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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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jr -By . Bernard Gwerczman 

• iVw 1W Times Service . - 

MOSCOW — Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz said Tuesday that 
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meat or narrow differences sigmC- 
candy in any of the areas to be 
discussed at the meeting between 
President Ronald Reagan and Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev in Geneva in two 
weeks from now. '■ 

At a news amference following 
14 boms of discussions Mth Mr. 
GOTbadiev, the Soviet leader, and 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the for- 
eign minister. Mr. Shultz said dip- 
lomatic efforts would continue in 
Moscow and Washington before 
the summit. But he seemed to hold 
out Euler expectation of any major 
breakthrough. 

Efforts to work out differences 
'< tm arms control, regional issues, 
human, rights and bilateral Soviei- 
American relations would contin- 
ue, he said. But be added that *^rerv 

serious differences" remain, 

Asked what the chances were for 
an accord on agreement in princi- 
ple for the arms control negotiators 
in Geneva, or even on a final com- 
munique that contained more than 
a repetition of known different^; 
Mr. Shultz said “I wouldn’t bet 
The New York Times on that.” 

Mr. Shultz said that be was 
pleased by the exchange of views 
and felt both sides gained from it. 
He said that whether the Geneva 
meeting is a success depended oh 
the altitude of Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Gorbachev and not on what others 
believedl 

At one point, he said there had 
been some effort to narrow differ- 
ences But when asked to amplify, 
be said he did not want to overplay 
the narrowing. 

Ihe secretary's discussion with 
»Mr. Gorbachev lasted for nearly 
^Ffonr hours Tuesday morning, and 
was the lengthiest any U.S. admin- 
istration official has had with the 
Soviet leader. Mr. SbnJtz said they 
had “a very vigorous discussion." 

Outside tensions in Soyiet- 
American relations did not appear 
to cause problems in the discus- 
sions. Mr. Shid tz was asked about ■ 
the case of Vitely Ynrrfienko, fhe.^: 
KGB official who seemingly de- 
fected to the United States last 
summer, but claimed Monday in 
Washington that he had been kid- 
napped and demanded to be al- 
lowed to return to the Soviet 
Union. 

Mr. Shultz said that be and Mir. 
Gorbachev bad a “very brief dis- 
cussion" of the Yurchenko affair at 
ihe end of the talks. Mr. Shultz said 
that the charges by Mr. Yurchenko 
were "totally false.” _ 

^ Before the meeting began, re^ 

>7 porters saw Mr. Shultz pointing to 
a battery of phones in Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s Kremlin office and asking, 
i'Can you call anywhere in the So- 
viet Union with them?" 

Mr. Gorbachev, seeming to en- 
joy being observed by reporters, 
said. “Yes, and more.” 

“Thank god," the Soviet leader 
added, using. an everyday Russian 
expression, “we have communica- 
tions and opportunities for obser- 
vation and surveillance that makes 
things calmer ” 

. “That's right,” Mr. Shultz re- 
sponded! “At the same time, I 
blow cases where I wish I didn’t 
know as much as I knew.” 

If Mr. Shultz was taken literally 
Tuesday, and the summit meeting 
7 were to take place Wednesday, 

1 there would be no important agree- 
ments announced by Mr. Gorba- 
chev and Me. Reagan. 

“Basically, we have a lot to do,” 

Mr. Shuhz said. 

The areas that still hold out pros- 
pects for some U ^.-Soviet, agree- 


There was. a -s us picion among 

some reporters after the news con- 
ference at Spaso House, the resi- 
dence of the American ambassa- 
dor, Arthur A. Hartman, that Mr. 
Shultz might have been overstating 
the lack of progress so that there 
would be some “surprise an- 
nouncement” in Genera. But Mr. 
Shultz in the pest ha$ toded to be 
careful and precue. is his descrip- 
tions of such encounters. 

Mr. Shultz left Tuesday night for 
an overnight, stop in Iceland before 
returning to Washington on 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Raul H. Nitre, the special arms 
control, negotiator, new in a sepa- 
rate plane to Geneva and Brussels 
to bncf arms control negotiators in 
Geneva and allies in the North At- 
lantic Treaty. Organization. 



Pentagon Selects 
French-Designed 
unication 
for Army 




Vitaly Yurchenko, a high-r ankin g KGB officer who defected, announcing be intends to return to tbe Soviet Union. 

Soviet Agrees to Allow KGB Defector 
To Be Interviewed in Washington 


!*• AMCOOMd ftou 

Mr. Gorbachev, left, and Mr. Siroltz before their calks. 


1 SDI: Selling 



lsion 


By David Hoffman 

WasUugtoa Post Serncr 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has become both a 
salesman and a negotiator in his 
increasingly expansive comments 
about a space-based missile de- 
fense system. 

In an interview with four Soviet 
journalists published Monday, Mr. 
Reagan said that the United 'States 
would not deploy a proposed 
space-based shield against nuclear 
arms until all nations have elimi- 
nated such weapons. 

A senior White House official 
said Mr. Reagan was attempting to 
describe his hopes for eliminating 
nuclear missiles and eventually 
sharing space-defense technology 
but was not intending to establish a 
major new element. ixtU-S. policy 
by his commenis to the Soviet jour- 
nalists. 

Whether this vision, will ever be 
turned into a reality is many years 
in the future, and certainly beyond 
Mr. Reagan's presidency! accord- 
ing to senior UB. officials. Mr. 
Reagan’s latest comments clearly 
exceeded the more cautious lan- 
guage in official U.S. policy about 
ute future of tbe program. 


But tbe president did not appear 
to be speaking carelessly in the in- 
terview, and aides say he has seri- 
ous purposes in such sweeping 
statements about his S26-biilion 
Strategic Defense Initiative. 

One purpose is to sell his vision 
of the program to American and 
world opinion. According to a se- 

NEVS ANALYSIS 

nior official who has worked close- 
ly with the president on this issue, 
Mr. Reagan tends to exaggerate his 
rhetoric about strategic defense m 
an effort to convince Americans 
and others that his goal of making 
nuclear war “obsolete” is a valid 
one. 

Polls show that while Americans 
like the abstract idea, they would 
prefer to have serious negotiations 
with the Soviets on limiting nuclear 
missiles. 

Another purpose Could be to set 
the stage for future negotiations 
with tbe Soviet Union. 

Mr. Reagan said at his last for- 
mal news conference that he was 
not interested in using the space- 
based defense program as a bar- 

(Cooftuiedou Page 6, CoL 8) 


Compiled bv Ota 1 Staff from Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union has agreed to permit the 
UA authorities to interview Vitaly 
Yurchenko, the senior KGB offi- 
cial who now says he wants to re- 
turn to the Soviet Union after re- 
portedly defecting to the United 
- Slates three months ago. State De- 
partment officials said Tuesday. 

Tbe State Department said that 
the interview with Mr. Yurchenko 
would take place Tuesday evening. 

UB. officials said they want to 
determine if Mr. Yurchenko in fact 
wants to return to the Soviet 
Union. 

Mr. Yurchenko, who had been 
termed the most important defec- 
tor to the West in years, appeared 
at the Soviet residential compound 
in Washington on Monday night 
and declared (ha he had not de- 
fected. 

• !■ JmIi < Lv o T . .i^ped three 
months ago in Rome, drugged and 
held in forced isolation bv the Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency on an es- 
tate near Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

Reagan administration officials 
immediately disputed Mr. Yur- 
chenko’s account, saving he came 
to the United States voluntarily. 

After providing important infor- 
mation on operations of the KGB, 
the Soviet secret police and intelli- 
gence agency, theoflicials said, Mr. 
Yurchenko apparently developed 
second thoughts, walked out of his 
safe-house quarters and found his 
way to the Soviet Embassy on Sat- 
urday night. 

U.S. officials said privately that 
they did not know whether Mr. 
Yurchenko had simply changed his 
mind, got homesick, or feared for 
his family’s safety. Others said they 
wondered if he had been sent as a 
double agent to embarrass the 
United States. 

In Moscow, Tass, the official 
press agency, accused the United 
States on Tuesday of “state terror- 
ism" for the alleged abduction of 
Mr. Yurchenko in Rome. 

The U.S. secretary of state, 
George P. Shultz, in Moscow for 
talks with Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
the Soviet leader, said Tuesday that 
Mr. Yurchenko’s charges of abduc- 
tion were “totally false." 

He said be had briefly discussed 
the case with Mr. Gorbachev, but 
did not reveal what was said. 

A State Department spokesman, 
Charles E Redman, said Tuesday 
that it appeared that Mr. Yurchen- 


ko’s decision to gc :o ±t Soviet 
Embassy on Monday E’e: three 
months of talking to U.S. •.tf.e.it- 
gence officials “was a per-rnal de- 
cision and we will Jtiemp: eon- 
firm tha: at a meeting with him" 

He said the interview would nice 

LUS- congressmen were stunned 
by Mr. Yurchenko's return to 
the Russians. Page 5. 

Support grows in the L\S. Con- 
gress for delaying a Soviet strip 
and a disputed sailor. Page 4. 

place in a “noncoercive atmo- 
sphere.” 

Mr. Redman said Mr. Yur- 
chenko had entered the United 
States under special authority 
granted by tbe attorney general anc 
that even if he heid a Soviet diplo- 
matic passport it would r.ot be val- 
Sj f-,r Trir*3 on; r; n-:r 


Mr. Redman would not respond 
to some of the specific allegations 
Mr. Yurchenko made on Monday. 

"From the moment of entry into 
the United States, - he said. “Mr. 
Yurchenko enjoyed ail the rights 
ar.c freedoms granted under the 
U.S. Constitution" He added: 
"Had Mr. Y urchenLo expressed a 
desire at any time to return to the 
U.S.S.R.. we would not have hin- 
dered him from dome so." 

He would not discuss the impli- 
cations of the affair on U.S. intelli- 
gence. but said he saw no reason 
why the case should affect prepara- 
tions for the U.S.-Soviet summit 
meciir.a in Geneva on Nov. 19 and 
20 . 

Mr. Yurchenko said Monday 
that CLA captors brought him a 
contract three times that they said 

(Cosfeaai tm P-ijjf 7. Go*. ?> 


CfrfjyVJ f‘a s. 1 ,;' fr.« D^Jlitn 

WASHINGTON — A Frec- 
ch-U.S. industrial team won a com- 
petition Tus*la\ with a Bntish-A- 
merican consortium to build a S4.5 
billion U.S. Anr.\ battlefield com- 
munications system, the Defense 
Department announced. 

Thomson-CSF. which is owned 
by the French government, and 
GTE Corp. are to proride a mobile, 
jam-resistor.: telephone and tele- 
printer system by I9Q3. 

James Ambrose, the U.S. Army 
undersecretary, said the S4.3 bil- 
lion bid by Thomson and GTE won 
out coer j S~4 billion proposal by 
the learn of Plesscy Co., a British 
concern, and Rockwell Interna- 
tional Corp.. an American compa- 
ny. 

The basic contract of S63.25 mil- 
lion will be given to GTE tiu-; year 
and six other fixed-price contracts 
will be awarded in later years, the 
army announced. GTE's govern- 
ment systems division is to build 
the system. 

The GTE system, known a* Mo- 
bile Subscriber Equipment, will in- 
corporate major elements of the 
French mobile communications 
system, known as RJT.A. developed 
by Thomson-CSF and other 
French companies. It has been in 
field use with the French and Bel- 
gian armies for two years. 

Intended for the entire army 
force Of five corps ar.d 26 divisions, 
including active duty, reserve and 
National Guard units, the system 
may be the biggest single purchase 
of foreign military equipment the 
Pentagon has ever ordered. 

The system, when in place, 
would mark the first time in U.S. 
Army history that all units, active 
and reserve, will have a mobile tac- 
tical communications network that 
is coded and jam-resistanL the 
army said. 

Thai the contract would be 
.•m.-jded 'a OTE-Thoms.r«: had 


JFesf Germany. Britain 
WiH Support Eureka 

West Germany jnd Bn tain 
said they would provide fur.d.- 
lo support research under Eure- 
ka. die French inui atr.e to &:ir> 
tilaie West European coopera- 
tion in high technology. Paget 

long been rumored on both sides of 
the At lari tic. and the ridding creat- 
ed a dispute between Br.iai.-: ar.d 
the United States. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain reportedly in- 
tervened directly with President 
Ronald Reagan to gain assurance* 
that the contract would he awarded 
to the partnership of the Colins 
radio division of Rockwell ar.c 
Plessey. 

Mrs. Thatcher is said to nave 
appealed io Mr. Reagan on the 
ground that Britain traditionally 
has been a more loyal ally to the 
United Slates than has France. 
From the beginning. London has 
supported Mr. Reagan's plans fora 
space-based anti-missile shieid: 
Pans has opposed it. 

The contract was to have been 
awarded in July but had been de- 
layed because of new cost analyses 
ordered by Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger. 

In addition, the General Ac- 
counting Office, the investigate 
aim of Congress, questioned :he 
wisdom about going into full pro- 
duction on the system without test- 
ing it fully under simulated battle 
conditions. 

Army plans call for new combat 
communications gear to equip the 
entire force by 1993. The army so- 
licited bids for the svsiem in’Julv 
1984. 

In addition to the U.S. business 
involved in the communications 
{Coatinut-J or rage 6, Or! ii 


PLO’s Role 
Is Stressed 
By Hussein 

By Jonathan Gayror 

Reuser. 

LUXEMBOURG — Kins Hus- 
sein of Jordan, renewing his all for 
an international conference on the 
Middle East, reaffirmed Tuesday 
his belief that the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization should lake pan 
in any serious peace talks. 

Hussein, addressing the parlia- 
ment on the second day of a state 
visit to Luxembourg, noted that the 
PLO was acknowledged by the 
United Nations as the legitimate 
representative of the Palestinian 
people. 

“In any meaningful negotiations 
leading to the peace we all seek.” he 
said, “the legitimate Palestinian 
representatives should be invited to 
participate in the peace process.” 

Hussein’s strong renewed com- 
mitment to PLO participation in 
any peace settlement with Israel 
followed attempts by Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres of Israel and by 
the United States to coax him into 
entering into peace talks without 
the organization. Israel rejects the 
inclusion of the PLO as a partner in 
any talks. 



Thi AaooUfd Prey 


King Hussein arriving in Luxembourg for his state visit 


In a recent address to Jordan’s 
parliament, Hussein spurned an of- 
fer from Mr. Peres for immediate, 
direct peace talks. However, some 
Israeli officials said then that they 
were encouraged that there was 
only an indirect mention of the 
PLO in that address. 

In his speech to Luxembourg’s 
Chamber of Deputies. Hussein said 
that the Feb. 1 1 agreement between 


- • stsgggir 





x. : v 






Royal Visit: Why Such a Fuss? 

Answer lies in History, Language and U.S. Character 


th* taacste P*b 


Diana, Princess of Wales 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Times Semce 

WASHINGTON — The imminent visit of a 
young British couple, he 36 years old, she 24, has 
sent a frisson of excitement through Washington 
unmatched in the memory of old-timers in a city 
quite accustomed to receiving the glamorous and 
the celebrated. 

The Prince and Princess of Wales are not due 
here until Saturday morning, but already the news- 
- papers, magazines and television networks are out- 
dong themselves: What is their marriage really 
like? Hew much money do they earn for British 
. business? Does she get along with her in-laws? 
How are they rearing their children? What are their 
political views, if any? 

All of which leaves one larger question: Why do 
weeare? 

Washington, it is always said, is a rity about 
power. The royal visitors have next to none and. 
even when Prince Charles inherits the British 
throne from Queen Elizabeth IL they will not have 
a great dcaL Not as much as this Supreme Court 
justice or that cabinet member, both of whom 
would go unnoticed if they ever rode the subway, 

. Charles sometimes complains to his intimates, 
in fact, that he has no defined role in life, at least 
not yet.. . 

It cannot be simple glamour, the former Lady 
Diana Spencer is a beautiful woman, all right, 
although some Britons have been caddish enough 
to suggest that her nose is a bit loo large or that sue 
has become too thin, but other beautiful women 


come here without causing such a commotion. Not 
even Princess Grace of Monaco, who, after alL was 
royal, glamorous and American, stirred such a 
fuss. 

Nor can it be money: there are plenty of Ameri- 
can fortunes equal io the prince's, if not to the 
Crown’s, and plenty of American women with 
wardrobes that outshine that of the princess. 

The answer is much more complicated, a com- 
pound of the obvious and the subtle. Youth and 
glamour and money matter, but so does tradition: 
it mailers that Charles inarches in the line stretch- 
ing back to Victoria and Elizabeth I and William 
the Conqueror and yes, even George III. 

Lacking a monarchy, lacking even an indirectly 
dected chief of stale such as West Germany's 
president, Americans gravitate toward the British 
monarchy, although some are made uncomfort- 
able by dhn lSih-century republican folk-memo- 
ries, which show up in a reluctance to bow or 
curtsy. Thai particular monarchy appeals to .Amer- 
icans because of a common language, because of 
cultural bonds, because of Britain's eminence 
among the countries that still have sovereigns, but 
also because some people in the United States fed 
vaguclv that they are a part of it. 

Each summer, tens of thousands of Americans 
stand outside Buckingham Palace, watching the 
changing of the guard, hoping for a glimpse of 
some member of the royal family. Ask why they 
are there, and they uiD mj, whether their names 
are Lombardi or Schultz or O’Brien or whatever. 

(Continued on Page 6, CoL 3) 



.... 

fmm 
IP 

..vA ' \bi*. viji 

* 

Prince Charles 


Jordan and the PLO on a joint 
approach to Middle East peace had 
breathed fresh life into the peace 
process. 

But he cautioned: “Little can be 
achieved if the United States shirks 
its responsibilities as a superpower 
and as a champion of human rights, 
freedom and the right to self-deter- 
‘rainaiion.” 

Hussein said that an internation- 
al conference should be heid under 
the auspices of the United Nations 
and should include all five perma- 
nent members of the UN Security 
Council, as well as all parties to die 
conflict. He said he hoped the 
United Stales would "participate 
and partake actively.” 

He also met with Jacques Poos, 
Luxembourg’s foreign minister, 
who currently holds the presidency 
of ihe European Community. Mr. 
Poos said afterward that the king 
had outlined a four-stage plan for 
peace in the Middle East- 

Under the plan, Mr. Poos said, a 
Jordanian delegation would first 
meet with U.S. representatives. 
Then, the PLO would explicitly 

recognize Israel. Next, a Jordanian- 
Palesiinian delegation would meet 
U.S. negotiators within ihe frame- 
work of the international confer- 
ence, and the conference would 
dear ihe way io direct peace talks 
and a final settlement 

Mi. Poos said the plan deserved 
EC support. He said he had loid 
Hussein that EC officials still were 
prepared to receive a Jordanian- 
- Palestinian delegation. 

■ Arafat, Mubarak Talk 

Yasser Arafat, ihe PLO chair- 
man. embraced President Hosni 
Mubarak of Egypt on Tuesday af- 
ter four hours of talks about bol- 
stering the PLO in the aftermath of 
the hijacking of the cruise ship 
AchilJe Laura, United Press Inter- 
national reported from Cairo. 
Osama el- Baz. Mr. Mubarak’s chief 
political adviser, said the discus- 
sions were “very fruitful.” 


Marcos Seems 
To Backtrack 
On Election 


Reuters 

MANILA — President Ferdi- 
nand E. Marcos seemed to back 
away Tuesday from a firm commit- 
ment to a presidential election in 
January but has agreed to include 
the rice presidency if an election 
does take place. 

Mr. Marcos issued a statement 
Tuesday reversing a previous indi- 
cation that he would call an elec- 
tion by presidential decree. In- 
stead. ihe statement said, he would 
leave the calling of an election up to 
the Philippine legislature. 

“We will throw everything to Ba- 
lasang Pambansa and it is up to 
Batasang to decide whether to hold 
the special election or not," the 
statement said. The Baiasang Pam- 
bansa. or National Assembly, is 
controlled by Mr. Marcos’s New 
Society Movement. 

The statement also said that the 
vice presidency would he revived if 
the assembly decided on an elec- 
tion. 

Mr. Marcos first announced his 
willingness to hold an early election 
during an .American television in- 
terview on Sunday, reversing his 
previous stand that there would be 
no poll before May 1987. He later 
proposed Jan. 17. 1986, us the dale. 
He declared then that he would 
face the voters alone — without a 
running male — because “the issue 
is Marcos." 

Opposition groups asserted, 
however, that a continued vacancy 
of the vice presidency would add to 

ihe country's political instability. 
There has been no vice president 
since 1972. when Mr. Marcos abol- 
ished the position. 

Referring to that criticism, the 

(Continued on Page 6, CoL 4} 


INSIDE 

■ French claims of negotiations 

over the fate of two secret 
agents are likely to worsen lies 
with New Zealand. Page 2. 

■ Police warned the editor of a 

Cape Town newspaper he could 
be prosecuted for interviewing 
a guerrilla leader. Page 4. 

■ Justice Brennan of the U.S. 

Supreme Court has emerged as 
the court's strongest liberal 
voice. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The London Metal Exchange 

called on the Bank of England 
to back a bankers* plan de- 
signed to solve the international 
tin crisis. Page II. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


To New Zealand 9 s Pique, France Says Deal Was Made on Agents 


By Richard Bernstein thai “there were no deals made’ m 
-Vrw y«* TimaSrnk* the case. “As attorney general, I 

PARIS — A new diplomatic ar- actually took no part in any d ect- 
meat between France and New sion relating to this matter at all 

aland arrog a te d intwin tlmmslr. he Said. 




Monday that there had been dis- t he attack." the daily newspaper 
erect contacts over the agents was Liberation said in an editorial on 


fcatead appeared to be in the mak* 
mg Tuesday as Foreign Minister 
Roland Dumas of France said 
negotiations between the two coun- 
tries had led New Zealand to re- 
duce charges against two French 
secret agents being held there. 


However, in a radio interview in 
Paris on Tuesday. Mr. Dumas said 
that negotiations between the two 
rides have been taking place since 
late last month and are continuing 
as pan of a French effort to secure 


Earlier, Prime Minister David lhc rdease of A* ^ French offi- 
Lange of New Zealand had denied . .... 

that dipkimaiic "haggling” had en- “The torn haggling is improp- 
abled the two Frenchagenis to er ” Mr. Dumas said. “Negona- 
plead guilty to manslaughter lions are taking place and I will 
charges while more serious charges make way effort to obtain the re- 
ef murder were dropped. lease of the two French officials in 

Captain DomuuquePrieur. 36. » «*« a rime and under the best 
and Major Alain Mafart, 35, of the conditions possible.” 



and Maior Alain Mafart. 35. of the conditions possible. 
GeoSr&Storate^^ External ^ He said that talks had been un- 
Security, the French intelligence dw way since Sept. 23 when be bad 


agency, were accused of involve- 
ment in a French operation to sink 


^ ' it t g 

4 

M 





palmer at the United Nations. 

“I reject the sovereignty and David Lange Roland Dumas Some baric questions on ue op- 

independence of New ZeSand but nation remain unanswered, m- 

mratalst mova^^fb^July 1 have an opinion," Mr. Dumas plead guilty to lesser charges, had been the result of negotiations. 

said. “I can say that the New Zea- french officials remained silent “Allow me to be discreet,” he official who entered theattack cn 
tOEranhw^emando Pereira, wm i 1 ®* 06 system has taken a throughout Monday, with the only said in a television interview. “It is “f*? nam« of the 

SwheTT^i more correct Appreciation of the comnStt coming from Defend a condition of our operation, whose agenu who actually earned out the 

nmniR nff eminave eharoes at- facts." Minister Paul Quilfes, who called first element took place” on Mon- attack. _ 

Sdtottehunrftbe^^ich Mr. Dumas’s statement repre- the sinking of the boat a “regreua- day. ' ”***% oeve L k ^ W ^ e S^ 

to benhai S AudSharbor. semed a rare official reaction in ble affair." . [Earlier Tuesday, Mr. Lange re- through the writ of some fame 


David Lange 


1WUUIU uuuuu , , .* 

cratiou remain unanswered, in- 
had been the result of negotiations, dudmg the identity of the French 


incorrect, Reuters reported. Tuesday. 

[“It's so discreet that no one in Several French newspapers said 
Wellington knows anything about that OkI. French government had 
it," he said.] * pressured New Zealand into mak- 

The plea bargaining arrange- mg an arrangement for the two 
ment. which was made known in a agents by threatening to reduce un- 
surprise announcement on Mon- ports of the country’s agricultural 
day in Auckland, was dearly a po- products into the European Com- 
litical windfall to the French gov- mtinity. There has been no ooaBr- 
ernment, which has suffered matian of these claims either by 
intense embarrassment at home French or New Zealand officials, 
and abroad because of what came New Zealand authorities say that 

to be known as the Greenpeace the murder charges were dropped 
affair. because there was insufficient evi- 

The guilty plea meant in essence deace to convict, 
that there wiU be no trial of the The two agents hdd in New Zear 
French officers and thus no presea- land since their arrest there on July 
tation of the reported large qnanti- 12 are assumed 10 have helped in 
ty of evidence collected by the New the sabotage operation by coDect- 
Zealand police on the French oper- ing information on Greenpeace 
a tirm a gaitwr the Greenpeace ves- members and helping to bring ex- 
seL plosives into the country. 

Some baric questions on the op- ~ The French press has reported 
ition remain unanswered, in- that the sinking was carried out by 
uriing the identity of the French another team of agents whose 
f y-ial who ordered the attack on members escaped the day after. 


WORLD BRIE FS — 

Janizelski Expected to Give l P aP °^ 

WARSAW (AP)— Genera! fcpuf} 

^ssst^sss^ssst 

the sources, who did not want to be identified- sesion of the 

expected to be made public Wednesday at the inaugural 

caul rht- general’s decision tO Step dOWK OS hejd^ 


party," a diplomat said. “It means Janndsto nas 

Poland is no longer political but economic. 

Belgian Bank Is Damaged by Bomb t 

LEIDEN, Bdgium (AP) —The extremist 
bombed the mam branch of Krc dun b anfc, Bdgmm s third _ 

here Tuesday afternoon, cansing extensive dam age but apparent!, ipj 


agents set off explosive charges at- 
tached to the hull of the ship, which 
was berthed in Auckland harbor. 
New Zealand's justice minister. 


Paris to the decision in New Zea- 


“We will never know, unless it is 
re- through the work of some future 


Geoffrey Palmer, said Monday land to allow the French agents to 


Nonetheless, Mr. Quilfes also jected suggestions of a deal and historian, what really happened in 
tinted that the judicial outcome said that Mr. Quote's assertion on Auckland or who, in Paris, ordered 


„ Sentencing of the French agents 
has been set for Nov. 22, but it was 
dearly being hoped in France that 
the two might eventually be ex- 
pelled from New Zealand rather 
than made to save out jail terms 
there. 


woald explode 30 minutes later. Another man, 
with a bomb to the rafl of a stairway. It expk 


said, fixed a briefcase 

at 3:03 PM- 


Protesters Disrupt Transport in Chile 


wvt&tnpoia ty 

^0P doff he^ 


Report on CIA Exposes 
'Thuggery,’ Libya Says 




AVENUElOUtSE 

INTERIM 

207. /uenuelofie - XSO&usefc 
uta^o-M 


The Associated Press 

TRIPOLL Libya — An alleged 
CIA plan to undermine Colonel 
Moamer Qadhafi's government 
demonstrated the failure of Reagan 
a dminis tration policy of “open 
blackmail and muscular thuggery,” 
Libya has declared. 

In Moscow, Tass, the official So- 
viet news agency, said the alleged 
plan was an example of what the 
Soviet Union «ilk U.SL state terror- 
ism. 

-The comments were reactions 
Monday to a Washington Post re- 
port that President Ronald Reagan 
authorized the Central Intelligence 
Agency to support covert opera- 



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tions against Colonel Qadhafi’s re- 

g ii Tf ff 

A While House spokesman, Wfl- 
liam Hart, declined to confirm the 
existence or credibility of the docu- 
ments quoted by The Post, bnt said 
that Mr. Reagan ordered an inves- 
tigation “in an effort to determine 
who is responsible for disclosure 
and 10 take appropriate action.” 

The Libyan news agency, JANA 
called The Post report a revelation 
of U.S. plans to carry out terrorist 
sabotage against Libya with the 
aim of w eakening the government 
and halting “its successes in con- 
fronting U.S. destructive activities 
all over the world.” 

“This new step the U.S. presi- 
dent takes reflects the true feeling 
of failure the U.S. president suffers 
from, the fear from Libya," the 
Englisb-Ianguage dispatch said. “It 
is proof of his admittance..pf the 
failure of his policy of open black- 
mail and musoilar thuggery." 

The report by Tass said, “The 
green light given by the White 
House to the Central Intelligence 
Agency and other secret services in 
their criminal actions against Libya 
is a fresh instance of international 
terrorism which has been elevated 
to the status of state policy of the 
U.S." 




\ ' • Vs 

f" a" ; Pi 


•7C'7^. - 





rri • struck 17 

Lhnstians tss 
Seek to Alter s^jj 
Lebanon Poet Edi 

DAMASCUS — Two Christian 
militia officials arrived here Tues- oppose 
day to seek changes in a Syrian- National 
backed peace pact for Lebanon as bacfcgjta 
Christian representatives in Beirut Movnnea 
hardened their opposition to the 

accord. tea to so 

A Christian source m Beirut said a rfw ««mn 
the current draft reduced the cram- 
try’s Christian president to a fig- T_ J*„ 
urehead, and Christians could not ^*kt ll ki 
agree to thaL NEW ] 

CantiSe Chamoun, a Christian strained s 
leader and a former Lebanese pres- Tuesday < 
idem, said that the political ch- yeaxsam 


SANTIAGO (Reuter) — Dem- 
onstratoxs disrupted pubBc trans- 
portation here Tuesday at the start 
of a 4&-hour protest against Qtik’s 
stihtaiy government, following a 
night of viohsneem which bombers 
struck 17 times and 23 persons 
were arrested. 

President Augusto Pinochet or- 
dered troops onto the street s to 
guard nag ex* intetsectioos, bridges 
»nd underground sta tio ns and to 
patrol southern Santiago, where 
protesters erected barricades 10 
halt traffic. A main rail line leading 
to the port city of Valparaiso was 
bombed, and buses m both cities 
were burned- .. 

Opposition trade rations of the 
National Workers Command, 
backed by the Popular Democratic 
Movement, a coalition of Commu- 
nists and Socialists, called the pro- 
test to support dx leaders jailed 
after similar protests in September. 



Angnsto Pinochet 








Kw Aawdetad PMs 

A FREE HAND — An Israeli woman waving as she 
walks with armed companions on an outing in Jerusa- 
lem. AD four are settlers on the occupied West Bank. 


INIMITABLE 



Gulf States Seek 
Better Iran Ttes 


MUSCAT, Oman — Leaders of 
six Gulf Arab states, meeting here 
for talks, are reviewing their coun- 
tries’ relations with Iran as a means 
to end its five-year war with Iraq, 
Abdul Aziz bin Mohammed 
Rowas, Oman's information minis- 
ter, said Tuesday. 

Relations between members of 
the Golf Cooperation Council and 
Iran have been strained because of 
their f inan cial and political support 
for Iraq in the war. 

A senior Arab diplomat said that 
the council's member nations — 
Oman, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the 
United Arab Emirates, Bahrain 
and Qatar — hoped to persuade 
Iran to review relations separately 
from the war. 


recent weeks, now was “douded.” 

After a meeting in Beirut with 
President Amin Gemayd, he said 
that new negotiations on the draft 
were needed between the Christian 
Lebanese Forces militia, the Suite 
Moslem militia Amal and the Dru- 
ze-led Progressive Socialist Party 

militia 

“I believe there are matters on 
which it is impossible to agree," 
Mr. Chamoun said, adding that 
“we shall reject any initiatives or 
programs if we find that they do 
not conform" to “the dignity of 
Lebanon, the sovereignty of Leba- 
non and the vital interests of Leba- 
non.” 

Leaden of a Shiite fimdamcotaT 
ist group also spoke out against the 
draft pact 

The Christia n envoys, Michel 
Smaha and Assad Shaftari, said on 
arrival in Damascus that there were 
flaws in the agreement, bnt that 
their Lebanese Forces militia 
hoped to finalize an agreement in . 
fresh talks with Amal and the Pro- 
gressive Socialist Party. 

The two men were expected to 
meet the Syrian first vice president, 
Abdel Halim Khaddam, who has 
been holding long meetings in Da- 
mascus with Lebanon’s three most 
powerful militias to end 10 years of 
aril war. 

The militias drafted an accord 
last month to alter gradually the 
present Lebanese political system, 
which favors the Christian minor- 
ity. It was to have been signed Sun- 
day. 


India, China Discuss Border Depute 

NEW DELHI (AP) — India and Quo, whose relations have been 
strained since the border war of 1962, held their fast substantive talks 
Tuesday on the boundary dispute since negotiations began almost four 
years ago. 

The two tides met for four hours in New Ddhi and dacnssedconfHct- 
ing territorial claims on a sectar-by-sectm basts, an Indian Foreign 
Mfrrirtiy spokesman said. Delegates diaenssed “matters of substance,” he 
said, butdeefined to specify the issues. - 

The talks are the sixth round since negotiations started in Decem b er 
1981 and the first since Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi assumed office last 
October. 

Mexican Aide in Moscow Found Dead £ 

MOSCOW (AP) —A Mexican diplomat and has maid have been found 
beaten and shot to death m the diplomat’* Moscow apartment, the 
Mexican Embassy said Tuesday. - - . .» 

In a statement, the embassy sad that the body of Mumd Portion 
Quevedo, 43, and his maid, Marfa del Cm-mcn Cruz, were found Thurs- 
day by diplomats. He embassy said the deaths had not been announced 
earlier so as “to not obstruct said investigations.” ■ 

The statement said that Mr. Fartilla Qtjfcvddgfc bdldagoea bad become 
concerned when be did not arrive for work on ObL 30 and did not answer 
his telephone or door hdL Emhany staff gniwyd nwkyfcM 

apartment, found the bodies and catted the po&e. 

3d IiberianParty Turns Down Seals 

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP), — The Liberia Umfisation Party has 
become the third opposition party to refuse its scats m the new legisla- 
ture, ci ting voting irregularities in the Oct. 15 dectioo^ 

The party chairman. Lesfie Greeae, ca&ed Matida; on the Special 
Election Commission to hold a new election within four weeks m the 
presence of foreign observovTbe Liberia Ifa a.yBu ty.and the Liberia 
Action Party refused scats last week. j 

The dect^amamsskinarnionncedOct, 29 that theanffitary head of J 
state, Major General Samuel K. Doe, bad been dated president with/, 
50.9 percent of the vote and that his Naticud De mp a ati c Party aM 
Liberia had won 72 of the legislature's 90 scatsl 

For the Record 

Seven persons dfed Tuesday In VirgMi as a stum ddnged the mid 
Atlantic states, forcing thousands to evacuate their homes and leaving 
others missing. In West Viighuii, Governor Arch Moran said the flooding 
was the worst in the state's history. (AP) 

A former sergeant fen the Nazi SS, Wolfgang .Otto, went on trial, 
Tuesday in Kxefdd, West Germany, charged with complicity in the 1 
murder of a German Communist leader, Ernst Th&ehnann. f. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 3 









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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 ? 1985 


Americans Casting Ballots 
On Range of Spending Plans 


By T.R. Reid 

H 'asking; on pest Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — American 
voters went to the polls Tuesday to 

decide refer enduxns ran ging from 
abortion to ■‘nuclear-free’* zones. 

Scores of state and local p ropes* 
ais calling for new bond issues or 
tax increases, or both, were to test 
the dominant view in Washington 
that Americans are resistant to new 
taxes. 

Among these are a bond issue of 
more than a billion dollars in Texas 
lo provide new water supplies in 
the west and curb flooding in the 
east, a $100- million bond issue in 
Ohio to pay for research to help 
make the state's high-sulfur coal 
more marketable and several local 
initiatives in California seeking to 
reverse the lax-cutting momentum 
created by the Proposition 13 tax- 
reduction measure in 1978. 

Some dirisive issues of the de- 


cade were being reviewed across 
the United States: 

• Three New England towns will 
have initiatives asking citizen’s 
views on the Supreme Court’s 1973 
decision voiding state restrictions 
on first- trimester abortions. 

• Oak Park. Illinois, win have a 
nonbinding referendum on the 
town's best-known law: the 1984 
ordinance banning possession of 
handguns in that Chicago suburb. 

• Ami-auclear forces have 
brought forward a number of pro- 
posals designed to restrict the use 
of nuclear power for war or peace. 
The cities of Oberiin. Ohio, and 
Boulder. Colorado, have proposals 
to declare themselves nuclear-free 
zones, with neither commercial nor 
military nuclear materials permit- 
ted in their borders. 

• San Franciscans were to de- 
cide whether S 150.000 of their tax- 
es should be used to finance a state- 
wide campaign to legalize 
marijuana in California. 



Support Grows in Congress to Delay 
Soviet Ship, Disputed Sailor in ILS. 


By Philip Shenon 

New York Tuna Semce 

WASHINGTON —Congressio- 
nal support has grown for a request 


come any effects of_ drugs and re- 
gather his thoughts." 

The Reagan admkustratiOT has 
come under attack from conserva- 
tive groups and Ukraininn-Amen* 


that the Reagan administration ^ ^vists for its treatment ot the 
stop a Soviet freighter from leaving The White House has said 


the United States with a sailor who 
jumped ship and was returned to 
the vessel later by the VS. authori- 
ties. 

Three Democrats and two Re- 
publicans in the Senate signed a 
letter Monday assailing what they 


that it considers the matter c ^ osc ^ 
Some lawmakers have exp ressed 
fear that Mr. Medvid was returned 
to the ship because the Reagan ad- 
ministration was worried that the 
incident would hann the meeting 
this month between President Ron- 


called the ‘'disgraceful" handling aid Reagan and Mikhail S. Garba 
of the incident by the Immigration c hev, the Soviet leader. 


and Naturalization Service, which 
returned the sailor to tbevessd at 
one point over his protests. 

More than a dozen other mem- 


An aide to Senator Jesse Helms. 
3 Republican of North Carolina, 
who is a powerful figure in conser- 
vative aides, died such a possibdi- 


A woman In Louisiana prepares to drop a wreath with the words “Peace,” “Welcome” and 
“Freedom,” written in Russian, into the Mississippi near the Soviet ship Marshal Konev. 


bers of Congress have made similar ty in indi ca ting that the senator 
complaints.. might sign the letter soon. 

The letter asked th3t the sailor. “We’re deeply concerned abort 
Miroslav Medvid, 22. be irans- the lack of due process^ said the 
f erred to a “ne u t r al third nation aide. Dr. Clifford A. Kiracofe Jr. 
where be could recuperate, over- “It appeals that this is just another 


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JOHANNESBURG — Police 


as it comes under increasing pres- gratuiatoiy messages that ihe news- 
sure from racial unrest, mounting paper received after publishing the 
internal criticism ot both its left interview, which he conducieri him- 


SKnfice ® coW Wood to the Wacfc 
mass ot summitry'-’' - f 

The freighter. tire Marsha Ro-: 
nev, was reported at anchor Moo, 
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Thursday. 

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med Tuesday a 

an . American groups 10 temporal 

dy block the departure rf fe 
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interview (he saiJor agpo* The Xk 
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London, T«t 4933873, Tlx 265653 Times on Tuesday and warned him 

that he might be prosecuted for his 

defiant publication Monday of an 
ROM MILAN TO: ] interview with the president of the 
outlawed African National Con- 
gress. 

Readers, however, flooded the 
libera) Cape Town newspaper with 
congratulatory messages, the edi- 
tor, Anthony Heard, said. 

South African officials also 
called on the Reverend Allan Boe- 
sak, a mixed-race religious leader 
who is president of the World Alli- 
ance of Reformed Churches, to in- 
form him that the government had 
overruled a court decision return- 
ing his passport. 

Mr. Boesak, who was arrested 
Aug. 27 on subversion charges and 
released on bail, now will not be 
able to make a trip to the United 
States to collect a human rights 
award on Nov. 20. 


tional condemnation. 

The minister of law and order. 


don a few days ago. 


SSSttSmE 



Plaoie Contact 

MBon Tab 475065974223214 
The 321280/FEXPOR 

For other programs and detofcd 
BtfonrxAan, as it your 

TRAVEL AGENT 


Louis Le Grange, was quoted by had published an anide encourag- “tt .” 1 V? 

the semi-official ‘snmh Afriran in© msAm in mil th^ n«su»n« “r*™ -.8® Dac* EO UK 


the semi-official South African ing readers to call the newspaper 
broadcasting service Tuesday as with comments on topical issues, 
saying he had called for the prose- There were hundreds of calk Tues- 
cuiion of Mr. Heard for publishing day expressing appreciation ax be- 
a long interview with Oliver ing able to read Mr. T amh o’s views. 


Tam bo, president of the guerrilla 
organization. 

Mr. Heard said later in a tele- 
phone interview from Cape Town 
that a lieutenant of the security 
police had arrived at his office to 
warn him that an investigation into 


he said* and surprise at the appar- 
ent pragmatism they revealed. 


Union. He was then showed To 
rejoin the step. * 

Labor group s also have become 

of the Americ an Federation ot La^ 
bor and Coyness of In&istrttI Or- 


**I think what has happened is ^aa6ook,-mtt to Mr. R ta&a, 
that people have realized for the M Monday askmg thai US. offi- 
— j.... . dafea^Hrk&raewiheaaflorr • ' 


a possible contravention of the law laied.” headded. 


first tone j ust-how dqxi ved of first- 
hand information they are and how 
their attitudes have been manipu- 


HEAD OFFICE 

Paris: (For dasafied only): 
47-47-46-00. 

EUROPE 

Amsterdam: 26-36- 1 5. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01) 32 9440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

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London: (01) 8364802. 
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Sweden.- (08) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contao Frankfort. 

UNITED STATES 

New York: (212) 752-3890. 
West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Bryamston: 421599. 


LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires: 41 40 31 
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Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne: 690 8233. 
Sydney: 929 56 39. 957 43 20. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Paddington, Queensland: 
369 34 53. 


In a third development, seven 
pastors of the influential Dutch Re- 
formed Church were forced Tues- 
day to abandon plans to meet lead- 
ers of the African National 
Congress when Home Affaire Min- 
ister Stoffel Botha warned them 
they would not be allowed to leave 
ihe country. 

All three actions reflea a hard- 
ening of attitude by the govern- 
ment of President Pieter W. Botha 


was being launched. 

Under South Africa’s stringent 
security laws, it is a crime to quote 
any individual or organization de- 
clared banned by the government. 

The African National Congress. 
South Africa's main African na- 
tionalist movement, was banned 
nearly 25 years ago and no full 
statement by the organization or 
any of its leaders had appeared 
inside the country until Mr. Heard 
published his 3.600-word interview 
with Mr. Tam bo on Monday. 

If he is prosecuted and convict- 


■ Clergymen Assail Botha 

Michael Isikojf of The Washas- 
ton Post reported earner from Wash- 
ington: 

Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, ihe 
1984 Nobel Peace Prize winner, 
and CT. Beyers Naude. general 
secretary of the South African 


Of 22 Pefiae Officers ; 

■ JUuttn 

MINATITLAN. Mexico 
Three suspects hare been detribat 
in Mexico in the search for a drag 
gar® that ambushed and k3W 2? 
pohee offkersru tbe somheartenj 


Council of Churches, have eaBed stare of Vcracnt^lkfodcanofficafc 
on UiL and European banks to saidThesday. ' ' 


demand the resignation of Mr. 

Botha's government as a «*idrtinn 

for rescheduling South Africa's men who had escaped from the 
bank debt. - kfflers were bring riosriy quo?- 

Bishop Tutu, who is Made, and booed. They said the killing* gp- 1 
Mr. Nande, a while Afrikaner,, parestly began with a gun battle 
urged the replacement ot the gov- Thurstnry when .the policemen" 
erament by leaders ‘^responsive to moved in cm a scspected manjuana 


SoBrees at tbe federal general at* 
toroey’s office swd that two police^ 4 
men who imd escaped from the r 


ed, tbeeditor could besentenced to ^ ASton^ 

urged the replacaneai ot the gov- 
the option of a fine. miwni hv lenrtffR in 


Mr. Heard said he had been en- the needs of all South Africa's peo-. plantation m a renxHe mountain- 


coura^d by the “cascade’* of con- 


txisi^Ma 



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WHALE OF A TALE — A humpback whale that baffled marine expects by swimming 
up the Sacramento River on a 24-day, 66-mile (KKMdkmieter) excursion beaded out to 
sea Monday. As crowds cheered, the whale swam under San Francisco's Golden Gale 
Bridge, accompanied by a flotilla of small boats. More than 560,000 was spent in 
attempts to get the whale to turn back to die Pacific. The 40-ton creature finally seemed 
to respond to an electronic device that imitated underwater cries of humpbacks. 

Navy Says It Itaned 
Jet Prices Around _ 


John F. l i ftm an Jr., the secretary of the navy, 
says muuazy aircraft prices went np. for three 
decades by about 10 percent a year, oh. top of 
inflation, because of “goldplaimg” — the practice 
of adding unnecessary features — and of con trad- ■ 
ing with only one supplier. 

Mr. Lehman said that «»«■ he introduced com- 
petition and got * goldplating lust under control, 1 * 
navy aircraft prices dropped. He said the price of a 
Grumman F-14 Tomcat, the navy’s premier fight- 
er, dropped $3.9 million to 520 million, between 
1982 and this year. 


Short Takes 

Senator Robert J. Dole, an unann ounced candi- 
date for the 1988 Republican presidential nomina- 
tion. said he had a forthcoming speaking engage- 
ment in Vermont arid planned to “drop by and see 
my friends in New Hampshire,” ate of the coun- 
try's earliest presidential primary. “As I look back 
on 1980,*’ the Kansas senator added, “that 
shouldn't take long.” That year Ronald Reagan - 
won the primary _ with 33.000 votes. Mr. Dole 
fin i sh ed seventh with 597. Mr. Dole is undaun te d . 
He said that on a recent-visit to the Kansas State 
Fair, he saw one man wearing a “Dump Dole” haL 
“I pot him down as undecided,” the senator said. 

Almost as many Americans died in the Korean. 
War, 54,259, as in the Vietnam War, 58,022, but 
there is nd Korean War memorial in the Washing-' 
ton area, a lade that a veteran of that conflict. 
Senator John H. Glenn Jr., has decried. Mr. dean 
and two fellow fighter-pilot veterans of Korea — 
Ed McMahon, the entertainer, and Ted Williams, 
the baseball immortal — are promo ting a cam- 
paign to set tip such a- memorial legislation is 


under consideration in both the House and the 
Senate. 

-•-• John Baldwin, the New Jersey slate tax director, 
on hearing complaints (bat state income tax re- 
hands were slow, said he “told the employees to get 
hoi and get those refund checks out” The employ- 
ees moved so swiftly they neglected to check 
: whether refunds bad already been mailed to the 
people on a comput erize d list Duplicate checks 
totaling 5236,000 were mailed to nearly 1,000 state 
residents. Mr. Baldwin said the error was embar- 
rassing and “a lot my fault.” 

. Americans are saving a «nafor portion of their 
incomes than at any time since, the early 1950s. The 
annual savings rate sank to 2.9 percent of income 
during the summer, less than half the rate for most 
of the past decade. Economists are concerned, 
pointing out that savings are a primary economic 
resource. They ascribe the drop to readier credit, a 
federal tax system that subsidizes borrowing and 
the growth of health and retirement benefits. 

This winter the federal Energy Assistance Pro- 
gram win once again earmark op to $11 billicm to 
help poor people pay for home heating. In addi- 
tion, more and more public utilities are adding a 
box to their monthly WHs far customers to check if 
they wish to contributes] toward the same cause. 
The utilities then turn the money over charities to 
distribute. These “fuel funds” are expected to raise 
about $30 million this year. 

. Ltte fa a hmcheon appointment. Dale Reming- 
ton, a television producer, telephoned i he Four 
Seasons restaurant in mid-Manhattan and asked 
the person who answered to “go to the bar and 
inform Chota Chudasama that 111 be a bit late," 
The New York Times reported. Asked how to 
recognize Mr. Chudasama, Mr. Remington said, 
“He's an Indian.” There was a brief pause before 
the voice inquired, “Feather or dot?” 

— Compiled bv 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


1986MafniH 




31 Satuntoj 


1986 

■Jiaries 

el 

'J3& 


Congress Stunned by Defector 9 s Return 
To Soviet but Doubts U.S. Kidnapping 



New York Tima Service 

I WASHINGTON — A Soviet de- 
fector's announcement that, he 
Would return home has stunned 
feading members of the U.S. Con- 
ibi gross. But most defended the con- 

* duct of American intelligence in 
the case and dismissed his assertion 
that he had been kidnapped by the 
United States. 

- “He’s lying," the chairman of the 
Senate Select Committee on Intelli- 
gence, David F. Dureaberger, a Re- 
publican of Minnesota, said Mon-, 
day of Lhe defector, Vitaly 
Vurchenko. 

- Same lawmakers suggested that 
Mr. Yurchenko, a senior dEficer of 
the KGB, the Soviet secret police 
and intelligence agency, had never 
really defected at all, but was part 
of a ploy to embarrass the Umted 
States. 

\ Others said that U.S. intelligence 
had g ained inf onnatibp front him 
j, jutd could not have treated him as a 

* prisoner. But a few were critical of 
the Ccnunl lntelligcnoe Agency for 
Jetting him stop away. 

<* Mr. Dureaberger said be spoke 
Earlier on Monday with William J. 
Casey, the central intelligence di- 
rector, and was assured that . Mr. 
Yurchenko had not' been coerced 
into defecting to the United States. 

The senator said the information 
that Mr. Yurchenko had provided 



David F. Durenbecger 

to the Unhed States was useful. 
The stuff we have been able to 
check out,” Ke-said, “checked out" 
He said that “it bad value to have 
the No. 5 person hi the KGB" in 
the United States. 

But another member of the intel- 
ligence committee, 'Senator W3- 
Eam S. Cohen, a Republican of 
Maine, said ihat 'fane members 
bad expressed skepticism almost 
from the beginning about Mr. Yur- 
chenko's defection. 


Reagan Dismisses 11 of 21 Advisers 
To 'Streandine’ Intelligence Board 








New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has dismissed II of 
the 21 members of a commi ttee of 
outside advisors who help him de- 
velop his foreign intelligence poli- 
cies, according to White House of- 
ficials. 

•’ According to one of those dis- 
missed, Mr. Reagan said in a letter 
that the President’s Foreign InteQi- 
gmee Advisory Board needed to be 

streamlined. 

A senior administration official 
said of the board, ‘There were 


many people who normally dis- 
agreed so mndh it became useless.” 

The official said the membership 
would be reduced to 14. Among the 
remaining -members are Henry A. 
Kissinger, the Tamer secretary of 
state and William French Smith, 

the former attorney general. Four 
new members will be named. 

- Some of (hose removed said (hat 
members with ties to Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush now outnumber 
Supporters of Mr. Reagan. 


“It just seemed too convement," 
Mr. Cohen said. He said Mr. Yur- 
chenko had crossed over just when 
“the West was sufficiently embar- 
rassed about losing defectors to the 
East” 

Senator Lloyd Bentsen, a Demo- 
crat of Texas and also a member of 
the nudhgence committee, said 
that he had not been briefed but 
that he was less sympathetic than 
some of his colleagues to the CIA’s 
handling of the case. 

“The OLA damn well will have 
some explanation to give me to- 
morrow" the senator said. “It’s 
pretty incredible," he added, that 
Mr. Yurchenko was able to leave. 

Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han, a Democrat of New York and 
a former member of the intelli- 
gence committee, said he bad tele- 
phoned a CIA official to ask what 
he should say about the case. 

The senator said he had been 
told; “Tell them it’s a free country. 
He was free to come. He was free fo 
go" 

Mr. Moynihan was one of sever- 
al senators who mentioned what 
they called personal problems as 
being part of Mr. Yurchenko’s de- 
cision to return to Moscow ."He said 
he did not want to blame U.S. intel- 
ligence officials for losing Mr. Yur- 
chenko. 

A member of the House intelli- 
gence panel Representative Rob- 
ert W. Kastenmezec, a Democrat of 
Wisconsin, said he doubted Mr. 
Yurchenko's story of being 
drugged and kidnapped by Ameri- 
can officials, but that it should be 
investigated. 

The chairman of the House com- 
mittee, Lee H. Hamilton, a Demo- 
crat of Indiana, declined to discuss 
the case.- 

While Mr. D u re a ber g er and Mr. 
Moynihan said American rnlelli- 
gence officials could not have done 
any. more to hold on to Mr. Yur- 
chenko, Mr. Cohen disagreed. 

“Obviously if he is able to walk 
away on his own and show up at 
the Soviet Union's embassy," Mr. 
Cohen said, “security wasn't what 
it should be.” 


U.S. Charges Soviet Increases Arms 
To Managua, Shipped Through Cuba 


Ccapilrj H Our Sicff From thpouka 

WASHINGTON —Hie Reagan 
administration has accused the So- 
viet Union of significantly stepping 
np anns shipments to Nicaragua in 
recent weeks, transferring them 
through Cuba, after a yearlong 
slowdown is ddivenes. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speak es, said Monday that 
Soviet btok shipments to the Nica- 
raguan government had acceler- 
ated in recent weeks and represent 
a “serious increase” in weapons for 
use against anti-government guer- 
rillas. 

“It’s important to note that the 
renewed mDnaiy buildup coincides 
with the Sandinifa government's 
crackdown on civil liberties and a 
military offensive against the dem- 
ocratic resistance in Nicaragua." he 
said. 

Administration officials con- 
firmed earlier reports Monday that 
a U.S. SR-7] reconnaissance plane; 
attempting to measure the ship- 
ments in a mission over Cuba on 
Thursday, was targeted by a Cuban 
anti-aircraft missile site hut appar- 
ently did not draw fire. 

According to recent intelligence 
reports, Soviet ships have unloaded 
crates of military equipment at the 
Cuban port of MarieL 

The equipment, which appears 
to include trucks and T-54 tanks, 
was later boarded on small Nicara- 
guan cargo vessels and delivered to 
the port of El Bluff in Nicaragua, 
administration officials said. 

The Pentagon estimates the Nic- 
araguan Army now has at least 340 
tanks and armored vehides, includ- 
ing 1 10 T-54 and T-55 tanks, more 
than 70 long-range howitzers and 
rocket launchers, and 30 helicop- 
ters, including at least a half dozen 
of the fast attack helicopters, Mi-24 
HINDs. 

The Nicaraguan government has 
acknowledged receiving its first So- 
viet-buih tank* during the first half 


of 1981 and has put some of them 
oa display at various ceremonial 
occasions since then. 

The Cuban government, in a 
protest note to the US. Interests 
Section b Havana, accused the 
United States cn Monday of “vio- 
lating all conns of international 
law" by making two overflights the 
entire length of Cuba in a cme-bour 
period cn Thursday morning. The 
note said that this was the sixth 
time U.5. military planes had over- 
flown Cnba during die Reagan ad- 
ministration, 

A spokesman fc: the Cuban In- 
terests Section is Washington said 
his government had co response to 
the American assertion that the 
overflights provided proof that So- 
viet weapons were King reloaded 


for Nicaragua at the port in Pinar 
dd Rio province. 

An administration official told 
The Washington Post thai the So- 
viet shipments to Nicaragua 
through Cuba were the first of any 
significance since Soviet freighters 
■iilmrird military equipment at 
Nicaraguan pons last fa!L Despite 
L'-S. concerns that those shipments 
included Soviet MiG fighter 
planes, analysis later viewed the 
weapons as largely defensive. 

An official told The Post that a 
SR-7! Blackbird reconnaissance 
plane was flying over Cuba last 
Thursday when Cuban gunners tar- 
geted it with the fire-control radar 
from an SA-2 ami-aircraft missile 
site. Apparently no missil e was 

fired, the official fad. 

(WF, ATT; 



Guatemala Runoff Election Certain ; 
Runner-Up Refuses to Concede Defeat 


. Compiled bv Our Sis 7 From Dajuzcha 

GUATEMALA CITY — A 
moderate conservative politician 
who was runner-up in Guatemala's 
first eje ction for a cv Siaa president 
in 15 years has disntissed a call by 
the w inner to concede defeat, mak- 
ing a runoff ejection cerfan. 

Neariy complete election results 
gave six rightist parties a combined 
56 percent of the vote. This would 
give them power to block any legis- 
lation considered reformist, 'politi- 
cal analysts fa d. 

Jorge Carpio Vico Lie of die Na- 
tional Center Union, the runner- 
up, said: “It is our firm decision to 
go to the second round and to win 
iL" 

Earlier, the center-! eft Christian 
Democratic Party's candidate, 
Mario Vutido Cerezo, claimed vic- 
tory saying he would win 40 per- 
cent of the votes. He added a runoff 


with Mr. Carpio would be a mere 
formality and that the Christian 
Democrats would win. 

A second round was considered 
a certainly Tuesday by party politi- 
cians as none of the eight presiden- 
tial candidates was expected to 
gain the absolute majority needed 
to win the election outright. 

With vote counting nearly com- 
plete. Mr. Cerezo was ahead with 
about 40 percent, followed by Mr. 
Carpi o’s 2! percent. 

The elections Monday, designed 
to return Guatemala to civilian rule 
after three decades of almost un- 
broken military government, were 
for president, vice president, may- 
ors and 100 representatives to the 
National Congress. 

The eventual victor is scheduled 
to be sworn in Jan. 14 as Guatema- 
la's first elected civilian president 
after 15 years of direct or indirect 
military rule. (Remen, \VP) 


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•** 



U.S. Selects French-Designed System 


(Continued from Page 1} 
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U.S. Array experts, officials have 
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their findings after Mrs'. Thatcher 
made her request to Mr. Reagan on 
Aug. 30. RITA stands For Reseau 
Imesre des Transmissions Auto- 


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Communications Network. 

The British Ptannigan communi- 
cations system has been used by the 
First British .Army Division in 
West Germany since this spring. 

The contract to GTE-Thomson 
could set a precedent for more U.S. 
arms purchases abroad: for exam- 
ple. an already developed anti-air- 
craft system to replace the Divad, a 
U.S.-built weapon that was can- 
celed because of cost overruns. 


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European companies got the op- 
portunity to scD their systems only 
after American companies had 
failed despite research over 10 
years that cost more than S700 mil- 
lion to develop a successor to a 15- 
y ear-old system that relies on vul- 
nerable phone exchanges and 
cables. 

The sale also would provide 
Thomson-CSF with an opportuni- 
ty to broaden its markets for 
French arms, particularly in the 
Middle East, and would draw the 
French arms industry closer to its 
Western allies. (Reuters. UP1 ) 



n 


Excited by 
i’ Visit 


Royals' 


(Continued from Page 1) 


that they are touching base, ^seeing 
where we come from,” re-establish- 


ing the connection with Europe. 

In a curious way, Americans feel 
closest to the country they rebelled 
againsL and the hubbub over the 
royal visit is one sign of that 
The final and crucial element in 
persuading ordinarily sensible peo- 
ple to pay so much attention to 
royal visitors is the passion for ce- 
lebrity. which is one of the notable 
features of the times. In other eras, 
it was war heroes and great politi- 
cal leaders who were celebrated. 

Now Americans are fascinated, 
more than most peoples, by people 
with more ephemeral claims to 
fame, with fewer real achievements. 
The prince and princess are benefi- 
ciaries of this, as are football stars 
and television commentators. 

But they offer much more to the 
celebrity-watcher. The actress's se- 
crets may be pried out. but not the 



London, Bonn to Contribute to Eureka 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

HANNOVER. West Germany 
— Britain and West Germany, in 
cautious statements, said Tuesday 
that they would provide govern- 
ment funds to support research 
projects being established under 
Eureka, the French initiative to 
stimulate West European coopera- 
tion in high technology. 

Britain, in what officials here 


18 participating governments as a 
significant new commitment, even 
though the West German leader 
declined to specify bow much Bonn 
would contribute. 

“It was an encouraging step." 
said Roland Dumas, the French 

minister for external relations. 

Mr. Kohl told the delegates, who 


which we never 


ruled 


funding. 

OUL” 

Mr. Kohl’s statemenl was his 
firmest expression to date of sup- 
port for Eureka, although several of 
his ministers had said that Bonn 
would contribute up to 1 billion 

Deutsche marks. {S382 miilionl. 
The contribution was denied later. 


IVU. twm Wtu U1V "WW . , 1|- ■ 

will be examining about 300 pro- however, by the Finance Ministry, 
jects submitted by 11 countries. Emphasizing that private cony 


.that his government was willing to 


saw as a slight shift from its previ- provide financial support for selec- 
ous policy of emphasizing private- live Eureka projects from the feder- 
sector financing, said that it would &1 budget. 


Helmut Kohl 


contribute government funds to 
Eureka. 

According to Sir Geoffrey Howe; 
the British foreign secretary, the 
British contribution would be 
made from an existing £250-miliion 
(S358-mihkra) fund for industrial 
investment. Britain stopped short 
of any pledge of funds in 1985 
beyond the unspecified expendi- 
ture from the investment fund. 

Last month. Britain had said that 
the major responsibility for financ- 
ing Eureka projects rested with in- 
dustry and other private sources. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s an- 
nouncement at the opening of a 
two-day conference on Eureka was 
viewed by many delegates from the 


Officials at the conference said 
that without government financing 
from West Germany. Eureka prob- 
ably would have no chance of win- 
ning further support from West 
German industry. 

Sir Geoffrey said Tuesday that 
be believed that as Eureka projects 
advanced, those in which British 
companies were participating 
would qualify for an increasing 
share of the industrial investment 
fund. 

“Different governments have 
different ways of making funds 
available," he added. 

Geoffrey Pat tie, Britain's indus- 
try minister, said, “We have accept- 
ed the idea that some projects may 
require an element of government 


panics should largely finance their 
own projects and that Western Eu- 
rope should continue cooperating 
economically with the United 
States and -Japan. Mr. Kohl said 
that Europe could meet worldwide 
competition only “if we also take 
into consideration the possibilities 
of selective government assistance 
and financial support.’* 

Mr. Kohl p»ri that government 
finan cing was necessary to give Eu- 
ropean companies a fair chantY in 
competition with their foreign 
counterparts and that West Ger- 
many's objective was to provide 
funds only to “meaningfully sup- 
plement and support the resources 
made available by the private sec- 
tor, especially by industry and 
banks." 

So far only France has commit- 
ted a specific sum, 1 billion francs 
(SI 25 million), announced by Pres- 


ident Fianqcis Mitterrand at the 
first Eureka conference in Paris on 

July H. j 

The British and West German 
statements came amid conflicts J 
and differing, approaches among 
euvemment ministers and officials 
over how Eureka should be orga- 
nized and should function in the 
months ahead. 

On Tuesday evening, it appeared 
as if the conference would post- 
pone the formal establishment of a 
p e r ma nent secretariat that would 
an as a clearinghouse for Eureka 
projects. Italy, the Netherlands and 
Belgium had sought a strong orga- 
nization to protect their interests 
against wfaax an Italian source de- 
scribed as a “rich, big-nation dub" 
dominated by West Germany, - 
France and Britain. r 

Foreign g od research ministers 
were preparing a statement to be 
issued on Wednesday that dele- 
gates said would commit govern- 
ments to Eureka and would call on 
companies and research institutes 
to establish new Eureka projects. 

French, West German and Brit- 
ish officials said that only about six 
projects would be adopted formally 
on Wednesday, probably in the 
fields of environment, computers 
and robotics. 




Marcos Seems to Backtrack on Poll 


princess's: as much as her sense of 


tin may seem to have “modern- 
ized" the monarchy, it really has 
□ot changed things at alL As Wal- 
ter Bagehot observed in the last 
century, the monarchy's “mystery 
is its life." Only the pope spends so 
much time in public yet keeps so 
much clothed in secrecy. 

Thus, even when the prince gives 
an interview, which is not often, he 
leaves doubt about his political 
views, and he seldom says anything 
pointed on any subjecL 

It may well be, as a recent Wash- 
ington Post-ABC News poll sug- 
gested, that most Americans have 
no clearly established opinion of 
the prince or the princess. But one 
need have no dearly established 
opinion of symbols to* react strong- 
ly to them: they are by their nature 
not well defined, and yet they can 
be very potent indeed.’ 


(Continued from Page l) 

statement issued from the presi- 
dential palace Tuesday said: “It is 
now apparent that the complexion 
has changed from Marcos to that of 
his entire administration and his 
entire program of govemmenL" 

Mr. Marcos, 68, did not say who 
his running male would be. 

The opposition also has accused 
Mr. Marcos of bending the rules to 
stay in office during the 60-day 
election campaign. Under the Phil- 
ippine Constitution, a special presi- 
dential election can be held only If 
the office becomes vacant. 

“If there is no vacancy in the 
presidency, we cannot have an elec- 
tion.” said Arturo Tolentino, a for- 
mer foreign minister. “If Marcos 
- loses and the opposition wins, its 
constitutionality will be ques- 

i* 


Filipinos outside peaceful political nouncement on U.S. televirion in- 
processes. stead of info rming the Philippine 

Mr. Marcos ruled by martial law P»pfc has Jed many people to 
for nearly nine of his years in pow- Ibat he was trying to win some 
er. First elected in 1965, be has P 0 ™* in Washington, 
been shaken lately by a growing The New Society Movement is 
Communist insurgency, charges of scheduled to meet Sunday to dis- 
corruption and a deteriorating cuss the election. The legislature 


economy. 

Many observers say that Mr. 
Marcos called the election under 
pressure from the United States, 
which maintains two strategic 
bases in the Philippines and has 
sent a procession of officials to Ma- 
nila to urge reforms. 

It has been suggested that Mr. 
Marcos is baiting the opposition 
with a constitutional obstacle so 
that he may not be able to call an 
election after alL The fact that Mr. 
Marcos made the election in- 


conceivably could take up the issue 
on Monday. 

If an election is held, Mr. Mar- 
cos’s opponents appear likely to be 
Salvador P. Laurel a former sena- 
tor who leads the opposition coali- 
tion, and Corazon Aquino, widow 
of Beuigno S. Aquino Jr., the popu- 
lar opposition leader who was as- 
sassinated in August 1983. 

Mis. Aquino is an emotional fa- 


vorite, but a political novice. 
sCwhoi 



For Reagan , 
AnEffortto 
SeUa Vision 


tioned.'' 


The United Nationalist Demo- 
cratic Organization — 3 coalition 
of 12 opposition groups — said in a 


Mr. Laurel, who is currently on a 
lecture tour in the United States, 
said Tuesday in Washington that 
any presidential election in die 
Philippines should be delayed until 


Ferdinand E. Marcos 


statement that it welcomes an elec- EdffS HI 223 , GdHIS 
tion but “condemns the Marcos- 


jnr j tj j j, rnuippuaes sooura oe aeiaycd untu 

Jiarpov IS nolamg March to give the opposition time 

x ° to prepare. 

“We must have a campaign peri- 
od of at least 90 days," be said. 


style election as a rank violation of 
the constitution and a manifest 
scheme to manipulate the dectoral 
process to perpetuate himself in 
power.” 


Any further violation of the con- 
stitution, it said, would drive more 


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I h!)mE^ QN - E —.OFFICE: - . HTOfiJ 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — The world chess 
champion, Anatoli Karpov, ad- 
journed the 22d game of his cham- 
pionship match with Gary Ka- 
sparov on Tuesday, and experts 
said Mr. Karpov bad good chances 
of winning the game. 

Mr. Karpov, playing white, used 
a Queen’s Gambit opening. He was 
one pawn op when he sealed his 
42d move. 

Mr. Kasparov leads the match 
by 11.5 points to Mr. Karpov’s 95 
points, and needs only one more 
{joint to win the match, which is 
limited to 24 games. A victory is 
worth one point and a draw gives 
each player a half point 


The election should take place on 
March 17. 1986, not Jan. 17 as 
Marcos proposes.” 

Mx. Laurel said he was sore that 
the deeply divided democratic op- 
position would come up with a sin- 
gle candidate. He said he was cat- 
ting short bis U.S. tour and 
returning to the Philippines to in- 
volve himself in the campaign. 

If the fragmented opposition 
overcomes its divisions and agrees 
on a common ticket, it must then 
find resources to battle Mr. Mar- 
cos's well-heeled political machin e 

One opposition member of the 
legislature commented: “To win an 
election in the Philippines you have 
to have guns, goons and gold We 


have the goons but we are low cm 
ammunition and money.” 

■ US. Reacts Cautiously 

A U.S. State Department 
spokesman, Chaxks E Redman, 
said that the chief concern of the 
United States was not when the 
Philippine election would be held, 
but whether it would be credible. 
The New York Times reported 
from Washington. 

“Whenever elections are held, 
our concern is that they be fine and 
fair,” Mr. Redman said Mrmday. 
Tf elections are to re-establish 
competence; as President Marcos 
has stated, then it is essential that 
they be credible to the. Philippine 
people, including satisfactory an* 
swets toconsdtutional questions.” 

Although the Reagan adminis- 
tration greeted Mr. Marcos’s an- 
nouncement with caution, officials 
said it was imporumt that the elec- 
tion have credibility to prevent any 
widening of internal strife 


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(CoBfimied from Page I) 
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that Mr. Reagan's rhetorical build- 
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have attempted to stop at the re- 
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a negotiating tactic for later bar- 
gaining. 

Such negotiating does not ap- 
pear to be tikdy at the Geneva 
summit with die Soviet leader, 
MDchail S. Gorbachev. Mr. Reagan 
told the British Broadcasting Corp. 
last week that the only bargaining 
he envisioned at Geneva would be 
toward an agreement to share the 
strategic defense technology once n 
is developed. 

The BBC interview also illus- 
trates the escalation of Mr. Rea- 
gan's rhetoric. He said that he 
would want to see “reductions of 
offensive weapons" as part of any 
sharing of the technology. But two 
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Mr. Reagan told the Soviet jour- 
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down with the rater nations of the 
wodd, and (hose that have nuclear 
arsenals, and see if we cannot come 
loan agreement oa winch there will 
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The White House spokesman, 
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clarify it using the more cautious 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


New Leader 
fa Tanzania 




Malaysia Begins Prosecution of Journalists Under Secrecy Act 


Takes Over 
From Nyerere 


'.u*rar+',. 

-os- 


\vfc£. 


Reuiers 

DAR ES SALAAM. ■ Tanzania 
■ — All Hassan Mwinyi was sworn 
in Tuesday as Tanzania's second 
‘president, succeeding Julius K. 
Nyerere. who had ruled since inde- 
pendence from Britain in 1961. 

Mr. Mwinyi. 60. was the sole 
candidate for the office. In elec- 
tions held Ocl 27. 92J, percent of 
"the voters cast “yes'’ votes for him. 

Mr. Nyerere handed over to Mr. 
Mwinyi the country's 1984 consti- 
tution and the election manifesto 
of the r uling party. Mr. Mwinyi 
also was presented' with a shield, 
spear and kigodo, or traditional 
seat 

The new president named the 
former justice minister. Joseph 
Warioba. 45, as prime minister and 
' first vice president, replacing S alim 
Ahmed Salim, who stepped down 
as required under the constitution. 

Idns Abdul WakiL 59. succeeded 
Mr. Mwinyi as president of the 
island of Zanzibar and second rice 
president of Tanzania. 

Mr. Mwinyi is expected to ap- 
point his cabinet on Wednesday. 

Although Mr. Nyerere. 63. has 
stepped down as president, he is 
expected to continue to wield con- 
siderable power as chairman of the 
ruling Chama Cha Mapinduzi Par- 
ty. He has announced that he plans 
to retain that post until 19S7. 




By Barbara Crossccte 

Vfif York Times Service 

SINGAPORE — Malaysia, citing the Official Se- 
crets Act. has begun to prosecute journalists who gain 
access to unpublished govemmem reports. 

On Friday the Malaysian police arrested a 27-year- 
old reporter for the country’s leading English-lan- 
guage daily. The New Straits Times. He had written in 
January about government plans to acquire Airborne 
Warning and Control System planes from the United 
States. 

The arrest follows the conviction last month of 
Janies Clad, a foreign correspondent in Malaysia for 
the Far Eastern Economic Review. Until this year only 
three other people had been convicted under the act. 
all of them opposition politicians. 

The journalist arrested this week, Sabry Sharif, was 
charged on two counts: obtaining an internal defense 
report and using the information to write an article. 


Mr. Sabiy pleaded not guilty Saturday to the 
charges. His trial is likely to take place in February, 
according to an official Malaysian television news 
report 

In October Mr. Clad was fined S4.150 for reporting 
in July on a cabinet document "A Managed and 
Controlled Relationship With the People's Republic 
of China." 

Links with China are a sensitive issue in Malaysia, 
which has a large ethnic Chinese minority and which 
was tormented by on armed campaign by ethnic Chi- 
nese Communists from 1948 lo 1960. Prime Minister 
Mahathir bin Mohamad is due to make his first 
official trip to China this month. 

At his trial. Mr. Clad. 38. pleaded guilty on the 
advice of his lawyers and of Derek Davies, editor of 
the magazine. In an interview, Mr. Clad said this was 
done to avoid further criminal charges against him 
and to reduce the possibility that officials suspected oF 


having given him the information also would be The New Straits Times. ~ , v -f 
arrested. journalist could » r "■ 

Mr. Gad was the First journalist arrested under the asking for information * 
act. which was introduced by the British in 1950 and government. s ^ ^ 

rewritten by an independent Malaysian government in in an article published in Ocli'oer ^ 

J 972. Last year the act was further strengthened by the t hat a Malaysian legal expert, w-- 11 . 

government of Mr. Mahathir. example, told her. “Strictly r 

Malavsian news organizations, and foreign publica- q-^uHc even hv asking- J gOViSUne"* 
lions distributed in the country 1 , are supervised closely lhe nau election?" “ 


bv the government. Broadcasting arid the national in or.c > v ' 

pfess agency. Bamuna, are government cffliuoItaL politioans^conv-h-ted ur.de: the sc: 

Local reporters say ibev can come under considerable n „Soi4ic.it*iec arJ : 


Local reporters say mey can come unaer consacraoie ----- r-™- yiJT rmaiiol | nhotocopiec - 1 

pressure not to write about sensitive subjects. J^t ^^uem pru *, : -,c . 

FnrvHon m av pniw Malaysia Freclv. ^ mail anon p - . _ _ . . 


Foreign correspondents may enter Malaysia freely, 
but there have been cases recently in which the govern- 
ment has held up the distribution of foreign publica- 
tions because of dissatisfaction with their coverage of 
the country. 

According to a study of the implications of the 
Official Secrets Act made recently by Paulynn Chin of 




mailed to him unsolicited. The 
no difference and dismissed the aprwa- 


Ali Hassan Mwinyi 


Soviet Agrees to Allow Interview of KGB Defector 


Always the superb choice 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Mr. Nyerere has been a powerful 
voice in calling for international 
action against white-minority rule 
in South Africa and for a new 
world economic order. 

Mr. Mwinyi is a devout Moslem 
and, like Mr. Nyerere, a committed 
socialist. He has inherited severe 
economic problems, including sag- 
ging agricultural output 
He has a reputation for honesty 
and flexibility. As president of 
Zanzibar, he liberalized trade and 
allowed businessmen to open for- 
eign exchange accounts. 

Mr. Mwinyi. who studied educa- 
tion in England, has bdd the posts 
of ambassador to Egypt and home 
affairs minister on the mainlan d 


would make him ’a millionaire. He 
said he refused lo sign it 

“According to their contract*' he 
said, **I was supposed to do noth- 
ing. The only thing I was supposed 
to do was to live and keep silent in 
the United States. And 1 would be 
one of the consultants." 

U.S. officials had been exultant 
about obtaining Mr. Yurchenko. 
On Oct 1 1. the State Department 
formally confirmed h is presence in 
the United States and described 
turn as the deputy chief of foreign 
intelligence for the RGB with per- 
sonal responsibility for directing all 


KGB operations in Canada and the 
United States. 

U.S. sources have said be identi- 
fied two former U.S. intelligence 
officers as Soviet agents. One. Ed- 
ward L. Howard. 34, escaped tris 
home in New Mexico after being 
interviewed by FBI agents in late 
September. He was last reported in 
Helsinki. The other is still under 
surveillance. 

Mr. Yurchenko’s connection to 
other developments, including sev- 
eral defections by West German 
intelligence officials, remains only 
speculative. 

A former counterintelligence of- 
ficial who spoke on the condition 


he not be named, told The Associ- 
ated Press on Monday nigbt that 
Mr. Yurchenko “turned over what 
we call chicken feed.” 

“He certainly would have known 
a lot more than has come out," the 
former official said. 


Soviet viewers saw the musta- 
chioed returnee — identified only 
as a Soviet diplomat, with no men- 
tion of the KGB — reading out bis 
statement claiming that he had 
been kidnapped by American 
agents. 



(AP. UPI, WP) 
■ A Moscow News Event 
Serge Schmenumn of The Nesr 
York Times reported from Moscow: 

Although Mr. Yurchenko and 
his defection had never been men- 
tioned in the Soviet press, his re- 
turn to the Soviet fold was a major 
event on evening television news 
here. 


The news conference seemed to 
reflect, above all, Moscow's satis- 
faction at recouping on the hurruli- 
au'ng publicity in the West given 
Mr. Yurchenko's defection, and 
before that the flight of the KGB 
chief in Britain. Oleg A. Gor- 
diyevsky. aod the ensuing expul- 
sions by London and Moscow of 31 
of each other’s diplomats. 


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U.S. Arms Makers Visit 


Chinese Military Plants 


By Daniel Sourherland 

Washington Post Service 

BELTING — A group erf U.S. 
arms industry executives has com- 
pleted an unpublicized weeklong 
visit to Beijing as part of an “ex- 
ploratory mission" to learn more 
about China's military industry 
and its needs. 

The group, which is to travel out- 
side Beijing for another week, left 
the Chinese capital Monday for 
Xian, a center for aircraft produc- 
tion. 

The visit, a first for C hina, ap- 
peared to point toward further mil- 
itary cooperation between the 
United Slates and China. It fol- 
lowed a recent derision in Wash- 
ington to make the first govern- 
ment- to-goverament offer of a 


Chinese Abort 33% 


Of All Pregnancies 


Return 

BEIJING — China released 
Tuesday figures showing that 
about a third of all pregnancies in 
the country last year were aborted. 

Health Ministry officials said 
there were about 18 million births 
in China in 1984 and 8.89 million 
abortions. The officials denied that 
the authorities had forced the abor- 
tions as part of efforts to restrict 
population growth. 

In August, the US. Congress 
blocked funds intended for a Unit- 
ed Nations population program as 
a result of reports of forced abor- 
tions in China. Only 5.3 percent of 
married women in the childbearing 
age group use contraceptive pills. 


military sale to China. The sale 
would' include technology and 
equipment to modernize the Chi- 
nese production of artillery ammu- 
nition. 

Roger W. Sullivan, the delega- 
tion leader and executive vice presi- 
dent of the National Counol for 
IL&.-Cbina Trade, said the execu- 
tives were not here on a selling 
mission. Rather, he said, they were 
part of a process of discussion and 
familiarization that probably 
would lead to sales and some forms 
of cooperative U.S.-Chinese ven- 
tures in military industry. 

Mr. Sullivan said the group of 18 
executives from major U.S. compa- 
nies — including Boring. Ford, 
Honeywell, Hughes Aircraft, Lock- 
heed. Martin Marietta and Rock- 
well International — were well re- 
ceived by the Chinese and were 
given considerable access to the 
military industry. 

Group members have visited 
electronics factories and an ar- 
mored-vehicle plant, and were to 
see aircraft and shipbuilding facili- 
ties in the course of their stay. 

Although the business executives 
were described as derision makers 
in their Grids, their visit has gone 
unreported by the Chinese press so 
far. 

Military sales are a sensitive is- 
sue for China. Both the Chinese 
and the Americans have been pro- 
ceeding at a slow, deliberate pace in 
the area. 

Asked about the purpose of the 
group’s visit, Mr. Sullivan said that 
“it’s long been an assumption of 
U.S. policy" that “a normalization 
of military relations was an integral 
part of the whole process of nor- 
malization.” 



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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


lieral&SfeSribUM 'Summit Syndrome’: 




Publfcbrd Vhli Hr .New York Time> and Tbe VasfaioglPi PW 


Stopping the Trade Battle 


Seeking, in 1940. IP dissuade Britain's 
ponderous labor unions from demanding 
higher wages for their war effort. John May- 
nard Keynes became frustrated with what he 
called a process of “slow talk." Current 
attempts to free up world trade are equally 
frustrating. It may be a full year before real 
negotiations begin. 

In the 1950s and 1960s. the world pros- 
pered as successive rounds of multilateral 
bargaining under the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade, or GATT, helped to low- 
er international trade barriers. Increasingly, 
the industrialized countries accepted the 
principle of free competition. This raised 
industrial efficiency, boosted employment 
and helped keep inflation down. Tbe last 
decade, unhappily, has seen this process 
reversed. Not only have both Europe and 
.America been re-erecting the barriers to im- 
ports. they also have been dumping their 
products, particularly farm goods, abroad at 
subsidized prices. This delays the conquest 
of inflation, depresses business, aggravates 
Third World indebtedness and almost cer- 
tainly. on balance, leads to a loss of jobs. 

The importance of getting on with a new 
round of trade negotiations lies in the proba- 
bility that if things do not get better they will 
get worse. But the new talks will not begin 
until it is clearer exactly what is to be negoti- 
ated. Traditionally, bargaining within 
GATT has concentrated on liberalizing 
trade in industrial goods. This time, howev- 
er, there is strong pressure to include farm 
goods, and that places the European Com- 
munity. with its extravagant agricultural po- 
licy. on the defensive. .And the United States 
is putting many Third World countries on 
the defensive by demanding that trade in 
services — banking, insurance, communica- 
tions. computer software and other sectors 
— should be on the bargaining table as well. 

More flexibility is needed if the real busi- 
ness of trade liberalization is to begin again. 


Tbe world can hardly prosper if Europe — 
and America — stay locked into improvi- 
dent policies to featherbed their farmers, 
both rich and poor. And it is doubtful 
whether this is the right moment to include 
services in the trade bargaining process. The 
poorer countries' fear of being invaded by 
the service sectors of the rich probably is 
exaggerated. But il is more important, im- 
mediately. to reverse the move toward pro- 
tection in industry and agriculture than to 
bring services into the procedure. 

A new round of GATT talks will be no 
panacea for the world's economic ills. It will 
be slow. .And it will not correct the major 
imbalances of today — Lhe Third World 
debt problem. .America's huge trade deficit 
and Japan's awe-inspiring surplus. The 
whole point of such bargaining is to try to 
match each country’s gains and concessions. 
This cannot substitute for the macroeco- 
nomic adjustments — the changes in fiscal 
and monetary policies, exchange rates and 
policies to control inflation — that are need- 
ed to produce a better pattern of interna- 
tional payments. 

But the promise offered by a new round of 
GATT negotiations is. in the long run, im- 
mense. Lower trade barriers, as Secretary of 
State Cordell Hull insisted while World War 
II was still raging- can put the world back on 
the path to higher living standards, greater 
efficiency and Tower international strife. The 
alternative — expressed dearly last week by 
Clayton K. Vernier, the U.S. trade represen- 
tative — is bleak. If there is no GATT 
round, .America will make bilateral trade 
pacts, effectively negating the postwar sys- 
tem of nondiscrimination between individ- 
ual countries. This can be the route down 
which Hjalmar SchachL Hitler's economics 
minister, led Nazi Germany — economic 
autarky such as is practiced today by 
the Communist world. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Marcos’s Election Gamble 


President Ferdinand Marcos, whose misrule 
is crushing the Philippines, has finally done 
something encouraging. By calling a presiden- 
tial election for Jan. 17. he has acknowledged 
the contention of hi* many critics, domestic 
and foreign, that the mandate he now enjoys is 
inadequate and that the situation in the Philip- 
pines requires action. His offer opens up a 
vista that did not exist as long as he insisted he 
would serve until his term expired in 19S7. 

Most informed observers concluded some 
time ago thai it was foolish to expect real 
reform from the authoritarian Mr. .Marcos', an 


expert in manipulating the political same to 
his end*, and those of his corrupt cronies. The 


his end*, and those of his corrupt cronies. The 
question, which had not been answered satis- 
factorily. was whether the United States might 
.-omehovv undo Mr. Marcos's effort to board 
himself in behind his country's democratic 
form* and its usefulness to U.S. strategic inter- 
ests. With Mr. Marcos now committed to risk- 
ing his power in an early election, a new set of 
calculations enters in. 

Mr. Marcos well knows, or he should, how- 
suspect are elections in which, as former For- 
eign Minister Raul Manglapus has warned, 
“die dictator himself is to be a candidate, 
{retaining} all his absolute power and his con- 


trol of the army, the Commission on Elections, 
the secret police, ail national media, and all 
significant public and private funds." 

So Mr. Marcos, to ensure that his offer of 
elections serves his nation's interest, must out- 
line promptly the procedure for fairness he has 
in mind. The traditional way for dictators to 
lei go — even those who. like Mr. Marcos, 
exploit the forms of democracy — is simply to 
step down and yield the field to national 
forces, including the military and the political 
parties. How eLse does Mr. Marcos expect to 
gain respect for the new elections? 

Cynics suggest that Mr. Marcos called the 
early elections merely to embarrass his politi- 
cal opposition, which he has done his best to 
keep weak and divided, and to quiet what he 
calls “childish claims" — many from the best 
.American sources — that he "has lost touch 
with the people. If that is true, then the United 
States has its job cut out for it: to persuade Mr. 
Marcos to follow through on his promise of 
elections, a promise he already appears to be 
hedging. President Reagan is increasingly be- 
ing drawn into the effort to save the Philip- 
pines from Ferdinand Marcos. He can expect 
no better opportunity for a long time. 

— THE W ASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


U.S. Power in the Philippines 

• Are we condemned to watch the lone bas- 
tion of American military power in Southeast 
Asia fall? What are the threats to the U.S. 
bases — and to the Philippines as an ally? 

The expansion of the New People's Army is 
the first threat. Manila estimates this force's 
strength at 9,000 men. The Pentagon puts the 
figure at 16.500. Intelligence sources say the 
Communist insurgency is growing daily. 

' A second threat is the clamor by opposition 
politicians and some members of Lhe Marcos 
government for a U.S. withdrawal [from Subic 
Bay Naval Base and Clark Air Base]. An 
American retirement to Guam and Tinian Is- 
land would cost upward of $8 billion. Defense 
Department sources say, and would mean a 
serious loss of the U.S. strategic advantage 
in Southeast Asia. 

One answer to tbe military threat is strong 
American support for the efforts of General 
Fidel Ramos, the acting chief of staff, to re- 


form and re-equip the Philippine Army. Amer- 
ican sources report that soldiers often lack 
shoes and ammunition, that rifles and machine 
guns are sold to the insurgents and that capa- 
ble young officers are sidetracked in favor of 
friends of Mr. Marcos and his cabaL 

General Ramos has made a good start. The 
United States intends to increase the number 
of training teams that instruct the Philippine 
Army in maintenance, logistics and adminis- 
tration. There is no question now, however, of 
employing American soldiers as advisers in 
field operations against the insurgents. 

Should tbe insurgents close on the U.S. 
bases, then the United Stales might be forced 
to use military means to defend them. That, 
would lead to cries of “another Vie tnam. ” 
which, although persuasive to many, would be 
tripe. What the United States would be de- 
fending from the bases is the power balance in 
an explosive comer of the world. 

— Syndiccaed columnist Drew Middleton. 


FROM OUR NOV. 6 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Greece's 'Crisis of Rebirth 1 
PARIS — Greece is passing through a crisis of 
rebirth. The vital need is not merely a revision 
of the Constitution, bnt a revision of almost 
everything. Greece is not a poor country. Thes- 
saly alone could support the whole country 
with its wheat. But it does not. Why? The 
answer is that Greece's finances are not based 
on scientific principle: that taxes are not all 
paid; that the Customs system is antiquated; 
that justice is slow; and that economic devel- 
opment is backward. Even men educated for 
Lhe work of reform are wanting. It is the dearth 
of such men that presents perhaps the greatest 
difficulty to M. Eleulherios Venizelos, the new 
Prime Minister. The revolution that con- 
demned the old chiefs has laid a greater bur- 
den on the new leader. Greece, awakening, 
demands more than mere political ability. 


1935: New Hope for Lower Tariffs 
PRAGUE — Proof of hope among the world's 
governments for downward revision of tariff 
rates through international agreements was 
supplied by J. Butler Wright, American Minis- 
ter to Czechoslovakia. He quoted Secretary of 
State Cordell HulL who recently told the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce: "Our program envis- 
ages that the important nations of the world 
mil proceed gradually ... to readjust to a more 
reasonable level the existing excessive tariffs." 
The speaker added that a League of Nations 
committee has adopted a resolution stating 
that the removal of arbitrary trade restrictions 
was indispensable to economic recovery. Mr. 
Wright also quoted Sir Samuel Hoare, Secre- 
tary of State for Foreign Affairs of Great 
Britain: “The lowering of trade barriers is one 
of the fundamental tasks of lhe present time." 


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Reagan Must Beware 


By Daniel Schorr 


W ASHINGTON — A scries of 
intensive briefings. called 


VY intensive briefings, called 

“fine-tuning." are giving President 
Reagan a firm grasp of administra- 
tion positions for his meetings Nov. 
19 and 20 with Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
in Geneva. What the briefings cannot 
do is immunize him against Summit 
Syndrome — a tendency toward im- 
peiuousness on the lonely peaks of 
statesmanship, marked by unpre- 
meditated remarks and sometimes 
producing unexpected outcomes. 

Those of us familiar with 30 years 
of superpower summitry can recall 
some of the consequences of im- 
promptu wp-leve! diplomacy. 

Perhaps the most successful East- 
West summit meeting since the war. 
from the .American viewpoint, was 


Impromptu top-level 
diplomacy can have 
dangerous — and 
unforeseen — results. 


the first. In Geneva, in 1955. Nikita 
S. Khrushchev failed to lure Presi- 
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower into a 
one-on-one conversation with him- 
self or with Marshal Georgj K. Zhu- 
kov, Mr. Eisenhower's wartime com- 
rade-in-arms. who had been brought 
along for that specific purpose. Mr. 
Khrushchev complained in his mem- 
oirs thai Mr. Eisenhower had been 
“much too dependent on his advis- 
ers," acting like “a dutiful school- 
boy” to his secretary of stale, John 
Foster Dulles. 

What Mr. Khrushchev did not 
know was that, in deciding to go to 
Geneva, Mr. Eisenhower had over- 
ridden Secretary Dulles and tbe Re- 
publican old guard, who feared he 
might “give away the store,*’ as they 
believed President Roosevelt had 
done at Yalta and Potsdam. 

The surprise proposal for “open 
skies" arms-control inspection, 
which turned out to be a public-rela- 
tions triumph, hod been developed 
secretly for the president by a non- 
governmental task force headed by 
Nelson A. Rockefeller, unknown to 
the State and Defense departments. 

It was perhaps overconfidence, 
nurtured by success at the Geneva, 
that led President Esenhower into a 
grave misunderstanding when he 
next met Mr. Khrushchev, at Camp 


David, Maryland, in the fall of 1959. 

As told to me by the late Llewellyn 
K~ Thompson, a two-time ambassa- 
dor to Moscow, the president at one 
point invited Mr. Khrushchev for a 
walk to see a new bowling alley and 
went off with hrm J accompanied only 
by a Soviet interpreter. When they 
returned, three-quarters of an hour 
later, Mr, Eisenhower said they had 
not discussed anything substantive 
enough to warrant dictating a memo- 
randum of conversation. 

It later developed that during their 
stroll the president had agreed inno- 
cently with Mr. Khrushchev that the 
situation in Berlin, a four-power is- 
land inside East Germany, was “ab- 
normal" and that some new arrange- 
ment could be discussed. 

Mr. Khrushchev left Camp David 
convinced that the United States was 
ready to make concessions on tbe 
status of the divided city — an idea of 
which he quickly was disabused in a 
State Department statement, which 
provoked a furious speech in which 
Mr. Khrushchev charged a double- 
cross. It was undoubtedly this, as 
much as the incident over the shoot- 
ing down of the U-2 spy plane, that 
led Mr. Khrushchev to storm out of 
the 1960 meeting in Paris. 

The subject of Berlin came up 
again when President John F. Kenne- 
dy met with Mr. Khrushchev in Vien- 
na in June 1961, again with serious 
consequences. Mr. Khrushchev took 
offense at the president's warning 
about “miscalculation,” which the 
Soviet leader termed patronizing and 
threatening. A blustering Mr. Khru- 
shchev announced that he would sign 
a separate peace treaty with East 
Germany and convert Berlin into a 
“free city.” A conciliatory sounding 
Mr. Kennedy, while asserting U.S. 
rights, said that no doubt the situa- 
tion in Berlin was unsatisfactory but 
that this should not upset the b alanc e 
of power. Mr. Khrushchev shrewdly 
drew his conclusions. 

The Soviet leader wrote in his 
memoirs that he found Mr. Kennedy 
“a reasonable man” who “was inter- 
ested in finding a peaceful solution to 
world problems and in avoiding con- 
flict with tbe Soviet Union.” So, Mr. 
Khrushchev concluded, “I think he 
knew he wouldn't be justified in start- 
ing a war over Berlin.” 

Mr. Kennedy knew, as he later 
said, that be had created “a terrible 
problem" in Mr. Khrushchev’s per- 
ception that he was inexperienced 


X ' V 


m/ 






mm 


( J (/ A {III]* 








r Those were the good old days. ’ 


and weak. Seeking to dispel that. Mr. 
Kennedy called up the military re- 
serves, increased the defense budget 
and urged Americans to build bomb 
shelters. But, in August the wall be- 
tween East and West Berlin started to 
rise, and in his memoirs Mr. Khru- 
shchev boasted, “I think il was a 
great victory for us, and it was won 
without firing a shot” Vienna had 
turned out to be a costly summit 
meeting for America. 

The Nixoq and Ford summit meet- 
ings produced no such dramatic fall- 
out, although aides remained trauma- ■ 
rized by the dangers of direct 
diplomacy. For example, when Presi- 
dent Richard M. Nixon, during his 
third summit session with Leonid I. 
Brezhnev, in June 1974, strolled off 
with him to a grotto near his Crimean 
villa. Secretary of State Henry A. 
Kissinger and lhe White House chief 
of staff, Alexander M. Haig Jr., clus- 
tered with staff members at the swim- 
ming pool wondering nervously 
what the two leaders might be talking 
about — and possibly deciding. But 
Mr. Nixon later satisfied his aides 


The writer, who has covered almost 
all East -West summit meetings, is now 
national affairs correspondent for Na- 
tional Public Radio. He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times, 


Botha’s Dilemma, and a Daring Way Out of It 


J OHANNESBURG — The government of 
President Pieter W. Botha has fallen between 


J President Pieter W. Botha has fallen between 
stools. Its reform program has proved too limited' 
to capture black imaginations but extensive 
enough to forfeit the confidence of hard-line 
Afrikaner voters. 

The result is a devastating combination of 
black unrest and white backlash that revealed 
itself in a series of by-elections last week. 

The government appears to have persuaded 
itself that the unrest is not the result of black 
anger but is the work of a few agitators. Its 
solution is to use tougher security measures, not a 
new political approach. 

The by-elecuoa results should be no cause for 
alarm. The government has a two-thirds majority 
over all other parties combined, and computer 
predictions show thai the 17.2-percent swing in 


By Ailister Sparks 


the by-elections to lhe far-rightist parties would 
enable them to win only 6 more seats than lhe 1 8 


enable them to win only 6 more seats than lhe 1 8 
now held by the breakaway Conservative Party 
of Andries TreumichL 

But the Botha government has a deep-rooted 
fear of seeing its power base in Lhe white Afrika- 
ner tribe eroded. The thought that the far rightist 
parties may become Lhe new custodians of Afri- 
kaner nationalism's holy grail is a nightmare that 
cannot be dispelled by new English votes. 

Mr. Botha said he would “take cognizance of 
why people voted the way they did.” That proba- 
bly means he will move even more cautiously 
with his reforms, and crack down harder on the 
perceived agitators. 

But slower reforms and harsher action in the 
townships can only increase black anger, leading 
to more unrest, which in turn will result in a 
stepping up .of the international sanctions cam- 
paign and a further loss of business confidence. 


causing more economic hardship and more of a 
white backlash; a vicious cycle. 

A leader in Mr. Botha’s position is bound to 
lose hard-line support as soon as he declares in 
favor of refonn. If he then moves forward half- 
heartedly, he fails to win new support horn the 
recipients of his reforms. Nor does his tentative- 
ness bring back the hard-liners. 

Mr. Botha's ambiguity has caused a crisis of 
confidence in his leadership. The issue now, 
many believe, is whether a bold leap could per- 
suade blade South Africans that the government 
really intends to dismantle apartheid. Those who 
favor such a course suggest it might unfold with 
this kind of declaration of intent: 

1. The government declares its intent to re- 
scind all apartheid legislation within one year,, 
during which time it wm begin negotiations with 
representatives from all sectors of the communi- 
ty to devise a nonradal and nondiscriminatoiy 
constitutional system. 

2. The government makes only one advance 
stipulation, that it will insist oa agreed, perma- 
nently entrenched safeguards for minority 
groups so that apartheid is not replaced by an- 
other system of racial oppression. 

3. As a gesture of good faith, the government 
announces the unconditional release of Nelson 
Mandela and other members of the African Na- 
tional Congress imprisoned for life. 

4. The government invites the president of the 
ANC, Oliver Tambo, to return to South Africa 
under indemnity from arrest to take part in the 
constitutional talks. 

5. Tbe government hopes the ANC will make a 


reciprocal gesture by suspending its campaign of 
violence. The government notes that tne-ANC 
has always claimed that it turned to violence only 
because it was deprived of the right to campaign 
for change by constitutional means. 

6. Tbe government announces thntefease <rf all 
persons who have been detained under efficien- 
cy regulations and the Internal Security Act since 
the current unrest began, and the withdrawal of 
all charges against them. 

7. The government again hopes that the per- 
sons concerned will make a reciprocal gesture by 
using their influence to bring an end to the 
widespread unrest in the country. 

8. Tne government appeals to the international 
community, and especially neighboring states in 
southern Africa, to cease all hostile acts against 
South Africa axu! to use their influence to fadp 
stabilize the country. . 

Such a declaration would have a galvanizing 
effect. Doubtless there would be a further loss of 
voter support on the right, but many other whites 
anxious to see genuine reform would rally behind 
the government. 

Black leaders would be certain to respond 
positively. Tbe level of unrest would dimmish. 


and, with support replacing threats from abroad, 
business confidence would recover. An improved 


economic climate would help limit the growth of 
both white reaction and black extremism. 

Those who support this approach do not pro- 
tend that a transition to a new nonracial society 
would be easy. But they believe it offers a fair 
chance to end the vicious cycle of blade unrest 
and white backlash. 


The writer is a special correspondent covering 
South Africa for The Washington Post 


Baker’s Latin Debt Proposal: Positive, but Impractical 


W ASHINGTON — There is 
much to be said for Treasury 


YY much to be said for Treasury 
Secretary James Baker's highly tout- 
ed initiative on Third Worid debt 
What cannot be said is that it will 
provide 3 long-term solution to the 
critical debt problem that countries 
such as Mexico are facing today. 

Mr. Baker's plan comes down to 
three points. First, it offers a concep- 
tual shift of emphasis from austerity 
and economic adjustments to eco- 
nomic growth. Then, in order to fi- 
nance that growth, the plan proposes 
an increase in lending to debtor coun- 
tries by commercial banks; the World 


By Jorge G. Castaneda 


meet interest payments, Latin Ameri- 
can nations were seriously straining 
their social and political fabric. 

Unfortunately, the new LLS. strat- 
egy does not directly address this key 
problem, and it may even make it 
worse. Despite its positive features, 
Secretary Baker’s plan appears to 
represent a last-ditch effort to keep 
Latin loans performing — that is, 
paying interest — at aH costs. 

Mexico's situation, even before the 
September earthquakes, illustrates 


Bank also might eventually proride 
guarantees for new private loans. Fi- 


guarantees for new private loans. Fi- 
nally. Mr. Baker calls for structural 
reforms in the indebted nations; it 
considers deregulated, market-ori- 
ented and open economies necessary 
in order to make economic growth 
truly self-sustained. 

Insofar as the Baker proposal 
marks a change in the Reagan admin- 


The plan appears to be 
alasfaBuhpffon 


drid eased up oa those policies and. 
began spending; the Mexican econo- 
my, which responds to public policy 
in Pavlovian fashion, began growing. 
During the last quarter of 1984 and 
the first quarter of this year, it grew at 
a 7-percent annual rate. Jobs were 
being created, investment was . up, 
and the mood in Mexico was chang- 
ing, from despair and resignation to a 
glimmer of hope and optimism. 

It was not to be. As brfore, growth 
brought skyrocketing imports (main- 
ly from Lhe United States) and stag- 
nating exports. Tbe trade surplus 
shrank 48 percent during the first 
seven months of 1985. Almost over- 
night it became evident that Mexico 
either could continue servicing its 


performing at ah costs. 


istra Lion's policy toward the Latin 
American debt dilemma, it i s unaues- 


Amencan debt dilemma, it is unques- 
tionably a positive development By 
admitting that a new policy is neces- 
sary, it implicitly recognizes what 
many already knew; that the reme- 
dies stitched together under dire cir- 
cumstances during the Mexican crash 
of 1982 have not worked. 

To the extent that the Baker ap- 
proach emphasizes growth, it implies 
that the United States finally has un- 
derstood that all debt service and no 
growth make for an explosive politi- 
cal situation in most debtor coun- 
tries. In fact, this realization proba- 
bly led to the new plan. It was 
becoming obvious that by sacrificing 
everything — growth, investments, 
imports and living standards — to 


the problem. The economy went 
through a severe adjustment in 1983 
and the first ball of 1984. Gross na- 
tional product shrank 5 percent the 
first year and stagnated the first half 
of the next year. Real wages de- 
creased by nearly 40 percent, but in- 
flation, public spending and trade 


Drought at 
Largely because of this, the economy 
racked up a hefty surplus in its for- 
eign accounts. That surplus was used 
to pay the $12 billion to $14 billion 
per year — or 55 percent to 60 per- 
cent of export earnings — eaten up 
by service on the S95-billion debt. 

But by mid- 1 984 it became clear 
that the political and soda! costs of 
orthodox adjustment policies wore 
becoming dangerously high. Conse- 
quently, President Miguel de la Ma- 


debt or continue growing. It could 
not do both. Mr. de la Madrid chose 
prudence: a moderate, medium- term 
restructuring of tbe economy, contin- 
ued interest payments and a new re- 
cession for the second half of 1985. 

The bottom line is that without 
substantia] new lending or a sharp 
cut in debt service — from around 55 
percent of export earnings to around 
25 percent — the Mexican economy 
cannot grow. Arid without growth, 
wfaidi Mexico has experienced unin- 
terruptedly since 1940, it is only a 
matter of time before the country’s 
political stability is brought into 
question. But new funds, even if they 
were available in sufficient quantity 
(which is doubtful), would .only post- 
pone the problem, compounding it; 
New debts tins yearmean more inter- 
est to pay next vear and every year 
after. These are the problems that the 
Baker plan does not -address, 

Furthermore, although a drastic 


overhaul of the Mexican economy is 
necessary, h is far from certain that 
World. Bank and U.S. conditionality 
would facilitate that overhanL The de 
la Madrid administration already has 
begun implementing many of the re- 
forms in question: a liberalization of 
foreign investment restrictions, a 
lowering of the protectionist walls 
around Mexican industry, a mtbai-fc 
in the state-owned sector. 

And already Mr. de la Madrid is 
feeling the political heaL He has 
roused many nationalist and “statist” 
demons. If, in addition, the reforms 
are perceived as being the result of 
U-S. pressure, that heat may become 
unbearable. Very little can be 
achieved in Mexico without U.S. sup- 
port; even less can be done if that 
support is too obtrusive. In this sense, 
the Baker plan may make a difficult 
situation worst 

The earthquakes that struck Mexi- 
co City on Sept. J9-20 offered an 
opportunity tot the United States to 
help Mexico find its way out of the 
debt crias in a realistic, long-tom 
manner: by convincing private U.S. 
banks that the only way for Mexico 
to avoid paying no interest Later is to 
pay less interest now. Instead, Mr 
Baker came up witha quick fix: new 
loans to meet payments, new interest 
to be paid next year, new reforms to 
make things seem ‘‘structural ” 
Missed opportunities are. the stuff 
major crises are made of: Mexico will 
not be. an exception. 


In France, 
A Problem 


By Flora Levis 


that he had said nothing to mislead 
Mr. Brezhnev about U.S. policy. 

President Gerald R. Ford, in his 
1975 meeting with Mr. Brezhnev in 
Vladivostok, reached an agreement 
in principle that set the stage for the 
SALT-2 agre ement. But Mr. Ford 
never strayed from what was basical- 
ly a Kissinger script, nor did besneet 
alone with Mr. Brezhnev. 

Now it is President Reagan's turn 
with Mr. Gorbachev. Undoubtedly, 
Mr. Gorbachev would look for op- 
portunities for a private, informal 
conversation. If lummy is any guide, 
Mr. Reagan should be on guard 
against generalities with unrecog- 
nized meanings. In the heady atmo- 
sphere. the urge will be strong to 
write a page of history with a new 
“spirit of Geneva.” That should be 
guarded against. lest the president 
fall into the Summit Syndrome. 


rhythsucaBy. His posters show him 
with a strip of red doth across his 


influx of migrants, specifically Arabs 
and Africans. Mr. Le Pen has two 


LETTERS 
Nicaragua’s Colors 


‘True Colors in Ma- 
“ a caricature of the 
thnoceotnaty and ignorance so of- 
displayed in North American 



f: ■ .ytmr .. . ? 



P ARIS — The roost interesting. 

and disturbing, French poBticat 
phenomenon as this country; moves 
toward crucial partiameaxasy ; ejec- 
tions next year is a chubby,. pink- 
faced, platinum Hood tamed Jean- 
Marie Le Pen. 

Mr. Le Pen, 56, heads a party 
called the National From, grown 
suddenly in the last couple etyean. 
from a thaggsh fringe group on the 
extreme right. The polls show Shu 
with 10 percent to 12 percent of the 
vote, which would mean 33 to 46 . 
assembly seals under the new system 
of proportional represmiaiiou. • . 

The other major parties have, de- 
nounced him. He has been called a 
Fascist. a racist, art anti-Semite ©u 
the basis of his arguments;.* bar, a 
slanderer, a punreyor of dtsmfbrma- 
lioo on the basis of h» method. • 

At bis party's national convection 
last weekend, be denied aB that, say. 
ing be was being made a victim of 
“political apartheid.” He attacks ev- 
erybody dse, comfenumig France’s 
Fifth Republic a* “powerless." it* sd- 
mmis trairoa as ‘'’bureaucratic totafc 
onanism,” Hs teftish intellectuals as 
“tyrannous,” and its educational sys- 
tem as Mama. 

He deflvers his kng. rambling 
speeches with a wagon smile, lively 
but modest gestures, lots of amusing 
quips. His supporters roar approval, 
chant hsaame. stand and applaud 




,;W I/’/ 


with a strip of red doth across his 
mouth. The caption reads. “Le Pen 
lefts the truth bet be is being gagged.” 

The problem is precisely that his 
raean-emwied message, offered with 
cheerful, dawning style; is getting 
across. The message is that the prob- 
lems of France adT stem from the 


fit 


themes, foreigners and crime in die 
streets, which he suggests are synony- 
mous. He appals to the utmost of 
French chauvinism and xenophobia. 

Mr. Le Pen’s campaign has been 
amplified by an extraordinary demo- 
gnqrfnc projection published in the 
mass-drotialkm Le Figaro-Maga- 
zine. Under the title “Will we still be 
French in 30 years?” it shows 
France's symbolic Marianne vetted 
and jewded as an Arab princess. 

Le Figaro claims dial by 2015. 
“noo-European foreigners’* wfi] 
dominate France, destroy its culture, 
make Mun its prevailing religion, 
and tip if “over into tbe Third World 
unless something is done now.” 

Recnriuneat of foragn workers 
was halted years ago and immigra- 
tion is tightly controlled, so putting 
the issue as a matter of border sur- 
veillance is a euphemism. What the 
National Front proposes is to cm off 
sadai security and other nondiscri- 
mmating rights and benefits for these 
“foreigners” in an attempt to drive 
them out French-bom children of 
the m ig rants are included. 

The longstanding law that any- 
body bom in France has a right to 
French citizenship is challenged un- 
der the evasive charge that this con- 
stitutes “automatic naturalization.” 
Bring “truly French” is not defined, 
but a “swarthy” skin is considered 
tme sign of forrignness. 

In some ways, Mr. Le Pen's rise 
parallels periodic surges of the ex- 
treme right in France, historically 
with Jews as the scapegoat but this 
time focused on Arabs. It is an irony 
that he is winning popularity as the 
Communist Party declines; it is down 
now to about 10 percent. Undoubt- 
edly, a substantial number of ex- 
Co numm ist voters have switched to 
the opposite extreme. 

Some officials of the Socialist gov- 
ernment thus tend to dismiss Mr. Le 
Pen on the ground that traditionally 
the extremes in France add up to 
around 20 percent and that the only 
difference now is that the balance has 
shifted between the two ends. •' 

This tends to disguise the fact that 
the ruling Socialists and the conser- 
vative opposition each have sought to 
exploit the National Front against 
the other. The Socialists accuse the 
conservatives of secret collusion, al- 
though they evidently hope that Mr. 
Le Pen’s group will prevent the re- 
spectable right from winning an ab- 
solute majority. The conservatives 
blame the Socialists for fanning Mr. 

,. p 5°* s popularity with their “lax” 
poheies and their electoral reform. 

both sides are playing with fire. 
Both have had to accept “ imrmg ra- 
pon and crime as campaign issues. 
Undo - Mr. Le Pen’s attack, France's 
retf-nnage as a land of assured free- 
dom and liberal hospitality is more 
endangered than its Frenchness. 

The New York Tunes. 


% B 




an 


"ntogs about Nicaragua. M 

ine editorial dismisses the VJS.- W 


iC-Zr/y . COntra war as a cause of 
rjJSSF 1 * 1160011 suspension of 
^liberties, arg mg, “a more Bkriy 

Sr** “ “ en 9tion of discon- 
milita Ver a economy and 

S^ a fSf Cnpti0IL ’’ 18 

jnent that the contra war is an impor- 
l.]' ca “? e the economy's ennn- 

KS?® too complex for The 
«ew York Times to follow? 


tuo- 


The contributor, a writer and prtfes- 
r of political science at the National 


University] of Mexico, is currently a 
senior associate at the Carnegie En- 
dowment for International Peace. He 
wrote this for the Los Angeles Tunes. 


Martha! 7 ■‘HUES UK* UU* 

®*™Jthe adjective “anti-leftist” to 
lhe comras. But what oa 
mean? Are 

3£x»S; ’J* 0 “ disaffected with 
toe Sandurists and are fiehtina with 

I ndian s fighting for a 

iwv rerntfet^ campainos focc- 
“ noaj? m 


JOHN W. FANESTDL 
Oxford, England. 


•.I 




l*aar ^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


INSIGHTS 





New Soviet immigrants waiting for their turn to be processed by officials at the Ben-Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv. 

* Soviet Appears to Be Searching for Way 
To Redefine Its Relationship With Israel 


1 


h 

't 


By William Claiborne 

M'ashingttm Pou Service 

ERUSALEM — As at least three Warsaw 
Pact nations inched closer toward restor- 
ing some diplomatic links with Israel, the 
iet Union appeared to be searching for a way 
to redefine its relationship with the Jewish state 
in order to become a player in the arena of 
Middle East peace negotiations. 

That was the assessment of senior Israeli 
foreign policy advisers here and of Western 
diplomats in Moscow and Warsaw. However, 
many of the diplomats cautioned against ex- 
pecting any early breakthrough either in a resto- 
ration of the Soviet-Isradi diplomatic ties, 
which were severed in 1967, or in any large-scale 
increase in Jewish emigration from the Soviet 
Union. 

Press reports here and in Europe of secret 
Heals involving the imminent transfer of up to 
20,000 Soviet Jews to Israel could be part of a 
Soviet campaign to defuse the emigration issue 
before the Geneva meeting between President 
Ronald Reag an and the Soviet leader, Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, diplomatic sources in Moscow 
and Israeli officials said. 

The Israeli officials insisted that there is no 
basis for optimism about a chang e in Soviet 
emigration policy and characterized reports of a 
pending Moscow-Td Aviv airlift of Soviet Jews 
as “wishful thinking." 

Less amorphous, however, have be® diplo- 
matic contacts suggesting that Soviet bloc coun- 
tries, with Soviet approval, are moving toward 
re-establishing low-level diplomatic relations 
with Israel. 

Poland and Israd already have agreed to 
restore limited ties and soon will announce the 
opening of interest sections in Warsaw and Td 
Aviv, according to government officials in Jeru- 
salem and in Warsaw. Romania currently is the 
only Soviet bloc country with ties to IsraeL 

The Israeli foreign minister, Yitzhak Shamir, 
who met at the United Nations last month with 
his counterparts from Poland, Hungary fr"d 
Bulgaria, said last week that he had received 
signals from two East European countries in 
addition to Poland that they, too, were interest- 
ed in strengthening ties with IsraeL 

While Mr. Shamir would not name the two 
countries, they are widely presumed to be Hun- 
gary and Bulgaria. 

H OWEVER, an informed Israeli govern- 
ment source said, “We are not at a stage 
with any Eastern European country 
that is near to the point that we have with 
Poland." 

East European sources in Moscow have de- 
nied reports that Hungary — which is said to 
have the largest Jewish papulation in the Soviet 
bloc outside the Soviet Union — was consider- 
ing restoring ties with Israd. 

Western diplomats in Warsaw said that Po- 
land’s renewal of ties with Israd may serve as a 
model for similar moves by Hungary and Bul- 
garia, and that their capitals, Budapest and 


Sofia, could serve as connecting points for air 
service between the Soviet Union and IsraeL 

The diplomats noted that unlike Romania, 
Poland, Hungary and Bulgaria are unswervingly 
loyal to the Soviet foreign policy line and could 
provide a more reliable link for Soviet-Isradi 
contacts. 

In confirming Poland's intention to restore 
some ties with Israel, officials in Warsaw 
stressed their adherence to the Soviet policy of 
calling for Israeli withdrawal from all territory 
occupied in the 1967 Middle East war, the 
establishment of an independent Palestinian 
state and the convening of an international 
conference on Middle East peace that includes 
the Soviet Union. 

In addition to the Soviet bloc moves toward 
some diplomatic ties, there have been other 
signs of Sonet relaxation toward Israd, The 
first was in July, when Israel’s ambassador in 


Diplomats caution against 
expecting any early 
breakthrough either in a 
restoration of Soviet-Israeli 
diplomatic ties or in any 
large-scale increase in 
Jewish emigration from the 
Soviet Union. 


Paris, Ovadia Sofer, and his Soviet counterpart, 
Yuli M. Vorontsov, met and reportedly dis- 
cussed a renewal of ties and an increase in 
emigration of Soviet Jews. 

list month, in a break with tradition, Mr. 
Sofer was invited to a Soviet reception in Paris 
during Mr. Gorbachev’s visit. 

During the Paris visit, Mr. Gorbachev said at 
a press conference, “The sooner the Middle East 
situation is normalized, the sooner one can 
proceed with consideration of a normalization 
of relations” between Israd and the Soviet 
Union. 

Middle East diplomats in Moscow said that 
they thought the Soviet leader’s remark gave a 
hint of a new approach to IsraeL Moreover, 
unconfirmed reports that the Soviet Union 

B. lcharansky and Andrei D. Sakharov, and the 
issuance of an exit visa to Mr. Sakharovas wife, 
Yelena G. Bonner, have fueled speculation that 
the Kremlin is on the edge of relaxing relations 
with IsraeL 

Diplomats here cautioned, however, that the 
reports could be the result of pre-summit meet- 
ing maneuvering. 

In a narrow context, Israeli officials and 
Western diplomats in Moscow said, Moscow's 
tentative moves toward relaxing relations with 


Wichita Basks Under International Spotlight 
As Americans, Foreigners Sing Praises of City 


By Scott Kraft 

Los Angela Tlnm Service 

“m w T ICHITA, Kansas — It began as a 
simple Chamber of Commerce song- 

▼ ▼ writing contest to get Wkhiians excited 
about Wichita. But now, to the surprise of city 
boosters, 2^500 armchair songwriters in every 
U.S. stale and nine foreign countries are ringing 
Wichita’s praises. 

The problem is that most of the composers 
writing times such as “I Left My Heart in 
Wichita” and “Take Me Bade to Wichita, Kan- 
sas" have never laid eyes on the place. 

“Tdl me,” one recent caller asked, “just what 
does Wichita look like?" To hear some of the 
nonnative lyricists teQ it, Wichita is a city of 
towering smokestacks, sunflower-lined streets, 
corsetted women, pulsating neon lights and 
backyard oil wells. A place where, as one Cali- 
fornian wrote, “even with its spring tornadoes, 
you can still grow your potatoes." 

Others more accurately describe an aircraft 
manufacturing center in the heart of wheat and 
cattle country where the people are friendly, the 
air is clean and the streets are safe. 

Soon after the Chamber of Commerce invited 
Wichita people to write a song for its annual 
meeting, and offered a 51,500 rash prize, songs 
started flooding in. 

“I don’t know much .about Wichita, but, in 
writing this. I’ve become very fond of it,” said 
Joan Rogers, a housewife in England who wrote 

“Wonderful Wichita.” 


The verse offered by Lorraine Myers, of Fair 
Oaks. California, focused on Wichita’s family 
atmosphere: 

Did you ever see such a ma! 

She raised us right in Wichita, 

Fed us beef and wheat and beans. 

Sunflower seeds and collard greens. 

Taught us manners and right from nrong 

And made us learn to sing this song. 

Among the foreign musical tributes are ones 
from Kildare, Ireland, and Brisbane, Australia. 
The composers include students, real estate 
agents, ministers and even professional musi- 
cians. 

ypKTT ORD of the contest spread. Paul Har- 

mA/vey, a former Kansan who is radio 

Y ▼ commentator, talked it up on his pro- 
gram. Then the British Broadcasting Corp. did a 
report. Since then, Wichita has received 75 en- 
tries a day. A panel of local musicians will select 
the winner at the chamber's annual meeting 
Nov. 21. 

The rules decree that each song contain the 
word “Wichita," a requirement that results in 
creative attempts at rhyme and even more cre- 
ative spellings. 

Janet £. Rowe, of Horseheads. New York, 
managed to rhyme every line with Wichita: 

Where virile men eat their beef raw . ' 

Where all the sweet ladies wear a bra. 

Where every Indian respects his squaw. 

Where fine fish dinners come with slaw. 

Spelling Wichita turned out to be more diffi- 
cult. Is it Witchita, Wichitah or Witchata? Rose 


Nixon, of Trenton, New Jersey, summed up the 
problem: 

/ think that / have never saw 

A place as nice as Whichita. 

It is my duty now to tell it 

By gum — if I could only spell it! 

So far, only about 300 entries include original 
lyrics and music, as required. About two-thirds 
of Lhe entries have come from outside Kansas. 
Some writers who have never been in Wichita 
rely on the city’s promotional material. Others 
use almanacs, encyclopedias and road maps. 
They sing of Interstate 35, the cottonwood tree 
(the state tree) and the meadowlark (the state 
bird). 

Peculiarities in local parlance trip up a few 
songwriters. Several have the Arkansas River 
winding through downtown Wichita, which it 
does, but rhyming Arkansas with Wichita, 
which it does not. It is the “Are-kansas” River in 
Kansas. 

Area businesses recently added to the S 1,500 
cash prize. They are offering about 510,500 in 
merchandise and services, such as camping 
equipment, flying lessons, free airline tickets 
and a year's supply of blue jeans. 

The city of 280,000 is enjoying the kind of 
image-raising that money could not buy. 

“We’ve tried hundreds of limes to raise the 
profile of Wichita," said Dorothy Schmitt, a 
chamber vice president Now. she said, “we have 
realized millions of dollars' worth of publicity, 
and what’s nice is that we didn't expect it at afl.” ‘ 


Justice Brennan: In Fighting Trim 


By Al Kamen 

Washington Past Service 


\\'T ASHINGTON — Six years ago, Jus- 
\\f dee William J. Brennan Jr. of the U.S. 
v Y Supreme Court appeared to be a tired 
73-year-old — despondent, frail and thinking 
about retiring. 

Quitting is the last thing on his mind today. 
Justice Brennan is his ebullient former sdf: 
working the crowd al a reception, dancing the 
night away at a party, traveling to Europe and 
around the United States. 

Now, his friends talk not so much about his 
retirement, but the renaissance of Justice Bren- 
nan. 

His rejuvenation could not have come at a 
more opportune time as far as liberals are con- 
cerned. The court is under persistent attack by 
President Ronald Reagan and Attorney Gener- 
al Edwin Meese 3d. 

The attacks ore receiving increased attention 
because Justice Brennan, and more recently. 
Justice John Paul Stevens, appear to be fighting 
back in speeches of their own. Such exchanges 
between the executive branch and Supreme 
Court justices are rare, particularly for Justice 
Brennan, a low profile, behind-the-scenes court 
consensus-builder all his life. 

The central topic of the debate — bow strictly 
courts must adhere to the specific intentions of 
the 18th-caitury framers of the US. Constitu- 
tion — is fundamental to American govern- 
ment 

More importantly. Justice Brennan's allies off 
the court and out of government are counting on 
him to con tinue leading the resistance within the 
court to erosion of the precedents of the Earl 
Warren court, which conservatives regard as 
prime examples of judicial activism. 



**r.t» rutfM- 


U.S. High Court’s Strong Liberal Voice Is Louder Than Ever 

rulings in the Warren court „f 

s 

Burger. 

I N July. Mr. Meese: speaking u tte 

can Bar Association, condemned « 

Sc court's famous civil tights Jnd fl J- 
liberties decisions, saying thn ,htr 

church-stare separation in 

founding generation as somewhat nzarrc. 

Mr. MMseS^ justices diouM «ac* *•*■*£ 
literal words of the Constitution and in e i mwn 
tions of its auihore “as the onlv iduble guidr. 
No current Supreme Court Justice so dtffc 

represents the judfctal philosophy that . » r 
Eteeserook on in that 

in his own speech Ocl 12 to about _200 teachers 


Israel could be viewed as another indication of 
Mr. Gorbachev’s apparent efforts to rid Soviet 
diplomacy of obstacles as it pursues high-priori- 
ty economic objectives. 

R ENEWAL of ties between Israd and the 
Warsaw Fact nations would give the 
Soviet Union and its financially 
strapped satellites enhanced access to financial 
sources in tire West, analysts in Jerusalem said. 

For example, tire Polish government of Gen- 
eral Wqjdech Jaiuzelski, isolated by much of 
tire West after the imposition of martial law in 
1981, remains anxious to strengthen contacts 
outside Eastern Europe in the search for West- 
ern technology to modernize Poland’s economy. 

Like other Soviet bloc countries, Poland 
views Israel as a potential source of economic 
exchange, according to Western diplomats in 
Warsaw. 

Bulgaria is the Soviet Union's closest ally in 
Europe and has played surrogate for Soviet 
foreign policy moves in the past. A Bulgarian 
connection to load would be the closest tire 
Soviet Union could come to ties with Laud 
short of direct diplomatic relations. Western 
diplomats in Warsaw said. 

From a broader perspective, the Soviet 
Union’s apparent overtures to Israd can be 
viewed as an attempt by the Kremlin to dear tire 
way for a more active diplomatic role in the 
Middle East, according to Israeli officials and 
Western and Middle East diplomats in Moscow. 

In his speech to tire UN General Assembly 
last month, the Israeli prime minister, Shimon 
Peres, suggested that the Soviet Union could 
participate in an international forum to initiate 
Middle East peace talks if it re-established dip- 
lomatic relations with Israd. 

However, the usually well-informed Soviet 
journalist Victor Louis said that restoration of 
relations with Israd and Soviet participation in 
Middle East peace talks were viewed in the 
Kremlin as separate issues. 

Noting that the Soviet Union was the first 
nation to recognize Israel in 1948, Mr. Louis 
told tire Israeli newspaper Ma’ariv that he 
would not rule out tire possibility of a renewal of 
ties. 

“But," Mr. Louis was quoted as saying, “Mr. 
Peres must not present an ultimatum that if the 
Soviet Union does not restore relations, it won’t 
be allowed to take part in Middle East peace 
negotiations. This approach won't succeed The 
relations have to develop by themsdves in 
stages. The issues of the Middle East in general 
and Israd and the Soviet Jews, these are sepa- 
rate issues." 

Analysts in Jerusalem, noting unconfirmed 
reports that Egypt and Jordan had begun to 
urge tire Soviet Union to restore ties with Israd 
in order to get an international conference on 
tire Middle East going, said that Moscow would 
be confronted on the question by its strongest 
ally in the region — Syria — unless President 
Hafez al- Assad of Syria won assurances of sig- 
nificant Israeli territorial concessions on the 
Golan Heights. Zsrad captured the area from 
Syria in 1967. 


| OR five years, observers have been pre- 
dicting that four or more vacancies would 
open on the court, giving Mr. Reagan the _ ^ 

opportunity to reshape It well into the 21st Dwight^D. 


William J. Brennan Jr. 

quamtances. Justice Brennan stopped going out 
socially for several years before bus wife died in 
1982. 

The bounce is back in his step, several former 
clerks and friends noted, and those who have 
seen him recently say Justice Brennan has put' 
on weight — despite daily stints on bis exercise 
bicycle — and is feeling “very feisty.” 

This role was not predicted when President 
Eisenhower appointed a state Su- 


centmy. So far there has been one vacancy: 
Justice Sandra Day O’Connor succeeded Potter 
Stewart, who retired. 

Justice Brennan's vigor suggests that he, like 
his 76-year-old ally. Justice Thuigood Marshall, 
will leave only when he has no choice. 

Few men still living have played as important 
a role as Justice Brennan in creating and main- 
taining the legacy of the Warren court. He is 
viewed with begrud ging admiration even by 
those who disagree most strongly with his re- 
cord. 

As the conservative National Review maga- 
zine said, “No individual in this country, on or 
off the court, has had a more profound and 
sustained impact upon public policy in the 
United States for the past 27 years." 

Justice Brennan’s closest friends say his dark 
period came while Marjorie, his wife of more 
than SO years, was gravely 01 with cancer. He 
went home every day at 4:30 PM to be with her 
during the long illness. 

In addition. Justice Brennan underwent treat- 
ment in 1978 for a cancerous tumor in his 
throat, and he suffered a mild stroke in 1979. 

Noted for Ins geniality, for putting his aim 
around the shoulders of friends and casual ac- 


preme Court justice from New Jersey to the UJS. 
Supreme Court in 2956. 

He never was considered to be at the far end 
of the liberal spectrum daring the Warren court, 
but rather was the pragmatic coalition-bttilder, 
often in the rawuer of a shifting activist majority 
with the former justices Hugo Black and Wil- 
liam O. Douglas to his left 

He mndt> a major impact in that role. Justice 
Brennan wrote the landmark 1964 opinion in 
New York Tunes vs. Sullivan saying that the 
press could not be sued for false statements 
unless those statements were deliberately made. 
In that case. Justices Black, Douglas and Arthur 
Goldberg argued a more revolutionary concept 
that newspapers should never be sued by public 
officials for libeL 

In 1962 Justice Brennan authored the famous 
Baker vs. Carr “one-man, one vote" ruling, 
whi ch for the first time inserted tbe federal court 
into what previously had been considered a 
political preserve. 

Justices Black, Douglas and GoUbog are 
gone. The court has shifted to the right, taring 
Justice Mar shall, joined in 1967. and Jus- 
tice Brennan often isolated. 

While Justice Brennan rarely dissented from 


and school administrators, appeared 
spomfint Without mentioning Air. 
pame, Justice Brennan said that such views were 
“arrogance cloaked as humility" and amply «ud 
a political bias against the rights of mi non lies. 

Justice Brennan's remarks were interpreted 
widely as a veiled reply spedfuaJly .10 Mr. 
Meese. In fad. the speech was drafted in May. 
two moo tbs before Mr. Meese spoke, and the 

general topic was selected by his hosts. 

According to sources. Justice Brennan did not 
regard the speech as anything out of the ordi- 
nary, and was reported to be astounded at the 
attention it got, since he rdt he had said it all 

before. . . 

Indeed, he has been waging war against the 
Reagan-Meesc-Burgr judicial philosophy for 
years, particularly on the conservative ktea th at 
modern courts should intciprw the Constitution 
as it might be interpreted try thefovadera of the 

pafiwi. 

OR example, in 1983 the court upheld the 
common practice in stare leg isla t ures rf 
baring a chaplain say a prayer at tte 
opening of* session. The court, in support of its 
decision in Marsh vs. Chambers, noted that tire 
fust IJ -S. Congress m 1789 wrote. Jhe JFsA 
Amendment to the Constitution, that the same 
Congress opened its sessions with a prayer ana 
that, therefore, the f ramera of die fiat Amend- 
ment's refighms gtmrwiiflcs behoved fegfcfative 
prayer to be co ns tit u tional . . 

Justice Brennan Assented. It iff dangerous, be 
atgg ftqgri, to lei the act* of early coBgCMsee be 

too modi of a guide to 20th-amtay oonatinit 
lions! iniezpreta&OB. •' 

There are certain “skeletons Bt the eangrefr- 
sional doses,” Justice Brennan wrote. The lim 
Congress, in addition to W 

qoiredthai those couriered of 
whipped, not exceeding thutynuneatripo.”^ 
“We current justices read tire COBStitutiob u 
the onfy way that 

in his recent speedy "as Tfith-frntuty Atped- 
cans. We look to the hiaoty of &e tiro* of 
framing and to the m lewcni ag ItiBdry oftatofr- 
pretaiiotL But ihe iihiuiaSr ^oestioti avs f fife 
what do tfaewosdspE theuxsiran mqnrfiroe;* 
Justice Brennan now sppeara fiveher, regular- 
ly joining m flic tharp qa csn Qnigg so gterte 
cares about. Eew doubt that WBSam J* Brtttnan 
Jr.isbackmfi^mgfarou T ■ 




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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NO VEMBER 6, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


A ' Homecoming’ 
For Country Music 

■ . n. nr 


By Michael Zwerin mui 

InUrnauoTvJ Herat! Tribune 

F > ARIS — Country music may P*J 
be coming bade home. 

It originated with European folk wa 

songs brought to North America by 

immigrants. As they moved inl a n d. ® ■ 
their old songs became an increas- jv 
ingly essential cultural tie with the 
mother country and each other. 
Square dances replaced reels, fid- *TJ 
dies replaced bagpipes. The migra- 
tion continued west towards Mexi- . : 
co, guitars appeared. It came to be r° 
called country and western, west- 
era swing, and bluegrass. and there 
were other offshoots as it evolved 
into the only significant form Oi 
American popular music not based ^ 
primarily on African roots. It was 
also called “White Blues." 

While the blues moved to Mem- P 5 
phis and Chicago, cross-bred and 
[used into urban music reaching ■ 
millions, country music remained 
in the country- Ttese people did 
not like cities, and city people 

caDed it hillbilly music. TTm songs “ 

were about basics like family, farm- , 
ing and God. Bred in remote yai- 
levs, plains and hills, there was Um- 
ited media access. It was . 
considered coray. unsuitable for “ 
export to urban centers, let alone „ 
abroad. 

During World War U. country « 
folks went north for work, then 

northerners came south for the son. 

Then came the folk boom, Dylans 
“Nashville Skyline." countrv-rock 
groups like the Eagles. By the late ( 
1970s. polished in the commercud 
miil. countrv music constituted 50 
percent of the pop music market. 
Nashville grew to rival New Yore 
and Los Angeles as a business cen- 
ter. At that point, there seemed no 
need for export. But it leveled off in 
the 1980s. and though plannum al- 
bums by the likes of Dolly Paxton 
and Kennv Rogers still sell less 
than 5,000 copies in most Europe- 
an nations, the territory is opening 
up. Items: . 

• The European Country Music 
Association, formed in July in Hol- 
land. united 12 national organiza- 
tions that hope to produce jomt 
tours none could afford alone. 
Member stales include Finland, 
Poland, Belgium. Italy and Czecho- 
slovakia. 

• An estimated 20,000 people a 
day attended this summer's unoffi- 
cial but tolerated four-day country 
music festival in Plzen, Czechoslo- 
vakia. to listen to, among others. 
Amazing Grass from France and 
Poland’s Country Road. Foreign 
and Hungarian bands perform at 
an annual country music festival 
near Budapest. The Soviet Com- 


munist Party paper Pravda praised 
country music for “propagating 
oeaceful and humanitarian ideas. 

• Ln April, 1984, 35.000 tickers 
were sold for a three-day country 
mudf [estival in London's Wem- 
bley Arena. A British promoter. 
Mervyn Conn, explained: Coun- 
try music conjures up an appeal of 
open spaces. It tdls a story of ev- 
eryday life. It's working-class mu- 
sic, and the connotation of rbe cow- 
bov when you’re living in a very 
tight, crowded society is appeal- 
ing." Conn is presently organizing 
a European tour next March for 
Johnny Cash. Waylon Jennings 
and Bill Monroe. It will include 
Spain. Germany, Switzerland and 
Britain, and it will be the first ume 
first-magnitude country stars will 
perform in Portugal. in 

• One of the few authentic coun- vi 

try performers to tour Europe regu- J : 
larly for years. Bob Everhart is F 
scheduled to play the New Morn- rc 
ing in Paris on Dec. 1. He says he s 
finds many British country bands b 
“better »hiin their counterparts m a 
America" , d 

• Kenny Rogers plans to record n 

his next album in Paris. He is look- 
ing for a “more international L 
sound" and blames himself for his i 
“spotty” European sales: “rve nev- z 
er geared my music to the interna- 1 
tional market before." I 

• The country-rock group Ala- 

e bama, which has sold a total of lo i 

: million albums, is scheduled to tour i 

l Europe for the first rime in June. 
Some groups do not travel well no 

0 matter how big they are. Alabama 
. is expensive- The lour is a conader- 
j. a ble gamble, but Greg Rogers of 
£ RCA Europe believes The time has 

■a come." _ . 

in • The same Greg Rogers was the 
. motivating force behind the U. K. 

* country music chart, the first out- 
“ side the United States, which ap- 
!* peared last August with 30 top- 
sailing country albums based on 
® computerized data from 350 out- 

If let «The French rockers Eddie 
JL Mitchell and Johnny Hallyday 
^ have both recently recorded al- 
_« bums in Nashville. 

..a •According to Gilbert . Rouit, 
ho- director of the Parisian Country 
Music Memorial, a combination 
- a fan dub and foundation. 10.000 

,ffi- hardback copies of a French coun- 

irrv try-music encyclopedia listing 800 
,i, names null be published next 
J? SSl Rouit cans himself “the 
S only full-time employee of country 

jjgn muric in France." Although Gam- 

1 at try Music Memorial has only 1.000 
•val members, that is up from 50 five 
0 m- years ago. Rouit has sold advertis- 



■ llJ / £ ^ g ^ 

Gems Revises 'GmMe’: Pure Irm — 4 *°, 


lOrh-cennuv money-mania. What, ica accompaniment, and “Hard 
By Michael BiUmgton Mamierite Day’s Night." 

t ONDON — 1 1 is a brave drama- d Armand is not money bur the the ^nume gaiety of 1 

L; list who Offers US a new ver- if Armand had possessed the happy advent Of the Liverpool 

don of “CanuDe" with the unage of suffidentlY large private fortune, foursome. . . 

satin-quilt- fled to Italy. Tbe ^ £ 

ed sets inlte MGM mwie snU Uwd a doctor and lived hap- thatithas 

powerfully strong. But, undaunted, jj ever after. interesting to . h the wdl- 

Pam Gems has come up with ter p § ul if Gems’s arguments are a or- 

revision of the play by Dumas fils w dubiouSi die has created a won- recorded bv 

s?ss?jsfflr* 

THE LONDON STAGE 

v _ tress's “Camille" as “The first I into visionary paafism with Yoko 
Shakespeare Company has trans- who died of ca- One. It suggests Lenncm had In- 
ferred from Stratford s Other Place ^ j^d not be said ly discovered himself tewif 

to London's Comedy Theatre, is a ^ a horrendous tragically shot. But what it 

slightly unfocused play but a m- ofJtobg more than outofaccount is the equally 

umph for the lead actress, Frances captSra the character’s documented otter side of 

Barber. (“My the caustic 


BV a niuu* » 

e p gn»»ne gaiety of the 1960s and 
e happy advent of the Liverpool 

ursome. , 

The problem with the snow is 

-AtliirtA rtffu nMT OT 


V : 

than to explore the ” ^le. l “’- 

lire. «r rffeciiiw but ^ 


VAs a— are a 

sSSfHSssa 


myth rather than to explore 
complex reality. 

□ 

One Of the best shows in town at 

the moment is to be found, as so 
often, at the tiny Bush “ 

west London, The play is “Tjhroagb 
the Leaves" by the 39-year-qkl Ba- 
varian dramatist Franz Aaver 


the moment is to be fomd, as so jg eeu » the 

Qtig, .lll« tin? Bah Tteire m ^ k 

west London, The play is %ZT Matha scrub? s 

the L»v« by Ihe 39-yrai^dBa- 

varian dramatist Franz Xaver .t’hervieMinedsvou* ■ K 
lOxietz. and ii has beeo brought to «!*» 

S* sb?si'« .SLi* about 


Da Anooatad Wsb 

Kenny Rogers \ 

ins, in the Memorial’s quarterly re- 
to Marlboro dgareuesMd 
Jack Daniels bourbon, me 
French just adore the ‘lonesome 

road 1 side of American culture, he 

said: “Truck drivers dress in cow- 
boy shirts, boots and hats. Europe- 
an record companies are adring 
themselves if country might have 
more potential than they thought. 

• David Soul who P^ys Hu P 
in the Siarsky and Hutch TV senes, 
is starting a singing career. His first 
album will include a songby the 
French country musician Christian 
SeeureL 

• Taped in the Belgian amuse- 
ment park Bobbqaanland in July, 
the TV show Euro Country Mas- 
ters, featuring European groups, 
has been broadcast in Belgium, 
Holland, Sweden. Norway, Den- 
mark and Switzerland. 

• A concert to be produced by 
Country Music Memorial at me El 
Dorado here on Nov. 11 win pre- 

: sent French bands with names like 
. Buffalo Wayne. Canyon Riders, 
■ Dixie Stompers and Good News. 

; POONE SBURY 

f rT USED TO Be A H-I 

woewaa&. /& & 

wucAMSEe.um A 

FDfeNTlAL! I I 


tear mi , 

— Naihan once aescmuca uuc h y.-Ao trnrgn. u one says u ..... «!.%% Martha. 

i-r-inc- trSs “Camille" as "The first I into visionary pacifism wi^ Yoko between a 40ish female of- gflecn Nidmlas f piH!! ,c 

Shakespeare Company has trans- CTer 5^ w ho died of ca- Ono. It su»sts fal-njerchant (Martha) and a gross. ^ a beguiling as 

f erred from Straifonl sOther Place ^ q n|t , not be said ly discovered hunsdf !**“ coarse drunken factory-hand g-mflitv and earthy F”f u hu ,.4cr , s 

10 London's Comedy Theatre, is a who has a horrendous tragBrnHy shot- (Quo), one makes it sound desper- ^ su ^ npS ofT iM* Olio 

slightly unfocused play bm a m .^ tlar But , more than out of account is lixequauy *>’ BDatlract ive. But Kroetz ^ boPm and Ken Stott - ua b!e. 

umph for the lead actress, Frances the characters documented Writes about his characters with monster but^a ^ g |Jj L , f 

Barber. - f ierce love of possessions ("My the caustic wiL tte_ a such lotal respect and depicts iteir hcer-bdlied figure as *‘?l# art |. ia ' S 

Money, as much as passoo, , . „ lovely things"), her teas- ty, the drug-addiction that hada hnnmous realism ^ feelings as he is of . “y v - 

spins the plot in Gems s rewrite of sexuality and her pas- profound effect on his diat the result is a small master- do5 , ybe aaors play 'V lt ^ , i y rn r* 

this romandc classic. Si™teronb taken (Eom & lift Unnonjras a bunffle of ■ to ^ Elation in Scotush^^ 

Gautier is seen as a worlung-^rf sot. wku^ jf a Umb had been contradiction^ none, of which are ^ Rainer Werner ,htt only serves to remad® 

wbo has made flood asa ^ ^ the stage by explained m this Ftasbinder, for whose theater though the play ,arum * 

Srather than defaidr and Rxm Loetz. in fact, wrote. tte predicament is nmvrnal. 

ESaf-SKSStM 2 E T=»sn?5F5Sr' 


Kroetz dqricts two oidmary peo- 
ple trapped both by their own 
needs and by a society that pre- 
serves the notion of m ale supe rior- 


r^tionship is lf S ZrZd iSt S Ono’s'shre^ hy. Martha is lopdy. despite ^ 

fimiSy capsized by her S‘SSg£SLSStS bS^e -s matog to love but proud of ter canung- 

to fleece a Russian pnn« topay for finny there beats an richer than ever. The savm 6J^c« — 

ihdr escape to Italy. The point >s of the show are the song? and the - • 


Michael BiUin&on M , reV *?^S 


aowiuraj - “ r — j . 

that between Marguerite and Ar- 
mand cann ot survive in a society 
based on commercial transaction. 

Ifl call the play unfocused, it is 
because Dumas’s old story of a 
doomed love doesn’t quite stjuare 
-.u ctrKt nn economic re- 


nener man evra. a uc 

of the show are the semgs and the - • n .11 TT-ll 

aSffi-JSBSe? Smithsonian to Build HaU 

ihan Barlow plays to in his 30s) is 1 


Because uuuwaB — J — - «*I amuin a CdeDraUOn OI JOUR ABO.uiaau™*'*" - : -7 

doomed love doesn’t quite stjuare . gob Baton that began whom sing, act and P^>‘ ““JJjJ* 

with Gems’s sttess on econormc re- Everyman in 1981 ments, the eye is taken by -Jel & 

ality and the changes she has made hasnow moved into the beautiful Carol Sloman, who trans- 

10 the story’ make rt morc - not lc ^’ Astoria (across the street from a mutes in an instant from Aunt 
melodramatic. It is not merdy “SSSbIw. Minn to Cynthm Lennon, and by 


pacuauu & jfuuu^* Srt,TT m 

£SS3 On 'Wormatkm Revolution 

T^rnan," a celebration of John And, in a smaU casr ofnme, dlof . ^ receive prom 


By Irvin Molotsky 

Hew York Times Sayicc 


revolutkHi and will rft»«proroi' 


stretching but dislocating the long -r^. brat tiring tout the evening Mia Soteriou’s Yoko. who nas cap- plans for an cOntwron square rett^awim 

-asSsfcsr-?.- SMSSPatsss Ossa's 

•S55S LfflsJSSSLS: 5MSlp»» aS®2sS£*S5 


rbe 19th century to todays sopms- fliepennanem esimmuuu 
ricated computers, and that will satiated from bigness and 
track newdKopments in oomtmi- dooocs bccauserbc te- 

, vondthe Smithsonian’s p«wii» 


rnnm, 

MICHAEL ?, 


OFHXEE-UPPER. 
MUMS APB 
ICmtBFOU. j 


youeoTYcm gbamneo^ 

PUMSfrXj. /WTHBLOADtttG 
&WPCANAL UIMSBB . v 
^.CONVBUED! ' I 


i Ub WAUIWIUVU “““ . 7 : 

gtnfie#! initially in the Smuhsom- 
an’s National Museum rf Ameri- 


quite clear). Even more mioauj, ~ ^ ^ “Love revolving screens, urn aucarou^ track new developmems m commw- ~ 

ttSttSSSZfc Me Do." ttith iu beautiful hanpon- ^ , U, po^ up ^ ^ ^ ^ % ■ggggSJg- ' 

gtnTii-d initially in the Snrithsom- 

■i an’s National Museum rf Ameri- T^rnfoimation revolution,” 

rrr; p 7^7 ORAWSHr can History, but officials indicted ^ was comparable onlv 

. I7WNX/TS arm mSnrrK &OM.UX5A' dutt a separate museam of mfor- ^ ^ things as the Industrial 

JU9TTHEK1NP uSl* rM7)LFZ£. mazion and commnmcauon mighl PjrrohlT ^^ Gutenberg's inven- 

GFHXBZrU&ER. RJJM8IN6. AWTHEJ£APII i & . ■ OF ’'S/AMO be bmh one day. tion of movable type. Such events, 

mL °°2r^itew.vweUve,the 


I an s tvanonaj wus o m i w «!»•- 
AOPFar 0R.AM9SHT can History, but officials indicted 
arm aSrfirx FOOU-^ 5 ^ riiat a separate museam of mf<»- 
uSSi7 PBCPIETUM nation and commnmcatxon nn^il 

(rCa r^ 'EHINlO be bmh one day. 

I \ &MTfa»&. * . m MS' Ailafnff OVTilart 

\ 


piH I a KjJdUUb yi u o uiMM w 

pratinn and nnmmnmcation might 
be bmh one day. 







r« the amiuisaiuiiur — - — — raiuui»- ,. _ lL ,' 

conference: “Tf the subject is as . “It affects the way we live, the 

S^rtantas we drink itis. the time way we work and, tmfortiM^y. 
may well come when a separate itewaywefi^W AdMBsmd 
museum may evolve. of the rcvrriutioam 

“Certainly dus will focus <m the mfocmam^^g that it was } 
compuiff bntwflaho ^^Sc^idSet the new hall 

the inventions of the I9thcxntpry. ^ ^dsting Smilh- 

Adams said of the nw ^hibto op. _ -^n w-rinn of coomutatkm 

tStStto tte ta»« « 


NYSE Most Actives ~ 

VoL H»h law I" 1 aw * 


Am Exp 
P cLvin 
AT&T 

Bo*tnr 

AHosp 

Rcvnlns 

Avon 

CSX 

GMol 


24623 15% 
1STV4 134 1 

1*430 ■% 

15880 131% 
15573 16 
14184 5516 
13S25 45ft 
13793 39ft 
17157 Zlft 
11575 

11373 46J. 
11098 2Sft 
-®i4 73 
10054 24ft 
9703 68ft 


133ft +1JJJ 

£ ttt 

’Sft _ 
53ft — ft 

13ft +W 

as ts 

2644 — ft 
26 ft + ft 
68% +lft 


Dow Jones Averages 


ORW HWI w. uai 09. 
Indus 138631 IfflS '»» ] !%j9 + IS 

s § U m sss: sa 


NYSE Diaries" 


NYSE index 


Comnosift 

industrials 

Tramp. 

utmiiM 

Finance 


Hteh LB* Close Clrtw 
111317 110J6 inAJ 
127 JO 12656 vnx +0J0 
1D65B 105.16 10648 +146 
076 5741 57J4 +0.14 

11944 11171 H9A4 +1.19 


Tiiesdaj’s 

NiSE 


AMEX PiarieT 


NASDAQ Index" 


AMEX MostAcHvea 


Closing 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanaed 
Total issue* 
New Hints 
New Lows 
I volume up 
V olume down 


Close Prev. 

267 225 

2*8 286 

230 247 

745 "S 

14 23 

u n 

1429.130 
BSg 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

UtMHIes 
I Bonks 
Tramp. 


Close ChVt 
9U5 +142 

39145 +171 

+52 

38009— O.W 

31747 +«9 
36476 +044 


; EdnBt 

SB2 

IClrtJV 

IWrtd 
driMAs 
CNUCP 
TIB _ 
Dome? 




SS 

^ St 

JS St 


3s +» 


111 

« Ti 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

utilities 

industrials 


HMh LCW 5XCT 


am cave 

8054 +052 

B2 +055 

8J41 +0.10 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
I volume down 


Ctoee Prev. 
«5 «9 

- £ 

2033 2038 

1“ 2 

20 25 

7551&U0 

26498700 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y^ 


Be* Soles *ShTI 

Nw' 1 ~ 1331 4”3* 

162454 397461 18707 

gas ziasss 

‘included In Ihe soles figures 


VoL of 4 1I94W4W 

prvf.4PJA.V0i. 104740486 

prev comoBdoted dose i254W?a 


Tobies Include the 
up to the closing on Walt Street ond 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index] 


AMEXSaleT 


industrials 

Transfl. 

Utilltte* 
Finance 
Compos He 


man Low Close ChOe 
21372 212.10 21*44 +1» 

'asig 

,ss & .as :s 


4 PJW. vohxne 
Prev. 4 PJIA. valume 
Prev. com. valome 


amex stock Index . K\ 

•me, inr am ewae 

23036 . 22931 - 230» +045 


5^ ugn 

nl». YM. PE WHHtetiLow QuoLOrtt 


Stocks End at Record High 


DMonm 
Hleh Lew stack 


ctoa DMendi 

nlw. YM. PE uasHMiUm Qootqrtis HW Low 


Ph. YM.PE TOHWiLow .Quota*# 


24ft 16 AAR 
17ft WAK 
14 9ft AMC 
SK& 2934 AMP 
5z 19 ANR 
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61ft »» ASA 

27 10ft AVX 
2BV* 19ft AZP 
« 38ft AWt 
2Sft 19ft ACO 
24ft Hft ACTT 
IBM 7 Aar 
19 15ft Ado 
JO 13ft Adn 
urft 8ft Adv 
36ft 22ft AMI 
lift 10ft Ado 
ISM 14ft Ado 
15ft 15ft Ado 
12ft 6ft A*j 
lift 9 Aer 
soft 34ft Aet 

57ft 53ft Aet 
385* 22ft Ahi 
3ft 2ft AIR 
s 44 ft AH- 
24ft 17ft Air 

29ft 23ft Ate 

76ft 60 Alt 
26ft 12ft Ab 
B 12ft AU 
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31ft A>< 
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31 21 Ah 

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35ft a«4 
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78 44ft 

SBft a 
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27ft 17 
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50 27 1 
AcmoC 15 

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1 AditlMI M 15 
I AdvSrs 531 19 a 
1 AMD 5 

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. AdobPfA 
, AdobpfB . 

■ Advest -12 U ] 

254 57 

4 Aet Lot S4le 97 
b Ahmns 170 12 

\ Ah^. 27 

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Untied Press tmermiional I 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York | 
Slock Exchange rallied sharply m the final hour ■ 
of trading Tuesday w push the Dow Jtmes 
industrial average to its third record close in live 

SC 7T^blue-chip index rose 6.99, to finish at 

i 'iQfi fn 

Broader indicators also advanced. The New 
York Slock Exchange index climbed 0.6-, to 
1 1 1 07, and the Standard & Poor s-500 stock 
index advanced 1.12 to 192.37. The pnee of an 
average share rose 20 cents. . 

Advances outpaced declines by a 2-1 rauo, 
and volume rose to 119.2 million shares from 
104.9 millio n on Monday. 

Market participants said stocks too* cue 
from continued strength in the bond market. 

Robert Kahan, head of equity trading at 
Montgomery Securities, said the market will 

continue to move higher. 

“There’s a lot of cash on the sidelines, a 
tremendous demand for stocks and a lack of 
supply," Mr. Kahan said. “The interest rate 
environment is clearly improving; rates are go- 

Jensen, of MKI Securities, said that, 
“The market’s tone was good and volume accel- 
erated." Other traders noted that the market 
was able to climb despite some sporadic selling 
in the blue chips as the Dow approached 1 ,400. 

In the credit markets, however, some partici- 
pants were sounding a cautions note on interest 
rates. George Kegler, senior vice president at A. 
Webster Dougherty &Co.in PJjJadelplte^l 
that after its three-week rally, the bond market 
is vulnerable lo disappointment. 

“Interest rates have fallen lower than wnai 


currem Federal Reserve monetary policy and 
economic data warrant,” Mr- Kegler said. He 
said rates could rise if there is "any isapij 1 ^- 
ing news on the deficit reduction efforts of the 

administration and Congress." 

Philadelphia Electric was the most acuve 
NYSE-listed issue, unchanged at 15/4. IBM 
followed, adding lVs to 133%. The company 
raised the prices of some of its software pro- 

erams for the IBM personal computer. 

Pan American World Airways was third, ris- 
ing % to 8 ?(l , . o | 

Among other active blue chips. Procter & 
Gamble jumped 2W to 66%. Late Monday it 
said it had agreed to purchase G.D. Searles 
over-the-counter drug lines from Monsanto. 

Among other pharmaceuticals, Bnstol 1 Myers 
added 2% to 61 fc, Squibb rose 2^ to 73‘A and 
Hi Lilly rose 1M to 95%. 

American Express added ft to 45ft and 
AT&T was unchanged at 21ft. 

General Motors added 1ft to 68%, Ford ft to 
48ft and Chrysler ! to 41ft. 

In the technology sector. Digital Equipment 
jumped 2ft to 1 17ft and Data General rose I* 
to 42ft. Cray Research added ft to 57ft and 
Honeywell rose ft to 62ft. 


‘Is 


15% BncOns .30 |4 11 26 


tSvk Si BncCtr n 54# 55 

a S’S 


8 m 

189 2M 
27 53W 
32 S3M 
264 45U 




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lie'll fill 

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47 28 BvotCo 150 4.1 y ^ 

KSBSah 


203 afiM 
271 MM 


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TVt J AM 140 3 3/ 

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1| 

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PLsniis |r 

iTlt.SS&jiS'tf “ g’«j 

."aKTflJI is- 


nuutjwvu 1*^ — 

GTE rose ft to 41 ft. The Army has awarded a 

$4J»-biDjon contract for a new combat radio- 
telephone system to a U.S.-French industrial 
partnership made up of GTFs Sytvama Divi- 
sion and France’s Thomson-CSF. 

Some interest rate-sensitive insurance stocks 
climbed. General Re added 2ft to 93ft and 
Chubb advanced 2ft to 53ft. 

Prices were higher in active trading on the 
American Stock Exchange. 


.J52&! 

Ifl I i i 

1 S7«X31M wj 

S aT 61* 64 +W. 

13 

U ,J 4« 44* 461*1 + W I 

'J ‘Jftf SSI Sh tSUe + 3k 

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89V. 69 I 
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SO 24M i 
23M 22M 1 
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70M SOM . 

4AM 31M 
4M 1* 
24M 1AM 
27toi 19M 
46M sue 
14 9*. 

27M 17 
39M 23M 
78 S2 
19M 13M 
W, 10 
15Vs I0M 
12M 9to 
2 M 
19to ISM 
74M 60% 
34% 30M 
31M 28 
39M !S% 


ATrpr S54 82 
AmS. S54 68 
AmraD 20 4 22 

ZSZ? * 12 1A 
i Amfoc 

1 Amlesc . _ 

, Amoeo XOTb SO 9 
i AMP 22 23 37 
i Amoco 70 24 IS 

■ Amreo ... ‘J 
i AmStt. 140 17 9 

■ Amsted 150 X4 17 

! ArtS” 21 

; K i5 H » 

1 S8 

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AnhmiPfXAB 4.9 
1 Anlxtr ^ 15 IS 
Artflwffl 54 J 22 
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. Apocne . 78 24 11 

y AochP uniJO 11.1 
6 ApPwpf 112 117 
6 ApPwrt 4.18 127 
AnPwpf 350 125 
M AnIDto 1261 87 V 


<23 69V* ( 
36 14M 1 
8 8 ) 

26 43M 
467 47M 
2 23W 

jn a* 

1257 31M 
216 1»S 

29 22M 

30 37M 
1560 *6M 
3 IS ■ 2M 

35 20M 
54 25M 
B4 44M 
105 W> 
63 22% 
3677 36M 
222 74 
331 17M 
565 12 
98 lWi 
237 12 

254 im 
lisozgj 

II SOM 
383 TIM 


69 4I9M + M 
14 14M + U 

83 S3, 

439* 43M . . 
45M 46M + M 
23M 23M + M 
24% 25 + M 

23V. Hft-h 
2M 2W — M 
66 66M 

309k 3IM +IM 
12% I2M 
22M 2JM— M 
37M 37M 
ASM 46M +1M 
» » 
i 20M 20M + M 
' 2SM 25M + fk 
i 44M 44M + M I 
i 13M 13M + M 
i 25V* 25M— M 

. SAM 36M— M 
73M 73M— 1M 
, 17M 17M + M 
11M 1IM— M 
I 13% 1»- M 

'% TtX 

t JSk 72% + M 
k 32M 32% — % 

S 30M 30% + % 
20M 21% + to 


BV* ApOlMa 
16% ArdlDn 

26M ArlP.pl 3 

14 ArtiBs* 

16 Arklo 1 
<m ArlnCp 
liv* Armada 
AM Ar-mco 
ISM Armc Pt * 
13M Arms Rb 
i 38M ArmWln 
. 23M AroCP 
i 11M ArawE 
i 16 Artiw 

I AM Arvlns 
. IAU. Asorap 
23M AshlOII . 

■ 3S AlMOPf 
24 V, AsdDGs 
k 79 AsdDPt 
a 17 Vb Atotone 
it ZJM AICyEI 
; a AtiRicti 
6 10M AllosCP 
i IBM Aueat 
% 25M AuMDI 
b 4W Avalon n 
to 17V* AVEAAC 
to 2BM A«TV 
to 10 Awkjll 
to 27 Avnet 
17% Avan 
to 16M Avdln 


28 42 

,14b 5 13 2532 
358 117 68 

50 27 9 212 

158 57 23 190 


13 13 13 

22% 22% 22% — M 

30V* 30% 30M + % 

26% 25% 2AV2 + % 

20% 2DVt 20% + M 


2.10 187 1 

48 14 B 619 
170 34 * 225 

lS iS 12 21 

3D 17 906 

72 15 124 14 

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(Continued on Page 12) 


16to H lift + to 

23* 21* 32 — to 


.chu 


:S_ i.- v r _^ _ 




i 





Statistics Index 


AMEX MU* P.TS 
AMEX NSnvlMSR. I U 
NYSE arte** ' P,n 
NYSE NtflVJM P.l« 
Canadian stocks - P.Ta 
Cumae? p.u 

cwnmootto* • P.14 
DMOtmb P.U 


mwi P.17 

ram Wn P .15 
Caw«n«t*ts pji 

Impr est rtnn p.u 
ownarr p.n 
OMtons p.u 

EL* 0 * ' ™ 

mrfcm p.i B 


71 |V remnmnui^t .* 

itenilbdBfefe (tnbunc. 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 



.S. Stocks 
eport. Page 10 




'■ - ^ 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6. lo^ 


* * 


Page II 


‘* r '-Ci 


£ « v> ff 
?*> b e “V* 

'•'- Siv... 


K i. 


INTERNATIONAL manager 

You Can Go Home Again, 
But It’s Not Always Easy 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

hutrviuxxj Htraid Tnbtme 

I ONI ??ci! '~ f G P“ 18 b 5 )roe after aa assignment abroad can be 
asstr«^u] a® gomg overseas. An executive who recently 
j “oyed back, to Britain after along foreign assignment 
. put it this way: “This move has taken an Amoving toC on 
•: ^iunvi'" 1 , Str U jh 1 3111 cx ba Q sted and am only working up to 5 percent 

*■ 1 M “ nibiy *** 


r^As vt 

1 


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A’ 

S: 


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Executives may find 
returning from a stint 
overseas xs as stressful 
as the original move. 


a n to Buildup 

1311011 Revolmj* 


recerv? 


Going home can be d ifficul t even when you have asked for the 
mw when the new position is a promotion and you have gotten 

Caroline Roberts, director of traunng and organizational de 
vdopment with Young & Rn- , 

bicam Ltd. in London, the 

British subsidiary of the ILS. 
advertising agency, asked her 
company to move her back to 
London after spending 6tt 
years in New York and 3*4 
years in Brussels. 

After being bade in London 

for two months, she believes 

that it was a good career move. But is fin/ttwp jj difficult to 
readjust to England after 10 years abroad. 

“The problem is that you are not coming borne at aD,” says' Ms. 
Roberts. “Going abroad I knew my limitations. Moving back 
home, you t hink you know your way around but you doa'L.” 

P SY CHOLOGISTS in the United States and B ritain call it 
re-entry stress. After a few years abroad, returnees 
themselves strangers in their own country. They often tty 
to fit back into the community they hsdkftbtt no longer have 
the same frame of reference that th«r friends have. The country 
has changed and so have they. They may start to fed isol ated, 
lonely and depressed. 

“Re-entry stress is a type of extreme exhaustion caused by 
coping with a high level of novelty in your environment which 
you dunk you know something about but winch, in fact, is totally 
new to you,'’ says Sharon A. Tufam/dao, a U.S. behavioral 
psychologist who is managing director of Health Connections, a 
London-based health-consultancy firm 
Clyde Austin, professor of psychology, at Abilene Christian 
University in Abilene, Texas, has counseled 600 clients who were 
experiencing re-entry stress: He described the phenomenon this 
way: “The biggest problem is that expectations are not met. You 
don't think you are going to have problems but you da As a 
result you feel a sense of loss and nostalgia.” 

There is no empirical data linking the physiological and psy- 
chological disorders normally attributed to stress, such as heart 
disease and alcoholism, to re-entry stress per sc. Diplomatic 
services, the armed forces and rmiftiTmtirmaU have been more 
concerned with stress caused by working overseas. These institu- 
tions, which send large numbers of people overseas every year, 
usually believe that returnees can wdl handle going home. 

But the UJS. Navy, some psychologists and some companies 
■: n. jJJing ijm Ware realizing that those returning may need help. The Charter 
- day." Clinic in London, which specializes in expatriate stress, is con- 

■i:J that the M r ducting a research prefect with 50 expatriate couples on the 
tension caused by coining home as well as going abroad. 

The Center for International Briefing at Farnham Castle in 
England is surveying European multinationals to ask them 
whether they would pay for their returning executives to attend 
seminars to help them adjust to home a g^m. Farnham Castle is a 
major European briefingeenter for executives going overseas. . 

Staying in touch with friends and keeping informed about what 
is going on at home can hdp reduce re-entry stress. - ■ 

“The attitude we took is, ‘Let’s take tins like moving to a new 
country,’ " says Just Donker, an account director in Amsterdam 
with the Dutch subsidiary of Young & Rubicam. Mr. Donker has 
just returned to the Netherlands with his family after having lived 
in Canada for 10 years and in Brussels for three. He finds that 
both he and bis family have adapted well, although his eight-year- 
(Contimed oq Page 17, GoL 7) 


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turns 

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1M19 

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20755 

29187 

79 J6 

26-15 

11.465 * 

7069 

39125* 

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ZUSS 

10701 

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Otainas to London and Zurk*. fottm Ui athmr Etmcman canton. Now York rata* at* PM. 
lol Commanded trtnc »J Amounts hmM to ttuvmtaaound fc/ Amounts n—d*i today one 
dollar (•) Unfit ol 100 txi UnMofUOOM Unlit of IBM) N.O.:notaaofed; tLA^notenattctolm. 
{=) To bwooe pound: SUSUOX 

Other D*Oar Values 

Corrtncr oar USJ Cummcy par (Ui Cummer par liii 

Argeo. austral 030 nn.mortUw SM Max. MM 4M1» 

AustroLS LM41 Crack drac VSLOO Norw. krona 7 JUS 

Aostr. -sctdl. T&2* HOnKant 7MOS PtULMSO 17J0 

Ma.Ho.ft-. SL.ro todtoaruneo U0773 PoruateoPo .HUB 

Bnnilcnn. 1515JM Indo. rupiah 1.12100 ' Saadi rtral US 


US4 
SavtotraMa 077* 
15*A0 
7J37 

■ s «un 


^CanadtaflS 1J724 »rWi« OW* «•».* «» TVckaklkn 5*3 l20 

•CMaere yuan U01S Israeli dwic l^tU50 S. Air. rand 2SM1 UAEdkMm H72S 

1 Danish krona 44435 Kuwaiti (finar 03979 S. Kor. won SMlflO VomlMHy. . 1A53 

Evyat. pound 1J5 Mnkn'.rtaa. M«5 

■ StarUaa: 1X125 Irbsft t 

Sourcn: Booaua du Banatox IBnraeiti; Banco CamowcWto itoUona IMIkal; Bonnva Ns- 
lionale de Part 1 (Parts): Bads of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BA 1 1 (Onor. rtyoL dtrtom); 
Gosbank (ruble), otmr data kam Heaton and AP. 


Interest Kates 


Mm 

• .j; 

• 1 - -ft* if ■ i* 

: i i?- JL '«s- 

: 

' ‘ •'?r 7->. r?" 
•S 3^ i 

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SWIM 

Donor D-Mark Franc 

1 month MV* 1W". 

2 months MVk -«*-*» 

latonIM Mv* * -—4 tv 

i months MM «W1% 4*-*V» 

1 rear BiMW **-5 


Stamm 
11 H.11 u. V1V9V, 
n tw-n ■**. 9th4K- 
n tw-n m. nm« 

11 fwll 11, lOOh-IO*. 
11 iW-11 ft. WMTft 


fbo.5 

ECU SON 
KM 7 ft. 
IMft 7 ft. 
HM1h 71k 
IMh 7*. 
% 


Sources: Morga n Guaranty (dollar*. DM. SF , < Pound. FF): Uoydt Ba nk (ECU): Routers 

ISOR).RotaaaepneottotntoiartainkdapatltMotSlmm>aintoknumferanu/yaleat). 


Key Money BatM AW. s 


UaBadStotn ' 

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^NodRndi b 

■^»rlme Rate MV * 

7 Bnrtau- Local Roto . IW *Vr? 
CM Pomr fB-17f don MS 7JS 

3-monie TIraaMnr Bins 722 721 

MtonnTrattorrMN ?■» 739 

CBtSKBi an 7-55 7/0 

CD1M«dm tJO 740 


71% 


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Lomhard Rato 
OvcraJsBt Rata 
Oiw Moon 


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Brtlolh 

Bank Ban Rale 
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fMtor Treasury Bra 
MMath umrnaah 

Dbcoaot Rate 
am Meat* 

4B-aav latarhaak 


tH I* 

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II 2/1* 113/14 

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Spares; ffMkrs Coninmibank. On St 

LyemaKBonk of Tokvo. 


Arirnn Prilar P ey o ri to 

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Source: Retdm, 


ILS. IH— eyMarked Fwudg 

Tki-5 

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30 day nvero** TtoU: . . 744 

TeHrata tnfonst Rate tadn; 7.91 
Source: Ma rr W Lyncn. 1 lemma. 



. Nob. 5 . 

. AM. .PM. CDVi 

Ham Korn 33495 32U0 -0.90 

UanatHIt 32475 — —US 

pom nuinai mu . nyw — u* 

Zurich . 3MJR5 224X5 —OTS 

Undan 3KS 33440 -0 75 

Now York — . 2208 -an 

Luxembourg, fftsri* and London oJHefef flx- 
Inor. Mono Kuna md-Zvrtai ooenka one 
dooms prfcca.' Wr York Cantex current 
oonlmt. AHprtcet Ip VJ. tear ounce. 
Source: Reams. 


UK. Bank 
Asked for 
Tin Loan 

LME Supports 
Rescue Han 

Reuters 

LONDON —The London Met- 
al Fxrhangc called Tuesday on the 
Bank of England to back a bankers’ 
I^an drawn up in an effort to solve 
the world tin crisis. 

The LME board chairman, Jac- 
ques Lion, said that the central 
bank should provide a loan to the 
.16 financial institutions that on 
Monday had proposed a refinanc- 
ing package for the International 
Tin Council, the producers’ and 
consumers* group that said oo Oct. 
24 that it no longer had the money 
to support tin prices. 

The ITCs withdrawal from the 
market p rom p ted the LME to sus- 
pend trading until a solution was 
found to the crisis, which has 
threatened the rw»wei*l health of 
traders, mines and tin-producing 
finrirm* Trading aim was suspend- 
ed on the Kuala Lumpur metals 
exchange, and the U.S. General 
Services Administration has 


The 14 hawks and two metals 
trading firms, which are owed hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars by the 
ITC, said that they would defer for 
12 months repayment of principal 
and interest owed to them if ITCs 
22 member nations provide a fresh 
injection of cash and guarantee its 
loans outstanding 

Mr. liiw cm the Rank of 
England to extend a bridging loan 
to the f inancial institutions once 
members had given backing for the 
JTC but before they had pledged 
debt guarantees, which he said 
could prove difficult for some pro- 
ducing countries. 

Dealers fear that if the ITC had 
to reduce or even abolish its tin- 
-buying program when trading re- 
sumed, prices could fall by as much 
as 50 percent from the level of 
£8.140a metric ton (51 1,729>er 1.1 
short tons) when business was sus- 
pended. 

ITC delegates who held fruitless 
meetings last wedc aimed at solving 
the crisis, are scheduled to res ume 
Wednesday in emergency session. 

“We bdieve it is vital' to have a 
positive response by Friday at the 
latest," Sr Adam Ridley, a Ham- 
bros Bank director speaking oo be- 
half of the 16 creditors, said Tues- 
day. 

Sir Adam said it was necessary to 
avoid a situation in which ITC 
creditors and metals traders were 
forced to dump tin on the market to 
recoup money lent to the metals 
council. The creditors currently 
bold tin warrants as security for 
loans they have made to the ITC. 
Bul 


Brazil’s Fast-Growing Arms Exports 

Ranking 5th 
In Sales. It .Aims 
At Third World 


By Alan Riding 

Sen ViJrf. Timn Sertve 

SA0 PAL’LO — Brazil's new 
40-ton bauie tank, the OsOno, is 
being tested in die deserts of 
Saudi Arabia. Its Tucano trainer 
aircraft has just been adopted by 
Britain’s Royal Air Force. And 
the first 10 Brazilian-made As- 
tros II rocket systems are alreadv 
being used bv Iraq in its war 
agaiosi Iran. ’ 

That is not all. Last year. lor- 
cign defense attaches were sur- 
prised to spot Br azilian -made ar- 
mored vehicles at a military 
parade in Beijing. And last 
month, as evidence of the impor- 
tance of the occasion. President 
lose Samev- was on hand for the 
maiden flight of Brazes AM-X 
subsonic jet fighier, which is be- 
ing built iu collaboration with 

Italy. 

A decade ago. Brazil barely 
had an arms industry. Now, ana- 
lysts gemrraU) rank’ the country 
as the fifth-bEggest arms exporter 
in the world, after the United 
States, the Soviet Union, France 
and Britain. Most of hs 40 client 
nations are in the Third World, 
where it often competes success- 
fully with the big powers, but 
some of its more imaginative 
military equipment is also at- 
tracting the interest of members 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization. 

Perhaps most surprising un- 
like other leading weapons mak- 
ers. Brazil did not develop its 
export trade as a b> -product of a 
large domestic military establish- 
ment. Nor are exports being used 



Jose Luiz Whitaker Ribeiro 


to expand Brazil’s poinicai influ- 
ence. Rather, this !> iiti cuEiness 
— and good business at that. 

The Brazilian arms industry 
employs lOC'.GGG w criers in ac- 
companies. mos; of them pri- 
vately owned: more than yj per- 
cent of theu producuc-r. i> des- 
tined for expert No official 
figures cr arms sales zre re- 
leased, and the rules of success- 
ful arms dealise reeuire that 


trade figures disguise how* much 
of what is sold to whom. 

Nonetheless, industry sources 
say that arms exports should 
earn Brazil SI billion to S1.5 bil- 
lion in 19S5. The International 
Defense Review and other jour- 
nals pul the figure as high as $2.4 
billion. By comparison.' the Sovi- 
et Union delivered $9.4 billion in 
arms in 19&4. and the United 
(Continued on Page 12, Col 1) 


Unemployment 
Rate Dips 0.1% 
In W. Germany 


Curr.?;!e£ h S7uV r/.w Dnpuiine: 

NUREMBERG — West Ger- 
man unemployment ir. October re- 
mained well above the 2.1 million 
level despite a slight improvement 
during the month in the number of 
people holding jobs, the federal La- 
bor Office taid T uesday. 

In another report Tuesday, the 
economics ministry said (hat indus- 
trial production fell a provisional 
0.2 percent in September oiler 
dropping a revised 3.2 percent a 
month earlier. The ministry had 
originaliy pu: the August decline at 
2.8 percent. 

The Labor Off ice said 2.15b peo- 
ple left the jobless rolls last month, 
reducing total unemployment to 
2,148.819. or S.6 percent of the 
work force, compared with 8.7 per- 
cent in September. The rate also 
stood at S.6 oerce.it in October. 
1984. 

Total unemployment during the 
month, howr-cr/ was the highest 
for an October since the period of 
postwar reconstruction ;n the late 
1940s.. It was around 4,000 higher 
than October 1984. officials said. 

The agency also said that the 
number of workers placed on cur- 
tailed shifts rose by 25.107 during 
the month, to 126.S6C*. And the 
number of unfilled tobs dropped 
4.983. lo 1 12.045. 

Heinrich Franke. president of 
the Labor Office, said he expected 
“somewhat better prospects on the 
employment front" next year. He 
did not elaborate. 

Meanwhile, the economics min- 
istry said that its production index 
fell to 1012 in September from 


Venezuela Charts an Independent Oil Strategy 


Reuters 

CARACAS — Venezuela, a co- 
founder of the Organization of Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries and 
currently its third biggest producer, 
is charting an independent oil strat- 
egy aimed at building new markets, 
according to government and in- 
dustry sources. 

On Tuesday, the government- 
owned Petrol eos de Venezuela an- 
nounced that it would cut the price 
-of its benchmark Bachachero heavy 
crude by 40 cents a barrel to 
S23.1Q, and raise some light-prod- 
uct prices to match a similar move 
by Mexico last week. 

Analysts had anticipated the 
pricing action since Venezuela and 
Mexico, an independent producer, 
compete directly in the MS. market 
in sdling heavy crudes. 


Although 75 percent of sis ex- 
ports are already sold outside the 
cartel’s official’ price structure. 
Venezuela continues to support 
unit) among members. Bui with 
the need to service a S34-biliion 
foreign debt, its priorities increas- 
ingly lie elsewhere, analysts say. 

"Venezuela will defend OPEC, 
but this does not prevent us from 
acting to defend our own inter- 
ests." the energy- and mines minis- 
ter. Arturo Hernandez Grisanit. 
said over the weekend. 

Already producing i.56 million 
barrels a day. Venezuela has the 
capacity to produce another 1 mil- 
lion barrels per day. 

Mr. Hernandez's comments re- 
flect a significant policy change by 
the government in the las; few 
months. Mr. Hernandez refused to 
follow Mexico’s heavy crude price 


cuts earlier this year until OPEC 
met in July. 

Venezuela’s former energy min- 
ister, Humbeno Calderdn Berti. 
says it is imperative for Venezuela 
to fix its heavy erodes independent- 
ly of OPEC in order to defend its 
markets. 

“OPEC s price structure is pure 
fiction, and Venezuela must design 
its own strategy." he told reporters. 

Heavy erodes make up around 
45 percent of of Venezuela’s 1.4 
million barrels per day in exports 
while light and medium, which are 
subject to OPEC price rules, are 
less than 25 percent. 

Under Mr. Calderon. Venezuela 
began to diversify its markets. In 
1982. it set up a joint venture with 
Veba Oel of West Germany which 
now sells 1 50.000 barrels per day to 
the European market. 


But other heavy erode processing 
arrangements wiih partners in Ita- 
ly. Brazil. France and the United 
States were blocked by congress. 
However, the government cleared 
the way last week for the national 
oil company to participate directly 
in consumer markets through joint 
ventures with a reform of the 1975 
oil nationalization law. 

Aside from heavy erodes, PDV 
also is looking at liquified-gas mar- 
kets. Last month, PDV signed a 
one-year agreement with Marubeni 
Corp. of Japan to supply 200.000 
metric tons of propane. 

Mr. Hernandez says the new 
strategy will pul Venezuela in good 
shape to weather the oil slump. 
This year, he said, he expects to 
exceed the export target of 1.356 
million bartels per day. 


102.4 in August and 105. S in July. 

But the index was It percentage 
points higher than in September 
last year, when it stood a; S9.fr. 
Third-quarter production s.y 
percent higher than in the vreond 
quarter. 

Manufacturing industry provi- 
sionally showed an overall 0.7 per- 
cent fall in September against Au- 
gust. with capital goods output O.V 
percent higher buf consumer goods 
production down 2.3 percent. 

In other areas, construction out- 
put rose 1 percent and electricity 
and gas production bv 2.4 percer.i. 
Mining production was 2.4 percent 
lower. iL'Pl. Raiterzi 

■ Gains Front Privatization 

Bonn expects income of 2 billion 
Deutsche marks (S769 million) in 
the next two years by seiiinc .-take: 
in state-owned companies. Reuters, 
reported from Bonn. 

In an interview with the newspa- 
per Schleswig-Holsteinische 
Landes zoning, the Finance Minis- 
ter. Gerhard Siolienberz. was 
quoted as saying that the govern- 
ment expected to receive 400 mil- 
lion DM from selling part interests 
in various companies next year. 

The balance would be received in 
in 1987, he said- 

The government has announced 
plans Lo sell part of its interest in 
<nx companies, including Lufth- 
ansa, the national airline, before 
the end of the present parliament. 

Mr. Sioitenberg said he did no: 
rule out pan privatization of Salz- 
gitter AG. the steel and engineering 
group, in the next legislative period 
beginning early in I9S7. Salzgitter 
is expected to break even neu year 
after heavy losses. 

Government sources said that 
Bonn expected to sell stakes in Yiag 
AG. an aluminum, chemicals and 
energy group, and Prakia-Seismos 
GmbH, an energy exploration 
company, next year’. Bonn will cut 
its 87.4-percent stake in Viaa by at 
leasL a quarter and have the compa- 
ny listed on bourses, sources said. 

The government’s plans for 
Prakia-Seismos. in winch it has a 
direct 95-percent stake, are less 
clear, but it will initially retain a 
substantial holding, sources said. 

Mr. Stolten berg’s aim of reduc- 
ing Bonn's 74.3-percem stake in 
Lufthansa to around 55 percent has 
so far been blocked by Franz Josef 
Strauss, Bavarian premier and 
leader of the Christian Social 
Union Party. Any progress on the 
issue will require iop-leve! coalition 
talks which have yet to be sched- 
uled, the sources said. 


SEC Begins Insider-Trading Probe 


By Steve Coll 
and David Vise 

Washington Past Semee 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Securities ami Exchange Commis- 
sion said that it has launched a 
series of investigations into insider 
trading by professionals who delib- 
erately spread false takeover infor- 
mation and then profit from the 
wild swings in stock prices. 

The SECs enforcement director, 
Gary Lynch, called the recent stock 
price activity “unsettling." Mr. 
Lynch, who disclosed the agency 
investigations Monday in an inter- 
view, said that he was particularly 
alarmed when rumors, rather than 
news events and other public dis- 
closures, recently dictated much of 
the action on Wall Street for an 
entire week. 

The latest takeover rumors have 
caused sharp hourly fluctuations in 
the price of some stocks, such as 
CBS Inc. 

CBS stock jumped 15 points 
amid takeover speculation during 
trading late last week, only to fall 
more than S points Monday when 
no bidder materialized. 


“A conple of weeks ago we start- 
ed taking a look at the insider trad- 
ing area with a fresh eve," Mr. 
Lynch said. “I don’t know if it is 
insider trading or spreading of un- 
founded rumors, but there is some- 
thing going on in the market that I 
find unsettling. And we’re going lo 
see if we can get to the bottom of it. 

“There were six companies that 
were the subject of takeover rumors 
one day and their stocks moved up 
appreciably," he said. “That week 
there were 'over 20 stocks subject to 
takeover rumors." 

Mr. Lynch also said that the SEC 
is in the midst of more than 35 
investigations of insider trading. 
Wall Street sources said that 
some of the investigations involve 
stock purchases in prominent take- 
over targets by professional inves- 
tors. known as arbitrageurs, during 
the last year. Mr. Lynch refused to 
comment on specific purchases be- 
ing reviewed by the SEC. 

Insider trading involves the ille- 
gal use of nonpublic information 
by investors seeking to profit from 
sharp changes in the price of 
stocks. For example, a corporate 


director with advance knowledge 
of a takeover bid could profit by 
buying stock in the Urge: company 
prior to an announcement, an act 
that Mr. Lynch said would be 3 
clear violation of insider trading 
laws. 

The SECs intensified concern 
about insider trading comes at a 
time of explosive merger and acqui- 
sition activity. During the third 
quarter of 19S5. the total value of 
corporate buyouts wa* more than 
S34 billion, the second-highest 
quarterly volume ever, according to 
Mergers & Acquisitions magazine. 

CBS has been the target of more 
takeover rumors this vear than any 
other corporation. .And the specu- 
lation has continued in the several 
months since CBS successfully de- 
fended itself against a hostile take- 
over bid from the Atlanta broad- 
caster, Ted Turner. 

CBS officials are convinced that 
Lhe company is the target of rumors 
planted by professional investors, 
who profit when the stock rises, i 
following a rumor, and then sell 
before it falls, when the rumor fiz- 
zles. 



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history has ever known. 

His genius was an overriding influence 
not only on watch-making techniques 
but also on lhe beau.'y 
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| V* Bcdfiwi S ijujcc. I jiiuiMnUCIK. «(■(•. Knetind MUiHUWft U:lc\. J.HMi 

I .i2 Bnudujv. New V.rk \.\ Iiw»M i212i V.vlTTH lllcv 47*07 iS'H x.kSi 

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S.,w :;..s.-r'y r - 

si®-'-- 


Page 12 


Tuesdays 


NiSE 

dosing 

Tables include ttie nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


l: Manfti 
men Low stock 


23V: 15% Dallas jo 411 30 51 16«b 1a*s )6ft 

M‘% »U DasnonC JO 73 14ft 14’: Ift + H 

TOft 22VJ. DanaCo ITS A3 7 687 2«'.* 23’; 3£a + ft 

»* ffl* Danqhr B U 7- ^ IVl 

IS 43.1 Daniel .18b 13 108 fl 7** ft. — ft 

401* ZT-. DcrtKr s 1-5* 19 13 1734 39*1 39ft 3»ft— to 

76 31 DataGn 44 4592 Ci 4l 421; +1V« 

54 B 4 Dotorn JI2 S': P> S’: 

H1* Wi DloDs? 2* 13 8 213 T . * 7to 7ft — to 

22 Mft Dsvco 74 1*4 9 22 171* 17ft 171* 

45ft 291* DcrvtHd J2 11 17 3997 40 3«ft 39=* + '* 

=0ft 15 DovtPL 100 10.7 S 307 ISft ISft 18ft 

JO’* 244* DeanFd J6 14 17 32 3flto 3«ft 38ft + ft 

33to 24ft De«re 1.00 AO 37 cfli 25ft T4ft 25 + ft 

2frft 20V* DelmP 1.92 7J 9 231 24** 24ft 74 s *— '4 

534* 36ft DflltaAr 130 U 7 3153 J 01 - 38’ 1 3941 +14* 

IQ 4'i Deltona 73 64. 6': 64s— '* 

Mft 241* DUChS 1.04 25 18 1280 414 j 41'* 414* + ft 

2BVb 2«* Denstol V20 SJ 12 bS 214* 21 to lift + to 

OT* 31*4 DeSoto 1.40 A3 II 24 32’s 32to 377 + •* 

171* 14 D«Ed US tlJJ 7 2976 15ft Jrt 15ft + 4* 


80 64 DelEof 9JI 123 1510: 74ft 76 76V- + V: 

671a S3 DatEaf 7X 11J 3380: 4*; u<* 66* + 4* 

654* 5l’:DefEpf 7*4S 1U 3300:65 43to 45 +Tft 
641* 52 DelEpf 7.36 11 J U00: 65 64 c>5 +1ft 

264* 23V* DEPfF 275 106 22 26 26 24 

2»ft 23 DEorR 3J4 I2J 26 26 l S 26-1 26ft— to 

271* 21 3 . DE OtQ 3.13 127 41 25ft 251* 251* + ft 

37V* 22'* DEBlP 3.12 12.1 A 2T* 25 1 ; 25ft + ft 

ST* 22 DEofB 275 107 1 254* 254* 254* 

29 'a 24 DEofO 140 112 119 ZTi 27'.; 77 - a + 

294* ?4’A DE of M 142 114 20 271* TTt 274* + ft 

331* 28 DEorL iJM 117 11 31’s 31’* 31’: 

341* 29 DE PfK 4.12 12 a 16 321. 32 324* + ft 

116’/= 107 DEOIJ ISAS 137 3 114ft 114ft 1 Mft + ft 

99U 771* Del E Pi 9.72 M 36510; 99V- 99’* 9V’; + ’a 
20ft 16ftDe1Eor 228 11.7 1 l»lt TV: 19;— ft 

24 1BV: Do» ter 20 3 a 13 270 22ft 21ft 22Vi 

181. 114* DiGtor AJ IB 74 37 17 16% 17 + ’-J 

21 I4ti DlamS 157rl0.1 1563 in IS'* 15V; 

38to 341* DioShpf 4 00 MO 9 34ft 36 J6ft + ft 

22ft 20V* D la SOI n IXe 66 137 21V* 21 21'* + Vs 

11 6ft Diana C p 31 31 3 1 W 9.: «»+ 

57V; 317* DtoWds U00 24 M 503 372fc 3714 371* + 4* 

1254* BS 1 .* Digital 19 4944 118V* 1151* 117ft +**■: 

95 5eft Disney 120 U SO 5W 9?ft »lft *7% + ft 

28 V* 17*1 Dels IX 7.1 15 69 19ft 19V* 191* + * 

6V* 4'* Divrsln 3 ISO SU S’-* 5 1 * 


1563 ir* IS'* 15V— 

9 36’i 36 36'* + ’* 

737 SIU 21 21'* + Is 

6 94* r.3 94* + 


28W ITt's Dels 
6V* 4'* Dlvrsln 

10V* <A* Dome 9 

34V* 26'» DomPs 
23V* i6t; Donald 


3 13 SU SU 5 1 * 

1404 SI* B'-a 81* 

8J » 1021 SZ 1 : 32’* + '* 

19 TO 63 23 224*221* 


617* 43-* Donlev 1.16 IS IS 270 STU 51Vi 57’. — 


351* 23U Dorsev 1J0 


35 1 * 36 + "a 


«2'.; 3T:, Do. or A3 IS 13 30J ITj ISv; 35 1 *— v* 

3T* 27 DowCIl I AO A9 IS 5320 36-', J6V« 36*8— '* 

SO 36’- Dowjn J3 11 18 8J9 33 JT.~. 38 + *1 

35 8': Downe» AOe 1.1 4 60S 36'i 35 36'a +1-* 

lS'i 11 Draw AO 3A 211 IP. I3v* 131. + '• 

24’* 174* Drew JO JJ 16 832 T8‘j 18 ’t 18’:— ‘3 

21": 161* Dre*B 100 114 48 HU W» WU + '* 

69V: 35 OrevHrt AOa .9 15 611 631. 68'.* 68'2 + '* 

63 4* 46 l * duponl 100 4.9 16 6322 62U #1 614*— > 

40 3IU duPnfpl 350 9.4 2 37': 37t J 3?U— ** 

357* 274* PuieP 160 7A 9 109? 339* 33=* 33’:— ’* 


40 3IU duPnfpl 3JO 9.4 2 J7': 37U 37U— 4* 

357* 274* DukeP 2A0 7A 9 1 09? 339* 33=* 33 ;— ’* 

BS 1 : 70 Dukeol S_T) 10J 10= 82'-; 82 't ST; +1U 

BOV* *5 Dukeol 820 lfLo 1200: 77 77 77 +2 

77 61V; Dukrol 7 AO 1QA 3EC= 7T-: 71V: 73V: + 1. 

27 22"a DukePl 2A9 10A 1 26 - 4 26V* 26's + U 

35 1 : 304* Dukeol 3AS 10.9 33 lS’i 341. 35U + =* 

83’* «0 DvnBrd 120 1’ 20 14M 75 74 75 +1 

1 rs 14',* DuaU 2JJ6 116 7 a« I6-* I5"i I6 : * + 'i 

18=. 15*. DucofA 110 11.1 200= 19 19 19 U 


16** 121* DuapJ IA7 1 1 j* 
IT* 13*s Duasl ICO 111 
18** 14 Duqpf 2C; 112 
16 141. Dua pKJ 110 125 

15 1J'* DuaprK 110 112 

20’- 151. Duo pr 131 111 
25i: 23'. Duq pr 175 10.9 
62V: SO Duq pl 720 112 


29 EGG .45 1.4 
15’. Ei3K n 1U 7.9 
23’.: E Svsf JO 1J 
20 EavreP 1.04 U 
12’: Easce 221 
3*1 EosiAir 
11* EALWIO 
V; EALWtA 
77* EsAIrpf 153k 
9": EAir PIB A20k 
11*: EAlrotC 
21': EasIGP U0 SJ 
IS' a EaitUll 106 P.J 
41 U Ejkods 120 50 
J9’* Eaton 1.40 2J 
l»v* Ecmini M U 
20 Eckera UM 15 


1050: 157« 15*. 1S»* + U 
llKt 16V: 1S~: li’r + U 
2C0: ?7 17 17 + 'll 

IDO: 161* 161* 161. 

ir it 3 * ir* 17*. + u 

oC0= T9V* v® If* + v, 

180= 2T.* 25-* 2SU 

100=5? 59 }» — 1’* 


26'* EdisBr 160 
144* EDO 13 1.9 

8 EdCrtiD .12e 1- 

221. Edward JO 18 

lit: EPG del 135 9A 

9 siTaro sue j 


10 iO 13 5395 
A0 IS 8 293 
,4J 15 11 396 

.04 3J 14 2044 
60 SJ) 13 3 

IS 1.9 13 78 

.12e 11 16 56 

JO 18 13 168 


351* 344 * 
16 TSH 
23- : 27»* 
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scis 

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UVTERWATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


Sis. Owe 

Dw. • 1C. PE 130* Hlaf La* Oiwt.Cnge 


[Continued from Page 10) 

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m* n Culinet s 79 1185 IS 14' 2 1-F* + H 

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Id* 9»a Currlnc l.lOcloj 39 1IW3 HHs 1015 

3ai* 301a Cwriw 1J0 3J 16 IS JJV; 34 344* + v* 

STa 33W Cyclops 1.10 13 B 12 48U 48 4fl 


12 .vomit 

Hiflh Law Stott 

12 7*« 

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24'.* 151* 

16 It'S 
9’5 2 
78U 66 
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5=* 4': 
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20 111* 

29't ir* 

214* 171* 

24* l"i 
13'* 9’i 

I* 1 ; 131* 

I1»t> 174* 

35 21's 

4': J'a 
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KW* 25’ -. 

50': 32U 

17 6'i 
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74=* IS 
28 15 

2a'’ a 14"s 

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91 a !*« 

T2l; T« 

«'• 331: 

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55=1 «l; 


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3429 1* 

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1165 1316 23V* 
1 7 166 20 

25 130 2ft 
42 12L* 

I 52 I4 T » 
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IX 36 34U 
124 4 

I IB 18=* 
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1 9 34 43U 

16 27 9'i 

1 13 4SB 141* 

■ 13 X JIV: 
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i a SO 14*3 
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391 V* 
42 2 

6 7t 
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16'* liv* 
27 IS'* 
19 13'* 

446. 23 

221 * 15*, 

13 B'a 

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44'; 32 
J2U 31'* 
39 3tM* 


2J0 32 Z4 

1.9* 73 B 

X *0 21 

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160 115 
.13 IJ 9 

i 20 1.0 X 

AO 43 14 

88 45 10 

X 2.4 1® 

JUeU I 
1J4 4.1 10 
23 

39 3D4. FCMog 1.60 -L7 10 

22V* 14 FedNM .16 .7 

25 left FedlPB X 19 17 

30’: 251* F Pap pi 131 BA 

25 19'a FedRII lJe 64 15 

19=* 14** FdScml 80 A£ 14 

68'., 49 FedDSt 2J4 3J 10 

37 131* Perm IX 3J 17 

35 251* Fittest 1JW 3.1 11 

11>* 5<* FlrtCpA .051 

S'; 4ft FlnCopI .60 12.0 

3ri 29 FinCopI 6JSA114 
6ft 2V; FnSBar 3 

291- 2S 7 * FlreFdn 
22ft 16' a Fireetn JO =3 IJ 
27ft 15'- Ft AH S A60 26 » 

SSV: S3 r (Allot AXelU 
43 2S’a Frak5v ' .60 4.1 7 

34'; 22 FBkFls IX 2.9 14 

46ft 25ft FBost s IX Zi 10 

26ft 19ft FstOlIC IJ2 5J 9 : 

53’- 44'; FChiO Pf5.l4el06 
IT: 1Q=* FIBTet 60 4.9 12 
44' a 32 U FIBT.pISXelSA 
19ft 6’. FtCilv 4 

29'- 12'k FFedA: ASB IS S 

40 431a FFB 3.12 iS 8 

55ft 39ft Flnlste 2J0 i! 7 

34V* 25 1 -* Flnfsl Pl 2 JT 7.9 
lift 6'; FlMiss X 3.4 10 

31'* 16 FINatnn 6 

7”; 5'-: FsIPa 
301* X=- Fit Pa Pl 262 =.7 
31ft 2SU FtUnP.I 1 M 7.1 14 

X'-: 18 FivaSk J8 14 10 

35*a 17ft F'WlK IX IS 8 

55': 48 FWiscal 5JS 11 J I 

41 32 -. FlSdhO 1.0C. 3.9 

13 8Va FIshFd .056 A 773 
43 26ft FltFnG S 1A4 IB 8 
S2»* 4J 1 : FIIF of 4JJ7e7J 
28=* 17ft FieeiEn « 14 9 1 

3*1* 31ft Ftomna i.X 2 S 13 

13ft lift Flexlpl lAl 12J 

291. X FloniSli 16 .7 17 


3S 15'* FloCIPT 18 

45 1 : 31': FlaEC .160 .4 13 

29’ a 22ft FIOPrB 2.16 =J 8 

18ft lift FlaSII J2 11 13 

6ft 3U Flv. Gen 

21'* 14'* Flower .45 22 19 

Xft 13=* Fluor .40 29 

5° 47>* FooieC LI il 11 

51'* 40ft Faraw 280 SJ 4 

13'* 11V: FIDear 136 ISJ 

45ft 28'. FiHows 

IS 1 : 10ft Foil'ATl .44 4J3 12 

13v* 71* FonPhOl X 14 lj 

32ft 24ft Fo.bra 1U A2 

27 22 Fojmvr 16 

Xft 16ft FMEPr. 1.10a SJ 

134* Oft FMGCn 1 33 

10ft 8ft F.MOG 2B4e23.1 5 

2 Tn IS 1 * Frol Me AflS II 11 

32'k 22 Frlfllm jo0 22 35 

Ml- 2U. FrueM .70 12 6 

3T-a Xft Frullf Df 200 73 

36ft 28' . Fuqua A0 U 9 


Xft GAF 
271. GA7 X 
49U GATX pi . 


I 4SU 671* 671* 

I 25 24ft 2411 

> 9ft O'- Oft 

I lOVg 9ft 10 + ft 

ill 10ft IIP* — U 
r J1U 31 JTU— ft 

> 11=6 lift lift 

I a 19ft X +14 
| 14 14 14 + U 

I 441* 44 44ft 
I 19ft lBft 19ft +! 
81* BVs 8ft — U 

5 41* 4ft 

44ft 44ft 44ft + U 
481* 46ft 48ft +2ft 
3* 33-i 34 +'.« 

21ft 21 U 21'.: + U 

1 17ft 17ft 17=4 + ft 
27 27 27 

; 24’: 24V: 

! IS >7ft 18 

66ft 64 1* 66ft -Mft 
321* 31 U 31ft— ft 
32 'a 32 32ft + ft 
Aft 6ft 6U 
$ S S — ft 

54 33ft 34 + ft 

6 6 6 

2?s* 29 U 29ft 
ira 10ft 181* + ft 
Xft 257a 25ft + ft 
561* 56U 56'* — '.- 
337* SSft 381* — ft 
34 33ft 34 

4lft 41ft 41ft + ft 
2«ft Mft Mft + ft 
43 U 48ft 
12ft 12ft 12'* 

34ft 341: Mft + V, 
Aft 61: Aft 
27 2eU 27 + ft 

55ft 5«a 54ft- ft 

49 48V; 48ft + ft 

30 291* M — ft 

V* 7 7ft— ft 

31 U 31 ft 31 Vk 

eft eft Aft — ft 

Xft 26'; 26ft + ft 
28ft 2SU XU— ft 
Xft X 24V!. + ft 
34'* 34ft 34ft— la 
: 54'-: 54': 54 ft 
S' ! 2«1a 25ft *1 Ik 
12ft 12 12»; + ft 

38ft 37ft 38V. + V- 

52 =S 51ft 52ft— Ik 
18". 18ft 18V;— V* 
37ft 37 IT- + >* 

12ft 12ft 121k 

aft 22ft 2T* + U 

31=* 31ft 31ft 

X 39 39 

29ft 29*1 Xft 

ir* 17 17 — la 

fft Sft 5ft + ft 
21ft 20ft 71ft + U 

14 13~a 14 

S4U 54'; 54'* + 'a 

48’ * 47U 48’i + ft 

13 12ft 13 + *. 

44ft 43ft 441* +1 

I1U 10ft lift + ft 

12ft 12ft 12V- 

25 - X 35 

U’l 23U 24ft +1’» 
19 13ft 1F6 

10ft 13ft 10ft 

lO'i 10 1 01a + '-a 

19-; 19 19Va 

2T* 27 S’* 

S'* 22ft 22ft — U 

271- 2<ft 27ft + la 

31 Vs 31 U 31'; + ft 


7’ a GCA 

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31* GF Cd 
? V * 

MU GTE pf 
20ft GTE ol 
3 GalHou 
431, Gannett 
20' : Gaolnc 
7U Gearllf 
14': Gelco 
9ft Gain IlC 
10 Gomil I 
31': GnCoro 


39ft 39' a 
301- X': 
50". 50ft 
7Ta 71k 
75ft 741i 
X.i 3ft 
41s 4ft 
41 7; 40ft 

25’i ar* 
^415 

ir.: 17ft 
10 ft 10 U 
lift tilt 
43U 60 


39’: + ft 
30':— U 
50Ta + ft 
7ft- U 
74ft— ft 
3ft + ft 
4'.; — Va 
4iv; + l; 
25U- ft 
2 « 

3ft 
S4ft 
47ft +5 
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17t; + ft 

iou 

1IU 

61ft +r.k 


iz Mourn 
High Low Stock 


Sts. Goss 

Ply. VIA PE Ufa Hfth Low gua. Cn'ac 


3ft 4 — ft 
191k 19ft— ft 
1?« 13ft 
: 2 

49U 69ft + U 
7Vk 7ft + ft 
16K. 17 — ft 

~s 2 »la _ ft 
71 U 31ft + ft 
S 5ft + ft 
14ft Mft— ft 

ft + 

221* 23ft + ft 
19ft 19ft + ft 
22ft aft + ft 
I9’to X 
2 ft 2 Va + ft 
12 1 2ft 

14' 1 14ft— ft 
191- 19’a 
34 34'* 

3Tk 4 

18ft 18ft— ft 
XU XU 
43V| 43U + V* 
9’; 9ft — Vk 
13ft 14ft + *4 
21’** 21ft + Vk 
ijft 1 ? + ft 
ltft i6va + ik 
2<’a X + ft 
1 ft 1 ft- ft 
>1* 11*— ft 

2ft 2ft 
42U 42ft + ft 
toft 17 

53U S3ft - ft 


1A30 9J 67 
IX 1J7 12 27 

X 1A 11 242 
IS 293 

1S I 

IX 1A 7 1147 
220 1a 13 5913 
7 X 


5.00r 7J 6 97tn 

JBI .! 432 

L75 U 250 
5 X M 15 
.16 16 16 14 

B 794 
IJ6 IJ 97 2884 
IS 164 
IX « 11 506 
IX IDA 3D(b 


14ft 

31ft 
22ft 
771 

ra 

3U. 

62 
S3 
4K, 

11 % 

BU> 

12ft 
47ft 
53 
64% 
toft 

36 
47ft 

3ft 
10ft 
58% 

6 

37 
10ft 
10ft 
64ft 

2ft 
s 
19 

19ft .. . _ 

2Sft GonuPT 1.18 3J 14 4IB 

S ft GcPac JO U H 3X1 
ft GaPCPf 2J4 SJ 1 

Bft GaPwpl 3M 11J 43 

25%. GaPw pf 3*44 IZ2 17 
27 GaPwpi 3J6 12 a 9 

19 GaPwpf 2J6 11A 117 

18ft GaPwpf 2JD 11.9 15 

22 GaPwpf 275 10*4 11 

57ft GaPwpf 7JH lli 5480= 

GaPwpf 7J2 115 330= 

GerftPd 03 16 14 377 
2ft GerbSc .13 J II 1S9 
4ft Getty s .16 J 439 291 

Oft GIANT 43 

5% GlbrFn 4 354 

Aft GlffHill J2 3*0575 170 
3ft Gillette 2A0 3.9 13 571 
1ft GJeosC 106 3 

7ft GlenFd JO IJ 4 317 

1ft GlobIM .121 667 

4% GtobMpllJa 115 

Bft GldNus X 637 

1H GkSN wt 391 

GldWF J4 A 4 789 

Gdrlcll 1J6 AS 199 
IX 61 6 47S9 

J2 3J 23 7 

M 21 1162 

280 7A 12 2033 
AB 20 14 35S* 

AS 25 7 355 
7 234 

IX 1A IS 75 
IJSclU 12 

1J2 4J 16 27S 

IX 25 7 3116 

1J6 9*4 9 13 

6 1024 
IJ2 4J 11 924 

4.75 1IU 60= 

JO M it ’S 
X 10 16 164 

IX 3J 11 1205 
280 HU 3 

.16 2*4 61 98 

M 27 13 10 

X 2T 13 6045 
5JS BJ 1 

24 156 

1A4 121 6 2534 
185 128 13 

4*40 121 10 

X 29 10 2T2 



22% htallFB IXI 
7Jft Halbfn IX 6J 
“4 Hailwd X SJ 
7% Halwdpf J6 60 
26ft HamP ■ IJi U 
12ft HanJS l*47aiai 
17ft KarUI lJ4a 9.1 
16ft Handl s J6 2*4 
16 HandH M 2i 
16ft Hanna A0 27 
39ft HarBrJ IX 1.7 
2lVk Harfnd s J6 1 J 
7ft Hamisfi 
Mft Horn pfB 3*40 116 
Mft HampfC213 7.9 
15ft HrpRw 5 M 30 
2 Tu Harris X IS 
10ft HorGrp 
22 Haruo IX 4J 
Mft Horlm* ITS 37 
14%. HattSe IX 104 
19ft HawEt 1.72 0O 
9U HavHA Me 4J 
Xft Hazlem M 1.9 
9ft Ha: Lab 72 2J 
10ft HlthAm 
19 HiiCrPn 73*15 
10ft HIUISA 
10% Hecks X 22 
13% HeclaM X IJ 
Mft Hellmn *48a 25 
. I Aft Helllo X IJ 
291* xft Heinz s 
22ft 12% HelrteC 
24ft 18 HelmP 76 IJ 
401. 3lft Her ails IX 4*1 
19ft 10ft HerltCs .(Ml 
34 21 HerllC pfl JO 45 

21 16 Hermn n 

Xft X Hershv IX 2J 
lov; 5% Hessian 
13ft 9 Hestnof 
38% 28% HewIPk 22 7 

33% M Hence! as 23 ' 
23ft I5>* HIShoar X 2*4 
UVa 9ft HIVoll .17 15 
26 Vk 19'k Hllnbrd J4 2*4 
aft 54 Hlllon IX 27 
37V'. 26ft HHortil Me 10 
57*fc 39 Holiday IX 15 
Xft 65*4 HollyS IX U : 
20ft 10ft HotneD 
27'.t 17’ft HmFSD 
9ft 7 HntoG pf 1.10 1U 
28Vk 20ft Hmstka X .9 1 
18 10 HmsIFn X 25 

631* 46ft Honda Xe .7 


17ft 171* — V* 

58V1 S9 + « 
35% 35Vj— H 
10ft 1013 + V, 
10 10 
ZVk 2ft 
62ft 64 +1U 
59ft 61 +1 

Avk 4ft 
\7% 18ft + ft 
Oft 9ft- ft 
14% Uft + ft 
64% 64ft + Va 
57 57 — ft 

67ft 68ft +lft 
39ft 391k 
39ft 39ft- % 
52ft 52ft + ft 
ii; 4Vs 
15*4 15ft— % 
91 93ft +2ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
39ft 40% + ft 
12 12 — V» 

U 13 
76 76 — % 

3ft 3U— ft 
9ft vft 
19ft 19ft 
20ft 20ft 
30% 31% + Vi 
21ft 22 + ft 
37ft 371k — ft 
25ft 25ft + ft 
28% 28% + ft 
29ft 29ft + ft 
2116 22ft + ft 
71 21% 

26': 26ft 
66 66 +1 
X + ft 
36ft- ft 
75"a— % 
30 + % 
10ft + ft 
8ft 

17% t ft 
66% 66ft — % 
15ft 15ft— It 
12% 12ft 
lft lft + ft 
4va 4ft + ft 
9ft to 

lft 2 + ft 

371* 37ft 
31ft 31ft + ft 
26% 26% — ft 
16% 

321* — ft 
37ft- ft 
33ft -I- la 

17 

18 - ft 
62ft 

Uft + ft 
36 + ft 

28=6 

181*— ft 
27ft + ft 
28ft + ft 
46 — % 
5ft— U i 
IQft— % 
71* — % 
30% +11i 
26ft + ft 
6%— % 
Mft 

43ft + % 1 
65ft— ft : 
15ft— ft I 
12ft 

30ft + ft 

av; — % 
20ft + % 


29ft + ft 
26ft +1 
lft + Va 
9ft 

39ft + ft 
Mft - ft 
20 % + % 
23ft + Va 
18ft 
18 

57ft -f % 
33ft— ft 
9ft + ft 
25 

Mft + ft 
20 

2Sft + ft 
16% 

29ft— ft 
Mft 

17% + % 
21ft— 1* 
ID + ft 

21 %— ft 
14ft 

11 

21 

IDU— ft 

12ft 

15ft 

19ft— ft 
31 + ft 

28ft + ft 
2116 -H16 

20 + ft 

36ft + ft 

IT* + ,*■* 

33 — >6 
17ft- It 
49% — % 

Skill 

27 +% 

21 — % 
11 + % 
22 %—% 

83ft + ft 

iSk- % 

22 + ft 
15% 

54% + ft 


12 Month 
Hwnuna Stott 

47ft 54% 

Mft 22ft 
28% 72 
Aft 3ft 
52% 28ft 
29ft 17% 

42ft 31ft 
lWi 123* 

41ft 2816 

Xft X 
81ft AB 
29ft 20ft 
14ft B 
19ft Uft 
27ft 23ft 
13ft 9ft 
15ft 12 
2* 17% 

36ft 21ft 
31ft 21 
4lft 24ft 
32 20ft 


Vk Oote 

) ID! High Low OIMLCVWI 


in 12 

L2B IS 

jfiMeU 

X U 

Em IX 27 
a O& *4B 15 
lint 1J1 4*4 
ntpf 2JQ 4.1 
rrtPf 6J5 7.9 
nd W M 
>R 17461 7 J 
ICp X 2*4 
2JB 9.1 
X 4 JO 
X 3.9 
33 IJ 
X 28 
X 17 
X 2J 
2X 6 A 


Oft 62 
36ft 36ft 

a a 
5V> 5% 
32ft 32 

am am 

40ft 40ft 
60% 60% 
mu 79ft 
a 27% 
916 9ft 
17ft 16% 
25% Mft 
10ft 91k 
12ft 12ft 
21ft 21ft 
27 26% 

30ft 2914 
3S Mft 
31ft 31ft 


37% 35 ICInd 1*44 19 
1FU 14% 1 CM n Xe S3 
lift 8% ICN 
MW 15ft INAIn 1.92 11.1 
STft 2146 iPTimn l*Ce &J 
19ft }£* IRTPre IX 97 
36ft 25ft ITT Cp IX 27 
65ft 49 ITT nIK 4X 47 
AJV; 49 ITT pfO 5X 8.1 
48% 35% ITTpfN 250 57 
6fl Sl% ITT pfl UQ 7J 

19ft IT JU Int 40 u 
M% 18 IdDhoPa 172 BJ 
17 5 IdsolB 

27% me UlPewr L44 vij 
21% 16% llPowof 2.10 1DJ 
30ft 15% llPOWPf 113 117 
21ft 1711. llPowpf L35 117 
38ft 30ft llPowpf 4.12 Hu 
36% 28% llPowpf 3JB 41J 
48ft 33’A llPowpf 4*47 117 
37% X llPowpf ISto 1U 
36% 26ft ITW 72 2 A 
XU 31ft ImpChm 27Be 59 
12 7% InuXCP 

15ft 10 INCO JD IJ 
lift 15% IndIMpf ZIS 117 
20ft 16 IndIMpf 275 11J 
30% 26% IndIMpf 163 127 
26% 21ft IndlM Of 275 107 
28ft 22 IrefiOss 204 BJ 
7ft 4% Ineaco JJ71 
53% 39% IngerR zao as 
37% 3Q% InaR pf 275 65 
15% 11 InerTec J4 16 
26 19% inldStt 781 

48% 38ft InldSf Pf 475 11J 
21% 16ft I ns Ilea lJOOfa 57 
6% 3ft InspRs 
26% lift InfpHsc 
38 If InfgRpf 3X 117 
35ft 25% InfgRpf 4J2S 137 
9ft 7% Intloa n 
9ft 9% Intlogpf IX 162) 
14ft 8 InIRFn 
19ft ]7ft ItcsSe LIOolOJ 
73ft 57ft Irrterco 3X 4J 
12% 9 IntrfsS x 5.8 

83ft 41 Infrfk 2X £4 
12% B% Intoned 

24% 15ft IntAlu 72 <1 
138% 116 IBM 4*40 37 
29% 16>; IntCIrl X IJ 
J5 25 Int Flaw 1.12 JU 
lift 6ft InH-tarv 
7% 3ft IrUHrwt 
3% 2 IntHwtB 

43 23ft IntHpfA 
34ft 2D IntHPfD 

44 34 InfMbt 2X 67 

43% 24ft infAAuir 176 4S 
57ft 44ft ltd Paw 2*40 12 
16ft 7ft Ini Res 

Mft X InfNrtti 2*48 53 
78 68V: IniNt Pi 6 JKS B7 

IBS 13B IntNlDfJDX 77 
43ft 32% IntpbGn IX 27 
22 M% IntBakr 
22ft 18% InfsIPw IX 97 
22 18 IrtPwpf 278 UL6 

13% 8ft I msec a J0o 1J> 
21ft 17% lawoEl 1.90 95 
35 76 lowllG 274 BJ 

37fk lowoRs 3.08 9.4 
40 31% ItoIco 3J04 L5 

13ft 9ft IpcoCd 76 37 
40ft 28% lrvSnk 1.96 5J 
53ft 44 IrvBkof 474e 9J 


23ft JWTs 
23ft j River 

16 Jamswy 

10ft JonnF 
36 JeffPil 
51 JerC pl 
9lft JerCpf 
14ft JerCuf 
6ft Jewtcr 
33% JahnJn 
38 U JahnCn 
SOft JftnC pf 
21% Jargen 
19% Jasfens 
21ft JavMfg 


1.12 18 17 
X IJ 11 
.12 J 10 
l*43el1J 
IX XI 7 
7J8 127 
I ISO 129 
2.1B 127 

22 

IX 33 IS 

IX 42 9 
425 77 
IX 47 19 

X 14 15 
IX 62 14 




7ft KOI 
lift KLM 
30ft Kmart 
14% KN En n 
12ft KaisrAI 
13ft KalsCe 
15% KaiCpf 
7ft Koneto 
11 KCtyPL 
15ft KCPLpf 
17 KCPLpf 
41’.; KCSou 
11% KCSapf 
9ft KanGE 
32ft KonPLf 
18% KaPLof 
18ft KaPLpf 
12ft Katyln 
33% Katyaf 
ISft KaufBr 
14 Kaufpf 
73 Kaufpf 

BS8S3 

ft Keaal 
17% Kerrnit 
15ft KPTav n 
23% KyUHl 
9ft KerrGI 
KerrMc 


74 27 12 
Jle 2J > 

IX 43 10 

.151 

J U f 
177 87 

X 4J M 
276 MX6 5 
220 117 
273 11J 
ll» 11 I 
IX 8j0 
1.18 92 5 
276 78 8 

272 107 

273 97 

IX 32 
J 21 5 
IX 9J 
875 11.1 
IJ4 28 15 
IX 27 8 


2,44 BJ 10 
M 4*4 
1.10 X4 23 


81 29ft 
421 34ft 
141 19% 
339 12% 
199 49 
35Qz 64% 
90x105 
13 18ft 
64 U 
9070 47ft 
465 44 
92 54% 
3 23ft 
26 25ft 
117 22% 


1775 10ft 
587 18ft 
5711 32ft 
56 Mft 
1065 Mft 
300 14% 
226 15% 
649 8ft 
3159 22% 
2 18 % 
1 20% 
421 52% 
20QZ12% 
4689 12ft 
81 37ft 
3 22ft 
1 22ft 
749 17% 
7 45 

2a 14% 

I 15ft 
21 78% 
1125 67% 
372 45% 
610 

171 IKK 
1234 15% 
155 29 
64 10% 
347 32ft 


36% — % 

14ft— % 
10 ft — % 
17ft 
21ft 

16%— % 
34% + ft 

63 

62 +1 
45ft 

64 

12ft + ft 
21% + % 
5V.— ft 
33 — Vu 
20 +2% 

19 + ft 
30 

36 — % 

33% — ft 
39% + ft 

a 

29% + ft 
38% — % 
8% — % 
11 

19% + % 
19ft 

29ft— % 1 
26ft + % . 

*8 

S3 + % 

36% 

lift 

20 + % I 
43% 

17% + % 
4ft + % 
21ft + ft 
26ft + % 
34% + % 
rtk + % 
9ft 
im 

19ft + % 
6Hk +Jft- 
10ft— % 
48% -F % 
9% + % 
17ft 

133% +1% 
24% 

33 

7% 

4ft— % 

2% 

79 —1 
23% — ft 
38ft— % 
38ft +1 
44ft + ft 
7%— % 
42ft— % 
78% +Tft 
M6% +1% 
39ft 

2T% + % 
20ft + U 
21 % 4 - % 
9ft + % 
19% — % 
32% + % 
32% 

35ft + Vt 
Uft 

39% — % 
52ft— ft 


29% 29% — ft 
34% 34ft 
18ft 18ft— ft 
12 12ft + ft 
48% 49 
64% 64% 

iss las +1 

18ft lift— ft 
Uft 14% 

47ft 47% + ft 
43ft 43% + ft 
54 54 

23% 23ft + % 
25ft 25ft— ft 
32 22% + % 


Vft 10% + % 

n uft -fft 

31% 32% + ft 
14ft 14ft— ft 
U% 14ft 
13ft 14% + ft 
15ft 15ft— % 
Bft 1% 

22ft 22% — ft 
18% 18% 

20% 20% + ft 
52% 52% 

12 % 12 % — % 
12ft 12ft -fft 
37% 37ft + ft 
23ft 22ft 4- ft 
22ft 22ft 4 ft 
16 17 4 ft 

43ft X 4 2ft 
14% 14% 4 % 
151k ISft 
70 78% 41 

65 65ft— 1% 

44 TL* 

18ft 18ft 4 ft 
Mft 15 —ft 
2Bft 28ft 
10 10 — % 
Xft 32ft 4 ft 



12 Month 
High Lew Stock 


DM. YKLPE 


62ft 4 % 
36ft 4 % 

a 4% 
5%- % 
32ft 4 % 
20% 4 ft 
»k4 ft 
lift 4 ft 
xft- % 
60% 

79% — % 

as 

9ft 

16ft— ft 

25ft 

10 

12% 4 % 
21ft- ft 
26% — % 
30ft 4 ft 
34ft 

31ft— Vt 


31ft 2ift Keya-P IX 4*4 8 

5 2% KerCW , 

15ft 12% Kerim 5 M It }7 

37% 26% Kfdde ]■» 10 

BSft 64ft Kid PfB 400 AB 

57ft A% KWde Pf IX 2.9 . 

65% 44ft Kknoa 2X & 

40ft 26ft KneMfW 76 11 1* 

ISft 10% Know o* I7 

as 2<% Koser M a 

22% 12% KWmor J2 

21% 15% Kopers X 
T04 95% Kopgr pflfLQO 107 

14% 12ft K orea JJe 17 
46 M Kroger 2X 44 <> 
24ft Vft KuWm * -® *2 i? 

63ft 28% KWCW * * 

23% 15ft KyOT A M I 


Sl 

wmH*9n»-Bw 

« 2«t 29% 
33 3ft 3ft 

no 14% M% 
ia wish 

10 m a.. 

3 56U 56% 
«3 59% Sift 
UM 36% 35ft 
111 1 6ft 1 6ft 
» 26ft Mft 
91 Mft 1 4ft 
789 Mft 15% 
3 97ft 97% 
55 lift 14% 
79 45% 45 
31 18 ljft 
91 39ft » 

62 a 19ft 


OBotcnrge 

39WS * % 
3ft +% 
Mft— % 
35ft- % 
84 —1 
56% 4 % 
59ft— % 
36 4 % 

18ft— U 

26ft 

lift— % 

1S%— ft 
rru — u 

14ft 4 % 
4 SU 

18 — % 
39ft + ft 
» 4 ft 



lire 

LN Ho IMeiafl 10 
LLERv 122elK9 
LLCCP 
LTV 

LTVpf 3351 
LTV PfB 2291 
LTV p(C 3741 

LTVpfD M\ 

LQirinf * ® 

LadGs 170 65 » 

I nfnron JO ZS3M 

tStogpf 2X 107 „ 
Lamurs 24 24 15 
LamSos , ..I* 1 

Lowtlnt J6 5.1 
LearPT 30 1.9 
LeorPpf2£lU 
LearSo 200 4 3 9 
LeaRnJs X 24 M 
UwvTr IX 4.9 M 
LeeEnf 7M23 1* 
LegMos 20b 12 If 
LeaFlaf J52 IS ■> 
LcbVoi „ , 

fcSSS TH ™ 

LOF fJf * IX 25 I 
LOFpf « «„ 
UbtvCp 72 24 U 
LIUV 379 13 TJ 
LimifdS .16 J 31 
UncNII IJ* 19 10 
UnePI 27*3 9J 
Litton .V5BI 11 
Litton pf ZOO 19 
Lockhd 70t U 8 
Loci i to X 15 15 
Laewss IXa 21 13 
Loglcon 74 7 19 

LomFta IX 19 12 
LomMfsZX 8J IT 
LamMwt 
LomotMn 

LnSfar LX 66 4 

LoneSpf 5J7 10*0 . 

LILCO 2 

LILPiE 

LILpfJ 

LILpfX 

LILPIW 

LILpIV 

LILpfU 

LI L PIT 

ULRfS 

LILPfP 

bliraDs 72 27 14 
Loral J2 L4 17 
LoGen) J7 65 10 
La Land IX 28 10 
LoPcc Xb IB 36 
LaPLPf 3*961 125 
LaPLpf 237| 117 
LauvGs 252 9J 8 
Lawst ZOO 12 11 
Lowes 36 IJ M 
Lubrzl 1.16 57 U 
Lubvs M IJ 24 
LudcvS 1.16 AS 12 
Lufcens X 35 M 


15 

25% 

18 
10 

28% 

35% 
lift 
10 
2ft 
6ft 
10% 

12ft 
3BU. 

38% 

36 
31% 
lft 
10ft 
12 % 

10% 
soft 

44% 

X 
5ft 
15% 

24% 

3 

% 

25% 

43 
19 
Bft 
13ft 
73 

50% 

26% 

M 8% 

36 25ft 
3% lft 
30ft 23 
12ft 10ft 
65% 48% 

17% Vft 
13% 6ft 
15ft lift 
68% 37% MayDStrlja 37 
65 43 Mario 280 A3 

31% 21 McDrpf 229 9*6 
»ft amt McDrpf 2 a mu 
30% MftMcDer! LSD 9J 
Vft 2% McDriwt 
10% 6ft McDfd X 25 
70 50 McDoW SO 17 

87 64 AAcDnD UBT 27 

52 37ft McGrH IX 3J 
SO 37 MCKMS 240 5 j 0 
15 7% Mdjrat 


17 796 16ft 
45 2 ICS 52% 

6 748 18ft 

9 2M 11 
9 45 36ft 

U 94 39% 

36 69 17ft 

641 2S% 

17 9ft 
56 7% 

67 11% 

2 14% 

17 476 33 
U 4766 65ft 
690=64 
9 499 49% 

114 3ft 

68 14% 

77 12ft 

3 T68 18 
5 938 48 

1000 53ft 
365 Xft 
271 5% 

34 17 

8 7271 35% 

2 3% 

313 

7 21 
120 

a wa 

134 
21 

17 474 
19 651 

8 1105 

14 2490 

15 671 
196 

9 
*3 

» XI 
17 475 
85 

4 27 
12 464 58ft 57ft 

12 188 64ft 64 

9 23 22% 

327 25% 25ft 
941 a 19% 
244 3% 3% 
15 3X 9ft 9% 
15 X17 69ft 61%. 
8 1314 67% 65% 
IS 1735 45% 43ft 

13 429 41% 47ft 

14 10*0 9ft 4ft 


1 


23ft— ft 
27ft— % 

llft^f % 
TU + % 

39% + % 

lfti— it 
34 Im— ft 
9% 

12% + % 
24ft— % 
7%— % 
22ft 
ID 

if* + % 

JCF& + % 
21% 

SMS 

Til 

17 + U 

Mft- ft 

14% — % 
11%— % 
19% + % 
44ft + ft 
74%+ % 
30% + ft 
95% +1% 
27%.+ % 
47% +2*6 
23%- 
82 —1 
22%+ % 
46ft + % 
31% + ft 
Xft +ft 
36ft + % 
36% + ft 
27ft + ft 
3V. + % 

am + % 

29 +% 

53ft + ft 
7% + ft 
25% — ft 
43 +1 , 

ISft— % 
ISft 

18ft— ft 
22 — % 
18ft 
63 

13ft— % 
Uft— ft 
27 —1 
33% + % 
12 + % 
35% + ft 
21 + % ! 
28% + ft 
20% + ft 1 
28% + ft 1 
63 + ft 

23ft +Tft I 
20V.— Vk ! 
38 + ft . 
231b 

13ft + % I 


16% — ft 
52 + ft 

Uft— % 
II + ft 
36ft + Vt 
38ft -4 
17ft 
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9ft- ft 

7% + % 
lift 

14% + % 
33 

64ft— % 
64 +4% 

48ft— ft 

3% 

M — % 

12ft 

17ft 

39% — ft 
53% + ft 
48ft— ft 
5ft 

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35% + ft 
3%— ft 

34ft + ft 
53% + ft 
40% — % 
10ft— V. 
15ft + ft 
99ft +7tt 
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at* 

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Uft ■ 
in*— ft. 


saa. mia 

vtft 22ft SEnS"*!* A3 
UK. 33 Meed iJ0 
25ft iru Metro* M ii 
39% 25% Mcdtrn JO 2fl 
56% 4Tb Meltoa 2J4 L* 
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*8V: 3T- MctvtU IX U 
TO SS% Merest IJO -fl 

120 85% - Ift r c* 375 

BD 50% Merdtti 
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3% lft MeaoOf 
22 lTk MesoW 
25ft atft AMD UftM 
rft it P toj ob TftM- 
4% 7% Mtse* _ 

61% 50 MtEafG TJ» 

3% 2 McxFid *Kk1S£ 
Uft 16ft McftER IX 
7*b 4 Atiddb* J6 14 

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2D*!. 151* MttfPas :30 AJ 
WA 26% MWE 276 ’■? 
15-* 1B4b MIR&R M J; 
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<*» Ml tot . 

36ft 25% Moot! 220 *2 

% iriMofcttf 

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m 1 rft Motasc X U 

1Z-; 1% MOMCK 

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54 44% MdRCsoOX fft 

ltVb 149* Monro A? 57 
5 5ft 40ft Mensan IX if 
Xft Mft MaoPw 2J8 67 
199* TST* IMfiit 1JM 94 
Wh B% MO «V M 104 
21% u Moores 22 II 

3fi MaerM IJ 4 *4 

_. 24% MrMpi ISO 97 

5444 36ft Morons 2X A1 
X 754i Morgn ot 6J*e 79 

Vft MgfXM , 

3D% MortCnd 148 34 

23% lCft Morses X AB , 

16 MtgRtv 1 3# 74 

_ 25’U JHarton X 2J . 

39ft 29% Motor la X zs ■ 

26% 15 Mstlfra S4 3*0 

Uft 8% Atarage 
32ft 23% MOTO IX X> i 
2 lft 14% MurrvO X IS 1 
Uft !} MiflOm IX 104 
1% MKTL 


.SMr — ’ 

iw aStchw-- > 


i TtofH-gw u**- OX.gi'w* ^ / 

I -M I 35ft jlft ‘A 

342 38ft 37ft «% + fts, V 
I ,1» 3ft 3 £h 34ft- ft?' , 
l 6»» a 38ft « .+JJt+, 

■ 531 «7V. 4» <7ft + ftt 

5 Jffi U X — 2- ' 

i mi A4ft 44% 44ft - *4 1 ». 

a&J An* 43ft 60* ft ft ..( 

■ !i9i n»ft n*s - 5- i' 

I 793 66 44ft M +l'j* 

, 3998 30% 79ft »% y 
4li 3ft 2ft 3ft + % - 

1 1X7 16ft >4% Uft - ft 
2 33 37ft Bft— i 
1 63 g* J'k 5ft 

154 3ft ru JU 

7TXU 63 ft Atft 43ft tlft 
Iff W 5 J% + %„ 

6 !Tft t7"l 17ft + . 

44 4> 4% eVA * ft. - 

I UK 55% 51% »%— ", 

sm- m su 9 + %. . 

983 16 m lS'i Uft- ft., 

X Wft 30ft 30% + % . 

36 H«k 10?k HH» - • 

i 1943 rr*m to ft 7*% + % 

379 Kft 37% 31ft- S 

Ml* 1% 14, 

an 6ft 5ft 6 : • 

5W3 3tu Xft 30%- ft. 

r? 5% s2 s£ 

337 304. 29% 29% — % - 

we ns ift m + %.-. 

« Kft 49ft 50ft + ft 
I » » K -.% 

151 15% Mft 1J% + ft.. 
n>wJ5% 44 45 +%•-• 

aa an t m m — ■+ •' 

«7 i*ft « ro* + <j* 

4* Bft Bft BVi + ft 

n» m. m wit- £ ' 
ax zm am zm + % .£. 

23. 77 n if 
1801 36 33% JJH + ft 1 . 

330 *7% 87% 07% * 

6 ttft 17ft T2ft + % • 

9B X 43ft 44 + ft:' 

67 20ft 28ft 209, 

UJS lSft T7ft mb— ft- .. 

311 33 32ft 33Vk— ft- 
201 31ft 39ft 31% + ft - ' 

M II T7ft 11 +H..L 

104 Uft Uft 16ft + ft' i 
MW 32 31% 32 +-fc\. 

W 19ft T9 W — ft 
31 M Uft Oft •( 

6 lft lft Tft- ft 


21% ISft NAFCO UB 41 IS 10? lift lift 16% + ft - 

36% 23%N80S IX AO 7 45 J5% 35 Vft + 'S'. . 

20 ft B% M&K 11 U4 11% lift rift + 

aa% itu nch 72 is n r ao% w* • 

44% 32% NCMS Iff II f n < 39*6—18-' 

36% 24% KCR JB 2A 12 *7la 36% 35ft 34 + ft •, 

Uft *% HLInd m SJ _ 599 Uft Q% llft— vf' ' 

36ft 27 HU ■ Z32 ffi I 9 39 39 29 

Fft % NVF IS % % % 

59% 35% HWA JB 17 29 IT33 521t 52% 52ft + Mf 

2Bft 22 ftatCD Iff II 3 » Wk B 33% + ft - 

a*ft 33V, Uatm 8 m a Mft Mft— 

11% 5% KHC.TV J1 U» » II K Kb 

35ft 234+ MoMWrt 278 AS 22 991*33% 32 32% - %- * 

21ft lift MMEffij U 388 21ft 20% 21 — ft - 

30% 239k HalFGS IB 71 I 57' 24% 28% 26% + & 

37% 22ft (Hems 7 *24 37ft 36ft 3Hi— IWt 

4ft Z% MlHam 53 m 3ft 3% + % " 

33ft 21 MU 75 3 m 36% 26% 26% + ft 

6S 50% Hllpf Iff U 3 56 56 5e + ft. ' 

37% Uft HAbdE 56 V U <165 20% 30% + tt* 

11% 7% NMmS 4 > 7ft B f 

3BV* 23ft MlPntst 1J8 U 13 W 29% 29ft 3%k 

15% 10% MfSwm 38 443* IDft TO’A 10% — ft 

53% 48% NtSvapTASa SA 22 X Xft Xft— ft 


34% 25% Ntsvcfai UK U U 314 33% 31ft 33 — W> 
IS lift NSKMd M 30 22 XlMl3ftl3% 


Mft Hms JU 57 


TO lift 11% lift— % ‘ 


33% 26ft NevPw 2*4 W 10 -51 33 31ft 31ft + 16 


19 isnfbvppf mn.i 
12% 9% NewSwL B 41 I 
46% 36% HE nod US II 7 
29 24% NJRsc 270 87 .9 

29U SS*A HY5EG 256 93 7 

35 21 MVS pf 335 117 

76ft 63% MTS pt UD BJ 

28% 22ft NYSpiA Ute 14 • 

20ft U NVSX 2.12 KJ 

32U 27% NYSpf017S J23 

20ft 14 Kew+fC M 73 17 

63 33% NcwM HLOW. 

19 12% Mewmi AJB«!2A6 5 


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30* 44H 44 Uft + tf ‘ 
U 25% 25% 25ft + ft 
*41 26 25ft 25ft + ft 
4Kx 32 32 32 - 1 

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A 20 20 3D 

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m 64ft. 62. .BSft+lftr- 
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35% 77ft NiaMpf 190 II A war 3* 34 34+1 

3* » NIoMoi AX 117 600 c SH; 25% 33%— ft f . 

44 35 MaMt* 4UIU 2ttZ 4T 41 4> 

55ft 43% NkaMof AM Hi 38% 52% 52% 52% + ¥r [ 

29ft 36ft KiBMPf l.99e 7J> 10 St® M 2S%— MC,' 

17ft 14% NlagSB lXSmn.1 10 lS'i 15% 15% . 0 

Mft lift MtcoJtt J? 9 13 are (246 17% — %*' 

Uft XSft NICOW 104 res 17BV 29ft 28% 29 

16% 12ft NoUAf .13% JIB0 7034 14ft 14% Mft 

17% Mft NardKs - 8 598 Uft 13% 13ft 

73% 54ft HarfkSa IX A7 9 7K 73 72ft 72ft 


17% Mft NardHi ■ 'ft 

73% 54ft NarfkSo XX A7 9 

27ft 7 Mgrtto 

xft 37% Narstr zb u i 

19 nft Nerm j» 3 .6 

65ft 47ft NACocd U0 U ■ 

<5% 31ft NAmi 1JB Iff M 

20% Uft HEnO .170*103 M 

a lift NaeeKJt USB « '6 


703k 1 4ft 14% Mft 
598 Uft 13% 13ft + % 
7^ 73 . 72ft 729b *. *i 

37 7% 7 7 — %' 

X 45% 45 45 — 

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H Mft Uft Uft + ft 1- : 
« 17% 16% 17 +%•• 


lift 9ft NlndPi US6 15* V 1IM M 9% 9% + % 
51% «% MBEMftf 352 73 f 399 Xft 48% 48ft t % 
37 29ft NSPwof X6B UA B90c34% 34 34.-% 

A§ 54ft HSPwpi AM Mi 3680r 65 6S 65 — 1% 

4 iSt^tKJSS0 ^ **** 

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u% b mwsiw • n rm 

40% 32% Norton U0 SJ7 13 302 3Sft 


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35 . 22ft Now Mm Itt iff 


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23 

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20 + % 
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47% 38% Nucor 
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Mm Itt W 
M .9 13 

M “ 


THb NYNEX AX 73 


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36ft 25% OakHeP 1JQ $3 
3B6 ZM OecfPVf ISO 5 
Hft Wb OcdPwf 
25% 20ft OcdPpf 2J0 9J9 




4% 4ft + ; 
ISft 16ft + 


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. 8 29% 29 29 —ft 

1021 34ft 33% 34% + % 
- 7 Vft u« 14% 

J 25% 23 35% + ft 


(Coo&raed 00 Page 14)- 


The Saudi American Bank is scheduled to open its first 
international branch on November 8th, 1985. 

This branch, which will he in Istanbul, will be the first commercial Saudi Bank in 
Turkey. 

The presence of the Saudi American Bank in Turkey would serve to make the 
financial flows between Turkey and Saudi Arabia much faster and more efficient. 
Equally important, it would serve to develop and increase the trade arid investment 
flows between Turkey and die whole Region which the Saudi American Bank serves 
and represents. 

\\ idi its fully computerized operations in Turkey, the branch will be able to 
continue with Saudi American Bank's already proven performance as one of the 
most efficient banks in Saudi Arabia, the Arab countries and the world at large. 

Tlie Saudi American Bank is confident that the technological and managerial 
resources it is putting into Turkey will make it able to serve as the effective link for 
all business between Turkey and Saudi Arabia as well as the whole Middle East 
region. 


Saudi American Bank 

(jjmhumet (tiiddesi -33. Harbiye. Istanbul. Turkey 
Telex: -? 224 smhk tr. 27_22b.sahk tr 


Saudi American Ran 
capital of SK 300 Mi 







fg^ry 




fp*f 







If your market is corporate America, 
Forbes will pot you on the map. 


If you want to make your mark on corporate 
America, it helps to make an impression on its 
leaders. And in the 1984 study by a leading inde- 
pendent researcher, Market fticts, Inc., .Forbes 
was shown to be preferred reading by more cor- 
porate officers in 1,000 of America's largest ser- 
vice and industrial companies . In comparison 

Maga z ines read regularly by corporate officers 
in 1,000 of America^ largest companies? 

Forbes 

68.3% r , 


OuilnwWaafc 

61.8% 


^Market Facts, Inc. 1984 


with Fortune and Business Week, Forbes was 

judged to be overall favorite by 44% versus 29% 

for BusinessWeek and 19% f or Fortune 03 
When regular readers were asked which of 

b ^ St ^ exci tement of busi- 
ness, Jo Aes had tw’ce the scores of the other 

two. And when asked which of the three stands 
for free enterprise," 71% named forbescom 
pared wrth 13% for Fortune and 7% f^Cmess 


FORTUNE 

48.4% 


Cost per Thousand Circulation 


Forbes 

4C Page S46.89 

BWPageS30fiS 


4C Page S52.79 


4C Pa^e SS6.39 


foW o7B^w e r ularly than e,ther 

reaching America's most effec magazinefor 
rive executives. If you want to 
make an impression on this 
ehte, not only is itgood busi 
ness for yoii to put your 
advertising in Forbes, it' s 
bound to be good for 
your business. *. 




For Further i nfornution, please contact Peter M. Schoff, Diiector of 
Interna riorul Advertising Forbes Ma^uane, 50 Rail Mad, London 
SW1 Y 5|Q, England, Tel: (01 1 93MI61/2. 





i «v •; « 

1 Z * 3? to 


«i , iu \ 

j 11 !5 a : V 


I : |:g-i|!||| W»»««aiM>UHBHI> 

: 1 1 8 1 B 1 !| BMW Net Rose 12 . 4 %, 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


Murdock Says Stock Offer 


f||'^ _ ^ b y foreign Sales May Fund Metromedia B 


sr , 


foreign sales. - - J J ** pavmioiflu. 

ja If $ Revenue for the three qnancre ^ also akl that be 

, ili&i*' was 1036 billion Deutsche mark*; ocpec1 ^ ^ group sales to rise to 
" 2*1* (S3.99 billion). Sales incrcaiedl^ “«« 18 MKon DM ia 1985- ! 

A «£- poceni id 1350 biUkra DM from ?? ra l * M H®*®?** l»i 't™- 1 

" the 1984 period, Dw > awomaker did not provide , 

* » feltj: Foreign revenue increased 2fts *?*“ &°°P figures far toe first : 

’] *$ i5* V- Wllibo DM, whfle 0,116 nwnths. 

, ‘S ^ S J" sbI 65 ® West Germany rose only chairman also forecast that 

t & U-. 02 peraofr to 3.74 billion DM, the P™l company sales wifi be iosi 

[; t^gf UthKle maker said. under 16. man DM, compared 

J* *:g.5l ■ Cbmmoitmgontoegapbetwra 12.93 Wlion DM Iasi jwr. he' 


3i ii* port markets early in the year 
t r -.' wiwn to® high U.S. dollar helped 
foreign sales, 

In. addition, he said, domestic. 


_ _ 

’ a" £v » si op Omits, doe to start throughout 
i'S * *' Europe in 1988. 

12 jpfj*? Mr. Knenbeim said that the big- 
ger rise in revenue than in volume 

ua^s*; sales reflects a trend toward larger 
and more expensive cars and is 
£ _j 3 only partly the result of price in- 
3 st'&t creases. 

*= s*{ BMW said it increased car pro- 
J! iductiaa in the first nine months bv 
percent to 325,736 by working 


15 » ?. 

Hit 

J! &»?■ 


“ III Earnings Fell 
? S?|s 33.4% in Quarter 

j 7 ?f H 5 • Umted Press International 

if/!?’ NEW YORK — ITT Corp., the 
\[ g 55 £?■ diversified technology and services 
v «£ »» 5 5 ““pany. says its third-quarter 
' ?a ^ » ea rnmgs fell 33.4 percent from a 
' ’jajfi St year eariier, to S77 million, or 50 
Moraw; b, *r cents a share, from S11S.6 million. 
mEocL;’ or-77 cents a share, in the third 
« gvj fc j quarter of 1984. Revenue rose to 
, a u S4-9 bflKon from a restated $4.7 
m, i«S S; 1 billiou a year earlier. 

* ’S ^ >5t ; However, last year's third quar- 
««£!,? :• ter reflected a nonrecurring gain of 
I ’S 5* “!il S54.7 nnQjon from the acquLsition 
IS £«£s. of ICL PLC by Standard Tde- 
I phone & Cables PLC an ITT affili- 

^ r ' ate. Excluding the one-rime gain, 
wl J* >; income for the 1985 third quarter 
rose 27 percent. . 

!;>j E Nine-month earnings rose to 
t tin 4^ o; t, ^3083 million, or S2.03 a share, 

: St 3 £ com S273J».tmffion, or 51.81 a 
; £ S? n! f toare. a year eariier, ITT said. 

•i : 

I J =« 

D A 


3jS?- 


BMW had a record parent net 
profit of 329.6 million DM in 1984. 

Mr. Kfleaheim said 1985 results 

may not lop those of last year be- 
cause of higher depredarico con- 
nected . with deferred investment 
caused by the sevep-we& metal- 
workers* strike in 19S4. 

Ford to OSer Air-Bag Optsm 

The ittsmoMt Am 

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. 
says itwhoffer adriver^de airbag 
neat March on its Ford Tempo- 
Mercury Topaz compact cars as an 
5815-opuon. The option, an- 
nounced Monday, win be the first 
offering of airbags to the general 
public by a U.S. automaker in a 
decade. 


COMPANY NOTES 


tiftt York Torts Sm-.^e 

WASHINGTON — Rupert Murdoch has urfd the Federal Com- 
maruearions Commission that the company he created to purchase a 
group of television stations from Metromedia Inc. nay offer stock to 
the public id bdp raise funds to finance the SU5-bilSon takeover. 

It would b® the first public offering m toe United States of stock in 
a company controlled by tfw international publisher, although some 
bonds, bdd by his 20th Ceniuiy-FoK Film Corp. are publicly held. 

The possibility of a public stock sale was among the general details 
of a capitalization plan for Mx. Murdoch's company. News Amenta 
Television Inc, which has proposed to purchase seven and retain rix 
television outlets that reach 22 percent of the US. viewing a iidi«vy» 

. The stations include those in major markets such as New York City, 
Washington. Chicago, Dallas and Los Angeles. 

Monday’s fifing with the rCC. which must approve the proposed 
acquisition, was seen by industry and government analysis as a 
response to the FCCs decision List week to postpone final action on 
the Metromedia acquisition proposal. But Howard Squadron, counsel 
to Mr. Murdoch, denied that this was the reason for the filing. 

The commission dropped the Metromedia acquisition proposal 
from its agenda for last week amid objections from members of 
Congress and broadcast activists who argued that Mr. Murdoch had 
provided insufficient financial data about his proposed purchase and 
had no detailed plan for disposing of properties to comply with the 
FCCs ownership roles. 

The data filed with the commission on Monday said that News 
America would issue six million common shares with a par value of 
one cent. All of the common stock would be held by Twentieth 
Holdings Corp., of which Mr. Murdoch’s New America Holdings has 
the controlling interest 

In addition, News America would issue 1.55 million of 1.25 million 
authorized shines of nonvoiing preferred stock, all of which would be 
offered to holders of Metromedia bonds as pan of a 50- per cent cash. 
50-percent stock swap offer. 

- Holders of the preferred would be allowed to deci two additional 
directors to the three- member board of News America if the equiva- 
lent of six full quarterly dividends bad been accrued but not paid, the 
filing said. The two directors would gp off the board once the 
dividends were paid. 


Apple Plans 
Move Into 
Mainstream 

Va >nfSr Tiira** e 

NEW YORK — Apple Comput- 
er Inc., saying thur it" had regained 
its footing after mi* iiiO! 1 ! 'U!««C! 1 i*' 
ous year in its history, has outlined 
a plan to integrate sw products ir.io 
an “IBM-defined world - of com- 
puter systems. 

The company said the move 
marked a broad refocusing thui 
some Apple officials tea ceded 
would concentrate ie?i on fiashy 
new technciogiet and more eh 
nuking machine* attractive to 
busiossn. 

In a presentation to Wall Street 
analysis, .Apple predicted cz. Mon- 
day that its resirccturizg earlier 
this year would alio* if tc pc-si 


Westland PI 


By Colin Chapman 

iiutmur-tkd th - j.'j T'.i ur-. 

LONDON — Westland PLC. 
the financially troubled British hs- 
itcopter ar.d hovercraft group. Is 
seeking a major capital injection io 
prevent its banker.- from withdraw- 




^■rittmtoSeek Partner 


mil’ior. [$5* million j. The govern- 
ment provided the £41 milium w ith 
Ihe proviso that the company sell 
400 of the helicopter?. 

The gnvernment has -aid tlut if 
the vales uravt i< not met. it re- 
serted she rslh: to demand the rc* 


irg support, j senior number o' the turr. of iftme of the aid. proportion- 
company's board, who asked .v-.; to jie io the l.ii!iirf Io meet the vales 
be identified, said nxentiy. tarpe; 

Talks arc being held with Sikor- St far fewer than Sy have been 
sky. the helicopter siiSidiary of vi’d. and a possible purchase by 


U.S.-tJased United Techni loacs the lr.d-.ar. -Kwenttnent of 27. for a 


Corp.. and witli AercspariJ s of 
France, but si- far r.o agre-Jtnent 
has been reached wish either, the 
source said 

The prospect of Britain's only 
behcc^ter manufacturer being bro- 
ken up. and its highly profiiab'e 
technology subsidiary. Nonr.alair- 
G arret! Ltd., being sold Jo pay ;•••* 
m.ouniirg debts, is being taken so 
scriousiy itai a rescue operaucr. l-. 


tot. i I .'•! £t'5 million — to be fi- 
nafistd -:th British jtd — is also 
'ttii tmcefuin. 

“Westiand'*. biMor. is littered 
with hjrana skins.** -aid Tim Har- 
ris. an ir.'iMmeni analyst with Sa- 
•.ory Mill" London stockbrokers. 
“And the W-50 is one of them. 
Ever, though they h^d no contract 
for the Indian order, they started 
■maktre seme of then:, and have 


chant banks, withdrew an -ra- 
tion bid for the company. Eri.t... 
Rotorcraft valued the compan . 
iW pence a share, compared -a.-.. 
the market price then cf 125 par.. . 

After Bristow withdrew. 
pnee collap'cd to 58 pence, by >a • 
sir.ee partialiy recovered, c-r. t'r.- 
strength of :he merger talk.-. 

Mr. Bn&iuu. who pianned .c 
]ecl £W* million in new Capita: i".'. 
Westland and to -aril .is Er j- - 
Hovercraft Corp substdizr- :rr 
Bell Helicopter subsid.ar. of ■ 
iron Inc. of the United State.-. : 
he had considered it "q-j;:e a p:c r.-.- 
istng rituuiton. wiuch uic 
made more profi table if re- 
managed.” 

But after hi> bid was accer:-.-. 

hi' partners discovercJ the j-.zt 
Westland's u-mmitmeni u- :rr '.*. - 
30. “At the 11th hour ar.c f - :. 
minute, we eot answer^ 1“ c - ..:.- 


' AiuljRsti noted :tfca:ie company “^imed 

hadcuiiiss^p^ecic increait ^, Unlin2 
research and cevfcopsmi spend- ^ ^ 
ing bv W jwteen; and would m- ?Tai .j X2i 
ara.-angjwfocusor.Naie&ioiiifiaov- One of ^ 
; rumen i and jsiernatior.al j 


Font Motor Co. is likely to use Japanese pipe-joint maker, said it 
Urines Chausson, a French coach- bad acquired BKL Fittings Lid, a 
maker, to assemble a new 24,000 subsidiary of Guest, Keen & Neit- 
mid-engme sports car due to reach lefolds PLC of Britain. Nippon 
the UA market in 1989. according Benken purchased all BlCL's 
to toe UJS. trade paper Automotive shares, worth £120 million <583.4 


group interest;, in France. The com- 
pany had net loss of 704 million 


eminent anc isiernaiicr.aJ 
accounts. 

Company officials hinted that 
they were looking for w^.ys to settle 
their lawsuit agai ns: Stev <m P. Jobs, 
Apple's co-four.ce:. who was 
forced to resign as chairman in 
September. 

Monday's acao-jncesr.ent 
marked the third rims ir. Lhan 
two years that Apple has said ii 
would iEiecrate iti Si acrattosh com- 
puter into offices, iradirionai 
sironghoid of Ir.Ltreaucaal Suri- 


apfointed ir. June, and me U.S 
accoumLis firm Pnce Waterhouse 
&. Co. has beer, commissioner iu 
produce a report. 

One of Westland’s nusjor prob- 
lems has -been that although its 
products — particularly the Lyn\ 
and Sea King helicopters — won 
distinction in the Falkland.-. u a r 
more than three years ago. the Brit- 
ish government has been hard- 
headed in placing new orders. It 
has no: agreed :o buy the new 
Westland 39 helicopter, although :: 
backed its development with £4: 



debt:. 

. «.rtcn rose from £17.1 

■nilko 

n in : 

S-j to L?>.A million in 


row 

r tand not far ihen of 


n::jor 

l !icurv not denied by 

toe co 


Ho'ac.-lt. the compe- 

•IV "A C 

-'•d 

.'•. Lommers: further on 

to.? f: 

i'urj. 

\i :hi current shire 

pnCK. 

d; 

;?:> ^re higher thin toe 

rctarki 

: 

:e toe shareholders' 

•lock. 

Tr.- 

company ^ -tool, has 

bed.i : 

iraoin 

j.; in toe mid- 70-pen cc 

rar^gc 

in -,v 

en: d->s 


The veriousnesi, of Westland's fi- 
nanri-1 pTivniemy came to light in 
June. •* he:. Bristow Rotocraft 
PLC. a company formed by Alan 
Bristow, a leading helicopter opera- 
lor. arc a number of London mer- 


abilitiw-s far in excess th:-.-.- .- 
which ive based our offer." 

Westland has staked mu.- • ■ 
another helicopter, the EH-ij*. .: 
new generation of anti-siibrj-r:-: 
and utility helicopter- fvr 
1 9Qt>s. luring developed ir. p^rir--- 
ship with Agusta of Italy. 

Westland officials see ir..- r- 
diate cnSis as finding the v_--. : 
survive until the EK-101 is :r. re- 
duction. with hopes that the 2--- 
fense Department uii! order V. -*• • 
to replace its Wcsset hehcor:.-:- 


francs in the first half of 1985 after ness Machines Corp. A series 


million), and took over its debts. 
Nippon OD Co. posted a parent 


i -rm 


mid-engine sports car due to reach lefolds PLC of Britain. Nippon a loss of 1.07 billion for all of 1984. 
the UJS. market in 1989, according Benken purchased all BKL’s Soutbhnd Royalty Co/s board of 
to the UJS. trade paper Automotive shares, worth £120 million <583.4 directors unanimously rejected a 
News. million), and took over its debts. 5694.4 million buyout offer by Bur- 

Fried. Krepp GmbH said its sub- Nippon OD Co. posted a parent lington Northern Inc. 
ridiary Krupp Indnstrieiechnik . company net loss at 6.09 billion Tandon, a U.S. maker of com- 
GmbH won an order worth 14 mil- yen ($293 million) for the first sit puler disk drives, lost an important 
lion Deutsche marks <$538 mil- months of the fiscal year ending round in its patent infringement 
h on) to build two factories in Chiria March 31, 1986, after a profit of case against Mitsubishi Electric 
to produce edible oil and high-pro- 3.99 billion yen in the year-earlier Corp. of Japan. Judge Sidney Har- 
tein meal from soya beans. period Sales were 137 trillion yen, ris of the U3. International Trade 


ridiary Krupp Indnstrieiechnik company net loss at 6.09 billion 
GmbH won an order worth 14 mil- yen ($293 million) for toe first sit 


to produce edible oil and high-pro- 
tein meal from soya beans. 


General Motors Corp. is conrid- down 33 percent from 1.42 trillion. * Commission ruled that Mitsubishi 


ering high-volume production of Procter & Gamble Co. has 
plastic-bodied cars in the early reached agreement to acquire the 
1990s, according to Metalworking over-the-counter drug business of 
News, a trade paper. - G-D. Searle & Co. from Monsanto 

Monsanto Co. said it had devel- Co. for an undisclosed amount of 
oped a new engineering technique cash.' 

to make plant cells and whole SheB Fren^aise said it planned to 
plants resistant to the herbicide raise its capital to 3.9 billion francs 


glyphosaie. 

Nippon Benken Kogyo Co., a 


($491.2 million) from 1.83 billion 


to cover losses and restructure Shell on Monday. 


did not pirate disk-drive technol- 
ogy from Tandon. 

Wonnald International U(L said 
Sunshine Australia Ltd. had raised 
its stake in Wonnald to about 36 
peroem of its 81.06 million issued 
shares after acquiring 13 million 
shares, following its cash bid of 4 
Australian dollars ($2.78) a share 


raise steps have blocked ±e way, 
but company officials and analysts 
agreed that this tare Apple hid a 
better chance of su-ocess 

The key element cf Apple’s r.ew 
strategy, according to John Sculicy. 
the chief executive, was a commit- 
meal to work wish outside software 
houses io design programs :o cra- 
ned Apple's Macintosh u main- 
frames and minicomputers. 

Mr. Sculley’s piart envisions two 
distinct uses for the Macintosh. 
One is as 2 stand-alone personal 
computer that has already enjoyed 
considerable success among stu- 
dents, artists and others. The sec- 
ond role will be as a fairly easy-to- 
use terminal for larger systems, 
mostly minicomputers and main- 
frames made by Digital Equipment 
Gup. and IBM. 


Comite Colbert | 

SX Dupont: The Pursuit of Perfection J 


Ar.Jrt Dauct't, President 


('her. S.T. Dapor.t's celebrated iu::- : ’ T '. rp' 7 _X: ;i *'!7'; toe luxury lighter market and his ?' 

rv lighters are taken to pieces, one • / v doubled rumover in rive years. 50.V- if"? 

ndersrrids why they c.m be coiled ^ 'V.iyi'y reached 450 miilior. frir.es ?S5'.- rr.si- . t.j 

only lighters as liandsome inside : \?m}. .■ ^°nun 19&t and are expected :•) hit ;K 

b oul Exdi of the 71 hi shiv preo- : >1, . *&. ' ■ . 480 million francs in 1995. Experts ;g 


Brazil's Arms Industry Grows Strong on Sales to Third World 

(Cottfiniied from Page II) nology to develop no-frills weap- okJ Mr. Ribeiro in an interview at als, in some cases pitted directly tic missile. Potential customers are 

sats*? States $7.7 billion!, according to the - ons rthat are ideally suited to the the Slq Panlo-headquartecs of his against compering models. “The said to provide some heip with de- 

_ “ “ U^. Anns Control and Disarms- needs of Third Worid armed company, whose full designation is Osorio has the same mobility, fire- velopment costs for such projects. 

'••e-.nuvG on Page HI ment Agency. forces: They are simple to operate Engesa Engenheiros Espedaliza- power and armor as the American The state's role in aviation has 

B ut Brazil seems determined to and maintain, with spare parts eari- das SA. He said Engesa now pro- Ml tank, but ours is 40 tons and been enormously successful State- 

export itself out of its S104-bQlioa ly available; they are strong enough duced 50 percent of all wheeled theirs is 60 tons and therefore more owned Embraer. Empresa Brasi- 

forrign debt crisis, and even SI to withstand rugged terrains. And mifiiaiy vehicles made in the non- expensive,” Mr. Ribeiro said. “We leira deAerondutica SA.is the only 

billion is no small coutriburion to a thCT come at an attractive price. Communist world, “and the only should make a sale. Three countries non-UfS. company among the lop 


ment Agency. 

But Brazil seems determined to 
export itself out of its S104-biHion 
foreign debt crisis, and even SI 
billion is no small contribution to a 
trade surplus that should top 512 
billion this year. That contribution 


and maintain, with spare parts easi- 
ly available; they are strong enough 
to withstand ragged terrains. And 
they come at an attractive price. 

Brazil itself b e c ame aware of the 
importance of standard spare parts 


J m w m _ ■ f/VT*! L *4 1 J 1 <• Uk. iwnmv Muiuuwikj vi uiwt. 

is likely to continue nsmg, for Bra- m.1977, wten it canceled a long- vehicle enables Emresa to equip 

^ m.—* e — t elon/ltna milifantaftCcieteruMi aorAP. < . * . * 



/C& 


e Ameri^ 
lie map* 


- vcriU-"- 
• • 

trunv 

vv;;^' 

■ - 



zQ is the most successful of toe 
“rnddle-income” developing coun- 
tries in entering arms markets long 
, monopolized by the industrialized 
Rations. 

^ Such is the economic importance 
of the weapons business, in fact, 
that BnmTs new civilian govern- 
ment has not changed the whole- 
hearted support for weapons man- 
ufacturing formerly provided by 
the military regime that stepped 
down last March after 21 years in 
power. The government has main- 
tained bans on arms sales to South 
Africa, Cuba and Iran, but no other 
countries are blacklisted as poten- 
tial clients. A minis terial commis- 
sion routinely considers each arms 
dead, but its liberal approach is one 
of Brazil’s selling points: The coun- 
try delivers the goods without polit- 
ical strings attached. 

Unlike the United States, Brazil 
does not require diems to sign an 
Jfend users certificate,” under 
which makers can veto resale of 
their miBtary equipment. This has 
hdped Brazfl pick up clients unable 
to obtain U-S.-made weapons ei- 
ther directly or through resale. Its 
largest dieut is Iraq, with Libya a 
strong second- Others in the Mid- 
dle East indude Saudi Arabia, Jor- 
dan, Egypt, Algeria, Morocco and 
Tunisia. Even Iran is known to be 
using Brazilian armored vehicles 
that have either been captured 
from Iraq or obtained From Libya. 

Brazil has sold armored vehicles 
in sub-Saharan Africa as well, no- 
tably to Gabon and Zimbabwe, but 
the country’s other major maiket is 
Latin America itself. Brazil won 
several new Latin customers, in- 
cluding Chile, when the Carter ad- 
ministration in the Umted States 
refused toseQ aims to their military 
regimes. But even civilian gpvem- 

Tpenis, aware of the danger of sud- 
’Sen suspensions of U.S. mfliiary 
credits, have increasingly looked to 
Brazil as a reliable supplier. 

Brazil has adapted existing tech- j 

advertisement 

KANEGAFUCfll CHEMICAL 

INDUSTRY GO. LTD. 

(CDR«) . 

The undersigned announces that the An- 

■ a ■ nn* c Ir r * ■ 


Slan f^J^ il ri y -.^ol a ? CC . aSr ^' toem to suit toe cheat — who that Engesa approaches toe devd- 
mem wuh the United Slates to pro- aSf ^ for 0^,^ able l0 opmem of new weapons. First, it 
test criticism of human nghis ^0^ between West German or identified a demand for a lighter 
violations m Brazil. At toeume, an jj _ g_ eng^es. Access to spare parts tank among Third World countries 
estimated SO percent of toe equip- ^ a j wa y S a prime consideration, where bridges and roads could not 
, wf 822 * 5 *, flrmcd for “ s re ~ Engesa offers a 12-month guaran- support 60-ton vehicles. Then it 
qmrea Unmade spare pa rts iee mechanical problems studied toe best available suspen- 


Communist worid, “and toe only should make a sale. Three countries 
ones coming off an assembly line.” have taken options to buy IJQO of 

The relative simplicity at these I ^ em ' 
vehicles enables Engesa to equip The Osorio symbolizes toe way 
them to suit toe diem — who that Engesa approaches toe devd- 


estnnated 80 percent of toe equip- 
ment of Brazil's armed forces re- 
quired U3L-made spare parts — 


■ r i* JJ 1 * <i<aui »h mw wi uu u v i u w»wun^*w 

many of suddenly became and faisks own small airline, Aero- 
diffHmli 10 obtain. Brasil, to insure quick delivery of 

Hus vulnerability gave Brazil a men anri an ^ nr dL i m iLs 0 tf xc - 


where bridges and roads could not 
support 60-ton vehicles. Then it 
studied toe best available suspen- 
sion systems, armor, electronics. 


new incentive- to build np its own 
arms industry. Today, 80 percent 
of the equipment bought by the 
Brazilian military is locally made. 


Brasil, to insure quick delivery of cannons and engines before build- 
men and equipment to its offices ing a model that gave purchasers 


and bases in 35 countries. 

“We have about 50 people sta- 
tioned in Iraq permanently,” Mr. 


different options without sacrific- 
ing power. 

Brazil's other new field weapon 


Government Htcouragemeai has «** "and they even do is the Astros II rocket system made 

■ ■ ■ . mainlPn^nm Tvnrb nn llv» frnnt nv AvflwnS AfTOesnaCial another 


maintenance work on the front 
line.” 


The greatest tribute to toe Casca- 


been an importam factor in this mamtenance work on the front Avibras AeroespaciaL another 
buildup, notlrast in providing ex- ^e." pn^ie company that, under its 

port financing. But apart from toe The greatest tribute to toe Casca- 

aviation market, the surge in arms veJ and Urutu designs is that En- Leite ’ “f^,^ row P . e 

exports is principally a victory for gesa has signed an agreement for 
private enterprise. Much of toe their manufacture under license in in 

credit for Brazil's assault on the toe United States by FMC Corp. SKIERS 
world market goes to a handful of The hope is that toe Pentagon will melers ) ouiside Sao Paulo, 
entrepreneurs — ■ and chief among buy th em for toe UJS. rapid-de- Making a wide range of rockets 
them is Jas6 Luiz Whitaker Ri- ployment force. and bombs for expert, Avibras has 

bdro, whose company, Engesa, t t.,.n llJim r n „.n ^ ^ ,.1 flourished in part because of toe 

employs 10,000 people and expects SsEESSS Gulf war. Saudi Arabia has appar- 

10 expon $600 million in weapons entIy j® 114 * 1 lra 9 011 ^ customer 

this year alone. tS list for toe Astros II rocket system. 

Founded in toe 1960s as an o3- a S 300- million contract dis- 

equipmenr supplier, toe company SS >pan 3!i closed late last month. Following 

developed ite m-nramf Argentina's successful use of 

rear-suspension system that en- French-made Exocet missiles 

abled trucks and other vehicles to SJfri D SS" against British warships in toe 1982 

reach remote oil Gelds over inhos- S ^ Bnt ' Falkland^ war, Avibras is develop- 

it,., .a., am and West Oermany. 


10 general -aviatioa producers in 
toe West. 

The irony is that, with military 
spending accounting for less than 1 
percent of toe country’s gross do- 
mestic product — a measure of toe 
total value of a nation’s goods and 
services, excluding income from 
foreign investments — Brazil's 
armed forces cannot afford Osor- 
ios, Astro II rocket systems and 
roost of toe high-tech n^ueriel be- 
ing produced in Brazil. Neverthe- 
less, toe arms industry is earning 
vital export dollars, and its exis- 
tence fits well with BrazC’s deter- I 
tm nation to achieve autonomy to i 
major strategic areas, including en- j 
ergy and information processing. 


When S.T. Dapor.r's celebrated iu::- : * r ' ” 

un lighters are token ro pieces, one •' ,1” 

undasrands why toey cm be coiled \ 

ri.< only lighters os handsome inside ' '.Jgi- ■■ 

as oul Exdi of toe 71 highly preo- 

siorxd pieces down :o the smallest ^ 

spnng is axiled and burnisiied w-ith T ' 

the some painstaking concern given i.-';.tMfei**' 

ro the distinctive exteriors made of 

prerious metals or Chinese lacquer. -.‘•‘■’••J- jvfflpy- 

That rhe interior medunism is ur.- 

seen is no excuse at Dupont ro 

follow- che competition into cutting ZMtfflmiffitli 

comers. “The drama with today'? 

luxury products is tint thcy_ arc slipping into 

throw-away luxury,” uvs .^r.cre Douce:, presidenr 

or S.T. Dupont since 19?o. "We beiir.-e :n luxury 

as an investment. A Iuxun object is 4 companion 

one wants to keep a long rime ” 

Dupont's mastery of che intricate craft of Chinese 
lacquering using natural ingredients anti the ancient 
techniques is unique on the induKria! scale Tna'r 
competence is so formidable that lacquer schools 
send students to learn how they develop new colors 
and designs 

The company spends in astonishing mr.c percent of 
rumcn-er on maintaining quality. C>nc our of five 
lacquer lighters is rejected for flows *Ltx>.vlute!;. 
imperceptible :o the consumer - and sometimes 
r.-en to me,” says DouceL The medianicil pans are 
recuperated and the product deoroyed. 

"If you Start making concessions, you no longer 
' have quality." he says, "and quality is our religion.” 
This desire for perfection hi*, won rhe firm, a 
subsidiary of Giiictre since 19 ”r, a 55 percent snare 


'$s\ lionun 19&1 and are expected t;» hit ; \ 
' * %•'/ 480 m, ^' on fr^^ 5 »n Expsrto : \ 
ii ' T'i to 130 countncs account for 7 ? per- 
’** J?’ cenr of sales . j 

* n an effort to penetrate the difficult ' b' 
^ ^V : M. LfnitecJ Starcs * uxu -7 rcarko, their ife 

7 • tm ^ New York bounque was opened H 
jfi" on Madison Avenue in September. 

The cmpbiosis will be on the prestige j p'j 
writing instruments, air each' best- j >7 
sdlers'in the U.S. Introduced m !$ra. ; E 
dhe line has boensudv a suoces that Daponc now vxs jH 
almost as many pens as lighters and their share of th-. r! 
luxury world market is estimated at 40 perccr.L ! ^ 
Dupont also manufactures elegant timqpicces and, ; ri 
in 2 return to irs roots, leather accessories. Founded j ^ 
in 1872, che firm originally spcciJized in Iuxun - U 
leather traveling coses for pte-jet set VIPs. Dunng 
the Second World War a shortage of precious j p 
materials sct the company to adapting on acres wr. : jjj 
acarcd for toe Maharajah of Panala who had -ft 
ordered 50 cases firted with solid gold lighters j-’ 
Made in aluminum during the war. the lighter has : h : 
evolved into t-aday's coveted emblem of prestige in ! fi 
silver, gold or Chinese lacquer. 

Now Duponr is Launching a new smaller, slimrr.vr i -3 
version of the famous lighter. Produced in design; 
ranging from kinetic compositions in palodium and • • 
gold to art-deco inspired decors of Chinese lacquer . ‘Jt 
this new bijou lighter will continue to proclaim the 1 M 
immutable Duponr tenets of beauty and fijwlea; 
quality. !fj 


iSSUtUIION Of I ■ 


l'vj m >:i«,'in •_ • •■*.•1 . 1 .i r: ii I f . ‘••-ir -u- 1 I>I unr: hi-, mi i>i 1 . 1.M 
•\N ANNUL'NCLM!- -\T Hi THE COMITF COLHIIRT 


aviation market, toe surge in arms veJ and Urutu designs is tout En- 
exports is principally a victory for gesa has signed an agreement for 
private enterprise. Much of the their manufacture under license in 
credit for Brazil’s assault on toe the United States by FMC Corp. 
world market goes to a handful of The hope is that toe Pentagon will 
entrepreneurs — : and chief among buy them for toe UJS. napid-de- 
them is Jos6 Luiz Whitaker Ri- ployment force. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Nov. 5, 1985 

M«t asset valus qaalatioas ore swotted by the Fund* limed with the exception ot wmt quotes based on issue price. 

Tbe Kbrqiool symbols inaicalB frequency et quotations supplied: id) -dally: twj - weekly; (PI - M-monthtv: tr) -regularly; tl)-)rreautartr. 


bdro, whose company, Engesa, 
employs 10,000 people and expects 


Until now Engesa has prospered 
by making wheeled. mflhaxy vehi- 


jo^MOOnuffion in^pon, 
Founded in the 1960s as an ail- 


developed its own “boonstraag” 
rear-suspeasian system that en- 
abled tracks and other vehicles to 
reach remote oil fields over inhos- 
pitable terrain. From that point, “it 
was natural for os to build a troop 


Argentina’s successful use of 
French-made Exocet missiles 
against British warships in the 19S2 
Falkland* war, Avibras is develop- 
ing a similar surface- 10-sea shore- 
defense system known as toe Barra- 


was natural for os to build a troop The test ground appears to be defense system known as toe Baira- 
carricr, since ii was nothing more Saudi Arabia, where the Osorio is cuda. It also hopes to produce 
than an armored truck,” Mr. Ri- undergoing hoi- weather desert tri- Brazil's first medium -range ballis- 

beiro said. — 

'Now toe company’s two best- ■ — » 

selling products are the Urutu, a 
carrier that can transport 13 sol- 

diers and is armed with machine A 

guns or cannons, and toe Cascsvel, mWw 

a three-man armored car tool can U 

be fitted with a 90mm cannon. Sub- 

sequentiy came toe Jararaca, an 

armed reconnaissance vehicle, as 

well as a variety of tank carriers. 

' m On October 16. 1985. SCOA'e boud o( directoa approved tbe interim 
1973, we .VC sola OVero.uQO Casca- financial aai e memafor tbe firat six mondtt of 1905. Tbe volume of buamcM 
vek and Unit us,” said the 57-year- handled by ihe Group in the first ball of the vear reached 73 billion francs 


ADVERTISEMENT 


cttjwoKiHmiun^ 

C0RP0RATH1N 

(CDR*) 

The usdea%aed aoaeoaca tlut aa fiom 13th 
November. 1985, at KwAiooruiie N.V_ 
Spuixtriii 172, Anwerdam, fiv.tp.BS. 50 
of the C0R*a Chu^don lnf* » waln«*nl 


On October 16. 1983. SCOA'e board of directoa approved tbe interim 
financial auiememsfor tbe first sir mondtt of 1985. The volume of buamcM 
handled by the Group in the first half of ihe year reached 73 billion francs 
and consolidated earnings came io 28.4 million francs on sales of 
4382 million francs. The Group's share of the consolidated earning was 
15,9 Bkillioo fanes, SCOA S-U HStained a lass of 8.9 cdllkw francs. 


Tbe 1985firai-half figures are cotni 
period ended on Jane 30. 1984 i 
15 months long): 


ued vitb tbe figures for the nine- month 
elow (the preceding fiscal period was 


mini Report 1985 of Kaaegpdnchi Corporation, each ropr. Ml «ku«, will 
Qunital ladnSBy Co^tiil-]Vnll be be pwWt viA.Ofl*.3^!i net pn 
available in Amsterdam at • reuwd-daretW.iafBism* S-.L3 p. »h.) *firr 

Pirnon, Heldriiw & Rereon N. V.. <Wae*» *“■ “ S '’ 195 “ 

. Ate-- S-tej-RV 

I Amsterdam Rottenfam Bank N.V^ a f lrr< Morti<» of n aUhkmfi IS5n U&.A, 

' Bank Meea * Hope NV-,. ux (- S-.M5 - Wh.*^ with Dflc.2£f 

Kas-.Associalie N-V. net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 

COMPANY' N.V. . COMPAXY .VV. 

Amateedom, 23rd October, 1985- - Antttodwn. 30* October. ]«S, 


Consolidated sales 
Consolidated result 

* Group's share 
SCO A SLA, 


tax months ended 
June 30, 1985 
4382 MT. 

+ 28.4 M.F. 

+ 15.9 M.F. 

— &9 M.F. 


Nine months ended 
Jure 30. 1984 

5J597 ME. 

— 4L- M-F. 

— 56.4M.F. 

— oI.-M.F. 


As in 1984-, the rendu of the latter half of 1985 will be strongly influenced 
bv tire las quarter's operations dependent mainly on the seasonal distribu- 
tion sector and on shipments of commercial vehicle components to Nigerian. 
There are reasonable prospects of those shipments, which lave practically 
hern cut off since 1984, in the near future. 

Subject Io ratification at the neat annual shareholders’ meeting, tire board 
coopted Messrs AL MAlSSOLR. Jean Paul PARAYRE and Pierre SCO* 
HIER as dire ctors o f SCOA S..4. in replacement of .Mestn> Philippe Dub c. 
Ernest df NATTES and Louis SANMARCO whose resignations nave been 
acknowledged. 






\3H 


■IWI F&CAilontlc S liM -H«) Li0r3iinr‘i PocJII 

• Iwl FS.C Europson — 5 IS IS ■■*■’»] LlCn-s: inM. JtnoJler Cov_ 

■Iwl PtCOrtcnlDl S 21 JG M1MARBEN 

FIDELITY POB 47S. Haminsn Rcfmvta -i C ) CI=M A 
(ml A merlcen Values Common _ S SSJ7 tm I Class £ - U-S. 

iml Amer Valuer Qjm.Prei S 10A23 (w ) Cloii C - Jesan 

0 1 FWellt* ATMT. Assets i 72.14 OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

Hi Flaellrv Auilralia Fund S II£S -ion Muliicurrencr 

10) Floelllv Discovery Fund 5 -.00,2* •( ml Dollar Medium Term 

(0) Fiatlirv Dir. SvK.Tr S 127i7 ■l»i Dollar Lana Ter 

Id) FweiityFar Easi FuntL__ I 24.11 -i*i jccar.Me ion. 

to i Fiaeiirv ini'i. Funa s 73*1 -iwi Pcuna sterling 

I O i Fidelity OrlenT Fune s 32J2 -!«t Df U»ene Marl 

Id? Floelilv Fronlter FunO___ S 142) -Ini DuicJi Florin 

(d i Flee lltv PpcJilc Fund— S IT2.V4 ■( «. i Swill Franc. 

tfli Fidelity Saci.Crowm Ft — S IsJ* ORANGE NASSAU CROUP 

I a l FidelltV world Fund S 7!S#‘ Pfl S SETS Tne MOSuo (0701 ^■“STa 

FORBES PO B8S7 GRAND CAYMAN 

Vanson ao era oi-BM-atm 

■;»] Dcuor income S 7.00 

(wl Forties hlO" 'nc oil! FO C *A40 

(n.1 Gala Income s A3o 

twl GoW AoweeioiiDn — 5 tAu 

•m) straleoic TratUno— i 1J0 

GEFINOB FUNDS. 

r«l Ecs» investment Fund S 3S&9S 

:■»! Scpnl-n world Fung L 1U.72 

iwi Slaie St. American S 161JS 

London .01^914230. Geneva I-22355KH1 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

PB 119. SI Peler Fan. Guems*v. 0491-K71S 

f*l FulurGA//. S.A I 1)4-23 

Iwrl GAM Artll rose <nc S 112 45 


SF 133.90 
5 142* 


S 12.U 
S 11.1* 
S 113 
I 124? 
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FL 10S4 
1010 


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Iwi gam Ermiiaae— 

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(w) GAM Hang Kon? Inc. 

<wl GAM inTematlonal Inc., 
iwi GAM jaaan ‘nc 


a ) ee.er Beireainoen^-*- 
PAmSBAS-GROVIP 
i a i .tor leva inlemational 

(Cl ECUPAR . 

mi aeLi-DM. 

(wl OBLiGESTION 

I OBLI-DOLLAR 
IOBLI-tEN—- 
IW] OELI-CULDEN 
I a I PifiOIL-FUND 
I a I PA RE UROPE GROWTH 
\B1 PARINTER FUIJO 
(0 1 PARINTER BONO FUND 
I -Sens (-1 fl I PAR >JS Troas. Bond 'Cl. B‘- S I14J; 
S 114.331 ROYAL B.CAHADILPOB HAGUE RN5EY 
S 13J«Sl-*lw) RSC Ccnodicn Fund Lid.. J IMS 


S *!* 
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5F 9175 
S 122020 
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S *9.90 
*11.17 
S 173 99 
S 1041 
* 114.23 


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. S 1C3.11 -!■(» i P8C Ini i Capital Fd S 2A23 

. S 100 79 •+[ * i BBC IP.I1 income Fd 1 114* 

. S le.1I ^-laiPEC MosCurrmcrFfl — _ S 264* 

5F 11A5S .+i») RBC Norm Ame» Fd S 10.03 

. S 90.43 SKAND1FOND INTL FUND (4*4.23*2701 

. S 130.10 -( a unc Bid S tJ* Oner i 6AS 

S 11TJ1 .(nrJfiiA- Sid S At? 0*lc»_._.S 640 


(»> GAM Norm America Inc. 1 1D9J7 SVEKSKA INTER NATIONAL LTD. 

I w I GAM N. America Unit Tnisl, loe-Saa 17 DnonsMre SiLXandonJai-377-HHO 

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Iwi GAM. Pens. & Chor. U.ri.FH, 102.50 9 5WIS5 BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES] 

IWI GAMflflt — — S 114.02 -Id I America Voter .-..- _ 5F 4E37S 

wi GAM SinBaperei'Maui, Inc l 9*43 isj P-M.orr Bono Selection 

(w i GAM Sien A inn umi Trim 140.70* a -(a i Dollar Bona Selection 




1 1 M 


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HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT.1HTUSA t.|dj UnlniV 
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id i imervoior__ 

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(d 1 'ren Ewso Selcclion 


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-Id' CSF (Balanced) 5F 24^ 

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JARDIME FLEMING. POB 70 GPO Ha Ko 

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t r 1 j.F Pacific incwne Trim Y 2501 

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LLOYDS BANK INTL, POB 418, Geneva 11 
-+(wi Uo*as mriDanar— — _ 4 117.70 

■+lwl Lloyds inn Europe.. SF 122.10 

-hwJ Uovds mn Growfn SF 17140 

-r( w I Liovdi mn Income SF JI«jM 

-*(•) Ltonte InM H. A men co S it420 


-Id) umrema_ 
■jd) UnilondS— 

mrnSSSSm 

•(d : Untns* 

■la: UNiziNS-. 

Of 

her Funds 


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DM11J15 iwi Activwf inn — — J 1141 

S lOJiS (ml Ames Lie 

S 2fcJ7 («) Aauilc Inieaialianai Fur.a— S 177.27 
S 1197 I r i Anao Finance /.F. S WflJI 



DM' DetnvJwMam; BF l Beiotum Frercs, FL-Duidi Florin. LF-Lueembours Francs: ECU - European Currency unit - SF ■ Swlca Fronts: o-ot*«f; + -C*(er Prieesra-WSonpride 
PiYllO ion oar unit; na- Not Areiiacie; Nj2.-NqiConnnuniaiiM.o- Hew: s-susponaed. 1 5/&-5iKfc Split; *- En-DlykNndi “■ Ei-Rh; •"-Crass Performance indei Scoiemticr. » 
Redemrt- Prtce- Ee-Cdupan; •• - Formerly WorfcJwSde Fund Ltd: fr ■ Oflor Price incL 3«* crenm. choroe; 4-+ - doily stock price as on Amfierdom SloCfc Entfwrwe 









Pace 14- 


*'* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


Tuesdays 



Closing 


Tea lea include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
end do no! reflect late trades elsewhere. 


S'rc* 


Di». via pe 


Si. 

I«s Hlgn low 


CUB* 

Sum. Oi'm 


8L 


I) Men'll 

HhmLcw 


SIJ. 

■Xi •"■jri Lsw 


ne'e 

Quit. Cht* 


(Continued from Page 12) 


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74 2S 2«% 246*— % 

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135 17% 175a 17% + % 
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SS’s 47% Tekrrnv 1X0 

£'A JU Taleon, 

2741* 227 TcfcJvn 

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37vs 73 TxABc 
26 TexCfl) 


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16’* ITT. SeaC pffi 2.10 13.4 
16% 13% 5eaC pfCXIO 115 


F-: 3% SeaCo 

> 447* 36% seoerm jo 

t 21% 15% settuil 

34'- 23'A Seal Air 64 

J 32% 25% SealPw LBQ 

I 391* M Sean 1J6 

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24^ ,K fhrilf v % xs iS 100 w 

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9% 4%-Tlfan 
11% 8% Titan pf 1 JO 94 

391: 26% ToUSne 1J2 AS 

21 U 1SL Tokhms 68 13 

21 'k 16% ToiEdl* 153 llo 

29! j 24% ToiEd of X72 1X9 

30- 247* To! Ed of 175 1X9 

28 23% ToiEdpI 347 1X6 

337* 2S% TdEd d A28 1X7 

20% 16% TOIEdaf X36 124 

18% 15V* TOIEd Pf23l 1X2 

30 9% Tonkas 

55% 26 ToolRol 68b _ -- 
26% 14% Trchm* 60 17 10 2503 

18% 11% ToroGo 60 XI 11 273 

5 1 TOSCO 969 

16', S': Towrtc 37 

9% 3% Towle Of 64 1X1 19 


US, Hstiires 


Season Season 
HlOh Low 


Ocen High Low Close Chy. 


Season 

H,gh 


SCOSJI" 

La-, 


\v. S 


QMn ->'-jl> low CICM Chj. 


167JS 13275 

167 JO 138X0 _ 

16U5 >4150 Mar 

Esr. Salas Prav. Soles 5J64 

Prev.Dav Open Ini. 11J96 cKtit 

SUGAR WORLD ll(NYCSCE) 

1 12600 lbs.- cents per lb. 


S*P 163.75 165H0 16X2S 16X00 —1.45 
Dec 164X0 16460 16173 16X00 — 1JD 


163X0 —SO 


Grains 


WHEAT ICBT) 


SXW b'.' rrii.-iln-.il -r 

■ ioHarseer 

.sne! 

T73 




3*9' : 


3_*4 4 

325, 


-XI'- 

3.74' a 

■*=: 

.V— r 

j.T£ 

12i 3 

336 


— »•- 

4.0: 

32J 

M5- 


33- : 

3 l2 -» 

3.1J'4 

-.01 '4 


L4S 

Jul 


:.93 . 

191'-: 


—03-4 

3AS 

147 

S«s 


214 

193 

2H 

—XI 

3X5 

114-4 


IBS’ 

JOS’: 

10C 

325 

-M'-. 

Esr 5c: ct- 

Prev sates 

46- 






:-4hei 




Cct 131 4 

1)6 

131- 

13S’.« 

+.03% 

6Ur 1*1', 

245-4 

If- 

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+X3', 


1SC% 

146'- 

150 

+.DT., 

jy! 2.44 

15?' 4 

148' 


+.03'4 

3a* 235 

137'-. 

134-4 

137 , 4 


Dec 125 

13V: 

13 

111 


Mcr 135 4 

1X0 

223 

139’: 

+J7.-0 

P-ev. Seles 






.*.77 
aJB 
A'4 
A23 
lJ 2 
3.63 
Est. Sales 


163X0 
206.50 
16X50 
167X3 
15253 
167 00 
1-9.SC 

150.00 

150.00 
Es:. Sales 


SS: 

»; 
5JV: 
5JP : 


12700 

13X00 

13X50 

13-XC 

135*0 

137*0 

1JO.OO 

MXOO 

14600 


+.03’: 

”.04U 

553 : 5.46% Sir 4 


Prov Ca.Oocn'ni. 2 °j7c .-DrJ 
CORN(CBT) 


2.67 it-- . 

X6I’. 231 

23? XXI 

XT? XT- . 

23S : 220' - 

274’; 233 

Esr. sales 

pre» Day Oven i-u.tJo.ISS Chi. 155 

SOVHEAW5(CBTI 
SJ K0 e u mini mun- iioi'ar^ atr eeshei 
6)8 4.17 - N3. i.'f : 5.11- : 5,’J XI9’- 

A TO X1C ion 5J7 332 535" * £31% 

«sr 5 Ji itj'a SX'm 5.44'- 
J.'3V 547 ’ “ 

Jui SSs 
Auc sj: 
aec S3* 

Mo, 13, 

Jon 

Prev. Seles 44J5o 

Prev. Do-. Open Ini. *4J5C orf 1 337 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 

100 Ions- (toilers per ion 

i8txo 1X5.40 d« irxo 7i9jo it£60 i49jo 

Jon 14763 I5CM if JO 149.90 
MS' 143.70 15OJ0 14840 153.70 
MflV 150X3 15XS9 149.70 15160 
Ju' 15063 15X5X ISC5C 15220 
A-.-S 15000 152C0 150X0 151.70 
aep 14363 14963 14860 149J0 
Qel 14*00 I4£6D 145X0 14X50 
Dec 14560 I4SX0 14550 14360 
Jen 1-660 

Prev. Sales 10-132 


7.75 

UO 

Jan 

550 

5X1 

5x5 

SX1 

+36 

9J3 

134 

,".\ar 

610 

4J7 

610 

633 

+ 18 

7.15 

358 

Mav 

629 

650 

628 

650 

+ 19 


339 

Jul 

643 

6 66 

6X3 

A Alj 

+.79 

6.0O 

424 

SCD 

6X2 

iX 


6X2 

+.18 

0 95 

4X2 

Oct 

674 

692 

671 

691 

+ 17 

725 

615 

Jan 




7X5 

+.17 

745 

4X1 

Mar 

727 

7 M 

727 

740 

+.IO 

Est. Soles 


Prev. Seles 10 

996 





Prev. Dev Open Int. 39.117 up 1.662 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric Ians- Spar ton 


2337 

1945 

Dec 

TUS0 

2C55 

2043 

2045 

—45 

2392 

1955 

Mar 

2180 

2180 

2137 

2141 

—46 

2422 

1060 

,’Aov 

2233 

2233 

2200 

2201 

—44 

242« 

I960 

Jui 

2270 

370 

2343 

2237 

— 3a 

2430 

2X2 

Sea 

2270 

2270 

2270 

22x5 

-38 

2425 

23S5 

2055 

TVS 

Dec 

Mar 

255 

2285 

2275 

2275 

22SS 

-36 
— 36 

Esl. Sales 

Prev. sales 1.150 





541 

536 


563’ 

s 


54JP- +JM 
56B : +65': 
540 +X3 

535--: +.03’, 
548 +X3': 


prev. Dot Openint. 45^23 uolOO 
SOYBEAN OIL CC8T1 
60X00 IDS- dollars per ICO lbs. 


X9.55 
29 07 
28.60 
r-as 

7565 

25.15 

24.05 

2250 

X1A5 

20.35 

6 sl. Sales 


19.05 

I9J2 

19 60 
XOXX 

20 40 
10-47 
7060 
M45 
20J5 
X0J5 


Dec 

Jan 

Avar 

Mcv 

Jui 

Au8 

S*P 


I«57 

32 

3075 

21X5 

21X0 

JUS 


Od 21X0 
Dee 2IJ5 
Jan XT « 

Prev Sales 12X10 


20J2 

19j8 

10X9 


20.15 

:ojo 

S?B 

31X4 

20.43 

— X2 

20.90 

TOJSO 

2085 

+JW 

3120 

20.93 

21.16 

+X1 

21X8 

21X0 

21 JO 


21 JO 

21.15 

21.15 

+.05 

21X0 

21X0 

21.10 

+.04 

21X5 

2105 

21 JO 

+X4 

31X0 

21X0 

21 JO 

+.05 


Prev.Dav Openint. 45.490 oil 711 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME) 
40X0010*.- cents per lb. 


67X5 

55X0 

Dec 

67J5 

67.70 

6660 

67.17 

+.10 

42.45 

5425 

Feb 

63X0 

£302 

63X0 

63.40 

+X3 

47 J7 

55JO 

Aor 

62.47 

6157 

62X0 

62.23 


6625 

36 25 

Jun 

el. 90 

61.95 

6135 

61 JO 

— X2 

6640 

55 JO 

AuO 

60X5 

4035 

60.10 

6620 

+J0 

60X0 

57 JO 

Oct 

59X0 

59 JO 

59X0 

59.10 

+J5 

'5JO 5“ JO DOC t/C-50 60 JO 

Eri.&ales 70X75 Prev. Sales 20X83 
prev. Dav Open int. 68X04 us 1X79 

<50.10 

£0.10 

—.10 


PEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44X00 lbs.- cenls per lb. 

73J0 
714b 
7110 

71.00 

70.00 

4860 ... .. 

Esl. Sales 1605 Prev. Sales I60» 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. +695 oHX« 
HOGS (CME) 

30X00 lbs.- cents Per lb. 



5tLB5 

3615 

Dec 

47,45 

47.75 

4670 

47.15 



33.10 

Feo 

4645 

*675 

45.90 

46J2 

+J0 


36.12 

Aor 

4160 


41J5 

41.7S 

+J3 


3« JO 

Jun 

44J0 


43JU 

43J5 

+X5 



Jul 

44X5 


*3.75 

44J7 

+J0 


4625 


4285 

42J5 

«2JS 




38X7 

Oct 

40.05 


39.75 




3637 


41X0 


40.75 

40.07 

+.02 

40 90 40X5 Fen 

Est. Sales 1589 Prev. Sales 8,488 
Prev. Dov Open Int. 26910 UP 1X74 

41X0 

+23 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 
30X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 


7620 

5675 

Feb 

6175 



63X5 




Mar 

62.50 


£255 




57X5 

Mav 

44.15 


63J0 

6442 

+87 


57 JO 

Jul 

64.90 

UK 

63X0 

6670 

+JS 

73.15 5650 AW 61 J5 62x0 

Est. Sates 6815 Prev. Sales 4800 
Prev. Dar Osen Inf. 8,105 us 198 

61.10 

6210 

+85 


Pood 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE J 
8, 600 lbs.- cents per la. 

129-25 Ree 162X0 16360 15760 15861 — X9S 
147X3 I2B60 AVar 14X20 164J5 1SB60 1S9J1 — X13 

167.18 131X0 Mav 16X60 16460 159X0 160J1 —7 0S 

167.10 13560 Jul 14360 16460 I6QJ0 16160 —MS 


j CWreooOptions 


PHILADELPHIA E BCHANGE 
option 8, Strike 
underlying Price Calls— Last 

Nov bee Mar Nov Dec Mar 
12.SW British Pounds-ceots per unit. 


9.15 
530 
3 JO 
2XS 

. .. 1.00 

58X00 Canadian Ddllnrvcents per unit. 


Pols— Last 


BPaund 

125 

S 

1BJD 

143 17 

>30 

5 

1630 

143.17 

IJ5 

r 

r 

143.17 

140 

f 

4.10 

143.17 

1*5 

0J0 

no 

143.17 

ISO 

r 

035 

14117 

165 

r 

r 


173 


CDollr 
726® 

7269 
7269 

7259 rt r r r 

62,300 west German MarKs-cents Per unit. 


1.14 


0.73 


DMork 

38J9 

38J9 

3027 

3029 

3829 

38J9 

38J9 


IJ9 

050 

OX' 


SJS 

r 

3*2 

2J8 

163 

082 

0J7 

0.15 


4.76 


152 

1.1a 

0.75 


0X3 

0.1a 

064 


0XS 

OJO 

1.10 

135 


0.04 

0J3 

066 


0.16 
a 40 


no 

400 

8J0 


0.12 

0J3 

061 


D.06 

0.10 


0.K 

1-46 


125X00 French Prnncs-lOtfis of a cent per unit. 
FFranc 120 r 5.70 t r 

1X560 125 1J0 r r r 

■ 25.60 130 r r 2J5 _r. 

6.2S0XI 
jven 

40.14 
48 u 

46.14 
44 14 
4X14 
4X14 

48.14 
48 U 

6 W00 Swiss F rones -cems per unit. 


0.15 


a 

5 

8.07 

810 

& 

r 

r 

42 

r 

606 

r 

r 

r 

00* 

43 

r 

5.10 

r 

r 

r 

r 

44 

r 

4.12 

622 

r 

r 

r 

45 

r 

311 

6*5 

r 


r 

46 

f 

2.10 


r 

0.10 

a*2 

47 

in 

IJ7 

1.08 

004 

0.76 

0X3 

<8 

044 

0X0 

1.44 

r 

05? 

1.13 

49 

a.ui 

0J4 

1X3 

r 

r 

US 


SFrane 

41 

S 

5.75 

t 

*648 

42 

S 

6 7* 

P 

46.48 

43 

f 

3.7* 

r 

4648 

44 

r 

280 

r 

46.48 

45 

r 

1 06 

r 

4pJ8 

46 

075 

IJJ 

2J4 

46.48 

47 

023 

0.73 

1 JO 

*£.*8 

48 

r 

0J9 

1-23 


0.01 


0X8 

OJO 


Taloi call vol. 1 1637 Coil O0«a id. 

Total put vol. 5,9*' Pul own ■«- 

t — Nat Iraded. a— No option ottered. 

Lost is premium t purchase price/. 

Source, ap. 


198.151 

1517C 


Prev. Dav Coen Ini. 20J£« uo 71 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
15JS0 lbs- cents oer lb. 

IB1.D0 1I2J0 Nov 114.40 USJS 11150 113J5 

180.00 11320 Jen 11720 11720 11420 114-JO 

17760 11175 Mar 11660 11660 1T5.1D 115.15 

16X60 111.95 Mav 1 1450 116.70 11560 11560 

15760 111.40 Jui HS60 11560 11560 115.15 

18060 111X0 Scp 113X0 113X0 113X0 11 

lt*J5 11160 Nov 

Jan 

16125 11160 Mar 

ESI. Sales 750 Prev. Soles SO* 

Prev. Oov Open Int. 5.913 uo 180 



Season 

High 


Season 

Low 


Open High Low Close 


90X2 

ML47 

90.17 

89.90 

Esl. Sales 


8728 

8764 

88X4 

8929 


D*C 9026 9083 
Mar 90-0 9060 

Jun 90.14 90.18 
Sea 89X6 89.90 
Prev. Sales 21 jw 


9034 

90.41 

90.14 

9965 


9061 

9068 

90.18 

89.91 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEXI 
25X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 


60X0 

8A2S 

6JJ0 

5E50 

Nov 

Dec 

60X5 

61X5 

60X0 

60X0 

£055 

+.10 

+.10 

B4J0 

MJ0 

58.75 
59 JO 

Jan 

Mar 

61X0 

61.90 

6150 

6125 

61X5 

+.10 

+.10 

74.00 


AAov 

6210 

A?7* 

61.W 

6220 

+.15 

74X0 

im 

Jul 

6255 

62X5 

6245 

6255 

+.15 

73.90 

40.90 

Seo 

62X5 

6295 

6295 

6295 

+.15 

70 JO 

61X3 

Dec 

63X5 

*165 

6150 

63X5 

+.15 

70JP 

67.90 

47 JO 

£3.33 

*255 

42«0 

Jan 

Mar 

Mav 

4170 

64J0 

64J0 

63X5 

6425 

6470 

+.15 

+.15 

+20 

06JO 

*1X0 

63J5 

*1X0 

Jul 

5*P 




£5-15 

6555 

+25 

+25 

Est. sates 

Prev Sales 4X20 





Prev. Dor Open lnt.143-438 Off 74 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

% per pound- 1 ooW eoualsRUQOl 
l.**25 1.0700 Dec 1.4295 1X315 1X340 1X270 

1.4310 1X680 Mnr 1X185 1X200 1X130 1.4150 

1X215 1.1905 Jun 1X100 1.4100 1X030 1X050 

Esl. Sales 6,246 prov. Sales 7.123 
Prev.Dav Open Ini. 29298 oil 568 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Saar dir- 1 point eaualsSO -0001 
7566 J0C4 Dec .7280 7281 .7255 7256 

7504 6981 Mar .7X73 .7273 .7242 .710 

7360 .7070 Jun .7268 7268 7226 .7230 

7303 .7176 Sea 7242 7242 7220 .7218 

E st. Sales 1714 Prev. Salts U40 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 5J22 up 366 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc- 1 point eeuabSOXOOOl 
.13610 -09670 Dec .12550 

.12400 .10985 Mar .12480 

.12180 .12130 Jun .12410 

Esl. Sales Frev. Soles 14 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 138 up3 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Sper mark. 1 point eouolsSOXOOl 
J874 7971 Dec J844 7856 7837 J846 

J90* J040 Mar J378 J889 J870 3878 

J935 J335 Jun J914 6914 J905 3910 

3960 3762 SCO 3959 3959 3959 3946 

Ext. Sales 18316 prov. Sales 23X62 
Prev. Day Open |n|. 51703 off 520 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Sper yon- 1 point equals SQ.000001 
•004832 .003905 Dec XG4810 X04823 X0480A .004820 

•004841 X04835 Mar X04820 J04831 X04815 .00*829 

004852 X04220 Jun .004839 X04843 X04S39 X04846 
004800 .004690 Sto X04865 

004905 X0415B Dec X048S5 JV4885 X0488S X048S9 
E»t. Sales 17X44 Prev. Sales 16.107 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 39X39 up 156 
SWISS FRANC (MAM) 

Sper franc- 1 PolnicauafsSLOOBl 
-4728 3531 Dec X684 X693 

4771 3835 Mar X724 X7H 

X800 X190 Jun .4775 -1775 

X830 X810 Sep X830 XS30 

Est. Sales 13348 Prev. Sales 19334 
Prev. Oov Open Int. 39X52 up 5 


Cbg. 

+X2 

+J3 

+J» 

+.as 


-80 
— 85 
—90 


-J7 


—60 

—60 

—60 


—17 

-16 

—15 

-12 


I 37% in, SvcCps 

!£■* 11% Shakiee 

26-'* 16 Shawl n 

*05a 29!, ShetIT 

j 30 'i 21 She 1C la 

i 40 257-2 Shrwin 

I 9 s' , shoeiwn 
1S'.» 12 ShavrW 

. 19"« IS SlerPoc 1X6 

41 26% Singer X0 


3T* 28% Singrpf 150 10X 


32 


3X 17 

18 


, 177. ?2% Skyline 

I I*'i T* SmlHtln 

; 71% 50% SmkB 

84'.: 48% Smack r 

41% 21% SnaoOh 

15% 12% Snyder 

j *3 Vb 31% Sonot 

I 1*V* I3V, SorrvCp .. 

• 32% 22% SoaUn 1J0 4.1 

! 4TTA 33% Source 330 BX 

23«. 19% SrcCnof 2*0 10X 

I 3JVa 24% SoJerln 2X8 9J 12 

{ 491, 38', Soudwn 1X0D 23 12 

35 24% 5oet8k 130 18 10 

! 9 6% SbetPS 2I3I33X 38 

i 27% 21% SCoiEd 216 XX 8 
I 23'.* 17% SouitiCo 2X4 T0X £ 


130 IS 10 4105 34% 34% 34** + % 

.12 1J 14 62a TO 9% 10 + % 

" 637x321* 32V* 22V,— U 

64 59 58% S8% — % 

924- 44% 44 44 1 * — % 

41 1TA 13 13% + U 

707 28% 27% 27%— % 

25 12% 12% 12% — % 

21 15% 1S% (5% + % 

5Q 15% 15% 15% — % 

U 11 3125 19 18% 18% — % 

35 3% 3% 3%— U 
17 12 2622 43% 42 U 42%— % 
19 23 17% 17% 17% — % 

IX lb 1586 30% 29% 30 — V* 

43 9 139 24 23% 2« + 

5.1 10 5988 34% 34% 34% + *A 

219 104% lOS’i 105% — 1% 
945 28% 27% 2B% + % 

55 19 18% 18% 

304 27% 27V* 27% + % 

322 15% 14% 15% + ft 

56 22% 21% 22% 4- ft 

982 39% 39% 39% — ’ : 

306 25% 2£Vs 26ft + % 

SW 38 37% 37ft— ’/• 

TS 8«b 8 SV* 

4 13% 13ft 13% + % I 

244 18% U% 18% 4- % [ 

1326 38% 37 38 +1 t 

3 32ft 32% 32ft — ft I 
13% 13ft 13 V* — ■ '• i 
_ _ _ 8% 7ft 8% + % 

100 43 11 1760 70 61% 69ft 4- ft i 

1J0 1.5 IB 19 80ft 80 00ft + ft i 

1.16 3J 12 297 35V* 34% 35ft — ft I 

M 118 18 29 14% 14K 14ft 

2X0 5J 11 2226 37% 35% 36% + ft 

.16* .9 15 1392 U 17% 18 — ft 


5 10% 10% 10% 

278 29ft 29ft 29* 

56 17% 17% 17% f ft 

353 aft »> 20 

22 29ft 23% 28% — - 

14 29ft 2»ft 39>*— 

TO 27% 2 Ts -ffi 

3 224- 32% 33=^ 

7 191* 19 19ft + % 
£ lBVe. 13ft 18ft 

10 X 5 274 24’a 23', 23%—.- 

48b X 16 J7 56% 5^» 56^ +1- 

zptk j;,^ 2% 

TiT* + % 

„ n Si S'- ft 

47’A 25ft TbvSTU S ‘ 27 2140 K;, 36% 4- % 

2B’i 17 Trews J2 1.0 It 1521 17ft 16_j JMJ— r* 
23 8's TWA 1131 22% 22% 22% 

16 13 TWApf 225 MJ 172 15% 15% JJ- 

34ft 16ft TWApfBZJS A7 33 33% 33ft HT* 

32% 24% Truram 1X8 5J 15 2811 31% 3i% J7% 

21% 17% Tran Inc 2J8 1CL8 15 2V.« 21 

M lift TAR tty 1X0 SJ 86 3 12 1 

21ft 15ft TrnCda nl.12 68 7 

57ft 44 Trartsco 699»I4J 48 

66ft 53 Tmscpf 137 6.S 

24% J9V: TrcaEjt 2J6 51J 
13 ir 5% Tronscu 8 

96 85ft TrGPpf >X4 8.9 

25% 22 TrGPPf ZS0 TOO 

13% e* 4 rntsOh 6 

<7% 29ft Tromvy UD 4X 13 

43 ft 2Zft Trnwfa X8 

25", 12ft TwkivttA 

J4-« 27ft 7»B Pl 2JD 5J8 39 3Tfe 3*'i 34'> 

177* 15% Tydd Pi 1.90 103 t 17% 17% 17% 

49ft 34ft Trcvi’n- 2X4 4 X II 5131 66% 45V, 46 + 'f 


21ft + %b ■ 

..... 12 . j 

26 16% lb! 1 : 16V2— H 

819 48% 48% j 

370 £0 W‘3 59-5 + ft I 

iai 20% 2tr* + % 

79 8ft 8 8% +.% | 

200:97 97 07 +1 l 

1 S 25 25 — % 

68 12ft 12% 12% — 'A 

67 45ft 45% 45ft 

IJ 14 3492 4C% 39% *0 + 4. 

269 22ft 22% 22ft + i 


19 

72 4J 23 
40 U B 
2X5* 6J 7 
90 33 6 
2X 12 
10 
«X 14 
8.9 11 
I.l 9 


.« 2 

A0 


4.16 TX 
3X881X0 
JD X 5 
1X0 23 TO 
A4 1J 17 
Jl* 9S 7 
20 11 12 

53 U . . .... .. 

. _ - - .. .150 J 25 119ft 30% 31% + % 

19% 9% TritE pf 1.10 6X 715 17% 16% 17V* + % 

43% 31% TuesEP 3XC 7X 9 419 40Vj 40 40Vy + % 

17% 9% Tpltex XS 2X 15 116 17% 17 17% 

20' A lb TvrinDs JO 48 15 6319 18% 18% + % 

41 30 Tree Lb X 20 12 » W4 3KV ffl - VU 

17% 12% Tylers X0 3J> 12 39* 13% 13% 13% 


5SV: 50' a Trovol 
27% 22ft in Can 
30% 7*» Triolns 
34% 23 TF.oPc 
49ft 30% Tribune 
6ft 4 TrJajlr 
7% 5H Tr*SP 
17Ti 13’, Trlntv 
35ft ’,4% TnlEns 


in 54ft 5*1, + % 
130 26% 26% 26% + % 
773 31ft 30V II +1 J 
66 3.-% 35% +1% 

723 49% 4S% 49% +IL 
7 5% 5% 5% 

107 6% 6% 6%— % 

16 14<4, 13% 14 * ft 


JR 29 2S3 29 

. S u » *1 3S-* 38 . 

5 V 2 JfcBsF M 43 7 725 56% 5* SMX'% 

TO* 42 «WF pf 4SK *B 200* 5B% 4»ft X<% + b 

29ft 23V; MefFM ZJB HX 11 172 24% 31 24%-.% 

18ft n Wfendes 34 U 15 liar Tb -.«f% n% " 
IK 17 «MCA *1111 ira r B 
45 35 fWPfP 2JB SJ « IV 40ft «% + V, 

S% w%wsta»T*ue » » m, w% _ 

3ft WWAfti. 6 » 3% 7% 

I, % WtAir«f( _ S75 

n WAirof lit 8* IS . _ 

81* Vi WCNA . HI ) H 1 , 

II >6% WCMApfJZ 347 332 19% 17% Wk *« 

•33 99% wPoel . _ 10. i 12S%125%US% .T 

17 5% IHMkn 400* T3% 11% 13% +B* 

47% 24ft WnOaof 17 33 23V, B tn, 

51% 26 WHUPfC 4 3B, J7V. ■«%. 

8% 7ft WMJPfS 83 6% 6% 646 + IL 

14ft 4% WnUpfE . 117 Wft n . tt 

46'.* 28 WUTIb* 2 37ft 37ft 3716 +r 

IT-ft 5% WUTlnUL . .21 . 13% a%'l3%+ % 

43% 26 WtfgE UO 2* 13 93+3 43% 42ft 42k, “ 

41% 34% WftStvc IX U » 412 31 J6K X7%+K 

34 34% Weyortl MO <6 27 3013 28% 27 SS +T 

44% UMWevrpf 180 7.1 M 30% 3i TTVj fT 

51% 45ft Wtvrpr 4J» U 77 48% *8% + % 

19% 4% viWWH} « 8% 8% 116- b 

27% WVb vlWPffoM - - 88121% 71% 21% +1 

32b* n% viWiPtt ol *«kx 16 IS 15 — T 

5N6 WnM . 2XO 43 19 M? tt 4446 46. . +9 

El, 25% WbttC 730 43 SM 30% 29ft 30%+% 
34% 19ft Wkrt e Of 0 01 5% 22% 13% +» 

TSV, mv VKUtlt*. JO Iff W 2798 3Mk I«* A* 

17% Mr YM*S «B 154 II .10% 11 +% 

15% 8 Wilfred 12 00 Ills- 11% 1146 +' 

ij% ' 7% vnaacG .W Jt S * 

33% 26ft VBfDam lxt 47 22 
5% 2 WUnEI 
7% 5% UnfehrO M 17 

3i% 3t wmCRx ut sj n 

20% S% Wemte JO LI i 
S% 5% winner * 

Sft 3% WWerJ 

40% 38% tHKCP X4T 48 0 

93% 72ft WISE pf 090 9.9 

81 43ft VWsEpO 7J5 97 

26% 23ft maG.pt 3J5 9X 

40ft 28ft WtacPL 2X4 73 t 

39 ft 29% WHtrt 216 U t 

40% 38% WHcs Ml 33 TO 

u . au. 'ii itaPr v it 

S3'A 3TA Wo fw tR 2J0 18 11 1523 33ft 52 £U, + % 

4% 7ft WtWr 1J2 -4 . 3ft J +V 




&&36-2m+i 

177 4ft 4ft 4 ft— fi 




7% 

JT’ 


3 


u 


. 2b 3 - 20ft SotnGss 1X0 
I 44 31% SNEtl 172 

39ft 3 r» SoNEPf 182 
52 41% SaNE Pf 4X2 

i ZP.4 TTn SoRvBf 260 

I 31 24% SotJnCo 1.72 

; 39ft 24=i Sojtmd 1JCQ 

55 i&tse"* 4 ®. 


IS 8 
6X 11 
9J 
9J 
93 
4 X 

25 9 


18 lift So Roy .12 .7 

8’b Sft Seumrfc Jib 29 
51 47 SamkPf 6J8eI3J 

■U S 


4467 

4709 

X765 

XE30 


X680 

X720 

X767 


3X343 

IJ2 41 80 
1X2 42 Z1 
1JM 47 13 
1J6 2X 18 
JO 15 119 
X6 27 11 ... 

27 15 61 

5X 9 2545 


-23 

—10 


Prev. Day Ocen int. 76X54 up 79 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40X00 tbs.- cents ner lb. 


70X0 

41X0 

NOV 

Dec 4270 

4215 

4170 42*0 4250 

—25 
— XS 

7650 

44.30 

Jfln 

4290 

—XI 


*190 

Mar 41X0 

4325 4355 4160 

— XS 

6675 

4*50 

Mav 

4420 

—25 

6145 

4450 

Jdl 45.15 

45.15 45.15 45X0 

-XS 

5210 

46.90 

See 

4570 

— 25 


•48.95 

Dec 

4679 

—25 

S3JS 

49X0 

Jon 

Mar 

MOV 

47.10 

47X0 

4850 

—25 
— XS 
— 25 

50J0 

50X0 

Jul 

4920 

— XS 

Est. Sales 

Seo 

4950 

624 

—24 

Prev. Dov Onen Int. 1.735 Off 130 



SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 trov cp- cent? per trov at 


620X 

4092 

Nov 

£092 

6092 

6072 

6082 


5902 

Dee 

611.4 


6105 

6125 

121S2 

M932 

5950 

6072 

Jon 

6245 

*265 

*232 

6167 

6248 


6100 

Mav 

Mon 

634X 

6322 

6332 


6292 

Jul 

6415 

6435 

6415 

6422 


6212 

Sep 

6510 

6S2J} 

bsaa 

6515 

799X 


Dec 

666.0 

*672 

*652 

665.9 

7892 

7700 

£782 

6/02 

Jon 

Mar 

6792 

6792 

6792 

6/12 

6812 

7522 

6835 

May 

6WX 

*942 

6902 

6917 


6992 

Jul 

7035 


7035 

702X 

Ev. Soles 


Prev. Dav Ooen Ini. 87X17 up 885 




—.1 
— J 


PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trov at- dollars per trov az. 

373X0 25750 Jon 377 JO 331X0 326X0 328.10 

357X0 ^WJO Apr 330X0 333X0 329X0 330.10 

3UX0 OTXO Jul 333X0 333X0 333X0 333X0 

3*0X0 30150 Oct 33493 33450 33450 33490 

Est. Sales 2132 Prev. Sales 1.192 
Prev. Oav Open Int. 1X102 off 260 
PALLADIUM l NY ME) 
loo trov o:- dollars per oz 

141X0 91X0 Dec WIJS 102X0 101.10 101JO 

127 JO 91J0 MOT 101 JO 10250 10150 101X5 

114X0 91 JO Jun 102X0 10250 101.75 102X0 

115X0 97.70 Sea 103X0 

107 JS 104X0 Dec 10400 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 247 

Prev. Dav Onen Int. 4561 oH 12 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 troy az.- dollars per troy ol 
326 JO 320.00 Nov 325JH 325X0 325X0 32430 

489 JO 301J0 Dec 32680 327 A0 32410 32420 

Jan 32B20 

485J0 306X0 Feb 33040 331J0 330.10 33030 

496X0 31470 Apr M4J0 33 530 33410 334.10 

43SJV 320J0 Jun 33880 33880 338J20 33420 

42BA0 331X0 AU9 34150 

395JO 335X0 Del 3CJO 34780 347 JO 347.10 

393X0 342X0 Dec 35250 35250 352X0 35180 

358J0 31380 Feb 35680 

388-40 355X0 Apr 36T.90 

394J0 369X0 JIM 36780 

335X0 372X0 AuO 37120 

Est. Saits Prev. Sales 1X107 

prev. Day Open lnf.123,100 off 16 


— JS 
— 75 
—JO 
—JO 
—JO 


—80 
—.90 
—.90 
—JO 
—JO 
—JO 
—JO 
—.90 
—.90 
—JO 
—JO 
— JO 
—.90 


Financial 


9299 9292 
9286 9278 
9233 9251 
9222 9218 

91-91 91X6 


9133 9U3 91J1 


46-25 

B6-24 

85-26 

83-13 

8+28 


9294 

9280 

9233 

9221 

91 JO 

VIJ8 
91 J1 
91X5 


8+9 

B7-9 

86-11 

85-16 

8+24 


US T. BILLS (IMMI 
Sl m llllen- pis of 100 PCt. 

93X8 8577 Dec 92W 

9293 86 A0 Mar 9280 

9258 87X1 Jun 923 

9232 BHXO Sep 9221 

81.91 89X5 Dee 91.91 

91 JO B9J8 Mar 

91J?9 90J0 Jun 

9094 90B3 SeP 

Esr. Saits Prev. Sales U62 

prev. Day Onen Inf. 39.939 oft 285 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT1 
si 00X00 prin-els A32nxtsofl00pct 
88-1 1 75-13 Dec 86-25 tt-14 

87-11 75-14 Mar B6-24 87-13 

86-10 7+30 JUK 85-26 86-13 

B4-4 BO-7 Sep 85-18 85-20 

8+19 80-2 Dec B+20 8+25 

Eli. Sales Prev. Sales 6X64 

Prev. Day Osen InL 69,102 off 557 
US TREASURY BONDS (CAT) 

(8 Dd-SlHUXXLoft »32n«of 100 pet) 

79-3 57-8 Dec 7B-U 79-15 78-16 746 

77-29 57-7 Mar 77-8 78-3 77+ 77-27 

7+18 56-29 Jun 7fr* 7M0 764 76-22 

75-31 5+29 Sep 75. 75-27 75 7H0 

7+74 5+25 Dec 7+1 7+27 7+1 7+71 

7+15 5+27 Mar 73-26 73-26 73-23 73-74 

7+36 £3-12 Jui 73 73 72-30 72-30 

72-27 iU Sw 1M 72-9 72-6 72-7 

72-18 £3-24 Dec 71-18 

70-20 £7 Mar 70-3! 

68-30 £+25 Jim . 70-14 

Est. Sales Prev.SalesHBAn 

Prev. Dav Open Int J09JS9 Off 7.956 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CB12. 
sunox indev-Pfs & 32na$of 100 pet 
8+31 81-17 Dec 8+19 333 8+18 

8+2 SO-4 Mar 85-21 8+5 85-21 

8+3 79 Jun 8+7 8+8 854 

8+9 79-10 Seo 8+19 8+20 8+15 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales UJ4 

Prev. Day Open Int. 7A49 aH51 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

■I million, pta of 1 00 pci 
9J50 B5J4 Dec *2X7 92J3 9127 

92.18 B6J4 Mar 02.12 92.12 02.12 

91.n 8643 J Un 

91-44 B7X4 Sap 

90X7 S8J4 

9A» 88X0 Mar 

EsLSates Prev. Salas 191 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 1.935 Off 54 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

Sl (nllllDRSits al 100PCL 
W.17 B4XQ Doc 9158 92X5 91J6 

91.93 8610 MOT 9178 91X5 91J5 

SI'S 8 + 7 ^ Ju" 91X6 91J4 91*4 

91.18 87X0 See 01.11 01.17 91X9 


8+26 

85-31 

8+6 

8+15 


— X2 
— X3 

+XI 

+X2 

+X2 

+X2 

+JJ2 


+11 

+12 

+11 

+11 

+11 


+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 


+5 

+7 

-« 

+10 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130X00 bd. H.-5 per 1X00 bd. ft. 

18610 126J0 NOV 145X0 145 JO 14X50 14X70 —JO 

187X0 133 A0 Jon 147X0 148A0 145J0 145A0 —A0 

1«5X0 139.70 MW 1S3J0 15X70 T51.1D IS1X0 -JO 

17640 14620 May 15680 157X0 1J5-50 155X0 —1X0 

1B3XC 1*9 JO Jul 160X0 160X0 159A0 159 JO — A0 

17600 152.90 Sep IbXJO 143X0 162J0 16280 —1X0 

181X0 15650 Nov 162A0 16260 162A0 162A0 — 1A0 

Est. Sales U58 Prev. Sales 958 

Prev.Dav Open Ini. 6969 off 39 
COTTON 2(NYCE) 

50X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 


73.00 

5751 

Dec 

£a«5 

61.30 

4X57 

£179 

+.12 

7675 

5877 

Mar 

61X5 

6170 

6170 

61X9 

+J2 

70X0 

58.90 

May 

61X1 

6211 

6155 

6210 

+.15 

70X5 

6550 

SBJD 

5240 

Jul 

Oct 

5975 

59X8 

5971 

S9X6 

5240 

+76 

—25 

59X5 50X5 

6»75 5255 

Est. Sales 

DOC 5220 52X9 
Mar 

prey. Sales 2209 

51X5 

5209 

5250 

—XI 

-.10 


Prev. Day Owm Int 22X57 up 121 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

*2X00 oa i - cents per pa I 

8670 £9.15 Dec 8675 8630 85J0 8575 — A4 

88X5 69X0 Jon 8550 05J5 3S25 85 M -77 

0675 70.00 Feb 84.10 84XS 8375 8190 —36 

BUS 68X0 (for 79X5 79X0 77-20 77X5 — JJ 

77 A0 £8X0 Apr 75X0 75J5 75X0 75J0 -A3 

74J0 68X0 May 72A0 7370 72A0 73X3 +J)5 

74L2S 71X0 Jun 72X0 72.00 71.90 7T.90 — Xfl 

7150 72X0 Jul 72X0 72X0 7170 72X0 —1X0 

72J0 77J0 Auo 71 A0 71 Afl 71 A0 7100 —1X0 

72J0 72J0 Seo 72X0 —1X0 

Est. sales Prev. Soles 7X21 

Prev. Day Open Int. 31X67 off 1X68 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 


31 18ft SwAirt 
16ft l’»* SwtFor 
19 12 SwtGas 1X4 

88% 63». Sw3«HI 6X0 
29 19-k SwErtr J2 

26J« 20 SwtPS 2X2 
T7ft I2r,„ Spartan 52 
27% 15% SoeefP 
59 36ft Sperry 
3 r.i 31F* Soring* 

43% 35ft SauufO 
73% J9% SeuJbb 
23’e 18% StaleV 
23% IS SIBPnf 
17% lOVj StMotr 
55% 39% SMOG* 

23% K)% StPocCs A0 
lift \2ft Strotaex 
31% 23% SlanWk 
lift 9ft StaMSe 
3** 2 Vj Steeva 
20ft 15% Sferehl 
12ft *% SiHBcP 
37ft 2£ft SterlDo 
36% 16 SlevnJ 1X0 4J 
J3V, 25ft StwWm TAB 60 20 
14 10 SlkVCpf 1X0 77 

*5% 38ft StaneW 1J0 14 8 
34ft 24 StantC AO 22 24 
51' J 34ft SfocSfLD 1.10 2J 11 
31ft 16% StarEa 152 9J 14 
4'., 7% vIStorT 
91 40 S toner A0 A 

21% 17 SlrtMln TXOe 67 
20ft I4ft SlrkJRt £0 IS 38 
£'“ 3T, SutrvSh 

39 28% SonOi 

11% 6% Sun El 
56ft *3% SunCo 2X0 
110% offft SunCpf 225 
*9 ft *0 Swxfair 1X0 
11% 5ft SunMn 
7ft 7 SunMPf 1.19 161 
35% 31 SunTrSf UO 3A 10 
22 14ft SuaVals J8 
48% 29ft SuoMkt M 
17ft 12 Swank AB 
22ft left Sybron 1X8 
16ft 10ft SrmsCD 
73ft 45ft Syntax 152 
40% 30ft Sysco AO 


30 29% 29% 291* — ft 
27 M% 38ft J8V, _ ft 
2 23 22% 23 + 'i 

21 27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
439 44ft 43ft 44ft— U 
168 32!* 31% 32 

13 6% 6% 6% 

2010 2Sft 25 25ft + ft 
1911 20% 2 8% 3ft 
99 24% 24 24ft- % 

178 41% 41 41% + % 

1 38% 38% 38% + % 

20001 soft 50ft 50ft — % 
8 26% 26ft 26% + % 

276 54% 54 54% + % 

18 9656 17% 17% I7%— ft 
5 J0£ 8% 8ft Eft— % 

113 49 48% 49 + ft 

15 2806 26 25% 26 + ft 

105 12% 13% 12ft + ft 
5 w mi 17% 

8 151 fbi * 78 78ft— ’.a 

9 401 3% 25 25 — ft 

168 25% 25ft 25% + ft 

17 Uft Uft Uft— ft 
74 20 10% 10% + ft 

2440 47% 46% 47% + % 
t 36V, 34ft 36'- — ft 
133 39% 39 39% 

2967 73% 70% 731* -Wft 
43* ZPi 22% 22% + % 
159 20% 2) 20ft + % 
12 11% 12 + ft 

-52ft 51 51% +'% 

133 17ft 16% 17ft + % 
*5 12% 13V> 12ft 
225 30 29ft 29ft— % 
17 10% 10% 10% 

16 2% 2% 2%—% 

17 19 - If |0 

io 11% lift im 

3A 15 1756 35% 351* 35% + ft 
658 26% 25% 26% + % 

77 28% 27% 277*— % 
200: 13 12Vs 13 

22 44% 44ft 44% + 56 
B8 27ft 27 27ft + % 

189 37% 37 37ft— ft 

209 20 19% 19% + % 

387 ja 154 1% + ft 
324 01 90% 01 + ft 

67 19ft 18% 19ft + ft 

1074 21ft 20ft 21% + ft 

13 4% 4% 4% + V* 

96 37% 36ft 37ft + ft 

78 10 0% 10 + ft 

686 51ft 51ft 51ft— ft 

' 105% 105% 105% -1% 
734 45 44ft 45 + ft 

550 6ft 6 6% + ft 

799 7ft 7ft 7ft 

. . 729 35% 35ft 35% + ft 

IX 17 1035 22 21ft 21ft— ft 
I.l 12 637 43ft 43 43 — Va 

16 22 36 13ft 13 13ft + % 

SJ 99 19ft 19 19 

14 153 lift lift lift 

26 16 1522 74 73 74 +!ft 

lfl 17 103 <0% 39% 40% + % 



59', 30% UAL 1X0 20 

36'-: 29 UAL P» 2A3 75 

17-* ir* UCCEL 17 

30 22% UDCn 4X0 UJ) 17 

24'. J tr-3 UGf 2X4 95 12 
1V« 8% UN CRM 
14 10 ft UrtS A0 U 13 

38% 23% USFG 22C 5.9 

4fH 24% IJSGs 1A8 4.1 6 

19% 12% UfllFret 20 U 13 

124*., 84% UmNV 2J72* 72 12 

4’.% 33ft UCamp IA4 46 15 

64% 32% UnCcrb 1A0 5X 

6ft «% UmonC 
191* 14' a unEiec 1X4 9J 7 
32% 25 UnEIpf 3J0 \\7 
40 31 UrtElpl *JC 12 2 

34% TT, UnElPiMfXD 129 
72 55 UEIofL 8X0 ItA 

32 21% UsEipf 258 112 

2DVi 15% UnEi of 2.13 IU 
26% 21% UnEi pf 2J2 MX 
72 55 UElefH 8X0 11X 

24 22 UnExpn Ale IX 
53% 3Pi UnPoc iXO 3A 12 UR4 __ 

xn»v»nm 

CTk 10ft u^mo XSe 2 

Xk 17% UCbTV* .10 J 
43% 24% UoEitrg 2A8 5X 
24% 13ft UllUim 2X5 &i 
30% 14 UIDupf 357 MB 
17 14ft UlUvpr 2X0 XU, 

25 15% Unjtlnd A0 28 
36% 20% UJerB s L16 33 


1760 49ft 4Ti* 48% 

001 30ft 30ft 30% + ft 

862 IS 14% 14% 

25 25% 25 25 — % 

100 21% 21% 21ft 

188 10% 10% Wfc— % 

116 11% lift 11% + % 

1840 77% 36% 37 + % 

tOZ) 40% 39% 40% + % 

7 <5% 15% 15% 

296 123% 121% 122 —1% 
958 35% 34% 35% +1 
1YIS 50% 58% 5B%— Mi 
12 5% 5% 5% + % 
204 10% 19ft 19% + % 

i£S- 

?T + % 


84% 54% Wrtaly 
4% 2% WU8P 
16 M% WYftLb 
23% 75ft WVM 


11 I 6 6 

m 36ft 34% m 

fU II Mft t3% 

252 7ft 6 % 7 

15 7ft 7ft 
343 36% 36ft 
SOzfO 90 
7580rao 79 

■1 »% 26% 

389 36% 36% 

• 3+ 30ft 39 . 

103 37% 36ft 37ft +U*' 
_ _ 01 (H* 1t% Uft-ft 

2XO . IS 71 7523 53ft 52 “ 

3T2 4 3% 


5% +% - 


INbII U 53 l4 ' 17% 03% +V 

30 3X 35 
48-34 0 


5 3ft 3ft IftVS 
W U% 10ft 10% \ - 
28 17 16% 14%—% 


55ft 36% Xl*0K 
20 ft% XTRA 


S3 18 

u n 


M 53 32% 32% +% 
55 22% 22ft 22ft + .% 


II 7ft ZopeftC 
57% 3a% Zaras 
25 16ft ZenHhE 

21% isft zeros 

39% 22% ZbrrHn 


IS 45 U SS X 3916 20ft— ft 
J2 15 JT ffll «ft 8 8% - 

X 18 ms 57 4Sft 56% +1% 
•tt 17ft 16% fflk+ft 
1% 19% T9%I9L-- 
704 <1% 39% 39% + ft 


iSZ I 


J N\SE H£te-Lo»s 


my UMMM 
3% 2 UPkAfcl 
38ft 27% UsolrG 

42ft . _ _ 

24% U 

SJTK 



s»sa-% 


5 USMom 
31ft USLens 


. ?s 
• u -* } d£ 

J0 2 J W J73 34% 
JfZ 2A U 434 39 
IXO 4A -25-5719-26% 
Pf 5X3*107 7 55W 


M IX 13 


AS 24 
XI 

4X 12 


30/49 

2290 

Dec 

29.99 

3029 

2973 

2975 

—74 

2950 

24J8 


2879 

2922 

2SXS 

28X5 


29 M 

2475 

Feb 

28.17 

2877 


28.10 

—79 

29 JS 

24.13 

Mar 

2750 

27X3 

27X5 

—77 

29X5 

2293 


2720 

27.10 

2675 

2477 


27.94 

23X5 

LVOV 

26X0 

2673 

2658 

2658 

—70 

2670 

2370 


2670 

26J7 

2670 

2630 

— X7 

2&J1 

24X5 

JUI 

2570 

26X4 

25.00 

3*lIW 

— X3 


24,90 


25X0 

25X0 

25X0 

t-; ■■ 


2720 

24J» 

Ses 

25X0 


m- -T ■ 


— M 

25X0 

25.15 

OO 

NOV 

2550 

2SJ3 

2550 

25X5 


2550 

25J5 

—as 

— X7 

25X0 2450 Dec 2SL33 25J3 

Feb 2*70 2470 

Eft. Sales Prev. Sales 9X11 

Prev. Day Open Int. 64.918 off 61 

SJ3 

2470 

2533 

2470 

+X4 


Slock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents 

2DQXS 173 JO Dec 10150 192X0 19L10 19205 

3B3J5 7S2X0 Mar 193X5 19190 10270 19170 

20450 taifltl Jun 194A5 10SXQ \H30 195X5 

196A0 107X0 Sep 196X0 196X0 195J0 I96A5 

Est. Sales 63X78 Prev. Sales 57J57 
Prev. Day Open int. 64X34 off 301 


VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
point, amj cents 

Si^ JS-?9 19&1D 196.90 107X0 
19 °- 15 '"-TO IW-™ 199 A0 

iS-29 d 0 " 2)1 S 

»?■», 200X5 Sea :jhS) 

I? Prey. Sales 4.917 ^ 

Prev. Day Open Int. 8A40 upJ72 


9231 —XI 
92.13 -m 
01X1 +XI 
91A6 +JK 
01.12 +J)3 

90J9 +X4 


02X2 

91X2 

91X1 

91.14 


—m 

+xi 

+X2 


NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYPE) 

PtNntsond cents 

117X0 101X0 DCC 11040 111.15 110A0 lUXS 

1 18.75 1 0550 Mar 11155 112X5 1IIA0 111 JO 

170X0 186.90 Jun 11290 1129? 112X5 liuS 

10610 see 113X0 H3J0 1I3A0 lliTO 
Est, Sales Prev. Sales 10X96 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 7461 ub213 


MAJOR MKT INDEX (C8T) 
paints end rights 

IfL. 24, ! s 247^* 361% 282% 
Es^le, ® 

Prev. Day Open int, JJ43 


+.75 

+J5 

+X0 

+55 


+A5 

+A0 

+X0 

+1» 


+50 

+A5 

+M 

+■35 


+lft 

+lft 


SOL, 301* TDK 
36% 27>. TECO 
12% 7 TGIF 


X7e j 
2X6 7X 10 
12 


38 391'. 38% 39% + % 
ISO 33% 33% 33ft— % 
88 7% 7ft 7% 


25 USStiPt 2X5 7.9 

SSJSS& sgl 

6% DnStak 
34 UnTech 1A0 
3f>* 3V*. UTchPf 255 
25 20ta UnlTel 152 
21 15>4 UWR 

3 Tft 17% Uaitrde 

SI 16% Umvar 

78 21% UnlvFd 

23% 15% UnLrai 
S3 2£lk UnoCDt 
12«% 63% Up! riwi 


1X8 

50 

X0 


1607 79% 

12 1 7% . _ 

35 10 1310 29% 39% 

7 A 34% 34% 

86 9 13*7 22% 22V* _ 

72 U 125 18 17% I! 

439 20% 



» 20% 20- 20% + % 
3 19% 19% TOfc— % 


IX 16 

— At 7 . — . 

1.12 4.1 M 121 27*+ 27% 27% + % 
1J» 4X 8 301 20% 20% 20% 

IXOb 42 7 1891 20% ZBft 28% 

2X0 22 21 1115 124% ID 124ft +1% 


43. 32ft USL1FE 1.13 2X 11 23TO 41 39ft 40ft +1- 


34% 30% USLFpf 3X3 MX 
1(F* 0 LfStfeFO 1XBO105 
26% 21 UtaPL 2X2 9.1 13 
2% 22% UtPLpf 280 106 
28ft 23ft UfPLPf 2J0 105 
23% 19 UfPLPf 2X6 T05 
20 16% UfPLPf 2X4 I OX 

2 lift UtlOCO 1A0& 6 A 7 
23 19 UtHCopf 2A4 11.1 

24% 20ft utitcopraxi n.i 
3Sft 30% UlllCopf 4.12 115 


I 37ft 32t, 32ft— Mi 

7 10% 10% MV, + ft 
448 25% 25% 25ft + % 

18 26% 26% 26%— 16 

8 27% 27% 27% 

3 22% 22% 22% — K 
47 19% 79% 19% + Ml 
235 22 21ft 22 + % 

77 22ft 22 22 — ft 


23ft Z3ft 23ft— ft 
34% 34% 34%—% 


49% 24% VF Carp 1X8 27 11 
u% 5% Valero 126 

25% 14 Valerpf 3A4 13X 
3ft 2ft Voter ‘Ji 
J8VL 19 VonDrn 1X0 At 7 
5% 2% Varca 
42% 27ft Vartan J6 IX 21 
13% .9% Voro A0 11 3* 
25% 13 Veeca A0 2J 13 
12 3% Vendo 15 

11% 9% VestSB UOtflOJ 


2$1 47ft 47ft 47%—%. 

270 lift lift 11% + ft 

45 2rt» 24% 24ft + ft 

SO 2% 2ft 2% 

ffl 24ft 21 24%—% 

lS 9% 5ft 5% 

357 25 23ft 25 +1 

271 13 17% 12ft 

a 16’A 15% 76ft + ft 

75 9ft 9ft 0ft + ft 

29 lift lift lift 



NCW LOWS 38 


AdObeRSPiA 
ButtasGsoT 
vIEwnPii. 
KjeaarPrkn 
TaxAmSacB ’ 


AWSsnnfO 

Cbrflil* 

ESsSE** 


Asarcelnc 

Coowtdpf 

HubcreUSA 

RxlbrtsnH 

TowtaMtopf 


PSEG 755^7 

ReyntrtpfC 

SaatfiWod 

Syntax 

Teen Ron 

TrOjuneCo 

WftPlASV 


Athkaw Intf 
EDO 
inf! Reels 
RvonHom 

Trocar* 


Creifilois Appoint liquidator 
For Sinclair Vehicles Inc. 

. The AssocuuaJ Press 

COVENTRY, Engjaod — Credjiors of Sin- . 
dair Vehicles LitL, iviach developed and mar- - 
keted an dectric tricyic recently, said Tuesday , 
that they bave a^xnnLed a liquidator — Chris- 
topher Morris, who also acted as liquidator for 
defunct Laker Airways. . . 

Press Association, the British domestic news 
agency, said (hat Mr, Morris will sell what by 
can Of the company's re mainin g a yyts . wfriefy 
consist mainly of about 4^X) unsold dectric 
tricydes, known as the CS. The total debt (tithe 
company, now renamed TPD Ltd, is put at £6.4 
mOJion (S9J nuZEon), the news agency sahL Si 
Clive Sinclair, the British inventor who de- 
signed the three- wfaeded, one-seat er.- is owed 
£5.9 minion by the company, the association 
said. 


?1* 


Commwiities 


Awr. J 

Ctaee 

High Low BM Ask Ctifte 

SUGAR 

FreceB (runes per metric Ion 
Dec 1.430 1A12 1A13 1A20 —2 

Mar 1A45 1A33 1AH 1A35 —2 

Mav 1A7TJ 1A59 1A65 1A60 — S 

Aug 1515 1J1D 1503 1510 —S 

Oct 1545 1538 1J3Q 1540 —4 

Dec 1560 15*8 1545 1551 UhCh. 

Esl. vol.: 1.700 kits of 50 tans. Prev. actual 
soles: 2678 lots. Open Interest: 2SA39 

COCOA 

French francs per lio leg 
Dec 1X75 1X60 1X50 1X60 — 33 

Mar 1,900 1/875 1X85 1.900 — 26 

May N.T. N.T. 1.010 - — —20 

Jly H.T. N.T. 1,920 — —20 

See N.T. N.T. 1.03O — —20 

Dec N.T. N.T. — 1.07O —25 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 1580 —25 

Est. vol.: 4 tots of 10 tans. Prev. actual safes: 
8 tots, open interest: *57 

COFFEE 

French trowel p*r 100 ko 
Nov 2J7D. 2.145 — 2X90 —20 

Jon 2.T70 2.140 1125 1145 —37 

Mar Zlffl 1140 1154 11B5 —20 

May N.T. N.T. 2,164 2,185 —24 

Jly N.T. N.T. — 2X15 —5 

Sep N.T. . N.T. — 2X10 —25 

Nov N.T. N.T. — . 2X30 —30 

Est. voJj 10* tots of 5 ions. Prev. oriucl 

sales: 71 lots. Open Interest: 349 

Source : Bourse du Commerce. 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 
Reuters. 

D-). Futures. 


Close Previous 

9Q&MH 904^0 f 

1J3&BQ 1.735.90 

121^) 121.49 

Com. Research Bureau. 226.10 225^0 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CBT: Olifow Board of Trade 

CME: OUcago Mareenm* EAtAange 

IMM: international Monetary Market - 

Of Chicago Mercantile Exdiann 
NYCSCE; New York Coax, Sugar. Coffee E* 

NYCE: Now York Cotton Exdiange 

COMEX: Commodity EMAongg. New York 

NYME: New York Mercantile Exchange 

kcbt: Kansas Cltv Boom of Trade 

NYFE: New York Futures Exchange 



Strike Crib-Up 
Prt» He* Dee Jen l 


UU IS 1 . IS., IA 

in n ip* ii 

5% Aft £* Tb 
l'» 2% 3ft 4b 
') Um 1 7/16 2 
- ft ft ILOi] 
1/14 — — . 


in 

175 

180 

IK 

1W 

IK 

M 


Ttfricoffnlime SJ6A74 
T«W atlOMn M.EUN 
Total pel Mirine 1318B 
Total Pri DeaM.MMN 

iB*a: 

task HUB Law Ilf 40 
Source: CBOB. 


Nov. 5 
PotvUst 

N» 8t( Jn Fll 

r. Li* in* - 

Im % 

11A4 1 1/16 
3H & 
3ft A 
6ft - 


1/11 7.16 

1/14 

114 1ft 

10M43 

4ft 

Wft - 


aounu9+097 


Asiaii 

Commodities 


Nop. 5 

HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
ILSSmt oeoce 

close 

High Lew Bid Ask Bid 

■Now _ N.T. N.T. 374X0 326 00 X5 90 327X0 
Dec _ 327 JM 327X0 32650 32800 32700 329X0 
Jan — N.T. N.T. 32850 3»JJ0 32950 3JIJJ0 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 33000 33200 33100 33300 
API - N.T. N.T. 33400 33600 33SO0 33700 
Jun— N.T. N.T. 33800 34000 33900 34100 
5» - .N.T. N.T 34200 34406 34200 34500 
Oct 34800 34800 34700 349X0 348X0350X0 
Volume: 23 tots of 100 ox. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5X per ounce 


i 


- Lomlon 
Commodities 


High 

32670 

N.T. 


Prev. 

Low 

32*70 

N.T. 


. Volume: 60 lots of 100 at. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mo torsion cents per kilo 
close 

Bid Ask 

Dee 17950 19050 

Jan — 18056 Ml JO 

Feb 182X0 1KL00 

Mar 1 81 X0 184X0 

Volume: 0 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents Per kilo 
dose 


Settle 

32+70 

330X0 


Settle 

377JO 

331.90 


RSSIDec- 
RSS1 jot— 
RS52Dec_ 
R5S 3 Dec _ 
RSS 4Dee- 
RSS 5 Dec— 


Bid 

154X0 

I56J0 

149X0 

147X0 

10X0 

138X0 


15425 

157X0. 

150X0 

148X0 

1*5.00 

140X0 


Previous 
BM Ask 

179 JO ISO JO 
IBBJ0 181 JD 
102X0 1B3X0 

183X0 184X0 


Previous 
«« ASk 

1S5J0 154X0 

15425 15475 

148J0. 148X0 
14450 1 47 JO 

142X0 V4450 

137 JO 13? 60 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Motoysion rft?ggl»per2Slgns 


NOV. 

Dec. 



dose 

Prevloo* 

Bid 

A 9* 

Bid 

Mk 

448 

675 

665 

480 

£80 

685 

*86 

491 

602 

693 

705 

706 

715 

720 

727 

735 

710 

730 

790 

750 

705 

730 

713 

.740 

70S 

730 

715 

740 

690 

720 

700 

730 

690 

720 

780 

730 


Source: Reuters. 


|j(xndon^fctok 


Previous 
-BM As 


liSeTreasuries 


Nor. 5 


Ducooet 
Offer Bto 


Ylrid 


prev. 

Yield 


. l Wr.+ 

Close 

Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ton 
SpoT £6260 64LS0 65100 

Forward 68450 687X0 677X0 

COPPER CATHODES (HIWgSS) 


654X0 

678X0 



Sterling per nelrta too 

*SW# 951.00 
977X0 978X0 972X0 974X0 

cop p er c athod es mmm tu . 

Sterling per metric hm 

S®0 f _ 928X0 *30X0 931X0 923XD 

Fgjrort 9S9J0 940,00 9HXff’lSoO 

Staritag per metric tea 

5POI 273X0 274X0 SASJS 2mJG 

NICKEL 27400 17640 272X0 

Starting per metric tee 

J* 1 , . 330X0 2MX0 7902X0 29I2XO 

ftjnwrt : 3890X0 2800X0 7921X0. 2922X0 

Pence per Troy wince ' 

SpoI 421 JD 477 Ol 421X0 *??1 W 

43SX0 434X0 


meiric ton 
an. w/i 
nn. njQ. 

pgr m e trie too . 

4«U» 402X0 

ft ' 


85*8X0 BS40XD 
845400 846OX0 


390X0 392X0 


Qosa 

,ugar HW ’ ^ 

5lernog per metric ton 
Dec 


'Am. 5 

Preview 
BM ASK 


N-T. N.T TS2X0 154X0 14400 149X0 
1MXO 158*0 16X40 163X0 159X0 15940 
147.30 14230 14730 167 JO 163X0 1 41 to 

S^S IS 40 W840 

178X0 17240 177X0 178X0 173X0 173X0 
Volume: 1X60 tots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Start too Per metric ton 

D * c ixa 1X35 1X37 1X59 1X60 

IA73 1X77 1X78 1303 TJQS 

1J40 i’tSS I'S! 1*55? '- 730 1.721 

J-" H20 1330 1J31 \254 IJSS 

| Jg U5T 1^53 1^76 1J77 

1-771 1.749 1J56 TX57 1J70 1J71 
?^84 1^74 1,774 IJB3 1775 1,788 
Volume: 3X29 lets of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

S reruns per metric ton 

HOV l'om i*2fS JJW1 VBS 1X70 1X90 

1-913 L915 1,912 1^5 

i’o2 1*215 1lWa ’• Bw 1-722 IMS 

i«2 ] i ®76 1X96 1.905 IJ42 USS 

kto 3-222 2-2 1 '.■*£ im 

Nay 1,97D 

Volume: 7M7 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

UX. dollars per metric ton 
N0,r 21!® 2 M ' 2S 2447S 264JS 286X0 

bSS SS 3S23S ™ js 

SfS SS® 2S83S 25450 259 JD 9* 0 QQ 
SS 2 s3 - 75 T 5 ** 2S4K 255X0 
SBfS 3f<*> 3*A75 Z45 l 75 SsXO 
23450 225J0 234X5 r««« 237XO SotjS 
ij&JS Zffl .75 229X0 22950 228X0 229X0 

H ? * 7a aau >o 2212s 22 Slsd 

2SUp 226X5 224X0 39425 22550 32175 


MOV 

Aug 

Oct 


May 

Jly 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 


J, 
Mar 
May 
Jly 


1.930 1J0S 1X25 1X80 IXW 
1,960 1X90 1.945 1.9*0 2X20 


JOT 

Feb 

Mar 

ApJ 

May 


Dec 
Jan 
Feu 
Mar 
Rpl 
May 
Jim 

■Hr 

Volume: 1X61 lots of 100 tans. 

CB Upe OIL (BRENT) 

UX. donors per barrel 

D*® SS 2- 40 28X8 .28X6 28X9 2S7n 
S'2 S-S 2-® 2758 27JS M'S 

II M 2S SS gs 

VI 

Volumejliziate of lxm barrels. 


Hitachi Zosen Plans 
To Cut 5,000 Workers 

The A ssociated Press 

hm?*?? T H | lachi Zosen 
pWr a iea ^ifls Japanese ship- 
budder. said Tuesday that it 
plann^ to cut 5.000 people from 
iisworic force of 17JXJ0 by March 
1987 because of an industry slump. 

Hitachi's management recently 
presented the plan to unions, whiefi 

mL < U P A ted tO resp0nd this 
monih. the company said. The plan 

calls for moving up the mandaiorv 
retirement age to 58 from 60. traS 
femng some workers to affiliatp 

compames and helping othem^S 


Gornmoditrood uwi 

Cofte+4 Sartre, b. 

PJrln tetoth 64/30 38 Vl Vd — 

Steel bUtots (Pfttj. m 

hwn2Fdrv.PWta.tan * 

CeppM- elects a 

Tin (Struts), to 

Zto&E.U.L. Baste, to, 

PailotSuin. or 

Silver n.y_ oz 

Source: AP. 


jT Dividends ^\- 





. ; . : 

CawiPOdV Per Ami Pay 

LIQUIDATING 

Hfnes Lumber Co .satofl 13-26 l>5 

INCREASED 

.10 11-29 IV] 


Attaras-Mlliis 
Carrots Core 
Dota-Oeston Labs 
Emerson EJmric 
^N«ti ankAneh. 
Hergi ev Foods 
Hemtey Foods O-B 
gtacodlHvCota 
Tetefln Iot 


.W MS !i® 
M t+ if* v. 
49 n-n ii-?? 


a 49 13-10 

. S7JO 12-1* ^ 


a /37 V, I2-U 

q J*iw . 
a m u. *a ■«•».» 
. a .«w i»i* 
INITIAL 1 ' 

Interstate Securities - .30 12-S 

OMITTED.. . S . 

ramBeachiBC .y 

STOCK 

RnwLaHCruiun . jpe HO *1* 
Itoanam Sioeaei - A 2 PC 12-U ll-P - 

STOCK SPLIT - * 

yitortv Fedl SBL — Vter-2 
Plecanniy Catetertos — 5-tar - * 

1 USUAL 

Avenmcorp 
{Jbdwfn & Lvons >nc 
Bwgomjjtoacorp 

Carpoitor Teen ' 
gb» Ptao ta twe 
owi«tbj Matert 
totetanOii RvttvTr 

Lockheed carg 

tsssss^s* 

ft ch core 
NUICore 

SSSrbses:.- 

gJwwmHtahiBe 

KsaSS®^' 

|«J’Cana<te (nc 

?S55?Cmmgbci-a - 


o .15- n WJ 

a ao n-g i 

a 20 n-jr ii 

O .13 11-38.TV! 
G J2ta. »2f!*V 
Q .r». IMS VW 
135 tt-W ffi 
.116 ll-» TV 
.184 11-29 If] 
30 12-» W 
jo 12-39 IV 

m S5.»w 

_ 30 12-te . 

Q X7V, 12-T7 I 
B .16* 1-15 W- 
Jt.YMS’Tf 
Jt B-w 
JM TVV2 lj;' 

a 11-28 1 
X7 n-ii i 
.13 IMS TV 
.10 IT-15 TJf 
_ XS I MB Tl^ 
. X7% IMS ,}»j 
O .16 W. 13-1 IJ’ 


.11 T3-5 IJ-g 
AS tM3 ^ 
J5 . 13-3 I1-J- 

.15 13-11 »'3t' 

X7 12-TJ 
.10 11*29 »•' 


reSJJjy ,; "^nonlMyj e-nuarierirr 

- » 


Source: UPI. 


To Onr Headers. 

. Danscbc mark funires 
hous were not available in lids 
ion 
























Dollar 


own louonua 
n-w musnas 
na m*ms» 

B-ll WM7 WBlI7 
0M2 HUMO.U 


? V, , ' ,C>1 





Schlumberger 


"SEGflipi r? 


CANADIAN PACIFIC 


dividend will be pad under withholtfue of 
25 % Can. m with DO*. 3 J 6 net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 

commit? n>v. 

An u ta dim. 30lfa October. 1965- 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


3? 






Non Dollar 










2# 


Reaching Mots 
Than aTnnd of a 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
AroundfoeVfodd. 

Bmlb3 Kf£rib mif 


\ 

\ 



Tue sdays 

AMEX 


Qoshei 


ToMh i aelude flu ootKHrwtde prices 
up to flu dosing mi Weil Street 
and do ml reflect kite trades elsewhere. 

l ie The AsmkjcU:J Prru 


^ i ^ 


Page 15 


2 T\. !«■* 
ir* s 


A* 1*. CTi 

is 1 * 10% ooio^c e 

24. I 1 * Galxt'O 2S 

33U 2fl* Caron ITS 4J 13 

Ifl»* 7»h GolLII 

13*s r* Cel mS tl 

1H 2'-. Cemco 


17 j r* 

277 11 11 

<2 IVi 1*1 
2 27V. r*> 
91 10 7 s * 

K 12-4 12* 
2a 2* 2- 


ir- 12** GDofns a 47 t 355 I 1>1 Id 
17V* 13 SnMicr 10O 3 II H 1J*» 15W 

(Continued on Page 16) 


h- British dw*. 


STPDDUP* 
hr news 
::i:h inwow r 
;J. oni-wtt-' 
r,?jnv. d* & 





S.s" 


m*. 



v * 


Wherever it is,we'Rfind it. 





Uipipn 


assssio 


■ floras ohorga my: 
'□Access 
.□ Anwiccn 


IteefSinpSf^^^A&ia^fonnrnwdi 

Afnaj,U5A,FfffidiPoljTwacvMddfcEatf 


Cord expiry cti f 


O' 












VV A 1 &J£$ 335 fc.«. . ; /.; , , ,r\ v 

/' / ■/>•?£ - 0 ■ ■■ . . -K.,A' r > • A . / - ; A-/A '-Vi - 

a wm. 


/: 


/ 7 


7 / 


\ <-\W 



■ i 

: ^ % m / 





>*y 7 
- / - ?? x 


r i 


f 





1 




A A 


r 


/ 





/ 




/ 


/ 


V- 


VI • 









\ £ 


/H A 

/ v> / •••. 


OIL. Wherever it is. well find 1 L Oil 
is the primary source or energy. It is 
the power that moves the world and 
will be so for many years io come. 

Bui. il is necessary lo be prepared 
to wrestle this treasure from ihc 
eanh’s most secrei sironpholds. using 
ihe latest continuously evolving tech- 
nology, and to venture into hostile, 
inaccessible places 

Agip. Italy's national ml company. 

took up this challenge sixty years ago. 
probing into the origins of the earth, 
experimenting with new techniques, 
and devoting to these activities 

human and economic resources that 
are always up to the dilTicultics to be 
overcome. 

Wherever the possibilities of 
finding oil exist. Agip is present with 
its spml of initiative and decades oT 
experience. The results achieved, 
alone or in cooperation with leading 
oil companies, in 30 countries, on 5 
comments, make Agip a reliable 
operator in any oil activity. 

Even where no-one has ever 
reached. 


A 


U v 








































Tuesdays 

mex 

Closing 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wail Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


17 9ft 

•% a 

1 ST* AVj 

;iv 1 5vt 

ZJ'-i 30 

»V* 14ft 

12 A 

W 

19V 13*4 
6 V 7% 
*’<. avs 
18V? 11 VS 
23V; 14V, 

I4Vb 13% 

dV: 


HiPtron 

Holman 

HcMvCp a* u 

Hm«Cn 

H/nlrtd 012.95 1X4 
Horml 1 J4 25 
hmHor 
rtmH wrt 

HatIPtv l-» M 
HOtIPwt 
HouOT £iaU] 
HovnE 

HubAlAs 34 14 
HubelBs Ji 13 
Husky* J4 SJ 


15V 15ft 
2 ft 24 
IBVj 18V 
Ws 21ft 
mt 31% 
21% 204 

% Tl 

18V 184 
4% 44 
44 4% 
T5tt 14ft 
23ft 22ft 
23% 23 
7ft 4% 


+ V» 
2ft 

W6 — <4 
22V. + Vft 
33 

21% + % 

18V + ft 

4ft 

4ft— ft 
15 — ft 

72V? ft 
23ft— ft 
4V — ft 


21 13ft MovSfr 

5 1ft Murpin 

1 >» Musent 


15 1 1» 13ft 13ft - ft 

'I H \ \ 



8 3ft 

SSft 32ft 

7ft 1ft 

3ft 2ft 

9 3% 

A 4ft 
3ft 1*4 
ZU ft 
40ft »ft 
13ft 5 
2T? 11 
2ft 1ft 
3 2ft 
1J 6ft 
15 10ft 
4ft 2ft 
lft ft 
13ft 513 
7ft 3ft 
4ft lft 
10ft 2ft 
10ft 2ft 
23i? 13ft 
41 25 


30 1.1 18 

.251 HUI 
M 

.12b .9 


104 5% W 
104 49ft 47V 
125 1ft 1 

1 2ft 2ft 
214 7ft 7ft 
10 5ft 5ft 
395 3ft 3ft 
25 ft ft 
20 37 34ft 

6 5ft 5ft 

8 18ft 18ft 

314 1% 1ft 

1 2ft 2ft 

9 ltV lift 

3 13V 13V 

2 Ba 3% 3ft 
70 % V 

471 6 5ft 

S A A 
30 3ft 3ft 
422 4V 4 
54 A. 3ft 
828 22V 207k 

7 33ft 3314 


SV 

49ft -t-lft 
1 ft 
2ft 

7ft— ft 


37 + ft 

Sft — ft 
ttu 

IV + ft 
2ft— ft 
lift— ft 
13V + ft 

\x\ 

6 + ft 

4V 

3ft— ft 
4 — ft 

4 

S ’.*— ft 
ft— ft 


IV La Bara 
9ft LBPnl 

lift LnOBn n M 18 11 
13V Lndmk 40 10 14 
lft Loan- 34 

9 Lauren 31 

14ft LearPP 3J» 1U 
2ft LraPh 12 

4ft LisliurT 8 

lft LHORsf 
2ft LlffW 
lft Lodae 
14 Tk LoflCfl 

27ft LorWnr 19 

10ft Lunm JOB 5 31 
8ft LurrdyG 15 

9ft Larks II 

8ft LynCSs 30 1J 12 


105 lft 
10 4ft 
13 2Bta 
12 19ft 
85 10V 
2 9ft 
IS 20 
194 7ft 
87 4ft 
139 IV 
24 4ft 
12 IV 
2 9ft 
189 37ft 
55 Aft 
105 lft 
99 1ft 
IS* lift 


lft lft— V 

4ft Aft -V ft 

20 20ft + ft 
19ft 19ft + V 
Th 10ft + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
19ft 2D + V 
7 7 — ft 

AH Aft d- ft 
1ft 1ft + ft 
Aft Aft + ft 
lft IV + ft 
19V 19ft 
36ft 34ft— ft 
15V 14 + ft 

lift 11V 

11 11 

lift nv + ft 


20ft lift 
4ft lft 
15ft 10ft 
50V 35ft 
4ft 3V 
5V 3ft 
12!? 9ft 
18ft 14ft 
19ft 8ft 
nv i7% 
5V lft 
7 3ft 
34 22V 

33ft 22V 
710 4ft 
18ft lift 
29ft 1* 


RllSoun 
Redkw 
R«alB 
Resit A 

RstAsB 

RjtAiA 

RtbtotP 

RloAIo 

Rdcwvs 

Room 

RtwnyP 

R«rPlm 

RurUcte 

wr- 

SSJ 1 


s 

\ 

JO M U 

M X* 

J8 t? O 

.12 i 20 


y id-* 

29 3V 
65 14ft 
431 46 
4 5 
17 4ft 
3 10 
? 15ft 
63 I Aft 
123 <9ft 

“ T S 

9 4ft 
15 » 


2ft ■ 
14% l {ft 
44ft -O’-' 

4ft ,4ft 
10 10 
15ft Ift*- 

14V 16ft 1 

T« 19% 
lft 1ft- 
4ft 8ft- 
2ST| 26 1 

23 J5‘? 

17ft 19ft- 

24% «*■ 


£ -MB » « « 

Ktwp* jo.** 3 

UV Talus “ 

37% TolFdaf 43 
55 TgJEUpl 8-22 —ft 
A*’- TdEdpCMC Jift 

7% Tarfel J9»rX3 
8 % TmtPtn JZ* 
VToJPtwi _ „ 
23% TefPI pi 2J8 V 
Bft. TrwL« .70s *-i ** 
sift Tn**ree ** 43 9 

W- Tnmmrt 4A *i i 
7ft T«M* 40* 3.9 
6 -ft Trt«P J« S3 39 
2S3 Ta&Mt* . „ 

«JV Turns n . » 

22 TurnrC 120 As »5 

P? TraEflft IS* 17 


ISA M* 

7 «■ 

za Uft 

JteJOft 

SldCZ 08 
JH 7»J 

8 »J 

74A UV 

■a 2ft 
I! 21ft 
:J Kft 
« I So 
3 t«V 
8 Vm 
6 a 

6 ■ »S 
TU t2ft 
a 34ft 
SZ 8V 
133 lft 


19. 

* 4 — ft 

t 4 - ft 

UV IK- ft 
3Tft 3Jft- ft 
♦5V AA'i— 1H 
79ft 79ft +1 
lft rn + % 
I5H 11V + ft 
7 . 2 - !V 
29 29*8 

ltV. lift 

i5«* m * h 

14H uv 

uv mu— % 
nv i3 — ft 
2V> 2V— ft 

n 12% + % 

»% »* +i 

ov sv 

lft - lft— ft 


AV HAL IDe 1- 

10ft HMG .cO LS 

4>k Halifax ,04e .7 

lft Helm I 

1 Halmlwl 

Aft Homo; I .9311 1 J 
21V Hnavm n JJSc 2 
13ft Hantrfl s JO 21 
V Harvev 

21 W Hasbrs .15 A 
28% HosthW M O \A 

9ft Hil n 

19 HlfhCrS J8I Zd 
5ft Himcti 
Aft HIlhEx 
4V Heinwr roe Z4 
10 HeimcK .10 ' 

2 Heldar 
3’-* Hetlonl 

% HelmR 
3ft HenhO 
lft Hindi? 


5 S'- 

» IT 
5 Pj 
rx r-\ 

30 lft 
SO 9ft 
lto :n. 
74 23S* 
5 lft 
J20 34'd 

J 3Sft 

474 Oft 
19 1A'< 
39 9% 

ISO 9 

56 8'? 

i 13ft 
li 3ft 
71 


S'* ■+■ v? 
11 

S':— ft 
Sft + ft 
I'd + ft 
Bft — ft 
Jdft — ft 

23V + ft 
lft 

33ft + ft 
29ft + 1? 
9 — ft 
16 
9% 

Bft— •» 
S':- ’.j 
13V— ft 
2 ft — ft 
4ft * % 
ft + ft 
5 — ft 
2% + ft 


14V 11% jadvn 
7V 5*4 Jacobs 
4% 2% jelAm 

IV ft JrtA wt 
9% 5ft Jetren 
4ft 2ft JOfinPd 
lift Aft JobnAjn 

lift 6 Jannlnd 
71« 2ft jgcnejk 


jft 2 
14V 10 
13 10ft 
151? 9V 
24 15ft 
23ft 14 
4V r. 
4 2ft 
12 V ni 
7ft 2ft 
2ft ft 
Aft 2ft 
Aft 3ft 
Aft 3ft 
Aft 2ft 
5V 3ft 


■50b A2 9 

8 

.71HQJ 11 

JO 4*1 10 
4 
14 


JO U 9 

.20e 1J 10 
.40 34 16 
J0O42 I 
ASf 13 19 
.151 48 15 
•15e 5J> 18 
2D 2J 14 
6 


2 'lft T Sft ’»*— ft 

'% * ^ \ + * 

6 Aft Aft 4ft— ft 

25 2V 2ft 3ft 

64 6V Aft AV + ft 
144 8ft 7ft I + H 

7 3 2ft 2ft— ft 


3ft 

3V 

3ft + ft 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft— ft 

12ft 

12 

12 -ft 

12 

lift 

11V— ft 

19ft 

19 

19 — ft 

20 

19ft 

19ft + ft 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft + ft 

3 

2ft 

3 

8V 

7ft 

8 — 14 

2ft 

2ft 

7ft 

% 

% 

h 

4>_ 

4 

4ft 

3ft 

3V? 

3ft— ft 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft— ft 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 1 


Notice of Redemption 

Transamerica Overseas Finance Corporation N.V. 

Slz% Guaranteed Sinking Fund Debentures Due 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the provisions of the Fiscal Agency 
Agreement dated a> ot December 1 . 1 - J . under which the abovedesignated Debentures are 
issued. jI.S~o.0n0 aggregate principal amount of such Debentures of tfie following distinctive 
number* have been selected tor redemption on December 1. 1985 at the redemption price of 
\ tin percent oi the principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest to the date ol redemption. 
On or alter the redemption date, interest on such Debentures will cease to accrue. 

SI.IMNI O.U PON DEBENTURES 


Ml 


- Cl 1 i.'li". .-Ill -7 

*77.1 

•Ift.iJ 

i« , ii*"i 


IJIKkS 


lrtTOSl 

141MCI 

150&t< 

l«K5 

IMliHl 

i 

in;.". 

»VJ f.'i 1 7 mC! 



lirjihi 

U1411 

121417 

i:«5! 

1.T754 

14BS4 

15060 

mass 

I9*»; 

■| 


i .I'Li • 'i 

— in 


lirjii.1 

nir.7:: 

u>rj 

I.ET51 

i:irm 

I4tKC 

150*51 

1K172 

ISM1H1 

1" 

'n!w 

i.siji -nrT 

*>l i 

\t-:, t 

SiRSCi 

K*.T1 

iLnm 

UfJLMl 



15O0-J 

1sl*7:i 

I9H9J 

i : 

in-' 

"C.- i.;rrj •*'-> 

-M.l 


l i'-jiw; 

unit:. 

1-1 IT 

i:RE!7 

1.TK4 

14t>K9 

150*5:1 

I8U79 

1969:5 

1'. 

lli.-j 



■<%::: 

l'Wi“ 

IINiTM 

IJI-1 

Uteb* 

i:mw 

1445*3 

15064 

ittaoi 

19695 

I- 


1 -i-i 

— J! 

J**i-‘. 

l"”lll 

imi.su 


man 

ISTiC 

14697 

150*55 

1H-J1C 

19697 

•jr.H 

l r..-. 

.SSli.'. ll’I'J". -u-"- 



IIS 

HMSfl 

lai*: 

«:keO 

IHTR# 

147IX» 

15069 

i 

1969M 

rj: 

l*ii </• 

1I4IJ * 11-11 

-1*1! 

u-i.t* 

1*'-Iii 

inifcs:: 

IJJIM 

1.124 1 

l:iTW» 

14701 

15074 

IHL»o 

197(81 

I'M 

bins* 

■-SI : iHrs: 7 

-*|;s 

!lO. 

l«rji- 

nsisi 

11! IMS 

1.K411 

141(24 

I471M 

15075 

IK>b 

19701 


it! !•;] i " i : ’•H.m -p:; :-77 nrj|p iji:w l.rjii Mrs: 14704 isoTP iMtie iPTftt 


i:’-i 

Ml*4 

.14*7 

W.l 

»nu7 

'VI*. 

6*7*1 

111229 

!ih«i-2 

127=85 

>:-• 

li.l-i 

54 !9 

6;i::i. 

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llhiW! 

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MIT 

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MW*7 

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n*59s 

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69 42 

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9X9.5 

16-212 

10,599 

12312 

414 

111 - 1 5 

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i.u ; ; 

4-i::t 

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9x!*4 

117247. 

iiiTihi 

127,14 

415 

!>:-■. 

.142' 


* 1 • 

xih.li 

9 '97, 

1024X 

107,11 

1-27,111 

ill- 

MLS. 

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1117*12 

127,17 

149 

lii*:* 


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102 x 2 

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1 27,79 

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IT::: 

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< 2 . : 

9127 

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1 105(9 

12392 

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The Debentures specified above are ro be redeemed for the Sinking Fund at the Corporate 
Trust Office of Citibank, N.A., III WaO Street, Corporate Trust Services, 5th Floor, in the 
Borough of Manhattan, the Gty of New York or, subjecr to any laws and regulations applicable 
thereto, at the main offices of Citibank. N.A. in London (Citibank House) and Frankfun/Main. 
the main office of Amsterdam- Rotterdam Bank. N.V. in Amsterdam, the main office of 
Sociere Generale de B.wijue S.A. in Brussels, the main office of Banca d’America e dlralia 
in Milan, the main offices of Banque de Paris et des Pavs-Bas and Compagnie Europeenne de 
Banque in Paris, and rhe main office of Banque de Paris et des Pays-Bas pour le Grande Duche 
de Luxembourg in Luxembourg. Payments by offices outside New York City will be made by a 
United States dollar check drawn on a bank in New York City or by a transfer to a United States 
dollar account maintained bv the payee with a bank in New York City, on December 2. 1985. 
Pin nient of the redemption price will be made upon presentation and surrender of such Debentures 
with all coupons appertaining thereto maturing after the dare fixed for redemption. 

Coupons due December 1 . 1 985 should be detached and presented for payment in the usual 
manner. 

For TRANSAMERICA OVERSEAS FINANCE CORPORATION N.V. 

By: CITIBANK, N.A. 

November a. 1985 Fiscal Agent 

Notice 

Withholding of of gross redemption proceeds may be required by the Interest and Dividend 

T ax Compliance Act of" 1 98? unless the Paying Agent has the correct tax identification number 
(social security or employer identification number) of the Pavee. Please furnish a properly 
completed Form W -9 or equivalent when presenting your securities. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC 
CORPORATION 

(CDRfl) 

The undenigned announco ih»i j* lean 4th 
November. 1985, ai Kas-Awocuiie N.V. 
SpuBtraat 172. AnutrnLun. div 

laccompaninJ by an "ATfhfcn 

CD1V a MitauVahi Electric Corporation^ 

Mill be payable * ilh DO*. 2339 




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on 





HowDSM 

keeps the world's 
farmers from grumbling 


KEEPING the worlds 
farmers from grumbling is 
a thankless task but at 
DSMwedotry. 

As one of the worlds 
leading fertiliser producers 
UKF, members of the DSM 
Fertilisers Division, has 
more than a passing interest 
in the land ... six million 
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improving crops and yields 
and life styles. 


AS ONE of the world’s 
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are a vital and ambitious 
company with product and 
capital expansion plans 
running into the twenty-first 
centuiy. To achieve these 


DSM 1$ 


ambitions DSM seeks out 
the brightest of talents. More 
than one hundred graduates 
join us eveiy year to keep up 
the momentum of our 
research into new 
technologies. 

Our secure financial base 
ensures that we have the 
means to match our 
ambitions and those of the 
farming communities 
for generations to come. 


- leave it to the professionals, 

DSM P.O. Box 6500. Heerlen. 640 1 JH. The" Netherlands Telex; 560 18 







































- c ' 

■ U : 

• jji ;? 


Is ”l ^ 

14 itfi 


?i ^ CWWHiCYMAWtttS 

| 'I I jf | Dollar Falls to 4M 

” J * ^ *wn Dapacha enviraai 

■ J - in A S?«. j NEW YORK — lie dollar fdl . small h 

£ i#on. Tuesday to a 56-momh low impact! 

• frtji;-' againsuhe yen debate an eaang of 

Japanese interest rates, but rose In N< 
. against aD other nuqor currencies. 2.6110 

■j ig$\ Dealers said that market send- 16030a 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 






)‘2l£ 


Page 17 


t Dollar Fails to 4 1 /2-Year Low Against Yen 

? , .. W In, S>„ r e-..// r r\- . V 


environment, he aid, relatively 
small bids can have a significant 
nnpaa on rates because o£ the linn- 

new of the market. .' 

. jn New York, the dollar rose to 
2.6110 Deutsche marks from 


f mait toward the O.S. currency had 


the payout on these hoods is k&s 
favorable and .the desire for further 
currency risk has been at lout tem- 
porarily dampened, - be said. 

Iq earlier trading in Europe, the 
dollar dosed at 16155 DM m Lon- 


Tlijj 

* i 


2.1490 Swiss francs from 2.1420, 
and to 1,761.00 Italian lire from 
1,757.00. The British pound slipped 
to $1.4310 from SI. 4385. 

But the dollar continued to 


r&Uaove 

Currency 


overnight in Tokyo, 
ocy dosed in New 


raraed Jess bearish in the absence 2.1490 &teft^fr«^42a 

! J ®S’ by banks to and to 1,761.00 Italian lire ftwn 

1 pa&ntom. ■ / ' 1,757,0a The British pound slipped 

=S ;■» \k , Sow de m a n d ahead of further to $1.4310 from S1.43B1 

2 $ i 1 ^F* 1 But toe dollar continued to 

thcddUrttmtotone^eah^- weaken against the yen, falling to a 

56-nwath low despite an uncxpect* 
\ a ^ nrodo ^ ar TSU *f 8 ave toe ed easing of short-term Japanese 

overnight in Tokyo. ThclS 
. ^*91* fed toedolbr has come currency dosed in liw Yoric at 

?,.» 207-^ yen, down from 2O&05 bo 

;; »; ,<■ y T^etds a time time for digestion," Monday. 

i S&S- J^d Liesching, economist at It closed earlier at 208.05 yen in 

l jti£ C feiJ 1 !? a £? n ^ lk ’ f said * London, up from 207.65 at Moo- 
l till , toemMlMt favors the day's dose, and at 2Q7JS in Tokyo, 

short side for the dollar and that, “The Japanese Whi a kn of 
comlaned with a view that U5. U5. bonds when the exchange rate 
,jr ]i O- rates could strengthen slightly, per- was a favorable 240 yea to the 
£ {8$S,’ haps spsfced some buying to cover dollar, and the market is dearly 
S i Postons.” saturated with certain types and 

*5 iiLjS j- Mr. Liesching also noted that maturities oT bonds,” hfr. liescb- 
i *1? K r £ trading volume has diminished sij>- ingsaid. 


“Monday to 7.9Si0 

^^fr^itsMondaydosc^ 


2J965. Earlier in Frankfurt, the 
dollarwas fixed at midxfternooa at 
16110 DM, up from 15940 at the 
Monday fixing. 

The British pound ended in Lon- 


rbeU.S. 
York at 
D8 j 05 bo 


London, up from 207.65 at Mao- 
day's dose, and at 2Q7J5 in Tokyo. 


showed maiginai gains against con- 
tinental currencies. The release of 
liK M-3 moocy-supply figures for 
October had little mpaa on ster- 
ling, dealers said. 

In other European markets 
Tuesday, the dollar was fixed in 


“The Japanese bought a tot of Rons at 7.9565 French francs, up 5 




it &'£■ niScandy in recent days. In such an 


'i $$ 

^ Sst 

, >i i( 


also noted that 
s diminished sig- 


saturated with certain types and 
maturities of bonds," Mr. Uesch- 
ingsaid. 

“Now, at 210 yen to the dollar, 


Belgian francs in Brussels, up from 
515$. In Turjch, the drffrr pIomH 
at 2.1443 Swiss francs, up from 
2.1375 Monday. (Reuters, UPI) 


Japan May Scrap 
Next Bond Issue 

Rouen 

TOKYO — Japan's Finance 
Ministry is likely to cancel its 
planned November issue of 
10-year hoods because Of recent 
instability in ibe secondary- 
bond market, ministry sources 
sad Tuesday. 

Before the eoUapse of Japa- 
nese secondary market, bond 
prices at the end of last month, 
the ministr/s finance bureau 
planned a November issue of 
from 1.2 trillion to 1.4 triStou 
yen ($566 bilBou) in 1 0-year 
bonds to meet about 2 trillion 
yen of maturing issues. 

The sources said that the 
ministry officials are worried 
about recent market price vola- 
tility and the possibility that a 
large issue might farther dam- 
age market sentiment. The vola- 
tility is a direct result of a joint 
decision by the Bank of Japan 
and the Finance Ministry to 
guide short-term interest rates 
higher to firm the yen and 
dampen rising speculation in 
the bond market, the ministry 
sources said. 


Amexco Unit Names Head of French Branch 


By Bremia Erdmann 

Wm'. J Tr.ivtt 

LONDON — American Express 
Bank Ltd. has chosen a prcmicent 
French banker to head its Paris- 
based subsidiary. 

AEB, the intematicsj] banking 
arm of American Express Co. of 
New York, said that it had appoint- 
ed Francois Giscard (TEsiaing as 
chairman of Trade Devriopmecr 
Bank (France) SA. Trade Dev elop- 
ment Bank's primary businesses 
are trade finance, private batiyjg. 
forKgn-ochangc and ueasu^ ser- 
vices and loan syndications’ 

Previously, Mr. Giscard d'Es- 
uing, 59. served for I ! years with 
the stale-owned Baiuquc Franijaise 
du Co mm e rce Exicrietrr, most re- 
cently es the bank's president. Be- 
fore that, be served nine years as 
deputy director gezeni; of the Cen- 
tral Bank of Central .African States. 

Ex-IFCHead to Advise 

Chinese Investment Chief 

Hans R. Vattke, former bead of 
Inig r naii onal Finance Corp.. has 
been named persoszl adviser to 


Ror.g Jiren, who is vice chairman of appointed to its international advj- 
China's Peoples Congress and soty board. He is director-general 
chairman of China International of Dumez, the French construction 
Trust & Investment Corp., or Cl- group, and previously was presi- 
TIC. CiTIC is the Beijing-based dent of the executive board oiPeu- 
gcvvernmental agency respcmsible geot SA, the French automaker. 

fort rad e and investment, jomiven- „ *. n , 

BUSS mi fmaace in Chiiu and k Hones’ll Em^SA. Brn^ek. 
a j ?car ^ has appointed Albert C. Kibbler 

vice president of marketing. He 


Mr. Wuttke also previouslv was J' ^ rauc,:i “ nc 

managing direclor of Dfesdncr fomKrl -V vna pro, dan. and 
Bank AG and .as Knicr pannnr of ^ "“"tf 
M M Warburg-Brinckmann. “ff* ■ “ ‘ 


ttinai: Co- .h/Hambo^ " ’IfSSjfSS 


merchant bank. He currently 
makes his homes in Washington 
and London. 

Am&zeniaro- Rotterdam Bank NV 
has named Henk Schulte Nordholt 
manager of its new representative 
office in Beijing, the first to be 
opened in the Chinese capital by a 
Dutch bant. He previously was in 
the Far East department of the 
Netherlands' Ministry of Econom- 
ic Affairs, engaged primarily tq the 
development of trade between the 
Netherlands and China. 

’ Toocfae, Remnant & Co., the 
British fund-management group, 
said Jean- Paul Parayre has been 


Inc., which makes control systems 
and computers. Honeywell Europe 
directs a!! of Honeywell's interna- 
tional controls acuvities in Europe, 
Africa and the Middle East. 

Rohm & Haas Co. has named 
Basil Vaisiliou a regional director 


cessor as business director for plas- 
tics in Europe. 

James Cape! St Co. the Loudon- 
based stock brokerage, has named 
Peter Quinnen to succeed Keith 
Heathcote as chairman and chief 
executive, effective Jan. 1. Mr. 
Heathcote will remain as deputy 
chairman until his retirement Dec. 
31. 1986. Since 1982. Mr. Quinnen 
has been director, responsible for 
U.K. institutional equity business. 

Woolfrorth Holdings PLC, the 
British retailing group, has ap- 
pointed Sir Kenneth Durham, 
chairman of Unilever PLC. to its 
board as a nonexecutive director. 
Sir Kenneth will become Wool- 
worth's nonexecutive deputy chair- 
man following the retirement later 
this month as executive deputy 


for Europe, based in London. He chairman of Peter Firmston-WTl- 
takes over those duties from Allan l^ms. Following his retirement. 


Lev an tin. who has been transferred 
to the Philadelphia head office of 
the maker of specialty chemicals. 
Mr. Vassiliou is succeeded as 


Mr. Finnsion- Williams will contin- 
ue on Wool worth's board. 

Saab-Scania AB. the diversified 
Swedish maker of motor vehicles. 


Rohm & Haas's business director has named Milton Mobarg and 
for industrial chemicals in Europe Siellan Ekiof as vice presidents, 
by Brian Yeats. The company has Both are in Saab-Scania's aircraft 
□ot vet named Mr. Yassiliou's sue- division. 


^ «r £ c 

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s 


THE EUROMARKETS 


^ Variety of New Issues Emerge; Secondary Trading is Moderate 


Company 7 Results The Problems of Going Home 


Revenue ana profits or Josser in millions, arc In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


iii ft e-.*: By Christopher Pizzey 

Jt Si i»' r • ’ -Reuters 

& BlPk LONDON — The Eurobond 
i« f ^ h. '.'market was do minate d Tuesday by 
*t 5 ;• activity in the primary sector that 
ft saw a variety of new issues emerg- 

> § ;■ i°g during the day, dealers said, 
lofc w 1 J»r-v Trading in the secondary market 
if ^ ^1; was only moderate with dollar 
J? straights and lloating-raie notes 

tending to show only slight changes 

,B IB ii Util' fmm Mnn/nu 


ers viewed as being a fittie tight by Ei\ Huuno & Co. (Londonl 


- - — — ^ jKsJ from Monday. over the mean ot xl» six-month 

‘ The day started with two further London interbank bid and offered 

ii 17 •w TT* perpetual floating-rate notes that rates. “That g>a to prove how tight 

— — z ~~ ~~ — rank as primary capital under Bank margins have since become on per- 

of F - ng jand gu i d eli n es. National petuals/’ one dealer commented. 

— CC Westminsier Bank PLC launched a The Bank of Ireland launched a 

l 'A fi Snd»wJrt.r S500 ‘ r ? iIIion note paying W point SlOO-mOlkm perpetual paying % 
. n i i ” 41115 over the three-month London in- point over the three-month London 

E2SEB=c ^a^^^ terbank bid rate, which some deal-' Interbank offered rate. It was led 


The issue was lead-managed by Ltd. and was quoted at 99.17 bid 
National Westminster’s merchant on the when-issued market corn- 
bank subsidiary. County . Bank pared with the total fees of 100 
Ltd-, and coded on the when-issued basis points, 
market bid at 99.75 against the 25- Also riming the morning, Qti- 
basis-point total fees. corp launched a $100-tmffion bond 

Traders noted that the bank’s that has a novd feature. The cou- 
last perpetual — a two-tranche ar~ poo wfll be adjusted every two 
rangement totaling $1 billion years at a spread of 65 basis points 
launched last May — paid 14 point over the th*n- pr»-v*iHng anrmalrwi 


raies. “That goes la prove how tight is percent and it was priced at 


margins have since become on per- 
petuals.” one dealer commented. 
The Bank of Ireland launched a 


\ Hutton & Co. (Loodonl Two European -currency-uni i 
kT was quoted at 99.17 bid bonds were launched, the larger be- 
: when-issued market com- mg a 75-mfllion-ECU issue lor Pe- 
with the total fees of 100 trooorp Overseas Finance, guaran- 
oints. teed by the Petrolenm Corp. of 

i during the morumg, Qti- New Zealand. The eight-year bond 
nnched a $100-tmffion bond pays 9 percent ami was priced at 
is a novd feature. The cou- 99te. 

31 be adjusted every two The issue was l ead-managed 
t a spread of 65 basis points by Credit Suisse first Boston Lid., 
r. then-pTTvwitmg anwnaKwt winch quoted it within the total 
yield of two-year U.S. Treasury se- fees at a discount of 1%. 
curi ties. The issue's initial coupon Mott Hennessy SA issued a 50- 
lerceni and it was priced at million-ECU bond paying 9 per- 
. , . cent over 5% years arid priced at 

H»iew»tead managed by 100H. The lead manager was Chase 


Brilala 

Salostwry (J.) 
tn m>h ms in« 

Rwmm 1^30. l*ac. 

Praia* M*r_ IU Ti l 
Par Short— CJM* SJTK* 


lalteri Sutes 
Ammrnn Rubber 


itM Eflienon Electric 
£4*3. *m Qaar. 1»85 IVM 

IM Revenue 1.1*0. 1,120. 

Nd Inc. ^-21 

Per Snore 1.22 12 

Tear 1«5 19M 

Revenue 4A50. 4J*0. 

Nei Inc ^>IC« 

er Per snare SX3 SJX 


(CtHrtinned from Page 11) Geneva, the European headquar- 
old English-speaking son has found lers of ^ V& computer company, 
it a bit difficult to learn Dutch. Even *if the adjustment is easj. 

Usuallv, according to returnees, most people spend a few months 
friends and relatives don't extend feehng disoriented. 


10054. 

The issue was toad numpg i-ri by 


Profir :iti :at<» 

Par Stare OJO 071 

Kedwriaads 

Akzo 

3rd Ooor. IfU Iff* 

Revenue— 4 JSC. 

prams me inr 

PerStare *JU <JC 

9NU»tM ms UK 

Revenue lisot i£=C 

Prom *S1J J7£l 

Per Stare ifcSi >4X? 


Mrs 

4tb Qaar. 

1985 

19M 

Gelca 


Revenue 

199J 

!MJ> 

sraouar. 

1915 

19M 

1914 

Nei Inc. 

ID 

59* 

Revenue 

3104 

2518 

ST8 

Per Snare 

US 

Del 

Oner Net 

1744 

2525 

TS4.9 

948 r 

1985 

1984 

Oper Stare- 

0.95 

U0 

cut 

Rawenue ___ 

7A7J 

665* 

9 Maelln 

1985 

ItM 


sei inc. 

stze 

2SJ9 

Revenue 

887 jJ 

729J 


Per Snare— 

1J2 

241 

Oper Net 

547 

710 


IflSf auaner mrWto ocOn ot 

Oper Stare— 

2M 

378 


as much support to execu lives com- 
ing home os they do at the original 


“For the first two months I fell 
strange. One problem is that ! 


move overseas: They don't realize didn't know anv of the new media 


S-®- Warburg & Co. On the wheu- Manhattan Ltd. and the issue fin- 
tssued market h was quoted just i$hed at a discount of 7 /k, comfort- 
outside the 214 percent fees at a aHv within the 1% percent filing 
discooni of 2*6. concession. 


pungpbM 

Bcnouet 

M Ooor. IW 

Revenue 7WL5 

Prolin la 129-4 


,-jr owners one ot SM million «3 

“ u CemeX 1Z7 1 m, hum In P mourns from 

*T tU CMT ins 19M reotited IflvnMMnl seun. 

JSf Revenue' rrs .1 riV ITT 

•Xh Or** not — 1247 11.17 ]nd Ouar. 1W5 me 

Oomr Saara_ 04* BJ* Revenue 4.TO0 UM. 

IB Half 1H5 MM £*' Inc. 77J IIS4 

Revenue 72*.! *127 PerStare — £lS0 0J1 

Oner Net — 2&H 7IJ) f Moattu IMS ItM 

Oner Snare— 1JB 107 Revenue 

MU nets rrchttc pains at f I J Net Inc. 

lfM m ::ian n avaner ona oi Sl» PerStare — 

IC7 ermum innxf-voar tram tits- )CS4 Quarter r, 

IS can r mure opera t ions ottU? miluo 


haw difficult the return can be. personalities." says Mr. Donker. 

“We went back expecting our Dual-career families face addi- 
fnends to be only temporarily in- tional obstacles. If the nonexecu- 
terested in our experience overseas, tive spouse was working abroad. 
The possibility of re-entry stress the experience may be worth coih- 
has b«n softened by the fact they ing back home. If the nonexecutive 
have been genuinely interested in spouse did not have a job abroad, 
our experience abroad,” says Dick rc-cmering the job marten at home 
Wilson, administration manager is that much more difficult. Expens 


for U5. field operations at H tw- 
in* lett-Packard Co. Mr. Wilson 


on expatriate stress believe that the 
strain has led ro a higher divorce 


KITS* — moved back to California three rate among expatriate couples re 


Per Stare 2sa 141 

MUamrTarnctlnchxtesoain 
at SS* ? million. 


months ago after having spent four 
years at Hewlett-Packard SA in 


turning home. But there are no fig- 
ures available. 


5‘*K1"8S5 c*» 

-Uf'.-Qufl 

iff' 


'*Cw LOOS is 


- r ^tu a*, 
■wiraufl 

-WflHj*, ^ 


lU casday ^s 


Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 
3 pan. New York Nine. 
Via The Associated Press 


RMsnOt 
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MS 4K> 
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28 
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124 
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33 

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105 

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13ft 13ft 13ft 
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31ft 31 31 

32ft 31ft 32 
10ft IDVi 10U 

34ft 34ft 34ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 
28ft WA 28ft 
9ft 9 9ft 

’g 

37ft 
22ft 
10ft 


Sft 4ft 4ft— ft 
4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 

ft 
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41ft 25ft JackUa IM 

34ft 14ft JBSWSSW 48 

■ft 4ft Jefluarf 24 

znk 14ft Jertco .It 3 30 

7ft 3ft Janlcnl r 42 
Ml* VJb Juno* 41 

28Vb 13ft Jusm 40 24 IS 


Net 

■aft Low 3 PM OjM 

tft Sft Sft — '* 
37ft 34 w 34 Vb— ft 
22 21ft 22 + ft 

5ft Sft Sft — ft 
22ft 27ft 22ft 
Sft Aft 4ft 
M 18ft 19 
lift ISft 15ft 


QNbmto 
HtoHLow Stock 

19ft 12V, OatlcC 
48ft 221b OpIicR 
I* 1 * 17ft Ortone 
1ft 5ft OrtUT 
■ 4ft OrtoCP 
20 131b Osfmn 

34ft 24ft OftrTP 
15 VA OvrEm 
left 1 OmiMi 
4ft ft Ovoeo 


Sam in Net 

Ph, Vbt lflfc Hli LB1» 3 PJIL pint 

ISO 13 12ft 139k— ft 

384 33V> 31ft 32 + ft 

70 14 14 14 — ft 

74 4ft 4ft 4ft— lb 

39S 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

20 IS 43 13'* 13ft ISft— ft 

276 SJ 71 33 Eft lift * ft 

1 10ft lffi 10ft + t 

78 in 54 14ft 14ft 14ft + ft 

472 ft fi ib 


12 Montn 
mail low stoa 


Sotein Her 

DO. YB. lom huh low IPMCftoe 


34ft 13ft 
9 4ft 
34ft I3U 
19ft 13ft 
17ft 18ft 
10ft 4ft 
41ft 39ft 
47ft 29ft 
Sft 4ft 
li eft 
8ft 2ft 
21 Vb 13 
ISft 4ft 
14ft 10ft 
39ft 8ft 


KLAs 

KVPhr 

KomonS 

Konair 
Kader 39 
K avdon 
Kemp TJ0 
KyCnli 1J0 
Kevn 
KevTm 
Klmbrk 
Kinder M 
ICrov M 
Krunar Jt 
Kuidce .121 


19ft 19 
8ft aft 
25ft 24 
14ft 16ft 
12 lift 
9ft 9ft 
94ft 54ft 
43ft 41ft 
4ft 4Ui 

aft m 

2ft 2ft 
17ft 17ft 
7ft 7 
14ft 14ft 
11 Wft 


25 -VI 
14ft + ft 
lift 
9ft 

54ft + ft 
43ft +Wb 
4ft 

m + in 

f5=S 

«=S 


M 

LS 

14 

im 

4J 

177 

ua 

10 

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L40 

17 

70 

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14 

14 

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11 

10 

141 

SO 

111 

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4J 

82 

154 

10 

805 

589 

A 

11 

124 

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3J0 

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10 

229 

105 

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95 

124 

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30 

AO 

LflO 

44 

217 

454 

397 


A 

2 A 

104 

94 

A 

lfl 

<71 

555 


lift SI* 
ISft 9ft 
23ft 9ft 
19ft 9}b 
50ft 32ft 
21ft 139* 
!«ft It 
17 lift 
17 141* 

59ft 35U 
32 23ft 
71b 4ft 
15ft 81* 

r a 

3ft Ift 
341* T7U 
47ft 3* 
7ft «ft 
28ft HI* 
3»ft HU 
left 37ft 
4ft 4ft 
49ft 21ft 
35ft 20ft 
33ft ISft 
26ft H 
19ft Sft 


UOBfflk 
LSI COO 

Lnfftft*. _ 
LoZBv 170 
LodFm .16 
Loietw 70 
LomoT 80 
Loncost 48 
LotaCo 97 
Lowins 73 
LoeDw 
Lefaver 

ijnvfsP Jib : 
Lexicon 
LexkTta 
Uefjrt XX 
Ulnv* 74 
UeCam 
UIvTuI 70 : 
UnBrd 

UocTri 220 . 
Llndbra .14 1 
UrCta* 75 
UmoP ITS ! 
Lotus 
Lvncfwi 
Lvotas 


4ft 41* 
im i7ft 
101* 10 
18 17ft 
50ft 50 
21*b 21ft 
U 13Vi 
15ft 15ft 
ltft 14 
S3 51 
24W 2Sft 
51* Sft 
91b 9 
7Vb 71* 
Sft 2Vt 
2 1ft 
21*b 2DVS 
471b 47VS. 

eft tv> 

17Vb 15ft 
35ft 34ft 
341b 34ft 
4 5ft 
43 42 U. 

25-* 24ft 
18ft II 
23ft 22ft 
17ft 14ft 


10 — V* 
18 -f-y* 

50 

21*k 

t4 + ft 
15ft— lb 
14 

Sift 4- ft 

24 + ft 

Sft 

ru— ft 

7ft +4* 
Ift— ft 

lft 

31 9 ft 

47ft *■ ft 
m *• ft 
151* —2ft 
35 — ft 
34 ft 

5ft— ft 
42ft— ft 
J4ft 

181* -e ft 
22ft— ft 
17ft +lft 



73ft 39ft 
4ft 2tm 

« ^ 
I Oft 7ft 
Sft 3 
14 IW 
14ft 4ft 
Sft 2Vb 
If 12ft 

24 L. |Vb 

71* 3V> 

lift Aft 
2SW l«W 


SutofB 1.92 ZJ 189 

Summa 477 

SumfHI .10 1.1 130 

Sunuf loa 

SuoSkv 1 

Suprtox 45 

SvirrfjT 42 

Syntocn 173 

SVfrtTUt 225 

Svseen 8 U u 

SyAtoc 27 

Svstln 200 

Svolnfo 9 

Sv»tml 88 7 92 


72 71'* 71ft e ft 

2ft 2*, 2ft — W 
Ift BH Ift *■ W 
lth 1ft Ift 
iw m ra 
3ft r»b 3ft + •* 
9ft 9W 9ft 
9ft 9 * 9ft + W 
4W 3ft 4 
If 1IW 19 + ft 

9ft 9 ft 9ft — W 
Aft Aft 6ft + ft 
TOVj 10ft 10ft— ft 
2 S'* 25 25ft 


28 

27 

77ft 

+ 

ft 

lift 

IIW 

lift 

+ 

'4 

BW 

Bft 

Kh 



26W 

25 ft 

25ft 

— 

ft 



U 
Oft 
1» 

14ft + Vb 
IM + V* 
Ob+ ft 
44ft— ft 
2Vb + ft 

431b— ft 
■4ft + y* 
8ft — ft 

n 

’A 

lift + ft 

39ft ■* ft 

K- a 

30ft + 8b 






40 

14 

1544 

17* 

16* 

17 + * 


06 

A 

4 

914 

vu. 

VW + W 




123 

14ft 

M* 

16ft + % 




32 

f* 

4ft 

4ft— W 





3 

2ft 





35 



*— * 


M 

S 

28 

1BW 

lift 

18* 


J? 

SA 

247 

31ft 

31* 

31ft + W 


M 

24 

200 

9 

■ft 

Sft— w 


.Ml 


59 

7 

6ft 





33 

2 

2 

2 — ft 




73 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft + W 


1* 

9 

22 

17ft 

1714 

17ft 


OO 

A 

38 

18* 

lift 

18* 




95 





92a If 

15 

33 

31* 

32 + » 




19 

Wb 

10* 

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36 

30U 

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M 

15 

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26* 

24 

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28 

2228 

42* 

42ft 

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6 

SW 

sw 

Stb 




161 

31* 

31 

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m ' 



1H 




Hf 



19 

12ft 

121* 

l Jft 

H- . 

M 

14 

W 

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r 



US 

27* 

27ft 

27ft + ft 

■ 



17 

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13ft 

13ft + VS 

R 



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714 

7ft 

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133 
279 
X U 25 
43 
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180 XI IM 
83 
1155 
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574 




ISIS 6 QMS 
9W Vm Quoar* 

ISft 9 OuokCS J> 3J 
Ml* left Quanrm 
5ft 3W QuestM 
left IU Ou Irate 
16ft 7ft Qualm 2 


Sft 814 m 

7ft 7ft TV. 

lift 11 lift + ft 

2Dft 20 20ft e ft 

4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

16 15ft 15ft 

lift 10ft T1W + ft 


m 


24ft 11 I 
24ft 13ft l 
20ft 5 
9ft 10ft 
13ft 7ft 
29ft 14ft i 
54 23ft i 
36ft lift l 
lift aft i 
28ft 21W I 
11 6 I 

22ft lift I 
14ft Aft I 
13W 9ft I 
S% 2ft . 
32 21ft I 
4ft Ift I 
6 2W I 
33ft lift I 
5V* 3ft I 
22W I4W \ 
S7Vi 2Sft I 
25ft 17ft I 
25 14ft I 
48ft 37ft I 
22 14ft I 
20W 9ft I 
13 Aft I 
Aft 3ft I 


24W 24 
IS 14ft 
BVj Oft 
13W 12VS 
12ft IM* 
77ft 26ft 
S3ft S3 

%% 

17V» 17 
7ft 6W 
12 IS 
4V, 4W 
MW 2^b 

2BV3 27ft 
tVt 4ft 
SOW 20W 
36ft 36W 
22ft 23 
24W 24J* 
45ft 45W 

iaw iiw 

12W T2W 
1DW 10, 

S ift 


24W -4- Vb 
IS — V* 

aw 

IJW — ft 
17ft — V* 
24ft 

53 — ft 
25ft— W 
9ft f- ft 
25ft ■+■ W 
4ft— ft 
17 — ft 
Aft— ft 
12 + W 

4W 
27W 

4 + ft 
3 - W 

28'* 

ift 

HP*— W 
JAlb — ft 

22ft + ft 
24ft— ft 
45ft— W 
1lW + ft 

12ft— ft 
10ft— ft 

5 


4*i VLI 
7ft VLSI 
Sft VMX 
7ft VSE 
t Volta La 
8ft VafFSL 
2Aft ValNH 
19ft ValLn 
lift Van Dus 
43* Vafuoll 
2V* Ventrex 
13ft Vicorp 
Aft VleaeFr 
9w Vikma 
13ft Vlrawc 
Sft Voaavl 
141* Voltinf 


241 

2139 

227 

■14e 17 5 

7132 
ISO 

170 37 68 

M Z0 49 
40 2.1 296 
12 
4M 

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728 11 18 

10 

14 

85 

102 


Sft 5ft— ft 
lift lift — ft 
ift ift 
9W 9W 
A'* AW f ft 
1AW ISW— ft 
35ft 1SW 
20 20ft + ft 
191b 19W + ft 
ift 4ft— W 
44* 4ft — ft 
17ft II'* * ft 
Aft 7V* 

12ft 12ft— ft 
19ft 20 
Aft 7 — ft 

ll'b 19 + ft 


42h 4Vb 4ft + W 
7Vj 7V, 7ft 
Sft 
2ft 


M. 





I* 10ft 7ft 
Vi 35* 16ft 

1% mu. m 
v* n » 

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32 38 

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33Vb 17 

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? 23V> WV 
33Vb 20ft 
re* 3 
38* II* 
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Sokrtion to Previous Puzzle 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, »8S 


iiaaaiiiifiiialw 


PEANUTS 




HIHHIIHIBIII! 


i'll hold you up. anp 

WHEN HALLEY'S COMET 
COMES BY. YOU BARK... 


SORRY, IT WAS JUST 
THE AWN RS=LECTING 
OFF AW SUPPER. W5H.. 


aaa aaaa aaaaaa 


BLONDIE 



foreign land 

By Jonathan Rohan. 3S2pages. $16.95. 
Viking Inc., 40 West 23d Street, New York , 

n. y. 10010 . 

By Michiko Kflkutani 




G EORGE GREY, the hero of Jonathan 
Raban’s new novel, has spent the better 
iff. u nvnuflW From CltV 


VOU'UL. I I'LL. BE THE 
LOVE < \ JUDGE OF= rl 
THIS > ( THAT 


A SAT TBgV - 
OP&9KTED ' 
FE ATHER . 
DUSTS? r 


aaaaaaa aaaaaaa 


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howasout IP 1 1 

BATT ERIES ARE 
INCUJOB? ? r--' 


rooms io auurnci. - 

way to Kve was to assu m e that your marching 
orders would arrive tomorrow, and, havmg 
lived so many years “a lodger in etbaj*°P‘*j J 
bouses," he nas “packed up the lodgers habit 


rsvY^ 

osfl*' 111 i 1 


WMiata, uc mo f**-"*’* -jr 

of panti n g through without leaving tracks. 
He’dbeen bom in a rectory that belonged to 


Solution to previous puzzle on page 17 


ACROSS 

1 Morsel often 
■Steamed 
5 Vacation spots 
10 Particle for a 
physicist 
14 Molten mass 
15City in Fla- 


18 Ready to eat 
17 Tried too hard, 
in a way 

20 Sheeting 

21 Quartet 
favorite 

22 Single 

23 Norse poetry 

24 Sphere 

27 Coal carrier 

28 Heavy coat 
34 Greeting for 

Dolly 
36 Midday 

38 Shield border 

39 In an irritating 
manner 

42 J. Arthur of 
films 

43 City in 
Normandy 

44 Remainder, in 
Rouen 

45 Ingratiate 
47 Cape in 

Portugal 

49 Cut 

50 Spaces 

52 A Gabor sister 


54 Mold again 

58 Italian 
Savoring 

62 Lacking in 
basic needs 

64 T winkler 

65 North Pole 
workers 

66 Pleasant cloud 

67 Fake, with 

••up- 

68 Patriot Silas 

69 “On Your 

1936 

Broadway 

musical 

DOWN 

1 Hoof sound 

2 Wash 

3 State 
absolutely 

4 O'Neill’s** 

Millions” 

5 Calaboose 

6 Pinnacle 

7 Traveler’s 
reference 

8 Argue, as a 
case 

9 Desert sight 

10 Soviet sea 

11 Flowering tree 
of the South 

12 What Watson 
won in 1982 

13 Ancient Asian 

18 Swiss division 


19 Ball balancer 

23 Silent-screen 
stars 

24 Chicago 
airport 

25 Cornwall’s 
wife 

26 Without flavor 
28 Pier for Pei 

30 Achy 

31 Useless items 

32 Kind of type 

33 Freshen up 
35 Similar 
37 Words of 

dismay 

40 Discarded 

41 Kind of pit 
46 Gelling 

substance 
48 Shade of red 
51 Madam Mesta 

53 Eminence 
grise 

54 Hie 

55 Within: Comb, 
form 

56 Loc. of Pierre 

57 A partner of 
now 

58 Calcar 

59 Exchange 
premium 

60 Hawaiian 
symbol 

01 Parabases 
63 Shrubby plant 


neo EJCdl DUEM *» • 

the Church and gone on to Navy quartmand 
Company apartments; and he left each buiet 
exacuyas br?d found it.” If such a restless life 
has freed him from responsibilities, however, 
George has also begun to realize that it has 
made him a stranger to his family and mends 

he has become one oT those unannounced, 

nervous-making guests who drop by .m the 

. . ... ,L. ii u'irmn g 


boarding ^ 

pled 

couldn't express Ins weans*- ^ W ;<J. .» 

This nutshell “S^hopmS w 
inadequate. and we rod ^e-auefl. 
the deeper reasons ilWW forth* 

Thoomvelations, JjSSmLacd " Go^ 

coming- By the ^ passes thro«#» 

is still a stranger, n - ^ \hroush his 

the pages erf ihts book, ashepasses 

life — without lea ving track s. 

A#icAiAx> ^ ' Z7= ^ ‘ 

York Tunes. j 





bestsellers 


BEETLE BAILEY 



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ALL RIGHT. BRAtTY-- 
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psychiatric y 

HOSPITAL— BUT ) 
YOU1L HAVE TOa 
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nigm ana incn arc guuc 11161 

African nation where he has Sved for the last 
few years, and return home to Fngi a nn . 

George's travels give Raban lots of opportu- 
nities to exercise his skills as a travel wnter. In 
tfab nowL he coigmes up ppst-colanalAm« 
with a few bright, Wangh4ike strokes of color 
— -George liked Bom Porto’s easygoing, fes- 
tive Marrist-Lminism," he writes. “The fur- 
ther you went into the WofoL Negro mtenorof 
Montedar. the more the politics of the conn try 
last their good humor." And yet the Taragn 
land” of the book’s tide refers less to this 
fictional Third World than to England — 
which strikes Gtra^ af ter bis 

oo^w 1 ^ lineaments erf^^green, pleasant 
land of his youth in the sh abfo, b Hgjhted coun- 
try that greets him cm his return. 

In witty, acerbic prose, George’s dour nn- 
pressioiis of England lend this novo a perspec- 
tive not unlike that of “The Kingdom by the 
Sea,” Paul Theroux's recent book, which also 
treated Britain as a hostile, alien land. 

The grubby boroughs of South Londonenat 
comparisons with Africa; “It kicked like a 
lawless country. The blocks of workers flats 
were dirtier, more sprawled and raggedy, than 
those of Accra and Dar es Salaam; there was 
mote trash blowing in the streets th an there 
was in Lagos." Ana the local tefevisma shows 
with tb*ir gossipy inside jokes strike him as the 
products of a distant, inscrutable culture. After 
the warm, soothing waters of Africa, fee north- 
on seas around England fed “Thin, Ughi- 
starved," and the English gardens strike him as 
frowzy and browbeaten. 

When it comes to conjuring up a supporting 
cast of characters in “Foreign Land, Raban, 
sketches then in swiftly, creating forceful line 
drawings in a sentence or two. We meet the 
president of Bom Porto, “a genial pacific sod 
who’d race asked George if he knew the work 
of Banddaire-Rimbaod, a singular poet whom 
George had decided to leave poBtriy i ntact” 

Sfrrila, the loving daughter tamed feminist 
wit; Vera, the blast mistress who poses no 
threat because die is seeing Mother man, are 
drawn with humor and affection. 

I But Raban’s gift for characterization does 
not extend to George himsdf, and there is a 
jagged hole at the center of this bode. The 


t ic 2J300 ****•<*?’ 


FICTION 


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1Z THE IMMIGRANTS DAUGHTER. W 
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NONFKTION 

WE. bv PriKiSs Beautoi 


1 ELVIS AND ME. by Piteifti VcmOxu 

1 gg^gf?S^3SrrjfaSS 


p XwI tiftf , .... — ‘ '" * T “7 v"T 

3 YEAGER: An Autobiopapltf. by Owe*- ^ 

* > 

s 1 NEVER FLAYED TH E GAME , by 
Howard CcseB wi * Venae Boovcntrc ' 

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10 A PASSK»r FOR EXCELLENCE, by 

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14 LAST WISH. by Betty T* 

13 FERRARO: My Swry. by OaAbae A. ^ 

Fenaro — — — — ■ ; — — -• 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MB C BiANEOUS 

1 FTTFOR UFE. by Hwvey Dianwad and ( 

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' UK* i— M , — *!" 

5 WEBSTERTS NINTH NEW C O LI - F -- 

GIATE DICTIONARY 5 


BRIDGE 


f 


By Alan Trusoott 


O N die diagramed deal, 
North-Sooth could not 
mnsiifer three no-trump with 
dubs wide open, so they were 
forced to choose between a 4-3 
fit in one of the mayor suits and 
game in diamonds. 

Kve diamonds would have 
been a sensible contract, and 
would have snocecded. The de- 
clarer would be able to avoid a 

heart loser by end-playing 

WesL barring an opening heart 
lead from East. 

That unlikely event would 
make no difference, for the de- 
clarer would play d iamond 
winners followed by spade 
winners, discarding the tingle- 
ton dub from the North hand. 

In practice, South landed in 
four spades and had a. tricky 


|HK 


control problem. He won the 
second trick with the heart ace 
after East had wan the coating 
dab lead and shifted to hearts. 

The declarer seized the op- 
portunity to show that he b a 
«1all fa l card player. His aim 
was to discard his heart jack 
eventually on dnmnr/slast di- 
amond, but that was easier 
said than done. 


drew trumps. As pfan m ai, the 
heart loaer was aacmbd Oft 
dummy’s last diamond for » 
toedof 10 tricks. ' * 

NORTH" ' ' 


VI 74* 

+ AKSBZ 
*7 


cards He, but South found an 
unusual safely day' that was 
sure to succeed against any 
Hkcly break. He led a diamond 
to dummy’s ace and thoc^it it 
over. Then he kid a low <Ea-- 
mood, the key move. 

West won and returned a 
diamond for his partner to 
ruff. But South was in full cen- 
tred. He won the heart .return : 
with the king, ruffed a dnb and 


WEST 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


SPORTS 


Soviet Men in Gymnastics Lead 


L niied Press fntenuavnul 
MONTREAL — Despite the ab- 
°f *** P crforraer. the Sovi- 

et. Union dominated the men's 
ocnnpulsories Mondav on the 
Opening day of the world gymnas- 
tics championships. 

Led by consistently near-perfect 
scores by' Vladimir Arwmov. Yuri 
Korolev and Valeo dn Mogilnvi, 
Russians racked up 293.15 out 
of]a posable 300 points. The squad 
tvas missing its star. Dmitri BQcczer- 
chey. who broke a leg in a car 
accident near Moscow on Oct. 17. 

-East Germany was second over- 
all with 290.70 points, followed bv 
Japan (290215), China (2S9.45), 
''■Vest Germany (283.50). Hungary 
(283.05). Cuba (282.60) and the 
United States (281.85). 

The top individual performer 
was Artemov with 59.10 out or a 
possible 60 points, followed by 
East German Sylvio Knoll (59.05). 
Korolev' was thud (58.65) and Mo- 
gflnyi fourth (58J5). 

. Two Japanese were next, Kqji 
Sotomura with 58.40 and Olympic 
gold medalist Kqji Gushiken with 


5S.35. China's Olympic bronze 
medalist. Li Ning. tied For seventh 
with 58.30. 

The U.S. team attributed its dis- 
appointing showing to jitters and a 
baa break. The Americans were 
forced to compete with only five 
men in three events after Daniel 
Hayden suffered a sprained ankle 
on the high bar. Hayden will be out 
for the duration of the weeklong 
competition. 

“There was a lot of tension out 
there.’’ said U.S. team member Tim 
Daggett, who finished tied for 15th. 
"When you have an injury like that, 
it's so difficult. In a sport like gym- 
nastics. you need every man out 
there.” 

Daggett was inconsistent but 
still was the best on the U.S. squad 
with a score of 57.70. He had indi- 
vidual event scores ranging from 
9_55 on the pommel horse and rings 
to 9.75 on the floor exercises. 

The U.S. squad, which lost four 
members to retirement after the 
1984 Olympics, felt the pressure of 
defending the team gold it won at 


Los Angeles. “Everybody is out to 
beat the U.S. now.” Daggett said. 
“Without Hayden in there, we can 

have no mi stakes. It's a lot of pres- 
sure to put on young guys. Unfor- 
tunately. we didn't deal that well 
with it in some circumstances." 

Scott Johnson, who along with 
Daggett competed in the Los Ange- 
les Games, said the U.S. squad was 
shaky. “I don't think our confi- 
dence was as high as it could have 
been." be said. "1 have to keep a 
positive attitude because one of our 
team members is out We have to 
pull together as a team. The show is 
not over yet." 

Teams are allowed to enter six 
competitors, with the top five 
scores counting toward team totals. 
U.S. coach Abie Grossfeld said the 
men’s optional team exercises on 
Wednesday will be “tough, real 
tough" with only five men. 

There are 363 athletes from 38 
countries competing in the champi- 
onships. which are held every two 
years. The women were to start 
Tuesday in the team compulsories. 


Herzog Is Top National League Pilot 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Whitey Herzog, 
Who managed Sl Louis to the Na- 
>r tional League pennant in what was 
expected to be a rebuilding year, 
was named the National League's 
manager of the y ear by the Baseball 
Writers Association of .America on 
Monday, beating Cincinnati's Pete 
Rose by one point. 

Herzog received 11 first-place 
votes and 86 points in balloting by 
the panel composed of two writers 
from each of the 12 league cities. 

Rose, who took the Reds io a 
second-place finish in the Western 
Division as a player-manager, had 
S5 points and 10 firs t-plaafb allots. 

Tom Lasorda of the Los Angeles 
Dodgers finished third with 39 
points, including three first-place 
voles. Davey Johnson of the New 
York Meis had four points and 
Buck Rodgers of the Montreal Ex- 
pos had two. 

~lt really is a great honor be- 
cause there was lots of competition 
this year." said Herzog. 

. “Fellows like Pete and Tommy 
and others did great work. When- 
ever you get an honor like this, it 
takes a lot of people to do the job." 

• The Cardinals were jolted by the 

2 TD Passes Help Cards 
Rally to Down Cowboys 

„ it m 

The Associated Press 

ST. LOUTS — Neil Lomax con- 
nected on a 46-yard touchdown 
pass to Pal Tilley" early in the sec- 
ond half and added a clinching toss 
to XT. Smith with four minutes to 
play as the Cardinals ended a four- 
game losing streak by beating the 
Dallas Cowboys. 21-10. in a Na- 
tional Football League game here 
Monday night. 

Dallas bunt a 10-0 halftime lead 
on Danny White’s 8-yard TD pass 
to Drew Hill and Rafael Sep lien's 
19-yard field goaL The Cardinals' 
Earl Ferrell scored on an 8-yard 
run with late in the third quarter. 


off-season free- agent departure to 
Atlanta of bullpen ace Bruce Sut- 
ter. who had 45 saves in 1984. But 
Herzog designed a bullpen by com- 
mittee. and six Cardinals relievers 
combined for 44 saves. 

He gave the left field job to rook- 
ie Vince Coleman, whose 1 10 sto- 
len bases as leadoff man served as 
the catalyst Tor the Car dinal attack. 
Herzog and General Manager Dal 
MaxvUl also engineered a trade for 
slugger Jack Clark, who hit 22 
home runs. 

When Clark was injured in Au- 
gust, a casual coffee shop conversa- 
tion with Cincinnati pitching coach 
Jim Kaal led Herzog to acquire 
Cesar Cedeno. who was an impor- 
tant contributor in the pennant 
race. 

The Cardinals won 101 games 
during the regular season, captur- 
ing the Eastern Division title by 


three games over the Mets. Sl 
L ouis dropped the first two games 
of the playoffs to the Dodgers be- 
fore winning four straight games 
and the pennanL 

In the World Series, the Cardi- 
nals were two outs away from the 
world championship in Game 6. 
but succumbed to a Kansas City 
comeback, losing that game and 
the title. 

Rose staged a season-long pur- 
suit of Ty Cobb's all-time record of 
4.192 hits, passing him in Septem- 
ber. 

At the time, he still bad the Reds; 
who hod been picked to finish near 
the bottom of the division, in con- 
tention for the Western title. 

He was rewarded with a three- 
year contract that will pay him Sl 
million a year, making him base- 
ball's highest paid manager. 



Rudderless Brazil: Don 9 t Panic Yet 


Pete 

‘ Fame doesn't w in a World Cup.’ 


Internaiioiud Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Dear Pete: 

Nice io bear from you again. But 
can it be that you. the embodiment 
of Brazilian triumph of player in- 
stinct over coaching destructive- 
ness. have joined the panic about 
your homeland's being without a 
soccer manager seven mouths be- 
fore the World Cup? 

You probably feel cut adrift in 
New York, where the sham of pro 
soccer has died and film acting eats 
up your days. Yet your past mas- 
tery' on the field remains so vivid, 
so important, that from Singapore 
to Stockholm to Soweto we receive 
your message in banner headlines. 

“Fame," you say, “doesn’t win 
matches, much less a World Cup." 
Without seeing you face to face, it's 
difficult to tell what your real cry of 
the heart is. Could it be that of an 
old player whose ambition of ap- 
plying sporting fame toward a po- 
litical career are thwarted? And, 
instead, you find yourself in Ameri- 
ca, being used in the film role of 
Pedro, a smalltime crook. 

You comment that Brazil's lack 
of soccer preparation reflects the 
confused situation of the country. 
In sport it does that, and more. 

Whereas in your heyday soccer 
was truly the opiate of the masses, 
the second religion after Catholi- 
cism, its soul is now being de- 
stroyed. 

Those of us who followed the 
Brazilian beat to the ends of the 
earth, and cling to hope of doing so 


again, do not want to betieve your 
despondency. 

Yet powerful evidence of decline 
exists. It was there in the national 
team that this summer qualified for 
the finals in Mexico, but could do 
no better than 1-1 home draws 
against both Paraguay and Bolivia. 

The Rio state championship, 
once played to 180,000, this year 

Rob Hughes 

occupied a smaller stadium while 
Jehovah's Witnesses filled the fam- 
ous Maracana. 

Tbe once mighty Botafogo loses 
its playing ground to a mining com- 
pany — and crowds of a mere 3,000 
fans are trickling in to watch your 
beloved Santos, 

Of course, it would never be 
quite the same once they had seen a 
thousand goals from Pde. 

But Zico. once hailed as the 
white Pde, spoke for milli ons when 
be said (before going under the 
anesthesia for his latest operation). 
“We must return to the days when 
the ball was the target and not the 
opponent's legs." 

Violence, it's true, has become 
the excusq for falling standards on 
and off the field. And not only in 
Brazil; I recall you, Fete, having to 
live with viciousness, not least in 
England in the 1966 World Cup. 

Yes, they brutalized yon. Yes, 
you learned to get your retaliation 
in first, the occasional elbow dent- 


ing a hatchet man's nose. But no. c ft °™“ i . iffvl ' 

- enough, member no» « ;r 


the thugs were not smart 
not quick enough, not licensed 
enough to intimidate, to inhibit the 
joys expressed so spontaneously by 
you. by Gerson. Tostao. Clo- 
doaldo. Jaimnho, Riveiino and 
Carlos .Alberto four years Utter. 

But who walked out on whom in 
Brazil? We believe, you and I. that 
the flight to richer European pas- 
tures of Zico, Fakao. Socrates. Ju- 
nior and Cerezo denuded fans back 
home of empathy with their idols. 

Not only stars. There are 28 Bra- 
zilians performing in Portugal an 
exodus prompting the 1983 team 
manager. Carlos Alberta Parra ra. 
to warn: “We can say goodbye to 
the 1986 World Cup already — 
cow the youngsters are going io 
Europe, wo." 

Farrdra had a point, although he 
and other leading Brazilian coaches 
are quick enough w climb aboard 
the Arabian bandwagon. 

Home is where the purse is for all 
save the spectators. Continuity, 
and the style of preparation to 
which you became accustomed, is 
old hat Time itself appears to 
move faster than a decade ago, 
when your sports federation could 
corral the top 20 stars into three 
months of concentration. 

We arc getting old, Pde, you and 
L We grow nostalgic for what can 
no longer be. 

When last in Rio, particularly on 
the beaches and among the shan- 
ties. I saw barefooted stills no coa- 




two years 

Union 

vouihs bear -i- ‘•'T'CSj' 
the world youth B 

In Moscow. Pa-- 1 b. -> ■ 

— -Silas" — :iv* tw £-• 
as player of ir.s 
runnerup. also : x 1 
responsibility of | — 1 

Gerson. .... 

to China a w j,f, r ;“:V';> t v«ra 
chunky uiw , . Ai 

passed the bail » v- J -L£-’ 
named piayer o: l '"“' 

!6 tournament. 

So Brazilian ’.* • 

blessed with the kir.es c: **•* 
raised vou from oScuntv t 
True, waiting for those ki*-* 
idle as resting on pi-5 
wonder if your fears are — ■ 
cus tomary' neurosis « p'o- 
post- World Cup Brazil. 

The cup will be connate* m if. • 
nnlv Latin Americans 


Riding High, Piggott Starts Farewell Tour 



feimvUmtad Pm h— r M cnal 

Whitey Herzog, pondering a move during the 1985 playoffs. 


By Ira Berkow 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The lad was 
steeped in jockeyship. as the British 
call it. He was brought up around 
British race tracks by his father, no 
surprise since the father was a fam- 
ous jockey, as was his father before 
him. In fact, the family traces its 
riding back seven generations. 

The boy was 12 when he rode in 
. his first professional race, in 1948. 
That year he won his first race, at 
Haydock Park in Lancashire. 

A pale, shy lad. he was tall for a 
rider — he would grow to be 5- 
foot-8 { 1.72 meters). He rode with 
stirrups high and back lowered; his 
knees seemed to abut his jaw. 
Astride his mourn, he resembled 
noL so much Eddie Arcaro or Sir 
Gordon Richards — Britain's most 
famous jockey — but Ichabod 
Crane. Yet it was obvious early that 
Lester Piggott had a special talent. 
Not only was be adept with the 
reins, but he had that certain 
toughness inherent in many out- 
standing athletes. 

In fact some considered him sur- 
ly. They spoke to him and it seemed 
as if be hadn't heard what they 
said. Often it turned out he hadn't. 
Piggott was deaf in one ear. 

And when he spoke, he did so 
quietly, almost reluctantly, and 
you'd have to lend a dose ear. You 
still do. 

Piggott took the hearing impair- 
ment as a positive stroke. "You got 
on with things," he would say later, 
“and did than your own way, and 
you didn't rely on praise or blame 


because half the time you never 
heard iL" 

In Britain, where one can hardly 
pass a bellhop or chambermaid or 
housewife who doesn't have at least 
a few quid on a nag with their local 
turf accountant. Piggott became an 
idol of huge proportion. And he did 
it not because he spent hours on 
“chat shows" or was effusive with 
the gentlemen of Fleet StreeL He 
did tt by winning. 

In 30 years, he has booted home 
4,349 winners in Britain, second 
only to Richards. Abroad, be has 
won more than a thousand races. 
And he has won 28 Classics in 
Britain — the equivalent the most 
prestigious U.S. races — more than 
any other rider. 

He will win no others there. Pig- 
gott, who will turn 50 years old on 
Saturday, has just retired from 
British racing and will begin a ca- 
reer of training racehorses. But he 
still has a few rides to go before be 
rests. Last Saturday be rode in the 
mile-and-a-half Breeders’ Cup Turf 
at Aqueduct; his mount, 30-1 shot 
Theatrical, finished 11th. about 
eight lengths behind the w inner. 
Pebbles. Next he travels to a hand- 
ful of stops in France, Singapore. 
Hong Kong and Malaysia for fare- 
well appearances. 

Next March. PiggoM's autho- 
rized biography will be published. 
The author is the British mystery 
writer and former jockey, Dick 
Francis. What has made Piggou so 
good for so long? “He thinks like a 
horse," said Frauds. “I mean, 
when a horse wants to go through a 
gap, Lester knows what the horse is 


dunking , and also what the horse is 
capable of. It's like they're carrying 
on a discussion through the reins. " 

What many admire most about 
Piggott is the way he has “wasted" 
himself — that is, reduced. He has 
had to diet rigidly throughout his 
38-year career to maintain a weight 



Lester Piggott- 
\ .. He thinks like a horse.’ 


of around 115 pounds (52.1 kilo- 
grams). He might normally be 
about 150 pounds. 

In the jockeys' room before the 
race he rode here Friday. Piggou, 
gray-haired and slim, eyed a spread 
of cold cuts, Bui he turned away, 
and discussed what he would be 
looking forward to when be retired. 

“Eating." he said, “of course. 
I've had to be careful day after day. 
] love sweets and all that you 
shouldn't eat Especially ice cream. 
V anilla ice cream. Yes, quite.” 

He said he would miss the excite- 
ment of riding. “Every race is fan,” 
he said. “But I think as a trainer, 

especially for the big races, you can 
feel a similar kind of excitement" 
Shortly, in bis blue racing silks, 
he strode out and to the paddock. 
There, in the late afternoon sun, he 
climbed aboard a 4-year-old bay 
filly named Capricorn Belle, an 18- 
1 shot for a mile race on the grass, 
Capricorn Belle broke last among, 
the 11 starters, and was no better 
than nin th in the backstretch and at 
the halfway pole, and eighth at the 
three-quarters pole. 

Now Piggott found a place for 
Capricorn Belle on the rail and 
moved to the seventh position, to 
sixth, fifth, fourth. As they pound- 
ed down the stretch, Piggou could 
go no farther. He was blocked by 
traffic as Tax Dodge crossed the 
finish line first 

In long shadows Piggott, rising, 
pulled up on his mount He didn't 
win the race, but be gave a noble 
effort It was a sweet moment to 
remember him by. 


ritory where only Lat: 

have" triumph ed. \our • 

Argentina and Uruguay, mav ■ uv 
now have managers, but me> nave 
absolutely no plaver> to call on 
Thev are scaiirreti. chatirc nciws 
in seven mainly European coun- 
tries. . 

When the last Uruguayan- mid- 
fielder Jorge Barrios, left r«J«n a 
Greek club, he murmured, j-uck 
at last I thought i was going lo be 
the last one to turn off the hunts 
when the others had left." 

Who else frightens you 1 

France and Denmark travel bad- 
ly. Hungary’s confidence might, 
like England's running game, mdt 
in the midday sun. Italv recently 
lost a home friendlv to Norway. 

West Germany? Franz Becken- 
bauer now says his youngsters arc 
“clearly unable to cope" and that 
some seniors aren't reliable, either, 
perhaps he suspects none shares his 
touch. let alone yours. 

But choosing a Brazilian manag- 
er might be less urgent than finding 
a medicine man to nurse Zico. Soc- 
rates and Falcao through injury, 
and then bless those 33-year-olds 
with the elixir of youth to last 
through June. 

The manager might be Tde San- 
tana or Mario Zagalo. Brazilian 
Sports Federation politics will de- 
cide. 

Santana, the purest waits in Sau- 
di Arabia, to return only if Giuhte 
Cowinho remains president of the 
federation. Zagalo. the worker, 
would emerge under Jose Ermirio 
de Moraes, whom FIFA President 
Jo5o Havclange is backing to oust 
Coutmho. 

Zagak> would, as you well know, 
complete a circle. In March 1970. 
he inherited, with three months to 
go, the team prepared by Jo5o Sal- 
Han ha No time to constrain your 
xnan^kwsaxrtadelfacn.orfotfc- 
mand defensive methods he and his 
followers have once inflicted on 
Brazil 

In your own finest hour, Form* 
gtnnho (Bale ant), as Zagalo was 
dubbed, thus begin the coofimon 
about how Brazilians should play. 
He never advocated violence, but 
by disturbing the faith in spontane- 
ity he began the betrayal of the 
freedom you so memorably ex- 
ploited 15 yens agp. 

Perhaps the later the manager is 
named the better? 


? ;- 
t 

V 


i i t 


: i 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Hockey 


Transition 


Final Regular-Season fjuumriign Football League Leaders 


National Hockey League Leaders 



SCORING 

TO C FG 5 Pts 


PUNTING 

NO Yds A VO. 

L 

Phoson, MH 

Fields. Ham 

22 

23 

586 264 
535 2U 

Ken nerd. Wpg 

0 

47 

<3 

22 198 

Clark. OH 

140 6573 47.0 

78 

Townsend. Tor 

23 

467 20J 

Possoglla, BLC 

0 

*° 

37 

25 IBS 

□Ivon, Edm 

134 60*6 45J 

76 

Catvrbone. On 

21 

436 204 

Rinrtt. Ham 

0 

33 

32 

25 154 

Ruoff. Ham 

138 5886 45J 

77 

Fields. Sask 

15 

423 282 

Bison. Edm 

0 

49 

25 

14 138 

Cameron, Woo 

117 5256 44.9 

95 

Hill. MH 

17 

397 2 M 

Dorsey. OH 

0 

24 

28 

12 120 

Passoglia. B.C 

140 6287 *4.9 

76 

Edwards. Oft 

16 

305 19.1 

Hay, Cal 

0 

21 

27 

18 128 

Iteslc, Tor 

164 7181 43J 

83 

Hopkins. Cal 

IS 

294 194 

Kurts, MH 
Rhtgvmy, Sosk 
Ellis. Sask 

8 

0 

17 

26 

25 

8 

23 

0 

4 1T4 

U 109 

0 102 

McTaauc. Mil 141 5896 414 

Hav. Cal 163 6682 414 

PI) NT RETURNS 

65 

77 

Playoff Schedul 

e 



BOvd, Wpg 

15 8 

0 

0 90 


NO Yds AvgTD 

Fernandez. B.C 

15 0 

0 

0 90 

Clash. B.C 

111 1148 104 0 


RUSHING 



Zeno. Sask 

72 

699 97 

2 


NO Yds Avg TD 

Steele, wpg 

63 

615 94 

1 

toaves. Woo 

267 1323 

54 9 

CarhKl. Tor 

62 

518 84 

0 

'Jraklns. B.C 

193 

964 

54 8 

Skipper, MH 

34 

507 14.9 

1 

VAbart, Ham 

118 

928 

7.9 6 

Bennett, Ham 

44 

487 11.1 

1 

Duntocn. Edm 

113 

737 

65 9 

Hall. Col 

54 

442 04 

0 

wans, oh 

107 

710 

67 1 

Woods. Edm 

36 

366 104 

a 

Ellis. Sask 

149 

569 

34 M 

Nolle s. Wpg 

42 

350 84 

0 

Brawn. OH 

110 

544 

54 4 

Crawford. Ham 

48 

333 6.9 

1 


Jones. Earn 
Conan. Edm 
Wilson. Mil 


Dcwatt. B.C. 
Clements. Wpw 
B orne*. Mil 
Paoeao. Sask 

□unloan, Edm 

Wom. OH 
Hobart. Ham 
CIIL Mil 
Holloway. Tor 
Jordon, Sask 


82 522 64 
« Ml O 
1)0 435 Sja 


AH Com Yds 1C TO 
476 301 4237 12 27 
425 2S7 36«7 17 18 
453 265 3432 23 13 
447 270 3420 20 « 
405 242 3410 22 19 
43* 236 297S 25 12 
437 211 2522 14 l« 
352 212 22S5 IS 7 
210 139 1735 4 7 
194 I1B 1610 0 4 


KICKOFF RETURNS 

No Yds AvaTD 
Jenkins. B.C 15 720 20/ 0 

Zone, Sask 30 MS 31.5 a 


NFL Standings 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Edit 


RECEIVING 


Fernandez, B.C. 
Boyd, Woo 
Greer. Tor 
Poclawskl. Woo 
El Board Sask 
Tolbert, Cel 
Sanduskv. B.C. 
Kelly. Edm 
Ellis, Sask. 
F*6rms, Sask 


No Yds AvoTD 
95 1727 I8L2 15 
76 1372 181 14 

78 1323 1721 9 
75 1271 14.9 6 

79 1193 181 4 
67 1124 168 0 
SB 1073 185 7 
59 1034 1 75 6 
IB 977 94 3 
51 011 159 3 


Tennis Leaders 


MEN 

Eondnos 

. I. Ivon Lendl. 5075AS1. 8 John McEnroe. 
58222137. 3, Mats Wllofider. SS58797. 4. Jimmy 
Cannon. 54622136. 8 Barks Becker, SSSOJii 6. 
Anders jarryd, SWUM. 7. Slefan Edbera. 
5307.935. 8 Tim MavoH*. I293J89. 9. V annlefc 
Noah. S291JB1. I CL Tomas Smld. S289.S82. 
Tour Points 

- I.lvan bendl.32109.2. John McEnroe, 3403.1 
Alois vWtonder, 2308 4. Jimmy Cannon. 2.178 
S. Baris Becker. Z023. 8 Yarmlek Noah. 1.82s. 7. 
Melon Edbera. ld61.8A/iders Jerryd.1 J289, 
Tim Mavolte 1204. Milaslav Medr. 1411. 
WOMEN 
Earn toot 

• I. Marllna Navratilova. 5I.152JI79. 2. Owls 
Even Lloyd 006.949. X Mona MandWkcva. 
5534.997. 4. Helena Sukova. 536X287. 8 
.» Uirlver, 5362401 t, Claudia Kohde-Kllsch, 
V. saujm. 7. Zina Garrison, 053 -84 5 8 KaHiv 

Jordan. S183440.V. KOttiv RlnaldL1178417. 10. 
SleHl Grot. SI6&3I2. 

Toar Potols 

I, Chris Evert Uova 2308 Z Martina Na»rt>- 
lllova. 1850. X Pam Shrlvor. 1428 A Claudio 
KoMo- Kitsch. 1348 8 ZMn Garrison. I3» 8 
Manuela Maleeva, 1138 7. Sietfl Oral. 10888 

Mono ManWIlwva. im9. Neten Sukova.1000. 

10, Gabrida Safcaflni, 978 



W L 

T Pet. PF 

PA 

N.Y. Jets 

7 2 

0 

.771 208 

135 

New England 

6 1 

a 

467 173 

156 

Miami 

5 4 

0 

456 220 

194 

Indianapolis 

3 6 

0 

433 172 

204 

Buffalo 

1 8 
Central 

0 

.111 121 

216 

Cleveland 

4 5 

0 

444 150 

132 

Cincinnati 

4 5 

a 

.444 260 

278 

Pittsburgh 

4 5 

0 

444 183 

153 

Houston 

4 5 
West 

0 

444 162 

IBS 

Denver 

6 3 

a 

467 219 

181 

LA. Raiders 

6 3 

0 

467 196 

187 

Seattle 

5 4 

0 

456 221 

203 

San Diego 

4 S 

0 

444 228 

231 

Kansas CHv 

3 6 

0 

433 171 

204 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

Ea*t 


Dallas 

6 3 

0 

467 207 

146 

N.Y. Giants 

6 J 

0 

467 203 

151 

Wash bio ton 

5 4 

a 

456 158 

168 

Philadelphia 

4 5 

0 

444 136 

145 

St. Louis 

4 5 

Central 

0 

444 186 

216. 

Chicago 

9 0 

0 

1400 255 

124 

Minnesota 

S 4 

0 

456 183 

188 

Detroit 

5 4 

p 

556 170 

196 

Green Bay 

3 4 

0 

433 164 

216 

Tamoa Bav 

0 9 

West 

0 

400 184 

272 

LA. Roms 

8 1 

0 

48* 1*1 

127 

San Franetsco 

5 4 

0 

456 228 

167 

New Orleans 

3 6 

0 

413 173 

235 

Atlanta 

1 B 

a 

■111 171 

284 

Monday's Result 

SI. Louis 21, Dallas 10 



DIVISION SEMIFINALS 
NO*. 18 
East 

Ottawa at Montreal 

west 

Edmonton at Winnipeg 

OIVI5ION CHAMPIONSHIPS 
No*. 17 
East 

Ottawa or Montreal at Hamilton 

west 

Edmonton or Winnipeg at British Columbia 
GREY CUP 
Nov. 34 

Division ch am pions, at Montreal 


College Top 20s 

The too 20 in The Associated Press coDese 
football pall WreHHcce »at« In parenthe s e s , 
season records, total points based on 20-19-18 
etc, and tost week's rankttm): 

Record Pts Pvs 


NHL leaden Ibroeati mms of no*. 3: 
OFFENSE 
Scarlet 

G A Pts 

Gretzky. Edm I W 21 

Simmer. Bos 13 7 20 

PTOPP, Phi 10 10 20 

Llnseman. Bos 2 18 20 

Lemleue. Pit 9 10 19 

Hawerchuk. Win 7 12 19 

Anderson. Edm 11 7 18 

Baschman. Win 9 9 IB 

Naslund Mon 10 7 17 

Fraser. CM 0 9 17 

Gartner, Was 10 6 16 

MacLeaa Win 10 6 16 

Power-Play Goals 

Gp Poo 

Kerr. Phi 11 6 

Naslund. Mon 11 6 

Anderson. E*n It S 

Goulet. Quo 7 5 

Mac Leon, win 12 5 

Nilsson, Min It 5 

Skrika Von 12 5 

GOALTENDING 

(Empty-net goats la parvntttesos) 


MOW 

FuflT 

Edmonton 
R login 
Jensen 

Washington (2) 

Billing! cm 

Rescb 
Chevrler 
New Jenev (23 
Hrudev 
Smith 

NY islanders 
□'Amour 
Lamella 
Canary (1) 
Wamsley 
Mlllen 
May 

51. Louts (II 
Meiodw 
Romano 

Pittsburgh (3) 

Beauare 
Melon son 






Minnesota (1) 

678 

48 

8 

4JP 





Bouchard 

344 

11 

0 

Z7U 





Hayward 

459 

37 

0 

484 

313 

18 

a 

345 

Behrund 

26 

5 

0 

11SI 

347 

21 

8 

343 






668 

39 

0 

155 

Winnipeg 

725 

S3 

■ 

4J6 

249 

14 

0 

137 

Sauve 

191 

8 

0 

251 

482 

28 

0 

149 

Bonner man 

414 

34 

0 

4.93 

731 

44 

8 

341 

Skorodenskl 

60 

6 

0 

6J» 

68 

2 

0 

2D0 

Chicago D) 

665 

49 

8 

442 

747 

15 

0 

3.73 

weeks 

242 

17 

0 

421 

370 

23 

0 

173 

Lhit 

420 

34 

D 

486 

472 

42 

0 

175 

Hartford 

662 

51 

• 

442 

336 

19 

0 

3J9 

Edward# 

300 

23 

8 

440 

2K) 

19 

0 

176. 

h Bernhardt 

361 

29 

0 

482 

686 

38 

• 

176 

Toronto 

661 

52 

B 

472 

136 

7 

0 

349 

Soelaert 

120 

9 

0 

450 

524 

34 

a 

189 

Rov 

286 

23 

a 

483 

460 

42 

8 

182 

Penney 

254 

23 

0 

543 

120 

4 

0 

100 

Mo Ureal 

668 

55 

0 

540 

345 

26 

0 

AZ7 

Janecvk 

376 

31 

0 

49S 

124 

9 

8 

435 

Eliot 

405 

35 

0 

5.19 

689 

41 

• 

184 

Los Anodes aj 

781 

68 

8 

5JQ 

3ta 

23 

0 

343 

Stefan 

245 

15 

a 

347 

310 

21 

D 

4JB6 

Pusay 

40 

3 

0 

450 

678 

46 

• 

4.12 

Mlcotof 

325 

36 

0 

645 

425 

28 

8 

195 

Mia 

120 

14 

0 

7J» 

245 

19 

Q 

445 

Detroit 

730 

68 

t 

549 


BASEBALL 


CHICAGO— Stoned a one y ear working 
agree m ent wtth (tie Peninsula (Vlcglnlo) Pi- 
lots at Rio Carolina League. 

NEW YORK— Named Sammy El ns. pitch- 
ing coodL 

TEXAS A cquired Pete tncavtoUa. out- 
fielder. from the Montreal Expos for Jim An- 
derson, infleMer. and Bab 5fbra, pitcher. 

Noflgaaf League 

ATLANTA— Named Bobby Dews minor- 
league administrator. 

MONTREA L- Rene wed the contract of 
Buck Rodgers, mana ger, through the 1987 sco- 
son. 

PITTSBUR GH . R e n ewed It* working 
agreement wHn rhe Hawaii Wanders of the 
Pacific Coast League lor one year plus an 
oatlon year. 

ST. LOUiS-Wmied Rube Walker special 
assi gnm ent Seoul. 

BASKETBALL 
Nattomd Basketball League 

LEAGUE— Ruled that New York's fnm- 


agent offer sheet to Albert King of the New 
Jersey Nab to togaLaad Rial the Nets nave 
until Friday to match It. 

PHOENIX— Waived Devin DurrarL guard - 
forward, and Michael Holton, guard. Activat- 
ed Rod Faster, guard and Georgi Gtoudwv. 
forward 

SEATTLE— Stoned RodHtogbM.PUard4or- 
ward waived Brian Martin, forward 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 

N.Y. RANGERS— Recalled Ran Scan, gaol- 
to, from New Haven of the American Hockey 


European Soccer 


CUP WINNERS' CUP 
(Seosed Round, Second Leg) 
Golatasoror L Bayer Uerdtogen 1 (Bayer 
Uerdlngm advances on aggregate. 3-11. 


t. Florida (42) 
l Penn State (151 
2. Nebraska 
A Ohio State 11) 

8 Air Force 
8 lowa 

7. Oklahoma (it 
8 Miami (Fla.) 

9. Michigan 
18 Oklahoma state 
11. Baylor 
18 Arkansas 
IX Auburn 

14. UCLA 

15. LSU 

18 Florida Slate 
17. Georgia 
18 Brtohom Young 
19. Tennessee 
28 Alabama 


7- 0-1 

8 - 0-0 
7-141 
7-1-0 

7-1-0 

5- 14) 
7-1-0 

6 - 1-1 
e-14) 
7-14) 
7-14) 
e-2-o 

6- 1-1 

5- 14) 
6-24) 

6 - 1-1 

7- 24? 
4-1-2 

6-24) 


1,159 

1,113 

1-OZ7 

958 


834 1 

m 9 
BIS II 
685 4 

600 12 
597 13 
55* 14 
462 * 

452 15 
359 16 
2439s ID 
228 18 
193 17 
158 19 
94 



MP 

GA 

SO 

Avg 

Keans 

360 

16 

0 

247 

Peelers 

305 

14 

a 

175 

Boston 

665 

18 

• 

171 

Punoa 

60 

a 

1 

0J» 

Barrassa 

665 

35 

1 

116 

Buffalo 

725 

35 

2 

1M 

Froese 

240 

11 

0 

175 

Lindbergh 

420 

21 

1 

100 

Ptiiladeipehi 

660 

32 

1 

Itl 

Gosselin 

MS 

21 

1 

240 

Sevlgnv 

760 

IS 

0 

175 

Quebec 

725 

M 

) 

258 

Vanblasbrouc* 

414 

19 

1 

275 

Kleisinaer 

191 

14 

0 

440 

NY Rangers 

685 

31 

1 

127 

Caprice 

85 

4 

0 

182 

Brodeur 

665 

37 

1 

144 

Vancouver 

738 

41 

1 

127 


Basketball 


National Basketball Association Leaders 


NBA leaders ttiroagh games of I 
TEAM OFFENSE 


NHL Standings 


HO*. 18 

A Mania ot Philadelphia 

Cleveland at Cincinnati 

Detroit ot Chicago 
Green Bav at Minnesota 
Houston at Qurfoto 
Indianapolis *rt New England 
LA. Rams at N.Y. Giants 
Pittsburgh at Kansas City 
St. Louis at Tarim Bav 
Seattle at New Orleans 
LA. Holders at San Diego 
N.Y. Jets ol Miami 
Dallas at Washington 

N09. II 

San Francisco at Denver 


The UPl board of coaches tap 20 ratings 
(HnHHacc votes cmd records in parentheses: 
total points, based on IS lor firs! place, 1« tor 
second, etc, and last week's rankings!: 

1. Penn Stats 134) (80) 600 2 

8 Nebraska (5) (7-1) 570 3 

1 Otlto State 111 17-1) 505 7 

4. Air Force I2i (9-01 4*8 6 

8 Oklahoma (5-1) 415 B 

8 lowa (7-1) 392 1 

7. Miami (Fla.) (7-11 374 12 

8 Bav lor (7-11 775 10 

4. Michigan (6-1-1) 266 4 

10 . Arkansas (7-1) 253 11 

11. Oklahoma State (6-1) 238 13 

W. UCLA (6-1-1) 179 14 

13 Louisiana State is-u 126 ig 

14. Auburn (*-2> 123 J 

13 Georgia (6-M) S6 17 

18 Florida State (6-21 51 9 

17. Tennessee 14-1-2) 35 18 

18 Brigham You no 17-2) 34 l« 

19. Texas A&M (6-21 19 19 

2D. Alabama (6-21 It 20 

(Mote: Bv ag r eement with me American 
Football Coaches Association, teams an 
NCAA or conference probation ore Ineligible 
tor tap- 20 and national champlenahlp consid- 
eration by UPl. Currently on probation are 
Florida and Southern Meihedtot.) 


PtiltaaelPhla 
NY Rangers 
Washington 
NY islanders 
New Jersev 
Pittsburgh 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T PIS GF GA 


12 40 

12 44 


53 32 

35 


43 


Adams Division 
8 J 1 
8 3 1 

6 S l 
6 S 0 


12 


Boston 
Quebec 
Buffalo 
Hartford 
Montreal 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 
Sl. LOUIS 4 4 7 

Chicago a 4 1 

Minnesota 3 6 7 

Detroit I I 3 

Toronto 1 10 0 

Smytte DlvliMn 
Edmonton 9 5 0 

Vancouver 642 

Winnipeg 6 S 1 

Calgary t 5 a 

Los Angeles 3 10 0 4 

(MONDAY'S RE5ULT 
M.Y. Ranger* f 1 1—4 

Pittsbergb g 1 1—2 

Povellch (8). Allison 2 (2». Osborn* (4j; 
Blalsdeli U). Bullard IS), stmts on goal: New 
York (on Humoral 6-19-11—26, Pittsburgh 
(an Vanblestaraucki 5-6-8—13 


10 35 41 

9 46 49 

8 47 48 

5 35 68 

7 33 52 

IB SS 39 

14 50 41 

13 54 S3 

17 52 43 

47 68 



G 

PI. 

Avg 

LA. Lakers 

4 

518 

1294 

Detroit 

6 

737 

1228 

Indiana 

4 

490 

1224 

Milwaukee 

6 

714 

1194) 

Portia na 

5 

595 

119.0 

Denver 

4 

474 

1184 

Phoenls 

4 

467 

11641 

LA. Clippers 

5 

580 

1164 

Houston 

5 

579 

1154 

New Jersey 

6 

678 

1110 

sacra memo 

4 

451 

1124 

Philadelphia 

5 

563 

1124 

Chicago 

5 

560 

1124 

San Antonio 

5 

554 

1184 

□alias 

4 

442 

1104 

Uloh 

5 

551 

1104 

Golden Slate 

5 

536 

1074 

Cleveland 

5 

529 

1054 

Boston 

5 

528 

1054 

Atlanta 

5 

503 

1004 

Seattle 

4 

385 

96J 

Washington 

4 

377 

94J 

New York 

5 

471 

944 

TEAM DEFENSE 



G 

N& 

Avg 

Washington 

4 

383 

954 

Boston 

5 

497 

994 

Seattle 

4 

402 

1004 

Denver 

4 

417 

1044 

New York 

5 

525 

1054 

Atlanta 

5 

526 

1054 

Cleveland 

5 

545 

1094 

Portland 

5 

M5 

1094 

LA Clippers 

5 

553 

1104 

Philadelphia 

5 

553 

1104 

San Antonia 

5 

553 

1104 

Milwaukee 

6 

666 

1114 

Houston 

5 

557 

1114 

LA. Lavers 

4 

454 

1134 

Golden Stale 

5 

S70 

1144 

Dallas 

4 

457 

1144 

Utah 

5 

574 

1144 

Chicago 

s 

576 

1154 

Sacramento 

4 

466 

1164 

Detroit 

6 

709 

1184 

New Jersey 

6 

728 

1214 

Indiana 

4 

491 

1224 

“hoenix 

4 

535 

1334 


English, Den. 

Dan (lev. Utah 
Woolridee, CHI. 
Wilkins, ail 
A guirre, Doll 
Kellogg. IML 
Smith. Loc 
Mo lone, Phil. 
Floyd. G-S. 
Somoson, Heu. 
Vondeweghe, Prt. 
Fleming, Ind. 
Moncrtof. MIL 
Scott. LAL 
Free, CJev. 
Johnson, Sac. 
Thomas. Def. 
Abdul-Jabbr, LAL 
Chambers, Sea 
Ewing, N.Y. 


INDIVIDUAL 

Scoring 

G FG FT Pts A VO 
4 47 36 130 325 


5 52 

5 51 

5 56 

4 41 

4 41 

51 


48 152 304 
43 145 29 JJ 
28 148 280 
27 KM 780 
17 180 280 
23 125 25JI 


S 

S 43 38 124 2U 

5 45 23 122 94A 

5 48 24 (21 382 

5 38 42 116 XU 

4 33 25 91 228 

6 49 33 134 223 

4 36 17 B9 22J 

5 39 31 111 2 U 

4 37 14 88 22J> 

6 44 42 132 220 

4 36 13 85 21 J 

4 31 22 83 21 J 

5 40 26 106 21.2 


FleW Goal Percentage 

FG FGA PCI 
Thorne, Sac. 31 44 JOS 

Green, LAL 16 24 JUH 

Johnson. SA. 22 33 Ml 

T h oma s on, sac. 31 33 jot 


Jones, nwe. 
Sander* Phoe. 

Fleming, ind. 
Banks, Chi. 
Sean. LAL 
Hodges. Ml. 


Williams. N_l. 
Scnmnsoa Hou. 
Laimbeer. Del. 
O toluwon. Heu. 

Malone. PNl 
Carroll, GS. 


Johnson, LAL 
Thomas, Dot. 
Cower. LAL 
Stockton. Uton 
Edwards, Loc 
Lucas, Hou. 


15 H 68 

25 40 .635 

B B 673 
22 36 All 

36 59 410 

24 43 405 

Rebeondhig 

G OH Def Tot Avg 
6 27 63 » 144 

1 23 51 74 144 

6 24 56 80 1M 

5 25 40 65 134 

5 28 34 63 124 

5 10 49 59 114 

Assists 

G No. Avg. 
2 25 124 

< 67 )1Z 

« 43 104 

5 47 94 

5 46 9.2 

5 43 BA 











-k-l-Ti’ "; n ^ £ '• . , V-’t 


fe- 






<1X3 




( 










Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Key Money Questions 


By Russell Baker 

VT EW YORK -• Government is 
about money. It has always 
about money. The great ques- 
°ons are. and always have been: 

1. How is the money to be raised? 

2. How is the money to be spent? 

3. Who is to decide how the mon- 
ey win be raised and spent? 

Of these, the fust two questions 
are the meat and potatoes of the 
day’s news. The way they are an- 
swered determines who gets taxed 
to the hilt, who gets off easy, who 
goes scot-free and who gets the 
Son's share of the gravy. Few peo- 
ple are much iniercsledin the third 
question, although it is the one 
whose answer determines the itmH 
of political system that governs us. 

It is the fundamental issue, for it 
determines whether there will be 
dictatorship or democracy. If pow- 
er to decide how to raise and spend 
money is given to the executive arm 
of government, as it is given to the 
Communist Party in the Soviet 
Union, dictatorship results. 

The nature of dictatorship is to 
tax people for the money needed to 
perpetuate the dictatorship. In 
modem times this means vast ex- 


penditures for police, military and 
other security forces required not 
only to protect the dictatorship 
from assault, but also to crush any 
proposal to give the nation's taxed 
population a voice in deciding how 
money will be raised and spenL 
□ 


If Americans seldom think about 
this ultimate question, it is proba- 
bly because h has been satisfactori- 
ly answered in the United States 
for so long that it no longer seem 
to be a question. Here the decisions 
about how much money to raise, 
what taxes to levy, how to distrib- 
ute the tax burden and how to 
spend the money are powers of 
Congress. 

News reporting that speaks of 
"the president’s budget," “the pres- 
ident’s tax plan" and so forth, may 
create an impression that this ulti- 
mate power lies with the president; 
it does not 

The question of who has power 
to set taxes and direct the spending 
was settled for us too long ago — in 
England more than 100 years be- 
fore anyone on this continent even 
dreamed of forging colonies into a 


republic. 

There 


seriously challenging the king's 
money powers soon after the death 
of Queen Elizabeth I, while the first 
American colonies were being 
planted. The resistance of the Stu- 
art kings, James I and his son 
Charles L, led to the English revolu- 
tion. military defeat for the king's 
army, the beheading of King 
Charles I and 11 years of parlia- 
mentary rule that effectively settled 
for all time, at least in the English- 
speaking world, the right erf the 
people’s elected representatives to 
have tbe final say about taxing and 
spending. 

When the Englishmen who creat- 
ed the United States drew up (heir 
system for governing, they adopted 
the measures won generations ear- 
lier by their forefathers. The presi- 
dent could only propose: Congress 
had the power to dispose. But then. 
of course, they gave the president 
the power to veto if the disposing 
displeased him. 

It is possible, given its druthers, 
that the present Congress would 
exercise its taxing powers to reduce 
the immense deficit created by tax 
cuts and spending increases it au- 
thorized at President Reagan's re- 
quest- If it did, though, the presi- 
dent has said he would veto it. in a 
reckless moment of campaign de- 
bate with Walter Mondale last 
year, he swore off any possibility of 
raising taxes, and so both Congress 
and president are stuck with their 
immense deficit. 

Now there is a scheme to end it 
Congress will pass an act surren- 
dering all of its most precious 
rights. Abandoning its power to 
decide taxing and spending policy, 
it will order fixed percentage cuts 
in spending over the next five years 
until a budget balance automatical- 
ly occurs in 1991. 

Thus the Congress gives up the 
central power granted to the peo- 
ple’s representatives in a democra- 
cy. Reagan, who doesn’t care much 
about history but hates taxes, is 
ready to go along despite warnings 
that it may email cuts in his big 
rearmament program. 

What a shabby performance, es- 
pecially by our congressional repre- 
sentatives, surrendering tbe power 
that so many died to give them, and 
all because they are afraid that us- 
ing it will hurt their chances of 
being re-elected next year. 


Young Composers: 
In Confrontation? 


Hi- -. •• 


'*’’^2^** " .vtu* 

v A * 


PEOPLE 


f. : 


By Mark Hunter 


P I ARIS — In European musi- 
cal rirdes. this is the fall of the 


Jean- Baptiste Devillers’s “A 
Pic” took us back to tbe 1950s, 


V frfJ ) * '< 


the Parliament first began 


New York Times Service 


JTcal circles, this is the fall of the 
“young composer." Paris’s IR- 
CAM center, with the Festival 
<f Automne, Ensemble Intercon- 
temporain and Ensemble Alier- 
nance as co-producers, is in the 
midst of a series entitled “Eu- 
rope: Young Composers," show- 
casing works by the generation 
bora between 1946 and 1955. 

The Venice Biennale, which 
ended on OcL 1. called its 17th 
International Festival of Con- 
temporary Music “Europe 50/80: 
Generations in Confrontation." 
Behind the titles is a sense of 
promise in contemporary compo- 
sition, and an irony. 

“There’s a new generation or 
composers who have less of a 
problem with their father fig- 
ures." said Nicholas Snowman, 
tbe program director at IRCAM, 
the Centre Pompidou’s institute 
for acoustic and musical research. 
The “fathers” he alluded to are 
the postwar giants of composi- 
tion, Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz 
Stockhausen. Luciano Berio, and 
Iannis Xenakis. 

Snowman, who is also artistic 
adviser to the Biennale, feels that 
the “previous generation” of 
composers, now in their 40s and 
early 50s, “felt shadows over 
them.” “The new generation 
aren't necessarily better compos- 
era," he said, “but there's a great 
diversity of styles; eveiyone's do- 
ing their own thing." 

The irony lies in Snowman’s 
implication that the composers in 
the middle generation were not 
doing their own thing. It is as 
though contemporary composi- 
tion, in Europe at least, held its 
breath for a generation. 

Certainly the program present- 
ed at IRCAM and the Centre 
Culture! Wallonie-Biuxelles on 
Oct. 23-25 was diverse, although 
it could be called uneven. Rug- 
gero Lagana's “Wo" set Roman- 
tic washes of color against grind- 
ing!)' dissonant contrabass lines, 
offset by such once-un orthodox 
but now universal techniques as 
glissandi of violin harmonics, and 
percussive notes played with the 
wood of bows, for an overall ef- 
fect of lyrical motion. 


with a full panoply of Boulezian 
structure, while James Dillon's 


structure, while lames Dillon’s 
“Windows/Canopies” demon- 
strated the extent to which 
sounds once peculiar to comput- 
ers have been fully integrated into 
acoustic instrumental techniques, 
producing veniginal physical ef- 
fects. 

The hits of the series so far, 
perhaps, were Sandro GorlTs “Le 
Due Sorgenti," in which lyric 
string lines and percussive coun- 
terpoint developed into a sophis- 
ticated harmony of microtones 
(notes that lie between the tones 
of the diatonic scale), and “Cdi" 
by Michael Fmnissy, a piece that 
begins in near-hysteria, as two 
soprano voices rage against an 
instrumental ensemble, and sus- 
tains its momentum to a taut con- 
clusion. Another high point was 
the solo flute introduction to 
Thomas H. P. Plate's “Fldten- 
stflcfce," performed by Pierre- 
Yves Artaud, whose overblowing 
techniques gave tbe effect of two 
simultaneous lines to a most com- 
plex melody. 

In lotah these pieces signaled 
the end of a long phase of mere 
experimentation with new sounds 
that began in the mid-1950s. 
“Making new sounds isn't the 
question now," said Pascal Dusa- 
pin. two of whose works “Niobb" 
and “Hop" conclude die series. 
“That’s easy. But putting them 
together is hard." The key ques- 
tion for these composers was 
summed up by Dfilon: “How to 
create a structure where even a 
disappointing performance can't 
deny the energy of the piece." 

The series also made evident 
that if there is a confrontation of 
musical generations, it is in huge 
part a matter erf culture. “For this 
new generation, electronics are as 
natural as swimming." comment- 
ed Snowman. “You can now re- 
create the physics of sound, and 
that’s something this generation 
feels,” in a way previous genera- 
tions could not, he suggested. 

A piece like Thierry Lancino’s 
.“Profondeurs de Champ" is re- 
markable for the smoothness of 
its transitions between natural 
and taped electronic sounds. 



McCartney Raps lennon 


The former Beatk Paul McCwr- tncm ? moru- ofri.p- 

ney said Tuesday that although “ ien ^£jd» vs&nua* *lu! 
John Lennon was “no angd." he li«j JSLSmjA L* * h '.' 


cation of an article in ttte »nusn ~ i -nvited her to ™ 

magazine Woman, in which wfore she ga-tf J 

McCartney was quoted as calling cer em ^ n ^ Snnda^ lindsav Scot*, 
Lemon a “rWeurering swine" t 

who took credit for songs be didn’t s P ea k*°Z fef 


ok credit for songs as awn t «*» nroKem on a 

McCartney sskl be feared "^SShSE****** 


whig* mtViiiuicy osuu * * T » j ..i- 

that the article, based on a tde- c'he uid. “We de- 

phone interview with tbe writer fuse the &>*** . manner. It 

Hunter Davies four years ago. (WuiJ*""? 1 ,,-,,. 




Hunter Davies four years ago. 
could be misinterpreted. In the 
magazine interview, McCartney 
described Lennon as jealous, inse- 
cure with women and suspicious of 
McCartney’s motives. "He could 
be a maneuvering swine, which no 


a choice of dealing 
mous number of people or 
jug the time putting or. J S lT * • 
performance." 

E3 i 


Somov Davis Jr.. 59. sufferrag 

fc.v U Intprruol&j J 


one ever realized," McCartney was p-iin in his {tip- intenrupi*; a 

quoted as saying. “Now since his £35 Vegas engagement to enter Cc- 
death. he’s become Martin Lmher , «Sn»» Medical Center in Los 
Lennon. But that wasn’t him either. Angeles for tests- Tie entertainer 
He wasn’t some son of a holy *35 hospitalized Frida) and 
saint” In his Tuesday statement expected to remain in the hospital 
McCartney said: “T*d like to make for at least a week, Arnold Upsman. 


fabaiCholm* 

11116117 Lancmo: Smooth transitions. 


Moreover, the new generation 
is more open to ideas from out- 
side the Western classical tradi- 
tion. Among tbe composers in 
this series, many, including Lan- 
tino, Platz and Dusapin. began in 
jazz or rock bands. “We have to 
think of our history as including 
not only Western music," said 
Dusapin, “but extra-European 
muse, jazz and variety. Boulez 
and Xenakis" — with whom Du- 
sapin studied — “hate jazz, but 
ary generation listens to it." 

It was plain that Dusapin's 
generation Is not entirely com- 
fortable with its inheritance. 
"We’re not composers," he 
scoffed at a symposium held dur- 
ing the series, “we’re young com- 
posers." And composers who are 
obliged, as Platz noted, “to find a 
rationale for what we're doing. 

“When new music came into 
being," Platz said, “it was so new 
that even the composers lad to 
reflect a lot on what they were 
doing, and take responsibility for 
a critical discourse." This dis- 


course, he said, has now become 
obligatory far all young corapo- 
sers:“Now everyone has to do it." 
One consequence is that “It's eas- 
ier to get funding if you’re seen as 
representing a movement. And in 
every movement there are 10 idi- 
ots and a leader. I’m not part of a 
movement, and yes, it has been 
hard to get funding because of 
that" 

Yet among participants in the 
series there was virtually unani- 
mous agreement that “young 
composers," however obnoxious 
the tide, are better off than the 
preceding generation. That lost 
generation of European compos- 
ers, perhaps, would well deserve 
and welcome a series or two of 
their own in the near Future. 


it dear that John Lennon was no 
angd but t like zmQions of others, 
loved him dearly." The 1981 inter- 
view will appear in an updated ver- 
son of Davies’s book, “Tbe Bea- 
ties," which is to be published in 
December. McCartney was quoted 
as saying that Lennon “took my 
songs apart" during their 10-year 
partnership in the Beaties from 
1960 to 1970. “He was paranoiac 
about my songs. We had great 
screaming sessions about than," 
McCartney said of Lennon, who 


his publicist, said. 

□ 

A Swedish artist is looking for 
some U. S. warplanes and perhaps 
a couple of outdated MiGs for his 
peace exhibition. “1 have heard 
rhaf yon also work for peace on 
Earth and that is why 1 tum to you 
with nay difficult wish," the artist 
Antes, Ffidve? said in letters to 
the U. S. and Soviet embassies in 
Stockholm- A defense official at 
the U.S. Embassy in Stockholm / 


was shot to death outside his New dediaed to comment on the matter.* 
York apartment on Dec. 7, 1980. but (he -Soviets had more 10 say: 


“As I matured and grew up, I got 
up to his level," he was quoted as 
saying. “I wrote songs as be did and 
sometimes they were as good as his. 


“We haw seat the fetter to the 
military museum in Moscow." said 
the cultural attache. Alexander 
Looker- “If we woe to donate a 


We grew to be equals. It rqgde lam plan*; I th“k it *9°^ ** 

insecure." But Lennon was always one From World war u. Hidvegt 


insecure with women and once said -'he had- obt a i n e d a few guns 
warned McCartney “not to make a and a DC-3 plane from various 
nW for his wife Ynko fW sources for the exhibition, which is 


play" for his wife Yoko Ono, sources for the exhibition, wtuen is 
McCartney added. “He got really planned for Stockholm next Sep- 


crazy with jealousy sometimes." tember. “The DC-3 may depict a 
McCartney was quoted as say- peace dove with an dive branch in 
mg that Lennon took credit for the beak,” he said. 


The “ Europe : Young Compar- 
ers series continues Nor. 7-9 at 
the Centre Cuhurel Wallome-Bru- 
xeiles, with Dusapin 's "Hop ’ " and 
“ NiobL " 


Mark Hunter is a journalist who 
writes about cultural affairs. 


songs be did not write. “I saw 
somewhere that he says he helped 
on ‘Eleanor Rigby.' Yeah, about 
half a line.” (See also page 10). 

□ 

There will be no Tina Turner 
Park is East Sl Louis; flfisois, be- 
cause the ringer could not make H 
to the dedication. Mayor Ceri Offi- 
cer was rankled and issued a state- 


Andrts Segovia, 92, and his wife 

attended Pope John Pad 0's pri- 
vate Mass Tuesday and the guitar* 
& played a coopfe of selections for 
tbe pontiff at the Apostolic Palace, 
Vatican officials said. Segovia per- 
formed in Roam: last weds, his first 
appearance there in more than 10 
years. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
l&dy) *04 3m. Romo 


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