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With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

PARIS. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


Cm m IDO E». tartniona-LTS F, Ui W rtbC-SOf: 

non :5ioB M^ria iro K_ 'fjgnfch.ai _JCS 


ESTABLISHED 1881 


-'zxzl 


i^fo Return 
SS^To Soviet 

~yy$urchenko Says 
He Was Held 
Forcibly m U.S. 

Cfxnpilai by Our Stuff From Dispoicha 

‘ he 1 2 WASHINGTON — Vitaly Yur- 

; ■'fraii.Jr* \ haiko. a high-ranking Soviet in- 
■•: i * % dligence official who the United 
"■• 'V Ha3 J tl,B said ^ defected, said Mon- 


Reagan T inks SDI Deployment 



By David Hoffman 

U'askiar.’oK Pott S.-rr:.-i> 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, in an interview 
with four Soviet journalists pub- 


r-, "* * « • ■*. 


K| tiv;ear Washington and escaped to 
* •’mill ^ ^ ae Soviet Embassy. 

• ij^' Piisgjl- Mr. Yurchenko said at a news 
Conference at the embassy, “My 
‘^^.uriy wish is to return is soon as. 
’• ! JrS^^ossiMe to my country, my family 
• »tW’-jid friends.*' 

u- l. i i v 


* 

*v 

l* * 


Mr. Reagan had said previously mg about seeing if there isn’t a lzvestia. and the two Soviet press 
that the United States would re- defensive weapon that does not kill agencies. Tasv and Novosti. 
search, develop and test the system, people, but that simply nukes it Mr. Reagan, questioned by the 
known as the Strategic Defense Ini- impossible for nuclear missiles. Soviet journalists, discussed L .S. 
dative, and negotiate deployment once fired out or (heir silos, to public opinion of his missile de- 
with the Soviet Union. He also has reach their objectives — to inter- fense plait, 
offered to share the technology cepi those weapons. A Soviet reporter cued a poll 

with the Soviet Union. “Weapon isn’t the term to use for that found a large majority’ of 

The interview was concluded what we are researching," Mr. Rea- Americans would prefer to see a 
Thursday and published Monday gan told the Russians. “We are re- reduction in superpower offensive 
by i he Soviet newspaper lzvestia. a searching for something that could arsenals rather than dev eiorrr.ee i 
transcript of the interview, the first mate it, as I say. virtually impossi- of space weapons. Mr. Reagan re- 


with Toot Soviet journalists pub- ’dative, and negotiate deployment once fired out of iheir silos, to 
listed Mondav, said that the Unit- *e Soviet Union. He also has reach their objectives — to inter- 
ed Slates would not deploy a pro- offered to share the technology apt those weapons, 
posed space- based shield against with the Soviet Union. “Weapon isn’t the term to use for 


He sajj jjg “fordblv YefenaG. Botmtfsda i^ir , Tatiana, and her mother, Ruth, listening to her call from the 

2 Ktnrtwl 'Em/ nnlrnnun M m m . l' • Soviet Union <wer a speaker phone Mondav at their home in Newton. Massachusetts. 


tffci *■ bdneted by unknown persons'* in 
'•J.ifj- *aly and brought unconscious to 
United States, where he was 
'ii.r^jB Jtatfraued and kept in isolation and 
:nt Itemed access to Soviet officials, 
v, , V . A .7"®- fe . Earlier, a spokesman for the Sen- 
... 4 ! ta ?iSc fe Intelligence Committee said he 
“• l[i t [Lad been tcJdby the Central Intd- 
W njgence Agency about Mr. Yur- 
henko’s decision to return to the 
- oviet Union. 

Pbddn [l B i ' There was no immediate com- 
' from U.S. officials. 


Soviet Umoa over a speaker phone Monday at their home in Newton, Massachusetts. 

Sakharov Talks With Relatives in US . , 
Says He Has Ended Hunger Strike 


The Assonatcd Frets 




NEWTON, Massachusetts — . Mrs. Bonner has talked with rda- 
Andrei D. Saldiarov, the Sovki dis- lives by phone. 


was the first time in IS months that to call Mrs. Banner. Reporters, in- 
Mrs. Bonner has talked with rda- formed ihar Monday’s call would 


sideni. spoke by telephone Monday 


agreement in which ±ere will be 

J 1 deploymem onlv if iha-e is elLmina- 

Esteoing to her call from the «Je oudmr weapons.” Mr. 

in Newton, Massachusetts. IO ^ sp^hidd 

technology. Mr. Reagan said: 

, • • TT fi “lx will be available for the Sovi- 

HI cl Dnion as well ourselves. .And if 

Wi the Soviet Union and the United 

f-y m -m States both say we will eliminaie 

)|« Vf|«| oar offensive weapons, we will put 

>■ KJi/t WmwA-* in this defensive thing in sonw 

place in the world a madman sotne- 
(o call Mrs. Banner. Reporters, in- day tries to create these weapons 
formed that Monday’s call would a gain — nuclear weapons — be- 
be allowed, were given permission qua , remember, we all know how 


posed space- based shidc agiinsi ww inc Sovici union. m&iponisn t uie term louse lor 

nuclear arms until all nations have interview was conducted what we are researching" Mr. Rea- 

»g*m i to ri'rminvir o.fk wsapc.is. Thursday and published Monday gan told the Russians. “We are re- 
linking deploymen! to the elinti- b> ^ Soviet newspaper lzvestia. A searching for something rhat could 
nation of nudear arsenals in what of the interview, the first make it. as 1 say. virtually impossi- 

appeared to be a sharp shift in U.S. granted to Soviet print journalists ble for these missiles to reach their 
policy. Mr. Reagan said: b >’ 3 UA president since John F. targets. .And if we find such a thing, 

“It is not my propose for deploy- Kennedy in 1961. was released by my proposal is that we make it 
meat until we sit down with the ^Tiiie House. available to all the world. We don’t 

other nations of the world, and Mi. Reagan objected to the pop- just keep it for our own advan- 
ihose that have nuclear arsenals. “|ar term “star wars" to describe tage." 

and see if we cannot come to an ^j 5 . proposal, which the Soviet The president also discussed 
aereement in which ±ere will be Union has sought to block. global conflicts with the four jour- 


lis proposal, which the Soviet The president also discussed 
Union has sought to block. global conflicts with the four jour- 

“W'e arc not talking about ‘star nalisis. who represented Pravda. 
vars' at all.” he said. “W'e are talk- the Communist Panv newspaper. 


arsenals rather than deveiormec: 
of space weapons Mr. Reagan re- 
sponded by citing another p*.I! 
showing that Americans also would 
favor a “defensive shield shat 
doesn't kill people" and would “se: 
rid of nuclear weapons." 

Larry Speak es. ihe White House 
spokesman, said that Mr. Reagar: 
would make similar points to Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet lead- 

{ Continued on Page 6. C6L 6) 


l Reagan Interview Runs, Soldier 
i With Cuts, in Moscow Leaves U.S. 

a y 

f Bv Serge Schmemann emerged a world seen through KaCGV 

« ■ Sen York Time: Semee through the eyes of an American 


ftor- Since his defection, admmislra- with relati ves in die United States : weight, he and his wife said. 


. 64, is regaining to record the first few minutes of 


rT, j|fc;i ,» v - amcc ms oaecuon, aommistra- 
officials said, Mr. Yurchenko 
• ip-r, * J s ®ltad provided information to the 
, ^-Vest about Soviet intelligence op- 
■ r.“. ^ kra lions in Europe and the United 

■{){ ,. aw r R e w 35 said to have identified 
* " CIA employees, mclu£nz 

'"-vir.ner 19S7 Dt^Sdwafd Howard, a former agen t 


fOTihefHVttimeinsucyears,ieIlmg “His only problem now is his 
them he had ended a hanger strike heart,” Mrs. Yahkdevicfa’s bus- 
that may have caused Soviet offi- band. Efrem, said after talking to 
rials to let his wife seek medial Mr. Sakharov. 


the conversation. 

For unspecified reasons, Mrs. 


to make them now." 

“So, you can't do away with that 
information. Bor we would all be 


MOSCOW — lzvestia published conservative, who is ready to forget r™,««' 

Monday one of the most extensive » n0 ,| l " nouce obvious and um- T , 

samplings of a U.S. president’s versaU >' facis. if they don’t WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
droughts ever presenud to Soviet fit ^ positions or if they expose soldier who sough i refuge at Jie 

„i. t l: ’• i llC FmKu.i- ,n AfoIv>nict >n nil 


treaunem in the West. Mrs. Bonner told the family that 

Mr. Sakharov, speaking to his die would leave far Siena. 'Italy, 
stepchfldren and his mother-in- late this month, and undergo an 


For unspecified reasons, Mrs. information. Box we would all be 
Yankekvich said, Soviet officials safe knowing *Jhat if such a mad- 
wanted Mrs. Bonner “to leave as man project is ever attempted, 
soon as possible." there isn’t any of us that couldn’t 


the character of his actions,” Izvcs- 
tia wrote. 

The only previous interview’ by 


Mrs. Bonner told the family that Mrs. Bonner said she would defend ourselves aeainst it." 


• ‘^retaetfevho disappeared last month while kilograms) and weighed about 130 
• *o»'inai ad.'g’inder federal surveillance. Mr. pounds when he abandoned the 
'U'^rfx^ioward has fled the United Stales, 

-^ceL-iiDj^jid no arrests have readied from He said he e nded the hunger 
■- j: Lie Ma t dr. Yurchenko's information. strike when his wtfe, Yelena G. 
'-•“-.luitMi ’ Mr. Yurchenko, 50, defected to Bonner, was. told she would be 
he United States in Rome in eariy granted a visa that wonld allow her 
_______ jagusL At that he was de^ 10 leaw-the Soviet Urma and to 

1 _ . ■Tubed as the No. 5 man in the re®™ within three months. ■ 

REALQtGB. Mrs. Booner, 62. who also spoke 

l -<> TOM BS Hie United States has aclcnowl- dtxringthecalLhasan eyeailmedL 
TTdged the defection of Mr. Yur- .."Diey want as to know he is 

^ ^.^ benko only once officially. On ahvr, Lbais qmte dear,” smd Ta- 

s* SrH 11, following pros reports ^ Yankekvich. Mr. Sakharov’s 


law, said he had lost 44 pounds (20 operation there an her ey es. She 
kilograms) and weighed about 130 said she would uavd to the United 
pounds when he abandoned the States after the operation. 


leave as soon as she was able to 
provide care for Mr. Sakhar ov 
through the winter. 


The president's remarks ap- 
peared to establish a new- condition 
on deployment that had not been 


He said he ended the hanger whether she would seek treatment 
strike when his wtfe, Yelena G. in the United States for a heart 
Bonner, was . told she would be ailment, 
granted a visa that wonld allow her The family members planned an- 

to leave. the Soviet Union and to other phone conversation on Nov. 
return w irhin three months. 18 to discuss final travel plans. “We 

Mrs. Bonner, 62. who also spoke believe she will know by then when 
during the call has aneye ailment, she is leaving for Moscow" Mrs. 

"They want ns to know he is Yankelevich said, 
alive, that’s quite dear,” said Ta- Mr. Sakharov, a physicist who 


id she would travel to the United “She said it was psychologically part of U.S. policy. In the past, Mr. 
ales after the operation. * difficult for her after their long sep- Reagan had said that total eiumna- 

Thc famDy said it was not dear aranon io leave Andrei Sakharov don of nuclear weapons was his 


right now ” Mrs. Yankelevich said, goal, but not a condition of deplov- 
“She wants to be with him right menL 


wvc-soHD c*. : ^ u 4 following pias reports rinna Yankdririch. Mr. Sakharov’s was awarded the 1975 Nobel Peace talked while on his hunger strike 
nfenCt hat he had defected, the State De- stepdaughter. She was referring to Prize, was exiled to Gorki in 1980 Mrs. Yankelevich said much c 
Uil£122ci>artraent said in a statement: Soviet autborities who forced him after criticizing the Soviet interven- the 25-minute conversation wit 

liANYttanu “We can pow officially ooaifmn and his wife into intemalexile in . non in Afghanistan. Mis. Bonner aer mother and stepfather wa 
Vitaly Yurchenko^* senior of- thirdtyrofGOitt was ailed in 1984.' ipent discussing fantiiy affaiiyar, 

r; %i "p£:'idal of the KGB, has been in the . Shesaid the call was asuiprisc. It The family tried twice last week alking with grandchildren. 


. r: ?.i gp:j dal of the KGB, has been m the 
" «woirTnrtJnited Stat« for some' tnrie. He 
■ — , ’;Iw{^iad previously asked that his pres-; 
' race here not be publicized.” - 
nrii res Prior w> his defection, the stale- 
-- u iv-mvir; 11 ™ 1 Mr. Yurchenko “served 
_______!is deputy chief in the North Ameri- 

eojb Department of the KGB’s First 

. ' «3C;Gluef Directorate (Foreign InteQi- 

i.f si *2.^pnce). 

“The first chief director handles 
WsetsKGB intelligence operations 
• .V^^woiidwide. Mr. Yurchenko was 
- v:. ^J^jcrifkally responsible for the di- 


was oiled m 1984.* 

The family tried twice last week 


now.” U.S. officials and Mr. Reagan 

She said the couple was reunited also had described a “transition” 
an Ocl 23, a day before Mrs. Bon- period that would come before de- 
ner applied for the visa. Family ploymem. During this period, they 
members said that Mr. Sakharov said that the United States would 
and Mrs. Bonner had been separat- negotiate with the Soviet Union on 
sd while living in Gorki. Reports deployment, 
said Mr. Sakharov had been bospi- Larry Speakes, the White House 
talreed while on his hunger strike, spokesman, reiterated the “transi- 
Mrs. Yankelevich said much of non" language Monday. He also 
the 25-minute conversation with repeated Mr. Reagan’s previous 
aer mother and stepfather was statements. that damnation of nu- 
ipent dixnssmg family affaii?ar.3 dear weapons was the president's 


SET 6 " P ^ ^ the character of his actions,” izves- UA Embassy in Afghanistan last 

’ _ tia wrote week left voluntarilv Mondav after 

ne^a^” Md2TS3d V*. ^ * fe ^uffSSu * P ES? 

Rea£X interview with Soviet pMljoiOT^sts witha US- prot- 

ioiirn^iiuc rtmiiiwt demifi ^ eal toc * w 'hen Alexei Adz- s,aie Department said. 

hubei, the lzvestia editor under Ni- The 19-year-old soldier, identi- 

Bn S. Khrushchev, imervieued fied by U S. official as Alexander 
President John F. Kennedy. Sukhenov, signed 4 brief senemem 

^IhL WarlS Paa iro^fTt- The in,ende« »irhMr. Rragan in tor se,d he ned mfle 

n i,_i v _ p j fho< - _r vATHin Ph — 3 m3D w ho has been reviled m his flecsion or his own free will 

ropc?an& iMt afto 1 World War^I ib« clwdy controlled Soviet press 1 

the United Stales proposed gKing -wposed Russians to a rare array Si3Xcl^immi ^fimi said, 
units nuclear wea^oSm^n inS of alien arguments. The soldier then left the embassy 

narinnal _ ^tact. for example, were Mr. 0 _. : 


ReaganS interview with Soviet pMi jomu^sts witha US- proi- 

jouraalists omitted several signifi- I***.**? Mcx « A ^‘ 

cam points, however, including huba, the toestia editor under Ni- 

satemems that Soviet forces had “i er ' 1 ~« d 

installed the regime in .Afghani- Prudent John F. Kennedy. 

iha; Warviw Pnrr .monVom- ^ interview with Mr. Reagan 


up its nuclear weapons to an inter- 
national authority. 


State Department official said. 
The soldier then left Lhe embassv 


. f Reagan’s assertions that Soviet S®*'*** tno P s ln Afghanistan are 
troop^were using booby-trapped heavy drug users, according to 
toys in Afghanistan; tiut tibe Soviet defectors to the rebels. Page 6. 

the following page by a detailed with Fikryat A. Tabeyev. the Soviet 

and oftra strident rebuttal of equal ■ d ^ ^ Soviet Union was ambassador to Afg h a n i s ta n , 
leng^hbytiiefour Soviet mtervtew- ^ ™ Um^red StatS in\S A State DepanSemspokesman 

*ea«h for ipace-baud defen&ve ai4,“W e ca wnfira Ehelefi 


s deployment. 

i- Lany Speakes, the ^Vhite House 


bad said nothing substantively new 
“to anyone who is even marginally 
familiar with the political world- 


systems against nuclear missiles. 
The interview was published 


alking with grandchildren. 


ultimate goal. 


view and, of course, the practical in lzveaia - although the inter- 
political actions of Ronald Reagan. «*»«* represemed Pravda, 


“In his answers there cleariy 


Allonsm’s Party Gains, 
Reducing Peronist Seats 


By Bradley Graham 

Washington Pau Service 


were frequent before his election 
two years ago, his survival may 


BUENOS AIRES — The ruling d ^? end 1 nu ? c on bis ability to aut- 
Radical Chic Union has won a acA and calm the mihiary than on 


DBH®®*'' . _ _ „ _ 

t ^ c - rr ’ operations in the United States and elections widely regarded as a ref- Military analysts doubt that a 

^-Canada,” the statement said. erendum on the first two years of new coup attempt is imminent, but 

. “During his lengthy career in the President Ratil Alfonsin’s adminis- they warn that Mr. AlTonsin's fail- 
’ KGB, he held various key positions (ration. ure to restructure the armed forces 

within the KGB, inclu di n g chief of The government's imwe opposi- has provided an opening for irou- 
■I .» ; V. 5 ERLY . Department Five or Dire«orate X tion, the Peronists, lost votes blemakers. 


lion of KGB cotmterintdigence convincing victory in congressional ^ SLan( ^ il 8 with the voters. 


~ '' c ^053erations in the United States and 
-Canada,” the statement said. 

- “Daring his lengthy career in the 
7 KGB, he held various key positions 


! (Woridwide counterintelligence) <rf 

:r * " the First Chief Directorate. He had 


also been 


ounterintelHgence) of around Argentina, while small par- The government has yet to re- 
J: Directorate. He had ties on rheleftand right made mod- dace the size of the army, rid the 
ted to the Soviet Em- est gains, according to incomplete militar y of the worn human rights 
hington 1975-1980." returns from Sundays balloting. offenders, assign it a peacetime 


J^bassy in Washington 1975-1980." 
lUflU®*' Mr. Yurchenko's defection 



Marcos Urging Election 
For President in January 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispxdxy 

MANILA — President Ferdi- 
nand E. Marcos declared Monday 


He also said that money was need- 
ed to fight the insurgency. 

Under the Philippine Constiiu- 


that he intended to ask the Philip- tion. special elections normally are 
pine legislature to call a presiden- held after a president dies, becomes 
tial election for Jan. 17. disabled, is removed from office or 

The election wonld be the first resigns, in such cases, the speaker 
real lest of Mr. Marcos's popularity of the National Assembly takes 
since he was re-elected in 1969. power for 60 days while candidates 


the Communist Party newspaper, 
and the Tass and Novosti news 
agencies. Soviet television news 
read a brief announcement of the 
publication, which said that 
“alongside general pronounce- 
ments in favor of peace and nor- 
malized relations with the Soviet 
Union, attempts were made in the 
interview to distort the Soviet for- 
eign policy." 

Some points made by Mr. Rea- 
gan were apparently too conten- 
tious to be printed. 

Gone was Mr. Reagan’s state- 


ou fads own volition but only after 
assurances from the UJS. govern- 
ment that he could siay if he wished 
to." 

The soldier walked into the em- 
bassy compound Thursday from a 
nearby radio installation where he 
had been assigned. Soviet and Af- 
ghan troops ringed the embassy 
and authorities turned off electric- 
ity, prompting U.S. protests to 
both the Soviet and Afghan gov- 
ernments. The embassy operated 
afterward on power from its emer- 
gency generators. 

Officials said that following the 
soldier’s departure, troops were 
withdrawn and the power was re- 
stored at the embassy compound. 

A Stale Department official, re- 


disabled, is removed from office or ra® 1 . 1 ^ >e Afghan government questing anonymity, said that Mr. 

resigns, la such cases, the speaker "which invited the Soviet troops ui Tabeyev assured the Soviet soldier 
of the National Assembly takes didn t have any choice because the on Mondav that he would not be 


Faced with a serious Communist campaign. 


government was put there by the punished, the official said the sol- 
Soviet Union and put there with dier was then released by U.S. offi- 


insurgeacy and growing political A forthcoming presidential do- the force of arms to guarantee. . .." ^ais with that understanding 


unrest, Mr. Marcos has been under cree, the text of which was released 
pressure from the United Stares to by the Philippine Embassy in 


turns from Sundays balloting. offenders, assign it a peacetime 
[With 99- percent of the vote function, or increase civilian con- 


*£> closely followed that of two other counted Monday, the Radicals had crol, the analysts said. 


high-ranking Soviet intelligence of- won 43 percent to 343 percent for 
fidab. ' the Peronists, The Associated Press 

At about the time that Mr. Yur- reported. The leftist Intranrigem 
<y ~ chenko’s defection was first report- party was a distant third with 6 

percent 


ed in late September, U.S. offkaals 

«>ofinn«l that Sergei Bokhan, the ' (Half the 254 seats in the Chian- f^T5emacracy~and Peace, in Bue" 
puty director of Soviet mihtary ber of Deputies were up for dec- nos Aires. 

^^vatenigence in Athens, had defect- tion. The partial retarns indicated „ , . _ w , 

ed io the Wesi in May and bad that the Radicals wonld add one 
— provided information about the seat to the majority of. 129 they won 
penetration of the Greek govern- in the 1983 elections that restored 
^:Smt by Soviet agents. civilian role. - V 

.Also this summer, Oleg A. Gor- (The labor-based Peronists lost 01 ^L l3rsc A 1310 ^ d*™ 00 - 
:~ :V * dievsky, a KGB official who West- seven of their 11 1 .seats, while the racies. .... 

— era officials said had led a long Intransigents appeared Hkdy to Militar y spe nding has been 
career as a double agent, defected double their representation, from, pared 35 Percent, but the main re- 
from his post in London.: three to six] . v . suit has been to hurt morale be- 


u » P" CC “L The ratio of troops to civilians, 
the Peronists, The Associated Press j^y ^ to i ooo. is higher in 
aborted. TheWtiM ^ttansiMm Argentina than in BrazilMaico. 
Party was a distant third with 6 or Venezuela, according loan anal- 
. io v /v' ■ J 5 * 5 by the Arturo Hba Foundation 


Ratil Alfonsin 

restructured to acco m moda t e the 
reduction. 

Air force pilots have been forced 


call an election and institute politi- 
cal and economic reforms. 

A palace statement said that Mr. 


Washington, said that Mr. Marcos 
would keep all of his powers 
through the election “to prevent a 


Gone, too, was the comparison “W e him he could Slav as 
of Afghanistan and Grenada: “The ]ong ^ he wanux j t0 » die official 
Soviet troops have been in Afghan- ^ -He said, *No,’ he warned to 


Marcos had told 50.000 supporters hiatus in government.” 


in Tariac. the hometown of the 
slain opposition leader Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr„ that the election would 


The provision is certain to bring 
protests from opposition politi- 
cians, who have asserted that as 


isurn for six years now, fighting all 
that time. We did what we were 
asked to do — the request of the 
government of Grenada — and 
came home." 

Other omissions included Mr. 


go back home. He warned to eo 
bade io the Soviet Union. He didn’t 
like Afghanistan." 

UJS. officials described the sol- 
dier as homesick for the Soviet 
Union and tired of the war with 


"erase doubts regarding the popu- long as he keeps his office Mr. Reagan’s contentions that EasL Eu- Afghan resistance forces. They said 


to cut their flying time in half, ex- laxity of my administration." Marcos has the power to rig the ropean countries were denied the 


pensive equipment cannot be 
maintained, and salaries remain 


He said he would run for re- elections, 
election alone, without a vice-presi- Mr. Marcos's political oppo- 


^ ir uuvlumuuu owns 

penetration of the Greek govern- 
- T^S?*’v ment ty Soviet agents. 

a r .Also this summer, Oleg A. Gor- 
: dievsky, a KGB official who West- 


® . . . 1°*'' Captain Boris Juan Mar- dential contest, because “the issue nenis met Mondav to try to agree 

Despite military budget cuts last lenhoff, a retired naval officer who ^ Marcos." Mr. Mamas, who has on a single candidate. They called 
ar, Argentina stiD spends a great- advises the defense minister. been president since 1965. invited on the president to resign to make 

proportion of its gross national “The government has not taken members of the ILSL Congress to the election constitutional. 


self-determination promised by the 
Yalta agreement, and that U.S. 


he did not request political asy lum. 

Following the soldier's appear- 
ance at the embassy compound, the 


troops fought under the United Soviet ambassador asked to see 


product on the military than the any measures to restructure the 
other large Latin American democ- armed forces,” agreed Andres Fon- 


lne government nas not taken members of the U.S. Congress to the election constitutional, 
any measures to restructure the observe the elections. Ln Washington, Reagan : 


Nations flag in Korea. 

Mr. Reagan’s statement that 
“since 1 979 seven Latin American 


J7-.SS66 


a j 


T»i& 










from his post in London:: 

(AP, Reuters, UP1) 


INSIDE 

Jl By restricting jonmalisls, 
South Africa acted to alter the. 
message of unrest. Page!. 

■ UJS. politicians expect two. 
state elections to give signs of 
Lbe future after Reagan. Page 5. 

^OPINION 

■ The press restrictions in 

■South Africa will hit black re- 
porters especially hard, a 
Soweto editor writes. Page $■ 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ A 1787 Chateau Lafite 
thought to have belonged to 
Thomas Jefferson is to be auo- 

■ tioned in London. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Boeing Co. is the favored 

candidate to take over deHavfl- 

iand Aircraft of C anad a, offi- 
cials said. Page 1 1* 

TOMORROW 

The Soviet Union appears to be 
trying ro redefine its relation- 
ship with Israel in order to be* 
come a player in the arena of 
Middle East peace negotiations. 


Interpreting. the returns, leaders 
of the Radicals said they alsn 
would be able to form new coali- 
tions in several provincial legisla- 
tures that bad been governed tradi- 
tionally by the Peronists. 

' The vote was the first off-year 
congressional election in 20 years 
and came nine days after imposi- 
tion of a state of siege by the civil- 
ian government to combat terrorist 
violence. 

Congress has tended to play only 
a weak policy-making ride, with 
power concentrated in the execu- 
tive branch- But the vote was im- 
portant for Mr. Alfonsin, who 
sought a solid reaffirmation of 
public support to strengthen his 
.position for expected changes in 
the economy and state security ap- 
paratus. 

Dozing die final weeks of the 
campaign; bomb explosions, and 
phone ih«atsag8ui5Lmi2ha^ and 
other targets overshadowed the' de- 
bate and underscored the frapliiy 
of law and order. 

The government blamed the vio- 
lence on rightist extremists bent on 
destabilizing the country so that 
the military would be provoked to 
intervene again: • 

■ Military Remains a Key ~ 

. Lprfio Chavez of The New York 
Junes reported earlier Jrom Bueruxt 
Aims: 

Mr. Alfonsm.ts one of the most 
popular leaders in Argentine hisio- . 
jy, but in a country where coups 


ties. tana, a miliiary analyst at the inde- vince the world that our program is 

Military spending has been pendent Center for the Study of the supported by the people," Mr. 
xed 35 percent, but the main re- State and Society, which has dose Marcos said “Wc need foreign 
It has been to hurt morale be- nes to the government. “They have loans, the financial assistance and 
cause institutions have not been (Continued on Page 4, Col. 7) foreign investment from abroad." 


“We need a snap election to con- oration officials and members of 
vince the world that our program is Congress said that Mr. Marcos's 


In Washington, Reagan adminis- countries have made major strides 
tration officials and members of from authoritarian to democratic 


Marcos said. “We need foreign 
loans, the financial assistance and 
foreign investment from abroad." 


Congress said that Mr. Marcos's systems” was changed to read, 
announcement was potentially a “since 1979 the countries of Latin 
major development, but added that America have made colossal strides 
The question would be whether he in the direction of the demccratici- 
( Continued on Page 4, CoL 6) ration of the continent ” 


Battles Loom Over Control of World’s Plant Seeds 


By Philip J. Hilts 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —Two new battles are 
looming over the world's supplies of plant 
se e ds , and at stake are enormous commer- 
cial and political benefits for those who 
control the supplies. 

In Washington, nine international 
groups and several individuals filed a law- 
suit Monday in U.S. District Court alleging 
that the U.S. Agriculture Department is 
violating the law by keeping too few variet- 
ies in its seed bank and not storing them 
properly. 

: The second battle is expected to begin 
Saturday in Rome, where a bloc of Third 
World nations is threatening to seize con- 
trol of the seed banks now supported by 
the United Nations Food and Agriculture 
Orguuzation and the World Bank. 

The bloc wants the seed banking system 
put tinder the control of a new body, with 
roles that will effectively abolish patents at 
new seed varieties bred by companies, um- 
vemties or nations. The United States is 
threatening to cut off iu contribution to 
the FAO if this happens. 

The Third World bloc contends that the 
practice of gathering useful seeds in other 
nations, improving them through breeding 
programs; and uang them to benefit the 
developed nations amounts to “generic im- 


perialism." Often, they say, the altered 
seeds are sold back to fanners on the land 
where the seeds originated. 

Disputes over the control of plant "germ 

{ ilasm* have intensified greatly in the past 
ew years as nations have begun to realize 
the commercial value of the genes carried 
in seeds, root slacks and cuttings. 

By breeding a strain of wheat that is 
resistant to drought or disease with another 


sphere have large numbers of useful crop 
seeds. 

So for more than a century the West has 
freely imported germ plasm, as it has oil 
and other resources, from the rest of the 
world. 

Now, Third World nations say they want 
to have a fair value placed on their plant 
resources, and are seeking help to do better 
breeding of their own. 


For more than a century the West has freely imported 
germ plasm, as it has oil and other resources, from the 
rest of the world. 


strain that produces a high yield, a re- 
searcher can produce a plant that is superi- 
or to its ancestors. 

A group of plant breeders in North 
America recently estimated that seeds from 
a single seed bank increased the value of 
the spring wheat crop by SS00 million. 
They said 50 percent of the crop used 
material from the bank. 

Hie struggle h the UN Food and Agri- 
culture Organization spring from the fact 
that the nations of the developed world 
haw few primary crops native to them, 
while the tropics and the Southern Hemi- 


Pat Roy Mooney, an American expert 
on germ plasm. leDs of being asked by a 
man in the Middle East, “‘How is it that we 
as farmers spent 10,000 years cultivating 
and breeding our plants, then someone else 
from the West works cm it for 10 years, and 
only them is it called ‘imeflectual property 
and becomes patentable?" 

The international system for sharing 
germ plasm is run by a group called the 
international Board for Plant Genetic Re- 
sources. funded by the FAO, the UN devel- 
opment program and the World Bank. 
In 1983, ibe Third World tried to dis- 


mantle the system and set up a new one 
under UN auspices. That effort failed, but 
what resulted was an “undertaking," or set 
of non binding principles about the running 
of the international system, to which UN 
member countries were asked to add their 
signatures. 

The final version of the undertaking said 
that germ plasm should be held as “a 

common heritage" shared by all. Third 
World nations sought not only access to 
original seeds, but also to seeds being de- 
veloped or already patented by companies 
around the world. 

About 100 nations have signed the un- 
dertaking, though many expressed strong 
reservations. The United States and a feu- 
other nations did not sign. 

In the meeting that is to begin Saturday, 
the Third World nations are expected to 
press for the undertaking to be made a 
legally binding document, not just an 
agreement in principle. 

Slate Department officials said the ef- 
forts would be vigorously opposed. If it 
succeeds, they said, the United Slates may 
ignore the new system or end its support of 
the FAO altogether. State officials said. 
The U.S. contribution makes up 25 percent 
of the organization’s budget. 

A U.S. official said the reasons behind 
(Cootinoed on Page 4, CoL 3) 


him. U.S. officials initially denied 
the request on the ground that the 
soldier was not willing. 

U.S. officials said the soldier lat- 
er changed his mind and met for 75 
minutes Sunday with Mr. Tabeyev 
and Edward Hurwitz, the U.S. 
charge d'affaires, who speaks flu- 
ent Russian. After ihai session, the 
soldier asked for more lime to think 
over his options. 

He deliberated Sunday night, 
then made his decision on Monday 
to leave. 

■ An Isolated Outpost 

Susan F. Rash- of The New York 
Times reported earlier from Wash- 
ington: 

The decision of the Soviet soldier 
to take refuge in the U.S. Embassy 
in Kabul turned international at- 
tention on one of tbe most isolated 
UJS. diplomatic outposts. 

While Kabul is removed from 
the fierce fighting in the country- 
side between Afghan guerrillas arid 
Afghan government forces backed 
by Soviet troops, the Soviet Army's 
dnve into Afghanistan in 1979 
made lhe city a largely inhospitable 
place for .Americans to live or work. 

According to the Slate Depart- 
ment, there are only a handful of 
American citizens in Kabul beyond 
the lOLal of 20 diplomatic personnel 
and Marine guards assigned to the 
embassy. 

Indeed, the State Department 
has been under pressure from some 
in Congress to close U.S. opera- 
tions there, but department offi- 
cials say they have resisted because 
they consider the embassy valuable 
for both symbolic and strategic rea- 
sons. 

”Wc see it os a sort of beacon, to 
show ihe Afghan people we have 
not given up on them." a senior 

(Continued on Page 4, Col. 8) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


Press Ban May Presage New Crackdown by Pretoria 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Sheila Rule 

Aw Yprl Ttnm Service 

JOHANNESBURG — A for- 
eign television news team was de- 
tained recently by the police in an 
area where soldiers were firing tear 
gas at demonstrating students. 

Although members of the crew 
were seated in a parked car and not 
filming the unrest they were taken 
into custody after policemen and 
soldiers spotted cameras in the car. 

At the police station, a captain 
demanded to see their identifica- 
tion. The cameraman took out a 
cord showing be was accredited as a 
working journalist by the Foreign 
Ministry. 

“I don’t want to see that," the 
captain said angrily. “Don't show 
me that card or a Diner’s Cub 



more than three hours and freed 
after lawyers intervened. 

The incident underlined the 
powers the security forces enjoy 
under South .Africa’s state of emer- 
gency decree and their hostility to- 
ward journalists, especially (hose 
working for news organizations 
abroad. 

As television around the world 
vividly showed South Africa’s 
spasms of racial strife nigbt after 
night and other nations reacted 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

with outrage and sanctions, some 
political analysts said that the au- 
thorities increasingly blamed the 
messenger for the message. 

The analysts said it was this atti- 
tude that led the government Satur- 


disnins covered by the govern- is is find themselves at times caught 
meat’s emergency regulations. between suspicious and angry pro- 


mts find themselves at times caught “The world would probaMv not -r t J RpKplfi ftp* T ;n A dminis lTatlAw 
between suspicious and angiy pro- jmow that 800 people have died in a U goJlufl. AlCwtllb _ r * ^ 


is is working for newspapers can Reporters, photographers and 
cover such situations but must first television crews have spent more 
report to ibe local police and foQow and more rime dodging the police 
their instructions. In such cases, the in arras of unrest. Security forces 
authorities can bar the journalists have assaulted and detained them 


NAIROBI (Reuters) — Ugandan rebels. resenting peace talks with thg 
countrv’s military government, announced Monday they were setting i? 
of a formal adnemstration m areas they control. Diplomats said the nwj 
by the rebels would dampen prospects for an early settlement in the talks, 
which are bong bdd in Nairobi. 


escorted by the police. 

Id addition, only journalists ap- 


therr film or videotapes. 
Ami-apartheid activists charged 


card. I want to see some real idenri- day to impose major restrictions on 
ficauon. local and foreign journalists. They 

The journalists wcr$ held for said that the clampdown could 

— both increase South Africa’s diplo- 

■ marie isolation and strengthen the 

jgt&fc agjfefc already nearly absolute powers the 

wfe* V 1*113 ng Sfp police and army have to act against 

New York City? political foes. 

^ The reflations include the ban- 

Lrramercv tung of television- crews, photogra- 

__ iixx '* phers and radio reporters from cov- 

r ering unrest in 38 magisterial 


Under the restrictions, journal- testers and hostile security forces, little over a year and how much NAIROBI (Reutersi — Ugandan rebels, resuramg peace talks with tha 
is is working for uewspapns can Reporters, photographers and black people arc suffering under counIIV ' s military goveramo tt . announced Monday they were setting ^ 
cover such situations but must First television crews have spent more this creel system." the critic said. a f 0 fgtal adirntBStration m areas they control. Diplomats sad the itoj 

report to ibe local police and follow and more rime dodging the police Restrictions on the press in bv the rebels would dampen prospects for an early sffitiemenr in the talks, 
then instructions. In such cases, the in areas of unrest Security' forces ^ no i new. The nil- Which are being bdd in Nairobi. 

authorities can bar the journalists have assaulted and detained them ^ Na tio nal Parry began curbing The National Resistance Army said it had established an inlcrun 
from areas unless they agree iq be without charges, sometimes seizing ^ after it gained administration in "liberated zones/’ mainly in southwestern Uganda. **r 0 

escorted by the police. their film or videotapes. power in 1948 and there are al- provide services pending an agreement with the junta in Kampala “ 

In addition, only journalists ap- Ami-apartheid activists charged roore ^ 100 laws govern- The rebel leader, Yoweri Museveni, said in a statement that |? 

proved by the Department of For- that the government’s move to min- p ress freedom. departments dealing with matters such as finance, education and auner- 

eign .Affairs, the Bureau for Infer- imize news coverage and, in panic- B ^ reeulations suggest als had been set up and 13 district officers had been appointed. Ha,i 
nation or the police will he allowed ular, io curb foreign television, was “ . worldwide criticism Musa Kigongo. described as a -veieran freedom fighter" and chairman of 

(0 work m the districts covered by a step toward ever roore violent local the rebel inner council, was appointed chief administrator, 

meeroeigency r^ulahons. tactics against black and mixed- re- - • - 

The authorities have reframed race protesters. ri^r-pT t^ve accuset j television _ _ . r 

{Srfwta*.*.— * Benazir Bhutto Sent Baek to Europe 

proclaim under the emergency mem opponents wonld lose an im- vimeat maaents. . LONDON (AP) — Benazir 

rales. Were censorship to be inuo- portant means to bring about inter- President hct ct w . po Bhutto. leader of the opporiuoa 

dneed, reporters could be required national awareness of repressive ferred to these cnarges i as Pakistan People’s Party, arrived in 

to identify their sources of informa- measures. a speech before foreign corr^ion- i— j 0 _ ^ Monday after Karachi 


proved by the Department of For- that the government’s move to min- 
eign .Affairs, the Bureau for Infer- inure sews coverage and. in partic- 
nation or the police win be allowed ular, to curb foreign television, was 
(0 work in the districts covered by a step toward ever roore violent 


the emergency regulations. 

The authorities have refrained 
from imposing total press censor- 


tactics against black and mixed- 
race protesters. 

Without the presence of foreign 


ship, which they are empowered to reporters, these critics say, gov era- 
proclaim under the emergency mem opponents would lose on im- 
rales. Were censorship to be inuo- ponani means to bring about inter- 
dneed, reporters could be required national awareness of repressive 
to identify their sources of informa- measures, 
tion in areas affected by (he emer- The government recently banned 


the rebel inner council, was appointed chief administrator. 

Benazir Bhutto Sent Baek to Europe 


LONDON (AP) — Benazir 
Bhutto, leader of the opposition 
Pakistan People's Pam. arrived in 
London oh Monday after Karachi 


gency decree or could be forbidden journalists from Soweto, the huge 
bv law from writing about the situ- black township near J ohann esburg. 


by law from writing about the situ- 
ation. 


and activists ear that more black 


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The Sunday Tribune in Durban townships may also soon fall under 
said in an editorial that the security such restrictions. 

r tj mi i_t- utf .u:. l. j i j ^ 


“ * r ■ l-uiiuun uii «uia 

dents. He warned ifac police released herfrom bouse ar- 
not to go too far in negate re- ££ ^ put ^ <*, a pLme for 
porting on the country. Europe. 

As unrest by blacks overflowed Miss Bhutto. 31, hM sought per- 


from townships into the city of Jo- ovission to answer a sansmoos to 
hannesburg on two consecutive appear Nov. 6 before a French 


forces would now “be able to use “If this had happened a year Fridays, foreign camera crews were investigating the mysterious 

all the awesome powers they have ago,” said a critic, who refused to confronted by white citizens with death of her younger brother, 

available without fear that any mis- be identified, “the wodd would still cries of “How much are you paying Shahnawaz Bhutto, in Cannes, 

use will be tznarguably captured by not know about and would not them?" and allegations that the France, last July. 


the camera." 

The new rules come as journal- 


have w?n for themselves the op- journalists knew beforehand that 


pression of the state. 


violence would take place. 


South African Paper Prints Interview With Rebel 


Chilled 

TIO PEPE 

The natural aperitif. 

Very Dry Sherry 


JOHANNESBURG — A lead- 
ing South African newspaper de- 
fied the law Monday by publishing 
an interview with Oliver Tambo, 
president of the banned African 
National Congress. 

The Cape Times carried the in- 
terview with Mr. Tambo, who un- 
der the South African system of 
proscribing political opponents 
cannot be quoted legally in the 
country. The African National 

Talks on Disarmament 
Resuming in Stockholm 

Reuitn 

STOCKHOLM — The Stock- 
holm Conference on Confidence 


Congress is the leading black na- end Allan Boesak, an antiapartheid 
tionalisi group. activist facing subversion charges. 

The newspaper said that the in- Macerate w a vu* 


terview, conducted in London, was 


Magistrate W.A. de Klerk 
scrapped bail conditions imposed 


■-“fl LT“ a ^tribujion to 

peaceful solutions rnSouib Afnca court Sept 20, mdudi^^oii 
overwhelming public press Semetk attending funer- 
mi P9^f nce - , . als, addressing meetings and leav- 

of mgUsl^d district without police 

South Africa," the Capf^nS P™ 5510 * 


said. 

A spokesman for Louis Lc- 


Tbe magistrate said in Malmes- 
bury that Mr. Boestic still must not 


and Security-Building Measures * throw white rule in South Africa by 
and Disarmament in Europe re- fence. 


Grange, the minister of law and communicate with state witnesses, 
order, said tha t it was too earlv to encourage disinvestment or boy- 
say if the newspaper would be pros- cotts. or visit schools. Bail re- 
ecuted. The offense is punishable m aine ^ 20,000 rand (S7.790). 
by a jail term of up to three years. Mr. Boesak was detained Aug. 

Mr. Tambo was quoted as urging 27, a day before he was due to lead 
Pretoria to create a climate for talks a march on the Cape Town jail 
with the African National Con- where Mr. Manddals held, 
gress, which has pledged to over- 0 0 


sumes Tuesday with many dele- 
gates optimistic that this month’s 
meeting of the U.S. and Soviet 
leaders may provide the impetus 
for a breakthrough. 

The conference of 33 nations is 
expected to be one of the items on 
the agenda when Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev meet in 
Geneva on Nov. 19 and 20. Dele- 
gates in Stockholm have been try- 
ing since January 1984 to negotiate 
an agreement on military confiden- 
ce-building measures to reduce the 
risk of war in Europe. 


row white rule in Sonth Africa by ® Tear Gas Security System 
rce. Anglo American Coip^ South 

‘‘There is always a possibility of Africa's mining and industrial con- 
truce,” Mr. Tambo said. “It glomerate, acknowledged Sunday 


a truce,” Mr. Tambo said. “It glomerate, acknowledged Sunday 
would be very, very easy, if, for that it has equipped stores and of- 
example, we started negotiations." fices in one its gold-mine complex- 
He added that Nelson Mandela, es with a system that could spray 
a leading African National Con- tear gas in case of unrest, the Los 



Before leaving. Miss Bhutto, the 
daughter of former Prime Munster 
Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, who was exe- 
cuted in 1979, vowed to return to 
Pakistan as soon as possible even if 
it meant her arrest. She said the 
civilian parliament 2 nd govern- 
ment were a front for the mffitaiy 
regime of President Mohammed 
22a ul-Haq. who has promised u> 
restore full democracy by Jan. I. 



Benazir Bhutto 


Arafat Arrives for Talks with Mubarak 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Yasser Arafat, the bead of the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization, arrived Monday night in Cairo for talks with President 
Hosni Mubarak that could be cracud to efforts » revive die Middle East 
peace process, officials said. . 

Mr. Arafat flew from the United Arab Emirates after cotBpIetinga tour 
of Gulf states aimed at gathering. support for an Arab summit meeting. 
Thar talks’ will focus on the peace pro ces s and a mending of rebtiems 
with Mr. Mubarak, diplomats said. Mr. Mubarak, was angered when 
some senior PLO officials criticized the way Egypt responded to the 
hijacking Iasi month of an Italian arose ship, the A ddle Laura. 


For the Record 

Fifteen persons were fcflkd iaS 
a bus fell from a bridge Monday, 


id six were injured seriously when 
said. It was going from Leonlorte 


gress figure, would have to be re- Angeles Tunes repented from Jo- 
leased from prison before talks hannesburg. 
could take place. Mr. Mandela was Peter Gush, chairman of Anglo 
recovering Monday after undergo- American’s gold and uranium divi- 
mg surgery Sunday for an inflamed sion, said that the system was in- 
prostate gland. stalled at Wes tern 'Deep Levels 

Separately, a South African Mine. 50 miles (81 Jtilome- 

court substantially relaxed bail m) of Johannesburg, 

conditions Monday for the Rever- after nnrest in 1974 and 1975 in 


to Catania when it fefi about 65 feet (about 20 meters). iRaaers) 
Two employees of JapanYaabassy m Beirut, who were kidnapped by 
mfiiiiamen in West Bezrnt last Tuesday, have been released under an 
exchange of hostages, an embassy s pokes m a n said Monday. (AFP) 

fices in one its gold-mine complex- Oliver Tambo Genoan . s P a ?* Monday for a a one-day extension 

es with a system that could spray .of ihe current scie ntifi c mis s i on of die space shuttle Challenger, but later 

tear gas in case of unrest, the Los which 15 black miners were killed ** [f quest US,: 5 1 ? officials said someexpennients 

.Angeles Tiroes repented from Jo- in tribal fiehS^' would haveto be curtatierf to pr^ the necessary power. The nusaorvi 

hannesburg. Used 1975. the svstem ^end Wednesday morning m CafifomuL (J 

Peter Gush, chairman of Anglo consists of canisters of tear gas - . . 

American’s gold and uranium divi- hung in the mining complex's li- r/»TP/»finn 
sion, said that the system was in- quor stores, kitchens and some ad- 

stalled at Western Deep Levels ministration offices. Remote con- Becauseof an editing error, it was incorrectly reported in a New Yot 
Gold Mine, 50 miles (81 kflome- trols allow mine security officials to Times dispatch from Jerusalem during the werkend that Ytrval Nectar 
ters) southwest of Johannesburg, release the gas if rioters attempt to is the minister of science and develop me nt in the Israeli cabinet. Mr 
after unrest in 1974 and 1975 in move into these areas. Neeman is not in cabinet. 


tear gas mease oi unrest, toe Los which 15 black miners were killed 
.Angeles Times reported from Jo- m tribal fighting. 
hannesbur & Used once in 1975, the system 

Peter Gush, chairman of Anglo consists of canisters of tear gas 
American’s gold and uranium divi- hung in the mining complex's li- 
sion, said that the system was in- quor stores, kitchens and some ad- 
stalled at Western Deep Levels ministration offices. Remote cm- 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


New Zealand Denies 
Deal for Guilty PI ea 
By 2 French Agents 




Rearers 


AUCKLAND. New Zealand — 
New Zealand denied Monday dial 
it had made a deal with France that 
led two French secret agents to 
plead guilty to manslaughter 
charges in the s inkin g of the Rain- 
bow Warrior. 


Captain Dominique Prieur. 36. 
and Major .■Main Mafan. 35. plead- 
ed guilty to manslaughter and sab- 
otage charges on Monday, before 
any evidence had been heard. They 
were remanded in custody for sen- 
tencing Not. 22. 


Their surprise admission came 
30 minutes into a preliminary court 
hearing on the sinking of the 
Greenpeace flagship. A photogra- 
pher for the and"- nuclear group was 
killed when the vessel was sunk by 
an explosion in Auckland harbor 
on Julv 10. 


its agents had been ordered to sab- 
otage the Rainbow Warrior. 

A defense lawyer. Gerard Curry, 
also rejected suggestions of a deal. 
“You can be absolutely sure h is 
not a political trade-off!” he said. 

The prosecutor. David Morris, 
told the court that the police could 
not prove that Captain Prieur and 
Major Mafart had personally 
planted the two bombs that sank 
the ship. 

A summary of evidence read af- 
ter the agents' admissions said that 
Fernando Pereira, the Dutch citi- 
zen who was killed, had not been 
injured by the explosion but had 
drowned as he tried to rescue pho- 
tographic equipment. 

The Rainbow Warrior was to 
have led a protest fleet in an at- 
tempt to stop France from explod- 



Marcos Urging Election 

For President in January 


In Manila, opposition reaction 
to Mr. Marcos's announcement 
was generally favorable. 

“We welcome the announcement 

of a snap deed on." said a 
ment from the National Unifica- 
tion Committee, which convened a 
votins. meeting of a dozen opposition 

The White House spokesman, ?oops on Monday to discuss etec- 
Larry Speakes, said that the dec- tion strategy. 


(Continued from Page I) 
would take steps to assure a fair 
election. 

In particular, officials said, it 
was critical that Mr. Mateos keep 
his promise to accredit citizen poll- 
watchers who were active in 1984 


Russian 
Leaves U.S. 
Embassy in 

tf 

Afghanistan 


V; M !* 


V ■= . i 


ih 




(Continued fro® Pstje 1) 

official said. ’’And it is also, of 
course, a very important listening 


New Zealand police had 
dropped a charge of murder and 
substituted one of manslaughter. 
But Prime Minister David Lange, 
who earlier had called the sinking 
“a sordid act of state-backed ter- 
rorism," said that any suggestion of 
a deal was untrue. 


ing nuclear devices at its Munir oa 
atoll test site in the South Pacific. 


Two Greenpeace officials, Steve Sawyer, left, and Peter Wilkinson, with placards outside 
the court bnflding where two French agents attended a preliminary hearing Monday. 


dons must be “credible, fair and 
broadly based in terms of partici- 
pation.'' 

Asked if the United States want- 
ed to play a role in supervising the 
elections, Mr. Speakes said, “I 
don’t know that we would super- 
vise; certainly we would observe.” 

The Senate Select Committee on 
Intelligence issued a report Friday 
saying that the Marcos government 
was in danger of bong brought 
down by the civil unrest and the 
insurgency. The committee ch a i r- 
man, Senator David F. Durenber- 
ger, Republican of Minnesota, said 
that Mr. Marcos was incapable of 
introducing reforms and that he 
should step down. 


David McTaggart, chairman of 
Greenpeace, said that the outcome 
was not the justice chat President 
Francois Mitterrand of France had 
urged and added: “Mitterrand. 
Hemu and Lacoste should all have 
been in the dock today." 


Battles Loom Over Control of World’s Plant Seeds 


The statement added, “The op- 
position reiterates its readiness to 
field a single candidate.” 

Opposition parties were holding 
their own meetings, but their lead- 
ers rai d earlier that they would re- 
spect the National Unification 
Co mm ittee's choice of a single can- 
didate from among the various par- 
ries' nominees. 

About a dozen opposition lead- 
ers have been mentioned as possi- 
ble standard bearers but the field in 
recent weeks has narrowed down to 
three. They are: Salvador LaureL a 
for mer senator who heads the Unit- 
ed Nat ionalis t Democratic Organi- 
zation; Jovho Salonga, the Liberal 
Party president, and Corazos 
Aquino, widow of Mr. Aquino, 
who was assassinated two years 
ago. (Reuters, A?, SYT) 


post. 

LLS. diplomats, whose tours of 
duty in Kabul generally run 18 
months to rwo yen* receive both 
jjaniship and danger pay- amount, 
ing jo 3 50 -percent differential in 

their salaries. 

Since 1979. when the UJ5 ambas- 


sador to Afghanistan, Ackilpt^ 


“They are not for sale." Mr. 
Lange said of the two agents of 
France's General Directorate of 
External Security. “This is a pro- 
cess of law. not some sordid hag- 
gling. selling prisoners." 


Defense Minister Charles Hemu 
and Admiral Pierre Lacoste. who 
headed the secret service, lost their 
jobs in the scandal. 


Mr. Lange said the pleas and 
sentences would not alter a com- 
pensation claim lodged by New 
Zealand after France admitted that 


The police still want to arrest 
three other French agents oa mur- 
der and sabotage charges. France 
has said it will not prosecute them 
because they were acting under or- 
ders. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
the reform action were not prob- 
lems with the current system, but 
the desire of the Third World “to 
gain political control.” 

“It is obscene that while people 
are dying of hunger in Africa these 
peoples want to spend money on 
setting up another system.” said the 
official, who did not wish to be 
identified. 

A second front in the war over 
plant seeds is the suit filed against 


the Agriculture Department. 

The plaintiffs, incl uding Jeremy 
Rifkxn, a social activist; Mr. Moo- 
ney; the National Fanners Union 
of Canada; and several interna- 
tional environmental groups, are 
asking that the department be or- 
dered to determine whether its al- 
leged failure to run a broad and 


well-organized seed bank system 
vulnerable to 


has made the nation 
crop failures and economic dam- 
age. 


“This country and the entire 
world face a crisis because of the 
eroding plant gene pool” says the 
complaint. “The agricultural sys- 
tem of the U.S., in particular, is 
supported by an extraordinarily 
narrow genetic base, a situation 
viewed with alarm by those who 
have studied the system." 

The complaint charges that the 
Agriculture Department cannot 
even name all the seed collections 
around the country, much less sys- 




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tematically collect seed from them; 
that there is no attempt to collect 
seed s (rf anything other than com- 
mercial crops; ami that the system 
cannot e* that all the seeds 
are still viable because of inade- 
quate storage. 

Paul Fitzgerald, a deputy admin- 
istrator of the Agricultural Re- 
search Service; George A While, 
head of the plant introduction of- 
fice in the genu plasm research lab- 
oratory; and Lewis Bass, head of 
die National Seed Storage Labora- 


Alfonsm 
(kdns Seats 


tory, agreed that the work labeling, 
storing and evaluating samples was 
hampered by a lack of funds. 

But they defended the emphasis 
on storing seeds of food oops and 
said that storage conditions ap- 
peared adequate: 


Suicide Blast 
Kills 2 Men 


In Lebanon 


Reusers 

SIDON, Lebanon — A militia- 
man was killed and a woman in- 
jured Monday when a suicide -car 
bomber attacked a checkpoint of 
the Israeli-backed South Lebanon 
Army in southern Lebanon, securi- 
ty sources said. 

The sources said the bomber 
himself was irilied when he rammed 
a car into the checkpoint at the 
entrance of Arnoun village, four 
miles (seven kilometers) north of 
the Israeli border. 

The Syrian Nationalist Social 
Party d armed responsibility in a 
statement to an international news 
agency in Beirut. It identified the 
bomber as a Syrian, Arnmar al-Aa- 
sar, 24. lire statement was accom- 
panied by a photograph of Mr. Aa- 
sar and a copy of his wifi. 

In Tel Aviv, Israeli militaiy 
sources said a would-be suicide car 
bomber was killed when his vehicle 
exploded after South Lebanese 
Army mBinamen fixed on Mm for 
ignoring orders to stop. They said 
the car carried 440 pounds (200 
kilograms) of explosives. The re- 
port mentioned no other casualties. 

In Damascus. Syria urged rival 
Lebanese factions Monday to stop 
arguing and sign a Syrian-brokered 
accord to end 10 years of aril wax. 

The state-control! ed Damascus 
radio said the factions should end 
debate on trivial matters and take 
practical steps toward security and', 
national reconciliation. 

The pact, drafted last month bry 
the mam Christian, Dnzze and Shi- 
ite Moslem militias after weeks of 
meetings with Abdd Halim Khad- 
dam, the Syrian, first vice president, 
was to have been signed Sunday in 
Damascus. 


(Coofinaed from Page I) 
cut the budget, and salaries are 
lower, but they have left the struc- 
ture.” 

One of the potentially dangerous 
structures left standing, militaiy 
analysts said, is the army intelli- 
gence unit, Battalion 601. The unit 
is believed to employ 2j000 men, 
including retired officers and other 
ci vilians . A former member of the 
battalion was one of 12 suspects 
arrested in connection with recent 
bombings. 

The intelligence group, accord- 
ing to analysts, has always been 
independent. It does little work tor 
the present government. 1 The recon- 
stituted dvffian state intelligence 
agency is still too inexperienced to 
be of any help, an analyst said. 

Many officers who were active 
when human rights abuses were 
prevalent are still in uniform, the 
analysts said. With nine former 
tniwuy rulers on trial and 1,700 
cases pending against other offi- 
cers, the analysts said some of those 
officers may have reason to fed 
uneasy and to be interested in plot- 
ting against the civilian govern-. 
menL 

Even officers who are uninterest- 
ed in subverting the government 
are described as impatient with 
what they see as -constant pubfic 
criticism of the army. When tome 
officers appeared to give pretrial 
testimony last year, they were met 
by crowds who shouted insults 'at-. 
them, miHlaiy analysts said. 

“If the persecution of individuals 
doesn't stop at some paint, we are 
not going to have a peaceful coun- 
try,” Captain Marienhoff said. 
“One day we have to say,, 
‘enough.*” 


Dubs, was kidnapped and 
when the police stormed a hotel 
room where he was being held, the 
State D epar tment Em not permit, 
ted diplomats to bring dependents 
to Kabul. 

As a result of the Dubs killing, 
the highest-ranking U-S. official in 
Kabul is a charge d’affaires. Mr. 
Hurwic has been stationed there 
for just over two years and is sched- 
uled for reassignment early next 
year. 

The embassy compound occu- 
pies > HoA in die newer section of 
Kabul known as "Sharhmaa," 
which literally translates as “new 
city.” Like most hemes arid Mold- 
ings in Kabul, the co mp o un d is 
surrounded by a stone wall Ac- 
cording to State Department offi- 
security has been stepped up 
in recent years. 

But the officials stressed that (he 
safety of the building and its per- 
sonnel are in some ways teas of 
problem than in many Western 
capitals because of the tight control 
by Soviet authorities. 

While tile Marine guards live in 
the compound, diplomatic person- 
nel have their own homes nearby. 

US. officials who have worked 
in Kabul since Soviet forces joined 
tbc fighting in 1979 say that iow- 
levri harass ment by Che Afghan 
government is a fact of fife. 


Laxity Alleged 
In Secret Service 
By UJL Ex-Agent 


But Modem political sources in 
Beirut said tome Lebanese Chris- 
tian; leaders had reservations about 
the-drafL 

The proposed accord would 
gradually dismantle the present po- 
litical system that favors tire Chris- 
tian minority, in part- by. 
the powers of the Cfanstian-1 
presidency. 


wore raws *i uss to* 

THE WOOD m 16 PAOES 

DAILY IN THE KT 


Washington Post Service 

- WASHINGTON - — A former 
employee of Britain’s communica- 
tions intelligence agency has al- 
leged in an unpublished manu- 
script that lax security was so 
pervasive daring his 30 years there 
that both U.S. and British secrets 
routinely were lost, misplaced or 
fefl into Soviet hands. 

pie employee, Jock Kane, 61, 
retired from the Government Com- 
munications Headquarters, or 
GCHQ, in 1978 after holding over- 
seas posts supervising some of Brit- 
ain’s. electronic monrloring activi- 
ties. 

Mr. Kane’s principal allegation 

ed conditions in whj^^Soriet spy, 
Geoffrey A. Prime, was able to 
steal thousands of pages of top- 
secret materia l relating .to recon- 
naissance satellite projects under- 
taken by the United States and 
Britain daring the 1970s. 

Mr. Kane’s manuscript, 
“GCHQ: the Negative Asset,” has . 
been suppressed under Britain’s 
(Hfidal Secrets Act A copy was 
obtained by The Washington Post. 


UJLPostOffice 
Cuts Rates for 
2d-Oass Letters 


The Anocmtni Press 

LONDON — The British 
Post Office made the first price 
tat Monday in its mafl service 
-since the peonypost was in tra- 
duced in 1840. Tne cost of mail 
ing a second-class letter was re- 
duced from 13 pence (18.5 
cents) to 12 pence. 

. Most people send Christinas 
cards second class, which is not 
guaran teed for delivery the day 
after posting as is Fust-class 
maiL First-class mail costs 17 
pence. 

Sir Ronald Dealing, Post Of- 
fice chairman, said the cut 
would cost the Post Office £! 
m i n i on a week in revenue. 

That was less publicity fora 
20-percent increase in the cost 
of mailing newspapers abroad 
and a 100-percent increase for 
companies paying by c ontr act 
for such postings. 

Ihe Publishers Association 
said that up to 40 percent of the 
current business in exported 
books and journals, worth over 
£500 million a year, could be 
made uneconomic by the higher 
charges: Some business might 
be diverted to overseas past of- 
fices, it said. 


* 


2 Bombs Damage Banks 
In Brussels* Charleroi 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — - Two 
bomb explosions damaged major 
Belgian banks in Brussels and 
Charleroi within hours Monday. 
The extreme leftist Fighting Cbm- Sg 
mraist Cells claimed responsibility 
for one of the attacks, the police 
said. - 



A. security guard was shot and 
wounded, after he surprised two 
persons fearing a panel truck out- 
side the Brussels head office of the 
Janqnc Bruxelles Lambert early 
Monday. The truck, equipped with 
a loudspeaker that broadcast a ta- 
pe-recorded warning to evacuate 
. ai ? a » exploded shortly after- 
ward, causing extensive riamay 
eight hours later a bomb exploded 
the Socfete Generate de 
Banque office in Charleroi, slightly 
nyming one person. 


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p v % U.S. Diplomatic Moves 
>’ On a Middle East Accord 
* Grow Daily, Israelis Say 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5. 1985 


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By William Claiborne 

1} iuhingioii Post Soviet 

JERUSALEM — ILS. invoJve- 
mem in secret diplomatic contacts 
fcith Jordan, Egypt and Israel over 
a possible comprehensive Middle 
East peace agreement is intensify- 
ing daily, according to a senior Is- 
raeli officiaL 

The offidaL who asked notio be 
identified, also said Sundav that 
other nations, such as France, 
might be utilized is behind-the- 
scenes efforts to reach a break- 






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international forum. 

■ According to the official, the 
main obstacles that are the focus of 
U.S. attention are finding a suit- 
able international forum that 
would lead to direct talks and the 
nature of Palestinian participation 
in talks with Jordan and Israel. 

The official also said that while 
Israel did not expect the Syrians to 
join the peace talks, it would be 
willing to negotiate with them. 

Israeli officials also said that 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres has 
decided to rely exclusively ori. a 
strategy of “quiet diplomacy" in 
seeking direct peace negotiations 
with Jordan in the face of increas- 
ing^ harsh criticism from some 
members of the rightist Likud fac- 
tion of his coalition government. 

Mr. Peres was described as being 
determined to seize the moment to 
initiate talks with Jordan even if it 
brought his coalition near to disso- 
lution over ideological dashes with 
the Likud faction. 

He has 1 1 months left before he 
will have to turn the-job of prime 
minister over to Foreign Minister 
Yitzhak Shamir, leader of the Li- 
kud bloc, and Mr. Peres is known 
to be anxious at least to begin talks 
toward striking a -peace pact with 
Jordan before then. 

Members of the Likud faction 
are said to worry that Mr. Peres 
may have enough time to reach a 
breakthrough with Jordan, thus 
scoring, perhaps, enough political 
capital to force an early election 
and seek a more favorable coali- 
tion. : 

' The prime minister was said to 
be sanguine about recent press dis- 
closures that he asserts were de- 
signed to scuttle his peace initia- 
tive. 

One disclosure, winch a Peres 


MiTanvdiJSiar °° e disclosure, which a Peres 
— ‘ '.t'i -wnv non^ - ^ hide termed “blatant disutforma- 


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DEATH NOTICE 


•We announce with deep regret the 
loss of our great friend 

Mine Ida Dembo De Lasga ' 
Internincnt ennedire Pcre-Xadmse. 


[Sylvia' md Henri 'GeTLerrnan. 


secret offers to King Hussein of 
Joriian eo&iatning sweeping con- 
ecsskms not approved by the Likud 
ministers of the Israeli cabinet. 

A senior Israeli official said that 
Mr. Peres was convinced that ur. 
opportunity for peace with Jordan 
was so ckse at hand that it could 
not be sabotaged by such political 
in-fighting. 

When asked how he thought qui- 
et diplomacy could succeed in the 
face erf almost certain further at- 
tempts at political undermining by 
some suspicious Likud ministers, a 
senior Israeli official rep Bed, “It's 
not easy, but it’s going better than 
yon think- 1 * 

The small Tchiya party, with 
. hacking by Trade Minister Arid 
Sharon, caused a brief uproar last 
week by purporting to have seen a 
document containing an offer by 
Mr. Pans to Hussein of an interim 
peace agreement. Under, the al- 
leged pact, Jordan and Israel would 
jointly administer a form of limited 
Palestinian autonomy in the Israe- 
li-occupied West Bank. 

The so-called secret plan bore a 
striking resemblance to the “func- 
tional concessions" proposals 
drafted by Mr. Peres in 1975 when 

he was defease minister. Those pro- 
posals later were i n cor po r a ted in 
various widely publicized autono- 
my plans, including oqe proposed 
by Prime Minister Menacbem Be- 
gin after the 1979 Camp David 
peace treaty with Egypt 

Mr. -'-Peres deme^T having made 
any such offer to Jordan, and then, 
in a speech to his Labor Party, 
indicated that his Likud critics 
might encounter difficulties if they 
trial to bah him into a misstep 
during his quest for peace talks. 

The momentary “criss” over the 
alleged document deflated almost 
immediately, and Mr. Shamir, 
leader of the Likud bloc, joined Mr. 
Peres in issuing the unequivocal 
denial that an oner had been made. 

Mr. Peres's deft management of 
that episode, coupled with his deci- 
sive crushing of a Likud challenge 
to his peace initiative thiree days, 
earlier in parliament, emphasized 
what some political observers in 
Israel have described as an increas- 
ingly sophisticated and coolly pur- 
poseful quest for an opening of a 
peace dialogue with Jordan. 

He is said to be convinced that, 
after the hijacking last month of the 
cruise ship Adrille Lauro, the PLO 
effectively has been dealt om of the 
peace process. Thus. Mr. Peres has 
turned to the trade-off that his ad- 
visers regard as essential to give 
Hussein if direct peace talks are to 
begin: some sort of international 
auspices to inilbuf Itfyniaiifflit 
••• Such auspices would protect 
-Hussein from assertions of seeking 
a separate peace treaty with Israel 


In Miami Beach, the Young Are Taking Over From the Old 



Page 5 


By Jon Nordhcimo 1 

>*v }«ri Fonts Sen-;rt 

MIAMI BEACH — The subtle 
but telltale signs of revival arc 
here- 

The maternity ward at Mount 
Sinai Hospital which was almost 
closed a few years ago because of 
a low birthrate in Miami Beach, is 
scheduled to expand 

South Beach Elementary 
School dosed for a. decade for 
lack «rf pupils, is due to reopen 
next fall 

South Point* Park, which 
opened last month, has juagie 
gyms and joggmg courses and a 
theater, hut no seats for die elder- 
ly. 

A landlord with 856 units to 
rent offers a 15-percent discount 
lo new tenants under the age of 

50. 

Slowly. Miami Beach, a city of 
100.000? is changing. The genera- 
tion of the elderly who have domi- 


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r.aicd the 'ou-.hen luff of the 
rtfeon for 25 years, mostlv Jewish 
and of Ecslcra European extruc- 
liij.n. is dying ojl 
A decide' aao mmc ihac 50 


percent r.f the population of 
South Beach wu*. r5 or older. Now 
a aiwounr, s^r.ev pliers the 
figure at no mere th^r. 2i pcr:cn 

Tlic ddcriy ore beitg rspiicce 
by three groups who arrchlnanz 
South Beach, or South js 
i: is now derigr-ii ed. 

The first of ties? are ±s Hit- 
panic poor, moitiy Curcru who 
ur>: moved :r.:c blighted op^rt- 
menfc. and j-r sues: ho- 

lds a decude ago. 

More recently. arcsU-j-umj!- 
isLs and rorunu"-. drewrt b\ ?.ne».- 
pensive Art Deco hr.j«-;r.E cr.d u 
beachside lifestyle beacn storing 
in when their Bohemian-hippie 
surrounding ir Cocc-nu: Grove 
on i be south ecee of Mam began 
to give way to iu.vurv condorjir.:- 
ums and fashionable re* uu ran is. 

No* vouch cpwardiy mobile 
rwo-payjfafijT fan'll ere regin- 

ning to nv>ve ir.. 

“Whcr. we mc.ed down here 


two years ag*.' irorr. New Jcrvv 
we rented a" town house ;r. the 
suburbs." said Cjfen Van?-, mur- 
Ltefir.gr director for a Munu cIjs* 
company, "li tool rriv an hour :o 
commute to work " 

Now she says nlie ljti drive 
a ctos- :h? buy to work ;n ! f. min- 
utes. And the i*A ; 9 An Deco 
h.xusc that she and her husband. 
Lloyd, the manager . ■: :he Miami 
Bivat ShiAv. bought Iasi vear for 
■‘S'-O Cmu plus'" i> on N ioc hlocL. 
from the ?cean. 

“What's hjprx-Tiing is a sea 
change in local percer'.ions," ,%eid 
.Alan Rauzir.. head of the Miami 
Beach Development vTiirp. a non- 
profit agency set up to assist ir, 
rehabsiitating South Beach. 

“We're neccome j muiudinre:.- 
si-etai city for the first time, an 
urban seashore resort " 

Individual entrepreneurs are 
digging in. “I don't worry about 
vacancies. ! car: wju tor the right 


dienuic." >a;,s Linda Polansky. 
head o syndicate that operates 

iheClav Hotel on E*par,io!a V. av. 
a narrow street of charming 
buildtr.gi designed in 1*25. 

Anothe* chanee that may have 
create: .icnificar.ee in the long 
run is wnar appears to be a new 
spirit L i' l.i\.c cooperation. The 
history i'l Mi-i;jt Beach is rich in 
strone-willeJ how! owners and 
entrepreneurs price to cutthroat 
practices who spurned Miami 
atid ihe resl of Dade County 
aero.— the bay. 

Now Dade Count*, has I S mil- 
lion pe-’-p.'e and the realbaiion is 
growing thai r.ah sides cf the hay 
need each other. 

The former riv.-i- t«w e--:>r>e r - 

jiu a . d"*. . _ 

% xicc iiK-m :a\ uy> n-jj.i snip i*cj 
to expand the Miami Beach con- 
veritinr. eerier, which has fallen 


w.sjfu!!;, behind those 
cities 


:.ther 


New Arms V oting in 2 States: Guide to Post-Reagan Polities 

For Managua 
Are Reported 


Tilt AsiotListd Pros ' 

"WASHINGTON — "Hie Sorie: 
Union, after an unexplained s!ow- 
dovvn in deliveries of military bard- 
ware lo Nicaragua, has stepped up 
such shipments in recent months 
and is now shipping cargo by way 
of Cuba. US. government sources 
said Monday. 

Intelligence officials still do no; 
have a dear picture of what type of 
hardware is arriving in Nicaragua, 
a source said, but there have been 
indications over the pa*i two weeks 
of new shipments involving trucks 
and tanks. 

Last week, the source continued, 
a U.S. supersonic spy plane flew 
over Cuba and confirmed that car- 
goes woe being removed from So- 
viet and Bulgarian ships and trans- 
ferred to Nicaraguan freighters. 

The source refused to discuss a 
published report that an SR-71 
Blackbird reconnaissance plane 
that flew over Cuba last week was 
fired on from the ground with sur- 
face-to-air missiles. 

“We know the Cubans scram- 
bled some planes, but they didn't 
get dose,” the source said! “Our 
plane wasn't in any danger.' 1 

The Washington Times reported 
Monday that an SR-71 flew over 
Cuba twice Thursday night to take 
surveillance photographs and was 
fired on by Soviet-made missiles. 

Lany Speak cs, the White House 
spokesman, would not comment on 
the report directly, but he said 
there has been a “steep increase" in 
military shipments from the Soviet 
Union to Nicaragua. 


By. Phi: Gj:1cv 

V rv y.-r» 7.n_- Ww 

WASHINGTON — Voters in 
Yirdpjj and New Jersey will elect 
governors Tuesday ;n contusis ihat 
are being waUhcd h> K'lh Demo- 
crats and Republrcans ejgcr to 
glimpse the political future av Pres- 
ident Ror.aid Reag.sr.'s- dominance 
of American pcJ:lis» bcgin» to 
wane. 

Voters in dozens of U.S. cities, 
including New York. Cleveland. 
Seattle. Miami ar.d HiviMotl. will 
be electing mayors and other offi- 
cials. For the mo»! p^rt. the city 
elections turr. on local is.<ues and 
pers-.-n a lilies B-ai the mayoral race 
in Houston !ia>. attracted outside 
auemion because »>f ar. ailemp! io 
make a political is»ue out of public 
concern over acquired nr.rriine de- 
ficiency syndrome, or AIDS. 

The attention of \y ashing: on pt*- 
liticaJ circies wii! be f.;vmscd on the 
two contests for governor. Some 
campaign strategists say the con- 
tests haw already provided lessors 
for both parties :n their struggle to 
understand and manage the 
changes in voter atliiudes and par- 
ly allegiance lha: are pan of Mr. 
Reagan's legacy. 

Democrats in Virginia and Re- 
publicans in New Jersey are follow- 
ing a similar strategy tn an attempt 
to expand their voting coalitions. 
Their candidates for governor are 
stressing fiscal conservatism, com- 
passion for human needs, educa- 
tion. economic development and 
efficient management of the .stale 
government. In neither state have 
any social issues such as abortion 
figured prominently in the political 
debate. 

Lee Atwater, a strategist forVice 
President Georgs Bush, said ih'e 
campaigns in both stales illusirated 



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Kathryn J. Wlutmire 

what he called sseT.ew synthesis" 
taking place ir. American politics 
that would require both panics to 
turn to new ideas ar.d new coali- 
tions in future elections. 

In New Jersey. Governor Tnom- 
as H. Kean. 50. a Republican who 
won the office four "years ago by 
only 1,797 votes of 2.5 million cast, 
appears beaded for a strong victory 
over his Democratic challenger, Pe- 
ter Shapiro. 35. the chief executive 
of Essex County. Some New Jersey 
Democrats are concerned that Mr. 
Kean's popularity could help Re- 
publicans win conrro! of the state 


legislature, where Democrats hold 
an eight-seat majority. 

Republican strategists say Mr. 
Kean has evpandeo die cnaiuion 
that carried the state for Mr. Rea- 
gan in the 19S4 election to include 
blacks, union members ana others 
who usually vote Democratic. 

Roger J. Stone Jr., a Washing- 
ton-based Republican strategist, 
said the message of the New Jersey 
campaign for his party was that 
“the politics of consensus work bet- 
ter than the politics of ptvlari/a- 
lion." 

“The old political wisdom was if 
you had one group you had to for- 
feit another.” he added. “But 1 
think New Jersey shows that you 
can be a candidate of traditional 
vaiues and still he for expanded 
opportunities for minorities, and 
that you can be a fiscal conserva- 
tive and still be compassionate. 
That is the message for the national 
parties.” 

In the Virginia campaign. Demo- 
crats are :r>ing to put together a 
coalition of blacks and conserva- 
tive whites to counter the political 
realignment that has raised the 
hopes of Republican candidates in 
Virginia and other Southern states. 

The Democrats have put for- 
ward a ticket that includes a candi- 
date for lieutenant governor who is 
the first black nominated for state 
office in Virginia by a major party 
since the Reconstruction period 
following the Civil War. They also 
have a woman running for attorney 
general. 

Gerald L. Babies. 45. the Demo- 
cratic candidate for governor, and 
his running mates have tied them- 


seivcs closer- u- Governor Charles 
S. Robb, j popuLr Democrat who 
is ineligible io run again this year. 
Statewide pols show Mr. Bullies 
comfortably leading his Republi- 
can opponent. Wvatt B. Durrette. 
47. who ha> closer, identified him- 
self with the president's policies. 

In one of the few other races to 
.a trait national j:ter.::or.. voters in 
Houston w ill elect a mayor and city 
council member-, ir. a campaign 
that has been marked by a sharp 
debate over homosevual nghis and 
AIDS. At. ant: -homosexual slate of 
local candidates, using the name 
“the straight slaie." wii f be li.vted on 
the balloL 

Mayor Kathryn J. Whitmire is 
the Democratic incumbent seeking 
her third two-year term. Ska has 
been criticized by her opponent. 
Louie Welch, for stopping by a 
homosexual bar to celebrate her 
19Si victors. 


TV Star Elected to Head 
Radical Partv in Italy 

y * 

Tr.t iJt,J I'rf: 

FLORENCE — Eczo Tortora. a 
European Parliament deputy and a 
former television star convicted or 
drug trafficking, was elected Sun- 
d jv as president of the Radical Par- 
ly.’ 

Mr. Tortora won an overwhelm- 
ing majority of votes for the cere- 
monial post on the final day of the 
party’s national congress. The par- 
ty has one seat in the Italian Cham- 
ber of Deputies and 1 1 in the Sen- 
ate. 


imoff Vote 
Appears 
Likely in 
Guatemala 


L «i.Vh f />i v>v ,-r , >.v. 

GUATEMALA CITY ~ Mario 
Vinicio Cerezo of ir.e Christian 
Democratic Part;- ami Jor.;; Car- 
ptu Nt colic of the N a Mona 'Center 
Union appeared M.r.ca’, to ha 
headed toward a rur. ir. Guate- 
mala's presidential ci evti: <n. 

There are eight :;r 

the post and if r..vr.c -vt • ^r. - 

lute mj;oRlv the tv..', re :c- .r.c :r.- 
most votes will me:! .n a rjnrfi 

.■ ...... rs_ ■ 


country s 2.0 mu.Ki. i__ 

voters east ballois Sur .da;. . The r.ew 
president would be G*oj:cmo3a'i 
first civilian leaderaf :er 51 year.-i-f 
direct or indirect mi !itar. rare. 

The turnout in ti ’.c elect. on.', in- 
cluding races to elec: a 
ber Legislative Assent^ 1 *., was 
much higher than in previous elec- 
tions when voters couid ehoore 
only among miatar. candidate-. 
.All the candidal' :s :r. Sunday race 
are civilums. 

The government released return? 
Monday lor aN>ui 24 percent c: the 
total vote. 

Mr. Cerezo. 41 was in the lead 
with about -Hi percent, whale Mr 
Carpni had avmt 22 perrer.t. Mr. 
Cerezo follows the moderate!;. !i'o- - 
era! international Christian Demo- 
crat ideology, while Mr. Carpio. 
publisher of ihe newspaper Ei Grti- 
ficc. is considered a mod era!-’ con- 
servative. 

Jorge Semno Elias, a center- 
right candidate of a coalition of 
two parties, was third w-th 
percent c>f the total, while the far- 
right candidate. Mario Sandovai 
Alarcon of the Movement for Na- 
tional Liberation, had !(».<• percent. 

Four other candidates split the 
remaining votes. 

The head of state. General Oscar 
Humberto Mejia Victorcs. who 
seized powi.r from another general 
in a coup in W.vy. pledged a return 
t»* democracy. The army has prom- 
ised to stay out of politics when the 
new president lakes office on Jan. 
14. 

The military rulers have beer, un- 
able to ea.‘.e Guatemala's economic 
crisis, the worst in its history . or to 
pul down a leftist insurgency. A 
return to civilian rule is expected to 
lead to more foreign aid. particu- 
larly from the United States. 

Observers from 14 countries, the 
United Nations and the Organiza- 
tion of American States watched 
the voting. 


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ssiarn in Afghanistan Called Heavy Drug Users 


By Arthur Bonner 

V« ) i vi 7W> Sit.iu- 
G HU R BAND. Afghanistan — 
Sorie. - soldiers in Afghanistan u$e 
drugs extensively, and some Rus- 
".ifts m?H gasoline. ammunition and 
su'len tarns u • support their habits. 
^ .cording lo several Soviet defee- 
■ors living with .Afghan guerrillas. 

In addition, several" guerrilla 
. -.'mm anglers say that ihey have 
.jnjured Russians while the sol- 
J'ers were 1 drugged or while they 
-•.ere iiyins* to buy hashish or her- 
•.-in from village merchants. 

Aveordin,? to Western diplomats 
_rd analyse of the Afghan situa- 
tion -r. Pakistan and elsewhere. So- 


viet troops in Afghanistan have 
turned to drugs for the same rea- 
sons that many Americans did in 
Vietnam: They are young, away 
from home constraints, bored, 
frightened and under fierce pres- 
sure to prove themselves. 

.Afghanistan is one of Lhe world's 
major production centers for opi- 
um and ns derivatives, according to 
U.S. narcotics agents in Pakistan 
and elsewhere in Asia. It is part of 
the "Golden Crescent" extending 
front Iran to Pakistan and .Afghani- 
stan. an area that the agents said 
accounts for more than half of the 
world's illegal opium output. 

The country also is a major pro- 


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ducer of cannabis-based drugs such 
as hashish that are consumed 
throughout South .Asia and the 
Middle East. The profits from 
these drugs are great; Afghan hash- 
ish can be smuggled out of Paki- 
stan, where it costs. S5Q a kilogram, 
for sole in Saudi Arabia at $3,000 a 
kilogram, according to the narcot- 
ics agents. 

Rahmauillah is a Soviet defector 
interviewed in Afghanistan who 
previously went by the name Alexei 
Ivanovich Olenin. 

He said that at the Soviet base at 
Qiligai. where he had been a Lruck 
driver: “There are 10.000 Russian 
soldiers there, and a lot of times 
they have nothing lo do. Half of 
them smoke hashish: the officers 
get drunk on vodka.” 

“The soldiers are paid in rubles 
and never have enough money to 
even buy cigarettes," he said, add- 
ing that if the Russians “want to 
buy from the .Afghans, they need 
afghanis, and so they sell gas and 
ammunition and anything else they 
can.” 

Naik Mohammed, a defector 
previously known as Gennadi Ana- 
tolievich Tsevrna. said of the Rus- 
sians: “They sell gas and ammuni- 
tion. They steal guns from a 
storeroom and sell them. They use 
the money to buy hashish." 

Another report came from Ah- 
med. a Russian who said he had 
defected from the Soviet base at 
Abadan and was formerly called 
Alexander Yurievich Levenets. 
“They sell gas and ammunition to 
get money to buy hashish.” he said. 
“If a soldier is killed, someone 
would try to steal his rifle to sell it 
for money for hashish.” 

There are many opium poppy 
fields in northern Afghanistan. 
Generally, there are about 50 pop- 
py plants in a s mall plot mixed 
other crops, such as tomatoes and 
okra. Tall marijuana plants grow 
everywhere. 

The .Afghan guerrillas, known as 
Mujahidin, say they are opposed to 
alcohol and drugs because the Ko- 



* * * 'll* . 

;*m * * ' 

' • v 

**- :'t 1.‘ 



and "eight Russians came in look- 
ing for food.” 

“They put their guns in a corner 
and began smoking hashish,” Mr. 
Finder said. “After a while our men 
took their guns and captured them. 
There were so many of them and so 

many other Russians in the area 
they could not take them away, so 
they killed them.” 

Mohammed Sabir is a guerrilla 
commander at Ghurband, in Par- 
wan province, about 20 miles (32 
kilometers) west of the Russian 
base at Pul-i-Mattak and about 50 
miles north of Kabul. He said be 
does nothing to discourage drug 
sales because the sales help demor- 
alize Lhe Russians. 

“There is a shop near the Pul-i- 
Matiak base where they go to say 
they want to buy hashish," he said. 
Young boys make the exchange, he 
said, because the Russians fed it is 
safer to deal with them than with 
adults. 

“One boy has done this so often 
be has learned some Russian.” Mr. 
Sabir said. 

Mr. Finder said he had made an 
arrangement with sympathetic 
shopkeepers in the area thai if Rus- 
sians come to them seeking to buy 
hashish, the shopkeepers would tell 
him. 

“About nine or IQ months ago.” 
he added, “a Russian who could 




President Reagan, in an interview with four Soviet journalist pabfished Mooday, had 
downnew c t^Sis for deployment of a space-based 

two press agencies, Tass and Novosti, and two newspapers, Pravda and Izvesda. 


(Continued from Page 1) 


speak some Persian asked for her- . er. at the summit meeting Nov. 19 
oin. He was sent to one of our and 20 in Geneva. 


Ahmed, who defected from 
the Soviet Army, now fights 
with the Afghan guerrillas. 


ran forbids them. They are fighting but "the Russian fought him," Mr. 
a religious war, Lhey say, and will Finder said. “Other Mujahidin 
do no thin g to violate Islamic teach- came and pulled the Russian to the 
bags. When questioned about drug ground. They took his Kalashnikov 
use, guerrilla commanders say only and pointed it at him. 
that their men do not use drugs. “He shoutedi “Why are vou do- 
AH gu«oUa sources acknowl- j ^ j m WeiM f; n™ 

ge however, that groups of shot and killed him right there and 
avtly armed men who travel the left ^ ^ for ^Russians to 
me routes the rebels travel may 


Iold , J lh f ■ Shultz, Shevardnadze Meet 

sian that the heroin could be ob- ^ Q 

tained in another village, and the Secretary of State George r. 
two got into a truck. Shultz met Monday with Eduard 

The guerrilla “tried to take out Shevardnadze, the SwttfcjV 
his pistol to capture the Russian. ?£” muuster. to discuss the agento 
frvtoH. Kim "Mr far the Geneva summit meeting. 


apart" on curbing nuclear weap- Foreign Minister Georgi M. Kor- '■ " 

ons nrvrnko and Anatoli F. Dobrvmn,' “ 

A senior U5. official said Sun- ^ Soviet ambassadw toWs^ag- 
dav that negotiators for both sides Km, **re among lOWtoffia^J 

in Geneva apparently were willing asasaag Mr. Shevardnadze. ; . 
rotrv to work out an interim accord M TaSis in Gena'S 


to try to work out an interim accord 
to freeze intermediate- range nucle- 


A. Shevardnadze, the Soviet for- ^ misajes in Europe at 140 each. 


edge, however, that groups of 
heavily armed men who travel the 
same routes the rebels travel may 
well be sm ugg lers or drug dealers. 
Drug dealers can roam freely in 


The Associated Press reported 
from Moscow. 

The two-day visit by Mr. Shultz, 
who carried a letter from Mr. Rea- 
gan to Mr. Gorbachev, could help 
shape the outcome of the meeting 


At the table with Mr. Shultz were 
10 U.S. officials, including Robert 
C. McFariane. the national security 
adviser, and Paul H. Nitze, the 
principal U.S. arms control advis- 
er. 

On the Soviet side; First Deputy 


US. and Soviet arms control no- J$ 
gotiazars met Monday for four - 
hours to discuss space weapons, the 
first meeting since Mr. Reagan's 
offered bis proposal last week, 
Reuters said in a dispatch from 
Geneva. The talks were ex tended to ■ 
allow consideration of the US.--' 
plan. *. 


More recently. Mr. Finder said, a 
Soviet officer asked for heroin in a 


Rebels in Chile Bomb 

o. d,,... In traveling with guerrilla con- 

Buildings, Burn Bu&es vovs f rom pa^s^ j nl0 A/ghani- 

Reuten stan, armed groups pass each other 

SANTIAGO -- Bombs dam- on trail ? ana ask no questions; to 
aged two government buildings < I.° might mark a person as a spy 
and burned and destroyed seven e, ther for the Russians or for some 
buses in the Chilean capital Mon- other hostile gr 0ll P- Sulfi Finder, a 
dav nioht capninE a week in which guerrilla co mm a n der in northern 


much of Af^huii.iaii. calling 

se ves guerrillas, and can hire bodv- , . 

guards mthKulashnikov rifles. ' 


shot and lulled him right ihcre and “d ^ it »iH set ta future „ rri , „ ■. 

WUus body for d. Russians m « ““^oposed a 50- StllfhntS in Seoul Assad U.S. Policy 

More recently. Mr. Finder said, a percent cut in long-range missiles Washington Post Scn-icc 

Soviet officer asked for heroin in a 3 ceiling on strategic bombers TOKYO — Student demonstra- 
bazaar. “We derided we would ni response to a Soviet offer of a 50- lors occupied the Seoul office of 
capture him alive to use in ex- percent reduction that encom- ^ American Chamber of Corn- 
change for some of our men who passed all nuclear misrile systems. merce m Korea on Monday for 
had been taken prisoner,” he said, a Mr. Shultz, who is to meet Tues- about two and a half hours before 
But the Russian became suspi- day with Mr. Gorbachev, said being removed by police, reports 
cious and reached for his gun, Mr. while trave ling to Moscow- that the from Seoul said. 

Finder said, and the guerrillas shot United States and the Soviet Union The students chanted slogans 


capture him alive to use in ex- 
change for some of our men who 
had been taken prisoner," he said. 


Msu/un£ftwi Post Service 

TOKYO — Student demonstra- 
tors occupied the Seoul office of 
the American Chamber of Com- 
merce in Korea on Monday for 


Finder said, and the guerrillas shot 
him to death. 


United States and the Soviet Union The students chanted slogans 
remained “quite a difference condemning the United States for 


buses in the C hilian capital Mon- other hostile group, bum rutder. a 
dav nioht capping a week in which guerrilla co mm a n der in northern 
guerrillas struck" more than 20 -Afghanistan, said he had heard 


times across the country. many reports of Russians being 

Unions of the Workers National captured while they were drugged. 
Command have called for protests About two years ago. he said, a 
Tuesday and Wednesday to press Soviet platoon was making a sweep 
for the' release of six opposition through villages, mostly deserted, 
leaders imprisoned under internal near a highway. Some men from his 
security laws after anti-government group were hidden in a house to 
protests in September. prepare for an ambush, he said. 



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Changing Hanoi: Makeup, Jewelry 9 Momingjogs 



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1 Geneva 




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A work CKiWr helps to maintain the rjtflngmgf»rfr nf' 'Hfliwii hy repairin g a hfl h>in a rity diwf. 

Reagan Will Be Low-Key on Rights 


Summit, He May Link Helsinki Pact and Arms Control 



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By David K. Shiplcr 

New York Tima Sen nee 

WASHINGTON — In an effort 
to increase the emigration of Jews 
from the Soviet Union arid improve 
SovieL treatment of dissidents, U.S. 
officials have formula led a careful- 
ly calibrated strategy for President 
Ronald Reagan to use in his Gene- 
• i 1 :' w va meeting with Mikhail S. Gorb*- 
' •' 'urwier lof^. chev. the Soviet leader. 

- '-'■'iitoj Su, ' ' According to officials involved 
K.»es in •**? f - “ planning, the president wiD 
-- ’tciorav**- avoid ^6*? accusations and public 
-•'ii film t ^ declarations. He does not intaid to 
■ .,.., *•***: present Mr. Gorbachev with a list 
of cases, although he is expected to 
■ it.upn s Bat: mention several prominent disa- 
‘ ■ ljl ’ !n « tefe dents during the 
^‘■•••’laptitnie c;. Instead, Mr. Reagan is being ad- 
T."' 1 vised to dwell on the importance of 

CQS Tnt observing international agreements 

specifically, the 1975 Helsinki 

accords, which c ontain provisions 
ACCS IQ on family reunification and the free 
fcfc^owof mformation — to reassure 
If The American public and Congress 
that the Soviet Union would adhere 
p : to an arms control treaty if a new 
. -= fb ! OTe “ negotiated 
■vy«> F» • “The way the president plans to 
** ^ not sour the atmo- 
w ns ht |i|C 7 r sphere.” a senior State Department 
iCx.lfl official «rpl»m«ri “One caii ifif- 
- cuss difficult subjects in a manner 

r-^vi j(sas*« Since 1968, about 265,000 Jews 
have emigrated from the Soviet 


‘N .«? 


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-C.r. i *r-$ 




> 


HOLIDAY'S if Union. But after the number leav- 

: ing reached a high of moire than 

51,000 in 1979, Soviet antboriries 
reduced exit permits to a trickle, 
— PORT© “Suing privately that the United 
States had reneged on an agree- 
r days muss menl to improve trade conditions 
; ROM mi infchange. . 

_v 30N } According to the National Con- 

fereace on Soviet Jewry, based in 
. <“ New York » <My 920 Jews have left 

-flbis year. Emigration of Soviet Ar- 
’• , ^ Remans is alio reported to have 

; ;^i 7 taasw been virtually halted. 

• : " The subject is one of the most 

difficult to negotiate with the Rus- 
sians. Traditionally, the Soviet 
Union has not wished to discuss 
Jj human rights at summit meetings, 
t^^i5so6^- contending that the issue is a purely 
:ds:A vast [&&, internal matter and citing the Hd- 
sinki accords* ban on interference 



_____ mcb»— 


in the internal affairs of the coun- 


-j«patc 


** if* tries involved 


]574lft 



Because of sensitivities on both; 
sides, the question has the potential 
for creating friction and damaging 


other efforts in the talks, which will 
concentrate on arms control, re- 
gional conflicts, and other aspects 
of U.S. -Soviet relations. 


Graxi Reaffirms 


igg ILS. Ties, Asks . 
" Renewed Mandate 


Rouen 

ROME — Prime .Minister Bct- 
tino Craxi asked Parliament on 
Monday to confirm his government 
coalition in office, saying its mem- 
bers now agreed that the govern- 
ment hnndwt the affair of the 
ActaUe Lauro excursion liner “cor- 
rectly and efficiently*' and helped 
secure the release erf the hijacked 
and crew. 

i also described UJS.-I- 
talian ties as unbreakable and de- 
fended his insistence that the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization 
pale in the Middle East 
effort 

Both houses erf Parliament were 
expected to vote their confidence 
later this week in the five-party 
coalition. It fell apart when the 


■ 1 





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It.-;-' 




coalition. It fell apart when me 
-sjjk , Republican Party withdrew its sup: 

port last month’over the handling 
A ehiTl e Lauro affair. The 
ZSfT&sp government rdeased a ftlflfitinian, 

Mohammed Abbas, decile VS. 
demands that he be hdd for extra- 
dition as the mastermind of the 
hijacking, 

Mr. Qaxi denounced the “inde- 
cent wsbosity* of news reports 
suggesting a nft between Italy and 
the United States. 

But he said there must be no 
repetition of the “incidents at Si- 
~ , g. r goneBa,** the Sicilian base where 
'■£?!£*:? U-S. and .Italian troops confronted 
, each other for custody of the four 
hijackers, who had landed aboard 
- • > - M an Egyptian plane that was forced 
down by U.S. Navy Jet fighters. 
The four are now in Italian custody 
charged with the hijacking and the 
killing of an American passenger. 


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Mr. Reagan has rndteated his in- 
tention to lake a firm, but low-key, 
approach on hunts ri ght* 

in a recent interview with the 
British Broadcasting Corporation, 
Ire said, “I don't «hmir that the 
human rights thing should be a 
kind of public discussion and ac- 
cusing fingers bang pointed ai 
each other.” 

“But I Think H should be ex- 
plained, ” he said, that a chief con- 
cern “is the violation of the Hdsin- 
Iri Pact. Uns was one of the main 
reasons why we are signatories to 
that put, is this ag reement about 
not separating families and so 
forth, allowing people freedom to 
choose.” 

“What they have to understand,” 
Mr. Reagan continued, “is that in 
some of uw major areas where we 
could seek agreement, we have a 
better chance In our type of society 
of getting the approval that we 
need from our Congress, from our 
people/ of some of these agree- 
ments if these these human- 
rights problems are not standing in 
the way. And maybe I can point 
that oul” 

The H elsinki agreement was 


signed by 33 Eastern and Western 
European countries, and the Unit- 
ed Suites and Canada, as an effort 
to increase cooperation in military 
and h umanitarian affairs. 

A State Dep a r tm ent official said 
that ibe president planned to raise 
with Mr. Gorbachev several hu- 
man-rights problems, including the 
sharp drop in Jewish emigration, 
(he imprisonment of dissidents 
who publicized Soviet violations of 
the Helsinki accords, and Mos- 
cow’s refusal to allow the departure 
of 20 Soviet dozens who are mar- 
ried to Americans. 

Lists of such cases are transmit- 
ted routinely at lower diplomatic 
levels by the United Stales to the 
Soviet Union. 

The careful Reagan approach 
appears to have gained support 
from American activists in the hu- 
man-rights field. 

“It should not be confrontation- 
al/ 1 said Jerry Goodman, executive 
vice president of the National Con- 
ference on Soviet Jewty. “We want 
to see remits, and the administra- 
tion wants to see results. No one is 
interested in being provocative, if 
that's going to hurt." 


Bv Barbara Crosstrtc 

Sr*' York Times Smite 

HANOI — A resident ambassa- 
dor calls it Hanoi's “simply lovely" 
season — the weeks between the 
stifling months of summer and 
winter’s dismaL bitter drill- The sky 
is bine, the air fresh and the streets 
are full of activity. 

In the morning people jog, exer- 
cise in parks and squares and seem 
to dawdle on the way to work. By 
evening, a magician has appeared 
on the steps of the Central Bank, 
where an energetic band has swung 
into “B'esamc Mucha” Couples 
draw closer in the dusk. 

“Streets very bicycle." a petti cab 
driver explains cheerily as he 
swerves in the zwihght to avoid a 
pedaling teen-ager wearing a T- 
shirt that savs “Cheech and 
Chong.*' On a downtown comer, a 
vendor with several dozen mugs is 
selling beer from a tub. 

This year the change in atmo- 
sphere may be more than just sea- 
sonal, some longtime residents of 
the city say. 

There are still bullock carts 
where other Asian dries would 
have cars, but there are also more 
motorbikes, more fashionably 
dressed young people, and more 
women in rainbows of soft ao dais, 
the traditional Vietnamese tunics 
and trousers that were once seen 
less frequently among the black pa- 
jamas. Lipstick and jewelry are 
making comebacks. 

Some of Hanoi’s new look has to 
do with the city’s celebration in 
September of the 40th anniversary 
of the declaration of independence 
from France. Squares have been 
repaved, buddings painted and a 
cluster of picturesque but derelict 
shops around the city’s central lake 
removed to make more room for 
grass and park benches. 

Other changes grow out erf new 
economic policies that appear to be 
taking into account, at least for the 
moment, the grumbles of long-suf- 
fering consumers. 

Many North Vietnamese have 
gone South over the last decade to 
have a look at Ho On Minh City, 
formerly Saigon, and have come 
back fascinated by its looser and 
more prosperous-looking way of 
life. 

A lot of people, diplomats say, 
also have an eye on China’s “mod- 
ernizations." Foreign visitors are 
often asked for details about devel- 
opments there, and whether life has 
improved as much as thev have 
heaM. Q 

The runaway hit of the theatrical 
season is “Me and Us." a satire on 
petty-minded bureaucrats who get 
in the way of progress. Tickets, like 


everything else, are for sale on the 
black market, and there are reports 
that die company is looking for a 
bigger theater. 

The play, by Llu Qu£!g Yu. go! 

REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK 

by the censors, the knowledgeable 
say, because it is essentially ;r. line 
with cntictsms made hy Hanoi's 
economic pragmatist, who have 
been in die ascer.dnr.cy since a par- 
ty meeting in Jure. 

The play, which originated :n Ho 
Chi Mirth" City, where :i won ar. 
award, and has been televised na- 
tionally. ridicule* the COph t 
of party officials, tnake-wark jobs, 
endless" political meeting and ritu- 
alistic jargon. 

Audiences seem to empathize 
with the tragic hero who is clob- 
bered by the system for shcwiuz 
initiative. As a line m the play puts r 


it: He was "wrong to be right too j 


mem's decision to loosen controls 
over construction materials, and re- 
lease briclu and other long absent 
items for private purchase. 

On several streets, piles of bricks 
and cement were destined lo be- 
come restaurants, workers said. In 
the countryside, farmers build big- 
ger houses'. 

The freeing of construction ma- 
terials came at about the time the 
central government decided to 
make drastic changes in the way iiv 
employees, a large percentage of 
the work force in this strictly con- 
trolled Communist economy, were 
paid. Ration coupons to be ex- 
changed for goods were abolished 
and wages increased, at least theo- 
retically. 

Civil servants are sometimes 
wan of new policies and divided 
about whether thev will work. Sev- 


eral said they now had more money 
to spend and valued the greater 
freedom of choice ir. making pur- 
chases. Others said they did not 
expect significant improvement in 
their lives. 

“We still all hare to have two 
jobs.” a government interpreter 
said. 

□ 

Sometimes Hanoi's two societ- 
ies. (he secretive government and 
the curious people, intersect jar- 
ringly for a second. One recent 
morning, a bicyclist pulled up 
alongside two Americans in “cy- 
cle" pedicah> and began the litany 
of “where from": 

Rusria? 

Sweden? 

Germany? 

America! 

“1 used to teuch physics in New- 


ark, New Jersey," he said m En- 
glish. “I came home in 1971,“ 
added, doffing a smart straw ha*, 
he cruised along. 

He had begun drifting animated- 
ly into reminiscences of New Y orL 
when he suddenly halted in mid- 
sentence and pedaled off. his face 
without expression and his eyes 
straight ahead as if he had never 
seen the strangers. 

Beneath the new shade tree was 
a policeman. 

Waldheim Seels* Presidency 

Reuien 

VIENNA — Kurt Waldheim, 
secretary -gen era! of the United Na- 
tions from 1972 to 19SI. was nomi- 
nated Monday as a candidate ir. 
Austria's presidential election next 
Mav. 


soon. 


There is a budding boon of sons ] 
in progress in Hanoi. A d.’plomalj 
said it was a result erf the ioverc- 


Maxwell to Trim 
Mirror Group’s 
London Payroll 

Reuse r 

LONDON — Robsr: Maxwell 
who is in a dispute with Britain’s 
print unions, announced plans 
Monday to eliminate 2.00 3 of the 

6.000 jobs at his Mirror Group 
Newspapers. 

Mr. Maxwell has given fonnai 
notice of digniwi :c the entire 
London work force arc he said that 
from Dec. 1, the group’s printing 
would be transferred to his British 
Newspaper Printing Carp, and 
there would only be werk for 4.0'rfi. 
The group publishes the Mirror, 
with a circulation of 3.6 millio n a 
day. 

Mr. Maxwell wanted that if the 
print unions failed to agree :o his 
plan by the end of this month, the 
Mirror Group would be shut and 
all 6,000 printers would be dis- 
missed. 

His letter followed the refusal of 
London print workers to print the 
northern editions of his newspa- 
pers after primers ir. Manchester 
refused to do so a week ago over 
Mr. MaxwelTs plans :o buy a local 
plant. He said the refusal had cost 

560.000 copies of the Mirror. 

“Our rivals." with union cooper- 
ation, be said, “have jumped in to 
take advantage of our troubles.” 


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Page 8 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srlbune, 


Publifthrd With The York Timm and The Washington Port 


Moscow’s Radar Message 


At one leveL the pre-summit meeting pro- 
posals that Moscow and Washington are lob- 
bing back and forth are meant to impress an 
international audience. Bui the proposals may 
also have substance, like the Soviet offer on 
missile-detecting radars. 

Years ago. the Russians made a bad deci- 
sion — to build at Krasnoyarsk in Siberia a 
radar that almost certainly violates the Anti- 
Ballistic Missile Treaty of 1971 The partly 
completed radar is at the center of the Reagan 
administration's litany that Moscow cannot be 
trusted to honor arms control treaties. 

After months of insis ting implausibly on the 
radar’s innocence, the Russians now seem will- 
ing to talk about it. Without conceding its 
illegality, they offer to cease construction if the 
United States cancels modernization of two 
radars in England and Greenland. 

The ABM treaty allows each side to build 
radars that give early wa rning of a missile 
attack. To prevent them from being used as 
part of a missile defense system, the treaty 
requires that radars be located on each coun- 
try’s borders, pmming outward. The Soviet 
Union has a gap in its early-warning radar 
coverage that legally could be plugged by- 
building two expensive radars in inhospitable 
Arctic terrain. Perhaps to save money, it chose 
to plug the gap with a single radar far to the 


south at Krasnoyarsk. But if the Russians 
figured they could bluster their way through 
this bending of the rules, they were mistaken. 
The Reagan administration has made a major 
issue of the infraction, and with cause. 

The American plans to which the Russians 
object involve replacing steerable dish radars 
with phased- array radars at Thule in Green- 
land and Fylingdales in England — an upgrad- 
ing that could be regarded as inconsistent with 
the treaty’s undertaking that neither side will 
deploy anri-ballistic missile systems or their 
components outside its national territory. 

The Russians propose that the Krasnoyarsk 
radar, and the Thule and Fylingdales up- 
grades. all be scrapped. Since each side atta- 
ches great importance to the early-warning 
capabilities of these devices, the Russians’ real 
hope is presumably for an agreement to con- 
tinue with all three. That might not be a bad 
deal, provided that the ambiguities that invited 
the dispute were clarified. The Russians 
should pay some price for having an inland 
radar capable of directing defense of missile 
fields in defiance of the treaty. 

The administration has dismissed the pro- 
posed Soviet radar deal as "inequitable and 
unacceptable.” Of course it is inequitable as it 
stands. But it is also negotiable. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Fairer Campaign-Funding 


For the first time since 1 974 there is talk that 
Congress may consider bills calling for major 
changes in campaign finance regulation. It is 
not that the current legislation was defective 
from the start. It is that there is a hydraulic 
pressure behind money in campaigns, and 
when Che inevitable loophole is found, the 
money comes gushing through. Nol only the 
Democratic Study Group but conservative 
senators such as David Boren of Oklahoma 
and Barry Goldwater of Arizona are prepared 
to tackle the subject again. 

The sense that the system needs repair is 
strong in a study by the Democratic Study 
Group showing an increase in spending by 
political action committees — independent 
organizations that raise funds for candidates 
who support their goals — and a decrease in 
individual contributors. Legislators are uneasy 
lest it seem that organized interests axe buying 
up Congress while the more diffuse interests of 
ordinary voters are not being served as well. 
Political action committees gave more than 
51 00 million to congressional candidates in 
1984. up from SI 15 million in 1971 

A new bill sponsored by Mr. Boren and Mr. 
Goldwater would limit House candidates to 
SI 00,000 and Senate candidates to limits 
based on the size of their state. It would lower 
the maximum contribution for political action 
committees and raise it for individuals. It 
would bar the committees from acting as con- 
duits for individual contributions t a practice 
referred to as “bundling") and tighten lim- 


its on spending by independent campaigns. 

The Democratic Study Group is preparing a 
bill that would provide a 100-percent tax credit 
on contributions up to SICK). The current 50- 
percent credit on contributions up to S50 has 
just been deleted by the House Ways and 
Means Committee from its tax bill. 

These proposals are in their formative 
stages. Congress, as it ponders them, should 
keep three things in mind. Fust, the key to any 
campaign finance law is full disclosure. Ensur- 
ing full disclosure may require tightening up 
the soft-money loophole and prohibiting prac- 
tices such as bundling. 

Second, reforms should not unduly restrict 
the amount of money that candidates, includ- 
ing challengers, can raise. The system suffers 
not from a surfeit of campaigning but from a 
perception that the politically adept and eco- 
nomically interested have unfair advantages. 

Third, reforms should not impinge on free- 
dom of political expression. The argument of 
the political action committee organizers that 
the committees are only a vehicle for voters’ 
expression is self-serving, but cannot casually 
be dismissed. While Congress could further 
regulate that particular form of expression, it 
would be unwise to prohibit it altogether. 

After such a long interval. Congress is wise 
to consider serious proposals for reform. But it 
should tread carefully, aware how difficult it is 
to anticipate all the consequences of change in 
the campaign finance law. The details matter. 

THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Pretoria’s Ban on the Press 


Repression without witnesses: Such is the 
substance of Pretoria's decision to ban the 
South African and foreign press from filming 
and airing images of violence [in the 3S desig- 
nated emergency areas}. Incapable or bringing 
the violence to an end. Pretoria, aware of its 
crumbling image, hopes to restore its credibil- 
ity by keeping international opinion in the 
dark about the facts. No more films? No more 
photos showing the police killing black pro- 
testers? No more denunciations of Pretoria's 
“racist” regime? It is an absurd calculation. 

— Le Monde i Paris). 

South Africa's press and television restric- 
tions won’t stop the mounting unrest. Remem- 
ber. the young rioters in the townships never 
saw the pictures of themselves on television. 
Nor will it allow the fresh and intimidating 
sweep of police powers to come to bear behind 
a cloak of total secrecy: South Africa is too 
leaky and too Westernized. 

But turn the thrust of Prime Minister 
[Pieter] Botha’s promulgations round — as a 
challenge to journalists covering one of the 
most important stories in the world. Should 
bans and threats turn off the tap of news, as 
Mr. Botha presumes? Is his basic assumption 
right — that television today lives by action- 
packed pictures alone? Deny televirion those 
pictures and. quite soon, British televirion and 
the great American networks will put show 
business before boredom and consign South 
Africa to the memory hole of dreadful, bloody. 


but unphotosraphed stories like the Iran-lraq 
war. It is a profoundly cynical calculation. 
Will television editors and journalists prove 
him right, or wrong? 

— The Guardian (London). 


Bonner: One of a Lucky Few? 

Yelena Bonner, the human rights activist 
and wife of the dissident physicist Andrei 
Sakharov, has been given permission to travel 
to the West for medical treatment. Several 
lesser-known activists have suddenly been 
granted exit visas. These are welcome, if unsur- 
prising. developments. As the Soviet leader 
Mikhail Gorbachev prepares for his meeting 
with President Reagan, some modest signs of 
more decent official behavior were to be ex- 
pected. If the summit achieves nothing else, it 
has at least won freedom for a few unhappy 
Soviet citizens. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


Both Sides Must Keep Giving 

Of course the Soviet and .American offers [to 
reduce their stocks of nuclear weapons] have a 
propaganda purpose. Yet they go beyond mere 
posturing, and underline (he benefits which 
would accrue from holding an annual high 
level meeting to discuss reducing tension. The 
public relations exercise of wishing to appear 
reasonable and ready to make concessions can, 
in fact, lead to genuine agreements. 

— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR NOV. 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: South Africa’s First Parliament 
CAPE TOWN — The first Parliament of the 
Union of South Africa was opened [on Nov. 4j 
by the Duke of Connaught, who said: “His 
Majesty [King George] well knows that you 
have passed through the fire of sorrow and 
trouble, and that misunderstanding and con- 
flict have brought calamity upon the land, but 
all this is now buried with the past. He recog- 
nizes, too, that here, as elsewhere, there must 
exist a marked divergence of political opinion. 
Such divisions of thought and action are the 
essence of free and responsible Government. 
The King rejoices in the knowledge that the 
union of his South African dominions has 


1955: Italians Advance in Abyss inia 
PARIS — With the apparent collapse of Ethi- 
opian defenses in the north. Premier Mussoli- 
ni’s Black Shirt invadeis are expected to march 
into Makalle, chief objective in the new drive 
southward, without a shot being fired. Count 
Ciano. Mussolini's son-in-law, and Mussoli- 
ni's two airmen sons, flying over Makalle [on 
Nov. 4]. reported that the inhabitants have 
already raised the flag of surrender. Italian 
observers also reported that concentrations of 
Ethiopian troops south of Makalle have bro- 


: of free and responsible Government, ken camp and are in full retreat [toward Addis 
mg rejoices in the knowledge that the Ababa). Sloshing along muddy moun tain trails 
of his South African dominions has through a downpour, die Italian troops contin- 


already made for the social and materia) pro- 
gress of his people, and he feels assured that all 
South Africans will work steadfastly for the 
welfare of their great and beautiful country.” 


ued their advance on Makalle. Meanwhile, 
Italian airmen on the southern front carried 
out extensive bombing operations on Ethiopi- 
an concentrations south of Jljtba. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1953-19$: 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. .ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIS1E 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
Carl gewirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubiaher 
Executive Editor RENE BQNDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Depun- EJiur RICHARD H. MORGAN 




ROBERT K. McCABE Depun Ediior STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director 

Carl GEWIRTZ Asaxiau Editor FRAN^ISE^pPO^^i^reaor 

International Herald Tribune, l&l Avenue Chartes-dc-GanUe. M r rf _ _ 

France. TeL: (1) 47.47.1165- Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables HerakI " l 

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Managing Dir. Asia: M&obn Glam. 24-34 Hemessy Rd. Haig 
Manasms Dtr. UK: Rctm MacKidiat, dJ Long Aoe, Lendoi Wd 

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S-4. au capital de 1.2Q0.000 F. RCS Nanurre B 732021126. Commission Paritaire No. 61337. 
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© 1985. International Herald Tribune. All rights reserved 


Deputy Publisher 
Ajsadate Publisher 
Associate Publisher 
Director of Operanmj 


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 



A Crayola Defense line: 
Coloring the World Safe 


By Ellen Goodman 


B oston — Unm i saw the 

commercial, I had no idea that 
“star wars” was so simple that even 
a kindergarten child could under- 
stand iL l thought you needed phys- 
ics. when all you really needed was 
Crayolas. The regular box of 
Crayolas. not even the giant size. 

The 30-second television spot, 
brought to me courtesy of the Co- 
alition for the Strategic Defense 
Initiative, changed all that. It 
opened with Crayola figures of 
Mom. Dad. child and Spot. (I think 
it was Spot, although it might have 
been a small brown horse without a 
mane. Hard to tell.) There was also 
a black Crayola house and a yellow 
Crayola sun. 

While the school piano tinkled in 
the background, a little girl narrat- 
ed her wonderful tale of 10 Crayo- 
las in search of national security. “I 
asked my daddy what this ‘star 
wars' stuff is all about” she began. 

“He said that right now we can't 
protect ourselves from nuclear 
weapons: that’s why the president 
wants to build the Peace Shield.” 

As she reported this, a white line 
appeared in a huge arc that covered 
the house, family, horse/dog and 
even the sun. This was the Crayola 
Peace Shield. The young narrator 
went on to explain how “it would 
stop missiles in outer space so they 
couldn’t hit our house." On cue, 
little brown Crayola missiles 
bumped up against the white 
Crayola shield and were destroyed. 

The girl concluded. "Then no- 
body could win a war and if nobody 
could win a war there’s no reason to 
start one.” With that, the shield 
turned into a rainbow and even the 
sun began to smile. 

Frankly. I always liked coloring, 
not to mention story hour at scbooL 
This tale bad just enough truth in it 
to be especially appealing. Creating 
a “Peace Shield" is not really much 
harder, after alL than drawing a 
gigantic white line around the sun. 
The real sun. In fact, instead of 
financing the Pentagon's efforts at 
“star wars," I think we should com- 
mission the artist Christo to wrap 
America. It would be cheaper. 

What is so artistic about the pro- 


SDI spot is notjust the coloring. It 
is the timing, the 30-second com- 


is the timing. The 30-second com- 
mercial already has been seen in 
Washington, and the conservative 


Still Apartheid, Even in the Dark 

-L Africa, the craving for fm 


J ohannesburg —F our black 

journalists from the Sowetan, a. 


coalition is planning to air it na- 
tionally in the coming pre-summit 
days. It is just a small — child-sized 
— part of the campaign to convince 
the American public that the presi- 
dent is right, that a “star wars” 
defense is too important to bargain 
away for something silly like uucle- 
ar arms reduction. After alL it 
doesn't matter how many nuclear 
bombs there are if we all have our 
white Crayolas handy. 

This is not the first cartoon ren- 
dition of “star wars." The network 
news shows the SDI working with 
astonishing regularity. The net- 
works continually offer some art- 
ist's concept of an incoming missile 
being blown up. The artist never 
misses. The “visuals” add to the 
notion that the SDI not only exists 
(it does not) but that it can work. 

Nor is this the only commercial. 
The Defense Department has care- 
fully orchestrated a series of “tests" 
under the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive Organization. They are really 
what KostaTsipis. a physicist at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, calls “an unchallenged ad- 
vertising campaign." 

One by one. we have been treated 
lo reports of ever-so-successful en- 
gineering tests, complete with dra- 
matic “Wow-’im-up” film footage 
straight out of a video game. They 
purport to show a new defensive 
technology in the making. But in 
fact — as Mr. Tsipis and his col- 
league Philip Morrison, who have 
analyzed the tests, report — they 
were “mainly simulations of pro- 
gress. orchestrated and widely re- 
ported for public effect.” 

In fairness, the Reagan adminis- 
tration needs all the “star wars" ads 
it can muster. The public does not 
share the president’s consuming 
commitment. Americans remain 
convinced that any new U.S. weap- 
ons program inevitably will be 
matched by the Russians in a never- 
ending arms race. 

With a summit meeting around 
the corner, we can count on a 
beefed-up advertising campaign to 
sell Ronald Reagan’s “star wars.” 
Perhaps a few more spiffy tests 
from the Defense Department 

We’re off to Never-Never Land. 
Clap if you believe in white Crayola 
Peace Shields. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


J journalists from the Sowetan, a. 
newspaper of which 1 am an editor, 
were driven around the townships of 
Soweto last Tuesday morning lying 
face down on top of a mil itary ar- 
mored vehicle for about four boors. 
One of than, after bang beaten 
about the head and kicked all over his 
body, had a dog set loose on him. 
Two others have swollen faces and 
split lips. They say they were assault- 
ed by South African soldiers. _ 

The incident is not unusual ina 
black journalist's working Kfe in 
South Africa. The four young men 
were naive to think their press identi- 
fication cards would be sufficient 
protection for them to move around 
the huge black suburb after the H 
PJVL curfew, which has been in force 
several months now under state-of- 
emeigency regulations, ins tead , their 
press cards seemed only to infuriate 
the militar y men. 

Soweto, home to two million 
hlarkc, is now off limits to the press, 
as are other designated emergency 
areas. The divisional commissioner 
of police in Soweto. Brigadier J.C 
Coetzee, said of the press blackout: 
"I am sorry, but it means that report- 
ers who live in Soweto cannot do 
their work there. I issued the ban on 
instruction from headquarters, and it 
is clear. ... All journalists, foreign 
and local, have been banned from 
entering Soweto." (Since then be has 
said some reporters might be admit- 
ted if they Mr. Coetzee’s per- 
mission.) The order presented an im- 
possible situation for reporters who 
live in and cover Soweto, and conse- 
quently the four men from my news- 
paper fell afoul of the rule. 

The blackout is nothing new in the 
history of this country’s deceptively 
free press. Many outriders are struck 
by the way in which opposition jour- 
nals in South Africa seem to lash out 
fearlessly at the state and its policies. 
And yet press freedom in South Afri- 
ca is a chimer a that applies the most 
insidiously effective muzzle cm the 
free exchange of ideas. It is also an 
apt reflection of the country’s racist 
and repre ssiv e structures. 

For blade journalists, who live 
mainly in areas where instability 
manife sts itself, the free expression of 


By Aggrey Klaaste 


ideas and information is a hazardous 

business. From ^ 

nf black journalism m the late 19 juS 

2 ,d ffiSroiS I960s.^^«: 

thex have been destroyed throu£«- 
spair and frustration in then jobs, or 
they have fled the country. 

In the 1960s, a sort of renaissamre 
period for black newspaperman toe 
situation was even more tragic, moss 
of the black writers were intoxicated 


gifl/SijtfflF journmna 

IMMIfiBATlggL 





By Betty in Tl>» iff (M«nn w h»4 
C3-WSyndnM. 


r Could l hare my 
deportation order note? 
It’ll save time.' 


by the avenues made open to them. 
Their work expressed this in an emo- 
tional display of literary, -drills- But 
they remained under onslaught from 
the apartheid system. Their peers in 
the other race groups and even some 
of their employers regarded them as s 
special brad — people who read a 
lot, drank even more and often IriBed 
themselves in the process. 

In the 1970s, particularly after. 
1976 when political activism s w ep t 


South Africa, she craving for free 

expression became even more jngem. 
For several rears after the unrest of » 
1976. very few white reporters apet-i? 
aIe d in the Hack umantia, %e 
Mad journalist came of tgt, and 
even Afrikaans-langnage newsp apers 
tried to craptav Wads. Because the 
blade joojt&fot *as the mm vital 
source of information. the spotlight 
focused os black newspaper*. The 
Hand lings between black editors and 
the government were drawn. Largely 
for tins, two black newspapers, the 
World and Weekend World, were 
banned; no reason was giyai 

In 1980, the gov e r nme nt set op * 
coassmsioa to look, into the press. 
Some erf its re cos am endanons wot 
hair-raising. It proposed not tmb> 
that journalists should have.* cod$* 
butihatilK^ritoBWbcrcgisKTedLkc 
doctors or lawyers. The press bitterly 
protested about government interfer- 
ence and potential censorship, and 
the letter of the proposal was not 
imp fancnlcd. But the spirit stiU had 
(Oumafism m a squeeze oT sdf -cen- 
sorship and sometimes plain harass, 
metro Bhdtjouzsafists took most of 
the flak. Many were detained. Pho- 
tographers had choir equipment con- 
fiscated and their film destroyed. 
Some journalists were charged, and 
two arc serving tong ja3 toms. 

The 1980* sax an upsurge of news 
coverage of the townships by white 
reporters, pa rt k aflari y tram tefcvi* 
soil Hus drove the pwenunent tttio 
another panic sfemtioe. fcodcaDy, 
the emergence of while nportmg 
rook rise spotlight and some of the . 
pressure away few a Mach, ncespajt 
pers. There were just too many news- 
men from Sooth Africa andahroad in 
the to wns hi ps. For awhile, die gov- 
ernment ksr theupper hand. 

The current state of remergency, 
instituted July 21, has created more 
problems for journalists. And the lat- 
est measure is ludicrous. News cover- 
age of events inside South Africa has 
been so extensive that putting a 
blackout an the emergency areas now 
is like shutting the gate after the mare 
has bolted. 


The writer is the deputy editor of the 

Sowetarr He contributed this comment 

so Use Los Angeles Tunes, : 


Why Bail Out a Repressive Romania? 


W ASHINGTON — American 
concern for human rights 


By Juliana Geran Pilon 


disadam. Bona fide emigrants by 
contrast, face increased harassment 


should be extended to apply to Ro- 
mania. The regime of Nicolae 


mania. The regime of Nicolae 
Ceausescu is one of the world’s most 
repressive. Yet Romania continues to 
be given special and generous treat- 
ment by the United States. 

Exports from Romania to the 
United States enjoy most-favorcd- 
nation status, which significantly re- 
duces the tariffs on them. To grant 
this privilege to Romania, the United 
States has had to waive the Jackson- 
Vanik amendment to the 1974 Trade 
Act, which prohibits the use of gov- 
ernment credits and most-favored- 
nafion treatment to Communist (or 
“nonmarket”) countries unless they 
can demonstrate progress in human 
rights, particularly on emigration. 

Legislation was introduced this 
past summer to deny most-favored- 
nfttinn status to Romania permanent- 
ly. In recent weeks. Representative 
Christopher Smith, Republican of 
New Jersey, and Senator Paul Trible. 
Republican of Virginia, introduced a 
more modest but equally useful pro- 
posal — to deny most-favored-nation 
status to Romania for a six-month 
probationary period. 

Regrettably, the State Department 


than SI-21 bfllian in 1984. American 
exports to Romania have been almost 
steady, from S249 million in 1976 to 
S246 millio n In 1984. According to 
the Commerce Department, total 
American imports from Romania 
amounted to $460 mflfion in the first 


Finally, by granting favors to Ro- 
mania, the United States, is in effect 
encouraging its support far terrorism 
General ion Mihsi Pacepa. depnijf 


Romania censors almost 
everything, bam unions 
and UteraBy has turned 
Bibles into toilet paper. 


opposes all these measures. 
Most-favored-nation stat 


Most-favored -nation status is of 
great benefit to the Ceausescu re- 
gime, providing it with badly needed 
hard currency and credits, as well as 
legitimacy. At the same time, most- 
favored status increases the US. 
trade deficit: While the total value of 
two-way trade between the United 
States and Romania increased from 
about S450 million in 1976 to more 


half of 1985, while American exports 
to Romania were only S94J million. 

The purpose of the Jackson-Vanik 
amendment is “to assure the contin- 
ued dedication of the U.S. to funda- 
mental human rights.” Yet Romania 
has done little to promote snch rights. 
The regime persecutes religious be- 
lievers, uses psychiatric hospitals for 
political purposes, censors almost ev- 
erything, bans free labor unions and 
literally has pulverized Bibles into 
pulp to turn them into toilet paper. 
Recently, the government announced 
plans to forcibly “relocate^ old peo- 
ple, moving them, from their dry 


director of the Romanian foreign in- 
telligence service and personal advis- 
er to President Ceausescu until his 
defection to the United States in 
1978, reports: “Terrorism is a Signifi- 
cant pvt of the Romanian govern- 
ment’s foreign and domestic policy. 
Concerning its foreign terrorism, be- 
sides conducting assassination opera- 
tions against expelled dissidents,.?®^ 
litical opponents -in Emigre 
o r ga nizat i on s and defectors, Bucha- 
rest is secretly -involved in mterc*- 
tional terrorism on the broader scak. 
A few examples are the paramSifiry 
training schools run by Romania for 
members of the Western Cwnmunisi 
parties, who receive training in sabo- 
tage, diversion and guerrilla tactics: 
Romania’s political and material 
support of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization and te terrorist detach- 
ments . . . and the secret oooperatiww 
of the Romanian, government witir 
the Libyan security forces.” 

If the United States at last ended 


its special favors to Romania, Con- 
gress and the administration Would 


to the countryside. 

According to the former U.S. am- 
bassador to Romania. David Funder- 
burk, many of the Romanians al- 
lowed to emigrate are criminals being 
“dumped” in the United States, 
agents instructed to infiltrate the 
Emigre community, or forcibly exiled 


be demonstrating that the Jackson- 
Vanik amendment Is not a dead letter 
and that the United States genmndy 
cares about human rights. 


The writer, who emigrated from &b- 
mania in 1962, is a senior analyst id 
the Heritage Foundation, a public po- 
licy research organization . She con- 
tributed this ro The New YbrfcTanet. 


Reagan’s 'Good Deed’ for the Poor 


W ASHINGTON — In a few 
weeks, the Reagan administra- 


YY weeks, the Reagan administra- 
tion will propose something good for 
poor people, something that will en- 
courage voluntary racial integration 
in schools — and it will dnve the 
liberal establishment up the wall. 

Twenty years ago, in the heyday of 
the Great Society, America generous- 
ly decided to try to help children, 
mainly from poor families, to remedy 
their difficulties in scfaooL 
The federal government now is 
sending about S3 5 billion a year to 
local schools for remedial education 
programs, and it probably does some 
good. But it goes to schools struggling 
to help pupils in poor neighborhoods, 
and the lads there who need the spe- 
cial help rarely reach the average. 
Now the Education Department 


By William S afire 


will offer a plan to Congress to make 
it possible for poor Daren ts to do for 


it possible for poor parents to do for 
their children what rich parents now 
do: Choose the school tnai can best 
teach their troubled kids. 

The idea is to send a voucher for 
educational services to the parents of 
children who now quality for remedi- 
al aid. In effect, the voucher will say: 
“Take this slip, worth 5630 a year, to 
the school you think will do ihe best 
job teaching your child. It can be a 
public or a private school, near your 
home or dear across town. The 
school that enrolls your child gets the 
federal money, and if you do not like 
the job that school does, you can 
switch next year.” 

If you are poor, stuck in a ghetto 
and warn a better life for your child, 
this would be a good deal. You would 
shop around, find a good school — 
_ probably in a white, middle-class 
m^^ghb^^ood — and willingly send 
i there by bus or subway. 

f l |F n school administrator, 

1 ff ' I Cobably use the money be- 
Jj voucher; moreover, you 
an educator whose calling 
nBRSP# a value the teaching of 
the disadvantaged child. Here is 
your chance to do what you talk 


about doing, and at federal expense. 

In this voucher system, there can 
be no doubt that the pupils who are 
behind stand a better chance of 
catching up, at no added cost to the 
taxpayer. Since the school system is 
for the benefit of the students, and 
ance public policy encourages volun- 
tary integration, who can oppose it? 

Some well-to-do parents of chil- 
dren enrolled in public schools in 
wealthy neighborhoods, as well as 
some parents of kids in private 
schools, will not want little Faunt- 
leroy associating with the likes of 
backward black or Hispanic or po’- 
whiie- trash children. Life will have to 
be tougher for snobs. 

With nobler motives, the public- 
school establishment will be up in 
arms because it will see this as the 
slippery slope toward tuition tax 
credits, long sought by parochial 
schools. Many public school teachers 
view any plan providing parents with 
a choice of schooling as undermining 
public schools by encouraging the 
best students to go private. 

But in this case; William Bennett, 
Mr. Reagan’s education secretary, is 
on strong If unfamiliar ground. 
“Creaming” the best students away 
from public schools cannot be an 
issue here, because this transfers the 
worst students to better schools. Nor 
can this be criticized as a device to 
avoid racial integration; it would do 
just the opposite, making it possible 
for poof minorities (who are the ma- 
jority of students needing remedial 
aid) to enter schools now economical- 
ly forbidden to than. 

Nor can this plan to amend Chap- 
ter I of the Education Act be derided 
as a budget buster, the criticism often 
leveled against tuition tax credits, 
which would reduce taxes collected 
from parents with children in private 
schook. This would not cost one cent 
more than is now bong spent, or 


collect one cent less. The same money 
would be directed individually by 
parents, and not automatically by the - 
local school authorities. 

What about state aid to parochial 
schools? That is a legitimate concern 
the Supreme Court has already ad- 
dressed in Aguilar vs. Felton, holding 
that federal money for remedial edu- 
cation can go to religious schools so 
long as the help is provided outside 
the school. 

At bottom, what infuriates some 
educators is the introduction of par- 
ent's choice into the school system. 
That means parent power. That 
means competition between schools 
and faculties. Life wfl] become more 
rewarding for good teachers and 
more embarrassing for bad teachers. 

In 1970, a costly welfare reform 
was rejected by suspicious liberals, 
who in rueful retrospect call it “Nix- 
on’s Good Deed.” Now we have con- 
servatives Hying to help poor dnk- 
dren- Let ns see if Reagan’s Good 
Deed goes unpunished. 

The New York Times. 


Lenui According to Reagan — f 
Tracking a Dubious Quotatioii* 

By Carl Meyer 


N EW YORK — President Rea- 
gan was asked recently if he still 
thought the Soviet Union was an evil 
empire. Yes. he said, because of 
things like the downing of a South 
Korean airliner in Soviet airspace. 
Moreover, he said, Soviet leaders re- 
peatedly proclaimed their global am . 
tntion, which is why “I have often 
quoted” Lenin's statement that: 

“We wiH take Eastern Europe. We 
will organize the hordes of Asia. And 
then we will move into I -atm America 
and we won’t have to take the United 
States; it will Fall - into our out- 
stretched hands like overripe fruit." 

When did Lenin say that? The 
quote fefl like an overripe frail into a 
tdevwed discussion that followed 
Mr. Reagan’s appearance. A Soviet 
olfitaal, Geoigi Arbatov, called it a 
Nazi •invention once exposed by the 
commentator Alistair Cooke. Mr 
Cooke, sitting at hand, just smiled 


When later aslrwi for details, 
Cooke said he could not recall vbftt, 
if anything, he had fever broadcast 
about the quote. He had. bis 
theory: The line might have. come to 
Mr. Reagan from an old moviescript- 
At the Library of Congress, «e- 
fcarehers found an old fowfef show- 
ing that they had been astod sew*! 
ttoies to check the citation someyeae . 
ago. It failed to turn up, aspTOiused, 
m “The Collected Works irf.Leniii" 
Volume X, page 172 — or -in any 
Russian or English edition of 
works. Also in toe fddor-vtts-a chp\' 
pmg from The Chicago Daily News, 
dated Dec. 8,. 1958, descriiftig ihe 
quote as a fake but grvmg no scarce- 
Just then an indirect' referetifie^d 
the Same idea, turned "up it a 


book on South Africa by Joseph 
lyveld. He wrote that fie heard & 
language attributed to Lenin 
nght-wing gen e rals in Pretoria.- Hfe 
that they apparently learned^ 
jram a book called “NoneDafeCall 
It Conspiracy,” published arCaKfor 
flia in 1971 and avidly read hy men}- 
<rf the John Bis& Sodety. v 
Thus prompted, I finally foratf . 
what scans to have been Plreadefar 


LETTER TO IBE EDITOR 

A dance lor India’s Poor 316 and destitute foi 


Steven Weisman’s report on the 
return to New Delhi shim life of arti- 
sans, acrobats and others who took 
part in the Festivals of India in the 
United States and in France Cdfta’ 
Fite, Ityhans Return to Squalor , " Oct. 
14) pointed out the obvious irony of 
these people’s experience. But it 
failed to note that these poor mi- 
grants to the capital never would 
have dreamed even of the transitoiy 
fame and fortune Lhat. touched their 
lives had the Indian government nnt 
chosen them as the cultural ambassa- 
dors oflndia’s artistic heritage. - 
The point the late prime minister,. 
Indira Gandhi wanted to m ake was 
that an abundance of talon can be 
discovered among the simple, iffiter- 


ate and often destitute folk that make 
up the subcontinent’s mfllions. ' 

At the 1981 census, about 28 oer- 
«nt of Ddhps people were slum 


4 -.. “ 


dwellers or squatters. True; some nol- "Hie fifiie Bookro? 

mcians do exploit them. But others fo'Ir 1 Society, 1 " compiled ifl 

have managed to bsusg relief to those R<*crt WekL '* 

with artistic f skills. ^ On page IQ, his book-says: “Lenin 

K-GORUR. r^.^^Bntbefortfhediedf? 

' % Switzerland for hisTbOowers 


K.GORUR. 
Bully, Switzerland. 


Pinion 

skwldbe addressed "Letters to the 
Lthtar and must contain the writ- 
ers signature, name and full ad- 
dress.. Utters should be brief and 

-V'tOES editing. We cannot 
for the return 0 f 

unsolicited manuscripts. ' m ' ■ J 


strategy for this conquest, li.wss, ye 
stwwld readily admit, brilliant, IN* 
seeing, realistic and maKsticsfly MB' ! 
ple.:U has been paraphrased:!^ 

^ff^Bfnzedas follows: 

take Eastern.. Europei .Next;: $ c 

masses of Asia,^ Then we shall eno* 
cto the Iasi bastion of ^ canHafisot tie 
United States of America. We 
not have to atiadcr it wfll-feB See 
overripe fntit into our hands.* 1 " ' : * , 

The New Ttinef . ; 


V 3 - 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


Page 9 






»!iWrv; : 'rt 



*S«:- 4 £. a V/ 



ARTS /LEISURE 





, ;i 


urti 

i*rru . ’ 


'^Sts 

'■ hre ™n**tH* a U Tribute 

:'. AT YORK— -When (he new 
v ' r< nX co-anchorwoman of the CBS 
. '*4 t M pnnng Show" throws her head 

uncle TedS? 

l " ! ^ ,S*V k whcn ** Slnright at yon, h’s 

:.’ "^-4* E ? or P ™ cle Jack; Md frta > profile, 

v -t. . 9 » u> U 5 ^ • she is the spitting image of mother 
Eunice. And whist she langhs, the 
■Kennedy charisma explodes all 
over the screen. 

-^„ r . . -k. . . Yew Mark Siriver, who reeeniiy 

r f ; r,i “to one of the top jobs on 

Hebe Dorsey 

■i^'^ &m American television, rfnimt That 
*• • w.;^a a J/V . the fact that she comes. from the 
:: ina2?i, : United State's most famous fam- 

<*&’• 3y k*d nothing to do with her «;- 
• ..." ~r %y 2 ^. ttog the job. 

‘ “I don’t think my employca 

... and - looked ai it. this way," she said. 

J,,Uri Uhas! ■ “This is a big business, it means 
'V : ~ millions of dollars. I don’t dunk, 

n- i f .„. - they’d put in somebody who don’t 

deserve h.” 

Shriver, 29, feds she worked long 
end hard to be where she is today.' 
She was not unknown to 
Coast viewers when she sn warded 
Phyllis George, a former Miss 
America, whose undistinguished 



n; 

::-.y£tS 


'her**i ,n ®fe'- “ght-month stay at CBS proved 
^ ■ ■ ■ fo-raa- 


ftCT£ ]aa2b.' Ultk more than a penchant for nas- 

tel colors 


*%* 


. T" e c ynon r 
: ”- ,c d Jnj v ij Jr. 
' r '=mi f w 


'■'wlij UBiitw 

, : ; r * ntenatr 


v 'liens Hit 

" Htmtig 

" nt 




“'Bta utuemor 

::.T UuTffc^^it ttl “ lc ? s - 
:rm -J kT*. fin as A bright kid who grew up in the 

competitive Kennedy dan Shriver 
said she was lured by television as 
early as 1977, “the day after 1 grad- 
uated." “I was 21 ," she ««h “j 
started at the bottom of the Enc. 
bringing coffee, pulling wire copy.” 
After a year in Philadelphia, she 
went on to Baltimore for two years, 
then to Los Angeles, where she got 
her first break on national televi- 
sion with a syndicated entertain- 
ment ma pping called “PAL” 

This is when she was spotted by 
CBS and offered a job in the Los 
Angeles bureau, where she worked 
for three years. 

e -j-v “1 cowed a multitude of topics. 

K An . J the conventions last summer, the 
I lUUiail Olympics, the Cannes film festival. 
^ I also substituted for Phyllis 
^ George when she was out of the 
: U- imoJS COUQtr y* so yo“ ™ 8 ht say 1 was 

.-^St nextmline.” 

... 4 . ;i:>. ( njifti s^; Shnver is not unaware that die 
■ ■■jjttcibsitebL brings Kennedy charisma to the 
r. :rj. i.-a s * ww - The mane of hair, the snn- 
' ;tw HmmZ * shine smOe and the unmistakab le 
New England na«1 twang are all 
distinct assets. But she wants to 
make sure that people know there 
is more behind the attractive sur- 
face. 

The daughter of Sargent Shriver. 
a former ambassador to France, 


the Rflmcc 

Mf.ia ad 
' \JCeiU C ok;: 
• 1 10 lk ttfe; 

" -'p.Tii' 'Tarwii. 
r .n if Lk Rb£ 

:-r.-ai jol &st 
il icresc 


and Euske 
riitinbqitectBisrii 
terefls, lw inothers 
f«iheiSs^fid as weS as 
nedys' pcfiricd*ad*pons orierna- 
ooo. ;• . 

^Because <rfmyapbiingirig,rm 
'interested in * lbt 'of dangs." she 
said, “fashion, spons, politics, the 
.«ws of the day and people jn gen- 
enUBecame aqr parents have ex- 
postfl me to a vodo. variety of snb- 
jeas. m ■ • 

, She is equrily .comfortable dis- 
cosang die United States’s budget 
with « couple of - senators' or die 
latest baseball gamt^ With a grand- 
father who wasdieU.S.ambassa- 
6ac to the Coen of St James, Sa> 
ver also can address &e Duke of 
Malboroo^ as “Your Grace,” 
without the least tat 

gauche. (Shriver iuoykwed d» 
mike Iasi Tborsdas' toother with 
the mar q ue ss of. Tavistock and 
Laird and Lady Romsey, k propos 
: oparing of rTlie Treasure 

Houses of BotanT ctlnbrtirai in ai 
the National GaSay m Washing- 
ton.) 

While die does not wetend to be. 
Miss Middle Amenca, Shriver 
cfcarty tries sot to project too 
strong an image. Although she 
emrUre «p<t even laughs often, she 
B fl fW fflOrttlffn Ap ^Hn! and gen- 

erally tries to keep her interviews 
on an easygoing, poEte^ conversa- 
tional lewd. This low profile con- 
trasts with her lively, competitive 
and highly charged personality off 
the air. 

Besides being related to the Ken- 
nedys, Shrivar also had to face the 
fact that she was a woman and a 
strikmg46oking woman at that. 

“There’s always been a stigma' 
thauf yoor’rc pretty and you *ess 
id; yoq have to be dumb. When I 
first took bn this job, everybody 
said: ’em your hair, every other 
woman on TV has short hair.’ In 
California. I was told blonde wom- 
en worked better. My answer is be 
yoursdfL Otherwise, you betray 
yourself and everybody else," 

She did not let her lodes take 
over. “My mother always told me: 
‘Don’t ever depend onybur looks, 
because your looks will ga But if 
you work on your mind, that won't 
go.’ I don’t pay any attention to my 
looks,” she added, “but I pay atten- 
tion to my presentation. I know 
what colors work for me — bril- 



Oldest Bordeaux? Yes; Jefferson’s? Maybe 


Maria Shriven “It was a 

Irani, solid — and what dothes 
work for me — tailored, not busy. I 
wear a lot cf Ungaro.” 

She also nous quite a bit of 
jewelry, including a nicely sized di- 
amond ring, a present from her 
fianct, the actor and body-builder 
Arnold Schwarzenegger. 

“1 get up and look il this job as if 
I were going to the market," she 
said. “1 am a woman before I am a 
journalist. So I have to look the 
best lean.” 

Despite the glamour of the job, 
Shriver functions from unpreten- 
tious. cramped offices on the West 
Side, surrounded with young peo- 
ple in track suits and runmng 
shoes. Besides stacks of books, 
there is a huge picture of her hug- 
ging her father, plus several with 
her fianofe. The two are to be mar- 
ried next April at die family estate 
in Hyannisport. Massachusetts. 

Asked if she iliowght she could 
accommodate her grueling sched- 
ule — “I try to wake up at 3 AM.” 
— with a husband mid a family life, 
Shriver said: “1 hope so. Ask me a 
year from now. I don't thmlr it's a 
job you do forever. It was a goal of 
min e to do this job, one of the best 
in television, the top of the ladder. 
Bui if 1 find 1 can't cope any mere. 


OoWM 

goal of mine to do thi«c job." 

HI have to find something else. 
You have to make choices along the 
way." 

After two months, Shriver '& con- 
tribution is already visible, even if 
the show* is still flat. It needs to pick 
up its own rhythm and flow be- 
cause, basically, Shriver and For- 
rest Sawyer, her co-anchor man, 
still seem to be on parallel tracks. 
But the pace is picking op, and the 
decor has sobered up and no longer 
looks like a flowersbop. 

Shriver hopes thing s will keep 
improving Hope, a key Kennedy 
wad. is often on her lips. 

“I hope that I'm bringing new 
interest to the show. I have a lot of 
energy and I am interested in a lot 
of thmgs, from politics to enter- 
tainment. 

“I hope I'm bringing new vigor, 
my own varied interests and eight 
years of television experience. 

“I hope that the show will reflect 
■ some of my own ideas. This is 
what’s exciting about it" 

The bottom line is simple. “If 
you've done your homework, 
you're smart and you listen, you’re 
bound to make it," die said.' 

And asked who she admires the 
most on television, she said: “I ad- 
mire any woman who survives the 
network." 


By Howard G. Goldberg 

$r* y.-rii Si'. ff 

A CACHE of more than a dozen 
bottles of wine though: u- hare 
belonged to Thomas Jeffenm, a 
connoisseur of fine Bordeaux, has 
been found in Paris. One. a Cha- 
teau Lafite vintage, dated 5737. i> 
10 be auctioned in London on Dec. 
5. Tw others. 1TM and 1*^7 Cha- 
teau dTquem, have bom drunk. 

Michael Broadber.:. wine direc- 
tor of Christie's, reached in Lon- 
don, said; “It will be ihe oldest 
authenticated vinu.e-catec Bor- 
deaux Christie's has ever void. Even 
at Chateau Lafite. they don’t have 
any. The oldes: ir. their celiar is 
1797.” The bottle is expected to sell 
for “well in excess cf £10.000" 
(about S 14,000]. 

The Lafite — bearing the spell- 
ing Lafitte. the initials’ ThJ. and 
the year, an engraved ahheugh it is 
not known by whom — was con- 
signed to Christie's b> ils West 
German owner. Hardy Roden- 
Stock, a music publisher. .Although 
specialists have validated the age of 
the Lafite, a researcher ai Mcnu- 
celk*, Jefferson's mar. -i or. ir. Vir- 
ginia. says rk.n no Jefferson boities 
are believed to have survived and 
that unusually punctuated initials 
on the Lafite warrant skepticism 
that il was the president's. 

The Christie’s sale will follow by 
only a few montiu the rebinh of a 
portion of Jeffersc.-.'s !S07 vine- 
yard at Morciceilo. near Char- 
lottesville. where he retired ir. 1S09 
after two terms as president. Las: 
spring, the vineyard was replanted; 
this autumn, the fir?! fruit ap- 
peared — caberse: S 2 u\ignoc. tiie 
great Bordeaux grape. 

Rodenstock. who lives ir. Bad 
Marienberg. said in a telephone in- 
terview that more than a do 2 en 
bottles cf Bordeaux, all narked 
with the ThJ. initials, were found 
early this year behind a cellar wall 
in an old bouse in Pans. He de- 
clined to give rite address. 

He said there were three bc>tties 
of 1784 and 1787 Chateau dT- 
quem (a premier ctj Sauiemes). 
three 1787 Lafite. three Chateau 
Margaiu from 1787 and three 17S7 
Chateau Brane Mouum. predeces- 
sor of today's Mouton-Rothscbild. 
He indicated there were more from 
each chateau, but withheld details, 
and said he had three bottles with- 
out identification. 

In 1787, Jefferson, in his third 
year as minister to France, toured 
celebrated Bordeaux estates. His 



A 






i 


/ * i 

t i It 


a , mci 

Chateau Lafite, 1787, 

journal cites “Maigau." “la Fite" 
“Mouton” and “Diquem.” He also 
visited Champagne. Burgundy 
(whose wines he fancied), Beaujo- 
lais, the Cote Roue and southern 
Rhone. Italy, Frontianan and .An- 
jou. In 1788, in a tour of Germany, 
he explored Rhine and Moselle 
wines. 

After I7S9, Jefferson, whom 
scholars generally consider the 
most sophisticated palate in early 
.America, served imported claret in 
Philadelphia and the White House 
and at Momicello. 

Cinder Goodwin, the Monti cello 
researcher, who has spent 15 years 
on Jefferson’s financial records and 
is “intimate” with his correspon- 
dence, said: “No Jefferson bottles 
with wine in them have ever sur- 
vived. to our knowledge. Except for 
a broken Madeira decanter found 
in a dry well here, no other empty 
bottles have been found either.” 

She said the punctuation of the 
ini rials ThJ. raised a crucial ques- 


tion about authenticity, because 
she believes that she has not seen 
Jefferson's initials used in precisely 
*hai form. She said that when Jef- 
ferson abbreviated Th Jefferson, 
his script signature, he wrote ThJ. 
— usually with a colon and a peri- 
od after lhe J. Moreover, she said, 
his standard identification on per- 
vonu! possessions was TI.. the 1 
being a contemporary form of J. 

R. de Treville Lawrence Sr., who 
is editor of The Vmifera Wine 
Growers Journal, a quarterly pub- 
lished ai The Plains. Virginia, and 
who edited a 1976 anthology tilled 
“Jefferson and Wine." said Roden- 
stock had mentioned the discovery 
in a June 14 letter. Rodenstock, he 
said, had requested photocopies of 
Jefferson documents cited in the 
anthology that bear upon wine 
transactions. In the telephone in- 
terview. Rodenstock said that not 
only does Jefferson’s correspon- 
dence apparently validate the own- 
ership but also that after a 1787 
Yquem was opened and drunk at 
Yquem in May. he had the wine 
and cork analyzed by a laboratory, 
which dated the cork to between 
i7SG and 1800. 

Michael Broad bent character- 
ized Hardy Rodenstock as a “high- 
ly respected collector and connois- 
seur of fine old wine." Broad bem 
said that to his regret he had not yet 
seen the Paris cellar, that Christie's 
glass experts had vouched for the 
authenticity of the bottle and en- 
graving date, that rite cork was 
original and covered with an origi- 
nal wax seal and that the wine ap- 
peared to be in good condition. 
“We've taken every precaution 
short of pulling the cork.” he said. 
“If we did. there would be nothing 
for anyone to acquire." 

“I'm a cautious chap,” he said. 
”But knowing Rodenstock. having 
tasted the 1784 Yquem — it must 
be right. He's a wealthy man and 
not after money, li look a lot of 
persuading to get him to sell it. Of 
course, who can actually prove it is 
authentic?" 

Goodwin wonders hew four sep- 


arate estates came up with “ThJ." 
since “we have no record” that Jef- 
ferson wanted bottles imtiaied. 
(Perhaps the bottles came from a 
common .source, Broad beru theo- 
rized.) Goodwin knows of only or.e 
labeling request — in a 1 790 Jeffer- 
son leuer to Yquem. written ir. 
Philadelphia, asking 30 dozen for 
George Washington. 10 dozen for 
himself, to be wrapped separately 
and labeled G.W. and TI.: wha: « 
unclear is what was to be labeled, 
the bottles or shipping container*. 
Paper labels were not used on bot- 
tles at that lime. 

“Mr. Jefferson.” as Virginian* 
still respectfully call him. had me- 
ticulous. thorough habits. The ar- 
chive of his lifetime's writings is 
"boiiomless." Goodwin *a;d. 
Those papers contain a Dec. IS. 
1787, letter to Yquem. written ir. 
Paris, ordering 250 bottles of 1784 
Saul ernes, as well as a Jan. 7, I7SS. 
replv [hat the order was being 
filled. 

Broadbent. who tasted the 17S4 
Yquem with Rodenstock and 
Count Alexandre de Lur Saluces. 
the chateau's proprietor, said. "It 
was remarkable, unbelievable — 
soft and sweet, beautiful balance." 

Goodwin said lhe “Jefferson 
file," which “for ihat period is vir- 
tually complete," does not show he 
ever ordered, received or drank 
1787s or was given any as a gift. 
Records show ihat he ordered and 
got 1784 Margaux. and that he or- 
dered I7S4 Lafite but il was un- 
available. The name Brane Mouton 
“never turns up."’ 

Broadbent said Rodenstock 
planned to wait until 1987. then 
lake a 200-year-old bottle to Mon- 
ti edio jo open. If he does, the un- 
corking will occur the year Jeffer- 
son’s replanted 1807 vineyard is to 
produce its first significant harvest. 

Not all 1807 varieties have been 
found, so the vineyard will become 
what Hatch calls “a vignette” — a 
composite — of the viney ard's mul- 
tiple plantings. 


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'Faust,’ 'Oberon’ Take 
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ABLE ID SEE 
HALFTHEROOHS 

/ 



By Henry Pleasants 

L ONDON — Two new prodoc- 
/ tions, Gounod's “Faust” by 
the English National Opera at the 
CoUseunthere and Weber’s “Ober- 
on” by die Scottish Opera in Glas- 
gow — and aided reactions to 
them — fltostrate as vividly as 
codd be wished lhe crisis of “opera 
in our time." 

Neither opera is what the play- 
bills and program books say it is. 
The “Fanst” is not Gounod’s and 
the “Oberon” is not Weber’s, al- 
though in each case die music is 
theirs. What is presented on the 
Stage is not what composer and 
librettist had in mind when music 
and text were written, or what was 
seen when the operas were first 
performed — with “Faust," indeed, 
as h Jibs been performed wherever 
opera is given far the past 125 
years. “Oberon" even hasanentire- 
4y new Hbretto % the author and 


n on lint* toR^ 

Dubious Qmt 




M. v 



)K 



lan Judge, of the Royal Shake- 
speare Company, mating a debut 
as opera producer, gives “Faust" a 
Victorian setting, makes a red- 
wigged tart out of h&rguerite and 
lusher die not In prison, bat in a 
lunatic asylum. Tbejcwd box takes 
two supernumeraries ib carry it, 
and while singing the “Jewel 
Song,” reclining lingerie-dad on 
luxurious scatter cushions in a pal- 
ace garden dotted with statuary 
DSahn demon. Baste et pure"?). 
Marguerite admires bendf in enor- 
mous mi rrors bdd up — and 
twiried — by a bevy of half-naked 
Nubian rnymtidans. 

In. Graham Vick's “Oberon,” 
Oberon is represented as “half -sus- 
tainer of the cosmos.” Reria and 
Fatima areseaetaiKS in the U. S 
Embassy of an Islamic slate where 
they are held hostage by the ayatol- 
lah and rescued not by Sr Hoot of 
Bordeaux and Sberasmm, but by 

two test pilots, Hugh and Geoffrey. 

What is most disturbing about 
all this is that notices- have been 
mixed, lhe reason being: that many 
critics have so high opinion of ti- 
ther opera and warfare conclude 
that no harm is done in making 
something of them that they were 

never intended to be. It poses an 
ethical problem, the more pressing 
because similar. wMitrf has been 
practiced on so many opens — and 


better ones — 'ey so many produc- 
ers in the past decade or two. 

Those who practice and sanction 
this sort of artistic mischief argue 
that in order to keep opera alive for 
contemporary andiences it must be 
brought up to date, made “lopi- 
caL” Those who oppose this view 
argue that if an opera cannot sur- 
vive as conceived and executed by 
composer and librettist — and that 
has been true of “Oberon” for 160 
years — then h should be left in 
peace. 

The “modernizers” feel called 
upon to save the opera bouse from 
becoming a museum. Well, muse- 
ums play an important role in our 
cultural Efe. Much money, time 
and effort are expended in present- 
ing their holdings as truthfully and 
solicitously as possible. 

There is much to be said for 
accepting the opera bouse as a mu- 
seum. Some 90 percent of the via- 
ble repertoire is from one to two or 
more centuries old. And there is as 
much or more to be said for doing 
everything possible to make it a 
good museum and treating its trea- 
sures with the respect and rever- 
ence they have so richly earned. 

Musically, the English National 
Opera's “Faust," sung in a new 
En glish translation by Edmtmd 
Tracey, and reverting to Gounod’s 
op&n^cormque original with spo- 
ken dialogue, is in quire good order, 
with Arthur Davies (Faust). Hden 
Field (Marguerite) and John Tom- 
linson (Mephistopheles) in the 
principal roles, and knowingly con- 
ducted by Jacques Ddacflie. • 

The trouble remains that against 
the concei ts of l«n Judge anti his 
stage design and lighting collabora- 
tors, Gounod hasn't a chance. 

Further performances of "Fausi" 
on Nov. 6, 9. 12, IS, 21. 26 and 29 
and Dec. 3. 


Henry Pleasants is. a London- 
based writer tvho specializes in music 
and opera. 


AUTHORS, WANTED 
BY N Y. PUBLISHER 

c FV *»»*y book pufa&har urii mu- 

b i. v scrim o# all lypes, fiction. non*fton, 

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1 j. 



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Monday thru • 
Saturday 
from 9:30 am. 

coirn.Bt ' 0 ^” 1 
November Special Offer: . 

■—30% on _ 

L’OREAL PERMANENTS 
iSalon X: 15 R. Baosy-<rAnrias, 
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Brochure on request 
k*417 Fifth Avt, NYC 



Full winter 

collection 

ESCAEt^ 

at European 
export prices 

Marie-Martme 

8 , Rue de Sevres, Paris 6Ql 
TeL- ( 1)42 22 18 44 . 
Owfit cards 




The new BULL SPS ronge of minis and super-minis 
is designed primarily for engineering, scientific and real- 
fime applications in manufacturing and research, in both 
the industrial and academic environments. 

Capable of handling the full spectrum of scientific 
and technical applications - from computer-aided 
design and manufacturing (CAD/ CAM) to industrial auto- 
mation - the BULL SPS mini-computers combine calcula- 
tion power with adaptability to the technological needs 
of the moment, while maintaining market standards. 


BULL SPS 7, the new system conceived in collabo- 
ration with users themselves, benefits from the conside- 
rable industrial expertise and experience of BULL. The 
BULL SPS 7 "multi-microprocessor mini" is designed speci- 
fically for innovation: the SPART real-time executive and 
the SPIX operating system (UNIX" system V. 2) are inte- 
grated to insure operating efficiency and access to a 
huge library of programs. It can be compatibly integra- 
ted into a wide variety of local and public networks, both 
mixed and homogeneous. 

BULL SPS 9 is the top of the SPS line and offers 
direct access to the power of data processing, to the 
world of UNIX" and to communications networks. A pio- 
neer in the new concept of RISC architecture. BULL SPS 9 
insures the future of your scientific and CAD/ CAM 
applications. 

Based on the same UNIX" operating system, the 
BULL SPS 7 and SPS 9 can operate in the same network. 

With its new range of SPS computers, BULL has 
extended its line and offers total solutions geared to the 
needs of those industries and research centers that are 
taking up the technological challenge of tomorrow. 

“UNIX is a trademark of AT &T/Bell Laboratories. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


1 


Mondays 


T 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Ofxm High LM Last CM- 


inaua assiff imsi m?s» ubpas— fl-g 

TnmS' UUI &71.3S 45? 39 46431 — 1J0 

5«l M1J7 14124 1S9J8 UOJD- 178 

Camp 56144 56444 5045 542.16— 173 


Composite 

Industrials 

Transp. 

utilittea 

Finance 


High Low Close ChV* 
110.78 110.22 11045 —9.10 
154.95 15447 13640 -021 
10447 105.112 105J12 —033 
5739 5732 5742-002 
11000 117.77 11035 + 061 


NISE 


Qoang: 


Advanced 
Declined 
undmns 
Total issues 
Hew Hlahs 
Hew Laws 

Volume uc 
va hone dawn 


225 302 

287 221 

2tt 245 


21 21 

U 13 

U4U9I 

240*730 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 


78?. H 24MI 
JWA3 31734 
3SZ5V 28932 
34434 272-91 
27105 211 M 

11043 21051 
24434 2393* 


NYSE Diaries 


Close PYey. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

UlfNJles 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


767 1009 
SID 561 
648 433 


Volume up 

Volume dawn 


424DO960 

40091 940 



Buy Sates 

■sow 

Nov. 1 

ia7.sk 4iua 

15740 

00.11 

>62454 397761 

12207 

Oct 30 

I5C390 407749 

16714 

Oct. 29 

153755 409708 

7.983 

Oct . 28 

145711 377760 

8733 

- included in mo solos figures 







Pm coasoUdoted do*e 

ISU0U88 


Standard & Poor's index 


77< r»» 


AMEX Sales 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Industrials 

Trorm 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


High Law Close Ch*e 
21137 211-419 212A4 — 043 
17X47 17L71 17229 —002 
8475 8640 8440 — Oil 
2291 2279 733* +aiO 
19134 19044 19175 —038 


4PJW. volutne 
Prev.4 PJW. volume 
Pm.coiu. volume 


m 

1 : * f 


Stocks Close With Narrow Loss 


11* ErusSus M 13 


L' nr red Press fntenumcmd 

NEW YORK — Profit-taking after last 
week's record-breaking gains pressured slock 
prices Monday, but late buying of blue chip 
issues erased most of the losses and the market 
dosed only narrowly lower. 

The Dow Jones industrial average declined 
0.57 points to 1389.68. 

Broader indicators declined- The New York 
Stock Exchange index eased 0.10 to 110.45. 
Standard & Poor's 500-stock index decreased 
0.2S to 191 .25. The price of an average share fell 
by four cents. 

Declines edged out advances 799-767 among 
the 2.029 issues traded. 

Big Board volume totaled 104.9 million 
shares, down from 129.4 million Friday. 

“Investors took profits but the market re- 
mains at lofty levels." said a trader at a major 
brokerage firm. He said investors acted selec- 
tively. responding well to a stock when it report- 
ed strong earnings or was affected by a favor- 
able news development. 

Some analysts said the market was close to 
"lopping 1 ' after recent advances. 

Jon Gr overrun, head of equity trading at 
Ladenburg. Thalmann A Co., said the market 
might take "a stab" at hitting 1 .400 on the Dow. 
but that reaching that level would signal an end 
to the upward move. 

“The market is more likely to be in a correc- 
tive mode for the next couple of weeks," Mr. 
Groveman said. “When you take the compo- 
nent stocks of the Dow and look at each one 
individually, they have met just about every 


near-term price objective. At this point there's 
not much left to do for an encore." 


“The market is really taking a defensive pos- 
ture while it waits for new leadership." a trader 
said. 

Texas Oil & Gas was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, easing ft to 1544. IBM followed, 
climbing 114 to 132ft. AT&T was third, off ft to 
21 . 


95 Eraz*ipfl£L43riftJ 
17* EroExn 129* 44 
1% Enorco 
91% Entora 

13* EntaxE 2309164 
17* Eotaxln 134 63 
211% Eoufxs 134 34 
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3214 EqtRSS 1-72 40 
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IT* EssBus M £1 
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15 EsJrteo 72 45 
14* Ethyls 56 23 


1* vIEraiP 
33% ExOlo 172 41 
14* ExcotST 1366189 
42% Exxon 330 *3 


Potlatch Corp. was the session's biggest win- 
ner. climbing 6ft to 42ft on news that two 
companies controlled by the Beteberg family of 
Canada now hold a 5.7-percent stake in the 
company. Market sources said the Belzberg 
move was considered “very unfriendly" and 
cited extensive arbitrage trading. 

CBS produced the day's biggest drop, falling 
5ft to 118. It climbed nearly 15 points last week 
amid active arbitrage trading and takeover 
speculation. 

Merck climbed 2ft to 119ft after Enalapril, 
its high blood pressure drug, received an ap- 
proval letter from the U.S. Food and Drug 
Administration. Squibb, which also has a high 
blood pressure remedy, fell I ft to 71ft. 

In the high technology sector. Digital Equip- 
ment rose 1ft to 1 14ft and Honeywell fell ft to 
62ft. 

Among active blue chips. Sears eased ft to 
34ft and U.S. Steel fell ft to 26ft. 

General Motors edged up ft to 67ft. Dupont 
lost ft to 62ft and Westinghouse Electric, trad- 
ing ex-dividend, eased ft to 42ft. 


23* 

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investment 

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■•;- £■ •.* ::• ?vw«ndi P.n -W -teh” P.Ya 

% ?■ I ^ Tuesday, November 5, ims ~~ 

nnuKESMttoraoMB 




Africans Agree to Respect 




61 million 60-idiogram 032- But the producers 
pound) bags. The producers _ - | .< 

^ ^0 r-[£q said this quota was about 5 Contend tnat 

> t » 1S&X«- 4e 1984-85 quotas 

producers also stemmed were above demand. 

7 from unforeseen problems ■ ■ . . 

such as drought, transport dif- 
ficulties. political instability in some countries and tike fact that 
’• vui many exporters of the robosta variety do not harvest their crop 
jf-r ill.,' . until December, the sources said. 

mm “All Afriran coffee is not necessarily available on Sept. 30. The 

piffifiSH ^agreement is too rigid," one senior official of the Inter-African 
Coffee Organization said. 

■ _i - fi 1 ^-U'\ ri 1 HE COFFEE agreement aims to Unit the amount of coffee 

:,fcJ UDff ' I released onto the worid marifrt thrnng h a system nf qnntnc 
with the aim of keeping prices within a range of $1-20 to 
S 1.40 a pound. The International Coffee Chgamzathm, nmetfnjar 
' m London early in October, fixed the 1985^86 global quota atH 
^ v •: nui ^ “nUion bags. 

Unlike many other commodity agreements, the coffee accord 
— _ m has had some success in achieving Jq price goals; The ICG’s 
“ l5 ^y avera B e price was quoted last Wednesday at $1.26 per 

:l 7%*;:.' pound. 

7 -‘I l jjjj’p: But the United States, the world's biggest consumer, voted 
'i |t ? * against the final London package after failing to win ap p ro v al of 
i* H *, * 5- penalties for bdow-reqmrement shipments linked to ml*** to 
-V nonmembers of the organization. 

'5| African producers repeated exporters' backing for the U5. 
... ; ut stance, partly reflecting their fear that the accord could collapse if 
'e ?■ ?' the United States earned out its threat to withdraw, the sources 
c^isaid. . 

'jt-x Rising sales to nonmembers, particularly East European court* 

" r - 1 a 1 0- tries, have created a parallel coffee market, undermining the 
-f 1 eji «: £; accord, according to commodity analysts. But African producers 
:> .• ‘{j say that while they have had shipment problems, they sell finle 

& c coffee to nonmembers. 

:: ! 'It’S*. A document of the In ter- African Coffee Organization that was 

'• . .L- . f ■ 




global quota at 5l 


5815: 


,-ii -i \ »ps-. 
‘ ill- 


]] ^>(1 throughout 1984-85 but that it was not caused by excessive sales 
” v to nonmembors as was the case with some F*rin American 

aC-tv - 


:> c *:*■ exporters. 

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Qirrenc^ Reties 


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TUB 2024*5 U«5 UK' TTSTVS MM 2SJ»» 

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* ^;,!l SDR L077T*. S24445 22*0 NJX HQ, 3054 SU3B 2213* NA 

:; 7 ? I ClDiJmu k> LonOon anti Zurich, nxlnvt In other Eurwon cratorc. Nrw Yort: ralws at 4 PM. 

CommtrcJal franc lb) Amotmtt nwdfctf to bwaampamtd <c) Amounts neHad to bay or* 
g Units of TOO <x) UnUtoflM* (r) Unit* of IQJfQO N.O.; not HuofKi; ; not ovolfaDKt. 


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sLbiO fin.fr. *2*0 Ugarw 

‘ ^ ^ Brazn cto. U15L00 MonMia 

^r.::CMatal laws IrMB 


i Unlt3ofma00H^ntdt*xX*i/NA^:no1aYaBat»a. 


Csnwcr per ILU 
Ra. markka SM 
QnwkKrnc. . 1S3JH 
Hook Kanos 72*85 
lai n r ap — 1247773 
Monariali U224M 
Irish K 0B4* 

braefl took, van 50 
Ktovalfl dinar 02*24 
Matoy.riM. 14*55 


Carraacy Mr OU 
Mn.M0 4*000 
Non*, krone 7 JUS 
PML poso 1720 
PorlMCnda 14150 
Somfl rtvol 3*5 

OHi am 

£. Afr, md 25441 


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SavMfiMt 0779 
Saa a aa w ki 1**J0 
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TWtHMS 4B4Q 
TMM 2*255 
IMMOH 55025 
IMIOrtun 35725 


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S it-*; Danish krooa 9531 IQnwIH dinar 02*24 S.Kot.«mb WON VU i fc 14*3 

j ^'f. Cgypt pound 125 Matoy.iHv. 25*55 

i« * ?;* Sterling: 12104 IrWHC 

V- J". Source*. Baneua du BvtMax (Brussels); Bonce Corrunmndaim nattaaa ( M O rnO ; Ana* No- 
■C 0 1 Honeto de Parti (Parti).- Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (SOW: BAli Idm rival Orttam ): 
-jf-v’. Gotbank fnMoi. otnor oota tram Rootin oner AP. 


faferestRaies 


IT £ *, Em wau -r ea c y P eaati f 

Urtw 

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moom 7Wr8» 4A5H 3HM 

^•:,3 t 3mDnn» 7V-B1*. *h* **-*V. 

;• c i": 3 RiMtHs 7MIH . .41W . . 4Hx4H. 

V S ! * month* B4M flh-5 4WMH 

;; rj^ivoor w«i sn^s* 4wn 

:;!• J' y Sources: Maroon Guaranty (donor. DM, SF, 
- r-"- (SDR). Rato applleaeti to Interbank deposits 

sj'5 

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Net- 4 

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» Ej 7" • Dtacoonl Rate 3W 7W 

Federal Fends 6V4 B 

Prime Rat* *W *Vi 

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i ■. >moatnTreaxsry am* 721 7.1B 

Amoetli Tnwmrv BOB ■ 72* ■ 724 


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lift 

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n 

13 

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11 3/14 

113/14 

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113/14 

113/14 

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S 

5 

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a*a 

71/M 

:"*• iMay tuertaaK 

* 7 

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7 13/1* 


AbI— PtH w P «| Mu te 

Nov. * 

1 month 1-IW 1 

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Smooths 7*e-SH - 

(nMOa B-tVk 

1 year (U-nh 

Source: neuters. 


U«SL M o tey Market ft 

Nov. 4 

Merrill Lynch Reotty Assets 
38 day nvoroe* yleM: 751 

Ttterat* Interest Ret* tonne 7564 
Secret: Moniti Lvncti. Ts i s ra te. . 



Sources: Beaten Catnmonban*, Cti* tk 
LvonnakL Bant of Tokyo. 


• • • ; Aba 4 

AM. PM. . ChVt 

HoaoWKW .33*25 32£78 +IJS 

LuMOibanra 32X75 — —ms 

Paris 015 *0rt 32XB8 3JtU - . -OJD 

Zurich 32540 325,40 : 42J0 

London . 32550 32X35 4125 

iteerYork — - 321(0 — 14)0 

Luxmmboum. Ports and London omc/d flx- 

toi » none Kong and Zurich amine and 
dosing prices; Mow York comm .current 
contract All Prices la UJLXoeroooes. 
Source : Reuters. 


ills; To Our Readers 

•;A:5:; R-ginnmp today, we will publish futures prices far North 1 Sea Brent 
/ ;• ;! Ip - crude aL, as traded on the London Petroleum E x ch a ng e. Today these 

' ^ jfi;-! data are on Pagc l2. 


' ; ill; Markets Qosed 

\ All banks,' government offices 

‘ ^ 5»f ; Monday For a nati<wal htriiday. 


Hcralb^^Tfcribunc, 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


Jy-Lj 


U.S. Stock* 
Report, Page 10. 
Page II 


By ROGER MAY 

Ream 

A BID3 AN, Ivoiy Coast — African coffee producers, in an 
/\ aticmpt to ensure the future of the International Coffee 
/ \ Agreement, have pledged to curta3 ihe practice of 

snipping less. of. the commodity than is required 
The agreement. The problem of under-shipments was one of the 
mmn items of an annual assembly here of the 25-member bjier- 
-Afncan Coffee Organization, conference sources said. 

™ loui^y conference last week, African produce* said ' 
they would try to respect shipment rcqnircxncnis laid down by the 
International Coffee Organization. 

But they repeated their view that much of the problem had ■ 
been caused by an ICO dedrion to fix an export quota for the 
1984-85 coffee marketing ~ 


Boeing 
Bid Wins 
Support 

In Offer to Buy 
deEmfflandAir 


Chartuigthe Vital U.S. Invisibles 9 


By Warren Getler 

Inirrnntuuva] Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT ■— Boeing Co. is 
considered to be the front-runner 
in bidding to acquire state-owned 
4e Havihand Aircraft of Canada 
LuL, Canadian government offi- 
cials disclosed Monday. 

A recontmendafioo that Boeing’s 
lad be approved w£D be subamied 
to the board of the Toronio-based 
Canada Devckpment Investment 
Corp., the state holding company 
responsible for returning de Havil- 
land and a second aircraft builder, 
Canadair LtcL to the private sec- 
tor, officials in Toronto said. 

The U.S. airplane manufactur- 
e’s bid is expected to be presented 
id the CD1C board for final ap- 
proval within weeks, the officials 
said. If accepted, the proposal will 
go before the Canadian cabinet, 
probably before the end of the 
year. 

Canadian officials would not 
disclose the price offered by 
Boeing, although they pm the book 
value of de Havillaod at 130 mil- 
lion fun adlan dollars (S95-5 mil- 
lion)- Over the past decade, de Ha- 
viHand has had accumulated net 
losses of 4M million dollars. 

The oftkaah, who sptdce ou the 
condhioa that they not be identi- 
fied, srid that Boeing’s bid eiurged 
as the most attractive among a 
handful of others, which included 
offers from McDonnell Douglas 
Corp.; the West German industri- 
alist, Justus Domier; and Rimgaie 
Holdings LaL a Canadian investor 
group. 

Boeing officials at the company’s 
Seattle headquarters declined com- 
ment A press sp okesman said 


Canadian government about the 
status of its bid. 

A baOder of small commuter air- 
craft, de Havilland has caught the 
attention of major commercial air- 
craft maker * interested in becom- 
ing potential suppliers of short- 
ninge aircraft for regional airlines. 
At the center of de Havilhmd’s at- 
tractiveness, industry sources say, 
is the group’s new twin-engine 
Dash 8 model. 

Sales of the Dash 8, which have 
been buoyant recently, are expect- 
ed to spur de HaviBand*s gradual 
return to profit. 

De Havillflnd reported a loss of 
39 million dollars in the first half of 
1985 on sales of 125 mOlian dollars. 

Mr. Domier, the West German 
industrialist, said Monday in Zu- 
rich that a sale of de HavULand to 
Boeing would lead him to consider 
whether to make a new bid for 
Canadarir alone. 

He is understood to have been 
the only party to make an offer for 
control of both companies. Under 
his proposal, they would be forged 
under an umbrella holding group in 
which Mr. Domier would own at 
least 26 percent with the remainder 
open to Canadian investors. 


Purchasers Say 
U.S. Economy 
Improved Again. 

The Asseaased Press 

NEW YORK — The U.S. 
economy entered the fourth 
quarter maintaining the strong 
rebound of September, the Na- 
tional Association of Purchas- 
ing Management said. 

The rate of improvement in 
production in October was un- 
changed from the strong show- 
ing in September, the associa- 
tion said Sunday, based on its 
monthly survey of purchasing 
managers. New orders slipped, 
however, falling back to the 
pace of June to August. 

Inventories declined in Octo- 
ber as manufacturers began 
making seasonal adjustments, 
the report said. Employment 
was somewhat improved from 
the previous two months, with 
the rate of decline slowing. 

The association’s seasonally 
adjusted ipdex rose to S1.7 per- 
cent in October tram 51 percent 
in September. A figure above SO 
percent indicates that the econ- 


Better Statistics 
Are Sought on 
Service Sector 

Bv Eileen Shanahan 

.Vo* York Tunet Senuv 
WASHINGTON — “We’ve 
been looking at ibe economy 
with one eye; it’s time to open 
the other eye." says Joan E. Spe- 
ro, senior vice’ president of 
American Express Ca, talking 
about the lack of adequate data 
on what is widely considered the 
most dynamic part of the U.S. 
economy: the service sector. 

Gregory Ross, vice president 
of planning and development for 
ARA Services Inc., a commercial 
food and health service compa- 
ny, puts the issue another way. 

“with the information we 
have now," he says, “it’s like try- 
ing lo use a 20-year-old toad 
map that doesn't have the Inter- 
states to figure out the fastest 
wav to get places." 

the shortage of data hurts the 
economy in diverse and often 
unpredictable ways. For exam- 
ple, the United Stiles is expected 
to apply pressure in upcoming 
trade negotiations for lower im- 
port barriers for services such as 
insurance and banking But UJS. 
negotiators will be hamstrung, 
say many service-company offi- 
cials, because the government 
may know loo little about the 
volume and price of service im- 
ports and exports to build an 
effective case. 

“We know how to measure all 
those autos that go out," says 
Mrs. Spero. “But how do you 
capture tire services flows — 
b anking , insurance and so on?" 

While the government has tak : 
en step* in recent yean to redress 
the imbalance, most service- 
company executives agree that 
far more needs to be done. They 
worry that major business and 
public-policy derisions are being 
tnarii* with inadequate data thai 
distort perceptions of reality. 

“We have a hangover of re- 
strictive thinking when it comes 
to services,” says Waller W. 
Heller, professor of economics at 


Services: Where the Growth Is 

Cpgtpoong anuutf rttn L b«««d oo grata now/nal ptbCuci in 

GurBredatent. tor effected aecrsrs of me aconooiy 


Compound Annual Growth 
1960-1944 1980-1964 


Tin Rescue Plan 
Is Proposed by 
FTC Creditors 


GQOPS-PRODUC1NG 

Agriculture, Forestry, Rshonea 
Construction 

I — ■ ■ — ■— ■ . ■ . ... 

Manufacturing 

Minina 


Sactor 

Cofapounci AnmiM Growm 
TQC0-1M4 1980-1B84 

SERVtCES-PRODUCING 

4.0% 

3.6% 

Communication 

7.1 

4.7 

Telephone. Telegraph 

7,8 

4.7 j 

Radio, Television 

2.9 

6.2 1 

Finance, Insurance, Real Estate 

4.0 

2.9 

Banking 

3.8 

1.7 

Insurance 

3.0 

o !2 

Securities, Commodities Brokers 

4.8 

16.9 

Real Estate 

4.2 

30 

Public Utilities 

3.9 

1j9 

Services 

4.1 

2.4 

Amusements, Recreation 

3.4 

4.9 

Auto Repair 

4.2 

IS 

Business Services 

6.8 

7.2 

Health Services 

542 

3.6 

Legal Services 

4.6 

6.4 

Personal Services 

0.4 

1.9 

Transportation 

2.1 

-1 JO 

Wholesale, Retail Trade 

3J9 

4.7 

SAiSE* j 


the University of Minnesota and 
a former chairman of the Coun- 
cil of Economic Advisers. 

“People still think about the 
service sector in terms of tie 
Middle Ages — low productivity 
activities like barber shops. 
There’s all this hand-wringing 
about the basic industries, tike 
autos, but computers are just as 
basic. These obsolete thought 
patterns are part of what's get- 
ting us into our protectionist 
posture.” 


Th* New >ori Thiibi 


The list of statistical pitfalls 
for business executives and gov- 
ernment policymakers is impres- 
sive. It includes the following: 

• Measuring imprecisely the 
output of service industries". This 
ma> have led to a chronic under- 
estimating of overall economic 
growth and productivity gains. 
Nancy- Teeters, the fomier Fed- 
fcral "Reserve Board governor 
who is now director of econom- 
ics for International Business 
(Continued ou Page 17, CoL 2) 


LONDON — Creditors of the 
International Tin Council an- 
nounced Monday a plan to end the 
chaos >c the world tin industry 
which has halted trading in the 
metal for nearly two weeks. 

The 16 financial institutions of- 
fered the ITC more funds, and said 
they were willing to give the council 
a 12-month breathing space in re- 
paying principal and interest it 
owes them. 

They said they would do this 
provided ITC producers paid S6G 
million to the council — money 
they pledged last month for further 
ITC buying operations but have 
still not paid — before tin trading 
resumed on the London Metal Ex- 
change. 

There is unlikely tc> be a response 
to the proposals" until a meeting 
Friday of the ITC, a grouping of 22 
tin producing and consuming 
countries. 

The iin crisis started Ocl24 
when the council abandoned price 
support operations, saying it had 
run out of money to support world 
prices above f ree-marke: levels. Tin 
trading on the London Metal Ex- 
change and in Kualar Lumpur, the 
world's other main tin 'jading cen- 
ter. was immediately suspended. 

The proposals will be discussed 
when leading trading firms meet 
officials of die LME Tuesday to 
bear what progress has been made 
in salvaging the tin market. 

Throughout the crisis, the British 
government has been under pres- 
sure to guarantee future borrow- 
ings by the ITC. Michael Brown, 
the chief executive of the LME. 
warned the government over the 
weekend that the LME faced col- 
lapse because of the crisis, adding 
that there would be spinoff casual- 
ties in other commodity markets if 
that happened. 

The creditors said they expected 
ITC members to say publicly that 
they would give the ITC enough 


cash to keep it afloat cr they v.cuic 
wind down the council's supper 
buying operations while still meet- 
ing existing liabilities. 

The institutions said the;- want- 
ed a reply to their prcpc<&k by the 
time they meet Friday. 

A spokeswoman for the British 
Trade and Industry Ministry said 
Britain welcomed any proposal 
aimed at ending the tin marke: cri- 
sis but dechned to comment on 
whether Britain, as an ITC u:r- 
sumer member, would accept the 
bankers' conditions. 

Britain has said :• is willing :c 
pay its share of the ITC:- debt*, 
estimated a: hundreds of millions 
of dollars, and last week took the 
lead in calling for a resumption of 
emergency ITC talks aimed at put- 
ting the market back or. its fee:. 

The ITC met for two days list 
week but failed to settle members' 
differences on how to end the cha rs 
and gave no hint to traders and 
creditors about how it planned to 
honor its obligations 

The bankers' move is the firs: 
firm initiative since the star: of tin 
crisis. 

Among the conditions laid down 
by the creditors in return for pro- 
viding new Hinds for the ITC are 
that; 

• ITC member countries mu>! 
place at the disposal of the buffer 
stock manager the additional funds 
recently committed by the produc- 
er country members of the ITC. 

• ITC members must undertake 
to put in place guarantees for the 
present outstanding amounts ad- 
vanced by the institutions, together 
with rolled up interest for the next 
12 months. 

Mr. Brown said if tin-producing 
nations paid their debts tc the tin 
council’s buffer stock — the pnci - 
support mechanism — then it 


Pohl Rules Out Rate Increase to Defend Mark 


By Warren Getler 

liumanonaS Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Karl Otto 
PbhU president of West Germany’s 
central bank, said Monday that 
there is no coordinated policy on 
interest rates among the five major 
Western industrialized nations and 
he emphasized that the Bundes- 
bank has no intention of raising 
key interest rates as a means of 
defending the Deutsche mark 
against the dollar. 

Some speculation about a passi- 
ble interest-rate increase in West 
Germany bad surfaced last week as 
a result of a rise in West German 
capital-market rates and of moves 
by the Bank of Japan to boost 
short-term yen interest rates. 

Mr. Pohl said that the Bundes- 
bank regarded relatively low inter- 
est rates in West Germany as a 
hard-won reward from tight fiscal 
and monetary policies. He said that 
it was an achievement that the 
Bundesbank would not endanger in 
any effort to “correct" the dollar's 


exchange rate against major for- 
eign currencies. 

“Press reports have indicated 
that the government and central 
bank of Japan are prepared to lift 
the level of Japanese interest rates 
as a means of supporting the appre- 
ciation of the yen." Mr. Pohl told a 
group of German tax advisers. “I 
want to make perfectly dear that 
this is nolthe policy of the Bundes- 
bank." 

Although Mr. Pohl ruled out 
raising rates to prop the mark. 
Bundesbank officials have indicat- 
ed privately that the German cen- 
tral bank would not necessarily 
move to cut rates here in the ab- 
sence or a rate reduction by the 
U.S. Federal Reserve Board. 

A reduction in the key rates by 
the Bundesbank, prior to a similar 
move by the Fed, could undercut 
the value of the marie by encourag- 
ing investors to seek the higher re- 
turn on dollar investments. 

Bundesbank officials also indi- 
cated that although there was no 
commitment to increase interest 


rates in a coordinated fashion at 
the latest meeting of Group of Five 
ministers in September, there was 
discussion about abstaining from 
inleresi-raie policy that would run 
counter to the goal of having non- 
dollar currencies appreciate against 
the dollar. Such actions could in- 
clude cutting rates prior to a reduc- 
tion in key U.S. rates. 

The Group of Five nations, the 
United States. Japan, West Germa- 
ny, Britain and France, agreed in 
September on steps at that meeting 
designed to strengthen key curren- 
cies against the dollar. 

Mr. PdhL noting that U.S. mone- 
tary aggregates have been allowed 
to expand markedly in recent 
months, was skeptical about the 
chances for a cut soon in the U.S. 
discount rate, the fee charged by 
the Federal Reserve on loans to 
member commercial banks. There 
have been rumors in recent weeks 
that such a reduction was immi- 
nent 

“In view of strong monetary ex- 
pansion. an attempt to bring down 


interest rates and thus the dollar 
through an easy-money policy 
could easily jeopardize the credibil- 
ity of the U.S. Federal Reserve,” 
Mr. Pdhl cautioned. 

Mr. Pohl asserted that beyond 
his government's agreement to’ par- 
ticipate in coordinated central- 
bank intervention, he saw no rea- 
son to diverge from current fiscal 
and monetary policies. 

Bundesbank officials are under- 
stood to view the dollar exchange 
rate of 2.60 DM as having reached 
a kind of equilibrium. 

The Bundesbank president gave 
three reasons to avoid changing do- 
mestic monetary policy. 

First, he said, the major world 
trade unbalance — and its effect on 
foreign-exchange rates — is chiefly 
a U.S.-Japanese affair. Second, he 
said, the current dollar-mark ex- 
change rate of around 2.60 DM 
does not threaten price stability. 
And. third, be said, that exchange 
rate does not threaten the competi- 
tiveness of West German industry 
in exporting its products. 


would be np to the metal exchange 
“to organize a soft landing for titC" 
thus preventing sharp price fluctu- 
ations. 


Saudi OU Output 
Is Said to Soar 

Reuters 

NICOSIA — Saudi Arabia's 
output of crude oil rose sharply 
in October, to 4 million barrel’s 
a day. slightly under its OPEC 
quota of 4.35 million barrels, 
the Middle East Economic Sur- 
vey said Monday. 

Saudi Arabia has borne the 
brant of declining demand for 
oil from members of the Orga- 
nization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries, and its output 
sank as low as 2 million barrels 
a day in August. But the Saudi 
oil minister, Sheikh Ahmed 
Zaki Yamani, has said in reeen; 
weeks that the kingdom now 
intends to raise its output to- 
ward its permitted ceiling. 

The Economic Survey, a Ni- 
cosia-based newsletter, said 
output by the 13 OPEC coun- 
tries last month totaled 17.3 
million barrels a day compared 
with its agreed-upon maximum 
of 16 million barrels. 


China Bans Most Car Imports 
To Aid Its Industry, Reserves 


omy is expanding. 

The index is based on new 

orders, production, speed of 

suppliers is filling orders, in- 
ventories and employment. 

Vendor deliveries showed lit- 
tle change for the ninth consec- 
utive month, and no items were 
reported in short supply. 


BEIJING — China announced 
Monday a strict ban oo most vehi- 
cle imports for the next two years 
to stem a flood of Japanese cars 
and to preserve its dwindling for- 
eign-exchange reserves. 

Official statistics in China show 
that in the first quarter of 1985. 
vehicle imports totaled 27,461, up 
851 percent from 2,889 in the corre- 
sponding year-earlier period. 

Toy* 4a Motor Corp. alone ex- 
ported 34,000 vehicles to China last 
year and was expecting an increase 
to more than 70.000 this year. 

The People’s Daily newspaper 
quoted a senior economic official 
as saying that no organization or 
enterprise in China would be able 
to impart small cars, jeeps or mini- 
buses during the next two years 
without special permission. 

In its overseas edition, the news- 
paper said the Communist Party 
leadership had ordered strict con- 
trols to be placed on imports of 
vehicles both (o conserve foreign 
exchange and to encourage “do- 
mestic technological progress." 

A spokesman for Tokyo Boeki 
Ltd., a company which handles im- 


ports to China from Toyota, said 
business bad declined recently, but 
said that Toyota was unaware of 
any comprehensive ban. 

Beijing officials believe soaring 
imports of foreign cars have con- 
tributing to a drop in China's for- 
eign-exchange reserves. 

The Chinese government wants 
to see more domestic auto produc- 
tion, and is favoring joint Chinese 
ventures involving forage compa- 
nies. Several are underway. 

Volkswagen werk AG. the West 
German automaker, is assembling 
Santana autos in Shanghai and 
Peugeot SA of France signed an 
agreement last month to build a 
track plant in Canton. 

.American Motors Corp. is coop- 
erating in the production of its 
Cherokee four-wheel-drive vehicle 
at a plant in Beijing, and Citroen or 
France and Nissan Motor Co. of j 
Japan both have held negotiations j 
on setting up production facilities 

in China. 

China produced 310,000 v ehicles ' 
last year. Although production in 
the first half of this year was up 48 
percent from a year earlier, it did 
not meet deman d. 


The Perpetual Calendar 


WORLD-WIDE SERVICE BY 

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complete aircraft management purchase, sales financing. Insurance, 
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Our Alr-Tind service la available to you around-the-clock: ~ 

1 Mitsubishi 2-4 Citation R - 3 Leaqat 35-1 Learjet 36 - ■ 

6 Falcon 10-6 Falcon 20-^7 Falcon SO - 1 Jetstar H - 7 GuHstream U/Kl - 
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and exchanges were dosed in Japan 


(tam Duswictorf. GanevB, Knral Munich, Zurich Europe: . 

Jeddah, Riyadh MtckflaEash 

• Boston. MA. Morristown. NJ.. Woat Palm Boacti, FL North America; 


Zuncn (118142002 Tlx. 59 £20 
Riyadh (1)2201888 Tlx.205651 
Boston (817] 2740030 71* 951 195 






741A 411* SCM 250 V 17 
12* 9* SL Ind -22b 17 11 
32* 19WSPSTeC JO 15 IS 

1* 13 SOUne JM j 38 

20 14 SobnRv 241el+4 

2DH 12* 5fedHs JO 17 15 

12* 5tfc StodSe 22 

9* HA StadSwt 


London Metals 


Clow PlWlOM 

BM ASk BM Aik 

ALUMINUM 
Steribio per aietrlc ton 
snot 65X00 454-BO 65450 68650 

forward 67770 67850 47200 47400 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric ton 
spot 950.00 951-00 949 JO 951 JO 

forward 97250 97100 97SJ0 97400 

COPPER CATHODES (Stnadardl 
Stemav per metric tea „ 

5POt 921JJ0 92300 92100 92400 

forward 95200 95400 93500 95BOO 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 

mat va qi 2A4J0 24200 24300 

ferward 27173 27200 27200 27300 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric Ian 
Spot 290200 291200 284000 2S56M 

forward 392100 292200 288500 289000 

SILVER 

Pence per troy ounce 

soot 421.00 42200 42300 4MOO 

Forward 43400 <3500 43400 437 JO 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling par metric ton HMI _ 

spot Siim — 843800 854900 

forward Susp. - 854400 844000 

ZINC 

Sterling rer metric ton __ 

spat 39000 19200 39900 40100 

Source: AP. 


Now offering 
CBOT 

BON D 

FUTURES 

WBea & BBS 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

• - LmrCrxernknee Rota 


$15 


* ROUND TUAN 
IMYAND 
OVERNIGHT 


’AppHet on/r to trades 

acceedtnR 750 contract! per 
catmAzr mrmPt Ftrtt 2 So 
contracts S2f rmntd rum. 


< jJI unc of uur pnofeselrmah: 
212-221-7138 

Telex; 2 — OGS 

BEPDBLZC CLEARING 
CORPORATION 

«iMtM«ntKTra 

lepeMr laltotal leak ctihwlw* 

A *12 Brawn PMKKU B«4 


volume; < late al 25 Forte. 
Source; Reuters. 


Gomnwclities 


JUT _ N.T. N.T. 31900 34100 33700 33900 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 34300 34500 34100 343.00 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 34800 35000 34400 34800 
Volume: 25 late of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5i per ounce 


High low Settle 

Dec 327J0 327 JO 327.1® 

Feb N.T. N.T. 331 JO 

Volume: 40 lata at IDO az. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Ma lays Mm cents per ktla 

Clow Prr 

Bin Ask Bid 

Dec 1 79 JO ibojd ihioo 

Jan 18030 1BL50 18200 

Feb 18200 18X00 18X00 

Mar 18100 18400 18400 

Volume: 0 lot*. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cent! per kilo 

- Close Prat 

BM Ask Bid 

RSS 1 Dec- 15550 15400 15553 

RSS T jan_ 15425 15475 15750 

P.S5 2 Dec- 14850 14930 New 

RS5 3D0C- 14450 14750 — 

RSS 4 Dec. 1CJ0 144 JO — 
RSS 5 Dec. 13700 13900 — 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rtngglle per 35 turn 


ConSnoilities 


High Law BM Ask arw 

SUGAR „ 

French (ranee pgr metric Ian 
Dec 1030 1*405 1415 1420 +13 

Mar 14® 1420 1-05 1.04 +4 

MOV 1473 1770 1.444 1-474 +3 

Aug 1516 1 JM 1504 1514 + 10 

Del 1540 1540 1532 1545 + 12 

Dec 1548 1545 1544 1550 +13 

Est. voL; 3000 late of 50 lane. Prev. actual 
rates: 1580 lots. Open Interest: 24478 
COCOA 

FreiicSi trance per 110 kg 

1590 1590 1585 1590 + 

1.920 1.930 1,900 1.920 


fbt. 4 

Close Previous 
High Law BM ARC BM Ask 

5UOAR 

Starling per metric tea 
DOC N.T. N.T. 14400 14950 15150 15350 

Mar 14250 15850 159.00 159-40 161.40 14200 

May 14550 14X00 14350 14350 145L2Q 18550 

Aug 17050 18850 18809 14850 17080 17150 

Oct 17550 17350 17X00 17X40 17550 17400 

Volume: X203 lots of SO tons. 

COCOA 

Steriiag per metric Ion 
Doc 1543 1555 1559 1540 1559 1540 

Mar 1,706 1597 1,703 1.705 1J01 1,702 

May 1530 1J23 1.730 IJ31 17Z7 1528 

jly 1J53 1.749 US* 1555 U49 1J50 

SOP 1.775 1773 1774 1777 1749 1775 

Dec U70 1745 1770 1771 1744 17&8 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1775 1781 1780 1785 , 

Volume: 1,185 late aflO tans. 

COFFEE 

Starting Per metric ton 
NOV 1,940 1545 1470 1490 1.944 1.954 

Jan 1490 1485 1.912 1.915 1.991 1495 

Mar 1,992 1499 1.922 1,925 2510 2515 

May 1,990 1,915 1442 1455 2510 2525 

Jly 1.990 1.945 1465 1485 2510 2540 

Sep 2500 1470 1480 1,990 2520 2550 

Nov 1.985 1,985 1.940 2520 2510 2580 

Volume: 9474 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

UJLdoHan par metric tan 
NOV 24423 264JD 26475 34850 26025 24&50 
DOC 26S75 20030 241 30 20175 26400 26475 
Jra 26275 25950 259 JO 24050 24250 26X25 

Fob 25875 25350 25875 25550 25775 25775 
Mar 25050 24575 24575 24450 24950 24930 
API 24075 23750 23750 23730 23930 23975 
May 23050 23050 22850 22950 23150 23250 
Jun 22950 22550 22575 22530 22850 23150 
Jly 23050 225.00 22530 22S75 22750 22950 
volume: 1,139 Ion at 100 tone. 

CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

U5- doikn per barrel 

Dec 2855 2870 2889 2870 New New 

Jan Z0JB 2750 2775 2750 — — , 

Feb 27-47 2775 2773 2778 — — 

Mar 26-90 2440 2435 2880 — — 

*P» ®>-SS 2650 25JM 2430 — — 

May 24.15 26.15 2570 2470 — — 

Volume: 129 lots of 1500 barrels. 

Sources: Reuter* and London Petroleum Ex 
chanoe tuasoft, crude all}. 


, S&p 100 
indec Options 


Strike UBrUnt PuhJjai 

Prtc* NUT Dec JM Fee Hov StS Fee 
l4JI9 tt-___WMW- 
in 141* 143* lAi Ula 1/M J/M 5/14 7/14 

m VJ L0 9^ 10 I/m 7/14 13/M 1 S/14 

“flat M >t 1 7/142 B. 
IB llnuvuiw JL 2 1* 5 

in 1* tin* iw 1 «v an tv. Tie n 

IIS---_ UTi___ 

iMdaCnkme jkda 
T«W can awn tat. 505.175 
TMpdrWn MU66 
TrWwri 0PM felt. 44J547 

HMfeUUf Lap 11453 Bote 1K92 + 011 
Source; CBOE. 


Massey-Ferguson Shutdowns 

Reuters 

TORONTO — Massey-Fergu- 
son Lid. said Monday ii would sus- 
pend production Nov. 15 at its 
combine harvester plants here and 
in Brantford. Omario because in- 
dustry sales in North America bad 
dropped to record low levels. 



3-nxmtti bill 

Dtscoant 
Oder Bid 

772 770 

Mot. 4 

Prev. 
Yield Yield 

745 743 

4-«Datti bill 

771 779 

7.70 

748 

l-rearbiB 

777 775 

751 

7.90 

N-vear bead 

Bid Otter 
W3 28/32103 30/37 

Yield 

1020 

Prev. 

Yield 

1073 

Seurat; Salomon Brothers. 

MarrDl Lynch Treasury index; 13L29 
Change far me dev: +622 

Average yield: 045 % 

iwa. Merrill Lynch. 



DM Futures 
Options 


P.CermmMart-aSJRO marts, cents etr mm 


Xoc. 4 

Strike Calls- Settle Ptm-SeftM 

Price Dec Mar Jea Dec Mar Jun 

1 78 275 263 ILM 050 B72 

18 0.95 L73 272 0J2 884 15* 

39 441 171 173 OJB 177 1J2 

*0 0.15 083 UO 1J1 156 204 

<1 004 054 044 — — 245 

estimated total wL «JW 
Cote'. FrLveL 1802 apMM. 3*338 
Puts: "rl. vol. 2717 open lot. 77JM 
Sourer: vJ»tr. 


COFFEE COiYCSCE) 

mSo^ma^Dae 14050 14475 15930 16146 —614 
14753 12830 Mar 15153 14550 14153 16154 — 5J9 
M 147.18 13150 Mav 14175 16530 15170 15276 -852 
13 

1-8 | 

i I Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Opttona Strike 

UmleriylDa Price Cate— Last I 

Nov Dec Mar Nov Dec Mar 
12300 British Pounds-cents par unit. 

B Pound 120 4 • r 2400 4 

14455 125 * 1975 t 8 

14455 110 3 1180 r 1 

14455 135 r 9.15 970 r 

14455 140 r r 640 0.15 

14455 145 070 135 450 r 

14455 in r 030 273 r 

5550a Conodkia DaHare-cents Par antt. 

CDallr 71 r r r r 

7350 73 r r r r 

7350 73 r r 073 r 

42J00 warn German Mcrio-centi per mdt. 
DAtom 30 3 833 r 5 

3888 31 4 730 r S 

3848 32 5 654 r s 

3848 33 5 530 r 0 

3848 34 I 430 473 ■ 

3848 35 r 162 450 r 

3848 36 r 234 r r 

3848 37 r 1.74 274 r 

3848 38 035 150 175 r 

3848 3V 0.14 049 176 058 

3848 40 r 070 054 r 

1K4M French Frwics-iottii of a cent per unit. 

F Prone 120 r 645 r r 

12677 125 1.90 r r r 

67SUM Japanese Yen-UOths el a cent per unit. 
JVen 41 s r 75B 5 

«.14 42 r 618 470 r 

4814 43 r 612 634 r 

4814 44 r 4.16 473 r 

4814 45 r XU 344 r 

4814 46 2.15 270 240 r 

4614 47 ITS 140 159 r 

4614 48 045 052 143 074 

4614 49 613 040 6M r 

<2300 Swiss Fraacs-eents per naif. 

5 Prone 40 s 6«6 r a 

4650 42 S 550 r S 

4650 43 r 455 r r 

4680 44 r X10 r 051 

4650 45 r 118 113 r 

4680 46 r 148 r 610 

4650 47 042 058 r r 

_ 4*40 48 r 041 140 r 

Total call vaL tun con open 

TotolpalvoL 6975 Put open 

, r— Hat traded. 9— NaepHanoHered. 

Lost I* premium [purchase price). 

Source: AP. 




r 100 
60S 455 

350 r 


053 r 

809 r 

r 052 


0.12 r 

075 050 

r 141 


803 r 
UH 627 
610 045 

076 675 

659 174 


603 r 
607 042 

r 056 
079 151 


■at. IMM 
W. 150915 


yiaar nun Jim 

96M 9653 Sen 

Est. Sales 3531 Prev. So let 8721 
Prev. Day Open ML 4 6224 UP 190 
M YR. TREA5UHYCOBT1 _ 

Si 00500 prin-p*s&32ndBotiaopct ■ 
■8-11 7S-13 Dee 87-M 88-1 

87- 11 75-14 Mar M46 86-31 

16-10 7+30 Jun 85-2 88-1 

84-4 80-7 SOP 

8+19 80-2 „Dec M-ll tt-U 

Eri. Sales Prev.SaiM ix« 

Prev.Day Open ML <9569 oHW O 
US TREASURY BONDS com u 
I8pc+swo500-ids632ndeo(i00pd0' 
790 57-8 Dec 78-1* 2808 

77-29 67-2 Mar 77-6 77-1S 

76-18 58-27 Jun. 785 »-12 

75-XT SG Sep 757 75-10 

7+24 56-35 Dec 74 7400 

7+15 5+gr Mar 

72OT £F sen 71-03 71-27 

7620 BE 7613 7M* 

eSSte PtW.SateteWl. 

m^D^Onealnt317JU ueUM 
MUNICIPAL BO NDS (C BTj . 

Si BHbe Mda+pMAmtAatWOnet 
*8+33 n-W Dee M-W 1W2 

88- 2 MM Mar *+20 B-N 

550 79 Jun 

eSSoM- p35.S0M* 2512 

Prev. Dor Oooa Infc 7jm up 156 

*as=w«i » 

9X18 8656 Mar 92J4 9X16 

91-79 M43 Jun 

HJ9 HJ4 St 

prev. Ouy Open lnt UB Off 48 


78-13 Was 43 

7M 77-15 +3 

75-30 76-10 ■« 

7409 IS* 40 

7849 7+9 4d 

7342 +3 

78-18 +3 

7148 71-X7 +3 

71-4 +3 

70-10 7849 +3 

780 -HI 


88-11 8801 
8544 8524 


Commodity indevwc 


90+209 

K6Uref8 1 ' , • 1 tyt a * 

D-J. Futures '(nfil 

Com- Research Bureau - . 

Moody^ : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931 
p- preliminary; f- f(na] 

dow Jones . base too : Dec. 3t, 1974. 


Prev loos 

W.lflt 

225^0 


9230 9232 -54 
9X13 ttU —52 

.R M +51 
9159 +52 

9B2T +52 



US? Vortc 




'ut 





































































Morgan Guaranty 
continues to manage issues 

in more currencies 


than any other underwriter 




■1" 7h>: 

Ms t-. 


*— -.«J TV •' 


t 


| <!?! 


■ r i*' 


e With the current uncertainty in the LIS. dollar 
* exchange rate, non-US: dollar capital markets 
£ continue to grow. In this environment, more and 
fc more multinationals are turning to The Morgan . 
i. Bank for non-dollar bond financing. 

2 In the first nine months of 3985— in which over 

2 -half of all international bond issues were in non- 
^ U.S. dollar currencies— our subsidiary Morgan 
r : Guaranty Ltd was lead manager of issues in a . 

Sc wider range of currencies than any other 
underwriter. 

£ Here’s what makes Morgan a truly global 
; financial intermediary. * 

£ □ As a major participant in the international 

J securities markets— as well as the worldwide for- 
eign exchange, government bond, and bullion mar- 
^ kets—we have an exceptional ability to perceive 
% and exploit market opportunities for our clients . 
w , □ Morgan is the leading counterparty that can 
act with equal proficiency as either principal or 
•>: agent in interest-rate and currency swap trans- 
it actions. . 

2 □ Morgan’s financial strength— over $5 bil- 

" lion in primary capital— lowers our clients’ cost 
2 and risk in intermarket arbitrage. 

V Our clients find that using foreign currency 
?• bond markets broadens their investor bases and 
£ facilitates economic arid accounting hedges of 
£ overseas investments. Through currency and 
^interest-rate swaps we help them create dollar 
/ obligations at substantially reduced costs. We also 
i identify opportunities to earn arbitrage profits in 

k non-dollar markets. ” 

J _ Some examples of how Morgan has helped bor- 

r rowers take advantage of new opportunities in 
i non-dollar markets so far this year: 

?■ Deutschemarks. Morgan Guaranty GmbH was 
5 ; lead manager of an R.J. Reynolds DM265 million 
? issue swapped into U.S. dollars. This was the first 


Selected non-U.S. dollar issues 
lead-managed by Morgan Guaranty 
January-October, 1985 


Bank of Tokyo 

British Petroleum 

British Petroleum 

Chrysler Financial 

Chrysler Financial 

Coca-Cola Financial 

European Investment Bank 
Gaz de France 

IBM Credit 

IBM France 

IBM Ufarid Trade 

IC Industries 

ITT 

J.C. Penney 

Kingdom of Sweden 

McDonald's 

Mobil 

Motorola 

Nordic Investment Bank 

Olivetti 

PepsiCo 

Peugeot 

R.J. Reynolds 

R.J- Reynolds 

Security Pacific 

Sterling Drug 

World Bank 


AS50 million 
¥ 17 billion 
£50 million 
SF35Q million 
NZS65 million 
NZS75 million 
DKR25Q million 
FF5Q0 million 
NZS60 million 
FF70Q million 
ECU 350 million 
CS5Q million 
SF1QQ million 
¥ 26 billion 
FF5QQ million 
¥ 25 billion 
FF500 million 
ECU 50 million 
DKR200 million 
SF10Q million 
SF130 million 
FF50Q million 
DM265 million 
SF275 million 
ECU iQQ million 
£30 million 
SF600 million 


straight Euro-Deutschemark issue in which a 
foreign-owned firm acted as book-running lead 
manager. 

Swiss francs. Morgan Guaranty (Switzerland ) 
Ltd launched as book-runner a SF235 million 
issue which we combined with a currency swap 
to provide 35-year U.S. dollar financing for R.J. 
Reynolds. Increased to SF275 million, tills was 
the largest Swiss franc offering to date by a U.S. 
company. In the Swiss public bond market we 
were also book-running lead manager for issues 




The Morgan Bank 


for ITT, PepsiCo, Olivetti, and the first zero coupon 
issue for the World Bank. 

ECUs. Morgan was lead or co-lead manager of 
ten ECU issues, including an ECU 100 million 
issue for Security Pacific Australia which we 
swapped into U.S. dollar financing. 

Sterling. We were book-running lead manager 
for Euro-sterling bond issues for British Petro- 
leum and Sterling Drug. In addition, Morgan 
lead managed a $100 million issue for Minnesota 
Mining & Manufacturing that was the first dollar/ 
sterling dual-currency issue ever. 

Yen. For J.C. Penney, we arranged U.S. doEar 
fixed-rate funding, at a cost below the yield on U.S. 
Treasury notes, through a Euro-yen bond issue 
and currency swap. 

New Zealand dollars. This year we've led nine 
issues, including a NZ$75 million Coca-Cola 
Financial issue which we swapped into fixed-rate 
U.S. dollar financing. 

French francs. We were co-lead manager, with 
two French banks, of a Gaz de France issue that 
reopened the Euro-French franc bond market 
after a four-year lapse. Then we co-led French 
franc issues for IBM France, the Kingdom of 
Sweden, Peugeot, Mobil, and Electricite de France. 

Danish krone. We were lead manager for the 
first two issues in the Euro-Danish krone bond 
market, which opened this year. 

Let us compete for your mandate. You’U find 
we deliver innovative services in the capital mar- 
kets with the same high quality and sldH that 
have long been hallmarks of all Morgan banking. 

Morgan Guaranty 7 Ltd, 30 Throgmorton Street, 
London EC2N 2NT 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, 23 WaU Street, 
New' York, NY 10015 Uprut FZt-C 





ze 14 . 


How CitiBanking Electronic L/C’s speed trade 
to deliver the goods to your bottom line. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 

| Floating-Rate INlotes 


The rules have changed, IfyuiTre still 
handling Letters of Credit in traditional ways, 
you could be creating unnecessary headaches 
for yourself. And missing out on profit oppor- 
tunities for your company. 

With CitiBanking. you speed the turnover 
of goods by increasing 'your control aid 
efficiency. Yxi can open new L/C s in minutes. 
Determine the status of outstanding L/C s in 
seconds. And manage vour FX and cash flow 
exposures much more effectively. All with 


'M 




rrZSk 


'V/t 










- 


■3L 




remarkable ease. ..and unmatched security. 

To find out how your Import Department 
can benefit from the worlds most advanced and 
secure electronically delivered banking services, 
call the Citibank located near you. 

And put the Citi of Tbrnorrow-' 1 to work for 
your company today. 


i ici rnmc ~n tuc citi 
wcd-utic iu me c .in 

CITICORP& CITIBANK 


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ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Nov. 4,1985 


Net enter value qawlattan* ore supplied t»y the Fuads listed with *ne nevpNaa of mom doom bawd u*Jm* *nc*. 

The marginal symbols indicate fraqunn o* nuotollons supplied: (cf) - deity; (w) - weekly; (b) - Bi- m o ntb ty; frt - nnaatr; CO - W |> W . . 


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Pfaoios by; Bischof. Bunl Capa. Canier-Bresson. Erwu. Hass, and other Magnum photographers. 

From die archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe 
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Page 15 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 5, 1985 




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Reuters 

„ WASHINGTON -a Canadian 
fcnanaal group controlled by the' 
pdzberg fcrofly has offered to ac- 
quire Potlatch Corp^ a major US. 
lumber, plywood and papers con- 
cern. in a transaction, valued at 
about $670 million, • 

Tbe chairman of .Potlatch, Rich- 
ard Madden, called the proposal 
“extremely unattractive" and sad 

of dtrectcmo 

However, the company’s stock 
rose S6.75 Monday toS42L75 m 
volume of 506.800 shares on- the 
expectation that the company 
would be taken over by the Bda- 
bergs or someone else. 

'potlatch said it received' a letter 
over the weekend from First Gty 
Financial Corp., a Vancouver, Brit- 
ish Columbia concern, offering to 
acquire the company for S45 per 
share in cash. 

Sixty-nine percent of First City 

duett, Peabody 
To Be Acquired 
By West Point 

The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Cluert, Pea- 
body & Co„ escaping a take- 
over by a California investor, 
said Monday h had agreed to be 
acquired by West Point- Pep- 
tpercll Inc. for about 5375 nw- 
|7ion in cash and stock. 

Queti, Peabody is a -New 
York-based apparel maker. 
West Point-Pepperell, head- 
quartered in West Point, Geor- 
gia. produces textiles and 
household fabrics. 

The announcement sawt the 
investor who had been pursuing 
a hostile acquisition of Clueit, 
Peabody, Paul A. Bilzerian of 
Sacramento, agreed to sell his 
Quell shares to West Point and 
to drop his tender offer for the 
remaining stock. 

Mr. Bilzerian led an investor - 
group that already owned about 
24 percent of CluetL 

Under the agreement, West 
Point- PeppcreU would pay ei- 
ther 541 in cash or 0.9704 of a - 
share of its common stock, 
which is also valued at 541, for 
each Cl nett share, . . • 

Mr. BQzerian’s group had of- 
fered 540 a share. 


t& owned%'j%^W)«g brothers 
who Canadian 

famgy in real estate, 

trust and fa ss^ oen^arBes and 
rmam^sovKeooriocrn^ 

The Bdztejs' fisdosed in a fil- 
ms with the Securities and Ex- 
change Crpiprissj^Monday that 
they ahesdy Md dwoqpivalem of 
a 5.7-peii^'st^^PcMauh. The 
stake includes Sl.^gflO shares , and 
an option- Stearns & 
Co H a Wall Street-brokerage part- 
nership, for an additional 200,000 
shares, the BefcbtigrtahL 
The brothcrs said that they held 
the Potlatch securities through first 


r for Potlatch Sunshine Australia Bids S 226 Million Baring Announces Major Restructuring 


Trost Qx, wUdMheyabo^ comrof. 

Potlatch haV proposed an 
amend mem; to its /bylaws that 
would give masting, shareholders 
four votes to every one for new 
shareholder. The 8ehberg& said 
they wen: conjadfeimg a pnjxy fujht. 
against the proposed m eas ure and 


that their S45 offer .was conn ngern 
on the withdrawal of the pl^n 

The Befcbergs gave Potlatch’s 
managemou until 5 p.m. local time 
Wednesday to respond iu titor of- 
fer. and said that talks could lead to . 
aWgherbid. 

Mark Rogers of Dean Winer 
Reynold* Inti *aid he believed that 
the offer of 545 per share was inad- 
equate. He said that in a takeover 
situation, the company would be 
worth in the S6ft-a-share range and 
that fundamentally. Potlatch >>lock 
would be valued in the upper 40s. 

. . Analysis predicted that Potlatch 
would not be able to remain inde- 
pendem or to continue .in its pre- 
sent structure in fight of die offer. 

“In the forest-products industry, 
most of the companies that have 
been involved m this type of situa- 
tion have not been successful with- 
standing it,” said Uotv Ross of 
Paine Webber Inc. 


For Rest of Wormald International 

E.-Sifi 

^ — Sunshine Au?trali.i Ltd. ■yjic Monday will make a 

bid valued at 324.2 Australian joilars <5226.7 mrilicn? for tire SO. 57 
percent of Wornia’d Inicmaiionu! Ltd. :t does not already owtl 

Wormald. a fire proieei:.*^j and seeunty group, operates in many 
countries, indudicg Britain and rht* United States. 

The bid. tor 4 doitar* a \hare. for Sl.it6 million Wonraui shares. 
The value ol the «ffer u. based ,t» Fridav’s close for Worm aid stock on 
the Svdney Sioci: Exchanee. 

Sunshine earreiilly holds 15.7 million. Wormald shares. Sunsrd;,e‘s 
managing director. Lee Minn Tee. said. He added that ihe offer is 
conditional on Sunshine receiving acceptances f«*r sC nereea: o- 
W'lvrmald 

Wormald shares hav e traded actively this vear is a range of rr’.u eea 
3.1U dollars and 4.02 dollars because of ukei:.ier speculates. 

The compar.v eailicr this year Fought off a partial bid from 
Adelaide Steamship C«. toraling 5 55 dollars a a lure. The rid was 
later raised to 3.9ft dollars. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Baring Brothers & 
Co., a privately owned London- 
based merchant bank, announced 
Monday a major restructuring 
plan. 

The bonk, w hich has increased 
its Asian operations and entered 
the British stock broking business 
uithin the last two years, said the 
reorganization would enable it to 
increase more easily its debts for 
further expansion. 

Changes in British financial mar- 
kets also prompted the move. Bar- 
ing, said. 

Under the changed structure, a 


new company. Barings PLC. will be 
Formed. 

It will have two principal subsid- 
iaries, Baring Brothers and Baring 
Investment Management Hold- 
ings. 

Baring Investment will deal with 
the group's investment manage- 
ment activities. 

Under the new structure, the 
Baring Foundation, a charity, will 
own all the equity in Barings PLC. 

Voting control, however, will re- 
main substantially unchanged in 
the hands of the directors. 

However, the directors will con- 
vert their evistir.g 26 percent inter- 


est in Baring Brothers mtocumui 
live preference shares of Barin 
PLC. 

A total of 10.9 million of the :2 5 
million eight-percent cumulative 
preference shares will be issued 

In addition. Baring said the re- 
structured bank will extend the 
scope of profit sharing, limited pre- 
viously to senior executives and di- 
rectors. 

Baring's Asian operations in- 
clude merchant hank interests in 
Hong Kong. Singapore and Kuaia 
Lumpur, investment management 
in Tokyo and Hong Kong, and a 
venture capital company in Japan. 


93% of Revlon Is Tendered 
In Pantry Pride’s Takeover 


Corptied by Qm S*&f*** Dispatrtn 

NEW YORK, — .Panuv Pride 
Inch's takeover of Revlon Inc. was 
completed over (be weekend after 
more than SI pencem of Revlon 
shares were tendered in response to 
the Pantry Pride offer, a Revlon 
spokesman- said Monday. 

- Roger Shdly. Revlon’s vice pres- 
ident for corporate: affairs, said: 
“The offer from Painty is 
completed arid we will do nothing 
to stand in its way.”' About 27 mil- 
lion shares in the beany products 
and hrahbearc company were ten- 
deredbytbedeadlmeof 12KH AAL 
Saturday. • 

Ronald - O. Perdman, Pantry 
Pride's chttinnari -arid dae f execu- 
tive officer, said Sttndoy that Pan- 
ny Pridewas o^otia ting with Rev- 
lon to take control of Revlon's 
board “promptly," after Pantry 
Pride's victory in the three-month 
takeover bottie. 

Revlon has promised to work 
with Pantry Rode “to ensure an 
orderly transition." 

. Forstmaim Little & Co„ the New 
York investment house that had 
made a competing hid for Revlon, 
is expected to fight a ruling by the 
Delaware Supreme Court on Fri- 
day that led to Revlon’s decision to 
give in to Pantry Pride's offer. . 


Revlon accepted Pantry Pride's 
latest Offer of S58 a share, or about 
SL74' billion, on Friday after the 
cram upheld a lower court's find- 
ing that Revlon's directors hod 
breached ihdr fiduciary duty by 
giving Foratmann Little a contract 
to buy two of Revlon's most impor- 
tant units as pan of the purchase of 
the entire cranpany. 

Pantry Pride began its run at 
Revlon in August with a bid of 
547.50 a share. The bid was raised 
several limes as Revlon's manage- 
ment countered with a plan to take 
the company private in partnership 
with Forstmann Little. 

In hs arrangement with Forst- 
tnann Little, Revlon hud agreed to 
sell its beauty products operations 
Tor $900 million to Adler & Shay- 
kin, an investment concern. Forsi- 
marm Little had contracted to sell 
Revlon’s Northd iff Thayer health- 
care unit and iu Rehds chemical 
division to .American Home Prod- 
ucts Co. for S355 million. 

Pantry Pride officials said they ■ 
would not decide whether those ar- 
rangements would be honored until 
they had studied the various sale 
agreements and scrutinized Rev- 
lon's books. 

lRaaers.*YT) 


COMPANY NOTES 

AB Volvo, the Swedish automo- 
tive. energy and food group, said t: 
"was. seeking, a listing on The Brus- 
sels and .Antwerp stock exchanges 
to broaden the foreign market for 
its free shares. OF a total t>r 7L6 
million Volvo sham outstanding. 
18.1 million are open to foreign 
buyers. 

American Express Bank lid. has 
acquired 26 percent of Nigeria's 
NAL Merchant Bank Ltd.. N.AL 
said in a statement. The shore' 
were formerly held by Continenta! 
Illinois Core- which is divesting 
itself of foreign holdings. Forty 
percent of N.AL is owned by for- 
eigners. 

Gable & Wireless PLC said it 
bud signed a 20-year agreement 
with the government of the Virgin 
Islands to operate the territory's 
local and international telecom- 
munications netuorL The compa- 
ny will imeM £7 milhon <510.1 mil- 
lioni in the project. 

Janfine Bemmy Holdings Ltd. of 
Hong Kong said its subsidiary . Jjr- 
dine Fleming Taiwan, has started 
operations in Taipei. The unit is the 
first foreign investment manage- 
ment company to receive a license 
from Taiwanese authorities. 

Johnson Matf&ey Bankers Ltd. 
will be sold os soon as possible, the 
Bank of England said." The central 
bonk, which took over the troubled 
concern 13 nwinihs ago. said it will 
pursue talks with several parties. 

MCO Hokfiogs Inc. of Los An- 
geles said it had agreed to sell three 
subsidiaries. MIGC, MGTC. and 
MGPC, to Western Gas Processors 


Ltd. for S42J millio.'ti The transac- 
tion will involve the sale of out- j 
standing stock of MIGC and i 
MGTC and the assets c-i MGPC. 

Santos Ltd- an ;>ii and gas pro- 
ducer ic the Cooper 3 oms in Aus- 
tralia. said its re-.erue'.oialed J4S.7 
million Australia.-: dollars «Sil^ 
million) in the third quarter, up 
from I2fi.6 million the second 
quoner and lijC. 7 rmilior. in the 
third quarter of 1^54. 

Short Brothers Ltd. cf Belfast, 
the state-owned oircrof: and uus&iie | , 
manufacturer, toid i: had begun 
developing a kigh-vsiocty air-ie- 
fense weapon system called “Sior- 
itreak" under a conpsti'.ion orga- 
nized by the British Defense 
Ministry. 

Sodele Natiooale Elf Aquitaine 

of France said it submitted a hid to 
acquire a 35 -percent srake in the 
“T-block" in the Br.tish semor of 
the North Sea from Phillips Petro- 
leum Co. Tne offer is conditional 
on Elf Aquitaine taking Phillips 
Petroleum's place as operator. 

Texaco Inc. said a consortium it 
formed with Shell OS Co.'s Pecxen 
International Co. has reached an 1 
agreement with Ecuador's national 
oil company, Corporacios Estatal 
Petrolera Ecuatoriano. to explore a 
500,u00-acre (202,000- hectare i 
area in Ecuador's coastal region. 


Notice of Special General .Assembly of Shareholders of 

FIDELITY 

AMERICAN ASSETS N.V 


Minebea Bid Deadline Passes 

Compiled hip Our Staff From Daptudtes the consortium had “already 

TOKYO — A deadline for take- begun to plan for whatever changes 
over negotiations between a UJS.~ of mana gemen t may be necessary." 
British consortium arid Minebea Minebea, with a market value of 
Co., a leading Japanese manufac- J600 . nuDion and 1984 sales of 
turerof ball bearings, passed Mon- ■ about 5730 million, has purchased 
daywith .no indication. -that the 23 companies sance -its founding 25 
talks had been hdd. . years ago, including a. $1 10-riullion 

The consortium, comprising purchase last year of New Hamp- 
Trafalgar Holdings Ltd. of tbe shire Ball Bearings Inc. The trans- 
Uniied States, headed by Charles action gave Mrnrfwa control of 80 
Knapp’ and Glen International, a percent of the UJS. munature-bear- 
Londori securities and investment ings market. (AFP, UPI) 

concent, made an urisoHdted SI .4- ^ — ; — 2 —.: : — ; 

billion offer for Minebea Oct. 25. ^ ^ 

It set Monday as a deadline for - ^ Bgga: 

Minebea to accept its offer to buy NOTIl 

all Minebea shares, induding those Jwll 

reserved for the conversion of war- AC DCDI ERA | 

rants and convertible bonds. After wr KEryDUV I 

^e.deadine, die consortium said, | formerly Tr 

JJrvould go ahead with ah unfriend-. ] 3 Boulevard d€ 

ly tender offer.' 

The U-S.-British bid would be 

the first hostile takeover in Japan; rm 

lQ 3 At tbe Extraorduurv General Sharrh 

announced test week that n was Shard***™ deddrf to put RH in li, 
merging with a doming subsidiary, which plan consuls essentially in Uk- 

Kanemori Co-, effective April 1. nine USS5u- bf the Common Slock 
The merger, Minebea said, would Mr. Edmond J. Saha; Chalnnan of ih 
raise Minebea's capital to 17 billion he has no present intention to sell dx 

yen (579 million). of Republic Holding SjA 

The president of the Japanese 
concern, Takami Taknhashi, said 
the merger had been considered for 

some tune but the agreement was At the mating of the Widsnor 
signed because of the Trafalgar- ,be deeded «. effect » 

Glen bid.. >) US SSL- ca»h payment I 01 

The Japanese business cbmmu- W 0 j 6+«5 shares of RN^( 

nity is watdune anxiously bow the Republic New York Corporuioit n 1 
consortium’s bid fares. Irwas not 

utiar late Monday whether Mine- INFORMATION CONt±otWlNG Sf 
hea’s merger with Kanemori would SHARES ARE IN BEARER FORM 

be sufficient to thwart the foreign . 1. A& bom November 12. 1985, si ar 
consortium's hopes. . 18 of hia *ha«s of Republic Hold 

‘The/re making a big mistake soact as per hia instruction*. Cou 

by picking on us," Mktelwfl’s exec- 18 10 the distribution of RNVC a 

utive vice preadent, Iwao Ishizuka, - L >° n ^ 

saidoTLbcfordsnhiddcrs.-Evemf 

they stKcewl in ukrng usov», the 3 No fractional shares of RNYC shi 
entire staff will quit and they 11 basis of the cWng price of RjNYi 

have no company left." . day of prcsentation'cT coupon Nr. 

Meanwhile, Trafalgar's ' execu- immediately preceding day, 

live vice presidenl, Mark Dodge, Pajment in nspedcdnaciioiulei 


1 INVESTMENTS — U.SJV. 

INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE 

Ideal for Pension Funds and other large Groups 

1. Safe and Secured 

2. Below Market Acquisition 

3. Toted Management 

4. High Yearfy Returns 

5. Excellent Appreciation. 

Properties $3,000,000 and up 
Principals only please reply tO~. 

e ee | a Uayd J. WBHams, Rsdtor 

111 I I 5629 FM 1960 W„ Suite 210 

|| I I Houston, Texas 77069. 

V*/ \A/ TeL: (71 3J 586-9399. Tbe.; 387356. 




Viking Resources 
International N.V. 

NA.V. as or 31-10-63 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 3 Special 
Genera] Assembly of Shareholders of Fidelity 
American Assets N.V. nhe “Fund") will be held 
on November 25th. 1985. at 10 JO a.m. at the 
registered office of the Fund at Schotregarweg 
Qoa. Salinja, Curacao. Neiheriands Antilles for 
1 he following purposes. 

1. To consider approving the Exchange Agreement 
under which the Fund will combine its assets 
with those of American Values N'.V. 

2. To consider approving certain organisational 
changes made in furtherance of the Exchange 
Agreement and the new investment structure, 
as follows: 

ia 1 terminating the Fund's existing accounting 
services agreement and entering into a new 
administrative services agreement with 
American Values N.V, and Fidelity Internationa] 
Limited under which the services performed 
under the existing accounting services 
agreement will continue to be performed: 

1 hi terminating the Funds existing custodian 
contract because the Fund's investments will 
be made through American Values N.V. which 
will have an identical custodian agreement 
with the Fund's custodian: 
ic) changing the investment objectives, policies 
and limitations of the Fund to reflect the new 
investment structure. 10 better reflect the 
present portfolio of the Fund and to satisfy 
requirements of the Luxembourg Stock 
Exchange; and 

(d) changing the Valuation Regulations of the 
Fund to take account of the new investment 
structure. 

3. To transact such other business as may properly 
come before the meeting. 

Implementation of the actions specified in 


items 1 and 2 will require a statement of non- 
objection by the supervisory authorities of the 
Fund. 

Draftsof the above-mentioned documents may 
be inspected at the Fund's principal office a: 
Pembroke Hall. Hamiiron. Bermuda or at the 
offices of Fidelity International Management 
Umiied.or K redie thank 5. A. Luxembourgeoise. 
listed below. 

Holders of registered shares may vore by proxy 
by mailing the enclosed form of proxy 10 : 

Fidelity American Assets N. VI 

c.-o Maduro & C Uriel's Trust Com pair,. N.V. 

P.O.Box 305 

Curacao 

Netherlands Antilles 

Holders of bearer shares may vote by proxy by 
mailing a form of proxy and certificate of deposit 
for their shares obtained from the Fund’s principal 
office at Pembroke Hall. Hamilton. Bermuda or 
from the companies listed below, to the Fund at 
the above address. Alternatively, holders of bearer 
shares wishing to exercise iheir rights personally 
at the Meeting may deposit their shares, ora 
certificate or deposit therefor, with the Fund at 
Schonegatweg dost. Salinja. Curacao. Netherlands 
Antilles, against receipt therefor, which receipt 
will entitle said bearer shareholder to exercise 
such rights. 

All proxies land certificates of deposit issued 
to bearer shareholders! must be received by the 
Fund not later than 9J0a.m. on November 25th, 
1985, in order to be used at the Meeting. 

By Order of the Management 
Charles T.M'.CoIlis 
Secretarv 


INFORMATION: 

Pierson, Hetdring & Pierson N.V., 
Herengrocht 21 A Amsterdam. 


The Bank of Bermuda Limited 
Hamilton, Bermuda 


da Limited Kredietbank S-A. Lu x em bou rgeoise 

muda 43 Boulevard Royal 

Luxembourg 

Fidelity International Management Limited 
25 Lovat Lane 
London EC3R 81 1 ~ 


NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS 
OF REPUBLIC HOLDING S.A. IN LIQUIDATION 

. (formerly Trade Development Bank Holding S.A.) 

13 Boulevard de la Foire r 2013 Luxembourg, Luxembourg 

FIRST DISTRIBUTION OF ASSETS 

At the Extraordinary General Shareholders Meeting of Republic Holding S.A- fTtH” j held on October £9, 1985. ihe 



value US S5-- of the Co mm on Stock of Republic New York I jjrpo ration ("the RNYC ■-hait-i"). 

Mr. Edmond J. Safxx, Chairman of the Board of Directors of RH ami holder vf 6l.6£ of RH dure.’, ha* deci-coi ihat 
he has no present intention to sell the RNYC shares be will receive directly or iudirecth as a rrMiit uf the liquidation 
of Republic Holding S-A. 


At the first meeting of (he Limndaiors Committee n[ Republic Holding S. A. in liquidation fceld on October 3V, 1985. 
the Liquidators decided to effect as of November 12, 1% ihe lira Jistnlruhnn of a'-rL- injd'- up of; 

a) US S2-- cash payment for each share of Republic Holding S.A. in liquidation; 

b) 0J56475 shares of .RNYC share* for «cb unare Republic Holding S. A in liquidation. 

Republic New York Corporation is listed on the New York Stuck LsJar^e and tlx- bmtinn Stock Exchange. 

INFORMATION CONCERNING SHAREHOLDERS OF REPUBLIC HOLDING S_\. IN LIQUIDATION WHOSE 
SHARES ARE IN BEARER FORM. 


Alfa Romeo. 
Some cars are more 
sporting than others. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

• • HKE5AT3Q.10A5. 

A: LLS. DOCLAR OSH . *1053 

b i yotnajweacYCASH sitss 

Cl DOiAKBODS- ' 51L69 

D: WA7R3XSBNCYB(>I)S S1234 

E s STSUNG ASSET £11.15 

■ JOBBGN & COLOMAL 
(vWNAGCM&ff (JQSEV1 LMTH) 

M MUtCASTH STRST^rmBkHtSEr^t 
QS3427351 ' . ■ TBEXi 4192063 
POR OTHSJ F & C FUNDS, S£E 
WTEKNATIONM FUNDS UST 


For ihe latest informatiun on 
De Voe-Holbein International nv 
arid Gty-Qock International nv 
pkaae caD. collect 31 -^627762. 


Investors seeking ahtweaverage 
capphal g^ins. in global stock 
markets can simply write us n 
note and the w^ddy 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sen free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center- . 
Stawinakylaan «57 * 

1077 XX Amsterdam. ' 

Tfic Netherlands • 

Teiex: ]45((7 firco nl 


so act as per his instructions- Coupon Nr. 17 entitles the Shareholder to l!ie Life £2.- cash disinbuuon, coupon Nr. 
]8 to the dirfribntion of RNYC shares. 

2. Upon presentation of coupon Nr. 18. the Paying Agent will confirm to Ihe Shareholder the number of R.NTC 
. dnns to which be' is entitled and. in accordance uiih liis rnrinii'tion.-, will arrange fu; il:i iwiit, nai ,- 1 ration and 

delivery of Ua entitlement in RNYC shares. 

3. No fractiotml shares of RNYC shares will he delivered. Fraetioiul share-) enlillunciib will be juid in ej-h. i-n the 
basis of the cloning price of RNYC shares on the New York Stock Exchange-* annpu-me Trcm.it rimis Tare rm :he 
day of prenectafioo'oT coupon Nr. 18 to the Paying Agent, or. if such day is not a trading iui rm .- uch exchange, the 
imtneauielrpiecedina day. 

Payment in resped fractional entidements will be nude on the business dav (whi>:h expresioo -hail mean a day 
in which banks are open for business in London and New York, or the place of business of tin.- /igi -nL as the i-antexi 
requires) next following the day of presen la bon of the relevant coupons numbered 13. un!e*s such das i? no: j 
Trading dav on the relevant exchange, when payment will be made on the day of pn-ienlalji’n. 

4-. No RNYCsbarea will be liutrihuteo in respect of coupons Nr. 18 presented after Januarv 10. 1 9X0. -Viler Janiun 
10. 1986. the RH Shareholders will be entitled to receive onlv tiuirprorau share o[ proceed* from the ialc bv RH 
. of the untfistribuuxl RNYC shares, a gunat preventjuun and surrender of coupon Nr. 18 j: tin olfii* o! Repidihc 
National Bank of New York (Luxembourg) S-A. (“R.NB Luxiuiboiir^"}. an indirect whofiv-OHiiL-J luh.-ii-jn •>[ 
. RNYC. The proceeds of such taka will lie deposited with RMS Luxcmboun' prompt lv after the pimwiL- id - uch 
sales are received. 

5. Coupons Nr. 77 and 18 may be presented ro anv of ih* Paving .Vgcnta hated herehelow: 

Mnubctareri Uanorer Limited 
8 Frinca Street, Loodoo EC2P SEN (England) 

Bnupe lnVcrnationale a UsttBhonrg S A. 

•_ ' 2 Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg (lawemhoarg) 

Manufarmrer* Hanorer Bwicjac Relghrm 
13 Rwr de Ugne,1000 Bnuwefo (Brfgiain) 

' ' MimzfKtnrera BUmover Basque Nordiquc 

20 Rue de In ViUr-l'Evhjur, 7500ft Phri» (France) 

Manufacturer* Hanover Trust Comp a ny 

Bocfceahetaier Landstnaae SI/53, Frankfurt fW. Germany) 

Mb nnfy inrem Hanover T nml Corapanv 
40 Wail Street, New York, N.Y. 10015' (C-S^A.) 

Republic Natioul Bank of New York 
452 Kf* Avenue, New York, N-Y. 10018 

. Repobltc National Bank of New York 
. 46 Berkeley Square, London ® 1 X 3DB ( E n gl a n d) 

Republic National Bank of New York (Luxembourg) S.A, 

103 Grand 'Rue. 1661 Luxembourg (Laxembourg) 

Trtd). Development Bank 

30 Monument Street, London EC3R SLH (England) 

Tirade Development Bank (Luxembourg) S.A, 

34 Avenue -de la Porte Nru>«, Luxembourg (Luxembourg) 

..... The Liquidators 

Join Horn* Roger Jnnnd 

C.G. Rodney Leacb Wdlrr H. Weiner 






AlSA ROMEO WKH985 



V V 







p age 16 


Mondays 

^MEX 

Qoans: 


include ttw nationwide prices 
up to ffte closing on Walt street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I in The Associated Press 


Jf Month 

" | oh Law and 


MS. CttM 

DW. VKL PE lOBsHInft Low Quot. Oi’PB 


.16 


.16 


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10 » 
ia 


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.60 1- 21 


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37 T6ft left 26ft — l* 
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47 31 GO: 5 5 5 —1* 

6 111 3^ 3V» XU+'« 

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4ffC| 484. 4ft'S + AS 

6*S 6*S t?m— U 

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6 Fl ft 

2' . 2V* TVs — '1 

6’.r 6lt — lit 
34a 3AS IPS 
54U 5=. 5Ai 
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9 07* 9 + VS 

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23 

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229% 

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7 

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10 

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13"! 

S' . 5afl5cr 

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1? 

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1096— ft 

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16 

3 

139% 

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10ft 

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29 

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51 

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16 

37 

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26ft— ft 

■ 

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12 

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9 1 ; 

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.40 SO 

10 

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8 

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8 

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13 

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4 

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3 


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9 

e‘i Be raw! 

JO 13 


W 


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Aft — ft 

4'.l 

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79 

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1J 

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50 

996 

9 

996— 1% 


70'j 

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1J0 1S7 


4’. 

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2 

37ft 

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32 

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27 

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1.9 

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to UtcckE 





194- 


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TjSO 

UK) 


IT BloonlA 
19': Ii'-* BlcuntB 
23 tt*i EolarPj 
14V> via BowVoi 

1P?3 9*S80W>A5 

SA. 21 ; Boswinr 
16*3 121- Bcwnc 
26Ai I9>. Breen B 
JTVd 26’j Bra FA 
41*6 281! SmFB 
S 2*a Bucntm 
5V. 3V. BuckhPt JO 108 
13U 6’! Boshn 

22*c CDI 
ms f. cmiCp 
3'. V-B CMXCd 
Vy> Wb CSSn 
14U 9 CorsNJ 

K i"! CoaleA 
IDAS Col RE 
32 19'A Calmot 


100 IVi 119s 11V2 + W 
13 96 96 96 + «6 

495 2^!» 2996 2976 + to 

6 3 3 3 — Vs 

118 40 38*6 391s + 96 

12 1596 15to IS'. 

7 269. 2616 2616 + 16 

1 149. 14V, 149.— to 

24 14to 1496 14*s— Is 

12x22to 32?6 ISs— 4s 

20 n i is 

11* 12T* 12'~ 12*. + to 

2 12*1 12to 12V. + V« 

165 147S 141* 141;— 4k 

110 11 Ifft. I0to— to 

5 10’-== 1096 WVl 

S I ft 37. — Vi 

303 irs 179- IB +1. 

43 M's 23*. 24(6 + to 
9 34V! 34*s 34 V» + 96 
IJO 26 11 1472 ST'S 3796 39to +1* 
1 3to 396 316 

1 496 496 496 

7 796 7to 7H 

6 21 to 21 Vs 21V»- 96 

35 916 9*9 99* 

32 196 Ito Ito 

10 Bta 8V. BVj 

5 7 rm into ioto + to 

48 6 596 6 

43 12*. 1296 12*. 

92 3146 31 31 to 


15 13 
II 13 
21 

10 
13 
15 

25 9 


IT 

1 jb mo 9 

M IS 14 


6'6 3 r i Caitan n 
ft Caltn «t 
1F1 ll*i Cameo 
171s uv. CMarca 
33*. ibi-s caiocc 
3591. Wit cwlne 
13 41s Cardiff 

1576 8’. CareB 

1596 BU Car* A 
89. 4 I V. CaroE B 
Bto ito CareE A 
4316 38 carpp pt £00 tOO 
S'h 26. casMan urns 

ZTl 149s CastlA Mb SO It 

ZZ’% 25to CasFd 1200 IS 

r. to CmFdrt 

7to 7 CosJtnd 

9H ito CetiU mi 
M> t lOto CenlSe IJ7d2J 
91# 5V. Cefec JO 17 13 

4 I"z ChnspH 25 

IH6 121: ChaoP 72 AS 15 

2996 la’s ChIMAs .16 J 14 

29 17to ChIMB 5 .16 0 It 

im 6to ChtDvB 

35to 16 OtiHn s 



9 

13 

3 

X 

X 

44 

22 9 

7 

lift 

IWl 

rffl 


114 

Mte 

)4W 

*4 



18*. 

189% 

12 

2)49 

3994 

389% 


17 

2 

9ft 

9ft 




14ft 

139* 


3 16 

14 

14 

iw. 


IS 

61 

69* 

696 


16 

10 

frft 

6ft 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


3316 

35 

339. 

43 

1296 

45 

221s 

6to 

10*6 

5 *. 

74 

1194 

13*. 

1I1S 

1J*» 

10'A 

SO*. 

ly- 

isto 

25': 


13to Citaclei 
19V* CitFsf 
20': CtoGas 
35 "s Clarmt 
6to Clarke 
24to Clanst 
11 to CiaDavs 
T '2 Coarntr 
69— Coflu 
19. CdF *rt s 
S'* Camttt) 
8to Com Inc 
6*. Compo 
694 ComoD 
41 s CmnCn 
5to Cmafct 
Tils Cnctim 
6*s CanedF 
696 Contlty 
Uto ConrCp 


.17 J 28 

4 

1JMD 38 9 
IJO U 9 
i.«e 45 
J8e 3.1 10 
£Se U 9 
.16 1J 

21 U f 


100: 46to 46 V. 
16 2ft 2*. 
305 16 lSto 

W SIMS 26 
29 Ito Ito 
H 3to 3to 

18 ns 9to 
34 T2to 126s 

7 76* 716 

275 194 Ito 

19 16'6 16 
902 19ft 19 

18 21 to 21 VS 
5 Bto Bto 
29 31* 3 Ito 
895 2Sto 27ft 
27 33VS 33to 

4 30ft 30ft 

9 42to 42 to 

2 9 9 

5 3696 36to 

16 14 1316 

14 49tt 4to 
25 Bto Bto 

519 5 496 

45 W 23V. 
163 8*1 8V! 

84 12% 12 
38 II 1096 
212 6to 6to 

14 TS 7 
13 IB 17H 

15 766 7to 
15 isva i5to 
13 1716 17to 


9Tb 

59% Cental 

85 302 

89% 

Bft 

Fi 

Ito Commit 

103 

49% 

4ft 

10 

4»* ConsOG 

32 

dto 

4ft 

to 

ConOGwt 

10 




2516 16’ 6 CnStorn 
121: Bto CnStrwl 
IS 7 ! TV. uiCemtA 
26 to 1716 ContMN 
1466 109- Convrt n 180 160 
194. 1794 Copley n 
3ft - - - 

1 


6 13*6 
50 1396 
89 ZPH 
18 Uto 


9*. 

2to 

12to 

35 

48to 
17to 
13ft 
2to 
ill 
25 
31 to 
3 


ft CoaCrn 
Vs CosCrwt 
9V6 CntrM n 
196 Court Id J06« 25 
ri CrstFo .15e 15 9 
2Sto Cross 1A4 4J 15 

23** CrmrtM lJOa 26 9 

6 
1 

J9 i.9 n 

.92 37 9 


19 

220 

13 

161 

2 


1896 

2ft 

96 

9ft 

296 

10 


% 

157a— to 
Mto — 16 
1*9.— to 
39*4 +4 
9 to + to 
1394— to 
14 + li 
696 

6*i + 9s 

46 to — 1 
2ft 

16 + to 

U — 96 
Ito + to 
av* 

Vto + to 
129s + ■- 
796 + 16 
194 
I6to 

199* + to 

21ft— 96 
814 + to 
31 to— vs 
ZB — to 
3366— to 
30ft— 96 
4266 + ft 
9 — VS 
36ft 

13Vs— 94 
4U — 16 
896 + to 
ito— ft 
23to— to 
S'* 

12—9* 
1096— ft 
6ft 

PA + ft 
7716— n 
79* + to 
1SV6 + ft 
17ft 

Sft— ft 
496 + ft 
4ft 


24ft 2Sto 
129k 1316 + *6 
I3to 13ft 
27-Ta 231% +!ft 
lift lift — ft 
1896 + to 
2ft— ft 
9* + to 


9ft CmCP 
7*6 CrCPB 
vi CrutcR 
v* CrvstO 
1394 Cubic 
23Ji Curtice 
ft CustEn 


119 3196 
9 379. 
18 16to 
II »V* 
45 ft 
4306 9b 
33 21ft 

g 25 ^ 


1896 

X 

10 


-r vm 

T=S 


3 19% 
15*. 796 
15*. 616 

5to 396 
J4» IPh 
ZIPS 10ft 
7 3V: 

8ft 2 

69* 39s 

3716 25ft 
16 129. 

4 19* 

7 4 

9ft P.i 

16 ID 7 * 
77ft 9I« 
9ft 5ft 
9*6 59* 

26ft 6 
314 Ito 
76V4 36 V. 
6 2 r * 

2^1 lV. 
v* vs 
16ft 12 
13ft 01a 
34's 23 
1 16 

201a 12*6 
16ft 12 
Mft y.’ 9 
2914 1816 

996 6to 
169* 13 
796 4ft 
776 2ft 
3to 2to 
rn 30'i 
ISto 794 
2ft 7l 
25to 15ft 
67b 2to 
Vi 296 
13ft 10ft 
7ft 2ft 
799s 12ft 
ft ft 
10ft 4ft 
2 ft 
17ft im 
3ft 2ft 
12ft B 
9ft 4ft 
B96 59* 
27ft 7F,b 
4ft ft 
J7to 3314 
05ft 22VS 
1014 6ft 
9ft 6 
9ft 6ft 

12ft Bto 
22*. 1696 
15ft 6 
19 1596 

109s 394 
15ft 11 
13to 99b 
15to lift 
12to 61* 
•3*6 2894 
30ft 21 
149* 7 

9ft 5ft 


DWG 
DamEA 
DumEB 
Damson 
Dorns pt 
Dal a Pd 


JW tS 
zoo sue 
Z30 26J 

3J5 170 
.16 1J 


Dei 

Decrnf i 
Del Lab 
DelVaf 
Del mad 
Dssntm 
Daspnl 
DeviCp 
DvnRrn 

DSog a 

Dh»B 

DtOBthS 

Dipl con 

□lllrd 

Diodes 

DlrAdn 

DomeP 

DfnePwt 

Damirs 

□ riuHs 

Ducom 

Dteiiap 

Duplex s 

DurTst 

Dm let 

Dvneer 


5 

U 

S2 15 10 
IJ4 10.9 9 

J3t 54> 11 
13 
89 

70S 324 

49 

47 

15 


JO 


J 16 
10 
12 


19 
30 33 


M 20 11 
40b 19 15 
-27* 1.9 II 
00 29 12 


lft 
Bto 
9 

3ft 
22 
I3V» 
6to 
2ft 
- 3ft 
18 35ft 
16 
19* 
4ft 
9 

13ft 

715 

Ito 

68 25ft 
38 Ito 
214 66 
36 3ft 
21 
B67 
100 
157 13 7 * 
Bto 
2696 
I 

— 1814 
14 13ft 
206 lift 
27 28 


20 

178 

290 

107 

10 

775 

32 

IS 

T 


2 

772 

18 

11 

7 

II 

19 

6 


14 

35 

187 

41 




Rite 

10 + VS 

33Vl 3316 + to 
37 379- + ft 

169% 1694 + V* 
12V* 129k— • 
ft 
ft 

2096 20ft— to 

1ft 1ft 
9to 9ft 
BH 8ft— ft 
Sft Sft 
21to 22 + to 

1294 1316 + 9* 
5ft 6ft 
29% 29*— to 
3ft 3ft 
35V* 35V: + ft 
15ft 16 + to 

lft Ito— to 
4 4ft 
Bft 9 

13ft 13ft— ft 

pi* pi* 

6ft 6ft— ft 
6ft Sft — to 
241% 2(94 + 9* 
ito Ito— to 
65to 65to 
3 316 

4ft 5ft + V. 
1ft 1ft 

1394 1394— to 
Bto 8ft — to 

■am* 

18 1814 + 14 

1396 13ft + to 
13ft 14 

27ft 27ft + Mi 


40 48 40 
J2 2.1 27 
15 
11 
13 
7 


6MG2U 

.12 


1.40 67 


EAC 
EECO 
ERC 
E51 
Eoma 
EsiOP 
Echos a 
ElAudD 
EICAm 
ElecSd 
Etalnor 

EmMdn 03e J 
EmCor 

EovDvf nJJO 21 J 
EnaMat 
EnoCHl 
ErrrSrv 

ESDn 40e 28 
Enstrpf MmUB 
Erqlnd 
Eskav 

EiLev Pt IOQ 1U 
Emr 

E-tonl 
EsqRd 

EtjLav 

EvrJB 
EvrJ A 
Exert 

FPA 
Fablnd 
FarirFin 
Forty pf 
Fkjola 
FWrtnB 
Fartcrps 
FischP 
FitcGE 
FftlRck 
Flukr 
Foadrm 
FlhillG 


19 Bto Bto 89k + to 
16x15ft 15to 15Vi— to 
65 6ft 6ft 6ft + VS 
64 79b TV. 7to + M 

20 TM 7>A Pit — 'in 
7 3296 3296 32ft— to 

"S n 9% ^ ,5 5rjr 
11 219% 2Dft 20ft— 9% 

21 69* 6to 4 ft — to 

268 314 3 3to— to 

36 12to 1194 12 + to 

23 5*4 5ft 596- 9* 


A0 24 


40 20 
47t 2J 


80 



IBx 15£ r$£4 

l^-ft 

7 

13 

9ft 

99% 

99% — ft 


20 

ft 

ft 


9 

6 

14ft 

14ft 

14ft— ft 


IU 

3ft 

3ft 

31* + ft 

B 

4 

914 

Bft 

9ft- ft 


70 

7ft 

Sto 

79% +196 


2V 

7ft 

Aft 

7ft +lft 

7 

31 

17ft 

14ft 

16ft- ft 


17? 

Ift 

ito 

Ito + ft 

54 

10 

37ft 

371% 

37ft 

38 

104 

299% 

291% 

29to— ft 

37 

1 

10ft 

109% 

lOto + ft 

35 

«S 

,0 

9ft 

99* 

14 

34 

9to 

9ft 

Oft + '% 

43 

I 

10 

10 

10 

7 

4 

20ft 

70ft 

20ft— ft 

31 

19 

15ft 

15ft 

151* 


141 

lfrft 

16ft 

169% + ft 


44 

sto 

Aft 

Aft 

II 

57 

129% 

17 

12ft 

7 

8 

lift 

11 

lift + ft 

71 

38 

Oft 

139% 

139% — ft 

5 

160 

13 

17ft 

139% + ft 

7 

7 

38 

38 

38 + ft 

ID 

125 

73V- 

73ft 

239% + ft 

5 

19 

17to 

17ft 

12ft 


80 

49% 

Sft 

59% 


24ft 19ft FooK A JO 
321% 121* FaresIL 
7 9* Fotaml 

4314 331% Front? lOOa 27 12 
7ft FrdHIv 
» 14 FrmB 

129% 5 Fries E n 
» lift FrtodB 
2394 10ft FffltMd 
14to ito FrtAert 
MVi Oft FurVIt 


1J 26 
31 


17 
14 

J2b 10 22 
I 

.171 1J 
JO 14 36 


5 231% 239* 23to + 14 

393 28 27'A 27ft + ft 

63 1ft lft lft— to 

1 3**i 30ft JOto + to 

13 6 R% 6 

12 27ft 2ft 229 b 
63 8ft Bto Bft + to 

31 Tito 309% 21 ft + 9* 

125 23ft 23ft 2398+ to 

8 lift 14ft 14ft 

322 13ft 13ft 13ft + VS 


Aft 

<9% 

>su 

291. 


ito GRI 
194 GTI 
row. GaiaxC 
_ . Ito GalxvO 
3DV4 249% Goran 
16ft 7ft GatUt 
139% 9ft GelmS 
49% 2to CMKD 
18to 17ft GDefns 

5 2ft GnEnw 
179% 19 GnMIcr 

6 3ft Genlsea 
15ft 9to GenvDr JO 

Vtt GeaRes 
196 GeoRwt 
Bto GeoRxMlOO 


26 

B9 

777 

113 


08 


64 8 
_ 70 11 
■10b A 13 


>4 

ftt 

179% 


S4to 13V] GlanF s 
30 8 GnlYia 

35ft 30to Gtatftt 
37 2394 Ghmr 

49* 394 GlabNR 
7to 3 Gaktw 
Ito 9* GWFId 
19ft 15ft GorRo 9 
16 Aft Graham 


JS 25 11 
fOOb 3J 20 


40 B 


It 


5to GrahMc 1.70e2BJ 8 


349* 16to GrndAu 
159% 99* GrTertl 

44 to 27 GrtLkC 
36 129% Gronm i 

lift 51% GrrOwr 
I3to Bft GrdCn 
lift 11 GltCdg 
3694 24 Gltstr 
15to 8 Gull 

101% 6ft HAL 
1394 10 to HAAG 
6VB 4ft Hall lax 
T* lft Holml 
39ft 2194 Hndvrnn 
lonfrds 


48 


2.1 17 
15 
14 16 

,9Bf 90 Jt 
50b 45 9 
52 

40 1J 14 
OSa 4 15 
■tor U 
40 55 
04e 3 

OSe J 1 
50 2J 14 


4*. ito ito + to 
2 Ito. 3 + to 

ri n it 

146 Ito Ito 
371% 371% 27ft + to 
18 109% 10ft 1016— to 

18 12 lift 12 —to 

14 2VB 2to 29* + to 

46 14 139* t3ft 

12 296 2ft 29% 

27 15ft IFm 15ft + ft 
4 Sft 5to F». — ft 
158 10’A 10ft lOto + V* 

37 lift 71*6 lift 

18 39% 3ft 39* + ft 

16 109. 109% 109* + 9* 
398* 99* 22to 229% + Vs 
93 15ft IF* I5to — to 
34 34to 341% 341% + 96 

3 3014 30 3014— to 

190 4 4 4 

26 3to 3ft 
136 IS ft 
1x1896 10*% 18*6 

18 7to 7ft 714 — 14 

61 6to Sft 6 — to 
10 19 19 19 

w ion. 10ft lOto + ft 
701 36ft 3516 35ft — ft 
106 23» 2Zto 23ft + ft 
26 II 10ft 10ft— Vs 
24 lift II 111%— to 
533 14ft 149k 149* 

9 3494 34ft 3496 
130 lift lift lift— to 
7 Sft Sft 81% — ft 

4 It 11 11 + ft 

9 Sft SV* Sft 

383 2ft 2 3—1% 

15 34ft 241* Sift + 1* 

38 23to 33ft 23ft— ft 

19 19% Ito lft + 1% 
493* 34to 33ft 33ft— ft 

6 39 389* 38ft 




2714 13ft H . 

2ft ft Horvev 
39ft 21 to Hasbr i .15 A 10 
43 269% Kcrabrpf 2X0 SJ . 

419* 2 FA Hastlns ^0a 14 10 5 29ft 29ft 291% — ft 

94% 9to Him 1001 9ft 9ft 916— to 

J8 24 f 
20 
IB 

04 4.9 9 
JOB 23 9 
.10 3 9 

59 


into 

ift 

59% 

ift 

17 

18ft 


■24 


43 
45 
16 
TJ 7 


171% 13 HlttlCr I 
lOto Sft HlttlQl 
18 6ft HHtlEX 
15ft 119% HelitlM 
9ft Aft HelnWr 

17ft 10 H*lnlc* 

3ft 2 Heidor 

3'4 HeUant 
ft HelmR 
39* HershO 
19% Hlndrt 
91* Hlatron 
. 6ft HolWCP 
21ft ISto HmeGn 
22ft 20 Hm Ira Of2.9S 1X4 
22ft lift Harml 5 54 24 13 

12 6 HmHar 31 

3ft 4% HrnH wt 

199* 139* HotiPtv IJO 93 16 

6ft 39% HattPwt 

6to 31% HauOT J4e17J 

I Bft lift HavnE 10 

IJto BV% Howfln JSe 24 7 

Sift 16to HubetA s 76 XS 12 

24ft 13ft Hubei B S 36 

21ft 179* HudGn 40 

99* Aft Husky 0 J6 


81 

48 

12 

6 

15 

111 

1071 

135 

10 


U 13 

B'4 


3ft ICEElt 


IS 


42 I6ft M 16 — to 
38 99% 9 9V. + ft 

9ft 89* 9 +ft 
13 'A 13 13 — ft 

Sft 89% Bft 
14 139* 13ft 

39% 21* 24% + ft 

4 39* 3ft + ft 

to u 1* 

Sft 5 Sft + ft 
2to 2to Tit 
33 >5ft lift 151* + ft 
33 lBft 1896 18ft— ft 
2469 219k 20ft 219* + ft 
304 22ft 219* 22 + to 

53 21ft 20ft 21 — ft 

« x xza 

109 19 1Mb 18ft 
31 69k 64% 69* + ft 

200 ift 49* ift + ft 
13 15ft 15 15ft 
io mi* 9ft into + to 

114 22to 22 22 — to 

27 23ft 23ft 23to + ft 
3 18V» 18V. 18V. + V. 
64 71* 7 7ft— ft 

471 5to 5 5to + to 


55ft 

329% 

ICH % 



B 

163 

4Bto 

479% 

48 


79% 

lft 

ICO 



113 

20 

lft 

lft 

lft — 

v% 

Sto 

2ft 

IPM 




2 

2to 

2ft 

296- 

1% 


3ft 

IRTCPS 



33 

2 

79% 

/ft 

79% 



Aft 

IBS 

.12 

33 


10 

Sft 

F,fe 

Sft + 

ft 

Sto 



.128 

4J) 


201 

31? 

3 

3 


79* 

ft 





70 

ft 

9% 

ft — 

ft 


30ft 


IJO 



BA 

37ft 

369% 

36ft — 

9% 

13ft 

5 

Infra ht 



6 

72 

61% 

6 

6 — 

ft 

27ft 

11 


JO 

1.1 

IB 

a 

1894 

18ft 

18ft — 

ft 

79* 

19% 




8 

175 

19* 

19% 

19% — 

ft 

13 

6ft 


40 



46 

119* 

119* 

119* + 

V% 

IS 

lffft 

intmk 

Mb 

.9 


1 

139% 

139% 

139% — 

1% 


49* 

1ft 

139% 

7ft 

41* 

9tt 

109* 

HP* 

7 


7fe intBknl 
4* InIBkwt 
Sft IntHvd 
3ft InlPwr 
lft InlPral 
6 Ini Sea mi 
2ft intllirn 
21b tnThral 
Sto intent 


148 
55 

16 49 

34 10 

21 

3 

17 1134 

91 


X 

a 

396 

9ft 

ito 

ito 

69* 


3ft 

to 

566 

494 

3ft 

9 

39* 

394 

696 


3ft 

9 — ft 

ift + 9% 
4 + to 

69* + 9% 


23V!. 

13ft ionics s 


14 

H 

22ft 

22ft 

2296 + ft 

41 

25 IroaBrd 


32 

32 

339* 

33 

3191 + to 

169* 

794 

11V* Jodyii 

51% Jacobi 

sob 4J 

9 

21 

6 

1296 

5to 


12 — to 
59* 

49% 

2ft Jet Am 


8 

82 

4 

3to 


lft 

ft JetAwt 



72 

% 

9% 

09% 

Sft Jelron 

.711105 

11 

3 

696 

69* 

59* 

6ft 

39% JohnPd 



15 

29* 

296 

296— ft 

llto 

61% jotmAm 

JO 45 

10 

134 

ito 

Aft 

696 — ft 

llto 

6 Jahnlnd 


3 

22 

7% 

7to 

79* + ft 

7ft 

7ft JumeJk 


17 

12 

3 

3 

3 + ft 


39ft 31 to KnGcnf 450 12J 
49% 2 KonkC 2 

161* 10 KavCn JO 15 9 
13 109b KayJ n Jds U ID 

15ft 99* KearNt JS 3.3 IS 

24 1 54% Kenwln Ma Al W 

23ft 14 Kef dim SSI It 19 
49* 29h Key CoB .151 F0 IB 

4 . Sft KevCoA .159 5j> 18 

124* 7ft KevPh 
7ft 2ft Key Co 
ift 21* Kktdewt 
ift 3ft Klnartl 
446 29% Kirfav 
594 Sft Kit Mftj 
39% 2 KleerV 
169* lOto Knoll 

30ft 229* KooerC 


8) 

8 

.. 16 

JO 24 15 1849 
6 17 

212 
13 
69 
2 

3 

64 


14 

jar s 

15 

M 75 


150x 37 37 37 

m 3ft TA 3ft— 1% 
2 13 13 13 + ft 

14 17ft 12 12ft + ft 

15 12V6 lift 12ft— ft 
1 19ft 19ft 19ft — 9% 

19ft ttft + ft 
3 3 3 

3 2ft 3 
Bto 79% FA + ft 
3ft 
4 

34% 

29% 

49* 

7ft 


7ft 

413 

3ft 

2ft 

4ft 

2to 


7ft 

41%— ft 
3ft + to 
7ft 
ift 

2ft— ft 


2J2 


2ft lft LSB 
7 3ft LoPnt 
20ft lift LndBnn 
199* I3to Lndmk 
14ft Laser 


Lauren 


50 X0 11 
40 20 14 
12 
32 


279* I6to LearPP XDO 1X2 


15to 141* 149* — ft 
26 V* 2Sft 26ft + to 
2 3 2 

4 4 4 

2fRh ® 20 — to 

199% 1996 1996— ft 
9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
9ft 9to 9to 
199* 199* 1994 


34ft 

3 

ito 

2V 


9ft 7ft LeePh 
3lto 191i Lettish* 
6ft ift LetjurT 

S Levitt 
9ft UbtPPta 
lft UleRst 
21% Utfid 
lft Lodge 
33ft IMt LonCo 

3W6 27'A Larimr 
I* 101* LUmex 
141: Bft LundvE 

13 7 * Oft Lutia 
lift 10 Lydol 
26ft Bft LvnCSs 

lift 17*4 MCO Hd 
Zft Ift MCO Rs 
71% MSA 

ft MSA wt 


J0J 3 


r% 

ito 

•39% 

4ft 

IF. 

19ft 

3ft 

13ft 


JO 


JBelO-i 


6to MSI Of 
M5R 



TV: ... 

796 AAqcGrg 9 

8ft MacSdl .16 .9 60 

to Mocrod 

. . 3ft MaoBks 6 

719% 10ft Me PS JSi 1J 3 

15ft Bft Mniartg .70e 

P% 2ft Mrttiot 

17 ift MrklVS II 

23ft 21 to AAarm pf U5 10.9 
SHk I5» Alrairir 21 

83 13ft AAorlPr 19 

I9to 109% Aflastod JOO 1.1 6 
79* $ Motet 19 

22ft 9ft AAatRsh .12 1J I 
30 Bto MatScn 7 

23ft 1FA Matrix* 21 

169% Bto MavErtg 150 150 
26to 14ft IMavflw JO 45 9 
«ft ito Me Daw 25 

7ft lft McRae A JOe SJ 97 
■Ato SB*. Media 1.16 14 17 
2214 14to Media 54 L2 18 
10 Sft MorcSL 
259% 89* AftlPra 

30ft tl M* leu a 
279% IBVb AAetroC 
Bft jlv MCYlG ft 

12 89% MidAm 

339% 17 Mldlnd 
18ft 13ft MtchlE 
159% 9ft MonM g 
18% 10ft MoogB 
189% 10ft AAOOOA 
32ft 159* AAAAedn 
4ft IftMtgRtwt 
199% 169% MtgGttl 156 89 7 
10 8 AAtgPln JDe 24 

2ft 7 Morfnt 
Aft 2ft MtMed 13 

21 139% MovSrr .151 is 

9ft 49* MovieL 
5 194 Murpln 

131. 9 Myerln JBb 25 8 
17 13V% NRMn 2J0 IU 

209% 181% NRMpf 240 1X7 
9ft Sft Ngntck 15 

149* 1114 NtGaO 40b 14 10 
21ft 121% N I Paid! .10 4 

2396 1496 NMxAr J9t 44 19 
17ft 12ft NPlnRt US 6J 15 
241% 13 NPra 1J0B SS 12 
7ft 7ft NWldPn 
49% 31ft NVTtmes 40 14 ts 
t*k 3ft NewbE JSr AI 6 

179k lift Newear 53 13 

16ft 11 to NewLsn 13 

IP* 131% NwpEI 150 89 11 

7ft 59% Nkhinn 18 

in. 69% Nidwls 8 

2ft 19% Modlnd 

»% 21* Holex 

lift 99% NCdOgs 

37 299* NIPS pf 4J5 124 

Fh 2ft NuHrz 
lift ift NadDl 
129* Bft Numoc 
24to 169% OEA 
22ft ISV* OQkwd 
12 4 OdetAn 

Tift ift OdefB 

24V. 18ft OHalnd 
2796 101% Ofttea s 
7ft - 3ft OOklep 


,7 S 


8to + 16 
11% 

« - ft 

a-" 

'XT'* 

II Li — W 


31ft— 'b 
lift — to 


as 


14 


14 
4 13 


15 76 
14 18 


27 /ft / /n 

228 28ft 38ft 3ft + 1 

9 4ft 6 V* Vi — ft 

6 6 4 4 — ft 

11 34 34 34 

68 Ift Ift H%— 

10 4 4 4 — 1% 

13 1ft Us 1ft 

25 1 7ft 19'* 19ft— ft 

195 17ft 36ft 37 — to 

133 16V B 15'.% 15ft— U 

49 lift 119% 113* 

45 lift II II — to 

22 13ft 13'.% 131% — <% 

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96 13ft 13ft 13te + 1% 

188 19% 11% 11% 

21 Bft 81: “ 

1 lft lie 
43 9ft 9 
SJ 2ft 2ft 
Sft 
17ft 
ft 

lift 11 

40 20’ a 199* KPa 
5 17ft lift lift— ft 
35 ift 4 V* 4ft — 1% 

27 ISto 15 

3 3198 21ft 

23 779* |7*i 
9 57 SSft 55ft — Hi 

31 19 1B9* 19 

16 5ft 5ft 5ft— l* 
49 10 99* IQ + ft 

29 149* 1496 149% 

312 189* 17V> IB 11 + 1% 
2S6 109% 9ft W + ft 
59 209* 20'. o 2016— ft 

14 A 59* 59* 

10 4 39* 31a + to 

1*5 81 799* 809. +71* 

70 2D9. ZOto 2096— to 
18 Sft Bto gto _ ft 
5 169* 16ft Mto + to 
14 13'.% 13to 13ft + ft 
29 261% Tift 26ft—9b 
114 496 4 446 + 96 

5 9ft 9ft 9ft— to 

4 289* 28ft 289* + >A 
126 149% 14to 14 to 

23 159b IF* 159% + Id 
3 171* 17ft 17ft + ft 

83 16ft 16ft 16ft + '% 
16 21 20ft 20ft— 1% 

103 2 lft 2 + to 

54 179% 17ft I' 

97 Bft Sft 

29 Ift Ift . _ 

14 49* 496 49* 

1 13ft 13*8 13ft + ft 
1 TU 7 to 7to — 1% 
21 2 lft 2 + 1% 

1 10 ID ID 
20 14ft 13ft 14 

9 19to 19 19 

13 9 Bft 9 

A lift 119* lift— Vb 
559 17ft 16ft 17ft + to 

5 10ft 17ft 18ft 

198 15ft 15to 15ft— V* 
135 241% 24 24 

87 79* 7ft 7ft— V* 

«S3 43ft 429* 43 
38 4<% 4 4'% + 1* 

30 12V. 12 12 

31 lift 149* 149*— 1% 
3 16ft 169* 16ft + ft 

63 6ft 69* 69* — 1% 
54 9ft 9ft 9ft 
9 29* 2ft 2ft— to 
VD 29b 2ft 29* + (% 
7 10V6 1018 10V6 
mb 3496 3496 3496 
27 3ft 396 3ft + ft 
29 Sto 5 51% 

24 • 9 9 

13 20 20 20 

51X20 19ft 20 + V% 

121 5ft ift 5ft + ft 
3 6 to 6 to 6'A + (A 

2 2096 20ft- 20ft 

200 24 23 231% +11% 

61 4ft 41% 49% + to 


4 “ TM 

17ft + V6 


— 1% 
— 1% 


7ft 

Sto Oppenh 

ir 

10 


329 

4to 

4to 

•ito 

8 

4ft OrtolHA 

2.7 

26 

31 

5Vt 

sto 

51% + ft 

7to 

4to OrrolH B 

J0 

3J 

36 

4) 

Sft 

5 

Sft + ft 

296 

1 ■ Ormond 




21 

lft 

lft 

lft 


259* 16 OSutvn s JO 13 17 
149* Aft O.trdF 521 *4 10 


149* Sto OzorttH JO 1 A 14 3498 
15 llto PGEpfA 1J0 102 
13ft 10ft PGEofB U7 11J 
121* 9ft PGEpID 125 1X9 
12ft 9ft PGEpfE 125 llj 
IZft Bft PGEpfG 120 1M7 
36 31ft PGEpfF 434 12.9 
331* 29ft PGEpJZ 406 123 
29T6 24ft PGEpfY 3JD IU 
24ft 19ft PGEpfW 257 11 J 
22ft 17Vi PGEptV 222 II J 
249% 199* PGEDfS 262 ll.T 
11 Bft PGEpfH 1.12 102 
19ft 15ft PGEptP 305 112 
S8ft 14ft PGEpfO 200 110 
19ft 14ft PGEofM ISA 11.1 
2T 169* PGEpfL 225 IU 
Z»to ISto PGEofK 204 112 
219* 17to PGEpfJ 222 112 
lift 81* PGEpfl 109 110 
ZSto 16 PGTm 1J4 44 9 
419* 32ft PacUotAM IU 
43V% 34to PacLIof 450 11.1 
73to 58ft PacLt pf 704 IDS 
9* 9% Pageg 

409% 32ft PallCd M 13 20 
3ft Sft PantaSt 49 




249b 241% 249% + ■* 
1296 12ft 12ft + V% 
lift lift 14V* + Ml 
33 15 lift lift — 

1 121% 121% 2ft 
M lift lift lift . .. 
17 lift lift lift— ft 
40 10ft 10ft )W% 

22 33ft 339% 33ft 
31 31ft 31ft 319% 

"Ito 28 28 

23 23 

20ft 20ft 
231% 239% — ft 
119% 10V%— u. 
1896 18ft 
1BV* IBto + Vi 
176% 179% + ft 
20 20 + ft 

179% 181* 

209% 209% 

9ft 9!h 
281* 289* + ft 
39H 39ft + ft 



200X41 40V: 40ft— to 


2000X 70 70 70 + to 

70 to to to + ft 

146 379* 37V6 379% + 4% 
47 79* 7ft 7ft— Ml 


32 

17to PnrtCh 

ua 

u 

12 

7 

32 

31 to 

31ft— ft 

’3ft 

4V% PatTcti 



31 

97 

,§* 

5 

5 - ft 

llto 

6to PaulPt 



47 

1? 

9to 

9to— ft 

59% 

29% PoyFan 



28 

77 

4 

3to 

3to- ft 

im 

81* PeerTu 

JCb 4J 

13 

ID 

3Wr 

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9to— ft 

Bft 

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lJOa X4 

17 

7 

359% 

3596 + ft 

24ft 

15ft PenTr 

IJO 

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11 

39 

349% 

24ft 

249% 


29% 96 PE CP J5rSS •' 

269* 191% Pen RE s 1J0 60 10 
Ufr Tu Penril JO 27375 
1%% ft Pentmu 
13ft li Pertnll X0 11 20 
12ft 99* PerinlPf 1.10 9.1 
49* 2V6 PHLw 

ft ft PetLwt 
9to Aft PetLSPl US 240 
111* 7ft PetLepf 2JB 25J 
17ft 119* PetLepf 3J3 25-9 
29% Ito PtlllLD 260149 2 


196 ft ft ft 

53 26ft 26ft 26ft— ft 

45 71% 7ft 7ft — ft 

19* 19* + ft 

12ft 12ft + ft 

12 12W + ft 

* X 

6ft Aft- ft 
8ft 9 

12ft 12ft— ft 
ito ito 


19* 

1 

u 

1 b 


1 19* 

7 2ft 
7ft V» 
16ft 10ft 
749* 68 
lOto 6ft 
20ft 15ft 
16V6 12ft 
ito 7ft 
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12V: 79% 

17ft 129% 
7ft 59* 
311% U 
Oft 64% 

1*% ft 

Mft 9ft 
12*% 7to 
4*6 3V6 
22ft 1K% 
23ft 15ft 
40 311% 

3*ft 3016 
Bto 2ft 
70*1 Sft ■ 
Bft 59% 
Sft 39% 
191% 1S96 
20 IS 
2ft 1. 
14ft 10ft 
9 to Aft 
17ft 16 
2ft Ito 
20ft 16ft 
ift lft 
IF* MSft 
509* 3F6 
536 40 
Sft 3% 
59* Ift 
12ft 9V» 
13*6 14ft 
19ft Bft 
am 171* 
S*t lft 

34 23to 
33'% 229k 
7*6 ift 
18ft lift 
29ft 16 


PlcoPd 

Fieri wt 

PionrSy 

PffOsm 

Pithmy 

Ptzzain 

PicrDo 

PivGms 

PtvSA 

PopaEv 

PortSv* 

PostiPr 

PrelrO* 

PrattLi 

Pratt Rd 

PramRs 

PreiRA 

PreyR B 

kP* 

EEPA 

Sffi 


U It 

1.1 148 


10 IS 


jo u n 


JXU 


ID 


42 15 


§ 


148 2 to 

22 4% 

12 39% 
It 1695 

A 7 *ft 

SHv% 

78 39% 

S ll'i 
1*9* 
16 6 
59 18ft 
2 7 

10 ft 
3 lift 
16 lift 
90 396 
71 19ft 
8 239% 
750 Y 38 
13 3Zto 
622 416 

3 « 

26 69% 
19 3ft 
3 1BU. 
12 17. 

S ft 

4 12 
. 9 Bto 

13 17 
3 14% 

10 18 
76 2ft 
5 149% 
561 45ft 

’£1 
3 49* 

13 10ft 
MX 15ft 
75 169* 
63 19 
6W 1*6 
S 6ft 
23 26 
7 249b 
135 Aft 
171 18ft 
S3 2446 


2ft— ft 

ito 

31% 

I6to .. 
74 + 1» 

79% + ft 
16 —ft 
16ft + ft 

3 + V. 

3ft— ft 
11 — ft 
149% + 96 
Sft— lb 
Uft— ft 
7 + ft 
1% 

11*% + ft 
lift— ft 
39* + to 

m , 

Oft— ft 
38 +»% 

33 

4*% + ft 


.te — ** 


a - .5 

•a 


15 


c 



5 




1 

Bto 

3ft SFM 


4 

89 

4 

& 

3ft— ft 

Bft 

7 SFNpfA 



3A 

73% 

7to— ft 

30V» 

20*% 5JW* 

145 33 

13 

4* 

39ft 

39ft 

39ft— ft 

S 

29% SMD 


13 

21 

. Bb 

3V6 

3*i — ft. 

101* 

646 5ooe 



14 

7to 

79* 

79* 

O’-. 



17 

44 

Sto 

59* 

s?ii 


ft SCarto 




1 

1 

1 

9 

69% SDOOM 

JS 10.1 


9 

89* 


Bto + ft 

91% 

69* SDoonf 
79% SDaoPf 

JO MU 


4 

JFH 

9%i 

816 + 1* 

10 

IJO 10.1 


1 

«< 

Mk 

9ft + <Jt 

879% 

77 SDgOPf 

9J4 114 


50x85ft 

85ft 

•59* — I 

24ft 

19 5Dgo(»f 

247 WL9 


1 

239* 

229* 

224* 

399* 

34ft SDsouf 

us ixo 


5 

3STh 

384* 

38*6— ft 

30 

21V. Sandgte 

JD 2J 


54 

271% 

29ft 

2916— 96 

Sto 

39* Sarunric 

JO 1 9.1 

11 

- A 

44* 

496 

496— ft 

7 

4ft Sound B .15 2b 
99% Stum pf 1 JB 1X2 

8 

2 

Sto 

Sto 

39% + ft 

11 


2 

7h 

9ft 

9ft— 1% 

99* 

? SatnOn 

1JD 160 


24 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft— 1% 

159% 



IS 

m 

1396 

13V* 

I3b< + ft 

5ft 

39% Sceotrn 



i.i 

31% 

31% 

396 

301* 

17?% Sctielb 
19% ScbootP 

46 20 

13 

36 

7B9% 

21 

28 —9% 

29* 

48 XI 


39 

2to 

TV* 

2ft— ft 

14'* 

9to Sdnmb 

21 

43 

10 

996 

Ak— 9% 

7to 

394 SaMst 

.10 14 


43 

5*6 

5ft 

5ft + ft 

34V> 

12 Sell— iu 


7 

46 

121% 

lift 

llto— ft 

40ft 

33 Scoae 

-43 U 

W 

2 

Bft 

33ft 

33V* -K ft 

67ft 

42ft SbdCn 

40 3 

6 

1 

Sift 

A7ft 

67ft 

2ft 





lft 


Ift 

159% 

94* SecCnp 

.16 14 

7 

39 

11 

UR* 

11 

49* 

2 SefePro 



5 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft _ 

Ito 

to SettOtt 



?4 

to 

to 

to— A 

Bft 

34% SekB 


75 

3* 

4ft 

ift 

ift 

6 

,44% 

39% Seri ig As 
W% SrvHco 

J8 24 

11 

1 

A 

5ft 

llto 

nX 

5ft— 1% 
lift 

11 

79% semo 


13 

14 

109% 

9ft 

101% + 9% 

Uto 

69% Serve tr 

461 S3 

20 

30 

17ft 

m* 

nr» + ft 

12ft 

9ft Scion s 


IB 


109* 

,0to 

tow— » 

139% 

Bft Sneers 

1JM0 84 

7 

7 

llto 

Uto 

1196— ft 

2 




45 

ft 

n 

ft 

ISto 

Sto ShopiM s 

.16 |j4 


0 

lift 

lift 

lift 

16ft 

79% SlerHSr 


21 

48 

Bto 

Bft 

8ft— ft 

151% 

9ti SlerSon 

J7t 27 

24 

33A 

Wft 

9ft 

10—1* 

15ft 

7to Keren 

JOT 


32 

8 

8 

8 

71% 

4 a tea 

.101 

Ml 

70 

5 

5 

5 —ft 

15V* 

Sto SBcesA 

JO 14 

12 

113 

10ft .1016 

109% 

59% 

Sft SDvrtst 



39 

ato 

Sft 

I9T%+ ft 

3H% 

10?% SmffiA 

40 44 


» 

793% 

<s 

20 

10 SmttiS 

40 4.1 


26 

19ft 

19Vi + ft 

Z7V6 

24ft Stntlipf 

2.12 13 


52 

37 

Mft 

27+16 

Oft 

59* Solitron 


20 

17 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

1696 


250 

A 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft + ft 

1 

Pm SoTex 

Bft SCEd at 



33 

ft 

to 

H— ft 

10*6 

1JQ 10J 


17 

10ft 

956 

9ft 

,1ft 

Bft SCEd pf 

146 1BJ 


17 

UR* 

¥99% 

* 

lift 

Bft SCEdpf 

1XIB 11.1 


15 

10 

996 

94*— to 

1296 

89% SCEd of 
lift SCEdpf 

1.19 1IU 


117 

Tito 

US 

llto— 16 

1494 

US 1U3 


210 

74ft 

lift— to 

43ft 

34ft SCEdpf 

L30 13 


1 

39to 

39ft 

39to + 9% 

93ft 

A9ft SCEdpf 

844 9.1 


120 

939% 

939% 

931% + to 

23ft 

18 SCEdpf 

230 KL3 


64 

22ft 

219% 

2216 + 96 

23ft 

179% SCEdpf 

221 10.4 


21 

21ft 

ft 

21V* + ft 

75ft 

SOft SCEdpf 

748 104 


as 

71ft 

71ft + 9% 

859% 

61 SCEdpf 

IJO 104 


in 

raft 

8796 

B24* + to 

BB 

70 SCEdpf 

846 10J 


3 

into 

nib 

8396 + 4% 

Sft 

7V. 

29% SovBco R 
44% SpedOP 


9 

30 

5 

3 

Ato 

Ato 

3 

Ato— lb 

13V* 

lilt 

SKSSSTn 

JW 

206 

1 

II 

Aft 

41% 

A 

4 

A — 96 

49% 

Bto 

44% StHavn 

JOB 14 

70 

3 

Sft 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

239% 

17ft StdPril 

JB4 31 

A 

17 

22 

7196 

21ft + ft 

1016 

79* Stamvd 


58 

4 

Sto 

llto 

Bto— ft 

2114 

149* StarrtH 


19 

5 

179* 

1796 

174* — l* 

KP4 

Ato S latex 



75 

Sto 

Bto 

Bto 

23ft 

15ft Stem 

48 34 

n 

1 

2296 

779% 

2246— ft 

Zft 

14% SlertEI 


A 

ito 

196 

14* 

23 

139* Shi Ext 
54% Starts ft 

JS 17 

7 

2 

14ft 

lift 

14ft 

llto 

-T8B 14 

26 

118 

10ft 

99* 

99% 

2Tb 

Ito StrotW 



5 

Ito 

-ift 

Ito 

7 

34% SuoiHE 



8 

«to 

446 

446 + 1* 

lift 

lift SumtE pflJO 113 


14 

13ft 

1316 

»i!E + * 

11 

7 SunCty 



11 

Aft 

816 

Bto 

24% SunSL 



61 

3ft 

316 

-3ft + 9% 

Z4ft 

lift SunJr 

M 21 

U 

3 

779% 

S2 


3694 

2116 SuprFd 

44b 1J 

14 

97 

3696 

JftUa — Ufa 

19% 

ft SupCre 



M 

1 

i - 

i — W 

13ft 


JO 14 

7 

43 

lift 

n 

11 - ft 

181% 

lift SuprSr 

36 23 

ID 

16 

16ft 

15to 

16—1% 

6fe 

2ft 

39* SaSOMh 
1ft SnflEng 


9 

9 

22 

90 

49% 

19% 

496 

1ft 

lft 

28 

194% Swift in 

IJO 5J> 

25 

51 

24 

23to 

Sft + ft 

69% 

149% 

3ft Svnaloy 
Ato SvstEns 

.10 14 

9 

17 

22 

r a 

r+1% 


! 4to TordBr - - - 

Oft TgaTY J® ■*“ - 

. 5to Tear-. 

re TchAffl .. 

»U TehS^J .. ii 

, 44to Techfip J W - »" 

3%. T*cnto 
I 10 to T eCMTj 
I »*•» Teehi^ 

*7 TeionP 
, vis TeMcon 
24'k TeiiS » “ 

, a to TelOft AS 
, * to Teiac . 
r !"* JglESSf. 

I 4 Tenocv . _ 

, 22 TexCflo »I3 

716 7emA.jr 

, 4ft TeaAE .„k*r_5 1 
, 16ft TexAE P'SOT •«- 
9% TxSCOH 

i llto Tofu* . ** 

51 TolEdPl 77» -r. 

, 2ft Tprtel JW >3. 
i sft TeftPTO .< 

S TotPtwt 

ZT- TotPtP# l* „ 

Bft TnwL. J2» J-l *s 
11*6 TrrwTec l > 
13'k Tran ron M ' 

6ft TrmCc J9t SJ *C 
39* Trfdex •» 

r.% TubMex « 

Wto TuraB n S 

22 TumrC U0 •: ' ■ 
Pt TmEan lx u 
lft Tylr wl 5 
Ift UNA 
Bft UTimtr 
Bt* Umcarp 
lift UnlCPPt ,-g_ *5 
Jto Uniroor 1J4CI28 
159. UAirPd f- J4 
left UnCavF siO ■ 

ift UFeadA .1C 6J 
Ito UFocdB 
lift UiMed 
12~* USAG «t 
Fk UnlMiV M 

ri UnvCm > 4 

6ft UaivRi 76 

lO'b UnrPot 


etc 


‘i !H »l* 4 



n 1* * ^ * ■: 

W% iSbVMkloC ,40b 14 17 29 77 'Lfc ' 


JO 


0<r J 
JOdU 
.40 S3 

JO 4-4 


JO 

.16 

.11 


s 

J 14 


6ft 3ft VtftSh 
16 9% Verna 

139% Bft Veaiil 
lOto Sft vuiech 
9 4ft Vtean 
4ft 196 Vlntse 
18ft 12 Viren 
99* Aft VHudG 
T2ft Tto wastes 
1916 149% VuKCa 
7ft Sto WTC 
361% 18V. Walbar 
29V* U WmB 
29 149* WatnC 

2 ?. WornCwt 

IT*. 496 Wl&HS 
130 76 WkbPst 06 

3M 149% WRIT % LI7 
Sft 3 Wltifrd 
19ft 13ft WtfiW pf 202 16J 
9ft 516 hUlWR 
l to WeMnwt 
3ft ft MAebcar 
ift 3 Wades 
10 Aft Wedotn 
12- 7ft MtaBdt 
Aft 4ft Wlm on 
9ft 7 WildTb 
14 Sft WeSdSrn 
19ft 4ft Wei ICO 
TV. n. WeBAon 
4 21* WefGnf 

389* Hft WMco 
2ft ft Wewco 
IBto 596 VMSrC 16 

129% Sft Wstbra JO 14 

Ufe Aft WDhBtf 

23ft Tit WIHHhn 18 

21V* Mto WIRE 7 1J6 7.7 1$. 

13ft 6ft WstSLS .16 1J 4 

24ft- 111% WtarEns IS 

ift 2 to VWeftito 



174 

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1* 

32 

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17 

29 

77 

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33 

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fit 

2216 


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to Wickasnt 
10 WIckespCLSD 87 . 

10ft Wiener n JO 19 > 
21% Wln£ B 3A 

2ft WflnEA 
199% Wldlln 2J34 1X6 

8 Wddrm AO BA 34 
lift WkWMr 52 26 7 

2ftWwde£ - -- 75 

9 Wttrthn JS 
m J 44 


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% to 

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17 8ft 8>% 

14 1» ,-‘t — % 

72 to ft- 

20 2*6 2ft 214— ■ » 

10 0 ft 9ft Oft 

7j Wto ,0ft .0ft- t * 

5 Sto a'.'B Bft 

16 I Oft HF»6 10ft 

1 149* lift 14*4— '» 

4J '* *J — .* 

|4 3 2ft 3 — ■- 'i 

43 3*"k 38to JF-a -+ to 
4 1 1 1 — ft 

n ivi 7 ;v/ + 1. 

IB 129. nil 121% + ft 
168 71^ 7to 79* + to 

35 m: m* 179* 

15 20V6 20 70ft + ft 

18 137i 13ft 13«% 

125 149* 149% 14ft 

40 3 3ft 2ft — 


l.lflell.T 7 

frd'l 

M 12 

4 


62 10 13 


219* ISto Wraitr 
•to 59% YonkCs 
Sto 31% Zbnar 


OH 


5 1994 4ft 41% 4'% v 

9 Ito Ift »«%— Vt 
61 28ft 289% 289%- 'a 
1 10ft ID 1 i lift 
73 Aft 69* Aft — * 
ID 41% 41% 4«6 + 1% 

. 6 211* 71 21'o + <* 

7 th ivi n . 

SR 20 mi 199% + 9b 
ITS 3?% 3to 3ft 4-ft 
36 99* 99* 9(* - 

44 3 199* 1*9% 1996— 1* 

11 25 7 7 7 2 

' 286 4 3ft 3ft-* 


| AMEX IBghfrLows :[ 


NEW HIGHS 23 


AO i Coaln 
BkCnrp 
Con5tr wf 
FHdtbaGE 
PocGTron 
Tatoo . 


Aitaxlndn 
ICO Inc 
SdentLSB 


AmContUid AmTrExua 
ConduaWkie Connelly 
Country Ml gti EwerJnB 
HomeGpn Hotel Prop wt 

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A survey on AJBC readers. 
Here are the facts. 


A Kf: READERS ABE MOBE 
ACTIVE IN FINANCES 
AND INVESTMENTS* AeL% 

Private life msazemee and retirement pension 
schemes I 25 


Credit card 


Two 


Three 


More than three 


Investments through financial concerns 

(shares , Gov er n me nt stock, fixed term deposits* bonds, 
etc.) 


M 


rr 


17 


14 



ABC 



READEBS OWN A HIGHER 


ABC 


AMO NG READERS 

THE ELECTRONICS AND DATA PROCESSING 
SECTOR IS OF MAJOR —rS 

IMPORTANCE* A BC 

Hi-fi equipment 

Colour TV 

Video 

Personal computer (a t home) 

Decision- taking responsibility in the purchase of 
the company's data processing equipment 


THE TOP GEAR BRACKET* h 

No. c 1 cars 

One 

JBC* 

BEST or 
PRESS Ih. 

69 ! 

66 

Two 

19 

9 

Three or more 

5 

1 

Buy more new cars 

61 

45 

Bny more imported cars 


~ir 

Buy cars of all capacities* bat 
particularly of the highest 

Ud to 1J200 c.c. 

31 

~w~ 

From 1,200 to L8Q0 c.a 

More than 1,800 c.a 

42 

10 

JL 

7 

Major decision-taking responsibility 

10 

3 


* According to a survey conducted in Febxuaxy/Maxch. 1985 by GESE, Socioeconomic 
Researchers, within the framework of the Autonomous Community of. Madrid. 

ABC. SERRANO, 61 PHONE 34-1-435 3100 

MADRID CSPAIN) TELEX 27682 





ABC. Prestigio cle la Puma de Espana. 


ABC: Madrid 's General Ddfy Newspaper since 1905. 





- 51 s jf> 

•- : »1 1? ft 
v .' 

'* *i ilV 

li . ! Vv 

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• •- .. b, *. • 


- * a 
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INTERWATIONAl HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


Growth of 2.5% 

Forecast in I LK 

Rouen 

i- LONDON —..The London 
r&asnass School said Monday 
that it^apccted ibe growth of 
the British economy to hold 
s«ady ai 2.5 percent in 
with inflation below ^percent 
by the middle of die year. 

This would mean little 
change -from this year’s rate of 
underlying growth, excluding 
the effects of the economic re. 
bound that followed the ending 
of the miners’ strike. - 
Th e school said the strong 
pound would be the ntrug 
of a fall in inflation It said it 

agreed with a forecast by Nigel 

fiUwson, chancellor of the Ex- 
that inflation would 
■drop bdow 4 percent in Bad- 
1986 from 6 percent now. Bank 
base Leading rates, now lift 
percent, were expected to fall to 
| 9 percent by the end oTI986. 


ILS. 


**■* 

■ Machines Coqx, feds certain that 
“there’s s lot of productivity Jain 
going on” in the economy being 
missed because of inadequacies in 
.measuring what computers do, 

• Orercuting the trade prob- 
leans of the Untied States. Harry L 
Freeman, oeemhe vice presdent 
of American Express, thinW ex- 
ports of services ate considerably 
trigger dun estimated. He notes 
that the Commerce Department 
put a figure of S60 hSfioo on ser- 
vice exports acoople of years ago 
but he thinks it may actually Be 
more like S100 bfiBon, because of 
nnreponed business activity. 

“The trouble is that a hit of peo- 
ple don't realize they're exporting 
sendees," he says. -Americans 
manage hospitals around the 
world; that’s an export of services. 
If a UJ5. law firm balls a Gcnnan 
bank, forteffing it what Congress is 
doing cm the tax bin, that's an ex- 
port." 


- • Hampering basnets efficien- 
cy. Most government statistics 
track only broad categories of ser- 
vices . Tbs not only makes it hard 
for service companies. to identify 
their best potential growth areas, 
but also can prerent service-com- 
pany manager s from com p a rin g 
their companies’ performance, in 
sales or in efficiency, with the rest 
of tfidr industry. 

For example. Mr. Ross said he 
would Eke to know how large a 
star home hedth-care services arc 


: ?. !*> 

U u 

: * i J * 




. TO ■*? ■. 

$JU- 

■ * i T** c - 

! 

" *, f. 

*5 7u 

IS St. 
1 3 & t 
: 

j] *•£• 

3 

* 

ifll i -• 

> it; ' 
Jj r* 2 

js • ■ 

!U 4 v. 


^ ^afcrijfey 


H.GMS 3 


Company Results 

Revmwe andproHts prjauun. in miMons,ontokK&<BrrmuM* 
unless otherwise Indicated. . 


Halted Stale* 

CttromoUny American 
w floor. ms dm 

Revenue 2000 UM 

met I pc. ■ . 087 025 

f Moottu DC ml 

RevOOlie 637.1 637 A 

Hal Lots 286. 070 

. General Pvbllc utL 
eLjfaoor. ' ms nw 

MU 70SO 

Wot Inc 3S2 34J» 

Per Short—. <JJ6 056 
9 Months ms 1984 

Rn«n 2300. 2060. 

Met Inc 824 . S7J 

Par Shore U1 US 

Household inti 
3rd floor. ■ -ms IfM 

Rovtnue 2010 . vm 

NOT Inc. 507 41 J 

Per Snore— _ 087 210 


f Months DB rm 
Revenue 6240. im 

WM Inc. 1604 17l5 

Per Stint 2Jf 2M 

MCA 

MQnor. MS DM 

Revenue __ 4267 etu 

MM inc as BJ 

ParShora . oft o» 

f Manths ms DM 

R*yeno* iato MSI. 

Net Inc M2 764 

Per Snore— _ lja - US 
Ptrthanr nautrs after JSorJ 
fpUllnAUB. 

MGM/ua Entartnmt 
Whaecr. ms mi 

Revenue — 1772 13X4 

NMU£-_ taMfJ U* 
Per Sflare — gjl 

Year IMS DM 

Revenue __ . jjj i »Mi _ 


Not Inc ^lalim 347 
Par sum-. — aoo 

SwE^wSSoSEbjIti* 

Am 

Nash Flncti 

3rd qmt. ms tM6 

Hownus <227 3*75 

Net Inc X72 XK 

Pvrsnott— 073 073 

♦ Mufti IMS 19M 

Rovenuor Mti. MX? 

Mt Inc. . 13* : US 

Per snare ."mi MX 

PtwhEsmu 
3rd floor". . • IMS ISM 

na va e io 3*06 mM 

MMt 164* 6J3 

Parshen ass 02* 

• Months. ms dm 

Revenue 70773 4114 

Net lac 107 10* 

Par Share 110 (UN 


KEEP UP TO DATE WITH 
BUSINESS PEOPLE 
APPEARING EACH WEDNESDAY 
AND FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


homes; his company is in both 
fields but b bigger in nursing 
homes. Since the two lines of busi- 
ness are tamped into one statistical 
category, be carmot find out. 

ItaditioQaUy, Urn UJ5. govern- 
ment's s tat i sti cs gatherers lave fo- 
cused on manufacturing and, to a 
lesser extent, on the other goods- 
produdng industries — mining 
conscruction and agriculture. The 
goods-prodneing industries were 
always considered die heart of the 
economy, while services were a Frill. 
Manufacturing and the other 
goods-prodne-ing industries were 
the most vulnerable to cyclical ups 
and downs, and therefore had to be 
studied more deedy. Only manu- 
factured and agricultural products 
were significant exports. 

There is evidence now that none 
of these things are as tree as they 
once were. Inst how modi is hard 
to say, because of the lack of data. 

Goods-prodnditg industries last 
year accounted for only 32 pcrcern 
of the dollar value of wfaal the 
United States produced and 29 per- 
cent of die jobs. Services, broadly 
defined to include everything else 
— transportation, communica- 
tions, public nrihries, wholesale 

and mail trade, frnawei* wigimn^ 

real estate, business and persona] 
services and government — ac- 
counted for the resL 

Those things most people think 
of as services — health care, legal 
wrak, barter and beamy shops, re- 
pair sendees and so on — consti- 
tute what economists call the ser- 
vice industries, as opposed to the 
service sector. The service indus- 
tries accounted for 14 percent of 


Monday^ 

arc 


KttUM .Stuck 


DM. YM. TUI 


mm I tIMeatn 
L*» 3 PM. Ort* M«Li» 


-MMIf. f<_- 

5.1MI1S ■— V 
Howrofl *>? 

-••■Ce.Tr. ^ 

•■•e^arrj;} 


Prices 


NASDAQ PTlCRl OS Of 
3 f pjn. nrw York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


Mb M 
27 lift 
mt 4 
in tm 
M n* 

74* 316 


22 WH» 
3M H4* 
- 21 IS 
2H6 33ft 
no 3 


BolfTc .16 24 84 

Bo>mc n u ik 
B smota 3 

BMaFC 40* IS 211 
Bra*Q> Si 

Bmco M 33 40 
BnwTom * 

Bruno i .14 U MB 
BuHdTz 73 

Brntmi 24 27 *0 

BunrBr 9 

BMAa 204 33 Wt 
BlHlaW 447 


m 44* 
2SV. 314* 
4 -4 

37 24M 

lift 1116 


134% 130. 
73 3116 

1416 1416 
1714 UK 
31ft 3t 
7 ca 


4ft-* U. 
25ft + ft 
4 

27 + K 

lift + U, 

EH* + ft 
32ft + 
2416 

Ifift— M 

a»6 

8ft— ft 





lift 

w 
Si 

716 

% 

516 
17ft 13ft 
23ft ISft 
J4ft 7ft 
WK 7ft 
37ft 32ft 

" 3 


V -S> . iS 

- 

; iv- , s-ft 

. 

? 




r/ ^ 


^ a 


46ft 45ft 

-716 7 
1514 15ft 
34ft 34ft 
814 8ft 
7ft 9ft 
4716 4616 
•ft 7 
16 15ft 
1716 14ft 
916 (ft 
171* 16ft 
11 10ft 
7ft . 7* 
3416 34 
40 59ft 
6H 4ft 
716 9ft 
lift 10ft 
3216 32 






31ft 
7ft 

36ft 37 
14ft 14ft 
5ft 5ft 
416 416 
Uft 19 
35ft 36ft 
Oft 43ft 
40 40 

9ft Uft 
3016 3016 
24ft 21ft 


32V. 

Tft 
27ft 27ft 
•ft 916 
17ft 14ft 
Uft 10ft 
Uft 17ft 
3ft 3ft 
716 6ft 
2336 23ft 

9 tft 
4ft 4ft 
13ft "Oft 
tft tft 
7ft Tft 
2ft 216 
4ft *M 
30 IfU 
4ft Cl 


Oft 3ft 
Tift 4 
56ft 2914 
tft S 
Wft Tft 

’St 5ft 

241* 14 
20ft 14 
171* Uft 
3316 UU. 
lift 14ft 
.lift 10ft 
Uft 5U 
7ft 4 
32ft 13ft 
Uft 0 
Uft ■ 
19 12ft 
15M ft 


GTS 

GomaB .10 

Garwtcft 

GanatS 

Gam 

GaFBk 

GariMi 

GSWG* M 

UsaTr 

GMaax 

Gatl 

GouMP M 

Ofoca M : 

Grptili 

GfWSe 

GW5av Mr : 

GtSoPd 

Gftch 

GuUM Om 
GHBdC 1580c 


3ft 3ft 
6ft 6 
<836 4816 
K6 9ft 
1ft tft 
24ft 24ft 
Tft 7ft 
19ft Uft 
15 Uft 

JS* 

3» 2216 

16ft 15ft 
lift 17ft 
13ft 13ft 
7ft 7ft 
22ft 2116 
9ft tft 
15 Uft 
14ft U 
ft ft 


Ml 

«&-* 
1ft— ft 
24ft + ft 
7ft— ft 
19 + ft 
15 + ft 

15ft + ft 
2216— ft 
1416 

17ft— 16 
Uft + ft 
**-16 

tft 

Uft „ 
Uft + ft 
ft 


MARKETS 






j 


lage 17 


domestic production and 22 per- 
cent of ea^oymeM last year. Their 
share of VS. enjoyment was larg- 
er than manufactonng. which now 
employs 19 percent of the work 
force, though manufacturing srill 
produces aboat 25 percent of grass 
domestic product, as it has for 25 
years. GDP is defined as the basic 
measure of a nation's output of 
goods and services, excluding cer- 
tain income from abroad. 

Dolls, sa«, lace, razors and ci- 
gars all arc measured in the govern- 
ment's statistics. Each is what is 
known as a four-digit industry un- 
der die standard industrial classifi- 
cation, whose sales, employment, 
inventories and capital investment, 
among other facts, are coUecied. 

By contrast, every type of legal 
service will be found under just one 
four-digit industry code, and there 
are no specific data for such rela- 
tively new services as cable TV or 
physical fitness facilities. 

ran of the problem is that ser- 
vices arc not so easily measured as 
manufactures. How do you mea- 
sure a unit of output from a com- 
puter when its work can range from 
a simple piece of word processing 
to an infinitely complex analysis d 
a problem in finance or physics? 

Walter B. Wruton, the retired 
chairma n of Qticorp, argues thai 
figures on business investment are 
losing validity because they fail to 
measure “human capital." 

Writing a software program, be 
says, “may require only a relatively 
trivial sum of money, as compared 
to (he amounts of money we nsed 
to thinV of as capital in entering, 
say, a heavy manufacturing busi- 
ness. On the other side of the coin, 
theltaiowledge-cap^aani^^ 
in the software writer’s head , or in 
the documentation, or on disks, is 
very subs tantial and very real A 
strong argument can be mad e that 
information capital is as important, 
or even more critical to the future 
growth of the American economy 
than money.” 

Nonetheless, steps are being Lak- 
en to improve service statistics. The 
effort is led by big service compa- 
nies, the Labor and Commerce de- 
partments and a new trade group, 


Mr. Ykt Hft Hh* Lo. S PAL CUV* 


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Coalition of Servioe Industries Inc 

The Bateau of Labor Statistics 
has, riace June 19S4, been collect- 
ing and publishing data on earn- 
ings and hours waxed in S2 service 
industries that it amid cot cover 
separately before. 

Already, the new information 
has paid dividends. Janet L Nor- 
wood, the commissioner of Labor 
Statistics, points out that die im- 
proved BLS surveys showed com- 
panies providing temporary help to 
Other employers were among ibe 
fastest growing service businesses. 
Mrs. Norwood thinks fixture sur- 
veys of companies that supply tem- 
porary walkers may beip identify 
cy clical swings in the economy. 

With an additional SI j million 
Congress appears to be ready to 
add to its funding this year, BLS 
will lock into ways to measure the 
dnsive output of service industries. 
BLS bad hoped to start some of this 
work two years ago. when Congress 
also added funds — $750,000 at 
that rime — that had not been 
requested by the Reagan adminis- 
tration. But tiie Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget instead forced the 
Labor Department to use the mon- 
ey to cover part of the government - 
wide pay raise that went into effect 
that year. 

Also in the works is a revision 
and updating of the standard in- 
dustrial classification, winch will 
provide the framework for the 
benchmark economic censuses to 
be taken in 1987, as they are every 
five years. 

Trade is another area in which, an 
effort is being made to revise, ex- 
pand and upgrade the statistics, as 
policymakers look to the servioe 
sector to help lower the US. trade 
deficit. Over the last few* years, a 
surplus of trade m services has 
helped to offset the huge deficit in 
the balance of trade is goods. That 
surplus has shrunk, however, to a 
reported S18.1 billion in 19S4 from 
$4-1-2 billion in 1981, according to 
Commerce Department figures. 

However, the effort to upgrade 
statistics on trade in services is 
yielding mixed results. 


Dollar Edges Up in U.S., Mixed in Europe 


Ream 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
dosed mostly higher in US. trad- 
ing on Monday siier closing mi*M 
in Europe. 

Dealers in New York said the 
buying there was prompted by 
firmness in short-term U5. interest 
rates and growing doubts about the 
likelihood of a quick relaxation of 
the Federal Reserve Board’s mone- 
tary policy. 

But few dealers attached much 
significance to the dollar's modest 
rebound against some currencies, 
and said its downtrend probably 
remains intact. 

In New York, the Ui currency 
closed at 2.6030 Deutsche marks, 
near the day’s highs and nearly a 
pfennig above Friday's finish' of 
1596a 

The yen continued its advance, 

based on the marker's belief chat 

the Bank of Japan wants the cur- 


rency to strengthen even further, 
dealers said. It firmed to 208.05 to 
the dollar versus 208.65 at Friday's 
close. 

Speculation that disunity in the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries will eventually lead 
to lower oil prices also worked in 
the yen's favor. Sterling, by con- 
trast, suffering because of Britain's 
status as a petrocurrency, eased in 
New York to SI .4385 from SI .4430 
on Friday. 

Other dosing rates for the dollar 
in New York, versus dosing rates 
Fridav, included: 7.9400 French 
franci up from 7.9125; 2.1420 
Swiss francs, up from 2.1300, and 
1,757.00 Italian lire, down from 
1.75 1 JO. 

The dollar's gains coincided with 
a statement by Bundesbank presi- 
dent Karl Otto P6U that the 
Group-of-Five nations bad taken 
no agreement at their Sept. 22 


meeting to harmonize interest rates 
in pursuit of a weaker dollar. 

His statement helped buoy the 
dollar in early Europe trading buL 
the boost proved temporary. 

In London, the dollar dosed at 
2J962fe DM, up slightly from its 
opening of 2 J935 but down from 
the 2.6055 high reached earlier in 
the day after Mr. Pbhl's statement. 

In Frankfurt, the dollar was 
fixed at 2594 DM. down from 
2.6079 DM on Friday. 

The British pound ended at 
$1.4410 in London, down from 
SI. 441 5 on Friday. 

In Paris, the dollar ended at 
7.906 French francs, down from 
7.974 francs on Thursday. The 
market was closed Friday for a 
holiday. 

In Zurich, the U.S. uni: ended at 
2.1375 Swiss francs, down from 
11500 francs on Fridav. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


$100-MUUon FRN Issued for Banco di Sicilia 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Room 

LONDON — Monday was a 
quiet trading day on the Eurobond 
market, with few changes from Fri- 
day’s closing levels, dealers said. . 

One dollar- straight trader at a 
U.S. bank said. Tm afraid it's not 
been a very inspiring day." He add- 
ed that the volume was well down 
from last week's levels, with both 
retail and professional operators 
remaining on the sidelines. 

The primary markw was also 
quiet, with only one dollar issue, a 
SlOO-mfflion floating-rate note for 
the Banco di Sicilia, emerging dur- 
ing the trading day. 

The seven-year issue pays 1/16 
point over the six-month London 
interbank offered rate and was lead 
managed by Mitsubishi Finance 
International It was quoted on the 
when-issued market at 99.8S bid. 


just on the total fees of IS basis 
points. 

The day’s other floater was a 
Deutsche- mark issue carrying a 
maximum coupon cap. The 300- 
million-DM issue pays V* point 
over three-month Libor, with a cap 
of 8 percent and was lead-managed 
by Commerzbank AG. It was 
quoted on the when-issued market 
at 9956, outride ibe total fees of 35 
basis points. 

In the Deutscbe-maik-siraighi 
sector. Heron International Fi- 
nance BV issued a 1 00-miHi on-DM 
bond paying 7li percent over 10 
years and priced at 99¥l It was 
guaranteed by Heron International 
PLC and its Netherlands Antilles 
imiL The lead manager was Deut- 
sche Bank AG. 

The Gty of Stockholm issued a 
37 5-million- French-franc bond. 
The 1 5-year issue pays a coupon of 


lOli percent for the first five years 
and it may be called by the borrow- 
er or redeemed by the investor after 
five and 10 years. It was well re- 
ceived and was quoted at a dis- 
count of K, inside the 1 Vi-percent 
selling concession. 

In the secondary markets, deal- 
ers said dollar floating-rate- note is- 
sues also finished with little net 
change on the day. 

Dealers noted that longer-dated 
period Eurodollar deposit rates 
generally dosed unchanged on the 
day, providing little incentive for 
professionals to trade. 

In the convertible sector, the two 
issues for BTR PLC were both 
quoted at around 99 following pric- 
ing. Both tranches were assigned 
the indicated coupons, 5 percent 
for the SI 50-million issue and 41* 
percent for the European -currency- 
unit portion. 


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416 41* 41*— ft 

13ft 13H 13ft— U 
111* 11 lift + ft 
15 1(16 1416 + ft 

lift lift lift + ft 
316 7ft Sft— V* 
471* 49 4916 

3796 31ft 22ft + ft 
9VS 9 9 — ft 

1416 14V* 14ft— ft 
29ft 29 29V. + ft 

18 1616 1666—1 

4ft 4 4 



171* WD 
10 wol 
Sft wik 
T7ft 
Uft 
Wft 
6 

10ft 
716 
516 
SW 
5ft 
15ft 
61* 

24ft 
3 
3 


231* lift VIowFi 54 13 504 


av* aft + ft 


30ft 5W Isolds .Wl A 1138 
13ft Wft TUotor Ma 3.9 30 

43ft 31 ZftnUt 136 U 13 
516 7U ZJtrt 49 

lilt Wk ZtoxJ 10 

1596 6ft ZOMVn J8| J 76 


34’u aft 34 ♦ ft 

12V» 13ft 13ft 
41ft 41 41 - V* 

Tft Tft 3ft— ft 
6 5ft 5ft 
lift lift lift 


JO 

9 

529 

14 

JO 

IS 

i3 

MO 

14 

?i 

543 

MS 

53 

ID 

JO 

1J 

261 

,15b 38 

SO 

77 

13 

n 

X.1 

SSI 

36 

11 

34 

33 

W8 

1J 

10 

M2 

23 

5 


24ft 

249* 

249* 

__ 

Mi 

IBft 

Uto 

Uto 

— 

9* 

n* 

7 

7» 


ft 

77 

361. 

V 

+ 

ft 

179* 

1796 

17% 



2116 

31 

21 

— 

ft 

Bto 

7ft 

8 

+ 

16 

1416 

Uft 

1414 



8 

Tft 




8 

7ft 

71* 

+ 

ft 

77ft 

77ft 

379* 



13ft 

1316 

1316 

MM 

ft 

Bto 

m 

3396 

+ 

to 

34 

33to 

33* 

— 

ft 


4ft 4 4 — ft 

5V* Sft 51* 

lift lot lift + ft 

»V- av 6 23V6 
(ft ift ift 

2016 1916 1M4 + ft 

36V6 35V* 3416 + 16 

a 2316 a +u 

168 163V* 168 

72W 7116 73 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


ocqq □□□□□ aaan 

□bob aaaHEH aniaa 

OE0E3 EIQQQQ □□SHI 
C3Q 0001333 0333193 

3ESQD0 3033 
□□□D 33300 O0t 

□01H0333H3QI1E2l1303| 
000 30003 3000 

0033 330031 

□00030030033 
□□0030 □□330000 
□D30 □□□□□ 30001 
BBHQ 03000 3001 
0Q30 30030 00001 





















































Page 18 





mTEBWATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY.- Novnumpg V 




!■■■ m 

1UIHIII 

IIIIIIU 



PEANUTS 

THERE IT 15! THERE'S 

HALLEY'S COMET, ANP 
THERE'S .ANOTHER ONE 
KISHT 6E5IPE IT! 


TH05E AREnV COMETS. 

THOSE ARE THE 
I HEADLIGHTS ON A CAR.. 


really? THAT'S ) ASTRONOMERS AU. OVER 
A 5HAME J THE UWRU7 WILL BE 
FOOLED AGAIN! 


BOOKS 




BLONDIE 

A7JO THE ^ 

LAWYER SA1P-. 





Solution 
ACROSS 

I T-men.e.g. 

5 French 
minister’s title 
9 Put one’s foot 
down 

13 Chinese hum 

14 Patriot Silas 

16 San . Italy 

17 Election Dav 
hopefuls 

19 Gide’s 11 

Die" 

20 Eight of man’s 
leech 

21 Longs for 
enviously 

23 Cane before 
the course 

24 Less cowardly 

25 The maples, to 
a botanist 

27 Gallup. Harris 
or Roper 

30 Sting less, 
feckless bees 

32 D.C. security 
breach 

33 Henpeck 

35 Prohibition 

36 Aviary sound 

38 Mussolini’s 
daughter 

39 Tic toe 

40 Breakfast food 

41 Periods of 
boredom 

43 Aftermaths of 
very close 
elections 

46 Vapor: Comb, 
form 

47 Elm’s bounty 

£' jVeic York 1 


To previous puzzle on page 17 

48 Mansard 1 s French Alps 


extension 
50 Promise 
confidently 
52 Cynics 

56" till next 

year! ” 

57 Easy victories 
on Election 
Day 

59 Tub plant 

60 NATO’S 
defunct cousin 

61 Nutcracker's 
suite 

62 Desires: itches 

63 Greek athletic 
contest 

64 Mardi 

DOWN 

1 Centers of 
attention 

2 Israeli 
statesman 

3 Therefore, in 
Tours 

4 Lees 

5 Annex 

6 Consoler's 
advice 

7 Dugout wood 

8 Ethyl’s 
adherent 

9 Spot fora hot 
pot 

10 Direct vote on 
a proposed law- 

11 Fail to include 

12 Polka 
followers 

15 Increase 
rapidly, as 
prices' 


Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


area 

22 Siberian citv 

24 This 
permeates a 
victory party 

25 Like football 
crowds 

26 Subject of a 
loser’s past- 
election speech 

28 Fragrant 

29 Where 
Kaltenbam 
held forth 

30 Banned 
insecticide 

31 Pastries 
(literally, 
“whirlpools") 

34 Yak-yak on 'he 
dais 

37 Grow dim 

38 Getting into 
the race 

40 Adonis's killer 

42 Kind of orange 

44 Paratroopers’ 
gear 

45 “Never 

know for whom 
. . Donne 

49 Jason's father 

50 Like absentee 
ballot casters 

51 Vendition 

52 Obstruction 

53 German nver 

54 Surrender, in 
Siena 

55 Speedy planes 

58 Actors’ org. 


BEETLE BAILEY 




THE GENERAL ' 
IS COMING OUT ; 
FOR TARGET J 
PRACTICE. SB M 

sure he An 

SETS A GOOP& 
SCORE F L 


WOW WHAT 
I MEAN? 




* ^ rL 


© 


ANDY CAPP 

( £ 'M4 DlHi Mirror hmciDfl- 1 

Dm tty N«n towel 


I'M BUSY a 


r COME 
ANOSEE 
WHAT I 
BOUGHT, 
^TtXiAVj < 

L FLO — J 


prosperity cauve. 

JUST AS HARD TO v 
TAKE — ESPECIALLY^ 
V WHENrPSYDUK . 

NEXT DOOR 
f NEIGHBOURS' ) 


THE CRONE: 

Woman of Age, Wisdom and Power 
By Barbara G. Walker. $19.95: 191 pages. 
Harper & Raw, Publishers Inc., 10 East 53d 
Street, Hew York. N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Elinor Lenz 

I S there in today’s urbanized society a crea- 
ture more pitiable than the woman who is 
no longer young? Barbara Walker's answer in 
“The Crone,’* her scholarly study of the older 
woman in pre-patriarchal cultures, is an un- 
qualified “no.” She finds modem society guilty 
of eliminating older women, making thou in- 
visible. “Women are socially and professional- 
ly handicapped by wrinkles and gray hair in a 
way that men are not. . . . Our society re- 
gards elder women as decidedly unbeautiful as 
wefl as useless. " 

The plight of the postmenopausal woman 
has become a ' familiar theme m both fiction 
and nonfiction ever since the women’s move- 
ment joined forces with a growing: public inter- 
est in aging Simone de Beauvoir in her classic, 
“The Second Sex" lamented the “sorry tragedy 
of the aged woman: She realizes she is useless." 

In the preindusuial world, the scenario of 
a g in g for women followed a very different 
pattern. The woman past the child-rearing 
years occupied an important and highly re- 
spected place in the family and the community. 

In modem industrial sod cues, psychologists 
and gerontologists agree that the aging process 
in women is especially difficult for the tradi- 
tional housewife. As Walker observes, “what 
she has been taught to think of as her only true 
fulfillment, the wife-and-mother role, no’long- 
er provides satisfaction because it is no longer 
functional. Her children grow up and leave. 
Her husband is preoccupied with his career, 
which usually Teaches a peak about this time. 
Thus, it is hardly surprising to find, as recent 
studies have found, that women are afflicted 
by midlife depression in direct proportion to 
their acceptance of the traditional f eminine 
role.’’ 

How was that once-powerful and re vered 
figure reduced to the debased image* of witch, 
hag, or in today’s pejorative label, “old bag"? 
Walker traces this extraordinary process of 


displacement from its source at the dawn of 
historv when men first began to underhand fe- 
male role in reproduction throagh-fe me of 
the male-dominated medie val jA urch. Asthe j 
power of the church grew, greed acd corrap-= t 
tion flourished, and the male clergy wok wtr 
aianv of the functions and pwws of fe older ' 

women, enriching their coffers in the mooes*. 

The stage was set lot fe so-called Gttttv. 
Witch Craze, during which it is estimated fet 
from the 15th to l?ih centuries 500.000 people, 
most of them elderly women, were wxtirtdrif - 
witchcraft and burned to death; - v. 

Walker attributes the witch-hnaiiog aatont 
to men's need For a scapegoat to lafcenri fe 
burden of their sins and failures: a couvemenf 
wav of gening rid of poor, solitary oc noefertije 
females or shrewish wives or e nnttatift i*: ... 
neighbors; a sadistic outlet fexswu^ stin^. 

There is ample evidence that underneath • 
religious hvsseria whipped up by. fej&uu&v ~ 
tore, social and political forces overeat maat Jt' ' 
calculated effon by church and. static intt del : 
signed to divert the populace from thaje»rt% . 
grievances. The practical significance . i 
witch hunts, as the anthropoIogist-lHstOiriaii.' 
Marvin Harris has noted, was that tbevshiftof 
the responsibility for the crisis of late medico^ 
sorietv — its plagues, famines and. brotafah 
pldtationcf ihepooc— -froniboriidwntiiamd .. 

stale to demons m human form.' ’ • 

“The Crone" arrives at a time who; there 
some encouraging indications of * : 

of the older woman’s historic daim towbdoet 
and power. When an 88-year-otd wotiHuvflet-' 
en Hoovcn Sammyer. becomes a bdsucBfefe - ’ 
author, when the octogenarian Barbara- * V 
McClintock makes a breakihrough . 

Prize-winning discovery in geneifcs, 'aflil : whea : 
a television sitcom dealing with the liyea yyf 
loves of three 60-year-old women mafoit M g - 
in the ratings, we can assume or at hast bdpe,f - 
that we are on the verge of a.iieir -age- in V 
women’s aging. -■ y . 

. J . -> . ~ ;-y' - . 

Eluwr Lena’s most revem book u ^The farti- . 
mzation of America: Ha* Women 't Values Are •' 
Changing Oar Public and Prmac LriesT-Skc 
wrote this review far the Los Angela Times. 




VIZARD of ID 

W w 

■ PPlZ££VMlOtf 


UfflOO 
YOJ WWp, 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


/ " 


<sO,W 

OFWP5& 

wtucm 


VfcVorm 
i OfAM&P 




H-5 [HI . 




REX MORGAN 


Do VOU SEE WHAT I MEAN, DR 
MORGAN? BRADY WON’T HELP AE I 
^JS^^Loffcogaine WITHOUT 
JM GOING TO A SPECIAL HOSPITAL f a 


f BKADy > 
CAN'T 
wap VOU, 
. CLAUDIA!, 


"Marreus ME THE STUFF 1 SHOimiVBO/WO 
awRwteusaiethe STUFF I S/KMW0O[* 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


m: 


GARFIELD 

•y'VMOM WRITES THE GREATEST 
LETTER GARFiaP. LISTEN 


aSS 1 ? I!i e Ps Y cH, ATRIST JTi-i GUESS I 1 
fEEL you NEED ' d V DON*T HAVE ANY 
PgQgSSIOHAL CARE' CANT ) CHOICE' YOU'RE 
j^YQU ACCEPT T H AT ? ^ ALL GANGING UPj 


n 


BRflg LE^J 
ECbtobtNI 


Unsciambte these four Jumbles, 
one letter lo each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 

TEGOB I 


ROBIT 








PON^STOII- IT FOR ME, JON. 
I M WAITING FOR THE /MOVIE 
— TO COME OUT - ^ 


I © UBS IMM FeKure S)n(9caH.lnc. 


J By Robert Byrne 

- A NATOLY Karpov and 
/A Gary Kasparov each had 
his own idea about how to 
•practice before they began th«r 
world championship match. 

Karpov showed, in his g*nv 
with the British grandmaster 
Jtfe Nnnn, his virtuosity in 
overcoming the Najdorf Sicil- 
ian. 

The point of intopolating 
3 . . , N-KB3 is to exdude 
the possibility of White’s set- 
ting up a Maraczy bind, even 
though it might not be a very 
effective one, after 
3 . . P*P; 4QxP, N-QB3, 5 
RQN5, B-Q2, 6 BxN, BxB, 7 
P-B4. 

Aginst the Nqdorf Varia- 
tion, 5 . ... P-QR3, Karpov 
has not used anything bnt the 
tame, posttional 6 B-K2 for 
many years. He has a marvd- 

. ous touch for this move; which 
however, doesn’t seem lo suc- 
ceed when others try h. 

One of the typical Najdorf 
subtleties is that the namral- 
looking 10 . . P-Q4?» works 

out badly: 11 P?cP, NxP; 12 
NxN, QxN; U QxQ, BxQ; 14 : 
KR-Q1, B-QB3; 15 N-R5! 
yields While a sli^it but persts- ] 
tent end-game advantage. 1 
Each time. Karpov faces the ( 
Nqdorf, he produces small ai- .« 
tendons in hiy tactics. This 
time he substituted 13 KR-Qi < 
for. his earlier 13 KR-QB1, t 
which was wed countered by I 
13 . . . Q-B3; 14 B-B3, B-B5; s 
15 R-R4. KR-K1; 16 R-N4. Q- . 
B2; 17 N-Q5, NxN, 18 PxN, P- 2 
B4, in the game between s] 
Alonso Zapata and J aim e p 
&uiye in Gehfnegos, 1984. fi 
However, the main strategic ' 


CHESS 

idea remained (he same: White 
will slowly and stubbornly pe- 
d pare to smk a into the 
d outpost square Q5. 

0 ■ Nunn’s 13 . . . KR-QI 
ir contained a well-concealed 

trap - the routine 14 P-B3?f 
c would aBow Black to free his 
sr game by 14 . . . P-Q4!; 15 
a PxP, NxP: 16 NxN. BxN; 17 
[- QxB, N-B3 because White 
□Hist return (he piece with 18 
g Q-B4. Still, it was very Hkriy 
e better for Blade to place Ins K- 
■ R at Kl. Then, Black need not - 

1 mai ntain vigilance against 
i some fomre threat of B-N6. 

f Possibly Karpov's 14- Q- 
i KIl?, which aimed to hamper 
J Black in thrusting . . 7p-Q4, 
had ikk occurred to N nnn. 

• Karpov commented that: 
. 14 „ ; : N-B4; 15 -Q2, P-Q4 
would lead to 16 PxP, NxP; 17 
NxN, BxN; IS P-QB4. B-K3; ' 
19 P-QN4.N-Q2; 20 P-B5 with 
an advantageous qneensidc 
bind for White. 

Nunn .criticized his 
15 . . . B-B5 for doing noth- 
ing to hinder the pirn unfold- 
ing at Karpov's moves 16-18, 
by winch White obtained. a ,j 
hammeriock on his Q5 square. .: 
Yet Nunn did not suggest what I 
he could have done better. Af- j 
ter24 RxB, White had thebisb- 
op-pair and conirtd 1 of moie . 
space. 

With 26 . . . B-N4, Nram 
offered a pawn with the idea 
that 27 BxB?!, PxB; 28 RxQP, . 
N-Q5, 29 RxR, QxR would 
^ve White probienK. j 

Karpov could have answered 
29 ■- - ■ B-N4 by 30 RxP, re- 
spctndingto 30 . . BxB by 31 
PxB! to ensure that- the cpeoi J 
file r emain roen. jj 

Noun'S '30 . .!;■ P-QN3 




ll to B H II HH 

PwAtonaencS. . .P«F 


could not have been explofretr 
by 31 PXPW BxR; 32 RxQP? 
.because 32,i ..N-Q5! costs 
White fe oebange. However, 
Karpovs 3! P-<m PxP; 32 P- 
N5! maintained white's advao* 

: ^hrmiffe^ahed of a defense 
rfte-33... R-B6; 34 P-N6, 
B<J1; 35 RxQP, preferring to 
yield the - exchange with 
33 . . . R-B4 in fe-hope <rf 
Nodcarfing the poatiad. 

. Buthe diouM not have loos- 
cned bis position with 
36 . .■ .- P-R6? became when 
this pawn feff to 40 RxP his 
game became indefensible. In 
rmy case^ Norm ovtatepptd 
the time Emit and forfeited at 
move 40. , 





iw M 

ssr z 

Ml 0 

m m 

M3 0 
8^.2 


a Ml hi 

tr-H/un iw 
» **** o«l 


*« 2SS‘ %S 

«/MaS A? Ml 


1 ^ b AI a ■ 1— 



Answer when I 


THAT AFTER-PINNER 
SPEAKER ALWAYS 
KNEW WHEN TO RISE 
TO THE OCCASION — 

But selpomthis. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
lomt the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


W)rid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Nov. 4 

Casing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday's J «mtaes: POWER KAPOK GUILTY LIQUOR 

Ansmr - ^airls Ejose tneir eyes while kissing, but 
others do this -LOOK BEFORE THEY "UP* 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


tonne 

Amsterdom 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Beteroda 

Bantu 

Bmsels 

Bucharecr 

'Budapest 

Copen baoen 

Costa Dal Sol 

Dublin 

Edtnbunih 

Ptoratce 

Fro nil furl 

Geneva 

Hots In hi 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prone 

Royklavih 

Home 

Stockholm 

Strabo erg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

23 72 20 M o 

A 43 0 35 tr 

23 73 IB A4 cl 

It « « 48 cl 

14 S7 4 39 d 

7 4S 0 32 tr 

7 45 -1 30 tr 

14 57 O 32 cl 

12 £4 2 36 tr 

7 45 1 J4 tr 

19 do 13 55 0 

11 H 4 43 sh 

10 SO 4 » r 

W A0 7 45 tr 

3 37 J 27 o 

* « 0 32 a 

3 37 0 32 tr 

1A AI 13 55 o 

25 77 18 M Ir 

20 AS 17 43 r 

12 54 4 39 o 

U 55 II 52 r 

14 57 4 39 tr 

4 39 | 34 „ 

5 41 -2 29 | r 

1A AI 10 30 d 

4 59 -2 28 o 

8 45 1 34 a 

4 43 -4 25 Ir 

-3 27 -4 25 o 

IV «4 12 54 tr 

4 39 -1 30 cl 

4 3V -1 30 o 

13 55 8 46 -fr 

9 48 I 34 tr 


Bangkok 

Botilne 

Horn Kong 

Manila 

New Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Si n gapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Algiers 

Cairo 

Cane Town 

Casablaaca 

Harare 

Laaei 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


HIGH LOW 
C P C F 

30 86 24 7 S cl 

IS 59 I 44 fr 

25 77 22 72 tr 

28 82 24 75 ct 

Z 7 81 17 A 3 tr 

1 * 41 8 44 tr 

20 48 12 54 tr 

28 82 25 77 o 

2 a 79 20 68 Ir 

IV 44 9 48 tr 


23 73 14 57 a 

2 a 79 7 a el ir 

21 70 13 5 S o 

25 77 13 55 el 

23 73 17 43 o 

30 84 24 75 a 

27 81 IS 59 cl 

23 73 IS 59 el 



Hoescti 
Horten 
Hunei 
IWKA 
Kail + Salz 
Karxtodt 
Kaulhof 
KkMckner H-D 


Ctose Pi-gv. 
1A3 1A5J0 

370 373 

331 338 

350-50 358 

277 284 

318 31 9 JO 
331 343 


K^ k £f^ ,erkC 9720 '00.70 
Kjwo StatU 1B0 178JO 


Close Prey 

Ruse la i 7475 3™ 

SA Brews Zs eS 

SJHkJlena -moo 3875 

•HKOl fjAQ f*KK 

West Holding 8W0 m 

Compos ite Stock Index : Njl 
P revtou* : isizjo 


TnmioarHse 372 373 

THF 145 146 

Ultramar 353 210 

Hql!*sr. c - « 11/3212 19/64 
United Biscuits 204 -303 

Vickers 306 3m 

Wool worth 596 581 

P-T-3 0 Index : um.ig 
Prtvlaai : lOTIUe 
E-TJJE.1W index : uaajro 
Previous : TJ7U0 


Metro 14 B 5 

Merlin 2 H 9 

MIctielln 1138 

MoelHanflessv 1938 

Moullnox ta 

Occl den tote 673 

Pemoa RIc 727 

Perrier 455 

Peuooot 39150 

Prlnlmruil 2 B 5 J 0 

Rodlotechn 342 

Refloute 1550 

Rotrajei Uclof 1499 

Sonofl 6 W 

Skis RoESlOTKd 7340 


Linde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mo mas mann 

Muenrti Rueck 

Nlxdari 

PKf 

Porsche 

Preussaa 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhelnmctair 

Setter Irtg 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thvssflrt 

Vet>a 


«M 610 

St 31* 
215 ZS4 
261 JO 264 
2400 2*W 
584 5B8JD 
715 715 

1298 1335 
263 NA 
15120 1S4J0 
213 211 

sfi m 

64ZSO 640 
347 363 

477 683 

17580 177 JO 
272 27X50 


voihswoOTftwerk 3»jo«jg 


AA Cera au au 

AlUrt-Lwns 276 Z& 

Angta Am Gold S4H6 S491L 

A*5 Bril Foods 268 . 268 

As* Dairies 134 to 

5?T? oyl -412 419 

5*”* 649 6S2 

Jwjon, S m 

il cc ™ 

Blue Circle 585 sm 

■ M m 

5*2“ 2257 22s 


Bowotar Indus 315 m 


BP 

Brit Home St 
frit Telecom 


561 563 

318 317 

190 191 


LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Alru 19 66 1 it ci 

Caracas — — — — pg 

Lima — — — — no 

Mexico City 20 48 5 41 Ir 

Rio de Janeiro — — — — no 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage -7 19 -17 1 h- 

Alloa ta 14 57 9 48 cl 

Boston 12 54 7 45 r 

Vtaintt 9 48 I 34 tr 2 “ ‘ J * 

® f. K * « l i t 

Zartdi 3 37 I 30 et Honolulu 30 84 19 44 tr 

MIDDLE EAST Houston 22 73 s 4i tr 

TT" 0 , „ r iJSAmelw 26 79 16 41 fr 

Ankara 1* » ” « r Miami 27 11 23 73 nc 

Beirut — — — — na Minneapolis 9 48 -4 2$ <r 

Dam ascus — — — — W Montreal 12 54 5 41 pc 

Jerusalem 34 75 14 57 fr Nassau it 88 22 72 tr 

Tel Aviv 27 Bi 13 55 ir new York 14 5? 9 3 cl 

OCEANIA BonFronetsco & 72 11 B pc 

— — • Seattle 11 52 7 45 r 

Auckland 15 59 10 50 el Taranto ID 50 9 48 r 

Sydney 23 72 17 63 0 Washington 14 61 10 » r 

et-doudy.- fo-fooavi fr>talr; tvnati; o-averensl; nc-peniv cloudy; r-rain, 
sh-showerg; sw-snaw; 3t-atar my. 

TUESDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Rough. FRANKFURT: Pain. Temp. 
8 — 2(46 — 36). LONDON: Rain. Temp. 11 —5 152— 41). MADRID: Rain. Temp. 
13—10 (55 — 501. NEW YORK: Rain. Temp. 14—9 157—tfl. PARIS: Rain. 
Temp. 11 — 5 (52 — 411. ROME: Rain. Temp. 14 — 12 (41 — Ml. TEL AVIV: na. 
ZURICH: Showers, Temp. B -4 (46 - 99). BANGKOK: CHwdv. Terns. 31 — 2S 
188 — 771. HONG KONG: Cloudy. Temp. 24 — 24 ( 79 — 751. MANILA; Shower*. 
Temp. 32 — 24 (90— 75). SEOUL: Foggy . Terns. 16 — 7 (41 — 45). SI NGAPO R E : 
Thunderstorms. Temp. 31—24 (88 — 75). TOKYO: Foggy. Temp. 19-8 
(44— 46). 


ArbM 
Bekaert 
Cocker I II 

Cobeae 

EBE5 

GB-mnoSM 

GBL 

Gevoert 

Hoboken 

intercom 

KrodlorbanJc 

Petrallna 

Soc Generate 

Sallna 

Sol vav 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

ViellieMgnlogne 


2770 3820 
7610 73*0 
208 215 

44 » 4510 
3710 371 D 
5170 5300 
2715 2710 
4»3 4790 
5480 5700 
.2“ 2745 
> KM 10050 
7100 7000 
2395 2400 
8490 SHU 
5830 5800 
4890 4850 
5490 5490 
2105 2100 
4450 7150 


Cumwf stock index : M-afr; 
Previous : 2837X5 


Bk East A*k> 
Cheung Kong 
Chino Light 

Green Island 
Mono Sena Bank 
Honderwn 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 

mE T 1 Sl5? nk 

HK Telephone 
HK YauRiotaJ 
HK Whorl 
Huien Whampoa 
Hysan 
Inn city 

Jardm* 

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ir JForsr Loss in Four Years . 33-3 


^i-rr <l - jr » T ia ... ,‘ne v 

r^aiSfegS 

>~cr>asS 


By Mark Hosier omwdaKaidsriddjodtrytBtoa 21 drubbing by San Diqoin 1981, 
cci-mT* Srm " tooefadowmn^ infikted a Jong list wbenibefrancirirewssstillinOak- 
„ ^ “7.*“ Los Angdes <rf other utsclls.: land The Seahawks are 4-0 against 

SSiJHjfc®? Seattle’s 33-3 National Football the Raiders hoe trader Chuck 

League ’Victory -ended a five-game &*«■ 

Swrtrf v«? l 5n SeaI ^ wks “ ter " Aogdei.iwaimtg streak, liwas The Raidas otugaiwd the Sea- 
cepwa Marc Wilson four times, the Raiders’ worst loss since a 55- ha*ta in the latest encounter. it is 


mm 

m. 

. • •• - — ■*• Ste, * 


not easy to lose by 3ff when yoa’re 
moving the ball better than the op- 
position. but Los Angeles man- 



awbroKS 1 


■ ..." Z 

-itJEssiiS 



V'? 1 m ee«S B A 

‘ * 

i >i 




;ss 


At one point. Seattle had a total 
of five first downs and led, 19-0. 
The Seahawks bad the ball for two 
minutes and 39 seconds of Ihesec- 
'.ond period — and scored 23 pants. 

With 5: ttteftinlhe third period, 
the Raiders were winning the battle 
. for rime of possession — 27:11 to 
12:35 — - but losing on the score- 
board, 26-3. 

Los Angries came into the game 
fourth in the NFL in yardage al- 
lowed (280 vards a game). It bdd 
Seattle to 234. but the winners 
gained another 180 on four inter- 
ception returns and a blocked puat. 

On the second Los“ Angeles play 
from scrimmage, Wilson’s long 
pass for Jesse Hester was picked 
off by Seahawk safety John Hams. 
The Raider defense got the ball 
bade, so that one cost them noth- 
ing. The Seahawks later marched 
63 yards for a Norm Johnson field 
goal and a 3-0 lead (aside from that 
drive, Seattle had 50 yards in first- 
half total offense). 

Chi die next Raider possession, 
punter Ray Guy got off a low 34- 
yarder that Kenny Easley fielded 
and returned 29 yards to die Los 
Angeles 27. Dave Krieg promptly 
got Gun Warner isolated on line- 
backer Brad Van Pelt and hit him 
with a scoring pass. Johnson’s kick 
was blocked and tbe Seahawks led. 
9-0. 

Los Angdes bdd the ball for two 

New Englan d defe nders, mgning Andre Tippett, above, sacked 

L>an Marino three times in Sunday’s 17-13 derision over Miami. Butler intercepted and ran back 31 



mftouNPUP 

yards to the Raider 13- Three in- 
complete passes later, Johnson 
kicked a field goal; 124). 

Los Angeles then marched 48 
yards 10 the Seattle 52. Chris Bahr 
came on to try a fidd goal, but 
comeback Tcny Jackscm buzzed 
in from the outside and stuck his 
face right into it. Tbe ball bounced 
once and was fielded neatly bv Bv- 


Lineman Perry 
TD Receiver in 
Chicago Victory 

The Audi msnf Prm 

G REEN BAY, Wisconsin — 
William Perry, the Chicago 
Bears’ 308-poond (139.7-kilo- 
gram) rookie defensive lineman 
who two weeks ago ran for a 
touchdown against Green Bay. 
caught a scoring pass Sunday as 
Chicago beat & Packers again, 
16-10. 

The 4-yard toss from quarter- 
back Jim McMahon came with 
25 seconds left in the first half 
and gave the undefeated Bears 
their first lead of the game. 

Perry lined up in the left slot 
on the' second-and-goal situa- 
tion. He went in morion to the 
right and was unguarded in the 
end zone. 

“It’s my first touchdown pass 
ever," said Peny. “I'm having 
fun." 

“How he got around end I 
don't know." said Packer line- 
backer Brian Noble, “but he 
waddled — waddled. Tolled, 1 
don't know what yon want to 
call it — around the end and 
caught the pass.” 


ron Walker, who zoomed 57 yards The Rami’ Eric Dickerson, who 
for a touchdown and a 19-0 bulge, shattered OJ. Simpson's NFL sin- 
Tbe Raiders avoided funner ale-season rushing record in 19&4. 
trouhle until the hair's dosing me*- gained 108 yards on 23 carries — 
men is. when (hey turned loose sheer only the second time he’s been over 
two-minute offense At the Seattle 100 yards this season. He left the 
40 with 1 :27 left, W£sos aimed a game hie in the fourth quarter with 
pass for Dofcie Williams but hit an anile injur,-. 



£g 


)J. Simpson's NFL sin- 31 **> "V; s ■ ' V* 

rushing record m 1 984. ■r >*£ ' J *. >*£ V ; * . t 

»nd time he’s been over %■ * \ ' 

this season. He left the " H " .^'U j 




Seahawk Terry Taylor ir.s: cad 
Taylor went 75 yards up ie side- 
line for a touchdown. The score 


'* . A. 


Jets 35, Colts 17: In Indianapo- 
lis. quarterback Ken O'Brien 
passed for 164 yards and a career- 


Gymnasts Cautioned on 'Exhibitionism’ 


• ljj .~. Thr . ASS ° Cm>ed Pnxt said Cuban athletes sometimes do if they were Sophia Loren or seme- At the world rhythmic cynmas- 

.- MONTREAL — Intemarional in celebration. “We wouldn’t like thing — then there will be penal- ■ tics championships in Spain last 
gymnastics officials, saying they to make a show. At the nationals, ties.* Edmonds said. ipomh, Titov said, the crowd bdd 

don t want athletes “jumping maybe. But at the internationals, After scoring a perfect 10 j 0 on “P competition as long as 30 min- 
around like monkeys, say they wul we like c la ss i c al behavior." th- vmiti m Hirwh «h^ onU Smim utes while cheerinc for iis favorires. 



ties," Edmonds 

around like monkeys," say they wifi we like classical behavior." ' the^UtoS* thegoid, Kata!. 
dedua tom the scores of oampeti- The men's team compulsories who is not competing here, leaped 
tors wIkj don t observe proper de- were to start Monday, with the first into the aimscrfhcr co^h, Bda 
conim during the world gymnastics women’s c om pe ti tion on Tnesday. Karol vi who was standine ia the 
#SP»3?P t «: , r . A lotaJ of 363 gy mnas ts from 41 press section, and then returned to 

p The problem, officers of the In- countries— only 38 are competing tbe podium to wave to die crowd 
lemanonaJ Federation of Gymnas- as teams — are here, indnding and hug her teammates, 
tics said Sunday, is that what ap- teams from the Eastern Bloc coun- Soviet and Romanian evmnasis. 
pears on television to be gleeful tries that boycotted the 1984 Olym- mong others, have aSo been 
exuberance looks artificial and pics. - - known to return to the platform 

contrived ra person. - Tim Daggett and Scott Johnson and take a amain calL 


PoslUoo rifErj u 

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PxP? 1 . BxP; 2i. 

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tics said Sunday, is that what 
pears on television to be gie 
exuberance looks artificial 
contrived in person. ■ ■ 


press section, and then returned to 
tbe podium to wave to die crowd 
and hug her teammates. 


Soviet and Romanian gymnasts, responding, it will be O-K. We’re 
among others, have also been not going to shoot Him. But there 


The championships, which wore are back from the U.S. men’s i«nn 
to begin Monday, mark the first that won the gold medal last year in 
tiixje the federation has ever warned Los Angeles; only Fam Bifart re- 
compethors of a possible 03-point turns from the giotp of U3. worn- 
deduction for delays of “odribi- en who won tbe silver, 
demist behavior" that officials' fed Titov said he asked that one ban- 

are intended more to influence the ndnibdaimniRU.S. superiority be 


known to return to the platform 
and take a curtain g*H- 


judges than to celebrate. 


■ Federation president Yuri Titov ing the 1984 Games. Without stn- 
and vice president Frank Edmonds alme out the U3. team, he and 


Angdes; only Pam Bifeck res /y «| m # /y -m 

(rumour s Overtime Goal 

Itov said he asked that one ban- __ -r%-w _ 

Puts Blues in First Place 


and vice president Frank Edmonds ding out the UJ5. team, he and 
said such demonstrations became Edmonds criticized die way its 
painfully, obvious at the 1984 members hugged and cheered for 
Olympic Games in Los .Angdes. each other mLos Angdes. 

Titov, aformerwodd gymnastics “We don’t want to get into a 
champion from the Soviet Union, situation like soccer and tennis, 
said thebe were too many demon- with all its prima donnas,” Ed- 


UmuJ Pros imentasiemi wouldn’t second-guess Babych. 

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Of “Dave did the right tiring." Long 
Sunday night’s three National said. 


Hockey League heroes. Doug Gil- 
mour was the least likely. 


“The play was there, and Dave 
tried. Unfortunately, it got away. 


. MS 

’’<»• L* 

: **) J* 

T « V 

■; MI J* 

i ve; r-B 

■ s v«j 

3 5-M * M 


idLuiflua* strations daring the Olympic gym- moods said. 

M n> * Rustics competition. He denied that the wanting was 

Si a J5T < "There should be no jumping inspired by American Mary Lou 
jggs*. aro““d. like monkeys," Titov said Rettou’s celebration of her gold 
nr J on Sunday. “We don’t want tbe medal in the Olympic all-around. 

£2 F 5 m* J gymnasts to interrupt the attention but his description seemed to fit 

J* s of the judges and the attention of her actions. 

» , the audience, which would Eke to “We have issued a warning to the 

** art* see Jhe other athletes. .. . federationsihai if any of ibor peo- 

£un 32 ! 

is IS 

K >15 


Edroont’s Wayne Gretzky and but on any other night it would 
Philadelphia’s Tim Kerr each have worked." 


scored bat tricks to lead last sea- 
son’s Stanley Cup finalists to routs. 


The victory evened the Blues’ 
road record at 3-34), and lifted 


but Gibnour’s goal was the most Them past Chicago for the Norris 
*— lead. 

NHL FOCUS "We made the most of our op- 

dramatic and significant of the portunities," said Coach Jacques 
niehL His tallv with 65 seconds Demos, whose club is 1-1-2 in Sl 


night. His tally with 65 seconds 
remaining in overtime lifted St 


Louis. “But we have to start play- 




Hit* t" 0 * 1 

11 ir- 

fix 

S’* ’g » 
1«* ^ > 


“We are a serious sport,” Titov pie make a. lot of fuss — if the 
said, waving bis fist in the air as he coaches go and kiss the gymnasts as 


K nicks, Undermanned, 
Lose Fifth Game of Year 


2!>: S* J * The Aaodaied Press 

' PORTLAND, Oregon — The 
ok J . Ifceavy load is starting to catch up~ 
$ l with Patrick Ewing. “I was. very 
sc<-. !p j tired," Ewing smd after his deplet- 
* l ed New York Knicks dropped a 


/xf V rxnm aflowing Gflmour to break 

UU.C UI X CaT out. 2-on-l, with Mark Reeds. 

“I used Mark as a decoy," Gfl- 
he's got to play a lot more than he’s mour l* 1301 ^ got away 


Louis to a 4-3 triumph over tbe kind of hockey at home to 

Winnipeg Jets, propelling the Blues ^ ^ ans happy. That’s the 
into first place in the Norris Divi- W of hocke . v we must play to 
sj on. 0%‘ercome our lack of talent in some 

Seconds after shots by Winnipeg arcas " 
threats Paul MacLean and Lauri e The Blues got a stalwart perfor- 
Boschman, Jet defenseman Dave mance from rookie goaliendrr Dar- 
Babych came in too far from the rcH May, making ms second start 


' , , _ J" 1 1C 
■; " . T . « a 


&it 

te f2r 
Ft 

49 L 

no** T:- 

ffj'i ? ■ 

j** 

»u^ 7 p 

^ 2 \ 
»u L : 
f, L l> : 
iff* 

gS; ? 

sin- ?} 
iff 

43V £> 

^ iLV 


used to." 

In tbe mbit's only othtx Nation- 
al Basketball Association game, 
Milwaukee beat Ocvdand. 

Ewing usually found two or three 


point, allowing Gflmonr to break smcc bring elevated from Peoria of 
out, 2-on-l, with Mark Reeds. the International Hockey League 
“1 used Mark as a decoy,” Gil- 00 Oct. 19. 
mour said, “but the puck got away Evening his record at 1-1, May 
on me, so I just poked it toward the stopped 32 shots — including the 


iaL Luckily, it fooled [goal tender 
an] Bouchard, and we wot.” 
Winnipeg Coach Barry Long 


key overtime saves on MacLean 
and Boschxnan. He also earned the 
assist on Gihnour's game-winner. 


110-96 National Basketball Associ- Blazers collapsing on him when he 
alien dedsion to the Portland had tbe ball He and Portland's 




anon derision to the Portland had tbe balL He and Portland's .ii ' m ■ 

— — — — ■■ 1 Sam Bowie squared off for only the 

NBA FOCUS second time — the Gist having been ?.y& / ■ ■ 

srr r z : . ~ rr- “ *he semifinals of the national fe* • > '- J 

Trail Blazers hae Sunday mghL tournament . two 

it something Tve got to get ago, when Ewing’s George- 






us ^ l °- , „ . , . . town team beat Bowie and Ken- 

The 0-5 Knicks were down to 

sfcven phyas against Portland — i L was a near standoff this time, 
wo were out with mjunevrwo ^ Ewing 15 points and g 
foulal out and starting guard Dar- rebom Xro Bowie's 12^is and 
renWalker was 6 rebounds. But Bowie 

second period for bumping referee rninr , tr ^ 

Bennett Salvatore. - . .. - 



1 t*.-* 


Bowie said Ewing looked tired. 


Angdes Clippers on Saturday 

night 

>8; Coach HuMc Brown said his 


“You get some playa who can pve 

him a couple of minutes of breath- 'i 

ers, he’ll be the great player every- / >!,'> 


A Coach Hut«e Brown sad his 
feed rookie should be able to 


those things he has to learn how to Vandewgbe t^iped iheT>aIanced 
tofto paee himself. Some- Kitond snack with 21 poms. 


Portland (4-1) took ccmtrol by 




Formnle Tag Is Winner 

Of Trans-Atlantic Race 

jJ| *.• 

J 1 * » V Untied Press international 

5 R! NEW YORK — Fonnule Tag. 
ji» }! \ skippered by Canadian Mike 
§£ jSf.. Birch, won a’ Monaco-New York 

6 pr'. trans-Atlantic yacht race Sunday, 

cl'- S •-**. finishing mjust under three weriisi 
i T Fonnule Tag took the lead .from 


scoring 10 unanswered points to 
nm up a 32-23 lead with 26 seconds 
left in the first quarter. New York 
was within 12. at 77-65, with 3 
minutes and 12 seconds left in the 
third quarter. But Jim Paxsou and 
Gyde Drexler led a 12-3 spurt that 
put the game out of teach. 

“Even with this kind of start, 
we’re still okay menially” said 
Brown, whose knicks conclude a 


• • ■V* ^ 


I 


was 26-0, and the ane was ou: of ^ lhrcc touchdouiu. and Free- 

_ , sun McNeil rushed for 149 vards 

In other ms. :r* Assoc&tJ M 26 names to pace Nn York’s 
Pros reponed: rout of the Colts. 

Chargers 30. Broncos 10: In ban _ 

Diego. Dan Fouts daw for 284 TneJcis. leading the AFCs East- 


■wm - 


vards and two TDs — bo± to Wes en Dj'ision with a 1-1 record, ben- 
C haatflg — to lead ±r Chargers' cf* ,led three Indianapolis 


rout of Denver. 


fumbles in the first half. Thev 


Gaiy Anderson, who defected to scored on five of their first six pro- 


San Diego from the United States session? 
Football League five weeks ago, 1«5S tnai 
scored on a 16-yard nm that gave quarter, 
San Diego a 24-3 lead with 5:16 left 49ers 
in the third period cisco, b 


sessions, including three times in 
less than four minutes in the second 


49ers 24. Ea$ts 13: In San Fran- 
cisco. Mau Cavanaugh, filling in 


” 1 Wfl 


Anderson finished the day with for injured quarterback Joe Mon- 
1 16 yards oo 22 carries, becoming i.^pa, completed 20 of 32 passes for 
the first pro player :o rush fee 100 255 vards and a touchdown in help- 
yards in the same year in rwo dif- bjg ihs49ersend a three-game Phil- 
ferent leagues. adelphia winning streak. 

aiSJfe? Ca ^ 8h hit roo * e J T” 

256 yards and two scores, and tight a scon^ pass and made max.- 

end lony Hunter caught six passes Ro lf , Cr ^? 

for a career-best USyirds asda ^hree sconng drives to help the 

TD to pace the Los Angeles Rams v * en - 

past New Orleans ~ Montana sat out the game be- 

Los Angdes sacked Sami quar- cause of a strained sternum but is 
torback Dave Wilson nine times, expected back next week. Cavan - 
with Gary Jeter. Dennis Harmon augh also took his place against 
and Shawn Miiler each logging Philadelphia last season and guid- 
two. ed tbe team to victory. 


SCOREBOARD 

Football 

Selected L.S. CoQege Conference S tandings 





rne Auiui M >-c!i 


toonth, Titov said, the crowd bdd 
up competition as long ns 30 min- 
utes while cheering for its favorites. 

“One has to remember that there 
is another gymnast all keyed up 
and waiting to start," Edmonds 
said. 

“If somebody has done some- 
thing outstanding and the crowd is 


should be an element of common 
sense in it." 



BIG TEN 

Harvard 

4 1 0 

117 

69 

5 2 0 1*1 93 

WALES CONFERENCE 




Cerderenr* Av Genn 

Yale 

2 1 1 

62 

el 

3 3 1 97125 


Petri at Division 





RLTPBSPKLTHiSf 

Prmcelon 

3 2 9 

73 

57 

3 4 0 130 143 


w 

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Otuo SI. 

4 I C :*2 *7 7 1 5 254 14* 

Brawn 

2 3 0 

79 

S3 

3 3 1 T31 9* 

Pfiilodeipfite 

Q 

2 

0 

11 

£3 

22 

Iowa 

4 10 132 86 7 1 3 295 109 

Dartmouth 

1 2 1 

47 

61 

1 S 1 96155 

Washington 

s 

5 

3 

12 

44 

u 

III Inert 

3 : I 12iT3 4 3' 189293 

Columbia 

0 4 0 

43154 

0 7 0 64242 

NY islanders 5 

4 

1 

11 

39 

38 

MkTilgan 

3 1 1 11* 36 6 1 1 1*3 SI 

.Cornell 

0 4 0 

40 

72 

1 6 0 89123 

New Jersey 

5 

S 

1 

11 

41 

42 

Mlnnesola 

3 3 9 ir 86 5 2 0 233 130 







NY Rangers 

8 

5 

0 

10 

36 


Purdue 

2 3 0 127:45 4 4 C 229 2)1 

MAJOR INDEPENDENTS 


Pltwouran 

3 

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3 

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41 

47 

Mien. SI. 

2 3 C 1C7-.40 4 4 3 19*179 



W L 

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OP 


Arums Division 




Wtecaralrt 

1 4 C 8913' 44 0 ! 9*188 

Penn U. 


8 

0 

0 167 

112 

Boston 

8 

3 

1 

17 

54 

30 

Indiana 

1 4 0 75 'SO 4 4 0 190230 

Army 


7 

1 

0 303 

134 

Quebec 

8 

3 

1 

17 

50 

39 

NrmwMHi 

1 4 C 51141 2 5 3 133233 

Miami .Fta 


7 

1 

0 386 

128 

Buffalo 

6 

5 

1 

13 

*3 

35 


PACIFIC-18 

Florida SI. 


6 

3 

0 348 

173 

Hartford 

6 

5 

0 

12 

45 

50 


Conference Ail Games 

IJIAisk 


6 

2 

0 291 

«4 

Montreal 

4 

6 

1 

• 

43 

54 


WLTPUCPWLTPhOP 

W. Virginia 


4 

3 

1 126 

138 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


UCLA 

IIS IS U 6 1. 2*9 150 

Noire Dome 


4 

3 

0 173 

1»6 


Norris Division 




WaaNngwi 

4 1 0 122 6C 539 171 134 

Syracuse 


4 

3 

0 1«0 

92 

St Louis 

4 

4 

3 

10 

35 

41 

South. Cal 

3 1 0 124 42 4 2 0 '.60116 

Cincinnati 


3 

4 

0 179 

214 

Chicago 

4 

4 

1 

9 

46 

49 

Ariz. SI. 

3 J C 92 *4 * 2 3 198113 

Pittsburgh 


* 

4 

1 181 

139 

Minnesota 

3 

6 

2 

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47 

48 

Ariiana 

3 i D 7958 620 18* 88 

S. Carolina 


4 

4 

0 204 

m 

Detroll 

1 

8 

3 

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35 

68 

Oregon 

2 2 0 134113 4 4 0 225247 

Temple 


4 

5 

0 204 

179 

Toronto 

1 

ID 

a 

3 

33 

52 

Oregon St. 

2 3 0 50164 2 3 9 123248 

Vir. Tech 


4 

5 

0 195 

178 


Smvttie Division 




Wain. st. 

2 5 0 1£9 156 2 7 C 232*8 

SW La. 


4 

5 

0 143 

3a5 

Edmonton 

9 

2 

0 

10 

55 

39 

Stanford 

1 4 0 71 140 2 6 e 1*82*6 

Navy 


3 

S 

0 185 

114 

Vancouver 

t 

4 

3 

14 

50 

41 

California 

1 * 0 110182 3 6 C 197 335 

Boston CoL 


3 

7 

0 163 

259 

Winnipeg 

6 

5 

1 

13 

£4 

53 


SOUTHEASTERN 

MmalLSl. 


3 

5 

2 166 

177 

Coloary 

6 

5 

0 

13 

S3 

42 


Conference All Somes 

E. Carolina 


3 

6 

0 116 

190 

Las Angeles 

2 

10 

0 

* 

47 

60 


PL-PBCPWLTPtsOP 

Louisville 


2 

7 

0 161 

343 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 



Florida 

6 0 0 87 43 7 0 1 230 111 

Rutgers 


1 

6 

1 107 

194 

Tamers 




0 

1 

0—1 

Alabama 

3 1 0 118 89 6 2 0 231 728 

Tuktne 


0 

8 

0 114 

263 

Edmonton 




2 

2 

3—7 


Peru Out of World Cup Contention 

Chile riimLnated the Peruvian national soccer team (white shirts) 
from World Cup contention with a 1-0 victory Sunday in Lima. 
Chile won the two-match consolation round on 5-2 aggregate, 
and will meet Paraguay in a home- and -home series to determine 
South America's fourth representative at the 1986 finals in Mex- 
ico City. Argentina. Uruguay and Brazil have already qualified. 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE MiOMri: Toronto (Or, Funr MOMi 10-3-tC— re- 

Pamac Division Eemonion ion atrrmassn M24-21 

w l T Pti GP OA Si. Louis t 1 0 1— « 

PnilotieiohU o 3 0 11 £3 33 Winnipeg a J C 6— 3 

WotlUngtOT s 5 2 12 44 ** LOVCtlee 111. Hunier IS). Vullrn **l. G<:- 

NY isionaers S « 1 I! 3» 3t mour (31: MacLean (lCi. HcwercRuk «7>. 

New jersey S 5 1 M 41 42 Boscnmen 191. Shots on goal: S< LOurs ion 

NY Ranaers 5 5 0 10 1* 52 Boucharoj e-T-t?-?— M. /i.nr.&ro icn Uty, i 

pimourwn 3 S 3 9 it 47 11-12-9-3— 2S. 

Arums DlvIUon Los Aitaeus 2 1 1—4 

Boston B 7 1 17 54 30 PhlladMpOlo 3 3 2—7 

Ouehec B 3 I 17 SB 39 SiniMMft i7i. Kerr 3 !lli, Rie» Sutler Hi. 

BuHolo 4 5 1 13 43 35 Zruel 12). Smith ill. Sykes Hi. Y/ilr,cms if). 

Hartford 4 S 0 12 4S SO wens (41. Guar 131. Shot* on goal. Los Anae 

Montreal 4 e 1 • 43 54 les ion Linaberon) 13-0-4—3. Pnuaae'cr.ia 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE Ion JonecrkJ 13-1S-I0— 17. 


Soccer 


LSU 310 7327 510 113 43 

Georelo 2 I 1 m <C III 35«ui 

Tennessee 3 1 0 64 SI 4 12 167112 

Auharii ‘ "‘2 2 0 92 61 6 2 0 26&127 

Kentucky 1 2 0 39 55 S 3 O 1S7T23 

Mississippi 130 toll! 3 4 1 137 178 

VonaerbMt 0 3 1 4719 2S 1 111216 

M*L. Si. 0 4 0 78 «4 5 4 0 215226 


NFL Standings 


Gretzky 3 Id. Napier 111. Summon »n (4), 
McTavlsh (SI.MeinvK 111; Prycw (31, Shots 


Baylor 

Arkansas 
Texas AAM 
Texas 
SMU 
Rice 
Houston 
Texas Tech 
TCU 


Maryland 
Clenteon 
Go. Tech 
Virginia 
N. Carol mo 
N.CaraSI. 
Duke 
Wk. Forest 


Nebraska 
Oklahoma 
OUOlSI. 
Coiarado 
Kansas 
Missouri 
Iowa St. 
Kansas St. 


sssr T «— ir— 
-sr* 

« 1 a 171 64 7 1 0 264 96 
4 1 0 148 106 6 2 9 234 1SB -, r |n|nnrt 
3 1 0 IZ7 »4 5 2 0 173159 

3 2 0 148 B 4 33 299139 
7 3 0 mm 350 IB 396 

1 4 0 ICSie 2 69 IK 269 

0 5 0 S3 153 3 5 0 542267 - 

0 5 9 49 222 2 5 0 137 247 rT£,*w, 

ATLANTIC COAST Seattle 

Conference AT Gomes 
WLTPtsOPWLTPtsOP rjw 

4 0 0 125 40 6 2 0 232 93 * CanSOS ^ 

4 I 0 116 67 5 3 0 156 130 MATIOI 

4 1 0 95 45 5 2 I 139 85 

3 1 0 ICS 72 5 2 0 195129 Doha* 

J 2 C 65 87 4 4 o ’.#0 lie N.Y. Giants 
140 79136 279 144 2S2 Washington 

0 4 0 33 157 2 6 5 122 18S Phllodetohla 
C 5 0 62126 2 6 9 175201 Si. Louis 
BIO EIGHT 

Conference An Gomes Chicago 
W L T Pis CP W L T PtsOP WJrmrsoia 

4 0 0 120 St 7 10 28a 103 Detroit 

3 0 0 i« 24 51018* 67 Green Bov 

2 1 0 55 55 6 : 0 14610* Tornoo Boy 

3 2 0 94 44 5 3 0 147 120 

13 0 75 94 5 4 0 251 191 LA. Roms 

1 3 0 72113 1 7 0 141236 San Francisco 
1 3 0 69145 3 5 0 119245 New Orleans 
130 36 137 170 54299 Atlanta 

MISSOURI VALLEY 

Conference All Games _ 9 _° 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
east 

W L T PCI. PF 
N.Y. Jets 7 7 0 .778 20 

New Englmd 6 3 0 .647 17 


Cl. PF PA 
.778 208 135 
A67 173 156 
S56 2J0 194 
333 172 204 
.111 121 216 

A44 150 132 
.444 260 278 
-444 183 153 
.444 162 185 

•667 219 181 
A67 1«6 187 
.556 221 202 
AM 220 231 
JJ33 171 23* 


1 Basketball 
NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
East 

6 2 0 .750 

(ants 6 3 0 .667 

Won 5 4 0 SSa 

rtohta 4 5 0 .444 

ill 3 5 0 J75 

Central 

0 too 1.000 

.ala 5 4 0 556 

540 .556 

Bov 3 6 0 .333 

1 Bov 0 9 D JI00 

west 

sms 8 10 ,889 

ancfaca 5 * 0 554 

r leans 3 6 0 .333 

i 18 0 .111 


Boston 

W 

4 

L 

1 

PCI. 

J00 

GB 

New Jersey 

3 

3 

500 

Ite 

Washington 

2 

2 

500 

1W 

Philadelphia 

2 

3 

.400 

2 

New York 

0 

5 

3)00 

4 

Detroit 

Central Divlstee 
4 

2 

•667 

_ 

MitwmA.ee 

4 

3* 

6*7 

— 

Chicago 

3 

2 

400 

vs 

Atlanta 

3 

3 

*00 

IVj 

indiano 

1 

3 

-230 

2 

Cleveland 

1 

4 

-2DC 

2W 


0 JX 197 125 

0 A47 203 151 

0 SSi 15S 166 

0 .444 136 745 

0 J75 145 206 

0 1.000 255 124 

0 556 183 180 

0 556 170 1*6 

0 533 164 216 


589 191 127 
556 228 167 
.333 173 235 
.111 171 284 


SUNDAYS RESULTS 


WLTPtiCPVVLT PhOP QncagB U. Green Bay 10 


Tuba 3 0 0 117 47 4 5 0 208 293 

W. Tee. St. 3 1 1 136 148 5 3 ; 213230 

IndlO no SI. 2 1 0 85 77 4 4C 189215 

WIChHa St. 2 2 0 136130 3 6 0 1*82*4 

Illinois Sl. I 1 I 3* S3 4 3 2 156 135 

5. Illtnota 1 3 0 99 IP 4 SO 338291 

Drake 1 4 0 92 85 4 6 C 191 219 

WESTERN ATHLETIC 

Conference All Games 
W L T Prs OP W L T Pts OR 
Air Force 600249 69 9 9 9 353 108 

Brig. Yng 4 I 0 190 52 7 2 0 299 121 

Utah 4 1 0 175143 7 2 0 332235 

Hawaii 3 1 0 114 78 3 4 1 210192 

Cote. SI. 3 4 0 179230 3 * 0 192270 

SriDtea SI. 1 3 0 *5121 3 3 0 222240 

New Mex. 143IC71S9 2 6 0 179 284 
Tk-EIPaia 1 6 3 *5187 1 7 0 162 295 

Wyoming 0 5 0 MSO! 1 7 0 139 289 

MID-AMERICAN 

CenWtiw am Gomes 
W L 7 Pts O P W L T Pts O P 
Bawl. Gm 7 0 0 232107 9 0 0 28*155 

MIomL a 3 1 I T57 114 5 2 1 16715* 

CentAHeh. * 2 0 1C7 93 5 2 0 134 103 

6. Mich. 3 3 0 112142 4 4 0 151180 

WJMkMgan 2 3 i 8*1» 2 5 1 95167 

Kent SI. 2 3 C 127 99 3 5 0 178181 

N. Illinois 2 3 0 *0 98 2 6 0 113223 

Bell SI. 3 5 0 147196 3 6 0 145233 

Oh)0 U. 1 5 0 11* IS? 17 9 13*217 

Toledo 1 50 81114 Sooiisin 

IVY LEAGUE 
Conference All Gaines 
W LT P1SOPWJ.T Pts CP 
Petm J C 0 127 62 6 1 0 1*5 103 

Final CFL Standings 


Bowl. Grn 
M>omL O. 
CeniAUeh. 
E. Mich. 
WJMkMgan 
Kent St. 

N. Illinois 
Bell St. 
Ohio u. 
Toledo 


Cincinnati 21 Buffalo 17 
Pinshvrgn 10. Cleveland » 
Minnesota 16. Detroit 13 
Houston 2X Kansas City 20 
New England 17. Miami 13 
N.Y. Gtems 21 Tomoe Bov 20 
Washington 44. At (onto 10 
Seattle 33. LA. Rotders 3 
LA. Roms 28. New Orleans 10 
N.Y. jets 35. Indianapolis 17 
Son Francheo 24. Philadelphia 13 
Sen Diego 30, Denver 10 

Mondays Game 
Dallas ai Si. Louis 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Denver t 0 1X09 — 

Houston 3 2 400 lte 

Dollos 2 2 .500 2 

Son Antonio J 3 AM Ivy 

Uion 2 1 ado 2te 

Sacramento I 3 .250 3 

Podnc Division 

l— A. Clippers s 0 1XG0 - 

LA Lakers t 0 uooo v, 

Portland 4 1 .000 1 

Seattle 1 3 JSD 3te 

Golden State 1 4 JOO 4 

PheenU 0 * M0 4W 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Milwaukee 24 3* 31 27—120 

Cleveland *7 33 24 26—110 

Cummings *-19 5-7 23. Presscr 8-13 M 21. 
Mon cr tel 7-15 7-9 21 .- Hinson 8-1* 4-« 20. Hub- 
bard S-10 8-10 It Rebounds: Milwaukee St 
I Lister II); Cleveland *0 ( Turpin 13;. Assists: 
Milwaukee 3* | Pressev. Hodges 6) ; Cleveland 
25 (Mlnnlefleld 81. 

Mew York u 14 a 2s— 94 

Portland 34 22 33 21—110 

Vandewegne fr-9 9-10 31. Thompson 8-12 7 3 
>8; Sparrow 0-14 4-6 22. Walker E wing 7-18 l-l 
15. Grunteld 4-10 3-4 15. Rebeuedt; New York 
42 (Ewing 8): Portland 4* (Thompson 81. As- 
sists: New York 20 (Sparrow 71; Pomona 39 
{Vo1emme. Drevler 7). 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
SOUTH AMERICA 

PerutCbllel (Chile advances on S-2cMre- 
gaie). 

Colombia % Paraguay I (Paraguay ad- 
vances. an 4-Z aggregate, took: raff with Chile 
lor berth In Worm Cup tmdlsi. 

Next matches: Nov. 10. Cmie at Paraguay 
lAsuncItml . Nov. 17. Paraguay at Chile < San- 
tiago). 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Real Madrid 4. Hercules 0 
Real Sociraaa 1, Osauinaji 
Cadii 1. Las Palmas 0 
Va nodal kl 2. Barer k>no 2 
Celia 1. Sevilla 2 
Gllon I. Athletic Bilbao 0 
Beils Z Adetica Madrid 2 
Esponol 3, Racing 0 
Valencia *. Zorogara 2 

Standings: Real Madrid 17: Giion 15; Ath- 
lettc Bilbao 13; valiaaoiia 12: Atlellco Ma- 
drid. Sevilla Real Sociedad It. Barcelona 
Valencia. Zoragua. Cadiz 10; Esponol. 5an- 
tonaer. Bells 8; Los Palmas 7. Hercules 6. 
Celia S; Osasuna *. 


Transition 


FOOTBALL 

HBttenol Football League 
GE N VE R— Signed Willard SCiSMjm. rf ten- 
sive loci le. to a series of one-veer contract-, 
DETROIT— Acll voted William Frrcrell. 
asrnercack-satelv. Placed Arne id Brown, 
cor ne mock, on iniured reserve. 

GREEN BAT— Placed mule McLeod, de- 
fensive Dock, and Keith Uecvcr. guard, on 
iniured reserve. Activated Ponme Burgess, 
defensive back, and Tim Huliman. guard 
INDIANAPOLIS— Placed Moll eauza. 
wide receiver, on ml urea reserve tci.-aiee 
Oliver Williams, wide receiver. 

N.Y GIANTS— Activated Eric Scnubert. 
placeKIcker. Placed Tyrone Davis. defensive 
hack, on injured reserve. 

WASHINGTON— Placed Dorr. I Grant. Ce- 
tensive lackle. on iniured reser-.e Activated 
Stove Hamilian. defensive end 
HOCKEY 

Hatton ai Hockey League 
DETROIT— Sent Corrode Micaiei. goal- 
tender. 10 Kawmazoo of me iniernaiianoi 
Hockey League Called up Bod Proben. leti 
wlng.irom Adirondack ot the American Hock- 
ey League. 

LOS ANGELES— Acquired Brvor. Er,.-*. 
son, right wing, from Wasningfan for Biuee 
Shoofiotlom. defenseman 
N.Y. ISLANDERS— Recoiled Gale Henry, 
loti wlng.ond Neal Coulter, rigni wing. Irom 
Soring Meld ol the AHL Sent Bob Sdssen. cm- 
lor. la Springfield. 



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Vo 

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C 

284 

332 

16 

V-OTTBwa 

7 

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777 

41 

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Toronto 

6 id 0 344 
western Division 

397 

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13 

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Page 20 


ART BUCHWALD 

f No Countdown for Me 


YI7ASH3NGTON — NASA has 
” » just announced that it will 
choose a journalist to fly into orbit 
on a space shuttle flight next fall. 
The passenger will be selected from 
thousands of journalists by the As- 
sociation of Schools of Journalism 
and Mass Education. 

Minimum requirements ore that 
the. candidate be a citizen of the 
United States, have five yeans of 
journalistic ex- 
perieaoe and be 
wor king at the WT 
time. 

The applicant 
must pass a k»’ 
physical exami- R ; •53^' JH 
nation and be BiL 
able to demon- m 
strate an ability ¥m 

to comnumicai’e nr 
to mass audi- 
ences in the Bacnwald 
broadcast and print media. 

I'm aware of what you're think- 
ing: 1 would be the perfect person 
to take the flight! But before you 
nominate me I have to warn you I 
have no interest in going into space. 
□ 

Sure. 1 know your argument I 
am probably in better physical 
shape than any journalist in the 
country, and could handle weight- 
lessness more easily than most. 
And there is probably no question 
in your mind that f could do a 
better reponingjob. So why won't 1 
fly? The main reason is 1 have to 
dunk of myself before my country. 

This is the downside to the shut- 
tle flight They say I would have to 
give up four months of my life to 
prepare for the three- or four-day 
NASA flight. Since I've already- 
had intensive training flying the 
Eastern Shuttle 10 New York I 
don't see why I need more. 

The next thing that bothers me is 
that the candidate has to promise 
not to violate the privacy of his 
fellow astronauts. This makes no 
sense. If you can't violate some- 
one’s privky you have no right to 
call yourself a journalist. Space, for 

Play Postponed Again 

The Asiocuied Press 
FRANKFURT — The Monday- 
opening of a Rainer Werner Fass- 
binder play whose premiere was 
scuttled by Jewish demonstrators 
last week has been postponed until 
Nov. 13. to allow a “coding-off 
period.” city authorities said. 


all its grandeur, is still the story or 

human beings holed up in on alu- 
minum cigar, standing on their 
beads, hurtling around the globe 
while TV records them waving to 
the camera. 

1 have other reasons for turning 
down the flight. One is that I will be 
required to pool all the information 
1 gather with every other reporter 
on the ground. 

Why should I risk ray life so 
everyone efse can get my story? 
Pooling with other reporters is un- 
fair because the only reason for a 
journalist to go into space is to 
make his colleagues look stupid 
when he returns. 

□ 

The idea of NASA giving a jour- 
nalist a Tree trip in a shuttle could 
present a conflict of interest- Lei us 
say. for argument's sake, the food is 
lousy, the crew is fooling around 
and the much-touted walk in space 
doesn’t live up to the advertising. 
How can you report freely what 
really goes on behind closed doors 
on a shuttle when NASA is picking 
up the tab? 

The final thing that bugs me 
about the offer is that we journal- 
ists were NASA's fourth choice — 
after Senator Jake Cam. a Saudi 
Arabian prince and a schoolteacher 
named Christa McAuliffe. Senator 
Gam has milked everything he saw, 
as has the prince, and Mrs. McAu- 
liffe. who goes up next, isn't plan- 
ning to keep what she sees a secret 
either. By the lime a journalist is 
launched there won't be one new 
thing in space left to see. 

□ 

1 have only given a few reasons 
why 1 don’t want to go up in the 
shuttle. I'm not surprised that when 
you first read the story of NASA 
offering to shoot a professional 
communicator into the sky my 
name immediately came to mind. 
.And 1 hope T haven't disappointed 
any readers by withdrawing from 
the competition. 

Some of you. in your enthusiasm, 
may have already submitted my 
name. If so. please write to the 
NASA Journalist in Space Project. 
University of South Carolina Co- 
lumbia South Carolina and tell 
them to take me out of consider- 
ation. I don't want the NASA peo- 
ple to select me and then find out. 
to their embarrassment. I'm the 
only member of the media who 
doesn't want to go. 


INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1985 


PEOPLE 


Lawyer’s Novels Probe Business Ethics Vintage Car Speeding 


By Sandra Salmans 

Vru YWr* Times Service 

N EW YORK — As Louis Au- 

chincloss sees it, things have 
never been worse. “We’ve fabri- 
cated a society of wolves and coy- 
otes." he said. “Why does any- 
body think we're better than we 
were in the robber baron days?" 

it is more than 30 years since 
Auchincloss. the 68-year-old 
writer and lawyer, began worry- 
ing about business ethics. Recent- 
ly. with scandals exploding at 
military contractors, brokerage 
firms and banks, the rest of the 
world seems to be catching up 
with him. The Harvard Business 
Review- is holding its second an- 
nual competition for the best arti- 
cle by a manager or executive on 
ethical problems in business. It 
appeals to men and women 
"caught in the jaws of expediency 
and conscience.” as the review 
editor put iL 

Conscience, in business and 
law, is what Auchincloss has ex- 

S lored in most of his 37 books. In 
is just-published novel. "Honor- 
able Men,” his hero, a man of 
rigorous morality, debates the 
ethical pros and cons of takeover 
battles. In his forthcoming “Dia- 
ry of a Yuppie.” a lawyer — “a 
perfectly horrid young man” — 
scrambles ruthlessly to the top of 
the heap — a conclusion that sug- 
gests Auchincloss' increasingly 
dour view of what his characters 
call the “great world." 

“I wonder if there are any rules 
at all now." he said. “Do people 
care about anything else beyond 
being caught? Not from where I 
riL” 

Where Auchincloss sits most 
days is a small comer office of 
Hawkins. Delafield A Wood, a 
Wall Street law firm specializing 
in bonds. He is a partner in trusts 
and estates, a white-shoe special- 
ty in which he deals exclusively 
with private individuals. 

The firm itself is something or 
a legal backwater, according to 
Steven Brill editor and publisher 
of The American Lawyer, a 
monthly magazine. But Auchin- 
closs "is highly regarded c a a law- 
yer.” he said. “You don't hear 
much about him." he added, "but 
you rarely do hear about people 
in trusts and estates unless they're 
Rov Cohn.” 


Ttutchcf 





<r‘ 


Martyra K. Yee/TVe New York Tin 

Louis Auchincloss: “I don't think people like their lawyers writing novels.” 


As an author, Auchincloss gets 
mixed reviews. Literary critics of- 
ten dismiss him as nothing more 
than a novelist of manners with a 
sometimes labored style. Bui 
some academics and publishers 
praise him as one of the few au- 
thors who write about the busi- 
ness world with a real under- 
standing of its complexities and 
conflicts. He himself says that he 
bases his stories neither on his 
experience — he does no takeover 
work, and submits each chapter 
to lawyers who do — nor on sto- 
ries people tell him. “I make 
things up,” he said. But his plots 
clearly have some relation to the 
news. 

In “Honorable Men,” for ex- 
ample. the hero, Chip Benedict, is 
caught on the horns of several 
moral dilemmas involving the 
family business. To meet the de- 
mands of the market place, he 
moves the company into cheaper 
products and finances the expan- 
sion by takin g it public. He thus 
makes it vulnerable to a takeover 
bid by Bamheim Industries, a 
New England behemoth in 
household equipment. Initially, 
he fighls the bid with the usual 
artillery: antitrust suits; private 
investigations into personal lives. 
Then he decides that such tactics 
are repugnant, and that even his 
goal of saving the company may 
be morally debatable. He aban- 


dons the fight, sells his stake and 
makes a personal fortune. 

Is Auchincloss saying that the 
best moral course for a takeover 
target is to yield? 

“Who can possibly tell in a 
takeover?” he said. In a takeover 
fray, he added, “worse things 
may be done by the people who 
resist takeovers" than by the 
would-be acquirers. On each side 
of a hostile takeover, he said, law- 
yers “bring lawsuits that are not 
motivated, merely harassing; I 
was brought up to believe lawyers 
who did that were shysters." 

In both his moral scruples and 
his literary career, Auchincloss is 
used to feeling alone. In 1 956, law 
firms were said 10 have asked job 
applicants their reaction to his 
novel, “The Great World and 
Timothy Coll,” which explored 
whether it was possible for a man 
to retain his integrity at a Wall 
Street law firm. Now, if be is read 
at all by lawyers, it is for enter- 
tainment 

Tve been reading his stuff for 
years,” said Martin Lipton, a 
leading mergers and acquisitions 
lawyer. Lipton said that he reads 
the novels mainly for their por- 
trayal of society, rather than their 
observations on the law — and be 
staunchly defends the morality of 
fighting hostile takeovers. Still, 
he said, “lots or what Auchincloss 
has to say about lawyers and law- 


yers' clients and the way law 
firms operate is wdl taken." 

Upton's interest may be un- 
usual. Auchincloss believes be is 
largely unread by his colleagues 

in the legal community. “It’s 

most infrequent for businessmen 
and lawyers to read novels,” he 
said. “Only women read novds 
— and now they're going profes- 
sional.” Furthermore, he said, fic- 
tion-writing lawyers are regarded 
with suspicion. “I don't think 
people like their lawyers writing 
novds,” he said. “Many people 
think you can't do two things at 
one time. I think it's hurt me. has 
impeded my career. That doesn't 
mean it's wiped me out.” 

The reviewers have not wiped 
out his literary career, either, out 
the lack of critical recognition is 
plainly dispiriting. 

Auchincloss pulled oul a recent 
review in The New York Times 
that said if there was a wider 
moral about America in “Honor- 
able Men,” then “it has not been 
veryeffectively realized.” 

“Well, if it nad been, it would 
have beat ‘Moby Dick,’ wouldn't 
it?” Auchincloss said with a 
touch of asperity. 

He will be forced to retire from 
law next year under his firm's 
mandatory retirement policy. “I 
would be just as happy to contin- 
ue,” he said. “But I shall be per- 
fectly happy. Life goes on." 


event for pre-1905 road anstro- ■*-- 

crais, ended with oiganows accus- ter of fact- • ^ cLhst*. 

rag the driver of a speedy German saying- that hcAt; 

vdtenin of unseemly racing - at father J.Paf 

more than 20 mph (32 W* The A: ^ ^ 

1902 Daimler-Benz, entered by the !:r, son 

Mercedes Benz Museum of StuU- and has . a £i_’jjL who -asiutsd J 
gan, nipped into Brighton only I John Mg** 
hour 48 minutes after setting out stroke 

from London’s Hyde Park on the _ _ in 

57-mfle run Sunday. The Daimler- when Frances Papp» 3' SLi 
Benz, driven by Torn Marscfc, ar- Chicago to take her ne« « 
rived more than an hour ahead of Wittlujwda, for r*. - 

the next fastest participant — a poorer, there was nMm 
1898 Rochet tricycle winch was fd- ^oabTon which ** *®fr“ 
lowed by a 1902 French-bniit won S40nriilk>nintbe IIlin«j-Sia e 
Mors. “Our rules carefully state i nner* in 19S4. the bigg** 1 ’ 


cvenu saw uic vac** coutue WCU aaimujj , 

course, Peter Cooper. He com- c»Jiich and Greek service, then 

plained that the Daimler-Benz fan honeymoon in Australia. 

must have cracked along at more " 

than 20 mph, the average speed □ 

limit laid down by the organizers. j uari—a Baryshnikov danced. 

the Royal Automobile Club. “We Bette Midkr sang and thecas* « 

will tMimir iKa crti infirm An TnftC- — A .«v DCflOI iTlCk* 


fy this car from next year's run," AIDS research and care- The sow- 
said Cooper. "We do not want to ^ The Best of the Best at 
mm it into a race, as it could be the Metropolitan Opera House feu- 
dangerous for those taking part" tuiet j 30 stars, who donated their 
□ talents for the city's large* show® 

The publis her BMcoIm FoA cs jggjf deficbn- 

and his wife, Jtobwla, obmpgi * ^^^TBaryshBikm-. ap- 

at Hack disclos ed m Jjdapa. OfflE an , 

Wyoming. Forties, a tanner Ne« Mon/ - 


Jersey state senator, is the publish- 
er of Forbes Magazine: 

□ 

The American oil magnate John 
Pad Getty n said that as long as be 
has money, he will keep gjviuRU 
away. In a rare interview with The 


of HoBywri stare joined 
go's royal family in a weekend a 
festivities centering on the second 
Princess Grace Foundation- u 
e^PristtRaiRiwUI and his chil- 
dren. Prince Albert, Princess 
Stephane and Princess Caroline 
were the star attractions Sunday at 


Sunday Times of London, the re-. a fundraiser for the foundation, 
elusive billionaire who has become «hWi rmr s money Sac 


one of Britain's biggest philanthro- 
pists said be has no use for an 
income of £100 nriffion (about SM4 
mQiion) a year aid takes' pleasure 
in the endowments he is able to 
make. Getty, S3, was interviewed in 
die private London Qhric, where 
the paper said he has spent more 
than a year receiving triatment for 
phlebitis, an ttiflawnnarign of the 
veins. The reprater, Henry Porter, 


young artists. Cary Grant anil his 
wife. Etartara, who. chaired the 
event, attended along with Frank 
Sinatra, Roger Moore, Gregory 
P in* smA Jimmy Stewart. The first 
fund-raiser was held two years ago 
in Washington. 

□ 

Qomb EKsabrth II returned to 
Britain Sunday after & 26-day tour 


said Getty can pursue his pass io ns 'of 10 Commonwealth countries in 
for literature and the cinema of the the Caribbean, including a state 
1930s and 1940s from his hospital visit to the Bahamas during the 
bed. He also occasionally goes oat biennial Commonwealth Confcr- 



with friends and receives hospital ence. Her husband, Prince PhBip, 
visits from a select arete, including had returned earlier. 


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17B& Tatar 263X1 FANR IX & 


74 CHAMPS-Q.YSSS Ui 

Sfodo, 2 or 3-rocni apartment 
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I£ OARDOE 4359 6797. 


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