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PARIS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 u . 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Tfie Associated Press 

I JOHANNESBURG Two 
rightist parties made major gain; Jjj 
five by-elections and said Thursday 
that the remits showed a surge in 
white opposition to the South Afri- 
can government's limited race re- 
forms. 

The National Party of President 
Pieter W. Botha kepi control of 

Solution of South Africa's debt 
crisis is seen dependent on pofit- 
ical reforms. Page 16. 

four of the five rural and blute- 
eollar parliamentary districts in 
Wednesday’s voting. But the far 
right managed to slash ihe Nation- 
al Party’s past majority in all four 
jgjiisiricls, and Mr. Botha’s party lost 
T- seat in Orange Free State for the 
first time since 1953. 

"There is do doubt that there is a 
significant drift away, from the Na- 
tional Party." said Jaap Marais, 
leader of the Hersligte National 
Party (Reformed National Party). 
The party’s victory in the industrial 
center of Sasolburg was its first 
since ii was formed in 1969. -. 

An dries Treumicht, leader of the 
Conservative Party, which was 
formed three years ago, said that 
voters had joined the far right be- 
cause of the National Party's 
“swing away from white self-dewr- 

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By David B. Oiiaway' 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — TheJntov 
national Monetary Fond, with 
— / backing from the' Reagan adzhhiisr 

, - 1 ^ tption, has withhdd a S453-mil- 

.' ■* ir -r> - basai lion loan payment to the Phfliyv 
' • • pines becanse^ Presidml Ferdmand 


mination ia power-sharing and 
mixed mvoisnaem.” 

Mr. Botha said ‘be .was satisfied 
with the tmkxxoe of the voting, 
“co n s idering the cfifTwaili ecoaonuc 
consequences of the reasskn,” a 
drot^hl and “the present unrest 
situation in enrtam parts' of .ihe. 
country, ” where more ihan 750 
peoide have been killed in 14 
months of racial nooflio. 

[Mr. Botha reaffirmed plans to 
pwsue ientaowe :«fonns w the 
apartheid system despite the elec- 
toral .setback, Retuers reported 
from Johannesburg. Hr acknowl- 
edged in a statement that be had to 
take aocoent of- the^ rightisi badt- 
Utsh buz pkdgod to wcsic toward a 
peaceful South Africa.] - 
Some analysts noted that given 
die current ot ex- 

trea a e oomervatives could have 
. done bettec^aadthat a lone victory 
in five races indicates no serious 
threat to Nationalist rule. 

Mr. Botha’s pany holds a com- 
manding .two -thirds majority in 
Parliament, and the voting did not 
threaten its pontrioL 
While the National Parry actual- 
ly Increased its voter share slightly 
from 2W74 four years ago to 
27,062, the two far-right parties, 
which oppose any power-sharing 
with blacks, jumped from 6J199 in 
1981 to 22^47. . 

Almost 15,000 more voters went 
to the poSsin a heavy turnout, and 
nearly ah the new votes went to the 
far right. 

Mr. Botha's party had cam- 
paigned mi a platform of moving 
ahead with gradual race reforms to 
gi ve the blade majority some say in 

tt^tberights oT nuaor- 

ity. Both far-right parties said that 
Mr. Botha’s reforms were la first 
step toward. abdicating white pow- 
er. • •.-• 

The moderate Progressive Feder- 
al Party, which opposes apartheid, 
contested just two of throats and 
never had a serious chance of win- 



GandDhi Marks Mother 'S Death 

Prime Minister RqK' Gandhi of India, with his wife. Sonia, and 
the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibet, left, at a memorial 
service Thursday in New Delhi marking the first anniversary’ of 


the assassination of Indira Gandhi As hundreds of thousands 
paid homage to Mr. Gandhi's mother. Sikh militants praised one 
of her assassins, who was killed by the police, as a martyr. Page 5. 


Rights Groups Wait for Sakharov’s Wife 


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pines because Presjdent Fexdmtod 
c. Marcos has refused to cany tm? 
‘promised economic reforms .that 
threaten the interests of .his dose 
tAWtB associates. 

Bunafc*<r Disclosure of the new financial 
re?? pressure on the Marcos govem- 
ment came Wednesday in a Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee 
Powa*f r r hearing in which admixiistratioQ 
experts on Asia predicted “dvfl 
toftSbEi war on a massive scale” in the PlrQ- 
ngddjjgf ippines without “a comprehensive 
— T coontermsurgency plan” against 
Commmnsl rdselk 
The assistant secretary of de- 
0 niw.‘\£~ Tense, Richard L. Annitage, said 
that such a fdan most combine po- 
lilical, economic and social reforms 
with a “new vigorous leadership” 
in a Philippine military purge of 
"overstaying generals.” 

Despite “some apparent pro- 
gress" toward military reform and 
the government's ability to cope 
with the New People’s Army insur- 
gency, Mr. Annitage estimated that 
N0l fighting within three to five years 
££ would reach “a strategic stale- 
matt” 

That was defined by Paul D. 
Wolfowitz. an assistant secretary of 
state, as “civil war an a massive 
scale.” 

Mr. Wolfowitz and Charles W. 
reenlcaf Jr., an assistant adminis- 
ator of the Agency for Interna- 
tional Development, disclosed that 
the a dminis tration, as wdl as the 
International Monetary Fund, has 
increasingly resorted to economic 
muscle to force change on the Mar- 
cos regime. 

. Mr. Wolfowitz said the IMF had 
delayed payment of a loan’s third 
installment, worth about SI 13 zxnl- 
tion, until the Marcos government 


National Party now Judds 
126 seats in the white dumber of 


RUM 

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apd one fortheReforined National 
Party. The New Republic Pany, an 
ally of the Nationalists, hcdds five. 

In Sasolborg, where Louis Stof- 
berg, a’Refanned National Party 
candidate, won a narrow victory, a 
major issue was whether a white 
man manied to a mixed-race wom- 
an coukl five in a white area and 
send tfcmr children to white 
schools. The couple were married 
legally this year after the National 
Party repealed the law against 
nrixedjnaraagea. and Mr. Stotberg 
said in pamphlets that the family 
“could hve in your street.” 

In another development, Mr. Bo- 
tha accused foreign jonmafisls of 
biased rep o r ting on his govern- 
ment's moves toward racial reform. 
Mr. Botha that the govern- 
ment might act against foreign re- 
porters whom it believed were 
abasing press freedom. 


Complied bp Our Staff From Dispatcher 

VIENNA — H uman rights cam- 
paigners waited for a third day 
Thursday for Andrei D. Sakharov's 
wife, -Yelena G. Bonner, who is 
reported to have received pennis- 
sion to leave the Soviet Union, but 
she has not been seen yet 

A -West German newspaper re- 
potted that UJ3. and Soviet offi- 
cials were negotiating the exchange 
of Mr. Sakharov, 64, a physicist 
and dissident, and Anatoli Shchar- 
ansky. 37, an imp ri soned- Jewish 
dissident, for a number of East Woe 
gjies. ■ 

The mass-circulation daily news- 
paper Bild said that the Soviet lead- 
er, -Mikhail S, Gorbachev, would 
“give a signal" for the trade if his 
Nov. 19-2Q summit meeting with 
President Ronald Reagan “comes 
off well." 

The report closely resembled one 
carried by the weekly ^Der Spiegel a 
month ago. At the time, members 
of the Sakharov family living in the 
West said they feared that such 
information had no substance and 
had been leaked by Moscow to di- 
vert attention from human rights 
issues before the summit meeting. 

Bild, dting “diplomatic sources 
in Moscow and Washington.” said 
Thursday that negotiations on the 
swap were going on simultaneously 
in both dues and in East Berlin. 

Involved in the talks, said Bild, 
are Francis J. Median, the U.S. 



Tatiana Yankdevich waited 
by a telephone in Massa- 
chusetts for news of her 
mother, Yelena G. Bonner. 

ambassador io East Germapy. and 
Wolfgang Vogel, an East German 
lawyer who has been pivotal in 
talks that resulted in major East- 
West spy exchanges in recent years. 

Bild reported Monday that Mrs. 
Bonner had been toid by the Seder 
authorities that she was free to fiv 
to the West for medical treatment'. 


A day later. Victor Louis, a Sovi- 
et journalist who has acted as a 
liaison between the Kremlin lead- 
ership and Western news organiza- 
tions, appeared to confirm the re- 
port 

A U.S. Slats Department 
spokesman said he had reliable in- 
formation that it was true. 

In Vienna, representatives of the 
human rights group Amnesty In- 
ternational. a Jewish aid group and 
dozens of reporters waited in vain 
at the Vienna airport after reports 
tiwt Mn Booner migh* arrive oc a 
morning flight from Moscow. 

Amnesty Internationa: sources 
in Vienna said they expected Mrs. 
Bonner to pass through Vienna on 
her way to Italy, where she twice 
underwent eve treatment in the 
1970s. 

Dissidents in Moscow told Unit- 
ed Press International that they be- 
lieved Mrs. Bonner may have re- 
fused to leave the country without 
her husband. 

Alexei Semyonov, Mrs. Bonner’s 
son by her first marriage, said in 
Newton, Massachusetts^ that the 
family had no fresh news of his 
mother. He said that an attempt to 
reach her by telephone Wednesday 
had failed. 

Efrem Yankdrrich. Mrs. Bon- 
ner's son-in-law. dismissed specu- 
lation about the reasons for her 
failure to arrive in the WesL 

“The onlv ones who know wbv 


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9* 


U.S. House Approves $2 76-Billion Military Spending Bill 


-m 


.•.agANrly came to grips with “the difficult 





policy issue involved in reform, of 
the coconut and sugar monopo- 
lies.” 

The SI 13 million was scheduled 
to be paid Sept. 1. 'and Ihe delay 
(Continued on Page 6, CoL 9) . 


. By Steven V. Roberts 

New York, Thtits Service . 

WASHINGTON -r The VS. 
House of Represeritalives has ap- 
proved deasdvdy a 1276-bfllion 
military spending bill, but not be- 
fore the lawmakers sem shock 
waves through the Reagan admin- 
istration by voting to duninale 
funds for 12 new MX imsoles. 

The vote Wedxasday against (he 
missiles was 211-208. bat the ad- 
mmistratiern and Republkan lead- 
ers, working feverishly ova- the 
next few hoars, succeeded in forc- 
ing a second vote that reversed the 
outcome, 214-210. ' 

Many lawmakers said the events 
illustrated the growing pressure cm 
Capitol HiD to cut Pentagon spend- 
ing in Hghtof congressional efforts 


to require a balanced budget by 
1991. 

House and Senate negotiators 
debated the details of such a plan 
as the Reagan administration 
stepped up pressure for passage of 
an increase in the debt ceiling, to 
which the budget-balancing plan 
was attached by the Senate. ■ 

. Senate negotiators left the con- 
ference on Ihe plan Tuesday night 
after attacking a House proposal to 
begin requiring a Iowa deficit in 
the current fiscal year. The House 
Iter, Thomas P. O’Neill Jr., a 
it of Massachusetts, reiter- 
ated Wednesday that he was sure 
Congress would pass some version 
of the plan, whose two main spon- 
sors' are Senator Phil Gramm of 
Texas and Senator Warren B. Rud- 


man of New Hampshire, both Re- 
publicans. 

“You can’t argue for Gramm- 
Rudman and for an increase in 
defense — the two don't fit,” said 
Represents the Leon A. Panetta of 
California, a Democrat and a lead- 
ing strategist on budget issues. T 
think we're in for a lot of this. 
Every issue will be debated in terms 
of Gramm- Rudman, and this was 
the start.” 

However. Representative Trent 
Lou of Mississippi, the Republican 
whip, called the rote against, the 
MX a fluke and said it had nothing 
to do with efforts to balance the 
budget. 

The military appropriation bill 
was approved by a vote of 359-67. 
The S276 billion is the major share 
of a iota! Pentagon budget of S292 


billion for the 1986 fiscal year, 
which began Ocl I. Additional 
funds, mainly for military con- 
struction, are contained in other 
bills. 

The legislation freezes military 
spending at last year's level, and is 
a sharp rebuff to the Reagan ad- 
ministration. which originally re- 
quested about S322 billion. 

Wednesday’s bill is S 10 biiiion 
below a spending ceding set in pre- 
vious legislation establishing and 
continuing military programs. That 
bill, which permits an increase 
equal to the amount of inflation, 
was sent to President Ronald Rea- 
gan on Tuesday. The appropria- 
tions bill approved Wednesday ac- 
tually provides funds for the 
programs. 

The appropriations measure row 


goes io the Senate, where a sub- 
committee of the Appropriations 
Committee approved a bill on 
Wednesday allocating ihe full S302 
billioa permitted by the legislation 
setting spending ceilings. 

in other key provisions, the bill 
adopted Wednesday would block 
spending for a new variety of chem- 
ical weapons, limit testing of anti- 
satellite weapons and bar the use of 
funds to provide military assistance 
to rebels fighting in Nicaragua. 

The appropria lions bill provides 
$2 5 billion to finance research on 
Mr. Reagan's proposed space- 
based system to protect the United 
States from a missile attack. While 
this allocation represents an 80- 
percent increase for the system, it is 
more than 51 billion less than the 
request. 


■ ny I 



In Japan, Progress Eludes Many Among the Masses 


A SMboko SugiiiKrta, center, and neighbors d&cqssmg plans 
^ IPa to build sewers to ser*fr homes in TamflgEHvajosiB, Japan. 



By Susan Chira 

. A'oi IWA Times Service ' 

TAMAGAWAJOSUI. Japan — 
Japan is a wealthy nation whose 
citizens do not enjoy many of the 
amenities of wealth that Western- 
ers have. • - 

■.Only 34 percent of Japanese 
communities have modem sewer 
systems, compared with 97 percent 
in Britain and 85 percent in the 
United States, Just 51 percent of 
Japanese roads were paved as of 
.1982,. compared with 1981 figures 
of 96.4 percent in Britain and 85 
percent in the United Stales. The 
average size of homes built in Ja- 
pan in 1983 was 932 square feei 
(86.6 square meters), compared 
with 1,450 square feet last year in 
the United States. 

. There would seem to be plenty 
for people here to bUv. particularly 
in the face of urging by the United 
Slates for the Japanese to shrink 
their 550-bUlioa trade and capital 


surplus by spending more at home. 
Greater spending in Japan would 
absorb some of the savings that 
now get exported. 

But such proposals have not 
cuughi the imagination of the aver- 
age Japanese, who still is attuned to 


clothes dryer. Yet i" one of many 
anomalies here, houses in her 
neighborhood, a 90* minute com- 
mute to central Tokyo, sell for 
about S250.0Q0 and her neighbors 

drive Mercedes Benzta. 

Nor is Mrs. Sugimoio. whose 


For many Japanese, national wealth has 

brought little sense of personal entitlement. 


the realities oi the postwar era and 
the need to sacrifice comforts so 
the nation could rebuild. For 
many, national wealth has brought 
little sense of personal entitlement. 

Shihoko Sugimoto's house, for 
instance, would be Sparun by 
American standards. By Japanese 
standards, it borders on" the luxuri- 
ous. 

Mrs. Svtgiraoto has no sewers, no 
central beating, no dishwasher, no 


husband has a comfortable income 
as an insurance company sales 
manager, lacking much of the elec- 
tronic gear that Japan is so good at 
exporting. In ha tiring room stand 
a large color television, a stereo and 
a video-cassette recorder. 

But Mrs Sugimoio feels that 
some of the conveniences that 
Americans regard as basic necessi- 
ties would be impossible luxuries in 
oil-poor Japan. “We're used to be- 


ing cold inside; we grew up with 
ii_” she said. “When 1 was young, 
•ac did not even have a healer.” 

"We may have a trade surplus," 
added Tomeko Nagai, who lives 
down the road. “But we're noi that 
rich." 

By many measures. Japan has 
come far. In 1983. Japan's per-cap- 
ita gross national product was 
59,717. ahead of Britain's SS.140, 
although still below the SI4.093 
level in die United States. Japanese 
workers earned an average of S6.05 
an hour last year, compared with 
S4.48 in Britain and S9.I7 in the 
United States. 

Japan’s life expectancy last year 
became the world’s longest: S0.2 
years for women, compared with 
I9S3 rates in the United States for 
w omen of 73.8 years and 77.1 years 
in Britain. 

But if people are used to doing 

(Continued on Page 6 CoL 7) 


Reagan Requests 
Extension of 
Arms Talks to 
Offer U.S. Plan 


she hasn’t left 2 re the Soviet au- 
thorities,'' he said. 

He added that Mrs. Bonner's rel- 
atives believed she had not left 
Gorki. 

Mr. Sakharov, a leading human 
rights campaigner, was banished to 
the closed city of Gorki in January 
1980 for his dissident activities. 

Mrs. Bonner, 62. a Jewish-Ar- 
menian pediatrician, was a found- 
ing member in 1976 of the Soviet 
Helsinki group monitoring human 
rights abuses. She married Mr. Sa- 
kharov in 1970. 

She was sentenced to five years 
imernal exile last year for anti-So- 
viet activity and joined her hus- 
band in Gorki. 

She and Mr. Sakharov have 
staged two hunger strikes, the last 
in April to try to secure ha pas- 
sage abroad for treatment of a 
heart ailment. 

Bild said the four-tiered swap 
broke down as follows: 

The United Stales would send 
imprisoned East bicc agents to the 
Soviet Union. Also to be handed 
ov er to the East would be two Com- 
munist spies imprisoned in West 
Germany. Lothar Erwin Lutze of 
East Germany and Yevgeni Sem- 
lyakov of the Soviet Union. 

in return. Moscow would free 
Mr. Shcharansky. Mr. Sakharov 
and up to 12 imprisoned agents of 
the United States, Britain and West 
German v. (AP, Reuters. UP I) 


By David Hoffman 

It a-CKC.-on Pot; Srniff 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan said Thursday that 
he has asked the Soviet leader. 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, to extend 
the current round of Geneva arms 
negotiations so that the United 
Slates can present a new proposal 
that envisions "deep cuts" in nucle- 
ar missile arsenals. 

The U.S. negotiators were io pre- 
sent the new proposal to the Rus- 
sians in Geneva on Friday, he said. 
The extension, if granted by the 
Soviet side, would allow both sides 
to have “a real give-and-take" on 
the proposal, he said. 

Mr. Reagan said the new propos- 
al wjs "serious" and “detailed” 
and covered ail three areas of the 
negotiations — strategic, interme- 
diate-range and space weapon*. 

The new proposal was approved 
by the president this week after 
Western leaders urged him to make 
such an offer before the Nov. 1 9-20 
summit meeting with Mr. Gorba- 
chev in Geneva. 

The offer came as a response to 
Mr. Gorbachev's cal! early in Octo- 
ber for a 50-percent cut in nuclear 
weapons. 

Mr. Reagan said the United 
States had told Moscow that the 
Soviet offer “unfortunately fell sig- 
nificantly short in several key ar- 
eas" but that it “also has positive 
seeds which ws wish to nurture." 

Reagan administration sources 
said the proposal would require a 
50-pacent reduction in Soviet bal- 
listic missile warheads, from about 
8.900 to about 4500 for land-based 
and sea-based missiles. The pro- 
posal also included a limit of 3.000 
warheads on the Soviet land-based 
missiles. 

Currently, the Soviet Union has 
about 6.400 warheads on land- 
based missiles and 2,500 on sea- 
based weapons. The United States 
has 2,130 warheads on land and 
5,370 at sea. Tnese do not include 


bombers or air-launched cruise 
missiles, nor intermediate- range 
weapons based in Europe. 

Mr. Reagan, speaking a: the 
While House, made it clear ;ha: the 
U.S. proposal did no: agree to limh 
his Strategic Defensive Initiative, a 
program to develop ipace-ba^-ed 
ballistic missile defenses. 

He said that he wanted to e\- 

0% PACE 6 

■ Moscow reported !y submit- 
ted a draft arms agreemen: in 
Geneva. 

WA military review said tha: 
U.S. and Soviet ar^cnak are 
growme. 

plore with the Soviet Union "hov- 
people everywhere Cur. benefit 
from exploring the potential of 
nonnuclear defense* which threat- 
en no one." 

The president said the recent ex- 
change of proposals marked a “suc- 
cessful start" to a "long process” of 
reducing nuclear arms. 

He described his main criteria 
for any agreement with the Soviet 
Union as “deep cuts, no first-strike 
advantage, defensive research be- 
cause defense is safer than offense, 
and no cheating." 

On Thursday, Mr. Reagan was 
interviewed by four Soviet journal- 
ists. whom he told tha: he would 
accept some of the figures outlined 
by Soviet negotiators under Mr. 
Gorbachev’s proposals. 

Administration officials also dis- 
closed that Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz will confer in 
Moscow early next week with Sovi- 
et officials about the possibility of -a 
second summit meeting between 
the two leaders. 

The U.S. proposal will be ex- 
plained by Mr. Shultz or, a visit tc 
Moscow early next week, and alsc 
(Continued oa Page 6, CoL 4) 


Moscow Urged by Arabs 
To Restore Israeli Ties 


By Bernard Gw err zm an 

Sew York Times Sen ice 

WASHINGTON — Some Arab 
nations, including Egypt and Jor- 
dan, have urged the Soviet Union 
to restore diplomatic relations with 
Israel as a way to advance pros- 
pects for Middle East peace talks, 
according to Israeli and Reagan 
administration officials. 

Israel has refusal to take part in 
any international conference on the 
Middle East that includes the Sovi- 
et Union, unless Moscow first re- 
stores ties wiLh Israel. The United 
SLates, a senior administration offi- 
cial said Wednesday, will inform 
the Russians in coming weeks that 
it supports the Israeli position. 

The Egyptians and Jordanians, 
in unpublicized approaches to the 
Soviet Union, have said that a lack 
of relations with Israel is delaying 
the holding of a conference that 
could lead to actual peace talks, 
Israeli and U.S. officials said. The 
officials did not name Lhe other 
Arab countries involved. 

The conference proposal has be- 
come more significant because 
King Hussein of Jordan and Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres of Israel 
have said that this forum could 
open the way for direct negotia- 
tions between Israel and a joint 
Jordan -Palestinian group. 

After opposing a conference, the 
United Slates and Israel now indi- 
cate that they would be willing to 
attend. But they have said there 
must be a firm agreement before- 


LNSIDE 

■ Four crewmembers from a 

Greenpeace yacht were being 
expelled from French Polyne- 
sia. Page 2. 

■ The tfisputed plea bargain 

with a spy was approved by 

high U.S. officials. Page 3. 

■ Lebanon’s prime minister has 
pledged to work to get U.S. and 
other hostages freed. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The U.S. government's main 
gauge of future economic activ- 
ity increased by only 0.1 per- 
cent in September. Page 13. 

■ International Harvester said 

that it planned to restructure its 
financing. Page 13. 

WEEKEND 

■ Vladimir Horowitz returns to 
France and Italy. A review by- 
David Stevens. Page 7. 


hand that it will serve as a means to 
direct talks and not have the power 
to decide anything. 

Richard W. Murohy. the U.S. 
assistant secretary of Sate for Near 
Eastern and South Asian affairs, 
said Wednesday in testimony to a 
congressional subcommittee that 
"the peace process is at a delicate 
stage, but a hopeful one.” 

“In the past several months," he 
said, “we have been able to come 
closer than ever before to agree- 
ment on the kinds of steps that will 
be required.” 

Even with Soviet participation, 
an international meeting would 
have no guarantee of success, be- 
cause the presence of the two su- 
perpowers, in any role, could make 
reaching a consensus difficult. 

The Soviet Union broke rela- 
tions with Israel in June 1967 to 
demonstrate support for the Arab 
side in the Middle East war that 
ended that month. Moscow's offi- 
cial position is that although it rec- 
ognizes Israel as a sovereign state, 
it will not restore relations until 
Israel agrees to withdraw from the 
lands it seized in that war. 

The major obstacle to negotia- 
tions remains ihe Israeli conditions 
about the makeup of any Palestin- 
ian contingent to peace talks. The 
Israelis have repeatedly refused to 
deal with the Palestine Liberation 
Organization, but King Hussein 
has said he is committed to includ- 
ing that group. 

Mr. Murphy, who made an un- 
publicizcd trip io .Amman last 
week, said he had not yet received a 
report from the Jordanians about 
the meetings this week between 
King Hussein and Yasser Arafat, 
the PLO chairman. Mr. Murphy 
said il was clear that Jordan was 
unhappy with several recent acts of 
terrorism by Palestinian groups. 

whether or not they were directed 
by Mr. Arafat's organization. 

in his first public comments 
since his mission. Mr. Murphy :o!d 
the House Foreign Affairs subcom- 
mittee on the Middle East that the 
region “is at one of those moments 
in its history when events have be- 
gun to come together in a way in 
which, with efforts from all sides, a 
peace process can be substantially 
advanced and we can hope to see 
the opening of negotiations in the 
near future." 

Bui he wanted lIul there was not 
much time remaining. “The win- 
dow of opportunity is fast slipping 
away," he said. 

Poland, a close ally of the Soviet 
Union, has announced an exchange 
of diplomatic interests sections 
with Israel. This is only one step 
away from full diplomatic rela- 
tions, and would not have been 

(Continued on Page 6, CoL Ij 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1. 1985 


;?iIh 1 - 


Greenpeace 
Says Crew 
Is Expelled 
By French 


j *'• . ' 

1 ■ .'-x. ■' ' 

:• V 


I 

I - 


Reuter] 

AUCKLAND. New Zealand — 
TVie four-person crew of the yacht 
Vega, who were arrested when they 
sailed toward Mururoa atoll in an 
attempt to prevent a French nucle- 
ar test, are being expelled from 
French Polynesia, Greenpeace said 
Thursday. " 

The Greenpeace director. Steve 
Sawyer, said that Chris Robinson, 
an Australian, and Sue Ware, a 
New Zealander, were expected to 
be put on a flight to Sydney on 
Thursday. Peter Willcox. an Amer- 
ican. and Grace O’Sullivan, an 
Irish citizen, were to be sent to Los 
Angeles. Mr. Sawyer said. 

Mr. Sawyer said that Green- 
peace bad been told of the expul- 
sions by New Zealand and Austra- 
lian diplomats. He said be 
understood that the Vega was be- 
ing towed from Mururoa to Tahiti. 

The four have been in custody 
since the Vega was boarded by 
French commandos last week. 

The ketch was on its fourth pro- 
test toy age to Mururoa and sat 
outside’a 1 2-mile (20- kilometer) ex- 
clusion zone for a month as pan of 
a four-boat protest fleet, headed by 
the Greenpeace. The Greenpeace 
became the group's flagship after 
French agents sank the Rainbow 
Warrior in New Zealand in July. 

French officials contended that 
the Vega had entered the 12-mile 
zone. 

One vesseL the yacht Varangian, 
remains in the area. 

Meanwhile, in Paris, a parlia- 
mentary investigation into the 
sinking "of the Rainbow Warrior 
has been dropped after a legal com- 
mittee of the National Assemblv 



Article Fuels Furor in France 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Wav Cleared for U.S-Grina Anns Sale 


Immigrants Threaten Nation’s Character, It Asserts Wav Geared for L.b-Uuna Arms Sale . 

sensitivity over immigration, which WASHINGTON <WP) - Cac&s has ctocd fewc yfcv theft*? 

has been emerging as one of the aovernroent-to-govtrmoens 3nas sale to 
major political issues in parliamen- Department to offer technology, eqwpnifflt and assistance to modem® 
tajy elections schemed for Ita* ***« * 


rf**' 1 ’*; 

<■ it. 1 


'* - - _ 
' - 



v ' ' 

\ ' 


By Judirh Miller 

.Vjpu- York Tima Service 

PARIS — The publication of an 
article asserting that French identi- 
ty and culture are threatened by the 
growing immigrant population has 
touched off a political furor in 
France. 

The debate has been intensifyin g 
since Saturday, when Le Figaro 
Magazine, the conservative weekly 
supplement to the daily newspaper, 
published an article asking: “Will 
France still be French in 2015?” 
The cover featured a picture of 
Marianne, symbol of France, wear- 
ing an Arab woman's veil affixed 
by a rosette in red, white and blue, 
the colors of France. 

The article, written by Jean Ra- 
spaiL a prominent French writer, 
and Gerard Francois Dumont, a 
demographer who heads the Insti- 
tute of Political Demography, as- 
serts that the proportion of 
France's non-European immigrant 
population will grow to a point that 
endangers the survival of tradition- 
al French culture, values and iden- 
tity. 

Three senior French officials 



It also has been cited frequently s6-miHion package of blueprints and wtgs *«■ wumutoa 
political analysts as the issue could increase to as much as 598 miflieg. Toe request was toefast uadg 


by political analysis as the issue cQ^d increase to as much as 5sra muucn. request 
that has helped boost the political tbe U.5. Foreign Military Sales program, winch requires specuu acenjmg 
fortunes of Jean-Marie Le Pen, and formal congresaona! Inonfirauon. - 

leader of the extreme-right Nation- Congress was notified Sept- 30 and had 30 days^o rqect th e deal. Its 

al Front, the cotmtiy's fastest- failure to act by Wednesday automatically Signaled approval. ; • 


toTwfk Jhfcu approxi- Khomeini Cautions on Nationalization 


matelv 90.000 cheering supporters „ , 

that “immigration is the number TEHRAN (Reuters! — Iran s spiritual tote. Aymoll^v RuhoDah 
one problem facing our country.’* Khomeini, told the nation’s nc* cabinet on Thursday not to nabcnalpe 
According to the last census in everything” and suggested its members play down their ideofeg^| 


M. 

Georgina Dufoix 


non- European origin, those from 
Africa, Asia and. particularly. Al- 
geria, Tunisia and Morocco. 
France's former colonies in North 
Africa. 

Many North Africans flocked to 
France after their countries became 
independent particularly Algeri- 
ans, who had French citizenship. 
During the late 1960s and the 


parliament Monday at his home in Tehran. ■ • . . " 

Iranian officials said privately that a deep tdeologjcal gap separates 
radical reformists like Mr. MoussavL who want a strong public sector, 
and traditionalist politicians like Mr. Khamenei who toil more toward 
private enterprise. But the 83-yezr-otd ayatollah issued a calf for attitv 
“Even if there are supposed differences of opinion among ouisdves. 
must be together.” 


condemned the article as false, pro- own statistics Wednesday in re- 1970s, they readily found employ- 
vocative and racist Prime Minister spouse to those of Le Figaro, chal- mem in France's rapidly expanding 
Laurent Fabius, in a speech to (he lenged the authors to support their economy. 

National Assembly, sard the article data and conclusions. Recently, however, un employ- 


Liberian Parties Protest Poll Results 


the Aanoatod Pnm 


A Greenpeace member, Frank Charreire, inspects a hole 
Thursday in the Rainbow Warrior that was made when the 
ship was sabotaged in July. A bearing into the bombing is 
scheduled to begin Monday in Auckland, New Zealand. 


drew’ a dangerous link between so- The p 
dal insecurity and immigrants. Mr. Dun 
“Immigrants have contributed in on the falseassuraptionlhat Presto Franfois Mitterrand’s ? • 

large part to the richness of French women’s fertility would Socialist government has been 6e- 

France," Mr. Fabius said. “Those continue dropping from 1.72 births fending its immigration policy, 

who have been manipulating immi- per thousand in 1984 to 125 in which attempts to crack down on • 

gration statistics are going counter whfle non-European worn- illegal immigration, to encourage - 

to our country’s genuine national en's fertility rates woSd remain unemp^edlmmignmts who wish r«*wte.Mt 

interesL" constant at the current 4.69 per to retSm home to leave hy helping Doe s National IteMci«K E^ 

Jack Lang, minister of culture, thousand. finance their return and to help » TS> , 0 rn “ r\ ' • , 


The projections employed by ment has soared in France, totaling 
Mr. Dumont, she asserted, rested about 10.5 percent. 


on the false assumption that 


MONROVIA. Liberia (AF) — The three losing parlies in wh*t w 
billed as Liberia' s first free, n a ti a pa rty dection challenged the remits 
Thursday tint gave Major General S atn a ri K. Doe, Liberia's military ’ 
leader, the presidency with 50.9 percea* of the vote. 1 
Tbe Liberian Unity Party, led by Edward KesseBy. joined teUbcriaa- 
Actioa Party and the Liberian Unification Party that cariiCrhad daL - 
lenged the Oct. 15 poll results as “a mockery of the law." ” 

The opposition parties said they raid not take the.lS sous they ha# 


Greek Cypriot Leaders 
Meet on New Election 


refused to approve it. committee 
officials said Thursdav. 


officials said Thursday. 

The Laws Committee, which has 
to endorse any parliamentary in- 
vestigation. rejected formal" de- 
mands from Socialist and Commu- 
nist members for a commission of 
inquiry. 

Prime Minister Lauren l Fabius 
had announced the investigation 
after admitting in September that 
French agents were responsible for 
sinking the ship, in which a crew- 
member was killed. 

The sinking embarrassed the So- 
cialist administration at home and 
abroad and led to the resignation of 
Defense Minister Charles Hernu. 
as well as a major reorganization in 
the French intelligence establish- 
ment 

The Laws Commission consists 
of representatives from all political 
parties but reflects the left's domi- 
nance of the National .Assembly. 

Both main opposition parties 
had said they would not take part 
in. a commission of inquiry because 
it would be dominated by tbe So- 
cialists. Officials said the Socialists 
decided not to press for an investi- 
gation on the ground that it would 
be useless without opposition par- 
ticipation. 


Ranees AKEL gained a majority il was not 

NICOSIA — The Greek Cypriot certain that an amendment to un- 
House of Representatives con- seat Mr. Kyprianou would be con- 


interest. 

Jack Lang, minister of culture, 
called the magazine “an organ of 
racist propaganda" and attacked 
the article as “completely gro- 
tesque and ridiculous.” 

France’s minister of social af- 
fairs. Georgina Dufoix, asserted, 
that it was “reminiscent of the 
wildest Nazi theories.’’ Mrs. Du- 
foix, whose ministry released its 


thousand. 


This assumption, government of- permanent employed immigrants 
ficials said Wednesday, ignored the here to assimilate. ’ 


Alfonsm Sees Threat to Government 


fact that French women's fertility Mr. Rasp ad and Mr. Dumont 


has been virtually stable in the past defended their article's statistics, 
decade, while foreign women’s fer- methodology and conclusions. 


tility rates have been declining France h 
steadily. about inur 

The debate over Le Figaro’s arti- said, “unwi 
de is the latest indication of the and trends. 1 


France had become “hystericaT 
about immigration. Mr. RaspaD 
said, “unwillma to face true facts 


vened Thursdav to vote on its own stitutional. 


dissolution which, if approved as The parliament censured Mr. 


expected, would lead to general Kyprianou last March over his 


elections on Dec. S. 


handling of talks, sponsored by the 


The two main opposition parties. United Nations, with the Turkish- 
ihe rightist Democratic Rally and Cypriot leader, Rauf Denktosh, 


the Communist .AKEL. said the aimed at reuniting Cyprus. 


elections would serve as a popular The talks, focusing on a United 


referendum on the leadership of Nations draft accord to establish a 
President Spryos Kyprianou, federation, collapsed when Mr. Ky- 


whom they want to resign. 


prianou sought to negotiate the 


Mr. Kyprianou’s center-right draft while Mr. Denktash wanted 
D1KO party has only nine seals in t o sign it as a final text. 


the 35-member House, against 23 Mr. Kyprianou rejected the par- 


held bv AKEL and Democratic liamentaiy censure, which said he 


Rally. ’ should either accept the draft and 

Democratic Rally and AKEL bind himself to the views of a par- 
oppose Mr. Kyprianou s handling liamentaiy majority or resign. The 
of efforts to reunite the island” Supreme Court ruled the motion 


which has been split since Turkish was tuiconsututional and that pres- 


troops took control of tbe northern idential and parliamentary powers 
third in 1974. must be kept apart. 

Democratic Rally wants a con- Mr. Kyprianou favors a popular 
stitutional amendment in a new referendum to decide on issues 


House to allow early presidential posed by the reunification talks, 
elections. Mr. Kvpnanou's term Tbe issues include whether Turkey 

n ii i • iMA .L«,,r j Uw nr* a — t:.! f 



Protesters Halt 
Fassbinder Play 
In Frankfurt 


would normally end in 1988. 


should have a military and political 


The opposition is one seat short role as guarantor of the proposed 
of the two-thirds majority required federal republic, and restrictions 


to amend the constitution. 

Legal experts, however, say that 
even if Democratic Rally and 


on freedom of movement, settle- 
ment and land-ownership between 
the two sides. 



Kremlin Version of News Conference 
Puts Twist on Washington Variety 


By Philip Taubman holds a briefing at least once a or Mr. Komiyenko and one of 
AW Ynrk Times Senice month. them answered. 

MOSCOW — That great Wash- The Washington news confer- The officials appeared to address 
ington institution. f he news confer- ® nce > in which officials and report- all the written questions and they 
ence, has come of age in Moscow. ^ maneuver to gain some intangi- took at least a dozen oral questions 
complete with many a free-wheel- advantage, is recognizable in its from the floor. In the end, there 
mg Washington twist, but not too Russian form. In transplanting the were more questions asked by 
many. format to Moscow, however, the Western reporters than those from 

With increasing frequency. Sovi- Kjemlil1 made *»“ ad J'ust- the Soviet Union or Soviet bloc, 
ei leaders are fielding questions n,e ° ts - ^The three Soviet officials han- 

from reporters before a battery of ^ necentnews conference at the died the questions like old-time 
television cameras, apparently foreign Ministry Press Center il- State Department or Pentagon offi- 
hoping, like .American reporter. 80016 of . the sunilan lies aals, mixing humor with bombast, 

that such sessions will help pro- differences with Washington, deflecting hard questions, never al- 

mote and clarify government poli- “““ ? e!110r f 0 ” 61 officials — lowing themselves to be drawn into 
cie$. Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, comments that went beyond stated 

tl. . . , * chief of the Soviet general staff; policy. 

?! Georgi M. Komiyenko, a first dep- When Mr. Komiyenko was 
cv urse, was Mikhail S. Gorbachev s ut y dialer 0 f foreign affairs; and asked by an American how Presi- 


or Mr. Komiyenko and one of 
them answered. 

The officials appeared to address 
all the written questions and they 
took at least a dozen oral questions 
from the floor. In the end, there 
were more questions asked by 
Western reporters titan those from 
the Soviet Union or Soviet bloc. 

The three Soviet officials han- 
dled the questions like old-time 
State Department or Pentagon offi- 


ItoAaoCKftadtan 

Wolf Hefler, 71, a former inmate of a Nazi work camp, 
fixed a Star of David to bis coat Thursday outside a 
Frankfurt theater, where protesters halted die world 
premiere of a play they contended was anti-Semitic. 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Demon- 
strators stormed the stage of a 
Frankfurt theater on Thursday 
and halted the wodd premiere 
of a play by Werner Rainer 
Fassbinder that has been called 
anti-Semitic. 

Theater staff members said 
the play stopped soon after the 
curtain went up. About two 
dozen Jewish demonstrators re- 
fused to leave the stage, al- 
though the actors read a state- ~ 
meat pleading lor the show to 
be allowed to continue. 

Outside the theater, about 
1,000 demonstrators chanted 
slogans denouncing the play. 
Scuffles broke out with police 
as a few protesters tried to 
break through cordons. 

The play, “Der MQH, die 
Stadt and der Tod” (“Garbage, 
the Gty and Death”), is set in 
Frankfurt’s red-light district 
and concentrates on the role of 
an unscrupulous Jewish proper- 
ty speculator. 

Mr. Fassbinder, who died 
this year at age 36, was- one of 
West Germany’s best-known 
and most prolific filmmakers, 
with more than 40 movies in a 
career that spanned 17 years. 


BUENOS AIRES (NYT) — 
President Radi Alfonsin has assert- 
ed that “professionals of violence 
who had been left without a func- 
tion” in a democratic Ar gen t ina 
were attempting to desub&ze his 
government. 

“Even tboughit is incredible, be- 
cause it appears absurd, they warn 
to take power," he said Wednes- 
day, referring to those accused of 
involvement in recent bombings 
and bomb threats. Their method, 
be said, was to crease “i nsec uri ty, 
the sensation of imp u n i ty, generat- 
ing tto idea that democracy is unr 
able to defend its dtizats." 

Mr. AtfoDsn made the com- 
ments in his Gist nationwide ad- 
dress since be i mposed a state of 
siege Ocl 25. He declared the 
emergency primarily to ensure the 
arrest of six military officers and 
six ri viliaTre suspected of terrorism, 
according to officials: Mr. AHbnstn 
Faces a popularity test an Sunday 
when Argattines vote in mid- term 
congressional eketions. ■ 



- 

;• • • • : »- - 



Radi Alfonsin 


Judge StiU Studying A ir*India Crash 


CORK, Ireland (AI^— 'The possibility that a bomb caused the Air- 
India jumbo jet disaster in June “is a strong theory " the judge heading 
die Indian government's investigation into the crash said Thursday. 

Justice Bhubinder Nath KirpaL a judge of the 'High Court in New 
Delhi, said, “It is a strong theory winch has been advocated by some of 
the participants in the investigation." Bui he stressed, “1 will not hazard 
any guess as to what caused tbe crash until all the evidence has been 
gathered.” The- formal court hearings oMas inquiry will open in Nrs 
Delhi on Nbv. I8, he said. - . 

The Air-India Boeing 747 plunged into the Atlantic about 120 rniks 
. (1 !90 Hometers)^ off .the southwest coast of Ireland on June 23 while on a 
flight from Toronto and Montreal to Bombay. AH 329 people oa board 
were lolled, and the cause of the crash has yet .to be determined 4 


Senators Trade Charges on U.S. Budget 


Witness Gives Inside View of Mafia 


New York Jury Hears of Strict Rules, Harsh Punishment 


By Arnold H. Lubasch 

Nets York Tima Serrtce 


international Mafia drug ring, is 
called the “pizza connection” case 


WASHINGTON (UP I) — The Senate Republican leader, Robert J. 
Dole, accused Democrats on Thursday erf “playing games" with a 
measure to balance the U-S. budget. But the House speaker, Thomas 
(TNdlL said the Republican-controlled Senate “stonewalled" efforts to 
pass tbe bflL .... 

The two. traded charges in the absence of action by a House-Senate 
conference panel on the measure tobalance the budget that is attached to 
crndal legislation to increase tbe debt nalmg The panel failed to reach 
agreement Wednesday mghL 

Sena tors dedined to vote on a House proposal to increase the fiist-yar 
impact of the Senate plan aimed at forcing a balanced budget by 1991. A 
scheduled meeting on the issue was delayed until late Thursday. 


comments that went beyond stated 


NEW YORK — An admitted because some of tbe defendants 
member of the Mafia in the United owo pizzerias purportedly used for 


recent appearance in Paris with 
President Francois Mitterrand of 
France. 

Vladimir B. Lcmeiko. the For- 
eign Ministry spokesman, now 


LeRqy 


-rt> 

bv Bnuuc • Meacito 


&L, 


Leonid M. Zamyatin, the Krem- 
lin's chief spokesman — answered 
questions about Moscow's latest 
arms proposals. 

Providing the government with a 
' chance to restate its positions in a 
way that would produce imema- 
I tional coverage, particularly on 
television, seemed to be the main 
purpose of the briefing. 

But selecting statistics to support 
different positions is not the prop- 
erty of one side. At Washington 
news conferences, charts often em- 
phasize the Soviet advantage in 
I land-based intercontinemal ballis- 
tic missiles. At the conference here, 
huge colored charts in the big audi- 
torium highlighted the U.S. advan- 
tage in nuclear warheads. 

Mr. Zamyatin, like U.S. officials, 
read a statement that summarized 
Soviet objectives at the arms talks 
in Geneva. 

He then opened tbe floor to 
Questions. Unlike the practice in 
Washington, many questions were 
submitted in writing, deposted in 
small white boxes at either side of 
the stage, where they were periodi- 
cally picked tip and delivered to 
Mr. Zamyatin by an aide. 

Mr. Zamyatin examined the que- 
ries. discussed them briefly in a 
whisper with Marshal Akhromeyev 


When Mr. Komiyenko was 
asked by an American how Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Mr. Gor- 
bachev would get along at their 
coming meeting in Geneva, be re- 
plied with a thin smile; T have not 


States who turned informer has tes- drug deals, 
tilled about tbe strict rules and Mr. fiuscetta, 57, has been tie- 
deadly punishment imposed by the senbed as one of the most signifi- 


secretive crime organization. 

Jurors as well as spectators 
leaned forward in tense antidpa- 


cant Mafia figures ever to become 
an informer. He has provided in- 
formation that led to the arrest of 


had time for psychological stud- Tommaso Busceua, began testify- 


tion Tuesday as the key witness, hundreds of Mafia suspects in Ita- 


RockweU Admits 
Fraud Charges 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 


mg in U.S. District Court here in 
the “pizza connection” narcotics 
trial. 

Surrounded by tight security, 
Mr. Buscetta testified for the first 
time in public about joining the 
Mafia organization in his native 
Sicily shortly after World War EL 

“Mr. Buscetta, what was that or- 


Arr Force suspended Rockwell In- ganization that you joined?” a 
[er national Corp. from doing busi- prosecutor. Kichaid A. Martin, 


ness with the Defense Dep an mem 115 

for at least 30 days Thursday after ^-osa Nostra,” he answered. 


the leading federal contractor adding that it was generally known 
pleaded guilty to defrauding the “ Mafia. He said the words 
gove rnme nt. C°sa Nostra were a Sicilian expres- 

Verne Orr, uecreiary of the air s * on Qtoniag “our tiring, it belongs 
force, said, “I've taken this action to .^L 


ly, according to the authorities. 

After being selected for Mafia 
membership, Mr. Buscetta said 
Tuesday, he went io a meeting with 
four men who pricked his finger, 
required him 10 rub his Weeding 
finger on a small picture of a saint 
and told him to swear an oath of 
silence while they set the saint’s 
picture on fire. 

“I had w pronounce the oath,” 
he recalled, “whereby I was to say 
that should I betray tbe organiza- 
tion, my flesh would bum tike this 
saint.” 



For die Record 


Janos Kate, tbe Hungarian tote, arrived Thursday in Britain for a 
three-day visit with the Bntish prime minister. Margaret Thatcher, as parti 
of bar.rfrort to encourage dialogue with the Eastern bloc. (Aff 

Ine Cost of Appeal in Britain on Thursday cut to eight ware the fife 
lwo ■^‘^ h ? lincrs ‘ 00311 Hancock X Russell 
aanklamUor killmg a tan dnvtr last November during Britain’s coal 

Ftosutot ^RonaM Reagan, who says he has made “a 100-percmt 
rec ®^ cx r” s ^ e ^ operation for colon cancer in July Is tounteio 
another health examination Friday. ai * r (UP I) 

PoGee in Santiigobsed water camion and tor gas Wednesday » 
disperre a rally of 2.000 women who marched along theOriton canilars 
mam shopping avenue to demand an end to military rule. - (UPD 


Moi * he was 

^Ugandan government and rebel leaded wouMrcacfa a 


settlement in talks to end hostilities in the cntmirv 
Benazir Wmttoy da ught er of the ttccutedllri^nmi 


Tommaso Buscetta 


m Prime minister, Zulfikar Ali 

Bhutto, wsQ be allowed to leave Pakistan on Suodav snort** in Kuradri 
said Thursday. Sbe>«pected to testify SS^l^SSSXSZ 


«iu .inureoay. sue is expected to testify next week in France d 
inquiry m to the potsonmg death of herbroth^^ 


uring an 

• (AFP) 


Older members later instructed testified. 


it’s the same in every place,’ 


him about his obligations in the “I was told we have brothers also 


to protect the taxpayer’s interests you do, Mr. Buscetta. 

and 10 send another clear signal enter into this organization 

. _ _ _ . T - **' ull>.J T _ n.. Vl 1 mt «t_ _ 


Mafia, Mr. Buscetta continued, tes- cm the other side of the ocean,” he 
ttfying in Italian with an interpret- said, adding that Mafia members in 


tores 


that the air force simply won't tol- C'rited La Casa Nostra?" the prose- 
erate this or other kinds of fraud, a5 * fC ^- 


regardless of the size of the con- “1 didn’t moke out any applica- 
tractor," lion to become a member — 1 was 

The order will bar Rockwell caHed; I was invited,” he replied, as 


0 enter into this organization “I was reminded to behave in the 
ailed La Cosa Nostra?” the prose- appropriate manner,” he said, “to 
utor asked. be sflent, not to look at other men’s 

**1 didn’t make out any applica- wives or women, not to steal and 
ion to become a member — T was especially, at all times when I was 


SicBy told of families in the Uni led 

States. 

Mr. Buscetta was arrested in 
Brazil in 1983 and taken to Italy, 


Washington Petr Service 

MANAGUA — Nicaragua’; 


The order will bar Rockwell called; I was invited,” he replied, as caued I had to rush, leaving what- 
from signing any contracts with the many spectators broke into laugh- ever J was doing.” 
government, which would include ter. “What would happen," the pros- 

the company s major involvement Joining in the laughter was Gae- center asked, “so far as you know. 


ea oiaies last L»ecemoer under an liberties (hat had been smavntei CT f a “ er » « said tte more 

agreement with the US. govern-, in an Oct. 15. decree bnSSufa -JS-STf C0ITe « a 'Technical 
ment a error, addim» tho. 


government, which would include ter. -What would happen," the pros- w 0 _ The suspSm 

the company s major involvement Joining in the laughter was Gae- center asked, “so far as you know, . WeD ? ^ ose * ^er rate ^ . 

in the space shuttle program as well tano Badalamemi, a major defen- so far as you were told, if you c V tors ^ d > ^vhy did you decide to The rights restored Wednesday 
as being the prime contractor for dam accused of being a former top violated one or those principles pve aaatememtq the. Italian after beared debate vtn principai- 
the air force’s new B- 1 B bomber, leader of the Mafia to Sicily. that you just described?” authonoesr judical freedoms, indudbgthe 

In March, Mr, Orr took similar The trial, which involves charges “Death," the witness said. , S**-* 11 * the time had come to nght lo a jury, 0 k right to attorney 


“WdL Mr. Buscetta," the ^rose- of -other rights' was ratified. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


adding that “it was never 
m tontion to suspend those lib- 


the air force’s new B- 1 B bomber, leader of the Mafia in Sicily. 

In March, Mr, Orr took similar The trial, which involves charges 
action against General Electric Co. that the 22 defendants operated an 


authorities?” 

“Because the time had come to 
do so," Mr. Buscetta answered. 


The decree, which increased re* 


Ttu. J- I J ' - Buawwn. auairatu, puiw-uuu *rom seu-sncrirainfltifm iho toC ngBt w 

moitiouiiig that several of and the right to habeas corpus for Sandimst Front to- 

^artdep^g a Nhfu fanrily his relatives had been killed recent- prisoners mi aSS jiS 0 ® oi the" Sandmists- 

structnie. as described bv Mr. Riwt- u. w.. s_ _ w.e. __ “zr 13 ”. r* <*tmes Leaders nfv- ,rT^_. 


SAGfi.OR’S • MASTBCS • DOCTORATE 
For Walk. Awfamle, Uh EiqMnhm. 
Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 


PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 


^ %VL ® 


structure. 

cetra. 


J ■« J ■ - , ' i w w ii wr viiiiuuvid UUL OVUlXn Qf fWTfflAj, 

as desen bed by Mr. Bus- ly by rivals m a Mafia war m Sidfy. againsi “the security of the nation 
“What, if anything.” the prose* . and the public order." 


“The organization was divided cutor asked, “did yon request in The suspension of oiber rithts. 
up mto families.” the witness said, return for having provided such a such fls the right to strike 


t w uis# aanumisu- 

railed foe 

^° m P ,ctc snspenaoa of the de- \ 


M0 N, Sepulveda Btvd. 
Los Anodes, California 
V0049, Deot. 23, U3A. 


T*T 


explaining that each family had a 
capo or boss, a sotveapo or under- 
boss. a consigliere « counselor, ca- 


os>s«a, uiu juu in]urai w kuv . (K Olner.H gh tc rj%, - .» • 

return for having provided such a such as the right to stake, the rieh! raW 1 " 6 .^edoesdav’s debait 
statement to the Italian attfhori- to outdoor, asseaibly -and the right. C?m^ t ^ lves riw'Danaaatift. 

to frecotpression; was ratified by^ ^ dentTS!!^. p J«y ^hri.Indepenr'. 


*3^ T “r wa * rauned by dent FikZTi 

Security for my family "he re- . the.96-n3ember assembly for a peri- Snm* jF, Pan y walked out 

lint ” - - . wl^nwWM- ‘ “■ v®*® UHCMIw •_ .A 


podednas or captains and so/datfor plied. . ^ • - pd of rare year. " r™^^egates refused to aireod 


soldiers. 

“Wherever there is Cosa Nostra, 


- • uuwulCYsar. . . fi . •■wuseo to atlCDu 

The trial is expected to otmtint* : Rrfad SoB^ a delegate for (he ^ didn’t want to . 

for about ax mbnthsl . ;•/ : Sandiiust National Liberation - present Sr B «tea»e with thftf 

h wnce, Mr. Solis said. X 


Be 

ful 


ln« 

ah 


’ '' * r «. 


' 1 v'r- - 
-ft Vt 

£ * 




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INTERACTIONAL HERALD TRIBU1NTL, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


Page 3 


'■ "T, 

- . - * W*., 

■ • - “ J 1 r; 


Approvs 




.1 ~ 





By Stephen Em 

New York Time] \wnmr. 

.WASHINGTON - Reagan » d : 
““““ration officials havTcon- 


prwed the agreement under vAich' 

John A. Walker Jr. pleaded gufltv 
. Monday to charges that he ran a 
spy nng for the Soviet Union. 

‘ Senior officials at the Ptotagon 
uw laJa^Jusuce Department were de- 
vf scribed Wednesday as angered by 
, cntKasrn from the navy secretary' 

•*■ F- Lehman Jr, erf the plea 

; bargain. He said Tuesday dial he 
never agreed to it and that it would 


Ipan 


Wednesday by Mr. Lehman on a- 
rowans tdenpion nows show was 
canceled. Be iso refused requests 
to dabora#.qaiTris assertion Tues- 

rlfttr » hi > «lk*- — 1 * * - u 


** _ • ~ ~ 

Mr. Write has agreed to a life 
sentence and wiB be eligible for 
parole after 10 years. His son win 
receive 25 years m prison and could 
be parried in eight years and four 
months. Both men are expected to 
serve- more than the minimum 
terms. . ' 

Mr. Ldunan'SjBssertioa that Mr. 
Writer c ooper ati on would be of 
gri nhnri help m the-mtfiauy's as- 


> Partin p 


" ' .Pf^ £8 re ®d to « and that it would “““tori help ra the unfitaiy's as- 

■ ' 3 s^rk. be of fit ti e benefir to the military, sessmeai of .the. security bread was 

' • • - . Pentagon official said some dis p ut ed by offiriabr directly iri- 

■ senior officials shared Mr. Lefa- volvol with such nmngri ■. 

.man’s view. The comments con- Coland Anthony J, Gallo Jr, the 

~ firmed lhat the administration was ^ ® pn “' ■ A "* f - f 
.divided over the ontcorae of the 


r*o 

“V-L 

'"Sj 



U.S. Air Controllers 9 Bid 
To Unionize Is Stalled 



U-S. Army dseTot cotmterattlli- 
gence, said aU erf. the nriHiary ser- 
vices were hoping far « windfall of 
information from Mr. Write's de- 
cision to talk. 

“Tve said aU along that nnlft« 
John Waite or Whitworth talks, 
wc were never going to know all 

,, . r (hat damage that was done,” he 

m ^7 Sm T . said, referring to another figure in 

■ vtr. of ij^ . 1 3^: Mr. Lehman said Tuesday thm the case, Jerry A. Whitworth. 

! '-At fijl -Mr. Walker would be of little help “The (XHinmmications ups 

^ ro asressmg. the damage caused by in the navy are similar to the ones 

- J“s 17 years of espionage, and he we have a the asraw and air force," 

‘;hel' ni | T T?^ ■ feared the Justice Department of .he said. “We afl have concerns. 

: “ treating espionage as just another Some of the documents were DIA, 

white collar enme.’’ . some went onra. Werilhaveavest- 

A long-scheduled appearance ed interest ip shaking this tree." 


John A. Walker Jr. 


•A...? 1 * 


case. 

Justice Department officials said 
Mr. Lehman raised questions 
about the arrangement last week, 
. but they daimedr that his public 
objections Tuesday were much 
.more critical than his private re- 
marks. 



The DIA is the Defense Intelli- 
gence Agency. 

■ Fugitive Ex-Agent Crik Wife 

Edward L Howard, a fugitive 
former CIA agent suspected ot spy- 
ing, has telephoned his wife from 
abroad. The Washington Post re- 
ported Wednesday, quoting two in- 
telligence officials. 

Mr. Howard has been sighted in 
Helsinki bur has not entered the 
Soviet Union, according to the 
sources. The sources familiar with 
the. manhunt for Mr Howard said 
the call might indicate that he was 
uncertain about defecting. 


By Richard Wickin 

New York TmaSerme 

NEW' YORK — ITte effort to 
organize a union to represent 
American air traffic controllers, al- 
ready moving at a ranch slower 
pace than some advocates forecast 
earlier this year, has suffered two 
severe setbacks. 

In late August the Atr Line Pilots 
Association, which disclosed tenta- 
tive plans in April to organize the 
14,000 controllers into an affiliated 
nationwide union, decided unex- 
pectedly not to go ahead 

Union advocates were disap- 
pointed by the pilots' decision not 
to organize the controllers. They 
recognized, however, that if there 
was a strike by pilots atonemrime, 
controllers in an allied union might 
be accused of discriminating 
against that airline, which could 

Soviet Condemns Pair 

For Meal-Plant Fraud 

Retacn 

MOSCOW — Two managers of 
meal plants haw been sentenced to 
death for defrauding the state of SI 
million by falsifying production 
figures, a’ Soviet newspaper said 
Thursday. 

The agri cultural paper, Selskaya 
Zhizn. said that dozens of oiKar 
offenders were sentenced and that 
some had received long prison 
terms for their part in the fraud, 
which occurred in the central Asian 
republic of Kirgiz. 



create serious public opposition to 
an alliance. 

Then in late September, a federal 
agency ruled against a petition 
from New England scsircilers that 
would have opened me way for 
selling up regional bargaining 
units. The regional membership 
drive that led to the petition was 
one of several conducted by the 
American Federation of Govern- 
ment Employees. 

Although the issue never was 
raised directly , the clear implica- 
tion of the ruling was dial only a 
nationwide unit would be autho- 
rized to bargain with the control- 
lers' employer, the Federal Avia- 
tion Administration. 

Now a third union, the Marine 

Duarte, in U.S., Defends Accord With Rebels 

labor sources outside that union. 


IwvUwd P>mi I fl pm o nd 


President Reagan welcomed lues Guadelupe Duarte Dur&n, daughter of President Jose 
Napole6n Duarte of E2 Salvador, to the White House on Thursday. Mr. Duane is at right. 


The controllers have cot been 
represented by a imicrc since the 
Professional .Air Traffic Control- 
lers Organization was stripped of 
its bargaining rights after calling a 
walkout in August 35?!. The union 
was decertified because i: had vio- 
lated the law barring strikes by fed- 
eral employees. On the "same 
ground, the Reagan a dminist ration 
dismissed i 1,4X1 controllers who 
went out on strike. 

Leading advocates of a union for 
controllers say controllers are gen- 
erally unhappy, not about wage 
scales and job security but about 
what they describe as overwork and 
management's poor human rela- 
tions. 


By John M. Goshko 

'Waskirpar. Past Scn iic 

WASHINGTON — President 
Jose Napoleata Duarte of E Salva- 
dor. in an address Thursday while 
here on a three-day visit, defended 
his derision to meet the demands of 
leftist guerrillas who held his 
daughter hostage for 44 days. 

With his daughter. Ices Guada- 
lupe Duarte Duran, by his side, Mr. 
Duarte said he had acted “not only 
as a head of state but as a father." 

He made his remarks to the Na- 
tional Press Club and in an ex- 
change with reporters after a brief 
meeting with President Ronald 
Reagan at the White House. 

\0s. Duarte Duran and a com- 
panion were kidnapped in Son Sal- 


vador on Sept. 10. They were re- 
leased Ocl 24 as pan of 'a complex 

exchange in which 22 leftist politi- 
cal prisoners were let out of Salva- 
doran prisons and 96 wounded re- 
bels were allowed to leave the 
country. The guerrillas also freed 
33 mayors and municipal officials 
whom they had kidnapped. 

In bis speech, Mr. Duane con- 
tended that the outcome had been a 
victory for his government because 
the guerrillas had been unable to 
use his daughter's ordeal to polar- 
ize Salvadoran society. 

He said the rebels* hope had 
been that the government would 
retaliate with a campaign of repres- 
sion against f amili es and sympa- 
thizers of the guerrillas. But he said 


he bad refused to take that course 
“because we want the bw to be 
respected-" 

“They wanted the president to 
lose control of himself, but they did 
not succeed," he said. 

Mr. Duane also denied that he 
derided to negotiate in the face of 
opposition from the Salvadoran 
armed forces that reportedly 
caused tension and created specu- 
lation about a coup against his 
presidency. The military's top com- 
manders. he said, bad supported 
him fully. 

At the White House, he told re- 
porters that his actions had caused 
no strains in his relations with Mr. 
Reagan, despite reports to that ef- 
fect. 


Believing in the 



In cars, looking 
ahead means BMW. 


Raul Aha 


ii "IndrinsAir-IndiiGs 

* 

■■■ ■: i-j'.iboriaat 

• •- theory" thsp^- 

«-• - .■ - v • '.he suite 

• •• • - . »hc ffieftte; 

.. -i-reaudwadk 

■: all the evidofth 

wfl qe: 


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Whether people demand morefroma top-class 
car than the conventional idea of sophistication 
and quality is ultimately a question of how 
great their- expectations are end how deep, their 
pereonkl level of techni&l appredation. 
Someone who is used to making not only excep- 
tional but also highly indjvidual.demands is 
seldom satisfied with the traditional demonstra- 
tive attitude towards status whehit comes to 
choosing a top-quality car. . 

What actuaiiv attracts you persona Hvto a top - 
class car? Conventional technologies? 

Surety not 

Because in the end analysis our Present and even 
more our future, are shaped by innovation- 


Taken from that farsighted point of view, a BMW 
represents the unconventional, alternative 
attitude towards exclusivity. 

Especially where technology is concerned. 

But then that's exactly why the large BMW has 
cometo be recognised ail over the world as the 
outstanding illustration of how a car can 
justify its claim to exclusivity not merely through 
its luxury butalso through its out of the ordinary, 
progressive technologies. 

And underlying BMW’s success with drivers all 
over the world is the philosophy of always 
passing on those technologies as quickly as 
possible to its customers. 

Just take, for instance, what two highly 
respected motoring journalists had to say about 
the BMW 7451: 

M At this moment in time, no other manufacturer 
is providing more conclusive proof that the engine 
technology of the future is totally inseparable 
from engine electronics.” 

. (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung) 


“High performance motoring plus favourable con- 
sumption and acceptable emission levels 
demand exceptional technological know-how, a 
basic reappraisal of the internal combustion 
engine ._ and engine electronics. 

And no other standard production car... offers 
Such an all-embracing engine/transmission 
management system." 

(Schweizer Automobil Revue) 

But much more important, aren't your own 
highly personal demands - and your own rea- 
lisation that without the very latest technologies 
tomorrow's problems will never be solved - 
enough good reasons for choosing the 
forward-looking solution the next time you come 
to buying a top-class car? 

Today, there’s already one car that through its 
innovative electronic solutions has come 
a long way along the road to solving tomorrow's 
problems. 

Not least amongst them, the need for greater 
environmental awareness without any loss in the 


performance and dynamism that are so essential 
to motoring safety. 

So why should you settle for driving behind in 
the wake of progress? 

Drive the large BMW. 

You won't only be doing yourself a favour, but 
also the environment we all share. 

Have a quiet word with your BMW dealer. Or, at 
the very least, contact us for further information. 

BMW cars. 

The BMW range of fine automobiles; the ultimate 
in performance, comfort and safety. 


BMW AG Munich 



PBuWHW 


Page 4 


licralb 



tribune 


PuMWied With Tl» N«* - YoATinKMadUK Washington Pwt 


Aifonsin vs. Regression 


Argentina's democratic government is once 
again under attack from violent and unrecon- 
ciled supporters of the military junta that col- 
lapsed two years ago. The current epidemic of 
bombings is apparently not designed solely to 
disrupt the congressional elections next Sun- 
day. The bombers are trying to prove that 
democracy will not work and that, to restore 
order and security. Argentina will have to 
return to the previous style of authority. 

Until last spring, friends of the junta could 
hope that inflation would do their work for 
them. President Raii! Alfcnsin was followings 
cautious and hesitant economic policy that 
was proving increasingly ineffectual. By late 
spring the economy was sliding toward hyper- 
inflation. an experience that democracies rare- 
ly survive. But in June the .Alfcnsin adminis- 
tration imposed a totally different and more 
drastic plan that has so far proved extraordi- 
narily effective. The inflation rate fell from 
31 percent a month in June to 6 percent in July 
and 2 percent in September, as industrial pro- 
duction began to rise again. 

Meanwhile, the government had brought to 
trial nine generals and admirals of the former 
junta, and' throughout the summer there was 
an outpouring of testimony describing the vio- 
lations of human rights under their rule. It is a 
remarkable case, for three of the defendants 


are previous presidents of the country. There 
was much doubt earlier that the government 
would be able to prosecute these men. But the 
trial is now concluded and a verdict is expected 
shortly. The bombings this month are a re- 
sponse to the successes of a popular govern- 
ment. not to its failures. Because the junta's 
friends find themselves more isolated than 
ever, they have resorted to the tactics of terror. 

The government arrested a dozen prominent 
suspects last week, but a disagreement arose 
among the courts over its authority to hold 
them. As judges began to free some. Mr. Ai- 
fonsin imposed the state of siege — suspend- 
ing certain civil liberties — for 60 days- 

He is presiding over a country badly shaken 
by the savagely divisive and destructive poli- 
tics of the past generation, and in many Argen- 
tines' minds the basic question is whether it 
can be ruled by any instrument other than the 
gun. Mr. Aifonsin stands for a better alterna- 
tive. but he has felt himself compelled to take a 
step backward. His defenders can poim out 
that none of the government's extraordinary 
powers are being used to interfere with the 
election campaigning. It is always dismaying 
to see an expedient like a state of siege in- 
voked. but Mr. .Aifonsin has earned a pre- 
sumption that he is proceeding in good faith. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Milked by Supercows' 


According to researchers at Cornell Univer- 
sity in Ithaca. New York, the supercow is on 
the way. Within a few years it will be possible 
for farmers to feed herds a cheap, apparently 
harmless natural hormone that increases milk 
production by as much 3S 40 percent. To a 
world entranced by progress and bedeviled by 
hunger, that surely sounds like good news. 

If the supercow were a new computer or 
chain saw. she would be cheered by ail. Com- 
petition would force producers to pass on 
savings to consumers, lowering prices and rais- 
ing living standards. But because of the power- 
ful dairy lobby, the prices for fluid milk and 
milk solids are set by Congress, not by the free 
market. Abundance is an embarrassment to be 
hidden, or sometimes, in the case of cows, 
slaughtered. If history is any guide, the wind- 
fall from bovine growth hormone will go to 
wealthy, efficient dairy farmers — and the 
contractors who build warehouses to store 
government surplus butter and cheese. 

Generally, costs and demand determine 
price. Innovations that lower costs make pro- 
duction more profitable at existing prices, 
thereby stimulating ourput. Eventually, prices 
fall and less efficient producers are forced oul 

Automated milking, selective breeding and 
scientific feeding methods have increased 
yields dramatically. In 1960 it took an hour of 
labor to produce 120 pounds (54.4 kilograms) 
of milk: in I9S0 an hour yielded 4?0 pounds. 
In 1950 the average cow produced 5.500 • 
pounds of milk: today it is close to 13.000. 

Much of the gain, however, has been denied 
to consumers because of government interven- 


tion. Regulations effectively prevent the trans- 
port of low-cost fresh milk from California 
and the Midwest to the high-cost South. The 
Feds set a minimum nationwide price for but- 
ter. dry milk and processed cheese. The gov- 
ernment is obliged to buy any surplus: the 
current surplus is about 10 percent of outpuL 

Tlie program serves the interests of most 
dairy farmers. Small, inefficient producers eke 
out a modest living. Large, efficient dairy 
farmers clean up. But the farmers' gain ts far 
exceeded by the loss to consumers and taxpay- 
ers. How is supercow likely to fit in? 

At first, surpluses will increase sharply as 
fanners find it more profitable to produce milk 
at the government's minimum price. The dairy 
lobby has known for some years that the 
mountains of surplus butter and cheese offend 
the public more than higher prices at the dairy 
case. So ii has convinced Congress to offer 
cash incentives to fanners who slaughter their 
herds. As supercows come on line, there will be 
pressure for an ever larger “diversion" pro- 
gram financed by the Treasury and consumers. 

The future, then, is all too likely to resemble 
the past. A decade from now. inefficient dairy 
farmers will still rise at dawn, muttering about 
how hard they work to earn so little. Spokes- 
men for their rich, efficient neighbors will still 
be issuing press releases about what a bargain 
milk is — and still be mailing campaign checks 
to their congressmen to make sure it stays that 
way. Unless citizens rise up against this special 
interest the course of progress is easy to pro- 
ject: super cow, supersurplus, superhandout. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


More Missiles Instead of Fewer 


[In a BBC interview aired on Wednesday. 
President Reagan was asked about “star 
wars") If we come up with this “defensive 
weapon," said the president, then “we go to 
the world, to our allies, to the Soviet Union" 
and we say “let's have the world have this for 
their own protection so that we can all elimi- 
nate our nuclear arsenals.” But there is. sol- 
emnly. no senior figure in his administration 
who could recite this with a straight face. It is 
rubbish: actual, scientific rubbish — for as far 
as the laboratory toilers can see. 

If and when a variant of the SD1 eventually 
comes into being, long after this president and 
all his sharing pledges have cantered away into 
the West, it may provide areas of constrained 
defense around America’s own missile sites 
and. perhaps, around some key cities. There 
will be no defense for Europe, say. against 
cruise missiles. Nor will there be any guaran- 
teed defense for ordinary Americans scattered 
across that continent. And in the meantime the 
inevitable response for a Soviet Union worried 
by the SDI is to argue that [it] can only be 
breached by sheer weight of warheads, and 
that therefore more missiles must be built here 
and now and into the immediate future. 

— The Guardian ( London I. 


Internationa] Physicians for the Prevention of 
Nuclear War. Now the IPPNW has won the 
Nobel Peace Prize. Its membership has grown 
from six to 145.000 in 40 countries. The growth 
is phenomenal. Reognition by the Nobel com- 
mittee is deserved. If only the politicians in 
Moscow and Washington were also to recog- 
nize that it is possible to transcend political 
and cultural differences and inject preventive 
medicine into the nuclear threat 

— The Hartford ( Connecticut } Courant. 

Tobacco in the Third World 


Preventive Strategic Medicine 


Dwight D. Eisenhower, in his last year as 
president predicted that sooner or later people 
[were] going to demand peace. Two decades 
later his words helped inspire the founders of 


The problem in Malaysia, as in many devel- 
oping nations, is tobacco's importance to the 
livelihoods of many poor people. The issue is 
politically sensitive, so the government must 
tackle it on a long-term basis. But moving too 
slowly would allow time for vested interests to 
become even more entrenched. These include 
powerful multinationals tinning to Third 
World markets in the face of declining con- 
sumption in the developed world. 

More people in developed countries are 
choosing not to smoke. Recent U.S. studies 
show that the smoking rate is much lower 
among people with higher social status — 
people who tend to be better educated and 
more likely to be concerned with health. 

The less advantaged may not have the same 
information or ability to choose. If fewer Ma- 
laysians are to be included in this group, ef- 
forts to promote economic development and 
alleviate poverty must be pan of the campaign 
against tbe habit of smoking, 

— The Business Times (Kuala Lumpur). 


FROM OUR NOV. 1 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Founder of Red Cross Dies 


HE I DEN. Switzerland — The death is an- 
nounced of Henri Dunam, founder of the Red 
Cross, in the Heiden Sanatorium ]on Oct 30], 
M. Dunam was bora in Geneva in 1828. Dur- 
ing the Crimean war he was impressed by the 
work done by Florence Nightingale, but it was 
not until 1859. during the Italian campaign, 
that his ideas took shape. He was able to 
institute an international ambulance service. 
October 1S63 saw the international conference 
[in Geneva] which provoked the Diplomatic 
Congress of 1864 and conclusion of Ihe Gene- 
va convention. The Red Cross societies were 
bom: events have shown what splendid work 
they were destined to do. In 1901 he was 
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. 


1935: Trans-Atlantic Flights Planned 

LONDON — Tbe first step toward a regular 
trans-Atlantic air service will be taken by Im- 
perial Airways next year when it is proposed to 
carry out experimental flights across the At- 
lantic. Sir Eric Geedes, chairman of the com- 
pany. told the annual meeting of shareholders 
[on Ocl 31]. “We have placed an order for 
what is known as a Mayo-Composite aircraft," 
Sir Eric said, “which has been specially de- 
signed to meet the conditions of Atlantic air- 
mail service. At die same time tbe company 
bas under construction a flying boat of normal 
character, but of sufficient range to fly the* 
Atlantic. If the builders keep to program, this 
boat should be delivered in time for us to carry 
out experimental flights next year." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
carlgewirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publish* 

Executive Editor RENE BONDY Deploy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Assaaote Pvbhker 

Deputv EJuar RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAlSONS Director ef Circuttssion 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sales 


CJAJU- UX-«U\.*e. umivi « ' — — J ' V 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Advertising Sales 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charies-dc-Gzulle, 92200 Neuflly-sur-Sdne, 

France. Td.: (1)47.47.1165. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. ^ 

Director de la puUkadant Waller N. Thayer. 

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SA. au capital de 1.200.000 F- RCS Nantem B 732021126. Commission Pariiaire No. 61337. anM 
U.S. subscription : $322 yearly. Second-class postage paid a Long Island City, N.Y. 11101. 

€ 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


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Shultz Will Take Summit Cues Back From Moscow 


W ASHINGTON — President 
Reagan will celebrate the first 


VV Reagan will celebrate the first 
anniversary of his re-election on Nov. 
6. A couple of days earlier. Secretary 
of State George Shultz will be in 
Moscow to set the agenda for tbe 
Reagan -Gorbachev summit meeting 
in Geneva on Nov. 19 and 20 — a 
conference that could have an impor- 
tant bearing on the historical record 
of the Reagan presidency. 

Nobody expects the leaders of the 
two major nuclear powers to recon- 
cile the political and philosophic dif- 
ferences of 70 years in eight hours of 
talk, half of it devoted to translation. 
Mr. Shultz's assignment, as usual, is 
to keep things from getting worse 
than they already are. 

Die question at Geneva is whether 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorba- 
chev will talk sense privately about 
their problems, or deliver more pro- 
paganda nonsense about their differ- 
ences. Mr. Shultz is going to Moscow 
to try to define a practical agenda for 
future negotiations not only on arms 
control but on the easing of East- 
West tensions in general. 

This is the sort of thing Mr. Shultz 
has done most of his professional life. 
As secretary of labor he tried to bal- 
ance the conflicting demands of man- 


By James Reston 


agement and the unions. As secretary 
of the Treasury he watched the Unit- 
ed States move from isolation and 
protectionism into tbe tangles of the 
first worldwide competing economy. 

He has worked in die academic 
world and has a sense of history, and 
be has been in Washington long 
enough to know something about tbe 
stupidity of political and personal 
ambition. Accordingly, unlike many 
of his colleagues, be has few illusions 
about Moscow or Washington, or 
about the allies or about himself. 

The chances are that be may make 
some progress in his talks with Mr. 
Gorbachev. Henry Kissinger may 
very well be right in saying that it is 
wrong to base hopes for peace or 
reconciliation with the Russians on 
the personality of new Soviet leaders, 
but occasionally even Henry has been 
wrong. Prime Ministers Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain, and Yasuhiro 
Nakasone of Japan have the impres- 
sion that Mr. Gorbachev has so many 
problems at home that he is demand- 
ing new policies there and consider- 
ing compromises abroad 

All this may be wrong — there is 
much evidence that it is — but Mr. 


Shultz has a chance to analyze tins 
for himself when he meets Mr. Gor- 
bachev. He can then tell Mr. Reagan 
whether to go to Geneva expecting 
die worn or hoping for the possibility 
of compromise, as the allies suggest 

Such an approach to tbe summit 
meeting will not be popular with oth- 
er members of the Reagan cabinet 
particularly with Secretary of De- 
fense Caspar Weinberger, who thinks 
that past agreements with the Rus- 
sians have been violated and doubts 
that any new agreements with them 
in tbe future would be useful. 

In recent weeks Mr. Reagan has 
seemed to side with Mr. Weinbergers 
pessimistic analysis. He w-ent to the 
United Nations condemning Soviet 
expansionist policies in Europe, Afri- 
ca and Latin America and suggesting 
that he could deal with Mr. Gorba- 
chev' only if Moscow.agreed to aban- 
don its political and military inter- 
ventions in regional disputes. 

On this he had a valid point, for it 
is true that there can be no reconcilia- 
tion between Washington and Mos- 
cow on tbe peace of the world as long 
as other side violates its treaty com- 
mitments under the United Nations 


Middle East: New Patterns in an Old Stalemate 


P ARIS — Is the Middle East, with its routine 
violence and its peroenial rounds of aborted 


JL violence and jts perpetual rounds of aborted 
peace initiatives, doomed to stalemate? For the 
first time in years, promising diplomatic, politi- 
cal and psychological patterns are emerging. 

The Israeli bombing of PLO headquarters in 
Tunis, renewed Palestinian terrorism culminat- 
ing in the hijacking of the Achille Lauro, the 
American capture of an Egyptian plane carrying 
the hijackers and the recent Soviet overture to- 
ward Israel all suggest that the political configu- 
ration of the Middle East is changin g. 

The Palestinians are suffering the most from 
these shifts. The contrast between their hopes in 
1974, when Yasser Arafat was addressing the 
United Nations, and their exclusion from that 
very same forum 11 years later is the best proof 
of the erosion of their movement's image. 

Mr. Arafat is a prisoner of the PLO's contra- 
dictions, incapable of choosing between political 


By Dominique Mo'isi 


moderation and physical violence. He is increas- 
ingly isolated ana will survive only as long as the 


ingly isolated and will survive only as long as the 
competing appetites of those who want to con- 
trol tbe PLO cancel each other out. 

There are signs today of strains between the 
PLO and Jordan, and even between tbe PLO and 
Egypt; moderates in the Arab world find Mr. 
Arafat a growing embarrassment, with his ambi- 
guities and his inability to pursue or impose a 
consistent line. More Arab countries today are 
seriously considering a PLO without Mr. Arafat 
— at a time when Israel is more than ever looking 
to Palestinian alternatives to the PLO. 


Tolerance for the PLO has apparently been 
reduced by a Rambo syndrome: The West is in a 
mood of backlash against Third World violence. 
There is growing impatience with Middle East- 
ern terrorism in partioilar. So a decade of lenien- 
cy toward the PLO could he ending. 

Public opinion in Europe has been heavily 
favorable to the American seizure of the Egyp- 
tian plane. More significant, European denunci- 
ations of the Israeli raid over Tunis were compar- 
atively mild. Three years ago, amid revulsion 
after tbe Sabra and Chaula massacres in Leba- 
non. there would have been an uproar. 

As they savor the PL(y$ faB from grace, Israe- 
lis can also celebrate tbe gradual ending of their 
diplomatic isolation. From Africa and Easton 
Europe — and even from Western Europe, with 
the {Banned establishment of formal diplomatic 
relations with Spain — the news for land has 
been good. Especially symbolic is the resumption 
of cultural ties between Israel and Poland — an 
interesting sign of new inventiveness in Soviet 


immediate domestic purposes with the raid over 
Tunis, but in the process they played dangerous- 
ly with Egypt, their chief asset in tbe region. 
Israel may have endangered seven years of peace 
with Egypt by unnecessarily exposing the Hosni 
Mubarak regime to its own inner weaknesses. 

While the state of Israel recovers lost diplo- 
ma tic recognition, its dozens are bang exposed, 
to a new form of hatred and violence that extends 
abroad to all Jews. Anti-Jewish terrorism. ex- 
presses the desperation of the Palestinians and 
growing' radicafization in the Arab world under 
tbe influence of revolutionary Idam 

And that tendency is met ua Israel by increas- 


ing receptivity to the racist theories of Mear 
Kahane, which -signal a oisis of moral values. * 
Developments in the relationship between, the 
Palestinians'and Israel are not necessarily a zero- 
sum game. The Palestinians' loss will not neces- 
sarily turn out to be Israel's gain. . \ 

As the South African drama unfolds, Israelis 
can see a vivid example of what could happen to 
them if they were to freeze tbe atnatioa m the 
occupied territories, as it is today. 

If it is to capitalize on diplomatic gains, exploit 
an extended margin of maneuver andpresest 
successfully at home an alternative of peace to 
Kahanism, the government of 'Shimon Peres will 
need determination and courage. . 


diplomacy under Mikhail Gorbachev. 
By allowing Poland to resume som 


By allowing Poland to resume some kind of 
relationship with Israel, the Soviets killed two 
birds with one stone: They promoted increased 
recognition for Wojdech Jaruzdskfs regime, and 
they sent positive signals to the Israelis. 

However, Israel's short-term gains could be 
offset in the Jong term. Israeli authorities served 


The writer is associate director of the Jnstitut 
Francois des Relations Internationales. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


More Than Food Crosses the Ethiopian Aid Bridge 


H ANOVER, New Hampshire — 
A year ago this week the United 


By Jack Shepherd 


States began large-scale emergency 
feeding of Ethiopia. The food aid has 
created a fragile bridge between the 
two antagonists — a Soviet diem 
state controlled by a Marxist, and the 
world's richest capitalist nation, led 
by an outspoken ami-Communist. 

Ethiopia continues to need emer- 
gency aid, and the United Stares re- 
mains the primary donor. The mutual 
linkage, which has made possible 
some repairs in relations, is all tbe 
more remarkable because neither 
side wanted to join tbe other in com- 
bating the famine. That linkage re- 
flects President Reagan's new, more 
pragmatic policy toward Ethiopia. 

The government of Lieutenant 
Colonel Mengistu Halle Mariam has 
never publidy welcomed the aid from 
Western countries. It did not cooper- 


Hon metric tons of food in 1986. It is 
likely to get it. While rainfall is easing 
the food crisis across much of sub- 


Saharan Africa, five countries will 
need emergency food throughout (he 
coming year. Ethiopia heads the fist, 
the others being Angola, Botswana, 
Mozambique and Sudan. 

Small changes between Ethiopia 
and America b cat watching for what 
they may portend. For example, re- 
lief workers, medical specialists and 
other aid technicians report an opea- 
ness and friendliness among Ethiopi- 
an counterparts. Ethiopians are find- 
ing employment in relief operations. 

After a year of quiet negotiations, 
first begun by Representative Jim 
Wright of Texas and then pressed by 
Vice President George Bush, Colonel 


Mengistu began in September allow- 
ing relief agencies to get food topeo- 
ple in Tigre, WoUo and Eritrea. That 
food is going to some two million 
people trapped by guerrilla fi ghting 
who have not received any food be- 
fore. It may also help stem the flow of 
refugees into relief camps in Sudan. 

The Reagan administration is us- 
ing the aid as an instrument to press 
home several foreign policy . argu- 
ments. It is urging Colonel Mengistu 
to increase Ethiopia's efforts to con- 
trol famine, to reduce the pace of 
forced resettlement and to evacuate 
the relief camps more hnmanely by 
enabling the hungry to return to their 
villages and to farming. 

Washington is also using the aid to 
make clear to the Ethiopians that 


Amerieais their true benefactor. Mr. 
Bush reminded Addis Ababa that 
while the United States is donating 
almost 6QOjOOO metric tons of food, 
the Soviet Union — which has sold 
Ethiopia $215 billion in m3itaiy aid 
—has sent merely 10,000 metric tons. ' 

It will take more than food, aid to 
repair the relationship, of course. Mr. 
Reagan and Colond Mengistu re- 
main at odds. Soviet influence has 
not dimnnshed 'Bm the aid brid ge, so 
carefully pm into place, enables both 
nations to span (hear ideological 
chasm and to settle into a relation- 
ship that, whflenettiesome, might im- 
prove further, to munmi benefit - 


Defensive 


Chutzpah 


In Moscow 


Bv William Safine 


W ashington — The soviet 
Union, wbkh wants to block 


American space-based nsssdc de- 
fense. h 2 s been caught red-handed 
with an illegal ground-based missile 
defense — but refuses to »vc it up. . 

On July 27. 1983. syndicated col- 
umnists Rowland Evans arid Robert 
Novak reported that US. biteUtgeoct 
had sent a secret wanting to list 
White House: An immense radar sys- . 
lem was being built-in Siberia in 
violation of the ABM treaty. That 
column was the scoop of the year; 

A week later. Senator lames Mc- 
Clure wrote President Reagan asking 
for a closed-session briefing on wfcat 
he termed “the most flagrant Soviet 
SALT violation yet," The next week. 
The New York Times confirmed the 
concern of mteliipnce offidak at the 
satellite photos of the sew radatr in- ‘ 
siaflatioo the size of two football 


fields near Krasnoyarsk. 

Three months before this disclo- 
sure. Mr. Reagan had surprised the 
world with bis idea for changing the : 
basis of midear deterrence: No krag- 


Chaner. But Mr. Reagan seemed to 
be making the settlement of these 
regional disputes a condition for 
reaching an accommodation on the 
control of nuclear weapons. And on 
this point not only the allies but 
many of his own advisers disagree. 

They include Mr. Shultz, whose 
practical view, as usual, is that it is a 
bum idea to reject some progress un- 
less you can get everything you wanL 

The president ma} be coming 
around to accepting this approach to 
the summit. He has agreed to respond 
to Mr. Gorbachev's proposal for a 
50-percent cut in some nuclear mis- 
siles and to his more hopeful propos- 
al for a comprehensive test ban on all 
nuclear weapons systems. 

And President Reagan is sending 
to Moscow not Mr. Weinberger but 
Mr. Shultz, to talk things over with 
General Secretary Gorbachev and 
see if at least they can arrange an 
agenda in Geneva that will minimize 
the propaganda and keep the negoti- 
ations going — not only on the con- 
trol of midear weapons bet also oo 
UN treaty commitments to refrain 
from the threat or use of force against 
the territorial integrity and primal 
independence of other nations. 

The Hew York Times. 


ex would the United States rely on 
“mutual assured destruction," en- 
shrining vulnerability in a balance of 
terror, but it wotifd-seek to build a 

Bo3d^*3«^^towjrioQ horn- 
fieri the MAD crowd, which believes 
that nakedness is strength. “Con- ': 
coned scientists'* rushed into print 
with p re di c ti o ns tSai a shseB oould 
never be devised. Russians joined in 
the furious derogation of “star wars’* 
defense, which would leapfrog the 
Soviet advantage in offense. 

But these was a glaring weakness . 
at the Soviet-MAD argument: Tbe 
news ita toe Russians were building 
a missilotorgetmg radar in their 
heartland meant that the Soviet 
Union, in violation of the Anti ballis- 
tic MisSe Treaty. of 1972, was build- ' 
ing its own defense. If the Russians 
were «*«■«»"£ by building a; secret ‘ 
defense, then the argument against 
an open U5. defense collapsed 

That b why American dom re- 
fused to be&ere the story of the Kras- 
noyarsk radar. It had to be a concoc- 
tion of right-wing extremists bent on 
n&nmgMditioiial arms control doc- 
trine. Doves preferred the Russian 
explanation: just listening to mes- 
sages from space. That is also why 
some of os haxd-hnea have been hir- 


NHan-Brezhnev deal allows 


“early wanting" radars on the peri- 
phery of mutual defeases, but only 
one local defense missiles. 

Ihe Soviets chose, to 'build a local 
defense around Moscow; America 
chose to build none. The Soviets' per- 
mitted system includes a battle-man- 
a ge ment radar to plot the tr^edaries 
of hundreds of incoming missiles si- 
multaneously. thus enabling gr ound- 
based ntisafas to sbooi them down. 

Now here is tbe rob: The budding 
id Krasnoyarsk is ihe same, in sze 
and g g rwi] ^ ' as die radar installation 
near Moscow that the Russians freely 
assert is designed- to target incoming 
ICBMs. (Rasaan technocrats stick to 
-onesetaf pfans.) The only real differ- 
ence is dial the radar at Krasnoyarsk 
is a treaty violation. It means that the 
. R u ssia n s are putting a rudimentary 
national missile defense in place. 


r i.'i •. •• 


In other words, they may have air jfe- 
ady begun to deploy a ground- ( 


The writer, author of “The Politics of 
Starvation" and managing editor of the 

South-North News Service, contributed 
this cammau to The New York Times 


ready begun to- dq)k>y a ground- 
based defense against nfissiles in their 
re-entry stage — w hile complaining 
about prospective U.S. tasting of a 
space-based defense against mingles 
in their launch stage. 

. . At this point, with a summi t ap- 
proaching and tbe Matani Krasno- 
yarsk violation making their anti- 
defense argument on tenable, the 
Russians could (a) admit the viola- 
tion and shut it down, (b) admit noth- 
ing but d is mantle their illegal radar, 
(c) wreck their attack on the VS. 
space def ense plan by doing nothing. 
Mikhail Gorbachev chose a bolder 
course: He offers to “stop 
bundi ng" his defenses at Krasno- 
yarsk (omside, that is; mAfe, the 
dectronic work goes on) in return for . 
abandonment of US. plans to upr 
grade a couple of early warning ra- 
dars that the treaty permits. 

Talk about chutzpah. Well hold 
our violation at its present leveL he 
says, but you have to pay for it 
True to form, American MADmeo 
embrace tins comical ploy as evidence 
or ms conciliauon. and promptly cast 
suspitaon on modernizing America’s 
penpperal early wanting system: 

Don’t be fooled. The Krasnoyaisk 
radar defense is evidence of ihe Sovi- 
et drive to pur a national ABM sys- 
t«n m It proves that Mr. Gor- 
psenev does not care whether his 
jrearyhreahng stand is exposed. Mr. 
is duty bound to insist on 

S lete dismantling at Krasno- 
before talks on limi ting (frpW- 
nient of other defenses can start. 

New York Tones. 


ate for much of this past year. Colo- 
nel Mengistu delayed unloading re- 


nd Mengistu delayed unloading re- 
lief food at his principal port and 
prevented it from teaching starving 
peasants in the guerrilla-held prov- 
inces of WoUo, Tigre and Eritrea. He 
deprived countrymen of food by 
forcing them from relief camps and 
brutally resettling them in the south. 

The Reagan administration had 
twice deliberately delayed — for up 
to 10 months — requests for emer- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


About the OPEC Fund 


gency food from private American 
relief agencies inside Ethiopia. Vow- 
ing never to feed a Marxist nation, 
the administration tried to cut the 
1984 budget for emergency food aid 
to Ethiopia from 8,170 metric tons to 
zero, despite warnings that some 2J 
million Ethiopians were starving 

However, prodded partly by elec- 
tion politics and partly by photo- 
graphs of skeletal, starving children, 
ihe administration started feeding 
Ethiopia. In two months, food deliv- 
eries jumped from 45,000 to 332,000 
metric tons. Today, American assis- 
tance includes trucks, planes, medical 
supplies, tents and other disaster aid, 
and 550,000 metric tons of food. 

Ethiopia recently asked for 1.6 mii- 


Jonathan Power's opinion column 
“OPEC Must Salvage Its One Suc- 
cess” (Oct. 8) contains inaccuracies 
and misleading statements. It reflects 
a misconception that OPEC concerns 
itself with aid. OPEC is concerned 
with the coordination and unification 
under an authority 

oil ministers of 13 

oil-exporting countries. Hie OPEC 
Fund for International Development 
is a separate organization, with a 
ministerial council comprising the' 
OPEC members* finance misters. It 
was set up to provide development 
aid to other Third World countries. 

Aid from OPEC members is ex- 
tended through many other channels, 
including national institutions, mul- 
tilateral agencies winch they largely 
or totally finance, and United Na- 
tions agencies. It was never intended 
to be a form of compensation to de- 
veloping countries for tbe prices they 
had to pay for their oil imports. ' 

There would be no case lor angling 


out oil (or special treatment, rather 
than any other category of imports. 
Oil revenues have simply been tire 
enabling factor behind aid from 
OPEC members. So it was inevitable 
that the drastic fall in oil incomes in 
recent years would have an effect on 
aid programs' of OPEC members. 

The allegation that OPEC mem- 
bers' aid to Africa and Aria has “dif- 
fered tittle” from Western-aid cannot 
be supported by the facts. It is stQl 
vastly more generous. According to 
OECD statistics, net disbursements 
of official development aid from 
OPEC members in 1983 and 1984 
averaged Q.95 percent of GNP, com- 
pared with 0-36 percent from OECD 
countries. The total GNP of the 


in the case of industrialized donors, 
but from depletion 'of a resource that 
represents capital. Secondly, it is to- 
tally untied u> the geopolitical or 
commercial interests, of the donors 
and gives priority to the development 
needs of the poorest countnes as 


• i , - . « . . — 

identified ov beneficiary govern- 
meats. Furthermore, a significant 
part of this aid financ 

services obtained from 

countries. These arc all unique fea- 
tures of aid from OPEC members. . 

The OPEC countries cannot be 
blamed for the lade of progress in 
"creating alternative development 

KS in5 V u i tf ^ s geared to 
Thud World needs.” They have al- 
ready agreed to finance 40 percent of 
the replenishment needs of the Inter- 
national fund for Agricultural De- 
velopment. The United States bas re- 
fused to jean other OECD' nations in 
meeting the remaining 60 percent. •- 
In view of the limits to OPEC 
members’ resources, is it surprising 

that tbeOPECFundconcentrat^on 

alicicaring aid where it appears most 


OPEC group in 1984 represented 
only 27* percent of the GNP of the 


EC countries and 16.8 percent of the 
GNP of the United State. 

These figures do not take account 
of two important factors. Aid from 
OPEC members originates in devel- 
oping countries ana does not stem 
from a renewable annual .income, as 


needed and most effective, rather 
than pursue ambitious targets that 
ragure the cooperation of mdustrial- 
^cwmtnes, which may or may not 
'Die OPEC members 
still stand resolntdy be- 

Mndthor existing commitments . 

: - _ A-BENaMARA. 

OPEC Fund, Vienna. 


Another Side of the Sti 

WiDnW 


r-T- m m* Medium 

f An Erratic II c jaIlTTTT 
Oct 1{s A{ 

swSSSKi 

losing theus ? bon ‘ ^ 

.Sunnin»S£^^ 






fc> 


-r st 


v--;~ •■: ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


Page 5 




V Lebanon 

To Work to 

J* 0 ** • 

Hostages . 

-" ^ Assocuurd Press 

' -'•? Si 1 itfSV-’ — Prime Minister Ra- 

I 5 ?W; Karam pledged; Thursday 
■ pat his government would work to 

: ^ re< " LLS., British and French hos- 

v ’ ■ : 2 W >5 ^8® « Lebanon after three Rusl 

“ *’* a/ 5 w »e freed unharmed after 30 
.•tWiS2r days « captivity . . 

. “V* ‘ ' 4 v“Ja g: T !“ Soviet charge d’affaires, 

\ '^'ht3C .YunSudifcov. said outside Wseni- 

% CPtff MW bass y ^ none of the men “had 
; '■ “y*® 5 or bruises to indicate they 


r;V. 

• "«• H... 5 


-»;i ■** 

* 


•‘o J \ 

:^'V, 

: 'sVW 


J 

"OH 




VTdi* 


7^&- 

• 7 .;^^ 

’■^.•slfcSS 

*’ ecrfcuLb j.fc 


any scars or bruises to inritea fr they, 
had been physically mistreated 

during captivity." 

He said the -three, who were re- 
leased Wednesday night, were 
“tired and under the supervision of 
a physician." 

He said they had not yet been 
debriefed about their captors be- 
cause of their physical condition. 

Mr. Suslikov, the senior Soviet 
diplomat in Barur, said he visited 
President Amin Geraayd at his 
suburban Baabda palnr? east of 
Beirut, on Thursday “to extend our 
thanks and appreciation for all. the Two unidentified Russian <fi] 
assistance we received to secure the the Soviet Embassy in Beiru 
release of our personneL" npljtiaim>n belonging to die 

He also visited Defense Minister 

Abdel Usayran to express Soviet mercial attach*; and Nikolai 



Rajiv Gandhi Elected Members Join Hong Kong Council 

Leads India BV Dinah Lee Instead of passing the administra- schoolteacher. was attacked Ocl 10 dates were political moderai 

Ratiyw f " vVf..- e tion of Hong Kong to an indepen- b\ three men armed with meLai middle-class professionals or n 

1 |-| rvyvtn Q*p HONG KONG — Hor.g Kong’s dem government, they arc passing water pipes and a knife as he and a chants with solid background? 

-*-Lt * ■ Ifl jilv' iegi%lature ha.- be«n a new session « to a Communist power that fre- colleague left their district office, education, social or indust! 

*-* with the First elected members m ouemly has indicated it does not according to the police. Mr. Ng was work. The council traditionally 

TVfntlw^ more than 140 years of Briliahcolo- favor a one-man, one-vote system hospitalized with serious facial and been viewed as a rubber star 

X U iTxUlill/I nial rule, for Hong Kong after 19??. internal injuries. composed of civil servants and £ 

Twenty-four of St members of 
the Legislative Cour.d;. which con- 
vened 'Wednesday. were elected 


7 kc isnuiutfj Pun 

NEW DELHI — Pnme Minister 


Instead of passing the administra- schoolteacher, was attacked Ocl 10 
Hon of Hong Kong to an indepen- h> three men armed with metal 
deni government, they are passing water pipes and a knife as he and a 
2 t to a Communist power that fre- colleague left their district office. 
quemJy has indicated it does not according to the police. Mr. Ng was 
favor a one-man, one-vote system hospitalized with serious facial and 


for Hong Kong after 1997. 

The last month also has seer, the 
emergence of friction between in- 


internal injuries. 

This attack, and warnings from 
resident Chinese Communist offi- 


Rajiv Gar.Jfct led hundreds of ScpL 26 as part o; Britain’s plan to 


coming politicians and entrenched, dais that further political dcvclop- 



Two unidentified Russian diplomats, right, as they entered 
the Soviet Embassy in Beirut on Thursday with a guard, a 
imfitiatnan belonging to die Progressive* Socialist. Party . 


appreciation for his help. 

Asked why he thought the Rus- 


Svirsky, the embassy doctor. 

They were kidnapped Sept. 30 in 


The former resort town com- 
mands a network of mountain 


thousand* of Indiana on Thursday 
in paying homage tu hit mother on 
the first anniversary of her assassi- 
nation. while Sikh militants in Pun- 
jab lauded her killers. 

The nation observed “National 
Integration Day" in memory of In- 
dira Gandhi, who was gunned 
down by two Sikh bodyguards at 
her home last Oct. 31. the assassi- 
nation plunged India into its worst 
sectarian violence since indepen- 
dence in W>. 

At least 15,000 policemen and 
paramilitary forces were deployed 
at a rally a i tended by Mr. Gandhi 
in New Delhi to prevent possible 
attacks by Sikh extremists. .All 
spectators passed through metal 
detectors, army helicopters hov- 
ered nearby and sharpshooters 
perched atop nearby building*. 

One of Mrs. Gandhi's alleged 
assassins. Beam Singh, was shot to 
death by the police” after she was 
hilled. The oiIot. Saiwant Singh, is 
on trial for murder. 

Sikhs say Mry Gandhi was killed 
to avenge an Indian Army assault 
on Sikh extremists in the Golden 


introduce demccracy before the 
territory reverts to Chinese sover- 
eignty in 199“. 

Hilt? ?ublic **“’? 9 VVI . lhe of Some political optimists saw the 

develop into a self-sustefning !«ai p ° lll ' cal P 301 ^ 1 ^- M candidates running for 24 seats 

suvtrmcm capable Cf boldine its ^ rom **** descriplion of ihe at- in the newly expanded Legislative 
own under Bcr ire's authority ~ lack the police suspect that the Council as a measure of how fast 
At Make are" the prtoervaiion of **« members of one of political attitudes can be awak- 

existmc freedoms "or more than 5 5 Hon S Kor S’ s ^ads. a network of ened. For many years, the assump- 
miiiic-n people ar.d Lhe continuing secrei criminal societies that uon that Hong Kong people were 
vitaliiv of the world’s ■hird-’arcest emerged in China during Ihe late apolitical, seeking only to profit 
financial center, with "foreign in* ISthcentury and has continued to from the territory's impressive eco- 
veMiuen: of more than sTf fii'ion dominate organized crime in over- nomic growth, had stood unchal- 
But British officials are faced 5635 Chinese communities. lenged. 

with an unfamiliar complication: Ng Mine-sum, a 29-year-old Most of the successful candi- 


if less official, powers. 

Less than a month after the ele- 


ments must match Beijing's blue- 
print for Hong Kong, have cast a 


lions, a gang attack on an elected shadow over the evolution of a po- 
district official provoked fierce system here. 


Some political optimists saw the 
M candidates running for 24 seats 

in the newly expanded Legislative 


vestment of more than Si .5 hiilion. ^mutate organizea enme m over- 
But British officials are fared 5635 communities, 
with an unfamiliar complication: Ng Ming-yum. a 29-year-old 


dates were political moderates, 
middle-class professionals or mer- 
chants with solid backgrounds in 
education, social or industrial 
work. The council traditionally has 
been viewed as a rubber stamp, 
composed of civil servants and gov- 
ernment appointees with close ties 
(o the British establishment. 

Under the new electoral system, 
however, only 0.5 percent "of the 
territory's population was eligible 
to vote for ihe council's elected 
seau. Under an electoral college* 
system, they voted for candidates 
from their geographical or profes- 
sional consti luenries. 

Beijing has guaranteed Britain . 
that it will leave Hong Kong's capi- 
talist system alone for 50 years af- 
ter 1997. But many community ac- . 
tivists and officials say they fear 
that the absence of a democratic 
system would allow Communist in- 
terests to fill any power vacuum 
created by Britain’s departure. 


Anti-Suharto Speech Cheered at Jakarta Trial 


Prjrer: icies and their implementation how longs to the Group of 50 dissident 

JAKARTA — Hundreds are not in line with the pledge” Mr. organization founded by retired 
cheered and applauded at a court Suharto made in 1967. miliiary officers, former "civil ser- 

Thursday wher. a leading Indone- Mr Dharsono has been charged vanu “ d ,sUmic ]wders - 
«« Jr TO’den: with writing a document with other About 300 people crowded the 

butuno of b:ca _ ^ 2 . P*®«gc to dissidents, including Mr. Sadikin, court Thursday and several hun- 


roads. The Souk eKSharb garrison t^j,. in r^isar in 19S4. 


.. , *^ h would 

iir?? St 

Mai (lu, 

; ieT naiyofl jjiJ 
- " n defense. If 
-.cnirng b> 


sans were released whOe 1 ] West- West Bdrw with a fourth Russian, has been loval to the Christian ii,,/ -c f:i L. 

emers were still being held, Mr. . Arkadi Katkov, 32, a consular sec- president in Lebanon’s 10-year civ- culaLej :„, rt Jh e jlL_i e 
Suslikov said: “Maybe it’s because rctarv. by the hitherto unknown IT war. . 


% - * a if UIVIIUUIUK wujii ■ MAW X*U« 1A UUtI~ 

govern the nation constitutionally, ^ proseci nion charges was dred outside listened to the pro- 
Aii Sadikin. a retired general and aimed at toppling the govemmenL ceedings on loudspeakers. They 
former governor of Jakarta, who Diplomatic observers said Lhe cheered and applauded Mr. Sadi- 


Suslikov said; “Maybe it’s because reiary, by the hitherto unknown 
we have many friends in Lebanon Mami e Liberation Or ganizati on. 


and Syria." 


SS", inTn,-^v, TT “ ' Thursday and praised Beam Singh 

bafic Liberation Orgaruzauon, ffg^Q^g tapered off after as “a martyr and heroic warrior of 

Pr?*: ^ ^ unru three and a half hours when a the Sikh nation." Manv chanted 


oiicininmiainmimisis. cease-fire was called, but new fight- slogans for a separate Sikh nation 

MX. Katkovs body was touna hmkie out s«ml h,« !.u<*r and earned banners ovine: “Sikhs 


^.Kar^sa^^eareha^y 

f 31 ^ mleased- We Mr- Katko* body was found - broke out several hours later, 

hope that all other hostages will be Oct 2. on a garbage dump in south rJLecajd 
freed in the near future." Beirut. He bad been shot. ______ 

Six Americans, four Frenchmen The pro-Syrian Beirut daily ach- i ~ 


freed in the near future." 

Six Americans, four Frenchmen 


police said. 


and canted banners saying: “Sikhs 
are slaves in India. U'e wilfhe free.” 


former governor of Jakarta, who Diplomatic observers said Lhe 
was testifying at Lhe subversion tri- trial offered a rare platform for 
al of another rerired general and criticism of the military-backed Su- 
dose friend. Hanono Dharsono. hano govemmenL 
smd Mr. Suharto had railed to keep Nlr 58 ^ ^ 

his promise after iS years in power. lv aUended ^ lriaJ< b aj^s sa- 
“That was some premise," he luted by security officials when he 
said, adding that “government pol- enters ihe court, although he be- 


cheered and applauded Mr. Sadi- 
kin's testimony in full view of 
armed police and units of military 
police. 

The document in question gave a 
dissident account of an incident 
SepL 12 in a poor section of north 
Jakarta, where troops clashed with 


protesters stirred by fiery Islamic 
sermons critical of Nlr. Suharto. 

Mr. Sadikin, who called the doc- 
ument mild, told the court that re- 
ports he received said the number 
of casualties was higher th^n the 
official figure. He said he had a list 
of 50 people believed to have beer, 
missing since the demonstration 

He said accounts by witnesses 
had shown that troops wildly 
opened fire into the crowd, that 
army trucks had run over the dead 
and injured, and that corpses were 
taken away in army trucks. The 
document had sought an indepen- 
dent investigation of the protest. 


and one Briton are still being held Charq said Thursday that Mr. Kat- 


inWiuS $ 
AfflenaW 

‘V. 

Ji.-w-mg atretajofe 

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-- Itcrd-linenintfe; 

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• radanoBki 

TttiiuaJ defeiat tae 

vs!;Ee 3Eti an ^ 

• chose to brim 
-* Moswtte 
•' sent Tut Sms': 

• irdodtstlate 
“ r- 'iJjmo plot ton 
. ■ .*:C.- ■:>( ricoaraadr 
• u.!;-. thus aulissi 

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"*. •. .._*A is the SSK.K*. 

_ ;... it theradtresc 
• '••• c--tiatdKRnssafe 
■ ji.aeoitfua^ 

' V •SaikiDicdmcoEa 
. ' -_irj lUeonltidc 
: radar it Kh? 

■.••InioD.Iiffleaifc 
.re ruius! a refet 
. ■ ■ — -::e defenscinifc- 


hostage in Lebanon. 

Asked whether his government 
was trying to secure their release, 
Mr. Karami said, “There is no 
doubt that the government is carry- 
ing out its duties with various par- 
ties involved in the case of releasing 
all the hostages." 

A . police spokesman said the 
three Russians were driven to a 
crossroads about 100 yards (90 me- 
ters) from the embassy's main gate 
and freed. 

He said that the Russians, in 


kov was IdDed because be tried to 
escape. It gave no further details. • 
Doctors who examined Mr. Kat- 
kov’s body said he was killed by a 
single shot -in the head but had 
other gunshot wounds. 

Meanwhile. Israeli warplanes 
staged a 40- mim ne mock air raid 
Thursday in central and eastern 
Lebanon, and govonmem troops 
clashed in artillery duels with Syri- 
an-backed -Druze militiam en near 
Beirut, police reported. 

They said an army sergeant and 
a ctvQxan were killed and nine otb- 


Flying on via Switzerland is very easy. 




track suits, walked barefoot into ers were wounded in the battles 


the embassy. 

The embassy's physician has or- 
dered that they have no visits. - 


around the strategic hilltop town of 
Souk el-Gharb, seven miles (11 ki- 
lometers) eastof Beirut. Four of the 


The three are Oleg Spirin, a press wounded were soldiers, the rest 
attach^; Yaleiy Mnkov, a com- were civilians. 




on Terrorism 


* r - : 


■ i... if thfiadvsc % Robin Toner 

■ : • V C-i tianheltasafe .Vw York Tima Service , 

: • jioteo WUffltSE WASHINGTON - Marilyn 
' ».* •» >'■; .r. iwhiwma KKnghoffcr, whose husband was 
' "_itj iThcoolude killed in the hijacking of the Achille 

rahr Lauro. delivered an impassioned 
• • •.•"'’uoaliiKBifc P 1 ® 3 here for a worldwide commit- 
•* '•’imiannfcc 1X1011 10 combat terrorism, which 
~:.\L called “the gravest danger con- 

...t^^isl^fr^bngthecivilizedwotld.".- 
"* ; ;. T “I believe that, my husband’s 
lit death has made a difference in the 
• . : r-c u. wa y iJiai people now peredve their 

ii« wen vulnerability," Mrs. Klinghoffer 

' " •' told the House Foreign Affairs 
ci'iros-***® 1 Subcomminee on International 

•-* jaB); Operations. “I bdieve that, what 

- happened to the passengers bn the 

■; j.% tl« . Adnlle Laura, and to my family, 

CU walfe : 03X1 happen to anyone, at any time, 

yjj-Ticat at any place." 

•.-..jj ijuiW Mrs. Klinghoffer, 58, urged ap- 

. . .iuinJi'n.iWJjS proval of a resolution, introduced 
. •• s-jBifelfc®"?, 

, ,-ar Jiod a 5t 

' ! 

. 7.' ’..irfod*** 1 '. 

• - '7. def 








" - H< (J resolution condemns the hijacking 1X1 ® 11 did not deal with the details 
V ’ dcffflws iJj. of the Italian liner Ocl 7 “and the her ordeal, but' raiher focused 
■ •’*- lioi *■ 'S’ cowardly and brutal” killing of broadly on the issue cf terrorism. 
7.77 ;ocs %■ Leon Klinghoffer, 69, who used a Ixx her dosing comments, she said, I 

r c ntt?*' “An its lafffrt virtrm T hrfna to vrm 


.'7-0!^^ 

■ V.V 

' a‘?£t 


* 


Marilyn KEngboffer 


by Representative Theodore S. 

Weiss, a Democrat who represents w * x ° i once and fra-. all of hijacking 
the 17th Congressional District of and ihe.toidng of bostaga.” 

New York, in which she lives. That- hire. KnqgbofFer’s brief state- 


ex’s brief state- 


wheelchair. 

It also urges President Ronald 
Reagan to call an international 
meeting “to determine the steps 
which must be taken to rid the 


High Court Rides 
In Kahane 9 s Favor 

RcWfTS 

TEL AVIV — Israel's Supreme 


“As its latest victim, I bring to you 
also the lament cf the martyrs and 
the survivors that have gone be- 
fore," listing modem terrorist at- 
tacks. 

The House subcommittee heard 
Mrs. Klingjboffer’s testimony os 
pan of a continuing review of ter- 
rorism and anti-terr o ri sm activi- 
ties. The panel also heard Wednes- 
day from Robert "B. Oakley, 
director of the State Department's 
office for counterterrorism and 
emergency planning. 

Mr. Oakley said the hijacking 



O^urt rated Thursday that Rabbi ha ^' ‘^.^nS ^reS^ and 
MeirKabane may legally sponsor deiennumijon lo continue the fight 
anti-Arab l^islaupn in parliament affains . t , hf . ^ 


■ 


- '.i i * * 

• • U'« • 


wiu-niou m fjoi Miuni against lie scourge of international 

even if.it damaged the country's * 

.u-. _ j„ In other action Wednesday, the 
IctUiI StffrXiSSn chairman of the Senate Judicial? 

Committee, Strom Thurmond. R<s 
the parliamem, must allow Rabbi pf South Carolina, said he 

Kahane to introduce suchbiUs woujd introduce le^slation to per- 

^/? Cy * pr0p01l ^« «?NS nut the death pen^for terrorists 
views and raise memorus of Nazi ^ m 

anu-semiusm. ■ 

Rabbi Kahane. who campaigns 

for lhe expulsion of Arabs from 

Israel, sued parliamentary leaders WORLDWIDE 
for barring him fromjntroducing EjVTERTAINMKNT 

legislation they viewed as racist. 

His bills would strip non- Jews of 

Israeli citizenship and prevent mar- 

riages between Jews and gentiles,. I - . J 


WORLDWIDE 

EWERTAJWMEVr 


'^4 

■ '>• . . Cftf t. 




THE 

PRIMAL INSTITUTE 

of Los Angeles 

is pleased Jo armounoB dial Mw’- 
vi«ws tier preqpednw potisnts win b# 
conducted in London by VIVIAN 
JANOV on Friday, Nov. 15, IMS. 
.For infan na tio n about fills or lhe 
New. ITfii WlawHjp flwop/ week 
please contort-. . . 

Ihe Primal fratitute, . 
2215 Cofay Ave^ 

Los Angeles, Ca. 90064 USA 
{713)478-0169’. 


Discover 
the charms 
of the city 

Yab Yum 


apg^sais, Amstertterti 

l Ait major cradii jrards accepted- 


^ -UK 


But also very hard. 

Our timetable shows in impressive fashion just how attractive Switzerland is. With extremely short transit 
times and excellent connections in Geneva and Zurich, Swissair makes it thoroughly easy for its passengers 
to fly on to 44 European cities or to Africa, Asia, North and South America. And what happens? Instead 
of the short stopover; many passengers prefer a slightly longer stay in Switzerland with its almost un- 
limited possibilities. A sure sign that the land of Swissair, apart from being unusually well located, is also 
an unusually beautiful turntable for journeys to Europe and overseas. swissair 







Page 6 


oscow 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* FRIDA V, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


INTERMEDIATE-RANGE MISSILE DEPLOYMENT 


U.S. - NATO 


By Gary Lee 

Il'axfctsifriNi Pal Scn-.-it* 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
has submitted a draft agreement on 
arms control issues for U.S. en- 
dorsement during the November 
summit meeting in Geneva, accord- 
ing to diplomatic sources in Mos- 
cow. 

The draft outlines the “agree- 
ment in principle" on space and 
nuclear arms issues that the Krem- 
lin says it is seeking at the summit 
meeting, the sources said. It is seen 
as part of Moscow's intensified bid 
to reach an accord with Washing- 
ton at the current Geneva arms 
talks. 

Foreign Minister Eduard A. She- 
vardnadze. after calling publicly at 
the United Nations last week for 
the two sides to adopt an agree- 
ment in principle, submitted the 
text to US. officials last Friday, the 
sources said. 

The draft is to serve for discus- 
sion and possible agreement by 

Restore Ties, 
Moscow Urged 

(Continued from Page 1) 
taken without Moscow's approval 
and probably its instigation. State 
Department officials said. 

Or the Warsaw Pact nations, 
only Romania did not end ties with 
Israel in 1967. 

H Hungary, Yugoslavia Ties 
Hungary and Yugoslavia have 
agreed with Israel to exchange rep- 
resentatives. following the example 
of Poland, United Press Interna- 
tional quoted press and radio re- 
ports as saying Thursday. 

Israel radio said Hungary would 
soon exchange representatives with 
Israel with the Israeli representa- 
tive having an office in an embassv 
in Budapest. 

The Ha'aretz newspaper said the 
Israeli office in Yugoslavia would 
be opened in Belgrade. 

Earlier Thursday, Foreign Min- 
ister Yi tzhak Shamir told Israel 
television that “another Eastern 
European country" would ex- 
change envoys with Israel after Po- 
land did. 

Israeli Town Made Duty-Free 

The A.ttividicJ Fret j 
TEL AVIV — Israel's southern 
resort of Eilat has heen made a 
dut\-free zone in an effort to in- 
crease the town's flagging econo- 
my. Mayor Rafi Hochman said 
Thursday. 


President Ronald Reagan and Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev in Geneva on 
Nov. 19 and 20. 

In Washington, a White House 
spokesman. Edward P. Djcrejian. 
would not comment on the report. 
But sources said the text of a Soviet 
statement had been brought to die 
United States by the Soviet foreign 
minister. 

Last Tuesdav. a While House 
spokesman. Larry Speak es. said. 
"We don't have any agreement 
with the Soviets to develop a com- 
munique. or a statement of princi- 
ples. We do not oppose one. but 
we're not seeking one." 

Soviet officials' efforts to create 
an impression of momentum in Ge- 
neva are expected to reach a climax 
next week during preparatory dis- 
cussions in Moscow for ihe summit 
meeting. 

Senior Kremlin officials are be- 
lieved likely to seek preliminary ap- . 
proval of ihe text by Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz, who is con- 
ferring with Soviet leaders Monday 
and Tuesday. 

Soviet spokesmen and U.S. Em- 
bassy personnel in Moscow have 
declined to comment on the text. 
But a Western diplomat said one 
ICremlin objective is “hard commit- 
ments" from the Reagan adminis- 
tration on limiting the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, a research pro- 
gram into space-based defense. 

Other Western analysts familiar 
with the rough oullin- of the pro- 
posal said it probably would in- 
clude the 50-percent cut in nuclear 
weapons arsenals that Soviet nego- 


tiators in Geneva already have pro- 
posed as a trade-off For US. can- 
cellation of SDL 

The draft is also thought to pro- 
pose a system of verification for a 
pan on nuclear testing that the 
Russians previously have pro- 
posed. 

A comprehensive U.S. response 
to these Soviet proposals is expect- 
ed to be made soon. 

Days after submitting the text of 
a draft accord for the summit meet- 
ing. Soviet sources publicized 
through the Western press that Ye- 
lena G. Bonner. 60. wife of Ihe 
Soviet dissident. Andrei D. Sakha- 
rov. had been given permission to 
leave the Soviet Union to receive 
medical treatment. 

The sources also revealed that 
Russian negotiators in Geneva had 
offered to scrap work on the Kras- 
noyarsk radar installation, in cen- 
tral Siberia, which the United 
SiaLes says violates current ac- 
cords. in exchange for U.S. cancel- 
lation of plans to improve radar 
stations in Greenland and Britain. 

In Moscow. Soviet officials have 
projected an image of flexibility to 
WesLem diplomats with the ap- 
proach of Mr. Shultz's visit. 

"They appear likely to make 
compromises on some other issues 
before and during the summit." a 
senior Western diplomat in Mos- 
cow said, "and to publicize them.” 

Speculation persists in Moscow 
that the Russians will make a major 
public relations move to curry fa- 
vor with the West before the sum- 
mit meetina. 


GROUND-LAUNCHED 
CRUISE MISSILES 
(1 Warhead Each) 

Range: 1,500 miles 
DEPLOYMENT: 

June *85 80 


DEPLOYED IN: 
BRITAIN, BELGIUM. ITALY 


PERSHING (1 
MISSILES 
(l Warhead Each) 

Range: 1,000 miles 

DEPLOYMENT: 

June '85 54 

DEPLOYED IN: 

WEST GERMANY 



SOVIET 

UNION 


ml 


IMF Delays Manila Loan 

With U.S. Concurrence 



\ V 


SS20 MISSILES 
(3 Warheads Each) 

Range: 2.500 miles 
DEPLOYMENT: 

Jtme , 85 m -.--441 _ _ 

DEPLOYED THROUGHOUT 

SOVIET UNION 





\°a. 



c J / 

Vj 1 




Li j \ 




""Hr t" 




(Continued from Pag* 11 ^ 
The SI 13 million was scheduled 
to be paid Sept. 1. and the delay 

effectively halts disbursement l of 
5453 million from a 5658-nuijion 
loan the IMF made in Decern rer. 
AID officials said, 

Mr. Wdfowiiz said the Reaun 
administration had given the IMF 
its "strong support" in its efforts to 
break up the monopolies, which are 
widely viewed as being controlled 
bv close associates of Mr. Marcos. 

’ “We have noi yet seen any sub- 
stantial reform implementation." 
he added . . , 

.An IMF spokesman said the 
fund was reviewing Manila's per- 
formance in adopting promised re- 
forms and had yet “to come to 
terms on criteria" before releasing 
any more money. 

Mr. Greenleaf disclosed that the 
United States in September had 
. withheld S3 9 million in develop- 
ment assistance for a rural farm 
credit program until Manila lifted 
restrictions on import licences for 
the private sector. 


The committee chairman. Sena- ^ 
w r Richard G. Lugar. Republican 
of Indiana, warned that "our pa- . 
tience is about rur. out" with Mr." ■ 

Marcos- . . j J | 

■ ‘Other Action’ Seen 

Senator Dave Durenbexger. a , - 
Republican of Minnesota who is l- \ ■ 
ehjunrun of the intelligence amk" ■* [ > ' 
nance, recently tcM an inwrticwcr - 
for National Public Radio that if\ J 

ihe negative trends in the Philip- i > | 
pines continued. U.S. intelligence,. ;fU 8 
agencies might have to take “other*. . »* 
action." The New York Tunes re- 
ported Wednesday from Washing-^ 
ton. • - .7 

Mr. Durenberger declined (4 
specify' what action he bud in mind, . 
but he pointed wit that, ia 19^ 
intelligence agencies were not usaf. 
to help organize an alternative j p ~ 

the Sandints i rebels taking power 
in Nicaragua. 

"We don't intend to make that r 
mistake in the Philippines, the" 
president doesn't intend ux make * 
that mistake.** the senator said. 


[hi 




For Many Among Japanese 
Progress Is a Sewer System 


Mmmffiiiins 


New U.S. Arms Proposal Is Expected 


Arms Study Says U.S . , Soviet 
Prepare Major Deployments 

Reuters 

LONDON — The United States and the Soviet Union have laid the 
groundwork in the past year for the deployment of new and deadlier 
nuclear systems, the International Institute for Strategic Studies 
concluded Friday in its annual review. 

The London-based institute said that, while there have been no 
dramatic changes in the past year in the deployed nuclear weapon 
systems on either side, both superpowers will be deploying new 
svsttms over the next few years while improving the weapons first 
deployed in the 197Q> and early 19S0s. 

While the U.S. defense secretary. Caspar W. Weinberger, said 
recently that the Soviet Union had deployed mobile SS-25 missiles, 
the institute added information on a second mobile missile, the SS-24. 
The SS-24 also is reportedly dose to deployment in silos and then 
possibly in mobile launchers. 

The institute said there was a 37-percent increase in the number of 
Soviet strategic nuclear warheads over the past three years compared 
to a 10-percenl increase in U.S. warheads. 

The United Slates is estimated to have 10.174 strategic nuclear 
warheads with an estimated yield of 3.625 megatons. The Soviet 
Union has at least 9.987 warheads yielding about 5.837 megatons. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
will be promoted in Mr. Reagan's 
scheduled address to the nation be- 
fore he leaves for Geneva, the 
sources said. 

Meanwhile, administration offi- 
cials said that the Soviet Union, in 
a recent informal discussion at Ge- 
neva, suggested an agreement on 
intermediate-range nuclear missiles 
that included as a first step a freeze, 
beginning Dec, 1. on U.S. and Sovi- 
et forces now in the field. 

The next stage of the Soviet plan, 
covering a period of 18 months, 
would involve a reduction in the 
number of U.S. single- warhead 
cruise missiles deployed in Western 
Europe to between 100 and 120, 
and the removal of U.S. Pershing-2 
missiles based in West Germany. 

The Russians then would reduce 
their triple-warhead SS-20 medi- 
um-range missile force in Europe 
so that they had the same number 
of warheads on their SS~20s as did 
the remaining U.S. cruise missiles 
together with British and French 
missile forces. 

Mr. Gorbachev said early in Oc- 
tober that the Soviet Union was 






reducing the number of SS-20s in 
Europe to 243. and proposed to 
freeze the remaining SS-20s in 
Asia. 

The SovieL leader did not specify 
from wfaat level the reductions 
would be figured, but there are be- 
lieved to be about 300 S5-20s in 
Europe. The United States plans to 
deploy 464 ground-launched cruise 
missiles and 108 Pershing-2 mis- 
siles, for a total of 572 missiles. 

Most of the Pershing- 2s already 
are deployed. More than 128 
ground-launched cruise missiles 
are in place. 

The primary U.S. objection to 
the Soviet proposal has been, that it 
counted medium-range missiles de- 
ployed bv the United States in 
Western Europe, including bombs 
on fighter-bombers, as "strategic" 
weapons. The U.S. response will 
elimina te all medium-range weap- 
ons from the count of strategic mis- 
siles, officials said. 

By the U.S. estimate of strategic 
weapons, the Russians have 6,400 
land-based missile warheads and 
2j50Q submarine warheads com- 
pared with 2,130 land-based and 
5370 sea-based warheads for the 
U.S. side. 

The UJS. response, in its drafted 
form, would call for each side to cut 
the combined total of warheads by 
half. 


■ Lubbers Rejects Delay 

Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers 
said Thursday he had rejected an 
invitation by the Soviet authorities 
to discuss the projected deploy- 
ment of cruise missiles in the Neth- 
erlands. The Associated Press re- 
ported from The Hague. 

The Soviet invitation included as 
a condition a postponement of a 
government decision on deploy- 
ment of cruise missiles. Friday's 
decision is expected to be in favor 
of deployment of the 48 North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization medi- 
um-range missiles in 1988. 

Mr. Lubbers told Parliament 
that he had received a cable signed 
by his Soviet counterpart Nikolai 
I. Ryzhkov, inviting him for talks 
“anywhere." 

"It would not be right to post- 
pone the decision once" more," Mr. 
Lubbers said, “and so it would not 
be right to accept the invitation." 


Wallace Has Polyp Removed 

The Associated Pros 

MONTGOMERY, Alabama — 
Governor George C. Wallace had a 
polyp removed from his colon 
Thursday, and Ms physician said it 
did not appear to be cancerous. His 
doctor said it was similar to one he 
had removed two years ago. 


( Con tinned from Page I) 
without, there are some minor rum- 
blings of discontent. 

Mrs. Sugimoto. for example, is 
tired of living without sewers. For 
20 years, she has covered her drains 
with nylon stockings, the better to 
filter out impurities that back up 
septic tanks. Every few years, when 
the septic tank will absorb no more 
water and begins to smell, her fam- 
ily must pay to have a new one dug. 

“I’ve tried to be patient for 20 
years." she said. “But ! feel 1 can't 
put up with it much longer." 

Mrs. Sugimoto. who is 43 years 
old. and a group of like-minded 


attract more people to an already-' 
overcrowded Tokyo, and land' , 
prices have soared as a result 

To get more space.- people rnnsr* 
move farther from Tokyo and en- 
dure the resulting commutes. To- 
kyo-area residents spend an aver- 
age of 91 minutes a day . 
commuting, and polls show iba’i . 
almost a third spend from two to-- 
four hours a day going to and from \ 
work. • 

The Sugimoto home 1 is on the 
large side, with two small bed-' 
rooms downstairs and three up-„. . 
stairs, two of which the Sugimoto* . 
rent to boarders; a kitchen with 


neighbors have become emsadera ™7orTsSB litehfc &*k.' 
foraKwtrsvstOT_ m Ta , raga»T!i 0 - mow’s slodv. which is DlKredlS .[■ 
sui. lobbying thar local govern- dubs, OntbiH bus and ah 
10 opconslmctron. Bnt ^ , Woo( b | 2 .foo,(i7- 

bysttn ntft budga s snd^ 1 ^ ££r by 36-macO worn ttat 
disputes alwttt where a treatment s^ves as combination family and • 
plant would be built, she has re- 1 u 

drived little assurance that sewers .... 

will come to her town soon. ,'fn Ihe kitchen. Mrs Sugimoto " 

After the lack of sewers, Mrs. has to make do with less tban many 
Sugimoto and her friends believe American housewives. She cook’s; 
the toughest problem facing the on a two-burner portable range, ” 
Japanese is the expense of land and and has a small oven. When she 
the resulting crowded housing. The washes dishes, without the aid of £j| 
problem is particularly acute in To- dishwasher, she tries to scrimp on ■ 
kyo. which has the best jots and the soap, kst the residue dog the septic 
least space. It is not unusual for a * .. 


couple with a young baby to live in To wash clothes. Mrs. Sugiraota 

one roam with a small kitchen and must fssl Ell up her nonautomatic . 
hath. _ . washing machine with water, drain 

According to Japan’s construe- the water after the wash cycle, add' 
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WEEKEND 


Page 7 


y&The Culturifi 


'Jg-g-.V;— .i?_ _ • _■ 

'•ii 


i[fe^ 





ARJS — Jazz, comic strips* rock — 
Jack La ng , t be French minister of 
culture seems ready to snhnrttw. 
anything that moves, the French 
Le Poii 


riv 

£ /x 


/I \ 


«a -V. 


:;;v£4. 

’A,.' magazine Le Point says. Says The Econo- 

' E 1 n ?*!' ^ °^y ^ Freocharts had the vitality 

■ n * Ok of T ^eirendy Mr. Lang." .• 

J . ” France’s tong-awaited cultural expio- 

“ ston seems confined to the combustible per- 
son of Mr. Lang, he has managed tocompen- 
^ s ate f or the lack of major artistic creation by 
promoting to the position of fine arts crafts 
'Dfth/V ““ h f, ve . lon S been accepted simply as 
rUlIft agreeable mgredients of French daily Me. . 
C ^ C0U P^ e of years ago, he announced that 

1 “/ jJVtffih. *?“ eoutur * ^ really culture. Now he has 
J °*m(J decreed that the culinary arts cun in effect be 
considered art with a capita] A. 

The government has just awarded a frve- 
milii on-franc subsidy to the support and 
> expansion of the. culinary arts, much of 
ich will fund a school thai will open next 


in,ol ^Ja j 




■■«csl 


f **< 




to- 


Mary Blume 


. ... '■•■ u Wcib fc 

•: J] „ Wt; _____ 

• , n ' | Dlll{. 

. Jnj pj, iL year outside Lyon. It is to be called the Ecole 
; Nationale des Arts Culinaires and the fact 

l ’ a J-.' w 1 ’ t ^ ial ^ abbreviation, ENAC, is so dose to 
• e ENA, the abbreviation for France’s elite 
academy for aspiring national leaders, its 
,j.‘ purely uncoinddentaL 

. ..." “ ,1 - 1 ^ The cul unification of cooking began last 

■ .t ^ February when Lang and Michel Rocard, 

■ “ “i the minister of agriculture who has «»* 

. ljr<lL ' r s > Ijj/ resigned, commissioned the journalist ^d 

author Jean Femiot to write a report on the 
Muring. present and future of cooking and the food 
f.- industry. 

.1 _ i*i Cfr Femiot, 67, has for a long time been a 
- twiMq ^ restaurant critic and he has the sleek, cou- 
''■nwui 4 i w | t tented mi of a cat who has often supped on 
VT - exquisitely prepared canaries. His second 

•„ l wife, in an attempt to efficiently eradicate 
fe their social obligations, once scheduled five . 
i&fe. dinner parties on five successive Wednes- 
' . & days, each with the same food and wines. By 

Pwiit: the third Wednesday Fepnioi was distinctly 




ihcSiaaa; 
■"••" .trill lL ii 



classic re^onal 
ri-.idueitt Femiot- certainly agrees with Jade Lang 
that cooking is an an — perhaps the greatest 
r .hhiiVnv- o f 811 he says. 

• * :!! uplusiK “Some people consecrate themselves, to 
- fine Mil ta pmoting or to music, but to me cooking 
> ihenitit surpasses the other arts because it involves 
.. ;’ lT jjj, each one of our senses and also it is corrviv- 
iaL We can listen to music or lode at a 
® paintmg alone, but we gather to ergoy a 
meaL” .. 

10 published government rqx>n, Fer- 
nioi added, “cooking is an an in the full . 
meaning of the word. ... More than the 
others, it is popular, democratic. One must 
eat each day while one need not gaze upon a 
painting or listen to a concerto every 24 
hours. Man certainly cooked before punting 
the Lascaux caves." 

Man certainly did. But it is not die past 
that concerns FemioL The present need, he 
says, is to promote French cooking through- 
out the world — which wnnld also give an 
economic hype to such andOaiy industries, 
las table iineosi china and glassware, wines 
and prepared foods — and to give young 
chefs a training suited to modem rimes. 

This includes studies in such fields as 
marketing, promotion and nutrition. True, 
the present generation of globetrotting 
Freni* cooking stars — GuJSrard,. Vergt, 
Trasgros, ZBocuse — seemed to need no 
tuition in marketing or public relations but 
Femiol says that Uke Monsieur Jourdain’s 
speaking prose, they were practicing ad- 
vanced s ewing techniques without knowing 
what they were. 


for many 

J, -ho hitu* 60 * 



. - i~: jives in 


the 


HAT Femiot advocates at the new 
ENAC outside Lyon is a conmlete 
. . tr aining along the Kites of the Cuh- 
nary Institute of America, which he consid- 
. ers a model of its land. At present, he says; 

ranee has only a few schools, and the tradi- 
tional method of apprenticeship of necessity 
limits the number of potential trainees. 

The new chef will know as much about 
riboflavin as rdris. As well as an artist, he wiD 
be an ambassador. At present, Femiot notes, 
French food is as low in American populari- 


Jean Femiot . 

iy polls as a fallen souffii. only slightly 
ahead of German cooking (with 8 p e rcent m 
the votes against 6 percent) and way behind 
Italian (36 percent), Chinese (23) and Mexi- 
can (20). 

The new chef will be open to modern 
objects such as nucrowave ovens and frozen 
fish which, says Femiot, can be as good or 
better than fresh. Nor should the new chef or 
anyone else be snippy about fast foods since 
they do hot compete with haute cuisine. Says 
Fenu'ot, “One can eat fast food at noon and 
have a three-star meal at night" 

Many of Femiot’s ideas are directed to- 
ward exporting: At present mostly raw food 
and agricultural materials are exported and 
he would like to see an increase in finished 
products as wdL One might think this would 
have more to do with the Ministry of Trade 
than Culture, but, says Femiot with a shrug, 
if Culture is interested he is pleased because 
it is better than nothing. 

He is also trying to get private manufac- 
turers involved in events that would show- 
case French products, perhaps creating a 
permanent center along the lines of the 
South Street Seaport in New York. 

“Our biggest success," he says, “will come 
on die day when we can say a French wine 
really can only be property savored in 
French-made glass." 

As for the state of French cooking today, 
nouvefle cuisine may be beautiful bit is it 
art? Definitely, says Femiot, and it shows 
the curiosity and vigor of French invention 
in that its chefs took inspiration from the 
Orient and Italy and created something of 
the* own. His own taste nms more to tradi- 
tional dishes, and the quality of French pra- 
ctice, he says, has never been better. 

“I remember when cheese had worms, 
wine would often be off and fruits rotten," 
he says. To those who complain that today’s 
bread and butter don’t taste as they used to, 
he replies that tins is an age-old lament and 
that in 1854 someone named Alexis de la 
Coloin bi fere stated in an official report on 
food frauds that “Roquefort cheese isn’t 
what it used to be. It is a poor imitation often 
filled out with starch, cereals and even pota- 
to and moldy bread crumbs." 

It is an amiable idea to proclaim that 
cooking is an art — and it is certainly better 
than chewing over the question of what art is 
— but Jack Lang's proclamation seems at 
odds with a view of France stated by the late 
President Georges Pompidou and repeated 
by the present government: that the nation 
should be renowned for its technology rather 
than for the quality of its cheese. 

Doesn’t Jean Ferniot think that his plan 
wQl reinforce the old view of the French as 
pleasantly backward people wbo only care 
about food? 

“No,” he says, “because the people who 
say that still come hare to eau" ■ 


Horowitz Comes Back Once Again 


by David Stevens 


P ARIS — Vladimir Horowitz, who 
may very wdl be the last of the old- 
fashioned virtuosos and pianist* 
superstars, is back on the concert 
stage again, and Europe has him — at least 
for a series of Four redials here and in Milan. 

He is herein the flesh, that is. But while be 
is giving his concerts in person, last Saturday 
and tomorrow at 3:30 P.M. at ihc ThUtre 
des Champs- Elys6cs here and the afternoons 
of Nov. 17and 24 at the Tcairo alia Scala in 
Milan, he will also be available at Carnegie 
Hall on the evening of Nov. 15 in filmed 
form. 

The film, in stereo digital sound, was 
made earlier this year in the pianist’s town 
bouse on Manhattan's Upper East Side. It is 
a combination of a recital and what the ads 
call an “intimate evening" with Horowitz 
and his wife, Wanda, a daughter of Arturo 
Toscanini. The idea of a pianist using mod- 
em technology to lake over a concert hall 
without actually appearing on stage proba- 
bly makes history of some sari — and it is 
probably fitting that it is Horowitz who is 
tile subject of this trans-Allantic bit of show 
business. 

The concert played on the film, incidental- 
ly, will also be issued as a recording by the 
firm Deutsche Grammophon, with whom 
Horowitz recently signed a recording con- 
tract. 

Tickets for the first concert last Saturday 
did not exactly sell like ho teak es. Perhaps 
this was because the public was apprehen- 
sive that Horowitz, at 82, would not live up 
to his legend, or because be is familiar here 
almost exclusively through recordings, or 
because of negative reports of bis last emer- 
gence from retirement a couple of years ago, 
or because Saturday afternoon is an unfamil- 
iar hour for coocertgoers. or because of a 
price scale up to 1,100 francs (about J137 — 
the film at Carnegie Hall has a 57.50 top). 

Nevertheless, the Theatre des Champs- 
Bysfees was parked when — 34 years to the 
day since his last Paris concert, and on the 
same stage — Horowitz emerged carefully 
from the wings and showed that he could 



Vladimir Horov.ii z in Paris the day before his first concert. 


still get an audience *0 its feet. He ignored 
the tumultuous reception, waxing his right 
hand disnrissively as if to stem the applause, 
and sat down at his own Steinway on his own 
bench, shipped from New York When the 
applause did not stop, he rose and bowed 
slightly with an impish smile. 


A little more than two hours later, when 
after two brief encores Horowitz came out 
and closed the piano lid and keyboard cover, 
the prolonged ovation was hardly less sono- 
rous. “I have young lingers," he was quoted 
as saying earlier this year, and he had proved 
it- 


What the Paris audience heard was not the 
Horowitz of legend, if by that is meant the 
pianisi of flamboyant virtuosity, of such 
circus turns as his own "Carmen" Fantasy or 
his own roof-raising arrangement of “The 

Continued on paqe fi 


After Gilels, Whither Soviet Pianism? 


by Donal Henahan 


N EW YORK — The death the oth- 
er day of Emil Gilels, a few days 
short of his 69th birthday, has 
further thinned the ranks of an 
elite group of' Soviet virtuosos who broke 
onto die international scene after World 
Warn. 

Of the three acknowledged leaders of that 

S p, only his fellow pianist Sviatoslav 
ter. soil active at age 71, is left, the 
legendary violinist David Oislrakh having 
died in 1974. The old guard of Soviet music 
is passing and the new guard, if there is one. 
is slow in ta kin g shape. 

When the truce in the Cold War was 
declared in the 1950s, the Soviet Union led 
with its three aces, beginning by sending 
Gilds, who was already greatly admired in 
musical circles as the result of occasional 
appearances in Europe and from a few high- 
ly regarded Soviet recordings. Anticipation 
therefore ran high when he made his Ameri- 
can debut in Philadelphia with the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra on OcL 3, 1955, playing the 
Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto in B-flai mi- 
nor, a performance he repeated the next 
night in Carnegie HalL Shortly thereafter he 
recorded the same concerto with the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra under Fritz Rei n er. 

It is difficult now to conjure up the mood 
of public euphoria that existed at that time. 
With Sol Hurok, the last of the impresarios, 
working wonders as a cultural intermediary, 
the long-dammed reservoir of Soviet artists 
overflowed. 

Audiences greeted the newcomers deliri- 
ously, and hyperbole was the response of 
most critics. A few- prominent critics, howev- 
er, lodged complaints about certain aspects 
of Gdels’s playing. While admiring his tech- 
nical prowess, they found fault with his mu- 
sical taste and noted a lack of sophistication 
in his interpretations. In fact, when he re- 
corded with the Chicago Symphony, there 
was some friction in rehearsals because Rei- 
ner, a famously punctilious and irascible 


man, felt the Soviet pianisi lacked intimate 
knowledge of the score. 

It may be worth remembering, of course, 
that other renowned soloists, including Jas- 
cha Heifetz and Arthur Rubinstein, were 
similarly fell not to measure up to the Reiner 
standard of musicmaking. 

As the years went on. Gilels reiurned to 
the United States often and either his sophis- 
tication grew or his critics did. The playing 
was beard to take on extraordinary finish 
and nuance of tone. He continued to please 
audiences with the big, splashy pieces such 
as the Tchaikovsky and Brahms concertos, 
but he also came to play Schubert and Mo- 
zart with a grace and elegance that somehow 
always took one by surprise. 

Compared to his colleague Richter, Gilds 
was more predictable and in some ways less 
fascinating as an artist. Richter has always 
impressed me as the introvert, the deep 
searcher, the pianist who is less concerned 
with playing all the notes in sequence than in 
being a gr rat poet, whereas Gilels generally 
left the impression that he enjoyed above all 
being a great pianist. And yet, like any true 
musician, Gilels defied easy pigeonholing. In 
his playing be could be a sensation seeker, as 
in the Paganini Variations of Brahms, but 
then he might take up Mozan and be as 
reticent and sdf -effacing as a monk. One 
moment a performance could be alive with 
crackling intensity, the next aD urbane 
charm. I have vivid recollections of Gilels 
recitals in which two different pianists might 
have been performing. One was in 1977 
when he played Schumann’s “Carnaval" in 
as brusque and unfeeling a manner as yon 
could imagine and then returned after inter- 
mission to give performances of Rachmani- 
noff and Scriabin that were technically stun- 
ning and suffused with ardent lyricism. 

His final appearance here in 1 9S3 came as 
a surprise. Gilds had not appeared in New’ 
York for six years but suddenly showed up in 
midseason, on short warning, for a Carnegie 
HaU redial For muc h erf the program he was 
in a mood to hammer away impresshdy in 


his big virtuoso Style, but my keenest memo- 
ry is of some finely wrought small pieces of 
Brahms. He kepi one guessing. 

In spite of his cautious speech and stiff 
manners, he was not, I think, an entirely 
inscrutable person. I met him only once, just 
before his 1977 redial here. 

Wicked speculation had been going 
around at the time that his pride was injured 
by the attention bang lavished on other 
Soviet pianists, Lazar Berman in particular, 
and that he wanted to reclaim his New York 
title from the contenders. In his interview’. 
Gilds expressed astonishment that anyone 
would impute such a motive to him. but then 
could not resist performing a half-panto- 
mimed, off-the-record putdown of Berman. 

Gilels was a typical Soviet artist of his 
time in that he played his cards extremely 
close to the vest when dealing with the West- 
ern press. By the time of the aforementioned 
interview, hie understood English quite well 
and spoke it confidently. In addition to his 
linguistic aides, his interview entourage in- 
cluded his wife, his daughter and two Ameri- 
can press agents. 


P ART of Gilds's caution and suspicion 
no doubt stemmed from his precari- 
ous position as a Jew and an honored 
Soviet artist in a period of great tension for 
Soviet Jews. Like both Oistrakh and Richter, 
he was from Odessa, a city that once had one 
of the largest Jewish populations in the Sovi- 
et Union and traditionally was the cultural 
center erf the Ukraine. 

It is an area that also produced Sol Hurok, 
which must have helped to cement his spe- 
cial relationship with the three foremost So- 
viet musicians. In the 1960s, when disrup- 
tions of American concerts by the Jewish 
Defense League and other groups were a 
constant threat, all Soviet performers came 
to be apprehensive. Some, including Richter, 
were clearly terrified. After one particularly 
bad experience in 1970 — a duo recital with 
David Oistrakh that was interrupted by pro- 


testers who stormed up the aisles yelling 
anti-Soviet slogans and climbed onto the 
stage before being wrestled down by security 
guards — he stopped coming altogether. He 
has not been heard in New York since. 

The defections of Soviet artists, which 
began when Rudolf Nureyev jumped the 
ship in Paris in 1961, laid all touring Soviet 
performers under suspicion and particularly 
increased the tension under which Gilds and 
his Jewish colleagues had to function. How- 
ever. unlike such subsequently disenchanted 
artists as Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Mikhail 
Baryshnikov, Alexander Godunov, Natalia 
Makarova, Kiri! Kondrashin. Vladimir Ash- 
kenazy, Maxim Shostakovich. Mstislav Ro- 
stropovich and Galina Vishnevskaya, Gilds 
obviously never found life in his native land 
so intolerable that he found it necessary to 
give up his special status and privileges as a 
hero of Soviet art. 

And now the postwar heroes of Soviet an 
arejust about gone. After Gilds and Richter, 
for instance, who will be nominated to cam’ 
the banner of Soviet pianism? Ashkenazy 
was the most likely candidate at one time, 
but he long ago chose to live abroad, as did 
Bella Davidovich and Youri Egorov. Ber- 
man, still only 55 years old. is certainly 
young enough, but his reputation has slipped 
considerably in recent years. That leaves a 
cadre of comparative youngsters led by An- 
drei Gavrilov and Alexander Toradze’ each 
of whom has adherents though neither has 
veL begun to acquire the prestige of their 
hallowed elders. 

Idly however. 1 wonder what would be our 
reaction to these two superb young pianists 
if they had been sequestered for 20 years and 
all we knew of them was hearsay and what 
could be gleaned from poorly made or pirat- 
ed engines take over? Might they not be 
welcomed as if they were Gilels and Richter 
reincarnated? To find out we might need 
another World War and Cold War, and I 
imagine even piano buffs would think that a 
high price to pay. ■ 

I’^S Thr VVh Y.-ri Ti/nr. 


.. . jc Cn? 13 

.J. J (ll.l • ** 

... • ?l>fl L ’ JI ’ 

. ■ -son- 

' 

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j.;.W A” 


Robert Wilson and the Importance of Silences 


-sllS 1 


■ tan* 

,! V** . 

; 

'llF 



by Margaret Croyden 

-j- EW YORK — At the. Brooklyn 
I Academy of Muse, Robert Wil- 
[ son is watching a run-through of 
JL x his new play. The set is op, the 
lights are up, the actors are in costume. From 
the proscenium hangs a scrim embroidered 
in gold .with the name of the play: “The 
^Golden Windows." On a raked stage, a deal 
man, noose-around his neck, is suspended in 
space. Behind Mm stands a blade bouse 
resembling a sentry box, with a shaft ©flight 
glaring through the slightly Often door. Lying 
downstage and looking up at the corpse is a 
girl draped in white. _ 

The night is starry; the. moon is high. An 
amplified voice whistles “A Bicycle Built for 
Two.” After a long wait, the dead man 
speaks: “But it is time to withdraw.- The 
actors are getting ready to begin. Maestro, 
the overture.” The corpse disappears into the 
flies; an overture from John Gay’s “Beggar’s 
Opera” is heard, and “The Golden Win- 
dows*’ unfolds. 

This work, which was written, directed 
and designed by Robert Wilson and was fust 
presented in 1982 at the Munich Kammer- 
spiele to unanimo us critical accla im , has just 
opened as part of the Next Wave Festival of ' 
the Brooklyn Academy, where Wilson’s 
“Einstein on the Beach,” an opera with nai- 
sic by Philip Glass, had a successful revival 

lastyear. . ' 

For many years, during which Wilson cre- 
ated 10 m^or stage pieces and numerous 
smaller ones (several sponsored - by the 
Brooklyn Academy), his theater work — - a 


blend oi dreamlike collages and fragmented, 
alow-moving action — was appreciated 
mainly by avant-garde experimentalists and 
Post-Modernists. 

Until now, the 43-year-old Wilson, who 
was boro in Texas, has worked almost exclu- 
sively in Europe, where be found enthusias- 
tic audiences and substantial funding for bis 
large, epic works, and where he still has 
important commitments. In 1984 he corn- 
pitted “the CIVIL warS" (originally sched- 
uled for the 1984 Olympic Am Festival but 
canceled for -fack of money), a nine-hour 
spectacle depicting personal and political 
disconL Sections of “the CIVIL warS" were 
performed in Europe and the United States, 
and the entire production is scheduled to be 
staged-in Texas next FalL 

Wilson, who in Europe is considered a 
theatrical genius, finally seems to be achiev- 
ing broad artistic recognition in his native 
lantLSome critics have predicted that he will 
become a major force in the revival of visual 
theater, , whidi was in the ascendancy when 
his ca reer began in the 1960s but was subse- 
quently; overtaken by traditional American 
naturalism. 

“The Golden Windows,” though highly 
visual, is a departure from Wilson’s virtually 
nonverbal and lengthy creations. Tt is com- 
posed of -language integrated with image, 
sound and space, and is constructed with the 
. riagfitcaf unities in mind. It lasts less than 
two bows, there are only four characters, 
.there is one set (black and white) and one 
timo span — evening, midnight and early 
morning. There are simple cos mines de- 
signed by Quistophe De Mend, and taped 
music -god '.sound. 


Wilson has collaborated with an audio 
specialist, Hans Peter Kuhn, to create what 
he calls- a “floating sound collage" in which 
sounds will reverberate all over the theater. 
The actors perform with body microphones; 
their live voices are used in conjunction with 
their preiaped ones. All but one role is dou- 
ble cast. 


T HE title “The Golden Windows" de- 
rives from a from fairy tale: A boy 
sees a house in the distance that, from 
his perspective, has gold windows. When he 
draws nearer there is only a co mm on farm- 
house with ordinary windows. Later in the 
story, he sees a plain house, his own, which 
seems to have turned gold doe to the light of 
the sun. The fable and the play share a 
similar image: A house’s appearance 
changes with the change in time and perspec- 
tive. 

Bui the piece has no linear plot- Wilson 
works like a poet using metaphors and sym- 
bols. Four unnamed people — a young girl 
and boy and an older man and woman, 
designated only by numbers in the text and 
distinguished by what they wear — move 
about and speak in non sequimrs. Sentences 
are piled on top of each other; ideas are 
dissociated and disordered The characters 
seem to be remembering or re-enacting past 
relationships, but they and their motives 
remain enigmatic. 

Perhaps Wilson is expressing the mystery' 
of human behavior and perception, or ques- 
tioning why people cannot communicate. Or 
he may be observing that memory is only a 
mass or discordant and disconnected im- 


ages. But his admirers have been known to 
be less involved with the story and its mean- 
ing than with the painterly images that float 
before their eyes. And they tend to sense the 
characters’ relationships not by their words 
but by what the images convey. 

There are usually hints. Reminiscent of 
“ Einstein on the Beach" and Wilson’s earlier 
“Deaf man’s Glance." “The Golden Win- 
dows" contains falling stars and rising 
moons, brooding lights and menacing shad- 
ows, ceremonial gestures and ominous 
movements, plus a coup de theatre, the hall- 
mark of a Wilson production. As in most of 
his work, images, often paradoxical, are ar- 
ranged in geometrical and architectural pat- 
terns that the director believes will evoke 
highly textured surface and a subtle subtext. 

If the meaning of Mr. Wilson’s work 
strikes many people as obscure, die means 
by which be achieves his effects arc dear. At 
rehearsals, which were held seven hours a 
day, six days a week on and off since June, 
Wilson, in jeans and cowboy boots, was 
surrounded by assistants, ail of whom had 
worked with him in other productions. 

In contrast to the dark, somber quality 
that many associate with his work, the direc- 
tor was thoroughly relaxed, jovial and full of 
humor. Unlike most directors, who demand 
privacy during rehearsals, he welcomed visi- 
tors. On any day such people as Susan Son- 
tag, Lucinda Olilds and actors from his 
former productions could be seen wandering 
in and out. “The atmosphere was the best I 
ever experienced,” said Gaby Rodgers, one 
of the cast members. “Wilson is not like 
some other directors who act out their prob- 


lems in rehearsals; he's completely warm 
and suportive." 

At first the actors sat around a large table 
and read through the text, trying to make 
sense of it. Wilson asked them what they 
thought the play was about. Each gave an 
interpretation, and then he staled his own 
view: “As people talk, we have many starts 
and stops — this is how the script is. It's like 
watching television, like switching stations 
in midstream. This is how we think. The 
script is also like an edit that has gone 
astray." 

But. one actor asked, what is the story 
line? Exactly who are these people? Wilson 
remained silent. 

“1 don’t tell the actors what the play is 
about," he later explained, "because each 
one has to discover it for himself. Then it is 
his or her character. I give them specific 
gestures and movements that don’t necessar- 
ily relate to the text. Very often they are 
presented in contradiction to the spoken 
word. 1 very seldom interfere with their in- 
terpretations as long as 1 can ultimately draw’ 
my own conclusions from their performance. 
I have said many times that if you make a 
table, make it yourself, carve the wood, put it 
together, you have a different feeling for that 
table than if you buy it in the store. So I 
think that in this play you get certain materi- 
als — the words — and the actors have to 
mold them imo something of their own. 
When they do that, they have a different 
reeling for the finished product . . 

As with all his works, Wilson prepared for 
this production by creating abstract black- 
and-white drawings that express the overall 



Hnvtor I 1 * JeaiTJ oj-rtr P-7#r 


Robert Wilson. 

depth, shape and light of the piece. Then he 
drew on story boards the visual details of the 
action; this became the visual script. Next a 
script for the language was prepared, and 
finally, a script indicating the sound effects. 
As a result there were three scripts — the 
visual (including the lighting), the verbal and 
the aural. “Mostly the visual is the poetic 
expression of the verbal." he said, “but I can 
separate or harmonise or lei the texts contra- 
dict each other, for the texts stand alone." 

After two days of reading the manuscript, 
the actors rehearsed on [heir feci. Wilson 

Continued on page 8 










Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Summer’s Approach in Buenos Aires 


by Lvdia Chavez 


B UENOS AIRES — South America 
has exploded into spring end Bue- 
nos .Aires — above oil a walker's 
city — is one of the best cities m 
which to savor the approach of the Southern 
Hemisphere’s summer. The Argentine capi- 
tal is full of parks. cafes, streetsof luxurious 
shopping, and a panoply of well-dressed 
Argentines who love nothing better than 
showing off themselves and” their city to 
foreigners. 

It is also the time of year when .Argentines 
escape on the weekends to their country- 
places. clubs and beaches. The visitor might 
warn to follow to retreats such as Bariloche. 
a mountain resort where spring means the 
skiers depart and the trout fishermen arrive, 
or. just across the River Plate, to the beach 
resort of Puma del Esie in Uruguay. 

There is. of course, much to do in the city. 
Spring brings with it everything from the 
world's best polo io Mozart’ There is always 
good theater, wonderful markets, and some 
of the best beef in the world. For those who 
like to spend time swimming or playing 
tennis, there are public facilities that would 
put some private American clubs to shame. 

One of the world's great opera and concert 
halls is ihe Teatro Colon tmain entrance on 
Libertad, between Tucuman and Viamonte). 
Slowly, the Argentines are developing an 
orchestra as weU as opera and ballet compa- 
nies to do it justice. In November. Richard 
Strauss’s “Der Rosenkavalier” and his tone 
poem “Don Quixote” will be presented (the 
latter as a ballet). In December the opera will 


be “E! Case Mai! lard" by Roberto Garcia 
Morillo. an Argentine. 

Two Argentine dancers — Julio Boeca 
and Raquel Rossetti — recently won medals 
at the prestigious Moscow International Bal- 
let Competition. They should not be missed 
The Colon's programs are listed in The Bue- 
nos .Aires Herald, the city’s English-language 
newspaper. Tickets range from the equiva- 
lent of SI 3 for orchestra seats to S2 for the 
upper balconies. Additional information, 
and arrangements for a free tour, can be 
made by calling the the theater at 35-54-14. 

The traditional place to see the tango 
performed has been El Viejo Almacen. but a 
better deal (at 510 a person) is Cano 14. at 
Talcahuano 975, where the shows start at 
U:i5 P.M.. and Thursday and Friday at 
9:30 P.M. The cover charge is SI 2. 

.After midnight, the truly daring might 
want to go to La Argentina, at Rodriquez 
Pena 361. one of the few places left where 
visitors can compete against working-class 
Argentines who have spent years honing 
their tango skills. 

Nightclubs include Hippopotamus, which 
opens sl II P.M.. at Junin 787 (41-83-10). 
and Le Club I formerly Regine's), at Quinta- 
na III (22-25-65). For disco, there is New 
York City, open only on weekend nights, at 
.Alvarez Thomas 1391 (551-93-41). 

Another place to hear music — everything 
from jazz to opera — is the Cate Mozart, at 
Reconquista 1050 <311-6802). The programs 
are at 5 P.M. and 11 P.M.. with a S3 "cover 
charge. 

There are good buys in s« eaters and leath- 
er goods. (Avoid anything with zippers since 
thev usuallv don't work.) One of the better 



costs S32. These can be bought from the Polo 
Association; tickets at the fields range from 
SI. SO to S6.S0 to see one game. There are 
also games at the Torrugas {0320-91262} and 
Indies country clubs (667-0252). 

The most convenient recretion center is 
K.DT in Palermo, at Figueroa Alcona 3800 
(801-1213). where there is swimming, cy- 
cling. basketball and football. 

There is also a municipal golf club in 
Palermo at Tomquisiand Olleros (772-7261) 
facing the lake. The course costs S3. The 
greens are usually Tree during the week, and 
reservations have to be made in person 
weekends. 






.SV* * V. 


- :: 

F * A v £ _ * v 


H .--ir-l 4 ; 



Florida at Christmas. 


Ropf-VoBti 





places to find just about everything is Flori- 
da. a long pedestrian mall in the center of 
town. 


River 

Plate 


Some of the good leather places include 
asa Lopez on Florida. Mundo del Cuero in 


,elWw KWW.I1 



Casa Lopez on Florida. Mundo del Cuero in 
the first block of Florida off Plaza San Mar- 
tin. and Willy Keni at Maipu 953. A good 
leather jacket will cost between S100 and 
SI 75. purses and shoes under $30. 

While Florida is crammed with shops. I 
prefer walking along the parallel streets 
called Alvear, Juncal and Aren ales in the 
Barrio Norte, just north of downtown. The 
shops in these neighborhoods are closed 
from 1 P.M. on Saturday until Monday. 


Sunday shoppers will have to go io San 
Telmo. an old working-class neighborhood 



fh* New tgit Times 


Telmo. an old working-class neighborhood 
that has undergone considerable renovation, 
to become a haven for antiques hunters. 
There is also an antiques fair every Sunday 
in the Plaza San Martin. 

In addition to shopping, people watching 
and taking a siesta, try attending some of the 
polo games or visiting some of the recreation 
clubs. 

The most important polo championship is 
the Palermo Open, which is played on the 
Palermo Park fields at Libertador and Dor- 
rego. The games take place in November, 
with the finals on Nov. 23. (The dates are 
moved up if the season runs into rain.) For 
more information, call the Polo Association 
at 33-46-46 or 30-09-72. A subscription to 
the Palermo Open costs $50, entitling the 
holder to watch all the games; a partial 
subscription to the semifinals and finals 


AH, the Argentine beef. There is really 
none as lean, as good, and as plenti- 
-L\. ful. The national specialty is the 
asado — provo lone, beef and innards, barbe- 
cued on a grill. No matter bow long one stays 
in Argentina it. is hard to tire of this dish, 
which Argentines finish off with a fruit salad 
or a slab or ice cream topped with hot. dark 
chocolate sauce. 

The cuts of beef are slightly different those 
elsewhere, but a bi/e de chorizo is similar to a 
strip steak: a lomo, filet mignon. and asado 
de lira are short ribs. The best starter is 
proveieia a la ptancha, a thick piece of provo- 
lone cheese topped with oregano and served 
hot from the gnll. 

It is a Sunday tradition — the maid’s day 
off — to go to the Cos tan era, a strip of 
restaurants along the River Plate, to enjoy an 
asado. There are many restaurants and most 
are good. A favorite among Argentines is 
Los Ah os Locos, where dinner for two with 
wine will come to about S18. 

Other great places for an asado are La 
Mosca Blanca, near the Reriro Station (313- 
4890). Ligure, at Juncal 855 (393-0644). 
where the line always moves swiftly and one 
should finish dinner with the panqueque Lig- 
ure. a ertpe topped with sambayon. fruit and 
ice cream. 

La Cabana, at Enure Rios 436 (38-23-73), 
tends to be filled with English-speaking visi- 
tors but it serves some of the best steaks in 
town. 

A good place that serves great pizza and 
steaks for less than S5 a person is La Pipeta, 
at the comer of Lavalle and San Martin. 
When business people take clients out, they 
usually have lunch at Gark's, Sarmiento 645 
(45-19-60), where the prices are higher and 
the pace slower. 

Though the Costanera is a Sunday tradi- 
tion for many, the an crowd goes to the 
Telmo Bar in San Telmo for the green no- 
quis. the Argentine version of gnocchi. You 
must arrive near noon or risk having the 
spinach-and-potato dumplings run out. 

During the week, the art crowd can be 
seen at a few restaurants, downtown near the 
Plaza Hotel, where the food is straightfor- 
ward. and die people always interesting. 
Among these is Bar Baro, at Ties Sarcentos 
415. 

Another popular restaurant district is the 
Recoleta, named for the cemetery near the 
Plaza San Martin, where some of Argenti- 
na’s greatest and most notorious leaders. 





55** 




The foyer of the Team Colon. 




including Eva Peron. are entombed in mau- 
soleums in every style of architecture. 

Nearly all of the cafes in the Recoleta 
neighborhood hare outdoor tables where 
many an afternoon can be spent watching 
the people. All serve sandwiches, drinks and 
tea with pastries. A favorite meal is toasted 
cheese on miga. a thin white bread. 

For something heartier, there is the Mu- 
nich Restaurant, at Roberto M. Ortiz 1871 
(44-39-81). The milanesas. breaded chicken 
2 nd beef cutlets, are excellent, and are to 
Argentines what hamburgers are to Ameri- 
cans; a serving of milanesas with salad and 
wine usually costs less than S5. 

Hotels in Buenos Aires are generally (rider 
and smaller than American ones; as in Euro- 
pean hotels, a Continental breakfast is in- 
cluded in the price of the room. Five-slax 
hotel rates run from about S65 to S 120 for a 
doable, four-star from $50 to S70 and the 
three-star from 535 to $45 (the ratings are 
according to the hotels themselves). 

Among the five-star hotels are the Plaza 
(Florida 1005; 311-501 J), overlooking the 
Plaza San Martin, and the Hotel Gandge. 
(Tucumin 535: 393-7212), where many 
rooms have been renovated. Also in this 
group are the Hotel Panamericano (Caries 
Pellegrini 525; 393-6017) and the Hotel 
Sheraton (San Martin 1225; 31 1-6310). 

Four-star hotels include the Hotel Bisonte 
(Paraguay and Libertad; 294-8041), Hotel 
Regente (Suipacha 964; 313-6628), Hotel 
Bauen (Callao 360; 393-2110) and El Con- 
quistador (Suipacha 948; 3 1 3-3152). 

Three-star hotels include the Dora (Maipu 
963; 31 2-7391 X Hold de las Americas (Li- ' 


benad 1020: 393-3432) and the JHotd UrH . 
caster (Cordoba 405; ' a 1 2-406 IX 
Many residents leave the city during the : 
weekend. There isswne value inthbforthe 
visitor also. Argentina is more ttanlfiQQ 
miles long, as varied as the United 
and expensive to get to in the first glare. A 
national airport within 15 nnnUteiofinosi 


also special tickets for foreigners: Acrohncas 
Argemmas has a 14-day pass ($199) the 
permits three stops in Argentina beyond die 
entry point -and a 30-day pass (5290) that 
permits multiple stops withm the earner^* 
First choke among weekend destinations 
may be the Alpine-tod^ resort of BiaSo- 
die. a 90-nttnme plane ride from Bheads 
Aires. The best plaice to stay {also the mosi 
expensive bi 5159 a night) is El Casco (id: 
22-532X a German-owned inn that rivals the 
best in Europe. Other ''good hotels in. die 
resort iocfcide Interlaken (26456: 580)' and 
Hosteria del Viejo Motion (12-411; $75). ’ 
■nKwedcendptaremostfikciyiobebeanl 
about in one of the city’s fancier cafes, or 
.glimpsed in one of the many gossip- maga- 
zines, is Pimta rid Este. It is a fashionable 
beach resort — with higft-risf rnnATiTTi in h 
and boids as wcH as sailing vessels huge and 
small in its coves and harbor — on a.penmd 
sula sroaraiing the River Plate and the Ar- 
lanuc Ocean. A round-trip ticket from Bue- 
nos Aires costs S13Z Two hotels are La 
Capilla, at $66 a night, and L’Aubagct at 
$100 a night. While in Fonts del Erie, don't 
trass the Manes de Uruguay stores, where 
handmade sweaters and shawls sell for less 
than$4QL . : vjg ■ 




CWTfe .Vrf, York Tima 



Horowitz 


Continued from page 7 


Stars and Stripes Forever,” or of such caval- 
ry finishes as the one on his Tchaikovsky B 
fiat minor concerto recording with Toscani- 
ni. his father-in-law. 

This concert was a reminder of the other 
Horowitz, the one who programmed plenty 
of small-scale works and miniatures along 
with the grand showpieces, and who was 
often responsible for bringing back the mu- 
sic of composers who had fallen out of fash- 
ion. For at the peak of his career, if Horowitz 
unearthed a little-known work it was taken 
up by others. 

He is as much responsible as almost any 


harpsichordist for bringing the sonatas of 
Domenico Scarlatti to public attention, and 
he opened his Paris recital with two of them, 
played with dean rhythmic vitality and po- 
lish. And this was followed by Schumann's 
“Kreisleriana,” one pf the composer’s less- 
known keyboard cycles that he has long 
championed. 

Likewise Alexander Scriabin, for whom 
the child Horowitz played in Kiev and for 
whose music he later showed such an uncan- 


ny affinity. Here he played two of the early, 
Chopinesque etudes of Opus 8, brilliantly 


Chopinesque etudes of Opus 8, brilliantly 
and with certain stylistic understanding. 


After the intermission name the Schubeii 
Impromptu in B fiat minor (Opus 142)* less 
convincingly, then back into stride with 
three of Liszt's late; speculative short pieces 
; — the "'Consolation*' Nol 3. an Impromptu 
in F sharp from 1873, and die piquant 
"Vabe Oubtiie" No. 1, with its abrupt and. 
teasing ending . . _ ' 

Then Chopin, and after two manukas , a - 
return of the old thunder and sudden surges 
-of electric energy with the Opus 53:$oipi .- 
naise. The ghosts of the Polish cavalry ; 
in the splendid middle section and ttierain-T 
cert ended with a flourish of viziuoift: 

Bui on the whole this was a quieijjjrtidjv 
spective artist at work, as if almost ploying 
for himself, and yet obviously aJux^-gjay-. - 
fully happy io be’ back before a pubEtf/tll 


Robert Wilson 


Continued from page 7 


’ ’’ j-’ 


For the 

executive who likes 
to travel light... 


choreographed the movements frame by 
frame, and the actors learned their parts by 
endless repetition. They had to be concerned 
with every detail, to .memorize aot only a 
complicated script but complicated move- 
ments as well Actors in a Wilson produc- 
tion. said the assistant director. Julia GO- 
leite. “hare to be absolutely precise and hare 
perfect attention." While the actors were 
learning their “business" and walking 
around, scripts in hand. Wilson would dem- 
onstrate the required movement or stand 
behind an actor to show him or her how to 
move. Or he would alter the placement of a 
hand, or a head or a shoulder. 


~ The desktdiary 
that’s not desk-bound 


“Hold your bands in your lap for 15 sec- 
onds.” he directed one actor. “Walk to the 


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chair in 15 seconds, turn your head in one 
second; put your hand down to the count of 
15 seconds. . . . Tiy to be very still: don't 
move. The silences are just as beautiful as the 
text, so don't take a lot of time with the 
words. Don't show the audience too much. 
Listen to the text inside your head. Don't 
perform.’’ 

Tuning is an essential factor in any Wilson 
piece, so much so that his assistants used 
stopwatches to cue the actors. Told how 
many minutes or seconds to hold their posi- 
tions. when to turn their heads, when to pick 
up an object, how many minutes to laugh - 
the actors could leave no movement to 
chance. Wilson is interested in line. In archi- 
tectural structure and in spatial arrange- 
ment. It is just as though “he were painting 
on stage/" says his assistant. 

Might dtis create a problem with Stanis- 
lavsky-trained, or method, actors who try to 
find inner justification for their movements? 


“Of course,” Wilson answered, “actors 
want to know why they are doing this or that, 
and 1 always say. T don’t know.’ Every actor 
wants me "to start with the cause, and most 
directors do start that way to get the effect 
But I do .the opposite. . . . Some of the 
actors I worked with in Germany, the older 
actors, were more comfortable with my ap- 
proach. In that sense they were ideal for my 
work. They weren’t so involved with the 
Stanislavsky method. They came from the 
old school; they are great technicians- the 
director could give them the result and thev 
would fill in. . . . Theater todav has be'- 
come very psychological: actors want to in- 
terpret for the audience: they impose too 
much on the audience.’’ 

Wilson prefers a theater that allows dis- 
tance. where the situation can be viewed in a 
more detatched way. “I think if you want to 
present something emotionally, and you 
have a constant outpouring of the emotions, 
the audience wfl] do the opposite. They will 
not respond. . Of course, we are not 
demanding that the audience all feel the 
same, that their response be the same. When 
responses vary, there is more space and more 
freedom.'’ 

One of the most important aspects of 
Wilson's aesthetics is the lighting, which he 
thinks through early in the planning process, 
but incorporates in the rehearsals last. His 
contract stipulates the time he will receive to 
work out the lighting for a show; for “The 
Golden Windows” that was 60 hours. The 
Ugh ting design was firmly in his head when 
rehearsals began, so that he could direct , the 
actors in accordance with where the light 
would fall. . 

When he actually lit the stage, he started 


with an overall light to set the basic mbod 
and then used special light to focus aantfe- 
tails — a hand, a finger, the nape of *»eCk 
the door or an object. It could take tiofirSo 
get the light just right on the fold ^of iWx. 

Jt an actor moved an inch from ihea»raed 
place, he or she might be in the 

tig* 11 people, not sets or envirtamwj&jyl'. 
Wilson says, but I think objects arejfteras” 1 
important. I want audiences to set beaain 
things. Lights add commentary id thjty&ual 
text, just as music and voices on tape p&da - " 
score or contradict the. verbal le^-EQE^v- 
ample. there may be a glass bf rmlk ona%' ' 
i ought allow the space around the 
entirely dark and light only the' miUL PedWe 
would listen to the text and watch the object. ' 
and m that way. the light becomes aa actor- 
it creates a space, an image, a shape. J jgft t 
has ns own laws and its own teMUre. Treat) 
actually exist by itself. In fact,one^m-io6k 
at a theatrical piece as light showL’T':'/ ' V 

The effect aims to be defiberaielv nrFStCTi- 1 
ous. Wilson wants to surprise the^audkrice 
-* 5 * 15 ° « ,B ». a “leehmcsdWfi- 
rivm ; „ “ in riming, in move- 

gemeim spa^ 

' i To - ** reall y free one . mi# ■ 
then mechanical structure, and 

within?hJ l free t0 do whatever one . wants 

SJsan “ d ,h «* s what 

Wha. rm ^ 



licralb^^Sribunci 


DOONESBURY 


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DPYWSEeTHBZMOS 















■ -' .-.Jc.-’i / r - 


, .X 


by Roger CoDis 








OU*R£ traveling from Fans to 
Strasbourg. You arrive a few mu- 


Tbe NotrveUe P rora fa g is an attempt u> 
recapture disaffected first-class passengers 
mi build a new market among business 
travelers and opinion leaders (or an estimat- 
ed two mflfion households m France, 20 


tiles after 10 A M at th# ™ BBBOB oauxnows m rranoe, w 

1’Est - aL *“ percent of the active population) who many 

L & , tem for a£2 of' «dioi»itv. 


an opulent executive lounge with its own. 
street entrance. Yon check your baggage, 
Jiave a coffee, call tin: office, may be mj - the 
Vyideotext or scan the lunch menu brought to 
.you by the chef. A hostess will reserve you a 
too. a rental car ora hotel at the other end. 

The train leaves at 10:23. You settle into a 
swiveling armchair and spread out your pa- 
pers. After a drink in the bar you treat, 
yourself to a gourmet lunch —smoked sajm- 
.on with caviar, oouou pastoral mot herbes 
{readies and a half-bottle of CMteau Latoor 


fest .a desire for standards of exclusivity, 
food and service at least comparable to those 
of die crack luxury trains of the 1960s. 

According to an SNCF spokesman, the 
project has cost T2 mfllion francs and will 
ran for at least a year. The target is to 
increase first-class traffic by at least 10 per- 


Paiis-Strasbourg 


..1974 — in the restaurant.. You could have CATtnPA TYlQT’lrc o 
; -chosen a simpler meal served at your seat OyrV 1UC ili fl l A O a. 
^The commissedre de bord is cm band to iron — 

;.but problems. Perhaps you’re not comfort-. i*p»h|'|w| frv 

.•able where you’ve been placed. WeQ, heh&s PtJt U r.f i UJ lUXUiy 

jeven seats in reserve for such eventualities. 

-Or you want to borrow a dictation machine 
s ,*or listen to a m u sic cassette. You arrive in cent on fee Srrttshcsoini run. It is b«no n 


,*pr listen to a music cassette. You arrive in 
’ --.Strasbourg at 2:18 P-M. —just wriff four 
* hoars — in the best possible shape. 

• This is a new experimental first-class se r- 
: - J Vt^Air rice (La NouveUePremiire) that the French 

: °’ e the, ^ consists of one^ttain 

- • ,.,, rt ’ r between Paris and .Strasbourg with a single 

Ina u nt»[ ( rtop at Nancy. The idea, badeed by extensive 
. “ar*® 1 research, is to regain some of the 

' r ‘ *<■ m [bti!? first- cla ss traffic lost to airlines in the l»« 
;;'ini D it .few- years. 

• .. ' i,iU31 ' patter i An alternative would have been to Uy. But 

- - - tor fcTripfc], 5 lo c^tch the 12:50 Air Tmw flight from 

" ^4*da\ aat it ^ iajr ^ es Gaulle would have meant leavin g 

' ^ ,n .Ihc center qf Paris by around II AJt Yon 

. '"j-da m * would have been shoehomed into an Airbus 
•" • 'I'.’p'. fo*" an ho ur with not even a cap of coffee, 

and arrive in the center of Strasbourg at the 
same tune as the train, or a bit later. 

' pl-Jne ridfTf! Tk® SNCF is counting on a combinatkm 
• rjcj io -|~ .?• . of speed, comfort, service and three-star cui- 
j rjzhii ,V fu £ ® ne pn«*i although this is a 

1 “ 1 factor too when it comes to value for money, 

finer Jjc : Paris-Strasbonig one-way by plane costs 575 
- - IsiwlaL®?- S* francs (phis taxis); the Nouvdle Premfcre is 

-• ' .% ,442 francs (17 percent more than normal 

yt first) plus 200 to 300 francs for a meal, bat 
7™ then you've got to eat somewhere. 

.... .V* • i ' a *C ’ France’s railway renaissance started in 
V.i-mim-pj. September 1981 when the TGVs (tram a 
1 ■ l ,1c 1 grande vhesse) were inaugurated on the Par- 
’“sh-naanfe ;js-Lyon service, covering the 265 miles (430 
- uiltnguatk kilometers) in just two hours. Center to cen- 
= 2r S ter, depending when you travel, this can be 

• " rijier Pfeirad-^F faster than by air. SNCF says that the TGVs 

• ■ have captured 40 percent of the air traffic 

. ■ ■’ I»t5 kni: between the two cities, and that on the exist- 

• 'a7.t. and l'te ing TGV network executives nejsresem 45 
•: Punuddfc: pCTcentof passengers c ompar ed with 35 per- 

’ -IrjauviE; cent on regular trains. 


:: 


u. , w 

*w!uioCi4|].p 
' •7"-‘Ksni«m r| i 

■ ‘ • pe num 
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have captured 40 percent of the air traffic 
between the two cities, and that on the exist- 
. ing TGV network executives represent 45 
percentof passengers c ompar ed with 35 per- 
cent on regular trains. 


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_ Unlike the Trans-Hurope Express and 
other luxury trains, the TGV u.dttnoctaJia 
There are both first and second classes and. 
and no tariff supplement for some 
-Herein lies a problem. TGV passengers ap- 
plaud the speed but complain about the 
■mediocre food and service. First class costs 
about 50 percent more than second, but 
there is almost no difference in comfort and 
amenities. As a result, many people are- de- 
. serring first class for second. 

The problem is ev en greater with ordinary 
trains- Since the SNCF introduced its uni- 
versally comfortable, air-conditioned Cor- 
‘ ail-type coaches in 1975, phasing out the. 
dasric restaurant cars, its first-dass traffic 


cent on the Strasbourg run. It is being moni- 
tored by consumer research and if success- 
ful, the Nouyelle Premiire will be 
mcaipocaied into the new TGV Adantique 
service due to start in 1990 between Paris 
and Brest {trip time cm from 5 hours 42 
minutes to 4 hours 36), Paris and Names (cut 
Cram 2 hours 53 minutes to 2 hours) and 
Paris to Bordeaux (cut from 4 hours to 2 
hours 58 nrinutes). Future TGV extensions 
are Paris-Zuricb (in 4 hours from 6 at pre- 
sent) and Paris-Frankfurt (in 3 hours 20 
minutes from 6 hours 10). 

Bui if ihe Nouvdle Prormfere is successful, 
why wail until 1990? The original TGV 
equipment on the Paris- Lyon route is due for 
renewal in 1987, so why not start with that? 
Even better, if it's such a gnat idea, why not 
experiment with the TGvitsdf instead oT an 
ordinary express train? 

The official answer is that Paris-Stras- 
bourg was chosen precisely because there is 
no TT3V and that between Paris and Nancy 
(where there is so viable airport) the SNCF 
has a market share of 50 percent, which will 
enable them u> measure the reaction of the 
existing passengers, whereas between Paris 
and Strasbourg, ability to capturepassengers 
from Air later will be decisive. However, a 
maverick element within the organization 
fears that an opportunity may Have been 
Ion. “It’s a pity to make something new out 
of something old,” a marketing executive 
says. “Even the name was a compromise. We 
would have preferred to call n something 
like ‘Club* or ‘Executive Class.’ ” 

None of this detracts from the imagina- 
tion and flair that has gone into the Nouvdle 
Premiere. The SNCF called upon the ser- 
vices of several outside experts (an unprece- 
dented move it seems) including Francois 
Catroux, who designed the interiors of the 
coaches (which have a mix of conventional 
and more informal dub-type sealing); Jean 
Gillet, director of the Hotel Meuricem Paris, 
who advised on diem services, and Jod 
Robuchon, owner-chef of Jamm. a MSchdin 
three-star restaurant in Paris, who is respon- 
sible for creating and supervising the cuisine. 
This is produced in a central kndien in Paris 
by Rent Sdmmayer, former maftre tfhotei 
at the Ritzin Paris. The dishes are prepared 
under a new vacuum process by which they 
are refrigerated (not frozen) and reheated in 
a specialty designed steam oven on the main. 
The process is so successful, Robuchon says, 
that he has already had queries from several 
airlines. People are riding the train, he says, 
mst to eat the food and the SNCF is U sur- 


fob:-' -has fallen; total traffic has grown by 35 to 40 ammes. People an: ndmg the tram, he says, 
. ic EMd " percent, but first dass repre se nts only about just eat me food mid the SNCF is sur- 

• .tfiiomlE* 18 percent compared with 25 percent 10 prised and ddighted. 

W.iissi years ago. Soane firat-dass passengers have The French may have rediscovered that 

• ih . u'JJ* switched to air travel, especially since the the way to a traveler’s heart is through Ins 

; . ,f,wsL -Airbus came into service: stomach. ■ 


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H ONGKONG — there is a partic- 
ular exhaustion that overcomes 
visitors to Hong Kong and ren- 
ders them incapable of setting 
foot in one more shop. It is a symptom of 
overdose: According to tourism officials, the 
3.2 million people who visit Hong Kong each 
year spend almost 65 percent of their time 
shopping. 

Though it is undoubtedly true that the 
most avid of the shoppers miss seeing one of 
the great cities of the world, there are some 
shopping experiences that serve as explora- 
tions of this culture. The Chinese govern- 
ment operates huge department stores in 
Hong Kong; a trip through one of these gives 
a fascinating and encyclopedic look at life in 
Hong Kong, a Western -veneered but essen- 
tially Chinese city. These stores are also 
excellent places to buy food, textiles and 
artifacts from China. 

A favorite shop of this type among resi- 
dents of Hong Kong is the China Products 
Co. in the Causeway Bay section of Hong 
Kong island. Causeway Bay is a shopping, 
eating and residential area that, even when 
not particularly busy, resembles Fifth Ave- 
nue the day before Christmas. But the com- 
pany's main store at 19-31 Yee Wo Street is 
slightly removed from the activity. It is less 
frenetic the Chinese Merchandise Em- 
porium. at 92-94 Queen’s Road, Central, but 
it retains something of the street-stall atmo- 
sphere missing from the high-priced, tocrisi- 
oriemed Chinese Arts and Crafts stores, 
whose main branch is at 3 Salisbury Road. 
Star House. Another store is the Yue Hwa 
Chinese Products Emporium at 300-306 Na- 
than Road, Kowloon. 

The best way to enter the China Products 
Co. (a building that takes up a city block) is 
from the comer of the store lhaL angles onto 
Victoria Park, for this leads the customer 
directly into the food section. On the win- 
dow ledges is an attractive selection of por- 
celain gingers jars. The tall ones sell for S10 
(all prices are given in U. S., not Hong Kong, 
dollars), and the more classic squat jars sdl 
for about $6. Each size is filled with candied 
ginger. 

Stretching down the near wall is the tea. In 
this section one will find the most popular 
teas: scented jasmine and bitter bouies, li- 
chee and chrysanthemum. These come loose, 
or packaged in painted bamboo boxes, in 
small tin containers and in china pots (each 
for less than $3). But one can also buy green 
teas such as the top-grade Lung Ching or the 
best of the white <*■«* . the Fujian flowery 
silver pekoe, both of which cost about $60 a 
pound 

The middle of the ground floor contains a 
wide selection of Chinese wines. A popular 
gift is ginseng wine, which is delirious 
though bitter. The root of the ginseng plant 
is considered a powerful remedy for all kinds 
of afflictions- In the ground-floor medicinal 
section of the store are ginseng roots from 
North Korea and northern China, with price 
tags as high as SI 7307 a tael, roughly one 
and a third ounces. But the wine is enjoyed 
as a beverage and can cost as little as S8 a 
bottle. 

.On the second floor the shopper will find 
clothing. Traditional garments, as well as a 
large selection of Mao jackets, are available 
for a reasonable price. 

Min lap are short silk jackets with manda- 
rin-style collars, subtle Jacquard patterns, 
and are filled with silk (a more effective 
insulator than goose down). The finest min 
lap are Peony brand from Shanghai; in blue, 
brown and black, they cost about $25. 

Women’s brocade jackets cost $12 each 
and come in colors such as turqoise with 




Jade urns ai the China Products Co. 

silver embroidery and maroon with gold, 
some trimmed with fake fur. Past the jackets 
and embroidered cardigans, past the lace 
and linens and behind a case Cull of embroi- 
dered handkerchiefs and scarves ( 1 930s-style 
men's paisley silk scarves are an excellent 
buy at S4 each i is a special room for robes, 
both casual and formal. SQk dressing gowns 
emblazoned with dragons sell for less than 
$20 as do silk nigh; gowns, blouses, brocade 
smoking jackets and cotton kimonos. 

Also in this room are cheongsam, the 
floor-length dresses with frog closures and 
side seams that are open to the knee. 
Cheongsam made of rayon can cost less than 
$20; for a cheongsam of silk, one would have 
to buy the silk and rake it to a dressmaker. 


F OR those having clothing made in 
Hong Kosg it is considerably cheaper 
to buy the" fabric at the Chinese de- 
partment stores, and then take it to one’s 
tailor. The third floor of the store offers a 
considerable selection of fabric. Shantung 
silk goes for less than S6 a yard. There is raw 
silk and Thai silk, crepe de chine and satin. 
Floral prints, bamboo prims, geometric and 
traditional Chinese prints are available in all 
sons of colors for less than $10 a yard. The 
brocade sells for less than S5 a yard and the 
most stunning has dragons in silver, salmon 
and royal blue. The best selection of fabric is 
available in January as almost everyone has 
clothes made for the lunar New Year cele- 
bration in February. 

Hong Kong has no museum of contempo- 
rary Chinese porcelain and jade craft, but 
the third floor of the store might function as 
one. There is bone china hidden in the back 
of the room, near the antique teapots. The 
painting on the bowls, which is done by 
hand, is breathtaking: intricate renderings of 
mythological animals and court scenes. 
These bowls are eggshell thin and they come 
with their own satin-cushioned boxes. A 
small one sells for around SiOO. 

A crowd of local shoppers often gathers 
around the jade dragon vases; each is carved 
from a solid block of white jade and costs 
$18,000. Here, too, is cloisonnfe and lacquer- 
ware: A three-foot black lacquer vase with 


dragon and phoenix and a gold leaf interior 
sells for S660. but there is a large section 
devoted to less extravagant pieces. A 12- 
place set of china in a wide variety of tradi- 
tional patterns can be had for less than 5200. 
complete with serving bowls. 

On a less monumental scale is the chop, a 
type of seal that has been in use in China for 
centuries; it is a tradition that is still carried 
on in contemporary Hong Kosg. Though 
many younger Hong Kong Chinese prefer 
the Western practice of signing their name, 
most older Chinese still close business deals, 
set up bank accounts and end letters with an 
ink print from the characters carved on the 
bottom of the chop. 

Jade chops, which start at S250, are im- 
pressive but most chops are made from mar- 
ble, stone, ivoiy or plastic. A black stone 
chop contained in plastic tortoise, which also 
harbors a pad of red ink, costs SI 2 and 
makes an excellent gift; there are numerous 
merchants who will carve characters based 
on the sounds of the recipient's name into 
the base of a chop, for less than 510. 

Near the chops is the jewelry section. This 
is one of the few places in Hong Kong where 
you can be sure that the jade vou buy is jade. 
The small stud earrings are often made from 
high quality jade. Prices vary: For the dark- 
est green jade expect to pay $40 a pair. On 
the far side of the jewelry section is ivory. Be 
sure to see the ivoiy mah-jongg set, which 
sells for S900 (plastic tiles are available for 
less than S15 a set). 


A LSO displayed in various cases in the 
l\ room in which ivory is sold are fig- 
J- JL ures from Chinese mythology in a 
wide range of sizes and workmanship. 
.Among them are porcelain statues of the 
warrior Kwan Kung, patron of both Hong 
Koog’s police and the colony’s gangsters. 
Smiling at him from another case are statues 
of Tin Hau, goddess of seafarers, and in yet 
another case are figures of the goddess Koon 
Yum, who sits on an unfolding lotus leaf 
bolding 16 weapons, one for each of her 
hands, and smiles enigmatically. Prices of 
the statues vary according to the quality of 
the details and the size, from S10 for a tinv 


Tin Hau to S500 for a tuo-foot-high Koon 
Yum. Most, though, sell for i ess Lhan 550. 

Also of note are the vases scattered about 
the room. The two-fooi-high ones sell for less 
than S300. with the exception of the Kwong 
Sze vases from King Tak province; these go 
for several thousand dollars. 

On the fourth floor arc suitcases, musical 
instruments, sporting goods, shoes, leather 
and stationery. While most of this merchan- 
dise is not likely to tempt the Western buyer, 
there are some exceptional items. Among 
them are a gigantic kite in the form of a 
butterfly for S 100. woven carpets from Tian- 
jin, and a selection of brushes and ink stones 
for calligraphy. 

k LSO on the fourth floor is an office in 
f\ which you c?n arrange for shipping 
J- A- your purchases. It is wise to watch 
while the goods are packed and to insist on 
lots of padding since there is no practical 
way to make a claim for damaged or missing 
goods. 

There is no bargaining in the Chinese 
government-owned department stores, and 
the salespeople have little patience tor those 
not fluent in Cantonese — but as a word of 
comfort, they don’t have much for those that 
are. Prices are clearly marked, however. All 
the stores accept major credit cards; cash 
transactions are in Hong Kong dollars. 7.8 to 
the U.S. dollar at current rates of exchange. 

Other branches of the Chinese Products 
Co. are at 488 Hennessy Road, also in 
Causeway Bay and at 73 Argyle Street, in 
Kowloon. Hours are 1 1 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 
daily, with a 1 P.M. opening on Thursday. 
Causeway Bay is easily accessible by tram, 
bus, taxi and now, by subway (Causeway 
Bay stop on the Island line). 

Other Chinese government-owned stores 
and brandies of the stores mentioned can be 
found throughout the territories with most 
clustered in Tsim Sha Tsui. Kowloon, and 
Central, Hong Kong. ■ 

William Schwalbe, assistant editor of In- 
sight magazine, lives in Hong Kong He wrote 
this article for The Sen York Times. 


austruT NOVEMBER CALENDAR 

^ nod). 

VIENNA, Bftse ndorfer Hall (tel: s^^ 0 ^nJS^ c¥xapetmmthe 

65-66-511 . : t rht n :^ r - ftiinr Nov. 28: Yiui Simonov eonduoor.P^ Nov.4,5,20:“TbcTwo Pigeons" (Ash- CONCERT— Nov. 15: EaserabteOr- 

RECITALS — Nov. 7: Eva Mark- Anare * Lncnicr t olor_ ter Katin piano (Mussorgsky, Radi- ton, Mesager). “Divertissements.” chestrale de Paris, Jean-Pieire Wallez 

Mflhler piano (Badu Debussy). 1-7 . t > maninov). Nov. 6. 7, 12, 13:* < LaBayadire'’(P«i- conductor. 


COLOGNE, Oper der Sudi (tel: 
23.25.811. 


ROME. Accademia Nazionaledi San- 
ta Cecilia fid: 679.03.89 j. 


v -it ifc 

- ; . • lofoe- 

‘.‘••Vilea** 


RECITALS — Nov. 7: Eva Mark- — — v 

' Nov. 17: -Fiddio" (Beethoven). 

Nov. 1 2: ChartotteLowery-Ma>T so- TosaC fPacdni). 

-prano, Karen de Pasld piano (Mo- Nov- 24: "Xrisian nnd Isolde” (Wag- 


nch. Sbiunann). 

l«y. “Dougla" (Holder, 


BALLET — Nov. 6: “Orpheus" <TJi- CONCERTS — Orchestra e Coro dell' 
rich.Sbiunanji). AwadimuNazicmdediS&nui Cecilia 

JAZZ — Nov. 10: George Winston. — Nov. 3-5: Phillipe Emremont con- 


Nov. 6.7, 12, 13: “La Bayadere” (Peti- conductor. 


Ritonio d'Ulisse in Patria" (Monte- 
verdi). 

Nov. 4 and 10: “The Bartered Bride" 


Nov. 22: Frederick Marvin piano xj~. \ spian Sled e-Pcrkins trumpet (Handel. OPERA — Nov.9:“Urrovaujre“(> r er- •H6tdM£ridiea cel: 47.58. 1230]. 

(Chopin, Dussek). ™di). di). JAZZ — To Nov. 16: Wild Bill Davis. 

' •Kotaerthans(td: 72.46.86). OPERETTA— Nov 2 and ^9: “The Nov.S: Philh a nn oma Orchestra, Ken- Nov. 16, 21. 26. 29: "Semde" (Han- aMaison de Victor Hugo i tel: 


.-ndiiHf.® Orchestral 

-ScS* 1 * k'i conductor, 
„-x vatoreAcc 

L** - Nov. 3: Ai 

. ••■jnLvh. 1 . w j n ctoju 

• '.*• Paert). 

. -rxflU 1 * . : Nov. 5: V, 

-■ Webern). 

“ ''..•'uJ# 11 ; Nov. 7: Vb 

' '"usi-* .•Purcell). 

-Nov. 23 an 


CON CER13— Nov.2: TJie Oianiber LandoTSmiks" 
Orchestra of Europe, Claudio Abbado Nov 7-**DieF]oi 
conductor, Rudolf Sedan piano, Sal- >j av ‘ o -m- 


con doctor, Rudolf Sedan piano, Sal- jj ov ‘ g nnrt 
vatore Accardo violin (Bach, Mozart). nvtilifSckerV. 

Nbv. 3: Arnold SchOnberg Choir, Er- j ___L 

win Ormer conductor (Da Venosa, 

Paert). I 

Nov. 5: Vermeer Quartet (Schubert, 

Webern). 


neth Page conductor, Julian Evans pi- 
ano (Liszt, Rachmaninov). 


del). 

•Tate Gallery (id: 821.13.13). 


42.72.16.65). 

EXHIBITION — Nov. 6-Jan. 31: 


Nov. 8 and 30: “Der Bendstndem 


BELGIUM 


fT - mi r . ano (Liszt. Kacnmanmov). •late Ualleiy (id: X41. 13.13). eaxuhi i — >ot. t 

Nov. lliOrehesiraofSi. John’sSmith EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 10: “Victor Hugo's Drawings " 


uare, Oliver GOmoox conductor, “Pound’s Artists,” “Gwen John, An *MusCe d’An Mod erne (tel: 


Anton dG flute. 


Philippa 

vies harp (Handd, Mozart), Northern aVictoria and Albert Museum (id: EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: “Vera 


Da- Interior Life.” 


47.23.6] 27). 


Sin/onia, Jozy Maksymiuk conduc- 589.63.71). Szekdy,"“J 

tor, Christian Zakarias piano (Britten. EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: Thysscn-Bo: 
Gounod)- “Browne Muggs: English Brown Salt- •Music Car 


Webern). taounoaj. Browne Muggs: t 

Nov. 7: Vfcuna String Setter (Mozart, BRUSSELS, Palais des Beaux Arts Nov. 12: London Oriana Choir. Leon Glazed Stoneware. 1 


• - '••: 

•' '' 

. 


_■ Purcell). 

_ Nov. 23 and 24: The Chamber Ordie&- 
tra of Ernope, Yehudi Menuhin con- 
ducior/viohn, Douglas Boyd oboe 
T (Bach. Haydn). 

' * •Mufflkverein (icL 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS — Vienna Phimaimonic 


Leon, ^ mower. OPERA— Nov.2,5, ]3. 16, 19,Z3:“U ducior/piano(Debu»y.Raveij. 

n • .... Ritorno d'Ulisse in Patria" (Monte- Nov.lD-l2:GiusqppeSir.oDolicon- 

R d ' P ( *' verdi >- ducior, Malcolm Fraaer piano iSchu- 

l ° : ’* ThC BfidC " Vehudi Menuhin conduc 

rfv^pic ^^beth Connell soprano (Mo- 

Mmhmf ,ban ^ Quartel ( Mozart - Nov. 17. 20. 29: “EleWira"( R. Strauss). Nov. 24-26: Wolfgang Sawalisch con- 

RECITALS — 'Nov. 10: AnneQueffe- F^NKFLllT. AJte Oper (id :! 3400). Sj^o^ollf 1 ^ anoJuI,jVirJd - v 
lec piano. Olivier Chartier vidon, B ALLET — Nov. J)-22: Carmen. , 

Yvan Chiffoieau oiano (Beethoven with AniomoGades. IKIESTE, TeaLro Comunalc Giu- 

SebumannL P CONCERTS _ Nov _ 5; «ppe Verdi (tel; 63.1^8,. 

Nov. 24: Thomas Zebecmair violin, ModeTn - IngoMetzmacherconducior. OPERA — Nov. 12. 15. 19. 22. 24. 27. 
Malcolm Frager piano (Bach). Matthias Tacke violin. Gerhard Op- 29: “Simon Boccanegra*'rVerdii. 

•Thiatre Musical de Paris fiei: pjt*pijmo(Bexg). TURLN, Teatro Regjoiid: 54.80.00). 

4251.19.83). Nov. / and 8 Frankfurt Radio Sym- OPERA— Nov. 7. 10.12. 14. 17, 19.22. 


CONCERTS -Nov. 3: Philadelphia “ ,uc 

!£» issas*** - •— 

Nov! “Elektra” ( R. Strauss). 
RECrTALS — Nov. 10; Anne QudTe- FRANlffLUT. AlieOper(td : 1 3400). 
lec piano. Olivier Qiariicr vidon, PALLET — Nov. 20-22: “Carmen. ” 


Yvan Chiffoieau piano (Beethoven. 
Schumann i. 


BALLET — Nov. 20-22: “Carmen, ” 
with Antonio Cades. 

CONCERTS — Nov. 3; Ensemble 


(td: 51 2.50.45). Lovett conductor (Haydn, Vivaldi). To December. “The Japanese Folk- tnal vocal Ensemble, Michel Piquenu 

EXHIBITION - To Dec. 22: “Span- Nov. 16: London Concert Orchestra, craft Movement: 19th A 20th Century conductor (Rossini. ScarLami. 

ieh Snlenders and ViBages. Nicholas Clcobury conductor. W3- Textiles and Ceramics." EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 15 

1500-5700/* •• , ; liamOeobury conductor, WiSlamSte- To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great “Claude-N’icolas Ledoux." 

•MusCes Rovaux des Bcaux-Arts de phenson piano (Rachmaninov. Tchai- Fashion Photographs Chosen by Da- ToNov. 24: “LesGrancs Boulevards, 
fidsique (id: 513^5.46). kovsky ). vid Bailey." To Jan. 5: “Eugine Bc:ol" 

EXHIBITION To Dec. 22- Nov. 18: Royal Pilhanoonic Orches- To Jan. 26: “Hats from India." RECITAL — Nov. 17: Yannick L 


. Orchestra — Nov. 2 and 3: Leonard "Goya.” _ . „ , , 

Bernstein conductor, Misha Maisky •Musba Royainc ffArt et dTfiffloire fonmner piano (Chopin, STRATFOREH«»o-AVON. Royal TM GraEd Pa.ais del: 

cdlo (Schumann). (id: 733.96.10). . Trtwuljovsky). Shakerooue Theatre (tek 29 -e -r . 


•Musics Royaux des Beaux-Arts de 
Bddque(iel: 513215.46). . 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 


Sizdcdy," *Tvfod era Masrers from the •Thiatre Musical de Paris (tel: P't^ piano I Berg). TURLN, Teatro Regjot tel: 54.80.00). 

4S — To Nov. 17: Thvsscu-BonxnnsaaCdleciioa 4241.19.83). Nov. / Md 8 FranWun Radio Sym- OPERA — Nov. 7, 10. 12. 14. 17, 19.22, 

Browne Muggs: English Brown Salt- •Mus6eCanxavalet(«ei:42.72JU3l. CONCERTS— Nov. 4: Warsaw Phil- phony Orchestra, Eliahu lnbal con- 24. 26: “Elisabeth. Queen of England" 

-_i i trc." CONCERT — Nov. 24: Michel Pique- harmonic Orchestra, Kazimierz Kord djjctorc Busoni ». t Rossini). 

“The Japanese Folk- tnal vocal Ensemble. Michel Piquemal conductor. Elisabeth Leoaskaia piano >7: Melos Quartet (Haydn). VENICE, Ca' Vendramin Cal-m 

t: 19lhftAlthCemuiy conductor fRossini. Scarlatti 1. (Cbopin. Stravinsky). Nov. 23: London Kulharmonic Or- { i c j ; 70.99 .Ci 9). 

ramies." EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 15: Nov. 25: Toulouse Chamber Orches- chestra. Andrew Davis conductor EXHIBITION— To Nov. 24. “Felice 

Shots of Style: Great “Claude-Nicobs Lcdoux." ira. Georges Armand conductor. Ro- dnr-rrl^'c j r~ Carena." 

nphs Chosen by Da- ToNov. 24: “LesGrancs Boulevards.” benoAussel guitar (Piazzola). RttllALh— Nov.^: AndrqGaun- •MuseoCorrerfiel: 2<625i 

To Jan. 5: “Eugene Bcjol" JAZZ— Nov. 2: Michel Brecker, The !3M5 pin,i , . - EXHIBITION— ToNov. 10: “Oper j 

is from India." RECITAL — Nov. 17: Yannick Le Franco .Ambrose! liTentei. Nov.9.BnmoLeonardoGelberpiaiio Music: 1 946- 1985 M 


t conductor. Wil- Textiles and Ceramics.” EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 15: 

actor, William Sic- To Jan. 19: “Shots of Style: Great "Claude-Nieolas Ledoux." 

e»h«. r~\ — k., rv., twm™. ■>.< - **i •• 


tra, Andrew Litton conductor. Jean- To May 25: “British Watercolours." Gaillard harpsichord (Scaria: tit. 


cdlo (Schumann). ■ (id: 733.96.10). 

- Nov. 5 and 6: Leonard Bernstein con- EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: “Los 
duct or {Beethoven, Haydn). IbeTos." ■ 

. Nov. 29 and 30: Christoph von Dob- 

. nanyi conductor (Beqg, Dvorak). n 

Nov. 4: Japan Philharmonk: Orche*- . 

) tra, Kcn-Idjrro K obayashi conductor — : — 


Tchaikovsl 


i tuauiura,.;. shaV fov^ip unwirre/tel: 29-56 JI3 1 42,61.54.10). 

Nov. 23: New Symphony Orchestra. THEATER Nov. 2. 9, 12, 16: "As EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 3: “Salon •Tour Montp: 

Clive Fairbaim conductor (Schubert, va,. Tit--. D’Auiomne.” 42.72.93.41). 

J Stratws). Nov.4.5. 7. 8L 117^^4^15,18, 19.21. 7S»Pf&« l £ : ^ Josh: “ Re >' nolds; EXHWmON — ; 


Nov. 3: Freddie Hubbard Quintet. l?°^5S 1 0 5S u - L, **!*V l ■ .. 

JAZZ MUSICAL —Nov. 13-Dec. 19: Nol 20: Chnsioph Pop pen violin, Ma- 
“ Block and Blue" (Segovia/Orezzolji. na Graf bar P (Pergolesi. Tanini). 


i Beemoven. Weber). rarena" 

£21!; aSR* *** GaUTi ' -M^Correr.icI: 25625, 

10: “Operj 


“Block and Blue" (Segovia/Orezzolii. 

•Tour Montparnasse (tel: HAMBURG, Staatsoper del: 

42.72.93.41,. 35. 1 5.551. 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Four CONCERTS — Nov. 3-5: Philhar- 

Cen tunes of Ballet in Paris." monic Siaaisorchbier. Hans Zen der 

conductor (Mahler, Schtinberg). 

aenuiuv BALLET — Nov. 27 and 30: “Onegin'* 

utKIHMIT (Cranko.Tchaikovskv,. 

MUSICAL — Nov." 16: “My Fair 

BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: T 

141 44 49) CrfcRA — Nov. 6, 9, b: La Tra- 


Staatsoper (tel: 


Nov. 29: HaD6 Orchestra, Stanislaw 23: “Oihdl'o" (Shakespeare). 
Skrowaczcwsld conductor, John Ull 


_ . mano ( Beethoven). 

1 ’ rTehnikovskv Tovama) , * EXHIBITIONS — To Nov. 17: 

- Orchestra, “ J * R ^5 UdBn ’" * Ray ‘ 

. . V-hMwIP mnitnnnr I iirinnD _ • IDOnd GlCCOTV. 


EXHIBITIONS^-To Dec.1 5: “Con- Lidzey." PARIS, A.D.A. 

t (Beethoven, wnponw, Art" XBow&ky, Dokmqnl MUSICAL - Nov. sT^The Gondo- 4177^26). 

n - 10- TonWnsder Orchestra, Ed- • . •„ _ . ' Hers" (Gilbert and Sunhnn). EXHTBITION — 

■S^bS^rondue^aLri) THEATER -Nov. 2. 4-9, 11 -16, 18- ture. Engraved Gl 

231 “L** “55 rabl ^“ (na^cal based tography. 

“mjumT ' ^U«.15.*The^fi«ouoeToumL on novel by Victor Hugo). •American Cfcnta 

SETH. Franz Schubert Quartet PhotMcrftheAr^R^byMau- .British Museum (id: 636.15^5). EXHIBITION-; 

INOT. It. rraac v reenBuilhat and Manode Andrade.’* PXHrarnON— TflJan.l986:“Bud- luunT.Wilev:Cal 


• (Schubert). 

Nov. 15 and 18: New Vienna Vocal 
''Ensemble. Peter Altmarm conductor 


.BartokQuafletfBrahms.Mo- T< wjai -, rtfl Up ^ im “Homage to Barcelona’ kiv 

Nov." 28 and 30: QemendcOjnsart, of Modem An (td: 19J)7.19 )l •^dMCofisemi<ldiB6fll.l l>. No- 

r Rgnfe Cl c TT^fa e eondnetor, Vienna ETOUB1TION — To Dec. i: “Roman OPERA— -Nov. r 7.8,13. 16. a* 


- . Hers" (Gilbert and Sullivan). EXHIBITION — ToNov. 28: “ScuJp- 

(PortuS- THEATER — Nov. 2, 4-9, 11-16, 18- ture. Engraved Glass, Paintings, Pho- 
_■ 23: “Les Miserahks" ( mu sical based tography." 

Tounstt on oovd by Victor Hugo). •American Center (tel: 43.3521 J0|. 

b y®“ u - •British Museum (id: 636.15.55). EXHIBITION —To Nov. 30: "Wfl- 
EXHIBITION— To Jan. 1986: “Bud- liamT. Wiley: California L" 

— ' dhism: Art and Faith." •Centre Culture! ChaiU ot-G oilier a 

•Hayward Gallery (td: K18 J7JW). (tel: 4720.71 JO). 

EXHIBITION — Nov. 14-Feb. 16; DANCE — Nov. 6-11: Peter Goss 
— “Toires-Gaxda: Grid-Panera-Sign," Dance Company, CompagnieJoaane 


23: “Oihdlo" (Shakespeare). ’ 1723-1792." 

-j. k/uieuo tsn«a^eare,. •Music du Louvrcttei: 42.60.3926 ). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 6: “Le Bran 
FRANCK a Versailles." 

*Mus6e du Petit Palais ttel: 

42.65.1173). 

PARIS, A.D.A-C. Galleric (tel: EXHIBITION — Oct. 3-Jaii^: “Soldi 
42.775626). D'encre," Victor Hugo's man uscrip is 

EXHIBITION — -To Nov. 28: “Sculp- and drawings, 
ture. Engraved Glass, Paintings, Pho- • Salle Pkyd (tel: 45.63.07.96). 
tography." CONCERTS — Orchestre de Paris — 

•American Center (tel: 43.3521 J0|. Nov, 6 and 7: Gary Benin: conductor, 
EXHIBITION —ToNov. 30: “Wil- Kristian Zimermac piano (Liszt, 
liam T. Wiley: California L" Roussdl 

•Centre Culture! Chafflot-Galliera Nov. 13 and 14; Christoph You Doh- 


Cen uines of Ballet in Paris." 


GERMANY 


nanyi conductor, Ghidon Kremer vio- 


“Homageio Barcelona" 

•London Coliseum (tcL 836.Q1.11). 


DANCE — Nov. 6-11: Peter Goss lin (Brahms, Schnittke). 

Dance Company. Compagnic Joaanc Nov. 16: Daniel Barenboim conduc- 
Rivoire. i or/ pi ano. Isaac Stern \iolin. Lubes 

Nov. 13-17: Nina Wiener and Dane- Yoraanoff violin f Bach, Bruch). 


34 j ,44.49) uruw — nov. o, y, i^: ira- 

OPERA— Nov. 2 and 6: "The Barber ’(Verdi) Q 

of Seville" (Rossini). Nov - and — : ’ Fideho (Beetho- 

Nov.5.S. 10:“Wazzeck"(BCTgi. . .. ,, , 

Nov. 7 and 11: “Lucia di Lammer- ! J ov - 2 ' “*• - 4: Kabanova 

moor" (Donizetti). (Janacek). 

Nov. 17; "Fidelio" ( Beethoven ). 

Nov. 21 : "La Bohfeme" (Puccini). ITALY 

Nov. 27 and 30 : “Tannhauser" (Wag- 
ner). " ■■■“" 

. BOLOGNA, Galleria d’Ane Mo- 
C.UNL ERTS — Berlin Pblharmonic derna (td: 50.2S.59j 
Orchestra — New. 5 and 6: Witold Lu- EXHIBITION —To Nov. 30 : “Luigi 


ITALY 




l €9* m 


Madrigal CboirjXaver Meyer condot> Avant-Garde: 1910rl?30'' (Male- •2L3*k “ttpheus 
• torCBadi). vitdt. Kandensky.GoatiarovaV (OffenbadiL 

■ RECITALS — Nov. 9: Detlev El- — — — ; f iS v -? an ?i: Fa 

I singer piano (Bach). ■ . . fUftl AMD THFATER^If 

i M °“ Pb, "° &eetb °- LONDON. Buticu Centre (tel: . SdiiS" & 

Nnv *tft- vt atttT mT iw«ft 638.4 Ij 41). ■ Nov. 4-6, II- 14: “ 

sssssassssas cm 


27, 30: “Orpheus in the Underworld" 
(Offenbach). 

Nov, 6 and 9: “Faust” (Gounod). 
•National Theatre (td: 633.08.S0). 
THEATER — Nov. 2 and 16: 
“Pravda" (Bremen, Hare). 

Nov. 2: "She Stoops to. Conquer" 


era. Nov. 20 and 21: Daniel Barenboim 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 5: “Henri conductor. Andrads Schiff piano 


tosslawski conductor fLuiosbwskfl. 
Nov. 8 and 9: Vaclav Neumann con- 


Benelli.” 

•TeatroComraunalertd: 2129.99). 


Sores and Claude Vallet." 


I Bach, Strauss k 


ducior. Cerile Licad piano (Gluck. BALLET— Nov. 5-7: Cullberg Ballet. 


Mozart), 


•DnQMa.Mp.lri: Nov ^-J^d B^^ eoedee. i^. » Hrto. ScUtf 


46-84.77.95). tor, fuhak Perlman viohn (Mendels- mndiTcrUM- ( n'Xr 

EXHIBITION— To Dec. 22: “Pali- sohn, Wcbenij. confluoor (Bruckner). 

Una: The Sacred Village of Jainism,” No\ .28: Daniel Barenboim conductor 
photographs and o-'orks by N icok Tif- (Schubert). 

ten. Ensemble Orchestral de Pans — Nov. 


cello. Sunna Abram piano. 


,„„ nr Noy 27: Reinhanl Peters conductor FLORENCE. Teatro Comunale ltd: 
lucIor ( Fncdl, Ha venstein). 277.92.36). 

v Nw. 30: Zubin Mehta conductor, OPERA — Nov, 3.6. 10. 13. 16: “Urt 
‘ p“:; ManluArgerich piano (Chopin >. Balioin Madiera" (Verdi 1. 

.raui Nov. 10: Berlin Symphony Orchestra. Nov. 14. 17, 20, 23, 26: “La Fille du 
wen. Van Pascal Tortelier conductor, An- Red mem" 1 Donizetti ). 

dreas Blau nmeiGcmnod, Haydn). miian. T.-.irn -.11, « ra ie del: 


(Goldsmith). - ten. Ensemble Orchestral de Pans — 

Nov. 4-6, II- 1 4: “A Chorus of Disap- •Centre George* Pompidou (tel: 9: JAromeKaltenbach conductor. 


CONCERTS — London Symphony provaT (Avckboum). 42J7.12J3). 

Ordaatra— ‘Nov.2:Norman Da Mar Nov. 22 and 23; “The Duchess- of EXHIBITIONS— ToNov. 11: “Ray 


42J7.12J3L Baduraskoda piano (Beethoven. 

EXHIBITIONS —ToNov. II: “Ray- Brahms). 

moo Mason, Jean- Michel Alberola, Nov, 23: Jean-Pierre Wallez conduc - 


Nov. 25-30: "Ti'onadab" (Shaffer). Viswanadhan, GuUuun, Mohamed tor, BemvArts Trio (BeetbovcsD. 


Nov. 7: AndrewlliiviscondDctor, Vik- «Royal Academy of Arts (tel: Sheikh " 


iqriaMuHova vjofofBcrlioz. Ragani- 734.90J2). 


To Dec. 16: “Malta.’’ 




•- Glazunov), 

OPERA — Nov. 2: “Ebclra” (R- 
:: Strauss).'.' , ' • . 

■ Nov. 3 and 5: “Faust (Goonqd). • 


Nov. 14: Andrew Davis conductor, Art in the Twauicth Cemtuy." 


EXIBITION —To Dec- 21' “German To Jan. 1: “Klee et la Mi 


Loots Lortiepuno(BoeihovH% Rocri 
ni). • ■.y.'.’f.'i.--' 


•EgliseSL-Severin ftd 


lusique. 

: 4177.19.' 


•Theatre des Champs- Elysees (tel: 
47J2347.77). 

DANCE — Dance Theater of Harlem 
— Nov. 4, 6-10: “Giselle" (Coralli- 


^.SSlhiSSSSSS^ SS7 92 n’l TLJ,ro *»'• 

Wand CondllC ' BALLET— Nov. 1 1-13. IS. 16.20.23. 
lor (Bruckner). 27; ULj dcirjta , a « (Cranko. 

RECITALS — Nov. 7: Andre Watts Scarlatti 1. 


•Royal Opera House(tel: 240.1066). RECITAL — Nov. 14; Miebd Bou- /Perrot. Adam), "Troy Game" Leonardo Gdber alia Scala — Nov. 6-8: Gustav Kuhn 


CONCERTS —Orchestra dri Teatro 


BALLET— Nov. 2. 8, 15. 1 8, 23: “The wd organ (BachV 


(North. Braalian music). 


conductor i R. StnuLvO, 


w 1 ^a7-'"“T^R mwikaval^ (R- Nov.26:fc»WdihW0«toc»f,Eliz- Seeping Beauty" (Petipa. Tchirikov- •Eftlise Si.-Vincent-de Paul {tel: Nov. 11-14. 16. 17: “Caravanserai" . 28 , : Andrej G awn low piano Nov. 13-15: Eliahu InbaJ conduaor 

-Nov,4ana7. DerKosmuravauoi s ..k-tiiw , — i~v * ^*7 won, (Beatty, Santana), “Vo!unuries"(Tct- rM»hw. 


"-Stranssjl 


■ abeth Tmwviq^TcfiaBcovsky). 


(Mahler), 


Music: 1946-1985." 

NETHERLANDS 

AMSTERDAM. Conccriaefciouw * tef- 
71.S3.45). 

CONCERTS — Concerigehoua Or- 
chestra — Nov. 9:, Nikobuv Harnon- 
coun conductor (Mozart. Schubert). 
Nov. 13-15: Nikolaus Harnoncriurt 
a^n ducior, George Pieterion clarinet 
(Haydn, Schubert). 

Nov. 2: Amsterdam Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Thomas Sundcrlirg conduc- 
tor. Raphael Oleg violin. 

Nov. 3: European Chamber Orchestra 
Per Musica, Viktor Liberman. Julian 
Reynolds conductors. Viktor Liber- 
nun violin I Debussy . Ravci 1. 

Nov. 6: Dutch Symphony Orchestra. 
Edo de Waan conductor (Mahler 1. 
Nov. 18: Cologne Chamber Ensemble 
(Bach, Vivaldi). 

Nov. 23: Netherlands Chamber Or- 
chestra. Emmanuel Kririn conductor. 
Sabine Meyer clannet rMozan. W'as- 
nerj. 

UNITED STATES 

NEW YORK, Metrnpnliun Museum 
of Art (tel: 535.77.10). 

EXHIBITION — Jan. 5: “India!" 
•Museum of Modern Art 
ttel:708.94.00). 

EXHIB1TONS — To Dec 3: “Nets 
Phoiography" (Berman. Mendoza. 
Ross.Spanoi. 

To Jan. 7: “Contrasts of Form: Ge» 
me trie Abstract An I9I0-I9K0 “ 
WASHINGTON D.C. National Por- 
trait Gallery (id: 357.27.00). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. S: “Wom- 
en on Time." 

To April 13: “Private Lives of Public 
Figures'. The Nineteenth Century 

Family Prim,” 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


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109.77 109.40 109.65 — 03)4 
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unchanged 
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New HUM 
New Laws 
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volume sown 


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14451 1 377540 
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14X574 400544 


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Prev.4 PAL vol._ 

Prev consstMotctf dose 14454X6M 


Tables Include the natioawide prices 
up to the dosing an Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



Close 


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270 

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21333 21053 211X6—0X8 
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Prices Turn Down on the NYSE 


j 9 
U IS 

1* t: 


Compiled by Our Stiff Frcr Dtspetrkes 

NE^' YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange turned downward Thursday as 
the rally of the past few sessions faltered in the 
face of some negative U.S. economic news. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 
which closed Wednesday at a record high, 
slipped 1.26 to 1.374.31. 

Advances slightly outnumbered declines on 
the New York Stock Exchange. Volume totaled 
121.53 million shares compared with I20J6 
million in the previous session. 

The NYSE’s composite index lost .04 to 
109.65. 

At ihe .American Stock Exchange, the market 
value index was up .50 at 22S.61. 


M-l Surges $ 8.5 BHMon 


12 Monlil 
HUH Law Stetfc 


Mv.YM.PE 


* 

HMaHUhL ow 


Oam 

OudOrgg 


20 11V. EnlsBus J* 1J> M 121 19*fe 19*, 194, — W 

17* Eftteren 1A0 7.1141 1258 "EPI* + M» 


Untied Press IniemanonaJ 


NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
the U.S. money supply, known as M-l, rose S8 J 
billion in the latest week, substantially more 
than had been expected, lessening the prospect 
of an immediate cut in the Federal Reserve’s 
discount rate. 

The increase Followed two weeks of sharp 
decline — S6.S billion and S3 J billion — ana 
the market had been looking for an increase of 
around $6 billion. 

“But the SS.5-billion increase was a surprise 
and leaves M-I roughly S10 billion above tar- 


U.S. government statistics provided little get," said David M. Jones, economist at Aubrey 

nisAri Fflr h/tnfc nF ravivtno m'/innmir UtYlVLTh r n. . )•«. . A. iha 


3J 

25 

IJ4t 1.9 70 


L7 9 


66 9 


support for hopes of reviving economic growth. 

The Commerce Department reported that the 
U.S. merchandise trade deficit set a record in 
September, with imports exceeding exports by 
S25.5 billion. It also said new factory orders 
dropped 0.6 percent last month. 

The agency also said that said the index of 
leading economic indicators posted a stnaller- 
ih an -ex pec led 0.1 -percent gain. 

Nevertheless. Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baidirige said that five consecutive monthly in- 
creases in the leading-indicators index portend- 
ed continued economic growth in 1986. 

And speculation persisted on Wall Street that 


O. Lanston & Co. “As a result of the rise, the 
Fed will hold reserve pressures stable while the 
dust settles on the wild volatility in money 
numbers die past seven weeks. - ’ 

M-l includes currency in circulation, travel- 
er’s checks and checking deposits at financial 
institutions. 


“The bottom line is that we are seeing the 
current advance run out of steam,” Mr. Comer 
sail! 

Noting the renewed linkage between the per- 

romance of the bond market and the progress 

the Federal Reserve might soon relax its credit of equities, Mr. Comer said that stocks cduld 

5” AmM»i' iA3 5? ts 2*84 m'i 5o — IpoUcv further. Some analysts argue that the continue to take their cue from the bonds a 
i=+ AmSor 150 ^ is- 3 v>s 3 i=, i'-. WeakcT the current performance ot the econo- while longer. But he said that the broader 
[S', =* ABO*' .9 .=?? ‘54~ l Ik, P.A Vi'inn lw,«K t(*l nm Tvrformmf< M. well 3S ihe DOW. 




2l*fa 17=6 EnsExn IJBe 6£ 

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25 19ft FeORIl 156 


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35 25=4 FWcsl 

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JO 2A 19 158 8ft 8ft 8ft 

JM« 1.1 9 291 5ft 5Vi 5ft 

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22 1Z79 4AIA 45ft 46ft 

160 47 TO 57 34 33ft 33ft— ft 
S* X 197* 20=4 20ft 20ft + Vk 
70 35 17 2* 18 17*6 17ft 

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12 Monte 
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33ft 24 Hwcel 
23ft 1514 HISbaor 
13ft 9ft HJVott 
26ft 19ft HtfCbrd 
73ft 54 Hiuon. 

37V. 26ft Hitachi 
57ft 39 Hal Idol 

81 ft 64 HI Id V A 

S3*c 65ft HoMyS 
20ft 10ft HaflteD 
27ft 17ft HmraO 
9ft 7 HmeGafl.TO 1L5 
28ft 20ft HlWJtar JD 5 6? 
18 19 HteflFH M 26 




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<7* *5*4 *4*4 *5ft + ft 

394 3S=i 3TA gw + ft 

319 52 51ft ?2 + * 

3 76ft 76ft »6ft 

43 82 'A KP* 83ft + ft 

213 lift 11 11 . „ 

1737 24 23'A 24 + *6 

36 9ft 9ft t 
06 22=4 22ft 22ft— ft 
21 lift U’- £ 

913 55ft 54ft 5fA— '“j 


■a nexe* 

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13 M 60* W* & Xf> + ft 
u asu a «=t soft- ft 


5ft 25*7 MCA* ® 

s: B ■ SEF* "5 4 ’ » fi*’S 

V n= Thou 7X1 75 .9 7i 3M Sft iift+ ft 



36ft 22ft HnnBn 1J8 14 11 * £? 2 


Aft 31ft HOUOPjM U* 


SS 2? KSSrtOTolOJ 310 2g ^4 3|ft- ft 

30ft 26 Hotetlh 3X0 1QX « g^Sft” +ft 
3J 12 50 14 13ft 53ft 

45 10 31X1 41ft 40ft 4MS + ft 

_ li 

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238 9J 11 33 25 24ft J£ft— ft 

J2 u n 9 22 27ft 21ft 

M 26 U 2246 26ft 261* + }* 

JO U 17 23 29ft 29ft 29ft —'A 

in 13 11 2080 35ft 34 35ft +1 

200 6J II 41 31ft J1V= 31ft 


19=6 12*6 

40ft 28ft HouSlnt 1A 
81 'A 67ft Hoirrt Pt 625 
29ft 20ft Houind 2A4 
14ft 0 HooOR 
20ft 14ft KowlCp 
27ft 23ft HuMwd 
13ft 9ft Hoffr 
15ft 12 HuoliTl 
24 I7V6 HUSOSP 
36*6 21ft Human 
31ft 20ft Hunt AM 

41ft 25ft WutteF 

32 20 Hydro* 


i 


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154 

120 

1X0 

£51 


4J 14 
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351? 



1.4 K 
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2.4 12 


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3=- 22' > ACanol 230 114 
52 V, =2 


_ ACanPl 3.00 6J 
20ft 17* i 6C0OB0 220 111 
30ft 25=- ACaoCx 251 e *A 
II 5*» ACentC 


... S» UH SI 
so =nv- m". w- 4 ft 
» 117ft U7ft 117ft 
n 23 23ft 23 
-3 26'- IS-l. 26'- ♦ '.2 
4«4 56ft 55ft S* — 

22 24ft 34ft 24ft— ft 
25 494- 43== 49=- +lft 

51 70i* 20' s 20ft — 

24 25ft 24=- 26=4 + 

52 5=k S*» 5=, 


,my . vhe more likely iome Fed acuoa becomes. 

Charles Comer of Opperiheimer & Co. said 
conviction that the market will continue climb- 
in 2 remains relatively low. 


57ft 4J»7 ACvcm 1.90 17 15 1D« S3 Sift 51=- + 
— . .. 3,9 2J^ 28'- 2S=- — ft 


JJ 17 
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29U 19 ADT 

24ft lflft AElPtV 

49ft 34'- AmE«P 1J, 

26ft i=ft AFomi S .48 
J4'- 23ft AGnCP 1.00 
1* 8 AGnl Wt 

£6= 52 AGnl pfA 5X7e105 
n=. 47=6 AGn PlO X64 iA 
J6ft 28 AHcrll IJ0 
IJft 7i a A Hoist 
**’» 48 AHome 2.90 
48ft lift AH0SP 1.13 
97V, 73 Amrlcn 6X0 
91ft 42 AinGm 
Mft 1* AMI 
=', 2ft AteMol 
^ 13ft AProsds 
IF, 5 ASLFlO 
18ft 13’ - ASLFlptZl* 11* 
15ft lift A5hlt> JO *7 
35ft 26ft AteSId Ufl 
Wi 35ft AmSfor M . 
78 4*=i ASIrpfA 448 Al 

58ft 51 ASIrpfB 6J0 ll.« 

AT8.T 1J0 58 
AT&T Of 3AI 9.1 
AT&T tti X3t 9J 
AWQlr S 1.00 3,7 
AmHotl 220 1 Jj 
5*1 U 


OX 9 4331 22ft 22ft 22ft— V, 
3£ 15 7594 44 45 45ft— ft 
1.9 16 1ST 25ft 2=ft 24ft 

10ft- ft 


3017 30ft 30 

254 lift lOft .. 

55ft S5ft 55ft- = 

61=4 60 60 -1ft 

33ft ZF.% J3ft— ft 

... 9', 9ft 9ft 

5.1 11 9010 57ft 54ft 57 
2J 16136J8 48ft IP1 48 + ft 

,1 9 915 93ft 92ft 93ft- ft 


35 \0 


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•lift 33 
42 34 

27ft 17 
38ft 14 


.72 

JO 


<2 Vs 61=4 ATrpr 
18 6ft ATrsc 
89ft 69 ATrun 
44ft 26ft Amcrofl 
SO 24 ft AmesD 
23ft 22=» AmrO «*I 
29ft 197a Amelek 
28ft 18ft Amtac 
16 3ft Amtesc 
70ft 50ft Amoco 
37ft 27ft AMP 
22*6 lift AmpCO 
23ft 12ft Amreo 
IT’S 22ft AmSIft 
45ft 30 Amsted 
4U 1ft AnoonP 
24ft 16ft Anlog 
37ft 19ft Anchor 
46ft 31ft AnOav 
|4 9ft AndrGr 
ZT* 17 Anoellc 
39ft 23 ft Anheuss X0 
7B 52 Anhou D> 3J0 
19' i 13ft Anixir J8 
16ft *»s Anteem X4 
15ft ID'i Anlluiv 
10ft 9‘i Apache 


5 23 1305 91- 90 90ft -T 
U 10 2896 19ft 18ft 18=-- ft 
2=k r- 2’* 
lift lift 16ft 
7ft 6ft 7ft + ft 
15ft 1 5ft 15=- + ft 

B llft 12 +=* 

ft 29=4 30 — ft 

6Tft 6!'k 61ft + ft 

— 72ft «•* 72ft 

IBS 57ft 57 57ft + ft 

IS 14=23 20=4 20ft 20=« 

130 «J 39= 40 + »i 

413 40r, 40= 40=4 + ft 

9 118 271- V 2T.6 

7 131 lift 16 16U 

29 69 67= 67= -lft 

7 13ft 13= 13= — V*. 

I 82ft 82ft 82ft— ft 

8 22 +1 43= 

32 113 45ft 45V, 

13 Eft 22ft 

160 24= 24ft _ 

52 22= 22' i 22ft— ft 

243 3ft 2ft 3 — ft 

2067x681, 67ft 47ft 


JO JJ 15 


3 JOS A9 9 


14 26 1542 30', 30V. 30= — ft 


U0 

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14 15 
11 

18 9 

19 Ij 


US 

1J2 

J4 

,60 


20 

55 

JO 33 
IX 15 
2J 14 


14 1^ 12ft 12ft 

43 22ft Eft 22ft + ft 

37 37ft 37 1 - 37=4 — = 
139 41= 41 U 41ft + ft 
209 3 2= 2= — ft 

351 20ft 20= 20U 

68 25 24= 25 + ft 

100 44*“ 44 44ft + ft 

77* 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 

21 25ft 25ft 25= — ft 


12 13 7811 37ft 35= 37 +lft 


48 

U 18 
J 22 
J4b 12 8 
18 13 12 


ft AnchP vrl 

19V, is= ApchPwnllO 11.1 
14= 60ft ApPwpf 8.12 11 J 
34ft 30 ApPv.pl A1B 13X 
31Vi 27ft ApPwpf 180 126 
3«ft 15ft AplDto 1.761 7X 

15ft 8ft AppIMo 

24= 16ft ArehDn -14b A 

102', 77 ArlPpt 9J5e 9A 

31ft 2*ft ArlPpI 158 11X 

lMft B2 ArlPpt 10 JO 10J 

25ft 14 ArkBst 60 14 9 

749. 1* Arkla 1X8 55 2* 

% Vi ArlnCP 
15ft lift Armada 
lift *= Armco 
22V: 15ft Armcpf 110 106 
24V, 13ft AnrisRO AS 14 E 
39= 28= Arm win I JO " 

34ft 23= AtoCp U0 
18= 11'- ArawE JO 
30'A l* Artra XI 

V lift Arvln t 80 
27= lift Asarco 
J7 23= AshlOII 160 
44= 15 AshIO Dt 19* 

» 24ft AsdDG 5 7.40 
23ft 18ft Attilone UO 
■&U Eft AtCvEI 158 
67ft 42 AH Rich 4X0 
17= 10ft AtiasCa 
29ft 18= Aucat AO 
54= 35ft AutoDt 68 ._ 

S'<* 4’A Avolann .05© 1.0 

34ft 17ft AVEMC 60 IX 14 

39ft Eft Averv 68 2X 14 

24= 10 Avion 13 

38 Vi 27 Avnei SO * ~ 

V 17ft Avon 2X0 


1125 75= 73ft 74ft +2ft 
307 171-r 17 1 7ft + ft 

254 lift lift 11= — ft 

573 13ft 13= 13= 

5*9 12ft lift 12ft + ft 

ufl i % i + V* 

281 19 18= 19 + ft 

mor 72 72 72 +1= 

38 Eft 32 32ft + ft 

13 30ft 30ft 30ft + ft 

39 3286 22= 19 22ft +3ft 

27 61 13ft 12= 12ft 

12 1*92 Eft Eft 22ft + ft 

:O00z 99= 99= 99= — ft 

JJ 30= 29ft 3lFft + ft 

20198= 98= 98= — ft 

9 73 25ft 25ft 25V, — ft 

7JJ7 lMk 19V l*vi— ft 

55 hi ft — 

I lift lift lift 

824 8= 8ft 8ft 


36 9 
14 12 
U 

IX IE 
JO 9 


33 19ft 19= ir,i + ft 
17 14 14 14 


3= lift Avdin 


2294 37ft 36= 37 

156 34ft 34= 34ft + ft 

31 11= lift lift 

18 Eft Eft 21 'A — ft 

105 26ft 26= 26=— = 

335 17= 16ft 17ft — ft 

336 35ft 35ft 35ft + ft 

5 Oft 42ft 42ft 

418 36ft 36 36= 

TO 18ft 18ft 18= — = 

116 27ft 27= 27ft 

5814 66= *5ft 46 — ft 

*3 lift lift lift— = 

22= 22ft 22ft + ft 
. 54ft 53ft 54ft + ft 
4 5 4ft 4ft— ft 
159 33ft 33ft 33ft + ft 
703 3S 34ft 34ft — ft 
.. 34 0 24 a 24ft 24ft + ft 
16 30 1628 32ft 31ft 31ft— 1ft 
76 13 2856 26ft 25ft 2*ft + = 


46 9 
92 

J.9 12 
8X 10 
9J 10 
6.1 


U 26 
U 21 


1695 


IS 372 17= lift inn + ft 


14= 6= BMC 

35ft 21V- Bolmco 
18ft 15 Bkrlnll 
24= 18ft Baldar 
2ft ft viBaidU 
10 2= vIBfdU Pf 

30= 20 Boll, 

1BH 11V, BallvAM 
lift 7*k BollyPk 
E'A 18= BltGE S U0 
38V: Ball pfB 450 



23ft 15ft BncOns X0 35 11 
10= 8ft BncClr n 6io 5J 
5ft 1= BanTex 
*2 47= Bandog U0 23 11 

S5ft 37ft BkBos 140 46 5 

54ft 45= ShapfA 4.91* 9.1 
47ft 31ft BkNY 23 S3 7 
33= 20= BonkVo 1.12 Al 8 
Eft 12ft BnkAm X0 U 

47 39ft BkAmpt 4.916J2J 
74ft 6lft BkAlTI pt 7X3el25 
16ft 13ft BkAm pt 2X8 
32ft 76= BkARtV J40 86 12 
75ft 50ft BcnkTr 2JD A2 * 
71 21= BkTrpf 260 9.7 

44 35ft BkTrpf 4-E 91 
15ft 9ft Banner X3a J 11 
39ft 19 Bard 6* 16 14 

25 18= BomGp 30 IS H 

41ft 25= Barnet s 1X4 27 11 
»ft lift BaryWr 60 31 15 
13ft *= BA5IX -12b 16 11 

35% 5*11 Bousch 78 ' 

lift 11= BoxtTr 17 


7ft 7= 7= — ft 

24 23ft 23ft — ft 
16 15ft 15=— ft 
TOVS, 20 20ft + ft 
1 = 1 ft != + = 

16 4= 4 4 

48 27= 27ft 27ft 
6345 17ft lift lift— lft 
12* 9ft 9ft 9= 

9 1992 22ft 22ft 22ft + = 
502 45= 45= 45= —1 U 
341 23ft 22= 23 + ft 

58 9ft 9ft 9ft — ft 

486 2ft 2 2ft 

33 52ft 51ft 52ft + ft 
582 52ft 51= Bft +1= 

1 54= 54= 54= — ft 
114 43ft 43= 43ft + ft 
150 27ft 23ft 27ft + ft 

3181 14 13= 13ft — ft 

37 40» 39ft 44) — ft 

2 *»k 62ft 62ft + ft 
202 15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 

08 28ft 27= 38 — = 
615 64 *3ft *3ft— = 
14 25ft 25% 25ft — ft 
40 46ft 46ft 46ft + ft 
125 14= 13ft 14= + = 
232 36ft 36ft 36ft + ft 
1 22= 22= 22= 

366 » 38ft 38ft— ft 
3*6 19 18ft 19 + ft 

71 V* Bft 8% + = 

2.7 13 1415 29ft Eft Eft— l'A 
25 54 4264 12ft 12% 12ft + ft 


27ft 20ft BavFIn JO X 166 24 23= 23ft + = 

34= 25ft BarttG U6 82 It 49 Jtft 3tft 3t% + = 

22ft 2Tft BsarSt n 2355 22= 21ft 21**— = 

38** 31= Bearing 1X0 11 13 1 37ft 37ft 37ft— ft 

47 2S Boa ICo 1X0 Al 9 50657 44= 39= 44ft +1ft 

86= S2V> Boa tpt 138 4J 491 81 76 81 +2= 

16= 12ft Been- JU 14 101 US 13= 13ft 13ft 

58ft 36 BednD 1J0 22 14 386 55= 5& S4%- ft 

7= fi* wlBeker 367 1 ft + ft 

li 1ft vIBekr pt x» l 19 3 2ft 2ft 

17ft 12ft BeUnH .40 3X ID 33 lWi 13ft 13ft + ft 

J7% 27ft BelHwt JO. 2X ID 481 32ft 31= 3l=- ft 

37 22 BelHwpf X7 11 15 31ft 31ft 31ft— ft 

97 76% B+llAtt 6X0 IS 9 1416 9t= 87= »»- = 

33 25ft BCE g IE 566 30ft 30ft 30= + ft 

26ft 19ft Belllnd .3 13 71 25 24V, 2=3= 24ft + ft 

44% 31ft BellSou 2X0 6X 9 4736 41ft 40= 41 - = 

57 41ft BeklAH X0 1J 23 34 45ft 45= «= 

39= 34 Semis 1X0 26 12 IE Mft 38ft 38ft + ft 

45ft E Ben ftp 2X0 U 10 317 40= 43ft 43= + = 

40 31 Benefrt A30 Hi 4 37ft STV» 37ft — = 

41 33 Benelpt fM 10.7 12»« ,41ft 42 +2 

El 142= Bsnetot 5JSD 25 60zlW IW 193 

E= 18 Beral Pf 2M 11.1 51Bi 23ft 22 ft 22ft + ft 

lift Beneath IE 7J 75 lift lift 16= 

*'.= 3= BengtB .071 X3 4= 4ft 4ft- ft 

9 3ft Berkov 97 6ft 6= 6= 

15 1 0ft BestPd XUS 461 14ft 14ft 14ft— ft 

ill, 13% ilmsti JOI 1»» 22? 5S-£ 

4TA 36ft Betnsiaiwn 13A 182 37= 3fi= 36ft— ft 

M'.« 18ft BemStntJJO 114 1011 18ft Ufo 18ft + = 

40= » Bewortv E 9 17 3E 34ft 33= 34 

X0 3J 88 1154 24% Eft 24ft , 
S 80 1 7ft 17ft 17ft— ft 

64 13 16 1EI 19= 19ft 19ft 

1.92 5J 9 35 33ft 33= 33ft + ft 

X8| 333 23 31ft Eft — 1ft 

4.1 14 380 33 32ft 32ft + ft 
14 14 3623 46ft 4Sft 45ft- ft 


ket is not performing, as well as the Dow . That, 
rather than the progress of the blue chip index, 
could determine the ultimate direction. of the 
market. Mr. Comer said. IAP, UPli 


377* 28= FlnCppf *35,185 
6ft 2V3 FnaBor > 

29= 251* FlreFdn 
22ft 16V* Fh-estn X0 AJ 14 
27ft 15= FIAItS ABO 23 9 

58VS 53 FtAtlpf 635*1U 
43 25ft FISkSY Ufl 4.1 7 

34V> 72 FBkFl t 1X0 

46ft 25= FBod, 1X0 

26ft 19ft F«CMc 122 


i: .vonm 
High Lon 5 'k* 


Sis. 

100s Him Law 


Cfcse 
O-ct-Chge 


3U, 26= BrlgSr 
66'r; 47’- BrlRM 
4~, 3ft BrltLnd 
E'.-i 21ft BrtlPt 
S’, 1 Brock 

Eft lift Brckwy 
43'. 34 BkvUG 


1A0 

IE 


1.99e 6X 8 


1J2 

s.i: 


4X 14 
■J 9 


+y* J4 okvuii j.i, 

37 1 - 30ft BkUGpf 395 1U 

Eft 15ft BwnSh JD .9 IS 

32ft 25 BrwnGp IE 45 19 

56 Eft BrwnF lXB Z0 17 




40ft Eft Bmswfc 1X0 
40ft 29= BrshWl 52 
l*t, 16 Bundv 50 U 
20 l*v, BunkrH ZI6 117 
20= 14= Burma 

M= 24'- Burllnd 1&4 54 
68i: 45 BrlNttl 1,40 2J 
7% 4ft BrlNeof 55 
23ft 19ft BriNpf 2.12 
52 4612 BrIN nf 

18= 9ft Bumev 
68 52 Burron 

20ft 11 Buttrln 
5ft 1= Butte, 

13ft 2ft Bute, of 1X51 


60 12 171 27ft 25ft Eft— ft 
JJ 15 3496 57ft 56ft 56ft— ft 
21 TO 4 4 4 

299 33= 33 33 — ft 

44 Iti 1 1'* 

166 29 E= 28ft + ft 

79 43ft 431, 43= 

14 35ft 35= 35ft— ft 

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74 30 29?, jo 

394 53 52= 52ft + ft 

810 38ft 3Sti 33= + = 

185 30ft 30 30= — = 

40 10 IB 18 

21 IBft 12ft 18ft + _ 

30 16ft tat* lift- ft 

El Eft 30 30ft + = 

879 63= 64= +lft 

2 7ft r , 7?* + ft 
B 24 Eft 24 + ft 

453 51ft 51ft 51ft— ‘J 

. 2B1 107, 10ft 10ft 

44 II 1499 56ft 55ft 56 

19 84 171 13ft 13ft 13ft 

88 lft 1= 1ft— ft 
20 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 


SLloe 0.9 
M 4.1 38 
160 ' ' 

52 


50 

3X0 

1X0 


11 


250 

275 

4.10 


IE 11 J 


12 


29 18= CBI In 

IE 68ft CBS 
85 529: CBS pf 

Bft 4 CCX 
60ft 36ft CIGNA 
32= Eft CIGpf 
SJft 49 CIGpf 
7ft lft CLC 
59ft 23= CNAFn 
ltft 9= CNAI 
Eft 16= CNIV 
49ft 36ft CPC Inf 2J0 
E= lift CP Ntl 150 
22ft 19ft CRIIMI 
Eft 21ft CSX 
40= 27ft CTS 
17ft 7ft C3 Inc 
33= Eft Cobat 
17ft Bft Caesar 
25ft 13= Cal Fed _ 

54= 37= CalFdPf tJS 95 
21 13ft Cal I tin XSb 14 
15*, 12 Comm I .12 .9 41 

76 15= CRLkg .40 

ift 2H) CmpR a .161 
46ft 30% Co mips IE 3X 13 
15** lift CdPacs At 
22= 16ft CcnPEB 
228ft 151 CapCHs 
27ft 191* CapHdS 
12ft 9 Caring s 
40= 77= Carlisle 


IE 19ft 19ft 19= — ft 


25 21 5314 119 
U . 1 83 

8 100 4ft 

45 38 3440 59 


89 31ft 
204 52 
34 lft 


44 16 
55 10 
2J6e11X 
1.16 45 9 
1X0 35 10 
438 

.92 35 10 
13 

58 2J 4 


26= 18ft CaroFt 
30ft 73Vi CarPw 


X0 

.70 

77 

58 

IE 


50 

250 


35 9 
14 II 
9.4 7 


26= 21 CorPnf 257 1 0.8 


48 34ft CarTec 2.10 

llVj 6ft Carrol X7 tX 11 

24= 17= CarPlrs 50 25 10 

31 22ft CartHw IE 4.2 18 

46ft 24= CarlWI 50 15 13 

18ft 12ft CascNG IE 75 7 

16ft 9ft CosSIOs 

» 15= CstICpf 158 k 

15ft 17 CstICpI .90 62 

E= 38ft CalrpT 50 15 

27= 19ft Ceca 50 3.1 10 

131= 74ft Cetanse 4B0 37 11 

44= 36 Cetonpf 450 105 

10ft 7ft Cengv X4 e 5 27 

45 34= Cenlel £38 55 « 

Eft 20ft Centex 25 1.1 10 

27 2IF* CenSaW 2X2 19 7 

31 'A 22= CenHud 2.96 11.1 6 

44 36= CnlU of 450 108 

21ft lift CnllPS 154 85 

79ft 20ft CnLaEI 2X8 7 S 

37 Jlft CLaEI pi A18 11.9 

lift 9 CeMPw 150 11X 106 
71= 18= CV1PS 1.90 97 6 

lift 2V, CwitrDt 

12% 8= CntrvTI 

Eft 17V* Cenvlll 

Eft 18% Crl-teed 

30ft lift CewAIr 

2Sft 19 Chmpln 

27ft 72 Chml pf 1 JO 

54ft 46% Chml pi A50 



9% 7= ChamSp 50 5.1 14 

4ft 1 vioirtC 
1% = vlCht wt 

4ft 1ft vIChrt pf 
525 52? S°“ , 3xo *5 5 
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56= 51ft Oiase pf 655S11X 
r.. 8X3el65 

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32= 24ft Chenwd IE SJ 12 

44ft 29= ChmNY 258 6J 5 

44= Eft ChNYpt 1X7 45 

56= 511, ChNYpt 4X8g 75 

as ? P fK « 

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11= 7 1 * Chi Full 
58= 31 OirteCr 
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14ft 9ft Chroma 
63 44= Chrm pf 

40 ft 25= Qirvs/r 
51= Eft Chubb s 
63ft SOW Chubb Pf4E 
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27U 21 Clkam 722 


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02 82 +2 
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58 58= + ft 

31ft 31ft + % 
51% 52 + ft 

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452 Sift 55ft 54ft — ft 
27 lift 11 11 

157 18ft 17= 10 + '* 

409 48ft 47V, 47ft — % 
34 28 25= 25= - ft 

92 20= Eft 20% + 
1581 26 25= 25= 

154 28ft 27ft 27ft- % 
68 8= 8ft 8= + ft 

816 25= Eft 25= + ft 
565 14% 14ft 14% + ft 
866 22ft 21= Eft— '* 
179 51 50ft 50= + ft 
71 20% 19ft 19%—% 
E 13 17ft 13 
302 22= 22U Eft - ft 
169 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
725 41ft 40ft 41 + ft 

1061 12 11= T2 + ft 

550 19ft 19ft 19ft + % 
85 195= 193ft 195= +2= 
1001 23% 23ft 23ft + ft 
277 9ft 9ft 9ft— % 
516 Eft 27= Eft— ft 
235 24= 24ft 24%— ft 
472 27ft 27ft 27ft— = 

5 25ft 24= 24= — ft 
T3ft Eft — ft 
ift 7 

23ft + ft 

28= 

336 45% 43% 44%— % 
37 16% lift lift 

396 12% 12ft 12% + ft 

9 26% Eft 26% + % 

73 14% |4«a 14% 

2058 35ft 35ft 35ft + ft 

73 25ft 25% 25ft + ft 

755 129ft ISBVz 129= — = 

2 43V1 43= 43ft 

a 388 9ft 9ft 9ft + % 

9 236 42= 41ft 42% — ft 

10 763 23% Eft 23% + ft 

7 1514 25= ZSft 2S%— ft 

6 79 27 26% 26= 

180Z41V 41= 41 = 

11 2419 19% 18% 19ft— ft 

7 76 26% Eft Eft — ft 

8 35= 3S= 35V. 

207 12% 12= 12= 

47 19% 19ft 19V, 

354 4% 4% 4% 

196 12 11= 11= 

75 18 17= IB 

111 23U 23 23ft + ft 
. 40 30ft 30. 30 + ft 

2490 22ft 21= 72 

6 23ft 23ft 23% 

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153 7ft 7= 7% 

101 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 

43 % ft % 

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4137 60 68= 59V, +lft 

7 48ft 47= 47= — ft 

45 55ft 55 55ft + % 

106 53% 53 ft 53% + ft 

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132 34 ft 34% 34ft + ft 

iff*— ** 

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26% 17ft BiocfcD 
36ft 23% BIO-HP 
37% lift BlQirJn 
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50ft 34ft iselnos 1X8 


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61 50ft BobeC nfSXO 
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lift 9ft BmE nr 1,17 105 
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2P» 19= Bowalr 71 3J 


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704 42ft 41 41 — = 

590 20= 20% 2OT4— ft 
111 9 8% 8=— ft 

98 39% g% E% , „ 

100x 03 83 83 -fft 

15 11= lift lift , .. 

33 13= 13% 13= + ft 

mi 22% aw. 22% + % 


51 39% C In Bell 3.12 64 

19% 13% QnGE 2.16 I1X 
34% Eft ClnGpf 4X0 1£1 
39% 29 OnGpf 4JS 117 

74ft 60 OnGpf 

74ft 61 OnGpf 
75% 60% ClnGpl 
26% 15% ClflMJI 
EH 19= OrdK 9 
31 18% CirOly 

30% 15 Circus 

51= Eft Clllcrn _. 

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102 97= ata,D«B7J!3e 77 

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19= 8% CtelrS, 

32= 2J% CKnkE 
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21= 19= ClvCJof 2X0 IPX 
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*4 53 CfvElpf 7X0 11.9 

64ft 54 CIvEfpf 756 I2X 
14ft Bft Ctavpk JOI 
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45% 27% Clonu 
26% 14= ClubMd 
39ft 2Sft Clu9«P 
EH 16ft Cluetof 
21ft m Cboehm 
36= lift Coast I s 
74% 59ft CocoCI 
21ft 10% Colneo 
32% Eft Coiemn 


33% 22% CclePal 1J6 


49% 40= CotePbf 4X5 
25% 16= CofAJks 54 


M 20% 20= 20%— ft 
31 8 7% 8 + % 

20 53= SSft 53ft— ft 
114 11% lift lift + % 
130 14ft 14% 14% — ft 
, 1 13 63 62 — % 

5TO is! 39% 39= — ft 

'.87 50ft 50 KS% 

7 63ft 63ft 63ft 
520 16= 16% 16= + V* 
144 25% 25ft 25% + % 
9 49 48% 49 + % 

«9 18% 18% 18ft 

33 33 + = 

7S& 37= 37ft 37ft 
Mfc74ft 73 73= - ft 

mm it 73= 73= + w 

75101 76ft 73ft 76ft +1 
m Uft 15= 15ft + ft 
SSS 22% 22ft 22ft 
79 22= 22V, 22ft— ft 

118 2SU E 25= — ft 
5462 44% 43% 44ft— ft 
20 79% 79ft 77V2 
10 100% 100ft 100ft — % 
S .7% 6% 4%— ft 
387 12ft 11% 12 
217 27ft 73 ZTft + ft 
S 12% 12% 12% + 'A 

53 17 16% 16% 

® *> 

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3300* 63 61 63 +1= 

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1X6 IX U 1119 4Sft 44= 44ft— ft 
JOe IX <7 21 20= 20= 

1X0 2X 18 1232 36ft 35= 35% 

1X0 AS 76 22% 22= 22% 

59 35 13 IE IOVj 10% 10% — ft 

M M 095 33 32ft 32ft- % 

256 4.1 14 1209 73% TTft 71%— % 

„ £555 20ft 19% 19ft- % 

28= E + = 
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21= 8 Camdls X0 9 

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33= 26 CwEpf 
18% 14ft CwEPf 
18% is c«*E pf 

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150 11J 
2X0 114 
8J8 114 


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616 14= 14 14 — % 

ATS m* n 33’m + 

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1004 36ft 35= Eft— ft 
.1 Sl^ S1V* $1% 

10 27ft zn* 27% — ft 
58*108 108 108 
SO 44% 44% 44% + ft 
1566 2B 26% 77% — ft 
1905 21% 21 21V4- % 

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2221 9% 9% 9% + ft 

6W737 Eft E Eft- ft 
1 fflft Eft 28ft — lft 
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* ff* Wfc '7ft 

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2* 24% Eft 24% _ ft 
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35= Eft Camper 
27 12ft Comp Sc 
44= 9ft Cpfvsn 
39= Eft ConAW 
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50 40% ConE Of 5X0 10.7 

36 U 25 CnsFrt 1.10 J1 12 
47% 38% CmNG 2J2 55 9 
8ft ift CansFw 
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54% 32= CnP pfo 745 14J 
56 32ft CnP ofE 7X2 144 
56 aft CnP pfG 7X6 I4X 
31ft 15% CnP prV 440 1SJ 
25% 14 CnPprtJ 340 14J 
Eft 14% CnPprT 378 15.1 
551, E'4 CnP pfH 748 144 
28= lift CnPprR 4X0 15X 
E'A 14% CnPprP 3.98 1HX 
E= 14% CnPprN 3X5 14.9 
18ft 10ft CnPprM£50 147 

17 9= CnPprL 2X3 144 

79 1S% CnPprS 4X2 15X 

18 10ft CnP prK £43 144 
47= 31ft CnftCp £40 55 21 
10ft 4% ContfU 
4' i % Conti I rt 

52ft 33 CnflllPf 
2 % CHI Hid 

12 4 Cntlnfo 

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38= 15ft CIDatO _ 

40ft 32*1 CnDtpf 450 U1 
1% % viCnaKU 

39 27= Coopt 152 4X 15 

41= 31= Coonl Pf £90 75 
20% 14% CoprTr xo £4 
27 15 CoopvIs .40 ' 

1S= B% Copwld X2I 
23= 17% CpwtdPf£48 14X 
27% 17ft Cardura X4 35 15 
15= It Corein 56 *X VI 
52ft 30% ComC S 1X8 24 22 
OTA Eft CorBIk 1JK 1.9 
10= 5= CntCrd X4r 27 IS 
II 6 Crate 13 

29ft 32 Crone 140b 44 11 
55ft 73 CraYRS 21 

19% 17% CrekN pf £18 114 
53= 49ft CrekN pf Z43e 5X 
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74= 43 VI CrwnCk 14 

44% Eft CrwZel 1X0 £5 
50% 44 CrZelpf 443 94 
35b a= Culbro X0 25 15 
3»* 13 Cullnets 
88ft 58VV CumErt 2X0 35 
10= 9% Currme U0al04 


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1X0 

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1646 I Oft 9ft 9%— = 
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15 18ft 17% 10% + % 
25 39 29= 3S + . 

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U 8 5318x 35= 35= 35% 

BOOz 44 43= 44 — ft 

2 46= 46% 46= 

83 E 35= 35ft— = 
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1735 714 7= 7b— ft 

J®te 3U 30 X 
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340: 54= 52= 54= +2= 
350 29b 28ft 28% + = 
90 Eft E Eft + % 
1 25 25 25 — 1= 

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9 26% 26= 26b— % 
5 26ft 26= E= 

29 25% 25ft 25% 

1 17 17 17 + = 

IS 15ft 15= 15ft + = 
15 M= Eft 25=—% 
9 16= 16ft 16% + % 
339 43= 43= <3= + ft 
142 7% 7% 7% + % 

237 2% 2 2% 

18 52ft 52 53ft + ft 

479 = = 

310 12% 11% 12 + = 

2006 23% 23ft 23= + % 
117? 16= 16% 16= + % 

100* 32 a a — 1= 


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371* 37% + % 
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17 17 + % 

25% 26 +% 
9b 9b 

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an 53 50= 52% +2% 
100 9 8= 8% 

15 9% 9ft 9ft 
IE E= 35= Eb + ft 
072 54% 53= 54ft— ft 
54 19b 18= 18= — ft 
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27 23= 22% 23b 
437 76% 74ft 75ft + % 
218 40 39= 40 + % 

9 48% 48 48% + % 

TO 32= 32% 32% + ft 
19 4564 14% 13% 14% + ft 
8 ia *4% 63% 63= — b 
8 10ft 10% 10% 


33% 33% 33% 

48= 48% 48W— % 


Eft 15ft Dallas 66 AX 30 

14% 9= DamonC X0 U 
30% 22= DanaCP IE £5 7 
9% 5% Da no hr 8 

15 6= Daniel .186 £2 

-teft 26= DartKr s 1X6 40 13 


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30% 14= DoyfPL £00 T1X 7 

66 52% DPLPf. 7J7 112 

40% 24% DecnFd 66 IX 17 

33% Eb Deer* 1X0 co 38 

26% 20% DelmP 1X2 7X 9 

52= Eb DelfaAr 1X0 27 7 

10 4= Dettcno 

44% 24% DlxCh e 1X4 £5 18 
28% 21 DansMf 1X0 55 12 
37% 31= Do Sola 1.40 4J IB 
17% 14 DefEd 1X8 112 7 
oa 64 DetEof ?a m 
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64V. 51 DetEnf 7J6 11X 
26% 21= DEpfF £75 ID* 
28% 23 DEprR 3X4 I2J 
27= 11= DE pfQ J13 1£1 
27% 22C, DE OfP 3.12 12X 
25% 21% DEpfB TJS 107 
29b 24 DEpfO 3AD 1X7 
2«% 24b DEpfM 3A2 122 
33% 78 DEert- 4JW 1£7 
34% 79 DEPfK 4.12 T£6 
116ft 107 DEpfJ 15*8 117 
20% 16% DetEpr £28 11X 

7A 10ft Dtucter JO JJ 13 

18= 11% DlGlor 64 SX 93 

21 14% DlomS f57rl01 

3B% 34= DtaShpf 4X0 11 J 

22 20% DteSOfn U0e 6u4 

11 *= DlanaCp JO U 1 

57ft 31% DleUdS 1X0 £7 14 
125% 05= Digital 
95 Mb Disney 
28% lift DEI % 

DEI wf 
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10ft 6% Domeo 
Eft 26= DemRs 

23 16ft Donald 

61% 43ft Donley 
35= 23= Dorsey 
42ft 32% Dower 
37% 27 DowCh 
50 36b DawJn 

33 81* Downev 

15b 11 Drava 
24b 17% Drew 
21ft 16% OrexB 
69% 36= Dreyfus 
61% 46% duPont .... _ 

40 31b duPntpf 3X0 9A 

50 40 duPnt pf 4X0 95 

S * 27% OukeP 2*0 7 S 
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77 61% Duke pf 7X0 10X 

27 aftDiifcert 2X9 10.1 
35ft Xft Dukdpf 3X5 50 9 


SO 16= lift lift — ft 
107 14b 14 14= 

377 23% 23 21% + ft 

120 8 7= 7% 

47 8% 8% 8ft 
736 39% 39b 39% — ft 
KO 42 39= 40 —lft 

270 5% 5ft 5% 

13 8 41 7ft 7% 7% 

U 9 M 17ft 17% 17% + = 

£1 17 2151 39= 39% 39= 

- 559 IBft 18% 18V*— % 

met 63 60= 60b— = 

311 Eb 37= Eb 

1158 Mb 25 25% — ft 

471 25% E% 24= — % 

1498 38% 37% 37%— = 

687 7= 6 bV* —IV, 

863 41% 39= 41% +1% 
79 22b 72 22 

409 Eb a 32b + b 
10ST 15% 14% IS — % 

50z 74ft 74% 74ft 

17900: 66ft 65 66% +1% 

4000Z 62= 62b 62% + b 

2 26 E E 
7 26= Eb 26% + ft 

40 25% 25ft 25% + % 
5 25ft 25= 25% + % 
12 25% 25% 25% 

40 »% 27% 27% + ft 

134 38 73 27 — = 

22 31% 31% 31% — ft 
9,32% 32% 32% 

114b 114b 114b + b 

3 19b 19ft 19ft + ft 
408 22 21ft a= + = 
224 16= 16% Ifib + b 

21*0 15% 15% 15ft— ft 
3 36% 36b 36% + b 
2*9 22% 21% E= + b 
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383 37b 36= 36% — ft 
.. 18 29*3 113% 112=113=-!% 
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133 20ft 20 3RD— % 

2 34% Eft 34ft 

73 5% 5= 5% 

479 8= Bft 8%— ft 

1520 32b 31% a —ft 
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35B 55ft 55% 55% + b 
325 35% 35% 35% + % 

H 25 1479 W* +1% 

1X0 45 15 4404 »% Eb 36ft— % 
JB 2.1 U 1208 37% 36= 37 — ft 
MO IX 3 397 Eft 32= 33b + = 

X0 « 57 1H* lift 13% 

X0 42 16 741 18% IBft 18% + ft 
£00 10* 51 19= 1? 19= 

„X0CJ 9 IS 719 89 68% 68ft— ft 

100 4X 1* 9740 62ft 60= 62b +1= 

1 37b 37b 37b + = 

3 47ft 47ft 47ft + b 
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280* 77= 77= 77= 

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7 EM Eift 30ft 

41 35% 34% 35V1 


6.9 6 


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1XB 3* 13 


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17% 13% Duanf 
18% 13= Duanf 
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25ft 23 Qua or 
27 20% DynAm 


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im 123 
£07 12X 
£31 12J 
2J5 10X 
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1582 15= 15b 15% — b 
750* ltft 15ft 16= + b 
210* tab 16ft lift — = 
330* 19 18= 11= 

310* 35= 35b 25b— ft 
100 25= 25b 25% + ft 


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73 E= 24ft 54ft— = 

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6 13330 ift 6 6ft— = 
144 2% 2ft 2ft— ft 
IM lft 1= 1%- % 
37 18= 17ft IB 
W »ft 20 ft— % 
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144 a. 21ft 21%— = 


SX 
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60 43% FFB £12 SJ 8 

55% aft Flniste 2X0 
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11% 6% FINU35 X* 

31= 16 FIN otnn 
7% Sft FstPa 
30= 23= FifPoof £62 
Tift 25= FtUnRI £00 
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35ft 19% FIWlsc U0 a . 
55ft 48 FWIscsfiXS MX 
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13 Oft FtahFd X5e *171 
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28= 17ft Fleet En M 21 9 
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13% 11% Field Pf U1 125 
29= » FlgtifSf 1 .16 J 

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2K 33% 32V, 32ft — % 
529 a 31= 33 +1 

786 6% 6 ift — ft 

70 33% 33% 33% + b 

117 5% 5b 5b 

5046 29% 2JVk Eft- ft 
70S 18b IBft 18% 

402 25ft 23= 25ft + = 
a 56% 55 56% + % 

97 at* 3Bft 38% + ft 
£9 14 13 MV* 34V* Eft 

lilt 371 40b 40% 40ft— ft 
U 9 4012. 2«ft 23= 24ft 


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416 lift lift lift + ft 
2 37ft 37ft 37ft + = 
1 33= 33= 33=.— ft 
18 6 % 6 = 6 % 

343 27= 26% 24b 

137 5*% 54 54= + % 

460 50= 49% 50= + = 

46 30% 30% 30ft + = 

316 T% 7ft 7% + ft 

29 31ft 31 
763 6% 6 

72 27b 27 
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54 26% 25ft 

a 34% 34ft . 

100= 54ft 54ft 54ft + ft 

1164 Eft 23ft E + ft 

U 12 lift 13 

154 38% 37% 37% — % 

493 19ft 19ft 19ft— = 

567 36= 35= 36ft + = 

1 12% 12% 


36% 25 1C fnd 
19= 14% FCMD 
11% 8= ICN 
30 22= ICN pf 

18b 15ft INAIR - , . 

27= 21% IPTimn 
17ft 14= 1RTPTS 1X0 9J 
36= 25% ITTCP V™ H 
6*% 49 ITT?K H 
64ft 49 ITTpfO 5X0 7X 
fflft 35b ITTpfK £25 4X 
48 Sib ITTpil 4X0 63 
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21ft Mb ItPcWBf £10 IQX 
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637 0% 8= Bft 

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TO2 13 T2fb 12=— b 
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36 32= 32ft 32ft + 3 

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380 25= Sft m + ft 

175 10= 10% 10ft + b 

2 8% 8% 8% 

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275 20ft l»ft 19=—% 
27 13ft 17% 12% — b 

188 2b 2ft 3ft— ft 


1*0 SX 13 
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203 17ft taft 17ft + b 
391 29b 28ft 79 + ft 
9 21b MM Mb + ft 
10QZ AVb 8ft Bft 
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Hcmlb^gribttnc. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


Jyj-J \ 4 ifi 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 11 


■J«pj jj ^ . ®J DAVID E. SANGER ; 

NevYa rk Timet S<nkc . 

T EW yORK — In the rmdst Of a refnarfobly 

computer dump, there scans to be ad insatiable de- 
H J ? ftS_L ^ df ?^*wdw^Ncwl«H3BagUia«o»ace 

li U kf *tSr c ,joH»i« ^ni»nies hope to do. die same with software — 
* 24 |S ffe**** 111 ^ I j sed software that can be “recycled" — mprograms for 


N 


ne time u takes to develop new 
nch reocady eondtadcd that 80 
mission critical* systemslies in 


tfr — : : — \ajuvzum. m uussnjn cnucar svstcniS ties m 

'•£- * & IP'HJSfW of unwieldy pn^rams. 

;•:■ s« j *** Propoamxs of the technology, dneflythcnewSoftwaie Pro 
• :-■ .i. j j, $ jj ^jductiviw Comortmm in Res- ^ ■ ■ ■■■■■' 

S:ton v&emif 


■ :- i „ Tj n »<ui«.u,TiLjr wjnsoranm m Kes- 
;; * ! i„B 1 n&too, Vn^mia, Troast that £t 
•■■ c *'i5 «s s^-could save more than half the 
'I*-' £ now required to design 

iand write some of the largest 
: i iiJ * V programs used by the Defense - 

' i‘ Department and its ccratrac- 


software for some 


to be surmounted before program 


: c ii )S *b a Ijundo- way. “The problem is that -the Japanese listened to ns loo, 
:" r B ft V an O five years ago, while we were grin talYinp they gtartfn p /Ift pie r 

J "5 & ^something about it." .. 

- : Z m '* & 5 i ^ Ae mid- 1 960s, when airplanes aid common rations systems 

■ U ^ Jg ar simpler, solirtledqjendedOTOonqwters that the average 

3J i: iSgjfmflitaiy system required less than fivemanthsetf software devel- 
mK st i) nj ^ ft- opment tcme.Today. hardly a landing gear is InA^ m p ly i* or « 

11 ^ ^^’“aYig^don system turned on withotit the oversight of one or more 

/ -z i] ,? ^computer systems. By most estimates,^ now takes eight years to 
- ' i: I* iw § §*. devdc^) software for a ctnmilex xmfinuy system. 

?. ! 7 2* 1 *®! 

’« ji B Si r ^ fT^ HE frustrating part for programmers is that much of their 

.? ij wf5 I daw is spent reinventmg the vdied, writing ccnqmtercode 
• ‘ £ £ u ?i va y Mtmlar to programs written many times before. 

. . - - '5 ig ^ “Probably 70 percent of the software developed by the major 
•it ii r e- fe aeroqiace manufa c tur ers has been written sometime, somewhere 
~ ,:<1 7 it before,” said V. Edward. Jones, -president <rf the consortram, 
iiSl i which was formed by 12 aeroqiaoe companies *h«t include TRW, 
■ ;ii : |j ^ ii ^Gru mm a n , Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed and Northrop, 
rj -rj tt«u^“But there has never been a library where those programs can be 
‘ %'-h l^cut up into pieces, indexed by funetkm and then stored.” 

: '< f :» ‘5 ^ i } Bimding that library has become the first task of the caosar- 
.•• .1 ii i rtium, winch is starting with a STO- miTH on anneal budget and 
f, : < w ij 7? about 200 eo^doyees. Once the ^stem is operating, Mr. Jones 

•: a ill St a Boeing programmer, for example, would be able to 

: c :i ?. -n -r,Ss^oiate *e program fragment he needs, (dine it into a Imger 
- 1 l» ^ Stprogram under development and rest assured that it has afceaay 
„ .. * Hi ? * been ddniggpd, or rid <rf errors. 

■* ^|*3 But programs, unfortunately, are rardy written in neat mod- 

■! !'s2 ldes 11,31 0811 besnapped on and ott like hubcaps. Instead, they 

S ii rV are ridden with Intadqtendencies — 1 logical loops that rely on 

.-i H * k 1 vi f information gained elsraihere in the execution of -the program. 

> ' iS Scs “It’s 80 interconnection problem,” said Mr. Fr eem an . “And 

r "’; . « ^ t there is no easywayout. Somdimesyouneed an.^nterconpection . 
' .j i n i n a language,* someway to'corrnect ail erf^ the modules and’ xbakesure 

. , i i m . ^ nrrwV t Atr ” -• 


^ ^ f they work together.” 

*5 The troubles do hot md there.Only recently has the Pentagon 

Atl i (ContaoBd on Page 17, CnL4) 


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Markets Closed 

Financial markets were dosed Thursday m Tah^CXA^clay.There 
was no afiemoon trading in &**x became of. arhoB^pn Friday, - 
markets are dosed: hi Austria, France, Italy,.Xuxad>orar «nd the 
Philippines for a holiday. m-- . 




DivkSns; the Pacific Market 

Airlines market share based on 
passengers flown m 1984 

v Source: Department of Transportation 




Pan Am 
14% 


m 




Japan Air Unes 
26% 


Korea 
.Airlines - 
\ 6 % 





1 '"1 


Others 

8% 


China 

Airlines 

5% 


Singapore 

Airlines 

7% 



Tip Now Yort Tara 


Northwest Guards Its Pacific Flank 


By Agis Salpukis 

Nc*v York Tuna Senior 

NEW YORK — Next year, Northwest 
Airlines Inc. will move its headquarters from 
the Minneapolis- S l Paul International Air- 
poo to a new building on a spacious site in 
rural Minnesota. From its windows, the staff 
will lode out on three lovely duck ponds 
dotting the vast property, and an almost 
timilless view of the surrounding countryside. 
- Until recently, the prospects for success for 
Northwest, the seventh-largest U.S. airline 
and the biggest American carrier in the lucra- 
tive Pacific market, seemed just as limitless. 

But for the first time since the 1950s, when 
Northwest was near bankruptcy, the compa- 
ny feds vulnerable. The daurk cloud on its 
horizon: the agreement that Pan American 
World Airways has negotiated to sell its ex- 
tensive Pacific routes to United Airlines, the 
largest UJ5. carrier. 

“United is. three times the size of us," said 
Steven G. Rothmrier, Northwest's president 
and chief executive officer. “There is no way 
you can match their feed system.” 

If the Department of Transportation, 
which recently announced preliminary ap- 
proval of the acquisition, gives the final nod 
to Pan Ain’s proposal, Mr. Rothmder says, 
Northwest would be greatly weakened over 
the long term and may even be forced to 
merge with a larger carrier to survive. Thai, at 


least, is the case he has been making in his 
vigorous effort to get the approval reversed. 

His campaign seems doomed. Elizabeth 
Hanford Doie, secretary of transportation, 
has rejected the argument that Northwest wiii 
be- severely harmed by the United-Pan .Air 
accord. And most airline analysts doubt that 
Northwest's survival is at stake. 

“II could put a lot of pressure on North- 
west, but not to the point of driving them out 
of business,” said Edmund Greenslet of Mer- 
rill Lynch & Co. 

Still, Mr. Greenslei adds, “it certainly will 
make the Pacific a much tougher place to 
show the kind of good results they have 
shown in the past." And some analysts say 
that if, as expected, the proposal — the larg- 
est route case in aviation history — wins final 
approval in its present form from Mrs. Doie 
this week, Northwest eventually could be 
forced to seek a merger partner such as Delta 
Air Unes or Eastern Airlines. Even then, such 
a merger would not give Northwest a feeder 
network the size of United's huge domestic 
system, which carries more than 1 20.000 pas. 
sengers daily. 

Julius Maldutis, airline analyst at Salomon 
Brothers, says that if Nortbwes't does wind up 
in a merger with a major carrier, other airlines 
may feel at such a disadvantage that they, 
too. will initiate mergers. “The degree of 


concentration in the industry will increase,” 
he said, and that could mean more control 
over cnees and thus higher fares for consum- 
ers. 

While the proposed S750- million United- 
Pan Am agreement has introduced some un- 
certainty into the long-term outlook for both 
the industry and for Northwest — which this 
year relied on the lucrative, but increasingly 
competitive. Pacific market for 40 percent of 
its total traffic — the short-term prospects for 
tile airline are still strong. 

During the past six years, Northwest has 
been gearing up to expand its Pacific opera- 
tions. As of last year, it had captured about 
27 percent of that market, compared with 
Pan Ara's 14 percent. 

In the third quarter ending S*»l 30, net 
profit for Northwest’s parent, NWA Inc., fell 
6.9 percent to S39.0 million from 545.9 mil- 
lion. Bui Northwest is considered one of the 
healthiest carriers in the industry, with 1984 
earnings of SS6.8 million on revenues of S2.4 
billion, decades of steady growth, and a 30- 
year tradition of cost-conscious mana gement, 
h has paid out dividends without interrup- 
tion since the early 1950s. 

Although he insists that a United with 
Pacific routes will hobble Northwest in the 
long term. Mr. Roihmrier acknowledges his 
(Continued on Page 16, CoL 5) 


Economy Stfll Sluggish 
111 U.S. in September 


Compiled by Our Staff Front Dtsptuekes 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
government’s main g aug e of future 
economic activity rose only 0.1 per- 
cent in September while new orders 
for manufactured goods fell 0.6 
percent, the Commerce Depart- 
ment reported Thursday. 

And m another report, the de- 
partment said that the country's 
trade deficit with the rest of the 
world widened in September to an- 
other monthly record. 

Although there were bright spots 
within the individual reports, econ- 
omists said, the numbers taken to- 
gether continued to portray an 
economy weighed down by a flood 
of imports. 

The huge trade deficit has been 
the principal factor holding back 
US. economic growth this year. 
The United Stales has lost 340,000. 
manufacturing jobs o™ January 
as American producers have lost 
foreign and amnestic markets to 
cheaper foreign co m pe t ition. 

The Commerce Department said 
the trade deficit, the difference be- 
tween imports and exports, surged 
to a monthly record of SI 5 J billion 
in September, an increase of 57 
percent from the August deficit of 
-59.9 billion, which had been the 
year’s low. 

The big jump came from a 21.8- 
percent surge in imports, to S33 J 
billion, the C omm erce Department 
said. Exports rose IJ8 percent, to 
S17.7 billion. 

Some economists had been ex- 
pressing moderate optimism based 
on a belief that the wrest of the 
country’s trading woes might be 
over with the declines this year in 
the value of the dollar. 

The September deficit, which in- 
dnded a record deficit of 55-1 bil- 
lion with Japan, kft the imbalance 
for the first nine months of the year 
'at SI 06.7 billion, 12 percent worse 

than the same period last year. 

This year's total deficit is expect- 
ed to hit SI 50 billion, far above last 
year's record of 5123.3 billion. 

Meanwhile, economists said that 
the slight 0.1-percent rise in the 
Index of Leading Indicators, which 
is designed to forecast the future 
course of the economy, was in line 
with expectations. The September 
rise, the smallest since an identical 
gain in June, marked (be fifth con- 
secutive month that the index has 
shown, an increase. 

Economists pointed out howev- 
er, that the index is a notoriously 
volatile yardstick ibai is often sub- 
ject to wide revisions. Indeed, ibe 
department revised the August in- 
dex to a 0.9-percent gain from 0.7 
percent but left the rase in the July 
mdex u n c h a nge d at 0.7 percent. 

David Wyss, an economist with 
Data Resources inc^ a private fore- 
casting firm, said the index has . 
been si gnaling modest growth in 
coating months. 


He predicted that the gross no- 
tional product, the widest measure 
of a nation's output of goods and 
services, would grow at an annual 
rate of around 2_5 percent in the 
final three months of this year and 
at a similar pace next year. 

The gross national product rose 
at a 33-percem annual rate in the 
third quarter, up sharply from the 
1.1-percent pace in the first six 
months of the year. 

The 0.1 -percent rise in the lead- 
ing index stemmed from a rise in 
five of the i 1 indicators available. 

The biggest positive contributor 
was a rise in the money supply 
followed by an increase in the aver- 
age workweek. Other positive fac- 
tors were contracts for capital 
equipment, building permits and 
changes in sensitive materials 
prices. 

Five indicators declined, with 
the biggest negative factor coming 
from a drop in stock market prices. 
Other negative factors were a , 
change in the amount of credit, net 
business formation, a rise in unem- 1 
ploymem claims and new orders 
for consumer goods. One indicator, 
the speed with which orders are 
filled, was unchanged. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL I) 


Mexico Raises 
Light OiL Cats 
Heavy Crude 

The Atsoeimed Pros 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico 
has announced that it w01 raise 
the price of tight crude and low- 
er the price of heavy wL 

The government oil compa- 
ny, Petrdleos Mexican os, said 
Wednesday that Mexico was 
raising the price of light crude 
by an average of 60 cents a 
band. The price of heavy crude 
will fall 40 cents. 

Pemex said the new prices, 
effective Friday, would bring 
more money to Mexico, which 
has a $%.4-bilIion debt. Two 
major earthquakfts in Septem- 
ber have further aggravated the 
country's problems. 

Pemex said light Isthmus oil 
would rise from S26.25 to 
$26.75 a band for Europe, 
from S2650 to S26.90 for the 
Far East, and from S26.75 to 
$27.50 for the United States. 

Heavy Maya oil will drop 
from $2150 to $2110 for Eu- 
rope, from S23 to $22.60 far the 
Far East, and from S23.50 to 
$23.10 for the United States. 

Mexico’s volume of exports 
from July to October averaged 
more tiuin 1 J25 million barrels 
a day, Pemex said. 


Inco Ltd. Asks 
LME to Suspend 
Nickel Trading 


Compiled h\ Our Staff From Dispute ! » 

LONDON — Inco Ltd, the big 
Toronto-based nickel producer, 
said Thursday that it had asked the 
London Metal Exchange to consid- 
er halting trading in nickel because 
of acme pressure on prices caused 
by the tin crisis. 

There was no immediate reaction 
from the exchange. But analysis 
said the request was a clear sign 
that the week-old suspension of tin 
trading by the LME is beginning to 
affect other metals markets. 

Dealers said Thursday that spot 
metal prices fell during the session 
in erratic and sometimes disorderly 
trading as buyers backed away 
from committing cash io physical 
metals of any kind. Buyers were 
reluctant to lake delivery- even at 
discounts, the dealers noted. 

The LME suspended tin trading 
last Thursday after the Internation- 
al Tin Council, comprising the 22 
major tin producing and consum- 
ing countries, said it could no long- 
er afford to support the metal's 
price at 2 greed-upon levels. 

The suspension has been extend- 
ed until at least Monday, and 
worldwide tin trading has been vir- ■ 
tually shut down amid fears that 
the metal's price could collapse 
once it is lifted. 

Traders said that if tin trading is 
resumed without ITC support, the 
metal's price could tumble by as 
much as £2.000 ($2,850) a ton from 
its level or £8,140 before the ITC 
problems surfaced last week. 

Inco, the non-communist 
world's largest nickel producer, 
said it had requested the trading 
suspension because the current “tin 
crisis in unduly influencing' 1 nickel 
prices. 

Nickel fell to $1.76 a pound on 
the LME Thursday from S1.78 on 
Wednesday. It traded earlier this 
week at S1.90 a pound. 

Most analysts agreed that Inco's 
request would likely be refused on 
the grounds that many LME mem- 
bers bolding tin might go bankrupt 
if unable to liquidate their nickel 
holdings. 

Meanwhile, banking sources said 
Thursday that banks threatened by 
the crisis in the world tin market 


met Thursday with the Bank of 
England, which oversees the Lon- 
don Metal Exchange. 

Banks from Malaysia, the 
world's largest tin producer, were 
among those meeting with Britain's 
central bank in an apparent effort 
to secure financial backing, accord- 
ing to the sources. 

The Bank of England refused to 
confirm the meeting, citing its rule 
of confidentiality. 

Banks in Europe, South America 
and the Far East face a serious 
threat because of tbeir loans to the 
ITC. which has used the loans to 
support tin prices in the face of the 
metal's oversupply on world mar- 
kets. 

Industry estimates place the 
ITCs bank debt as high as £500 
million. 

The sources said that the British 
government has come under in- 
creasing pressure to guarantee fu- 
ture borrowings by the ITC as an 
essentia] prerequisite to any solu- 
tion to the current crisis. 


Creditors Extend 
Venezuela Freese 
On Public Debt 

Reuters 

CARACAS — Venezuela's 
creditor banks granted a 30-day 
extension to its 2'e-year public 
sector debt payments freeze, 
banking sources said Thursday. 

The extension, which begins 
Friday, was intended to ' give 
more time to reach agreement 
on a draft model contract for 
the 521.2-billion package that 
must go out to 450 creditor 
banks for approval 

Outline agreement was 
reached in September last year 
but contract agreement has 
been held up by Venezuelan in- 
sistence on a contingency clause 
for unforeseen economic cir- 
cumstances. The sources said 
Venezuela was seeking renego- 
tiation of the agreement should 
oil prices plunge. 



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Page 12 


I INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


^ 5 S J 




REPUBL1K TUNESIEN 

MINISTERIUM FUR VOLKSWIRTSCHAFT 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

iNTERKATlONAL AUSSCKRE1&UNE K.P. 3764 

Dip Gjffd Phospfulef (Company (order! mil der AbMchL berehaunuscJiinene fur 
die L"mrtawere<:hlie«u»; der Phvphalsruben im i.olsi-becken zu kurfen. zu 
inlemaDonalcn Lieferangefcoten fur mcheiebende Audiuttuns; auf: 

— S hifthereifte Lader van 1 Kubikvord (ftT6S in’) 

Iddelwtang. 

— 2 luftbereifie Lader von 2 Kufaikyard (1.530 m’t 

Laddebuuig 

An dicser Aitsuhreibung inusuwierte i^rseJIrchifttn Rieutcn gejen ZihJung der 
Suirune un 50 Dinar (iQntag Dinar) vom Senior General. 9 rue du Royaume de 
I'Aiabie Sxmdile. Tunis R.P. 

An&ebole. in fechsfjciier Auffuhrunc und iranzoekiier Spraehen mQs&en Mon- 
sieur le Durcteur dfe- Achifc de (a Gompagnie des Phosphates de CiLu. 213*1 
MetbiHu iTun&tat. spalesienp am 14 1 1 1985 um 1(100 Lhr rrwrgerts vorliepen. 


REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA 

MINISTRY FOR THE NATIONAL ECONOMY 
GAFSA PHOSPHATES COMPANY 

INTERNATIONAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
N P 3764 


The Gita Phosphates (Company invites international tenders with a view. lo 
pu refusing the iol logins mining equipment for underground exploitation in 
the phosphate mines of the Cafca Basin: 


Metluui tTunbbl. spaleslenp am 14 11 1985 urn 1 
Dlt auseere L'mechus bl »ie fold zu bcschriften; 


’Appel doffres N P 3764 
End ns miniers 

Me pas cuxvrir avam le 14. 1 1.193 d . 

Die L iwhlage werden am 14.11.1985. vemnittae um 10.00 Uhr. in deT 
Direction des Achats Pepinment Lo Metboui toiler Bflwvhnung der OSenilich- 
keit gtOflneL 

\ach dirtfeni Datum eucehenck- feitbchnfiliche Angeboie konnen nicht berCck- 
sichdgr werdrn. 


— S lyre wheeled loader* of 1 cubic yard 
— 2 tyre wheeled loaders of 2 cubic yard 

The companies interested by this invitation to lender may obtain a schedule 
of conditions upon payment of the sum of 50 dinars (fifty - dinars), from the 
Service General. 9 rue du Royaume de I’Arabie Seoudite. Turns R.P. 
Tenders in the French Luiguape. in six copies, should be forwarded to 
Monsieur le Directeurdes Achats de la Compare des Phosphates de Cafsa. 
2130 Meibom (Tunisia), before the 14/11/85 at 10.00 a_m. The outer 
envelope must be marked as follows: 

"Appel d'offren IV P 3764 

F.ng»n« mini on* 

$e pas oirvrir a van I le 14/11/85." 


The envelopes, uil( be opened in public on 14/11/85 at the Direction des 
Achats Department in Metlaoui at 10.00 a.m. 


Achats Department in Metlaoui at 10.00 a.m. 

An\ tender received bv telex or after this date will not be considered. 


85 


NEDBAI 

GROUP 




PROFIT 


PROFIT AND FINAL DIVIDEND 

For the year ended 30 September 1985 


The nel taxed income aurilnilabl? lo shareholders of the .Nedbank Gn.uip Limited, after provision for all known 
losses and contingencies and afler transfers lo internal reserves, for the year ended 30 September 1985 amounted 
to R91.3-million(1984: R 105.1 -million I. 

Earnings per share for the year under review amounted to 101.3 cents 1 1984: 1 16.9 cents). 


Nedbank 

less: intercompany dividends 


Nedbank Factors 
Nedfin Bank 
Nefic 
Syfrels 

DAL Merchant Bank 
Other investments 
Nedbank Group taxed income after 
transfers lo internal reserves 
Retained income brought forward 


1985 

R000 

56 916 

5 034 
51882 
(2 759] 
9843 

6 788 
12 420 

7 178 
5 989 


1984 
R000 
69 634 
7 512 
62122 
1020 
14026 
8106 
10 183 
6209 
3393 


Appropriations 
Dividends paid and proposed 
Special levy on deposits, net of taxation 
Transfer lo disclosed reserves 

Retained income 

Fully paid shares in issue 
Eamings per share 
Dividends per share 


91 341 
12 098 
103 439 
89 797 

54098 
7216 
28 483 

R13 642 
90 132 272 
101,3 cents 
60 cents 


105 059 
9272 
114331 
102 233 
61 145 


41088 
R12 098 

89890155 
1 16.9 cents 
68 cents 


Earn in gs for the second half of the financial year. R45. 1 -million, are largely unchanged from the R46.2-raillion 
reported at the interim stage for the first six months. Bank margins widened a little during the second half of the 
year, but the provisions for specific doubtful debts were increased. 

BANKS’ ACT REQUIREMENTS 


The present capital position of the banks in the Nedbank Group is adequate to comply with the anticipated initial, 
more stringent capital ratios which will be required in terms of the recent amendments lo the Banks' Act. 

REVIEW 


During tlie first hall of the financial year under review the economic recession in South , Africa and the abnormally 
high interest rate pattern which pertained continued the adverse impact, which had been seen in the previous 
financial year, on the earnings of the banking companies in the Group- 

During the second hall the economy responded lo the discipline of the restrictive fiscal and monetary stance the 
authorities had adopted. At the rust of largely increased unemployment and underutilisation of capacity 
throughout the country, the current external account was brought into satisfactory surplus, the underlying inflation 
rale abated somewhat, the financial markets showed less strain and interest rates began to ease downwards. 
Political events then became dominant. The late August 1985 announcement of the temporary and partial 
suspension of repayments abroad, and the reimposition of exchange controls — while a response to external 
pressure which was draining South Africa's slock of foreign exchange — caused a severe jolt. It marked the move 
towards a less outward-oriented and market-directed phase of development for the South African economy. 

The disrupt ion to the international financial mechanism impacted particularly on Nedbank. Being the only South 
African institution with significant hanking offices abroad (which remained open during part of the period when 
South Africa s foreign exchange market was dosed). Nedbank was first in line as foreign hanks sought wavs of 
reducing their aggregate exposure to South African risk. 

Vt bile Nedbank » London and New } ork branches were subjected to considerable stress by these developments, 
the situation has since been stabilised and the international payments mechanism cleared. The bank's foreign 
liabilities were in large part on-lent to public sector Iwdies in Suuth Africa, which lendings an? denominated and 
repayable in the same currencies as the tank's liabilities. The Group has no open or exposed foreign exchange 
borrowings. 


As a result of die international developments the activities of Nerltank's London branch - which started 
operations «8 years ago — and of the New York branch are being scaled down. 


LOSS PROVISIONS 


The intensity of the domestic economic downturn and the volatility and degree of the depreciation uf the rand have 
been exceptional by post war standards. They have led lo corporate failures and difficulties, resulting in 
substantial charges for tad and doubtful debts being home In banks in the Croup. In addition to Ihe provisions for 
■specific doubtful accounts, general non-specific reserves for unforeseen losses are at an international lv 
acceptable level of more than one percent of the loan portfolios. 

OUTLOOK 



The debt rescheduling arrangements, and so the market and policy environment within which the now delayed — 
but still expected - revival in the pace of South Africa's economic activity will occur, are not yet known. Economic 
growth, once the present uncertainties have been cleared, is likely to be more locally oriented than in the past but 
it will not necessarily be less vigorous. In the present volatile financial and market circumstances an earning 
forecast is extremely difficult, but Croup budgets indicate that there is a reasonable pros[>ect. allowing for the 
likely dmp in income from overseas oik* rations, of approximating the 1984/85 profit levels- 

FINAL DIVIDEND 


Thursday^ 


» Month 

HtSfcLOtt Slock 


cia cqn * i. .w* • 

^HtohLaw Qtf-qa hq*!£2lX2! 


_■» rar.cE 


9a.-' -'5Jbh ■ 

Taaitfca&w awt. #»'*■ 


Closing 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up to Hie closing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Sis. C taw 

Piv. fifl. PE Wttt High U* Qua. CVB8 


(Continued from Page 10) 


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Non-resident shareholders* tax will !«• deducted from dividends | viva hie to nun-resident shareholders. "Hie 
transfer- registers will dose from 2 November 1985 and rew|*en mi II November 1985. 

Shareholders who changed their address should notify the transfer secretaries immediately. 

The annual general meeting of shareholders will Is; heir! in Johannesburg on 3 Decembe^l^M0*ldB 


Bv order of the Board 


Ihin-ii'r Si n-tariii: Kr.tx-r Nm-t Itr-iMnir.iI'Ki | wuii.il. Sup. Ij-titir. in Kn 

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61 33% 33*0 33*0 + % 

7 W 77% 17% + % 
145 23% ££-23%— Wl 

48 52 50% 52 +1% 


21*4 10% PwlftHm .12 1.1 13 m 11% 10% 11 — % 


Jl*8 V6ta Purotal 

10W 6V6 Pm 


393 18 17% 17H— % 

985 6V, 618 6*8 


QuokOs 140 24 15 986 56*8 56W 56% 


63 33 QuokOS 140 2J 15 ^ ... 

105 91 OuoOPf 9.56 9J _ 100x104 104 104 +1 

25 17 QuokJO XO 12 a S3 24% 24% 24% + 16 

TOVJ 5 Quaiwx 17 384 5% 5% 516 + % 

34*6 27 QuesJar 140 5J 10 80 29*8 29% 29*6 


9V< 4% Tiftei 374 4% 6% 6%— % 

Tltt 1% Titan pf 1X0 9J 3 11 10*6 lift 

39% 26% TodSbP IX 47 II » 3 M M 

21ta V5*6 ToUlml JB 2J VI S7 17% 17% T7V, 

2116 16% ToJEat* 2J2 125 5 517 20% » 20% + % 

29% 24% TofEtf pf 272 127 6 2914 29 79V. 

XV. 24% TalEdpf 3J3 12X 15 3% 28*6 79V. + U 

a 23% TolEd pf 347 124 - 11 27% 27% 27% + % 

3398 28*8 TolEd pf 4JR 12J 61 33% 33% 33%‘+ *0 

1H% 15% TolEd pf 231 124 . 718 17% 17% + % 

a 9% Tonkas .10 J 5 145 TJS8 73% 23%— % 

53*6 U Tool Rot 4BB 9 14 48 52 50% 52 +1% 

24*6 14% Trehms 40 7J II 1806 23 32*8 22% . 

112 98% TrchPf 1038c 9J 100 110*8 lWti 110%— % 

18% 11*8 ToroCo ,J8 22 11 IM 18% 18% 18% 

5 1 Toko 479 416 4% 4% 

16% 6Yi Toiyle , if 6% 6*0 6%— » 

10 4 Towle pf 44.110- \ 4 4 4 

4116 25*4 ToyRUS 26 110* 34% 34% 34% + % 

2816 17 Trocrs 32 19 11 1121 18 17*6 1714—48 

23 8% TWA <935 22% 22 2214— % 

16 13 TWApf 225 UJ 119 15*6 15% 15*6 

34% 18% TWAPfBZ2S 6X <76 33% 33_ 33%— V. 

32*0 34*6 Tronsm 144 5J 15 839 .31% 31% 31%— 16 

2198 17% Tran I nc 232 VIA 19 21% 21% 27% + % 

14 11% TARtly 1X0 83 88 * 12% 1216 12% 

21% 15% TmCdaoT12 69 7 33 16*6 16 .16% + % 

57% «4 Transco &99eI4J 48 1715 48% .48 48%— Vs 

66% S3 Trracpf X87 45 201 59% 59 J9%— *6 

24% 19% TnmEx 236 UX 183 20% 20 20 + % 

13% 5% Tronsai - 7 156 7% 7*8 7% . 


<7*8+16 9% MWMkL 6 IMS 8. 7% 

AH— % 3% HWMJrwf- -. - 169-2*4 2% 

Ip. 26% 11 WAlTPf 2X0 14 . 27 .23% 23% 

a 1% m WCNA 477 W EH 

17% a 77% WCNA pf72S *3X 31 17% U*6 

20% + % 133 99*6 WPod 10 17 125*6 125% 

29% . « 5*6 WUatan 819 11% iS* 

2916 + 14 £»% a*% WoUBBf . . - 3 . 31% 30% 

27% + % 52 a WnUpfC 2 am JAW. 

33H--+H 8% 2% WnUptS 7> 4% *% 

17% + % H%_f*8WnUptE 107 ll*t llta 

23% — % 43 20 WUTlpT \ 03*6 75*6 

52 +1% 77% 5% WUTfPfA 12 133. 13% 

55 . IK*®*' ^-2 jx u-xm o% o,- 

1M0— % JB3f»WttK U2 34 » MO -37V: JT-r: 

!8% M. 2+ta Wererti UO 49 75 1364 3*% 700 


<IW « 7%..7*fc-% 

- 189 » -» 

B .73*6 23% 23% + 18 
477 J* t% TH +14 
31 17% M11W-V1 
0 12 125*6 IW6-125*4 +% 

X19 u% rate I8H-+ % 
3 31 % 30% am +i 
j am jm/am.-^w; 


71 4% - 0% .*%'■? H' 


j? iKt aw ; 


ll» I AAA 

26 110* 34% 34% 34% + % 
19 11 1121 18 17% 1714— *8 

4935 22% 22 22V. — % 


44*6 36*8 Weyrpf 2X0 73 
5M0 45% Weyrpr 4J0 9 A 
20*6 «WvlWW»K 
» 14% vjWPttpfB 

32% 10% vilMlPNpr. 


26% 14% QfcRetl J40 1.1 1* 156 22% 73 


9*6 6% RBtnd X41 4 

49% 34 RCA 1X4 29 

112 00 RCA pf 4X0 17 

38% 32*6 RCA pf 345 9 A 

9*8 4ta RLC X II 

4*m 3Vi RPC 
19*6 13% RTE J6 11 
1BV« 8% RodJce 


X4J 4 61 6% 6% 6*8— % 

1X4 29 24 4128 47% 46*6 46*6— *6 

4X0 17 4 108 10TA 107%— 2 

345 9A 3 3S*i 38*6 38% + % 

X II 19 113 6% 6*0 6%— V> 

5 3% 3% 3*6— % 

J6 11 9 19 IS IB IB 


Gon^pai^ Results 


fttnnue and profit* or kton. la mm Ions, ora M local 
cummefe* ortins oitierwhc Indicated, 


*714 31% RalsPur 1X0 29 15 


12 471 17% 17 


9% 5% Romod 
2116 14% Bunco 
4% 7*i RanorO 
78% 51% Rarcm 
17% 9% RavmK 


X0 29 15 3200 44% 45*4 <5*8— % 
54 S3 7*6 7% 7% 

X4 4J 10 11) 18% 17% 18% + % 

972 4 3*6 A + % 

M J 26 996 74% 72 74% +2% 

.. 6 10 9% 10 + % 


(Other Earnings on Page 13) 


53% 3656 RovTtin 140 13 IT 1344 48% 48% 48% 

1051 5% ReodBI - JO 45 342 6% 5% 4% + I6 


. MEI 

3rd Ouor. 1985 

Revenue 2254 

lief inc. nxs 

Per Shore — 170 


9 Mo mm . 

Rgwiw— . 
Net Inc — 

.Per Shore 


1983 . 1984 
5J0C 4J00. 
442.1 54A5 

2-57 138 


^whSc* i 

^ r 

" r i 

12% 8 WHfmd 12 T 

1» 7% WlflcxG .W J 5 

32% 26% WHUam 1 JO 4J 22 

5% 2 WlhnEI 

^ ^ ^ « 13 

0% 356 WlnterJ 
40% 30% VVUcEP 14 u t 
M 43% WbEpf 735 74 
4H0 28H WlscPL 7J6 74 9 
39% 29*6W%cPS Z84 74 9 
«% 30% jjffiuB IAS Cl 9 
1* °Vi WatvrW .2* 2X 

« %?S!S5 ** nn 

Jta-asw s is u 


M 3818 
.151 <8 .47*8 

Itt. BW- JS 

20QzM 20% 

4«t » ■ 


4J W <29 44*8 


151 31 - 
1 39% 
77 if . 


12 m 1th;imE'^^„ 

£ £ S' 35324 S 

4 » -3H 3H . g«k3* 

13 § -34^ r StS- » 

9 

? 

II 209 52% . 

3 12 m ^ 


J2 io as 

M 15 U 


219* 14% RdBafPt2.T2 1A7 
16*6 11% RJtRef 1 J3e 9J 11 
17% 0*6 RroiEa 14 

12*9 7 Rodmn JO IS 16 

IU. "m Regal 

43% 27*8 RetchC JO 2J 14 
iff* 4*8 Roc Air 5 

3 1% RepAwt 

12*6 6 RbGvjJ 3 X 40 9 

4956 34 RepNY 144 13 9 


53 14% 1416 14% + ta 9 Month* 


1* 574 10% 998 10% + *6 l Net Inc . 


49*6 34 Rep NY 144 3J 
27*6 2356 RSVptC112 114 
57*6 52% RNYpfA 6J4ell 3 
34% 24*6 ReoBK ,144 59 
30 23% RepBtcafZ12 7J 

25% 15% RshCof J2 IJ 
29% 22% Revco SO 19 
17*6 H*8 Revere 


JO IS 14 165 BJg 8g ^0 + V0 

XO 2J 14 143 32% 32 32%— % 

5 2714 916 898 9% + W 

294 1*6 1*6 1*6 

JO A0 9 317 7*8 796 7% 


19BS 1781 
598J 5405 

3U7 M22 

1.98 20? 


3rd Quar. 
Revenue . 


9 317 7*8 796 7% S'"*"® 

9 41 49% 49 49% + Vi Q°er Nri — 


h24eiu 10 B 
M 52 6 313 31% 

L12 7J 5 27% 

J2 IJ 233 24*8 

X0 2J 30 UT7 27% 

3 in 1446 


8 27% 27% 77% — % Oper Share_ 


MI tutor 
1985- 

. 3544 

1.10 


55 -% 9 Months 
31*4— H [ Revenue. 


lM4 Storase Technology 
><05 3rd Quar. 1785 1984 

K-7? Revenue — 170.2 zklo 

7Sfl Net Lass 1A0 4A7 

9Mpb»« 1985 1984 

Revenue -XUS 4544 

I9M Ref U»* S9J no. 

168.1 J5»fr toeiw* tax crmdlfs at 

047 W P-nio nfft net alia ta- 
IWU dados kxts of sits munaa^ 


H% 3516 Xerox 
79 19H XTRA 


1X0 6ft 17 
44 M 11 


37*4 2§l ISrafo ^ J| 


to 2*a 


•S 48 m m . t*»o 

■« J 17 in 54 JElii 

_ ,_ns itm ami 
•S H 16 a mm; 



57% 22 Vb Revlon 1X4 3J 18 403S 57% 


11 «•% 
449 24*8 
22 69 


JO 2J 14 2008 23 
15 M' 2H 
IJ U I 13 34*6 


99% 93 RvfnpfB 332 100 

2498 17% ftexhm JO 341 14 IT3 23*8 

15*6 11*4 Rflmrd J4 1) 9 76 14% 

32% U% Reynlp 3 1 JS SJ 4 5293 26% 

130 'A 123% ReVInpflZM 100 2471 J29H 

41% 30 RevMt) 1X0 02 422 31% 

87 45 ReyMpf 440 iA 11 WH 

7JA 8 24 RevM pf Z30 94 449 24% 

49 26*6 RchVrt 148 Zl 23 22 69 

33% 21% Rite Aid JO 2J 14 2000 23 

7Tb T.i RvrOkn 16 38 2?6 

34*8 28% Ratafnv U0 U f 13 34*6 

41% 24% Rotrtsn 140 64 403 24% 

24% 5% v| Robins 569 II 

24% 17V. RochG 120 9.4 6 317 32% 
<K'« 31 RochTl 244 65 I 40 3S% 

20% 18 RckCtrn 1888 18% 

41*6 »8 Rockwl 1.12 32 9 WOS »6 

73 55% RotimM 220 3J 11 47 67% 

70 40 Rohr In 10 2*9 60% 

27'A UV, RoInCm JO IJ 31 ID 24% 

18 ’A 5% RaKflEs XB 3 Zl <13 12*0 

12% 0% Ratlin* 44 1* 17 45 12 

3V» 2 Ramon 42 2V6 

19 11 Roper 44 44 73 14 

47 24 Rarer 1.12 27 2? 1604 4216 

11% 7% Rowan .12 U 44 214 7% 


27% + v. Ooar Nel — - +.11 

24 — % Ooer Share— 060 
27W— *6 

«%-% Nortok . 

IM +*fc 3rd Quar. 1985 
23*6 + » 52r?2" ’S^s 


25%— *6 l^rSharm 


31V8 + W Revenue 
48*8— tt Met Inc . 


13 34*6 
403 24% 
549 II 
317 22% 
60 3S% 
1888 18*1 


24% + 16 _ 

** +% Nets tocfuda gams of 3 cants .Teaneco 

22% per stwra m auarter end of 19 SraQBOr. .- iftg . ]ne 

cents In 9 months from tateof Revenue _ 3X70. 3J7a 

3«J + % securities- Fmonth nets abo Oper Met 10SX 126X 

»fc-* toetode dataset BMb in Oper Share. oS .fig 

3?--* J® & I ££** wn ”***’* "ESS . JW ..W 


Norfak 

3rd Quar. .1985 1984 

Revenue 146X 1204 

Net Inc— 543 X4Q 

PerShar* UO USD. 

9Menfta TUBS' 1984 

Revenue <204 3349 

Net Inc : 164 1Z7 

Per Share 1X3 L78 

Nets Include gaSts of 4 cents 
per share tn auarter end at IP 
cents In 9 mo nt hs from side of 


Sun 

SndQaar. 1985 19S« 

Revenue zno. X430. 

Met Inc. (01140. 122X 

Per Shore. — nip 

1985 1904 

"2«noe 10480. 11490. 

Met Inc. mx 402X 

Per Share, — -1X0 148 ; 

a: lass, lass nets include 
charge of S375milUan. 


^SE f%hs-Lows^:| 


MEW HIGHS : 


10*0 

22V» * V, 
3516 
18% 

35% + % 
67 — *6 
tOU— W 
tt%— 16 


TManHta . *985 *984 1 

Revenue - - . tijjo. linen 

Oper Net — 3S2x £?S 
Qper8hare_ : Uf m 

iWi*J*Kta«» HTf/eoffaf 

SHOmtftton. 


1.12 27 Z? 1604 42% 
.12 U 44 2141 7*8 


w* + % Old Hepablic Ihn 
SneZu 3rd Quar. 1985 19W 

£%_* OPfrNtK— IM 15J 

15V8_ s OP0T Share— . 099 1X2 

11% 9 Month* 1988' 1984 

2% + Ml Oner Net — 443 4*3 

13% + % Oder Shore- 254. 2M 




64% 47% ROVID 1290 5J 7 2034 64Sv 


RuBmdS 48 IJ 18 374 9ta 


24 14% RwsBr 12 66 19% 

24 15*0 RusTos 36 W II Wffl 

31 ta 22% RvenH 1X0 41 8 1250 25% 

28% 22 Ryders 40 21 11 807 22% 

29 18% RytdAd 44 28 11 88 23*8 

20% B% Rvmer 


<!»+% . 

, + % 

43% — % _ 

15% + Vi 3rd Quai 
X + tt Revenm 
19 +16 Net Inc 


pan An 

IrdQear. 1983 


int Texas Air 

4 43 .3rd Quar. - 19&5 

258 ^venoe — . 541J 

Oper Net 387 

Oper Share— 1x1 

— t Months ins 

RMCfUK 14*0. 


AtowiAium 

Betti steel 

OarpTech 

FKmtCb 

UehVoIlrxl 

PavleepCash 

UlUtom 


NEW LOWS 


OperStMre^ 2X3 oj? 


S3B?" 1 

MlCfclhry 

Wat Com a pf 


ArnhfaCP Alhlitoit jffl 
BrfanStmt B*tt*mG4p1 
Fstcwodi p Faa&>t 

S5ffl+" 35SS& 

Rytoerpf ' •". TmfH 



22tt —1 % Per awre _ 
9Montta 

jh+ 5 -ara ss= 

u 


Rymerpn.TT 104 


t- IBM 5 Si *■?£?** 1°* cromtt of 

so.'^ssi 

T . 114J vs Slid. mRUantn 9 month?. 


l%hs-ljOwi : 1 1 


I Ralston Purina 

ernooar. IMS ■ IBM 


74ta 41 

12*8 9*0 
37% 19% 
19 13 

3 14 

20*8 1216 
12tt 5% 
2*8 116 
30% 23% 
2» 25% 
36ta 70>* 

a is% 
me 9% 
8*8 3% 

35*6 24% 
20% 20% 
9*4 6*4 

12% 8*8 
43% 29% 
25*8 20 
35*8 24 
4916 31% 
25% 29% 
2216 17*8 
23% 18% 
9% 5 
13% 8 
28% 21% 
57% 35% 
<310 32tt 
14*0 8% 
27 23%. 

«1VS S3V4 


2X0 2J 17 727 

3Xa IJ 10 4 

X0 25 15 20 


2J1414J 3» 

JO IJ 15- 111 
22 Ml 
143 

XUS 1023 
I JO 4.9 9 * 471 
J2 23 12 321 
1J2 8J 7 4 

1X8 10J « 

.16 S IS’ 1734 
Ut U I « 
.VOtTDX 10 - 243 
18 14 

JO IX 14 947 
IJ4 BJ 12 J« 
IXQ 11 13 976 
144 11 U 1591 
144 42 15 9 

140 8X 7 .15 
IJt U - 4 

: . . 1 ». 
1.121 1 
LU SJ 0.1230 
IJ8 .33 14.1529 
JO 36 • 9 37» 
.U U W <S 
Jbf .. 13 5lS- 
xK.ix loiw 


Per snore— L .115 


1430.. l.tTO 
58.9 583 

033- 047 

las im 

5440. un 
2564 242J 


3rd Quar. 
Revenue — 
Oper Net _ 
Oper Share— 
9 Moritts . 
Revenue — 

Oner Net 

Oper Share— 


Travelers 


«»Q»ar. VS JO Quar. 1985 m. 

R«v»nue l^t. 1.1TO Revenue— 3 x 00 . 3 2m 

Net Inc «+ 5C2 oper Net _ 

Par Share— . .073. 047 OperShare. S*. K* 

Year. 1905 ' 1W - 1 renrirn - - mm , 

Per Share —L 115 240 OperShare- 248 

I9BS results toclodo Cerrtlnen- . Hots cxctxte taa*** tT. 


doaesctmegeotsitsmtaion. . ve S25A million tn> menhS. 


. St Payf-Caaipanies utd h 

non. 1985 1981 letQpai 

Ravanuv - - <0-1 401X ReJSw 

Net LOU • *43 74J9 S^ r ,-;4 ; 

» Mantbs ' - . -1985- 1984 Oaersh 

Revenue^— U20. X3X- Nets at 

Net UK. - ' 37751 a! 97.14 SI* mill 

Per Shore ixa • — ttSSnei 

a; lass, in* net* Include million, 
losses pfsSSAmtmo* In noar- 
ter end at US million - to 9 
months tram discontinued . _ 
apera t fa a. - ■ g™”* 


Utd Merdwnfs & Mfrt 

iSmSt 1595 

g«nue .22BJ 1684 

SP«-hW— 049 542 

Ooer sham™ 1 asz a« 

SSjEsssSFE 

iVBnetJnaadeoaatntt/ssj 


■ Southern. Co.'.' • 

MQuar. 1985 1984 


WUtcrni) . 

fcd'Qiw. . 1984 

■ttMOpic— 83307 ' 

Net Inc j* 

Per more-:. 0.7* 

yWK' - 1984 


BW 32% + Yi 

58% 58% — % 


Revenue‘s. 1AL TJSO. i&SgiL - ,2 ” IMS 
Nerinc , 277X 207 -Netint — ZT ift H? 0 - 

Per Shares IBS \- UW P?r»Sr?^I lift IV? 







♦V 

. '-f 



v SSfc- 4* . 

w 4 

It -i i: : J 

* » , ^ *• •! 

:*■ ■** a 

T -f: £ -»- *# 

•■* y >L- •■*•■* *7 

^ ■*--. IT 1 “■• 

’* *1 u. ^••* • » 

•- V* "«• -.•*' • 

-jr :** 

>* •.:,*« * 

f £: zi\ j 

• I- ** > **'• : 

r. a* * 

^ : 
•-; -.-« \* ; - 

«■■«*• 4fi :. * • > 

- > * ^ '• -i 

£r ■— V-* “ife 

::• ^ '■■: r •# 
«. -,-... ^ t . 4 : 


■*':■ -*•••; ■; 


.-a -: .. .' 


‘ -.1 i'. , 

' -\ ?•*. .; 

.* ' « -i : j 


• - -* / . 

'* •M' ■ t. 

■ n :-. i i. 


*-*■ - i '±A !*. “ 


: . . '- • ■•* 

■* ’-• . .i ‘.; 


* « -M ■■ * 

r-*. .-. •■-, . ^ 


•• - ‘ ~t ■- t, 

t; v. ».• 

- •• .«*-<» J 


r;: .zn j 


. ■< *. 


V. -t • : 

-i : J «i 

_• •• •. i •;»•» 

!■-*.-. • • 

. : •■•.«•. 

... , ■ *. v-. - - 

— T, -- * . 


r ■ • •- : i 


T'„ • *> 

■V. . - J 


- - 1. ‘ . 

••-•.• ■ !» 




BUSINESS ROUNDUP " 

: -S8' International Harvester 

I ^ Restructures Fiitatioin g 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1. 1985 


JyU-J \ ^Page 




- The AnodtUed Prop 
. -CHICAGO — Intonation*} 
JIarvestor said Thursday that h had 
restructured its financing and 
would reduce half its debt to the 
_ company pension fund. 

■1*. ^ company said h would pay 
; more than S500 million to the vest- 
ed pension fund, reducing its liabtl- 
vy by about half. Its refinancing 
also will enable the truck manufeo- 
; -turer to re-enter the commercial 
^paper market. 

1 - J 011 ^ iuto the pension 
land wffl come from International 
Harvester’s financing subsidiary, 
international Harvester Credit 
Coip^ which wffl pay a dividend of 
-S3S0 million to the parent compa- 
ny. 

The company said its financing 
Subsidiaiy would raise cash by issu- 

COMPAWY wore 

• .Ford-Werke AG of West Gerzna- 


ingdcbeimiie^ saydile in tbefu- 
tom. The su^^iy also has raised 
cash receatfy by seffihg some of the 
receivable aocotmts . generated 
when.Internaicnal Harvester was 
stiD in tfe fano-oqoipment btisi- 


ncco&jc.Tbeoan9Miiyjiw 
factores and sefls -medium- and 
heavy-di^y trucks, 

Ifecn^ooipmaiion idso ^will 
reduce its hank borrowmgs and in- 
terest costs. by Tq^dM its $JJ- 
billion revolving credit Ea* with a 
SlJrbjllioc cremi fine that expires 
in 1989. . ' 

In 1984 the cooqiany lost $55 
million <m sales o£ S4w8. Ktl^ n, 
compared with a $485-tmliion loss 
in I963<msaks of S3.61dOJon. Its 
worn year was 1982 whcn it posted 
aloss m $1.7 l^ion bn sides of $4.3 
taffion.-. ' • - • 


Disney Team 
Visiting Spain 

Rfvt&j - _ 

VALENCIA, ^ain — An 
inspection team from Walt Dis- 
ney Productions has arrived in 
Spain to study possible loca- 
tions for a new theme parts on 
the Me di terr an ean coast, local 
officials said Thursday. 

Engineer*, topographers and 
designers from the company 
will survey suggested sites in 
Catatonia. Casieflcn and Ali- 
cante over the next three days. 
Another Disney team is exam- 
ining locations in France, the 
officials said. 

A government spokesman, 
Javier SoIjqul, told reporters 
Wednesday that the cabinet 
would bring together the offers 
of the different regions to com- 
pose “one final bid” to con- 
vince Disney to locaie die new 
park in Spain. 


Sime Darby to Seek Joint Energy Ventures 


fUtr.trs 

KAjALA LUMPUR — Suite 
Darby, the diversified Malaysian 
commodities and firuincia] group, 
plans to set up joint ventures with 
foreign companies in oil and gas 
exploration to lessen its depen- 
dence on plantations. 

The group's chief executive. Ah- 
mad Vahya. said Thursday that the 
group is looking ai such companies 
as Australia’s Broken Hill Pty. as 
potential partners when the nation- 
al oil company. Petrosas, opens the 
next round of bidding form l-cxplo- 
raiion permits in March. 

“It is pan of our plans to develop 
nonplamation activities," he said. 

Sime Darby posted a pretax 
profit of 210.7 million ringgit ($86 _ 
million} in the year ended JuneJ 
down from 214.3 million a year 
earlier, 

Sime Darby expects that oil and 
gas exploration in Malaysia will 
continue for at least the next 10 
years, Mr. .Ahmad said. 


U.S. Interest Reported in Japan Link 


Nbna Motor Cci. said it; wants 


& 10 re ^ aB 10 accdctaie by one year the sec- 

1982 ood pbase of (woda^^ans for 
™ dA P|^ iPMtocbeckforapossi- the Aoswr modd at as plant in 
ble SMLbdt defect. A spokesman . Washington, ftoductioo 

aid that 2 d percent of those cars in Britain is to begin in August 

»5££r*tnSST& h 

^^cmtodispose^loS 
T “tiier . pitals and a hospfifnianageniem - 

• u K the IV' contract in TnmesseeTl^uS ^ 5 ° r Iw! ^ ae ? 1,cond ™r. ma ) c ' 
j l h ' 0 '. 0 >t agency said HCAWnSup of 

‘ un 11 two hoq>ital chafn« could lessen Ior KUaxmximKaxxm equipment. 

competition in the Chattanooga Union Bank of Fttdand LnL, the 
.'Tropieu area. conhtty*s largest commercial bimk, 

- Jaguar PLC said it produced has acquired more than 50 percent 
■? ArtQi^ 28.000 Series 111 sedans and XJS of 11x1 shares in Bank of Helsinki 
•" L 'hv toffV^Jorts cars in the first nine mnnthc LuL, officials said. Union Bank on 
-T- 'Mihai ^ of 1985, 14^ percent more than Thursday bought a 20-percent 
n r' A «tc3jj^' during the like period last year., stake from Skopbank. ending a 
^^teson-- Jaguar said its production target light foe control of BOH. 

nde V ; this year is 38.000 cars. WheefingHPiftsbii^ Steel Cora. 

1 MItsi*idH Heavy Industries Ltd. has tentuaatod four pension funds, 
aighijis'gr said its parent company net income with $475 million in unfunded li- 
;“io!aafc'. rose ^ peraait to 37.07 billion abilities, and turned them over to 
iter tood fa ■ y en (SJ75 million) in the six ;the Pension. Benefit Guaranty 
aUa’tifti months ending Sept 30. Sales fell Corp„ which atsures the pensions 
lohno ptjji' - 14 P^cem to ; 869.75 billiem yen at UA workers. The move in effect 
fncifiS' from 102 nillion yen in the 1984 doubled PBGCs deficit to more 
file's [an£- ^ rsl half. than $1 billion. 

|h< 01®, jg. '' . . 

JjS U.S. Economy Still Sluggish 

(CoatbmA fromPa ^ 11 ) New factory orders, which are 
d-inr hdflt* said the modest rise in the dosdy watched as an indicator of 

i Y . * leading index still pointed to con- industry’s ability to add capacity 
v andVto growth in 1986 becauseof. and new jobs, had risen 1J percent 

r V r* the components that had risen. ni August. 

are pomtmg npwid. includmg the - m risen 0J 


than SI billion. 


| U.S. Economy Still Sl uggish 


^Susses jsa^arsis 

“ K 53 ,n « ?“ "new orders would few risen 0J 
factory workweek, new OTders for. percent j* September. ' 
r_ plant and equipment and pennits ‘ .. >>- 

for homebuUdmg." he said. “De- The- w®* 11 th^hne included a 
— '■ tense orders for capital goods, 0.8-percent fall m orders Tor dura- 
, . which are not included in. the lead- *~ e ^ oods ’ ,tems o'pee**® lo 
...T ouM ing index, also have been rising.- lh rec or more ymus, and a 03- 
mnariOpk . Ln hs thud report Thursdayth* parent drop m orders for nondn- 
jik uHi Bi Commerce Department said that rablc goods. An advance report had 


roes! Commerce Department said that 
■ioiunifE orders to UJS. faaories for manur 
.V -‘-f factured goods fell 0.6 percent in 
J® ® Sqitember. 

. Mil IB £ . a 

iternsP 
sruid^. 
i ikOpa 
; Piihsbff 
stftl«^’ 

■hffl'v 


hie drop m durables-goods or- 
al a atelier I.l percent. 

iAF. Reuters) 


A fetor France- Preae 

TOKYO — Four U^. idecom- 
tmmicatron companies have aehrt 
to join Kokusai Denshin Denwa 
Co. in high-speed, low-cost digital 
satellite communications service 
between J^pan and the United 
States, KDE> sources said Thurs- 
day. 

Hie sources identified the UJS. 
companies as SatdSte Business 
Systems, which is affiliated with 
MCI Communications Corp.; 
Comsat International; American 
Satellite; and AT&T Communica- 
tions, an international telephone 


division of American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 

The service is to use a new com- 
munications satellite of the multi- 
national International Telecom- 
munications Satellite Consortium 
to transmit data across the Pacific 
to banks, trading houses and com- 
puter companies. 

The data will travel at (wo mega- 
bits per second, compared with In- 
telsat's present satellite speed of 56 
kilobits per second, according to 
the sources at KDD, Japan's over- 
seas telephone and telegraph mo-, 
nopoly. 


Company Results 

Revenue antt proms or Josses. In millions, ore lo local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


Con. General Electric 
3rtl O war. IMS I9M 

lltVBW, 317.3 23SJ 

Promt tan ».u 

Per5tur«_ VU 1.12 

>mwm - IMS IW 

RnaiM inSO 9547 

PndH 37.7 wn 

Per Sftare 13* US 

Stem » Cordon Mines 

mqmt. ms im 

ReWHMW 81.2 71LO 

Oe«- Lost 2JH 4J7 

f Maatns IMS 1*84 

Revenue MSe 2*4.7 

Oiw Net _ — Ml (gHU 

Oner Share— 021 — 

O' lass. 

bulled Slates 

Brims* Stratton' 
HtQoor. IMS 1*85 

Revenue me 134a 

Net Inc. - (chub ua 

Per Snore — O.M 

a: loss. . 


mqtwr. ms 

Revenue 34T2 

Net Inc. .(aims 

Per Shore— — 
rear ' 1*85 

Revenue 1X10. 

Nei Inc. - - laM&4 
Per Snore _ — 

o: loss. 


Cyclopt 

artfQiMf. 1*85 

Rfivimie __ 3344 

Net Inc — _ . &0 
Per Share— 1J1 

*Moatt» 1*85 

» t*U 


MW new inctttM tmn of SSs 
million in 9 monies Irom 
cnongo In accounting ana 
oato of tlj minion m both pc- 
rttktt from Insurance settle- 
ment. 


Dots General 

amOuar. 19tS 1*84 

Revenue 2945 3414 

Oner Net 0J0 243 

Oner Shore_ 0JH 0*2 
f Mount 1*85 1*84 

Revenue U«a l.ua. 

Oper Net 243 873 

Oner Shore- M2 ie0 
JM< nets exciaae gains at 
SKA minion ktau aner a m t m 
SIS million In 9 manna. 


General Re 

MQaar. 1*85 1*84 

Revenue ssu 3*U> 

oner Net 4X7 aw 

Oner ShOra_ DJ0 0J* 
fMoottit 1*85 1*84 

Revenue Ijso. i.im 

Oner Net _ KKU *7J 
Oner Shore. 234 2.17 

Nets mid ude ooin at S3 mil- 
lion vs loss at IU million m 
auorter and gain of U.7 mil- 
lion as lass of S6SUHO to P 
mantta. 


* M«tftn 1985 1*84 

Revenue B4U0. 4310. ; 

Oner Net 165.17 21137 

Oner shore— vn 3JU 

Rally Services 

WOgar. ms 1*84 


Revenue 
Net tnc . 


230.9 1*93 ! 

938 143 


Per snort— 03* 032 

fMMfflu 1985 1*84 

Revenue 847J 8459 

Net tnc. ... 24>2 i*j3 ; 

pw Share— 131 133 . 

Per snore results oOunted I 
tor Star J sow m Aug. \ 

LuDrtzol I 


XroOnor. 

ms 

1984 

Revanua 

3833 

2045 

Not inc. 

134 

1*3 

Per Short __ 

0J4 

081 

9 Mnmtn 

1985 

1984 

Rovenut — 

7093 

4448 

Ntf Inc. -- 

48.9 

545 

Per Shore 

170 

1J* 


Harcourt Brace Jov, 

3rd Qaar. 1985 1*84 

Revenue — 339.9 2888 

Net Inc 393 308 

Per snore. — 383 33* 


fiiunttix 
Revenue- 
Net Inc _ 
Per Star*. 


339.9 2888 

393 308 

383 338 

1*85 1*84 

7118 5743 

413 31.5 

404 140 


Intvrnoriti 

manor. 1*85 1984 

Revenue xsso. 1310. 

Oner Net 3837 3531 

Oner Share— 080 032 


cents per share In avarter 
and all cents inP mantra. 

Manville 

VO Ouar. 1*» 1984 

Revenue — 515.7 511.9 

Net Inc laiiei* 4*5 

Per Share— — an 
9 Month* IMS 1984 
R^enue— 1850. moo ; 
N*t Inc _ ialE58 1038 1 

Per Share — 180 

a; loss. 


Masco 

*7H Ouar. 1*85 1*84 

Revenue 2SOO 177 0 

Net tnc — . 3*3 283 

Per snare — 088 (U* 

9 Months IMS 1*84 

Revenue — . 7350 0440 

Net inc — 1113 97J 

Per Share — i,*j 189 

IW nets include gati at 4 


He Pressed, however, ihx: Sime 
Darby is not moving cui of ihc 
plan mi on sector, its core busLiess. 
despite depressed cam modi:;, 
prices is recent years. 

The company* also is engaged to 
tractor sales, insurance, property 
development and tire production. 
It has investment ir. Southeast 
.Asia, Australia. Britain and the 
United States. 

Mr. Ahmad said that Sime Dar- 
by is still awaiting approval from 
Australia's Foreign hvesarxr.t Re- 
view Board to nuse its stake in 
Australia's Monlock Brothers to 50 
percent from 15 percent 

He said Matlock, which is a 
franchised Suzuki Mote: Co. deal- 


er. is an attractive invest mem be- 
cause it is listed on the Perth Stock 
Exchange. 

He said that Darby recenth 
bought a 20-perceni stake in a palm 
oil refinery project in Egypt in a 
move in develop downstream plan- 
tation activity. 

The refinery, due to come os- 
stream in mid- 5986, will have an- 
nual capacity of 73,000 tons of re- 
fined. bleached and deodorized 
palm oil. h would be Sime Darby's 
first Middle East investment and 
refinery outside Malaysia. 

Mr. Aluiu’d said ihc group's 
short-term plans are to develop its 
core businesses, particularly manu- 
facturing in Southeast Asia. 


Honda Rejects UA W Bid 
To Represent Ohio Plant 

Reuten 

MARYSVILLE. Ohio — 
Honda of America Manufacturing 
Co. said Thursday that it had re- 
jected the United Auto Workers' 
request to bargain for about 2.600 
workers at its Marysville assembly 
pbnt. 

The UAW last week said it 
would seek bargaining rights and 
would file a petition fora represen- 
tation election with the National 
Labor Relations Board if the com- 
pany refused the request. Honda 
said it had received indications 
from a survey of production work- 
ers that the union did not com- 
mand majority support. j 


' Fur l|it- lyl^-t it Joniufinii mi 
[V Xuc-HoILkHii liUi'nuliiifui :u 
and (lid -Cluck Inirnutiniuf nv 
, jil'-w call collect 31 ■20-627762 


Investors seeking above average 
J capital gains in global Mixk 
markets can simpiv wnte u» a 
note and ihe weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT nrwdcltcr 
will be sen free and without 
obligation 


Fits! Craiuth-rck' Si-vuniikN hi 
Vttirld Trade Cemcr 
StrawiRukvIaan X57 
|ij"77 VX Am*ter«iam. 

Tin- NithcrLmd' 

Telcv Id5ti7fsm.ini 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Oct. 31/ 1985 


Net auet *otu* awmiiaai ore ioosliea by me Funds itrtM with th* uccpthm ot MMne wotn basee 
Tfc* maralaai ivtnDau tnaicatc tmura o* auatafloas stwiica: (ai - aoHvs C«l - «mklv; (b) - M-manmiv.- trj - 


At. AUL I8AJUUSCMEMT 

I Ml Al-Maf Trim. 3 A 

BANK JULIUS BAER A CD. I w 
-id I gfltmm i — . 

-(a ) Centoor — 

-<d) Eovtootr Amtr<B 

48 1 LUtaT Euront 

■to I Ea 8bnr Paofic 



BH9INTERFUHDS 

■iwl imerbonfl Fund 

*4wl Mcrcwnncv u»_— __ 

■iwl liiMFcurranev SM 

-lx) Uitwrcurrancy Staling 


. -ml C8C JJtonllc S 1237 -*f«i UovUi inn Poeitie SF 130.90 

. ( 177*7 -,wl CJ.C EyWNfl S 14 MS -HnMJotfU inti Smaller Cot— . i 143o 

■;w: FLC Oriental I 3031 NIMARBEN 

5P 8*130 FIDELITY POB 87A Hamitton B^rmaila .(UICIOWA l 8988 

5F 124250 -(m: American Volurs Cotnnuc— i 90J8 -lw i Clan B • U3. I 10310 

*1143100 -1 mi Amer vam*i Cum.Pret t 104.17 .(w I Clou C • Jaaan * 9537 

SF J1UL&30 -id ( Fidelity Amer. *nw— _ * 7i3i OftLIFLEX LIMITED 

SF 11*4.00 -id> Fideriii Auttrwio Fund s ms -in Munteurrenev * 1221 

SP 9973W fl 1 f «jciirv DUcav^TT Fyna * ICjq- .| w i Dollar Medium Term— 11.14 


SF1S78J0 -<al FldelltV Dlr.SvOS.Tr 

-I d 1 Fioeinv Far East Fund— 
. s 12424 -t a 1 Fidelity int'L Fund— . 

- S 1C.I3 -tdl Fidelity Orient Fund 

SM 303* -1 a 1 Fuel iiy Frontier Fund — 

- c 1020 ■: a I Fidetnv Pacific Fung 


S 12735 -tw> Dollar Lons Ter 
1 23*9 ■(•»! Japanese Yen— 
S TLX -t w) Pound Sterling - 
t 22.13 -Iwi Demscne utorfc. 

* 1431 -lw) Dutcn Florin 

S 15037 -Iwl Swlu Franc— 


-(v»> j idereoi wry PacAc Otter t I3J4 -Id ) FioeHty Soa. Growth Fa. * 18.12 ORANGE Nassau group 

iSLKfI2SRe»A ,w ' <:>!,ef — 1 1U1 Fuofl 1 3887- PBSSSTS. Tne HOflue 1070) 48*870 

BANQtJg INPOSurz FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN -I C ) Sever BelegglnoB»+-f S 


* I £31 

S 11.14 

* 1134 

S 1331 

— ( 10.5* 

DM 1D.7I 
-FL 1033 
SF IOCS 


-Id) Alton Gnwm Fund— — 
-del niwrtv^i 
4*1 FIFAmnvn 

-twl FIF-Eurooe 

-l*>) FI F-Podflc 

-Id) lodemez UuiiAonasA 
-Id) IndMuez Mull loom* B 
•< di Indosucz USD (M8AF) 


* 111* London Aoeni 01^19-3*13 PARISBAS-GROUP - " 

SF *830 -I w 1 Dollar income * 730 -1 d I Cortexo International S 91J7 

S 1A*8 -Iwl FortwsMtsn Inc. Gilt Fd— I 9880 -IdlECUPAfi ECU 107732 

S 1S3J .i-iCnia Income * B38 -l-il OBI I83 M DM 123137 

S 1*87 -del Gold Anpreootlon S 488 -lw) OBUGESTION SF 9535 

* 10535 -iwil Strategy TrodlA* 1 130 -lw) OBLI -DOLLAR *122320 

S 17427 GEFINOR FUNDS. -HelOBU-YEN Y 104OM3O 

S 103838 -ft»l EoU investment Fund ( 37oS» (wl OB LI -GULDEN FL 111A30 

■del Scottish Wond Fund [ 12321 -Id) PAROtL-FUND S 99.90 

■8*0- -lw) State it. American * 18232 -tdl PAREUROPE GROWTH *1133 

I0J1 London 31 -*91 *230. Geneva :41-22a55S3[l -I dl PARINTER FUND— — _ * 12126 


■RITAJfNIA^OB 271. 54 Heber, Jersey -Iwl Scanun World Fund 

PrtT.poj .or 1 c yn s 0JW •{») Slow Si. American- 

■NJBr UManotCwr C ICJ1 London :01 -4*1 *230. Gawi 

-( d I BrU. 1KLS Manoujwrrf ( 1.142 GLOBAL ASSET MANAG 

-td I Bnr.littu Manag RorM t I188 PB IT*. St Peter Part. Cue 

-dn I Hr J. Am. me. A Fd lm * 1.1 IB -twl FuturGAM SJL 

•twl BriLGoid Fund s orotr -del GAM Arbitrage Inc- 

-(1*1 Brll3tanoB£vrrencv * 1434- 4el GAMerlca inc____ 


on Issue price, 
reaulortv; III - Irreco tarty. 

ml P.G C. - S *13i 

■Id I Dollar. Boer Dona (-a 5 1C2730 

-Id I D-mork-Baer Bond Fd DM IGUSO 

I d 1 D. Wtrtcr WM mag ivt Tsi _ . s 11/7 

I r I Drakkar inven.Funa k.v * 11288? . 

(d 1 Drevfu* America Fund 5 10C3 

1 d I Dfjvtus Func mn * ka 

Iwl Dreyfus Inter continent S 34D8 

(hi The EsiooJIinmerrt Trust 1 1.19 

lai Europe OaHpotlont. Ecu 6le8 

(wl First EOOIe FuM S 18337.70 

Irl Fifty Star* Ltd ■ ■ s 88584 

I w) Fixed income Trans— — _ 1 102a 

ml Fo nt * lex issue Pr SF 19935 

lwl % 739 

lw) FormuJo Selealon Fa SF *--.w 

(dl Fonaitallo — — 5 1412 

Id I Govemm. Sec. Fund* s 8884 

Id) Frankl-Trusi InterzJns DM 4*31 

(w> HoiKSmonn HldfK. N.V. * 12471 

lwl Fleslla Funds— * 15433 

(wi Martian FuM. sjtwj* 

imi IBEX Hoidlnas lw SF 11535 

lr> ILA-IGB S 93* 

I r 1 ILA-lGS — — * 10J0 

m I IAW4.U,* «1A s 1831 

ml intormortcer Field S 28785 


t 1.183 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. -Id) PARINTER BONG FUND 1 10.28 

t 1188 PB IT*. SI Peter Port. Guernsey. 0481-3715 -id I PAR US Trees. Bond -Cl. B 1 . S 11338 

v 1JJ* -IWlFuljfGAMSA S 10631 ROYAL B. CANADA.POB M4AUERHSEY 

S 0700* -ten GAM Artjrtrooe Inc S 13883 -Flwl RBC Canadian Fund LM._ * 11.10* 

s 1434- -mi GAMerlca inc — 1 142J0 -+mi RBC Far East&Pocific Fa_ i 12J4 

* ,.Ot -twl GAM Australia Inc S 10235 HHivI RBC inil Capital Fd— __ S 2413 

I S3J7 -lie) GAM Boston inc s 1104* -+m; RBC inn income Fd S 11 a1 

* 1.1KJ -mi GAM Ermitmu. j It JO -+| a I RBC Mon.Currencv Fd * 26.07 

* 3.715 fw 1 GAM Frartc-val SF 11331 -+i*yl RBC North Amer Fd S 9.90 

■mi GAM Hone Kang Inc. 5 9895 SKAKDIFOHD INTL FUND <44-t-2U27«l 

S 4232 -lwl GAM international Int S 13351 -twl inc.: Bid I 436 Oiler * 485 

* 17J* -ml GAM Jann inc.- * 11535 -twiAcc.: Bid * 638 Otter * tM 

>) -twl GAM Norm America inc. S 1D9J» SVEMSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

5F *4450 -iw) GAM N. America Unit Trust- 10435 a 17 D e vM Ub lre Saalonoon-m -377 30*3 
SF 109.10 -t— I GAM Foeilit inr J 13138 -I r I SHB Bona Fund— j J3.7* 


1.118 -twl FuturGAM LA. — . 
O70iT -twl GAM AfUtraao In 

. _ ... _ 1434* -lwl GAMerlca inc— 

-tdl Brit. Jaacn c:r Pen. Fd S l.ar -lwl GAM Australia In 

-tw> Br i-’ersev G-Lt Fund c 2377 -iw) GAM Boston inc _ 

•idl Brl». world Le.s. Fund t l.lKI-m)GAMErmita«e_ 

Jd J Br-t. njoru Tecjin. Fund — * 0.7|j -twl GAM Franc-val 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL -lw] GAM HODO Koni 

-lw> CaollDi' im Fung- . * *7 3? -| wl GAM in Ter none 

-tw)C<M<>ai imikjSa * 17J* -mi gam jaoan inc 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) -twl GAM Norm Am 

-tdl Action* Su uses— 5F **450 -iw) GAM N. Americ 


-to I Send voiorSwi SF io*.io t-lwi gam pociiic inc s 13138 -I ri SHB Bena Fund * 237* 

^ 2 ! S^S y 0 *** Dw '>3 17 J-twj GAM Pens. & Cnor. Wonaw IOITOb .(■») SHB im Growtn Fund s 2427 

Id 1 Ova Valor JS^C-LAH 1 123.95 pel GAM Pens & Cnor. u.K. FiL— 101.700 SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES1 

-tdl BonflVtdar Yen. — yen lJWMnn l.iwi GAMnm, I 11737 -Id) Amertca-valor— SF 482.75 


*< 5 } $*5'*'* voter Swt SF 12255 ■! wl GAM Slnoonore/Molay inc t 9744 ^ d I D-MarL Bond Selection _ DM 12133 

-l d I C on-. e rr uaier u S oollAH . 1 123*9 -mi GAM Start A inn Unit Trust —14125* p -td) Dollar Band Selection — s 13717 

•IdlConos e i - SF *7130 .(wl GAM Systems lnc___—_ S 10431 -1 d ) Ftortn Band Si ' - 

-( d 1 a FonavBenas SF 7825 -lw! GAM vyorldn'KJt Inc * 177*3 -tdl Inter valor 

-fdiCS Fanas-inr'i— SF liras -twl GAM Tvcfie SJL Class A t 11888 -td) Jaoan Porttoll 

■I dies Money Mancet Fund *139830 G.T. MANAGEMENT (UlO LUL -tdl Start Im Bond 

■Id) GS Money Mark rr Fund— DM 13WJK, (d) Berry Pot Fa. LW S 1CA4 -tdl Swiss Foreton 

-tdl CS Money McrVe* Fund 1103930 -t r I G.T. AnoPefl Sdenoe S 1151 -Id) Swlnvaior Ne 

-Id 1 Enerole-Va** — SF 14N7S -Id) G.T. Asean H.K. GwtlLFd * 1289 -td I Universal Ban 

-tdiu tw . — ... ■■ SF 79400 -tdl GT. Aeln Funa.. _ % U8‘ -id 1 Universal Fun 

-to Euraxwolor SF iaoj» -id) G.T. Aimrolta Fund S 2831 (d) Yen Bond SeN 

-< d I PacHK -Valor SF leiJO -1 a 1 G.7. Europe Fund— _ _ 1 1313 union bank of ' 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC - 1 w) G.T. Eura Small Cos. Fund S 1538 -td lAmca UJ. Sh. 

wincBMtar moos*. 77 London wan -< r ) G-T. Dollar Fund * 14*1 -f d ) Bond- Invert- 


Id) interminmaMm. Fd-Cl.-B 1 - s lot.;* 
I r 1 infl Securities Fund ■ S 1113 

(dl In vesta OWS dm 423* 

t r ) invert A namiouas s 987 

t r 1 liDltarrune inn Funo SA— 1 1731 

lwl Moan Selection Fund t 129*8 

twl Jaaon Pociiic Fund * 11137 

fm) Jetfer Pms. inti, ud 5 111*133 

td I tCIcMwnrt Benton Inn Fd . * 2119 

twl Klelnwort Bens. Jap. Fd S 8113 

twl Korea Growth Trim KW8J9495 

S 939 

tdl L*Kom Fund S133LS2 

(w) Leveraae Caa hoM— — — S 17930 

I d I Lharlboer S 135530 

(wILurtuna— * 78J* 

lm! Maonaturm mu * 15932 

I d I AAodlotanum SeL Fd. S 2350 

t r I Meteore Y 1C*.18 i3o 

fwINAAT S ia*l 


S 10431 -I d ) Florin Bond Selection FL 127.17 

S 177*3 .1 n > Inter jnlnr SF 8425 

t 11888 -td) Jaoan Portfolio SF 890jo 

-tai Star lino Bona Selection. c lo&oe 

I 1CA4 -tdl Swiss Foretan Bond Sel SF 11(129 

t 1151 -1 d 1 SwUsvaior New Series SF 381.75 

* 1189 -tdl Universal Band Select SF 8230 

1 08' -Id 1 Universal Fund SF 11739 

* 2831 -id) Yon Band Selection Y 1041130 

I 1113 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

.* 1124 -tdl Amea U-S.Sh.. SF 3375 

S 1481 -td I Bond. Invert SF 6725 


1 d I Nlkko Growth Pockaor Fd— *905488 

lwl Nippon F<«« t 7952* 

Im) NOSTEC Ponfom *4*4977 

(wl Havotec Investment Funa S 9*37 

(wINAJH-F S 18537 

lm) NSPF.I.T. t 17*33 

td) Pociiic HOTUan invt. Fd 311RU 

lwl PANCUBBI me s 2TJ4 

1 r ) Porton Sw. R Ert Geneva— SF 139730 


LONDON ECl Id 92097*7 .' -{a ) G.T Bond Fund j 11J8 -t d I Foma Svrtss SlL SF 18530 

-twj Finsbury Group m I 12738 -Id) GT. Global Tectvriav Fd t 1277 .rp) Jaaon-lnvesl SF *2730 

-tm) Wta rtwrter Q.wers.lea I 1934 la I G.T. Honshu Pamtinoer * sum -t d I Safll Souiti Afr. SlL — _ SF 2*430 

■ jrn) W jnqwqer Flncndo: lw. — * *J9 1 G.T. invest mem Fund— 1 1976 -td) Sima Irtocfc priori SF 21500 

* ,oaa8 ■tvrJG.f. Japan Small CaFund- s 41*3 UNION INVESTMENT Fraokfun 

■mi Winchester Koiduias, FF 10873 ■( r 1 G.T. TocnnMovy Fund s t><* -Id) Unlnenta DM 4370 

— S 128* 4 a I G.T. Sown China Fund 1 1477 -1 d ) Unlfands DM 31*0 

-tw) Wnrktwlde Securities— S 4U4 MILL SAMUEL IMVEST.MGMT. INTL. SA. -tdlUnlrak. DM 8110 

^•rt.WSlJMdeSB^rt. *172383 Jersey. PG. Box 81 Teta534 7602* -Id) UNIZIN& DM 11575 

DIT INVES TME NT FFM Strut P3. Bax 2421 Tel 4131 234051 OHl(W Cnnrte 

-4-1 a I Cancomra DM 3539 -Idl Crossbow fFar Eosi) SF 1089 UreieT rUnaS 

-*l d I j nri We nrentpna___ DM 91*7 -(d) CSF f Balanced] SF 26.15 twl Artloonds InvertmenK Fund. S 24.13 

LtawlGaorBO.Bnmeii -Id) European Eaultv Fund- DM 1030 I w) Actives! Inti * 1131 

-Im) DBH Commodity Pool *33830— ■! d) intm. Bond Fund * 10AS tm) Allied LM S 47S 

-(ml Cjjrrencv 8, Cola Pool SU784— -; d I im. Currency UJl S 2473 tw) Aouita Interaallorvsl Fund S 14938 

-tm) Winch. Ufa Fut. Pool *556.90 — -1 a I ITF Fd (Tecmaloay) S 1432 ( r ) Arab Finance 1 r * mss 

-(ml Trans Worta Fui. Pool * 73033 -Idl CSeo* Fd (H. AMERICA! * 2&S5 (r)Arkme X18S280 

T T , 4f r . CO UER 5 eY5 LTD - JARDINE FLEMING, POB 70 GPO Hv Ka (wl TnstCOr InM Fd. (AEIF) S 1053 

SL'JKiJSASS 31 i r > J.FCurrencviBond 1 1387 (w) Bondseta*- Issue Pr SF 13830 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. -( r 1 J.F Hono Kano Trust S 3459 (ml Canada Gid-Manaoae Fd * 983 

— * lOWOMw 1XL672- -l r ) JF Pacific income Tmrt — Y 2582 td) Capital Preserv. Fa. Inn. * 11*5 

BldlCMiBlC ■ * 1133 Offer *12.1*5 -f r i J.F Jaam Tnni y 4717 twl riww c.i wi j in 

nrrriJgUTIOWAL INCOME FUND -I r I J.F Jaoan Tecnnotooy Y 18312 fdl Elrtnyert Ecu ECU 100558 

- d > S*“rt Term - A‘ (Accum) — * 15071 -l r) J-F Pacific SecilAccl t 7.11 id 1 cmnwn Llama nv — .. S1D08S4 

'! 2 ! SCSI X* nm * 0 ** Br ’ * LLOYDS BANK t NT l- POB *18. Geneva 11 (ml Ctaveland Offshore Fd. 52101*8 

- h I Short Term Tl 1 f Accumj — . * 177*9 -+lwl Llavdtlnn Dolkir * 11770 (wl Columbia Securities FL 99*5 

-t d 1 Short >*rm U I Distr) — _ s 09S07 -f-lw) Lloyds InH Europe SF 12110 ( r) COMET E— — « * 842*0 

tg&Tqrn i. m , 5 25.18 -Ylwl Lloyd* inn Growm SF 17130 twl COnworL Fa. inn a Certs * 1134 

-+tw| Uoyoslnri income SF 31*30 (w) Convert. Fd. Inti B Certs * 3138 

I. Louronoe Pounty MIIL EC4 01*23-4483 -+[wi Liovas infl n. America— _ * 10420 (wi DCdwa Japan FwM_— _ Y 10307 


-Id) Short Term ^-fAccumj — * 177e* -flwl Lloyd* inn Dollar— _ 

-t d I Short Term -S' l Distr) * O9S07 -f-lw) Llovds inrt Eurooe 

-in 1-nnnTwm * 25.18 -HwJ LlDVdS Infl Growm 

FAC MGMT. LTD. IKV. ADVtSBRS -f-{w j UoyS InH mSSeZH 

I. Laurence Pounty MIIL ECx 01-4234483 rt-tw) Llovds lnt‘1 N. America. 


NEW ISSUE 


Thru- \oirs how nor hern reitiurmi under tin • Untied Siam Seamiies An of IW ,md nutv 
not he offered ur sold m the l ' nited Slates of America aria luitiniiiils , <r rnideni\ ilwrmf. 
These Sates having been sold, llus announcement ap/ tears as a nuttier of recur,! unh 


U.S. $100,000,000 


t r V Permol Value n.u 1 1291.1* 

( r I Plotodm 1110539 

(w)PSCO Fund N.V S 1323C 

lw> PSCO IMLN.V. * US 88 

fd 1 Pufnnm Inrt Fund S 71.10 

I r i PrLTem 1 83882 

(w) Quantum Fund N.V J 488778 

(dl Renta Fund LF 279530 

( d ) RenterveU LF 105558 

(dl Reserve insured Deposits S 111578 

( w I Rudolf Wolff Ful Fd LM 1 122130 

lwl samurol Portfolio SF 11455 

id) SC I /Tech. SA Luxembourg _ * too 

tw) Seven Arrows Fund N.V S *43*4 

tw) Stale Sf. Bank £ nutty MdptNV *9*0 

(wl StroMw Investment Fund. S ti« 

( a ) Syntax LM.TCtass ai- * u*7 I 

tw) Techno Growth Fund SF T&94 ; 

(d) Thornton Ausiralla Fd Ltd—. S 933 

Id) Thornton HK8 China * 9.95; 

Id Thomlon Jaoan Fund Ltd— * 12**! 

(w Tokyo Poe. Hold. (Seal S 10574 

(w Tokyo Poe. Hold. N.V * 14439 

(w Transpaci f ic Fund * 9415 ; 

fd Turgunlte Fund * 11*41 I 

lw TwMdyJSmwne n.vJ2kxuA *2280.16 

tw TwMdv^rowne n-v-ClossB— *157414 

tm Tweedy3rowno(U.K.Jn.v — *1004*3 

td UN ICO Fund DM 7970 

(d UNI Bond Fund *114479 

f r UNl Capnal Fund *1199.98 

Id US Federal Securitas * I DJI 

(w Vanderbilt Asset* * 1250 

Idl World FundS A S 1338 


tad; + • Offer Prices:*;- did chanoe 
Performance Index September; 
llOCfc Exchonoe j 


OCTOBER IW5 




il 

l ’>f : 



i 

Rothschild 


C^old and Platinum quartz watches, men's fragrance and lighters 


H. Rclhichic Wdi'ih S. »V Ru»? S: rtonore rt. 2001 NutichiriH, $mtz<*rJ3rvl 


Sun Capital Corporation 

f Incorporated in Delaware) 


10% Guaranteed Notes Due 1990 


Unconditionally Guaranteed by 


Sun Company, Inc. 

(Incorporated in Pennsylvania) 



Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 


BankAmerica Capital Markets Group 


Dresdner Bank Aktiengesellschaft 


Morgan Guaranty Ltd 


Salomon Brothers International Limited 


Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) 

Limited 


Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited 


Deutsche Bank Capital Markets Limited 


Goldman Sachs International Corp. 


Morgan Stanley International 


Swiss Bank Corporation International 

Limited 


S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 



Page 14 




LVTER1MATI0WAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVKMPPft j, 198 S 


FIRST 


In August 1985 , Research Services 
Ltd. released a study of the reading 
habits of international financial 
managers in Europe.* The study 
showed conclusively that more read 
Institutional Investor than any other 
magazine . . . including : 

• The Economist 

• Euromoney 

• Business Week 

• Fortune 

• Time 

• Newsweek 

• Der Spiegel 

• Le Nouvel Economists 

In fact in virtually every category- 
from job responsibility of financial 
manager to industry to geographic 
location, the story remained the 
same: Institutional Investor ranked 
first. 

And if worldwide leadership is not 
reason enough to advertise in 
Institutional Investor, here is another: 
thanks to strengthening international 
currencies, coupled with a new rate 
structure, an advertising schedule in 
1986 will cost international 
marketers significantly less than it 
did in 1985 . 

Put first things first. Contact your 
Institutional Investor account 
executive today. Or, contact 
Christine Cavolina, European 
Advertising Director, in London at 
( 01 ) 379 - 7511 . In New York, contact 
Denise C. Coleman, V.R & 
International Advertising Director at 
( 212 ) 303 - 3388 . 

'Co- sponsored by Business Week. 7be Economist 
Euromoney. The Fmanctal Times. Institutional Investor 
International and The Wall Street Joumal/Europe 


iiRiSl ional 


US. Futures 


Season Season _ .... rtw ChS- 

Hlsn LOW Open Hflh low Close a 

M® £5 35" Sg gf SR =3 

73.15 55JO At* tOJU 62*1 6,1 

Est. Soles 5.151 Pr*v. Soles *-TO 
Prev.DerOoeninf. 7.540 up <2 


ii.; V* 0,73 

avt u 

eotrt ” * .ff* 


Season Season 
High Lew 


Oom Htoti Low Close Q». 

Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

*§* s vz Hits & 

J™* ^ ztzn 

i&. & 19214254 

J^Op. 

CORN (CBT) 

SJOObu minimum- daltarsocr bushel 
2.75 lUVi Doe 2 33 ** T) 

2.77 UJlh Mar UTVi 143 

Witt 131 2M 

2AJ 233 Jul iiS lire 

zj4rt 133 Mar Z3M1 139 

Est. Sales P rev. Soles ? ?54 4 

Prev. Day Open lnt,137A3D in IJW 
SOYBEANS fCBT) 

5J500 Cxj mlmrraim-dol I orsoir bushel 
AftM NOV 5JB% 5.17 

Jan sli* saws 

M SJSVj MOT 5J1 teii 

SJgtt Jul £51 £59Vj 

A21 JL29V, Sn Ut M3 

Nov m 5J9 

-*S* . SJ7 ^ Jon 585 54* 

f^-Sotes Pmv.SalM 55J62 

Prev. Day Open Int. 79.990 otiBW 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

'92 tons- dollars oer ton 

JJ*S2 J2^S UAJS MMB 

14100 27.00 Jan US® U8® 

20650 13CLOO MOT 147® 150.50 

»“5° 3SS l«5o 15150 

Jo'S Jll» IJU» 15100 

151-00 12150 Auo 15150 15150 

]?750 5®° ,saM !S1-K 

MS JO 14000 Od 147 SO 148*31 

15000 14X00 dS: |£oq 

1S3O0 146® j3? iSn iSSo 

§ 5t Sales Prev. Sales IA221 

Prev. Day Open Int. *6301 off 347 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 
i 6WX®lbs-Oolkirsper lOOIbs. 

2m Oec 19® 2X10 

3N 07 19a Jan 19J1 2D 09 

2140 19JQ Mot 20.15 2058 

27X5 2am MOV 2049 203? 

TOM Jul 20*1 ^25 

■5-15 2L£ Auo 7195 21 JO 

2405 20 JO Sep 7100 21 JO 

22® " 2D. 45 2X91 7,5 

21-25 M D« ffit US 

2DJ5 20J5 Jan 

IHlH!* 3 prav-Sales 12.U0 

Prev. Day Open InL 47ai off A53 


119 123% +07 

IZ JOB +OSV, 

JI 5 , 1 ny i +« 

1BVS U9% 

2J2 2J2 — , JXNt 

105 


jam +o7v. 

XCtt +JJS% 
Zi2 1A4V5 +JK 

P 


5.14V, •KVttSi 
5J7K, +.11% 
SJ9V, +.10V, 
SJS% +08% 
SJ5tt +07% 
154 +JJ7W 
138 +04 Vt, 

5JF4 +04 
147V, +04 


144.10 14130 
34120 147.10 
14700 149 JO 
1«JD 15100 
15100 15100 
15100 151 .ID 
M9O0 15000 
14150 14&20 
14450 147 JO 
14400 14400 


COSFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37JD0ltn.- cents per lb. „ 

I40JO 129^ Dec 159 JO 142JD 

)57jn 12150 Mar 159J0 161^ 

157.18 13100 AteV 159 JS 161.U 

157.10 115.50 Jol 15900 1*1.10 

1570* 13225 5en 159^ 1ITN 

15700 13400 Dec 18050 «>■» 

14500 14250 Mar 

EsL Safes Prev. Sales 1532 

Prev. Day Open inf. 11057 off 73 

SUCA EWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

112000 las.- cents per Kh. 

773 300 Jon 445 500 

9J3 334 Mar 5.70 4.15 

7.13 158 May 909 4-TO 

4*9 279 Jvl 423 445 

8 JO 434 sea 

493 *113 Od 453 472 

70S 425 Jan 47 3 475 

7.16 4J1 Mar 7.12 702 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales 13LS44 

Prev. Oov Open InL 82077 op 2*4 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metricians. Sper ton 

2337 IMS Dec 2084 2109 

2392 1955 Mar 2181 2194 

702 19*0 MOV 2240 2245 

2*29 19*0 Jul 2277 2273 

2430 2D23 Sea 2298 2294 

2425 2055 Dec 2308 2308 

2385 2029 Mar 

ES. Sales Prev.Sales 15*1 

Prev. Day Open inf. J0J80 off S3 

P«%!!2. E iH*? 6 c»"ce) 

15000 lbs.- cents per tb. 

1BIOO 1 1305 Nov 11410 11500 I 

180.00 113JD Jan 11495 m JO 1 

177 JO 112.73 Mar 115® 115J0 1 

16250 I115S Mav 71460 715J0 1 

157 JO 111/40 Jul IU90 11190 1 

1B050 ill® see 

HI JO 111 JO Nov 11125 11425 1 

Jan 

1*1-25 Til JO Mar 11400 11400 1 

Erl SaJei LOO 0 Prav.Sotes 720 

Prev. Dav Open Int 5L5W uo68 


0 


;s i 


150LDO 18145 
158.10 Ml .ft 
158.15 181.18 
I5B.75 161.10 
15930 WM 
1*0 JO 1*1-20 


445 5J0 

5.90 6-14 

408 428 

423 6A3 

ta 

452 471 

475 485 

7. 12 7 3b 


2078 2103 
5173 5191 
2228 2243 

2304 


11120 112J5 
11140 110-80 
11415 11*50 
114 JO I144S 
11380 113JO 
111.50 
11125 111.75 
1I2J0 
11400 1 1225 


Metals 


19 JO 76 nr 
19J1 20.13 

20.15 20-51 

20AS 2032 
3LS3 21J1 
MJO 21 JO 
2-»5 2U0 
2DJ1 21JS 
21® 2U2 
71-40 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 lbs.- cen Is per lb. 

47JS 53® Dec *400 *487 

87JS 54 JS FeD 4273 63J0 

*7J7 55J0 Apr 8Z00 *7 pi 

W5 Jill 61J5 *zS 
AtJ « *0-20 60J5 

g JO Oct 5295 59.10 
45J0 59 JO Dec 

EsLSaJea 25J42 Prev. Sain 18.133 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. *7 jmw off ijso 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44JOO lbs.- cents per R>: 

7X20 SLID Nov 8580 AMO 

79J0 4050 Jan 4470 49J0 

S-5® «■« Aar 8490 69® 

70® 80.10 May 47J2 *7 JO 

wifS 0 . Si 75 *7® *7® 

Esr. Seles 2.119 Prev.Sales L903 
Prev. Day Open Int. 9J79 OHIO 
HOGS (CME) 

3Q®0 IBs., cents per ID. 

SJ5 34J5 Dec 87® 87® 

50.47 3410 Feb 

j7® 3412 Aar 40® 8470 

^■ ao Jon 43J » ,aja 
4945 4tU 5 Jul 83® 83JJ 

AU0 4X75 4X75 

41.10 38J7 Oct 40.15 40.75 

49J0 207 Dec 8U» 41® 

8DJ0 «U5 Feb 40 JO 

Esr. Sales 7J13 Prev.Sales 10.187 
Prev. Day Open Int. 24J41 up 875 

2P»KBELUES(CME1 
340CO lbs.- cents per lb. 

76® 55-75 Feb *180 83® 

75.40 55JS Mar 83® 63J5 


8423 +UB 
82J7 +M 
*1 JO —.15 
4187 —JO 
6045 
545D 
80® 


65.10 -.17 

o470 +J5 

69 ® +M 

8482 +.12 

S7J5 — J7 

ft® — ® 


4472 —JO 
84 17 

4025 —35 

8285 — 77 

81112 —.18 
42J0 —25 

39.90 —JO 
40.93 —.05 

40® -.JO 


6125 -1® 
8147 —.93 


COPPER tCOMEX) 

2S®0 lbs.- cents per lb. 

60J0 40 JO Nov 

84® 3450 Dec 8495 80.95 

84® 5875 Jot 60.95 61® 

SO® 59® Mot 61® 61® 

7*00 40® May 61.95 *2® 

78® 40L3S Jut *?■?* mil 

2-90 M® See *275 4275 

70® *1® Dec 61® *120 

70® 43® Jon 

47® £U5 Mar 

£7® 62® MOV 64I1S 4*05 

(6® 6375 Jol 

81® 61® Sea 

&t Sales Prev.Sales tl®4 
Prev. Dev Open Int. 77J00 ott289 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

*4000 lbs.- cenlsser lb. 

Nov 

70® 8245 Dec 87 ns 8270 

26-50 8470 Jan 

2X60 43.15 mot 8X03 43® 

4675 4*50 May 

6X8S 4475 Jut 88® 4*65 

52-10 84® Set, 

49.10 8875 Dec 

Jan 
Mar 

S3JS 49® MOV 

5030 5000 Jul 

Sep 

EsL Sales Prw.Sohes 41S 

Prev. Day Open Int. 2020 up 17 
SILVER (COMEX) 

S8IOO tray oil- cents per irav ox. 

,S2 *1?-° Nov 4H0 6110 

12300 5900 Dec 620J) £240 

SS® Jan 4240 6240 

e ?E a Nlcr 6320 6310 

’25^ fU- 0 6390 6880 

f»0 Jut 687.5 6510 

WO 6210 Sep 6550 6550 

7990 &CO Dec 6760 *780 

W90 6780 jot 

7700 ftULfl Mar *800 6800 

7S20 uas May 7TOO 7WO 

7880 6990 Jw» 

i^-Sctfes Prev.Sales 13J89 

Prev. Day Open Int. 8X987 up 657 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50triw ar.-doUors per troy ax. 

K7JD 331® Now 

332® 330® Dee - - 

M7® Jan 33500 3RS0 J 

Apr 339® 339® j 

36IB0 27300 Jul 341® 381® ■ 


S»J5 
8415 8025 
4495 6455 

80.15 61® 
41/40 61 JO 

61® 61® 
62® 6275 

£290 4230 
63® 
6X40 
6*05 4375 

6*10 
6885 


81.55 
81® 41.90 
4225 
8290 4X00 
4XJ0 
88 J 0 84/0 

85.10 
46.15 
46JD 
87® 
87.93 
4ttnn 
89 ® 


6090 «0X< 
61TJ 6125 
6220 6167 
6240 6247 
6330 63X1 
6410 641.9 
6520 651/4 
6650 665.9 
6710 

6800 881 2 
8910 692C 
7030 


CVRC DDL LAM 

"irif 1 m m 

\ s:.x sop ft® Ji-ff 

r zi Dec 95,711 

! iilt iTsi y cr 

+ -S *54 > W» 

«r« 25 > SCO 8*q 8>4B 

1 P'i'i 'ia’ei PrrxMVB 8M31 

' p£. Mi Ccee.aV.4CJC7 LPAfW- 

' BRJT15H PCUBD tIMM: '. 

1 see, sxpts- ==B>.N leiU8.*TC3a>7 . 

1 ■‘ui'i.’K avc iJjia '.mb 

i5 ; 5 '.aw V=r w» 

! :;sn Jpr. 1.42® row 

cj. s- n rJW ?n, Soct 

• Pre.Tc=vOPP !> ' al 7I4BUMW 

‘ CANADIAN MUM I IMM1 

1 sorer \7x rwc%St3Wl - 

; -•an Dec -Wf 3 g 

>»* J=!‘ wr D05 JIB 

73t.'. Z"- " n 

■DCJ Is SAF .K -7n> 

E-j Sin Jt »rev Sate » *•» 

p-ev.r;*Coc* <»• 48*3 up 54 

! FRENCH FRANC UMM3 

• iorri-c-c oc*flteQtfa>tTS*W»i 

> ,:X2S Dec 

1 tree .*7»J5 «cr 

1 ir.se u*y. 

: £tl 5 Mv Sm ® 

Prev. Do. Co*- Int 138 

i GERMAN MARX «M*M) ^ 

< isrrT-c’t-iM^'MWOiiSOMOt _ 

• 3Si7 J5-: Dec JO» JBf 

' JF«S .wor JEM 9t 

J9!3 J3S JOT1 

i TOC S«P 3W5 JNS . 

i 6Lt. 5des 2*6' Prav.Scjw JUN 
; Prev.Sc-, Coc+:.i*. 587*9 SUJ91 • 

' JAPANESE YEH(IMM) 

! tatrrW-lK ^ieWflWIIW - 

. ®x 3 S 3 3 UK* aec oafew man ® 

1 j04'*-. refers iw.mmMOsrjat 

3C8S30 xwo+r See OOCBCOBOB*® 
®4S4* OC*‘M Dec 00097 0087*3® 
! Eji.SsiB XW Prev 3M*t I&M 
j Prev D=* -Deep lit. MOT ott X405 ■ • 

! 5 MUSS FRANC (fMM7 

1 sper'rme- ‘ p^M’wauoumoOft =■• 

4TS 2531 Dec Ml OU ., 
.877! KS Me 075 2S J 
/833S 4’9C JOT .iOSS-.*jfi / 


EJt. Stfes «C77 Prev SoSea I7jjff^" 

P.-ev. CCWJ «if. J»fl» Off roar * 


! LUMBER CCMfi) - _ • 

- 132JK beLii-SaerlOOBMlL 

. is«.io s:sjb nm hub tabs 

• 37 ® IJXofl JO*, lost ljS 

< its® -2S2» mot ■ ism iSB 
•• 17143 :«5JB May 1565* 

■’ nxx -89.58 Jut HUB MOcSB 

! iss jgi “ ** 

iRMc-MWaUP - 

COTTON 3 IffVCVI '- 
50.7T/ c* CfPfy per tt> - 

73® 57-5? Dec un ujN 

^ 15 §2 II 

Sir 13 oS s, * t 

V&t 

| Prev. aovOoen tut. nOBewer 

MEATINO OfLdprAM) 

82®0 ort- ornfeacreol 
gS 8g§ NW 87® S3) 
(BTo +* is Dec or® as® 




5*75 

Sl.H 

77 ® 

70 - 

XUS 

TUB 

TUB 

EUtMrt 


-*«.« Dec 

»«* JOT 


•ABB . Apr 

55S S’ 


it ft 

81 JS &5 

77 ® 77 ® 

as as 


^ le If . 

Sl-fc 


ft-44 >J« v 

-wm, 

WJ* +JI- 


Currencj Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
oprtofi A Strike 
Underfyloe Price Colls — Lost 

,N£r. JHe Mar Nov Dec Mar 
Briltsb PovMkciMi per unit. 


3 

1*00 

18® 

r 

9® 

10.10 

4® 

4® 

6® 

0.70 

1® 

4® 

a» 

OSS 

X85 

r 

r 

1X0 


Columbia liftoff at Kennedy Space Center. 


asspPHHMm 

:; r-" 

■ ^ - Jf jA 

I :.v„ v. : , ' •> ■ ; . 

J '' ■ 

V ' 


Challenger Astronaut Donald Petereon in Space. 


I2S s r r s 4ns r 

130 5 18® 1*60 s n.,0 r 

J35 r 9® 1410 r 075 ZIO 




HUWJ Conodtar Dollars-cents per OBIT. • - 

CDcHFr 73 T t f r r on 

“5? W# ft Oarnen Maiiu-cnts per unit. 

? s s® r * r ojh 

S5 S * 7® r • r 402 

J3 s 6J8 r » y r 

ig-22 33 S SJ4 r % r r 

3 s r 3/40 r r 402 r 

J* r 283 r r 0® r 

g 1 » is S . of ^ 
t H 0j 3 f & u ? “? “J “f 

4J50O90 Japoorae Yen-iearh* Of a cent POT unit. 

J'W 40 S r 7Jd S r r 

« r 4® r r r [ 

fS r r 2® r ao7 036 

jZ-5 r 1® ill r 42D 448 

47 064 0.94 L48 023 057 1® 

f?"2 2 DJfl 0J2 1® r r r 

47® 49 r 0J2 024 r r 911 

*2500 5 wlis Frcmcs*mTfc per unit. 

5 H I * >M 5 ' ^ * f ? 

^ I •! ts ? J f f 

H 5 | ® ? f 

ft* 41 * r 6.10 9 OBI • r 

» 4® r a r r 

rrrrOfOr 

8A55 ft ln r po 300 005 021 I 

48^5 86 1® ]J| r 022 045 r 

4*S5 47 r 0*3 US r r r 

4055 48 r 440 1 99 r r r 

TrtSfSStlS- HS? Coll 0P«| InL r 190458 

TWW put VoL 643 1 Pot open lot 111 Tiff 

i . r Tf^°t. tro ? gd - *-*Ho option offered. 

Lost is premium (purchase piieet. 

Source; JP. 


MORE NEWS IN U25S TIME 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

DATLY IN THE IHT 


38000 30X50 Od 341® 34X50 

Est-Saiua Prev.Sales 2JJ0 
Prev. Dav Ouen InL 1X859 up 9B 
PALLADIUM CHYME) 

T® tray az- doCOTS per a: 

Jft-g ’}« Dec ns® ns® 

127® 91® Mar «J5® 106® 

71^ Jot its® las® 

,17-lS Sft* 10480 Hi 4 ® 

107.25 108® Dec 

E5 f - Sol« Free. Sales 401 

Pros. Day Opm int. 6J24 ua?S 
GOLD (COMEX) 

WO tray ot^Diipra pot iroy «. 
m® 32a® Nov 
8ft® 30L5B Dec vean 22SJ0 

29^2 m® 3Ji80 

fas 2U2 Apr 336® 338® 

- J2O50 Jan 340® 30® 

<Z8® 331® Aug- — - 

SHS 9ft 34X® 34X50 

^ 35250 35170 
355® Apr 

3*9® JOT 
38500 377® Ana 

ESt. Sales 30000 Prev.Sales T5J64 
Prev. Day Open ln>.J22J0) off 347 


331® 
3500 
322® mep 
325® 327.90 
33B® 331® 
38300 
332® 334® 


101.10 101.15 
IflUT? 102 ® 
102 ® 10200 . 
308® 10X25 
1082S 


32878 
3ZS® 33670 
32870 

329® 330® 
33X20 338® 
339® 338® 

34XW 

347.10 347® 
350® 22® 

362® 
36 a® 
371® ■ 


55 33 ; & 

^pv S DatoDOTM£ r a®9 > Sink M -- 

CRUOE OROtYMB) 

lamtAL-OTaenaeraM. 

»£ nt» Dec 3B3B JK40 

29® 34J8 Jot 19 J8 2*43 

2M6 Ml Feb XU 2SLM 

ZS H-2 55f E n 5S 

3* 5i»-«r 27® 27® 

5 S 5 S aw 

£5 J* • *>• S® 

26-28 2883 JU 3U2 2033 

3*05 3UB A«« M® 'Mat 

77® 38® Seo 25® 25® 

25J5 25.15 Od 23® 35® 

EslSoJm Prev. Sotti lUii 

Prev. Day Open M. *XMB off MS 


Mt +® : 

yi +S'.; 

3 .-f®4 .':■ 


27 J& p 3 , +a 

s£ 2 S ig 

26.10 S6.U +17 
26® TUB +35 
ZK BE - +75 
25® SK +3} 


Finonctol 


ub t-jm i i. soi mo 

SirnJItlon-pftoflWpd. • 

«2S fH? S 80 S* 4 72J2 9X95 9X00 

«S ,VScr 9281 *287 7277 9275 

E-S ^ un 91/7 0151 7X86 92-51 

Zfl? SS 2XH 92.13 9zn 92.16 

SJ« S-£ E” 9X30 ”- 80 ^1-79 7LB4 

«■£ Mar 7I - 5D *1®. ■’IJB 9172 

Sf2 8 00 «a 71® 9172 9U5 

TO54 90® Sea 97® 

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1 SrU S’ii “or 86-2B 88-18 8636 

807° sS * !0 '* S ' 8 “ ®’ S ® 

88-19 «42 ■ Dec "S3 

Est.Saies Prev.Sales ZU84 

Prev. Day Open int. 70870 up 385 
^TRGASURY BONDS (CBT) . . . 

(s ^' sioaoo ^ ,rf * &32ndsotioopcSl 
7^2 57 -fi Dec 78-10 38-2J 70S 28-77 

JJ?? S i. Mar - 2" 1 77-W 78-28 77+ 

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Z5-3] 5S-® SOT 74-25 75 7+21 7+J7 

74 24 56-a Dec 73-26 74 73*2 78 

7+15 56-27 Mar 72-2! 73* 72-26 73-3 

7+26 63-12 Jun 72-2 72-10 . 72 7M - . 

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193® W7® Sot 

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VALUE UNE IXCBT) - 
potetsaad cents . . 

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Commodity indexes 


i: gSK? _ : 

DJ. Fulures tojot 

Com. Research Bureau- 7 25M 

Moody* -base TOO : Dec. 3). 193T. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 ; Sep. TO, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base TOO : Dec. 3T. 1978 


Market GuMp 



i— KE 3 KH 1 EB E 3 

|L^VlMgaWEj]MEj]gvll 

■KlIFvM 



rT l S 0,c ? dven £ ture? as much for your money. 

Toke advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 

well give you an extra month of Trib free with a one-year 
subenphon. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 

Twra as many heroes and lots, lots 
more in the International Herald Tnbune, the global newspaper. 

HU n ■ HerolbSl^nbunc. ■ b H N ■ 

Pteose enter my s ubsen pfon for: 

HI 12 m 0 *( + JiSr*) O ^months ( + Q 3 morttB ( + j^ ek ) 

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SUGAR HWI ^ »« Aft or 

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Mpf»otcn« IssMtsSs; 


veiuitte; ao» tots of 50 tons. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


Tobte * the nationwide prices 
up la {he dosing on Wairstreet 
and do not reflect We trades eSS*,* 
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This October, November and December; First Class passengers on our daily nonstop flights from London to Singapore will enjoy a menu that includes Tcrrine de Foie Gras de Canard Fraiche. SaJade Boulestin Parhimee Aux Tnjffes and Magret de Canard Boulestin, prepared A 
from recipes created exclusively for Singapore Airlines by -Boulestin of London. Accompanied, as always, by such pleasant diversions as Dam Perignon, Malossol Caviar and Hennessy X.O^ served by our gentle hosresses in their sarong kebayas. SINGAPORE AffUJNESwJ 


:5ih inifcB •• 





■ •. X : . 








V v-*: - .. C. 






(W 


■ ;,f 


N V . 7 . 




/ 





ONLY TWO PLACES IN 
THE WORLD SERVE 
MAGRET DE CANARD BOULESTIN. 


BOULESTIN, 

ONE OF THE FINEST RESTAURANTS 
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AND 


SINGAPORE AIRLINES 
FIRST CLASS. 


i 































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1985 


South Africa’s Mediator 
Is Said to Urge Reforms 


By Alliseer Sparks 

ll'ai&unpLV} Pits: Service 


JOHANNESBURG — South 

Africa will not solve its foreign- 
debt crisis unless it makes major 
political changes and moves to end 
racial unresL according to a source 
dose to the banker mediating the 
debt dispute between South Africa 
and the banks holding its S 14-bil- 
lion short-tens foreign debt 
The unnamed source, purported- 
ly expressing the news of the nego- 
tiator. Fritz Leutwiler. was quoted 
in an interview in South Africa's 
leading finan cial daily. Business 
Day. that creditor banks would re- 
fuse to sign on agreement on the 
country's debt freeze unless the in- 


ternal political situation changed. 
If there were no change. the 


If there were no change, the 
banks would maintain a capital 
boycott of South Africa, the source 
said. 

Hie wanting from South .Africa's 
own mediators came just one week 
after Mr. Leutwiler met with the 
creditor banks in London, and as 
the country underwent a test of 
white attitudes toward reform and 
the continuing unrest with a series 
of special legislative elections. 

It also came on a day when the 
bankers' monitors would have re- 
ported the highest riot death toll in 


more than a month, with at least 
seven blacks killed in the segregat- 
ed townships. 

The next debt meeting is sched- 
uled for Nov. 26. In the meantime. 
Mr. Leutwiler and his mediating 
team are collecting the views or the 
creditor banks. 

According to the source quoted 
by Business Day, who was inter- 
viewed in Zurich, the attitude of 
the banks has been stiffened by 
some of Pretoria's recent hard-line 
actions. He cited as an example the 
execution of Benjamin Moloise. an 
African National Congress mem- 
ber. despite international appeals 
for clemency. 

American banks had taken the 
lead in insisting on political change 
as a condition for reaching an 
agreement, the source said, but he 
stressed that others, including at 
least one prominent Swiss bank, 
were now also taking this line. 

South Africa declared a morato- 
rium on debt repayments Sept. ] 
when U.S. banks then other banks 
refused to roll over the country's 
short-term loans, causing a slump 
in the rand. The Pretoria govern- 
ment then engaged Mr. Leutwiler, 
a leading Swiss hanker, as a media- 
tor to try to reach an agreement on 
the loan repayments. 


ILK. Joblessness 
Stayed at 13.1% 
For October 


U.S. Lists What It Says Are 200 Trade Barriers 


The Asteewtrd Press 
LON DON — The seasonally 
adjusted unemployment rate in 
Britain was steady at 13.1 per- 
cent in October.’ the govern- 
ment announced Thursday. 

While the actual number of 
unemployed people fell by 
69,337 in October, the adjusted 
adult jobless rale — the best 
guide to employment trends — 
fell by only 4300. the Employ- 
ment Department said. 

Employment Secretary Lord 
Young said the figures were 
“mildly encouraging.*' but op- 
position spokesmen accused the 
Conservative government of ac- 
quiescing in unemployment 
On an unadjusted basis, the 
unemployment rate dropped 
from 13.8 percent of the work 
force to 13.5 percent, with al- 
most 3.28 million out of work. 

“Unemployment after allow- 
ing for seasonal adjustments 
has remained broadly level for 
the last six months," Lord 
Young said. But he said that 
“more months of figures like 
these will be needed before we 
can be sure that the long, persis- 
tent upward rise in unemploy- 
ment has come to an end." 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

VV»’ Ytvk Tima Struct 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration has cataloged for 
Congress more than 200 foreign 
trade barriers that it says impede 
American exports, from soda asb to 
telecommunications equipment 

The administration said 
Wednesday that it was seeking to 
eliminate all these barriers by nego- 
tiations with other countries or by 
challenges under U.S. law or 
through international organiza- 
tions. 

A 241-page report issued 
Wednesday, required under the 
1984 Trade and Tariff Act. is the 
rust government listing of such 
barriers ever compiled, and it will 
be used both in righting the prac- 
tices and in setting priorities for a 
new round of multilateral trade 
talks. 

The U.S. trade representative. 
Clayton K. Yeutter. acknowledged 
in a transmittal letter to the Senate 
Finance Committee that many of 
the trade barriers are permitted un- 
der international law or practice 
and are therefore not “unfair" in a 
legal sense. 

As a result, he reported, the ad- 
ministration is giving a “high prior- 
ity" to the new trade round as a 
way to bargain down the foreign 
obstacles in return for U.S. conces- 
sions. 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


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une. 92521 Newly Cede*. France 


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in ilia 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


AUTO CONVERSION 


Trasco London Ltd. 

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AMERICAN MTL UNtJBWUTBB 
Oberfndau- 76-73 
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5wf*edand-UK-W. Germany 


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rue WDOEtBOURG 7482 
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TlX: 20377 


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By Phone: Call yow local IHT representative with your text. You 
wdl be informed of the cost immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad wiB appem within 48 hows. 

Cert: The base rate it S9JB0 per (me per day + teed taxes. There era 
25 letters, opts and spocm in the test line end 36 m the Mowing fries. 
Minimum space b 2 knee. No abbreviations occeyrpd. 

Creed Cards: American Express, Diner’s Oub, Eurocard. Master 
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HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMERICA 


PORSCHE. BMW. A ROUSROYCE 
LH/RH wire. New & Pie-Owned. 

8 yews etpe ranee in Impart/Export. 
Documentation, sKppmg esc. 


wit: (For daubed only]: 
47-47-46-00. 


DOT & EPA 
CONVERSIONS 

Dane h The ULS.A. 

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WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG OR 
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An n i n darn Airport, The Netherlands. 
Phone 020)15201 Tetea 12566 


USA Out speodty. 

Take advtj rf o ge of our expenence. 

HUGHES MOTOR COMPANY 


EUROPE 


, SMPSU3E Inc. 576 fifth Avenue. 
7th Boor. New York. MY. 10086. USA. 
Phone (212) 869-4484. Tefec 427955 


nwnemiuth, bide md 
(0) 202 744643 
TU 41254 HUGHS G. 


SHIPSBJE SA, Chau n ee de Wavre 
„ 465. KWO Bussed. SdgMiL 
Phone {02)6499062. Tele* 63290 


TRANSCO 


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280 Si. 280 SB, 500 SB. 

500 SI. 500 SBC 
1986 Models {ran Stock: 
230E.300E.300n, 260 5E. 300 SE. 
300 SH, 500 54 500 SB, 500 SEC 
Shipment & deEvery worldwide. 

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MAMZS LANDSTK. 191 
D-6000 FRANKFURT/ M 


Amsterdam: 76-36-15. 
AHwns: 361-8397/360-2421. 
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Copenhagen: (01) 32 9440. 
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Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Usbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: (01) B36-48Q2. 
Madrid: 455-2891/45^3306. 
Milan: (02J 7531445. 
Norway: (02) 41 29 53. 
Romo: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


Buena* Aires: 41 40 31 
(Dept. 3121 
Caracas; 33 M54 
Guayaqgi: 51 45 05 
lima: 417 852 
Panama: 69 05 11 
San Jot* 22-1055 
SnutiupBi- 6961 555 
Soo Paula: 852 1893 


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Jeddcfc 667-1500. 
UJ L£; Dubai 27416). 


FAR EAST 


OCEANWIDE 
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UNITS) STATES 


TEL (01 69-73 30 61 
life 4140)8 


Since 1972, experienced ear trader for 
Mercedes, Porsche, BMW. Jaguar. Im- 
medkto delivery. Import/ export, U5. 
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Now Yaric [2l2J 752 3890 
Wed Coast: (415) 362-8339. 


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JoWa: 5)0092. 
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Seoul: 735 87 73. 
S u ioraart: 222-2725. 
Tawarr.752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 


Melbourne: 690 6233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
ffarife 328 98 33. 
taddingtan, Queensland: 
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In comments to reporters. Mr. 
Ycutier said he believes lha! the 
new round could begin by next fall. 

He answered questions at a din- 
ner given by the European Coro- 
rouniiy’s ambassador. Sir Roy 
Denman, who himself said of the 
new trade round: “There is now die 
prospect of something rolling.” 

From Australia lo Venezuela, 
the administration's catalog, for- 
mally known as the National Trade 
Estimates, ticks off each barrier 
and what is being done about it. 

“The existing international trade 
structure condones too many trade 
barriers," said Mr. Yeutter. “Be- 
yond that, there are many areas of 
growing importance — such as ser- 
vices and investment — where 
there are no rules at all." That 
leaves countries free to set up barri- 
ers. 

Japan, with more barriers than 
any other country, takes up 25 
pages, or nearly 10 percent of the 
catalog. The section on Japan starts 
with a description of its high tariffs 
on wood and paper products and 
ends with a discussion of the quo- 
tas. tariffs and investment restric- 
tions that inhibit American sales of 
semiconductors. 

Restrictions by the European 
Community, the largest U.S. trad- 
ing partner, take up 15 pages. 
These run the gamut from “phyto- 
sanitary" restrictions on oak logs 


and lumber imported from the 
United Slates to the practice of 
European makers erf the Airbus to 
increase European-made pans. 

While the trade barriers in devel- 
oped countries are described as 
"considerable," the report peri ms 
out that developing countries 
maintain even greater barriers. 
That is because they come under 
more lenient rales. 

Brazil's import duties, for exam- 
ple. average more than 40 percent, 
against the United States* 5 per- 
cent 

No effort is made in the report to 
add up what all the barriers may 
cost the United States in terms of 
lost exports. The Commerce De- 
partment has estimated that if Ja- 
pan eliminated all its unfair barri- 
ers. U.S. exports might rise by 
about S10 billion. The U.S. deficit 
in merchandise trade with Japan 
last year was S37 billion. The UJS. 
global trade deficit amounted to 
S123 biQion. 

“Even if all the harriers covered 
in this report were completely elim- 
inated, the U.S. trade account 
would continue to be strongly af- 
fected by such overall economic 
factors as exchange rates, U.S- and 
foreign economic growth and infla- 
tion and the adjustment process in 
developing countries." the report 
cautions. 

Senator Lloyd Bentsen. a Texas 


Democrat and one of the authors 
the provision in last year’s unde 
law that requires the listing of bar- 
riers, said the report “can play a big 
role in. our efforts to shape a trade 
policy” by identifying the “trouble 
spots." 

President Ronald Reagan has al- 


7 Groups Bid 
To Build link 

Across Channel 


ready taken action a ga i ns t some of 
the barriers listed in the report. 


Recent actions involved Japan. 
South Korea, Brazil and the EC 


Brazil Inflation Dropped 
S^h%to9% for Month 

The Associated Pros 
RIO DE JANEIRO — Inflation 
in October dropped slightly to 9.0 
percent in Brazil, bringing the an- 
nual rate to 212J5 percent, the low- 
est monthly figure this year, the 
Getulio Vargas Foundation an- 
nounced Wednesday. The founda- 
tion's figures arc accepted as offi- 
cial by the government. 

Brazil's high inflation has caused 
friction with the Internationa] 


tensions to help pay back the coun- 
try's debt of more than SI00 
billion, die largest in the develop- 
ing world. The government has 
promised to reduce inflation, which 
has been more than 200 percent fen 
more than three years. 


LONDON — A; 

groups formally Tfta*- 
gHg£id a muitib^n-dclas 
fixed tink acww.il"! 

British official 
groups had submitted p Up 
Britain and France for a !iti* • > 
bridge, tunnel or b«n J< ~ ' ' 
the 22-mile (3S-k«loitKtL.+ 
channel. The two 
are expected 10 select «*»■ ™ “1 
proposals early next year. Com- 
pletion is expected o> lbe 
mid-19905. J- 

Channel Tunnel Group F*;* 
posed a £2.3-bUiicn 
Iion) twin rail tunnel- Eurorouu. 
offered a £5-Z-b01ion. nw* 
and-rail link with bridges, am*, 
.final islands and a IJ-tmie rtm : 
neL And Euiobridgc 
a £5.9-biItioa. 22 -nnle bridge 

with seven spans and multilevel 
roads. 

Sea Containers unveiled a 
£2.1 -billion plan for a single 
car-train tunneL Eurolink pro- 
posed an enclosed bridge with 
tide-powered hydroelectric gen- - 
outers. A seventh bid was re- ■ 
ceived from a group called Eure- 
Traniworid TunneL but no de^ 
tails were provided. 


Northwest Sees Vulnerability on Its Pacific Flank p 


(Continued from Page 11) 
company's ability to compete suc- 
cessfully over the next three to four 
years. 

United is in fighting trim these 
days, having rebounded from 
losses in 1981 and 1982. It has the 
cash reserves and credit to buy the 
long-range 747 aircraft needed for 
the Pacific routes. If its pact with 
Pan Am wins final approval, as 
expected, it wfl] have gained over- 
night routes that usually take de- 
cades to put together through bilat- 
eral agreements with foreign 
nations. With its own Pacific flights 
out of Seattle and Portland gate- 
ways. it now has 3 percent of the 
Pacific market. 

For now, Northwest is well-posi- 
tioned for a Pacific battle with 
United. Between 1979 and 1984. it 
doubled the number of passengers 
carried on its Pacific routes and 
replaced Pan Am as the nnyor Pa- 
cific carrier in the United States. It 
added flights to Tokyo from its 
gateways in New York. Chicago, 
Seattle, San Francisco, Los Ange- 
les, and Honolulu. To accomplish 
this, the carrier hired 4.000 workers 
and raised the pay of the average 
employee in the 16,000-strong 
work force by 68 percent during the 
past six years. Most of the new 
workers have been assigned to cus- - 
toroer service. 

"In the short run," says Mr. 
Rothmeier. who at 39 is the youn- 
gest chief executive at a major air- 
line. "there is no question about 
retrenching or pulling back in the 
Pacific. We are going to build up 
our strength as an American carrier 
by increasing flights as much as the 
market uill allow." 

In fact, he says, the airline will 
add new routes to China and 
Southeast Asia over the next few 
years. And, with 10 new Boeing 
757s, the airline is budding its do- 
mestic feeder network by increas- 
ing its flights by 15 percent this 
year and 10 percent in 1986. Inter- 
national flights also win grow by 10 
percent, starting next year. 

To prepare for that, Northwest 
I announced last Tuesday that it had 
ordered 10 Boeing 747-400s and 10 
757-200s, at a cost of about $2 
billion. It is the largest aircraft or- 
der in the company’s 59-year histo- 
ry. And although Northwest has 
come up with most of the cash 
needed to buy the planes, the air- 
line will be forced to take on more 


debt than stockholders have been 
accustomed to seeing on the bal- 
ance sheeL 

In fact says Mr. Rothmeier, the 
entire expansion program has 
transformed the company’s Spar- 
tan image, created in the mid-1950s 
when an ailing Northwest Orient 
Airlines brought in Donald Nyrop, 
a former chairman of the Civil 
Aeronautics Board, as chief execu- 
tive. Mr. Nyrop’ s cure for the com- 
pany involved hefty doses of cost- 
cut ting and austerity. The 
headquarters buhl during’ his 24- 
year tenure, a drab building at Sl 
P aul International Airport, barely 
has windows. Mr. Nyrop wanted to 
keep down heating and cooling 
costs. 

With the move to a 154-acre (62- 
hectarc) site, that spare image may 
be fadihg these days. But Mr. Roth- 
meier insists that the legacy has 
lingered. “Paying attention to every 
dollar we spend is part of our cor- 
porate culture; our people have 
grown up under that system.” said 
Mr. Rothmeier. who was hired by 
Mr. Nyrop 1 1 yean ago to be a 
corporate financial analyst. 

Mr. Nyrop's penchant for avoid- 
ing big debt still is reflected in the 
company’s 1984 debt-to-eqimy ra- 
tio. which was J-to-1, compared 
with an industry average of 1 J-to- 
1. His tight-fisted attitude toward 


labor was adopted by Mr. Roth- 
meier as recently as 1982, when the 
company, rather than gram labor 
demands it considered too high, 
watched its machinists go on strike. 

tOur basic philosophy has not 
changed one bit,” said Mr. Roth- 
meier, referring to the strike. “One 
dollar’s worth of pay for one dol- 
lar’s worth of work.’’ 

Even with the hiring drive, the 
ratio of labor costs to other ex- 
penses has been kept at about the 
same level as during Mr. Nyrop’s 
time — about 24 percent com- 
pared with about 35 percent indus- 
trywide. Last year, Northwest was 
the industry’s third-most produc- 
tive airline. 

With an average wage of about 
542400, its revenue per employee 
came in at 5164^823. And the com- 
pany still continues the practice 
initiated by Mr. Nyrop of putting 
one company’s engine — Pratt & 
Whitney — in almost all planes, to 
hold down nwinlHianH! costs and 


agreement from dipping North- 
west is the future; Mr. Rothmeier. 


combination of Uniled’s; 
ApoDo computerized reservation. 


U.S. travel agents, and its highly, 
developed domestic network, he 
says, are advantages that North- 
west will be unahfe to match. And,; 
he adds, carriers such as Japan /$ir 


linta and Singapore Air also maV 
out the Dcessnre on when United* 


“We’re still the same conserva- 
tive airline;'' said Thomas E. 
McGinnity, vice president of pur- 
chasing and sores, who has been 
with Northwest for 30 years. 

Still, Northwest’s robust finan- 
cial health and smmy short-tom 
prospects In' the Pacific will not be 
enough to keep the United-Pan Am 


London Stock Exchange to Admit 
Firms Without Indwidual Members 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The London Stock Exchange will admit companies 
to corporate membership after next March without requiring then- 
executives or staffs to be individual members of the exchange, die 
exchange's council announced Thursday. 

Each corporate member would have one share, the same as individr 
uals. 

Sir Nicholas Goodison, chairman of tbc exchange, said that all staff 
in member companies who have contact with customers must be 
“approved persons,” in accordance with the requirements of the 
British Government's Securities and Investment Board. 

They will also be subject to the exchange's regulations, although — 
unlike individual members — they will not have to pass the exchaig}e 
examinations or show any other academe record. ' 

By omitting the examination and by setting the entrance fee for 
corporate membership at a low fee — which has not been determined 
— the council has almost ensured that international groups, which 
next year will be able to own 100 percent of brokerage houses, win 
stay within the exchange's scope rather than operate indcpendcntly.af i 
it ! 


“I am confident Merrill Lynch will be in the exchange for the 
purpose of equity trading," he said. . 


FkKitiiigllale \otes 


Ocl 31 I i*wer/MaL 


Dollar 




NEW YORK CITY 

EXCURSIONS 


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7 DAYS - MAJOR CARDS 

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CHICAGO 


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TEL: 212-737 3291. 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tal: 46 1 1 58 


ZURICH 


Opening Summer of 86 «i Dales 

Cfingo (3*2) 736.7005 


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Heathrow. Crerfil cords. 352 8343 


All major crodH trade acceptad. 


LONDON BCORT SERVICE. TeL 
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I SI Beaudvsni Place. SW1. 

737 I Tet 01 584 6513/2749 (4-12 pn) 


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put die pressure on when United 
begins to serve the routes it win gfet 
from Pan Am to Japan. South 
Korea, China. Kong Kong, Tav 
wan, tiie Philippines, Singapore. 
Thailand, Australia and New Zea- 
land. ' ' ' 

What gives United the big edgeis 
its abifity to feed these Padfi? 
routes from a domestic netwbrit 
that serves 159 dries in all 50 stales. 1 
Northwes t currently serves 72 cities * 
in 26 states. And where both cam-, 
exs fly into the same dty. North* 
west usually does so with less HC* 
queasy. United, for example, has 
125 daily arrivals at San Francisof 
and 66 dally flights into Los AugeJ 
fca, comps ed With Northwest’* 
nine San Francisco and 10 Los An| 
geks flights daily. ^ 

Even with its phoned domes tka 
pepansion, Northwest cannot 
proach these numbers.- United % 
ApoUo eompmerHOKvatioa 'Mi 
tern, along witit American AirtitKBt. 
Sabre reservation system, has- iti* 
ready been reviewed by the CnaL 
Aeronautics Board to- efimmate’ 
assy Idas in favor of these akiineft .- 
but other carriers that nmtrdy’a^ 
tfsvd agents usisg these systems 
say that subtic hiases remain to* 
wind United and American. Af 
dough both dbSnes deity gettfijlg 
m edge, Noetinvest drams that 
^United propanrsApoflo so that rti 
flights show up on screens abead^y 
sbme compeUtors that may off^; 
morecoDvcaiciu fli^us. L 

- Northwest’s battle with the De- 
partment-- of Transportation arid 
with Ihtited comes at a time wtjen 
the Pacific market is growing ever 
more lucrative. Traffic has jumped 
dming the ijnst24 years to.6.2 mD- 
,lion from 362,000 and is expected 
to grow by 8 percent to 9 percort 
over the-next five years. That sqct 
of. growth has prompted forest 
carriers such as JAL and Singapore 
Airimes to plunk down billions f<Jr 
jumbo -Boeings so that they, toe, 
can expand their routes. . 






















* 



Cr . 





, T 0 g^0m»BiCY MARKETS 

! ^(V^conomicDa1 

Ijf* i. <.\ompikd}n Our Staff Fnm Dtipardta 
•- : A s NEW YORK — Tie dollar was 

^ lower Thursday by a record 
Z 0 ifeV-S-. t » dc deficit and a weak but 
: h-.j^^cgrmdicators rra«t that some 
/-' j- ^ C'l^ra^ sigiialedihe-probabat 
ij,. ;• of lower interest rates. • 

Dealers said the market wascau- 
before Friday’s All -Samis 
'.'“hiv • Oliday, when most European mar- • 

•v ,/ ,c! Tqj' * tsU* will be closed. . 

V“Tbe leading indicator number 
expected but even with the 
::r f * i'S ->ward revision the previous 
'Vouth the economy is not showing- 
. ■ Jr .i , .“] 1 Tong growth,” said Jody Foulks, 

. ^ • h^ttgrate trader for Chicago’s Har- 

P, ^-jpbe government reported a re- 
1 u*-' V*S monthly trade deficit of SIS S 





I. 


ll V ffion for 


hiLi *« «»>iwjbe, higher than 

L i ^r : P ected - ^ mde * °f leading tn- 
;> vl t ^vcatois, a barometer of economic 
$ ends, recorded a tiny 0.1-percent 
,, 71 p^,; crease in September, while Au- 
list's growth was revised upward 
r.fn'^j. 1 &S Percent. . 

Foolks said that rhe dollar 
.. I'jqtci t - iefly plunged to 15980 Deutsche 
0 Aiks in New York. “Bat the 2.60- 
. . ‘ -ark level is a very strong support 


1 . 


- forAodoffiau^oi^^ilessaw 
it wa»>gni% 1 oi^p$^hegu 
to buy it tack," afirakL 

Deabs ^ad, benfevo, the slug- 
gish oudodefor iheUS, jecooomy 
continues-io pcSot to a redaction in 
the Federal Reserved d ppo unt rare, 
somerimedjarh^' the fbtmh quar- 
ter. 

"Perhaps we need lower razes to 
give ft lode to she economy," Ms. 
Foulks said. “But diftLposittbility t 
combined wi& stronger interest 
rates in Japan, Germany and the 
UX and eonlmoed intervention 
by central banks probablymeans a 
lower dofiar” ..... 

EarOcr in Emope, the dollar feD 
sharply on tte Uneconomic data, 
but recouped most of its losses as 
operatocs took profits and cut short 
positions. . 

The British pound , ended al 
$1.4405 in London, baxdy dunged 
from Wednesday’s close of 
$1.4415. BmitfeB 103.7695™*! 
the Deutsche mark from 3.7795 <m 
Wednesday. In Ncw-Yort, it cost 
$1.4420 to buy cue pound, slightly 
more expensive than 51.4340 on 
Wednesday. 


ffHE EUROMARKETS 


wn in U.S. 


hi Tokyo, die dollar closed u 

212.0 Janaaex yen, up s&ghtly 
from Wednesday's 2)1.75. Later in 
New York, it dosed at 211.15 yen, 
down a bit from Tburada/s 21 165. 

Other New York rates, com- 
pared with levels late Wednesday, 
mdnded: 16140 DM, down from 
2.6320; 7.9450 French francs, 
down from £0175; 2.1465 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.1550, and 

1.765.00 Italian lire, down from 
1.77&50. 

Dealers said Thursday's late 
bounce back in Europe demon- 
strated again the dollars re silience 
at lower levels, where steady com- 
mercial demand has always 
emerged recently. 

: Earlier in Europe, the dollar was 
fixed at 2.6168 DM in Frankfurt, 
unchan ged from Wednesday’s fix- 
ing; at 2.9515 Dutch guilders in 
Amsterdam, up from 2.9510, and at 
.1,766 ,60 hre in MEan, down from 
I.766J90. The dollar dosed in Zu- 
rich at 2.1405 Swiss francs, down 
from 2. 1433 on Wednesday. 

Foreign-exchange markets were 

dosed in Paris for a holiday. 

/Iff/, Hauers) 


Swiss Banker 
Amends Remark 

Rearm 

ZURICH — Pierre Langue- 
tic, president of Swiss National 
Bank, rated out on Thursday 
the possibility of a wide-rang- 
ing liberalization of the Swiss 
capital markets. 

Mr. Languetin said in Lau- 
sanne on (ret 24 that the bank 
might oouider a liberalization 
of the laws that restrict franc- 
bond issuing to bonks based 
here. 

On Thursday be said that any 
changes, which he said were still 
only under review, would con- 
cern adjustments to regulations 
governing dual-currency bonds 
— bonds issued in one currency 
but repaid in another. 


Prime Shuffles European Executives 


n Its 


? £ 



fL 

J x H]]L By Christopher Pizzey 

-- f ncni f :c _. LONDON — Attention in the “ *’“.*i“ u “** ««• «wc 
- : in [he f Q ' ^.nrobraid market Thnrsday fo- P*f lSsue P® 0 ? 4* about 100.11. 
v'-- '^ Jsed squarely cm the floating-rate- The Canadian Imp erial Bank of 

'■■■ -w.lw sector with fair Deutsche Commerce issued a 10-year note 

"" -^iw 811(1 19/0 dollar issues being paying W prant over rhe six-month 

duri n g the day, dealers London interbank offered rate with 


month London interbank bid rate 
with a uuudnnxm coupon of 8 per- 
cent. It was quoted wdl above the 


4Kat.. 
- r - MV. 


-Puj 


c The Deutsche-mark issues to- 
led I_2 billion DM and all were 


UVjbm, '*** vuiiwii L/ra ami au were. 

'll s-u^'nnehed with maximum coupon 
•• -Jl:. Dealers here noted that nine 

- «ad notes totaling 3.55 bfl- 

DM were planned in the No- 
'.i-jiw^^hber DM Eurobond calendar 
- p in ^ “* r -inounced on Tuesday. 

• .-j f ^ "The DM issues all traded within 

- ih.r ph^'or total fees, although somenp- 
• ./jad. J^ators here expressed concern that 
i_ ® E ‘flood of new issues could prove 
A r, .. ^ 1 ^.. fficult for the market to depart. 
.-.Lm r^Morgan Guaranty GmbH lead- 
imaged a 400-mflfion-DM. 10- 
.-n 't ko aSE ' 4r notc for J -F- Morgan A Co. 
-C. l1J15r At pays ¥t point over the three- 

‘CMlTinBItfH . 

' - r _ IjIs hk 


a maximum ooupon of 8 percent, 
which was soon raised by the lead 
manager, Cooamenhank AG, to 
400 milfiem DM. from the bridal 
300 mflfin n DM. Even after the 
taaease, the issue was quoted weB 
within the 10 -basis-pomt seffing 
concession at 99^5 bid. 

Commcrrbahk also led a 300- 
nrilEnm-DM, 10-year note fa Secu- 
rity Pacific CQcp. The issue pays W 
point over six-month Libor with a 
coupon era of 8 percent. It was 
quoted at 9930 fad, just on the 10- 
baasi»int adSzre ooocession. 

Indnstriekreditbank AG led for 
its own nuit, KB Finance AG, a 
100-nuIHon-DM note paying Vi 


pant over three-month Libor. The 
IO-ye&r issue will have a maxim um 
coupon of SVfa percenL 

In the dollar floating-rale- note 
sector, a further perpetual floater 
ranking, as primary capital was 
launched for a British ckaring 
tank; the third such issue in two 
days. 

The 5400-ariHion note was for 
Standard Chartered Bank PLC 
pays 27% basis points over six- 
month Xibid. It was priced at 
100.10 and was quoted on the 
when-issued market at 99.96 bid. 
1 mmmgw was Go/dQUEQ ^bfhc 
tnMwMniwwii Gorp. 

Northeast Savings FA issued a 
SIOO-mflBon floater paying % point 
over 12-monih Libor. The issue 
was quraed by the lead manager, 
Morin Lynch Capital Markets, at 
99.66, within the total fees of 65 
basis paints, 

. Seasoned dollar floaters general- 
ly ended the day a easier where 
changed, dealers said. 


Recycling 
Of Software 

(Continued from Page 11) 

settled on a single computer lan- 
guage, called ADA, for all of its 
systems. But the consortium's li- 
brary, which is really just a large 
computer data base, wifl be filled 
with programs written in a dozen 
computer languages. 

“In most cases, we won't have 
the tods for translation." said Mr. 
Jones. “In those cases, it would 
probably be faster just to write the 
program again, in the language you 
need.” 

Moreover, not afl the programs 
in the library will be available for 
tending While paitid pants in the 
consortium say they expect no ami- 
crusi objections from the Justice 
Department over joint research, 
sharing proprietary computer pro- 
grams among the companies may 
be tempting fate.- As a result, TRW 
will be able 10 catalog all of its own 
programming work, but it will not 
nave access, for instance, to 


By Brenda Erdmann 

Inumantmal MaaU Tribute 

LONDON — Prime Computer 
Inc. has shuffled the top manage- 
ment of its European operations 
for the second rime in less than four 
mouths. 

In early July, the L'S.- based 
maker of minicomputers divided 
its E uro pe a n subsidiary operations 
into two sew regions. Northern 
and Southern Europe, headed by 
Malcolm Padma and Charles Pi- 
casso, respectively. That move fol- 
lowed the appointment of Richard 
Williams as vice president, interna- 
tional marketing operations, and 
bis transfer to Prime's corporate 
headquarters in Natick, Massachu- 
setts. 

The new structure had been in 
place for two months, when Mr. 
Picasso decided to join the comput- 
er division of the big French elec- 
tronics and aerospace company. 
Marra, tearing bis newly created 

post a Prime as head of ihe South- 
ern Europe region Vacant- 

Prime has now shifted responsi- 
bility for all European operations 
to Mr. Padma. who holds the title 
of rice president, Europe, Middle 
East and Africa marketing, opera- 
tions. 

At Prime Computer (UK) Ltd. 
Sven-Aage OemfeLdt has become 
managing director. He takes over 
those duties from Mr. Padica, who, 
upon his appointment as head of 
the Northern European region, also 
was to continue in his post as head 
of Prime's UJL operations until a 
successor could be found. 

Mr. Oemfeldt moved to Londo n 
from Stockholm, where he held the 
post of managing director of Prime 

Scandinavia. He will be succeeded 
in that position by Geoff Quett, 
who currently is managing director 
of Prime's Si ngap ore distributor 


In time; however, access to the 
p r ogrammi n g code itself may be 
less important than access 10 the 
concepts underlying it. At the Uni- 
versity of California, Mr. Freeman 
and others are looking for ways to 
reuse generalized designs and pro- 
gram specifications, so that they 
can be translated into rirtaally any 
language. 


To Our Readers 

Please said information abort 

i MMp iw Bt ftanp c In- 

Business People 
International Herald Tribcme 
Room 501-S, Bracken Hoose 
10 Cannon Street 
London EC4P4BY 

FngliHwi 

Telex 262009 (IHTLON) 


operations. Mr. Duett’s successor 
has not yet been named. 

IATA Elects Mehouar 

As President for ’85-86 

LONDON — The International 
Air Transport Association has 
elected Mohammed Mekouar as its 
president for 1985-1986. Mr. Me- 
kouar is president of Royal Air 
Maioc, (he Moroccan flag carrier. 

As head of the association, which 
represents 140 airlines worldwide, 
he gnfflcro d s Heinz Rubnau, chair- 
sun of Lufthansa, the West Ger- 
man air line. 

Citibank has named Simon Rig- 
gall country corporate officer for 
Morocco, based in Casablanca., He 
succeeds Christian Bartholin, who 
is bang transferred to Paris as gen- 
eral manager for commercial bank- 
ing at Contpagnic Generate de 
Basque - Citibank. Mr. Rjggall 
previously was deputy head of the 
agribusiness sector for Citibank in 
Europe, the Middle East and Afri- 
ca. 

NMB Bank (Deutschtaiun AG, 
Hamburg, has appointed Onno 
Van Da Broek as general manag- 
er. Mr. Van Den Broek was deputy 
genera] manager of NMB Bankas 
office in Geneva. No one has yet 
been named to succeed him in that 
post. Earlier this year, NMB Bank 
Look over the Hamburg office of 
Nederiandse Credietbank 

Wartsfla, Finland's leading ship- 
building company, h as nanwl Pan, 
li Jumppanen as a director. Mr. 
Jumppanen, who u with the Tech- 
nical Research Ce nter of Finland, 
will be responsible for research and 
dcvdopmem of Wartsila's arctic 
and offshore technology. 

STC PLC the British telecom- 
munications and computer compa- 
ny, has named Sir Raymond Brown 
tc its board. He is one of the joint 
founders of Racal Electronics Ltd. 
and has served as chairman of 
Muirhead PLC since I97Z 

Lufthansa b ftS named Hanrri ni 

Weber personnel director, succeed- 
ing Hermannjosef Wolff, who is 
stepping down for health reasons. 
Mr. Weber previously was manager 
of the industrial-relations subdivi- 
sion, based in the West German 
airline's head office in Cologne. In 
addition, Lufthansa appointed 
Ewald Mdsch head of the new fi- 
nancing division. He was manager 


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of the accounting and administra- 
tion and services subdivisions. 

Tate A Lyle PLC has named Neil 
Shaw chairman and chief execu- 
tive, effective March 1. Mr. Shaw 
will succeed Sir Robert Haslam, 
who recently was named chairman 
of Britain's National Coal Board to 
succeed Ian MacGregor. Mr. Shaw, 
56. was elected a director of the 
British sugar producer in 1975 and 
became group managing director in 
1980. 

Lytes Bros. Steamship Co. of 
New Orleans said Andrew French, 
operations manager for Asia, has 
ban appointed general manager* 
liner services, based in San Francis- 
co. Mr. French, who was based in 
Tokyo, wQ] be succeeded today as 
operations manager for Asia by 
Daniel MinkJer. Paul C. Lighibano 

has bon named to the new post of 

general sales manag er for Asia for 
Lykes Lines Agency Inc„ a subsid- 
iary. He is based in Tokyo and 
formerly was the company’s re- 
gional manager Taiwan/Hong 
Kong/ Southeast Asia. 

Michael McCarty has become 
the company's general manager for 
Hong Kong and Taiwan, based in 
Taipei. He takes over duties previ- 
ously held by Mr. Ligbtband. 
James Egan was named Lykes 
Lines Agency’s manager of confer- 
ences and pricing succeeding Mr. 
McCarty. Mr. Egan, who is based 
in Tokyo, previously was Lykes’s 
district sales manager, trans-Parific 
services, in Chicago. 

Campbeff's U.K. LuL. the British 
arm of the U.S. food company, 
Campbell Soup Co„ has appointed 
Derek Hornby a nonexecutive di- 
rector. Mr. Hornby is chairman of 
Rank Xerox (UK) Ltd. and on ex- 
ecutive director of its parent com- 
pany, Rank Xerox Lid. 

Quality International, a Wash- 
ington-based hotel chain, has 
opened offices in Bern. Switzer- 
land, and Saarbrucken, West Ger- 
many, as part of its European ex- 
pansion plan. Martin Buehler. 
director for Central Europe, will 
head both offices. 

Wettugtoo Underwriting Agen- 
cies Lt«L. the managing agency di- 
vesting from Willis Faber, has ap- 
pointed Anthony Cooper as 
managing director Mr. Cooper 
currently is senior partner of Price 
Waterhouse in Malaysia. 

Klein wort, Benson Lonsdale 


Convergent Says 
QwirmanQuit 

Roam 

SAN JOSE, California — 
Convergent Technologies Inc. 
said Thursday that its founder 
and chairman. Allen H. Mi- 
chaels, had resigned to form a 
new business, and four other 
high-level employees were leav- 
ing with him. 

It said Mr. Michaels has indi- 
cated that the new business 
would not compete with Con- 

vergcnL 

The others are its executive 
via president and director. El- 
iot J. Wegbreil; the via presi- 
dent for business development. 
Matthew Sanders 2d, and two 
vice presidents, Robert Van 
Naarden and Richard 

LowemhaL 


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1 


PLC of London said Sir Arthur 
Norman, chairman of De La Rue 
Co„ has been appointed to it* 
board as a nonexecutive director. 
Retiring from the board is Denys 
°OT*. 

Slade Consulting Group Pty. 
Ltd., an Australian executive 
search firm, has opened an office in 
London. Slade Consulting Group 
(UK) Lid. is beaded by Jim Hay- 
man, who joins the company from 
Sacs Consulting Group in Mel- 
bourne, where he was managing 
director. Also joining Slade's U.K. 
operations is Martin Lawless, who 
was with Arthur Young Manage- 
ment Consultants as a senior con- 
sultant. 

Maihesoa A Gx, London, said 
R.M. Collins has been appointed a 
director. He will be responsible for 
investment banking and banking 
activities. Maiheson & Co. is a unit 
of Jardine, Maiheson Holdings 
LuL 

Fennoscandia Ud. of London 
said Hugh Adamson, previously 
manager at Fust National Boston 
Ltd. in London, has been appoint- 
ed U.K. manager and a member of 
its management committee. 

American Express Bank, the in- 
ternational banking arm of Ameri- 
can Express Co., has named Adrian 
Verwey its area head for Latin 
America. Mr. Verwey previously 
headed A EE’s global credit opera- 
tions, a post in which he is succeed- 
ed by L. Alan Bawden. 


4Wr 116 Ooeoner IS 

T7W M Oelflo i 221 

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57*4 391* ONoGa 270 42 MJ 
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32 

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326 

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120 

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346 

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28 

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thevwffkL 

The Interoanonal Hoald Tribune. 
Bringing the World’s Most 
Important News to the World's 
Most Important Audience. 

























PEANUTS 


books 





That's that he's 

. 60 T WITH HIM? 



T CANT 
BELIEVE 

rr_ > 


iJftfi/A beagle 
i*Ji I BLASTERS 


gift 


THE YOUNG SCIENTISTS WHO 
ARE INVENTING THE WEAPON- 
RY OF SPACE 


BLONDIE 


By William J. Broad. 236 pages. SI 6.93. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 

U. S. POLICY, 1945-84 


CMDC7/, WEREN'T YOU J \ 
GOINS TO 'HOW. IN t-' 
TOUR SROP ? 


‘•If I CHANGED 

S ter mind r 




'III VOU CAN'T USE THE 
( SOFA,DADDY.-MIICE<S 
V_- CQWINS OVSR r 

/-'Landwe , u.be J 

IN HEPE 1 — 


T rrs A KNOWN fiACT„ *S 

I TEENAGE DAUGHTERS J 


By Paul B. Stares; S25; 334 pages. 
Cornell University; 


ACROSS 
1 Expunge 
6 Nasser's 
successor 
11 Forestall 
13 Iron or gold 

16 City on the 
Reuss 

17 Den denizen 

IS Fools' Day mo. 
19 .. is 

done": Book of 

Common 

Prayer 

21 Ma that says 
"Maa!” 

22 African village 

24 Like neon 

25 Japanese 
cousin of Mr. 

26 Apportions 

28“ Were a 

Rich Man" 

29 Plunger's loss 

31 “ Fideles" 

33 Democritus 
follower 

35 Perform at La 
Scala, palin- 
dromicaily 
37 Wine or vine 
39 Depose 

43 Went West, 
perhaps 

44 Indsl. activity 

46 Organic 
fertilizer 

47 Literary 
collection 


48 Fair, in 
Ferrara 

50 Placate a 
glutton 

51 Soak flax 

52 Downwind 

54 Filbert 

55 Bewildered 
57 Weather-map 

features 

59 Gulf on the 
Ionian 

60 Bequest 
recipient 

61 Paper amount 

62 First Egyptian 
king 

DOWN 

1 Threw forth 

2 Box again 

3 Hail, to Caesar 

4 Kind of 
therapy 

5 Boredom 

6 Havana lass 

7 Onihequi vive 

8“ Set," 

1957 film 
9 Figure for a 

C.P.A. 

10 Progress 
intelligently 
planned 

11 Blood part 

12 Italian 
province 

14 Decor style 
since 1895 


15 "Last Case” 
sleuth 

20 Palindrome 
for pitchers 

23 Marquis 

27 Penned a pig 

29 Powhatan's 
captive 

30 Gap 

32 Yamamai’s 
kin 

34 Old English 
money unit 

36 “ the 

Night": Mailer 

37 Juno 

(Roman 

goddess) 

38 Incarnations 
40 Give off 
41Doesa 

surgeon's job 
42 Feared fly 
43Corday's 
victim 

45 Perceval’s 
quest 

48 Celebration, 
Italian style 

49 Electric- 
furnace 
inventor 

52 Star State 

53 Palazzo 
Ducaie 
resident 

56 di-dah 

58 Behave like 
Cato the Elder 




Ml 


BEETLE BAILEY 




how poe£ rr 

LOOK TO VOU? 


I SEE A 
COUPLE OF 
PRAW8ACKS 


LIKE 

WHAT 

-z. 


Moos 

UjMKS£- 




ANDY CAPP 








ALL THOUGHTS OF 
RETIREMENT.' r- 




Reviewed by Robert M. Bowman 

TT IS fascinating how two books on roughly 
A the same subject can be so completely dif- 
ferent. W illiam J. Broad and Paul B. Stares 
have produced two excellent books on weap- 
ons in space — with no overlap whatsoever. 

Both present f h«r material - chronologically, 
with earn chapter representi n g a period of time 
dominated by an individual, la “Star war- 
riors^* by Broad, the period is a day in his visit 
to the Lawrence Livermore Laborataiy, and 
the individuals are young scientists involved in 
the development of ^Third-Generation Nucle- 
ar Weapons" for “Star Ware.” In “The Milita- 
rization of Space” by Stares, the period covers 
a number cl years, and die individual is at 
every point a president of the United States 
trying to cope with the possibility of an arms 
race in space. Broad's bode covers one week; 
Stares's covets four decades. 

The subject of both books is space weapon- 
ry. Yet one would be hard pressed to find a 
angle system that is mmtkoed in both books. 
*?StarV?amors” by Broad deals in the weapons 

of the future, while Stares documents those of 
the past. And while both authors recognize the 
existenc e of a relationship between the two, 
Broad concentrates on “Star Wars” (satellites 
to shoot down missiles), while Stares empha- 
sizes ASATs (missies to shoot down nassues). 

The biggest difference between these two 

books is in their style. Broad's book is intimate, 

even gripping. It reads Hke a good novel. A 
triwirt reporter for The New York limes, he 
makes the characters come alive — all of diem, 
from a hftflnricaf giant Hke Edward Teller to 
the ex-fianc6 of one of the scientists in thc lab. 
He seems to understand that it is almost im- 
possible to judge a p roposal (whether for a 
triffi on-do Ear weapon system or for a thou- 


Sc an‘ important contribution to * 

debate- .. .«,•«< « »•» bis ability to 

Where Broad teally science 

make science intaesUCS; LnJ-e P hc- 
popularizes, who he 

namena and turn & - ^pia-r.cd m 

serves up the real w» 

such a way that niseasily^cug^ 

the layman, iris soa« « cot- B rul .j 

In describing a laser, fw examp . ■ 
says, “Whar makes the bursts so up c { 

they arc coherent; that is. 
nutation whose waves arc all uifcKp 

KSS SSA m 

IriSSTuaht — but one that was very speui e. 

Regular.^ is made Sd 

faZ, lhat^S interferewiih 
justas waves on the ocean snrf *? ( 2H^L r 
each other out. In contrast, waves of 
have exactly the ssmefrequency and 
of modOT and are srep 

another. Urey are a pounding rh\Thm o I hgW- 
By comparison, Robert Jastrow in he wgj 

bJokdwoteda whole chapter to «pL“nmg 
lasers without even menucoing 

Broad is to be congratulated for not trivializing 
hie .. • 

Stares’s bode, on the other hand, is 
cal as Broader is intimate, StOTKLS a scholar ( a 
very good one) and las book rrflats that. It 
reads aSt like a Ph-D. thesis, which shouW 
not be surprising, since that is essentially what 
it j& It is also a treasure trove of information. 
The appendices alone arc worth the pnee of tne 
book to anyone interested in space vieapoos. 
The very day I received the book m the 
referred' to rt for data on Soviet anu-satelutv 
(ASAT) tests to confirm, my answer to a con- 

- i_ ^ ■ ■■ ■ ■■■■ .-I i-i a Fluor cnPfVn Un 


that day. 

. Though 1 read it from cover to cover. 

S few who boy the bode will ev^do so 
5 they exgoy drinidng from a . firehose. 
This is meant as a caution, not a criticism, for 
die book is very well written. Of course, sop 
the Encyclopaedia Britamrica. 

With all their great differences, the two 
Twjfg wjn d op with aaflg couriusiiQns. Stares 
writes, “The advent of anti-satellite and other 
space weapons will be akm to opening the 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


WIZARD of ID 


•0 Seic York Trims, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



sm 


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Or\MA&> 


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la>eer tw 
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m* 
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REX MORGAN 


qesse maan anna 
bedd naans aaas 
SDE9D aasas sass 
aBanaaaa aaaaaa 
□ana ss □□ 
Essas assssaas 
□EnasDannss □□□ 
□eb aas QQS 
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Uljmiiriii LBUinnoo — 

of sndx weapons win be short-lived or, more 
likely, rOuscsy. Instead, the superpowers will 
become locked into a never-ending, ever-do- 

3- ' . -t t ----- u d«» «in 


mimdrng search for security in space that will 
leave them worse off than before." 




1 T VJ • t r 1 1 1 'M » • i 1 






pSsa 














PR- Avorgam 
r AND 1 WERE IN THE HOSPITAL 
UMTlL TWO THIS jKORMING, CLAUDIA ( 
I TOLD HIM I FELT A COMPASSION 
FOR YOU— SUT I VWtrr KNOW IF 1 
WAS IN LOVE WITH YOU ANYMORE ( 


HE EXPLAINED THAT THE 
COCAINE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR 
WHAT HAPPENED TO YOU f MY 
QUESTION IS WHY WOULD YOU 
RISK DESTROYING WHAT we HAP 
BETWEEN US* _ 


BRIDGE 




*1 PRACnClM6 SMELLING 6000 AND 1 
DROPPED 'ICXJR PERFUME BOTTLE-" 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
| s by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


GEE, I WISH WE 
COULD GET SETTER 
RECEPTION ON 
THE TELEVISION 


Unscramble tfiew four Jumbtea, 
one letter » each square, to farm 
tour onfriaiy words. 


INLOG 













Answer here; 







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' r •*' S'.'r tiirg J^sSt ,% Steven Cost 7 ^■• v ‘ • ' 7'5d{ereja^ 

• •* Ihi MFW vnDv Vw I"* 7S " t * StnkK ; - s •'• • £•*: * 'lw° *c wide-open race an: &c Aga Kjbm^ooopkd 
: - *.' >1 a^aLJo Saturi4 y' 4 seven sad Sberniwr wrt ihe'entiy of 

:■ -. .• r :■ *•>• ^SSSSSl R«M ■ «a Bob Bade, coopted bcause 
.- -- ; . ^ ^ inchidmg ahnoH evov hoagm Merita m oroerdripinimsa ia.bwh. The 

. ' ■ 1 ‘ ~;V» I? 5 **. 10 ** a c *»njjMn this yaac, - . .? 1 " wjrJPeMjlia, twice a winner against males in Exmjpe, 

^'. '■-■Vu S10 nfflinnjii purees arc #isutad of starting. .5?P»'J1 nnffioa Distaff has the sauOest field, and 

,r : v. ?***!? ££?&• ' - 01hcr placed GrirNfattaBffKtm: ^fe^^aciTOStartqswffltennmmgasangMfy. 

< ^ojL% , 2?r *“*? ^ *“* ovrrsabscribeiThosc femes - ;-®fe D - Wayne LcJws-tramed trio of Lady's Secret, 
. ',•••• ■>'.. . V* to ^ fidds if there ax^tac'Kctfcbcs %*&* Magic and Alabama Nana may-make the race 

: i ,j y fnoayaftarroon. ' S; 1 '. v ; ^K^nn»tfwnl event and figure* to be oobenerfiuml- 

•- - C!J|. Wfc ■ • -lit fmlv milnh/ 4 :_s — i .-■ •;:.<a3t; A.^A. »i -_. 


- ... ' '-^ aiw? MgP 11 ^ * hatf on the grass, instead offtgyt minify* r : 3hVea3e fifties and the SI nallion Sprint. 

“ ■■•::" .?‘i ? ’ a * ^ asric 81 a and a quarter do flfry-7' tt'thc 2-^yetr«pM £By race, he wiD saddle Twifigfn 
■■•..■ .7:' . ^V-KSlte^.F^ and Arewdrevingfo^yet, who 

' - - ’.. ! : : ^ntei, -n. * -□ ' : figwc to be odds-on dukes against' pine mte&Lu- 

: : 1 : jr < a»fkfch p v rcas0n ^ OT t ^ 10Se changes, horaorer^was tibeta&i - «'* SptiSt doo-of Mt Livermore and Paacfco Villa 

.^pn&.beati^mMpo^ 

Tl ^wH? 1 Granlon and Strawberry Road both have YroaMe 
’ , " “ 4 ** s^PPy ** tracks, aniUh^^ rc -7 : - . IBtey-ranfiflftMiteoa the grass, like the Tmf, has a 

• 1 - : ~en calling for some rain in the New Yotk area' 1>ea*ftr : .fi»rcBeia flavor, drawing continental stars 

."■... -•= ^nsS, <w Satssrfay. •- - . . HRo^on.l ^ acemsk.Shadmlai^NewSoB^ 

•••". ' Ua yfai ; - How «* t«ck will be affected cannotbewcdicied - TOnop. US. estnmu are Cozzok, AI Mamoon and 

' "-•■Irp,, -ratil Saturday afternoon. . Tllo ^ Skw 

:: ini,,r^ lff kfc A sloppy track covered with water isSody to hefo ‘ nallion hnwrik is topped by Mogambo, 

^T lt ^&;' r . 0 ? t 'I™ neTS ^ ham P er dwse getting net <fri ?Ao"w» the Champa g ne Stakes w 9?* lengths last 
'" i; t; f' 1 ^ bodij^dcked mto ther faces. A dryin g and muddy - timeo u t , hot the Mr. Projector cote finished third to 
_®-u£^x>nld jnove tiring to speedballs and hae&ul to 1 - Jin«iffle«ttianti Storm Cat and Danzig Connection 
- - li^^ch^-rraners. . m^jpwevions start 

' - ; c . r A soupy track could conq>romise TOt orfy Satnr- r ■ ‘ Now bf dm Juvenile runners, however. Is likely to 

-. • ■ ^W 13 ^ 5 731X8 hat also the selection New Yo^ asbost named champion 2-year-old or become the eariy 

.j. i': rntims Bresedezs* ravorite for nexi ^ring’s Triple Crown. Those honors 

.. f'^^i^LT^The controversial dedaon to mn fhefrTTtrw> T »^ probridy wffl go to Ogygtan, the tmdefeated Damas- 
• •' : : Z***5S* Hollywood Park in California last year was »«wt> = cos ooh who is out for the year with sore 5*»»« but 
‘ ' c °nTLnn ^'flfcause of tbe possibility of inclement weather in the would hawe been heavily fawred in the race. 

.... '• ii PfqW 1 r* ortIjcast - r, 

The Classic, the richest of the cap races and the one,!-.- U 


Jav»fle catrams Storm Cat and Danzig Connection 
prawns start. 

■•" Hone bf dm Juvenile runners, however. Is likdy to 
he. named c hamp i o n 2-year-old or become the eariy 
favorite for nexl ^ring’s Tx^>le Crown. Those honors 



Broken Nose Break for Hagler 


By Dave Anderson 

.VfH- York Toner Sen:ce 
NEW YORK — After his first 
round with a new sparring partner. 


“the postponement is a break for 
Marvin." 

One reason for Hagler' s desire to 
main* the Nov. 14 dale was his 


Zacfc Hewitt, Tuesday night at his disdain for Mugabi. *Tve seen vid- 
Palm Springs, California, training cotapes of his fights." the champi- 
eamp, Marvrious Mamn Hagler on had said. ‘Tm not too im- 
was smQing through his headgear, pressed." 

“The kid," said the undisputed But the 26 opponents knocked 
middleweight champion, “is just out by Mugabi in his 26 bouts must 
right for me.” have been impressed. And if Hagler 

Even Hagler didn't know how had been cautious in trying to pro- 
right. With an accidental bead butt jgci his bad back a gains t Mugabi, 
moments later, the kid broke the he surely would not have been the 
champion’s nose. As a result, $ame gladiator who was all over 
Hagler 1 s title bout with John Mu- Hearns during the eight minutes of 
gabi of Uganda, scheduled for iheir title bout earlier this year. 
Nov. 14 in Las Vegas, has been That was the champion at his best 
postponed, probably until early jn contrast, when he was cautious 
next year. Also delayed will be his against Roberto Duran two years 
eventual rematch with Thomas ago he was far from his best. 
Hearns wtodi had been blueprint- Ev(m g Href’s bade had held 
ai for March _4 by promoter Bob jp during t rainin g, [hat would 
Aram. hardly have guaranteed the ailmen t 


ter son fought from a crooked 
crouch, the result of what was later 
diagnosed as a “slight rotation of 
the fifth lumbar vertebrae." Be- 
tween rounds, one of his corner- 
men, Al Sflvani. lifted him and 
squeezed, hoping to snap tbe verte- 
brae into place. 

Whatever chance Patterson had 
against Ali, he had none with a bad 
back. In the 12th round, finally, the 
referee, Harry Krause, slopped the 
bout. 

About a year earlier. Ali had 
been forced to postpone his re- 
match with Sonny Uston because 
he required emergency hernia sur- 
gery. 

Although the fight eventually 
was held in Lewiston. Maine, sis 

months later, it had been scheduled 

in Boston originally. Three nights 
before the bout. Ali was rushed to 
Massachusetts Genera] Hospital 


But the fractured nose (the dis- would not have reemed during the for hernia surgery. At the hospital 


closure was made Wednesday) was 
a marvelous break for the marvel- 
ous middleweight champion. 

With a 61-2-2 record and un- 
beaten for the last 10 years. Hagler 
hasn't made man y mistakes in box- 


bout. 

If a reinjury had developed, the 
champion might have reacted with 
the same savage frenzy that flat- 
tened Hearns after the referee had 
momentarily stopped their bout to 


bg. But he was about to make what det£TTniEC ^ 0 f Hagler’s 

could have been a tig one. Instead Or he might have’ been as sud- 
of postponing tas tide defense den]y helpless as Flovd Patterson 
agamst Mugabi despite an atlmg was ^ ^ back ^ oul in his 


.’ 'lnjiijjcr ^ ne Okay ravome is Chiefs Crown, who wan test -hive mounts in every cop race. Jorge Velasquez, who 
' • i 2 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile as a 2-vear-old. The leads in stakes victories tins year with 43, rides sax 

’ ;r ’ “ e ^ ^Tfla was beaten as the favorite m «D dace of hones Saturday, mdnding four t-nfam trainees. 

?«ajj Bni^ Wf ^^ r ^ s ^^^^ roTO ra° es .Batid)oond3dtt)win Steve Qmthen, the former star jockey here who left 

' Stakes and the Marlboro Cup.Under far Europe four ye&rsago, has three mounts on Euro- 

- ' ; _r DcmId McBeth, he has beaten eveiy Oasac. pean imports. Lester Piggott, who is retiring after 

" .. ' ^•'{q^utrant except for the invading Omadhtn long shot, more than three decades as Britain’s tending rider, will 


: . t .. IT afl iH 4 kmperiaI Chmce. “ “ 

, , ? . — Bp. Gate Dancer, Vanbu uBngham, Track Barron and 

^ fcSounding: Basque are thefour oUerhoraem the field; 
« dn^-n that order, they finished behind Chiefs Crown in 


make & farewell appearance cm the long shot Theatri- 
cal in the Tmf. 

The cap tabes win be the first seven of the day. The 


RtL-ftV.# tc P-ea '-■^f' c - a no : 

Donald McBetfa aboard Classic favorite OtieTs Crown. 

Nets 9 Working Overtime, 
Defeat Pacers, 147-138 


L u ™ that order, they finished bdund ChkTs Crown in final event on theejght-raoe Aqueduct card is the first 
^ Ilf ^ ^ Sfe,^ Mariboro. The other 3-year-dds are Proud Troth, division of the 5100,000-added Lashkari Stakes for 3- 
. ~ ‘ r f' ,J a uv^iecond to Chief’s Crown in last ^ring’s Flamingo year-olds on the grass. Creme Frakhe and Exclusive 
■wxnm ij^jtakes, and T urkoma n, the Travers nnracr-op. Partner are the favorites. The second division will be 


Compiled by Our Staff 'From Ikspsid as 

l seven of the day. The EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
ueduct card is the first Jersey — Any National Basketball 
Lashkari Stakes for 3- Association team that leads the 


The Nets go t a remaAable sj}- 
around perforsiar.ee from guard 
Micheal Ray Richardses as he 
scored a career- sigh 3i points and 


back, he had resumed training on 
Monday. Described at first by his 
personal doctor as an acute lumbo- 
sacral strain, the spinal ailment was 
diagnosed in Palm Springs “as hav- 
ing symptoms of a possible rup- 
tured disk," by Dr. Anthony Daly, 
the I5S4 Olympic medical director. 

“I’d like to see the fight pushed 
back." the champion had said 
Tuesday, “but it's not my deci- 
sion." 

_ Asked if he had talked to Aram 
about a postponement because or 
his back ailment. Hagler men- 
tioned that the Top Rank promoter 
had been talking to his manage r, 
Pat Petronelli. and his trainer, 
Goody Petronelli — as if it were 


1965 heavyweight title bout with 
Muhammad Ali. 

From tbe fourth round on, Pat- 


Sam Silverman, the Boston pro- 
moter, was with Freddie Brooks, 
then a closed-circuit television pro- 
moter who was hoping to avoid a 
postponement. 

“Maybe they can freeze il" 
Brooks said. 

"Forget iu" Silverman said. 
“Forget it." 

With his bad back. Hagler wasn't 
willing to forget it. But now h<* 
knows be must — at least until next 
year. 


: -vB-TrjN 


* ‘>it than brioc." The 14 entrants for the Turf include 12 horses who run Sunday. 

"I'-ffitcstto. 

r ^Si SCOREBOARD 

& assenka?: ; „ 

■■■na.Aaw.«fe Football 

-• ■•••?ciaie 3tSac; : — ; — — - 

- a College Te^m and ZndmdnalLeaders 

TEAM OFFlIin Arkansas ' am w* 


are the favoritex. The second division will be third quarter could be 
day. . . night. 


New Jersey' Nets by 19 points in the added 1 1 rebounds, ; 1 assists and 9 ~°p c }' raronew — i 
third quarter could be in for a long steals in a 14“-!S8 airte-cvertime lJieiJ decision, not his. 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


victory over the Indiana Pacers 
here Wednesday night. New Jersey- 
trailed by 91-72 late in the third 
quarter before rallying. 

On opening night "las: Friday. 
New Jersey also trailed by 19 


It deserved to be his derision, not 
theirs. For two reasons: It was his 
back and it was his tide. Had he 
climbed into the ring Nov. 14 won- 
dering if his back was ready physi- 
cally, be also would have been w cu- 


te am OfflMH 


M* TB7t 3MLS 


WALKS CONFERENCE 


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UCLA 

247 522 

4*2 

Now Jareoy 

4 

5 

0 

J 

33 

35 

532 !S2J5 

44*1 

PiHibarH 

29* 586 

7X2 

PittibureA 

3 

5 

2 

5 

37 

« 

422 5474 

4333 . 

Maryland . . 

2M 411 

■7J 


Adaais DtotteM 




54015404 

4ML7 

Arfcanm 

m 435 

*017 

Outawc 

■ 

2 

1 

IT 

47 

34 


mam 4tus „ ... 

SB 333* MOS 

TmaTacn. ’. 
CorYtJ* Y0»P0 H*v^U» V*oo» 
41* 29B sms Nevtor 
4M9S7* MU FlMMaSt 
447 3945 3BA WWtarn Nllcb. . 
44*3931 ai*4 
333 UM aa«uO 


NO: . Bouton 

AWCaVM YO»w» Horttorn 
1W. 53 73* MU Buffalo 
157 7* *94 1H7 MontmF 


1 13 42 23 

0 “T2“ 44' .42 

1 TT 33 29 

0 I M 50 


I^Foroe 


AltCo Yd* YO*po 
331 211 33S3 3*33 
Ml Ml 2MB 3W7 
243 142 2271 3MJ4 
2T7 134 2220 317.1 
253 1422101 SOU 
SCMln* 

G Ptx' Avs 
7 282 403 
S 322 402 
7 248 JU 
7 MS 37J 
7 253 34.1 


TEAM DCFEHSU 


Baylor m n m ttia CAMPBELL confnrehce 

Plartdo St 172 ■* n im Nvrtt DMUaa 

WWtarn MUL . 1M 74 N* 1Z7J Ctdoado 4 S 1 f 42 44 

tcorfaa MImHiD 3 S 2 > M *5 

. . • « Pis A vo St Laois 3 4| 1 24 33 

MUdaaa ' 7 40 O Detroit 111 3 21 41 

LSU 5 43 04 Toronto 1 1 0 2 30 41 

Arkansas 7 VI 114 Sarnia Dtvttion 

ArUana 7 82 11 3 Edmonton I 1 0 14 41 34 

Maryland . 7 B1U VOneaaiw 5 4 2 12 44 3* 

Wtnnfaos 5 4 1 IT 44 48 

MtMVioUAL Cafaarv 5 5 0 TO 48 40 

. TaM ONm LMAMOtal 2 1 0 4 31 Q 

Ytf»Av*YO*pg WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 

Eraratt, Puntoa 2*32 73 mut PinMrvk 2 1 *-J 


nM (21, Sinn 131. Cartyla IT), snots m aool : 
WkmJpM ten FuhrJ 134-13—34; Edrcumion 
(an Hoyword) 10-14-10—44. 

Buffalo 1 1 1—2 

Cafaarr I j 3—4 

Patiemn (31. Bank <*). Mtsaaomt u>. 


37 43 nary (cm Barrawo) 12-10-10—32 

Toroitto 2 1 P-J 

47 34 Vancouver 2 | 3—5 

42 22 BuWa 13L (Mnav <21, Tofal 3 «j, Sund- 

** '42 Btroin tali Vohm 01, Clark 2 t*l. Shots ad 
3* 2* aaat: Taranto (on Brawur) r-7-4-20; van- 
3* so couvnr (an B*mhortM) 11 - 12 - 13 — 34 . 


points in the third period before dering if he was ready men tally, 
beating Boston in double overtime. “But with all the commitmenu,’' 
“We shewed our pride when we he had said, “I hope my back wifl 
came back," said Ricbardson, hold op.” 

" - ■ — ■ Hagler's like that As one of na- 

NBA FOCI’S ture’s noblemen, he’s always doing 


».„* am »* taftss&sr&SK 

was 36 against New > ok Iasi year. . h . . wncn . f Hrtinp him S { , 


Tennis 


Pro Leaders 


Oklahoma 

-.-.vsita-ipwo 

Control Mich. 

^ SuB “Tatodo 

'Soalhern Cat 

.» {•. 

*’ » hCFLLeaders 

>BD» f _ SCORII 

XJtonore. WH 
N^PcoHSaotte, 8UC 
v ■ Ruoft Ham 
•* ‘ Ohran. Edm 

- T.. • J’ ■ Dorsey, Ott 
i '■ Hov, Cai 

,«c ^ f Rtoaway, Saflk 
f;. e:' Karts. Mn 
S*®wwwi>b 
_ ^i«rils. Soak 

-■ y . : B , RUSH II 


PtovaYcbYOspfl 
2*5 908 W74 
434 1738 24*3 
4*0 1819 2593 
3*1 UU 2603 
4*4 1893 244.7 
371 MU 247J 


Evorott, Puntoa 
NOOCO, NYU 


ToafavRkJMa n 


Oavnor. lM8d 
Tradoau, IB - 


Tnjtatmm. Tana 
Smith. MfesSt 


Jo cks ow. Auburn 


WMta, MldtSt 
Thomas. OUaSf 


Yds Avo YOSOfl 
2632 73 3740 
2744 7.1 3432 
2S51 7 H 320.1 
1*48 8 Jt 2713 


3S MEN avsutu pjuiia cuu nnuaii iuu 

M Eorutafli 20 points and 23 rebounds as New 

40 V. Itfqn l^"- WZS40L Z John MCErvo*. ]£,»■ ^ a record with 79 

S3 3822337. X Mel* W1 tender, S55A797. *. Jlinmr ' J J 

Connors. S44Z3M. 5 . Barb Becsar. Osiris. *. rebounds, one more than the previ- 
_a AnOors Jortva. oojua. 7, Sl*fan EOUrro. ous high. 

“Pride was the diTference,’* said 


agaraw i ^ bact ^ wasn - l hin ,^if a 
Once I got m\ m the f avor — ^ f or a J3,I mill ion 

fourth tpianer I fat 1 ooulan t miss. it mrrted ouTthe 

iSAjLSP ? 31 “ did STa favor he 

ends of the court. wouldn’t ask of othos. 

. After the Nets, lost to the Pacers. -PcwhcJcwicaHv ” Aram xmoi 
119-92. on Saturday. Richardson ^bot^caUy. Aram agreed, 

vowed he would get even Wednes- - 

dav. It took him a while, but he 

finally did it, with help from Otis Cp/YD'T'C 

Birdsong. Darryl Dawkins and OX 1 O 

Buck Williams. 

Birdsong scored 2S points. Daw- 
kins hit 10 of 12 field seals and ftnl 1 acJaiwc Tc Hqi*i*i 
scored 25 points and Williams had A^UeSierOS IS BaiTI 

20 points and 23 rebounds as New PONTE VEDRA, Florida (AP) - 



Ifa AjooaMfaa 


3 1 2-4 *307335. A Tim Muymto. 3293389. 9, Y«mlC» 


- s Weovts. Won 
: £ . JtnklnL B.C 
. * Hobart, Ham 

•. .^1- SI 1 tfanhwa Edm 
"Ul- - ft', watt*, otr 
. — - c*. Sanaa. Edm 

• ; } Brawn. OH 

- - p.’ Ellis. Saak 

. - ;y i , Wban. «fl 

- .7 5. Caiwoa Edm 


Dmratt, BX. 
CJemeos, Woo 
Ountflon. Earn 
■ tann MM 
Poonoa. Sack 
Watts. Ott 
H obon. Horn 

cm. mm 

Hotleway, Tor 
Jordan, Sotfc 


i - Fu-nandoz. B.C 

>, BOVd, Wpb 

f.1 PoplawsM, Wpb 
cl Grrar.Tor 
r. 1 i.. jhaard, Sask 
f \. v&ewi.on 
i f Sandufky, BX. 

>1 Kelly, Edm 

F: . Elite, Saak. 
Efarm*. satfc 


Cfartc. ott 
f Dfaon, Edm 
' &uoff, Ham 
/ Conwroa wn 
j Pastaunaac. 

V Iteok. Tor 
AKTofloe, Mil 
i'V Hov, Col 


TD CFG S. Pt» 
0 47 44 32 193 
0 47 37 22 101 
• 32 28 23 13* 
0 47 23 14 130 

0 23 37 12 114 
8 19 24 II IIS 

1 22 22 - 14 102 

0 25 23 3 97 

15 0 0 0 90 

IS 0 0 0 90 

IMf* 

No Yds AtfflTD 
247 1323 SO * 
193 944 53 0 
■ 10T 834 82 4 

110 721 43 9 
92 412 47 1 
12 SS 43 4 
101 S17 11 4 
142 515. 36 12 
710 433 4D 1 
80 433 43 0 

IKO 

Alt Com Yds ICTD 
452 202 3923 11 26 
425 257 3497 1718 
391 2313354 20 19 
422-249 31 VS 21 12 
409 2*5 31 W 10 I 
391 218 27M 24 11 
. 405-1*7 2391 13 If 
3513I2 22S51S 7 
1*3 U1 1445 4 .7 
1*4 118 1410 I 4 

Iff MG 

NO Yds Avis TD 

a* us* vi w 

74 072 1M 14 
IS 1271 17a 4 
74 12W 145 1 
74 1132 14* 4 
65 1047 14.1 5 
5$ >040 11* 7 
59 1014 17* .4 
90 90S 10.1 > 
51 in IS* 3 

TNG 

NO Ydf Avfl. L 
134 4291 473 71 
123 5419 457 74 
119 5393 *13 77 
I T7 5254 44.9 95 
134 ton 44J8 H 
154 44)97 4X5 82 
132 5565 <2* 45 
150 CIS 414 77 


Rob ItocPR KOR Yds YdsPo 
Jackson, Atxn 1M2 B 0 0140 2003 
Palmar. Tmol EOT 131 0 96 1600 300* 

McCoNum. Nvy 715 199 10*251 1338 191.1 
Dubosfl, Nob 118 35 0 190 MH5 1725 
' fLHonwn, towd 784 39C 1SMT9I17W4 


2541 7a 320.1 Gar* 3 (4). KHma (3L Fattor (11. Duauav 
1*41 ZO 2713 (21.-AMntban),BMsdeU(3).Unastroiri(21. 
1935 73 2764 snots oa saal: Pittmarah isntanl 10-1!-*— 
2209 54 276J 30; Dfltroit too Romano) 17-7-12-04. 

1991 53 273* Phlta d ifaUto 1 3 9-1 

1*57 54 2653 MoatrMt 1 3 S— 4 

mi 7.1 2442 Karr 2 (71. Pioop 2 (10L Rich Suitor (3»; 
2KN 5* 2435 Wattw 12}, Galn*y (TJ, CBeHos tl). BJmtth 
tag . (1).Slwtsonfloto;PWioartJHtaJoaSortwrt) 

Car Yds Avo Ydspa 7-8-13—21; Mamraal (an UMtowah) 7-166- 
1*11402 7.1 2003 3L 

345 1323 5* 171.4 OfloOW I 2 X— 4 

340 M77 43 1SX* Hartford 12 3-4 

U3 H3 5* 135L5 Tlppolt 2 (4>, NnMO (3L Turatan 2 (41. 
134 *10 44 mo Farrow a); Babvcb <11. Goufet (71- Anaar- 
lawi wn l4),HuM*r MV. Stools on ooal: QuiOacloa 

PR NOR Yds YdsPD Uaty 10-14-15-41.- Hartford (an SflVfany) 7-7- 
B 0 0 1410 2003 19—34. 

n o *6 i6M mo ewaaflo 3 i »-4 

>9 109 251 im 191.1 Mlausrta 1 3 1—a 


Noah, 1391711. 10. Tomas SmW, S2B9J82. 
Toot Paws 

1. John MeEnnMrUOf.X limn L*«ei.3482.X 
Mats wilaodrt-.zm. a Jimmy Cannon. 2.T71 
5. Barh B*ck*r.lB23, A YtmnVck Noah. 1 J24. 7. 
Stefan Etttwr*. 1,441.8. AaOers Jarryd, IJM. 9. 
Thn Mavotta 1 324 Miiosfav Moor. 130- 
ATP Conwatsr RaaUn«s 
1. 1 van Landl.UNjU Mints. 2. Jenn AAcE ora*. 
13340. 3. Mats W1 lander. 11541.4. Jlmmv Con- 
nors. 87.11 5. Boris Becker, 4937. 4. Stefan 
Edb*ra^3367. Yannick Noc*v6259.a Anders 
Jar rva. 5*04.9. Kevin Curren. 5675. 10. Johan 
Krltfc, 4475. 

WOMEN 

Eandnfls 

L Martina rttrmoUovo. 11.1524)79. 2. Chris 
Evert Lfava 5804.949. a Mono Morudikovo. 
SSU597. 4, Pom Sbriver, 1342333. S. Helena 
Sukoua, 5353337. 6. Claiidia Kohde-Kllscn. 


“Psychdegjcally.” Aram agreed, Hagjer, profile intact, before nraning inti) anew sparing partner. 

SPORTS BRIEFS Hawks Win 

Ballesteros Is Barred From PGA Tour OnSavard’s 

PONTE VEDRA, Florida (AP) — Seve Ballesteros's PGA tour mem- _ 
berehip has been revoked, and the Spanish golfer will be eligible to play a fwf-gj 
only in next year’s Masters, U^. Owm and PGA Championship, Deane M-AJLIA5 •JLI/I c/ 


rebounds, one more than ice previ- only in next year’s Masters, U^. Open and PGA Championship, Deane tJ 

ous high. ^ Beman, the PGA commissioner, said Thursday. 

“Pride was the difference," said Those three tournaments, part of golfs grand slam, have their own 77ir Associated Pres 

Dave WoU, the winners' coach. “It eligibility rules: they are not considered “co-sponsored events" by the BLOOMINGTON. Minnesota 
was more mental toughness than tour, but rather are “approved events." Ballesteros has won two Masters — For every couple of goals Chica- 
anything else. Richardson was titles and two British Open championships. go center Denis Savard sets up with 

great. He took over when the game The ruling came because Ballesteros played in only nine PGA tour his inimitable skating, stickhand- 
was m the balance and did what be events this year. The minimum for retaining membership is IS. ling and passing, he likes to try out 

had to do." — _ hie Aam chnf U/hr*n iict'iwl tihif 


ling and passing, he likes to try out 
his own shot. When asked what 


Evert to Lead U.S. Into Wiehtman Cup 

the first minute of the founb quar- WILLIAMSBURG. Virginia (UPI) — Chris Even Uoyd was to lead a But^hDe^sStraakia? isn't 

ter before Richardson started heavily favored U.S. team against Britain beginning Thursday night in his trademark, it's not too shabby, 
cranking up. the two nations’ annual Wightman Cup teams competition. either. 

He scored nine prints in the final Unbeaten in 24 singles matches in Wighunan play, Evert will captain a Witness Wednesday night’s 
quarter to help forge a ! 13-1 13 tie team of Para Shriver. Kathy Rinaldi and doubles specialists Betsy game: After setting up two firsi- 
at the end of regulati on. H e added Nagelsen and Anne White. The Britons are led by Virginia Wade. 40, period goals, Savard scored with 
16 more in the three extra periods, playing in a cup-record 21st consecutive year. Her teammates are Anna- ~ 

including a 22-foo: jumper that bef Croft. Jo Durie, Anne Hobbs and Sara Gomer. pm FOCUS 

gave tbe Nets the lead for good at The three-day. best-of- seven event is scheduled for five singles and two — 

135-133. doubles matches. The United States leads tbe series, 46-10. and has lost 2:16 left in the game to give tbe 

Herb Williams, who isd Indiana only six matches in winning the last six years. Black Hawks a 6-5 National Hock- 

with 28 points, hit a free throw to ’ ey League triumph over Minneso- 

make it 135-134. bat over the next Kai* flip ^ Sa^d was only following the 

three minutes New Jersey reeled off pattern of his 38-goal, 105-poim 

12 straight points, including four Briton Charlie Magri knocked oat champion Franco Cherchi in the season last year. 


good. Bui while shotmaking isn’t 
bis trademark, it's not too shabby, 
either. 

Witness Wednesday night's 


Sacani CD,awn*on (U.FrasorSHI.Gont- «»7330. 7, gw Garrison. OU& l Koito 


Lone. I«m 
B atLFIa 
5iwla. Atobma 
TastavrOteMta PI 


9N 8 891191 1704 nor t2).5avart (4); B*Ua«a2(61,NMson I4>. 
atm Hartsbura (21, McCarmv (3). Shots oa wool: 

Ratine Chicago (oa Baaupra) U*7— 29; Mlnncsofa 
Alt Ca Yds TBs PI* (oa BanoennoBj W- 15-7— 40. 

229 151 1984 21 MAS WtOnfaM 5 1 2-8 

148 W 157* IS 1400 EOmooloo 1 4 1-7 

139 10 7319 12 140 CoffaT (5), Knistatm^ (2L A/Vhrson (II). 
205 198 20B0 M 1543 Kurd 2 (7),Ma«l«r (4), MacTavNh (4); Ar- 


Karaatao. OWo» 

TSS 95 06714 15X5 


Ractevt— 



Cm* CfverCtpo 

Cartor. Pardufl 

7. -45 709 

M 

D-WKtams. to 

- 7 57 711 

M 

SHwflhtor. SD St 

7 52 6K 

74 

BvnMn. Or* St 

. 4 44 633 

73 

Baty, Started 

7 44 SIS 

44 


JsWMa. Arts 
LOO, UCLA ; 
SfadUn. Va 

DlottrtdUtollsa 


DuoarO, SMU 
Jadkson. Aabara 
wntto. BwtOra 
BeilL Frssaa 
ripaaUSo. low 


waBtar, E Cara 
Moafa, OUafit 
H m B wflfa iiOra SI 
WMfa. Tim 


Hatton. Cota 
Sbnon. AFA 
KMOUde* 
Cafaarl. Aubara 
BJtnntL Mtofl 


Tudor. Utah 
EakoGFnsM 
Scnwflteos. Byncso 
Martin. BaaCoT 
MafoaUt Texas . 


. J5® f®?® EASTERN CONFERENCE 

* 17 15 J82 2.14 hi...,,. n t , „ 

M -__ n . — __ win — l ire umswa 

SS'lSim WLM.CS 

14 U am WwWw* 10 " 2 O 14)00 — 

as. w M'- £ » ;B«ton 2 1 .447 to 

““ , ’* 14 : “■ TPhltaaalPiito 2 1 347 to 

' -rovp k m. m. Near Jamrv 2 3 300 1 

TO «- NmiYora 0 2 JM 2 

" . 2 1:2” Caatrot Dtvtaloo 

S'o'J nSi <Meao ° 3 ° , -2» - 

“ . fl 88 M " 103 Detro * t 2 2 ^10 Ito 

-- a fa -a « >• huttone 1 I 300 Ito 

"* ?_ * - W ’■ MliwauM* 2 2 500 Ito 

™ r Zr V 4. TO iir Aflanfa I 2 333 2 

W r / B • fS Ctawtend I1M1 

T l l iS ? S ,W TS215 S SSL BN “ 

r* SI 7 * 3* MJ0W8SI DWNM 

4 5 . 48 0 ° #nV,f 3 0 LOOO - 

L a i S o' S' H °v«ton S 1 M3 1 

^ * ' ■” Dados 1 1 JW Ito 

'' San Antonio 1 2 333 2 

* ^2: Utah 1 2 J33 3 

■ - " ", Soarananto 0 2 300 2to 

5 462 ***** OMs,an 

- . • - . j- 2 . 23 . UL CBPPsra 1 0 MOO - 

_ • 2 2 U Lalwra 2 0 1300 to 

- ■ - , ' Portland 2 J 347 l 

IfaYre TD Avo Pho * llx « 2 JW 3W 

h 1159B1 ^ Statll* 0 ! M W 

" « W 1 m CflWM Stefa 0 3 JW 3 

” „ « an » J52 WEBNE5DAY-S RESULTS 

ST lie . U Wh—tow » a* * 2*-«* 

• S 9» ■ 14? ***** 3* 32 25 JS-1T7 

™ - ■ Mdfato 11-® M 25. Johnson 7-15 1 Ml 21; 

”” ” . _ Ptora W-17 w 24. MMKtfai 6-14 V8ft.lt*- 

„ taottos: Mltwouta* 53 (Cummfaw UJ; (kw 

w' -« LB ■> £1 ton 51 (Partstl 131. ASittts: MltorMtac 21 

rp S s l 27 (Preiser 4Ji Boston 87 (Bint Afaiga 51. 

r-"'-"ss : : s'SSw* ssssss 

Malana w-2fl 11-12 31. ervlna ll-l* M 24; 

f VmMMBM Tl-23 2-2 26. T H O U CMi 745 *4 20. 

■ ~ ' Raflomtett Dotra»«l (Matiorn 161: PnriotlM- 

; Ohio a (Cnfltao*. Alaton* UJ. AaltH: D*- 

d Cup Soccer '£!" 1TW ™" ,: 

* - ' — talus ■ 33 20 S If W n 5—138 

■ • x • M*. ■ Haw Jarwv HEM31MH ll-W 

^HTl I HMltfring . ALUchanUon 15-315-12 3LBirasanfl 12-26 4- 

x - , J W. 428; KW1llla(TtSl>22 4428. FtoREl»e-1tW 

OROOP4 ; . ~ 22,simflw»Y8-i6»42ZR«taaii( ua itaiowet5 

Luxototaare a jn*miMin;ifawJ*rw77(&wniiem*m 

Bmaarta IT; Franc* */.. fiasl Aretshu (ndtoM24 (Ffamlnef); N*w Jerwrr 
uesflN N ia B.-’tutsAtaure a. 97 . tM.*Ue»xnfa90« 1)1, 

I lllflfcflSB! MOW. U. Frooem ML S am Antoni* 34 31 M H— UO 

JEauGormunMn. Bofawfa. , UM 34 24 87M-4M 

- — Dander 11-23 17-13 33, Hansen 6-ti 3-4 iS; 

V-'TOXOUf < *• MRrttal 1BGS 0-0 20, GBraore 5-B »-U 20. 

Soviet (Jfaan HL Dan m ar k 9L Greanwotat-i8l-l17.Rta0fltar:3an Antonio 
7. kiUM L WreoyA - - 45 (GOmora * 1 ; mon 48 (Doratow. AAoton*. 

'mitrtii- Till '."11 rritaat va. Eaton, how* 61. Assure: San JUitoato 20 
■Rctrlantf-vfl. Norwa y . ' (Matthews 4); Ulan 20 (Stodaon 9). 


Basketball 


“ NBA Standings 


: Wl 

r~r s Ut ! <v 


V' PONT RETURNS ' 

No Yds Are TO 

Clash, BjC. . 188. 1031. WL1 0 

S. Zeno, Eask 4* 684 95 2 

r: SMMWN u AS 91 1 

< 1 BMHMn. Horn 42 477 114 1 

>ir Cftrind. Tor " 57 4» 7^ 0 

•• * SUeeor. MH 2S- 411 HJ 1 

f HalLCal 47 390 M 0 

' ■ WOods. Earn 36.364 103 0 

‘: 'fa NcUa, Wpb 42 350 U 0 

li 1 v CTawtord, Ham . « M3 6.9 1 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No Yds Avo TO 
> Janklns. BJL 35 730 204- 0 

itao-tafc 24 was • 

PfmntvMN W. S07 367 V 

I ' Ffatah Ham 21 438 225 • 

J JOwnjend, Tar 23 447 2U * 

Jf Caferaone, Ott 21. 0 

I,'; Fleidf. Satk __ . IS 423 207 0 


Tucker. Utah . 
OMw Ls vflo 
Johnson. UTEP - 
Humphrey, A l flUom 
Ron, PtoSr - 


Hitt. Mtt 

Edwards, On 

HooWnSfCai 


World Cap Soccer 

European Qualifying . 

■ " - SMW94 ; . . 

Prana a, UnaMQhpara 0 
' staadtaes: BWaarta it; franc* *,.. fitta 
. Garfimm. Yuaortawio 8;*t wm boure 0. 

nimnfal wfl HiBtoflsu mow. U. Frane* ml 
VBW i htai Eaw CnrmORW vm. Pu Soo rtn . , 


is 378214 0- Swrtrerfamf 7. nmanaA.' Norway A. 

'14 ' jos m -a . ' ; H * ma T s I wfl - mtareate ‘wOy^'IX iretant vs. 
15 29*1*4 *. Dtamqrti. Jwl UiMltMtf its. Norway. 


Jonton. SM3ML 9, Kottty Rinaid I. S17B417. 10, 
Steffl 6ra(. 1M12T2. 

Tour Paints 

1- Chris Ewart Lloyd, 2300.2, Martina Navra- 
tilova ISSOL 1 Pam Shriver. 1420. a DouCfa 
Kahcto-KOsch. 1259. 5. Zina Garrison, non 6. 
SlflHl Oral. >065. 7. Manuehl Maleeva. 1075. S. 
liana MandUkava. 970 9, Gabrlela Sanatinl. 
970. ID, Nattly SlnaML *45. 

VTTA Computer Rank to es 
1. Martina Navratilova 174.9838. 2. Chrtt 
Evert Uovd. 173X774. X Harw MandJIkova. 
874396. 4. Pam Shriver, 774702. & Cfaudro 
Koffae-KIHctT. 74JM2. a. Zlno Garrison. 
70. MIS. 7. Stotfl Graf.477188.8. Helano Sukoua 
634400. 9. Bonn I* GodUMk. 624750 ID. Man- 
uels Maioeva. 604953. 

MEN'S TOURNAMENT 
(in Antwerp. Befafamt 
Third Room 

Tim Windsors U4wdet. Atom Bricham. se>- 
ofam. 6-2. 6-2. 

Anders Jarryd. Sweden, del. Jookim Nvs- 

trarn, Sweden. O-l 4-2. 

Mark Dickson. US. <toi. Yannien Moon. 
France, 7-* (7-5), *-*. «-X 

Lecont*. France, det. Kevin Currm. 
Ui 0-1. oa 

Mots wi lender, Sweden, ML woltok Ffaok. 
Palana, 4tt 44. 


Transition 


Baseball 

Amerteoa LeedM 

CHICAGO— Renewed ll& workino ooree- 
menT with me Buffalo Bisoniolth* American 
AMoeiattan far 1906. Ncmwa Joe Havwk mo- 
jOl’-kODUfl &rw/t. 

OAKLAND— Named Mi Mew man. Bob 
wotson ana Ron Ptare a»ctws. Aanounced 
that SHIV Williams, Mil too coach, hasrerirad. 
national Ltasoe 

CHICAGO — NaawdBUlHcrrfard director of 

mtoor-leasue operat ic is . Jdm Outso travel 

In secretary. Bob IDocn director putnico- 
tlcns and Nad Colletti director at jukiio rela- 
tions. 

SAN DIRGO— Named Jack Matoal minar- 
Itadue WrtlOB Instructor. 

FOOTBALL 

NaHsaot Football Lnm 

CLEVELAND— Released Raretv Hicks and 
Elvis Franks, defensive ends. 

DETROIT— Placed Wilbert Montoomerv. 
running Dock, on Iniurad rrwrve. Stoned A.J. 
Jones. ruMinflbadt. 

GREEN SAY— Placed Dorvll Jonrs. defen- 
sive bock. Oft Mured reserve. Stoned Ken 
Sttthk defensive boa. 

St LOUIS— Named Horry Gilmer asuv 
lant coocti In cflaroe 01 awwleroockji. 

TA6APA BAY— Stoned Dennis Jarman. 
Onehoctar. 

HOCKEY 

NoJlomH Hacks* Learn 

PITTSBURGH— Loaned Phil Baoraue. OC- 
Mn«««Man. to Btalbnare 01 tne A-norisan 
Hockey LeogiMt. RecaUM Joe MsDannoii. <to- 
toraernan, (ram . Baltimore. 

HOME RACING 

MEADOWUUfDS RACETRACK— Named 
Joseph RuuonMto direcsor at maricaHm. 

. COLLEGE 

mar ist— N amed Grand Brahe acsKtafa 
womens takeiean coach- 


including a 22-foo: jumper that bel Croft, Jo Durie, Anne Hobbs and Sara Gomer. fJTJT FOCUS 

gave tbe Nets die lead for good at The ihree-day. besx-of-seven event is scheduled for five singles and wo ; — 

135-133. doubles matches. The United States leads tbe series, 46-10. and has lost 2:16 left in (he game to give ihe 

Herb WiDiams, who isd Indiana only six matches in winning the last six years. Black Hawks a 6-5 National Hock- 

with 28 points, hit a free throw to ' ey League triumph over Minneso- 

make it 135-134. bat over the next Fap flip ^ Savard was only following the 

three minutes New Jersey reeled <rff patiern of his 38-goal, 105-poim 

12 straight points, including four Briton Charlie Magri knocked oat champion Franco Cherchi in the season last year, 

each by Richardson and Birdsong, second round of a scheduled 12-round bout Wednesday night in Alessan- "I haven’t been shooting much 
to take a commanding lead. dria, Italy, to win the European flywei ght boxing title for the third time in lately, so when I get open, I shoot 

“I don’t know why it took so his eight-year career. " (UP I) the puck." Savard said. “They’re 


Mondiikova. each by Richardson and Birdsong, second round of a scheduled 12-round bout Wednesday night in Alessan- 

L S. Claudio to Lake a com man din 2 lead- rfria Italy to arin tliA Pnrnrw*an flvixmoht Ho vino title for the third time, in 


long for us to get going, but we Danish soccer star Preben EDcjaer Larsen escaped injury in a collision 
didn’t get down or give up when we Wednesday night that totally destroyed the car he was driving, according 
were behind," Richardson said. “1 10 police in Verona, Italy. (UP!) 

was sluggish in the first couple of Marc Boooicond, the son of former Miami Dolphin linebacker Nick 
games, learning W'ohl’s new sys- Buonicomi is paralyzed from the neck down, doctors in Miami reported 
tem- Now I feel great. I was really late Tuesday. The 19 -year-old sophomore linebacker for The Citadel was 
flowing.’' (AP, UPI) injured Saturday in a game against East Tennessee State. (UPI) 


the puck." Savard said. “They’re 
the same old North Stars," he add- 





RUNNING IT UP — Alain Gtresse, here splitting defenders, scored a goal as France 
routed Imembourg, 6-0, in a World Cup qualifier Wednesday night. Second in European 
Group 6, France is one point ahead of East Germany and Yugoslavia, over which it holds 
goal-difference advantages of three and eight, respectively. All three have one match left 


med outshot Chicago by 15-8 and, with 
was three consecutive goals, lied the 
/PI) game. After Bill Gardner put Chi- 
cago up 4-1 3t 2:55. Kent Nilsson 
— and Brian Bellows scored on power 
plays and Craig Hamburg tallied 
at 17:55. 

The Black Hawks argued that 
Tom McCarthy's midway through 
the final period was kicked into die 
net; the tally gave Minnesota the 
lead, but 34 seconds later Curt Fra- 
ser scored (o set the stage for Sa- 
vard. 

McCarthy Scored at 13:12 on a 
pass from Brian Bellows that hit his 
foot and got past goalie Murray 
Baiuierman. “He [referee Kerry 
Fraser] said McCarthy turned his 
foot, but didn't direct it in.” said 
Chicago's coach. Bob Pulford. who 
argued for a full eight minutes after 
the goal. Tve never heard of such a 
thing. 

“But in a situation like that you 
want to quiet tile crowd down, and 
wc did. In retrospect, that goal was 
a blessing in disguise.” 

“I thought we took it to them 
from the second period on. but that 
McCarthy goal seemed to light a 
fire undo- them," said North Star 
goalie Don Beaupre. “They started 
taking it to us." 

Savard’s game-winner came 
from 40 feet out 

“He just came up the far side and 
fired a long one," said Beaupre. “It 
was a perfect shot — and when it 
e counted." 

n Other NHL winners Wednesday 
[s night were Hartford, Philadelphia. 

Bdmonion, Calgary, Detroit and 
" Vancouver. 




£5 &£&Si xz&g • 








TRIBUNE, SATCRDA Y-SLHVD A Y, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 1985 


f POSTCARD 

Upheaval in Twain Town 


The Fall of a Guru and His Commune 


Bv Ed Schafer 

V. - The Jsstxuired Pros 

1 tjANMIBAL. Nfosoun — The 

*1 seven-month f«uval cele- 

fritting the 150ih aaruversaiy of 

Hide Twain’s birth may have given 

Hannibal a big boost as a tourist 
: 'Attraction, but it left the city's gov- 
. ^foment in 3 shambles. 

.'.With the celebration in its final 
Keek, the Mississippi River com- 
munity of 19.000 people is without 
a mayor and three of its 12 city 
Couacilmen. victims of a bitter 
■squabble caused at least in part bv 
the festival. 

“The sesqui centennial celeb ra- 
■ lion has done remarkably well un- 
der adverse conditions,” former 
Mayor John Lyng, a member of the 
festival commission, said in a re- 
cent interview. “Out of a budget 
that eventually reached S850.000, 
we are only about $ 20,000 to 
$2S,0(X) short and we should make 
llvai up with collections, sales of 
inventory and pledges bv the end of 
the month.” 

Even before the event opened 
last spring, it ran into problems. A 
SI j million budget nos proposed, 
but that was trimmed to $560,000. 

Organizers had envisioned a long 
series of concerts by top groups, 
permanent additions' to the historic 
downtown district and even an in- 
ternational balloon race. 

An amphitheater was built on 
the southern edge of the town's 
waterfront, but a theme stage 
planned for the northern pan 
didn’t materialize. The balloon race 
also failed to come off and some of 
the musical events were canceled. 

Meantime, Lyng was defeated as 
he sought re-election. Most attri- 
bute the loss to anti-festival senti- 
ment. 

However, Lyng’s successor, 
Richard Cerretti, resigned Nov. 12 
after being threatened with im- 
peachment. Three councBmen ac- 
cused him of misusing city equip- 
ment and labor, and illegally taping 
telephone conversations. 

The three councilinen, Wayne 
Pafford, John Hamilton and James 
Dexbeuner, also resigned. All four 
men said they would seek re-elec- 
tion in a special election in Febru- 
ary. 

Twain — Samuel Langhome 
Clemens — was bom on Nov. 30. 
1835 in nearby Florida, Missouri, 
but grew up in Hannibal, which 
was the setting for “The Adven- 
tures of Tom Sawyer” and “The 


MOVING 


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INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FQR YOUR 
NEXT MIBNAHONAL WOVE 

FOR A RE ESTIMATE CALI 


Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” 
whose publication 100 years ago 
was retailed on some souvenir T- 
shirts. 

Cerretti had made the festival an 
issue in his mayoral campaign, say- 
ms there were better ways to spend 
city funds for economic develop- 
ment. “I wasn't critical of the festi- 
val itself," Cerretti said Wednes- 
day. “f was critical of the planners. 
We spent huge sums of money and 
got nothing Tor it.” 

Although none of the impeach- 
ment charges against Cerretti in- 
volved the festival, his criticism of 
the festival had provoked resent- 
ment within the council. The coun- 
cil voted last month to suspend the 
mayor with pay pending an im- 
peachment hearing, which was can- 
celed after the resignations were 
announced. 

Local feelings were not soothed, 
either, by an article in the Wall 
Street Journal on Aug. 6 ; which city 
officials said “did a hatchet job" on 
the town and the festival by listing 
all of its negative aspects. 

“The reporter found and quoted 
lots of critics of the sesquicentenni- 
aL but apparently wasn't as zealous 
in his pursuit of (he other side of 
the story." wrote Gil SiuenkeL. 
managing editor of the Hannibal 
Courier-Post. 

Throngh it all, however, the festi- 
val drew several hundred thousand 
visit ora over the summer and nearly 
paid for itself. “WeTl know after 
Nov. 30," the official dosing, said 
the Reverend Peter C. Hauser, who 
quit the sesqui centennial commis- 
sion in the spring because “there 
were waves threatening to sink the 
ship.” He has changed his mind, 
however. “I believe a sizable por- 
tion of the community now recog- 
nizes that it was a worthwhile 
event- They didn't think it could be 
pulled off. but it was.” 

“Maybe some of the dreams 
were too large.” said Tom Boland, 
president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Lyng added: “It’s just too 
bad that the political laundry was 
hung out to dry just as we were 
calling national attention to our- 
selves.” 

Twain would have loved it. 

“When politics enter into munic- 
ipal government,” he once wrote, 
“nothing resulting therefrom in the 
way of crimes and infamies is then 
incredible. It actually enables us to 
accept and believe the impossible.” 


MOVING 


By Wallace Turner 

■Y«w Ytrk Times Service 

R AJNEESHPURAM. Oregon — What used to he the reception 
center has become the departure lounge as the population of the 
Rajneeshee commune here melts away. 

Throughout the day ihc red-dad followers of Bhagwan Shree 
Rajneesh bring their luggage to a curb here, where it sits in the gently 

spiraling snowfall, as they wail ■ — ■ 1 — 

for the bus that takes them out. ' W. washwoton l 

Their guru has gone to India after _ j \ 

a plea bargain on a federal indict- fl Portland nntnmni J 
mem for immigration fraud. 1 f- 

There is an uneasiness among J \j m ijg 

some followers as rhey face a new *J &»■>• [° 

life. “I’ve lived herethese years j OREGON 1 

where 1 was provided for.” said \ m I 

Swami Sagar Chetcan. who was \ 1 

running the cash register at the V mevada 

delicatessen. “My clothes were / CAUFOn ** ,A o - 55Tfoo 

dean. I had clean sheets. I was L ‘“ J 

fed. I had a doctor when I was ill 7N ’ N *** VarA r '"*’ 

and a demist when I had a tooth- bought the Muddy Creek Ranch, 
ache. Now I’m about to go out in 62,000 acres (25,000 hectares), for 


,£ntMpp9 


Tim New for* Vmei 


bought the Muddy Creek Ranch. 
62,000 acres (25,000 hectares), for 


the world again, that success-ori- 55.75 million in July I9SI. 
exited place, and it worries me. 1 The commune invested about 
don’t even have clothes to wear to $35 million, according to esti- 
be interviewed for a job, .except males published by Oregon news- 


these. What would I say. that I’ve 
been a member of a cult?” 


papers. Oregon tax assessors in 
the two counties where it is situai- 


Declining to give his pre-com- ed list its value ai 53) milli on 


mune name, as did all others in- 
terviewed, he was wearing the red 
colors of the commune members, 
as well as the mala, a medallion 
with a picture of the guru, around 
his neck on a siring of wooden 
beads. 

It is a lime of embraces, of 
goodbyes, of promises to remain 
in contact, of shared memories. 

Waiting at the bus stop where 
they had put down their luggage, 
Putoma, a former Eastern Air- 
lines cabin attendant, and Shiva 
Nan da, a former structural engi- 
neer in Copenhagen, both said 
they had joined the guru in Poo- 
na. India. 

Putoma said she was jaded 
with travel around the world on 
her airline passes and had agreed 
to go with a friend, a New York 
stockbroker, to India, where they 
looked up the guru. “At that time 
Bhagwan was in silence, I sat and 
looked at him and it came to me 
that there was more in life." 

She came back to the United 
States and then returned to Poo- 
na to live. In 1983 she rejoined 
(he group here. She drove a taxi 
around the commune. 

In four years the cult built a 
s mall dtv in (his isolated valley 
that had' been carved by two 
small streams. The Raj n ass bees 


The money produced a town 
that housed up to 3 jOO people. It 
has shops, stores, a farm opera- 
tion. airplanes, a jet. airstrip on 
the valley floor, a fleet of buses, 
restaurants, a hotel, all sons of 
heavy equipment to build roads 
and houses, and a dam to provide 
water storage. 

Where the money came from 
will be an issue in court actions 
that officials here say they expea 
to follow the commune's depar- 
ture. 

Many Rajneesh ees deposited 
their money with the Rajneeshee 
Financial Services Trust, which 
promised them they could have it 
back- But accounts have been fro- 
zen, although depositors still may 
use their credit cards to make 
purchases at commune stores. 

..Ma Prem Niren, 40, Lhe mayor 
of Rajneesbpuram. told the com- 
mune's residents last week that 
they should plan to leave and that 
the place would be sold. 

Antelope is a village 20 miles 
From here that is populated most- 
ly by retired people and has been' 
the 'gateway to Rajneeshpuram. 
Margaret HilL a former mayor 
who is a critic of the commune, 
spoke bitterly of Rajneesh. who 
in 1981 left followers in Poona 


when he came (0 the United 
States. 

“Their leader is a crook,” said 
Mitchell in an interview. “Now 
he has left two groups of follow- 
os in the lurch when the going 
got tough.” 

The commune rode roughshod 
over the residents of Antelope 
when they criticized it in 1982. 
Rajnee&bees moved into Ante- 
lope. voted and took over the city 
government, r enaming the place 
Rajneesh. At the Bhagwan's sug- 
gestion, in the Nov. 5 election 
they voted to rename it Antelope. 

Life at Rajneeshpuram began 
10 fall apart in mid-September 
when Ma Anand Sheela, the gu- 
ru's chief aide, left with some of 
her staff. 

Rajneesh announced to the 
others that Sheela, who is also 
known as Sheela Patel Silverman, 
bad done many bad things such 
as plotting murder, tapping tele- 
phones and grabbing power. 
From Europe she retorted that 
the commune’s troubles stemmed 
from the guru's demand for more 
and more jewelry, more Rolls- 
Royce cars for his fleet, which 
numbers about 85, and other 
wasteful luxuries. 

On Ocl 23 a federal grand jury 
in Portland indicted Rajneesh 
and others on charges that they 
plotted sham marriages to bring 
his followers of foreign citizen- 
ship into the United Slates from 
his prior commune in Poona. 

OfBdals say they believe Raj- 
neesh learned of his indictment 
and fled Rajneeshpuram in a jet 
He was arrested in Charlotte, 
North Carolina, and returned to 
Portland to face charges. 

On Oct 28, Sheela and others 
were arrested in West Germany 
on charges made in a Wasco 
County, Oregon, grand jury in- 
dictment that they cried to mur- 
der Rajneesh's physician in a 
struggle for power in the com- 
mune. 

On Nov. 14. Rajneesh pleaded 
guilty to two counts of the indict- 
ment. He paid a $400,000 fine 
and was ordered to leave the 
United Slates. He left that day, 
saying he hoped never to return, 
and is reported to be in India. 

Rajneesh's followers here were 
told last week by Dyan John, fi- 
nance officer for the commune, 
that the commune had current 


debts to purveyors of about SL5 
millio n and a long-term debt of 
$35 million, mostly to a web of 
Rajneeshee corporations. 

[Followers of the Bhagwan 

Shree Rajneesh have received an 

invitation from the Indian guru 
to join a commune in Poona, but 
those remaining at the central Or- 
egon settlement showed tittle 
eathu&iam Thursday about the 
offer. United Press International 
reported. Eighty-two of the gu- 
ru's Rolls-Royce automobiles 
were sold to a Texas dealer. Raj- 
neeshee officials said furnishings 
and equipment of the commune 
will be sold at an auction begin- 
ning Dec. 17.] 

So the guru's followers have 
begun to melt away. Theirs num- 
bers have dwindled to fewer than 
1 , 000 , and that is quickly dimin- 
ishing. 

Back at the commune, those 
not ready to leave met to talk over 
the past. Chi a bench outside the 
delicatessen a wo man in late mid- 
dle age talked erf her experience at 
the commune. “Life is its own 
meaning,” she said. 

She had lived in Bellevue, a 
Seattle suburb, and conducted 
therapy sessions at a humanistic 
center, she said, giving hex name 
as Dyson. 

She heard things that attracted 
her to Poona, time she met the 
guru and decided, “I wanted to be 
with this man became be trig- 
gered a sense of well-being-'’ 

She sold her home and moved 
to Poona. Then she followed the 
guru to Oregon. Now die will go 
back to the Seattle area to live 
with relatives. 

Ma Prem Matron, a woman in 
her early 30s, was on duty at the 
main gate. She said she would go 
back to Palo Alto, California, to 
visit her family, and then on to 
Santa Ft, New Mexico, where she 
was a waitress and masseuse. “If I 
had done the sex stuff, I would 
have made a lot more money,” 
she said, “but 1 was too shy then 
and now I'm too scared of dis- 
ease. I just missed out an the way 
around.” 

On the road out, up the hill 
above Curdijeff Dam and Krish- 
namurti Lake, which is dedicated 
to the guru, the exodus passed an 
attractive billboard on which was 
printed: “I go to the feet of the 
awakened one.” 




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PROUDLY PRESENTS 
A NEW LEISURE RESIDENCE VILLAGE 
SURROUNDED BY THREE 1 8 -HOLE CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSES1 

NUEVA ATALAYA 

Apartments and Town Houses overlooking Hie Mediterranean and adjacent 
to the famous golf courses of GUADAIMINA, ATALAYA and EL PARAiSOI 
Unobstructable views of the sea and Gibraltar; large swimming pool, 
beach facilities with all water sports and tennis courts. 

Only minutes from Marbeika center, San Pedro and Puerto Bonus) 
Infrastructure and landscaping completed! No further construction 
to be undertaken within the vicinity I 

READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY S 

Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, separate guest's doackroom, 
fully fitted kitchen, marble floors, wall-to-wall carpeting in 
the bedrooms, highest quality of construction; planned and 
built by German General Contractor! 

living surface of 128 to 139 m2 
05. $80,000 — to 85,000 — 

Ten yean mortgage made available by 
BANCO INDUSTRIAL DEL MBUTERRANEO MARBELLA 

Our offer for an inspection visit! 

Spend this years Christmas and New Year vacation in our pleasant 
Leisure Residence Village in Marbellal 
We will provide one of the above described Apartments or Town Haases 
which wall comfortably accommodate four persons, at the charge of 
U.S. $60 — PER UNIT PER DAYI 
We will provide ground transfer from and to Malaga Airport. 

Should you decide to purchase one of those units before your 
departure, ,hil charge will be waved and we shall reimburse you for 
' your air travel cost for two persons from any European City! 

For travel arrangements please co ntact your travel agent 
or call us for direct flight booking assistance! 

Spain will join the European Community in 19861 
Tins will bring 1 2% Value Added Tax to Property Transactions! 

One reason more to avail yourself of our offer; combine an enjoyable 
holiday with a use full inspection visit and, by making a may be 
already long-time pending decision to buy a holiday home in Marbelio 

AT THE RIGHT TIME, SAVE VALUE ADDED TAX ! 

We are at your disposal! 

ALFRED WILLNER & ASSOCIATES MARBELLA 

Developers and Promoters of Leisure Property 
Caroline Pork No. 5, MorbeHa , (Mo loga), Spain, Tel. (3652) 772368 
TELEX!7772S W1LN E 


I Ifl the charming mounfctn resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES PRUNES 

Over lo oking a jpferefo Alpine panan- 
ma X min. from Mantrem and lake 
Geneva by cor. 

- you con own quality resdenaes 

with indoor swimming pool end 

fitness faa'ities m an ded 
environment for Muire and spans 
jsiu, gdl. Ms) 

- fironangat low 5F. rtrw 

up to 00% mortgages. 

PIobm contact; 

RMxfanai fa s Frew s, 1854 Uytn 
SWITZERLAND 

Tet (025) 34 1 1 55 Tit 456 110 HA1 CH 


SWITZERLAND 

GSTAAD VAU£T 

Attractive 2 to 5 room apartment 
avaJabfa for foreigners, m r«pkd Swra 
j chalet in Chateau cfOex. Beautiful 
view. q»rt and centrally loosed. Phew 
from SFT’OHOO. Favorable mortgages 
at 6V: % Irterasr. Apartments Abo 
A vocable m Montreal an Lake Gene- 
I vO & other mountain resorts, '-outset. 

GiOBE PLAN 5-A. I 

Av Man Eepcn 24. 

OH 005 Lauvxme, Swuzerfand. | 

Tel pil 22 35 12 Hi. 251 85 MOlS \ 
< Visits weknned - Abe weekend* 


SWITZBU-AND 


020-448751 (4 lines) 

Nederiwen 19-21. Amsterd a m 

DUTCH HOUSING CB4T2E BV. 

Dekne rentals. Vafanuastr. 174 
Amslertian. 028c'2IZ34 or 623221 


SHORT TBUA IN (ATM QUARTER 

No agents. Tel: 4329 3881 


CHARMING DUPLEX opretment, 
bcouNdly fumshed. 46 06 P4 37 

LUXURY APARTMENT UW, 
equpped, qomoe. 4257 0414 

DOUXE GARDEN MARAIS STUDIO, 
Dec. 15 -Feb. 15. F3500 42747666 | 

151H 1 beckoam, bath, terroce, of | 
gjrnfam. doy^ north. 48 28 52 19 

TROCADSK7. LUXURIOUS 3 room. 
Tel 1-46475282 / 45534275 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and oil with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble berths. 

Executive Services Available 
Model Suites I 


EMPLOYMENT 


FOR THE FEATURE 

INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS 

TURN TO RAGE 11 - 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

URGENTLY WANTED 

MARKETING LEADERS 
A EXPERTS 

US$150,000 + m 1986 Anrwfiw in- 
turtrva bead on perfonoanoa, 1*. 
profit duing/dock option. Intern* 
Sand investment gap sofa 
oagnave 

SPROR MANAGERS, 

SALES EXECUTIVE 
AND DYNAMIC SALES 
ORGANIZATIONS 
to p* lk i pc rt » in the higWy prefidtlr 

Tforoudibrod Bacmg and badng 
Indurtry' bqtg gfferad far the fry finw 
with rohxn of mpitol guonrtBoi Ap- 
pfiemte mud be hsfi ocKwreri wtti 
trading bexigroond m futira, wouri- 
Ifaj, raurancB or bonking. Ffamcy in 
two knguogo dedroUt: &vgt*h plw 
German, Japanewe, Omm ot Aro- 
bc. tntervtavrt rod oriet fart ion in major 
Eurctoecxi and Aden rittol. 

Appfcanb dw4d send currieuhmi vita 

and one photo toi 

Inti Hardd Trfaurw, Box 99999, 
1005 Toi Song Commerod Bldg, 
2634 Hamny ftJ. Hag Karo or 
Wl Hendd Trftwm, Ban 42199, 

63 Lang Acre, London, WC2. 

TOURISM A BUSfhBS. Anarkan 
mother tongue Fan* band for new 
cxdfing cnaHenge, tueeeB.it org» 


MAivr.»Vi,’,iain 


POSITIONS WANTED 


AI110UN3 MAN 
FOR SHOAL TASKS 
G yean old, *ngto, qjortwB, boatdriv- 
ing, (dot's ond hefcepter fantoa. 9 
yoart iucfa A dxtti l toB troeens, afl ade- 
gcxie* of (hiving Scmeu. Atoiy yen 
experience in • • • 

and motor yt 




tin Abo 
of «iac 
«cdan,-Oy 


rig, cd cafe- 
tfoiyyras 
cors,so£nq 


«ka lanaggm: 

an.-epanwv-tBuiir 


ina far suitobfa potion in Gennanyi 
abroad. Phase write toe Bax 2216: 
LRT, Friedridntr. 15. 

06000 hcMtit/Udn 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 
CWIH 1 Executive - 4) year aid Oxx- 


In ter national Business Message Center 


ATTENTION BGECtjnVB 

Publish your business message 
in the International Herald Tri- 
bune. when mere than a third I 
of a mdlioit readers world- 1 
wide, most of whom an in 
business and industry, w HI 1 
nod H. Just telex us (Pais , 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

SOS 30 MUUON, tacured loot need- 
ed Phone: Munch 64 47 50. 

BUSINESS SERVICES 



TELEX' 

Wo are looking forward to wd 


25 W1LN E 

ing you in MorbeHa this Christmas! 


intei ed. 

REVAC 5-A. 

52 Mombr Hart. CH-13W G8CVA. 
Tel D22'341540. THmc 22030 


Rom Opport un ity. Per Sole Beg ent 
DUPLEX APAHTMBMT 
of obcut 96 tq m.. fie sa ni ty famrhed 
beeurifii wewi. tn tee foex- we. 
Several bekorwa. H»el tentae <• - e . 
quired. Prrvate swimming poet s r.d Hi- 
nts center qvafobfa m tee Dwlci'i 
For pnee and Other deleJs. 
please ptm CH. MATT?, GSTAAD. < 
030/4 36 25 

i LAKE G84EVA + UiGANO. 

bet™. Gstaod rege-r, Loccmo. e*t 
I Foreiqners ecu buy rrng-irficea- new 
Qrortraenb.'etidett 'vikn ledtcvie 
Swiss ig i dffiey posable, rl aSOtD ! 
S A, Tour Groe 6. CH 100’ Lovusnne j 
, 3 1 '2516! 1 . Luqcsric e^fic r 9i -‘JiTtxa 1 


Muring mol wo twi tele* you 
back, and your message will 
appear within 48 hours. The 
rate it UJ. f 9.80 e r hod 
eqti nrototf per Kite. You must 
Mode complete end verit- 
able bating oddrois. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

U. 5. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

estsbfehed cantpam seeks additional 
Mortal IO e-pW /evolutionary tncfrno- 
k-jHCol breakterau^h in the nut mduary, 
created by aonwneni umersuy profes- 
kv m the USA fim dnndena paid 
bcepnonrtly bjn and .'eturns pro- 
tested for decades 

Gorjeroui Shore Pvtkfoatkm 
ovaeabte in ManoHewieiit Co. 

Wme- 

Bo* 2*35, HeiaU Tribune, 
c 2521 r-leuil)y >3eden. France 


BROKERS / ADVISORS 

. dwitTi can invtrsi ifi or»^ of Arra*. 

«i» rnoo Exciting Tpd in otogfeqt 
Breakthroughs ■n ihe n u r ,njus!r, 
v-'te" 33C6J trees dread. Flamed in 
1V8J Proieciec ■3imjd mui«-ie evcniu. 

cfr. reaches 52%. 

investor! Encfirioi Invited: 
■v«en, 3 l callable m Ergtsh. French, 
& S’ mo - Tnbune. 

“2521 r-tev*, Zedc. France 

KfRESENTADVE WANTED m d) 

“opean :^reres to tail lire of Secu- 
nh 6oy of lesgest suppSer m tee U3. 
-Ontocr. r/one-. 3aas Ltd. « IW 
Slfee*. London Swl. Tel DJ-335 
cr 01-750 IV^- 

2ND PASSPORT 31 eoL-renes. CWC 
.e t leonentx 10©. ?b Athens Greece 


NEED A LIAISON 
MAN B4 EUROPE? 

Business Agaal and M«&ator 
Now Resimng in G er m any 
•wda In r« pr es ent a Few 
Select CBents 

Patenric/ cfcrts should be m need of an 
individual to provrie personal or bm- 
ness services in Western Europe. Am 
American, 36, speak fluent French + 
German and have a proven track 
and in U5. 6 European temness deal- 
ings. Am otm^ietert in hanrfing private 
+ commerdd aifun of o sei te e no- 
lure. U5 refe ren d a am be povided. 

Afl inqunes heated conAdentialV- 

2215. LRT_ Frierkchrtr. IS. 

6000 Frankfurt/ Main 


DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Fine drenondi in any pace range 
at lowest wholesale prices 
direct hem Antwerp 
center of ihe diamond world. 
FiA guarantee. 

Far free price list write 


Pefifaxwsiraal 62. B-S31B Antwerp 
Bdta tum ■ Tefc (32 3} 234 07 51 
Tbu 71779 syl b. Atthe Dkaremd Ouh 
Heart of Antwerp aamoraf industry 


m 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC, 

UJLA. S WOMDWRC 

A complete person u i 6 business service 
plowing a imque caUetWon of 
relented, renuitc & mhibngud 
individuals for toad S 
promonond oeaxuans. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 50te St, N.r.C. 10019 
Service Represermhves 
Needed Worldwide. 

HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report . 12 countries mrfyzed. De- 
fats. WMA. 45 Lvndhuru Terrace. 
Ewte 563, Central. Hong fang. 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

LONG TERM 1ENOS& REQUIRED 

fried rate nrirantum U5S20 tniUten, by 
direct apptcont s far f mt a al opera- | 
firn -nrti prime bant guarantees. Ap- i 
Dtv m wntinp B8G. me des Hellenes I 
36. 1050 Brussels, Balgwn. i 


DILADY 

Factory sales oi kxne cut cfoenonds 

Lange Herenhteestr 29. Ataweip 
Bel^um, Teh Q3/23277J3S. tfo 35243 

OFFICE SERVICES ~ 

MANILA: Be present d e« i >t» dfiflaA 
economic bates. Share complete Fadfo 
bes / services, Makati office Europe- 
an monaamert, confidant^, since 
1961. MCC PO Box 1569, MMenfo. 
Tefc 817-4187 (5 fines] The 22232 

OFFICES FOR RENT 

MW YORK. USA. Midtown urtque 
luxury duplex opcrt m enl 6 office n 
private baking dso 1 other mdtvid- 
uoi office. Price U5S3500 & SI 000 
monihly lespacthiely. Avq fo ble nene- 
efirerty. Tefc 213575 1421 or 212-213 
8899 or write: Law Office, 134 Leung- 1 
ton Avenue. NY. N.Y 10016, USA 

OFFICES FOR SALE 
Prindpc&ty of Monaco 

OFFICES FOR SAIE 
l in prestigious, centrally toasted bu3d- 
ing, 336 sqjn-, interior layout may be 


Far Further details please oreuocti 

A.G.E.D.I. 

26 t» Bd Prirtoesse Charlotte 
MONTE CARLO 
MC 98000 MONACO 

Tali [93 1 50 6600 Tele* 479417 AVZ 


e - year old Cnar- 
t<llAt 091 OOZZ teted Accountant with 15 yean sue- 

[2 I J.I 47 l-OOOO cessful experienat in the profitable 

■» of HLiedi com p anies. 


©nee, paniaAariy m USA & AustraSq, 
seela geaerd nangement podfon 
mth rmXl mu hond ergd iahc ri where 
ha partkkr abStoes n inti manage- 
ment can property be utSsed. AweL 
able ©arty ISfc Box 42149. IJ-LT^ 63 

long Aoe, London, WCS 

OtHCE MANAGBUBOOKKS>BL 
Experienced blngud Franch/Engfah. 
Avdtohfa mid-Jon. Betse writei PJC- 
140-73 Burden Crescent, Kew Gcr- 
cfans tOk, NY 11435 USA. 


CBVEHAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

CRIMSON TRAVEL 
TRAVEL AGENT 
INTERNATIONAL RATE EXPERT 
NASHUA, MEW HAMPSMRE 

Cdcuipte international carfaie regular & 

jpeckd fares. Develop* mdntanintl 

rate "CHEAP STA?T Assw in traning 
Dflunts on ufitofon of tarfffs, etc Af 
voncql^SA BIlE & fidteting sUb ro- 
quned-_ For farther tnfornxftcn, write er 

^Gmscn Travel Service, fonrel 
39 JFK St., Cartridge, MA 

. e-S!£ 3S4 - W “ 

An Equd OpporfarWy Employer 

gHAUBJONG OPPORTUNITY 
for Good Satenwn/ Wc m, 
ttyP tew raqufced. 
m*" 1 cormMton, activity in id 
”**g te ^w ort in yow home area or 

^sr^wivss- 

U £^ T SL SpmW “ • h !*' 1 “Wntemg 

SKJMHJL'iftrtsS 

Bwtrt career 
OJ her turopeevi loco- 

‘SvSSs’feiS? ?37HeraldTri- 
bune, 92S21 Neu«v Cete e,. Praice 

BOGETIC SAlJESPBBOfMtenaQer 

mg U-S. mto wy. MuM be mgtBiixad, 

(MAIJtFBMma.Vofidv^i^: 



EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


rsJtWf- 


t-r \’I; J l.",;J, l ,l L- ' 


2»| new motfaL 
A50 SUC, 280 Sl> 


Phorwc OTf/ 


impnmd par Offprint. ~J rue Je rEvangtle, 7501 S Paris. 







i