*% ANPICJt 480 68 SI 13382 U’m 6tft 


dmau AlIRCPf 380 .7 

16%. :r% AlIRCPf ITS 9.7 

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449% 371* AufoD* M 15 19 

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314* 221* BCE 0 2J3 

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120 2J IS 517 


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80 28 


Trading Is Moderate on NYSE 


H Montii 
HWLM Stock 


Div.Yirt.PE NOcMObLJM 


TlMOdttl 
H tab Law She* 


Oto. «d PE MBHlBhtJW 


U H « 

*' 12 35 121* 126* ta* 


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980 119 1509 76 74Va 75to + 4* 

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8J8 12.1 50r 681% 681% 40% +14* 

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.14 J 9 213 214* 211% 211%— to 


MU 101 % AJtirtoa ji 2.1 20 ™ £■ to 

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31V 23'- Alcan 1 JO 4J 12 3 468 254* 2 Sto 254*— i* 

361* 271% AleoStd 1JQ 35 12 3B9 34 H44 34 + U 

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5*1% 38 AJMOtr 112 317 • IW 57 54,. 564* + 9* 

114* 51% AlllsOl 292 6U 6V 4to 

544* 24 AllsCpf 53 S' 4 2S? t^J 1 

274* 20 ALLTL 184 68 9 25 ^ B + V, 

39»* 294- Alcoa 1.20 39 14 596 33to32V%3^ + to 

23 151% A max JO IJ 1770 l£4 l»k 16V*— to 

43 32V% Amax pi 380 88 B 34 V 33 V 3 3A, + 1 U 

34 22%. AmHn 1.10 U 20 6910 28» 28U 2 SVl 

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United Press Inurmitionol 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were lower iate Wednesday is 

moderate trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
1.90 to 139.62 shortly before 3 P.M. 

Declines led advances by a 7-TO-6 ratio 
among the 1,963 issues traded. 

Five-hour volume amounted to about 
75,070.000 shares, compared with 74,980,000 in 
the same period on Tuesday. 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in Yew- York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 

Analysts said the market was continumg a 
consolidation phase after recent advances. They 
said trading volume has been thinner when the 
market has been easing. 

“Anytime there is selling pressure, volume 
declines." said Ricky Harrington of Interstate 
Securities, Charlotte! North Carolina. Mr. Har- 
rington said his outlook on the market remains 
positive. 

“The bond market has been very strong,” he 
said. “With rates on fixed-income securities 
coming down, investors should begin lo shift 
money from those instruments into stocks,” he 
said. 

Analysts said while the tax plan discussed by 
President Ronald Reagan on Tuesday night 
might have underlined general uncertainty, it 
had little impact on trading. “The tax plan has 
already been discussed.” Mr. Harrington said. 

' Crandall Hayes of Robert Baird & Co- Mil- 


waukee, agreed. “ Re a g an didn’t say anything 
that everyone didn’t already know,” he said. 

Another positive sign for the market is that 
while indexes are near there all-time highs, the 
market lacks enthusiasm, some analysts said. 
Indifference and apathy can be healthy for the 
market because it can mean there stiB aremves- 
tors who could become more positive about the 
market and start buying 

“It’s when everybody begins to speculate that 
you gel into the terminal phase of the market,” ] 
Mr. Harrington said. “When everyone is eu- 1 
p boric, it means everyone probably has already 
bought.” 

TWA was near the top of the actives list and 
higher. The carrier plans io seek a friendly 
merger to thwart New York investor Cart C. 

1 cairn's attempt to take over the airline. 

AT&T was lower. American Express was 
higher. 

After advancing 6 fe to 834 Tuesday on Fri- 
day’s announcement that it would buy as much 
as 35.8 percent of its outstanding common, 
Litton was unchanged at midday. 

IBM was lower. Texas Instruments was off 
sharply, breaking below a 12 -month low of 89% 
after First Boston analyst Jack Geraghty re- 
moved the stock from his firm’s buy recom- 
mended list and cut his earnings estimate. 

General Motors and Fora were gaining. 
Champion International Corp. was lower. 

Oil stocks continued to come under pressure, 
depressed by wide expectations that Statoil, 
Norway’s state oO company, will cut the price of 
its crude by 50 cents to SI a barrel. Mobfl, 
Texaco, Atlantic Richfield. Phillips Petroleum, 
Unocal and Royal Dutch were all slightly weak- 


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NOTICE OF MANDATORY REDEMPTION 


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A National Westminster Bank PLC 

US $50,000,000 9% Capital Bonds 1986 

in accordance with condition 7 (t) and (ii) of the bonds, the redemption installment of $7,000,000 principal amount of bonds due July i . 1 985 has been met by purchases in the open market of 
$1,046,000 and by a drawing by lot of $5,954,000. 

The serial numbers of bonds drawn by lot for redemption on July 1, 1985. are as follows: 


11 1152 2250 2952 3397 4307 13165 13550 13932 

14 1163 2255 2953 3398 4308 13166 13536 13934 

15 1166 2257 2854 3400 4809 13169 1356S 13935 

21 1302 2264 2958 3403 4811 13171 13570 13940 

25 1304 2270 2960 3405 4813 13172 13573 13942 

26 1300 2273 2981 3409 4814 1 3174 13575 13946 

27 1308 2275 2968 3410 4616 13176 13580 13947 

29 1310 2281 2969 3411 4618 1317B 13581 13948 

32 1311 2373 2972 3420 4820 13182 13582 13954 

34 1314 2375 2976 3434 4821 13166 13584 13956 

35 1315 2377 2981 3438 4826 13107 13585 13958 

36 1320 2382 2982 3440 4834 13192 13587 13962 

37 1330 2384 2S63 3448 4836 13196 13589 13B84 

38 1334 2385 2885 3449 5188 13187 13593 13969 

50 1335 2396 2987 345a 6776 13196 13595 13973 

54 1338 2398 2989 3451 7146 13227 13597 13975 

60 1341 2400 2990 3454 7147 13228 135% 13977 

86 1342 2402 2991 3457 7150 13231 13602 13978 

72 1343 2404 2992 3460. 7151 13232 13604 13979 

86 1344 2408 2997 3482 7154 13233 13606 13981 

91 1348 2408 2999 3464 7157 13236 136% 13985 

97 1349 2410 3001 3468 7158 13238 13609 13986 

99 1352 2415 3003 3469 7161 13240 13611 13987 

102 1354 2417 3004 3470 7168 13242 13613 13692 

103 1358 2419 3005 3471 7170 13246 13615 13994 

106 1370 2421 3007 3472 .7172 13248 13620 13996 

106 1372 2425 3008 3474 7173 13250 13622 13697 

210 1374 2428 3009 3478 7174 13%2 13624 13998 

212 1376 2436 3010 3478 7177 13254 13625 13999 

214 1420 2439 3011 3493 7178 13255 13627 14001 

219 1460 2440 3015 3498 7179 13258 13629 14002 

220 1491 2443 3017 3499 7510 -13258 13631 14008 

229 1462 2453 3018 3500 7516 13263 13644 14012 

230 1494 2454 3025 3501 7517 13285 13646 14014 

231 1497 2457 3027 3502 - 7519 13268 13848 14018 

235 1539 2459 3029 3506 7521 13267 13850 14019 

237 1540 2461 3032 3507 7527 13269 13652 14020 

241 1543 2465 3034 3508 7530 1327B 13654 14031 

242 1547 2467 3043 3509 8592 13279 13658 14034 

246 1668 2468 3044 3510 8601 13280 13662 14036 

247 1688 2471 3045 3516 11304 13262 13664 14038 

249 1818 2477 3046 3583 11305 13287 13666 14039 

251 1819 2461 3047 3585 11307 13288 13668 14040 

2S3 1820 2482 3051 3687 11308 13289 13870 14047 

255 1822 2493 3054 3583' 11922 13294 13675 14051 
257 1824 2496 3056 3595 11923 13295 13681 14053 

288 1826 2499 3063 3568 11924 13296 13683 14055 

300 1651 2500 3064 3800 11928 13297 13686 14080 

302 1853 2501 3068 3607 11833 13300 13687 14061 

306 1856 2503 3068 3609 11937 13304 13689 14062 

333 1858 2504 3072 3610 11940 13306 13695 14063 

334 1860 2505 3078 3611 11941 13314 13896 14064 

335 1884 2507 3079 3613 11944 13316 13697 14066 

336 1865 2508 3112 3614 11948 13317 13699 14070 

337 1866 2510 3114 3615 11950 13318 13700 14073 

340 1868 2513 3116 3619 11952 13320 13702 14074 

342 1870 2517 3118 3621 11954 13322 13707 14085 

346 1872 2522 3120 3623 11956 13324 13708 14087 

347 1686 2526 3122 3624 11957 13336 13709 14068 

355 1889 S30 3123 3625 11958 13343 13711 14091 

359 1891 2531 3124 3828 11960 13345 13712 14095 

361 1893 2532 3126 3631 11969 13348 13713 14099 

383 1895 2533 3127 3633 11970 13350 13715 14100 

366 1896 2536 3126 3835 11973 13352 13719 14101 

368 1899 2538 2132 3637 11974 13356 13724 14103 

372 1900 2540 3134 3641 11975 13357 13733 14104 

373 1901 2829 3136 3643 11978 13362 13735 14105 

374 1905 2630 3136 3648 11980 13363 13743 14106 

375 1907 2631 3140 3650 11982 13365 13745 14107 

377 2010 2662 3141 3651 11984 13367 13747 14109 

379 2014 2664 3146 3852 11988 13368 13749 14110 

381 2023 2666 3148 3654 11989 13369 13750 14113 

383 2027 2667 3153 3660 11992 13373 13753 14117 

384 2031 2670 3102 3662 11994 13375; 13754 14119 

485 2033 2871 3165 3664 11995 13380 13755 14123 

467 2037 2676 3166 3666 11996 13382 13756 14124 

488 2043 2677 3167 3700 11996 13384 13759 14125 

49Q 2044 2678 3172 3704 12000 13388 13761 14130 

491 2045 2679 3175 3706 13002 13387 13765 14134 

495 2048 2680 3177 3707 13004 13389 13767 14135 

496 2049 2684 3178 3710 13005 13391 13768 14138 

497 2050 2688 3181 3717 13006 13393 13769 14140 

488 2052 2690 3182 3720 13008 13401 13772 14142 

503 2054 2691 3186 3724 13010 13408 13775 14144 

505 2056 2992 3187 3725 13011 13410 13776 14149 

506 2062 2695 3188 3728 13013 13412 13777 14150 

507 2064 2696. 3192 3730 13015 13413 13779 14151 

509 2065 2807 3194 3731 13016 13414 13780 14152 

511 2066 2699 3197 3736 13024 13416 13761 14153 

515 2073 2700 3201 3744 13025 13421 13783 14155 

518 2068 2704 3209 3745 13026 13422 13765 14161 

520 2096 2705 3205 3754 13028 13423 13788 14167 

523 2096 2706 3207 3756 13032 13425 13787 14169 

525 2100 2780 3210 3760 13034 13430 13788 14172 

526 2104 Z761 3222 3761 13038 13432 137BB 14174 

527 2114 2762 3225 3762 13039 13434 13790 14477 

529 2116 2770 3226 3774 13040 13438 13798 141 79 

531 2118 2782 3227 3776 13042 13438 13804 14183 

533 2122 2800 3229 3778 13045 13443 13806 14184 

535 2124 2802 3234 3780 13048 13445 13812 14187 

591 2126 2803 3236 3781 13048 13446 13817 14189 

505 2129 2804 3245 3782 13054 13447 13619 14191 

598 2130 2805 3247 3784 13056 13448 13821 14192 

600 2135 2813 3251 3787 13060 13451 13824 14195 

607 2136 2815 3253 3789 13062 13453 13830 14197 

608 2137 2817 3254 3804 13063 13455 13832 14199 

609 2138 2819 3256 3808 13064 13456 T3834 14203 

611 2139 2823 3259 3809 13066 13458 13836 14206 

613 2141 2845 3260 3812 13070 13460 13837 14272 

616 2143 2846 3265 3813 13073 13461 13843 14274 

618 2145 2849 3289 3814 13074 13462 13848 14275 

622 2146 2853 3275 3816 13078 13467 13853 14278 

623 2149 2858 3276 3818 13063 13469 13855 14280 

524 2150 2859 3279 3820 13084 13472 13856 14281 

631 2151 2860 3280 3822 13085 13478 13857 14282 

632 2157 2862 3281 3825 13069 13479 138% 14283 

655 2163 2864 3282 3827 13090 13480 13861 14285 

657 2164 2866 3296 3832 13001 13482 13862 14286 

660 2167 2867 3300 3841 13092 13483 13863 14287 

676 2168 2668 3301 3843 13093 13464 13864 14290 

678 2169 2870 3302 3844 13095 13485 13867 14292 

991 2171 2871 3304 3845 13099 13488 13889 14294 

993 2174 2876 3306 3847 13101 13490 13871 14295 

997 2176 2878 3308 3850 13102 13491 13873 14297 

999 2180 2879 3309 3851 13105 13494 13875 14299 

1001 2187 2882 3310 3852 13108 13495 13877 14300 

1003 2189 2883 3311 3854 13110 13498 138S3 14302 

1010 2190 2885 3316 3859 13111 13500 13884 14303 

1012 2192 2895 3321 3861 13112 13502 13885 14307 

1017 2194 2897 3327 3865 13113 13509 13887 14464 

1018 2196 2900 3333 4015 13114 13510 13889 14466 

1019 2201 2902 3335 4594 13116 13517 13891 14467 

1026 2204 2906 3336 4596 13125 13519 13893 14468 

1028 2205 2908 3337 4598 13127 13520 13894 14474 

1098 2206 2911 3339 4800 13129 13521 13895 14476 

1100 2208 2912 3340 4602 13130 13525 13896 14477 

1103 2209 2913 3343 4603 13131 13529 13900 14476 

1104 2213 2917 3344 4687 13136 13534 13902 14480 

1105 2221 2919 3347 4689 13137 13536 13904 14462 

1107 2222 2921 3369 4710 13139 13540 13906 14488 

1113 2223 2922 3371 4712 13141 13547 13910 14492 

1114 2224 2925 3373 4715 13152 13548 13912. 14493 

1115 2225 2931 3376 4718 13153 13549 13013 14494 

1116 2227 2932 3377 4790 13156 13550 13918 14496 

1119 2229 2935 3378 4793 13158 13551 13920 14499 

1124 2231 2937 3386 4794 13160 13553 13922 14500 

1125 2236 2941 3387 4795 13181 13555 13926, 14503 

1126 2241 2946 3389 4797 13162 13557 13928 14507 

1131 2245 2948 3391 4802 13163 13559 13930 14509 


6079 16776 17173 

6080 16782 17174 

6081 16780 17175 
6086 16790 17176 
6089 16800 17177 
6093 16806 17181 
6095 16808 17183 
6116 16810 17184 
6118 18811 17185 
6120 16814 17191 
6124 16820 17193 
6126 16826 17195 
6128 16827 17199 
6130 16828 17200 
6134 16830 17202 

6137 16833 17204 

6138 16834 17206 

6139 16835 17208 

6140 16836 17215 

6141 16837 17220 
6143 16839 17224 
6146 16844 17229 
6150 16846 17233 
6152 16849 17234 

6154 16850 17236 

6155 16857 17237 

6156 16858 17238 

6157 16861 17240 

6158 16862 17242 
6160 16863 17243 
6162 16865 17250 
6164 16867 17252 
6169 16868 17253 
6171 16869 17254 
6175 16873 17258 
6177 16877 17263 
6181 16879 17265 
6183 16668 17268 
6199 16891 17268 
6201 16893 17270 
6205 16895 17271 
6207 16896 17273 
6209 16897 17275 
6213 16898 17277 
6215 16899 17283 

6225 16900 17286 

6226 18911 17268 

6227 16913 17296 

6228 16915 17298 
6241 16917 17299 
6245 16920 17302 

6249 16922 17304 

6250 16924 17309 

6251 16926 17318 

6259 16928 17321 

6260 16932 17323 
6265 16935 17325 

6267 16936 17326 

6268 16937 17327 

6269 16938 17339 

6272 16939 17342 

6273 16946 17344 

6274 16948 17346 

6275 16956 17356 

6276 16957 17357 

6277 16962 17358 
6280 16966 17359 
6282 16977 17360 
6288 16979 17363 
6290 16880 17365 
6294 16981 17366 
6306 '16983 17369 
6308" 16085 17372 
631 V16986- 17373 
63137 16992 17378 

6314 16993 17380 

6315 16996 17385 

6316 17000 17386 
6319 17002 17389 

6323 17004 17380 

6324 17006 17391 

6328 17008 17392 

6329 17013 17395 
6332 17022 17399 
6334 17023 17401 
6338 17026 17413 

6340 17027 17415 

6341 17028 17419 

6342 17030 17421 

6347 17031 17425 

6348 17034 17426 
6411 17041 17427 
6413 17042 17429 
6415 17043 17431 
6417 17046 17435 
6*19 17047 17440 

6420 17051 17442 

6421 17058 17446 
8422 17061 17448 
6423 17066 17450 
6425 17070 17452 
6427 17071 17453 

6432 17074 17454 

6433 17075 17456 

6434 17076 17458 

6435 17062 17480 
6447 17087 17462 
6451 17088 17466 
6454 17097 17496 
6458 17098 17497 

6645 17099 17501 

6646 17100 17502 
6650 17103 17505 

6652 17104 17507 

6653 17105 17511 

6654 17106 17514 
6656 17107 17517 
6660 17108 17521 
6864 17111 17523 
6665 17117 17524 
6686 17119 17525 
6669 17120 17527 
6870 17122 17529 
6882 17123 17531 

6684 17124 17533 

6685 17125 17534 
6688 17126 17537 
6690 17128 17541 
6698 17129 17543 
6709 17130 17549 
6715 17133 17551 
6717 17135 17653 
67T6 17137 17554 

721 17141 17557 
6723 17143 17558 
6725 17144 17560 
6729 17145 17564 
6731 17148 17565 
6735 17151 17566 
6741 17154 17568 

6743 17158 17573 

6744 17158 17575 

6745 17161 17577 

6747 17163 17578 

6748 17165 17579 
6758 17167 T7581 
8760 17168 17582 
6764 17171 17583 
6768 17172 17585 


7586 17951 


8761 19834 20233 26497 31377 

8766 19835 20234 26499 31378 

8767 19836 20235 31007 31 378 
8771 19837 20237 31008 31380 
8773 19638 20241 31012 31382 
8776 19639 20252 31014 31388 
8781 19843 20254 31017 31387 
8783 T9B45 20255 31019 31388 
B7B5 19646 20262 31020 31389 
8787 19851 20264 31023 31390 
6789 19855 20270 31025 31392 
6791 19856 20275 31027 31393 
8795 19657 20277 31030 31394 
B798 19858 20278 31033 31398 
9502 19863 20260 31037 31399 
9504 19865 20283 31041 31401 

9511 19871 20289 31042 31403 

9512 19872 20290 31045 31404 

9513 19875 20291 31046 31405 

9514 19877 20292 31047 31406 

9515 19876 20293 31049 31407 
9517 19879 20294 31053 31410 

9520 19881 20295 31055 31416 

9521 19882 20297 31058 31417 

9522 19884 20299 31059 3141B 

9523 19885 20497 31064 31425 

9524 19888 20499 31066 31427 
9532 19889 20500 31067 31431 

9534 19894 21098 31068 31436 

9535 19896 21107 31069 31439 
9540 19899 21109 31072 31440 
9542 19902 21111 31074 31441 
9544 19903 25558 31078 31442 
9546 19904 25959 31080 31443 
9550 19906 25962 31084 31445 

9552 19907 25964 31085 31446 

9553 19908 25966 31086 31447 
9556 199% 25970 31088 31453 

9565 19913 25974 31091 31455 

9566 19915 25975 31093 31457 

9567 19919 2S976 31095 31458 
9570 19921 25977 31099 31480 
9572 19923 26004 31111 31461 
9578 19929 26005 31112 31463 

9583 19931 26008 31115 31470 

9584 19932 26012 31116 31474 
95% 19935 26013 31119 3147B 
9587 19936 26014 31121 31480 
9590 19937 26017 31123 31484 
9592 19938 26019 31129 31485 
9594 19943 26202 31130 31488 

9596 19947 26204 31135 31489 

9597 19949 26205 31137 31494 

9598 19951 26206 31139 31496 
9602 19953 26208 31143 31503 

9604 19955 26212 31145 31505 

9605 19956 26214 31147 31508 

9606 19959 26218 31148 31512 
9611 19960 26222 3114B 31513 
9617 19970 26226 31153 31514 
9619 19974 26227 31157 31516 

9622 19975 26228 31158 31517 

9623 19977 26229 31161 31518 

9624 19979 26232 31162 31519 

9629 19983 26233 31165 31525 

9630 19888 26239 31167 31528 

9631 19888 26241 31173 31538 
9635 19990 26243 31178 31542 

9638 19991 26244 31180 31544 

9639 19992 26247 31181 31545 

9640 19993 26249 31182 31547 
9643 19996 26250 31183 31555 
9645 19998 28253 31186 31557 
9647 20000' 26255 31 191 31559 
9649 20052 26256 31193 31568 

9653 20058 26257 31201 31569 

9654 20059 26261 31202 31570 
9855 20060 26262 31206 31571 
9659 20061 26263 31209 31575 
9661 20062 26265 31210 31577 
9665 20064 26266 31211 31580 
9668 20065 26267 31212' 31582 

9667 20067 26271 31215 31584 

9668 20070 26273 31217 31586 

9669 20072 26275 312f9 31589 

9670 20074 26276 31220 31593 
9673 20078 26277 31221 31595 
9675 20078 26281 31222 31597 

9677 20080 26283 31224 31599 

9678 20062 26291 31227 31601 

9679 20084 26297 31228 31602 
9661 20092 26299 31229 31605 
9663 20094 26303 31231 31611 
9685 20095 26309 31232 31618 
9691 20098 26313 31235 31621 
9693 20101 26314 31241 31623 
9695 20102 26320 31242 31624 
9697 20103 26322 31243 31626 
8699 20104 26324 31245 31627 
9701 20110 26325 31248 31630 
9705 20111 26326 31250 31633 
9709 20116 26327 31254 31635 

711 20117 26329 31260 31637 
9713 20120 26331 31262 31641 
9715 20122 26336 31264 31642 

9717 20124 26338 31269 31646 

9718 20125 26340 31270 31647 
719 20128 26342 31272 31649 

9720 20131 26343 31273 31653 

9721 20135 26348 31276 31656 
722 20137 26351 31277 31658 

9725 20140 26352 31282 31660 
733 20142 26355 31284 31661 
9734 20143 26357 31293 31667 
9740 20148 26359 31294 31671 
741 20149 26360 31295 31675 
9743 20150 26361 31297 31677 
747 20151 26362 31299 31678 

9752 20152 26385 31300 31679 

9753 20153 26369 31301 31681 
754 20154 26371 31302 31682 

9756 20156 26372 31303 31663 
9762 20173 26373 31305 31684 

9764 20174 26375 31307 31689 

9765 20175 26377 31311 31690 
766 20178 26378 31312 31692 

9768 20179 26379 31313 31693 
9771 20182 26382 31315 31694 
774 20183 26383 31318 31688 
776 20184 26384 31320 31700 
9778 20186 26386 31322 31702 

9783 20187 26389 31324 31703 

9784 20192 06391 31325 31709 
9792 20193 26393 31326 31714 
9795 20194 26411 31330 31715 

9801 20201 26414 31336 31716 

9802 20202 26*15 31337 31717 

9803 20203 26416 31338 3171 B 
9805 20204 26465 31346 31719 
9810 20205 26467 31350 31720 
9813 20206 28471 31355 31721 
9815 20207 26472 31357 31724 
9819 20211 26473 31362 31726 

9821 20213 26475 313S4 31727 

9822 20214 26477 31365 31728 

9823 20215 26479 31367 31731 
9825 20219 26481 31372 31733 
9827 202% 26486 31374 31735 
9833 20226 26494 31376 31737 


31744 33154 33568 33946 35403 36722 37059 39439 40900 41532 41933 42357 43015 43840 44227 44914 45619 46013 46741 4B713 

31746 33167 33569 33950 3540* 36723 37062 39445 40902 41535 41939 42359 43017 43842 44231 44915 45620 46017 46742 48715 

31749 33160 33570 33952 35405 36727 37064 39448 40906 41537 41945 42361 43016 43847 44233 44924 45623 46019 46743 48720 

31750 33169 33571 33956 35406 38728 37066 39453 40908 41540 41947 42362 43019 43B55 44237 44926 45625 46020 46745 48724 

31751 33170 33572 33957 35407 36731 37067 39464 40910 41542 41949 42363 43021 43656 44240 44928 45626 46027 46746 48725 

31753 33172 33574 33958 35408 36732 37066 39466 40913 41544 41 951 42368 43023 43B57 44242 44929 45627 46029 46749 48726 

31756 33175 33575 33959 35411 36733 37069 39470 40915 41549 41953 42370 43030 43659 44244 44932 45631 46030 46750 48727 

31756 33177 33583 33960 35412 36735 37072 39471 40916 41554 41956 42377 43031 43861 44246 44937 45633 46034 46751 48728 

31763 33178 33585 33962 35413 36736 37075 39472 40921 41555 41964 42380 43032 43862 44247 44939 45637 46039 46756 48729 

31766 33179 33586 33964 35415 36737 37078 39473 40923 41558 41966 42381 43046 43063 44248 44940 45644 46041 46766 4B739 

31766 331 B1 33588 33970 35417 36738 37086 39478 40924 41559 41968 42384 43051 43866 44252 44941 45645 46043 46766 48743 

31770 33185 33589 33972 35419 36740 37087 39480 40925 41560 *1971 42366 43052 43872 44259 44942 45646 46056 46780 *8747 

31771 33190 33590 33974 36359 36741 37089 39481 40929 41562 41983 42387 43056 43878 44261 44945 45648 46059 46794 48750 

31772 33194 33593 33977 36368 36744 37090 39482 40930 41565 41984 42390 43056 43880 44262 44946 45649 46070 46796 48761 

31773 33198 33595 33978 36370 36746 37092 39483 40937 41568 41985 42392 43065 43884 44267 44947 45650 46077 46800 48765 

31777 33199 335S7 33985 38372 36753 37093 39484 40939 41571 41993 42394 43066 43886 44269 44948 45655 46076 46801 48766 

31778 33200 33600 33987 36374 36755 37094 39486 40951 41574 41997 42398 43067 43890 44270 44949 45658 46079 46804 48772 

31781 33202 33601 33991 36376 36757 37096 39490 40952 41576 42000 42399 43069 43897 44271 44950 45659 46080 46815 48774 

31783 33205 33602 33993 36378 36761 37098 39498 40960 *1585 42001 42400 43073 43902 44277 44951 45660 46081 46817 48775 

31785 33210 33605 33995 36379 36762 37104 39500 40962 41586 42002 42402 43074 43904 44278 44955 45668 46083 46819 48777 

31787 33213 33614 33997 36382 36765 37106 39501 40964 41587 42013 42404 43075 43906 44279 44957 45669 46085 46824 48780 

31789 33214 33615 33999 36383 36766 37109 39503 40969 41588 42015 42405 43079 43908 44280 44962 45670 46087 46828 48781 

31791 33215 33619 34000 36384 36769 37114 39504 40971 41589 42017 42406 43086 *3909 44285 44966 45672 46100 46830 48782 

31796 33222 33620 34832 36385 36771 37116 39505 40973 41593 42019 42408 4308B 43910 44295 44968 45673 46*47 46834 48783 

31797 33224 33621 34843 36386 36772 37118 39509 40977 41595 42021 42410 43102 43911 *4296 44971 45674 46452 46836 48784 

31798 33228 33625 34847 36387 36778 37119 39513 40979 41597 42022 42414 43103 43914 44301 44973 45676 46453 46838 48785 

31803 33230 33626 34851 36388 36782 37120 39517 40983 41598 42027 42423 43108 43916 44303 44979 45670 46457 46043 48786 

31 805 33234 33632 34862 36393 36784 37126 39519 40985 41599 42038 42427 43112 43917 44305 44981 45680 46459 46853 48796 

31807 33236 33634 34863 36394 36786 37128 39521 40989 41601 42039 42429 43115 43918 44309 *4982 45682 46460 46857 48798 

31809 33237 33641 34864 36395 36795 37126 39524 40990 41604 42040 42430 43117 43919 44312 44884 45685 48461 46859 4886* 

31813 33238 33642 34866 36397 36799 37130 39525 40991 41615 42042 42431 43119 43920 44614 44989 45695 46462 46861 48865 

31818 33242 33643 34872 36399 36808 37132 39532 40693 *1620 42043 42432 43121 43922 44622 44991 45697 46467 46863 48872 

31820 33246 33647 34874 36400 36810 37133 39534 40994 41822 42044 42433 43122 43924 44628 44992 45708 46468 46665 48876 

31824 33247 33653 34878 36401 36813 37137 39544 40997 41624 42045 42434 43127 43926 44630 44997 45709 46469 46867 48878 

31827 33250 33655 34880 36403 38814 37138 39548 40998 41625 42048 42435 43129 43927 44631 44998 45710 46471 46868 48880 

31828 33256 33657 34883 36404 36815 37139 39555 40999 41626 42049 42437 43130 43929 44633 44999 45711 46473 46869 48882 

31833 33258 33658 34885 36405 36816 37141 39556 41000 41632 42052 42438 43131 43930 44642 45001 45712 46475 46871 48883 

31835 33262 33659 34886 36410 36819 37144 39557 41003 41638 42053 42439 43134 43931 44644 45003 45713 46477 46872 48884 

31839 33267 33660 34887 36421 36820 37147 39558 41010 41644 42054 42440 43136 43933 44645 45009 45717 46478 46873 48885 

31841 33268 33863 34888 36426 36822 37148 39559 41011 41646 42056 42441 43140 43937 44648 45013 45719 46485 46883 48888 

31842 33269 33665 34891 36432 36824 37153 39563 41012 41649 42063 42445 43148 43941 44650 45015 45720 46489 46886 48890 

31847 33274 33667 34892 36434 38826 37155 39564 41014 41651 4206S 42440 43150 43943 44663 45019 45723 46491 46890 48892 

31B51 33276 33669 34895 36435 36827 37156 39569 41016 *1653 42069 42453 43152 43944 44666 45021 45724 46492 46901 48893 

31853 33277 33G77 34897 36438 36831 37157 39577 41018 41657 42071 42457 43154 43945 44668 45022 45725 46493 46902 48896 

31855 33279 33678 34902 36439 36833 37159 39580 41019 41658 42073 42460 43156 43947 44670 45023 45729 46497 46905 48897 

31857 33280 33679 34904 36440 36836 37160 39584 41028 41860 42074 42462 *31 5B 43955 44671 45029 45731 46498 46907 48900 

31859 33283 33681 34907 36442 36842 37161 39585 41030 41661 42075 42465 43161 43957 44676 45031 45732 46502 46916 48601 

31863 33285 33687 34909 36444 36845 37162 39591 41032 41662 42079 42467 43163 43959 44677 45040 *5733 46505 4691B *8902 

31866 33286 33688 34911 36446 36846 37164 39593 41033 41665 42081 42469 43165 43960 44660 45041 45735 48506 46922 48906 

31868 33287 33683 34918 36449 36847 37165 39594 41035 41667 42083 4247B 43167 43969 44682 45042 45736 46507 46924 48907 

31869 33269 33694 34920 38461 36849 37166 39595 41040 41668 42085 42480 43168 43971 44884 45044 45737 46509 46925 48908 

31870 33290 33896 34922 36464 36853 37170 39597 41044 41869 42089 42481 43173 43972 44686 45045 45738 46511 46927 46912 

31876 33294 33697 35174 36465 36857 37172 39598 41048 41674 42096 42489 43174 43976 44687 45048 45739 46513 46928 48913 

31877 33296 33698 35177 38473 36858 37176 39600 41052 41875 42097 42491 43176 43983 44690 45050 45741 46514 46929 48914 

31878 33297 33700 35181 36476 36860 3717B 39603 41053 41678 4209B 42497 43179 43965 44691 45052 45742 46515 46930 48917 

31 880 33298 33702 35182 36479 36861 37182 39604 41054 41679 42099 42498 43180 43967 44692 45053 45743 4651B 46931 48919 

31887 33300 33704 35183 36485 36862 37184 39605 41062 41680 42100 42499 43184 43988 44694 45056 45745 46521 46933 48921 

31888 33301 33705 35185 36489 36864 37166 39607 41064 41687 42102 42508 43189 43991 44704 45061 45746 46523 46934 46922 

31894 33304 33712 35186 36499 36865 37187 39611 41065 41688 42105 42510 43191 43993 44707 45063 45746 46529 48937 48923 

31897 33307 33716 35190 36503 36886 37188 39615 41070 41689 42107 42511 43193 43995 44708 45064 45749 46531 46939 48925 

31899 33309 33725 35196 36504 36872 37190 39619 41071 41690 421 OB 42515 43195 43996 44709 45065 45750 46532 48944 48926 

31906 33311 33729 35200 36505 36873 37198 39621 41072 41692 42109 42516 43197 43999 44711 45069 45752 46535 46948 48927 

31907 33312 33731 35203 36507 36874 3719S 39623 41073 41698 42113 42517 43199 44001 44714 45071 45759 48537 46955 48929 

31909 33313 33732 35205 36509 36876 37202 39625 41076 41700 42117 42518 43201 44003 *4715 45074 45767 46538 46956 48930 

31913 33315 33737 35207 36511 36878 37203 39629 41081 41706 42119 42520 43209 44005 44716 45075 45789 46539 46959 48932 

31919 33316 33738 35209 38513 36880 37204 39634 41083 41714 42121 42524 43217 44007 44720 45077 45781 46541 46960 48934 

31923 33317 33739 35210 36516 36882 37206 39638 41085 41720 42133 42525 43219 *4008 44721 45080 45793 46542 46961 48935 

31924 33318 33741 35211 38518 36885 37207 39640 41089 41721 42135 42526 43221 44019 44722 45082 45795 46543 48963 48936 

31925 33325 33743 35212 38520 36887 37210 39842 41096 41722 42138 42527 43227 44021 44726 45083 45797 46545 48965 48937 

31926 33334 33748 35218 36521 36888 37214 39643 41098 41723 42147 42530 43233 44022 44727 45064 45799 46547 46966 48938 

31927 33337 33750 35220 36522 36888 37218 39844 41102 41726 42149 42532 43235 44023 4*728 45089 *5802 46548 46968 48940 

31929 33339 33752 35224 36526 36891 37219 39646 41103 4172B 42155 42533 43239 44031 44732 45091 45803 46550 46969 48948 

31931 33340 33755 35225 36527 36892 37220 39647 41112 41730 42156 42537 43241 44033 44736 45100 456% 46551 46975 48852 

'31937 33341 33756 35229 36528 36894 37222 39650 41114 41735 42157 42539 43243 44035 44740 45101 45810 46554 46977 48954 

31939 33345 33757 35234 36529 36896 37223 39651 41118 41742 42158 425*3 43248 44036 44753 45104 45815 *6555 46979 48961 

31940 33349 33759 35238 36530 38897 37224 39656 41122 41744 42161 42546 43251 44038 44755 45105 45816 46556 48980 48962 

31945 33351 33764 35239 36533 36898 37225 39657 41124 41753 42162 42548 43255 44040 44757 45107 45B17 46557 46981 48963 

31951 33363 33769 35240 36535 36900 37232 39658 41129 41754 42168 42550 43257 44041 44758 45109 45818 46561 46983 48965 

31952 33367 33773 35241 38536 36904 37234 39661 4 1131 41755 42169 42551 43534 44042 44759 45110 45819 46565 46985 48967 

31055 33370 33777 35244 38543 36905 37237 39665 41132 41757 42170 42552 43536 44044 44760 45111 45821 48567 46987 48970 

31956 33372 33778 35245 36544 36906 37238 39669 41133 41759 42172 42553 43539 44047 44763 45112 45823 46568 469B8 48971 

31959 33377 33779 35246 36547 36908 37238 39673 41135 41765 42175 42563 43542 44049 44765 45415 45824 46571 46989 48972 

31971 33381 33782 3S248 36549 30912 37244 39879 41139 41706 42178 42568 43543 44052 44766 45417 45825 46573 4B991 48974 

31978 33365 33791 35251 36551 38913 37246 39681 41143 41767 42180 42853 43544 44053 44773 45418 45826 48574 46992 48978 

31983 33387 33792 35252 38553 36914 37248 39683 41146 41769 42184 42859 43548 44056 44774 45419 45831 46575 46993 48981 

31985 33390 33793 35255 36555 36919 37253 39665 41148 41770 42185 42860 43551 44057 44775 45421 45832 46577 46997 48983 

31986 33391 3379S 35256 36556 36921 37254 39689 41149 41771 42186 42861 43557 44060 44776 45422 45635 46579 46998 46984 

31967 33398 33797 35259 36557 36922 37257 39690 41153 41778 42191 42862 43558 44061 44779 45427 45836 465B6 46999 48985 

31989 33402 33798 35260 36559 36923 37260 39691 41154 41779 42199 42867 43559 44062 44781 45429 45846 46590 47000 48987 

31993 33406 33799 35261 36562 36926 37261 39693 41158 417B2 42200 42874 43565 44064 44783 45436 45648 46591 47006 48988 

31995 33407 33804 35263 36564 36927 37262 39695 41160 417B3 42205 42677 43566 44066 447B5 45437 45850 46592 47007 40997 

31996 33408 33805 35267 36570 36928 37263 39697 41162 41785 42208 42880 43567 44068 44786 45438 45852 46597 47013 48999 

31997 33409 33808 35268 36572 36930 37268 39696 41163 41787 42209 42082 43571 44072 44787 45447 45854 46596 47017 49000 

31999 33410 33810 35269 38576 36937 37272 39700 41164 41789 42210 42884 43572 44073 44789 45448 45856 46601 47019 49330 

32000 33411 33811 35271 38577 36939 37273 39701 41166 41791 42212 42885 43575 44074 44795 45449 45859 46802 47021 49331 

33008 33412 33812 35273 38578 36940 37274 39702 41170 41794 42216 42888 43579 44076 44797 45453 45866 46603 47023 49335 

33010 33413 33814 35281 36586 36941 37277 39703 41171 41799 42220 42895 43581 44079 44799 45458 45888 46610 47027 49337 

33013 33414 33815 35283 36590 36942 37278 39712 41172 41801 42226 42896 43583 44081 44803 45480 45870 48813 47502 49339 

33015 33415 33818 35284 3S592 36943 37279 38714 41174 41803 42228 42897 43591 44082 44804 45462 45871 46614 47503 49344 

33019 33419 33820 35292 36599 38947 37280 39719 41178 41805 42230 42698 43592 44089 44806 45470 45872 46615 47509 49345 

33026 33421 33823 35301 36604 36949 37281 39723 41178 41806 42232 42901 43593 44091 44810 45476 45875 46817 47511 49346 

33027 33423 33826 35306 36610 36951 37288 39728 41180 41807 42234 42903 43595 44092 44811 45477 45877 46622 4B499 49359 

33028 33425 33832 35308 36615 36952 37297 39737 41181 41811 42235 42907 43601 44093 44813 45478 45878 46623 48602 49362 

33030 33429 33835 35309 36619 36953 37298 39741 41184 41813 42236 42909 43602 44095 44B15 45400 458B4 46628 48604 49364 

33032 33434 33836 35312 36621 38955 37303 39743 411B5 41815 42242 42912 43735 44097 44818 45481 45886 46630 4B605 49365 

33035 33436 33837 35313 36623 36856 37304 39746 41186 41817 42243 42914 43736 44098 44822 45483 *5888 46632 48607 49368 

33043 33441 33840 35314 36625 36957 37305 39749 411B7 41820 42244 42918 43741 44099 *4823 45484 45892 46636 48611 49371 

33046 33444 33841 35315 36627 36963 37307 39754 41188 41823 42246 42920 43742 44100 44826 45485 45S97 46638 48613 49373 

33052 33446 33848 35316 36629 36964 37322 39758 41192 41826 42250 42922 43743 44101 44827 45488 45899 46639 48615 49379 

33053 33450 33847 35324 36630 36965 37324 39762 41196 41836 42256 42923 43747 44103 44828 45469 45901 46640 48617 49384 

33054 33451 33848 35325 36631 36966 37330 39765 41203 41638 42257 42924 43749 44109 44831 45490 45903 46642 48619 49391 

33055 33452 33849 35326 38633 36069 37333 39766 41204 41839 42259 42928 43756 44113 44832 45496 45904 46648 48624 49393 

33056 33455 33854 35327 36635 36971 37337 39769 41205 41840 42261 42931 43757 44116 44833 45499 45905 46657 48631 49395 

33057 33457 33856 35329 36637 36973 37339 39773 41206 41842 42262 42933 43758 44118 44834 45534 45908 46658 46633 49396 

33058 33461 33858 35330 36639 36975 37341 39774 41208 41843 422B4 42934 43760 44120 44635 45537 45909 46659 48634 49397 

33059 33467 33859 35331 36643 36978 37343 39783 41210 41844 42265 42935 43762 44126 44837 45538 45910 46662 48635 49403 

33067 33469 33860 35334 36645 36979 37347 39786 41212 41848 42266 42937 43765 44132 44639 45539 45914 46884 48639 49406 

33068 33470 33865 35335 36846 36880 37348 39787 41214 41849 42272 42938 43767 44136 44640 45543 45915 46667 48641 49407 

33072 33477 33867 35339 36651 36961 37353 39803 41215 41850 42281 42943 43768 44144 44841 45547 45917 46668 48647 49408 

33074 33479 33868 35341 36652 36982 37358 39805 41216 41852 42282 42947 43769 44145 44843 45548 45921 46671 48649 49410 

33080 33480 33869 35342 38653 36984 37359 39806 41218 41B58 42283 42949 43770 44146 44845 45549 45925 46673 48651 49420 

33082 33483 33870 35343 36655 36986 37368 39808 41219 41861 42284 42950 43773 44148 44847 45550 4592B 46876 48656 49422 

33089 33489 33871 35345 36656 36989 37369 38810 41222 41B67 42285 42952 *3774 44152 44852 45551 45931 46677 48657 49424 

33091 33491 33872 35346 36664 36991 37371 39816 41226 41870 42286 42954 ‘3775 44155 44856 45553 45936 46680 48658 49430 

33093 33493 33873 35347 38866 36962 37375 39818 41230 41874 42287 42658 «3~82 44157 44859 45556 4S941 46681 48660 49431 

33095 33495 33878 35349 38668 38995 37377 398Z3 41233 41877 42288 42959 '3788 44162 44866 45557 45943 46687 48662 49437 

33100 33497 33879 35350 36670 36999 37378 39824 41234 41878 42289 42960 43787 44167 44870 45558 45945 46688 48663 49439 

33102 33499 33882 35352 36671 37003 37379 39825 41235 41882 42291 42966 43*93 44169 44674 45562 45949 46697 48664 49445 

33104 33500 33684 35354 36672 37004 37381 39833 41237 41884 42292 42967 43799 44173 44B75 45564 45950 46698 48665 49447 

33106 33501 33885 35358 36674 37005 37384 39835 4123B 41886 42295 42968 43U04 44178 44878 45568 45951 46702 48666 49455 

33106 33502 33886 35360 36675 37007 37386 39836 41239 41888 42297 42972 43805 44180 44879 45571 45953 46708 48666 *9457 

33110 33503 33889 35364 36676 37008 37390 3983B 41240 41889 42299 42974 43806 44183 44881 45573 45954 46710 48669 49458 

33112 33504 33590 35 366 3S87S 37013 37397 33839 41241 41890 42300 42963 43809 44184 44883 45574 45955 46711 48670 49460 

33116 33507 33893 35367 36679 37014 37399 39B40 41479 41891 42301 42984 43810 441B5 44885 45575 45959 46716 48672 49461 

33120 33509 33909 35369 36865 37024 37401 39846 41481 41892 42303 42985 43811 44188 44889 45577 45961 46718 46673 49462 

33122 33510 33911 35371 36688 37025 37402 38848 41483 41894 42305 42987 43812 44160 44894 45581 45963 46720 48674 49471 

33129 33511 33913 35372 36690 37026 37403 40853 41485 41895 42313 42993 43816 44191 44896 45583 45965 46722 48675 49472 

33130 33512 33915 35377 36694 37028 37406 40854 41488 41901 42314 42994 43818 44192 44898 45584 45968 46723 48676 49473 

33131 33513 33916 35379 36695 37032 37410 40855 41489 41906 42318 42995 43820 44193 44900 45586 45972 46724 48684 49474 

33132 33515 33919 35380 36696 37033 37411 40859 41491 41910 42324 43000 43822 44194 44902 45507 45974 46725 40686 49477 

33143 33516 33921 35381 36697 37034 37414 40863 41495 41912 42326 43001 43824 44203 44903 45588 *5980 48726 48888 49*78 

33145 33527 33927 35383 36698 37035 37*15 40884 41506 41916 42337 43002 43825 44206 44904 45590 45982 46727 46690 49479 

33146 33528 33928 35384 36705 37038 37418 40874 41510 41919 42339 43003 43827 44208 44905 45591 45906 46730 48692 49981 

33147 33534 33931 35385 38713 37037 37418 40876 41513 41920 423*1 43004 43630 44210 44906 45606 45987 46732 486S4 

33149 33542 33932 35395 3S715 37048 37419 40877 41517 41923 42344 43005 43831 44212 44907 *5607 4599* 46733 48698 

33151 33543 33833 35396 36717 37052 39426 40880 4151B 41924 423*6 43006 43632 44215 44908 45608 45998 46734 48700 

33154 33548 33940 35398 36719 37054 39435 *0090 41523 41925 42350 43009 *3833 44217 44910 45610 46004 48735 48702 

33158 33554 33942 35400 36720 37056 39436 40892 41530 41929 42353 43011 43836 44220 44912 45616 46006 46736 48709 

33160 33566 33943 35402 36721 37058 39437 40896 41531 41830 42355 43013 43838 442% 44913 45618 46008 46738 48710 


- On July 1 , 1985 the principal amount of bonds drawn for redemption together with accrued interest thereon to said date will be paid against presentation of the bonds at the offices of: The 
Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A., New York, New York: London, England; Luxembourg, Luxembourg; and Paris, France; Banque de Commerce S.A.. Brussels, Belgium; Nederlandse 
Credietbank N.V., Amsterdam, Holland: Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale. Dusseldorf, Federal German Republic; and HandeisBank N.W.. Zurich. Switzerland. 

interest on bonds drawn for redemption wijl cease to accrue on and after July 1 , 1985 and such bonds must be presented for payment together with the July 1 . 1986 coupon appertaining 
thereto, failing which the face value of any missing unmatured coupon will be deducted from the principal sum to be repaid. 

The July 1, 1985 coupon should be detached and presented for payment in the usual manner. 

After this redemption the balance of bonds remaining outstanding will be $8,000,000. 

■ The following bonds drawn for redemption on July 1, 1984 in the aggregate principal amount of $34,000 have not been presented for payment. 

28 30 31 48 TO 287 1380 1361 3224 17432 41144 41152 41157 41159 41161 41552 41584 41590 41591 41596 41600 41603 41734 41736 41760 -41763 41859 41862 41866 *1689 42531 43576 43589 48960 

THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, N A. 

Principal Paying Agent 
Dated: May 30, 1985 


:« 1 - 








4 


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12538 120 5.30 r 9.20 0X0 r 5.95 

12538 125 150 5.10 r 150 6.W r 

12530 130 035 125 r 531 t 1155 

12528 135 0.10 1XS r 10.10 r r 

SAW Canadian DoUora-cents pot unit. 

CDollr 72 r 059 13S 023 aJD r 

7252 73 r r M5 0J5 1JS r 

7252 74 r OX 045 152 t T 

7252 75 r r r r r 15B 

7252 74 r 0.14 r 150 r r 

62X00 West German Mariwamts permit. 

OMark 29 r r r r 0.T7 r 

32.12 X r 035 r OOl US r 

r 007 r o.w 


32.12 30 r 035 r OOl 0 

32.12 31 IX r r 007 

32.12 32 048 IX 1-90 032 IX 

32.13 X 014 090 145 IX 157 

32.17 34 ox r IX r 

32.12 X r ax r r 

mow French Froms-lOth* of o cent par unit 
FFranc 100 5.30 r 7.50 T 

A»25aooo Japanese Yco-ieotlts ota ant per unit. 
jywi V r r r 0.00 

39-76 40 019 r r OX 

39.76 41 r 052 r r 1 

CUN SMU Frnacs ajnM per MR. 

SPrnnc X r r r r 0 

3022 X r r r 001 0 

3022 36 r r r r 0 

31122 37 IX r r 0.10 0 

J027 X 047 r r OX 1 

3077 X DX1 r 151 096 


3022 42 OOl 

Total caHvotun 
Total put vat 4542 


40 HJ)5 077 141 

41 052 049 r 


r r 010 r 

r 001 029 r 

r r ox uo 

r o.io ox r 

r OX IX r 

151 096 r r 


Coll open W.MI524 
Put open lot. UJ529 


r— Net traded, s— No option ottered, o — Old. 
Lost ts premium (purchase or led. 

Sew AP. 


r* wi 
30J6 m* 
53* 5M 
2634 2414 
91k 9V. 
10* MM 
341b 3S5k 
X 2415 
284k 28* 
3914 m 

30V5 3044 
2044 204k 

744 744 


49* 

32* UAL 


• 

5741 

49 

47* 

49 +1* 

34* 

349k UAL Ft 


529 

22 

31* 

32 + * 

15* 

79b UCCEL 



11 

96 

14* 

13* 

14 

24* 

14*k UGI 

2X4 

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23* 

23* 

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19* UGI pf 

2X5 120 


2Bz 33 

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1319 

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230 

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103* 

75 UnlNV 

5L26# S3 

18 

745 

99* 

99* 

99* + * 

41* 

309k UCamp 

1X4 

49 

18 

■43k 34* 

34* 

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57* 

32* UnCortt 

X40 

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39* 

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34 

5* 

5* 

5* 


corn (am 

5X00 (MI mild mum- Oct lory per biatiei 
351 2X2 Jul 2.724k 273 

1511k 257 S*P 257 256 

2.95 253 Dec 2S3* 253* 

3.10 252* Mar 252Vj 253 

321* 257* MOV 247* 247* 

256 257* Jul 250 2J0tk 

2561k 253* SOP 252 252* 

Est. SaiM Praw. Sales 25.149 

Prew.DoyOpen irrt.Hn J46 oft 675 
SOYBEANS (CST1 
5500 bu mint mu m-doilare Per bushel 
7.99 556 Vk Jul 557 551* 

756 155 Auo 53Vi 158* 

171 553 Sen 154 156* 

6 50 5501k Nov 551 553* 

179 170 Vk Jan 172 173 

742 £51 Vt Mo r 552 SXlk 

7.79 189 ftflev 5X9* 190 Vk 

65B 5.95 Jul 5551k 557 

EsL Sales Prw.Sataa 25025 

Prev. Dav Open Int 62534 oft 6*4 
SOYBEAN MEAtlCBTl 
MB torts- dollara per ton 
196X 117 JO Jul 11030 119X 

10000 12090 Auo MIX 12150 


London Commodities 

May 29 


Paris Commodifies 

May 29 


lets o( S3 lens. 

ton 

1.755 1.740 1.775 1.780 
1X75 1.776 1.796 IJ97 
1.7-M 1.762 1.736 1.787 
1.717 I.TS 1.748 1.750 
I’M 1.751 1750 1.759 
l.Tol 1765 1 768 1.776 
I 1.767 1.77S 1768 1.783 
1 lal”. ol 10 lens 

frir toe 

7315 IDS 3052 2055 

IJ57 7JU» 74NC 2095 
7.107 7.105 2135 2136 
7.151 7.154 7.187 1190 
2915 2700 2235 2248 
7.190 7193 7.730 7.773 
7.190 2X0 2.185 2215 
■ots ol 5 Iwtv 



Asian Commodities 

Mav 29 


HONG-KONS GOLD FUTURES 
U.SJPW ou nce 

HHA Low Bid Ask 

MOV _ N.T. N.T. 31000 312310 3 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 3(000 3123X1 3 
Jlv _ N.T. N.T. J12JU 31600 3 
Auo - N.T. N.T. 313X 315310 3 
Od _ 319X 319 0Q 3163X3 3303X1 
Dec _ NT. N.T. 37100 32300 
FC« _ N.T. N T. 32500 3773X1 
Apl _ 33000 33000 3303)0 33200 
Volume: 26 Ion ol 100 02 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5X per ounce 


Cash Prices May 29 


Commodity oAdUntt 
Coffee 4 Santos. Id 

Prtntdalh 64/3) 30 *. vd _ 

Steel W I lets ( Pttt.l, Ion 

Iron I Fdry. Philo- Ian 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt. . 

Lead Spot, Id 

copoer elect- lb 

Tin (Straits], R> 

Zjnc E. SI. l_ Basis, lb 

Pal lad i um. oi — 

Silver N.Y- oi 

Source: AP. 


IBDlOO 120X0 Auo 721X 121X0 

179 JO 1 23.90 Sep 124X 12433 

WLSO 12650 Oct 127.10 T27.50 

1M3K 13220 Doc 13280 13120 

1633X1 135X0 Jan 13550 11SJW 

•20650 14000 Mar 1463)0 141.10 

16250 U53» MOV USX U&50 

167X 1503)0 Jul I483M W9JJ0 

Eat. Solas Prev. Sales 10X62 

Prev. Day Open I nt. 53X01 up!*4 
SOYBEAN OIL (CUT) 

60000 Fto- dollar* per 100 lbs. 

3273 2270 Jo| 303)6 3QJ9 

315*5 2250 AU9 2A46 29.10 

31.10 2250 Sep 27.95 28.13 

3037 2290 Oct 27JB 27.17 

29 JK 2290 Dec 26.10 2627 

2 9XO JIM Jon 25X5 2SAS 

2260 24X0 Mar 2SJ5 2£30 

27X5 24.40 MOV 253XJ 25X 

25.15 MX Jul 34X5 2428 

EsI. Sales Prev.Saloi 12X91 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 60X59 ueLdSt 
OATS (CBT) 

sxo ix)minrrr>ait>- dot tors aer bwhei 
IJIVk lx* Jul 1JS0VI 150* 

179 IX SOP 1-58 IX 

1-X2V5 L54 Dec 1A4 1.S4* 

IM Ml Mar 

IX IX MOV 

Eli. Sales Prev. Sales 297 

Prev.DayOpen int. 2813 oH2B 


SJ6* UM 
USK 556 
552* UM 
SXVk SL5B* 
547* 568* 
SXf* £79* ■ 
546 £87* ■ 

593 593 


11100 11150 

171.10 12150 

324.10 12430 

127.10 127.10 
T322C mJO 
13450 13450 
189.18 139 JO 
U5X 1453X1 
14800 14900 


2946 3023 +.14 

2073 29312 +.16 

2725 2EU5 +3N 
2603 2608 —JB 
2SX 25JB — tfl 
25X 2541 —M 

'x.re. wtw — jo 
2445 MJO —33 
MM 2455 -ill 


IX IX —m 
147* IX —in* 
IX* 152* -%01Vk 
157 -3)1* 

IX -JDVk 


Industrials 


Dividends Mav 29 


HtOb Leer 

Jun 311-20 31 W» 

Auo 31560 314X 

SOP N.T. N.T. 

CJCt N.T. N.T. 

Volume: *o loUof IOOol 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Motorskm cents Per Mio 
Close 

Bid AX 

Jun 19450 1953)0 

Jlv 19325 19350 

Acs 19450 (953X1 

Sen 19650 19800 

volume- Slots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per MM 
Close 

BU Ask 

RSS I Jun— 17575 171J5 
RS01 Jlv— 16875 16925 

RSS 2 Jun— 167.75 148J5 

RSS 3 Jun- 76575 166.75 

RSS 4 Jun— 161 7S 14X75 
RSS 5 Jim— 156J5 1X75 


Settle Settle 
311 « 31450 

31 SX 31840 
31740 32050 

319X 32250 


Bid Ask 

1943X1 19530 

1933)0 19X75 

19450 1953)8 

19650 19X00 


Previous 
BM ASk 
16950 17050 

M&2S 16875 
16725 16825 

16525 16625 

lal 25 16X25 

IS62S 15825 


Gold Options (prim h> Jror.i 



is waiin 

<25 S.-5 1050.1200 


Gold 31075 3M2S 

ValcHsWUteWcU &A. 

I. QuN * Moof-Btaac 
121 1 Coni I. SekmW 
Tel 310ZSI . Trim MJ85 


UNICO 

INVESTMENT FUIVD 


The half-year(y report 1985 may 
be obtained from the Paying 
Agents Of hum the 

Amsterdam IUmmi Office 
NJL Voerimrgwd 162-170^ 
1072 SJ Amsterdanv HoBcrkL 
Tel.: 20-262363. Tbtj 15412- 

Net asset value per unit as per 

30A19B& DJA75.17. 


Company 

Per 

Amt 

Pay 

Rec 

INCREASED 



Angelica Coro 

O 




FsT Nail Bancoro 

u 

.14 

M 


N Jtfm RoTources 

G 

55 

M 


Newfoundland Tele 

U 


6-15 

6-14 

PresIdaniKk Ule 

5 

04 

7-1 

6>14 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 


Intarpcm — Her -4X5 





STOCK 




Manhattan Indtn 


IS 

7-T 

6-13 

USUAL 




Abram Industries 

a 

.06 

7-: 

6-14 

Alcar Inc 

u 

.11 

M2 

A-27 

Bank at Novo Scotia 

u 


7.^ 


Brockwgy Inc 


33 

+53 

6-:« 

CaiMat Ca 

c 

15 

70 

+15 

Connecticut Energy 

Q 

.40 

v5B 


First Voikngni FflCi 

y 

J3 

A-il 

5-51 

IPALCO Entarer 

c 

.‘6 

7-15 


Kov Carp 

a 


6-IA 

Mo 

Mlldtcll Erpy A Dov 

G 

£i 

/O 

6-15 

NBSCCwp 

13 

.19 

6-38 

MS 

Nevada Svm S Lit 

O .15 k 

773 

ft-17 

Phtltn Morris 

a sixo 

7-10 

6-14 

Redman Indvt 

a 07 • 

:■» 

r-e 

Seairtty Bancoro 

a 

2t 

T.| 

6-14 

Sorrvmli Bancorp 

u 


6-14 

V31 

Tucson El Pwr 

• u 

.74 

+:< 

+ 13 

UldCKFtncl 

0 

13 IT 

7-1 

*■’ 

Wot* Ins. Jon mon Co 

u 

371 

ft-J? 

D-\ t 

Westvaca 

Q 

43 

7-J 

6-12 

A-Atmual. M+AanlMy. 

GOwrierl* : S-Seml- 

Annual. 





Source: UPl ■ 






London Metals 
May 29 


Close PrwlBoi 

■Id AX Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 

Start Me ear metric tee 

wot B5D50 B51X B 703X1 871.00 

forward 874310 87S3I0 89350 S94JB 

COPPER CATHODES (Hloh Grade) 

Sterllny par metric ion 

soot 1.178310 1.1 79 JO 1.19000 1 .1923)8 

lorword 1,17800 1 .1793)0 1,18900 1.19008 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Starling mt metric too 
SPO) 1.17060 1,174.00 1,179310 1.18000 

forward 1.17000 1.1713)0 1.1793)0 1.18000 

LEAO 

Sterling per me tr ic Ion 

2&SS W5 -“ 

tarward 30 IX 3023X) 3003X1 JO IX 

NICKEL 

Start lag per metric too 
spot 442000 UntO 4245100 JJW* 

lorword 4^1000 421 5J0 L43S3X) 424000 

SILVER 


Livestock 


voiuma : 0 lets at 25 tans. 
Source: Kevlars. 


spot 486JG 4873X1 47850 47950 

l or w or d 5013X1 502X0 494X0 4953X1 

TIN (Standard) 

Starting per metric ton 
spot 951SX0 952SXQ 954100 9AS5JB 

forward 9500X0 9590X0 9X0310 951000 

ZINC 

Sterttao per metric tan 
spat 4T2X0 413X0 XSX0 604X0 

tarward 61800 6193)0 614JO 615X0 

Source: AP. 


954SX0 9X5X0 
9X0X0 951000 


S&P 100 Index Options 
May 28 


Strtts 

CodMce 

Pile* JM 

Jtr 

an 

sep 

16 £ 


U* 



I6S 


__ 




>7# 

•Tt 

J4-: 

_ 

u 

113 

!k 

1+1 

ii. 

n 

us 

4H 

t 

7-1 

Fv 

as 

1 > 

4 

it 

S* 

11 C 

Lb 


!l» 

74 

TK 

1.16 

n 


Ik 


DM Futures Options 

May 29 

XGeuOTNnrt-ffiffllraBlx arts oer rark 


I 


CATTLE (CMC) 

40000 Ibsr cents per lb. 

MJO 59X5 Jun 4150 42X0 

6757 6845 Auo 64J5 64X0 

6598 6810 Od 6X40 61X5 

67 JS 6150 D«rc 64^ 64A5 

6725 42. W? Fab 45.14 4520 

6757 6320 Apr 6540 MX 

66J5 46X0 Jun 65X0 65X5 

Ext. Sales 16X07 Prev.Sales 21X99 
Prev. Dav Open Int 52X03 oH5B6 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMB) 

44X00 n».- cents per b 
73J0 6427 AU0 69X5 69X5 

73X0 6440 Sep 6865 6845 

71X2 64X3 Oct 68JS5 6855 

7X2) 65X5 Nov 69X5 69XS 

7940 6640 Jen 7X13 70.15 

7DJ0 66.10 MOT 7836 70.10 

EsL Sales 1XW Prw.Saies M83 
Prev. Dov Open Int. 7204 up 105 
HOGS(CME) 

30X00 ibnr cents per tb. 

5540 4440 Jun 48X5 4820 

S5J7 47 JB Jul 51 JH 51.15 

5437 47X7 Aue 3040 30X5 

5L75 4500 Oct <7.10 47X5 

50X5 <637 Dec 44X0 «<0 

5000 46X3 Fob 49X0 49.10 

•47JJS 4430 APT 4S75 4SJS 

49 JK <6X0 Jun 

49X5 <7X5 Jul 

Est.5alee 5.125 Prev.Satas UM 
Prev. Day Open Int. 24X69 up 225 
PORK BELLI RS (CME) 

38000 fbv- cants per lb. __ 

8227 61.12 Jul <120 <527 

5843 68X0 A US 63X5 6533 

76X0 61U Feb 7225 7100 

7520 64X0 Mar 7259 72X8 

7540 70.18 MOV 

3AM <0X8 Jul 

EsL Sales 4.161 Prev.Satas 8564 
Prev. Dov Open lot. 11292 w301 


6145 <1X7 
6425 64X7 
6J.15 6X57 
64X0 6445 
6 SJX 65X0 
6540 66X0 

65X5 65X5 


MN <0X0 
70X5 70.15 

TUB 78X0 


47X0 47X5 
8948 5045 
50X5 504* 
46X0 47X0 

4795 48X5 
4U2 48X5 

45X5 45X7 

4B.10 
49X0 


MIS <115 
6443 <5X2 
7220 72X2 
7250 72X0 

7X72 
72X5 


Financial 


9X81 
9228 
9113 
91X8 91X0 
9144 9133 

91X0 9U0 
TUB 9UD 
9089 



US. Treasun Bill Rales 
May 28 


>mamt> 7X3 

frmonlti 7X7 

one year 7J» 

Source. Salomon Bremen 


YleM TMd 
746 7C 


Huh 1B4 j 4 10*18251* Ota uu -a« 

Source: CSCE. 


— | Abortion Bale in U.S. Slows 

i l ulled Frets IntenulionaJ 

• — Legal abortions 

■— in tne Uoitoi Stales increased From 
^ £ 9 /’ 6 ? 6 1 in 1980 *0 1.300.760 in 
Md Lnesi year for which sia- 

7C to tics were available, according to 
7.77 U.S. health officials. Bui thel981 
118 rate of increase was the lowest re- 
ported since 196<). 


Strike 

C0Hs4eMc 



Price Jw 

Sw 

Dec 




31 1X4 

221 

240 




37 078 

157 

1.99 

am 



33 (MS 

1XS 

1X9 

0JS6 

159 


34 0X3 

066 

1.10 

1X1 

TX3 

UI 

* oxn 

OX) 

exo 

■L# 

US 


36 — 

US 

u/ 


135 

Ul 

EitlnalBdtiMigLSJfS 




CaR»: Tw. VOL 1X57 epee idt «xs 


Pete : Tut veL 1523 Oped M. 37.994 


Source: CME, 






New UA Envoy lor Belgrade 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan on Wednesday 
nominated John Scanlan, an offi- 
cial in the State Department’s Bu- 
reau of European Affairs, as the 
new U.S. ambassador to Yugosla- 
via. He is to succeed David Ander- 


COFPCE C (NYC3CE) 

37X80 ltaa.< cants par to. 

152X0 122X1 Mav 14L50 4X5 

149X0 171X0 Jirt M45B 144X1 144X0 U4X3 —22 

147.58 127X0 Sop U5J0 14SX8 145X0 54544 

146X0 129X5 Dae 145X0 145X0 145X0 145X6 — X3 

14548 125L5B MOT 14A4S +.15 

10X0 1X5J0 JU( ICXS +.12 

142X0 132XS Sap 141X5 — .13 

Esf.Stics 1X92 Pnrv.Satas 1X25 
Pm. Dav Open int. 12X93 oft 162 

SUGARWORLO 11 (NYCSCE) 

1 UUXMI IbA-conrs per Ox 

9X5 2X7 JiH 3X0 3X2 2X7 2X7 — JS 

9X5 306 See IIS 3.17 3.18 111 — m 

9X5 JR Od 3X9 3X2 139 3X8 — X2 

7X5 160 Jan _ 3X3 +X2 

7X3 3.W MOT 4.15 4X1 4.12 418 +3Q 

7,15 4X8 May 434 436 433 4X5 -OD 

fw*7 445 Jul 4M 4X7 453 456 —JR 

420 47< SOP 470 

4M 478 OCf 488 488 4SJ 485 —A 2 , 

EsL Salas 6X30 Prtv.Mtl 5272 
Pm. Dav Optai Int, 913)53 up 239 

COCOA (NYCS4X1 I 

U matne tom- S par taa 

2400 1998 Jul 2070 5090 2Bg 2083 +11 

2415 7987 Sap 2946 2998 2041 2055 +4 

2337 IW OK 2227 20*0 2023 2044 +4 

MO It’S Mar 2028 3055 ZES 2051 +3 

2138 I960 MOV 2061 +5 

7110 I960 Jul 2078 3070 2870 20*6 +* 

BsLSalas Prw.Saies 2X37 

Piw. Dav Open Int 21X09 up 195 
ORANGE JUICE nrrem 

1 5jry1 aw. 1 v *» — ■». 

I&LSS 14060 Jul 140X0 14400 13440 143.15 +US . _ Bmau 

182X9 138X8 Sop 137X0 148X0 134X0 1<0JM +1X0 »***«» PO UND WMW 

1813)0 ' 138. 10 NOV 07X5 139X0 136X0 I3BX? _ ( s fS3F lm ^l!Sf nt ' 

TEU0 139X8 Jon T36X0 T 383X9 134X8 117X5 — JS . 1 - 3SS0 Jun 1X540 L2780 L25I5 1X735 +240 


lindens c omp i le d shortty beta 
Sf* OOMP. INDEX (CME) 

Batata and cents 

1913K) 154.10 Jun IRAS mu 

W7E5 }S?“ W2J0 

175X0 Dk 194A5 IMJ) 

_*tar_ 19420 

Est.5w*8 Prev.Sai«s au23 

Prev- Day Open Int 67.237 aftB< 

y*«jg LlNta OCCBT) 

Pgtata end cents 

US3 

mxo 200X0 Dec 207.15 207.15 

Prev. Day Open tat 

S3 SfS £5 !»« »J o 


iii a g fig B 

Prey. Doy Open int ISjaSMtSi 


W7J0 18M0 

SI ® 

198.15 198.15 


1V9A0 
302X8 mug 
207.15 207.J5 


108X5 18920 

J11X0 iua 

11110 1UM 

1)5X0 115X0 


2415 

2337 

TWO 

2138 

7110 

eat Solas 


1MJ OK 
1955 Mar 
I960 MOV 


1 Commodity Indexes ~ 

vzss = 

DJ-Funirw— ______ 

Own. Research Bureau. Kv; 
^toodv^s : base 100 : Dec. 31 1411 
p-mlMiwv: f-fiSal 31-1W1 - 
Reuters : base 100 ; &»p ie in, 

Dow Janas : base R?ltW. 


Qu caao Board 


Previous 

. 2U-M f 
1/028.90 
119-E3 
231 JO 




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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

Austria’s Voest, Japan’s OM 
To Set up Joint Chip Venture 


Yi-^ 


% sv 

^ is V 


Reuters 

VIENNA — Vocst-AIpine AG, 
the state-owned steel, engineering 
and electronics group, and Ob 
Electric Indnstiy Co. Ltd. of Japan 
agned an agreement Wednesday to 
invest S285 million in a joint ven- 
ture to manufacture large-scale in- 
tegrated circuits in Austria. 

Oki will have SI percent and 
Voest 49 percent of the yet on- 
named company, to be based in 
Graz in southern Austria. 

The investment will be maria in 
three phases, the companies miri 
The first, taking S16 mininn , \wH 
start immediaieiy and c ontinu e un- 
til production b^ins in the middle 
of next year, according to Voesf s 
chairman, Heribert Apfaltcx. - 

By the end of the third phase, in 
the early 1990s, the new company is 
expected to have An n ual sales of 
abbot 4 billion schillings ($868 mil- 
lion), he said. 

The company will start with a 
share capital of 40 million schil- 
lings, dang to 400 milli on by the 
end of the third phfl» 

Mr. Apf alter said the Aus trian 
government win provide aid equiv- 


Fateof SME of 'Italy Grows Confused 

Reuters ]Q3 hiTHon Kre more Qian Mr. 

ROME — The fate of Italy’s Benedetd’s bid and SO billion 
staie-coutroBed food group, SME, more than offered last week by 


Reuters 

ROME — The fate of Italy’s 
staie-con trolled food grou p , SME,. 
was further confused Wednesday 
by the emergence of a third offer 
from a partnership which includes 
a major competitor of rival bidder, 
Carlo de Beaedetti, the chairman 
of Olivetti SpA. 

The bid. confirmed by the state 
indns trial hnlrifng - company DU, 
was made jointly by two private- 
ly-owned Italian food groups, Fer- 
raro and Barilla, and private televi- 
sion magnate Silvio BednsconL 
k_Tbe gutnegh yjs offerin| ^) 


203 bilBoa lire more than Mr. de 
Benedetri’s bid and SO billion lire 
more than offered last week by an 
unidentified consortium. 

Mr. Barilla, BiriUmfs main com- 
petitor in Italy and a market leader 
in the food sector, was unavailable 
for comment. 

But Mr. de Beaedetti, cha i r ma n 
of Buitom winch has bid 497 billion 
lire for SME, said he stood by his 
valuation. 

Italy’s finance minis ter, Pierluigi 
Romiti, has. «*id the government 
has around three weeks to make up 
hs mind on Mr. de Beaedettfs bid. 


Floating Rate Notes 


May 29 


Dollar 


COWMlIttf 1M 


Unwr/MaL 
ADed IrtAfS 
MUedlrtdiR 
MBMIrWiW 
AH Lad irtjtiParp 
ArabBiioCwpn/W 
AlkaiHcFta ff/M 
AntraistafS 
BCD Comm Ital M 
BaNDinmn 
BcaDfRaMW/VI 
Bat Dl Roman 
Boo Santa SpirDofl 
Bangkok Bk (BUin 
Boa Carp 97 
BkGnmxn/W 
Bk Graeco *3/97 
BklretaadR 
Bk Ireland 97 
BkMoatraoiW 
Bk Montreal Vi 
BkMaatraain 
BkNhM YartiM 

Bk Nova Scotia M/n 

BkHavaSarttoM 

Bk Tokyo 93 

Bk Tokyo 19 

Bk Tokyo D 

Bk Tokyo FobN/n 

BkTokvoDadVfl 

Bank m nBrtcnO/SW 

BonkonTnioiaB 

BantmTnialM 

bhcophoIh 

BoH Fin 17791 

BO 95 

BUIat 99 

BUInta 

MiaamaV 

Bo bklaBwz99 

BOO 19 

BteoI7 

BfaOcttt 

Bin Janll 

Ska 99 

Bnp95 

BnH» 

BnnBSTM 

Bnnft 

Bno» 

fkwOT91 

BnpJulH 

BoK 

Ba Paribas Pare 

BqMnmlMI 

Bardnyi O/S 95 

BndanO/SN 

BarckmO/SPwD 

BorckmtVSM 

MUomPoro 

BUBlwnDadWM 

BdotaimH 

BvmiBkl9 

Boron Bk 0791 

BeMwn947M 

BaWMBOd997W 

Ccan 

Cot OS 

Oicn 90/91 

0490 

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ObcM(WUv) 

aocH 


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9W M9US lOJE 
■ fm momsciDM 

M, 0H7 M0JTBO21 
M TD-ii Sfi mn 

mk vatKinoui 

9 77« HJ0TS1D055 

9B. 17-11 99.55 99^5 
n loo 99 ja mo 
91k »H WUSM045 
9« SHU V9J3 VTS3 
7.975 M( 99J) 99X1 
SJk - 99 JS 99 JS 

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Mi 0741 99J1 9VJ2 
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194 H47 WU41D03I 
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Oartdkmta Bk PI 194 

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CBtcoroPtooPI 
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CanpFfaiCiX.97 
Condi Of Eurapa 92 

cefa/w 

Cd 91/95 

Ccf BT/TA 
CcfFdM 
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COMMB7792 


Cr Do Hard 19/92 
CrFeoiStrmm 
CrFar Exparim 
CrLvonnUilVK 
CrLmaotam 
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Crtmmrfia/W 
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FuB lot *4/94 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


Page 19 


alcnt to 55 percent of Voest* s in- 
vestment, wh ich will be channeled 
through a new leasing subsidiary of 
Voest that wifi build and equip the 
plant and lease it to the jointly 
owned company. 

Vocsfs chairman said the ven- 
ture is part of his company's strate- 
gy of diverafying from sied and 
rngmflrrmg . Last year, Voest won a 
500 million Domche marie (SI60 
nriffion) orda: from EBM Deutsch- 
land GmbH, a subsidiary of Inter- 


to produce multilayer circuit 
boards, 

Voest, through Austria NGkro- 
systeme Intartational GesmbH, al- 
ready is producing semiconductors 
at Graz in a joint venture with 
American Microsystems Inc. of 
Santa Clara, California. 

. Yashio Masada, a senior manag- 
ing director of Old, said the agree- 
ment with' Voest met his company’s 
need to set im production farifibes 
in Europe. Ola signed a contract 
last July urith France's state-owned 
Hromson-CSF to make metal ox- 
ide semiconductor gale arrays that 
can be used by both companies. 


S AS Reports 
Profit Increase 

Ratters 

STOCKHOLM — Scandi- 
navian Aiffojes Systran report- 
ed Wednesday that profits had 
increased in the first half of the 

year but said there would be no 
improvement in yearly remits 
because of strikes in Sweden 
and Denmark. 

Profit before appropriations 
and taxes rose 11.5 percent, to 
174 million kronor ($19.4 mil- 
lion) in the six months to the 
end of March, from 156 million 
kronor in the comparable 
1983-84 period. Jan Carbon, 
managing director, said yearly 
profits would be little dunged 
from 968 milli on kronor. 

All commercial flights to and 
from Sweden were grounded 
for 18 days by a civil servants’ 
strike in May. SAS, owned by 
Norway, Denmark and Swe- 
den, is seeking S30 million in 
compensation from the Swed- 
ish government. Flights were 
also disrupted in March and 
April by a three-week strike in 

Denmark. 


COMPANY NOTES 

Bd Resources Ltd. said it wiD 
raise S20Q mfiBon through a place- 
ment of S23J3 minion worth of SI, 
10.5-percent convertible preference 
shares at $8L50eacfa, the Annum n, 
Robert Hoboes & Court, told the 
animal meeting. He also said the 
mining company has not ruled out 
a takeover offer for Asarco Inti, 

rninlher mining rnnrwn 

British Aerospace PLC said it 
hp.q si gned a manufacturing, licens- 
ing and technical agreement with 
the dectro-qptxal and data sys- 
tems division of Hughes Aircraft 
Co. of California. The agreement is 
for the manufacture in the United 


Renault Plans 8,000 New Layoffs 


By Axel Krause approach to layoffs is followed, ac- mem described as "complementary 
International Herald Tribune cording to the sources. searches for liquidity." 

PARIS— In an effort to reduce “In general, if the same approach Some auto industry analysts 
its reconi losses, Renault, France’s is followed, we will approve," a have estimated that Renault may 
suue-owned automaker, plans to government official saidof the new about 45 billion francs in 


An Industry Down at the Heel 

it- T ovAfffi (Continued from Page 15) Despite the increase in total shoe 

f XJClYvJxS nnue to squeeze his profits, he said, sales, retailers overestimated the 

* the company may be forced to strength of the economy. Consum- 

ment described as “com p le m entary make shoes abroad. ers bought new shoes but not as 

searches for liquidity." “Well try to hold off as long as m&ny 35 anticipated. At the end erf 

Some auto industry analysts possible," hie said. 1984. footwear makers had 216 per- 

have estimated that Renault may The strongest manufacturers in more in finished inventory 
require about 45 billion francs in the footwear industry are large, di- than they did in 19850, according to 
financing between 1985 and 1991. versified companies, including U5. Kun Salmon Associates. 

There is also speculation that Mr. Shoe Corp. and Melville Corp. Even the healthiest sectors of the 
Besse may be traced to sell ailing Such enterprises import some shoes shoe business failed to perform as 
divirions and plants, and possibly themselves and depend on other expected. Athletic shoes bec ame 
its 46.4-pexcenl holding in Amen- consumer products and retailing ^ strongest footwear category 
can Motors Corp., the fifth largest operations for most of their sales, with a 10-percent sales gain. But 
U.S. automaker. But last year was difficult for the roany American shoemakers hare 


in Ameri- consumer ] 
fib largest operations 


A company spokesman on diversified companies, loo. 


cut an additional 8,000 jobs in layoffs Wednesday He empha- financing between 1985 and 1991. versified companies, including U5. 
1986, reducing the work force in sized that layin»" off workers There also speculation that Mr. Shoe Corp.. and Melvfik Corp. 
France to 80,000, sources dose to through early retirements, for ex- Besse ** foreed tQ ^ ailing Such enterprises import some shoes 
the company said Wednesday. amplefdoes not add to unemploy- dwaoos and plants, and possibly themselves and depend on other 
The company has already begun meat, now 10 percent of the work its 464-percait boI^ in Ameri- consumer products and Iretailmg 
dimmaSg3»ai 10,000 of its force in FranceTimd rising. can Motors Corp, the fifth largest cyerauons for mostof their sate. 

QfttVYKnh* n last that will he com- „ . . _ . . U.S. automaker. But last year was difficult for the 

rileted bv lie end of this year The ■ Pnme M ° usler . Fabius, a company spokesman on diversified companies, too 

plS^terSo^rifibe SSSfjSSrcteadte Wc f n P day ^ . B ro^ SbwGom SuLouis. a 

presented to nnirane on June 17 as MU0 . nal naa« inoone, said tnai has no current plans to with- large shoe wholesaler, importer and 
L 1 jSSSiSE^bn to draw from the United Stales, and retailer, had to cut back rails own 

B^^ U ^aSt’s chair- ^ rarKe ^ s themost difficul t part of t h a[ between AMC and uni cm shoe production as a result of im- 
mar/ 865 our restructuring program, officials were scbedulwl for June 3. port competition and retail price 

Company sources said that virtu- Renault, winch lost I Z5 billion . AMC has announced it wifi dose cutting. 

aDyaSthe cuts so far have the full &Mcs ($L33 bfflion) last year, is «* *■* remaining car assembly JThir retail arm had a reasonably 
Kariran p g[ the government, bo- s^king to become competitive with * n Kenosha, Wisconsin, good year, said Richard Scho- 

canse they hare cuds through ewiy ofl » west European and US. car while the government of Quebec mate, pwsidentof Brown Shoe. 
rrtinmSs, »i.,n. a n, nanufachirHi Torrach that god. P”™“ !» “PJ®? 1 1 15 mmtsl 8,11 >* .«!*>>: ™ 11 ^ 

and finBTM-tng the. n ^W African the company estimates it must in- m attracting an AMC plant or as- usa of imports. They have to be. 
and North African immigrant crease productivity by at least 40 sembly subcontracting to Quebec. Retailers had a tough year, too. 
workers to their native countries, percent. 

It was not immediately dear how At a meeting on Tuesday, the A J ~ 3 _ 

the new cuts will be achieved, al- board also. discussed ways to rcfi- O LOCKS xVVOlCI 8 OLcUXLDCClC 
though Mr. Besse reportedly has nance the group over the next few JT 

decided against dismissals. Union years, which could involve fresh (Continued from Page 15) like Gary Cooper in “High Noon." 
laiders may oppose the cots, bm capital from the : government, low- ^ ~ How Xaag until we gjel to He sees the prospect of a 20-per- 
the government is expected to ap- interest loans from nationalized 1400?” m this week's commentary cent decline soon for Wall Street, 
prove Mr. Besse’s plan if the same banks and what a company stale- on stocks. The shortest 100-point Since last July he has been predict- 
■ move in the Dow at each of its ing that the market wifl top out at 

centennial levels, from 1,100 to 1.350, give or take 30 points. 

'*200’ wok. “d two Amane his mAicalor& flashing 

days to achieve, he pointed out. , h _ nrV( « 

States of the British-desijmed come rose 1 percent to 922 million The longest was the 26 years it took .u^w;. .. ^ : „ . i.^ r „ . 


than they did in 1980, awording to 
Kurt Salmon Associates. 

Even the healthiest sectors of the 


abandoned the industry because 


Wednesday wn phaCTw-d ihai Re. Brown Shoe Co. in Sl l-rmis , a s b° c designs are so labor-intensive 
nault has no curreni plans to with- large shoe wholesaler, importer and that they could no longer compete, 
draw from the United States, and retailer, had to cut back on its own Not even running shoes could 
that talks between AMC and uni cm shoe production as a result of im- £eep up with their impressive per- 
offidalswerescbeduI«lforJune3. port competition and retail price formanw of previous years. Once 
AMC wtiT io iT T w yd it win eloiof cutting. accounting for 25 percent of the 

its last remaining car assembly "Our retail arm had a reasonably athletic footwear raarkeL running 
plant, in Kenosha, Wisconsin, good year," said Richard Scho- &ocs dropped to 17 percent last 

while the government of Quebec m ak e r, president of Brown Shoe, year- 

province has expressed its interest But be added: “They arc a large * * 

in attracting an AMC plant or as- user of imports. They have to be.” German Cost Of Living 

sembly subcontracting to Quebec. Retailers had a tough year, too. T _ ntTf . ^ 


leaders may oppose the cats, bm capital from the government, low- 
the government is expected to ap- interest loans from nationalized 
prove Mr. Besse’s plan if the same banks and what a company state- 


States of the British-designed come rose 1 
I mfsrfln 2000 and 4000 miniatnr - Australian 


1 to 922 million 
(S615 million) 


ized airborne infra-red rcconnais- in the year ended March 31, up 


centennial levels, from 1,100 to 1250, give or take 30 points. A P m ““ }Pr ex ' 0351 

1200, took two months and two A w , n hi I? 80 ’!., ros ^ P 0 ”?® 1 
rfautT tn irhimw iv» nrnniMi ™n Among his mdicaiors flashing March for an increase of 2. 

T 1 ? 0 - mflrkeL Hc c" 1 April 

lo4oTTheS lllmks u wiH peak in the next week The statistics office saidW, 

to nse tram juu to ine last or two> whm ^ mieresj rates j— « » _ 


sance equipment 


from 91.69 million dollars a year 


CommemNok AG of West Ger- earlier. It said a significant recov- 


IKKprant advance took two years, starting to rise again. 


German Cost of Living 
Increases 0.2% in May 

Reuters 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— The cost of living in West Ger- 
many has risen 02 percent in May 
to stand 27 percent higher than iii 
May 1 984, according to provisional 
figures released by the federal star 
tistics office Wednesday. 

In April the index, based on 
1980. also rose 02 percent from 
March for an increase of 15 per- 
cent compared with April 1984. 
The statistics office said Wednes- 
day that the final figures for May 
are due in about 10 days. 


many it is raising capital ery in earnings depended on in- 
through an issue of dividend right creased demand for major coin- 
certificates totaling 425 miTHnn modify exports. 

Deutsche marks (5136.7 milli on). FBck, the West Goman indusui- 
The management board chairman, al crmglwnerate , was ordered by a 
Walter Sdpp, said the issue of these Cologne court to pay back taxes 
certificates is advantageous for the touling 290 million Deutsche 
bank since under West German tax marks ($932 mfilion) on a share of 


riier. It said a significant recov- Bert Dohmen-Rnmirez, editor of 
!/ in earnings depended on in- the Wellington Letter, writes: 
ased demand for major com- “People's memories are short. They 
xlity exports. don't remember the enthusiasm 

Fticfc, the West German indusiri- during the bull markets of the 
conglomerate, was ordered by a 1960s. The stock market was the 
ilogne court to pay back taxes rally topic of conversation at cock- 
tafing 290 million Deutsche tafi parties. People quit their jobs to 
arks ($932 mfilion) on a share of speculate full time. Being a broker 


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modi ties trader, reported net in- ler-Benz AG shares sold by Flick in When taxi drivers, doormen and 
- the mid-1970s in order to invest in bellboys are giving hot stock lips, 

tentr/HM. coupon Moxt bm mu the UJL chemicals conglomerate, then it's time to hold for the exits, 
okbu k To-ii MuiuMi W.R. Grace. We are nowhere near that." 

Shis/w m SSSSlS Honejkone & Vaumati Ferry Co. However, Stanley Beige, tcchni- 

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is planning to build a first class cal market analyst at Tucker An- 
waterfroot hotel in Hong Kong’s thony, is standing out there lonely 

central district next to Exchange] 

Square, a properties official said. ^ _ 
The company is negotiating with BWWaoRS. TnDBTF V 

the government for a private treaty masters - . cfaioKnit ■ 

to use the rite for a hold. 1 r>CfiPrr ja^w I 
Matsushita Electric Indnstrial I withoriOT 1 

S«s— — 

Industrial Co, begUuting ioOcio- I g. StgaoB’L. 
ber. ■ 


PRI/TECN 

PRIVATE AMERICAN TECHNOLOGY S.A. 

SodM anonyms cTinvestissament 
SUge social: Luxembourg - 20 boulevard Emmanuel Servtsi 
H.G Luxembourg B. 20.566 

Mesrimrs les actioonaim rant inlormfa rfu tail qw I "assembler graenk 
extraordinain? de b sociele qui s'tsl teriue le 29 avrii 1985 a 15.-00 n j pu 
dettberer, fautede quorum. 

En consequence, une nouvelle assemblfe geneiale extraordinaire, uvev le 
m£me onLre du jour, est convoquCe pour le 18 juin J 15:00. qui deliberera. 
qudque rail le no mb it d 'actio ns rcpreseuleea. 

Lon de I'assemblfe generate extraordinaire, unite action doone droit i un 
vole. 

Tout actionnaire pad ruler par mandaUirv. 

Afin de porticiper i res aasembleea. les proprietaires d'actkms au port cur 
devrool depoeer leurs actions cinq jours oumbles a cant l'ansanblce an 
siege racial de PRI/TECH ou aupres (Tune banque acceptable par 
PR1/TECH. 

Poor la sodete 
BANQUE PRIVCES.4. 

Succnrsnle de Luxembourg 
20, Bd. E. Servaia 
Luxembourg 


REPUBLIC OF IRELAND 


SWEDEN 


NETHERLANDS 


CANADA 


W. GERMANY 


Non Dollar 


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■ So pror CrwdH Sutose-Flnt florton LM. 


BAHAMAS 



All these securities having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


The Royal Bank 
of Scotland 

7Ms 

Group pic 


Issue of up to 

£200,000,000 Floating Rate Notes 2005 

of which £100,000,000 has been issued as the 


Initial Tranche 

S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. .. 

Charterhouse Japhet pic 

Bank of Tokyo niterziational Limited Banque Nationale de Paris 

Baring Brothers & Co., Limited 

Credit Commercial de France 

Credit Suisse First Boston Limited Kidder, Peabody International Limited 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Mitsubishi Finance International Limited 

Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 

Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited 

Morgan Stanley International 

Nomura International Limited 

Orion Royal Bank Limited \ 

The Royal Bank of Scotland pic 

Sanwa International Limited . 

J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. Limited 

Williams & Glyn’s Bank pic 

Yamaichi International (Europe) Limited 


HONG KONG 


MALAYSIA 


SINGAPORE 


AUSTRALIA 


NEW ZEALAND 


NatWest: a major world bank 


“The strengdi and stability of tiie National by a bank of undated subordinated debt to 
Westminster Bank Group are considerable raise USS500 million. This was followed in July 
by any standards" ^ BoflJt j raaili ch a , by the rights issue which raised £236 million. 

National Westminster Bank Group r 

Hnancial ffighli Ats 1984 

A In 1984 National Westminster Bank made £m B.Em 

record profits and strengthened its position as Capital and Reserves 2,649 193,907 

a leading Internationa] Fmanda] Services Pre-Tax Profit 671 49,117 

Group with International Banking Division TotalAssets 71517 5235044 

enhancing its reputation as a significant iuuu 

provider of finance to major Corporate Rates operative at 31st December im 

Customers worldwide. Copies of the Report and Accounts which include the 

_ . .r Ti.i_ T 5 i > ■ i Chairman's Statement, may be obtained from: 

A The Significance Of the Banks involvement The Secretary's Office. National Westminster Bank PLC 
in the intemational finandal markets is 41 bodibury, London ec 2 P 2 BP. England 

illustrated by die size of our foreign currency SSJSBfiZ^tenkPix: 

asset base in the London Eurocurrency Brussels office: ziyeurenberg 

Markets. CuiTency assets now exceed the Regional Office for France: 18 Place Venddme. Paris 

equivalent of £25 billion, a figure indicative of Branches in Antwerp, Bordeaux. Lyons. Marseilles, Names 

our standing amongst the world’s largest and Klce 

financial institutions. A National Westminster 

A In- April 1984 we made the first ever issue The Action Bank 

AUtTIIAUA TELEX 24491 BAHAMAS TELEX NS 201 77 BAHRAIN TELEX BS59 WELflUlM TELEX 2120S BRAZIL TELEX 381-2130051 rt=, ^ 

FRANCE TELEX 210393 GREECE TELEX 212766 HONG KONG TELEX HX 61672 IRELAND TELEX 25186 ITALY TELEX 3206634APAN Tcfcv 
MALAYSIA TELEX 33044 MEXICO TELEX 017 71 788 NETHERLANDS TELEX 5064 1 NEW ZEALAND TELEX NZ 3903 SINGAPORE rci 
SPAIN TELEX 46934 SWEDEN A NORWAY TELEX 15050 SWITZERLAND TELEX 6l2lB6 UK TELEX 685351 USA TELEX 233563 U««c»tc. - „ 26,01 
W. GERMANY TELEX 416500 USSR TELeX 4132SB 














Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on May 27, 1985: U.S. $130.09. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pieraon, Hridring & Pierson N.V., 

Herenqracht 214.1016 BS Amsterdam. 



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Fed Official Sees 
GNP Rising 2 . 5 % 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — A Federal Re* 
serve Board governor, Henry Wal- 
Hcfa, has said he expects US. gross 
national product to have grown fay 


about 25 percent by the fourth 
quarter of this year from the year- 

ago leveL 

Fust-quarter growth in GNP 
which measures the total value of 
goods and services, including in- 
come from foreign investments 

was estimated at 1 J percent 


Philippines Seeks 
Credit Extension 

Reuters 

MANILA Prime Minister Ce- 

saMasns 

wo® it expires m 1987. 

wbo U tilso finance 

SSSwias 

V* fdk. which will be 


of a SI 0-billion 


433 Creditor hanV r tv, , 

was agreed on last week. PK * ag * 

Japan’s Vdide Exports Rige 

Reuters 

TO -° -astjste 




report- 


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New Issue 
May 30, 1985 


This advertisement eppeais 
as a matter of record only. 


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Financial Highlights 1984 (DM million) 


Total Assets 


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Debentures and Bonds ■ 


Receivables from Non-Bank Clients 


Fixed Assets 


Deposits by Banks 


Deposits by Non-Bank Clients 


Own Debentures in Circulation 


Capita] and Published Reserves 


Net Interest and Commission Income 


Personnel and Operating Expenses 


Taxes 


Net Profit 


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5091 


14330 


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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


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PEANUTS ' 

IF WE WATCH TV ALL WE U5E WOP» PRETTY SOOM WE WON'T 

THE TIME, we WON'T HAVE HM/ETD KNOW ANYTHING 

TOUaW TOEEA^ 7^7— 

/^> I OR PO MATH.- II c ^ ^/iS^v 


PRETTY SOOM we won't ( that's when i'll* 
HMetd know anything V fit in! j 





m.ONDIE 

rTBLONO.es & ami/J I |t?oes sheus 


IS GOMINS UP , 


5 a 154 (35 156 


ACROSS 57 Theatrical adage 26 As* 


I Dwell on a M Segments Of 
subject eternity 

sSSJS 61 Brief role for a 

10 Goren triumph E5f!^l noma 

14 Rye topping Every, in Roma 

15 Range partly 63 Legendary 

in Venezuela siege sue 

16 Haifa dance 6* Derision 

17 Court-tennis 65 Beet, for one 

areas DOWN 

26 Green minerals 

21 Block of gold 1 Sewing- 

22 Thrice, in machine man 

prescriptions 2" Tisnot , 

23 Brewers' dried or eye, we 

flowers • beauty call”.: 

25 Folk song Pop® 

29 Wrestling gear 3 Guido , 

30 Kindled baroque 

33 Dies painter 

34 “Blue 4 Little lake 

1977 hit tune 5 Tilted 

35 Suffix with 6 Anagram for 

serpent range 

36 Deflates, so to 7 Japanese 

speak plants 

40 Yalie 8 Discrete: Abbr. 

41 Great White 8 ^ lerI y dir - 

Way sights 30 Tibiae 

42 Judah's second 11 Pelican Slate 

son legislator 

43 Snug retreat J* Jason's craft 

44 Indian orince *3 Spar 


son 

43 Snug retreat 

44 Indian prince 

45 Heathens 

47 Confident 

48 Highlander's 
bonnet 

49 Columned 
walkways 


18 Wee quantity 

19 Shakes a leg, in 
Soho 

23 Helen or Isaac 

24 Some native 
Nebraskans 


52 Calls to account 25 Two-footed 

P New York Tima, edited by Euge 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


(generally) 

27 Higb-school 
subject 

28 Brown or 

Elgait 

29 Windfall 

30 Tropical vine 

31 Pizarro victim 

32 Formative 
years 

34 Debbyor 
Daniel 

37 Sudden entering 

38 Within 
shouting 
distance 

39 Freighter's 
record 

45 Manse resident 

46 Nero’s “she 
loves" 

47 Pert 

48 More accurate 

49 Bit of 
marginalia 

50 Thursday’s 
eponytn 

51 Wine: Comb, 
form 

52 Weaponry, for 
short 

53 Memorable 
baritone Gorin 

54 girl (disco 

dancer) 

55 Forbidden item 

56 Vexed state 

58 Sch. for future 
Pattons 

59 Woman soldier 

t Mrinhi 



ABOUT HER 
rr AGE ? r— ' 



SHE ACWT6 SHE'S TWO B { AND THEN SHE UES 
YEARS VOUNSB3 THAN ME £ ABOUT NW J — ' 



BEETLE BAILEY 


I TOLP 
HIM THAT 


T PEMANP 
TO SEETHE. 
GENERAL y 
I .WON'T 
TAKE NO U 
FOR AN 
answer/ A 


ANDYCAPP 

L, IN C3N/VW CLEAN FLOOR ^ 




5 

L * e s -30 


HE WANTS TD KNOW IF 
YOU'LL TAKE A CUSTARP 
PIE FOR AN ANSWER 


.srsgB'y* 

THE MOOf>-!\ 


>1! 



> f TVJQ THJMSSTHftT LAE> ^ 

J l NEVB?SEBV1STaGETV 

' > — - VVHATHEV MANre -% 

; //VsU> WHATHE CeSS^VES 


WIZARD of IP 

% WWrfe -rHP Riser 
THIS P 


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tupe 4PU 
OF F&lT&roie 
FfOM 
■mP&sittrs 


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REX MORGAN 


ALL-RIGHT, MR. 
TCMPKIklS— I'LL 
SEE IF I CAN GET 
A FLIGHT OUT 
THB AFTERNOON/ 







Si 



■■*!!!! 

ilHliii! 



mm 


I WISH 1 HAD A B 03 THEROR A SISTER... SOMEONE I 
didnThaytabeniceto/' 


THAT SCRAMBLH) WORD GAME 
• by Hand Arnold and Bob Loo 


Umcrambifl mess tour JunnMM, 
one tetter lo each square, to form 
tour oKBmuy words. 


GARFIELD 

HEY.GARFIELP, HERE'S AN 
ARTICLE ABOUT A GUY WHO 
THOUGHT HE COOLP FLY BY 
WEARING A CAPE AMP JUMPING 
OFF A BOILPING 


THEY SCRAPEP HIM OFF FIFTH 
AVENUE WITH A POTTY KNIFE. 
I GUESS HE LEARN EP HI S 
^ LESSON x-"' 


RUCRY 


SOUPI 


CEADDE 


TUSALE 


Print answer here: 


s 





YEAHHE 

PIPN'T 

BELIEVE 


Bibbs IWMFWure! 


m 


HOW CARELESS 
DRIVERS 
FREQUENTLY 
ENP UP. 


Now arrange Uw circled letter, to 
form toe surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


VM1 Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse May 29 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

JumMOK CHIME GLAND FALLEN BEAVER 
Answer Jealousy eels In with the arrival a. tola— 

A RIVAL 


ACF Holding 
a soon 
AKZO 


WEATHER 


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BOOKS 


Lk"' 


SECRET GARDENS: The Golden 
Age of Children's literature 

By Humphrey Carpenter. 235 pages. Illus- 
trated. SI 6.95. 

Houston Mifflin, 2 Park Strvet, 

Boston, Mass. 02I0S. 

Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 

S OME READERS of children’s books, most 
notably Dorothy Parker, have deplored the 


— Lewis CanoH 

cubbyhole SmvhSS writers who heted 
and George A*? d “ 5,01 

to destroy primus assume ^ 

fresh light to realize that, at 

history and hteratur^ anj j Edwardian 

16851 50 SLw nrisftewbo 

ages are concera«L it chadren * s books, 

withdrew into the «ho reflected the 


look on childhood. But Humphrey Carpenter, His approach provio , a ^ nam ^ 

the English critic. points out that Milne is ideal leverage to ta3Xx persuades us 

actually kidding, if his li^ht verse and his various worb and careen- Water 

Winni&-U»-Poon books have an overriding that Charles Kj convincin^y 


, . 

theme, it is the “ruthless ^otism" of children. Babies." is a charming *“1-^ hack’^Sd 

dismisses E- 

who dares") is-not that Christopher Robin is p.L. Travers s Maty roppm* 

saying hisprayers bin raihex mat he is not story strung round one gP^ hJtensiing 

praying. Tte BeanUful Child would rather with magic powers). Caulfield 

think^outwhaL fun it was in the bath tonight !Snt^ ^ ID. SahWs Hoidw Caunm 

than about God • and his many descendants. ^ 

Some readers celebrate the chapter called represent adolescence u as 

“The Piper at the Gates of Dawn in Kenneth privileged condition, are distant 

Grahame’s “Wind in the Willows," when Rat the Golden Age's Beautiful 

and Mole hear the music of the gpd Pan, as the consummated in Frances Hodgson Burnet 

transcendent moment in the transcendent “Little Lord Fauntleroy-” , . - 

r .t . . - .i- r^monter S thesis allows 


wort in children's literature of the past centu- 
ry. Carpenter disagrees. While he considers 
Grahame’s classic a masterpiece, he regards 
the Pan chapter as “a piece of bad late Victori- 
an art" that is “redundant within the scheme of 
the book.” 

These are two of many stimulating insights 
in Humphrey Carpenter’s “Secret Gardens,” 
which assays the development of English and 
American children's literature from the late 
18th century all the way down to the present 
Carpenter is a co-auihor of “The Oxford Com- 
panion to Children's Literature" and the biog- 
rapher of two prominent children's writers, 
J. R. R. Toflden and C S. Lewis, as well as of 
the poet W. H. Auden. For most of his adult 
life, as he explains in his preface to “Secret 
Gardens," he has gro w n increasingly aware 
“that the great English children’s writers from 
Lewis Carroll to A A Mflne formed some sort 
of identifiable literary movement, like Blooms- 
bury or the Georgians or the Romantics." In 
the present book, be nails that theory down. 

Are its results useful? Does it do us any good 
to learn that following 19th-century Roman ti- 
dsni’s discovery of the separate world of child- 
hood. there was reflected in children's litera- 
ture first a loss of confidence in the prevailing 
standards of the industrial age, and then a 
search for a secret, pre-industrial Arcadia dial 
was identified with the special magic of child- 
hood? Or has Carpenter simply found a way to 

Sotnthm to Previous Poole 


mnnn boboe □ sna 
□Emu Banns bobs 
G nnnnsBannmBHnHn 
DBDBG3E3B HE3E3E3C3E 
HEBEI BBEE 
E3EHEBE QBOE3EBB 
DEH0O E3I3IJD BOB 
EBBQBBEQnBBBEBQ 
BED □□□□ □□□□□ 
BBBBQEB EDIIHEBCa 
BEBE EDEIB 

□bdbbb nnaanaa 

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QBBQ BBOHB EOE3B 
BBBB BOaBH EB0Q 




tian belief” What an irony u »s. aaas uupm- 
STSSt elsewhere in his life Dodpon«he- 
mently protested the slightest hint of 

^AruTm^the course of an entertaining dis- 
course on the subtle dass chsuncucms rep^ 
sented by Mole, Rat, Badger and Toadm The 
Wind in the Wfllows." Oirpepter amggsts thrn 
one of the models for Toad may wdl have been 
ooue other than Oscar Wilde, “wh«e scandal- 


ety, par riralariy the Yellow Book aide m 
whichGrahame himself had briefly moved." 

Finally, Carpenter’s critique gives the reader 
a fresh perspective cm the presrat state of 
children’s literature. Why did the Golden Age 
come to an end? World War 1 was a cutoff 
pant, even though Mflne wrote in the 1920s. 

“It must have been harder to dream up River 
Banks and Never Neva* Lands after the experi- 
ence of the Somme," Carpenter observes. 
Whenever it died, the better contemporary §f 
books, like FhQippa Pearce's “Tom's Midnight 
Garden,” have been telling children that it is 
time to grow up. Childhood is dead: it was 
done in by the Doming of television, “a medium 
which makes no real distinction between child- 
hood and adults.” 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on the stiff of 
The New York Times. 


U. S. Methodists list Favorite Hymns 

United Press Intematumal 

WASHINGTON — “How Great Thou Art" 
and “Amazing Grace” lead the list of favorite 
hymns among the United States's 9,4 million 
United Methodists, a dmrch survey says. Oth- 
er most-sunghymns are: “O For A Thousand 
Tongues," ‘The Old Rugged Cross," “Blessed 
Assurance," “Holy, Holy, Holy," “What a 
Friend," “All Hau the Power,” “fa the Gar- 
den," and “The Church’s One Foundation." 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal, a 
slightly careless defense 
permitted South to make an 
unmakab le game. 

Four hearts was reached af- 
ter West had opened the bid- 
ding, and the singleton dub 
was led. West secured his ruff, 
and shifted at the third trick to 
the diamond king. At this 
point South was facing a sure 
one- crick defeat 
But at the fourth trick the 
defenders combined to pro- 
duce an error. West might wdl 


BRIDGE 


have led the diamond queen, 
but be chose a low card. East 
made the fatal error by playing 
the ace instead of the ten when 
dummy played low. 

This promoted dummy’s 

nificant card and gave SoutL 
all the help he needed. He 
ruffed the diamond ace, drew 
trumps and gwhwi his dab 
winner. Then he led all bis re- 
maining trumps, a n d West was 
squeezed at the Htb trick. He 
was unable to pressve the dia- 
mond queen and the guard for 
ihe spade king. 


mjRin 
*A9 
U A J 105 
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WEST (D) 
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Neither side to vnhmMe. The 
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Pass ' Pass 

West tad tbe dob three. 


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SSSSS? ®j— *«w 


Caranwrnm* index : 1111.10 
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Brussels 


Current Stock Index : ZJOJO 
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644 664 

27S 274 

217 215 

3 302 

140 19 

2 2 
240 NA 
312 312 

29 191 

440 435 

NJL 79 
I6A. 247 
100 100 
432 440 

419 420 
162 163 

584 SfU 
25 25 

NJL 195 
401 412 

49 426 

160 160 


AMJJ 410 414 

Asohj Ghent 1071! 1040 

AsctilGtafs 879 B7S 

Bat* of Tokyo 810 BOO 

BrfdMttone 524 528 

Canon 1200 I WO 

Cado 1440 1470 

CIMi 420 4M 

Dal NUwofi Print 1070 109 

Danfl Hawse 442 420 

Dalwc Securities 857 U0 


Mar 28 


Zurich 


2* 

Jh 

3* 

*7% \ 


'I Vi 11%, 




40 +■ 


fftV " 


■ntoanau Index: 









































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


Page 23 




SPORTS 


h:'i‘ 


i Y 6 


.1 


Sukova Upset; Mandlikova, McEnroe Win 


6 ..,, 


"j--. ■ ii,- . . 

V»<i |'i 

i a;V\ .V 


w 

4v.i- - V. 


1 . 

IT. . 

(. ; t . 
Wa.- • • 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Fifth-seeded Helma 
Sukova of Czechoslovakia was up- 
set Wednesday, while country- 
woman Hana" Mandlikova, the. 
No. 3 women's seed, bounced back 
from the brink of defeat in the 
second round of French Open ten- 
nis champ ionships. 

Also beaten, was the No. 6 wom- 
en's seed, American Zina Garris- 


The 


left-handed Bragin twice 
was a point away from faking a 5-2 
lead in the fmai set after Mandli- 
kova had squared the match at one 
set alLButtheCzedi saved the first 


point with a smash and Burgin seed, dropped a set but stayed on 
squandered the second by hitting a course for a possible quarterfinal 

clash with Noah by beating Robert 

Aigueilo of Argentina, 6-4, 3-d, 6-1, 


son, 7-6, 2-4113-11, by South A£ri- 
'Bn Fairbanks 


•.k 




'**' I \ • ; 

... 


can veteran Rosylin 
Sukova, 20, won the first set, 6-2, 
against Chris tiane Jolissaint of 
Switzerland before losing the next 
two — 6-3, 64). Jolissaint is ranked 


(-. , ... 

; . . . 

1- .• , . 


FRENCH OPEN TENNIS 


*Ut.- • . • : 

W;. .... . ... 

. 

tuv; *> , . ..." 

Ji’.' tj ;- .... 

1*. 


!•“: 61st by the Women’s TomisAso- 

.‘J aation. Had the seedmgs held, Su- * 
- * kova was expected to be a major 
:■ ^obstacle to Martina Navratilova's 
bid for a second coztsecutive 
' French title. 

In men’s second-round pirn, top 
seed John McEnroe of the United 
!•.{ States easily won a listless 6-2; 6-4, 
>’ 6-4 tnatrh over Romanian Florin 


A‘,T. 


h«*\pV.-A 

\<v: ... .. .. 

aert-a! », • 

WlV v, 

r-{*v 

...• s . 

in ! 


“I felt all right, but Ifdl I didn’t 
play particularly weD,” said McEn- 
roe, who played his second match 
:v.v ; in two days. 

• “The cenditions weren’t that 

gpod. It was dry and windy, but I 
: ;y. r felt I kept my concentration well 
■: v- ; £ ^ because there was a lot of rimutmg. 


' -’.v’ T 


" 1 'l .i . 

•efc 

» -.,; t v.: 

« -Oh l - 

i 1. . 

s . . -. 


It wasn’t a very enjoyable match," 
McEnroe said. 

Mandlikova, her left knee bleed- 
.7 ing and her shirt covered in red clay 
after three tumbles on the center 
," v court, came from behind to beat 
American Elise Bragin, 2-6, 6-4, 7- 
;• 5, in a match that lasted nearly 2% 
' hours. 



forehand into the net. 

Mandlikova, who woo. the sin- 
gles title here four years ago, moved 
into a 5-4 lead, tan the drama at 
Roland Garros Stadium continued 
as she lost four match points after 
holding a 4(H) lead on Burgin’s 
serve. Burgin, ranked 31st world- 
wide, evened the set at 5-5 before 
Mandlikova wrapped up the 
match. 

Mandlikova admitted she had 
played lesss than steadily. “I ex- 
pected a tough but not that 
tough.” she added. “She played 
wdL She played a very good tacti- 
cal match.” 

Mandlikova said she had worked 

hard before the tournament and 


6*4. 


Also advancing was No. 5 seed 
Andres Gomez of Ecuador, 6-2, 6- 
1, 6-3, over Swede Kent Carissoo. 

Spaniard Emilio Sanchez, a 
“lucky loser” who replaced the in- 
jured Romanian Die Nastase in this 
two-week tournament, moved into 
the third round as be downed Hunb 
van Boecfcel of the Netherlands 6- 
1, 6-2, 6-4. No. 12 seed Henrik 
Stmdstrom of Sweden defeated 
American Mare Flur, 6-1, 2-6, 6-4, 
6-2. 

Chris Evert Lloyd kept pace with 
her main rival, Navratilova, mov- 
ing into the third round by stop- 
ping fellow American Lisa Bonder, 


the unexpectedly hard-fought 

opening ronnd had inercoed V N^radlova von her second- 

round match on Tuesday. French- 
woman Catherine Tanvier beat 
American Kim Sands,6-4, 6-4, to 


confidence in her conditioning, al- 
though her finesse still needed 
work. 

“1 didn’t play my best tennis 
today, but rm in Jfiod physical 
shape and in good fighting spirit” 

No. 4 seed Mats mlander made 
certain West German Boris Becker 
would not accomplish what the 
Swede pulled off three years ago 
when be dimmated the 17-year- 
old, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1, in the second 
round. 


advance to a third- round m wring 
with Navratilova. 


WDandear, 20, won the French 
Open in 1982 by upsetting estab- 
lished players with regularity; an 


Meanwhile, No. 4 seed Manuela 
Maleeva cf Bulgaria beat Switzer- 
land’s Petra Deihees-Janch, 6-1, 6- 
2, and 16th-seeded American Pam 
Casale was upset by Nathalie Tau- 
ziat of France, 6-7, 7-6, 6-2. Two 
years ago. Tanziat was not ranked 
among the top 10 women in 
France. 



Tueday, Becker had beaten Ameri- 
Vita 


No. 5 seed Helena Sukova 

. . . Upset in the second round. 


can Vitas Gerulaitis. 

Fren chman Yannick Noah, who 
won the singles title here two years 
ago, continued Iris comeback with a 
stunning 6-1, 6-1, 6-4 victory over 
Dutchman Mkhid Schapers. 

Tomas Smid, the men’s No. 13 


In other second-round women’s 
matches, Gabriels Sabadni. the 15- 
year-old Argentinian and No. 14 
seed, was a comfortable 6-0, 6-2 
winner 
United 

Carling Bassett of Canada 
3, 6-3 victor over Jennifer Mundd 
of South Africa. (AP, UP!) 


tort Un M fan imgmotufid 

Goahfnrier G^antEuhr, stopping Ron Striter’s penalty shot *AI1 1 have to do is staid there and wait for the shooter to commit hhasdf.’ 


HSffi&S Oilers 1 Victory Away From Retaining Tide 

Bassett of Canada was a 6- %/ %/ Kj 


- •. • -*<• 
iU-’-i . . 

St-i. v* V 

ist.--.in,. r 

N i k 

X 

f >• ••• .. 

... -V . 

a • r. fe * . 


Perez’s Hot Bat Helps Reds Overtake Cubs 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispaldia 

EDMONTON, Alberta — Aided by four 
two by Wayne Gretzky, and 


t saw Chica- 
treal's Bill 


it Fuhr’s save on only the third penalty shot 
of the Stanley Cup finals, the 


ConpUedb? Our Staff From Daptadta 


CINCINNATI — Suddenly a 
... Jdrird ■” ■“ * ' 


party is standing between 
Pete Rose and Ty Cobb. Tray Pe- 
rez, starting at first base in place of 
Rose, drove in four runs with a 


doable in the seventh as the Reds 
rallied from six- and five-run defi- 
cits to end a three-game losing 
streak. 


Trailing by 6-0, Cincinnati sent 
a to the plal 


» n . 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


•- ^-r ■ - 

; V '-- • , 




r 


•? • -v-w.: . 

wv.vSl-.i/i: 


rr--- *• 

1 1- 


home ran and a double here Tues- 
day night, leading the Cmcinwiti 
Reds to a 13-11 corne-from-behind 
victory over the ChfcagD Cubs. 

For the time being, Perez’s hot 
bat bas Player-Manager Rose 
benching hhnseff, interrupting his 
quest to pass Cobb’s career hit re- 
cord of 4,191. “He deserves it,” said 
Rose “That’s why Ire's in the line- 
up — to hit." 

J Perez was 3-for-3 on the night 
with a three-run homer in -the 
fourth riming and a run-scoring 


11 men to the plate in the fourth 
and scored five runs. The first sev- 
en batters reached safely off newly- 
acquired free agent Larry Gtxra. 
The big blow was Perez’s 375lh 
career home run, which gave him 
1 ,602 runs batted in lifetime. It was 
the fourth straight game in which 
he has homered. 

Roy Cey tripled in two runs in 
the sixth as the Cubs widened to a 
10-5 lead, but the Reds again sent 
11 men to bat in the bottom of the 
riming, wheaGary Redus hit a two- 
run home run and Cesar Cedeno 
drove in three more with a bases- 
foaded double. Cedeno scored on" 
Wayne KrcnduckPs angle. 


Cincinnati broke an 1 1-11 dead- 
lock with two runs in the seventh. 
Redus singled leading off, stole sec- 
ond ami scored on Dave Concep- 
cion's single. After Concepcion 
stole second, Perez doubled him 
home. 


For many years Perez, 43, has 
been one of baseball's premier 
power hitters. Coming off the 
bench this year, he is 10-for-20, 
with six walks, a double, four 
homers and 13 RBIs. “I can’t swing 
the bat any better,” he said. “I can’t 
be fooled by anything. Do I look 
43? That's £oly age — ifs only 
numbers.” * 


double in the eighth, to pot Mon- 
treal past the Padres. 

Pirates 4, Astras 3 
In Houston, Junior Ortiz, who 
entered the game what Tray Pena 
sprained his ankle in the fourth, 
singled in the 12th with the bases 
loaded to beat the Astros for Pitts- 
burgh. Lee MamQi started the 12th 
with a walk off Julio Salano, the 
sixth Houston pitcher. Gauge 
Hendrick doubled to right and 
Doug Frobel was walked intention- 
ally to load the bases for Ortiz. 
Gold Glove catcher Pena, who had 


in the history 
Edmonton Oilers raced to a £3 victory over the 
Philadelpia Flyers here Tuesday night. 

The Oilers’ 15th straight home-ice playoff 
victory — tying the mark set by Montreal from 
1968 to 1 971 — gave them a three-lo-one lead in 
the four-of-seven game series. The OOers can 
capture their second consecutive National 
Hockey League championship on Thursday 
night If the Flyers win Thursday, the series will 
return to Philadelphia for a sixth game. 


go Black Hawks. The first ai 
gp’s Virgil Johnson fail to beat 
Durnan on April 13," 1944. 

“1 just don't want to talk about it” said Sutter 
after the game: 

His brother Rich, however, did talk. “He had 
the goalie beat and he made the shot be want- 
ed.” 

“He tried to slide it between my legs or over 
my glove,” said Fuhr. “But ire didn’t lift it 
enough- But I think the play is slightly to the 


STANLEY CUP fINAIS 


Gretzky pounced on a loose ]jwck with 7:07 


Expos 8, Padres 5 
In San Diego, Andre Dawson, 0- 
for-20 entering the game, came off 
the bend to drive in three runs, 
two with a tie-breaking, two-out 


left in the second period to score his 15th goal of 
the playoffs and break a 3-3 tie. The Oilers had 
trailed, 3-1, in the opening period. Gretzky 
added the winners’ fifth goal with 3:42gone in 
the third period, connecting while Ptmadd- 
phia’s Ed Hospodar was in the penalty box. 
”We knew the Flyers woald come out hard 
just delivered an RBI tingle, in- and, no question, they did,” raid Gretzky. “We 
jured his ankle sliding bade into probably should have been behind, 4-1 or 5-1, at 

one point. Grant made the save on the penalty 
shot andrhai was the tnmtngpoinL Grant held 
usin there until we got going. One thing that has 
made us a good team is that when things aren’t 


first on a pickoff attempt in the 
fourth. 


Cardmals 9, Braves 3 


In Altanta, Willie McGee drove 


m^SSTjadtcSk had ^ri^forusscmumnegivesusabigliftlike 


(;i; 



four hits as Sl Louis overwhelmed 
the Braves with a season-high 19- 
hh attack. 

Bfaie Jays 6, White Sox I 
In the American Ti- a gnft , in Chi- 
cago, Ernie Whitt drove in two 
runs, one of them with a homer that 
ignited a four-run seventh, as To- 
ronto won a franchise-record 
eighth straight game and handed 
the White Sox their seventh consec- 
utive loss. 

Brewers 3, Indians 2 * 

In Milwaukee, Rollic Fingers re- 
tired all five batters he faced after 
coming on with erne out in the 
eighth and ran his all-time leading 
record for saves to 331 as the Brew- 
ers edged Cleveland. 


that 


With 8:47 gone in the fust period, Fnhr made 
the big save by standing his ground as Ron 
Sutler attempted to score the first penalty-shot 
goal in a Stanley Cup final It was the first 
penalty shot awarded in the cup round in 14 
years and only the 14th in the history of the 
playoffs. 

There have only been two other penalty shots 
in the finals, the last on May 16, 1971, when 
Frank Mahovlich of the Montreal Canadiens 
was turned away by^ Tony Esposito of the Chica- 


goalie’s advantage anyway. All I have to do is 
stand there and wait for the shooter u> commit 
himself.” 

The Flyers, however, came out of the period 
with a slight edge. They opened up the 3-1 lead 
by the 11:32 made, scoring once at even 
strength, once on a power play and once while 
short-handed. The Oilers tallied twice on power 
plays after going a dismal 10-for-65 on man- 
power advantages through the playoffs. 

It was the Sutter brothers who started thinj$ 
rolling for the Flyers, combining for a goal only 
46 seconds into the game. Fuhr made a superb 
save on Derrick Smith, but Ron Sutter retrieved 
the pack and tried to jam it in. The puck 
caromed off the post to Fuhfs left, struck Rich 
Sutter’s skate and slid across the line. It was 
Rich Sutter’s first career playoff goal. 

It took the Oilers over four minutes to get 
their first crack ai Pdle Lindbergh, but that shot 
pulled them even at 1-1 and set yet another 
playoff mark for Paul Coffey. 

Standing at the right point on a power play, 
Coffey put in a hard slap shot off Charlie 
Huddys pass from the left point at 4:21 The 
goal was Coffey’s 10th of the playoffs, one more 
than the mark for defensemen set by Bobby Oit 
in 1970 and tied by Brad Park in 1978. 

After Todd Bergen gave the Flyers a 2-1 lead. 


the momentum appeared headed toward Ed- 
monton when, at 8:31 Doug Grossman was 
caught for holding Glenn Anderson. Crossman 
complained vehemently on the call and 
whacked the puck down the ice in disgust: 
referee Keny Fraser slapped him with another 
two-minute minor for unsportsmanlike con- 
duct. 

But during the four-minute Oiler advantage. 
Sutter was awarded the penalty shot and the 
Flyers scored a shorthanded goal to lift then- 
lead to 3-1. 

Fifteen seconds after Crossman went off, Sut- " 
ter batted the puck away from Gretzky. Skating 
furiously, he broke down the slot ahead of Mark 
Messier, who hauled down the young center just 
as he let go a shot on Fuhr. Fraser blew the 
whistle immediately and pointed toward center 
ice, the gesture for a penalty shot, at 8:47. 

Sutter, gathering momentum from deep in the 
Flyer end, pitied up the puck at center ice and 
rushed to within 10 feet of Fuhr before firing a 
forehand wrist shot Fuhr dropped, extending 
his right leg, flashing out his glove hand and 
turning away the shot as the Coliseum crowd of 
17,498 stood in a wild ovation. 

Slightly less than three minutes later, with 
Crossman still watching from the box, Murray 
Craven and Derrick Smith combined for the 
short-handed goal 

Huddy feD at the right point and Smith raced 
unchecked down the left wing. He centered the 
puck to Craven, who had beaten Coffey to the 
crease, and Craven deflected the puck in at 
11:32 for the Flyers' fourth short-handed goal 
of (he playoffs. 

But the Philadelphia offense soon became 
dormant, going without a shot on goal for al- 
most 20 minutes through the end of the first 
period and into the second. During that stretch, 
the Oilers erased their defid t and moved to a 4-3 
advantage. fA'IT, AP) 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Hockey 


Tennis 


Tuesday’s Line Scores Stanley Cnp Finals French Open 


Pirate catcher Tony Pena, who had just hit a nntsooring single, sprained Ins left ankle 
sliding back into first dining a pickoff attempt in Tuesday mghfs fourth inning in Houston. 


Rangers 6, Royals 1 
In Kansas City, Missouri, Burt 
Hootom, hampered by injuries in 
the last few seasons, pitched his 
first complete game since June 19, 
1983 — When he was with the Los 
Angeles Dodgers — in pacing Tex- 
as past the Royals. jjp^ 


VANTAGE POINT/ Ira Berkow 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Ctovafcmd MS BSO «2*-a s 

M B a u ami in w nx-a 7 3 

I Rota 1 and Benton; Haas, Fingers (B) and 
MW. W l la w . 5-3. L— < I noton. 3-1 FI 1* 

son (7). 

MD Oil 4P S— 4 ID 1 
IN Nl OW—I 3 I 

5tMMindWMtt; Dotson. Aoosto m.Soiliner 
17} snd Rrt. W— Stieb, S4 L — Dotson. 2-3. 

HR— Toronto. Whitt Ml. 

■n m ns-* n 0 
env no in in-i 7 1 

Hoaton and StowgM; GuMcza. Beckwith (U 
and 5undb«fo. w— HootoaS-l. L— GubJcaa, 1- 
1 

(MMMsota at Butoa. pud* mini 


GAME 4 


■ PhUadUpWa 


3 D 
2 2 


A- Transparent Ueberroth : Spend a Buck to Skip Belmont Stakes 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
«u ni iBO- 


Ne w York Timet Service 

NEW YORK — It has been 
three weds since Peter Ueberroth, 
commissioner of baseball de- 
that all employees of the 
gor leagues must subject them- 
selves to random drag testing. 
Details of implementation were 


bat drag abuse has worked. Part of 
that process includes a committee 
made up of three nonahgned physi- 
cians to treat players who have 
been suspected of or have admitted 
to drug abuse. 

But the contention that it has 


NEW YORK (AP) — Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck, who 

lay’s Je: 


earned S2.6 million by winning Monday’s Jersey Derby, will skip the June 
8 Belmont Stakes to rest until late Jure. The colt passed up the May 18 
Preakness, the second kg of racing’s Triple Crown, to run in the Jersey 
Derby. 


The Jersey Derby “was a tough race and he didn't have the easiest of 
his owner, Dennis 


traps," his owner, D ennis Diaz, said Tuesday. “He came through the race 
worked has met with derision in with nicks and cuts and bruises. He got bumped around pretty good. He 
some quarters, mostly because of showed the heart of a champion.” 


several well publicized drag cases 
over the past several years. It is a 
safe guess that thou have been 
more — how many more it is im- 
possible to tell. 

Ueberroth says he wants base- 
ball to make the statement that this 


“Now we’ve got an opportunity to rest him, and Fm sure heU come 


May, which is now. “No," said 
Edward Dtuso, general counsel to 
major-league baseball “we don't 
haw a precise date yeL** 

Tt is transparent that Ueberroth: 

• Had no dear idea of how to 

implement the testing. The plan L . , 

S&K Crosby Tournament to Have New Site 

have a separate agreement under a it* Do yon go. shoot it by. doing 
labor- management settlement. what almost aH other businesses 


opportunity to rest aim, ai 
back bettor than ever,” trainer Cam Gambolati said. He said the colt 
woald have three weeks of light naming and then sl 
Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Pad; in New Jersey cm July 27 as a 

on Aug, 17 in: 

ew York- 


-11 t* i 

andtaooM NO m zo»— u u 1 

goto. Brwstor U). FrazJor Ml. Soronson 
17) and Davb; Tibbs. Pastara O). Hume IS). 
Franco (7) and Knlca4v.W-Franco.S-l. L— 
Saranwn. VL HR* — Chlcosc, Cov (2), Sector 
It). Cincinnati, Paraz (4). Radus Cl). 

SL Loots ON 711 M l 9 t* I 

Atlanta Nl 111 200—3 7 1 

Farwfe Lahti (71 end Nieto; Barter, 
ZJSfflHti (3), Camp (ci.Garbor (7). Forster to) 
and BenodfcL W— Farseh. M. L— tSmltti.2-*. 
Sw— Latui |3). HRs— SI. Louli, Londrum-d). 
Atlanta. Murahv (12). Harper (3). 

MM W 001—4 D 1 
NO IN IN HO— 3 t« 0 
RoMmon. Holland (71. Candelaria (I). 
Gtxinte (m and Pena Ortta K); Matfab, CW- 
houp (Sl. DnAn <». OIPJno (I). Smith (ID], 
Solano 111) and BaHev. Ashby 15 } . W— 
Guam*. 14 L-Stom l-l. 

MHft-Ml WWeHU 1 

sea Dtooo 300 no ooo-s 11 3 

b -S mith. Locos (5). Robonw to). Reonkn 
ill ond RtaDorokL Butora ID : Shou. Do Lera 
to). LaHorto (», cesoose to), Stoddard to) 
and Kennedy. Bediv to) . W-Hoborae. 1-1. L- 
GosaaBB. VI. Sv— Reardon 113). HRs — San 
DtoO& Mdtevnolds (7). Gsrvov (7). 


FM Parted— ^ L PhUodetphta. Rich Setter I 
(Ron Sutler. Smith), :4L X, Edmonton, Coffer 
id tHuddv. Kurd). 4:22 Iop). 3, PMhxtotoMo. 

BenMa4(ZezoLCnmmon)'S:X(pa).4aPtiii- 

adolphla. Cravea4 (Smith. Marsh), 1 1 -Jl («h). 
5, Edmonton. Noddy 3 (CaHov. Karri). ib: 23 
(OP). Peno moi - Po u l in. PWL (high-sticking), 
3:31; Honda*. Edm. (htab-sHddns). S:17; 
Mnsler. Edm. (stashing). 5:5V; Grossman. 
PhB, doubts minor (hoUno-urapartsnim- 
Uke conduct), l:S; Hospodar. PWL (slash- 
tag), 14:33. 

second Ported— 4. Edmonton. Anderson 10. 
-.21.7, Edmonton. Gratxkv 15 (Cottev. Huddvl. 
12153 U>P). Pan am as— Tocctwt PhD. (rough- 
ing). Food hi. Edm. IrouaMng), Pah 
arson. PWL i hoo kin g). 12:11; Allboa PWL 
(stosMng). 17:39; Hunter, Edm. (rouaWna). 
17:3V; Low, Edm. (lidding). 1|;D2; Cnm- 
nm PWL (hold no). 19:07; Hunter. Edm. 
(holdlna). MS*. 

Third Period— 4. Edmonton, GnrUcv 16 
(IK sos tor. Anderson), 3:42 (ppL Panalttos— 
H os podar. PWL (hooking). 2:46; Hunter, 
Edm. (kneeing). 7:58. 

State on goal: PhlladoloMa an Fuhr 1D6- 
7—23: Edmonton, an Undberati (22 shate-18 
sovts), Froeae (8:51 2 0> nsrtacod by Ltad- 
beroti at 8^6 2d; re-entered at start of 30.10-9) 
1 0-12-10— 32. 

penalty Not: Ran Suttnr. PWL Bto7 1st 
(missed). 

17491 

Kerry Fraser. 


ME ITS SINGLES 
First Ron ad 

Guillermo Vilas. AgcnMna del. Watty Mo- 
swr, Australia, 6^63. 6-2; Horado do to Pana, 
Argentina, del. Guy Forget, Franca, 76 (8-6), 

5- 7, 6-1. 6-1; Francesca cancaltottL Italy. dH. 
Hana-Jorp Schwoter. west Germany, 6-L 6-1 

6- 7 (1-7). 3-6. 60; Cossto Malta. BraxJL deL 
Korol Novaeek, CMChoatovokPa 7-464, W. I- 
675. 

Secoad Round 

John McEnroe (1). UJL deL Florin Sesar- 
eeanu, Romania, 62, 6-C 64; Mats WXander 
I4)^wcden net Boris Becker, west Germany. 
6X 62. 61 ; Andres Gomez (5). Ecuador, del 
Kant CartsaomSwadea62.6-4.61; Yannick 
Nocdi to). France, del. MlchM Schapers. Hol- 
ted. 6-1. 61. 64. 

Henrik Sundstrom (12). Sweden del. Marc 
Flur. u .8.61.24.64.67; Jorao Arresa 5pahv 
del Marco Ostota Yugoshnda 7-5, 64, 62; 
Dorrsn Cahill, Australia del. Dan CsseMv. 

6ii 61# 62; Henri Leconte. France, del. 
Pascal Partes. France. 62. 61. 63; Marcos 
Hocevor, Brazil. deL Tamm Warns**. UJL, 6 
1.44.74.64; JOW Luis ClercAraentlna.deL 
AWandra GanzabaL Argentina, 63, 6% 63 
WOMKirS SINGLES 
First Round 

Catherine Tanvier. Frara. del. Marcel □ 
Skuhereka, Czechaslavakki, 6-2. 6-3 


Chris Evert-LJayd (21. U^.deL Lisa Band- 
er,U^7-L63; Hana Mandnfcava U). Czech*, 
stowkia. del. Elise Burgin, U.S. 2-6. 64 7-5; 
Manuela Malceva (4). Bulgaria, clef. Petra 
Denwes-Jatidi, Switzerland, 61, 67; Carling 
Bassett (81. Canada, del. Jennifer MundeL 
south Africa 6a 63; Gobriwa Sabarinl (14). 
Argentina del. Pentv Bara. 64L 62; 
Catherine Tanvier. France, del. Kim Santo. 
U3k.64.64; Anoema Kanellopoatou. Greece, 
del Laura Glhfemelsler, UJ- 63. 64; Anna 
Marla CecchM. Italy, del. Carina Korlsson, 
Sweden, 6ft. 61; Marie Oirtattne Calfeta. 
France, clef. Andrea Hotokova, Czechoslovo- 
Wa. 62. 44. 63. 

Kathy Horvath. US* def. Pelro Kenwler, 
West Germony. 7-6 174). 61; Gabrtola Dinu. 
West Germany. dH. VIcM Netaon. U^. 44, 7-6 
17-3). 62; Terry Phelps. UJ5- def. Emmm- 
uelto Derlv, France, 63, 62; Christian* Jolls- 
salnt, SwUzeriand. def. Helena Sukova (5), 
Czechoslovakia. 24, 63. 60; Svtvta Honlka, 
West Germany, del. CmnJlIe Benjamin, U8L. 
64b 61; Tine Scheur-Lorsea D e nmark. deL 
Beth Herr. U^. 6-3. 6-1; Ceclto Calmette, 
France, amt Anne MInfer. Australia. 61. 64; 
Anne White. U-S. def. Catherine Sul re. 
France. 64, 74 (7-S); Ranavn Fairaank. 
South Africa. deL Zina Garrison (61, U£. 74 
(74), 24. 161 1 ; Bonnie Gadusek (ID). U A, def. 
Andrea Jaeger. U.S. 61,61; Isabelle Cueto, 
West Germany, def. Nathalie Iferremon. . 
France. 64. 6-2 


Football 


SCHEDULE 

(Edmonton toads sertoi. 3-1) 
Mar 36 P hl tode tet ila at Edmonton 
x-June 2: Edmon to n at PhikxMpMa 
x-juna 4: Edmo nto n at PMtade to Mo 
(e-lf necessary) 


United States Football League Leaders 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Quarterbacks 
Aft Com 


SAN FRANCISCO (AT) — Kathryn Crosby said Tuesday that the 

to- 1 tot a- .in., a 4.1 I ■. -ir . 


Golf 


of public opinion against the play- 
ers’ association and provide a cata- 
iten- 



■ • Rn&hed to judgment because 
I 1 * information hannful to 
in»ge was forthcoming 


ket statement about testing and 
then not giving the details of imple- 
mentation? . 

Right now, baseball seems 
healthy. Certainly there is a con- 
cern about drag abuse in baseball 


The Monterey Peninsula Golf Foundation, which has sponsored the 


Francisco, has said said it will continue to hold the event under a different 
flume. The Crosby family had controlled only the name. 

'5 tics to the toumamau, i 





has still notcomidrt'edlu^be. ' game and the way if s been ban- 

•S’SWJSKte Coadl by NBA Bulb 

Tom Mattia,a^x)kesmfln for IBM, can 10 , appearance in four years, was fired late Tuesday. Chicago fimshedthe 

said, ^pDcor<rohaac tenets: re- ^ season at 3B44 and^ lost in the first round of the plirygfffetoMilwankec 

In a 10-year career, Loughery played for Detroit and the then- 
Baltimore Bullets before finzshing with P h ila d dphia in 1971 He coached 
the 76ers late in 1972 but Itft in 1973 for the Anurican Basketball 
Association, where he took the New York Nets to the champinwyitip . 



w 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Taranto 

29 

U 

SH 

— 

Detroit 

24 

17 

JB5 

4 

BaUtmore 

14 

18 

-571 

4 Vi 

Now York 

21 

20 

.512 

7 

Milwaukee 

19 

22 

463 

9 

Bouton 

19 

24 

M2 

» 

Oewtland 

16 21 

West Dtvtston 

Mi 

UUi 

CalHonda 

25 

IS 

sn 

— 

Kansas Otv 

24 

19 

4» 

1 

Minnesota 

21 

22 

AN 

4 

Oakland 

21 

22 

488 

4 

Oitecma 

19 

21 

JOS 

to 

Seattle 

1? 

34 

JUO 

6 

Tekoa 

16 

31 

-364 

9ft 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
CQH DMstaa 

W L Pet 


spect for tite indnrid nai " Thai is 
^J^y what Dm Fdtr, executive 
■^Sf^MtP^bassaid. 

Fifc mdennands Hat if the in- 


of games for drug-gambler asso- 
ciates. The last time anyone was 

accused of throwing a game was 66 

years ago There has not been a 
ehmi nf evidence that it has hap- 



. -■ cffirpsl unnalysis, __ . _ 

iiocont price that has kept the game dean. Chicago was 65-99 during tougberys two seasons at the hdm. 



AMoetolloB toodera 
itoraugh to* MMtortH Tooraomont: 

EARNINGS 

l.Cu-ttsStranaa U0U9813. Lomiy WadUm 
E91311. X Cahrin P«JtC £91.530. 4 Maic 
OWteora 8277,167, 5. Bernhard Longer 
»74E. A Craig Stadfer S254JM1 7. Ray Ftovd 
8238.1ML & Carev Povtn 322X349.9, Tom Wat- 
son sinjBl 10, Fuzzy Zseller S) 66.156. 

SCORING ‘ 

1, Don Poatov. TOSS. 2, Craig Stodtor. 703*. X 
Corey Pavln. 7051 A, LarrvMlzto 7(158. 4 Tom 
Watson, man. 6. Ray Ftovd end Mart 
O'Meara 70189. 8, Calvin Paste and Keith F*r- 
SUL 7092. Too had wHh 70bM. 

AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
I. Fred Couples, 27&X. Z Andy Boon and 
Greg Normal, 27S6. A Mae O'Grady, 274J.& 
Sonny LytoandBUl GtoHMbZ7aA.7, Jim Dart, 
2732.8, Bd*V WadHn*.572A8. GrtsToiggs. 
2722. lft, Don PohL 2712 
DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
I, CWwtn Peefb m2. Hole irate. JOB. X 
David Edwards, .796. 4 Mika Reid. J770. S, Tim 
Norrix, JW. 6 Uory Nahnn, J66 J. Tom Kite. 
J6l.8,Jack Renner. JSl «, Scott Simpson end 
Doug Teweh, J4». 

GttSUBHS IN REGULATION 
1, Jort NIO(laH.mz AI Golbergar.ma 
Bruce Ltotzke, 7! 8. < Calvin Peete, Jli & 
John Mahatfey. J1L 6, Corey Pay In. Jtf>. 7, 
Dan Paul and Tn-ChutM hon, .707. 7. Doug 
Tewcu, jdx 10, Roger MOllble, jwl 



Yanis 

Rush 

Pan 

Tampa Bay 

5335 

1676 

3657 

Now Jersey 

4982 

2980 

1922 

Birmingham 

4720 

1967 

2751 

Memphis 

4611 

2032 

2649 

Baltimore 

4527 

1795 

2733 

JoduoAVille 

4354 

1673 

2681 

Orlando 

3 m 

1416 

2076 


Team Detente 


1 

8 

! 

3 

36R 

1432 

2266 

Memento 

4155 

1475 

2680 

Batttmara 

4179 

1717 

2416 

Tampa Bay 

4494 

1006 

26N 

New Jersey 

4541 

1564 

3804 

Jacksonville 

4707 

1850 

2857 

Orlando 

5256 

2652 

2604 


Quarterbacks 



Alt Com Yds 

Td In 

Lewis, Memo 

173 

92 1481 

15 

Sioudt, Wrm 

358 216 2777 

29 1 

Fintaoi Balt 

277 335 2687 

14 1 

Reaves, T3 

451 251 3473 

21 2 

Kelley. Moms 

173 1M 1458 

6 1 

Luther. Jack 

384 170 1876 

10 1 

Fluffe, NJ. 

279 133 3896 

U 1 

Collier. Ort 

302 158 1842 

7 1 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Team Offcast 



Yards 

Rush 

Pan 

Houston 

5519 

US 

4634 

Denver 

4972 

1751 

3221 

Oakland 

4918 

1856 

3062 

Arizona 

4410 

1654 

2806 

Portland 

3663 

1613 

2050 

Leo An petal 

3631 

1633 

1978 

Sen Antonia 

34N 

1300 

2180 


Ttoo Defease 


Oakland 

4184 

1336 

3848 

sen Antonia 

4248 

1577 

2671 

Denver 

4311 

1670 

2641 

Arizona 

4449 

1803 

2646 

Las Angela 

4732 

1667 

3003 

Portland 

4765 

1957 

2808 

Houston 

4868 

1683 

3185 


Keilv. Hou 
Hebert, Oak 
Gaalkmo. Dan 
D. Williams. Ariz 
Noutwlsnl, SA. 
Evens. Den 
Yotrna LA 
Woodward. Port 
Retemon, Port 


Yds 
567 360 4623 
368 177 2983 
230 133 1531 
377 177 2663 
333 173 2279 
303 146 1976 
I 95 101 1353 
US 62 831 
213 ID1 1380 


Td Int 
» 19 : 
26 14 1 

10 10 
is i3 ; 
15 30 
12 IS : 
4 » - 
3 6 ■ 

9 17 



BASEBALL 
American League 

DETROIT — Recalled Dove Bergman, Or* - 
Bosomoa from Nativllle of toe American ' 
Ataedtofion. Placed Chris Plttara. infWdte. .* 
on toe ISHtav suopkinentol disabled list • 
National League 

CHICAGO— Signed Lorry Cure, ototocr. • 
Plaaed Gory Matthews, ogtfleUar. an toe 16 - 
ttav disabled list, signed Jeff Small, short- "■ 

itoo: Lee Grimes and Michael Jones, am field- . 

ere, and Salt Lochcnu, catcher, to freement »•- 
contracts. 

HOCKEY 

Notional Hockey Leone 
BOSTON— Signed Krais Ntonhuh, toft 


DET ROI T— Purd wood toe roaxUnlna two 
yws of toe contracf of Darryl sinter.mfee 

In order to rebate him. 


World Cup Soccer 


EUROPEAN GROUP 7 
IfKMana a Scotland 1 




n*kI matches: June n ioxom] 

SctrfJL Wales n. Scat land; Sept.23, StSnwi 'I 


I 


i- I-.J 









Page 24 


ART BUCHWALD 


A MiUary Sidecar Soi 

W i 


ASHINGTON — The trou- you were involved with an SCM 
bie in the Defense Depart- scout motorbike that the Army was 
mem (and who says there is any building.” 
trouble in the Defense Depart- “That wasn’t a motorbike. The 
ment?) is that as weapons become only SCM I remonber was an 
more sophisticated, they take long- $8,000 fonr-whed-drive semi-per- 
er and longer to produce. There- sound earner. I stayed with it for 
fore, the person in the Pentagon three years, and dim I was trans- 
wbo originally came up with the ferred to Hawaii” 



idea is no 
there, and the 
project has gone 
through dozens 
of teams and 
many different 
lives before it is 
ready for com- 
bat. 

Take the SCM 
Mark 89. Back 

in the 1950s the „ . „ , 

U. S. Array BodroaM 
wanted a scout car motor vehicle, 
which in effect was a motorcycle 
with a sidecar. 

□ 

The idea for a new scout bike 
was thought up by Lieutenant Har- 
old Doggcu, who is now a retired 
general m Sarasota. Florida. 

“Do you remember bang the 
project officer on the SCM?” I 
asked him on the phone. 

He thought hard. “Seans to me J 
bad something to do with it The 
scout bikes from World War II 
were obsolete and I went to the 
Harley- Davidson people and asked 
them to come up with a design. 
When 1 left we were hassling over 
the price. They were asking $500 
for each one and 1 was trying to 
knock them down to $450.” 

“Then you left before it got off 
the drawing boards?” 

“Yes, 1 di«L I turned it over to a 
Major Art Hammond, and that's 
the last I heard of it I believe he's 
out in Arizona at Sun City." 

I tracked Hammond down. 

“Sir,” I said. “I understand that 


“You don’t remember who look 
charge of the project after you?” 

“Colonel Jeffries or Jeffrey. Not 
too sure of the guy’s name, out he 
wound up heading the Lackadaisi- 
cal Defense Company that was go- 
ing after the contract.” 

Jeffries was also retired when I 
found him on his boat in the Chesa- 
peake Bay. He recalled the SCM 
wdL “We never did go into produc- 
tion with the SCM because the 
Army decided instead of a semi- 
personnel vehicle it wanted an all- 
weather tank. So we tore up the 
plans and started from scratch. 
Then I retired from the sendee and 
Brigadier General Tommy Wog- 
genueuner headed the project te am . 
He was really hot on the SCM and 
had Congress convinced the Army 
couldn’t do without it Wuggen- 
beimer insisted the SCM have ra- 
dar on top of it and the capacity to 
float on water. We told them we 
could buBd it for $500,000 each, 
and they were about to sign the 
order when Wuggen heimer was 
sent to Vietnam and replaced by 
Lieutenant General ‘Swede’ Ruf- 
fles. 

“Swede was the ten helicopter 
pilot in the Army and he decided 
the SCM would have to fly. So he 
brought in a helicopter company as 
a co-contractor, and we worked for 


10 years trying to get the thing off 
md. We were up to S2J 


Frost Ruined ^85 Champagne 

Reuters 

EPERNAY, France— The 1985 
champagne harvest may be the 
worst in 50 years, owing to unusu- 
ally severe winter and spring frosts, 
a spokesman for the Champagne 
Trade Association said Tuesday. 
About 25,000 of 62,000 acres 
(10,000 of 25,000 hectares) planted 
with vines in the Champ agne area 
would produce far less than usual 
and in some cases no wine at aR 


the ground. _ ... . 

milli on when Swede was relieved 
by General Archie Toland, an engi- 
neer, who not only wanted the 
SCM to carry airborne personnel 
do the work of a tank and have the 
ability of a helicopter but also per- 
form as a bulldozer. We said it 
could be done for $10 million 
each." 

□ 


“In ail the years you worked on 
the SCM did anyone ever mention 
that it originally was supposed to 
be a scout bike with a sidecar lo 
transport a lieutenant and his 
aide?” 

Jeffries said, “What would the 
Army want with a motorcycle that 
could only transport two people?” 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1985 


T jmghing Cow and the Smile of Success 


By Sandra Salmans 

New York Tuna Service 

N EW YORK — Solemnity is 
not a quality normally asso- 
ciated with the advertising busi- 
ness, but for yearn Joy Golden 
felt that her comic talents were 
stifled by demands to be serious 
about lipstick and mascara. So 
last year, when TBWA Advertis- 
ing asked the copywriter to “do 
comedy” for one of its accounts 
— Vache qm rit or Laughing Cow 
cheese from France — she leaped 

at the chance. “I saw the intrinsic 
of someone going into a 
store and asking fora little round 
laughing cow in a red net bag,” 
she said. 

Thus was bom a radio adver- 
tising campaign in which women 
— talking sometimes in a Bronx 


accent a breaihy. Marilyn Mot- 
i the style of 


roe voice or in the style of a San 
Fernando Valley girl — try to 
mh'ghtea people who M to real- 
ize mat the cow is actually cheese. 

TH get you a little round 
laughing cow in a red net bag,” 
Enid, in one c ommer cial, offers 
ber hungry husband. “I don’t care 
if she’s in lace with high beds, it 
isn’t what I had in mind,” he 
complains. 

The campaign, introduced a 
year ago in New York, sent 
Toug hin g Cow’s sales soaring by 
60 percent, according to Frank 
Schnieders, president of the U. S. 
office of Fromagenes Bel the 
manufacturer. This year, the 
company has increased its radio 
campaig n budget tO $13 nmfli on. 

As for Golden, a 55-year-old 
New Yorker, the campaign's suc- 
cess “ changed my whole life,” she 
said. Disc jockeys talked about 
the commercials, listeners 
phoned in to find out who wrote 
them, and the advertising indus- 
try showered them with prizes. 

Soon. Golden, who had been 
freelancing since 1980. was be- 
sieged by requests from other ad- 



MriraK. WTlw New York Tire* 

Joy Golden (center) recording a new commercial. 


vertisersk In February she formed 
pany, Joy Radio, to 


her own company, „ 
write and produce comedy and 
jingle radio commercials. “They 
will all be funny.” she said. “I 
don't want to do anything 
straight.” 

During her childhood, she 
learned comic timing by listening 
to the Jack Benny radio show 
and, a day after graduating from 
the University of Connecticut, 
she took a job in the stenographer 


pool at Batten, Barton, Dustine 
& Osborn, the agency for Benny’s 
sponsor. Lucky Strike. Sne 
moved quickly into copywriting 
but worked for a number of ac- 
counts to which hnmor was 
anathema. “The cosmetics indus- 
try is very serious: it’s like 
NASA" she said. 

By the time TBWA assigned 
her the Laughing Cow account, 
she was ready “to do a tittle 
shriek.” She wrote a commercial 
in which a woman asks a super- 
market clerk to suggest a snack. 

“How about a laughing cow?” 
he says. “It won’t fit an a crack- 
er,” riie replies. 

That commercial never ran, 
“but I knew, after (hat how to do 
it,” Golden said ‘There had to be 
a gag answer. There would always 
be someone innocent who said, 
‘It’s too big, too fat, I can’t bring 
it to school' Once I bad the for- 
mat down, it was a snap.” 

When it came time to record 
the commercial Lynn Lipton, an 
actress chosen to do the voice, 
suggested an ethnic style. “1 said 
‘Ethnic? How ethnic?' " Golden 
said. With a Greek- American 
boss at TBWA and a German- 
born client, she felt uneasy. 


“Heavy ethnic,” Lipton inristed. 
And thus it is a “constrmmate- 


ly”- 

— New York voice 


,t offers to 
bring a laughing cow to a hot-tab 

iT. <»rr 


party (“If youre worried about 
sunburn, dump the red net bag 
and put the cow in a caftan,” a 
friend suggests), to ber daughter’s 
Sweet 16 party (“AH her mends 
were impressed except Heather 
Rub ini who expected a real cow 
and brought a bale of alfalfa”), 
and to bed as a snack for her 
husband Stuart (“Then be ate all 
10 nmnebeeses and said it was the 
best treat he ever had in bed. So I 
smacked trim”) 

“When I'm hot, I knock them 

fTin “ she said, adding that she? has 

written as many as half-a-dozen 
co mmercials in a single day. 
“One line follows another. I 
sometimes feel the typewriter 
does it aH It’s very easy for me. 
It’s the easiest thing in the 
world” 

When the work goes badly, 
however, no me gets more upset 
than Golden. She reads all her 
commercials to her older daugh- 
ter, a theatrical producer who. 
according to Golden, has a poker 
face. “I always say, ‘Is this runny 
or is this the worst? ” she said 


Her daughter’s reaction to an 
early Sweet 16 draft was devastat- 
ing. “She said. That’s not funny, 
Ma,’ " Golden said Her own re- 
sponse, riie said, was “Panic. I 
thought my career was over, Fm 
not funny anymore, all FA be able 
to write a gain are obituaries: 
‘Gins burg comma Helen, dearly 
beloved aunt . . 


Golden has signed eight diems 
for whom she is in various stages 
of writing and producing radio 
commercials. She expects to earn 
an average of about $20,000 for 
each job, a onn that includes her 
baric creative fee, phis residuals 
paid each time a commercial airs. 
She said she hopes to earn up to 
$300,000 this year, a $100,000 in- 
crease over the previous year. 

As for Laogbing Cow, the cur- 
rent campaign will end next 
mouth, with a new campaign 
scheduled to begin in September. 
Next year, Schnieders said more 
cities may be added to the sched- 
ule. How well New York humor 
will play between the coasts, how- 
ever, isundear. 


“I don’t know what makes 
th*m laugh in Wisconsin,” Gold- 
en arfminaf. “Is chat the Mid- 
west?” 


people 

Thatcher. A Satirical OU 


m. 



Saturday. — r 

to Kuala Lumpur 

painter Rnskm 


X LbUUtU A* 

with Prime Munster mnnw field 01 stuay. *-""- 5 -- r~ 
Mohamed during her vuatu> the ^ a Yale faculty nwntaSUK* 

Far East eariierSis year. The Lon- 1966 , became ti» univerartYS lm 
j -tt mmaimiim) that leSS — - j^»» m 1078. 3l 8 ££ 40. He 


rataniwiiiw j .i , 

don Times commented that less 
than fervent supportm of the 
prime minister might chuckle at the 

painting, “in widen her teeth figure 
rather more prominently than 
Sgatdtt and Saatdri might hire. 
Saatchi and Saatchi is the advertis- 
ing firm that handles publicity for 
Thatcher's Conservative Party. 
Roger de Grey, the president of the 
Royal Academy of Alts, said: 
“This is satire If s not supposed to 
be flattering.” 

□ 


i m. * » * He 
Smoumed last atm* that he 
would retire in June 1936. 

Q 


Affister 

for The Wi 



ior i** ft® m Swjjji 

Africa, hi won the 1985 Louts M, ■ 
Lyons Award for Conscience and x 
Integrity in Journalism, the Nie^r 
man Foundation of Harvard Urn-' 
versity announced. . . Jaha 


,1* 

;,fK^ 

!i :. /*<!’ & 

■ 


Loneliness was the biggest con- 
cern of 18-year-old Tama Aefci as 


a, the NBC reporter^- - . 

and the producer Wffiaa Trope 
have been named winners of the 



wOuam asioap meant ■» -j — 

form of higher education. After Ae- oellence m rqxntmg-- - 
b?s family and friends kissed her agn policy and retated issues, 
goodbye -Tuesda^she tearfully Gosfako recoves the $1,000 prize 


pulled out of the South Street Sea- 
port in New York in her 26-foot (8- 
meter) sloop, Vanina, which is 
Hindi for God of Water. The sloop 
was a present from AebTs father, 
Ernst, 47, a graphic artist who lives 
in So Ho in lower Manhattan, who 

gave it to her in lieu of a college 
tj xt. can rmn 


fa- his coverage of U.S. policy to- 
ward Lebanon in 1984. Kalb and 
Turque's winning piece . was an 
houriong documentary “The Real#/. 
Star Wars-Defense in Space.” . 

□ 




in aono in uwa iubuu<uuui, w w 

gave it to her in lieu of a college Australia will compensate Pablo 
education. He said that the $40,000 Picasso's granddaughter Marina 
vessel bought in England, was for damage last September to one 


CUUUIUUIL iAU MUU uw ir<v|vwv riMWua U « 

vessel bought in England, was for ttawiay! last September to one 
“cheaper than a college education of Picasso’s paintings, “Trois 
nowadays," and that his daughter Crfines” (Three Skulls) at the Vk> 
ready - 


was 


r for the trip. 
a 


A Los Angeles judge dismissed a 
lawsuit brought by Frank Sinatra 
claiming Capitol Records autho- 
rized the distribution of low-quali- 
ty recordings of his work and used 
tiis name to promote them without 
his consent. A lawyer for Capitol 
Records. Howard Kim, said Sina- 
tra's action was barreafay the Stat- 
ute of Limitations, under which 
such claims had to be made within 
four years of the alleged actions. 
Each of the purported actions oc- 
curred more than four years ago, 

IkM ^ — - -* — I— 


VI A IWOMV a W 

Crfines” (Three Skulls) at the Vic- 
toria National Gallery in Mel- 
bourne. Australia had insured the. 
Picasso, part of an international 
exhibition, for $304,591 U.S, a 
federal Arts Ministry spokesman 
said. A official dipped as he tried 
to stem the painting fall to the 
ground when its hook snapped, and 
accidently thrust a screwdriver 

gotiauems arc Mntinning over tiri^ 
extent of cooipensatkni. The Mel- 
bourne Age newspaper reported 
Tuesday that " a 2,W0-y tar-old’ 
sword from an exhibition of Chi- 
nese entombed warriors was acci- 
dentally broken in the gallery is 

ino-i - i 


curred more than four years ago, dentally broken u the gallery is 
King told Superior Court Judge 1982 and that. China was pud 
Charles Jones. Jones agreed with $195,000 U. S. in compensation. 


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iScngConenercM 
UM HeneiMy R« 
HONGKCNO 


Tek HK 5-286726 


AWQHOUCS 

HAM 

praau 


ANONYMOUS m 
Rome 


HAVE A MCE BA« BoM. Have a 
nice day! Baled 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

“ Health Cm Resources to Paris”. 
Auxurnhereiveegy-lo-useguidein 
Engfah from prenatal to cencfnc 
health care, plus french soda nant- 
ly.Send WO to WK£, 31 cm Bosquet. 

• ntO Ptak Tri: 555 91 71 AwrioUe 

at Brantaio's, American Colege. V4- 
lags Voice, WH Smith, bookstores. 

SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurotrt deivery. 
Write Keyset. FOB 2. 81000 Bnreeb. 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

BBLG31IM 

HRUXH Iff, owner seto sumptuous du- 
plex upralmnn 400 K}jn., facing 
woods, 10 rooms, 5 bedroorav? 

Tek Bruxelel 32/2 344 63 93. 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

COTE IYAZUR 

MOUONS 

PROVENCA1E VBLA 

HdJ. bring gring onto large terrace, 
equipped Mehta 4 bedrooms, 3 beah- 
roono. gmes room, raura, ceflor. 
Treed S waled 1650 »Cf«. garden, 

P ° 0, *tate SSP^ehriv rifeted 

roonc bouttv asnvy wuro 

Wcraft^lOOroo 

L’UNIVHISHIE 

6 Ave Gcergat Oenem 

06000 N«. Um 88 44 98 

CLOSE TO MONACO 

ROQUBRUNfi 9-room fely eqwpped 
& ar-oondhioned residence m quet 
area, only minutes away from Ihe fam- 
ous ftmapoBy of Monaco. baMtuly 
tedscoped gredan (2,000 sq.nJ wiih 
guest htwse, pool & patta. For father 
aetrih contort: 

AGHH 

26 bo Bd. fimeess Charfabe 
Mente-Creto, MC 91000 Monaco 
(931 SO 66 OO bd. 155. Tb. 479417MC 

MQUGMS REStOENTIAL UNIQUE. A 
jxrvaso hoWay porodvc m 5.000 
sqra. gar dm fix loven of ftene. 
Dream modem property 400 sqju. 
large reception TOO iqjn. Firestoce 
w* vnde openngs of nceure. 4 bed- 
rooms, 4 baths. Guest epertment. 
FurheK omramng pool- 150 tarn. 
Mweflous summer receptm 150 
sqjn. wrth bcebecue. 5500.000 Con- 
rort SS, <7 Lo Gosette. 06400 
CANNE1 Tel: P31 38 19 19. 

CANNES CAUFOTRE la made ev 
vmtment m the heart of the most 
reudanhri oreo of Comes. For lovers 
of ouihenvaty, fentoeK fxoperty of 
•arty 19th century, 360 re^m.. large 
receptions fig jq.«n , fireplace. BGcrd 
mom. Guest apartment, svmnvng 
pool Pootetrso Fabulous sea «w, 
attrartrvB garden: 1000 sq.m 
S»50J00 5Sf47 La Craisette. 06400 
Comes. Tek |9S 38 19 19. 

FERNAY VOLTAIRE. Apartment, 3 
beckootm. high doss, rfaonfled by 
lap thrian descmerThrey fernrivd lot 
5155X100. Tekptq 42 94 34. 

PARIS A SUBURBS 

ST NOM LA BRETECHE 
SUPHB PROPERTY 

_ 217 aqjrs kring space. _ . 

sauna extras* room. 1 700 JOJn. park. 
VERY HIGH CLASS 

F2BOOOOO 

COJ 1 . (3)95 4 92 00 

PEAR JARDM DES PLANTES 

TOWNHCXJSE - LOFT 

ON HOWBIED com 

RARE * OUG1NA1 

300 SOAL JUSTOS1 PBCE 
SBME KAYS* (7) 329 60 60 



BBAINT LAURENT 

rive gauche 


Women's shop 


19 et 21 avenue Victor - Hugo 
75116 Paris TeU (1) 500.64.64 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


PONT DE NBJUY 

TOUR IE FRANCE 
Cause departure. M u g iR cent 280 

1 1 rar ira r-. r^wrrv i tifln 

AIL PARS. Tet 747 95 40 


OIAMPDE MARS 

7* wry hrah dan fld 
Living + 2 bedrooms 
Tet 380 2608 
Agence da PEtole. 


NBUftlYCHEZY 

hi beautifd aid buAfag, 5th Roar, 
i. 165 ' 

Tet 


6 team,JiS t^^wad' s room. 


15TH AVL SUFFRB4 

Luxurious (wA5na 200 son Rat. 
BRfflCO.533 68 91 


A1ITBU Race Tr get. Q i^orden faong 
I*, dning, 3 bedrooms, 2 


south, 
baths, 
ny. 2 eMries. let 


>, bafco- 


IE MARAIS (near Place des Vosges) 


17th century butting. 105 tatty, i 
roorn^un, bath. FI .300,000. 


SWITZERLAND 


VILLARS 

W1NTHJ & SUMMER 
PARADISE, 20 M1NUTE5 
FROM L AKE GENEVA 

Aparteseata. rmong lav studas 
a 4 rooaa. Ava^abll Far Sale To 


Fcntasoc mere, Ngh guafr 
X 3- Prices 


W. seMed rew^ntn) izecs. 

from S195.00Q to SF&35.000. Mart- 


avaJafcte e enfy interest. 


gages avatteie 
fix infonraBorv 

G1065 RAN SA. 

Av. Mor-Kepcs 2i. 

CH-1005 LAUSANNE, S«cerExd 
Tel: [211 22 35 12. TU »1SSM5JS CK 
Suae 1970 


SWnZBUAND 


Forer c ncrs esi buy STUD (OS' APART. 
ivevf5 ■■ CHALETS. 


_ LAKE G34EVA - 
MONTRBIX ar n these world fcndtis 
resorts CKANS-MONTANA, LES 
CHAIttStETS, VH0HBZ. VOlAKS, 
JURA & recun of G5TAAD. trem 
SRIOUOO Mortgage s 0 G% at 6.4% 
efleiest. 

REV AC SA- 
Your Partner m Bmoa 
52 Montbn&nf. CH-7232 G3GVA. 

Tet: 022/3C1540 Telex 22030 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


MANHATTAN NYC 

THE ULTIMATE M 
CONDOMINIUM UYING 
TRUMP TOWH . on fifth Avenue 
MANHATTAN PIACS • Id A. & 13 St 
New, ele ga nt , prestigpous unts lecture 
dsMctme, secure end enveie 2, <, 5. 


betkoomt. [)500 to 30 CO sq. ftj ArsA 
able cSteqly 


frgci owners. 
Contoefs Mr. NL fttmoo 

Mcnocemert Carp. 

118-35 QueemBvd 

Fores: HSs. NY 11375 USA 
Tel: 71H97-Q48 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


TO EOT 

Mr, August 

French Riviera 


Gcp cTAnfibes 

Lnurion xohere w3c 
Pod. 7 bedrccna. exonc 


/ wcrocna. exonc ccrflcn 
CdtSJlISEliQ 
Michc* Bci i4pj J 
42 Av. Vidor Hugo. Pcrs 16Ri 


CWTH MONTE CARLO. f& rent 

Mr and Augiet, comferteiie apart- 
ment far 2 persons. deefMtQ doove. 


double bed, lege kvmd *oon wet, 

Myeqapped 


sofa bed. fitly eqixppe^ btdvn. ste- 
reo, TV, bafetry, wrf, m jyU icee 
w«w o-edadong easno and kb. 
naOCD'raonft. 6w 2334. Hereid Tn- 
faw. 9321 NwJy Cedw. Fnm 


ST. TRGCUi Old lawa Uc epflond 
lOOiqjn, tfudo + terrace. Pcnorcm- 
k mw, Cham. Jidy 5 - 22. FI 2, 000. 


^ 01 before naan - ar 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANPE5. Very nee apaumn; very 
nnod eonttten, lowly, bxunaus 
ildng. 62 sc^ai + terrace 50 SQJn, 


view on sea aid ^^facug south. 


cabn. June 
ant months 
) 500 49 5P or 7i 


nber 


2690. 


Teb 


COIE ITAZUR, VBKE area, 20 nans, 
beodt, ewfushw Proven^* vila. 
mad cotdbriohle modem occonvno* 
daftan for 2 couples. Furnished with 


antiques,_JbneJ 5/ Sept. 1& 


, le) Paris, 548 95 40. 


ST. TSOPEZ. On jort B apttod 


becioam. June 


view. Large Cvma • 

15 - September ft. F4O00Q- Teb 06- 
94)792101 before noon- or {1)624 


ST. TROPEZ Superb view, house with 
pool. 6/6 people from J«e 15/June 
5q Aug. 4 Septlet (1) 764 97 71. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


EXECUTIVE S UITE MA YFAIR- Luxu- 
ry furnished tpomob, newly deco- 
rated, fitly serviced, seartmd/teiex 
Foottes. £450/ t3b per week. 3 
months to 2 years. Mourtcvm Man- 
Ltd London 01 491 2626 


LONDON. For the best Fumbled flab 

and Souses. Conn* the Sped*& 


PhBps-fcrr.orto Lews. Tefc'SoUh of 
T2 8111. North of Pbrk 722 


fM 352 6111, „ .. 

5131 Tele* 27B46 HBDE G- 


BERKHfY SQUARE. LUXURY ^ 


oan K4y fumohad 1 bedroom — . 
lon g let (3 25 per week , short l e t£375 
per 'wtk. Mnanura 3 raonThs. Pbon& 
noon - 4pm; (01) 629 3770 / 499 4841 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING ONTE£B.V_ 
Deluxe terA^ Vclenussir. T74. 
Arroendam. 030621234 or 623222. 


ITALY 


When in Home: 

PALAZZO AL VHABSO 
Luary apartmert house vrith fumidied 
flab, avcddble for 1 weekend mare 


Fhonm 6794325, 6793450. 
Ma del ^ 


Write: Wa . 

00186 Rome. 


16. 


FLORENCE ITALY. teSTOBC center. 
Short term rertais. 055 244456 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO. IUXUBOUS fu«y 


fixnWwd 


iflaorcentotiyci 
ment, HOspjn. large ter - 

p variootaig s ea, u n irtenupted 

French.' ftr/nxi sao mult panorama 


sfasTrastss-ra 


Se June through’ August. CdL office 
hours Svritantond 0 1/W 1 9 


• 10. 


PARIS AKEA FURNISHED 


SHORT TBHA STAY. Advcrtoges of □ 
hotel vrilheul m convetiencM. feel at 
home in race stinks, one beckaam 
and more in Paris. SOSHJM 80 rue 
d» rUnivpsftt, Pirns 544 39 40 


NEAR RAMROUfljJET. 45 bn Ports, 
bewliful tvxjcn. woods. fuCy 
equpped. 5 bedrooms, double Irving. 
nearqoH & temiv Fran Juhr 15 -Aug. 
IS P^DOO net. Tet (3) 041 31 B6. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy 

I Ave. 3e 


Service 


750M M 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


AG04T IN PARIS 
562^1640 


RATS FOR BMT 
SHORT -LONG TERM 


RATS FOR SALT 

omcB tor mnzsAii 


EMBASSY S9V1CE 
563 68 38 


Seledfatu of stuias & 2 mam i 
Rmidereiol Areas 
Pornbe short terra 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAl ESTATE AGOT 

764 03 17 


74 CHAMPS-S.YSSS 8th 


Shidia^2 or 3-fpom apatmenl. 


i month ar raore. 

IE OAIHDGE 359 67 97. 


PARK MONCEAU tnecr). 2 bedroom, 
fving. duinq elegcru bu3dn& racely 
fotn3ied Ary-Auq 5950/ marm Abo 
avntoble toftoXoaV; 267 08 35 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

CUT YOUR HOTH.ML1- tar a Rotate! 
ty tiirant netx the Eftel fewer. Lux- 
ury dudiae to 5-foom opartmpto. 
(ram one week upwards. FLATOIH, 

14 rue du ThACtrt 75015 Paris. fS 
575 62 20. The 20SZ11 F. 

MONTMHNA5SE AREA. Venr rice, 
cornpletriyirrademizod, sm* 2-room 
flat with tenacB. deb floor. 
F5D00/ month. From June to October. 
Teli Mr Cofin (81) 80 55 77. 

5 Mi NEAR PONT NBJF. BegaK, sun- 
ny and quel dcvfele room perrixxoe, 
m two (teen with terrace + Irichen 
and beriroom. F5,00Q/month Tet 
329 63 46 before 9 an 

SHORT RBRAL IN PARIS: studos 
raid 2 rooms, b&vjtifuiy decorcXed. 
Contort: Soflregte 6 ate Drioane, 
75008 Peris Tet^ll 359 99 50 

t MONTH, tom Tst-Jriy 1st. 2 rooms. 
Srina F4000. Vuit Thursdby^Frirkry 1 

21 Ae. de to Molte ficyret, 
75007 foik Courtyard, 2nd floor. 

16TH LUXURIOUS, bedrtxxn & dou- 

bie firing. HLSOO/morth. Short term 
after Jury. Tet 647 86 B1 

RUE DCGWaiE. 555 10 70 l 70 

iqjrc. churni, fight, equipped big Bv- 
tearoom. 

78i MVAUDES. Very rice Jhtag + 2 
bedroorm. wefl furnished, fcriy 
equipped, quiet. FifiOOQ; 72037 99 

6IH ST- G8MAM Very beautiful 4- 
roorre, character. F7.5D0 net. Tek 526 

11 24. 

17TH VI LIBS. Excepbanri. 6<aom 
friclex + girrierMerTaoB. Free June 
2«HAugml reto. Tek 3265506. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SHORT IBM in Ldki Quarter. 
No marts. Tab 329 38 81 


nCHEUEU DRpUpT J bn*oor^: 


Ewnw. Udian, both. Tel 296 54 ! 


CENTRAL NUBS Qwaa^a^artaeris 


& studios, al comforts. I 


MAFflH liMKU 3 room, svrny. 


16IR Luxurious 6-room cMM ltn e N. 
toon term. Tel: 720 9495. 


8TH AVL MAROAU, to shore 
room flat F2J0Q. Tel 723 70 6). 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


T ROCAD BO. LUXURY, 2 ROOMS, 
tan ucii, | 
only nice 




International Business Message Center 


ATTBmON EXECUTIVES 


in the 

buna, where mare than a (bird 
of a mRion renders wnrfcf- 
wrdm. meet of whom are In 
bwrin e w tool industry, off 
road it. Jam tehee w {Paris 
6I3S9SI baton /Dam. en- 
suring that we can telex you 
bade, and your massage wtf 
wee wtMi 48 hours. The 
ran k US. $9.80 ar heat 


indvtSn ean uJet m and nriG- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


Incorporation txd management rt UK. 
W* « Mon. Turia, Anguia, Chamy 


mast atner anihara arm 

• Confident wd advtce 

• branedatB avotobity 

• Namnee terwees 

• Bearer shoes 

• Boat r egairaixj ra 

• AccounV>g & o dm irus tr ri ion 

• Md, telephone & felei 


iTE 


savics LTD 
Hew) Office 

Mt Pleasant, Doeala* fate of Meet 
Tab Dae^oi (0624) 23718 
Telex 628554 SHECT G 


lnndon ... 

2-5 Old Band ftjaxton Wl 
Tel 01-493 4744. D> jfl247 SCSLDN G 


BROKERS 

INVESTMENT ADVISORS 


Yaur dams on invest m are at Ameri- 
ca's mast scaring technological break* 
through* m a blfijn dollar rut industry. 
30.000 trees dready floated 6 
Dividends Fred. Hgh omud eortingi 
assured hr msiy, nanryean. Gner- 
ou» coexainiins araf Soma. Materi* 
d avdtafale in En$hsh. frendv Garatn. 


PUNSJL 

A* MorvBepen 24, 

041005 Lausanne, Swmedard 
Tel (21)22 35 12-Tk;i5 185 k®JSCH 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

Ml 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPl£ 

UNUMUHl INC 

U5JL t WORLDWIDE 

A complete sood & buuness service 
proviefeg a oneue ccUertran of 
wlentedi venorie & multilnguai 
ndh^ajofe hjr afl occo3ort$. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 W. 56th SL, MYC 10019 
Service flepresentatwes 

Needed Worldwide. 

„ HWBCH JOINT VBmj« 
Coltteraboa Ui compony des^ww 
nionufartunng end martelmo BM 
PC/XT/AT nxrexXiWB peripheral fxtxf- 
ucti induing modems, mulu-hinrtini, 
memory exporrion. graphic, ernulcrion 
boardv H Bitai citad tonphn posabte 
fart/ventore collaboration for Europe- 
an macufectwina'marirersig. Eirope- 
rai compraves with nnhring trade re" 
cord & financial resources should mb er 
telephono fin Franra) [79] 81-1437 or 
(USA) [B1B1 710-1717 or u«iie *o CPI., 

Wh. OI. 


OFFSHORE TAX SHH.TBI 

, COMPAMB 

ISC, Isle rfMan. Turks. Qmnet isksods, 
Pmomp, Ltena and most offtere ra^ 
« Conytere suffxxt fncBues. Very 
And amdonnty. 

Free consultation: 

Rage. Gnffin LLB., F.CA. 

Brodrare: Coroorote Management l*L 
Western House, Victorio Street. 



FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

GOTO MBBAL MINE 

Lj^fd.'nCriorodo. U5A S2J mi- 
ion JU5. | needed to get nre mto goad 
predurtion. Excellent payback. Top, 
wrereniahve, oararienerd monagt- 
raenf m place., Pnndpah, inveriteeri 
managers, haters only should write 

m Weis i Co, he 

210 W. 22 S»,&*8rooOL 60521 LEA 

iHl 

BUSWBSS W SCAFfiXNAVlA. ff 
youneed high terel mraketing mpoch 
y ter. P^^ucfc or serene in 

5candmavKi / Norflient Fivnpe r nv 
tart us for mumd udarneiBn. 30 
yeon of eranwitt and outstonriag 
resritsand references. First Marietuto 
6*5prmera Afl PO Ba* 102. 5 
maUtohte, jwdere. Tek (46(4I>- 
981442. The 32700 COM S 

DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Your test boy- 

Fine tfiranends m any pnee rmge 
at toweri vtetosde prices 
deed from Antwerp 

Oder of the dnratmd world, 
fid guarantee. 

For free price fa wrp 
toodrim Goldanrteto 

CniWli RllOff 

Esmbiahed 1938 

hShocnstrod 62, B-2018 flrtwwp 

TW^^M^^jOud 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond ndmtry 

AJ7W7ION SAUDI ARABIA Agents - 
Crai you successfully represertf my 

Sisk’s 

UStwrart. Av. louse 366. 105D Bris- 
sris, Bririum. 

WNAMAI iml cosporatwns 
52" axdride now. Tri 

B62fl 20240. 7 rite 628352 HAND 
G (waUKL 

OFFICE SERVICES 

USBUSDCSS B4VBTMB415- Ftorfda 
Red EsWe. Masrai/Mason Inc. 790 E 
5». 202, Fort Lauder- 
drie. FI 33301 USA 

IMPETUS * ZURICH * 2S2 76 2T. 
Phone / trie* / meitaL 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORID-WH5E 
BUSWESS OHRES 


Ce n ylete «*Hb Seovtarid, T des 
A dm i nist rative. Corporate 
Repre i en t a B e n 8 OtfaerFocOSn 


AMSTERDMA Euro BudneB Carter 
Kazengr. 99. 1015 CH Arraterdran 
TeW#2Z7tQi Tde*: 16183 
ATi®45 Executive 5ennarj. Athera 
Tower Athens 610. 

Tel (301 7796 232 Trice 216343 


Eoheja Chanbers, 213 
’"aatoav 400 f 


Noumea Point. Boater 40t) 021. 
Tet 244949. Triot 01 16897. 


SBSc 4 Rue de la Preae 
1000 Bn»i 


--- _ D LJ Tet 217 83 60 
Telex: 25327 

DUBAI; P.a Bat 1515. DNATA 
Artne Centre Doha. UAL 
Tek 214565 Tele* 4891 1 
LONDON: 11C The Strand. 

London WC2R OAA 
Tek PI) 836 9918. Tte 24973 
MADRID: C/Orerae N° 684. 

28020 Mockid- Tel 270 56 * or 
270 66 04. Trie*.- 46642 
MBAN: Via Bocmno 2 
30123 Milon. Tel 86 75 W/80 59 279 
Tab* 320343 

NEW YORK 575 Mtxfao n Avenue 


New York. NY 10022. Tet g^2) 605- 


020a Tele* 125&U / 237- 
PARIS: BOS, 15 Arm Vtaor Hugo 
75116 PBris. Te h 502 18 00 
Trskee S20B93F. 

ROME: Via Sovaia 78, 00198 ftxna. 
Tek 85 32 41 -844 80 70. 

Trite 613458 

SINGAPORE: 111 North Bridge Id. 
#11-04/06 Penrauta Hsa, STore 
0617. Tri= 3366677. The 


ZUBOfc Benravt^ 32, 8001 Ztfich 


Tek 01/214 L 
Trim 012656/812961. 


Geneva France Border 
MBA 


MKHHBUQEAU 

AG8ia SBEV1CES 
Your fufly ewtopa d office in Fran. 
PBru U ue on prio r, wed, ptoar), t rade 
sales, tedteo A (dnndiutuu ad 
s e ae t md soviets. Lead trad eaxfitor 
advisers. Sxrt ar krac terra. MBA 85 
R» do Geneve. 7434Q Goao rd. Fiu ce. 
Tek (50) 92-1341 Tic MA 30PCP8 F 


YOUR SWISS IU5VE55 
BASB « LUGANO 
Fuiy intoradMl bums services phone 
/ triex / mtri services I tre rei oftore / 
adranstodian / bookheMW Tri: 
091/231 161 ■ Dn 79544 PMSA CH 


17TH: Owner rents 3rd, floor in .old 

DuulO- 


oecvoonL ± m i^wh mam 


tar status. Tet 20 25 17 


CHAMPS HY5S5- Booutful 2 roams. 

" c 


»9a 


SPAIN 


MAUORCA. To rent June, 
raagnffi- 


Jriy or Axguri. lerge via. 
cent view, pooi. K) mra. to sea Lrege 
Rvtng/tSrvng, age modemVitchrav4 
douS» bervoon^, bed*, help cwtri- 
able. Paris 260 60 18 ar Bat 2336. 
Hvdd Tribute, 92521 ftouSy Codex, 
fiau 


USA 


. . . . _ furnished Central Park 

South shoo u partmu n t with Ink 
rite, fufl hotel service. 3 yea 1 
create EfflO/nwA. (71^ 466- 
9230 (Mccvm). 


REAL ESTATE 
WA1YIED/EXCHANGE 


PK3RS5EUK AMBDCAIN cherche 

stuefo 6 2 prises,, meubife avec «lt- 
diona, pour Join/iulel/Aout. VriBers, 
Oetok 54rae era 6tee. F3JXD a 
F7JXKL Ecnre: Bar 2341, Herdd Tri- 
bmr, 92521 Neu*y Cedrx, fraKg. 


EMPLOYMENT 


for Moa-EXEamvE positions 
LooKuma 

TNTBlNAnONAL POHDONS" 
PAGES 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 
Reporti n g to the gres jdant of a reykfly 
expanding Cnadbi Kttdl d e s ign a, 
venture captd corapuiy. Successful 


Copabikty to travel H r 

is a necessity . Fluent English a required. 

Artabc creativity and/or raarttenne ex 

perience is at asset trad modeffing ex 
perience is hdpht fleree reply kt oodv 
dence wrth reswne aid LD. | 
posable. Skrhngiduy 


per aman. to 2337, 
92521 NeuByCedet 


fiance 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


SA1E5 EXECUTIVE 47, Belgian, based 

in Tr^iri. 15 yean experience con- 
sumer & reload products. ex ceBert 
regohatKc sHs, 6 years fix East 
axpenenet teent m 5 languages, w» 
rag to travri/rebade veondw 
seeks scha ar merofaeftrina pool 
Write to F. Jasei, 21/6 lane 22, 
2nd fid. Treoraqu, Tapri, Taiwcx 
cal Tape! pqgl 4^7 


■USPBS EXECUTIVE 45, Brtfshwth 

key peribon > ptn 


or US group beamied in good 
karito sda & gnwdt ddk ftnen- 
abte * had weritina Ftoent Frendi. 
naiiCL— 


Reply to 41 016. LH. 
London, WC2E9JH. 


,63 long Acre. 


MARKET RBEARCN epeoofet, m- 

prwtoc«,sertspanttonvvjlhUSiTijra- 
rteand or Dutch firm m Amdedem 
ofte- Aug. 1. Wri te to S. Yen Rot 
y^iWeeTd er^gri n^ | t i^ 10, |] 


CANADIAN 1AWYH/EXEOJTTVE. 

looking for new 
| Pto n Europe. Cora - 1 
■,p*ffra*ra. pubfc rate- 

I I 



general PosmoNS 

AVAILABLE 


R^UnONAL EMPIOYMSIT: 
firfeptonri^ fflenogers ari skfcd 

workers ae dwart needed at world 

»PgP«.. We can codas 
000 firms ei 133 coMries and 

tor m torraste mjntonMiimid Greer 
Conudtms, 2730 SaiPedraNE. Suite 
H. ABaaauerqoe, NM 87710 lSh. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSTITONS 
AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE ASSSTANT 
k^wrting to the president of a rapidjy 
C x pondng Conofen hi-tech deign 4 
venture capitol comp tMiy. Successful 
eontfidato wB met « the praraorion of 
cm nri. product, as wed as pomirfy be- 
ing fedured in Ihe krtage c tm paign. 
CopchSty to travel & possfldy nauuSo 
aa neceaity. Fknnl Gngfish b required. 
Artistic croabvity and/or marketing ex- 
perience « an anL and nxid rihi g » 
perience ■ heb*A Pteue reply in confi- 
dence with resun* and IDj 
passUe. Starting sdtry J20JJOL 
per an num, to 2338, Herod Ti 
92521 NeuUy Ctdex, R anee. 


GNGUSf SifAKfW 

■Tek 770 80 69, Or te 


wortod. 
■Mr tain 


person td _ . . 

me du Hridw, ftx»9. Metro Opera. 


GENERAL 

POSTITONS WANTED 


ATTRACTIVE 4 HEGANT LADY, 26, 
Swianadve, used to representation Ot 
WT level series PA pasifioa, trend- 
ing vurioo nw PUase write to to 
2155, LH.T. Frieetoehstr. 14 D6000 


American 


CAPABLE 

wants Pons position as 

■Friday for executes. 

Cuny. Tek 813)837-fafi6 USA M 



HMHlEVH.Ganaai/EnQishcxBstant, 
edwaded, vetsafib, in Wl environ- 
ment. Good centals, fine to travel 
Paris 548 80 47. 


YOUNG GERMAN fahion modal, 
highly educated, looks for an intertst - 
ing pasrflon. Ionian 34500801 


Mmaum JOURNALIST seeks 

crxiwncraom- No oases. Mordsafl 

(fiance) Trir (50) 04 83 34 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVADABLE 


unnVF SSCS for AMB8CAN 
Toms » PAJttS: 

E ngidy B ring, Dutch ar German 
seavtoras, faovjtetoe of French re- 
quired, English shorthand BEngud 
Wramte. Vftteor oto* 138XSS 
Vidor^F^o, 751 16 Paris. 


727 


Paris, Fronce. Tet 


Don 't arise 
INT ERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

kl.M(WUSUi. 




[SECRCTARDES AVAH iw p 

young Swiss LadyS 


to 




^^EDUCATIONAL 
PosmoNS avaiuuh y 




UgWjT^long^bn^ 


NY, NY 1Q&T 




“we. pholo n 


Herald Ti 


fiance 


Noay&to. 


POsniSSsArSnAiHg 


mipjua. 

«8»*: 

P* PI** + roam A 


bom. 


9^ Dartrrouth GoflS/ 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS A VA2LABU 


AU PA* WANTO M USA _For_W^ 


Norvsaoker. Others tome. 2 kxb- 


yeare ond 7 tnorriu old. J. Dnflrav 7 
2725 Pine St. San finanasca, CA '••» « 
94115 USA 4&TO7547. ST 


4 FAMRB P telodriphwj,^ PA need au 


pm Start — 

Sind phone tnriwr & 


47, Southeastern, PA 1 


August. 

j to WK 

USA 


SAUDI ARABIA £200 PHI WEEK 


net, frained end mtpwranced^wnnj 


rensred. Cal London 730 1 
3CB91icwi 


1 Licenced UK finptoy Agency. 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONSW ANTED 


BUHUSH TRAM® NANME. KgNy 


vrilh dvkkeo ad 

aoM. cabn surerinafured pvwv hoe 
nmv. Fry Consultanb 7 Hte St Alder- 

tet Hants UK. Tet 0252^15369 IX 

Licwncnd 


BUTia/VAlET AGE 40, jto fcto^a t 


ricvS^Miiinan^SatoBe bn- 
expenrxKod in top hoase- 


ALWAYS AVAAABLE - AU NUIS. 

n&ri 


dridren’t npreqr, num's hotpot? i 
dan SwHn daui 
._Cafl Sbreie Bgretn, 


imw, 

| of Id c 

— . ^Edwide. Bi 
landon 730 8122/5142 Q4 hour?) Lf- 
CEMPAGY. Tto 695067<SOAPi& 


L-, . ■ — , r L, 

UtilURI ... 

help worldwide. 


ABOVE AVBtAGE POSITIONS fa ■ 
rixwewwage staff. Cal Au for end 
Domestic Aprantaetth in UK-01 579 rAr 
2040,>lte^241 R4TKEX G. 
Beawtment Consultanis) ' ^ 


caDyramaen, ta aa» acxry mads & 
duiffeurs- Stoqne Bwboul 730 8122 


- Bwoou, 730 8122 
/ 5142. licenced employment anency 


E ATON HIREAU NA MAB - A Q« 

K»ten^30 9566-136 gtx neSL SWl' 
bcenced LK finplaynant Agency. 


Oi 

lit 


V ;■ 

>'a: 


AUTOMOBILES 


1984 THUNDBOBH) Ben. 5 iten. 

| airt oo nefton. ftJy loodtd Coroput 
««L Wheat color, teottw odoriar. 
|12JX)0 jries. vcfldOsA re ri dra llon. 
|to offer river SIQjQOa D^vered, 


MndridgrPto fan. Tri: 


Spain 041) 65313 


10 pm. 


1978 WfiBrtuh radng 

green. FdSjOOQ. Para 705 23 97 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR SWPPMG 

pajqs 

CANhB/NKE 
«N«FUST 
BONN I /COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 

Kb?* 01 

WBABIHAVEN 
h*W YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANG&ES 
MONTREAL 

AQB4IS WOR__ 

tove ri to us to bring 8 to you 


i- 


500 03 04 
39 43 44 
il 07) 80 51 
228) 212921 
880BT 
10 45 



AUTO CONVERSION 


oar/ WA CQNVBtSONS to ULS 
fa>ce guaranteed. \TA. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TAKE IHE PRORT 






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MYCAR 


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